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BUREAU OF FISHERIES 


REPORT OF 

THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1910 

AND 

SPECIAL PAPERS 


GEORGE M, BOWERS 

Commissioner 



WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
1911 











CONTENTS. 


Report of the Commissioner of Fisheries for the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1910. Document 734, 40 p. (Issued November 25, 1910.) 

The distribution of fish and fish eggs during the fiscal year 1910. Document 
740, 112 p. (Issued June 1 , 1911.) 

Dredging and hydrographic records of the U. S. Fisheries Steamer Albatross 
during THE Philippine expedition, 1907-1910. Document 741, 98 p. (Issued 
November 29, 1910.) 

Condition and extent of the natural oyster beds of Delaware. By H. F. Moore. 
Document 745, 30 p., 1 chart, (Issued February 10, 1911.) 

The fisheries of Alaska in 1910. By Millard C. Marsh and John N. Cobb. Docu¬ 
ment 746, 72 p. (Issued April 19, 1911.) 

Special investigation of the Alaska fur-seal rookeries, 1910. By Harold Heath. 
Document 748, 22 p. (Issued November 10, 1911.) 

The fur-seal fisheries of Alaska in 1910. By Walter I. Lembkey. Document 
749, 40 p. (Issued November 8, 1911.) 

The salmon fisheries of the Pacific coast. By John N. Cobb. Document 751, 
180 p. (Issued November 25, 1911.) 


iii 





REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1910 


Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 734 


1 




CONTENTS. 


Page. 

General considerations. 5 

Propagation of food fishes. 6 

Extent of work. 6 

Review of operations. 7 

New stations and improvements. 11 

Acclimatization and results of fish culture. 12 

Fish-cultural relations with States and foreign countries. 13 

Biological inquiries and experiments. 15 

Oyster investigations and surveys. 15 

Pearl-mussel investigations. 16 

Experiments in sponge culture. 17 

Study of fish diseases. 17 

Other inquiries and experiments. 18 

Marine biological laboratories. 19 

Alaska salmon service. 19 

Alaska fur-seal service. 21 

The fishery industries. 22 

Statistics and methods of the fisheries. 22 

Shad and alewife fisheries. 27 

Investigation of the mackerel fishery. 28 

Fisheries of Mississippi. 31 

Miscellaneous activities. 33 

Relations with other government bureaus. 33 

International fishery matters .. 33 

Employment of vessels. 34 

Publications and library. 35 

Appropriations. 35 

Recommendations . 36 

Reorganization of personnel.- - - 36 

Salaries and personnel. 36 

Sponge law. 37 

Extension of fish culture. 38 

Laboratory for the study of fish diseases. 39 

Fishery intelligence service. 40 

New building.^- 40 


3 








































REPORT 


OF THE 

COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


Department of Commerce and Labor, v 

Bureau of Fisheries, 

I V ashing ton, August 1910. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the opera¬ 
tions of the Bureau of Fisheries for the fiscal year ended June 30, 

1910. 

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS. 

This Bureau was organized as the United States Fish Commission 
in February, 1871, and on June 30, 1910, therefore, it completed the 
fortieth fiscal year of its existence. Originally clothed solely with 
functions of investigation and inquiry into the reputed or real de¬ 
crease in the food fishes of the coastal and interior waters, it soon 
manifested that it could perform important service in actually increas¬ 
ing the supply of such fishes. In recognition of this fact acts of Con¬ 
gress from time to time have enlarged the functions of the Bureau 
until to-day the purely practical work of increasing and conserving 
aquatic food resources through cultural and experimental operations 
has become the dominant feature of the Bureau’s activities. 

For a long while wholly relieved of executive control of the 
fisheries by reason of the constitutional reservation of that right to 
the States, the Bureau recently has been invested with the adminis¬ 
tration of the important fisheries of Alaska, including the entire 
control of the Pribilof Islands and the fur-bearing animals of the 
Territory at large. 

The steady increase in* the volume and importance of the Bureau’s 
work has been especially rapid in the past ten years, and the fiscal 
year just closed, which witnessed a drastic change in the control of 
the seal herd, has added considerably to the sum of the Bureau’s 
duties. The probable adoption of joint international regulations 
in respect to the fisheries of the waters contiguous to our northern 
boundary presents the possibility of a great enlargement of the 

5 



6 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

Bureau’s executive functions in the near future. Each year brings 
increasing demands from the several States for aid and advice in 
respect to the drafting of laws and regulations, the establishment 
of state fishery services, and the best measures for the conservation 
and development of fishery resources, and the Bureau feels that, its 
influence for good in matters relating to the fisheries is yearly becom¬ 
ing more important. The salient features of the work during the 
fiscal year are exhibited in the following pages. 

PROPAGATION OF FOOD FISHES. 

EXTENT OF WORK. 

It is gratifying to be able to record another successful 3 r ear in fish- 
cultural work. Methods have not varied appreciably from those of 
former years, and attention has been directed principally to enlarg¬ 
ing the output. 

The widespread and increasing interest taken in the Bureau’s 
work by people in all sections of the country and the growing con¬ 
ception of the benefits resulting from the stocking of public and 
private waters are manifested by the large number of applications for 
fish received during the year, the number being 10,635, an increase of 
523 over 1909. 

Work was conducted at 35 permanent stations and 86 field and col¬ 
lecting stations, located in 32 States. With reference to the fishes 
propagated, the regular hatcheries may be classified as follows: 
Marine species, 3; river fishes of the eastern seaboard, 5; fishes of the 
Pacific coast, 5; fishes of the Great Lakes, 7 ; fishes of the interior, 15. 

The results of fish culture depend largely upon climatic conditions, 
the most elaborate and carefully executed plans ending in success or 
failure according to the state of the weather in the spawning season. 
In 1910 these conditions were generally unfavorable, resulting in the 
curtailment of egg collections of most of the important species, but 
owing to the superior quality of the majority of the eggs obtained, 
the Bureau was able to exceed its record year of 1909 by 126,800,000, 
or 4 per cent, the total output of fish and eggs being in excess of 
3,233,000,000. This was accomplished without increased funds, the 
available appropriations being the same as in the preceding two 
years, and was made possible largely through the faithful and effi¬ 
cient service rendered by the Bureau’s employees in their several 
lines of work. 

The following is a table summarizing the distribution of fish and 
fish eggs for the year. Of these, 443,177,000 eggs and 7,425 fish were 
delivered to various state fish commissions, and 600.000 eggs of salmon 
and trout were shipped to foreign countries. 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


7 


Summary of Distribution of Fish and Eggs, Fiscal Year ended June 30,1910. 


Species. 


Catfish . 

Carp . 

Bunalonsh . 

Shad . 

Whitefish . 

Lake herring . 

Silver salmon. 

Chinook salmon. 

Bluebaek salmon. 

Steelhead trout. 

Humpback salmon . 

Rainbow trout. 

Atlantic salmon. 

Landlocked salmon. 

Blackspotted trout. 

Loch Leven trout . 

Lake trout. 

Brook trout . 

Sunapee trout . . 

Grayling. 

Pike. 

Pickerel . 

Crappie and strawberry bass. 

Rock bass. 

Warmouth bass . 

Smallmouth black bass . 

Largemouth black bass . 

Sunfish (brehm) . 

Pike perch . 

Yellow perch . 

Striped bass . 

White bass . 

White perch . 

Yellow bass . 

Sea bass . 

Smelt . 

Mackerel . 

Freshwater drum . 

Cod.. . 

Pollock . 

Haddock . c. 

Flatfish . 

Lobster . 


Eggs. 


Total. 474,295,461 j 2,722,310,215 


2,160,000 
55,42S, 000 
1,440,000 
375,000 
37,531,417 
100,000 
250,000 


536,494 
5,000 
115,000 
2,748,550 


10,210,000 

516,000 


25,000 


321,455,000 

5,200,000 

4,566,000 


16,500,000 


4,500,000 

9,854,666 


780,000 


Fry. 


89,076,000 
195,964,000 
70,300,000 
10,918,025 
16,342,556 
121,136,995 
3,570,287 
1,368,000 
552,716 
1,217,366 
985,040 
1,765,834 


33,649,622 
7,405,545 
171,029 
81,000 


537,600 
56,600 


155,025,000 
326,885,000 
2,7S4,000 


338,480,000 

’”808,666' 


764,090 


210,354,000 
38,140,000 
712,000 
930,755,000 
162,505,000 


Fingeriings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


544,350 

22,710 

201,475 


67,525 
21,719,600 
179,718 


1,771,128 
238,212 
304,364 
884,154 
68,248 
4,286,150 
4,228,461 


18 

43,300 
500 
414,477 
69,985 
792 
113,305 
679,482 
345,635 
4,760 
109,245 


6,050 

'”250' 


9,000 
ii,950 


2,052 


Total. 


544,350 
22,710 
201,475 
92,236,000 
251,392,000 
71,740,000 
11,293,025 
53,941,498 
142,956,595 
3,900,005 
1,368,000 
2,860,338 
1,460,578 
1,404,404 
5,398.538 
68.248 
48,145,772 
12,150,006 
171,029 
106,018 
43,300 
500 
414,477 
69,985 
792 
650,905 
736,0S2 
345,635 
476,484,760 
332,194,245 
7,350,000 
6,050 
354,980,000 
250 

808,000 
4,509,000 
764,000 
11,950 
220,208 000 
38,140,000 
712,000 
930,755,000 
163,287,052 


36,326,896 3,233,332,572 


REVIEW OF OPERATIONS. 

The conspicuous increases in the output of fish and eggs over the 
year 1909 were in bluebaek, silver, and Atlantic salmons, lake trout, 
lake herring, yellow perch, shad, cod, flatfish, and steelhead trout, 
the production of the latter three species exceeding all previous 
records. 

There was a slight decrease from last year in the number of chinook 
salmon liberated from the Pacific coast stations. Notwithstanding 
a normal run in the Sacramento, the season at the California stations 
was the poorest for thirteen years, due partly to such low water that 
the fish were unable to ascend the tributary streams on which the 
hatcheries are located, and, later, to freshets which carried away the 
racks and permitted the impounded fish to escape, with the loss of 
millions of eggs. Two causes are at present militating against the 
increase of salmon in these streams—the increasing numbers of black 
bass, which prey upon the young salmon after planting, and the 

















































































8 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


ascent of the fry by thousands into a recently constructed irrigating 
ditch, where they are left on the land to die. The only remedy that 
can be suggested is to plant the fry in the lower reaches of the rivers 
or establish a large hatchery at tide water, the latter method involv¬ 
ing less expense. Unless some action is taken the number of salmon 
in these rivers will decline rapidly. 

Taken as a whole, the work of the Oregon stations was satisfactory, 
although high water during the spawning of the chinook salmon 
shortened the season and reduced the collections to slightly below 
those of the previous year. 

At the Washington stations, where attention is devoted chiefly to 
the sockeye, humpback, and silver salmons and the steelhead trout, 
the work was augmented by the opening of two new field stations. 
In Alaska, where the sockeye salmon is propagated, the yield of the 
two hatcheries was. highly satisfactory, especially the Afognak sta¬ 
tion, operated for the first time this year. 

The lake-trout, whitefish, and pike-perch work of the Great Lakes 
stations, while not equal to that of some seasons, gave better results 
than had been anticipated in view of the obstacles encountered. Potent 
factors in the shortage at the Michigan stations were the unusually 
early spawning season, followed by unfavorable weather, and the 
necessity of complying with recently enacted state legislation, which 
stipulates that the operations of the Bureau must be supervised by the 
state fish and game warden’s department and that all eggs must be 
taken and fertilized by fishermen licensed by that department, thus 
placing the work in the hands of inexperienced men. Compliance 
with the provisions of this law curtailed the output of Northville and 
its substations fully one-fourth. The law also prohibited pike-perch 
collections on the St. Clair River, one of the Bureau’s most productive 
fields in past years. 

At the Duluth station the weather and other conditions were favor¬ 
able, permitting increased lake-trout work, but whitefish and pike- 
perch operations on Lake Erie were materially interfered with by 
storms, although the poor collections of the latter species were offset 
to a great extent by the superior quality of the eggs secured. 

The lobster output from the three marine stations was about equal 
to that of 1009. The impounded stock at the Boothbay Harbor sta¬ 
tion was stripped in April, and though the lobsters were in vigorous 
health the average yield of eggs was smaller than usual, due, it is 
believed, to their greater activity in the pound during the mild winter 
and the consequent shedding of many eggs. The construction of two 
substantial lobster pounds during the year places this station on a 
greatly improved basis. At the Gloucester and Woods Hole stations, 
which are not equipped with pounds, the lobsters collected during 
the fall are cared for in live cars through the winter. 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


9 


The number of cod fry produced at these stations was nearly 
100,000,000 greater than in 1909, the greatest gain being at the Glouces¬ 
ter station, where more eggs than could be handled were obtained from 
fishing grounds in the vicinity. 

. The collection of flatfish eggs was the largest ever made by the 
Bureau, numbering 1,195,911,000, from which 930,755,000 fry were 
hatched and distributed. At Boothbay Harbor, where this work 
has only recently been undertaken, the output was increased 100 per 
cent over that of the previous year. 

Other marine species propagated included pollock at Gloucester, 
haddock at Boothbay Harbor, and mackerel and sea bass at Woods 
Hole. 

In view of the steady decline in the shad fishery in rivers tributary 
to the Atlantic for the past fifteen years, it is gratifying to be able 
to record an increased egg collection of this species and a correspond¬ 
ing increase in the output of fry. The results are attributable partly 
to recently enacted legislation regulating the methods of fishing in 
the Albemarle Sound and partly to an exceedingly early spring, 
which started the run of fish in the Potopiac River before the pound 
nets could be equipped, each factor permitting a larger number of 
fish than usual to ascend to the spawning grounds. 

On the Susquehanna River, at one time the Bureau’s most produc¬ 
tive field, there was no improvement over recent years, emphasizing 
anew the destructive influences of unregulated fisheries and the neces¬ 
sity for concerted action by the States concerned if any practical 
results are to be obtained in the rehabilitation of this important 
fishery. 

White and yellow perch were again produced in considerable 
numbers at the station on the Susquehanna River, and on the Potomac 
River the output of yellow perch exceeded all previous records, due to 
the enlargement of facilities for propagating the species. 

Owing to the passage of a state law prohibiting the capture of 
striped bass by commercial fishermen during the spawning season, 
the Bureau was unable to secure eggs of this species at its California 
station in 1909, and as this law remains in force no attempt was 
made to conduct operations in 1910. The prospects are good for 
effective work with the striped bass in this field, and its propagation 
will be resumed in the event of a change in the law. 

As in previous years, most of the brook-trout eggs handled at 
the fisheries stations are purchased from dealers, this course having 
proved more economical in most sections of the country than reliance 
upon collections from waters available for the purpose. At present 
only two stations—one in New England and one in Colorado— 
obtain their supplies of eggs from wild fish, and the fields heretofore 


10 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


open to them are narrowing each year because of the encroachments 
of commercial fish culturists. In 1910 Wellington Lake and the 
Grand Mesa Lakes, heretofore the most productive sources of the 
Colorado station for eggs of the blackspotted, brook, and rainbow 
trout, had to be given up to private enterprise. 

The Bureau having been requested to undertake the propagation 
of the blackspotted trout on the Truckee River with the view of re¬ 
plenishing the stock, depleted through excessive fishing, a field station 
was established at Derby Dam, Nevada, in the winter of 1909-10. In 
a normal season several millions of eggs might have been obtained, 
but owing to low water in the river and the destruction of large num¬ 
bers of eggs by market fishermen the collections amounted to only 
1,371,900. These were hatched without unusual losses and the fry 
deposited in the river. It seems advisable to continue operations 
here next season, as it is apparently a promising field for fish-cultural 
work. 

Investigation of the streams in Yellowstone Park demonstrates 
the possibility of greatly extending operations with the black-spotted 
trout, and it is intended to increase the force of experienced men in 
this field with the view of making it a source of supply for the Lead- 
ville, Spearfish, and Bozeman stations. The work in the park during 
the past season was entirely satisfactory. 

Taken as a whole, the output of the basses, sunfish, and catfish 
from stations in various parts of the country was good, the improved 
results being largely due to increased knowledge of the factors 
governing the successful propagation of these species. The produc¬ 
tion of pond stations was supplemented by the collections on the 
Mississippi and Illinois rivers, where, in addition to securing suffi¬ 
cient bass and allied species for restocking many depleted waters, 
large numbers of other fishes were seined from shallow sloughs 
formed by the floods and returned to the main streams. If not re¬ 
moved, the fish would perish from drought or cold, and their rescue 
conserves a valuable local food resource. A new station established 
at Helena, Ark., late in the summer rescued over half a million fish. 

With the view of extending rescue operations over a larger ter¬ 
ritory, temporary collecting stations have been located at Caruthers- 
ville, Mo., and Rosedale, Miss., which will be made permanent auxil¬ 
iary stations if experience proves favorable. It is believed that 
similar inexpensive stations can be advantageously established at 
various points on the Mississippi River from New Orleans to St. 
Paul, as the field for this work is extensive and the number of fish 
that can be economically reclaimed from the drying sloughs and 
lakes is governed only by the amount of money available for the 
purpose. 

Although the propagation and general distribution of carp was dis¬ 
continued many years ago, the Bureau constantly receives applica- 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


11 


tions for this fish, and in instances where the waters described are 
unsuited to other species the requests are complied with by transfer¬ 
ring carp from other waters. In this connection it may be interest¬ 
ing to quote from the census records that in 1903 the total catch of 
carp in the United States was 18,942,763 pounds, valued at $442,255, 
and in 1908 the total catch was 42,763,100 pounds, valued at $1,135,390. 

NEW STATIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Under authority of the act providing for two or more new fish- 
cultural stations on Puget Sound or its tributaries, a careful investi¬ 
gation has been made and two suitable sites decided on. As soon as 
title can be obtained construction will begin. 

At Holden, Vt., 24.3 acres of land were acquired for an auxiliary 
to the station at St. Johnsbury, the facilities of which were too lim¬ 
ited for the requirements of northern New England. 

The opportunities for fish-cultural and biological work in the val¬ 
ley of the upper Mississippi prompted Congress to authorize a station 
auxiliary to that at Fairport, Iowa, but to be more particularly 
devoted to propagation and the saving of fishes from overflowed lands. 
A site of about 31 acres was purchased at Homer, Minn., about 5 miles 
from Winona, and a pumping plant and ponds are now nearly com¬ 
pleted and other buildings begun. The station will be ready for oper¬ 
ation at an early date. 

Results in the past having warranted the extension of the station 
at Mammoth Spring, Ark., 10.5 additional acres have been purchased 
there for the construction of several large ponds, which will soon be 
ready for use. 

At the Fairport, Iowa, biological station much work in grading, 
construction of roads, and laying out ponds was done. A building 20 
by 50 feet, with pebble-dash finish, containing an office, storage room, 
and small laboratory equipped for experimental work in fresh-water 
mussel culture, was practically completed during the year. A pump¬ 
ing plant consisting of two gasoline engines and two centrifugal 
pumps was installed in a small frame building 20 by 30 feet constructed 
for that purpose. Eleven cement ponds (4 small ones, G of medium 
size, and 1 large one) were also constructed for practical experiments 
in mussel propagation. 

Improvements provided for by special appropriations were made 
at many of the stations. At Bozeman, Mont., cement hatching 
troughs were installed in place of wooden ones, in accordance with 
modern practice, and are giving excellent results. At Boothbay 
Harbor, Me., a coal house was built, the wharf extended and 
altered, and the dams at the lobster pound completed. At Erwin, 
Tenn., a new T hatchery was built on modern plans, the old one hav- 


12 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

ing become badly dilapidated and beyond repair. The new build¬ 
ing is a frame structure 32 by 72 feet on a concrete foundation, and 
contains besides the hatching room, equipped with cement troughs, 
an office and workrooms. The water-supply and drainage systems 
have also been improved and extended, and to a considerable degree 
built in concrete. At Duluth, Minn., a dwelling for the superin¬ 
tendent has been erected which is in harmony with the surrounding 
private structures of the city and adds to the efficiency and appearance 
of the reservation. It is a two-story frame structure 32 by 36 feet, 
containing 7 rooms and basement, with the necessary office facilities. 
At Greenlake, Me., the new road has been completed, facilitating 
the distribution of fish and eggs, shortening materially the distance 
over which it is necessary to haul supplies, and doing away in great 
part with unreliable boat transportation. At Neosho, Mo., the new 
pipe line providing an extra supply of water has been completed and 
connected with the hatchery and ponds in approved manner, and the 
woodwork about the ponds has been replaced by concrete. It is be¬ 
lieved there will be no further trouble with the water supply at this 
point for many years to come. 

At Leadville, Afognak, Yes Bay, and the Pribilof Islands no 
expenditures of importance have been made for account of special 
appropriations. 

The plans and specifications for the constructions described have 
been prepared in the office of the Bureau’s architect and engineer 
and the work planned and supervised by him. In addition, various 
surveys have been made and plotted, and maps and charts of a special 
nature prepared. 

For fish-cultural work on Lake Erie, in connection with the Put¬ 
in-Bay station and to take the place of a boat obsolete and worn out, 
there was built a steel steamboat of the lake tug type 85 feet long, 
16 feet beam, and 8 feet 6 inches in depth. The vessel is equipped 
for the special requirements, has machinery and appliances of ap¬ 
proved design, and it is expected will be a valuable addition to the 
facilities of the Bureau. 

ACCLIMATIZATION AND RESULTS OF FISH CULTURE. 

After nearly forty years of endeavor to establish the chinook 
salmon of the Pacific coast in waters of the United States where it is 
not indigenous, conclusive evidence of success in one instance has come 
to hand. Within the past j^ear it has been ascertained that the species 
has become established in Lake Sunapee, New Hampshire, where 
numerous specimens from 3 to 5 pounds in weight have been taken 
by anglers. This is undoubtedly the result of a plant made in 1904 
by the New Hampshire fish commission, the eggs having been sup¬ 
plied from the Bureau’s hatchery at Baird, Cal. Encouraged by the 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


13 


outcome of this experiment, the Bureau made a plant of 40,000 finger- 
ling chinook salmon in Lake Champlain in the spring of 1010. 

There unquestionably has been an increase in Atlantic salmon in the 
Penobscot River, as evidenced by the results of the Bureau’s opera¬ 
tions in 1910 compared with 1908 and 1909. Though receiving the 
catch of a smaller number of weirs the past season, the collection of 
spawning fish was twice as great as in 1909 and 60 per cent greater 
than in 1908. 

It is believed that owing to the planting of the species by the 
Bureau pike perch have become sufficiently abundant in the St. Law¬ 
rence River to warrant the collection of eggs at the Cape Vincent 
station, and plans will be made accordingly. The fishermen on Lake 
Ontario report that lake trout and whitefish, which have been planted 
extensively by the Bureau, are increasing rapidly, and that numbers 
of fishermen who were driven to other pursuits by the former deple¬ 
tion of the fishery are resuming operations. In 1908 the catch of 
these two species was 5,567 pounds, while in 1909 it increased to 
12,532 pounds. A corresponding increase is shown in the take of 
pike perch in this lake. 

The following statistics show the increasing catch of the striped- 
bass fishery in California, the species having first been introduced 
from the Atlantic coast into the waters of that State in 1879: 



Year. 

Pounds. 

Value, 

Year. 

Pounds. 

Value. 

1889.. .. 

1890.. .. 

1891.. .. 


10,290 
20,119 
_ 30,074 

$4,073 

4,021 

4,002 
0,488 

1893. 

1899. 

1904. 

252,454 
1,234,320 
1,570,404 
1,775,700 

$13,037 

01,814 

92,110 
134,060 

1892.... 


SO;209 

1908. 


For a series of years it has been the custom at the Baird, Cal., 
station to select for spawning purposes large fish only, a practice 
which appears to be developing a larger breed of fish. Chinook 
salmon of the run of 1909 averaged 20 pounds in weight, an increase 
of about 3 pounds over the previous run. The possibilities of selective 
breeding are indicated by this experience. 

FISH-CULTURAL RELATIONS WITH STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

Several States still continue in force certain laws and regulations 
in respect to the fisheries which tend to curtail and hamper the activi¬ 
ties of the Bureau. In <$ome cases the States show a willingness to 
mitigate as far as possible the effects of laws which inadvertently 
interfere with the Bureau’s work, but in one or two instances the 
legislative and executive attitude appears to be unreasonable if not 
hostile. 

With the States in general the relations of the Bureau have always 
been harmonious, and a system of cooperation has developed which 
59395°--11-2 




















14 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


has been mutually beneficial to the participants and advantageous to 
the public. Eggs taken and fertilized at the Bureau’s stations are 
transferred to the state fish commissions, by which they are hatched 
and planted. The Bureau’s expenses and difficulties in distribution 
are thereby reduced and simplified, and the superior local knowledge 
usually at the service of the state authorities is of value in indicating 
the most suitable localities in which to plant the fry. On Lake Erie 
the Ohio and Pennsylvania fishery authorities cooperated with the 
Bureau in the collection of eggs of the whitefish, lake cisco, and pike 
perch. 

As shown in the following table, the fish eggs allotted to the state 
commissions during 1910 aggregated over 443,000,000 and were sent 
into 17 States: 

Allotment of Fish Eggs to State Fish Commissions, Fiscal Year ended 

.June 30. 1910.“ 


State and species. 

Eggs. 

State and species. 

Eggs. 

California: 

28,764,467 

New York: 

50,000 

Colorado: 

Rainbow trout. 

41i500 


225,000 


15,000 
15,000,000 

Connecticut: 

White perch. 

Yellow perch. 

5,200,000 

North Dakota: 

Illinois: 

Steelhead trout. 

100,000 


500,000 
4,000,000 


10,000,000 

Whitefish... 

Ohio: 


8,000,000 

41,264 


18,000.000 
170,725,000 



Michigan: 

Oregon: 


20,000 


6,465,300 
175,000 


5,000,000 


Pike perch. 

34,280,000 

Pennsylvania: 

Missouri: 

Silver salmon. 

75,000 


100,000 


50,000 


25,000 

2,000,000 

550,000 

500,000 


31,428|000 
96,000,000 

50,000 

100,000 

Pike perch. 


Montana: 

Blackspotted trout. 

Washington: 



Nevada: 

Wisconsin: 

Blackspotted trout. 

422,000 


4,500,000 

New Hampshire: 

Wyoming: 


100,000 


075,000 

443,177,531 


Total. 


0 Also there were allotted to Michigan 3,500 lake trout, to Oregon 45 blackspotted 
trout, and to Wisconsin 3,880 lake trout, or a total of 7,425 tingerlings, yearlings, and 
adults. 


In response to requests coming through diplomatic channels the 
Bureau furnished eggs to the governments of foreign countries as 
follows: 


Country and species. 

Eggs. 

Argentina: 

Chinook salmon. 

200,000 
100,000 
100,000 
25,000 
50,000 

Silver salmon. 


Landlocked salmon. 

Lake trout. 



Country and species. 

Eggs. 

France: 


Blackspotted trout. 

10,000 

Japan: 

Rainbow trout....'. 

110,000 

Brook trout. 

5,000 

Total. 

•00,000 















































































REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


15 


BIOLOGICAL INQUIRIES AND EXPERIMENTS. 

OYSTER INVESTIGATIONS AND SURVEYS. 

The field work of the survey of the public oyster beds of James 
River, Virginia, which was undertaken at the request of the governor 
and the fish commissioner of Virginia, was brought to a conclusion 
on September 15, the charts and report were finished on November 30, 
and the printed report was issued about February 1. This survey 
was designed to furnish definite data concerning the location, extent, 
and condition of the public grounds in the James and Nansemond 
rivers above Newport News and to provide a foundation for needed 
legislation by the State. The present boundary lines are based on 
the survey of 1892-1894, and their justice has long been a matter of 
contention, the oystermen claiming that much productive bottom was 
omitted from the public grounds, and the planters contending that 
a large area of barren bottom was included. The present survey 
could not demonstrate the validity of the first claim, as such bottoms, 
if they existed, have been long since occupied for planting purposes, 
but it was shown that about 58 per cent of the present area of the 
grounds consists of barren bottom and an additional 15 per cent 
bears oysters too sparsely scattered to be commercially valuable. Of 
the 26,408.4 acres surveyed, but 7,153 acres can be regarded as actually 
productive. It was found also that in certain places oyster planters 
have encroached on the public rocks, and it was evident that in other 
places adjoining the planted beds the rocks had been depleted by 
illicit operations. 

To release from the public grounds and throw open to rental a 
considerable area of the barren bottom and to rectify the boundary 
lines so as to permit adequate policing, the state fish commissioner 
had an enabling act introduced in the legislature at its latest session. 
To attain the ends sought, it unfortunately was necessary to exclude 
from the public grounds a small proportion of the productive bot¬ 
tom, and as the legislature held that this was in contravention of a 
' constitutional provision relating to the oyster beds, the proposed 
law failed of passage. 

At the request of the governor of Delaware, acting in his capacity 
as chairman of the Delaware Oyster Survey Commission, the Bureau, 
at the close of the fiscal year, was engaged in a survey of the natural 
oyster beds of Delaware, the State defraying part of the expenses for 
necessary temporary assistance. As in the case of the James River 
survey, the steamer Fish Hawk was detailed for the service, and a 
considerable part of the work was performed by her personnel. 

•The authorities of Alabama and Mississippi have also requested 
assistance and advice in connection with the management of oyster 


16 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


bottoms, and a preliminary inquiry has been made to determine the 
most profitable and practicable assistance feasible with the resources 
available to the Bureau. 

Cooperation with the Coast and Geodetic Survey and the Mary¬ 
land Shell Fish Commission in the survey of the oyster beds of Mary¬ 
land, pursuant to an act of Congress, has been continued, and the 
field work will be completed early in the next fiscal year. It is be¬ 
lieved that the Bureau will have discharged all of its obligations in 
this connection prior to the end of the fiscal year 1911. 

The experiments in the fattening of oysters at Lynnhaven Bay, 
Virginia, have produced better results than for several years past. 
During a period when practically no fat oysters could be obtained 
from the open waters of the bay the experimental claire was regularly 
producing oysters of very fine quality. In this connection the Bu¬ 
reau is conducting investigations of the food and feeding of oysters 
which have already developed some unexpected results, throwing 
light on practical problems confronting the oyster grower. Some 
minor modifications of the claire were made near the end of the fiscal 
year, and it is hoped that it will be possible to fatten oysters earlier 
in the season than has been possible heretofore. 

PEARL-MUSSEL INVESTIGATIONS. 

The Bureau has continued its investigations of the pearl-mussel 
beds of the Mississippi Valley, the material depletion of which has 
seriously threatened the prosperity of an important industry of that 
region. With the aid of persons connected with various educational 
institutions of the States principally interested, field parties were 
established for the examination of various streams in Virgina, West 
Virginia, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, 
Missouri, and Oklahoma. The habits, distribution, abundance, and 
commercial availability of the mussels found in the several localities 
were studied with the view of opening new sources of supply for the 
manufacturers of pearl buttons and for the purpose of laying, a foun¬ 
dation for the protection, conservation, and improvement of the' 
existing beds. 

Owing to the severity of the weather during the winter, progress 
in the erection of the biological station at Fairport, Iowa, authorized 
by Congress near the close of the preceding fiscal year, was less rapid 
than was desired, but on the improvement of conditions in the spring 
construction work went on more rapidly, and at the close of the fiscal 
year mussel-propagating operations were being conducted on a scale 
promising to yield some practical results. As Avas pointed out in the 
preceding report of the Bureau, this station is designed for the study 
of problems relating to the general fisheries and aquatic biology of 




REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


17 


the Mississippi Valley, but particularly for the cultivation of the 
mussels employed as raw material in the pearl-button industry, a 
manufacturing interest giving employment to a large number of 
persons. 

Progress has also been made in the construction of the substation 
at Homer, Minn., which recent investigations show can be employed 
for various economic purposes connected with the fisheries, in addi¬ 
tion to mussel culture. 

EXPERIMENTS IN SPONGE CULTURE. 

Although the experiments in growing sponges from artificial cut¬ 
tings have already developed what the Bureau regards as a prac¬ 
tical system of sponge culture, work is still being carried on with 
the purpose of improving the methods and testing the effects of 
different environments on the rate and character of sponge growth. 

The sponges grown in Cape Florida Channel, which, as reported 
last year, attained an average weight of 1.25 ounces each at the end 
of twenty-nine months, were found to average 2 ounces ten months 
later, some of the largest specimens weighing from 3 to 6 ounces 
each when thoroughly cleaned and dry. The same disparity in the 
rate of growth of different specimens observed in other localities 
was found to occur in this place, while at Soldier Key, about 7 miles 
distant, where the conditions appear to be equally favorable, growth 
was very slow. 

STUDY OF FISH DISEASES. 

During the fiscal year the Bureau has continued cooperation with 
the New York State Cancer Laboratory in the investigation of thy¬ 
roid tumor or cancer in domesticated fishes. An aquarium with 
two independent systems of closed-water circulation, with proper 
means of refrigeration, has been established for the observation of 
salmon and trout and experiments in inoculation and treatment. 
Investigation at various stations of the Bureau and at other hatch¬ 
eries have shown that the disease is even more widespread and gen¬ 
eral than was suspected. Considerable difficulty has been encoun¬ 
tered in obtaining for purposes of experiment a sufficient number 
of fish above suspicion of infection, and it has been necessary in this 
effort to secure a quantity of wild trout from remote streams. Owing 
to the technical difficulties attending this work, which are equal 
to those -retarding the advance of knowledge relating to the cause 
and nature of cancer in human beings, progress is made only by 
slow and painstaking steps and by the use of the most approved 
appliances and methods. For this reason it is highly important 
that the Bureau should be provided with a well-equipped laboratory 


18 REPOKT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

and experimental hatchery, not only for the purposes of the present 
investigation but for the study of the many other diseases affecting 
fishes, both under domestication and in a state of nature. The Presi¬ 
dent, in a special message to Congress dated April 9, 1910, urgently 
recommended an appropriation for this purpose. 

During the year the Bureau was called on to investigate epidemics 
among hatchery fish at Spruce Creek, Pa., and Roxbury, Vt. At the 
former place the mortality was due in part to the thyroid tumor or 
cancer before alluded to, but the majority of the deaths were appar¬ 
ently caused by a bacterial infection which the Bureau has found at 
other places, but which it has not the facilities to study at present. At 
Koxbury the disease is also infectious and annually causes large 
losses. The Bureau has likewise made investigations in Pennsylvania, 
Ohio, and West Virginia upon the kindred subject of the pollution of 
streams in its relation to fishes and the fisheries. 

OTHER INQUIRIES AND EXPERIMENTS. 

The investigations of the Pacific coast salmons have materially 
advanced knowledge of the subjects during the year, particularly in 
respect to parasitism and the changes in the tissues affecting the food 
value of the fish at and near the breeding season, and in regard to 
the relationship of the steelhead trout and rainbow trout. 

In connection with the State Geological and Natural History Sur¬ 
vey, the Bureau has continued examination of lakes in Wisconsin, with 
particular regard to the gaseous content of their waters. The rela¬ 
tionship of this subject to practical fish culture is highly important, 
and the data so far obtained have thrown light on certain failures in 
the acclimatization of fishes, the causes of which have been obscure. 
The study of the physical environment and habits of the salmon, smelt, 
and other fishes of Sebago Lake, Maine, w^ere continued, and in 
response to a request a somewhat similar line of research was under¬ 
taken in Sunapee Lake, New Hampshire. In the latter locality there 
is a considerable fishery for smelts as they ascend the streams to 
spawn, and it was learned that young chinook salmon planted imthe 
brooks were taken with the smelts. 

The survey of the fishing grounds and investigation of the aquatic 
resources of the Philippine Islands, in which the steamer Albatross 
has been employed since the autumn of 1907, was brought to a con¬ 
clusion in October, 1909. The vessel returned to San Francisco on 
May 4, 1910. The Philippine expedition has yielded extensive col¬ 
lections and a large amount of information relating to the fisheries 
and fishery resources, and the material is now in course of study 
for the preparation of comprehensive reports on the scientific and 
economic results. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


19 


MARINE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORIES. 

The marine biological laboratories maintained by the Bureau at 
Woods Hole, Mass., and Beaufort, N. C., were open as usual for 
several months during the summer and fall, and their facilities were 
availed of by the usual number of investigators. The researches 
carried on covered a considerable range of subjects and embraced 
investigations of a number of species of economic importance, includ¬ 
ing the diamond-back terrapin, fishes, stone crab, quahog or hard 
clam, oysters, mussels, and seaweeds. The year witnessed the com¬ 
pletion of an elaborate report by the.director of Woods Hole labora¬ 
tory on the marine biology of the waters adjacent to the station, 
embodying the results of investigations carried on for many years. 

ALASKA SALMON SERVICE. 

The report of the agents at the salmon fisheries of Alaska, which 
was published in April, 1910, includes the data for the fishing season 
of 1909, practically all of which was embraced in the fiscal year 1910. 

The number of salmon taken during the season was about equal to 
the catch of 1907, but fully *20 per cent less than the number caught 
in 1908. In 1909 there were taken 34,692,608 fish of a gross weight 
of 175,028,594 pounds, as compared with 43,304,979 fish weighing 
213,378,570 pounds caught in 1908. The decrease was apparent in 
all species excepting the king salmon, which exhibited an increase 
of about 55 per cent. The catch of red salmon was 115,120,670 
pounds, as compared with 124,713,630 pounds in 1908; of humpbacks, 
37,965,928 pounds, as compared with 60,424,620 pounds; of dog 
salmon, 9,456,048 pounds, as compared with 18,066,576 pounds; of 
king salmon, 8,959,544 pounds, as compared with 5,757,246 pounds; 
and of cohos, 3,526,404 pounds, as compared with 4,416,498 pounds. 

The total pack of canned salmon in 1909 was 2,403,669 cases, valued 
at $9,439,152. There were 45 canneries in operation, a decrease of 5 
since 1908, and the total investment in the industry, excluding cash 
capital, was $8,631,345. In addition to the canned pack, the fishery 
produced pickled salmon to the value of $208,758, mild-cured salmon 
valued at $149,300, and some minor products. 

The total yield of the salmon industry was valued at $9,796,210, 
produced by an investment of $9,007,037 and the labor of 11,439 
persons. 

Owing to the vigilant enforcement of the laws by the agents of the 
Bureau during the preceding year, there were comparatively few 
coiliplaints of violations during 1909. Several convictions were 
obtained for fishing during the weekly close season, but those engaged 
in the fishery showed a general desire to comply with the laws and 
the regulations of the Department. The pernicious practice of 


20 REPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

“ jigging ” for salmon, which results in the cruel mutilation of fish 
which afterwards escape and die, has been stopped, and prohibition 
has been placed on the tourists’ practice of catching in their hands the 
nutritively useless but reproductively valuable spawning fish strug¬ 
gling up the falls and rapids. 

The effort to prevent the waste of edible portions of salmons, the 
choice parts of which have been pickled under former practices, has 
been successful, the salteries now pickling the entire fish or utilizing- 
in other ways the edible parts formerly thrown away. 

The statistics relating to the operations of the government and 
private fish hatcheries in Alaska will not be available until the return 
of the agents from the Territory. 

The counting of the salmon passing into Wood River, which was 
begun in the preceding year, was continued during the run of 1909. 
The spawning fish numbered but 898,000, as compared with 2,000,000 
in 1908, and the catch of fish in Nushagak Bay, to which Wood River 
is a tributary, was but 4,900,000, as compared with 6,400,000 in the 
year before. It is estimated that between 6,200,000 and 7,400,000 
fish entered the Nushagak basin, and that between 20 and 35 per cent 
escaped to the spawning grounds, as compared with a total run of 
between 10,100,000 and 13,600,000 fish and an escape of between 37 
and 53 per cent in 1908. From the valuable but still insufficient 
data so far obtained it appears that for every salmon reaching the 
spawning grounds from two to five return several years later, and 
that of these from one to four may be taken without impairing the 
fishery. These are highly probable extremes, and the present rate of 
reproductive increase is between the two. 

In the minor fisheries of Alaska cod were taken to the value of 
$118,821 and halibut worth $195,529. There were employed in these 
fisheries fixed capital to the value of $503,837 and 548 persons. In 
addition there is a fleet of vessels from California and Washington 
fishing in Alaskan waters, the data for which are not included in the 
above. 

The Bureau is making an effort to stop the use of food fishes for 
fertilizer and to stimulate the utilization of scraps and waste fishes 
for that purpose. This is not only in the interest of economy of con¬ 
sumption, but to prevent the pollution of waters through the dis¬ 
charge of putrescent wastes. It therefore recommends the enactment 
of laws prohibiting the manufacture of fertilizer from food fishes 
and the extension of the antipollution act of March 3, 1899, in such 
manner as to protect the fisheries of Alaska. 

Suitable vessels for the use of the salmon-inspection service are 
urgently required, and provision should be made by law for the regu¬ 
lation and limitation of the future establishment of plants for 
utilizing salmon. 




REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 21 

Attention is again called to the fact that the personnel of the 
Alaska salmon service is entirely inadequate to a proper enforcement 
of the laws and regulations and the carrying on of investigations 
essential to a proper and intelligent administration of these important 
fisheries. Several additional scientific assistants are urgently needed 
in this service. 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL SERVICE. 

Ity an act of Congress approved April 21, 1910, that portion of the 
previous law requiring the Secretary of Commerce and Labor to 
lease the privilege of killing seals, on the Pribilof Islands was re¬ 
pealed, and as the lease of the North American Commercial Company 
expired by limitation on April 30, 1910, the Bureau, under the direc¬ 
tion of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, assumed the entire 
administration of the islands, including the functions and obligations 
previously imposed on the lessees. The present duties of the Bureau 
on the islands therefore embrace all matters whatsoever relating to 
the seal herd and the care, education, and welfare of the native 
population. 

Owing to the abuses connected with pelagic sealing mentioned in 
the preceding report of the Bureau, the condition of the seal herd is 
more precarious than at any previous period of its known history, 
and the utmost care must be exercised to save it from commercial 
extinction. In anticipation of the expiration of the lease recently in 
force ahd in view of the advisability of a change in the methods of 
administering the islands, the Bureau called a meeting of the advisory 
board mentioned in the last report, which, together with the em¬ 
ployees of the Bureau, embraces practically all of the available natur¬ 
alists and officials whose experience on the islands qualifies them to 
pass in judgment upon the present requirements of the seal herd. 
The Bureau has based its policy in respect to the islands upon the 
unanimous advice and recommendations of the parties to this con¬ 
ference. 

The preponderance of the pelagic kill on the high seas, which is 
beyond the Bureau’s control, consists of mature cow seals, and for 
reasons that are recognized by those having knowledge of the habits 
of the fur seal the killing of a limited number of the excess of im¬ 
mature males has been deemed advisable. No definite quota has been 
fixed, but the number is to be determined by the agents on the islands 
governed by certain rigid limitations as to age, sex, size, and the min¬ 
imum number to be reserved for future breeding. The breeding- 
reserve is to be selected, as far as possible, from the most vigorous 
and perfect individuals, with a view to the gradual improvement of 
the herd. 


22 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

Under the provisions of the act of April 21, 1910. the Secretary of 
Commerce and Labor is charged with all matters pertaining to the 
care and preservation of all the fur-bearing animals of Alaska. Under 
this authority the Bureau has drawn regulations relating to the killing 
or capture in Alaska of certain fur-bearing animals other than seals, 
and said regulations, having been signed and promulgated by the 
Secretary of Commerce and Labor, are now effective in the Territory. 

For the purpose of putting into effect the provisions of the act 
above referred to, the sum of $150,000 was appropriated. The imme¬ 
diately necessary additional employees required by the enlargement 
of the Bureau’s functions on the islands have been appointed. The 
Bureau, under authority of the law and by direction of the Secretary 
of Commerce and Labor, has entered into negotiations for the pur¬ 
chase of the buildings, boats, and other property of the North Ameri¬ 
can Commercial Company on the islands. The company has placed 
an apparently reasonable valuation on its property, and the proposi¬ 
tion is under consideration subject to the results of an inventory now 
being made by an agent of the Bureau on the islands. 

The data relating to the killing and the condition of the seal herds 
to July 31, 1909, were published in the preceding report of the Bu¬ 
reau. Those for the season of 1910 are not available at the time of 
writing the present report, and in any event are more strictly ger¬ 
mane to the succeeding fiscal year. 

THE FISHERY INDUSTRIES. 

STATISTICS AND METHODS OF THE FISHERIES. 

The commercial fisheries of the United States, including the various 
fishery industries dependent upon them, represent an investment of 
about .$95,000,000, and the value of the products derived from the 
fisheries proper is about $62,000,000. With the exception of the 
mackerel and some other fisheries that for a number of years have 
not been as extensive as formerly, all of-the more important branches 
of the industry are in a prosperous condition. The catch of mackerel 
during the past year was smaller than in the previous year, amount¬ 
ing to 46,439 barrels fresh and 17,542 barrels salted in 1909, against 
57,566 barrels fresh and 21,267 barrels salted in 1908. The spring 
fishery in 1910 was poorer than for a number of years past, the catch 
up to July 1 being only 16,410 barrels of fresh mackerel and only 
2,490 barrels of salted mackerel. It was an exceptionally unfavorable 
season for the seiners, as they took only about 2,200 barrels of the 
total catch of fresh mackerel, the remainder being caught by the gill- 
net fishermen. The fish were larger than usual, many of them weigh¬ 
ing from 3 to 4 pounds each, but the greater portion from 2 to 3 
pounds each. The fleet numbered about 50 seiners and 125 netters. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


23 


Prices were good and some of the netters made large stocks. The 
first mackerel of the season were landed on April 8, at Fort Mon¬ 
roe, Va., the fare consisting of 1,200 fish weighing 2^ pounds each. 
The seiners reported seeing a good body of fish off the southern coast, 
but they were wild and could not be caught with seines. Of the fresh 
mackerel landed, 1,000 barrels were caught on Nantucket Shoals 
and the remainder mostly off the coast of New Jersey and in the 
vicinity of Block Island. The salted mackerel were all from the 
Cape Shore, and were all large fish. The light catch so far during 
the season on the Cape Shore is attributed to the fact that the fish 
passed along the coast far offshore outside of the fleet. 

The investigation of tl^e fisheries of the Philippine Islands was 
completed before the close of the year, and the statistics and other 
information relating to the commercial fisheries are being compiled. 

A canvass of the salmon fisheries of the Pacific coast has also been 
made and the returns will be published at an early date. 

In the spring of 1910 a beginning was made in the collection of 
comprehensive statistics of the oyster fishery. This is the greatest 
single national fishery in the world, and of itself yields a more valu¬ 
able product than that derived from the entire fisheries of many 
important maritime countries. The work is demanded in the in¬ 
terests of the trade and for enlightened legislative regulation of the 
fishery. A canvass of the shad fisheries of the South Atlantic States 
was begun at the same time, and both inquiries were in progress at 
the close of the year. 

The usual information was collected by the local agents at Boston 
and Gloucester, Mass., as to the quantity and value of fishery prod¬ 
ucts landed at those ports by American fishing vessels during the 
year. The investigation of the movements of mackerel was con¬ 
cluded, and an inquiry was made regarding the condition of the shad 
and alewife fisheries of Chesapeake Bay and tributaries, and the 
fisheries of Mississippi. 

The statistics collected by the local agents at Boston and Glouces¬ 
ter, Mass., of the extensive vessel fisheries at those ports have been 
published as monthly bulletins and distributed to the trade in various 
parts of the country, and also as annual bulletins giving the quantity 
and value of fishery products landed by American fishing vessels by 
months and by fishing grounds for the calendar year. The number 
of trips landed at these ports in 1909 was 6,306, aggregating 173,- 
102,224 pounds of fish, valued at $4,616,444. Compared with the 
previous year the receipts have decreased 8,363,023 pounds in 
quantity and $12,981 in value. There was a decrease in the catch of 
cusk, hake, and mackerel, but an increase in that of cod, pollock, and 
halibut. The statistics are given in detail on the following pages. 


and Values of Certain Fishery Products Landed at Boston and Gloucester, Mass., by American Fishing Vessels during 


24 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


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Quantities and Values op Certain Fishery Products Landed at Boston and Gloucester, Mass., by American Fishing Vessels during 

1909, by Months— Continued. 



a Includes herring from Newfoundland (4,296,250 pounds frozen, $113,535, and 9,029,756 pounds salted, $160,529). 
































































































REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


27 


More than (50 per cent of the quantity and nearly the same propor¬ 
tion of the value of the • fishery products landed at Boston and 
Gloucester by the American fishing fleet during the year were caught 
on fishing grounds lying off the coast of the United States. A little 
over 28 per cent of the catch was from banks off the coast of the 
Canadian Provinces and 11.25 per cent from grounds off the coast of 
Newfoundland. The Newfoundland herring fishery furnished less 
than 8 per cent of the fishery products landed at these ports. The 
quantity and value of the catch from each of these fishing regions are 
given bv species in the following table: 


Quantity and Value of Fish Landed by American Fishing Vessels at 
Boston and Gloucester. Mass., in 1909, from Grounds off the Coasts of 
the United States, Newfoundland, and Canadian Provinces. 


Species. 

United States. 

Newfoundland. 

Canadian Provinces. 

Total. 

Cod: 

Pounds. 

Value. 

Pounds. 

Value. 

Pounds. 

Value. 

Pounds. 

Value. 

Fresh. 

28,031.010 

S765,402 

88,810 

81,492 

10,470,311 

$188,253 

38,590,131 

$955,147 

Salted. 

Cusk: 

4,158,127 

137,120 

3,828,665 

113,087 

24,757,580 

753,446 

32,744,372 

1,003,653 


2,608,626 
105,627 

41.022 

7,660 

7,690 

123 

531,652 

72,218 

8,746 

3,147,938 
185,535 

49,891 
4,037 

Salted. 

Haddock: 

2,637 

191 

1,809 



37,345,145 

907,965 

1,885 



5,055,621 

226,940 

115,054 

2,291 

42,400,766 
424,603 

1,023,019 

4,289 

Salted. 

Hake: 

186,428 

11,235 

113 


12,668,503 
25.176 

186,176 
252 

11,278 

10,947 

70 

483,460 
77,201 

7,572 

789 

13,163,241 

113,324 

193,818 

1,173 

Salted. 

132 

Pollock: 





• 



12,355,229 
373,869 

145.111 

100 

1 

147,262 

970,156 

1,951 

11,369 

12,502,591 

1,380,645 

147,063 

15,541 

Salted. 

Halibut: 

3,805 

36,620 

367 


418,691 
4,460 

38,530 
308 

1,349,221 

94,603 
63,004 

1,820,723 
52,164 

136,873 

3,159 

3,588,635 
860,113 

270,006 
66,471 

Salted. 

Mackerel: 

803,489 





2,461,000 

794,400 

132,707 
55,250 



1,660,060 
2,663,500 

91,230 

156,901 

4.121,060 

3,457,900 

223,937 

212,151 




Herrins;: 



Fresh. 

99,600 
85,800 

1,651 

1,481 

4,296,250 
9,029,756 

113,535 

25,000 
162,108 

500 

4,420,850 

9,277,664 

115,686 

164,854 

Salted. 

Swordfish: 

160,529 

2,844 



1,626,520 

157,185 

394 

47 

10,242 

1,297 

1,637,156 

15S,529 

Other fish: 

Fresh. 

1,058,700 

27,000 

6,005 

574 





1,058,700 

27,000 

6,005 






574 






Total... 

104,433,911 

2,585,066 

19,482,115 

547,294 

49,186,198 

1,484,084 

173,102,224 

4,016,444 


SHAD AND ALE WIFE FISHERIES. 

The canvass relating to the methods, apparatus, extent, and con¬ 
dition of the shad and alewife fisheries of Chesapeake Bay and tribu¬ 
taries, which was begun in the spring of 1909, was completed before 
the close of that year, the work being done by the steamer Fish Hawk 
and field agents. The fishing apparatus used in the capture of shad 
and alewives was located on charts, and statistics of the catch for 
the season of 1909 were obtained. The fishing apparatus included 
3,332 pound nets, 12,768 gill nets, and a considerable number of 
seines, fyke nets, and other appliances. The catch consisted of 
2,924.018 shad, having a value to the fishermen of $785,739, and 
128,618,249 alewives, with a value of $284,039. The shad were sold 














































28 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


fresh, and the alewives were disposed of in both a fresh and salted 
condition, the number salted being 16,827,000, valued at $74,419. The 
shad catch has declined nearly 50 per cent in quantit}^ since 1897, 
the number of shad taken that year in the Chesapeake and tribu¬ 
taries being 5,341,751. In 1901 the number had decreased to 3,000,544, 
and in 1904 to 2,950,492. A still further decrease of 26,474 occurred 
in the past year. This large falling off during these years is obvi¬ 
ously due to overfishing and to the fact that the large number of 
pound nets and other apparatus operated prevent the anadromous 
species from reaching their spawning grounds, thus seriously inter¬ 
fering with both natural and artificial propagation. In Virginia 
in 1909 there were fished in these waters for shad and alewives 2,043 
pound nets and 7,121 gill nets, and in Maryland 1,289 pound nets 
and 5.620 gill nets, the remainder of the gill nets being in Pennsyl¬ 
vania and Delaware. The catch apportioned by States in 1909 was 
as follows: 


State. 

Shad. 

Alewives. 

Virginia. 

Number. 
1,855,446 
1,000,827 
60,045 
7,700 

Value. 

$488,336 

272,869 

22,224 

2,310 

Number. 

69,469,949 
59,093,300 
25,000 
30,000 

Value. 
§128,375 
155,499 
75 
90 


Pennsylvania. 

Delaware. 

Total.'. 

2,924,018 

785,739 

128,618,249 

284,039 



INVESTIGATION OF THE MACKEREL FISHERY. 


The mackerel investigation, which was begun in April, 1909, at the 
request of the Board of Trade and Master Mariners’ Association of 
Gloucester, Mass., representing many of the firms and vessel owners 
interested in the mackerel fishery, was concluded in October of that 
year, occupying a period of about six months. The schooner Grampus 
was detailed for the work, and Capt. Jerry E. Cook, an experienced 
mackerel fisherman of Gloucester, was in charge pf the inquiry. The 
vessel was equipped with gill nets and lines for locating the fish and 
with tow nets for use in detecting the presence of the minute crus¬ 
taceans which form the principal food of the mackerel. The object 
of the inquiry was chiefly to determine the movements of the mack¬ 
erel, which usually make their first appearance on the American coast 
in the spring off Cape Hatteras and gradually move northward to 
the Gulf of St. Lawrence, to locate any bodies of mackerel that may 
frequent grounds remote from those cruised over by the fishermen, 
and also to assist the mackerel fishermen by furnishing them with 
information as to the schools of mackerel seen and their location and 
movements. 

It is thought by some fishermen that the introduction of purse 
seines and gill nets in the fishery, replacing hooks and lines and a 

















REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


29 


plentiful supply of toll bait, has had a tendency to disperse the 
schools of mackerel and is partly responsible for the prevailing 
scarcity of that species during the past twenty or more years. This 
opinion, however, has not become sufficiently strong or general to lead 
to any concerted action on the part of the vessel owners with a view 
to abandoning the use of these forms of apparatus in the mackerel 
fishery and returning to the former methods. 

The Grampus sailed from Gloucester April 7 and proceeded south¬ 
ward to Lewes, Del., where she joined the seining fleet. On May 2 
the vessel sailed from that port to begin the work of investigating 
the movements of the mackerel. The first experiments were made on 
that date in latitude 38° N. and longitude 74° 21' W. The work was 
continued along the coast from this locality to Georges Bank until 
the 1st of August, but chiefly on the southern grounds in order to 
ascertain whether the mackerel remain there after making their first 
appearance early in the spring or move northward. The fish were 
not located there, however, after the early run in the spring, nor 
were any of the usual signs of them, such as sea geese, red feed, 
whales, etc., observed. The vessel worked over Georges Bank and 
continued eastward over Browns Bank, and on August 5 anchored 
at Sandy Point, Shelbourne, Nova Scotia. She sailed from there 
on the 8th of August, and from Halifax on the 12th, reaching North 
Sydney, Cape Breton, on the 15th. For the remainder of August 
and during September the work was pursued in the Gulf of St. Law¬ 
rence and on the southerly part of the coast of Newfoundland. The 
Grampus left the Gulf of St. Lawrence early in October and arrived 
at Gloucester on the 16th of that month. At all times during the 
cruise a masthead lookout for mackerel was kept day and night when 
the weather was favorable for observation, and net trials for locat¬ 
ing the fish were made at every opportunity. 

During the first part of the trip the work was frequently interrupted 
by stormy weather, which also at times greatly interfered with the 
operations of the seining fleet. The mackerel were late in showing, 
and were unusually far offshore. Investigation showed that the lat¬ 
ter condition was caused by the appearance of great schools of bonito, 
which came up the coast over the usual mackerel route and kept the 
schools of mackerel well offshore, and later, when the mackerel 
approached their regular course, caused them not to show, but to move 
along under water. This was indicated by the many large hauls made 
by the vessels of the mackerel netting fleet, which did unusually well, 
while the purse-seine fishermen, depending on the mackerel to school 
and show, had a poor season as a whole. There was a good catch 
on the Nova Scotia coast, or Cape Shore, and the vessels did well 
for a time on Nantucket Shoals, but otherwise the season was 
practically a failure. A few hauls were made on the southern edge 
59395°—11-3 


30 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


of Georges'Bank, but the fish stayed there only a short time, disap¬ 
pearing as suddenly as they came. In Massachusetts Bay and on the 
Maine coast there was practically no mackerel fishing, a few small 
schools taken off Monhegan being all that showed on the latter shore. 
The season in the Gulf of St. Lawrence was also a poor one, the catch 
of the 22 American purse-seining vessels that went there being only 
1,785 barrels. No fish were found schooling, and the catches made 
were secured by throwing toll bait and using line and jig, the seine 
being run around the vessel while the fish were attracted by the bait. 
Bad weather set in early and fishing off North Sydney was discon¬ 
tinued before the usual time. 

The cruise did not result in ascertaining where the southern body 
of mackerel goes after coming as far north as Long Island nor in 
locating the great bod}^ of mackerel which goes into the Gulf of St. 
Lawrence, but that large schools entered the Gulf of St. Lawrence 
in June and, some of them at least, came out in the fall and went 
south is indicated by the fact that large catches were made off Hali¬ 
fax and La Have and westward as far as Cape Sable, and that great 
schools were reported off Halifax and other Cape Shore ports late 
in the season. It is evident from the experiments and observations 
made during the cruise that the food supply and spawning habits of 
the mackerel are not the only factors to be considered in the study 
of their migrations, but that the weather conditions and the presence 
of bonito and other predatory species have a decided influence on 
their movements. A plentiful supply of food was frequently found 
in localities where there were either no mackerel or^ only scattering 
individuals. 

The Grampus kept in as close touch with the seining fleet as was 
consistent with the work, and furnished the vessels with all informa¬ 
tion obtained regarding the schools of mackerel seen. 

Considerable information was also obtained during the cruise re¬ 
garding the movements of menhaden. These fish were reported by 
the mackerel seiners early in April about 25 miles off Boclie Island, 
North Carolina, in 45 fathoms of water. They were in large schools 
and appeared to be working northward and keeping well offshore. 
About the 20th of the month large schools were observed in 36° 30' 
north latitude and extending a distance of about 90 miles. A number 
of menhaden were taken in the mackerel seines about this time, and 
were large and moderately fat fish. During April large schools of 
bonito were seen some distance inshore of the menhaden, which was 
apparently the reason why the latter remained so far offshore. One 
vessel reported sailing 25 miles with bonito constantly in sight, mov¬ 
ing rapidly and at times breaking water, probably in pursuit of some 
small feed other than menhaden. No schools of bonito were seen'north 
of the Virginia capes, and the menhaden appeared on the coast of 
New Jersey early in May after the bonito disappeared. 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


31 


FISHERIES OF MISSISSIPPI. 

At the request of citizens of Biloxi, Miss., through their Represent¬ 
ative in Congress, an investigation was made of the condition of the 
fisheries at that place, and incidentally of the coast fisheries of the 
entire State, not including oysters. 

The fisheries of Mississippi are chiefly carried on at Biloxi and 
Scranton, the former place having about 250 vessels and boats and 
the latter about 50 engaged in this industry. The principal species 
taken are shrimp (which ranks first in importance), bluefish, Spanish 
mackerel, pompano, mullet, flounders, trout or squeteague, and crabs. 
In former years the supply was generally equal to the demand, but 
in the last three or four years it is claimed b}- fishermen and others 
interested in the fisheries that there has been considerable falling off 
in the annual catch of most species, on account of overfishing. 

While the coast fisheries of Mississippi are not as extensive as those 
of some other States, they are of great value to the State and should 
receive as careful attention in the way of protection as other States 
give to their fisheries. Many fishermen and dealers at Biloxi are of 
the opinion that artificial propagation is the only means by which the 
more important commercial species can be saved from extermination, 
but a judicious enforcement of laws that should be enacted to prevent 
the wholesale capture of fish during the spawning season, and making 
it a penal offense to capture fish by the use of dynamite, lime, or 
other explosives, in rivers, lakes, bayous, or along the coast, would 
have a tendency to restore the fisheries to their former prosperous 
condition. This course of action would no doubt produce beneficial 
results in a comparatively short time. The first requisite in the 
present circumstances seems to be to take the necessary steps to save 
certain species bj^ natural rather than by artificial means. The 
establishment of a state fish commission, with authority to recommend 
and enforce fishery legislation, would also be of great assistance in 
protecting and maintaining the fisheries. Without such an organi¬ 
zation the fisheries are destined to decline more rapidly in the future 
than they have in the past. 

The principal forms of fishing apparatus used in the fisheries of 
the State are drag seines, gill nets, and trammel nets. There is also 
a considerable quantity of fish taken with cast nets. In no part of 
the country is this apparatus used with greater skill than in this 
region, and according to some of the fishermen its extensive use is 
responsible for the great scarcity of crappie, black bass, and pike. 
When the water in the rivers and bays is low, many species of fish 
take refuge in pools and deep holes and are easily captured. 

In Red and Black creeks it is said that fish were once abundant, but 
in recent years the use of dynamite has nearly exterminated them. 
According to reports, this method is not only employed by commer- 


32 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


cial fishermen but also by people who wish to supply their own table. 
Jugs filled with lime and lowered to the bottom are also the means of 
destroying large quantities of fish. The water coming in contact 
with the lime causes the jugs to burst, scattering the lime, which 
either kills the fish or causes them to rise to the surface in a dazed 
condition, making their capture easy. 

At Biloxi the harbor for vessels is at Back Bay. Six or seven 
years ago considerable fishing was carried on from 2 to 3 miles 
above the anchorage, toward the head of the bay. At the present time 
very few T fish are taken in this vicinity. At times during a freshet 
buffalo-fish are caught in considerable quantities near the mouth of 
the bay. At other times this species is generally observed up the 
bay some 6 or 8 miles above Popps Point, where commercial fishing 
is prohibited. During a heavy freshet it is said that the current runs 
15 miles an hour. 

In the upper part of the bay there are numerous small islands cov¬ 
ered with tide grass; these islands afford excellent seining grounds. 
In the channels formed by the islands fishing is carried on with 
trammel nets. There are many snags in the channels, which prevent 
the use of drag seines. 

Shrimp were quite scarce in 1909, but in the spring of 1910 they 
were plentiful, and the usual pack was made. It is estimated that 
in the vicinity of Gulfport and Biloxi 6,000 barrels of shrimp were 
caught during the season. It is stated that only about one-half the 
quantity of shrimp is now taken as compared to the catch ten years 
ago, although nearly double the number of men and boats is em¬ 
ployed. In the last few years, however, there has been considerable 
increase in the catch, owing to an extension of the fishing grounds. 
Vessels now fish for shrimp 30 miles east and west of Biloxi and 
from 75 to 100 miles south. 

Shrimp arrive from the south in the latter part of February and 
remain on the coast until May. In the latter part of July or the first 
of August a school of mixed sizes of shrimp appear, and in September 
another school of marketable shrimp strikes the coast. 

In 1909, 14,000 pounds of mullet were taken in one haul of a seine 
and all were said to be spawn fish. Many fishermen are of the opin¬ 
ion that such wholesale slaughter of spawn fish should be stopped. 

Redfish or channel bass, trout or squeteague, and sheepshead have 
not decreased as rapidly as some other species, being taken in deep 
water, and principally with hook and line. 

The shipping facilities and method of handling fish at Biloxi com¬ 
pare favorably with those in other parts of the country. On account 
of the scarcity of many shore species, attention is being directed to 
the red-snapper fishery. To engage in this fishery would require 
deeper draft vessels and the building of plants for handling fish 
on the outlying islands, where vessels arriving from the banks could 


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 


33 


land their fares and transship them in scows or other shallow boats 
to Biloxi. In this manner the red-snapper fishery might be estab¬ 
lished and successfully prosecuted. 

MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES. 

RELATIONS WITH OTHER GOVERNMENT BUREAUS. 

During the year the Bureau has cooperated with other branches of 
the Government, both giving and receiving assistance in the interests 
of an economical and efficient administration of the public business. 
The assistance rendered to the Bureau of the Census in the statistical 
canvass of the fisheries in the preceding fiscal year was supplemented 
by the detail of an agent of the Bureau to aid in certain technical 
matters connected with the compilation of the data. This assistance 
consisted principally in the identification and consideration of the 
involved and often dubious nomenclature of the fishes exhibited in 
the field schedules. 

A large number of samples of fishery products have been identified 
and passed on at the request of the food and drug board of the 
Department of Agriculture, and other assistance has been rendered 
in connection with the functions of that board. 

In March, 1910, on request of the Secretary of War preferred 
through the Department, an examination and appraisal was made 
’ of certain oyster bottoms adjoining the military reservation at Fort 
Monroe, Ya., recently ceded by the State of Virginia to the Federal 
Government. A full report, accompanied by tracings, was trans¬ 
mitted to the War Department. 

The Bureau expresses its appreciation of the services of the Bureau 
of Chemistry of the Department of Agriculture for analyses of water 
from various hatcheries and to the Coast and Geodetic Survey for 
various charts and projections and for other courtesies extended. 

INTERNATIONAL FISHERY MATTERS. 

In 1909, as in the four previous years, at the request of the Depart¬ 
ment of State, the Bureau detailed a representative to visit New¬ 
foundland for the purpose of observing the operations of American 
fishing vessels engaged in the herring fisheries there under the pro¬ 
visions of the modus vivendi. The detail extended from October, 
1909, to January, 1910. No vessel was assigned to the work this year. 
In June, 1910, two representatives from the Bureau’s official staff were 
detailed to The Hague to assist the American counsel in the case be¬ 
fore that tribunal for a settlement of the dispute as to the rights of 
our fishermen in Newfoundland and Canadian waters under the 
treaty of 1818. 

The Bureau continued its cooperation with the State Department, 
through the International Fisheries Commission, in securing basic 


34 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

data for the regulations required by the treaty between the United 
States and Great Britain, signed April 11, 1908, which provides for 
the joint control by the United States and Canada of the fisheries 
in the waters contiguous to the boundary between the two countries. 
Field work was conducted in Passamaquoddy Bay and eastern Maine 
and on Lake Erie and Lake Huron. 

There is every reason to believe that both of these international 
questions, which have long been a source of irritation to the fishermen 
of the countries involved, will be satisfactorily adjusted during the 
present year. 

EMPLOYMENT OF VESSELS. 

The investigation concerning the aquatic resources of the Philip¬ 
pine Islands was continued by the steamer Albatross until February 
12, when she went to Nagasaki for a general overhauling before 
undertaking the voyage to the United States. She arrived at San 
Francisco in excellent condition May 4, and was promptly made 
ready for immediate work in Alaskan waters. While the vessel under¬ 
went considerable repairs in Hongkong the year before, these were 
necessitated by work previous to the Philippine expedition and the 
fact that she returned to San Francisco in such good condition after 
a cruise beginning in 1907 reflects credit on the construction of the 
vessel and the care given by her commanding officers. 

The steamer Fish Hawk was occupied from the beginning of the 
fiscal year until the middle of September in a comprehensive survey 
of the public oyster grounds of Virginia in the James River, and 
afterwards in collecting aquarium specimens. In October the ship 
went to Woods Hole, where her machinery was put in good order by 
the station force and the crew and the vessel made ready for further 
work. In the spring, shad hatching on the Delaware River was be¬ 
gun and continued until June, when a survey of the public oyster 
grounds of Delaware was commenced and at the close of the year was 
still in progress. Fuller references to the surveys mentioned are 
embodied elsewhere in this report. 

The schooner Grampus was engaged in the mackerel investigation 
referred to elsewhere until October 10, 1909, her sphere of operations 
extending from Newport to Bay of Islands, Newfoundland, and the 
Gulf of St. Lawrence, and including the offshore fishing banks. 
During the late fall and winter the vessel was laid up and the crew 
utilized in connection with marine fish-cultural work on the New 
England coast until April, when she was made ready for sea and 
began the collection of lobster eggs and distribution of lobster fry 
for the hatchery at Boothbay Harbor, Me., and was so engaged the 
remainder of the year. 

The smaller steamer Phalarope was used during the entire year 
in fish-chltural work on the New England coast and on the Potomac 





BEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 35 

River, and as a collecting vessel for the Woods Hole laboratory. 
The Curlew was employed on the Mississippi River, especially in 
collecting fishes from the overflowed lands. 

PUBLICATIONS AND LIBRARY. 

The collection of special books maintained by the Bureau for pur¬ 
poses of reference and technical investigation has received 260 acces¬ 
sions in Washington from gifts, purchases, and exchanges, and over 
200 accessions at the laboratories and stations elsewhere. The intimate 
relations maintained with other libraries result in exchanges and 
transfers which are mutually profitable, and particularly advan¬ 
tageous to the Bureau in view of the limited funds available for the 
purchase of books and periodicals. The use of the library has been 
much facilitated by the progress made during the year on the system- 
atic subject catalogue. 

The continued interest of the public in the work of the Bureau is 
shown by the facts that during the year 2,916 bound volumes and 
21,832 pamphlets of its publications were sent out on request, 45,890 
were required for the regular mailing list, and 2,020 issued to authors. 
There were received from the Government Printing Office for dis¬ 
tribution 87 new reports and bulletins published by the Bureau and 
5 reprints of important documents the supply of which had been 
exhausted. The titles of the new issues (No. 646 to No. 732) may be 
found in the Bureau’s list of publications available for distribution. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

The total appropriations for the Bureau for the fiscal year 
amounted to $823,490, or $16,610 less than the aggregate for the 


previous year. 

Salaries: 

General_$316, 860 

Agents at Alaska salmon fisheries _ 4, 500 

Agents at seal fisheries _ 11,430 

Miscellaneous expenses: 

Administration_ 8. 000 

Propagation of food fishes _ 275, 000 

Inquiry respecting food fishes - 30, 000 

Statistical inquiry - 7, 500 

Maintenance of vessels _ 55, 000 

Supplies for native inhabitants, seal islands _ 19, 500 

Specials: 

Establishment of fish-cultural stations on Puget Sound or its 

tributaries _1_ 50,000 

Establishment of a fish-cultural station in the upper Mississippi 

Valley _ 25, 000 

Purchase of a steamboat, Put-in-Bay, Ohio_ 15, 000 

Construction of roadway, Greenlake, Me _ 2, 700 

Repairs to buildings, Pribilof Islands_ 3, 000 
















36 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

In addition to the above funds, the sum of $150,000 was appro¬ 
priated and made immediately available for the purpose of carrying 
out the provisions of the act of April 21,1910, which placed under the 
Secretary of Commerce and Labor the administration of the fur-seal 
islands and the preservation of the fur-bearing animals of Alaska. 

An itemized statement of expenditures authorized by the fore¬ 
going appropriations will be made as required by law. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

REORGANIZATION OF PERSONNEL. 

The foregoing report exhibits briefly the rapid growth of the activi¬ 
ties and responsibilities of the Bureau by natural accretion to lines of 
work long established and by the addition of functions not contem¬ 
plated when the present organization was adopted. The assignment 
of new duties to the Bureau has made it necessary to impose them 
upon persons whose time and attention were already fully taxed by 
the natural development of their previous responsibilities, and it 
therefore appears to be essential to the continued efficiency of the 
Bureau that there should be a reorganization of the personnel. The 
Alaska salmon service and the fur-seal service, now assigned to the 
Bureau, both involving executive and police functions of an exacting 
character, are administered by the Division of Scientific Inquiry, 
from which it is desirable that they be separated. The original re¬ 
quirements of the division are incompatible with the added functions, 
and their continued administration by one person can only be at the 
sacrifice of the efficiency of both. It is therefore recommended that 
the present organization be augmented by the creation of a new 
division to be known as the Division of Alaska Fisheries, with suffi¬ 
cient additions to the present force to make its work effective. 

The United States has entered into certain treaty obligations in 
respect to the waters adjacent to the Canadian boundary, whereby it 
is proposed to assume international control of the fisheries in the 
interest of their conservation and development. Regulations making 
this agreement effective were submitted to the Senate but were re¬ 
turned to the joint commissioners for further consideration. It is 
assumed that they will be reduced to a satisfactory basis in the near 
future, in which event the Bureau will find itself charged with enforc¬ 
ing them. Should this be the case, since under the present organiza¬ 
tion there is no provision for the discharge of this duty, it will be 
necessary to provide a Division of International Fisheries. 

SALARIES AND PERSONNEL. 

The recommendations of the preceding fiscal year in reference to 
the increase of the salaries attached to certain positions in its service 
are renewed. Congress at its recent session increased the pay of low- 




REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 37 

grade clerks, firemen, and messengers, but did not authorize any 
advance in the salaries of those on whose work the efficiency of the 
Bureau is more directly dependent. The experience of another year 
has made more apparent the desirability of making remuneration 
more commensurate with duties and responsibilities. 

The Bureau is in constant receipt of requests from Members of 
Congress and state authorities for special investigations and experi¬ 
ments in the interests of the public fisheries, and in many cases prompt 
compliance with these legitimate demands is difficult or impossible, 
because the personnel has not kept pace with either the growth of the 
work or the increase of general appropriations. There are certain 
fisheries to which, on account of their peculiar requirements, it has 
not been possible to render the service which those engaged in them 
have the right to expect. To the oyster industry, for instance, which 
yields $16,000,000 annually, about 30 per cent of the value of the 
entire fisheries of the United States, the Bureau’s assistance has been 
wholly inadequate. Proportionately to the value of the respective 
fisheries, sixty-five dollars are profitably expended in shad culture 
for every dollar spent for the benefit of the oyster industry. The 
inequality arises not from the inability to allot money from the appro¬ 
priations, but to the lack of trained and experienced men. Fish- 
cultural methods can not be applied in oyster culture, and the only 
valuable aid which can be offered is through the medium of research 
and practical experiment, which experience has shown lead to profit¬ 
able and lasting benefits from disproportionally small expenditures. 
For carrying on such work provision should be made for additional 
scientific assistants. 

SPONGE LAW. 

The act of June 20, 1006, to provide for the protection of the 
sponge fisheries of the United States on the high seas of the Gulf of 
Mexico and the Straits of Florida, has shown itself futile and impos¬ 
sible of enforcement. The purpose of this law was to prohibit the 
fishery by diving in depths of less than 50 feet, and during the period 
from May 1 to October 1 to prevent the taking, by whatever means, 
outside of the 3-mile limit, of sponges smaller than 4 inches in 
diameter. 

The offenses aimed at are not specifically prohibited, but they 
were supposed to be prevented by the prohibition of certain subsid¬ 
iary acts—the landing, curing, or offering for sale in the United 
States of sponges taken in contravention of the real purpose of 
the law. To secure a conviction it is therefore necessary to estab¬ 
lish a connection between the act of taking under the objection¬ 
able circumstances and certain subsequent and secondary acts which 
per se are innocuous. A diving vessel operating during the close 


38 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

season can not be interfered with until the sponges are landed, cured, 
or offered for sale in the United States. The sponges, therefore, must 
be followed or traced from their beds in the high seas to a point 
of territorial jurisdiction, a requirement that is usually impossible 
of enforcement. 

Moreover, the law provided the Department with no machinery 
for its enforcement. It has been necessary to depend upon the 
courtesy of the Treasury Department for the personnel required, 
and no provision has been made for expenses. 

In view of the circumstances narrated, and in the interest of the 
unimpaired maintenance of the sponge beds, it is recommended that 
the act of June 20, 1906, be amended to correct its defects and that 
the Bureau be provided with an inspector, a suitable boat, and funds 
for the proper enforcement of the law. It is further recommended 
that the minimum size of sponges which it shall be legitimate to take 
be established at 5 inches diameter, and if this be done that the 
close season be curtailed by not exceeding two months. 

EXTENSION OF FISII CULTURE. 

It is again urged that provision be made for the establishment of 
additional stations for the rescue of fishes from overflowed lands in 
the Mississippi Valley. Millions of fish now annually left by the 
receding waters to die of exposure can by this means be saved at 
small expense. 

The Bureau is of the opinion that a highly important work of the 
near future will be the stocking of ponds and streams on the farms 
of the country with hardy species of fish requiring little care or 
attention and omnivorous as to diet. The several species of catfishes 
appear to fulfill the requirements more completely than any other 
fish. They will grow in sluggish and muddy water, they are very 
tenacious of life, their diet is of wide variety, and as food they 
are excelled by but few fresh-water fish. While some of the smaller 
species can be made important additions to the home food supplies 
of the farms, certain others, particularly the larger ones, are already 
the basis of important commercial fisheries. For the propagation of 
both kinds the establishment of a station at some point in the lower 
Mississippi Valley, preferably near Morgan City, La., is regarded as 
highly desirable. 

The fish-cultural work in Yellowstone Park has been conducted 
heretofore with inadequate means as an adjunct to the operation of 
Spearfish Hatchery, but it is believed that the opportunities in the 
national park are such as to warrant an independent station. One 
of the chief difficulties encountered in the efforts to replenish the 
depleted fisheries of the United States arises from the lack of control 




REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 39 

over the fishes after they are planted and the neglect of certain 
States to make provision for their protection. Yellowstone Park, 
being under federal jurisdiction, offers an exceptional opportunity 
to demonstrate the possibilities of fish culture under rational and 
consistent regulations. 

The Bureau also recommends the establishment of one marine and 
one additional fresh-water hatchery on the Pacific coast, and an addi¬ 
tional station in Texas for the supply of a demand for fish in the 
Southwest which it is at present impossible to satisfy. 

LABORATORY FOR THE STUDY OF FISH DISEASES. 

There is again urged the importance of a station for the study of 
fish diseases and experiments in the interests of fish culture. In some 
of the hatcheries of the Bureau and in similar establishments under 
state and private auspices certain fish diseases have become so preva¬ 
lent as to make it a matter of grave consideration whether the propa¬ 
gation of certain species, especially the trouts, should not be aban¬ 
doned. It frequently occurs that the fish and fry are decimated by 
epidemics for which there are no known remedies, in consequence of 
which there are annually entailed on fish culture large wastes of time 
and money. In addition to the financial loss, embarrassment arises 
at times in filling legitimate demands for fish for restocking depleted 
waters, and the effect on the morale of the employees of the Bureau 
who have to struggle hopelessly against an obscure disease is not 
unworthy of consideration. The gravest phase of the matter, how¬ 
ever, is the possible relationship of some of these diseases to more or 
less kindred affections occurring in human beings. It, has been deter¬ 
mined that a type of cancerous affection is of widespread distribution 
among domesticated trout and their offspring planted in the streams. 
Whether this disease has a causal relation to cancer in human beings, 
or whether the two are to be even traced to the same source, is a mat¬ 
ter of doubt, but the annually increasing mortality from cancer in 
man and certain remarkable coincidences in the geographical dis¬ 
tribution of the disease in man and fish render it imperative that it 
should be made the subject of minute inquiry. The matter therefore 
has not only economic but humanitarian aspects, and the considera¬ 
tion of the serious character of the latter prompted the President to 
submit to Congress on April 9, 1910, a special message advocating an 
appropriation of $50,000 for the construction and equipment of a 
laboratory adequate to enable the Bureau to discharge its plain obli¬ 
gations. The Bureau in the meantime is proceeding in the investiga¬ 
tion to the limit of its powers, but it may be stated emphatically 
that it can make but little progress without the special facilities 
asked for. 


40 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

FISHERY INTELLIGENCE SERVICE. 

For many years the Bureau has maintained at Boston and 
Gloucester, Mass., a service making current statistical reports on the 
fisheries of those ports. This service has the strong support of the 
commercial interests, and a proposition for its abandonment would 
result in instant and vigorous protest. The large fishery interests 
of the Pacific coast are becoming insistent in their requests that a 
similar service be inaugurated in that region, and the Bureau regards 
the work of such importance as to impel it to recommend provision 
for a suitable personnel for the purpose. In view of the regard in 
which the reports at Boston and Gloucester are held by the fishery 
interests, it would appear desirable to gradually extend the service 
to other places on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts having extensive vessel 
fisheries. 

NEW BUILDING. 

As has been repeatedly indicated in these reports, the quarters of 
the Bureau are antiquated, crowded, unsafe, and inadequate in every 
respect. They impede the transaction of the public business and 
interfere with efficiency and development. It is again earnestly 
recommended that provision be made for a building which will fur¬ 
nish offices, laboratories, workrooms, and an aquarium national in 
scope and in keeping with necessitous requirements. 

Respectfully, 

Geo. M. Bowers, 

Commissioner. 


To Hon. Charles Nagel, 

Secretary of Commerce and Labor. 




THE DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS DURING 
THE FISCAL YEAR 1910 


Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 740 










CONTENTS. 


Page. 


Character of the work. 5 

Method of distribution. 5 

Size of fish when distributed. 6 

Size of allotments. 7 

Species cultivated in 1910. 7 

Output. 9 

Statement of output by stations. 10 

Allotments to State fish commissions. 24 

Shipments to foreign countries. 24 

Summarized statement of distributions. 25 

Details of the distributions. 26 


INDEX TO SPECIES. 


Page. 


Atlantic salmon. 39 

Bass, large-mouth black. 88 

rock. 83 

sea. 110 

small-mouth black. 86 

strawberry. 81 

striped. 109 

warmouth. 85 

white. 109 

yellow. 110 

Blackspotted trout. 40 

Blueback salmon. 30 

Bream. 101 

Brook trout. 44 

Buffalofish. 28 

Carp. 27 

Catfish. 26 

Chinook salmon. 30 

Cisco. 29 

Cod.... Ill 

Crappie. 81 

Drum, fresh-water. Ill 

Flatfish.!. 112 

Fresh-water drum. Ill 

Grayling. 80 

Haddock. Ill 

Humpback salmon. 30 

Lake herring. 29 

Lake trout. 43 

Landlocked salmon. 39 

Large-mouth black bass. 88 

Lobsters. 112 

Loch Leven trout. 43 

Mackerel. 110 

Perch, pike. 105 

white. 110 


Page. 

Perch, yellow. 107 

Pickerel. 80 

Pike. 80 

Pike perch. 105 

Pollock. Ill 

Rainbow trout. 31 

Rock bass. 83 

Salmon, Atlantic. 39 

blueback. .30 

chinook. 30 

humpback. 30 

landlocked. 39 

silver. 29 

Sea bass. 110 

Shad. 28 

Silver salmon. 29 

Small-mouth black bass. 86 

Smelt. 80 

Steelhead trout. 31 

Strawberry bass. 81 

Striped bass. 109 

Sunapee trout. 80 

Sunfish. 101 

Trout, brook. 44 

blackspotted. 40 

lake. 43 

Loch Leven. 43 

rainbow. 31 

steelhead. 31 

Sunapee..:. 80 

Warmouth bass. 85 

White bass. 109 

White perch. HO 

Whitefish. 29 

Yellow bass. HO 

Yellow perch. 107 


3 


























































































THE DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS DURING THE 
FISCAL YEAR 1910, 


CHARACTER OF THE WORK. 


More than 95 per cent of the output of the fish-cultural stations 
consists of important commercial species, notably the salmons, shad, 
whitefish, pike perch, yellow perch, white perch, lake trout, cod, 
pollock, flatfish, and lobsters. These are hatched in lots of many 
millions annually and planted by the Bureau, the fresh-water spe¬ 
cies principally in the large coastal streams and in the Great Lakes, 
the marine species upon the inshore fishing grounds of the Atlantic. 

The cultivation of the fishes of the interior waters generally classed 
as game fishes, although a comparatively small factor in the total 
output, is a very important feature of the Bureau’s work, supplying 
as it does various kinds of young fish for public streams, lakes and 
ponds, fishing preserves, private ponds, streams, etc., in all parts of 
the United States. Among the fishes most extensively cultivated 
for these purposes are the landlocked salmon, several species of 
trout, the grayling, the basses, crappie, bream, and catfish; various 
others also- are handled. The trouts are artificially hatched from 
eggs taken from both wild and domesticated stock; the basses, 
catfish, and others are derived from mature fish held in ponds for 
breeding purposes, or (except the small-mouth black bass) they are 
rescued from the overflows of the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers. 
Collections from the latter sources include also pike and pickerel, 
which are not distributed to applicants but are returned immediately 
to the main streams. 

METHOD OF DISTRIBUTION. 


The first consideration in the Bureau’s distribution of fishes is to 
make ample return to the waters from which eggs or fish have been 
collected. The remainder of the product is consigned to suitable 
public or private waters upon application indorsed by a United 
States Senator or Representative, the Bureau furnishing to persons 
interested an application blank for this purpose. The blank calls 
for a description of the waters to be stocked, and by this information 
is determined the species of fish that is suitable and the number that 
may be allotted to the water area in cpiestion. Certain predaceous 
species, such as the basses, perches, and pickerel, are not furnished 
59395°—11-1 5 


4 




6 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


for waters inhabited by trout or other valuable fishes to which they 
would be destructive. Nor, of course, are species like trout and 
salmon furnished for waters already stocked with fish that would 
prey upon them. 

The fish are carried to their destination in railroad cars equipped 
for the purpose, or by messengers who accompany the shipments in 
baggage cars, and are delivered to the applicant free of charge, at 
the railroad station nearest the point of deposit. The applicant is 
advised by telegraph when the shipment will arrive, and is expected 
to make due provision for care of the fish until planted. Definite 
instructions in this respect are furnished at the time of shipment. 

During the past fiscal year (July 1, 1909, to June 30, 1910) the 
Bureau received 10,635 applications for fish, nearly all for the game 
species. The demand, especially for the basses, crappie, and the 
catfishes, has for some time been greater than could be met with 
available resources. The number of applications this year was 523 
more than in 1909. 

SIZE OF FISH WHEN DISTRIBUTED. 

Fishes are distributed at various stages of development, according 
to the species, the numbers in the hatcheries, and the facilities for 
rearing. The commercial fishes—such as the shad, whitefish, lake 
trout, pike perch, cod, etc., hatched in lots of many millions—are 
necessarily planted as fry shortly after hatching. Atlantic salmon, 
landlocked salmon, and various species of trout are reared, in such 
numbers as the hatchery facilities permit, to ftngerlings from 1 to 6 
inches in length; the remainder are distributed as fry.® 

The basses, bream, and other sunfishes are distributed from some 
three weeks after they are hatched until they are several months of 
age. When the last lots are shipped the basses usually range from 
4 to 6 inches and the sunfishes from 2 to 4 inches in length. The 
numerous fishes collected in overflowed lands—basses, crappie, sun¬ 
fishes, catfishes, yellow perch, and others—are 2 to 6 inches in length 
when taken and distributed. 

Eggs are distributed only to state hatcheries and, occasionally, 
to applicants who have hatchery facilities. 

a The varying usage in the classification of young fish as to size has caused such confusion and difficulty 
that the Bureau has adopted uniform definitions, as follows: 

-FYy=fish up to the time the yolk sac is absorbed and feeding begins. 

Advanced fry= fish from the end of the fry period imtil they have reached a length of 1 inch. 

Fingcrlings= fish between the length of 1 inch and the yearling stage, the various sizes to be designated 
as follows: No. 1, a fish 1 inch in length and up to 2 inches; no. 2, a fish 2 inches in length and up to 3 inches; 
No. 3, a fish 3 inches in length and up to 4 inches, etc. 

Yearlings= fish that are 1 year old, but less than 2 years old from the date of hatching; these may be 
designated No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, etc., after the plan prescribed for ftngerlings. 






DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


7 


SIZE OF ALLOTMENTS. 

The Bureau does not attempt to furnish to any one applicant 
more than a brood stock of fish for a given private pond or stream, 
it being expected that these will be protected until they have had 
time to reproduce. The number of fish in an allotment is, however, 
a variable quantity, depending upon the species and the age at 
which distributed. Brook trout, which are distributed both as fry 
and fingerlings, are allotted in much larger numbers as fry than as 
fingerlings 3 or 4 inches long. Pike perch, which, owing to their 
excessive cannibalism, can not be reared and are consequently dis¬ 
tributed as fry, may be supplied in lots of half a million, where an 
equal water area would receive only 200 or 300 young bass from 2 to 
5 inches long. These latter larger fish have a much better chance of 
reaching maturity than have the fry, and the actual value for stocking 
purposes of a few hundred fingerling bass may therefore equal many 
thousand times this number of pike perch fry. 

SPECIES CULTIVATED IN 1910. 

The species cultivated by the Bureau in 1910 numbered some 50 
fishes and the lobster. Of these the following were artificially 
propagated: 

The catpishes (Silurid.e): 

Homed pout, bullhead, yellow cat ( Ameiurus nebulosus). 

Marbled cat ( Ameiurus nebulosus mannoratus). 

The shads and herrings (Clupeid.e): 

Shad ( Alosa sapidissima). 

The salmons, trouts, whitefishes, etc. (Salmonid^e): 

Common whitefish ( Coregonus albus and C. clupcaformis). 

Lake herring, cisco (Leucichthys artedi). 

Chinook salmon, king salmon, quinnat salmon ( Oncorhynchus tschaivytscha). 

Silver salmon, coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch). 

Blueback salmon, redfish, sockeye ( Opcorhynchus nerka). 

Humpback salmon ( Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). 

Steelhead trout, hardhead (Salmo gairdneri). 

Rainbow trout (Salmo irideus). 

Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar ). 

Landlocked salmon (Salmo sebago). 

Blackspotted trouts: Yellowstone Lake trout or cutthroat trout (Salmo lewisi)’, 
Colorado River trout (Salmo pleuriticus) ; Tahoe trout (Salmo henshawi). 

Loch Leven trout (Salmo trutta levensis). Introduced species, propagated in 
limited numbers for observation. 

Lake trout, Mackinaw trout, longe, togue (Cristivomer namaycush). 

Brook trout, speckled trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). 

Sunapee trout (Salvelinus aiireolus). 

The graylings (Thymallhue): 

Montana grayling ( Thymallus montanus). 

The smelts (Argentinhle): 

American smelt (Osmerus mordax). 


8 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


The basses, sunfishes, and crappxes (Centrarchid.e): 

Crappie ( Pomoxis annularis). 

Strawberry bass, calico bass ( Pomoxis sparoides). 

Rock bass, red-eye, goggle-eye ( Ambloplites rupestris). 

Warmouth, goggle-eye ( Chsenobryttus gulosus). 

Small-mouth black bass ( Micropterus dolomieu). 

Large-mouth black bass ( Micropterus salmoides). 

Bluegill bream, bluegill sunfish ( Lepomis pallidus). 

Other sunfishes, chiefly Eupomotis gibbosus. 

The perches (Perchle): 

Pike perch, wall-eyed pike, yellow pike, blue pike ( Stizostedion vitreum). 

Yellow perch, ring perch ( Perea Jlavescens). 

The sea basses (Serranhle): 

Sea bass ( Centropristes striatus). 

Striped bass, rockfish ( Roccns lineatus). 

White bass ( Roccus chrysops). 

White perch ( Morone americana). 

Yellow bass ( Morone interrupta). 

The mackerels (Scombrid.e): 

Mackerel ( Scomber scombrus). 

Th e cods (Gadid^e): 

Cod ( Gadus callarias). 

Haddock ( Melanogrammus seglejinus., 

Pollock ( Pollachius virens). 

The flounders (Pleuronecthle): 

Winter flounder, American flatfish ( Pseudopleuronectes americanvs). 
Crustaceans: 

American lobster ( Homarus americanus). 

After the annual seasons of high water in the Mississippi basin, 
great numbers of young fish are left in sloughs and pools when the 
waters have receded, -and would eventually die by the drying up of 
these shallow places in summer or freezing in winter. Large collec¬ 
tions are made from such sources, for return to the original stream 
and, of the most abundant species, also to supplement the hatchery 
stock for distribution. The fishes so collected in 1910 were as follows: 
The catfishes (Silurid^e): 

Spotted cat, blue cat, channel cat (Ictalurus punctatus). Only limited numbers 
obtainable. 

Horned pout, bullhead, yellow cat ( Ameiurus nebulosus). 

The suckers and buffalofishes (Catostomid.e): 

Small-mouth buffalofish ( Ictiobus bubalus). 

The minnows and carps (Cyprinid^e): 

Carp ( Cyprinus carpio). Distributed in rare instances, for waters unsuited to 
other species. 

The pikes and pickerels (Esocid^e): 

Pike ( Esox Indus). Restored to the streams; nqt distributed. 

Pickerel ( Esox reticulatus). Restored to the streams; not distributed. 

The basses, sunfishes, and crappies (Centrarchid.e): 

Crappie ( Pomoxis annularis). 

Rock bass, red-eye, goggle-eye ( Ambloplites rupestris). 

Warmouth, goggle-eye ( Chsenobryttus gulosus). 

Large-mouth black bass ( Micropterus salmoides). 









DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


9 


The basses, sunfishes, and crappies (Centrarchid.e)— Continued. 

Small-mouth black-bass ( Micropterus dolomieu). 

Bluegill bream, bluegill sunfish ( Lepomis pallidus). 

Other sunfishes (chiefly Eupomotis gibbosus).. 

The perches (Percuke): 

Yellow perch, ring perch ( Perea flavescens). 

The croakers (Sceenidje): 

Fresh-water drum, sheepshead, gaspergou ( Aplodinotus grunniens). Only lim¬ 
ited numbers obtainable. Not distributed. 

Certain introduced species are propagated to a limited extent, as 
follows: 

The minnows and carps (Cyprinid^e): 

Goldfish ( Carassius auratus). Propagated for ornamental purposes; not dis¬ 
tributed . 

Ide ( Leuciscus idus). Cultivated variety, golden ide. Propagated for ornamental 
purposes; not distributed. 

OUTPUT. 

Although unfavorable climatic conditions, in 1910, prevented the 
collection of as large numbers of eggs as usual, the superior quality 
obtamed from the most important species made possible a 4 per cent 
increase over the previous record year of 1909. As appears in the 
Report of the Commissioner of Fisheries for 1910, this year’s output 
of the stations was something over 473,000,000 eggs, 2,720,000,000 
fry, and 36,000,000 fingerlings, yearlings, and adults, or more than 
3,230,000,000 fish and eggs in all. The yield of the various species 
showed the usual fluctuations, there being notable increases in the 
blueback, silver, and Atlantic salmons, lake trout, lake herring, 
yellow perch, shad, cod, flatfish, and steelhead {rout, offset to some 
extent by decreases in chinook salmon, wliitefish, pike perch, and 
less important fishes. 

The following table shows the work of the different stations in 1910, 
the period of operation, and the eggs and fish delivered by each sta¬ 
tion for distribution. It will be noted that transfers of eggs and 
fish from station to station are frequent, serving economy and con¬ 
venience in transportation where the shipment consists of eggs, and 
giving advantageous distributing centers in the case of young fish. 
Transfers are in all cases credited to the receiving station in the 
column of totals, but for completeness of information are recorded 
opposite both shipping and receiving station in the columns headed 
“Transfers.” The purpose of this table is to be distinguished from 
that of the summary of distributions on page 25 of this report, 
which is a statement of the number of eggs and fish actually delivered 
at their destination, all losses in shipment being deducted. 


10 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Stations Operated and the 


Note.—T he relative importance of the stations is in a degree indicated in the table by marginal indentions 
haps shifting in location from year to year. At all other substations eggs were both collected and hatched, 
stations to which they are, for'administration purposes, subordinate; but it is not always possible to show 


Station and period of 
operation. 


Eggs. 

Species. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to other 
stations. 

Transfers from other 
stations. 






Entire year. 

II umpbaek salmon 




7,331,217 

13,680 



Entire year. 


Central station, 15,000. 






Battle Creek, Cal... 
Oct.-Jan. 


7,358,800 

438,550 
100,000 
15,849,450 

100,000 



Blackspotted trout 



Jan.-May. 

Mill Creek, Cal 






Oct.-Jan. 




Entire year. 





100,000 







Birdsview, Wash... 
Entire year. 

Humpback salmon 




275,000 
300,000 



Steelhead trout.... 

Cape Vincent, 25,000.. 

Day Creek, 769,000_ 





Illabott Creek, 431,740. 

Day Creek, Wash.... 

Feb.-June. 
Illabot t Creek, Wash. 

July-Oct. 
Salmon Banks, San 
Juan Island, Wash. 
July-Oct. 

Battery, Havre de 
Grace, Md. 

Feb. 27-May 25. 





439,990 







5,200.000 

16,500,000 

800,000 












Boothbay Harbor, Me.. 
Entire year. 


780,000 






Cod. 














July 1-Jan. 1. 





July 1-Oct. 31. 





Entire year. 

Blackspotted trout 




85.000 





25,000 

















Grayling, Mont . 





"Mar. 1-June 30. 

Grayling. 




Soda Butte , National 

Blackspotted trout 




Park, Mont. 

June 16-20. 

Bryans Point, Md. 

4,030,000 

1,077,000 



Feb. 21-May 23. 

Shad. 

4,030,000. 


Cape Vincent, N. Y_ 

Entire year. 

Steelhead trout.... 

1,077,000. 

Birdsview, 25,000. 

Whitefish. 



Put-in-Bay, 25,000,000. 

Brook trout. 




Lake trout. 



Duluth, 5,100,000. 


Pike perch. 



Put-in Bay, 5,000,000.. 
Grand Lake Stream, 


Landlocked salmon 




Rainbow trout.... 



15,000. 


Yellow perch. 




























































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


11 


Output of Each, 1910. 

and italic type, the italics being used to denote substations which were merely collecting points, per- 
It should be added that some suT>stations are more important in the actual fish-cultural work than the 
the output of these important substations separate from that of the main hatchery. 


Fry. 

Fingerlings, yearlings, and adults. 


Dis- 1 Transfers to 

tributed. j other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 

output. 

68,422,170 
363,740 
2,286,257 






68,422,170 

363,740 

9,502,474 

13,680 
24,165 
7,358,800 

1,156,570 
100,000 
15,849,450 

5,908.848 
149,570 
4,654,825 
14,400 
1,368,000 
5,354,177 













* 



24,165 











718,020 

















5,808,848 
149,570 
4,554,825 
14,400 
1,368,000 
5,079,177 
1,422,938 









































1,672,938 

705,840 

705,840 

















8,250 







120,300,000 
338,480,000 
5,391,000 
115,000 
128,106,000 
402,165,000 
14,888,000 
712,000 






125,500,000 
354,980,000 
6,191.000 
115,000 
128,888,052 
402,165,000 
14,888,000 
712,000 


















2,052 























1 









353,818 

351,006 

48,518 

18 

17,000 
28,900 
18,718 



353,818 

351,006 

71,518 

106,018 

17,000 

28,900 

18,718 






23,000 

81,000 










































200,285,000 

31,065,000 

46,761 
20,170,000 
941,500 
4,852,000 
4,800,000 
14.500 

38,000 

1,600,000 






200,285,000 

31,065,000 

46,761 

20,170,000 

941.500 

4,852,000 

4,800,000 

14,500 

38,000 

1,600,000 
























































































































12 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Stations Operated and the 


Station and period of 


Eggs. 

Species. 




operation. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to other 
stations. 

Transfers from other 
stations. 

Central Station, Wash¬ 
ington, D. C. 

Entire year. 

Sunfish. 




Crappie. 




Catfish. 









Warmouth bass.. 





Rock bass. 





Small-mouth black 





bass. 

Large-mouth black 
bass. 









Steelhead trout.... 





Chinook salmon... 



Baird, 15,000 





Bryans Point, 4,030,000 
Put-in Bay, 6,000,000.. 
St. Johnsbury, 20,000.. 

Put-in Bay, 640,000_ 

Detroit, 500,000. 

Bryans Point, 1,077,000 


Pike perch. 















Clackamas, Oregon City, 
Oreg. 

Entire year. 

Rainbow trout.... 



Brook trout. 

. 



Steelhead trout.... 



Eagle Creek, 75,000_ 

Blackspotted trout 
Lake trout. 








Chinook salmon... 

150,000 


Rogue River, 61,600... 

Big White Salmon, 

.do. 


Wash. 

Aug. 1-Feb. 28. 
Cazadero, Oreg. 

Steelhead trout.... 



Eagle Creek, 410,000... 


Chinook salmon... 

2,452,666 
485,000 


Eagle Creek,Clacka- 

Steelhead trout.... 

Cazadero, 410,000. 


mas River, Oreg. 
Mar. 15-June 25. 
Eagle and Tanner 

Chinook salmon... 

269,300 

14,200 

3,805,000 

484,000 

Clackamas, 75,000. 


Creeks, Oreg. 

Aug. 1-Oet. 1. 
Illinois River, Oreg . 

Aug. 1-Apr. 30. 
Little White Sal- 


Rogue River, 14,200. 


.do. 


mon, Wash. 

Entire year. 
Rogue River, Oreg.. 



Illinois River, 14,200 .. 

Entire year. 

Steelhead trout.... 


Wil’amette, Oreg... 

Shad. 




Jan. 1-July 15. 
Bybee Bridge, Rogue 

Chinook salmon... 




River, Oreg. 

Aug. 1-Nov. 1. 
Cold Springs, Bulloch- 

Large-mouth black 




ville, Ga. 

Entire year. 

bass. 

Sunfish. 




Catfish. 





Warmouth bass... 





Rock bass. 




Craig Brook, East Or- 

Brook trout. 



St. Johnsbury, 5,000... 

land. Me. 

Atlantic salmon... 

1,345,000 

Upper Penobsco t, Me., 
1,340,000. 

Entire year. 
Upper Penobscot,, 

.do. 

Craig Brook, 1,340,000. 

Grand Lake Stream, 
15,000. 

Me. 

Oct. 15-June 1. 
Duluth, Minn. 

Landlocked sal- 



Entire year. 

mon. 

Brook trout. 




Whitefish. 



Detroit, 25 000 000 


Pike perch. 



Put-in Bay, 15,000,000. 


Steelhead trout.... 




Lake trout. 

5,425,000 

Cape Vincent, 5,100,000 
Green Lake, 125,000. 

Northville, 5,000,000... 

Grand Marais, Mich. 

.do. 

Oct. 16-Nov. 18. 
Grand Marais, Minn. 

.do. 




Sept. 19-Nov,26. 
Grand Portage,Minn. 

.do. 




Sept.24-Oct. 15. 
Keweenaw Point, 

.do. 




Mich. 

Oct. 4-Nov. 2. 
Marquette, Mich.... 





Oct. 16-Nov. 11. 
































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


13 


Output of Each, 1910—Continued. 


Fry. Fingerlings, yearlings, and adults. 


Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 

rotai 

output. 




5,600 



5,600 




247 



247 




450 



450 




9,000 



9,000 




752 


• 

752 




2.010 



2,010 




1,000 



1,000 




440 



440 

7.000 






7,000 

12,000 






12,000 



10,00(T 


Nashua, 10,000. 

10,000 

3,700,000 




3,700,000 

5,000,000 






5^000,000 

18,700 






18,700 

774,000 






774,000 

977,000 






977,000 

51,116 






51,116 

64.800 






64,800 

126.000 






126,000 

82,214 



1,418 



83,632 

12,000 





12,000 

3,086,200 



225 



3,836,425 

3,512,200 






3,512,200 

1,808,835 






1,808,835 

534,197 






2,986,197 

49,503 






49,503 






269,300 

4,808,000 






8,613,000 

660,292 

> 





1,082,692 

89,850 






89,850 

1,678,000 






1,678,000 









107,850 



107,850 




7,080 



7,080 




100 



100 




40 



40 




100 



100 

196,000 



76,550 



272,550 

155, 799 



82,413 



243,212 

1,217,366 






1,217,366 



11,400 



11,400 



« 

370,000 



370,000 

25, ooo, oon 





25,000,000 

13,800,000 






13,800,000 



161,000 



161,000 

8,825,000 



4,246j 500 



13,271,500 




























































































































14 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Stations Operated and the 


Station and period of 
operation. 


Eggs. 

Species. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to other 
stations. 

Transfers from other 
stations. 

Duluth, Minn.—Cont’d. 





Oct. 16-No v. 12. 





Oct. 16-Nov. 13. 





Oct. 15-Nov, 1. 


1,360,000 

4,566,000 



Jan. 2-June 30. 




Apr. 1-May 30. 




Entire year. 

bass. 

Large-mouth black 
bass. 












Wytheville, 503,000.... 

























Entire year. 





Cod. 

34,689,000 

Woods Hole, 24,835,000 






Landlocked sal- 

55,000 

St. Johnsbury, 5,000... 

Grand Lake Stream, 

Entire year. 

mon. 

25,000 

4,500,000 

704,799. 








Duluth, 100,000. 

Branch Pond, Me... 

Sept. 13-Nov.30. 
Grand Lake Stream, 
Me. 

Entire year. 




Northville, 300,000. 

mon. 

824,799 

Duluth, 15,000. 


mon. 

Spearfish, 25,000. 



605,000 

55,000 

Cape Vincent, 15,000. 
Green Lake, 704,799. 

' 

Entire year. 


Clackamas, 100,000. 





' 


Blackspotted trout 

235,000 






Colo. 

Apr. 6-May 8. 
Donah Lake, Colo ... 
Nov. ll-Nov.30. 









Oct. 18-Nov. 28. 
Engelbrecht Lake, 
Colo. 

Oct. 16-Nov. 12. 





Blackspotted trout 
Rainbow trout.... 




Colo. 




July 1-Aug. 1. 
Oct.25-Nov. 11. 
Musgroves Lake, 
Colo. 

Oct. 12-Dec. 6. 
Woodbridge, Colo.... 

Brook trout. 












Nov. 27-Dec. 3. 
Mammoth Spring, Ark.. 
Entire year. 

Large-mouth 




black bass. 
Small-mouth 


* 



black bass. 
Rainbow trout.... 





Rock bass. 




Des Arc, Ark . 

White bass. 




Mar. 4-May 7. 
Helena, Ark... . 

Catfish. 




Aug. 24-Dec. 29 

Buffalo fish. 




Rock bass. 





Pike perch. 





Fresh-water drum 





Sunfish. 





Crappie. 





Large-mouth 





black bass. 
Yellow bass. 





White bass. 


.... 1 




























































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


15 


Output op Each, 1910 — Continued. 


* 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, yearlings, and adults. 

Total 

output. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 






















48,262,000 

2,669,000 






49,622,000 

7,235,000 

700 

22,460 

233,600 
490,780 
230 
1,450 
18,535 
3,860 
16,900,000 
38,140,000 
143,907,000 
312,820,000 
873,364 

1,026,500 

4,500,000 

351,922 








706 

4.860 

233,600 
490,780 
230 
1,450 
18,535 

3.860 



17,600 


































16,900,000 
38,140,000 
134,053,000 
312,820,000 
586,100 

1,001,500 






















237,264 












351,922 

















468,640 

381,440 

2,012,880 

325.600 
24,700 

565.600 



22,200 

379,640 

217,625 







3,472,520 

588,225 
24,700 
837,600 











37,000 


































































1,400 

82,510 

200 

4,300 



1,400 

82,510 

200 

4,300 
























21,540 

178,675 

10,215 

800 

8.950 
85,365 

177,010 

18,230 

250 

5.950 



21,540 

178,675 

10,215 

800 

8.950 
85,365 

177,010 

18,230 

250 

5.950 


































Tupelo, 1,600.. 









































































































16 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Stations Operated and the 


Station and period of 
operation. 

Species. 

Eggs. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to other 
stations. 

Transfers from other 
stations. 


Rock bass. 




Entire year. 

La Crosse, Wis.a _ 

July I5-Oct. 19. 

North McGregor, 
Iowa.a 

July 15-Oct.6. 

Nashua, N. H. 

Pike perch. 



Put-in Bay, 3,500,000.. 

Brook trout. 



Lake trout. 




Rainbow trout.... 
Small-mouth 
black bass. 
Sunfish. 

125,650 








Yellow perch. 




Large-mouth 
black bass. 
Catfish. 







Pickerel. 




Crappie. 




Carp. 




Buffalofish. 




Pike. 




Pike perch. 




White bass. 




Crappie. 




Sunfish. 




Large-mouth 
black bass. 
Catfish. 







Yellow perch. 




Carp. 




Pike. 




Fresh-water drum. 




Small-mouth 
black bass. 
Sunapee trout. 




Entire year. 

Lake Sunapee, N.H 
Oct. 13-Nov.22. 

Neosho, Mo. 




Brook trout. 




Chinook salmon... 




Rainbow trout.... 




Brook trout. 




Sunapee trout. 




Landlocked salmon 
Rainbow trout.... 
Large-mouth 
black bass. 

Rock bass. 




41,264 



Entire year. 

Northville, Mich. 






Crappie. 




Carp. 




Y ellow perch. 




Pike perch. 



Put-in Bay, 1,800,000.. 

Small-mouth 
black bass. 

Brook trout. 



Entire year. 

Alpena, Mich. 




Rainbow trout.... 



Wytheville, 100,000.... 
Charlevoix, 3,066,560.. 

Northville, 4,000,000... 
Detroit, 15,000,000. 

Lake trout. 

34,894,000 



Green Lake, 300,000. 
Sault Ste. Marie, 
5,000,000. 

Alpena, 4,000,000. 
Charlevoix, 10,584,000. 

Feb. 23-May 4. 
Bay City, Mich..... 

Whitefish. 



Pike perch. 




Apr. 1-Apr. 29. 
Belle Isle, Mich . 

Whitefish. 




Oct. 25-Dec. 12. 
Charlevoix; Mich. .. 
Oct. 20-Dec. 21. 
Feb. 28-May 4. 
Cheboygan, Mich .. .. 

Oct.l8-Nov. 15. 
Detour, Mich . 

Lake trout. 

3,066,500 

Northville, 3,060,560... 

Northville, 10,584,000.. 
Detroit, 15,000,000. 

Whitefish. 

Lake trout. 







Oct. 15-Nov. 10. 




. 


a Station for the collection of fishes from overflowed lands. 



















































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


17 


Output of Each, 1910—Continued. 


Fry. 

Fingerlings, yearlings, and adults. 

Total 

output. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 




8,300 



8,300 

3,300,000 

866.500 
3,880 

211,350 

9,695 

53,875 

10,320 

77,025 

111.500 
500 

102,820 

22.300 
22,800 
39,500 

4,460 
100 
95,125 
* 136,100 

162,025 

384,700 
84,700 
115 
3,800 
3,000 
21,600 

171,029 

788,000 

57.300 

3,300,000 







866.500 
3,880 

85.700 
9,695 

53,875 

10,320 

77,025 

111.500 
500 

102,820 
22,300 
22,800 
39,500 
4,460 
100 
95,125 
136,100 
162,025 

384,700 

84.700 
115 

3,800 

3,000 
















































































































21,600 

171,029 
788,000 
















St. Johnsbury, 
104,000. 

57,300 


Craig Brook, 
2,200. 

Central Station, 
10,000. 


























168,500 



52,855 

11,650 

30,025 
12,950 
115 
50 



262,619 
11,650 

30,025 

12,950 

115 

50 

1,400,000 
176,000 

532,200 

82,500 

10,013,500 

4,000,000 

15,000,000 





















. 




1,400,000 

162,000 

426,000 
500 

' ' 






14,000 

106,200 

82,000 

3,500 















4,000,000 
15,000,000 






















10,584,000 
15,000,000 






10,584,000 
15,000,000 


































































































































18 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Stations Operated and the 


Station and period of 
operation. 

Species. 

Eggs. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to other 
stations. 

Transfers from other 
stations. 

Northville, Mich—Con. 


74,500,000 

34,280,000 

Central Station. 500,000 
Duluth, 20,000,000. 
Sault Ste. Marie, 
20,000,000. 

Alpena, 15,000,000. 
Charlevoix, 15,000,000. 


. Entire year. 






Oct.20-Nov.23. 





Nov.6-Nov. 18. 
Grassy Island, Mich. 
Oct. 25-Dec. 12. 









Nov. 15-Nov.24. 
North port, Mich.... 

Oet.26-Nov. 18. 
Port Huron, Mich... 
May 1-May 20. 

St. Jtimes, Mich _ 

Nov. 1-Nov. 24. 
Sault Ste. Marie, 
Mich. 

Feb. 20-May 21. 
















Detroit, 20,000,000. 




Northville; 5,000,000... 




Oct. 15-NOV.22. 

Pike perch. 

324,475,000 

77,06S,000 

1,440,000 

Duluth, 15,000,000. 


Entire year. 

Kelleys Island, Ohio. 
Nov.10-Nov.23. 

Whitefish. 

Central Station, 
6,000,000. 

Neosho, 1,800,000. 
Meredosia, 5,000,000. 
Wytheville, 1,000,000. 
Manchester, 3,500,000. 
CapeVincent, 5,000,000. 
Cape Vincent, 
25,000,000. 

Central Station,640,000. 




Whitefish. .7... 



.do. 

* 



Nov. 7-Dee. 3. 





Nov. 1-Nov. 28. 
Apr. 1-Apr. 20. 
North Bass Island, 
Ohio. 

Nov. 5-Dec. 3. 
Apr. 16-28. 

Port Clinton, Ohio.. 
Nov. 3-Dec. 2. 
Apr. 3-May 7. 
Toledo , Ohio ..'. 

Pike perch. 




Whitefish. 




Pike perch. 




Whitefish. 




Pike perch. 




.do. 




Apr. 1-May 11. 
Quincy, Ill. 





Entire vear. 
Meredosia, lll.o. 

Crappie. 




July-Dee. 

St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Carp. 




Large-mouth black 
bass. 

Catfish. 







Yellow perch. 




SunfishT. 




Pike perch. 



Put-in Bay, 5,000,000.. 

Brook trout. 

35,000 


Entire year. 

Darling Pond, Vt... 

Sept. 1-Dec. 21. 
Hatch Pond, South 
Ryegatc, Vt. 

Aug. 9-Nov. 13. 
Lake Mitchell, Vt... 
Sept. 1-Dee. 17. 

Small-mouth black 
bass. 

Landlocked sal¬ 
mon. 

Yellow perch. 

Craig Brook, 5,000!.... 










Brook, trout. 




.do. 




Brook trout. 









a Station for the collection of fishes from overflowed lands. 









































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


19 


Output of Each, 1910 — Continued. 


Fry. 

Fingerlings, yearlings, and adults. 

Total 

output. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 

25,000,000 

12,100,000 






29,000,000 

46,380,000 





















































20,000,000 

5,000,000 






20,000,000 

5,000,000 











89,375,000 

75,020,000 

70,300,000 






376,550,000 

126,448,000 

71,740,000 


















































































20,100 
35 

108,045 

25,350 

9,055 

25,000 



20,100 

35 

108,045 

25,350 
9,055 
25,000 
4,250,000 
1,267,346 


























4,250,000 

1,661,000 





Holden,300,000 


346 


Holden, 31,425. 




140,000 

4,800 



2,550 



142,550 

3,000 

3,595 




Holden, 1,000... 



3,595 






























































































20 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Stations Operated and the 


Station and period of 
operation. 


Eggs. 

Species. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to other 
stations. 

Transfers from other 
stations. 

St. Johnsbury ,Vt.—Con. 





July 1-Nov. 13. . 
Apr. 12-June 30. 





mon. 



















Entire year. 





Large-mouth 
black bass. 


















Entire year. 





mon. 



25,000. 


Blackspot ted 
trout. 

2,719,000 

Clackamas, 100,000.... 



Bozeman, 544,000. 

Wytheville, 100,000.... 










lah, Wyo. 

Oct. 20-Jan. 15. 





Dak. 

Oct. 20-Dec. 31. 

Thumb of Lake, 
Yellowstone Na¬ 
tional Parle, Wyo. 

May 25-Aug. 1. 

Clear Creek, Yel¬ 
lowstone National 
Park, Wyo. 

June 1-Aug. 10. 

Blackspotted 

trout. 









• 


Yellowstone Na¬ 
tional Park, Wyo. 
June 1-Aug. 10. 
Cub Creek, Yel¬ 
lowstone National 
Park, Wyo. 

June 1-Aug. 10. 
Steamer Fish Hawk, 
Delaware River, Phil¬ 
adelphia, Pa. 

May 6-June 1. 
Tupelo, Miss. 

.do. 




Shad. 








Entire year. 

Large-mouth 
black bass. 
Crappie. 








Catfish. 




White Sulphur Springs, 
W. Va. 

Rainbow trout.... 

100,900 



Brook trout. 

1,000 



Entire year. 

Large-mouth 
black bass. 
Small-mouth 







black bass. 
Blackspotted 
trout. 

Lobster. 




Woods Hole, Mass. 




Entire year. 

Cod. 



Gloucester, 24,835,000.. 

Mackerel. 




Flatfish. 





Sea bass. 




Chilmark, Mass . 

Lobster. 




Oct. i-Oct. 9. 
East Greenwich, 

Flatfish. 




Mass. 

Mar. 1-Apr. 1. 
Gosnold, Mass . 

Lobster. 



• 

Sept. 16-Oct. 9. 
May 23-June 23. 
Newport, R. I . 

Flatfish. 




Mar. 10-Apr. 1. 













































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


21 


Output of Each, 1910—Continued. 


Fry. 

Fingerlings, yearlings, and adults. 

Total 

output. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to ' 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 



St. Johnsbury, 
300,000. 

St. Johnsbury, 
1,800. 

177,975 

3,500 

3,370 

St. Johnsbury, 
31,425. 

St. Johnsbury, 
1,000. 


177,975 

3,500 

3,370 

20,000,000 

1,000,000 

4,130 

3,335 

138,239 

9,675 

25 

684,000 

12,000 

68,248 

2,989,750 

234,775 







20,000,000 

1,000,000 












4,130 
3,335 
138,239 

9,675 

25 

684,000 

12,000 

68,248 
514,750 

234,775 







































Bozeman ,400,000 























































1,703,000 






1,703,000 

9,950 

18,850 

1,550 
100 
363,175 
881,870 
3,200 

201,750 

2,480 

17,499,000 
61,413,000 
764,000 
215,770,000 
808,000 



9,950 

18,850 

1,550 

100 

262,275 

821,870 

3,200 

1,750 

2,480 







Helena, 1,600... 















59,000 









200,000 









17,499,000 
61,413,000 
764,000 
215,770,000 
808,000 
































| 



























59395°—11-5 












































































22 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Stations Operated and the 


Station and period of 
operation. 


Eggs. 

Species. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to other 
stations. 

Transfers from other 
stations. 

Woods Hole, Mass.- 
Continued. 





Sept. 29-Oct. 21. 

Plymouth, Mass _ 

Nov. 10-Mar. 22. 
Sandwich, Mass.... 
May 3-June 23. 

Cod. 












Ian. 20-Mar. 23. 





May 3-June 23. 





May 3-June 23. 
Oct. 1-Oct. 10. 





Mar. 17-Apr. 1. 

Large-mouth 
black bass. 
Small-moutb 




Entire year. 





black bass. 

Rock bass. 





Yellow perch. 





Rainbow trout.... 

948,000 

Erwin, 503,000. 



Brook trout. 

Cape Vincent, 50,000. 
Nashua, 50,000. 
Spearfish, 100,000. 
Central Station, 15,000. 
North ville, 100,000. 



Carp. 





Pike perch. 



Put-in Bay, 1,000,000.. 

Yes Bay, Alaska. 

Blueback salmon.. 



Entire year. 

Total output of 
Bureau. 










« 








































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


28 


Output of Each, 1910—Continued. 


Fry. 

Fingerlings, yearlings, and adults. 

Total 

output. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 

Dis¬ 

tributed. 

Transfers to 
other stations. 

Transfers from 
other stations. 


















































39,000 

14,000 



29,225 

1,100 

11,250 

125 

230,600 

173,450 
120 



68,225 

15,1005 

11,250* 

125 

360,600 

173,450 

120 

1,000,000 

69,879,600 





























1,000,000 
48,160,000 







21,719,600 







3,233,012,237 















































24 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


ALLOTMENTS TO STATE FISH COMMISSIONS. 


As usual, various state fish commissions were supplied from the 
Bureau’s stock with eggs to be hatched and distributed under their 
respective auspices. Following is a record of such allotments in 1910: 


Allotments of Fish and Eggs to State Fish Commissions, Fiscal Year 1910. 


State and species. 


California: 

Chinook salmon. 

Colorado: 

Blackspotted trout. 

Connecticut: 

Yellow perch. 

Illinois: 

Lake trout.. 

Whitefish.. 

Pike perch.. 

Rainbow trout.. 

Michigan: 

Landlocked salmon. 

Lake trout.. 

Pike perch. 

Missouri: 

Brook trout. 

Rainbow trout. 

Pike perch. 

Minnesota: 

Large-mouth black bass. 
Montana: 

Blackspotted trout. 

Whitefish. 

Nevada: 

Blackspotted trout. 

New Hampshire: 

Chinook salmon. 


Eggs. 

Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings. 

and 

adults. 

28,764,467 


225,000 


5,200,000 


500,000 


4,000,000 


8,000,000 


41,264 


20,000 


5,000,000 

3,500 

34,280,000 

100,000 


25,000 

2,000,000 


18,250 

550,000 

500,000 


422,100 


100,000 



State and species. 

Eggs. 

Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

New York: 



Blackspotted trout. 

50,000 



41,500 

15,000 


Landlocked salmon. 


White perch. 

15,000,000 


North Dakota: 


Steelhead trout. 

100,000 

10,000,000 


Pike perch. 


Ohio: 


Whitefish. 

18,000,000 

170,725,000 




Oregon: 


Chinook salmon. 

6,465,300 

60 

Blackspotted trout. 

175,000 

45 

Pennsylvania: 


Silver salmon. 

75,000 

50,000 


Blackspotted trout. 



31,428,000 

96,450,000 




Washington: 



50,000 
100,000 




Wisconsin: 


Lake trout. 

4,500,000 

3,880 

Wyoming: 



675,000 

443,627,631 


Total. 

25,735 


SHIPMENTS TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

In response to requests reaching the Bureau through diplomatic 
channels, fish and fish eggs have been donated to foreign countries 
as follows: 


Shipments of Fish and Eggs to Foreign Countries, Fiscal Year 1910. 


Country. 

Species. 

Eggs. 

Finger- 

lings, 

year- 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

Argentina. 


200,000 

100,000 

100,000 

25,000 

50,000 

10,000 

110,000 

5,000 


France. 





Landlocked salmon.. 





Japan. 



Mexico. 

Brook trout. 



25 

Total. 



600,000 

25 




















































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 25 

SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF DISTRIBUTIONS. 

The following table shows the numbers of eggs and fish actually 
distributed during the fiscal year 1910; or, in other words, the output 
of the hatcheries with all losses in transportation deducted. It thus 
does not agree with the tabulated summary in the Annual Report 
of the Commissioner for this year, compiled at an earlier date, which 
shows the numbers of eggs and fish delivered by the stations for dis¬ 
tribution, the subsequent losses in transportation not being con¬ 
sidered : 

Summary of Distribution of Fish and Eggs, Fiscal Year 1910. 


Species. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Total. 


Catfish. 

Carp. 

Bufialofish. 

Shad. 

Whitefish... 

Lake herring. 

Silver salmon. 

Chinook salmon. 

Blueback salmon. 

Humpback salmon. 

Steelhead trout. 

Rainbow trout. 

Atlantic salmon. 

Landlocked salmon. 

Blackspotted trout. 

Loch Leven trout. 

Lake trout. 

Brook trout. 

Sunapee trout. 

Grayling. 

Smelt. 

Pike. 

Pickerel. 

Crappie and strawberry bass 

Rock bass. 

Warmouth bass. 

Small-mouth black bass. 

Large-mouth black bass. 

Sunfish (bream). 

Pike perch. 

Yellow perch. 

Striped bass. 

White bass. 

White perch. 

Yellow bass. 

Sea bass. 

Mackerel. 

Freshwater drum. 

Cod. 

Pollock. 

Haddock. 

Flatfish. 

Lobster. 


2 , 160,000 

55 , 428,000 

1 , 440,000 

375,000 

37 , 531,417 

100,000 


250,000 

556,494 

5,000 

115,000 

2 , 748,550 


89 , 076,000 

195 , 719,000 

70 , 300,000 

10 , 888.025 

16 , 342,556 

121 , 136,995 

1 , 731,740 

3 , 570,287 

595,616 

1 , 217,366 

974,040 


531,892 

22,710 

201,475 


66,045 

21 , 719,600 


179,718 
1 , 705,328 
238,212 
301,064 
906,654 
68,248 
4 , 286,150 
4 , 085,174 


18 

9,000 

43,300 

500 

410,428 

66,035 

792 

109,980 

665,868 

342,825 

5,260 

108,439 


6,050 


250 


11,950 


10,210,000 

516,000 


25,000 

4 , 500,000 


321 , 455,000 

5 , 200,000 

4 , 566,000 


16 , 500,000 


1 , 756,094 


33 , 645,922 

7 , 365,945 

171,029 

81,000 


537,400 

56,600 


154 , 480,000 

326 , 885,000 

2 , 784,000 


338 , 480,000 


808,000 

764,000 


9 , 854,000 


210 , 354,000 
38 , 140,000 
712,000 


930 , 755,000 

162 , 505,000 


1,532 


531,892 
22,710 
201,475 
91 , 236,000 
251 , 147,000 
71 , 740,000 
11 , 263.025 
53 , 940,018 
142 , 950,595 
1 , 731,740 
4 , 000,005 
2 , 857,438 
1 , 460,578 
1 , 390,104 
5 , 411,298 
68,248 
48 , 142,072 
11 , 967,119 
171,029 
106,018 
4 , 509,000 
43,300 
500 
410,428 
66,035 
792 
647,386 
722,468 
342,825 
475 , 940,260 
332 , 193.439 
7 , 350,000 
6,050 
354 , 980,000 
2,50 

808,000 

764,000 

11 Q50 
220 , 208!000 
38 , 140,000 
712,000 
930 , 755,000 
162 , 506,532 


Total 


473 , 535,461 


2 , 721 , 832,615 


36 , 094,503 


3 , 231 , 462,579 






































































26 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


DETAILS OF DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, FISCAL 

YEAR 1910. 

CATFISH. 


Disposition. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


Disposition. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


Arizona: 

Grand Canyon, Berry’s pond... 

Summit Pond. 

Holbrook, Becker’s reservoir. 

Pratt’s pond. 

Prescott, American Ranch Lake. 

Wilcox, Adling’s pond. 

Ditmar’s pond. 

Arkansas: 

Boonville, Branch Pond.. 

Green Forest, Willow Pond. 

Harrison, Estes’s pond. 

Helena, Mississippi River. 

Hiawassee, Rucker’s pond. 

McNeil, Stevens’s pond. 

Mammoth Spring, Warm Fork Creek .. 

Stamps, Price Pond. 

Colorado: 

Pueblo, Skinner’s reservoir. 

Rifle, White River. 

Georgia: 

Chamblee, Jones’s pond. 

Idaho: 

Grangeville, Tolo Lake. 

Naples, Stampede Lake. 

Illinois: 

Avena, Sycamore Lake. 

Chicago, Armour’s pond. 

Otis’s pond. 

Galva, Mirror Pond. 

Odell, Odell Pond. 

Tremont, Pflederer’s pond. 

Indiana: 

Boonville, Hemenway’s pond. 

Buckskin, Buck’s pond. 

Centerville, Townsend’s pond. 

Evansville, Bockstege’s pond. 

Heltonville, Ramsey’s pond. 

Lewis, Freeze’s pond. 

Pleasant Lake, Pleasant Lake. 

Tilden, Hadley’s pond. 

Iowa: 

Chester, Upper Iowa River. 

Independence, Wapsipinicon River.... 

Lime Springs, Upper Iowa River. 

Manchester, Maquoketa River. 

North McGregor, Mississippi River. 

Kansas: 

Goddard, Clear Creek Pond. 

Kansas City, Hosps’s pond. 

Marquette, Sunny Pond. 

Pawnee, Payton’s pond. 

Kentucky: 

Elizabethtown, Hagan’s pond. 

Sodgensville, Nolin Creek. 

Nolin Creek, North Fork. 
Tharpe’s pond. 

Louisiana: 

Grand Cane, Clear Springs Pond. 

Maryland: 

Loch Raven, Harrison’s pond. 

Mountain Lock, Potomac River. 

Rocky Ridge, O wings Creek. 

Sharon, Rogers Pond. 

Massachusetts: 

Westdale, Taunton River. 

Michigan: 

Collins, Grand River. 

Jackson, Big Portage Lake. 

Grass Lake. 

Lakeview, Brimmer Lake. 

Tamarack Lake. 

Town Line Lake. 

Penn, Mud Lake. 

Portland, Grand River Pond. 


100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

125 

20,640 

100 

273 

100 

150 

100 

200 


100 

300 

300 

400 

450 

450 

500 

500 

500 

500 

. 100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
200 
300 

400 

400 

2,500 

4,000 

187,500 

65 

80 

65 

65 

200 

400 

300 

200 

100 

150 

450 

150 

150 

500 

480 

480 

480 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

650 

480 


Minnesota: 

Brownsville, Mississippi River. 

Mahnomen, Mayzhuckegishig Lake.... 
Rochester, Zumbro River, South Fork. 
Mississippi: 

Guntown, Cochran’s pond. 

Missouri: 

Brandsville, Niessen’s pond. 

Richland, Gasconade River. 

Seligman, Mountain Pond. 

Springfield, Appleby’s pond. 

New Jersey: 

Mullica Hill, Mullica Hill Pond. 

Pompton Lakes, Pompton Lakes. 

Washington, Fair Haven Pond. 

New Mexico: 

Clovis, Laughing Water Pond. 

Columbus, Kennedy’s pond. 

Corona, Ingram’s pond. 

Deming, Burney’s pond. 

Harris’s pond. 

Hon’s pond. 

Jacobson’s pond. 

Kelly’s pond. 

Elida, Brown’s pond. 

La Lande, McGill’s reservoir. 

Lqs Vegas, Asylum Lake. 

Pecos River. 

Montoya, Paloma Springs. 

Portales, Humble’s pond. 

Twin Mill Ponds. 

Silver City, Central Creek Pond. 

Texico, Stafford’s pond.i.. 

Tucumcari, Buchanan’s pond. 

New York: 

Cooperstown, Schuylers Lake. 

Greenport, Sills Pond. 

Unadilla, Susquehanna River. 

Walden, Wallkill River. 

Wallkill, Dwaarskill Creek. 

North Dakota: 

Devils Lake, Devils Lake. 

Glen Ullin, Burns’s pond. 

Gwinner, Edmon’s pond. 

Milnor, Stone Lake. 

Oakes, Christenson’s pond. 

St. John, Bouvin Lake. 

Ohio: 

Bethel, McCarty’s pond. 

Bradford, Greenville Creek. 

Upper Stillwater Creek....... 

Cincinnati, Lake Como. 

Cridersville, Retreat Lake. 

Dola, Hively’s pond. 

Ironton, Rucker’s pond. 

Jackson, Long’s pond. 

Marion, Scioto River. 

Orbiston, Orbiston Lakes... 

Ravenna, Infirmary Pond. 

Ripley, Hauke’s pond. 

Rock Creek, Parks’s pond. 

Stryker, Juillard’s pond.. 

Wapakoneta, Brown Pond.:... 

Youngstown, Mahoning River. 

Wickliffe Lake. 

Oklahoma: 

Aline, Elliott’s pond. 

Bison, Springdale Pond. 

Chiloeeo, Chilocco Lagoon. 

Collinsville, Ellingswood Lake. 

Cushing, Prairie Lake. 

Twin Elm Lake. 

Wild Horse Pond.. 

Enid, Spring Valley Creek. 

Erick, Garrett’s pond. 


43,250 

800 

500 

100 

150 

400 

200 

200 

400 

400 

100 

100 

80 

80 

100 

200 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

80 

100 

100 

100 

100 

80 

300 

150 

300 

152 

155 

3,000 

100 

150 

100 

150 

400 

100 

250 

150 

150 

100 

100 

150 

100 

250 

100 

150 

150 

100 

100 

400 

100 

200 

100 

100 

200 

200 

100 

125 

150 

100 

100 





































































































































27 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
CATFISH—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


Disposition. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


Oklahoma—Continued. 

Glencoe, Greenwood Lake. 

South Side Pond. 

Guymon, Jordan’s pond. 

Hastings, Wabash Pond. 

Isabella, Wahl’s pond. 

Lawton, Park Lake. 

Maramec, Maramec Lake. 

Marshall, Crouch’s pond. 

Proctor’s pond. 

Perkins, Canon Pond. . ..... 

Stigler, Hall’s pond. 

Stillwater, Boomer Creek. 

Kautz’s ponds. 

Nash’s pond. 

Swartz’s pond. 

Stratford, Davis’s pond. 

Waynoka, Hancock’s pond. 

Yost, Newman’s pond.. 

Yost Lake. 

Pennsylvania: 

Birdsboro, Monocacy Creek. 

Carbon Center, Carbon Center Pond_ 

Factoryville, Lake Carey. 

Greensburg, Hacke Pond. 

Kingston, Ryman’s pond. 

Rahns, Perkiomen Creek. 

Reading, Maiden Creek. 

Rupert, Wide Water Canal. 

Seottdale, Mill Race Pond. 

Smiths Ferry, Woodlawn Pond. 

Susquehanna, Churchill’s lake. 

Susquehanna River. 

Troy, Cross Roads Creek. 

Lillmary Creek. 

Mud Creek. 

Sugar Creek. 

Wilkes Barre, Bear Lake. 

Wolmesdorf, Tulpehocken Creek. 

Wagners Pond. 

South Carolina: 

Blackville, Rodgers Pond. 

Graycourt, North Rabun Creek. 

Honea Path, Barkers Creek. 

Broad Creek. 

Haynie Pond. 

Kays Pond. 

Pickens, Bivers Lake. 

Holders Lake. 

Spring Lake. 

Thomley Pond. 


75 

75 

250 

125 

100 

175 

150 

100 

100 

75 

200 

100 

75 

75 

75 

100 

275 

75 

75 

200 

100 

350 

100 

400 

400 

400 

200 

150 

100 

300 

300 

100 

100 

100 

450 

150 

400 

400 

175 

125 

150 

200 

150 

200 

250 

250 

300 

200 


South Carolina—Continued. 

Starr, Pruitt’s pond. 

Walhalla, Carey’s pond. 

South Dakota: 

Fairfax, Manhalter’s pond. 

Philip, Grindstone Pond. 

Presho, Corkill’s lake. 

Scenic, Knutson’s pond. 

Warner, Papke’s pond. 

Vermont: 

Bellows Falls, Connecticut River. 

Virginia: 

Covington, McAllister’s pond. 

Dillwyn, North River. 

Slate River. 

Gainesville, Broad Run. 

Houston, Easley Mill Pond. 

Occoquan, Occoquan River. 

Palmyra, Rivanna River. 

Urbanna, Jackson’s pond. 

Washington: 

Addy, Blue Lake. 

Spring Lake. 

Anacortes, Lake Erie. 

Montesano, Silvia Lake. 

Oroville, Lemonosky Lake. 

West Virginia: 

Bedington, Emerson’s pond. 

Benwood, Riedel’s pond. 

Grafton, Otter Creek Pond. 

Nuttall, Chalybeate Spring Pond. 

Romney,Potomac River, South Branch. 
Wisconsin: 

Brillion, Long Lake. 

Round Lake. 

Genoa, Mississippi River. 

La Crosse, Mississippi River. 

Mauston, Drainage Canal. 

Pelican, Little Mud Lake. 

Rice Lake. 

Prairie du Chien, Mississippi River. 

Sheboygan Falls, Sheboygan River. 

Victory, Mississippi River. 

Wyoming: 

Lusk, “ J. M.” Company’s pond. 

Moorcroft, Lone Tree Reservoir. 

Newcastle, Lodge Pole Creek. 

Sheridan, Big Horn Pond. 


125 

125 

150 

200 

200 

200 

200 

400 

150 

300 

300 

300 

230 

300 

350 

550 

75 

75 

150 

150 

150 

150 

250 

250 

250 

550 

300 
300 
4,166 
47,418 
300 
300 
400 
172,500 
500 
1,666 

400 

200 

250 

150 


Total a 


531,892 


CARP. 


Kansas: 

35 

West Virginia: 

15 

Minnesota:" 

8,650 

Wisconsin: 

1,666 

New York: 

La Crosse, Mississippi River. 

10,318 


100 

Victory, Mississippi River. 

1,666 

Oklahoma: 

100 

Mexico: 

25 

Vian, Allen’s pond. 

Virginia: 

Wytheville, Brownings Mill Pond. 

Indian Creek. 

15 

Total. 

22,710 

110 

10 




a Lost in transit, 12,078 fingerlings. 























































































































28 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 
Details op Distribution op Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


BUFFALOFISH. 


Disposition. 

Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

Disposition. 

Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

Arkansas: 

Helena, Mississippi River. 

Minnesota: 

Brownsville, Mississippi River. 

178,675 

8,650 

Wisconsin: 

Genoa, Mississippi River. 

La Crosse, Mississippi River. 

Victory, Mississippi River. 

Total. 

2,666 

11,318 

166 

201,475 


SHAD. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

District of Columbia: 



New Jersey—Continued. 



Washington, Anacostia 



Riverton, Delaware 





295,000 



80,000 

Potomac 


Timber Creek, Delaware 




682,000 



120,000 

Maryland: 


New York: 


Accokeek Creek, Potomac 



New York, New York 





980,000 


800.000 


Broad Creek, Potomac 


North Carolina: 




2,504,000 

Eden ton, Albemarle 



Carpenters Point, North 



1,360,000 

47,762,000 

500,000 


234,000 


Havre de Grace, Chesa- 


Oregon: 




3,485,000 

Willamette, Willamette 



Susquehanna 



1,588,000 


821,000 

Pennsylvania: 

Poquessing Creek, Dela- 


Swan 






396,000 



200,000 

Occoquan Bay, Potomac 


Virginia: 




898,000 

Dogue Creek, Potomac 



Pamunkey Creek, Poto- 



2,401,000 


5,044,000 

Little Hunting Creek, 


Piscataway Creek, Poto- 



2,717,000 


4,621,000 

Occoquan Creek, Poto- 


Swan Creek, Chesapeake 
Bay. 



3,391,000 


70,000 

Pamunkey Creek, Poto- 





600.000 



3,572,000 







4,337,000 

quehanna River..’. 


385,000 

Washington: 


New Jersey: 

Camden, Delaware River 
Rancocas, Delaware 



90,000 


803,000 




Total. 

2,1 GO;000 

89,076,000 

River. 


500,000 








































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


29 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
. ' WHITEFISH. 


Disposition. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Disposition. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Illinois: 

Havana, Illinois Fish 

Co mmi ssion. 

Michigan: 

Alpena, Lake Huron. 

Belle Isle, Lake St. Clair.. 
Detour, Lake Huron....'.. 

Lake Michigan... 
Detroit, Detroit River.... 
Escanaba, Lake Michigan. 
Fish Island, Lake Supe¬ 
rior. 

Isle Royale, Lake Supe¬ 
rior. 

McCargoes Cove, Lake 

Superior. 

Marustique, Lake Michi¬ 
gan. 

Marquette, Lake Supe¬ 
rior. 

North Point, Lake Huron. 
Skilligallee Reef, Lake 

Michigan. 

St. Ignace, Lake Huron.. 
Sand Bay Reef, Lake 

Michigan. 

Scarecrow Island, Lake 

Huron. 

Simmons Reef, Lake 

Michigan. 

Whitefish Point, Lake 

Superior. 

Minnesota: 

Duluth, Lake Superior... 
Grand Marais, Lake Su¬ 
perior. 

Susie Island, Lake Supe¬ 
rior. 


4,000,000 


1,000,000 
9,000,000 
0,000,000 
3,000,000 
10,000,000 
2,000,000 

490,000 

13,100,000 

210,000 

2,000,000 

4,655,000 

9,000,000 

5,000,000 

2,000,000 

5,000,000 

5,000,000 

5,000,000 

5,000,000 

300,000 

3,000,000 

3,000,000 


Montana: 


Anaconda, Montana State 

500,000 

New York: 

Cape Vincent, Lake On¬ 
tario. 

Chaumont, Lake Ontario. 
Cooperstown, Otsego Lake 
Fox Island, Lake Ontario. 
Fullers Bay, Lake Onta¬ 
rio.:. 


Grenadier Island, Lake 
Ontario. 


Hayes Point, Lake On¬ 
tario. 


Mexico, Lake Ontario.... 


New York, New York 
Aquarium. 

1,500,000 

Oneida Lake, Oneida 
Lake. 

Wilson Bay, Lake On- 


Ohio: 

Catawba Island, Lake 
Erie. 


Isle St. George, Lake Erie. 
Kelleys Island, Lake Erie. 
Lakeside, Lake Erie. 




Ohio State 
Fish Commission. 

18,000,000 

Pennsylvania: 

Erie, Pennsylvania Fish 
Commission. 

31,428,000 


1,500,000 
2,000,000 
387,000 
3,500,000 

170,000 

5,500,000 

2,000,000 

4,000,000 


387,000 

1,500,000 


10,000,000 

10,000,000 

20,000,000 

20.000 

25,000,000 


10,000,000 


Total a 


55,428,000 


195,719,000 


LAKE HERRING, OR CISCO. 


Ohio: 

Cleveland, Lake Erie. 

Isle St. George, Lake Erie. 
Kelleys Island, Lake Erie. 

Lakeside, Lake Erie. 

Middle Bass, Lake Erie... 


1,440,000 



Ohio—Continned. 


10,000,000 

10,000,000 

300,000 

20,000,000 

Put-in Bay, Lake Erie_ 


Total. 

1,440,000 


10,000,000 

10 , 000,000 

10 , 000,000 


70,300,000 


SILVER SALMON. 


California: 

Brookdale, San Lorenzo 



Washington: 


5,308,848 

500,000 

5,079,177 

100,000 








County Hatchery. 
Pennsylvania: 

100,000 


Argentina: 

Buenos Aires, Argentine 



100,000 



75,000 







375,000 

10,888,025 






a Lost in transit, 245,000 fry. 












































































































30 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 


CHINOOK SALMON. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

California: 


2,286,257 



1,000,000 
1,549,500 
300,000 
27,214,967 











New Hampshire: 


7,380 


100.000 




51,200 

New York: 

5,000 




3,600 


25,000 




3,640 

Oregon: 

G, 465,300 



534,197 
3,686,200 




70 

60 





160,302 
499,930 





572,400 


Washington: 

349.570 
2,012,200 
900,000 
705.840 
1,900.000 
2,908,000 


















99,250 

200.000 

95 

Argentina: 





37,531,417 

16,342,556 

66,045 



BLUEBACK SALMON. 


Alaska: 


34,018,060 

34,404,110 







21,719,600 



48,160,000 

4,404,825 
150,000 

Washington: 






Argentina: 

100,000 


Total. 



100,000 

121,130,995 

21,719,600 



a Lost in transit, 1,480 flngerlings. 


HUMPBACK SALMON. 


Disposition. 

Fry. 

Alaska: 

Afognak, Letnik Lake. 

363,740 

1,368,000 

Washington: 

Birdsview, Grandy Creek. 

Total. 

1,731,740 




























































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 
Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 


31 


STEELHEAD TROUT. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Maryland: 


12,000 


Michigan: 


10,000 

10,000 

10,000 








50,000 




14,000 

32,000 

12,000 

21,000 

12,000 

16,000 

8,300 

1.500 
400 

2.500 
6,000 




Minnesota: 












Montana: 















New York: 


35,423 

11,338 




North Dakota: 

100,000 


Oregon: 

1,934,835 

49,503 

89,850 

14,400 
40,300 
1,382,638 








Washington: 











18 


50.000 

25.000 

25.000 





Wisconsin: 





14,000 
10,000 




Total. 



250.000 

3,570,287 

179,718 



RAINBOW TROUT. 


Alabama: 

Tanner, Pecks Branch. 

Arizona: 

Flagstaff, Live Oak Creek. 

Rock Creek. 

Tucson, Sabino Creek. 

Winslow, Chevelon Creek. 

Arkansas: 

Bald Knob, Hart’s pond. 

Berryville, Osage River. 

Crickette, Yocum Creek. 

Decatur, Lakeside Pond. 

Elkins, White River. 

Flippin, Goff’s pond.'.... 

Greenwood, Vache Grass Creek. 

Mammoth Spring, Spring River. 

Springdale, Lake Vaughan. 

Sulphur Springs, Williams’s pond. 

California: 

Brookdale, Santa Cruz County hatchery 
Colorado: 

Buena Vista, Chalk Creek. 

Cottonwood Creek. 

Middle Cottonwood Creek. 
South Cottonwood Creek.. 

Buffalo, Platte River. 

Cimarron, Little Cimarron Creek. 

Colorado Springs, Frost’s reservoir. 

Creede, applicant. 

Eldora, Lake Eldora... 

Estabrook, Mendenhall Creek. 


25,000 


7,500 


7,500 

7,000 


2,400 

7,200 

7,200 

6,000 

7,200 

4,000 


4,000 


800 


7,000 
7,000 


200 


13,680 


100,000 


2,000 


6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

10,000 


25 


8,535 
3,750 



































































































32 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
RAINBOW TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry- 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Colorado—Continued. 


55,000 




2.500 




10,000 



10,500 

25,000 

25,000 









20.000 


20,000 




9,000 



25,000 



1L 000 




4,000 




9,000 




9,000 




3,750 




2,500 



10,000 
10,000 
7,500 
10,000 












2,500 
10,000 
12,500 
10,000 






. 






25,000 



4,000 




2,500 

West Cliffe, Brush Creek Lake. 



0,000 

6,000 

4,000 




Georgia: 

Clayton, Hiawassee River. 






4,000 

4,000 

Oakman, Dry Creek. 



Rabun Gap, Charley Creek. 



3i 200 
2,400 

Flat Branch. 






3,200 
2,400 
4,000 
2,400 
1.600 

Shook Creek. 



Tallulah River.* 



Tate Creek... 



Ringgold, Murphy’s pond. 



Idaho: 

Ashton, Eggbert Lake. 



1,000 

1,500 

Bliss, Far View Lakes.•. 



Cambridge, Little Weiser River. 



1,000 

Hailey .applicant. 

5,000 


Priest River, Skookum Pond. 


500 

Troy, Pineview Pond. 



600 

Illinois: 

Havana, Illinois Fish Commission.. 

41,264 


Indiana: 

St. Paul, Mill Creek.-. 


2,000 

1,000 

South Bend, Beyer’s lake. 



Leeper Pond. 



1,000 

Iowa: 

Manchester, Maquoketa River. 



400 

3,000 

600 

1,000 

1.500 

200 

2,000 

3,000 

2,000 

2.500 
2,000 
5,000 

480 

North McGregor, Bloodv Run. 



Postville, Livinggood Creek. 



Waukon, Silver Creek. 



Village Creek. 



Kansas- 

Erie, Canville Creek. 



Marion, Spring Creek. 



Maryland: 

Cumberland, Evitts Creek. 



Lakewood Lake. 



Minley Branch. 



Rocky Gap Creek. 



Mountain Lake Park, Broad Ford Creek. 



Little Youghiogheny River. 



Oakland, Browning Dam. 



5,000 

320 

500 

1,000 

Harvey’s pond. 



Westminster, Fairview Pond. 



Michigan: 

Brentcreek, Gillett’s pond. 



East Tawas, Cold Creek. 



Gaylord, Sturgeon River. 



15,000 

1,250 

590 

Gladwin, Cedar River. 



Grayling, Tillula Lake. 











































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


33 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
RAINBOW TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Michigan—Continued. 



10,000 


10,000 




2,000 
2,000 
18,000 
0,000 
500 
12,000 
400 
1,250 




Paris, Muskegon River. 






Plymouth, Millers Creek. 



Rose Center, Buekhom Creek. 






Titt'abawassa River. 



Wingleton, Marquette River. 



18,750 

Marquette River, South Branch. 



3.500 

1,800 

3,000 

2.500 

400 
4,000 
400 

Minnesota: 

Duluth, Archer Creek.• . 



Silica, Little Swan Creek. 






Missouri: 






Wistman Creek. 



Bourbon, Blue Spring Branch. 



6,190 

400 

Brown Springs, Brown Springs Lake. 





12,500 
7,500 




Lucas Branch. 


4,000 

Silver Lake Branch. 


20,000 
20,000 

Exeter, Roaring River. 





4,000 
6,000 
55 




Neosho, Hickory River. 



Newburg, Little Piney River. 



6, S10 
4,000 

~ Mill Creek.". 



Reeds Spring, Moose Springs. 


2,500 

St. James, Meramec Springs. 


6,000 

St. Joseph, Missouri Fish Commission. .. 

25,000 


Springfield, Spring Creek. 

15,000 
30,000 


Verona, Spring River. 



Wheaton,"Joys Creek. 


400 

Pogues Creek. 



400 

Shoal Creek. 



800 

Montana: 

Armstead, McIntosh Creek. 



1,200 

Spring Creek. 



1,200 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

Bozeman, Wild Horse Run. 



Chinook, Box Elder Creek. 



Columbia Falls, Fish Lake. 



Delphia, Half Moon Lake. 



1,000 

Dillon, Ajax Creek. 



960 

Blacktail Deer Creek. 



900 

Carter Creek. 



2,400 

Lake Creek. 



960 

North Fork River. 



960 

Stewart Gulch. 



960 

Strowbridge’s pond. 



960 

Tent Lake” ...". 



1,200 

Van Camp Creek. 



1,200 

Emigrant, Dailey’s lake. 



2,000 
2,000 

Fortine, Fortine’Creek. 



Lakeview, Cliff Lake. 


4,000 
10,000 
5,000 
4,000 

4,000 

Elk Creek... 


Elk Lake. 



Hidden Lake. 



Thompson, Clear Creek. 


1,500 

Squaw Creek. 



1,500 

Townsend, Duck Creek. 



2, 000 

Nebraska: 

Andrews, White River. 



10,000 

Gretna, Chadron Creek. 



l'eoo 

Nevada: 

Verdi Boulder Riffles. 



4,000 
4,000 

Chalk Bluff Pools. 



Marble Works Pools. 



4, 000 

Truckee River. 



sj 000 

New Jersey: 

Jersey City, Witterman’s pond. 



2,000 





























































































34 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
RAINBOW TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

New Mexico: 



2,000 

1,000 







1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




Looo 



2,400 

1,200 

6,000 









2,000 

New York: 


19,000 



'500 




2,000 


41,500 

5,000 







400 



19,000 

North Carolina: 


1,600 




100 




1,600 




3i 200 
4,000 
75 










2,100 

South Toe River. 



' 125 




150 




4,000 




3j 200 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 




Bald Creek... 



Bear Creek. 



Bear Meat Creek. 






Bridge Creek. 





















2 ,400 

Deep Creek. 



3j 200 

Galbreath Creek. 



2 ,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
8,000 

Grassy Branch. 



Indian Creek. 



Jenkins Creek.:. 



Jones Creek. 



Kirkland Creek. 



Lands Creek. 



2,400 

2,400 

Laurel Creek. 



Little Hurricane Creek. 



2,400 

7,200 

Long Creek. 



Middle Hurricane Creek. 



2,400 

Mill Creek. 



2,400 

Nettle Creek. 



2'400 

Noland Creek. 



3; 200 
1,600 

North Fork Creek. 



Peach Tree Creek. 



2^400 

Pigeon Creek. 



2 ,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 

Saw Mill Creek. 



Shepherd Creek. 



Silver Creek. 



Una Creek. 



Watkins Creek. 



2^400 

West Fork Creek. 



ljooo 

Bushnell, Chambers Creek. 



3.200 
2,400 

Indian Camp Creek. 



Kirklin Creek. 



2, 400 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
4,800 
75 

Little Laurel Creek. 



Stecoah Creek. 



Cherokee, Lufty Creek. 



Soco Creek. 


. 

Cranberry, Blevin Creek. 



Cranberry Creek. 



75 

Roaring Creek. 



3,200 































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


35 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


RAINBOW TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

North Carolina—Continued. 

Dillsboro, Big Savannah Creek. 



2,400 
2,400 
2,400 
3,200 
75 
4,800 
2,400 
3,200 
4,800 
3,200 
4, 800 

Dick Creek. 



Savannah Creek, East Fork. 



Elk Park, Banners Elk Creek. 



Dutch Creek. 



Elk River. 












Ellijay Creek. 



Tesentee Creek. 



Goldsboro, Melton Pond. 



3,200 

4,000 

4,000 

4,800 

1,600 

2,400 




Boylston~Creek. 









Laurel Creek. 






50 

" LaurelCreek. 







64,800 

1,400 

Linville Falls," Caleb Creek. 



Cane Creek. 



1,400 

1,400 

Irish Creek. 






1,400 

Linville River. 



4,200 

1,400 

Magazine Creek. 






1,400 




1,400 




4,000 

1,400 




Burgin Creek. 



1,400 

1,400 







1.400 

2.400 

1.400 










1,400 




1,400 

1,400 

1,400 










1,400 




2,100 




2,400 

2.400 

1.400 










700 




3,200 




1,400 




2, 400 




1,400 




1,400 




1,400 




1,400 




1,400 




1,400 




1,400 




1,400 




1,400 




2,400 




2,400 




3,200 




1,400 




1,400 




2,400 




800 




3,200 




700 




3,200 




450 




1,475 




200 




1,400 




1,400 




2,800 




1,400 

Crib Creek. 



1,400 




















































































36 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 
Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


RAINBOW TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

North Carolina—Continued. 



700 

1,400 

1,400 

1,400 

1,400 

1,400 

1,400 

1,400 

1,400 

1,400 

1.400 
700 

4,800 

1,600 

2.400 
4,000 
2,400 
2,400 
3,200 
3,200 
2,400 

75 

75 

75 

3,200 

4,000 

4,000 

12,000 

3,200 

5.600 
75 

3,200 

1.600 

1,450 

2,000 

1,000 

500 

2,000 

5,000 

































































































North Dakota: 












Ohio: 






Oregon: 


5,400 
6,000 
3,000 
3,000 
5,500 
3,000 
3,000 
6,000 
3,000 
2,000 
10,116 































Pennsylvania: 

Bainbridge, Engle Run. 


1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

5,000 

5,000 

4,000 

6,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

375 

3,000 

4,000 

3,000 

3,000 

5,000 

2,400 

1,500 

1,500 

2,000 

3,000 

1,125 

SOO 

Hoffman Run. 



Stackstown Run. 



Benton, West Creek. 



Berlin, Blue Lick Creek. 



Brush Creek.. 



Chambersburg, Birch Creek. 



Carbaugh Run. 



Hoosic Run. 



Cherry Tree, Cush Creek. 



Cherry Run, Penn Run. 



Clarendon, Arnots Run. 



Farensworth Creek. 



Four Mile Run. 



Tionesta Creek. 



Tionesta Creek, West Branch. 



Cresco, Bushkill River. 



Goose Rim. 



Levis Branch. 



Ebensburg, Chest Creek. 



Frackville^ Kaufman Dam. 



Glen Iron, Penns Run. 



Green Hill, Big Woods Pond. 































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 
Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


37 


RAINBOW TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Pennsylvania—Continued. 

Lanesboro, Tunkhannoek Creek. 



6,000 

3,000 

2,000 

1,500 

2,000 

3,000 

2,000 

2,250 

375 

4,000 

5,000 

7,000 

6.000 

375 

Lehighton. Wild Creek. 



Lenover, Weaver Run. 



Middleport, Morgan Dam. 



Millersburg, Forney Run. 



Little Wieanisco Creek.. 



Norristown, Elmwood Park Lake. 



Paddy Mountain, Penns Run. 



Pardee, Penns Run. 



Ridgeway, Big Mill Creek. 



Rising Springs, Penns Creek. 



Somerfield, Youghiogheny Creek. 



Tunkhannoek, Bowmans Creek. 



Weikert, Penns Run. 



South Carolina: 

Cleveland, Middle Saluda River. 



4,000 

4,000 

3,200 

4,000 

150 

Greenville, South Saluda River. 



Rosman, Cane Creek. 



Estatoe Creek. 



South Dakota: 



Cascade Springs, Cascade Springs. 



12,500 
5,775 
5,000 
8,000 
5,325 
















150 

Hill City, Newton Fork Creek. 



5,625 

2,500 

2,500 










5', 775 




5,625 
12.500 
4,500 
3,750 













12,500 




12,500 

23,150 







'150 




300 




600 




25,000 




500 




500 




2,000 

10,000 

10,000 

4,000 

100 







Tennessee: 









125 




1,200 

75 







800 




800 




800 




1,600 

3,200 







1,600 




100 




2,450 




2,185 
220 







4,800 

4,000 

175 










4. COO 




3.200 




50 




1.000 




800 




125 




4,800 




3,200 




3.200 




1.600 

800 

SevierviUe, Layman’s pond. 




59395°—11-6 



















































































38 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
RAINBOW TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Tennessee—Continued. 



4,000 

4,000 







50 




3,200 

4,000 

4,125 

4,000 







Wolf Creek, Wolf Creek. 



Utah: 

125,000 



59,400 




6,000 

48,000 





Virginia: 


300 




8,000 
2,500 
12,000 










3^000 




18'000 




9,000 

3,000 

12,000 

6,000 

4,000 

200 



















4,800 



7,000 



6,400 




6 ,400 




12,000 




'800 

Natural Bridge, Cedar Creek Dam. 



500 

New Castle, Meadow Creek. 



2,000 




3,200 




2,400 
2,400 
8,000 
12,000 
8,000 
1,125 



















300 

Stanley, Henderson’s pond. 



1,000 

Sugar Grove, HolstonRiver, South Fork. 



8,000 

300 

Waynesboro, Lithia Pond.. .. 



West Point, Remlick Hall Pond. 



3,000 

6,400 

Wytheville' Cove Creek. 



Washington: 

Colville, Black Lake. 



2,000 

Colville River. 



3,000 

4,000 

Harrington, Crab Creek. 



Republic, Granite Creek. 



4,000 

18 

Seattle, Exposition Aquarium. 



Sumner. Salmon Creek Pond. 



1,000 

3,000 

1,500 

Valley, Bond Lake. 



West Virginia: 

Blake, Loup Creek. 



Capon Springs, Trout Run. 



3,650 

Yellow Stream Gap. 



3; 650 
750 

Holly Junction, Elk River.. 



Keyser, Patterson Creek. 



4,300 

2.500 

7.500 
1,000 

Marlinton, Elk River. 



Midvale, Middle Fork River. 



Rippon, Wiest’s pond. 



Seebert, Cranberry Creek. 



38,500 
3,000 
21,000 

Spring Creek, Sinking Creek. 



Stonewall, Piney Creek. 



Surveyor, Clay Pond. 



'500 

White Sulphur Springs, Howard Creek. 



3,000 

2,000 

Spring Branch. 



Wildell, Greenbrier River. 



5,000 

Laurel Run. 



b ,000 

Wright, Piney Run. 



24,000 




















































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS. 1910. 


39 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
RAINBOW TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Wisconsin: 



3,000 

3,000 

1,200 

3,000 

1.500 

2.500 
3,000 
3,000 
1,200 

1.500 
3,000 
4,000 

5,000 

Chimney Rock Creek. 





















Kendall, Lumsden Creek. 












Wyoming: 





12,000 



3,600 
2,000 
2,000 









7,000 



1,000 
1,500 
300 
10,000 
10,000 
' 15,000 
















Japan: 

110,000 


Total a. 



556,494 

595,616 

1,705,328 



ATLANTIC SALMON. 


District of Columbia: 



100 

76,500 
5,139 
41,000 
33,000 
82,413 

60 

Maine: 














1,217,366 

New York: 



5,000 





5,000 

1,217,366 

288,212 

1 


LANDLOCKED SALMON. 


Idaho: 



4,000 

Maine: 



7,500 



33,000 





7,500 




2,000 




2,000 




2,751 



24,750 
16,500 







16,500 




6,000 



30,000 

5,000 
15,000 







10,500 




13 



25,000 

2,000 




6,000 



20,000 




24,750 



a Lost in transit, 18,100 fry. 



























































































40 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued, 
LANDLOCKED SALMON—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Maine—Continued. 



9,000 




4,500 



24,750 

24,750 

24,750 










4,500 



65,000 
316,440 
24,750 
24,750 
32,000 
5,000 

4,500 
17,700 










10,500 





18,000 




13,500 



24,750 



9,000 



50,000 

70,000 



21,000 




6,000 



30,000 

3,500 



3,000 



15,000 
24,750 






6,000 




6,000 

7,500 

6,000 






24,750 



6,000 




5,700 



15,000 

Michigan: 

10,000 

20,000 





Montana: 


8,000 

New York: 

15,000 

15,000 






14,500 



30,000 


Vermont: 

Averill, Averill Pond. 


1,000 



2,000 

Brandon, Lake Dunmore. 


2,500 



1,000 

Washington: 

Ephrata, Moses Lake. 


5,000 

11,400 

Wisconsin: 

Luck, McKenzie Lake. 



Wyoming: 

Lander, Christiana Lake. 


' 

5.000 




5,000 

Argentina: 

Buenos Aires, Argentine Government. 

25,000 





Total <». 

115,000 

974,040 

301,064 



BLACKSPOTTED TROUT. 


Arizona: 

Grand Canyon, Hull Pond. 

Little Hull Pond 

Colorado: 


Antoni to, Conejos River. 

La .Tara River. 

Cardinal, Develin Lakes and Creek 

Cascade, Cascade Brook. 

Cebolla, Elk Creek. 

Gunnison River. 

Red Creek. 

Cimarron, Little Cimarron River.. 

Cliff, Platte River. 

DeBeque, Bull Creek Lake. 


19,440 
4,320 
9,500 
10,000 
10,000 
25, 790 
4,000 
10,000 
4,800 I 
15,000 ) 


a Lost in transit, 11,000 fry and 2,300 fingerlings. 


3,750 

3,750 











































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


41 


Details op Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
. BLACKSPOTTED TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Colorado—Continued. 

Denver, Colorado Fish Commission. 

Dillon, Rock Creek. 

Slate Creek. 

Straight Creek. 

Fort Collins, Cache la Poudre River. 

Pine Creek. 

Glenisle, Platte River. 

Glenwood Springs, Mitchell Creek. 

Grand Valley, Parachute Creek. 

Gunnison, Bird Lakes. 

Insmont, Rock Creek. .' . 

Loveland, Big Thompson. 

Marshall, South Boulder Creek. 

Molina, Cottonwood Creek. 

Cottonwood Lakes. 

East Bull Creek. 

Monte Vista, Rock Creek, South Fork. 

Montrose, Big Red Canyon Creek. 

Spring Creek. 

West Dry Creek. 

Nast, Frying Pan River. 

New Castle, Divide Creek. 

Parlin, Quartz Creek. 

Pine Grove, Elk Creek. 

Ridgway, Cow Creek. 

Dallas Creek. 

Rifle, Williams River. 

Salida, Arkansas River. 

Little River.... 

PonchaCreek. 

South Fork, Rio Grande River, South Fork 

Wheeler, West Tenmile Creek. 

Idaho: 

Bonner County, Bonanza Lake. 

Darsey, Stevens Peak Lake. 

Greer, Wells Pond. 

McCammon, Mountainview Lake. 

Rupert, Lake Walcott. 

Soda Springs, Knollins Springs. 

Spirit Lake, Kit Carson Creek. 

Twin Falls, Blue Lake Creek. 

Wallace, Lost Lake. 

Michigan: 

Detroit, Detroit Aquarium. 

Montana: 


225,000 


3,600 
3,600 
3,600 
30,700 
31,010 
3,600 
10,000 
10,000 
4,000 

2.400 
40,746 
14,400 
10,000 
52,748 
10,000 

6,000 
8,000 
6,000 
6,000 

10.500 

12.500 
6,000 
4,800 

12,000 
12,000 
22,000 

22.500 
7,500 

10,000 
6,000 

8.400 


50,000 


10,000 

7.500 

2.500 
3,000 

12,000 

3,000 

5,000 


7,500 


10,000 


Anaconda, Montana Fish Commission. 550 ,000 

Baker, Baker Lake. 

Ballantine, Arrow Creek. 

Belton, Lake McDonald. 

Big Timber, Big Boulder River. 

Bozeman, West Gallatin River, South Fork. 

Butte, Columbia Gardens Hatchery. 440,000 

Chinook, Peoples Creek. 

Chinook, Snake Creek."_ 

Craig, Burke’s reservoir. 

Darby, Tin Cup Lake. 

Dorsey, Checkerboard Creek.’ *.. 

Little Birch Creek. """ 

Woods Gulch Creek. 

Harlowton, Musselshell River. 

Havre, Clear Creek. 

Helena, Chessman Reservoir. 

Josephine, Sixteen Mile Creek. 

Kalispell, Corneilson’s spring. 

Corneilson’s lake. 

Howser’s lake. 

Lewistown, Beaver Creek. 

Big Casino Creek. 

Big Spring Creek. 

Casino Creek. 

Cottonwood Creek. 

Surprenant’s pond. 

Livingston, Fitzpatrick’s pond. 

Trowbridge Creek. 

Martinsdale, Musselshell River, North Fork. 

Missoula, Bitter Root River. 

Monarch, Tillinghast Creek. 

Neihart, Belt Creek. 


16,000 
4,000 
12,000 
4,000 
5,000 


8,000 

8,000 

6,000 

10,000 

6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

8,000 

6,000 

8,000 

8,000 

6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

14,000 

6,000 

12,000 

12,000 

2,000 

4,000 

8,000 

10,000 

6,000 

6,000 
























































































































42 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BLACKSPOTTED TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Montana—Continued. 



2,000 

6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

12,000 
















Nebraska: 



Nevada: 

298,300 



85,000 




3,000 

3,000 





123,800 




3,000 

6,000 

3,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

3,000 

4,000 


16,450 

633,020 


New Mexico: 


























14,400 
4,800 
6,000 









15,000 



7,200 

New York: 

25,000 

50,000 





Oregon: 


45 



12,000 

12,000 

16,000 

8,000 

14,214 

20,000 

















175,000 

50,000 


Pennsylvania: 



South Dakota: 


10,000 

7,000 

16,000 

6,000 

35,000 

9,000 

30,000 

5,000 

30,000 

21,000 

35,000 

8,000 

5,000 

30,000 

12,500 

2,500 

6,000 

47,750 

5,000 

6,000 

40,000 

25,000 























* 

















Rapid City*, Electric Light Pond. 









Rapid Creek. 






Spring Creek. 









Utah: 

50,000 



20,000 


Virginia: 

Sweet Chalybeate, Sweet Springs Branch. 


2,480 

42 

5,000 

737 

600 

10,000 

Washington: 

50,000 










Winona, Palouse River. 



































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


43 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


BLACKSPOTTED TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Wyoming: 

Beulah, Crystal Springs. 



6,000 

15,000 

Crook County, Sand Creek. 





400,000 



11,200 

4,200 

5,600 

5,600 

8,400 




Raft Lake. 










175,000 




. 21,250 


500,000 




15,000 

18,750 




France: 

10,000 





2,748,550 

1,756,094 

906,654 



LOCH LEVEN TROUT. 


South Dakota: 



68,248 




LAKE TROUT. 

Colorado: 


24,700 


Idaho: 


18,000 

4,000 




Illinois: 

500,000 


Maine: 

11,000 
11,000 
11,000 
263,922 
11,000 
11,000 
10,000 
11,000 

9,000 

756,000 
756,000 
2,268,000 
756,000 
2,000,000 























Massachusetts: 



Michigan: 
















10,000 



150,000 
1,512,000 
600,000 
‘ 700,000 
1,975,000 











Isle Royale, Lake Superior. 


2,052,500 

600,000 





275,000 
1,025,000 






16,000 



150,000 
1,400,000 
1,400,000 
2,050,000 
756,000 
756,000 
1,400,000 




















2,000,000 

3,500 


756,000 
700,000 




Sault Ste. Maris, Michigan Fish Commission. 

3,666,666 



a Lost in transit, 9,740 fry. 


















































































































44 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
LAKE TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Michigan — Continued. 


1,950,000 
756,000 
1,512,000 










780,000 
660,000 






2,000,000 

Minnesota: 


20,000 

20,000 

6,900 




Montana: 



New York: 


40,000 
450,000 
40,000 
100,000 
1,000,000 
32,000 
1,627,000 
750,000 
24,000 
450,000 



























150,000 



40,000 
100,000 





North Dakota:' 


20,000 

Oregon: 


11,300 

17,500 

30,000 
35,000 
17,500 
17,500 

Pennsylvania: 



Vermont: 














3,370 



15,000 
35,000 
14,000 
17,500 










Wisconsin: 


10,000 

12,000 

12,000 

12,000 












16,000 



3,880 


4,500,000 




32,000 



10,000 

12,000 

12,000 







Argentina: 

50,000 


Total a . 



10,210,000 

33,645,922 

4,286,150 



BROOK TROUT. 


Arizona: 

Jerome, Beaver Creek. 

Dragoon Creek. 

Thompson Creek. 

West Fork Creek. 

Tucson, Sabino Creek. 

California: 

McCloud, Wheelers Creek. 

Point Reyes, Paper Mill Creek. 
Colorado:' 

Antonito, Conejos River. 

Basalt, Luna Creek. 

Berrys Ranch, Eagle River.... 
Black Hawk, Dory Lake. 


2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

15,000 


50,000 


24,165 


20,000 

25,000 


9.000 


7,000 


a Lost in transit, 4,000 fry. 














































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


45 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
arid adults. 

Colorado—Continued. 


30,000 




4,500 



8,000 

16,000 

8,000 









12,500 
7,000 






35,000 
15,000 
15,000 









5,100 
10,200 
5,100 









30,000 
20,000 
27,500 









6,000 



10,000 
10,000 
10,000 









1.500 

8.500 
6,800 




West Bull Creek. 





10,000 
100,000 
25,000 
100,000 
12,500 
30,000 
30,000 
40,000 
38,000 
25,000 
15,000 
25,000 
12,000 
24,000 
20,000 
16,000 
12,000 
15,000 
12,500 


















5,000 






































3,000 



15,000 

15,000 






1,000 



10,000 
15,000 
50,000 
10,000 
10,000 
15,000 
18,000 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
8.000 

19.950 
10.000 

11.950 
39,000 













































40 

2,000 






20,000 

24,000 

24,000 









20,000 



25,000 

250,000 

20,000 

4,000 

44,000 

15,000 

25.000 

15,000 

44,000 






















Willow Creek.. 





















































































































































46 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Colorado—Continued. 


30,000 

15,000 

15,000 









100,000 



80,000 

30,000 







13,600 
11,900 
10.200 
2,000 












7,900 
12,500 
16,000 
10,000 
15,000 
20,000 















15,000 

4,000 





15,000 
10,000 
4,000 









2,000 



20,000 
3,880 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
15,000 
28,500 
15,000 
















Ridgway, Dolores River. 








3,600 

1,800 






10,000 
25,000 




Spearhead Lake. 


2,400 



28,000 
40,000 

Woodbridge Pond. 



Sawpit, Sylvan Lake. 


6,700 

South Fork, Beaver Creek. 


12,500 
12,500 
12,500 

Elk Creek.,. 



Goupel Creek. 



South Platte River. 


22,500 

Trout Creek. 


12,500 
25,000 
15,000 
10,000 
15,000 

Steamboat Springs, Bear River. 









■yampa River. 



Texas Creek, Spruce Creek Reservoir. 


7,200 
2,400 

Thomas ville, Spring Creek. 



Woods Lake. 


200,000 

23,000 

Tolland, South Boulder Creek. 



Trinidad, McWilliams Pond. 


4,000 

10,000 

5,000 

16,500 

South Lake. 



Twin Lakes, Lake Creek. 



Webster, Platte River. 





98,000 

Venable Creek. 


10,800 

Wheeler, Black Creek. 


15,000 

Wolcott, Eagle Creek. 


6,000 

2,000 

Woottoh, Sugarite Creek. 



Connecticut: 

Botsford, Halfway River. 


12,000 

Danbury, Willow' Brook. 


300 

Greenwich, Byram River. 


8,000 

New Haven, Spring Glen Pond. 


300 

400 

600 

Norwich, Billings Brook. 



Broad Brook. 



Choate Brook. 


7,500 

7,500 

7,500 

Pease Brook. 



Stony Brook. 



Saybrook Junction, Hart Brook. 


300 

Stamford, Mill Creek. 


20,000 
30,000 
12,000 
16,000 
32,000 
IB, 000 
16,000 

Rippewan River. 



Stratford, Brookdale Pond. 



Tariffville, Three Cornered Pond. 



Waterbury, Andrews Pond. 



Hancock Pond. 



Hop Brook. 












































































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


47 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Connecticut—Continued. 


16,000 

8,000 

8,000 


Osborne Brook. 



Potatuck River. 





23,000 


Delaware: 


4,000 

2,400 

4,000 

1,800 

1,200 

3,000 

1,000 

900 

Georgia: 






Idaho: 


















900 

900 

900 

2,000 

0,000 

1,500 

2,000 






















6,000 

1,200 

1,200 

4.500 
1,200 

1.500 
2,000 
1,500 





- 




















2 ,000 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 
000 













Illinois: 



300 




300 

Indiana: 



1,950 

2,000 

1.950 
1,000 

3.950 













Iowa: 



6,000 
6,000 
7.500 







Kentucky: 



10,000 

Maine: 



500 



30,000 

30,000 

20,000 

15,000 

20,000 















1,800 

1,500 



21,500 

25,000 

30,000 








1,500 



30,000 
80,000 
15,000 

1,500 





600 



15,000 

750 


25,000 


21,000 

35,000 







50,000 

20,000 

25,000 










37^500 




900 




1,500 

600 




• Chace Pond. 



1,500 
































































































48 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details op Distribution op Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Maine—Continued. 

Farmington, Chain of Ponds. 



3,000 

1.500 

1.500 
1,600 

1.500 
3,000 

1.500 
1,500 
1,400 




Grant Pond. 



Gull Pond. 



Lufkift Pond. 





1 . 

Redington Creek. 



SandyRiver. 



Tufts Pond . 



Green Lake, Ducktail Pond. 


20,000 

25,000 

15,000 

Partridge Pond. 



Snowshoe Pond. 



Greenville Junction. Moosehead Lake. 


1,500 

Harrington, Schoodic Lake. 


35,000 

Holeb,“Little Pond. 


1,500 

Jackman, Hatchery Brook. 


15,000 

15.000 

15,000 



1,500 

Thompson Brook. 


Katahdin Iron Works, Big Houston Pond. 


1.500 

3.500 

Little Houston Pond. 


35,000 

30,000 

37.500 

20,000 

Kineo, Cany Creek. 


Moosehead Lake. 


4,500 

Lincoln, Long Pond. 


Livermore Falls, Long Pond. 


1,500 

Lowelltown, Bog Brook. 


12,500 

12,500 

12,500 

30,000 

Deer Pond. 



Lowell Pond. 



Machias, Bog Lake. 



Monmouth, Baker Pond. 


1,500- 

1,500 

Jimmy Pond. 



Mosquito, Baker Pond. 


10,000 

15,000 

Onawa, Upper Boarstone Pond. 


• 

Oquossoc, "Rangeley Lakes. 


2,25( 

Otis, Green Lake. 


100,000 

Oxford, Hall Pond. 


1,200 

Perry, Bovden J^ake. 


40,000 

37,500 

40,000 

Phillips, Carlton Pond. 



Philips Lake, Philips Lake. 



Portage, Portage Lake... 


2,100 

1,500 

GOO 

Rumford Falls, Howard Pond. 



Sedgwick, Thurston Brook. 



South Paris, Pennesseewassee Lake. 


17,500 

Shagg Pond. 


1,500 

Washburn Pond. 


15,000 

Tunk Pond, Tunk Pond. 


1,500 

Unity, Sandy Creek. 


30,000 

25,000 

West Ellsworth, Pattens Pond... 



West Paris, Abbot Pond. 


1,200 

1,500 

600 

Little Concord Pond. 



Washburn Pond. 



Wilton, Webb Pond. 


17,500 

York Beach, Otter Pond. 


450 

1,000 

2,000 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

500 

400 

500 

800 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

500 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

2,000 

Maryland: 

Annapolis, Alcorn Branch.. 



Bel Air, Barnes Run. 



Cool Spring Run. 



Durham’s brook. 



Elbow Brook. 



Flint Mill Brook. 



Graveyard Brook. 



Hollands Brook. 



Johnson’s brook. 



Stoner Creek. 



Wysong Brook. 



Deer Park, Altamont Pond. 



Block Run. 



Pond Run. 



Trout Run. 



Elkridge, Stony Run. 



Fallston, South Fork Brook. 



Glyndon, Lake Jorosa. 



Hagerstown, Marsh Run. 



Mill Spring Run. 



Highland, Heaps Brook'.. 



Minefield Brook. 



Ramsey Brook. 



Hutton, Crystal Lake. 


... 


















































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


49 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Eggs. , 


Fry. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Maryland—Continued. 

handover, Eccles Pond. 

Monkton, Curtis Brook. 

Matthews Branch. 

Patterson Brook. 

Phelps and Reynolds Branch. 

Mountain Lake Park, Pine Run. 

New Freedom, Ruhls Branch. 

Oakland, Cherry Creek. 

Deep Creek. 

Dunker Lick Creek. 

Hamill’s lake. 

Harrington Creek. 

Harvey's pond. 

Millers Run. 

Wilsons Lake... 

Rockland Station, Green Springs Run. 

Ruxton, Rockland Creek.y. 

Sharon, Magnes Brook. 

Smithsburg, Oswald Run. 

Silver Falls Creek. 

Warner Gap Run. 

Stoyer, Sand Run. 

Thurmont, Hunting Creek. 

Westminster, Fairview Pond. 

Wilson, Laurel Run. 

Massachusetts: 

Athol, Swift River.I 

Clinton, Nashua River. < 

Concord, Punkatasset Pond.i 

Fitchburg, Lord Brook.i 

Mulpus Brook. 

Greenfield, Fisk Pond. 

Groton, Hunkerty Brook. 1 

Holyoke, Man Han River. 

Williamsett Brook.I 

Lawrence, Schubert’s pond. 

North Adams, Iloosac River, North Branch. 

Hudson Brook. 

Northampton, Running Gutter Creek. 

South Hanson, Poors Creek. 

Tolland, Slocum Brook. 1 

Waltham, Pequod Brook. 

School House Brook. 

Westfield, Big Powder Mill Brook. 

Farmington River, East Branch... 

Little River. 

Powder Mill Brook. 1 

Weston, Draper Brook. 

West Townsend, Allison’s pond. 

Williamsburg, Clary Pond. 

Highland Brook. 

Michigan: 

Addison, Posy Creek. ! 

Alger, Bear Creek. 

Wells Creek.j 

Alpena, Davis Creek. 1 

Newton Creek... 

Watson Creek.. 

Widner Creek. 

Baldwin, Baldwin Creek.. 

Battle Creek, Sevenmile Brook. 

Bellaire, Shanty Creek... 

Biteley, Marquette River.'.. 

Branch, Weldon Creek. 

Brighton, Ore Creek. 

Calumet, Eagle Creek. 

Mosquito Creek. 

Central Lake, Central Lake Brooks. 

Clare, Tobacco River, North Branch. 

East Tawas, Vaughn Creek. 

Gladwin, Cedar River. 

Smith Creek. 

Grand Marais, Grand Marais Creek. 

Greenville, Berridges Creek. 

Hale, Hale Creek. 

Smith Creek. 


500 
1,000 
500 
500 
500 
500 
1,000 
1,500 
2,200 
1,800 
1,000 
2,300 
320 
1,800 
500 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
500 
500 
500 
400 
1,500 
500 
1,500 


20,000 


16,000 


4,000 


12,000 


8,000 

8,000 


600 


600 

900 

500 

600 

700 

300 


500 

500 

700 

500 

1,200 


500 

1,400 

700 

500 

300 

180 

300 

300 


5,000 
10,000 
12,000 
9,000 
9,000 
12,000 
15,000 


16*666 

12,000 


18,000 


15,000 

10,000 


9,000 

9,000 


3,000 


3,000 

3,000 

3,000 


6,000 

4,000 

3,000 


1,000 


10,000 

2,000 







































































































50 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
BROOK TROUT — Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Michigan—Continued. 

Hillsdale, Kirby Brook. 



3,000 

Holland. Half Way Creek. 


6,000 

Interlochen, Betsie River. 


3,000 

Kalamazoo, Haden Brook. 


15,000 
12,000 

Silver Creek. 



Kingsley, Boardman River. 


2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

East Creek. 



Mayfield Brook. 



Little Manistee, Little Manistee River 


20,000 
25,000 
20,000 
10,000 

Lovells, Au Sable River, North Branch. « 



Big Creek. 



Crapo Creek. 



Mandan, Montreal River. 


6,000 

Millersburg, Indian Creek. 


12,000 

15,000 

15,000 

12,000 

9,000 

12,000 

10.000 

Little Ocqueoc River. 



Ocqueoc River. 



Muskegon, Cedar Creek. 



Silver Creek. 



Newaygo, Bigton Creek. 



Northville, Townsend Creek. 



Peacock, Au Sable River. 


3.000 

10,000 

6,000 

6,000 

Manistee River. 



Petersburg, Crystal Pond. 



Phoenix, Gratiot River. 



Roscommon, Barnes Creek. 


5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
15,000 
10,000 
5,000 

Beaver Creek. 



Cedar Creek. 



Cold Creek. 



Durant Creek. 



Willow Creek. 



Standish, Lundy Creek. 


6,000 

4,000 

4.000 

4,000 

4,000 

Sweetwater, Sweetwater Creek. 



White Cloud, White River. 



Wingleton, Bowman Creek. 



Cedar Creek. 



Danahar Creek. 


15.000 

Minnesota: 

Alborn, Ericsson Creek. 


600 
10,000 
4,000 
4,000 

9.200 
6,000 
5,300 

10,000 
6,000 
6,000 
900 
2,000 
12,000 
6,000 

1.200 
4,000 

10,000 

800 

7,500 

10.000 

6.000 

4,000 

2,000 

600 

2,400 
400 
2.000 
2,400 

2,000 
600 
2,800 
10,000 
8,000 
10,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2.000 
2.000 
1.000 
2,000 

Beaver Crossing, Beaver Creek. 



Budd Creek. 



Little Split Rock River. 



Split Rock River. 



Split Rock River, East Branch. . 



Canton, Weisel Creek. 



Carlton, Otter Creek. 



Cloquet, Otter Creek. 



Squaw Creek. 



Deephaven, Jennison Creek. 



Kokesh Creek. 

. 

Duluth, Endion Brook. 

. 

Lester Creek, East Branch. 


Temperance River. 


Fond du Lac, Mission Creek. 



Fosston, Poplar Lake. 



Hibbing, O’Brien Brook. 



Hovland, Upper Brule River. 



Knife River, Micmac Lake. 



Mountain Brook. 



Nigadoo Brook. 



Lewiston, Enterprise Creek... 



Gunther Valley Creek. 



Hemmingway Creek. 



Laufenbergs Valley Creek. 



Pine Creek. ; 



Rush Creek. 



Stockton Valley Creek. 



Whitestone Creek, Middle Branch 



Whitewater Creek, South Branch 



Little Falls, Hillman Creek. 



Okesippi Creek. 



Skunk Greek. 



Minnesota Citv, Rear Creek. 



Rollingstone Creek, North Branch... 



RollingstoneCreek, Rupprecht Valiev Branch 
Preston, Bear Creek. 





Camp Creek. 



Forestville Creek, North Branch_ 



Forestville Creek, South Branch. 

























































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


51 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Minnesota—Continued. 

Preston, Partridge Creek. 



1,000 

1,500 

2,000 

400 

1,000 

4,000 

4,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

Sugar Creek. 



W atson Creek. 



Redwood, Schmidts Creek. 



Rochester, Bear Creek. 



Rollins Siding, Bates Creek. 



Pine Creek. 



Rushford, Big Spring Creek. 



Camp Creek. 



Choice Creek. 



Coolidge Creek. 









Ensend Creek. 



Enterprise Creek. 



1,000 

Ferguson Creek. 



1,000 

Gribbin Creek. 



1,000 

1,000 

Hemingway Creek. 






1,000 

1,000 

Jansens Creek. 



Johnson Creek. 



l’ooo 

Meade Creek. 



1,000 

Onstine Creek. 



1,000 

Opheim Creek. 



1,000 




1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

Paterson Creek. 



Pine Creek. 



Tangen Creek. 



Voagen Creek. 



1.000 

Wilson Creek. 



1,000 

1,000 




Saginaw, Demsey Creek. 



4,000 

1,000 

1,500 

St. Charles, Campbells Spring Branch. 



Carters Run?... 



Crows Creek. 



1,500 

1,000 

Drakes Creek. 






1,000 




400 




400 

Pine Creek.. 



2,000 

2,000 

6,000 

Trout Run. 









4,500 

800 







400 




1,400 




1,000 




800 




400 

Ferguson Creek..”. 



400 




1,000 




1,000 

1.600 







1,000 




600 

Marev Creek. 



1.000 




400 




600 




600 




1,600 




1,000 




600 




1,400 




1,000 




2,000 




400 


. 


1,000 

Missouri: 

100,000 


Montana: 


1.200 




2,800 




1,600 


. 


22,500 




3,500 




2,000 




12,000 

Boulder. Buffalo Creek. 



2,000 
























































































52 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Montana—Continued. 



4,000 




36,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

6,000 

3.500 
15,000 
18,000 

1.500 


























* 


1,500 

2,000 







2^000 

2,000 

1.500 

3.500 













1,800 




600 




4,000 

1,800 







5,500 

2,000 







7.500 




2,000 

2,000 







9,000 

4,000 

4,000 










3,000 

1,500 







9,000 




3,000 

2,800 







9,000 

7,500 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

2,000 



















1,500 




4,000 

Nebraska: 



15,000 
30,000 







600 

Nevada: 



3,600 

New Hampshire: 


16,000 
30,000 






40.000 




40.000 




12,000 
20,000 







1,500 




1,500 

1,500 






8,000 
12,000 
8.000 








4,000 




8,000 




16,000 
8,000 
8,000 










8,000 
12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
8,000 
















180 




220 




180 



6,000 
16,000 
20,000 




Ashuelot River, East Branch. 












































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


53 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

New Hampshire—Continued. 

Laconia, Follett Brook. 


6,000 
12,000 
8,000 
20,000 
5,000 


Gilford Brook.. 



Lebanon, Cranberry Pond. 



Lisbon, Star Crescent Pond. 



Madison, Silver Lake. 



Manchester. Dalton Brook. 


180 

Manter Brook. 


12,000 

8,000 

Nigger Creek. 



Prescott Brook. 


180 

Nashua, Budro Brook. 


6,000 

Chase Brook. 


180 

Cider Mill Brook. 


8,000 
12,000 

Gibson Brook. 



Newburv, Lake Sunapee... 


6,000 

New London, Barber‘Brook. 


6,000 

Newport, Cutts Brook. 


1,000 

Penacook, Brickyard Brook. 


6,000 
6,000 
12,000 

Tannery Brook. 



Peterboro, Nay Brook. 



Pike, Eastman Brook. 


500 

Plymouth, Little Glen Ponds. 


48,000 
8,000 

Portsmouth, Marston Brook. 



Peverly Brook. 


250 

Potter Place, Fellows Meadow Brook. 


6,000 

Raymond, Fordway Brook. 


180 

180 

180 

180 

Jose Dudley Brook. 



Pine Hill Brook. 



Scribner Brook. 



Sanbornville, Pike Brook.. 


16,000 
8,000 

South Brookline, Rockwood Pond. 



South Lyndeboro, Herrick Brook... 


180 

Warner, Meadow Mills Creek. 


8,000 

12,000 

8,000 

12,000 

16,000 

12,000 

Stevens Hill Creek. 



Wentworth, Baker River. 



Wilton, Miller Brook. 



Purgatory Brook. 



Stonv Brook. 



Winchester, Willard Pond. 


1,000 

Wolfeboro, Ilaith Brook. 


12,000 

New Jersey: 

Elberon, Wlialepond Brook. 


1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

Passaic, McDaniels Brook. 



Pattenburg, Manunselocwa Creek. 



Pompton Lakes, Haycock Brook. 



Princeton, applicant.. 

1,000 


Salem, Coilihs Run. 


1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
500 
500 
500 

5,000 

2,000 

4,000 

2,000 

3,200 

2,000 

2,000 

4,000 

5,000 

1,600 

Cool Run. 



Easter Run. 



South Ogdenburg, Kinney Brook. 



Sparta, Pullis Stream. 



Sherman Mine Brook. 



New Mexico: 

Alamogordo, Spring Canon Pond. 



Glorieta, El Reto de la Arrhaw. 



J>as Vegas, Sapello River. 



Santa Fe, Rio Grande Live Stock Co.'s lake. 



Rio del Medio. Creek. 



Santa Fe River. 



Tesuque Creek. 



Silver City, Glenwood Pond. 



Glenwood Springs'.. 



Wagon Mound, Tison Creek. 



New York: 

Adams, South Sandy Creek. 


24,000 

Afton, Cady Creek.. 


500 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

Cornell Creek. 



North Afton Brook. 



Pixly Brook. 



Altmar, Beaver Dam Brook. 


12,000 

16,000 

24,000 

Potts Mill Brook. 



Salmon River. 



Apulia Station, Cascade Brook. 


1,500 

500 

1,000 

1,500 

600 

1,000 

Cold Brook. 



Conklin Brook. 



Dodge Brook. 



Gallinger Brook. 



Gleason Brook. 




59395°—11-7 


















































































































54 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Egos — Continued. 


BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

iv York—Continued. 

Apulia Station, Grady Brook. 



600 

6,000 

1,500 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

Johnson Brook. 



June Brook. 



Keeler Brook. 



Lee Brook. 



Newman Brook. 



Osborne Brook. 



Auburn, North Brook. 


20,000 
24,000 
20,000 
12,000 
12,000 
24,000 

Salmon Brook. 



Sennett Brook. 



Barneveld, Big Drumlin Pond. 



Beaver River, Beaver River. 



Twitchell Creek. •. 



Bellport, Osborne Creek. 


500 

Berlin, Little Iloosick River. 


16,000 
16,000 
8,000 
20,000 
8,000 
6,000 

Bliss, Wiscoy Creek. 



Wiscoy Creek, North Branch. 



Blossvale, Fish Creek. 



Brainard, Black Brook. 



Budlong Brook. 



Buffalo, New York State Cancer Laboraiory. 


250 

Cambridge, Blair Brook.'. 


12,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
6,000 
8,000 
16,000 
16,000 
12,000 
8,000 
12,000 
12,000 

Pammanook Creek. 



Rice Brook. 



Canton, Baldwin Brook. 



Buck Brook. 



Clark Brook. 



Dean Brook. 



Giflin Brook. ...... 



Granis Brook. 



Howard Brook. 



Leonard Brook. 



Little River. 



MeFadden Brook. 



Pleasant Brook. 



Taylor Brook. 



Cattaraugus, Cattaraugus Creek, West Branch. 



Central Bridge, Grosvenor Pond. 


500 

1,500 

600 

Cincinnatus, Brakel Creek.i. 



Cooperstown, Iroquois Farm Ponds. 



Corinth, Sturdevan Brook. 


12,000 

Cornwell, Mineral Spring Creek. 


1,000 

1,500 

2,000 

Dryden, Virgil Creek. 



Edmeston, Wharton Creek. 



Floodwood, Ledge Pond. 


24,000 

Georgetown Station, Gladding Brook. 


500 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

600 

600 

1,000 

1,500 


' 





Middletown Creek. 



Plank Creek. 



Thompson Brook. 



Greene, Crandall Brook... T. '. . 



Highland Falls, Queens boro Creek. 



Hoosick Falls, Case Brook.,. 


8,000 
12,000 
16,000 

Shingle Hollow Creek. 



White Creek. 



Iona Island, Doodletown Brook. .. . 


1,000 

Livingston Manor, Beaverkill River.. 


10,000 

7,500 




Mahopac, Hillsboro Lake... 


2.500 
1,000 

1.500 

Marathon, Hunts Creek. 



Merrills Creek. 



Newark, Military Brook Pond.. . 


8,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
6,000 
8,000 
4,000 
8,000 
8,000 
16,00C 

New Lebanon, Burnemead Brook. 



Church Brook. 



Cold Spring Brook. 









Hull Brook. 


150 

Lost Brook. 


Mahar Brook. 



Meadow Brook. 












Shaker Mill Brook. 


150 

150 

Thomas Brook. 








































































































































55 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details op Distribution op Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

New York—Continued. 

New Lebanon, Tilden Brook. 



150 

West Meadow Brook. 


8,000 

Wyomonock Creek. 


500 

New York, New York Aquarium. 

10,000 


Northville, Barkers Stream. 

10,000 


Onativia, Hiscock Brook. 


1,000 

1,000 

2,000 

1,000 

2.500 

1.500 
2,000 
1,000 

Kennellys Brook. 



Morgan Brook. 



Montgomery Brook. 



Oneonta, Butternut Creek. 



Otsego Creek. 



Ouleous Creek. 



Otego, Otsdawa Creek. 



Paul Smiths, Lower St. Regis Lake. 


18,000 

Patterson, Croton River. 


2,500 

2,500 

Quaker Brook. 



Prospect, Big Rock Lake. 


24,000 
16,000 
16,000 
10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
7,500 
6,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
10,000 
13,500 
8,000 

Randolph, Little Conewango Creek. 



Rome, Canada Creek. 



Point Rock Creek. 



Roscoe, Abewood Brook. 



Appley Brook. 



Beaverkill River. 



Berry Brook. 



Darbee Brook. 



Shin Brook. 



Stewart Brook. 



Tennanah Lake. 



Willowemoc River. 



Salamanca, Stoddards Pond. 



Saugerties, Dwaskill Creek. 


2,000 

1,800 

Swartzwood, Jackson Hollow Creek. 



Syracuse, Carpenter Brook. 


16,000 

8,000 

8,000 

20,000 

De Montforde Creek. 



Thurman, Millington Brook. 


6,000 

Veli Pond. 


Valley Stream, Trout Lake. 


1,000 

Watertown, French Creek. 


4,000 
4,000 
6,000 
8,000 
10,000 
24,000 
24,000 

Kings Creek. 



Knapp Creek. 



Waterville, Oriskany Creek. 



Townsend Creek. 



Williamstown, Carterville Pond. 



Willsboro, Warm Pond. 



North Carolina: 

Addie, Scotts Creek. 


3,200 

4,800 

4,000 

1,600 

1,600 

500 

1,000 

2.500 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 

1.500 
1,000 
4,000 

800 

1,600 

2,400 

2.400 

6.400 
500 
500 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

500 

1,000 

500 

Apalachia, Cane Creek. 



Sular Creek. 



Balsam, Dark Ridge Creek. 



Woodfin Creek. 



Black Mountain, Long Branch Creek. 



Middle Fork Creek. 



Montreat Lake. 



Silver Fork. 



Sugar Creek. 



Swannanoa River, North Fork. 



Boonford, Ayles Creek. 



Cane River, Elk Fork. 



Brevard, Middlesex Branch. 



Craggy, Wells’s pond. 



Dilfsboro, Brushyfork Creek. 



Elk Park, Elk River. 



Hickory Creek. 



Winkler Creek. 



Glenwood, Goose Creek. 



Mashburn Creek. 



Greenlee, Bear Creek. 



Bobs Fork Creek. 



Graybeard Creek. 



Greenlee Fork Creek. 



Haw Branch. 



Huskins Creek. 



Jarretts Creek. 



Little Shoals Creek. 



Logan Creek. 



Lone Fork Creek. 



Mountain Creek.... . 



Nahlets Creek.1... 


























































































































56 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

North Carolina—Continued. 



500 

Rock House Creek. 



500 

She Bear Creek. 



1,000 




lj 000 




'500 




500 




1,000 

1,000 







1.000 




3 ; 200 

14,000 
10,000 
2,000 







Linville Falls, Catawba River, North Fork. 






500 




1,500 




500 




1,000 




'500 




1,000 

1,000 

1,000 










500 




1,000 




1,000 

1,000 

Limekiln Creek. 






1,000 




1,000 




1 ' 000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




'500 




1,600 




2300 




2,400 

4,000 




Linville River. 



4 ,800 




1,600 




Z, 200 
1,000 







2,400 




3'200 
2,400 







2,400 

3,200 

2,400 










2'400 




2 ,400 
1,600 







'500 




500 




500 




3,200 

3,200 

1,600 

1,600 













l' 600 




ljeoo 

3,200 







3,200 

3,200 

1,600 










L600 

1,600 







3; 200 
1,600 







l' 600 




\ , 600 
1,600 







1,600 

1,600 

1,600 

1,600 










Whittier. Conley Creek. 



L600 


















































































57 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
. BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Ohio: 

Bellefontaine, Macochee Creek. 




Spring Branch. 



3,000 

Cleveland, Canyon Spring. 



Mansfield, Golf Spring Run. 




Mercer Creek. 




Mercer Lake. 




Niles Run. 



3,000 

Reynolds Run. 



Ravena, Spring Creek. 



3*000 

Urbana, P'owefis Brook. 



Oklahoma: 

Carrier, Spring Bark Creek. 



600 

400 

Weatherford, Deer Creek. 



Oregon: 

Baker City, Daly Creek. 


5,000 

4,000 

4,000 

3,000 

15,000 

10,000 

5,000 

Duncan, Meacham Creek. 



Gibbon, Umatilla River. 



Hilgard, Spring Creek. 



Milwaukee, Crystal Lake. 



Oregon City, Abemethv River. 



Clear Creek. 



Rock Creek Pond. 


9,000 

9,800 


Woodcock River. 



Pennsylvania: 

Allentown, Cedar Creek.. 


3,000 

500 

Altoona, Big Laurel Run. 



Burgoon Run. 



500 




500 

Demmaree Run. 



500 




500 

Green Springs Run. 



500 

Juniata Gap Run. 



500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




1,200 




1,000 




2,500 




1,000 




500 




1,000 




1,000 




L 000 

1,000 

1,000 










1,000 




Looo 




Looo 




1,000 




1,000 




l ',000 

1,000 







1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




i.ooo 




1,500 




3,000 

1,500 







2,000 




500 




1,000 




1,500 




500 




500 




500 




1,000 




500 




1,000 




1,000 




500 




2 ,1X10 




1,000 




500 




2,000 

Birdsboro. Molasses Pond. 



300 



































































































58 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Pennsylvania—Continued. 



500 




600 

1,200 

500 










2,000 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 

500 







500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




4,000 

2,500 

2,500 

375 













500 




1,000 




1,000 




i; 500 
1,000 







i; ooo 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 













1,000 

500 







1,000 

1,000 







1,000 

500 







500 




1,000 

1,000 







1,200 

500 







1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 

1,200 







2,000 

1,500 







1,000 




1.000 




1,000 




1,500 




1,000 

500 







500 




500 




1,000 




1,000 

500 

Samples Run.I..,. 
























































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


59 


Details op Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — C ontinued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Pry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Pennsylvania—Continued. 



2,000 

2,000 

500 

2,000 

2,000 

500 

500 




Glen Isle Run. 



Rock Run. 









Bash Run. 






500 

500 

California Run. 



Clear Spring Run. 



500 

David Evans Pond. 



500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




1,000 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




500 




1,000 




2,000 




1,000 




500 




1,000 

1,000 

1,000 










2,000 




1,000 




1,000 




2,800 




600 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,500 




500 




2,500 




1,000 

400 







600 




1,800 

1,000 







500 




1,125 




1,800 




1,800 




1,000 




600 




1,000 




1,500 




1,000 




500 




500 



. 

1,000 




1,000 




500 




500 




1,000 




500 




500 




1,000 




500 




500 




500 




500 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 



. 

500 




1,000 

Pavnter Brook. 


. 

500 


























































































60 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — C ontinued. 


BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Pennsylvania—Continued. 



1,000 

500 

Rout Creek. 



West Braneh. 



1,000 

Hopewell, BeaverCreek. 



2,000 

500 

Otts Run. 



Three Spring Run. 



500 

Yellow Creek. 



1,000 

500 







3,000 




1,000 

1,500 

Stone Creek. 



Trough Creek. 



1,500 




1,000 
1,000 

Grassy Hollow Run. 



Haugh Run. 



500 

Jersey Shore, Larry's Creek. 



2,400 

500 

Keating Summit, Brown Hollow Creek. 



Cowley Run. 



1,000 

Indian Run. 



500 

Portage Creek. 



1,000 

500 

Spring Creek. 



Knoxville, Troups Creek. 



1,500 

Lancaster, Furnace Run. 



l'OOO 

Middle Creek.,. 



1 j 000 
1,000 

Silver Run. 



Steinmans Run. 



1,000 

1,000 

500 

Walnut Run. . 



Landerberg, White Clay Creek, West Branch. 



Lanesboro,~ Brush ville Creek.... 



500 




1,000 

Cascade Creek. 



uooo 




1,000 

500 

Dodges Creek. 






1,000 

Egypt Creek. 



1,500 

Hemlock Creek. 



2 ; 000 
500 

Roaring Brook. 



Wild Cat Brook. 



1,000 

Laquin, Little Schrader Creek. 



1,800 

Laubach Station, Hess Run. 



500 




500 




500 

Laughlintown, McMullen Run. 



1,000 




1,000 

Lehigh ton, Spring Brook. 



(300 

Lemont, Cedar Creek. 



500 




500 




500 




1,000 

Pine Swamp Run. 



500 




1,500 

Lenover, Weavers Run... 



500 




1,500 




1,500 




1,500 

Lilly, Bear Rock Creek. 



500 




500 




500 




500 




1,000 

Lock Haven, Ba'gley Run. 



500 




1,200 




500 




1,200 




500 




1,400 




500 




700 








1,200 




500 

Earon Run. 



500 




500 




500 




700 




500 

Grows Run. 


.1 .100 

























































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


61 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
BROOK TROUT — Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingeriings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Pennsylvania—C ont inued. 



1,400 

500 

1.400 
1,200 

700 

500 

500 

500 

1,200 

1,200 

l,S0O 

500 

500 

1,200 

700 

1,200 

500 

500 

2.400 
1,200 
1,200 

500 

500 

1,200 

700 

1,200 

500 

500 

1,200 

500 

500 

1,200 

500 

50C 

1.400 
700 

1,400 

500 

500 

500 

700 

500 

1,400 

500 

500 

700 

500 

1,200 

500 

500 

700 

2,100 

1,200 

700 

1,200 

1,200 

700 

1,200 

700 

700 

700 

600 

3,000 

500 

1,500 

1,000 

500 

500 

500 

L000 

500 

500 

1,000 

500 

500 

500 

500 



































































































































































































































































































































62 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details op Distribution op Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Pennsylvania—Continued. 



1,000 

1,000 

500 

500 

500 

2,000 

500 

500 

1,500 

1,000 

2,000 

1,000 

600 

1,000 

1,000 

600 

North Salmon Creek. 



Six Mile Run.. 



Truby Run. 



Warner Run. 



West Millstone Creek. 



Wild Cat Run. 



Marklesburg, Touse Run. 



Marsh Hill, Frozen Run. 



Maston, Pigeon Run. 






Smith Run. 



Mauch Chunk, Bear Creek. 



Big Bear Creek. 



Drakes Creek. 



Glen Run. 



Heydst Run. 



600 

Hickory Run. 



1,000 
1 000 

James Run. 



Keipers Run. 



600 

Mauch Chunk Creek. 



1,000 

1,500 

600 

Mud Run. 



Panther Creek. 



Pine Run. 



1,000 

600 

Robinsons Run. 



Ruddles Run. 



600 

Sand Spring Run. 



500 

Stony Creek. 



1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

2,000 

1,000 

500 

Wild Creek. 



Y ellow Run. 



Mayport, Pine Run. 



Meadville, Berlev Run. 



Brawley Run. 



Hamilton Run. 



1,000 
1,000 
1 000 

Little Sugar Creek. 



Spring Run. 



Middleport, Cold Run. 



1 000 

Mifflinburg, Brush Hollow Run. 



'500 

Buffalo Creek.. 



1,500 

First Gap Run. 



500 

Fourth Gap Run. 



1,500 

500 

Halfway Gap Run. 



Hays Gap Run. 



500 

Lukers Gap Run. 



500 

Pine Swamp Creek. 



1,000 

1,500 

500 

Rapid Run*. 



Reeds Gap Run. 



Sand Run. 



500 

Second Gap Run. 



500 

Spruce Run. 



1 000 

Third Gap Run. 



1 000 

Yankee Run. 



500 

Mifflintown, Big Run. 



1,500 

1,500 

3,000 

1,000 

East Lost Creek. 



Hornings Run. 



Sponhowers Run. 



Tennis Run. 



500 

West Lost Creek. 



1,500 

1 000 

Millville, Bear Run. 



Milroy, Laurel Run. 



1,500 

1,500 

500 

New Lancaster Stream. 



Mt. Joy, Big Spring Creek. 



Mt. Pocono, Wilson Spring Run. 


500 

Mt. Union, Carters Run. 

;;.. 

500 

Scrub Gap Rim. 


1,000 

1,000 

Singers Gap Run. 


Muncy, Muncy Creek. 



2,500 

New Freedom", Codorus Creek. 



1,000 

500 

Summitt Creek. 



New Holland, Goods Run. 



500 

New Ringgold, Beaver Creek. 



GOO 

Cold Run. 



600 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

Rausch Creek. 



Newton Hamilton, Licking Creek. 



Long Hollow Run. 



Nigger Creek. 



1,000 

Orangeville, Achenbach Run. 



500 























































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


63 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
BROOK TROUT — Continued. 


Disposition. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


P ennsylvania—Continued. 

Osceola Mills, Bear Run. 

California Run. 

Coal Creek. 

Flat Rock Creek. 

Mountain Creek. 

Trout Run. 

Paddy Mountain, Penns Run. 

Palm, Indian Creek. 

Parkersburg, Octorara Creek. 

Parsons, Bear Creek. 

Meadow Run. 

Pond Creek. 

Ten Mile Run. 

Patton, Carroll Creek. 

Shehan Run. 

Paxinos, Irish Creek. 

Petersburg, Garners Run. 

Globe Run. 

Irvins Run. 

Lick Run. 

t Roaring Run. 

Philadelphia, Darbey Creek. 

Phillipsburg, Ardells Spring Run. 

Barker Run. 

Beaver Run. 

Bennens Run... 

Big Spring Run. 

Bilgers Run. 

Black Bear Run. 

Black Moshannon Creek.'. 

California Run.. 

Clearwater Run. 

Clover Run. 

Cold Run. 

Dayton Run. 

Echo Glen Park Lakes.... 

McCords Run. 

Morgan Run. 

Nooch Run. 

One Mile Run. 

Senser Run. 

Seven Springs Run. 

Shields Run. 

Six Mile Run. 

Smays Run. 

Tests Run. 

Tomtit Run. 

Upper Daugherty Run... 

Whetstone Rhn. 

Wolf Run. 

Pleasant Stream Junction, Potash Run. 

Pottstown, Povvderdale Run. 

Pottsville, Big Creek.. 

Black Creek. 

Breechlez Pond. 

Eichert Creek. 

Hells Creek. 

Neland’s pond..*. 

Rattling Run. 

Seltzer Creek. 

Stony Creek. 

Strouser Creek. 

Powys, Cold Fork Run. 

Daugherty Run. 

Long Fork Run. 

Lower Daugherty Run. 

Wolf Run. 


2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,625 
1,000 
1,500 
1,500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
500 
500 
1,500 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
1,500 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
1,000 
1,000 
500 
500 
500 
500 
2,000 
1,000 
500 
500 
600 
500 
1,000 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,500 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
500 
600 
600 
600 
600 


Ralston, Rocky Run. 

Rattling Run, Rattling Run 

Reading, Furnace Creek. 

Hartmens Creek... 

Hay Creek. 

Hoidennan Creek.. 

Laurel Creek. 

Limekiln Brook... 

Willow Creek. 

Wyomissing Creek. 


2,000 

500 

600 

500 

1,000 

500 

3,500 

600 

600 

600 



























































































64 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details op Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Pennsylvania—Cont inued. 



2,000 
2,400 







1,200 




1,200 




1,200 


:::::::::::: 


1,200 




3,600 

1,400 

1,800 


. 



:::::::::::: 





2,100 




1,400 


. 


1,000 




1,000 

1,000 

1,000 



i 







1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,500 




1,000 




1,000 




500 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1.000 




1,000 




500 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 

1 ,C00 







1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,500 




1.000 

Wolf Creek . 



1,000 




2,000 




1,000 




2,500 




1,000 




1,000 




500 




2,000 




1,000 




500 




1,500 




1,000 




1,000 




500 




1,000 




500 




1,000 




500 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




600 




500 




600 




1,000 




1,000 




500 

Smethportj Boyer Brook. 



1,000 

























































































65 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Pennsylvania -Continued. 

Somerfleld, Youghioglienv River. 



400 

Spruce Creek, Spruce Creek. 



Starrucca, Coxtown Creek. 



1,000 

500 

1,000 

son 

Farrell Creek. 



McKane Creek. 



Sampson Creek. 



Shadagee Creek. 



1,000 

500 

2,000 

500 

1,000 

500 

500 

500 

500 

1,500 

1,000 

2,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,500 

1,000 

2,000 

2,000 

600 

Shehawkin Creek. 



Starrucca Creek. 



Wild Cat Creek. 



Stewartstown, Grove Run.. 



Stillwater, Myers Run. 



Roberts Run. 



Trout Run. 



Stroudsburg, Baker Run. 



Broadhead Creek. 



Brown Run. 



Cherry Creek. 



Deep Hollow Run. 



Kettle Run. 



McMichaels Creek. 



Mountain Creek. 



Pencil Creek. 



Pocono Creek. 



Sambo Creek. 



Wigwam Run. 



500 

Tionesta, Bates Run. 



500 

Bear Creek. 



500 

Big Coon Creek. 



1,500 

Chauncy Run. 



500 

Council Run. 



500 

Davis Run. 



500 

Dawson Run. 



500 

Hemlock Creek. 



1,500 

Holeman Run. 



'500 

Indian Camp Creek. 



500 

Jakes Run. 



500 

Jamieson Run. 



500 

Johns Run. 



500 

Jug Handle Run. 



500 

Korb Run. 



500 

Lamentation Run. 



500 

Little Coon Creek. 



1,000 

Little Hickory Creek. 



1,000 

Little Tionesta Creek. 



1,000 

Pearson Run. 



500 

Peters Run. 



500 

Pigeon Run. 



500 

Piney Run. .. 



500 

Pit Hole Creek. 



1,500 

500 

Reck Run. 



Ross Run. 



1.000 

Salmon Creek. 



1,500 

Sandrock Run. 



500 

Sibble Run. 



500 

Stewarts Run. 



1,000 

Sugar Run. 



500 

Tubbs Run. 



1,000 

2,500 

1,000 

Tower City, Clarks Creek. 






Troy, Becker Creek. 



600 




600 

Cleveland Creek. 



600 

Covert Creek. 



600 

Dry Run. 



600 

Forbes Creek. 



600 




600 




1,000 




600 




1,000 




600 




1,200 




600 




600 




500 

Ulysses, Pine Creek. 



1,000 
























































































66 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details of Distribution 


of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Pennsylvania—Continued. 

Waynesboro, Antietam Spring, Branch. 



500 

375 

500 

3.000 

500 

2,000 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

3,200 
3,200 
2,400 
1,000 
2,400 
3,200 
2,400 
2,400 
2,400 

2.400 

2.400 

2.400 
2,400 

7,500 
8,000 
20,000 
5,000 
10,000 
15,000 
10,000 
10,000 
12,500 
7,500 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
7,500 
7,500 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
J2,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 

12.500 
8,000 
8,000 

20,000 
12,500 
20,000 
30,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
10,000 
1,000 

2.500 
2,500 
8,000 

12,000 
14,000 
10,000 
10.000 
12,000 
75,000 
6,000 
12,500 
10,000 
12,500 

2,400 

Weikert, Penns Run_*....“. 



West Chester, Broad Run. 



Wheelersville, Schrader Creek. 



Williamsburg, Brumbaughs Run. 



Clover Creek. 



Marsh Run... 



Woodbine, Bells Hollow Branch. .. 



Boyds Run. 



Kilgore Run._. 



Rocky Run. 



Wade Hill Branch. 



York, Green Branch. 



South Carolina: 

Cleveland, Fall Creek. 



Headforemost Creek. 



Reeces Gap Creek. 



Pickens, Big Laurel Creek. 



Cane Creek. 



Dogwood Stump Creek. 



Laurel Ford Creek. 



Laurel Fork Creek. 



Lynchs Mill Creek. 



Mathers Creek. 



Siele Mountain Creek. 



Surveyors Camp Creek. 



Willis Creek. 



South Dakota: 

Custer, Willow Creek. 



Deadwood, Spruce Creek. 



Doyle, Big Elk Creek. 



Dumont, Spearfish Creek, East Fork. 



Elmore, Ice Box Canyon Creek. 



Spearfish Creek. 



Englewood. White Wood Creek. 



Hanna, Little Spearfish Creek, East Fork. 



Hermosa, Battle Creek. 



Hill City, Dismal Creek.•.. 



Gibson Creek... 



Hutton Creek, South Branch. 



Palmer Creek. 



Spring Creek. 



Sunday Gulch Creek. 



Mvstic, Prairie Creek. 



Tittles Springs Pond. 



Victoria Creek. 



Nemo, Box Elder Creek. 



Jim Creek. 



ICnowlton’s pond. 



South Box Elder Creek. 



Pine Ridge Agency, Bear Creek. 



Pringle, Beaver Creek. 



Cold Brook. 



Rapid City, Deer Creek. 



Pine Forest Lake. 



Rapid Creek. 



Spring Canyon Pond. 



Roubaix, Carroll Creek. 



Halls Pond. 



North Elk Creek. 



Rochford, Little Rapid Creek, North Fork. 



Sisseton, Long Hollow Creek.. 



Spearfish, Cox Lake. 



False Bottom Creek. 



Hiltons Gulch Creek. 



Kingsley’s lake. 



Lindley Spring Run. 



McGregor'Spring Branch. 



Miller Creek....“.•. 



Normal Lake. 



Spearfish River. 



Todd’s pond. 



Spring Gulch, McDonald Pond.:. 



Sturgis, Deadmans Creek. 



Walker, Rock Creek Pond. 



Tennessee: 

Blevins, Brushy Creek. 
























































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS. 1910, 


67 


Details op Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 


BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Te nnessee—Continued. 

Butter, Greggs Branch. 

Greenville, Camp Creek. 

Knoxville, Fountain City Lake. 

Nashville, Lipscomb’s pond. 

Newport, Ground Hog ( reek. 

Pikeville, Bradens Creek. 

Cooper Branch. 

Glade Creek. 

Halls Creek. 

Skillern Creek. 

Shell City, Doll Branch. 

Shell Creek. 

Slocums, Farmer Branch. 

Shouns, McEwen Branch. 

Payne creek. 

Utah: 

Provo, applicant. 

Applicant. 

Grandview Pond. 

Provo River. 

Robins Springs Pond. 

Spring Creek Pond. 

Springdale Pond. 

Upper Falls Ponds. 

Vineyard Ponds. 

Salt Lake, Spring Creek. 

Springville, Spring Creek. 

Vermont: 

Averill, Forest Lake. 

Little Averill Lake. 

Mild Brook. 

Bellows Falls, Morse Brook. 

Bennington, Jackson Brook. 

Brattleboro, Ames Brook. 

Brickyard Brook. 

Broad Brook. 

Houghton Brook. 

Johnson Brook. 

Weatherhead Hollow Brook. 

Whetstone Brook. 

Wilder Brook. 

Castleton, Castleton River. 

Chester, Fullerton Brook. 

Williams River. 

Cuttingsville, Shrewsbury Pond. 

Fair Haven, Eureka Pond. 

Fowler, Fowler Brook. 

Greensboro, Caspian Lake. 

Groton, Darling Pond. 

Holden, Furnace Brook. 

Pico Pond. 

Hydeville Castleton River. 

Ferrin River. 

Lyndonville, Vail’s pond. 

Manchester, Batten Kill River. 

Lye Brook. 

Mountain Brook. 

Marshfield, Niggerhead Pond. 

Montpelier, Mallory Brook. 

North Bennington, Cold Springs Brook.. 

Paran Creek. 

Northfield, Yatter Pond. 

Pawlet, Pawlet River. 

Pittsford, Furnace Brook. 

Sugar Hollow Brook. 

Plainfield, Laird’s pond. 

Poultney, Poultney River. 

Pownel, Mattison Brook. 

Proctor, Fox Pond. 

Proctorsville, Williams River. 

Putney, Sacketts Brook. 

Randolph, Ayers Brook. 

Bear Hill Brook. 

Chandler Brook. 

Clough Brook. 

Eldredge Pond. 

Fisher Brook. 


100.000 
25,000 


18,600 


35,000 

55,000 


25,000 
12,000 


125,000 


6,000 

" 56 ,’ 666 ' 


8,000 


12,000 
12,000 
16,000 


10,000 


20,000 


20,000 
8,000 
16,000 
8,000 


2,400 
4,000 
4,000 
800 
2,400 
4,000 
2,400 

5.600 
3,200 
4,000 

1.600 

5.600 

1.600 
1,600 
1.600 


1,800 


1,800 
1,800 
3,600 
1,800 
3,600 
3,000 
2,400 


1,500 


1,000 

1,000 

1.500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 
1,000 

3.500 
1,000 
3,000 
4,800 
1,000 

1.500 
6,000 
7,000 

10,000 
3,000 
4,000 


850 

L406 


3,000 

2,500 

1,250 

1,250 


5,000 


3,000 

4,000 

4,000 

2.000 

4,000 


1,500 

2,000 


500 


8,000 










































































































68 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

V ermont—Continued. 


8,000 

16,000 

8.000 










20,000 
8,000 
8,000 
12,000 
8,000 
24,000 



















1,500 




1,500 




1,000 



8,000 

Billings Brook. 


1,500 



12,000 



5,500 
12,000 
1,350 

Chittenden Reservoir. 





16,000 
12,000 
32,000 
12,000 
12,000 














1,000 



8,000 
12,000 
8,000 
16,000 
8,000 















100,000 
8,000 
20,000 
25,000 
16,000 
15,000 

5,425 









South Wallingford, Soutfi Wallingford Branch. 








648 

Frog Pond. 


10,000 

500 



20,000 



500 




7,500 

500 






20,000 



1,677 




1,000 

Stony Brook. 


20,000 



2,000 

148 

Waterman’s pond. 



Springfield, Hazen’spond. . 



500 

Stockbridge, Tweed River. 


8,000 

2,000 

Taftsville, Beaver Brook. 


2,000 

2,000 

Townshend, Shanty Lot Brook. 



Walden, Haynesville Brook. 



E 500 



40,000 
20,000 
16,000 

Meadow Brook. 



Wells, Wells Brook. 





1,000 

Meadow Brook. 


8,000 



1,000 




1,000 

1,000 

1,000 







West Paulet, Indian River. 


20,000 

Windsor, Mill Brook . 


3,000 

4,000 

1,500 

Woodstock, Lakota Lake. 



Moore Pond. 



Smith Brook. 


8,000 

8,000 

Wyandale Brook. 



Virginia: 

Alleghany Station, Cove Creek. 


* 500 

Arcadia, North Creek. 



400 

Arrington, Mountain Spring Pond. 



2,400 




300 




1,000 

2,400 

4,000 

Bedford, North Otter River. 



Big Island, Hunting Creek. 






4 ,000 
600 

Covington, Cast Steel Run. 



Laurel Run. 

. 


3,000 
























































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details op Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


69 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

V irginia—Continued. 

Covineton. Roaring Run. 


3,000 

500 

1,500 

4,800 

Craigsville, Campbell Run. 



' Claytons Brook. 



Culpeper, Hazel River. 



’ Miller Creek. 


18,700 

Ferrol, Trout Run. 


500 
2,400 
G, 000 
300 

Glenvar, Callahan Brook. 



Goshen, Kelso Run. 



Grottoes, Big Run. 



Harrisonburg, Long Run. 



300 

Hunters, Little Difficult Run. 



2,500 

600 

Jenkins Ford, Cedar Creek. 



Maurertown, Cedar Creek. 



6,000 

1,000 

2,400 

600 

Mount Vernon, Washington Spring Branch. 



Pearch, Horsleys Creek.*.. 



Richmond, Burke’s pond. 



Rockfish, Goldmine Creek. 



2.400 

6.400 
500 

Salem, Peters Creek. 



Spout Spring, Steele’s pond. 



Stanley,* Hendersons Mill Pond. 



400 

Tates Run, Tates Run. 



50 

Tye River, Cox Creek. 



2,400 

Washington: 

Addy, Stenger Creek. 



4,500 


100,000 




4,500 




5,000 




5,500 

Newpoft, Bead Lake. 



6,000 




6,000 

18 

Seattle, Exposition Aquarium. 



Spangle, Spring Lake *. 



3,000 




6,000 

Wenatchee, Spring Valley Pond. 



6,000 

West Virginia: 



800 




1,000 




1,500 




2,000 




2,000 




2,000 




1,000 




500 




3,750 




2,500 




1,000 




3,000 




500 




1,500 




1,500 




1,500 




1,200 




750 




750 




2,500 




1,000 




3,000 




1,000 




1,000 




3,000 




14,000 




500 




1,500 




6,000 




1,000 




2,000 




1,000 




2,500 




2,000 




800 




1,200 

TJttlfl Wolf Creek . 



3,000 




1,500 




2,500 




4,000 




6,700 




1,000 


59395°—11-8 






















































































70 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

West Virginia—Continued. 











59,000 












Wisconsin: 

Albertville, Little Elk Creek. 



Alma, Littie Waumandee Creek. 



Alma Center, Pigeon Creek. 









EagleValley Creek. 



French Creek. 



Gilman Creek. 



Haines Creek. 



Holcomb Coulee Creek. 



Hunters Creek. 



Kried Valley Creek.;. 



Lewis Valley Creek. 



Long Creek. 



Mineral Spring Brook. 






Rocky Run Creek. 



Sandy Creek. 



Scharlow Valiev Creek. 



Trout Rim... 



Aubumdale, Mohan Creek. 



Augusta, Beamans Creek. 



Bears Grass Creek. 



Beaver Creek. 



Bee Creek. 



Beef River. 



Bridge Creek... 



Browns Creek. 



Chaney Creek... 



Coon Gut Creek. 



Diamond Creek. 



Hathaway Creek. 









Muskrat Creek. 



Otter Creek. 



Sand Creek. 



Thompson Creek. 



Travis Creek. 



Bangor, Adams Creek. 



Big Creek.. 






Kalburan Creek. 






Swamp Creek. 



Barneveld, Clavalm Stream. 



Four Mile Creek. 



Beldenville, Trim belle Creek. 



Birchwood, Fullerton Pond. 






Blair, Bear Creek..I. 
















































Norwav Coulee Creek. 




Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


2,000 

600 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

4,000 

2,000 

2,000 

3,000 

2,800 

1,200 

6,000 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

4,000 

600 

800 

600 

300 

400 

600 

300 

300 

300 

300 

400 

400 

400 

400 

800 

300 

400 

300 

400 

300 

900 

300 

600 

300 

4,000 

800 

900 

2,700 

6,000 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

600 

1,000 

1,600 

1,000 

1,000 

1,400 

400 

400 

1,000 





















































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


71 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BROOK TROUT— Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

W isconsin—Continued. 

Bluff Siding, Pine Creek. 



1.000 




2 ; 000 

4,000 

3,000 

4,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

4,000 

4,000 

S,000 

2,000 

4,000 

2,000 

4,000 







Cable, Big Run. 









Five Mile Creek. 















Ole Lake Brook. 












3,000 




4,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 

Fremstead Creek. 



1,000 




1,000 




1,000 

1,000 







1,000 




1,000 




1.000 




1.000 




600 




1,000 




1,000 

Drywood Creek. 



1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1.000 




1,000 




1,000 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




600 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




1,000 




1,000 




4,000 




3,000 




2.000 




1,000 




4.500 




500 




3,000 




3,000 

Middleberry Creek. ' . 


800 
























































































72 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — C ontinued. 


BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

W isconsin—Continued. 

Dodgeville, Smith Creek. 



3,000 

1.500 

4.500 

1.500 

4.500 
300 

1,200 

2,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,200 

300 

300 

W illiams Stream. 



Drummond, Jaders Creek. 



Johnson Creek. 



Long Lake Branch. 



Durand, Averill Creek. 



Bear Creek. \. 



Big Arkansas Creek. 



Big Coulee Creek. 



Drier Creek. . 



Fall Creek. 



Fox Creek. 



Gray Creek. 



Heron Creek. 



1,000 

Little Arkansas Creek. 



2,000 

2,000 

Porcupine Creek. 



Spring Creek. 



600 

Eau Claire^ Beaver Creek. 



1,600 

1,600 

Clear Creek. 



Coon Creek. 



1,500 

1,000 

Craft Creek. 



Cranberry Creek. 



800 

Deer Creek. 



500 

Eight Mile Creek. 



1,000 

Eighteen Mile Creek. 



1,000 

2,600 

Elk Creek. 



Five Mile Creek. 



1,500 

Grace Creek. 



400 

Hansen Creek. 



2,000 

300 

Little Niagara Creek. 



Little Rock Creek. 


;;. 

500 

Lowes Creek. 



1,800 

Nine Mile Creek. 



1,800 

North Creek. 



300 

Otter Creek.. 



1,000 
• 500 

Pine Creek. 



Rock Creek. 



1,600 

Sandy Creek.. 



500 

Seven Mile Creek. 



1,500 

Sherman Creek. 



1,600 

Spring Creek. 



1,300 

Trout Creek. 



1,800 

1,000 

1,000 

Twelve Mile Creek. 



West Creek... 



Wrights Creek. 



800 

Edgewater, Arfin Creek... 



1,000 

1,000 

2,000 

1,000 

1,000 

Beaver Creek. 



Billikin Springs Creek. 



Casey Creek. A. 



Derosier Creek. 



Hay Creek. 



2,000 

1,000 







1,000 




2,000 

1,000 

2,000 

1,000 













1,000 




2,000 

2,000 

9,000 

1,000 







Eleva, Big Creek. 






1,000 

Ellsworth, Brush Creek. 



3,000 

3,000 

3,000 

3,000 

4,000 







Lost Creek. 









3,000 




3,000 

4,000 

4,000 




Plum Creek. 



Fairchild, Black Creek. 



300 

Boatman Creek. 



300 

Coon Fork Creek. 



600 

Coon Gut Creek. 



300 

Flick Creek. 



COO 





























































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


73 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
, BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

W isconsin—Continued. 



too 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




4,500 




500 




6,000 

4,000 

4.000 

6,000 

300 
















300 




900 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




600 




300 




300 




2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 













2.000 




400 




400 




300 




300 




400 




300 




300 




300 




600 




300 




300 




300 




400 




300 




300 




700 




300 




300 




400 




1,000 




500 




300 




2,400 




500 




2,000 




400 




300 




300 




2,000 




300 


. 


2,400 




500 




2,400 




500 




3,000 




5,000 




1,000 




3,000 




900 




1.000 




1.000 




1.000 




1.000 




1.000 




1,000 




1,000 

, Mortiboy Creek. 



1,000 



























































































74 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details oe Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Wisconsin—Continued. 

Hixton, Nettleton Creek. . 



1,000 
1,000 
2 000 

North Branch. 



Pine Creek. 



Schmerhorn Creek. 



1,000 
1 000 

Simpson Creek. 



Tank Creek____ 



1,000 

Timber Creek. . 


1,000 

3,000 

Hudson, Willow River.. 


Indenendence. Bennett Valiev Creek.. 


300 

Borst Valley Creek. 

! 

1,300 

Bruce Valley Creek. 

___ 

1,300 

1,000 

1,300 

1,000 

Burt Valley’Creek._. 



Chimney Rock Creek. 



Cookes Creek. 



Dubil Valley Creek. 



1,000 

1,300 

Elk Creek... 



Elk Creek Pond. 



300 

Engum Creek. 



1,000 

1,000 

Finright Creek. 



Gunderson Creek. 



1,000 

1,000 

Ilawkinson Creek. 






1,300 




1,000 

1,000 

Kilniss Creek. 



Kurth Valley Creek. 



1,000 

1,000 




Maloney Creek... 



i’ooo 

1,000 

Nelson Valley Creek. 



North Branch Creek. 



1,300 

1,000 

Olson Creek. 



Plumb Creek. 



1,300 

Poppies Creek. 



1,000 

Roskos Creek. 



1,000 

Russell Valley Creek. 



1,000 

Rusts Creek.’.. 



1,000 

1,000 

Schaffners Creek. 



Simonson Valley Creek. 



1,000 

1,300 

1,000 

1,300 

Skogstad Creek.’. 



Slanton Creek... 



Solfest Creek. 



Traverse Valley Creek. 



1 ,300 




1,000 

Ulbug Valley Creek. 



1,000 

Vennis Creek. 



1,000 




1,300 




4,000 

8,000 

4,000 

300 










Davis Creek. 



300 




300 




300 




400 




300 




300 

Indian Creekr.. 



2,000 




4,000 




4,000 




3,000 




3,000 




3,000 

3,000 







1,500 




1,500 




1,500 




3,000 

1,500 







3,000 

3,000 







3,000 




3,000 




300 




4,000 




3,000 




3,000 

10,000 




Tvler Forks River. 



1,000 


























































































75 


DISTRIBUTION OP FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Wisconsin—Continued. 

Menomonie, Anderson Creek. 



800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

1,600 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

Annis Creek. 



Asylum Springs Creek. 



Balsbaugh Creek. 



Beaver Creek. 



Big Elk Creek. 



Big Hay Creek. 



Big Meadow Creek. 



Bishop Creek. 



Biss Creek. 



Blairs Creek. 



Boland Creek. 



Browns Creek. 



Clarks Creek. 



Coon Creek. 



Cowan Creek. 



Cranberry Creek . 



Dashone "Creek. 






Drowleys Spring Creek. 






Eddy Creek. 






800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




1,600 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




1,600 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




SOO 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




SOO 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




800 




1,600 

Wolf Run. 



800 


























































































76 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 

BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

W isconsin—Continued. 



2.000 




2.700 




300 

1.300 







400 




1,300 

2,000 

500 










300 




300 




300 




1,200 

2,000 







600 




1,000 




1,500 




R000 

1,000 

1,000 










1,000 




1 j 000 
2,000 
1,000 










1,000 




1,000 




1,000 

1,000 







1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 













1,000 

1,000 







1,000 




1,000 




2,000 

1,000 







1,000 




2 ,000 
1,000 







300 




400 




300 




300 




.500 




500 




300 




300 




300 




600 




300 




500 




300 




300 




500 




500 




300 




300 




300 




300 




600 




300 




300 




300 




6,000 




3,000 




1.000 




600 




900 




4,500 

600 




Bogus Creek. 



300 




300 




300 




300 




300 

Roaring River. 



600 























































































77 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


BROOK TROUT — Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
j and adults. 

W isconsin—Continued. 




Phipps, McDermott Brook. 




Nemokagon River. 



1, oOO 

Rogers Creek. 




Plymouth, Mullet Creek. 




Union River. 




Rice Lake, Angler Creek. 




Barker Creek. 




Big Bear Creek. 




Big Kettle Creek. 




Browns Creek. 




Cannon Creek. 




Cobb Creek. 




Cranberry Creek. 




Desair Creek. 




German Creek. 




Hay River. 




lleger Creek. 




Hemlock Creek. 




Kegamo Creek. 




Little Bear Creek. 




Little Spring Creek. 




Long Lake Stream. 




Meadow Creek. 




Miller Creek. 




Moosier Creek. 



1,000 

Mud Creek. 



Olson Creek. 




Overby Creek. 




Pekegamo Creek. 




Prairie Creek. 




Renville Creek. 



1,000 

Rice Creek. 



Savage Creek. 




Silver Creek. 




South Creek. 




Spoon Creek. 



1,000 

Spring Creek. 



Spur Nine Brook. 



300 

Sucker Creek. 



Weiss Creek. 



1,000 

West Branch. 



Yellow River. 




Richland Center, Ash Creek. 




Fancy Creek. 




Little W illow Creek. 




Melancthon Creek. 



600 

Pine River. 




Ridgeway, Mill Creek. 




River Falls, Kinmckinnic Creek. 




Nye Creek. 




South Fork River. 



900 

Rosendale, Silver Creek. 



600 

Solon Springs, Ox Creek... 



Sparta, BeaverCreek. 



300 

Big Creek. 




La Crosse River. 



400 

Little La Crosse River.... 



400 

Sargent Creek. 



300 

Silver Creek. 



300 

Soper Creek. 



300 

Sparta Craek. 




Squaw Creek. 



300 

Tarr Creek. 



300 

Tuttles Creek. 



300 

Walworth Creek. 



300 

Spring Valiev, Bahrs Creek. 



300 

Burghardt Creek. 



300 

Cady Creek. 



300 

Cave Creek. 



600 

Eagle Springs.-. 



300 

French Creek. 



300 

Gilbert Creek. 



1,200 

Jacobson Creek. 



300 

Johnson Creek. 



300 

Lohns Creek. 



300 

Lousy Creek. 



600 

Mines Creek. 



300 































































































78 DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 




BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Wisconsin — Continued. 



1,200 
4,000 
3,000 
4,500 
4,500 
6,000 
2,000 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
2.000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
1,000 
3,000 
4,000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
306 
300 
300 
300 
4,000 
3,800 
600 
2,000 
3,000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,000 
3,000 
1,200 
300 
2, 300 

2.300 
2,000 

300 

1,000 

1,200 

1.300 
900 
300 
600 

1.300 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 

300 
2,000 
2,000 
300 

2.300 
400 
400 
400 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
600 
300 
300 















...» . 


















































































Matchett Creek. 









Wausau, Jim More Creek. 















Lunch Creek. 















Clear Branch. 






Coon Creek. 






Dauve Spring. 






Kickapoo Creek. 





















Sherve Creek.. 



Spring Coulee Creek. 



Spring Valley Creek. 



Sveen Creek. 



Timber Coulee Creek. 



Timber Valley Creek. 



Van Ruden Creek. 



West Salem, Adams Valley Creek. 



Bostwicks Valley Creek. 



Bums Creek_”.. 



Cliff McClentock Creek. 



Gilles Coulee Creek. 



Green Creek. 



Holberg Creek. 



Johnson Creek. 



Jones Creek. 






Larson Creek. 



























































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


79 


Details of Distribution’of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
. BROOK TROUT—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Wisconsin—Continued. 



400 




300 




600 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




400 




300 




300 




1,000 

1,000 







1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 













1,000 




1,000 




1,000 




1,000 

300 







300 




300 




600 




300 




300 




300 




300 




300 




800 




600 


« 



500 




300 




1,500 




300 




300 




3,300 




300 




1,500 




2,000 




4,000 




23,000 




2,000 




2,000 




4.000 




2,000 




2,000 




2,000 




2,000 




2,000 




2,000 




2,000 

Wyoming: 



2,000 




6,000 




3,000 




2,500 




2,500 




2,500 




2,500 




5,500 




10,000 




12,500 




5,000 




15,000 




20,000 

Japan: 

5,000 








516,000 

7,365,945 

4,085,174 





a Lost in transit, 23,600 fry and 158,687 fingerlings. 




















































































80 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details of Distribution of Fish aRtd Fish Eggs — Continued. 
SUNAPEE TROUT. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

New Hampshire: 

Lake Sunapee, Lake Sunapee. 


115,029 

56,000 


Newbury, Lake Sunapee. I. 



Total. 




171,029 






GRAYLING. 


Montana: 

Lakeview, Elk Creek. 


16,000 

65,000 


Elk Lake. 



Washington: 


18 

Wyoming: 

Sheridan, Bear Creek. 

25,000 





25,000 

81,000 

18 


SMELT. 

Maryland: 

Mountain Lock, Potomac River. 



9,000 

New York: 

Raquette Lake, Lake Kora. 

4,500,000 


Total. 



4,500,000 


9,000 



PIKE. 

Iowa: 

Lime Springs, Upper Iowa River. 



700 

1,900 

18.650 

500 

19.650 
1,900 

North McGregor*Mississippi River... 



Minnesota: 

Brownsville, Mississippi River. 



Wisconsin: 

Genoa, Mississippi River. 



La Crosse, Missis*sippi River. 



Prairie du Chien, Mississippi River. 


• 

Total. 





43,300 





PICKEREL. 


Wisconsin: 

Genoa, Mississippi River. 



166 

168 

166 

La Crosse, Mississippi River. 



Victory, Mississippi'River. 



Total. 





500 





































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


81 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
CRAPPIE AND STRAWBERRY BASS. 


Disposition. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


Disposition. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


Arkansas: 

Harrell, Spring Dale Pond. 

Helena, Blue Hole. 

Long Lake. 

Mississippi River. 

Junction, Spring Lake. 

Nashville, Mine Creek. 

Patmos, Mental Pond. 

Stamps, Mucille Lake. 

Price Pond. 

Washington, Allen’s pond. 

Connecticut: 

Danbury, Kellogg’s pond. 

Wolf Pond. 

New Haven, Granniss Lake. 

Illinois: 

A vena, W illow Lake. 

Belleville, Club Pond. 

Heinemann’s lake. 

Carbondale, Club Lake. 

Simons Lake. 

Carterville, Peyton’s pond. 

Donnellson, Clover Leaf Lake. 

East Hannibal, Sni E’Carte River. 

Herrin, Manning Pond. 

Mine Pond. 

Hillsboro, Seymour Club Lakes. 

Lake Forest, Whitehall Pond. 

Indiana: 

Ilaubstadt, Oak Summit Pond. 

Lebanon, Bramble Gravel Pit. 

Paoli, Willow Lake. 

Richmond, Crystal Lake. 

Shell Brook Pond. 

Iowa: 

Algona, Upper Des Moines River, East 

Branch. 

Fort Madison, Green Bay. 

Independence, Wapsipinicon River_ 

North McGregor, Mississippi River. 

Stockport, Silver’s pond. 

Kansas: 

Caldwell, Bluff Creek. 

Farlington, Mitchell's pond. 

Kentucky: 

Bradford, Locust Brook Pond. 

Meadow Brook Pond. 

Campbellsburg, Sanford Pond. 

Cropper, Willow Pond. 

Emmons, Breezy Heights Pond. 

Lebanon, Graham’s pond. 

Rogers’s pond. 

Louisville, Cemetery Lake. 

Lake Lansdowne. 

St. Mary, Forester Lake. 

Louisiana: 

Athens, Gandy’s pond... 

Marsalis Pond. 

Bernice, Chalybeate Spring Pond. 

Heard’s pond... 

Keatchie, China Grove Lake. 

Mansfield, Bickerstaff Lake. 

Brick Company’s pond. 

Many, Hoagland’s pond. 

Quitman, Harvey’s pond. 

Spring Lake. 

Ruston, Hancock’s pond. 

Maryland: 

Mountain Lock, Potomac River. 

Prince George County, Goodloe’s pond. 
Minnesota: 

Brownsville, Mississippi River. 

Rochester, Zumbro Mill Pond. 

Wheaton, Lake Traverse. 


70 
7,000 
22,200 
145,610 
70 
250 
100 
60 
185 
100 

250 

250 

200 

200 

150 

400 

200 

200 

250 

150 

750 

500 

500 

300 

320 

100 

100 

100 

200 

200 


400 

125 

400 

46,000 

100 

1,000 

25 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

150 

150 

100 

300 

200 

100 

100 

70 

70 

100 

150 

100 

130 

70 

70 

100 

247 

100 

43,250 

20 

200 


Mississippi: 

Booneville, Beach Bluff Lake.... 

Hollaway Lake. 

Red Elm Lake. 

Columbus, Mullins Lake. 

Corinth, Lake Billsville. 

Macon, Poplar Lake. 

Willow Glen Pond. 

Noxapater, Estes’s pond. 

Philadelphia, Spring Pond. 

Tupelo, Sterns’s pond. 

West Point, Fortson Lake. 

Missouri: 

Aurora, Crane Creek. 

Butler, Lake Katherine. 

Higginsville, Railroad Pond. 

Mount Vernon, Honey Creek. 

Hoshaw Lake.... 
Jaggerman Lake. 
Johnson’s lake... 

Spring River. 

Nevada, Katy Allen Lake. 

Springfield, Walnut Spring Lake. 

Warrensburg, Meily’slake. 

West Plains, Carter’s pond. 

Willow Springs, Maple Pond. 

New York: 

Albany, Stevens’s pond. 

Newark, Asylum Reservoir. 

North Carolina: 

Hendersonville, Jane Mill Pond.. 

Lake Osceola.... 
Rainbow Lake.. 

North Dakota: 

Berlin, Rush Pond. 

Fullerton, Appelquist Pond..'_ 

Glen Ullin, Sprecher’s pond. 

Ilankinson, Lake Elsie. 

Lisbon, Prairie Farm Lake. 

Ohio: 

Bradford, Greenville Creek. 

Covington, Stillwater River. 

Gettysburg, Greenville Creek 
Winton Place, Hollywood Lake.. 
Oklahoma: 

Alva, Harbaugh Lake. 

Apache, Morgan’s ponds. 

Spring Pond. 

Sturman’s pond. 

Wogan’s pond. 

Ardmore, Camp Brown Creek.... 

Edward’s pond. 

Hickory Creek. 

Love’s lake. 

Silver Lake. 

Barron Fork, Yonah Pond. 

Bliss, Arkansas River. 

Canute, Turkey Pond. 

Chouteau, Bledsoe Pool. 

Cleveland, Silver Lake. 

Cushing, Willow Pond. 

Elgin, South Side Farm Pond.... 

El Reno, Nettie Ruth Lake. 

Fletcher, Cox Reservoir. 

Gracemont, Walnut Grove Pond. 

Marietta, Black Lake. 

McKinney’s pond. 

Smith’s pond. 

Washington Lake. 

Noble, Appleby’s pond. 

Oklahoma City, Deepwater Lake 
Fields’s pond... 
Gaylord’s pond.. 


100 

100 

200 

100 

250 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

300 

100 

275 

300 

200 

200 

200 

400 

100 

200 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

200 

300 

150 

55 

100 

100 

200 

100 

350 

250 

250 

200 

175 

100 

50 

50 

50 

400 

300 

200 

300 

400 

100 

200 

150 

100 

100 

100 

50 

300 

150 

100 

50 

65 

50 

50 

50 

150 

175 

200 












































































































































82 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details op Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
CRAPPIE AND STRAWBERRY BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 


O klahoma—Continued. 

Oklahoma City, Gum’s lake. 

Turner’s lake. 

Oologah, Sunday’s pond. 

Pawhuska, Clear Creek. 

Snyder, Deep Pond. 

Terral, Ewing’s lake. 

Yukon, Kralick Run. 

Pennsylvania: 

Fails Station, Lake Winola. 

York, Codorus Creek, South Branch... 
South Carolina: 

Aiken, Black Poplar Pond. 

Belton, Belton Mills Pond. 

Bishopville, Kelley’s lake. 

Central, Arnold’s pond. 

Chappells, Mills Pond. 

Scurry Pond.. 

Webb’s pond. 

Clover, Campbell’s pond. 

Darlington, Creek Pond. 

Fair Forest, Fair Forest Creek. 

Fountain Inn, Durbin Creek Pond. 

Greenville, Saluda Silver Lake. 

Rembert, Evans’s pond. 

Wateree, Griffin Creek Pond. 

Yorkville, Turkey Creek Pond. 

Tennessee: 

Somerville, Allbright’s lake. 

Texas: 

Albany, Kellum’spond. 

Broyle’s pond. 

Waterworks Pond. 

Annona, Capital Lake. 

Arlington, Jones’s pond. 

Artesia, McWhorter’s reservoir. 

Athens, Gauntt’s lake. 

Koon Kreek Klub Lake. 

Prater’s lake. 

Atlanta, Warren’s lake. 

Austin, Austin Lake. 

Slaughter Lake. 

Windy Crest Lake. 

Bay City, Austin’s pond. 

Water Works Pond. 

Beckville, Parker’s lake.. 

Big Sandy, Big Sandy Lake. 

Lake Everman. 

Robinson’s lake. 

Blossom, Patton’s pond. 

Brazoria, State Farm Lake. 

Canyon City, Paloduro Creek. 

Spring Creek Lake. 

Carmona, Carmona Pond. 

Carthage, Davis’s lake. 

Prior’s pond. 

Center Point, Guadalupe River. 

Verde Creek... 

Childers, Lake Scott. 

Clarksville, Clear Lake. 

Grassy Lake. 

Round Lake. 

Coleman, Coleman Lake. 

Lost Creek. 

Santa Anna Branch. 

Sunnyside Lake. 

Coolidge, Earner Lake. 

Copperas Cove, Dewald’s pond. 

Corsicana, Corsicana Fish Association 

Pond. 

Water Works Lake. 

Cotulla, Cartwright’s reservoir. 

Counter Switch, Country Club Lake 

Crockett, Daniel’s lake. 

Dallas, Munger’s pond. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

Disposition. 

Finger- 

lings, 

year- 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

200 

Texas—Continued. 

De Kalb, Crump’s pond. 

30 

100 

Detroit, Oil Mill Pond. 

30 

100 

Elgin, Elgin Lake. 

20 

100 

Elkhart, Elkhart Lake. 

100 

150 

Farwell, Hamlin Pond. 

31 

100 

Fort Worth, Lake Homewood. 

140 

100 

Garrison, Cedar Lake. 

50 


Giddings, Fisher’s pond. 

65 

200 

Jaehne’s pond. 

30 

150 

Raube’s lake. 

30 


Sumfl’s pond. 

25 

100 

Symm’s pond. 

30 

100 

Thonig Pond. 

30 

125 

Toepper’s pond. 

25 

100 

Volkers’s pond. 

30 

100 

Graham, Norris’s lake. 

106 

100 

Oak Grove Pond. 

50 

100 

Worthington Knox Lake. 

50 

75 

Grand Saline, Malone Pond. 

20 

150 

Grapeland, Tvers Lake. 

50 

100 

Willow Lake. 

30 

100 

Groveton, Friday’s pond. 

30 

200 

Nelms’s lakes. 

80 

125 

Hamlin, Red Lake. 

20 

100 

Haysland, Lake Shelby. 

75 

100 

Honey Grove, Fin and Feather Club 




100 

200 

Jacksboro, Cooper Lake. 

50 


Mays Lake. 

20 

30 

Jacksonville, Hillside Lake. 

75 

30 

Jordan Lake. 

75 

100 

Park Lake. 

75 

40 

Sampson Lake. 

100 

30 

Shearn Lake. 

75 

20 

Jonesville, Lake Sand Hill. 

100 


Kaufman, Bond’s pond. 

10 

100 

Gilmore Lake. 

100 

20 

Hatch Pond. 

20 

40 

Hindman’s pond. 

20 

50 

Sand Lake. 

20 

100 

Tavlor's pond. 

50 

30 

Warrenskjold Lave Lake.... 

20 

20 

Kemp, Long Lake. 

100 

20 

Kent, Tatum’s pond. 

25 

100 

KerrviUc. Turtle Creek Pond. 

30 

50 

Lampasas, Collins's pond. 

20 

100 

Lillian, Reese Branch Pond. 

40 

50 

Llano, Llano Lake. 

315 

26 

Longview, Beale Lake. 

75 

50 

Fisher Lake. 

75 

100 

Lake Lomond. 

100 

100 

Lovelady, Duck Lake. 

Kelley Pond. 

100 

40 

20 

50 

McDade, Milton’s pond. 

20 

100 

Manchaca, Bear Creek. 

50 

100 

Marshall, Bentley Lake. 

30 

100 

Bonita Lake. 

100 

200 

Lake Ferns. 

100 

50 

Thelma Lake. 

60 

100 

Mart, Club Lake. 

150 

100 

Midlothian, Cooper’s lake. 

40 

100 

Mineola, Goldsmith s pond. 

30 

100 

Mineral Wells, Kearby Tank. 

25 

100 

Mount Calm, Nelson Pond. 

10 

75 

Stovall Pond. 

40 

30 

Mount Selman, Brock’s lake. 

30 

20 

Mayfield’s pond. 

20 


Naples, Naples Club Lake. 

15 

50 

Walker’s pond. 

30 

40 

Nash, Earnest 's lake. 

100 

40 

Normanna, Blackburn's pond. 

28 

175 

Paige, Gropp Pond. 

30 

30 


20 

20 

Palestine, Bear Lake. 

200 























































































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


83 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
CRAPPIE AND STRAWBERRY BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Texas—Continued. 

Palestine, Cartmell’s lake. 

East Side Park Pond. 

Wallace Lakes. 

Paris, Stannard’s pond. 

Willow Lake. 

Petty, Fielding Lake. 

Queen City, Prator’s pond. 

Rockdale, Clear Lake. 

Rotan, Willingham Pond. 

Royston, Brooks’s pond. 

California Creek Lake. 

Henry’s tank. 

Stephens’s tank. 

Saginaw, Kane’s pond. 

San Angelo, Concho River, Middle and 

South Forks. 

Dove Creek. 

Kickapoo Creek. 

Water Valley Country 

Club Lakes. 

San Antonio, Lamm’s tank. 

Mitchell Lake. 

San Marcos, Blue Hole Pond. 

Saron, William Lake. 

Sulphur Springs, Elberta Lake. 

Picnic Lake. 

Thomas Lake. 

Taylor, Roberts’s lake. 

Temple, Lake Polk. 

Terrell, Bass Lake. 

County Club Lake. 

Elm Pond. 

Green Lake. 

Grinnan Pond. 

High Point Creek. 

Martin Pond. 

Muckleroy Pond. 

Sargent P'ond. 

Timpson, Bussey’s pond. 

McWilliams’s pond. 

Tye, Crawford Lakes. 

Tyler, Clear Spring Lake. 

DeLay’s lake. 

Lake Park Lake. 

Lakewood Country Club Lake.. 
Murphy’s pond. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

Disposition. 

Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


Texas—Continued. 


20 

Tyler, Pine Hill Lake. 

30 

30 

Tyler Fin Club Lake. 

100 

40 

Waco, Katy Club Lake. 

100 

20 

Wills Point, Imperial Lake. 

100 

30 

Virginia: 


100 

Culpeper, Englands Mill Pond. 

200 

20 

Dillwyn, Fitzgerald Pond. 

125 

50 

Fredericksburg, Boscobel Pond. 

500 

100 

Leesburg, Goose Creek. 

300 

30 

Lynchburg, Murrell Pond. 

100 

50 

Midlothian, Midlothian Pond. 

100 

50 

Natural Bridge, Cedar Creek. 

400 

100 

Petersburg, Belschers Pond. 

150 

35 

Hauslik Pond. 

325 


Spicer Pond. 

200 

133 

Richmond, Crittenden Pond. 

200 

60 

Darby town Pond. 

200 

133 

Fulton Fishing Club Pond. 

200 


Selden’s pond. 

200 

74 

Rockfish, Rockfish Lake. 

200 

30 

Scottsvilie, Chester Pond. 

100 

100 

Soudan, Grass Creek. 

200 

25 

Suffolk, Lake Savage. 

2g 

30 

Sweet Briar, Sweet Briar Lake. 

200 

100 

Winterpock, Indian Spring Pond. 

150 

50 

Zuni, Joyner’s pond. 

200 

50 

Richardson’s pond. 

200 

20 

West Virginia: 


75 

Blueton, Holley’s pond. 

150 

20 

Philippi, Middle Fork River. 

400 

75 

Salisbury, Salisbury’s pond. 

200 

50 

Wisconsin: 


20 

Genoa, Mississippi River. 

5,832 

20 

Independence, New City Pond. 

250 

75 

Kewaskum, Beach wood Lake. 

200 

30 

La Crosse. Mississippi River. 

49,086 

40 

Millston, Polley Creek. 

200 

20 

Mosmee, Half Moon Lake. 

350 

20 

Prairie du Chien, Mississippi River.... 

46,000 

20 

State Line, Pickerel Lake. 

200 

25 

Victory, Mississippi River. 

3,332 

50 

Wausau, Lake Wausau. 

400 

100 

O’Day Lake. 

250 

100 

Silver Creek Bay. 

400 

100 



30 

Total a . 

410,428 


ROCK BASS. 


Alabama: 

Fivepoints, Poplar Springs.... 
Arizona: 

Wilcox, McComb Ranch Pond 
Arkansas: 

DeQueen, Gantlon’s pond. 

Gravette, Dow’s pond. 

Harrison, Estes's pond. 

Helena, Mississippi River. 

Mena, Irons Fork River. 

Mountain Fork River.. 

Ouachita River. 

Prairie Creek. 

Rock Creek. 

Twomile Creek. 

Pine Bluff, Trigg’s pond. 

Connecticut: 

New Haven, Hubinger’s lake.. 
Georgia: 

Etowah, Hill’s pond. 

Ringgold, Tiger Creek. 


100 

Illinois: 

Belleville, Club Pond. 

100 


Carbondale, Thompson’s lake. 

300 

100 

Donnellson, Cherry Grove Pond. 

100 


Wilson’s pond. 

200 

500 

DuQuoin, Egyptian Pond. 

100 

250 

McLeansboro, Goehring’s pond. 

100 

400 

Indiana: 


9,915 

Bloomfield, Richland Creek. 

550 

500 

Boonville, Hemenway’s pond. 

500 

500 

Carlisle, Wellington Pond. 

150 

500 

Cory, Prairie Lake. 

200 

500 

Woodland Lake. 

200 

500 

Danville, Soper’s pond. 

200 

500 

Evansville, Clear Pond. 

150 

200 

Stringtown Springs Pond.. 

150 


Fairmont, Brookshire’s pond. 

100 

500 

Fort Branch, Symond’spond. 

100 


Greencastle, Lake Woodland. 

200 

100 

Greentown, Avres’s pond. 

100 

300 

Macy, Baker’s pond. 

100 


a Lost in transit, 9,049 fingerlings. 










































































































































84 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details o? Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
ROCK BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Finger- 

lings, 

vear- 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


Indiana—Continued. 

Plainfield, Spright’s pond. 

Seymour, Bars Pond. 

Easting’s pond. 

Summitville, McLain’s pond. 

Wawaka, Fountain View Pond. 

Winchester, Gravel Pit Pond. 

Iowa: 

Manchester, Maquoketa River. 

Kansas: 

Chanute, Durey Pond. 

Cherokee, Allen Pond. 

Farlington, Mitchell’s pond. 

Leavenworth, Park Lake. 

Marion, Bruno Creek. 

East Creek. 

French Creek. 

Lyons Creek. 

Medicine Lodge, Ilouchin’s pond. 

Kauffman’s pond. 

Peabody, Calbeck’s pond. 

Kentucky: 

Beaver Creek, Hindman Pond. 

May’s pond. 

Buechel, Blankenbeker’s pond. 

Campbellsville, Creel’s pond. 

Cropper, Turnpike Pond. 

Dover, Jennings Pond. 

Lebanon, McElroy’s pond. 

Lexington, Lake Callahan. 

Louisville, Parkview Club Lake. 

Schroerluecke’s pond. 

Paris, Brannon’s pond.. 

Clarke’s pond. 

Clay Pond. 

Edwards Pond. 

Frazier Pond. 

Grayson Pond.„. 

Hedge Pond. 

Jackson’s pond. 

Maher’s pond. 

Paynes Pond. 

Purnell’s pond. 

Vimont’spond. 

Watson Pond. 

Wiggins Pond.. 

Shawhan, Estes’s pond. 

Ewait’s pond. 

Winchester, Twomile Creek. 

Louisiana: 

Arcadia, Boone’s springs. 

Grand Cane, Grand Cane Creek Pond.. 

Homer, Gandy’s pond. 

Maryland: 

I.jamsville, Quynn’s pond. 

Monrovia, Cashour’s pond. 

Mountain Lock, Potomac River. 

Thurmont, Hemler’s pond. 

Michigan: 

Bath, Park Lake.. 

Minnesota: 

Rochester, Zumbro River, South 

Branch. 

Mississippi: 

Guntown, Cochran’s pond. 

Pontotoc, Gardner’s pond. 

Highland Fish Co. Lake. 

Patterson’s pond. 

Ripley, Keenin’s pond. 

Missouri: 

Butler, Lake Catherine. 

Glasgow, Steinmetz Pond. 

Holmes, Dunlap’s lake. 

Joplin, Wild Cat Spring. 

Marshall, Stedem Pond. 


500 

200 

200 

100 

100 

100 

325 

100 
. 150 
150 
200 
50 
50 
50 
50 
100 
100 
50 

125 

125 

200 

175 

100 

150 

175 

400 

200 

200 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

200 

100 

100 

100 

200 

200 

2,010 

230 

200 


200 

100 

125 

100 

125 

100 


5,000 

100 

100 

200 

100 


Finger- 

lings, 


Disposition. 


year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


Missouri—Continued. 

Merwin, Corbin’s ponds.. 

Mount Vernon, Gillingham’s pond_ 

Skinner’s pond.. 

Tillotson’s spring.. 

Truitts Creek.. 

Williams Creek.. 

Neosho, Twin Springs. 

New Mexico: 

Ancho, Cooper’s lake. 

Carlsbad, Dark Canon Creek. 

Deming, Knowles’s pond.. 

Peterson’s pond. 

Ramsey’s pond. 

Texico, Crescent Pond. 

Tularosa, Silver Lake. 

Vermigo Park, Adams Lake.. 

New York: 

Dover Plains, Lake Ellis.. 

Great River, Timber Point Pond.. 

Middletown, Wallkill Creek.. 

New Windsor, Walker's lake.. 

North Carolina: 

Carthage, Hannon’s pond.. 

Durham, Ellis’s pond.. 

Fayetteville, Cross Creek.. 

Mollett Pond.. 

Hendersonville, Lily Pond. 

Mebane, Lake Weda.. 

White Pond.. 

Salisbury, Josey’s pond. 

Star, Ilursey Spring Pond. 

Wake Forest, Walthonia Fish Club 

Pond.. 

Weldon, Gooch’s pond. 

Ohio: 

Bidwell, Jones’s pond. 

Blanchester, Reeves’s pond. 

Chardon, Charlotte Pond. 

East Palestine, Freed’s pond. 

Fremont, Sandusky River. 

. Ironton, Howell’s pond. 

Kansas, Feasel Quarry Pond. 

Marion, Whetstone River. 

Springfield, Little Miami River. 

Summit, Summit Lake. 

Wiekliffe, Morris Reservoir. 

Oklahoma: 

Chickasha, Harness Pond. 

Crescent, Crescent Lake. 

Osborn’s pond. 

Elgin, Glenn Pond.:_ 

Guthrie, Hawley’s pond. 

Highland Lake. 

Red Lake. 

Hillsdale, Coldwater Creek. 

Lawton, Markeson’s pond. 

Marlow, Jorgeson Pond. 

Newkirk, Lake Vanderpool. 

Santa Fe Lake. 

Okeene, Seigfreid’s pond. 

Perry, Clear Lake. 

Watson’s pond. 

Willet’s pond. 

Ponca, Bell Lake... 

South Coon Creek. 

Purcell, Brewer’s lake. 

Tryon, Bermuda Lakes. 

Wanette, Laughlin’s pond. 

Weatherford, Bear Creek Pond. 

Pennsylvania: 

Birdsboro, Hay Creek. 

Bushkill, Delaware River. 

Indiana, Yellow Creek. 

Marion, Back Creek. 


3,000 

250 

250 

200 

750 

500 

500 

200 

225 

100 

100 

100 

100 

200 

300 

100 

100 

400 

100 

150 

75 

50 

50 

150 

75 

75 

75 

150 

385 

75 

100 

100 

150 

200 

500 

100 

100 

250 

300 

200 

100 

150 

50 

50 

150 

142 

141 

142 
50 

250 

100 

100 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

30 

50 

100 

30 

200 

1,200 

300 

400 













































































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


85 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
> . ROCK BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Pennsylvania—Continued. 

Marion, Conocoeheague Creek._ 

Rowlands, Lackawaxen River. 

Weissport, Big Creek. 

Rhode Island: 

Barrington Center, Wood’s pond. 

South Carolina: 

Blacksburg, Bear Creek. 

Clover, Camp Run. 

Greenwood, Curltail Creek. 

Little Curltail Creek. 

Ridgeway, Hobby Lake. 

Rock Hill, Spring Ponds. 

Spartanburg, Moore’s pond. 

Starr, Branch Pond. 

Westminster, Branch Lake. 

Woodruff, James Creek Pond. 

Yorkville, Hart’s pond. 

McNeil’s pond. 

Tennessee: 

Chattanooga, Chickamauga Creek. 

Concord, Pepper’s pond. 

Gibson, Estes’s pond. 

James’s pond. 

McMinnville, Sink Creek. 

Murfreesboro, Stones River. 

Paris, Russell’s lake. 

Sparta, Cave Spring Pond. 

Watauga Point, Buffalo Creek. 

Texas: 

Alpine, Jackson’s pond. 

Anson, Hendrick’s lake. 

Aquilla, Vaughan’s lake. 

Blum, Mirror Lake. 

Bowie, Waggoner Pond. 

Celina, Gearhart’s pond.. 

Chico, Largent’s lake. 

Comanche, Highland Lake.. 

Cooledge, Hardeman’s pond. 

Trinity and Brazos Valley 

Lake. 

Crawford, Railroad Lake.. 

Cushing, Kinney’s pond. 

Datura, Pritchard’s pond. 

Dublin, Johnson’s pond.. 

Easterly, Easterly’s pond. 

Edgewood, Brier Springs. 

Fairlie, Martingin Pond. 

Franklin, Cedar Creek, West Fork_ 

Duncan’s pond. 

Love’s pond. 

Grapevine, Crowley’s pond. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

Disposition. 

Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

400 

Texas—Continued. 

Grapevine, Hicks’s pond. 

50 

600 

Greenville, Birdsong Lake. 

100 

300 

Swan Pond. 

40 


Haskell, Cunningham’s pond. 

100 

200 

Shook’s pond. 

50 


Hico, Gilmore Creek. 

50 

100 

Joshua, Stephen’s pond. 

200 

100 

Linden City, Dean’s pond. 

50 

100 

Lufkin, Melville Delta Pond. 

100 

100 

Marfa, Barrel Springs Pond. 

50 

100 

Mineola, Conger’s pond. 

100 

200 

Mount Vernon, Gardner’s pond. 

50 

100 

Smith’s pond. 

75 

100 

Palestine, Spring Lake. 

Park Springs, Plum Pond. 

100 

100 

30 

100 

Rotan, Lake Cottonwood. 

100 

200 

Tuxedo, Davis Lake. 

25 

200 

Waco, Fleming’s pond. 

75 


Winehell, Hoghland’s pond. 

1.50 

200 

Winnsboro, Beggs’spond. 

200 

200 

Wolf City, Jones’s pond. 

50 

100 

Utah: 


100 


100 

400 

Virginia: 

400 

Bumpass, Hill’s pond. 

1.50 

100 

Danville, McGuire’s pond. 

300 

100 

Hewlett, Duke’s pond. 

200 

500 

Hurt, Dawson’s pond. 

200 



150 

100 


1,000 

40 


100 

75 


600 

50 


600 

50 


600 

60 

40 

South Hill, Ferguson’s pond. 

200 

150 

150 


200 

50 


250 

Walkers Station, Vaidens Mill Pond ... 

600 

100 


250 

100 


250 

50 

Woods Cross Roads, Valley Front Pond. 

150 

50 

West Virginia: 


50 

75 

75 

50 

150 




650 


200 


500 

Wyoming: 

75 

100 

100 


300 


66,035 



WARMOUTH BASS. 


Georgia: 

40 

Maryland: 

Mountain Lock, Potomac River. 

752 


Total. 

1 

792 


a Lost in transit, 7,360 fingerlings. 


59395°—11-9 



















































































































86 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


SMALL-MOUTH BLACK BASS. 


Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Arkansas: 



Mary land—Continued. 





2,000 






2, 000 


2,000 




2 ,500 


12'000 




2,500 


1,000 


Connecticut: 


Massachusetts: 



1,500 


Congamond, Congamond Pond. 




1,500 



900 






900 




1,000 






150 


750 




500 


900 







300 



200 



300 



10,000 


900 

Indiana: 



Michigan: 




1,000 



6,000 



1,000 



400 


1,000 



3,000 


1,000 



1,500 



1,000 



1,500 



1,000 



1,500 



1,000 



l' 500 



l' 000 



1,500 



1,000 



1,500 



1,000 



1 ,500 



1,000 



lOj 000 



l’ 000 



1,500 

200 


1,000 




400 


1,000 



1,500 



1,000 



1,500 



1.000 



3,000 

1,000 





400 



180 



400 



500 



400 



250 



400 



300 



1,000 



1,500 



300 



l' 000 


3,000 




1 , 000 


3| 000 

400 



ljooo 


400 



i; ooo 



400 



1,000 


3,000 




'700 


3,000 




1,000 


3,000 




2, 000 


3 ', 000 




'300 


3,000 




1,000 


3,000 




1,000 


3j 000 






R 500 




1,000 


1,500 




2^540 



600 



2 ,540 



800 



300 



400 



3,240 



600 



225 



400 



300 



800 



345 


2,000 




375 


2,000 




300 


2,000 


Pendleton, Fall Creek. 


150 


2,000 




300 


1,500 




375 


1,500 




2,000 


3 ' 000 






1,000 



2,000 


3,000 




2,000 


3^ 000 




2, 000 



400 



2 ,500 



400 



900 


3,000 




1,500 


3,000 


Maine: 





400 


1,600 




400 


1, 500 




400 


4,500 



5,000 


Maryland: 



400 

Cropley, Potomac River. 

4,000 



3,000 



12 ,000 



3,000 


Mountain Lock, Potomac River. 

1,000 

Orion, Lake Orion . 

3,000 




























































































































































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


87 


Details op Distribution op Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
SMALL-MOUTH BLACK BASS-Continuad. 


Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Michigan — Continued. 


■ 

Ohio—Continued. 




2,800 



1,500 



400 


400 



200 




North Buckhom 





200 


1,500 





South Buckhom 




68 


1,500 




40 


400 



40 


4.500 





Topinabee, Mullet Lake. 


1,000 

Dam. 


40 



400 



50 

Watersmeet, Bass Lake. 


300 



40 



300 



70 

Witch Lake, Long Lake. 


300 



50 

New Hampshire: 



Lebanon, Big Swatara Creek_ 


70 

Claremont, Rocky Bound Pond. 

750 





Peterboro, Cunningham Pond.. 

1,500 




70 


1,500 




70 

New Jersey: 



Lake Conewago. 


70 



200 



70 

Branehville, Culver Lake. 


200 



70 

Lambertvilie, Lambertville 





70 



100 



70 



125 



45 

Sunset Lake. 


125 



70 

Sterling Forest, Greenwood 



Stover Lake. 


70 



150 



70 

Sussex County, Lake Grinnell.. 


100 



70 

New York: 



Lenape, Brandywine Creek. 


68 



500 



50 

Batavia, Godfrey Pond. 


40 



68 

Horseshoe Pond. 


40 



50 

Tonawanda Creek.:... 


200 



50 

Binghamton, Susquehanna 



Scranton, Cobbs Pond. I. 


50 



40 



50 

Broadalbin, Kennyette Creek.. 

5,000 




40 

Cambridge, Crystal Lake. 

5,000 




40 

Dead Pond. 

5', 000 





Lake Lauderdale... 

5^000 


River. 


40 

School House Pond. 

5,000 




40 

Fort Edward, Glen Lake. 

5,000 




50 


2,000 




40 

Johnstown, Caroga Lake. 

5,000 





East“Caroga Lake.. 

5,000 



1,500 



5,000 



1,500 


Kingston, Mohonk Lake. 

2,000 


White Pond. 

1,400 


Mohonk Reservoir... 

2,000 


Tennessee: 



Middletown, Wallkill Creek.... 


34 



6,000 

Pelham, Hutchins Pond. 


150 



3j000 

Schenectady, Mariaville Lake.. 

5,000 




7,000 

State Line.'Queechy Lake. 

2,000 






400 


6,000 




300 


6,000 



2,000 



4,000 



300 


b, 000 






6,000 




200 


6^000 


Mortimer, Johns River...". 


150 


5,000 




200 


10,000 




150 


4,000 


Ohio: 



North Troy, Upper Missisquoi 



1 500 

200 



300 


1,500 



750 



1,500 



5,000 



1,500 



10,000 



1,500 



5,000 



1,500 

400 


5,000 


Rocky Fork Creek.. 

1,500 

Virginia: 



1,500 




350 


3,000 




200 


3,000 



3,000 



3.000 



8,000 



1,500 



9 ; 000 


Germantown" Big Twin Creek.. 

3,000 


Loudoun County, “Potomac 




400 


24,000 




600 


12,000 



1,500 



3,000 






1,000 


Lake. 


400 

Petersburg, Club Pond. 

3.000 




































































































































































































88 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details op Distribution op Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
SMALL-MOUTH BLACK BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Virginia—Continued. 



West Virginia—Continued. 



Petersburg, Woody Pond. 

6,000 




800 


12 ,000 




100 


1,000 





Remington, Rappahannock 



15,000 



2,000 





3,000 




300 


1,000 




300 


2', 000 




300 


300 



300 

Washington: 





800 



100 



400 



100 



498 



100 



300 



100 



300 

West Virginia: 





300 

Capon Springs, Great Cacapon 





500 


45,000 




300 


1 200 




9,000 



537,400 

109,986 

Greenbrier River. 

24|000 





LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS. 


Alabama: 

Montgomery, Brick Yard Lake, 
Whetstone Lake., 

Seale, Evans's pond. 

Arizona: 

Flagstaff, Lake Mary. 

Tucson, Cienga Creek.. 

Arkansas: 

Bearden, Crystal Lake.. 

Bentonville, Sugar Creek. 

England, Clear Lake. 

Fairfield, Atkins Lake.. 

Helena, Blue Hole. 

Long Lake. 

Mississippi River.. 

Hope, Moses’s lake. 

Sandy Bois d’Arc River. 

Lake Village, Lake Chicot. 

Lancaster, Frog Bayou. 

Little Rock, Asylum Pond. 

Mammoth Spring, Strawberry 

Creek. 

Warm Fork, 

Mena, Big Brushy Creek. 

Big Fork Creek. 

Carter Creek.. 

Clear Creek. 

Cossatot River. 

Dallas Creek.. 

Irons Fork River.. 

Jansen Lake.. 

Little Brushy Creek_ 

Little Missouri River.... 

Little Rock Creek.. 

Mountain Fork River.... 

Ouachita River.. 

Prairie Creek.. 

Two Mile Creek.. 

Paris, College Lake. 

Rosboro, Caddo Pond.. 

Scott, Old River. 

Thornton, Pine Lake. 

Upland, Brazeal’s pond. 

Colorado: 

Boulder, Pitts’ pond. 

Denver, Holliday’s lakes. 

La Jara, Laguna Escondida. 

La Junta, Holbrook Reservoir.. 

Lamar, King Lake. 

Neegrando Lake. 


1,000 
2,000 
2,000 

300 

300 

150 

500 

400 

350 

1,000 

1,800 

7,323 

100 

250 

1,150 

500 

100 

500 

300 

300 

350 

300 

350 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

350 

300 

300 

(100 

300 

300 

500 

100 

540 

125 

30 

150 

150 

480 

1,000 

320 

320 


Colorado—Continued. 


Neeskah Lake. 








Thurston Reservoir. 

Littleton, Springer’s pond. 

Manzanola, Lewis’ reservoir_ 

Pueblo, Squirrel Creek Re:*er- 






Connecticut: 


Danbury, Bradley’s pond. 

Weekapeeka Lake.... 
East Hampton, Pocotopaug 


Goodspeeds, Bashan Lake. 

Higganum, Higganum Reser- 


New Canaan, Lake Waccobuc.. 
North Stonington, Wyassup 


Waterburv, White Oak Pond.. 


Delaware: 

Milton, Parkers Pond. 




Teal! Mill Pond. 


District of Columbia: 

Washington, Central Station 


Florida: 

Ehren, Muller’s pond. 














Georgia: 

Douglas, Peterson’s ponds. 

Greenville, Powers Hill Pond... 
Groveland, Cannochee River... 




Marietta, McKenzie’s pond. 

Mayfield, Cason’s pond. 



a Lost in transit, 3,319 fingerlings. 


320 

320 

320 

320 

320 

320 

300 

450 

100 

550 

300 

250 

225 

300 

400 

390 


300 

200 


390 

260 

250 

300 

100 

200 


150 

500 

500 

2,000 

500 

500 

500 

1,000 

1,750 

1,500 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

500 

100 





















































































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS — Continued. 


89 


Disposition. 


Georgia—Continued. 

Millen, Buck Head Creek.. 

Ogeechee River.. 

Oglethorpe, Buck Creek.. 

Talbotton, Williams Pond.. 

Tifton, Hale’s pond.. 

Valdosta, Loch Laurel.. 

Vienna, Heard’s pond.. 

Idaho: 

Nampa, Lake Lowell.. 

Priest River, Lees Pond.. 

Illinois: 

Antioch, Lake Marie. 

Aurora, Fox River.. 

Belleville, Biebel’s pond. 

Fourmile Club Lakes. 

Beech Ridge, Cache River.. 

Brighton, Kelsey’s pond.. 

Montgomery Lake... 

Cairo, Cache River.. 

Campus, Factory Pond.. 

Carbondale, Cox’s lake. 

Manning Pond. 

Mine Pond. 

Spillers Lake 
Thompsons Lake.. 

Carter, Wellman’s lake. 

Carterville, Brandon Pond. 

Carroll’s pond. 

Carter Pond. 

Coleman Pond. 

Colp and Arnold 

Lakes. 

Ferrell Pond. 

Hofer Lake. 

Zimmerman’s lake.. 

Chester, Crisler’s pond. 

Fishing Club Lake. 

Clay City, Doherty’s pond. 

Crainville, Norton’s pond. 

Crystal Lake, Crystal Lake. 

Dallas City, Mississippi River.. 

Decatur, Club Lake. 

Franklin, Burlington Reservoir. 

Freeburg, Freeburg Lake. 

Walnut Grove Pond. 

Glenwood, Glenwood Pond. 

Grays Lake, Gages Lake. 

Herrin, Cambon Pond. 

Egyptian Pond. 

Homewood, Calumet River. 

Kankakee, Iroquois River. 

Kankakee River.... 

Kansas, Hallock’s lake. 

Kewanee, Sans Souci Lake. 

Makanda, Roberts’s pond. 

Marion, Hart’s pond. 

Keystone Pond.. 

Schwerdt’s lake. 

Water Works Lake. 

Modoc, Bersche’s pond. 

Mulberry Grove, Hudson Pond. 

Murphysboro, Stacher Lake_ 

Naperville, Du Page River,' 

East Branch. 

Stone Quarry Lake. 

O’Fallon, Henrys Lake... 

Olney, Olney City Reservoir... 

Richmond, Lake Elizabeth. 

Riverside, Des Plaines River.. 

Sandusky, Round Pond. 

Shepherd, Sni E’Carte River.. 

Sterling, Sinsippi Lake. 

Ullin, Cache River. 

Utica, Fourth Quarry Pond.... 

Vandalia, Kaskaskia River. 

Virden, Maple Avenue Lake.... 

Waterloo, Bissell Lake. 

Woodberry, Woodberry Lake.. 


Fry. 


Finger- 

lings. 


1,000 

1,000 

750 

250 

500 

500 

250 

250 

100 

1,200 

900 

250 

200 

550 

300 

250 

550 

500 

200 

800 

800 

300 

400 

300 

100 

300 

150 

175 

150 

150 

100 

350 

350 

300 

100 

100 

800 

900 

80 

300 

200 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

300 

450 

500 

1,200 

1,200 

200 

750 

100 

175 

150 

400 

150 

200 

300 

200 

1,000 

450 

400 

400 

800 

900 

100 

600 

900 

550 

450 

500 

300 

600 

500 


Disposition. 


Fry. 


Finger- 

lings. 


Indiana: 

Anderson, Bayview Pond. 

West Brook Pond... 

Claypool, Caldwell Lake. 

Simon Shultz Lake... 
Yellow Creek Lake... 

Cory don. Big Indian Creek. 

Elbert’s lake. 

DeLong, Tippecanoe River. 

Eaton, Hamilton’s pond. 

Fort Wayne, Lake Emily. 

Indianapolis, Eagle Creek. 

Fall Creek. 

Nesom’s pond.... 

White River. 

Jasper, Calumet Lake. 

Schmitt’s pond. 

Kendallville, BLxler Lake. 

Liberty, White Water River, 

East Fork. 

Macy, North Mud Lake. 

South Mud Lake. 

Monticello, Big Metamonong 

Creek. 

Tippecanoe River.. 

New Albany, Silver Lake. 

North Liberty, Rupel Lake.... 

Owensville, Stone’s pond. 

Paoli, Brookside Reservoir. 

Pierceton, Webster Lake. 

Richmond, Rettig Lake. 

Rockville, Little Raccoon Creek. 

Rome City, Lower Lake. 

Sylvan Lake. 

Stewartsville, Footes Lake. 

Summitville, Roseboom’s pond. 

Warren, Salamonie River. 

Iowa: 

Bentley, Walnut Hill Pond. 

Cedar Falls, Cedar River. 

Hacketts Lake .... 

Chariton, McCoy’s pond. 

Rice Lake. 

Charles City, Cedar River. 

Chester, Upper Iowa River. 

Clarion, Elm Lake. 

Coggon, Buffalo Creek. 

Corning, Lake Vernon. 

Decorah, Upper Iowa River_ 

DeWitt, Crystal Lake. 

Silver Creek. 

Edgewood, Funk’s pond. 

Forest City, Imogene Lake. 

Glenwood, Glenwood Park 

Lake. 

Hampton, Reed Lake. 

Independence, Wapsipinieon 

River. 

Lime Springs, Upper Iowa 

River. 

Manchester, Maquoketa River.. 
Marble Rock, Shell Rock River. 
Maynard, Little Volga Creek.. 
North McGregor, Mississippi 

River. 

Tuskeego, Robertson’s pond.... 
Kansas: 

Belmont, Bentley’s pond. 

Blue Rapids, Big and Little 

Blue River. 

Bronson, Second Lake. 

Caldwell, Fall Creek. 

Chanute, Valley View Pond.... 

Cherry vale, City Lake. 

Colony, Clark’s pond. 

Conway Springs, Slate Creek.... 
Farlington, Mitchell’s pond 

Huron, Anthony’s pond. 

Isabel, Gibson’s pond. 


400 

300 

250 

200 

250 

300 

100 

700 

125 

300 

100 

200 

75 

200 

300 

100 

200 


375 

400 

400 

300 

300 

40 

300 

100 

100 

200 

50 

435 

400 

800 

200 

200 

400 

125 

400 

400 

100 

600 

400 

800 

100 

400 

100 

400 

400 

200 

150 

150 

700 

400 

400 

2.250 
7,100 

400 

300 

5.250 
100 

100 

300 

100 

500 

100 

300 

125 

300 

125 

225 

100 

































































































































































90 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Fry. 


Finger- 

lings. 


Disposition. 


Fry. 


Finger- 

lings. 


Kansas—Continued. 

Kansas City, Idlewild Lake.... 
Kingman, Harris Springs Pond. 

Reed’s pond. 

Leavenworth, Fairgrounds Lake 

Marion, Catlin Creek. 

Clear Creek. 

Cottonwood River, 

South Fork. 

Middle Creek. 

Mud Creek. 

Willowbrook Pond. 

Medicine Lodge, Chapin Ponds. 

Currie Lake... 
Read Lake.... 
Silver Springs 

Lake. 

Melvern, Long Creek. 

Peabody, Cotton Creek. 

Country Club Lake... 

Crisfieid Pond. 

Doyle Creek. 

Gray’s pond. 

Henry Creek. 

Johnson’s pond.. 

Rock Island Lake... . 

Spring Creek.. 

Townsend’s pond.... 
Pittsburg, Sporting Club Ponds. 

St. Francis, Spring Creek. 

Selden, Prairie Dog Creek. 

Tyro, Brick Company’s lake.... 

Waverly, Rock Creek. 

Wilder, Woodson’s pond. 

Yates Center, Waterworks Res¬ 
ervoir. 

Kentucky: 

Anchorage, Cox Lake. 

Pryor’s pond. 

Augusta, Licking River, North 

Fork. 

Bonnieville, Riggs’s pond. 

Campbellsburg, Little Ken¬ 
tucky River. 

Ekron, Horse Lot Pond. 

Woods Pond. 

Yellow Lake. 

Elizabethtown, Cedar Creek.... 

Nolin River.... 
Rauboldt Pond. 
Valley Creek... 
Y oungers Creek 

Eminence, Thome’s pond. 

Glasgow, Beard Pond. 

Boyds Creek. 

Fallen Timber Creek.. 

Peters Creek. 

Richardson Pond 

Skeggs Creek. 

South Fork Creek.... 

Glendale, Nolin Creek. 

Hodgensville, Nolin Creek. 

La Grange, Highland Lake. 

Lebanon, Big Pond. 

Cheyels Creek. 

Indian Creek. 

Peeps Creek. 

Rolling Fork Creek... 
Rolling Fork Creek, 

North Branch. 

. Rolling Fork Creek, 

South Branch. 

Louisville, Green’s pond. 

Lake Lansdowne... 
Parkview Club Lake 

South Park Lake_ 

Wagner’s pond. 


100 

Kentucky—Continued. 


200 

100 

Stephensburg 


150 

Williamsburg, Jellico Creek. 


250 

250 

Louisiana: 


Benton, Sunny side Pond. 


250 



250 



250 



100 

Clinton, Gallent’s pond. 


125 

Edgerly, Chesson’s pond. 


125 

Jeanerette, Albania*Pond. 


250 





250 



250 



100 

Rustin, Lyles's poncl. 


250 

250 

Maine: 

Boothbay Harbor, Pine Lake... 


350 



250 

250 

Maryland: 


100 



250 



350 



250 



125 



75 



325 



150 



200 



100 



250 

Conococh eague 
Creek. 




150 

75 

Hampstead, Patapsco River, 




80 



75 



Mountain Lock, Potomac River. 


200 



100 



100 

Rocky Ridge, Monocacy River. 


100 



80 



80 



40 

80 

80 

Massachusetts: 

East Dedham, Mather Brook 


75 



75 



200 



200 



150 



100 

West Gloucester, Haskell’s pond 
Michigan: 


200 

75 


150 



80 



150 



75 



75 






150 



150 





150 





150 



80 



195 



80 



ICO 



80 

Sutherland Lake.... 



200 

200 

300 

100 

100 

250 

50 

25 

100 

50 

75 

25 

150 

3C 

100 

125 

450 

155 


150 

320 

180 

280 

130 

100 

80 

150 

280 

100 

150 


200 

400 

340 

270 

300 

150 

440 

140 

100 

300 

200 

80 

360 


250 

390 

250 

1,500 

400 

400 

390 


350 

200 

200 

200 

350 

1,000 

200 

150 

150 

100 

175 

400 

400 

200 

400 

200 

400 

400 

























































































































































91 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details of Distribution' of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Fry. 


Finger- 

lings. 


Disposition. 


Michigan—Continued. 

Iron wood, Tamarack Lake. 

Taylor Lake... 

Ishpeming, Silver Lake. 

Kingsley, Ilogsback Lake. 

Rennie Lake. 

Oakley, Shiawassee River. 

Oden, Crooked Lake. 

Schoolcraft, Weed Lake. 

Sylvania, Katherine Lake. 

West Bear Lake. 

Turtle, African Lake. 

Clover Leaf Lake. 

Eel Lake. 

Emiline Lake. 

Gaylord Lake. 

Hawk Lake. 

Honey Moon Lake. 

Independence Lake. 

Line Lake. 

Mint Lake. 

Moose Lake. 

Orms Lake. 

Rowes Lake. 

Toe Lake. 

Minnesota: 

Alexandria, Darling Lake. 

Lake Agnes. 

Lake Carlos. 

L’Hommedieu 

Lake. 

Brownsville, Mississippi River.. 

Duluth, White Lake. 

Kelsey, Lake Rauppe. 

Mankato, Lake Washington 

Minneapolis, Burnett’s lake. 

Pengilly, Swan Lake. 

Preston, Root River. 

Root River, Middle 

Branch. 

Rochester, Zumbro River, Mid¬ 
dle Branch. 

Zumbro River, 

South Branch. 

St. Paul, State Fish Commis¬ 
sion. 

South Haven, Augusta Lake... 

Betsy Lake. 

Lake Caroline.... 
Stewartsville, Lake Florence.... 

Root River. 

Mississippi: 

Aberdeen, Dead Lake. 

MeNiece Lake. 

Medor Lake. 

Tombigbee River.... 

Ackerman, Willow Pond. 

Agricultural College, Me Kell’s 

pond. 

Bexley, LeatherberryMil! Pond. 

Mill Pond. 

Biloxi, Howell Pond. 

Lorenzo Pond. 

Brandon, Raymond Pond.. 

Canton, Factory Pond.. 

McBride Pond.. 

Round Lake. 

Columbus, Lake Katherine_ 

Corinth, Bridge Creek. 

Cane Creek. 

Chambers Creek. 

Clear Creek. 

Clear Lake. 

Conway Lake. 

Coon Creek Pond. 

Derryberry Lake..... 

Elams Creek. 

Griffins Pond. 

Gum Pond. 


400 

400 

400 

375 

375 

200 

700 

175 

200 

200 

400 

200 

200 

200 

200 

400 

400 

400 

400 

200 

400 

400 

400 

200 

200 

150 

700 

300 
3.000 
400 
450 
400 
300 
900 
600 

600 

200 

200 

18,250 

400 

400 

400 

500 

600 

25 

300 

600 

275 

200 

100 

75 

75 

75 

75 

100 

100 

100 

100 

300 

200 

300 

300 

200 

150 

200 

200 

100 

150 

150 

200 


Mississippi—Continued. 

Corinth, Lambert’s lake. 

Long Pond. 

Marlows Mill Pond 

Parmitchie Creek. 

> Romine and Ward 

Pond. 

Santa Fe Lake. 

Seven Mile Creek. 

Tuscumbia River. 

Utley Mill Pond. 

Waukomis Lake. 

Wilson’s pond. 

Dancy, Barefoot’s pond. 

McCarter’s pond. 

Smith’s pond. 

W alker’s pond. 

White’s pond. 

Wilson’s pond. 

Durant, Smith’s pond. 

Friars Point, Moon Lake. 

Iloulka, Reed’s pond. 

Houston, Busby’s pond. 

Knox Pond. 

Howells Switch, Rankin Pond.. 

Jackson, Curry’s pond. 

Farish Pond. 

Lewis’s pond. 

Lynch’s pond. 

Morrison’s pond. 

Richmond Lake. 

Spring Lake.. 

Tapley’s pond. 

Lee County, King Creek. 

McCool, Fancher’s pond.. 

Lily Pond.. 

Sweet Gum Lake. 

McDonald, Maj ure’s pond. 

Ogletree’s pond_ 

Smith’s pond. 

Maben, Butler’s pond. 

Macon, Eiland Pond. 

Howards Lake. 

Madison Station, Glenarchen 

Pond. 

Man tee, Lofton’s pond. 

Moseley Pond. 

Taylor’s pond. 

Meridian, College Lakes. 

Pleasant Springs.... 
Queen City Club 

Pond. 

New Albany, Conner’s pond... 
New Houlka, Chuquaton c h e e 

Creek. 

DeLashmet Lake 
Houlka Creek.... 

Reed Pond. 

Okolona, Elliott Pond. 

Mill Pond. 

Okolona Lake. 

Red Bud Creek. 

Sansom’s lakes. 

Osborn, Montgomery’s pond... 

Oak Grove Pond. 

Pearson, Sweetwater Lake. 

Philadelphia, Wilson’s pond... 

Pickayune, Tate’s lake. 

Ripley, Morgan’s pond. 

Sallis, Temple’s pond. 

Sessums, Ash Creek Pond. 

Gay’s pond. 

Rush’s pond. 

Wild’s pond. 

Shuqualak, Belle Pond. 

Dugan Pond. 

Hamilton’s pond.. 

Jenkins’ pond. 

Woodlawn Pond.. 


Fry. 


linger- 

lings. 


150 

150 

100 

200 

150 

150 

200 

300 

150 

300 

100 

100 

150 

150 

100 

150 

100 

200 

250 

25 

150 

50 

400 

300 

150 

100 

150 

150 

300 

300 

150 

650 

300 

150 

150 

25 

25 

25 
150 
150 
200 

100 

150 

200 

150 

300 

45 

200 

200 

150 

150 

300 

200 

200 

200 

200 

150 

600 

109 

100 

200 

50 

76 

26 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 

70 

200 





































































































































































92 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details op Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — C ontinued. 
LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Mississippi—Continued. 



Nevada: 





200 



250 



100 



250 



100 






100 



300 



100 



400 



150 



600 

Washington’s pond . 


100 



300 

Strongs, Cox Branch_I. 


100 



500 



100 



400 



200 



200 



100 



250 

Summit, Godbold’s lake. 


250 



400 

Toomsuba, Live Oak Lake. 


35 



200 



100 



400 



300 



400 



150 



100 

Union, Johnson’s pond. 


25 



350 



150 



800 



300 



Tipton’s pond. 


150 



500 

Yazoo Citv Cedar Grove Pond. 


150 

Rahway, Water Company’s 



Missouri: 





500 

Asbury, Blackberry Creek. 


200 



250 

Aurora, Flat Creek.. 


300 



600 

Bolivar, Pomme de Terre River. 


400 



300 

Brandsville, Lake of the Four 



South Vineland, Bucksliietem 



Cantons. 


100 



400 

Butler, Lake Katherine. 


400 



200 



200 



250 



200 



400 



400 



Clinton, Clinton Lake. 


300 



250 

Cole Camp, Cole Camp Creek.. 


300 



500 



150 



150 

Creve Cceur, Creve Coeur Lake.. 


225 



254 

Dedwick, Livingston's pond_ 


100 



150 

Deepwater, Dickey Lake. 


150 



300 

Fredericktown, St. Francis 





150 



200 



280 

Grand View, Spring Lake. 


100 



100 

Higginsville, Railroad Pond.... 


475 



320 

Kansas City, Fairinount Lake.. 


400 



320 



100 




Knoblick, Little St. Francis 





195 



140 






300 



400 



150 



400 



200 



400 

Water Works Reservoir 


200 



400 

Mount Vernon, Truitt Creek.... 


300 



400 

Neosho, Crescent Pond. 


200 



400 

Nevada, Railroad Reservoir_ 


200 



150 

Noel, Perry’s ponds. 


200 



400 

Pleasant Hill,‘Leonards Lake... 


500 



100 

Richards, Richardson’s pond... 


100 



200 

Rolla, Big Beaver Creek'.. 


80 



400 

Big Dry Fork Creek. 


150 



100 

Little Beaver Creek. 


100 



400 

Little Drv Fork Creek... 


100 



300 

Eove Creek. 


100 



300 

McBride Spring Branch. 


40 



200 

Waltz Spring Branch.... 


40 



200 

Rosedale, Lewis’s pond. 


40 



200 

Springfield, Doling Lake. 


300 



200 

Swope Station, Lagoon Lake... 


200 



200 

Wooded Lake.. 


200 



200 

Thayer, Warm Fork Creek. 


200 



200 

Wayne, Woodruff Springs. 


300 



200 

Waynesville, Gasconade River. 


150 



400 

West Plains, W oolworth’s 





400 

bayou. 


200 




White River, 





400 

North Fork. 


200 



400 

Willow Springs, Willow Springs 





400 

Reservoir. 


200 



500 

Nebraska: 





500 

Stuart, Clear Lake. 


200 

Paradox Lake. 


500 

























































































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details op Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS-Continued. 


93 


Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

New York—Continued. 



Ohio—Continued. 



Riverside Schroon Lake. 


500 




Roseoe, Florence Lake. 


400 




Thurman, Echo Lake. 


400 



500 



400 



Walden, Wallkill River. 


300 




Wallkill, Schawangunk River.. 


400 




Warwick, Wickham Lake. 


400 




Williamstown, Panther Lake... 


400 



75 

North Carolina: 



Rock Creek, Grand* River. 


125 

Charlotte, Catawba River, 



St. Marys, Mercer County Res- 




96 




Franklin, Cartoogaja Creek. 


405 




Cullasagee Creek. 


405 




Tennessee River. 


300 



150 

North Dakota: 



Wauseon, Miller and Becker 


Ambrose, Skjermo Lake. 


300 



2Q5 



400 






400 




Cottonwood Pond. 


100 



50 



300 



175 



300 





400 



250 

Buttzville, Buttz’s pond. 


300 



325 



300 



175 



100 



250 

Crystal Springs, Crystal Springs 


500 

Ames, Garden Lake. 


100 

100 



400 



300 



3,500 



400 



200 



250 



100 



300 

Burns Pond. 


100 



100 

Granville, Buffalo Lodge Lake.. 


600 



100 



200 



250 



100 



300 



100 



250 



400 



200 



10,500 



175 



300 



100 



300 



300 



200 



300 



600 



100 



600 



150 



150 



150 



100 



150 



400 



100 



1,100 



100 



150 



125 



300 



100 



300 



100 



100 



140 






150 



50 



100 



100 



100 



575 



125 



500 



100 



100 



125 



100 



100 



175 



200 






200 



250 



250 



300 



250 



500 



250 



150 



140 



150 



100 



150 



250 



400 



125 



50 



100 



775 



100 



300 



100 



300 



100 



100 



100 



100 



250 



200 



250 



425 



250 






250 



250 



250 






250 

Fork. 


125 

Hallett, Mirror Lake. 


200 

































































































































































94 DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 

Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Oklahoma—Continued. 

Haskell, Oputtuna Pond. 

Willows Pond... 
Hennessey, Jarvis’s pond. 

Hobart, Elk Lake. 

Hydro, Deer Creek. 

Jet, Saline Valley Pond... 

Kelsey, Illinois River. 

Lawton, Medicine Creek.. 
McAlester, Cole’s lake.... 
Madill, McMillan Lake... 

Marietta, Bills Creek. 

Cochron Creek.. 
Corcoran Creek.. 
George William Creek. 

Haynes’s lake. 

Hickory Creek. 

Kirkpatrick Lake... 
Marietta Club Lake.. 

Oil Creek. 

Rock Creek. 

Shegan Creek.. 

Simon Lake.... 

Marlow, Adkins Pond. 

Boone Pond.!!! 

Cooper’s pond. 

Findley’s pond. 

Marlow Park Lake.... 

Marlow Pond. 

Martin’s pond.’ 

Murray’s pond.... 

Oquin’s lake. 

Sand Hill Pond. 

Shaws Pond. 

Waldbridge Lake...! 
Mill Creek, Mill Creek.. 
Muskogee, Country Club Lake 
Newkirk, Santa Fe Lake 
Ninnekah, Nelson Lake. 

Noble, Clear Brook.” 

Wadley’s pond.. 

Norman, Sunnybrook Lake 
Oehelata, Water Works Reser¬ 
voir. 

Okeene, Schallmo Pond 
Oklahoma City, Belle Isle Lake! 

Club Lake. j 

Colcord’s lake.. I 

Elm Lake.! 

Hogan’s pond.. 
Kingkade’s 

lake. 

Lakeview Lake 
Shepherd’s 

lake. 

Spring Creek... 
Osage, Osage Lake. 

Pawhuska, Clear Creek 
Pawnee, Walenciak’s lake 
Perkins, Jennings Pond 

Perry, Beers’s lake.. 

Bostick’s pond. 

Brown’s pond..!!!.!! 
Casey’s pond... 

City Lake. 

Hansen’s pond..I 

Hansing’s lake. 

Keaton’s pond... 
McCune’s pond...!. 

Moore’s pond. 

Tucker’s pond. 

Ponca, Cottonwood Lake 

Evans Lake. 

Rockbound Lake 

Turkey Creek. 

Willow Pond.. 

Pond Creek, Fairview Lake.' 

Guernsey’s lake. 


Fry. 


Finger- 

lings. 


100 

300 

100 

150 

250 

100 

300 

650 

150 

125 

125 

250 

175 

125 

125 

250 

125 

200 

200 

150 

125 

150 

100 

100 

100 

150 

150 

150 

125 

150 

150 

200 

100 

125 

300 

300 

250 

125 

125 

100 

150 

200 

100 

300 

200 

250 

125 

200 

250 

300 


375 

125 

150 

350 

100 

100 

200 

200 

200 

200 

500 

200 

100 

200 

250 

175 

125 

200 

2p0 

200 

325 

150 

250 

250 


Disposition. 


Oklahoma—Continued. 

Poteau, Long Lake... 

Purcell, Club Lake....!!.'!!!!! 

Ripley, Crain’s pond. 

Sallisaw, Sallisaw River 

Sentinel, Big Elk River.! 

Stillwater, Carpenter’s lake! 

McKinnon’s pond. 

Stroud, Loch Kathrine. 

Sulphur, Lowrance Lake 
Tahlequah, Wolfe Lake 

Terra!, Rock Island Lake.! 

Tishomingo, Big Sandy River.. 

City Lake..! 

Foley Lake. 

Little SandyRiver 

Trousdale, Liwix’s lake. 

Tuttle, Davis’s pond 
Vinita, Electric Park Lake..’!!! 

Hall’s lake.!.’ 

Walter, Johnson’s pond.!. 

Watonga, Cunningham’s "lake 
Waukomis, McClennahan’s 

pond. 

Woodward, Reiliy’s springs. 

Yukon, Maixner’s pond. 

Pennsylvania: 

Bath, Spring Reservoir... 

Big Bend, Conewago Creek ..... 

Fleuent Pond.. 
Birdsboro, Hay Creek. 
Brillharts, Cadorus Creek, South 

Branch. , 

Bushkill, Deer Lake.!!!!!!!!!’" 

Forest Lake.!!! ! 

Lake Taminent. 

Mud Pond.. 

Chester Springs, Pickering 

Creek. 

Collegeville, Willow Hurst Dam 

Connellsville, Indian Creek. 

Danville, Susquehanna River 
Susquehanna River, 

North Branch. 

Denver, Cocalico Creek. 

East Berlin, Conewago Creek 

Factory ville, Lake Carey. 

Lake Kewanna.. 
Lake Manataka.. 
Falls Station, Susquehanna 

River. 

Fort Washington, Sandy Run.! 

Gettysburg, Marsh Creek. 

Rock Creek. 

Goldsboro, Susquehanna River. 
Graftesford, Perkiomen Creek 

Greenville, Shenango River_ 

Hanover, Conewago Creek. 

tt Little Conewago Creek 

Hatboro, Little Neshaminy 

Dam. J 

Hickory, Allegheny River...!.! 
Huntingdon, Raystown Branch 

Indiana, Twolick Creek. 

Kimberton, French Creek. 

Lancaster, Conestoga River 
Mount Morris, Dunkard Creek 
New Oxford, Little Conewago 

Creek. 

Newtown, Neshaminy Creek. 

Oaks, Perkiomen Creek. 

Skippack Creek. 

Oxford, Octoraro Creek, East 

Branch. _ 

Palm, Gehard Dam. 

Hosensaek Creek.!!..!!!! 
Perkiomen Creek 
Phillipsburg, Lehigh River. 


Fry. 


Finger- 

lings. 


300 
300 
100 
300 
350 
100 
100 
125 
200 
100 
100 
200 
100 
200 
250 
100 
100 
100 
100 
300 
100 

100 
100 
100 

100 

300 

300 

350 

420 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

100 

80 

175 

150 

250 

350 

300 

300 

300 

350 

200 

250 

250 

280 

300 

300 

300 

200 

200 

350 

180 

150 

300 

300 

1,000 

250 

GOO 

200 

200 

500 
- 100 
100 
100 
200 








































































































































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


95 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS — Continued. 


Disposition. 


Fry. 


Finger- 

lings. 


Disposition. 


Pennsylvania—Continued. 
Pittsburg, Gridin Reservoir.... 

Wildwood Reservoir. 

Pocono, Naomi Lake. 

Pocono Lake. 

Port Royal, Tuscarora Creek... 
Pottstown, Manatawny Creek.. 

Rahns, Perkiomen Creek. 

Reading, Angelica Creek. 

Jordan Creek. 

Maiden Creek. 

Schuylkill River. 

Stony Creek. 

Tulpehocken Creek... 
Schwenksville, Perkiomen 

Creek. 

Susquehanna, Susquehanna 

River. 

Telford, Perkiomen Creek, 

Northeast Branch. 

Temple, Ontelaunie Creek. 

Troy, Cross Roads Creek. 

North Branch. 

Trunkeyville, Alleghany River. 

Tunkhannock, Lake Carey. 

Union City, Lake Pleasant. 

Warren, Jackson Creek. 

Weissport, Poho Poco Creek.... 

West Chester, Park’s pond. 

Wrightsville, Cabin Creek. 

Fishing Creek.... 

Rrentz Creek. 

Susquehanna 

River. 

York, Beaver Creek. 

Big Conewago Creek. 

Codorus Creek, South 

Fork. 

Codorus Creek, West 

Fork. 

Fishing Creek. 

Fox Creek. 

Keesey Dam. 

Kreutz Creek. 

Kreutz Pond. 

Little Badams Creek. 

Little Conewago Creek... 

Susquehanna River. 

York Haven, Big Conewago 

Creek. 

Conewago Creek... 
Susquehanna 

River. 

Zieglersville, Perkiomen Creek.. 
Rhode Island: 

Kingston, Hundred Acre Pond. 

Westerly, Park Lake. 

South Carolina: 

Aiken, Branch Pond. 

Shaws Creek. 

Anderson, Branch Water Pond. 

Brown Pond. 

Silver Lake. 

Angelus, Middleton’s pond. 

Belton, Saluda River. 

Bethune, Estridge’s pond. 

Mill Branch Pond.... 

Mill Creek Pond. 

Blacksburg, Broad River. 

Blaney, Black Lake. 

Borden, Pollard Mill Pond. 

Bowling Green, Crowders Creek. 

Crowders Creek, 
South Fork... 
Calhoun, Twenty-three Mile 

Creek.:. 

Camden, Savage’s pond. 

Chester, Sandy River. 

Clinton, Enoree River. 


180 

270 

300 

350 

180 

150 

300 

200 

200 

250 

350 

200 

1,000 

300 

400 

200 

300 

250 

300 

300 

800 

350 

300 

250 

200 

140 

200 

200 

300 

140 

560 

140 

280 

140 

280 

140 

140 

140 

280 

140 

280 

280 

560 

280 

300 

520 

390 

75 

500 

48 

48 

48 

500 

96 

500 

500 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

70 

500 

1,000 

2,000 

25 

48 

500 


South Carolina—Continued. 

Clover, Allison Creek. 

Beaver Dam Creek. 

Bigger’s pond. 

Catawba Creek. 

Catawba River. 

Crowders Creek. 

Crowders Mill Pond. 

Lower Beaver Dam 

Creek. 

Mill Creek. 

Upper Beaver Dam 

Creek. 

Columbia. Cedar Creek. 

Congaree Creek. 

Cotton Mills Reser¬ 
voir. 

Dents Pond. 

Gin Pond. 

Poplar Branch Pond. 

Rodgers Spring. 

Croft, Bridge Pond. 

Darlington, Charles Mill Pond.. 

Easley, Silver Pond. 

Eastover, Colonels Creek. 

Edgefield, Beaverdam Creek.... 

Edmund, Thresher Pond. 

Eureka, Seiglers Mill Pond. 

Everett, Hilliard Pond. 

Old Mill Pond. 

Fort Lawn, Abernathy’s pond.. 

Catawba River. 

Crawfords Pond. 

Fishing Creek. 

Gilbert, Hamburg Branch. 

Great Falls, Catawba River. 

Catawba River 

Pond. 

Rocky Creek. 

Southern Power 

Co.’s pond. 

Greenville, Saluda Lake. 

Greenwood, Bag Creek. 

Curl Tail Creek 

Pond. 

Cutler Branch 

Pond. 

Davis’s pond. 

Garys Pond...._ 

Harrison Creek. 

Johns Creek. 

Little Curl Tail 

Creek. 

Rays Pond. 

Wardlaws Pond... 

Hartsville, Ox Pen Branch. 

Hickory Grove, Bullock Creek.. 
Honea Path, Broad Mouth 

Creek. 

Little Creek. 

Little River. 

Mattison Mill 

Pond. 

Saluda River. 

Turkey Creek. 

nopkins, Chappelle Creek. 

Mill Creek. 

Tub Mill Creek. 

Inman, Ray’s pond. 

Lamar, Harrell Mill Pond. 

Lancaster, Mosier’s pond. 

Langley, Power House Pond... 

Laurens, Reedy River. 

Leesville, Lightwood Creek 

Pond. 

Lightwood Pond. 

Lexington, Gable’s pond. 

Marietta, Middle Saluda River . 

North Saluda River.. 


Fry. 


Finger- 

lings. 


1,000 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

2,000 

4,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

30 

36 

48 

96 

48 

36 

36 

500 

500 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

1,500 

500 

1,000 

48 

1,000 

2,000 

1,000 

1,000 

4,000 

75 

120 

‘75 

75 

25 

75 

75 

135 

75 

1,000 

500 

1,000 

150 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

1,000 

1,500 

1,000 

500 

500 

500 

150 

48 

75 

500 

500 

1.500 

2.500 





















































































































































96 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details op Distribution op Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Disposit on. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

South Carolina—Continued. 


South Dakota—Continued. 




. 1,000 



125 


. 75 



150 


. 1,000 



300 





300 


. 150 



400 


. 25 



300 


_ 1.000 



300 



'500 



150 



500 



300 



500 



150 



500 



300 



1,000 



300 



'500 



200 



500 



125 






125 



1,500 



400 



Fooo 






'500 



150 



500 



150 



2,000 






48 






500 



200 



75 






500 






500 



200 



48 



200 



1,000 



200 






200 



150 


2,400 




500 





500 



200 



150 


800 




500 


2,400 




500 



200 



500 


800 




1,000 



200 



1,000 


1,000 




500 



150 



25 






1,000 

Fork. . 

2,065 




1,000 





25 


2,055 




1,000 





25 


2,055 




3,000 


200 



50 



150 



500 



105 



48 



200 



1,000 



300 



1,000 



150 



1,000 


3,425 




500 



Langdon* Branch 





100 



1,000 



100 

Turkey Creek Pond.. 


1,000 



100 

Woodruff, Chumley’s pond. 


500 



100 

South Dakota: 



Amarillo, Paladora Pond. 


900 



300 



400 

Bonesteel, Flurams Lake. 


250 



200 

Canton, Big Sioux River. 


800 



500 

Carthage, Lake Magnuson. 


175 



200 



300 



400 

Round" Lake. 


300 



500 

Dell Rapids, Big Sioux River .. 


400 



200 

Forestburg, Watch Lake. 


125 



100 

Kimball, Pleasant Lake. 


300 



400 

Lane, Flowing Wells Lake. 


175 



150 

Lennox, Lake Thorsen. 


300 



100 

Madison, Lake Herman. 


500 



800 



600 



150 

Marion, Center Lake. 


300 



150 

Silver Lake. 


300 



200 

Vermillion River, West 





100 

Branch. 


300 



200 

Midland, Stafford’s pond. 


125 



400 

Oakton. Stangl’s pond. 


200 



300 

Parker, Dorow’spond. 


100 

Travis Branch. 


950 







































































































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


97 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Fry. 


Finger- 

lings. 


Disposition. 


Fry. 


Finger- 

lings. 


Texas—Continued. 

Brookesmith, Buena Vista Lake . 
Brownsville, Horseshoe Resaca 

Lake. 

Resaca de la Guerra 

Lake. 

Brownwood, Allison’s pond. 

Camp’s pond. 

Collins’s pond. 

McGaugh Pond... . 

Snyder’s pond. 

Bryan, Nall’s lake. 

Buckholtz, Helmcanip Pond... . 
Calallen, Casa Morado Reservoir . 
Calvert, Calvert Country Club 

Lake. 

Canyon City, Canyon Lake. 

Paladora Creek... 
Pritchard’s pond. 
Terra BlancoCreek 

Carlos, Lake Carlos. 

Caro, Lower Saner Pond. 

Celina, English Lake. 

Moore’s lake. 

Smith’s lake. 

Stelzer’s pool. 

Center, Wood Lake. 

Center Point, Medina River.... 

Childress, Lake Keeler. 

Lake Scott. 

Clarendon, Allan Creek. 

Clarksville, Clarksville Country 

Club Lake. 

Cleburne, Cleburne Country Club 

Lake. 

Willow Pond. 

Clifton, Christenson’s lake. 

Reeder’s pond. 

Clyde, Deadman Pond... 

Colmesneil, Lively’s lake. 

Colorado, McCreless’s lake. 

Plasted’s pond. 

Spring Creek Pond... 
White Elephant Lake 

Cooledge,Cottonwood Lake_ 

Long Branch Lake_ 

McReynoIds’s reservoir 

Valley Lake. 

Corsicana, Burks Lake. 

Morse’s lake. 

Woodley Pond. 

Cotulla, Chapman Lake. 

Poteet Lake. 

Crowell, Burress’s pond. 

Campbell’s pond. 

Railroad Pond. 

Cuero. Hickory Lake. 

Cushing, Becton Lake. 

Dale, Eppright Pond. 

Dalhart, Rita Blanca Lake. 

Dallas, Bachman Pond. 

Coombs Creek. 

Tenison Lake. 

Decatur, Halsell Lake. 

DeKalb, Hathcocks’s pond. 

Del Rio, Devils River. 

Denison, Lake Denison. 

Denton, Country Club Lake.... 
Detroit, Clarksville Club Lake.. 

Detroit Club Lake. 

Sample’s pond. 

D’Hanis, Clay Hill Pond. 

Doucette, Pope’s pond. 

Stewart’s lake. 

Eagle Pass, Rosita Creek. 

Eastland, Kinnebrew Pool. 

Edgewood, Davis Pond. 

Elgin, Christian Lake. 

Egleston Lake. 


100 

Texas—Continued. 




1,000 





1.000 



200 



150 



200 



200 



1,000 



150 






160 





500 

600 

Gainesville, Gainesville Club 


725 



600 



725 



800 



150 



329 



300 



350 



125 



300 



1,500 

1,150 





500 



300 





500 

Glad water, Phillips Spring Lake 



200 



100 



112 



112 



150 



150 

200 





600 

300 

300 

100 

200 

50 

201 

1,000 

200 

500 

400 

400 

300 

150 

400 

1,500 

50 

200 

200 

375 

775 

300 

100 

300 

500 

800 

300 

400 

150 

100 

300 

400 

200 

1,000 

300 

150 

150 

134 








































i . 










. 




i . 


.. 

















Kingsville, Christenson’s reser- 
voir. 



100 

2,000 

50 

500 

300 

32 

50 

300 

213 

300 

213 

200 

200 

500 

GOO 

100 

500 

100 

200 

200 

50 

100 

100 

150 

200 

100 

150 

100 

150 

100 

150 

200 

1,000 

300 

200 

185 

100 

1,200 

150 

600 

500 

150 

200 

400 

400 

400 

400 

400 

400 

500 

800 

200 

500 

500 

360 

300 

150 

200 

300 

150 

1,000 

400 

100 

200 

100 

100 

150 

200 

816 

200 

634 

200 

300 

300 

400 

100 

















































































































































































98 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Texas—Continued. 



Texas—Continued. 



Kyle, Goforth Pond. 


150 



800 

Ladonia, Burton’s pond. 


300 



900 

Elliott’s pond. 


300 



<300 

Water Works Pond... 


300 



500 

LaGrange, Crownover Lake.... 


1,500 



400 



1,500 




Laredo,* Bulls Eye Lake. 


500 



1,000 



300 



150 

Moritas Take. 


500 



100 

Perren’s pond. 


400 



175 

Lillian, Ball’s pond. 


150 



150 

Lillian Lake. 


150 



200 

Lindale, Roberts’s pond. 


150 



100 

Llano Grande, Llano Grande 





100 

Lake. 


1,000 



200 

Llano, Llano River. 


5,000 



150 

Shumake’s pond. 


50 



1,000 

Longview, Harris’s lake. 


400 



300 

Melton’s lake. 


200 



1,000 

Tavlor’s pond. 


300 



150 

Lovelady, Patterson Lake. 


1,000 



300 

Lyford, Bamboo Lake. 


100 



30 

McGregor, Leon River. 


500 



1,000 

South Bosque Creek. 


400 



200 

Mabank, Caruthers’s pond. 


200 



200 

Cockerell’s pond. 


54 



200 

Grubb’s pond. 


150 



1,000 

Hebei’s pond. 


200 



i" ooo 

McCoy’spond. 


200 



200 

Pepper’s pond. 


200 



300 

Robertson’s pond. 


250 



305 

Wind Mill Pond. 


200 



1,000 

f Madison, Donaho’s pond. 


50 



30 

Mahl, Pleasant IliH Lake. 





300 

Watkins’s pond. 


50 



1,000 

j Malakoff, Bartlett’s pond. 


100 



150 

Bricky ard*Pond. 


200 



150 

Flagg’s lake. 


400 



100 

i Manchaca, Labenski Creek. 


400 



200 

Onion Creek. 


500 



300 

Marfa, Barker’s pond. 


100 



200 

, Marshall, Fern Lake. 


500 



100 

McClaran’s lake. 


250 



400 

Maxwell, Schawe Lake. 


1,000 



150 

[ Memphis, Brice’s lake. 


1G0 



150 

Cottonwood Creek... 


500 



200 

Jones Creek. 


400 



800 

Noel’s lake. 


100 



500 

Parker Creek. 


500 



500 



900 



500 

Spring Creek. 


500 



500 

Spring Lake. 


100 



500 

! Mercedes, Davis Lake. 


1,000 



500 

Meridan, Johnson’s lake. 


200 




, Merkel, Martin’s lake. 


050 



500 

Miller’s lake. 


400 



500 

Valley Farm Lake. 


300 



500 

Miles, Lipan Creek. 


410 



500 

Milford, Katy Pond. 


300 




Mineola, Conger Pond. 


28 



500 

Lake Park Pond. 


100 




Willow Pond. 


150 



600 

Mingus, Nine Lake. 


300 



900 

Thurber Lake. 


1,000 


. 

60 

Mount Calm, Herring Lake. 


100 



400 

Mount Pleasant, Lake Dellwood 


150 



400 

Mount Selman, Phialpha Lake. 


250 



50 

Mount Vernon’ Devall’s pond.. 


150 



500 

Holbrook Lake. 


150 



50 

Nacogdoches, Fern Lake. 


1,000 



50 



800 



100 

Navasota, Shell Lake. 


1,000 



500 

Y arboro Lake. 


1,000 



300 

New Braunfels, Comal Creek... 


600 



500 

Guadalupe 





300 



300 



500 



1.000 



200 

North Zulch, Railroad Reser- 





200 

voir. 


600 

Byrd’s pond.. 


50 












































































































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details op Distribution op Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS—Continued. 


99 


Disposition. j Fry. 


Finger- 
| lings. 


Disposition. 


Fry. 


, Finger- 
lings. 


Texas—Continued. 

Sulphur Springs, Higdon Pond. . 

Pound Lake.. . 
Reiley Lake.. . 
Thompson 

Pond. 

W ooaland 

Lake. 

Taylor, Taylor Lake. 

Temple, Lake Polk. 

Terrell, Arnolds Lake. 

Cooper Lake. 

Country Club Lake. 

Garrett’s pond. 

Gordon Lake. 

Griffith League Lake... 

Landos Lake. 

Martin’s lake. 

Oleander Lake. 

Sand Branch Lake. 

Walton Lake. 

White Rock Lake. 

Timpson, Green’s lake. 

Wedgeworth’s lake... 

Troup, Gourley Lake. 

Waco, Holloway Lake. 

Oak Lake. 

Turner’s lake. 

Waller, Ellis Pond. 

• Walnut Springs, Smitham’s lake 
Waxahachie, Bell Branch Lake. 

Bullard’s lake. 

- Davis’s lake. 

Katy Fishing Club 

Lake. 

Spalding Lake.... 
West End Lake... 
Weatherford, Briten Branch.... 

Hammond Lake.. 

Webbs, La Zeta Pond. 

Weinert, Edwards Lake. 

Lake Creek Tank. 

West, McClellan Lake. 

Wetmore, Classen’s pond. 

Wichita Falls, Woodall’s pond.. 
Wills Point, McKinney Lake... 

Winsboro, Harris’spond. 

Wortham, Hardy Gin Lake- 

Yoakum, Mergenthal Pond. 

Shampaign’s lake. 

Zulch, Zulch Lake. 


10 

10 

20 

20 

150 
150 
300 
100 
200 
900 [ 
100 
500 
100 
400 
100 
100 
100 
100 
150 
100 
300 
200 
300 
300 
100 
400 
50 
800 
200 
200 

500 

475 

485 

50 

2,300 

400 

150 

750 

400 

50 

300 

100 

20 

150 

100 

200 

150 


Utah: 

Centerville, Perkins’ pond. 

Ogden, Brigham Pond. 

Virginia: 

Alleghany, Dunlap Creek. 

Ashland, Ashland Park Pond... 

King Pond. 

Atlee, Cross Creek Pond. 

Blackstone, Webb’s pond. 

Bristol, Columbian Paper Co.’s 


reservoir. 

Broad Run, Broad Run. 

Brookneal, Falling Creek. 

Buffalo Junction, Aarons Creek. 

Hites Pond... 

Pools Pond... 

Watkins Mill 

Pond. 

Callaghan, Dunlop Creek. 

Potts Creek. 

Chatham, Crystal Lake. 

Hedrick’s pond. 

Church Road, Burnt Quarter 

Pond. 

Claremont, Snyder’s pond. 

Clarksville, Grassy Creek. 

Island Creek. 

Lewis’s lake. 


3,000 


1,000 


1,000 

1,000 


2.000 

1,000 

2,000 


100 

200 

300 

75 

75 

100 

150 

200 

75 

250 


250 

250 

250 

400 

400 


200 


Virgin ia—Continued. 

Clarkton, Staunton River Lake. 

Cobham, Cobham Park Pond.. 

Cohoke,- Cohoke Club Pond. J . 

Cologne, Bland’s pond.}. 

Craigsville, Campbell Pond.|. 

Culpeper, Smith Run Pond- j . 

Danville, Dan River.I 1,000 

Drakes Branch, Twitty Creek.. . 

Drewryville, Drewry Mill Pond j. 

Pope’s pond.I. 

East Lexington, North River | 

Pond.. 

Elmont, Chickahominy Mill I 

Pond.. 

Evington, Haden Branch.. 

Farmville, Bolling’s pond. 

Richardson’s pond. 

Fishers Hill, Shenandoah River . 

Fredericksburg, Corenty Pond. 

Rappahannock 
River. 


Gordonsville, Atkinson’s pond. .. 

Harrisonburg, Dry River. 

Linville Cree k 

I.ake. 

North River. 

Hollins, Carvins Creek. 

Hot Springs, Jackson River. 

Hunters, Little Hunting Creek. . 

Heswick, C'nristan’s pond.. 

La Crosse, Meherrin River. 

Lawrenceville, Great Creek. 

Meherrin River. . 

Rose Creek. 

lawyers, Leech’s pond. 

Leesburg, Goose Creek. 

Potomac River. 

Limeton, Shenandoah River, 

South Branch. 

Louisa, Kent Mill Pond. 

Lynchburg,Odd FellowsHome 

Lake..... 

Martinsville, Smith River. 

Moseley Junction,Oak Hill Pond 

Mt. Jackson, Mill Creek. 

Shenandoah River. . 
Shenandoah River, 
North Branch... . 

Smith Creek. 

Natural Bridge, Buflalo Creek.. . 

Nelson, Aarons Creek. 

New Castle, Craig Creek. 

Johns Creek. 

Newport News, Jordan’s lake... 

Norfolk, Lake Modoc. 

North River, North River. 

Nottaway, Robertson’s pond... 
Oak Ridge, Oak Ridge Pond.... 

Occoquan, Metzger’s pond. 

Occoquan River. 

Wells Pond. 

Overall, Shenandoah River ... 
Oyster Point, Oyster Point 

Pond. 

Youngs Mill Pond 
Pamplin City, Bakers Mill Pond 
Calhoun Pond... 
Rossers Mill 

Pond. 

Penola, Mataponi Pond. 

Petersburg, Brandon Pond. 

Cains Mill Pond.... 

Daniels Pond. 

Kutchan Pond. 

Lake Ferndale Park 
West End Park 

Lake. 

Rapidan, Taliaferro Lake. 


2,000 


3,000 


1,000 


3,000 


5,000 


500 

100 

75 

75 

75 

350 


350 

250 

250 


200 

75 

200 

250 

200 

200 

40 

80 

300 

100 

100 

100 


400 

150 

75 


300 

300 

250 


50 

200 

300 

100 

700 


100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

250 

125 

250 

250 

125 

200 

100 

125 

500 

40 

80 

40 

300 

200 

200 

250 

250 

250 

SO 

200 

200 

75 

75 

75 

150 

150 






















































































































































































100 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Virginia—Continued. 

Richmond, Broad Lock Pond.. 

Bryan Pond. 

Dead Creek Pond... 

Falling Creek. 

Flat Rock Pond.... 
Fulton Club Pond.. 

Garlick Pond. 

Lakeside Pond. 

Licking Creek Pond 
MacGregor Hall 

Pond. 

Newman Pond. 

Powhite Pond. 

Providence Forge 

Pond. 

Reservoir Lake. 

Spring Pond. 

Rockfish, Hardwick Lake. 

Plain view Pond. 

Shawen’s pond. 

Rocky Mound, Furnace Creek.. 

Big River. 

Roxbury, Etna Mill Pond. 

Rural Retreat, Scott’s pond. 

Salem, Roanoke River. 

Saxe, Charlotte Pond. 

Shipman, Oak Ridge Pond. 

Soudan, Grass Creek. 

South Boston, Butram Creek... 

Dan River. 

Strasburg, Shenandoah River... 

Shenandoah River, 

West Fork. 

Stuart, Mayo River. 

Swords Creek, Clinch River. 

Sycamore, Hunt Mill Pond. 

Tappahannock, Mornington 

Lake.1 

Timber Ridge, North River. 

Urbanna, Jackson Mill Pond 

Victoria, Abilene Reservoir. 

Victoria Reservoir. 

Village, Smithers Mill Pond.... 
Virginia Beach, Lake Christine.. 
Wadesville, Opequan Creek.... 

Wakefield, Brittle’s pond. 

Walkerford, James River. 

Walkers Station, Vaidens Mill 

Pond. 

Warren, Ballinger Creek. 

Waterlick, Shenandoah River... 

Weems, Carter Creek. 

Winchester, Back Creek. 

Hogue Creek. 

Woodstock, Shenandoah River, 

North Branch. 

W ytheville, Reed Creek. 

Washington: 

Anacortes, Lake Campbell. 

Paso Lake. 

Medical Lake, Clear Lake. 

Silver Lake. 

Montesano, Lake Neuwatzel.... 

Newport, Casey Lake. 

Tacoma, Madrona Lake. 

West Virginia: 

Belva, Peters Creek. 

Bretz, Deckers Creek. 

Caddell, Cheat River. 

Capon Springs, Great Cacapon 

River. 

Chapmansville, Guyandotte 

River. 

Charleston, Elk River. 

Elm Grove, Big Wheeling 

Creek. 

Fairmont, Monongahela River. . 

Tygarts Valley River 


Fry. 


1,000 

2,000 


3,000 


2,000 

2,000 


3,000 


Finger- 

lings. 

Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

1,000 

1,000 

West Virginia—Continued. 


400 



150 

1,000 



400 

1,500 

1,000 



1,150 

Little Falls, Monongahela River 


400 

1,500 

1,000 

100 


200 

Monongahela 


G40 

1,000 



1,000 

200 



1,000 



400 

1,000 

1,000 



400 



80 

1,000 

Romney, Potomac River, South 


560 

100 



400 

100 

Springfield, Potomac River, 


300 

100 



400 

100 



1,400 

200 

Weston, Monongahela River, 


600 

250 



400 

2,000 

200 

Wisconsin: 


500 

225 



600 

100 



400 



150 

200 



400 

300 



400 

75 



200 



200 

75 



200 

350 



300 

200 



500 

250 



250 



300 

200 



300 

250 

200 



250 

Fairchild, Eau Claire River, 


400 




800 

100 



1,668 

400 

300 



200 



200 

100 



400 

400 



600 



600 

400 



500 

100 



250 

75 



300 

200 



400 

200 



200 

200 



300 

100 

Hillsboro, Baraboo River, South 


250 

350 



400 



400 

400 

300 

Trempealeau 


500 

400 



4,666 
1,200 

400 



300 



1,000 

250 



200 

200 



200 



400 

150 



400 

4,000 

4,000 



300 



200 



200 

900 



400 



200 

240 



200 

200 



200 



200 

400 



200 

400 



400 

400 

Herbert Lake. 


200 




























































































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
- LARGE-MOUTH BLACK BASS—Continued. 


101 


Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Disposition. 

Fry. 

Finger- 

lings. 

Wisconsin — Continued. 



W isconsin—Continued. 





400 



450 



400 



800 



200 



300 



400 



200 



500 



400 



300 



300 



400 






400 



250 



400 



400 



200 



166 



250 



500 



600 






800 



500 



500 









125 



4,250 

Shoshoni, Big Horn River. 


400 



400 




Sheboygan Falls, Sheboygan 


Total a . 

56,600 

665,868 

River. 


250 





a Lost in transit, 25,135 fingerlings. 
SUNFISH (BREAM). 


Disposition. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


Alabama: 

Gordo, Hannah’s pond. 

Haleyville, Haleyville Pond. 

Hodges, Strifel’s pond. 

Kennedy, Savage’s pond. 

Reform,' Harper’s pond. 

Sulligent, Maddox’s pond. 

Tuscumbia, Tuscumbia Spring. 

Vance, Lawrence’s pond. 

Arkansas: 

Greenwood, Saling’s pond. 

Harrison, Bates’s pond. 

Helena, Mississippi River. 

Hope, Brandon’s pond. 

. Johnson’s pond. 

Little Rock, Asylum Pond. 

Mammoth Springs, Mammoth Springs. 

Marshall, Horton’s pond... 

Nashville, Mine Creek. :.. 

Reese’s pond.. . 

Whelen, Edmond’s pond. 

Connecticut: 

Leonard Bridge, Hop River. 

Seymour, Beecher’s pond. 

Florida: 

Ehren, Floral Lake. 

Tampa, Saddle Bag Lake. 

Georgia: 

Adel, Beaver Dam Bay. 

Saddlebag Pond. 

Americus, Mountain Creek Pond. 

Ashburn, Clear Pond. 

Fitzgerald’s pond. 

Atlanta, Moccasin Lake. 

Blue Ridge, Carter’s pond. 

Chamblee, Jones’s pond. 

Charing, Branch Pond. 

Clarkesville, Edward’s pond. 

Hazel Creek. 

Clayton, Justus’s pond. 

Collins, Jarriel’s pond. 

Wilson’s pond. 

Wrenn’s pond. 


100 

125 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

125 

150 

150 

83,665 

100 

100 

100 

200 

150 

250 

100 

100 

600 

300 

100 

100 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

110 

120 

25 

50 

100 

150 

125 

50 

50 

50 


Disposition. 


Finger- 

lings, 

vear- 

iings, 

and 

adults. 


Georgia—Continued. 

Cuthbert, Nochaway Creek. 

Wade’s pond. 

Ellavi le, Murray’s pond. 

Ellabelle, Tony Branch. 

Flint, Stegall’s lake. 

Forsythe, Bessie Tift Lake. 

Jackson’s pond. 

Garfield, Oglesby’s pond. 

Glennville, De Loach's pond. 

Lewis’s pond. 

Graymont, Cowert’s pond..... 

Wetherford’s pond. 

Halcyondale, Simmons’s pond. 

Junction City, Carlisle’s pond. 

Moore’s pond. 

Leesburg, Kinchatoonee Creek. 

Macon, Biarly Lodge Pond. 

Recreation Club Lake. 

Manchester, Manchester Pond. 

Marshallville, Grisolm Spring Pond .... 

Outing Club Pond. 

Rumple’s pond. 

Mayfield, Long’s pond. 

Millen, Buckhead Creek. 

Ogeechee River. 

Munnerlyn, Rosemary Creek. 

Rupert, Bodiford’s pond. 

Scarboro, Ogeechee River. 

Smithville, Kinchatoonee Creek. 

Muckalee Creek. 

Stillmore, Cannochee Pond. 

Stinson, Lake Benson. 

Summit, Bowie’s pond. 

Brown’s pond. 

Cowart’s pond. 

Spring Branch Pond. 

Turner’s pond. 

Sylvester, Pope’s pond. 

Talbotton, Maxwell’s pond—. 

Parker’s pond. 

Silver Lake. 

Wilson’s pond. 


100 

50 

100 

200 

400 

50 

50 

100 

50 

50 

100 

100 

50 

50 

50 

100 


100 

100 

100 

100 

200 

200 

100 

100 

50 

100 

100 

100 

100 

225 

100 

100 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 


59395°—11-10 









































































































































102 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details of Distribution 


of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


SUNFISH (BREAM)—Continued. 


Disposition. 


G eorgia—Continued. 

Tennille, Boatright’s pond. 

The Rock, Stafford’s pond. 

Tifton, Purdy’s pond. 

Ty Ty, Parks’s pond. 

Vienna, Lane’s pond. 

Wade, Brinson’s pond. 

Illinois: 

Belleville, Gauss’s lake. 

Rheins’s lake. 

Olney, Olney Reservoir. 

Indiana: 

Borden, Koerber’s pond. 

Spring Pond. 

Bristol, Newman’s pond. 

Carbon, Harrold’s pond. 

Chrisney, Oak Hill Pond. 

Dubois, Silver Pond. 

Edinburg, Spring Lake. 

Fairmount, Little’s pond. 

Manzanita Lake. 

Farmersburg, Lewis’s pond. 

Kewanna, Bruce Lake. 

1 Lima, Still Lake. 

Madison, Big Creek. 

New Albany, Old Cave Pond. 

- Ossian, Willow Pond. 

Silver Lake, Silver Lake. 

Veedersburg, Coal Creek. 

Iowa: 

Casey, Spring Lake. 

Cumberland, Hawthorn Lake. 

Fort Madison, Green Bay. 

Lime Springs, Upper Iowa River. 

North McGregor, Mississippi River. 

Underwood, Geise’spond. 

Kansas: 

Grenola, Cana River. 

Kentucky: 

Beard, Cypress Pond. 

Elizabethtown, Heady’s pond.... 

Eminence, Boyne’s pond. 

Helbum’s pond. 

Glasgow, Fallen Timber Creek. 

Grays, Lynn Camp Pond. 

Louisville, Lake Lansdowne. 

Saxton, Beech’s pond. 

Sonora, Ireland’s pond. 

Louisiana: 

Bogalusa, Bogalusa Pond. 

Homer, Gladney’s pond. 

Spring "Lake. 

Ruston, Pugh’s pond. 

Scotland, Scotland Plantation Lake.... 
Maryland: 

Bel Air, Barnes Run. 

Chevy Chase, Locust Lake. 

Landover, Oak Hill Pond. 

Mountain Lock, Potomac River. 

Massachusetts: 

Plymouth, King’s pond. 

West Pond. 

Minnesota: 

Brownsville, Mississippi River. 

Smiley, Pelican Lake. 

Mississippi: 

Blue Mountain, Simmons’ pond. 

Booneville, Gin Pond. 

Brookhaven, Applewhite’s pond. 

Brooksville, Dixie Pond. 

Peterson’s pond. 

Centreville, Dick’s pond. 

Willow Lake. 

Collins, Mayfield’s pond. 

Columbus, Fig Pond. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

Disposition. 

Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

100 

Mississippi—Continued. 

Corinth, Pound’s pond. 

100 

50 

Rilla Pond. 

100 

50 

Waukomis Lake. 

100 

50 

Crenshaw, Berk’s pond. 

100 

50 

Mitchell’s pond. 

100 

50 

Durant, McDonald’s pond. 

100 


Enterprise, Kamper’spond. 

100 

200 

Gandsi, Spring Pond. 

100 

100 

Hazelhurst, Harrison’s pond. 

100 

100 

Heidelberg, Vernon’s pond. 

Hickory, White Oak Pond. 

100 


100 

100 

Houston, Knox’s pond. 

100 

100 

Jackson, Spring Lake. 

Willow Pond. 

100 

100 

ino 

300 

Laurel, Park Lake. 

150 

100 

Liberty, Ball’s pond. 

100 

100 

Lockhart, Harbour’s pond. 

100 

300 

McDonald, Ingram’s pond. 

100 

100 

Macon, Boswell’s pond. 

1.50 

100 

Eiland’s pond. 

150 

200 

Howard’s lake. 

125 

400 

Stuart’s pond. 

100 

200 

Meridian, Bailey’s pond. 

100 

350 

College Lake. 

100 

100 

Miller’s pond. 

200 

100 

Suttle’s pond. 

350 

100 

New Albany, Stroud’s pond. 

100 

800 

Nicholson, Gentry’s pond. 

100 


Okolona, Colburn’s pond. 

200 

200 

Quitman, Lake Ruth. 

100 

100 

McNair’s pond. 

100 

1,100 

Sessums, Perkins' pond. 

100 

4,500 

Sherwood, Norris’ pond. 

100 

73,250 

Shuqualak, Adams’ lake. 

150 

100 

Wigwam Lake. 

150 


Strongs, Lake Bolivar. 

100 

200 

Spring Creek. 

100 


Williams’ pond. 

100 

100 

Summit, Hillside Pond. 

200 

100 

Willow Pond. 

150 

100 

Taylorsville, Robinson’s pond. 

100 

100 

Tishomingo, Holley’s lake. 

Tupelo, Hill’s pond. 

150 

150 

200 

400 

Van Vleet, Arnett Place Pond. 

250 

300 

Hickory Grove Pond. 

100 

400 

Waynesboro, Dyess Mill Pond. 

100 

150 

Oakland Pond. 

100 


Patten’s creek. 

100 

300 

Taylor’s lake. 

100 

100 

Wilkins Mill Pond. 

100 

100 

West Point, Dunlap’s lake. 

400 

100 

Ivy’s pond. 

400 

200 

Trout Lake. 

100 


Whittaker, Whittaker’s pond. 

150 

1.50 

Yazoo City, Hicks’ pond. 

100 

400 

Missouri: 


250 

Arlington, Lukrofka’s pond. 

400 

5,600 

Conway, Thomas’ pond. 

200 

Marquand, Clubb’s pond. 

200 

300 

Nebraska: 


300 

Cheney, Variety Grove Farm Pond.... 

100 

17,300 

Nevada: 

Ely, Olsen’s lake. 

150 

500 

New Mexico: 



Deming, Harris’s pond. 

150 

100 

Elida, Mesa Lake. 

100 

100 

North Carolina: 


100 

Aberdeen, Bonnie Brier Pond. 

75 

100 

Sand Hill Branch Pond. 

300 

150 

Angier, Matthews’ pond. 

150 

150 

Concord, Clark Creek. 

225 

150 

Springville Pond. 

150 

125 

Fayetteville, Pine Lake. 

450 

300 

Franklinton, Dickerson Mill Pond. 

75 

4 















































































































































103 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 

Details op Distribution op Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 
SUNFISH (BREAM)—Continued. 


Disposition. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


Disposition. 


Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


North Carolina-Continued. 

Franklinton, Green Hill Pond. 

Spring Branch. 

Whiteside Pond. 

Williams’s ponds. 

Gastonia, Crawford’s pond. 

Lake Giles. 

Payes Lake. 

Spencer’s lake. 

Glen Alpine, Silver Creek Pond. 

Gold Hm, Second Creek. 

Graham, Graham Country Club Pond.. 

Guilford College, Ash Pond. 

Hendersonville, Lake Osceola. 

Lake West. 

Rhett’s pond. 

High Point, Willard’s pond. 

Landis, Codie Creek Pond. 

Landrum, Green way’s pond. 

Hughes’ pond. 

Lexington, Bock’s pond. 

Hargrave’s pond. 

Liberty, Cane Creek Pond. 

Thompson’s pond. 

Lilesville, Dockery’s pond. 

Island Creek. 

Mill Brook, Pineridge Pond. 

Morgantown, McDowell’s pond. 

Morven, Hamville Pond. 

Mill Pond. 

Spring Pond. 

Pinnacle, Culler’s pond. 

Pittsboro, Four Springs Pond. 

Hail borne Pond. 

Petty’s pond. 

Raleigh, Country Club Lake. 

Lynn’s pond. 

Rockingham, Dog Branch Pond. 

Ronda, Bugaboo Pond.. . 

Little Elkin Pond. 

Rutherfordton, Broad River Pond. 

Salisbury, Cauble’s pond. 

Glover’s pond. 

Smithfield, Pou’s pond. 

Southside, Rhyne’s pond... 

Wake Forest, Allen’s pond. 

Bobbitt’s pond. 

Dickson’s pond. 

Harrison’s pond. 

Maltonia Club Pond. 

Moore’s ponds. 

Spring Pond. 

Wilbon, Neill’s pond. 

Wilkesboro, Roberson’s pond. 

Winston-Salem, Holton’s pond. 

Youngsville, Alexander’s pond. 

North Dakota: 

Devils Lake, Devils Lake. 

Granville, Buffalo Lodge Lake. 

Oriska, Beyer’s pond. 

St. John, Clear Lake. 

Hooker’s lake. 

Lake Alexander. 

Lake Nemo. 

Waukipa Lake. 

Ohio: 

Ada, Hubbell’s pond. 

Gallipolis, Safford’s pond. 

Hebron, Buckeye Lake. 

Orbiston, Orbiston Pond. 

Perry, Shady Nook Pond. 

Rarden, Taylor’s pond. 

Rossmoyne, Taylor’s pond. 

Sharonville, Schatzle’s pond.- 

Tippecanoe City, Kessler’s pond-... 


75 

75 

75 

150 

75 

225 

150 

300 

75 

150 

225 

75 

000 

300 

150 

75 

75 

75 

150 

175 

75 

75 

75 

225 

225 

210 

100 

75 

150 

150 

75 

225 

75 

150 

300 

75 

75 

150 

150 

75 

175 

125 

150 

75 

75 

100 

100 

100 

150 

300 

100 

225 

75 

75 

75 

1,000 

300 

70 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

100 

100 

000 

100 

400 

100 

100 

100 

X00 


Oklahoma: 

Ardmore, City Lake. 

Dyer Lake. 

Reed’s lake. 

Santa Fe Lake. 

Asher, Merrill’s pond. 

Salt Creek Ponds . 

Doxey, Topper’s pond . 

Elk City, Hughes’s lake. 

Hugo, Wright’s pond. 

Pryor, Miller’s pond. 

Stuart, Coal Creek. 

Tyrone, Crites’s pond. 

Pennsylvania-. 

Canonsburg, Neill’s pond. 

Danville, Susquehanna River. 

Hanover, Little Conewago Creek. 

Huntingdon, Raystown Branch. 

Icedale, Brandywine Creek. 

New Bethlehem, Leatherwood Creek... 

Palm, Hosenack Creek Lake. 

Perkiomen Creek. 

Reading, Maiden Creek. 

Tulpehocken Creek. 

Shoemakersviile, Dreibelbis Creek. 

Moyer Creek. 

Temple, Ahren’s pond . 

Bernhart’s lake. 

Weissport, Big Creek. 

Windber, Ice Company Pond. 

York, Spring Lake. 

South Carolina: 

Aiken, Bridge Creek Pond. 

Johnson’s pond. 

Shaw’s pond. 

Thorpe’s pond. 

Belton, Williams’s pond . 

Bethune, Bell Branch Pond. 

Blacksburg, Parris’s pond. 

Blaney, Crystal Lake. 

Borden, Pollard Mill Pond. 

Camden, Boykin’s pond . 

McLeod’s pond . 

Central, Arnold’s pond . 

Holcomb’s pond . 

Chester, Dry Fork Pond . 

Columbia, Cayce’s pond . 

GilbCreek . 

Messer’s pond . 

Mill Creek Pond . 

Poplar Branch Pond. 

Cope, Fogle’s pond. .. 

Cordova, Smoak’s pond . 

Fort Mill, Spring Pond . 

Gaffney, Parker’s pond . 

Turner’s pond . 

Graniteville, Power House Pond . 

Greenville, Houston’s pond . 

Maple Creek Pond . 

Greenwood, Logan Branch . 

Moore Branch Pond . 

Spring Pond . 

Hartsville, Beaver Dam Pond . 

Prestwood Pond . 

Honea Path, Big Spring Pond. 

Broadmouth Creek . 

Kay’s pond. 

Knight’s pond . 

Little River . 

Johnston, Brimson’s pond . 

Butler’s pond . 

Calhoun’s pond . 

Hilliard’s pond . 

Hollingsworth’s pond . 

Lott’s pond. .. 


300 

200 

100 

300 

100 

125 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 


300 

1,250 

150 

200 

300 

500 

200 

200 

300 

300 

200 

200 

200 

200 

300 

200 

100 

150 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

75 

100 

100 

100 

200 

50 

50 

75 

200 

200 

200 

200 

100 

100 

75 

75 

75 

75 

75 

150 

75 

75 

75 

75 

100 

100 

100 

175 

150 

75 

100 

10C 

75 

75 

100 

75 

75 

























































































































































104 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
SUNFISH (BREAM)—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

South Carolina—Continued. 


Johnston, Spring Branch. 

75 

Ward Creek Pond. 

100 

Kershaw, Horton’s pond. 

75 

Kinards, Oxner’s pond. 

75 

Lancaster, Steele’s pond. 

75 

Wildcat Pond. 

75 

Laney, Robeson’s pond. 

100 

Langley, Little Horse Creek Pond. 

250 

McCormick, Britt’s pond. 

• 75 

Spring House Pond. 

75 

Spring Pond. 

100 

Macedon, Bogy Pond. 

100 

Newberry, Kings Creek. 

100 

North Augusta, Big Branch Pond. 

100 

North, White’s pond. 

100 

Orangeburg, Gue’s pond. 

50 

Pageland, Hicks’s pond. 

100 

Perry, Piney Branch Pond. 

125 

Pickens, Colony Pond. 

50 

Oolong Pond. 

75 

Rock Hill, Mill Pond. 

100 

Ruby, Oliver’s pond. 

100 

Salley, Branch Pond. 

150 

Seneca, Langston’s pond. 

50 

Shoals Junction, Dunn’s pond. 

100 

Simpsonville, Rocky Creek Pond. 

75 

Strother, McMahan’s pond. 

50 

Trenton, Hughes’s pond. 

100 

Horn Creek. 

75 

Hunt Creek Pond. 

100 

Marsh’s pond. 

100 

Raus’s pond. 

75 

Shaws Creek Pond. 

75 

Webb’s pond. 

75 

Union, Buffalo Mill Pond. 

100 

Municipal Reservoir. 

100 

Wagner, Dean Swamp Pond. 

75 

Walhalla, Bauknight’s pond. 

75 

Burley’s pond. 

75 

Oconee pond. 

75 

Todd’s pond. 

75 

Verner’spond . 

75 

Willington, Ariail’s pond. 

75 

Covin’s pond. 

75 

Gilbert’s pond. 

75 

Le Roy’s pond. 

75 

Little River. 

100 

Winnsboro, Freight’s pond. 

50 

Haynes’s pond. 

75 

Woodruff, Chumley’spond... 

75 

Ferguson Creek. 

50 

AVatson’s pond. 

75 

Yorkville, Smith’s pond. 

75 

South Dakota: 


Hitchcock, Cramer’s pond. 

100 

Scenic, Knutson’s pond. 

425 

Tennessee: 


Butler, Cable’s pond. 

175 

Concord, Turkey Creek Lake. 

200 

Cookeville, Clause’s pond. 

225 

Cumberland Gap, Holly Hill Pond. 

200 

Lambert’s pond. 

200 

Johnson City, Aspen Bower Take. 

500 

Knoxville, Little River. 

75 

Maryville, Housholder’s pond.... 

200 

Tate Springs, Kirkham’s"pond. 

75 

Tate Springs Reservoir.. 

150 

AVautauga Point, Buffalo Creek. 

500 

AA'hitesburg, Shields’s pond. 

75 

Texas: 


Amarillo, Famous Heights Park Lake.. 

50 

Big Springs, Davis’s pond. 

35 

Fisher’s pond. 

35 

Blum. Klondike Lake. 

100 I 


Disposition. 


Finger- 

lings, 

yew- 

lings, 

and 

adults. 


Texas—Conti nued. 

Brady, Lime Oak Creek. 

Brazos, Blucher’s pond. 

Carbon, Pierce’s pond... 

Carthage, Hill’s lakes. 

Cisco, Lake Borine. 

Clifton, Manske’s pond. 

Comanche, Highland Lake. 

De Leon, Spring Pond. 

Elkhart, Elkhart Lake. 

Eskota, Kurth’s pond. 

Fort Worth, Davie Bums Lake. 

Friona, Mayflower Pond. 

Gorman, King’s pond. 

Lusk’s pond. 

Gordon, Chenault’s pond. 

Horlin’s pond. 

Graham, Oak Grove Pond. 

Grand Saline, Brown’s pond. 

Jacksonville, Belva Lake. 

Kaufman, Holler Pond. 

Kemp, Trinity Lake. 

Lindale, Mill Creek Pond. 

Llano, Doel’spond. 

Lytle, Carter’s pond. 

Mabank, Grubb’s pond. 

Manor, Johnson’s reservoir. 

Marlin, Clark’s pond.. 

Marshall, Lake Ferns. 

Lake Katrine. 

Walker’s lake. 

Merkel, Count’s pond. 

Nacogdoches, Mamie Ross Lake. 

Rockdale, Coffield’spond. 

Randle’s lake. 

Rotan, Hunter’s pond. 

Saginaw, Beall’s pond. 

Santo, Miller’s pond. 

Terrell, McCord’s pond... 

Renfro Creek Lake. 

' Toyah, Humphries’s pond.... 

Tuxedo, Davis’s lake. 

Tye, Worthington Lake. 

Tyler, Country Club Lake. 

Lake Park. 

Lake W ood. 

Walnut Springs, Smitham’s lake. 

Wichita, Railroad Pond. 

Winnsboro, Baker’s pond. 

Spring Lake. 

Virginia: 

Biealeton, Old Gum Spring Pond. 

Beaver Dam, Thompson’s pond.. 

Belmont Park, Goose Creek. 

Charlottesville, New Reservoir. 

Cumberland, Burleighhall Pond.. 

Dillwyn, Fitzgerald’s pond. 

Disputants, Belsches’spond. 

Drewrys Bluff , Spring Lake. 

Dungamon, Kilgore’s pond. 

East Lexington, North River Pond.... 

Evington, Irvine's pond. 

Farmville, Agee’s pond. 

Gladys, Maple Pond. 

Gordonsville, Oak Hill Pond. 

Orange, Mill Creek Pond...,. 

Pennington Gap, Hickory Flats Pond.. 

Petersburg, Belscher’s pond. 

Shipman, Mountain Pond. 

Spout Springs, Poplar Pond. 

Staunton, Gypsy Hill Lake. 

Trotitville, Alderson’s pond. 

Troy, Poplar Grove Pond. 

Wihton, Brown’s pond. 

Warrenton. Cedar Run. 


75 

30 

30 

50 

100 

50 

25 

100 

200 

50 

50 

30 

60 

30 

50 

30 

20 

30 

200 

30 

100 

100 

40 

30 

30 

20 

50 

300 

50 

50 

30 

300 

100 

40 

130 

50 

50 

25 

25 

50 

100 

40 

200 

200 

200 

100 

60 

20 

150 

150 

125 

350 

225 

125 

125 

125 

125 

450 

100 

200 

250 

200 

400 

125 

200 

400 

125 

150 

125 

150 

125 

200 

100 




























































































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


105 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs — Continued. 
SUNFISII (BREAM)—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

Disposition. 

Finger- 

lings, 

year¬ 

lings, 

and 

adults. 

Virginia—Continued. 


Wisconsin—Continued. 


Warren ton, Forest Branch Pond. 

Washington: 

150 

Independence, New City I ond. 

La Crosse, Mississippi River. 

200 

21,468 


300 


300 

West Virginia: 

Prairie du Chien, Mississippi River. 

58,250 

Bedington, Emerson’s pond. 

500 

Victory, Mississippi River. 

1,666 

Weston, Walnut Fork Pond. 

200 

Wyoming: 


Wisconsin: 


Sheridan, Cut-Off Pond. 

150 

Genoa, Mississippi River. 

4,166 
300 


342,825 




a Lost in transit, 2,810 fingerlings. 


PIKE PERCH. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Arkansas: 


50,000 

400,000 







800 

Connecticut: 


500.000 

Illinois: 

8,000,000 



930,000 
1,260,000 
1,260,000 

800,000 
1,000,000 
1,200,000 
1,000,000 
1,500,000 
1,500,000 

750,000 
600,000 
300,000 
400,000 
400,000 
400,000 
250,000 
200,000 

400,000 

800,000 
1,500,000 
800,000 
800,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
800,000 
1,500,000 
1,000,000 

400,000 

1,000,000 

800,000 

500,000 

600,000 

500.000 

1,200,000 
4,500,000 
500,000 
540,000 








Indiana: 


















Iowa: 
























Kansas: 



Kentucky: 



























Massachusetts: 


















Michigan:. 













34,280,000 


Edwardsburg, Eagle Lake. 

975,666 
































































































































106 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


PIKE PERCH—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Michigan—Continued. 

Hale Lake, Hale Lake. 


500,000 
800,000 
600,000 
800,000 
1,000,000 
1,200,000 
360,000 

540,000 

500,000 


Loon Lake. 



Lincoln, Brownlee Lake.. 



Millersburg, Barnhart Lakes. 



Paw Paw, Maple Lake. 



St. Joseph', Lake Chapin. 



Witch Lake, Horse Shoe Lake. 



Minnesota: 

Alexandria, Lake Geneva. 



Big Lake, Big Lake. . 



Brownsville, Mississippi River. 


1,730 

Chub Lake, Chub Lake. 


400,000 

600,000 

720,000 

400.000 
400,000 

Hanging Horn Lake, Hanging Horn Lake. 



Mankato, Lake Washington .“. 



Missouri: 

Crocker, Gasconade River. 



Roubidoux Creek. 



St. Joseph, Missouri Fish Commission. 

2,000,000 


New Hampshire: 

Mountainview T , Ossipee Lake. 

1,000.000 
500,000 

700,000 

600,000 

600,000 

400,000 


Winchester, Forest Lake. 



New Jersey: 

Boonton, Rockaway River. 



New York: 

Addison, Canister River. 



Bliss, Eagle Lake. 



Lisle. Tioughnioga River. 



North Dakota: 

Cando, State Fish Commission. 

10,000,000 


Ohio: 

1,000,000 
1,000,000 
16,000,000 
16,000,000 
1,000,000 
475,000 
20,000,000 





Holliers Beach, Lake Erie. 






Lima, LimaXake. - . 



Port Clinton, Lake Erie. 



Put-in Bay, Lake Erie. 




170,725,000 


Toledo, Lake Erie.. 

10,000,000 

1,500,000 

400,000 

800,000 

600,000 


Upper Sandusky, Upper Sandusky River. 



Oklahoma: 

• Tahlequah, Illinois River. 



Pennsylvania: 






Erie, Pennsylvania Fish Commission._•. 

96,450,000 



700,000 
500,000 
700,000 
300,000 
700,000 
500,000 
800,000 
800,000 
200,000 
1,000,000 
500,000 
500,000 

800,000 
800,000 

800,000 

600,000 

800,000 

800,000 

11,000,000 

1,000,000 

1,000,000 

500,000 

800,000 

400,000 

500,000 


Goldsboro, Susquehanna River. 









New Milford, Upper Lake. 



Spruce Hill, TuscaroraCreek. 


. 

Susquehanna, Page Pond. 


Susquehanna River. 



Vicksburg, Armstrong Run. 



Wilkes-Barre, Nuangola Lake. 






York Haven, Susquehanna River. 



Soul h Dakota: 

Langford, Ninemile Lake. 



Sixmile Lake_.-. 



Tennessee: 

Springfield, Milldale Pond. 



Vermont: 



Ludlow, Plymouth Pond. 



Miles Pond, Miles Pond. 






West Danville, Joe’s pond. 



Virginia: 

Wytheville, Reed Creek. 



West Virginia: 






Wisconsin: 



Barronette, Deep Lake. 




































































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


107 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 


PIKE PERCH—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Wisconsin—Continued. 


800,000 
500,000 
800,000 










416 



400,000 
400,000 
400,000 
600,000 
400,000 
500,000 
720,000 
450,000 




W agner Lake. 




















2,148 



600,000 
2,500,000 
400,000 









166 



800,000 




321,455,000 

154,480,000 

5,260 




YELLOW PERCH. 


Colorado: 

La Jara, Laguna Escondida. 

Connecticut: 

Hadlyme, State Fish Commission.. 
Delaware: 

Wilmington, Brandywine Creek.... 
Illinois: 

Carbondale, Horse Shoe Lake_ 

Chicago, Armour’s pond. 

Otis’s pond. 

Eckerts, Deich’spond. 

Irving, Funk’s lake. 

Millstadt, Grossman’s pond. 

Shipman, Olmsted’s pond. 

Indiana: 

Angola, Walled Lake. 

Centerville, Kitterman’s pond. 

Edinburg, White River, East Fork. 

Lake Cicott, Lake Cicott. 

Lebanon, Saltmarsh Pond. 

Silver Lake, Silver Lake. 

Winchester, Summers’s pond.'. 

Iowa: 

Lime Springs, Upper Iowa River... 

McGregor, Lake Como. 

North McGregor, Mississippi River. 
Kansas: 

Pittsburg, Gibson Pond.:. 

Kentucky: 

Cropper, Dunavent’s pond.. 

Pollard’s pond. 

Louisville, Lake Lansdowne. 

Park View Lake. 

Woodbine, Lake Placid. 

Maryland: 

Accokeek Creek, Potomac River.... 
Baltimore, Patapsco River Pond... 

Bryans Point, Potomac River. 

Bush River, Bush River. 

Cecil, Chesapeake Bay. 

Chase, Dundee River. 

Freeland, South Lake. 

Gunpowder, Gunpowder River. 

Harford, Swan Creek.. 

Harmony Grove, Richfield Pond... 
Havre de Grace, Chesapeake Bay... 
Pamunkey Creek, Potomac River.. 
Piscataway Creek, Potomac River.. 
Principio, Chesapeake Bay. 


5,200,000 


800,000 


200 

900 

900 

100 

500 

300 

400 


200 

90 

200 

300 

75 

200 

100 

20 

900 

42,750 


66,117,500 


10,945,000 

2,400,000 

23,600,000 

600,000 


2 , 200,000 
9,500,000 
200,000 
12,600,000 
10,985,000 
64,887,500 
15,000,000 


100 

100 

100 

300 

100 

300 


150 


300 


a Lost in transit, 545,000 fry. 






































































































108 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details op Distribution op Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
YELLOW PERCH—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
arid adults. 

Maryland—Continued. 


5,915,000 
41,000,000 
400,000 







Massachusetts: 


400,000 


Michigan: 


400 

Minnesota: 7 



4,000 

200 




Missouri: 



100 

New Hampshire: 


400,000 

800,000 

New Jersey: 





200 



1,000.000 

1,000,000 






200,000 


New Mexico: 


219 

New York: 



2,000 



000,000 



150 



GOO, 000 
400,000 
200,000 





> 




200,0C0 
GOO, OCO 
000,000 










GOO, 000 


North Carolina: 


GO 




100 




100 




100 




100 




100 




100 




100 

North Dakota- 



1,000 

200 







175 

Ohio: 



70 

Oklahoma: 



70 




75 




50 




100 



150 




250 

Pennsylvania: 



120 




120 



GOO, 000 



425 



200,000 



GOO. OCO 




400,000 




125 



GOO, 000 




100 




325 



400,000 




150 




150 



1,000,000 




300 



600,000 




100 

South Carolina:*" 7 



120 

Denmark. Savannah Lake. 



180 







































































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 


109 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
YELLOW PERCH—Continued. 


Disposition. 

Eggs- 

Fry. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

South Carolina — Continued. 



00 




120 




00 




00 

South Dakota: 



000 

Vermont: 


300,000 
GOO, 000 
400,000 









500,000 




1,445 



800,000 

2,000,000 

Virginia: 





125 




200 



300,000 



20,080,000 




4.550,000 




10,205.000 
400,000 








250 




100 

Washington: 



500 

West Virginia: 



100 


1,000,000 


Wisconsin: 

300 



4,000 



600 

Prairie duChien, Mississippi River. 



37,750 


5,200,000 

,326,885,000 

1 

108,439 



a Lost in t ransit. 856 fingerlings. 


STRIPED BASS. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Maryland: 


115,000 

2,669,000 

North Carolina: 

4,566,000 

Total . 

4,506,000 

2,784,000 



WHITE BASS. 


Disposition. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Arkansas: 

5,950 

34 

33 

33 

Wisconsin: 




6,050 


































































































110 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 
WHITE PERCH. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Connecticut: 

Seymour, Hemp Swamp Pond. 


400,000 

2,400,000 

800,000 

2,000,000 
4,000,000 
122,450,000 
18,250,000 
66,800,000 
32,555,000 
5,150,000 
17,100,000 
37,750,000 
20,825,000 

400,000 
400,000 
400,000 
800,000 
400,000 

800,000 

400,000 

600,000 

600,000 

Delaware: 

Nassau, Red Mill Pond. 


Wilmington, Brandywine Creek. 


Maryland: 

Bush River Station, Bush River. 


Chase, Dundee Creek. 


Havre de Grace, Chesapeake Bay. 


Elk River... 


Susquehanna River. 


Hendersons Point, Elk River. 


Locust Point, Chesapeake Bay . 


Swan Creek, Chesapeake Bay".. 


Town Point, Elk River_. 


Wild Duck Harbor, Susquehanna River. 


Massachusetts: 

Gardner, Stoddard Meadow Pond. 


Tilton Pond. 


Whitman Pond. 


Leominster, Spectacle Pond. 


South Sudbury, Bright’s pond. 


New Hampshire: 

Baboosic, Baboosic Lake. 


Raymond, Pawtuckaway Lake. . 


Winchester, Forest Lake. 


New Jersey: 

Boonton, Dixson Pond. 


New York: 

Albany, Forest, Fish and Game Commission. 

15,000,000 

Lake Waccabuc, Waccabuc Lake. 

800,000 

600,000 

600,000 

Lewisboro, Trinity Lake. 


Middletown, Hennessey Lake. 



1,500,000 

Pennsylvania: 

Annville, Quittapahilla Creek. . 

400,000 

800,000 

Vermont: 

Montpelier, Groton Lake. 


Total. 


16,500,000 

338,480,000 


YELLOW BASS. 



Disposition. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Arkansas: 


250 




SEA BASS. 



Disposition. 

Fry. 

Massachusetts: 

Falmouth, Buzzards Bay. 

253,000 

555,000 



808,000 



MACKEREL. 


Massachusetts: 

Falmouth, Buzzards Bay. 

Great Harbor. 
Gosnold, Vineyard Sound 


388,000 
338,000 
38,000 


Total 


764,000 


































































DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910. 
Details op Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs— Continued. 


Ill 


FRESHWATER DRUM. 


Disposition. 

Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 

Arkansas: 

Helena, Mississippi River. 

8,950 

1,500 

1,500 

Iowa: 

North McGregor, Mississippi River. 

Wisconsin: 

Prairie du Chien, Mississippi River. 


Total. 

11,950 



COD. 


Disposition. 

Eggs. 

Fry. 

Maine: 


6,310,000 

4,304,000 

4,274,000 

38,658,000 

9,733,000 

22,510,000 

29,060,000 

9,305,000 

5,979,000 

44,423,000 

163,000 

4,630,000 

2,580,000 

862,000 

18,250,000 

9,060,000 

253,000 


* 



Massachusetts: 





9,854,000 




















Woods Hole, Eel Pond. 




9,854,000 

210,354,000 


HADDOCK. 

Disposition. 

Fry. 


Maine: 

Boothbay Harbor, Bootbbay Harbor. 


712,000 


POLLOCK. 


Disposition. 

Fry. 

Disposition. 

Fry. 

Massachusetts: 

Beverly, Massachusetts Bay. 

Gloucester, Atlantic Ocean. 

Ipswich Bay. 

Massachusetts Bay. 

1,330,000 
12,400,000 
1,180,000 
2,920,000 

Massachusetts — Continued. 

Manchester, Massachusetts Bay. 

Rockport, Atlantic Ocean. 

Total. 

14,510,000 
5,800,000 

38,140,000 





























































112 


DISTRIBUTION OF FISH AND FISH EGGS, 1910, 


Details of Distribution of Fish and Fish Eggs—C ontinued. 

FLATFISH. 


Disposition. 


Maine: 

Boothbay Harbor, Boothbay Harbor 

Linekin Bay. 

Mill Cove. 

Massachusetts: 

Beverly, Massachusetts Bay. 

Falmouth, Buzzards Bay. 

Great Harbor. 

Little Harbor. 

Quissett Harbor..... 

Gloucester, Annisquam River... 

Gloucester Harbor. 

Ipswich Bay. 

Gosnold, Buzzards Bay. 

Hadley Harbor. 

Lackey Bay. 

Robinson Hole. 

Tarpaulin Cove. 

Vineyard Sound. 


Maine: 

Biddeford Pool, Biddeford Pool Har¬ 
bor. 

Wood Isle Harbor .. 
Boothbay Harbor, Boothbay Har¬ 
bor. 

Bristol, Johns Bay. 

Brooklin, Naskeg Harbor. 

Camden, Camden Harbor. 

Cape Porpoise, Cape Porpoise Har¬ 
bor. 

Damariscotta, Damariscotta River.. 

Deer Isle, Eggemoggin Reach. 

Southwest Harbor. 

East Boothbay, Linekin Bay. 

Eastport, Broad Cove. 

Falmouth, Casco Bay. 

Frenchboro, Frenchboro Harbor.... 

Long Isle Harbor. 

Friendship, Friendship Harbor. 

Isleboro, Penobscot Bay. 

Isleford, Isleford Harbor. 

Isle of Shoals, Gulf of Maine. 

Isle of Shoals Harbor.. 

Piscataqua River. 

Jonesport, Roque Isle Harbor___ 

Kennebunk, Kennebunk Port Har¬ 
bor . 

Wells Bay. 

Kittery Point, Pepperals Cove. 

Little Deer Isle, Billings Cove. 

Lowry, Delanos Cove. 

Milbridge, Pigeon Hill Bay. 

Mount Desert, Bass Harbor. 

Southwest Harbor... 

New Harbor, New Harbor. 

North Haven, North Haven Harbor. 

Pulpit Harbor. 

Orrs Island, Lowells Cove. 

Pemaguid, Pemaquid Harbor. 

Port Clyde, Port Clyde Harbor. 

Portland, Casco Bay. 

Peaks Isle Roads. 

Portland Harbor. 

Prospect Harbor, Bunkers Harbor.. 

Dyers Bay. 

Rockland, Rockland Harbor. 

Rockport, Rockport Harbor. 

Small Point, Horse Isle Harbor. 

Small Point Harbor... 


Fry.' 

Disposition. 

380,176,000 

4,591.000 

17,398,000 

Massachusetts — Continued. 

Manchester, Massachusetts Bav. 

Monument Beach, Monument Beach 

18,210,000 

Provincetown, Provincetown Har- 

11,156,000 
6,138,000 



2,047.000 


6,579,000 
111,170,000 



109,540,000 
7,800,000 
21,783,000 
17,264,000 
12,328,000 

Woods Hole Harbor... 

Rhode Island: 

East Greenwich, East Greenwich 


7,063,000 
17.006,000 
18,810,000 





LOBSTERS. 



Maine—Continued. 

South Addison, Pleasant Bay. 

10,000,000 

South Hancock, Skillings River. 

2,000,000 

Southport, Atlantic Ocean. 

Cape Harbor. 

6,000,000 

Deckers Cove. 

3,000,000 
250.000 

Ebencook Harbor. 

St. George, Martins Harbor. 

1,000,000 

Stonington, St.onington Harbor. 

Surry, Union Bay. 

4,500,000 

Swan Isle, Old Harbor. 

500,000 

Tennants Harbor, Owls Head Bay.. 

500,000 

Vinal Haven, Vinal Haven Harbor.. 

400,000 

Wells Wells Bay. 

1,000,000 

WestLubec, Grand Manan Channel. 

5,250,000 

Winnegance, New Meadows River... 

4,000,000 

Winter Harbor, Winter Harbor. 

500,000 

York, York Harbor. 

1,500,000 

Massachusetts: 

3,500,000 

Bakers Island, Massachusetts Bay.. 

400.000 

Beverly, Massachusetts Bay. 

1,500,000 

Boston, Boston Bay. 

1,600,000 

Cohassett, Massachusetts Bay. 

1,000,000 

Falmouth, Buzzards Bay. 

400,000 

Quissett Harbor. 

650,000 

Vineyard Sound. 

Gloucester, Atlantic Ocean. 

500,000 

Gloucester Harbor. 

500,000 

Ipswich Bay. 

1,500,000 

Gosnold, Buzzards Bay.1 

200,000 

Cuttyhunk Harbor. 

3,000,000 

Hadley Harbor. 

2,000,000 

Lackeys Bay. 

1,000,000 

Vineyard Sound. 

500,000 

Lanesville, Ipswich Bay. 

3,500,000 

Manchester, Massachusetts Bay. 

1,500,000 

Marblehead, Boston Bay. 

1,000,000 

Rockport, Atlantic Ocean. 

500,000 

Rockport Harbor. 

3,500,000 

Swampscott Harbor, Massachusetts 

1,000,000 

5,000,000 


Woods Hole, Coles Pond.. 

3,500,000 

Great Harbor. 

2,500,000 

New Hampshire: 

3,000,000 

Stratford, Little New Harbor. 

12,000,000 

Oregon: 

3,000,000 

1,000,000 

Yaquina, Yaquina Bay. 

500,000 
2,106,000 

Total. 


Fry. 


01,020,000 


5,751,000 

4,678.000 

7,797,000 

5,080.000 

23,655.000 

4,142,000 

11,661,000 

6,090,000 


12,134,000 
13,254.000 
6,434,000 


930,755,000 


250,000 
2,000,000 
4,500.000 
1,500,000 
1,500.000 
500,000 
1,000,000 
500,000 
250,000 
500,000 
1,000,000 
3,000,000 
500.000 
350,000 
1,500,000 
500.000 
4,500,000 

300,000 
1,400,000 
3,700,000 
834,000 
493,000 
874,000 
341,000 
2,800,000 
600,000 
500,000 
2,721,000 
1,087,000 
827,000 
2,868,000 
6,165,000 
1,100,000 
2,800,000 
300,000 
600,000 
600,000 

200,000 
192,000 
1,097,000 


4.000,000 

ol,532 

162,505,000 


a Adults, of which 520 were lost in transit. 


































































































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF THE 
U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS DURING 
THE PHILIPPINE EXPEDITION, 1907-1910 


Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 741 


1 








DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF THE U. S. FISH¬ 
ERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS DURING THE PHILIP¬ 
PINE EXPEDITION, 1907-1910. 


The Philippine cruise of the Albatross covered a greater period of 
time than any single expedition previously undertaken by that vessel. 
The ship left San Francisco October 16, 1907, and, sailing by way of 
the Hawaiian Islands, Midway, and Guam, arrived at Manila Novem¬ 
ber 28. The stop at Midway, occasioned by a requisition of the 
vessel to carry stores from Honolulu to the United States marines 
stationed on Midway, was made the opportunity to take a small 
collection of the reef fishes and shore fauna of that group of islands. 
The number of fishes was very small, owing to the inability to carry 
enough explosive to do effective work, only 10 pounds of dynamite 
being allowed for use here and at Guam. Small collections were 
similarly made at this latter place when the ship stopped there for 
coal. 

A two months’ delay in the arrival of the stores which had been 
shipped from New York direct to Manila limited the vessel’s activity 
for that period to the immediate vicinity of Manila. Thereafter the 
work was done by a series of short cruises made to the different parts 
of the Archipelago with Manila as a base for supplies and the deposit 
of collections. 

During the period between February 2 and June 9, 1908, cruises 
were made to the southward, the first along the southwest side of 
Mindanao, thence through the Sulu groups, extending as far as 
Sandakan, Borneo; the second through the central group, including 
Panay, Negros, Cebu, Leyte, Masbate, and Marinduque; the third 
about the east and southeast coasts of Mindanao. 

After the return to Manila from the last of these cruises it had 
become apparent that the Albatross required extensive repairs, and 
in August the ship left for Hongkong to have these made. Upon 
conclusion of this work in October Pratas Reef was visited and a 
number of soundings and trawl hauls were later made in the China 
Sea between that reef and the Batan Islands. Some work was done 
in the Batan and Babuyan islands and on the northern end of Luzon. 
Contemplated stops along the northwesterly coast of Luzon were 
prevented by bad weather which culminated in a typhoon. 


3 



4 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


During December, 1908, and Januar}^ 1909, a cruise through the 
Calamianes and the western and southern regions of Palawan was 
completed, touching on the return trip at Sandakan, Cagayan Sulu, 
and Iloilo. Late in January and early in February a number of cod 
trawl sets were made in the vicinity of Mariveles, but with indifferent 
success. The succeeding month was spent along the southern coasts 
of Luzon and adjacent islands, continuing thence southerly along the 
small islands to Bohol, thence westerly by the C'agayanes to the east 
coast of Palawan and northward into the Cuyos, returning to Manila 
early in April. 

After a short trip to Lingayen Gulf early in May, the ship cruised 
along the small islands north of Samar and on the southeast coast of 
Luzon as far as Maculabo Island above San Miguel Bay, returning to 
Manila late in June. The latter part of July and all of August and 
September were spent in cruising from the southern coast of Samar, 
along southeastern Leyte, thence along the northern coast of Mindanao 
as far as Dapitan, thence northerly to Cebu, where some time was 
lost in repairing the boilers. The latter part of the period was con¬ 
sumed in further work in the vicinity of Zamboanga and along the 
Sulu group as far as Borneo, touching at a few small islands adjacent 
to the Borneo coast. Early in November the ship undertook a sup¬ 
plementary trip through the Dutch East Indies, touching at Menado, 
Ternate, Amboina, and Macassar, as well as at many intermediate 
points. On this trip a number of trawl hauls were made, including 
some exploration of the waters of the gulfs of Tomini and Boni in 
Celebes. 

The homeward trip from Manila was begun January 21, 1910. 
Bad weather and other difficulties prevented the execution of orders 
to continue the work in the vicinity of Formosa and the Loo Choo 
Islands; at only two stops in Formosa were any collections made. 
After further repairs to the vessel in Japan, sail was set for the LTiited 
States and San Francisco was reached May 4, 1910, after an absence 
of over two and one-lialf years. 

EXPLANATION OF TABLES. 

The last previous dredging station of the Albatross was no. 5095, 
the last hydrographic station was no. 4896, occupied during the 
northwestern Pacific cruise of 1906. (See Bureau of Fisheries Docu¬ 
ment 621.) Five hundred and seventy-seven dredging and 41 
hydrographic stations were occupied during the Philippine expe¬ 
dition, extending the series of dredging, stations to no. 5622 and the 
hydrographic series to no. 4937. In the tables the series are distin¬ 
guished by the prefixed letters D and II, respectively. 


DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 


5 


Only those stations where the ship’s gear was used (i. e., with the 
ship as an instrument) to collect natural-history specimens have been 
designated in the records as dredging stations. At times specimens 
were taken with dip nets during the occupation of a hydrographic 
station, but on account of the irregularity of such collecting the station 
was not regarded as a collecting station. No numbers have been 
given to the numerous shore stations, nor to minor collections made 
with the ship at anchor. But numbers have been given in the 
dredging series to hauls of the large intermediate net when used in a 
tideway with the ship at anchor. 

Since the shore work constitutes such an important part of the total, 
the data regarding shore stations is shown in chronological order with 
the dredging stations, the locality, apparatus, etc., appearing in the 
appropriate columns. To economize time most of the reef collections 
of fishes were made with dynamite. The method was to locate the 
desirable fishes in the coral growth by means of a view glass (a glass- 
bottomed box) used from a boat. A small charge of dynamite with 
electrical connections was carefully lowered and discharged. Such 
fishes as floated were at once collected with a dip net, and the place 
marked by a buoy. As soon as the bottom had cleared it was searched 
and the dead fish gathered by diving or more usually by means of 
long-handled spears. 

The various kinds of apparatus used at each station are recorded 
in the tables in chronological order, each on a separate line, opposite 
the station number, or, in case of unnumbered stations, opposite the 
locality, in the column “Apparatus.” 

The “Position” of a station is that point occupied by the vessel, 
as determined by the navigator at the time of beginning the first 
operation at that station. The position of the subsequent opera¬ 
tions under the same station number corresponds in a general way 
to the line as indicated under “Drift.” The distance covered by 
all the operations of a station is usually, however, not greater than 
the negligible error of observation, except in stations near shore 
determined by bearings. 

In relation to the hydrographic information obtained, the degree 
of accuracy with which positions are located is of greater importance, 
and a description of the methods is necessary to the proper use 
of this information. A great part of the region traversed is still 
unsurveyed; and even where surveyed, parts are incorrectly or 
incompletely charted. Owing to press of work and lack of time, 
no opportunity was afforded to correct such errors, and the best 
available charts were therefore used as the basis of all determina¬ 
tions of position when in sight of land; in the column “Chart” is 
noted the number and edition of the chart used at each station. 

59395°—11-11 


6 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


When in sight of land position was fixed by compass bearings, and 
from the position so obtained on the chart in use the latitude and 
longitude were pricked off and set down in the record as the position 
of the station. If these charts should hereafter be corrected in 
latitude and longitude, the positions assigned to the stations must be 
changed accordingly. 

In conformity with previous practice, an additional position, by 
true bearing and distance, of some prominent shore feature is given 
for each station when practicable. As viewed from the ship, Hie 
nearest and most prominent objects on shore from which the ship’s 
position was determined were often topographical features, incon¬ 
spicuous and unnamed on the chart, and impossible of identification 
by a brief written description. Therefore the bearings given in the 
tables were laid off from the plotted position on the chart to some 
object prominent on the chart, whether the object could actually be 
seen from the ship or not; though whenever convenient one of the 
two points taken for bearings by the navigator in determining the 
position is used in the table as the point of reference. The letters 
(S.), (N.), (W.), or (E.) indicate, respectively, the south, north, west, 
or east tangent of the point of reference after which they are placed; 
e. g., Verde Id. (E.)=eastern tangent of Verde Island. 

All bearings are true unless otherwise indicated. 

The spelling of all geographic names in these tables is that found 
on the charts designated in the column “Chart.” There is consider¬ 
able variation in this respect in the different issues of charts. 

“Time of day” in the case of soundings indicates the time the 
plummet struck bottom; in the case of dredgings, the time at which 
the apparatus began to tow on the bottom; in the case of interme¬ 
diate nets, the time at which the nets started to tow at the depth 
indicated; in the case of surface hauls, the time at which they were 
lowered into the water and began to be towed or the current to pass 
through them. 

“Depth” (in fathoms) is the depth obtained by the sounding 
when a sounding was made. In cases where no sounding was made 
the depth is estimated from the chart, unless the station immediately 
follows another, in which case the depth obtained at the preceding 
station is given. In seine hauls the depths given are approximate, 
and represent the greatest depth of water through which the seine was 
hauled. 

“Temperatures.” The air temperatures are taken from the ship’s 
log for the hour nearest the hour entered in the time column; the 
same is true of the surface temperatures where the towing commenced 
near the hour mark, but in other cases the surface temperature was 


DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 7 

taken at the time given. The bottom temperature was taken at the 
time of sounding. All readings by Fahrenheit thermometer. 

“Density.” The water density is in all cases reduced to 15 ° C. 
The density of bottom water was ascertained from a sample taken by 
the Sigsbee water bottle. Inability to secure an accurate working of 
this instrument led to the discontinuance of the trials. 

In the double column “Trial” is indicated the depth at which 
apparatus was worked, as well as the duration of operation. In the 
case of bottom apparatus this latter is the time during which it is 
supposed to be dragging on the bottom, up to the beginning of 
reeling in; for intermediate nets the time occupied in towing at the 
depth shown in the depth column is indicated by the first quantity, 
the time occupied in hoisting by the second; for surface nets the 
time indicated is the time actually towed at the surface. 

In the double column of “Drift” is shown approximately the gen¬ 
eral direction in which the gear was hauled as well as the distance. 
The state of the currents and of the wind, with the exigencies incident 
to the steering of the ship, make this more or less inaccurate. 

The apparatus used consisted of the usual beam trawls for all work 
on the bottom. All intermediate and surface work was done with a 
large tow net and small plankton or Kofoid nets, except an unsuc¬ 
cessful trial of a triangular shear-board net. 

Abbreviations and Symbols. 

12' Ag.12-foot Agassiz beam trawl. The Agassiz type of beam trawl was 

used more and with better results than any other used during the 
cruise. The runners now in use stand 4 feet in height and the 
usual type of net carries a taut headline, making the full opening 
available. For deep-sea work where the possibility of upsetting 
the frame is great, a reversible net is used, with a running bolt- 
rope passing through the clips forward of the middle of the shoes. 
The use of this net is indicated by the abbreviation'‘rev.” 


25 r Ag.The same runners used in the 12-foot frame but spread by use of 

two light spars for beams to a 25-foot opening. Used successfully 
on smooth bottoms. 

9' Alb.-Blk.9-foot Albatross-Blake beam trawl. 

B. A.British Admiralty. 

3-bd. int.a net with triangular opening operated by 3 shear boards and handled 

by a 3-part bridle from dredging cable—in no case successfully. 

2 / Blk.a 2-foot Blake trawl, generally used from a steam launch or rowboat; 

net made of yinch webbing. 

botm.bottom. 

C. S.Coast Survey. 

D.dredging, or collecting, station. 

dip.ordinary dip net on a 12-inch or 14-inch ring, with bamboo handle; 

used extensively in reef fishing with dynamite and from the gang 
plank with electric light. 

dyn.dynamite. 













8 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


e. 1 .electric light. 

H.hydrographic station. 

H. O.U. S. Hydrographic Office. 

hbr.harbor. 

int. 3.intermediate 3. This is a large ship’s net on a 5^-foot ring; net about 

11 feet long made of no. 0000 grit gauze, with about 3 feet of the 
bottom of no. 3 silk, and a brass bucket at the bottom. The out¬ 
side netting is |-inch webbing for the protection of the silk. 

int. 4.intermediate 4; same as intermediate 3, bu t with an extension of 6 feet 

of 1-inch webbing carried to a 10-foot ring, thus increasing the 
opening to 10 feet. 

int. 5.intermediate 5; similar to intermediate 4, but with no. 14 grit gauze 


only in the bottom part from the 3-foot ring to the bucket; above 
this ^-inch webbing to the 5^-foot ring, and thence 6 feet of f-inch 
webbing to the 10-foot ring. Equipped with a funnel of f-inch 
webbing. 


9'Jn. dr.Johnston oyster dredge. This is an Albatross-Blake beam trawl 

with a rake bar bolted at the heel. Used also in 6-foot length. 

K. 1.a small plankton or Kofoid net, made of no. 1? silk, on ° 14-inch ring. 

K.2.._ .same as above, but made of no. 20 silk. 

K. 4.same as above, but made of no. 3 silk. 

K. 5.same as K. 2, but made of no. 1 silk. 

K.6.a net of same length as other Kofoid nets, but provided with clamps 


on opposite sides of the ring to attach directly to the cable; also 
with a bail from the ring to the bucket. Designed to lower and 
hoist with the ship lying to and the cable running vertically, thus 
making no catch except while ship is underway and towing. 


Lt.light. 

Luc. sdr.Lucas sounding machine. 

m. b.mud bag. When more than one mud bag is used the two supple¬ 

mentary bags are rigged one at either end of the trawl frame. 

6' McC.6-foot McCormick; an adaptation of the Blake trawl frame, with rear 

beam bolted to bottom shoe and serving as a spindle on which bent 
teeth of £ by 2 inch iron work as a rake. Not successful. 

2' o. p.open plankton net on 2-foot ring; made of no. 1 silk. 

spec.specimen. 

12' Tnr.12-foot Tanner beam trawl. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr.. .Tanner-Blish sounding machine. 

therm.Negretti A Zambra thermometer, with Tanner case. 

wat. bot.Sigsbee water bottle. 


* signifies depth as shown by chart when no sounding has been made. 

** signifies depth and character of bottom as obtained by sounding at previous station, 
t signifies nets towed astern, from taffrail, side by side. 

§ signifies apparatus towed (horizontally) at depth indicated, during number of 
minutes given in the first period; then hoisted (vertically) to surface, net open, 
in time next shown. 

The letters (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), when used with the abbreviation 
for sounding apparatus, indicate the kind of sounding cup used; thus, 

(a) .. .Sigsbee sounding rod. (d). ..bail-cutter. 

(b) .. .Lucas snapper. (e).. .ordinary lead with tallow. 

(c) .. .Lucas 4-tube sounding rod. 






















DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 


9 


“Character of bottom,” determined by the specimens from the 
sounding cup, is expressed by abbreviations, the key to which is ap¬ 
pended. It will be noted that these abbreviations are arbitrarily 
capitalized for nouns. When used as adjectives, however, the noun 
abbreviations are not capitalized. 


bk... 

.black. 

fne_fine. 

M. 


. .scattered. 

bl.... 

.blue. 

For... Foraminifera. 

mrgn. 

..marginal. Sh.... 

..Shells. 

br.... 

.brown. 

G.Gravel. 

Mss... 

..Masses. sml... 

..small. 

br-gn. 

. brownish-green. 

Glob. -Globigerina. 

Oz. . . 

.Ooze. Sp_ 


brk... 

.broken. 

gn. . . .green. 

P. 

.Pebbles. St_ 

. .Stones. 

C. 

.Clay. 

gn-br. .greenish-brown. 

Ptr_ 

.Pteropod. vol... 

. - volcanic. 

Clmps. Clumps. 

gn-gy. .greenish-gray. 

R. 

..Rock. W.... 

. .Seaweed. 

Co.... 

. Coral. 

gy-gray. 

Rf.... 

..Reef. wh... 

. .white. 

crs.... 

..coarse. 

hrd. . .hard. 

rky... 

. .rocky. 


dk.... 

.dark. 

Lav_Lava. 

S. 

..Sand. 

























10 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the TJ. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


Depth. 


Character of 
bottom. 


D. 5096 


D. 5097 


D. 5098 


D. 5099 


D. 5100 


D. 5101 


D. 5102 


D. 5103 


Between Honolulu and 
Manila. 


Midway Ids. Harbor. 


.do. 


Guam; Apra Bay (rf). 

_do. 

_do. 


.do. 


1907. 
Nov. 7 

Nov. 8 
Nov. 19 
Nov. 20 
Nov. 21 

..do. 


Manila Bay and vicinity .<* 

Manila Bay (Luneta Beach). 

Manila Bay, inside break¬ 
water (anch.). 

_do. 

_do. 

Manila Bay (Malate Beach).. 

Manila Bay, inside break¬ 
water (anch.). 

Manila Bay, inside break¬ 
water. 

_do. 

Manila Bay, outside break¬ 
water. 


Manila Bay (Luneta Beach) 
Manila Bay (near anch.)_ 


C. S. 4240 
Feb., 1907 
_do— 


_do.... 

_do.... 

C. S. 4712 
Sept., 1904 
_do.. 

_do.. 


_do_ 

_do_ 


.do_ 

.do_ 


Dec. 6 

...do. 

Dec. 7 
Dec. 8 
Dec. 9 

...do_ 

Dec. 11 

Dec. 12 
...do_ 


Dec. 30 
...do_ 


China Sea off southern Luzon. 

Corregidor Lt.. N. 2.70 miles 
(14° 20' 23" N., 120° 34' 15" 
E.). 


Corregidor Lt., N. 6° E., 3.60 
miles (14° 19' 15" N., 120° 
33' 52" E.). 


Corregidor Lt., N. 21° E., 
4.30 miles (14° 18' 40" N., 
120° 32' 40" E.). 

Corregidor Lt., N. 36° E., 
4.80 miles (14° 18' 55" N., 
120° 31' 20" E.). 

Corregidor Lt., N. 16° E., 
5.70 miles (14° 17' 15" N., 
120° 32' 40" E.). 

Corregidor Lt., S. 82° E., 
10.50 miles (14° 24' 30" N., 
120° 23' 20" E.). 

Sueste Pt. Lt., S. 85° W., 
1.20 miles (14° 45' N., 120° 
12' 30" E.). 

Subig Bay (Subig anch.)_ 

Subig Bay, Subig (beach).. 

Calaclan Pt., S. 86° E., 2.50 
miles (14° 49' 30" N., 120° 
13' 30" E.). 


C. S. 4240; 
Feb., 1907. 


_do. 


.do. 


1908. 
Jan. 2 


..do. 


.. .do. 


..do.do. 


...do. 1 


.do. 


C. S. 4254; 
Sept., 1902. 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 


..do. 


Jan. 


...do. 


.. .do_ 

Jan. 7 
.. .do. 


10.00 a. m. 

9.00 a. m. 
1.00 p. m. 
1.00 p. m. 
9.00 a. m. 

1.00 p. m. 


3.00 p. m. 

7.00 p. m. 

7.00 p. m. 
7.00 p. m. 
9.00 a. m. 

7.00 p. m. 

8.00 p. m. 

10.00 a. m. 
1.30 p. m. 


9.00 a. m. 
4.00 p. m. 


10.42 a. m. 
11.01 a. m. 


12.44 p. m. 


1.21 p. m. 


2.15 p. m. 

2.22 p. m. 

1.16 p. m. 


4.20 p. m. 


7.00 p. m. 
9.00 a. m. 
1.46 p. m. 


fms. 


3.5 

3.5 


*38 


35 


35 

*43 


co. Clmps.; S. 

Co. 

mrgn. co. Rf. 

co. Mss. 

mrgn. Rf;sml.stag¬ 
horn Clmps; S. 
co. Mss.; S. 

M., S. 

M. 

M. 

M. 

fne. S. 

M. 

M. 

M. 

M., sml. R. 

M., S.. 

M. 


gy. M., S., Sh. 
gy. M., S., Sh. 

gy. M., S., Sh. 


gy. M., S., Sh. 


gy. M., S., Sh. 

gy- S. 

gy- s. 


s. 

gy- m. 


a From December 16 to 21 a shore party made collections at the mouth of the Santa Cruz River and the 
adjacent shore of Laguna de Bay and visited the markets at Santa Cruz and Majayjay. A party visited 
Taal Lake December 24 to 29 and made collections by seining (45' seine) on the south side of Taal Id., 
and by purchase from natives on the Pansipit River, and at Taal December 31 and January 1 a shore party 
made collections on Mariquina River. 



























































































DEEDGING AND HYDROGEAPHIC RECORDS. 


11 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

-Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

° F. 





ft. m. 


mi. 







8-12 ft.. 

1 00 









20-30 ft. 

2 00 









6-20 ft.. 

4 00 









6-20 ft.. 

3 00 









3-10 ft.. 

3 00 









6-20 ft.. 

2 00 









4ft .... 

2 30 










2 00 










2 00 










2 00 









6 ft .... 

2 30 










2 00 










20 








2' Blk... 










2' Blk. 











4ft .... 

2 30 













79.5 

79 







\ 







(b). 





79.7 

79 






21 

S W. a . 


80 

79 





' botm... 

19 

NW.byW.a 


82 

79 





botm... 

20 

W.byN.o.. 


81 

80 




9' Tnr.; m. b.. 

botm... 

20 

W. by N.a. 


86 

80 












(b). 

botm... 

20 

NE.«. 


82 

78 


1.02391 


int. 4 §. 

37 fms.. 

20 

NW. i W. 









4 



86.5 

81 


1.02447 




20 

N. 11° E.. 







3 










2 00 









20 ft ... 

2 30 



84 

79 




12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

S. 45° E... 

0.6 


Remarks. 


Work interrupted 
by storm. 


Mostly on shore 
flat. 


5 hauls. 


Do. 


Towed from 
steam launch. 

Do/ 

Several hauls from 
mouth of Pasig 
River to outer 
entrance through 
breakwater. 

5 hauls. 

Finally hauled on 
Jan. 4, 1908. 


Veered 5 fms. dur¬ 
ing haul, not on 
bottom; water- 
haul. 

Veered at 5 minute 
intervals from 75 
to 94 and to 104 
fms. Trawl cap¬ 
sized on bottom, 
but made a 
small catch. 

Net capsized on 
bottom, but 
made a small 
catch. 


70 fms. dredge 
cable out. 

Cable veered from 
45 to 57 fms. dur¬ 
ing haul. 

5 hauls. 


a Course steered by ship. 































































































12 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


Depth. 


Character of 
bottom. 


D. 5104 
D. 5105 


D. 5100 


D. 5107 


D. 5108 


D. 5109 


D. 5110 


D. 5111 


D. 5112 
D. 5113 


China Sea off southern Lu¬ 
zon— Continued. 

Olongapo (beach). 


Beach opposite Olongapo. 

Olongapo (anch.). 

Sueste Pt. Bt., S. 58° W 
1.30 miles (14° 45' 48" N 
120° 12' 20" E.). 

Sueste Pt. Lt., N. 57° W 
1.90 miles (14° 43' 55" N 
12C° 12' 50" E.). 

Grande I. (rf.). 

Port Binanga (beach) 

Port Binanga (anch.). 

Port Binanga (rf.)_ 

Corregidor Lt., S. 57° E.,2.25 
miles (14° 23' 55" N., 120° 
32' 33" E.). 

Corregidor Lt., S. 17° E., 1.75 
miles (14° 24' 30" N., 120° 
33' 40" E.). 

Manila Bay (Luneta Beach). 

Limbones Cove (E. shore, 
beach). 

Limbones Cove (SW. shore, 
rf.). 

Limbones Cove (anch.) 

Corregidor Lt., N. 39° 

22.50 miles (14° 05' 5" N., 
120° 19' 45" E.). 


E., 


Corregidor Lt., N. 42° E., 
25.80 miles (14° 03' 45" N., 
120° 10' 30" E.). 

Corregidor Lt., N. 20° E., 25 
miles (13° 59' 20" N., 120° 
75' 45" E.). 


C. S. 4254; 
Sept., 1902. 

_do. 

_do. 

_do. 


. .do..., 


_do. 

_do. 

_do. 

_do. 

C. S. 4240: 

Feb., 1907. 


_do_ 


.do. 

.do. 


.do. 


.do_ 

.do_ 


1908. 
Jan. 7 

.. .do. 

...do. 

Jan. 8 


..do. 


..do. 

..do. 

. .do. 

Jan. 9 
..do. 


..do. 


Jan. 13 
Jan. 14 


..do. 


. .do. 

Jan. 15 


...do. 


.. .do. 


Nasugbu Bay (anch.). 

Nasugbu Bay (beach near 
town). 

Nasugbu Bay (Pillar Rock, 
rf.). 

Sombrero Id., S. 41° E., 4.50 
miles (13° 45' 15" N., 120° 
46' 30" E.). 

Balayan Bay (Taal anch.)... 

Sombrero la., S. 18° E., 6.75 
miles (13° 48' 22" N., 120° 
47' 25" E.). 

Sombrero Id., S. 7° W., 9.50 
miles (13° 51' 30" N., 120° 
50' 30" E.). 


Balayan Bay and Verde Id. 
Passage.a 

Balayan Bay (Ligpo Pt. rf.). 


.do. 

.do. 


.do. 

.do. 


.do. 

.do. 


.do... 


C. S. 4240, 


.do_ 


.do_ 


. .do. 

Jan. 16 


..do. 

. .do. 


..do. 

Jan. 17 


...do. 


2.00 p. m. 

3.30 p. m. 
7.00 p. m. 
10.20 a. m. 


1.00 p. m. 
2.00 p. m. 
7.00 p. m. 
8.30 a. m. 
1.58 p. m. 


2.38 p. m. 


4.30 p. m. 

4.30 p. m. 

7.00 p. m. 
8.01 a. m. 

8.34 a. m. 


8.47 a. m. 

9.00 a. m. 
9.20 a. m. 
10.26 a. m. 

10.43 a. m. 

3.18 p. m. 

3.32 p. m. 


00 p. m. 
00 a. m. 


00 a. m. 
38 p. m. 


08 p. m. 
00 p. m. 
06 p. m. 

33 p. m. 
43 p. m. 


4.02 p. m. 


Jan. 18 10.00 a. m. 


fms. 


13 

*33 


6 

'*37' 


*28 


13 


16 

16 

16 

10 

12 

135 

135 


236 

10 

177 

177 

159 

159 


grassy. 

(?).::: 


(?) . 

sctrd. Clmps. Co. 


sctrd. Clmps. Co. 
gy- M. 


gy. M. 


fne. S. 

S., P., Co. 


solid Co. 


Co. 

dk. gy. M. 
dk. gy. M. 


sctrd. Clmps. Co. . 


gn. M. 


dk. gn. M. 

dk. gn. M. 
dk. gn. M. 

dk. gn. M. 


. dense Co., S. 


a Collecting trip to Taal Lake on Jan. 18. Dredging with hand dredge. 













































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


13 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907 1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

0 F. 





h. 

m. 


mi. 







20ft ... 

1 

15 









8 ft .... 

1 

15 










2 

00 



81 

78 




12' Tnr.; m. b. 



20 

S. 22° W .. 

0.8 

81 

78 




12' Tnr.; m.b. 



20 

N. 60° W. 

(?) 







6-20 ft.. 

4 

30 







150' seine. 


2 

00 








dip.; e. 1. 


2 

00 









6-15 ft . 

2 

00 



86.5 

78 


1.02393 


12' Tnr.; m.b. 

botm... 


20 

N. 48° E.. 

1.2 

84.5 

78 


1.02379 


12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 


20 


1.7 







4 ft .... 











12ft ... 

1 

30 









6-12 ft.. 

1 

30 








dip.; e. 1. 

surf.... 

2 

00 



80 

80 

80 

1.02406 












(b). 






80 

80 




9' A lb.-Blk.; 

botm... 


1 

N. 36° E... 







m. b. 






81 

80 














(b). 






81 

8ft 







10 

S. 

.3 

81 

80 







23 



82 

80 


1.02386 


9' Alb.-Blk_ 



12 


(?) 

82 

80 




8 swabs. 

botm... 


11 


(?) 

ftQ 

80 

59 

1.02406 









(b). 






85 

80 




12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 


20 

N.20° E... 

.6 






dip.; e. 1. 

surf.... 

2 

00 










2 

30 









6-15 ft.. 

3 

00 



84 

80 












(b). 






84 

80 




12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 


30 

N. 22° E... 

1.8 







surf.... 

1 

30 



86 

80 

52.4 

1.02416 

1.02496 







(b). 






84 

80 




12' Tnr.; m.b. 

botm... 


30 

N. 13° E... 

1.3 

82 

80 


1.02413 










(e). 






80 

80 




12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 


10 

N. 9° E.... 

.6 





dyn. 

6-20 ft.. 

5 

00 




Remarks. 


1 haul. 
Do 


4 hauls. 


Tall lashing 
slipped; no catch 
except In mud 
bag. 


Dredging cable 
fouled gin block. 
Trawl not 
dragged on bot¬ 
tom. 


No catch. 

Trawl immediate¬ 
ly torn on coral. 
Soundings with 
hand lead. 


20 fms. cable 
veered during 
haul. 


Sounding cup lost; 
therm, did not 
trip. 


Uneven bottom. 








































































































14 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER AEBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


Balayan Bay and Verde Id. 







Passage— Continued. 









1908. 


fms. 




C. S. 4240; 

Jan. 19 

3.00 p. m. 


blk. S., M. 


Taai). 

Feb., 1907. 








7.00 p. m. 

10 






9.00 a. m. 


dense Co., S. 


poc Pt.). 






D. 5114 

Sombrero Id. N. 36° E., 7.2 

.do. 

...do.... 

10.49 a. m. 

340 

fne. S. 


miles (13° 36' 11" N., 120° 



11.17 a. m. 

340 

fne. S. 


45' 26" E.). 






D. 5115 

Sombrero Id. N. 49° E., 7.30 

.do. 

...do- 

1.08 p. m. 

340 

(?). 


miles (13° 37' 11" N., 120° 







43' 40" E.). 



1.41 p. m. 

340 

(?). 

D. 5116 

Sombrero Id. N. 69° E., 2.50 

.do. 

...do- 

2.53 p. m. 

200 

(?). 


miles (13° 41' N., 120° 47' 



3.13 p. m. 

200 

(?). 


05" E.). 






D. 5117 

Sombrero Id. S. 17° E., 10.80 

.do. 

Jan. 21 

9.10 a. m. 

118 

(?). 


miles (13° 52' 22" N., 120° 







46' 22" E.). 



9.27 a. m. 

118 

dk. gn. M. 

D. 5118 

Sombrero Id. S. 47° E., 10 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

10.41 a. m. 

159 

dk. gn. M.. 


miles (13° 48' 45" N., 120° 







41' 51" E.). 



11.00 a. m. 

159 

dk. gn.M. 

D. 5119 

Sombrero Id. S. 80° E., 18.90 

.do. 

.. .do- 

1.24 p. m. 

394 

gn. M., S. 


miles (13° 45' 05" N., 120° 



1.56 p. m. 

394 

gn. H., S. 


30' 30" E.). 






D. 5120 

Sombrero Id., S. 79° 30' E., 

... . .do. 

.. .do- 

2.41 p. m. 

393 

gn. M., S. 


19.2 miles (13° 45' 30" N., 



3.10 p. m. 

393 



120° 30' 15" E.). 










7.30 p. m. 

10 






11.00 a. m. 


** 


water). 










10.00 a. m. 




water, anch.). 







East coast of Mindoro. 






D. 5121 

Malabrigo Lt., N. 14° W., 9 

C. S. 4714; 

Feb. 2 

8.14 a. m. 

108 

dk. gn. M. 


miles (13° 27' 20" N., 121° 

June, 1906. 






17' 45" E.). 



8.30 a. m. 

108 

dk. gn. M. 

D. 5122 

Malabrigo Lt., N. 46° W., 

.do. 

.. .do- 

10.34 a. m. 

220 

gn. M. 


20.60 miles (13° 21' 30" N., 







°120 30' 33" E.). 



10.59 a. m. 

220 

gn. M. 

D. 5123 

Malabrigo Lt., N. 44° W., 

.do. 

...do_ 

1.09 p. m. 

283 

gn. M. 


32.50 miles (13° 12' 45" N., 







121° 38' 45" E.). 



1.44 p. m. 

283 

gn. M. 

D. 5124 

Pt. Origon (N.), S. 56° E., 

.do. 

.. .do- 

5.04 p. m. 

281 

sft. gn. M. 


20.75 miles (12° 52' N., 121° 







48' 30" E.). 



5.38 p. m. 

281 

sft. gn. M. 


Sulu Sea, vicinity southern 







Panay. 






D. 5125 

Nogas Id. (W.), S. 11° E., 

C. S. 4718, 

Feb. 3 

9.07 a. m. 

411 

gn. M. 


24 miles (10° 48' N., 121 6 

Dec., 1906. 


9.41 a. m. 

411 



48' 30" E.). 






D. 5126 

Nogas Id. (W.),S. 26° 30' E., 

.do. 

...do.... 

1.05 p. m. 

742 

sft. gn. M. 


11.75 miles (10° 34' 45" N., 



2.00 p. m. 

742 

sft. gn. M. 


121° 47' 30" E.). 











10 
























pools).' 














































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


15 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





ft. 

2 

m. 

00 


mi. 

Purse seine owned 
and hauled by 
native fisher¬ 
men. 








1 

30 









6-20 ft.. 

5 

00 




81.5 

79 


1.02447 







84 

80 




botm... 

20 

N.54° E.. 

0.5 

Cable veered from 
460 to 520 fms. 
during haul. 

Sounding cup did 
notclose. Therm, 
not properly at- 
tached and 
fouled water 
bottle. 

Therm, not prop¬ 
erly attached; 
fouled stray line. 

No specimen in 
sounding cup. 

82 

80 

(?) 

1.02434 

1.02454 


83 

80 

12' Tnr.; m. b . 

botm... 

20 

N. 43° E... 

1.0 

86 

80 

50.2 

1.02426 



86 

80 


12'Tnr.; m.b.. 

botm... 

20 

N.5° E.... 

0.5 

82 

79 


1.02475 


82 

79 



(b). 

12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N.31° W.. 

0.8 

81 

79 


1.02426 




81 

79 



(b). 

12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 

30 

N.50° W.. 

0.8 


82 

80 

43.7 

1.02386 

1.02468 



82 

80 

12' Tnr.; in. b. 

botm... 


9 

N. 23° E... 

1.0 


82 

80 

43.7 

1 02386 

1.02480 





82 

80 


350 fms. 


20 

N.5° W... 

1.0 

393 fms. dredge 
cable out. 






1 

17 

30 





. 



15 



Towed from steam 






dyn.cap.; dip. 





launch. 

76 

79 


1.02420 







76 

79 



(b). 

12' Tnr.; m.b. 

botm... 


20 

S. 79° E... 

1.0 


78 

79 


1.02489 








Snapper failed to 
close. 

;79 

79 



(b). 

12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 


20 

S.59° E... 

1.3 

^0 

j79 

79 

79 


1.02475 








Do. 



(b). 

12' Tnr.; in. b. 

botm... 


20 

S. 6° W. .. 

1.3 


( 82 

80.5 

79 

79 


1.02468 








Do. 



(b). 

12' Tnr.; m.b. 

botm... 


17 

S.9° W. .. 

1.5 


J 81 

83.5 

80 

80 

50 

1.02444 

1.02475 







int. 4 §. 

365 fms. 


20 

N.62° W.. 

1.5 

550 fms. dredge 

83 

84 

80 

80 

49.5 

(?) 

(?) 



26 



cable out. 

No specimen in 
water bottle. 

12' Tnr.; m.b. 

botm... 


20 

N.81° W.. 

1.5 





surf. 

1 

30 














Set over night. 







and surf. 
10 ft ... 

3 

00 



6 hauls. 






copper sul- 
phate. 

2 

00 






























































































































16 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


Sulu Sea, vicinity southern 
Panay —Continued. 




fms. 




1908. 



D.5127 

Nogas Id. (W.), N. 11° 30' E., 
22 mile (10° 02' 45" N., 
121° 48' 15" E.). 

C. S. 4718; 
Dec., 1906. 

Feb. 4. 

2.57 p. m. 
4.06 p. m. 

■ 958 
958 

gy. M., Glob. 

D. 5128 

...do.. . . 


Nogas Id. (W.), N. 6° E., 
32.50 miles (9° 52' 10" N., 

.do. 

7.05 p. m. 





121° 49' 35" E.). 







Sulu Sea off western Min- 







danao. 






H. 4897 

Dulunguin Pt., S. 70° E., 
4.80 mile (7° 46' N., 122° 

C. S. 4723, 
Oct., 1905. 

Feb. 5 

11.43 a. m. 

1,570 

gy. M., Glob. 



E.). 






H. 4898 

Dulunguin Pt., N. 50° E., 1 
mile (7° 43' 45" N., 122° 

.do. 

.. .do... 

1.13 p. m. 

221 



D. 5129 

03' 45" E.). 

Dulunguin Pt., N. 44° E., 
3.80 miles (7° 41' 30" N., 

.do. 

.. .do.... 

2.04 p. m. 

0-100 

* 


122° 01' 45" E.). 

Dulunguin Pt., N. 1° W., 
9.50 miles (7° 35' N., \22 6 
04' 45" E.). 



2.23 p. m. 

3.29 p. m. 
3.48 p. m. 


D. 5130 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

102 


102 



C. S. 4644; 
July, 1905. 

...do_ 

sft. M., S. 

Panabutan Bay (NW. 
beach, near river). 

5.00 p. m. 








7.30 p. m. 
8.48 a. m. 

11 


H. 4899 

Id. oil Panabutan Pt., S. 78° 

.do. 

Feb. 6 

18 

sft. gn. M. 


W., 3 miles. 





H. 4900 

Id. off Panabutan Pt., W., 

.do. 

...do. 

8.58 a. m. 

19 

sft. gn. M. 


0.30 mile. 






H. 4901 

Id. off Panabutan Pt., N. 52° 

.do. 

...do. 

9.04 a. m. 

21 

gn. M., S. 


W., 0.30 mile. 







Panabutan Bay (beach). 

Panabutan Bay (Siriguay 
Pt., rf.). 





S., M. 


.do. 

...do. 

9.00 a. m. 


sctrd. Co. 




H. 4902 


.do. 

...do. 

9.10 a. m. 

23 

gn. M., fne S. 

W., 0.50 mile. 


H. 4903 





27 

co. S. 

W., 0.50 mile. 





D. 5131 

Id. off Panabutan Pt., N. 20° 

.do. 

...do. 

9.14 a. m. 

27 

gn. M., co. S. 


E., 0.40 mile. 









9.27 a. m. 

27 

gn. M., co. S. 

D. 5132 

Id. off Panabutan Pt., N. 15° 

.do. 

...do. 

9.54 a. m. 

*26 

gn. M., S. 


W., 0.30 mile. 





H. 4904 

Id. off Panabutan Pt., N. 62° 

.do. 

...do. 

10.23 a. m. 

38 

gn. M., S. 


E., 0.30 mile. 





D. 5133 

Id. off Panabutan Pt., N. 52° 

.do. 

...do. 

10.28 a. m. 

38 

gn. M., S. 


E., 1.50 miles. 



10.40 a. m. 

38 

gn. M., S. 





7.30 p. m. 



Sulu Archipelago, near Ba- 






silan Id. 






D. 5134 

Balukbaluk Id. (N.) S. 59° 
W„ 6.25 miles (6° 44' 45" 

C. S. 4511; 
Dec., 1904. 

Feb. 7 

7.14 a. m. 

25 




N., 121° 48' E.). 

Balukbaluk Id. (N.), S. 59° 
W., 4.90 miles (6° 44' 12" 
N., 121° 46' 55" E.). 




25 


D.5134a 

.do. 

...do. 

7.54 a. m. 

34 






8.05 a. m. 

34 





























































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


17 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 — Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


| Air. 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

84.5 

°F. 

80 

°F. 

50.1 

1.02477 

1.02516 

Luc. sdr. (a)... 


h. m. 


77?/. 


83 

81 

9' alb.-Blk.; 2 


20 

N. 9° W. 

(?) 

0.6 

4.25 mi. distance 
given by re¬ 
corder. 

82 

80 




m. b. 

int. 4. 

surf.... 

20 

S.6° E.... 

82 

80 




Luc. sdr. (a).,. 


82 

80 










81 

80 

57.6 

1.02482 


(b). 

Tnr.-Blishsdr. 





suited in loss of 
all the apparatus 
used. 

Density at 100 fms. 
1.02495. 

193 fms. dredge 
cable out. 

80 

80 


int. 4 §. 

100 fms. 

20 

S. 31° W.. 

1.3 

81.5 

79.5 

59.2 

1.02447 

1.02451 

Luc. sdr. (a)... 

8 

80.5 

80 

9' alb.-Blk.... 









130' seine. 

12 ft ... 

30 



tom and carried 
away. 

1 haul. 






dip.; e. 1. 

surf.... 

2 00 








Tnr.-Blishsdr. 









(e). 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 











(e). 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 











(e). 

175' seine. 


2 00 









dyn. 

8-15 ft.. 

2 00 



Water brackish. 






Tnr.-Blishsdr. 



Coral unthrifty. 






(e). 

Tnr.-Blishsdr. 






88 

79 


1.02447 


(e). 

Tnr.-Blishsdr. 






88 

79 



(e). 

9' Tnr.; m. b.. 


13 

N. 43° E.. 

.3 


85 

79 


1.02447 


9' Tnr.; m. b.. 

botm... 

20 

S. 69° W.. 

.7 




Tnr.-Blishsdr. 




85.5 

79.5 


1.02447 


(e). 






85 

80 



(e). 

9' Tnr.; m. b.. 

botm... 

16 

S. 21° E... 

.4 





surf.... 

20 


Set in tide current 









at gangway. 

82 

78 

78 

? 

1.02497 







Therm, not allow- 

81 



(e). 

9' Tnr.; m. b.. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 

botm... 

20 

S. 42° W.. 

.9 

ed time to set. 

Ship drifted to po¬ 
sition of 5134a 
whilegetting ap¬ 
paratus ready. 

15 sec. allowed for 

83 

78 

76.2 







83 

78 



(e). 

int. 4 § . 

25 fms.. 

20 

N. 26° E.. 

.9 

therm, to set. 

50 fms. dredge 





2 



cable out. 

















































































18 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 


Vicinity of Jolo. 








1908. 


fms. 

D. 5135 

Jolo Lt., S. 46° W., 11.90 

C. S. 4542; 

Feb. 7 

2.29 p. m. 

161 


miles (6° 11' 50" N., 121° 

Apr., 1903. 





08' 20" E.). 



2.50 p. m. 

161 






14 


.do.. 




14 


Marongas Id., S. side. 






Pangasinan Id., S. Pt. (rf)... 


Feb. 13 








14 

D. 5136 

Jolo Lt., S' 37° E., 0.70 mile 

.do. 

Feb. 14 

8.50 a. m. 

22 


(6° 04' 20" N., 120° 59' 20" 






E.). 



9.07 a. m. 

22 

D. 5137 

Jolo Lt., S. 61° E., 1.30 miles 

.do. 

.. .do. 

9.44 a. m. 

20 


(6° 04' 25" N., 120° 58' 30" 






E.). 



9.55 a. m. 

20 

D. 5138 

Jolo Lt., S. 19° E., 2.50 miles 

.do. 

.. .do. 

10.50 a. m. 

19 


(6° 06' N., 120°58' 50" E.). 









10.55 a. m. 

19 

D. 5139 

Jolo Lt., S. 51° W., 3.60 miles 

.do. 

...do. 

1.02 p. m. 

20 


(6° 06' N., 121° 02' 30" E.). 









1.13 p. m. 

20 

D. 5140 

Jolo Lt., S. 33° W., 6.10 miles 

.do. 

.. .do. 

1.58 p. m. 

76 


(6° 08' 45" N., 121° 03' E.). 









2.09 p. m. 

76 


Bubuan Id., S. Pt. (rf.). 






Bubuan Id. (anch.). 

.do. 

.. .do. 

7.30 p. m. 

12 

D. 5141 

Jolo Lt., S. 17° E., 5.50 miles 

.do. 

Feb. 15 

8.39 a. m. 

29 


(6° 09' N., 120° 58' E.). 









8.47 a. m. 

29 

D. 5142 

Jolo Lt., S. 50° W., 3.90 miles 

.do. 

...do. 

10.26 a. m. 

21 


(6° 06' 10" N., 121° 02' 40" 






E.). 



10.33 a. m. 

21 

D. 5143 

Jolo Lt.,S.50° W., 3.40 miles 

.do. 

...do. 

11.05 a. m. 

19 


(6° 05' 50" N., 121° 02' 15" 






E.). 



11.09 a. m. 

19 

D. 5144 

Jolo Lt., S. 50° W., 3.40 miles 

.do. 

...do. 

11.19 a. m. 

19 


(6° 05' 50" N., 121° 02' 15" 






E.). 



11.26 a. m. 

19 

D. 5145 

JoloLt., S. 16° E., 0.85 mile 

.do. 

...do. 

1.37 p. m. 

23 


(6° 04' 30" N., 120° 59' 30" 






E.). 



1.44 p. m. 

23 


Sulu Archipelago, vicinity of 
Siasi. 





D. 5146 

Sulade Id. (E.), N. 18° W., 

C. S. 4542; 

Feb. 16 

10.04 a. m. 

24 


3.40 miles (5° 46' 40" N., 

Apr., 1903. 





120° 48' 50" E.). 



10.11 a. m. 

24 

D. 5147 

Sulade Id. (E.), N. 3° E., 

.do. 

.. .do. 

11.20 a. m. 

21 


8.40 miles (5° 41' 40" N., 






120° 47' 10" E.). 



11.27 a. m. 

21 

D. 5148 

Sirun Id. (N.), S. 80° W., 

C. S. 4544; 

...do. 

1.00 p. m. 

17 


3.80 miles (5° 35' 40" N., 

Oct., 1906. 





120° 47' 30" E.). 



1.07 p. m. 

17 

H. 4905 

Sirun Id. (W.), N. 33° E., 

.do. 

Feb. 18 


10 


2.43 miles (5° 32' 50" N., 






120° 42' 15" E.). 





D. 5149 

Sirun Id. (VV.), N. 39° E., 

.do. 

. ..do. 

9.26 a m. 

10 


2.40 miles (5° 33' N., 120° 






42' 10" E.). 



9.32 a. m. 

10 

D. 5150 

Sirun Id. (W.), N. 34° E., 

C. S. 4514; 

. .do. 

11.37 a. m. 

21 


11.7 miles (5° 23' 20" N., 

Jan., 1906. 





120° 35' 45" E.). 



11.43 a. m. 

21 


U. S. Fisheries 


Character of 
bottom. 


fne. co. S. 

fne. co. S. 

sctrd. Co., S. 

sctrd. Co. 

s.; sf: 

S., Sh. 

S., Sh. 

S., Sh. 

5., Co. 

5., Co.. 

co. S. 

co. S. 

fne. co. S. 

fne. co. S. 

co. Mss. 

co. S . 

co. S . 

co. S., Sh. 

co. S., Sh . 

co. S . 

co. S . 

co. S. 

co. S. 

co. S., Sh. 

co. S., Sh. 

co. S., Sh. 

co. S., Sh. 

co. S., Sh. 

co. S., Sh. 

co. S. 

co. S. 

5., Co., Sh. 

Co., Sh. 

Co., Sh. 

co. S.,Sh. 

co. S., Sh .. 














































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


19 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 — Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


5-« 

< 

© 

Ih 

3 

CQ 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°f. 

80.5 

‘F. 

80 

°F. 

57.4 

1.02457 




h. 

772. 


mi. 


80.5 

81 


(e). 



20 

S. 26° W.. 

1.0 





dip. e.1. 

dip. e.1. 


2 

00 








2 

00 









4—8 ft... 

3 

00 



Coral heads taken 
ashore. 







5-12 ft.. 

2 

00 








dip. e. 1. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 

surf.... 

1 

30 




84 

80 


1.02489 





83 

79 



(e). 

12'Agz.; 2 m.b. 

botm... 

20 

N,.72° W.. 

0.6 


84 

80 




away. 

84 

80 




(e). 

12'Agz.; 2 m.b. 
Tnr.-Blisb sdr. 

botm... 

20 

N. 27° W.. 

0.6 


85 

80 





85 

80 




(e). 

12'Agz.; 2m.b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 15° E.. 

0.6 

1 mud bag carried 
away. 

83 

80 


1.02457 


83 

80 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

04 

S. 45° E... 

0.2 


83 

80 


1.02477 



83 

82 



(e). 

12' Agz. rev.; 



20 

N. 70° W.. 

0.8 





m. b. 

8-20 ft.. 

1 

00 








surf.... 

1 

30 




81 

78 


1.02461 






81 

78 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

18 

N. 13° E.. 

0.5 


87 

80 


1.02503 



88 

80 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

11 

W. 

0.5 

1 bridle-stop car¬ 
ried away. 
Sounding lead 
carried away. 
Fouled bottom; 

89 

80 


1.02442 



89 

80 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 


4 



91 

81 


1.02514 






mudbagtorn; no 
distance made. 

91 

81 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 45° W.. 

0.6 


88 

77 


1.02482 



88 

77 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

15 

S. 

.6 


82 

80 


1.02468 





82 

81 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 


20 

N. 77° W.. 

1.1 


85 

SO 


1.02447 








84 

80 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 


20 

S. 72° E... 

.4 


82. 5 

80 


1.02523 







82.5 

80 



(e). 

12' Agz., m. b. 

botm... 


18 

S. 51°E... 

.7 
















(e). 







81 

78 

78 


1.02509 









84 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 


20 

N. 10° W . 

.8 


82 

78 


1.02495 







82 

78 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 





Net fouled bottom; 






| 

1 bridle stop car¬ 
ried away; no 
distance made. 












































































































20 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


SuluArchipelago, Tawi Tawi 







Group. 


1908. 


fms. 


D. 5151 

Sirun Id. (C.), N. 58° E., 

C. S. 4514; 

Feb. 18 

1.02 p. m. 

24 

co. S.,Sh. 


19.3 miles (5° 24' 40" N., 
120° 27' 15" E.). 

Pajumajan Id. (W.), S. 2° 
W., 2 miles (5° 22' 55" N., 

Jan., 1906. 


24 

co. S., Sh. 

1.07 p. m. 
3.21 p. m. 

D. 5152 

.do. 

...do. 

34 

wh. S. 



120° 15' 45" E.). 

Dos Amigos Bay (anch.). 

Tocanhi Pt., S. 27° E., 2.10 
miles (5° 18' 10" N., 120° 



3.28 p. m. 
7.30 p. m. 
9.00 a. m. 

34 

\vh. S. 


.do_ 

.. .do. 

7 


D. 5153 

.do... ... 

Feb. 19 

49 

co. S., Sh. 




2' 55" E.). 

Bakun Pt.’ S. 11° W., 0.70 



9.08 a. m. 

49 

co. S., Sh. 

D. 5154 

H. O. 1852; 
Apr., 1900. 

...do. 

10.23 a.m. 

12 

co. S .. 

mile (5° 14' 50" N., 119° 



58' 45" E.). 



12 

co. S. 

D. 5155 

.do. 

. ..do. 

11.00 a. m. 

12 

co. S. 

miles (5° 13' 40" N., 119° 



57' 20" E.). 

Tataan Pass, Simulac Id. 

(S. end Basun Channel). 
Simulac Id. (S. end Basun 
Channel). 

Tataan Pass (anch.). 

Tataan Pass (Simulac Id.,rf.) 
Tinakta Id. (N.), S. 77° W., 
3.40 miles (5° 12' 50" N., 




12 

co. S. 


.do. 

...do. 

2.00 p. m. 
7.00 p. m. 

mrgn. co. Rf.. 





.do. 

Feb. 20 


mrgn. co. Rf.. 


1.30 p. m. 

7.30 p. m. 


mrgn. co. Rf.. . 


.do. 


9 



.do. 

Feb. 21 


mrgn. co. Rf.. . 

D. 5156 

.do. 

. ..do. 

8.35 a. m. 

18 

fne. S., Sh. 





119° 55' 55" E.). 

Tinakta Id. (N.), S. 80° W., 
3.30 miles (5° 12' 30" N., 




18 

fne. S., Sh. 

D. 5157 

.do. 

. ..do. 

8.59 a. m. 

18 

fne. S. 



119° 55' 50" E.). 




18 

fne. S. 

D. 5158 

Tinakta Id. (N), N. 89° W., 
1.90 miles (5° 12' N., 119* 5 

_do. 

...do. 

9.21 a. m. 

12 

crs. S., Sh. 



54' 30" E.). 

Tinakta Id. (N.), N. 82° W., 
1.40 miles (5° 11' 50" N., 




12 

crs. S., Sh. 

D. 5159 

.do..;... 

..do. 

10.04 a. m. 

10 

co. S.!. 



119° 54' E.). 

Simulac Id. (rf.). 




10 

co. S. 




1.30 p. in. 

7.30 p. m. 
8.26 a. m. 

mrgn. co. Rf. 


Tataan Pass (anch.). 

Tinakta Id. (N.), S. 72° W., 
2.75 miles (5° 12' 40" N., 

.do. 


9 


D. 5160 

.do. 

Feb. 22 

12 

S. 



119° 55' 10" E.). 




12 

S. 

D. 5161 

Tinakta Id. (E.), N. 12° W., 

.do. 

. ..do. 

9.03 a. m. 

16 

fne. S., blk. Sp.... 


1.80 miles (5° 10' 15" N., 






119° 53' E.). 

Tinagta Id. (S), N. 63° E., 
4.10 miles (5° 09' 55" N., 




16 

fne. S. 

H. 4906 

C. S. 4514; 
Jan., 1906. 

...do. 

9.51 a. m. 

55 

S., brk. Sh. 



119° 48' 55" E.). 






D. 5162 

Tinagta Id. (S.), N. 71° W., 
5.40 miles (5° 10' N., HO' 5 

.do. 

. ..do. 

10:10 a. m. 

230 


10.31 a. m. 

230 

crs. S., brk. Sh_ 


47' 30" E.). 







Bongao (anch.). 

Bongao (near anch.). 

Sanguisiapo Id. (rf.). 



7.30 p. m. 
7.30 p. m. 

6 











sml. Clmps. Co.,S. 
co. S. 

D. 5163 

Observation Id., N. 79° W., 
6.70 miles (4° 59' 10'' N., 

.do. 

. ..do. 

9.36 a. m. 

28 



119° 51' E.). 

Observation Id., S 82° W., 

8 miles (5° 01' 40" N.,119° 




28 

co. S. 

D. 5164 

.do. 

...do. 

10.16 a. m. 

18 




52' 20" E.). 

Observation Id., N. 70° W., 




18 

gn. M. 

D. 5165 

.do. 

...do. 

1.19 p. m. 

*9 

Co. 

6.40 miles (4° 58' 20" N., 
119° 50' 30" E.). 







D. 5166 

Observation Id., N.20° W., 
4.60 miles (4° 56' 10" N., 

.do. 

...do. 

2.54 p. m. 

97 

co. S. 

co. S. 


119° 46' E.). 

Simonor Id., N. side (rf.)_ 

Observation Id., N. 11° W., 



3.05 p. m. 

3.15 p. m. 
3.36 p. m. 
3.53 p. m. 

97 





D. 5167 

.do. 

...do. 

110 

Co *. 

5.60 miles (4° 55' 10" N., 
119° 45' 30" E.). 

no 

Co.*. 

















































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 21 

Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 


84 


83 


81 


80 


63.5 


52.9 


Density. 


Sur¬ 

face. 


1.02489 


1.02457 


1.02437 


1.02437 
i." 02437 


1.02422 


1.02422 


1.02422 
i." 02422 


1.02447 


1.02447 


1.02442 


1.02495 
1.02644 


1.02406 


Bot¬ 

tom. 


Apparatus. 


Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 
Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

dip; e. 1. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 
Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 
Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

int. 4 §. 


dyn. 

4 gill nets 

dyn. 

dyn. 


dip; e. 1. 

dyn. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

9' Jn. dr. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

9' Jn. dr. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

9' Jn. dr. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

9' Jn. dr. 

dyn. 

dip. e. 1. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

9' Jn. dr.. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

9' Jn. dr.. 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 


Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12' Agz.; m. b. 


dip; e. 1. 

4 gill nets. 

dyn. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

9' Jn. dr. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

9' Jn. dr.. 

9' Jn. dr. 


Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 


dyn. 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12' Agz.; m. b 


Trial. 


Depth. 


botm 


botm 

surf. 


botm 


botm 


8 fms 
5-30 f 


5-40 f 
5-40 f 


surf. 
6-20 f 


botm 


botm 


botm 


botm 
6-20 f 
surf. 


botm 


botm 


botm 

surf. 


6-15 f 


botm 


botm 

botm 


botm 


6-15 ft. 


botm.. 


Dura¬ 

tion. 


ft. m. 


15 
1 30 


21 

2 

3 00 


3 00 
3 00 


30 
3 00 


2 

3 00 
1 00 


15 


2 30 

4 


2 00 


20 


Drift. 


Direction. 


N. 86° E. 


S. 56° W. 


N. 27° W.. 


S. 42° W. 
S. 58° W. 


S. 28° E.. 


S. 29° W. 
N.80° W. 
S. 14° E.. 


S. 67° W. 


S. 9° E. 


N. 63° W. 


N. 30° E. 
S. 


S. 5° E.... 


S. 14° W. 


Remarks. 


(?) 


1.4 


20 fms. d redge 
cable out. 

Set over night. 

Channel between 
reefs. 


Net fouled bottom. 


Final haul Feb. 24. 


No sounding 
taken. 


Distance recorded 
.7 mile; 1 bridle 
stop carried 
away. 


59395°—11-12 











































































































































22 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Station 

No. 


D. 5168 


D. 5169 

D.'aro 

H. 4907 
D.5171 


D.5172 

H. 4908 
D. 5173 

D. 5174 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 

Sulu Archipelago, Tawi 
Tawi Group—Continued. 







1908. 


/ms. 


Observation Id. N. 17° W., 

C. S. 4514; 

Feb. 25 

7.09 a. m. 

80 

co. S. 

4.20 miles (4° 56' 30" N., 
119° 45'40" E.). 

Sulu Archipelago, vicinity 

Jan.,1906. 

co. S. 


7.23 a. m. 

80 




Sibutu Id. 






Sitanki (anch.). 

C. S. 4722; 
Apr., 1905. 

Feb. 25 

7.30 p. m. 






Sitanki (near anch.). 



7.30 p. m. 



Tumindao Reef S. end (rf.).. 

.do. 

Feb. 26 


sctrd. Clmps. Co.. 
sctrd. Clmps. Co.. 
co. S. 

1.30 p. m. 
8.36 a. m. 


Sibutu Id. (S. E.), N. 38° E., 

8 miles (4° 32' 15" N., 119° 

.do. 

Feb. 27 

*10 


22' 45" E.). 

Sitanki wharf. 





S., M., Co... 

Sibutu Id. (S. end), N. 38° 
E., 13.50 miles (4° 28' N., 
119° 19' 30" E.). 

.do. 

...do_ 


128 


11.17 a. m. 

128 





Sibutu Id. (S. end), N. 10° 
E., 13.50 miles (4° 26' N., 

.do. 

...do_ 

12.51 p. m. 

850 



119° 25' 30" E.). 

Omapui Id. (W.), S. 22° W„ 

.do. 

Feb. 28 

3.21 p. m. 

250 

fne. co. S. 

12 miles (5° 05' N., 119° 28'E.). 



3.47 p. m. 

250 

fne. co. S. 

Sandakan and vicinity. 






Sandakan (near anch.). 

B. A. 950... 

Feb. 29 

8.15 p. m. 

8.15 p. m. 
8.00 p. m. 
2.00 p. m. 

7 


Sandakan (anch.). 



7 





7 


Sandakan (beach above fish¬ 
ermen’s village). 

.do. 

Mar. 2 


S., R. 



Vicinity of Jolo. 







C. S. 4722; 
Apr.,1905. 

Mar. 5 

9.00 a. m. 






Jolo Lt., E., 24.75 miles (6° 
03' 15" N., 120° 35' 30" E.). 

.do. 

...do_ 

10.06 a. m. 

318 

fne. S., Sh. 





10.31 a. m. 

318 

fne. S., Sh. 

Jolo Lt., N. 78° E., 7.50 
miles (6° 02' 30" N., 120° 

C. S. 4542; 

...do.... 

2.27 p. m. 

171 

Sh., Co. 

Apr.,1903! 


52' 20" E.). 





Jolo Lt.,N. 82° E., 6.75 miles 
(6° 02' 55" N., 120° 53' E.). 

.do. 

...do_ 

2.39 p. m. 

186 

Sh., Co. 




2.57 p. m. 

3.46 p. m. 

186 

Sh., Co. 

Jolo Lt., E. 2.60 miles (6° 03' 
45" N„ 120° 57'E.). 

.do. 

...do_ 

20 





3.51 p. m. 
4.00 p. m. 

20 

Jolo (anch.). 




Jolo (rf. near anch., north).. 
Jolo (beach, west of town).... 

.do. 

Mar. 6 


Co., S. 

.do. 

...do_ 

2.00 p. m. 

. 

S., Co., grassy_ 

Jolo (near anch.). 



4.00 p. m. 

9.00 a. m. 

10 

S. 

Jolo (west ol anch.). 


Mar. 7 

S., Co. (staghorn 
Mss.). 








































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 


23 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

Air. 

j Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





U. m. 


mi. 

79 

79 


1.02386 


Luc. sdr. (e).. 





79.5 

79 






3 

S.... 

(?) 








1 00 











. 







9-15ft.. 

3 00 









9-15ft.. 

3 00 



81 

79 


1.02509 



botm... 

5 

S. 11° W.. 

.2 







12—15 ft. 

1 00 



0.5 

78 


1.02426 







81 

78 





botm... 

2 

S. 27° E... 

(?) 

82 

79 








76 

83 

53.5 

1.02373 

1.02462 






76 

83 





botm... 

20 

S. 45° W.. 

(?) 







surf.... 

15 









1 30 










1 30 









12ft.... 

3 30 









6—12ft.. 

2 00 



84 

82 


1.02447 







85 

82 



12' Agz.; m. b.. 

botm .. 

20 

N. 47° W.. 

1.0 

96 

84 












(b). 





99 

83 


1.02518 









(b). 





93 

• 83 





botm... 

6 

E. 

(?) 

ion 

8 9 









100 

82 




(e). 

botm... 

6 

N.58°E... 

.4 

















8ft. 

3 00 








4ft. 

2 00 








botm... 









4-10ft.. 

3 00 




Remarks. 


Net fouled bottom. 


Set over night. 


No sounding. 


Distance recorded, 
0.5 mile; 1 bri¬ 
dle stop carried 
away. 


Distance not ob¬ 
tainable on ac¬ 
count of fog. 


Towed from steam 
launch. 


6 hauls. 


Temperatureat277 
fms. 53.3. Den¬ 
sity at 277 fms. 
1.02462. 

Net slightly dam¬ 
aged. 


Distance recorded 
0.7 mile. 


Hauled and 
shifted about 7 
p. m.; not found 
on following 
morning. 

4 hauls; 1 at mouth 
of stream. 

Hauled following 
morning and at 
1 p. m. 










































































































24 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


Position. 


Sulu Sea, S. E. of Cagayanes 
Ids. 


D. 5175 


D. 5176 
D. 5177 

D. 5178 
D. 5179 


D. 51S0 

D. 5181 
D. 5182 

D. 5183 

D. 5184 
D. 5185 
D. 5186 


Manucan Id. (E.), N. 45° 
W., 23.25 miles (9° 21' N., 
121° 37' 45" E.). 

Manila Bay. 

Manila Bay (Luneta beach).. 

Cavite (Sangley Pt. beach).. 

Verde Id. Passage. 

Escarceo Lt., S. 57° E., 7 
miles (13° 35' 15" N., 120° 
53' 20" E.). 

Escarceo Lt., S. 53° E., 5.80 
miles (13° 35' N., 120° 54' 
36" E.). 

Vicinity of Romblon. 

Pt. Origon (N.), S. 5° E., 2.30 
miles (12° 43' N., 122° 06' 
15" E.). 

Romblon Lt., S. 56° E., 4.50 
miles (12° 38' 15" N., 122° 
12' 30" E.). 

Romblon Harbor (rf. S. of 
Agbatan Pt.). 

Romblon (anch.). 

Romblon (beach at Binagon 
and Agpatan Pts.). 

Romblon (rf. E. of Sabang 
Pt.). 

Romblon (rf. E. side Rosas 
Pt.). 

Romblon Lt., N. 6°30'E., 
7.10 miles (12° 28' 30" N., 
122° 15' E.). 

Off eastern Panay. 

Antonia Id. (S.), S. 63° W., 
6.60 miles (11° 36' 40" N., 
123° 26' 35" E.). 

Antonia Id. (S.), N., 43° W., 
3.70 miles (11° 30' 40" N., 
123° 23' 20" E.). 

Between Panay and Negros. 

Lusaran Lt., S. 29° E., 4 
miles (10° 32' 48" N., 122° 
26' E.). 

Lusaran Lt., N. 22° E., 11.25 
miles (10° 18' 30" N., 122° 
23' 30" E.). 

Lusaran Lt., N. 23° E., 25.50 
miles (10° 05' 45" N., 122° 
18' 30" E.). 

Lusaran I.t., N. 20° E., 37.80 
miles (9° 53' 30" N., 122° 
15' 30" E.). 

Tanon Strait, east coast of 
Negros. 


D. 5187 


Apo Id., S. 21° W., 12.50 
miles (9° 16' 45" N., 123° 
21' 15" E.). 


Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


1908. 


fms. 


C. S. 4717; 

Mar. 8 

7.22 p. m. 

* 


Feb.,1903. 





C. S. 4240; 

Mar. 16 



S„ M. 

Feb., 1907! 






Mar. 23 



S. 

C. S. 4240; 

Mar. 24 

7.01 p. m. 

*260 

*S. 

Feb.,1907. 





.do. 

...do_ 

7.33 p. m. 

*260 

*s. 

C. S. 4714; 

Mar. 25 

8.35 a. m. 

73 

fne. S. 

June,1906. 







8.51 a. m. 

78 

fne. S. 

.do. 

. ..do_ 

10.41 a. m. 

37 

hrd. S. 



10.49 a. m. 

37 

hrd. S. 

C. S. 4442; 

...do_ 

2.00 p. m. 


Mss. staghorn Co. 

Mar.,1907. 








20 






S.,Co. 

.do...:.. 

. ..do. 

9.00 a. m. 


mrgn.Clmps. Co... 






C. S. 4715; 


7.32 p. m. 



Apr., 1907. 




C. S. 4417; 

Mar. 27 

8.39 a. m. 

26 

M., fne. S. 

Feb., 1905. 







8.46 a. m. 

26 

M., fne. S. 

.do. 

...do. 

9.43 a. m. 

24 

fne. S., M. 



9.51 a. m. 

24 

fne. S., M. 

C. S. 4718; 

Mar. 30 

10.27 a. m 

96 

sft. gn. M. 

Dec., 1906. 


10.51 a. m. 

96 

sft. gn. M...;. 

.do. 

. ..do. 

1.09 p. m. 

565 

gn. M. 



1.53 p. m. 

565 

gn. M. 

.do. 

. ..do. 

4.39 p. m. 

638 

gn. M. 



5.26 p. m. 

638 

gn. M. 






C. S. 4718;' 

Mar. 31 

1.06 p. m. 

225 

sft. gn. M. 

Dec., 1906. 


1.26 p. m. 

225 

sft. gn. M. 

















































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


25 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

Remarks. 

9 

< 

1 Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F 

°F. 





h. m. 


mi. 


82 

82 






0 20 

N. 7° E... 

1.3 












bottom at 70 











fms. 







4ft... 

1 30 










10ft. 

2 30 




80 

79 






0 21 

S. 72° E 

1 0 


80 

79 




int. 4 § . 


0 20 

E... 

0.9 









1.5 


cable out. 

80 

80 


1.02515 

1.02516 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 
















trip. 

80 

80 






0 20 

N. 84° W 

2.0 


81 

81 

75.7 



Luc. sdr. (a)... 





81 

81 






0 15 

N. 81° W 

1.3 







dyn. 

8-15 ft 

3 00 








dip; e. 1. 


2 00 









150' seine. 











dyn. 

10-20 ft. 

3 00 









dyn. 

8-15 ft.. 

1 30 














rain. * 

79 

80 


1.02530 


int. 4. 


20 

S. 5° E_ 

(?) 


80 

80 


1.02544 


Tnr.-Blish sdr. 










(e). 






80 

80 




9' Jn. dr. 


4 

S. 46° W.. 

.3 


81 

80 


1.02515 













(e). 






81 

80 






8 

S. 39° W.. 

.7 












55 fms. 

83 

81 

63. 4 

1.02489 

1.02551 

Luc. sdr. (a)... 






84 

81 




12' Agz.;3m.b. 


20 

S. 78° W.. 

.7 

Veered from 192 to 










250 fms. during 











haul. 

90 

83 

49.8 

1.02489 

1.02505 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 






92 

82 






20 

S. 52° W.. 

2.0 


81 

82 

49.8 

1.02481 

1.02492 

Luc. sdr. (b).. 






81 

82 




int. 4 §.. 


20 

S. 64° W.. 

2.5 

1,000 fms. dredge 








48 



cable out. 

81 

80 


1.02530 


int. 4. 


20 

S. 4° W... 

.8 


87 

81 

53.6 

1.02475 

1.02492 







87 

81 






11 

S. 79° W.. 

.6 

Lashing slipped; 











catch"lost. 




















































































26 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


D.51S8 
D. 5189 
D. 5190 

D.sin 


D. 5192 
D.5193 
D. 5194 
D. 5195 
D. 5196 


D. 5197 
D. 5198 

D. 5199 
D. 5200 

D. 5201 
D. 5202 
D. 5203 


Position. 


Tanon Strait, east coast of 

Negros— Continued. 

Port Bais (anch.). 

Pescador Id., N. 16° E., 14 
miles (9° 44' N., 123° 14' 
20" E.). 

Pescador Id., N. 72° E., 3.30 
miles (9° 56' 30" N., 123° 
15' E.). 

Pescador Id., S. 9° E., 10.70 
miles (10° 08' 15" N., 123° 
16' 45" E.). 

Guijuliigan (beach). 

Refugio Id. (S.), S. 74° W., 
5.50 miles (10° 29' 45" N., 
123° 31' 15" E.). 

Balamban (anch.). 

Off northern Cebu Id. 

Jilantaguan Id. (E.), N. 13° 
W., 3 miles (11° 09' 15" N., 
123° 50' E.). 

Chocolate Id., N. 77° E., 8 
miles (11° 16' 45" N., 123° 
55' 45" E.). 

Chocolate Id., N. 66° W., 8 
miles (11° 15' 30" N., 124° 
11' E.). 

Capitancillo Id. Lt., N., 
11.75 miles (10° 47'N., 124° 
06' 30" E.). 

Capitancillo I.t., N. 5° 30' 
W., 14.30 miles (10° 44' 
30" N., 124° 07'30" E.). 

Mactan Cove, S. E. shore 
(rf.). 

Mactan Id. (shore, opposite 
Cebu). 

Vicinity western Bohol. 

Mantacao Id., S. side (rf.)... 

Mantacao Id., S. side (beach). 

Mantacao Id. (anch.). 

Baliscasag Id., S., 22 miles 
(9° 52' 30" N., 123° 40' 45" 
E.). 

Baliscasag Id., S. 6° E., 10.25 
miles (9° 40' 50" N., 123° 
39' 45" E.). 

Tagbilaran Channel (beach 
onBohol side nearS.anch.). 

Pamilacan Id. (E.), S. 61 ° W., 

6.25 miles (9° 31' 50" N., 
124° 40" E.). 

Pamilacanld. (E.).S.66° W., 

7.25 miles (9° 31' 50" N., 
124° 02' 05" E.). 

Sogod Bay, southern Leyte Id. 

Limasaua Id. (E.), S. 1°E., 
14.80 miles (10° 10'N., 125° 
04' 15" E.). 

Limasaua Id. (E.), S.2°E., 
16.70 miles (10° 12' N., 125° 
04' 10" E.). 

Limasaua Id. (S.), S. 38° W., 
5.50 miles (9° 58' N., 125° 
07' 40" E.). 


Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


1908. 


fins. 


C. S. 4718; 

Mar. 31 

8.00 p. m. 

9 


Dec., 1906. 





.do. 

Apr. 1 

10.21 a. m. 

299 

gn. M. 



10.44 a. m. 

299 

gn. M. 

.do. 

.. .do. 

1.08 p. m. 

300 

gn. M. 



1.33 p. m 

300 

gn. M. 

.do. 

...do- 

4.16 p. m. 

295 

gn. M. 



4.39 p. m. 

295 

gn. M. 






.do. 

...do. 

2.58 p. m. 

258 

gn . M .“_. 



3.26 p. m. 

258 

gn. M. 




12 

S. 

C. S. 4718; 

Apr. 3 

9.28 a. m. 

32 

gn. S. 

Dec., 1906. 







9.40 a. m. 

32 

gn- S. 

.do. 

...do. 

11.03 a. m. 

71 

gn. M. 



11.12 a. m. 

71 

gn. M. 

.do. 

.. .do. 

1.58 p. m. 

148 

gn. M. 



2.15 p. m. 

148 

gn. M. 











.do. 

Apr. 6 

10.00 a. m. 


mrgn. Clmps. Co.. 

.do. 

Apr. 7 

8.00 a. m. 


honey-combed Rf. 

C. S. 4718; 

Apr. 8 

3.00 p. m. 


mrgn. Mss. Co_ 

Dec., 1906. 









S. 

.do. 

...do. 

8.00 p. m. 

10 


.do. 

Apr. 9 

8.34 a. m. 

174 

gn. M. 



8.55 a. m. 

174 

gn. M. 

.do. 

.. .do. 

11.05 a. m. 

220 

gn. M ... 



11.25 a. m. 

220 

gn. M . 

.do. 

.. .do- 

3.00 p. m. 


S., grassy. 

C. S. 4719; 


7.30 p. m. 



Aug., 1904. 









C. S. 4719; 

Apr. 10 

8.24 a. m. 

554 

gy. S., M . 

Aug., 1904. 


9.13 a. m. 

554 

gy. S., M. 

.do. 

.. .do. 

10.31 a. m. 

502 

gy. M. 



11.07 a. m. 

502 

gy. m... 

.do. 

...do. 

2.21 p. m. 

775 

gn. M. 



3.47 p. m. 

775 

gn. M. 








































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


27 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 —Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

c 

< 

<v 

0 

*52 

5 

C Q 

e 

0 

0 

PQ 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 



82.5 

84.5 

85 

89 

92.5 

90 

81 

81 

82 

82 

83 

83 

62.6 

1.02475 

1.02502 

62.8 

1.02468 

1.02495 

63 

1.02468 

1.02482 




93 

91.5 

83 

83 

62.8 

1.02497 

1.02516 




82 

82 

86 

90 

85 

84 

82.5 

81.5 

82 

82 

82 

82 

83 

83 

84 

82 


1.02518 





1.02503 




56.5 

1.02447 

1.02597 


1.02514 

1.02518 


























89 

91 

84 

81 

81 

81 

54.3 

1.02489 

1.02513 

53.9 

1.02434 

1.02500 






83 

82.5 

80 

85 

80 

79 

82 

83 

79 

79 

79 

80 

80 

80 

80 

81 


1.02530 

1.02468 

1.02440 




52.8 

1.02497 

(?) 

1.02440 

1.02457 

52.9 

1.02468 

1.02606 





Apparatus. 


dip; e. 1. 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12 Agz.;3m.b. 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12 Agz.; 3 m.b. 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 
int. 4 §. 


150' seine. 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12' Agz.; 3 m.b. 

dip; e. 1. 


Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(b). 

9' Jn. dr. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

12' Agz.; 3 m.b. 
Luc. sdr. (a). 
12' Agz.;3m.b 

int. 4. 


dyn... 

poison. 

dyn... 


Trial. 


Depth. 


surf.... 
botm... 


botm... 


250 fms. 

9ft. 

botm... 
surf.... 


botm... 


botm... 

botm... 

surf... 

surf... 

10-20 ft 


130' seine. 

dip; e.1. 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12' Agz.;3m.b. 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12'Agz.; 3 m.b. 


130' seine, 
int. 4. 


Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12' Agz.; 3m.b. 


Luc. sdr. (a)... 
12' Agz.; 3 m.b. 


Luc. sdr. (a)... 
12' Agz.; 3 m.b. 


10-30 ft 


5ft.... 
surf... 


botm.. 


Dura¬ 

tion. 


h. m. 

3 30 


20 
20 
3 00 


20 
1 30 


2 00 
2 00 


1 00 
”20 


botm. 
6ft... 
surf.... 

surf.... 


botm. 


botm... 

botm... 


20 

1 00 
20 

18 


Drift. 


Direction. 


N. 63° W.. 


N. 70° E.. 


N. 43° W. 


S. 88° W. 


N. 45° W. 


N. 44° W. 
S. 25° w! 
S.22°30'E 


N. 58° W. 


S. 54° W. 


Remarks. 


Brackish water. 


400 fms. dredge 
cable out. 

8 hauls. 


No sounding. 

Ship steered in 
circle. 

High water. 

Tide pools. 


6 hauls. 


E. 

.6 




S. 24° W.. 

1.5 

(?). 

(?) 


N. 72° W.. 

2.7 


3 hauls. 


Ship steered in 
circle. 


Veered 112 fms. ca¬ 
ble during haul. 
Therm, failed to 
trip. 


Veered from 1,200 
to 1,330 fms. dur¬ 
ing haul. 











































































































28 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 


Off east coast of Leyte Id. 








1908. 


fms. 

D. 5204 

Mariquitdaquit Id., N. 88° 

C. S. 4719; 

Apr. 11 

9.48 a. m. 

15 


E., 3.50 miles (11° 04'18" N., 

Aug., 1904. 





125° 05' 30" E.). 










3 


Tacloban (near anch.). 





D. 5205 

Caguayan Pt., N. 2° E., 0.70 

.do. 

Apr. 13 

9.28 a. m. 

8 


mile (11° 19' 30" N., 124° 58' 






05" E.). 









1.00 p. m. 



babuy Id. (rf.).a 





Off western Samar. 





D. 5206 

Badian Id. (N.), N. 27° E., 

C. S. 4420; 

Apr. 14 

9.54 a. m. 

32 


5.75 miles (11° 31' 40" N., 

May, 1907. 





124° 42' 40" E.). 



10.02 a. m. 

32 

D. 5207 

Badian Id. (N.), S. 74° E., 

.do. 

.. .do. 

11.22 a. m. 

35 


4.70 miles (11° 38' 05" N., 






124° 40' 45" E.). 



11.27 a. m. 

35 

D. 5208 

Taratara Id. (N.), S. 07° 30' 

C. S. 4451; 

.. .do. 

12.53 p. m. 

26 


E., 4.10 miles '11° 45' 53" 

June, 1904. 





N., 124° 42' 50" E.). 



12.59 p. m. 

26 

D. 5209 

Taratara Id. (N.), S. 53° W., 

.do. 

.. .do. 

2.03 p. m. 

20 


1.80 miles (11° 45' 25" N., 






124° 48' 05" E.). 



2.13 p. m. 

20 





2.13 p. m. 

20 





4.00 p. m. 



Rf.). 









5 




Apr. 15 




Aguada Pt.). 











Rf.). 












Catbalogan (Lutao Rf. and 


Apr. 16 




Anas Pt.). 





Catbalogan (Quinituay Rf., 






beach). 






Catbalogan (Quinituay Rf.). 

.do. 

.. .do. 

2.30 p. m. 


D. 5210 

Limbancauavan Id. (E.), N. 

C. S. 4420; 

Apr. 17 

10.17 a. m. 

50 


1° W., 3.00 miles (11° 49' 

May, 1907. 


10.30 a. m. 

50 


55" N., 124° 28' 05" E.). 



10.30 a. m. 

50 


East of Masbate Id. 





D. 5211 

Panalangan Pt., Talajit Id., 

C. S. 4715; 

Apr. 17 

1.05 p. m. 

155 


N. 33° E., 5.25 miles (11° 

Apr., 1907. 


1.20 p. m. 

155 


51' 35" N., 124° 14' E.). 









1.20 p. m. 

155 



C. S. 4455; 


4.00 p. m. 



inside Dumurug Pt.). 

Sept., 1904. 






Apr. 18 




Pt. (beach). * 











inside Dumurug Pt.). 








Apr. 19 

3.00 p. m. 







20 

D. 5212 

Panalangan Pt., S. 54°30' E., 

C. S. 4715; 

Apr. 20 

8.29 a. m. 

10S 


14.50 miles (12° 04' 15" N., 

Apr., 1907. 


8.45 a. m. 

108 


124° 04' 30" E.). 





D. 5213 

Destacado Id. (S.),’N. 87° E., 

.do. 

.. .do. 

10.38 a. m. 

80 


8.50 miles (12° 15' N., 123° 






57' 30" E.). 



10.47 a. m. 

80 


Masbate (rf. N. of town). 

.do. 

. ..do. 

3.00 p. m. 



a One boat made collections up the Silaga River for a few miles. 


Character of 
bottom. 


gn. M 
M.,S. 


staghorn Co., R .. 


gn. M. 

gn. M. 

gn. M., S. 

gn. M., S. 

sft. gn. M. 

sft. gn. M. 

gn. M. 

gn. M. 

sft. Co., S. 


5., M. 

sft. Co., algae__ 

staghorn Clmps., 
Co., R. 

Co., R. 

5., Co. 

staghorn Mss., Co., 
R. 

fne. gy. S. 

fne. gy. S. 


gn. M., S. 


S., sctrd. Clmps 
staghorn Co. 


S., sctrd. Clmps 
staghorn Co. 

S., sctrd. Clmps 
staghorn Co. 


gy. S., M. 

gy. S., M. 

5., M.,Sh. 

5., M.,Sh. 

Co., R. 













































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 


29 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 — Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 

< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

84 

° F. 
82 

°F. 

1.02391 


12' Agz.; 3 m.b. 


ft. 

m. 

21 

N. 57° W.. 

mi. 

1.0 















84 

83 


1.02448 


12' Agz.; 3 m.b. 







3-10 ft.. 

3 

00 



83 

83 


1.02406 






83 

83 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b.. 

botm... 

20 

N. 18° W.. 

.7 

86 

84 


1.02395 



85 

84 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b.. 

bo tin... 

15 

N. 16° E... 

. 5 

84 

84 


1.02483 



84 

84 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b.. 

botm... 

20 

N.27° E... 

. 6 

81 

84 


1.02493 



81 

84 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b.. 
K2. 



20 

S. 28° E... 

. 6 

81 

84 






10 

S. 28° E... 

.3 





12-15 ft. 

1 

00 















Oft. 

3 

00 









12-15 ft. 

3 

00 









4-20 ft.. 

3 

00 









8-30 ft.. 

3 

00 









6 ft. 










4-30 ft.. 

2 

30 



82 

83 

84 

76.3 

1.02406 

1.02523 





83 

12' Agz.; m. b.. 
K2. 

botm... 


11 

N. 1° W... 

.2 

83 

83 




surf.... 


11 

N. 1° W... 

.2 

83 

84 

84 

84 

56.6 

1.02482 

1.02509 




int. 4§_ .... 

K2*. 

(?). 

surf.... 


20 

N.31° W.. 

1.7 

84 

84 





10 

20 

N.31° W.. 

1.7 





6-10 ft.. 

1 

30 








2 

30 









6-10 ft.. 

3 

00 









6-10 ft.. 

1 

00 








dip; e. 1. 

surf.... 



82 

83 

80 

80 

59.9 

1.02467 

1.02476 






12' Agz.; m. b.. 

botm... 


20 

N.21° W.. 

.9 

82 

85 

81 

81 


1.02489 








(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b.. 
dyn. 

botm... 


20 

N. 22° W.. 

.8 




6-25 ft.. 

2 

00 




Remarks. 


Sounding with 
hand lead. 


Hauled following 
morning. 

Fouled bottom; 
trawl lost; mud 
bag only recov¬ 
ered; sounding 
with hand lead. 

Brackish water. 


Mud bag lost. 
Towed alongside. 


Finally hauled on 
Apr. 17. 


Coral unthrifty. 
2 hauls. 

2 boats used. 


Towed alongside. 


200 fms. dredge 
cable out. 

Towed alongside. 


5 hauls. 


Veered 8 fms. dur¬ 
ing haul. 















































































































30 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


D. 5214 
D. 5215 


D. 5216 
D. 5217 
D. 5218 


D. 5219 


D. 5220 
D. 5221 
D. 5222 
D. 5223 
D.5224 

D. 5225 
D. 5226 


Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

East of Masbate Id. — Cont’d. 

Masbate (near anch.). 

C. S. 4715; 

1908. 
Apr. 20 


Apr., 1907. 


Palanog Lt., Masbate, S. 17° 

.do. 

Apr. 21 

W., 2.60 miles (12° 25' 18" 
N„ 123° 37' 15" E.). 

Palanog Lt., S. 5° 30' E., 8.50 

.do. 

. ..do- 

miles (12° 31' 30" N., 123° 
35' 24" E.). 

Between Burias and Luzon. 

Port San Miguel (beach). 

C. S. 4454: 

Apr. 21 

Port San Miguel (rf. N. of 

May, 1906. 
.do. 

. ..do- 

Puro Id.). 

Port San Miguel (anch.). 

Anima Sola Id., N. 44° W., 

C. S. 4715; 

. ..do- 

Apr. 22 

29.50 miles (12° 52' N., 123° 

Apr., 1907. 

23' 30" E.). 

Anima Sola Id., N. 42° W., 
17.30miles(13°20" N., 123° 
14' 15" E.). 

Anima Sola Id. (E.), N. 10° 

.do. 

...do.... 

.do. 

...do.... 

W., 2 miles (13° 11'15" N., 
123° 02' 45" E.). 

Burias Id., Port Busin (pt. 

C. S. 4454; 

...do.... 

below fort rf.). 

May, 1906. 


Burias Id., Port Busin(anch.) 

.do. 

. ..do_ 

Port Busin (pt. below fort, rf.) 

.do. 

Apr. 23 

Port Busin (beach at fort pt.) 

.do. 

...do- 

Between Marinduque and 
Luzon. 

Mompog Id. (NE.), N. 35° 
30' W., 12.25 miles (13° 21' 

C. S. 4715; 

Apr. 23 

Apr., 1907. 

N., 122° 18'45" E.). 

Santa Cruz Harbor Marin- 

C. S. 4453; 

.. .do- 

duque (anch.). 

July, 1908. 


Santa Cruz Id. (SE.). 

.do. 

Apr. 24 




San Andreas Id. (W.), S. 57° 

C. S. 4714; 

. ..do- 

W., 8.50 miles (13° 38' N., 

June, 1906. 


121° 58' E.). 

San Andreas Id. (W.), S. 27° 

.do. 

. ..do- 

E., 5.50 miles (13° 38' 15" 
N., 121° 48' 15" E.). 

San Andreas Id. (W.), S. 57° 

.do. 

. ..do- 

E., 9.20 miles (13° 38' 30" 
N., 121° 42'45" E.). 
Malabrigo Lt., W., 9.80 

.do. 

...do- 

miles (13° 36' N., 121° 25' 
30" E.). 

Malabrigo Lt., N. 79° W., 
6.25 miles (13° 34' 50" N., 
121° 21'45" E.). 

China Sea, south of Conegidor. 

Corregidor Lt., N. 10° E., 

.do. 

. ..do- 

C. S. 4240; 

Mav 4 

9.50 miles (14° 13' 24" N., 

Feb., 1907. 


120° 32'36" E.). 

Corregidor Lt., N. 10° E., 

.do. 

...do_ 

10.70 miles (14° 12' 15" N., 
120° 32'24" E.). 




Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


fms. 








8.00 p. m. 

20 


8.59 a. m. 

218 

gn. M. 

9.19 a. m. 

218 

gn. M. 

10.27 a. m. 

604 

gn. M. 

11.32 a. m. 

604 

gn. M. 



S. 

3.00 p. m. 


S., mrgn. Clmps. 



Co. 

7.00 p. m. 

19 


8.19 a. m. 

215 

gn. M. 

8.36 a. m. 

215 

gn. M. 

10.31 a. m. 

105 

crs. gy. S. 

10.44 a. m. 

105 

crs. gy. S. 

12.58 p. m. 

20 

crs. S. 

1.05 p. m. 

20 

crs. S. 



mrgn. co. Rf. 

8.00 p. m. 

12 





5.30 a. m. 

. 

S., R.,Co. 

1.57 p. m. 

530 

gn. M. 

2.37 p. m. 

530 

gn. M. 

8.00 p. m. 

12 

S. 







12.57 p. m. 

50 

sft. gn. M. 


50 


3.05 p. m. 

193 

gn. M. 


193 


4.33 p. m. 

195 

gn. M. 

4.49 p. m. 

195 

gn. M. 

• 





























































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


31 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


< 

j Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





ft. m. 


mi. 

Hauled following 
morning. 

Lost. 






2 wire traps... 










surface. 

1-30 



81 

82 

51.4 

1.02475 

1.02485 





81 

81 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

Luc.sdr. (a)... 

botm... 

20 

N. 36° E.. 

1.0 


82 

81 

50.5 

1.02440 

1.02441 


82 

82 

12' Agz.; m. b. 


20 

2 30 

S. 77° E... 

1.2 





15ft ... 

5 hauls. 







6-30 ft.. 

2 30 








dip; e. 1. 

surface. 

3 00 




SO 

80 

51.9 

1.02481 

1.02465 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 




80 

80 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 

botm... 

20 

N. 42° W.. 

1.5 


83 

82 

63.1 

1.02489 

1.02496 


85 

81 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 

botm... 

20 

N. 45° W.. 

1.2 


86 

82 


1.02538 



86 

82 



(e). 


5 

N. 16° W.. 

.2 






10-30 ft. 

2 00 










2 00 










10-30 ft. 

1 30 










6ft .... 

1 30 



3 hauls. 

84 

86 

50.8 

1.02468 

1.02467 




86 

87 

12' Agz.; m. b. 


20 

N. 27° E.. 

1.5 






2 00 









6-15 ft.. 

1 00 










4ft. 



5 hauls; beach In- 

87 

85 


1.02493 







side reef. 

87 

85 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

14 

N. 54° W.. 

.7 


85 

84 

52.4 

1.02503 

1.02467 



85 

84 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 21° W.. 

1.0 


85 

85 

52.8 

1.02470 

1.02447 


86 

85 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 20° \V_. 

1.7 


83 

84 




surface. 

20 

S. 69“ W.. 

1.8 


83 

84 






10 

N. 80° W.. 

.4 


85 

84 


1.02448 



40 fms.. 

20 

S. 

.9 

Record lncom- 




(?) 



plete. 

85 

83 


1.02514 



surface. 

20 

s. 

.8 








































































































32 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Station 

No. 


D. 5227 

D. 5228 

D. 5229 

D. 5230 
D, 5231 
D. 5232 
D. 5233 
D. 5234 


D. 5235 


D. 5236 


D. 5237 

D. 5238 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 

East of Mindoro. 








1908. 


fms. 


Pt. Origon, S. 44° E., 18.30 

C. S. 4714; 

May 5 

1.04 p. m. 

322 

gn. M. 

miles (12° 53' 45" N., 121° 

June, 1906. 


1.30 p. m. 

322 


52' 30" E.). 






South of Romblon. 






Romblon Lt., N. 3° E., 6.25 

C. S. 4715; 

May 5 

7.02 p. m. 



miles (12° 29' 30" N., 122° 

Apr., 1907. 

7.02 p. m. 



15' 45" E.). 




Between Cebu and Leyte. 






Talong Id. (E.), S. 17° W., 

C. S. 4719; 

May 7 

9.34 a. m. 

*290 


5.75 miles (10° 48' 45" N., 

Aug., 1904. 





124° 21' 15" E.). 



9.55 a. m. 

*290 


Between Bohol and Leyte. 






Limasaua Id. (S.), S. 68° E., 

C. S. 4719; 

May 7 

7.03 p. m. 

118 

gy. S. 

22.50 miles (10° 01' 50" N., 

Aug., 1904. 


7.13 p. m. 

118 


124° 42' 30" E.). 



7.13 p. m. 

118 





7.48 p. m. 



21.70 miles (10° 01' 15" N., 





124° 43' 15" E.). 









8.25 p. m. 



20.60 miles (10° 00' 45" N. 





124° 44' 06" E.). 









9.00 p. m. 



19.50 miles (i0°00' 22" N.| 





124° 45' 06" E.). 






Limasaua Id. (S.), S. 70° 30' 

.do. 

. ..do. 

9.42 p. m. 



E., 18.50 miles (10° N., 124° 





46' 06" E.). 






Pacific Ocean, east coast Min- 






danao. 






Surigao (beach near Bilan 

C. S. 4644: 

May 8 

8.30 a. m. 


M., S., Co., grassy. 

Bilan). 

July, 1905. 








1.30 p. m. 



Ian). 





Nagubat Id. (S.), S. 58° W., 

C. S. 4719: 

May 9 

9.24 a. m. 

44 

sft. M. 

7 miles (9° 43' N., 125° 48' 

Aug., 1904. 





15" E.). 



9.30 a. m. 

44 

sft. M. 

Generale Id. (S. W. shore, 



3.00 p. m. 



beach). 

















Pt., rf.). 






Generale Id. (rf.). 

.do. 

. ..do. 




Magabao Id. (S.j, N. 85° W., 

.do. 

May 11 

10.27 a. m. 

494 

fne. gy. S. 

9.10 miles (8° 50' 45" N., 



11.02 a. m. 

494 

fne. gy. S. 

126° 26' 52" E.). 











co. Mss., algae_ 

Lianga Bay (anch.). 




15 

Sanco Pt. Id. (N.),N. 69° W., 

C. S. 4724; 

May 12 

10.11 a. m. 

249 

.(?). 

5 75 miles (8° 09' 06" N., 

Oct., 1909. 


10.42 a. m. 

249 

gn. M. 

126° 31' 45" E.). 






Pt. Lambajon, S. 65° W., 

.do. 

. ..do. 

3.00 p. m. 

380 

gn. M. 

4.30 miles (7° 34' 45" N., 



3.28 p. m. 

380 

gn. M. 

126° 38' 15" E.). 








May 13 




Laeud). 





Baganga Bay (S. W. shore, 





S. 

beach). 









1.00 p. m. 


S., G. 

beach). 








































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 


33 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

< 

U F. 

86 

85 

84 

84 

86 

86 

84 

84 

84 

85 

83.5 

83 

83 

o 

E3 

3 

m 

°F. 

86 

87 

85 

85 

85 

85 

84 

84 

84 

84 

84 

84 

84 

a 

o 

o 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

°F. 

1.02498 





1.02519 





1.02525 




57.6 

1.02477 

1.02496 





1.02531 

1.02531 

1.02514 

1.02531 















84 

84 

86 

86 


1.02475 






















87 

86 

85 

86 

41.2 

1.02453 

1.02522 









85 

85 

91 

85 

85 

85 

86 
86 

46.4 

1.02477 

1.02482 

43.0 

1.02453 

1.02459 




















Apparatus. 


Luc. sdr. (a). 
Int. 4 §. 


Int. 4.... 
K2', K5 J. 


Tnr.-Blishsdr. 

(e). 

Int. 4; K2,K5§ 


Luc. sdr. (a). 

int. 4. 

K2, K5 % . 

int. 4; K2,K5 j 


int. 4. 

int. 4; K2, K5 § 
int. 4; K2, K5§ 


150' seine, 
dyn. 


Tnr.-Blish sdr. 

(e). 

12'Agz.;3m.b. 
150' seine.. 


dyn. 

dyn. 


dyn.. 

Luc. sdr.(a)... 
12' Agz.; 3m.b. 


dyn. 


dip; e.1. 

Luc. sdr. (a)... 
12'Agz.;3m.b. 


Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12' Agz.; 3m.b. 


dyn. 

130' seine. 
250' seine. 


Trial. 


Depth. 


290 fms. 


surface. 

surface. 


surface. 
surface. 
80 fms.. 


surface. 
100 fms. 
15 fms.. 


6-30 ft.. 
6-15 ft.. 


botm... 
6-8 ft... 


12-20 ft. 
12-20 ft. 


4-15 ft. 


botm... 

12ft... 

surface. 


botm.. 


botm... 
4-20 ft.. 
10-20 ft. 
30 ft.... 


Dura¬ 

tion. 


ft. 771. 


3 00 

4 00 


20 

2 00 


2 00 
3 00 


20 

2 00 


Drift. 


Direction. 


S. 30° E.. 


S. 30° E.. 
S. 30° E.. 


S. 17° W.. 


S. 63° E. 
S. 63° E. 
S. 63° E. 


S. 63° E. 
S. 63° E. 
S. 63° E. 


S. 56° E.. 


S. 4° E.... 


S. 3° E. 


S. 15° W. 


2.5 


2.5 


Remarks. 


400 fms. dredge 
cable out. 


225 fms. dredge 
cable out. 


125 fms. dredge ca¬ 
ble out. 


150 fms. dredge ca¬ 
ble out. 

25 fms. dredge ca¬ 
ble out. 


5 hauls. 


1 bridle stop car¬ 
ried away. 

5 hauls. 


Bridle stops car¬ 
ried away; net 
capsized; catch 
saved. 

Seining party 
failed to find 
suitable beach. 


Veered at intervals 
from 450 to 550 
fms. 


Roily, brackish 
water. 

7 hauls. 

3 hauls. River ex¬ 
plored. 






























































































34 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records op the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


D.5239 


D. 5240 

D. 5241 

D. 5242 

D. 5243 
D. 5244 
D. 5245 


D. 5246 


D. 5247 
D. 5248 

D. 5249 

D. 5250 
D. 5251 
D. 5252 
D. 5253 
D. 5254 
D. 5255 


Position. 


Pujada Bay and vicinity. 

Uanivan Id. (N.), N. 78° E., 
2.25 miles (6° 49' 08" N., 
126° 15' 12" E.). 


Uanivan Id. (N.), E., 2.40 
miles (6° 49' 36" N. ,126° 
15' E.). 

Uanivan Id. (N.), S. 68° E., 

3 miles (6° 50' 45" N., 126° 
14' 38" E.). 

Uanivan Id. (N.), S. 56° E., 

4 miles (6° 51' 53" N., 126 6 
14' 10" E.). 

Pujada Bay (rf. S. of Tatai- 
daga Pt.). 

Pujada Bay (beach both 
sides Mati.). 

Uanivan Id. (N.), S. 66° E., 
3.10 miles (6° 50' 55" N., 
126° 14' 35" E.). 

Uanivan Id. (N.), S. 52° 30' 
E., 4 miles (6° 52' 05" N., 
126° 14' 15" E.). 

Uanivan Id. (N.), S. 41° E., 
4 miles (6° 52' 36" N., 126° 
14' 52" E.). 

Pacific Ocean, east of Min¬ 
danao. 

Luban Id. (N.), S. 58° W., 
4.6 miles (6° 29' 15" N., 126° 
18' 45" E.). 

Gulf of Davao. 

Beach east of Davao town... 

Dumalag Id. (S.), S. 78° W., 
3.8 miles (7° 02' N., 125° 
38' 45" E.). 

Lanang Pt., S. 33° W., 0.40 
mile (7° 07' 25" N., 125° 40' 
24" E.). 

Lanang Pt., N. 1 mile (7° 06' 
06" N., 125° 40' 08" E.). 


Linao Pt., N. 22° E., 1.1 

miles (7° 05' 07" N., 125° 
39' 45" E.). 

Linao Pt., N. 32° E., 1.1 

miles (7° 05' 12" N., 125° 
39' 35" E.). 

Linao Pt., N. 22° F.., 1.5 

miles (7° 04' 48" N., 125° 
39' 38" E.). 

Linao Pt., N. 22° E., 1.5 

miles (7° 04' 48" N., 125° 
39' 38" E.). 

Linao Pt., N. 44° E., 0.7 

mile (7° 05' 42" N., 125° 
39' 42" E.). 

Dumalag Id. (S.), S. 65° W., 
4.5miles (7° 03' N., 125° 39' 
E.). 


Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
, bottom. 


1908. 


fms. 


C. S. 4646; 

May 14 

12.44 p. m. 

171 

sft. gy. M. 

Jan.,1905. 







1.02 p. m. 

171 

sft. gy. M. 

.do. 

...do. 

1.33 p. m. 

145 

sft. gy. M. 



1.49 p. m. 

145 

sft. gy. M. 

.do... ... 

. ..do. 

2.24 p. m. 

215 

sft. gy. M. 



3.05 p. m. 

215 

sft. gy. M. 

.do. 

. ..do. 

3.46 p. m. 

191 

sft. gy. M. 



4.03 p. m. 

191 

sft. gy. M. 











.do. 

. ..do. 

12.54 p. m. 

218 

gv. M. 



1.12 p. m. 

218 

gy M. 

.do. 

...do. 

1.48 p. m. 

171 

gy H. 



2.05 p. m. 

171 

gy- M. 

.do. 

...do. 

2.47 p. m. 

135 

gy- m. 



3.02 p. m. 

135 

gy M. 

C. S. 4724; 

May 15 

7.10 p. m. 



Oct.,1909. 



C. S. 4724; 

May 16 



M., S. 

Oct., 1909. 




.do. 

May 18 

8.47 a. m. 

135 

M. 



9.08 a. m. 

135 

M. 

C. S. 4648; 

...do. 

10.30 a. m. 

18 

Co. 

Sept.,1907. 







10.38 a. m. 

18 

Co. 

.do. 

. ..do. 

10.57 a. m. 

23 

Co., S. 




23 

Co., S. 

.do. 

. ..do. 

11.20 a. m. 

23 

Co., S. 



11.24 a. m. 

23 

Co., S. 

.do. 

. ..do. 

1.07 p. m. 

20 

Co. 



1.10 p. m. 

20 

Co. 

.do. 

. ..do. 

1.22 p. m. 

28 

Co. 



1.25 p. m. 

28 

Co. 

.do. 

...do. 

1.34 p. m. 

28 

Co. 



1.47 p. m. 

28 

Co. 

.do. 

...do. 

2.22 p. m. 

21 

S.,Co. 



2.26 p. m. 

21 

S., Co. 

.do. 

...do. 

6.03 p. m. 

100 

sft. M . 



6.13 p. m. 

100 

sft. M. 





















































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


35 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

Remarks. 

t-i 

< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





h. m. 


mi. 


84 

86 


1.02417 


Tnr.-Blishsdr. 











(e). 






84 

86 




12' Agz.;3m.b. 


7 

N. 13° W 

0.5 











ping stops car- 











ried away; net 











torn; frame 











twisted; 1 mud 











bag lost. 

84 

86 


1.02448 


Tnr.-Blishsdr. 











(e). 






84 

86 






20 

N. 16° W.. 

1.1 









7 



ble out. 

85 

85 


1.02453 













(e). 






84 

85 




9' alb. Blk.; 


20 

N. 15° W.. 

i.i 







m. b. 





540 fms. 

84 

85 

64.1 

1.02457 

1.02489 







83.5 

85 






20 

N. 13° W.. 

1.0 







m. b. 












6-20 ft.. 

2 30 










10 ft.... 

2 00 




84 

84 

63.6 

1.02453 

1.02468 







85 

85 





botm... 

20 

N. 15° W.. 

1.1 


84 

85 


1.02497 













(e). 






84 

85 





botm... 

20 

N. 46° E... 

.7 


84 

84 


1.02468 








84 

84 




(e). 


20 

N.2° W... 

.8 

Net damaged. 

83 

82 


1.02477 


fnt. 4 §. 


20 

S. 6° E.... 

1.8 

150 fms. dredge ca- 








8 



ble out. 







6ft. 

2 00 



3 hauls. 

80 

83 


1.02417 











(e). 






81 

83 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 76° W.. 

.5 


84 5 

83 


1.02453 








84.5 

83 



(e). 

botm... 

4 

(7). 

(?) 

Veered from 27 to 











30 fms. 

85 

84 


1. 02453 











(e). 






85 

84 





botm... 

7 

(?). 

(?) 

Veered from 30 to 









36 fms. 

84 

84 


1.02457 










(e). 






84 

84 





botm... 

3 

(?). 

(?) 


86 

83 


1.02433 










(e). 






86 

83 





botm... 

5 

(?). 

(?) 


85 

83 


1.02417 










(e). 






85 

83 




6' Jn. dr. 

botm... 

4 

S. 29° E... 



83 

84 


1.02433 










(e). 






83 

84 




6' Jn. dr. 

botm... 

11 

N. 11° E .. 

1.0 


83 

83 


1.02417 










(e). 






83 

83 





botm... 

5 

N. 

.3 





1.02227 








83 

84 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

(?). 

(?) 

Made after dark. 



















































































































36 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records op the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Date 


Time of 
day. 


Depth. 


Character of 
bottom. 


D. 5256 
D. 5257 


D. 5258 


D. 5259 


D. 5260 


H. 4912 
D. 5261 


D. 5262 


Southern Mindanao, eastern 
Illana Bay. 

Cotabato (beach outside 
Panalisan Pt.).o 

Cotabato (near anch. outside 
Panalisan Pt.). 

Malabang (beach below 
river).6 

Malabang (river). 

Malabang (anch.). 

Utara Pt., Bongo Id., N. 76° 
W., 2.80 miles (7° 21' 45" 
N., 124° 07' 15" E.) 

Utara Pt., Bongo Id., N. 88° 
W„ 7.70 miles (7° 22' 12" 
N., 124° 12' 15" E.). 

Polloe (Marigabato Pt., rf.).. 

Parang (Lalavanga Pt., rf.).. 

Parang (beach in front of 
village). 

Vicinity of Zamboanga. 

Zamboanga (W. end Little 
Sta. Cruz Id., rf.). 

Zamboanga (Little Sta. Cruz 
Id., rf.). 

Iloilo. 

E. of mouth of Iloilo River 
(beach). 

Off southern Panay. 

Juraojurao Id. (S.), S. 75° 
W., 16.25 miles (10° 27' 45" 
N., 122° 12' 30" E.). 

Off northwestern Panay. 

Caluya Id. (S.), S. 73° W„ 
12 miles (11° 57' 30" N., 121° 
42' 15" E.). 

Off southeastern Mindoro. 

Balanja Pt., N. 28° W., 7.20 
miles (12° 25' 35" N., 121° 
31' 35" E.). 

Mansalay (anch.). 

Balanja Pt. (rf.). 

Mansalay Bay (W. shore, 
beach). 

Mansalay Bay (NE. shore, 
rf.). 

Balanja Pt., N. 73° W., 3.70 
miles (12° 30' 55" N., 121° 
31' 50" E.). 

Balanja Pt., N. 80°' W., 6 
miles (12° 30' 55" N., 121° 
34' 24" E.). 


C. S. 4723; 

Oct.,1905. 
....do. 

.do. 


_do. 

_do. 

C. S. 4619; 
Apr.,1907 

_do. 


_do. 

_do. 

C. S. 4723; 
Oct., 1905. 


C. S. 4723; 

Oct., 1905. 
_do. 


1908. 
May 20 

...do. 

May 21 


..do. 

..do. 

May 22 


C. S. 4717; 
Feb.,1903. 


C. S. 4714; 
June,1906. 


C. S. 4311; 
July,1904. 


.do... 

.do.., 

.do. 


..do... 


...do. 

May 23 
. ..do. 


May 26 
May 28 

June 2 

June 2 

June 3 

June 3 


. ..do_ 

June 4 
...do_ 


. ..do. 

. ..do. 

...do. 


June 4 


Off eastern Mindoro. 

Pt. Orlgon, N. 83° E., 28.50 
miles (12° 37' 30" N., 121° 

37' 30" E.). 

a On May 20 collecting party went up Mindanao River to Cotabato; visited market. 
b May 22 to 24 shore party made collections at Lake Lanao; visited market at Vicar. 


C. S. 4714; 
June, 1906. 


...do. 

...do_ 

...do_ 


2.30 p. m. 
7.00 p. m. 

8.30 a. m. 

3.00 p. m. 
8.00 p. m. 
9.39 a. m. 

9.54 a. m. 
10.07 a. m. 

10.11 a. m. 
1.00 p. m. 
8.30 a. m. 
8.30 a. m. 


10.10 a. m. 
7.00 a. m. 


7.08 p. m. 


10.06 a. m. 
10.31 a. m. 


3.14 p. m. 
3.32 p. m. 

9.00 p. m. 
7.30 a. m. 
7.30 a. m. 


1.00 p. m. 
5.34 p. m. 

6.00 p. m. 
6.11 p. m. 


fms. 


7.39 p. m. 
7.45 p. m. 


13 

158 


158 

28 


312 

312 


234 

234 


145 

145 


S., M. 

S. 

S. 

S. 


M. 


M. 

S., sctrd. Co. 

sctrd. Co., co. R. 
S. 


sft. Co., co. heads 
sft. Co., mrgn. Rfs. 


gy. M., Glob, 
gy. M., Glob. 


gn. M., S. 

gn. M., S. 


mrgn. Co. 
S., Co.... 


sctrd. Co. 

bl. M., S. 

S„ M. 

S., M. 

















































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 


37 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 — Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

Remarks. 

j Air. 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





ft. TO. 


mi. 








6 ft .... 

3 00 





















20ft ... 

3 00 










5ft .... 










dip; e. 1. 

surf.... 

1 30 




83 

86 


1.02262 













(e). 






83 

SO 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 49° E .. 

0.6 


83 

86 


1.02277 













(e). 






83 

86 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

S. 66° E... 

.6 







dyn .*. _ 

4-25fi.. 

3 00 









dyn. 

6-25 ft.. 

3 00 










20 ft ... 

3 00 



8 hauls. 







12 ft ... 

1 30 









* . 

5-30 ft.. 

4 00 










5 ft .... 

2 00 



5 hauls. 

84 

84 


1.02587 


int. 5. 

surface. 

20 

S. 67° 30' 

.3 










W. 



84.5 

S') 

49 3 

1.02489 

1.02484 







84 

85 


12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 6° W... 

1.0 


85 

s') 

51. 4 

1.02484 

1.02484 







85 

83 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 14° W.. 

2.2 









1 00 










8—15ft.. 

4 00 










5—10ft.. 

3 00 



5 hauls; many 











stinging medu- 











s 







5-15 ft.. 

2 00 







1 02463 













(e). 






85 



1. 02448 








85 

83 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 29° E.. 

.4 


85 

83 


1. 02448 




20 

N. 

.5 


85 

83 




K2, K5t. 

surface. 

15 

N. 

.4 













59395°—11-13 































































































38 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


Off eastern Mindoro— Cont’d. 









1908. 


fms. 


D. 5263 


C. S. 4714; 


8.17 p. m. 




miles (12 6 38' 30" N.j 121° 

June, 1906. 





37' 30" E.). 










8.00 p. m. 

17 

S. 


Verde Id. Passage and Ba- 






tangas Bay.b 






D. 5264 

Malabrigo Lt., N. 86° 30' E., 

C. S. 4240; 

June 6 

8.19 a. m. 

181 

S., P. 


7.30 miles (13° 35' 30" N., 

Feb., 1907. 






121° 08' E.). 



8.38 a. m. 

181 

S., P. 

D. 5265 

Matocot Pt., Luzon, S. 17° 

.do. 

.. .do- 

■10.49 a. m. 

135 

S., M. 


E., 3.30 miles (13° 41' 15" 







N., 120° 00' 50" E.). 



11.09 a. m. 

135 

S., M. 

D. 5266 

Matocot Pt., S. 22° E., 7 

C. S., 4240; 

June 8 

9.08 a. m. 

100 

M. 


miles (13° 44' 36" N., 120° 

Feb., 1907. 






59' 15" E.). 



9.18 a. m. 

100 

M. 

D. 5267 

Matocot Pt., S., 39° E., 5.50 

.do. 

.. .do- 

10.08 a. m. 

170 

P.,S.,Sh. 


miles (13° 42' 20" N., 120° 







58' 25" E.). 



10.25 a. m. 

170 

P.,S.,Sh. 

D. 5268 

Matocot Pt., S., 50° E., 5.80 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

10.59 a. m. 

170 

S., P. 


miles (13° 42' N., 120° 57' 







15" E.). 



11.14 a. m. 

170 

S., P. 

D. 5269 

Matocot Pt., S., 54° E., 3 

.do. 

.. .do- 

1.08 p. m. 

220 

fne. S., P. 


miles (13° 39' 50" N., 120° 







59' 30" E.). 



1.34 p. m. 

220 

fne. S., P. 

D. 5270 

Escarceo Lt., S. 9° E., 4.25 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

3.07 p. m. 

235 

gy. S., blk. Sp. 


miles (13° 35' 45" N., 120° 







58' 30" E) 



3.27 p. m. 

235 







13 








S.,Co. 


beach). 












mrgn. Clmps. Co .. 


Manila Bay. 







C. S. 4240; 


8.00 p. m. 

4 




Feb., 1907. 










S. 


China Sea. vicinity southern 

. . 






Luzon. 








C. S. 4240; 

July 13 



Co. unthrifty and 



Feb., 1907. 



sparse. 







S. 


Jamelo Cove (E. side), (rf.).. 



2.00 p. m. 


Co. unthrifty and 





sparse. 





2.00 p. m. 


s . 

D. 5271 

Corregidor Lt., N. 17° E., 

.do. 

July 14 

8.08 a. m. 

56 

s . 


20.70 miles (14° 03' N., 120° 







27' 45" E.). 



8.30 a. m. 

56 

S. 

D. 5272 

Corregidor Lt., N. 26° E., 

.do. 

.. .do . . 

9.32 a. m. 

118 

M., Sh., co. S. 


25.50 miles (14° N., 120° 22' 







30" E.). 



10.05 a. m. 

118 

M., Sh.,co. S. 

D. 5273 

Corregidor Lt., N. 27° E., 

.do. 

.. .do .. . 

10.34 a. m. 

114 

M., Sh., co. S. 


27.25 miles (13° 58' 45" N., 







120° 21' 35" E.). 



10.47 a. m. 

114 

M., Sh., co. S. 





2.30 p. m. 


S., M. 


lage). 






o On June 5 a shore party went about 4 miles up the Naujan River in boats. 

b On June 7 a collecting trip was made up the Batangas River for about 2 miles; several hauls with a 
15-foot seine. 













































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 


39 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 




| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

° F. 

4 

°F. 

83 

°F. 


int.5;K2,K5§. 


h. m. 
20 

5 

1-30 

N 

mi. 

0.5 






surface. 



84 

84 


1.024.53 


Tnr.-Blish sdr. 




84 

84 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b.. 

botm... 

4 

S.37° E... 

5 

Cable parted while 
heaving in; trawl 
lost with 20 fms. 
cable. 

87 

85 


1.02489 




89 

85 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m.b. 
Tnr.-Blish sdr. 

botm... 

20 

N. 46° W.. 

1.0 


83 

84 


1.02448 



84 

85 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 
Tnr.-Blish sdr. 

botm... 

20 

N. 86° W.. 

1.1 


85 



1.02448 



85 

85 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 
Tnr.-Blish sdr. 

botm... 

20 

S. 65° W... 

1.3 


83 

85 


1.02433 



85 

85 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 
Tnr.-Blish sdr. 

botm... 

20 

N.3° W... 

1.0 


84 

85 


1.02417 

1.02509 

Therm, failed to 
register. 

85 

85 



(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 18° E... 

1.5 

85 

84 


1.02448 


Water bottlefailed 
to work. 

200 fms. dredge 
cable out. 

80.5 

83 



(e). 

int. 5;K2,K5§. 


20 

N. 1° W... 

1.1 





8 

45 







7ft .... 

2 00 



5 hauls. 







8-20 ft.. 

4 00 










1 00 










4 ft .. 










8-15 ft.. 

3 00 





* 





10ft ... 

3 00 



7 hauls. 







8—15f t.. 

3 00 









6ft .... 

4 00 




83 

85 


1.02552 





First attempt at 
sounding re- 

83 

85 



(e). 

12' Agz. 

botm... 

20 

S. 

.7 

83 

84 

57.4 

1.02453 





all apparatus 
used. 

83 

84 


(e). 

12' Agz. 

botm... 

26 

S.37° E... 

.3 


83 

84 







83 

84 




(e). 


30 

N.8° E.... 

1.7 






8ft .... 

2 30 

4 hauls. 


























































































































40 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


China Sea, vicinity southern 







Luzon —Continued. 









1908. 


fms. 



Tilig Bay (rf. outside village). 

C. S. 4240; 

July 14 

3.00 p. m. 


mrgn. rf. 


Feb.. 1907. 





. .do. 









9.00 p. m. 







1.15 p. m. 


mrgn. Co 7. 

D. 5274 

Malavatuan Id. (N.), S. 73° 

.do. 

July 16 

9.18 a. m. 

525 

gy. M., S. 


30' E., 17.50 miles (13° 57' 



9.59 a. m. 

525 

gy- M., S. 


30" N., 120° 03' 25" E.). 






D. 5275 

Malavatuan Id. (N.), S. 71° 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

12.51 p. m. 

117 

fne. S. 


E., 10.75 miles (13° 55' 55" 







N., 120° 10' 15" E.). 



1.05 p. m. 

117 

fne. S. 

H. 4913 

Malavatuan Id. (N.), S. 67° 

.do. 

.. .do..... 

1.28 p. m. 

117 

S., Sh., P. 


E., 9.30 miles (13° 56' N., 







120° 11' 40" E.). 









July 17 




D. 5276 

Malavatuan Id. (NW.), N. 

.do. 

...do- 

8.44 a. m. 

18 

Sh., P.,S. 


61° 30' E., 6.50 miles (13° 







49' 15" N., 120° 14' 45" E.). 



8.51 a. m. 

18 

Sh., P., S. 

D. 5277 

Malavatuan Id. (N.), S. 56° 

. do . 

.. .do - 

10.02 a. m. 

80 

fne. S. 


E.. 8 miles (13° 56' 55" N., 







120° 13' 45" E.). 



10.19 a. m. 

80 

fne. S . 

D. 5278 

Malavatuan Id. (N.), S. 23° 

.do. 

.. .do - 

11.34 a. m. 

102 

fne. S., M., Sh. 


E., 8.50 miles (14° 00' 10" 







N., 120° 17' 15" E.). 



11.53 a. m. 

102 

fne. S.,M.,Sh. 

D. 5279 

Malavatuan Id. (W.), S. 18° 

.do. 

. ..do.. .. 

1.13 p. m. 

117 

gn. M . 


W , 5.40 miles (13° 57' 30" 

* 






N., 120° 22' 15" E.). 



1.26 p. m. 

117 

gn. M . 

D. 5280 

Malavatuan Id. (N.), S. 60° 

. do. - 

.. .do. ... 

2.42 p. m. 

193 

gy- s . 


W., 6.10 miles (13° 55' 20" 



3.05 p. m. 

193 

gy- s . 


N., 120° 25' 55" E.). 






D. 5281 

Malavatuan Id. (N.), S. 84° 

. do . 

July 18 

10.17 a. m. 

201 

dk. gy. S . 


W., 4.30 miles (13° 52' 45" 



10.40 a. m. 

201 

dk. gy. S . 


N., 120° 25' E.). 






D. 5282 

Malavatuan Id. (N.), S. 84° 

. do . 

. ..do.. .. 

11.21 a. m. 

248 

dk. gy. S . 


W., 6.20 miles (13° 53' N., 



11.44 a. m. 

248 

dk. gy. S . 


120° 26' 45" E.). 






D. 5283 

Malavatuan Id. (N.), N. 64° 

. do . 

...do.. .. 

1.06 p. m. 

280 

dk. gy. S . 


W., 8.75 miles (13° 48' 30" 



1.36 p. m. 

280 

dk. gy. S . 


N., 120° 28' 40" E.). 










8.45 p. m. 



D. 5284 

Malavatuan Id. (S.), N. 46° 

. do . 

July 20 

8.07 a. m. 

422 

gy. M., Glob . 


W., 14.25 miles (13° 42' 05" 



8.45 a. m. 

422 

gy. M., Glob . 


N., 120° 30' 45" E.). 






D. 5285 

Malavatuan Id. (S.), N. 45° 

. do . 

.. .do. ... 

10.05 a. m. 

272 

sft. M . 


W., 17.50 miles (13° 39' 36" 



10.33 a. m. 

272 

sft. M. 


N., 120° 32' 55" E.). 






H. 4914 

Malavatuan Id. (S.), N. 42° 

. do . 

...do.. .. 

11.35 a. m. 

464 

gy- m., s . 


W., 18.70 miles (13° 38'05" 







N., 120° 33' E.). 






D. 5286 

Malavatuan Id. (S.), N. 45° 

. do . 

...do _ 

12.31 p. m. 

450 

gy- s., m . 


W., 19.50 miles (13° 38' 15" 



1.09 p. m. 

450 

gy- s., m . 


N., 120° 34' 20" E.). 






D. 5287 

Sombrero Id., N. 68° E., 

. do . 

...do.. .. 

2.30 p. m. 

379 

gy- s . 


11.25 miles (13° 37' 40" N., 



2.58 p. m. 

379 

gy- s . 


120° 39' E.). 


























staghorn Clmps., S . 

D. 5288 

Matocot Pt., Luzon, S. 20° 

. do . 

July 22 

8.14 a. m. 

*140 

S., M* . 


E., 5.70 miles (13° 43' 30" 







N., 121° E.). 






D.5289 

Matocot Pt., S. 42° E., • 5 

. do . 

. ..do _ 

9.03 a. m. 

172 

brk. Sh., S . 


miles (13° 41' 50" N., 120° 







58'30" E.). 


• 

9.25 a. m. 

172 

brk. Sh., S. 







































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 


41 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 


80 

80 

82.5 


83 


81.5 

82 


84 


84.5 

85 


82 


82 


84 


58.6 

59.6 


49.6 


50.4 

47.4 

46.8 


42.3 


46.5 

46.5 

42.5 

43.4 


Density. 


Sur¬ 

face. 


1.02497 


1.02442 


1.02457 


1.02422 


1.02402 
1.02437 
1.02417 


1.02437 


1.02497 
1.02473 

1.02503 
1.02433 


Bot¬ 

tom. 


1.02517 


1.02538 
1.02517 
1.02517 


1.02566 
1.02421 


1.02556 
1.02521 


1.02477 

1.02497 


1.02359 


Trial. 


Drift. 


Apparatus. 


Depth. 


dyn. 


dip; e.1. 

dyn. 

dyn. 

Luc. sdr. (a). 
12' Agz. 


Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

12' Agz. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 


dyn. 

Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b . 
Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 
Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 


Tnr.-Blish sdr. 
(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12' Agz.; m. b. 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12' Agz.; m. b 

Luc. sdr. (a). 
12' Agz.; m. b 

Luc. sdr. (a). 
12' Agz.; m. b 


dip; e. 1. 

Luc. sdr. (a). 
12' Agz.; m. b 

Luc. sdr. (a). 
12' Agz.; m. b 


Luc. sdr. (a). 


Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12' Agz.; m. b. 


Luc. sdr. (a), 
int. 5 §. 


dip.; e. 1. 
K2; K5.. 


dyn.. _ . 
int. 5 §. 


Tnr.-Blishsdr 

(e). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 


15ft ... 

surface. 
12-20ft. 
15 ft . 


botm. 


botm. 


6-12 ft 


botm. 

botm. 

botm. 


botm.. 


botm.. 


botm.. 


botm.. 


botm.. 
surface 


botm.. 

botm.. 


botm.. 


310 fms 


surface 

surface 


12-20 ft 
115 fms 


botm... 


Dura¬ 

tion. 


3 00 

1 00 
2 00 

4 15 


20 


2 00 


20 


24 
2 15 


Direction. 


N. 63° E... 


N.84° E... 


N. 22° W. 


S.70° E.. 
S.80° E.. 


N. 60° E.. 


N. 38° E. 


N. 86° E. 


N. 85° E. 


S. 83° E.. 


S.24° E. 
S. 21° e! 


N. 78° E. 


S. 73° E... 


N 76° W .. 


S. 52° E. 


1.7 


1.5 


.8 


Remarks. 


6 shots. 


2 shots. 
10 shots. 


Terminal sound¬ 
ing of D. 5275. 

7 shots. 


Net badly torn. 


Belly of net car¬ 
ried away by 
weight of mud 
when hoisted 
from water. 


Net torn; 1 bridle 
stop carried away 


Sounding cup lost. 


Net wrecked. 


550 fms. dredge 
cable out. 

Towed from row 
boat. 

9 shots. 

200 fms. dredge 
cable out. 













































































































42 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


China Sea, vicinity southern 


- 





Luzon —Continued. 









1908. 


fms. 


D. 5290 

Matocot Pt., S. 50° E., 3.10 

C. S. 4240; 

July 22 

10.54 a. m. 

*214 

Lav., G. 


miles (13° 40' 09" N., 120° 

Feb., 1907. 






59' 30" E.). 








, 

...do.... 

1.00 p. m. 




Vill. (rf.j. 




sloping bottom. 


Verde Id. (E. side) (rf.). 


...do.... 





Varadero Bay (anch.). 







Varadero Bay (N. side) (rf.). 


July 23 





Varadero Bay (beach). 






D. 5291 

Escarceo Lt.,’ N. 39° W., 2.20 

.do. 

. ..do_ 

1.27 p. rn. 

173 

fne. bk. S. 


miles (13° 29' 40" N., 121° 



1.45 p. m. 

173 

fne. bk. S. 


00' 45" E.). 






D. 5292 

Escarceo Lt., N. 30° W., 3.25 

.do. 

...do_ 

2.23 p. m. 

162 

fne. bk. S. 


miles (13° 28' 45" N., 121° 



2.37 p. m. 

162 

fne. bk. S. 


01' 12" E.). 






D. 5293 

Escarceo Lt., N. 59° W., 6 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

3.42 p. m. 

180 

fne. bk. S. 


miles (13° 28' 15" N., 121° 



3.59 p. m. 

ISO 

fne. bk. S. 


04' 30" E.). 







Varadero Bay (fresh-water 


July 24 



M 


stream). 





D. 5294 

Escarceo Lt., S. 71° W., 2.75 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

8.54 a. m. 

244 

S., P. 


miles (13° 32' 15" N., 121° 



9.13 a. m. 

244 

S., P. 


02' E.). 






D.5295 

Escarceo Lt., S 20° W., 2 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

10.06 a. m. 

231 

gy. S. 


miles (13° 33'15" N.,121 °E.). 



10.26 a. m. 

231 

gy. S. 

D. 5296 

Matocot Pt., S. 63° E., 4.50 

.do. 

. ..do_ 

12.47 p. m. 

*210 

M., s*. 


miles (13° 40' 09" N., 120° 







57' 45" E.). 






D. 5297 

Matocot Pt., S. 50° E., 5.10 

.do. 

. ..do_ 

1.55 p. m. 

*198 

M., S*. 


miles (13° 41' 20" N., 120° 







58' E.). 






D. 5298 

Matocot Pt., S. 38° E., 6.70 

.do. 

. ..do_ 

3.09 p. m. 

*140 

S*. 


miles (13° 43' 25" N., 120° 







57' 40" E.). 






D. 5299 

(20° 05' N., 116° 05' E.). 

H. O. 798; 

Aug. 8 


524 




June, 1885. 

8.53 a. m. 

524 

gy- m., s. 

D. 5300 

(20° 31' N., 115° 49' E.). 




265 






2.29 p. m. 

265 

gy. M., s. 


China Sea, vicinity Hongkong. 






D. 5301 

(20° 37' N., 115° 43' E.). 

H. O. 798; 

Aug. 8 

5.06 p. m. 

208 

gy. m., s. 



June, 1885. 


5.29 p. m. 

208 

gy. M., S. 

D. 5302 

(21° 42' N., 114° 50' E.). 


Aug. 9 


38 





6.51 a. m. 

38 

sft. gy. M. 

D. 5303 

(21° 44' N., 114° 48' E.). 




34 

bl M 





8.27 a. m. 

34 

bl. M. 

D. 5304 

(21° 46' N., 114° 47' E.). 

.do. 

...do.... 

9.06 a. m. 

*34 

bl. M. 

D. 5305 

(21° 54' N., 114° 46' E.). 

.do. 

Oct. 24 

8.07 p. m. 

*37 

sft. gy. M. 


Pratas Id. (SW. side, beach). 


Oct. 25 











D. 5306 

(20° 55' N., 116° 40' E.). 


Oct. 26 


170 

Co., S 





8.35 a. m. 

170 

Co.; S. 

D. 5307 

(21° 08' N., 116° 45' E.). 


.. .do.... 


186 

Glob.. 





11.04 a. m. 

186 

Glob. 

D. 5308 

(21° 54' N., 115° 42' E.). 




62 

S , M 





6.43 a. m. 

62 

S., M. 

D. 5309 

(21° 53' N., 115° 51' E.). 




62 






8.32 a. m. 

62 

gn. M. 





8.32 a. m. 

62 


D. 5310 

(21° 33' N., 116° 13' E.). 




100 

S., Sh. 





12.51 p. m. 

100 

S., Sh. 

D. 5311 

(21° 33' N., 116° 15' E.). 




88 






1.39 p. m. 

88 

crs. S., Sh.1 















































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


43 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

In 

1 Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





h. m. 


mi. 

84 

84 


1.02482 

1.02354 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

S. 36° E... 

1.3 






dyn. 

12-25 ft. 

1 30 








dyn. 

12-25 ft. 

1 00 








dip.; e. 1. 


6 00 








dyn.. 

6-15ft.. 

4 00 








150' seine. 

8ft .... 

3 00 



86 

84 

51.5 

1.02462 

1.02468 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 





85 

84 






20 

S. 28° E... 

1.0 

83 

84 

52.4 

1.02473 

1.02421 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 



83 

84 




12' Agz.; m. b. 


20 

S 13° E 

. 9 

84 

84 

57.4 

1.02457 

1.02510 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 





84.5 

84 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

30 

w. 

. 8 






20' seine. 

3 ft .... 




82 

83 

48.4 

1.02580 

1.02482 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 





83 

83 




12' Agz.; m. b. 


17 

N 86° W 


83 

84 

51.3 

1.02457 

1.02513 

Due. sdr. (a).. 





83 

84 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 59° W . 

1.2 

84 

84 


1.02473 




20 

S 63° E 

1. 2 

85 

85 


1.02477 



botm... 

20 

S. 69° E. 

1.0 

83 

84 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

10 

S. 31° E. . 

.5 

85.5 

83 

42.5 

1.02396 

1.02538 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 





83.5 

84 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

22 



86 

85 


1.02350 

1.02430 

9 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 





87 

85 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

< 20 



85 

84 

50.5 

1.02433 

1.02456 






85 

84 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 



84 

83 

. 

72.1 

1.02288 












(e). 





84 

83 





botm... 

15 



85 

84 

71.6 

1.01960 

1.02386 











(e). 





84 

84 





botm... 

20 



85.5 

84 





botm... 

20 



79 

78 




12' Tnr. 


20 








130' seine. 

15 ft ... 

2 00 









10-25 ft. 

2 00 



80 

80 

51. 4 


1.02489 






79.5 

80 




12' Tnr...'..'... 

botm... 

20 



80 

SO 

51.6 

1.02434 

1.02510 






80.5 

80 




12' Tnr...;.... 


20 



77 

77 


1.02461 












(e). 





77 

78 




12' Tnr. 

botm... 

15 



78 

79 

73.3 













(e). 





79 

79 




12' Tnr. 


20 



79 

79 




K2. 


20 



80 

80 

65 5 













(e). 





80 

80 




12' Tnr. 


20 



81 

80 














(e). 





81 

80 




12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 




Remarks. 


Sounding failed on 
account of too 
light lead. Net 
slightly torn. 

4 shots. 

Do. 

8 shots. 

7 hauls. 


6 hauls. 


Mud bag torn. 


Do. 


Ship steered circu¬ 
lar course. 
Therm, failed to 
trip. 


3 hauls. 
3 shots. 


Towed from horse 
block. 

























































































































44 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Station 

No. 


D. 5312 
D. 5313 
D. 5314 


D. 5315 
D. 5316 
D. 5517 
D. 5318 


D. 5319 
H. 4915 

H. 4916 

H. 4917 
D. 5320 

H. 4918 


H.4919 
H. 4920 
D. 5321 

D. 5322 

D. 5323 
D. 5324 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 

fins. 

140 

S., sml. Sh. 

140 

S., sml. Sh. 

150 

S. 

150 

S. 

122 

S., brk. Sh. 

122 

S., brk. Sh. 

122 

S., brk. Sh. 

148 

S.,Sh. 

148 

S.,Sh. 

159 

S.,Sh. 

159 

S.,Sh. 

230 

S., sml. Sh. 

230 

S., sml. Sh. 

340 

S.,br. C. 

340 

S., br. C. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


China Sea, vicinity Hong¬ 
kong-Continued . 

(21° 30' N., 116° 32' E.). 

(21° 30' N., 116° 43' E.). 

(21° 41' N., 116° 46' E.). 

China Sea, vicinity Formosa. 

(21° 40' N., 116° 58' E.). 

(21° 39' N., 117° 07' E.). 

(21° 36' N., 117° 27' E.). 

(21° 32' N., 117° 46' E.). 


H. O. 798; 
June, 1885. 
_do_ 


.do_ 


H. O. 798; 
June, 1885. 
_do.... 


1908. 
Nov. Q 


. .do_ 

Nov. 5 


.do. 

.do. 


Nov. 5 
..do.... 

..do_ 

..do_ 


(21° 31' N., 117° 53' E.). 

(21° 23' N., 118° 30' E.). 


(21° 14' N., 119° 02' E.). 


.do. 

.do. 


.do. 


, ..do_ 

Nov. 6 


.do. 


(21° 06'N., 119° 38' E.). 

(20° 58' N., 120° 03'E.). 


.do_ 

.do.;... 


..do... 
..do... 


(20° 46' N., 120° 52' E.). 

Santo Domingo, Batan Id. 
(rf.). 

Sabtan Id. (SW. side) (rf.)... 

Ibugos Id. (S. end) N. 77° 
W., 1 mile (20° 19' 15" N., 
121° 51' E.) 

Ibugos Id. (S. end) N. 81° 
W., 1.25 miles (20° 19' 15" 
N., 121° 51' 20" E.) 

Ibugos Id. (S. end) S. 89° 
W., 1.25 miles (20° 19' 30" 
N., 121° 51'15" E.) 

Ibugos Id. (S. end) S. 84° 
W., 1.25 miles (20° 19' 36" 
N., 121° 51' 15" E.) 

China Sea, vicinity of Batanes. 

Ibugos Id. (S. end), N. 0° 30' 
W., 12 miles (20° 07' 15" 
N., 121° 50' E.). 

Ibugos Id. (S. end), N. 15° E 
10.50 miles (20° 09' N., 121° 
47' E.). 

Port San Pio Quinto, Cami- 
guin Id. (rf.). 

Port San Pio Quinto (beach). 


.do. 

C. S. 4710; 
July, 1905. 
.do. 

.do. 


...do_ 


.do_ 


.do. 


C. S. 4710; 
July, 1905. 

.do. 


C. S. 4711; 

May, 1907. 
_do.. 


. .do_ 

Nov. 7 

Nov. 8 
Nov. 9 
. ..do.... 


...do_ 


..do_ 


..do_ 


Nov. 9 


..do. 


Nov. 10 
...do. 


4.05 p. m. 
4.27 p. m. 
6.20 p. m. 
6.45 p. m. 
6.05 a. m. 
6.25 a. m. 
6.25 a. m. 


8.21 a. m. 
8.42 a. m. 
10.37 a. m. 
10.57 a. m. 
2.05 p. m. 
2.31 p. m. 
5.03 p. m. 


5.32 p. m. 

7.23 p. m. 
12.11 a. m. 


10.15 a. m. 
2.25 p. m. 

3.18 p. m. 

9.32 p. m. 
8.00 a. m. 

1.00 p. m. 
6.00 a. m. 
(?>*. 


11.18 a. m. 

11.23 a. m. 
11.25 a. m. 
11.42 a. m. 


1.39 p. m. 
2.12 p. m. 

3.19 p. m. 
4.10 p. m. 


9.30 a. m. 

1.30 p. m. 
1.30 p. m. 


(?)689 


1,498 


1,758 

1,804 


1,804 

1,220 


303 

303 


564 

564 


sft. br. M. 
gy. M- 


sft. M.... 
Co., Lav. 


Co., R. 
Co., R . 


wh. S., Co., brk. 
Sh. 

wh. S., Co., brk. 
Sh. 

wh. S., Co., brk. 
Sh. 


rky... 
rky... 

Co., R 
Co., R 
S., P. 



































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


45 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


t-i 

< 

Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

80 

° F. 
80 

°F. 

57.5 

1.02461 

1.02482 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 


h. m. 


mi. 


81 

80 




botm... 

17 




78 

80 

53.6 

1.02461 

1.02513 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 




77 

80 



botm... 

15 




78 

78 

59.5 

1.02461 

1.02526 





78 

79 

12' Tnr.; m. b. 
K2. 


20 




78 

79 




surface. 

20 



Towed from horse 
block. 







79 

79 

54.4 

1. 02500 

1.02506 







80 

79 

12' Tnr.; m.'b. 

botm... 

20 




82 

80 

53.4 

1.02481 

1.02517 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 




82 

80 

12' Tnr.; m.’b. 

botm... 

25 



Mud bag torn. 

82 

80 

50.6 

1.02474 





81 

80 



botm... 

20 




81 

79 







Sounding outfit 
lost with 340 
fms. wire. 

Bridle stop carried 
away; net came 
up,upside down. 

40 fms. dredge ca¬ 
ble out. 

Sounding outfit 
lost with 689 
fms. wire. May 
not have reached 
bottom. 

Outfit and stray 
line lost while 
heaving in. 

Strong current. 

Therm, possibly 
tripped at 930 
fms. 

80 

79 




12' Tnr.; m. b. 


6 



79 

79 




20 fms.. 

27 



79 

78 





6 



79 

78 









80 

80 









80 

80 

36.2 


1.02574 






80 

80 


int.4, 2; K2 §.. 

500 fms. 

20 



80 

80 

36.4 



33 







10-20 ft. 

3 30 



8 shots. 







10-25 ft. 

4 00 



9 shots. 







10-25 ft. 

2 00 



2 shots. 














(e). 






















(e). 






82 

81 










82 

81 




(e). 


4 

N. 

0.2 


82 

81 





botm... 

9 

N. 

.2 

Sounding with 








hand lead. 

81 

82 

58.4 

1.02558 








81 

82 


12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 62° W.. 

3.2 


82 

82 

40.9 

1.02523 

1.02533 






78 

81 

12' Tnr.; in. b. 

botm... 

2 



Trawl lost; bridle 




12-20 ft. 

2 30 



and mud bag re¬ 
covered. 

2 shots. 







12-25 ft. 

3 00 



3 shots. 






130' seine. 

10 ft.... 

3 00 



5 hauls. 














































































































46 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the TJ. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


China Sea, vicinity of Batanes— 







Continued. 









1908. 


fms. 




C. S. 4711: 




fne. S. 


at head of bay). 

May, 1907. 






Port San Pio Quinto (rf.)_ 


...do. 

8.30 a. m. 


sctrd. Clmps. Co .. 




1.30 p. m. 


sctrd. Clmps. Co .. 




Nov. 12 

6.00 a. m. 


sctrd. Clmps. Co .. 


Off northern Luzon. 






D. 5325 

Hermanos Id. (N.), N. 86° 

C. S. 4711; 

Nov. 12 

10.45 a. m. 

224 

gn. M. 


E., 16.75 miles (18° 34'15" 

May, 1907. 


11.13 a. m. 

224 

gn. M. 


N., 121° 51' 15" E.). 






D. 5326 

Hermanos Id. (N.), N. 69° 

.do. 

.. .do. 

1.00 p. m. 

230 

M. 


E.,8 miles (18° 32'30" N., 



1.28 p. m. 

230 

M. 


122° 01' E.). 






D. 5327 

Hermanos Id. (N.), N. 55° 

.do. 

.. .do. 

2.16 p. m. 

198 

sft. M., fne. S. 


E.,6.80miles(i8°31'30"N., 







122° 03' E.). 



2.39 p. m. 

198 

sft. M., fne. S. 




Nov. 13 

2.00 p. m. 


M., S., grass, etc.. 


(beach).o 


Nov. 18 

8.00 a. m. 


M., S., sticks, 







leaves. 





3.00 p. m. 


S., M., grass. 


Vicente Islands, Palaui 






side (beach). 







Palaui Id. (W. side) (rf.)_ 





sctrd. Co., S. 





2.00 p. m. 




stream. 





D. 5328 

Hermanos Id., N. 79° E., 

.do. 

Nov. 19 

9.23 a. m. 

150 

bl. M. 


28.40 miles (18° 29' 45" N., 



9.44 a. m. 

150 

bl. M. 


121° 39' E.). 






D. 5329 

Font Id. (W.), N. 28° E., 

.do. 

.. .do. 

10.58 a. m. 

212 

bl. M. 


24.25 miles (18° 33'N., 121° 



11.25 a. m. 

212 

bl. M. 


37' 30" E.). 






D. 5330 

Font Id. (W.), N. 24° E., 

.do. 

.. .do. 

1.12 p. m. 

178 

br. M. 


23.30 miles (18° 33' 30" N., 



1.33 p. m. 

178 

br. M. 


121° 39' 15" E.). 







Off ivestern Luzon. 






D. 5331 

Hermana Menor Id. (E.), 

C. S. 4712; 

Nov. 22 

8.12 a. m. 

178 

S., Sh., M. 


N. 13° E., 7.30 miles (15° 

Sept., 1904. 


8.41 a. m. 

178 

S.,Sh., M. 


36' 45" N., 119° 47'45" E.). 










10.30 a. m. 


sctrd. Co., S. 





1.30 p. m. 


sctrd. Co., S. 





7.45 p. m. 






Nov. 23 

6.00 a. m. 


sctrd. Co., S. 





8.30 a. m. 


S., Co., grass. 


Salvador Id.) (beach). 










1.30 p. m. 


S., M., grass. 


bald, (beach). 









1.30 p. m. 


sctrd. Co. 


Mindoro Strait. 






Paluan Bay, Pantocomi Pt.. 

C. S. 4345; 

Dec. 11 





Feb., 1905. 











S., P. 







M. 





2.00 p. m. 

. 

M., sticks, leaves.. 





3.00 p. m. 


M. 


lugao River. 













Paluan Bav,anch.“. 


.. .do — 

7.00 p. m. 




a On November 14 a party went up Palaui River about 3 or 4 miles, in prahm, sei&ing with 25-foot and 
45-foot seines at intervals along entire distance. 








































































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


47 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 —Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

° F. 

°F. 

°F. 




5ft ... 

h. 

3 

771. 

00 


mi. 

7 hauls. 

12 hauls in small 
stream. 

10 hauls in small 
stream. 

4 shots. 




' 


25' seine. 

3ft. 

i 

30 








45' seine. 

3 ft. 

i 

30 









12-20 ft. 

3 

30 









12-20 ft 

4 

00 







> 

dyn. 

12-25 ft. 

i 

00 



2 shots. 

81 

82 

53.2 

1.02491 

1.02525 

Luc. sdr.(a)... 



81 

82 




12' Tnr.; m. b. 

Luc. sdr.(a)... 

botm... 

19 

S. 50° E... 

1.0 


82 

81 

55.4 

1.02437 

1.02496 


81 

81 




12' Tnr.; in. b. 

Luc. sdr.(a)... 

botm... 

20 

S. 60° E... 

2.0 


82 

82 

(?) 

1.02434 

1.02468 

Therm, failed to 
trip. 

81 

81 






20 







5 ft. 

3 

00 



7 hauls. 

Do. 

4 hauls. 

7 shots in a. m.; 

several in p. m. 
3 hauls. 







5 ft. 

4 

00 









2-4 ft... 

i 

30 









10-20 ft. 

5 

00 









2 

00 



78 

79 

53.9 

1.02464 

1.02513 






78 

78 

12' Tnr.; m'. b. 

Luc. sdr.(a)... 

botm... 

20 

N. 52° W.. 

1.2 


79 

78 

51.4 

1.02492 

1.02593 


79 

78 

12' Tnr.; in', b. 

botm... 

10 

N. 50° W.. 

2.2 


78 

78 

53.4 

1.02516 

1.02523 


78 

78 

12' Tnr.; m. b. 


20 

(?) 

(?) 


80.5 

80 

54.7 

1.02422 

1.02496 

V 


80.5 

80 

12' Tnr.; m. b. 



20 

S. 49° E... 

2.0 





10-20 ft. 

1 

30 

3 shots. 







10-20 ft. 

3 

30 











1 

30 



2 dynamite caps 
exploded at gang¬ 
way. 

8 shots. 







10-30 ft. 

5 

00 









4-10 ft.. 

3 

00 



7 hauls. 







2-4ft... 

0[ 

00 



4 hauls. 







8-20 ft.. 

2 

00 



4 shots. 







10-20 ft. 

4 

15 



4 shots. 







8 ft. 

3 

00 



10 hauls. 







2ft. 

2 

00 



Do. 







5ft. 

2 

30 



5 hauls. 







3 ft. 


30 



4 hauls. 

















dip; e. 1. 

surface. 

1 

30 



































































































































48 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records op the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 


Mindoro Strait—Continued. 

Sablayan Bay, near Sabla- 

C. S. 4345; 

1908. 
Dec. 12 

10.00 a. m. 

D. 5332 

yan. 

Apo Lt., S. 66° W„ 18.2 miles 

Feb.,1905. 
C. S. 4714; 

...do_ 

10.39 a. m. 

H. 4921 

(12° 47' 15" N., 120° 41'E.). 
Apo Lt., S. 65° W., 19.4 miles. 

June, 1906. 
.do. 

...do_ 

11.50 a. m. 
1.50 p. m. 


Sablayan Bay, Sablayan Pt.. 

C. S. 4345; 

.. .do_ 

3.30 p. m. 



Feb., 1905. 

.. .do_ 

7.00 p. m. 
10.00 a. m. 


Sablayan Bay, Sablayan Pt.. 

.do. 

Dec. 13 


Sablayan Bay, Pandan Id... 

.do. 

...do_ 

10.00 a. m. 


Sablayan Bay, Bagaong 
River. 






.. .do_ 

9.00 p. m. 
7.40 a. m. 

D. 5333 

Apo Lt., N. 45° W., 19 miles 

C. S. 4714; 

Dec. 14 

D. 5334 

(12° 26' 30" N., 120° 37' 45" 
E.). 

Apo Lt., N. 44° W., 19.7 miles 

June, 1906. 

.do. 

...do_ 

8.26 a. m. 

9.18 a. m. 


(12° 25'40" N., 120° 38'E.). 

Tara Id., west...:. 



9.58 a. m. 
10.17 a. m. 

3.00 p. m. 
7.00 p. m. 










Tara Id., bayou near village.. 

.do. 

...do_ 

7.30 a. m. 


Tara Id., beach near village.. 

Busuanga Id. 


.. .do_ 



C. S. 4714; 
June. 1906. 
.do. 


2.00 p. m. 

2.00 p. m. 


Port Caltom, beach near vil- 

...do_ 


lage. 

Port Caltom, anch. 



7.00 p. m. 


Port Caltom, Pangauran 
River. 


Dec. 16 


C. S. 4345; 
Feb., 1905. 
.do. 

Dec. 17 

1.00 p. m. 

2.00 p. m. 


Port Uson, Mayanpayan Id.. 

. ..do_ 





8.00 p. m. 

12.22 p.'m. 

D. 5335 

Linapacan Strait. 

Observatory Id. (N.), S. 55° 

/ 

C. S. 4716; 

Dec. 18 

D. 5336 

W., 10.7 miles (11° 37' 15" 
N., 119° 48' 45" E.). 
Observatory Id. (N.), S. 42° 

Jan., 1903. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

12.43 p. m. 
1.16 p. m. 


W., 9 miles (11° 37' 45" N., 
119° 46' E.). 

Linapacan Id., Malcochin 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

1.26 p. m. 

3.30 p. m. 


Harbor. 

Linapacan Id., Malcochin 
Harbor, anch. 

Linapacan Id., Malcochin 
Harbor, beach. 

Linapacan Id., Malcochin 


.. .do_ 

8.00 p. m. 





.do. 

.. .do_ 

8.00 a. m. 


Harbor reef. 

Observatory Id., west beach. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

2.30 p. m. 


Observatory Id., west. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

2.30 p. m. 

D. 5337 

Palawan Passage. 

Observatory Id. (N.), S. 80° 

C. S. 4716; 

Dec. 20 

7.31 a. m. 


E., 13.8 miles (11° 34' N., 
119° 26' E.). 

Observatory Id. (N)., S.82° 
E., 15 miles (11° 33' 45" N., 
119° 24' 45" E.). 

Cauayan Id. (N.), S. 37° E., 

Jan., 1903. 


7.40 a. m. 

D. 5338 

.do. 

...do_ 

8.04 a. m. 

H. 4922 

.do. 

...do_ 

8.12 a. m. 
8.15 a. m. 
10.01 a. m. 

D. 5339 

11.5 miles (11° 25' 45" N., 
119° 14' E.). 

Cauayan Id. (N.), S. 59° E., 

.do. 

...do_ 

10.32 a. m. 


10 miles (11° 22' N., 119° 
12' E.). 

North Guntao Id. 

.do. 

...do_ 

10.43 a. m. 

1.00 p. m. 


Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 

fms. 

Co. 

745 

gn. M. 


584 

gy. M., crs. S. 






Co. 



1 

310 

S. 


612 












sft. M. 




sctrd. Co. 


S., Co., W. 








sctrd. Co. 



46 

S., M. 


46 

S., M. 



S., W„ Co. 




S. Co. 




S., Co., W. 



43 

fne. Co., S., M_ 

43 

Co., S„ M. 



21 

52 

Co., S., Sh. 

M. 



Co.. S. 





























































































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


49 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 



j Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





h. 

771. 


mi. 








6-12 ft.. 

4 

30 



9 shots. 

84 

81 

38.2 

1.02385 

1.02548 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 






82 

81 







20 




83 

82 

40.2 

1.02401 

1.02535 

Luc. sdr. (a).. 














i 

30 



4 shots. 








i 

30 










2 

00 









phate. 






pools. 







6-9 ft... 

2 

00 



5 shots. 








6 

00 










1 

00 




79 

80 

73.8 

1.02406 

1.02543 

Luc. sdr. (a)... 







81 

80 







22 




81 

80 

43.2 

1.02385 

■1.02516 

Luc. sdr. (a)... 












K. 2. 


i 

02 




82 

80 




12' Agz.; m. b. 



7 

S 60° W 

2.0 











bag lost. 







10-20ft. 

9 

00 



3 shots. 








1 

00' 









10-20ft. 

4 

00 










3 ft. 

1 

30 










2ft .... 

1 

30 










10-20 ft. 

3 

00 










4ft. 

3 

00 











1 

30 











9 

00 



10 shots. 








4 

00 









10-20ft. 

2 

30 











1 

00 




82 

80 






















trip. 

83 

81 







17 

N. 77° W.. 

1.2 


83 

81 



















6 

N. 80° W.. 

1.2 








3ft. 

1 

30 











1 

00 










3 ft. 

4 

00 










10-20 ft. 

4 

00 










4ft. 

2 

30 



6 hauls. 







15ft.... 






81 

80 


1.02427 







No therm, used. 








9 

S. 82° W.. 

i.o 


81 

so 










Do. 

81 

80 





botm... 


20 

N. 70° W.. 

1.3 







K. 2. 



20 















Do. 

83 

SI 


1.02406 








84 

81 





botm... 


20 

S. 68° W.. 

2.2 








24-30ft. 

2 

30 



7 shots. 














































































































































50 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Station 

No. 


D. 5340 


D. 5341 
D. 5342 


D. 5343 
D.5344 

D. 5345 
D. 5346 

D. 5347 

H. 4923 

H. 4924 
H. 4925 

D. 5348 

D. 5349 
D. 5350 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records op the U. S. Fisheries 


Position. 


Malampaya Sound, Palawan 
Id. 

Bolalo Bay, anch. 

Bolalo Bay, flatsmear shore.. 

Bolalo Bay, mouth of bay... 

Bolalo Bay, head of bay. 

Bolalo Bay, anch. 

Bolalo Bay, near anch. 

Cone Id., N. 2° E., 1.5 miles 
(10° 55' 51" N., 119° 14' 12" 
E.). 

Endeavor Strait, near Relin¬ 
quish Head. 

Endeavor Strait,Chase Head. 

Endeavor Strait, Limunan- 
cong. 

Endeavor Strait, Relinquish 
Head to Nalinbungan Pt. 

Endeavor Pt. (W.), S. 18° 
E., 1.2 miles (10° 57'51" N., 
119° 17' 26" E.). 

Endeavor Pt. (S.), S. 58° E., 
0.5 miles (10° 56' 55" N., 
119° 17' 24" E.). 

Endeavor Strait, anch. bet. 
Bando and Endeavor 
points. 

Endeavor Strait, anch. bet. 
Bando and Endeavor 
points. 

Malapina Id., N. W. 

Inner Sound, near Pancol.... 

Clifl Id., S. 22° E., 5.2 miles 
(10° 51' 35" N., 119° 23' 24" 
E ) 

Clifl Id., S. 34° E„ 4.7 miles 
(10° 50' 40" N., 119° 22' 32" 
E.). 

Inner Sound, Malampaya 
River. 

Clifl Id., S. 43° E., 4.4 miles 
(10° 50' N., 119° 22' 03" E.). 

Clifl Id., S. 37° E., 4.6 miles 
(10° 50' 30" N., 119° 22' 20" 

Clifl M., S. 26° E„ 4.5 miles 
(10° 50' 44" N., 119° 23' 09" 
E.). 

Palawan Passage. 

Pt. Tabonan, S. 87° E., 11.4 
miles (10° 57' 15" N., 119° 
1' E.). 

Pt. Tabonan, East, 16.3 miles 
(10° 57' N„ 118° 55' 45" E.). 

Pt. Tabonan, S. 87° E., 24.3 
miles (10° 58' 15" N., 118° 
47' 15" E.). 

Pt. Tabonan, S. 89° E., 33.5 
miles (10° 57' 45" N., 118° 
38' 15" E.). 


Pt. Tabonan, N. 85° E., 45.2 
miles (10° 54' N., 118° 26' 
20" E.). 

Pt. Tabonan, N. 76° E., 43.7 
miles (10° 46' 40" N., 118° 
29' E.). 


Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


1908. 


fms. 


C. S. 4349; 

Dec. 20 

8.30 p. m. 



Aug., 1908. 





Dec. 21 



S., Co., W.. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

8.00 a. m. 


Co., W. 


.. .do_ 





...do_ 





...do_ 

9.00 p. m. 




Dec. 22 

19-24 








...do_ 








Co., S. 





S. 


Dec. 23 



Co., S. 

.do. 

...do_ 

2.03 p. m. 

19-22 

gy. m. 

.do. 

...do_ 

14-25 

gy- m. 







...do_ 










Dec. 24 

8.00 a. m. 


Co., s., w. 





S., R..... 

.do. 

Dec. 26 

7.46 a. m. 

*5 

M. 




6 

M. 










sft. M... . 




7 

M. 






.do. 

...do_ 

10.18 a. m. 

*7 

M. 




5 

M. 






C. S. 4716; 

Dec. 27 

6.32 a. m. 

51 

Co., S. 

Jan., 1903. 





.do. 

...do_ 

7.10 a. m. 

62 

s. 

.do. 

...do_ 

8.05 a. m. 

184 

fne. Co., S. 

.do. 

...do_ 

9.28 a. m. 

375 

Co., S. 






.do. 

...do_ 

12.41 p. m. 

730 

Co., S. 






.do. 

...do_ 

4.10 p. m. 

515 

gy- M. 



5.14 p. m. 





































































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


51 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

Remarks. 

< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





li. m. 


mi. 









1 00 










2-4 ft... 

3 30 










6-9 ft... 

3 30 











4 00 



3 shots. 








1 00 








K2, K5. 


20 



Tow’d from wherry. 











81 

80 





17-22 

20 

N.3°W... 

0.4 








fins. 

i 









2 00 










9-12 ft... 

2 00 










5ft. 

2 00 



13 hauls. 






seines. 











18-20 ft. 

0 00 




S3 

82 










83 

82 






15 

S. 2° E 

JJ 


83 

82 










83 

82 




9' Tnr. 


19 

S. 25° W.. 

. 7 







K2; 2' o. p- 


20 













launch. 








1 30 











3 30 











4 00 




80 

81 




6'McC. 


15 

S. 78° W.. 

. 4 













81 

81 




0' McC. 


26 

S. 18° W.. 

.7 








3—6 ft... 

6 00 















80 

81 




9' Tnr. 


20 

N. 47° W.. 

.6 


81 

80 




9' Tnr. 


10 

S. 72° E... 

1.0 












81 

81 




9' Tnr. 


io 

N. 36° E.. 

.5 


































82 

81 

56.4 

1.02422 

1.02576 







82 

81 

12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

N. 80° W.. 

1.5 

No land in sight; 










latitude and 











longitude ap- 











proximate. 



40.6 

1.02406 

1.02564 







83 

81 

12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

S. 80° W.. 

1. 5 

Do. 




1.02381 

1.02523 







82 

80 


12' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm... 

20 

S. 85° W.. 

3.0 

Do. 

















































































































52 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


D. 5351 


D. 5352 


D. 5353 


D. 5354 


D. 5355 


D. 5356 


D. 5357 


D. 5358 


Position. 


Palawan Passage— Cont’d. 

Pt. Tabonan, N. 62° E., 47 
miles (10° 35' N., 118° 30' 
E.). 


TJlugan Bay, Palawan Id. 
Oyster Inlet. 


Baheli River to Wood Pt.... 

Magsiapo Reef. 

Sagumay Pt. 

Anchorage (near Tidepole 
Pt.). 

Rita Id. (W. and S.).. 

Caiholo River. 

Tidepole Pt., S. 84° W.,0.4 
mile (10° 04' 30" N., 119° 
05' E.). 

Nakoda Bay, Palawan Id. 
Sirinao Id. (SW.). 


Chart. 


C. S. 4716; 
Jan., 1903, 


C. S. 4346; 
Aug., 1905. 

_do. 

_do.. 

_do.. 

_do.. 


..do.. 

.do. 

..dol. 


River (unnamed), SE. of 
Maricaban Id. 

Balabac Strait. 

Cape Melville Lt., S. 85° E., 
16.8 miles (7° 50' 45" N., 
116° 43' 15" E.). 


Cape Melville Lt., N. 85° E., 
16.8 miles (7° 47' 50" N., 
116° 43' 15" E.). 

North Balabac Strait. 

Caxisigan Id. (W.). 

Port Ciego, Martinez Pt. 

Port Ciego, Paz Id. 

Candaraman Id. (E.). 

Bugsuk Id. (S.). 

Balabac Lt., S. 61° W., 16.6 
miles (8° 08' 10" N., 117° 
19' 15" E.). 

Balabac Lt., S. 64° W., 15.5 
miles (8° 06' 40" N., 117° 
18' 45" E.). 

Balabac Lt., S. 65° W., 14.3 
miles (8° 06' N., 117° 17' 
10" E.). 

Jolo Sea. 

Taganak Id. (SE.). 

Sandakan Lt., S. 34° W., 19.7 
miles (6° 06' 40" N., 118° 
18' 15" E.). 

Cagayan de Jolo (S.). 

Cagayan de Jolo, Singuan 
Lake. 


C. S. 4346; 

Aug., 1905 
.do. 


C. S. 4309; 
Nov., 1906 


_do. 


C. S. 4347; 

Dec., 1905. 

_do_ 

_do_ 

_do. 

C. S. 4309; 

Nov., 1906, 
_do. 


Date. 


1908. 
Dec. 27 


Dec. 28 

..do_ 

..do_ 

..do_ 

..do_ 


Dec. 29 

..do_ 

Dec. 30 


Dec. 30 
Dec. 31 


1909. 
Jan. 1 


...do.. 


Jan. 


Jan. 

...do. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

...do. 


.do. 


.do. 


C. S. 4720; 

Jan., 1904. 
_do. 


C. S. 4348; 

June, 1905. 
.do... 


...do. 


...do. 


Jan. 

...do. 

Jan. 

...do. 


Time of 
day. 


8.43 p. m. 
8.53 p. m. 


9.00 a. m. 

9.30 a. m. 
1.00 p. m. 
1.00 p. m. 

8.30 p. m. 


8.00 a. m. 
11.00 a. in. 


3.00 p. m. 
6.00 a. m. 


6.33 a. m. 
7.10 a. m. 


8.33 a. m. 
9.55 a. m. 


1.00 p. m. 

9.00 a. m. 
9.00 a. m. 
8.30 a. m. 
8.00 a. m 

9.40 a. m. 
9.52 a. m. 

10.21 a. m. 
10.36 a. m, 

11.13 a. m. 
11.27 a. m. 


1.00 p. m. 

7.20 p. m. 

7.29 p. m. 

8.30 a. m. 
9.00 a. m. 
3.00 p. m. 


Depth. 


fms. 

50 


25 


148 


Character of 
bottom. 


Co., S. 


S., Co. 


M., S., W. 

Co. 

S.,Co. 


S.,Co. 

G., bowlders. 
M.. 


S., W.... 
M.,S.,G. 


58 


39 


Co., S.. 

W.,Co. 
W., Co. 
S., Co.. 
S., Co.. 

Co., S.. 
S., Sh.. 


Co., S. 


Co., S. 

S., Co., W. 
M. 



































































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


53 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

• 

Density. 


Trial. 


Drift. 



sJ 

< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





h. 

m. 


mi. 


81 

80 




12' Tnr.; in', b. 

botm... 


2 



Net wrecked; lati¬ 
tude and longi- 
t u d e approxi¬ 
mate. 















3 

00 



12 shots. 







2-5 ft... 

5 

00 










30 

- 


2 shots. 

Do. 








9 

00 










i 

00 








250' seine; dyn. 

20-40 ft. 

2 

00 



2 hauls, 6 shots. 






3 

00 














80 

81 







20 

N. 4° E... 

0.9 






4-10ft.. 

1 

2 

30 

5 hauls. 






dyn.; 16'-45' 
seine. 

10 

00 























148 fms. sounding 
wire lost. 

Foggy; latitude 
and longitude 
approximate. 

75 

80 




9' Tnr.; m. b.. 

botm... 

34 

SE. 







... 

75 

80 






25 

SE. 


Do. 





15ft.... 









12ft.... 

4 

00 



5 shots. 







4 

30 



6 shots. 



. 




9-15 ft.. 

9 

30 



15 shots. 







9-18 ft.. 

4 

00 



Do. 






Tnr. sdr. (e)... 




32 

82 


1.02518 



botm... 

19 

S. 14° W.. 

1.6 


85 

82 






85 

82 




6' McC. 

botm... 


16 

S. 50° W_. 

1.3 


85 

82 













9' Tnr.; m. b.. 

botm... 


01 

N. 45° E.. 

.6 

Net tom. 






15ft.... 

4 

00 



10 shots. 












80 

82 




12' Agz.; in. b. 

botm... 


14 

N. 56° E... 

.7 






3 

00 



5 shots. 







2-4 ft... 

2 

30 



4 hauls. 






dyn. 

10-40 ft. 

1 

00 



5 shots. 












59395°—11-14 






















































































































54 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


H. 4926 


D. 5359 


D. 5360 


D. 5361 


D. 5362 


Position. 


D. 5363 
D. 5364 


D. 5365 


D. 5366 


Jolo Sea—Continued. 
7° 39' N., 120° 04' 45" E.. 


8° 12' 45" N., 120° 37'15" E. 


Iloilo Strait. 

Anilao River, Passi, Pauay.. 

Guimaras Id., vicinity of 
Buena Vista. 

Manila Bay. 

Mariveles Bay. 


Boca Chica (mouth of North 
Channel). 

Pucot River (near Mariveles) 
Mariveles River. 


Mariveles Bay and Pucot 
River. 

Luzon Point. 


Mariveles wharf. 

Mariveles Bay (west). 
La Monja (Id.). 


Luzon Pt. 

Corregidor Lt., N. 74° W.. 
6.9 miles (14* 21' N., 120° 
41' E.). 

Limbones Cove. 

_do. 

Corregidor Lt., S. 89° W., 7.2 
miles (14° 24' 15" N., 120° 
41' 30" E.). 

China Sea, off western Luzon. 

Cape Santiago Lt., S. 35° E., 
14.6 miles (13° 58' 20" N., 
120° 30' 30" E.). 

Pagapas Bay, Luzon..'.. 

Pagapas Bay, Santiago River 

Balayan Bay, Luzon. 

C. Santiago Lt., S. 79° W., 
4.5 miles (13° 47' 20" N., 
120° 43' 30" E.). 

C. Santiago Lt., S. 68° W., 
5.4 miles '(13° 48' 30" N., 
120° 43' 45" E.). 

Taal anchorage. 

C. Santiago Lt., N. 73° W., 
6.7 miles (13° 44' 24" N., 
120° 45' 30" E.). 

Batangas Bay, Luzon. 

Escarceo Lt., S. 5° E., 7.7 
miles (13° 39' N., 120° 58' 
30" E.). 


Chart. 


Date. 


C. S. 4721; 
Jan., 1903. 


.do. 


C. S. 4416; 
Dec., 1907. 


C. S. 4249; 

Apr., 1904. 
C. S. 4240; 

Feb., 1907. 
C. S. 4249; 

Apr., 1904. 
-do. 


_do. 

C. S. 4240; 

Feb., 1907. 
C. S. 4249; 
Apr., 1904. 

_do. 

C. S. 4240; 
Feb., 1907. 

_do. 

_do. 


... do . 
... do . 
. ..do. 


C. S. 4240; 
Feb., 1907 

.do. 

.do_ 


C. S. 4240; 
Feb., 1907 

_do. 


.do_ 

.do_ 


C. S. 4240; 
Feb., 1907 


1909. 

Jan. 


..do. 


Jan. 13 
Jan. 14 

Jan. 28 

Jan. 29 

..do_ 

Jan. 30 

...do_ 

Jan. 31 

Feb. 1 

...do...-. 
Feb. 7 


.do. 

.do. 


Feb. 8 

..do. 

..do_ 


Feb. 19 


Feb. 20 
..do_ 


Feb. 20 
..do_ 


...do_ 

Feb. 22 


Feb. 22 


Time of 
day. 


12.52 p. m. 
3.31 p. m. 


1.00 p. m. 

a.m.-p.m. 

8.00 a. m. 

l.tiO p. m. 

3.00 p. m. 

7.30 a. m. 

8.00 a. m. 

2.00 p. m. 
-a. m. 

—— p.m. 


7.25 p. m. 

-p. m. 

-p. m. 

8.48 p. m. 


3.57 p. m. 


8.00 a. m. 
8.00 a. m. 


9.27 a. m. 
2.40 p. m. 


7.30 p. m. 
9.04 a. m. 


1.40 p. m. 


Depth. 


fms. 

460 


2,275 


Character of 
bottom. 


*125 


*180 

*160 


*214 


hrd. 


sctrd. Co. 


Co.... 
M., G. 































































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


55 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 —Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 




h. m. 


mi. 

Sounding wire car¬ 
ried away. Lat¬ 
itude and longi¬ 
tude approxi¬ 
mate. 

Sounding wire 
lost. Longitude 
and latitude ap¬ 
proximate. 











83 

82 














12-18 ft. 





15 shots; 1 day’s 
work. 

11 hauls; all-day 
expedition. 







20-30ft. 




















4—10 ft.. 

4 00 


















25' and 130' 




3.0 

went adrift. 
All-day expedi¬ 
tion.' 

Half-day expedi¬ 
tion. 

13 shots. 






seines; dyn. 











2 00 










10 00 










2 00 



3 shots. 

















































botm... 

1 00 

N. 48° E... 

1.3 















15-20 ft. 

2 66 



5 shots. 

76 

78 






9 08 

N. 29° E... 

12.0 




3-bd. int. tr... 

60 fms.. 

12 

N. 58° W.. 

1.0 








15ft.... 

6 00 










4 ft. 

3 00 



5 hauls. 






25' Agz. 


1 15 

N.25° E... 

3.0 








43 

N. 45° E... 

2.8 









1 30 











36 

N. 10° W.. 

3.0 


80 

79 




3-bd. int. tr... 

150 fms. 

20 

N. 6° E... 

2.5 




























































































56 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


Verde Island Passage. 








1909. 


fms. 


D. 5367 

Malabrigo Lt., N. 81° E., 8 
miles (13° 34' 37" N., 121° 

C. S. 4240; 

Feb. 22 

5.10 p. m. 

*180 

S.*_ 

Feb., 1907. 




07' 30" E.). 







Marinduque Id. and vicinity. 







Port Banalacan, Marinduque 

C. S. 4453; 

Feb. 23 

7.30 a. m. 


Co., S. 

D. 5368 

July, 1904. 
C.S.4714... 

181 


Tayabas Lt. (outer), N. 32° 
W., 21.8 miles (13° 35'30" 
N., 121° 48' E.). 

...do. 

2.08 p. m. 
2.45 p. m. 

June, 1906. 







Capulaan Bay, Pagbilao, 
Chica Id. 

.do. 

Feb. 24 

7.00 a. m. 


Co. 






Tayabas River (3 branches).. 


.. .do. 




D. 5369 

Tayabas Lt. (outer), N. 50° 
W., 8.8 miles (13° 48' N., 
121° 43' E.). 

C. S. 4267; 

.. .do_ 

8.04 a. m. 

106 

bk. S. 

Aug., 1907. 


8.30 a. m. 






D. 5370 

Tayabas Lt. (outer), N. 32° 
W., 11.6 miles (13° 44' 15" 
N., 121° 42' 30" E.). 

C. S. 4714; 
June, 1906. 

.. .do_ 


159 


9.58 a. m. 






D. 5371 

Tayabas Lt. (outer), N. 43° 
W., 6 miles (13° 49' 40" N., 

C. S. 4267; 
Aug., 1907. 

...do_ 

2.32 p. m. 

*83 

gn. M. (m. b.). 


121° 40' 15" E.). 





D. 5372 

Tabayas Lt. (outer), N. 3° 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

3.42 p. m. 

*150 

gn. M. (m. b.). 


W., 4.5 miles (13° 49' 12" 
N., 121° 36' 09" E.). 







Tayabas Bay, Lucena an¬ 
chorage. 



8.00 p. m. 








D. 5373 

Tayabas Lt. (outer), N. 20° 
E., 15 miles (13° 40' N., 
121° 31' 10" E.). 

C. S. 4714; 
June, 1906. 

Mar. 2 


338 

sft. M. 

10.15 a. m. 






D. 5374 

Tayabas Lt. (outer), N. 9° 

.do. 

... do_ 

11.57 a. m. 

*190 

gy. M. (m. b.)-, 


E., 7.4 miles (13° 46' 45" 
N., 121° 35' 08" E.). 






D. 5375 

Tayabas Lt. (outer), N. 49° 
W., 18.2 miles (13° 42' 15" 
N., 121° 50' 15" E.). 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

3.05 p. m. 
3.25 p. m. 

107 








D. 5376 

Tayabas Lt. (outer), N. 53° 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

4.19 p. m. 

*90 

gy. M., S. (m.b.).. 


W., 18.7 miles (13° 42' 50" 
N., 121° 51'30" E.). 












Co. 







Co., S. 

D. 5377 

Mompog Id. (E.), N. 55° W., 

9 miles (13° 26' N.,122° 19' 
E.). 

C. S. 4715; 
Apr., 1907. 

\ 

Mar. 4 

7.09 a. m. 
8.03 a. m. 

400 

sft. gn. M. 





D. 5378 

Mompog Id. (E.), N. 38° W., 
17 miles (13° 17' 45" N., 
122° 22' E.). 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

10.02 a. m. 
10.40 a. m. 

395 

sft. gn. M. 

H. 4927 

.do. 

...do_ 

730 


Mompog Id. (E.), N. 37° W., 
25.6 miles (13° 10' 35" N., 

1.06 p. m. 


D. 5379 

122° 27' 30" E.). 

Mompog Id. (E.), N. 30° W.. 
37 miles (12° 59' 15" N., 
122° 30' 40" E.). 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

2.46 p. m. 
4.02 p. m. 

920 


D. 5380 

.do. 

.. .do_ 



Mompog Id. (E.), N. 31° W., 
33 miles (13° 02' 45" N., 

7.26 p. m. 




122° 29' E.). 







Burias Id. 








C. S. 4715; 
Apr., 1907. 

Mar. 5 

8.00 a. m. 


Co. 






Alimango River. 

Ragay Gulf, Luzon. 

.do. 

...do_ 

9.00 a. m. 


S., M. ... 



Co. 


C. S. 4715; 
Apr., 1907. 

Mar. 6 

9.00 a. m. 













































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 


57 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 — Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


< 

| Surface. 

| Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

83 

°F. 

80 

°F. 




botm... 

h. m. 
26 

N. 63° E... 

mi. 

0 9 

Rear beam bro¬ 
ken and iron 
frame twisted - . 











12-24 ft. 




8 shots. 











87 

82 




12' Agz.; in. b. 

dyn. 

botm... 

37 

N. 22° W.. 

6.0 





4 00 







sml. seines; 
dyn. 




All-day expedition 
by 3 parties. 










80 

79 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

Luc. sdr. (a)... 

botm... 

20 

S. 9° W... 

1. 7 


54.3 





80 

80 



12' Agz.; in. b. 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

dip; e.1. 


20 

S. 31° W.. 

3.3 


83 

80 





22 

S. 87° W.. 

. 9 


82 

81 





21 

S. 74° E... 

1. 5 





suriace. 

1 00 



82 

80 

51.8 

1.02550 


Luc. sdr. (a)... 




81 

80 




20 

N. 32° E 

4.5 


82 

80 




12' Tnr.; m.b. 

Tnr. sdr. (e)... 

botm... 

33 

N. 29° E.. 

2.0 






82 

80 




12' Agz.; in. b. 

12' Agz.; m. b. 


20 

N. 39° W 

1.5 


82 

80 





’ 22 

N. 11° W.. 

1. 5 

Net torn in two 
places near 
mouth. 




10-20 ft. 

1 00 







12-18 ft. 

6 00 



15 shots. 



49.6 



Liic. sdr. (a)... 



79 

80 



12' Agz.; in. b. 

Luc. sdr. (a) . 

botm... 

13 

S. 31° E... 

2.5 

Net completely 
wrecked. 

50.4 



80 

80 



12' Agz.; m. b. 

Luc. sdr. (a)... 

botm... 

20 

S. 40° E... 

3.5 


85 

81 

50.4 



pieces recovered. 

50.5 

1.02443 


Luc. sdr. (a)... 
12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

30 

N. 43° W.. 

5.3 


83 

81 



82 

81 




int. 4. 














ing out. 







12-24 ft. 

9 00 









130' seine; dyn. 

4ft. 

3 00 









l-2-30ft. 

5 00 



20 hauls. 































































































58 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

D. 5381 

Ragay Gulf, Luzon— Cont’d. 

Arena Pt. (Luzon). S. 68° 

C. S. 4715; 

1909. 
Mar. 6 

9.15 a. m. 

D. 5382 

W., 2.8 miles (13° 14' 15" 
N., 122° 44' 45" E.). 

Arena Pt. (Luzon), S. 55° 

Apr., 1907. 

.do. 

...do_ 

9.35 a. m. 

10.02 a. m. 


W., 3.8 miles (13° 15' 20" 
N., 122° 45' 30" E.). 

Burias Id. 

C. S. 4454; 


10.23 a. m. 

8.00 p. m. 

6.00 a. m. 



May, 1906. 
.do. 

Mar. 7 



.do. 


6.00 a. m. 



.do. 

...do_ 

8.00 a. m. 

D. 5383 

Arena Pt. (Luzon), S. 66° 

C. S. 4715; 

.. .do_ 

3.08 p. m. 

D. 5384 

W., 22 miles (13° 22' N., 
123° 02' 30" E.). 

Arena Pt. (Luzon), S. 64° 

Apr., 1907. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

3.35 p. m. 

4.03 p. m. 


W., 20.7 miles (13° 22' 15" 
N., 123° 01'15" E.). 

C. S. 4454; 

...do_ 

4.32 p. m. 

7.00 p. m. 

8.00 a. m. 


Ragay Gulf, Luzon. 

Refugio Id., Pasacao Anchor- 

May, 1906. 

C. S. 4454; 

Mar. 9 

D. 5385 

age. 

Arena Pt. (Luzon), S. 61° 

May, 1906. 
C. S.4715... 

.. .do_ 

9.22 a. m. 


W., 23.7 miles (13° 24' 50" 
N., 123° 03' 70" E.). 
Galvaney Id. (near Caima 
Bay). 

Arena Pt. (Luzon), S. 5° W., 

Apr., 1907. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

9.54 a. m. 

3.00 p. m. 

D. 5386 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

3.25 p. m. 


25.3 miles (13° 38' 30" N., 
122° 44' 30" E.). 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

3.55 p. m. 

7.00 p. m. 
7.30 a. m. 



.do. 

Mar. 10 


Ragay Bay. 

.do. 

...do_ 

7.30 a. m. 


Between Burias and Luzon. 

C. S. 4715; 

Mar. 11 

8.00 a. m. 

D. 5387 

Bagatao Id. Lt. (outer), S. 

Apr., 1907. 
.do. 

.. .do_ 

1 06 p. m. 

D. 5388 

80° E., 27 miles (12° 54' 40" 
N., 123° 20' 30" E.). 

Bagatao Id. Lt. (outer), S. 

.do. 

.. .do _ 

1.42 p. m. 

2.51 p. in. 


86° E., 21 miles (12° 51'30" 
N., 123° 26' 15" E.). 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

3.27 p. m. 

7.15 p. m. 

1.46 p. m. 

D. 5389 

Between Ticao Id. and Luzon. 

Bagatao Id. Lt. (outer), N. 

C. S. 4219; 

Mar. 12 

D. 53C0 

3° W., 14 miles (12° 35' 45" 
N., 123° 48' 18" E.). 
Bagatao Id. Lt. (outer), N. 

Dec., 1904. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

2.56 p. m. 


12° W., 19miles (12°30' 54" 
N., 123° 51' 30" E.). 

Between Samar and Maslate. 

Escarpadald., Bagacay Bay. 

C. S. 4220; 

Mar. 13 

6.00 a. m. 


Destacado Id., Lode Bav- 

May, 1907. 
.do. 

.. .do_ 

8.00 a. m. 

D. 5391 

Tubig Pt. (Destacado Id.), 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

9.07 a. m. 

D. 5392 

N. 31° E., 3 miles (12° 13' 
15" N., 124° 05' 03" E.). 
Tubig Pt., N. 49° E., 5 miles 
(12 s 12' 35" N., 124° 02' 48" 
E.). 

.do. 

.. .do.... 

9.54 a. m. 




10.10 a. m. 


Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 

fms. 

88 



128 

M. 





Co. 


Co. 



127 



220 






R. 

327 




Co . 

287 






S . 


Co., S. 

209 

Co., S. 

soft gn. M. 

226 

soft gn. M. 



*109-80 

*54 

S.*. 


Co., S. 


R., Co. 

*118 

135 


gn. M., S. 
























































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


59 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


•Jiy 1 

CD 

Q 

cZ 

5 

E 

o 

o 

CQ 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

<D 

O 

C3 

5 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

"F, 



Tnr. sdr. (e)... 


h. 

m. 


mi. 


82 

80 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

Tnr. sdr. (e)... 

botm... 

15 

N. 13° E.. 

1.3 







83 

79 




12' Agz.; mi. b. 

2 gill nets. 


15 

N. 18° E.. 

1.5 






Hauled 6 a. m. on 
8th. 

4 shotsv 

9 shots. 

Beach and tide 
pools. 






dyn. 

10-18 ft. 

2 

30 








dyn. 

10-20ft. 

5 

00 








copper sul¬ 
phate. 

Luc. sdr. (a)... 

2 

00 





62.5 







84 

80 

1.02293 


12' Agz.; m. b. 

Luc. sdr. (a)... 

botm... 

20 

N. 70° W.. 

1.3 



62.4 



84 

80 



12' Agz.; m. b. 

dip; e. 1. 

botm... 


25 

N. 74° W.. 

2.7 








1 

00 







dyn. 

12-30 ft. 

4 

00 



12 shots. 



62.4 



Luc. sdr. (a)... 
12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 


13 

N. 47° W.. 

1.6 

82 

78 








dyn. 

10-25ft. 

9 

00 



7 shots. 



62.4 



Luc. sdr. (a)... 




83 

82 

1.02487 


12' Agz.; m. b. 

dip; e.1. 

botm... 


8 

N. 30° E .. 

1.3 

Net badly torn. 



surface. 

l 

00 






16A30 seines; 

3-5 ft.. 

2 

30 


Half-day trip. 






dyn. 

dyn. 

4-20 ft.. 

4 

00 







dyn. 

4-30 ft.. 

3 

30 



8 shots. 



52.4 



Luc. sdr. (a)... 




85 

79 

1.02503 


12' Agz.; in. b. 
K2. 

botm... 


20 

N. 44° E.. 

.8 




surface. 


20 

N. 44° E.. 

.8 




51.4 






84 

78 



12' Agz.; m.b. 
K2. 

botm... 


26 

N. 67° E.. 

1.5 







26 

N. 67° E.. 

1.5 







dip; e.1. 

surface. 


45 


78 

78 




3-bd. int. tr... 

40 - 55 


17 

N. 79° E.. 

1.6 





fms. 






79 

78 




3-bd. int. tr... 

50 fms.. 


26 

N. 58° E.. 

1.5 






5-30ft.. 

1 

00 

2 shots. 







18ft.... 

4 

00 



7 shots. 

77 

77 




12' Agz.; m. b. 
K2. 

botm... 


20 

S. 88° W .. 

1.3 





10ft.... 


20 

S. 88° W.. 

1.3 










78 

77 




12' Agz.; in. b. 

botm... 

5 

S. 36° W.. 

.5 

Net slightly torn. 


















































































































60 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Between Samar and Masbate — 
Continued. 


D. 5393 
D. 5394 


D. 5395 
D. 5396 
D. 5397 


D. 5398 


D. 5399 
D. 5400 
D. 5401 

D.5402 

i5.'5463 


D. 5404 
D. 5405 
D.5406 


Panganalan Pt., Talajit Id., 
S. 59° E., 14.8 miles (12° 
03' 30" N., 124° 03' 36"E.). 

Panalangan Pt., Talajit Id., 
S. 68° E., 8.1 miles (12° 00' 
30" N., 124° 05' 36" E.). 

Masbate Island. 

Port Cataingan. 

Between Samar and Masbate. 

Buang B., Talajit Id. 

Panalangan Pt., Talajit Id., 
S. 81° E., 2.9 miles (11° 56' 
40" N., 124° 14' E.). 

Panalangan Pt., Talajit Id., 
S. 78° E., 4.5 miles (11° 57' 
N., 124° 12' 24" E.). 

Panalangan Pt., Talajit Id., 
S. 78° E., 6 miles (11° 57' 
27" N., 124° 10' 42" E.). 

Between Masbate and Leyte. 

Gigantangan Id. (west). 

Gigantangan Id. (S.), S. 45° 
E., 2.7 miles (11° 35' 12" 
N., 124° 13' 48" E.). 

North of Cebu. 

Malapascua Id. (west). 

Tanguingui Id. Lt., N. 70° 
W., 22.8 miles (11° 21' 45" 
N., 124° 05' E.). 

Tanguingui Id. Lt., N. 77° 
W., 22.5 miles (11° 24' 24" 
N., 124° 05' 30" E.). 

Tanguingui Id. Lt., N. >79° 
W., 23 miles (11° 24' 45" 
N., 124° 06' E.). 

Between Leyte and Cebu. 

Capitancillo Id. Lt., S. 37° 
W., 16.1 miles (11° 11' 45" 
N., 124° 15' 45" E.). 

Calangaman Id. (north). 

Capitancillo Id. Lt., S. 46° 
W., 15.7 miles (11° 10' N., 
124° 17' 15" E.). 

Dupon Bay {Leyte) and vi¬ 
cinity. 

Sacaysacay Pt. 

Guint River. 

Ponson Id. (N.), S. 79° E., 
6.8 miles (10° 50' N., 124° 
26' 18" E.). 

Ponson Id. (N.), S. 86° E., 
8.5 miles (10° 49' 20" N., 
124° 24' 23" E.). 

Ponson Id. (N.), S. 88° E., 
10.2 miles (10° 49' 03" N., 
124° 22' 30" E.). 


C. S. 4418; 
Apr., 1906. 

.do. 


C. S. 4418; 
Apr., 1906. 


C. S. 4418; 
Apr., 1906. 
.do. 


.do. 


.do. 


C. S. 4418; 
Apr, 1906. 
.do. 


C. S. 4718; 
Dec.,1906. 
.do. 


.do. 


.do. 


C. S. 4718; 
Dec.,1906. 

.do. 

.do. 


C. S. 4426; 
May, 1904. 

.do. 

.do. 


_do. 


_do. 


Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

1 

Character of 
bottom. 

1909. 
Mar. 13 

1.44 p. m. 
2.04 p. m. 

2.56 p. m. 
3.13 p. m. 

fms. 

136 

hrd. S. 



.. .do_ 

153 

gn. M. 





Co. 





. ..do. 

8.38 a. m. 

140 


8.55 a. m. 

gn. M. (m. b.). 

...do. 

9.30 a. m. 

• 137 


9.45 a. m. 

gn. M. (m. b.). 

...do. 

10.21 a. m. 

134 

gn. M. 

10.36 a. m. 



3.00 p. m. 

3.03 p. m. 
3.21 p. m. 



. ..do. 

114 

gn. M. 




Mar. 16 



...do. 


32 

S., Sh. 



...do. 

9.34 a. m. 

25 

S., Sh. 

9.50 a. m. 


...do. 

9.58 a. m. 

30 




Mar. 16 

1.54 p. m. 
2.16 p. m. 

2.30 p. m. 
2.56 p. m. 
3.14 p. m. 

8.30 a. m. 

188 






...do. 

182 



Mar. 17 


Co. 





. ..do. 


190 

M. 



. ..do. 


262 




. ..do. 


298 

M. 

11.41 a. m. 





































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 


61 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 


Remarks. 

< 

j Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





h. m. 


mi. 













82 

78 






8 

S. 11° W.. 

1.0 





* 








SO 

78 






9 

S. 41° W.. 

1.1 








12 ft ... 

2 00 










18-30 ft. 

4 00 















79 

78 


1.02466 




19 

N. 75° W.. 

1.2 







K. 2.7. 


19 

N. 75° W.. 

1.2 













79 

79 




12' Agz; m. b.. 


20 

N. 66° W.. 

1.5 







K. 2.7. 


20 


1. 5 













79 

79 




12' Agz.; m. b. 


16 

N. 69° W.. 

1.2 







K. 2.7.. 


16 

N. 69° W 

1.2 








12-15 ft. 

1 00 



3 shots. 












81 

80 






7 


.5 








10-20 ft. 

3 30 



14 shots. 












79 

79 




6' McC........ 


9 

N. 22° E. . 

.5 













80 

80 


1.02458 


6' McC...._ 


12 

N. 10° E.. 

. 4 













80 

80 




6' McC........ 

botm... 

27 

N. 61° E. . 

.9 




55.8 









81 

81 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

22 

S. 45° E_ 

1.9 







K. 2.7. 

surface. 

22 

S. 45° E... 

1.9 








8-25 ft.. 

2 00 



7 shots. 



55. 7 









81 

81 





botm... 

29 

S. 55° E... 

i.8 








12-30 ft. 

7 30 



16 shots. 








7 00 






55.4 









81 

78 




botm... 

26 

S. 74° W.. 

1.8 













82 

80 





botm... 

20 

S. 82° W.. 

1.9 













83 

81 




12' Agz....- 

botm... 

27 

N. 81° W.. 

2.0 






























































































































62 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

D. 5407 

Dupon Bay (Leyte) and vicin¬ 
ity— Continued. 

Ponson Id. (N.), S. 76° E., 

C. S. 4426; 

1909. 
Mar. 17 


12.2 miles (10° 51' 38" N. 
124° 20' 54" E.). 

May, 1904. 


E>. 5408 

Between Cebu, and Leyte. 

Capitancillo Lt., N. 25° W., 
20.8 miles (10° 40' 15" N., 
124° 15' E.). 

Capitancillo Lt., N. 19° W., 

C. S. 4718; 

Mar. 18 

D. 5409 

Dec., 1900. 

.do. 

...do. 

D. 5410 

22 miles (10° 38' N., 124° 
13' 08" E.). 

Bagaeay Pt. Lt., S. 37° W., 
7.2 miles (10° 28' 45" N., 
124° 05' 30" E.). 

Between Cebu and Bohol. 

Lauis Pt. Lt., N. 35° E., 4.7 

.do. 

. ..do. 

D. 5411 

C. S. 4718; 

Mar. 23 

D. 5412 

miles (10° 10' 30" N., 123° 
51' 15" E.). 

Lauis Pt. Lt., N. 21° E., 5.5 

Dec., 1906. 

.do. 

. ..do. 


miles (10° 09' 15" N., 123° 
52' E.). 

Pandanon Id. (south). 

.do. 

. ..do. 



.do. 

. ..do. 


Reef opposite Pandanon Id.. 

.do. 

Mar. 24 

D. 5413 

Lauis Pt. Lt., N. 68° W., 10 

.do. 

. ..do. 

D. 5414 

miles (10° 10' 35" N., 124° 
03' 15" E.). 

Lauis Pt. Lt., N. 67° W.,9.5 

.do. 

. ..do. 

D. 5415 

miles (10° 10' 40" N., 124° 
02' 45" E.). 

Lauis Pt. Lt., N. 24° W., 7.2 

.do. 

. ..do. 

D. 5416 

miles (10° 07' 50" N., 123° 

Lauis Pt. Lt., N. 12° E., 2.9 

.do. 

Mar. 25 

D. 5417 

miles (10° 11' 30" N., 123° 
53' 30" E.). 

Lauis Pt. Lt., N. 10° E., 3.5 

.do. 

. ..do. 

D. 5418 

miles (10° 10' N., 123° 53' 
15" E.). 

Lauis Pt. Lt., N. 16° E., 5.6 

.do. 

. ..do. 

D. 5419 

miles (10° 08' 50" N., 123° 
52' 30" E.). 

Lauis Pt. Lt., N. 27° E , 

.do. 

.. .do. 

D. 5420 

17.8 miles (9° 58' 30" N., 
123° 46' E.) 

Cruz Pt. (Bohol), S. 20° E„ 

6 miles (9° 49' 35" N„ 123° 
45' E.) 

Bohol Island. 

Maribojoc Bay (anchorage).. 

.do. 

. ..do. 


C. S. 4718; 

Mar. 24 


Maribojoc Bay (E. of Cruz 

Dec., 1906. 
.do. 

Mar. 26 

D. 5421 

Pt.) 

Between Panay and Guimaras. 

Lusaran Pt. Lt., S. 27° E., 

C. S. 4718; 

Mar. 30 

D, 5422 

5 miles (10° 33' 30" N., 122° 
26' E.) 

Lusaran Pt Lt., S. 80° E., 

Dec., 1906. 

.do. 

...do. 


9.7 miles (10° 31' N., 122° 
18' 45" E.) 




Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 

12.57 p. m. 
1.28 p. m. 

fms. 

350 






159 





189 




11.21 a. m. 

385 

gn. M. 




145 

gn. M. 




162 




2.30 p. m. 
2.30 p. m. 


Co., S. 


S.,Co. 


Co., S. 


*42 




1.21 p. m. 
1.41 p. m. 

88 



150 




8.18 a. m. 

165 

gy- m., s. 

9.28 a. m. 

159 

gy. m., s. 

1.35 p. m. 
1.55 p. m. 

3.33 p. m. 

175 



127 






6.00 a. m. 


Co., R. 

5.38 p. m. 
6.10 p. m. 

7.17 p. m. 

137 




























































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


63 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 — Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 



| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F 

° F. 





h. m. 


mi. 


82 

81 






20 

S. 49° E... 

1.6 





dip; e. 1.; dyn. 
caps. 

surface. 

3 00 

2 shots. 










55.4 









83 

80 

1.02462 


12' Agz.; m. b. 
K. 2. 


20 

S. 46° W.. 

1.3 




surface. 

20 

S. 46° W.. 

1.3 









81 

80 




12' Agz.; m. b. 
K. 


29 

S. 51° W.. 

2.0 





surface. 

29 

S. 51° W.. 

2.0 

Record incomplete. 







82 

80 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

14 

S. 3° W... 

1.2 


55.2 





80 

81 



12' Agz.; m. b. 
K. 2. 

botm... 

24 

S. 33° W.. 

1.7 





surface 

24 

S. 33° E... 

1.7 




54.8 





81 

81 





22 

S. 67° E... 

1.7 






6-12 ft.. 

2 30 


4 shots. 







5 ft .... 

5 30 



11 hauls. 







10-12 ft. 

1 00 



3 shots. 

82 

82 

82 




6'"McC. 


6 

N. 30° W.. 

.6 

82 




6' McC. 

botm... 

9 

N. 23° W.. 

1.2 


62.4 



Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12' Agz.; m. b. 





83 

81 



botm... 

19 

N. 81° W.. 

1.5 


54.4 







81 

80 




botm... 

20 

South. 

1.5 


54.4 








81 

80 



12' Agz...._ 

botm... 

20 

S. 18' W.. 

1.2 


54.4 








81 

81 




botm... 

20 

S. 82° W .. 

.8 


54.5 








83 

81 



12' Agz. 

botm... 

20 

S.74° W. . 

i.3 


59 









83 

81 



12*-Agz., m. b . 

botm... 

17 

S. 54° W. . 

1.2 






surface. 

1 30 










10-20 ft. 

2 00 



6 shots. 



58.4 









84 

82 



12' Agz.; m.b . 

botm... 

19 

S. 70° W . . 

1.5 


84 

82 




int. 3. 

surface. 

20 

W. by S... 

1.5 


. 

1 





















































































































64 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


Depth. 


Character of 
bottom. 


D. 5423 
D. 5424 
D. 5425 


D. 5426 
D. 5427 
D. 5428 
H. 4928 
H. 4929 


D. 5429 


D. 5430 


D. 5431 
D. 5432 
D. 5433 
D. 5434 


Jolo Sea. 

Cagayan Id., Cagayanes Ids. 
(NW.). 

Cagayan Id. (S.), S. 11° E., 
4.8 miles (9° 38' 30" N., 121° 
11' E.) 

Cagayan Id. fS.), S. 11° W., 
3.4 miles (9° 37' 05" N., 121° 

Cagayan Id. (S.), S. 14° E., 

4 miles (9° 37' 45" N., 121° 
11' E.). 

Eastern Palawan and vicinity. 

Mantaquin Bay (Palawan).. 

Rasa Id. (southwest). 

Malinao River (Palawan).... 

Rasa Id. (southwest). 

Mantaquin Bay. 

30th of June Id., N. 29° E., 
12.2 miles (9° 12' N., 118° 
28' E.). 

30th of June Id., N. 16° W., 

11.5 miles (9° 11' 30" N., 
118° 37' 08" E.). 

30th of June Id., N. 62° W., 

19.5 miles (9° 13' N., 118° 
51' 15" E.). 

Fondeado Id. (SE.), N. 29 
E., 23 miles (9° 34' 48" N., 
118° 45' E.). 

Fondeado Id. (SE.), N. 19 
E., 19 miles (9,° 37' 30" N., 
118° 48' 30" E.). 

Iwahig River and tributaries 
(Pta. Princesa). 

Puerta Princesa (west of 
Bancaobancaon Pt.). 
Fondeado Id. (SE.), N. 18 
E., 15 miles (9° 41' 30" N., 
118° 50' 22" E.). 

Machesi Id. (southwest). 

Fondeado Ids. (W.), N. 57° 
W., 10.5 miles (9° 49' 40" 
N„ 119° 03' 20" E.). 

Verde del Sur Id. (south)_ 

.do. 

.do. 

Port Langcan, Dumaran Id. 
(east). 

.do. 

Port Langcan, Dumaran Id. 
(anch.). 

Port Langcan, Dumaran Id. 
(Green Pt.). 

Wreck Bay, Dalaganem Id.. 

Corandagos Id. (NW.), N. 
28° E., 4.8 miles (10° 38' 
45" N., 120° 12' 45" E.). 
Corandagos Id. (NW.), N. 
30° E., 5.7 miles (10° 37' 
50" N.. 120° 12' E.). 
Corandagos Id. (NW.), N. 
35° E., 6.5 miles (10° 37' 30" 
N . 120° 11' 05" E.). 
Corandagos Id. (N.), S. 63° 
W., 7.6 miles (10° 46' 45" 
N., 120° 22' 45" E.). 


C. S. 4717; 
Feb.,1903. 
_do. 


.do. 

.do. 


C. S. 4716 
Feb., 1903 

. ..do_ 

...do— 

...do_ 

...do_ 

. ..do— 


1909. 
Mar. 31 

...do. 

...do. 

...do. 


Apr. 1 

...do. 

Apr. 2 

...do. 

...do. 

Apr. 3 


. ..do. 

. ..do. 

...do. 

...do. 


C. S. 4343; 
July, 1903. 
-do. 

C. S. 4716; 
Feb., 1903. 

_do. 

_do... 


...do. 

.. .do. 

...do. 

...do. 

Apr. 4 
Apr. 5 
...do_ 


..do_ 

Apr. 6 


_do..do- 

_do.;. ..do 

_do.. ..do_ 

_do.! Apr. 7 


.do. 

.do. 


.do. 

C. S. 4717; 
Feb., 1903. 
_do. 


.do. 

.do. 

.do. 


.do. 

.do. 


Apr. 8 

...do_ 

...do_ 

...do_ 

.. .do_ 

. ..do_ 


9.00 a. m. 

9.16 a. m. 
9.55 a. m. 

12.52 p. m. 
1.24 p. m. 


2.20 p. m. 
2.57 p. m. 


3.00 p. m. 

3.00 p. m. 
8.00 a. m. 
9.00 a. m. 
2.30 p. m. 
6.42 a. m. 
6.44 a. m. 

8.04 a. m. 
8.09 a. m. 


10.14 a. m. 
11.23 a. m. 


3.28 p. m. 

4.39 p. m. 

7.00 a. m. 

6.30 a. m. 

7.32 a. m. 
8.14 a. m. 

1.00 p. m. 
10.07 a. m. 
10.54 a. m. 


2.00 p. m. 
2.00 p. m. 
8.00 p. m. 
4.00 p. m. 

5.30 p. m. 

7.30 p. m. 

7.00 a. m. 

2.30 p. m. 

2.49 p. m. 
2.54 p. m. 

3.26 p. m. 
3.34 p. m. 

4.04 p. m. 
4.16 p. m. 

7.50 p. m. 


fms. 

508 


mgn. Rf. 

gy. M., co. S. 


340 

495 


co. S. 

gy. M., co. S. 


sft. Co., R 


Co... 
S., G. 


27 


37 

1,105 


fne. gy. S. 

S , Sh. 


902 

554 


gy- m.. 

gy. M.,fne. co. S 
gy- M. 


766 


S., R., Co. 
gn. M. 


S., M., Co. 
glob. Oz... 


Co., G., S. 

S. 


R., Co. 


S., Co., G. 
R., S., Co. 
S. 


gn. M., co. S . 



































































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


65 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

Remarks. 

<< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





ft. m. 


mi. 







dyn. 

2-50;ft.. 

3 00 



6 shots. 



49.8 



Luc. sdr. (a). . 




82 

82 






27 

N.W. 





50.4 







81 

82 






20 

N. 67° W .. 

1.5 




49.4 



Luc. sdr. (a).. . 




82 

83 






20 

N.62° W.. 

1 2 








4 ft 

2 00 








dyn. 

6-12 ft.. 

2 00 









dyn. 


4 00 


5. 0 







dvn. 

8-10 ft.. 

3 00 










10 ft. . 

2 30 









Tnr. sdr. (e)... 






81 

82 




6' McC..; 


9 

N. 20° E.. 

.3 







Tnr.sdr. (e)... 






81 

82 












49.7 



Luc.sdr. (a).. 






85 

$3 






21 

N. by W .. 

1.0 


86 

83 

49.4 



Luc.sdr. (a)... 





83 

82 

49.4 



Luc. sdr. (a)... 













12 00 










4-20 ft. 

2 30 





.... 










82 

83 






18 

N.73° W.. 

1.9 








6- 12ft.. 

4 00 



10 shots. 



50 









84 

83 






25 

N. 

1.5 







K. 2. 


25 

N. 

1.5 








8-10 ft.. 

3 00 



6 shots. 







2-4 ft.. 

3 00 



20 hauls. 








12 00 



2 lines. 







6-15ft.. 

1 30 



5 shots. 








12 00 



2 lines. 








20 










8ft .... 

4 30 



17 shots. 







12—18ft. 

3 00 



6 shots. 












84 

83 




6' McC...'.'.... 


20 

S.46° W . . 

.S 


84 

83 















6' McC... ..... 

botm... 

20 

S. 68° W .. 

1.3 













83 

83 




6' McC........ 


20 

S. 44° W .. 

1.2 


83 

83 




lnt. 3. 

surface. 

20 

N. 70° E... 

.2 











































































































































66 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Cuyos Islands. 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


1909. 


D. 5435 


Cuyo Id. (west) 


C. S. 4345; 
Feb., 1905. 


do 


do 


Bisucay Id. (northeast). 

Bisucay Id. (NE.),S.55° E., 
1 mile (10° 50' N., 120° 58' 
10" E.). 


_do. 

C. S. 4717; 
Feb., 1903. 


Apr. 

..do. 

..do. 

..do. 


9 


8.30 a. m. 

8.30 a. m. 
2.00 p. m. 
7.50 p. m. 


West coast of Luzon, Manila 
Bay to Lingayen Gulf. 


D. 5436 


D. 5437 


Corregidor Lt., N. 83° E., 
5.2 miles (14° 22' 37" N., 
120° 29' E.). 

Hermana Mayor Id. (west).. 

Caiman Cove. 

_do. 

Hermana Mayor Lt., N. 69° 
E., 4.9 miles (15° 45' 54" N. 
119° 42' 45" E.). 


C. S. 4240; 
Feb., 1907. 


May 7 


C. S. 4712; 
Sept.,1904. 
C. S 4210; 
Sept., 1907. 

_do. 

-do. 


May 8 

.. .do. 

...do. 

...do. 


D. 5438 


D. 5439 

- *■ . 


D. 5440 
D. 5441 
D. 5442 


Hermana Mayor Lt., S. 21° 
E., 7.5 miles (15° 54' 42"N.. 
119° 44' 42" E.). 

Caiman Cove. 

Hermana Mayor Lt., S. 33° 
E., 12.6 miles (15° 58' 15" 
N., 119° 40' 20" E.). 
Bolinao Bay (north of Bo- 
linao). 

Bolinao Bay (east of village). 

_do. 

S. Fernando Pt. Lt., N. 82° 
E., 23.1 miles (16° 33' 52" 
N., 119° 52' 54" E.). 

S. Fernando Pt. Lt., S. 87° 
E , 18.7 miles (16° 38' N., 
119° 57' 18" E.). 

S. Fernando Pt. Lt., N. 39° 
E., 8.4miles (16° 30' 36" N., 
120° 11' 06" E.). 

Lingayen G. (east of Pt. 
Guecet). 


.do. 


.do. 

.do. 


C. S. 4238; 
Feb., 1905. 

.do. 

.do. 

C. S. 4209; 
Oct., 1905. 

.do. 


.do. 


.do. 


...do. 

May 9 
. ..do. 

. ..do. 

May 10 

...do. 

.. .do. 

. ..do. 

. ..do. 

May 11 


East coast of Luzon, San Ber¬ 
nardino Strait to San Miguel 
Bay. 


7.03 p. m. 


9.00 a. m. 

3.30 p. m. 

7.00 p. m. 
10.27 a. m. 

12.07 p.m. 

3.50 p. m. 

4.20 p. m. 

6.00 a. m. 
9.44 a. m. 
10.49 a. m. 

8.00 p. m. 

6.00 a. m. 
8.00 a. m. 
1.35 p. m. 
2.01 p. m. 

3.20 p. m. 

3.47 p. m. 

6.48 p. m. 
6.58 p. m. 

10.00 a. m. 


D. 5443 
D. 5444 
D. 5445 


Matnog Bay. 

_do.. 

_do. 

Balieuatro Ids., Biri Chan¬ 
nel (southern Biri Id.). 


C. S. 4258; 
Jan., 1903. 

_do. 

_do. 

C. S. 4220; 
May, 1907. 


Batag Id. (west, near Leung 
Pt.). 


C. S. 4449; 
Jan., 1907. 


Atalaya Pt., Batag Id., S. 
64° E., 3.6 miles (12° 43' 
05" N., 125° 01' E.). 
Atalaya Pt., Batag Id., S. 
65° E., 5.1 miles (12° 43' 
51" N., 124° 58' 50" E.). 
Atalaya Pt., Batag Id., S. 
56° E., 5.3 miles (12° 44' 
42" N., 124° 59' 50" E.). 


.do. 

.do. 

.do. 


May 31 

...do_ 

. ..do. 

June 1 

June 2 
...do. 

June 3 
. ..do. 


...do. 


...do. 


2.00 p. m. 

2.00 p. m. 
6.00 p. m. 
8.00 a. m. 
7.00 p. m. 
6.00 a. m. 
4.00 p. m. 
5.00 p. m. 
8.00 a, m. 
8.50 a. m. 
9.19 a. m. 

9.57 a. m. 
10.32 a. m. 

11.25 a. m. 
12.01 p. m. 


Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 

fms. 

R., Co. 


S. 


Co., R. 



*32 


S., Co. 




M. 





297 




S., Co. 

940 






S., Co., R. 


S.'_ ' . 

172 

fne. gy. S.,Glob... 

186 



45 




S. 




s., Co. 










Co., co. R ...._ 


Co. 

241 

co. S., Sh . 

308 



383 

gn. M., S. 








































































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


67 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

Remarks. 

< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





h. 

m. 


mi. 








4-16 ft.. 

3 

0 










3-4 ft_ 

2 

30 










6-18ft-. 

3 

00 



9 shots. 

83 

83 







21 

W. x N . 

0,7 

85 

86 







15 

W. 

.5 








8-10 ft.. 

5 

00 










5-12 ft.. 

2 

00 










9 fms... 

11 

00 




88 

86 




6 K. 6. 

100-600 


36 

N. 61° W . 

.9 








fms. 






87 

86 







27 












22 






46.2 










87 

87 




12' Agz.; in. b. 

botm... 


21 

S. 5° E.... 

1.2 








10-12 ft. 

2 

00 



8 shots. 



36.7 










89 

87 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 


14 

N. 16° W . 

2.5 

Net slightly tom. 








1 

00 









10—1’2 ft. 

4 

00 



7 shots. 







4ft. 

3 

00 



5 hauls. 



53.2 










86 

87 




12' Agz.; m,b. 

botm... 


20 

N. 22° E .. 

1.8 




52.2 










86 

87 





botm... 


20 

N. 64° E .. 

1.8 














82 

85 




25' Agz. 

botm... 

10 

34 

S. 12° E... 

15.5 








4-12 ft.. 

4 

30 



5 hauls. 







10-12 ft. 

.3 

00 

• 


5 shots. 







5ft. 

2 

30 



3 hauls. 








12 

00 










12-24 ft. 

7 

00 



13 shots. 








12 

00 










10-12 ft. 

3 

00 



7 shots. 







6-15 ft.. 

1 

30 



6 shots. 








13 

00 










5-15 ft.. 

7 

30 



17 shots. 



51.3 










82 

83 




botm... 


20 

N. 70° W . 

1.9 


45.3 










I 85 

83 



12' Agz. 

botm... 


17 

N. 65° E.. 

1.1 


44.3 










| 85 

83 



12' Agz_____ 

botm... 

37 

S.73° E... 

1.5 













































































































































68 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


D. 5446 
D. 5447 


D. 5448 

D. 5449 
D. 5450 

D. 5451 


D. 5452 
D. 5453 
D. 5454 
D. 5455 
D. 5456 
D. 5457 

D. 5458 

D. 5459 

I 


D. 5460 


Position. 


East coast of Luzon, San Ber¬ 
nardino Strait to San Miguel 
Bay—Continued. 

Atalaya Pt., Batag Id.* S. 
64° E., 5.3 miles (12° 43' 
51" N„ 124° 59' 18" E.). 

S. Miguel Pt., S. 7° W., 3.5 
miles (13° 28' N., 123° 46' 
18" E.) 

Tabaco Bay (west of S. 
Miguel Pt.). 

S. Miguel Pt., N. 23° E., 1.5 
miles (13° 23' 10" N., 123° 
45' 19" E.). 

Batan Id. (north, west of 
Camisog Pt.). 

East Pt. (Batan Id.), S. 43° 
E., 7.9miles (13°21' 36", N., 
124° 00' 30" E.). 

East Pt. (Batan Id.), S. 36° 
E., 9.2miles (13° 23' 15" N., 
124° 00' 30" E.). 

East Pt. (Batan Id.), S. 38° 
E., 8.2 miles (13° 22' 22" N., 
124° 00' 48" E.). 

Batan Id. (southwest, of Ba¬ 
tan). 

Rapurapu Id. (Babayon Pt.). 

Albay G., Yaua River. 

Legaspi Lt., S. 38° W..3 miles 
(13° 11' 54" N., 123° 47' 10" 
E.). 

Legaspi Lt., S. 58 W., 4.5 
miles (13° 12' N., 123° 49' 
18" E.). 

Legaspi Lt., S. 64° W., 5.7 
miles (13° 12' N., 123° 50' 
30" E.). 

Legaspi Lt., S. 70° W., 6.7 
miles (13° 11' 51" N., 123° 
51' 42" E.). 

Legaspi Lt., S. 76° W., 6.7 
miles (13° 11' 10" N., 123° 
51' 52" E.). 

Legaspi Lt., S. 60° W., 5 
miles (13° 12' N., 123° 49' 
40" E.)\ 

Batan Id., Caracaran Bay... 

Legaspi Lt., S. 84° W., 14 
miles (13° 10' 54" N., 123° 
59' 38" E.). 

Legaspi Lt., S. 88° W., 14.3 
miles (13° 10' 21" N., 123° 
59' 54" E.). 

Catanduanes Id., Cabugao 
Bay (east). 

Catanduanes Id., Cabugao 
River. 

Catanduanes Id., Cabugao 
Bay. 

Catanduanes Id., Agojo Pt.. 


Sialat Pt. Lt., N. 24° E., 8.2 
miles (13° 32' 30" N., 123° 
58' 06" E.). i 
Palumbanes Ids., Porong- 
pong Id. (southwest). 


Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


1909. 


fms. 


C. S. 4449; 

June 3 

1.25 p. m. 

300 

gn. M... 






C. S. 4221; 

June 4 

5.37 a. m. 

310 

gn. M. 






C. S. 4237; 





Mar., 1905. 





.do. 

. - .do. 

8.55 a. m. 

*47 


C. S. 4259; 


1.00 p. m. 


S., Co. 

Aug.,1906. 




C. S. 4221; 

.. .do. 

2.38 p. m. 

*300 


June, 1905. 





.do. 

.. .do. 

3.19 p. in. 

408 

gn. M., Co. 






.do. 

June 5 

7.34 a. m. 

*380 


C. S. 4259; 




S., Co. 

Aug., 1906. 


1.00 p. m. 


tide pools. 





Co. 

C. S. 4237; 





Mar., 1905. 





C. S. 4221; 

. ..do.... 

8.51 a. m. 

*110 

. 

June, 1905. 





.do. 

...do_ 

9.44 a. m. 

*146 


.do. 

. ..do_ 

10.46 a. m. 

*153 


.do. 

...do- 

11.57 a. m. 

*165 


.do. 

. ..do_ 

12.55 p. m. 

*142 


.do. 

June 8 

9.40 a. m. 

*146 


C. S. 4259; 

.. .do. 

1.00 p. m. 


S„ Co. 

Aug., 1906. 





C. S. 4221; 

. ..do_ 

2.04 p. m. 

*200 


June, 1905. 





.do. 

.. .do_ 

3.41 p. m. 

*201 


C. S. 4269; 





Feb., 1909. 















C. S. 4222; 





Jan., 1909. 





.do. 

...do_ 

8.37 a. m. 

565 

gy. m. 






.do. 

. ..do_ 

3.00 p. m. 


S., Co. 





































































DEEDGING AND HYDEOGEAPHIC EECOEDS. 69 

Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

< 

o> 

o 

J- 

D 

m 

6 

o 

o 

PQ 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 



84 

83 




45.3 



83 

85 






86 

86 







85 

86 




42.3 



85 

79 

86 

84 
























85 

85 

86 

86 

87 

85 

85 

86 

86 

86 

86 

85 






















87 

85 

85 

$5 






























86 

85 













Apparatus. 


Depth. 


Luc. sdr. (a). 
12' Agz. 


. botm... 


Luc. sdr. (a) 
12' Agz. 


Dura¬ 

tion. 


ft. vi. 
'28 


dyn. 

12' Agz.; m. b. 

dyn. 

12' Agz.; m. b. 


Luc. sdr. (a).. 
12' Agz.; m. b. 


int. 5 §. 


dyn. 

copper sulp’te. 

dyn. 

25' seine; dyn. 


12' Agz. 
12' Agz. 
12' Agz. 
12' Agz. 
int. 4 §. 
12' Agz. 


dyn.... 
12' Agz. 


12' Agz.; m. b. 
dyn. 


dyn.; 25' seine 

dip; e. 1. 

dyn. 


Luc. sdr. (a). 

12' Agz.; m. b. 
dyn. 


botm... 21 

10-15ft. 3 00 

botm...] 21 

8-10ft..: 4 30 

botm... 21 


botm... 


28 


280 fms.! 21 
12 

10 ft.... 8 00 

.I 2 00 

4 30 
9 30 


8-12ft.. 

botm... 

botm... 

botm... | 21 

botm... 14 

120 fms. 19 

J 7 


botm... 


20 


6-10 ft.. 3 30 
botm...i 23 


botm... 
10-18ft. 


surface. 
12ft.... 


botm... 
8-20ft.. 


20 
2 30 

8 00 

1 30 

2 30 


14 
2 30 


Drift. 


Direction. 


S. 83° E.. 
N.’ 64 V E ’. 


S. 64° E.. 


N. 


N. 

S. 61° E.. 


N. 48° E. 

* 


E. 

S. 79° E.. 
S. 63° E.. 
N. 88° W. 
S. 72° E.. 


S. 56° E.. 
N. 86° W. 


Remarks. 


mi. 

—' Therm, failed to 
1.6 register. 


7 shots. 


6 shots. 


1.4 


N. 43° W. 


10 shots. 
4 shots. 


13 shots. 


6 shots. 


13 shots. 


Therm, failed to 
register. 

5 shots. 


59395°—11-15 










































































































70 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 


East coast of Luzon, San Ber¬ 
nardino Strait to San Miguel 
Bay— Continued. 








1909. 


fms. 



Palumbanes Ids., “West 

C. S. 4222; 

June 11 

7.00 a. m. 



Id.” (west). 

Jan., 1909. 




Lahuv Id., Pocket Bay 
(west). 

.do. 

...do.... 

1.00 p. m. 







Quinalasag Id., Masamat 
Bay. 

.do. 


7.00 p. m. 









Quinalasag Id., Masamat 
Bay (east). 


June 12 

6.00 a. m. 


S., Co. 






Butauanan Id. (west and 
south). 

C. S. 4223; 

. ..do_ 

2.30 p. m. 


S., Co. . 


J une, 1908. 




Butauanan Id. (south). 

Maculabo Id. (west). 

.do. 

June 13 



Co., S. 


C. S. 4715; 

. ..do_ 

3.30 p. m. 

7.30 p. m. 


Co.. 



Apr., 1907. 




.do. 

June 14 


Co 




9.00 a. m. 




S. Miguel Bay, Colasi Pt_ 

C. S. 4223; 
June, 1908. 

. ..do_ 








D. 5461 

Caringo Id. (W.), N. 12° W., 
4.9 miles (13° 57' 42" N., 

.do. 

...do_ 

7.10 p. m. 

11 






123° 06' 42" E.). 

Canimo Pass, Daet Pt. 

.do. 

June 15 



Co., S. 


Canimo Pass, Basut River... 

.do. 

...do.... 




D. 5462 

Sialat Lt., S. 80° E., 5 miles 

C. S.4222... 

June 16 

5.50 a. m. 

469 



(13° 40' 42" N., 123° 56' 30" 

Jan., 1909. 


6.44 a. m. 



E.). 





Lagonoy G., Palag Bay (east) 
Sialat Pt. Lt., S. 74° E., 3.9 






D. 5463 

.do. 

...do. ... 

10.28 a. m. 

*300 

s.*:. 


miles (13° 40' 57" N., 123° 
57' 45" E.). 






D. 5464 

Sialat Pt. Lt., N. 82° E., £4 
miles (13° 39' 15" N., 123° 

.do. 

...do- 

2.14 p. m. 

*400 






57' 15" E.). 

Lagonoy G., Alto Pt. anch... 







Lagonoy G., Rosa Id. 

Lagonoy G., Bato River. 





S., Co. . 







D. 5465 

Atulayan Id. (E.), S. 50° W., 

.do. 

...do_ 

8.39 a. m. 

*500 

gy. M. (m. b.). 


7.3 miles (13° 39' 42" N., 
123° 40' 39" E.). 






D. 5466 

Atulayan Id. (E.), S. 62° W., 

.do. 

...do.... 

10.40 a. m. 

*540 

gy. M. (m. b.). 


7.7 miles (13° 38' 36" N., 
123° 41' 45" E.). 







Lagonoy G., Atulayan Bay 
(south). 

.do. 

...do_ 



S., R. 






Lagonoy G., Atulayan Bay 
(west). 

Lagonoy G., Atulayan Bay 
(anch.). 



6.30 p. m. 

8.00 p. m. 




.do. 

...do_ 









Lagonoy G., Nato River. 







Lagonoy Q., Atulayan Id. 
(east). 

.do. 

. ..do_ 

7.00 a. m. 


Co., S. . 




D. 5467 

Atulayan Id. (S.), S. 79° W., 

.do. 

. ..do_ 

7.52 a. m. 

*480 

gy. M. (m. b.). 


2.5 miles (13° 35' 27" N., 
123° 37' 18" E.). 





• 

D. 546S 

Atulayan Id. (S.), S. 83° W., 

.do. 

. ..do_ 

9.58 a. m. 

*569 

gn. M. (m. b.). 


5.7 miles (13° 35' 39" N., 
123° 40' 28" E:). 






D. 5469 

Atulayan Id. (E.), S. 63° W., 

4 miles (13° 36' 48" N., 123° 

.do. 

...do_ 

1.29 p. m. 

*500 





38' 24" E.). 






D. 5470 

Atulayan Id. (E.), S. 68° W., 
6.7 miles (13° 37' 30" N., 

.do. 

. ..do. 

3.26 p. m. 

*560 

M*. 




123° 41' 09" E.). 

Lagonoy G., Nato anch. 



7.30 p. m. 
9.17 a. m. 



D. 5471 

Sialat Pt. Lt., N. 71° E., 15 
miles (13° 34' 57" N., 123° 

.do. 

June 19 

*568 





47' 06" E.). 






D. 5472 

Sialat Pt. Lt., N. 63° E., 13.6 

.do. 

...do. 

11.12 a. m. 

*550 



miles (13° 33' 36" N., 123° 
49' E.). 











































































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


71 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 — Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

Lh’ 

< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

° F. 

°F. 

° F. 





h. 

m. 


mi. 







8-10 ft.. 

2 

00 









12-15 ft. 

3 

00 










1 

00 









10ft .. 

3 

30 









8ft. ... 

3 

00 









10ft .. 

4 

30 









15-25ft. 

i 

30 










i 

30 









8-18 ft.. 

4 

30 










2 

00 








Dhate. 













12 

00 



84 

86 







17 

E. 

2.5 







5-10ft.. 

2 

45 










10 

00 


0.0 



41.3 









83 

85 







17 

S. 35° E... 

1.5 







8-25 ft.. 

5 

30 



83 

84 







16 

S. 82° W.. 

.8 

84 

85 







10 

S. 40° W.. 

.2 








1 

00 









8-10 ft.. 

4 

30 










4 

30 


1.5 

83 

84 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 


20 

S. 59° E... 

1.6 

84 

86 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 


22 

S. 63° E... 

1.6 







15 ft.... 

2 

30 








wings. 













11 

00 









surface. 

1 

00 










11 

00 


4.5 







8—10 ft.. 

5 

00 



83 

85 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 


42 

N. 89° E. . 

2.7 

85 

86 





botm... 


33 

E. 

2.1 

84 

86 




12' Agz. 

botm... 


42 

N. 86° E. . 

2.8 

84 

86 




12'Agz. 

botm... 


34 

S. 50° E... 

1.6 







surface. 

1 

00 



80 

84 





botm... 


29 

S. 60° E... 

2.1 

83 

85 




12'Agz. 

botm... 


25 

S. 62° E... 

1.7 j 


Remarks. 


3 shots. 

2 shots. 

10 shots. 
9 shots. 

11 shots. 
7 shots. 

11 shots. 


5 shots. 


Bridle stops and 
one preventer 
carried away. 

24 shots. 


Bridle stops car¬ 
ried away; net 
badly torn. 

6 shots. 


3 hauls. 


10 shots. 


Bridle stops and 
lashing carried 
away; load lost. 


























































































































72 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and ’Hydrographic Records op the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

D. 5473 

East coast of Luzon, San Ber¬ 
nardino Strait to San Miguel 
Bay — Continued. 

East Pt. (Batan), S. 20° E., 

C. S. 4221; 

1909. 
June 19 


8.9 miles (13° 24' 15" N., 
124° 02' 48" E.). 

Albay G., between Paron 
and Jesus Pt. 

June, 1905. 

.do-._ 

Jun^ 21 


C. S. 4259; 

June 22 



Aug., 1906. 
.do. 

. ..do. 

. 





Port Gubat (Luzon). 

C. S. 4258; 

June 23 

D. 5474 

S. Bernardino Lt., S. 6° W., 

Jan.,19C3. 
C. S. 4220; 

June 24 

D. 5475 

8.4 miles (12° 53' 48" N., 
124° 18' E.). 

S. Bernardino Lt., S. 27° W., 
11 miles (12° 55' 26" N., 
124° 22' 12" E.). 

S. Bernardino Lt., S. 37° W., 

May, 1907. 

.do. 

.. .do. 

D. 5476 

.do. 

. ..do. 


13.5 miles (12° 56' 24" N., 
124° 25' 24" E.). 

Langao Pt. (extreme south- 

.do. 

. ..do. 


ern Luzon). 

Between Samar and Leyte, 
vicinity of Surigao Strait. 

Bito Lake and River (Leyte). 

C. S. 4423; 

July 26 


Abuyog (Leyte). 

June, 1905. 
.do. 

. ..do. 

H.4930 

Tacbuc Pt. (Leyte), S. 81°W., 

.do. 

July 27 

H.4931 

16 miles -(10° 46' 24" N., 
125° 17' 33" E.). 
Pagbabacnan Pt. (Malhon 

.....do. 

. ..do. 


Id.), S. 79° E., 16.5 miles 
(10° 45' 10" N., 125° 27' 48" 
E.). 

Casogoran (Malhon Id.). 

.do. 

...do. 


Gigoso Pt., Quinapundan 

.do. 

July 28 


Bay (Samar). 

C. S. 4719; 
Aug.,1907. 
.do. 

July 29 

. ..do. 

H. 4932 

Tacbuc Pt. (Leyte), N. 79° 

D. 5477 

W., 9.5 miles (10° 42' 10" 
N., 125° 10' 36" E.). 

Tacbuc Pt. (Leyte), S. 87° 

.do. 

. ..do. 

D.5478 

W., 11 miles (10° 44' 45" N., 
125° 12' 30" E.). 

Tacbuc Pt. (Levte), S. 80° 

C. S. 4423; 

.. .do. 

D. 5479 

W., 15.2 miles (10° 46' 24" 
N., 125° 16' 30" E.). 

Tacbuc Pt. (Leyte), S. 78° 

June, 1905. 

.do. 

. ..do. 

D. 5480 

W., 16.5 miles (10° 47' 15" 
N., 125° 17' 50" E.). 

Tacbuc Pt. (Leyte), S. 87° 

.do. 

. ..do. 

• 

W., 17.3 miles (10° 44' 36" 
N., 125° 19' E.). 
Hinunangan Bay (Leyte).... 

C. S. 4719; 

July 30 

D. 5481 

Cabugan Grande Id. (N.), 

Aug., 1907. 
.do. 

. ..do. 

D. 5482 

N. 86° W., 3.8 miles (10° 
27' 30" N., 125° 17' 10" E.). 
Cabugan Grande Id. (N.), 

.do. 

.. .do. 

D. 5483 

N. 87° W., 4.5 miles (10° 
27' 30" N., 125° 18' E.). 
Cabugan Grande Id. (N.), 

.do. 

.. .do. 

D. 5484 

N. 88° W., 5.7 miles (10° 
27' 30" N., 125° 19' 15" E.). 
Cabugan Grande Id. (N.), 

.do. 

.. .do. 

H. 4933 

S. 88° W., 6.4 miles (10° 28' 
N., 125° 20' E.). 

Cabugan Grande Id. (N.), 

.do. 

. ..do. 


N. 70° W., 9.1 miles (10° 
24' 37" N„ 125° 22' 15" E.). 




Time ol 
day. 

Depth. 

Character ol 
bottom. 


fms. 


2.05 p. m. 
2.49 p. m. 

1.00 p. m. 

545 

gy- M., S. 


Co. 


Co., S. 

1.00 p. m. 
8.00 p. m. 
1.00 p. m. 

7.18 a. m. 
7.37 a. m. 


S., Co. 


Co., S. 

124 

Co. 

8.51 a. m. 

195 

Sh. 

10.29 a. m. 

270 

Ine. S. 

3.30 p. m. 







S. 

7.02 a. m. 

93 

S. 

8.12 a. m. 

63 

crs. S., Sh. 



S., Co. 



S., Co. 



Co., S. 

10.02 a. m. 

44 

gy- M. 

10.23 a. m. 

48 

gy. M. 

11.33 a. m. 

57 

Sh. 

1.02 p. m. 
1.16 p. m. 

2.03 p. m. 
2.12 p. m. 

62 

gy. M. 

62 

fne. S. 


Co., S. 

8.18 a. m. 

61 

S., Sh., G. 




8.56 a. m. 

67 

brk. Sh., S., gn. M. 

9.48 a. m. 

74 

S.. brk. Sh. 

10.33 a. m. 

76 

S., brk. Sh. 

12.02 p. m. 

90 

gn. M., S., brk. 
Sh. 






















































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


73 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 — Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


£ 

j Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F 

. °F. 
40.3 





h. m. 


mi. 

85 

86 





15 

S. 41° E... 

1.2 





10 ft. 

4 00 







7—12 ft.. 

3 30 









10-15 ft. 

5 00 









1 00 









8-15ft.. 

4 00 











82 

82 





botm... 

16 

S. 58° W.. 

. 8 

59.3 





85 

82 




botm... 

16 

N. 82° W.. 

1.2 

48.3 




84 

83 





26 

N. 84° W. . 

1.0 





0—15 ft.. 

2 00 






dyn., s m 1. 
seines. 

12 00 


4.0 






12 ft.... 

4 00 


























9-18 ft.. 

6 00 









6-f0ft.. 

5 15 









8-15 ft.. 

5 45 





















86 

83 





botm... 

20 

S. 64° E... 

1.0 





87 

83 





botm-:.. 

14 

S. 74° E... 

.7 








87 

84 





botm... 

20 

S. 51° E... 

.8 








88 

84 






20 

E. 

.7 





10—15ft. 

8 00 











84 

83 





botm... 

20 

E. by S... 

1.0 







84 

83 





botm... 

24 

E. i S. 

1.2 








84 

83 





botm... 

21 

N. 58° E.. 

1.2 








85 

83 





botm... 

30 

N. 70° E... 

1.2 



















Remarks. 


Bridle stops car¬ 
ried away. 

12 shots. 

5 shots. 

14 shots. 

11 shots. 


8 shots. 


3 hauls. 


18 shots. 
17 shots. 

25 shots. 


20 shots. 

































































































































74 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


D. 5485 

D. 5486 
D. 5487 

D. 5488 
D. 5489 

D. 5490 
D. 5491 
D. 5492 
D. 5493 
D. 5494 
D. 5495 

D.5496 

D. 5497 
D. 5498 


D. 5499 

D. 5500 

D. 5501 
D. 5502 


Position. 


Between Samar and Leyte, 
vicinity of Surigao Strait— 
Continued. 

Cabugan Grande Id. (N.;, 
N. 59° W., 10.5 miles (10° 
22' 15" N., 125° 22' 30" E.). 

Between Leyte and Mindanao. 

Botobolo Pt. (Panaon Id.), 
S. 19° W„ 6 miles (10° 02' 
N., 125° 19' 20" E.). 

San Ricardo Pt. (Panaon 
Id.), S. 50° E., 11.2 miles 
(10° 02' 45" N., 125° 05' 33" 

San Ricardo Pt. (Panaon 
Id.), S. 59° E., 9 miles 
(10° N., 125° 6' 45" E.). 

San Ricardo Pt. (Panaon 
Id.), N. 42° E., 6.6 miles 
(9° 50'30" N., 125° 10'E.) 

San Ricardo Pt., N. 9° E., 
23.9 miles (9° 32' N , 125° 
11' E.) 

Diuata Pt. (W.), S. 9° W., 
19.3 miles (9° 24' N., 125° 
12' E.). 

Diuata Pt. (W.), S. 45° W„ 

15.2 miles (9° 12' 45" N., 
125° 20' E.). 

Diuata Pt. (N.), N. 84° W., 
5.5 miles (9° 04' N., 125° 20' 

Diuata Pt. (N.), N. 74° W., 

4.2 miles (9° 06' 30" N., 125° 
18' 40" E.). 

Diuata Pt. (N.), S. 76° E., 9.4 
miles (9° 06' 30" N., 125° 
00' 20" E.). 

Mahinog River, Camiguin 
Id. (mouth). 

Mahinog, Camiguin Id. 

Bantigui Id., N. 64° W., 7 
miles (9° 08' 26" N., 124° 57' 
E.). 

Bantigui Id., N. 64° W., 10 
miles (9°07' 15" N., 124° 59' 
30" E.). 

Bantigui Id., N. 64° W., 10 
miles (9° 07'15" N., 124° 59' 
30" E.). 

Northern Mindanao and vicin¬ 
ity. 

Macabalan Pt. Lt. (Minda¬ 
nao), S. 20° E., 11.6 miles 
(8° 41' 30" N., 124° 35' 40" 
E.). 

Macabalan Pt. Lt. (Minda¬ 
nao), S. 20° E.,7.9miles(8° 
37' 45" N„ 124° 36' 45" E.). 

Opol, Macajalar Bay (Minda¬ 
nao). 

Macabalan Pt. Lt. (Minda¬ 
nao)^. 35° E.,8.2miles(8° 
37' 37" N„ 124° 35' E.). 

Macabalan Pt. Lt. (Minda¬ 
nao), S. 35°E.,8.2miles (8° 
37'37" N„ 124° 35' E.). 


Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 

C. S. 4719; 
Aug.,1907. 

C. S. 4719; 
Aug. 1907. 

.do. 

1909. 
July 30 

12.42 p. m. 
12.57 p. m. 

fms. 

103 

. 

gn. M. 

July 31 

585 




. ..do. 

1.11 p. m. 
2.03 p. m. 

3.59 p. m. 
4.52 p. m. 

7.21 p. m. 

732 



.do. 

. ..do. 

772 




.. .do. 



.do. 

Aug. 1 .. 

830 




.do. 

...do_ 

8.25 a. m. 

736 

gn. M., Co. 



.do. 

.. .do_ 

12.42 p. m. 
1.31 p. m. 

735 

gy. M. 


. do . 

Aug. 2... 

478 




.do. 

...do_ 

8.30 a. m. 

678 

gn. M., S. 

.do. 

...do- 

12.44 p. m. 
1.54 p. m. 

976 



• 

Aug. 3... 

...do_ 






S., Co. 

.do. 

...do_ 


788 




.do. 

.. .do_ 

9.55 a. m. 
10.59 a. m. 

960 

gn. M., fne. S. 







2.50 p. m. 

960 

gn. M., fne. S. 

C. S. 4719; 
Aug.,1907. 

.do. 

Aug. 4... 

9.10 a. m. 

554 

gn. M., fne. S. 

...do_ 


267 




C. S. 4644; 
July. 1905. 
C. S. 4719; 
Aug., 1907. 


1.00 p. m. 

1.50 p. m. 
2.28 p. m. 


S., Co. 

...do_ 

214 

fne. S., gy. M. 






3.28 p. m. 

**214 









































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


75 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

Remarks. 

< 

& 

o 

3 

CQ 

s 

o 

o 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

d 

o 

g 

c3 

5 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





h. m. 


mi. 


85 

83 





botm... 

20 

N.40°E... 

1.7 

52.1 




84 

82 




botm... 

21 

S. 37° E... 

3.0 

52.3 



Luc. sdr. (a)... 

84 

84 




botm... 

23 

S. 65° E... 

2.7 

52.3 




85 

84 

83 

83 




botm... 
10ft.... 
50 fms.. 

surface. 

46 

46 

20 

4 

20 

4 

S. 43° E... 
S. 43° E... 

s 

3.5 

3.5 

.5 

.5 




K. 2. 


52.5 



K. 5. 

S . . 



83 

84 




botm... 

12 

S.28 0 E... 

.9 

Whole apparatus 
carried away. 

52.3 




84 

83 




botm... 

31 

S.45 0 E... 

2.7 

52.3 




84 

.... 

85 




botm... 

28 

S. 14° E... 

2.3 

52.1 



Luc. sdr. (a)... 

Mouth of river. 

21 shots. 

Lost apparatus 
and 1,000 fms. 
wire. 

Bridle stops lost 
frame twisted. 

20 shots. 

80 

83 




botm... 

45 

N.32° W.. 

3.0 

53.3 




82 

83 





botm... 
surface. 

35 

35 

N. 5° E.... 
N. 5° E.... 

3.2 

3.2 

52.3 



K.5. 

Luc. sdr. (a)... 

84 

83 




botm... 
600 fms. 

35 

33 

3 00 

in on 

S. 17° E... 
S. 17° E... 

2.7 

2.0 




.K.5... 







12-20 ft. 





52.3 







80 

83 




botm... 

16 

S.52° E... 

2.5 

52.3 




80 

83 




800 fms. 

20 

35 

S.60° E... 

2.6 







82 

84 





botm... 

27 

S.48 0 E... 

3.4 

52.3 




83 

84 




botm... 

. 

5 

N. 76° E... 

1.9 

53.5 




87 

84 



int. 4 . 

200 fms. 

5-12 ft.. 

18 

13 

4 30 

S.67° E... 

1.0 









54.3 






85 

86 



12' Tnr. 

botm... 

20 

S.38° E... 

1.5 





84 

86 




12' Tnr. 

botm... 

20 S. 38° E . .. 

1.7 
















































































































































76 


TJ. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records op the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

Time of 
day. 

Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 

D. 5503 

Northern Mindanao and vicin¬ 
ity —Continued. 

Macabalan Pt. Lt. (Minda¬ 
nao), S. 31° E., 6.6 miles (8° 
36' 26" N., 124° 30' 08" E.). 

Macabalan Pt. Lt. (Minda¬ 
nao), S. 39° E., 6 miles (8° 
35' 30" N., 124° 36' E.). 

Macabalan Pt. Lt. (Minda¬ 
nao), S. 31° E., 7.7 miles (8° 
37' 15" N„ 124° 36' E.). 

Macabalan Pt. Lt. (Minda¬ 
nao),S.^41° E.,12.2miles(8° 
40' N., 124° 31' 45" E.). 

Camp Overton Lt., Iligan 
Bay (Mindanao), S. 1° E., 
8.6miles (8° 21' 12" N., 124° 
12' 06" E.). 

Camp Overton Lt., Iligan 
Bay, S. 6° E., 4.9 miles (8° 
17' 24" N., 124° 11' 42" E.). 

Camp Overton, Iligan Bay 
(Mindanao). 

Nonucan R., Iligan Bay 
(near Camp Overton). 

Camp Overton Lt., S. 61° E., 
5.7 miles (8° 15' 24" N., 124° 

C. S. 4719; 

1909. 

Aug. 4... 

4.10 p. m. 
4.38 p. m. 

5.50 a. m. 

fms. 

226 


Aug., 1907. 


D. 5504 

Aug. 5... 

200 


6.15 a. m. 


D. 5505 







7.25 a. m. 

*220 


D. 5500 

.do. 

...do_ 

8.40 a. m. 

262 

gn. M. 



9.12 a. m. 


D. 5507 

C. S. 4613; 
June, 1906. 

.do. 

...do_ 

1.09 p. m. 
1.44 p.,m. 

2.53 p. m. 
3.17 p. m. 

425 

gn. M., fne. S. 

D. 5508 

...do_ 

270 

gn. M., fne. S. 


.do. 

Aug. 6... 


Co., S. 


.do. 




D. 5509 

.do__ 

Aug. 7... 


377 


8.36 a. m. 


D. 5510 

07' 18" E.). 

Camp Overton Lt., S. 68° E., 
9.1 miles (8° 16' N., 124° 03' 
50" E.). 

Camp Overton Lt., S. 80° E., 
15.3 miles (8° 15' 20" N., 

.do...i. 

...do_ 

9.53 a. m. 
10.31 a. m. 

423 

gy. M., fne. S. 

D. 5511 

.do. 

...do_ 

11.46 a. m. 
12.18 p. m. 

1.09 p. m. 
1.46 p. m. 

410 

gy. M., S. 

D. 5512 

123° 57' E.). 

Camp Overton Lt.,S. 76° E., 
14 miles (8° 16'02" N., 123° 

.....do. 

...do_ 

445 

gy. M., fne. S. 

D 5513 

58' 26" E.). 

Camp Overton Lt., S. 67° E., 

10.3 miles (8° 16' 45" N., 
124° 02' 48" E.). 

Camp Overton Lt., S. 34° E., 

24.3 miles (8° 32' 42" N., 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

3.07 p. m. 
3.53 p.“m. 

7.58 a. m. 
8.50 a. m. 

505 

gy. M., fne. S. 

D. 5514 

.do. 

Aug. 8... 

697 

gn. M., S. 

D. 5515 

123° 58' 36" E.). 

Camp Overton Lt., S. 26° E., 
24.6 miles (8° 34' 48" N., 







10.42 a. m. 




124° 01'24" E.). 






Inamucan Bay (Mindanao).. 
.do... 

.do. 


2.30 p. m. 


R., Co. 



Aug. 9... 


s 


Murcielagos Bay (Mindanao). 

Pt. Tagolo Lt. (Mindanao), 
S. 80° W., 9.7 miles (8° 46' 

C. S. 4641; 



Co., S. 

D. 5516 

Apr., 1902. 
C. S. 4723; 

...do_ 

9.57 a. m. 

175 

Glob. 


Oct., 1905. 


10.21 a. m. 


D. 5517 

N„ 123° 32' 30" E.). 

Pt. Tagolo Lt., S. 83° W., 

.do. 

...do_ 

11.00 a. m. 

169 

Glob. 


10.5 miles (8° 45' 30" N., 



11.21 a. m. 


D. 5518 

123° 33' 45" E.). 

Pt. Tagolo Lt., S. 64° W., 8.7 

.do. 

...do_ 

12.36 p. m. 
12.55 p. m. 
1.38 p. m. 
1.56 p. m. 

6.02 a. m. 

200 



miles (8°48'N.,123°31'E.). 


D. 5519 

Pt. Tagolo Lt.,S. 71° W„ 8.7 
miles (8°47' N., 123°31'15" 

.do. 

...do- 

182 

Glob., S. 





D. 5520 

E ) 

Pt. Tagolo Lt., N. 48° E., 4.5 
miles (8° 41' 15" N., 123° 18' 

.do. 

Aug. 10.. 

102 




6.20 a. m. 



30" E.). 





D. 5521 

Pt. Tagolo Lt., S. 11° E., 3 

.do. 

...do_ 

7.24 a. m. 

221 



miles (8° 47' N., 123°22' 30" 



7.51 a. m. 



E.). 

Silino Id. (west). 





S , Co 

D. 5522 

Pt. Tagolo Lt., S. 39° W., 6 

.do. 

...do_ 


230 

Glob. 


miles (8° 49' N., 123° 26' 30" 



9.57 a. m. 



E.). 
























































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


77 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 — Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 

sJ 

< 

j Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 

53.3 



Luc.sdr. (a)... 


ft. m. 


mi. 

83 

86 



12' Tnr. 

botm... 

20 

S.2° E.... 

1.2 

54.3 



Luc.sdr. (a)... 

77 

83 



12' Tnr.../... 

botm... 

20 

N. 7° W... 

1.7 





79 

83 




12' Tnr. 

botm... 

24 

N. 18° W.. 

1.4 

53.3 



Luc.sdr. (a)... 

84 

82 



12' Tnr_!... 

botm... 

14 

N.24° W.. 

1.7 

52.8 



Luc.sdr. (a)... 

85 

84 



12' Tnr. 

botm... 

20 

S.8° W.... 

1.0 

53.3 




84 

85 



12' Tnr. 


24 

S.2° E.... 

1.8 





6-12 ft.. 

8 00 






dvn. 

8 30 


3.5 



53.0 



Luc.sdr. (a)... 




79 

82 



12' Tnr. 

botm... 

23 

N. 34° W.. 

1.4 

53.0 






83 

84 



12' Tnr....;... 

botm... 

7 

S.44° W .. 

1.6 

53.0 







84 

85 



12' Tnr....;... 

botm... 

20 

N.64° E... 

1.9 

52.8 






91 

86 



12' Tnr. 

botm... 

20 

N. 74° E... 

2.2 

52.8 







84 

85 



12' Tnr. 

botm... 

15 

S.83° E... 

1.7 

52.3 








81 

83 



12' Tnr. 

botm... 

27 

N. 47° E... 

3.6 








85 

83 




12' Tnr. 

botm... 

28 

S. 20° W .. 

1.6 





8-15 ft.. 

3 00 









3 ft. 

2 00 









6-25 ft.. 

4 15 





54 3 







85 

84 


.. 

12' Tnr....;... 

botm... 

20 

S. 63° E... 

1.2 

54.3 








83 

85 



12' Tnr. 

botm... 

18 

S. 50° E... 

1.1 

54.0 








84 

85 



12' Tnr...' . 

botm... 

21 

S.9° E.... 

1.2 

54.3 








83 

85 



12' Tnr... . 

botm... 

43 

S. 14° E... 

1.6 

61.3 








79 

84 



12' Tnr. 

botm... 

24 

N. 13° E... 

1.3 

53.3 








81 

84 



12' Tnr....;... 

botm... 

4 

N. 52 E.... 

.9 





10-20 ft. 

3 00 





52.3 








81 

84 



12' Tnr. 

botm... 

18 

S.79° E... 

i.2 










Remarks. 


10 shots. 


Net badly tom. 


Beam frame 
sprung; net torn. 

Net fouled over 
beam. 

No sounding, 
depth about 700 
fms. 

11 shots. 

3 hauls. 

15 shots. 


No bottom sam¬ 
ple in sounding 
cup. 

Whole apparatus 
carried away. 

13 shots. 

Net fouled over 
beam. 






















































































































































78 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Station 

No. 

D. 5523 
D. 5524 

D. 5525 
D. 5526 
D. 5527 
D. 5528 
D. 5529 
D. 5530 
D. 5531 

D. 5532 

D. 5533 
D. 5534 
D. 5535 

D. 5536 
D. 5537 
D. 5538 
D< 5539 
D. 5540 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records op the U. S. Fisheries 


Position. 


Northern Mindanao and vicin¬ 
ity —Continued. 

Pt. Tagolo Lt., S. 48° W„ 6.7 
miles (8° 48' 44" N., 123° 27' 
35" E.). 

Pt. Tagolo Lt., S. 34° W., 17 
miles (8° 58' 07" N., 123° 32' 
45" E.). 

Between Siquijor and Bohol 
Ids. 

Balicasag Id. (C.), N. 11° W., 

18.2 miles (9° 12' 30" N., 
123° 44' 07" E.). 

Balicasag Id. (C.), N. 15° W., 
18.4 miles (9° 12' 45" N., 
123° 45' 30" E.) 

Balicasag Id. (C.), N. 14° W., 
8.2miles (9° 22' 30" N., 123° 
42' 40" E.) 

Balicasag Id. (C.), N. 15° E., 
5.8 miles (9° 24' 45" N., 123° 
39' 15" E.) 

Balicasag Id. (C.), N. 11° E., 
6.9miles(9° 23' 45" N., 123° 
39' 30" E.). 

Balicasag Id. (C.), N. 32° E., 

4.3 miles (9° 26' 45" N., 123° 
38' 30" E.). 

Balicasag Id. (C.), N. 43° E., 

4.2 miles (9° 27' 30" N., 123° 
38' 00" E.). 

Between Masbate and Leyte. 

Gigantangan Id. (S.), S. 33° 
E., 3.8miles (11° 36' 39" N., 
124° 13' 30" E.). 

Between Cebu and Siquijor. 

Balicasag Id. (C.), N. 71° E.. 

9.4 miles (9° 27' 15" N., 123° 
31' 48" E.). 

Balicasag Id. (C.), N. 72° E.. 
14.7 miles (9° 26' 00" N., 
123° 26' 37" E.). 

Apo Id. (C.), S. 24° W.,17 
miles (9° 20'30" N., 123° 23' 
45" E.). 


Between Negros and Siquijor. 

Apo Id. (C.), S. 26° W., 11.8 
miles (9° 15' 45" N., 123° 22' 
00" E.). 

Apo Id. (C.), S. 46° W., 8.7 
miles (9° 11' 00" N., 123° 23' 
00" E.). 

Apo Id. (C.), S. 64° W., 7.3 
miles (9° 08' 15" N., 123° 
23' 20" E.). 

Apo Id. (C.), N. 78° W., 8.2 
miles (9° 03' 20" N., 123° 
24' 45" E.). 

Apo Id. (C.), N. 76° W., 8.1 
miles (9° 03' 00" N., 123° 
24' 30" E.). 


Chart. 

Date. 

C. S. 4723; 
Oct., 1905. 

1909. 
Aug. 10 

.do. 

.. .do- 

C. S. 4718; 
Dec., 1906. 

Aug. 11 

.do. 

...do. 

.do. 

...do. 

.do. 

...do. 

.do. 

...do. 



.do. 

...do. 

C. S. 4718; 
Dec., 1906. 

Aug. >13 

C. S. 4718; 
Dec., 1906. 

Aug. 19 

.do. 

. ..do. 

.do. 

.. .do. 

C. S. 4718; 
Dec., 1906. 

Aug. 19 

.do. 

.. .do. 

.do. 

. ..do. 

.....do. 

. . .do. 

.do. 

.. .do. 


Time of 
day. 


10.49 a. m. 

1.06 p. m. 
1.51 p. m. 


8.28 a. m. 

9.29 a. m. 
10.36 a. m. 

1.07 p. m. 
1.38 p. m. 

3.08 p. m. 
3.42 p. m. 

4.44 p. m. 
5.19 p. m. 

7.14 p. m. 
7.49 p. m. 

7.14 p. m. 


5.30 a. m. 
6.08 a. m. 

8.23 a. m. 
8.53 a. m. 

10.38 a. m. 
11.07 a. m. 


12.50 p. m. 
1.36 p. m. 

3.15 p. m. 
3.39 p. m. 

4.55 p. m. 
5.20 p. m. 

7.11 p. m. 


7.42 p. m. 


Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 

fms. 




360 

S. 


405 

805 


gn. M., Glob. 

392 



439 



441 

gy. M., Glob. 







432 

gn. M., S. 

333 

gy. glob. Oz. 

310 

gy. glob. Oz. 

279 



254 



256 

gn. M., S. 

















































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 


79 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

Remarks. 

| Air. 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





ft. m. 


mi. 


82 

84 




12' Tnr.; m. b. 


20 

S.22° E... 

1.2 

No sounding. 



52.8 








83 

84 




12' Tnr. 


25 

S. 16° W .. 

1. 2 


82 

82 

53.3 



12' Tnr. 


22 

N. 85° E .. 

1.7 


82 

82 

52.3 









84 

84 




12' Tnr........ 


17 

E. 

1.8 



53.3 









87 

84 




12' Tnr... ..... 

botm... 

20 

S. 14° E... 

1.2 




53. 3 









87 

85 




12' Tnr........ 

botm... 

29 

S. 17° E... 

1.3 



53 










85 



12'Thr.;m.b.. 

botm... 

35 

S. 17° E... 

1.6 


84 

84 






20 




83 

S4 





surface. 

28 




86 

84 






14 





53.3 









80 

81 



12' Tnr........ 

botm... 

23 

S. 30° E... 

1.3 




53.3 









82 

82 



12' Tnr........ 

botm... 

20 

S. 64° W .. 

1.8 




53.3 









83 

84 



12' Tnr........ 

botm... 

09 

S. 69° W.. 

1.5 

Bridle carried 










away at surface, 











causing loss of 











most of catch. 



53.5 









84 

85 



12' Tnr........ 

botm... 

20 

S. 60° W.. 

2.7 






K. 5 








53.5 









85 

84 



12' Tnr.... 

botm... 

20 

S. 75° W.. 

2.0 


53.3 









83 

83 



12' Tnr... ..... 

botm... 

22 

S. 80° W.. 

1.3 


83 

83 





surface. 

19 




83 

83 






16 

















































































































80 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records op the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 

Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

D. 5541 

Northern Mindanao and vi¬ 
cinity. 

Tagolo Lt., S. 65° W., 12.7 

C. S. 4723; 

1909. 
Aug. 20 

D. 5542 

miles (8° 49' 38" N., 123° 
34' 30" E.). 

Tagolo Lt., S. 70° W., 13.2 

Oct., 1905. 

v ---do. 

. ..do. 

11.5543 

miles (8° 48' 30" N., 123° 
35' 30" E.). 

Tagolo Lt., S. 75° W., 12.5 

.do. 

.. .do. 


miles (8° 47' 15" N., 123° 35' 
00" E.). 

Murcielagos Bay (Mindanao). 

C. S. 4641; 

...do. 


Cascade River, Murcielagos 
Bay. 

Coronado Pt., S. 37° W., 21.5 

Apr., 1902. 
.do. 

.. .do. 

D. 5544 

C. S.4723... 

Sept. 6 


miles (8° 16' 30" N., 122° 26' 
30" E.). 

East of Zamboanga. 

Oct., 1905. 

C. S. 4511; 
Dec., 1904. 
.do. 

Sept. 8 

...do. 


Malanipa Id., northeast. 






Tulnalutan Id., north. 

.do. 

Sept. 9 
.. .do. 


South of Zamboanga. 

Isabel Channel, Basilan Id... 

C. S. 4543; 

Sept. 11 


Lampinigan Id., north and 

May, 1907. 
.do. 

. ..do. 


east. 

C. S. 4511; 

. ..do. 

Sept. 12 



Dec., 1904. 


Tapiantana Id., north. 

C. S. 4512; 

Sept. 13 


Bulan Id., north. 

Sept., 1906. 
.do. 

.. .do. 


Tonquil Id., Gumila Reef_ 

.do. 

.do. 

...do. 

Sept. 14 


Tonquil Id., northwest. 

.do. 

.. .do. 


Jolo I. and vicinity. 

C. S. 4512; 
Sept., 1906 
.do. 

Sept. 15 

. ..do. 

D. 5545 

Noble Pt., Tulayan Id. (E.), 

D. 5546 

S. 19° W., 3 miles (6° 04' 
45" N., 121° 20' 20" E.). 

Noble Pt., Tulayan Id. (E.) 
S. 13° W., 5miles (6° 06' 48" 
N„ 121° 20' 32" E.). 

Noble Pt., Tulayan Id. (E.), 
S. 38° E., 9.5 miles (6° 09' 
20" N., 121° 13' 40" E.). 

Jolo Lt. (Jolo), N. 77° E., 14.9 
miles (6° 00' 20" N., 120° 45' 
35" E.). 

Jolo Lt. (Jolo), N. 80° E., 

.do. 

. .do. 

D. 5547 

C. S. 4542; 

.. .do. 

D. 5548 

Apr., 1903. 

.do. 

Sept. 17 

D. 5549 

.do. 

.. .do. 

D. 5550 

15.8 miles (6° 01' 15" N., 
120° 44' 20" E.). 

Jolo Lt. (Jolo), N. 83° E., 

.do. 

.. .do. 


15.5miles (6° 02' 00" N., 120° 
44' 40" E.). 

Sulade Id., north. 

.do. 

.. .do. 

D. 5551 

Jolo Lt. (E.), N. 60° E., 18 

.do. 

...do. 


miles (5° 54' 48" N., 120° 
44' 24" E.). 




Time of 
day. 


5.25 a. m. 
5.51 a. m. 

6.34 a. m. 
6.56 a. m. 

8.46 a. m. 
9.04 a. m. 


1.00 p. m. 

1.00 p. m. 

10.34 a. m. 
11.17 a. m. 


7.45 a. m. 

1.00 p. m. 
7.00 p. m. 
6.00 a. m. 
1.00 p. m. 


8.30 a. m. 

1.30 p. m. 

7.30 p. m. 

8.30 a. m. 

2.00 p. m. 

9.30 a. m. 

3.00 p. m. 

7.30 p. m. 

8.30 a. m. 
2.00 p. m. 


9.00 a. m. 

9.26 a. m. 
9.43 a. m. 

10.34 a. m. 
10.52 a. m. 

1.31 p. m. 
1.51 p. m. 

7.55 a. m. 
8.20 a. m. 

9.09 a. m. 
9.36 a. m. 

10.20 a. m. 

10.46 a. m. 

1.00 p. m. 

1.46 p. m. 
2.07 p. m. 


Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 

fms. 

219 

fne. S., brk. Sh_ 

200 

fne. S., brk. Sh.... 

162 

S. 



S.,Co. 



759 

gn. M., fne. S. 


S., Co., R. 


S., R., Co. 




Co. 


Co., S., R. 


S., Co. 


Co., S. 




Co., S. 


Co. 


s., Co. 


Co. 




Co., S. 


Co.; S. 


Co., S. 

114 

fne. co. S. 

138 

fne. co. S. 

155 



232 

S., brk Sh. 

263 

S., Glob., For. 

258 

fne. S., Sh. 


Co., S. 

193 





































































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


81 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 



| Air. 

| Surface. • 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 

53.3 





h. 

m. 


mi. 


81 

83 




12' Tnr 

botm... 

21 

S. 17° E... 

1.0 


54.3 





83 

83 



12' Tnr.. 

botm... 

20 

S. 25° W .. 

1.4 

Net came up torn 
and tangled. 

54.5 




86 

84 



12' Tnr . 



17 

S. 20° W. . 

. 7 

Bridle stops car¬ 
ried away, frame 
bent, net badly 
tom. 

22 shots. 





4-12 ft.. 

8 

00 








4 

30 


1.5 



49.8 








82 

83 




600 fins. 


20 

N. 49° W.. 

1.5 







33 








10—15 ft - 

3 

30 










10-18 ft. 

2 

45 



10 shots. 







1 

00 









12-15 ft 

1 

00 



Do. 







9-20 ft.. 

3 

30 



16 shots. 







10-30ft. 

9 

30 



S 

6 shots. 







6-18 ft.. 

4 

00 



18 shots. 







1 

15 










8—18 ft 

3 

00 



9 shots. 







10-20 ft. 

3 

30 



10 shots. 







8-10ft 

2 

00 



8 shots. 


- 





10—15 ft. 

2 

30 



12 shots. 







1 

00 










4-6 ft . 

3 

00 



14 shots. 







8-10 ft.. 

3 

15 



12 shots. 







8-20 ft.. 

3 

00 



7 shots. 











82 

82 




9' Tnr. 

botm... 


16 

S. 34° E... 

1.1 


58.3 









83 

82 



9' Tnr.. 

botm... 


19 

S. 49° E... 

1.4 


56.3 









84 

82 



9' Tnr.. 

botm... 


20 

S. 32° E... 

1.5 


53.5 









82 

82 



9' Tnr.; m. b.. 

botm... 


29 

N. 55° W.. 

1.5 


52.3 








83 

83 



9' Tnr.; m. b... 

botm... 


21 

N. 23° E .. 

1.1 


52.3 








85 

83 



botm... 

- 

28 

S. 60° E... 

1.2 





10-15 ft. 

4 

00 



14 shots. 



53.3 







84 

83 


9' Tnr......... 

botm... 


20 

S. 15° E... 

1.1 











































































































































































82 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 
No. I 


D. 5552 
D. 5553 
D. 5554 
D. 5555 
D. 5556 


D. 5557 

D. 5558 
D. 5559 

D. 5560 

D. 5561 


D. 5562 


Chart. 


Date. 


D. 5563 
D. 5564 
D. 5565 
D. 5566 

D. 5567 
D. 5568 
D. 5569 
D. 5570 


Jolo I. and vicinity —Cont’d. 

Jolo Lt. (E.), N. 60° E., 18.3 
miles (5° 54' 30" N., 120° 
44' 15" E.). 

Sulade Id. (NW.), S. 4° E., 
0.5 mile (5° 51'00" N., 120° 
46' 30" E.). 

Cabalian Pt. (Jolo), N. 76° 
E„ 3.8 miles (5° 52' 27" N„ 
120° 52' 18" E.). 

Cabalian Pt. (Jolo), N. 50° 
W., 3.3 miles (5° 51' 15" N., 
120° 58' 35" E.). 

Cabalian Pt., N. 59° W., 4.5 
miles (5° 50' 55" N„ 121° 00' 
00" E.). 

Teomabal Id. (N.). 

Cabalian Pt., N. 70° W., 5.2 
miles (5° 51'30" N., 121° 01' 
00" E.). 

Cabalian Pt., S., 1.1 miles (5° 
51' 33" N., 121° 00'58" E.). 

Cabalian Pt., N. 66° W., 5.1 
miles (5° 51' 36" N., 121° 
00' 45" E.). 

Cabalian Pt., N. 76° W., 5 
miles (5° 52' 00" N., 121° 
01' 06"). 

Teomabal Id. (NW.), S. 36° 
W„ 0.2 mile (5° 50' 45" N., 
121° 01' 15" E.). 

Tutu Bay (Jolo). 


Tanun Pt. (Jolo), N. 87° E., 
17.2 miles (5° 54' 20" N., 
121° 13' 12" E.). 

Between Jolo and Tawi Tawi. 


Siasi Id., north. 

Tara Id., Panpan Pt. 

Bolipongpong Id., south- 


Singaan Id., north. 

Daxnmi Id. (N.), N.79° W„ 
6.1 miles (5° 48' 12" N., 120° 
30' 48" E.). 

Dammi Id. (N.), S. 85° W., 
6.1 miles (5° 50' 00" N., 
120° 31' 00" E.). 

Dammi Id. (N.), S. 69° W.. 
6 miles (5° 51' 42" N., 120° 
30' 30" E.). 

Dammi Id. (N.), S. 67° W„ 
6.8miles (5° 52' 12" N., 120° 
31' 00" E.;. 

North ol Tawi Tawi. 

Dammi Id. (N.), N. 81° W., 
9 miles (5° 48' 00" N., 120° 
33' 45" E.). 

Singaan Id. (N.), West, 0.9 
mile (5° 45' 50" N., 120° 
26' 00" E.). 

Simaluc Id. (SE.), S. 8° W„ 
6.4 miles (5° 33' 15" N„ 
120° 15' 30" E.). 

Simaluc Id. (SE.), S. 17°.E., 
5.7 miles (5° 32' 15" N., 
120° 12' 57" E.). 


C. S. 4542; 
Apr., 1903. 


_do. 


_do. 


_do.. 


.do. 


.do. 

.do. 


.do. 

.do. 


.do. 


.do. 


C. S. 4544; 
Oct., 1906. 

_do. 

C. S. 4722; 
Jan., 1909. 

_do. 

_do. 


_do. 

_do. 

_do. 

C. S. 4722; 
Jan., 1909. 

.do. 

.do. 

_do. 


1909. 
Sept. 17 


..do_ 

Sept. 18 

..do_ 

..do_ 


.do. 

.do. 


.do. 


.do. 


Sept. 19. 
..do_ 


Sept. 20. 

..do. 

..do. 

Sept. 21. 
. ..do. 


. ..do. 

. ..do_ 

...do_ 

Sept. 21. 

. ..do. 

Sept. 22. 
...do. 


Time of 
day. 


Depth. 


fms. 


3.18 p. m. 


7.28 p. m. 


9.19 a. m. 
9.29 a. m. 


10.59 a. m. 
11.09 a. m. 


11.36 a. m. 
1.30 p. m. 
2.58 p. m. 


3.17 p. m. 
3.35 p. m. 


4.04 p. m. 


6.13 p. m. 


8.15 a. m, 
1.45 p. m, 


6.07 p. m. 


1.00 p. m. 
3.30 p. m. 

10.00 a. m. 
10.25 a. m. 
10.47 a. m. 


11.24 a. m. 
11.45 a. m. 


12.32 p. m. 
1.00 p. m 

1.42 p. m. 
2.07 p. m, 


3.36 p. m 
4.05 p.m 

6.35 p. m. 


8.19 a m. 
8.49 a. m 


9.55 a. m. 
10.27 a. m 


236 

243 

244 


Character of 
bottom. 


Co., S. 
crs. S.. 


sctrd. Co., S. 
S., Co*. 


Co*. 

Co.*. 


Co., S. 
Co., S. 


Co., S. 


Co., S. 

S., Co., R. 


Co. 

fne. co. S .. 


fne. Co., S . 
S., ptr. Sh . 
fne. S., Sh. 


fne. S. 


S., Co. 


303 


330 


co. S. 


fne. S., Glob. 























































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


83 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


< 

Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





ft. 

TO. 


mi. 


83 

83 




9' Tnr.;m.b... 

botm... 

21 

S. 23° E... 

1.5 

Depth about as 
previous station. 




82 

83 





surface. 

10 

41 



Ship at anchor. 







83 

84 




6 ' McC...Y.... 

botm... 


6 

N. 74° W.. 

.2 

Net torn. 








82 

83 




6' McC....'.... 

botm... 


4 

N. 75° E... 

.5 










82 

83 







3 

N. 68° E... 

.3 

Trawl and 15 fins 
cable lost. 

7 shots. 





10-25 ft. 

3 

30 











83 

82 




6' McC. 

botm... 


5 

S W 

.1 










83 

82 




6' McC. 

botm... 


3 

S. 44° W... 

. 4 










83 

82 




6' McC. 

botm... 


7 

s w 

. 6 











83 

82 




6' McC. 

botm... 


9 

S. 20° E... 

. 5 

Everything car¬ 
ried away except 
bridle. 








81 

82 






11 

47 



Ship at anchor. 





10-20 ft. 

2 

15 









2-20 ft.. 

2 

30 



10 shots. 










84 

82 






11 

41 



Ship at anchor. 





15 ft ... 

1 

30 









8-15 ft.. 

1 

30 



Do. 







8-20 ft.. 

1 




Do. 







9-25 ft.. 

8 

00 



17 shots. 



52.3 






83 

83 




botm... 

18 

N. 6° W... 

1.3 


52.3 





84 

83 



9' Tnr__. ... 

botm... 

28 

N. 9° E... 

1.5 


52.3 





86 

84 



9' Tnr.; m. b.. 

botm... 

21 

N.45°E... 

.7 


52.5 





84 

84 



9' Tnr_..... 

botm... 

27 

N.56°E... 

1.6 


52.0 





85 

83 





21 

N.71°E... 

1.2 


82 

83 





surface. 

11 

20 

Ship at anchor. 

52.3 






84 

83 




botm... 

10 

S. 73° E... 

1.0 

Net torn. 

52.3 




87 

83 



9' Tnr.; m. b.. 

botm... 

17 

N. 45° W.. 

1.0 

Net came up 





fouled on bolt 
head. 































































































































84 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Station 

No. 


D. 5571 
D. 5572 
D. 5573 
D. 5574 
D. 5575 

D. 5576 


D. 5577 
D. 5578 


D. 5579 
D. 5580 

D. 5581 
D. 5582 


D. 5583 
D. 5584 

D. 5585 
D. 5586 

D. 5587 
D. 5588 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Position. 


North of Tawi Tawi— Cont’d. 

Simaluc Id.,north. 

Simaluc Id. (N.), S. 66° E., 
5.8 miles (5° 30' 45" N., 
120° 07' 57" E.). 

Simaluc Id. (N.), S. 51° E., 

4.7 miles (5° 31' 26" N., 
120° 09' 45" E.). 

Simaluc Id. (N.), S. 86° E., 
0.4 mile (5° 28' 30" N„ 
120° 13' 00" E.). 

Simaluc Id. (N.), S. 66° E., 

5.8 miles (5° 30' 45" N., 
120° 07' 57" E.). 

Mt. Dromedario (Tawi 
Tawi), S. 16° W„ 19.2 
miles (5° 28' 30" N., 120° 02' 
27" E.). 

Mt. Dromedario, S. 22° W., 

17.2 miles (5° 25' 56" N., 
120° 03' 39" E.). 

Bacun River (Tawi Tawi).... 

Simaluc Sibi Sibi Id. 

Mt. Dromedario, S. 9° W., 

' 10.9 miles (5° 20' 36" N., 
119° 58' 51" E.). 

Mt. Dromedario, S. 9° W., 

4.8 miles (5° 14' 38" N., 
119° 57' 57" E.). 

1 iciniiy of Darvel Bay, 
Borneo. 

Reef NW. of Tumindao Id .. 

Sibutu Id. peak, S. 77° E., 

20.3 miles (4° 54' 15" N., 
119° 09' 52" E.). 

Sibutu Id. peak, S. 82° E., 
23.2 miles (4° 52' 45" N., 
119° 06' 45" E.). 

Bumbum Id., north.. 

Bumbum Id. (NW.), S. 83° 
W„ 3.5miles (4° 30' 25" N., 
118° 41' 30" E.). 

Si Ami! Id. (N.), S. 82° W„ 
6.2miles (4° 19'54" N., 118° 
58'38" E.). 

Danawan Id. 


Sibuko Bay, Borneo, and 
vicinity. 

Si Amil Id. (N.) N. 88 W, 3.2 
mile (4° 19'00" N., 118° 56' 
20" E.). 

Si Amil Id. (N.) N. 74° W„ 
5.4miles (4° 17' 40" N., 118° 
57' 42" E.). 

Sipadan Id. (M.) S. 89° W„ 
12 miles (4° 07' 00" N., 118° 
49' 54" E.). 

Sipadan Id. (M.) West, 9.4 
miles (4° 06' 50" N„ 118° 
47' 20" E.). 

Sipadan Id. (N.). 

Sipadan Id. (W.) S. 12° E.. 
3.8 miles (4° 10' 35" N., 118° 
37' 12. E.). 

Mabul Id. (S.) N. 81° E., 1.7 
miles (4° 14'20" N., 118° 36' 
48" E.). 


Chart. 



1909. 

C. S. 4722; 

Sept. 22. 

Jan., 1909. 


.do. 

...do. 

.do. 

...do. 





C. S. 4514; 

. ..do. 

Jan., 1906 


C. S. 4722; 

. ..do. 

Jan., 1909. 


C. S. 4514; 

. ..do. 

Jan., 1906. 


. ...do. 

. ..do. 

.do. 

. ..do. 

/ 

.do. 

. ..do. 


C. S. 4722; 

Sept. 24. 

Jan., 1909. 


.do. 

Sept. 25. 

.do. 

...do. 

.do. 

. ..do. 

H O. 2117; 


June,1903. 


.do. 

Sept. 26. 


. ..do. 


Sept. 27. 

H. O. 2117; 

Sept. 27 

June, 1903. 


.do. 

. ..do_ 

.do. 

Sept. 28 

.do. 

... do_ 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


.do. 


.do. 

.do. 


...do .. 

.. .do... 


...do_ 


12.30 p. m, 

1.31 p. m. 
2.00 p. m 

3.02 p. m. 
3.34 p. m 


Depth. 


6.03 p. m. 


7.20 a. m. 


9.07 a. m. 
9.43 a. m. 


10.50 a. m. 
11.22 a. m. 

1.30 p. m. 

1.30 p. m. 
2.38 p. m. 
3.01 p. m. 


8.00 p. m 


1.00 p. m, 

8.03 a. m. 
8.25 a. m, 

9.20 a. m, 
9.40 a. m, 

2.30 p. m, 

5.55 p. m, 


10.11 a.m 
11.15 a. m 

2.00 p. m. 
8.15 a. m. 


1.48 p. m. 
2.33 p. m. 

3.28 p. m. 
4.02 p. m. 


8.49 a. m. 
9.31 a. m. 

11.09 a. m. 
11.44 a. m. 

2.00 p. m. 
2.35 p. m. 
3.11 p. m. 

6.10 p. m. 


fms. 

340 

334 


12 


340 

315 


Character of 
bottom. 


S„ Co. 
S„ Sh. 


240 


162 


21 

890 


447 

292 


476 

347 


415 

11 


Co., S. 


Co., wh. S. 
crs. S. 


Co., S. 

fne. S., Co.... 


br. S„ Co. 
Co., S.... 


S., Co. 

gy. M., fne. S. 


S., Co. 
S., Co. 


fne. S. 


fn. S., gn. M.. 
gy. M. 


gy- M. 


Co., S. 

gn. M., S., Co. 























































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


85 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 




5-18 ft.. 

h. m. 

4 00 


mi. 

11 shots. 



52.3 








81 

84 



9' Tnr.; m.b.. 

botm... 

21 

N. 67° E... 

1.4 


52.3 




82 

84 



9' Tnr.; m.b.. 

botm... 

26 

N.82°E... 

1.9 







83 

83 





surface. 

11 

42 



Ship at anchor. 







81 

82 





botm... 

24 

N. 58° E... 

1.2 


52.3 





83 

83 




botm... 

20 

S. 86° E... 

2.2 


53.3 





84 

84 



9'Tnr.; m.b.. 

botm... 


08 

S. 2° E_ 

1.7 





dyn.; sml. 
seines. 

3 

30 

4 shots. 

8 shots. 






5-20 ft.. 

3 

30 





54.3 







79 

82 



9' Tnr.; m.b.. 

botm... 

18 

S. 61° E ... 

1.8 

Mud bag lost. 




77 

82 






9 

49 



Ship at anchor. 

17 shots. 





5-25 ft.. 

4 

00 





55.3 







80 

82 



9' Tnr.; m.b.. 

botm... 

20 

S. 37° W... 

1.5 


55.8 




82 

83 



9' Tnr.; m.b.. 



17 

S. 16° W... 

1.0 






4-15 ft.. 

3 

00 

13 shots. 










82 

83 





surface. 

11 

55 



Ship at anchor. 

0 

38.3 






81 

82 



9' Tnr.; m.b.. 



17 

S. 17° E... 

3.3 





3-20 ft.. 

3 

30 








5-20 ft.. 

8 

30 



27 shots. 



40.3 






84 

85 



9' Tnr.; m. b. 

botm .. 

28 

S. 46° E... 

2.0 


44.3 




80 

84 



9' Tnr.; m.b.. 

botm .. 

21 

S. 56° W.. 

1.3 

Net badly tom 
and Tanner 
beam lost. 

41.1 



84 

82 



9' Tnr; m. b!.. 

botm .. 

20 

S. 53° W.. 

1.9 


44.0 




83 

84 






33 

N. 42° W.. 

.8 






8-20 ft.. 

0 

15 

13 shots. 



42.3 







85 

85 






21 

S. 15° E... 

1.5 


83 

82 




int. 4. 

surface. 

11 

35 

Ship at anchor. 










59395°—11 


16 
































































































































86 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


D. 5589 
D. 5590 
D. 5591 
D. 5592 
D. 5593 


D. 5594 


D.5595 


D. 5596 
D. 5597 
D. 5598 
D. 5599 


D. 5600 


D. 5601 
D. 5602 

D. 5603 
D. 5604 


Position. 


Sibuko Bay, Borneo, and 
cinity — Continued. 

Mabul Id. (S). 


Mabul Id. (NW.) N. 3° W., 
2.8 miles (4° 12' 10" N., 118° 
38' 08" E.). 

Mabul Id. (NW.) N. 22° W„ 
4.3 miles (4° 10' 50" N., 118° 
39' 35" E.). 

Mabul Id. (NW.) N. 6° W„ 
3.1 miles (4° 11' 48" N., 118° 
38' 20" E.). 

Silungan Id. (M.) N. 1° W., 
6.4miles (4° 12' 44" N., 118° 
27' 44" E.). 

Mt. Putri (sea tangent) Bor¬ 
neo, N. 52° W., 17.2 miles 
(4° 02' 40" N., 118° 11' 20" 
E.). 

Tawao River. 


Mt. Putri (sea tangent) S. 
82° E., 5.9 miles (4° 14' 20" 
N., 117° 53' 12" E.). 
Silimpopon River. 


Off Zamboanga, Mindanao, 
P. I. 

Zamboanga Lt. N. 31° W., 
0.1 mile (6° 54' 00" N., 122° 
04' 30" east). 

_do.... 

_do. 

.do.. 

.do. 


North of Celebes. 

Menado (town) S. 58° E., 68 
miles (2°05' 00" N., 123° 52' 
30" E.). 

Talisse Id., east. 


Limbe Strait, vicinity of 
Strait Id. 


Gulf of Tomini, Celebes. 


Kema (town). 

Limbe Id. (NE.), N., 20.7 
miles (1° 13' 10"N„ 125° 17' 
05" E.). 

Gorontalo pier, N., 7.1 miles 
(0° 22' 00" N., 132° 03' 
30" E.). 


Chart. 


IP. O. 2117; 
June, 1903. 
_do. 


.do. 


.do. 


.do._ 


B. A. 2099; 
Apr., 1895. 


B. A. 2576; 
Oct., 1882, 
cor. to 
Aug., 1905. 
B. A. 2099; 
Apr., 1895. 


C. S. 4645; 
July, 1907. 


.do.. 
.do.. 

.do. 

.do. 


H. O. 1727; 
Apr., 1909. 

B. A. 930; 
May, 1866. 
cor. to 
May, 1907. 


Gorontalo pier N. 6° W., 5.7 
m. (00° 24’ 00" N., 123° 03' 
45" E.). 

Bilatu (town), N. 26° W., 8.7 
miles (0° 22'30" N., 122° 42' 
30" E.). 

Dodepo and Pasejogo Ids. 


B. A. 1727. 
_do... 


B. A. 942a; 
Oct., 1868; 
cor. to 
Mar., 1906. 
_do. 


. .do. 


. B. A. 900; 
Mar., 1901; 
cor. to 
I Mar., 1907. 


Date. 


19C9. 
Sept. 29 

...do_ 


...do_ 

...do- 

...do_ 

...do_ 

Sept. 30 

...do_ 

Oct. 2 

Oct. 6 


Oct. 10 
Oct. 12 
...do.... 
.. .do_ 


Nov. 7 


Nov. 9 


Nov. 10 


Nov. 13 
...do_ 


Nov. 14 

Nov. 15 

...do_ 

Nov. 16 


Time of 
day. 


7.0f a. m. 

7.16 a. m. 
7.44 a. m. 

8.33 a. m. 
9.02 a. m. 

10.54 a. m. 


3.33 p. m. 
4.00 p. m. 

7.25 p. m. 

7.34 p. m. 


9.30 a. m. 

7.24 p. m. 
8.00 a. m. 

7.13 p. m. 


6.00 p. m. 
11.45 a. m. 
3.10 p. m. 
6.20 p. m. 


7.06 p. m. 
6.00 a. m. 


4.30 p. m. 
6.00 a. m. 
1.00 p. m. 


8.45 a. m. 
1.15 p. m. 
2.18 p. m. 

9.01 a. m. 
10.15 a. m. 


1.12 p. m. 
2.37 p. m. 

7.25 p. m. 
8.00 a m. 


Depth. 


fms. 


260 

310 

260 

305 

38 


765 


962 


803 


Character of 
bottom. 


Co. 

fne. gy. S., gy. M. 


gn. M., S. 


gn. M. 
fne. S. 


M., S 


Co. 


Co.... 
S„ Co. 
S., Co. 


S., Glob., Ptr. 


gy. M. 


Co. 














































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


87 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 — Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


< 

1 

Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 




7-25 ft.. 

h. m. 

5 00 


mi. 

15 shots. 



45.7 



Luc. sdr. (a).. 



81 

82 




botm .. 

20 

S. 49° E... 

2.0 


44.3 





82 

83 





21 

S. 55° E 

21 


84 

84 




9' Tnr. 

botm .. 

21 

S. 58° E... 

1.8 

Depth estimated 
from dredging 
wire angle. 

43.3 




83 

85 



9' Tnr. 

botm .. 

10 

N. 65° E... 

. 7 








84 

83 





botm .. 

15 


1.4 

Frame badly bent. 





8 30 


76 

83 




' . 

int. 4. 

surface. 

1 37 



Ship at anchor. 
Net badly torn. 












dyn. 


9 00 




80 

80 




int. 4. 


10 50 



Ship at anchor. 

Do. 

80 

81 




int. 4. 


12 30 



83 

82 




int. 4. 


2 20 



Do. 

85 

82 




int. 4. 


3 00 



Do. 

84 

82 




int. 5. 


11 15 



Do. 

80 

82 




int. 4. 

surface. 

26 



No bearings ob¬ 
tainable. 














10-18 ft. 

5 30 










8-10ft.. 

1 30 









dyn. 

8-10 ft.. 

4 30 









dyn. 

8-15 ft.. 

4 00 










7ft .... 

2 00 



2 hauls. 









81 

83 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm .. 

21 

S. 29° E... 

1.8 






81 

84 




12' Agz...;.... 

botm .. 

20 

S. 

2.0 

Net torn; bridle 
ropes torn loose. 






.... 






84 

84 






13 

E... . 

1.0 

One bridle stop 
carried away. 

No bearings ob¬ 
tainable. 

83 

83 




int. 4. 

surface. 

25 










8-20 ft.. 

4 00 

18 shots. 


















































































































88 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Station 

No. 


D. 5605 


D. 5606 


D. 5607 
D. 5608 
D. 5609 

ij.aio' 

D. 5611 
D. 5612 

i>."56i3 


D. 5614 

D. 5615 
D. 5616 


D. 5617 
H. 4934 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records op the U. S. Fisheries 


Gulf of Tomini, Celebes — Con. 

Dodepo Id. (W.) N. 14° W., 
5.9 miles (0° 21' 33" N. 121° 
34' 10" E.). 

Papajatu (Celebes). 

Sadaa Id., north. 

Dodepo Id. (W.) N. 3° W., 
10.8 miles (0° 16' 28" N., 
121° 33' 30" E.). 

Binang Unang Id., east. 


Binang Unang Id. (E.) S. 36° 
E., 5 miles (0° 04' 00" S.. 
121° 36' 00" E.). 

Binang Unang Id. peak, S. 
87° E., 19 miles (0° 08' 00" 
S„ 121° 19' 00" E.). 

Binang Unang Id. (N) N. 
80° E., 21 miles (00° 11'00" 

5.. 121° 16' 00" E.). 

Togian Bay, Togian Id. 

Batu Daka Id. (S.) N. 87° 

W., 20.9 miles (0° 36' 00" 

5., 122° 01' 00" E.). 

Buka Buka Id. (E.) S. 43° 

W., 6.4 miles (0° 40' 30" S., 
121° 50' 00" E.). 

Buka Buka Id. (E.) S. 3° E., 
7 miles (0° 38' 00" S., 
121° 45' 40" E.). 

Buka Buka Id., north. 

Buka Buka Id. (E.) S. 28° 
4 miles (0° 42' 00" S.. 121° 
44' 00" E.). 

Malibagu Pt,. (Celebes). 


Molucca Passage. 

Tifori Id. (C.) N.19° E„ 30.5 
miles (0° 31' 00" N., 125° 
58' 45" E.). 


Tifore Id. (C.) N. 40° W„ 35 
miles (0° 32' 30" N., 126° 31' 
30" E.). 

Tifore Id. (C.) N. 62° W., 50 
miles (0° 36' 00" N., 126° 
52' 20" E.). 

Dodinga Bay, Gillolo Id. 
Tidore Id., north. 


Maitarald., north. 

Ternate Id. (SE.) S. 45° W., 

7 miles (00° 49' 30" N., 127° 
25' 30" E.). 

Ternate Id. (SE.)S.33° W., 
7.8 miles (0° 51' 00" N., 127* 
25' 10" E.). 


Chart. 


B. A. 900; 
Mar, 1901; 
cor. to 
Mar., 1907. 

_do. 

-do. 

_do. 


B. A. 942a; 
Oct., 1868, 
cor. to 
Mar., 1906. 
_do. 


.do_ 

.do_ 


.do_ 

.do- 


...do_ 


. .do_ 


.do. 

.do. 


.do. 


Date. 


1909. 
Nov. 16 


. .do_ 

Nov. 17 
...do_ 


...do_ 

Nov. 18 

...do_ 

...do.... 


Nov. 19 
...do_ 


...do_ 


Nov. 20 


Time of 
day. 


Depth. 


fms. 

9.27 a. m. | 647 

10.25 a. m. . 


2.00 p. m. 
6.00 a. m. I 
9.09 a. m. [ 
10.07 a. m. 


8.25 a. m.! 
9.20 a m. J 

12.48 p. m. 
2.02 p. m. 

3.37 p. m. 
4.51 p. m. 

7.45 a. m. 
3.59 p. m. 
4.50 p. m. 

7.14 p. m. 


6.04 a. m. 
7.22 a. m. 


..do_.| 9.15 a. m. 

..do_,| 10.16 a. m. 

11.14 a. m. 


Nov. 21 


B. A. 942a: Nov. 22 
Oct., 1868, ! 
cor. to 
Mar., 1906. ! 

_do....do_ 


_do....do_ 


B. A. 942a; 
Oct., 1868, 
cor. to 
Mar., 1906. 

_do. 

_do. 


.do. 


Nov. 24 


Nov. 26 
Nov. 27 


. .do.... 


10 00 a. m. 1 


6.44 a. m. 
7.58 a. m. 


1.16 p. m. 
2.37 p. m. 

6.44 p. m. 


8.00 a. m. 


8.15 a. m. 
10.42 a. m. 
11.01 a. m. 

11.37 a. m. 


834 


4.00 p. m.. Cp., S 


Character of 
bottom. 


M„ Co.... 
Co., R„ S. 
gn. M. 


761 ! fne. S. 


1,089 | gy. M. 
1,092 i gn. M. 


678 


750 


752 


1,100 


1,021 


131 


Co.... 

gy- m. 


Co.... 

gy- m. 


Co. 


gy. M., S., Glob.. 


Co. 


Co. 


S., Lav . 





















































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


89 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910-^-Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


Air. 

Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





h. m. 


mi. 


82 

82 




12' Agz. 

botm .. 

21 

S. 63° W.. 

1.7 

Net slightly torn. 

2 shots. 





15-20 ft. 

1 









10-20 ft. 

1 



10 shots. 











83 

83 




12' Agz... ..... 

botm .. 

20 

S. 28° E... 

2.5 






10-12 ft. 

2 



11 shots. 











81 

83 





botm .. 

20 

S. 50° W.. 

1.5 


36.3 







80 

82 




botm .. 

20 

S. 40° W.. 

3.5 


36.3 






83 

83 





33 

S. 39° E... 

2.0 





dyn. 

5—18 ft.. 

3 30 

Do. 










84 

87 






27 

N. 63° W.. 

2.0 


83 

84 





surface. 

20 







. 


Therm., sounding 
cup, stray line 
and lead, and 70 
fms. wire lost. 

21 shots. 

80 

83 






22 

S. 5° E.... 

1.5 





5-15 ft.. 

3 00 









85 

84 






19 

N. 20° E.. 

1.8 





* . 

10-20 ft. 

1 30 

7 shots. 









Shot failed to de- 

82 

84 





botm .. 

12 

N. W. 

1.5 

tach. 

Bridie stop car¬ 
ried away; net 
torn. 






84 

84 




12' Agz...'..'... 


20 

s. w. 

1.5 


80 

84 





20-30 

18 

2 
















dyn. 

G—18ft.. 

4 00 



8 shots. 







8—18ft.. 

3 45 



13 shots. 









84 

84 




12' Agz.. ..... 

botm... 

10 

N. 71° W.. 

1.0 






























































































































90 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 




Station 

No. 


D. 5618 

D. 5619 
D. 5620 


D. 5621 


D. 5622 

D. 5623 
D. 5624 


D. 5625 
D. 5626 
D. 5627 

D. 5628 


D. 5629 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Position. 


Molucca Passage. 

Mareh Id., S. 69° E., 7.8 
miles (0° 37'00" N., 127° 15' 
00" E.). 

Mareh Id. (S.) S. 78° E., 7 
miles (0° 35' 00" N., 127° 14' 
40" E.). 

Makyan Id. (S.),S. 44° E., 7 
miles (0° 21'30" N., 127° 16' 
45" E.). 

Between Gillolo and Makyan 
islands. 

Makyan Id. (SE.). 


Makyan Id. (S.),N. 54° W., 
3 mi les (0° 15' 00" N., 127° 
24' 35" E.). 

Powati Anchorage (Makyan). 


Makyan Id. (NE.), N.66°W., 


4.1 miles (0° 19' 20" N., 127° 
28' 30" E.). 

Makyan Id. (S.), S. 88° W., 
7.5 miles (0° 16' 30" N., 127° 
30' 00" E.). 

Makyan Id. (S.), N. 67° W., 
8.9miles (0°12' 15" N., 127° 
29' 30" E.). 

Between Gillolo and Kayoa 
islands. 

Kayoa Id. (northeast). . . _ 


Kayoa Id. (SE.), S. 3° W„ 

6 miles (0° 07' 00" N., 127° 
28' 00" E.). 

Kayoa Id. (SE.), S. 5° W., 
6.7 miles (0° 07' 30" N., m 6 
29' 00" E.). 

Kayoa Id. (SE.), S. 15° E., 
4.5 miles (0° 06' 00" N., 127° 
26' 00" E.). 

Patiente Strait and southward. 

St. Lamo Id. (SE.), N. 9° W., 

7 miles (0° 28' 30" S., 127° 
45' 00" E.). 

Gane (Gillolo). 


Doworra Id. (S.), S. 62° W., 
6 miles (0° 50' 00" S., 128° 
12' 00" E.). 


Doworra Id. (south). 


Chart. 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


B. A. 942a; 
Oct., 1868, 
cor. to 
Mar., 1906. 
.do. 


1909. 
Nov. 27 


...do_ 


2.07 p. m. 
2.44 p. m. 


3.36 p. m. 
4.12 p. m. 


.do. 


Nov. 28 


5.48 a. m. 
6.24 a. m. 


B. A. 942a. Nov. 28 
Oct., 1868; 
cor. to Mar., 

1906. 

_do.do.... 


B. A. 912, 
Mar., 1885; 
I cor. to Oct., 
1906. 

B. A. 942a, 
Oct., 1868; 
cor. to Mar- 
1906 . 


Nov. 29 

...do_ 


.do. 


...do. 


8.30 a. m. 

9.21 a. m. 
9.50 a. m. 

6.00 a. m. 

7.36 a. m. 

8.03 a. m. 

8.56 a. m. 

9.22 a. m. 


..do. 


.. .do_ 


10.30 a. m. 
10.58 a. m. 


B. A. 942a, 
Oct., 1868; 
cor. to Mar.. 
1906. 

.do. 


.do. 

.do. 


B. A. 942a, 
Oct., 1868; 
cor. to Nar., 
1906. 

B. A. 912... 
Mar., 1885; 
cor. to Oct., 
1906. 

B. A. 942a, 
Oct., 1868; 
cor. to Mar., 
1906. 


Nov. 29 


. .do_ 


...do. 
...do. 


Dec. 1 


Dec. 2 


_do.do_ 8.00 a. m 


1.30 p. m. 


1.49 p. m. 
2.16 p. m. 

3.09 p. m. 
3.34 p. m. 


6.02 p. m. 

11.22 a. m. 
12.45 p. m. 
8.00 a. m. 


6.14 a. m. 
6.43 a. m. 


Depth. 

Character of 
bottom. 

fms.. 
417 

gy. M. 


435 

fne. gy. S., M. 

358 

gy. m. 


S., Co. 

298 

gy.andbk.S.(m.b.) 


S., Co. 

275 

gy. M. 


272 

fne. S., M. 

288 

fne. S., M. 


Co. 

230 

gy. M., fne. S. 

265 

gy. M., fne. S. 

22 

M. 


1,291 





205 




Co. 



























































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS 


91 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


U 

j Surface. 

| Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

° F. 





h. m. 


mi. 


82 

84 





botm... 

20 

S. 13° W.. 

2.0 







83 

84 





botm... 

29 

S. 22° E... 

1.8 







80 

82 






21 


1.0 






8—18ft.. 

3 00 


17 shots. 









81 

84 




12' Agz.; m. b. 


20 

S. 28° E... 

1.2 





10-20ft. 

1 00 

4 shots. 






Luc. sdr. (c).. 



80 

83 




12' Agz.; m. b. 

botm... 

21 

S. 10° E... 

1.0 






81 

83 





botm... 

20 


1.0 








83 

83 




12' Agz. 


20 

S. 15° E... 

1.5 






8-30 ft.. 

3 00 

20 shots. 









83 

84 





botm... 

21 

S. 5° W... 

1.8 







84 

84 




12' Agz.... ... 

botm... 

18 


1.0 








83 

83 





5 fms... 

11 40 



Ship at anchor. 

Stray line carried 

away. 

One bridle stop 
carried away. 

24 shots. 







80 

84 






20 

S. 20° E... 

2.5 

# 





10-25ft. 

7 00 









80 

83 






02 



Dredge frame 
runner badly 
bent; lead rope 
broken; bridle 
stops lost. 

13 shots. 




dvn. 

10-20 ft. 

3 30 






























































































92 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Station 

No. 


D. 5630 

D. 5631 
D. 5632 
D. 5633 

D. 5634 

D. 5635 
D. 5636 


D. 5637 

H.4935 
D. 5638 


D. 5639 

D. 5640 

iSlmi 

D. 5642 

D. 5643 


Position. 

Chart. 

Date. 

South of Patiente Strait. 




1909. 

Doworra Id. (N.), N. 3° W., 
4.5 miles (0° 56' 30" S., 128 6 

B. A. 942a, 
Oct., 1868; 
cor. to Mar., 

Dec. 2 

05' 00" E.). 

1906. 


Doworra Id. (N.), N. 58° E., 
10.5 miles (0°57' 00" S., 127° 

.do. 

...do_ 

56' 00" E.). 

Selang Pt. (Bachian Id.), N. 

.do. 

...do_ 

56° W., 12.5 miles (1° 00' 
00" S., 127° 50' 00" E.). 
Selang Pt., N. 24° W., 11.8 

.do. 

...do_ 

miles (1° 03' 00" S., 127° 44' 
00" E.). 



Pitt Passage. 



Gomomo Id. (E.), N. 41° E., 

3 miles (1° 54' 00" S., 127 d 

B. A. 942a, 

Dec. 3 

Oct., 1868; 
cor. to Mar., 
1906. 


36' 00" E.). 

Gomomo Id. (S.). 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

Gomomo Id. (E.j, N. 14° W., 

.do. 

. ..do- 

2.5 miles (1° 53'30" S., 127° 
39' 00" E.). 



Gomomo Id (E.), N. 46° W., 

.. .do. 

.. .do_ 

6 miles (1° 55' 00" S., 127° 
42' 30" E.). 



Bouro Id. (south) and vicinity. 



Uki Id. 

B. A. 942a; 
Oct., 1868, 

Dec. 9 



cor. to Mar., 
1906. 





Uki Id. 



Amblau Id. (N.), N. 80° E., 
21 miles (3° 53' 20" S., 

.do. 

Dec. 10 

48' 00" E.). 

Tifu Bay (Bouro Id.). 

.do. 

. ..do_ 

Tifu Bay entrance (W.), N. 

.do. 

.. .do- 

4° E„ 2.2 miles (3° 46' 15" 
S., 126° 24' 40" E.). 



Tifu Bay entrance (W.), N. 
17° E., 3.2 miles (3° 47' 15" 

.do. 

...do- 

S., 126° 23' 40" E.). 


Dec. 11 

Molucca Sea. 


Cape Pamali (Wowoni Id.), 

B. A. 3616; 

Dec. 13 

(N.), S. 77° W., 27 miles 
(3° 54' 50" S., 123° 27' 20" 
E.). 

May, 1907. 



Buton Strait. 



Labuan Blanda Id., N. 88° 

B. A. 3470; 

Dec. 13 

E., 1 mile (4° 27' 00" S., 
122° 55' 40" E.). 

Apr., 1906. 


Labuan Blanda Id. (S.). 

__do. 

Dec. 14 

Kalono Pt. (W.), N. 61° W.. 
3.4 miles (4° 29' 24" S., 122 4 

.do. 

. ..do_ 

52' 30" E.). 

Tikola Peninsula (N.), N. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

38° W., 6.5miles (4°31' 40" 
S., 122° 49' 42" E.). 









Pendek Id. (N.), S. 77° E.. 
1.7 miles (5° 11' 45" S., 122 15 

.do. 

...do- 

42' 36" E.). 




Time of 
clay. 


Depth. 


8.51 a. m. 
9.36 a. m. 


1.11 p. m. 
2.16 p. m. 

4.12 p. m. 
5.08 p. m. 

7.14 p. m. 


6.27 a. m. 
7.02 a. m. 


8.15 a. m. 
9.24 a. m. 
9.56 a. m. 

11.51 a. m. 
1.18 p. m. 


8.00 a. m. 


8.00 a. m. 
1.00 p. m. 
7.06 a. m. 
7.57 a. m. 


1.00 p. m. 
1.30 p.m. 


2.00 p. m. 
2.36 p. m. 

1.00 p. m. 
7.00 p. m. 


5.23 a. m. 
7.11 a. m. 


5.02 p. m. 
5.10 p. m. 

6.00 a. m. 
9.30 a. m. 

9.41 a. m. 

10.50 a. m. 
11.00 a. m. 

1.00 p. m. 
3.15 p m. 

3.42 p. m. 
4.06 p. m. 


Character of 
bottom. 


fms. 

569 


809 

845 


329 


1,262 


700 


1,560 


co. S., M 


gn. M. (in net)_ 


co. S.. 

hrd.. 

Co., R., soapstone. 

gy. M., fne. S_ 


mrgn. Co. 


S., R.. 

gy- M. 


S., M., R., Co. 


fne. gy. S 


Co., S. 


gy- M. 


S., brk. Sh. 


mrgn. Co. 
S., Sh.... 


gy- M. 


S., Co. 
Co., S. 
gn. M. 



















































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS 


93 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 


Trial. 

Drift. 


< 

Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Apparatus. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

Remarks. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





h. m. 


mi. 


82 

84 





botm... 

24 

S. S. W... 

1.8 






Sounding cup lost. 

84 

86 





botm... 

20 

N. by W.. 

1.5 







83 

82 

85 






22 

S. E. by E. 

2.0 


84 





surface. 

19 

No bearings ob¬ 
tainable. 












81 

84 




12' Agz. 

botm... 

13 

S.W.by S. 

1.0 






6-20ft.. 

7 30 


23 shots. 









82 

S3 





botm... 

05 

S. S. E.... 

.5 

Bridle stops lost; 
frame bent. 







83 

83 





botm... 

20 

S. by E... 

2.5 






10-30 ft. 

6 00 


19 shots. 







9 00 


7.0 







12 ft... 

3 30 


9 hauls. 









79 

83 





botm... 

12 

S. 21° W .. 

1.3 

Net fouled on bot- 





2-20ft.. 

3 15 


tom. 

18 shots. 




















84 

86 





botm... 

20 

S. 78° E... 

1.0 






3-15ft.. 

4 30 



13 shots. 







1 30 













82 

84 




9' Agz. rev.... 

botm... 

31 

N. 36° W.. 

.8 










84 

84 




12' Agz........ 

botm... 

12 

N. 52° W.. 

.3 






5ft. 

1 45 



5 shots. 









83 

84 

-ftf 

' 


12' Agz........ 

botm... 

17 

S. 81° W.. 

.6 









84 

85 




botm... 

17 

N. 75° W.. 

1.4 





5-18 ft.. 

3 30 



11 shots. 




1 


15-25 ft. 

1 45 



12 shots. 











82 

84 




12' Agz. 

botm... 

17 

S. 45° W.. 

.7 































































































































94 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Station 

No. 


D. 5644 
D. 5645 
D 5646 
D. 5647 
D. 5648 
D. 5649 


D. 5650 
D. 5651 ! 
D. 5652 
D. 5653 
D. 5654 

D. 5655 
H. 4936 
D. 5656 
D. 5657 
D. 5658 
D. 5659 

H. 4937 
D. 5660 
D. 5661 

D. 5662 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Chart. 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


Depth. 


Character of 
bottom. 


Baton Strait— Continued. 


Makasser Id. (E.), N. 4° E., 
1.3 miles (5° 27' 24" S., 122° 
38' 00" E.). 

North Id. (NE.), S. 10° W.. 
1.6 miles (5° 29' 06" S., 122° 
36' 06" E.). 

North Id. (S.), S. 68° E., 7.5 
miles (5° 31' 30" S , 122° 22' 
40" E.). 

North Id. (S.), S. 87° E., 11.6 
miles (5° 34' 00" S., 122° 18' 
15" E.). 

North Id. (S.),N.87°E., 10.2 
miles (5° 35' 00" S., 122° 20' 
00" E.). 

North Id. (S.), N. 87° E., 22 
miles (5° 36' 00" S., 122° 07’ 
36" E.). 

Gulf of Boni. 

Basa Id. 

Lamulu Pt., N. 5° W., 12.5 
miles (4° 53' 45" S., 121° 29' 
00" E.). 

Buginkali Pt., S. 67° E., 21 
miles (4° 43' 50" S., 121° 23' 
24" E.). 

Lamulu, S. 36° E., 7.5 miles 
(4° 35' 00" S., 121° 23' 06" 
E.). 

Lamulu, S. 40° E., 18 miles 
(4° 27' 36" S., 121° 16' 36" 

C. Tabako, N. 17° E., 21.5 
miles (3° 42' 00" S., 120° 45' 
50" E.). 

Labuandata Bay. 

C. Tabako, N. 7° E., 13 miles 
(3° 34' 10" S., 120° 50' 30" 

C. Tabako, N. 47° E., 9 miles 
(3° 28' 00" S., 120° 45' 40" 
E ) 

Olang Pt., N. 67° W., 14.5 
m iles (3° 17' 40" S., 120° 36' 
45" E.). 

Olang Pt., N. 61° W., 15.5 
miles (3° 19' 40" S., 120° 36' 
30" E.). 

C. Loko Loko, S. 31° W. ,12 
miles (3° 32' 40" S., 120° 31' 
30" E.). 

C. Lassa, S. 78° W., 19 miles 
(5° 33' 20" S., 120° 47' 10" 
E.). 

Flores Sea. 

C. Lassa, S. 78° W., 20.5 miles 
(5° 32' 50" S., 120° 49' 10" 

C. Lassa, S. 88° W., 20.5miles 
(5° 36' 30" S., 120° 49' 00" 
E ) 

C. Lassa, N. 21° E., 12.5 miles 
(5° 49' 40" S., 120° 24' 30" 
E.). 

Tana Keke Id. (W.), N. 17° 
W., 12.5 miles (5° 43' 00" S., 
119° 18' 00" E.). 

Tana Keke Id. (S.). 


B. A. 3470; 
Apr.,1906. 

1909. 
Dec. 16 


8.02 a m. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

9.37 a. m. 
9.54 a. m. 

B. A. 3616; 
May, 1907. 

. ..do_ 

11.36 a. m. 
12 10 p. m. 

.do. 

...do_ 

2.07 p. m. 
2.44 p. m. 

.do. 

...do_ 

3.47 p. m. 
4.29 p. m. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

7.23 p. m. 

B. A. 3616; 

May, 1907. 
.do. 

Dec. 17 

.. .do_ 

8.00 a. m. 

8.34 a. m. 
9.22 a. m. 

. ..do. 

.. .do_ 

1.39 p. m. 
2.32 p. m. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

4.39 p. m. 
5.24 p. m. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

7.23 p. m. 

.do. 

Dec. 18 

5.41 a. m. 
6.47 a. m. 

.do. 

.do. 

...do_ 

...do- 

9.00 a. m. 
10.20 a. m. 
11.00 a. m. 

.do. 

...do- 

1.40 p. m. 

.do. 

Dec. 19 

7.36 a. m. 

8.37 a. m. 

.do. 

. ..do- 

10.29 a. m. 
11.08 a. m. 

.do. 

. ..do.... 

1.38 p. m. 
2.23 p. m. 

.do. 

Dec. 20 

6.10 a m. 
6.57 a. m. 

B. A. 3616; 
May, 1907. 

Dec. 20 

8.12 a. m. 

.do. 

.. .do_ 

9.14 a. m. 
10.05 a. m. 

.do. 

. ..do- 

4.05 p. m. 
4.24 p. m. 

B A. 2637, 
June, 1885; 
cor. to Oct, 
1904. 

Dec. 21 

...do.... 

5.40 a. m. 
6.12 a. m. 

8.30 a m. 


fms. 

22 



206 



456 



519 



559 

gn. M. 





Co. 

540 

tide pools. 


700 



525 





805 




Co., S. 

608 

gy. M., fne. S. 

667 

484 




492 



510 

gy. M. 

702 

S. M. 


885 

692 


gy. m., s. 

180 



211 




Co. 






































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


95 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910 — Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

Air. 

Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

| Distance. 

°F. °F. 

°F. 





h. m. 


mi. 










80 83 






11 

S. 81° W.. 

.4 










79 83 




12' Agz. 


01 

N. 34° W.. 

JJ 










79 83 






20 


1.1 










83 83 






20 

S. 40° E... 

1.0 


39.2 








83 83 






23 

S. 55° E... 

.8 

83 83 






21 








12-20 ft. 

3 00 









3 00 




40.1 








84 84 




12' Agz. 

botm... 

10 

S. 45° W.. 

.7 


38.7 








85 84 






20 

N. 11° W.. 

2.9 


41.2 








84 84 





botm... 

20 

N. 61° W.. 

2.1 

82 82 






20 




38.3 



* 





79 83 






28 

N. 1° W... 

2.0 






5-18 ft.. 

3 00 




39.2 








84 84 





botm... 

20 

S. 45° E... 

1.5 











41.2 








80 83 





botm... 


S. 41° W.. 

1.8 


41.3 








-t 

cc 

<M 

oc 





botm... 

20 

8 . 19° W.. 

2.0 


41.2 








83 85 





botm... 

20 

S. 35° E... 

1.2 


39.0 








83 82 






21 

S. 62° E... 

1.0 


38.2 









39.2 








83 83 





botm... 

20 

S. 58° E... 

1.8 


50.5 








86 83 




12' Agz........ 


03 

N. 50° E.. 

1.1 


48.8 

' 







82 83 




12' Agz........ 


20 


1.8 





dyn. 

9-18 ft.. 

2 45 




Remarks. 


No bearings ob¬ 
tainable. 


10 shots. 


Bridle stops car¬ 
ried away. 
Sounding cup car¬ 
ried away. 


No bearings ob¬ 
tainable. 


12 shots. 


Therm, failed to 
register. 


Net torn below 
lead line. 


No bottom speci¬ 
men. 


16 shots. 



































































































































96 


U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 


Dredging and Hydrographic Records of the U. S. Fisheries 


Depth. 

Character pf 
bottom. 

fms. 

10 

400 


hrd. 


1,008 

M. 



Co. 

272 



367 

gy. s., M. 

901 





1,181 



960 






Co. 


Co. 


s ., Co. 

» 







Station 

No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


D 5663 
D. 5664 
D. 5665 


D. 5666 
D. 5667 
D. 5668 
D. 5669 
D. 5670 

D. 5671 
D. 5672 


Macassar Strait. 

Kapoposang Id. (E.), N. 11° 
E., 1.7 miles (4° 43' 22" S., 
118° 57' 35" E.). 
Kapoposang Lt., N. 66° E.. 
3.8 miles (4° 43'22" S. t 118° 
53' 18" E.). 

Kapoposang Lt., S. 40° E., 
18.8miles(4°27'00"S., 118° 
44' 00" E.). 

(W.).. 
W.. 11 
118° 47' 

& 


W., 11 
118° 47' 


Libani Bay, Celebes 

Onkona Pt., S. 1° 
miles (2° 54' 30" S., 

00" E.). 

Onkona Pt., S. 5° 
miles (2° 56' 00" S., 

30" E.). 

Mamuju Id. (E.), S. 31° E., 
10.6 miles (2° 28' 15" S., 118° 
49' 00" E.). 

Mamuju Id. (E.). S. 14° E., 
18.5 miles (2° 19' 30" S., 118° 
50' 00" E.). 

Chenoki Pt., S. 60° E., 40 
miles (1° 19' 00" S., 118^ 43' 
00" E.). 

Chenoki Pt., S. 31° E„ 42.5 
miles (1° 05' 00" S., 118° 56' 
00" E.). 

Dongala Lt., S. 80° E., 54 
miles (0° 29' 00" S., 118° 51' 
00" E.). 

Birabirahan (west). 


Dutch 123; 
Sept., 1901. 

_do_ 


B. A. 2637; 
June, 1885, 
cor.toOct., 
1904. 

_do_ 

_do_ 


.. .do_ 

.. .do_ 

. . .do_ 


Trusan Tando Bulong , B. N. 
Borneo. 

Daisy Islet, 4° 27' 53" N., 118° 
38' 25" E. 


Sulu Sea. 

Doc Can Id., southwest. 
China Sea. 


B. A. 9416, 
Nov., 1867; 
cor.toAug. 
1907. 

_do_ 


B. A. 2636; 
Apr., 1878, 
cor.toApr. 
1907. 

B. A. 9416; 
Nov., 1867, 
) cor.toAug, 
1907. 


H. O. 2117; 
June, 1903. 


C.S. 4722... 


Kwa Siang Bay, Formosa. 
So Wan Bay, Formosa.... 


1909. 
Dec. 27 


Dec. 28 
..do_ 


Dec. 29 
..do.... 


...do.... 

...do_ 

..do_ 

Dec. 30 

.. .do.... 
..do_ 

Dec. 31 


1910. 
Jan. 6 


Jan. 7 


Jan. 25 
Jan. 29 


7.20 p. m. 

9.09 a. m. 
9.43 a. m. 

1.51 p. m. 

2.59 p. m. 

8.00 a. m. 
8.39 a. m. 

9.18 a. m. 

9.55 a. m. 
10.25 a. m. 

3.41 p. m. 

4.45 p. m. 

7.25 p. m. 

7.03 a. m. 

8.18 a. m. 

12.41 p. m. 

1.45 p. m. 

7.26 p. m. 


8.45 a. m. 


1.45 p. m. 


10.15 a. m. 


8.30 a. m. 

7.30 a. m. 
































































DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS, 


97 


Steamer Albatross in the Philippine Islands, 1907-1910—Continued. 


Tempera¬ 

tures. 

Density. 

Apparatus. 

Trial. 

Drift. 

< 

| Surface. 

Bottom. 

Sur¬ 

face. 

Bot¬ 

tom. 

Depth. 

Dura¬ 

tion. 

Direction. 

Distance. 

°F. 

°F. 

°F. 





h. m. 


mi. 

S3 

84 
















10 40 





43.3 








81 

84 






21 

S. 67° W.. 

2.5 











80 

82 






05 

SW.... 

2.0 







6-18 ft.. 

3 30 













80 

82 






12 

S. 34° E... 

1.5 



41.7 








82 

83 






20 

N. 34° W.. 

1.5 



38.2 








81 

83 






19 

S. 47° E... 

2.8 

83 

84 






24 


1.0 



38.2 








82 

82 






20 


2.0 



38.2 








83 

84 






23 

S. 63° E... 

2.0 

82 

83 






20 

N. 10° W.. 








10-20 ft. 

2 15 









10-15 ft. 










10-30 ft. 

1 00 








• 

10-25 ft. 

3 00 









10-30 ft. 

3 30 














Remarks. 


Ship at anchor. 


No bot tom sample 
in net. 

No bearings ob¬ 
tainable. 

Entire net carried 
away on bottom 

20 shots. 


Shot did not de¬ 
tach. 


Shot did not de¬ 
tach. 

One bridle stop 
parted. 


No bearings ob¬ 
tainable. 


12 shots. 


6 shots. 


10 shots. 


13 shots. 
27 shots. 

































































































CONDITION AND EXTENT OF THE NATURAL OYSTER 
BEDS OF DELAWARE 

By H. F. Moore 

Assistant , U. S. Bureau of Fisheries 


Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 745 



CONTENTS. 


Page. 

Introduction. .* . 3 

Methods of the survey. 4 

Description of oyster grounds... 7 

Bombay bed. 7 

' Thrum-cap bed. 8 

Over-the-Bar bed. 9 

Patches between Over-the-Bar and Sand beds. 10 

Sand bed. 11 

Leipsic Rock. 11 

Bed north of Silver bed. 12 

Between Silver bed and Simons Creek. 12 

Silver bed. 13 

Lumps between Silver and Ridge beds. 14 

Drum bed. 15 

Ridge bed. 16 

Small beds northeast of Ridge bed. 18 

Old bed. 19 

Outside of Old bed. 19 

Scattered patches between Ridge and Southwest beds. 20 

Southwest bed. *. . 20 

Stone bed. r . 22 

East Line bed. 22 

Flogger bed. 23 

The beds in summary. 23 

Physical and biological conditions. 27 

Tides and currents. 27 

Salinity of the water. 27 

Enemies of the oyster. 28 

2 


































CONDITION AND EXTENT OF THE NATURAL OYSTER 
BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


By H. F. Moore, 

Assistant, United States Bureau of Fisheries. 


. INTRODUCTION. 

At the solicitation of the Delaware Oyster Survey Commission the 
Bureau of Fisheries during the summer of 1910 undertook a survey 
of the natural oyster beds of Delaware Bay within the jurisdiction of 
the State of Delaware. The State, which was making a survey of the 
planted beds under the supervision of Mr. C. C. Yates, of the United 
States Coast and Geodetic Survey, furnished the triangulation and 
made a small appropriation for the payment of two temporary em¬ 
ployees during part of the work, but the Bureau of Fisheries fur¬ 
nished all other personnel, in addition to launches, boats, and 
equipment. 

The steamer Fish Hawk was detailed for the work from June 1 to 
July 10, though, owing to unexpected delays in securing a launch 
able enough for the execution of hydrography in the open waters of 
the bay, she did not actually reach the field of operations until June 
18. Part of the civilian personnel was ordered to the ship on May 26, 
in order to have the equipment in readiness for the anticipated com¬ 
mencement of work on June 1, on which date the entire party was 
assembled. 

The purpose of the survey was the accurate location and charting 
of the natural oyster beds and the investigation of their present 
condition and productiveness. No previous survey or investigation 
of the beds of this region has been made, and although their approxi¬ 
mate location is known to the local oystermen with reference to cer¬ 
tain more or less indefinable natural landmarks, it is difficult for them 
to indicate, even roughly, their general position on the charts. Con¬ 
cerning some of the beds, and especially the southern extension of 
Flogger bed, the information obtained from the various sources was 
extremely contradictory. 

59395°—11-17 


3 




4 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


METHODS OF THE SURVEY. 

The methods employed were those pursued in former surveys of 
like character, and are explained in detail in a description of the beds 
of the James River , 1 from which some of the following is repeated: 

A “boat sheet” was prepared, on which were accurately platted 
the positions, as determined by triangulation, of lighthouses and the 
towers erected as shore signals. These data were furnished by the 
State and were based on a development of the triangulation employed 
in the survey of the planted or leased beds. 

The oyster beds were discovered by soundings with a lead line, 
but principally by means of a length of chain dragged over the bot¬ 
tom at the end of a copper wire running from the sounding boat. 
The wire was wound on a reel and its unwound length was adjusted 
to the depth of water and the speed of the launch, so that the 
chain was always on the bottom. Whenever the chain touched a 
shell or an oyster the shock or vibration was transmitted up the wire 
to the hand of a man whose sole duty it was to give heed to such 
signals and report them to the recorder. 

The launches from which the soundings were made were run 
at a speed of between 3 and 4 miles per hour, usually on ranges 
ashore to insure the rectitude of the lines. At intervals of three 
minutes—in some cases two minutes—the position of the boat was 
determined by two simultaneous sextant observations of the angles 
between a set of three signals, the middle one of which was common 
to the two angles, the position being immediately platted on the 
boat sheet. At regular intervals of twenty seconds, as measured 
by a clock under the observation of the recorder, the leadsman made a 
sounding and reported to the recorder the depth of water and the 
character of the bottom, immediately after which the man at the wire 
reported the character of the chain indications since the last sound¬ 
ing—that is, whether they showed barren bottom or dense, scat¬ 
tering, or very scattering growths of oysters. 

With the boat running at 3 miles per hour the soundings were 
between 80 and 90 feet apart, and, as the speed of the boat was 
uniform, the location of each was determinable within a yard or two 
by dividing the platted distance between the positions determined 
by the sextant by the number of soundings. The chain, of course, 
gave a continuous indication of the character of the bottom, but the 
record was made at the regular twenty-second intervals observed 
in sounding. 

The chain, while indicating the absence or the relative abundance 
of objects on the bottom, gives no information as to whether they 
are shells or oysters, nor, if the latter, their size and condition. To 
obtain these data it was necessary to supplement the observations 

i Moore, H. F.: Condition and extent of the oyster beds of James River, Virginia. Bureau of Fisheries 
Document No. 729. 




NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


5 


already described by others more definite in respect to the desired 
particulars. Whenever, in the opinion of the officer in charge of the 
sounding boat, such information was required, a numbered buoy 
was dropped, the time and number being entered in the sounding 
book. Another launch, following the sounding boat, anchored 
alongside the buoy, and a quantity of the oysters and shells were 
tonged up, separated by sizes, and counted. 

This boat at each station made a known number of “ grabs” 
with the oyster tongs, exercising care to clean the bottom of oysters 
as thoroughly as possible.at each grab. In a given depth of water 
and using the same boat and tongs, an oysterman will cover prac¬ 
tically the same area of the bottom at each grab, but, other factors 
remaining the same, the area of the grab will decrease with an increase 
in the depth. 

Careful measurements were made and tabulated showing the 
area per grab covered by the tonger employed on the work at each 
foot of depth of water and for each pair of tongs and boat used. 
With these data, and knowing the number of “grabs,” the number 
of oysters of each size per square yard of bottom was readily obtain¬ 
able by simple calculation. The following example will illustrate 
the data obtained and the form of the record: 


Department of Commerce and Labor. 

BUREAU OF FISHERIES. 


FIELD RECORD OF EXAMINATIONS OF OYSTER BEDS. 

General locality, Delaware Bay, Delaware. 

Local name of oyster ground, Over-the-Bar. 

Date, July 9, 1910. Time, 8.50 a. m. 

Angle, B 146-B 147. Buoy No. 6. 

Depth, 18feet. Bottom, soft. 

Condition of water, clear. 

Density, 1.008. Temperature, 25° C. 

Current,. Stage of tide, one hour flood. 

Tongman, M. A. Duffield. 

No grabs made, 8. Tongs, 20 feet. 

Total area covered, 2.5 sq. yds. 

No oyster, Ukeu 

Quantity shells, 14. 

I S pat per square yard, 5.2. 

Culls per square yard, 51.6. 

Counts per square yard, 28.0. 


This furnishes an exact statement of the condition of the bed at a 
spot which can be platted on the chart with error in position of not 
more than a few yards. From the data obtained a close estimate may 
be formed of the number of bushels of oysters and shells per acre in 
the vicinity of the examination and, by multiplying the observations, 
for the bed as a whole. In the course of the survey 590 observations 
were made at various places, principally on the natural rocks, but 
some on the barren bottoms also. 




6 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


In estimating the relative productiveness of the bottoms it appeared 
advisable to depart from the methods employed in the James River 
survey on account of the difference in the conditions under which the 
industry is prosecuted. Where tongs are used exclusively, a bed 
with a given quantity of oysters lying in shoal water is more valuable, 
commercially, than one with the same quantity of oysters in deep 
water, owing to the fact that the labor of the tonger is more efficient 
on the former. As has been pointed out, the area covered by a 
“grab” decreases with the depth, other factors being the same, and 
moreover the deeper the water the greater is the labor involved in 
making the grab and the smaller is the number of grabs which can be 
made in a given time. 

In Delaware Bay, while there is a certain amount of tonging during 
the fall and at such times as the weather will permit in winter and 
early spring, the most important and productive fishing is by means 
of dredges, the use of which is permitted from April 15 to June 30, 
inclusive. In dredging, the effects of varying depths of water, within 
reasonable limits, are practically negligible so far as the catch is con¬ 
cerned. The time required for winding in from deep water is greater 
than from shallow water, but as the dredge is approximately equally 
efficient whatever the depth, and as the difference in the time required 
in winding is small as compared with the period during which the 
dredge is on the bottom, the factor of depth, so important in tonging, 
is practically inconsiderable. 

| The classification adopted in this report is as follows: 

Depleted bottom___Less than 25 bushels per acre. 

Very scattering growth ._Between 25 and 75 bushels per acre. 

Scattering growth__Between 75 and 150 bushels per acre. 

Dense growth_Over 150 bushels per acre. 

As the region is important for the production of seed rather than 
market oysters, all sizes are included in the estimates of the density 
of oyster growth, but all loose shells and other debris commonly 
dredged are excluded. “Depleted bottom” is not necessarily that 
which was formerly productive but now practically barren, but is 
merely an expression of the present impoverishment of the bed without 
respect to its past. In some cases it may be a formerly barren area 
slowly coming into productiveness. 

The bottom rated as bearing a “very scattering growth” is the 
least productive bottom capable of furnishing a livelihood to the 
dredgers. 

In the course of the survey 16,435 acres, or over 25 square miles, 
were explored with sounding lines and chains. Of this area 2,144 
acres were found to be included in oyster beds of varying degrees of 
productiveness. In the survey the chain was dragged over 124 miles 
of the bottom, soundings were made at 5,772 places, and the position 
of the boat was instrumentally determined at 819 points. 







NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


7 


DESCRIPTION OF OYSTER GROUNDS. 

BOMBAY BED. 

This is the northernmost public oyster bed within the confines of 
Delaware. Its northern limit is opposite the upper pier at Woodland 
Beach, and its southern end is a little below the small creek known 
locally as Tombstone. Its inner or southwestern edge is from 200 to 
400 yards from shore, the average width of the bed is about one- 
fourth mile, and the total length slightly in excess of 1 mile. 

The estimated area, density of growth, and contents of the bed 
are as follows: 

Oyster Growth on Bombay Bed. 


Character of oyster growth. 

Area. 

Oysters per acre. 

Estimated 
content of 
oysters. 

Under 3 
inches. 

Over 3 
inches. 

Total. 


Acres. 

Ill 

12 

6 

2C> 

Bushels. 

250 

103 

22 

~0 

Bushels. 

115 

23 

5 

0 

Bushels. 

.305 

126 

27 

0 

Bushels. 

40,515 

2,512 

102 

0 





155 




43,189 






The dense area comprises a broad strip running along the entire 
inshore edge of the bed. The scattering areas are two, the larger 
lying near the middle of the outer edge of the bed and the smaller, a 
very narrow strip, on the offshore edge of the lower end. Both 
merge more or less gradually into the dense area with which they are 
continuous. The area of very scattering growth is a small patch 
situated near the offshore part of the upper end of the bed, in the 
midst of the depleted bottom. The latter appears to be a formerly 
moderately productive area which has become covered by a deposit 
of mud and now produces no oysters, although there are numerous 
buried shells lying on a hard bottom about 6 inches beneath the 
present surface. This bed differs from all others of the region treated 
in this report in being founded on a stony bottom, a considerable 
proportion of the oysters taken being attached to rock fragments. 
The oysters are in small clusters, with thin, sharp shells. Small 
oysters predominate, not only numerically but by measure. No 
drills were found and, reasoning from the low salinity of the water, 
probably do not occur. The specific gravity of the water at the time 
of examination, July 10, 1910, was about 1.005, and it is likely that 
the bed suffers periodically during freshets. The average depth of 
water is about 8 to 10 feet. 

It was reported that there were oysters between the piers, but none 
were found, although there were a few attached to the piling and 
lying on the bottom in its vicinity. 

























8 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


The details of the examination of this bed are shown in the following 
table: 


Details of Examinations of Bombay Bed. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
exami¬ 
nation. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 


1910. 

Feet. 


No. 

No. 

No. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

1S3. 


10 


1. 6 

35.2 

2. 6 

129 

26 

155 

184. 


10 


10.5 

42.0 

12.6 

184 

126 

310 

189. 


10 


11.0 

65.8 

19.5 

269 

195 

464 

191. 


11 


15.8 

34.2 

3. 2 


32 

207 

192. 


10 


28.4 

54.2 

20. 5 

299 

205 

504 

195. 

. ..do. 

12 

.do. 

9.5 

17.9 

9.5 

96 

95 

191 

197. 


12 


52.0 

58.4 

13. 7 

387 

137 

524 

199. 


11 


74.2 

57.4 

10.0 

461 

100 

561 

194. 


12 


11.0 

12.6 

3.7 

83 

37 

120 

198. 

. ..do. 

12 

.do... 

35.2 

0.0 

1.0 

123 

10 

133 

18(1. 


10 


0.0 

6.3 

0. 5 

22 

5 

27 

185. 

...do. 

11 

Depleted.~. 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0 

0 

0 

187. 


10 


0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0 

0 

0 

188. 


10 


0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0 

0 

0 

190. 


11 


0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0 

0 

0 












THRUM-CAP BED. 

For a distance of about 5 miles* below Bombay bed the bottom is 
reported to be barren, with the possible exception of a few patches of 
insignificant size, and it was not deemed warrantable to incur the 
expense of an examination. 

Thrum-cap bed is a somewhat triangular area lying about 1 mile 
offshore opposite the small stream known to the oystermen as Hay 
Ditch. It covers an area of about 78 acres, of which it is estimated 6 
are covered by a dense growth, 14 by scattering, and 55 b}^ very scat¬ 
tering, and 3 acres are characterized by a total absence of oysters, but 
with scattered shells buried in the mud. 

The areas of dense and scattering growth form a narrow strip on 
the inshore edge of the bed, with the denser area at the upper end. 
The bottom covered with very scattering growth stretches in gradually 
decreasing productiveness from the outer edge of this strip toward 
the deeper water. The depleted area is a small patch where the dense 
growth shades off into the surrounding barren bottom. The depth of 
water on the bed varies from about 18 feet at the inshore edge to 22 
feet on the outer border. 

It is estimated that the bed contained at the time of examination 
4,195 bushels of oysters of all sizes, of which the dense area bore 1,164 
bushels, the scattering 1,106 bushels, and the very scattering 1,925 
bushels. 

There were comparatively few dead oysters, and no indications of 
the presence of drills were observed. In July the specific gravity of 
the water varied from about 1.003 at low water to 1.011 at liicdi tide. 

c? 







































































NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


9 


The results of the examinations of this bed are shown in the follow¬ 
ing table: 


Details of Examinations of Thrum-cap Bed. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
exami¬ 
nation. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 


1910. 

Feet. 


No. 

No. 

No. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

179. . . 


19 


4.4 

28.4 

8.0 

114 

80 

194 

181.... 


20 


5.5 

12.2 

1.7 

62 

17 

79 

178. . 


22 


1.7 

3.3 

1.7 

18 

17 

35 

180. . . 


19 


0. 0 

0.0 

0. 0 

0 

0 

0 












OVER-THE-BAR BED. 

This bed, like the preceding, from which it is separated by a dis¬ 
tance of a little over one-eighth of a mile, lies just beyond the edge of 
the shifting sands, which extend to about the 12-foot curve. It is 
about 1 ^ miles from shore, and takes its name from its position some 
distance outside of a long sand bar, which, according to the naviga¬ 
tional charts, is covered by about 4 feet of water at low tide, but on 
which the present survey fouqd water a little deeper. The depth on 
the bed itself varies from 15 to 20 feet. 

The extent and general condition of the bed in July, 1910, is shown 
in the following table: 


Oyster Growth on Over-the-Bar Bed. 


Character of oyster growth. 

Area. 

Oysters per acre. 

Estimated 
content of 
oysters. 

Under 3 
inches. 

Over 3 
inches. 

Total. 


Acres. 

109 

15 

39 

163 

Bushels. 

103 

41 

0 

Bushels. 

162 

0 

0 

Bushels. 

275 

41 

0 

Bushels. 

29,975 

615 

0 







30,590 






The dense growth is found on two areas, 41 and 68 acres in extent, 
respectively, separated by a depleted area containing nothing but 
buried shells. The upper area is long and narrow and contains a 
large preponderance of oysters over 3 inches long. The northern 
end of the lower area is similar, with four or five times as many 
large oysters as small ones, but in the southern the two are in 
approximately equal quantity, and the average of both sizes is about 
335 bushels per acre. The area of very scattering growth is found at 
the inshore edge of the southern part of the bed, and was apparently 
formed by a recent strike on a previously depleted area. The three 
depleted areas lie at the ends and the middle of the bed, the latter in 
reality separating the rock into two distinct parts. The depleted 













































10 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


bottom bears no oysters and but few exposed shells and, apparently, 
has been formed either by the silting of sparsely productive bottom 
or by shells dragged by dredging from the rock on to the adjacent 
muddy bottom. 

The oysters throughout the entire bed are long, narrow, sharp-edged, 
and inferior in quality, and are almost invariably in clusters, whose 
bases are buried in soft mud. The bottom throughout is soft, and 
there is apparent nowhere any depth of shell deposits such as are 
found on Silver bed and the Ridge. 

The details of the examinations made on this bed are shown in the 
following table: 

Details of Examinations of Over-the-Bar Bed. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
exami¬ 
nation. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 


1910. 

Feet. 


No. 

No. 

No. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

1(39. 


18 


15.2 

28.8 

14. S 

154 

14S 

302 

170.... 


18 


12.0 

28.0 

8. 4 

140 

84 

224 

171. 


18 


5.2 

51.6 

28.0 

19S 

280 

478 

172. 


20 


9. 2 

5. 6 

10. 4 

52 

104 

156 

174. 


19 


• 0.8 

9.2 

15. 6 

35 

156 

191 

177... 


21 


5. 6 

6.1 

26.1 

41 

261 

302 

167. 


17 


0.8 

10.8 

0.0 

41 

0 

41 

168. 


18 


0 . 0 

0 . 0 

0 . 0 

0 

0 

0 

173... 


20 


0 . 0 

0 . 0 

0 . 0 

0 

0 

0 

176 


20 


0 . 0 

0 . 0 

0 . 0 

0 

0 

0 

182_ 

do_ 

21 


0.0 

0.0 

0 . 0 

0 

0 

0 

1 










PATCHES BETWEEN OVER-TIIE-BAR AND SAND BEDS. 

In the area between these beds are several small scattered patches 
of oysters, but two of which v T ere examined to determine their char¬ 
acter. One of these has an area of about 16 acres and is estimated 
to contain about 1,000 or 1,200 bushels of oysters. The other is 
about 5 acres in extent and contains probably about 200 bushels of 
oysters. On both beds and probably on other small patches in the 
vicinity the oysters are long, thin, and narrow, and are found in 
scattered clusters. 

The following table exhibits the data obtained from the examina¬ 
tions : 


Details of Examinations of Patches between Over-the-Bar Bed and Sand 

Beds> 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
examina¬ 
tion. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 

160. 

162... 

1910. 
July 8 

Feet. 

19 

15 

Very scattering. 

No. 

0 

0 

No. 

2.8 

3.0 

No. 

3.2 

6.3 

Bu. 

10 

11 

Bu. 

32 

63 

Bu. 

42 

74 
















































































NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


11 


SAND BED. 

Sand bed lies nearly north of the Ridge and northeast of Silver bed, 
being separated from the latter by a distance of about one-third of a 
mile. It covers an area of about 54 acres, of which 16 acres are cov¬ 
ered by a dense growth of oysters and 11 acres by a scattering 
growth, the remaining 27 acres being depleted. 

The productive bottpm forms a zone along the inner edge of the 
bed, the southern and middle portions bearing the denser growth. 
The depleted bottom occupies the outer half of the bed. It is esti¬ 
mated that the bed contained about 4,600 bushels of oysters of all 
sizes at the time of examination, and that of these 3,700 bushels were 
on the area of dense growth, 700 bushels on the very scattered growth, 
and 200 bushels on the depleted bottom. Oysters over 3 inches long 
preponderated on the productive portions of the bed, but were inferior 
in quantity on the depleted area. 

The oysters are superior in shape to those found on the bars north 
of this, being in smaller clusters and rounder. Dead oysters were 
comparatively few, and no indications of the drill were noted. 

Several boats were observed working on Sand bed during the latter 
part of June, and it is reported that the bed was dredged to some 
extent earlier in the season. 

The following examinations were made: 

Details of Examinations of Sand Bed. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
examina¬ 
tion. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 

154 . 

159. 

155 . 

156 . 

1910. 
July 8 

.. .do. 

.. .do. 

Feet. 

20 

19 

18 

19 

19 

Dense. 

Very scattering. 

Depleted... 

No. 

1.2 

4.0 

0.0 

0.4 

1.6 

No. 

24.4 

1.2 

0.0 

2.4 

No. 

14.4 

4.8 

0.0 

0.4 

0.4 

Bu. 

90 

18 

0 

10 

6 

Bu. 

144 

48 

0 

4 

4 

Bu. 

234 

66 

0 

14 

10 

157. 








LEIPSIC ROCK. 

This is a small but exceedingly prolific bed lying in the mouth of 
Leipsic Creek within one-eighth of a mile of the shore. It is approxi¬ 
mately circular in outline and consists of about 4 acres of very dense 
growth. It is estimated that the bed bear^ nearly 3,000 bushels of 
oysters, practically none of which is over 3 inches in length, and it 
is probable that it represents a recent rejuvenescence of an old bed. 
There is a deep deposit of shells forming the core of the bed, but 
around the edges this is covered by a deposit of mud which appears 
to be encroaching on and causing a gradual contraction of the pro¬ 
ductive area. It is probable that the oysters are subject to peri¬ 
odical destruction from fresh water and mud carried by freshets. 



































12 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


So far as could be learned the rock lias not been worked for several 
years. 

The following examinations were made: 

Details op Examinations op Leipsic Rock. 


Station 

number. 

Date of 
examina- 

Depth 

of 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

tion. 

water. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 

140. 

1910. 
July 7 

Feet. 

11 


No. 

41.0 

No. 

114.5 

No. 

1.4 

Bu. 

544 

Bu. 

14 

Bu. 

558 

56 

144. 

12 


0 . 0 

14.8 

0.4 

52 

4 

145... . 


10 


118.0 

300.0 

1.6 

1,460 

16 

1,476 





BED NORTH OF SILVER BED. 

North of the western end of Silver bed and separated from it by 
about one-eightli of a mile of soft bottom in which scattering shells 
are buried is a nameless bed covering about 25 acres. There are 
about 8 acres covered b}" scattering growth estimated to contain 
about 900 bushels of oysters and about 17 acres of very scattering 
oysters containing about 750 bushels. The northern part of the 
bed, which bears the heaviest growth, has a substratum of shells, 
but the southern edge lies on sandy bottom. The proportion of 
large oysters is greater than on Silver bed. 

The following observations were made: 


Details op Examinations op Bed North of Silver Bed. 


Station 

number. 

Date of 
examina¬ 
tion. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caifght per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed 

Market. 

Total. 

158. 

152. 

1910. 
July 8 
...do_ 

Feet. 

14 

13 

Scattering. 

Very scattering. 

No. 

4.5 

4.0 

No. 

6.7 

2.2 

No. 

7.8 

2.2 

Bu. 

39 

22 

Bu. 

78 

22 

Bu. 

117 

44 


BETWEEN SILVER BED AND SIMONS CREEK. 

Almost continuous with Silver bed and stretching for a distance of 
nearly one-half of a mile toward the mouth of Simons Creek is a bed of 
about 17 acres lying on the mud and sand. Its most productive 
area is nearest Silver bed, and the opposite end is bare except of scat¬ 
tered shells. The best part, about 5 acres in extent, bears a scatter¬ 
ing growth of oysters estimated to contain about 375 bushels, and 
the area of very scattering growth which adjoins it bears about the 
same quantity on its 7 acres. The depleted bottom is practically 
bare at present, but is in a condition to catch a small set under 
favorable conditions. 

















































NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


13 


The following table shows the results of examinations: 

Details op Examinations of Bed between Silver Bed and Simons Creek 

✓ 


Station 

number. 

Date of 
exami¬ 
nation. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 

166. 

165. 

Ill. 

1910. 
July 8 

...do_ 

June 29 

Feet. 

9 

9 

14 

Scattering. 

Very scattering. 

Depleted.... 

No. 

2.9 

0.0 

0.0 

No. 

3.4 

4.3 

0..0 

No. 

5.4 

3.7 

0.0 

Bu. 

22 

15 

C 

Bu. 

54 

37 

0 

Bu. 

76 

52 

0 


SILVER BED. 

This bed, which is said to derive its name from the silvery color of 
the shells found on the hard rock, is, excepting the Ridge, the largest 
and most important natural bed in Delaware. It lies about 1 mile 
east of the mouth of Dona River, locally known as Simons Creek. 
The bed has a maximum extent of about a mile east and west and 
slightly over a half mile north and south, and it lies in a depth of 
water varying from 8 to 12 feet. 

The following table shows its general extent and condition in 
July, 1910: 

Oyster Growth on Silver Bed. 


Character of oyster growth. 

Area. 

Oysters per acre. 

Estimated 
content of 
oysters. 

Under 

3 inches. 

Over 

3 inches. 

Total. 


Acres. 

65 

20 

45 

140 

Bushels. 

171 

82 

25 

8 

Bushels. 

74 

27 

21 

2 

Bushels. 

245 

109 

46 

10 

Bushels. 

15,925 

2,180 

2,070 

1,400 

Scattering. 


Depleted.”. 

Total. 

270 




21,575 






The most productive parts of the bed lie in its northeast half and 
include a belt of dense and scattering growth about one-half mile 
long and varying from one-eighth to one-third anile in width. 

A considerable part of the bottom covered by the bed is macadam¬ 
ized with a dense accumulation of shells, or probably two such areas 
separated by a belt of muddy bottom. In places the bottom was so 
hard with compacted shells and so smooth that a boat anchor would 
not take hold. Although this bed is not now raised above the sur¬ 
rounding barren bottom, it is probable that it originally formed a 
knoll, the crest of which has been cut away by dredging and tonging. 

The area of dense growth lies in a compact body occupying the 
middle of the eastern half of the bed, gradually merging with two 










































14 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


small areas of scattering growth at the northwest and southeast ends, 
respectively. There is a third area of scattering growth near the 
western end of the bed. The very scattering growth for ms a zone 
around the western and part of the southern side of the more prolific 
bottom, lying on a substratum of compacted shells. Most of the 
western half of the bed is composed of depleted bottom, which also 
extends as a narrow strip around practically the entire circumfer¬ 
ence of the rest of the bed, the bottom being generally hard and 
shelly with occasional patches of mud. 

In general the present condition of the bed indicates a former 
greater extent of productive bottom. There is every indication that 
it has been closely dredged during the past season, and the present 
content of oysters is probably but a small proportion of the quantity 
on the bottom at the beginning of the season. The shells are in 
excellent condition to receive a set of spat, and under favorable cir¬ 
cumstances the bed should speedily recuperate. There were com¬ 
paratively few dead oysters, and drills or borers do not appear to be 
troublesome. 

The following observations were made: 

Details of Examinations of Silver Bed. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
examina¬ 
tion. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 


1910. 

Feet. 


No. 

No. 

No. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

58. 


14 


23.7 

65.0 

12.2 

310 

122 

432 

110. 


14 


5.9 

21.1 

6.7 

94 

67 

161 

149. 


13 


1.5 

29.6 

7.8 

109 

78 

187 

163. 


10 


8.7 

40.0 

2.9 

170 

29 

199 

55. 


14 


12.2 

7.4 

1.9 

69 

19 

88 

147 . 


14 


1.4 

22.2 

3.3 

83 

33 

116 

164. 


9 


4.3 

22.9 

2.9 

95 

29 

124 

59 .. 


13 


0.4 

3.3 

1.2 

13 

12 

25 

100. 


11 


2.4 

7.9 

1 7 

36 

17 

53 

150. 


13 


2.6 

4.5 

3.3 

25 

33 

58 

52. 










53. 


13 


0.3 

4.5 

0.0 

17 

0 

17 

60. 


13 


0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0 

o 

0 

98. 


11 


0.0 

2.8 

0. 3 

10 

3 

13 

99 . 


11 


1.4 

1.0 

0. 7 

8 

7 

15 

109. 


14 


0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0 

0 

0 

148. 

July 8 

13 


1.1 

2.2 

0.0 

11 

0 

11 











LUMPS BETWEEN SILVER AND RIDGE BEDS. 

Lying between Sand and Silver beds on the north and Ridge and 
Drum beds on the south are a number of small lumps and patches 
surrounded by a considerable area of barren bottom. Eight of these 
areas were located by the survey, most of them covering areas of 3 
or 4 acres, and there are probably a number of others, as on account of 
their small size and irregular distribution but little time was spent in 



































































NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


15 


looking for them. But three of these places were examined in detail, 
and their location may be determined by an inspection of the chart. 
One of them was about 3 acres in extent and was estimated to con¬ 
tain about 2,500 bushels of long, sharp-edged oysters in large clus¬ 
ters, growing on a soft, muddy bottom. The other two spots exam¬ 
ined bore a very scattering growth. The largest of these, about one- 
fourth mile inshore of the upper end of Drum bed, was estimated 
to be about 8 acres in extent and to contain about 300 bushels of 
oysters. The other, just south of the middle of Silver bed, has an 
area of about 4 acres and contained at the time of examination about 
120 bushels of oysters. 

The five areas located but not examined varied in extent from 
about 1 to 14 acres, and are situated variously. They are shown on 
the chart as unshaded places surrounded by red lines. Judging 
from the chain readings none of them is particularly productive. 

The following observations were made in this region: 


Details op Examinations op Lumps between Silver and Ridge Beds. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
examina¬ 
tion. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 


1910. 

Feet. 


No. 

No. 

No. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

96. 


18 


1.4 

28.0 

75.2 

103 

752 

855 

86. 


15 


0.7 

4.1 

1.9 

17 

19 

36 

97. 


13 


0.0 

9 9 

9 ? 

8 

99 

30 












DRUM BED. 

Drum bed lies west of and very close to the depleted edge of the 
ridge and about 1 mile from shore. It has a length of over one-half 
mile, a width of about one-fourth mile, and a total area of approxi¬ 
mately 68 acres. Its condition and the relative extent of oyster 
growths of the several degrees of productiveness are shown in the 
following table: 

Oyster Growth on Drum Bed. 


Character of oyster growth. 

Area. 

Oysters per acre. 

Estimated 
content of 
oysters. 

Under 3 
inches. 

Over 3 
inches. 

Total. 

Dense. 

Acres. 

16 

21 

19 

12 

Bushels. 

139 

30 

32 

1 

Bushels. 

83 

65 

18 

6 

Bushels. 

222 

95 

50 

7 

Bushels. 

3,552 

1,995 

950 

84 


Very scattering. 


Total. 

68 




6,581 




















































16 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


The most prolific part of the bed is an area about one-fourth mile 
square extending across its middle, consisting of an area of dense 
growth flanked on each side by one bearing a scattering growth. The 
northern end of the bed is composed of a gradually narrowing area 
of very scattering growth, and there is a small patch of similar char¬ 
acter at the inside corner of the southern end. 

The depleted bottom is in two patches, one adjoining the scattering 
and very scattering growths at the lower end and the other interposed 
between the dense scattering and very scattering oyster deposits just 
above the middle. The bottom is soft on the areas of very scattering 
growth and on part of the northernmost depleted area, but is elsewhere 
hard and shelly. 

Small oysters exceed in quantity those over 3 niches long, excepting 
on the area of scattering growth, where there are about twice as many 
large as small ones. Loose shells are in fair abundance and of a char¬ 
acter to catch a good set under favorable conditions. 

The following observations were made: 

Details of Examinations of Drum Bed. 


Station 

Date of 
exam in a- 

Depth 

of 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

ber. 

tion. 

water. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 


1910. _ 

Feet. 

16 


No. 

27.2 

No. 

IS. 8 

No. 

3.6 

Bu. 

161 

Bu. 

36 

Bu. 

197 

48 


16 J 

17 


16.0 

30.0 

7.6 

161 

76 

237 


June 29 


4.0 

23.2 

13.6 

95 

136 

231 

51 

17 


7.2 

13.2 

3.2 

71 

32 

103 

84 


17 


1.4 

10.0 

8.2 

4 

82 

86 


June 29 

18 


1.6 

2.8 

8.2 

15 

82 

97 

105 

18 


1.6 

9.2 

1.6 

37 

16 

53 

108 


17 


0.0 

7.6 

2.0 

27 

20 

47 

7.8 

June 27 

15 


0.0 

0.4 

0.4 

1 

4 

5 

85 . 

17 


0.0 

0.0 

0.8 

0 

8 

8 









RIDGE BED. 


The Ridge bed, known to the oystermen as “The Ridge,” is at 
present the most important natural bed in Delaware, and during the 
period of the present survey it sustained by far the heaviest dredging. 
During the latter half of June numerous vessels were at work daily 
and until the end of the month, when the dredging season closed, there 
appeared to be a fair catch. 

The Ridge lies about H miles from the nearest shore, midway 
between Dona River and Mahon River. It is triangular in shape, 
with a deep indentation or slough of muddy bottom projecting deeply 
into its base at the southern end. It has an extent of slightly over 1 
mile north and south and its southern end is almost of equal extent 
east and west. It has a total area of 371 acres and the most produc¬ 
tive bottom, that which is rated in this report as bearing dense and 
















































NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


17 


scattering growths, stretches from the northern apex to about the 
middle of the bed, where it divides into two limbs astride the slough 
before alluded to. 

It is evident that this bed, like Silver bed, is an old one, and without 
doubt its central portions, those which now bear the heaviest growth 
of oysters, were formerly elevated above the surrounding bottom to 
form a shoal or ridge which has been pulled down and in large part 
carried away by the oystermen, particularly the dredgers, until at 
present the water over it shoals but little as compared with the sur¬ 
rounding barren areas. The great deposit of shells which originally 
existed has been taken up and the bottom so denuded that in places 
the originally underlying mud has been brought to the surface. Many 
little patches of bare mud were found where there was every reason to 
expect a deposit of shells and oysters and it was apparent that the bed 
was being overworked. 

The general condition and extent of the bed at the end of June, 
1910, is shown in the following table: 

Oyster Growth on Ridge Bed. 


Character of oyster growth. 

Area. 

Oysters per acre. 

Estimated 
content of 
oysters. 

Under 3 
inches. 

Over 3 
inches. 

Total. 


Acres. 

49 

86 

65 

171 

Bushels. 

160 

96 

36 

4 

Bushels. 

23 

25 

21 

1 

Bushels. 

183 

121 

57 

5 

Bushels. 
8,967 
10, 406 
3,705 
855 





371 




23,933 






The dense areas are two in number, separated by an area of scat¬ 
tered growth. The smaller of these areas lies at the northern apex 
of the bed and the larger one is a long belt along most of its eastern 
side. More or less soft mud is to be found in the former, especially 
near its upper edge, but the latter rests on a solid substratum of 
shells. 

The lower end of the larger dense area gradually verges into a 
small spot of scattering growth, but most of the bottom bearing 
a growth of this character is embraced in a long, somewhat S-shaped 
strip running from near the northern end of the bed almost to its 
southwest corner. The northern end, especially between and adja¬ 
cent to the dense growths, is most productive. 

The very scattering growth is all confined to the southern edge of 
the bed, most of it being between the mud slough and the dense and 
scattering growth. Excepting close to the more productive areas 
there is much muddy bottom in this area. Most of the depleted 






















18 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


bottom lies on the west side of the bed, but there is a narrow strip 
along the eastern edge and embracing the southern end of the dense 
and scattering growth. Much of the depleted area is in reality 
denuded or barren, and although most of it lies on hard bottom 
there are numerous muddy spots, especially near the southern edge. 

On this bed as a whole and especially on the more productive 
areas small oysters are in great preponderance. In many cases 
there were quantities of oysters so small that they fell between the 
teeth of the tongs. 

The following observations were made on this bed: 

Details of Examinations of Ridge Bed. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
examina¬ 
tion. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 


1910. 

Feet. 


No. 

No. 

No. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

67. 


17 


20.0 

20.0 

3.9 

140 

39 

179 

91. 


18 


31.2 

21.2 

1.6 

183 

16 

199 

93. 


16 


29.1 

16.0 

1.6 

158 

16 

174 

62. 


16 


19.2 

7.6 

2.0 

94 

20 

114 

65. 


16 


16.0 

12.0 

4.0 

98 

40 

138 

69. 

.. .do. 

18 

.do. 

17.2 

13.6 

2.8 

108 

28 

136 

92. 


16 


28.8 

4. 4 

2.0 

116 

20 

136 

101. 


15 


7.4 

10.7 

1.9 

63 

19 

82 

61. 

June 26 

14 

Very scattering. 

4.8 

1.1 

0.7 

21 

7 

28 

63. 


15 


‘2 2 

3.7 

5.2 

21 

52 

73 

79. 


16 


0.8 

10. 4 

2.4 

39 

24 

63 

90. 


17 


12.4 

5.2 

0. 0 

62 

o 

62 

64. 


16 


0. 0 

0.0 

0. 0 

0 

0 

0 

66. 


16 


1.2 

2.0 

0. 0 

11 

0 

11 

70. 


17 


2.0 

2.4 

0. 0 

15 

o 

15 

80. 


15 


0. 0 

0. 0 

0.0 

0 

o 

0 

81. 

- ..do. 

14 

.do. 

2.6 

0.7 

0.4 

12 

4 

16 

82. 


16 


0.0 

0. 0 

0.0 

0 

0 

0 

83. 


17 


0.4 

0.4 

0.0 

3 

0 

3 

87. 


16 


0. 0 

0. 0 

0.0 

0 

o 

0 

88. 


16 


0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0 

0 

0 

89. 


16 


0. 0 

0. 0 

0.0 

0 

0 

0 

102. 


13 


0. 0 

0. 0 

0.0 

0 

0 

0 

103. 


13 


0. 0 

0.4 

1.1 

1 

11 

12 












SMALL BEDS NORTHEAST OF RIDGE BED. 

Northeast of the Ridge is a small patch of about 7 acres of very 
scattering growth which is estimated to contain about 200 bushels 
of oysters, most of them over 3 inches in length. 

The following results were obtained from an examination of this 
area: 

Details of Examinations of Small Beds Northeast of Ridge Bed. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
examina¬ 
tion. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
' square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 


1910. 

Feet. 


No. 

No. 

No. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

94. 

June 27 

18 

Very scattering. 

0 

1.4 

2.4 

5 

24 

29 






















































































































NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


19 


OLD BED. 

Old bed lies close to the southeastern edge of the Ridge, from which 
it is separated by a narrow strip of mud with many buried shells. 
It is stated that the dredgers sometimes haul across the barren 
bottom from one bed to the other.. 

The condition and extent of the bed as determined by the survey 
were as follows: 

Oyster Growth on Old Bed. 


Character of oyster growth. 

Area. 

Oysters per acre. 

Estimated 
content of 
oysters. 

Under 3 
inches. 

Over 3 
inches. 

Total. 


Acres. 
20 
17 

Bushels. 

40 

10 

Bushels. 

2 

3 

Bushels. 

42 

13 

Bushels. 

840 

221 



37 




. 1,061 






Although the bed is at present not very productive it has the 
appearance of former greater value. It lies on a dense bed of shells 
and is undoubtedly the remnant of an old accumulation. There are 
very few large oysters to be found, but the young growth is fair in 
places and the conditions for a new set are good. The bed evidently 
has been subjected to severe dredging. 

The following observations were made: 

Details of Examinations of Old Bed. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
examina¬ 
tion. 

Depth 

of 

water. 


1910. 

Feet. 

76. 

•Tune 27 

16 

130. 

June 30 

17 

131. 


19 

132. 


19 

133. 


19 

74. 

June 27 

17 

75. 


18 

78. 


17 

134. 

June 30 

20 


Character of growth. 


Very scattering. 

.do. 

.do . 

-do . 

.do. 

Depleted. 

. do .. 

_do . 

. do . 


Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

10.4 

2.8 

0.0 

46 

0 

46 

6.0 

1.4 

0.0 

26 

0 

26 

0.8 

5.6 

0.8 

22 

8 

30 

10.4 

11.6 

0.0 

77 

0 

77 

4.8 

4.4 

0.0 

32 

0 

32 

0.0 

2.0 

0.0 

7 

0 

7 

1.2 

2.0 

0.8 

11 

8 

19 

0.0 

1.2 

0.4 

4 

4 

8 

0.6 

4.4 

0.0 

18 

0 

18 


OUTSIDE OF OLD BED. 

Immediately outside of Old bed is an area of about 16 acres, sur¬ 
rounded by sand, for which the oystermen appear to have no name, 
if, even, they are aware of its existence. But one observation was 
made at this place, where a dense growth of young oysters was found. 
If the other parts of the bed are equally productive this patch con¬ 
tains about 6,800 bushels of oysters, practically all of them under 3 
inches in length. The present growth is apparently of recent origin. 

59395°—11-18 






































































20 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


The following results were obtained from the examination: 
Details of Examinations of Beds Outside of Old Bed. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
examina¬ 
tion. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth- 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 

77. 

1910. 
June 27 

Fen. 

15 


No. 

35.0 

No. 

83.4 

No. 

15.0 

Bu. 

414 

Bu. 

15 

Bu. 

429 




SCATTERED PATCHES BETWEEN RIDGE AND SOUTHWEST BEDS. 

On the soft bottom tying between these two beds are a number of 
little patches of oyster growth, of which five were located with the 
chain and three were examined by tonging. The latter were all 
highly productive, and they probably represent the possibilities of 
oyster production in this vicinity on beds not frequented by the 
dredgers. 

The three beds examined covered a total of 11 acres, and it is 
estimated that they contained about 5,300 bushels of oysters, of which 
nearly three-fourths were over 3 inches long. Based on the results 
of the examination, and assuming that the other beds found are equally 
productive, the five beds probably contain about 11,000 bushels, and 
it is probable that at least 20,000 bushels are scattered in little 2 to 5 
acre patches in the vicinity. 

The following table shows the data obtained from examinations: 

Details of Examinations of Small Scattered Patches Between Ridge and 

Southwest Bed. 


Station 
nu m- 

Date of 
examina- 

Depth 

of 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

ber. 

tion. 

water. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 

40. 

1910. 

Feet. 

12 


No. 

20.3 

No. 
21.1 

No. 

21.1 

Bu. 

145 

Bu. 

211 

Bu. 

356 

42... 


14 


15.2 

30. 4 

20.7 

159 

207 

366 

71... 

June 27 

14 


15.2 

14.4 

71.5 

104 

715 

819 




SOUTHWEST BED. 

Southwest bed lies in the southeastern part of the present pro¬ 
ductive natural oyster grounds of the State and its southern edge is 
about one-fourth mile north of the “east line” which separates the 
private beds from the public ones. It has a north and south extent 
of upward of one-half mile and a maximum width of about one-third 
mile, containing all told about 106 acres. 

The extent and relative productiveness of the bottoms, as classified 
in this report, are shown in the table following. 













































NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


21 


Oyster Growth on Southwest Bed. 


Character of oyster growth. 

Area. 

Oysters per acre. 

Estimated 
content of 
oysters. 

Under 3 
inches. 

Over 3 
inches. 

Total. 


Acres. 

11 

8 

31 

56 

Bushels. 

40 

99 

18 

4 

Bushels. 

744 

48 

13 

1 

Bushels. 

784 

147 

31 

5 

Bushels. 

8,624 

1,376 

961 

280 





106 




11,241 






The area of dense growth is near the southern end of the bed and 
is flanked on the east and west sides by a very scattering growth, and 
on the north and south by depleted bottom. Most of the oysters are 
over 3 inches long and they appear to be in numerous small patches 
on the soft mud. The place has the appearance of bottom which has 
been overlooked by the oystermen and may as a whole be somewhat 
smaller in area than is indicated in the preceding table. 

The bottom bearing scattering growth lies at the northeast edge of 
the bed and at its southwestern limits merges into a strip of very 
scattering growth running along the western edge of the bed as far 
as the densely covered bottom first described. There is another 
small patch of very scattering growth near the southeast corner of 
the bed. 

The depleted bottom lies in three patches, one at each end of the 
bed and the other at the middle of the eastern edge. 

Although it is not known whether Southwest bed was dredged 
during the past season, it bears every evidence that it has been over¬ 
worked. Excepting on the small area of dense growth there are few 
marketable oysters, and bare or almost bare muddy spots are of 
frequent occurrence. Many oysters had been killed by drills and 
many of these animals and their egg cases were found. 

The following table shows the results of examinations: 

Details of Examinations of Southwest Bed. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
examina¬ 
tion. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 


1910. 

Feet. 


No. 

No. 

No. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

126 ... 


14 


1.5 

10.0 

74.4 

40 

744 

784 

31 


13 


5.6 

22.7 

4.8 

99 

48 

147 

121. 


13 


0.4 

5.0 

0.4 

21 

4 

25 

122. . 


12 


1.5 

7.5 

0.4 

31 

4 

35 

128.... 


15 


0.0 

1.4 

3.0 

5 

30 

35 

129. 


14 


0.0 

4.4 

1.5 

15 

15 

30 

32 .. 


13 


0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0 

0 

0 

120 .... 


14 


0.4 

4.4 

0.0 

17 

0 

17 

123. 


12 


0.0 

1.4 

0.4 

5 

4 

9 

124. 


13 


0.0 

0.0 

0.4 

0 

4 

4 

125. 

.. .do. 

15 

.do. 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0 

0 

0 

127. 

.:.do. 

15 

.do. 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0 

0 

0 









































































22 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


STONE BED. 

This bed possibly takes its name from the quantity of hard, sandy 
worm tubes, known to the oystermen as "stone coral/’ which are found 
attached to and overgrowing the oysters. It is probable that a good 
many of the latter are stifled and killed by this growth, which is 
even more abundant on a small depleted patch lying between the 
Stone bed and the mouth of Mahon River. 

The bed covers an area of about 33 acres of very scattering growth, 
on which there is an average of about 53 bushels of oysters per acre. 
It is estimated that about July 1, 1910, there were on the entire bed 
about 1,750 bushels of oysters, the large and small being in about 
equal quantities. 

The following observations were made: 

Details op Examination of Stone Bed. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
examina¬ 
tion. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 


1910. 

Feet. 


No. 

No. 

No. 

Bu. 

Bu. 

Bu. 



13 


0.7 

4.8 

2.6 

19 

20 

45 

104 

June 29 

18 



10.0 

2.4 

35 

24 

59 











EAST LINE BED. 

This bed lies just at the line which marks the southern limits of the 
public grounds, and it appears that for that reason it has a sentimental 
interest to the oystermen. It has a diameter not much greater than 
the length of a boat and is too small to plot on the chart, on which its 
position is indicated by a circle. 

Numerous examinations were made in its vicinity over an area 
of 6 or 8 acres, but at only one place were oysters found, and there 
they were very dense and mostly of marketable size. 

The data obtained at this station are shown in the following table: 

Details of Examinations of East Line Bed. 


Station 

num¬ 

ber. 

Date of 
examina¬ 
tion. 

Depth 

of 

water. 

Character of growth. 

Oysters caught per 
square yard. 

Estimated quantity 
oysters per acre. 

Spat. 

Culls. 

Counts. 

Seed. 

Market. 

Total. 

IIS 

1910. 
June 30 

Feet. 

13 


No. 

0.0 

No. 

10.0 

No. 

77.8 

Bu. 

35 

Bu. 

778 

Bu. 

813 
















































.NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


23 


FLOGGER BED. 

Flogger bed Lies along Joe Flogger Shoal, which separates Blake 
Channel from the ship channel. As developed by the survey, it is 
the largest bed in Delaware, having a length of over 3 miles, an average 
width of about one-third mile, and an area of about 6G0 acres. Owing 
to its exposed situation and the depth of water, as well as to the con¬ 
tradictory information received as to its approximate location and 
extent, it was the most troublesome bed encountered by the survey. 
Lines were run across Joe Flogger Shoal from its extreme southern 
end, but no indications of shells or oysters were encountered until 
within about one-half mile of east line. From this point scattering 
shells were found, but when the bottom was examined with the tongs 
these were discovered to be more or less submerged in the sand. 

The bed as outlined on the chart was located almost entirely by 
means of the chain. At its upper end it lies on the eastern or ship- 
channel side of Joe Flogger Shoal, but about a mile from its upper 
end it expands to the westward over an area of somewhat deeper 
water, and thence, to its southern end, continues on the western or 
Blake Channel side of the shoal. It was at this point of expansion 
only that oysters were found, in one small patch of very scattering 
growth and two or three areas of depleted bottom. The results were 
not of sufficient importance to exhibit in detail on the chart. It is 
possible that oysters are to be found in limited quantities in some of 
the deeper water, but the chain readings did not indicate patches of 
sufficient importance to warrant the expense of making dredgings. 
It is reported that there are oysters in some of the deep water of the 
ship channel, but no indications were found in such places as were 
examined. 

It is understood that Flogger bed has not been dredged for several 
years, and the survey indicated that while formerly it may have been 
of importance commensurate with its area, it has become covered with 
sand throughout practically its whole extent. It may again become 
productive, but there is no present indication of this probability. 

Oysters were reported around the buo} 7- at the head of Flogger Shoal 
and at another buoy on the opposite side of Blake Channel, but a care¬ 
ful examination, expeciallv in the latter place, failed to disclose them. 

THE BEDS IN SUMMARY. 

The oyster bottoms of Delaware all lie between Woodland Beach 
and the vicinity of Bowers Beach, covering an area about 21 miles 
long and with an average width of about 3 miles. South and west of a 
line running east from the old Mahon River Lighthouse and thence 
approximately southeasterly along Blake Channel, the bottoms are 
excluded from the common oyster fishery and a considerable propor¬ 
tion of the area is leased to private persons and firms for purposes of 
oyster culture. 


24 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


With this area this report will not deal, as it was examined by the 
writer in but the most cursory manner and the survey of the private 
beds was being made solely as a State undertaking. It may be stated, 
however, that the private beds are planted partly with shells, mostly 
brought from points on Chesapeake Bay, but generally with seed 
oysters taken from the natural beds. The grounds are in large part 
leased or controlled by residents of Philadelphia and New Jersey, and 
the product is consumed principally in Philadelphia, being marketed 
through Maurice River Cove in New Jersey. 

The natural rocks, with which alone this report is concerned, lie in 
a narrow strip between Blake Channel and the main ship channel on 
what is known as Joe Flogger Shoal, and between these channels and 
the Delaware shore in a belt which stretches from the east line above 
mentioned to about abreast of the upper pier at Woodland Beach, a 
distance of about 13 miles. 

At its southeastern end, where it adjoins the planted area, this zone 
is about 3 miles in width, but it gradually narrows to the northward 
until at its upper extremity it is hardly one-half mile wide. The most 
extensive beds lie in the lower half of the zone and the most intense 
fishery is carried on in that region. During the time of the survey 
this was practically the only place in which the dredgers were operat¬ 
ing, and we were informed that but little had been done elsewhere 
earlier in the season. 

The following tables summarize the data of the extent, condition, 
and general distribution of oyster growth on the several beds pre¬ 
viously discussed in more detail: 

Areas of Oyster Beds. 


Character of oyster growth. 


Name of bed. 

Dense. 

Scatter¬ 

ing. 

Very 

scatter¬ 

ing. 

» 

Depleted. 

Not 

deter¬ 

mined. 

Total. 


Acres. 

Acres. 

Acres. 

Acres. 

A cres. 

Acres. 


Ill 

12 

6 

26 


155 


6 

14 

55 

3 


78 


109 


15 

39 


163 




21 



21 


16 


11 

27 


54 


4 





4 



8 

17 



25 



5 

7 

5 


17 


65 

20 

45 

140 


270 


3 


12 


21 

36 


16 

21 

19 

12 


68 


49 

86 

65 

171 


371 




7 



7 

Old . 



20 

17 


37 


16 





10 


11 




12 

23 


11 

8 

31 

56 


106 




33 



33 


0) 





(') 





= 660 

660 








Total. 

417 

174 

364 

496 

693 

2,144 


i Less than 1 acre. 2 Practically all depleted. 



























































NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


25 


Estimated Oyster Content of Natural Beds, July 1 , 1910 . 


Name of bed. 

Character of oyster growth. 

Total. 

Dense. 

Scatter¬ 

ing. 

Very 

scatter¬ 

ing. 

Depleted. 

Not 

deter¬ 

mined. 


Bushels. 
40,515 
1,164 
29,975 

Bushels. 

2,512 

1,106 

Bushels. 

162 

1.925 

615 

1.200 

700 

Bushels. 

Bushels. 

Bushels. 
43,189 
4,195 
30,590 
1,200 
4.600 
3,000 
1,650 
750 
21,575 
5,920 
6,581 
23,933 
200 
1,061 
6,800 
20,300 
11,241 
1,750 
i 500 
( 2 ) 












3,700 

3,000 


200 






900 
375 
2,180 

1,995 
10,406 

750 

375 

2,070 

420 

950 

3,705 

200 

840 








15,925 
2,500 
3,552 
8,967 

1,400 

84 

855 


Between Silver and Ridge. 

> 3,000 





Old. 



221 



6,800 
5,300 
8,624 







> 15,000 


1,376 

961 
1,750 

280 




* 500 








( 2 ) 

Total. 





130,522 

20,850 

16,623 

3,040 

18,000 

189,035 


1 Estimated from chain indications. 2 Practically all depleted. 


Combining the foregoing data, an interesting comparison may be 
instituted between the beds sustaining a heavy fishery with dretlges 
and those which recently have been worked but little. According 
to the best information, supported by our own observations in the 
latter part of the season, practically all of the dredging in 1910 was 
on the beds south of Over-the-Bar, although a few vessels were 
observed apparently working on Thrum-cap. These beds, excluding 
Flogger, had a total area of 1,088 acres and a total estimated oyster 
content of 111,061 bushels, or an average of 102 bushels per acre, at 
the end of the season. On the beds which were reported or observed 
to be most severely worked the oyster content averaged considerably 
less than this. On the Ridge the average for the whole bed was about 
60 bushels per acre, on Drum bed about 97 bushels, on Silver bed 
about 80 bushels, on Old bed 30 bushels, and on Southwest bed about 
106 bushels, and for the five beds taken as a whole the average was 
about 75 bushels per acre. 

The beds above and including Over-tlie Bar have an area of 396 
acres and a total estimated content of 77,984 bushels of oysters of all 
sizes, or an average of 197 bushels per acre. These beds, owing to 
their position, are probably more subject than the lower beds to dam¬ 
age from freshets and are probably naturally less productive, yet 
they had at the time of examination an oyster growth over 2 \ times 
as dense. If we consider the various small patches surrounding the 
five beds enumerated above, which are in general too small to dredge 
or which, if large enough, have been overlooked during the season 



























































26 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


recently closed, the disparity is still greater. Those which were 
examined by tonging had an area of 46 acres and an estimated 
content of 18,000 bushels of oysters, an average of nearly 390 bushels 
per acre, over five times the density of growth on the large beds in 
the vicinity. 

The number of bushels taken from the beds of Delaware during the 
past season is not known but it was probably several hundred thou¬ 
sand bushels, and from the conditions found in the surve}^ and the 
data just deduced it probably can be safely assumed that oysters 
were from three to five times as abundant at the beginning of the sea¬ 
son as the} 7- were'in its closing days when the survey was made. 

This heavy draft on the beds would be less serious were it not 
accompanied by an abuse for which there is no excuse. In a region 
devoted mainly to planting and where a comparatively small quantity 
of oysters is marketed directly from the natural beds it is economically 
advisable to permit the taking of small oysters as well as large. So 
long as there is an abundance of shells on the bottom and a reasonable 
quantity of oysters is left to furnish spawn there will be, under favor¬ 
able conditions of water and temperature, a more or less regular set 
of spat and the oyster population of the beds will be fairly maintained, 
although, of course, the proportion of oysters of marketable size will 
diminish. When, however, the beds are stripped of shells, as appears 
to be the case in Delaware, they will surely become depleted. 

During the survey, although a number of vessels were actively 
dredging, no member of the party observed a boat engaged in culling. 
Inquiry among the oysfermen elicited the information that while the 
boats catching seed oysters for sale generally cull their catch because 
the planters will not pay 0 }^ster prices for shells, the vessels owned 
or operated by planters when dredging on the public beds rarely do 
so. They are charged with carrying away everything which the 
dredge picks up, the shells being valuable for hardening the bottoms 
on their planting grounds and as cultcli for catching a set of spat. 

That some vessels are guilty of such behavior is within the knowl¬ 
edge of the writer, and moreover the charge is supported by the con¬ 
dition of the beds. One of the most noteworthy of the facts disclosed 
by the tong examinations was the small quantity of shells found as 
compared with similar examinations of beds in other States. On 
the five important beds in the vicinity of the Kidge there are less 
than 2 per cent as many shells per square yard as are found on the 
seed beds of James River, Va., where culling is strictly enforced. In 
places the deep pavement of shells which must have existed formerly 
has been completely removed and the underlying mud now shows 
itself in patches in the midst of the beds. A hard-worked bed to be 
in a healthy condition should contain an abundance of shells. The 
ultimate result of the continuance of this state of affairs is not difficult 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


27 


to foresee. Oysters can not set on the mud. They must have some 
hard, clean object to which to attach when they settle down from 
their infantile free-swimming habit, and on the beds the old shells 
and the oysters themselves offer the only possibilities. If there be 
few or no shells the recuperation of exhausted beds is correspondingly 
retarded. If both shells and oysters are persistently removed, the 
most productive bed eventually will be hopelessly depleted. 

PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CONDITIONS. 

TIDES AND CURRENTS. 

A staff tide gauge was established at the wharf at Mahon River 
Liglit-house and readings were taken hourly from 8 a. m. until 5 p. m. 
during the period of the survey. This does not furnish a very accurate 
plane of reference, but as the location of the gauge was central with 
respect to the more important beds it is sufficiently accurate for the 
purposes of this report. The average rise and fall of the tide between 
June 19 and July 10 was 5.4 feet, the minimum being 4.5 feet on July 
10 and the maximum 6.3 on July 2. 

No measurements of the velocity of currents were made, but in 
general it may be stated that they are strong throughout the region 
embraced in this report. 

SALINITY OF THE WATER. 

The salinity of the water exhibited a very considerable range 
within the limits covered by the survey. From June 18 to July 10 
observations were made three times daily at the anchorage of the 
Fish Hawk and several times each day on the oyster beds undergoing 
examination. Most of the observations on the Fish Hawk were made 
at a point about 1 niile south of the east line and about 3 miles 
offshore, but others, fewer in number, were made near the southern 
limit of the planted beds, near the middle of the north and south 
extent of the public beds, and at the upper limit of oyster growth 
opposite Woodland Beach. 

The data obtained are shown in the following table: 


Salinity of Water Over Oyster Beds, June 18 to July 10 . 


Locality. 

Number 
of obser¬ 
vations. 

Specific gravity of water corrected. 

Average 
tempera¬ 
ture of 
water. 

Maximum. 

Minimum. 

Average. 

Opposite Woodland Beach. 

Midway between Ship John and Elbow Light¬ 
house. 

3 

3 

33 

6 

1.0074 

i 

1.0121 

1.0149 

1.0178 

1.0032 

1.0100 

1.0103 

1.0158 

1.0057 

1.0107 

1.0136 

1.0164 

°F. 

79 

77 

77 

68 

3J miles southeast by east of Mahon River 
Light. 

6 miles east-northeast of Bowers Beach.. f . 





















28 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


At the upper limit of oyster growth the salinity of the water was 
low at a time when there had been comparatively little rainfall, and 
it is probable that it may become practically fresh at this point during 
periods of freshet. This is without much doubt the cause inhibiting 
the growth of oysters at places higher up the river. 

At the southern end of the planting grounds the salinity is com¬ 
paratively high and in consequence it is to be expected that the drill 
or borer would be destructive. On the more important of the public 
beds, those lying between the east line and the mouth of Leipsic 
Creek, the density is favorable for the welfare of the oysters. It 
probably never falls so low as seriously to threaten the beds, and, on 
the other hand, it is hardly high enough, excepting close to the east 
line, to favor an abundance of drills. 

ENEMIES OF THE OYSTER. 

It is stated that schools of drumfish occasionally appear on the 
oyster beds of Delaware Bay and cause much damage, but none were 
observed during the survey. This enemy' of the oyster is usually 
more destructive on planted beds than on the public rocks, probably 
because the single-culled oysters on the former are easier to crush 
than are the clustered, sharp-edged specimens more common on the 
natural beds. The inroads of the drumfish are sporadic and unex¬ 
pected in most places, although on the coasts of some of the Southern 
States they are frequent enough to warrant the inclosure of the planted 
beds with wire fences. This appears to be the only really adequate 
protection, though if the presence of a school on the beds or in their 
vicinity is discovered in time it can often be driven from the neigh¬ 
borhood by the use of explosives. 

The principal enemy to the oyster on the Delaware beds is the drill 
or borer, a small marine snail which drills a hole through the oyster’s 
shell and thus gains access to the contents, which it consumes. The 
perforation is made by actual drilling with a rasplike organ protruded 
from the mouth, and so far as is known no acid or other solvent is 
employed to soften the shell. The drill breeds during late spring and 
summer, laying its eggs in vase-shaped, leathery capsules attached 
in clusters to shells and other hard bodies on the bottom. These 
capsules, each containing several eggs, are readily recognizable, 
being about one-fourth inch long and usually yellow in color. 

In the few places examined on the planted beds there were con¬ 
siderable numbers of drills and many small oysters killed by them. 
On the public beds near the east line some drills and killed oysters 
were found, but over most of the area surveyed the salinity of the 
water is somewhat too low to permit these pests ever to become a 
serious factor. Below a salinity represented approximately by a 
mixture of equal parts of salt and fresh water, having a specific 
gravity of about 1.012 or 1.013, the drill will not thrive. 


NATURAL OYSTER BEDS OF DELAWARE. 


29 


Although in the absence of other food the drill will attach and 
sometimes kill oysters of marketable size, it invariably attacks smaller 
ones by preference. Seed oysters 2 or 2 % inches in diameter are com¬ 
paratively immune, and in places where the drills are particularly 
troublesome such seed should be planted in preference to smaller. 
Although such is not known to be the case in Delaware, there are 
localities in which it is useless to plant shells or other cultch, as the 
spat is drilled before its shell has lost its first paperlike thinness. 

The drill is a difficult enemy to combat. Where it is sufficiently 
abundant to be a menace on private beds the oysters are usually 
dredged up and the drills removed by hand and destroyed, after 
which the oysters are again laid down. Much can be done by destroy¬ 
ing the drills and their egg capsules wherever found. The common 
practice of some Delaware planters of depositing rough seed on their 
beds undoubtedly helps to maintain the abundance of the drill. 

















■- 












5 . 

- , I 



























































THE FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910 

By Millard C. Marsh 

Agent at the Salmon Fisheries of Alaska 
and 

John N. Cobb 

Assistant Agent 


Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 746 


1 











CONTENTS 


* Page. 

Summarized statistics. 5 

Persons engaged. 5 

Investment... 6 

Products. 7 

The salmon industry. 11 

Hatcheries. 11 

Statistics. 12 

Catch. 12 

Canning. 15 

Canneries in operation. 17 

Pickling. 21 

Mild curing. 23 

Fresh salmon. 25 

Minor preserving processes. 25 

Return of marked salmon. 26 

Observations in Wood River region. 27 

Count of breeding run in Wood River. 28 

Significance of Wood River data. 33 

Explorations of Lake Aleknagik. 37 

The cod fishery. 37 

Shore stations. 38 

Statistics for central Alaska. 39 

Persons engaged. 39 

Investment. 39 

Products. 39 

Vessel fishing. 40 

The halibut fishery. 40 

Fishing grounds. 40 

Methods and conditions. 42 

Statistics. 44 

Persons engaged in the southeast Alaska halibut fisheries. 44 

Investment in the southeast Alaska halibut fisheries. 44 

Products of the southeast Alaska halibut fisheries. 45 

Puget Sound fishing fleet. 45 

The herring fishery. 45 

Abundance of fish. .. 45 

Uses for food and bait. 46 

The fertilizer question. 47 

Statistics. 50 

Persons engaged. 50 

Investment. 50 

Products.*. 51 

Fertilizer and oils. 51 


3 














































4 


CONTENTS. 


Page 

The crab fishery. 51 

The whale fishery. 52 

Furs. 53 

Aquatic furs. 54 

Beav r er. 54 

Muskrat. 55 

Land otter. 55 

Sea otter. 55 

Fur seal . ' .. 56 

Miscellaneous aquatic mammals. 58 

Hair seals. 58 

Walruses. 59 

License taxes and hatchery rebates. 60 

Complaints and prosecutions. 61 

Proposed legislation.... 63 

Recommendations. 65 

Appendix.—Fishery laws and regulations. 67 

An act for the protection and regulation of the fisheries of Alaska. 67 

An act to prohibit aliens from fishing in the waters of Alaska. 70 

Fishery regulations. 71 

Regulations for protection of fur-bearing animals. 71 























THE FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910 


By Millard C. Marsh, Agent at the Salmon Fisheries of Alaska, 
and 

John N. Cobb, Assistant Agent. 


SUMMARIZED STATISTICS OF THE FISHERIES. 

As in the similar reports for previous years, the District of Alaska 
is considered in the four geographic sections generally recognized, 
as follows: Southeast Alaska, embracing all that narrow strip of 
mainland and the numerous islands adjacent, from Portland Canal 
northwestward to and including Yakutat Bay; central Alaska, the 
region on the Pacific, or south side, from Yakutat Bay westward, 
including the Aleutian chain; western Alaska, the shores of Bering 
Sea and islands in this sea; and arctic Alaska, from Bering Strait to 
the Canadian border. 

With the exception of arctic Alaska and a portion of central and 
western Alaska, practically all of the fishing localities were visited 
by one or the other of the two agents engaged in the inspection work 
this year. Considerable commercial fishing is carried on in the Yukon 
River and its tributaries, where fish wheels, nets, and spears are 
employed, but unfortunately it has been found impossible so far, 
owing to the short time available for the agents each season, to extend 
the inspection work over this large area, or to secure data showing 
the extent of the fisheries there. Owing to the impossibility of the 
agents visiting arctic Alaska in the limited open season, the data for 
this section are incomplete, but what have been secured are shown. 

It has been found an impossibility to secure even approximate data 
as to the persons engaged or the investment in the hunting of aquatic 
animals (except fur seals and sea otters), which is general among the 
natives. 

PERSONS ENGAGED. 

The number of persons engaged in the fisheries of Alaska in 1910 
was 15,620, an increase of 3,032 over 1909. Of these 6,836 were 
whites, 4,147 Indians, 2,411 Chinese, 2,206 Japanese, 4 Koreans, and 
59395°—11-19 5 




6 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


16 Filipinos, as compared with 5,608 whites, 2,823 Indians, 1,998 
Chinese, and 2,159 Japanese, in 1909, showing an increase in 1910 
of 1,228 whites, 1,324 Indians, 413 Chinese, and 47 Japanese, The 
most gratifying feature is the large increase in the numbeir of whites 
and Indians employed, as all of the Indians and many of the whites 
are permanent residents of the District. The fact that the fisher¬ 
men act as sailors on the transporting vessels to and from the salmon 
canneries and salteries explains the small number of transporters 
shown in the table as compared with the large number of transporting 
vessels. 

Persons Engaged in the Alaska Fisheries in 1910. 


Occupation and race. 

Southeast 
• Alaska. 

Central 

Alaska. 

Western 
Alaska. 

Arctic 

Alaska. 

Total. 

Fishermen: 

Vessel— 

402 

6 


. 

408 


38 

48 



86 


4 



4 








444 

54 



498 




Shore- 

Whites . 

1,149 

737 

1,589 

72 


3,475 
2,416 
19 


1 ,710 

196 

438 


10 

9 


3 



3 








2,872 

933 

1,670 

438 

5,913 



3,316 

987 

1,670 

438 

6,411 


Shoresmen: 

Whites. 

731 

396 

1,232 

331 

10 

2,369 

1,566 


1,103 

132 


'705 

468 

1,218 


2,391 
2,188 
4 


472 

393 

1,323 



4 





16 


16 






3,011 

1,393 

4,120 

10 

8,534 


Transporters: 

Whites. 

264 

115 

205 


■ 

5S4 


69 

10 


79 


1 



1 


8 

3 



11 






341 

129 

205 


675 



Grand total. 

6,668 

2,509 

5,995 

448 

15,620 



INVESTMENT. 

The total investment in the fisheries is 820,711,422, an increase of 
$10,829,740, as compared with 1909. A considerable proportion of 
this increase is due to the showing of cash capital once more, this item 
having been eliminated for the first time in 1906. Nearly all forms 
of apparatus show increases as compared with 1909. 




































































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910, 


7 


Investment in the Alaska Fisheries in 1910. 


Items. 

Southeast 

Alaska. 

Central 

Alaska. 

Western 

Alaska. 

Arctic 

Alaska. 

Total. 

Num¬ 

ber. 

Value. 

Num¬ 

ber. 

Value. 

Num¬ 

ber. 

Value. 

Num¬ 

ber. 

Value. 

Num¬ 

ber. 

Value. 

Fishing vessels: 












71 

$501,100 







71 

$501,100 


1,024 







i;024 




177,049 








177,049 

Sailing.. 

3 

3; 800 

2 

$4,000 





5 

7; 800 


35 

87 






122 



875 


1,300 






2,175 

Transporting vessels: 











Steamers and launches. 

135 

366,850 

28 

252,050 

44 

$650,950 



207 

1,269,850 


1,378 

1,195 

2,662 



5,235 

Outfit. - .. 


210,800 


77,900 


109,600 




398,300 


20 

180; 150 

i3 

385,500 

32 

711,000 



65 

1,276,650 

Tonnage. 

6,753 

17,395 


41,748 




65,896 

Outfit. 

33,200 

22,000 


48,000 



103,200 

Steamers and launches 









(under 5 tons). 

240 

401,030 

12 

26,225 

7 

18,200 



259 

oi445,455 

Boats, sail and row. 

1,090 

59,648 

570 

33,880 

845 

186', 840 

82 

$13,300 

2,587 

293,668 

Scows and lighters. 

142 

67,183 

111 

58,300 

130 

107,529 



383 

233,012 

Pile drivers. 

22 

45,197 

21 

46; 300 

17 

38| 300 



60 

129; 797 

Apparatus, vessel fish- 









eries: 











Purse seines. 

10 

3,995 







6 10 

3^995 

Lines, trawl. 


22,080 







22!080 

Shotguns. 


48 

476 





48 


Whaling gear. 


1,015 







1,015 

Apparatus,' shore fish- 









eries: 











Haul seines. 

4S 

9,797 

56 

21,285 





c 104 

31 082 

Purse seines. 

152 

43,079 






d 152 


Gill nets. 

416 

58,659 

132 

17,295 

903 

90,682 



cl ,451 

1 fifi fi3fi 

Dip nets. 

13 

123 

18 

9 




31 

132 

Lines, hand. 


521 


1,245 





1 700 

Lines, trawl. 


15,870 







15 870 

Traps, stake. 

41 

109,550 

38 

51,162 

14 

19,500 



93 

180 212 

Traps, floating. 

13 

22,728 

1 

1,500 




14 

24,228 

Crab pots. 

366 

1,082 







3fifi 


Spears. 

120 

115 







120 

* 115 

Hoes. 

14 

10 

5 

4 





19 


Shotguns. 

40 

1,200 







40 

1 200 

Whaling gear. 








18 r 450 


Cash capital. 


3,544,333 


1,593,444 


3.456,660 


10,000 


8,604,437 

Shore and accessory prop- 







erty. 


2,376,584 


1,346,405 


3,030,008 


4,500 


6,757,497 







Total. 


8,257,623 


3,940,280 


8,485,706 


46,250 


20,711,422 









a Includes outfit. d Aggregate length of 59,030 yards. 

b Aggregate length of 3,280 yards. « Aggregate length of 412.176 yards. 

d Aggregate length of 36,190 yards. 


PRODUCTS. 

The total quantity of products was 214,536,433 pounds, valued at 
$13,259,859, an increase of 12,553,195 pounds and $2,078,471 over 
1909. Except for salmon bellies and backs, fertilizer, oil, furs, and 
bides, the weights are round weights, or the weights of products when 
first taken from the water; for weights of prepared products the 
reader is referred to the subsidiary tables of the report. As the pack¬ 
ing establishments almost invariably catch their own fish, it has been 
found practically impossible to show the value of the products as 
they leave the fishermen’s hands, hence the values shown are for the 
prepared products. 
















































































































8 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


Products of Alaska Fisheries iti 1910. 


Products. 


Southeast Alaska. 


Pounds. Value, 


Black cod: 

Fresh. 

Frozen. 

Pickled. 

Cod: 

Fresh. 

Pickled. 

Dry-salted. 

Tongues, pickled. 

Eulachon: 

Fresh. 

Pickled. 

Smoked. 

Flounders, or sole. 

Halibut: 

Fresh. 

Frozen. 

Fletched. 

Pickled..... 

Herring: 

Fresh. 

Frozen. 

Pickled. 

Dry-salted. 

Eggs, dried. 

Pollock. 

Redfish, or black bass. 

Rock cod: 

Fresh. 

Pickled. 

Salmon: 

Fresh- 

Coho, or silver. 

Humpback, or pink.... 

King, or spring. 

Red, or sockeye. 

Frozen— 

Coho, or silver. 

Dog, or chum. 

King, or spring. 

Canned- 

Coho, or silver. 

Dog, or chum. 

Humpback, or pink.... 

Kang, or spring. 

Red, or sockeye. 

Mild-cured— 

King, or spring. 

Pickled- 

Coho, or silver. 

Humpback, or pink.... 

King, or spring. 

King, or spring, fins.... 

Red, or sockeye. 

Red, or sockeye, tips... 
Dry-salted— 

Coho, or silver, backs... 

Dog, or chum. 

King, or spring. 

Humpback, or pink, 

backs. 

Red, or sockeye, backs. 
Smoked— 

Coho, or silver, backs.. 

Dog, or chum. 

Humpback, or pink, 

backs. 

Red, or sockeye, backs. 
Salmon bellies, pickled: 

Coho, or silver. 

Dog, or chum. 

Humpback, or pink. 

King, or spimg. 

Red, or sockeye.. 

Smelt. 

Tomcod... 


13,800 

10,172 

72,673 

6,000 


$572 

326 

1,934 

300 


2,600 

40,000 

000 

5,000 

19,038,001 

2,467,125 

73,893 

270 

574,359 

522,500 

731,560 

45,600 

1,000 


104 

1,200 

36 

150 

731,914 

73,548 

2,534 

14 

5,203 

5,225 

12,255 

954 

100 


19,100 

22,000 

100 


52,588 
24,000 
977,348 
77,577 

97,529 
17,337 
38,576 

5,841,990 
16,221,450 
34,382,285 
24,360 
18,247,740 

3,824,900 

9,450 
84,780 


960 

1,080 

7 


2,419 

300 

45,770 

4,378 

3,889 

695 

1,235 

404,907 
703,555 
1,565,358 
1,998 
1,466,918 

218,441 

296 

1,905 


400 

540 


29,570 
9,600 

21,800 


554 

288 


278 


440 

100 


14,000 
84,200 
1,200 
600 
4,085 
800 


770 

4,410 

128 

24 

205 

32 


Central Alaska. 

Western Alaska. 

Pounds. 

Value. 

Pounds. 

Value. 













16,000 

125,866 

2,877,157 

3,600 

$560 

3,320 

59,433 

130 























51,000 

2,040 













10,000 

300 





60,480 

1,728 









1,800 

8,000 

11,000 

90 

400 

440 









7,500 

225 









28,000 

840 













1,394,960 
9,170 
2,225,790 
1,105,020 
25,541,250 

35,650 

33,750 

3,510 

99,103 
403 
101,380 
85,235 
1,959,539 

2,232 

1,208 

78 

814,870 
1,564,640 
2,194,360 
1,686,090 
57,729,700 

$55,656 
69,451 
97,317 
127,569 
4,347,933 



810 
95,040 

15 

3,399 



400,950 

12,278 

2,819,880 

800 

92,351 
60 

10,000 

290 







1,500 

17,000 

2,000 

25 

410 

200 













16,058 

25,200 

1,608 

1,135 







39,000 

1,725 





161,000 

10,815 



































































































































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910, 


9 


Products of Alaska Fisheries in 1910—Continued. 


Products. 

Southeast Alaska. 

Central Alaska. 

Western Alaska. 

Pounds. 

Value. 

Pounds. 

Value. 

Pounds. 

Value. 

Trout: 

1,000 

50,000 

$50 

2,000 





Dolly Varden, or salmon 
trout— 

15,000 

13,510 

$750 

618 







1,000 
7,100 

3,800 

19,215 

2,617,000 
869,141 

2,077,500 

165 

2,744,480 

70 

6,880 

116,904 

2,000 

368 

50 

284 

168 

1,153 

40,000 
16,456 

55,000 

10 

117,270 

30 

430 

4,902 

300 

1,922 








Steelhead— 










Fertilizer: 





Whale .. 





Oil: 





















3,200 

32,000 

120 

2,400 









Aquatic furs and skins: 

608 

11 

560 

1,117 

120 

3 

2,763 

59 

917 

4,493 

5,900 

5 

1,026 

52 

25,834 

2,302 

20 

6 

85,476 

242 

871 

$5,883 

160 

69,245 

8,843 

670 

32 

468,042 

12 

150 



1,592 

1,232 

15 

5,086 

5,213 

600 

Otter— 



Beal— 

828 

4,207 





2,790 

80 

400,000 

395,000 

114,711 

55,025 

796 

85 

4,500 

4,789 

5,249 

4,805 






Whale products: 

























113,223,554 

5,542,633 

34,288,340 

2,365,195 

67,022,019 

5,346,788 


Products. 

Arctic Alaska. 

Total. 

Pounds. 

Value. 

Pounds. 

Value. 

Black cod: 


• 

13,800 
10,172 
72,673 

22,000 

125,866 

2,877,157 

3.600 

2.600 
40,000 

600 

5,000 

19,089,001 
2,467,125 
73,893 
270 

584,359 
522,500 
792,040 
45,600 
1.000 
1.800 
27,100 

$572 

326 

1,934 

860 
3,320 
59,433 
130 

104 

1,200 

36 

150 

733,954 
73,548 
2,534 
14 

5,503 

5,225 

13,983 

954 

100 

90 

1.360 







Cod: 












Eulachon: 












Halibut: 












Herring: 


















Redfisb. or black bass. 


































































































10 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910, 


Products op Alaska Fisheries in 1910—Continued. 


Arctic Alaska. 


Total. 


Products. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Rock cod: 

Fresh. 

Pickled. 

Salmon: 

Fresh— 

Coho, or silver. 

Humpback, or pink. 

King, or spring. 

Red, or sockeye. 

Frozen- 

Coho, or silver. 

Dog, or chum. 

King, or spring. 

Canned- 

Coho, or silver. 

Dog, or chum. 

Humpback, or pink. 

King, or spring. 

Red, or sockeye. 

Mild-cured- 

King, or spring. 

Pickled- 

Coho, or silver. 

Humpback, or pink. 

King, or spring. 

King, or spring, fins. 

Red, or sockeye. 

Red, or sockeye, tips. 

Dry-salted— 

Coho, or silver, backs. 

Dog, or chum. 

King, or spring.* 

Humpback, or pink, backs... 

Red, or sockeye, backs. 

Smoked- 

Coho, or silver, backs. 

Dog, or chum. .. 

Humpback, or pink, backs... 

Red, or sockeye, backs. 

Salmon bellies, pickled: 

Coho, or silver. 

Dog, or chum. 

Humpback, or pink. 

King, or spring. 

Red, or sockeye. 

Smelt.. 

Tomeod.. 

Trout: 

Cutthroat.. 

Dolly Varden, or salmon trout— 

Fresh.'_ 

Canned. 

Pickled.. 

Rainbow.. 

Steelhead— 

Fresh.. 

Frozen.. 

Fertilizer: 

Herring.. 

Whale.. 

Oil: 

Herring.. 

Shark.. 

Whale. 

Abalone shells. 

Clams. 

Crabs. 

Seaweed. 

Aquatic furs and skins: 

Beaver_. 

Castoreum. 

Muskrat. 


Pounds. 

Value. 

33,000 

$1,520 

100 

7 

60,088 

2,644 

24,000 

300 

977,348 

45,770 

105,577 

5,218 

97,529 

3,889 

17,337 

695 

38,576 

1,235 

8,051,820 

559,666 

17,795,200 

773,409 

38,802,435 

1,764,055 

2,815,470 

214,802 

101,518,690 

7,774,390 

3,860,550 

220,673 

43,200 

1,504 

89,100 

1,998 

95,040 

3,399 

400 

24 

3,221,370 

104,649 

800 

60 

10,000 

290 

29,570 

554 

9,600 

288 

23,300 

303 

17,000 

410 

2,000 

200 

440 

60 

100 

5 

16,058 

1,608 

25,200 

1,135 

14,000 

770 

123,200 

6,135 

1,200 

128 

161,600 

10,839 

4,0S5 

205 

800 

32 

1,000 

50 

65,000 

2,750 

13,510 

618 

1,000 

50 

7,100 

284 

3,800 

168 

19,215 

1,153 

2,617,000 

40,000 

869,141 

16,456 

a 2,077,500 

55,000 

6165 

10 

c 2,744,480 

117,270 

70 

30 

d 10,080 

550 

*148,904 

7,302 

2,000 

300 

/ 2,002 

10,568 

63 

219 

9 27,986 

75,248 


a Represents 277,000 gallons. 
6 Represents 22 gallons. 
c Represents 309,930 gallons. 
d Represents 1,260 bushels, 
e Represents 70,452 crabs. 

/ Represents 2,002 skins. 
o Represesnt 223,893 skins. 


































































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


11 


Products op Alaska Fisheries in 1910—Continued. 



Arctic Alaska. 

Total. 

Products. 





Pounds. 

Value. 

Pounds. 

Value. 

Aquatic furs and skins—Continued. 

Otter— 

Land. 



a 4 fifil 

$18,549 

Sea. 



6155 
o 9 

dSO 304 

Sea, pups. 



37 

472,249 

12 

Seal- 

Fur. 



Fur, unborn. 



<242 
/ 3,661 
266 

400,000 

395,000 

114,711 

Hair. 



Walrus ivory. 

186 

$186 

271 

Whale products: 

Bones, unground. 

Bones, ground. 




Stearin. 



5,'249 

Whalebone, or baleen. 

2,334 

5,057 




Total. 

2,520 

5,243 

214,536,433 





a Represents 1,861 skins. 

6 Represents 31 skins. 
c Represents 3 skins. 

d Represents 14,384 skins (of these, 660 skins were from a seized Japanese schooner). 
e Represents 121 skins (these were from a seized Japanese schooner). 

/ Represents 1,221 skins. 


THE SALMON INDUSTRY. 

The run of salmon was very good in all sections except western 
Alaska. For a time the outlook was bad in southeast Alaska owing to 
the excessive rains which prevailed during the first half of the season, 
causing the salmon to rush up the streams, but an exceptionally dry 
spell lasting six weeks followed, which made the streams quite low and 
kept the fish from going up too rapidly. As a result the fisherman 
were enabled to make large catches during this period. 

HATCHERIES. 

Seven salmon hatcheries were operated during the season of 1909-10, 
as follows: 


Salmon Hatcheries Operated in 1910. 


Name. , 

Location. 




Afognak Island. 








Hetta Lake. 


Quadra Lake. 




Owner and operator. 


United States Bureau of Fisheries. 

Do. 

Alaska Packers Association. 

Do. 

North Pacific Trading and Packing Co., and 
North Alaska Salmon Co. 

Northwestern Fisheries Co. 

Do. 


The Alaska Packers Association reports as follows on a subject of 
interest to fish culturists: 

We have been quite successful in retaining the fry in our nursery ponds [at Fort- 
mann hatchery] for a definite period and feeding them on fresh steelheads macerated 















































12 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


to a pulp. In two ponds containing about 10,000,000 fry, from 30 to 40 pounds of this 
food was fed each day, and they appeared to thrive wonderfully well upon it, as 
scarcely any dead fry were found. 

The rainfall was 160.80 inches and the snowfall 289 inches for the 
year ended June 30, 1910, at Fortmann hatchery; which record will 
give a slight idea of the weather conditions with which the super¬ 
intendents of hatcheries in Alaska have to contend. Despite the 
adverse weather conditions, however, all of the hatcheries except 
Fortmann and Afognak operated at full capacity, and taken as a 
whole the season was a fairly successful one. 

The Klawak Lake hatchery of the North Pacific Trading & Packing 
Co. was enlarged the present summer so that it is now able to handle 
10,000,000 eggs. 

At the dam on the stream leading to Capt. John C. Callbreath’s 
hatchery on McHenry Inlet a man has been stationed each year since 
the hatchery was shut down, for the purpose of lifting the salmon over 
the structure. In 1908, 1,022 males and 876 females were put over, 
and in 1909, 516 males and 434 females. 

Output of the Salmon Hatcheries of Alaska. 


Hatcheries. 

Year ended June 30,1910. a 

Eggs taken 1910-11. 

Red, or sockeye. 

Humpback, or pink. 

Red, or 
sockeye. 

Hump¬ 
back, or 
pink. 

Eggs taken. 

Fry liber¬ 
ated. 

Eggs 

taken. 

Fry lib¬ 
erated. 


6 72,005,000 
76,020,000 
53,340,000 
45,228,000 
( c ) 

10,313,000 

10,863,000 

69,879,600 
68,422,170 
50,725,000 
40,620,000 
5,300,000 
9,000,000 
9,850,000 



72,000,000 

30,725,000 

34,920,000 

49,626,000 

(O 

9,141,000 

11,200,000 

114,000 

405,000 


499,400 

363,740 























253,796,770 

499,400 

363,740 

9,141,000 

519,000 




a In three instances fry were held until July, 1910, and in order to make the record for the season complete 
these have been included. 

6 Of these, 5,000 were reported as coho eggs. 
c No report. 

STATISTICS. 

catch in 1907, 1908, 1909, and 1910. 

Following is a table showing, for the geographic sections, by appara¬ 
tus and species and by species alone, the number of salmon caught in 
the years 1907, 1908, 1909, and 1910. All species, except red salmon, 
show increases over 1909. The total catch in 1910 is smaller than in 
any of the other years shown. 


































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 13 

Catch of Salmon in Alaska in 1907, 1908, 1909, and 1910, by Sections, 

Species, and Apparatus. 


Apparatus and species. 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

SOUTHEAST ALASKA. 

Seines: 

302,963 
1,101, §22 

8,614,551 
259 
1,419,221 

273,993 

1,378,339 

8,900,467 

1,812 

1,691,149 

165,177 

387,774 

5,572,005 

293 

1,285,265 

322,521 

1,566,221 
6,228,732 
152 

1,481,898 





Total. 

11,438,816 

12,245,760 

7,410,514 

9,599,522 

Traps: 

139,783 
158,170 
3,438,335 
26.835 
615,684 

119,034 
368,709 

5,102,843 
3,448 
486,646 

112,213 

337,395 

3,628,940 
* 5,107 

893,816 

165,023 

437,726 

3,151,684 

2,546 
860,737 





Total. 

4,378,807 

6,080,680 

4,977,471 

4,617,716 

Gill nets: 

83,943 
74,298 
18,029 
70,388 
214,442 

84,176 
56,431 
59,582 
64,148 
378,834 

78,845 
9,041 
127,422 
68.659 
478,398 

164,990 
28,802 
32,357 
51,667 
574,251 





Total. 

461,100 

643,171 

762,365 

852,067 

Lines: 

1,052 

23,082 

1,329 

61,633 

8,000 

134,606 

6,000 

204,823 


Total. 

24,134 

62,962 

142,606 

210,823 

Spears: 

20,000 

4,000 

45,400 

70,000 

Wheels: 

King, or spring. 


27 



Total: 

527,741 
1,334,290 
12,070,915 
120,564 
2,269,347 

478,532 
. 1,803,479 
14,062,892 
131,068 
2,560,629 

364,235 
734,210 
9,328,367 
208,665 
2,702,879 

658,534 
2,032,749 
9,412,773 
259,188 
2,986,886 





Grand total. 

16,322,857 

19,036,600 

13,338,356 

15,350,130 

CENTRAL ALASKA. 

Seines: 

48,759 

252,373 

4,015 

3,568,069 

60,847 
268,466 
3,028 
2,709,750 

52,258 
127,549 
3,907 
2,038,833 

64,202 

375,041 

1,598 

2,227,803 




Total. 

3,873,216 

3,042,091 

2,222,547 

2,668,644 

Traps: 

163,076 

90,616 

89,918 

115,922 

1,318 

273,023 

34,007 

2,095,563 



6,420 

36,791 

2,711,142 

375,140 

17,216 

3,740 

44,632 



2,285,401 2,152,555 

Total. 

2,917,429 

2,768,373 | 2,290,845 

2,519,833 

Gill nets: 

15,000 
27,022 
358,649 



18,826 
15,995 
298,915 


18.351 
512,464 

18,059 

487,984 


Total. 

400,671 

530,815 

506,043 

333,736 

Total: 

226,835 

151,463 

142,176 

198,950 

1,318 

648,004 

51,600 

4,622,281 



258,793 

67,828 

6,637,860 

643,606 

38,595 

5,507,615 

131,289 
66,598 
4,679,372 





7.191,316 

6,341,279 

5,019,435 | 5,522,213 








































































































14 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


Catch op Salmon in Alaska in 1907, 1908, 1909, and 1910, by Sections, 
Species, and Apparatus— Continued. 


Apparatus and species. 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

WESTERN ALASKA. 

Traps: 

29,199 
36,141 
1,600 
5,011 
1,078,869 

20,000 
114,534 
261,519 
4,856 
860,516 

9,930 

101,456 

15 

3,096 

508,011 

6,340 

58,039 

513,072 

4,382 

326,833 






1,150,720 

1,261,425 

622,508 

908,666 

Gill nets: 

109,650 
472,586 
337,514 
134,391 

9,181,034 

86,088 
340,309 
138,138 
87,174 
16,013,966 

71,393 
346,340 
31,811 
128,893 
15,133,872 

132,860 
252,179 
149,057 
97,373 
11,266,776 






10,235,175 

16,665,075 

15,712,309 

11,898,245 

Total: 

138,849 
508.727 
339,014 
139.402 
10,259,903 

106,088 
454,843 
399,657 
92,030 
16,874,482 

81,323 

447,796 

31,826 

131,989 

15,641,883 

139,200 
310,218 
662,129 
101,755 
11,593,609 






11,385,895 

17,927,100 

16,334,817 

12,806,911 

TOTAL. 

Seines: 

351,722 
1,101.822 
8,866,924 
4,274 
4,9S7.290 

334,840 

1,378.339 

9,168,933 

4,840 

4,400,899 

217,435 

387,774 

5,699,554 

4,200 

3,324,098 

386,723 

1,566,221 

6,603,773 

1.750 

3,709,701 






15,312,032 

15.287,851 

9,633,061 

12,268,168 

Traps: 

332,058 
194,311 
3,440,255 
68,637 
4,405,695 

229,650 
483.243 
5,739,502 
25,520 
3,632,563 

212,061 
438.851 
3,632,695 
52,835 
3,584,382 

287,285 

497,083 

3,937,779 

40,935 

3,283,133 






8,446,956 

10,110,478 

7,920,824 

8.046,215 

Gill nets: 

208.593 
546.884 
355,543 
231,SOI 
9,754,125 

170,264 
396,740 
197,720 
169,673 
16,905,264 

150,238 
355,381 
159,233 
215,611 
16,070,254 

316,676 
280,981 
181.414 
165,035 
12,139,942 






11,096,946 

17,839,661 | 16,950,717 

13,084,048 

Lines: 

1,052 
23,082 

1,329 

61,633 

8,000 

134,606 

6,000 
204,823 


Total. 

24,134 

62,962 

142,606 

210,823 

Spears: 

20,000 

4,000 

45,400 

70,000 

Wheels: 


27 



Total: 




893,425 
1.843.017 
12,668.722 
327,794 
19,167,110 

736,083 
2,258,322 
15,106,155 
261,693 
24,942,726 

587,734 
1,182,006 
9,491,482 
407,252 
23,024,134 

996,684 
2,344.285 
10,722,966 
412,543 
19,202,776 






34,900,068 

43,304,979 

34,692.608 

33,679.25-' 



























































































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


15 


Number and Gross Weight op Each Species op Salmon Caught in 1907, 1908, 
' 1909, and 1910. 


Species. 

1907 

1908 


Number. 

893,425 
1,843,017 
12,60S,722 
327,794 
19,167,110 

Pounds. 

5,360,550 
14,744,136 
50,674,888 
7,211,468 
95,835,550 

Number. 

736,083 
2,258,322 
15,106,155 
261,693 
24,942,726 

Pounds. 
4,416,498 
18,066,576 
60,424,620 
5,757,246 
124,713,630 


Humpback, or pink. 



34,900,068 

173,826,592 

43,304,979 

213,378,570 



Species. 

1909 

1910 


Number. 

587,734 
1,182,006 
9,491,482 
407,252 
23,024,134 

Pounds. 

3,526,404 
9,456.048 
37,965,928 
8,959,544 
115,120,670 

Number. 

996,684 
2,344,285 
10,722,966 
412,543 
19,202,776 

Pounds. 
5,980,104 
18,754,280 
42,891,864 
9,075,946 
96,013,880 





Total. 

34,692,608 

175,028,594 

33,679,254 

172,716,074 



CANNING. 

When the season of 1909 opened, all grades of salmon, except 
pinks and chums, were commanding remunerative prices. The 
prices of these two grades began to crumble in 1908 and kept on 
dropping through 1909, until finally they reached bottom at S2.40 
per case for pinks (a drop of $1.05 per case from the 1907 prices) 
and $2.28 per case for chums (a drop of 96 cents per case from the 
1907 prices). The demand for pink and chum salmon began to 
fall off in 1907, despite which the packers kept on piling up stock 
during the next two years, with the result that they became a drug 
on the market, and for a time it was difficult to move them, even 
at the above unremunerative prices. Late in 1909 the demand 
began to improve, and when the season of 1910 opened but few 
pinks and chums were left in first hands. 

Early in the season rumors began to circulate that prices on all 
grades would be advanced, and the buyers, who had been content 
to buy only for immediate necessities as long as prices seemed to 
be crumbling, now came into the market with orders for large stocks. 
As a result, the packers soon were obliged to prorate the orders, 
as the pack did not begin to equal the demand. The expected high 
prices were realized, and before the pack had come out of Alaska it 
was all sold at the most remunerative figures realized by the packers 
in years. 

In 1909, owing to the expected quadrennial heavy run of sockeye 
salmon on Puget Sound, the canneries of Gorman & Co., at Kasaan, 
of the Astoria & Puget Sound Packing Co., in Excursion Inlet, and 
of the Fidalgo Island Packing Co., at Ketchikan, all in southeast 

































16 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


Alaska, were shut clown, as these companies felt it would be more 
profitable to devote all their energies to their Puget Sound plants. 
In 1910 all were operated. In addition new canneries were opened 
by the St. Elias Packing Co., at Alsek, in southeast Alaska, by the 
Northwestern Fisheries Co., at Kenai, on Cook Inlet (succeeding the 
mild-curing plant formerly operated by the San Juan Fishing & 
Packing Co.), and by the Columbia River Packers Association, at 
Chignik, in central Alaska. The cannery of the Alaska Salmon 
Co., on Wood River, western Alaska, which was closed down in 
1909, owing to the loss of its supply ship, was operated this year. 

New canneries which will likely be finished in time to operate in 
1911 are the Hawk Fishing Co., at Hawk Inlet, Tee Harbor Pack¬ 
ing Company, at Tee Harbor, southeast Alaska, and the Alaska Pack¬ 
ers Association, at Naknek, western Alaska. For some years the 
Alaska Packers Association lias operated two canneries at Karluk, 
on Kodiak Island. Karluk has no harbor, except for boats draw¬ 
ing less than 4 feet of water, and the association, fearing a repeti¬ 
tion of the disaster of 1907, when the bark Servia, with a full cargo 
of salmon, was driven ashore in a gale and totally destroyed, began 
in 1909 the erection of a new cannery at Larsen Bay, a well- 
sheltered spot near by. This establishment will operate in 1911, the 
two Karluk canneries being held in reserve. Fishing will be car¬ 
ried on as usual at Karluk, the fish being transported to the new 
cannery. C. A. Burckhardt & Co., who now operate two canneries 
in southeast Alaska, have bought the saltery formerly owned by 
Mrs. A. E. King, at Sunny Point, southeast Alaska, and will convert 
this into a one-line cannery. The Alaska Fishermen’s Packing Co. 
have purchased the Nelson, Olsen & Co. saltery in Kvichak Bay, 
western Alaska, and will replace the old plant by a one-line cannery. 
Several canneries are also engaged in making, or are contemplating, 
extensive changes to and enlargements of their present plants. 

On August 10 the cannery of the Alaska-Portland Packers’ Asso¬ 
ciation, at Snag Point, Nushagak Bay, was completely destroyed by 
fire. The warehouse alongside, with much of the gill-netting and 
all of the trap web, together with part of the season’s pack, was also 
consumed. The bunk houses, store, office, and residence, and the 
floating property, were saved. The property loss was about $200,000, 
partly covered by insurance. The company will rebuild next spring 
and hopes to have the cannery completed in time to operate that 
season. 

On the night of September 12 fire broke out in the cannery of 
Gorman & Co., at Kasaan, in southeast Alaska, and resulted in the 
total destruction of the cannery, warehouse, store, hotel, and part of 
the season’s pack. The company will erect a new cannery in time to 
operate next season. 



FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910, 


17 


Several canneries packed some thousands of cases of salmon in 
the new seamless, or sanitary can with such success that it is probably 
a question of but a few seasons until this will be the only form of 
can in use in Alaska. 

The two cannery fires resulted in the loss of the following cases of 


salmon: 

Cases. 

Cohos, 1-pound tall. 1, 552 

Chums, 1-pound tall. 4 , 896 

Pinks, £-pound flat. 141 

Pinks, 1-pound tall. 11 } 956 

Reds, 1-pound tall. 22,178 


Total..... 40,723 


These have been included in the statistical tables, as they had 
passed through all the stages of packing and were eventually paid for 
by the insurance companies. 

CANNERIES IN OPERATION. 

Following is a list of the canneries operated during the season of 
1910: 


Name. 


Location. 


Southeast Alaska: 

John L. Carlson & Co. 

George T. Myers & Co. 

Yakutat & Southern Railway Co. 

Astoria & Puget Sound Canning Co... 

Pacific American Fisheries. 

Northwestern Fisheries Co. 

North Pacific Trading & Packing Co.. 

Fidalgo Island Packing Co. 

Shakan Salmon Co. 

Gorman & Co. 

F. C. Barnes Co. (Inc.). 

Thlinket Packing Co. 

Alaska Packers Association. 

St. Elias Packing Co. 

Pillar Bay Packing Co. 

Metlakahtla Industrial Co. 

Pacific Coast & Norway Packing Co.. 

Yes Bay Canning Co. 

Chilkoot Fisheries Co. 

Central Alaska: 

Northwestern Fisheries Co. 

Alaska Packers Association. 

Columbia River Packers’ Association 
Western Alaska: 

Alaska Packers Association. 


North Alaska Salmon Co. 

Northwestern Fisheries Co. 

Naknek Packing Co. 

Red Salmon Canning Co. 

Alaska-Portland Packers Association 

Bristol Bay Packing Co. 

Alaska Fishermen’s Packing Co. 

Columbia River Packers Association. 
Alaska Salmon Co.. 


Taku Harbor. 

Sitkoh Bay. 

Yakutat. 

Excursion Inlet. 

Do. 

Dundas Bay, Quadra Bay, Santa Ana, 
Hunter Bay. 

Klawak. 

Ketchikan. 

Shakan. 

ICasaan. 

Lake Bay. 

Funter Bay. 

Loring and Wrangell. 

Alsek River. 

Point Ellis. 

Metlakahtla. 

Petersburg. 

Yes Bay. 

Chilkoot Inlet. 

Chignik, Uyak, Kenai, and Orca. 
Kasilof, Karluk (2), Alitak,and Chignik. 
Chignik. 

Nushagak Bay (2), Kvichak Bay (2), 
Naknek River (2), and Ugaguk 
River. 

Kvichak Bay, Nushagak Bay, Ugaguk 
River, and Lockanok. 

Nushagak Bay. 

Naknek River. 

Ugashik River. 

Nushagak Bay. 

Kvichak Bay. 

Nushagak Bay. 

Do. 

Wood River. 














































18 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


Persons engaged .—The fishermen engaged this year numbered 3,722, 
of whom slightly more than one-half were white. The cannery 
employees numbered 8,194, of whom all nationalities show increases 
as compared with 1909. The transporters numbered 515, an increase 
over 1909. All branches of the industry show increases as com¬ 
pared with 1909. In all, 12,431 persons were employed, an increase 
of 1,909 over 1909. 

Persons Engaged in the Salmon-Canning Indgstry in 1910. 


Occupation and race. 

Southeast 

Alaska. 

Central 

Alaska. 

Western 

Alaska. 

Total. 

Fishermen: 

444 

485 

1,541 

2,470 

1,233 


1,153 

80 


10 

9 

19 





1,607 

565 

1,550 

3,722 


Shoresmen: 

529 

359 

1,203 

326 

2,091 


1,060 

705 

121 

1,507 

2,388 

2,188 

4 


467 

1,216 

1,323 


472 

393 


4 




16 

16 





2,766 

1,344 

4,084 

8,194 



Transporters: 

184 

111 

189 

484 


23 

2 

25 


1 


1 


2 

3 


5 







209 

117 

189 

515 


Grand total: 

Whites. 

1,157 

955 

2,933 



2 ,236 

203 

'326 

2,765 


705 

468 

1,216 

2,389 
2,212 


484 

396 

1,332 


4 

4 




16 

16 





4,582 

2,026 

5,823 

12,431 



Investments, wages, e£c.-*-There were 52 canneries in operation— 
23 in southeast Alaska, an increase of 4 over 1909; 10 in central Alaska, 
an increase of 2 over 1909; and 19 in western Alaska, an increase of 1 
over 1909; a total increase for all Alaska of 7. 

There were 176 steamers and launches over 5 tons, 55 under 5 
tons, and 59 sailing vessels engaged in transporting supplies and the 
pack, and doing general work for the canneries. This is a large 
increase over 1909. 

All forms of apparatus except floating traps show increases over 
1909. The increases are especially noticeable in purse seines and 
stake traps, which increased in number 43 and 27 respectively. 

Included in this table for the first time are the items of cash capital, 
materials used, and wages paid. Considerable misapprehension 
























































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


19 


seems to have arisen among readers of this report as to the profits of 
the cannerymen, which have appeared to them enormous. Such 
an erroneous conclusion is apparently based on the assumption that 
the price received for the canned product represents practically net 
profits. For eight years prior to the 1910 season but few of the 
cannerymen received an adequate return upon the capital invested, 
while many of them sustained heavy losses during certain years. 
It has been found difficult to secure accurate data showing the cost 
of operation, and several items, such as insurance, taxes outside of 
Alaska, commissions paid the brokers, etc., have not been taken into 
account, but it is hoped in time to include these. 

Investment in the Salmon-Canning Industry in 1910. 


Items. 

Southeast Alaska. 

Central Alaska. 

Western Alaska. 

Total. 


Number. 

Value. 

Number. 

Value. 

Number. 

Value. 

Number. 

Value. 


23 


10 


19 


52 


Transporting vessels: 









Steamers and launches 









over 5 tons. 

110 

$310,450 

24 

$212,050 

42 

$605,950 

176 

$1,128,450 


1,186 


1,077 


2,507 


4,770 




175,000 


72,000 


104,000 


351,000 

Sailing. 

16 

160i250 

11 

348,000 

32 

71U 000 

59 

1,219; 250 


6,332 


17,160 


41,748 


65,240 



30,000 

20,000 


48,000 


98,000 

Steamers and launches 








under 5 tons. 

39 

86,300 

10 

24,025 

6 

13,700 

55 

124,025 

Boats, sail and row. 

541 

36,163 

263 

23,990 

822 

178,140 

1,626 

238,293 

Lighters and scows. 

108 

46,9S3 

108 

57,800 

130 

107,529 

346 

212,312 

Pile drivers. 

22 

45,197 

21 

46,300 

17 

38,300 

60 

129,797 

Apparatus: 

45 

9,372 

24 

18,100 



69 

27,472 


133 

38,784 





133 

38;784 

Gill nets. 

271 

31;134 

127 

16,545 

880 

88,957 

1,278 

136,636 

Traps, stake. 

41 

109,550 

38 

51,162 

14 

19,500 

93 

180,212 


13 

22,728 

1 

1,500 



14 

24,228 


75 

75 





75 

75 



230,000 


100,000 


190,000 


520,000 

Shore and accessory prop- 










2,016,144 


1,291,405 


2,913,008 


6,220,557 



1,964' 493 


' 778', 531 


1,646,775 


4, 389,799 



L100,678 


638,886 


562,295 


3; 301', 859 









6,413,301 


3,700,294 


8,227,154 


18,340,749 








Output . — The table of products shows the quantity and value of 
each species packed, with size and style of cans. As usual, western 
Alaska leads in value of the pack, but southeast Alaska leads in 
quantity packed. Red, or sockeye, salmon predominate in central 
and western Alaska, while humpback, or pink, salmon predominate 
in southeast Alaska. 










































































20 FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


Output of Salmon from the Canneries in 1910, by Species and Size of Cans. a 


Products. 

Southeast Alaska. 

Central Alaska. 

Western Alaska. 

Total. 

Coho, or silver: 

Cases. 

326 

2,249 

80,045 

Value. 
SI, 299 
12,357 
391,251 

Cases. 

Value. 

Cases. 

Value. 

Cases. 

326 

2,249 

111,614 

Value. 
$1,299 
12,357 
546,010 







19,928 

S99,103 

11,641 

$55,656 


82,620 

404,907 

19,928 

99,103 

11,641 

55,656 

114,189 

559,666 

Dog, or chum: 

231,735 

703,555 

131 

403 

22,352 

69,451 

254,218 

773,409 

Humpback, or pink: 

6,375 
7,900 
480,088 

15,871 

35,550 

1,513,937 





6,375 
7,900 
543,233 

15,871 
35,550 
1,712,634 







31,797 

101,380 

3i,348 

97,317 


494,363 

1,565,358 

31,797 

101,380 

31,348 

97,317 

557,508 

1,764,055 

King, or spring: 

108 

294 

432 

1,566 





108 
40,167 

432 

214,370 


15,786 

85,235 

24,087 

127,569 


402 

1,998 

15,786 

85,235 

24,087 

127,569 

40,275 

214,802 

Red, or sockeye: 

43,166 
39,941 
199,158 

170,489 
236,453 
1,059,976 



1,474 

5,896 

44,640 
39,941 
1,388,006 

176,385 

236,453 

7,361,552 





364,875 

1,959,539 

823,973 

4,342,037 


282,265 

1,466,918 

304,875 

1,959,539 

825,447 [4,347,933 

1,472,587 

7,774,390 


1,091,385 

4,142,736 

432,517 

2,245,660 

914,875 [4,697,926 

2,438,777 

11,086,322 



a All pound cases contain 48 1-pound cans; the J-pound cases contain 48 J-pound cans. Reduced to a 
common basis of cases containing 48 1-pound cans, the pack is 2,413,052J cases. 


Comparison of pack of 1907,1908,1909, and 1910 .—With the excep¬ 
tion of 1908, the pack of 1910 exceeds in quantity that of any of the 
four years, and it exceeds in value any of them, being the most 
valuable pack ever put up in Alaska. 

Comparison of the Output of the Salmon Canneries in 1907, 1908, 1909, and 

1910.“ 


Products. 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

Coho, or silver: 

1-pound flat. 

1-pound flat. 

1-pound tall. 

Total. 

Dog, or chum: 

Cases. 
969 
3,933 
80,772 

Value. 
$4,273 
17,292 
315,819 

Cases. 

209 

2,414 

66,309 

Value. 

$627 

9,903 

263,559 

Cases. 

1,206 

55,350 

Value. 

$5,543 
225,486 

Cabes. 

326 

2,249 

111,614 

Value. 
$1,299 
12,357 
546,010 

85,674 

337,384 

68,932 

274,089 

56,556 

231,029 

114,189 

559,666 

491 

664 

183,262 

1,228 
2,125 
544,404 








107 

218,406 

321 
553,876 





1-pound tall. 

Total. 

Humpback, or pink: 

120,712 

274,110 

254,218 

773,409 

184,417 

547,757 

218,513 

554,197 

120,712 

274,110 

254,218 

773,409 

17,589 
7,406 
545,772 

46,093 
26,662 
1,726,525 





6,375 
7,900 
543,233 

15,871 

35,550 

1,712,634 

I-pound flat. 

1-pound tall. 

Total. 

King, or spring: 

J-pound flat. 

1-pound tall. 

Total. 

Red, or sockeye: 

J-pound flat. 

1-pound flat. 

1-pound tall. 

Total. 

Grand total... 

569 

643,564 

1,590 

1,731,789 

464,873 

1,114,839 

570,767 

1,799,280 

644,133 

1,733,379 

464,873 

1,114,839 

557,508 

1,764,055 

28 

43,410 

98 

181,620 

125 
23,667 

425 

99,442 

48,034 

207,624 

108 
40,167 

432 

214,370 

43,438 

181,718 

23,792 

99,867 

48,034 

207,624 

40,275 

214,802 

45,383 
29,821 
1,242,600 

160,731 
154,646 
5,599,850 

21,817 
261950 
1,613,911 

68,083 
138,120 
7,318,048 

16,385 
85,193 
1,611,916 

63,888 
236,609 
7,310,053 

44,640 
39,941 
1,388,006 

176,385 
236,453 
7,361,552 

1,317,804 

5,915,227 

1,662,678 

7,524,251 

1,713,494 

7,610,550 

1,472,587 

7,774,390 

2,202,100 

8,781,366 

2,618,048 

10,185,783 

2,403,669 

9,438,152 

2,438,777 

11,086.322 


o All pound cases contain 48 1-pound cans; the J-pound cases contain 48 J-pound cans. 















































































































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


21 


The following table shows, by species, the average price received 
by the packer per case of 1-pound tails for a series of years. The 
1-pound tall cases are used because they form the vast majority of 
the pack and are the ones in common use by the consumer, the flat 
cans being packed for a special trade. 

Average Annual Price per Case op 48 1-pound Tall Cans of Salmon, 1905-1910. 


Products. 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 


$3.20 

$3.63 

$3.91 

$3.98 

$4.07 

$4.89 


2.69 

2.87 

2.97 

2. 53 

2.28 

3.04 


2.95 

3.00 

3.16 

2.69 

2.40 

3.15 


3.28 

3.78 

4.18 

4. 20 

4. 32 

5.34 


3.38 

3.77 

4.59 

4.52 

4.53 

5.30 






PICKLING. 

Owing to the low prices which have prevailed during several 
seasons for whole pickled salmon, there was but little incentive 
for the salteries to engage in this business very heavily this year. 
Some shut down altogether, while others very materially curtailed 
operations. Prices improved during the latter part of the season, 
but it was then too late. 

The action of the Department in forbidding the packing of salmon 
bellies without making some economic use of the backs contributed 
to the depression in the pickled trade, as bellies were the most 
remunerative product prepared. Nearly all of the salters are now 
agreed, however, that this action was wise and necessary. Under 
the old wasteful method from one-half to two-thirds of the edible 
portion of the fish was thrown away and the belly only was pickled. 

Persons engaged .—This year 261 persons (196 fishermen, 51 shores¬ 
men, and 14 transporters) were employed, a decrease of 135 as 
compared with 1909. 


Persons Engaged in the Salmon-Pickling Industry in 1910. 


How engaged. 

Southeast 

Alaska. 

Centrat 

Alaska. 

Western 

Alaska. 

Total. 

Fishermen: 





Whites. 

29 

3 

46 

78 


13 

105 


118 

Total. 

42 

108 

46 

196 

Shoresmen: 





Whites... 

5 

7 

20 

32 


16 

3 


19 

Total. 

•21 

10 

20 

51 

Transporters: 





Whites. 

2 

2 

4 

8 



6 


6 

Total. 

2 

8 

4 

14 

Grand total. 

65 

126 

70 

2 1 


59395°—11-20 

















































22 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


Investment .—There were 12 salteries (6 in southeast Alaska, 4 in 
central Alaska, and 2 in western Alaska) in operation, a decrease of 
4 as compared with 1909. In addition, a few of the canneries and 
mild-curing plants also pickled their surplus catch, and while the 
product has been included in the present table, the men and invest¬ 
ment could not be separated from the statistics of the other branches 
of the industry. 

Investment in the Salmon-Pickling Industry in 1910. 


Items. 

Southeast 

Alaska. 

Central 

Alaska. 

Western 

Alaska. 

Total. 


No. 

6 

Value. 

No. 

4 

Value. 

No. 

2 

Value. 

No. 

12 

Value. 

Transporting vessels: 

1 

$2,500 

1 

$12,000 

1 

$5,000 

3 

$19,500 


7 

40 

9 

56 



500 

2,400 

1,600 

4,500 

900 


1 

900 



i 


16 





16 


200 





200 



6,550 

1 

1,000 
1,160 

1 

4,500 

7 

12,050 


16 

'870 

39 

23 

8,700 

78 

10,730 
600 


5 

400 

2 

200 


7 

Apparatus: 

2 

350 

22 

2,230 



24 

2,580 


10 

2,800 

800 



10 

2,800 

2,525 


6 



23 

i, 725 

29 



8,200 

15,300 

5,925 


11,250 

9,500 

35,000 

54,450 
51,S00 
45,092 





27,000 





16', 577 


22,590 








Total. 


45,295 


56,317 


106,115 


207,727 







Output .—The output in 1910 amounted to 14,405 barrels, valued at 
$130,641, as compared with 26,915 barrels and 6,997 half barrels, 
valued at $208,758, in 1909. A small part of this output is composed 
of salmon bellies. A few of the backs were pickled and appear in 
this table, while the rest were either dried, dry-salted, or smoked, and 
appear under their proper headings in this report. 

Barrels op Salmon Pickled in 1910, by Species. 


Products. 

Southeast Alaska. 

Central Alaska. 

Western Alaska. 

Total. 


No. 

35 

Value. 

$296 

No. 

125 

Value. 

$1,208 

1,135 

No. 

Value. 

No. 

160 

Value. 
$1,504 
1,135 


126 



126 


70 

770 



70 

770 


314 

1,905 
4,410 

13 

78 

3 

$15 

330 

1,998 


421 

195 

1,725 


616 

6,135 


352 

3.399 

352 

3.399 


2 

24 





2 

24 


6 

128 





6 

128 


2 

20 

1,485 

12,278 

10,444 

92,351 

11,931 

104,649 



4 

60 

4 

60 


3 

• 24 

805 

10,815 



808 

10,839 







853 

7,577 

2,749 

27,239 

10,803 

95,825 

14,405 

130,641 


































































































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


23 


MILD CURING. 

At the opening of the present season the mild-curing industry 
was in better condition than for several years previous, as the pack 
of 1909 had been disposed of and prices for the new pack were ruling 
fairly high. Owing to this the packers extended their operations as 
much as possible, and as a result the pack this year is the largest ever 
put up in Alaska. 

With the exception of a small quantity put up in Cook Inlet, 
central Alaska, the packing of mild-cured salmon was confined to 
southeast Alaska, although it is more than probable that the packers 
will soon extend their operations into western Alaska and parts of 
central Alaska not now worked. 

As in previous years the principal trouble the packers experience 
is in getting rid of the white-meated king salmon with the least 
possible loss. These fish average about one-fourth of the total 
catch, and the fishermen insist that the dealers shall take them 
along with the others, which they do at a considerably lower price. 
A few of the larger of these white-meated kings are mild-cured. 
Early in the season many of them, together with the small red- 
meated fish, are shipped fresh to the Puget Sound ports, but after 
the kings begin to run in the Sound this is unprofitable. 

Persons engaged .—This year 656 persons (560 fishermen, 68 shores¬ 
men, and 28 transporters) were engaged in the mild-curing industry, 
as compared with 521 in 1909, a gain of 135. A number of others 
also were engaged for limited periods, but as their work in connection 
with other branches of the salmon business was more important 
they have been included there. 

Persons Engaged in the Salmon Mild-Curing Industry in 1910. 


Occupation and race. 

Southeast 

Alaska. 

Central 

Alaska. 

Total. 

Fishermen: 




Whites. 

354 

10 

364 


196 


196 


550 

10 

560 

Shoresmen: 





65 


65 


3 


3 


68 


68 

Transporters: 





15 


15 


13 


13 

Total. 

28 


28 

Grand total. 

646 

10 

656 


































24 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


Investment .—There were 14 fixed plants (13 in southeast Alaska and 
1 in central Alaska)—i. e., plants with permanent buildings and a chief 
business of mild-curing salmon—operated in Alaska this year. A 
considerable part of this industry is done by schooners and launches, 
the crews of which catch the fish in small boats and pack them aboard 
the vessels, moving from place to place with the schools of salmon. 


Investment in the Salmon Mild-Curing Industry in 1910. 


Items. 

Southeast 

Alaska. 

Central Alaska. 

Total. 


No. 

13 

23 

179 

Value. 

No. 

1 

Value. 

No. 

14 

23 
• 179 

Value. 

Transporting vessels: 

$51,500 


$51,500 





35,000 

4,000 



35,000 

4,000 

Sailing vessels.... 

2 

67 



2 

67 





3,000 

0 42,750 
14,305 
10,100 

26,225 
471 
40,920 
86,000 
46,537 



3,000 
42,750 
15,365 
10,100 

26,975 

471 

40,920 

86,000 

47,737 


35 

402 

20 

138 



35 

407 

20 

143 


5 

$1,000 


Apparatus, shore fisheries: 

5 

750 












Wages paid. i .. 



1,200 


Total. 





360,868 


2,950 


303,818 






a Includes outfit. 


Catch., by apparatus and products .—All told, 164,520 red-meated and 
22,525 white-meated king salmon were required in preparing the pack. 
The greater part of these fish were caught with trolling lines. The 
pack of 3,357 tierces, which sold for $220,673, is an increase of 1,065 
tierces and $71,373 over 1909. 

Catch of Salmon for mild-curing, 1910, by Apparatus and Species. 


Apparatus and species. 

Southeast 

Alaska. 

Central 

Alaska. 

Total. 

Gill nets: 

Number. 

20,864 

2,656 

Number. 

1,767 

Number. 

22,631 

2,656 


Total. 


23,520 

1,767 

25,287 

Lines: 

Red king salmon. 

141,889 
19,869 


141,889 
19,869 





161,758 


161,758 

Grand total. 


185,278 

1,767 

187,045 












































































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


25 


Products op the Salmon Mlld-Curing Industry in 1910. 


Products. 

Tierces. 

Round 
weight 
of fish. 

Dressed 
weight 
of fish. 

Value. 

Southeast Alaska: 

Red king salmon. 

White king salmon. 

Total. 

3,022 

304 

Pounds. 
3,475,300 
349,600 

Pounds. 

2,468,198 
246,700 

3209,826 

8,615 

3,326 

3,824,900 

2,714,898 

218,441 

Central Alaska: 

Red king salmon. 

Total: 

Red king salmon. 

White king salmon... 

Grand total. 

31 

35,650 

24,800 

2,232 

3,053 

304 

3,510,950 
349,600 

2,492,998 
246,700 

212,058 

8,615 

3,357 

3,860,550 

2,739,698 

220,673 



FRESH SALMON. 

As in previous years large quantities of king salmon (mainly 
white-meated and small red-meated fish) were shipped fresh to Puget 
Sound ports, where they brought very good prices up to the time 
king salmon began to run in the Sound waters. 

Shortly after the canning season opened certain fishermen with 
headquarters at Petersburg and Wrangell became dissatisfied with 
the prices offered by neighboring canneries, and failing to come to 
an agreement began shipping their catches of red and coho salmon 
fresh to Puget Sound ports, where they received fair prices. 

MINOR PRESERVING PROCESSES. 

Dry salting and drying .—At a few places in central Alaska the 
bellies of red and coho salmon are cut out and pickled, after which 
the backs are dried in the sun, and the resulting product, called 
“ukalu,” used for fox food at the fox ranches and for dog food. 

The dry salting of dog salmon for food has almost ceased, but 
22,178 pounds, valued at $554, being prepared this year. 

Smoking .—A delicious smoked product, known locally as “beleke,” 
is put up at Kodiak and several other places, the backs of red, coho, 
and humpback salmon being used. A considerable quantity of 
white-meated king salmon, cut into steaks, was smoked in south¬ 
east Alaska this year. 

Freezing .—The only establishments engaged in freezing salmon 
are at Taku Harbor and Ketchikan, in southeast Alaska. Only a 
small business is done in the freezing of salmon, halibut being the 
principal product of these plants. Black bass, black cod, and steel- 
head trout are among the miscellaneous products prepared. 






















26 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


RETURN OF MARKED SALMON. 

A number of salmon bearing mutilations of certain fins, apparent 
brands, or with missing fins, were observed during the summer, as 
occurs every season. So far as these concern single fins they are 
not to be referred to any known artificial marks placed upon fish as 
a means of identification. Twelve of them, however, were red 
salmon lacking both ventral fins and are identified as returns from 
a definite marking experiment which has yielded annual results 
since 1906. This continued return of marked red salmon to south¬ 
east Alaska is of particular interest. These fish were marked by 
Mr. F. M. Chamberlain as fingerlings about three months old, in 
August, 1903, at Fortmann hatchery, and liberated in Naha Stream 
above Heckman Lake. The mark consisted of the complete exci¬ 
sion of both ventral fins. , The number of marked fish liberated 
was 1,600. The returns which are considered to have been satisfac¬ 
torily identified are shown, by the year and locality, in the following 
table: 


Marked Salmon Identified Upon Return to Streams, 1906-1910. 


Years. 

Naha. 

Yes 

Bay. 

Kar- 

luk. 

Total. 

Age of 
fish. 

1906. 

2 



2 

Years. 

31 

4i 

5J 

61 

71 

1907. 

13 



13 

1908. 

5 

3 


8 



4 

1 

5 


1 

10 

1 

12 




21 

17 

2 

40 






One of the 10 fish credited to Yes Bay in 1910 was caught in the 
bay by commercial fishermen and preserved by freezing at Ketchikan, 
where it was examined by the assistant agent on July 23. It was a 
male 20.5 inches in length and weighed 3f pounds. All the other 
marked fish assigned to Yes Bay for any year were taken at the 
Government hatchery at the head of Yes Lake. 

These 40 fish are 2£ per cent of the 1,600 marked. The observed 
return is certainly somewhat larger and possibly greatly surpasses 
these figures. An indeterminate number, estimated at between 50 
and 100, were reported to have been seen at Yes Lake hatchery in 
1906, but of these no specimens were saved. No account has been 
taken of these in the above table, since there is no basis for determin¬ 
ing how many of the presumed marks were certainly of the same 
nature as those accepted as representing actual returns. Salmon 
lacking a single ventral fin are frequently seen in the runs, and some 
mutilations .of this pair of fins are to be distinguished from the results 
of artificial marking. While the table shows but one marked fish 























FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


27 


taken at Karluk in 1909, several were reported, the exact number 
being unknown. The one of which account has been taken is based 
upon examination of a preserved specimen. The few taken at Kar¬ 
luk are the only specimens known to have returned outside of south¬ 
east Alaska. 

.The relation of the return to the parent stream and adjoining streams 
of southeast Alaska, in which most of the marked fish were retaken, 
is of importance. Excluding the uncertain return to Yes Bay in 1906, 
over half the returning fish succeeded in reaching the parent stream, 
and even with these Yes Bay fish included, a considerable proportion 
still belongs to the parent stream, while by far the larger part of the 
known return is confined to the region within 40 miles of the parent 
stream. It is obviously indicated that red salmon return to the gen¬ 
eral region in which they were hatched, rather than to remote regions, 
and that a considerable number reach the particular region of their 
origin, or their parent stream. 

The return from the original plant of marked fish has now covered 
five successive seasons, indicating a variation of at least five years in 
the life period of a single hatch of red salmon. The known return 
had been diminishing in numbers since 1907 up to the current year, 
when it considerably increased. This is a somewhat anomalous 
result, and inconsistent with that gradual dwindling in numbers and 
disappearance from the runs of fish bearing this mark which was 
expected to occur. While the acceptance of these fish as conclu¬ 
sively indentical with the marked salmon of 1903 depends on the ces¬ 
sation of their occurrence within a reasonable time, there is at present 
no sufficient reason for doubting that they are the same. 

OBSERVATIONS IN WOOD RIVER REGION. 

Mr. H. C. Fassett, inspector of fisheries in Alaska, represented the 
Bureau in western Alaska, with headquarters on Nushagak Bay, and 
had charge of the investigations in the Nushagak region. The order 
closing both Wood and Nushagak Rivers was uniformly observed, and 
without its restrictive effect a considerable proportion of the reduced 
quota escaping to the spawning grounds through Wood River would 
have been taken. Eight fish traps were operated on the bay and two 
in Igusliik River, the latter yielding but few fish. The total take of 
traps was about 596,000, of which about 29 per cent were red salmon. 
These traps took 11.2 per cent of the whole catch of the Nushagak 
region, and 3.9 per cent of the whole red salmon catch. 

The following table shows the total Nushagak catch (including 
85,000 red salmon from Igushik River) and its content as to the five 
species of salmon. The red salmon catch is 83.5 per cent of the total 
number of salmon taken. 


28 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IK 1910. 


Catch of Different Species of Salmon in Nushagak Region, 1910. 


Species. 

Catch. 

Species. 

Catch. 

King. 

86,433 

4,427,626 
139,200 


440,369 

206,220 

Red - .. 



Total. 


5,299,848 


COUNT OF THE BREEDING RUN IN WOOD RIVER. 


The count of salmon escaping from the fishermen and ascending to 
the spawning grounds by way of Wood River was again made as in 
the two past years. The actual daily tally made at the rack at the 
foot of Lake Aleknagik is as follows: 

Daily Tally of Redfish into Lake Aleknagik during the Season of 1910. 


Date. 

Number. 

Date. 

Number. 

Date. 

N umber. 

July 4. 

167 

1,042 

2,717 
12,036 
13,131 
72,073 
105,835 
70,252 
26,772 
24,223 
37,612 


125,621 
64,026 
29,964 
31,628 
13,642 
10,928 
10,000 
4,881 
3,618 

2,747 
1,919 

Julv 26. 

1,162 

927 

715 

873 

708 

385 

361 

139 

5. 

16... 

27. 

6. 

17. 

28. 

7. 

18. 

29. 

8. 

19. 

30. 

9. 

20. 

31. 

10. 

21. 


11. 

22. 

2. 

12. 

23. 


670,104 

13. 

24. 

14. 

25. 





The run came into Nushagak Bay about July 3. The rack at the 
lake was completed and made tight on July 3, but no fish were seen 
until the 4th. The tally of July 7 probably represents the advance 
of the main run. As in the preceding year, there were two distinct 
impulses in the run at the lake, the height of the run or largest tally 
occurring on the 15th, or one day later than in the two preceding 
seasons. 
































































Record op Meteorological Observations at the Salmon Rack at Lake Aleknagik, Alaska, during Season of 1910. 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 29 


























































































Record oe Meteorological Observations at the Salmon Rack at Lake Aleknagik, Alaska, during Season op 1910—Continued. 





















































































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910, 


31 


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12 m. 

(i p. m... 
12 p. in.. 
G a. m... 

12 m_ 

6 p. m... 
12 p. m.. 
G a. m... 

12 m. 

6p.m... 
12 p. m.. 
6a.m... 

12 m. 

G p. m... 
12 p. m.. 
6a.m... 

12 m. 

6p.m... 
12 p. m.. 
6 a. m... 
12 m. 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 















































































































Record of Meteorological Observations at the Salmon Rack at Lake Aleknagik, Alaska, during Season of 1910—Continued. 


32 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 



i 

03 

i 

a> 

« 

Pleasant. 

Unsettled. 

Misty and raw. 

Cloudy and cool. 

Pleasant. 

Cloudy and cool. 

Overcast. 

Pleasant. 

Do. 

Overcast. 

Rainy. 

Pleasant. 

Do. 

Do. 

Unsettled. 

Stormy. 

Misty. 

Pleasant. 

Do. 

Unsettled. 

Stormy and cold. 

Unsettled. 

Stormy. 

Unsettled. 

Do. 

Stormy. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Boisterous. 

Moderating. 

Unsettled. 

Do. 

Do. 

Lake conditions. 

Drift 

(much, 

little, 

none). 

iillHilflllillilSSiliUlIMil! !! 

Current 
at rack 
(per min¬ 
ute). 

„ i i'13 i i ;§ ! : ii : : i§ ! : iS i : is i i is i i i** i i 
* ;:: •::: : i i ;: i ;;; : ■ ; ::; ;; ;: 

Depth at 
’ rack-gate. 

JiOOiOOOOiOMOiOOOC‘CCiOOOOiCOiOCiijMOWOOOtO«c2 • J 

^00 00 GO CO 00 CO 00 CO 00 CO 00 00 00 00 00 CO 00 00 OC 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 CO oo oo ccP\ • • 

Weather conditions. 

Rainfall 

(heavy, 

moderate 

light, 

trace). 

None... 
None... 
Mist... 
None... 
None... 
None... 
None... 
None... 
None... 
None... 
Light.. 
None... 
None... 
None... 
None... 
Light.. 
Mist... 
None... 
None... 

None... 

Moderat 

Light.. 

Heavy. 

None... 

None... 

Light.. 

Heavy. 

Light.. 

Light.. 

Trace.. 

None... 

None... 

Trace.. 

None... 

Wind (force and direction). 

ESE., light. 

E., light. 

E., light. 

E.. light. 

ESE., light. 

E., light. 

Calm. 

S., light. 

S., light. 

S., light. 

Calm. 

Calm. 

SW., light. 

Calm. 

Calm. 

SSE., moderate. 

Calm. 

Calm. 

ML, light. 

SSE., light. 

S., light. 

Calm. 

WSW., light. 

Calm. 

SSE., light. 

NE., moderate. 

SSE., moderate. 

SSE., moderate. 

SSE., moderate. 

SSE., light. 

Calm. 

SW., light. 

SW., light. 

Calm. 

Clouds 
in sky 
(amount 

1 to 10). 

O-'T'OTTr— iQOOCDC>OOC'1t— lO*OGOO<MOOOOOOOOOOOOOi CO O 

Barom¬ 

eter 

read¬ 

ing. 

S3SS338S38333SS3:SS8aS:3S822S8Sa8SS 

Temperatures. 

Lake 
at 6 
feet 
depth. 

iOOOiOOOOOLQOOOOOOOiO«OO^OOLOOvOOLO»OGOOOO oo 

Air. 

■5 0 

•B 3 

sa 

COODiOOOOcOWM^O>N«NO^COM^OOOOONOH(«ONOOO>OtO»0 OOO 

Maxi¬ 

mum. 

NOM^cDMOOHOlNMOCOOcOiOH^COCOOJOWN^'J'COHMO'fiO OW 

At read¬ 

ing. 

HO)0»0<N^MCOOOO^OCOOO^«^N5DOONU5HiOONWOiflfOO C^O 

Hour. 

6 p. m. 

12 p. m_ 

6 a. m. 

12 m. 

6 p. m. 

12 p. m- 

tj a.m. 

12 m. 

6 p. m. 

12 p. m- 

6 a.m. 

12 m. 

6 p. m. 

12 p.m_ 

6 a.m. 

12m. 

6 p.m. 

12 p.m- 

6 a.m. 

12 m. 

6 p.m. 

12 p.m- 

6 a.m. 

12 m. 

6 p.m. 

12 p.m_ 

6 a. m. 

12m. 

6 p.m. 

12 p.m_ 

6 a.m. 

12 m. 

6 p.m. 

12 p.m_ 

Date. 

July 26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

Aug. 1 

2 

3 









































































































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


33 


SIGNIFICANCE OF WOOD RIVER DATA. 

The spawning run up Wood River again shows a loss in comparison 
with the preceding season. The total was 670,000 in 1910, as against 
893,000 in 1909. The commercial catch of Nushagak Bay also fell off, 
being 4,400,000 in 1910 as against 4,900,000 in 1909. The Wood 
River run in 1910 was 75 per cent of the 1909 run; the Nushagak Bay 
catch in 1910 was 89.8 per cent of the 1909 catch. Thus in each of 
these years the Wood River spawning run has declined much more 
rapidly than the catch in the bay has declined. The following table 
shows the numerical results in round numbers for the three years of 
Wood River investigations. The last column gives the sum of the 
bay catch and the Wood River run, this total constituting far the 
greater part of the whole run into Nushagak Bay. 


Spawning Run in Wood River, 1908, 1909, and 1910. 


Years. 

Nushagak 
Bay catch. 

Wood River 
tally. 

Total. 

1908. 

6,400,000 
4,900,000 
4,400,000 

2,600,000 

893,000 

670.000 

9,000,000 

5,793,000 

5,070,000 

1909. 

1910. 



The commercial catch for the whole bay has fallen off since 1908 by 
two annual losses of 14 millions and t million, respectively. The 
corresponding loss to the Wood River tally was in 1909 numerically 
even greater than the loss on the catch, while in both 1909 and 1910 
the percentage loss in Wood River was greater than on the catch. 

According to observations in the river and the head of the bay, and 
the reports of the packers, the run up the main river was unusually 
large this season, evidently greater than the Wood River run. By 
taking the latter as a minimum and twice the number as a maximum 
for the main river run, and estimating otherwise on the same basis 
as in previous seasons, about 6,400,000 is obtained as the estimated 
run for the whole bay in 1910, which in view of the maximum error 
probable may be accepted as within one-lialf million of the actual 
run. Of this estimate over 79 per cent, or more than 5 million fish, 
are fish actually counted in Wood River by the observers and in 
Nushagak by the commercial fishermen. 

The total escape to the spawning grounds for the whole Nushagak 
region during the current season lies between 25 per cent and 36 per 
cent of the total run, with 31 per cent probable. In other words, the 
industry took between 64 per cent and 75 per cent of the whole run, 
and probably took about 69 per cent. 

As bearing on the rate of increase the figures for the season corrob¬ 
orate broadly the conclusions reached the year previously and tend 











34 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


to narrow the limits between which this rate is indicated to lie. 
From such a slender basis of facts as are available, a rate of increase 
of from 200 per cent to 250 per cent is to be inferred if there is neither 
under nor overfishing. If these figures are too high the Nushagak 
industry is overfishing. If they are too low, fish are being use¬ 
lessly wasted to the spawning grounds. The latter of these alter¬ 
natives would hardly be maintained by anyone, and can hardly hold 
over a course of years, yet it may possibly be true of an occasional 
season, such as that of 1908. 

Value of a census of salmon runs .—If the establishment of the 
increment percentage, rate of increase, or measure of the tendency of 
red salmon to multiply by their own natural and unaided reproduc¬ 
tive powers is of any importance to the fisheries, then the Wood River 
investigations or their counterpart ought to be continued and made to 
include a complete salmon catchment basin, the larger and more 
isolated the better. It can hardly be maintained that the factors of 
temperature, wind, chance, etc., affect so erratically the movements 
of the great schools that the annual run to a given basin is little or not 
at all related to the preceding spawning runs which escaped capture 
therein. Salmon of course do not all return to the region where they 
were hatched. Some go elsewhere and a continuous flux or ebb and 
flow of interchange results. 

But the number of the spawners inevitably measures the reproduc¬ 
tivity. If this number could be ascertained for all Alaska, it would 
soon be known how prolific the salmon are. Since this is impossible 
it remains to make the determination on as large a section of the 
spawning grounds as can be handled. A somewhat longer time is 
required in order that the annual variations affecting the particular 
fragment of the fishery under observation shall reach an average 
making it representative of the whole. It matters little whether the 
adult salmon return to their parent waters, or wdiether they inter¬ 
change freely, even to the extent of none returning to their birth¬ 
places. The essential point is to determine how large are the runs 
which succeed year after year to a series of known spawning escapes. 

As a matter of fact, there is much difference of opinion among 
fishermen respecting the controlling effect of winds on the movements 
of salmon. In Bering Sea few days pass without strong blows, and 
it is easy to relate the suddenly arriving salmon run to some par¬ 
ticular wind, just as the so-called equinoctial storm is supposed to 
have some essential connection with the autumnal equinox. But 
whatever resultant physical influences have, they do not prevent an 
unfailing annual rush of hordes of red salmon into Nushagak Bay, 
their advent predictable almost to the day and their numbers expected 
with perfect certainty to be measured in millions. During the count¬ 
less years in which this has occurred before the commercial fishery 



FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


35 


existed the uniformity was presumably greater than at present. The 
variations in size of the run known to have occurred since man dis¬ 
turbed the balance of nature in these fisheries are reasonably due mainly 
to the exigencies of the commercial industry, which has been unable 
to make any correlation between its take and the quota necessary 
for spawning. Even with these variations, no such thing as a failure 
in the run is known to history or tradition. Even at the lowest ebbs 
of the commercial fishery the salmon had still to be counted by 
millions. As fisheries go, the Nusliagak region and most of the 
Bristol Bay streams are constant and perennial sources of salmon. 

That the determination of the rate of increase of red salmon, or 
the limits within which it varies, is a matter of high importance is 
self-evident. Of course a high rate has already been implied by the 
great productivity of salmon fisheries and their failure in Alaska to 
deplete rapidly under enormous drains. Presumably it has been 
known to many that the fishermen have been, in many fisheries, 
taking almost every year more than half the run. The lesser portion 
must therefore have reproduced the whole run, which placed the 
annual increment at over 100 per cent. Just how small this escap¬ 
ing portion may be and .still reproduce a maximum run has been 
and is yet the vital and crucial question. But three long steps 
in answer have been taken by the three years of Wood River investi¬ 
gations. 

There is no other way to obtain this increment percentage than 
by continued counting of the breeders, which, with the commercial 
catch, amounts to a census of the run. The three annual counts 
already made in Wood River, coupled with general knowledge of 
the other rivers of the bay, already show roughly what proportion 
of the Nusliagak Bay run has reached the spawning grounds in these 
years, and since the Bering Sea fisheries are not rapidly declining 
this is probably not much below the proportion which should reach 
the spawning grounds. 

This showing is definite enough to be safely used in a practical 
way as a basis for dividing the whole run into a commercial and a 
breeding quota. At the beginning the tentative figures might be 
70 per cent for the former and 30 per cent for the latter. Seventy 
per cent is not far from representing the proportion of the run the 
industry has been taking from Nusliagak Bay in each of the past 
two years. By the use of racks in the rivers the run could be divided 
as it came into alternate daily portions, one to escape, the other for 
the packers. Thus a definite proportion of the run would be insured 
to the spawning grounds, and the actual number of fish of which it 
consisted would be known. Even if a considerable inaccuracy 
existed in the tentative fixing of 30 per cent for the breeding quota, 
no injury would result, for the annual counts would constantly 


36 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN' 1910. 


correct the figures. It is only necessary to begin such a system of 
catching and releasing at proportions just to the industry and reason¬ 
ably safe for the fisheries. It may be assumed for this purpose that 
a 30 per cent escape will approximately maintain the Nushagak 
fisheries. This implies a rate of increase of 233 per cent, which 
means that for‘three salmon which reach the spawning grounds, 
spawn, and die, ten adult salmon return during the next few years, 
and that if no more than seven of these are taken by the fishermen 
the process can continue indefinitely. 

The Pacific salmon, and particularly the red salmon, alone among 
commercial fishes, are surprisingly adapted to the control of man 
for the purpose of perpetuation and exploitation as a commercial 
asset. They leave the sea regularly at a certain season and make 
their way en masse to the narrow channels of the fresh and more 
or less clear waters, where they may be confined, held, captured, or 
counted and released to the spawning grounds without injury—all 
with comparative ease and convenience. Spawning is definitely 
confined to the single season of sexual maturity and is soon followed 
b} r the death of the adult, so that breeding salmon never themselves 
become a part of subsequent runs. These facts make it possible 
not only to measure their reproductive power, but to put into effect 
a system of fishing whereby from a minimum reservation of breeding 
salmon the fishery may be maintained perpetually at a maximum. 
At the same time the industry may obtain its fish for packing easily 
and cheaply. The pack may be made in a perfectly fresh condition. 
The canneries can operate uniformly throughout the season, instead 
of with the present alternations of scarcity and abundance. Runs 
of more uniform size would finally succeed upon a more uniform 
release of breeders, and would therefore be more accurately 
predictable. 

There is a certain quantity of seed represented by spawning 
salmon, a more or less definite fraction of the whole run, varying 
within presumably narrow limits, which nicely produces without 
waste from the spawning fields and the feeding grounds of the seas 
a maximum crop of fish. Any greater quantity is an excess, being 
a total waste of nonproductive seed, while any lesser quantity is a 
more serious loss, the waste of a multiplied return from potential 
seed which should have been used as such. No system of fishing 
can possibly make this measured sowing of the spawning grounds 
without actually counting the whole run. This the present system 
does not do. It counts the catch alone, and therefore it almost 
always wastes fish, either as nonproductive breeders or as the 
multiplied (by about 2J) return from fish which should have been 
allowed to breed. The tendency is toward the latter or greater 
loss. Only occasionally and by chance will both forms of waste be 
avoided. 




FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


37 


These opportunities which the peculiar specialized habits of the 
red salmon afford for perpetually exploiting them commercially 
without depleting their abundance should be utilized. The packing 
industry would greatly profit in the end and the Alaska fisheries 
would enhance in value as a national asset. At present the law 
does not provide power to establish such a system of fishing, but 
it would permit a trial in a suitable region by mutual agreement 
between the packers concerned and Federal authority. 

EXPLORATIONS OF LAKE ALEKNAGIK. 

During the summers of 1908 and 1909 every stream tributary to 
Lake Aleknagik, which gives rise to Wood River, was examined by 
the agent. During the current summer Mr. W. T. Bower, of the 
Division of Fish Culture of the Bureau, spent the period from July 17 
to July 27 in explorations of the lake and streams. By means of 
these observations the streams have been thoroughly prospected 
with reference to spawning salmon and hatchery possibilities. Two 
suitable and feasible hatchery sites have been selected, and on either 
a properly equipped expedition, arriving as soon as navigation 
opened, could erect a hatchery in time to obtain a portion at least 
of the same season’s spawn. 

Such a hatchery could be located on the lake shore and be accessible 
directly from tidewater for light-draft boats. No single stream of 
the lake would afford eggs enough to fill a large hatchery, and col¬ 
lections would have to be made over the whole lake in some seasons. 
There is, however, no more suitable location in the Bristol Bay 
region for accessibility and proximity to large spawning grounds. 
The second lake could be drawn upon for eggs if necessary. There 
is no hatchery in western Alaska, a region which furnishes some 63 
per cent of the total pack of Alaska red. 

THE COD FISHERY. 

All but one of the firms and individuals [John H. Nelson, of 
Squaw Harbor] operating in the district for cod exclusively 
have their headquarters at San Francisco, Cal., or Seattle, Ana- 
cortes, or Tacoma, Wash., at which places, or in their immediate 
vicinity, the cured fish are received and prepared for marketing. 
About half of the operators have shore stations located at favorable 
places in central Alaska, on the Shumagin and Sannak Islands, and 
Unimak Island. From thence the dory fishermen carry on their 
operations, bringing in their catch daily, and when they have accu¬ 
mulated enough to form a cargo a vessel is dispatched from the home 
port or else a fishing vessel completes its fare from the station 
catch and carries the fish to the curing establishments in the States. 

59395°—11-21 


38 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


The industry has suffered severely in the past from the spreading 
broadcast of exaggerated ideas as to its possible profits. As a result 
of this persons totally unfamiliar with the work have engaged in it, 
and instead of building up a trade by the preparation of a good 
product at a living price have prepared goods in a slipshod manner 
and then disposed of them by cutting below the prices of more 
reputable dealers. 

When the present season opened the trade was in a demoralized 
condition, owing to excessive cutting of prices. During the summer 
certain changes in ownership took place. A new company, the 
Western Codfish Co., took over the plants, vessels, etc., of King & 
Winge Co. and the Seattle-Alaska Fish Co. The Union Fish Co., 
of San Francisco, bought and had delivered to it the catches of the 
vessels owned and operated this }^ear by the Robinson Fisheries Co., 
of Anacortes, Wash., and the Blom Codfish Co., of Tacoma, Wash. 

Through this centralizing of the industry, price cutting was elimi¬ 
nated, temporarily at least, and when this report closed the market 
was in excellent condition. A considerable surplus is on hand, but the 
dealers are content to hold this for their own price, which, owing to 
the shortage of cod on the Atlantic coast, they are reasonably sure of 
getting. 

Mr. J. A. Matheson, of Anacortes, Wash., has incorporated his plant, 
and it is now known as the Matheson Fisheries Co. The Pacific States 
Trading Co., of San Francisco, which did not operate this year, will 
probably resume operations in 1911. 

The winter of 1909-10 was severe, and the cod fishermen were very 
much hampered as a result. Up to June 1 heavy winds prevailed, 
and after that, while winds were light, heavy fogs were frequent. 
Owing to the severe weather practically no fish were caught in Dublin 
Bay. 

On March 28 the codfish schooner Stanley, owned by the Union Fish 
Co., of San Francisco, Cal., when approaching Pavlof Harbor, on San- 
nak Islands, in central Alaska, grounded on a reef and immediately 
began to go to pieces. In the heavy seas continually breaking over 
her one man was washed overboard and drowned and three men, 
including the master, died from exposure before rescuing parties from 
the shore could reach the ship. The rest of the crew, five men, were 
saved. The vessel was carrying supplies to the company’s shore sta¬ 
tions in Alaska, and her loss seriously hampered the operation of 
these for several months. 


SHORE STATIONS. 

During 1910 the following shore stations were operated: Alaska 
Codfish Co.: Unga, Baralof (Squaw Harbor), and Kelleys Rock (Win¬ 
chester), on Unga Island; and Companys Harbor and Moffats Cove, 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910, 


39 


on Sannak Island. John H. Nelson: Squaw Harbor, Unga Island. 
Union Fish Co.: Pirate Cove, Popof Island; Northwest Plarbor, Little 
Koniuji Island; Pavlof Harbor and Johnson Harbor, on Sannak 
Island; Sanborn Harbor, on Nagai Island; and Unga, on Unga Island. 
Several which were shut down this year will be operated in 1911. 

STATISTICS FOR CENTRAL ALASKA. 

During the year 197 fishermen, 22 shoresmen, and 37 transporters 
were employed. The total investment amounted to $162,655. The 
catch amounted to 3,019,023 pounds of fish as taken from the water. 
When cured this weighed 2,269,914 pounds and sold for $63,443, a 
very large decrease from 1909. 


Persons Engaged in the Central Alaska Cod Fisheries in 1910. 


Occupation and race. 

Number:. 

Fishermen (shore fisheries): 

197 

Shoresmen: 

18 

3 

1 




22 

Transporters: 

37 


256 



Investment in the Central Alaska Cod Fisheries in 1910. 


Items. 

Number. 

Value. 

Items. 

Number. 

Value. 

Transporting vessels: 




197 

$5,950 
1,205 

3 

S28,000 



78 



45^ 000 


3,500 
37,500 

Stations, with accessory prop- 



2 


39,500 


235 




2,000 

Total. 


162, G55 






Products of the Central Alaska Cod Fisheries in 1910. 


Products. 

Round 

weight. 

Dressed 

weight. 

Value. 


Pounds. 
16,000 
2,877,157 
125,8G0 

Pounds. 

14,000 
2,157,914 
94,400 
3,600 

$560 
59,433 
3,320 
130 






3,019,023 

2,269,914 

63,443 



























































40 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


VESSEL FISHING. 

The following fleet ° of 11 vessels, with headquarters in California 
and Washington, operated in Alaskan waters this year, several of 
them spending the winter of 1909-10 in the north. 


Cod-Fishing Fleet in Alaskan Waters, Winter of 1909-10. 


Name. 

Class. 

Net ton¬ 
nage. 

Owner. 

Fanny Dutard. 


252 
220 
235 
171 
233 
138 
376 
370 

253 
328 
253 

Matheson Fisheries Co., Anacortes, Wash. 

Robinson Fisheries Co., Anacortes, Wash. 

Do. 

Seattle-Alaska Fish Co., Seattle, Wash. 

King & Winge Codfish Co., Seattle, Wash. 

Blom Codfish Co., Tacoma, Wash. 

Alaska Codfish Co., San Francisco, Cal. 

Do. 

Do. 

Union Fish Co., San Francisco, Cal. 

Do. 

Alice ’. 




Maid of Orleans. 


Vega. 







Barken tine.... 

John D. Spreckles. 

Fremont..'.. 







a Lost at sea. 


The vessels from Washington operating in Alaskan waters caught 
911,500 fish, with a cured weight of 3,563,000 pounds, which sold 
for $97,983, while those from California caught 498,399 fish, with a 
cured weight of 1,992,000 pounds, valued at $54,780. 

THE HALIBUT FISHERY. 

FISHING GROUNDS. 

The fishery for this very choice food fish occupies second place in 
the commercial fisheries of Alaska. At present the industry is 
practically restricted to southeast Alaska, the few fish taken in cen¬ 
tral Alaska being consumed in the towns in that section. This is 
due almost wholly to the fact that the present steamship facilities 
to this section of Alaska are inadequate for the handling of this 
species as expeditiously as is required. Halibut are reported from 
various places in Cook Inlet, from all along the Alaska Peninsula 
and the adjacent islands, and in Prince William Sound. 

In western Alaska the fish is reported from a number of places, 
the natives usually catching and using it for food. The natives of 
the Pribilof Islands, when fishing off the islands, catch numbers of 
halibut and these are usually very choice specimens. 

In southeast Alaska halibut appear to be most abundant in the 
numerous sounds and straits during the winter months. Icy, Chat¬ 
ham, Peril, and Sumner Straits, and Frederick Sound are the chief 
centers of abundance. The best grounds are to be found in Fred¬ 
erick Sound, especially around the Five Finger Islands. Good 
banks are to be found scattered all over Icy Straits. The waters of 


• None of the data relating to this fleet appear in the statistical tables. 



































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


41 


Chatham Strait are too deep for general fishing, but off Point Gardi¬ 
ner and at several spots off Baranof Island, are to be found good 
fishing banks, while Kootznahoo Inlet, on Admiralty Island, yields 
good fishing in summer. In Sumner Strait are to be found very 
good deep-water winter fishing grounds. During the winter of 1909-10 
some of the fishermen fished here in water as deep as 250 fathoms. 
The vicinity of the Eye Opener is the best ground to be found in the 
strait. Indians fish considerably in Boca de Quadra and the vicinity 
of Kali Shakes Cove, Mary’s Island, and the mouths of Kasaan Bay 
and Cholmondeley Sound. In Stephens Passage considerable fish¬ 
ing is done in and just off the mouth of Seymour Canal. Most of the 
fishing in the protected waters of southeast Alaska has heretofore 
been done in winter, as the fish were then most abundant and the 
prices realized were better than in summer when the Puget Sound 
fleet operates on the Flattery Banks, off the Washington coast, and 
brings the fish in in such abundance that the Alaska-caught fish, 
which have to be shipped on the steamers plying between Seattle 
and southeast Alaska ports, at considerable expense, can not com¬ 
pete. This summer, however, the New England Fish Co. bought 
and froze all halibut brought to its Ketchikan plant and as a result a 
number of fishermen continued halibut fishing throughout the year. 

For many years the Puget Sound steamers and large power vessels 
fished in Hecate Strait and off the chain of islands lying outside the 
British Columbia mainland. During the last few years these banks 
have been growing less and less productive, and as the Canadian 
fishery protection boats have very much harassed our fishermen who 
were operating in these waters, or who were driven into its harbors 
by stress of weather or for wood and water, they have been gradually 
extending their operations northward into Alaska waters, where they 
would be free from molestation. It has been known for some years 
that halibut were abundant at certain regions in the ocean off 
the outer fringe of islands in southeast Alaska, more particularly off 
Baranof Island and the mainland between Cape Spencer and Yaku- 
tat Bay, and it was surmised that other and possibly more ex¬ 
tensive banks would be found if looked for. During the winter 
of 1909-10 several of the vessels prospected the open waters between 
Cape Muzon and Sitka, with the result that halibut were found in 
great abundance throughout the greater part of this area. Off 
Forrester Island seemed to be the center of greatest abundance. 
Here an average depth of 80 fathoms is found for about 4 miles from 
shore; a little farther out it deepens to 150 fathoms. The first few 
cargoes from here averaged 15 pounds to the fish, but the average 
soon dropped to 14 pounds. One steamer early in July caught about 
250,000 pounds of halibut on the Forrester Island banks during one 
trip. 


42 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


Halibut frequent the sandy banks on which coral and a small 
shellfish known to the fishermen as “sea cocks” abound. The 
latter is sought by the halibut as a choice morsel of food. The fish 
is a very voracious and promiscuous feeder. The stomach of one 
opened at the Ketchikan plant of the New England Fish Co. con¬ 
tained an octopus, a crab, a salmon, and a dogfish. Sand launce and 
fish eggs of a large size appear to be its favorite food at certain seasons. 
One dealer reports finding a 6-inch section of a tree branch in the 
stomach of one. The fishermen say that frequently when pulling 
up a hooked halibut, other halibut will follow the hooked one to the 
surface, biting at its tail and body. 

A few female halibut with roe reach the dealers, but the fish are 
usually dressed on the banks, and the roe, when present, is thrown 
away. Several fish with roe were received by the New England Co. 
in August and September. 

METHODS AND CONDITIONS. 

Within the protected area in summer the fish are scattered con¬ 
siderably, but during the winter they school on banks in the waters 
noted above. During this season the greater part of the year’s 
catch is made by the smaller vessels, which are unable to stand the 
rough weather usually encountered on the banks in the open ocean. 

Dealers located at Hoonah, Juneau, Douglas, Scow Bay, Peters¬ 
burg, Wrangell, and Ketchikan handle the fish from the fishing boats. 
Scow Bay, which is on Wrangell Narrows, about 5 miles from its 
head, is the principal shipping point. Here are moored several large 
house scows, floats, and barges, alongside of which the fishing boats 
tie up and deliver their catch, to be boxed in ice for shipment and put 
aboard the regular steamers for Seattle, which pass through the 
narrows every few days. The fish are cleaned and packed in ice in 
bins aboard the vessel on the banks. The fishermen furnish their 
own ice, which is frequently secured from icebergs which have broken 
off from nearby glaciers and are floating around in the bays, sounds, 
and straits. The dealer furnishes the shooks for making the boxes, 
which hold about 500 pounds. Where glacier ice is not available 
the fishermen buy from the artificial ice plants, paying from S3 to S5 
per ton. 

A few years ago halibut weighing over 50 pounds were usually 
fletched aboard the vessel, but the demand for fletched halibut is so 
small, and the price realized is so inadequate to the work involved, 
that but few are now prepared in this manner, and these usually on 
shore. In fletching the sides are taken off in two complete pieces, 
which are then put into bins and buried in salt so that the brine will 
run off. It usually requires about three weeks for the fish to strike 
properly. Half-ground California salt is used in curing. 







FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


43 


In shipping fresh, the best fish are from 25 to 30 pounds in weight. 

A 1 D-pound fish is quite a small one. Those smaller are known as 
“chickens.” Mosi of the Alaska halibut are of good grade. But 
few logy halibut are found; that is, with watery flesh which clings 
to the knife when cut and does not have the blue tint of the first-class 
fish. 

Sometimes the dealer makes a contract with a vessel owner at a 
certain fixed figure, but when the fish are received on consignment 
the commission charged is generally 5 per cent. The dealers usually 
purchase outright, at the current rates, the fish landed by the small 
boats. 

Large halibut are occasionally taken, one being delivered at Juneau 
in 1904 which weighed 365 pounds. According to the fishermen the 
females appear to have well developed eggs at any season of the year. 

Shooks for making a halibut box cost from 65 to 70 cents for each 
box, depending upon the quantity ordered. The only other expense • 
is for nails and the labor required in making the box. The fisher¬ 
men deliver the halibut at the scows in an eviscerated condition 
When being packed for shipment the head is removed and the fish 
thrown into the box with the tail toward the middle. Under 
ordinary conditions 1 ton of ice is required for 6 tons of fish, which 
is quite reasonable when it is taken into consideration that the fish 
must be carried a distance of over 700 miles by steamer. The 
freight rate to Seattle varies from $7 to $7.50 per cubic ton, depend¬ 
ing upon the distance of the shipping point from Seattle. Foi 
shipments of less than 6 boxes the rate is somewhat higher.’ In 
addition wharfage has to be paid in Alaska (usually about $1 per ton) 
and in Seattle (40 cents per ton). Six boxes of fish are considered 
to weigh 24 tons. 

The greater portion of the Pacific coast halibut is shipped to 
points east of the Mississippi River, Chicago, New York, and Boston 
being the principal distributing centers. The demand from the 
Pacific coast and adjacent States, however, is showing a healthy 
growth, and will eventually absorb the greater part of the catch. 

Heretofore the vessels of the New England Fish Co. have operated 
from the company’s plant in Vancouver, British Columbia, the fish 
landed from the vessels with American register having been shipped 
through to places in the United States in bond, free of duty. Since 
the establishment of the company’s station at Ketchikan these 
steamers have virtually made this place their headquarters and 
have been so credited in this year’s report. 

On December 29, 1909 (too late to be included in the report for 
that year), as the gasoline schooner CapeTla was being towed from 
Wrangell to Petersburg by the gasoline boat Neptune, the latter 
broke down and both vessels drifted onto the northeast shore of 


44 FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 

Variks Island. The Capella became a total wreck, and her master 
and a sailor lost their lives from exposure and exhaustion after 
reaching land. 

On November 13 the gasoline schooner Sea Light, of Ketchikan, 
while on a halibut fishing cruise, was wrecked at Larch Bay, near 
Cape Ommaney, in southeast Alaska, during a severe gale. After 
suffering much hardship the crew of 8 men managed to reach safety 
in their dories. Later the vessel was found on the beach by another 
fishing vessel which worked her off and towed her into Petersburg. 

STATISTICS. 

During the year 1910 there were 829 persons employed in all 
branches of the halibut industry. The number of steamers and 
launches increased enormously over 1909, because of the highly 
remunerative prices realized for halibut the previous year. The catch 
* as reported in 1910 amounted to 21,579,289 pounds, valued at 
$S0S,010, as compared with 5,189,924 pounds, valued at $195,529 
in 1909. Part of this great increase in showing is due to the chang¬ 
ing of the headquarters of the New England Co.’s fleet of steamers 
from Vancouver, British Columbia, to Ketchikan, thus bringing 
them within the scope of this report. 


Persons Engaged in the Southeast Alaska Halibut Fisheries in 1910. 


Occupation and race. 

Number. 

Occupation and race. 

Number. 

Fishermen: 


Shoresmen: 


Vessel fisheries— 


Whites. 

29 


343 


2 


34 




377 

Total. 

31 



Transporters: 


Shore fisheries— 


Whites. 

1 


240 




180 

Grand total. 

829 

Total. 

420 




Investment in the Southeast Alaska Halibut Fisheries in 1910. 


Items. 

Number. 

Value. 

Items. 

Number. 

Value. 

Fish in? vessels: 



Scows. 

5 

$7,600 

Steamers and launches. ... 

66 

$468,800 

Apparatus: 




842 


Vessel fisheries, trawl 





165,049 



22,080 


3 

3,800 

Shore fisheries, trawl 




35 




15,S70 


875 

Cash capital. 


52,5-00 

Packing barges. 

1 

15,000 

Shore and accessory property. 


252,200 


1M 

a 253,330 



1,258,004 

Boats, sail and row. 

20 

600 





a Outfit included. 

































































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


45 


Products of the Southeast Alaska Halibut Fisheries in 1910. 


Products. 

Round 

weights. 

Dressed 

weights. 

Value. 

Vessel catch: 

Pounds. 

18,251,519 

2,343,644 

66,560 

Pounds. 

14,601,215 

1,876,915 

49,920 

$702,245 

69,871 

2,259 




20,661,723 

16,528,050 

774,375 

Shore catch: 

7S6.482 
123,4S1 
7,333 
270 

645,186 
98,785 
5,500 
200 

29,669 

3,677 

275 

14 





917,566 

749,671 

33,635 


21,579,289 

17,277,721 

808,010 



In Central Alaska 51,000 pounds, valued at $2,040, was marketed 
in addition to above. 

PUGET SOUND FISHING FLEET. 

A fleet of Puget Sound power vessels visits southeast Alaska during 
the months from October to March, when, owing to stormy weather 
and a scarcity of fish, it is not safe nor profitable to visit the banks 
near the home ports. This fleet makes its headquarters mainly at » 
Petersburg, at the head of Wrangell Narrows, shipping the catch home 
from Scow Bay, near by, via the regular steamship lines. A few 
rendezvous at Ketchikan and Juneau. This fleet was composed of 
60 vessels, valued at $782,230, employed 1,800 men, and used trawls 
valued at $70,850. As a result of its operations in Alaska the fleet 
(with the exception of the steamers) caught and shipped 3,531,644 
dressed pounds (the round weight of this catch or the weight of the 
fishes taken from the water was approximately 4,414,555 pounds), 
valued at $158,260. The steamers carry their own catches to the 
Sound ports and these have not been included in the above amount. 
During the summer months most of this fleet fishes on the Flattery 
Banks off the State of Washington, or else off the British Columbia 
coast. 

THE HERRING FISHERY. 

ABUNDANCE OF FISH. 

At times herring are quite abundant along the coasts of southeast, 
central, and western Alaska. At Captains Harbor, on Unalaska 
Island, they appear twice each year, in July and September. Resi¬ 
dents of Port Heiden, in Bering Sea, report that large schools visit 
that bay in the spring and fall, and there is said to be a large annual 
run at Atka Island. Herring are quite abundant in Port Clarence 
also, and some fishermen located at Grantley Harbor, near the head of 

























46 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


this bay, have been salting on a small scale during the past three or 
four years and selling the fish at Nome and the various settlements 
in that section of Alaska. The schools generally visit Cook Inlet, in 
central Alaska, from July to October, and these fish are the largest 
and finest found in Alaskan waters. In southeast Alaska herring 
are found in varying abundance in almost every bay, strait, and sound. 

According to the best information obtainable, the herring in south¬ 
east Alaska begin to spawn during April or May and continue in some 
localities as late as July 1. Immediately after spawning the fish 
school in great abundance out in deep water, especially in Frederick 
Sound and the southern end of Stephens Passage, and then reenter 
the ba 3 ^s for the purpose of feeding. During July and August they 
are filled with red feed (certain species of small crustaceans) which 
makes them very difficult to cure. In September and October 
apparently they change their food, for the red feed is not then notice¬ 
able in their stomachs, and at this time they are in their prime. The 
runs are usually composed of mixed sizes, although in early summer 
there are said to be numerous bays where all the herring will be of 
small size. In western Alaska, according to Nelson, the herring 
spawn in the neighborhood of St. Michael in June. 

At this time these fish form a continuous line along the beach, passing from south 
to north in unbroken succession, spawning on the seaweeds and rocks from above 
low-tide mark to a fathom below it. They enter all the inner bays and swarm about 
every reef and rocky point. The water boils with them along shore as they struggle 
about in a dense mass among the short seaweed in spawning, and they can be easily 
caught in one’s hands. The females move slowly among the weeds, and press in the 
midst of them, depositing their eggs, which adhere to whatever they come in contact 
with, by means of a gummy secretion with which they are coated. Thrusting my 
hand under water for a half minute was sufficient for it to be covered with eggs.° 

In southeast Alaska during the spawning season, the natives place 
spruce boughs in the water, and after the eggs have adhered, remove 
the boughs and dry the eggs in the sun, using them later as food. In 
this way many thousands of eggs are destroyed each season. This 
practice should be prohibited by law. 

USES FOR FOOD AND BAIT. 

Unfortunately, but little commercial use is made of herring as a 
food fish in central, western, and arctic Alaska. In 1907 a herring 
saltery was established on Simeonof Island, one of the Shumagin 
group, in central Alaska. Owing to the low prices realized for the 
prepared product, and the high cost of transportation, the plant was 
closed down in 1908 and 1909, but it was reopened this year. A small 
quantity is marketed fresh, but the great bulk of the catch is made 
by the Indians, who consume the fish, either fresh or after being dried. 

a Report upon Natural nistory Collections made in Alaska between the years 1877 and 1881, by Edward 
W. Nelson, p. 320-21 (18871. 



FISHEKIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


47 


In southeast Alaska the fishery has attained to considerable promi¬ 
nence. Here herring are sold fresh and salted for food; but the prin¬ 
cipal use is as bait in the halibut and king salmon fisheries and as fer¬ 
tilizer and oil. In baiting, fresh herring are used whenever possible; 
but when the fisherman has to hold them for a few days the herring 
are usually dumped round into a barrel with enough salt to preserve 
them until needed. There is also a demand from the States for the 
larger herring for smoking purposes, and each season a few dressed 
and rolled in salt are packed in halibut boxes holding about 500 
pounds, and shipped. 

Several inquiries were received this year from Seattle and San Fran¬ 
cisco brokers and commission men in regard to supplying salted her¬ 
ring for the China trade, and it is to be hoped that some business in 
this line will eventuate. 

Each season there are many complaints from the halibut fisher¬ 
men as to the scarcity of herring and the heavy loss sustained through 
the boats being tied up for days at a time owing to the lack of bait. 
The question of a constant and abundant supply of bait is, in fact, the 
most serious problem confronting the halibut fishermen. During the 
summer months halibut fishing is carried on in a desultory manner; 
but about the middle of September the fleet from Puget Sound arrives, 
and tins, joined with the local fleets, soon causes a tremendous demand 
for herring, winch is the only bait used in the fishery to any extent. 
The matter is still further complicated by the erratic behavior of the 
herring itself, winch may appear in countless numbers in a certain bay 
one year, while the next year there may not be one. 

The most feasible method for overcoming this handicap would be 
by the establishment of small freezers at Wrangell, Scow Bay or 
Petersburg,’ Juneau, and Hoonah, where herring could be received 
from the fishermen during the summer and early fall, when most 
abundant, and frozen and stored away until needed in the late fall 
and winter. The New England Fish Co., at its Ketchikan plant, 
freezes a large quantity of herring each year, which it supplies to its 
own steamers and to the smaller vessels which deliver their catches 
of halibut at its plant. 

THE FERTILIZER QUESTION. 

The use of herring in the manufacture of fertilizer and oil as con¬ 
flicting with its use by man directly as a food and bait fish, and indi¬ 
rectly through the dependence of the valuable king salmon fishery 
upon it as food material, gives rise to a somewhat puzzling quesfion 
of right and administrative policy. The present fisheries law does 


48 


FISHEBIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


not prohibit such use of food fishes, and there is now one plant— 
that of the Alaska Oil & Guano Co., at Killisnoo, in southeast Alaska—• 
engaged in the industry. This year this plant caught 59,000 barrels 
of herring, with an aggregate weight, roughly, of 11,800,000 pounds. 
Of these all but 130 barrels, which were pickled for use as bait, were 
converted into fertilizer and oil. 

It is easy to conceive of commercial uses to which fishes are put 
which take precedence over other uses with respect to public advan¬ 
tage. Thus the manufacture of fertilizer and oil from fishes is a 
lower use, inferior to the business of preparing food products from 
fishes, or even to their use as bait for food fishes. Thus the men¬ 
haden ranks lower than the herring. Such a view in part grows out 
of the fact that these fertilizer and oil products, quite legitimate in 
themselves, do not depend entirely on fishes for their raw material. 
Furthermore even fish fertilizer and fish oil do not depend upon the 
herring, for various nonedible fishes, as the menhaden, are available. 
The general view of a higher use denoted by the appropriation of 
fishes for human food has widely obtained and is evidenced by various 
legislation prohibiting the lower use where it has conflicted with the 
higher. The dependence of a highly prized food fish and a correspond¬ 
ingly valuable fishery upon another fish as food for the former, as in 
the case of the king salmon upon the herring, may be classed with 
the higher uses. This in fact is one of the most important aspects 
of the value of the herring fishery, if not its chief use. An important 
food of the king salmon is herring, and as the catching of king salmon 
by trolling now forms one of the most important and profitable of 
the fisheries of southeast Alaska, no condition that adversely affects 
it in a material degree should exist unless b}^ the justification of a par¬ 
amount right and importance. 

In the absence of a material higher use the manufacture of the 
lower products is to be commended, in so far as it causes no depletion, 
as making a legitimate use of fishes which would otherwise go to 
waste. Certainly were there no other demand for the herring, such 
a use should be encouraged. The king salmon of course makes a 
continual demand upon it, and the king salmon fishery is a perma¬ 
nent one. Even the satisfaction of this demand might perhaps leave 
a margin of the natural increase of herring for other uses. 

Other things being equal it is of course the operation of the law 
of supply and demand which will determine what use shall be made 
of commercial fishes, the product being prepared for sale in the high¬ 
est .market. Under such circumstances the matter of use might be 
left to competition which would exploit the fishery for its most 
profitable end. Perhaps no such legitimate use could be regarded as 
indefensible, though lower from some standpoints, but without 



FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


49 


discussing this question it may suffice to point out that equality of 
conditions in practice soon ceases to exist, as is the case with the 
present herring fishery in Alaska. An established industry with 
plants and special machinery might continue a less profitable use 
on account of its possession of facilities and the loss involved in 
change or abandonment, and make thereby serious inroads upon 
a supply which would otherwise actually be taken for food uses. It 
would then seem the part of justice to prohibit the lower use after 
such time or under such conditions as would secure the interdicted 
industry from serious loss. 

The practice evidently has been, with the approval of public 
sentiment concerned, to make legislative choice as between material 
conflicting uses on the general grounds of higher and lower uses, as 
already discussed. In the concrete instance of the Alaska herring 
fishery, although some demand an immediate ban on its manufacture 
into fertilizer and oil, it is not clear that a material conflict of interests 
exists. As a matter of fact, owing to distance from market, high 
freights, and the necessity for competing with the British Columbia 
and Puget Sound packers, the Alaskan herring has not made its way 
to any great extent as a food fish. As bait for the halibut fishery it is 
in great demand, but when most needed the herring run is usually 
small, and the salted herring, while used, is inferior as bait. Both 
the food and bait uses combined consumed only about 20 per cent 
of the take in 1910, a season ot abundance of herring. The rest 
was manufactured into fertilizer and oil. Certainly an exigent 
demand for herring for other purposes could have been met to a larger 
extent from the large run of the current season. 

It is for the future rather than the present that it is desirable to 
take action looking toward the end of the use of herring as the raw 
material for fertilizer and oil. It is safe to assume that all the uses 
of the herring are destined to increase, and therefore at some future 
time a conflict of uses is probably inevitable. There is but one 
establishment engaged in the fertilizer and oil industry in Alaska. 
To prevent extensions of the business and provide for its termina¬ 
tion without injury to existing interests it is only necessary to pro¬ 
hibit it by legislation effective at a future date, allowing ample time 
for the present concern to wind up its affairs. The Bureau has already 
through the Department recommended to Congress an early tenta¬ 
tive date, in part for the sake of eliciting the facts on which to base 
a reasonable interim. Evidence has been taken on both sides of the 
question and a common ground reached for a settlement of the 
question which is believed to be just for all concerned. It is main¬ 
tained and conceded that the continuance of the herring fertilizer 
and oil industry is likely to become inconsistent with public policy 


50 


EISHEKIES OE ALASKA IN 1910. 


respecting the fisheries. The Department on the other hand is 
inclined to allow a liberal term before any prohibition upon the 
industry shall become effective, and upon the fixing of this term the 
question may be said to pend. A few years’ delay in the inaugura¬ 
tion of this change, intended to hold indefinitely, is a matter of little 
moment to the fisheries, but of imminent importance to the industry. 

STATISTICS. 

The following tables show the condition of the herring industry 
in 1910: 

Persons Engaged in the Alaska Herring Fisheries in 1910. 


Occupation and race. 

Southeast 

Alaska. 

Central 

Alaska. 

Total. 

Fishermen: 




Vessel fisheries— 





59 


59 


4 


4 

Japanese. 

4 


4 

Total. 

67 


67 

Shore fisheries— 




30 

9 

39 

Indians. 

5 

5 


35 

9 

44 

Shoresmen: 



Whites. 

35 

2 

37 


31 

2 

33 


6 


Q 

Total. 

72 

4 

76 

Grand total... 

174 

13 

187 


Investment in the Alaska Herring Fisheries in 1910. 


Items. 

Southeast Alaska. 

Central Alaska. 

Total. 

Fishing vessels: 

Steamers and launches. 

No. 

5 

Value. 

$32,300 

No. 

Value. 

No. 

5 

Value. 

$32,300 

Tonnage. 

182 



182 

Outfit r. 

12,000 

10,000 

2,470 



12,000 


6 

1 

$ 1,200 

400 

7 

a 11,200 
2,870 
2,400 


42 

4 

46 


4 

2,100 

1 

300 

5 

Apparatus: 

Vessel fisheries— 

Purse seines. 

10 

3,995 

75 


10 

3,995 

475 

Shore fisheries— 

1 

3 

400 

4 


9 

1,495 

500 


9 

1,495 

Gill nets. 

1 



1 

500 



80,000 

50,800 


2,000 

5,000 


82,000 

55,800 









* Total. 


195,735 


9,300 


205,035 






o Includes outfit. 







































































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


51 


Products op the Alaska Herring Fisheries in 1910. 


Products. 


Herring, fresh, for food.pounds. 

Herring, fresh, for bait.do... 

Herring, frozen, for bait.do... 

Herring, pickled, for food...barrels. 

Herring, pickled, for bait.do... 

Herring, salted, for food_pounds. 

Herring eggs, dried, for food...do... 

Herring fertilizer.do... 

Herring oil.gallons. 


Total. 


Southeast Alaska. 


Quantity. 


574,359 
522,500 
979 
1.906 
45,600 
1,000 
2,617,000 
277,000 


Value. 


$5.203 
5,225 
9,056 
3,199 
954 
100 
40,000 
55,000 


113,737 


Central Alaska. 


Quantity. 

10,000 


216 


Value. 

$300 


1,728 


2,028 


Total. 


Quantity. 
10,000 
574, 359 
522,500 
1,195 
1,906 
45.600 
1.000 
2,617.000 
277,000 


Value. 
$300 
5,203 
5,225 
10,784 
3,199 
954 
100 
40,000 
50,000 


115.765 


FERTILIZER AND OILS. 

The only plant operated this year for the preparation of fertilizer 
and oil from fish was that of the Alaska Oil & Guano Co. at Ivillisnoo, 
in southeast Alaska. During the fishing season the company’s ves¬ 
sels caught 59,000 barrels of herring, as compared with 52,000 barrels 
of herring and 3,846 barrels of salmon in 1909. 

The Revilla Reduction Works have constructed a plant for the 
treatment of dogfish and mud shark livers at Ketchikan, in southeast 
Alaska. While the plant is primarily for the extraction of oil from the 
livers, it is also hoped by the owners to be able to dry-salt the flesh 
for shipment as food to China and Japan, and to dry the skins for 
sale. Unfortunately the flesh so far treated has turned yellow and 
brown, and until this fault can be corrected it will be of little value. 
The plant was completed so late in the season that practically nothing 
was done this year. 

THE CRAB FISHERY. 

As stated in previous reports, crabs are exceedingly abundant in 
nearly every section of Alaska, but it is only in southeast Alaska that 
they are put to any considerable commercial use, many being con¬ 
sumed locally, while large numbers are shipped to the Puget Sound 
markets, and a few to points in the Northwest Territory, Canada. 

The principal shipping places are Petersburg and Wrangell, and 
the fishermen from here crab on the flats in Dry Straits, opposite Ideal 
Cove, and at Scow Bay, in Wrangell Narrows. They use a rectangular 
pot of wooden framework, about 40 inches long, 18 inches high, and 
30 inches wide, with 3|-i n ch stretch mesh net covering. The tun¬ 
nels, of which there is one at each end, are 7 inches in width and 5 
inches in height. These pots cost about $3 each. 

The pots are set on trawls, about 25 or 30 to a trawl. Each is 
attached to a gangion about 5 fathoms long, thus permitting the 
raising and emptying of the pot without bringing to the surface the 
trawl itself. The trawls are marked by buoys and held by anchors. 

































52 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


On some of the trawls baited hooks are placed between the gangions 
for the purpose of catching bait for the pots. All sorts of fish, clams, 
etc., are used as bait. 

When fishing the pots the fishermen throw back into the water aril 
crabs under 6 inches in width, measured the broad way of the back, all 
females, and the soft-shell ones, the latter because there is usually very 
little meat in them. 

At first the crabs shipped out of the district were packed alive in 
seaweed, but so many died on the way or arrived in bad condition 
that now all are boiled before being shipped. The shippers classify 
them as follows: Large, 7 inches and over; medium, 6^ to 7 inches; 
and small, 6 to inches. The prepared crabs are packed in boxes 
holding between 12 and 14 dozen each, and are set on their bottoms 
in three tiers with layers of ice at the bottom, between each tier, and at 
the top. The freight to Seattle is $7.50 per measured ton, which 
would include 35 dozens of crabs. 

There is ample room for a large development of this industry, both 
in canning and marketing fresh, and it is probable this will take place 
as soon as knowledge of the abundant supplies to be had in Alaska 
becomes more general. 

THE WHALE FISHERY. 

The only shore whaling station in the United States where all the 
parts of a whale are utilized is at Tjme, at the lower end of Admiralty 
Island, in southeast Alaska, and this plant was operated more vig¬ 
orously than ever this year. In addition to the steamer Tyee, 
Junior , and the gasoline schooner Lizzie S. Sorrenson, which com¬ 
posed the fleet in 1909, the steamer Fearless (85 net tons) was fitted 
out this year. In order to permit the fleet to operate more freely in 
the open ocean, where most of the whales are now killed, the bark 
Diamond Head, loaded with supplies of coal, gasoline, provisions, etc., 
was anchored in a convenient bay, to which the fleet could resort when 
in need and thus save the long trip to the station except when neces¬ 
sary to tow the catch there. 

The Lizzie S. Sorrenson early in the season met a most unusual fate. 
As she was cruising around in the ocean about 8 miles southwest of 
Cape Addington the evening of May 10 a whale was sighted. She 
was cautiously worked to within gunshot and a harpoon driven into 
the animal. The weapon failed to reach a vital spot, and the whale 
made off at a terrific rate, but finding its progress checked it suddenly 
turned and charged directly at the vessel. Unavailing efforts were 
made by the crew to work the ship out of the way of the infuriated 
creature, and the whale, striking her a terrific blow in the stern, 
knocked out a portion of the bottom. Efforts made to plug the hole 
were without success, and as the pumps did not suffice, the crew took 




FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 53 

to their boats and the vessel soon sank. Two days later the ship¬ 
wrecked crew was- picked up by the whaler Fearless. 

The station fleet secured 146 whales, of which 6 were sperm whales 
and one a right whale. As the sperm and right whales produce more 
valuable by-products than the ordinary whales secured here, the 
financial return this year was better than in previous seasons. Since 
the fleet began fishing in the open ocean, moreover, a greater number 
of sulphur-bottom whales, which are the largest, have been secured, 
thus adding materially to the output of the station with but slight 
addition to the cost of operating in the interior waters. It is probable 
that the plant will be removed to a spot nearer the present scene of 
operations in order to eliminate the time and expense now necessary 
in order to get the killed whales from the grounds to the station. 

There are a number of shore whaling stations along the Arctic 
shores of Alaska, at Cape Smytlie, Point Hope, and Point Barrow. 
These stations are quite different affairs from the shore whaling 
station at Tj^ee, in southeast Alaska, being virtually trading stations 
which, in addition to their regular mercantile business, 'furnish the 
capital to outfit Eskimos who wish to hunt whales in the ocean close 
to shore. When a whale is killed the whalebone is removed and sold 
to the trader, while the natives eat or preserve as food as much of the 
blubber and flesh as they feel will be required to support them through 
the long winter. At Cape Smythe there are about 19 boats whaling, 
at Point Hope about 22, and at Point Barrow about 36 boats. The 
crews average about 8 men to a boat and the darting gun is quite 
generally used. The season lasts about 2 months, and comprises a 
part of April, all of May, and a part of June. The bone shipped out 
from these stations appears in the statistical tables. 

Owing to the glut in the whalebone market, but few of the Arctic 
fleet operated this year. The fleet comprised the following: Steamer 
Herman (229 net tons), steamer Iiarluk (247 net tons), brigantine 
Jeanette (217 net tons), schooner Rosie H. (69 net tons) which went 
north in 1908, gasoline schooner Conjianza (84 net tons), and the 
schooner Lettitia (233 net tons). The gasoline schooner Olga (43 net 
tons) sailed north in 1908 and was wrecked in the Arctic late in 1909, 
the news not coming out until this year. While whales were plentiful 
they were excessively shy and hard to approach. The fleet secured 
27 whales, the Iiarluk alone taking 21, which however, represents 
two seasons’ work on the part of the Karluk, she having spent the 
winter of 1909-10 in the North. 

FURS. 

Except in the case of fur seals and sea otters, no effort has hereto¬ 
fore been made to conserve the supply of fur-bearing animals of the 
district, but “An act to protect the seal fisheries of Alaska, and for 
59395°—11-22 


54 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


other purposes,” approved April 21, 1910, consigns these resources 
to the charge of the Department of Commerce and Labor. 

In accordance with section 4 of this law a set of regulations have 
been promulgated by the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, as given 
in full in the appendix to this report (p. 71). 

The following table shows the number and value of furs of all 
kinds shipped from Alaska in 1910: 

Shipment of furs from Alaska in 1910. 


Products. 

Southeast Alaska. 

Central Alaska. 

Western Alaska. 

Total. 


No. 

478 

Value. 
$4,935 

No. 

326 

Value. 

$3,085 

No. 

532 

Value. 

$3,821 

No. 

1,336 

1 

Value. 

$11,841 

20 

135 

10 

50 

1,560 

35 

125 


1 

20 


4 

125 

2 

10 

6 





1 

10 

1 




2 

50 


2 


4 

75 

27 

1,285 

20 

2 

200 

33 



4 

1 

15 

5 


3 

105 

1 

20 


4 


3 

30 


3 

115 

6 

145 
2,798 
65 


3 

150 



53 

2,648 

65 

56 








8 

2 


8 

2 


368 

1,922 

60S 

2,763 

59 

1,026 

5,883 

160 

2,002 

10,568 

219 






11 

6 

11 

6 


694 

447 

1,221 

997 

1,682 

1 

1,477 
250 

3,597 

2,921 

700 


1 

450 

2 


2 

60 

492 

14,730 

660 

5,636 

1,154 

20,426 



5 

' 175 

5 

175 


2 

20 

156 

1,007 

100 

199 

1,822 

357 

2,849 

100 



1 

1 


38 

370 

3,714 

30,084 
8,650 
3,680 

5,618 

3 

38,688 

390 

9,370 

69,142 
9,040 
7,699 


50 

53 




56 

57 

4,019 
20,443 

113 




13 

'120 

1,989 

2,002 

4 

20,563 


4 

4 

4 


182 

3,541 

85 

1,856 

3,738 

782 

18,685 
41,319 

1,049 

24,082 
49,351 


403 

4 ,294 
22,081 

462 

4,702 
16,974 

5; 567 
23,738 
223,893 


4,230 
12,738 
493 

2,534 

10,138 

76,369 
69,245 
8,843 
720 

108,588 
75,248 
18.549 
7,170 


5^086 
5,213 
600 

4 ,479 
447 

'917 

206'676 


4,493 

'921 

U861 

31 


3 

24 

5 ,900 

5 

4 



1 

2 

32 

3 

37 






4 

4 

4 

4 


138 

4,207 



614,246 

cl21 

468,042 

12 

14,384 

121 

472,249 

12 





20 

5 

180 

39 

9 

2 

209 

46 


36 

24 

62 

31 

11 

15 

109 

70 

Wolf. 

67 

281 

5 

40 

16 

86 

78 

407 


28 

175 

75 

397 

7 

42 

110 

614 



Total. 


54,095 


94,506 


769,024 


917,625 







a This table does not take into account the shipments of furs by mail nor of those carried out among 
the personal effects of passengers. 

b Of these 660 skins were from seized Japanese schooners and were sold by the United States marshal for 
$23,100. 

c These were also from the above seized Japanese schooners and were sold by the United States marshal. 


AQUATIC FURS. 

BEAVER. 

This is the most valuable fur-bearing aquatic animal found in the 
interior waters of Alaska, and has been hunted with such vigor that 
its ultimate extinction seems to be now but a question of a few years. 
The range of this animal covers all of the mainland of Alaska, except- 















































































FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


55 


ing only the belt of barren-coast country bordering the Arctic Ocean 
from Point Hope north and. east to the Canadian line. It is also 
found on a few of the islands in southeast Alaska, and generally 
in the lakes and streams of the interior, avoiding the large rivers, 
owing to the great change in level likely to occur at different sea¬ 
sons. During the last three years a considerable proportion of 
the supply has come from the Kuskokwim and Yukon Valleys. The 
natives catch beavers in steel traps set at a frequented spot or shoot 
them from a concealed place near the beaver house or dam. 

Castoreum, an oily odorous compound secreted by the preputial 
glands of the animal, also the dried preputial follicles and their con¬ 
tents, are sometimes prepared and find a sale in China, where they 
occupy a place in the pharmacopoeia. 

In 1905, 1,935 skins; in 1906, 1,536; 1907, 1,159; 1908, 1,280; 
1909, 2,323, and in 1910, 2,002 skins were secured. 

MUSKRAT. 

This animal is found on the mainland, except along the extreme 
northern coast line, wherever bogs and ponds or running water occur; 
it is also found upon Nunivak and St. Michaels Islands. The Kus¬ 
kokwim and Yukon Valleys, especially the former, furnish the vast 
majority of the output. The natives also use a large number each 
year for clothing and in barter with other native tribes. The value 
of muskrat has been steadily increasing during the last three years 
and as a result the animal has been hunted more vigorously each 
season. In 1905, 12,599 skins, valued at $1,192; in 1906, 3,611 skins, 
valued at $302; in 1907, 6,481 skins, valued at $498; in 1908, 31,712 
skins, valued at $6,257; in 1909, 121,568 skins, valued at $34,074, 
while in 1910, 223,893 skins, valued at $75,248, were secured and 
shipped from the district. This takes no account of the local trade 
in skins between the different tribes. 

LAND OTTER. 

This species is widely distributed in Alaska, being found on nearly 
every part of the mainland. It also occurs on many of the islands. 
A steel trap is generally used in capturing the animals. The supply 
of land otter skins is fairly constant from year to year. 

SEA OTTER. 

But two vessels, the schooner Everett Hays, owned by Mr. Samuel 
Applegate, of Unalaska, and the schooner Elvira (formerly the Japan¬ 
ese sealing schooner Kinsei Maru), owned by Mr. Fred Schroeder of 
Dutch Harbor, fitted out for sea-otter hunting in 1910. The hunting 
is generally carried on between Chirikof and Tugidak Islands (the 


56 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


latter one of the Trinity Islands) in central Alaska, and the season is 
from about May 15 to September 1, depending largely upon the state 
of the weather. This year the weather was very rough and as a 
result there were only about four days of actual hunting throughout 
the whole season. The Everett Hays secured 4 skins, while the 
Elvira took 12, a total of 16. 

A few natives living at Kayak this year hunted for sea otter off 
Cape St. Elias and on June 7 shot two and on June 15 one. These 
skins were sold at the near-by town of Katalla. 

Mr. Nils Christensen, of Cold Bay, on the Alaska Peninsula, hunts 
sea otters in winter along the reefs offshore, but secured no tiling last 
winter. The same was true of Mr. Charles Rosenberg, who patrols 
a stretch of some 30 miles of beach on the Bering Sea side of Uni¬ 
mak Island on the lookout for dead sea otter which may be washed 
ashore. 

This summer a native killed a sea otter near the Naknek River in 
Bristol Bay, where they are very rarely to be found. One was also 
killed in the neighborhood of Unga Island in central Alaska. 

The Canadian sealing fleet again- devoted a considerable part of 
its energies to the hunting of sea otter off Chirikof Island. The 
schooner Thos. F. Bayard secured two, while the Pescawlia secured 
seven. 

Several vessels from the Japanese sealing fleet also engaged in sea 
otter hunting, but with what success we are unable to state, owing 
to their secretiveness in such matters. 

FUR SEAL. 

The only place on the coast of Alaska which maintains a fur-seal 
fishery is Sitka. In April and May the herd passes Baranof Island, 
on which Sitka is located, on its way to the Pribilof Islands in Bering 
Sea, to breed. About the middle of April the native hunters, who 
are the only persons permitted to engage in the work, with their 
families, leave for the hunting grounds and establish their camps on 
Tava, Wrangell, and Biorka Islands, small islands a few miles from 
Sitka. 

This year 10 boat parties had their headquarters on Biorka Island, 
four on Wrangell Island, and 18 on Tava Island. Each boat party 
is composed of from 3 to 5 men, and these use sailboats costing 
about 8130 each. Repeating shotguns, costing from $25 to $35 each, 
are the only weapons used. The hunting is done in the open ocean, 
and the boats from the various camps cover an area of from 35 to 50 
miles directly out from shore and about the same distance up and 
down the coast. Good weather is essential, and in 1910 the natives 
were unfortunate, bad weather being frequent, with the result that 
the catch was very small. 




FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


57 


This year 135 skins were taken and sold at a price aggregating 
$4,117 (price paid the hunters and not the London price). In num¬ 
bers this is a big decrease from last year, when the natives secured 
396 skins. Prices received for the skins averaged much higher than 
in 1909, when $18.60 was received per skin, as compared with $30.50 
this year. 

The Biorka Island parties secured 50 skins, the Wrangell Island 
parties 13, and the Tava Island parties 72. The largest number 
secured by any one boat was 8. 

In outfitting these boats the hunter, who is head man, furnishes the 
boat and gun, while the rowers furnish the ammunition and food. 
The gross proceeds arising from the sale of the skins taken are divided 
equally among the crew, with the exception of the hunter, who gets 
$3 or $4 more than the others. 

The hunting parties return to Sitka the latter part of May. A 
committee of two is then appointed to supervise the sale of the skins, 
which usually takes place on a date between June 1 and 5, when the 
buyers from the States have reached Sitka. On sale day the skins 
are all brought to one house, where they are sorted into three sizes— 
“small,” “medium,” and “large”—care being taken to keep each 
boat’s catch separate from the others. The “small” skins are 
those of the pups born during the previous two years. The ‘ ‘medium” 
skins are said to have the best fur, but the buyers prefer the “large” 
ones on account of their size. The buyers are not allowed to pick 
out the choice skins and bid on these alone, but must take them as 
they run, the subdivision in the beginning being made merely in 
order that the buyers may see what they are bidding on. 

These skins are usually much sought after by the dealers, because, 
being taken by the natives, and a certificate from the collector of 
customs to this effect being attached to the catch, they can, under the 
law, be sent abroad to be cleaned and dyed and brought back to be 
sold in our markets. The possession of such a certificate is con¬ 
sidered to add about $10 to the value of the skin. 

The Japanese schooners were again troublesome. During bad 
weather, when the natives could not go out with their small boats, 
the schooners came in close, and then when the good weather came 
they would work out just ahead of the native boats and pick up most 
of the seals. 

The Japanese sealing schooner Raise Maru, which was seized on 
May 3, 1909, by the deputy marshal at Sitka, is still at that place. 
The crew were charged with killing seals within the 3-mile limit, and 
also landing on certain islands near by. They were tried at Juneau 
in September of the same year and acquitted, but the owners failed 
to resume possession of their vessel after their release. 


58 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


In 1909 revenue cutters seized the Japanese sealing schooners 
Saikai Maru and Kinsei Maru, and charged them with sealing within 
the 3-mile limit of the Pribilof Islands. The captured vessels were 
taken to Unalaska and later the officers and men were carried to 
Valdez, where all were tried and convicted at the November term of 
court. Condemnation proceedings against the vessels were insti¬ 
tuted, and on April 18 of this year the deputy marshal at Unalaska 
sold the vessels with their stores and equipment, the Kinsei Maru 
bringing $4,600 and the Saikai Maru $321.50. When seized the 
schooners had 660 seal skins, and these sold for $21,780. The vessels 
were purchased by Mr. Fred Sliroeder, of Dutch Harbor, who renamed 
the Kinsei Maru the Elvira, and outfitted and sent her out this year 
on a sea-otter cruise. The skins sold have been included in the 
statistical tables of this report. 

This year the Treasury Department adopted the policy of permit¬ 
ting sealing vessels to take on merely enough water to carry them to 
the nearest United States port, or if homeward bound, to take them 
home. Heretofore the vessels have taken aboard w r ater whenever 
and wherever they pleased, thus being enabled to extend their cruise 
indefinitely. Several sealing vessels which visited ports in southeast 
and central Alaska were affected by this rule. Under the law no 
resident of the United States is permitted to furnish supplies to a 
sealer at any time. 

The lease of the North American Commercial Co. of the Pribilof 
Islands expired this year, and the Government, through this Depart¬ 
ment, took possession of the islands. From St. Paul Island 10,754 
skins were shipped, while St. George shipped 2,834, a total of 13,586. 

MISCELLANEOUS AQUATIC MAMMALS. 

HAIR SEALS. 

These animals are to be found all along the coast of Alaska, occur¬ 
ring in places in almost countless numbers. While they form a very 
insig nifi cant part of the commerce in which the white traders par¬ 
ticipate, owing to the fact that their fur is worthless, they are of 
immense value to the natives, for from the flesh and oil is secured a 
considerable part of the winter food, while the skins are highly prized 
for covering the kayaks and umiaks, and for boot soles, trousers, 
mittens, clothing bags, and caps, and when cut into strips make a 
very strong and durable cord. The coast natives also barter the 
flesh, oil, and skins with the interior tribes for reindeer hides and furs, 
thus creating a very important branch of trade of which it is impos¬ 
sible to form an accurate idea, owing to the inaccessibility of most of 
the tribes and the secrecy they observe when discussing such matters 
with white men. 



FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


59 


WALRUSES. 

This animal, which is not found south of the Bering Sea shore of 
the Aleutian chain, was at one time very numerous north of there, 
and the hunting of it and the seal formed the principal occupation 
of the Eskimos during the summer. It goes north as the ice breaks 
up in the spring and returns again in the fall, stopping but a short 
time at any spot and keeping close to the ice pack all this time. 

While the hunting was carried on solely by the natives the herd 
suffered no appreciable diminution, but in 1868 the whalers began 
to turn their attention to walrus catching with serious results to the 
natives, as set forth in a former report.® 

To many of the Eskimos, especially on the Arctic shore, the walrus is almost a 
necessity of life, and the devastation wrought amongst the herds by the whalers has 
been, and is yet, the cause of fearful suffering and death to many of the natives. The 
flesh is food for man and dogs; the oil is used for food and for lighting and heating the 
houses; the skin, when tanned and oiled, makes a durable cover for the large skin 
boats; the intestines make waterproof clothing, window covers, and floats; the tusks 
are used for lance or spear points or are carved into a great variety of useful and orna¬ 
mental objects, and the bones are used to make heads for spears and for other purposes. 

During the first part of every season there is but little opportunity to capture whales, 
they being within the limits of the icy barrier. As a result much of the whalers’ time 
during July and August was devoted to capturing walruses. Men would be landed on 
the shore in June and left to watch for the animals to haul up on the beach at certain 
points. The walrus must either come ashore or get on the ice, and when a herd is 
well ashore one or two old bulls are generally left on watch. The best shot among the 
hunters now creeps up, and by a successful rifle shot or two kills the guard. Owing 
to their very defective hearing the noise made by the rifle does not awaken them. 
The gun is then put aside and each hunter, armed with a sharp ax, approaches the 
sleeping animals and cuts the spines of as many of them as possible before the others 
become alarmed and stampede for the water and escape. 

The natives hunt the walrus in kayaks, with ivory-pointed spears 
and sealskin line and floats. When the animal is exhausted by its 
efforts to escape, the hunters draw near and give the death stroke 
with a lance. 

In 1908 Congress passed an act for the protection of game in Alaska, 
and in this the killing of walrus north of latitude 62° was permitted 
only from August 1 to December 10, both inclusive, while no one per¬ 
son was permitted to kill more than one. 

This year new regulations were promulgated by the Department of 
Agriculture, and in these the open season for walruses in Bering Sea 
and Strait north of the Kuskokwim River is from May 1 to July 1, 
while all killing in Bristol Bay and Bering Sea south of the Kuskok¬ 
wim River is prohibited until 1912. 

As the natives are permitted to kill the walrus for food and cloth¬ 
ing at any time when in need of food, the object of the law, which is 

a The Commercial Fisheries of Alaska in 1905. By John N. Cobb, Bureau of Fisheries Document 603, 
p. 35,1906. 



60 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA I FT 1910. 


to prevent the indiscriminate killing by whites, is accomplished, and 
very few of the animals are now killed except by the few sportsmen 
who visit the Bering Sea district in summer. This year’s reports 
indicate that walruses are increasing. The inspector of fisheries for 
Alaska saw a large number on the ice in Bristol Bay in May, while 
the master of the trading schooner Helen Johnston claims to have 
encountered in Bering Strait, near the Diomede Islands, on July 5 a 
large herd of swimming walruses which covered several acres of water. 
Capt. S. F. Cottle, of the steam whaler Karluk, reports having seen 
large pods of walruses this year. 

LICENSE TAXES AND HATCHERY REBATES. 

Under the provisions of the act for the protection and regulation 
of the fisheries of Alaska (approved June 26, 1906) the packers in 
Alaska are compelled to pay license fees or taxes on their season’s 
output, as noted in the table following. The collection of these license 
fees or taxes is in the hands of the clerk of the court of the judicial 
district in which the packer is operating. The law literally requires 
the packer to pay the license fee in advance, but as the fee is based 
upon the pack he makes and it would be impossible in such an uncer¬ 
tain industry as fishing to estimate in advance exactly the quantity 
that will be packed, it is the custom to require the operator to apply 
for a license before beginning operations and then at the end of the 
season make return of the amount due the district. 

The following table shows the quantity of taxable fishery products 
prepared, the stated license tax on the product, and the total amount 
of tax due on each. The last item is approximate, being based upon 
returns on file at this Bureau, some of which are sworn to and some 
estimated, and therefore perhaps varying somewhat from those sent 
to the clerk of the court. It is not probable, however, that the amount 
given will vary much either way from the correct amount as shown 
by the returns of the clerks: 

License Taxes on Prepared Fishery Products. 


Items. 

Unit of 
quantity. 

Quantity 

prepared. 

License tax 
per unit of 
quantity. 

Estimated 
amount of 
tax due. 



2,413,052| 
14,405 
3,357 
77,478 
578 
1,308* 
435 

$0.04 
.10 
.40 
.05 
.10 
.20 
.20 

$100,522.08 
1,440.50 
1,342.80 
37.70 
57.80 
261.70 
87.00 


Barrels.... 
Tierces a.. 
100 pounds 
Barrels.... 


Dry-salted salmon in bulk. 








103,749.58 






o As the net weight of a tierce of fish is 800 pounds, this item is figured on a basis of 4 barrels to the tierce 
in working out the amount of tax. 


























FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


61 


The following table shows the name of the owner, location of each 
private salmon hatchery operated during the year ending June 30, 
1910, the number of salmon (red) liberated, and the amount of rebate 
certificates due each hatchery: 


Rebates Credited to Private Salmon Hatcheries in 1910.° 


Owners. 

Location. 

Red sal¬ 
mon fry 
liberated. 

Rebate 

due. 

Alaska Packers Association. 


40,725,000 

05,875,000 

9.850,000 

8,000,000 

5,300,000 

$16,290 
14,350 
3,940 
3,200 
2,120 


Karl ilk Stream.... 

North Pacific Trading & Packing Co. 





99,750,000 

39,900 




a Some of the hatcheries did not complete their distribution of fry before July 1; those remaining will 
be counted next year. 

COMPLAINTS AND PROSECUTIONS. 


On Sunday, May 22, in Taku Inlet, southeast Alaska, the assistant 
agent discovered Henry Hoeke, S. Nelson, John Hanula, Tom Carvo, 
Abraham Lahti, Oscar Lustig, Van Oleson, and Ole Oleson fishing 
during the weekly closed season. All were brought before the United 
States commissioner at Juneau for preliminary hearing and bound 
over to the next grand jury. On October 24 all were indicted by the 
grand jury held at Ketchikan, and on the 29th of the same month all 
but Van and Ole Oleson pleaded guilty. S. Nelson and Henry Hoeke 
were fined $50 each, while the others were fined $25 each. The Oleson 
brothers elected to be tried in Juneau, and on December 10 they 
appeared in court there and pleaded guilty; sentence was deferred 
for six months. 

In October a man named Mitchell was reported by other fishermen as 
violating the weekly closed season in the Taku River. He was 
indicted by the December grand jury, but was acquitted upon his trial 
the same month. 

A visit to Tamgas Stream, a tributary of Tamgas Harbor, on the 
south end of Annette Island, in southeast Alaska, on July 25, devel¬ 
oped the fact that a trap was being fished in the creek in violation of 
the law. Tamgas Stream is a short and narrow stream draining a 
lake, and a run of red and other salmon annually ascends the stream. 
About 300 yards from its mouth are a succession of cascades and 
falls. In the narrowest part of the cascades a rack had been con¬ 
structed of poles driven into the bottom and covered with wire 
netting in such way as almost wholly to prevent salmon from passing 
up, the portion uncovered being too steep for any but the strongest 
to surmount. Just below and running parallel to the rack, and at 
right angles to the shore, was constructed a flume, with a flaring 



















62 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


mouth at the outer end; at the shore end a sharp turn of the flume 
led into a square box with slat bottom and covered over with 
boughs. The fish in ascending the stream would be stopped by the 
rack and ir swimming around at the outer end many of them would 
be carried by the current into and down the flume, eventually landing 
in the receiving box at the end. 

Inquiry among the few Indians camped near the mouth of the 
stream developed the fact that a native named James, of Metlakahtla, 
who died last winter, had first constructed the trap several years ago. 
This spring his two sons, boys under 18 years of age, rebuilt the trap. 
They were ordered to remove it and did so at once. Owing to the 
youth of the offenders and other extenuating circumstances, the mat¬ 
ter was not presented to the United States attorney for action. 

On July 6 Mr. Nels Moen, of Wrangell, complained in regard to 
the location of the Alaska Packers Association trap in Humpback 
Bay, Bradfield Canal, and also said his partner in the operation of a 
rival trap in the same bay, Mr. Oscar Williamson, could prove that 
the association’s trap had been fishing on Sunday, July 3. As soon 
as possible thereafter a visit was made to Humpback Bay, where 
an inspection of the trap showed that it was constructed and placed 
in conformity with the law. As Mr. Williamson was confident of 
having evidence enough to justify his charge that the trap had been 
operated during the weekly closed season, the matter was brought 
before the United States commissioner at Wrangell, Mr. Williamson 
making the sworn complaint. Mr. H. A. Oleson, the trap foreman, 
was arrested and brought to Wrangell for preliminary hearing. The 
evidence, however, clearly showed no intent at violating the law and 
the defendant was discharged. 

On the occasion of a visit to Sarkar Stream, on the west coast of 
Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska, on August 26, Mr. Fred 
Brockman was discovered fishing a gill net which had been stretched 
from bank to bank. The net had 13 coho salmon in it at the time. 
Brockman was arraigned before the United States commissioner at 
Wrangell on September 3 and by him was bound over to the next 
grand jury, which began its sessions at Ketchikan on October 24 and 
indicted the defendant on the same date. On October 24 he appeared 
in court and pleaded guilty. Owing to the defendant’s physical 
condition the court imposed the small fine of 825, but gave an impres¬ 
sive warning that the next offender appearing in court charged with 
this serious offense would be severely dealt with. 

In the latter part of July several natives reported to the deputy 
marshal at Sitka that native fishermen were fishing within the pro¬ 
hibited area around the mouth of Necker Stream, which empties into 
Necker Bay, on the west coast of Baranof Island, in southeast Alaska. 
Twenty-five natives were brought in by the deputy marshal and 




FISHERIES OF ALASKA IK 1910. 63 

given a hearing before the United States commissioner at Sitka, who 
discharged all of the defendants, however, for lack of evidence. 

Several complaints were made in regard to alleged illegal fishing 
by gill netters operating in Karta Bay, Prince of Wales Island, south¬ 
east Alaska, but diligent search failed to substantiate any of these, 
and as the nets were soon withdrawn the complaints, which had come 
from purse seiners, ceased. 

On June 25 the deputy marshal and deputy collector of customs at 
Cordova visited Eyak River and found Peny and Causa Sabella, 
fishermen employed by the Northwestern Fisheries Co. at Orca, with 
a gill net stretched from shore to shore. The net held at the time 
of the visit some 40 or 50 fish. The men were brought before the 
United States commissioner at Cordova and fined SI and costs, 
amounting in all to S50 each. 

An evil which at present is slight, but will grow more and more 
serious as the district becomes more settled and the superabundant 
water power, which at present largely goes to waste, is harnessed and 
made to serve the purposes of the manufacturer, prospector, lumber¬ 
man, etc., is the building of dams in streams which the salmon fre¬ 
quent. By the terms of the law it is— 

unlawful to erect or maintain any dam, barricade, fence, trap, fish wheel, or other 
fixed or stationary obstruction, except for purposes of fish culture, in any of the waters 
of Alaska at any point where the distance from shore to shore is less than five hundred 
feet, * * * with the purpose or result of capturing salmon or preventing or 
impeding their ascent to their spawning grounds, and the Secretary of Commerce 
and Labor is hereby authorized and directed to have any and all such unlawful obstruc¬ 
tions removed or destroyed. 

In the past, builders of such obstructions have been very negli¬ 
gent in consulting the salmon agents in regard to the legality of their 
structures, and as a result considerable expense has been caused to 
them by their failure to observe the plain provisions of the law. 
Where some municipal or commercial benefit is to result the agents 
have been willing to meet the parties more than half way and to sup¬ 
ply all needful plans for the placing of fishways in such dams where 
feasible. 

PROPOSED LEGISLATION. 

At the hearings held between April 19 and May 25, before the Com¬ 
mittee on the Territories of the House of Representatives, on H. R. 
22579, Sixty-first Congress, second session, known as the Wickersham 
bill, in amendment of the Alaska fisheries law of June 26, 1906, repre¬ 
sentatives of the Bureau furnished statements and testimony bearing 
on the provisions of this bill in their relation to the fisheries. At the 
close of these hearings the following letter was transmitted by the 
Secretary of Commerce and Labor in response to a request for the 
opinion of the Department with respect to changes or additions 


64 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


desirable in the law. The proposals for legislation increase the taxes 
somewhat, and aim to extend and increase the power of the Depart¬ 
ment over all Alaskan fisheries save the fur seal. 

Department of Commerce and Labor, 

Office of the Secretary, 

Washington, May 25, 1910. 

Hon. E. L. Hamilton, 

Chairman Committee on the Territories, 

Home of Representatives, Washington, D. C. 

Sir: In reply to your letter of the 20th instant, in which you request the opinion 
of the Department with respect to changes advisable in the present Alaska fisheries 
law, after consideration of the act of June 26, 1906, section by section, the following 
recommendations are submitted: 

1. Sections 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 are satisfactory. 

2. Section 1 should be modified in accordance with the schedule already submitted 
at the hearing of May 3. This schedule is along the lines indicated by Judge Wicker- 
sham in H. R. 22579. 

3. Section 2 should remain until more adequate facilities are provided for fish- 
cultural work by the Federal Government. All fish-cultural work in Alaska should 
eventually be carried on by the Federal Government. This can be brought about 
by the abolition of the present exemption system, the taking over of such private 
hatcheries as the owners may desire to turn over to the Government, and the estab¬ 
lishment of additional Federal hatcheries. 

4. In section 3, line 2, strike out the words “for purposes of fish-culture” and insert 
in lieu thereof “by direction of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor”; and in lines 
4 and 5 strike out the words “where the same is less than five hundred feet in width.” 

5. In section 4, line 2, strike out the words “for purposes of fish culture” and insert 
in lieu thereof “by direction of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor.” 

6. In section 6, lines 6 and 7, strike out the words “five hundred yards of the mouth 
thereof” and insert in lieu thereof “such distance from the mouth thereof as in his 
judgment is necessary.” 

7. The matter covered by section 9 is now fully covered by the pure food and drugs 
act, food inspection decision No. 105, and this section may therefore be omitted. 

8. The following additional sections are now recommended: 

“Section —. That for the purposes of this act the Secretary of Commerce and Labor 
is authorized to determine and indicate by suitable markers the mouth of any creek, 
stream, or river in Alaska which salmon enter for spawning purposes. 

“Sec. —. That the Secretary of Commerce and Labor is authorized and directed to 
establish such regulations, not inconsistent with existing law, as may in his judgment 
be necessary for the proper protection and conservation of shellfish and other aquatic 
animals not otherwise mentioned in this act. 

“Sec. —. That it shall be unlawful to erect, maintain, or operate in Alaska any new 
establishment for canning or otherwise preserving for commercial use any salmon or 
other fish or fishery product, or to increase the capacity of any such existing establish¬ 
ment, or to reopen and operate any such establishment which has remained closed for 
the period of three years immediately preceding the passage of this act, without first 
obtaining the approval in writing of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor. 

“ Provided, however, That in the case of salmon-packing establishments approval shall 
be withheld only when in his judgment the fishing operations and investigations in the 
region adjacent to the proposed location indicate that the number of salmon taken is 
larger than the reproductive increase of salmon from adjacent spawning grounds: And 
providedfurther, That in case approval is withheld the applicant interested shall upon 
demand be given a hearing, of which he shall be notified at least thirty days previously. 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


65 


“Sec. —. That it shall be unlawful, after January first, nineteen hundred and eleven, 
to utilize any part of any food fish save the offal and refuse thereof in the manufacture 
of fertilizer or fish oil. 

“Sec. —. That the provisions of sections thirteen and sixteen of chapter four hundred 
and twenty-five of an act entitled ‘An act making appropriations for the construction 
repair, and preservation of certain public works on rivers and harbors, and for othe r 
purposes, ’ approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-nine, shall be applied 
to the protection of the fisheries of Alaska, and the Secretary of Commerce and Labor 
and his agents for the protection of the salmon fisheries of Alaska, and any officer or 
employee of the Department of Commerce and Labor designated by him, shall be 
charged with the enforcement of said section thirteen and shall have the same power 
and authority in all respects to swear out process and arrest as the several officials 
named in section seventeen of chapter four hundred and twenty-five of the above act.” 

Respectfully, 


Charles Nagel, Secretary. 


There is pending before Congress a measure for reorganization and 
expansion of the Alaska work of the Bureau of Fisheries, under the 
one head of Alaska Fisheries Service. This division will include, if 
the law is enacted, the salmon-inspection service and the fur-seal serv¬ 
ice, together with supervision of all other fisheries and fur resources 
of Alaska. 


RECOMMENDATIONS. 


1. That vessels be provided for the inspection service as recom¬ 
mended in the report for 1909, and that immediate provision be made 
for the two smaller launches requested, as the most urgent needs of 
the service, for use during the 1911 season. 

2. That in addition to the recommendations contained in depart¬ 
mental letter of May 25, 1910, printed on page 64 of this report, 
for the amendment of the present fisheries act of June 26, 1906, the 
weekly close season for salmon, as expressed in section 5 of the 
existing law, be extended over all Alaskan waters except Bering Sea 
and its arms; and that in sections 3 and 4 the word “salmon” be 
substituted for red salmon. 



APPENDIX-FISHERY 


LAWS AND REGULATIONS. 


The following laws relating to the fisheries and fur-bearing animals 
of Alaska, and the regulations established thereunder, which are now 
in force in the District, are published herewith for the guidance of 
those interested: 

AN ACT for the protection and regulation of the fisheries of Alaska. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That every person, company, or corporation carrying on the 
business of canning, curing, or preserving fish or manufacturing fish products within 
the territory known as Alaska, ceded to the United States by Russia by the treaty of 
March thirtieth, eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, or in any of the waters of Alaska 
over which the United States has jurisdiction, shall, in lieu of all other license fees 
and taxes therefor and thereon, pay license taxes on their said business and output 
as follows: Canned salmon, four cents per case; pickled salmon, ten cents per barrel; 
salt salmon in bulk, five cents per one hundred pounds; fish oil, ten cents per barrel; 
ertilizer, twenty cents per ton. The payment and collection of such license taxes 
shall be under and in accordance with the provisions of the Act of March third, eighteen 
hundred and ninety-nine, entitled “An Act to define and punish crimes in the district 
of Alaska, and to provide a code of criminal procedure for the district,” and amend¬ 
ments thereto. 

Sec. 2. That the catch and pack of salmon made in Alaska by the owners of private 
salmon hatcheries operated in Alaska shall be exempt from all license fees and taxa¬ 
tion of every nature at the rate of ten cases of canned salmon to every one thousand 
red or king salmon fry liberated, upon the following conditions: 

That the Secretary of Commerce and Labor may from time to time, and on the 
application of the hatchery owner shall, within a reasonable time thereafter, cause 
such private hatcheries to be inspected for the purpose of determining the character 
of their operations, efficiency, and productiveness, and if he approve the same shall 
cause notice of such approval to be filed in the office of the clerk or deputy clerk of 
the United States district court of the division of the district of Alaska wherein any 
such hatchery is located, and shall also notify the owners of such hatchery of the action 
taken by him. The owner, agent, officer, or superintendent of any hatchery the 
effectiveness and productiveness of which has been approved as above provided 
shall, between the thirtieth day of June and the thirty-first day of December of each 
year, make proof of the number of salmon fry liberated during the twelve months 
immediately preceding the thirtieth day of June, by a written statement under oath. 
Such proof shall be filed in the office of the clerk or deputy clerk of the United States 
district court of the division of the district of Alaska wherein such hatchery is located, 
and when so filed shall entitle the respective hatchery owners to the exemption as 
herein provided; and a false oath as to the number of salmon fry liberated shall be 
deemed perjury and subject the offender to all the pains and penalties thereof. Dupli¬ 
cates of such statements shall also be filed with the Secretary of Commerce and Labor. 
It shall be the duty of such clerk or deputy clerk in whose office the approval and 

67 



68 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


proof heretofore provided for are filed to forthwith issue to the hatchery owner, causing 
such proofs to be filed, certificates which shall not be transferable and of such denomi¬ 
nations as said owner may request (no certificate to cover fewer than one thousand 
fry), covering in the aggregate the number of fry so proved to have been liberated; 
and such certificates may be used at any time by the person, company, corporation, 
or association to whom issued for the payment pro tanto of any license fees or taxes 
upon or against or on account of any catch or pack of salmon made by them in Alaska; 
and it shall be the duty of all public officials charged with the duty of collecting or 
receiving such license fees or taxes to accept such certificates in lieu of money in pay¬ 
ment of all licensg fees or taxes upon or against the pack of canned salmon at the ratio 
of one thousand fry for each ten cases of salmon. No hatchery owner shall obtain the 
rebates from the output of any hatchery to which he might otherwise be entitled under 
this Act unless the efficiency of said hatchery has first been approved by the Secretary 
of Commerce and Labor in the manner herein provided for. 

Sec. 3. That it shall be unlawful to erect or maintain any dam, barricade, fence, 
trap, fish wheel, or other fixed or stationary obstruction, except for purposes of fish 
culture, in any of the waters of Alaska at any point where the distance from shore to 
shore is less than five hundred feet, or within five hundred yards of the mouth of any 
red-salmon stream where the same is less than five hundred feet in width, with the 
purpose or result of capturing salmon or preventing or impeding their ascent to their 
spawning grounds, and the Secretary of Commerce and Labor is hereby authorized 
and directed to have any and all such unlawful obstructions removed or destroyed. 

Sec. 4. That it shall be unlawful to lay or set any drift net, seine, set net, pound 
net, trap, or any other fishing appliance for any purpose except for purposes of fish 
culture, across or above the tide waters of any creek, stream, river, estuary, or lagoon, 
for a distance greater than one-third the width of such creek, stream, river, estuary, 
or lagoon, or within one hundred yards outside of the mouth of any red-salmon stream 
where the same is less than five hundred feet in width. It shall be unlawful to lay 
or set any seine or net of any kind within one hundred yards of any other seine, net, 
or other fishing appliance whicjh. is being or which has been laid or set in any of the 
waters of Alaska, or to drive or construct any trap or any other fixed fishing appliance 
within six hundred yards laterally or within one hundred yards endwise of any other 
trap or fixed fishing appliance. 

Sec. 5. That it shall be unlawful to fish for, take, or kill any salmon of any species 
in any manner or by any means except by rod, spear, or gaff, in any of the waters of 
Alaska over which the United States has jurisdiction, except Cook Inlet, the Delta 
of Copper River, Bering Sea, and the waters tributary thereto, from six o’clock post¬ 
meridian of Saturday of each week until six o’clock antemeridian of the Monday 
following, or to fish for, or catch, or kill in any manner or by any appliances except 
by rod, spear, or gaff, any salmon in any stream of less than one hundred yards in 
width in Alaska between the hours of six o’clock in the evening and six o’clock in 
the morning of the following day of each and every day of the week. Throughout 
the weekly close season herein prescribed the gate, mouth, or tunnel of all stationary 
and floating traps shall be closed, and twenty-five feet of the webbing or net of the 
“heart” of such traps on each side next to the “pot” shall be lifted or lowered in such 
manner as to permit the free passage of salmon and other fishes. 

Sec. 6. That the Secretary of Commerce and Labor may, in his discretion, set aside 
any streams or lakes as preserves for spawning grounds, in which fishing may be 
limited or entirely prohibited; and when, in his judgment, the results of fishing 
operations in any stream, or off the mouth thereof, indicate that the number of salmon 
taken is larger than the natural production of salmon in such stream, he is authorized 
to establish close seasons or to limit or prohibit fishing entirely for one year or more 
within such stream or within five hundred yards of the mouth thereof, so as to permit 
salmon to increase: Provided, however , That such power shall be exercised only after 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


69 


all persons interested shall be given a hearing, of which due notice must be given by 
publication; and where the interested parties are known to the Department they 
shall be personally notified by a notice mailed not less than thirty days previous to 
such hearing. No order made under this section shall be effective before the next 
calendar year after same is made: And provided further, That such limitations and 
prohibitions shall not apply to those engaged in catching salmon who keep such 
streams fully stocked with salmon by artificial propagation. 

Sec. 7. That it shall be unlawful to can or salt for sale for food any salmon more than 
forty-eight hours after it has been killed. , 

Sec. 8. That it shall be unlawful for any person, company, or corporation wantonly 
to waste or destroy salmon or other food fishes taken or caught in any of the waters of 
Alaska. 

Sec. 9. That it shall be unlawful for any person, company, or corporation canning, 
salting, or curing fish of any species in Alaska to use any label, brand, or trade-mark 
which shall tend to misrepresent the contents of any package of fish offered for sale, 
Provided, That the use of the terms “red,” “medium red,” “pink,” “chum,” and so 
forth, as applied to the various species of Pacific salmon under present trade usages shall 
not be deemed in conflict w r ith the provisions of this Act when used to designate 
salmon of those known species. 

Sec. 10. That every person, company, and corporation engaged in catching, curing, 
or in any manner utilizing fishery products, or in operating fish hatcheries in Alaska, 
shall make detailed annual reports thereof to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, 
on blanks furnished by him, covering all such facts as may be required with respect 
thereto for the information of the Department. Such reports shall be sworn to by the 
superintendent, manager, or other person having knowledge of the facts, a separate 
blank form being used for each establishment in cases where more than one cannery, 
saltery, or other establishment is conducted by a person, company, or corporation, and 
the same shall be forwarded to the Department at the close of the fishing season and 
not later than December fifteenth of each year. 

Sec. 11. That the catching or killing, except with rod, spear, or gaff, of any fish of 
any kind or species whatsoever in any of the waters of Alaska over which the United 
States has jurisdiction, shall be subject to the provisions of this Act, and the Secretary 
of Commerce and Labor is hereby authorized to make and establish such rules and 
regulations not inconsistent with law as may be necessary to carry into effect the 
provisions of this Act. 

Sec. 12. That to enforce the provisions of this Act and such regulations as he may 
establish in pursuance thereof, the Secretary of Commerce and Labor is authorized 
and directed to depute, in addition to the agent and assistant agent of salmon fisheries 
now provided by law, from the officers and employees of the Department of Commerce 
and Labor, a force adequate to the performance of all work required for the proper 
investigation, inspection, and regulation of the Alaskan fisheries and hatcheries, and 
he shall annually submit to Congress estimates to cover the cost of the establishment 
and maintenance of fish hatcheries in Alaska, the salaries and actual traveling expenses 
of such officials, and for such other expenditures as may be necessary to carry out the 
provisions of this Act. 

Sec. 13. That any person, company, corporation, or association violating any pro¬ 
vision of this Act or any regulation established in pursuance thereof shall, upon con¬ 
viction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding one thousand dollars or imprison¬ 
ment at hard labor for a term of not more than ninety days, or by both such fine and 
imprisonment, at the discretion of the court; and in case of the violation of any of 
the provisions of section four of this Act and conviction thereof a further fine of not 
more than two hundred and fifty dollars per diem may, at the discretion of the court, 
be imposed for each day such obstruction is maintained. And every vessel or other 
apparatus or equipment used or employed in violation of any provision of this Act, or 


59395°—11-23 


70 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


of any regulation made thereunder, may be seized by order of the Secretary of Com¬ 
merce and Labor, and shall be held subject to the payment of such fine or fines as 
may be imposed. 

Sec. 14. That the violation of any provision of this Act may be prosecuted in any 
district court of Alaska or any district court of the United States in the States of Cali¬ 
fornia, Oregon, jt Washington. And it shall be the duty of the Secretary of Commerce 
and Labor to enforce the provisions of this Act and the rules and regulations made 
thereunder. And it shall be the duty of the district attorney to whom any violation 
is reported by any agent or>representative of the Department of Commerce and Labor 
to institute proceedings necessary to carry out the provisions of this Act. 

Sec. 15. That all Acts or parts of Acts inconsistent with the provisions of this Act 
are, so far as inconsistent, hereby repealed. 

Sec. 16. That this Act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage. 

Approved, June 26, 1906. 


AN ACT To prohibit aliens from fishing in the waters of Alaska. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That it shall be unlawful for any person not a citizen of the 
United States, or who has declared his intention to become a citizen of the United 
States, and is not a bona fide resident therein, or for any company, corporation, or asso¬ 
ciation not organized or authorized to transact business under the laws of the United 
States or under the laws of any State, Territory, or district thereof, or for any person 
not a native of Alaska, to catch or kill, or attempt to catch or kill, except with rod, 
spear, or gaff, any fish of any kind or species whatsoever in any of the waters of Alaska 
under the jurisdiction of the United States: Provided, however, That nothing contained 
in this Act shall prevent those lawfully taking fish in the said waters from selling the 
same, fresh or cured, in Alaska or in Alaskan waters, to any alien person, company, or 
vessel then being lawfully in said waters: And providedfurther, That nothing contained 
in this Act shall prevent any person, firm, corporation, or association lawfully entitled 
to fish in the waters of Alaska from employing as laborers any aliens who can now be 
lawfully employed under the existing laws of the United States, either at stated wages 
or by piecework, or both, in connection with Alaskan fisheries, cr with the canning, 
salting or otherwise preserving of fish. 

Sec. 2. That every person, company, corporation, or association found guilty of a 
violation of any provision of this Act or of any regulation made thereunder shall, for 
each offense, be fined not less than one hundred dollars nor more than five hundred 
dollars, which fine shall be a lien against any vessel or other property of the offending 
party or which was used in the commission of such unlawful act. Every vessel used 
or employed in violation of any provision of this Act or of any regulation made there¬ 
under shall be liable to a fine of not less than one hundred dollars nor more than five 
hundred dollars, and may be seized and proceeded against by way of libel in any court 
having jurisdiction of the offense. 

Sec. 3. That the violation of any provision of this Act or of any regulation made 
thereunder may be prosecuted in any United States district court of Alaska, Cali¬ 
fornia, Oregon, or Washington. 

Sec. 4. That the collector of customs of the district of Alaska is hereby authorized 
to search and seize every foreign vessel and arrest every person violating any provision 
of this Act or any regulation made thereunder, and the Secretary of Commerce and 
Labor shall have power to authorize officers of the Navy and of the Revenue-Cutter 
Service and agents of the Department of Commerce and Labor to likewise make such 
searches, seizures, and arrests. If any foreign vessel shall be found within the waters 
to which this Act applies, having on board fresh or cured fish and apparatus or imple- 



FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


71 


ments suitable for killing or taking fish, it shall be presumed that the vessel and 
apparatus were used in violation of this. Act until it is otherwise sufficiently proved. 
And every vessel, its tackle, apparatus, or implements so seized shall be given into the 
custody of the United States marshal of either of the districts mentioned in section 
three of this Act, and shall be held by him subject to the proceedings provided for in 
section two of this Act. The facts in connection with such seizure shall be at once 
reported to the United States district attorney for the district to which the vessel so 
seized shall be taken, whose duty it shall be to institute the proper proceedings. 

Sec. 5. That the Secretary of Commerce and Labor shall have power to make rules 
and regulations not inconsistent with law to carry into effect the provisions of this Act. 
And it shall be the duty of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor to enforce the pro¬ 
visions of this Act and the rules and regulations made thereunder, and for that purpose 
he may employ, through the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of the Navy, 
the vessels of the United States Revenue-Cutter Service and of the Navy: Provided , 
however , That nothing contained in this Act shall be construed as affecting any exist¬ 
ing treaty or convention between the United States and any foreign power. 

Approved, June 14, 1906. 


FISHERY REGULATIONS. 

1. During the inspection of the salmon fisheries by the agents and representatives 
of this Department, they shall have at all times free and unobstructed access to all 
canneries, salteries, and other fishing establishments, and to all hatcheries. 

2. All persons, companies, or corporations owning, operating, or using any trap-net, 
pound-net, or fish-wheel for taking salmon or other fishes shall cause to be placed in a 
conspicuous place on said trap-net, pound-net, or fish-wheel the name of the person, 
company, or corporation owning, operating, or using same, together with a distinctive 
number, letter, or name which shall identify each particular trap-net, pound-net, or 
fish-wheel, said lettering and numbering to consist of black figures and letters, not 
less than six inches in length, painted on white ground. 

3. All persons, companies, or corporations engaged in canning salmon shall forward 
to the Bureau of Fisheries, Department of Commerce and Labor, Washington, D. C., 
three copies of each and every different can label which it is designed to place upon the 
canned product. 

Charles Nagel, Secretary. 


REGULATIONS FOR THE PROTECTION OF FUR-BEARING ANIMALS IN ALASKA. 


[Alaska Fisheries Service—Circular No. l.o] 

March 8, 1911. 

To whom it may concern: 

Section 4 of “ An act to protect the seal fisheries of Alaska, and for other purposes, ” 
approved April 21, 1910, provides that— 


No person shall kill any otter, mink, marten, sable, or fur seal, or other fur-bearing 
animal, -within the limits of Alaska Territory or in the waters thereof; and every 
person guilty thereof shall, for each offense, be fined not less than two hundred nor 
more than one thousand dollars or imprisoned not more than six months, or both; 
and all vessels, their tackle, apparel, furniture, and cargo found engaged in violation 
of this section shall be forfeited; but the Secretary of Commerce and Labor shall 
have power to authorize the killing of any such mink, marten, sable, fur seal, or other 


“The sundry civil bill passed by Congress March 4, 1911, provided for a reorganization and expansion 
of the Alaska service of the Bureau of Fisheries, as referred to on page 65 of this report. This circular, 
while by its date not strictly within the scope of the report for 1910, is printed here for its usefulness in 
connection with the other laws now administered by the Alaska fisheries service. 







72 


FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


fur-bearing animal under such regulations as he may prescribe; and it shall be the 
duty of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor to prevent the killing of any fur seal 
except as authorized by law and to provide for the execution of the provisions of 
this section until it is otherwise provided by law. 

Fur-bearing animals enumerated below may, subject to the provisions of regulation 
No. 12, be hunted and killed in the Territory of Alaska, except during the seasons 
specified with respect to each of the several animals mentioned. 

1. Sea otter. —The hunting or killing of sea otter is prohibited until November 1, 
1920. 

2. Beaver. —The hunting or killing of beaver is prohibited prior to November 1, 1915. 

3. Land otter and mink. —The hunting or killing of land otter or mink is prohibited 
throughout the season from April 1 to November 15, both days inclusive, of each 
year. 

4. Marten, fisher, sable, ermine, and weasel. —The hunting or killing of marten, fisher, 
sable, ermine, or weasel is prohibited throughout the season from April 1 to Novem¬ 
ber 15, both days inclusive, of each year. 

5. Muskrat. —The hunting or killing of muskrat is prohibited throughout the 
season from May 16 to November 30, both days inclusive, of each year. 

6. Black bear. —The hunting or killing of black bear is prohibited throughout the 
season from June 1 to August 31, both days inclusive, of each year. 

7. Fox, lynx, and wildcat. —The hunting or killing of fox, lynx, or wildcat is pro¬ 
hibited throughout the season from March 1 to November 15, both days inclusive, 
of each year. 

8. Wolf, wolverine, spermophile, and rabbit or hare. —The killing of wolves, wolver¬ 
ines, spermophiles (ground squirrels), and rabbits or hares is not prohibited. 

9. The killing of any fur-bearing animal by means of strychnine or any other poison 
is prohibited at all times. 

10. Permits or licenses may be issued by the Secretary of Commerce and Labor for 
the taking of fur-bearing animals for scientific purposes, for shipment to zoological 
parks, or for breeding purposes. 

11. The penalties and forfeitures imposed by the act will be strictly enforced 
against all persons who take, capture, or kill, or attempt to take, capture, or kill, any 
fur-bearing animal in the Territory of Alaska during the prohibited seasons herein 
established, or who barter or have in their possession the skin or pelt of any fur-bearing 
animal taken in the close or prohibited season. 

12. Shipments of furs, which may be made at any time, will be reported to the 
Bureau of Fisheries, Department of Commerce and Labor, on appropriate blanks 
which will be supplied for that purpose. 

These regulations supersede all others previously in force. 

Approved: 

Charles Nagel, Secretary. 


SPECIAL INVESTIGATION OF THE ALASKA 
FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910 

By Harold Heath 

Professor of Invertebrate Zoology, Stanford University 


Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 748 





CONTENTS. 


Page. 

Brief sketch of natural history of the seal. 3 

The rookeries. 4 

Rookery development. 4 

Harem counts. 5 

Active bulls. 6 

Idle bulls... 

Young bulls. 7 

Counts of idle and young bulls. 8 

Breeding cows. 8 

Counts of pups. 9 

Estimates of cows and pups.... 10 

Yearlings and 2-year-olds. 11 

The reserve. 11 

Estimate of all classes .. 12 

The quota. 13 

Conservation and some involved problems. 13 

The question of an equilibrium of the herd. 15 

The patrol and pelagic sealing. 16 

The pelagic catch. 18 

Cows in drives. 19 

Causes of death. 19 

Ages of seals. 20 

Appendix—Extract from field notes. 21 

2 


























SPECIAL INVESTIGATION OF THE ALASKA FUR-SEAL 
ROOKERIES, 1910. 


By Harold Heath, 

Professor of Invertebrate Zoology, Stanford University. 


Under the act of Congress of April 21, 1910, involving various 
changes in the administration of the Pribilof Islands and the seal 
fisheries and providing for the appointment of additional officers 
and employees, it was decided that a naturalist should be designated 
to study and report upon the condition of the seal herd. Pending 
the selection of a permanent occupant of this position, to take effect 
July 1 under the law, the writer was sent to the islands as a special 
investigator to perform the naturalist’s duties for the season which 
was already beginning. Observations were made on St. Paul Island, 
beginning June 29, the date of arrival on the island, and continuing 
until July 15, then for a week on St. George Island, and again on St. 
Paul until August 29. A report of these observations is contained 
in the following pages. 

I am indebted to the Government agents on the islands and to the 
officers of the revenue fleet for valuable data and many courtesies 
in connection with my work. 

BRIEF SKETCH OF NATURAL HISTORY OF THE SEAL. 

As popularly applied the term “seal” includes a fairly large group 
of aquatic mammals, such as the sea lion and the fur and hair seals, 
all of which bear a superficial resemblance to each other. Strictly 
speaking, the last named are the only ones deserving of the name. 
Unlike the hair seal, the fur seal, or sea bear, is able to progress 
readily on land, is able to hold its head erect, and its fore limbs, finlike 
in form, are used in swimming. Concerning its life at sea, we know 
that the seals of the Pribilof Islands spend their winter months along 
the western coast of North America, the adult females extending their 
migrations as far as southern California. Early in May the adult 
males or bulls begin to appear on the rookeries, where each is sub¬ 
sequently joined by 30 females on the average, the height of the 




4 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES;, 1910. 


breeding season occurring about the 15th of July. Shortly after her 
arrival each cow gives birth to a pup, and after a sojourn of perhaps 
two weeks, during which time she is served by the bull, she puts out 
to sea on the first of several journeys in search of food. 

During this time the young males or bachelors are arriving, and are 
usually found in groups on the outskirts of the rookeries. It is from 
these young males that the land catch of skins is made. 

Early in August disorganization of the harems commences. The 
greater number of cows have been served, the active bulls accord¬ 
ingly relax their vigilance, the idle bulls and those less mature wander 
about without serious molestation, the pups congregate at various 
points on shore or in the shallows, where they learn to swim, and as 
autumn advances the roving instinct becomes more and more appar¬ 
ent in all classes, finally leading to the abandonment of the shore early 
in November. 

THE ROOKERIES. 

In position and extent the rookeries have undergone but few changes 
since last year. The number of active bulls and the attendant harems 
have decreased slightly, but whether this indicates an actual decrease 
in the number of cows is doubtful, since the count of pups, as noted in 
a succeeding section, was made on one rookery only and the data 
derived therefrom are not perfectly trustworthy. The decline in the 
number of harems on St. Paul is most apparent on Gorbatch, the 
Zapadnis, and Tolstoi, where there are 55 less than in 1909. On 
the other hand, there are 47 more on the Reef, Kitovi, Polovina, 
and Vostochni. On St. George the very slight increase noted on 
Staraya Artel and Zapadni is almost exactly counterbalanced by a 
decline on North and East rookeries. 

This year the fleet operated chiefly about Northeast Point and to 
the south and east between St. Paul and St. George, but the results of 
their operations do not appear to be so distinctly reflected in a corre¬ 
sponding decline of adjacent rookeries as in 1909. Such a definite 
effect requires that the seals put out to sea along radii centering in 
either one of the islands, but on numerous occasions I have watched 
cows, and especially bachelors, leaving the rookeries, and their course 
is far from being either direct or uniform. The problem, however, is 
of interest chiefly to the naturalist as matters rest at present, and is 
without any very practical bearing on the conservation of the herd. 

ROOKERY DEVELOPMENT. 

At present there appear to be no very definite problems associated 
with the development of the rookery, but following the custom 
observed for several years past counts of harems and cows were made 
whenever and wherever it was possible. Kitovi especially received 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


5 


attention and as far as practicable was examined at intervals of about 
three days with the following results: 


Development op Kitovi Rookery, Season of 1910, as shown by Counts op 
Seals on Different Dates. 


Date. 

Harems. 

Cows. 

Reserve 

bulls. 

Half 

bulls. 


16 

27 

37 

6 


32 

107 

24 

14 


43 

326 

19 

7 


47 

500 

14 

10 


62 

929 

9 

10 



The past winter was unusually severe and long continued, delaying 
the breaking up of the drift ice, the melting of the snow, and the 
appearance of flowering plants for upward of three weeks. It is 
interesting to note, however, that this delay did not affect the sum¬ 
mer resident birds, which put in an appearance at the customary 
time, though compelled in numerous instances to deposit their eggs 
on the snow. Nor did it hinder the migration of the seals, though 
several cows likewise took up positions on snow drifts, wdiere they 
and the pups appeared to be unmindful of their unusual habitat. 

HAREM COUNTS. 

In accordance with the custom pursued in past years, the counts of 
harems were made as nearly as possible at the “ height of the season,” 
occurring July 12-16. Owing to stress of weather Sivutch, or Sea 
Lion Rock, rookery was not counted, but was estimated as containing 
61 harems, the number found last season. 

Summary of Harem Counts, 1910, and Comparison with 1897 and 1P09.« 


Rookery. 

1897 

1909 a 

1910 

Paul Island: 

G or batch. 

308 

120 

112 

Ardiguen. 

33 

11 

11 

Reef. 

454 

184 

206 

Sea Lion Rock. 

102 

61 

6R 

Kitovi. 

179 

55 

62 

Lukanin. 

139 

39 

41 

Polovina. 

143 

42 

50 

Polovina Cliffs. 

61 

23 

20 

Little Polovina. 

40 

19 

12 

Morjovi. 

233 

45 

47 

Vost.ochni. 

910 

184 

204 

Zapadni. 

458 

147 

118 

Little Zapadni. 

176 

62 

54 

Zapadni Reef. 

114 

11 

7 

Tolstoi. 

295 

87 

77 

Tolstoi Cliffs. 

98 

25 

29 

Lagoon. 

115 

12 

9 

Total. 

3,858 

1,127 

1,120 


Rookery. 

1897 

1909 

1910 

St. George Island: 

Little East. 

46 

4 

4 

East. 

128 

65 

59 

Zapadni. 

133 

43 

47 

Staraya Artel. 

57 

42 

48 

North. 

196 

106 

103 

Total. 

560 

260 

261 

Grand total. 

4,418 

1,387 

1,381 


a Figures for 1909 are those of Mr. George A. Clark. 


b Estimated. 





























































6 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


Assuming that Sea Lion Rock is occupied by the same number of 
harems as in 1909 or neglecting it for both seasons, there are 7 fewer 
harems on St. Paul this year- than last. 

Comparing the number of harems on St. George during the years 
1909 and 1910 there is 1 more, and when both islands are consid¬ 
ered 6 fewer. As there is one bull to a harem, this is another way only 
of stating that there are 6 fewer bulls this year than last; and obvi¬ 
ously such an estimate affords no indication whatever of the actual 
number of breeding cows. 

ACTIVE BULLS. . 

The number of active bulls, each in control of a harem, is as just 
noted, somewhat smaller this year than last (as 1,387 to 1,381); but 
it is the universal verdict that as a class they have lost none of those 
characteristics that make them successful masters. As usual there 
was considerable skirmishing among them as the harems were form¬ 
ing, but the wounds inflicted were comparatively insignificant and 
no deaths were recorded. Early in the season one dead female was 
found on Gorbatch whose wounds may have been caused by a bull, 
and later six cows were seen on various rookeries that had been 
severely though not fatally slashed. 

In a few cases young bulls or “ quitters” were found with harems 
on various rookeries, but usually they held sway on the outskirts of 
the community and joined the females in the mad rush to the sea 
whenever they were approached. It was the rare exception that 
they held a position in the more crowded portions of the rookery, 
where they would be called upon to defend their cows against the 
attempted inroads on the part of more seasoned harem masters. 

By some authorities it has been urged that this infusion of young 
male life into the general herd is beneficial, but in all probability its 
value is overestimated. It is not disclaimed that some animals are 
born with more vigorous constitutions than others, and that in all 
probability their offspring will be more hardy in consequence. And 
furthermore, it is a truism that in the struggle for existence it is a 
gain that the feeble are weeded out; but this is an entirely different 
question from the one relating to the effects of age. In the case of 
the female a long existence may lessen the production of milk or alter 
its composition, and consequently inhibit the proper nourishment 
of the offspring, but with the male no such argument may be brought 
forward. In the case of the race horse, which has been studied as 
much as any other mammal, attempts have been made to show that 
it is desirable to breed young males, and again, with essentially the 
same data, such a position has been attacked. To-day we know far 
less about the seal, but it is a safe proposition to argue in favor of 
perpetuating, as far as possible, those fully developed males that are 
able to protect their harems. 




ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


7 


IDLE BULLS. 

These animals are victims of circumstances. Owing usually to 
an unfavorable location, they have failed to secure harems, though 
they are as physically able to control them as any of their class. 
Furthermore, the term “idle” is a misnomer, for no one who has 
watched them on the rookeries would ever accuse them of being 
sluggish. On the other hand, they are aggressive in the extreme, 
and especially during the height of the season engage in frequent 
quarrels with the harem masters, from whom they usually pilfer a 
small number of cows before the close of the season. 

It can not well be doubted that an excess of this class of animals 
is more or less of a menace to the normal, or at all events what appears 
to be the most successful, type of seal existence. Claims have been 
made to the effect that for untold ages the seal has fought the battle 
of life successfully and that in the present time the hand of man is 
not required to control his destinies. The first part of this statement 
is undeniably correct, but the last is open to criticism, for it assumes 
that the seal is to-day leading a normal existence. Unfortunately 
this is not true, for we know that the number of breeding cows is 
becoming alarmingly reduced. In the open Pacific the number of 
captured males and females may be approximately" equal, but the 
Bering Sea catch, as past records show, contains from 70 to 80 per 
cent of females. Since, on the average, there is 1 male to every 30 
cows in the harem, there must inevitably" result an excess of males, 
an unnatural state of affairs, and the belief that in cutting down this 
excess we are conferring a benefit appears to rest on a firm founda¬ 
tion. 

This season the number of idle bulls was 221, not so great a number 
but that they were kept at bay until the disintegration of the harems 
had commenced, when they usually became the possessors of a small 
number of cows. 

YOUNG BULLS. 

Young bulls, otherwise known on the islands as “quitters”, are 
usually 6 or 7 years old, and at the approach of man retire. They 
frequently haul out with the bachelors or form a shifting fringe about 
the group of breeding seals. In rare cases they controlled harems, 
usually on the margins of the rookeries, and in a few cases were seen 
in the act of copulation. 

An accurate count of these animals was not made, unfortunately, 
since a considerable number had hauled out with the bachelors and 
could not be numbered without interfering with subsequent drives. 
At the height of the season the number on the rookeries was 184, 
and at various times 386 in all were included in the drives. Some 
were doubtless driven more than once, but it seems certain that the 


8 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


actual number was at least 200, giving a total of 384. As the average 
life of the male is 13 years, of which 5 are spent as harem master, 
the decrease annually of the present active list is 276. It is appar¬ 
ent therefore that killing in the past has not been too close, and 
that there is a sufficient reserve at the present time. 

COUNTS OF IDLE AND YOUNG BULLS. 

The following count of idle and young bulls was made at the time 
the census of harems was taken. It was not possible without causing 
undue disturbance to enumerate members of the latter class that had 
hauled out with the bachelors on four important rookeries—Northeast 
Point, Gorbatch, the Reef, and Tolstoi. 

Counts of Idle and Young Bulls on St. Paul and St. George Islands, 1910. 


Rookery. 

Idle 

bulls. 

Young 

bulls. 

Paul Island: 

Gorbatch. 

12 

17 


1 



28 

17 

Kitovi. 

9 

9 

Lukanin. 

5 

11 

Polovina. 

5 

12 

Polovina Cliffs. 

5 

5 

Little Polovina. 

2 

7 

Morjovi. 

1 

1 

Vostochni. 

29 

26 

Zapadni. 

22 

13 

Little Zapadni. 

10 

8 



3 

Tolstoi. 

7 

6 


Rookery. 

Idle 

bulls. 

Young 

bulls. 

St. Paul Island — Continued. 



Tolstoi Cliffs. 

5 

1 


3 


Total. 

144 

136 

St. George Island: 




20 


Zapadni. 

19 

17 

Staraya Artel. 

17 

21 

North. 

21 

10 

Total. 

77 

48 

Grand total. 

221 

184 


BREEDING COWS. 

While there is a steady increase in the number of cows hauling out 
on any rookery for a month after the middle of June, a seagoing stream 
soon makes its appearance, consisting of cows en route to the feeding 
grounds after their pups are born. Hence at the “ height of the 
season,” about the middle of July, the number of cov/s on the beach 
is no true indication of the total number, nor does it always bear a 
constant ratio to the whole. Under certain circumstances, possibly 
due to climatic conditions, nearly the full complement may be present 
at the height of the season, and again in other years not over 30 per 
cent of the community may be on the rookery. It thus becomes 
apparent that such counts, of varying character from season to season, 
must be used with extreme caution, if at all, in estimating the entire 
number of females on any rookery or the annual decline or increase. 
As has been pointed out by others, v T e may arrive at an approximate 
estimate only by a count of the pups, and under that heading an 
attempt has been made to show that even here we must use the results 
with the greatest care in making a census of the herd. 















































ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 9 

During the height of the season counts were made on the following 
rookeries: 


Counts of Cows on some St. Paul Rookeries during Height of Season, 

1897, 1909, and 1910. 


Rookery. 

1897 

1909o 

1910 


1,319 

281 

229 


1,286 

1,049 

470 

698 

646 

78 


137 


207 

218 


2,436 

654 

892 

837 


127 

92 


820 




426 




421 





7,214 

2,342 

3,767 


a Counts of Mr. George A. Clark. 


COUNTS OF PUPS. 

Owing to the fact that all the cows are never present on the rook¬ 
eries at a given time, it is obvious that the only approach to an accu¬ 
rate census of the breeding females is to be made by counting all the 
pups on all the rookeries. Such a procedure is not only arduous but 
wasteful, since the cows in early August, when the counting is usually 
done, are readily driven into the sea and a portion must inevitably fall 
a prey to the pelagic sealer. Accordingly it was the custom, for 
several years prior to 1906, to count the pups on a number of rookeries, 
and with such data estimate the entire herd. In more recent times 
the number’of such pup counts has become gradually lessened until 
this year Kitovi was the only rooker}^ examined, with the following 
result: Total number of pups, 1,966; dead, 62. 

The implication that Kitovi is a typical average rookery must rest 
upon the assumption that it stands between those in which the decline 
is great and those in which it is at a minimum. As a matter of fact, an 
examination of the counts of Kitovi during the past four years shows 
that in reality it has been remarkably constant so far as the cows are 
concerned. Commencing with 1907 the number of pups each year is 
1,959, 1,960, 1,979, and this year there are 1,966. 

Last year there were 55 active bulls on Kitovi and 1,979 pups; this 
year there are 62 bulls and 1,966 pups. The average harem last year 
was 36; this year, 31.7; a difference due almost wholly to the increased 
number of active bulls. And, furthermore, this slight difference is of 
far-reaching importance when we come to consider the application of 
these data to the estimate of the entire herd. With 1,381 harems, 
each numbering 36 cows, the estimate would be 49,716; if each com¬ 
prised 31.7 cows there are then 43,777 in the breeding herd, a differ¬ 
ence of 5,939, or 11,878 when the pups are included in the count, due 
solely to the presence of 7 active, extra bulls. 






















10 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


Then, again, on the other rookeries an increase or decrease in the 
number of active males produces a corresponding rise or fall in the 
estimated number of cows. For example, on Vostochni there may 
be 6,500 cows and 200 active bulls. If 20 idle bulls, before the height 
of the season, secure 1 cow apiece, they enter the active list, and 
there are then 220 harems. As the average harem is 31.7, this 
increase affects the estimate to the extent of a gain of 634* cows, 
though in reality the number of cows has remained constant. At 
present this gain or loss in the active bull list outside of Kitovi is of 
relative unimportance, but it is conceivable that under certain cir¬ 
cumstances it may assume a more prominent role. 

I have in mind the fact that in treating this phase of the problem 
we are, after all, dealing in generalities, but the results may become 
so general that they have little actual value. In my opinion it is 
highly desirable that a pup count on all of the rookeries be made 
during August, or even early in September, in stress of weather, or 
possibly after the sealing fleet has left Bering Sea; and again a 
similar survey should be made five years later, when the typical 
rookery could be determined and questions relating to the increase 
or decrease of the herd be settled beyond a reasonable doubt. 

ESTIMATES OF COWS AND PUPS. 

Assuming that the average harem comprises 31.7 cows, the total 
number in the entire seal herd is computed in the following table: 

Computation op Cows and Pups on St. Paul and St. George Islands, 1897, 

1909, and 1910. 


Rookery. 


1897 


1909 a 


St. Paul Island: 

Gorbatch. 

Ardiguen. 

Reef. 

Sea Lion Rock. 

Kitovi. 

Lukanin. 

Polovina. 

Polovina Cliffs. 
Little Polovina. 

Morjovi. 

Zapadni. 

Vostochni. 

Little Zapadni. 
Zapadni Reef... 
Tolstoi. 


9,086 
736 
13,393 
3,009 
5,289 
4,100 
4,218 
2,200 
1,180 
6,873 
13,511 
26,845 
5,192 
3,041 
8,702 


4,320 
355 
6,624 
2,196 b 
1,979 
1,404 
1,512 
828 
684 
1,620 
5,292 
6,624 
2,232 
319 
3,132 


1910 

Rookery. 

1897 

1909 a 

1910 

3,551 

St. Paul Island—Contd. 
Tolstoi Cliffs. 

2,891 

1,452 

888 

349 

Lagoon. 

2,598 

693 

285 

6,530 




1,934 

Total. 

112,023 

11.266 

35.502 

1,966 




1,299 

1,585 

St. George Island: 

Little East. 

1,190 

144 

127 

634 

East. 

3,776 

2,340 

1,870 

380 

Zapadni. 

3,923 

1,548 

1.490 

1,490 

Staraya Artel. 

1,681 

1,512 

1,522 

3,740 

North. 

5,782 

3,816 

3,266 

6,467 




1,711 

Total. 

16,342 

9,360 

8.275 

222 




2,471 

Grand total. 

128,365 

50,626 

43,777 


a Estimates of Mr. George A. Clark. 


b Estimated. 


In the above census it is to be remembered that the totals apply 
to cows and pups and that both together number 87,554 in 1910. 
















































ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


11 


YEARLINGS AND 2-YEAR-OLDS. 

Of the various computations necessary to arrive at an estimate of 
the entire seal herd those concerned with the 2-year-olds and year¬ 
lings are the least satisfactory. And yet by restricting the quota of 
skins taken to 3-year-olds we could in a relatively short period arrive 
at a fairly close approximation, and at the same time settle other 
vexed questions that are in need of solution. At the present time 
we are compelled to base our estimates largely on the quota and those 
males dismissed from the killing grounds. 

In the quota this year 10,210 skins weighed less than 7 pounds 
each, and 2,603 males were dismissed from the drives because they 
were undersized. Some of the latter were doubtless driven more than 
once, but even so it is probable that the number was not less than 
1,800. Besides these, 337 2-year-olds were branded early in the 
season. This accounts for 12,347. That there are yet others is evi¬ 
denced by the fact that fully 700 bachelors of killable size appeared 
on the hauling grounds of both islands in early August after the 
killing season, in addition to which there were probably other young 
animals in considerable numbers, though how many is uncertain. 
And it is probable, also, that some were at sea, but here again we have 
no exact information. A conservative estimate of 2-year-old males 
is therefore 13,000, which is also the number of virgin 2-year-old 
females that during the late summer arrived at the rookeries. 

It appears to be the general belief that in 1909 there‘were 12,000 
yearlings of each sex, and judging from estimates based on. pup 
counts and the quota, the herd appears to have been stationary for 
the past three or four years. Hence we might suppose that the num¬ 
ber of yearlings for this year is approximately the same as last. 
However, it is possible that the estimates based largely on Kitovi are 
misleading and that the quota was maintained by closer and closer 
killing. Future observations alone will settle this question. In 
order to be on the safe side we may assume that a shrinkage of 10 
per cent has taken place and that accordingly the number of year¬ 
lings of each sex for the year 1910 is 10,800. 

THE RESERVE. 

For six years prior to 1910 two thousand 2 and 3 year old males 
were reserved annually, but as the brand, made by clipping the hair 
on the head, was not permanent, we have no means of knowing how 
many of these were subsequently killed. If 1,000 were actually 
exempted each year and there is an annual mortality of 10 per cent 
there should be between 500 and 600 this year remaining of the 
reserve of 1905. And if the decline of the present number of active 
bulls is approximately 300 there should this year be an increase of 


12 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


over 200. As a matter of fact there is a slight decline, so that it 
appears that males exempted one year were killed the next. In 
reality, if we may judge from the records of past years, there is no 
necessity of reserving annually a number greater than one-half of the 
total number of active bulls, but these should be chosen from the class 
that will be wigged next year, or branded with a permanent mark. 

This year 1,271 males were set aside as a reserve. Very nearly 1,000 
4-year-olds and older were dismissed from the drives. Some of these 
were doubtless driven more than once, but it is assuredly safe to 
conclude that 600 were actually present. In addition there were 
others on the water front and in the water to the number of at least 
100, and finally there were 605 idle and half bulls. This gives a 
total of 2,576, a number considerably in excess of the requirements. 

ESTIMATE OF ALL CLASSES. 

The following is an itemized estimated census of the seals forming 
the herd hi 1910: 

Estimated Census of Seal Herd in 1910. 


Active bulls. 

Breeding cows... 

Pups. 

Idle bulls. 

Young bulls. 

Bachelor reserve. 

2-year males. 

2-year females... 
Yearling males.. 
Yearling females. 
Quota killed.... 

Total. 


Class. 


1910 


1,381 

43,777 

43,777 

221 

384 

1,971 

5,500 

13,000 

10,800 

10,800 

13,584 


145,195 


According to this estimate and Mr. Clark’s estimate of 158,488 
for 1909, the herd has diminished by 13,293 within the past year. 
Whether this is a just conclusion must be decided by computations 
to be made during the next few years. Accuracy is impossible so 
long as the present methods are employed. During late years it has 
been assumed that the error is not greater than 12 per cent, and this 
is probably a fair conclusion. Last year the herd numbered be¬ 
tween 150,000 and 160,000; this year it seems to fall between 140,000 
and 150,000. 



















ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


13 


THE QUOTA. 

In 1897 it was estimated that the ratio of bachelors to the entire 
herd was 1:20; this year it is approximately 1:10. The conditions 
that have brought about this change are matters largely of conjecture, 
for our knowledge of the seal is too imperfect to warrant a satisfac¬ 
tory explanation. It is reasonably certain that the mortality among 
pups is less than formerly and, as Mr. Lembkey states in his report 
of 1909, this would insure a proportionately larger return of yearlings, 
males and females, and subsequently of breeding cows, both of which 
are factors tending to the increase of bachelors. Then again the 
death rate of the young, estimated to be 50 per cent during the first 
year, may have been excessive and the proportion of bachelors to the 
the entire herd may have been greater than was estimated in 1897. 
But even if these problems were solved to our complete satisfaction 
they do not bear directly on the question of the conservation of the 
herd. As noted in another paragraph, the essential point to be set¬ 
tled is regarding the reserve. If it is sufficient to supply the requisite 
number of males, as the active ones disappear, then it appears to be 
the best policy to kill those remaining. The herd is declining or at 
best stationary. The pelagic sealer is hovering about the islands 
and close killing diminishes his catch. That the quota should con¬ 
sist of the skins of 3-year-olds is obviously the most economical plan, 
but from a purely zoological standpoint this is a matter of detail and 
relatively unimportant. 

This year 10,749 skins were taken on St. Paul and 2,834 on St. 
George, a total of 13,583, or 785 less than in 1909. The weights of 
these, together with data relating to the drives and numbers dis¬ 
missed, are given in the report of the agent in charge. 

CONSERVATION AND SOME INVOLVED PROBLEMS. 

It has been seen from the foregoing paragraphs that the number 
of males for breeding purposes is sufficient, and this has been so for 
many years. On the other hand the number of females has been 
decreasing steadily, and there is no question but that the pelagic 
sealer is, and has been, an important factor in producing this decline. 
Furthermore, another fact is evident, that with the conservation of 
the females on land and the setting aside annually of a sufficient 
male reserve no additional care will add one jot or tittle to the number 
of cows. It is perfectly true that the elements involved in the prob¬ 
lem of the male reserve are intricate and some are not clearly under¬ 
stood, but in the last analysis the important question to be answered 
is this: Is there a sufficient number of males to take the place of those 
active on the rookeries ? and every year the answer has been in the 
affirmative. On land, killing may be close, and skins below the 
59395°—11-24 


J4 ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES) 1910. 

maximum value may be taken, but if the females are protected and 
the male reserve be adequate other questions sink into a position of 
relative unimportance as the seal problem now presents itself. 

The foregoing paragraph is written from a purel} 7- biological stand¬ 
point, having in mind only the conservation of the herd, but there 
are other questions of a more practical bearing that should be settled 
before the sealing business can be conducted on the most economical 
basis. In the first place it is highly desirable that the number of 
pups born annually be more accurately determined, reducing the 
possible error below 10,000, where it stands at present. In 1896 the 
error was estimated to be about 6 per cent, but last year and this it 
is probably twice as great. With the herd approaching the vanishing 
point accuracy is more than ever a desideratum and should be had 
even at the cost of an unusual amount of labor. 

Again, we have no information, within narrow limits, of the number 
of males or females returning at the close of the first year, or if this 
be beyond computation, then of the number returning the second or 
even the third year. This, as the sexes are of approximately equal 
numbers, will give more nearly than any other practicable method 
the number of females taking their places on the rookeries. Beyond 
this time observations should be made to determine the number of 
reserved 3-year-olds that appear the next year, and finally the 
percentage that ultimately becomes active on the rookeries. From 
such observations the reserve of males may ultimately be made with 
an accurate knowledge of facts, and not with such hazy ideas as we 
have at present. 

It is highly desirable that the quota be taken from the males in 
prime condition, and I heartily agree with Mr. Lembkey and Mr. G. A. 
Clark, who argue in their reports of 1909 for the killing of 3-year-olds. 
I am by no means convinced that even by the branding of every 
pup, and so destroying the fur to some extent, we can, by this means 
ajone, reduce the value of the skin to such a degree that the pelagic 
sealer will be forced out of business. It may indeed be a fact, but 
the brands made in the past were in some cases fatal and are sup¬ 
posedly about all that the young seal is able to survive, and yet not 
over one-tenth or at most one-eighth of the fur is destroyed. The 
resulting depreciation of value will probably not amount to more 
than $10, and two San Francisco furriers place it as low as $5. The 
price of skins is gradually advancing and on the other hand we do 
not know what returns will pay the schooner owners to keep a ship in 
the sea. The crew, averaging 35, receives $5 per man each month 
(Captain Quinan of the revenue cutter Tahoma says $2.50) and 12^ 
cents goes to each man for every skin taken by his particular row¬ 
boat. Let us suppose each schooner is out six months, and, judging 
from past records, 8,000 skins,will be taken this year, or 320 per 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


15 


schooner. If the price per skin were only .$15 ($30 was the price 
they received last year) $4,800 would certainly be a paying invest¬ 
ment. 

On the other hand there is another factor making toward the 
reduction of the sealing fleet which, together with the partial destruc¬ 
tion of the skins through branding, may possibly put the pelagic 
sealer out of business or, more probably, so limit the number of 
vessels that an equilibrium of the seal herd may become a fixed 
feature. This element is competition. With 25 schooners in the 
sea, rivalry must this year have been very keen, and with a diminish¬ 
ing herd some competitors must sooner or later leave the field. Any 
depreciation in the value of skins must hasten the desirable result, 
provided—and here an unknown factor enters—that the price of 
skins does not advance. But with the decline of the number of 
skins it is probable that prices will advance, and it appears very 
questionable whether branding and competition will drive away all 
of the pelagic fleet for many years to come. It may, however, make 
it possible for the herd to remain practically stationary until some 
form of treaty insures more perfect conservation. 

The branding process may be made to include the male pups, but 
as the pelagic sealer secures but few bachelors this would greatly 
destroy the value of the land catch without giving adequate returns. 
It is possible that the males dismissed from the drives might be 
penned up for a month or so, but unfortunately I can not speak with 
authority regarding this plan, that was once put into execution several 
years ago. Some advocates claim that it is entirely possible; that 
after a few days the captives show no signs of restlessness in their 
unnatural surroundings. Others are equally certain that the experi¬ 
ment was not a success, as several of the larger animals broke through 
the barriers and some less fortunate became restless in the extreme 
and finally died of exhaustion. Furthermore, it is reported the 
bachelors ordinarily put to sea from time to time in search of food, 
and it is difficult to. see how food would be forthcoming even if they 
desisted from their attempts to escape. The fact that placing animals 
in captivity would prevent redriving does not appear in itself to be 
sufficient reason for carrying out the plan. If by these schemes we 
hope to drive the pelagic sealer from his elected calling then it 
seems to me they will not succeed, but that they may increase the 
value of the land catch is possible. 

THE QUESTION OF AN EQUILIBRIUM OF THE HERD. 

The question of an equilibrium of the herd is one of very high im¬ 
portance. In 1897 the Fur Seal Commission agreed that such a 
state of affairs would ultimately occur, and in 1909 Mr. G. A. Clark 
argues in favor of the possibility that there is now an equilibrium. 


16 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


Unfortunately, in the present year a sufficiently large pup count was 
not made whereby to settle the question. The estimated decline may 
be approximately correct or it may be due to the methods of taking 
the census. If an equilibrium does exist it means that if the number 
of guards stationed on the islands is sufficient to prevent poaching 
the entire land catch may amount annually to something in the 
neighborhood of 10,000 skins and the herd would be in no danger of 
extinction. If instead of allowing matters to rest as they are the 
Government orders the branding of female pups, then some of the 
pelagic sealers may be compelled to abandon their calling, and the 
herd would probably increase, but there is nothing to prevent the 
return of the entire sealing fleet when the herd is larger and a profit¬ 
able catch may be made even though each skin is much reduced in 
value. 

As matters appear there is one way only whereby the pelagic 
sealer may be driven away entirely, and that is by the further reduc¬ 
tion of the seal herd. This is at best a cold-blooded proposition and 
wall probably not meet with general approval, but there seems to be 
no other way to destroy the activity of the fleet. 

The question now stands, Shall the pelagic sealer be driven from 
the sea and the financial gain from the then highly diminished herd 
be reduced to a minimum, or is it better policy to place the business 
more nearly on a paying basis though the pelagic sealer share in the 
returns ? Until pelagic sealing is discontinued by an agreement with 
the countries concerned the revenue fleet must be kept about the 
islands, under any circumstances the natives must be cared for, and 
in various ways a heavy financial outlay must be made annually. 
Personally I favor the latter plan, reaping as large a harvest as is 
compatible with the conservation of the herd and at the same time 
leaving as little as possible to those on the high seas. 

THE PATROL AND PELAGIC SEALING. 

The revenue fleet maintained throughout the season of 1910 
a most thoroughgoing and careful patrol about the islands, where 
reefs, and shifty currents, and impenetrable fogs are of the most 
treacherous character. Three cutters, the Tahoma, Capt. Quinan, 
commanding; the Manning, Capt. Cardin; and the Perry, Capt. 
Haake, constituted the fleet, with Capt. Foley at Unalaska in com¬ 
mand. Prior to July 26 each vessel remained 12 days in the vicinity 
of St. Paul, and after 5 days returned from coaling at Unalaska. On 
the date named the Perry, during a dense fog, went ashore at Rocky 
Point on St. Paul and was never floated. The duties of the remaining 
vessels became correspondingly increased, but so far as known no 
schooner pushed inside of the 3-mile zone after this accident, and 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


17 


generally speaking the infractions of the law throughout the season 
were of minor importance. 

Pelagic sealing, on the part of the Japanese, continued with 
unabated vigor. During this season 25 vessels were reported, 7 more 
than in 1909, and the reports in Capt. Foley’s office in Unalaska show 
that each schooner carried approximately 25 to 40 men and from 
5 to 10 boats. Furthermore, several of these ships cleared from 
Japan early in the year, and, arriving at various points from Cali¬ 
fornia to Sitka, followed the herd to the breeding grounds in Bering 
Sea. In the vicinity of St. Paul Island, none ventured, so far as 
known, within the 3-mile zone, but in one or two instances violations 
were reported by the natives on St. George, where the revenue-cutter 
patrol is far less vigilant. On June 28 the Tokai Maru was seized 
and fined for violation of the alien fishing law, and on July 25 the 
Toro Maru was seized and fined for violation of the custom laws 
(section 2773 of the Revised Statutes). On July 18 two row boats 
were sighted in the vicinity of Zapadni, on St. George, so close to 
shore that one was seen to contain at least one unskinned seal. 
And again during foggy weather on July 30 two boats’ crews from 
the schooner Hoko Maru landed at Northeast Point and Lukanin, 
respectively, and the next day 4 sailors from the Toro Maru were 
captured en route to Zapadni. Though pleading stress of weather, 
all were taken into custody and were subsequently tried in Unalaska. 

Generally speaking, the fleet operated to the east and north of St. 
Paul, presumably in the path of the seals leaving the Reef, Kitovi, 
Lukanin, the Polovinas, and Northeast Point. On July 10 the steamer 
Homer reported at least a dozen schooners with their attendant 
boats, which had formed a great circle between St. Paul and St. 
George and were slaughtering the seals compelled to cross the line 
of fire at two points. Although the nearest of these vessels was at 
least 8 miles from the shores of St. Paul, the reports of the shotguns 
could be heard distinctly on land, and a count I made on that day 
from 11.20 to 11.50 a. m. showed that 228 shots were fired, an average 
of 7.6 per minute. 

In this connection it may be mentioned that on certain days, 
owing to meteorological conditions, sounds travel amazing distances. 
According to Capt. Quinan, shots were heard one day in July seem¬ 
ingly well within the 3-mile zone, but with the lifting of the fog the 
nearest boat was fully 7 miles distant. Somewhat later in the month 
a fusilade was distinctly heard on St. Paul, but with the clearing 
away of the mists not a single boat could be detected even with 
powerful glasses used from the top of a 70-foot hill. It thus becomes 
apparent that alleged transgressions, based on this species of evi¬ 
dence alone, are far from being trustworthy. 


18 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


To an outsider the practice of having Japanese stewards aboard 
the cutters is not above criticism. They must inevitably come into 
possession of valuable information that may be of service to Japanese 
prisoners, for whom they act as interpreters, if I am informed cor¬ 
rectly. Furthermore, the Japanese detained for 10 days on St. Paul 
this year were in constant communication with the natives of the 
village, and it was no fault of theirs if they did not learn more of the 
island than is disclosed by the chart. One has a certain amount of 
sympathy for the pelagic sealer, who receives a mere pittance for his 
services and is the only sufferer when his boat is captured; but his 
imprisonment is not a serious hardship, especially if he be allowed 
to work on the coal pile at $2 per day and is ultimately sent back to 
Japan. 

These are, after all, matters of comparative unimportance. The 
arrest, and even the severe punishment, of such offenders do 
not seriously interfere with the activities of the schooners and their 
owners. Such devices as branding to partially destroy the value of 
the skins, and of penning up male seals released from the drives, are 
not complete preventives, so that until an agreement is consummated 
the international struggle between watcher and watched must forever 
go on with all of the attendant aggravating features. It is possible 
that the herd is not in a state of equilibrium, but is actually dimin¬ 
ishing. If this continue the hunter on the high seas must ultimately 
vanish from the scene of his pernicious activity; but is the Govern¬ 
ment of the United States compelled to place the seal herd on the 
altar of sacrifice in order to bring about this desired result ? 

If this, indeed, be true then we must decide, and that right early, 
whether this be a lesser evil than the other, hypothetical to a certain 
degree, of branding the females, which form the greater portion of 
the pelagic catch, and by the depreciation of their skins, making it 
necessary for a greater number than at present to be taken with 
profit by the pelagic sealer. At the same time this would render 
it possible for an increased number of cows to escape and breed on 
the rookeries, and so add materially to the bachelor herd and conse¬ 
quently to the land catch. 

THE PELAGIC CATCH. 

Regarding the pelagic catch of this year, our evidence must rest 
upon a very slender reed—the reports of the Japanese themselves. 
According to these, 4,213 skins were taken prior to August 15, of 
which 2,098 came from Bering Sea. Last year the reported Japanese 
catch up to August 15 was 4,954 skins. As a matter of fact, it was 
then probably twice as large, for the entire season’s catch, as reported 
from the London market, was 10,561 skins. This year it is safe to 
predict that there will be at least 8,000. 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


19 


COWS IN DRIVES. 

During the killing season proper, closing August 1, the discipline 
maintained by the active bulls on the rookeries was very strict, and 
accordingly a very insignificant number of cows made their way into 
the neighborhood of the bachelors and were driven to the sealing 
grounds. Such as did so, of course, were subsequently released. 
During a food drive on August 10, when the harems had commenced 
to disintegrate, several cows appeared in the drive, but I was unable 
to find a single one among the dead on the killing grounds. Doubt¬ 
less females may occasionally be clubbed accidentally, but this year 
I can testify that the greatest care was exercised, and I know of no 
occurrences of the kind. 


FEEDING OF PUPS. 

For various reasons, up to the time of my departure from the 
islands, no attempt was made to raise pups. The pair handled 
successfully by Boatswain Thurber had shed the first coat and were 
fully 3 months old; he was unsuccessful with the young, black 
pups. These last named may possibly be reared if food of the proper 
character be fed, but at the present time we are ignorant of the com¬ 
position of seal’s milk. In any event one must have not only a 
large store of patience but an abundance of tinie, and whatever 
may be said regarding the first requisite the latter is not forth¬ 
coming during the summer, when one is concerned with numerous 
other matters pertaining to the herd in general and must leave the 
islands in August. 

CAUSES OF DEATH. 

Under normal circumstances the life of the seal of either sex is 
probably from 12 to 13 years. Since the bulls are active for not 
more than five seasons, one-fifth of the active list dies each year, 
and as the cows are believed to breed during ten seasons one-tenth 
of their number disappears annually. 

Judging from the reports of former years the season of 1910 was 
one of comparative quiet. No fatalities due to fighting were noted 
among the bulls, and only one cow was discovered whose death may 
be attributed to rough handling on the part of a bull. 

On the killing grounds between 20 and 30 bachelors were found 
with from one to three buckshot imbedded in various parts of the 
body. Some of the resulting wounds were severe, but no deaths 
were directly traced to this cause. 

In earlier times the ravages of the parasitic worm, Uncinaria, were 
especially noticeable on the Tolstoi sand flat and portions of Zapadni, 
but in recent years, due to the shrinkage of the herd, these areas 
have been abandoned. Very few cases were noted by Dr. Chichester 


20 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


in 1909, and not one was detected this year. The dead pups dis¬ 
sected showed no lesions whatever, their emaciated appearance and 
fimpty alimentary canal indicating death from starvation. 

AGES OF SEALS. 

Last year 34 branded cows that had been marked as pups not 
later than 1902 were observed on the rookeries. This year 11 were 
seen prior to August 1, but during this time there is little opportunity 
to examine the cows critically, and later in the season such an exami¬ 
nation would produce an unwarrantable disturbance on the rookeries. 
However, the fact is established that there are branded cows in 
existence, and the time of their disappearance and their possible 
age may be decided at a later date. It is interesting to note that two 
cows on St. George bore the T brand of 1899. 

Practically every active bull on both islands was examined critically, 
but not a single brand was seen and none was reported by the gov¬ 
ernment agents or the natives. The branded bull on Kitovi, which 
last year completed his fifth season, has disappeared. Another 
bull, blind in one eye, occupied a site on Kitovi for the third season. 
In other years bulls with scars or other distinguishable marks have 
been seen at various stations, but these have rarely continued on the 
active list for more than three or four seasons. It is therefore an 
established fact that under ordinary circumstances the male becomes 
active at 8 years of age and lives three or. four years thereafter. 
The age of the female is not known with the same degree of certainty, 
but it is commonly believed that she lives to the same age. 


APPENDIX—EXTRACT FROM FIELD NOTES. 


Beginning early in August, the harems begin to show signs of 
disorganization; the majority of the cows have been served and are 
free to come or go without serious let or hindrance; the idle and half 
bulls roam about at will and the breeding season thus passes into its 
last stage. From this time on observations producing no unwonted 
disturbance are to be made only from some place of concealment, 
such as are supplied by the cliffs of Ardiguen or Lukanin. To these 
two spots I repaired practically every day in August, and for varying 
lengths of time watched the life of the seal herd. It is unnecessary to 
detail observations that have already been recorded by several stu¬ 
dents of the subject, but I may voice again the general verdict that 
such a show of mammalian life is to be met with nowhere else on the 
face of the earth, ‘and from several points of view it would indeed be 
a calamity if the seal meets the fate of the manatee, the sea otter, or 
the buffalo. 

Concerning other life on the islands, much has been said and much 
remains to be investigated. For many years the bird life has received 
the attention of the ornithologist and the more important phases of 
the problems involved have probably been settled; yet there are 
other matters of minor detail relating to stray migrants, nest mate¬ 
rials, and construction and feeding that well deserve attention. 

The insects of the islands are numerous and of all the animals or 
plants doubtless afford some of the most important and interesting 
problems, if not the very greatest, of purely scientific character re¬ 
maining to be solved. Owing to the brevity of the summer season, 
some of the stages in the life history are completed in a surprisingly 
short space of time, and a comparison of the life histories of related 
insects in adjoining regions would be interesting to say the least. 
Furthermore, the conditions under which they survive the winter 
will also be an interesting chapter in the life of the island organisms. 

The flowering plants have been the subject of much study, and it 
is doubtful if many novelties will be recorded in the future. To a less 
extent this is true of the lichens, but there are unquestionably small 
species that have escaped detection; and again there are modifica¬ 
tions due to habitat that make it altogether possible that superficially 
similar forms may in reality be distinct species. Among the fungi 
there are certainly new forms. On some of the upland slopes in the 
early season I have found species that do not correspond to any 
described in the reports of the region. 


21 


22 


ALASKA FUR-SEAL ROOKERIES, 1910. 


It is highly desirable that a museum be installed on the islands, 
containing, so far as is practicable, specimens of all the animals and 
plants. And equally desirable is a library, comprising all works that 
in any way are concerned with the biology of the country. 

Finally, one word relating to the natives. Considering their ante¬ 
cedents, and especially their former mode of life and lack of advan¬ 
tages, these people have made truly remarkable strides, and yet there 
is obviously room for improvement. By nature conservative, they 
are somewhat nonplastic, but at heart they are anxious to better their 
condition, and they do respond with comparative readiness to all 
uplifting influences. In matters relating to personal hygiene there is 
much to be desired, and, improved, their span of life will doubtless 
be lengthened to a very noticeable degree. And, again, it is highly 
desirable that during the long and confining winter both the men and 
women have something to occupy their time—something profitable 
and yet agreeable, and if possible with a resulting value in some 
larger community. It is difficult to decide what is best. Numerous 
plans have suggested themselves, but none of them are free from cer¬ 
tain inherent difficulties, and I earnestly hope that those more com¬ 
petent may give the subject their serious consideration, for certainly 
this species of missionary work carries a rich reward. 

In addition to the questions here outlined are others of deep import. 
Years ago Darwin called attention to the remarkable similarity of 
the animals on the Galapagos Islands to those on the western 
slope of South America, and on the basis of this likeness formulated 
his theory of evolution. Doubtless on the Pribilof Islands the same 
conditions exist when compared with others of the mainland. Exten¬ 
sive breeding experiments are being carried on in several sections of 
our country, but it is by no means certain that new species are cre¬ 
ated in the period measured by a man’s life or even in a hundred 
years. On the islands, however, in a normal habitat, evolutionary 
agencies have doubtless made their influence felt, even though the 
islands are geologically young. It seems therefore wise to make 
extensive collections of the island fauna and flora, to study these 
critically, and, finally, to compare them with related species on the 
mainland. These results might be very interesting when considered 
in connection with the newly formed island of Bogoslof. On this 
body of land, forced above the sea within the memory of man, we 
already find plants thriving, and there are doubtless animals on the 
land or along the shore. Even if there are no visible differences 
between organisms on this island and those of the Aleutian chain, 
we may gain some insight into the means whereby their transporta¬ 
tion has been accomplished, and if collections and careful notes 
are kept in the near future the evolutionary side of the subjects may 
be studied sometime in the years to come. 



THE FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910 


By Walter L Lembkey 

Agent in Charge 


Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 749 


1 



CONTENTS 


* Page. 

The new administration. 3 

Increased scope of agents’ duty. 3 

Hire of vessel and purchase and transportation of supplies. 4 

Employees. 5 

Transfer of lessee’s property. 6 

Natives’ affairs. 8 

Supply depot. 9 

Bank accounts. 10 

Resources of natives.. . 11 

Census of inhabitants. 12 

Management of seal herd. 12 

Marking of bachelors. 12 

Statistics of killing. 14 

Skins shipped. 14 

Record of drives. 15 

Weights of skins taken. 19 

Enumeration of breeding herd. 21 

Counts of harems. 21 

Counts of pups. 23 

Number of breeding dows. 23 

Census of entire seal herd. 24 

Estimate of half bulls. 24 

Estimate of 2-year-olds. 24 

Number of yearlings. 25 

Number of 3-year-olds. 25 

Summary of seal life in 1910. 25 

Pup-raising experiments. 26 

Pelagic sealing. 28 

Wreck of revenue-cutter Perry. 29 

Foxes. 29 

Conditions and trapping on St. George. 30 

Trapping on St. Paul. 31 

Recommendations. 31 

Killing of bachelor seals. 31 

Support of natives. 33 

Scheme of compensation of natives. 36 

Natives on the Aleutian Archipelago. 36 

Manual training for natives. 39 

Fire protection forPribilof Islands. 40 

O 











































THE FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910 


By Walter I. Lembkey, 
Agent in charge. 


THE NEW ADMINISTRATION. 

With the passage of the act of April 21, 1910, the leasing system, 
which since 1870 had required that the sealing right on the Pribilof 
Islands be let in 20-year periods to the highest bidder, was abrogated. 
This new law neither suspended the killing of seals on the islands 
nor required it to be curtailed, but provided that such killing should 
be done only by the authority of the Secretary of Commerce and 
Labor through officers, agents, or employees of that Department, 
the natives to be employed to perform the labor necessary to secure 
the sealskins and to receive fair compensation for their labor. So 
also the sealskins taken under the authority and by the persons 
already mentioned should be sold by the Secretary to the best advan¬ 
tage of the Government. 

By this act the Secretary of Commerce and Labor was given 
authority also to appoint such additional officers, agents, and em¬ 
ployees as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of the act; 
to purchase at a fair valuation the plant of the former lessee on the 
islands; to establish and maintain supply depots on the Pribilof 
Islands; to provide for the transportation of supplies by the charter 
of vessels; and, finally, to furnish food, fuel, clothing, and other 
necessaries of life to the natives of the Pribilof Islands, and to pro¬ 
vide for their comfort, maintenance, education, and protection. 

INCREASED SCOPE OF AGENTS’ DUTY. 

This act placed upon the Department heavy responsibilities which 
hitherto had been borne by the lessee. The business of killing seals 
and curing the skins, the mercantile business with a stock of approxi¬ 
mately $40,000 worth of goods, and, in short, all other practical 
affairs, were required to be actively managed by the Department 
agents, who previously had occupied the virtual status of inspectors 
of the lessee’s operations, in addition to the duty of examination of 
the seal herd and the administration of the natives’ affairs. 

The act mentioned had not been approved by the President before 
those charged with the management of the seal fisheries were giving 
their attention to the working out of the details under the new con- 


3 




4 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


ditions. On May 9 the annual instructions to the agent in charge 
were signed; shortly afterwards $2,000 in cash was advanced to the 
agent to pay for labor on the islands other than that of killing seals, 
bonds being given by himself and assistant agents to insure the 
proper handling of this fund and the faithful performance of duties 
in general. On May 17 the agent in charge left Washington to begin 
the preparations for carrying out the requirements of the act of April 
21, 1910. 

HIRE OF VESSEL AND PURCHASE AND TRANSPORTATION OF SUPPLIES. 

On May 21 the agent arrived in San Francisco and on the 26th a 
charter for the steamer Homer at $142.50 per diem was signed, sub¬ 
ject to the approval of the Department of Commerce and Labor. 
This vessel was delivered under the charter June 1, and was sent first 
to the coal bunkers to receive her fuel and cargo coal and thence to 
the covered dock of the Cosmos Line to receive freight. 

After the charter of the Homer was completed, the purchase of 
supplies for the natives and the islands in general was next to be 
taken up. ' It was found at once that the best prices on the goods 
required could not be obtained without inviting competitive bids; 
consequently, with the assistance of the North American Commercial 
Company, the retiring lessee, which placed its annual requisitions 
at the Department’s disposal, schedules of the principal classes of 
merchandise were prepared in triplicate and presented to three of 
the largest mercantile firms in the several lines of business, with the 
request that each submit a bid in writing. All merchandise, with 
the exception of small articles of miscellaneous classification, was 
thus purchased from the lowest bidder, after a careful inspection of 
the goods to determine whether the quality as well as the price was 
satisfactory. 

It was necessary to visit in person the place of business of each 
firm to solicit these bids; to go again to make purchases, and again 
to deliver the vouchers in payment of the articles purchased. With 
this and the attendant clerical work, it is considered that no time 
was wasted in the preparations incident to the sailing of the supply 
ship for the islands. 

During the period from June 1 to 10, the supplies were purchased 
and the vessel loaded. On June 11 the Homer sailed from San 
Francisco, arriving at Dutch Harbor June 24. Coaling there, she 
proceeded to the islands, arriving at St. George June 27 and St. 
Paul June 29. Having discharged all freight, she left on July 1 
for Dutch Harbor to load coal for the natives’ use. Delivering this 
coal on July 7-11, she returned to San Francisco July 23. 

Taking on another cargo of merchandise, together with coal enough 
for the round trip to the islands, the Homer again left San Francisco 



FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


5 


August 6, arriving at Dutch Harbor August 21, at St. George the 23d, 
and St. Paul the 24th. Having received the sealskins aboard, she 
left St. Paul August 28 and arrived back at San Francisco Septem¬ 
ber 12. 

The sealskins were taken at once to Oakland Long Wharf, where, 
carefully packed in casks and placed in ventilated freight cars, they 
left on the night of September 14 for New York and thence were 
shipped to London to be sold at public auction. 

EMPLOYEES. 

It has already been stated that during the continuance of the leases 
of the two companies the Government agents on the islands were 
not concerned with the active management of business, but acted with 
regard to it merely as inspectors. This does not refer to the supervision 
of the natives’ affairs, the management of which was never the subject 
of concern by any of the lessee’s employees. Under these circum¬ 
stances the services of the four agents were ample to oversee properly 
the operations of the lessee and to perform such duties as might be 
required of the Government’s representatives. With the taking over, 
however, of the business which heretofore formed the exclusive con¬ 
cern of the lessee, an increase in the number of the Government 
employees on the islands became necessary. 

Special biological study of the seal herd having been decided upon, 
a naturalist was appointed for this work, Dr. Harold Heath, of 
Stanford University, accepting the position until permanent arrange¬ 
ments could be made. The selection of the additional employees and 
the assignment of their duties were left to the agent. Of the force 
required, it was considered advisable to retain as many of the em¬ 
ployees of the late lessee as could be used, as these men were efficient, 
skilled in their duties, and required no instruction other than that 
necessary to acquaint them with new conditions. 

During the summer the force of employees on the islands, in 
addition to the agents and the naturalist, was as follows: 


Name. 

Position. 

Period. 

Annual 

salary. 

On St. Paul Island: 



•SI. soo 




1,200 

1.200 

720 

II. C. Mills. 









300 




240 

Do. 



180 

On St. George Island: 


Until fall. 

1,200 

1,200 

900 










720 




300 




240 

Do..'. 



180 






















































6 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IK 1910. 


Mr. Proctor assumed his duties with the idea of serving during 
the winter on St. Paul. Subsequently, by an order of Secretary 
Nagel, made during the Secretary’s visit to St. Paul, Mr. Proctor 
was transferred to St. George as acting assistant agent, in place of 
Assistant Agent Clark, who returned to the Department. Dr. Mills 
served only during the summer, returning to his home at his own 
request. The Chinese cooks on both islands were relieved at their 
own request by others brought up from San Francisco. Assistant 
Agents James Judge and E. W. Clark with Agent Lembkey returned 
to the Department on the Homer. 

Messrs. Murtha and Cunningham served only during the summer, 
as was contemplated when they were first appointed. Dr. Pedro de 
Figaniere was sent up by the Department to take the place of Dr. 
Cunningham. Mr. Campbell was appointed by the Department. 
All others were appointed provisionally from the force on the islands. 

During the ensuing winter the force of employees on the two 
islands will be as follows: 

St. Paul: H. D. Chichester, assistant agent in charge; Walter L. 
Hahn, naturalist; Norman P. Morgan, physician; S. Melovidof, 
, school-teacher; a Chinese cook; and N. Bogadanof, stockman. 

St. George: A. H. Proctor, acting assistant agent; P. de Figaniere, 
physician; Ned B. Campbell, school-teacher; a Chinese cook; and 
M. Lestenkof, stockman. 

The respective assistant agents are performing their usual duties in 
addition to those heretofore devolving upon the lessee’s agents. When 
it is considered also that the office force of the lessee in San Fran¬ 
cisco, with over $20,000 in salaries, has been eliminated, it will be 
seen that the island service, wdiile highly efficient, is conducted at a 
minimum of expenditure. No increase in administrative force has 
occurred. A bookkeeper, two physicians, and two school-teachers only 
have been added, in addition to cooks and miscellaneous native help. 

TRANSFER OF LESSEE’S PROPERTY. 

By a letter dated May 7, 1910, from the Commissioner of Fisheries, 
the agent was directed to confer with the North American Commercial 
Company and if possible to arrive at a fair and just valuation to be 
placed upon the property of that company on the Pribilof Islands, 
with a view to purchase by the Government. 

Two days after arrival at San Francisco a conference was had with 
the company, at which a statement of the presumed value to the 
Government of the company’s holdings on the islands was made. 
After consideration of the question the company several days later 
agreed to transfer the Pribilof Islands plant at the valuation proposed 
at the previous conference. 

Upon arrival at the islands an inventory as of June 30 was taken. 
Later, the transaction having received the approval of Secretary 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


7 


Nagel, who personally visitq^l the islands and inspected the plant, 
vouchers were drawn to cover the various amounts shown on the 
inventory according to the basis of settlement proposed and accepted, 
and were transmitted to the Department for settlement. 

A recapitulation of the inventories on the two islands, as taken on 
June 30, 1910, with a memorandum of the basis of settlement,follows: 

ST. PAUL ISLAND. 


Company’s inventory. 


Merchandise. $5,154.33 

Tools and implements. 3,522. 83 

Drugs and instruments. 816. 63 

Household furniture. 2,957.22 

Dispensary furniture. 159. 97 

Boats and bidarras. 3,835. 40 


Telephone line. 367. 79 

School supplies. 276. 29 

Company buildings. 25,683.45 

Native dwellings. 17,269.11 

Sea-lion skins. 138. 00 

Live stock. 967. 62 

Salt and twine. 1,260.02 

Fox skins (traps, etc). 61.88 

Library. 1,012.86 

Wharf ways and derrick. 804. 63 

Coal, 66 tons 1,339 pounds, at $20. 1,331. 97 


Settlement price. 


San Francisco invoice cost.$5,154.33 

50 per cent of inventory. 1,761.41 

Inventory cost. 816. 63 

25 per cent deducted from inventory. 2,217. 92 

Do. 119.98 

Launch.$2,000 

Boat. 400 

Do. 275 

3 bidarras, at $175 each.... 525 3,200.00 

Lump sum. 90.00 

Do.,. 257.00 

50 per cent of inventory. 12,841. 72 

Do. 8,634.55 

Inventory cost. 138. 00 

Do. 967.62 

Do. 1,260.02 

Do. 61.88 

Lump sum. 200. 00 

50 per cent of inventory. 402. 31 

Same, at $17. 1,132.17 


Total 


65,620. 00 


Total 


39,255.54 


ST. GEORGE ISLAND. 


Merchandise.$6,352.03 

Coal, 38 tons, at $20 . 760.00 

Dispensary. 718.97 

Live-stock account. 313.72 

Groceries, company house mess. 227.73 

Salt and seal twine. 198.10 

Old salt. 9S. 87 

Sea-lion skins. 85.71 

Boats and bidarras. 1,215.96 

Company buildings. 11,604.04 

Derrick and landing (including cars and 

track). 1,737.23 

House and office furniture. 2,043.63 

Library. 670.64 

Native dwellings. 6,646.96 

Telephone. 297.25 

Tools and implements. 1,164.47 


Total. 34,135.31 


San Francisco invoice cost.-.$6,352.00 

Same, at $17.,. 646.00 

50 per cent of inventory. 359.48 

Inventory cost. 313.72 

San Francisco invoice cost. 227.73 

San Francisco invoice cost after inspec¬ 
tion. 198.10 

Do. 98.87 

Inventory cost. 85.71 

Lump sum. 700.00 

50 per cent. 5,802.02 

Do. 868.61 

25 per cent deduction. 1,532.72 

Lump sum. 100.00 

50 per cent... 3,323.48 

Do. 148.62 

Do. 582.23 


Total. 21,339.32 


The foregoing lists represent a total valuation for both islands of 
$60,568.17. Subsequent deductions because of errors in addition, 
computation, etc., reduced this amount by $26.69. A final settle¬ 
ment was made by the Department for $60,541.48 and checks for 
that amount were transmitted to the company. 

With the exception of the buildings, practically everything on the 
inventory represents new stock, purchased by the company during 
its lease and not acquired from the former lessee. With regard to 
the buildings it may be said that, although erected by the former 
lessee, they have been kept from deterioration by constant repair 
and could not be replaced for anything approaching the price 
paid for them by the Government. On St. George the company’s 
59395°—11-25 

























































































8 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


dwelling house and warehouses were virtually rebuilt by the late lessee, 
when also several new native dwellings were added. On St. Paul con¬ 
stant repairs were made to all the buildings during the period of the 
lease, and the buildings not only are habitable but efficient. When 
it is considered furthermore that only 50 per cent of the inventory 
valuation was paid for these buildings, it may be seen that the price 
was not excessive. 

NATIVES’ AFFAIRS. 

Upon the agents’ arrival at the islands considerable anxiety was 
found to have existed in the minds of the natives and others as to 
the time of arrival of the supply ship and the arrangements which 
might be made for the conduct of affairs under the changed condi¬ 
tions. Through the revenue cutters which touched at the islands 
previous to the arrival of the Homer , information had been received 
of the assumption of active management by the Government, but no 
intimation as to what efforts were being put forth by the Department 
for taking charge of the practical affairs. This anxiety had been 
heightened by the fact that the supply of some articles of necessity, 
as food on St. Paul, had been almost consumed. In fact, to provide 
against an imminent shortage it had become necessary in the early 
part of June to obtain by the revenue cutter Manning a quantit}^ of 
flour, biscuits, salt beef, and canned vegetables from Dutch Harbor. 
In addition to this fear of impending famine, the natives had received 
the impression that they would be obliged to labor for the Govern¬ 
ment without any compensation other than clothing and food, as 
had been actually the case under the Russian regime. 

The agents’ first effort, therefore, was to allay these impressions 
and to establish relations of confidence with the natives, though, as a 
matter of fact, the arrival of a shipload of supplies and of a gunny 
sack containing about 150 pounds of coin had the effect automati¬ 
cally of removing the greater portion of this uncertainty. In addition, 
conferences were had with individual natives and with the assembled 
communities, in which the changes which had occurred during the 
past season were explained and assurance was given that the intention 
of the Government was to improve the present condition of the 
natives wherever possible rather than to make it less favorable than 
under the late lessee. 

It was necessary specifically to reassure them that cash payments 
for sundry labor would be continued under the new management. 
This has been the source of almost all the cash received by the 
natives, and the loss of it the occasion of their chief anxiety. The 
assurance of the continuation of these payments in cash, together 
with the increase in the rate of payment for taking sealskins, and the 
material reduction in the prices at which merchandise is to be sold 
to the natives out of the stores on the islands, all had the effect of 



FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


9 


restoring confidence and obtaining a renewal of the natives’ good 
will. 

Supply depot .—Immediately upon the arrival of the Homer all 
hands not entirely occupied with sealing began taking an inventory 
of merchandise and other property belonging to the company, with a 
view to its being taken over by the Government, in accordance with 
instructions contained in the letter to the agent in charge dated 
May 7, 1910. This inventory was prepared in time to be transmitted 
on the return of the Homer on her first trip. 

After completing the inventory the merchandise which arrived on 
the Homer was uncrated and checked with the invoices. The price 
was marked on the articles at the rate fixed in the instructions of 
the agent, namely, a flat rate of 33J per cent advance over San 
Francisco wholesale prices. The prices of those articles of mer¬ 
chandise also winch were taken over from the company were made 
to conform to the prices fixed for the new invoices of goods. 

The application of this flat rate of 33J per cent advance had the 
result of selling merchandise to the natives at lower prices than ever 
before in the history of the islands. Because of high market prices 
in San Francisco at the time the spring requisition was purchased 
the retail price of butter was increased from 35 cents to 42 cents; 
flour remained the same, at SI.75 a quarter barrel; lard was raised 
from 18 cents to 21 cents a pound; rubber boots, from S6 to S6.35 a 
pair; canned beef from 30 cents to 35 cents each. Some few other 
articles were sold at the same rate as formerly; all other prices were 
reduced. A statement of some of these reduced prices follows: 


Articles. 

Former 

price. 

Present 

price. 

Articles. 

Former 

price. 

Present 

price. 

Apples: 

Canned. 

Evaporated. 

$0.25 

2 for .30 

$0.20 

3 for . 25 

Needles. 

Oil: 

$0.05 

.40 

.35 

. 06* 

.25 

.25 

.20 

.03* 

.20 

.15 

.15 

3 for . 25 

2for$0.05 

.26 

.25 

.05 

.20 

.20 

.15 

.02* 

.15 

3 for . 25 

3 for . 25 

3 for . 20 

Apricots, canned. 

.25 

.20 


Arctics: 

Men’s. 

2.25 

1.90 

Onions. 

Women’s. 

1.50 

1.35 


Beans, canned. 

.20 

.15 


Bedspreads. 

2.25 

1.70 


Beef, salt. 

• 12J 
.25 

.09 


Blackberries, canned. 

.20 


Blankets. 

7.00 

5.50 


Calico. 

.10 

3 for . 25 


Candles. 

.02* 

.02 

Worcestershire sauce, Ameri- 

Candy, 2 pounds. 

.50 

.25 


.25 

.15 

Chimneys, lamp. 

.15 

2 for . 15 

Shoes: 

Coffee. 

.25 

.20 


.75 

1.25 

3.00 

2.50 

2.00 

4.00 

2.50 
3.00 

4.50 
.25 
.061 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.20 

5.00 

.55 

.90 

2.00 

1.75 

1.40 

3.15 

1.75 

2.35 
2.60 
.15 
.05 
.45 
.25 
.40 
.15 
4.00 

Collars, white. 

.25 

2 for . 25 

Do 

Corn, canned. 

.20 

.15 


Crackers: 

Soda. 

.10 

3 for . 25 

Children’s. 

Do 

Sweet. 

.20 

.15 


Cups and saucers.set.. 

.20 

.15 


Dress goods. 

.00 

.50 


Ewers and basins.set.. 

2.00 

1.25 

Do 

Gingham. 

.15 

2 for . 25 


Gloves, men’s, wool. 

.50 

.25 


Knives, pocket. 

.40 

.30 


Jams. 

.25 

.20 



.25 

.20 


Lining, cotton. 

.15 

•12* 

.20 


Milk, condensed. 

.25 













































































10 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IK 1910. 


On every weekly order issued a saving of from 75 cents to $1.50 
was made by reason of these reduced prices. In addition the price 
of coal was reduced from $20 a ton to $12.75 plus a small charge for 
stevedorage at either end. While no accurate computation has yet 
been made, it is believed that by reason of the reduced prices of com¬ 
modities sold the purchasing power of the natives will be increased by 
several thousands of dollars. 

Bank accounts .—When the Alaska Commercial Company in 1870 
began taking seals under its lease, in addition to providing comfortable 
dwellings for the native inhabitants, it also endeavored to encourage 
thrift among them by receiving deposits of money from such natives 
as desired to open savings accounts. On these accounts, which were 
subject to check at all times, the company paid interest at the rate of 
4 per cent on balances found on May 31 of each year. During the 
period of this company’s lease some natives had accumulated accounts 
of over $2,000 each. 

These accounts were taken over by the North American Commercial 
Company when it succeeded to the sealing privilege in 1890. While 
during the 20-year lease of the latter company these funds on deposit 
became smaller, due to the lessened amounts earned by the natives 
and to distribution to nonresident heirs upon death of the owner of 
the account, there still remained a few so-called bank accounts in the 
hands of the North American Commercial Company at the time of 
the expiration of its lease. 

Wlien the contract of the North American Commercial Company 
expired in 1910 these funds remained on deposit with it, and some 
action with reference thereto became necessary on the part of the 
Government, which then took over the active management of the 
business. 

In the instructions dated May 9, 1910, it was directed that if the 
balance on the bank account of any native was small it should be paid 
by the company directly to the native; if, however, the native desired, 
it should be held by the company and deposited in a safe financial 
institution in San Francisco by the agent in charge as attorney in 
fact for the benefit of the native owning the account, the interest to 
be collected annually and paid directly to the native. 

Upon arrival at the islands last spring the natives were informed 
of the situation and told that if they desired their money could be de¬ 
posited in a bank in San Francisco previously selected, which would 
pay interest at the rate of 3^ per cent per annum. They all assented 
to the redepositing of their funds in the manner stated. 

Such small accounts as did not exceed $25 were paid to the owner 
in cash by the company; the accounts of larger amount than that 
stated were closed by the company’s presenting the respective owners 
with drafts for the several amounts. 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. . 


11 


Each native who possessed one of these drafts delivered the same 
to W. I. Lembkey and upon blanks previously provided signed a 
power of attorney to him authorizing him to deposit the drafts with 
a bank in San Francisco, to collect the amount of any interest due 
thereon and to give receipts for the same. 

A list of the accounts and the persons to whom they belong follows: 


St. George Island: 

Fevronia Galanin. $40. 00 

Dimitri Lestenkof. 137.00 

Michael Lestenkof. 240. 00 

Peter Prokopiof. 83. 55 

Emanuel Zaharof. 33. 20 

Zoya Swetzof. 123. 00 

Mary Galanin. 245. 00 

Michael Shane. 63. 55 

Mary Philamonof. 90. 05 


Total. 1,055.35 


St. Paul Island: , 

Alexander Merculief. 170. 00 

Nekita Hopof. 50. 00 

Agrifina Bbgadanof. 161.10 

Marina Stepetin. 40.00 

Apollon Bourdukofsky. 203. 30 

Parascovia Kozlof. 150. 00 


St. Paul Island—Continued. 

Peter Bourdukofsky. $130. 00 

Elizabeth Rookavishnikof. 40. 00 

Agrifina Fratis. 71. 00 

Agrifina S. Pankof. 285. 00 

Peter Oustigof. 140. 00 

Alexander Melovidof. 235. 00 

Julia B. Krukof. 170. 00 

Simeon Fratis. 71. 00 

Akalina Fratis. 426.00 

Alexai Emanof. 230. 00 

Tekan Volkof. 966. 00 

Martha Fratis. 71. 00 

John Hansen. 370. 00 

Oulianna Fratis. 71. 00 


Total. 4,050.40 


Grand total. 5,105.75 


The St. Paul drafts were deposited to the credit of W. I. Lembkey, 
trustee for the various natives. Separate accounts were opened with 
each fund and pass books provided to be delivered to each native 
owning the account. In cases where the money was owned by a 
minor child, the account was opened in the name of its natural 
guardian—either one of its parents, or if an orphan, the person with 
whom it resides—with Agent Lembkey as trustee for the guardian. 

Upon taking the St. George drafts to the bank it was discovered that 
by an oversight they had not been indorsed by the persons in whose 
favor they were drawn. Unfortunately, therefore, they could not be 
deposited. An arrangement was made with the North American 
Commercial Company, however, whereby the amount of these St. 
George drafts, $1,055.35, was deposited by the company to protect the 
drafts which it will be necessary to take back to St. George Island for 
proper indorsement. After being so indorsed they will be paid by 
the bank and savings accounts opened with each of the persons 
named, in the same manner as the drafts from St. Paul. 

The interest on these accounts will be collected annually and paid 
to the proper persons. The receipts for money so paid will be sub¬ 
mitted with the annual report. 

Resources of natives . — -During the summer of 1910, from taking 
seals, and the previous winter from trappings foxes on St. George, 








































12 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


the natives of the islands earned the following amounts, to be applied 
to their support: 


St. George: 

203 blue foxes, at $5; 9 white, at $1. $1,024 

2,834 sealskins, at $1. 2,834 

St. Paul: 

664 sealskins, at 75 cents. 498 

10,088 sealskins, at $1.,. 10,088 


Total. ■ . .* . 14,444 


As the fox skins were delivered to the North American Commercial 
Company, that company paid directly to the agent on St. George for 
the natives the amount of $1,024, due the natives on that account. 
The company also paid in cash to the agent on St. Paul the $498 due 
the natives from the 664 sealskins which the Department authorized 
the company to take to complete its quota of 15,000 for 1909. The 
amounts of $10,088 earned by the St. Paul natives and $2,834 earned 
by the St. George natives for taking the sealskins shipped on Govern¬ 
ment account in 1910 were credited to the natives on the island 
books. Payments of cash therefrom were not made except of small 
sums in very rare instances. Each native sealer, however, was 
allowed to draw supplies against this fund at a fixed rate each week 
until the cost of such supplies equaled the amount of the native’s 
credit from earnings; after this, supplies to be issued to him directly 
from the stores in sufficient quantity to support himself and family. 

The various statements of the division of natives’ earnings are filed 
in the Bureau of Fisheries at Washington. 

Census of inhabitants .—On St. Paul, on June 30, 1910, there were 
198 resident natives, including 98 males and 100 females, a net 
increase of 5 over the previous census. During the year 13 births, 
1 arrival, and 9 deaths occurred. 

On St. George, at the same date in 1910, 91 natives were present, 
of which 45 were males and 46 females. Six births and 2 deaths 
occurred during the year, leaving a net increase of 4 in the population. 

Detailed censuses are filed in the Bureau of Fisheries at Washington. 

MANAGEMENT OF SEAL HERD. 

MARKING OF BACHELORS. 

The general instructions to the agent, dated May 9, 1910, required 
that not any 2-year-old bachelors but onh^ 500 3-year-old bachelors 
should be marked to form the breeding reserve. This was predicated 
upon the assumption that the 500 3-year-olds so reserved would be 
over 14 per cent of the whole number of such young males in the 
herd. Subsequently, by a telegram from the Secretary dated June 
6, which, not having been delivered, presumably through the fault 
of the telegraph company, was repeated June 10, the number of 










FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


13 


3-year-old males to be reserved by marking was increased from 500 
to 1,000. 

These were apportioned between the two islands, by assigning 800 
to St. Paul and 200 to St. George, for the reason that there are in 
round numbers four times as many breeding seals on St. Paul as on 
St. George. Upon arrival at St. George Island a copy of the annual 
instructions was given to Assistant Agent Clark, and he was also 
informed that the quota of bachelors to be reserved on St. George 
was 200 3-year-olds. As the vessel remained at St. George only a 
few hours, and as numerous other matters required consideration, it 
was not possible to put into writing the various explanations of the 
instructions. 

Upon my return to St. George Island two weeks later I was informed 
by Agent Clark that the cpiota of marked bachelors had been secured. 
No statement of the number so marked, however, was made, and at 
the close of the season among the data received detailing the season’s 
work on St. George no mention was made of the number of bachelors 
branded. Upon meeting Agent Clark on the Homer after he had left 
St. George for San Francisco, upon specific inquiry I ascertained for 
the first time that the instructions were misapprehended by him and 
that he had sought to brand on St. George only 100 3-year-olds, and 
did actually brand only 108 of that class of young males. He had 
not the memoranda showing the dates on which drives were made for 
this purpose and the number secured from each drive. As the season 
then had been closed for three weeks it was useless to cause the 
marking of an additional number to make up the deficiency in the 
breeding reserve for that island. 

On St. Paul, however, more young males were branded than the 
total number for both islands required by the instructions. Previous 
to my arrival on that island, on June 29, with the current instructions, 
Assistant Agent Judge, acting under the instructions for the previous 
year, had already marked 337 2-year olds in addition to 279 3-year- 
olds, 14 4-year-olds, and 5 5-year-olds. After my arrival additional 
3-year-olds only were marked to complete the number of that class 
required for St. Paul. A record of the bachelors marked on St. Paul, 
showing also dates and rookeries driven from, follows: 

Record of Bachelors Marked on St. Paul Island for Breeding Purposes, 

Season of 1910. 


Date. 


Rookery. 


Tyro 

years. 


Three 

years. 


Four 

years. 


Five 

years. 


June 17 

27 

28 

July 2 

4 

5 


Reef.. 

Zapadni. 

Reef and Gorbateh. 

Northeast Point_ 

Reef.. 

Zapadni. 


46 

82 

209 


Total. 


77 

56 

146 

246 

191 

91 


























14 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


The total number of bachelors marked on both islands, therefore, 
would be as follows: 2-year-olds, 337; 3-year-olds, 915; 4-year-olds, 
14; 5-year-olds, 5; total, 1,271. 

The report of London trade sales this year shows that 5,006 large 
pup and middling pup skins (which are accepted to be those of 3-year- 
old bachelors) appeared in the 1910 catch. Adding to these the 915 
reserved 3-year-olds would make a total of 5,921 of that class which 
we might claim were in the herd in 1910. Of this whole number, 
the number reserved (915) is over 15 per cent. 

Two-year-old males were not required by the current instructions 
to be reserved, for the reason that the number of 2-year-olds having 
skins of 5 pounds and under, together with those 2-vear-olds which 
would not appear in the drives at all, of which there are always some, 
it was believed would be sufficient to supply the necessary number 
of 3-year-olds in 1911. 

STATISTICS OF KILLING. 

St. Paul. —From August 9, 1909, to June 17, 1910, 6 drives of seals 
on St. Paul and 2 on Sea Lion Rock were made to furnish food to the 
inhabitants of St. Paul. From these, 1,573 skins were obtained, 
including 1 from a seal found dead at Rocky Point. From July 3 to 
31, 29 drives were made on St. Paul for skins, in which 8,683 skins 
were secured. On August 10, 1910, an additional drive was made 
to furnish food for the natives during the coming “stagey season,” 
from which 496 skins were secured. From the sources enumerated 
a total of 10,752 skins were obtained during the season ended August 
10, 1910. 

St. George. —On St. George during the so-called food-killing season, 
from August to November, 1909, 18 seals were killed at Various dates 
by the guard at Zapadni; 8 drives also were made, in which 482 seals 
were killed, filling the quota of 500 for food allowed for that island. 
During the season of killing for skins, 2,314 skins were secured in 10 
drives, 16 were obtained from the seals killed at various times by 
watchmen for food, and 4 were left in salt from the previous season, 
a total of 2,334, in addition to the 500 taken during the food-killing 
season. 

SKINS SHIPPED. 

St. Paul. —Of the skins taken on St. Paul, 664 were delivered to 
the North American Commercial Company, under authority of the 
department’s letter of January 5, 1910, to complete that company’s 
quota of 15,000 skins for 1909. The remainder, 10,088 skins, were 
available for shipment on Government account. While this number 



FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


15 


supposedly was shipped from St. Paul on the Homer, on August 28,. 
word was received in October last from Assistant Agent H. D. Chi¬ 
chester, in charge on St. Paul, that after the departure of the Homer 
with the skins on board a bundle containing 2 sealskins was found 
wedged under the floor of the skin lighter or bidarra, in which 
crevice it had become obscured during the shipment of the skins. 
These two were placed in the salt house to apply on the shipment 
of the following year. The total number of skins, therefore, shipped 
from St. Paul in 1910 for Government account was 10,086. 

St. George . — On August 23, 1910, the whole number of skins taken 
on St. George, from the sources enumerated (2,834), were placed 
on board the Homer to be shipped to San Francisco for Govern¬ 
ment account. 

The whole number of skins from both islands, recapitulated from 


the data already given, is as follows: 

From St. Paul: 

By North American Commercial Company. 664 

By Government. 10,086 

From St. George, by Government. 2,834 


Total. 13,584 


RECORD OF DRIVES. 

On St. Paul, during the season of 1910, no record was kept of 
the seals dismissed from the food drive made on June 6 on Sea Lion 
Rock, as the configuration of the ground there is such that the 
seals can not be herded, but escape in every direction upon the 
landing of the clubbers, who kill such as they can while the seals are 
running off. So also no record was kept in the drive for “branding” 
on June 17, from which at the same time 145 seals were killed. 
The record of dismissals, therefore, begins on July 3, when the 
drive was made at Northeast Point for “branding,” at which, at 
the same time, the 2-year-old bachelors in the drive, not being 
required to be marked, were killed. 

In the 32 drives made on St. Paul from July 3 to August 10, 
a total of 12,434 seals appeared, of which 9,179, or 73 per cent, 
were killed and 3,255 dismissed. Those dismissed consisted of 
1,581 small, 825 large, and 849 of those marked for the breeding 
reserve. This killing was 4 per cent closer than during the lessee’s 
killing season of 1909, when 69 per cent of all seals driven were 
killed. 







16 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


Seals Killed and Seals Dismissed from Drives on St. Paul Island, Season op 

1910 


Date. 

Rookery. 

Killed. 

Dismissed. 

Total 

driven. 

Per cent 
killed. 

Small. 

Large. 

Branded. 

July 3 

Northeast Point. 

437 

32 

67 


536 

81 

4 


331 

48 

31 


410 


5 

Zapadni. 

166 

48 

31 


245 


6 

Tolstoi and Lukanin. 

142 

6 

39 

28 

215 

66 

7 

Halfway Point. 

77 

2 

9 

3 

91 

84 

8 

Northeast Point. 

293 

37 

47 

85 

462 

63 

9 

Reef and Gorbatch. 

437 

21 

28 

116 

602 

72 

9 

Tolstoi and Lukanin. 

120 

2 

17 

5 

144 

83 

10 

Zapadni. 

198 

10 

18 

32 

258 

76 

14 

Northeast Point. 

407 

16 

35 

15 

473 

86 

14 


5 


10 


15 


15 

Reef and Gorbatch. 

429 

19 

9 

17 

474 

90 

15 

Tolstoi and Lukanin. 

131 

17 

8 

2 

158 

82 

16 

Zapadni.,. 

339 

77 

22 

24 

462 

73 

20 

Northeast Point. 

' 487 

132 

29 

26 

674 

72 

20 


5 



1 

6 

83 

21 

Reef and Gorbatch. 

548 

56 

33 

42 

679 

80 

21 

Tolstoi and Lukanin. 

449 

53 

23 

26 

551 

81 

22 

Zapadni. 

346 

51 

32 

32 

461 

75 

25 

Northeast Point. 

465 

48 

65 

38 

616 

75 

25 


18 


17 

3 

38 

47 

26 

Reef and Gorbatch. 

664 

139 

30 

78 

911 

72 

26 

Tolstoi and Lukanin. 

336 

32 

35 

37 

440 

76 

28 

Zapadni. 

318 

55 

14 

44 

431 

73 

28 

Halfway point. 

12 

i 

2 

1 

16 

75 

29 

Northeast Point. 

589 

64 

68 

23 

744 

79 

30 

Reef and Gorbatch. 

575 

86 

37 

55 

753 

76 

30 

Tolstoi and Lukanin. 

204 

29 

29 

21 

283 

72 

31 

Zapadni. 

155 

25 

16 

26 

222 

69 

Aug. 10 

Reef and Gorbatch. 

496 

475 

24 

69 

1,064 

46 


Total. 

9,179 

1,581 

825 

849 

12,434 

73 


Classification of Large Seals Dismissed from Drives on St. Paul Island, 

Season of 1910. 


Date. 


July 4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 
9 

10 

14 

14 

15 

15 

16 
20 
20 
21 
21 
22 

• 25 

25 

26 
26 
28 
28 

29 

30 

30 

31 

Aug. 10 


Rookery. 

Four 

years. 

Five 

years. 

Six 

years. 

Seven 

years. 

Adult. 

Reef. 

7 

9 

9 

6 



12 

6 

n 

2 


Tolstoi and Lukanin. 

11 

8 

n 

6 

3 

Halfway Point. 

1 

2 

6 




10 

9 

14 

14 



8 

9 

2 

9 



8 

2 


7 



8 

5 

3 

2 



12 

G 

10 

7 



2 

3 


5 



4 

2 

3 




4 

2 


2 


Zapadni. 

10 

4 

3 

3 

2 


19 

5 

4 

1 


Halfway Point. 







2 

9 

12 

10 



4 

9 

4 

6 



16 

10 

4 

2 



24 

21 

18 

2 


Halfway Point. 

3 

4 

4 

4 

2 


10 

5 

12 

3 



13 

16 

5 

i 



8 

2 


2 

2 



1 


i 


Northeast Point. 

17 

9 

3 

5 

4 

Reef and Gorbatch. 

14 

16 

4 

1 

2 


7 

16 

2 

4 



9 

4 

2 


1 

Reef and Gorbatch. 

12 

1 

2 

6 

3 

Total. 

255 

195 

148 

111 

19 



























































































































FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


17 


On St. George the record of seals driven and dismissed covers the 
period from June 13 to July 31. In this time 3,065 seals were driven 
and 2,295 killed, while 240 small, 343 large, and 187 marked seals 
were released. The number killed represents 74 per cent of the 
whole number driven, an increase of 11 per cent over the killings of 
1909, when 63 per cent of those driven were killed. 


Seals Killed and Seals Dismissed from Drives on St. George Island, Season 

of 1910. 


Date. 

Rookery. 

Killed. 

Dismissed. 

Tota 

driven. 

Per cent 
killed. 

Small. 

Large. 

Branded. 


East. 

31 

4 

38 


73 

42 

23 


138 

11 

93 


242 

57 

30 


162 

16 

79 


255 

63 

July 5 

East, North, and Staraya Artel. 

171 

55 

30 

58 

314 

54 

• 12 

.do. 

313 

26 

14 

21 

374 

83 

16 

North. 

258 

18 

5 

5 

286 

90 

21 

North and East. 

376 

48 

15 

27 

466 

80 

26 

East, North, and Staraya Artel. 

405 

42 

35 

37 

519 

77 

31 

.do. 

441 

20 

36 

39 

536 

82 


Total. 

2,295 

240 

343 

187 

3,065 

74 


Classification of Large Seals Dismissed from Drives on St. George Island, 

Season of 1910. 


Date. 

Rookery. 

Four 

years. 

Five 

years. 

Six 

years. 

Seven 

years. 



17 

9 

9 

3 

23 


25 

43 

18 

7 

30 


39 

7 

21 

10 

July 5 
12 


8 

13 

6 

3 


4 

4 

6 


16 


4 


1 


21 


8 

5 

2 

26 


13 

6 

11 

5 

31 


13 

11 

6 

6 





131 

98 

78 

36 




It will doubtless be remarked that the percentage of seals killed in 
1910 was greater than in the preceding year. The seals killed in 1910 
were, however, neither larger nor smaller than those taken in 1909, 
but conformed at least as closely to the prescribed ages and weights 
as they did in 1909, the last year of the leasing system. Indeed, 
when doubt arose, as often it does arise, whether a seal was of the 
3-year-old (or killable) age or whether it was of the 4-year-old (or 
prohibited) age, in 1910 the animal was allowed to escape, whereas 
in 1909 it would have been killed. In this respect it may be said 
that the killing in 1910 conformed even more closely to regulations 
than that of 1909. 

Since the animals killed in 1910 were of the same class as those of 
the preceding year, and since the rejections from the drives were 

























































18 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


fewer in proportion to those killed, it must be concluded that this 
condition is due not to closer killing, but to the absence, for some 
reason, of those animals which are not killable and which when they 
appear in drives make up the number of “rejected” seals. In other 
words, the bachelors driven were not culled more closely for killables, 
but fewer rejectable seals appeared in the drives, thereby making the 
rejection percentages smaller. 

One certain reason for this increased percentage of killed in 1910 
is to be found in the lessened number of “branded” or marked 
bachelors with which to deal during the killing. In previous years 
2,000 of these marked bachelors were present during the killing season, 
while in 1910 only 1,000 of them were marked. Furthermore this 
missing thousand would have been composed of 2-year-olds which 
haul up on the bachelors’ hauling-grounds much more frequently 
than do the 3-year-olds. With 1,000 2-year-olds marked for exemp¬ 
tion from killing, it would have been certain that from 1,200 to 1,500 
more rejections would have occurred during the season, the number 
of rejections of this class varying somewhat from year to year. On 
the other hand, rarety does the number of subsequent rejections of 
the 3-year-olds equal the number of that class actually marked. 

Had 1,200 been added to the number of rejections obtained in 1910, 
the percentage of killed would have been 69, very nearly what it was 
in the year preceding. 

Another presumed cause of the lack of small rejections last year 
is the probable fact that the smaller seals, i. e., those that had skins 
under 5 pounds in weight, failed to haul up on land proportionately 
in the same numbers as hitherto; that is to say, these small seals 
remained for longer periods in the water than usual. In respect to 
this matter we are met with the fact that we are wholly unable to 
state anything definite concerning the hauling habits of young 
bachelors. Some are always in the water and on inaccessible hauling 
Grounds, for which reasons no definite idea of the whole number in 

o / 

existence can be obtained. Nevertheless, it is known that the haul¬ 
ing habits of seals vary from year to year; that these habits are altered 
b}^ circumstances not incident to their natural environment, such as 
the action and movement of the pelagic fleet; that these bachelors 
haul in one year in greater numbers proportionate^ on one island 
than the other, or on one rookery than on other rookeries; that they 
return to their normal habits with the disappearance of the cause 
which forced them to abandon those habits temporarily. 

For 1910 it can be shown that these small seals, which were yearlings 
the preceding year, were not killed, either as pups or yearlings. Year¬ 
lings are never killed on land except through unavoidable accident, 
and an analysis of London sales of skins shows that yearlings form 
but a small fraction of 1 per cent of the pelagic catch. Unless they 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


19 


died from natural causes, of winch there is no evidence, they must 
be in existence somewhere as 2-year-olds. Not having appeared on 
land during the summer, the natural inference must be that they 
were in the water and did not haul on land. 

That there were in existence small seals which did not haul during 
the summer might be indicated by the fact that in the killing on 
August 10 the number of small seals turned away was entirely 
out of proportion to the usual number occurring in drives during 
the season. The absence of these small seals during the summer 
was a matter of remark, and their reappearance at the last drive of 
the season also was noted with interest. 

In treating of this matter it is desired to show that notwithstanding 
the fact that of seals driven a greater percentage killed appears on 
the record for this year as compared with last, no smaller seals than 
usual were killed and not as large seals were taken as previously. 
The increased percentage is the result, first, of the absence of 2-year- 
old marked bachelors present in former years, and secondly, to a 
failure of young nonkillable seals to haul on land in their usual num¬ 
bers during the summer. 

WEIGHTS OF SKINS TAKEN. 

Of the 10,752 skins taken on St. Paul, 10,749 were weighed. Of 
these 70 were under 5 pounds and 48 over 8^ pounds. On St. George, 
2,834 skins were weighed, of which 20 were under 5 pounds and 11 
over 8£. Of the overweight skins on St. Paul, nearly all were taken 
in a food killing on Sea Lion Rock, and before weighing were immersed 
in sea water until they were saturated. In this condition each carried 
several pounds of water, increasing their weight correspondingly. 
Had they been weighed dry, or even with the usual quantity of moist¬ 
ure, few of them would have been above.the prescribed limit. 

It is not possible to avoid wetting the seals taken on Sea Lion Rock, 
neither is it permissible to salt the skins without weighing. It is 
wholly undesirable also to alter the statistics of weights in such man¬ 
ner as to attempt to compensate for excess due to the presence of 
water or other foreign substances in.the fur. The weights therefore 
have been recorded as taken, but due allowance must be made for 
conditions which change the weights and which have no relation to 
the size of the skins. 

The skins that were underweight were likewise taken mainly in 
food drives, at a time when the natives were eager for fresh meat and 
when they were restricted to killing seals having skins under 7 pounds. 
With the necessity of rejecting all the females and all the larger males 
from the food drives, it can readily be appreciated that the tendency 
of the natives is to let few of the small males escape, even if the skins 
weigh a few ounces less than 5 pounds. 


20 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


On the whole it can be seen that only a few skins of the whole 
catch were outside the weights prescribed and that these w’ere taken 
unavoidably. 


Weights of Sealskins Taken on the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, During the 
Year ended August 10, 1910. 


Weight. 

St. Paul 
Island, a 

Weight. 

St. George 
Island, b 

Pounds. 


Pounds. 


4. 

6 

4. 

1 

4}. 

4 

41. 


4£. 

20 

4 f. 

14 

41. 

40 

5*. 

125 

51. 

670 

51. 

82 

51. 

710 

51. 

406 

5§. 

1,014 

5j. 

202 

5|. 

1,277 

e:. 

628 

6l. 

'980 

61. 

106 

6J. 

1,113 

61. 

524 

6£. 

1,176 

6§. 

114 

6|. 

'993 

7!. 

321 

7~ . 

752 

7}. 

43 

. 

553 


168 

7J. 

552 

. 

7|. 

21 

7J. 

327 

8". . 

54 

8~. . 

203 

81. 

4 

8}. 

172 

8§. 

5 

8|. 

139 

9 !. 

6 

8f. 

7 

9}. 

1 

9 !. 

17 

9§. 

2 

91 . 

4 

10L-. 

1 

91. 

7 

10|. 

1 


4 







101. 

1 


2,834 

10J. 

2 


11. 

1 



Ill. 

4 



12. 

1 



Total. 

10,749 




a Nearly all the oversize skins listed from St. Paul Island were taken in a food killing from Sea Lion Rock, 
on which occasion the skins when weighed carried from 1 to 3 pounds of water each. Had they been dry 
when weighed, very few or none would have exceeded the prescribed weights. The major portion of skins 
underweight were taken in food drives for the natives, when large seals were released, and, consequently, 
the smaller seals were killed closely. 

b Of the skins from St. George over or under the limit of weight only 3 were taken during the sealing 
season proper. Four were taken by the company last year, and withheld from the quota; the others were 
taken during food killings, when the natives were particularly eager for fresh meat. 


Following is a statement furnished by Messrs. C. M. Lampson & Co., 
of the sizes of the sealskins consigned to them by the United States 
Government for auction in London. This statement shows the classi¬ 
fication of the 12,920 skins as weighed and assorted upon their receipt 
by the firm. 



































































FUR-SEAL, FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


21 


Assortment op Alaska Salted Fur Sealskins for Account of United States 
Government, Department of Commerce and Labor. 

[London, 19th November, 1910, 64 Queen Street, E. C. Subject to recount.] 


Lbs. oz. 


78 smalls. 7 15 

713 large pups. 7 2 

3,032 middling pups. 6 7 

4,899 small pups. 5 12 

1,266 ex. small pups. 5 5 

11 ex. ex. small pups. 4 10 

33 smalls, low. 7 11 

135 large pups, low. 6 9 

498 middling pups, low. 6 1 

501 small pups, low. 5 9 

88 ex small pups, low. 5 0 

10 smalls, cut. 7 2 

71 large pups, cut. 6 13 

238 middling pups, cut. 6 2 

421 small pups, cut. 5 6 

81 ex. small pups, cut. 4 15 

6 smalls, rubbed. 7 0 

55 large pups, rubbed. 6 14 


Lbs. oz. 


195 middling pups, rubbed. 6 6 

290 small pups, rubbed. 5 11 

75 ex. small pups, rubbed. 5 3 

36 faulty. 


12,732 


5 smalls. 

21 large pups. 

48 middling pups. 
94 small pups. 

18 ex. small pups. 
2 faulty. 


188 


a 12,922 


a See p. 15. This number recorded as shipped, but two skins afterwards found wedged under floor of boat 
used for lightering skins to steamer Homer. 


ENUMERATION OF BREEDING HERD. 

COUNTS OF HAREMS. 

The usual counting of harems and idle bulls at the height of the 
season of 1910 disclosed the following: 

Count of Harems and Idle Bulls on St. Paul Island, 1910. 


Date. 

Rookery. 

Harems. 

Idle bulls. 

Quitters. 

Water 

bulls. 

July 12 


9 

3 



' 12 


29 

5 

1 


12 

Tolstoi. 

77 

7 

l 

5 

12 


7 


3 


12 

Little Zapadni. 

54 

10 

4 

4 

13 

Kitovi. 

53 

7 

4 

4 

13 


9 

2 

1 


13 

Lukanin. 

41 

5 

6 

5 

13 


11 

1 



13 


2 


2 


13-15 


110 

12 

15 


13-15 

Polavina. 

50 

5 

2 

10 

13-15 


20 

5 

5 


13-15 


12 

2 

7 


14 

North East Point. 

251 

30 

17 

10 

15 

Reef. 

206 

28 

4 

13 

16 

Zapadni. 

118 

22 

9 

4 


Total. 

1,059 

144 

81 

55 


The number of harems on Sea Lion Rock, which could not be 
visited at this season, is placed at 61, the number found last year. 






































































22 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IK 1910. 


Count op Harems and Idle Bulls on St. George Island, 1910. 


Date. 

• 

Rookery. 

Harems. 

Idle bulls. 

Hauling- 

ground 

bulls. 

Quitters. 

July 14 


4 





22 

6 





37 

a 14 





103 

21 

10 




48 

17 

21 



Zapadni. 

47 

19 

16 

1 


Total. 

261 

77 

47 

1 


a Includes hauling-ground bulls. 


A summary of the number of bulls on both islands, with a com¬ 
parison of the number found in 1909, follows: 


Summary op Bulls on St. Paul and St. George Islands, 1910. 



Harems. 

Idle bulls. 

Quitters. 

Hauling- 

ground 

bulls. 

Water 

bulls. 


1,059 

144 

81 


55 


261 

77 

1 

47 



a 61 





Total, 1910. 

1,381 

221 

82 

47 

55 

Total, 1909 . 

1,399 

172 

139 

98 

13 


a Estimated. 


Compared with 1909 the number of harems on both islands has 
decreased 18, or 1.3 per cent, an inappreciable decrease when con¬ 
trasted with that which has occurred annually for years'. This de¬ 
crease in harems can not be laid to a scarcity of bulls, as can easily 
be proved, but to a lack of enough cows to provide other bulls with 
harems. 

On the other hand the number of idle bulls—that is to say, those 
mature adult males stationed on rookeries waiting for cows—has been 
increased from 172 to 221, or a gain of 29 per cent. This is the result 
of the saving of young males by marking and of further restrictions 
upon killing, commenced in 1904. 

The number of 7-year old males or “quitters,’’ so termed because 
of their tendency while idle to desert their stations when approached 
by man, has decreased from 139 to 82; the number of water bulls has 
increased from 13 to 55, and of the hauling-ground bulls there has 
been a decrease from 98 to 47. As these latter classes are more or 
less unstable and as some of each class could have been in the water 
at the time these counts were made, it is not attempted to ascribe 
specific reasons for the fluctuations in them. The fact is demon¬ 
strated, however, that young bulls are present in fair numbers. The 
further fact that 13 per cent of the stationed bulls, excluding quitters, 











































FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


23 


are idle, indicates conclusively that the herd of breeding bulls is 
properly safeguarded from too close killing by existing regulations. 

COUNTS OF PUPS. 

Because of the presence of Japanese schooners in numbers close 
to the islands, counts of pups on St. Paul Island were limited to 
Kitovi rookery, including Amphitheater. On St. George Island, 
for the same reason, pups were not counted except on Little East 
rookery, which now embraces only a few seals. The St. Paul counts 
follow: 

Counts op Pups on St. Paul Island, 1910. 



Live 

pups. 

Dead 

pups. 

Total 

pups. 

. Harems. 

Average 

harem. 


1,717 

187 

57 

1,774 

53 

33.4 


5 

192 

9 

21.3 




Total, 1910. 

1,904 

1,915 

62 

1,966 

1,979 

62 

31.7 

Total, 1909. 

64 

58 

34.1 



From the comparisons which the foregoing data afford, it would 
appear that the breeding cows on this rookery have not decreased but 
have remained virtually stationery as regards numbers during this 
period. The harems thereon, however, are more numerous, thus 
giving fewer cows to each bull, or, technically speaking, lowering the 
average harem on this space from 34.1 in 1909 to 31.7 in 1910. 

On St. George the count of pups on Little East, which, as stated, 
was the only count of pups made on that island, disclosed 75 pups in 
4iiarems, or an average of 18.7 cows per harem. The great decrease 
in this rookery (Little East) may be appreciated when it is noted that 
in 1897 the seal census made by the Jordan Commission gave to this 
rookery 46 harems and 1,190 cows. The number found there in 1910 
represents a diminution in thirteen years on this small rookery alone 
of 42 harems and 1,115 cows. 

NUMBER OF BREEDING COWS. 

As it is highly impracticable to count the pups on all the rookeries, 
it has been customary to arrive at the whole number of breeding 
cows by estimation based upon an actual count of the whole number 
of harems on the islands and the average number of cows found to 
be in each of the harems of one rookery which is accepted as typical 
of all. 

As the number of harems on all islands has been ascertained to 
be 1,381 and the average harem, as demonstrated by the count of 
Kitovi, to be 31.7, the whole number of breeding cows in 1910 would 
be 43,777. As 45,786 of such cows were shown by this method to 
59395°—11-26 
















24 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


be present in 1909, the decrease between the years, 2,009, represents 
a loss of 4.3 per cent. 

This for all practical purposes, is a fairly accurate measure of the 
number of breeding cows, which constitute the most important 
factor in the herd. While merely an estimate, the number is close 
enough to actual conditions to be approximately correct. A loss of 
only 4.3 per cent in the breeding cows from the pelagic sealing which 
has been practiced with such assiduity during 1910 would seem too 
small. However, the statistics of the seal herd for the last few years 
demonstrate that the rate of decrease during this period has not 
been large, and it is not out of the way to believe that it was small 
in 1910. 

CENSUS OF ENTIRE SEAL HERD. 

Beyond the breeding cows and pups, estimates of which contain 
much of accuracy, an estimate of the whole herd is very difficult to 
make, and is unsatisfactory in that it treats of elements which are not 
susceptible of ascertainment and must be approximated. There are 
also very few means of testing its accuracy at this or a future time. 
The methods used are, however, the best that can be devised and tend 
in the direction of accuracy rather than the opposite. 

ESTIMATE OF HALF BULLS. 

The record of rejections of seals from drives during the summer 
season of 1910 shows that 1,168 young males too large to be killed 
were released from the killing fields. It has been established that not 
by any means all of this class of animals haul in places where they can 
be enumerated and that the number of those actually turned away 
should be doubled at least to arrive at the whole number in existence. 

By doubling the number found, 1,168, we would have 2,336 half 
bulls, from which we may look for recruits to the breeding bulls. 

ESTIMATE OF 2-YEAR-OLDS. 

In 1908 it was computed that 53,884 pups were born. Being 
equally divided as to sex, one half, or 26,942, were males and an equal 
number females. 

In 1909, if we allow the diminution of 50 per cent for mortality at 
sea, which has been taken heretofore to occur among the pups during 
their first migration, one-half of these would return in 1909 as yearlings. 
There should have been then in 1909 by this method of computation 
13,471 yearling males and an equal number of females. These, with 
a loss of something like 10 per cent, would return in 1910 as 2-year- 
olds to the number of approximately 12,124 of each sex. 

We should have in 1910, therefore, by this computation, over 
12,000 virgin or 2-year-old cows and an equal number of males. 



FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IK 1910. 


25 


From the latter, however, at least 7,500 were killed during the last 
summer, leaving approximately 4,500 2-year-old males in existence 
at the close of the season. The above computation would indicate 
that 12,124 2-year-old cows and 4,500 2-year-old males were present 
at the end of the killing season of 1910. 

NUMBER OF YEARLINGS. 

In 1909 it was estimated that 45,764 pups were born, half of which 
were males and half females. By applying a 50 per cent death rate 
during their initial migration we should have in 1910 11,441 yearling 
males and the same number of yearling females. 

NUMBER OF 3-YEAR-OLDS. 

Nine hundred and fifteen 3-year-olds were marked during the 
summer and released as breeders. An uncertain number in addition 
was not driven at all and still survive. It would be a moderate 
allowance to estimate the number of 3-year-olds remaining in the 
herd at 1,200. 


SUMMARY OF SEAL LIFE IN 1910. 

From the foregoing computations an approximate census of seal 
life present on the islands at the close of the sealing season of 1910 


would be as follows: 

Bulls, active with harems. 1,381 

Bulls, idle, and quitters. 303 

Half bulls. 2,336 

3-year-old bachelors. 1,200 

2-year-old bachelors. 4, 500 

Yearling bachelors. 11,441 

Male pups. 21, 888 

Breeding'cows. 43,777 

2-year-old (virgin) cows. 12,124 

Yearling females. 11,441 

Female pups. 21,888 


Total. 132,279 


The foregoing “census,” if we except the bulls with harems, and 
those idle, is noticing more than an estimate based upon such enumera¬ 
tions as could be made that were of value in determining the number 
of seals. While it shows over 2,000 seals less than a similar computa¬ 
tion in 1909, it nevertheless exhibits apparent increases in certain 
classes of seals over the preceding census spoken of. For example, 
the 2-year-okl bachelors estimated to be present in 1910 exceed in 
numbers by over 2,000 those stated to be in existence at the close of 
the season of 1909. The 2-year-old cows estimated in 1910 are 2,000 
more than were assigned for the previous year. 















26 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


This is the result solely of the method of estimation adopted alike 
for both } r ears. Both are based upon the number of cows born two 
years previousi}". In 1907, 50,825 pups were estimated to have been 
born, and 10,165 of these were computed to have survived as 2-year- 
old males in 1909. On the other hand, in 1908, the same method 
of estimation would indicate that 53,884 pups were born in that 
year — 3,000 more than in 1907 — and that of these the number sur¬ 
viving as 2-year-olds in 1910 was 12,124. 

It is believed that it is not the intention of anyone to claim that an 
increase in seal life has occurred at any time within the past few 
years in the face of the large catches of seals in the water, consisting 
mainly of breeding females. It is believed, on the other hand,-that a 
marked decrease has occurred, a belief justified when the contracted 
space occupied by the breeding seals is viewed. But the measure of 
this decrease is ascertainable solely by estimation, the same methods 
being used from year to year. When using only a few seals in estab¬ 
lishing a basis for computing the whole number, it is not difficult to 
realize that a few chance harems more or less on the space counted 
would have the effect of greatly increasing or decreasing the whole 
number computed to be in the herd. It would be easy to revise these 
calculations by adding to or subtracting from the estimated number 
to make it conform with one’s idea of what number should or should 
not be found. But the idea one may have might be more incorrect 
than the result of the computation, so that in a revision it would 
not be possible to determine whether in increasing or decreasing the 
result one were moving in the direction of accuracy or away from it. 
It is much better to announce the number each year as it may 
appear from calculations made similarly, and to explain any apparent 
incongruity by the statement that the whole is an estimate and 
nothing else. 

The result of the killing of 1910 has demonstrated that the number 
of 2-year-old bachelors estimated as remaining in the herd at the 
close of the season of 1909 was entirely too small. In the census of 
1909 only 2,165 2-year-old bachelors were allowed. These of course 
would be 3-year-olds in 1910. As a matter of fact, the skins of 1910 
when classified in London showed that perhaps 5,000 of the catch were 
3-year-olds. In view of this fact it is believed that, in estimating 
the number of these as well as other immature seals, a smaller death 
rate should be allowed than hitherto. 

PUP-RAISING EXPERIMENTS. 

In accordance with the Bureau’s instructions, attempts were made 
on both St. Paul and St. George Islands to feed starving pups and save 
their lives. On St. Paul Island the efforts were unsuccessful, but the 
St. George experiments yielded most interesting results. 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


27 


ST. PAUL EXPERIMENTS. 

Perhaps a dozen or more starving pups were gathered off the 
various rookeries and brought to the village. An inclosure was 
built at the end of the village pond and the pups were placed in this. 

A bottle with an ordinary rubber nipple was used in a first attempt 
to induce the little animals to nurse. This method failing, however, 
milk was poured down the pups’ throats from the bottle. But this, 
besides being difficult and tedious, was uncertain and wasteful, as 
most of the milk was ejected by the pups before being swallowed. 
To feed a dozen or more pups with a bottle, moreover, occupied the 
services of half a dozen men for nearly half a day. Afterwards a 
tube attached to a funnel "was passed into the stomach of each pup 
and the feeding was accomplished by this means. 

Owing to lack of proper material the inclosure in which the pups 
were placed could not be made tight enough to retain them. Some 
of the pups escaped to the sea; the others died. Feeding with solid 
food was not attempted. 

Upon the departure of the Bear on her last trip from the islands, 
10 healthy pups upon which no feeding experiments had been 
attempted were taken from St. Paul rookeries and placed aboard that 
vessel to be shipped to Seattle for the use of the Bureau. All of these 
arrived safely, having been schooled on the voyage to eat solid food. 

ST. GEORGE EXPERIMENTS. 

Fifteen starving pups were gathered on St. George Island at various 
times and different methods were tried to save their lives. 

These starvelings readily ate all the small live fish that could be 
obtained and such other larger fish as the weather would permit the 
natives to capture offshore. In addition the pups ate salted salmon 
after it had been freshened in water. Had enough live or fresh dead 
fish been obtainable it is believed that at least some of the pups that 
were fed artificially could have been saved. 

On September 10, 1910, four starving pups were secured and their 
frenums cut. All were fed by injections of milk into the stomach. 
One died that night from congestion of the lungs, probably because 
of the introduction into the pulmonary tract of milk while feeding. 
Upon autopsy of this animal, a piece of coal as large as a walnut 
was found lodged in the pylorus. Two of the others escaped the first 
night. 

A corral, having a tank 4 feet by 8 feet and 1 foot deep, was then 
built and two more pups in addition to the one now remaining were 
placed in it on September 15. Into this tank filled with water were 
placed a number of small fish caught among the rocks (probably 
Neoliparis). The pups ate all of these at once and some sculpin cut 


28 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


into small pieces. After this several attempts were made to provide 
sufficient fresh fish to feed the pups, but owing to rough weather 
only several days’ supply could be obtained. After this salt salmon 
freshened in water was offered to the pups and eaten. When this 
latter was finally refused, milk and mutton broth were fed to sickly 
pups. 

All but one of these pups, 15 in all, died on the island, and that 
one, after being placed aboard the Bear, died before reaching Seattle. 

These experiments are of value, however, as demonstrating that 
by September 15 these pups have advanced to such a stage that 
they can eat and digest solid food even though they continue to 
nurse during October and November. The results also show, how¬ 
ever, that on the seal islands these experiments can not be carried 
on with hope of success because fresh fish can not be obtained with 
regularity in sufficient quantity. Had these pups been taken to 
Unalaska, where small fish can be readily obtained, it is believed 
that much better results would have followed. 

Of the 14 that died on St. George Island, the autopsies in 2 cases 
disclosed occlusion of the pylorus by stones taken through the mouth. 
The death of at least 1 of the pups was due to this condition. 

PELAGIC SEALING. 

During the season of 1910, 25 Japanese sealing schooners were 
boarded by revenue-cutter vessels on patrol in Bering Sea. Of 
these, 2 were seized by the cutters, 1 for a violation of the alien 
fishing laws and another for a violation of the customs law (sec¬ 
tion 2773, Revised Statutes). As a rule pelagic sealing vessels kept 
outside the 3-mile limit, and, so far as known, none of the men 
composing the crews landed upon the islands for the purpose of 
killing seals. 

Eleven Japanese in 3 small boats landed on St. Paul Island on 
July 30 and- 31. It was stated by them that they had been lost 
from their schooners and came to the islands as a place of refuge. 
They were quartered on the islands until August 8, when the} 7 were 
placed aboard the Manning and taken to Unalaska with 4 native 
witnesses, charged with having landed upon the islands without 
permission, in violation of the act of April 21, 1910. 

Upon trial before the United States commissioner at Unalaska 
they were found guilty and each sentenced to a week’s imprison¬ 
ment. After serving this sentence they were placed aboard a Japa¬ 
nese sealing schooner with their boats, guns, and other property and 
sent home. 

Unofficial reports indicate that 5 Canadian sealing vessels took 
seals last year in Bering Sea. Their catch from both the Pribilof 




FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IK 1910. 


29 


and Asiatic herds aggregated 3,775 skins. The total pelagic catch 
from the Pribilof herd, as shown by London trade sales, was in the 
neighborhood of 15,000 skins. 

WRECK OF REVENUE CUTTER PERRY. 

On the early morning of July 26, 1910, the revenue cutter Perry 
went ashore on Rocky Point Reef, St. Paul Island, in a thick fog. 
Shortly afterwards, by the action of the swell, her bottom was punc¬ 
tured on the rocks upon which she lay, and all efforts to get her off 
were futile. Such movable property (guns, stores, boats, etc.) as 
could be readily transported was brought ashore and stored in an 
empty warehouse at Rocky Point. The entire crew was quartered 
at the village for several days and was made as comfortable as circum¬ 
stances permitted. The teams and native men on the islands were 
used for several days in rendering assistance. Later the Perry's 
men and stores were taken aboard the other cutters in the fleet and 
the wreck stripped and abandoned. On August 19 the hull was 
broken up by a strong southerly gale and scarcely anything was left 
to mark where she grounded. 

FOXES. 

The history of foxing on the Pribilof Islands is interesting. What 
number of fox skins were taken off these islands by the Russians will 
never be known. Petroff (1883) states that 34,767 were taken from 
1842 to 1860, inclusive. From that date to 1867, the fox skins 
taken from the islands are not segregated from the returns of those 
taken from general Alaskan sources, which are given by Petroff as 
27,731. From 1870 to 1890 fox skins to the number of 4,380 on St. 
Paul and 20,412 on St. George were taken and shipped by the Alaska 
Commercial Company. From 1890 to 1910, 2,963 fox skins were 
taken on St. Paul and 13,641 on St. George. 

During the lease of the Alaska Commercial Company (1870-1889), 
there existed no contract with the Government for the right to pur¬ 
chase these skins, and the only expenditure by the company for the 
more than 24,000 skins it received was the 50 cents it paid the natives 
for each skin. The North American Commercial Company during 
the greater portion of its 20-year lease paid to the natives S5 for each 
blue and $1 for each white fox skin. 

Foxes are trapped annually on St. George Island hi house traps 
which do not injure the animal. The catch last year there was 227. 
On St. Paul Island, where these animals never have been as plentiful 
as they were on the other island, no trapping has been done since 1903 
until last winter (1909-10), when 185 were secured. These were 
killed in steel traps. For the blues the natives received $5 apiece; 
for the whites, $1. This money was applied to the natives’ support. 


30 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


CONDITIONS AND TRAPPINGS ON ST. GEORGE ISLAND.. 


On St. George Island, during the winter of 1909-10, the feeding of 
foxes in the herd during the period from October 20 to June 1 was 
continued as in former years. Seal carcasses preserved from kill¬ 
ings during the summer formed the greater portion of the material 
fed, together with about 3,000 pounds of salted codfish freshened in 
sea water. 

For some reason, not ascertained exactly, a smaller number of 
foxes passed through the house and box traps during the winter in 
question than ever before since feeding the foxes and selective trap¬ 
ping began. Whether this is the result of an actual diminution in 
the herd, or whether other conditions, such as an abundance of food 
outside the traps or an instinctive fear of entering the traps, were the 
cause, can not be stated definitely. 

During the winter of 1909-10 only 335 foxes passed through the 
traps on St. George Island. To show the smallness of this number 
as compared with former years, a table with the total number of 
foxes handled in the various years during which selective trapping 
has been followed is given below: 


1898- 99. 842 

1899- 1900. 973 

1900- 1901. 1,335 

1901- 2. 1,104 

1902- 3. 1,011 

1903- 4. 1,061 


1904- 5. 766 

1905- 6. 1,061 

1906- 7. 882 

1907- 8. 1,006 

1908- 9. 798 

1909- 10. 335 


In trapping, the practice is to catch all animals alive, to release as 
breeders a certain number of pairs of the most vigorous, and to kill 
those that are not considered the best examples of the species. 
Those released are marked, so as to be thereafter recognizable, by 
clipping a ring out of the hair on the tail of the animal, the marks 
differing for the sexes. Such foxes as escape being trapped, not 
being marked of course, can be distinguished at sight. 

No such number of foxes not marked was seen in the winter men¬ 
tioned as to lead unquestionably, to the conclusion that the herd has 
not diminished. ' There are, on the other hand, good grounds for 
believing that it has diminished. The causes of this probable fact, 
however, are obscure and conjectural. The very few found dead did 
not justify the belief that any epidemic had occurred. 

A summary of the statistics of trapping on St. George Island 
during the winter of 1909-10 is appended: * 


Marked and released: 


Blue males. 51 

Blue females... 57 

















FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


31 


Killed for pelts: 

Blue males. v . 126 

Blue females..-... 86 

White males. 5 

White females. 4 

Skins from animals found dead, etc. 6 

Skins accepted by lessee, blue. 203 

Skins rejected by lessee, blue. 6 

Skins mangey, etc., thrown away. 9 

White fox skins accepted by lessee. 9 

Total number of animals handled. 335 


These pelts, having been taken during the period covered by the 
contract of the North American Commercial Company, were deliv¬ 
ered to it upon payment at the stipulated rate of $5 for each blue 
skin and $1 for each white skin. The money thus derived was used 
exclusively for the support of natives. 

TRAPPING ON ST. PAUL ISLAND. 

During the winter of 1909-10, for the first time since 1904, there 
were considered to be foxes enough on St. Paul to justify trapping, 
wliich accordingly was carried on during a period of six days. 

On this island, unlike St. George, notwithstanding repeated efforts 
to secure it, the foxes do not congregate in large groups, permitting 
systematic feeding and selective trapping. An} r trapping therefore on 
St. Paul must be done with the spring steel trap, in the use of wliich 
the native trappers must scatter over the entire island. 

In the 6 days of trapping mentioned the St. Paul natives secured 
on that island 130 blue and 35 white foxes. In addition, a boat load 
of native men went over to Otter Island, and there secured 19 blues 
and 1 white. Observations made during the past summer indicate 
that the fox herd on St. Paul Island has not diminished appreciably 
as the result of this trapping of the previous winter. 

The skins taken on St. Paul and Otter Islands were delivered to 
the North American Commercial Company and payment made at the 
same rate as on St. George. This difference between the manage¬ 
ment of the two islands exists, however, that whereas the earnings 
on St. George from fox skins are formed into a community fund, on 
St. Paul each individual trapper is given the use of the money from 
such fox skins as he has been able to secure. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

KILLING OF BACHELOR SEALS. 

The methods used in taking seals during the past season of 1910 
were the same as those used by the two lessees in the preceding 
40 years’ tenure of the sealing right, and the same, in fact, in all 












32 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IK 1910. 


fundamental respects as those pursued by the Russians since 1840. 
They are the result of years of experience and are the best that can be 
devised to meet the conditions. No change in them should be made. 

The practice of killing bachelor seals for skins as well as for natives’ 
food should not be abandoned unless a cogent reason presents itself. 
No harm to the seal herd can result from the killing of surplus males. 
No benefit to the herd could accrue from the maturing of males 
unnecessary for purposes of reproduction, which, when of adult age, 
would have no female consorts, but which, by incessant and furious 
fighting, would destroy or cripple the breeding bulls and themselves 
as well. 

It is true that a test to insure the survival of the fittest should be 
applied to the male fur seal, as in fact it should to all breeders. It 
is not true, however, that this test can only be made through trial 
of combat. With respect to some groups of animals, such as the 
Pinnipedia, conditions of their natural environment may be so severe 
as to eliminate weaklings as effectually or even more so, than would 
fighting amongst themselves, and nature provides an eliminative 
process in the case of the fur seal entirely apart from the struggling 
of bulls with each other for supremacy on land. This test begins 
almost with a seal’s birth. 

When the baby seal has scarcely learned to swim beyond the borders 
of the rookery on which it .is born, while it is still a suckling and 
knows not how to seek other food, it is separated from its mother 
and driven off the land by the rigor of the climate. W T eak and 
unskillful swimmer as the pup is, not only must it withstand the 
severe winter storms in the northern ocean but in the same unfa¬ 
vorable element pursue and capture its food and elude its natural 
enemies of the sea. As the result of this struggle with the natural 
conditions in which it is placed it is estimated that one-half of the 
pups die during the initial migration. Only the strongest and most 
wary can survive this trial. 

This struggle for existence continues incessantly during the ani¬ 
mal’s life. From each migration it sends back to the breeding grounds 
only those animals hardy enough to withstand its severity. That 
animal leaving the rookeries with any physical imperfection does 
not return. It dies at sea. Those that do return are the most 
perfect examples of their class. 

With this severe eliminative test occurring as the result of natural 
environment, to superimpose a violent struggle with his own kind 
after the animal has reached the breeding ground would be to sub¬ 
ject him to further stress entirely unnecessary to prove his ability as 
a breeder. Having passed successfully through the winter’s migra¬ 
tion, the animal returns to the rookeries a perfect specimen of its 
kind. A severe trial by combat could not have the effect of increasing 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


33 


its breeding efficiency, but on the other hand could only seriously 
impair if not wholly destroy it. It would be the same if two valuable 
stallions, each physically perfect, and matched in strength and 
courage, were allowed to fight with each other until one were killed. 
The survivor, if one did survive, would be so seriously injured by its 
opponent as to be rendered incapable of service for the time being, 
if not permanently. 

To breed a large number of surplus male seals merely that they 
may fight amongst themselves and determine the strongest in combat 
is useless. By the time the strongest individuals have proved their 
superiority they have expended so much of their energy in fighting 
that physically weaker but fresh animals may overpower them and 
take their cows. Such is the history of the Pribilof rookeries during 
the time when thousands of idle bulls were present. Instances to 
substantiate this conclusion have been witnessed many times. 

Since physical combat is not required to test the ability of a male 
fur seal, no reason is known for providing a number of males beyond 
that necessary to fertilize the females in the herd. Therefore the 
practice of killing surplus males at the time when their pelts have a 
considerable commercial value should be continued. Surely no purely 
sentimental reason should prevail over those of practical weight. 

SUPPORT OF NATIVES. 

The present system of supporting the natives on the Pribilof 
Islands should be changed. Under it the native receives enough 
food, fuel, and clothing to sustain life, but only a portion of the sum 
necessary for his maintenance comes to him as compensation for 
labor performed, the remainder being donated as a gratuity through 
an appropriation of Congress. This latter feature is the most objec¬ 
tionable of all and the one which it is sought to eliminate. Better to 
explain the situation the following brief summary is given of the man¬ 
ner in which the natives have been supported since they were first 
transported to these islands. 

In 1787, the year following the discovery of St. George Island, the 
discoverer, Pribilof, brought to the islands a number of native fami¬ 
lies, principally from Unalaska, and landed them there to serve as 
laborers in taking skins from the animals with which the islands 
abounded. Several other adventurers also brought natives to these 
islands and founded small villages at several points thereon. In 1799, 
upon the taking over by the Russian-American Company of the 
administration of the whole of Alaska, the competing traders were 
sent away from the Pribilofs and the islands passed under the auto¬ 
cratic control of Baranof. A cessation of killing was ordered, and 
in 1806-7 nearly all the natives were removed to Unalaska. 


34 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


In 1808 seal killing began again, with accessions of laborers mainly 
from Unalaska and adjacent villages. On St. Paul Island the natives 
were drawn together and huddled into one settlement at Halfway 
Point. About 1825, for convenience in handling cargo, the village 
was again changed to its present site. 

On St. George Island several settlements existed originally, but 
were consolidated at the present site about 1830-1835. 

Under the Russian regime, especially under the management of the 
Russian American Company, which provided the machinery of govern¬ 
ment for the territory during the tenure of its privilege, the natives were 
mere slaves. They had no redress for any injury or insolence which 
their masters might see fit to inflict upon them. Their habitations 
were large communal dwellings of earth, half underground, cold, and 
filthy. Here they lived and died unnoticed and uncared for. They 
subsisted on fish and the flesh of seals, with the addition of roots and 
a very little flour. 

In 1835, Yeniaminof states, the natives worked at whatever was 
found and whatever they were directed to do. Payment was not 
established by the day or year, but for each skin taken by them or for 
what was placed to their credit. They received no specific wage, 
though they were not all of equal ability, there being usually three or 
four classes. In these classes the sick and old workmen were counted, 
although they were only burdens, and therefore received the smallest 
shares, about 150 rubles, and the other and better classes 220 to 250 
rubles a year. Those who were zealous were rewarded by a present 
of 50 to 100 rubles. The wives of the Aleuts, who worked only at seal 
killing, received from 25 to 35 rubles. These rubles were scrip cur¬ 
rency, made of leather, equal in value to a franc, or about 20 cents. 

In 1868, at the time of the purchase of Alaska by the United States, 
the natives were living in semisubterranean houses built of turf 
and such pieces of driftwood and whalebone as they were able to 
secure on the beach. Their food was seal meat and a few articles 
furnished in meager quantity by the Russian company. They had 
no fuel except driftwood and blubber, and depended for heat upon 
crowding together in the sod houses, sleeping upon the dried grasses 
secured upon the islands. 

In 1870 the Alaska Commercial Company took charge of the islands 
under a lease. It at once built neat frame dwellings for the natives, 
and paid them 40 cents apiece for each sealskin taken. As 100,000 
were taken annually this gave the natives about $40,000 each 
year, enough to support them.in qualified comfort. While this 
sum was divided on a communal basis, some natives by thrift and 
economy were able to save sums amounting to perhaps $2,500 each. 
No interference with the expenditure of their earnings was made by 
the agents of the government. 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


35 


When, however, after 1890, under the lease of the North American 
Commercial Company, the take of skins was reduced to a few thou¬ 
sands annually, the natives faced starvation. Their earnings at this 
time, at the rate of 50 cents for each skin, were entirely insufficient. 
To relieve this situation, the Government did not increase the wages 
of the natives for taking skins, but, as the reduction of the catch was 
due mainly to arbitrary restrictions by the Government, furnished 
an annual appropriation of $19,500 to supplement the natives’ 
earnings for their support. 

This appropriation, while keeping the natives from starving, made 
an important change in their fiscal relations. Heretofore the native 
could expend his earnings as he pleased. After the appropriation, 
however, the earnings were secjuestered by the agents, and the natives 
had no voice whatever in the expenditure of the money for which 
they toiled. Each native was allotted articles of necessity to a cer¬ 
tain amount each week payable from his wages, and after the latter 
were expended the appropriation was drawn upon at the same rate 
until another sealing season intervened. 

This practice exists to-day. The natives now receive $1 for each 
skin taken, in addition to the annual appropriation of $19,500. 
Their total income from taking seals and foxes, with the appropria¬ 
tion, was last year about $34,000, or somewhat more than $100 for 
eacli person. 

The system of distribution of these earnings is one of pure com¬ 
munism. The native men are divided into about four classes, 
according to ability in taking seals. The members of each class 
receive a like sum, those in the first class being given more than 
those in the second, and so on to the fourth class, the lowest, which 
embraces apprentices. These sums, whatever they may be, are 
credited to each native and are drawn upon each week by orders on 
the store issued by the agent to the head of each family, the amount 
of the order varying witli the size of the family. This plan of com¬ 
pensation, while assuring provision for the natives’ immediate needs, 
is highly objectionable when considered from a sociological stand¬ 
point, its weakness being that it reduces all to a common level. It 
prevents that progress that accrues from the cultivation of superior 
skill or greater self-denial, and makes a virtual almshouse of the 
Pribilof reservation by dealing with the inhabitants as indigents. 
It requires willing service of the native, but takes from him his wage 
and expends it for his benefit without his consent. Incentive to 
increased individual efficiency is lacking because effort to that end is 
fruitless in bringing any greater benefit than if it had not been made. 

It is reasonable to assume that the Government, while operating 
on the seal islands for its own profit, at the same time desires to better 
the condition of the native residents upon whose efforts it must depend 


36 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


for successful conduct of its business. The first step in that direc¬ 
tion is to do away with the appropriation of Congress for their sup¬ 
port and to increase the wage earned through the taking of skins to a 
sum at least equal to the amount necessary for their maintenance. 
This would at once eliminate the objectionable element of charity in 
the present system and allow each man to support himself and family 
from his own earnings. Such a course is in my opinion not only an 
act of simple justice, the consummation of which would, moreover, 
involve no additional expense to the Government, but would go far 
toward increasing the moral tone of the native, by making him more 
self-reliant and self-respecting. It can be taken without additional 
legislation, the Secretary of Commerce and Labor now having the 
power under existing law to fix the natives’ compensation for taking 
skins. 

SCHEME OF COMPENSATION OF NATIVES. 

The scheme of compensation embodied in the foregoing recom¬ 
mendations may be summarized as follows: 

1. The appropriation for natives’ support to be discontinued. 

2. For natives’ labor an allotment should be made of, say, $3 for 
each sealskin. 

3. The moneys thus derived should be formed into a general fund, 
which should be prorated among all the natives of both islands. 

4. This fund, by agreement with the natives, to be used for their 
support at the rate of a certain weekly amount based upon the 
number of mouths in each family. 

5. The balance or remainder of each native’s account at the close of 
each year to be paid to the native in cash. 

It must be understood that the native is restricted by his work 
to the seal islands and can not go forth to pursue any other vocation, 
be it more or less profitable. It is not fair to this laborer to deny 
him all progress in the world and to confine him in his necessarily 
restricted sphere to such compensation only as permits the bare nec¬ 
essaries of life to him and his family. Whatever a corporation hav¬ 
ing a lease of the sealing privilege may have done, the United States 
Government ought not to put its laborer into the condition of constant 
and continuous vassalage with all progress denied him. 

NATIVES ON THE ALEUTIAN ARCHIPELAGO. 

The Aleut race is not found on the mainland, but inhabits the 
Aleutian Archipelago and several of the islands along the coast of 
the Alaskan Peninsula. It was never numerous and now embraces 
probably fewer than 1,000 souls, whose numbers are decreasing 
rapidly from disease and insufficient food. Some action should be 
taken to ameliorate their condition. 


FUR-SEAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1910. 


37 


When discovered by the Russians in the eighteenth century, these 
Aleuts were a hardy race