(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Report of the committee of arrangements of the Common council of the city of New York, for the funeral obsequies in memory of William H. Harrison .."

THE LIBRARY* 1789 




P 11123 



RARY 
JJNIVERS JFORNDB 

DA/iS 






REPORT 



COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS 



Common Council of the City of JVew York. 



Juncral (Dbscquus 



IN MEMORY OF 



WILLIAM H. HARRISON, 

i 

i tfve 



WITH AN 



ORATION, 



HON. THEODORE FRELINGHUYSEN, 

CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK. 



BRYANT & BOGGS, PRINTERS, 

27 Pine Street, New York. 



EIBRAK? 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



ARRANGEMENTS 



FUNERAL OBSEQUIES 



IN MEMORY OF 



WILLIAM H. HARRISON, 

Late President of the United States. 



THE Joint Special Committee of both Boards of the Com 
mon Council, appointed to make arrangements for paying 
proper respect to the memory of WILLIAM HENRY HAR 
RISON, late President of the United States, respectfully 

REPORT : 

That they have endeavored to discharge the duty assigned 
to them, in a manner at once befitting the occasion, and de 
manded of them by the unanimous expression of the public 
voice; and if they have, in any respect, fallen short of what 



may have been justly expected of them as the representa 
tives of the City of New York, they earnestly assure the 
Common Council that such failure has not arisen from a 
want of due appreciation of the solemnity of the trust con 
fided to them, or of the just expectations of their fellow 
citizens. 

Immediately after their appointment, your Committee were 
waited upon by a Committee of the Common Council of the 
City of Brooklyn, consisting of Aldermen March, Oakley, 
Hart, Cross, and Burbank, who expressed a desire to unite 
with your Committee, on behalf of the City of Brooklyn, in 
the proposed arrangements ; to which desire your Committee 
readily and cheerfully assented. They then, in conjunction 
with the Committee of the Common Council of the City of 
Brooklyn, proceeded to consider the subject referred to them, 
and on the 6th of April, instant, they unanimously adopted 
the following resolutions, which were proposed by Alderman 
Benson, and directed them to be published in the papers of 
the day : 

Whereas, it is announced that the funeral of the late 
President of the United States will take place on Wednesday 
the 7th instant, at 12 o'clock, noon, it is 

Resolved, By the Joint Committees of the Common Councils 
of the Cities of New York and Brooklyn, that our fellow citi 
zens of the said cities are requested to close their stores and 
places of business to-morrow, from the hour of twelve at noon 
until sunset, and also all places of public amusements in the 
respective cities to-morrow evening. That the bells of the 
several churches in the two cities^ and fire alarm bells, be tolled 



from noon till 2 o'clock, P. M., and that 68 minute guns (be 
ing the number of years of the late President) be fired from 
the Battery, and also from such plac^e in the City of Brooklyn, 
as the Committee from that city may designate. That the 
owners and masters of vessels in the harbor, and the proprie 
tors of all public places in the said cities are requested to 
display their flags at half-mast during the whole day, and 
that our fellow citizens are requested to wear the usual 
badge of mourning for sixty days. 

Resolved, That the Common Councils of the Cities of 
New York and Brooklyn will solemnize the death of the 
late President of the United States, by a civic and military 
procession, to be composed of the military and different so 
cieties and citizens of our respective cities, and that such 
procession take place on Saturday next. 

Resolved, That the different societies, trades and asso 
ciations, and Fire Departments of our cities, are requested to 
send delegates to meet a Committee of this Body on Thurs 
day next, at 12 o'clock, at the Common Council chamber, to 
make the necessary arrangements to carry out the views of 
the Common Councils in an appropriate manner. 

Resolved, That the Army and Navy of the United States, 
on this station, are requested to co-operate with us in mak 
ing the necessary arrangements, and that they are requested 
to send officers to represent them at the meeting to be held 
at the Common Council chamber, on Thursday, at 12 o'clock 
at noon. 



Immediately after the appointment of your Committee, the 
co-operation of the military and of the various civic associa 
tions, and of our citizens generally, was tendered in aid of 
the proposed solemnities ; and in order to meet their views, 
sub-committees were appointed by your Committee, to make 
the necessary arrangements in that behalf. The Committee 
on the military consisted of Aldermen Peers, Nash and Un 
derwood, of New York, and Cross and Burbank, of Brook 
lyn ; and on the civic societies and associations, of Aldermen 
Graham, Pollock and Wood, of New York, and Oakley 
and March, of Brooklyn. 

It was also, on motion of Assistant Alderman Davies, 

Resolved, That a Committee of five be appointed to select 
a suitable person to deliver an oration on the occasion of the 
solemnities, and Aldermen Davies, Benson and Hatfield, of 
New York, and March and Hart, of Brooklyn, were appoint 
ed such Committee. 

It was further, on motion, 

Resolved, That a Committee, consisting of Aldermen 
Smith and Benson, of New York, and March, of Brooklyn, 
be appointed to wait upon the Hon. MARTIN VAN BUR EN, 
ex-President of the United States, and invite him to attend 
upon the funeral solemnities in honor of the late President. 

A communication was received at the same meeting of the 
Committee from the Veteran Corps of Artillery, which was 
accepted, and which was as follows : 



NEW YORK, APRIL 6, 1841. 

Dear Sir : Understanding that our Honorable Corpora 
tion have had under consideration the propriety of doing 
honor to the obsequies of our late President, William Henry 
Harrison ; should it be desirable, the Veteran Corps of Heavy 
Artillery respectfully tender their services to your Honorable 
Body for the purpose of firing the minute guns during the 
procession in honor of the occasion. 
Respectfully submitted. 

, GEORGE W. CHAPMAN, 

Captain Corrfdt. Veteran Corps. 

At a meeting of the Committee held on a subsequent day, 
the Committee appointed to select an Orator of the day, re 
ported that they had designated the Honorable THEODORE 
FRELINGHUYSEN, Chancellor of the University of the City 
of New York, for that purpose, who had accepted the ap 
pointment. 

At the same meeting the following orders from the mili 
tary were laid before the Committee : 



ORDERS. 

State of New "York Head Quarters. 

ALBANY, APRIL GTH, 1841. 
GENERAL ORDERS. 

Information having been received of the death of WILLIAM 
HENRY HARRISON, President of the United States, and Com 
mander in Chief of the Army and Navy thereof, the follow 
ing arrangements will be observed by the Militia of this 
State, as a manifestation of respect to the memory of that 
illustrious General and Magistrate. 

The usual badge of mourning, consisting of crape on the 
left arm and on the sword hilt/will be worn by all the com- 



. 8 



missioned officers of the Militia of this State until after the 
next annual inspection and review of their respective corps. 

The Commandants of all Artillery Regiments and Battalions, 
and of all companies of Artillery attached to Regiments or 
Brigades of Infantry throughout the State, will cause guns to 
be fired within their respective commands, at every half hour 
from sunrise until sunset; and the Commandants of the Militia 
will direct the national standard, dressed in mourning, to be 
displayed from their respective head quarters on the day next 
after the receipt of these orders. 

The Commissary General and keepers of the military 
stores will furnish the necessary implements and ammunition 
for these funeral honors. 

Officers receiving copies of this order will promulgate the 
same without delay throughout the bounds of their respective 
commands, and will superintend its prompt execution. 
By order of the Commander in Chief. 

RUFUS KING, 

Adjutant General. 



NEW YORK STATE ARTILLERY. 
Head Quarters First Division. 

NEW YORK, APRIL ZTH, 1841. 
Order No. 6. 

The afflicting intelligence contained in the foregoing Ge 
neral Orders, of the 6th instant, is promulgated for the infor 
mation of this Division. 

The occasion which calls for this demonstration of respect, 
is one which must awaken feelings of profound and univer 
sal regret. For the first time under our government, the 
Constitutional head of the civil arid military power of the 
country has been removed by death, while in the exercise of 
his high functions. Public testimonials of respect are due 
alike to the distinguished station occupied by the deceased, 
and to the character of the illustrious dead. 

The Major General feels persuaded that the Division will 
unite with alacrity in rendering the honors appropriate to 
this melancholy event. 



Pursuant to General Orders, Brigadier General Morris will 
order, a sufficient detachment from his Brigade, to fire half 
hour guns on the Battery, from the rising to the setting of 
the sun, on Thursday the 8th instant. 

Commissary General Chandler will furnish the ammuni 
tion requisite to carry this order into effect. 

Commandants of Brigades will attend the meeting of the 
Joint Committee of the Common Council, at the City Hall 
this day, at 11, A. M. 

The division will parade in uniform on Saturday, the 10th 
instant, to unite in the funeral ceremonies contemplated in 
the arrangements of the Common Council. 

Division Orders will hereafter be issued in reference to this 
subject. By order of 

Major General SANDFORD. 

ROBERT C. WETMORE, 

Division Inspector. 



NEW YORK STATE ARTILLERY. 

Head Quarters First Division, 
New York, April Slfi, 1841. 

ORDER No. 7. 

SUPPLEMENTARY. 

The Division will parade for the purpose of rendering 
funeral honors to the memory of General WILLIAM HENRY 
HARRISON, 'late President of the United States, on Saturday, 
the 10th instant. Division line will be formed in F3roadway, 
left resting on Chambers street, with front to the West, at 11 
o'clock, A. M., precisely. 

Commandants of Brigades will issue the necessary orders 
in regard to the appropriate insignia of mourning. 

Trie Cavalry and Horse Artillery, and Field and Staff Offi 
cers of the several Brigades, will appear dismounted. 

The Division will wear the customary badge of mourning 
for six months ensuing. By order of 

Major General CHARLES W. SANFORD, 

Co m manding. 
ROBERT C. WETMORE, 

Division Inspector. 
2 



10 

INFANTRY ORDERS. 

NEW YORK, APRIL TTH, 1841. 

In announcing to the corps of Infantry the decease of that 
distinguished patriot and illustrious citizen, WILLIAM HENRY 
HARRISON, late President of the United States, the Chiefs 
of the several Divisions of the city deem it unnecessary to 
refer to the qualities composing his character, for his history 
is identified with his country's glory. No words could do 
justice to his merits none express the deep feel ing occasion 
ed hy the melancholy bereavement. Universally beloved 
while living, his memory will receive a nation's homage 
now that he is no more. 

The several uniform corps of Infantry of this city, and 
the Officers of Infantry off duty, are invited to assemble in 
full uniform, with the usual badge of mourning, in the rear 
of the City Hall, on Saturday, the 10th instant^ at 11 o'clock, 
A. M., to unite with the Honorable the Corporation in pay 
ing funeral honors to the late President. The General 
and Field Officers and Commandants of uniform corps of In 
fantry are requested to meet at the Infantry Drill Rooms, on 
Thursday evening, the 8th instant, at 8 o'clock, precisely. 
GEORGE S. DOUGHTY, 

Maj. Gen. 31s Division. 
JAMES J. JONES, 

Maj. Gen. 3d Division. 
G. A. STRYKER, 

Maj. Gen. 28th Division. 
JOHN LLOYD, 

Maj. Gen. 32d Division. 



THIRD DIVISION OF INFANTRY. 

NEW YORK, APRIL 7, 1841. 

The Major General hastens to publish the following Ge 
neral Order to the Division, and he expects from the officers 
an immediate attention to the same. 

It beinor the intention of the Common Council of the City 
of New York, to solemnize the death of the illustrious indi- 



11 



vidual, by a procession, on Saturday next, and to invite the 
Military to co-operate, the time and place of assembling for 
such purpose will be announced in a future order. By or 
der of 

Major General JONES, 
(Signed.) PETER R. BRINKERHOFF, 

Division Inspector 



HEAD QUARTERS, ) 

32d Division N. Y. S. Infantry. \ 

DIVISION ORDERS. 

NEW YORK, APRIL 8, 1841. 

The accompanying General Orders are published for the 
information of the officers of this Division. 

All the officers and the several uniformed corps of this Di 
vision, will assemble in full uniform, dismounted, with the 
usual badge of mourning, at the Infantry Drill Room, on 
Saturday, the 10th instant, at 10 o'clock, A. M., to unite in 
paying funeral honors to our late President, WM. HENRY 
HARRISON. 

The General and Field Officers and Commandants of 
Uniform Companies of Infantry, are requested to meet at the 
Infantry Drill Room, on Thursday evening, the 8th instant, 
at 8 o'clock precisely. 

Brigadier General Cummings and Acting Brigadier Gene 
ral Morris will carry the requisition of these orders into effect. 
By order of Major General LLOYD. 
F. MAHONY, 

Division Inspector. 



TWENTY-EIGHTH DIVISION N. Y. S. INFANTRY. 

DIVISION ORDERS. 

Head Quarters^ New York City, April , 1841. 
The Commissioned Officers of the several Regiments and 



12 



Brigades of Infantry composing this Division, and the Officers 
of the Division Staff, are ordered to meet at the Infantry 
Drill Rooms, on Saturday, the 10th instant, at 10J o'clock, 
A. M., in full uniform, with the usual badge of mourning, to 
join in paying funeral honors to our late President WILLIAM 
HENRY HARRISON. 

The usual badge of mourning, consisting of crape on the 
left arm and on the sword hilt, will be worn by all the Com 
missioned Officers of this Division, until after the next an 
nual parade of inspection and review. 

The Commandants of the 45th and 58th Brigades of In 
fantry will promulgate this order for the information of their 
respective commands. By order of 

Major General GARRIT H. STRIKER, 
Commanding 28th Division of Infantry. 

R. H. WINSLOW, 

H. ALLAN WRIGHT, 

A ids de Camp. 



FIRST BRIGADE LIGHT HORSE ARTILLERY. 

Brigade Order No. 1. 

NEW YORK, APRIL 5, 1841. 

The Commandant herewith announces the melancholy 
news, the death of Gen. WM. HENRY HARRISON, late Pre 
sident of these United States, by a circular from his Cabinet. 
It appears he died about half past twelve o'clock on the 
morning of the fourth instant, perfectly composed. 

To pay that respect to the honored dead, and especially 
to one who has heretofore received the confidence of our im 
mortal Washington, the officers of this Brigade will wear 
crape on their left arm for sixty days, and Commandants of 
Regiments and troops will cause the national flag to be dis 
played at half mast at their respective rendezvous, the day 
following the reception of this order, from the rising until the 
setting of the sun. 

Commandants of Regiments will cause this order to be 
forthwith promulgated, and to hold their respective com 
mands in readiness to perform such further respect as may 



13 



be deemed expedient by the civil authorities, or our superi 
ors in command. By order of 

HENRY STORMS, 

Brigadier General, 

Commanding First Brigade Horse Artillery. 
OSCAR GALES, Aid de Camp. 
ROBERT BROWN, Brigade Major. 



FIRST BRIGADE LIGHT HORSE ARTILLERY. 

Brigade Order No. 2. 

NEW YORK, APRIL 7, 1841. 

Commemorative of the burial of our late President, Gene 
ral WILLIAM H. HARRISON, which takes place this day 
noon, at Washington, minute guns, corresponding with age 
of deceased, (sixty-eight,) will be fired by a detachment from 
the First Regiment of this Brigade, at Brooklyn Heights, un 
der charge of Major Albert Powell, and on the Battery by 
Captain Wiliam Chapman, commencing at 12 o'clock, noon. 
By order of 

HENRY STORMS, 

Brigadier General. 
OSCAR COLES, 

Aid de Camp. 
Per H. J. STORMS, 

Assistant. 



FIRST BRIGADE, N. Y. STATE ARTILLERY. 

Head Quarters Order No. . 

NEW YORK, APRIL 7, 1841. 

This Brigade will assemble on Saturday, the 10th instant, 
to unite with the civil authorities in paying funeral honors 
to the memory of the late President of the United States. 



14 



Line will be formed on Broadway, ri^ht on Leonard 
street, at 11 o'clock, A. M. ; Field and Staff and Cavalry 
dismounted. 

Commandants of Regiments will cause their colors to be 

shrouded in crape for two months, and crape streamers will 

be worn on them tor six months, from the date of this order. 

Officers will wear crape on the left arm and sword hilt, 

forjsix months. 

By order of 

HENRY U. SLIPPER, 

Colonel Commanding 
1st Brigade N. Y. State Artillery. 

ALEX. J. COTHEAL, 

Br. Q. M. 



SIXTH BRIGADE, N. Y. STATE ARTILLERY. 
Brigade Orders. 

NEW YORK, APRIL TTH, 1841. 

This Brigade is ordered for duty on Saturday, 10th instant, 
to pay funeral honors to the late President of the United 
States. The line will be formed in Broadway, right on Ca 
nal street, at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

Commandants of Regiments will cause their colors to be 
shrouded in crape for two months, and crape streamers will 
be worn on them for six months from the date of this order. 
The drums will be muffled. The Field and Staff Officers 
and Cavalry will appear on parade dismounted. 

The Officers will wear crape on the left arm and on the 
sword hilt for six months. 

In compliance with Division Orders of this date, Colonel 
Smith will order a sufficient detachment of the Eleventh Re 
giment to fire half-hour guns from the Battery, from the rising 
to the setting of the sun, on Thursday, the 8th instant. 
Commissary General Chandler will furnish the necessary 
ammunition. 

By order of 

Brigadier General GEORGE P. MORRIS. 

WILLIAM DENMAN, 

Aid-de-Camp. 



15 

VETERAN ORDERS. 

NEW YORK, APRIL STH, 1841. 

Veterans An all-wise Providence having removed from 
life our late Commander-in-Chief, our duty requires that we 
unite with our fellow citizens in rendering every mark of 
respect usually awarded to the illustrious dead. 

The Veteran Corps, including the Veteran Guards, under 
Captain Tuthill, will assemble at the Arsenal Yard, on Satur 
day, the 10th instant, at 10 o'clock, A. M.; Officers with 
crape on their left arms and hilt of their swords ; privates 
with crape on the hilts of their swords only. Lieut. Surree 
will take charge that the standards and gun colors are in 
crape. 

By order of 

GEORGE WARREN CHAPMAN, 

Captain Commandant. 

CHARLES ROBB, Adjutant. 



THIRTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT OF NEW YORK 
STATE ARTILLERY. 

JEFFERSON GUARDS REGIMENTAL ORDERS. 

New York April 7th, 1841. 

Pursuant to Brigade Orders, the Companies of this Regi 
ment, located in the City of New York, will parade on Satur 
day next, the 10th instant, to render funeral honors to the 
late President of the United States. The regimental line will 
be formed in Broome street, right on Broadway, at 10 o'clock, 
A. M. 

The colors will be shrouded in crape for two months from 
the date of this order. The drums will be muffled. The 
Field and Staff Officers will appear on parade dismounted. 

The Officers of this Regiment will wear crape on the left 
arm and on the sword-hilt for six months. 
By order of 

COLONEL ANDREW WARNER. 
CHAS. P. DALY, Adjutant. 



16 



FIFTY-NINTH BRIGADE, THIRD DIVISION, NEW 
YORK STATE INFANTRY. 

New York, April 8th, 1841. 

The above General and Division Orders are promulgated 
for the information of the Officers of the Brigade, and to carry 
out the views therein contained, the Officers of the Brigade 
will meet at the Infantry Drill Rooms, on Saturday, the 10th 
instant, at half-past 10 o'clock, A. M., in full uniform, with 
the usual badge of mourning, (crape on the left arm and on 
the sword-hilt,) to join with their fellow citizens and brother 
Officers, to do funeral honors to the memory of the late vene 
rable Chief Magistrate and Commander-in-Chief of all the 
Militia of the United States. 

The Brigadier General expects the Officers of the 59th 
Brigade will not permit this opportunity to pass without per 
forming the last sad duty towards one whose long life has 
been devoted to the best interests of his country, whether in 
the Councils of the Nation, on the battle field, or as a pio 
neer of the great West. The name of GENERAL HARRI 
SON has always been identified with the true interests and 
glory of his country. By order of 

DANIEL LEE, 

Brigadier General. 

LEWIS R. DAVIS, 

Brigade Major and Inspector. 



LIGHT INFANTRY BRIGADE. 

BRIGADE ORDER. 

New York, April 9, 1841. 

The several uniform corps attached to the Infantry of the 
City of New York, having organized themselves into a Bri 
gade for the purpose of uniting as a part of the military es 
cort in the funeral solemnities to the late President of the 
United States, and having selected Brigadier General Kier- 
sted of the 63d Brigade of Infantry to command them on 



17 



that occasion. General Kiersted, with acknowledgments 
for the distinction conferred upon him, hereby assumes the 
command. 

The Brigade will consist of three Regiments, and will be 
commanded as follows : 

1st. Regiment, Col. Ewen, of the 8th Reg't Light Infantry. 
2d. do Col. Murnford, of the 252d Reg't Infantry. 
3d. do Major Tuttle, of the Washington Guards. 

The Brigade line will be formed precisely at 11 o'clock, 
A. M., on Saturday the 10th instant, in Broome street, right 
on Crosby street. 

By order of 

BRIG. GENERAL KIERSTED. 
T. A. SWORDS, Brigadier Major and Inspector, 
63d Brigade of Infantry. 



LIGHT INFANTRY REGIMENT NO. 2. 

REGIMENTAL ORDERS. 

New York, April 9, 1841. 

The foregoing Brigade Orders are hereby promulgated. 
The several Corps composing this Regiment, viz. : 
The Union Riflemen the Benson Cadets, 

The Montgomery Guards, 

The Veteran Guards the Washington Cadets, 

The Putnam Guards, and the 

Livingston Guards, 

will form in Regimental Line, on Saturday, the 10th inst., 
in Centre street, the right resting on Grand street, at 10 
o'clock, A. M. The Field and Staff will appear on parade 
dismounted, and all officers will wear the usual badge of 
mourning, (crape on the left arm and sword hilt.) 

By order of S. JONES MUMFORD, Colonel. 

S. J. BOOKSTAVER, Adjutant. 
3 



18 
63d BRIGADE OF INFANTRY. 

BRIGADE ORDERS. 

New York, April 9, 1841. 

In compliance with the invitation to join the funeral so 
lemnities to the late President of the United States, the offi 
cers are requested to assemble at the Infantry Drill Rooms, 
on Saturday, 10th instant, in full uniform, with the usual 
badge of mourning, at half past 10, A. M. 

By order of BRIG. GEN. KIERSTED. 

J. A. SWORDS, Brigade Inspector. 



10th BRIGADE NEW YORK STATE INFANTRY. 

BRIGADE ORDERS. 

New York, April 8, 1841. 

The Officers of this Brigade are requested to assemble at 
the Infantry Drill Rooms, on Saturday, the 10th instant, at 
half past 10, A. JVL, in full uniform, with the usual badge of 
mourning, to join in the funeral solemnities to be paid to 
the late President of the United States. 

By order of 

BRIG. GEN. FREDERICK PENTZ. 
A. KINTZING POST, Aid de Camp. 

8th REG. LIGHT INF. PRESIDENT'S GUARDS. 

New York, April 9, 1841. 

Pursuant to the invitation of the Common Council of this 
City, and Brigade Orders of this date, the several Companies 
composing the Regiment, and the volunteer companies, will 
assemble, fully uniformed and equipped (without knapsacks,) 
at the juncti6n of East Broadway and Grand street, on Satur 
day, the 10th instant, at 10 o'clock, A. M., for the purpose of 



19 



uniting with the other uniformed corps and citizens, in a 
funeral procession in honor of the late President of the 
United States. Officers will wear black crape on the left 
arm and on the sword hilt. 

By order of 

COL. JOHN EWEN. 
WM. H. OGILVIE, Adjutant. 



264th REGIMENT N. Y. STATE INFANTRY. 

HEAD QUARTERS ORDER NO. 2. 

New York, April 8, 1841. 

The foregoing General, Division, and Brigade Orders, are 
published for the information and guidance of this command. 

The sad intelligence contained in said orders will be re 
ceived by all with unfeigned grief. 

In compliance with the above Brigade Order, the Officers 
of this Regiment will assemble in full uniform, Field and 
Staff Officers dismounted, with the prescribed badges of 
mourning, on the 10th instant, at 10 o'clock, A. M., at the 
Infantry Drill Rooms, Centre Market, to join with onr fel 
low citizens in paying the last tribute of respect to the me 
mory of our late President, WM. HENRY HARRISON. 

Captain Cairns, of the Independent Guard, and Captain 
Schwartz, of the Washington Riflemen, with their respective 
commands, armed and equipped in full uniform, and badges 
of mourning, will parade at the same time and place, to par 
ticipate in the solemnities of this occasion. 

Field Officers of this Regiment, and Commandants Cairns 
and Schwartz, are requested to meet our fellow-officers this 
evening, at 8 o'clock, at the Infantry Drill Rooms, to perfect 
arrangements and receive further instructions. 

By order of 
F. E. MATHER, Lieut. Col Commanding. 

W. C. SCOTT, Acting Adjutant. 



20 
3d BRIGADE, 32d DIVISION. 

HEAD QUARTERS ORDER NO. 39. 

New York, April 8, 1841. 

General Orders of the 6th instant, and Division Orders of 
this day, are hereby, in accordance with the directions there 
in contained, promulgated to this command. 
By order of 

Brig. Gen. T. S. CUMMINGS. 
HECTOR MORRISON, Brigade Major and Insp. 



64th BRIGADE N. Y. STATE INFANTRY. 

HEAD QUARTERS ORDER NO. 5. 

New York, April 8, 1841. 

The preceding General and Division Orders announcing 
the melancholy intelligence of the death of our late venerated 
Chief Magistrate, are promulgated for the information of this 
Brigade. 

Itt compliance with Division Orders of this date, the Offi 
cers of this Brigade will assemble in full uniform, (Field and 
Staff dismounted) with the usual badges of mourning, on 
Saturday next, the 10th instant, at 10 o'clock, A. M., at the 
Infantry Drill Room, for the purpose of uniting with the 
civil authorities in paying funeral honors to the late Presi 
dent of the United States Major General WILLIAM HENRY 
HARRISON. 

The Uniform Corps of this Brigade are directed to parade 
in full uniform with the usual badges of mourning, on Sa 
turday, the 10th instant, at 10 o'clock, A. M.. at the Infantry 
Drill Room for the same purpose. 

The Field Officers and Commandants of Uniform Com 
panies are requested to meet at the Drill Room, on Thurs 
day evening, 8th instant, at 8 o'clock, P. M. 

Commandants of Regiments will cause these orders to be 
published throughout their respective commands. 

By order of ROBERT C. MORRIS, 

Acting Brigadier General. 

H. W. SILL, Brigade Major and Inspector. 



21 
58th BRIGADE N. Y. STATE INFANTRY. 

BRIGADE ORDERS. 

New York, April 7, 1841. 

The Commissioned Officers of this Brigade are requested 
to assemble in full uniform (with the usual bad^e of mourn 
ing on the left arm and sword hilt,) at the Infantry Drill 
Rooms, Centre Market, on Saturday next, the 10th instant, 
at half past ten o'clock in the forenoon, for the purpose of 
uniting with their fellow citizens in rendering funeral honors 
to the late lamented President of the United States, WILLIAM 
HENRY HARRISON. By order of 

Brig. Gen. R. L. SCHIEFFELIN. 

JAMES MASON, Aid de Camp. 



BRIGADE INFANTRY. 

BRIGADE ORDERS NO. 57. 

New York, April 7, 1841. 

The nation justly mourns the loss of one of its prominent 
patriots of the Washington school, in the death of WILLIAM 
HENRY HARRISON, theflate popular head of our great Re 
public. With a view of joining the civil authorities, and our 
military associates'^ of the city, in paying a last tribute of 
respect to the memory of the late President of the United 
States, the officers of the 45th Brigade of Infantry will as 
semble in full dress, 3 ;\vith crape on the sword hilt and left 
arm, at the Infantry Drill Rooms, at half past 10 o'clock, 
A. ML, on Saturday, the 10th instant. Colonels Benson, 
Moore and Hudson, will also respectively direct the Light 
Infantry Companies attached to their commands to assem 
ble in full uniform, with the usual badge of mourning, at 
the same time and place last above mentioned. 

Pursuant to General Orders from Head Quarters, the Of 
ficers of this Brigade will continue to wear the usual badge 
of mourning, until after the next annual inspection and re 
view of their respective corps. 

WM. L. MORRIS, Brig-. General. 

CHAS. B. WHITTEMORE, Aid de Camp. 



22 

i 

62d BRIGADE OF INFANTRY. 

BRIGADE ORDERS NO. 22 

New York, April 9, 1841. 
i 

The attention of the Officers of the 62d Brigade a isjhereby 
directed-to the General Orders from Head Quarters, pub 
lished in this paper. To testify their obedience thereto, and 
as a mark of their deep sense of the bereavement our coun 
try has sustained, the Brigadier General calls upon them to 
join with him in attendance on the funeral obsequies or 
dered by the Civil Authorities, in memory of our late Chief 
Magistrate. They will, for that purpose, assemble at the 
Infantry Drill Room, over Centre Market, to-day, (Saturday) 
10th instant,f at half past 10 o'clock. 
By order of 

Brigadier General M. KEELER. 
W> D. WADDINGTON, 

Brigade Major and Inspector. 



THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION N. Y. S. INFANTRY. 

Major General John Lloyd arid Staff. 

Officers of the Third Brigade. 

Brigadier General Thomas S. Cummings and Staff. 

Colonel Abel Smith, and Officers of the Fifty-first Regiment 

Infantry. 

Colonel William Steel, and Officers of the Tenth Regiment 

Infantry. 

The following Battalion and Companies, attached to the 
Third Brigade, were on duty and formed part of the escort : 

First Battalion Second Regiment Light Infantry. 
Washington Guards, commanded by Major Andrew C. 

Tuttle. 

Tompkins Blues, commanded by Captain Samuel W. Seely. 
Montgomery Guards, commanded by Captain John Munday. 
Franklin Blues, commanded by Captain Thomas D. Smith. 



23 



Officers of the Sixty-fourth Brigade. 

Acting Brigadier General Robert C. Morris and Staff. 

Colonel Nicholas Carroll, and Officers of the One hundred 

and forty-second Regiment of Infantry. 

Lieutenant Colonel Frederick E. Mather, and Officers of the 

Two hundred and Sixty-fourth Regiment Infantry. 

The following Companies of the Sixty-fourth Brigade were 
on duty and formed part of the escort : 
Veteran Guard, One hundred and forty-second Regiment, 

commanded by Captain Daniel L. Tuttle. 
Union Riflemen, One hundred and forty-second Regiment, 

commanded by Captain Samuel S. Parker. 
Independence Guard, Two hundred and sixty-fourth Regi 
ment, commanded by Captain John T. Carnes. 
Washington Riflemen, Two hundred and sixty-fourth Regi 
ment, commanded by Captain Lewis Schwarts. 



THIRD DIVISION OF INFANTRY. 

New YorAr, April 16, 1841. 

Dear Sir : Agreeably to your request I enclose copies of 
Division and Brigade Orders, issued within my command, 
upon occasion of paying funeral honors to the late President 
of the United States, on the 10th instant. I have also to 
state that the following officers were present upon that day : 

Major General James J. Jones 3d Division 

Brigadier General Kiersted 63d Brigade 

Brigadier General Lee 59th Brigade 

and that nearly all the Officers of the following Regiments 
composing the division were present, viz.: 75th, 115th, 223d, 
249th, 258th, 257th, 267th and 269th. 

There was but one Company, (called the Livingston 
Guards) on duty from this Division; it was under the fol 
lowing Officers : 

Captain William Roome, 
Lieutenant O. H. P. Brush. 

This Company, with the other light Companies of the se 
veral Divisions ot Infantry, were organized as a Brigade up- 



24 



on the above occasion, under the command of Brigadier Ge 
neral Henry T. Kiersted, of this Division. It was com 
posed of three Regiments, the First under the command of 
Colonel Ewen, of the 8th Light Infantry Regiment ; the se 
cond under Colonel Mumford, of the 252d Regiment of In 
fantry, and the third under Major Tuttle, of the Washington 
Guards. 

The 1st in addition to the 8th Li^ht Infantry (President's 
Guards) contained the Scott's Cadets and two other compa 
nies whose names are not furnished. 

The 2nd consisted of the Union Riflemen, the Benson Ca 
dets, the Montgomery Guards, the Veteran Guards, the Wash 
ington Cadets, the Putnam Guards, and the Livingston 
Guards. 

The 3rd Regiment consisted of the Battalion of Wash 
ington Guards, the Independence Guards, and one or two 
other Companies whose titles are not known to me ; the 
whole making a force of about five hundred men. 

I regret exceedingly that I was accidentally prevented from 
making this report to you (as requested) yesterday. 
Respectfully your obedient servant, 

JAMES J. JONES, 
Major General 3d Division. 



GENERAL ORDER. 

It has become my painful duty to announce to the Officers 
of the Navy and Marine Corps, attached to this station, under 
my command, the death of WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, 
late President of the United States, which occurred on the 
morning of the 4th instant, at Washington, and to direct, in 
compliance with the directions from the Department, their 
manifestation of respect for the exalted character, eminent 
public services of the deceased, and their sense of the loss 
sustained by our common country, by this afflicting event, 
by wearing the usual badge of mourning for six months. 

And I further direct that funeral honors be paid him on 
board each of the vessels in commission at this station, by 
firing twenty-six minute guns, commencing at 12 o'clock, M., 
to-morrow, and by wearing their flags at half mast for one 
week. 

(Signed.) J. RENSHAW, Com'dt. 

Navy Yard, New York, April 7th, 1841. 



25 

GUARD SHIP NORTH CAROLI.NA, 
April 7th, half-past 9, A. M. 

SIR I this moment received your note in relation to the 
officers, men and boys attached to this ship, joining the pro 
cession to be formed on Saturday next, to render proper fune 
ral honors to the late President of the United States, WIL 
LIAM HENRY HARRISON. 

It is impossible for me to meet tho Committee at 10 o'clock 
this morning the time of my receiving your note and the 
time of meeting do not allow of it however, any arrange 
ment that the Committee may adopt with regard to myself 
and officers and boys will be attended to. 
I am respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN GALLAGHER, Captain. 
D. GRAHAM, Jun., Esq., 

Chairman of the Committee of the 
Common Council, New York. 



NAVAL LYCEUM, ) 

UNITED STATES NAVY YARD, N. Y., > 

APRIL TTH, 1841. 3 

ELIAS L. SMITH, ESQ.., 

Alderman, City of New York, 

Chairman of the Committee of Arrangements : 

SIR I am directed by Commodore James Renshaw, to in 
form you that at a meeting of the officers attached to this 
yard and station this morning, Captain J, T. Newton, Com 
mander J. R. Sands, U. S. Navy, and Captain Jno. Harris, 
U. S. M. Corps, were appointed a Committee, to meet the 
Joint Committee of the Common Councils of the Cities of 
New York and Brooklyn, to make arrangements relative to 
the funeral procession, to be formed on Saturday next. The 
Committee will attend at 12 o'clock. 

I am, Sir, very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

JNO. A. FARLEY, A. L. 
4 



26 

THe following proceedings of civic and other societies^ 
and associations of citizens were likewise laid before the 
Committee, with a request that suitable places in the pro 
posed ceremonies should be assigned to them : 

Delegates from the Board of Trustees of Columbia Col 
lege, John L. Lawrence, Beverly Robinson and Clement C. 
Moore, Esquires. 



The Faculty and Students of the University of New York 
will attend. 



NEW YORK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. 

Extract from the Minutes of the meeting held on Tuesday, 
the 7th of April, instant : 

On motion of James G. King, seconded by Prosper M. 
Wetmore, 

Resolved, That the members of this Chamber have learn 
ed with the deepest regret, the decease of WILLIAM HENRY 
HARRISON, late President of the United States, and that in 
testimony of their respect for his memory, they will wear the 
usual badge of mourning for thirty days. 

Resolved, That the above resolutions be published, and a 
copy thereof transmitted to the family of the deceased. 

ISAAC CAROW, President. 
EDWARD A. B. GRAVES, Secretary. 



BOARD OF TRADE. 

At a meeting of this Board, held April 8th, 1841, the fol 
lowing resolutions, presented by G. P. Disosway, were unani 
mously adopted : 

Resolved^ That this Board sympathize in the universal 
feelings of sorrow upon the death of WILLIAM HENRY 
HARRISON. President of the United States. 

Resolved^ That this Board, as a solemn tribute of respect 
for the distinguished patriotic services and private virtues of 
the deceased, as well as a mark of grateful remembrance fb? 



27 



his long and faithful devotion to our country, will unite in 
the funeral honors on this occasion. 

Resolved, That Messrs. Leavitt, Disosway and Cushman, 
constitute a Committee to confer with the Common Council, 
to carry into effect the above resolutions. 

Resolved, That the members of this Board be requested to 
wear the usual badge of mourning on the left arm for sixty 
days. 

J. W. LEAVITT, President. 

WM. W. PINNEO, Secretary. 



We, the undersigned, officers of Charitable Societies in this 
city, desire to join in the proceedings for the solemnization 
of the death of the late President. 

THOMAS FESSENDEN, 

1st Vice President of the New England Society, 
in the absence of the President. 

CHARLES EDWARDS, 
President of the St. George's Society. 

D. S. KENNEDY, 
President of the St. Andrew's Society. 

R. HOGAN, 
President of the Society of F. Sons of St. Patrick 

VICTOR DE LAUNAIS, 
President of the French Benevolent Society. 

C. W. FABER, 
President of the German Society. 



NEW YORK, APRIL 9, 1841. 

Gentlemen I have the honor to inform the Committee of 
the Common Council, that the St. David's Benevolent So 
ciety will be prepared to join the funeral solemnities to-mor 
row, and will be gratified to occupy a place in the procession, 
to be assigned to them by the Committee. 

With great respect, your obedient servant, 

DAVID C. COLDEN, 
Acting President of the St. David's 

Benevolent Society. 
To the Committee of the Common Council. 



28 

i 

MEETING OF THE BAR. 

Pursuant to public notice, the Members of the Bar assem 
bled in the Superior Court Room, on Saturday, the 10th of 
April, 1841, at eleven o'clock. 

Hiram Ketchum called the meeting to order, and on his 
nomination, David B. Ogden was appointed President. 

On motion of the Hon. John McKeon, M. C. } Daniel Lord, 
jun., and Charles O'Connor, were appointed Vice Presidents ; 
and on motion of Henry W. Warner, William H, Harison, 
and James T. Brady, were appointed Secretaries of the 
meeting. 

(Mr. Brady being absent from indisposition, George B. But 
ler was appointed by the officers of the meeting to act in his 
stead.) 

James R. Whiting, the District Attorney of the City and 
County of New York, moved the following resolutions, which 
were passed unanimously, viz. : 

Resolved, That the Bar of New York fully participate in 
the unfeigned sorrow which the death of our Chief Magis 
trate has spread through the nation. 

Resolved, That when the political head of any people is 
called away by death from his eminent position, it behoves 
the people over whom he was placed solemnly to consider 
the uncertainty of human life, and the vanity of earthlyj.dis- 
tinctions ; but in view of the decided and warm manifesta 
tions of public confidence which attended the elevation of 
our late Chief Magistrate to office, the flattering evidences of 
popular favor with which he entered upon his duties, the 
brevity of his term, and the sudden and unexpected man 
ner in which he was torn from the warm embraces of his 
fellow citizens, and united to the band of the illustrious 
dead, we find cause for the profoundest meditation. 

Resolved^ That however we may have been divided in 
the late political contest, we now remember WILLIAM HENRY 
HARRISON, only as an Illustrious American our Country 
man ; one called by the voice of a free and intelligent people 
to the highest political distinction on earth, and suddenly 
summoned by the Ruler of Nations to surrender that post ; 
as Americans, forgetting all minor distinctions, we are one 
in sorrow, and unitedly mingle our tears over the grave of 
the deceased. 



29 



Resolved, That we will wear the usual badge of mourn 
ing, and this day join the funeral procession. 

On motion of John Cleaveland it was 

Resolved, That we join the funeral procession, headed by 
the Officers of the meeting and the mover of the foregoing 
resolutions, and marshalled by the Secretaries ; and that the 
members be arranged as nearly in the order of seniority as 
may be. 

Upwards of two hundred and fifty gentlemen of the bar, 
almost all in full mourning, in addition to many other mem 
bers of the profession who officiated as pall-bearers, marshal 
of the day and his assistants, and in other stations, civil and 
military, then formed in procession : the Secretaries bearing 
staves of office covered with black crape. 

WILLIAM H. HARISON, Secretary. 
GEORGE B. BUTLER, Acting SeJy. 



PUBLIC SOCIETIES. 

L O. of O. F. 

, 

JGRAND LODGE ORDERS. 

Head Quarters, National Hall, ) 
New York, April 8, 1841. J 

The several Subordinate Lodges of the I. O. of O. F. of 
the City of New York and the County of Kings, will as 
semble in full regalia, at their respective places of meeting, 
on Saturday morning, the 10th of April, at nine o'clock, 
and proceed in Lodge form to Head Quarters, National Hall, 
Canal street; arriving at ten o'clock precisely, to join the 
general procession in paying funeral Honors to General 
WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, late President of the United 
States. 

The several Subordinate Marshals will report to P. G. 
Lewis H. Watts, Assistant Grand Marshal, immediately upon 
their arrival at Head Quarters. 



30 



The several Subordinate Lodges will take branch accord 
ing to seniority, the Junior Lodges in front, forming six 
abreast, except the Officers and Supporters, who will form 
in the usual manner. 

The brethren of jthe Grand and Subordinate Lodges are 
requested to appear in white gloves, dark colored cloth coats, 
black hats, and the usual badge of mourning on the left 
arm. 

Assistant Grand Marshals. 

P. G. Lewis H. Watts, P. G. Willett Charlick, 

P. G. Thomas B. Tappan, P. G. George Ruben, 
P. G. Thomas Vollinger, P. G. James ScartifF. 
By order. 

JOHN G. TREADWELL, 

Grand Marshal. 

The R. W. Grand Lodge of New York will convene at 
the Howard House, Broadway, on Saturday morning, at nine 
o'clock. By Order. 

JOHN G. TREADWELL, 

G. Secretary. 



GENERAL COMMITTEE OF DEMOCRATIC WHIG 
YOUNG MEN. 

A meeting oMhis Committee will be held at National 
Hall, Canal street, on this (Saturday) morning, the 10th of 
April, instant, at ten o'clock, for the purpose of joining in 
the funeral solemnities of our late President. 

BENJAMIN DRAKE, 

President. 

WILLIAM B. MARSH, 
GILES M. HILLYER, 

Secretaries. 



MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 
At a general meeting of the members of this association. 



31 



held at Clinton Hall, on Thursday evening, April 8, 1841, to 
express their sympathy on the occasion of the decease of the 
late President of the United State?, WILLIAM HENRY HAR 
RISON, on motion of Hector Morrison, President of the Asso 
ciation, John H. Gourlie was called to the Chair, and Sa 
muel Sloan appointed Secretary. 

The Special Committee of the Board of Direction, charged 
with making appropriate arrangements on the part of the As 
sociation, having made a report of their proceedings, it was, 
on motion of John Butler, jun., unanimously 

Resolved, That the members of the Mercantile Library 
Association^ participating in the general grief on the occasion 
of the death of WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, late President 
of the United States, do approve the measures taken by the 
Board of Direction, on the part of the Association, to make 
a suitable manifestation of our sorrow for the unexpected and 
melancholy event. 

Resolved, That as a testimony of the profound respect en 
tertained for the memory of the late illustrious President, 
and sincere regret for the irreparable loss the nation has sus 
tained by this afflicting bereavement of Divine Providence, 
the members of this association will wear the usual badge of 
mourning for sixty days ; and agreeably to the arrangements 
made by the Select Committee of the Board of Directors, 
will unite with the public authorities and citizens generally, 
in the observance of appropriate funeral solemnities, on Satur 
day next, the 10th instant. 

Resolved, That the members, and others intending to join 
with the association in the funeral ceremonies, are requested 
to meet in the Lecture Room of Clinton Hall, on Saturday 
morning next, at half past ten o'clock, when suitable badges 
and other emblems of mourning will be furnished. 

Resolved, That the above resolutions be published. 

JOHN H. GOURLIE, 

Chairman. 
SAMUEL SLOAN, Secretary. 

Members are requested to provide themselves with the 
Usual badge of mourning. By order. 

SAMUEL SLOAN, 
Recording Secretary* 



32 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE. 

New 'York April, 8, 184L 

At a stated meeting of this Institute, held this evening, the 
following preamble and resolutions were, on motion of Ge* 
lieral Tal Image, the President of the Institute, unanimously 
adopted : 

Whereas, it has pleased the Supreme Disposer of all events, 
in his wise, just, and mysterious Providence, to remove froni 
this life WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, the late venerated 
President of the United States, be it, therefore, 

Resolved, That suitable arrangements be made by the' 
Trustees of the American Institute, for joining in the solem 
nities of the funeral ceremonies contemplated by our fellow 
citizens, in honor of the memory of the deceased. 

Resolved, That the members be requested to assemble on 
Saturday, the 10th instant, at half past ten o'clock, A. M., 
at the Institute Rooms, for the purpose of joining in the pro 
cession, and that they will wear the Usual badge of mourn-* 
ing for thirty days. 

(Attest.) G. R. J. BOWDOIN, 

Recording Secretary. 



NATIONAL ACADEMY OF DESIGN, 

Whereas, we have heard, with the deepest regret, of the 
death of oitr Chief Magistrate, President HARRISON, and 
deeply sympathising with the friends of the deceased, and 
our fellow citizens generally, in this national bereavement, 
therefore 

Resolved, That the members of the Academy be requested 
to wear the usual badge of mourning, (crape on the left 
arm,) until after their next annual meeting. 

Resolved, That the members of the Academy assemble 
on Saturday, the 10th instant, at the Rooms of the Academy, 
at eleven o'clock, to unite with our fellow citzens in paying 
the last tribute of respect to the memory of the deceased. 



33 



Resolved, That the Secretary, J. L. Morton, Esq., is here 
by appointed, on the part of the Academy, to announce to 
the Corporation our acceptance of their invitation to unite 
in the ceremonies, and to make such other arrangements as 
are necessary. 



THE MEMBERS OF THE BAR, 

In mourning, will meet in the Superior Court Room, on 
Saturday next, at eleven o'clock precisely, for the purpose 
of expressing their united sense of the NATIONAL AFFLIC 
TION, and of joining their fellow citizens in the ceremonials 
of the day. 

It is hoped that every gentleman of the profession will be 
present. 

Hiram Ketchum, S. Jones, 

John McKeon, Ogden Edwards, 

John Cleaveland, W. T. McCoun, 

John A. Morrill, O. Hoffman, 

B. F. Butler, J. R. Whiting, 

Samuel R. Betts, M. Ulshoeffer, 

William H. Harison, David B. Ogden. 
April 8, 1841. 



NEW YORK FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

A meeting of the Engineers, Foremen and Assistants of the 
New York Fire Department, was held at Firemen's Hall, on 
Wednesday evening, April 7, 1841, C. V. Anderson, Chief 
Engineer, in the Chair. 

The object of the meeting having been stated by the Chair 
man to make arrangements for solemnizing the death of the 
late President, the following resolutions were on motion of 
Carlisle Norwood, seconded by Henry B. Hinsdale, unani 
mously adopted : 

Whereas, an all-wise and overruling Providence has seen 
fit to remove by death, WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, Presi 
dent of the United States ; and whereas, the Common Coun- 

5 



34 



cil of this City has requested that the members of the Fire 
Department should unite with them in solemnizing the death 
of the late President ; therefore, be it 

Resolved^ That the Firemen of the City of New York, 
entertaining profound respect for the patriotic services and 
eminent virtues of the late President, and sympathizing with 
our fellow citizens in the general grief into which his sud 
den death has plunged them, will unite in solemnizing this 
melancholy event on Saturday next, in such a manner as may 
be determined upon by our authorities. 

Resolved, That in pursuance of the request made by the 
Committee of the Common Council, we do appoint six dele 
gates to meet with the former at the City Hall, on Thursday, 
at 12 o'clock at noon, for the purpose of making the neces 
sary arrangements to carry out the object namect in the fore 
going resolution. 

Resolved, That the delegates be requested to publish in 
the Courier and Enquirer, New Era, and the Sun, the plan 
determined upon by them, and also the hour and place at 
which the Firemen shall assemble on Saturday next. 

Resolved, That as it is contemplated that the Firemen 
shall unite with the civic procession, that the foreman of 
every company is hereby requested to exclude all boys or 
volunteers from their ranks. 

Resolved, That the delegates have the entire arrange 
ments of the procession. 

Resolved, That the delegates appoint the Grand Marshal, 
and that they act as his aids also have power to add to their 
number. 

Messrs. Carlisle Norwood, George W. Varian, Elijah C. 
King, Henry B. Hinsdale, John P. Lacour, and George Kerr, 
were appointed as delegates to meet with the Common Coun 
cil. 

On motion, it was 

Resolved, That the Chairman and Secretary of the meet 
ing be added to the delegates. 

Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be pub 
lished. 

CORNELIUS V. ANDERSON, 

President. 
JOHN T. ROLLINS, 



35 



The Committee on the Fire Department, appointed at the 
meeting of Engineers and Foremen, on Wednesday evening, 
7th instant, have determined on the following 

ORDER OF ARRANGEMENTS. 

The line will be formed precisely at half-past 10 o'clock, 
on Saturday morning, in East Broadway, the right resting 
on Pike street. 

Officers of companies are requested to exclude all volun 
teers and boys, and to have their companies promptly on the 
ground, as the procession will move to the place assigned 
by the Committee of the Common Council, precisely at 11 
o'clock. 

The companies will appear without any of their apparatus 
and in citizen's dress, with their appropriate banners and 
badges, the banners shrouded in crape, and each mem 
ber will wear crape on the left arm. The foremen and as 
sistants will also carry their speaking trumpets, shrouded in 
crape. 

The line will be formed in the following order, viz. : 
1st Grand Marshal and two Aids, on the extreme right. 

2 Exempt Firemen. 

3d Officers and Trustees of Fire Department Fund. 
4 pire Wardens. 



5 Engine Companies, in regular succession, beginning 
with No. 1. 

6 Hose Companies in the same order. 

7 Hook and Ladder Companies. 

8 Hydrant Companies. 

After the line is formed, it will be broken into sections of 
six, and march to the place assigned by the Committee of the 
Common Council, where they will take their place in the 
funeral procession, in reversed order. 

In case of an alarm of fire, the companies located in the 
district where the fire occurs, will retire from the line, in an 
orderly manner the other companies will retain their places 
until ordered to leave by the Chief or Assistant Engineers. 

Grand Marshal, 
CORNELIUS V. ANDERSON. 



36 



Aids to the Grand Marshal : 

John T. Rollins, Carlisle Norwood, 

Frederick D. Kohler, George W. Varian, 

William C. Bradley, Henry B. Hinsdale, 

Zophar Mills, Elijah C. King, 

Jesse Brash, George Kerr 3 

William A. Freeborn, John P. Lacour, 

John S. Ken yon. 

CARLISLE NORWOOD, 

Chairman of the Committee of Arrangements. 

HENRY B. HINSDALE, 



FIRST WARD HOSE COMPANY, No. 8. 

The members and ex-members of this Company are re 
quested to assemble at the Carriage House, on Saturday, 10th 
instant, at 10 o'clock, A. M., for the purpose of uniting in 
the funeral procession in honor of our late venerable and 
patriotic President, General WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON. 

H. B. HINSDALE, Foreman. 
JOHN W. MOORE, Sec'y. t 



SOUTHWARK ENGINE COMPANY, No. 38. 

The members of this Company are hereby requested to 
meet at Jones' Second Ward Hotel, 87 Nassau street, on Sa 
turday next, at 10 o'clock, A. M., to join with the Department 
in paying funeral honors to our late President, WILLIAM 
HENRY HARRISON. 

By order of the Foreman. 

AUGUSTUS EMBREE, SeJy. 



EXEMPT FIREMEN. 

The Exempt Firemen of the Cities of New York and 



37 



Brooklyn, are requested to assemble at the Hospital Green, 
Broadway, this morning, at 10 o'clock. 
By order of 

UZZIAH WENMAN, Chairman. 



At a meeting of the Democratic Republican General Com 
mittee, held at National Hall, on Friday evening, the 7th of 
April, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, That this Committee, in common with their 
fellow citizens, have received with feelings of deep regret the 
melancholy intelligence of the decease of WILLIAM HENRY 
HARRISON, late President of the United States. That while 
we cherish with feelings of pride the recollection of his pub 
lic services, his private virtues and patriotic devotion to the 
interests of his country, and the integrity of our Constitu 
tion, we deplore the calamity which has thus cut short his 
career of usefulness, and deprived the nation of its Chief Ma 
gistrate. 

Resolved, That this Committee, in a body, will unite with 
their fellow citizens in the funeral ceremonies in honor of the 
late President, and that a Committee of five be appointed by 
the Chairman to communicate with the appropriate Commit 
tees on the subject. 

Resolved, That the foregoing resolutions be published. 

JAMES N. WELLS, Chairman. 

EDWARD SANDFORD, 

FRRDERICK A. GAY, 

Notice. The Committee are requested to meet at National 
Hall, this morning, at half-past 10 o'clock. 



NEW YORK, APRIL STH, 1841. 

To the Honorable the Common Council of the City of 
New York: 

This is to certify, that Francis Tudhop and John Gra 
ham, have been appointed as a delegation from the Journey- 



38 



men Stone Cutters' Association of the City of New York, to 
take their place in the line of march in the procession on 
Saturday, April 10th, 1841. 

WILLIAM YOUNG, President. 

HENRY LARKIN, Rec. Secretary. 

JEREMIAH LOONIE, Cor. Secretary. 



NEW YORK, APRIL TTH, 1841. 

At a meeting of the Trade Society of Journeymen Sail 
Makers, on Wednesday evening, April 7th, Mr. James Ols- 
sen, bearer of this credential, was duly appointed to act 
with your Honorable Body, to represent this body as a dele 
gate. 

JAMES E. LENT, President. 

JAMES S. COLE, Secretary. 



NEW YORK, APRIL 7, 1841. 
To Elias L. Smith, Esq., 

Chairman, fyc. Joint Committee. 

S IR Pursuant to a resolution of your Committee inviting 
delegates from the different societies, &c., to meet with you 
in making arrangements to carry out the views of the Com 
mon Council, in the matter of the death of the President of 
the United States, Messrs. William H. Brasher, Jno. T. Lor- 
ton and George A. Halsey, were appointed such Committee 
on behalf of the New York Society of Letters. 

Your most obedient servant, 

JAS. H. HEROY, 

President, pro tern., Board of Directors. 
Attest. 
R. P. CLARK, Secretary. 



This is to certify, that the bearers, F. W. Wolfe, Joseph 
Stum, and George McKibbin, are a Committee, regularly 



39 



appointed at a meeting of the Benevolent Association of 
Bookbinders, held on Wednesday evening, April 7th, 1841. 

THOS. JEWESSON, President. 
EDWARD McWnooD, Secretary. 



Delegates from the following Societies. 

For the United Benevolent Society of Journeymen Tai 
lors Edward Rielly: 

For the Hibernian Universal Benevolent Society John 
McBride : 

For the Shamrock Benevolent Society Daniel Hughes : 

For the Hibernian Benevolent Burial Society Patrick 
Kelly: 

Are in attendance to receive necessary orders with regard 
to their proper place in the line of procession, &c. &c. 



It is hereby certified, that the following gentlemen consti 
tute the Committee appointed to wait upon the Honorable 
Common Council, by" the Democratic Whig General Com 
mittee and the General Committee of Democratic Whig Young 
Men, in relation to the funeral solemnities of President Har 
rison, Samuel G. Raymond, Benjamin Drake, Giles M. Hill- 
yer, Revo C. Hance, James R. Wood. 

SAMUEL G. RAYMOND, 

Chairman. 
GILES M. HELLYER, 

Secretary of Committee of Arrangements. 



DELEGATES FROM THE CARTMEN. 

Andrew R. Jackman, Robert Millicken, 

Stephen D. Halsted, Lorenzo Dibble, 

Evert S. Voorhees. 



40 



To Alderman David Graham^ Jan., 

SIR The following were appointed a Committee on the 
part of the Grand Lodge of the State of New York, Indepen 
dent Order of Odd Fellows, to unite with the Committee on 
the part of the Common Council, to make arrangements for 
funeral honors to our late President WILLIAM HENRY HAR 
RISON, viz. : John A. Kennedy, Charles McGowan, Wm. A. 
Tyler, Wm. Y. Clark, and John G. Treadwell. 

JOHN G. TREADWELL, G. Secretary. 

New York, April 8, 1841. 



NEW YORK, APRIL 7, 1841. 

At a Special Meeting of Leather Dressers, held at the 
Shakspeare Hotel, corner of William and Duane streets, Mr. 
F. W. Wood was appointed Chairman, and Mr. Robert Brad- 
shaw Secretary. 

Resolved, That a Committee of three be appointed to meet 
the Joint Committee of the Cities of New York and Brook 
lyn, to make the necessary arrangements to carry out the 
views expressed in the resolution of the Common Councils 
aforesaid, when Mr. W. McDougal, Mr. J. Larkins, and Mr. 
B. Bradshaw, were unanimously appointed. 

FREDERICK W. WOOD, Chairman, 
ROBERT BRADSHAW, Secretary. 



At a meeting of the Board of Trade, held April 8, 1841, 
the following members were appointed a Committee to meet 
that from the Common Council, to unite in arrangements for 
the funeral honors to President HARRISON, viz.: John W. 
Leavitt, D. A. Cushman, G. P. Disosway. 



James Osborn, a delegate from Williamsburgh, informs 
the Committee that a procession will be formed in that place, 
and wish to be assigned a place in the procession immedi 
ately after the delegation from Brooklyn. 



41 

NEW YORK, APRIL 8, 1841. 

The New York Benevolent Society of Shipwrights and 
Caulkers would wish to unite with the funeral procession 
on Saturday next : delegates, William Bennet, Joseph 
Waterbury, Robert McGowan, Jun. 



Delegates from the Butchers of the Cities of New York 
and Brooklyn Jacob Aims and George Pessenger 
April 8, 1841. 

To the Grand Marshal of the Day. 

SIR The Butchers of the City of New York and Brook 
lyn would embrace the earliest opportunity to inform you of 
their intention to parade in the solemnities of Saturday next, 
and as it would be necessary that you should know their 
number, in order to assign them their proper place in line, 
they are fully assured that their number will be six hundred 
strong. 

Respectfully yours, 

LAWRENCE WISEBURN, 

Grand Marshal of the Butchers' Society. 



At a meeting of "The Society of the Friendly Sons of St> 
Patrick," held at the City Hotel on the 7th instant, the fol 
lowing preamble and resolutions were adopted : 

Whereas, The Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Pa 
trick" have, in common with their fellow citizens generally, 
received with deep regret the intelligence of the death of 
WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, late President of the United 
States of America. Be it therefore 

Resolved, That this Society unite in the funeral solemni 
ties to take place on Saturday next, the 10th instant, and that 

6 



42 



a Committee, consisting of James Reyburn, Dudley 
and M. O. Barry, be, and the same are hereby appointed, to 
meet the Committee on the part of the Corporation of the 
City of New York, at the City Hall, on Thursday next, the 
8th instant, at 12 M. 

Resolved, That the members of this society wear the 
usual badge of mourning for thirty days. 

Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be pub 
lished in the daily papers. 

ROBERT HOGAN, President. 
M. O. BARRY, Secretary. 



NEW YORK, APRIL 5, 1841. 

To the Committee of Arrangements : 

GENTLEMEN The undersigned, delegates from the Ge 
neral Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, beg leave to 
request a station in the procession preceding other Mechanic 
Associations, on account of its being the oldest, and also be 
ing composed of all trades, numbering fifteen hundred mem 
bers, exclusive of the Readers at the Apprentices Library, 
numbering seventeen hundred, which will be under their 
charge. The Society was organized in 1785, and took part in 
the federal procession on the adoption of the Constitution, 

DELEGATES. 

Samuel Roome, L. W. Stevens, 

James Van Norden, Adoniram Chandler^ 

Isaac Fryer. 



New York, April 7, 1841. 

This is to certify that the following persons were duly ap 
pointed as a Delegation from the Smiths' Beneficial Society^ 



43 



to meet the Committee of the Common Council, for the pur 
pose of making the necessary arrangements in paying the 
funeral honors to the late President of the United States, W. 
H. HARRISON: Daniel Cherry, SilasPearsall, and James E. 
Miller. 

SILAS PEARSALL, 

President. 
JOHN LEONARD, Secretary. 



IN DEMOCRATIC REPUBLICAN YOUNG MEN'S 
GENERAL COMMITTEE. 

At a meeting of this Committee, held at Tammany Hall, 
on Wednesday evening, the 7th instant, the following Gen 
tlemen were appointed Delegates to represent us, and join 
with this body in making arrangements to unite in the fune 
ral procession of our late President, WILLIAM HENRY 
HARRISON, viz.: G. W. Guion, M. Fallen, George C. Alex 
ander, James M. Hedges, and I. W. Styles. 

By order of the Committee. 

JAMES W. McKEON, 

G. W. GUION, Chairman. 

EMORY TOWNSEND, 

Secretaries. 



Thursday, 1st April, 1841. 
ELI A s L. SMITH, ESQ., 

Chairman of Committee of Common Council, fyc. : 

SIR: The Fire Department of New York, having re 
solved to unite with the Common Council and their fellow 
citizens, in solemnizing the death of WILLIAM HENRY HAR 
RISON, late President of the United States, I would respect 
fully ask that they may be assigned a suitable station in the 



44 

procession to take place in commemoration of that event on 
Saturday next. 

CARLISLE NORWOOD, 
Chairman of Committee of F. ]}, 



POLICE OFFICE. 

Halls 
New York,' AprilS, 1841 



Halls of Justice, ) 



ELIAS L. SMITH, Esa., 

Chairman of Committee of Arrangements : 

RESPECTED SIR: 

The undersigned Police Magistrates, for themselves and 
in behalf of the whole Department, being desirous of pub 
licly manifesting their respect to the memory of our de^ 
ceased President, WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, respectfully 
request your Honorable Committee to assign them a station 
in the procession to take place for that purpose on Saturday 
next, the 10th instant. 

MILN PARKER, 
HENRY W, MERRITT, 
E. STEVENS, 
GEORGE W. MATSELL, 
ROBERT TAYLOR, 
JAMES PALMER. 



NEW YORK, APRIL 8, 1841. 

To the Committee of the Common Council having charge 
of the Ceremonials on the decease of the late President 
of the United States : 

The Junior Members of the New York Bar request a 
place to be assigned to them in the procession to take place 
on Saturday next. 

GEORGE BOWMAN, Chairman, 

E. S. DAY, Secretary. 



45 



Members of the Central Democratic Republican Commit 
tees, of the Tippecanoe and other Harrison Associations of 
the City of New York. 

J. N. REYNOLDS, President. 



The undersigned, Delegate for the National Academy of 
Design, respectfully requests on behalf of the Academy, a 
situation in the line of procession, to be formed on the occa 
sion of the funeral solemnities in honor of our late Presi 
dent, 

JOHN L. MORTON, tfec'y, N. A. 



MERCANTILE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION. 

Clinton Hall, April 7, 1841. 

Alderman E. L. SMJTH, 

Chairman of the Committee.) fyc. 

SIR The Mercantile Library Association of this City, 
being desirous of uniting with the Authorities of our City in 
paying a just tribute of respect to the memory of the late 
President of the United States, beg leave to request that you 
will assign them a suitable position in the procession on Sa 
turday next. 

It may be proper to state that the Association consists of 
some four thousand members engaged in mercantile pur 
suits. 

Very respectfully yours, 

With much respect, 

SAMUEL SLOAN, 
82 Cedar street. Chairman of the Committee. 



Robert Bogardus, Esq. : 

Dear Sir : The Italian Benevolent Society of the City of 
New York, wishes a place assigned them in the procession 



46 



to be formed on Saturday next, to attend the funeral ceremo 
nies of our late President, General WILLIAM H. HARRISON. 
Yours very respectfully. 

JOHN B. COSTA, 
FRANCIS MONTEVERDE, 

Committee. 
April 8, 1841. 



TAMMANY SOCIETY, OR COLUMBIAN ORDER. 

The undersigned report themselves as a Committee on the 
part of the Tammany Society, to join in paying respect to 
the late President of the United States. 

JOHN I. MANNING, 
ALLAN M. SNIFFEN, 
ELIJAH F. PURDY, 
CHARLES MILLS, 
April 8, 1841. 



NEW YORK, APRIL 7, 1841, 

At a meeting of the Paul Jones Parading Club, held at 
their Library Room, No. 263 Broome street, on last evening, 
it was unanimously 

Resolved, That we appoint three delegates to represent 
the Club at the Council Chamber. 

The following persons were appointed : Captain E. J. 
Hincken, Lieutenant G. W. Palmer, and President Mc- 
Kenzie. 

(Signed.) D. W. McKENZIE, President. 

H. WEEKS, Jr., Secretary. 



To the Committee of Arrangements of the Honorable 
Common Council: 

The Miami Club respectfully ask at the hands of your 



47 



Committee, any place in the procession on Saturday, in order 
to pay the last tribute of respect to the late President of the 
United States, General WILLIAM H. HARRISON. 

Delegates, Louis Blanche and Edward Fleming. 



The American Association of Young Men respectfully 
request that you will grant them a situation in the proces 
sion on Saturday next, to celebrate the funeral obsequies of 
our late and respected President, WILLIAM H. HARRISON. 
Number between thirty and forty. 

J. R. CHAPIN, President. 
H. D. PRIEST, Secretary. 



American Institute, 
New York, April 8, 1841. 

To the Committee of Arrangements in honor of the me* 
mory of General WILLIAM H. HARRISON, late Presi- 
dent of the United States : 

GENTLEMEN I am desired to ask of you, in hehalf of 
the American Institute of the City of New York, for its offi^ 
cers and members, the assignment of a place in the pro 
gramme of the funeral procession. 

With much respect your obedient servant. 

T. B. WAKEMAN, 
Superintending Agent. 



The Smiths' Beneficial Society send as their delgates, 
James L. Miller, Nathaniel Pearsall, and Daniel Cherry, to 
ask a place in the procession. 

New York, April 7, 1841. 

ELIAS L. SMITH, ESQ., Chairman of the Committee of 
Common Council, fyc., $*c.: 

SIR I have the honor to inform you, that at a meeting 



48 



of the Engineers, Foremen and Assistants of the New York 
Fire Department, held on Wednesday evening. April 7, 1841, 
the following persons were appointed Delegates on behalf of 
the department, to meet with the Committee of the Com 
mon Council, to make arrangements for solemnizing the 
death of the late President of the United States : 
Carlisle Norwood, John P. Lacour, 

George W. Varian, George Kerr, 

Elijah C. King, C. V. Anderson, 

Henry B. Hinsdale, John T. Rollins. 

Very respectful ly, your obedient servant, 

JOHN T. ROLLINS, 
Secretary of E., F. $ A. of F. D< 



To ELIAS L. SMITH, ESQ.., 

Chairman of the Committee of Arrangements ) 
for the funeral obsequies of the late Presi- > 
dent of the United States : ) 

The undersigned were appointed, last evening, by a meet-' 
ing of Exempt Firemen, to make the necessary arrangements 
for paying due honors to the funeral rites of the deceased 
President. 

Signed. ELIJAH T. LEWIS, 

UZZIAH WENMAN, 
W. W. WILSON, 
HENRY M. LUDLUM, 
Committee. 



NEW YORK TYPOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Typographi 
cal Society, held on Wednesday evening, the following pre 
amble and resolutions were unanimously passed : 

Whereas, it has pleased. the Almighty Being, whose every 
action is dictated by infinite wisdom, to remove the Chief 
Magistrate of the Republic from that sphere of usefulness to 
which he had been called by the suffrages of his fellow citi 
zens,, and to gather to his fathers the patriot and the states- 



49 



man to whom was confided the direction of the destinies of a 
great people. Therefore, be it 

Resolved, That in common with the great body of our 
fellow citizens, we deeply sympathise with the family of the 
deceased, and most sincerely regret the loss which they, as 
well as the country at large, have sustained in the death of 
WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON. 

Resolved^ That when those whose lives have been distin 
guished for the benefits which they have conferred upon 
society are called from among us, we deem it the duty of 
their survivors to testify their appreciation of the merits of 
the deceased, by such tributes of respect as it is in their power 
to bestow. 

Resolved^ That in accordance with the sentiment of the 
above resolution, we will join with our fellow citizens in the 
solemnities with which they seek to mark their respect for 
the memory of the illustrious dead. 

Resolved^ That Hugh Pattinson, Charles Andrews and 
J. G. Clayton, be a Committee to confer with the Committee 
of the Common Council, and of other professions, as to the 
proper method of carrying these resolutions into effect. 

Resolved^ That a general meeting of the trade be called, 
to convene at the Howard House, corner of Howard street 
and Broadway, on Thursday (this) evening, at 8 o'clock. 

J. G. CLAYTON, President. 
G. S. WHARAM, Setfy. 



TO PRINTERS. 

A meeting of the New York Typographical Society, the 
Association, and all persons connected with the trade, will 
be held at the Howard House, corner of Howard street and 
Broadway, on Thursday (this) evening, at 8 o'clock, to take 
into consideration the propriety of uniting with their fellow 
citizens in the funeral solemnities on the occasion of the 
death of WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, late President of the 
United States. 

G. S. WHARAM, 
Secretary of the Typographical Society. 



50 



At a meeting of the Gold and Silver Artizans of this City, 
held at the York House, the undersigned were appointed 
delegates to confer with your Honorable Body, in relation to 
the funeral obsequies of our late Chief Magistrate. We would 
respectfully request that you would designate the position 
you wish us to occupy in the procession to be formed to pay 
the last tribute of respect to his remains. We will probably 
number about four hundred. 

Signed. WILLIAM GALE, 

PULASKI JACKS, 

HENRY J. HOYT, to Jill vacancy occasioned by the 

resignation of B. W. Clapp. 



The Joint Committee on the Civic and Military Arrange 
ments, shortly thereafter reported a Programme of Arrange 
ments for the proposed solemnities, which was adopted and 
published under the direction of the Committee, as follows : 

ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE 

FUNERAL OBSEQUIES 

OF THE LATE 

PRESIDENT HARRISOIV. 



The Joint Committee on the part of the Common Councils 
of the Cities of New York and Brooklyn, have agreed upon 
the following Programme of Arrangements for the funeral 
solemnities on the occasion of the death of 

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, 

President of the United States, to take place in the City of 
New York, on Saturday, 10th instant. 



51 



They have unanimously selected General ROBERT BO- 
GARDUS, as Grand Marshal of the day, who has named 
the following gentlemen as his Aids : 

PROSPER M. WETMORE, SAMUEL D. JACKSON, 

GILBERT HOPKINS, WRIGHT HAWKES, 

WM. SAMUEL JOHNSON, JOHN D. VAN BUREN, 

WILLIAM W. TOMPKINS, THOMAS W. TUCKER, 

JONATHAN AMORY, A. DAVEZAC, 

GARRET H. STRYKER, GEORGE W. HEELAS, 

JOHN A. MITCHELL, MARCELLUS EELLS, 

JOHN RIDLEY, JOHN A. MORRILL, 

GILES M. HILLYER, GEORGE W. EMBREE, 

HARMAN TEELE, FLORENCE MAHONEY, 

FREDERICK PENTZ, RUFUS PRIME, 

MINTHORNE TOMPKINS, MARSHAL J. BACON, 

MATTHEW KEELER, JOHN D. JOHNSON, 
WILLIAM M. McARDLE. 

General JAMES E. UNDERBILL has been appointed 
Marshal in Chief on behalf of the City of Brooklyn, who has 
designated the following gentlemen as his Aids : Majors 
William Cumberson, J. B. Clapp, G. C. Ball, Captains J. G. 
Hegeman, Seth H. Low, J. C. Duryea, E. M. Smith, A. M. 
Greig, Messrs. I. N. OIney, E. M. Fisk, Joseph Van Nostrand, 
James Hubbard and Jacob I 3 hilip. 

The Committee have agreed upon the following order of 
procession : 

The procession will move from the City Hall at 12 o'clock 
noon, precisely, and proceed up Chatham street to East 
Broadway, up East Broadway to Grand street, through 
Grand street to the Bowery, up the Bowery to Fourteenth 
street, through Fourteenth street to Broadway, down Broad 
way to the front of the City Hall, from whence it will file 
off under the direction of the Grand Marshal. 

The solemnities will be concluded as follows : 

1. Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Cox, of the City of Brooklyn. 

2. Funeral Oration by the Hon. THEODORE FRE- 
LINGHUYSEN, Chancellor of the University of the City 
of New York. 

3. A Requiem written by George P. Morris, Esq. 



52 

4. Benediction by the Right Rev. Bishop Onderdonk. 

The ceremonies to conclude with the firing of a volley by 
the United States troops on duty. 

The whole under the command of the Grand Marshal. 

The persons having charge of the different churches and 
fire alarm bells in the Cities of New York and Brooklyn, are 
requested to cause the bells to be tolled from the hour of 12 
o'clock at noon, during the procession ; and the owners and 
masters of vessels in the harbor, and the proprietors of pub 
lic buildings, are requested to have their colors hoisted half- 
mast from sunrise to sunset. It is respectfully recommended 
also, that our fellow citizens close their places of business 
during the solemnities of the day, and that in the evening 
the places of public amusement be closed. 

It is directed by the Committee that all public and licensed 
carriages and vehicles be withdrawn from the streets through 
which the procession is to pass. The Superintendents of 
Hackney Coaches, Stages and Carts, are charged with the 
enforcement of this order. 

The owners of private carriages and vehicles, are also re 
spectfully requested to conform to the wishes of the Com 
mittee in this respect. 

The associations, societies and citizens, to whom places 
are assigned as above, are requested to appear on foot. 

The Committee have unanimously resolved, that no ban 
ners bearing political devices or inscriptions, shall be admit 
ted in the procession. 

It is recommended that our fellow citizens, whether in the 
procession or not, wear the usual badge of mourning on the 
left arm. 

The various societies, associations, and other bodies, are 
requested to assemble at such places as they may respec 
tively select, and repair to the places of rendezvous designated 
in the annexed order. 

The different divisions in the above programme, will be 
designated by a white banner, with the appropriate number 
of each in black. 

The various civic societies will walk six abreast. 



53 

ORDER OF THE PROCESSION. 

FIRST DIVISION. 
GENERAL ROBERT BOGARDUS, 

Grand Marshal. 

PROSPER M. WETMORE, ] 
SAMUEL D. JACKSON, Aids to the 

JOHN D. VAN BUREN, [ Grand Marshal. 
JOHN D. JOHNSON, 

The head of the column will be preceded and escorted by 
the fine Light Infantry Company commanded by 

CAPTAIN SAMUEL W. SEELY. 
The following Military Corps will form the principal escort, 

the whole being under the command of 
Major General CHARLES W. SANDFORD. 

Volunteer Brigade of Infantry, 

commanded by Brigadier General 

HENRY T. KIERSTED, composed of the following Corps : 

First Light Infantry Regiment, commanded by Colonel 

JOHN EWEN, of the 8th Regiment of the Infantry. 

Second Light Infantry Regiment, commanded by Colonel 

SAMUEL JONES MUM FORD, of the 252d 

Regiment of Infantry. 
Third Light Infantry Regiment, commanded by Major 

TUTTLE, of the Washington Guards. 

The Division of Artillery in the following order : 

First Brigade, commanded by Acting Brigadier General 

HENRY U. SLIPPER, consisting of the 

Twenty-seventh Regiment, 
Commanded by Colonel WILLIAM JONES. 

Ninth Regiment, 
Commanded by Lieutenant Colonel JAMES L. CURTIS. 

Second Regiment, 
Commanded by Colonel THOMAS F. PEERS. 

Sixth Brigade, commanded by 
General GEORGE P. MORRIS, consisting of the 

Third Regiment, 
Commanded by Major JOHN W. AVERY. 

Thirty-eighth Regiment, 
Commanded by Colonel ANDREW WARNER. 

Eleventh Regiment, 
Commanded by Colonel GEORGE SMFTH. 



54 



Thirteenth Regiment, 
Commanded by Colonel ALEXANDER MING, Jun. 

First Horse Brigade, 
Commanded by Brigadier General STORMS. 

Second Regiment, 
Commanded by Colonel HAYWARD, of Westchester. 

First Regiment, 

Commanded by Colonel JOHN STEWART. 
Major General CHARLES W. SANDFORD, Commanding the 

Division of Artillery and Staff, 
Military of the City of Brooklyn, 

A Battalion of Light Infantry, 
Under the command of Colonel TOLFORD. 

SECOND DIVISION. 

GILBERT HOPKINS, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 
Officiating Clergymen and Orator of the Day, 

in a Carriage. 

The Reverend the Clergy. 

Major General SCOTT, Commanding the Military 

District, and Aids. 
Commodore J. RENSHAW, Commanding the 

Naval Station, and Aids. 

Major General GEORGE S. DOUGHTY, Commanding the 

Infantry on Duty. 

Band of Music. 

A Detachment of United States Marines, under 

Command of Captain HARRIS, U. S. A., 

as a Guard of Honor. 




FUNS R A X. URN, 



55 



Borne by Sailors of the Navy of the United States, and who 
have served on Board the Frigate 

Constitution, 

Under command of Commander SANDS. 

A Detachment of the United States Army, under 

Command of Captain DIMMICK, U. S. M. C., 

as a Guard of Honor. 

HORSE, 

Caparisoned, and led by WILLIAM L. NICHOLAS, 
an aged Servant of the Deceased President. 

O 

The following persons as Pall Bearers, (twenty-six in num 
ber, corresponding with the number of States,) 

in Carriages, viz. : 

Peter R. Livingston, John W. Hardenbrook, 

Major WillianTPopham, John De Camp, 

Stephen Allen, Isaac Lawrence, 

Aaron Clark, Major Shute, 

Cornelius W. Lawrence, Edward Taylor, 

Walter Bowne, Philip Hone, 

Chancellor Kent, George Griffen, 

Abraham Leggett, Sylvanus Miller, 

John Targee, John I. Morgan, 

Peter A. Jay, f Leffert Leffefts, 

John Wyckoff, ^ j Jeremiah Johnson, 

Daniel Winship, 8 j William Furman, 

Peter Bonnett, cq [ Robert Bach. 

Mayor and Acting Mayor of New York. 

Mayor of Brooklyn, and 

MARTIN VAN BUREN, Ex-President of the United States, 
and Suite, in Carriages. 

The Common Councils of the Cities of New York and 
Brooklyn, as Mourners, in the following 

Order, viz. : 
The Board of Aldermen, preceded by their Sergeant-at-Arms, 

Headed by the President. 
The Board of Assistants, preceded by their Sergeant-at-Arms, 

Headed by their President. 
The Officers of both Boards. 

The Common Council of the City of Brooklyn, preceded by 
their Sergeant-at-Arms, headed by their 

President. 
The Officers of the Common Council of Brooklyn. 



56 

THIRD DIVISION. 
JONATHAN AMORY, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

Governor and Lieutenant Governor of the State of 

New York. 
Heads of Departments of the State. 

The Senate of the State. 

House of Assembly of the State. 

Members of the Senate and House of Representatives of the 

United States. 
Society of the Cincinnati. 

Revolutionary Soldiers. 
Ex-Mayors, Ex- Aldermen and Ex-Assistants of the Cities of 

New York and Brooklyn. 
Heads of Departments of the City Government. 

FOURTH DIVISION. 
WM. SAMUEL JOHNSON, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

Foreign Ministers and Consuls in carriages. 
Ex-Members of Congress and of the 

State Legislature. 

The Judges of the United States, State and City Courts. 
Members of the Bar. 

FIFTH DIVISION. 
MARSHALL J. BACON, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

The Sheriff of the City and County of New York, and 
Under Sheriff and Deputies, with their Staves 

of Office. 
The Marshal of the United States and his Deputies. 

The Register, County Clerk and Coroner. 
Police Magistrates and Officers, with their Staves. 

SIXTH DIVISION. 
WM. W. TOMPKINS, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

Officers of the Army and Navy. 
Militia Officers off duty. 



57 



Collector, Naval Officer and Surveyor of the Port, and 

all other Civil Officers of the United States and 

State of New York. 

SEVENTH DIVISION. 
FREDERICK PENTZ, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

Fire Department of the City of New York. 
Exempt Firemen. 

EIGHTH DIVISION. 
WRIGHT HAWKES, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

The Grand Lodge of the State of New York. 
The Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

NINTH DIVISION. 
JOHN W. EDMONDS, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

The President, Trustees, Faculty and Students of 

Columbia College. 
The President, Faculty and Students of the University. 

College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Medical Society, Physicians and Medical Students. 

Teachers and Pupils of the Grammar Schools of Columbia 

College arid of the University. 

College of Pharmacy. 

United States' Naval Lyceum. 

American Academy of Fine Arts. 

National Academy of Design. 

Apollo Association. 

Chamber of Commerce. 

Board of Trade. 

TENTH DIVISION. 
JOHN RIDLEY, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

Teachers and Pupils of several Public Schools, and other 
Seminaries of Learning. 
8 



58 

ELEVENTH DIVISION. 
GEORGE W. HEELAS, Aid to }he Grand Marshal. 

A Division of United States' Seamen, and the Pupils of the 

United States Naval School, under command of 

Captain J. T. Newton, and Aids. 

TWELFTH DIVISION. 

MINTHORNE TOMPKINS, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 
Tammany Society, or Columbian Order. 

Democratic Whig General Committee, and Democratic 
Republican General Committee. The two bodies to form 
in parallel columns, headed by their respective Officers ; and 
between them a Corps of Young Men from the Tenth ward, 
bearing the flags of the Twenty-six States. 

THIRTEENTH DIVISION. 

WILLIAM McAiiDLE, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

BAND. 

Escort, Company of PULASKI CADETS, 
Commanded by Lieutenant E. W r . BURR. 
The General Committee of Democratic Whig Young 
Men, the Democratic Republican Young Men's General Com 
mittee. The two bodies to form in parallel columns, headed 
by their respective officers; and between them a Corps of 
Young Men, bearing the flags of the several States. 

FOURTEENTH DIVISION. 

GARRET H. STRYKER, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

Central Democratic Republican Committee of the Tippeca- 

noe, and other Harrison Associations, headed by their 

President, JAMES N. REYNOLDS. 

The Miami Club. 
Unionists' Association. 

FIFTEENTH DIVISION. 

General UNDERBILL, of Brooklyn, Marshal in Chief on 

behalf of the City of Brooklyn, and 

Aid to the Grand Marshal. 



59 



The Civic Procession from the City of Brooklyn. 
The Procession from the Village of Williamsburgh. 

SIXTEENTH DIVISION. 

\ 

JAMES MCCULLOUGH, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

The St. George's Benevolent Society. 

The St. Andrew's Benevolent Society. 

The St. David's Benevolent Society. 

German Benevolent Society. 

French Benevolent Society. 

Italian Benevolent Society. 

The Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick. 

The New England Society. 
The St. Nicholas' Society of the City of New York. 

SEVENTEENTH DIVISION. 

A. DAVIZAC, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

The Hibernian Benevolent Society. 

The Shamrock Benevolent Society. 

The Hibernian Benevolent Burial Society. 

EIGHTEENTH DIVISION. 

MARCELLUS EELLS, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

American Institute. 

Mechanics' Institute. 

Typographical Society. 

Benevolent Association of Bookbinders. 

NINETEENTH DIVISION. 

JOHN A. MORRILL, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

Leather Dressers' Society. 
Benevolent Society of Shipwrights and Caulkers. 

Smiths' Beneficial Society. 

Gold and Silver Artizans. 

TWENTIETH DIVISION. 

MATTHEW KEELER, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

The Butchers of the City of New York and Brooklyn. 

Cartmen of the City of New York. 



60 

TWENTY-FIRST DIVISION. 

GILES M. HILLYER, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

Society Library Association. 

American Lyceum. 
Athenseum Association. 

Mercantile Library Association, comprising over one 
thousand young men, with marshals of 

their own body. 

American Society of Young Men. 

New York Metropolitan Association. 

New York Society of Letters. 

TWENTY-SECOND DIVISION. 

FLORENCE MAHONEY, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 
General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, 

instituted in 1785. 

Readers at the Apprentices' Library. 
Journeymen Tailors' United Benevolent Society. 

Journeymen Stone Cutters' Association. 
Trades Society of Journeymen Sailmakers. 

TWENTY-FOURTH DIVISION. 

GEORGE W. EMBREE, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 
Wardens of the Port and Harbor Masters. 

Marine Society. , 

Ship Masters and Mates of Vessels in Port. 
Paul Jones' Parading Club. 

TWENTY-FIFTH DIVISION. 

RUFUS PRIME, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 
Thistle Benevolent Society, preceded by 

several bagpipes. 

All Societies and Associations not above enumerated 

in the order in which they shall 

report themselves to the 

Grand Marshal. 



61 



TWENTY-SIXTH DIVISION. 

HARMAN TEELE, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 

Captains of the Watch and Watchmen. 

Lamplighters. 

TWENTY-SEVENTH DIVISION. 

JOHN A. MITCHELL, Aid to the Grand Marshal. 
Citizens of other States. 

Citizens of Brooklyn. 
Citizens of New York arranged by Wards. 

The various military and civic bodies above enumerated, 
will assemble at 11 o'clock precisely, at the following places, 
preparatory to being brought into column : 

Officiating Clergymen, Orator of the Day, the Clergy, 
General Scott and Aids, and Commodore Renshaw and Aids, 
at No. 8 in the City Hall. 

Mayors of New York and Brooklyn and ex-President, at 
No. 8 City Hall. 

United States' Troops and Marines, at the west end of 
the City Hall. 

Pall Bearers, at No. 8 City Hall. 

Common Councils of New York and Brooklyn, at No. 8 
City Hall. 

Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Heads of Departments, 
Legislature of the State and Members of Congress, in the 
Mayor's office. 

Society of Cincinnati, Revolutionary Soldiers, ex-Mayors 
and Members of the Common Councils of New York and 
Brooklyn, and Heads of Departments of the City Govern 
ment, at No. 7 City Hall. 

Foreign Ministers and Consuls, ex-Members of Congress 
and State Legislature, Judges of the Courts and Members of 
the Bar, at the Superior Court Room, west end. 

Gentlemen included in the 5th Division, in the United 
States' Court Room. 

Gentlemen included in the 6th Division, in the East Su 
perior Court Room. 



62 



. Gentlemen included in the 7th Division, in East Broad 
way, resting on Chatham square. 

Gentlemen included in the 8th Division, in Murray street. 

Gentlemen included in the 9th Division, at College 
Green. 

10th Division, in the rear of the City Hall. 

llth Division, in the Park, west end of the Hall. 

12th Division, in front of Tammany Hall. 

13th Division, in the rear of the Hall of Records. 

14th Division, lower end of the Park. 

15th Division, in front of the Hall of Records. 

16th Division, in Warren street. 

17th Division, in Church street, the right on Warren 
street. 

18th Division, in Church street, on the left of the 17th 
Division. 

19th Division, City Hall place. 

20th Division, Beekman street, front of Clinton Hall. 

21st Division, in Chambers street, between Centre and 
Chatham streets. 

22d Division, in Spruce street. 

23d Division, Brick Church walk, on Chatham street. 

24th Division, in Barclay street. 

25th Division, in Vesey street. 

26th Division, in Vesey street, left of Division 25. 

27th Division, in Chambers street. 

ELIAS L. SMITH, EGBERT BENSON, 

CALEB S. WOODHULL, DAVID GRAHAM, Jun., 
ABRAHAM HATF1ELD, ORVILLE J. NASH, 

Committee Board of Aldermen. 

WILLIAM L. WOOD, HENRY E. DAVIES, 

JOHN A. UNDERWOOD, THOMAS F. PKERS, 
EDWARD PENNY, Jan., JAMES POLLOCK, 

Committee Board of Assistant Aldermen. 

J. S. MARCH, S. OAKLEY, 

S. HART, J. A. CROSS, 

W. BURBANK, 

Committee of Common Council of Brooklyn. 



63 

IN JOINT COMMITTEE OF THE COMMON 
COUNCIL. 

f if' New York, April 9, 1841. 

The Joint Committee of Arrangements add to their former 
programme the following particulars, which were acci 
dentally omitted : 

The closing ceremonies, consisting of the Prayer, Oration, 
Requiem and Benediction, will take place on the esplanade, 
in front of the City Hall, on the arrival of the rear of the pro 
cession. 

The Requiem, written by General Morris, and Luther's 
Judgment Hymn, will be sung by the members of the New- 
York Sacred Music Society. 

The United States' troops stationed at the different posts in 
the harbor, will fire minute guns from sunrise until noon. 

The Veteran Corps, under the command of Capt. G. W. 
Chapman, will also fire minute guns on the Battery. 

The Officers of the Army and Navy, off duty, will take 
post in the line on the right of the Sixth Division. ' 

JOHN W. EDMONDS, Esq., Aid to the Grand Marshal, is 
assigned to the Ninth Division, in place of Thomas W. 
Tucker, Es<j., who is unable to act. 

General MATTHEW KEELER, Aid to the Grand Marshal, 
will take command of the 19th Division, in place of Colonel 
S. Jones Mumford, elected Colonel of Light Infantry. 

Uniformed Corps of Light Infantry organized into a Bri 
gade under the command of Brigadier General Kiersted, con 
sisting of three Regiments. 

1st Regiment under the command of Colonel Ewen, of the 
8th Regiment of Light Infantry. 

2d Regiment under the command of Colonel Mumford, of 
the 252d of Infantry. 

3d Regiment under the command of Major Tuttle, of the 
Battalion of Washington Guards. 

Officers of the City Government, in the 3d Division, fol 
lowing the Heads of Departments. 



64 



Officers of the Courts, in the 4th Division, following the 
Members of the Bar. 

The College of Pharmacy, of the City of New York, will 
take post in the 9th Division, following the Medical Stu 
dents. 

The St. David's Benevolent Society will take post in the 
15th Division, following the St. Nicholas' Society. 

John Turner, Esq., is selected as one of the Pall Bearers, 
in place of Richard Hiker, Esq., who declines in consequence 
of severe lameness. 

By order of the Committee. 

ELIAS L. SMITH, Chairman. 
JOHN A. UNDERWOOD, Secretary. 



Your Committee also addressed the following communi 
cation to his Excellency the Governor of the State : 

New York, April 7, 1841. 
His Excellency Governor Reward : 

Sir The undersigned, a Committee on the part of the Com 
mon Councils of the Cities of New York and Brooklyn, have 
been instructed to invite your Excellency and suite, and 
through your Excellency the Heads of Departments of the State, 
to unite with them in the funeral solemnities, to take place in 
the City of New York, on Saturday next, the 10th instant, 
on occasion of the death of WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, 
late President of the United States. 

The Committee trust they maybe permitted, in addition to 
the mere formal discharge of the duty assigned them, to ex 
press, in behalf of themselves and of the Bodies they repre 
sent, a strong and earnest desire that you may not find it in 
compatible with your public duties; as they are satisfied it 
would be more grateful to your own feelings, on this me 
lancholy occasion, to unite with them in an expression of 



65 



respect and gratitude, due alike to the public services, the 
private worth, and the exalted station of the lamented dead. 
We have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your Excellencies obedient Servants, 
ELIAS L. SMITH, 
EGBERT BENSON, 
SAMUEL NICHOLS, 
D. GRAHAM, Jun.,. 
ABRAHAM HATFIELD, 
ORVILLE J. NASH, 
WILLIAM L. WOOD, 
EDWARD PENNY, Jun. T 
JOHN A. UNDERWOOD, 
In behalf of the City of Neio York, 

J. S. MARCH, 
W. BURBANK, 
S. OAKLEY, 
J. A. CROSS, 
S. HART, 
In behalf of the City of Brooklyn, 

To which the following reply was received : 

Albany, April 8, 1841. 

Gentlemen The communication by which, as a Com 
mittee of the Common Councils of the Cities of New York 
and Brooklyn, you have invited the Govenior of the State, 
his suite, and the Heads of Departments, to unite in the fu 
neral solemnities to be observed in the City of New York, 
on the occasion of the death of WILLIAM HENRY HARRI 
SON, President of the United States, has been received. 

Be pleased to tender to the Common Council our acknow 
ledgments for this mark of their consideration, and to assure 
them, that, deeply affected by the sad event which has in 
volved the nation in mourning, and entertaining a very high 
9 



66 



respect for the Public Authorities and citizens of New York 
and Brooklyn, it would be very grateful to our feelings to 
accept their invitation. 

The Legislature, however, having had this afflicting be 
reavement under consideration, and adopted suitable arrange 
ments for celebrating funeral honors on the occasion; and 
the Municipal Authorities of this City having assigned a day 
for a similar observance, it seems most appropriate that the 
Officers of the State, resident here, should unite with the 
Legislature and their fellow citizens in the obsequies to be 
performed at this Capital. 

We are, very respectfully, 

Your obedient Servants, 

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, 
J. C. SPENCER, 
JOHN A. COLLYER, 
O. L. HOLLEY, 
RUFUS KING. 
(The Attorney General and the Treasurer 

are absent from the city.) 

The Honorable Elias L. Smith, Egbert Benson, Samuel 
Nichols, D. Graham, jun., Abraham Hatfield, Orville 
J. Nash, William L. Wood, Edward Penny, jun., 
and John A. Underwood, 

Committee, ^c., on behalf of New York. 

The Honorable J. S. March, W. Burbank, S. Oakley, J. 
A. Cross, and S. Hart, 

Committee, $-c., on behalf of the City of Brooklyn. 



Your Committee also addressed the following communi 
cation to the President of the Senate of the State ; 



67 



New YorAr, April 7, 1841. 
Honorable Luther Bradish^ 

President of the Senate : 

Sir The undersigned, a Committee on the part of the 
Common Councils of the Cities of New York and Brooklyn, 
have been instructed to invite the Senate of this State to 
unite with them in the funeral solemnities, to take place in 
the City of New York, on Saturday next, the 10th instant, 
on occasion of the death of WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, 
late President of the United States. 

In performing this melancholy, though grateful duty, the 
undersigned take occasion to add, that it would be most 
gratifying to those whom they represent, and to their fellow 
citizens, if the Honorable Body over which you preside were 
enabled to unite with them on this solemn occasion, in an 
expression of respect, due alike to the public services, the 
private worth, and the exalted station of the lamented dead. 
We have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient Servants, 

ELIAS L. SMITH, 
EGBERT BENSON, 
SAMUEL NICHOLS, 
D. GRAHAM, Jun., 
ABRAHAM HATFIELD, 
ORVILLE J. NASH, 
WILLIAM L. WOOD, 
EDWARD PENNY, Jun., 
JOHN A. UNDERWOOD, 
On behalf of the City of New 'York. 
J. S. MARCH, 
W. BURBANK, 
S. OAKLEY, 
J. A. CROSS, 
S. HART, 
On behalf of the City of Brooklyn. 



To this eommuni cation, no official reply has been receiv 
ed, but the following proceedings appear, from the State pa 
per, to have been taken upon it in the Senate : 

LEGISLATURE OF NEW YORK. 

IN SENATE, APRIL 9, 184L 

Prayer by the Rev. Mr. LEVINGS. 

An invitation was received from the Joint Committee of 
the Common Councils of New York and Brooklyn. 

Mr. Taylor reported on the communication from the Joint 
Committee of the Common Councils of the City of New 
York and Brooklyn, and submitted the following resolution, 
which was unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, That the President of the Senate be requested 
to respond in suitable terms to the invitation of the Common 
Councils of the Cities of New York and Brooklyn, to unite 
with them in the funeral solemnities to take place in the City 
of New York, on Saturday, the 10th instant, on occasion of 
the death of WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, late President of 
the United States to assure them of the deep sympathy of 
this body in the National bereavement that the Senate have 
already made the appropriate arrangements for the funeral 
solemnities on this mournful occasion, and that their public 
duties deny to them the opportunity of mingling their con 
dolence with their fellow citizens of New York and Brooklyn. 

On motion of Mr. H. A. Livingston, it was resolved that 
when the Senate adjourns, it adjourn to meet on Monday 
morning at 10 o'clock. 

On motion of Mr. Lee the Senate then adjourned. 

A similar communication was addressed to the Speaker of 
the House of Assembly, from whom the following reply was 
received. 

ASSEMBLY CHAMBER, 

Albany, April 9, 1841. 

GENTLEMEN 

Your note of the 7th instant, transmitting an invitation to 
the House of Assembly, to join their fellow citizens of New 



69 



York and Brooklyn, in the funeral solemnities on occasion 
of the death of WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, late President 
of the United States, has been received and laid before the 
House. 

The House having, prior to the receipt of your invitation, 
had such action as a body in relation to this solemn event, 
as they deemed advisable, have not thought it expedient to 
take, officially, any further order thereupon ; and have there 
fore directed me most respectfully to decline your invitation. 
I am respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

P. B. PORTER, Speaker. 
To Messrs. Ellas L. Smith, Egbert Benson, .) 
Samuel Nichols, and others. \ 

Committee on behalf of the Citizens of New York. 

J. & March, W Burban/c, 
S. Oakley, and others, 
Committee on behalf o^f the Citizens of Brooklyn. 



The arrangements which were proposed by the Committee 
were carried out, as appears by the following official report 
from/he Grand Marshal, with the exception of the delivery 
of the Oration, which was necessarily dispensed with, in 
consequence of the inclemency of the weather : 



I have the honor of reporting to the Committee of 
the Honorable the Common Council of the City of New 
York, a detailed account of the execution of the Programme 
of Arrangements adopted by the Committee, and submitted 
to be carried out under my orders, with the assistance of 
such Aids as I might deem proper to select for the purpose. 
It will be perceived, that the names of several gentlemen ap 
peared attached to Divisions in the early publication of the 
programme, whose names do not appear in the execution 
the discrepancy was owing to the inability of those first se 
lected to do duty others will immediately be selected whose 
names appear at the head of the Divisions. Permit me to 
assure you that if the execution of the Programme of Ar- 



70 



rangements of the Funeral Obsequies in honor of the late 
WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, President of the United 
States, meet the Committee's approval, the credit of the exe- 
tion is due to the Aids selected. 

I am respectfully yours, 

ROBERT BOGARDUS, 

Grand Marshal. 
To ELIAS L. SMITH, ESQ., 

Chairman, fyc. 



FUNERAL OBSEQUIES 

In honor of the late WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, 
President of the United States. 

Civic and Military Procession. 

Under the direction of the Joint Committees of the Com 
mon Councils of New York and. Brooklyn, a Programme of 
Arrangements was prepared, and its execution confided to 
the direction of GEN. ROBERT BOGARDUS, as Grand 
Marshal. 

The following gentlemen were selected as Aids to the 
Grand Marshal : 

PROSPER M. WETMORE, SAMUEL D. JACKSON, 

GILBERT HOPKINS, WRIGHT HAWKES, 

WM. SAMUEL JOHNSON, JOHN D. VAN BUREN, 

WILLIAM W. TOMPKINS, JOHN W. EDMONDS, 

JONATHAN AMORY, A. DAVEZAC, 

GARRET H. STRYKER, GEORGE W. HEELAS, 

JOHN A. MITCHELL, MARCELLUS EELLS, 

JOHN RIDLEY, JOHN A. MORRILL, 

GILES M. HILLYER, GEORGE W. EMBREE, 

HARMAN TEELE, FLORENCE MAHONEY, 

FREDERICK PENTZ, RUFUS PRIME, 

MINTHORNE TOMPKINS, MARSHAL J. BACON, 

MATTHEW KEELER, JOHN D. JOHNSON, 

WILLIAM M. McARDLE, JAMES McCULLOUGH. 



71 



At a meeting of the Civic Staff, held at the Mayor's Office 
in the City Hall, on Thursday, the 8th instant, the Grand 
Marshal in the Chair, Samuel D. Jackson, and John D. 
Van Buren, acting as Secretaries, it was unanimously 

Resolved, That the following dress and equipments be 
adopted by the Staff: 

Black dress throughout. 

Chapeaux without ornament, trimmed with crape. 

Scarf of black satin and crape. 

Crape knot on the left arm. 

Dress sword, with steel mounting, scabbard covered with 
black velvet, and hilt with crape mourning knot. 

Black silk gloves steel spurs. 

Black saddle cloth, trimmed with deep fringe, and cord 
festooned in front. 

Russet bridle, with black fringe and crape knots on the 
foretop and nose piece. 



The following preliminary order was issued by the Grand 
Marshal : 

FUNERAL OBSEQUIES. 
GENERAL ORDER. 

City Hall, April 9th, 1841. 

The Aids to the Grand Marshal will assemble at the As 
sistant Vice Chancellor's room, City Hall, on Saturday morn 
ing, at 30 minutes past 9 precisely. 

The Grand Marshal will receive his Staff, at his quarters, 
No. 501 Broadway, at 10 o'clock precisely. 
It is expected that the Staff will be punctual in attendance. 
By order. 

ROBERT BOGARDUS, 
. S. D. JACKSON, Sec'y. Grand Marshal. 



72 



The various public bodies, associations and societies,, a*' 
sembled in large numbers, at an early hour, in accordance 
with the published arrangements of the Joint Committees. 

Precisely at the hour indicated in the programme of ar~ 
rangements, all the civic societies, public associations, and; 
invited guests, were in readiness to commence the move 
ment. The several Aids, heretofore named, having charge 
of the various divisions, promptly reported to the Grand 
Marshal, and the procession moved forward in the order pre 
scribed in the preceding programme. 

The movement commenced by the passage of the military 
escort, preceded by the Grand Marshal, from Broadway, 
in front of the City Hall, through Chatham street. 

The URN was placed on a bier in front of the Hall, and 
received the funeral honors of the corps on the March. 
When the first division had passed, the urn was borne to its 
station in the second Division, under an Escort of Marines,, 
and followed by a WHITE STEED, caparisoned in full 
mourning equipments. 

The route of the procession was through Chatham street,. 
East Broadway, Grand street, the Bowery, Fourteenth street 
and Broadway, to the Park, at which place it arrived about 
five o'clock, P. M. 

Upon the arrival of the head of the procession at the 
Park, the military escort were formed in line on Broadway r 
arid reviewed by the Grand Marshal. Each Division, as it 
reached the Park, was reviewed, and placed under the sole' 
direction of the Aid by whom it was led. This deviation 
from the original programme became n-ecessary in conse 
quence of the severe inclemency of the weather. 

Several Divisions filed into the Park, and witnessed the 
closing of the ceremonies in front of the Hall, where a re 
quiem was sung by the Sacred Music Society. 

The solemnities were opened by prayer by the Reverend* 
Doctor Cox, of the City of Brooklyn, and closed by a be 
nediction from the Right Reverend Bishop Onderdonk. 

The delivery of the contemplated funeral oration, by the 



73 



Honorable Theodore Frelinghuysen, Chancellor of the Uni 
versity, was prevented by the state of the weather. 

The bells of the various churches in New York and 
Brooklyn were tolled during the movement of the proces 
sion : all the vessels in port wore their flags at half-mast, 
from sun-rise to sun-set; minute guns were fired by corps 
especially designated for that purpose; various public 
buildings, and many private residences, on the route of the 
procession, were appropriately decorated with the insignia 
of mourning. 

The various military orders issued by the Commander-in- 
Chief, and the Officers in command of the several Divisions 
in this city, will appear in another place. 

At a meeting of the Civic Staff, held at the Mayor's Office, 
City Hall, on Friday, the 16th instant, in the absence of Ge 
neral Bogardus, the Grand Marshal, William Samuel 
Johnson, Esq., was called to the Chair, Samuel D. Jackson 
acting as Secretary, the following resolutions were submitted 
by Prosper M. Wetmore: 

Resolved, That the cordial acknowledgments of the Corps 
of Aids are due to General Robert Bogardus, Grand Mar 
shal of the Procession, for the urbanity and courtesy which 
distinguished his intercourse with the Civic Staff, on the re 
cent occasion of rendering funeral honors to the memory of 
the late President of the United States ; and also for his 
prompt, energetic and efficient conduct in the discharge of 
his official duties, evinced in the fact that the entire civic 
procession was in readiness to move at the precise moment 
indicated in the programme of arrangements. 

Resolved, That a copy of the preceding resolution be 
transmitted to General Bogardus. 

WILLIAM SAMUEL JOHNSON, 

Chairman. 
Extract from the Minutes. 

S. D. JACKSON, Secretary. 
10 



74 



At a meeting of the Civic Staff, held as above, the Grand 
Marshal in the Chair, it was 

Resolved, That the Staff unanimously return their thanks 
to the Joint Committee of the Honorable the Common Coun 
cil, for the liberality of their arrangements, and for their 
prompt and courteous attention to the wishes of the Civic 

Staff. 

ROBERT BOGARDUS, 

Chairman. 

Extract from the Minutes. 
S. D. JACKSON, Secretary. 



The following is the Requiem referred to in the above 
report of the Grand Marshal, which was written by George 
P. Morris, Esq., and sung at the conclusion of the cere 
monies by the members of the New York Sacred Music 
Society : 

Weep for a spirit fled ! 

The solemn word is spoken ! 
Weep for the silver-thread 

And golden-bowl are broken ! 
A warrior lived a Christian died ! 
Sorrow should slumber in our pride ! 

Go bring his battle-blade ! 

His helmet and his plume ! 
And be his trophies laid 

Beside him in the tomb ! 
Where files of time-marked veterans come, 
With martial tramp and muffled drum. 

Give to the earth his frame ! 

'T was born but to decay : 
Not so his deathless name ! 

That cannot pass away ! 
In youth, in manhood, and in age, 
He dignified his country's page. 



75 

Green be the wil 1 o\v -bough 

Above the swelling mound, 
Where sleeps the hero now 

In consecrated ground. 
His monument his fame endears 
His epitaph a nation's tears. 

Your Committee having been compelled by the state of the 
weather to dispense with the delivery of the Oration by the 
Hon. Theodore Frelinghnysen^ have obtained from that 
gentleman a copy of the Oration, which, with the corres 
pondence on the subject, is appended to this report. 

Your Committee have thus discharged the melancholy 
though grateful duty assigned to them. They deem it unne 
cessary in conclusion to detain the Common Council by any 
remarks upon its character, or upon the considerations which 
its solemnity is so well calculated to suggest. They feel, 
however, that they would be wanting in their duty to their 
constituents, did they not acknowledge the promptness and 
alacrity, as well as the deep feeling of sympathy with which 
every portion of their fellow citizens have lent their co-ope 
ration in carrying out the proposed object. For a season, at 
least, the spirit of party was forgotten, and men of every 
shade of political sentiment vied with each other in render 
ing appropriate honors to the memory of the illustrious head 
of our Republic. The scene was full of material for reflec 
tion, and it is to be fondly hoped that its recollections may 
be hallowed by the prayer that, as in this instance, we have 
felt and acted as one people, we may even in the heat of 
party contentions not forget that we have a common interest 
in cherishing the memory of the great and good of our be 
loved country, and a common stake in the welfare and per 
petuity of her institutions. 



76 



In conclusion, your Committee beg leave to express their 
thanks, and they doubt not those of the Common Council, to 
the Grand Marshal and his Aids, to the military, and civic 
bodies, and citizens who united with them, upon this melan 
choly and interesting occasion, for the efficiency with which 
the proposed arrangements were carried into execution, and 
for the readiness and alacrity with which they responded, in 
every instance, to the wishes of the Committee, in giving 
effect to this solemn and imposing pageant. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ELIAS L. SMITH, EGBERT BENSON, 

CALEB S. WOODHULL, DAVID GRAHAM, Jun., 
ABRAHAM HATFIELD, ORVILLE J. NASH, 

Committee Board of Aldermen. 

WILLIAM L. WOOD, HENRY E. DAVIES, 

JOHN A. UNDERWOOD, THOMAS F. PEERS, 
EDWARD PENNY, Jim., JAMES POLLOCK, 

Committee Board of Assistant Aldermen. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, APRIL 5, 184L 

PRESENT Elijah F. Purdy, Esq., President. 



ALDERMEN Calvin Balis Caleb S. Woodhull Egbert 
Benson Daniel C. Pentz Robert Jones James Ferris 
Josiah Rich Freeman Campbell Abraham Hatfield Elias 
L. Smith Samuel Nichols David Graham, Jun. Peter 
Cooper Orville J. Nash. 



77 



Alderman Nash moved that the reading of the minutes be 
dispensed with, which was adopted. 

The following communication was then received from his 
Honor the Acting Mayor, informing the Board of the death 
of General WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, late Presi 
dent of the United States : 

MAYOR'S OFFICE, APRIL BTH, 1841. 
To the Board of Aldermen : 

GENTLEMEN It becomes my painful duty to announce 
to you the melancholy intelligence of the death of General 
WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, late President of the United 
States : an event sudden, solemn and afflicting to the 
nation. 

Of his services, civil and military, it is unnecessary for 
me to speak: they are identified with the history of our 
country. 

I should do injustice to my own feelings, and to the station 
which I temporarily fill, were I not to partake of the general 
gloom that pervades the community, which mourns the loss 
of a Chief Magistrate, recently called from peace and retire 
ment to preside over the destinies of a nation of freemen. 

I respectfully suggest that such measures be taken as will 
evince the respect and affection due to one who has occupied 
so exalted a station, and shared so largely of the public con 
fidence. 

I am, with respect, gentlemen, yours, &c. 

ELIJAH F. PURDY, 

Acting Mayor. 

The same having been read, Alderman Smith rose, and 
after making some appropriate and feeling remarks upon the 
melancholy intelligence communicated by his Honor the 
Acting Mayor, presented the following resolutions : 



78 



Resolved, If the Board of Assistant Aldermen concur, 
that the Common Council of the City of New York have re 
ceived with deep emotion, the afflicting intelligence of the 
death of General WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, President of 
the United States, and that while they sincerely sympathize 
with the family of the deceased upon the occasion of their 
sudden and melancholy bereavement, they cordially partici 
pate with their fellow citizens, throughout the country, in the 
grief which is felt at the loss of one who was endeared to the 
nation by the patriotism and fidelity of his public services, 
by the purity of his private character, and by the exalted 
station to which he had so recently been called by the voice 
of the American people. 

Resolved, If the Board of Assistant Aldermen concur, 
that a suitable demonstration of respect for the memory of 
the late President, by the adoption of fitting solemnities, 
should be made by the public authorities and citizens of New 
York, and that a Committee of the Common Council, to con 
sist of six members of each Board, be appointed to make such 
arrangements in that behalf as they may deem expedient. 

Resolved^ If the Board of Assistant Aldermen concur, 
that the Presidents of both Boards of the Common Council 
be requested to direct the chambers of their respective Boards 
to be hung with black, during the remainder of the term of 
the present Common Council, and that the members of each 
Board will wear the usual badge of mourning for the same 
period. 

Resolved^ If the Board of Assistant Aldermen concur, 
that his Honor the Acting Mayor be requested to communi 
cate a copy of these resolutions to the afflicted family of the 
deceased, and to cause the same to be published in the news 
papers of this City and of the City of Washington. 



79 



Alderman Benson rose, and after making some suitable 
remarks on the occasion, seconded the resolutions. 

Alderman Graham made some appropriate remarks on the 
melancholy, event ; after which, the resolutions were unani 
mously adopted, and the President appointed Aldermen 
Smith, Benson, Nash, Graham, Hatfield and VVoodhull, such 
Committee on the part of this Board, and the same were 
directed to be sent to the Board of Assistant Aldermen for 
concurrence. 

The Board then adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

SPECIAL MEETING, APRIL 10, 1841. 
PRESENT Egbert Benson, Esq., President pro tern. 

ALDERMEN Calvin Balis Caleb S. Woodhull Daniel 
C. Pentz Robert Jones James Ferris Josiah Rich Wil 
liam Chamberlain Freeman Campbell Abraham Hatfield 
Nathaniel Jarvis Elias L. Smith Samuel Nichols Da 
vid Graham, jun. Peter Cooper Orville J. Nash. 

The President of the Board being absent, on motion of 
Alderman Smith Alderman Benson was appointed President 
pro tern., who, on taking the Chair, stated the object of the 
meeting. 

On motion, the reading of the minutes was dispensed with. 

Alderman Smith, Chairman of the Joint Committee of Ar 
rangements, reported the following programme of arrange 
ments for funeral solemnities in honor of the late President, 
WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, (see page 50,) which was 
adopted. 

Alderman Smith moved that the Board now join the fune- 



80 



ral procession, which was adopted, whereupon the Board 
took a recess for that purpose. 

The ceremonies having ended agreeably to the. programme, 
(except the prayer, oration and benediction, which were de 
ferred on account of the imfavorableness of the weather,) 
the members returned to their chambers, all present as be 
fore, and resumed in order of business. 

A motion was made that the Board adjourn, which was 
adopted. 



SPECIAL MEETING. 
BOARD OF ASSISTANT ALDERMEN. 

Monday, April 5, 1841. 

PRESENT Frederick R. Lee, Esq., President, in the Chair; 
Messrs. Peers, Underwood, Halsey, Adams, O'Neil, Wood, 
Vandervoort, Leonard, Ward, Penny, Bradhurst, Westervelt, 
Spader, Davies, and Pollock; who, on the call of the roll, 
severally answered to their names. 

The President arose and addressed the Board as follows : 

But a few short months since, it became my painful duty 
to announce to you the decease of one of our associates, the 
Assistant Alderman of the First Ward ; who, at a good old 
age, finished his course on earth, and I trust is now receiving 
the reward of a well spent life, in a brighter and better world. 

Scarcely has the gloom which then pervaded this Board 
been dispelled, before we are again called upon to mourn the 
loss of the Chief Magistrate of these United States. WIL 
LIAM HENRY HARRISON is now no more ! Elevated as he 
was, to the highest office in the gift of the People, melan 
choly indeed is the reflection, that after the short period of 
one month from his inauguration to the most important situ- 



81 



ation in the world, millions of free and independent people 
are called upon to mourn his death. This sudden bereave 
ment has cast a gloom throughout the nation, which time 
alone can eradicate. Unexpected as is the event, the only 
consolation left to his friends is, that their loss is his eternal 
gain. The last moments of his life were marked by calm 
ness and resignation to the Divine will. He died, as a Chris 
tian should die, trusting in the promises of the Gospel, and 
relying upon the merits of a once crucified, but now ascended 
Saviour. He died actively engaged in the public service, 
closing his mortal labors as the President of the people, ap 
pointed by their free election. In his life he was patriotic 
and useful, and in his death expressed a fervent desire for 
the preservation of the principles of the Constitution. 

This is the first instance since the formation of our Go 
vernment, that the people have been called upon to mourn 
the loss of the great head of the nation. An overruling 
Providence has thought proper, for some wise purpose, thus 
to afflict us. " Mysterious are thy ways, oh God ! and past 
finding out." 

He whose death we now deplore, after serving his country 
year after year, both in the battle field and in the Councils 
of the Nation, at a period of life when men are usually de 
sirous of retiring from public duties, when nearly three score 
years and ten had laid their burdens on Ids frame, he stood 
ready, at his country's call, to take command of a nation 
that is respected throughout the world ; to guide and direct 
it in the defence of liberty and order. Justly may he be ve 
nerated and respected, and justly may his death be univer 
sally deplored. With us, indeed, it would be a disgrace did 
we not evince our respect for his character and our gratitude 
for his services: many did it while their friend was living, 
and I trust that all will show their attachment to the acknow 
ledged head of the government, on the sad occasion of his 
death. He has gone to that " bourne from whence no travel 
ler returns." The tidings of grief will resound throughout 
11 



82 



our land ; every city, town and county will re-echo the note 
of sadness, and will unite in their condolence with the fa 
mily of the illustrious dead. They indeed need our sympa 
thies and prayers the aged partner of his bosom, who shared 
with him his sorrows and his joys ; who fondly anticipated 
meeting him, surrounded by a retinue of friends ; but, ah ! 
how changed the scene ! the solemn mandate has gone forth 
they meet no more! until the second coming of the Redeem 
er, in glorious majesty, to judge the world. He has now 
rested from his labors, and his best eulogium is the univer- 
val grief of the American people. 

But I have done, and would only add, that I have con 
vened the Board at this time, in order to enable you to adopt 
such measures as you may deem necessary upon this mourn 
ful occasion. 

The following message was then received from the Acting 
Mayor, through his Clerk, John Ahern, Esq. : 

MAYOR'S OFFICE, APRIL 5, 1841. 
To the Board of Assistant Aldermen : 

GENTLEMEN It becomes my painful duty to announce 
to you the melancholy intelligence of the death of General 
WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, late President of the United 
States; an event sudden, solemn, and afflicting to the nation. 

Of his services, civil and military, it is unnecessary for me 
to speak : they are identified with the history of our country. 

I should do injustice to my own feelings, and to the sta 
tion which I temporarily fill, were I not to partake of the 
general gloom which pervades the community, which mourns 
the loss of a Chief Magistrate, recently called from peace 
and retirement, to preside over the destinies of a nation of 
freemen. 

I respectfully suggest that such measures be taken as will 



83 



evince the respect and affection due to one who has occupied 
so exalted a station, and shared so largely of the public con 
fidence. 

I am, with respect, gentlemen, yours, &c., 

ELIJAH F. PURDY, 

Acting Mayor. 

The message having been read, the following resolutions 
were received from the Board of Aldermen : 

Resolved, (If the Board of Assistant Aldermen concur,) 
that the Common Council of the City of New York have 
received, with deep emotion, the afflicting intelligence of the 
death of General WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, President 
of the United States ; and that while they sincerely sympa 
thise with the family of the deceased, upon the occasion of 
their sudden and melancholy bereavement, they cordially 
participate with their fellow citizens throughout the country, 
in the grief which is felt at the loss of one who was endeared 
to the nation by the patriotism and fidelity of his public ser 
vices, by the purity of his private character, and by the ex 
alted station to which he had so recently been called by the 
voice of the American people. 

Resolved, (If the Board of Assistant Aldermen concur,) 
That a suitable demonstration of respect for the memory of 
the late President, by the adoption of fitting solemnities, 
should be made by the public authorities and citizens of 
New York ; and that a Committee of the Common Council, 
to consist of six members of each Board, be appointed to 
make such arrangements in that behalf as they may deem 
expedient. 

Resolved, (If the Board of Assistant Aldermen concur,) 
that the Presidents of both Boards of the Common Council 
be requested to direct the chambers of their respective Boards 



84 



to be hung with black, during the remainder of the term of 
the present Common Council, and that the members of each 
Board will wear the usual badge of mourning for the same 
period. 

Resolved, (If the Board of Assistant Aldermen concur,) 
that his Honor the Acting Mayor be requested to communi 
cate a copy of these resolutions to the afflicted family of the 
deceased, and to cause the same to be published in the news 
papers of this city and of the City of Washington. 

Adopted by the Board of Aldermen, and Aldermen Smith, 
Benson, Nash, Graham, Hatfield and Woodhull appointed 
the Committee on the part of that Board. 

Unanimously concurred in, and Messrs. Wood, Davies, 
Pollock, Peers, Underwood and Penny appointed the Com 
mittee on the part of this Board. 

On motion, the Board adjourned ; and the President an 
nounced jthat this board stood adjourned until Monday, the 
12th instant, at 5 o'clock, P. M. 

EDWARD PATTERSON, Clerk. 



SPECIAL MEETING. 
BOARD OF ASSISTANT ALDERMEN. 

Monday, April 10, 1841. 

PRESENT Frederick R. Lee, Esq., President, in the Chair ; 
Messrs. Peers, Underwood, Halsey, Adams, O'Neil, Wood, 
Vandervoort, Leonard, Ward, Penny, Bradhurst, Westervelt, 
Spader, Davies, and Pollock ; who, on the call of the roll, 
severally answered to their names. 



85 



The Committee appointed to make arrangements for the 
funeral obsequies of the late President, presented the pro 
gramme, prepared by the Joint Committees, which was ac 
cepted and ordered to be entered on the minutes. (See p. 50.) 

On motion of Mr. Adams, the Board then resolved to unite 
in the funeral procession of the late President, and thereupon 
took a recess for that purpose. 

The ceremonies having been performed agreeably to the 
preceding programme, excepting the prayer, oration and 
benediction, which were deferred in consequence of the un 
favorable state of the weather, the members returned to their 
chamber, all being present as before, and resumed business, 
and a motion being made that the Board do now adjourn, 
the same was carried, and the President announced that this 
Board stood adjourned until Monday, the 12th instant, at 5 
o'clock, P. M. 

On motion, the Board adjourned; and the President an 
nounced that this Board stood adjourned until Monday, the 
12th instant, at 5 o'clock, P. M. 

EDWARD PATTERSON, Clerk. 



BROOKLYN COMMON COUNCIL. 



At a meeting of the Common Council of the City of Brook 
lyn, held on the 5th day of April, 1841, present his Honor 
the Mayor and a quorum of the Board ; 

The Mayor, in a very feeling address, officially announced 
to the Board the death of WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, 
President of the United States. 

Alderman March offered the following resolutions, which 
were unanimously adopted : 

Resolved^ That this Board have heard, with feelings of 
the deepest regret, the death of WILLIAM HENRY HARRI 
SON, President of the United States. 



86 



Resolved, That a Committee of five be appointed by his 
Honor the Mayor, to recommend to this Board the adoption 
of such measures as may be proper and expedient on this 
occasion. 

Aldermen March, Oakley. Hart, Cross and Burbank were 
appointed said Committee. 

On motion the Board adjourned. 



At a meeting of the Common Council of the City of Brook 
lyn, called at the request of the Special Committee appoint 
ed as aforesaid, held on the 7th of April, 1841, present his 
Honor the Mayor and a quorum of the Board, 

Alderman March, Chairman of the Special Committee to 
make arrangements in regard to the solemnization of the fu 
neral obsequies of General HARRISON, made the following 
report, which, on motion, was unanimously adopted, and the 
proceedings of the Committee confirmed: 

That acting in conformity with the understood wishes of 
the Board, they immediately met, in conjunction with appro 
priate Committees of the Honorable the Corporation of the 
City of New York, by whom they were most courteously re 
ceived. The several Committees determined to act in the 
matter jointly, and accordingly agreed upon the resolutions 
dated April 6, 1841, signed by Elias L. Smith, Esq., the Chair 
man of the Joint Committees, and published in the daily 
papers. 

The Committee further reported, that the mournful event 
was to be solemnized by a civic and military procession, on 
Saturday next; and that a funeral oration would be delivered 
in front of the City Hall, in New York. 

The Committee further reported, that Aldermen March 
and Oakley were appointed members of the Joint Civic 
Committee, and that power was granted them to make such 
arrangements, on the part of the City of Brooklyn, as they 
might deem proper; that they acted upon the same by ap- 



87 



pointing General Underbill Grand Marshal of the City of 
Brooklyn, for the day of celebration, with power to confer 
with the different societies wishing to take part in the pro 
cession; to arrange the procession, and designate the line of 
march. 

The Committee further reported, that Aldermen Cross and 
Burbank were appointed members of the Joint Committee 
to confer with the Military, and to make such arrangements 
as they might deem proper. 

The Committee further reported, that the Reverend Doc 
tor Cox, of this city, would open the services with prayer; 
the Honorable Theodore Frelinghuysen, Chancellor of the 
University of the City of New York, would deliver the Fu 
neral Oration, and that the Right Reverend Bishop Onder- 
donk would conclude the services with a prayer and bene 
diction. 

The Committee further reported, that the Joint Commit 
tee were to meet on Thursday next, when the programme of 
the procession will be arranged, and of which due notice 
will be given. 

Alderman March moved that the report be accepted, 
adopted, and placed on file; and also that their proceedings 
be confirmed, all of which were adopted. It was further 

Resolved, That the members of the Common Council 
were the usual badge of mourning for sixty days, and that 
they recommend their fellow citizens to do the same. 

His Honor the Mayor informed the Board that he had 
issued the following proclamation : 

Whereas, By the dispensation of an All-wise Providence, 
the Chief Magistrate of these United States has recently de 
parted this life ; and 

Whereas, It is the acknowedged duty of a Christian peo- 



pie, as Christians, as patriots and as citizens, to respect the 
Chief Officer of the nation while in life; to pay a suitable 
respect to his memory when dead, and to make a right im 
provement of such dispensation of Providence, I do there 
fore most respectfully recommend to the Churches of all de 
nominations in this city, to dress their pulpits, and other 
parts of their places of worship at discretion, in suitable 
mourning, on the next Sunday, the llth instant; and re 
quest the Clergymen to make the services on that day ap 
propriate to the occasion as circumstances and their con 
venience will permit. 

Given under my hand, and Mayoralty Seal of the City of 
Brooklyn, this 8th day of April, A. D. 1841. 

C. P. SMITH. 

Office of the Clerk of the Common Council ) 
of the City of Brooklyn. \ 

I do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true transcript from 
the minutes of the proceedings of the Common Council of 
the City of Brooklyn. 

A. VAN NOSTRAND, Clerk. 



ORDER OF THE BROOKLYN PROCESSION 

On the occasion of the solemnization of the funeral ob 
sequies to the memory of WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, 

late President of the United States. 



The line was formed on Sands street, right resting on 
Fulton street, on Saturday, April 10th, 1841, at half-past 10 
o'clock, A. M., by Gen. James E. Under hill, Grand Mar 
shal, assisted by the following gentlemen as Aids : 



89 

Major WILLIAM CUMBERSON. 
Major JOSEPH B. CLAPP. 
Major GEORGE 0. BALL. 

Capt. J. C. Hegeman, Capt. Seth H. Low-,, 

apt. Edward S. Smith,. Capt. John C. Duryea,, 

Capt. Charles J. Blagrove, Capt, A. M. Greig. 

Messrs. James N. Olney, Edward W. Fisk, 

Joseph Yan Nostrand, Peyton A. Southall, 

Samuel N. Engle, Thomas H. Redding^ 

Henry I. Hadden, James Hubbard, 

in thQ fallowing order : 

FIRST. 

Grand Marshall 
Six Aids three abreast. 

SECOND, 

The Marine Corps of the United States Navy, under 
command of Captain Harris. 

THIRD. 
Officers of the United States Navy.. 

FOURTH. 

Seamen who have served on board of the United States. 
ship Constitution, and other sailors under command of Cap 
tains Newton and Sands. 

FIFTH. 
Naval Apprentices, under command of Captain Gallagher ^ 

SIXTH. 
Two Aids. 

Officers of the 44th Brigade off duty, 
Captain Birkbeck's company of Nassau Guards, 
12 



90 



Captain Smith's company of Jamaica Volunteer^ 

Captain Bennet's company of Hemsrtead Cadets, 

Captain Pierson's company of Brooklyn Light Guards,, 

Under command of Colonel Robert Tolford. 

SEVENTH. 

Two Aids. 

Mayor and Common Council of the City of Brooklyn,, 
preceded by their Sergeant-at-Arms. 

EIGHTH. 

Sheriff of the County of Kings, his Deputies, and the 
Marshals of the City. 

NINTH. 

Judges of the City and County. 

Clerks of Courts and Members of the Bar. 

Hamilton Literary Association. 

TENTH. 
Two Aids. 
Fire Department. 

ELEVENTH. 

Two Aids. 

Rope Maker's Benevolent Society, 
Watchmen's Benevolent Society. 

TWELFTH. 

Two Aids. 
Erin Fraternal Benevolent Society. 

THIRTEENTH. 

Aid. 
Civic Procession of the Village of Wifliamsburgh, 



91 

FOURTEENTH. 

Citizens of Brooklyn. 

The whole (consisting of about four thousand persons) then 
took up the line of march, passing down Fulton street to 
Hicks street, up Hicks street to Pierpont street, through 
Pierpont street to Atlantic street, down Atlantic street to~_the 
South Ferry, where three of the large boats of the Union 
Ferry Company were in attendance, on board of which the 
procession embarked for New York, and were safely landed 
afc the foot of Whitehall street. 

The line was again formed in the original order, and 
inarched up Broadway to the Park when each division re 
ceived its proper post in line, under General Robert Bo- 
gardus, Grand Marshal. 

J. E. UNDERHILL, 

Grand^ Marshal, 



New York, April 13, 1841. 

Sir On behalf of the Joint Committees of Arrangement 
Yor funeral solemnities in honor of the late President of th& 
United States, we have to request, for publication, a copy of 
the oration prepared by you for the occasion, and which the 
exceedingly inclement state of the weather prevented yoil 
delivering in the order announced in the programme of the 
Committee. We are instructed to say, the Committee deeply 
regret the occurrence which deprived them of the pleasure of 
hearing it personally delivered, and which has also caused 
so general a disappointment. 
With great respect, 

Your obedient servants, 

ELIAS L. SMITH, 
DAVID GRAHAM, Jun., 
JOHN A. UNDERWOOD, 

Committee, fyc. 
HON. THEODORE FRELINGHUYSEN, 

Chancellor University, N. York, 
25 Washington Place. 



New York, April 17, 1841. 

Gentlemen On my return to the city this morning, I re 
ceived your favor of the 13th instant, requesting a copy of 
the oration prepared for the occasion of the funeral solemni 
ties in honor of the late President of the United States. As 
it was prepared at the request of the Joint Committees of the 
Councils, I cheerfully comply with your wishes, and will 
have a copy made out on Monday. 
Very respectfully, Gentlemen, 

Your obedient servant, 

THEO. FRELINGHUYSEN. 

To Elias L. Smith, David Graham, Jan., ) 
and John A. Underwood, Esquires, \ 

On behalf of the Committee, &c. 



ORATION, 



ORATION. 



FELLOW CITIZENS 

The mournful occasion that has assembled us, is of sur 
passing interest and solemnity. Other bereavements are 
afflicting to our domestic and social relations, but this sudden 
and lamented, death of our Chief Magistrate spreads a wider 
desolation, and awakens a nation's sympathies. Not a heart 
but felt the shock, nor a face that did not turn sad at the 
tidings. So much of interest and animation, of excitement 
and agitation, had prepared the way for his elevation, that 
the public mind had no place for forebodings or sober fears; 
and when in the midst of all the hopes that were cherished, 
after one short month, the blow fell, it made the nation 
tremble. 

And, moreover, in the history of Divine Providence 
towards the executive officers of our government, there had 
been such uninterrupted benignity, that we were the more 
disposed to repress every apprehension. For while the mes 
senger of death has thrown his darts among all other depart 
ments of society, never, until now, have we been called to 
render funeral honors to a deceased President. All around 
him, in the House of Representatives, the Senate and the 
Seat of Justice, victims had fallen, but the executive mansion 
had been spared. Perhaps the thought was rising into a 
measure of confidence that this exalted station was invested 
with peculiar immunities that a mark so lofty would not 
range with the aim of the arrow. To-day, that illusion has 
vanished, and the charm is broken. We are shown with 
most impressive solemnity, that even there, where a nation's 
hopes are treasured up, there to fulfil the inscrutable purposes 
of infinite wisdom, death will make impartial visitation. 



95 



It becomes us my fellow citizens to mourn at this melan 
choly bereavement. God has spoken to us with loud and 
monitory emphasis. The standard bearer has fallen ; He by 
whom kings and rulers govern He who putteth down one 
and setteth up another, has inflicted the blow, and it be 
hoves us to bow before Him, with adoring submission and 
humility of spirit ; to make confession of our sins and implore 
his clemency, that mercy may rejoice against judgment. 

It is wise for us thus to pause from the avocations of busi 
ness, and ponder the lesson that is read to us to inquire 
into the causes, to trace all the lines of this dispensation, and 
each devoutly commend its instruction to his own heart. 

It is full of meaning. At a time of deep interest in the 
foreign relations of our country, when a collected and steady 
hand was never more needed that hand is palsied in death. 
Let us realize our dependance on infinite goodness, when 
the thought comes over us, should other kindred dispensa 
tions follow, (and they do not always come alone ; ) what dis 
traction, confusion and dismay might afflict our public coun 
cils: but I forbear " In the day of adversity let us consider." 

It is due to the memory of our venerable President, that 
we notice his personal history and character. He was born 
in Virginia in 1773. The time of his birth was auspicious: 
he came into life at that most eventful period when the prin 
ciples of American liberty were to be vindicated by the last 
appeal of injured nations. He grew up to manhood amidst 
the soul-stirring scenes of the Revolution. All that was 
lofty and pure, all that was magnanimous and self-sacrificing, 
in the incidents of that struggle, formed the daily lessons of 
his childhood. He lived almost near enough to hear the 
indignant peals of Patrick Henry's eloquence, as he de 
nounced the encroachments of oppression, and defied the 
threats of power. The first beatings of his pulse were quick 
ened by the undaunted purposes, the invincible firmness, and 
the triumphant exultations of freemen. 

In the Declaration of Independence that, on the 4th of 



96 



July, 1776, spread before the civilized world the recital of 
our wrongs, and commended to the favor of God the asser 
tion of our rights and the great principles of civil liberty, our 
lamented Chief Magistrate found a motive and a pledge to 
determine his own. Filial duty and his own willing and 
ready heart early enlisted all his energies on the side of his 
country: as that illustrious state paper maintained and plead 
her cause, he consecrated to her service the best feelings and 
profoundest veneration of his heart. 

His honored father was a member of that exalted council 
of enlightened patriots that prompted, directed, and shaped 
the mighty scheme of our national independence. O ! what a 
propitious and fruitful page for a re generous youth. By those 
golden lines he was taught that in the estimate of American 
patriots, there was a boon so costly, that life and fortune and 
sacred honor were not too dear to pay and pledge in its de* 
fence and that boon was liberty rational, regulated liberty. 

Such were the happy influences that swayed the early 
sentiments and formed the established character^ General 
Harrison and the scholar was true to his training. For 
through his whole life his love of country and fidelity to her 
welfare, have been the ruling principles of his conduct 
accorded by friends and adversaries. As he approached the 
active duties of manhood, he cast his fortunes with the enter 
prising spirits that were destined to bring into the confede 
racy the noble States of the West ; and there, as the coun 
sellor, the friend, and father of them all, he lived to behold 
Ohio, Illinois, Indiana and Missouri bringing into the Union 
the power, resources, and teeming millions of empires, where, 
within his own memory no human sounds^ but the whar- 
hoop broke the silence of universal solitude. 

The first public notice of General Harrison is in Noven> 
ber, 1791; and as his estimable and early friend, Judge 
Bennett, in his letters on Ohio, records of him " Soon after 
the battle and defeat of St. Glair in 1791, General Harrison, 
then a subaltern in the army, was sent in command of a small 



97 



detachment from Fort Washington to Forts Hamilton and 
Jefferson. 

" It was in the midst of one of the severest winters ever 
known in this country. Subalterns were not permitted to 
march on horseback. Of course, this youthful hero, not then 
twenty years of age, marched on foot through the snow with 
his knapsack on his back; and although the woods were 
swarming with hostile Indians, he reached the place of his 
destination in safety, after as severe an exposure to frost, 
fatigue, and danger, as was endured at any time during the 
war." 

He was after this elected the first Delegate to Congress 
from the Territory of Ohio, in 1799, and in the following 
year was appointed the first Governor of the Territory of 
Indiana. In after years he represented the State of Ohio, as 
a Representative, and Senator in Congress. In 1829 he was 
appointed by President Adams as Minister to Columbia. 

In the second war with Great Britain, in 1812, when the 
dark hour of defeat and discomfiture spread terror through 
the Western borders, and the screams of the savage began to 
disturb the sleep of the cradle, he guided our North-western 
army with consummate skill and heroism, reassured the con 
fidence of the country, and by the divine blessing stayed the 
threatened devastation of our frontiers. 

In all these high trusts he has earned the praise of a faith 
ful servant of his country. Corruption never stained his 
hand nor polluted his heart; and when he retired from the 
cares of office, it was riot to indulge in the luxuries of wealth, 
but diminished in means by devotion to his public duties, he 
returned to his farm to partake of its simple and healthful 
productions, with the honest consciousness that he owed no 
debt to his country, but gratitude and good will. 

He was a citizen soldier, a Christian patriot, a true hearted 
Republican, and an honest man. And until the waters 
of the Wabash and the Ohio shall cease to flow, the memory 

13 



98 



of William Henry Harrison will be enshrined in the grati 
tude of all posterity. 

And when his name was presented to the American people 
for the first office in their gift, it touched a chord that thrilled 
on every fibre. It was vain to approach the temper that was 
inspired by the calculations of policy -the heart claimed its 
share in the question and rejected such counsels. 

There was a conjuncture of incidents and recollections 
which imparted unwonted interest to the subject. It was the 
past coming back to us. It was neither politics nor party. 
It soared above them all. It was the free oifering of the 
heart, flowing from its fulness. He had in his childhood 
stood side by side with our fathers. He had, in the freshness 
of his youth, enjoyed the smiles and been honored by the 
confidence of the Father of his Country. 

General Harrison stood between the living and the dead 
a bright link to connect us in bonds of fellowship, with the 
golden days of our history. He seemed to rest with one hand 
on the past generation, and with the other, to take hold of 
the sympathies of the present. So many lines of precious 
interest met in him that patriotism and gratitude, with over 
whelming enthusiasm, laid at his feet, the first honors of a 
free and generous people. 

A President of the United States could not approach the 
office under more friendly auspices than invited General 
HARRISON. The contest, though warmly maintained, had 
passed away; the agitations which it had excited had all 
subsided, and the prospect was cheered by the most hopeful 
promise. Indeed, in the character of the Presidential elec 
tion, there had been a manliness, decorum, and respectful 
deference for law and order, alike hopeful for the future, and 
honorable to our institutions. But ' these, and more than 
these, could not avail to suspend or turn aside the Divine 
purpose : the decree had gone forth, and a morning bright as 
ever beamed from the heavens, long before noon was to be 
enshrouded with the shadows of death. The President lived 



99 



long enough to grasp the gilded prize, to taste of its sweetness, 
if such it had, and to realize the anxieties that clustered 
around it and death palsied the hand that held it. 

And what painful proof meets us, of the utter vanity of 
earth's richest treasures. Detach them from connexion with 
immortality, and they are the veriest shadows, and designedly 
so. He who endowed this living spirit within us, never 
meant that its resting place should be found on earth but 
we approach the truth so reluctantly, as to need these 
astounding providences to seal it home upon our hearts. 

The late President, in his inaugural address, has alluded 
in terms of anxious interest, to the spirit of party as among 
the most fearful dangers to our liberties when could an 
occasion be more solemnly suitable for us to improve the 
counsels of departed worth ? 

Political differences and personal preferences are incidental 
to free institutions ; perhaps the healthful action of our go 
vernment requires them. But let us differ as brethren of 
the same great fraternity, holding the same rights, bound by 
the same ties, and seeking the good of our common country. 

Let us differ, with this day's affecting scenes fresh in our 
minds. The grave is a sacred composer of dissentions 
how it smoothes the rough edges of conflict ! how it rebukes 
the harshness of angry discussion ! and no path of all these 
thousands but leads to the sepulchre. Let the prospect mo 
derate our political controversies. 

Let the world behold a spectacle worthy of freemen that 
while we, without restraint, discuss the measures, and judge 
the officers of our government, we draw a line around the 
charities of life, that no strifes of party shall be permitted to 
invade or disturb. 

There was another subject on which the President im 
proved the opportunity of his induction to open his senti 
ments and no pious mind could have made expression of 
them in happier terms. In the conclusion of his address, 
that had very properly developed the principles that should 



100 



govern his administration, as if to impart emphasis to the 
whole, he proceeds : " I deem the occasion sufficiently im 
portant and solemn, to justify me in expressing to my fellow 
citizens a profound reverence for the Christian Religion, and 
a thorough conviction that sound morals, religious freedom, 
and a just sense of religious responsibility, are essentially 
connected with all true and lasting happiness" 

Now that the honored lips which gave utterance to this 
conviction are sealed in death, it is most consolatory to his 
family, his friends and his country, to recall the occasion. 
Exalted to the very summit of earthly honor, -surrounded by 
many thousands of his fellow citizens, who crowded to the 
Capitol to render homage to the man of their choice ; all that 
was intoxicating in the splendid ceremonies did not tempt 
him either to forget his dependanee on God, or to forego that 
public decided testimony to the value of the Christian Reli 
gion, and beyond all worldly plaudits its essential connexion 
with true and lasting happiness. 

And the closing scene of the melancholy drama was in 
harmony with these elevated views. As the expected hour 
of dissolution approached, he calmly prepared to meet it 
with devout resignation and humble trust. 

The consolations of that blessed Gospel which he had so 
lately commended, did not fail him in this crisis ; and after 
committing his departing spirit to God, its latest anxieties 
while on earth were breathed forth in concern for his coun 
try and its Constitution. 

It was a death such as a Christian Statesman might de 
sire. He had just been entrusted with the Constitution ; he 
had most solemnly invoked the divine blessing on his faith 
ful purpose to preserve, protect and defend it ; and now that 
God was about to summon him to other, and as we trust to 
higher and purer service, the last hour was consecrated to 
religion and his country. 

Peace be to his memory. A nation's tears will embalm it. 




THIS BOOK IS DUE ON THE LAST DATE 
STAMPED BELOW 



RENEWED BOOKS ARE SUBJECT TO IMMEDIATE 
RECALL 



LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS 

Book Slip-50w-8,'69(N831s8)458-A-31/5 



N9 709667 

New York (City) 
Common Council. 

Report of the com 
mittee of arrangements 
of the Common council 
of the city of New York, 
for the funeral obsequies 
in memory of William H. 
Harrison. 



E392 
N56 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
DAVIS