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ONTARIO 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



REPORT OF THE MINISTER 

I960 




PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 

SESSIONAL PAPER NO. 7 




The Honourable John P. Robarts, Q.C, B.A., LLD. 
Minister of Education 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

DIRECTORY i 

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL AND FOREWORD iii 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 1 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 2 

TEACHER EDUCATION 4 

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 6 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 7 

SCHOOLS ATTENDED BY FRENCH-SPEAKING PUPILS 8 

SCHOOL ATTENDANCE 8 

AGRICULTURE 9 

ART 9 

AUDIO-VISUAL EDUCATION 10 

AUXILIARY EDUCATION SERVICES 10 

COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES 11 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 12 

EXAMINATIONS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 13 

GUIDANCE SERVICES 14 

MUSIC 15 

ONTARIO SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND 15 

ONTARIO SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF 16 

PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION 17 

PROVINCIAL LIBRARY SERVICE 17 

SERVICE RECORD 18 

IN MEMORIAM 18 

RETIREMENTS 19 

DIED IN SERVICE 22 

RETIREMENTS ON SUPERANNUATION 23 

RESIGNATIONS 23 

TRANSFERS 24 

PROMOTIONS 25 

APPOINTMENTS 26 



STATISTICS— 1. GENERAL 

TABLE 1 Statistical Summary of Public Education in Ontario S-3 

2 Post- War Increase in Provincial Grants S-5 

3 Provincial Population and School Enrolment S-6 

4 Age-Grade-Sex Distribution of Pupils — June, 1956 S-7 

5 Post-War School Enrolment by Grades S-8 

6 Immigration to Canada of School-Age Children S-9 

7 Immigration to Canada and Ontario of Children by Age-Groups S-l 

8 Children Transferring into or out of Provinces S-l 

9 Enrolment in Provincial Teachers' Colleges, 1960-61 S-l 1 

1 Enrolment by Years at Teacher-Training Schools S-l 2 

1 1 Professional Certificates issued during 1959-60 S-l 4 

12 School Administrative Units S-l 6 

1 3 Departmental Summer Courses S-l 7 

1 4 Summary of Attendance Officers' Reports S-l 8 

1 5 Elementary-School Teachers S-l 8 

1 6 Secondary-School Teachers S- 1 9 

1 7 Pupil Transportation S-20 

1 8 Post-War School Building Construction S-21 

19 Pupil-Destination S-23 

20 Pupil Retirement from School Life, 1957-60 S-23 

21 Pupil Retirement from School Life, 1946-60 S-24 

22 Pupil Retirement from School Life Related to Enrolment S-24 

23 School Enrolment by Counties and Districts S-25 



2. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

TABLE 24 Continuous Record of Enrolment S-29 

25 Schools and Teaching Areas S-30 

26 Schools Classified According to Number of Teaching Areas, 1945-60 S-30 

27 Schools Classified According to Number of Teaching Areas S-31 

28 Kindergartens S-32 

29 Auxiliary Education Services S-33 

30 Schools Attended by French-Speaking Pupils — Age-Grade Distribution of Enrolment S-34 

3. PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

TABLE 3 1 Continuous Record of Enrolment S-39 

32 Enrolment by Counties and Districts Showing Type of Municipality S-41 

33 Enrolment, Teachers, Teaching Areas and Schools by Type of School Board S-42 

34 Enrolment, Teachers, Teaching Areas and Schools by Counties and Districts S-43 

35 Schools Classified by Number of Teaching Areas Showing Enrolment and Teachers S-44 

36 Schools Classified by Enrolment Showing Teachers and Teaching Areas S-47 

37 Schools Classified by Number of Teachers Showing Teaching Areas and Enrolment S-47 

38 Enrolment, Teachers, Teaching Areas and Schools by Type of Municipality S-48 

39 Enrolment, Teachers, Teaching Areas and Schools by Population S-48 

40 Salary Frequency Distribution S-49 

4 1 Schools Attended by French-Speaking Pupils S-50 

42 Protestant Separate Schools S-50 

4. ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

TABLE 43 Continuous Record of Enrolment S-53 

44 Enrolment by Counties and Districts Showing Type of Municipality S-54 

45 Enrolment, Teachers, Teaching Areas and Schools by Type of School Board S-55 

46 Enrolment, Teachers, Teaching Areas and Schools by Counties and Districts S-56 

47 Schools Classified by Number of Teaching Areas Showing Enrolment and Teachers S-57 

48 Schools Classified by Enrolment Showing Teachers and Teaching Areas S-58 

49 Schools Classified by Number of Teachers Showing Teaching Areas and Enrolment S-58 

50 Enrolment, Teachers, Teaching Areas and Schools by Type of Municipality S-59 

51 Enrolment, Teachers, Teaching Areas and Schools by Population S-59 

52 Salary Frequency Distribution S-60 

53 Schools Attended by French-Speaking Pupils S-6 1 

5. SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

54 Continuous Record of Enrolment S-65 

55 Enrolment by Grade, Course and Sex S-67 

56 Enrolment by Municipality within Counties and Districts S-69 

57 Enrolment and Teachers in Individual Schools S-73 

58 Evening Classes S-93 

59 Schools Classified According to Number of Teaching Areas S-93 

60 Schools Classified According to Number of Pupils Enrolled S-94 

61 Schools Classified According to Number of Teachers S-94 

62 Salary Frequency Distribution S-95 

63 Schools Attended by French-Speaking Pupils S-96 

64 Certificates and Diplomas S-97 

65 Dominion-Provincial Student-Aid Programme S- 1 02 

66 Transportation Assistance S- 1 02 

67 Retirements Classified According to Highest Standing Attained S-104 

68 Estimated Progress of Pupils Through Secondary Schools S-l 04 

69 Agriculture— List of Schools S-l 05 

70 Agriculture — Teachers S-l 06 

71 Technical Institutes S-l 06 

72 Provincial Institute of Trades S-l 06 

73 Trade Schools S- 1 07 



6. MISCELLANEOUS 

TABLE 74 Public Libraries S-l 1 4 

75 Correspondence Courses S- 1 1 9 

76 Ontario School for the Deaf S-l 20 

77 Ontario School for the Blind S-l 21 

78 Music S-l 22 

79 Statistics Relating to the Community Programmes Branch S-l 25 

80 Inspectors and Inspectorates — Elementary S-l 27 

8 1 Secondary School Inspectors S- 1 39 

82 Special Branch Inspectors » S- 1 40 

83 Publications of the Department of Education S- 1 43 

7. FINANCIAL 

84 Financial Summary of Ontario School Boards S-l 46 

85 Public School Boards S- 1 47 

86 Roman Catholic Separate School Boards S- 1 48 

87 Secondary School Boards S- 1 49 

88 Metropolitan School Board for the Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto S-l 50 

89 Cost of Elementary and Secondary Education, 1946-59 S-l 51 

Chart 1 Education in Relation to other Municipal Services S-2 

2 Post- War Growth in Population, Enrolment and Teaching Areas S-4 

3 Post- War School Building Construction S-22 



DIRECTORY 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
as of December 31, 1960 

MINISTER OF EDUCATION JOHN P. ROBARTS, Q.C, B.A., LL.D. 

CHIEF DIRECTOR C. F. CANNON, B.A., B.Paed., LL.D. 

DEPUTY MINISTERS C. W. BOOTH, B.A., LL.D. 

— F. S. RIVERS, B.A., B.Paed., LL.D. 

REGISTRAR C. A. BROWN, M.A., D.Paed. 

ASSISTANT REGISTRARS F. HOGG, B.A. 

—J. B. SILCOX, B.A., B.Paed. 
— G. J. WESTWOOD, B.A. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION P. H. CUNNINGHAM, B.Comm., C.A. 

ASSISTANT TO THE SUPERINTENDENT A. J. HANCHARD 

CHIEF, GRANTS OFFICE F. S. WILSON, B.A., C.A. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF CURRICULUM AND TEXT-BOOKS J. R. McCARTHY, M.A., B.Paed. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENTS W. C. McMASTER, B.A., B.Paed. 

— M. B. PARNALL, M.A., M.Ed. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION G. A. PEARSON, B.A. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENTS W. G. CHATTERTON, B.A., B.Paed. 

— G. L. DUFFIN, B.A., M.Ed. 

—J. H. KENNEDY, B.A. 

— R. J. McNAUGHTON, B.A., B.Paed. 

— B. E. MICHAUD, B.A., B.Paed. 

— C. P. O'NEILL, M.A. 

— W. C. VANDERBURGH, B.A., B.Paed. 

—J. C. WILKER, B.A., B.Paed. 

DIRECTOR OF ART EDUCATION CD. GAITSKELL, M.A., D.Paed. 

DIRECTOR OF AUDIO-VISUAL EDUCATION J. W. GRIMMON, B.A., B.Paed. 

DIRECTOR OF CORRESPONDENCE COURSES L. M. McKENZIE, B.A. 

DIRECTOR OF FRENCH INSTRUCTION R. GAUTHIER, B.A., D.Paed. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT J. B. HEALY, B.A., B.Paed. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT E. E. STEWART, M.A. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SECONDARY EDUCATION S. D. RENDALL, B.A., LL.D. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENTS E. J. DAVIES, B.Sc. 

—A. L. LAKIE, B.A., B.Paed. 
—A. H. McKAGUE, B.A. 
—A. M. MOON, B.A.Sc, P.Eng. 
— W. R. STEWART, B.A. 
— R. H. WALLACE, M.A. 

DIRECTOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION B. S. McCOOL, M.B.E., B.A. 

DIRECTOR OF PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION. . .G. A. WRIGHT, B.S.A. 
REGISTRAR OF TRADE SCHOOLS H. M. MATTHEWS 



PRINCIPALS, PROVINCIAL TECHNICAL INSTITUTES: 

EASTERN ONTARIO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. . .V. J. BYERS, B.Sc, P.Eng., S.M.I.R.E. 

HAMILTON INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY D. H. CRAIGHEAD, B.Sc, M.Ed., P.Eng. 

PROVINCIAL INSTITUTE OF MINING O. E. WALLI, B.Sc, F.C.I.C, M.C.I.M., P.Eng. 

PROVINCIAL INSTITUTE OF TRADES G. WRAGG, B.S.A., M.Ed. 

RYERSON INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY H. H. KERR, B.A.Sc, B.Paed., P.Eng., M.E.I.C. 

WESTERN ONTARIO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY . ..C. M. JACKSON, M.Sc, P.Eng., M.I.R.E., M.C.A.P. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES and 

PROVINCIAL SCHOOL ATTENDANCE OFFICER H. R. BEATTIE, B.A. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT W. K. CLARKE, B.A. 

DIRECTOR OF AUXILIARY EDUCATION SERVICES D. A. MacTAVISH, M.A., B.Paed. 

DIRECTOR OF GUIDANCE SERVICES F. J. CLUTE, B.A. 

STATISTICIAN W. A. CAMPBELL, M.A. 

SUPERINTENDENT, ONTARIO SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND..S. E. ARMSTRONG, B.A. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT G. C. WHETSTONE, B.A., B.Ed. 

SUPERINTENDENT, ONTARIO SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF. .J. G. DEMEZA, B.A., B.Paed. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT D. E. KENNEDY, B.A. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION H. E. ELBORN, M.A., B.Paed. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENTS C. A. MUSTARD, M.B.E., B.A., B.Paed. 

— G. L. WOODRUFF, B.A., B.Paed. 

PRINCIPALS OF TEACHERS' COLLEGES: 

HAMILTON J. J. D. LONDERVILLE, M.A., M.Ed. 

LAKEHEAD W. A. WEST, B. A., B.Ed. 

LAKESHORE H. A. BLANCHARD, B.A., B.Paed. 

LONDON F. C. BIEHL, B.A., B.Paed. 

NORTH BAY J. D. DEYELL, B.A., B.Paed. 

OTTAWA W. K. F. KENDRICK, B.A., B.Paed. 

PETERBOROUGH L. W. COPP, B.A., B. Paed. 

STRATFORD G. O. DICKINSON, B.A., B.Ed. 

TORONTO R. A. JOHNSTON, B.A., B.Paed. 

UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA L. P. PIGEON, B.A., B.Paed., Ph.L, Lic.Paed. 

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES K. L. YOUNG, B.A. 

LEGISLATIVE LIBRARIAN (Mrs.) M. A. FRASER, M.A. 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC LIBRARY SERVICE W. A. ROEDDE, B.A., B.L.S. 

SECRETARY, TEACHERS' SUPERANNUATION COMMISSION J. R. CAUSLEY, B.Comm. 

TECHNICAL ADVISER B. M. McLEAN, B.A.Sc, B.Paed., P.Eng. 

ASSISTANT D. G.W. McRAE, B.Arch., M.F.A., 

F.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A. 



Report of 
The Minister of Education 

I960 



To The Honourable J. Keiller Mackay, D.S.O., V.D., LL.D., 
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

Your Honour: 

With all respect I present the Report of the Department of Education for the 
year 1960. In so doing, I should like to comment upon some aspects of the educa- 
tional system which appear to be of special interest. 

The total number of pupils in the elementary and secondary schools of the 
Province in September, I960, was 1,389,163, an increase of 69,938 over the en- 
rolment of the previous year. The elementary schools showed an increase of 
44,739 and the secondary schools an increase of 25,199. 

Expanding enrolments continued to spur on the building programme, as will be 
noted in the pages that follow. In 1960, new accommodation was provided for 
78,750 elementary-school pupils at an estimated cost of $59,938,000, and for 
26,480 secondary school pupils at an estimated cost of $39,1 69,000. 

The year 1960 appears to have been the turning point in the teacher supply 
situation as far as the elementary schools are concerned. The current enrolment in 
the ten Teachers' Colleges totals 6,730, of whom 5,740 will be candidates for 
teaching certificates next June. The successful students from such a large group 
should generally meet the demand for elementary-school teachers in 1961. 

As the bulge in school population moves into the secondary schools, as shown 
by an increase of 15.7 per cent in Grade 9 enrolment in September, 1960, as 
compared with 2.7 per cent in 1 959, steps have been taken to increase the supply 
of teachers to meet the expanding need. A programme of two summer courses 
supplemented by special supervision during the first year of teaching has attracted 
to the schools a gratifying number of able graduates of the universities. This year, 
the summer courses were offered in London and Kingston as well as in Toronto, and 
this movement toward decentralization proved very satisfactory. 

The number of central elementary schools provided by boards of trustees of 
township school areas and of union separate schools is steadily increasing, with 
the result that many rural children are now enjoying the advantages of attending 
a graded school. At the present time, less than 8 per cent of the elementary-school 
enrolment is found in one-room schools and less than 4 per cent in two-room schools. 
Local boards have found that, where they operate central schools, teachers who 
have a broad professional education can be attracted and held; an interchange 
of teachers can be arranged to provide specialized instruction in music, art, 
and physical education; and the number of grades per teacher can be reduced. 

Financial assistance through bursaries, scholarships, and loans was given to 
approximately 6,000 students in the scholastic year 1959-60, in a total amount 
just short of $2,000,000, an increase of 80 per cent over the amount paid in 
1958-59. 



in 



The government has established an Advisory Committe on University Affairs 
Among the functions of the Committee are: (a) to receive representations from the 
universities relating to their financial needs for operating costs and capital outlays; 
(b) to secure from the universities the information necessary for consideration by 
the Committee; and (c) to make recommendations to the Minister of Education 
regarding the amount of the annual grant to each university for operating costs 
and capital outlays. 

In 1944, the Guidance Services Branch was established in this Department to 
give assistance through local authorities to pupils and their parents in educational 
and vocational planning. A first objective in the programme was to provide the 
schools with an increased amount of educational and occupational information. 
This is being accomplished through the co-operation of universities and other edu- 
cational institutions, as well as of business, industry, and service organizations. The 
steady development of the guidance programme in elementary and secondary 
schools has also been furthered by various training courses for teachers offered by 
this Department, and by continued emphasis upon the aim of developing self- 
guidance on the part of the pupils. 

The Department of Education completely re-organized its Statistics Division 
several years ago. Through the work of a trained statistician and a competent 
staff, and through the provision of modern equipment, up-to-date statistical in- 
formation is now made available within a minimum of time. This service is of great 
value at a time when rapid expansion of the educational system calls for careful 
planning soundly based on recent and reliable information. 

In this report, information and statistics will be found with regard to the topics 
mentioned and to many other features of the school system. The educational system 
of Ontario is a vast venture in co-operation which involves the provincial and mu- 
nicipal governments, the taxpayers, the boards of trustees, the teachers and ad- 
ministrators, the parents, and last, but not least, because they provide the purpose 
of it all, the pupils and students themselves. The common task — the education of 
the children and youth of this Province— is well worth the faithful effort of everyone. 



Respectfully submitted, 





Minister of Education. 
Toronto, January 9, 1961. 



IV 



Elementary Education 



ENROLMENT 

The total enrolment of pupils in elementary schools in September, 1960 was 
1,126,388, of whom 843,737 were enrolled in public schools and 282,651 in 
separate schools. This was an increase of 44,739 over the total elementary school 
enrolment of September, 1959.( 1 ) 

BUILDING PROGRAMME 

In 1960 elementary school accommodation was increased by 78,750 pupil 
places, provided in 529 new buildings and additions, at an approximate cost of 
$59,938,000. From 1945 to 1960 inclusive, 679,800 pupil places were provided, 
at an estimated cost of $46 1 , 1 45,000.( 2 ) 

TRANSPORTATION 

In the school year 1959-60, elementary-school boards transported 76,796 
pupils to school. Of these, 6,502 were transported to secondary school. This was an 
increase of 12 per cent over the previous year. Of the pupils transported by 
elementary-school boards, 26 per cent resided 6 miles or more from school, 22 per 
cent resided 4 to 6 miles from school, 51 per cent resided 2 to 4 miles from school 
and 1 per cent resided within 2 miles of school. Board-owned vehicles were used 
to transport 1 5 per cent of the pupils over 1 per cent of the routes.( 3 ) 

CENTRAL SCHOOLS 

The number of larger graded schools in rural areas continues to increase. 
These central schools are being provided by boards of trustees of township school 
areas and of union separate schools. The broader and more effective educational 
opportunities made available in cenlral schools have been a source of satisfaction 
to pupils, parents, teachers, trustees and ratepayers, and have encouraged boards 
of areas in which central schools have not previously been established to give ser- 
ious consideration to the provision of these facilities. It has been the experience 
that in central schools, teachers with a broad professional education can be attrac- 
ted and held, the number of grades per teacher can be reduced and specialized 
instruction in music, art, and physical education can be provided. 

The increasing provision of transportation and ils acceptance by parents have 
assisted in the establishment of central schools. It is not expected that boards will 
find it possible to provide for the elementary education of all pupils in central 
schools. Because of physical obstacles and the sparse settlement of parts of the 
Province it is likely that it will be necessary to maintain ungraded one-room schools 
in certain locations for some time, but there is a quickening trend towards central- 
ized accommodation. Less than 8 per cent of the elementary-school enrolment is 
now found in one-room schools and less than 4 per cent is found in two-room schools. 

INTERNSHIP PLAN 

Many teachers who have been working towards post-graduate degrees in 
Education and who have expressed an interest in qualifying for the elementary- 
school inspector's certificate, have taken part in the Internship Plan to become more 
fully acquainted with the many and varied duties of an elementary-school inspector. 

The Internship Plan in Supervision is sponsored by the Ontario College of 
Education and approved by the Department of Education. Since its inception in 
1 955, eighty-five teachers have been placed with experienced inspectors in the 

(') See Table 5 ( 3 ) See Table 17 

( 2 ) See Table 18 



field for a two-week period to study at first hand the various aspects of the super- 
vision of classrooms and the administration of elementary schools. Subsequently, 
twenty of the participants have been employed as elementary-school inspectors by 
the Department of Education. 

PRINCIPALS OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

School boards are required to appoint a principal for each school. He is re- 
sponsible both for its organization and discipline. In recent years, the principal has 
also been expected to take a more active part in the supervision of instruction. 
This expectation is reflected in the plans for new school buildings and in the quali- 
fication of principals under new regulations. 

Since 1945, a principal's office has been provided in each school; in earlier 
days, many principals administered their schools from their classrooms. More 
principals are now relieved from their teaching duties on a part-time or full-time 
basis, depending on the size of the school, to supervise instruction throughout the 
school. In keeping with this growing recognition of the position of the principal in the 
elementary school, the regulations have been amended, effective September 1, 
1961, to require all new appointees as principal of an elementary school having 
an enrolment of 300 or more to hold a Bachelor of Arts degree as well as a Perm- 
anent First Class Certificate or a Permanent Elementary-School Teacher's Certificate. 



Secondary Education 

ENROLMENT 

The total enrolment of pupils in secondary schools in September, 1960, was 
262,775, an increase of 25,199 over September, 1959. By courses, the enrolments 
were as follows: General 200,368; Commercial 32,345; Commercial Special 
2,182; Technical 22,343; Home Economics 365; Art 764; Special Industrial 1,358; 
and Special Courses 3,050. ( 4 ) 

The total number of full-time teachers (including principals) in September, 
I960, was 1 1,478, an increase of 1,014 over that of the previous year. With an 
allowance for part-time teachers the pupil-teacher ratio in September, 1959, was 
22.6 to 1, as compared with 22.4 in 1959 and 22.9 in 1958. 

BUILDING PROGRAMME 

There were 24 new secondary school buildings completed in 1960 and addi- 
tions were made to 48 existing school buildings at a total cost of approximately 
$39,169,000.( 5 ) 

TRANSPORTATION 

During the school year 1959-60, secondary school boards furnished trans- 
portation for 61,387 pupils. These pupils were transported over 1,824 routes at a 
cost of $32,1 34 per day.( 6 ) 

The number of pupils transported to secondary schools by elementary school 
boards increased this year. 

Provision has been made for certain secondary school boards, with the ap- 
proval of the Ontario Municipal Board, to enter into agreements with an operator 
to furnish transportation for more than one year but not more than five years. 

( 4 ) See Tables 5 and 55 ( 6 ) See Table 17 

( 5 ) See Table 18 






PROVINCIAL STUDENT-AID PROGRAMME 

In the fiscal year 1959-60, financial assistance was given to approximately 
6,000 students in the form of scholarships, bursaries, and loans in a total amount 
just short of $2,000,000. This represents an increase over the previous year of 70 
per cent in the number of students assisted and almost 80 per cent in the total 
amount disbursed. The Dominion Government contributed $100,000 to the bursary 
awards. 

Ontario Scholarship winners, designated Ontario Scholars for the first time, 
and successful applicants for bursaries to the total number of 4,1 17 received free 
gifts in the amount of $1,042,997. Loans, repayable on very generous terms be- 
ginning in the year after a student's graduation or withdrawal, were issued to 
2,198 young people in the amount of $926,876. Some students received aid of 
two types from the scholarship, bursary and loan categories.! 7 ) 

For the fiscal year 1960-61, the sum of $1,200,000 has been set aside for 
scholarships and bursaries, while the "drawing account" for student-aid loans is 
$3,000,000. It is abundantly apparent to the Student-Aid Committee which con- 
siders the applications that without such government assistance a great many students 
would be denied higher education. 

DEPARTMENTAL TESTING PROGRAMME IN GRADE 12 

In the spring term of 1 960, short-answer achievement tests were administered 
to all pupils in Grade 1 2 of the General Course in English and Chemistry in order 
to assist principals and teachers, especially the many young teachers in secondary 
schools, to set and maintain adequate standards of promotion and to recommend 
on a uniform provincial basis their candidates for the Secondary School Gradua- 
tion Diploma. This programme was extended experimentally to include the Grade 
1 2 pupils in other courses for the first time. 

In 1960-61 the tests are being extended to other subjects. Their value is in- 
creasing as supervisory officials and teachers gain facility in the interpretation and 
application of the results. 

PRIVATE TRADE SCHOOLS 

In 1960 there were 152 schools registered under The Trade Schools Regula- 
tion Act. Of this group two have ceased business and 1 1 are new schools or branch- 
es. Fifteen schools which were registered in 1 959 did not renew their registration.! 8 ) 

The co-operation of the Better Business Bureau and certain newspaper adver- 
tising managers has been of great assistance in maintaining the standards of these 
private schools. The quality of instruction appears to be adequate. 

TECHNICAL INSTITUTES 

The technical institutes, which are organized under The Department of Educa- 
tion Act, and which, in general, operate under advisory committees, offer ad- 
vanced technological education between the levels provided in secondary schools 
and in the universities. 

Four institutes of technology — Ryerson Institute of Technology, Toronto; The 
Hamilton Institute of Technology; The Eastern Ontario Institute of Technology, 
Ottawa; and The Western Ontario Institute of Technology, Windsor — provide a 
three-year programme leading to employment in business and industrial occupa- 
tions. They also offer evening classes for employed persons who wish to improve 
their education. At all of these institutes there is a common first-year course for 
aeronautical, chemical, electrical, electronic, instrument, gas, mechanical, and 

( 7 ) See Table 65 

( 8 ) See Table 73 



metallurgical technologies. The Ryerson Institute of Technology offers the three 
years of each of these courses. In the other institutes, it is necessary for the students 
to transfer to Ryerson to complete the second or third year of certain of the courses. 

The Provincial Institute of Mining at Haileybury offers a two-year Diploma 
Course in technological subjects relating to mining. A recent addition to the building 
makes provision for a suitable milling laboratory, a new classroom to serve both 
milling and fire assaying, administrative offices, a staff room, students' common 
room, and a school library. 

On September 30, 1960, there were 3,049 students enrolled in the day 
courses in the five institutes mentioned, and 3,481 in the evening courses. ( 9 ) 

LAKEHEAD COLLEGE OF ARTS, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Although The Lakehead College of Arts, Science and Technology, Port Arthur, 
now operates under a Board of Governors, it continues to receive financial assist- 
ance from the Ontaiio Department of Education. This institution offers first year 
university courses in arts and science, and conducts two-year technological courses 
in forestry, mining, and industrial chemistry. 

THE PROVINCIAL INSTITUTE OF TRADES 

The Provincial Institute of Trades, Toronto, was established in 1951 to provide 
"in-school" training for apprentices in trades designated under the Apprenticeship 
Act of the Department of Labour of the Province of Ontario. In 1 960, the enrolment 
on the last day of September included 670 students on a ten-week course in the 
designated trades, and 130 students in courses of varying lengths in the non- 
designated trades. In the designated trades, four classes are admitted per year. 
The evening class programme, designed to encourage tradesmen to up-grade their 
training, had 1,631 persons enrolled on November 1, 1960.( 10 ) 



Teacher Education 



ENROLMENT 

In the autumn of 1960, a total of 6,730 students enrolled in the Teachers' 
Colleges, an increase of 779 over the previous year. Of these 3,750 were regis- 
tered in One-year Courses, 991 in the First Year of the Two-year Course, 1,203 in 
the Second Year of the Two-year Course, and 786 in the Completing Year of the 
In-service Course. Approximately 28 per cent of the students were men, an increase 
of 1 per cent over 1959.( 11 ) 

At the College of Education, 598 students were enrolled in courses leading to 
the High School Assistant's, Vocational, and Industrial Arts Certificates, an increase 
of 73 over the previous year. In addition, 82 students enrolled in the Library 
Course, an increase of 26 over 1959. In all courses, registration at the College of 
Education increased from 581 in 1959 to 680 in 1960. The proportion of men 
students enrolled increased slightly from approximately 62 per cent in 1959 to 
63 per cent in 1960.( n ) 

TEACHER SUPPLY 

The supply of teachers for the elementary schools was maintained by an 
increase in the number of graduates of the Teachers' Colleges and the operation of 
Pre-Teachers'-College Summer Courses. In 1960, approximately 4,100 students 
graduated from the Teachers' Colleges. Of these, 2,821 were in One-year Courses, 
730 were in the Second Year of the Two-year Course, and 589 were in the Com- 

( 9 ) See Table 71 (") See Tables 9 and 1 

( ,0 ) See Table 72 



pleting Year of the In-service Course. A total of 562 graduates of the Pre-Teachers'- 
College Summer Courses, First Year, and 599 graduates of the Pre-Teachers'- 
College Summer Courses, Second Year, were granted temporary certificates after 
attendance at the Toronto and Port Arthur centres. At the University of Ottawa 
Teachers' College, 63 candidates with teaching experience under Letters of Per- 
mission obtained Deferred Interim Second Class Certificates, and 41 obtained 
Interim Second Class Certificates through attendance at summer sessions. These 
certificates are valid in elementary schools where French is a subject of instruction 
with the approval of the Minister. 

The increasing supply of teachers for the elementary schools has made possible 
the raising of academic requirements for entrance to teacher training courses and 
a decreas* in the number of candidates admitted to the Pre-Teachers'-College 
Summer Courses. In September, 1960, the academic requirement for admission to 
the Two-year Course was the Secondary School Graduation Diploma of the Gen- 
eral Course with a minimum of four options instead of the three options previously 
required. Announcement has been made that, beginning in September, 1961, the 
academic requirement for entrance to the One-year Course will be standing in 
eight Grade 1 3 papers, including both English Literature and English Composition 
instead of the one English paper formerly required. Announcement has also been 
made that the Pre-Teachers'-College Summer Courses, first offered in 1952, will 
be discontinued, and that the First Year Summer Course will not be offered in 1961 . 
This means that the In-service Training Course will cease to be an avenue for teacher 
qualification. The number of students entering the teaching profession through this 
Course has been gradually reduced in recent years, from 1 ,1 20 in 1 958, to 734 in 

1959, and to 562 in 1960. 

Letters of Standing, valid in Ontario's elementary schools and granted to 
well-prepared teachers from other provinces of Canada or other countries of the 
Commonwealth, totalled 577 in the school year 1959-60. Letters of Permission 
issued to boards of trustees on behalf of uncertificated teachers in elementary 
schools totalled 753 by the end of November for the school year 1960-61. 

The special summer course programme, formerly offered only in Toronto, for 
the preparation of secondary-school teachers was extended in 1960 to centres 
in Kingston and London as well. A total of 1,035 candidates enrolled for the first 
eight-week summer session, an increase of 1 20 over 1959. Of these, 571 were at 
Toronto, 192 at Kingston, and 272 at London. A total of 866 candidates enrolled 
at the Toronto centre for the second summer session of five weeks, an increase of 
179 over 1959. 

Letters of Standing, valid in Ontario's secondary schools and granted to 
secondary school teachers trained in other provinces of Canada or other countries 
of the Commonwealth totalled 84 for the school year 1959-60. Letters of Per- 
mission, issued to school boards on behalf of secondary-school teachers not holding 
basic secondary-school teaching certificates totalled 584 by the end of November, 

1960. In addition, 262 Letters of Permission for the teaching of special subjects 
were granted on behalf of teachers fully qualified to teach general academic 
subjects. 



LAKEHEAD TEACHERS 1 COLLEGE 

In September, 1960, the Lakehead Teachers' College began operation in 
temporary quarters in a new secondary school building in Fort William through the 
co-operation of the Board of Education of that City. The initial enrolment of 207 
indicates the interest taken in teacher education by the young people of North- 
western Ontario, and augurs well for the future of the College. 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 

In April, 1960, construction was begun on a permanent building for the Lake- 
head Teachers' College on a site adjacent to the Lakehead Institute of Arts, Science 
and Technology in Port Arthur. The new two-storeyed building is T-shaped in form, 
and provides classrooms, library, gymnasium, auditorium, offices, and service 
areas. Special features of the building are a cafeteria and student common-room. 
It is expected that the College will move into its new quarters in 1 961 . 

During 1960, the building of the Hamilton Teachers' College was enlarged 
by the addition of a wing which includes eight classrooms and a cafeteria. The 
accommodation thus provided will be occupied early in 1 961 . 

Before the close of the year under review, planning was begun for the build- 
ing of the proposed Windsor Teachers' College. The new building will be erected 
on a site that has been obtained adjacent to the City of Windsor in the Township 
of Sandwich West near the junction of Third Concession Road and Dougall Avenue. 
It is expected that the new College will serve students living within the boundaries 
of Essex and Kent Counties. 



Curriculum Development 

CURRICULUM 

The Curriculum and Text-books Branch has charge of the work within the 
Department dealing with the preparation of courses of study and the provision of 
suitable text-books to accompany these courses. The officials of the Branch are 
assisted in the development of new courses by committees made up of well-qualified 
classroom teachers, directors and supervisors of special subjects, members of the 
staffs of the Teachers' Colleges and the Ontario College of Education, and inspec- 
tors. Other interested individuals, groups, and organizations are also consulted 
from time to time. As far as possible, officials of the Branch participate in curriculum 
work with local committees of teachers, at conferences, conventions, and workshops 
conducted by teacher organizations, inspectors, and Teachers' College staffs. 

A new course in Science in the Intermediate Division was issued in 1 960. The 
course includes basic programmes in the natural and physical sciences, including 
some subject matter formerly taught in higher grades. Since it emphasizes the ex- 
perimental method and demonstrates the inter-relationships among the several 
branches of science, it will almost certainly result in greater encouragement of the 
habit of making accurate observations, of withholding judgment until the evidence 
is in, of drawing conclusions that go only as far as the evidence permits, and of 
developing all the other aspects of critical thinking. 

A Reading List for the Primary and Junior Divisions has been issued for the 
guidance of teachers and school librarians in the selection of supplementary read- 
ing books. The use of this List should ensure that each school has a sound basic 
library for children so that they may have an opportunity to avail themselves of the 
literary heritage that is theirs. Committees are working on the development of new 
courses in English at the Intermediate Division level, in Physics at the Grade 11 
level, and in Biology at the Grade 1 3 level. A commiltee is also examining the 
handwriting programme in the elementary schools. A course of study in Russian is 
being developed for Grades 9 to 13. Experimental classes in this subject have 
been carried on for three years. Russian is now accepted as an option for the 
Secondary School Graduation Diploma, and has been approved as a subject for 
examination at the Grade 1 3 level beginning in 1 962. 



The policy of authorizing local Co-ordinating Committees to adjust existing 
courses to meet local requirements has continued to produce fruitful study of curric- 
ulum problems at the local level. This study has involved large numbers of teachers 
in curriculum work and thereby created marked improvement in classroom practice. 



TEXT-BOOKS 



During the past year, the Curriculum Branch has continued to work closely with 
authors, artists, cartographers, editors, and publishers in the preparation of new 
text-books designed especially for use in the schools of the Province. As a result, 
improved text-books are now being published in the fields of History and Geogra- 
phy for the Intermediate Division, Government at the Grade 10 level, Spelling, 
and Primary Reading. New atlases have been designed, and for the first time, 
a dictionary developed especially for Canadian elementary school pupils is av- 
ailable. New History texts written in French for use in schools in which French is 
a subject of instruction with the approval of the Minister are now available for 
several grades. Formerly these schools had to depend to a large extent on texts 
translated from English. 

The policy of the Department in encouraging the development of text-books 
by Canadian educators and publishers has provided new opportunities for Cana- 
dian teachers, supervisors, and inspectors, and has resulted in some excellent 
creative work. Pupils and teachers throughout the Province are enjoying the bene- 
fits of this work, and those responsible for producing it know that in its preparation 
they have so deepened their own understanding and knowledge that they can be 
even more effective in their regular teaching and supervisory duties. 



Professional Development 

SERVICES 

The Professional Development Branch has as its main responsibility the promo- 
tion of the in-service growth of teachers in the elementary school. An Assistant 
Superintendent of Secondary Education gives special attention to this work in the 
secondary schools. 

In-service programmes continue to expand as teachers increasingly become 
aware of the need to improve their professional qualifications and to keep in- 
formed as to the latest trends and practices. Officials of the Branch offer assistance 
to inspectors and teachers in organizing and conducting professional activities 
consistent with such goals. 

HELPING TEACHERS 

For the third successive year experienced "helping teachers" were employed 
to work, in co-operation with school inspectors, in assisting teachers with limited 
training and experience. The supervision and administration of this programme, 
which involved thirty-two "helping teachers" during the fall term of 1960, were the 
responsibility of the Professional Development Branch. There is every indication 
that this programme provided invaluable assistance to many beginning teachers 
during a most important stage of their teaching careers. 

SUMMER COURSES 

In co-operation with the Registrar's Branch and other superintendents of the 
Department, the Professional Development Branch supervised various summer 
courses for elementary schocl teachers. During the summer of 1960, courses were 
offered in thirteen centres throughout the Piovince and provided teachers with the 
opportunity for study in a wide variety of curricular fields at all levels of the ele- 
mentary school programme. 



Schools Attended by French- 
speaking Pupils 

TEACHER SUPPLY 

On October 15, I960, there were 364 student teachers at the University of 
Ottawa Teachers' College, 35 of whom were enrolled in the course leading to the 
Interim Elementary-School Teacher's Certificate, and 329 in the course leading to 
the Interim Second Class Certificate. 

In 1929-30, 25 per cent of French-speaking teachers held First or Second 
Class Certificates; in 1959-60, 91.2 per cent of French-speaking teachers held 
First or Second Class Certificates. 

SECONDARY SCHOOL ENROLMENT 

On September 30, 1960, the total enrolment of French-speaking pupils 
taking advanced French courses in secondary schools was 4,830. There were, in 
addition, 5,161 French-speaking pupils enrolled in Grades 9 and 10 of elementary 
schools.( 12 ) 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENROLMENT 

On September 30, 1960, there were 83,985 French-speaking pupils enrolled 
in separate and public schools, an increase of 3,901 over the preceding year. The 
number of French-speaking pupils in kindergarten classes was 5,702.( 13 ) 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

Correspondence Courses for French-speaking pupils in Grades 1 to 8 have 
been available since 1 946. The number of pupils taking these courses in November, 
1 960, was 33, and all grades were represented. 

School Attendance 

ENROLMENT 

The total enrolment in elementary and secondary schools in September, I960, 
was 1,389,163, an increase of 69,938 over the preceding year. The elementary 
schools showed an increase of 44,739 and the secondary schools an increase of 
25,199. For the school year 1959-60 the attendance efficiency of all elementary 
schools was 94.2 per cent; of secondary schools 95.0 per cent.( 14 ) 

COMPULSORY SCHOOL AGE 

Children who have attained the age of six years on or before the first school 
day in September are required, unless excused under the provisions of The 
Schools Administration Act, 1954, to attend school from that date until the last 
school day in June in the calendar year in which they attain the age of sixteen 
years. 

A child may be granted a home permit or an employment certificate if his 
services are urgently required at home, or in some gainful occupation elsewhere. 
A child under fourteen years of age may be granted a home permit or an employ- 
ment certificate for a period of not more than six weeks in a school term. 

EMPLOYMENT 

The number of home permits issued during the year 1959 was 1,889, an in- 
crease of 246 over 1 958. The number of employment certificates issued was 3,1 20, 

C 2 ) See Table 63 (u) See Table 5 

C 3 ) See Tables 41 and 53 



a decrease of 2,159 from 1958. This decided drop in the number of employment 
certificates issued for children of compulsory school age indicates that pupils are 
staying in school longer than at any previous time.( 15 ) 

Agriculture 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

Agriculture is an optional subject for elementary schools. No separate course 
of study is provided, but agricultural topics are included in the Natural Science and 
Science courses. 

SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

Instruction in Agriculture is provided in secondary schools in two ways. Courses 
in Agricultural Science may be given as an alternative to General Science, Physics 
and Chemistry in Grades 9 to 12. These courses are given in 1 20 schools in Grades 
9 to 1 2 and in 29 schools in Grades 9 and 10 only. There are 47 schools in which 
only the Agricultural Science option is taught. The other provision for agricultural 
instruction is the creation of a department of Agriculture in a school and the organ- 
ization of a two-year course for Grades 9 and 10, which includes Agriculture and 
Shop Work for boys and Home Economics for girls. In January 1960, there were 
1 02 schools with departments of Agriculture. ( 16 ) 

The total number of pupils taking Agricultural Science for the school year 
1959-60 was 58,308 and taking Agriculture 10,289. There were 12,887 pupils 
carrying on home projects in connection with their school work, including 5,067 
enrolled in 4 H Clubs in 24 activities. 

PRACTICAL WORK 

In addition to the regular classroom and laboratory work, most schools pro- 
vide gardening or require home projects. In addition, many schools are equipped 
with poultry houses, colonies of bees, and other special facilities for practical work. 
Agricultural buildings and tractors have been provided by 89 of the schools with 
departments of Agriculture. At twelve schools, greenhouses have been provided. 



Art 

RESEARCH 

Saturday morning classes were conducted for children with outstanding ability 
in art at the Ontario College of Art from October, 1959, to March, 1960. A staff 
of four artist-teachers was employed to teach 80 gifted pupils. At the close of the 
session, a large and attractive display of the children's work was arranged in the 
College. Many teachers visited the display to study the results of these special 
classes. 

SUPERVISION AND TRAINING 

The programme of art in elementary and secondary schools and in teachers' 
colleges was given attention. 

Meetings of elementary school teachers were held in several inspectorates 
and workshops were conducted in a number of rural areas. 

The Summer Courses in Art were again attended by large numbers of enthus- 
iastic teachers. Courses were offered in two centres — Toronto and Fort William. 
In Toronto, courses leading to all Art certificates were held, while in Fort William, 
those leading only to the Elementary certificate were made available. 

C 5 ) See Table 14 
C 6 ) See Table 69 



ART PUBLICATIONS 

The five booklets on Art, prepared by the Art Branch and distributed to 
teachers through Inspectors of Schools, were in great demand. 

Audio-Visual Education 

SCHOOL BROADCASTS 

A programme of 128 school broadcasts was prepared under the supervision 
of the Departmental Radio Committee for use in the elementary and secondary 
schools of the Province. Through the courtesy of the British Broadcasting System, 20 
broadcasts were made available to Ontario schools. In addition, four broadcasts 
from the Australian Broadcasting Commission proved quite useful. All programmes 
were presented in co-operation with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 
over a network of 27 radio stations. 

Radio manuals outlining the series of broadcasts were distributed to all 
Ontario teachers in September. In the elementary schools, an intensive evaluation 
survey to test the effectiveness of the programmes was begun. By this policy, 
through the Superintendent of Elementary Education, certain selected areas of the 
Province are asked each year to participate in a survey with the expectation that 
in the next five or six years most of the schools in the Province will be covered. An 
evaluation was also conducted in the schools of the secondary school system. 

Ontario elementary schools have 14,400 classrooms served by central sound 
systems. Also, there are 10,726 radios used in elementary-school classrooms. In 
the secondary schools, 8,279 classrooms are served by central sound systems, and 
527 classrooms report radios available. 

FILM SERVICE 

Films distributed from the Audio-Visual Education Branch directly to schools 
were shown on 100,964 occasions to a total of 4,391,789 students during the 
school year. In addition, 14 Boards of Education are operating their own film 
service, with a total of 4,253 film prints on extended loan from the Audio-Visual 
Education Branch. There were 73 additional film titles added this year, and there 
are now 1,421 titles, with 1 2,946 prints of sound films, available for use in Ontario 
schools. 

Ontario elementary schools have reported the ownership of 1,791 sound 
projectors, 2,668 filmstrip projectors and 574 opaque projectors. The secondary 
schools reported 566 sound projectors, 685 filmstrip projectors and 319 opaque 
projectors. 

SUMMER COURSES 

Two summer courses in Audio-Visual Methods at Toronto and Ottawa offered 
teachers an opportunity to improve their professional training in Audio-Visual 
techniques. A total of 294 teachers enrolled in these courses, an increase of 81 
over the previous year. 

Auxiliary Education Services 

SERVICES 

It is gratifying to report that where formerly the establishment of auxiliary 
classes appeared feasible only in the larger urban areas, more and more small 
urban and rural areas are now offering this service. The major emphasis of the 
work of the staff of the Auxiliary Education Services Division during 1960 was in 

10 



(1) organizing and conducting surveys in areas contemplating the establishment of 
services for exceptional children, (2) working with teachers and inspectors in rural 
areas for the purpose of planning suitable school programmes for children with 
learning difficulties, and (3) working with teachers and inspectors regarding special 
class programmes. The staff also participated in numerous in-service training pro- 
grammes for teachers on special education topics not only as they affect special 
classes but also atypical pupils in regular grades. 

The Division maintains a library of magnatype books to assist pupils with 
limited vision as well as a large professional library for the use of teachers and 
inspectors. Such books are lent free of charge. 

TEACHER TRAINING 

Summer Courses leading to the Elementary, Intermediate and Specialist 
Certificates in Auxiliary Education are offered to all teachers and principals. A 
total of 509 enrolled in these courses held at Toronto and London, an increase of 
75 over the previous year. Eight different options were offered covering various 
phases of exceptionality. It is encouraging to note that the number of secondary 
school teachers enrolled in the option "Auxiliary Education in Secondary Schools" 
is increasing each year. Fifty-six teachers completed the attendance requirement 
for the Specialist Certificate. 

The Department of Education conducted a five-week course for teachers of 
trainable retarded children in schools affiliated with the Ontario Association for 
Retarded Children. Fifty-two teachers attended the course. 

TRAINABLE RETARDED CHILDREN 

The programme of assistance to local Associations for Retarded Children 
which was begun in 1953 continues to grow at an unexpected rate. In September, 
1 960, there were 63 local Associations conducting classes in 66 schools with a total 
enrolment of 1,949 pupils eligible for grants. In 1960, grants on approved capital 
expenditures were paid to 1 6 local Associations. 

Community Programmes 

SERVICES 

The Community Programmes Branch assists communities to provide better 
opportunities for people to use their leisure time enjoyably and constructively 
through recreation and adult education. This assistance to communities involves: 
grants, advice and guidance, leadership training, conferences and seminars, and 
surveys. The Branch works in co-operation with municipal recreation committees; 
school boards; national, provincial and local organizations; university extension 
departments; and other departments in the Provincial Government. Communication 
with the municipalities is maintained through a field staff which has offices in Fort 
William, North Bay, Toronto, Hanover, London, Hamilton, Belleville, and Ottawa. 
Working out of the central office, there are also special advisers in the fields of 
arts and crafts, drama, music, puppetry, recreation for older people, rural pro- 
grammes, social recreation, recreation buildings and areas, and citizenship. In 
order to make resource materials available for community use, the Branch produces 
a number of publications and operates a loan service in drama, music, films, slides, 
and reference books. 

PROFESSIONAL TRAINING AND CERTIFICATION 

The purpose of training and certifying workers in municipal recreation is to 
maintain and improve the standards of qualification of employees in that field. 
The three-year in-service training course, which was initiated by the Branch in 

11 



1951, is now administered by the Extension Branch, University of Western Ontario. 
In 1 960, there were 1 06 people who enrolled for such training. In the last six years, 
158 Interim Certificates and 57 Permanent Certificates have been issued to quali- 
fied persons.( 17 ) 

RECREATION DEVELOPMENT 

Ontario Regulations 57 57 provide provincial grants to the municipal gov- 
ernments that pass the necessary by-law to appoint a municipal recreation authority 
and conduct or assist local recreation programmes. There has been a significant 
development in this field during the past fourteen years. Between 1954 and 1960 
the number of municipalities involved increased from 224 to 322; during the same 
period, grants paid per year rose from $287,306 to $532,459. ( 18 ) 

LEADERSHIP TRAINING 

The training of leaders is a basic need in the fields of recreation and adult 
education. The Community Programmes Branch is continuously involved in this 
activity and conducts courses either co-operatively with a community or directly, 
as a Branch project, if the training serves a number of communities jointly. 

CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION 

Service was continued during the year under review to teachers of classes for 
non-English-speaking immigrants in Ontario. These classes were supplied with the 
texts and resource materials made available through the Federal Citizenship 
Branch. Certificates were issued to newcomers to Canada who successfully com- 
pleted a course in English and Citizenship. Teacher education was provided through 
regional seminars and through the Department of Education Summer School course 
in the teaching of English as a second language. 

RURAL PROGRAMME 

In co-operation with the Ontario Department of Agricultuie and local com- 
mittees, the Community Programmes Branch conducts Rural Community Night 
Schools. In 1960, the number of these Night Schools was 1 6 with a total enrolment 
of 1,352. The Community Programmes Branch also co-operates with the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and the Provincial Leadership Forum Committee to conduct an 
Annual Leadership Institute which serves delegates from all areas of Ontario. 



Correspondence Courses 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Through the Correspondence Courses Branch, the Department of Education 
provides correspondence courses for Ontario persons who are unable to attend 
school. Of all students for whom these courses are provided, more than 90 per cent 
are over 16 years of age. Younger persons enrol for reasons of distance from 
school, temporary absence from Ontario, or illness. The courses which are offered 
are academic subjects for Grades 1 to 1 3 (including bilingual courses for French- 
speaking pupils in Grades 1 to 8) and nine trades courses in the fields of automo- 
tive mechanics, carpentry, machine shop practice, and radio theory and practice. 
All academic courses are free to residents of Ontario wherever they may be living. 
Trades courses are available to residents of all provinces at $10 a course. 

Enrolment of children in the elementary grades continues to decrease, while 
enrolment of adults in secondary school grades continues to increase, with enrol- 
ment in Grade 1 3 being much greater than that in any other grade at the second- 
ary-school level. 

( ,7 ) See Table 79 
( ,8 ) See Table 79 

12 



All correspondence courses have been prepared by teachers in the schools. 
All secondary-school lessons are marked by teachers in the schools, and each year 
an increasing number of elementary-school lessons are being sent out to teachers 
to be marked. 



ENROLMENT 



The maximum active enrolment for the school year was 5,742 on April 29, 
1960. This was the highest figure yet reached. Since the number of students en- 
rolled in correspondence courses is constantly changing, the average weekly en- 
rolment over a period of time should be considered. For the school year 1959- 
1960, the average weekly enrolment was 4,482, made up of 366 elementary- 
school children (English), 39 elementary-school children (bilingual), 249 adults 
taking elementary-school courses, 3,695 persons enrolled in academic courses at 
the secondary-school levels and 133 students in trades courses. The number of 
lessons marked during the year was 1 16,290.( 19 ) 

New students granted courses during the year totalled 7,795. The rate of 
increase is such that this figure is twice as large as the figure for total admissions in 
1955. The number was made up of 860 elementary-school pupils, 6,537 students 
taking secondary-school academic courses, and 398 students in trades courses. In 
addition to those admitted in the regular way, 41 persons in sanatoria received 
correspondence courses, 17 persons in penitentiaries, reformatories and training 
schools, and one student receiving instruction in a school car. Fifteen teachers teach- 
ing Grades 9 and 10 in elemental y and continuation schools received courses as 
teaching aids. The Branch is also providing courses for 9 students attending 7 
secondary schools of Ontario, who, while making full use of the programme the 
schools provide, find it impossible to complete Grade 11, 12 or 13 within the 
school year because the subjects they require are not taught. 

Students prepared through correspondence courses wrote 891 Grade 13 
Departmental examination papers in June, 1960, and obtained standing in 647. 
During the year, 387 statements of Grade 1 2 standing, 644 certificates covering 
subjects in other secondary-school grades, and 53 trades courses certificates were 
issued. 



Examinations and Scholarships 

DEPARTMENTAL EXAMINATIONS 

Statistics showing the results of the Grade 1 3 examinations, as well as the 
number of Intermediate Certificates, Secondary School Graduation Diplomas, 
Secondary School Honour Graduation Diplomas, Advanced Technical Evening 
Class Certificates, and Provincial Institute of Technology Diplomas issued, will be 
found in Table 64. 

Continued study of the Grade 1 3 examinations, with particular reference to 
marking procedures, gave promise that the present release date for the results 
can be maintained, and possibly advanced, despite increasing numbers of candi- 
dates. 

For the first time, objective-type test items not exceeding 30 per cent of the 
total value of the paper were used on five papers. This resulted in an improvement 
in the examinations and also in faster marking. While some constructive criticisms 
were received and while those immediately concerned with the setting of the papers 
are aware that improvements can be effected, there was general agreement that 
limited use of objective-type items is acceptable. 

(") See Table 75 

13 



TRANSPORTATION ASSISTANCE 

The transportation subsidies provided by the Department of Education for 
persons who reside in the territorial districts and who are enrolled in an eligible 
institution of university rank, have been in operation for thirteen years. In the year 
1959-60, the sum of $19,295.05 was paid to 803 students, of whom 539 reside 
east of Sault Ste. Marie and 264 reside west of that city.( 20 ) 

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR STUDY OUTSIDE ONTARIO 

For the school year 1959-60, from the $8,000 provided by the Province for 
scholarships for study outside Ontario, awards were made to Miss Jean McNicol, 
of Clarke Road High School, East Middlesex; Miss Christina I. MacBeth, Ryerson 
Institute of Technology, Toronto; Miss Elizabeth A. Thorn, Powassan Public School; 
and Mr. Edgar N. Wright, Island Public School, Toronto. 

TEACHER EXCHANGE 

During the school year 1959-60 a total of eighteen Ontario teachers were on 
exchange, sixteen in the United Kingdom, one in British Columbia, and one in the 
United States. 



Guidance Services 

SERVICES 

Guidance in Ontario schools includes the time-proven services of counselling, 
aids to student appraisal, provision of educational and career information, and 
some job placement. 

Over the past year, guidance workers in the schools have been called upon 
to give important assistance in the administration and interpretation of the Carnegie 
Study and the Grade 12 Departmental test programme. The effectiveness of 
secondary-school Guidance programmes has improved because of the increased 
number of adequately-trained personnel. Continued expansion and improvement 
of Guidance services in Ontario schools have gone hand in hand with a greater 
understanding of the services desirable and possible. 

An ever-increasing interest in obtaining educational and occupational inform- 
ation is evident on the part of students and their parents. This demand has been 
matched by willing action on the part of universities and other educational institutions, 
as well as of business, industry and service organizations, in making available much 
helpful information to the schools. The value of this co-operation of school and com- 
munity in providing students with authentic information regarding further education 
and vocational opportunities is now widely recognized. 

TRAINING 

Teachers' in-service training courses in testing, counselling and group work, 
provided by Guidance Services Inspectors in co-operation with local District In- 
spectors, continue to be in demand throughout the Province in urban as well as 
rural areas. During 1960, curriculum revision in Guidance has been undertaken, 
and minor adjustments in the time allocated to Group Work in Guidance in the 
secondary schools have been made to compensate for added emphasis laid on 
the individual counselling programme. Beginning in September of this year, all 
Ontario schools have been required to set up and maintain a uniform system of 
student records. This cumulative record system has enabled the schools to expedite 
the interchange of essential information about the students of this increasingly 
mobile generation. 

( 20 ) See Table 66 
14 



Music 

MUSIC INSTRUCTION 

Courses in Music under qualified music teachers were provided in 77 per cent 
of the elementary schools of the Province. Music was also taught in 296 secondary 
schools. There were 284 school choirs, 157 bands, and 81 orchestras in these 
schools, and 27 operas were performed during the year. Music festivals, competi- 
tive and non-competitive, were held in approximately 157 centres with more than 
60,000 pupils participating^ 21 ) 

TEACHER TRAINING 

There were 1,103 certificated teachers and supervisors engaged in the ele- 
mentary schools and 349 in the secondary schools of the Province during the school 
year 1959-60. Music is taught in all of the Teachers' Colleges, and there was an 
enrolment of 643 teachers at the Summer Courses in Music in 1 960. An experimen- 
tal course on string instruments was offered in Toronto to teachers who had taken 
the previous two courses. This course was attended by 41 persons. 

MUSIC OPTION 

Music is an optional subject in secondary schools, and pupils may obtain 
standing either through the regular course or by presenting the certificates of 
certain accredited examining bodies. In 1960, Grade 12 standing was attained 
by 2,660 pupils. Credit in music towards a Secondary School Honour Graduation 
Diploma was obtained by 304 pupils who tried the Departmental Grade 13 ex- 
aminations and by 1 ,044 pupils who presented equivalent certificates. 

RADIO 

Twenty-five music broadcasts were presented in four series during January, 
February, March and April. "Primary School Music," five 15-minute programmes 
for Grades 1 to 3; "Junior School Music," five 15-minute programmes for Grades 
4 to 6; "Music for Young Folk," ten 30-minute programmes for Grades 7 to 10; and 
"Ontario Sings," five 15-minute programmes for Grades 5 to 8, were broadcast, 
with commentary prepared and given in each case by the Director of Music of the 
Department of Education. 

Ontario School for the Blind 

ENROLMENT 

At the end of the school year in June, 1 960, there were 21 9 students enrolled 
at the Ontario School for the Blind in Brantford. During the summer vacation, 34 
withdrew by graduation, to seek employment, or to attend a regular school. In 
September, 42 new students were admitted, bringing the enrolment to 227, the 
largest in the history of the school — 134 boys and 93 girls. Of these, 165 are 
from Ontario, 13 from Alberta, 24 from Saskatchewan, 19 from Manitoba, 3 
from Quebec, 2 from the North West Territories and 1 from Peru.( 22 ) 

PROGRAMME 

The programme of the school is based on the Provincial Courses of Study for 
Grades 1 to 1 2, leading to a four option Secondary School Graduation Diploma. 
Subjects such as home economics and handicrafts for girls, manual training and 
piano tuning for boys, and typing for both, are practical courses begun as early 
as Grade 6 and continued through Grade 1 2. 

An active and varied physical education programme, conducted indoors and 
out, and having full regard for the individual abilities of the students, is provided. 
A broad musical training programme consisting of vocal, choral and instrumental 
work gives each child the opportunity to develop his talents. Recreational activities 



( 21 ) See Table 78 

( 22 ) See Table 77 



15 



include Girl Guides, Boy Scouts, Wolf Cubs and Brownies, as well as senior clubs 
for social activities and the operation of snack bars. Many events taking place in 
the community are attended by the students. 

Ten students completed the work of Grade 1 2 in June, 1 960, and of these, 
six are continuing their education in college or university and one is training to be 
a home teacher for the blind. 

NEW BUILDINGS 

The new music wing on the main administration building was ready for use in 
December, 1960. This impressive one-storey structure contains a new auditorium, 
costume and scenery rooms, music studios and practice rooms, a piano tuning de- 
partment, and a recreational playroom for the physical education department. 

An addition to the Junior School of four large, well-equipped classrooms was 
ready for use in October, 1960, providing adequate instructional accommodation 
for the pupils who live in the Junior Dormitories. 

Ontario School for the Deaf 

ENROLMENT 

The enrolment of 482 pupils at the Ontario School for the Deaf, Belleville, in 
1 959 was the highest in the history of the school to that date, but it was surpassed 
in the school year 1960-61. On October 15, 1960, the children at the school 
numbered 512 (277 boys and 235 girls), an increase of 30 over last year, and 
distributed as follows: Junior School, 251; Intermediate School, 118; and Senior 
School, 143. The age of admission to the school was raised in the year under re- 
view from five years to five years, four months. All pupils have severe hearing 
losses and come from Ontario.( 23 ) 

PROGRAMME 

The school provides a programme to meet the academic, vocational, and 
social needs of children from five to twenty years of age. Vocabulary and language 
development are emphasized in the junior grades. In the senior classes, basic 
academic courses to the Grade 10 level and a variety of vocational courses are 
provided. A well-rounded programme of physical education, inter-school athletics, 
cultural, social, and recreational activities, is carried on throughout the school year. 

Academic classes have increased in number. There are 27 Junior School 
Classes, 10 in the Intermediate School, and 14 in the Senior School. An elementary 
metal shop opened in January, 1960, as part of the vocational programme. 
Drafting was introduced during the last school year and upholstering was added 
in September, 1960, both in the Senior School vocational programme. Additional 
modern equipment has been installed for use in commercial classes, in sewing 
classes, and in the print shop. 

The school's ninetieth anniversary was specially observed on October 20, 
1960, when a tree-planting ceremony was held on the Junior School grounds, a 
birthday dinner was enjoyed in the Junior School dining room, and a banquet and 
programme took place in the main dining room. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

Extensive improvements to school property have been made during the past 
year, many of them by boys and girls in the Senior Vocational classes. Landscaping 
has been continued. Kitchenettes have been built in two senior residences, while 
drapes have been added to children's playrooms and dormitories. Additional 
playground equipment has been built and erected. Improvements to kitchen equip- 
ment have resulted in better working conditions and more efficient use of staff time. 

( 23 ) See Table 76 
16 



Phy 



sical and Health Education 

SERVICES 

The Physical and Health Education Branch continued to emphasize programme 
improvement in the year under review. Such improvement is becoming increasingly 
necessary in this age of automation and more leisure time. It is encouraging that 
parents, school principals and inspectors are strongly supporting a programme 
which should result in more healthy individuals. The staff of the Branch provides 
leadership in the field through cuniculum courses and guides, teacher visitation, 
in-service courses, summer courses, and youth leadership training courses at sum- 
mer camps. 

ONTARIO ATHLETIC LEADERSHIP CAMP 

Five hundred and fifteen young men and women from Grade 11, selected 
on a basis of high academic standing, ability to get along with people, and a desire 
to accept the responsibilities of leadership, attended the Ontario Athletic Leader- 
ship Camp for a two-week period in 1960. Many of these secondary-school 
students will enter the teaching profession to provide leadership in our school 
system. Plans are approved to double the capacity of this camp in the next five 
years. 

ONTARIO CAMP LEADERSHIP CENTRE 

Two hundred and fifty counsellors-in-training were recommended by the 
directors of non-profit camps to take the three-week course at the Ontario Camp 
Leadership Centre in Haliburton in 1960. These Grade 1 1 and 12 students were 
selected for their leadership qualities and high academic standing. The 3,300 acre 
site with its lakes, sandy shores, rocky outcroppings and nearby bogs, provides 
opportunities for unlimited experiences in studying natural science, camp craft, 
water safety, conservation, use of map and compass, out-tripping and survival 
living. Experience indicates that a high percentage of these counsellors will enter 
the teaching profession. 

GRANTS TO NON-PROFIT CAMPS 

Camp grants are paid to non-profit camps in accordance with the regulations. 
Over 400 applications for grants have been received. Final payment of these 
grants in 1 960 will amount to approximately $50,000. 

Provincial Library Service 1 * 

SERVICES 

The Provincial Library Service Branch assists communities to provide public 
libraries, and to improve the quality of library service. Members of the staff 
arrange and participate in workshops and conferences on various subjects, such as 
rural library service, library work with children, and the responsibility of public 
library trustees. The branch staff edits the quarterly "Ontario Library Review" and 
distributes other printed material. 

A library of 75,000 volumes is located at headquarters, from which books are 
sent out to teachers, and boxes of books are circulated among rural schools and 
communities not served by public libraries. A small library is also located at Moose 
Factory. 

All cities in the Province have established public libraries. Most towns, and 
many smaller municipalities, have also established library service. All these lib- 
raries are aided by Provincial grants, distributed from a legislative vote which 
amounted to $ 1 ,750,000 in 1 960. 

( u ) See Table 74 

17 



DEVELOPMENT 

Total expenditure on public library service amounted to $8,843,661 in 1959. 
Although much of this expenditure was in urban areas, extension of rural library 
service is taking place. Legislation and grants have been provided for county 
libraries, and the establishment of such libraries is being considered in several 
counties. Regional library co-operatives, aiding library service in the large terri- 
torial districts in the north of the Province, have been established in recent years, 
largely through Provincial aid. A new co-operative, for Sudbury and Manitoulin 
Districts, began in 1960. Several smaller public libraries were also organized. 

LIBRARIANSHIP 

In I960, 52 students obtained the degree of Bachelor of Library Science at 
the Library School of the University of Toronto. A much larger enrolment began 
studies for the academic year which will end in the spring of 1 961 . These librarians, 
needed for raising quali*y of service, will serve in public, university, school and 
special libraries in Ontario and elsewhere. 

The question of the training of non-professional library assistants, which has 
been partially met by Departmental training courses and workshops in the past, is 
receiving study in the light of probable county and regional library development. 

LIBRARY USE 

Book circulation increased to 25,500,000 books in 1959. Total circulation, 
includirg reference use, films and other materials, was 26,168,140. Many public 
libraries continued fine work in the field of adult education, sponsoring art exhibits 
and discussion groups. 

Service Record 

IN MEMORIAM 

W. H. CARLTON, B.A., B.Paed., who was Inspector of Public Schools for 
Northumberland No. 2, died in his sixty-eighth year at Cobourg after a short illness, 
on November 30, 1960. He was born in Creemore and received his elementary- 
school education at Reddickville near Shelburne. After attending Beeton Continu- 
ation School and the Owen Sound Collegiate Institute, he pursued studies leading 
to a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Bachelor of Pedagogy degree from the Uni- 
versity of Toronto. His teaching experience was gained in the Toronto Public Schools. 

In 1929 Mr. Carlton was appointed by the Simcoe County Council as public 
school inspector and served in that county for two years at Barrie and for seven 
years at Bradford. After further inspection experience in Grenville, he went to 
Cobourg in January, 1940, as Inspector of Public Schools for Northumberland. His 
influence upon education was further extended by service on the staff of several 
Departmental summer courses for teachers. Mr. Carlton was devoted to his work 
and will be remembered for the friendly way in which he approached his task of 
helping teachers to guide the educational development of their pupils. 

JAMES MALCOLM DENYES, B.A., who retired in 1938, after having served 
as Inspector of Public Schools in Halton County for twenty-five years, died on 
February 23, 1960. A tribute to his service was given in the 1938 Report of the 
Minister. 

HARVEY W. KNIGHT, B.A., B.Paed., Inspector of Public Schools in Ontario No. 
1, died in Uxbridge Hospital on May 24, 1960. He was born in Wiarton in 1901. 
After attending Midland High School, he graduated from Queen's University in 
1936, and received his Bachelor of Pedagogy degree from the University of 
Toronto in 1 944. Mr. Knight was Principal of Ritson Avenue Public School in Oshawa 
for twenty years. He was appointed Inspector of Public Schools for Grenville 
County in 1 943, and transferred to Ontario No. 1 in 1 950. 

18 



Mr. Knight was active in community organizations such as the Public Library 
Board, service clubs, lodges and the United Church. An able educator, he was de- 
voted to his inspectorate, his family, and his community. His sudden passing brought 
sorrow to all who knew him. 

ROBERT JOICE LANG, B.A., M.Ed., Public School Inspector for the North York 
Board of Education, died in his fifty-second year on December 3, 1960. He was 
born at Erin, Ontario. He received his elementary education in York Township 
and his secondary education at Runnymede and Humberside Collegiate Institutes. 
He graduated from the Toronto Normal School and was granted the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Master of Education by *he University of Toronto. With the 
exception of one year which he spent in the Air Force, he was employed in North 
York as a teacher, principal, executive assistant to the director of education and 
public school inspector. He was a calm and capable administrator, who will be 
sadly missed in his home, and in the school system to which he gave long and 
effective service. 

JOHN G. McEACHERN, B.A., B.Paed., who retired from the staff of the London 
Normal School in 1947, died on September 1 8, 1960. A tribute to his service was 
given in the 1 947 Report of the Minister. 



RETIREMENTS 

CHARLEMAGNE X. CHARRON, B.A., was born at Rockland and attended the 
Separate School in that village, the University of Ottawa, and the Ontario College 
of Education. His early experience was in the Rockland High School where he taught 
for five years. In 1928 he was appointed Inspector of Public and Separate Schools 
with residence at Cochrane. He was afterwards transferred to Sturgeon Falls and 
then to Windsor. He retired from this post on August 31, 1960. Mr. Charron made 
a significant contribution in the fields of administration and supervision of the schools 
under his jurisdiction throughout his career. 

JOSEPH A. GIBSON, B.A., B.Paed., retired on February 1, I960, from the 
position of Public School Inspector for Swansea, Weston, and Vaughan. He was 
born in Dunbarton, Scotland, and in 1917 graduated from the Dunbarton Academy. 
After serving in the Imperial Army from 1916 to 1919, he came to Canada and 
attended the Faculty of Education. He taught in Earl Grey Public School in Toronto 
for seven years and in the Central High School of Commerce for two years. In 1 929 
he was appointed Public School Inspector for North Wellington with office in 
Harriston. From 1931 until 1955 he was inspector in Simcoe County with his office 
in Orillia. From 1955 until February 1, I960 he was Public School Inspector for 
Swansea, Weston, and Vaughan Township. 

Mr. Gibson is a graduate of the University of Toronto with B.A. and B.Paed. 
degrees. He had been a devoted civil servant with the interest of pupils, teachers 
and trustees at heart. 

WILLIAM F. HISCOCKS, B.A., retired as Public School Inspector for the In- 
spectorate of Leeds No. 1 on August 31, 1960. He had served in this inspectorate 
with headquarters at Gananoque for eighteen years, and had previously been an 
inspector in Northern Ontario with headquarters at Monteith and at Cochrane, 
for seven years. Mr. Hiscocks was a native of Bruce County and received his second- 
ary education at Wingham High School. During the First World War he served 
overseas with the Canadian Army and with the Imperial Army with the rank of 
Staff Captain. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Tor- 
onto and attended the Ontario College of Education. He was a teacher on the staff 
of the Stratford Collegiate Institute before becoming principal of Chapleau High 

19 



School. Before his appointment as public school inspector he was principal of the 
Northern Academy at Monteith. In his quiet, effective way, Mr. Hiscocks was suc- 
cessful in helping pupils and teacheis in the areas in which he served. 

SIDNEY D. HOLMES, B.A., B.Paed., Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum, 
retired on March 31, 1960. Mr. Holmes, who was born in England, received his 
elementary and secondary school education in Picton, Ontario, Upon graduation 
from the Picton Collegiate Institute, Mr. Holmes enlisted in the Royal Canadian 
Artillery, and while on active service was wounded at Passchendaele in 1917. 

After the war he enrolled at the University of Toronto and graduated with 
honours in Chemistry. Professional training at the Ontario College of Education 
followed, whereupon Mr. Holmes began his teaching career at the Oshawa High 
School. Two years later he was appointed to the staff of Mount Allison University 
where he gave professional courses to degree candidates qualifying for the sec- 
ondary school teaching licence. He returned to Ontario to teach Science, first at the 
Smith's Falls Collegiate Institute and later at Jarvis Collegiate Institute in Toronto. 
In this sixteen-year period he earned the high respect of his colleagues both for 
his competence in the classroom and his concern for the prestige of his subject. He 
was the author of several articles in such magazines as "The School", and he gained 
editorial experience which was to stand him in good stead in a subsequent position. 

When the Ontario Department of Education re-established the post in 1944, 
Mr. Holmes became Editor of Text-books. In this capacity he demonstrated a con- 
cern for scholarship and accuracy which characterized all of his work with the De- 
partment of Education. He became Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and 
Text-books in 1957, and from that time until his retirement gave unstintingly of his 
experience and ability in the preparation of new text-books. 

REGINALD HAROLD KING, M.A., retired on December 31, 1960, from the 
position of Director of Education for the Board of Education of Scarborough Town- 
ship. Mr. King was born at Orangeville in 1896 and received his primary and 
secondary education at Orangeville and Saint John, New Brunswick. He graduated 
from McMaster University in Classics with the degree of B.A. in 1917 and received 
an M.A. degree in 1923. His teaching career began in Newmarket High School in 
1919. The next two years he taught in Strathroy High School. In 1922 he became 
the first principal of the first High School in Scarborough. When the Scarborough 
Board of Education was formed in 1953 Mr. King was appointed Director of Edu- 
cation for Scarborough and held that position until he retired. The R.H. King Col- 
legiate Institute has been named in his honour. During his 38 years of faithful service 
in Scarborough Township, the enrolment in the secondary schools increased from 
116 to 7,800 pupils. 

HORACE G. LOCKETT, M.A., B.Paed., retired from the position of Master at 
the Hamilton Teachers' College on June 30, 1 960. Entering Queen's University on 
the McKarras Scholarship, he was granted the B.A. degree in 1 91 2, the M.A. degree 
in 1914, and the High School Assistant's Certificate in 1915. After five years of 
teaching in elementary and secondary schools, he was appointed to the staff of the 
North Bay Normal School in 1919. In the following year he was transferred to the 
staff of the Hamilton Normal School where, for forty years, he served with distinc- 
tion. During his long career Mr. Lockett held all of the offices in the Supervising and 
Training Department of the Ontario Education Association, which honoured him 
with a life membership in 1960. An able teacher with successful experience in a 
variety of schools, he gave invaluable assistance and advice to the thousands of 
students whom he taught. He will long be remembered for his skill in English, his 
sense of fairness, and his keen interest in College athletics. 

ROBERT SAMUEL McBURNEY, B.A., B.Paed., Inspector of Public Schools, 
Kenora No. 1, retired on June 14, 1960. Mr. McBurney was born in Wingham and 



20 



received his elementary and secondary education in Huron County. After having 
attended the Faculty of Education, Toronto, he taught near Niagara Falls, and at 
Gorrie, Highgate, and Ridgetown. He later served for nineteen years as a principal 
at Port Arthur, and during this period obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from the 
University of Western Ontario and a Bachelor of Pedagogy degree from the Uni- 
versity of Toronto. On September 1, 1941 he was appointed Inspector of Public 
Schools in Kenora District, where he served until his retirement. Mr. McBurney's quiet 
and sympathetic manner earned him the respect of pupils, teachers, and trustees. 
He rendered conscientious service to the schools of his inspectorate, particularly to 
those schools in sections located in unorganized territory, some of which he first 
visited by plane. Since retiring, Mr. McBurney has made his home in Lindsay, 
Ontario. 

W. ROY McVITTIE, B.A., retired from the Public Service on February 29, 1 960. 
He was born in Southampton, Ontario, and attended elementary and secondary 
schools there. He graduated from the Toronto Normal School and received a 
Bachelor of Arts degree from Queen's University. After teaching for eleven years 
in Northern Ontario, Kingston, and Burlington, he was appointed Public School 
Inspector on July 1, 1931, with residence in Cochrane, Ontario. In 1935 he was 
transferred to Barrie, and in 1945 to Guelph where he remained as inspector in 
Wellington County until his retirement. Mr. McVittie served as secretary and as 
president of the School Inspectors' Group of the Civil Service Association of Ontario 
and for three years as secretary of the Ontario School Inspectors' Association. Since 
retiring he has continued to act as chairman of the Annual Meeting of Township 
School Area Boards of Western Ontario, a group which has been meeting for four- 
teen years, and which first met in Wellington County where Mr. McVittie was in- 
spector. His contribution to education in the Province and his influence in effecting 
improvements in larger units of administration were recognized by trustees of the 
Profince by making him an honourary member of the Ontario School Trustees' and 
Ratepayers' Association. 

ANGUS MOWAT, M.A., retired on March 31, 1960, from the position of 
Director of Provincial Library Service. Appointed in 1937 as Inspector of Public 
Libraries, he had previously held positions as chief librarian in Saskatoon, Windsor, 
Belleville, and Trenton. During the Second World War, he obtained leave to serve 
with the Canadian Army in the Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment. 

In April, 1948, Mr. Mowat became Director of Public Library Service. In 1959 
following a recommendation by Dr. W. S. Wallace in his "Provincial Library Service 
in Ontario" report, he was appointed Director of Provincial Library Service. 

The author of two books, as well as many articles, pamphlets and reports, S/\r. 
Mowat is well-known as a man of letters. His work for the development of public 
library service throughout the Province, his service as an administrator, and his 
knowledge of books and encouragement of reading, will be remembered and 
appreciated. 

CLARE B. ROUTLEY, M.A., retired as Superintendent of Professional Develop- 
ment, on September 30, 1960. Born in Lambton County, he attended elementary 
and secondary schools in Alvinston, and the University of Western Ontario, where 
he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Later, as a result of postgraduate 
studies at the University of Ottawa, he was awarded a Master of Arts degree. His 
professional education was obtained at London Normal School and the Ontario 
College of Education, following which he taught in rural schools in Lambton, Middle- 
sex, and Essex Counties, and for a time in the elementary and secondary schools of 
Fort William and Hamilton. 

In 1933 he was appointed Inspector of Public Schools in Prescott and Russell 
Counties, and in 1938 was transferred to Wentworth County where he served until 



21 



his appointment as Assistant Superintendent of Elementary Education, in 1945. 
When the Professional Development Branch was organized in 1957, he became 
its first Superintendent. 

Mr. Routley was widely known as an educator and as a leader in community 
organizations. His special interest was in Junior Red Cross, which he served for 
fifteen years as Chairman, Ontario Division. Mr. Routley's wide experience, his 
energy and enthusiasm, fitted him admirably for the job of raising the level of 
professional competence of Ontario teachers. 

STANLEY A. WATSON, B.A., retired as Superintendent of Curriculum and 
Text-books on October 31, 1960. Mr. Watson has had a unique professional ex- 
perience: teacher, principal, and inspector of elementary schools, master and 
principal in the normal schools, author of text-books and curriculum consultant, 
Assistant Superintendent of Elementary Education, and Superintendent of Curric- 
ulum. 

Mr. Watson is a native of Orillia, and after graduation from the Orillia 
Collegiate Institute, he attended North Bay Normal School. He began his teaching 
career in a rural school near Orillia, and in the Orillia Public Schools. In 1915 he 
enlisted in the Simcoe Foresters. His service in France was with the 1 16th Battalion 
during which time he was awarded the D.C.M. and Bar and commissioned in the 
field. 

Upon graduation from the University of Toronto, Mr. Watson taught and 
served as principal in several Toronto Public Schools. During this period he was 
called upon to collaborate with the late Thornton Mustard in the preparation of 
new courses of study for the elementary schools of Ontario. 

Since 1940, when he joined the Department of Education as a master at the 
Toronto Normal School, Mr. Watson has maintained an active interest in curriculum. 

During the Second World War he served at National Defence Headquarters 
as A.A.G., Directorate of Perscnnel Selection. 

When illness terminated his military service in 1943, Mr. Watson became 
Inspector of Public Schools in South Simcoe, and Principal of the Ottawa Normal 
School the following year. He was appointed Assistant Superintendent of Ele- 
mentary Education in 1946 and became the first Superintendent of Curriculum and 
Text-books in 1956. 

Mr. Watson's achievements have been characterized by a breadth of scholar- 
ship, an understanding of students, and a sense of humour, which have earned him 
the esteem of countless teachers, superintendents, and scholars across Canada and 
abroad. As Superintendent of Curriculum and Text-books for Ontario, visiting 
lecturer at the University of British Columbia, curriculum consultant in New Bruns- 
wick, chairman of the Committee of Directors of Curriculum for the Canadian Edu- 
cation Association, adviser to authors and publishers, he has made lasting contribu- 
tions to Canadian education. Perhaps foremost of these contributions is the growing 
prestige of Canadian text-books now appearing in Ontario classrooms. 



DIED IN SERVICE 

W. H. Carlton Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, November 30, 1 960. 

H. W. Knight Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, May 24, 1960. 

R. J. Lang Public School Inspector, North York Board of Education, 

December 3, 1960. 

22 



RETIREMENTS ON SUPERANNUATION 

C. X. Charron Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Windsor R.C.S.S. Division 
No. 2, August 3 1,1960. 

J. A. Gibson Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Toronto Metropolitan Area (Swansea, 
Weston) and York No. 5, January 31, 1960. 

W. F. Hiscocks Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Leeds No. 1, August 31, 
1960. 

S. D. Holmes Assistant Superintendent, Curriculum and Text-Books 

Branch, March 31, 1960. 

R. H. King Director of Education, Scarborough Board of Educa- 
tion, December 31, 1960. 

H. G. Lockett Master, Hamilton Teachers' College, Teacher Education 

Branch, June 30, 1 960. 

R. S. McBumey Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Kenora No. 1, June 16, 
I960, 

W. R. McVittie Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Wellington No. 2, February 
29, 1960. 

A. Mowat Director, Provincial Library Service Branch, April 19, 

1960. 

C. B. Routley Superintendent, Professional Development Branch, 

September 30, 1960. 

S. A. Watson Superintendent, Curriculum and Text-Books Branch, 

October 31, 1960. 



RESIGNATIONS 

A. Cummins Public School Inspector, Burlington Board of Education, 

June 30, 1960. 

R. C. Davis Public School Inspector, Brantford Board of Education, 

August 31, 1960. 

D. B. Deacon Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Parry Sound No. 3 and 
MuskokaNo. 2, July 31, 1960. 

Mrs. F. R. Devereux Master, London Teachers' College, Teacher Education 

Branch, August 31, 1960. 

Miss E. M. Deyell Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Wentworth No. 1, August 31, 
1960. 

G.G.Gardiner Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Huron No. 2, July 31, 1960. 

A. E. Gillies Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Lincoln No. 3, July 31, 1960. 

J. D. Hanmer Public School Inspector, East York Board of Education, 

May 31, 1960. 

23 



H.C.Henry Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Algoma No. 3, August 31, 
1960. 

W. S. Hougham Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Bruce No. 1, July 31, 1960. 

A. G. McKay Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Algoma No. 1, August 31, 
1960. 

J.B.Mitchell Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Simcoe No. 4 and Grey 
No. 4, July 31, 1960. 

E. C. Reeb Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Sudbury No. 1, August 31, 
1960. 

J. F. Stinson Assistant Superintendent, Special Educational Services 

Branch, July 31, 1960. 

Miss P. Taylor Librarian, London Teachers' College, Teacher Educa- 
tion Branch, May 31, 1960. 

TRANSFERS 

A — Between Branches 

J. W. Coulter Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Inspectorate, Huron No. 2, formerly 
Master, Stratford Teachers' College, September 
1, 1960. 

Miss D. H. M. Dunn Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Ottawa R.C.S.S. Division No. 4, formerly 
Master, Ottawa Teachers' College. 

D. G. W. McRae Assistant Technical Adviser, formerly Principal, the 

Western Ontario Institute of Technology, Windsor, 
January 1, 1960. 

A. T. Carnahan Secondary School Inspector, Secondary Education 

Branch, formerly Master, London Teachers' Col- 
lege, August 1, i960. 



B — Between Teachers Colleges 

D. R. Laister Master, Lakeshore Teachers' College, formerly Master, 

Toronto Teachers' College, September 1, 1960. 

C — In Elementary School Inspectorates 

J. R. Lalonde Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Cornwall R.C.S.S. Division No. 3 (new 
inspectorate) from Sudbury R.C.S.S. Division No. 
1, September 1, 1960. 

Miss M. Taylor Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Wentworth No. 1 , assisting Inspector J. K. 
Evans, from Lincoln No. 3, assisting Inspector A. E. 
Gillies, September 1, 1960. 

24 



D. W. Simpson Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, Bruce No. 1, September 1, I960; Mr. 
Simpson was formerly located in the Inspectorate 
of Waterloo No. 1 and City of Waterloo before 
he was leaned to the Department of National 
Defence in 1958 to serve for two years as Prin- 
cipal of the R.C.A.F. Dependents' School in Ger- 
many. 



PROMOTIONS 

R. H. Brayford Vice-Principal, Hamilton Teachers' College, formerly 

Master, Hamilton Teachers' College, July 1, 1960. 

W. K. Clarke Assistant Superintendent, Special Educational Services 

Branch, formerly Director Auxiliary Education 
Services Division, Special Educational Services 
Branch, August 1, 1960. 

M. J. Curtis Vice-Principal, North Bay Teachers' College, formerly 

Master, North Bay Teachers' College, September 
1,1960. 

J. D. Deyell Principal, North Bay Teachers' College, formerly Vice- 
Principal North Bay Teachers' College (appointed 
July 1, 1960), formerly Master, North Bay 
Teachers' College, September 1, 1960. 

E. Dubois Vice-Principal, University of Ottawa Teachers' College, 

formerly Master, University of Ottawa Teachers' 
College, July 1, 1960. 

D. E. Farwell Vice-Principal, Lakeshore Teachers' College, formerly 

Master, Lakeshore Teachers' College, July 1, 
1960. 

G. T. Hackett Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, placed in charge of the Inspectorate of 
Leeds No. 1, September 1, 1960; formerly in the 
Inspectorate of Peel No. 2, assisting Inspector 
A. A. Martin. 

J. B. Healy Superintendent, Professional Development Branch, 

formerly Assistant Superintendent, Professional 
Development Branch, October 1 , 1 960. 

L.B.Hyde Vice-Principal, London Teachers' College, formerly 

Master, London Teachers' College, July 1, 1960. 

F. W. Hyder Vice-Principal, Lakehead Teachers' College, formerly 

Master, Hamilton Teachers' College, July 1, 1960. 

C. M. Jackson Principal, the Western Ontario Institute of Technology, 

Windsor, formerly Master Hamilton Institute of 
Technology, January 1, 1960. 

D. MacRae Vice-Principal, Ottawa Teachers' College, formerly 

Master, Ottawa Teachers' College, July 1, 1960. 

D. A. MacTavish Director, Auxiliary Education Services, Special Educa- 
tional Services Branch, formerly Special Services 
Inspector, Special Educational Services Branch, 
August 1, 1960. 

25 



J. R. McCarthy Superintendent, Curriculum and Text-Books Branch, 

formerly Assistant Superintendent, Curriculum and 
Text-Books Branch, November 1, 1960. 

B. M. McLean Technical Adviser, formerly Assistant Technical Ad- 

viser, January 1, 1960. 

A. H. McKague Assistant Superintendent, Secondary Education Branch, 

formerly Secondary School Inspector, January 1, 
1960. 

W. L. McNeil Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, placed in charge of the Inspectorate of 
Halton No. 4 and Wentworth No. 2 (new inspec- 
torate), September 1, 1960, formerly in the In- 
spectorate of Halton No. 1, assisting Inspector 
R. F. Bornhold. 

Miss L. L. McNeill Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, placed in charge of the Inspectorate of 
Ontario No. 1, September 1, I960; formerly in 
the Inspectorate of Toronto Metropolitan Area 
(York), assisting Inspector D. I. Young. 

S. R. Miller Master, Stratford Teachers' College, formerly In- 
structor, Stratford Teachers' College, September 
1,1960. 

R.A.Oliver Vice-Principal, Stratford Teachers' College, formerly 

Master, Stratford Teachers' College, July 1 , 1 960. 

M. B. Parnall Assistant Superintendent, Curriculum and Text-Books 

Branch, formerly Principal, North Bay Teachers' 
College, September 1, 1960. 

W. A. Roedde Director, Provincial Library Service Branch, formerly 

Assistant Director, Provincial Library Service 
Branch, April 1, 1960. 

C. G. M. Smith Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, placed in charge of the Inspectorate of 
Kenora No. 1, September 1, I960; formerly 
assisting Inspector R. S. McBurney in this inspector- 
ate. 

F. B. Smitheram Vice-Principal, Peterborough Teachers' College, form- 
erly Master, Peterborough Teachers' College, 
July 1, 1960. 

R. O. Staples Vice-Principal, Toronto Teachers' College, formerly 

Master, Toronto Teachers' College, July 1 , 1 960. 

E. E. Stewart o Assistant Superintendent, Professional Development 

Branch, formerly Master, Lakeshore Teachers' 
College, September 1, 1960. 

W. A. West Principal, Lakehead Teachers' College, formerly 

Master, Stratford Teachers' College, June 1, 1960. 

R. H. Wilson Master, Peterborough Teachers' College, formerly 

Instructor, Peterborough Teachers' College, Sep- 
tember 1, 1960. 

APPOINTMENTS BY BOARDS WHICH EMPLOY THEIR OWN SUPERVISORY OFFICERS 
Barrie (New Inspectorate) 
A. G. McKay Superintendent of Public Schools, September 1 , 1 960. 

26 



Brantford 

R. N. MacLeod Superintendent of Public Schools, January 1, 1960. 

Guelph 

W. R. McVittie Public School Inspector, March 1 , 1 960. 

Halton No. 3 (Burlington Board of Education) 

D. B. Deacon Public School Inspector, August 1, 1960. 

J. B. Mitchell Public School Inspector, August 1, 1960. 

Lincoln No. 3 (Grantham Township School Area) (New Inspectorate) 

A. E. Gillies Superintendent of Public Schools, August 1, 1960. 

Peel No. 4 (South Peel Board of Education) (New Inspectorate) 

J. A. Turner Director of Education, July 1 , 1 960. 

A. Cummins Superintendent of Public Schools, July 1, 1960. 

H. C. Henry Public School Inspector, September 1, 1960. 

T. M. Martin Public School Inspector, July 1, 1960. 

St. Thomas (New Inspectorate) 

E. C. Reeb Superintendent of Public Schools, August 15, 1960. 

Sudbury 

J. M. Telford Public School Inspector, August 1 , 1 960. 

Toronto Metropolitan Area (Etobicoke Board of Education) 

J. F. Stinson Public School Inspector, August 1, 1960. 

Toronto Metropolitan Area (North York Board of Education) 

G. G. Gardiner Public School Inspector, August 1 , 1 960. 

Toronto Metropolitan Area (York Township Board of Education) 

J. D. Hanmer Superintendent of Public Schools, June 1, 1960. 

C. D. Cuthbert Public School Inspector, September 1, 1960. 

G. A. Trusler Public School Inspector, September 1, 1960. 

V. A. Wilcox .Public School Inspector, September 1, 1960. 

Waterloo (New Inspectorate) 

W. S. Hougham Superintendent of Public Schools, August 1 , 1 960. 

York No. 5 (Vaughan Township School Area) (New Inspectorate) 

J. A. Gibson Superintendent of Public Schools, February 1, 1960. 

APPOINTMENTS BY PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

H. N. A. Archibald Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960, 

London Teachers' College. 

J. C. Bailey Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Ottawa Teachers' College. 

S. R. Beisel Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Stratford Teachers' College. 

R. E. Boden Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Toronto Teachers' College. 

27 



J. R. Boos Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Hamilton Teachers' College. 

A. Brendon Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

London Teachers' College. 

C. W. Briggs Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Stratford Teachers' College. 

Mrs. M. E. L. Campbell. . . .Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, I960; 

Peterborough Teachers' College. 

C. W. Cantelon Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Hamilton Teachers' College. 

C. M. DeGaris Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Lakeshore Teachers' College. 

R. J. Desmarais Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, September 1, 1960; Inspectorate, Wind- 
sor R.C.S.S. Division No. 2, and Essex No. 1 1. 

H. E. Dubois Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, September 1, 1960; Rockland R.C.S.S. 
Division and Russell No. 1 1 . 

J. G. Elford Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

London Teachers' College. 

N. T. S. Emery Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960; 

Peterborough Teachers' College. 

Miss M. Epp Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

London Teachers' College. 

Mrs. D. C. Etherington Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, I960; 

Peterborough Teachers' College. 

W. G. Goddard Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 ; 

Lakeshore Teachers' College. 

Miss M. E. Gorman Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Ottawa Teachers' College. 

B. H. Gorrill Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, August 1, 1960; Inspectorate, Parry 
Sound No. 3 and Muskoka No. 2. 

Miss A. M. Grant Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Hamilton Teachers' College. 

K. W. Hagerman Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Lakeshoie Teachers' College. 

J. R. Hastings Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Ottawa Teachers' College. 

W. Hayes. Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960; 

Toronto Teachers' College. 

Miss I. Haythornthwaite.. . .Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, I960; 

Lakehead Teachers' College. 

G. G. Hepburn Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

London Teachers' College. 

T. A. Hodgins Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960; 

Toronto Teachers' College. 



28 



C. W. Hodgson Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 

Lakehead Teachers' College. 

Miss E. A. Imrie Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 

Lakeshore Teachers' College. 

Miss M. I. Lancaster Instructor 2, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 

1 960; London Teachers' College. 

J. R. Lavigne Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 

University of Ottawa Teachers' College. 

D. S. McAuley Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960 

Hamilton Teachers' College. 

Miss S. K. McCullagh Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 

London Teachers' College. 

Miss M. J. McKenzie Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960 

Lakehead Teachers' College. 

W. C. McMaster Assistant Superintendent, Curriculum and Text-Books 

Branch, January 4, 1 960. 

H. G. McTaggart Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, September 1, 1960; Inspectorate, Algoma 
No. 1. 

P. J. McTeague Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Ottawa Teachers' College. 

Mrs. M. E. Magee Librarian, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 

1960; London Teachers' College. 

L. E. Maki Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, September 1 , 1 960; Inspectorate, Kenora 
No. 2. 

W. R. Marshall Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 

Lakeshore Teachers' College. 

Miss M. E. Moore Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960 

Lakeshore Teachers' College. 

Mrs. R. A. F. Newman Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960 

Lakeshore Teachers' College. 

H. E. Parliament Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960 

Stratford Teachers' College. 

G. W. G. Penrose Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 

Toronto Teachers' College. 

Miss C. M. Perry Instructor 2, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 

1 960; Lakeshore Teachers' College. 

J. E. Pierce Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 

Hamilton Teachers' College. 

Miss C. G. Porterfield Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960 

Ottawa Teachers' College. 

L. S. Power Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, September 1, 1960; Inspectorate, Tim- 
mins R.C.S.S. Division No. 2. 

J. A. Pylypiw Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960; 

Lakehead Teachers' College. 



29 



F. J. Reynolds Special Services Inspector, Special Educational Serv- 

ices Branch, September 1, I960; Auxiliary Edu- 
cation Services Division. 

J. Riel Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 

University of Ottawa Teachers' College. 

D. H. Ross Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960 

Lakeshore Teachers' College. 

R. Shadbolt Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 

Ottawa Teachers' College. 

R. S. Smith Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 

London Teachers' College. 

J.W.Storey Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 

1 960; Hamilton Teachers' College. 

Mrs. M. I. Sunderland Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960 

Ottawa Teachers' College. 

D. A. Sutton Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 

Hamilton Teachers' College. 

A. L. Thomas Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, 1960 

Toronto Teachers' College. 

Miss E. A. Thorn Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960 

North Bay Teachers' College. 

J. E. O. Tremblay Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, September 1, 1960; Inspectorate Sudbury 
R.C.S.S.No.l. 

G. E. Walford Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Toronto Teachers' College. 

G. A. Watson Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Hamilton Teachers' College. 

F. H. Wilkinson Elementary School Inspector, Elementary Education 

Branch, September 1, 1960; Inspectorate, Al- 
goma No. 3. 

R. M. Wilkinson Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Ottawa Teachers' College. 

Miss A. Y. Wilson Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1, I960; 

Toronto Teachers' College. 

R. M. Woods Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Stratford Teachers' College. 

Miss M. H. Young Master, Teacher Education Branch, September 1 , 1 960; 

Toronto Teachers' College. 



30 



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S-12 




S-13 



TABLE 11— PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATES ISSUED DURING 1959-60 

(September 1, 1959 to August 31, 1960) 

A — Interim Certificates 

1. Intramural 





First 
Certificate 


Up- 

Grading 


Elementary 

1. Second Class (University of Ottawa Teachers' College) 


303 
41 

2,430 
684 
557 

25 

26 








2. Elementary-School Teacher's 
Teachers' Colleges 

(a) One-year Course, including 16 Deferred Elementary-School Teacher's 












Ontario College of Education 




3. Primary School Specialist's 




(b) to candidates entering with Elementary-School Teacher's Certificate 


1 1 


Total, Elementary 


4,066 


11 






Secondary 

4. High School Assistant's, Type B 

(a) One-year Course 


214 
716 

129 
72 

1 




(b) Completion of 10-week Summer Session 1959 and 5-week Summer Session 
1960 




(c) Departmental 5-week Summer Course 


130 


5. High School Assistant's, Type B (Endorsed) 


450 


6. High School Assistant's, Type A (Taken concurrently with Type B but not included 
in the 21 4 above) 
(a) One-year Course 




7. Vocational, Type B, One-year Course 




8. Vocational, Type A, Summer Sessions 


59 


9. Intermediate Home Economics 


50 


1 0. Intermediate Industrial Arts 


53 






Total, Secondary 


1,132 


742 






Elementary 2. Extramural 

1. Second Class 

(a) raised from Third Class 


40 
97 

8 
20 

166 
313 


10 


(b) to candidates re-writing Teachers' College papers 

(c) to holders of Letters of Standing 




2. First Class 

(a) raised from Second Class 








(c) to holders of Letters of Standing 




3. Elementary-School Teachers' 


266 








16 






(e) to holders of Kindergarten-Primary Certificates 










644 


292 







S-14 



TABLE 11— PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATES ISSUED DURING 1959-60 (Continued) 



Secondary 

4. High School Assistant's, Type B 

(a) from O.C.E., having passed the final examinations after exemption from 
attendance because of previous training 


First 
Certificate 


Up- 
Grading 


70 
63 

1 


22 


5. High School Assistant's, Type A 

(a) from O.C.E., having written the final examinations subsequent to obtaining 


154 












135 
5,977 


176 




1,221 






7,198 





NOTE: The figure 5977 does not include: 

(a) the 562 Temporary Certificates granted upon successful completion of the Pre-Teachers'-College Course, 
First Year, or 

(b) the 967 Temporary Secondary School Certificates granted upon successful completion of the 8-week 
(1960) session of the 8-week and 8-week Course at O.C.E., or 

(c) the 24 Deferred Second Class Certificates issued upon successful completion of the first summer session 
of the In-service Course at the University of Ottawa Teachers' College. 



3. Certificates in Special Subjects 



Classification of Certificates 


Elementary 


Intermediate 


Supervisor 


Specialist 


Total 


Persons Holding No Regular Certificate 


32 

65 


13 
47 


16 


3 

1 


48 


Vocal Music 


129 


Totals 


97 


60 


16 


4 


177 






Holders of Regular Teaching Certificates 


3 

351 

291 

322 

43 

97 

37 

36 

72 

227 

52 

212 

488 

516 

816 

25 

33 


34 
93 

124 
40 
71 

20 

53 

159 

26 


58 

9 

71 

93 

133 


7 

23 
35 
25 

29 

2 

5 
59 

9 
6 

1 


37 


Art 


509 
291 




469 


Commercial 


118 
193 




37 


Industrial Arts 


74 
72 




227 


Instrumental Music 


74 
341 




799 




133 




516 




816 




60 




6 




1 


Teaching English as a Second Language 


33 


Totals 


3,621 


620 


364 


201 


4,806 


Grand Totals 


3,718 


680 


380 


205 


4,983 



S-15 



TABLE 11— PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATES ISSUED DURING 1959-60 (Concluded) 

B — Permanent Certificates 

Classification of Certificates 





Elementary Schools 






Secondary Schools 






Primary 

School 

Specialist's 


First 
Class 


Second 
Class 


Elementary 

School 
Teacher's 


High 

School 

Assistant's 


High 

School 

Specialist's 


Permanent 
Vocational 


Vocational 
Specialist's 


Total 


38 


754 


353 


2,394 


763 


229 


67 


36 


4,634 



C — Letters of Permission 

(Issued to Elementary-School Boards which were unable to obtain the services of certificated teachers.) 

On behalf of 

( 1 ) persons with no professional training 454 

(2) holders of expired Third Class Certificates 138 

(3) persons who failed at Teachers' College and Pre-Teachers'-College of Ottawa Teachers' College 

Summer Course 318 

(4) teachers holding High School Assistant's Certificate 24 

(5) teachers holding certificates from other provinces (holders not eligible for letters of standing) 242 

1,176 



Source: Registrar's Branch. 

TABLE 12— SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNITS 
September, 1960 

NOTE: Only School Boards operating schools are included. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS: 

(a) Public 

Boards of Education 52 

Township School Area Boards 556 

Other Public School Boards: 

Urban 261 

Rural 1,862 

Boards Operating Schools on Crown Lands 22 

Total, Public School Boards 2,753 

(b) Protestant Separate School Boards 3 

(c) Roman Catholic Separate 

Union Boards 106 

Other Boards 600 

Total R.C. Separate School Boards 706 

Total, Elementary School Boards 3,462 

SECONDARY SCHOOLS: 

Collegiate Institute Boards 19 

High School Boards 1 73 

Continuation School Boards 22 

Boards of Education (51 ) 

265 

Total, Elementary and Secondary School Boards 3,676 

Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 
Secondary School Boards and Secondary Schools, September, 1960. 

S-16 






TABLE 13— DEPARTMENTAL SUMMER COURSES 
Enrolment by Subject, 1950-1960 

The Summer Courses are conducted by the Department of Education to enable teachers to refresh their knowledge of special subjects, 
acquire new skills and become acquainted with the latest developments in educational content and method. 



Courses 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1?59 


1960 




112 
511 
28 
165 
131 

21 
881 

60 

5 

161 

116 


49 
500 

35 
219 
144 

35 
1,076 

50 


500 

242 
152 

15 

1,093 

50 


73 

419 

30 

226 

153 

13 


437 

57 

221 

151 


22 
437 

66 
255 
147 


501 

55 

293 

152 


13 
538 

65 
337 
166 


667 

88 

375 

169 


15 
657 
213 
487 
214 


20 


Art (1) 


683 


Audio- Visual Methods (2) 


294 




561 






Dorset Workshop in Education for 




















Elem. School Principals' Refresher 


62 


49 


49 


69 


42 


80 


87 


50 




160 
127 
15 
114 
132 
152 


184 
109 

65 
130 
126 


176 

102 

24 

96 

72 

124 


211 
126 

64 

83 

108 


180 

165 

90 

91 

75 

127 


170 
168 


205 
197 


222 
188 


310 
264 


408 




259 








91 

80 

154 


129 
122 
118 


128 
158 
125 


175 
144 
167 
100 
239 
510 
177 
516 

58 
1,391 

60 
128 

12 

38 
81 














95 
109 
354 
529 
216 
605 

81 
1,632 

27 

77 


168 




74 
















91 
483 

73 
355 

69 
891 

27 


94 
512 

85 
433 

67 
990 

28 

71 
8 


231 




416 


395 


429 


377 


476 


449 

96 

293 


491 




165 


Physical and Health Education (5) 


216 


199 


246 


254 


275 


769 
89 




556 
6 


768 


951 


719 


800 


881 
24 


1,372 




51 












139 
















15 




Teaching English as a Second 














23 


44 








87 


119 


112 
40 


105 


77 

106 


124 














Workshops in Curriculum Building 


275 


66 
43 
































Workshops for the Intermediate 






33 






































Totals 


3,985 


4,279 


4,379 


3,072 


3,210 


3,552 


3,964 


4,386 


5,585 


5,995 


5,868 







(1) — Formerly Art and Crafts. 

(3) — Formerly Vocational Guidance. 

(5) — Formerly Physical Education. 



(2) — Formerly Audio-Visual Aids. 

(4) — Formerly Industrial Arts and Crafts. 

(6) — Formerly Primary Education III. 

(7) — Formerly High School and Vocational School Principals' 



The following courses, offered previously by the Department of Education, are now being offered by the Ontario College of 
Education: 

1. Commercial Subjects. 

2. High School Assistant's, Type B. 

3. Home Economics. 

4. Industrial Arts Specialist. 

5. Vocational Courses. 

Source: Registrar's Branch. 



S-17 



TABLE 14— SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE OFFICERS' REPORTS 



School children's employment certificates issued 

Home permits issued 

Employment certificates issued 

Cases brought before magistrates 

Source: Provincial School Attendance Officer. 



1953 



593 
1,137 
4,210 

214 



524 
1,280 
2,800 

222 



1955 



1,492 

4,295 

253 



1956 



1,663 

5,169 

378 



1957 



1,711 

5,480 

392 



1958 



1,643 

5,279 

304 



1959 



1,889 

3,120 

170 



TABLE 15— FULL-TIME TEACHERS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

NUMBER OF FULL-TIME TEACHERS ON SEPTEMBER 30, 1959 35,241 

ACQUISITIONS— September 30, 1959 to September 30, I960: 

From private elementary schools 61 

Teachers' Colleges and First-Year Summer Courses 4,278 

Letters of Standing 268 

Former secondary-school teachers 67 

Letters of Permission on September 30, I960 472(') 

Certificated teachers re-entering profession 1,262 

Others 189 

Total, Acquisitions 6,597 

WITHDRAWALS— September 30, 1959 to September 30, I960: 

To further education in teachers' colleges, universities, and other educational institutions 1 ,074 

To teach in secondary schools, private schools, teachers' colleges, or schools outside 

Ontario . 837 

Employment in a non-teaching occupation 406 

Marriage 381 

Retirement 395 

Illness 90 

Death 35 

Resumption of household duties (married women) 1 ,894 

Others 1 93 

Total, Withdrawals 5,305 

ACQUISITIONS LESS WITHDRAWALS 1,292 

NUMBER OF FULL-TIME TEACHERS ON SEPTEMBER 30, 1960 36,533 

EXPLANATORY NOTE: 

1 . This total shows only the number of Letters of Permission issued for the school year 
1960-61 in the month of September. 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 

S-18 



TABLE 16— FULL-TIME TEACHERS IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS 



NUMBER OF FULL-TIME TEACHERS ON SEPTEMBER 30, 1959 10,464 

ACQUISITIONS— September 30, 1959 to September 30, I960: 

From private secondary schools 37 

From Ontario College of Education (all courses) 1,1 52(!) 

Former elementary-school teachers qualified to teach in secondary schools 69 

Qualified teachers re-entering profession who were not employed previously on 

full-time basis 192 

Letters of Standing 52 

Letters of Permission on September 30, 1960 284( 2 ) 

Others 60 

Total, Acquisitions 1,846 

WITHDRAWALS— September 30, 1959 to September 30, I960: 

To enrol in a university or other educational institution 97 

To teach in an elementary school, private school, teachers' college, or school outside 

Ontario 181 

Employment in a non-teaching occupation 91 

Marriage 61 

Retired 136 

Illness 20 

Death 27 

Resumption of household duties (married women) 153 

Others 66 

Total, Withdrawals 832 

ACQUISITIONS LESS WITHDRAWALS 1,014 

NUMBER OF FULL-TIME TEACHERS ON SEPTEMBER 30, 1960 11,478 



EXPLANATORY NOTES: 

1. This total of 1,152 does not include persons who were employed by Boards on Letters of 
Permission during the school year 1959-60, who served as teachers during that school 
year, and who returned to the schools as teachers after successful completion of the 1960 
eight-week summer course at the Ontario College of Education. 

2. This total shows only the Letters of Permission issued for the school year 1960-61 in the 
month of September. 



Source: Secondary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, I960. 



S-19 



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S-20 



TABLE 18— POST-WAR SCHOOL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

SCHOOLS— NEW AND ADDITIONS 



ELEMENTARY 



Year 


Increased 
Enrolment 


Number 

of 
Projects 


Additional 
Pupil 
Places 


Estimated 
Cost 

$ 


1945 


6,126 


53 


4,200 


1,200,000 


1946 


7,294 


89 


6,500 


2,600,000 


1947 


7,773 


132 


11,400 


6,100,000 


1948 


21,424 


155 


18,400 


10,900,000 


1949 


21,267 


190 


22,500 


16,400,000 


1950 


19,456 


198 


27,300 


1 7,500,000 


1951 


42,324 


241 


31,000 


21,300,000 


1952 


58,386 


217 


40,740 


29,600,000 


1953 


55,605 


303 


45,675 


33,200,000 


1954 


53,239 


396 


57,400 


33,700,000 


1955 


41,878 


425 


63,000 


39,300,000 


1956 


48,282 


379 


60,100 


37,700,000 


1957 


59,221 


417 


64,480 


43,950,000 


1958 


56,481 


451 


74,735 


51,085,000 


1959 


54,051 


427 


73,605 


56,672,000 


1960 


44,739 


529 


78,750 


59,938,000 


Totals .... 


597,546 


4,602 


679,785 


461,145,000 



SECONDARY 



Year 


Increased 
Enrolment 


Number 

of 
Projects 


Additional 
Pupil 
Places 


Estimated 
Cost 

$ 


1945 


6,891 


2 


210 


56,000 


1946 


5,740 


9 


670 


303,000 


1947 


— 1,064 


19 


1,490 


539,000 


1948 


3,159 


27 


4,240 


4,470,000 


1949 


2,159 


19 


4,810 


7.577,000 


1950 


3,822 


29 


8,850 


13,142,000 


1951 


2,341 


29 


7,020 


8,631,000 


1952 


7,535 


31 


10,240 


14,240,000 


1953 


6,458 


43 


10,750 


16,891,000 


1954 


12,617 


58 


13,880 


17,689,000 


1955 


14,396 


56 


14,750 


20,217,000 


1956 


11,043 


46 


14,080 


17,285,000 


1957 


17,920 


66 


22,890 


29,209,000 


1958 


18,550 


58 


1 8,750 


26,081,000 


1959 


15,501 


71 


18,510 


25,193,000 


1960 


25,199 


72 


26,480 


39,169,000 


Totals 


152,267 


635 


177,620 


240,692,000 



Notes: 1. Enrolment increases are calculated on September enrolments. 

2. Building projects are counted in the year of completion. 

3. No account is taken in this table of pupil-places lost as a result of the following factors; shift from urban to suburban 
areas, fire losses, replacement of temporary and obsolete accommodation, and abandonment of small buildings to permit 
centralized facilities. 

Source: Technical Adviser, Department of Education. 



S-21 



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S-22 



TABLE 19— DESTINATION OF PUPILS WHO LEFT ONTARIO ELEMENTARY AND 
SECONDARY SCHOOLS DURING THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDING THE 
LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER, 1960 



Destination of Pupils 

Retired from school life to enter: 

Proprietary and Managerial 

Professional 

Clerical 

Agricultural 

Fishing, Hunting, Trapping, Logging and Mining 

Manufacturing and Mechanical 

Construction 

Transportation and Communications 

Commercial, Financial 

Service 

Labouring Occupations 

Not Employed 

Total 

Further Training: 

Private Academic Schools 

Universities 

Business Schools 

School of Nursing 

Provincial Technical Institutes 

Private Trade Schools 

Teachers' Colleges 

Pre-Teachers'-College Summer Course 

Agricultural Schools 

Other Educational Institutions or Training 

Total 

Left Ontario 

Death, Disability, etc 

Total Number of Pupils Leaving the Ontario School System 



Number 



Percentage 
Distribution 



99 


0.1 


759 


0.7 


10,892 


10.7 


4,675 


4.6 


572 


0.6 


4,160 


4.1 


1,307 


1.3 


1,727 


1.7 


4,213 


4.1 


6,243 


6.2 


6,768 


6.7 


11,429 


11.3 


52,844 


52.1 


8,904 


8.8 


5,931 


5.9 


2,306 


2.3 


2,058 


2.0 


886 


0.9 


451 


0.4 


2,929 


2.9 


219 


0.2 


194 


0.2 


1,470 


1.4 


25,348 


25.0 


19,553 


19.3 


3,687 


3.6 


101432 


100.0 



Source: Elementary- and Secondary-School Principals' June and September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



TABLE 20— PUPIL RETIREMENT FROM SCHOOL LIFE, 1959-60 











Age at date of leaving 








Grade in which pupil 
was last registered 


Below 

14 
years 


14 
years 


15 
years 


16 
years 


17 
years 


18 
years 


19 years 
and 
over 


Totals 

by 
Grade 




1,653 


987 


2,941 


4,803 


1,948* 






12,332 




Grade 9 




305 


2,058 


4,581 


1,753 


330 


61 


9,088 










40 


714 


3,859 


3,557 


1,383 


280 


9,833 








3 


107 


1,444 


2,749 


1,835 


722 


6,860 






Grade 12 






27 


500 


2,900 


4,396 


3,438 


11,261 




Grade 13 






2 


30 


236 


832 


2,024 


3,124 










13 


70 


197 


49 


14 


3 


346 








1,653 


1,348 


5,919 


15,414 


13,192 


8,790 


6,528 


52,844 







*Over 1 6 years of age. 

Source: Elementary- and Secondary-School Principals' June and September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-23 





















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S-24 



TABLE 23— ENROLMENT BY COUNTIES AND DISTRICTS 
SEPTEMBER, 1960 





September Enrolment 


County 


Public 


R.C 
Separate 


Total 
Elementary 


Secondary 


Total 
Enrolment 


BRANT 


12,417 

6,350 

34,126 

2,914 

9,188 

26,875 

12,387 

10,379 

4,709 

1,727 

20,388 

15,127 

8,892 

13,204 

15,512 

5,509 

10,384 

4,322 

18,826 

31,628 

7,711 

13,987 

21,884 

11,452 

18,401 

8,834 

11,686 

1,823 

3,803 

11,984 

23,459 

9,050 

4,680 

23,71 1 

24,216 

12,319 

47,315 

20,023 

208,428 


2,490 

1,455 

30,537 

1,262 

21,815 

3,157 

658 

204 

3,152 
2,772 
718 
3,995 
3,935 
1,101 
1,542 
245 
5,513 
6,261 
1,210 
1,135 
4,391 
1,059 
2,976 
1,331 
3,648 
9,283 
122 
6,869 
3,624 

10,717 

623 

9,417 

8,869 

2,943 

14,296 
2,192 

43,648 


14,907 

7,805 
64,663 

2,914 
10,450 
48,690 
15,544 
11,037 

4,913 

1,727 
23,540 
17,899 

9,610 
17,199 
1 9,447 

6,610 
11,926 

4,567 
24,339 
37,889 

8,921 
15,122 
26,275 
12,511 
21,377 
10,165 
15,334 
11,106 

3,925 
18,853 
27,083 
1 9,767 

5,303 
33,128 
33,085 
15,262 
61,611 
22,215 
252,076 


3,722 
2,198 

14,601 
1,084 
3,117 

10,855 
3,606 
3,272 
1,563 
423 
5,372 
5,153 
2,874 
4,755 
4,773 
2,219 
3,630 
1,164 
5,672 
9,788 
2,373 
3,784 
5,736 
3,689 
4,973 
3,168 
3,793 
1,552 
921 
3,429 
6,950 
4,582 
1,684 
6,596 
8,028 
3,941 

13,654 
5,313 

58,346 


18,629 


BRUCE : . . . 


1 0,003 


CARLETON 


79,264 


DUFFERIN 


3,998 


ELGIN 


13,567 


ESSEX 


59,545 


FRONTENAC 


19,150 


GREY 


14,309 


HALDIMAND 


6,476 


HALIBURTON 


2,150 


HALTON 


28,912 


HASTINGS . . 


23,052 


HURON 


12,484 


KENT 


21,954 


LAMBTON 


24,220 


LANARK 


8,829 


LEEDS & GRENVILLE 


15,556 


LENNOX & ADDINGTON 


5,731 




30,011 


MIDDLESEX 


47,677 




11,294 


NORTHUMBERLAND & DURHAM 


1 8,906 


ONTARIO 


32,011 


OXFORD 


16,200 


PEEL 


26,350 


PERTH 


13,333 




19,127 


PRESCOTT & RUSSELL. . . 


12,658 




4,846 


RENFREW 


22,282 




34,033 


STORMONT, DUNDAS & GLENGARRY 


24,349 


VICTORIA 


6,987 


WATERLOO 


39,724 


WELLAND 


41,113 


WELLINGTON 


19,203 




75,265 


YORK 


27,528 


METROPOLITAN TORONTO 


310,422 








749,630 


219,165 


968,795 


232,353 


1,201,148 






ALGOMA 

COCHRANE 


13,849 
8,190 
7,012 
1,330 
4,585 
6,346 
5,450 
4,592 

16,464 
5,972 

20,317 


8,689 

13,341 

1,200 

195 

222 

9,324 

23 

996 

1 8,769 

4,742 

5,985 


22,538 

21,531 

8,212 

1,525 

4,807 

1 5,670 

5,473 

5,588 

35,233 

10,714 

26,302 


4,140 
3,033 
1,636 
471 
1,326 
2,589 
1,531 
1,360 
5,677 
2,497 
6,162 


26,678 
24,564 


KENORA 

MANITOULIN 

MUSKOKA 


9,848 
1,996 
6,133 


NIPISSING 

PARRY SOUND 


18,259 
7,004 


RAINY RIVER 


6,948 


SUDBURY 

TEMISKAMING 


40,910 
13,211 


THUNDER BAY 


32,464 






Total Districts 


94,107 


63,486 


157,593 


30,422 


188,015 






Grand Totals 


843,737 


282,651 


1,126,388 


262,775 


1,389,163 



Source: Elementary- and Secondary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-25 




S-26 



2. Elementary Schools 





S-28 



. .-^,, : ...- 




% 






o 



TABLE 24— ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENROLMENT 
(Continuous Record from September, 1959 to September, 1960) 

ENROLMENT ON THE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER, 1959 1,081,649 

ADMISSIONS SINCE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER: 

(a) Beginners: pupils whose names were entered on the roll of 

a public or separate school for the first time 148,974 

(b) Pupils enrolled previously in another public or separate 
school in Ontario 221,844 

(c) Pupils entering from private schools 1,458 

(d) Pupils re-entering after a period of non-attendance 2,1 18 

(e) Pupils from outside Ontario 19,841 

TOTAL ADMISSIONS 394,235 

TOTAL, SEPTEMBER, 1959 ENROLMENT AND ADMISSIONS 1,475,884 

TRANSFERS SINCE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER 309,551 

RETIREMENTS SINCE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER: 

(a) Left Ontario 1 6,960 

(b) To Private Schools 7,929 

(c) Died 427 

(d) Health and others reasons 2,297 

(e) Ceased to attend school (other than in (a), (b), (c), or (d).). 12,332 

TOTAL RETIREMENTS 39,945 

TOTAL TRANSFERS AND RETIREMENTS 349,496 

ENROLMENT ON THE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER, 1960 1,126,388 

Source: Elementary-School Principals' June and September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-29 



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S-31 



TABLE 28— KINDERGARTEN STATISTICS, SEPTEMBER, 1960 





Public 


R.C. Separate 


Total, Elementary 


Classification 


Number of 
Schools with 
Kindergartens 


Kindergarten 
Enrolment 


Number of 
Schools with 
Kindergartens 


Kindergarten 
Enrolment 


Number of 
Schools with 
Kindergartens 


Kindergarten 
Enrolment 


Cities 


521 
267 

53 
288 
117 

21 


34,418 

13,816 

2,313 

20,155 

5,323 

1,454 


195 
79 
13 
40 
56 


8,406 
3,428 
345 
1,796 
1,739 


716 
346 

66 
328 
173 

21 


42,824 
17,244 


Villages 


2,658 


Urban Townships.. 
Rural Townships.. . 
Crown Lands 


21,951 
7,062 
1,454 


Total 


1,267 


77,479 


383 


15,714 


1,650 


93,193 






Total, 1959.... 


1,206 


75,057 


331 


13,546 


1,537 


88,603 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1959 and 1960. 




Photo by Metropolitan REGENT PARK PUBLIC SCHOOL, TORONTO Architect: F. C. Etherington 

S-32 



TABLE 29— AUXILIARY EDUCATION SERVICES 





NUMBER IN OPERATION FOR 


Type of Service 


1953-54 


1954-55 


Dec. 1956 


Dec. 1957 


Dec. 1958 


Dec. 1959 


Dec. 1960 


Opportunity Classes 


342. 


353 


444 


477 


510 


543 


649 


Opportunity Units 


135 


186 


161 


45 


58 


56 


73 


Oral Classes for the Deaf, 
and Hard-of-Hearing Classes 


22 


28 


33 


27 


31 


26 


28 


Limited Vision Classes 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


9 


9 


Limited Vision Units 


208 


262 


333 


292 


359 


301 


349 


Orthopaedic Classes 


17 


18 


21 


21 


25 


22 


25 


Orthopaedic Units 


5 


12 


20 


22 


60 


87 


188 


Health Classes 


24 


24 


24 


25 


25 


20 


20 


Gifted Classes 


2 


3 


5 


12 


20 


30 


M 


Elementary Home 
Instruction Units 


294 


321 


398 


238 


239 


233 


415 


Secondary Home 
Instruction Units 


1 


12 


15 


34 


30 


33 


43 


Home Instruction Teachers 
Speech Correction Teachers 
Itinerant Auxiliary Teachers 


29 
47 


37 

37 

1 


35 

52 

6 


25 
49 
14 


27 
57 
19 


26 
61 
20 


34 
69 
16 






Source: Compiled by the Auxiliary Education Division from information contained on the Elementary-School Principals 
September Statistical Report. 



S-33 



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S-36 



3. Public Schools 




S-38 



TABLE 31— PUBLIC SCHOOL ENROLMENT 
(Continuous Record from September, 1959 to September, 1960) 

ENROLMENT ON THE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER, 1959 817,880 

ADMISSIONS SINCE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER: 

(a) Beginners: pupils whose names were entered on the roll of a 

public school for the first time 111,040 

(b) Pupils enrolled previously in another public or separate 

school in Ontario 168,742 

(c) Pupils entering from private schools 692 

(d) Pupils re-entering school after a period of non-attendance. 1,461 

(e) Pupils from outside Ontario 14,701 

TOTAL ADMISSIONS 296,636 

TOTAL, SEPTEMBER, 1959 ENROLMENT AND ADMISSIONS 1,114,516 

TRANSFERS SINCE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER 247,072 



RETIREMENTS SINCE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER: 

(a) Left Ontario 13,470 

(b) To private schools 1,354 

(c) Died 317 

(d) Health and other reasons 1,411 

(e) Ceased to attend school (other than in (a), (b), (c), or (d).). 7,155 

TOTAL RETIREMENTS 23,707 

TOTAL TRANSFERS AND RETIREMENTS 270,779 

ENROLMENT ON THE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER, 1960 843,737 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' June and September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-39 




S-40 



TABLE 32— PUBLIC SCHOOL ENROLMENT 
September, 1960 



Counties 


Cities 


Towns 


Villages 


"Urban" 
Townships 


Rural 


Crown 
Lands 


Totals 


BRANT 


8,051 


930 






3,436 




12,417 


BRUCE 




2,128 


1,061 




3,161 




6,350 


CARLETON 


24,279 


603 


518 




7,187 


1,539 


34,126 


DUFFERIN 




892 


289 




1,733 




2,914 


ELGIN 


2,808 


796 


1,348 




4,236 




9,188 


ESSEX 


11,241 


5,137 


256 


5,321 


4,920 




26,875 


FRONTENAC 


6,154 








4,792 


1,441 


12,387 


GREY 


2,844 


1,944 


740 




4,851 




10,379 






1,213 


949 




2,463 


84 


4,709 


HALIBURTON 










1,727 




1,727 


HALTON 




13,267 






7,121 




20,388 


HASTINGS 


4,473 


2,346 


1,883 




5,080 


1,345 


15,127 






2,898 
3,289 


489 




4,595 
5,064 


910 


8,892 
13,204 


KENT 


4,191 


660 






LAMBTON 


7,450 


979 


1,650 




5,433 




15,512 


LANARK 




3,146 


225 




2,138 




5,509 






3,691 
872 


1,245 
212 




5,448 
3,238 




10,384 
4,322 


LENNOX & ADDINGTON 








LINCOLN 


4,804 


2,681 


574 


5,760 


5,007 




18,826 


MIDDLESEX 


1 2,935 


872 


465 




17,356 




31,628 


NORFOLK 




2,640 


133 




4,938 




7,711 


NORTH'D & DURHAM 




5,071 
4,041 


1,264 
1,155 




7,652 
7,476 




13,987 
21,884 


ONTARIO 


9,212 






OXFORD 


3,210 


2,122 


589 




5,531 




11,452 


PEEL 




2,850 


2,400 


11,035 


2,116 




18,401 


PERTH 


2,845 


1,780 


154 




4,055 




8,834 


PETERBOROUGH 


6,980 




1,107 




3,599 




11,686 


PRESCOTT & RUSSELL 




307 






1,419 


97 


1,823 


PRINCE EDWARD 




806 


478 




2,156 


363 


3,803 


RENFREW 




4,491 


848 




4,325 


2,320 


11,984 


SIMCOE 


3,232 


8,333 


1,101 




8,290 


2,503 


23,459 


STORMONT, DUNDAS 

& GLENGARRY 


2,946 


74 


1,229 
766 




4,801 
2,292 




9,050 
4,680 


VICTORIA 


1,622 






WATERLOO 


15,268 


2,879 


959 




4,605 




23,71 1 


WELLAND 


4,641 

4,908 

34,491 


4,159 
1,582 
2,782 


1,407 
849 


7,722 


6,287 
4,980 
6,111 




24,216 
12,319 
47,315 


WELLINGTON 




WENTWORTH 


644 


3,287 




YORK 




6,205 
6,334 


2,282 
4,368 




11,536 




20,023 
208,428 


METROPOLITAN TORONTO 


71,112 


126,614 






Totals 


248,075 


105,762 


34,297 


159,739 


191,155 


10,602 


749,630 



S-41 



TABLE 32— PUBLIC SCHOOL ENROLMENT (Concluded) 
September, 1960 



Districts 


Cities 


Towns 


Villages 


"Urban" 
Townships 


Rural 


Crown 
Lands 


Totals 


ALGOMA 


5,046 


871 
4,787 
3,876 

390 
1,797 

390 
1,678 
1,779 
3,874 
1,896 

552 


287 




7,645 
2,901 
3,136 
940 
2,696 
3,310 
2,611 
2,813 
5,941 
2,276 
6,895 




13,849 


COCHRANE . 




502 


8,190 


KENORA 








7,012 


MANITOULIN . 










1,330 
4,585 
6,346 
5,450 
4,592 

16,464 
5,972 

20,317 


MUSKOKA 




92 






NIPISS'NG 


2,235 




411 


PARRY SOUND... 


1,161 




RAINY RIVER 










6,524 






125 


TEMISKAMING. . . 




1,800 


THUNDER BAY. . 






59 












21,890 


1,540 


1,800 


41,164 


1,097 


94,107 






127,652 


35,837 


161,539 


232,319 


11,699 


843,737 





Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



TABLE 33— PUBLIC SCHOOL ENROLMENT, TEACHING AREAS AND TEACHERS 

CLASSIFIED BY TYPE OF SCHOOL BOARD 

September, 1960 



Type of Board 


Number of Boards 
Operating Schools 


Enrolment 


Number of 
Schools 


Number of 
Teaching Areas 


Number of 
Teachers 




52 
556 

261 

1,862 

22 

3 


393,351 
169,856 

179,277 

89,263 

1 1,699 

239 

52 


813 
2,401 

551 

1,895 

30 

3 

3 


12,418 
5,859 

5,687 

3,239 

432 

9 

3 


1 2,957 
5,780 

5,647 
3,210 

464 
9 




Other Public School Boards: 

Urban 


Boards Operating Schools on Crown Lands(l) . . 


Others (2) 


3 








2,756 


843,737 


5,696 


27,647 


28,070 





(1) Includes Military and Hydro Schools only. 

(2) Comprises 3 Railway School Cars. 

Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-42 



TABLE 34— PUBLIC SCHOOL ENROLMENT, TEACHERS, TEACHING AREAS AND 

SCHOOLS BY COUNTIES AND DISTRICTS 

September, 1960 



Counties 



Enrolment on 

Last School Day 

in September 



Number 

of 
Teachers 



Number 

of 

Teaching Areas 



Number 

of 
Schools 



BRANT 

BRUCE 

CARLETON 

DUFFERIN 

ELGIN 

ESSEX 

FRONTENAC 

GREY 

HALDIMAND 

HALIBURTON 

HALTON 

HASTINGS 

HURON 

KENT 

LAMBTON 

LANARK 

LEEDS & GRENVILLE 

LENNOX & ADDINGTON 

LINCOLN 

MIDDLESEX 

NORFOLK 

NORTH'D & DURHAM 

ONTARIO 

OXFORD 

PEEL 

PERTH 

PETERBOROUGH 

PRESCOTT & RUSSELL 

PRINCE EDWARD 

RENFREW 

SIMCOE 

STORMONT, DUNDAS & GLENGARRY 

VICTORIA 

WATERLOO 

WELLAND 

WELLINGTON 

WENTWORTH 

YORK 

METROPOLITAN TORONTO 



12,417 

6,350 

34,126 

2,914 

9,188 

26,875 

12,387 

1 0,379 

4,709 

1,727 

20,388 

15,127 

8,892 

13,204 

15,512 

5,509 

10,384 

4,322 

18,826 

31,628 

7,711 

13,987 

21,884 

11,452 

18,401 

8,834 

11,686 

1,823 

3,803 

11,984 

23,459 

9,050 

4,680 

23,711 

24,216 

12,319 

47,315 

20,023 

208,428 



387 

231 

1,141 
116 
297 
853 
436 
388 
150 
61 
677 
479 
304 
433 
523 
207 
370 
149 
602 

1,038 
237 
448 
717 
364 
587 
269 
384 
83 
141 
453 
805 
323 
171 
754 
789 
405 

1,486 
654 

7,070 



390 
240 

1,116 
119 
307 
890 
430 
382 
154 
62 
692 
469 
307 
423 
531 
206 
373 
147 
619 

1,015 
237 
464 
696 
362 
654 
274 
385 
85 
140 
455 
797 
331 
175 
751 
801 
416 

1,473 
649 

6,516 



82 

149 

142 

78 

111 

128 

116 

214 

46 

26 

67 

147 

157 

164 

176 

109 

162 

84 

88 

160 

49 

190 

139 

118 

94 

122 

85 

52 

68 

150 

232 

139 

93 

125 

133 

158 

131 

136 

358 



Totals 



749,630 



24,982 



24,533 



4,978 



S-43 



TABLE 34— PUBLIC SCHOOL ENROLMENT, TEACHERS, TEACHING AREAS AND 

SCHOOLS BY COUNTIES AND DISTRICTS 

September, 1960 (Concluded) 



Districts 


Enrolment on 

Last School Day 

in September 


Number 

of 
Teachers 


Number 

of 

Teaching Areas 


Number 

of 
Schools 


ALGOMA 


13,849 


445 


449 


99 


COCHRANE 


8,190 


264 


265 


55 


KENORA 


7,012 


231 


236 


49 


MANITOULIN 


1,330 


50 


49 


32 


MUSKOKA 


4,585 


154 


156 


42 


NIPISSING 


6,346 


209 


217 


47 


PARRY SOUND 


5,450 


184 


187 


58 


RAINY RIVER 


4,592 


154 


161 


47 


SUDBURY 


16,464 


557 


551 


124 


TEMISKAMING 


5,972 


205 


209 


59 




20,317 


635 


634 


106 


Totals 


94,107 


3,088 


3,114 


718 




843,737 


28,070 


27,647 


5,696 







Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



TABLE 35— PUBLIC SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED BY NUMBER OF TEACHING AREAS 

SHOWING ENROLMENT AND TEACHERS 

September, 1960 



i 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6-10.... 
11-15... 
16-20... 
21-30... 
31-40... 
Over 40, 



Number 

of 

Teaching Areas 



Number 

of 
Schools 



2,981 
573 
230 
223 
114 
650 
437 
265 
181 
30 
12 



5,696 



Total 

Teaching 

Areas 



2,981 

1,146 

690 

892 

570 

5,173 

5,630 

4,654 

4,358 

1,022 

531 



27,647 



Total 
Teachers 



3,030 

1,137 

687 

869 

548 

5,047 

5,700 

4,869 

4,571 

1,043 

569 



28,070 



74,603 

32,855 

20,807 

27,337 

17,388 

161,554 

176,470 

147,800 

137,252 

31,181 

16,490 



843,737 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 

S-44 




S-45 




S-46 



TABLE 36— PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN ONTARIO CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO 
NUMBER OF PUPILS ENROLLED, SHOWING TEACHERS, TEACHING AREAS 

AND ENROLMENT 
September, 1960 



Enrolment 


Number 

of 
Schools 


Number 

of 
Teachers 


Number of 

Teaching 

Areas 


Total 
Enrolment 


0-9 


- 101 

1,989 

1,024 

647 

284 

222 


101 
1,988 
1,167 
1,516 
1,114 
1 9TS 


102 

1,996 

1,168 

1,542 

1,149 

1,328 

1,432 

1,657 

1,950 

1,797 

1,801 

1,719 

1,676 

1,458 

1,207 

819 

1,547 

1,269 

625 

561 

239 

199 

87 

168 

151 


808 


10-29 


41 133 


30-49 


36,837 

45,383 

34,849 

38,351 

43,800 

52,127 

59,629 

56,631 

55,152 

55,279 

53,449 

46,911 

38,070 

26,263 

50,931 

41,835 

19,783 

18,810 

8,057 

6,390 

2,692 

5,718 

4,849 


50-99 

100-149 


150-199 


200-249 


195 1,394 
190 1,639 
1 84 1 °°4 


250-299 


300-349 


350-399 


152 
130 
116 
102 


1,825 
1,807 
1,769 
1 773 


400-449 


450-499 


500-549 


550-599 


82 1,506 
61 1,285 
39 859 


600-649 


650-699 


700-799 


68 

50 

21 

18 

7 

5 

2 

4 

3 


1,647 
1,342 
637 
606 
269 
217 
95 
191 
164 


800-899 


900-999 


1000-1099 


1 100-1199 


1200-1299 


1300-1399 


1400-1499 


Over 1500 




Totals 


5,696 


28,070 


27,647 


843,737 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 

TABLE 37— PUBLIC SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO NUMBER OF 
TEACHERS, SHOWING TEACHERS, TEACHING AREAS AND ENROLMENT 

September, 1960 



No. of 

Teachers per 

School 


No. of 
Schools 


Total 
Teachers 


Total 

Teaching 

Areas 


Enrolment 


1 


2,976 

575 

261 

219 

130 

626 

382 

265 

208 

37 

13 

4 


2,974 

1,150 

783 

876 

650 

4,996 

4,897 

4,660 

5,042 

1,243 

584 

215 


2,990 

1,149 

819 

910 

696 

5,140 

4,864 

4,470 

4,736 

1,156 

523 

194 


72,870 

33,250 

23,856 

27,754 

21,307 

159,677 

153,084 

141,032 

151,421 

37,002 

16,211 

6,273 


2 

3 

4 


5 


6-10 

11-15 

16-20 


21-30 


31-40 

41-50 

Over 50 


Totals 


5,696 


28,070 


27,647 


843,737 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-47 



TABLE 38— PUBLIC SCHOOL ENROLMENT, TEACHERS, TEACHING AREAS AND 

SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED BY THE TYPE OF MUNICIPALITY IN 

WHICH SCHOOLS ARE LOCATED 

September, 1960 



Classification 


Enrolment 


Teachers 


Teaching Areas 


Schools 




274,691 
127,652 

35,837 
161,539 
232,319 

11,699 


8,934 
3,999 
1,161 
5,377 
8,135 
464 


8,656 
4,035 
1,180 
5,115 
8,229 
432 


575 




365 


Villages 


158 




370 




4,198 


Crown Lands 


30 


Totals 


843,737 


28,070 


27,647 


5,696 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



TABLE 39— PUBLIC SCHOOL ENROLMENT, TEACHERS, TEACHING AREAS AND 

SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED BY THE POPULATION OF THE MUNICIPALITY IN 

WHICH SCHOOLS ARE LOCATED 

September, 1960 



Classification 


Enrolment 


Teachers 


Teaching Areas 


Schools 


Over 200,000 


172,395 
100,933 
50,513 
121,489 
78,600 
88,692 
94,975 
89,556 
34,833 
11,751 


5,696 5,352 
3,380 3,165 
1 650 1 A74 


288 


1 00 000- 1 99,999 


192 


50,000- 99,999 


140 


20,000- 49,999 


3,887 
2,559 
2,835 
3,170 
3,154 
1,272 
467 


3,877 
2,566 
2,879 
3,218 
3,189 
1,292 
435 


344 


1 0,000- 1 9,999 


325 


5,000- 9,999 


681 


2,500- 4,999 


1,270 


1,000- 2,499 


1,701 
722 


Under 1,000 


Others* 


33 


Totals 


843,737 


28,070 


27,647 


5,696 



*Comprises 30 schools located on Crown Lands and 3 Railway School Cars. 
Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-48 



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S-49 



TABLE 41— PUBLIC SCHOOLS ATTENDED BY FRENCH-SPEAKING PUPILS 

September 





Number 


Number 


Number of Teachers 




Year 


of 


of 








Enrolment 




Schools 


Teaching Areas 


Male 


Female 


Total 




1955 


73 


196 


43 


167 


210 


5,376 


1956 


72 


133 


32 


106 


138 


3,606 


1957 


71 


133 


27 


112 


139 


3,605 


1958 


65 


136 


31 


105 


136 


3,573 


1959 


64 


137 


35 


108 


143 


3,650 


1960 


58 


140 


31 


11 1 


142 


3,673 













Enrolment 
















Year 


Kindergarten 


Gr. 1 


Gr. 2 


Gr. 3 


Gr. 4 


Gr. 5 


Gr. 6 


Gr. 7 


Gr. 8 


Gr. 9 


Gr. 10 


Jr. Aux. 


Total 


1955 


255 


848 


790 


754 


690 


618 


512 


496 


353 


44 


16 




5,376 


1956 


53 


497 


486 


489 


467 


453 


428 


368 


304 


31 


13 


17 


3,606 


1957 


49 


508 


468 


460 


477 


450 


410 


382 


347 


46 


8 




3,605 


1958 


213 


500 


462 


423 


428 


438 


382 


367 


315 


34 


11 




3,573 


1959 


264 


521 


470 


425 


392 


447 


383 


354 


319 


60 


15 




3,650 


1960 


248 


510 


472 


433 


409 


399 


409 


349 


307 


89 


48 




3,673 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports. 



TABLE 42— PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
September, 1960 



School 


Number 
of 


Number of Teachers 






I 




Enrolment 




Teaching Areas 


Male 


Female 




Total 




S.S. No. 1 Grattan 


1 




1 




1 


21 


S.S. No. 2 Hagarty 


1 




1 




1 


15 


Penetanguishene 


7 


1 


6 




7 


203 


Total 


9 


1 


8 


9 


239 



Enrolment 



School 


Kindergarten 


Gr. 1 


Gr. 2 


Gr. 3 


Gr. 4 


Gr. 5 


Gr. 6 


Gr. 7 


Gr. 8 


Total 


S.S. No. 1 Grattan 

S.S. No. 2 Hagarty 


19 


5 

1 
23 


1 

1 

23 


3 
1 

24 


2 

4 
18 


5 

1 

26 


4 

1 

19 


1 

3 

20 


3 
31 


21 

15 

203 






Totals 


19 


29 


25 


28 


24 


32 


24 


24 34 239 























NOTE: The Protestant Separate School Board of L'Orignal does not operate a school. 
The pupils in the area attend Hawkesbury Public School. 

Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-50 



4. Roman Catholic 
Separate Schools 




I 

3 






S-52 



TABLE 43— ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOL ENROLMENT 
(Continuous Record from September, 1959, to September, 1960) 

ENROLMENT ON THE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER, 1959 263,769 

ADMISSIONS SINCE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER: 

(a) Beginners: pupils whose names were entered on the roll of a 
separate school for the first time 37,934 

(b) Pupils enrolled previously in another public or separate 

school in Ontario 53,102 

(c) Pupils entering from private schools 766 

(d) Pupils re-entering school after a period of non-attendance 

at any school 657 

(e) Pupils from outside Ontario 5,140 

TOTAL ADMISSIONS 97,599 

TOTAL, SEPTEMBER, 1959 ENROLMENT AND ADMISSIONS 361,368 

TRANSFERS SINCE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER 62,479 



RETIREMENTS SINCE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER: 

(a) Left Ontario 3,490 

(b) To private schools 6,575 

(c) Died 110 

(d) Health and other reasons 886 

(e) Ceased to attend school (other than in (a), (b), (c), or (d).). . 5,177 

TOTAL RETIREMENTS 16,238 



TOTAL TRANSFERS AND RETIREMENTS 78,717 



ENROLMENT ON THE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER, 1960 282,651 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' June and September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-53 



TABLE 44— R.C. SEPARATE SCHOOL ENROLMENT 
September, 1960 



Counties 


Cities 


Towns 


Villages 


"Urban" 
Townships 


Rural 


Totals 


BRANT 


2,259 


135 






96 


2,490 


BRUCE 




596 


230 




629 


1,455 


CARLETON 


23,337 


3,518 


78 




3,604 


30,537 
1,262 


ELGIN 


474 
9,503 
2,540 

354 


221 
4,378 


134 
646 


5,090 


433 
2,198 


ESSEX 


21,815 

3,157 

658 


FRONTENAC 








617 


GREY 


183 
81 


86 




121 
37 


HALDIMAND 


204 


HALTON 




2,174 






978 


3,152 
2,772 


HASTINGS 


1,304 


675 


479 




314 


HURON 




338 


101 




279 


718 


KENT 


1,558 


1,440 


67 




930 


3,995 


LAMBTON 


3,019 


170 


309 




437 


3,935 


LANARK 




1,024 






77 


1,101 


LEEDS & GRENVILLE 




1,318 


84 




140 


1,542 
245 


LENNOX & ADDINGTON 


2,932 


1,054 




1,342 


245 
185 


LINCOLN 


5,513 


MIDDLESEX 


4,501 


298 


38 




1,424 


6,261 


NORFOLK 




789 






421 


1,210 


NORTH'D & DURHAM 




933 


51 




151 


1 135 


ONTARIO 


2,790 


1,108 


250 




243 


4,391 


OXFORD 


534 


433 






92 


1,059 


PEEL 




409 


552 


1,798 


217 


2,976 


PERTH 


783 


124 






424 


1,331 


PETERBOROUGH 


2,968 




74 




606 


3,648 


PRESCOTT & RUSSELL 




3,144 
122 


1114 




5,025 


9,283 
122 


PRINCE EDWARD 








RENFREW 




4,376 


1,103 




1,390 


6,869 


SIMCOE 


731 


1,683 


199 




1,011 


3,624 


STORMONT, DUNDAS & GLENGARRY 


6,816 


722 


471 




2,708 


10,717 


VICTORIA 




415 






208 


623 


WATERLOO 


7,792 


931 


224 




470 


9,417 


WELLAND 


3,129 


2,392 


433 


2,063 


852 


8,869 


WELLINGTON 


2,470 


195 


177 




101 


2,943 


WENTWORTH 


12,638 


534 


110 


644 


370 


14,296 


YORK 




1,276 


128 




788 


2,192 


METROPOLITAN TORONTO 


22,598 


1,847 


395 


1 8,808 




43,648 


Totals 


115,030 


39,036 


7,533 


29,745 


27,821 


219,165 







S-54 



TABLE 44— R.C SEPARATE SCHOOL ENROLMENT (ConcSuded) 
September, 1960 



Districts 


Cities 


Towns 


Villages 


"Urban" 
Townships 


Rural 


Totals 


ALGOMA 


3,614 


806 






4,269 


8,689 


COCHRANE 




8,381 






4,960 


13,341 


KENORA 




1,033 






167 


1,200 


MANITOULIN 




74 






121 


195 


MUSKOKA 











222 


222 


NIPISSING 


2,283 


3,060 






3,981 


9,324 


PARRY SOUND 




23 








23 


RAINY RIVER 




613 







383 


996 


SUDBURY 


9,11 1 


2,500 







7,158 


1 8,769 


TEMISKAMING 




1,396 


125 


1,441 


1,780 


4,742 


THUNDER BAY 


4,362 


322 






1,301 


5,985 






Totals 


19,370 


18,208 


125 


1,441 


24,342 


63,486 




134,400 


57,244 


7,658 


31,186 


52,163 


282,651 







Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



TABLE 45— R.C. SEPARATE SCHOOL ENROLMENT, TEACHERS, TEACHING 

AREAS AND SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED BY THE TYPE OF SCHOOL BOARD 

UNDER WHICH SCHOOLS OPERATE 

September, 1960 



Classification 


Boards Operat- 
ing Schools 


Enrolment 


Teachers 


Teaching 
Areas 


Schools 


R.C.U.S.S. Boards 

R.C.S.S. Boards 


106 
600 


24,503 
9Sft 1 4ft 


786 
7 677 


790 
7 R17 


186 
1 170 










Totals 


706 


282,651 


8,463 


8,607 


1 356 







Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-55 



TABLE 46— R.C. SEPARATE SCHOOL ENROLMENT, TEACHERS, TEACHING 

AREAS AND SCHOOLS BY COUNTIES AND DISTRICTS 

September, 1960 



Counties 



Enrolment on Number 

Last School Day of 

in September Teachers 



Number Number 

of of 

Teaching Areas Schools 



BRANT 

BRUCE 

CARLETON 

ELGIN 

ESSEX 

FRONTENAC 

GREY 

HALDIMAND 

H ALTON 

HASTINGS 

HURON 

KENT 

LAMBTON 

LANARK 

LEEDS & GRENVILLE 

LENNOX & ADDINGTON 

LINCOLN 

MIDDLESEX 

NORFOLK 

NORTH'D & DURHAM 

ONTARIO 

OXFORD 

PEEL 

PERTH 

PETERBOROUGH 

PRESCOTT & RUSSELL 

PRINCE EDWARD 

RENFREW 

SIMCOE 

STORMONT, DUNDAS & GLENGARRY 

VICTORIA 

WATERLOO 

WELLAND 

WELLINGTON 

WENTWORTH 

YORK 

METROPOLITAN TORONTO 

Totals 



219,165 



2,490 


68 


70 


1,455 


35 


39 


30,537 


954 


1,025 


1,262 


35 


44 


21,815 


645 


641 


3,157 


102 


99 


658 


21 


23 


204 


5 


5 


3,152 


91 


90 


2,772 


85 


86 


718 


22 


22 


3,995 


126 


134 


3,935 


119 


127 


1,101 


36 


37 


1,542 


50 


56 


245 


8 


10 


5,513 


160 


166 


6,261 


190 


199 


1,210 


37 


39 


1,135 


34 


38 


4,391 


1 16 


120 


1,059 


30 


31 


2,976 


85 


87 


1,331 


37 


39 


3,648 


106 


110 


9,283 


326 


319 


122 


4 


4 


6,869 


218 


217 


3,624 


104 


96 


10,717 


365 


359 


623 


21 


20 


9,417 


259 


281 


8,869 


254 


261 


2,943 


81 


83 


14,296 


390 


397 


2,192 


64 


63 


43,648 


1,167 


1,163 



6,450 



6,600 



1,010 



S-56 



TABLE 46— R.C. SEPARATE SCHOOL ENROLMENT, TEACHERS, TEACHING 

AREAS AND SCHOOLS BY COUNTIES AND DISTRICTS 

September, 1960 (Concluded) 



Districts 



Enrolment on 

Last School Day 

in September 



Number 

of 
Teachers 



Number 

of 

Teaching Areas 



Number 

of 
Schools 



ALGOMA 

COCHRANE... . 

KENORA 

MANITOULIN... 

MUSKOKA 

NIPISSING 

PARRY SOUND. 
RAINY RIVER... 

SUDBURY 

TEMISKAMING. 
THUNDER BAY. 



8,689 

13,341 

1,200 

195 

222 

9,324 

23 

996 

1 8,769 

4,742 

5.985 



268 

421 

39 

6 

7 

312 

1 

32 

602 

158 

167 



274 

409 

38 

6 

7 

301 

1 

33 

605 

159 

174 



43 

59 

6 

2 

2 

64 

1 

6 

104 

32 

27 



Totals 


63,486 


2,013 


2,007 


346 




282,651 


8,463 


8,607 


.._ 

1,356 







Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



TABLE 47— R.C. SEPARATE SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED BY NUMBER OF TEACHING 

AREAS SHOWING ENROLMENT AND TEACHERS 

September, 1960 



Number 

of 

Teaching Areas 


Number 

of 
Schools 


Total 
Teaching Areas 


Total 
Teachers 


Enrolment 


1 


259 
164 

96 
120 

68 
383 
187 

58 

18 
3 


259 

328 

288 

480 

340 

3,018 

2,357 

1,010 

433 

94 


282 

335 

287 

453 

331 

2,901 

2,330 

1,013 

443 

88 


7,256 


2 


9,829 


3 


8,842 


4 


14,746 
10,628 
99,027 
80,313 
32,725 
15,789 
3,496 


5 


6-10 


11-15 


16-20 


21-30 


Over 30 




Totals 


1,356 


8,607 


8,463 


282,651 





Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-57 



TABLE 48— R.C. SEPARATE SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO THE 

NUMBER OF PUPILS ENROLLED, SHOWING TEACHERS, 

TEACHING AREAS AND ENROLMENT 

September, 1960 



Enrolment 


Number 

of 
Schools 


Number 

of 
Teachers 


Number 

of 

Teaching Areas 


Total 
Enrolment 


0-9 


12 

158 

131 

214 

138 

130 

93 

115 

82 

82 

58 

53 

30 

16 

13 

8 

8 

3 

5 

1 

6 


11 
158 
178 
515 
549 
687 
611 
940 
792 
886 
706 
743 
479 
259 
236 
149 
161 

68 
125 

28 
182 


12 
158 
181 
551 
574 
720 
649 
976 
793 
879 
728 
755 
459 
250 
227 
149 
163 

65 
121 

26 
171 


82 


10-29 


3,191 


30-49 


5,034 


50-99 


15,643 


100-149 


17,169 


150-199 


22,719 


200-249 


20,729 


250-299 


31,590 


300-349 


26,549 


350-399 


30,360 


400-449 


24,654 


450-499 


24,993 


500-549 


15,728 


550-599 


9,254 
8,055 


600-649 


650-699 


5,343 


700-799 


5,944 


800-899 


2,504 


900-999 


4,747 


1 000-1 099 


1,054 
7,309 










1,356 


8,463 


8,607 


282,651 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1 960. 



TABLE 49— R.C. SEPARATE SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO NUMBER OF 
TEACHERS, SHOWING TEACHERS, TEACHING AREAS AND ENROLMENT 

September, 1960 



No. of 

Teachers per 

School 


No. of 
Schools 


Total 
Teachers 


Total 
Teaching Areas 


Enrolment 


1 


261 

169 

109 

118 

83 

363 

177 

55 

17 

4 


256 
338 
327 
472 
415 
2,874 
2,264 
980 
412 
125 


275 
360 
372 
502 
442 
2,941 
2,237 
957 
402 
119 


6,818 


2 

3 

4 

5 

6-10 


9,919 
10,853 
15,683 
1 3,804 
98,126 


11-15 


76,193 


16-20 


31,596 


21-30 

Over 30 


14,568 
5,091 




Totals 


1,356 


8,463 


8,607 


282,651 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 

S-58 



TABLE 50— R.C. SEPARATE SCHOOL ENROLMENT, TEACHERS, TEACHING AREAS 
AND SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED BY THE TYPE OF MUNICIPALITY IN WHICH 

SCHOOLS ARE LOCATED 
September, 1960 



Classification 



Cities 

Towns 

Villages 

Urban Townships. 
Rural Townships. 



Totals. 



Enrolment 


Teachers 


Teaching Areas 


Schools 


1 34,400 


3,858 


4,010 


405 


57,244 


1,763 


1,735 


224 


7,658 


230 


240 


50 


31,186 


889 


895 


95 


52,163 


1,723 


1,727 


582 


282,651 


8,463 


8,607 


1,356 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



TABLE 51— R.C. SEPARATE SCHOOL ENROLMENT, TEACHERS, TEACHING AREAS 

AND SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED BY THE POPULATION OF THE MUNICIPALITY 

IN WHICH SCHOOLS ARE LOCATED 

September, 1960 



Population 
Classification 


Enrolment 


Teachers 


Teaching Areas 


Schools 


Over 200,000 


63,030 
27,370 
22,549 
58,658 
24,417 
25,691 
26,374 
23,030 
11,532 


1,766 
778 
641 

1,775 
716 
808 
844 
744 
391 


1,852 
783 
669 

1,791 
710 
811 
853 
749 
389 


1 55 


1 00,000- 1 99,999 


73 


50,000- 99,999 


78 


20,000- 49,999 


212 


10-000- 19 999 


101 


5,000- 9,999 


147 


2,500- 4,999 


214 


1,000- 2,499 


229 


Under 1,000 


147 






Totals 


282,651 


8,463 


8,607 


1,356 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-59 





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S-60 



TABLE 53— R.C. SEPARATE SCHOOLS ATTENDED BY FRENCH-SPEAKING PUPILS 

September 





Number 

of 
Schools 


Number 

of 

Teaching Areas 


Number of Teachers 




Year 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Enrolment 


1955 


478 


1,966 


258 


1,635 


1,893 


61,090 


1956 


499 


2,133 


273 


1,894 


2,167 


66,252 


1957 


498 


2,215 


303 


1,945 


2,248 


68,773 


1958 


517 


2,395 


333 


2,117 


2,450 


73,094 


1959 


504 


2,589 


364 


2,225 


2,589 


76,434 


1960 


509 


2,670 


382 


2,269 


2,651 


80,312 



Enrolment 



Year 


Kindergarten 


Gr. 1 


Gr. 2 


Gr. 3 


Gr. 4 


Gr. 5 


Gr. 6 


Gr. 7 


Gr. 8 


Gr. 9 


Gr. 10 


Jr. Aux. 


Total 


1955 


2,085 


8,672 


8,339 


7,937 


7,443 


7,036 


6,373 


5,709 


4,729 


1,579 


962 


226 


61,090 


1956 


2,611 


9,120 


8,578 


8,595 


8,110 


7,712 


6,809 


6,393 


4,946 


1,921 


1,250 


207 


66,252 


1957 


2,807 


9,259 


8,756 


8,503 


8,362 


8,175 


7,203 


6,567 


5,472 


2,043 


1,419 


207 


68,773 


1958 


3,976 


9,716 


8,934 


8,555 


8,421 


8,516 


8,020 


6,889 


5,889 


2,327 


1,655 


196 


73,094 


1959 


4,743 


10,092 


9,127 


8,831 


8,438 


8,548 


8,233 


7,605 


6,167 


2,612 


1,770 


268 


76,434 


1960 


5,454 


10,761 


9,615 


9,114 


8,867 


8,395 


8,176 


7,765 


6,759 


3,026 


1,998 


382 


80,312 



Source: Elementary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports. 



S 61 




tJ 



S-62 



5. Secondary Schools 




S-64 



TABLE 54— SECONDARY SCHOOL ENROLMENT 
(Continuous Record from September, 1959 to September, I960) 



ENROLMENT ON THE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER, 1959 237,576 



ADMISSIONS SINCE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER: 

(a) Beginners: pupils whose names were entered on the roll of a 
secondary school for the first time: 

(i) from public and separate schools 79,273 

(ii) from private schools 1,489 

(b) Pupils enrolled previously in another secondary school in 
Ontario 21,946 

(c) Pupils re-entering school after a period of non-attendance. 2,703 

(d) Pupils from outside Ontario 2,401 



TOTAL ADMISSIONS 107,812 



TOTAL, SEPTEMBER, 1959 ENROLMENT AND ADMISSIONS 345,388 



TRANSFERS SINCE THE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER 21,126 



RETIREMENTS SINCE THE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER: 

(a) Death, disability, marriage, etc 1,790 

(b) Left Ontario 2,593 

(c) To continue their education 16,592 

(d) Ceased to attend school (other than (a) and (b) ) 40,512 

TOTAL RETIREMENTS 61,487 



TOTAL TRANSFERS AND RETIREMENTS 82,613 

ENROLMENT ON THE LAST SCHOOL DAY IN SEPTEMBER, 1960 262,775 

Source: Secondary-School Principals' June and September Statistical Reports, 1960. 

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TABLE 56— SECONDARY SCHOOL ENROLMENT BY TYPE OF MUNICIPALITY 

WITHIN COUNTIES AND DISTRICTS 

September, 1960 



Counties 


Cities 


Towns 


Villages 


"Urban" 
Townships 


Rural 


Totals 


BRANT 


2,967 


502 






253 


3,722 


BRUCE 




1,710 


460 




28 


2,198 


CARLETON 


12,766 


870 


644 





321 


14,601 


DUFFERIN 




622 


415 




47 


1,084 


ELGIN 


1,886 


721 


481 




29 


3,117 


ESSEX 


6,929 


3,470 


439 




17 


10,855 


FRONTENAC 


2,339 








1,267 


3,606 


GREY 


1,471 


1,179 


622 






3,272 


HALDIMAND 




964 


599 






1,563 


HALIBURTON 










423 


423 


HALTON 




4,214 






1,158 


5,372 


HASTINGS 


2,519 


876 


1,758 






5,153 


HURON 




2,874 









2,874 


KENT 


1,756 


2,685 






314 


4,755 


LAMBTON 


3,267 


1,166 


340 






4,773 


LANARK 




2,219 








2,219 


LEEDS & GRENVILLE 




2,536 


751 




343 


3,630 


LENNOX & ADDINGTON 


1,899 


758 
1,132 




687 


1,126 


406 
828 


1,164 


LINCOLN 


5,672 


MIDDLESEX 


5,677 


947 


373 




2,791 


9,788 


NORFOLK 




1,820 


553 






2,373 


NORTHUMBERLAND & DURHAM 




2,863 


728 




193 


3,784 


ONTARIO 


2,627 


1,725 


325 




1,059 


5,736 


OXFORD 


1,573 


1,769 






347 


3,689 


PEEL 




1,360 


1,413 


2,200 




4,973 


PERTH 


1,360 


1,590 


179 




39 


3,168 


PETERBOROUGH 


2,920 




873 






3,793 


PRESCOTT & RUSSELL 




899 

921 
2,605 


191 
623 




462 
201 


1,552 
921 


PRINCE EDWARD 


RENFREW 


3,429 


SIMCOE 


1,868 


3,193 


505 




1,384 


6,950 


STORMONT, DUNDAS & GLENGARRY 


2,345 


416 


1,158 




663 


4,582 


VICTORIA 




1,136 


548 






1,684 


WATERLOO 


4,988 


1,034 






574 


6,596 


WELLAND 


2,474 
1,981 


2 120 




1,934 


1,500 


8,02 8 
3,941 


WELLINGTON 


1,236 


724 


WENTWORTH 


10,124 


981 




1,253 


1,296 


13,654 


YORK 




2,829 

4,070 


1 319 




1 165 


5,313 
58,346 


METROPOLITAN TORONTO 


22,248 


1,179 


30,849 






Total, Counties 


97,984 


62,012 


17,887 


37,362 


17,108 


232,353 



S-69 



TABLE 56— SECONDARY SCHOOL ENROLMENT BY TYPE OF MUNICIPALITY 

WITHIN COUNTIES AND DISTRICTS (Concluded) 

September, 1960 



Districts 


Cities 


"Urban" 
Towns Villages Townships Rural 


Totals 


ALGOMA 

COCHRANE 

KENORA 

MANITOULIN 

MUSKOKA 

NIPISSING 

PARRY SOUND 


2,836 

1,800 

3,673 
5,262 


585 
2,469 
1,410 

292 
1,326 

789 
1,035 
1,050 
1,510 
1,058 

284 


413 


1,439 


719 
564 
226 
179 

83 
310 
494 

616 


4,140 
3,033 
1,636 
471 
1,326 
2,589 
1,531 


RAINY RIVER . . 


1,360 


SUDBURY 

TEMISKAMING 

THUNDER BAY 


5,677 
2,497 
6,162 








Total, Districts 


13,571 


11,808 


413 


1,439 


3,191 


30,422 


Grand Totals 


111,555 


73,820 18,300 38,801 

1 1 


20,299 


262,775 



Source: Secondary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 




Photo by 
Herb Nott 



BURNHAMTHORPE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, ETOBICOKE 



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*Scarborough-R.H. King Collegiate Institute. 
*Scarborouah-Winston Churchill CI 


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♦Scarborough- West Hill Collegiate Institute.. 
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♦York East-St. Clair Junior High School. . . . 
♦York East-Westwood Junior High School. . . 

♦York North-Bathurst Heights C. and V.S 

♦York North-Bayview Junior High School . . . 

♦York North-Beverley Heights Junior H.S 

♦York North-Don Mills Collegiate Institute . . . 
♦York North-Downsview Collegiate Institute. 

♦York North-Dufferin Heights Junior H.S 

♦York North-Earl Haig Collegiate Institute. . 
♦York North-Lawrence Heights Junior H.S.. . . 

♦York North-Ledbury Park Junior H.S 

♦York North-North mount Junior High School. . 

♦York North-Northview Heights C.I 

♦York North-Queensborough Junior H.S 

♦York North-Victoria Park S.S 


♦York North-Willowdale Junior H.S 

♦York North-Wilson Heights Junior H.S 

♦York North-William Lyon MacKenzie C.I 

♦York North-York Mills Collegiate Institute. . . 

♦York Twp.-George Harvey V.S 

♦YorkTwp.-Runnymede Collegiate Institute. . 
♦York TwD.-Vauahan Road CI 


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S-92 



TABLE 58— EVENING CLASSES HELD IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

1959-1960 

Evening classes were conducted in 197 centres throughout the Province for 94,921 pupils during 1959-60 



Course 



Industrial & Trades 

Commercial 

Academic 

Home Economics 

Art and Drama 

Crafts 

Health and Fitness 

Driver Instruction 

Music 

Agriculture & Horticulture. 

Service Occupations 

Mining 

Other. 



Total . 



Enrolment 



1 8,937 

18,588 

1 8,494 

16,033 

5,192 

4,201 

3,672 

668 

661 

275 

190 

31 

7,979 

94,921 



Source: Secondary-School Principals' June Statistical Reports, 1960. 



TABLE 59— SECONDARY SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO NUMBER OF 
TEACHING AREAS, SHOWING TEACHERS, ENROLMENT AND TEACHING AREAS 

September, 1960 



Number of 

Teaching Areas 

per School 


Number 

of 
Schools 


Number 

of 

Teaching Areas 


Total 
Teachers 


Enrolment 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6-10 

11-15 

16-20 


1 

6 

6 

10 

13 

55 

59 

52 

90 

71 

39 

18 

1 

4 

1 

1 

3 


1 

12 

18 

40 

65 

444 

769 

913 

2,275 

2,500 

1,772 

993 

65 

311 

89 

95 

351 


1 

12 

16 

36 

66 

437 

804 

903 

2,457 

2,812 

1,941 

1,089 

70 

342 

94 

106 

292 


17 

227 

333 

778 

1,463 

9,585 

1 8,725 

20,570 


21-30 

31-40 

41-50 

51-60 

61-70 

71-80 

81-90 

91-100 


56,791 

64,566 

45,490 

25,385 

1,803 

7,234 

1,674 

1,846 


Over 100 


6,288 




Totals 


430 


10,713 


11,478 


262,775 



Source: Secondary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-93 



TABLE 60— SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN ONTARIO CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO 
THE NUMBER OF PUPILS ENROLLED, SHOWING TEACHERS, ENROLMENT 

AND TEACHING AREAS 
September, 1960 



Enrolment 


Number 

of 
Schools 


Total 
Enrolment 


Number 

of 
Teachers 


Number 

of 

Teaching Areas 


10-29 


5 
7 
15 
23 
33 
23 
20 
30 
17 
19 
16 
20 
19 
12 
13 
31 
20 
20 
23 
18 
11 
10 
7 
6 
4 

5 
3 


127 

300 

1,110 

2,879 

5,860 

5,151 

5,362 

9,683 

6,407 

8,008 

7,558 

10,485 

10,914 

7,518 

8,798 

23,283 

17,188 

18,918 

24,208 

20,657 

13,464 

13,398 

10,044 

9,282 

6,620 

9,265 
6,288 


10 
16 
55 
128 
284 
219 
268 
433 
276 
340 
330 
441 
469 
336 
387 

1 000 
757 
803 

1,031 
915 
568 
564 
413 
395 
309 

439 
292 


12 


30-49 


19 


50-99 


65 


100-149 


141 


150-199 


333 


200-249 


271 


250-299 


292 


300-349 


451 


350-399 


270 


400-449 


312 


450-499 


318 


500-549 


427 


550-599 


437 


600-649 


338 


650-699 


374 


700-799 


894 


800-899 


674 


900-999 


687 


1000-1099 


944 


1100-1 199 


774 


1200-1299 


478 


1300-1399 


473 


1400-1499 


365 


1500-1599. . 


339 


1600-1699 


279 


1700-1799 




1800-1899... 


395 


1900 and over 


351 






Totals 


430 


262,775 


11,478 


10,713 



Source: Secondary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1 960. 

TABLE 61— SECONDARY SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO NUMBER 
OF TEACHERS, SHOWING TEACHERS, ENROLMENT AND TEACHING AREAS 

September, 1960 



Number of 

Teachers per 

School 


Number 

of 
Schools 


Total 
Teachers 


Number 

of 

Teaching Areas 


Enrolment 


1 


3* 

8 
10 

9 
11 
57 
51 
51 
73 
59 
47 
31 

9 

4 

1 

4 

2 


3 

16 

30 

36 

55 

459 

670 

892 

1,839 

2,079 

2,123 

1,707 

590 

299 

87 

378 

215 


40 

18 

37 

43 

61 

543 

687 

856 

1,767 

1,849 

1,926 

1,425 

497 

272 

106 

361 

225 


359 


2 


303 


3 


614 


4 


765 


5 


1,339 

10,713 

14,960 

20,190 

42,196 

48,162 

49,517 

39,692 

1 3,774 

6,601 

2,038 

7,724 

3,828 


6-10 


11-15 


16-20 


21-30 


31-40 


41-50 


51-60 


61-70 


71-80 


81-90 


91-100 


Over 100 




Totals 


430 


11,478 


10,713 


262,775 



*lncluded in this group are one continuation school and two schools giving instruction on both the elementary and secondary levels. 
Source: Secondary-School Principals' September Statistical Reports, 1960. 



S-94 



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TABLE 63— SCHOOLS ATTENDED BY FRENCH-SPEAKING PUPILS 
Secondary School Classes 

Number of French-speaking pupils enrolled in October, 1960, in the advanced French courses of Collegiate 
Institutes, High, Continuation and Vocational Schools under the Supervision of the Department of Education. 



SCHOOLS 



GRADES 



10 



13 



Total 



Alexandria-Glengarry Dist. High.... 
Casselman-Cambridge Dist. High. . . 

Chelmsford Valley Dist. High 

Cochrane High 

Cornwall St. Lawrence High 

Eastview High 

Embrun High 

Espanola High 

Hawkesbury Dist. High 

Hearst High 

Iroquois Falls and Calvert Dist. High. 

Kapuskasing Dist. High 

Kirkland Lake Coll. & Voc. Inst 

Lafontaine Continuation 

Mattawa High 

Maxville High 

Midland-Penetanguishene Dist. High. 

Nickel District Coll. & Voc. Inst 

North Essex Dist. High 

Ottawa Fisher Park High 

Ottawa High School of Commerce. . 

Ottawa Technical High 

Paincourt, H. J. Payette Continuation. 

Plantagenet District High 

Rockland High 

Smooth Rock Falls Continuation 

Sturgeon Falls High 

Sudbury High 

Tilbury District High 

Vankleek Hill Collegiate Institute.... 
Williamstown High , 



261 

206 
73 
28 
83 
21 
46 
78 
39 
27 
18 
19 
23 
60 
49 
23 
25 
85 
45 
87 
61 
40 
125 
52 
19 
58 
27 



46 
47 
60 



193 

191 
51 
20 
99 
21 
26 
55 
16 
20 
15 

5 
12 
29 
25 

8 
14 
56 
27 
56 
38 
23 
101 
35 
10 
46 
15 



Source: Director of French Instruction. 



26 

49 

30 

8 

110 

120 

34 

11 

82 

13 

18 

25 

15 

16 

17 

2 

12 

22 

37 



8 
28 
10 

4 
66 
80 
14 

2 
93 

7 
14 
20 
15 
10 

9 

6 

9 
11 
20 



8 
16 
23 
10 
11 
47 
16 



925 



578 



19 



14 



99 



132 

185 

180 

12 

642 

609 

172 

61 

376 

62 

104 

181 

91 

73 

59 

32 

60 

122 

132 

31 

39 

164 

119 

206 

126 

98 

375 

135 

29 

157 

66 



S-96 



TABLE 64— CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS, 1960 

A— GRADE 13 DEPARTMENTAL EXAMINATIONS— JUNE, 1960 



Subjects 



English Composition 

English Literature 

History 

Algebra 

Geometry 

Trigonometry and Statics 

Botany 

Zoology 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Latin Authors 

Latin Composition 

French Authors 

French Composition 

German Authors 

German Composition. . . 
French Literature (Special) 
Special French Comp. . . . 

Greek Authors 

Greek Composition 

Spanish Authors 

Spanish Composition. . . . 

Italian Authors 

Italian Composition 

Music 

Accountancy Practice . . . 

Secretarial Practice 

Mathematics of Investment 
Geography 



Number 

of 
Papers 
Written 



17,275 

16,506 

8,036 

10,472 

12,300 

11,576 

7,320 

8,417 

8,409 

10,581 

4,611 

4,677 

11,643 

11,511 

1,259 

1,254 

155 

273 

39 

39 

280 

283 

79 

85 

366 

73 

35 

30 

901 



Number 

of 
Papers 
Passed 



13,511 

12,536 

5,439 

8,608 

9,523 

9,285 

6,193 

7,405 

6,800 

7,795 

4,197 

4,287 

10,502 

9,097 

1,188 

1,187 

106 

196 

38 

37 

183 

222 

60 

61 

307 

36 

21 

20 

638 



Per 

Cent 

Passed 

78.21 
75.94 
67.68 
82.20 
77.42 
80.21 
84.60 
87.97 
80.86 
73.66 
91.02 
91.66 
90.20 
79.03 
94.36 
94.65 
68.38 
71.79 
97.43 
94.87 
65.35 
78.44 
75.94 
71.76 
83.87 
49.31 
60.00 
66.66 
70.81 



Aeg- 
rotat 



52 

53 

37 

30 

31 

30 

32 

51 

18 

34 

28 

30 

50 

42 

7 

7 









1 
1 




1 








Appeals 



Total 
Number 



556 

578 

355 

153 

324 

239 

76 

94 

167 

355 

72 

65 

179 

578 

5 

10 

3 

3 





15 

10 





2 

3 



1 

32 



Number 
Sust'd 



66 

85 

249 

13 

57 

26 

12 

16 

33 

281 

13 

16 

21 

83 



2 



3 





2 







2 

1 





12 



Total 
Success- 
ful 



13,629 

12,674 

5,725 

8,651 

9,61 1 

9,341 

6,237 

7,472 

6,851 

8,1 10 

4,238 

4,333 

10,573 

9,222 

1,195 

1,196 

106 

199 

38 

37 

186 

223 

60 

61 

310 

37 

21 

20 

650 



Per Cent 



1960 



78.89 
76.78 
71.24 
82.61 
78.13 
80.69 
85.20 
88.77 
81.47 
76.65 
91.91 
92.64 
90.80 
80.11 
94.91 
95.37 
68.38 
72.89 
97.43 
94.87 
66.42 
78.79 
75.94 
71.76 
84.69 
50.68 
60.00 
66.66 
72.14 



1959 



89.00 
85.61 
71.42 
73.22 
72.86 
76.61 
79.74 
86.00 
74.58 
81.55 
78.46 
79.89 
73.24 
78.19 
90.85 
92.45 
92.62 
85.93 
90.91 
89.36 
72.54 
82.37 
89.47 
74.58 
84.17 
60.29 
75.68 
75.00 
70.49 



Totals 148,485 119,478 80.46 535 3,875 993 121,006 81.49 79.45 



Total Number of Candidates, 
Total Number of Centres. . . 



26,638 
445 



Total Number of Papers 1 48,485 



B— GRADE 13 AUGUST EXAMINATIONS, 1960 



Subjects 

English Composition 

English Literature 

History 

Algebra 

Geometry 

Trigonometry and Statics 

Botany 

Zoology 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Latin Authors 

Latin Composition 

French Authors 

French Composition 

Special French Literature 

Special French Composition 

German Authors 

German Composition 

Spanish Authors 

Spanish Composition 

Geography , 

Totals 

Total Number of Candidates. . 1,576 
Total Number of Papers 3,025 



Number of 
Papers Written 



406 
387 
352 
140 
264 
168 
161 
161 

72 
152 

46 

70 
131 
279 

58 

53 
5 
7 

12 
9 

92 



3,025 



Number of 
Papers Passed 



300 

210 

157 

56 

185 

65 

77 

80 

36 

74 

32 

58 

48 

92 

49 

46 

5 

5 

8 

4 

69 



1,656 



Per Cent 
Passed 



73.89 
54.26 
44.60 
40.00 
70.07 
38.69 
47.82 
49.68 
50.00 
48.68 
69.56 
82.85 
36.64 
32.97 
84.48 
86.79 
100.00 
71.42 
66.66 
44.44 
75.00 



54.74 



Total Number of Centres 



19 



S-97 



TABLE 64— CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS, 1960— (Continued) 

C— INTERMEDIATE CERTIFICATES 
Issued to pupils who have completed successfully in 1960, the Programme of Studies in Grades 7 and 8 and 
one of the Courses of Study in Grades 9 and 10. 

CLASSES OF SCHOOLS Number of 

Secondary Schools Certificates issued 

Collegiate Institutes 1 2,064 

High Schools 1 5,748 

Continuation Schools 250 

Vocational Schools 2,809 

Composite Schools 9,208 40,079 

Elementary Schools 

Grades 9 and 10 of Public Schools 321 

Grades 9 and 10 of Roman Catholic Separate Schools 4,359 4,680 

Total for all Schools 44,759 



D— THE SECONDARY SCHOOL GRADUATION DIPLOMA 
Issued to pupils completing Grade 12 in 1960 





Total 
number 
of pupils 
recom- 
mended 


Pupils Classified by Courses 




General 


Tech- 
nical 


Home 
Eco- 
nomics 


Com- 
mercial 




Classes of Schools 


3 
Options 


4 
Options 


5 
Options 


6 

or more 
Options 


Total 


Art 


Collegiate Institutes. . 
High Schools 


8,199 
9,486 
181 
2,040 
5,752 
4,629 


1,729 

2,041 

40 

74 

804 

1,263 


4,125 
4,879 
110 
169 
2,071 
2,797 


1,497 

1,418 

29 

12 

540 

431 


81 
87 
2 
1 
36 
20 


7,432 
8,425 
181 
256 
3,451 
4,511 






767 

1,061 










Vocational Schools. . . 
Composite Schools. . . 


839 
946 


36 
19 


861 

1,311 

118 


48 
25 










Totals 


30,287 


5,951 


14,151 


3,927 


227 


24,256 


1,785 


55 


4,118 


73 



E— THE SECONDARY SCHOOL HONOUR GRADUATION DIPLOMA OF THE GENERAL COURSE 
Issued in 1960 to pupils who have obtained Grade 13 standing in English Composition and English Literature 
and in at least six papers chosen from the optional subjects. 





Number of 
Candidates 
Qualifying 


1-year 

Attendance in 

Grade 13 


2-year 

Attendance in 

Grade 13 


3-year 

Attendance in 

Grade 13 


ADDITIONAL 
INFORMATION 


CLASSES 
OF SCHOOLS 


All 

required 

papers 

in 1960 


Some 
required 
papers 

in 

another 

year 


At 
same 
school 


Part 

at 

other 

schools 


At 
same 
school 


Part 

at 

other 

schools 


Number of the 
9,078 candidates 
qualifying for the 
Diploma who ob- 
tained standing 
in nine or more 
papers, all in the 
school year 
1959-60. 


Collegiate Institutes. . 

High Schools 

Continuation Schools.. 
Vocational Schools. . . 


4,096 

3,093 

17 

77 

1,795 


2,874 

2,101 

6 

38 

1,289 


281 

259 

6 

4 

105 


781 

662 

4 

35 

339 


156 
68 


4 
3 

1 




2,241 

1,466 



21 


Composite Schools. . . 


61 




1 


990 


Totals 


9,078 


6,308 


655 


1,821 


285 


8 


1 


4,718 



Number who wrote one or more Departmental Grade 13 papers in 1960 — 26,638. 
THE SECONDARY SCHOOL HONOUR GRADUATION DIPLOMA OF THE TECHNICAL COURSE 
Issued in 1960 to pupils who have completed successfully the one-year Grade 13 Technical Course in day 
classes. 



Composite Schools Number of candidates qualifying. 



23 



S-98 



TABLE 64— CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS, I960— (Continued) 



F— TABLE SHOWING OPTIONAL SUBJECTS TAKEN BY CANDIDATES for the 
SECONDARY SCHOOL GRADUATION DIPLOMA of the GENERAL COURSE 



Number of Diplomas showing standing in 3 options. 
Number of Diplomas showing standing in 4 options. 
Number of Diplomas showing standing in 5 options, 
Number of Diplomas showing standing in 6 options. 
Number of Diplomas showing standing in 7 options. 

Total Number of Diplomas Issued 



Options 

Mathematics (Algebra and Geometry) 

Science (Physics and Chemistry or Agricultural Science Parts I and II) 



Latin 

French 

French for French-Speaking Candidates. 

Greek 

Spanish 

Geography 

Art 

Music 

Commercial Work 

Home Economics 

Industrial Arts 

Agriculture 

Italian 

German 




G— THE SECONDARY SCHOOL GRADUATION DIPLOMA 

Vocational Courses 

Number of Diplomas Issued 



Art Course 

Commercial Course 

Accountancy 

Clerical 

Clerical (Bilingual) 

General Business 

General Business (Bilingual) 

Merchandising 

Secretarial 

Special 

Special (Bilingual) 

Total, Commercial Course. . . . 

Home Economics Course 

Clothing and Textiles 

Food and Nutrition 

Hairdressing and Beauty Culture. . . 

Homemaking 

Nursing Assistant 

Total, Home Economics Course 



1959 



68 



3,696 



96 



1960 



73 



122 


100 


427 


523 


4 


2 


1,527 


1,613 


14 


25 


49 


48 


313 


366 


1,229 


1,434 


11 


7 



4,118 



14 


10 


20 


7 


7 


7 


40 


20 


15 


1 1 



55 



S-99 



TABLE 64— CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS, 1960— (Continued) 

G— THE SECONDARY SCHOOL GRADUATION DIPLOMA (Continued) 



Technical Course 

Aircraft Mechanics 

Applied Electricity 

Applied Electronics 

Auto Mechanics — General 

Auto Mechanics — Body Repair 

Chemistry 

Drafting — Architectural & Building Construction. . . 

Drafting — Mechanical 

Electrical & Steam Operating 

Machine Shop Practice 

Plastics 

Plumbing 

Printing 

Sheet Metal Practice 

Welding 

Woodworking — Cabinet Making 

Woodworking — Carpentry 

Woodworking — General 

Woodworking — Pattern Making 

Industrial — Special 

Total, Technical Course 

Total Number of Vocational Diplomas Issued 



1959 



5,557 



1960 



16 


13 


342 


358 


122 


143 


222 


227 


5 


8 


51 


56 


122 


129 


287 


300 


304 


317 


3 


6 


59 


63 


28 


33 


23 


20 


3 


2 


46 


38 


50 


48 


6 


3 


7 


20 


1,697 


1,785 



6,031 



H— PROVINCIAL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DIPLOMAS 
Issued for the school year 1959-60 



Number of 

THE HAMILTON INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Diplomas 

Electrical Technology 8 

Electronic Technology 25 

Mechanical Technology 12 

Fibre Processing Technology — 

The Woollen and Worsted Systems 1 

The Cotton Systems 2 

Textile Chemistry and Dyeing Technology 3 

Total 51 




Photo by 
Herb Nott 

S-100 



BURNHAMTHORPE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, ETOBICOKE 



Architects: 
Shore and Moffat 



TABLE 64— CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS, 1960— (Concluded) 



PROVINCIAL INSTITUTE OF MINING, Haileybury 

Mining Technology 25 

EASTERN ONTARIO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Ottawa 

Mechanical Technology 14 

Electronic Technology 24 

Total 38 

RYERSON INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, Toronto 

Gas Technology 6 

Instrument Technology 3 

Architectural Technology 29 

Metallurgical Technology 11 

Merchandising Administration 18 

Aeronautical Technology 10 

Furniture and Interior Design 9 

Business Administration 44 

Home Economics 8 

Secretarial Science 8 

Fashion 15 

Chemical Technology 21 

Electronic Technology 78 

Hotel, Resort and Restaurant Administration 6 

Radio and Television Arts 30 

Electrical Technology 32 

Photogra phic Arts 7 

Journalism 13 

Mechanical Technology 35 

Printing Management 9 

Total 392 

Grand Total 506 



I— ADVANCED TECHNICAL EVENING CLASS CERTIFICATES 
Issued for the school year 1959-60 



Number of 
Certificates 

Belleville Collegiate Institute & Vocational School, Belleville 10 

Brantford Collegiate Institute & Vocational School, Brantford 2 

Lakehead College of Arts, Science & Technology, Fort William 7 

John F, Ross Collegiate & Vocational Institute, Guelph 3 

Central Secondary School, Hamilton 2 

Hamilton Institute of Technology, Hamilton 2 

Queen Elizabeth Collegiate & Vocational Institute, Kingston 9 

Kitchener-Waterloo Collegiate Institute & Vocational School, Kitchener. 9 

Clarke Road High School, London 7 

O'Neill Collegiate & Vocational Institute, Oshawa 13 

Eastern Ontario Institute of Technology, Ottawa 1 

Peterborough Collegiate Institute & Vocational School, Peterborough 16 

Sarnia Collegiate Institute & Technical School, Sarria 10 

Sault Ste. Marie Collegiate Institute, Sault Ste. Marie 5 

St. Catharines Collegiate Institute & Vocational School, St. Catharines 3 

Ryerscn Institute of Technology, Toronto 18 

Western Ontario Institute of Technology, Windsor 5 

Total 122 



Source: Registrar's Branch. 



S-101 



TABLE 65— PROVINCIAL STUDENT-AID PROGRAMME 
School Year 1959-60 

(Contribution of Dominion Goverment $100,000) 



Class 



Ontario Scholarships 

1 . Universities 

2. Teachers' College 

Bursaries 

Type A: 

1 . University (1st year) 

2. Teachers' College 

3. Provincial Technical Institute (1st year) 

4. Secondary School 

Type B: 

1 . University (2nd and succeeding years) 

2. Teachers' College 

3. Provincial Te:hnical Institute (2nd and succeeding years) 

4. Ontario College of Education 

5. Ontario College of Art 

6. Osgoode Hall Law School 

Total of Bursaries Tyoes A and B 

Total Number of Applications 1959-60 

Type A 2,746 

Type B 2,730 

Total 5,476 

Loans (Programme instituted in 1958-59) 

1 . University 

2. Teachers' College 

3. Provincial Technical Institute 

4. Ontario College of Education 

5. Ontario College of Art 

6. Osgoode Hall Law School 

Total Number of Applications — 1470 
Source: Secondary Education Branch. 



Number 
Awarded 



3,784 



Total 
Amount 
Awarded 



322 


$116,200 


11 


4,125 


333 


$120,325 


879 


$339,792 


171 


40,125 


61 


16,050 


406 


40,550 


1,517 


$436,517 


1,765 


$413,555 


262 


28,850 


85 


14,400 


41 


6,250 


72 


14,375 


42 


8,725 


2,267 


$486,155 



$922,672 



2,198 



1,645 


$701,601 


187 


66,765 


52 


20,325 


137 


56,960 


35 


13,650 


142 


67,575 



$926,876 



TABLE 66— TRANSPORTATION ASSISTANCE FOR PERSONS RESIDING IN THE 

TERRITORIAL DISTRICTS 
1959-60 

The Province of Ontario provided transportation assistance to 803 students during the school year 1959-1960. 
$19,295.05 was paid to 539 students residing east of Sault Ste. Marie and 264 students residing west of Sault 
Ste. Marie. Of those assisted 250 were in the first year, 252 in the second year, 199 in the third year, 100 in the 
fourth year, 2 in the fifth year and O in the sixth year. 

The institutions attended by these students were as follows: 



Queen's University 205 



University of Toronto 

University of Western Ontario. 

Assumption University 

University cf Ottawa 

Osgoode Hall Law School. . . . 
McMaster University 



193 
163 
62 
59 
29 
20 



Ontario College of Education, 

University of Waterloo 

Ontario Agricultural College. 

MacDonald Institute 

Ontario College of Art 

Ontario Veterinary College.. 



19 
19 
18 
8 
6 
2 

803 



Source: Registrar's Branch. 



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S-104 



TABLE 69— AGRICULTURE 

List of Collegiate Institutes, High Schools and Continuation Schools in which Agricultural Science was taken in 

January, 1960. 

(1) SCHOOLS TAKING AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE ONLY 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 

Cobourg 

Fort William 

Pembroke 

Port Arthur 

Scarborough, Agincourt 

Scarborough, David & Mary Thomson 

Scarborough, R. H. King 

Scarborough, Winston Churchill 

Scarborough, West Hill 

Scarborough, W. A. Porter 

Stamford, A. N. Meyer 

Stamford, West Lane 

Woodstock 



HIGH SCHOOLS 

Bancroft 
Belle River 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

Bracebridge 

Burlington 

Cayuga 

Cobden 

Collins Bay 

Cooksville 

Delhi 

Dryden 

Durham 

Fergus 

Fort Frances 

Fort William, Selkirk 

Lucknow 

Markham 

Maxville 

Merlin 

Milverton 

New Liskeard 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

Niagara 

Ripley 

Stouffville 

Sutton 

Thornbury 

Thomhill 

Trenton 

Wiarfon 

Winchester 

Woodbridge 



CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 

Denbigh 
Lynden 



(2) SCHOOLS TAKING AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE AND WITH DEPARTMENTS OF AGRICULTURE, 1960 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES & 
VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 

Barrie, Central — 1952 

Barrie, North — 1957 

Belleville— 1 947 

Belleville, Quinte S.S. — 1 954 

Belleville, Moira S.S.— 1959 

Chatham V.S.— 1 947 

Clinton— 1946 

Collingwood— 1 954 

Goderich— 1946 

Ingersoll— 1952 

Lindsay — 1954 

Napanee — 1 944 

Orillia— 1950 

Owen Sound— 1954 

Perth— 1 949 

Picton — 1946 

Renfrew — 1 943 

St. Marys— 1 944 

Stamford, Niagara Falls — 1943 

Strathroy— 1944 

Vankleek Hill— 1959 



HIGH SCHOOLS 

Alexandria — 1945 
Alliston— 1950 
Amherstburg — 1953 
Arnprior — 1 951 
Arthur— 1 944 
Athens— 1 944 
Aurora — 1 953 
Aylmer— 1948 
Bowmanville — 1955 
Beamsville — 1943 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 
Blenheim — 1 944 
Bradford— 1960 
Brampton — 1951 
Brighton — 1 955 
Burford— 1 945 
Caledonia — 1949 
Cannington, Brock D.H.S. — 1 954 
Chesley— 1 946 
Drayton — 1943 
Dresden — 1953 
Dunnville — 1 945 
Elmira— 1943 
Essex— 1946 
Exeter— 1 950 
Fenelon Falls— 1 954 
Glencoe— 1952 
Grimsby— 1945 
Hagersville — 1944 
Haliburton — 1954 
Hanover — 1950 
Harrow — 1944 
Kemptville — 1943 
Kincardine — 1 944 
Kingsville— 1944 
Leamington — 1 947 
Listowel — 1943 
Madoc— 1952 
Markdale— 1952 
Marmora — 1 952 
Meaford— 1945 
Medway H.S., Arva— 1 949 
Midland— 1955 
Milton— 1 944 
Mitchell— 1 944 
Newmarket — 1951 
Norwich— 1954 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 
Norwood— 1952 
Orangeville — 1951 
Paris— 1953 
Parkhill— 1954 
Palmerston — 1 945 
Pelham, Fenwick P.O. — 1 944 
Petrolia — 1945 
Pickering — 1951 
Port Elgin — 1946 
Port Perry — 1943 
Richmond — 1953 
Ridgetown — 1943 
Cornwall, St. Lawrence H.S. — 1 953 
Saltfleet, Stoney Creek P.O. —1947 
Seaforth— 1 946 
Shelburne— 1945 
Simcoe — 1 943 
Smithville— 1 952 
Stirling— 1 944 
Streetsville — 1 957 
Sydenham — 1 944 
Tilbury— 1948 

Tillsonburg, Annandale S.S. — 1950 
Tillsonburg, Glendale S.S.— 1959 
Tweed— 1945 
Uxbridge— 1945 
Walkerton— 1951 
Wallaceburg— 1950 
Waterford— 1946 
Watford— 1949 
Waterloo-Oxford— 1 956 
West Lome- West Elgin— 1949 
Williamstown — 1959 
Wingham— 1949 
Woodstock, Huron Park — 1957 



NOTE: 1 . The year in which a Department of Agriculture was introduced is shown after the name of the school. 
2. Science plus the Agricultural options is the term for courses in Grades 9 and 10. 

Source: Secondary Education Branch. 



S-105 



TABLE 70— AGRICULTURE 

TEACHERS OF AGRICULTURE 

Number of Teachers Concerned, School Year 1960-61 

Specialists or Type A Certificate 242 

Intermediate Certificate 32 

Granted Permission or T.S.S 121 

395 

O.A.C. and other Agricultural Graduates included above, 

Teachers 1 77 

Principals 20 

197 

Source: Secondary Education Branch 



TABLE 71— TECHNICAL INSTITUTES 
September, 1960 



ENROLMENT 



Male Female Total 



1. Full-Time 2,665 

2. Part-Time — 



326 2,991 
58 58 



Total 2,665 384 3,049 



BY COURSES 

2. (a) Engineering Technology 1 ,574 

(b) Business 377 

(c) Home Economics 1 20 

(d) Mining 82 

(e) Textiles 22 

(f) Other Courses 816 

2,991 



GRADUATES— School Year 1959-60 

(a) Engineering Technology 316 

(b) Business 84 

(c) Home Economics 36 

(d) Mining 36 

(e) Textiles 6 

(f ) Other Courses 59 



TEACHING STAFF 



1. Full-Time. 
1. Part-Time 



Aale Female 


Total 


151 13 


164 


15 8 


23 



166 



21 



187 



537 



EVENING CLASSES 

Enrolment as at November 1, 1960. 



Source: September Statistical Reports for Technical Institutes, 1960. 



3,481 



TABLE 72— PROVINCIAL INSTITUTE OF TRADES 
September, 1960 

ENROLMENT TEACHING STAFF 

1. Designated Trades 670* Full-Time 

2. Non-Designated Trades 

Full-Time 125 

Part-Time 5 EVENING CLASSES 

CERTIFICATED GRADUATES (School Year 1959-60) Enrolment, November 1, 1960 

1. Designated Trades 1,300 

2. Non-Designated Trades 115 

*Four intakes per year 
Source: September Statistical Report for The Provincial Institute of Trades, 1960. 

S-106 



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S-118 



TABLE 75— CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 



A. Active Enrolment 



COURSES 


November 30, 
1956 


November 30, 
1958 


November 30, 
1959 


November 30, 
1960 


Elementary Grades: 


483 

62 

201 


379 

49 

231 


338 

36 

221 


299 


Bilingual, Grades 1-8 


20 
234 








746 


659 


595 


553 






Secondary Grades: 


1,969 
157 


3,449 
71 


3,340 
113 


3,059 




91 






Total 


2,126 


3,520 


3,453 


3,150 








2,872 


4,179 


4,048 


3,703 







B. Average Weekly Enrolment — September 1 to June 30 



COURSES 


1953-54 


1954-55 


1955-56 


1957-58 


1958-59 


1959-60 


Elementary Grades: 


568 

79 

124 


571 

66 

159 


545 

59 

189 


476 

58 

226 


388 

52 
228 


366 




39 


Adult Courses 


249 


Total 


771 


796 


793 


760 


668 


654 






Secondary Grades: 


880 


1,141 


1,525 
93 


2,670 
66 


3,359 
111 


3,695 
133 












Total 


880 


1,141 


1,618 


2,736 


3,470 


3,828 






1,651 


1,937 


2,411 


3,496 


4,138 


4,482 







C. Number of Lessons Processed — September 1 to June 30 



COURSES 


1953-54 


1954-55 


1955-56 


1957-58 


1958-59 


1959-60 


Elementary Grades: 


19.020 
2,241 
3,665 


16,803 
1,755 
5,132 


16,256 
1,367 
5,350 


14,258 
1,795 
5,642 


12,431 
1,568 
6,049 


1 1,256 




1 01 8 




6,110 






24,926 


23,690 


22,973 


21,695 


20,048 


18,384 




Secondary Grades: 


27,062 


40,142 


52,006 
1,029 


79,537 
874 


85,256 
1,568 


96,146 
1,760 










Total 


27,062 


40,142 


53,035 


80,411 


86,824 


97,906 






51,988 


63,832 


76,008 


102,106 


106,872 


116,290 





Source: Director of Correspondence Courses 



S-119 



TABLE 76— ONTARIO SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF 



Enrolment by Age and Grade, 


October 1 5 


, 1960 


















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(1) 
>. 
CM 


o 
<u 
>• 
o 

CN 


D 
4) 

CO 



4) 

»o 

4 


C 

o 

4) 




<L 

>• 

N 

<> 


2 


11 

00 




4> 

>- 
O 

CO 




4) 
>. 

O 

CN 
6~ 





1- 





h- 

"0 


-C 

u 
CO 


JUNIOR SCHOOL 


18 


32 


24 
17 


11 

33 
3 


7 

21 

24 

3 

5 


1 

4 
21 

13 
3 




















93 
75 
56 
18 
9 
































8 
2 

1 








































































251 






























INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 












1 


10 


12 

10 
3 
11 
10 
2 


1 

2 

8 
2 

12 
12 














24 




























121.... 
















1 
12 


1 












131 


























?5 


















l 

7 










23 
21 


























1 18 


























SENIOR SCHOOL 


















1 
2 
1 


7 
7 
1 


3 

4 
9 
1 
1 
1 

5 
7 


2 








13 

13 

23 

18 

9 

20 
8 

20 
9 
















































10 
11 

"2 


2 
5 
1 


"i 
5 
9 


"I 

8 




















































































3 






















10 


2 
3 
2 


"i 

6 


1 

1 


















































? ! 10 


143 






























Totals 


18 


32 


41 


47 60 


43 


34 48 41 


27 


31 


35 


15 


26 14 512 512 







Years Attended by Grades, October 1 5, 


1960 


















Grade 




4> 

6 





CN 





>» 

CO 

CN 



« 


D 
4) 

>. 

Ml 
4 




0) 

>. 

-0 




4) 

>. 

K 

<6 



« 

CO 





>» 


CO 




4) 
>. 
O 



6 


2 



4) 
CN 



(j 
>• 

CO 

CN 




4) 
CO 



a 

4 





1- 





»— 

"o 


-c 
u 

CO 


JUNIOR SCHOOL 

Preparatory 1 (10 classes) 


41 
9 
3 
1 
1 


51 
61 

1 


1 

3 
6 


























93 
75 
56 
18 
9 




Preparatory 2 (8 classes) 


2 

24 




























17 
10 

1 


4 

7 


1 










































1 




6 




















251 


























INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 

1 Academic or Grade 2 (2 classes) 






1 


1 


3 


3 


11 
1 

'16 

3 
2 


5 

1 1 

"2 

8 

11 
















24 
12 
13 
25 
23 
21 






























1 
1 
6 
2 


1 

1 
1 
1 


"2 
1 
2 


"5 


1 
2 
1 

1 


10 


















2 
2 
















2 Vocational, not graded (2 classes) 


















3 Vocational, not graded (2 classes) 


2 














1 18 




















SENIOR SCHOOL 

1 Academic 1 or Grade 5 




1 
2 

"i 


"i 

1 
1 


2 

"i 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 


1 
1 




2 
3 


4 

5 
8 


1 










13 
13 
23 
18 

9 
20 

8 
20 

9 
10 




1 Academic 2 or Grade 6 
















2 
1 

1 


4 
6 


5 
3 


1 

4 
4 
2 


"i 

8 


"4 








1 


"i 

"2 

1 


1 

1 
1 
4 




4 Academic or Grade 9 




Graduating Class or Grade 10 (2 classes) 


1 
2 


1 
"2 


1 

"i 


1 
1 










1 Vocational, not graded 




2 
3 








2 Vocational, not graded (2 classes) 




2 




3 
1 


4 
4 

1 










4 Vocational, not graded 




1 
2 


3 
1 


2 




Full Time Vocational, not graded 








1 


1 


1 


1 








143 




















Totals ...... 


63 


130 


18 


45 


45 


24 


34 


41 


25 


22 


15 


17 


14 


13 


6 


512 


51? 







Source: Superintendent, Ontario School for the Deaf. 



S-120 



TABLE 77— ONTARIO SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND 

A — Enrolment by Age and Grade — October 15, 1960 

















„ 


v> 


H 






in 


m 


in 


VI 


m 


in 






D 


a 


o 


D 
0) 


a 





o 
1) 


o 


D 
4) 
>- 


□ 

4> 
>- 


D 
0) 

>- 


D 
IV 


o 

a> 


a 
» 


o 

>- 


a 
« 


a 

0) 


</) 


Grade 




>> 


>- 


o 


^ 


CN 


00 


■"* 


lO 


<o 


K 


oo 


o- 


o 

CM 


CN 


CN 
CN 


CN 


< 




>o 


ts 


00 


CK 


o 


' 


CN 


CO 


"* 


<o 


•O 


N. 


oo 


o 


o 

CN 


CN 


CN 


o 

t- 


Auxiliary 






2 




2 


1 


1 




1 


....j.... 






.... 


.... 






7 


Grade 1 


19 


15 


5 


3 


7777 














.... 


777^7777 




42 


Grade 2 




15 


8 


4 




1 











.... 




.... 


....j.... 




28 






2 


14 

1 


5 


3 








1 


TT77|7TT7 






....!....!.... 




25 












i ).... 






1 1 






Grade 4 






5 


4 


2 


5 


1 






19 


Grade 5 








2 


2 


7 


1 


2 


2 


~\T 









....I.... 




18 
































1 


4 


5 


1 


5 


i 


1 








....I.... 




18 


















TT77i77T7 


7~ 




Grade 7 








.... 




5 


3 


5 




1 


14 


Grade 8 
















7 


3 


2 




1 






7777 


.... 




13 


Grade 9 


















2 


4 


5 


4 


2 


1 








18 






















1 


5 


1 


1 






1 




9 




























Grade 11 
























2 
3 


2 
3 




2 






6 

































Grade 12 














1 




2 


.... 


10 














.... 


.... 














Specials 






















Totals 


19 


32 


30 


19 


12 


15 


17 


14 


19 


9 


14 


7f 


T 


2 


~ 


3 


i 


227 



B — Visual Acuity 

I960 

All Pupils— October, 1960 

Limited vision in both eyes 

Limited vision in one eye — light perception in other 

Limited vision in one eye — blind in other 

Light perception in both eyes 

Light perception in one eye — blind in other 

Blind in both eyes 

Total. 



New Pupils — October, 1 960 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 




8 
2 
2 
9 

4 


4 


5 
3 
5 


12 


Limited vision in one eye — light perception in other 


2 
2 


Light perception in both eyes 

Light perception in one eye — blind in other 


14 
3 
9 






Totals 


25 


17 


42 



Boys 



Girls 



Total 



134 



?3 



227 



C — Eye Conditions Producing Loss of Vision 










NEW PUPILS 




ALL PUPILS 






Boys Girls Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 




6 
3 
1 
5 
4 
2 
1 
2 




1 




9 
3 

1 
2 
2 









15 
6 
1 

6 
6 
4 
1 
2 



1 



31 

21 

23 

15 

12 

9 

9 

3 

6 

2 

1 

1 

1 


41 

12 

9 

8 

7 
5 
2 
7 

1 
1 





72 




33 




32 


Retinitis and Choroiditis 


23 

19 




14 


Microphthalmus 


11 
10 




6 


Myopia 


3 
2 




1 




1 






Totals 


25 


17 


42 


134 


93 


227 



Source: Superintendent, Ontario School for the Blind. 



S-121 



TABLE 78— MUSIC 

(a) ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 
Proportion of Schools Offering a Course in Music 





1958-59 


1959-60 


1960-61 




100% 
87 
58 
39 


100% 
87 
65 
45 


100% 




86 




60 




37 








83 


80 


77 







(b) SECONDARY SCHOOLS 





No. of Schools 
offering a 
course in 
Music (1) 
1960-61 














1956-57 


1957-58 


1958-59 


1959-60 


1960-61 




201 
183 


57% 
32 


54% 
33 


50% 
38 


51% 
40 


47% 

43 


Instrumental 




98 
158 


28 
28 


26 
32 


24 
35 


26 
35 


20 


Instrumental 


37 




53 
138 


13 
22 


13 
25 


13 
27 


12 
29 


12 


Instrumental 


32 




43 
119 


10 
18 


10 
21 


10 
22 


9 
25 


10 


Instrumental 


28 




9 
11 


2 

1 


2 
2 


2 

1 


2 
1 


2 


Instrumental 


2 



(1) For the purpose of this table the total number of secondary schools is taken as 426. 



Music Organizations in Secondary Schools 


1958-59 


1959-60 


1960-61 




(No.) 

85 

119 

266 

29 


(No.) 

91 

148 

274 

33 


(No.) 
81 




157 




284 




27 







Source: Director of Music. 



S-122 




S-123 



mmmmmmm 




S-124 



TABLE 79— STATISTICS RELATING TO THE COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH 



A — Immigrants to Canada from Non-English Speaking Countries and Newcomer Classes and 
Registration in Ontario as of December 1st of each year 



Year 



1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

NOTE: *For the first 9 months 



Immigrants to Canada 






from non-English 






Speaking Countries 


Classes 


Registration 


15,940 


126 


2,900 


71,976 


310 


7,500 


65,272 


584 


14,971 


52,686 


524 


13,694 


155,289 


756 


23,088 


112,517 


733 


21,923 


112,412 


843 


21,702 


99,524 


1,010 


22,893 


69,404 


835 


17,549 


103,761 


896 


16,691 


158,328 


919 


19,361 


87,783 


1,096 


26,117 


76,229 


921 


20,934 


57,875* 


655 


16,184 



B — Municipal Recreation Committees 





1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 




224 

170 

287,306 


238 

179 

313,064 


255 

196 

364,465 


274 

261 

410,519 


307 

228 

450,891 


314 

249 

498,552 


322 


Number applying for 
Amount of grants. . . 


grants. 
$ 


261 
532,459 



S-125 



TABLE 79— STATISTICS RELATING TO THE COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH 

(Concluded) 

C — Training and Certification of Municipal Recreation Directors 





1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


Number enrolled in training. . 


94 


68 


70 


79 


97 


134 


106 


Number completing 


13 


5 


10 


6 


7 


,2 


22 


Certificates Issued 

(O.R. 10/54) 


47 


7 


8 


13 


9 


6 


8 








16 


7 


8 


1 1 


5 


5 


8 












9 


5 


12 


8 


2 












1 




4 


3 


13 







D — Leadership Courses (Adult) 





1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 




No. 


Attend. 


No. 


Attend. 


No. 


Attend. 


No. 


Attend. 


No. 


Attend. 


Art & Crafts 


32 
3 
31 
12 
1 
38 
15 
43 


928 

85 

1,313 

463 

70 

1,457 

357 

1,555 


15 

4 

33 

7 

1 

18 

18 

39 


254 
156 

1,745 

561 

92 

902 

631 

1,597 


21 
3 
27 
14 
1 
18 
14 
23 


569 
95 

1,196 
518 
117 
807 
353 

1,342 


37 

2 

34 

8 

2 

34 

12 

15 


1,666 
70 

1,978 
233 
337 

1,360 
704 
627 


34 

29 
12 
2 
20 
30 
35 


1,136 






Physical Recreation 

Rural Leadership 

Recreational Directors... 
Social Recreation 


1,587 

775 

92 

1,458 

1,341 




2,044 




Totals 


175 


6,228 


135 


5,938 


121 


4,997 


144 


6,975 


162 


8,433 





Source: Community Programmes Branch. 



S-126 



TABLE 80— INSPECTORS AND INSPECTORATES 

as of December 31, 1960 

PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 



G. A. Pearson, B.A., Superintendent of Elementary Education Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

W. G. Chatterton, B.A., B.Paed., Assistant Superintendent Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

G. L Duffin, B.A., M.Ed., Assistant Superintendent Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

J. H. Kennedy, B.A., Assistant Superintendent Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

R. J. McNaughton, B.A., B.Paed., Assistant Superintendent Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

B. E. Michaud, B.A., B.Paed., Assistant Superintendent Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

C. P. O'Neill, M.A., Assistant Superintendent. .- Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

W. C. VanderBurgh, B.A., B.Paed., Assistant Superintendent Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

J. C. Wilker, B.A., B.Paed., Assistant Superintendent Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

J. R. McCarthy, M.A., B.Paed., Superintendent of Curriculum Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

W. C. McMaster, B.A., B.Paed., Assistant Superintendent Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

M. B. Parnall, M.A., M.Ed., Assistant Superintendent Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

J. B. Healy, B.A., B.Paed., Superintendent of Professional Development Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

E. E. Stewart, M.A., Assistant Superintendent Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

H. R. Beattie, B.A., Superintendent of Special Services 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

W. K. Clarke, B.A., Assistant Superintendent 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

Robert Gauthier, B.A., D.Paed., Director of French Instruction Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

D. A. MacTavish, M.A., B.Paed., Director of Auxiliary Education Services 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

F. J. Clute, B.A., Director of Guidance Services 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

C. D. Gaitskell, M.A., D.Paed., Director of Art 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

J. W. Grimmon, B.A., B.Paed., Director of Audio-Visual Education 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

L M. McKenzie, B.A., Director of Correspondence Courses 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

B. S. McCool, B.A., Director of Music Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2 

G. A. Wright, B.S.A., Director of Physical and Health Education 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 



PUBLIC SCHOOL INSPECTORS 

(Where Boards Employ Supervisory Officers) 



Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 


Barrie 


A. G. McKay, B.A., B.Paed., 


Public School Board, 
P.U.C. Building, 
15 Bayfield St., Barrie 






Belleville 


L. A. Kells, B.A., B.Paed., 


1 Public School Board, 






208 Bridge St. E., Belleville 








Brantford 


R. N. MacLeod, B.A., M.Ed., 


1 Board of Education, 

\ Central School, 

J 60 Sheridan St., Brantford 




R. M. Waghorn, B.A., M.Ed 


Chatham 


H. A. Tanser, M.A., D.Paed., 


] Board of Education, 
\ 93 William St N., 




J. G. Griffith, B.A., B.Paed 


I Box 1000 Chatham 








Fort William 


T. A. S. McKee, B.A., B.Paed., 


] Board of Education, 
[ 400 Catherine St., 
J Fort William 




J. O. Lees, B.A., B.Ed 


Gait 


E. W. Young, B.A., M.Ed., 

Supt. of Public Schools 


Board of Education, 
Box 338, Gait 


Guelph 


F. A. Hamilton, B.A., B.Paed., 


[Board of Education, 




W. R. McVittie, B.A 


| 385 Woolwich St., Guelph 








Halton No. 2 

(Trafalgar Township 
School Area No. 1) 


L. L. Skuce, B.A., B.Paed., 


) 

[■Seventh Line N., R.R.I, Oakville 


W. K. M. Armstrong, B.A., M.Ed 



S-127 



TABLE 80— PUBLIC SCHOOL INSPECTORS— (Continued) 



Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 


Halton No. 3 

(Burlington Board of Education) 


J. W. Singleton, B.A., B.Ed., 




D. S. Lawless, B.A., M.Ed., 


Board of Education, 
Box 505, 




D. B. Deacon, B.A 

J. B. Mitchell, B.A., B.Ed 


Burlington 


Hamilton 


R. A. Ridded, B.A., B.Paed., LL.D. 






J. W. VanLoon, B.A., B.Paed., 






P W. Diebel, M.A., B.Paed 


Board of Education, 
- 357 Hunter St. W., 




G R Force, B.A., B.Paed 




L. A. Freeman, B.A., B.Paed 


Hamilton 




G. J. Patterson, B.A., B.Paed 

L E Rouse BA BPaed... 






W. A. Tindale, B.A., B.Paed 








' 




A. C. Ritter, B.A., B.Paed., 


\ 




i Board of Education, 




H. C. Hunter, B.A., B.Paed 


329 Johnson St., Kingston 










R. M. Buie, B.A., B.Paed 

R W MacLean, B.A., B.Paed 


) 




Public School Board, 




H. R. Mark, B.A., B.Paed 


Victoria School, Kitchener 










A. E. Gillies, B.A., B.Paed., 


54 Ontario St., 


(Grantham Township School Area) 










A. B. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed., LL.D. 


\ 








W. D. Sutton, B.A., B.Paed. 


Board of Education, 




M W Chalmers B A. BPaed 


Municipal Building, London 




J. N. Given, B.A., M.Ed 

D. W. Reader, B.A., M.Ed 


, 


Middlesex No, 4 

(London Township 
School Area No. 2) 


G. S. Sleightholm, M.A., M.Ed., 


] 


C. W. Roberts, B.A., M.Ed 






C. M. Elliott, B.A., B.Paed., Ed.D. 

Supt. of Public Schools 

T J Heath B A. BPaed 


) 




1 Board of Education, 

[ 179SimcoeSt S Oshawa 




W. J. MacDonald, B.A., B.Paed 




Ottawa 


W. T. MacSkimming, M.A., B.Paed., 

Chief Inspector 

H. A. Christie, B.A., B.Com., B.Paed 

G. Peacock, B.A., M.Ed 

P. H. Seymour, B.A., B.Paed 


) 




Public School Board, 

330 Gilmour St., Ottawa 4 




C. B. Storr, M.A., B.Ed., Ph.D 

M. R. VanLoon, B.A., B.Paed 




Peel No. 4 

(South Peel Board of Education) 


J. A. Turner, B.A., 


1 




A. Cummins, B.A., M.Ed., 


Board of Education, 
Windy Oaks Dr., 




H. C. Henry, B.A., B.Ed. 

T. M. Martin, B.A., B.Paed 


Port Credit 


Peterborough 


E. P. Ray, M.A., Ph.D., 

Director of Education 

D. J. Hynes, B.A., B.Paed., 


] 

'Board of Education, 

City Hall, Peterborough 




J. G. Nichols, B.A., B.Paed 


J 



S-128 



TABLE 80— PUBLIC SCHOOL INSPECTORS— (Continued) 



Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 


Port Arthur 


G. P. Dalzell, M.A., B.Paed., 


\ 




Board of Education, 




F. C. MacDonald, B.A., M.Ed., 


> Central School, 
Port Arthur 






' 




M. F. Pummell, B.A., B.Paed., 

Supt. of Public Schools 

E. 1. McCulley, B.A 


) Board of Education, 
} 15 Welland Ave., 
J St. Catharines 










E. C. Reeb, B.A., M.Ed., 






> Collegiate Institute, 
J St. Thomas 








W. Rogers, B.A., B.Paed., 


1 Board of Education, 

• 190 Wellington St., Sarnia 






H. F. Froud, B.A., B.Paed., 




B. A. McPhedran, B.A., B.Paed 










Sault Ste. Marie 


R. S. Derby, B.A., B.Paed., 

Director of Education 

A. H. McGrigor, B.A., B.Paed 


| Board of Education, 
[> Central School, 
J Sault Ste. Marie 






Sudbury 


E. G. Higgins, B.A., B.Paed., 


1 Public School Board, 
[ 289 Cedar St. 




J. M Telford B.A., B.Paed 


J Sudbury 






Toronto Metropolitan Area 

(City of Toronto) 


Z. S. Phimister, B.A., B.Paed., LLD., 




T. H. W. Martin, B.A., D.Paed., 






M. K. MacDonald, B.A., B.Paed., 

Asst. Supt. of Public Schools 

N. A. Sweetman, B.A., B.Paed., 


Toronto Board of Education, 
• 155 College St., 
Toronto 2B. 




R. S. Godbold, B.A., B.Paed 




R. E Jones B.A. B.Paed 






J E Laughlin B A B Paed 






J. M. McEachern, B.A., B.Paed 






C. W. Maedel B.A B.Paed 






H. L. Martyn B.A., B.Paed 






E. Sager B.A. B Paed 






G. Varty, B.A., B.Paed 










Toronto Metropolitan Area 

(East York) 


D. A. Morrison, B.A., M.Ed., 


lEast York Board of Education, 




K. H. D. Hall, B.A., B.Paed., 


670 Cosburn Ave., 
Toronto 6 








Toronto Metropolitan Area 

(Etobicoke) 


K. F. Prueter, B.A., B.Paed., Ed.D 


1 




L. W. Smith, B.A., 






P. W. Buddenhagen, B.A., B.Paed 

H. C. MacCorkindale, B.A., B.Paed 

C. E. Potts, B.A., B.Paed 


540 Burnhamthorpe Rd., 
Toronto 18 




J. F. Stinson, B.A., M.Ed 

A. M. Turner, B.A., M.Ed 


J 


Toronto Metropolitan Area 

(Lakeshore District) 


A. G. Gillespie, B.A., B.Paed., 


Lakeshore District Board of 
Education, 71 Second St., 


(Long Branch, Mimico, 
New Toronto) 




New Toronto 


Toronto Metropolitan Area 

(Leaside) 


M. W. Holmes, B.A., M.Ed., 

Supt. of Public Schools 


Leaside Board of Education, 
200 Hanna Rd., Toronto 17 



S-129 



TABLE 80— PUBLIC SCHOOL INSPECTORS— (Continued) 



Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 


Toronto Metropolitan Area 

(North York) 


F. W. Minkler, B.A., D.Paed., 




H. R. Partlow, B.A., D.Paed., 






D L Bornhold B A B Paed 


North York Board of 




G G Gardiner, B.A. B.Paed 


> Education, 15 Oakburn Cres. 




W J Mcintosh M.A., D.Paed 


Willowdale 




G A Noble B A B.Paed 






L C Sutherland BA B Paed 






P D Windrim BA B Paed 










Toronto Metropolitan Area 

(Scarborough) 


R. H. King, M.A., 




A. S. Taylor, B.A., M.Ed., 






F. S. Cooper, B.A., B.Paed., 






J. J. Henderson, B.A., B.Paed., 


Scarborough Board of 
> Education, 2472 Eglinton 




LA. Code, B.A., M.Ed 

B. L Davidge, B.A., M.Ed 

W F Koerber, B.A., D.Paed 


Ave. E., Scarborough P.O. 




C. S. Lougheed, B.A., M.Ed 

H. A. Scott, B.A., M.Ed 

J. D. Toogood, B.A 


J 


Toronto Metropolitan Area 

(York) 


J. D. Hanmer, B.A., B.Paed., 




C D Cuthbert B.A B.Paed 


2 Trethewey Dr., 




G A. Trusler, B.A., B.Paed 




V. A. Wilcox, B.A 


J 


Waterloo 


W. S. Hougham, B.A., M.Ed., 


124 King St. N., Waterloo 










Welland No. 4 

(Chippawa, Stamford, 
Willoughby) 


R. A. McLeod, B.A., B.Paed., 


1 Board of Education, 1773 


D. G. Warren, B.A., M.Ed 


J Niagara Falls 




T. C. White, B.A., B.Paed. 


] 








C. R. MacLeod, B.A., B.Paed., 


Board of Education, 

451 Park St. W., Windsor 




G. F. Mann, B.A., M.Ed 










Woodstock 


H. W. Hedley, B.A., D.Paed., 


Board of Education, Central 








York No. 5 

(Vaughan Township School Area) 


J. A. Gibson, B.A., B.Paed., 


Municipal Offices, Maple 




York No. 6 


G. S. Mclntyre, B.A., B.Paed., 

Superintendent of Public Schools 


c/o McConaghy Public School, 
62 Yonge St. S., 
Richmond Hill 


(Richmond Hill Public School Board) 



PUBLIC SCHOOL INSPECTORS— COUNTIES 



Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 


Brant No. 1 


J C Webster B A B Paed . . 










Bruce No. 1 


D. W. Simpson, B.A 


Walkerton 



S-130 



TABLE 80— PUBLIC SCHOOL INSPECTORS— COUNTIES (Continued) 



Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 


Bruce No. 2 and Grey No. 5 


A. W. Smith, B.A., M.Ed 


715 2nd Ave. E., Owen Sound 


Bruce No. 3 


T. K. Waldie, B.A 


Box 520, Walkerton 








Carleton No. 1 and Russell No. 1 . . . 


R. K. Vogan, B.A., B.Paed 


1241 Wellington St., Ottawa 3 




C. A. Rath, B.A 


1241 Wellington St., Ottawa 3 




Dufferin No. 1 


C. W. Gabel, B.A., B.Paed 


Orangeville 








M. N. Hutchison, B.A 










T. R. McEwan, B.A., B.Paed 












C. A. Holmes, B.A., B.Paed 


5 Queen St., Port Hope 




A. D. McColl, B.A 








Elgin No. 2 


R E. Rowlings, B.A., B.Paed 










F. A. Leitch, B.A., M.Ed 


Box 1000, Essex 








Essex No. 2 


W. R. Quance, B.A., B.Ed 


Box 1000, Essex 








C. R. Crawford, B.A., B.Paed 


Box 781, Kingsville 






W F Hampton, B.A 


1448 Tecumseh Rd. E., Windsor 








Essex No. 11 


*R J Desmarais, B.A., B.Paed 










Frontenac No.l and Addington No.l . 


V. R. Reid, B.A., B.Ed 


Sharbot Lake 




J E Horton BA BPaed. ., 


1082 Princess St., Kingston 






Frontenac No. 3 and Lennox No. 2 . . 


A. F. S. Watts, B.A 


1082 Princess St., Kingston 


Glengarry No. 1 and Prescott No. 1.. 


H. L. Welch, B.A., M.Ed 


Alexandria 


Glengarry No. 11 and Prescott No. 13 


*J. A. A. Deschamps, B.A 


Alexandria 




W H Knisley B A M Ed . , 


Prescott 










A. F. Brown, B.A 


71 5 Second Ave. E., Owen Sound 


Grey No. 2 


L L. Sinclair, B.A 


71 5 Second Ave. E., Owen Sound 




W. G. Rae, B.A., B.Paed 








Haldimand No. 1 


T. R. Brown, B.A 










No. 3 and Victoria No. 2 


N. E. Ward, B.A., M.Ed 


Minden 


Halton No. 1 


R. F. Bornhold, B.A., M.Ed 


Box 448, Milton 


Halton No. 4 and Wentworth No. 2 


W. L. McNeil, B.A., B.Paed 


Box 27, Milton 


Hastings No. 1, Nipissing No. 4 
and Haliburton No. 2 


J. H. Bates, B.A., M.Ed 


Bancroft 


Hastings No. 2 and Prince Edward 
No. 2 


R. A. Dunsmore, B.A. M.Ed 


379 Front St., Belleville 




G. W. C. Nelson, B.A., B.Paed 








Hastings No. 5 and Northumberland 
No. 4 


C. E. McMullen, B.A., B.Ed 


Box 348, Trenton 



S-131 



TABLE 80— PUBLIC SCHOOL INSPECTORS— COUNTIES (Continued) 



Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 




J. H. Kinkead, B.A., B.Paed 


Goderich 








Huron No. 2 


J. W. Coulter, B.A., M.Ed 


Goderich 


Huron No. 3 and Perth No. 3 


G. J. Goman, B.A., B.Ed 


61 Old Mill Rd., Exeter 


Kent No 1 


E. C. Evans, B.A 


35 E. Market Square, Chatham 






Kent No 2 


A. A. Gilroy, B.A 


35 E. Market Square, Chatham 






Kent No 3 


V. L. Vandergust, B.A., M.Ed 


35 E. Market Square, Chatham 






Kent No. 11 


*H. J. Payette, B.A 

*F. Y. L. Lacroix, B.A., M.Ed 


\ 




35 E. Market Sq., Chatham 




R. J. Carter, B.A., B.Paed 


203 Vl North Vidal St., Sarnia 










A. V. Vincent, B.A., B.Paed 


Petrolia 








Lambton No. 3 and Middlesex No. 5 


W. G. MacDonald, B.A., M.Ed 


Watford 




J. W. Barber, B.A., B.Paed 


Perth 










G. M. Nobes, B.A., B.Paed 










Lanark No. 3, Leeds No. 3 and 
Grenville No. 2 


J. H. Crammond, B.A., M.Ed 


34 Beckwith St. S., Smith's Falls 


Leeds No. 1 


G. T. Hackett, B.A., M.Ed 


Gananoque 






Leeds No. 2 


G. Young, B.A 








Lennox No. 1, Addington No. 2 and 


H. H. Langford, B.A 


Box 150, Napanee 






A. Klim, B.A. B.Paed 


12 Main St. W., Grimsby 






Lincoln No. 2 and Welland No. 6. . 


J. L. Runnalls, B.A 


54 Ontario St., St. Catharines 




H. G. Schlotzhauer, B.A., B.Paed 








Middlesex No. 2 


H. A. Griffith, B.A., B.Paed 


389 Queens Ave., London 


Middlesex No 3 


E. Oakes B A B Paed . . 


Strathroy 






Middlesex No. 4 












Norfolk No. 1 


E. F. Jordan B.A M Ed 










Norfolk No. 2 


L. T. Slichter, B.A., B.Ed 








Northumberland No. 1 


C. W. Young, B.A., B.Paed 


Brighton 






Northumberland No. 2 


C. W. Young, B.A., B.Paed 


Brighton 




Ontario No. 1 


Miss L. L. McNeill, B.A., B.Paed 


Uxbridge 




Ontario No. 2 


T. H. Houghton, B.A., M.Ed 


110 Green St., Whitby 






Ontario No. 4 


J. C McClelland BA M Ed . . 


110 Green St., Whitby 






Oxford No. 1 


W. G. Anderson, B.A., B.Paed 


Woodstock 








Oxford No. 2 


A P Silcox BAB Paed . . 


Ingersoll 






Peel No. 1 


N. Muir. B.A.. B.Paed 


51 Main St. N., Brampton 



S-132 



TABLE 80— PUBLIC SCHOOL INSPECTORS— COUNTIES (Continued) 



Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 


Peel No. 2 


A. A. Martin, B.A., B.Paed 


30 Port St. E., Port Credit 








Peel No. 3 


E. R. Underhill, B.A 


51 Main St. N., Brampton 






Perth No. 1 


W. MacMillan, B.A., B.Paed 


Court House, Stratford 


Perth No. 2 and City of Stratford 


G. N. Edwards, B.A., B.Paed 


84 Ballantyne Ave., Stratford 


Peterborough No. 1 and 


K. O. Birkin, M.A., B.Paed 


Court House, Peterborough 






Prescott No. 11 




Plantagenet 






Prescott No. 12 


*G. C. Filion, B.A., M.Ed 


Hawkesbury 








H. L. Knight B.A., B.Paed 


Picton 








Renfrew No. 1 


M. A. Craig, B.A., B.Paed 










Renfrew No. 2 


G. A. MacLeod, B.A., M.Ed 


Box 250, Renfrew 


Renfrew No. 3 


W. J. C. Burgoyne, B.A., B.Ed 


Eganville 


Renfrew No. 4 


R. H. Field, B.A., M.Ed 


Pembroke 


Russell No. 11 


*H. E. Dubois, B.A 










Simcoe No. 1 


K. J. Ellis, B.A., M.Ed 


Municipal Bldg., Midland 


Simcoe No. 2 and Ontario No. 3... 


D. A. Lapp, M.A., M.Ed 


60 West St. N., Orillia 


Simcoe No. 3 


L. W. Clark, B.A., M.Ed 


Box 130, Alliston 


Simcoe No. 5 


P. M. Scott, B.A., B.Paed 


35 Owen St., Barrie 


Simcoe No. 6 


*F. J. Macdonald, B.A 


39 Collier St., Barrie 


Simcoe No. 7 


R. H. Macklem, B.A., B.Paed 


35 Owen St., Barrie 








Simcoe No. 11 


*J. G. Beaulieu, B.A., B.Ed 


557 Danforth Ave., Toronto 6 


Stormont No. 1 and City of Cornwall. 


A. E. Kelley, B.A., M.Ed 


Box 1237, Cornwall 


Stormont No. 2 and Glengarry No. 2 


P. H. Torrance, B.A., B.Paed 


Box 1116, Cornwall 


Toronto Metropolitan Area 


D. 1. Young, B.A., B.Paed 






R. G. Kendall, B.A., B.Paed 


\ Toronto 15 

J 


Weston) 




Victoria No. 1 and 

Peterborough No. 2 




Ontario Government Bldg., 
Oakwood Road, Lindsay 






Victoria No. 3 


D R. MacDonald, B.A. B.Paed 


Ontario Government Bldg., 
Oakwood Road, Lindsay 






Waterloo No. 1 and Wellington 
No. 3 


B. H. Bennett B.A., B.Paed 


741 King St. W., Kitchener 






Waterloo No. 2 and Wellington 
No. 4 


S. D. Oakes, B.A., B.Ed 


741 King St. W., Kitchener 


Waterloo No. 3 and Wellington 
No. 5 


C. Cornwell, B.A., M.Ed 


63 Ainslie St. N., Gait 


Welland No. 1 and City of Welland. 


J. R. M. Peat, B.A., B.Paed 


203 East Main St., Welland 








Welland No. 2 


E. G. Peterson, B.A., B.Paed 


41 Division St., Welland 








Welland No. 3 


N. R. Wightman, B.A 


39 Oakland Ave., Welland 


Welland No. 4 


See Page 3 





S-133 



TABLE 80— PUBLIC SCHOOL INSPECTORS— COUNTIES (Concluded) 






Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 


Welland No. 5 and City of 


H. W. Brown, B.A 


999 Victoria Ave., Niagara Falls 




Welland No. 7 and Lincoln No. 4.. 


E. J. D. Webster, B.A., B.Paed 


21 Cross St., Welland 






Wellington No. 1 


E. 1. Nelson, B.A., M.Ed 


Fergus 


Wentworth No. 1 


J K. Evans, B.A., B.Paed 


| 


Miss M. Taylor, B.A., M.Ed 


/Court House, Hamilton 


York No 1 . 


E. M. Dunn, B.A., B.Paed 


225 Cedar St., Newmarket 








York No. 2 


D. D. Adams, B.A 


225 Cedar St., Newmarket 






York No. 3 


M. Hallman, B.A., B.Paed 


18 Yonge St. N., Richmond Hill 




York No. 4 


W. J. McLeod, B.A., B.Paed 


18 Yonge St. N., Richmond Hill 





PUBLIC SCHOOL INSPECTORS— DISTRICTS 



Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 


Algoma No. 1 


H. G. McTaggart, B.A., B.Ed 


Court House, Sault Ste. Marie 




F. H. Wilkinson, B.A., B.Ed.. . . , 


Suite 18, Plaza Bldg., 
Elliot Lake 




Algoma No. 11 


*J. R. Potvin, B.A 


Columbia Walk, Elliot Lake 


Cochrane No. 1 


R. G. Boyce, B.A., M.Ed 


Box 130, Cochrane 


Cochrane No. 2, Algoma No. 2 
and Sudbury No. 5 


R. D. Barber, B.A., B.Ed 


84 Carlin Ave., Timmins 


Cochrane No. 11 


*A. Joubert, B.A., B.Paed 


Kapuskasing 


Cochrane No. 12 


*J. L. Duchesneau, B.A., B.Ed 


249 Algonquin Blvd. E., Timmins 


Kenora No. 1 


C. G. M. Smith, B.A., B.Paed 


Box 660, Kenora 


Kenora No. 2 


L E. Maki, B.A., B.Ed 


Dryden 


Manitoulin No. 1 and Sudbury No. 3 . 


S. Geiger, B.A 


Gore Bay 


Muskoka No. 1, Nipissing No. 3 and 
Parry Sound No. 2 


H. K. Fisher, B.A., M.Ed 


Box 249, Huntsville 




W. F. Hammell, B.A., B.Paed 


Bracebridge 




Nipissing No. 2, Parry Sound No. 1 


J. W. Truster, B.A., M.Ed 


108 Main St. E., North Bay 




Nipissing No. 11 and Sudbury No. 14. 


*C. J. Lamarche, B.A 


Sturgeon Falls 


Nipissing No. 12 


*F. A. Moreau, B.A., B.Paed 


269 Main St. W., Box 91, 
North Bay 


Parry Sound No. 3 and Muskoka 
No. 2 


B. H. Gorrill, B.A., M.Ed 


Court House, Parry Sound 




Rainy River No. 1 


P. C. Anderson, B.A., M.Ed 


Box 366, Fort Frances 


Sudbury No. 2 


G. F. Ross, B.A., B.Ed 


172 Elm St. W., Sudbury 


Sudbury No. 4, Algoma No. 4 and 
Nipissing No. 1 


A. J. MacLean, B.A., M.Ed 


172 Elm St. W. Sudbury 


Sudbury No. 13 


*J. O. Pelletier, B.A., B.Paed 


172 Elm St. W., Sudbury 


Temiskaming No. 1 and 

Cochrane No. 3 


J. F. Lawless, B.A., M.Ed 


Box 607, Kirkland Lake 



S-134 



TABLE 80— PUBLIC SCHOOL INSPECTORS— DISTRICTS (Concluded) 



Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 


Temiskaming No. 2 


M. C. Napper, B.A 


Haileybury 






R. R. Steele, B.A., M.Ed 


207 News Chronicle Bldg., 
Waters St., Port Arthur 




Thunder Bay No. 2 


J. S. Lowcock, B.A., B.Paed 


207 News Chronicle Bldg., 
Waters St., Port Arthur 




Thunder Bay No. 3 


W. J. Judd, B.A 


207 News Chronicle Bldg., 
Waters St., Port Arthur 


Thunder Bay No. 4 and 

Rainy River No. 2 


J. A. Martin, B.A., M.Ed 


207 News Chronicle Bldg., 
Waters St., Port Arthur 



ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOL INSPECTORS 



R.C.S.S. Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 
















*F. J. Macdonald, B.A 


39 Collier St., Barrie 








E. J. Neville, B.A 


244 Pinnacle St., Belleville 










L. L Begley, B.A 


189 Colborne St., Brantford 








J. D. Hogan, B.A., B.Paed 


2075 Lakeshore Rd.,Burlington 






*H. J. Payette, B.A 

*F. Y. L. Lacroix, B.A., M.Ed 


[35 East Market Square, 
/Chatham 






H. W. Cyr, M.A., B.Paed 










Cornwall Division No. 2 


R. J. Bergin, B.A 


3A Third St. W., Cornwall 




J. R. Lalonde, B.A., B.Paed 


3A Third St. W., Cornwall 










*J. R. Potvin, B.A 


Columbia Walk, Elliot Lake 








Guelph Division 


F. H. Hogle, B.A., B.Paed 


95 Norfolk St., Guelph 




L. L. Charette, B.A 


Haileybury 






Hamilton Division 


F. P. Cunningham, B.A., M.Ed 

W. M. McRae, B.A 


\Chedoke P.O., 579 Upper 
/ James St., Hamilton 


Hawkesbury Division 


*G. C. Filion, B.A., M.Ed 


Hawkesbury 








G. A. Dube, B.A., B.Ph 


Hearst 






Kapuskasing Division 


*A. Joubert, B.A., B.Paed 


Box 368, Kapuskasing 






C. P. Matthews B A B Paed . , 


1082 Princess St., Kingston 










741 King St. W., Kitchener 






London Division 


K. J. Regan, B.A 










Niagara Falls Division 


D. J. Lefebvre, B.A., B.Com 


1211 Drummond Rd., 






Niagara Falls 


North Bay Division No. 1 


*F. A. Moreau, B.A., B.Paed 


269 Main St. W., Box 91, 




North Bay 


North Bay Division No. 2 


R. M. Surtees, B.A., B.Ed 


108 Main St. E., North Bay 


Oshawa Division 


E. J. Finan, B.A 


110 Green St., Whitby 






Ottawa Division No. 1 


A. Gascon, M.A., B.Paed., Ph.D... 


1 

^258 St. Andrew St., Ottawa 




R. Millette, M.A., B.Paed., Ph.D 

P. E. Piche, B.A., B.Paed 



S-135 



TABLE 80— ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOL INSPECTORS (Concluded) 



R.C.S.S. Inspectorate 


Name of Inspector 


Address 


Ottawa Division No. 2 


F. J. McDonald, M.A., B.Paed., Ph.D 


309 Somerset St. W., Ottawa 


Ottawa Division No. 3 


F. Choquette, B.A 


1581 Bank St., Rm. 5, Ottawa 1 


Ottawa Division No. 4 


Miss D. H. M. Dunn, M.A., B.Paed 


309 Somerset St. W., Ottawa 


Ottawa Division No. 5 


L Carriere M A. D.Paed 


807 Bank St Ottawa 






Ottawa Division No. 6 


L J. Dupuis, M.A., B.Com., M.Ed 


309 Somerset St. W., Ottawa 


Peterborough Division 


B E. Nelligan, B.A 


103 Vi Royal Bk. Bldg., Peterboro 








Plantagenet 






Port Arthur Division No. 1 


J. F. Leonard, M.A 


207 News Chronicle Bldg., 
Waters St., Port Arthur 


Port Arthur Division No. 2 


J. P. Skehin, B.A 


207 News Chronicle Bldg., 
Waters St., Port Arthur 
















*H. E. Dubois, B.A 










G. D. Dwyer, B.A., B.Ed 












203 Vi North Vidal St., Sarnia 










F. R. Mills, B.A., B.Paed 


1 3 Angelina St., Sault Ste. Marie 








W. H. Bulger, B.A 


229 Delamere Ave. Stratford 








*C. J. Lamarche, B.A 


Sturgeon Falls 




Sudbury Division No. 1 


J. E. O. Tremblay, B.A 


172 Elm St. W., Sudbury 


Sudbury Division No. 2 


J. D. Bougie, B.A., B.Paed 


172 Elm St. W., Sudbury 




Sudbury Division No. 3 


*J. O. Pelletier, B.A., B.Paed 


172 Elm St. W., Sudbury 




Sudbury Division No. 4 


B. A. Hoy, B.A., B.Paed 


172 Elm St. W., Sudbury 




Timmins Division No. 1 


*J. L. Duchesneau, B.A., M.Ed 


249 Algonquin Blvd. E., Timmins 


Timmins Division No. 2 


L. S. Power, B.A 


81 Cedar St. S., Timmins 


Toronto Division No. 1 


J. C. Doyle, B.A., B.Paed 


9 Longwood Dr., Don Mills 






Toronto Division No. 2 


T. S. Melady, M.A 


42 Lynngrove Ave., Toronto 18 






Toronto Division No. 3 


Miss R. Lynch, B.A., B.Paed 


358 Quebec Ave., Toronto 9 








Toronto Division No. 4 


F. J. Hodge, B.A., B.Paed 


5592 Yonge St., Suite 37, 
Willowdale 






Toronto Division No. 5 


W. A. Hayden, M.A 


86 Lyndhurst Ave., Toronto 4 






Toronto Division No. 6 


*J. G. Beaulieu, B.A., B.Ed 


557 Danforth Ave., Toronto 6 


Toronto Division No. 7 


F. A. McDonell, B.A 


35 Cork Ave., Toronto 19 




A. Kuska, B.A 


203 East Main St., Welland 




Windsor Division No. 1 












Windsor Division No. 2 


*R. J. Desmarais, B.A., B.Paed 


707 Tuscarora St., Windsor 








Windsor Division No. 3 


J. F. Johnston, B.A., M.Ed 


707 Tuscarora St., Windsor 


Windsor Division No. 4 


F. J. Ryan, B.A 


707 Tuscarora St., Windsor 



* — This Inspector inspects both Public and Separate Schools 



Source: Elementary Education Branch. 

S-136 




S-137 







S-138 



TABLE 81— SECONDARY SCHOOL INSPECTORS 
as of December 31, 1960 



► Parliament Buildings, Toronto 



S. D. Rendall, B.A., LLD., Superintendent 

E. J. Davies, B.Sc, Assistant Superintendent 

A. L. Lakie, B.A., B.Paed., Assistant Superintendent j 

A. H. McKague, B.A., Assistant Superintendent 

A. M. Moon, B.A.Sc, P.Eng., Assistant Superintendent 

W. R. Stewart, B.A., Assistant Superintendent 

R. H. Wallace, M.A., Assistant Superintendent 



Secondary School Inspectors 

STAFF INSPECTORS— Parliament Buildings, Toronto: 

RESPONSIBILITY 

A. W. Bishop, B.A Mathematics 

A. T. Carnahan, M.A., B.Ed Geography 

Mary A. Clarke, M.A Home Economics 

Norman Davies, B.A Agriculture, Science 

Alfred Gamble, B.A.Sc Technical 

D. W. Gordon Industrial Arts 

G. P. Hillmer, B.A Commercial 

J. F. Kinlin, B.A., B.Paed Mathematics 

Henri Lemieux, B.A., B.Paed French 

F. M. Mitchell, B.Sc Technical 

Gladys R. Munnings, B.A English 

Mary I. Mustard, B.A., B.LS Libraries 

J. M. Ramsay, B.A Science 

David Steinhauer, B.A Modern Languages 

H. A. Sutton, M.A Classics 

J. F. Swayze, B.A., B.Paed Social Studies 



DISTRICT INSPECTORS INSPECTORATE ADDRESS 

A. H. Dalzell, M.A., B.Paed Algoma, Kenora, Patricia, Rainy River, 

Sudbury West, Thunder Bay Central School, Port Arthur 

T. O. W. Fowler, B.Com., B.Paed.. . Ontario, Simcoe, Victoria, Forest Hill 

Village, Weston, East York, Leaside . . 43 Castleknock Road, Toronto 12 
J. F. Guenther, B.A Haldimand, Lincoln, Welland, 

Wentworth 132 Cline Avenue, N., Hamilton 

G. E. Johnson, M.A Halton, Peel, York outside Metropolitan 

Toronto, Lakeshore, York Twp 21 Oakview Avenue, Toronto 9 

L. M. Johnston, B.A Haliburton, Hastings, Lennox and 

Addington, Northumberland and 

Durham, Peterborough, Prince Edward . 31 Southwood Crescent, Belleville 

W. T. Laing, B.A Essex, Kent, Lambton 43 Lisgar Street, Wallaceburg 

E. R. McClellan, B.S.A Brant, Norfolk, Oxford, Perth 72 Altadore Crescent, Woodstock 

J. O. Proulx, M.A., Ph.D., B.Paed.. Carleton, Stormont, Dundas, Glengarry, 

Prescott and Russell 203 Montfort St., Eastview 

D. W. Scott.. B.A Bruce, Elgin, Huron, Middlesex, 

Manitoulin 61 Wychwood Park, London 

J. R. Thomson, B.A., B.Paed Cochrane, Muskoka, Nipissing, Parry 

Sound, Sudbury, Temiskaming 915 Bloen Street, North Bay 

D. J. Wilson, M.A Dufferin, Grey, Waterloo, Wellington. . . 17 Hales Crescent, Guelph 

W. T. Ziegler, B.S.A., M.A Frontenac, Lanark, Leeds and Grenville, 

Renfrew 102 Water Street East, Brockville 

Source: Secondary Education Branch. 

S-139 



TABLE 82— SPECIAL BRANCH INSPECTORS 
as of December 31, 1960 

A SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES BRANCH 

H. R. Beattie, B.A., Superintendent 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

W. K. Clarke, B.A., Assistant Superintendent 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

Auxiliary Education Services 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

D. A. MacTavish, M.A., B.Paed., Director 

M.A. Fleck, B.A. 

F. J. Reynolds, B.A. 

(Mrs.) Amalia M. Stocker, M.A. 

R. J. Youngson, B.A., B.Ed. 

Guidance Services 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

F. J. Clute, B.A., Director 
Patricia R. Detenbeck, B.A. 

A. J. Shupe, B.A., B.Ed. 

W. C. Taylor, B A., B.Paed. 

School Attendance 

H. R. Beattie, B.A., Provincial School Attendance Officer 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

B. OTHER BRANCHES 

Art 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

C. D. Gaitskell, M.A., D.Paed., Director 

Audio-Visual Education 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

J. W. Grimmon, B.A., B.Paed., Director 
H. L. McNaught, B.A. 

Music 27 Surrey Place, Toronto 5 

B. S. McCool, M.B.E., B.A., Director 
J. Beaulieu, Mus. Bac. 

L. G. Queen, M.C., B.A., B.Ed. 
Christine C. Wilcosz, Mus. Bac. 

Physical and Health Education 559 Jarvis Street, Toronto 5 

G. A. Wright, B.S.A., Director 
Nora Chatwin 

H. Devenney, B.Sc, M.A. 
S. J. Ross, B.A. 
Ella Sexton, B.A. 
J. Young (Instructor) 

S-140 






:■.■■■■-";: m:< 






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S-141 




S-142 



TABLE 83— PUBLICATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

(Dates indicate year of printing or reprinting without revision) 

A. COURSES OF STUDY 
Grades 1 to 8 

Programmes of Studies for Grades 1 to 6 of the Public and Separate Schools, reprinted with minor 

revisions in 1955. 
Programme for Religious Education in the Public Schools, 1949. 

Curriculum I. 1, Intermediate Division (Grades 7 to 10), Outlines of Courses for Experimental Use, 1951. 
Circular I. 3, Guidance in the Intermediate Division, 1961. 

Curriculum I. 4, Reading List for the Intermediate Division (Grades 7 to 10), 1957. 
Curriculum I. 5, Physical Education, Outline of Courses for Experimental Use, (Grades 7 to 10), 1952. 
Curriculum P. 5, Physical Education, Primary Division, 1956. 
Curriculum J. 5, Physical Education, Junior Division, 1959. 

Circular 46, Courses of Study and Examinations in Schools attended by French-Speaking Pupils, 1955. 
Circular 14, Text-books Approved or Recommended for use in Elementary and Secondary Schools, 

issued annually. 



B. REVISION OF CURRICULUM 

Curriculum: 2, Promotion from Grade 8 and Admission to Grade 9, March 30, 1950, 1958. 

C. COURSES OF STUDY 
Grades 9 to 13 

Circular H.S. 1, Requirements for Certificates and Diplomas, issued annually. Outlines subjects of 
various courses leading to Intermediate Certificates Secondary School Graduation Diplomas, 
and Secondary School Honour Graduation Diplomas. 

Circular H.S. IB, List of Publications re Courses of Study, Grades 9 to 13, issued annually. Lists Circular 
Numbers and Titles of the various Courses of Study. 

Curriculum I. 1, Intermediate Division, (Grades 7 to 10), Outlines of Courses for Experimental Use, 1961. 

Courses in the various subjects of Grades 11, 12, and 13. These should be requested by subject and 
grade. 

Circular 46, Courses of Study and Examinations in Schools attended by French-Speaking Pupils, 1959. 

Circular 14, Text-books Approved or Recommended for use in Elementary and Secondary Schools, 
issued annually. 

Circular H.S. 58, Prescriptions in English and Modern Languages for Grade 13 Departmental Examina- 
tions, issued annually. 

Circular 46 (a), Prescriptions in French for French-Speaking Pupils for Grade 13 Departmental 
Examinations, issued annually. 

Circular S. 4A, Reading List for Senior Division (Grades 11 to 13), 1957. 



D. TEACHING AIDS 
Art 

Art and Crafts in the Schools of Ontario, 1949, 1959. 
Art Education in the Kindergarten, 1952, 1956. 
Art Education for Slow Learners, 1953, 1955. 
Art Education during Adolescence, 1954, 1958. 
Children and Their Pictures, 1954, 1959. 



Library 

Teachers' Library Catalogue. 



S-143 



Music 

Circular Mus. 3, School Music Festivals, 1946. 

Circular Mus. 5, Memorandum relating to the Teaching of Music in Elementary and Secondary 

Schools, 1955. 
Circular Mus. 6, Careers in School Music, 1957. 
Circular Mus. 8, Song Books for School, 1958. 
Music Appreciation Through Listening, for Elementary Schools, 1950, 1953. 



Radio 

School Radio Broadcasts, issued annually. 



Religious Exercises, Religious Education and Religious Instructions 
List of Bible Readings for Schools, 1944, 1949, 1958. 
Programme for Religious Education in Public Schools, 1949. 



ADDITIONAL PAMPHLETS 

Visual Education Catalogue and Supplements. 

Teaching in the Elementary Schools of Ontario, issued annually. 

Calendar of the Teachers' College, issued annually. 

Calendar of the University of Ottawa Teachers' College, 1958. 

Calendar of the Primary School Specialist Certificate Course, 1958 



F. SCHOOL ACTS AND AMENDMENTS 

The Department of Education Act, 1954. 

The Public Schools Act. 

The Schools Administration Act, 1954. 

The Secondary Schools and Boards of Education Act, 1954 

The Separate Schools Act. 

The Ontario School Trustees' Council Act, 1953. 

The Teachers' Superannuation Act. 

The Teaching Profession Act. 

The Trade Schools Regulation Act. 

The Public Libraries Act. 



G REGULATIONS 

Elementary Schools. 

Secondary Schools. 

Elementary-School Inspectors' Certificates. 

Supervisory Officers. 

Municipal Recreation Directors' Certificates. 

Scholarships for Study Outside Ontario. 

School Attendance. 

General Legislative Grants. 

Grants for Non-Profit Camps. 

Auxiliary Education Services. 

Assistance in the Cost of Educating Retarded Children. 

Programmes of Recreation. 

Public Libraries. 

Source: Registrar's Branch. 

S-144 



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S-149 



TABLE 88— FINANCIAL STATISTICS 
The Metropolitan School Board for the Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto 



(CALENDAR YEAR 1959) 



REVENUE 

1. Grants from Provincial Government 

2. Levy from the Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto 

3. Share of Supplementary Taxes levied by area municipalities in 1959. 

4. Share of 1959 trailer camp licence fees 

5. Surplus from 1958 



6. Total. 



Public 
Schools 



15,755,195 
25,839,309 

682,713 
772 

732,830 



43,010,818 



Secondary 
Schools 



7,542,053 

13,198,843 

346,920 

371 

924,786 



22,012973 



Total 



23,297,248 
39,038,152 

1,029,633 
1,143 

1,657,616 



65,023,791 



EXPENDITURE 

1 . Maintenance Assistance Payments (1) 

2. Cost of Auxiliary Classes in excess of Maintenance Assistance Payments. 

3. Share of School Construction Costs provided by Current Funds 

4. Portion of 1959 Non-Resident Fees 

5. Cost of moving portable schools 

6. Administration 



7. Debenture Debt Charges: 

On debentures issued by Metropolitan Toronto . . , 
On debentures assumed by Metropolitan Toronto , 



8. Share of Tax Deficiencies incurred by area municipalises in 1958 

9. Total Expenditures 



30,454,660 

2,376,729 

1,666,237 

76,476 

6,144 
149,404 



3,801,088 
2,731,711 



206,405 



15,567,669 

290,225 

1,767,729 

108,398 

24,091 



797,283 
1,462,972 



41,468,854 



20,120,843 



46,022,329 

2,666,954 

3,433,966 

1 84,874 

6,144 

173,495 



4,598,371 
4,194,683 



308,880 



61,589,697 



10. Surplus for the year 1959. 



1,541,964 



3,434,094 



1 1. Total 43,010,818 



22,012,973 65,023,791 



(1) Included in Item. 5, "Local Tax Levy" in Tables 84, 85 and 87. 

NOTE? As a resull of rounding, the component items may not add to the totals shown. 

Source: The Metropolitan School Board for the Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto. 



S-150 



TABLE 89— COST OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 





Calendar Year 


EXPENDITURE 


1946 

$ 


1950 

$ 


1954 

$ 


1957 

$ 


1958 

$ 


1959 

$ 




28,562,078 

40,420,676 

711,865 

3,638,151 

1,597,071 


46,590,115 

67,057,534 
1,243,238 
5,474,510 

3,283,317 


78,230,414 

111,424,131 

2,924,523 

14,641,207 

5,443,512 


114,783,874 

161,296,870 

4,280,677 

19,081,443 

7,254,140 


130,003,588 

182,143,660 

4,755,757 

22,552,600 

9,245,969 


159,695,732 


2. Total Current Operations 

lincl. 1) 

3. Transportation 


208,055,202 

5,678,480 

26,392,416 


5. Capital Outlays from 


13,160,320 






Total, Items 2-5 


46,367,763 


77,058,599 


134,433,373 


191,913,130 


218,697,986 


253,286,418 


Average Daily Attendance. . . 


486,977 


554,439 


716,284 


857,867 


903,916 


944,419 


Cost Per Pupil of A.D.A 


95.22 


138.98 


1 87.68 


223.71 


241.95 


268.19 



COST OF SECONDARY EDUCATION 









Calend 


□ r Year 






EXPENDITURE 


1946 

$ 


1950 

$ 


1954 

$ - 


1957 

$ 


1958 

$ 


1959 

$ 


1 . Instruction 

2. Total Current Operations 

(incl. 1) 

3. Transportation 

4. Capital Charges 

5. Capital Outlays from 


12,807,061 

18,597,582 

169,308 

2,682,565 

568,527 


17,999,625 

27,377,625 
2,538,348 
4,004,520 

1,074,055 


31,046,133 

44,441,121 
3,634,069 
6,668,687 

2,485,045 


48,759,170 

68,905,039 
4,870,869 
8,842,946 

3,433,650 


57,998,789 

81,476,108 

5,421,402 

11,033,396 

3,523,353 


73,473,969 

96,052,030 

5,945,516 

12,742,736 

6,290,089 






Total, Items 2 5 


22,017,982 


34,994,548 


57,228,922 


86,052,504 


101,454,259 


121,030,371 


Average Daily Attendance. . . 


106,657 


115,284 


141,230 


182,337 


193,534 


208,667 


Cost Per Pupil of A.D.A 


206.44 


303.55 


405.22 


471.94 


524.22 


580.02 



Source: Annual Reports of the Minister of Education for 1946, 1950 and 1954. 
Annual Financial Reports of Ontario School Boards for 1957-59. 



S-151 




S-152 




S-154 



INDEX 



A Page 

Administrative Units 1, S-3, S-16, S-42, S-55 

Admissions S-29, S-39, S-53, S-65 

Age-Grade: 

All Schools S-7 

Blind, School for S- 1 2 1 

Deaf, School for S-1 20 

French-Speaking S-34-36 

Agriculture, Report on 9 

Certificates S- 1 06 

Enrolment in 9 

Enrolment in Summer Course S- 1 7 

Practical Work in 9 

Secondary Schools giving S- 1 05 

26 

9 

10 

-17 

9 

8 

8 

S-3 

8 

S-3 



Appointments 

Art, Report on 

Publications 

Summer Courses S 

Supervision and Training 

Attendance, Report on School 

Compulsory Attendance 

Average Daily Attendance 

Percentage Attendance 

Elementary 

Employment Certificates 8, S- 1 8 

Home Permits 8, S- 1 8 

Officers' Reports S- 1 8 

Secondary S-3 

Audio-Visual Education. Report on 10 

Film Service 10 

School Broadcasts 10 

Summer Courses 1 0, S- 1 7 

Auxiliary Education Services, Report on 10 

Certificates 11 

Classes — Types S-33 

Retarded Children S-33 

Services 10, S-33 

Statistics S-33 

Summer Courses S-1 7 

Teacher Training 11 

Trainable Retarded Children 11 



Blind, School for, Report on 15 

Age-Grade S- 1 2 1 

Enrolment 1 5, S- 1 2 1 

New Buildings 16 

Ophthalmologist's Report S- 1 2 1 

Programme 15 

Boards, Number of School. . .S-3, S-16, S-42, S-55 

Financial Statistics S-1 46- 1 5 1 

Broadcasts, School 10 

Building Programme 1,6, S-2 1 

Bursaries 3, S- 1 02 



Central Schools 1 

Certificates: 

In Secondary Schools S-97 

In French-Speaking Schools 8 

Teachers' Professional S-1 4 

Classrooms S-3, S-30, S-31, S-42-8 

S-55-9, S-93 

Collegiate Institutes (See High Schools) 

Commercial Subjects, Summer Courses S-1 7 



Page 

Community Programmes, Report on 11 

Annual Grants 12 

Advisory Services 11 

Citizenship Education 12 

Leadership Training 12 

Professional Training 11 

Services 11 

Statistics S-1 25-6 

Conspectus of Education S-3 

Continuation Schools S-73 

Agriculture in S-1 05 

Correspondence Courses 8, 1 2, S- 1 1 9 

Courses of Study 12 

Enrolment 13, S-1 19 

Cost of Education S- 1 5 1 

Curriculum 6 



D 

Deaf, School for, Report on 16 

Age-Grade S-1 20 

Enrolment 1 6, S- 1 20 

Improvements 16 

Programme 16 

Departmental Examinations S-97 

Departmental Summer Courses S-1 7 

Departmental Publications S- 1 43 

Destination of Ex-Pupils S-23 

Dominion-Provincial Student-Aid Bursaries.. S-1 02 

Dorset Workshop for Conservation S-1 7 



E 

Education — Summer Courses S- 1 7 

Elementary Education, Report on 1 

Elementary School Inspection S-1 27 

Employment Certificates S-1 8 

Enrolment: 

All Schools S-3, S-25 

Blind, School for the S- 1 2 1 

Deaf, School for the S- 1 20 

Elementary S-29 

Evening Classes S-93 

French-Speaking S-50, S-6 1 

Increase in S-8 

Protestant Separate S-50 

Public S-39 

Related to Population S-6 

Secondary S-65 

Special Industrial S-8, S-73 

Separate S-53 

Summer Courses S- 1 7 

Teacher-Training Schools S-1 1 

Examinations and Scholarships 13 

Certificates and Diplomas S-97 

Departmental Examinations 13, S-97 

Student-Aid S- 1 02 

Transportation Assistance 1 4, S- 1 02 

Scholarships for Study Outside 

Ontario 14 

Teacher Exchange 14 

Exemptions from Attendance S- 1 8 

Expenditures of School Boards S- 1 46 



F Page 

Films and Filmstrips 10 

Financial Statistics S-l 46-1 51 

French-Speaking Pupils, Reports on 8 

Statistics S-50, S-61, S-96 

G 

Graduation Diplomas S-97 

Grants, Legislative S-5, S- 1 46-5 1 

Guidance Services, Report on 14 

Services 14 

Summer Courses S- 1 7 

Training 14 

H 

Hamilton Institute of Technology 3 

Health (see Physical and Health Education) 
High Schools (Including Collegiate Institutes) 

Boards S-3, S-l 6 

Building Programme 2, S-2 1 

Enrolment 2, S-3, S-65-95 

Evening Classes S-93 

Grants S-5, S-l 49 

Number of S-3, S-94 

Pupil Retirement S-23-24, S- 1 04 

Salaries of Teachers S-95 

Home Permits S- 1 8 

I 

Immigration of pupils under age 18 S-9-1 

Industrial Arts, Summer Courses S-l 7 

Inspectors: 

Active S-l 27 

Appointments 26 

In Memoriam 18 

Internship Plan 1 

Promotions 25 

Resignations < 23 

Retirements 19 

Superannuations 23 

Transfers 24 

Intermediate Certificate S-98 



Kindergartens; 
Enrolment. . 



S-32 



L 

Lakehead College of Arts, Science 

and Technology 4 

Lakehead Teachers' College 5 

Larger Units of Administration 1 

Letters of Permission S-l 6 

Letters of Standing 5 

Libraries, Public, Report on 17 

Statistics S-l 14 

M 

Metropolitan Toronto S-25 

Mining, Provincial Institute of 3 

Music, Report on 15 

Instruction 15 

Option 15 

Radio 15 

Statistics S- 1 22 

Schools providing S-l 22 



Page 

Summer Courses S- 1 7 

Teacher-Training 15 

N 
New Building Construction S-2 1 

O 

Occupation of Ex-pupils S-23 

Ontario College of Education: 

Certificates and Enrolment S- 1 1 , S- 1 2 

Ontario School for the Blind 1 5, S- 1 2 1 

Ontario School for the Deaf 1 6, S- 1 20 

Options taken for Graduation Diploma S-99 

P 

Permanent Certificates S- 1 6 

Physical and Health Education, Report 17 

Camp Programme 17 

Camp Leadership Centre 17 

Grants 17 

School Programme 17 

Services 17 

Summer Courses 1 7, S- 1 7 

Population and School Enrolment S-6 

Primary Methods S- 1 7 

Principals of Elementary Schools 2 

Professional Certificates issued S- 1 4 

Professional Development 7 

Professional Training, Report on 4 

Certificates issued S- 1 4 

Enrolment S-l 1, S-l 2 

Recruitment 4 

Protestant Separate Schools S-50 

Provincial Grants to 

School Boards S-5, S-146-51 

Increase in S-5 

Provincial Library Service 17 

Provincial Student-Aid 3, S-l 02 

Provincial Technical Institutes 3, S-l 06 

Provincial Institute of Trades 4, S-l 06 

Publications S-l 43 

Public Libraries, Report on 17 

Development 18 

Expenditures S-l 1 4 

Grants 17, S-l 14 

Librarianship 18 

Services 17 

Statistics S- 1 1 4 

Public Schools: 

Attendance S-3 

Boards S-3, S-16, S-147 

Enrolment S-3, S-39-43 

Grants S-5, S-147 

Inspectors S- 1 27 

Kindergartens S-32 

Number of S-3 

Salaries of Teachers S-49 

Teachers S-3 

Transportation S-20 

R 

Railway School Cars S-42 

Recreation Development 12 

Refresher Summer Courses S-l 7 

Retirements: 

Inspectors 19 

Pupils S-23-24 



Page 

Revenue of School Boards S- 1 46-5 1 

Revision of Curriculum 6 

Roman Catholic Separate Schools: 

Attendance S-3 

Boards, Financial Statistics S- 1 48 

Enrolment S-3, S-53-56 

Grants S-5, S-l 48 

Inspectors S- 1 35 

Salaries S-60 

Schools, Number of S-3 

Teachers S-3, S-603 

Union Boards S-55 

Ryerson Institute of Technology 3 



S 

Salaries of Teachers: 

Frequency Distributions S-49, S-60, S-95 

Scholarships 3, S- 1 02 

School Acts S- 1 43 

School Broadcasts 10 

Schools: 

Blind, for the S-l 2 1 

Deaf, for the S- 1 20 

French-Speaking 8, S-50, S-61, S-96 

New Construction of S-2 1 

Number of S-3 

Protestant Separate S-50 

Public S-39 

R.C. Separate S-53 

Secondary S-65 

Special Industrial S-73 

Teacher-Training S- 1 1 , S- 1 2 

Technical Institutes S-l 06 

Secondary Education, Report on 

Inspectors S- 1 39 

Graduation Diploma S-97 

Secondary Schools (see High Schools) 

Separate School Union Boards S-55 

Service Record 19 

In Memoriam 18 

Appointments 26 

Promotions 25 

Retirements 1 9, 23 

Transfers 24 

Student-Aid 3, S-l 02 

Summer Courses S- 1 7 



T Page 

Teacher Education 4 

Teachers: 

Certificates S-l 4 

French-Speaking 8 

Internship Plan 1 

Lost to the Provincial System S-l 8, S-l 9 

Number S-3 

Salaries S-49, S-60, S-95 

Teachers' College Enrolment S-l 1, S-l 2 

Teachers' Supply 4 

Teachers' Library Catalgue S-l 43 

Teaching Aids S- 1 43 

Teaching Areas S-3 

Technical Institutes 3, S- 1 06 

Testing Programme in Grade 12 3 

Text-Books 7 

Toronto Teachers' College S- 1 2, S- 1 3 

Township School Areas S-l 6 

Trades, Provincial Institute of S-l 06 

Trade Schools — List of S-l 07 

Report on 3 

Training Colleges for Teachers S- 1 1 , S- 1 2 

Transfers, Pupils S-39, S-53, S-65 

Transportation of Pupils 1,2, S-20 

Transportation Assistance S-l 02 

U 
Union Separate Boards S-55 



V 

Visual Aids, Report on 10 

School Broadcasts 10 

Film Service 10 

Vocational Schools: 

Attendance S-3 

Enrolment S-3, S-73 

Grants S-5 

Teachers S-3 



W 

Western Ontario Institute of 
Technology