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Full text of "Report of the Minister of Lands and Forests of the Province of Ontario, 1923-26"

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Belongs To INFORMATION & EDUCATION Rm. 24S1 

REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Lands and Forests 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

For the Year Ending 31st October 

1923 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO 
Printed and Published by ClarksonW. James, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1924 



Mtcd Press 



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CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Minister's Preface 5 

Appendices: 

No. 1. Department Inside Officers and Clerks 18 

2. Department Outside Agents and Inspectors 21 

3. Statement of Lands Sold and Leased with Collections 23 

4. Gross Revenue 24 

5. Receipts (Special Funds) 25 

6. Gross Disbursements (exclusive of Northern Development under Appendix 40). 26 

7. Timber Cut and Amounts Accruing re Dues, etc 32 

8. Revenue from Woods and Forests 34 

9. Successful Candidates at Cullers' Examinations 35 

10. Statement of Patents, etc., issued 36 

11. Statement of Work in Military Office (Lands Branch) 36 

12. Statement of Letters, Reports, Documents Received and Dispatched 37 

13. Locations, etc., under Free Grant Section of Public Lands Act 38 

14. Lands Sold 46 

15. Report of Director of Surveys on Crown Surveys 51 

16. Statement of Municipal Surveys Confirmed 53 

17. Statement of Municipal Surveys Ordered 54 

18. Statement of Crown Surveys in Progress 55 

19. Statement of Crown Surveys Completed ' 56 

20. Surveyor's Report, Township 9 Z., District of Sudbury 58 

21. " " Mississauga River (Portion of) 59 

22. " " Shore Line and Islands, Lake of Woods, District of Kenora. 60 

23. " " Lakes and Rivers, District of Timiskaming 62 

24. " " Traverse Part of English River, District of Patricia 63 

25. " " Traverse Wabigoon Lake and other waters, District of 

Kenora 69 

26. " " Meridian and Base Line, District of Thunder Bay 71 

27. " " Meridian and Base Lines, District of Thunder Bay 74 

28. " " Township Outlines, District of Cochrane 76 

29. " " Township Outlines, District of Sudbury 80 

30. " " Township of Mongowin, District of Sudbury 81 

31. " " Traverse of Shore Line, Lakes Minnietakie and Big Sandy, 

District of Kenora 82 

32. " " Readjustment Survey in Township of Blount, District of 

Timiskaming 85 

a. " " Traverse of Moose River, District of Cochrane 87 

34. " " Timber Limit Lines, Timagami Forest Reserve 96 

35. Algonquin Provincial Park, Superintendent's Report 97 

36. Quetico Provincial Park, Superintendent's Report 99 

37. Rondeau Provincial Park, Superintendent's Report 101 

38. Colonization Roads, Superintendent's Report 103 

39. Highways and Bridges, under Northern Development Branch 125 

40. Northern Development Branch, Statement 152 

41. Settlers' Loans, Commissioner's Report 159 

42. Forestry Branch Report — (1) Forest Fire Protection 161 

(2) Forest Investigation 178 

(3) Reforestation 182 

(4) Forest Pathology 197 

43. Timber Areas Disposed of during past year 208 

44. Spanish River Pulp and Paper Company, Agreement 219 

45. Abitibi Power and Paper Company, Agreement 224 

46. Continental Wood Products Co 228 



[3] 



Report of the Minister of Lands and Forests 
of the Province of Ontario 



For the Year Ending 31st October, 1923. 



To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

In accordance with the provisions of the PubHc Lands Act I have the honour 
to submit for the information of Your Honour and the Legislative Assembly 
a report for the fiscal year ending the 31st day of October, 1923, covering the 
operations of the various services under the jurisdiction of the Department of 
Lands and Forests. 

The services are so different and the operations under them so diversified 
that my preface must of necessity be rather general, the treatment of each 
being more exhaustively dealt with under its special appendix. 

Lands. 

During the past year the interest of the prospective settler has been mani- 
fested by the large number of inquiries made from different sources and requests 
for information relative to the attractive features of homestead land in the arable 
sections of the Crown domain. In actual land transactions in the way of entries 
for free grant locations there has been a slight decrease compared with last 
year, but in sales of lots for settlement purposes the yearly average has been 
maintained. 

Ever-increasing interest is taken in the Great Clay Belt where the oppor- 
tunities of hewing out and making permanent real homes are presented. The 
alluring features of this great tableland, with its ready supply of pulpwood to tide 
over the settler in his pioneer years, and its richness of soil, have considerably 
encouraged active settlement. A recent official tour of Northern Ontario revealed 
the extensive areas cleared and brought under cultivation within recent years 
and the vigorous efforts of individual settlers, who are generously treated by 
the building of roads, seed-grain supplies and advances, in the way of Govern- 
ment loans on easy terms. The general demand of the newer sections is more 
roads and when reasonable assurances are granted that such will be forthcoming 
the settlers' hopes are continued and their efforts furthered in the way of form- 
ulating plansfor encouraging friends to settle near by and thus develop community 
life. 

Sales of lots in Government Town Plots showed a substantial increase over 
the preceding year, a noticeable example being at Kapuskasing on the Trans- 
continental Railway, where a thriving centre is now firmly established as was 
predicted in 1917. A large up-to-date pulpmill is being operated by the Spruce 
Falls Company. The land contiguous to the town is practically all occupied by 
actual settlers, much of it being well cleared and extensively utilized, one settler 
practically within the town limits having, in addition to his substantial clearing, 

[51 



REPORT OF THE No. 3 



a large number of cattle, an important dairy industry and, above all, unbounded 
confidence in the agricultural future of the section. This successful settler is 
one of its original soldier settlers of the Farm Colony, whose faith in the North's 
potentiality and persistence in the trying years have been amply rewarded. 

A contemplated paper mill and a further development of the pulp industry 
at this point assure a larger community and a local market for the settlers' 
products. This situation is but typical of other points in the Great North. 

While the appalling fire of October, 1922, that ravaged an extensive area 
in the fine farming section of the Southern Clay Belt traversed by the Temis- 
kaming and Northern Ontario Railway, resulted in severe losses, the sufferers, 
through well directed Government and other organized effort, are rapidly 
recovering. The fire-swept centres are fast rising from the ruins of but a year 
ago and the substantial building programme already carried out with the projects 
under way indicates clearly the indomitable energy of the people and their 
unending faith in Greater Ontario. 

Clergy. 

Under this heading the sum of but $134 was received on old sales. This 
source of revenue has been practically exhausted as nearly all old sales have 
been cleared up. 

Common School. 

The sum of $1,418.89 was realized from this source, but this was all on 
account of the payment of long-standing arrears. 

Grammar School. 

An occasional sale made in years gone by is consummated by the occupant 
of land paying up and acquiring patent. An amount of $196 was collected in 
this class. 

University. 

Lands set apart for the support of the University were sold to the extent 
of 3,163 acres, for $1,806.89. 

Crown. 

Agricultural and Townsites revenue amounted to $107,900.26 while lands 
leased for various purposes brought a return of $87,632.01. The total area 
sold and leased comprised 154,018.94 acres. 

Free Grants. 

No additional free grant land has been opened recently, consequently the 
suitable areas are becoming considerably less each year. In the area of land 
located during the year a decrease is shown, a total number of 718 persons 
selecting land as compared with 1,013 last year. During the same period, how- 
ever, 113 parties purchased a total area of 5,757 acres adjacent to their home- 
steads. A total area of 90,143 acres was located to new applicants and 54,349}/^ 
acres were patented to 411 settlers who completed their clearing and cultivation 
during the past 12 months. 

For various reasons it is expedient in some cases for settlers to exchange 
lots or assign to other settlers and make new and more suitable selections. 
To enable more satisfactory settlement in this respect, 225 settlers assigned 
their holdings covering 28,080 acres. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 7 

Purchased Lands. 

There has been a very marked increase in the area sold during the year, 
from 121,817 acres last year to 138,130 acres. The number of settlers in sale 
territory continued to increase last year, reaching 978, while the previous year 
894 settlers purchased land. 

As a result of continued and systematic inspections the speculator is being' 
eliminated, and the settler encouraged in completing settlement. It was necessary 
to cancel only 355 sales during the year, which is about one-third the number 
cancelled in 1922. Compared also with the previous year, when 140,775 acres 
were cancelled, it was necessary to cancel only 52,273 acres, while the increase 
in patents is 143, the total number being 471. This improved condition of 
affairs not only affects local conditions but very materially assists municipal 
organizations and community life generally. 

Ranching Lands. 

The ranching industry is somewhat on the increase. Last season was 
exceptionally dry with the result that sufficient winter fodder in some instances 
was not produced. More careful selections of grazing areas are being made of 
land which is naturally well watered. The sheep-raising industry is being 
continued, a very substantial herd being now ranched north of Cochrane on the 
T. & N. O. Ry. extension. 

Fur-farming is also on the increase and considerable marsh areas are being 
acquired, particularly for the protection and propagation of muskrats. The 
areas leased are as follows: 

Ranching 3,570 acres. 

Fur farming 26,104 acres. 

Military Grants. 

Under Act 1 Edward VII, Cap. 6, and amendments thereto, there have 
been issued 13,998 Military Certificates. 

As a result of legislation last year, limiting the time in which to locate to 
the 30th April, 1923, a larger percentage of the outstanding certificates have 
been located or surrendered to the Crown. 

There were 21 certificates surrendered to the Crown for the $50 commuta- 
tion money. The small number thus surrendered is accounted for by the fact 
that the land is worth more than the cash value of the certificate. 

During the year 273 certificates have been located on 41,823 acres, making 
a total of 8,686 certificates actually located on land. 

There were 480 acres purchased by three certificates being applied in pay- 
ment thereof, making a total of 806 certificates which have been thus applied 
on land. 

Of the locations already made under certificates 220 were covered by patents 
issued during the year, making a total of 7,750 which have been thus disposed 
of by the Department. 

A large area, 15,752 acres, which had been located to 100 veterans who 
neglected to perform settlement duties within the time required by the Act, 
was cancelled and the land redeemed by the Crown. 

The total number of certificates that have therefore been disposed of is 
12,802, leaving 1,196 that are still outstanding. 



REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Accruals and Collections. 

The total accruals for the year's timber and pulpwood operations totalled 
$3,708,410.23, although the entire revenue of the Department amounted to 
only $2,693,421.14, or about one and three-quarter million dollars less than the 
preceding year, this being partly due, it is believed, to the inability of certain 
lumber firms to liquidate their assets covering the season's cut until it was too 
late to remit before the end of the fiscal year and also to the closing of the 
collecting year on time and not extending it into the following month as was 
the practice within recent years. 

It must also be borne in mind that included in the 1922 revenue was over 
$420,000 paid in by Shevlin-Clarke Co. in settlement of the legal action the 
then Government had taken against the Company. 

The sale of Agricultural Lands and Townsites with Crown Leases, including 
Provincial Parks, etc., amounted to s^209,535.85; Casual Fees $1,858.41; Refund 
Items s$96,595.44. From the Woods and Forests the Revenue was $2,385,431.44, 
made up of the following items: Bonus $931,013.87; Timber Dues $1,152,068.90; 
Ground Rent $97,545.08; Transfer Fees $7,915.15; Fire Protection $196,888.44. 
(See Appendix No. 4, page 24.) 

It should be pointed out that timber dues outstanding at the end of the 
year amounted to s$2,561,405.88, in addition to $154,804.85 for ground rent and 
fire charges, and as the bush operations for the ensuing season are expected to 
be equally as large as during the last it is confidently predicted that the revenue 
column will be considerably enlarged next year. While the uncollected revenue 
from timber operations may be regarded as high it must be remembered that 
the Crown holds as collateral at the end of the year, in the form of cash deposits 
alone, some $1,979,121.20, without regard to additional protection in the form 
of personal and Guarantee Company bonds. 

Disbursements. 

The total expenditure, less Civil Government, of the Department for all 
services (exclusive of those rendered under the Northern and North-Western 
Ontario Development Acts, for which see Appendices Nos. 40 and 41), 
was $3,621,233.95. Some of the more important items were: Crown Lands 
Agents' Salaries and Disbursements $23,437. 99; Homestead Inspectors $2 7, 032. 24; 
Crown Timber Agents $42,873.05; Fire Ranging $1,067,202.22; Forest Ranging 
and Measurement of Timber $487,046.91; Reforestation $214,547.12; Algonquin 
Provincial Park $46,747.67; Quetico Provincial Park $10,870.55; Rondeau 
Provincial Park $14,377.72; Surveys $168,277.80; Colonization Roads $827,855.98 
Commissions re Sundry Investigations $28,518.90; Litigation of Constitutional 
and Other Questions $18,047.93; Special Warrants $424,387.02; Clearing Town- 
sites and Removing Fire Hazards $99,896.73. (Additional details are found in 
Appendix No. 6.) 

The entire expenditure for the year ending 31st October, 1922, as set out 
in the Public Accounts for that year, was $4,649,622.28 for all services operated 
and controlled by the Department of Lands and Forests, while the Expenditure 
for the year just closed on 31st October, 1923, is slightly over seven million 
dollars, or a total increase in round figures of $2,405,000. 

This increase is made up as follows, round figures being used in each case: 

Outside Service and Surveys $ 715,000 

Colonization Roads 156,000 

Northern Development Branch Statutory Expenditures 1,188,000 

Special Warrants 346,000 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 9 

$715,000 — Outside Service and Surveys. 

Over 50 per cent, of this increase is due to an extension to the Fire-ranging 
Vote. During the past year the timbered areas of the Province were visited 
by unprecedented fires and the entire outside fire organization had to be largely 
augmented and special provision made to meet emergent conditions and 
unexpected demands were thereby made upon the Crown. 

Forest-ranging: Over 25 per cent, of the increase is due to the additional 
expenses involved in paying the scalers, all of whom are now appointed and 
supervised by and under the direct control of the Government represented by 
the Department. But while this increase is shown the fact remains that a 
large percentage — over half; — of this money ultimately comes back as revenue 
to the Crown, because under the system obtaining the timber operators in 
some instances return the full 100 per cent, and in others 50 per cent., according 
to contract, of the scalers' expenses to the Crown. 

Clearing townsites of fire hazards accounts for $90,000. Surveys of town- 
ships, the running of meridian lines, etc., required $13,000 beyond last year. 

Reforestation cost over $60,000 beyond the previous year, this being due 
to the adding of two new forest stations and properly equipping them, and 
also enlarging by several millions the nursery stock of the forest station at 
Norfolk. 

%\S6,QQ0— Colonization Roads. 

Increased requests for direct and by-law grants for colonization roads 
to provide for the township needs required over $150,000 in excess of the year 
1922. 

$1,188,000 — Northern Development Branch. 

This by far is the biggest increase in the expenditure under the jurisdiction 
of the Department of Lands and Forests it being provided for by Statutory 
enactment, the Government enactment being the Northern and Northwestern 
Development Act. This additional amount was devoted to the building of new 
trunk and lateral roads, making permanent improvements to old ones — the 
putting in of culverts, and the general supervision of roads in the north country; 
persistent and insistent demands emanating from the newer sections were em- 
phasized by reference to the extensive expenditures on the public highways in 
old Ontario and to the claims that older Ontario was being more favoured than 
the newer part; the encouragement of settlement, the promotion of industry 
and the general desire to link up the various settled portions in the North with 
connecting roads, prompted, no doubt, the added expenditure in the road items. 
In addition to the increased expenditure on roads generous relief was granted 
to the settlers in the way of supplying seed and furnishing necessaries subsequent . 
to the great fire in the fall of 1922. This catastrophe increased the expenditure 
under the heading of assistance to settlers, which is included in the Northern 
Development expenditure, by over $275,000. Farm implements have been 
purchased and supplied to the fire sufferers on standing collateral. 

$346,000— 5pma/ Warrants. 

The increase in Special Warrants of over $300,000 is more than accounted 
for by a Special Warrant of $400,000 having been passed as the result of a 
surrender from and a treaty with the Mississauga and Chippewa Indians covering 
some 21,000 square miles in the northern part of old Ontario, to which area 
the Indians claimed title, no surrender ever having been made to the Crown. 
Under a special agreement made in May, 1923, between the Provincial and 



10 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Dominion Governments a Commission was appointed and empowered to get 
surrenders and execute Treaties, which has been done on the basis of a com- 
pensation of $500,000, of which $100,000 is yet to be paid. 

Bush Operations. 

Logging: Evidences of an improved tone in the lumber market, following 
the somewhat pessimistic outlook in 1921 and part of 1922, and of an assurance 
that dealers contemplate a continued demand for building material are reflected 
in the bush operations during the past season. 

The output of pine, the basic log timber from Crown Lands for sawlogs, 
boom and dimension timber, approximated 325,000,000 feet B.M., or over 
75,000,000 feet B.M. more than the previous year, while sawlog timber, other 
than pine, was cut to the extent of 50,000,000 feet B.M., possibly 13 per cent, 
less than the preceding season. A considerable increase is recorded in the cut 
for piling purposes. 

Pulpwood to the extent of over 400,000 cords was cut from Crown Lands 
during the last fiscal year as against less than 300,000 cords for 1922. In addition 
over 200,000 cords were cut free of dues, this coming from settlers' lands. 

Pulpwood Industry. 

New mills opened at Kenora, where the Backus Company have an installed 
daily capacity of eighty tons, and at Kapuskasing, where the Spruce Falls Com- 
pany are producing seventy-five tons pulp daily. At Kenora a paper mill is 
being built to be operated in connection with the pulp mill, while at Kapuskasing 
the Company is contemplating the erection of a paper mill. 

Operations are under way at Fort William towards the erection of pulp 
and paper mills by the Great Lakes Company, while extensions have been 
made on the plant at Nepigon formerly held by the Nepigon Fibre Company 
but now controlled by Guaranty Investment Corporation, Limited, who will 
reopen the mill on a sixty-ton daily capacity basis. 

The completion of the new mills at Fort William and Nepigon and the 
determined efforts of the Fort William Pulp and Paper Company, the Thunder 
Bay Company and Provincial Paper Mills at Port Arthur, to continue operations 
to their limit, assure a permanency to the pulpwood industry at the head of the 
Great Lakes and makes certain a ready market in the near future for the full 
development of the great hydro power at Cameron Falls on the Nepigon River. 

A new and important pulpwood industry is being projected by the Con- 
tinental Wood Products, Limited, at Elsas, on the Canadian National Railway, 
some two hundred miles west of Sudbury, where the Company are obliged to 
erect a kraft-mill, which will consume, not only spruce and balsam but much 
of the poplar, tamarac, jackpine, etc., hitherto unmarketable. A large sawmill 
is now in operation and the pulp plant will probably be completed by the end 
of the year 1924, as the site has been selected and plans put under way for the 
starting of construction in the spring of 1924. 

The establishing of this industry is in pursuance of an agreement made 
between the Crown and the Company on the 10th July, 1923, as the result of 
the purchase by the Company under public competition of an area of 1,049 
square miles, situated in the watershed of the Trout and Chapleau Rivers in 
the Districts of Sudbury and Algoma. A 75 ton kraft pulp mill employing an 
average of 100 persons for 10 months of each year, and costing at least one and 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS n 

one-half million dollars, must be in operation before June 1st, 1925, and a paper 
mill of at least 35 tons capacity when the Crown directs. (For Agreement see 
Appendix No. 46, page 228.) 

To enable the Spanish River Pulp and Paper Mills, Ltd., now operating 
three large mills at Sault Ste. Marie, Espanola and Sturgeon Falls, to have addi- 
tional raw material to supply their existing concerns or extensions thereof or 
additions thereto, a special agreement was made with the Company under the 
Crown Timber Act whereby an area approximating 3,000 square miles in the 
Districts of Algoma and Sudbury was granted. The agreement was made 
15th May, 1923, and certain prices fixed by Order-in-Council, 13th September, 
1923, such prices, however, to obtain for two years only. (See Appendix 44, 
page 219.) 

Under date of the 12th July, 1923, an agreement was made between the 
Crown and the Abitibi Power and Paper Company for an area of 2,500 square 
miles more or less in the District of Cochrane. This Company owns and operates 
at Iroquois Falls, on the Abitibi River, a large pulp and paper mill of a daily 
output of 400 tons newsprint, and consistent with a desire to ensure continuous 
operation and the employment of a large number of workmen, the Crown granted 
this additional area, the agreement to be approved and prices fixed by Lieuten- 
ant-Governor in Council. (For copy of said agreement see Appendix 45, page 224.) 

For a complete list of timber sales throughout the year and the prices received 
see Appendix No, 43, page 208. 

There are several Crown Timber Agencies throughout the Province and as 
no regular audit or inspection of their office records or methods was in force 
it was found necessary to appoint an official to discharge this duty. As the 
varied operations throughout the forest regions of the Province have become 
most extensive and each District Agent is restricted to his own territory it was 
deemed advisable for the purposes of establishing reasonable uniformity and 
properly correlating the different operating services to have a general supervisor 
of bush operations. It was considered in the interests of economy and efficiency 
that the dual responsibilities of inspecting agencies and supervising operations 
could be exercised by the same individual; consequently an official was duly 
appointed in the person of Major J. I. Hartt, a practical bushman of long and 
wide experience, who is now functioning with good results. 

General. 

Timber surveys and cruises were continued with a view to estimating the 
timber wealth, air craft being utilized in collaboration with land parties. 
Important cruises were made in the Nepigon Forest Reserve to acquire first-hand 
knowledge of the timber and watershed situated there to enable the Depart- 
ment to more readily deal with the important and varied questions arising at 
the head of the lakes with respect to continued service to and assured perman- 
ency of existing pulpwood industries, all of which are of necessity linked up to 
the Hydro-Electric development of this region. 

Valuable detailed information was secured by the Forestry Branch through 
the air service in conjunction with land parties, on the Mississauga Forest 
Reserve. The residents of the north shore of Lake Huron and likely investors 
are keenly interested in the future development of the great natural resources 
of this reserve, and the inventory now being made will be utilized in reaching a 
conclusion on the best methods of handling the resources. 

The fire-ranging staff was faced with a herculean task the past year by 
reason of the abnormal drought that continued uninterruptedly in certain 



12 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

regions. Considerable areas were burnt, but fortunately, these cannot be 
charged as a distinct loss to the Crown, as sales were made of scorched and 
burnt limits on reasonably fair prices in order that the timber might be cut and 
removed before becoming uncommercial. Complete statements of the fire 
ranging operations may be found under its own appendix. 

Lands under License: The area covered by Timber License where the holder 
pays regulation ground rent and fire charges at the end of the year, 31st October, 
1923, was $17,768M square miles. 

Pulp Concessions: Area covered by pulp concessions exclusively amounts 
to 36,938 square miles, on which fire charges at the rate of $3.20 per square 
mile are payable. 

Summary of Timber Revenue. 

Bonus $931,013 87 

Timber Dues 1,152,068 90 

Ground Rent 97,545 08 

Transfer Fees .- 7,915 15 

Fire Protection 196,888 44 



: ,385,431 44 



Cullers' Examination. 

Examinations for Cullers' Licenses were held in August, at Callander, 
Thessalon and Kenora, when 26 candidates succeeded in passing, each being 
thereafter entitled to act as culler under the Act. A list of the successful 
candidates may be seen in Appendix No. 9, page 35. 

A large percentage of candidates were rejected, due in some measure to 
the candidates' inability to pass the practical test in the scaling of logs where 
deductions due to defects are necessary. Numbers coming from pulpwood 
regions with but little knowledge of and no experience in pine, though skilled 
in measuring pulpwood, fail in the pine examination. 

As the Department has found difficulty at times in getting qualified scalers 
for pulpwood without reducing the pine staff, provision will be made by an 
amendment to the Ontario Cullers' Act to enable a candidate to secure a pulp- 
wood license. 

Crown Surveys. 

Surveys of Crown lands in the northern part of the Province consisting of 
base and meridian lines, township boundaries, lake and river traverse, have 
been carried on in compliance with the several instructions issued. 

Town plot subdivisions of land patented since 1910 have been approved 
pursuant to R.S.O. 1910, chapter 34, as follows: 

Kirkland Lake Addition. — Part of mining claim T.C. 711, Township of Teck' 
District of Timiskaming (Wright-Hargreaves subdivision). 

Swastika Addition. — Part mining claim L.4485, 4486 and 8869, Township 
of Teck, District of Timiskaming (Simpson subdivision). 

Timmins Addition. — Part of south half lot 12, concession 3, Tisdale, District 
of Cochrane (Bartleman subdivision.) 

Timmins Addition. — Part of north part lot 2, concession 2, Mountjoy, 
District of Cochrane (Wilson subdivision). 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 13 

Municipal Surveys. 
Pursuant to sections 15, 16 and 17 of the Surveys Act, petitions for the 
resurvey of lines laid out under competent authority have been received from 
the Corporations of the Municipalities of: 
Township of Lancaster. 
Township of Harvey. 
City of Brantford. 
Township of Sunnidale. 
City of Toronto. 
Surveys performed and confirmed were: 

Part of the 5th concession of Township of Williamsburg. 
Part of the town line between the Townships of Niagara and Grantham. 
Part of road allowance between lots 3i and 32, 1st concession, Town- 
ship of Lancaster. 
Detailed reports of the several surveys will be found in appendices 20 to 34, 
inclusive. 

Provincial Parks. 

Ontario abounds in natural recreation grounds and no better evidence of 
its great asset in this regard is found than in those areas specifically set apart 
and classed as parks. 

Algonquin Park, in the older part of the province, is the rendezvous of 
tourists both summer and winter from all parts of the continent. Its attractive 
features are loudly praised by all who experience its delights, and the tourist 
traffic resulting therefrom, with the attending circulation of money, is in itself a 
very important factor in the business of the country. Of still greater importance 
is the park from the viewpoint of fur industry and game-hunting. The large 
area, protected as it is by some forty government rangers throughout the entire 
year, has proved a veritable breeding ground for the red deer, whose supply in 
contiguous grounds might .have long since disappeared had it not been for this 
haven of protection. A large restricted field like Algonquin Park, so admirably 
adapted for the propagation of muskrat, beaver, mink, marten, etc., assures 
adjoining territory of a more certain trapping ground, and as long as poachers 
can be successfuly kept outside of the park limits, natural reproduction will 
result and adjacent trapping grounds will be fed. 

Rondeau Park, in Kent Coimty, picturesquely nestles itself in a peninsula 
of Kent county, extending into Rondeau Bay, and, for its size, some seven 
thousand acres, is credited with having more red deer to a square mile than any 
like area in the province. Its wide stretch of water beaches on both sides, with 
excellent bathing and boating facilities, its dreamy bowers of woodland and magni- 
ficent mixed forest, excellent tourist sites and its general exclusiveness, all tend 
to captivate the visitor who becomes a summer resident by securing a lease from 
the Crown. 

Quetico Park, containing over one million acres, is situated in Rainy River, 
on the international boundary, and is the home of the finest quality of a red 
and white pine stand. Timber operations are being conducted on a basis of a 
brush-burning experiment in the hope of assuring a regrowth under favourable 
conditions. Hunting and trapping is forbidden in the park, and the care and 
protection thus afforded the animals conduce towards the rehabilitation of the 
surrounding hunting and trapping grounds. 

In the display at the Canadian National FIxhibition held last year, the 
Department transplanted a small corner of park life from Northern Ontario to 
Toronto, where thousands viewed it with pleasure and profit. 



14 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Colonization Roads. 

On this service $827,855.98 was spent, or $156,671.50 beyond that of the 
previous year. Commitments respecting direct grants along with by-law 
requests made early in the year had to be met. The construction and main- 
tenance expenditure for Colonization Roads is a direct benefit to those portions 
of the country receiving no benefit from the Provincial Highway system. For 
the details of road and bridge construction and the expenditure under this head 
see Appendix No. 38. 

Northern Development Branch. 

Approximately three and one-third million dollars was spent under this 
Branch during the past year, the details of which, with respect to the construction 
and maintenance of roads and bridges and the advancement of settlement and 
colonization,will be found on pages 125 to 158 inclusive, while the details of loans 
issued to settlers are on pages 159 and 160. 



FORESTRY BRANCH. 

Forest Fire Protection. 

Last season developed one of the most serious forest fire losses since 1917. 

This was owing to the very dry condition prevailing throughout Northern 
Ontario in the autumn of 1922, so that the spring of 1923 opened with practically 
no water in the swamps. In some of the outlying regions no rain occurred to 
influence the situation until July. This dry period entailed the placing of a 
large number of men on the staft at an early date, and owing to the serious 
weather conditions in late September the staff was kept on much later than 
usual. 

Weather conditions accounted for a large increase in the expenditure on 
ordinary ranging. It also accounted for over $100,000 additional cost in extra 
fire-fighting. 

Of 1,343 fires occurring during "the season, 670 did not get beyond ten acres 
in size, while 932 did not get beyond 100 acres in size. ■ The total acreage burned 
over of all classes was slightly over 2,000,000 acres, of which 593,000 was timber 
land. 

Improvement Work: During the last season the outstanding lines of im- 
provement work carried out was the erection of six permanent steel lookout 
towers, and 23 wooden towers, making in all 117 towers erected to date in 
Northern Ontario, 

Telephone lines were built to connect up lookout points. In all some 300 
miles was constructed during the last season. This gives us 636 miles of telephone 
line now completed in Northern Ontario in connection with forest fire protection. 

Equipment: In addition to the ordinary equipment purchased during the 
past season, the Department invested in 54 portable gas engines and pumping 
units with 2,000 feet of hose for each. These pumping units are found to be 
indispensable in connection with handling the forest fire situation. In many 
districts this past season they saved the situation. 

Of our increased expenditure about $60,000 was expended on these fire 
fighting units. We now have 88 units in use. Part of the increased expenditure 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 15 

required this season was in the replacement of blankets and tents used to supply 
the fire sufferers in the Haile^'bury district during the previous autumn. 

Forest Survey: Continuing the plan of a general forest survey of the 
province, the Forestry Branch during the past season conducted forest survey 
work over two areas, comprising 9,200 square miles. 

The preliminary work of making an aerial sketch map of the eastern portion 
of the Nipigon watershed was completed during the past season. This entailed 
the covering of an area of about 4,800 square miles, and required 104 hours' 
flying. 

An additional area, comprising the northern portion of the Mississagi 
Forest Reserve, was completed during the past season, covering an area of 4,400 
square miles with an aerial survey combined with detailed ground party work. . . 
(See Appendix No. 42.) ^ J^ 

Reforestation. 

Provincial Forest Stations: The development at the Provincial Forest 
Stations has gone on during the past season in a normal way with a few improve- 
ments. At the Norfolk Station a seed-e.xtracting plant was established. At 
Midhurst Station, Simcoe County, main buildings were erected, and ground 
broken for a nursery site. Preparations were made for a water system and it is 
expected that this coming summer the nursery organization will be well under 
way. 

Nursery Stock: The following is a summary of the nursery stock, including 
one-year-old seedlings and transplants, growing at the various forest stations: 

Norfolk County (St. Williams) 16,411,230 

Durham County (Orono) 3,454,600 

Simcoe County (Midhurst) 2,093,000 

Hendrie 1,511,000 

Sand Banks 1,449,000 

Kemptville 300,000 

Total 25,218,830 

Plantations: The distribution of planting material for various purposes 
was continued during the past season and the grand total of plants put out in 
various forms of planting amounted to 1,911,068. 

Seed Collecting: The past autumn was a splendid year for the collection 
of red pine cones. It was usually difficult to secure seed of this tree in large 
quantities, but during the past autumn a large amount of cones was collected, 
so that we will be gua**anteed red pine seed for the next two or three years. 

Jas. Lyons, 

Minister. 

Department of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, October 31st, 1923. 



APPENDICES 



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1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



23 



Appendix No. 3. 

Statement of Lands Sold and Leased. Amount of Sales and Leases and Amount of Collections 
for the year ending October 31st, 1923. 



Service. 


Acres sold 

and 

leased. 


Amount of 

sales and 

leases. 


Collections 

on sales 
and leases. 


Lands Sold: 

Agricultural and Townsites 


113,031.97 


$ c 
110,158 36 


$ c 

107,900 26 


Clergy Lands 


134 00 


Common School Lands 






1,418 89 


Grammar School Lands 






196 CO 


University Lands 


3,063 

37,907.97 
16 


1,531 50 

5,131 01 
162 50 


1,806 89 


Lands Leased: 

Crown 


87,632 01 


Temagami 


1,138 84 








154,018.94 


116,983 37 


200,226 89 



H. M. LOUNT, 

Accountant 



W. C. CAIN, 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



24 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 4. 

Statement of Revenue of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 

October 31st, 1923. 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Land Collections. 
Crown Lands: 
Agricultural 


84,936 07 
22,964 19 


107,900 26 

3,555 78 




Townsites 








Clergy Lands 


134 00 
1,418 89 

196 00 
1,806 89 




Common School Lands 




Grammar School Lands 




University Lands 












111,456 04 


Rent: 

Crown Leases 


82,140 27 
2,200 74 
3,291 00 
1,138 84 


Algonquin Provincial Park 






Rondeau Provincial Park 






Temagami Leases 










88,770 85 


Woods and Forests. 
Bonus 


931,013 87 

1,152,068 90 

97,545 08 

7,915 15 

196,888 44 


Timber Dues 












Transfer Fees 
















2,385,431 44 


Parks: 

Algonquin Provincial Park 


6,996 ^Z 

1,841 20 

470 93 


Rondeau Provincial Park 






Quetico Provincial Park 










9,308 96 




1,320 41 
404 00 
134 00 


Cullers' Fees 






Forest Reserves Guides' Fees 










1 S^S 41 


Refunds. 
Forest Ranging 


89,450 93 

1,826 74 

1,312 95 

1,598 43 

1,807 31 

350 40 

182 50 

32 60 

25 00 

8 58 




Clearing Townsites and Removing Fire Hazards. . . 












Surveys 






Litigation of Constitutional and other Questions. . . 






Agents' Salaries and Disbursements 






Forest Reserves 






Display at Toronto Exhibition 






Reforestation 






Contingencies, 










96,595 44 








2,693,421 14 



H. M. LOUNT, 

Accountant. 



W. C. CAIN, 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



25 



Appendix No. 5. 

Statement of Receipts of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 
October 31st, 1923, which are considered as Special Funds, 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Principal 


Clergy Lands. 


99 95 

34 05 




Interest . - 






Common School Lands. 


134 00 


Principal 


757 20 
661 69 


Interest 






Grammar School Lands. 


1,418 89 


Principal 


122 50 

73 50 


Interest - 






University Lands. 


196 00 


Principal 


1,211 38 
595 51 


Interest 








1,806 89 








$3,555 78 



H. M. LOUNT, 

Accountant. 



W. C. CAIN, 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



26 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 6. 

Statement of Disbursements of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 

October 31st, 1923. 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Agents' Salaries and Disbursements. 

Land, $23,43^.99 

Arthurs, E 




500 00 

352 85 

646 25 
200 00 

1,475 00 
622 00 

540 00 

637 00 
300 00 

1,249 50 

541 30 

522 00 
500 00 

514 60 
1,194 00 

268 25 
1,103 10 

420 00 

311 48 




Baker, R. H 


350 00 

2 85 




Disbursements 








Blank, F 


500 00 
146 25 




Disbursements 








Both, C 






Bolcer, T. W 


1,200 00 
275 00 




Disbursements 






«• 


Brown, John 


600 00 

22 00 




Disbursements 








Cameron, W 


500 00 
40 00 




Disbursements 








Campbell, Miss I. M 


500 00 
137 00 




Disbursements 








Dean, T 






Dempsay, S. J 


1.100 00 
149 50 




Disbursements 










500 00 
41 30 




Disbursements 








Douglas, W. T. , . 


500 00 
22 00 




Disbursements 








Ellis, H. J 








500 00 

14 60 




Disbursements 








Gibson, J. E 


1,000 00 
194 00 












Hales, W 


250 00 
18 25 




Disbursements 








Holland, H. E 


600 00 

503 10 












Hollands, C. J 


300 00 
120 00 




Disbursements 








Lockhart, J 


259 04 
41 44 
11 00 




Watt, F 




Disbursements 














Carried forward 


11,897 33 





1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



27 



Appendix No. & — Continued. 



Service. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



Brought forward 

Agents' Salaries and Disbursements — Continued. 



Land — Concluded. 



McFayden, A 

Disbursements . 

MacLennan, J. K. . 
Disbursements . 



Mills, J. E 

Disbursements . 



O'Donnell, J. L. . . . 
Disbursements. 



Parsons, W. J 

Disbursements . 



Philion, J. A 

Marchildon, J. P.. . 
Disbursements . 



Small, R 

Disbursements . 



Teasdale, R. A 

Disbursements . 



Thaw, D 

Disbursements. 



Whyboiirne, W. E. . 
Disbursements . 



Wilson, A. N 

Disbursements . 



Wilson, S. H 

Kurki, Miss A 

Disbursements . 



Woollings, J 

Disbursements. 



Homestead Inspectors, $27,032.24. 



Barr, J. C 

Disbursements . 



Bastien, J, A 

Disbursements . 



Brown, J. B 

Disbursements . 



Cragg, W. V 

Disbursements. 



Carried forward . 



600 00 
40 30 



700 00 
78 95 



1,200 00 
253 39 



800 00 

239 85 



1,000 00 
212 00 



166 68 
257 60 
126 93 



500 00 
17 70 



600 00 
141 91 



500 00 

16 40 



300 00 
18 30 



175 00 
13 25 



1,200 00 
700 00 
746 40 



800 00 
136 00 



1,500 00 
766 12 



1,200 00 
1,080 53 



1,100 00 
419 50 



1,500 00 
563 50 



11,897 Zi 



640 30 

778 95 

1,453 39 

1,039 85 

1,212 00 

551 21 
517 70 
741 91 
516 40 
318 30 
188 25 

2,646 40 
936 00 



2,266 12 
2,280 53 
1,519 50 
2,063 50 



31,567 64 



28 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 6 — Continued. 






Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 




31,567 64 

1,225 78 
2,072 75 
2,083 10 
2,663 55 

6,254 68 
2,463 70 
2,139 03 

4,330 11 

■ 2,052 03 
1,900 00 

4,040 82 

4,077 20 
3,038 11 
2,592 32 

4,802 68 




Agents' Salaries and Disbursements — Continued. 

Homestead Inspectors. — Concluded. 
Dean, T 


900 00 

325 78 




Disbursements 








Hughes, T 


1,400 00 
672 75 




Disbursements 








Jervis, H. F 


1,500 00 
583 10 




Disbursements 








Owens, H. B 


1,000 00 
1,663 55 




Disbursements 








Smith, D 


1,800 00 

1,600 00 

225 00 

284 00 

112 00 

2,233 68 




VanHorn, L. E 




Corke, A 




McArthur, A. J 




Thompson, J. 




Disbursements 








Watson, T. P 


1,500 00 
963 70 




Disbursements 








Wigle, R. G 


1,500 00 
639 03 




Disbursements 








Timber, $42,873.05. 
Alexander, J. A 


2,504 00 
902 88 
923 23 


• 


McLeod, Miss R 




Disbursements 








Christie, W. P 


1,700 00 
352 03 




Disbursements.' 








Hawkins, S. J 






Huckson, A. H 


2,300 00 
602 27 
120 00 

1,018 55 




Bell, MissB 

McDougall, Miss M 




Disbursements 








McCaw, J. G 


2,504 00 
963 04 
610 16 




MacCrindle, Miss I 




Disbursements 








McDougall, J. T 


2,300 00 
738 11 




Disbursements 








MacDonald, S. C 


2,200 00 
392 32 




Disbursements 








Milwav, J. H 


2,504 00 

960 00 

1,338 68 




Godfrey, Miss S 




Disbursements 














Carried forward 


77,303 50 





1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



29 



Appendix No. 6 — Continued. 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 




77,303 50 

4,535 99 
3,384 43 
2,405 7 
2,968 02 
2,745 67 

51 73 
50 00 
50 00 

1,659 68 
808 94 




Agents' Salaries and Disbursements — Continued. 

Timber — Concluded. 
Smith, J. D. C 


2,504 00 

902 92 

1,129 07 




Brunsel, Miss K. L 




Disbursements 








Spence, D. J 


2,300 00 
1,084 43 




Disbursements 








Stevenson, A 


1,900 00 

505 67 












Whelan, P. J 


2,504 00 
464 02 




Disbursements 








Wood, W. G. A 


1,600 00 
1,145 67 




Disbursements 








Miscellaneous, ?2, 620.35. 

Green, H. P., Caretaker of Islands in Charleston Lake. 
Disbursements 


50 00 

1 73 








Jamieson, W. H., Caretaker of Islands in Dog and 












McArthur, T. A., Inspector of Agencies 


900 00 
759 68 




Disbursements 








Hartt, J. I., Inspector of Crown Timber Agencies, etc. 


540 99 
267 95 












95,963 63 


Ottawa Agency. 
Larose, S. C, Acting Agent 


1,800 00 
814 27 


Rent 


700 00 

114 27 




Disbursements 












2,614 27 


Cullers' Act. 
McCaw, J. G., disbursements 


24 30 
41 50 

28 00 
22 30 


McDonald, S. C, disbursements 






McNabb, A. D., services 


8 00 
20 00 




disbursements 








Whelan, P. J., disbursements 










116 10 






Carried forward 


98,694 00 



30 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 6 — Continued. 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


% c. 


Brought forward 






98,694 00 


Fire Ranging 






1,067,202 22 


Forest Ranging 






487,046 91 


Forest Reserves 






9,470 28 


Reforestation 






214,547 12 


Algonquin Provincial Park 






46,747 67 


QuETico Provincial Park 






10,870 55 


Rondeau Provincial Park 






14,377 72 


Surveys 






168,277 80 


Colonization Roads 






827,855 98 


Board of Surveyors 






200 00 


Grant to Canadian Forestry Association 






3,000 00 


Insurance 






1,785 57 


Commissions re Sundry Investigations 






28,518 90 


Litigation of Constitutional and Other Questions 






18,047 93 


Allowance School Section, South Walsingham.. 






300 00 


Workmen's Compensation 






3,972 09 


Unforeseen and Unprovided 






1,216 30 


Creation and Extension of Parks 






1,128 61 


Clearing Townsites and Removing Fire Hazards. 






99,896 73 


Grant to Empire Forestry Conference 






7,000 00 


Special Warrants. 

Clearing Lands at Kapuskasing 




7,401 82 
3,600 00 
7,000 00 

400,000 00 
6,385 20 




Legal Fees and Expenses 






Burlington Beach Commission 






Compensation to Chippawa and Mi?sissauga 






Kapuskasing Water and Sewerage System 










424,387 02 
20 00 


Miscellaneous. 

Law Society of Upper Canada, lees 




Refunds — Miscellaneous 






18,986 22 


Display at Toronto Exhibition 






1,179 03 


Moving Expenses of Officials. . . 






379 25 


Purchase and Maintenance of Automobiles 






2,904 51 


Veterans' Commutation 






1,000 00 




■ 1 




Carried forward 




1 


3,559,012 41 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



31 



Appendix No. 6 — Concluded. 



Service. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



Brought forward 

Contingencies, etc. 
Departmental. 

Printing and Binding 

Stationery 



Express and Cartage ....... 

Postage and Excise Stamps . 



Telegraphing. 
Car Fare. . . . 
Livery 



Subscriptions. 
Advertising. . 



Typewriters, repairs and inspections. 
Annual Membership Fees 



Bowman, Hon. Beniah, travelHng expenses 

Lyons, Hon. J. " " 

Keefer, F. H. 

Cain, W. C, 

Hutcheon, J., 

Niven, F. J., " " 

Rorke, L. V., 

Titus, F. E., 

Work, J., 



Extra Clerks. 

Maps 

Sundries 



Extra Services: 
O'Neil, A. H.. 
Trivett, W. F. 



Colonization Roads Contingencies. 



Printing and Binding. 
Stationery 



Postage 
Express 



Telegraphing 

Subscriptions 

Typewriter, repairs and inspections. 



Fullerton, C. H., travelling expenses. 
Meader, C. H., 



Extra Clerks. 
Sundries 



4,231 25 
16,122 37 


661 
3,203 


87 
70 


1,728 33 

24 00 

125 75 


227 Q7 
10,306 03 


1,097 
29 


01 
00 



662 86 
600 00 
669 63 
190 21 
516 54 
215 00 
697 33 
122 31 
48 55 



10,557 93 

6,055 06 

259 45 



411 

651 


43 
83 


215 
21 


92 

28 


80 47 

16 50 

109 00 


184 
521 


54 
23 


1,082 
111 


64 
92 



20,353 62 
3,865 57 

1,878 08 

10,534 00 

1,126 01 



3,722 43 



16,872 44 



218 13 
244 50 



1,063 26 

237 20 

205 97 

705 77 

"1,194 56 



3,559,012 41 



58,352 15 



462 63 



3,406 76 



3,621,233 95 



For particulars of expenditure of the Northern Development Branch, see Appendix No. 



H. M. LOUNT, 

Accountant. 



W. C. CAIN, 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



32 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix 

Forestry 

Statement of Timber and Amounts accrued from Timber Dues, Ground Rent, 

Quantity and 





Area 
covered 

.by 

timber 
licenses. 


Saw logs. 




Agencies. 


Pine. 


Other. 






Square 
Miles. 


Pieces. 


Feet B.M. 


Pieces. 


Feet B.M. 


Pieces. 


Western Timber 
District 


12,715§ 
702i 
4,351 


8,641,461 

64,100 

755,481 


307,105,616 

1,377,806 

37,195,213 


1,451,782 

59,065 

330,693 


43,952,300 
1,425,251 
9,736,857 


86,714 


Belleville Timber 
District 


725 


Ottawa Timber 
District 


1,070 








17,7681 


9,461,042 


345,678,635 


1,841,540 


55,114,408 


88,509 



General Statement 



Agencies. 


Shingle 
Bolts. 


Cedar 

Lineal 

feet. 


Cedar 
Posts 


Tele- 
graph 
Poles. 


Pulp- 
wood. 


Railway 
Ties. 






Cords. 




Pieces. 


Pieces. 


Cords. 


Pieces. 


Transfer 
Fees. 


Interest. 


Western Timber 
District 

Belleville Tim- 
ber District. . 


2,077 


9,627 


75,765 

11,830 

3,242 


5,559 
1,130 


547,678 

64 

^ 25,619 


1,653,619 

5,598 

175 


$ c 
5,190 15 

50 00 

2,675 00 


$ c 

31,309 23 

115 14 


Ottawa Timber. 
District 






1,073 88 












2,077 


9,627 


90,837 


6,689 


573,361 


1,659,392 


7,915 15 


32,498 25 



JOHN H. HOUSER, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



33 



No. 7. 

Branch. 

Fire Protection and Bonus, etc., during the year ending 31st October, 1923. 

Description of Timber. 



Boom and Dimension. 




Piling. 




Cordwood. 


Tan 


Pine. 


Other. 




Hard. 


Soft. 


Bark. 


Feet 
B.M. 


Pieces. 


Feet 
B.M. 


. Pieces. 


Lineal 
Feet. 


Pieces. 


Feet 
B.M. 


Cords. 


Cords. 


Cords. 


10,178,181 
113,136 


20,140 

445 
5,336 


1,728,378 

70,015 

660,372 


1,033 


103,056 


5,504 


525,743 


7,511 
ICO 


30,529 


2,189 


247,553 










1,418 


















10,538,870 


25,921 


2,458,765 


1,033 


103,056 


5,504 


525,743 


7,611 


31,947 


2,189 



of Timber. — Concluded. 



Amounts accrued. 



Trespass. 


Timber 
Dues. 


Bonus. 


Deposit 
Timber Sales. 


Ground 
Rent. 


Fire 
Protection. 


Total. 


$ c 

33,084 41 

2,609 95 


$ c 
1,532,332 17 

6,238 41 

127.067 56 


$ c 

1,532,770 10 


$ c 
139,754 86 


$ c 

72,676 71 

3,180 00 
21,150 00 


$ c 

165,616 91 

3,957 80 
27,313 73 


$ c 

3,512,734 54 

16 151 30 


244 22 






179,524 39 








35,938 58 


1,665,638 14 


1,532,770 10 


139,754 86 


97,006 71 


196,888 44 


3,708,410 23 



W. C. CAIN, 

Deputy Minister. 



2 LF 



34 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Appendix No. 8. 

Forestry Branch. 

Statement of Revenue collected during the year ending October 31st, 1923. 

Amount of Western Collections at Department $2,272,908 95 

Belleville " " " 16,614 27 

" Ottawa " " " 95,908 22 

$2,385,431 44 



FORESTRY BRANCH. 

Timber Dues $1,152,068 90 

Bonus 931,013 87 

Ground Rent 97,545 08 

Fire Protection 196,888 44 

Transfer Fees 7,915 15 



$2,385,431 44 



FORESTRY BRANCH REVENUE. 

October 31st, 1923. 
Western District — 

Timber dues $1,067,204 63 

Bonus 791,156 46 

Ground rent 72,676 71 

Interest, timber dues 30,869 68 

■ Interest ground rent 439 55 

Transfer fees 5, 190 15 

Timber sale deposit 139,754 86 

Fire protection 165,616 91 



?,272,908 95 



Ottawa District — 

Timber dues $43,695 61 

Ground rent 21,150 00 

Interest, timber dues 1,022 88 

Interest, ground rent 5 1 00 

Fire protection 27,313 73 

Transfer fees 2 675 00 



95,908 22 



Belleville District — 

Timber dues $9,208 78 

Bonus 102 55 

Ground rent 3,180 00 

Interest, timber dues * 67 32 

Interest, ground rent 47 82 

Fire protection 3,957 80 

Transfer fees 50 00 



16,614 27 



J,385,431 44 



JOHN H. HOUSER, - W. C. CAIN, 

Chief Clerk in Charge, Deputy Minister. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 35. 



Appendix No. 9, 

CULLERS' EXAMINATION. 

Three examinations were held during the year, one at Callander, one at Thessalon and one 
at Kenora, on the 29th day of August, 1923. 

Twenty-six candidates were successful in passing the examination, and were duly granted 
licenses authorizing them to act as cullers. 

List of parties who passed the Cullers' Examination on the 29th day of August, 1923, and 
were duly granted licenses on the 10th day of September, 1923. 

Name Address Place of Examination 

Bissonnette, J. A Fort Frances Kenora. 

Colley, John W Sturgeon Falls Callander. 

Cowan, S Port Arthur Kenora. 

Carnihan, H. M Fort Frances Kenora. 

Cameron, N. S Stratton Kenora. 

Graydon, J. C Kenora Kenora. 

Gillies, J. P Blind River Thessalon. 

Horn, J. M Kenora Kenora. 

Hooper, W. A Kenora Kenora. 

Hook, D. E Kenora Kenora. 

Johns, C. H ; Sudbury Callander. 

Kennedy, Thos. J Lakefield Callander. 

Kennedy, James Stanley Thessalon Thessalon. 

Knight, George E Pakesley Callander. 

(License issued Jan. 4, 1924.) 

L'Abbe, Philip Port Arthur Kenora. 

Lacasse, P. D Port Arthur Kenora. 

McMillan, F.J Blind River Thessalon. 

McGillivray, James A Blind River Thessalon. 

Nault, Thos Sault Ste. Marie Thessalon. 

Ruxton, James Pakesley Callander. 

(License issued Nov. 29, 1923.) 

Sutherland, J. W North Bay Callander, 

Spence, S. D Espanola Callander. 

Shaw, Allan Keewatin Kenora. 

Shrumm, W. F Stratton Kenora. 

Snider, Roy 37 Emmerson Ave., Toronto Thessalon. 

Waller, Thos. F North Bay Callander. 

P.S. — Conway, Harold, Barry's Bay, examined at North Bay; Jones, W. J., 107 Marchmount 
Road, examined at North Bay: who presented themselves for examination in 1921, were granted 
Culler's License after obtaining further experience of one year, the former on the 16th August, 
1923, and the latter on the 18th April, 1923. 

JOHN H. HOUSER, W. C. CAIN, 

Chief Clerk. Deputy Minister 



36 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 10. 

PATENTS OFFICE (Lands Branch). 

Statement of Patents, etc., issued from 1st November, 1922, to 31st October, 1923. 

Public Lands (late Crown) 577 

" " (late School) • 12 

" " (late Clergy Reserves) • 1 

" " (University) 20 

Free Grant Lands (Act of 1913) 301 

" ' " (Act of 1901 Veterans) 224 

Mining Lands (Patents) 337 

Mining Leases 192 

Crown Leases 152 

Licenses of Occupation 98 

Temagami Island Leases 11 

Sand and Gravel Licenses 23 

Pine Patents 7 

Quarry Claims 6 

Water Power Leases 11 

Releases of Pine 2 

Orders-in-Council (Vesting) „ 2 

Total 1,976 

CHAS. E. BURNS 

Clerk of Patents. 

SELBY DRAPER, W. C. CAIN, 

Chief Clerk. Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



Appendix No. 11. 

Statement of the work done in Military Office, Lands Branch of the Department of Lands and 
Forests, during the year ending October 31st, 1923. 

Veteran patents issued 224 

Locations under military certificates 273 

Certificates applied in payment of lands 4 

Certificates surrendered for commutation money 20 

J. B. PROCTOR, 

Clerk in Charge. 

SELBY DRAPER, W. C. CAIN, 

Chief Clerk. » Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 37 



Appendix No. 12. 

Records Branch, 1922-1923. 

Communications received: 

From Crown Lands Agents , 8,335 

" Crown Timber Agents 4,399 

" Mining Recorders 4,284 

" Homestead Inspectors 3,242 

" Superintendent Algonquin Park 660 

" Superintendent Quetico Park 115 

" Superintendent Rondeau Park 346 

Orders-in-Council ; . 209 

Telegrams 134 

Northern Development Branch (figures supplied by them) 11,386 

Loan Commissioner (figures supplied by them) 7,083 

Forestry Branch (figures supplied by them) 25,725 

Colonization Roads (figures supplied by them) 4,968 

All other sources 29,325 



Total incoming (Minister's Ofiice not included) , 100,211 

Communications sent out: 

To Crown Lands Agents, Crown Timber Agents, Inspectors and Park Superin- 
tendents 24,480 

« General Public. 21,108 

Circular Letters re Timber Sales, etc 8,923" 

Maps and Blue Prints by Surveys Branch 4,800 

Northern Development Branch (figures supplied by them) 13,449 

" " " (Seed-grain) (figures supplied by them) 1,620 

Loan Commissioner (figures supplied by them) 12,628 

Forestry Branch Letters (figures supplied by them) 10,773 

" " " (Parcels and calendars) (figures supplied by them) 1,324 

Colonization Roads (figures supplied by them) 4,400 



Total outgoing (Minister's Office not included) 103,505 

Postage: 

Postage for the year, Records Branch 2,187 II 

" " Loan Commissioner 400 00 

" " Forestry Branch 601 14 

" " Colonization Roads 190 12 

" " Northern Dev. Branch 906 10 

Files: 

New Files issued. General 5,855 

" ** Accounts chargeable 629 

" " Accounts free 187 

S. K. BURDIN, W. C. CAIN, 

Chief Clerk, Records Branch. Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



38 



REPORT CF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 13. 



Statement showing the number of Locatees and of acres located ; of purchasers and of acres sold ; 
of lots resumed for non-performance of the settlement duties; and of patents issued in 
Free Grant Townships during the year ending 31st October, 1923. 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


C 

1-^ 


en 

a; 

V4-1 *^ 

o S 
6-2 


t 

<n 

o 
u 

3 

a 
d 


T3 

US 
lU 
li 
y 

6 


m 

C 

o c 


01 

J! ^ 

o '- 

;z; 


CO 

C 
<U 

0.-0 
O 3 

r- 


U3 

bs 

« c 

d§. 


Baxter 


Muskoka 

« 

« 

« 
« 


J. B. Brown, 

Bracebridge. . 

« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

Miss I. M. Camp- 
bell, Parry Sound 

« 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 

« 
« 

Dr. J.S. Freeborn, 

Maganetawan 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 


2 

1 


148 
100 






12 
1 


1,288 
100 


5 
5 


521 


Brunei 






500 


Cardwell 








Chaffey 

Draper 


1 
2 
6 


1-01 
200 
571 


1 


1 


2 
1 
4 
1 


202 
102 
561 
100 


1 


100 


Franklin 






3 
1 
4 


573 


Freeman 






152 


Macaulay 










412 


Medora 


« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 

Haliburton . . . 

Muskoka 

« 

« 
« 

Parry Sound. . 

« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

Parry Sound. . 

« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
















Monck 


1 


100 






1 


100 






Morrison 






2 


3701 


Muskoka 
















McLean 


















Oakley 


1 
4 
3 


51 
396 
235 






1 
3 

1 


51 
396 
100 


1 

1 
2 
2 
2 


187 


Ridout 






100 


Ryde- 






160 


Sherbourne. . . . 






143 


Sinclair 

Stephenson .... 


2 


216 




1 


3 


376 


200 


Stisted 














1 


87 


Watt 


1 


100 






1 


100 




Wood 






2 
2 


165^ 


Blair 






2 


5 










184 


Burpee 












Carling 


3 

7 


297 
609 






2 
4 
1 


398 

626 

74 


1 
2 
3 


5 


Christie 






220 


Conger 






448 


Cowper 

Foley. . 






1 


5 
















Ferguson 

Hagerman. .... 
Harrison ...... 


2 
1 


200 
97 


































1 
3 

1 


222i 


Henvey 














329 


Humphrey 

McGonkey 

McDougall .... 


4 

2 
1 
1 

2 
2 


492 
185 
100 
100 
157 
288 


2 
1 


89i 
100 






99 


1 

1 


85 
100 




4 


558 


McKellar 








McKenzie 

Monteith 


1 


5 


1 
2 


155 
378 


3 
2 


398 
285 


Shawanaga .... 
Wilson 

Chapman 








5 

3 
2 


865 

297 
350 


5 


205 


1 

1 
2 


200 

97 
150 


2 

3 

1 


298 
505 


Croft 






200 


Ferrie 








Gurd 


1 

3 
2 
5 
4 
2 
5 
3 


109 
339 
200 
594 
542 
245 
808 
484 










1 
1 
1 
4 


200 


Lount 






1 
1 

1 
3 
2 
3 


197 
200 
200 
392 
280 
350 


100 


Machar 






200 


Mills 


1 

1 


51 
33 


466 


Pringle 

Ryerson 




2 


232 


Spence 

Strong 


1 


h 




1 


451 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



39 



Appendix No. 13— Continued. 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


CO 

6 




tn 

6 


1 

a; 

o 

6 


03 

c 
o " 


J! £ 
d £1 


tn 

C 

d 

Z 


(0 

0) 

u- C 

o <u 


Armour 


Parry Sound. . 
« 

« 

« 

Parry Sound . . 
« 

« 

Nipissing 

(( 

u 
11 

Haliburton . . . 
« 

« 

« 
« 

Peterborough . 
« 

« 

a 

Haliburton . . . 

Peterborough . 
« 

Haliburton . . . 

Hastings 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

Renfrew 

(( 

(( 

« 

« 

it 

« 
« 


David Thaw, 

Emsdale. . 
« 

« 

« 

« 

H. J. Ellis, 

Powassan . . 

« 
« 

W. J. Parsons, 

North Bay. . 
« 

« 

R. W. Baker, 

Minden . . 


8 
5 
4 


985 
577 
361 






6 

3 

10 


795 

357 

1,454 


8 
2 
8 
3 


1,022 


Bethune 






355 


Joly..., 

McMurrich. . . . 






1,077 






447 


Perry 

Proudfoot 










2 
2 

1 

2 


204 
200 

100 
300 




2 

2 
5 
1 

1 
3 

4 
3 


200 

200 

611 

103 

. 100 

258 

400 
400 










Hardy 

Himsworth .... 


2 


6 


4 

7 
2 
4 


451 
1,095 


Laurier. ....... 


3 


129 


409 


Nipissing 

Patterson 


2 

1 

4 


200 
97 

500 


298 








Bonfield 






2 
2 
3 
2 


300 


Boulter 






400 


Chisholm 




' 






393 


Ferris 

Anson 


1 


100 


1 


u 


3 


500 


103 


Glamorgan .... 
Hindon 














1 


182 


« 
« 
« 

VVm Hales Apsley 
















Lutterworth. . . 


1 


28 


1 


28 






1 

2 
3 


28 


Minden 






314 


Snowdon 


1 

1 


25 
74i 










569 


Stanhope 

Anstruther. . . . 






1 


74i 










-- 


Burleigh, N.D. 
S.D.. 


« 

« 

A. N. Wilson 

« 

« 

W. J. Douglas, 

Maynooth . . 
« 

« 
« 
u 
« 
« 
« 
« 

Frank Blank, 

Wilno.. 






























1 
2 
1 

5 
2 

1 
3 

5 

1 


103 


Chandos 














203 


Methuen 






1 


2 






2 


Cardiff 


4 


687 


2 


" 354 


587 


Cavendish 


2 


10 


9 


Galway 










100 


Monmouth. . . . 


3 

2 
3 


394 

315 
300 






3 


385 


497 


Bangor 


2 


159 


288 


Carlow 


2 


200 


222 


Cashel 








Dungannon. . . . 


3 
4 

2 


163^ 
416 






2 

1 
1 


163i 

188 

91 


4 
4 

5 


292 


Faraday 

Herschel 

Limerick 


1 
2 


100 
91 


539 
494} 


Mayo 


3 
4 

1 
2 


384 
346^ 
100 
175 






2 
1 


329 
100 


1 
4 


91 


Monteagle 

McClure 




157 


566 


Wicklow 














WoUaston 














Algona, S 


















Brougham 


















Bnidenell 

Burns 


« 
« 
« 

« 
« 


4 
2 

1 


296i 

198 

104 


1 


50 


2 
2 

1 


198 
198 
104 


6 


l,138i 


Grattan 










Griffith 










Hagarty 


3 

18 
2 
2 


253 

l,35?f| 

305 

150 










4 

1 
2 
1 


344 


Jones 


2 


27 


• 2 

1 
1 


432 

200 

50 


233 


Lyell 


406 


Lyndoch 






315 



40 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 







Appendix No. 


/J— 


Continued 












Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


(0 

C 

o 

^% 

6 


to 


en 

3 

a 
'0 
d 


2 

CO 



d 


B 
en n; 

d 

;z; 


C/3 

^ E 

OS 

d£i 


c 
a; 

03 -0 
D. 0) 

d 


Six) 

^^ 

a 


Matawatchan. . 


Renfrew 

« 
« 

(( 

Renfrew 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
u 

Nipissing 

« 
« 

Algoma 

« 

« 

Algoma 

(( 

(( 

« 

« 

Algoma 

« 

Sudbury 

« 

Thunder Bay. 
(( 

(( 

u 

u 

u 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 


Frank Blank, 

Wilno.. 

« 
« 

Finlay Watt, 

Pembroke. . 
« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 
« 

« 

Robert Small, 

Mattawa. . 
« 

a 

u 

Thos. Dean, 

Sault Ste. Marie. . 


1 
11 

5 
11 


87 

1,045 

450 

1,024 










1 
1 
3 
1 


150 


Radcliffe 

Raglan 


3 


95 


6 
1 
4 


684 
200 
398 


167 

425 


Richards. 

Sebastopol 


1 


22 


222 


Sherwood 

Algona, N 


9 

1 

2 


739 

100 
194 


1 


50 


2 


186 


2 


297 


Alice 

Buchanan 


3 


■ 303 


1 


103 


1 

. 1 

1 

2 


50 
185 


Clara 






1 


39 






239 


Fraser 


3 


403 






289 


Head 












Maria 


1 


160 






1 


160 






McKay 










Petewawa 


2 


200 






1 


100 






Rolph 










Wilberforce. . . . 














4 


3831 


Wylie Pt 


1 

4 
7 
4 
3 
4 


75 

394 
728 
528 
234 
400 












Calvin 






5 
2 
2 
1 
1 


553 
108 
319 
102 
100 


1 
1 

1 


100 


Cameron Pt . . . 

Lauder 

Mattawan 


1 

1 


93 

5 


137 
205 


Papineau 






1 


100 


Korah 








Park 


















Prince 


« 

Thos. Dodds, 

Thessalon . . 






1 
1 


160 

6 


5 


720 


1 
3 


160 


Aberdeen .... 


1 


166 


484 


« Addl. 








Galbraith 


« 
« 
« 

W. E. Whybourne. 
« 

« 

Edward Arthurs, 

Espanola. . 

S. H. Wilson, 

Port Arthur. . 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 

M 
M 
« 


1 
1 


165 
33 


1 


5 






1 


165 


Lefroy 

Plummer 
















1 


117 


" Addl. 
















St. Joseph Isd.. 


3 


293 






2 


200 














Jocelyn 














2 
1 

1 


200 


Baldwin 


2 
6 

9 
6 

1 
5 
1 
4 
7 
1 
5 
12 


282f 
834§ 

1,356 
785 
160 
659 
160 
5291 
949f 
160 
800 

1,836| 






1 

2 

3 
3 


162 
370§ 

473 
448^ 


118 


Merritt 






68 


Blake 








Conmee 

Crooks . 


1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 


50 

16 

93 

2 

477 

84J 
234 


4 

3 
6 
2 
7 
11 
2 


626 
47U 


Dawson Road. . 

Dorion 

Gillies 


1 
4 
2 
1 
7 


315 
160 
157 
574 
160 
1601 
1,200 


660 

372^ 

878i 


Gorham 

Lybster 

Marks. . . 


1,561 
327 


McGregor 

Mclntyre 






2 

1 
1 
1 


324 






162 


O'Connor 






1 


2 






162 


Oliver. 


1 


160 


1 


160 


151i 


Paipoonge.N.R. 
« S.R. 
























Pardee 














6 

2 


522 


Pearson 


'"4 


560 






3 


400 


323^ 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



41 



Appendix No. 13 — Continued 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


to 

c 

o O 
d 


o 3 
6.2 

2; 


i2 

0) 

tc 

<a 
Si 
o 
u 

3 

a 
"o 
6 


1 

tn 

o; 

d 

;2 


en 

c 

o u 


en 

11 

O 3 
en 

1" 


c 
d 

Z 


tn 

Co .w 
^ C 
O 1> 

1^ 


Scoble 

Stirling 

Strange 

Ware 


Thunder Bay. 
« 

« 

« 

Rainy River. . 
« 

« 

« 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

Rainy River. . 
« 

<( 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 

u 

« 
« 
« 

Kenora 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

« 

Kenora 


S. H. Wilson, 

Port Arthur. . 
« 

« 

Wm. Cameron, 

Stratton . . 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 

Alex. McFayden, 

Emo. . 


6 
15 

3 
10 


870 
2,137i 

439 
1,147 


2 
3 
1 
1 


122 
232i 

2 
417i 


4 
9 

2 

7 


473 

1,425 

319 

941 


2 

4 

2 

11 


32U 
621f 
320^ 
1,180 


Atwood 




Blue. 


7 
3 
4 


962i 
480 
412f 


1 


i 


2 
2 
6 


238 

320 

559f 


6 

1 
5 
2 
1 
2 
2 


729 


Curran 




Dewart 

Dilke 


1 


99f 


162 


Morley 

Morson 


2 
12 
11 
6 
4 
5 


241 
1,367 
1,638 

727 
521 
816^ 


3 


163 


1 
8 
6 

5 
3 
3 


80 
l,064i 
8741 
645 
361 
4741 


728 
317^ 


McCrosson .... 






161 


Nelles 


4 


85 


323 


PatuUo 


240 


Pratt 








Roseberry 








Shenston 


















Sifton 

Spohn 

Sutherland 

Tait 


13 
14 
10 
2 
14 


1,900 
2,009 
l,540f 
160i 
1,866 


2 
1 
3 


169f 
77i 
36 


13 
13 
11 
2 
10 


l,990i 
1,7451 
1,569 
324 
l,393i 


1 

"l 
4 

1 


80 

"l74^' 
652 


Tovell 


2 

1 


119f 
3 


156 


Worthington . . . 
Aylesworth .... 














Barwick 


















Burriss 


« 
« 

« 
« 
« 

« 
(( 
(( 
<( 
« 
« 
« 

J. E. Gibson, 

Dryden . . 
« 

« 

« 

« 

« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 

H. E. Holland, 

Kenora. . 


1 
6 

2 
8 


159i 

907i 

100§ 

1,286^ 






2 
4 
2 
6 


319 
665 i 
lOOi 
967i 


2 
1 
1 

2 
3 

1 


3595 


Carpenter 

Crozier 


1 


70f 


160 
160 


Dance 


1 

1 
1 


159i 

2 
h 


319i 
526 


Devlin 


Dobie 

Fleming 


1 


80i 


3 


394f 


\m 


Kingsford 

Lash 


9 
1 
4 


1,418 
162 
657^ 


3 


80i 


7 
1 
4 


1,102 
164 
656^ 


2 
1 

5 
2 
1 
2 


341 
160 


Mather 






580 


Miscampbell. . . 


1 


11 


320 


Potts 


3 

1 


482 
158^ 


4 

1 


65U 
158 


160 


Richardson .... 






240 


Roddick 








Woodyatt 


















Aubrey 

Britton 


7 

13 
5 
2 
3 
5 
8 

20 
7 
8 
8 

10 
2 
5 
5 

28 

12 
9 


1,084^ 
2,017 
639^ 
222i 
470^ 
581 
1,097 
3,153 
1,118§ 
1,270 
1,059 
1,272 
240 
599f 
794 
3,519 

1,880 
1,093 


1 


8U 


7 
5 
3 


1,084^ 
796i 
431 


6 

1 
3 


852 
162 


Eton 


1 


2 


764 


Langton 




Melgund 


3 


112i 


4 
3 
3 
2 
5 
9 
4 
2 


630i 
273 
542 
312i 
800 
1,442 
579 
242 






Mutrie 


1 


122 


Redvers 








Rowell 






3 
12 


350 


Rugby 

Sanford 


1 


4 


1,520J 


Southworth. . . . 

Temple 

Van Home. . . . 


1 
1 


88 
65 


. 1 

1 
2 
4 

2 

1 

3 
6 


80 
160 
240 


Wabigoon 

VV^ain Wright. . . . 


1 


7 


4 

4 

12 

7 
6 


592i 
634 
1,753 

1,140 
685 


717} 
319f 


Zealand 

Melick 

Pellatt 


3 

1 
1 


217J 

1 
29 


164i 

508 
818 



42 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 







Appendix No 


13— 


Continued 












Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


CO 

C 

Q, 0) 
o u 




CO 

u 

0) 
CO 

3 

a 
d 


2 
"o 

CO 

CO 

'o 
6 


CO 

o w 


to 


CO 

C 
4) 

OS 

d-2 


CO 
4)13 

O^ 
« C 

d o- 


Balfour 


Sudbury 

« 

« 
« 

« 

u 

U 

u 
« 

Sudbury 

(I 

u 

u 

« 

« 

« 

Nipissing 

« 

it 

it 

it 

it 

Lennox and 
Addington . . 

Frontenac .... 
« 

« 

Lennox and 

Addington. . 
« 

it 

Haliburton . . . 
Parry Sound . . 

Nipissing 

« 
« 

Renfrew 

Parry Sound . . 


J. K. MacLennan, 

Sudbury. . 
« 

it 

« 

« 
« 

« 

John Brown, 

Markstay . . 
« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

J. P. Marchildon, 

Sturgeon Falls 

« 
tt 
tt 

Chas. Booth, 

Denbigh . . 














1 


160 


Blezard 


5 
1 
2 
1 


796 

60 

297 

136 


1 


h 


4 


643^ 




Broder 


1 


60 


Capreol. ...... 






2 


342 




Chapleau 




49 






Dell 


2 
4 
2 


320 
446 
32U 


4 


417 


Garson 












Hanmer 


4 
1 


5161 
80 






2 


161 


Lumsden 








Morgan 

Neelon 






















3 
1 

3 
4 


300 
1011 

342 
590^ 


1 

1 
1 
1 
2 


77 


Rayside 


1 

2 
6 


86 

2431 
855i 








Appleby 

Casimir 






159i 




4 


79 


Dunnet 






164^ 


Hagar 


10 


1,679^ 


2 


63 


6 


760 


1601 


Jennings 

Kirkpatrick 

Ratter 
















1 


171 


3 

1 
2 
3 


500 

160 

204i 

50U 






2 


232 




Caldwell 










Cosby 










4 


534 


Grant 


2 


U 


1 


147 




Macpherson . . . 
Martland . . . 






1 


159i 






1 


159^ 


4 
1 

1 


412^ 


Springer 

Abinger . 






82 














219 




tt 
it 
tt 

it 
tt 

tt 

Unattached 


1 


39 






1 


100 




" N. 










Clarendon . . 














2 
1 


176 


Denbigh 


1 


99 










99 


Miller Pt 












Palmerston 


















McClintock 














1 
1 

1 


50 


Shawanaga. . . . 
Airy 


(( 

(( 
tt 
tt 
tt 

tt 

it 

Total 














2 


2 


210 






2 


210 


157^ 


Finlayson 

Murchison 
























Sabine . . . 














3 
1 
3 


495 


Burns 














199 


Burton 






1 


1 






3 
















718 


90,143 


113 


5,767 


443 


51,745 


411 


54,349i 









No. of lots assigned 225 

SELBY DRAPER, 

Chief Clerk. 

W. R. LEDGER, 

Clerk of Free Grants. 



No. of acres assigned 28,080 

W. C. CAIN, 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



43 



Appendix No. 13 — Continued 



ISLANDS SOLD 


Part or Parcel 


Township 


District or 
County 


Agent 


No ot Acres 
Sold 


Island A 


Mason 


Parry Sound 

u 

« 

Lennox and Add- 

ington 

Frontenanc 


I. M. Campbell 

u 

« 

« 

« 


4. 


" B (Part) 


(( 


1.5 


" B (Part) 


(( 


4.63 


" B 429, Georgian 
Bay 


« 


.7 


Island A, Weslemcoon 
Lake 


Ashby 




Island B, Sharbot Lake 


Olden 


5. 
1.94 


Big Pine Island, Loon 
Lake 


Chandos 


Peterborough .... 


Wm. Hales 


1.25 


Pine Island, Loon Lake 


.75 


Wolfe Island, Charles- 
ton Lake 


Lansdowne 

Drayton . . 




52.25 


Parcel M C 20, Abrams' 
Lake 


Kenora 




1.7 


Island F P 97, Pelican 
Lake 


« 


« 




.1 


Location M C 8 


« 


(( 




.9 


Parcel R K 244 


Zealand 

Baxter 


u 




5.14 


Parcel 2, Island 133. . . 


Muskoka 

it 
u 

« 
Haliburton 


J. B. Brown 

« 

« 


1.5 


Island South of Big or 
Tobin's Island 


Medora 


.34 


Island S, Lake Joseph. . 
Bonner's Island, St. 

Mary's Lake 

Echo Island 


Humphry 

Stephenson 

Stanhope 

Aweres 

South Crosby. . . . 
« 

Darling 

Nipissing 


.9 

1.88 

2. 


Club Island, Island 
Lake 


Algoma 


Thos. Dean 

Unattached 

« 

H.J. Ellis 


2.5 


German Island 

Sauvage Island 

Waba Island, White 
Lake 


Leeds 


2.23 
2.70 


Lanark 


2. 


Idlewylde Island, Lake 
Nipissing . ... 


Nipissing 


3.4 












99.31 



44 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 13 — Continued 



ISLANDS PATENTED 



Part or Parcel 


Township 


District or 
County 


Agent and 
Post Office Address 


No. of Acres 
Patented 


Island B 357 


Cowper 


Parry Sound 

« 

« 

u 

U 

« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 

« 
« 

Muskoka 


Miss I. M. Campbell 
(< 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

M 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

Jas. B. Brown 

« 


1 70 


" B 716 


u 


2.70 


" B 597 


u 


1: 


« B 358 


« 


4 


" C 57 (Part) 


Carling 


9.50 


" C 35 


« 


1.36 


« C 309 


« 


3.64 


" 842 A 


Harrison 

« 

« 
« 

Conger 


.40 


« D 


34 


« 383 A 


1.15 


Pt. 4, Island 96 

Ft. Island 355 A 

Ni Island B 28 


2. 
4.93 

5. 


Island B 7311 


(( 


8.80 


« B 285 


« 


1.70 


Pt. Island 3464 T P. .. 


Mowat 


5. 


Good Luck Island 

Cranberry or Island A. 


Morrison 


1. 
.40 




54.62 



SELBY DRAPER, 

Chief Clerk. 



W. 



C. CAIN, 

Deputy Minister. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 45 



Appendix No. 13 — Concluded 



List showing number of locations by Returned Soldiers in Sale and Free Grant Territory, 
respectively. 

Number 
District Agency Locations 

In Sale Territory 

Algoma Hearst 13 

" Kapuskasing ■ 13 

" Thessalon 1 

" Sault Ste. Marie r Nil 

Temiskaming Englehart 3 

" Cochrane 28 

" Elk Lake Nil 

" Haileybury 1 

" Matheson 19 

" New Liskeard Nil 

Sudbury Massey 1 

" Sudbury 1 

« Unattached 13 

" Markstay 1 

Nipissing North Bay 7 

Thunder Bay Port Arthur 11 

Kenora Kenora 1 

113 

Statement showing number of lots resumed for non-performance of settlement duties by, or on 
behalf of returned soldiers. 

In Sale Territory 

Temiskaming Cochrane . 28 

" New Liskeard 5 

" Englehart 3 

" Matheson 12 

" Hearst 19 

" Elk Lake Nil 

Algoma Massey 1 

Cochrane Kapuskasing 11 

Nipissing North Bay 2 

" Markstay 1 

" Unattached. ; 1 

83 

SELBY DRAPER, W. C. CAIN, 

Chief Clerk. Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



46 



PEPOPT OF TFE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 14 

Statement showing the number of purchasers and of acres sold; of lots resumed for non- 
performance of the settlement duties; and of patents issued in Townships other than 
Free Grant during the year ending 31st October, 19^3. 



Tow;nship 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


U2 



Is2 

c« 

6 <^ 


CO 

°^ 

rt 


4) 

oi 


c 
6"" 


en 

0) 

II 

<u 


Machin 


Cochrane 


S. J. Dempsay, 

Cochrane. . 


2,561 

1,122| 

2,769 

3,500 

1,916^ 

4,031 

1,194 

4,003^ 

2,404 

1,347 

4,848 

1,884 

1,278| 

2,033 

2,138 

2,544 

1,176 
4,442 
4,984 
4,195 
6,105 
7,669 

4,189 
3,489 
3,894 


18 
8 
20 
22 
12 
26 
8 
25 
16 
. 9 
32 
13 
8 
14 
14 
16 

8 
31 
32 
27 
56 
52 

43 
35 
40 


5 

22 

10 

22 

5 

19 

4 

10 

14 

2 

14 

6 

7 

4 

2 

15 


670 
2,919 
1,370 
3,564 

818 

3,02U 
612 

1,619| 

2,097 
302 

2,049 
890 

1,104 
570 
293 

2,376§ 










Blount 


« 

« 

« 
« 
« 

« 

« 
« 

Cochra 

« 
« 

« 
« 

Cochra 

(( 

(( 

Timiskj 




« 




2 
1 
4 


328 


Shackleton 




(( 
(( 
(( 
(( 
{( 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 


4 


B rower . . 




604^ 


Pyne 








2 

3 

3 

10 


306 


Fauquier 

Fox 




283 




470 


Clute. . 




1,200 


Kennedy 




Calder 


2 

14 

1 

11 


287 


Glackmeyer 




1,7621 
157 




Leitch 




476 


Colquhoun 








3 
3 


484^ 
450 


Casgrain 


le 


J. L. O'Donnell, 
Hearst. . . 


Devitt 


« 

M 

u 
<( 




11 
17 
28 
25 
20 

19 
9 
6 


1,738 
2,643 
4,339 
3,650 
2,905 

1,841 
893 

552 




Eilber 




1 
3 
4 


7i 


Hanlan 




489 


Kendall 




491 


Lowther 






O'Brien 

Owens . . 


tie 


H. E. Sheppard, 
Acting Agent, 
Kapuskasing. . . 

« 
Jos. WooUings, 


5 

2 


195 
221 


Williamson 






Bavlev 


imine. . 










Englehart . 
« 

« 






Blain 




















Catharine 

Chamberlain . . 








636A 
3U 
40 


4 
1 
1 


10 


1,598 


14 
4 
9 


1,037 
660i 
1,314| 


Dack 


« 


1 


159^ 


Davidson 


« 
« 






Eby 












5 
5 


162^ 


Evanturel 












686 


Gross 














Ingram 




305^ 

481 
15U 
1,154 
460 

187 


2 
3 

1 
7 
3 
1 


1 

3 

1 
3 
3 

7 


1591 

480 

16U 

• 479 
480 

1,148^ 


2 
3 
6 
3 
2 
1 
3 
4 


310 


Marter 


« 
« 
« 
« 
u 


480 


Marquis 

Otto 


844 
109i 


Pacaud 


298i 


Pense 


37i 


Robillard 


« 
(( 
u 
(( 




355i 


Savard 












630 


Sharpe 














Truax 




1,115^ 

1,056 

234 

1,090 


7 

7 
3 

7 


5 

1 


802 
160 


1 

1 

10 

2 


160 


Benoit 


Timiskannnff 


J. E. Mills, 

Matheson . . . 
(( 




Beatty 


Distr 
Cochra 


ict 

le 


148 
819 


Bond 




1 


i63 


210 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



47 



Appendix No. 14 — Continued 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


u 

o"© 




a 1- 

rt 

6 " 


en 

wi 0) 
°^ 


to 
<u 
Ii 

•si 

OJ 


en 

c 
a> 

^'^ 
^ tn 

_(n 

6"" 


»*- c 
<u 


Bowman 


Ccc rant 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
u 
u 
« 

Timiskaming. . 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
u 
u 
« 
« 
« 
« 
<( 

Timiskaming . . 

Timiskaming . . 

Nipissing 

« 

« 

« 

Sudbury 

« 
« 
« 
« 


J.E. Mills 

Mathefon. . '. 
« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 
« 

« 
(( 

J. W. Bolger, 

New Liskeard. . . 
« 

« 


316 
1,276 

313 
1,601 
3,094 

604 

160 
1,490 

659 
2,704 
2,026 
1,577 
1,290 
2,067 

857 

874 

160 
320 


2 

8 

2 

10 

20 

4 

1 

9 

4 

15 

13 

10 

9 

13 

6 

6 

1 
2 






8 
6 
10 
3 
3 


755 








875 


(^arr 






1,593 


Clergue 






329 






400 












■ 1 


157 






German 


1 
6 
5 
5 
1 
4 
4 
6 
4 

2 


152 


Hislop . .• 


1 

4 


143 
675 


809 


Matheson 

Mountjoy 

McCart 

Playfair 

Stock 


819 
738 


1 


161 


159 
637 






477 


Taylor 






821 


Walker 






399 


Armstrong 






314 


Auld 








Beauchamp 

Brethour . . . 


1 


160 


2 
3 
3 
4 
2 
6 
3 
2 
8 
5 
1 
12 
8 
7 
2 


319 


« 

" ! ! ! 
« 

« 


218 

1,230 

400 

639 

358 


2 
8 
3 
4 
3 


477 


Bryce 


2 


319 


360 


Bucke 


383 


Cane 


3 


479 


310 


Casey. .... 


834 


Dymond 

Firstbrook 






388 


« 

u 
(( 
(( 
« 
« 
« 

« 

Mark Morgan, 

Elk Lake. . . 


479 
397 
648 
100 
145 
605 
161 
324 
80 


3 
3 
4 
1 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 






321 


Harley 






1,039 


Hen wood 

Harris 


3 


483 


800 
160 


Hilliard 






1,684 


Hudson . . 






1,280 


Kerns 






961 


Lundy 


2 

1 


320 
120 


320 


Tudhope 

Smyth 




1 

5 

1 
3 

4 






90 


Lorrain 


Neil J. McAulay, 
Haileybury. . . 

J. P. Marchildon, 
Sturgeon Falls. . 


642 


4 


3 


393 




Mason 


503 




159 


Scollard 


John Brown, 

Markstay. . . 
w 

W. J. Parsons, 

North Bay . . 
« 

R. A. Teasdale, 
Massey . . 


476 

480 
289 

3,204 
639 


3 

4 
2 

20 

5 






324 


Hugel 










640 


Loudon . 








Phelps 














Widdifield 






10 

1 
2 


1,280 


Awrey 










147 


Hallam 


u 
u 
« 


552 
368 
321 
160 


4 
3 
2 
1 






372 


Harrow , , . . 








May 






1 
4 


75 


Salter 






641 



48 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 14 — Continued 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


tn 

<u 

Ui 

U 





u 
3 en 

cfl 
. J= 
U 


U3 


en 


nj a; 

1 
• in 
<u 


en 

al 

i— en 

.2 

d 


en 

— c 

01 

IS 


Shedden 


Sudbury 

« 

Sudbury 

« 
« 
« 

Kenora 

Algoma 

« 
u 
u 
« 

Algoma 

Rainy River. . . 

Thunder Bay.. . 

a 
« 

Sudbury 

Renfrew 

Bruce. 


R. A. Teasdal", 
Masscy 










1 

2 

4 

1 


50 


Victoria . . 


« 










295 


Bigwood 


J. K. Maclennan, 

Sudbury . . . 
u 

« 

« 

u 

H. E. Holland, 

Kenora . . . 

Thomas Dodds, 
Thessalon . . . 


140 
525 
314 
317 
160 

253 

154 


1 

3 
2 
2 
1 

2 

1 






488 


Delamere 






155 


Dowling 

Loughrin 

McKim 
























Drayton 






2 


295 


Bright 












Johnson 

Patton 






2 


120 


« 
« 

Thomas Dean, 
Sault Ste. Marie 

« 

C. J. Hollands, 
Fort Frances . . . 

S. H. Wilson, 

Port Arthur. . . 
« 

« 

E. Arthurs, 

Espanola . 


166 
160 

58 

781 


1 
1 
1 

5 








Striker 






2 
1 

2 
3 
2 


171 


Thompson 

Aweres 






58 










309 








326 


Vankoughnet . . . 
Watten 


170 

357 

2,634 

895 
311 

857 


1 

2 

16 

6 
2 
6 






319 














2 


216 










Nipigon 






1 


161 








Nairn 






2 






314 




Unattached 

« 


371 


4 














1 
4 
6 

2 
2 
2 
5 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 


133 


Badgerow 

Bagot 


Nipissing 

Renfrew 

Nipissing 

Bruce 


« 
« 
« 
« 


556 
100 
175 
300 


4 
1 
2 
3 






495 






575 








319 


Bruce 






150 


Bedford 


Frontenac 

Grey . . . 






295 




(( 










359 




Brant 


(< 










50 


Bromley 

Barrie 


Renfrew 

Frontenac 

Peterborough . . 
Sudbury 

Cochrane 

Algoma 

Nipissing 

Victoria 

Lanark 

Sudbury 

Grey 


« 










100 


« 










65 


Belmont 


« 










100 


Creighton 

Cleland 


« 










158 


« 
« 
« 
« 

li 


131 
160 
334 
375 
49 


1 
1 
2 
3 

1 
























1 
4 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 


308 








455 


Dalton 






341 


Darling 






326 


« 
« 


112 
100 


1 

1 






112 








100 


Egremont 


<i 






8 


Hastings 

Sudbury 


« 
« 


100 
300 


1 
2 






100 


Fairbank 


i 


i25 


278 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



49 



Appendix No. 14 — Concluded 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


6 

iz; 


u 

3 


CO 

u 

. c 
rt 
2; " 


1 
"0 1 

. (0 

V 


to 

c 

V 

a.o 

3 
• (0 

to 

2"" 


to 

11 

4) 


Falconer 


Nipissing 

Carleton 

Nipissing 

Sudbury 

Cochrane 

Peterborough . '. 

Renfrew 

Huron 

Timiskaming . . 

Frontenac 

Lennox and 
Addington . . . 

Lanark 

Sudbury 

Simcoe 

Hastings 

Simcoe 

Temiskaming. . 

Renfrew 

Frontenac 

Grey 


Unattached 


328 


2 






2 

1 

5 

1 

11 


328 


Fitzroy 






100 


Field 


« 
« 
« 


425 
183 


3 
2 






581 


Gibbons 






152 


Graham 






1 695 


Guibord 


« 
« 


367 


2 








Harvey 






3 


407 


Horton 


« 


100 


1 








Howick 






1 
2 
5 

1 


100 


James 


« 










231 


Kennebec 




1,202 


10 






647 


Kaladar. . 






128 


Lavant 


« 
it 
« 
« 


159 
586 
272 


1 
4 
2 








Lome 






6 

7 
5 


1,117 

1,015 

216 


Louise 






Matchedash .... 






Marmora 


« 

u 


100 


1 








Medonte 






1 
4 
1 
1 
3 


1*0 


Maisonville 


« 










429 


McNab 


it 










50 


Olden 


« 
« 
« 
« 


214 
365 
100 


3 
3 
2 






160 


Oso •. 






366 


Osprey 








Proton 


« 






1 


100 


Rutherford 


Manitoulin .... 

Renfrew 

Ontario 

Lanark 

Essex 


« 
« 


160 


1 








Ross 






1 
6 
1 
2 
1 


100 


Rama 


« 










552 


So. Sherbrooke . . 


« 










92 


Sandwich East. . 


« 


58 


1 






89 


Sydenham 


Grev 






50 


Seymour 


Northumber- 
land 

Victoria 

Lennox and 
Addington . . . 

Simcoe 

Sudbury 

Hastings 

Sudbury 

Temiskaming. . 

Renfrew 


« 


200 


1 








Somerville 






1 

1 
2 


93 


Sheffield 


« 










100 


Tiny 


« 










22 


Trill 


« 
« 

« 
« 


129 
100 
161 
161 


1 
1 

1 
1 








Tudor 






3 
1 


260 


Waters 






81 


Whitney 








Wilberforce 






2 


175 




Total 














137,977 


978 


355 


52,273 


471 


56,953 







Number of lots assigned 613 Number of acres assigned 83,981 



J. E. DRINKWATER, 
Clerk in charge. 

SELBY DRAPER, 
Chief Clerk. 



W. C. CAIN, 

Deputy Minister. 



50 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 14 — Concluded 

Statement showing the number of purchasers, acres sold and of patents issued in Townsites, 
during the year ending 31st October, 1923. 



Townsite. 



District or County. 



Agent. 



'. 




<c 






+-1 


03 


, 


C 


&? 


1-1 


4> 









. 


<*. to 

rt 
.-C 


«> 


" 


6-2 


:z; 


:z; 


2; 



(U T3 



<*- *^ 



Alexandra 

Belleville 

Capreol 

Cobalt, North 

Dryden 

Foleyet 

Fordwich 

Hearst 

Hornepayne 

Kirkland Lake 

Kapuskasing 

Killarney 

Macfarlane 

Moonbeam 

Missanabie 

Petewawa 

Sioux Lookout 

Swastika 

Winnipeg River Crossing 



Cochrane. . . . 
Hastings. . . . 
Sudbury. . . . 
Timiskaming 

Kenora 

Sudbury 

Huron 

Cochrane. . . . 

Algoma 

Timiskaming 
Cochrane. . . . 

Algoma 

Kenora 

Timiskaming 

Algoma 

Renfrew 

Kenora 

Timiskaming 
Kenora 



Unattached. 



H. E. Sheppard. 
Unattached .... 



W. G. A. Wood. 
Unattached. . . . 



1.00 
.50 
.64 
.11 
.25 

1.00 

2.00 

19.24 

.80 

1.72 

27.37 

.17 

3.82 
.16 

1.87 
.25 
.94 
.85 



163.57 



154 



51 



.50 

.72 



.75 

.06 

2.00 

18.50 



.87 

15.39 

.17 

1.32 



,34 
.50 

20 
.23 

23 



44.78 



SELBY DRAPER, 

Chief Clerk, 

J. B. PROCTOR, 

Clerk in Charge. 



W. C. CAIN, 
Deputy Minister qf Lands and Forests. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 51 

Appendix No. 15. 

Honourable James Lyons, 

Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ont. 

Sir, — Surveys were carried out under instructions from this department 
during the past year comprising the running of approximately 200 miles of 
base and meridian lines; 600 miles of township outlines; 2,000 miles of lake and 
river traverse, subdivision of two townships into lots and concessions and 
various timber and other miscellaneous surveys. 

Base and Meridian Lines 

Phillips & Benner, Ontario Land Surveyors, Port Arthur ; 

K. G. Ross, Ontario Land Surveyor, Sault Ste Marie, Ont., 
were engaged on base and meridian line work in the territory west of the Nepigon 
Forest Reserve, district of Thunder Bay, north and south of the Canadian National 
Railway. 

Township Boundaries 

J. W. Fitzgerald, Ontario Land Surveyor, Peterborough; 
Charles V. Gallagher, Ontario Land Surveyor, South Porcupine; 
McAuslan, Anderson & Moore, Ontario Land Surveyors, North Bay; 
Sutcliffe & Neelands, Ontario Land Surveyors, New Liskeard; 
Speight & VanNostrand, Ontario Land Surveyors, Toronto; 
H. J. Beatty, Ontario Land Surveyor, Pembroke, 

were engaged on the survey of township boundaries in the districts of Sudbury, 
Cochrane and Algoma, 

T. J. Patten, Ontario Land Surveyor, Little Current, subdivided 
the township of Mongowin, district of Sudbury. 

G. P. Angus, Ontario Land Surveyor, North Bay, subdivided the 
westerly part of the township of Thorning, district of Cochrane. 

Lake and River Traverse 

James S. Dobie, Ontario Land Surveyor, Thessalon, traverse of English 

River, district of Kenora. 
R. S. Kirkup, Ontario Land Surveyor, Port Arthur, traverse of Minnie- 

takie Lake and Big Sandy Lake, district of Kenora. 

C. R. Kenny, Ontario Land Surveyor, Sault Ste Marie, traverse of 

Moose River, district of Cochrane. 
J. T. Coltham, Ontario Land Surveyor, Parry Sound, traverse of part 

of Kabinakagami River, districts of Algoma and Cochrane. 
T. G. Code, Ontario Land Surveyor, Cobalt, traverse of part of 

Kabinakagami River,. district of Cochrane. 

D. J. Gillon, Ontario Land Surveyor, Fort Frances, traverse of Seine 

River, district of Rainy River. 
C. H. Wilkins, Ontario Land Surveyor, Hastings, traverse of Canoe 

and Smoke Lakes, in Algonquin National Park, district of Nipissing. 
Lang & Ross, Ontario Land Surveyors, Sault Ste. Marie, traverse of 

part of Sturgeon River and Upper English Rivers, district of 

Kenora. 



52 ' REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Timber Berth Surveys 

Timber line in Township 9 Z, district of Sudbury, by J. W. Fitzgerald, 

Ontario Land Surveyor, Peterborough. 
Timber lines in the township of Kittson and east of the township of 

Brigstocke, district of Timiskaming, by Sutcliffe & Neelands, 

Ontario Land Surveyors, New Liskeard. 

Miscellaneous Surveys 

Survey of summer resort parcels on Rama Island and also on islands 

near mouth of the Severn River, by C. E. Fitton, Ontario Land 

Surveyor, Toronto. 
Survey of summer resort parcels at Bruce Beach in the township of 

Huron, county of Bruce, by E. D. Bolton, Ontario Land Surveyor, 

Listowel. 
Survey of parcels of land at Severn River, crossing Canadian Pacific 

Railway, township of Matchedash, county of Simcoe, by L. D. N. 

Stewart, Ontario Land Surveyor, Toronto. 

C. E. Fitton, Ontario Land Surveyor, Toronto, carried on the inspection 
of survey work in the field during the past season. 

Detailed reports of the several surveys for which returns have been made 
during the year will be found in Appendices 20 to 34, inclusive. 

L. V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 
Toronto, October 31st, 1923. 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



53 



Appendix No. 16 

Statement of Municipal Surveys confirmed during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1923. 



No. 



Name of 
Surveyor 



George L. Brown. 



Frank N. 
ford.... 



Ruther 



E. T. Wilkie . 



No. 



720 



731 



732 



Date of 
Instructions 



July 2, 1919. 



Aug. 24, 1922 



Nov. 22, 1922 



Description of Survey 



To survey the road allowance be 
tween the 4th and 5th concessions 
of the township of Williamsburg 
across lost 10, 11 and 12, in said 
township, and that stone or other 
durable monuments be placed to 
mark the boundaries of the same. 



To survey the road allowance be- 
tween the townships of Grantham 
and Niagara, extending from the 
Queenston and Grimsby Provincial 
Road to the lake shore road, and to 
plant durable monuments to mark 
the said road allowance as set out 
herein 



To survey the original road allow- 
ance between lots 31 and 32 in the 
1st concession of the township of 
Lancaster, county of Glengarry, 
from the Provincial Highway 
south to the St. Lawrence River, 
and to plant standard iron monu- 
ments to mark the said original 
road allowance 



Date when con- 
firmed under 
Ont. Statutes 
1920, chap. 48, 
sec. 11-18, in- 
clusive 



June 30, 1923. 



July 16, 1923. 



July 7, 1923. 



V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



W. C. CAIN, 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



54 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 17 

Statement of Municipal Surveys for which instructions issued during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1923. 



No. 



Name of 
Surveyor 



E. T. Wilkie . 



Oliver Smith. 



Roger M. Lee. 



A. G. Ardagh . 



Speight & Van 
Nostrand . . . . 



No. 



732 



733 



734 



735 



736 



Date of 
Instructions 



Nov. 22, 1922 



Mar. 19, 1923 



June 2, 1923. 



June 22, 1923 



Aug. 22, 1923 



Description of Survey 



To survey the original road allowance between lots 
31 and 32 in the 1st concession of the township of 
Lancaster, county of Glengarry, from the Provin- 
cial Highways south to the St. Lawrence River and 
to plant standard iron monuments to mark the said 
original road allowance. 

To survey the original road allowance between the 
13th and 14th concessions across lot 21, in the 
township of Harvey, county of Peterborough, and 
plant standard iron monuments to mark the limits 
of said road. 

To survey that part of the city of Brantford, in the 
county of Brant, lying between the westerly side 
of Rawdon Street and the centre line of Stanley 
Street and between the southerly side of Colborne 
Street, and the lands of the corporation of the city 
of Brantford on the north and to plant durable 
monuments to mark the several street lines within 
this described limit. 

To survey the line between the 15th and 16th con- 
cessions of the township of Sunnidale and the road 
allowance between lots 3 and 4, 6 and 7, 9 and 10 
in the 16th concession. 



To survey the street known as Spadina Crescent in 
the city of Toronto, in the county of York, as 
shown on registered plan D 33. 



L. V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



W. C. CAIN, 

Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



55 



Appendix No. 18 
Statement of Crown Surveys in progress during the twelve months ending October 31st, 1923. 



No 
1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 
17 
18 



Date of 
Instructions 



May 31, 1923 
April 15, 1923 
April 9, 1923 

April 8, 1923 
April 8, 1923 
April 15, 1923 
Aug. 30, 1923 
April 5, 1923 
April 5, 1923 
April 10, 1923 
April 15, 1923 



Name of 
Surveyor 



G. P. Angus. . 
H. J. Beatty. . 
J. T. Coltham. 



Description of Surveys 



Survey the west part of the township of 
Thorning, district of Cochrane 



June 


1, 


1923 


April 


15, 


1923 


May 


16, 


1923 


Aug. 


30, 


1923 


April 


15, 


1923 


June 


18, 


1923 


April 


15, 


1923 



T. G. Code 

J. S. Dobie 

J. W. Fitgerald.... 
J. W. Fitzgerald. . . 

D. J. Gillon 

C. V. Gallagher... 

R. S. Kirkup 

C. R. Kenny 

T. J. Patten 

K. G. Ross 

G. F. Summers. . . . 
SutclifTe & Neelands 

Sutcliffe & Neelands 
C. H. Wilkins.. .. 



Survey certain township outlines in the 
district of Algoma, west of A. C. Ry. . 

Traverse survey of Kabinakagami Lake 
and Kabibikagami River, district 
Cochrane and Algoma 



Amount 
paid 



Traverse part of Kabinikagami River, 
district Cochrane 



Traverse of part of English River and 
islands, districts Kenora and Patricia 

Survey certain township outlines south of 
C.P.R., district of Sudbury 



Survey of timber lines in township 9Z, 
district Sudbury 



Traverse of the Seine River, district of 
Rainy River 



Survey certain township outlines along 
the C. P. Ry., district of Sudbury 

Traverse shores of Minnietakie in 
district of Kenora 



Tranverse survey of Moose River, district 
of Cochrane 



McAuslan, Ander- 
son & Moore 



Survey of township Mongowin in district 
Sudbury 



Base and meridian line, district Thunder 
Bay 



Survey addition town plot of Alexandra, 
district of Cochrane 



Survey timber lines in the township of 
Kitson and east of Brigstocke, district 
of Timiskaming 



Survey certain township outlines east of 
the Abitibi, district of Cochrane. . . . 



Resurvey of shores of Canoe and Smoke 
Lakes 



Survey certain township outlines along 
C.P.R., district of Sudbury 



$2,350 00 
7,450 00 

3,000 00 
2,160 00 
8,000 00 
6,120 00 

250 00 
8,000 00 
6,100 00 
3,000 00 
4,160 00 
1,000 00 
7,267 50 

100 00 

200^00 
6,075 00 
2,940 00 

6,050 00 



$74,222 50 



L. V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



W. C. CAIN, 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



56 



TIEPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. ig 

Statements of Crown Surveys completed and closed during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1923. 



No. 



Date of 
Instructions 



Name of 
Surveyor 



Description of Survey 



Amount 
paid 



9 
10 
11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 

18 
19 



Sept. 26 

April 12 
April 27 



April 12 

April 12 

May 8 
April 12 

Apr: 



Apr 
Apr 
Apr 

Apr: 
Apr 
Apr: 
Apr: 
Apr: 
Apr 

Apr 
Apr 



1 17 

1 18 
1 18 
1 12 

1 1 
1 21 
1 26 
1 22 
1 12 
1 12 

1 5 
1 27 



1922 

1922 
1922 

1922 

1922 

1922 
1922 

1922 

1922 
1922 
1922 

1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 

1922 
1922 



G. P. Angus. 



H. J. Beatty.. . . , 
Jas. T. Coltham. 

Jas. S. Dobie. . . . 



J. W. Fitzgerald. . . 

C. E. Fitton 

Chas. V. Gallagher 

D.J.Gillon 

C. R. Kenny 

Roy S. Kirkup. . . . 



McAuslan, Ander- 
son & Moore . . . 



Mooney & Gill 

Phillips & Benner. . . 

T. J. Patten 

K. G. Ross 

Sutcliffe & Neelands, 



Speight & Van 
Nostrand 



E. T. Wilkie.. 
C. H. Wilkins. 



Resnrvey of certain lots in the township 
of Blount, district of Cochrane 



Survey certain township outlines, district 
of Algoma 



Traverse of Severn River between the 
townships of Matchedash, Baxter, 
Morrison, Wood 



Traverse the shore of the English River 
and the islands therein, districts of 
Kenora and Patricia 



Certain township outlines south of the 
Canadian Pacific Railway, district of 
Sudbury. 



Inspection of surveys, 1922. 



Certain township outlines along the Can 
adian Pacific Railway, district of Sud 
bury 



Traverse of islands and part of the shore 
lines Lake of Woods, district Rainy 
River 



Traverse of portion of Abitibi River, 
district of Cochrane 



Traverse shores of Wabigoon Lake, etc., 
district of Kenora 



Certain township outlines along Can 
adian Railway, district of Sudbury.. . . 

Certain lines in unsurveyed territory, 
district of Sudbury 



Base and meridian lines, district of 
Thunder Bay 



Traverse part Mississaga River, district 
Algoma 



Base and meridian lines, district Thunder 
Bay 



Certain township outlines on Abitibi 
River, district of Cochrane 



Certain township outlines on Abitibi 
River, district of Cochrane 



Renewal portion boundary between 
Ontario and Quebec 



Traverse certain lakes and rivers, town- 
ships Methuen and Anglesea 



$922 70 
4,157 85 

2,296 55 

4,216 00 

1,884 83 
1,230 44 

3,432 89 

5,844 70 
3,071 97 
3,687 20 

2,067 23 
2,238 00 
4,027 21 
4,939 71 
2,659 77 
2,122 39 

2,474 57 

548 90 

1,581 35 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



■57 



Appendix No. ig — Concluded. 

Statements of Crown Surveys completed and closed during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1923. 



Date of 
Instructions 



Name df 
Surveyor 



Description of Survey 



Amount 
paid 


$3,959 05 


805 


91 


1,583 


81 


377 


43 


343 


00 


745 


77 


2,269 97 


257 


75 



March 7, 1921 

June 5, 1922 

July 25, 1922 

Aug. 21, 1922 

Sept. 1, 1922 
June 30, 1922 
Dec. 11, 1922 

Nov. 17, 1922 
April 18, 1922 

April 15, 1923 

April 15, 1923 

April 27, 1923 
April 30, 1923 



June 19, 1923 



J. W. Pierce. . 
M. M.Gibson 
T. G. Code. . . 
L. Mooney . . . 



K. G. Ross. 
K. G. Ross. 
K. G. Ross. 



C. E. Fitton . 
R. S. Kirkup. 



Speight & Van 
Nostrand . . . 



Phillips & Benner. 

C. E. Fitton 

C. E. Fitton 



L. D. N. Stewart. 

E. D. Bolton 

L. D. N. Stewart. 



Survey boundary between Ontario and 
Manitoba 



Certain survey work, Presquile Park, 
county of Northumberland 



Traverse Reuben Lake, etc., district 
Nipissing 



Survey timber berth line, township 9 Z, 
district of Sudbury 



Survey Island Lake, township Aweres. . 

Survey Pine Island in St. Mary's River. 

Survey of water power possibilities, 
English and Sturgeon Rivers, district 
of Kenora 



Survey part of Rama Island . 



Survey of islands in Wabigoon Lake, 
district of Kenora 



Township outlines in the vicinity of 
Mattagami River, district of Cochrane 

Survey certain meridian and base lines, 
district of Thunder Bay 



Inspection of surveys, 1923 . 



Survey Rama Island at Washaga and 
islands in Severn River 



Architectural iron and bronze posts. 



Services and expenses in connection with 
Severn River survey 



Survey of cottage sites at Bruce Beach, 
township Huron 



Services and expenses re extension of 
parks 



184 50 

9,722 93 

9,355 92 
4,431 00 

561 00 
500 00 

152 50 

803 35 

173 17 



Total. 



$94,055 30 



L. V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



W. C. CAIN, ' 
Deputy Minister of Lands and Forests. 



58 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 20 
Survey of Township 9 Z, District of Sudbury 

Peterboro, Ont., December 7th, 1923. 

Sir, — I beg to report that, agreeable to your instructions dated August 
30th, 1923, I have completed the survey of the line between the east and west 
halves of township 9 Z in the district of Sudbury and beg to submit herewith 
plan — timber plan, field notes and accounts, all of which I trust will be found 
satisfactory to your department. 

I commenced the survey at an iron post planted by myself earlier in the 
season to mark the three-mile point on the north boundary of the township 9 Z 
and from this point I ran due south astronomically six miles, three chains, and 
seventy-six links where I intersected the north boundary of the township 8 Z, 
surveyed by Ontario Land Surveyor James Dobie in 1913. As I had taken 
an observation on Polaris for azimuth on June 27th last at a point just eleven 
chains and sixty-three links east of my present starting point — particulars of 
which I have given in the accompanying field notes. I did not think it necessary 
to observe again at the exact starting point. The country south, for the first 
thirty-three chains and twenty-five links, is rocky and was burnt over in the 
year 1921 and there is now on the ground standing and fallen dead spruce — 
Banksian pine, white birch and poplar with small poplar springing up. At 
the above-named point we reach the green timber consisting of spruce from 
ten to twenty inches in diameter, white and yellow birch and Banksian pine 
up to sixteen inches in diameter, and a fair quantity of white pine running from 
ten to thirty inches in diameter, the above size and class of timber, with the 
exceptions of very small patches of swamp and brule, continues to the end of the 
line. The country is of a very rolling rocky character and is absolutely devoid 
of agricultural land, but to my idea contains much valuable white pine and 
other classes of timber. We had snow and a very hard frost on the 13th of 
September, the weather continuing cold and cloudy for the balance of the 
work, so that I was unable to get another observation. I am glad to report, 
however, that according to my own chainage on the north boundary of town- 
ship 9 Z, and that of Mr. Dobie's on the north boundary of the township 8 Z, 
I have succeeded in practically dividing the township into east and west halves. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. W. Fitzgerald, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

To the Honourable Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



59 



Appendix No. 21 
Survey of Portion Mississaga River 

Little Current, Ont., February 21st, 1923. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit to you the following report on the survey 
of a portion of the Mississaga River which I have made in accordance with 
instructions from your department, dated April 26th, 1922. 

I left here on June 3rd, by motor boat, with a part of my party and on 
arrival at the mouth of the Mississaga River engaged more canoemen. 




Aubrey Falls, Mississaga River. Going up a heavy rapids on Mississaga River. 

I Started the work near mining location No. 3 in Gladstone township and 
on the completion of that section of it proceeded up the river to find the next 
starting point, the east limit of the township of Otter. Although we watched 
carefully for that line we missed finding it partly through underestimating 
our speed. When we finally located our position the camp had gone well up 
into Berth F, so I decided to complete the survey of that portion. on our return 
down the river. On the completion of the work through Bark Lake and up to 
the intersection of the north boundary of Berth T, the north boundary of the 
Mississaga Forest Reserve, we found that on account of the very low water it 



60 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

was unadvisable to return down the Mississaga and returned by the canoe 
route to Biscotasing and railway to Little Current where we arrived on the 
2 6th of September. 

As directed, posts, numbered and properly marked, were planted well 
above flood water at intervals not exceeding about one mile and at every lot 
or township line which we found. The posts are all of cedar with the exception 
of a few tamarac ones where cedar was not convenient. Where there was soil 
a hole for the post was dug about two feet deep and where loose stones were to 
be found, a cairn or mound, usually four to five feet wide at the base, was built 
around the post. The cairns are noted in the field notes. 

On the heavy rapids or falls levels were taken to ascertain the fall. On all 
considerable falls of water check levels were also made. 

There is considerable white and ned pine and in places there appears to 
be an enormous quantity of it as indicated in the notes. The kind and size of 
timber and brule country was carefully noted throughout. 

On nearing Bark Lake a good deal of tamarac up to six inches in diameter 
was observed. 

Along the whole course of the river and lakes the soil is sand and sandy 
loam and gravel with occasional beds of cobble stone. In only one or two 
places was any clay subsoil noticed. There are no great tracts of farming land. 

Away from the river and occasionally along the river there are rocky hills 
and ranges of rocky hills from 50 feet to 200 or 300 feet high. 

Minisinokwa, Lower Green and Bark Lakes which we surveyed, are very 
attractive and contain many desirable islands. The hills around those lakes 
are mostly well timbered and slope beautifully down to the waters. There 
are also many fine sand beaches on those lakes. 

With the returns I am forwarding a number of films of photographs made 
of some interesting spots in the country traversed. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 
■ 

Your obedient servant, 

T. J. Patten, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
To His Honour, Minister Lands and Forests, 
Toronto. 



Appendix No. 22 



Survey of Shore Line and Islands, Lake of the Woods, 
District of Kenora 

Fort Frances, Ont,, February 24th, 1923. 

Sir, — I have the honour of submitting this report on the traverse survey 
of the shore line and islands in the southern part of Lake of the Woods, made 
under instructions from the Department of Lands and Forests, dated May 
18th, 1922. 

This survey being a continuation of that made in 1921, was conducted 
on the same system, the original surveys made by the Dominion Government 
forming the basis: the surveys on the ground and the plans thereof being pre- 
pared to correspond with ranges 22, 23, 24, 25 and 26, east of the principal 
meridian. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 61 

The survey was commenced immediately after the receipt of instructions, 
the main shore traverse commencing at a post marked 12 M. planted at the 
end of the traverse made in 1921. This post is at the westerly extremity of 
the peninsula between Stoney Portage and Stevens Bay, which form part of 
Sabaskong Bay. 

The various islands were traversed in the usual manner: — polaris obser- 
vations being taken during the course of the work — observations at elongation 
were taken at all main observation stations, while time observations, based 
on the tables supplied by the department, were taken at various points on 
the traverse as the work progressed. 

In making the traverse of the main shore separate traverses were made 
of the different parts. Turtle Lake and Obabikon Lake being also kept separate. 
The fixed notes have been prepared for each of the divisions separately as 
follows : 

1. Stevens Bay — From the 12 M. post at the end of the 1921 traverse to a 
point nearly due north therefrom. 

2. Sabaskong and Button Bays — From the end of the traverse No. 1 to an 
iron post marking the west extremity of the south boundary of L R. 35 B, omitting 
Turtle Lake. 

3. Turtle Lake. 

4. Obabikon Lake South — Commencing at the end of traverse No. 2 ending 
at the end of traverse No. 5. 

5. Obabikon Lake North — Commencing at an iron post marking the south 
fwest angle L R. 35 B, thence to the end of traverse No. 4. 

6. Miles Bay — From the same point of commencement as No. 5 to the 
'end of the season's work. 

Mile posts were planted continuously from 0. miles at the aforesaid 12 M. 
post on traverses 1, 2 and 5, except when the traverse crossed Indian reserves 
^on which the posts were omitted — traverse 3, 4 and 5 were posted separately. 

Continuous traverses were run through the islands, connecting with the 
main shore traverse and with various points on the traverse made in the previous 
season. The whole system finally closing on a post planted in 1921 at station 
68 on the traverse of Dawson Island — G. 1793. 

During the progress of the survey the courses and distances of the traverses 
Iwere worked out by latitude, and departure in the same manner as in 1921, 
while the island traverses were plotted, and any errors detected were rectified 
by re-reading angle and distances until the traverse closed satisfactorily. 

Plans and field notes have been prepared in the same manner as those of 
last season; island description and acreage being shown on each plan. 

In some general descriptions of the islands given in 1921 holds good for 
this season's work. There are many very fine islands for summer resort purposes, 
on nearly all of which there is valuable white, red or Jack pine timber. 

There was no delay in the season's work from heavy wind. The survey 
was held up for a day or two in October on account of very dense smoke from 
forest fires, principally in Minnesota. 

The plans being prepared in accordance with the original ranges, should 
be joined to those of last season with np difficulty. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. J. GiLLON, 

Honourable Minister of Lands and Forests, Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Toronto, Ontario. 



62 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 23 

Survey of Lakes and Rivers, District of Timiskaming 

Cobalt, February 28th, 1923. 

Sir, — In obedience to your instructions, dated July 25th, 1922, to traverse 
certain lakes in the district of Timiskaming, I have the honour to report as 
follows : 

Routine of Work 

The work was commenced with the survey of Reuben Lake on August 7th. 
Completing this survey we moved camp on August 14th to Redwater Lakes. 
Surveyed Rankin Lake, Upper and Lower Redwater Lakes and moved to 
Boyce Lake on August 23rd. On September 3rd, we moved to Wicksteed 
Lake and carried on with the survey of this lake to the south boundary of the 
township of Kenny, completing the survey and moving to Cobalt on 
September 23rd. 

The following is the mileage of traverse : 

Reuben Lake 13 miles. 

Rankin Lake 43^ " 

Upper and Lower Redwater Lakes 103^ " 

Royce Lake 16^ " 

Wicksteed Lake 58^ " 

Total 102^ " 

Method of Survey 

The method of survey was the same as in previous years, i.e., transit and 
stadia. Particular attention was taken in the blazing and marking of trees 
on islands and at about one mile intervals along the shore. 

In cases where township lines crossed the lakes they were properly posted 
at one chain in perpendicular width from the shore. Bearing trees were marked 
and both posts and bearing trees are shown in the plans and field notes. 

Description of Lakes 

Reuben, Rankin, Upper and Lower Redwater and Boyce Lakes are all 
very similar as to shore line. The shore line being fairly high and mostly rocky. 
The timber dififers somewhat. This is shown on the plans. 

Wicksteed Lake, this being farther south than the lakes previously mentioned, 
the overburden along the shores is heavier and in many places is a good clay 
loam — most suitable for farming. The country around the lake has been 
timbered over for years. There is a very extensive brule to the east of the north 
part of the lake, apparently running a little to the east of south. I walked over 
six miles through this and it continued farther. The plan shows the timber 
close to the shore at different parts of the lake. 

Owing to the lake level being raised, we had considerable difficulty at 
some places in making the survey. This was more or less overcome by having 
the rodman take compass shots through the flooded timber from the several 
points on which he gave me readings, estimating as nearly as possible the distance 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 63 

to the shore. These are shown in the field notes, but are not shown on the 
plans, as they are not measured distances. The points at which stadia shots 
were taken are marked with blue chalk on the trees and if it is required actual 
measurements may be taken any time in the winter. 
Accompanying this report are : 

Plans— Reuben Lake, Rankin Lake, Upper and Lower Redwater 

Lakes, Royce Lake, Wicksteed Lake. 
Diary. 

Field Notes — one book containing all notes. 
Time book. 
The above is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Yours obedient servant, 



Cobalt, Ontario, February 28th, 1923. 



T, G. Code, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 



Appendix No. 24 
Traverse Part of English River, District of Patricia 

Thessalon, Ont., April 24th, 1923. 

Sir, — In accordance with your instructions, date April 18th, 1922, I spent 
the summer of 1922 in making a traverse of part of the English River and lake 
expansions of the same, and beg to submit the following report. 

The survey was commenced at the outlet of Lac Seul and continued down 
stream as far as Indian Lake where operations were discontinued for the season. 
A earful traverse of the main river and all lake expansions, including Mattawa 
River, Shallow Lake and Little Shallow Lake was made. In addition to which 
the survey of Trout Lake River, Cedar River, Long Legged River and Wabigoon 
River as far as the first falls on each of these streams. 

The survey was made by the usual method of transit and stadia, controlled 
on some of the larger lakes by triangulations expanded from carefully chained 
bases. Astronomic observations were taken very frequently and bearings 
were checked by long control sights wherever circumstances would permit. 

At frequent intervals along the shore, averaging about a mile apart, sub- 
stantial wooden posts were planted in cairns of stones. Each of these posts 
with very few exceptions was planted at a transit station. The posts were 
numbered consecutively from one upwards, each post being marked with the 

letter P, followed by the number of the post, thus "P. No " All posts 

were marked with a proper scribing iron. 

All islands within the limits of the survey were carefully traversed and 
tied to transit stations on the main shofe. The islands were numbered con- 
secutively from one upwards. Most of the islands were marked by a post set 
in a substantial mound of stones, the post being marked with the letter "I" 
followed by the number of the island, thus "I. No. ..." In some cases an 
island was marked by a prominent tree blazed conspicuously and marked 



64 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

in a manner similar to the posts. In cases where there were no trees and where 
it appeared Hkely that a post would be moved by ice, no distinguishing mark 
was left, but all such islands can be easily identified by reference to the plan 
of the survey. 

At each of the rapids and falls where there is any possibility of future 
hydro-electric developments, a site was laid out to provide for such develop- 
ment. These sites are all large enough to control the various water powers 
and provide ample room for the construction of such dams, flumes, and other 
structures as may be necessary. The lines around these sites were not cut 
out on the ground, but are indicated on the plans and the proper position of 
these lines is marked on the ground by substantial posts in mounds of stone, 
erected on each of the projected lines a sufficient distance back from the shore 
to ensure their permanency. These posts are marked with the letters W.P.R. 
to indicate water power reserve. 

No levels were run at any of these falls as all information regarding the 
heights of the different falls, flow of water, etc., had already been obtained 
by the Ontario Hydro Power Commission and by the Dominion Water Power 
Branch of the Department of Interior, In addition to this a line of precise 
levels has been run during the past few months down this portion of the English 
River by the Geodetic Survey Branch of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa. 

A copy of the field plan of my survey showing the location of all monuments 
planted during the season was sent to the Geodetic Survey Branch last fall, 
in order that the standard bench marks established by their parties could be 
tied to the monuments planted by myself wherever possible. 

The English River forms the boundary between the districts of Kenora 
and Patricia. It is a large stream as is shown by the fact that the discharge as 
determined by the Ontario Hydro-Electric Power Commission's engineers at 
Oak Falls, on October 19th, 1915, was found to be 9,358 cubic feet per second. 
There are several sites suitable for water power development on a large scale, 
and the large stream flow coupled with the splendid facilities for storage, render 
the power possibilities of this river of great importance. The Dominion Water 
Power Branch of the Department of the Interior has collected very complete 
data regarding the power possibilities of the English River and the reports are 
available for those who are interested. 

The English River flows from Lac Seul in a general westerly and south- 
westerly direction. The first falls occur a couple of miles down stream from 
Lac Seul, where Upper and Lower Ear Falls, which are only about a quarter 
of a mile apart, drop twelve feet and nineteen feet respectively, giving a com- 
bined drop of approximately thirty-one feet. From Ear Falls the river continues 
with gentle current for a distance of about fourteen miles to Camping Lake. 
This lake is over two miles across and a short distance below the lake the river 
breaks through a narrow gorge less than a chain across at Manitou Chute, 
where there is a drop of three and a half feet. A quarter of a mile down stream 
is situated Manitou Falls, where there is a total drop of twenty-eight and a 
half feet in a quarter of a mile. The combined head at Manitou Falls including 
Manitou Chute would be about thirty-two feet, which with the large stream 
flow of the English River would make a power of great importance. There 
is a very good site for the construction of a dam at the foot of Manitou Falls. 

Between Manitou Chute and Manitou Falls, Cedar River enters from 
the southeast. This river was traversed for about two miles up to the first 
falls. The portion of Cedar River traversed is fairly wide and flows with a 
sluggish current through a clay country and is bordered for the most part with 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 65 

grass and willow flats with hills behind timbered with large poplar, spruce, 
jack pine, balsam, etc. 

From Lac Seul to Camping Lake the English River flows through a clay 
country. The immediate shore in many cases is low, particularly around the 
many small tributaries which flow into it, but generally speaking rises con- 
siderably a short distance back. There are some rock exposures but not many, 
and they are mostly covered with a heavy mantle of clay. The most prominent 
rock exposures are at Upper and Lower Ear Falls. The prevailing timber 
along this stretch of river is large poplar with much spruce and balsam through- 
out. For a couple of miles above Camping Lake the banks are flat and covered 
with grass and willows for some distance back. 

About two miles above Camping Lake a large stream called the Mattawa 
River enters from the northwest. At the junction of the English and Mattawa 
Rivers, the Hudson's Bay Company formerly had a trading post which has 
been abandoned for some years and the buildings have entirely disappeared. 

The Mattawa River flows from Shallow Lake which is situated about 
four miles up stream from the junction. The Mattawa River widens out in 
places into small lake expansions and the banks generally speaking are of clay, 
the general characteristics as regards both land and timber being similar to 
the portion of the English River above described. 

Shallow Lake is about ten miles long and four wide with a long narrow 
bay reaching off to the west from the southwest corner of the lake for about 
four miles. The main axis of the lake is almost due north and south. The 
shores on the west side are for most part high and rocky, and in many places 
well timbered with spruce, jack pine, poplar, balsam, birch, etc. There is, 
however, quite an extensive area of burnt country on the west side about two 
to four miles north of the outlet. The east side is much lower and flatter than 
the west side and there are more shallow and muddy bays with gently sloping 
clay shores. Generally speaking this side of the lake is well timbered with 
poplar, spruce, balsam, etc. 

At the north end of Shallow Lake, Red Lake River enters. This river 
drains a fairly extensive system of lakes of which Red Lake is the largest. The 
Hudson's Bay Company have an outpost on Red Lake and it is in that vicinity 
that silver was reported to have been discovered recently, and where considerable 
prospecting is now being done. The survey was carried up Red Lake River 
as far as the first falls, which occurs only a short distance from the mouth of 
the river, where a spruce post marked "P. No. 40" was planted in a mound of 
stones on the west side of the river. The river here drops eight feet over a 
ledge of rock, but it is reported that in years of exceptionally high water this 
fall is flooded out. 

At the northeast corner of Shallow Lake, there is a shallow bay full of 
weeds into which empties a wide, sluggish stream which flows from Little 
Shallow Lake about four miles distant. This stream flows in a long, sweeping 
bends through a clay country and the shores are low with grass and willow 
flats extending back to timber which consists mostly of poplar with spruce 
scattered throughout. 

This river leaves the northwest corner of Little Shallow Lake which is over 
six miles long and nearly four miles wide at the widest place. The west side 
of Little Shallow Lake lies roughly parallel to the east side of Shallow Lake 
and much of the country between the two lakes does not appear to rise to a 
great elevation. 

On the west side of Little Shallow Lake there is a series of iron-bearing 

3 L.F. 



66 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

rocks showing exposures of magnetite banded with siHca, and at one or two 
points some diamond drilHng has been done. One of these drill holes was 
tied to transit station No. 739, which is about four miles south along the west 
shore from the outk;t of the lake. Drill cores were also seen on the west shore 
near transit station No. 748. 

The north, east and south shores of Little Shallow Lake are generally 
low and flat and in many cases no distinct shore line exists, and a foot or two 
difference in elevation of the water of the lake would submerge considerable 
areas that were comparatively dry at the time the survey was made. 

About three-quarters of a mile east of the outlet of Little Shallow Lake a 
river about two chains wide at its mouth enters a shallow marshy bay. This 
river was traversed for a distance of over seven miles and a half where it divided 
into two branches. At this point the river is about half a chain wide and flows 
with a gentle current through clay banks about ten to twelve feet high. The 
country along the lower stretches of this river is very low with areas of grass 
and willows studded with clumps of poplar. In one or two places, however, 
high rock ridges are visible not far back. The banks of this river gradually 
get higher as one goes up stream. There are some areas of poplar and spruce 
of good size to be seen along the stream, but a considerable area has been burnt. 

Trout Lake River enters Little Shallow Lake in a marshy bay on the east 
side. The shore line here is so indefinite and the bay so full of weeds and rushes 
that it is difficult to distinguish the mouth of the river until one is right into it. 
This is a much larger stream than the one just described, but the general char- 
acteristics of the banks as regards elevation, soil, and timber are about the same. 
The survey was carried up Trout Lake River, a distance of a little over ten 
miles to the first portage, where a substantial post marked "P. No. 50" was 
planted in a stone mound on the north side of the river. 

The territory described so far in this report appears to be largely a clay 
country, and there is a considerable area of good agricultural land on both sides 
of the English River and Mattawa River and east of Shallow Lake and adjacent 
to Little Shallow Lake and the streams tributary to it. It is difficult to say 
how extensive this clay area is, but it is undoubtedly large enough to warrant 
further exploration. 

A most important feature affecting a large portion of this whole area, 
however, is the fact that at times the English River and tributary waters are 
subject to very serious flooding. This appears to be caused by the fact that 
at Manitou Chute the English River is less than a chain wide and the gorge 
through which the river rushes is of such a character that the water is held 
back and rises many feet during the freshet season. On Shallow Lake and 
Little Shallow Lake the extreme high water mark as shown on the rocks along 
the shore is over twelve feet above the level of the lakes at the time this survey 
was made. Such a flood occurs only occasionally but when it does occur, owing 
to the low nature of much of the country, large areas are completely submerged. 
Had such a freshet or one anywhere near like it occurred during the season 
of 1922, it would have been impossible to have carried on this survey until it 
subsided. 

In view of these facts any proposal for water power development which 
would necessitate the raising of the waters of Shallow and Little Shallow Lakes, 
such as a concentration of all the available fall on the English River between 
Lac Seul and Manitou Falls at Manitou Falls, would require careful examination 
in order to estimate the amount of damage that would be done by flooding. 

From Manitou Falls the English River runs west for about three miles 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 67 

to Lower Manitou Falls, where there is a drop of about 15 feet. In this stretch 
of river there is a drop of about a foot, as there are a couple of places where the 
current is very strong. The banks are mostly high and rocky, covered with 
a growth of poplar, spruce, jack pine, birch, etc., much of it of good quality. 
The north bank is lower than the south and there is one low area through which 
a small creek runs that extends back for a considerable distance. 

Below Manitou Falls a short distance the river enters Barnston Lake 
and from here as far as Indian Lake where the survey was discontinued for 
the season, the general characteristics of the river and country adjacent are 
much the same. The English River here consists of a series of short river 
stretches connecting lake expansions, some of which are quite large. From 
the west end of Sandbar Lake, which is connected to Barnston Lake by a short 
river stretch on which there is a small rapid known as Barnston Rapids where 
there is a drop of a foot and a half, the general course of the river is south to 
southwest. The prevailing rock formation is Laurentian, the strike of which 
is east and west. The lakes occupy troughs in the granite and gneiss, the general 
direction of which follows the strike of the formation, the result being that 
the lakes generally speaking lie east and west and the river stretches connecting 
one lake with another cross the formation and run south and southwest. One 
result of this has been that the general travelled route along the river crosses 
the lakes instead of running lengthwise of them, and the lakes are much longer 
than would appear from observation along the travelled route. Oak Lake 
for instance is shown on the published maps of this section as being about seven 
or eight miles long, whereas its length is really nineteen miles. 

Long Legged River flows into the north side of Wilcox Lake about a mile 
west of the English River. This river drains a system of lakes lying to the 
northwest. The survey was carried up this river a distance of nearly seven 
miles to the first falls where a post marked "P. No. 108" was planted in a sub- 
stantial stone mound just west of the bottom of the falls. This river is two 
chains wide at the mouth with easy bends and sluggish current through a flat 
clay valley with higher ground some distance back. The banks near Wilcox 
Lake are low and flat with grass and willows for some distance back from the 
river. As one goes up stream the banks rise slightly and the quality of the 
timber improves, poplar, spruce and jack pine predominating. 

A short distance below Wilcox Lake there occurs a series of three falls 
known as Oak Falls. The upper two of these are close together, and the lower 
one is about three-quarters of a mile down stream. Lower Oak Falls drops 
immediately into Oak Lake. The total fall in these three pitches combined is 
twenty-two and a half feet. Between Oak Lake and Maynard Lake there is a 
river stretch with a fall of about a foot. At the outlet of Maynard Lake there 
is a short, heavy rapids where the river takes a drop of nine feet into Tide Lake. 
The banks here are rocky and rise rapidly a short distance back from the river 
on either side so that it should be possible to concentrate all the fall from Manitou 
Falls to Maynard Falls at this point. This would give an available head of 
about fifty feet which would provide a power concentration at this point of 
considerable magnitude. The question of the amount and value of the land 
that would be flooded, however, would have to be carefully looked into, although 
the character of the country is such that I venture the opinion that the damage 
from flooding would not be nearly so great as would occur in the case of the 
power concentration previously mentioned as a possibility at Manitou Falls. 

Below Maynard Falls the river flows through Tide Lake and Ball Lake 
and empties into Indian Lake where the survey was discontinued for the season. 



68 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

There are no rapids in this section of the river and only a couple of places where 
there is even a strong current. 

Wabigoon River enters the southeast bay of Ball Lake, and the survey 
was carried up this river as far as the first falls which occurs a couple of miles 
up stream. A post marked "P. No. 192" was planted in a mound of stones 
on the north side of Wabigoon River to mark the end of the survey in this 
direction. 

The general characteristics of the shores of the river and lake expansions 
from Manitou Falls to Indian Lake are very much the same. The shores are 
generally rocky and either high at the bank or rising a short distance back 
from the river. In the upper stretches of this section occasional small areas 
of clay similar to that seen farther up stream are seen, but as one goes down 
stream these clay areas become less frequent. There are, however, many places 
where the banks are quite low, these places occurring mostly where the small 
streams enter the main river or its lake expansions and at the ends of the many 
deep bays which often terminate in fairly extensive marshes. Some of these 
areas are quite large and in case of power developments involving the raising of 
the water levels, contouring would be necessary. Such areas are roughly 
sketched on the plans which accompany this report, but no attempt was made 
to determine the exact extent of these areas. 

The rock ridges on the whole are more prominent as one goes down stream. 
The roughest country seen during the season is in the neighbourhood of Ball 
Lake. Much of the Ball Lake country has been burnt over not many years 
ago, and the fact that the rocks are more exposed than where the country is 
covered with a heavy growth of timber, makes the hills stand out all the more 
prominently. 

The prevailing timber is poplar, spruce, jack pine, birch and balsam, the 
relative abundance of each being in the order named as far as could be judged 
without detailed examination. The greater portion of the country as seen from 
the water has escaped the ravages of recent fires and there are some large areas 
where the timber is of fair size and good quality. The largest area burnt over 
in recent years occurs to the west of Tide and Ball Lakes. 

There are a few scattered groves of red pine and occasionally a few white 
pine but they are not frequent and considering the country as a whole are not 
of great importance except for local building. At Oak Fall and on the portage 
at Maynard Falls a few stunted oak trees were seen, and near transit station 
No. 1595 on the large bay running east from Maynard Lake, a few wild plum 
trees were found bearing fruit of excellent quality. 

This country should be much more popular with tourists than it appears 
to be. Hardly any travellers were met with during the summer and most of 
these were on business of some sort. There is no sign of occupation except 
a few trappers and Indians' cabins at intervals along the river. And yet there 
is here a country of great natural beauty, easy of access and where the con- 
ditions for canoe travelling cannot be excelled. Long water stretches with 
portages both few and short, good camping sites, and moose, deer and small 
game in great abundance. The fishing is excellent and above all there is the 
primeval forest dotted with lovely lakes in all their glorious beauty. 

The English River forms part of one of the oldest routes into northwestern 
Ontario and has been used by some of our earliest explorers. On the north 
shore of Tide Lake, about half a mile northwest of Maynard Falls, members of 
the party discovered two old stone fireplaces marking the site of what had 
once been a fairly large building. One of these fireplaces is intact but the 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 69 

other was broken into two parts by the roots of a tree over a foot in diameter 
which had grown up inside the site of the old building. The timber which 
has grown up since the building was destroyed is over one hundred years old. 
Some hardy pioneer of a forgotten generation had made this his headquarters 
and passed on leaving no record but the mute story of the ruined hearth. 
What a story those stones could tell! Incidentally the fine trees that have 
grown up on this old site are a living proof of how nature could solve the problem 
of reforesting our waste lands, provided we could eliminate the fires which 
are such a terrible menace to the timber resources of our country. 

During the season Dr. E. L. Bruce of Queen's University made a geological 
survey of the area covered in this report, as well as the territory drained by the 
Red Lake River, and his report will be made to the Department of Mines so 
that it will not be necessary for me to touch on the geological features of the 
country. I might say that Dr. Bruce and his assistants made many trips inland 
from points on my survey and obtained much more information as to the country 
back from the Avater than I was able to do, as my time was entirely taken up 
with the survey operations. 

During the season a little over 645 miles of actual shore line were traversed, 
including 232 islands. The plans of the survey consisting of a series of tracings 
showing all measurements taken in connection with the above, as well as notes 
as to the character of the country, timber, areas of possible flooding, etc., have 
all been forwarded to your department. 

With this report are included a schedule of the islands, showing the numbers, 
nearest transit station, area and a short description of each island, together 
with my accounts in triplicate. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

James S. Dobie, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto. 



Appendix No. 25 



Traverse of Wabigoon Lake and Other Waters, 
District of Kenora. 

Port Arthur, Ont., July 29th, 1923. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report that in accordance with your instructions, 
dated April 18th, 1922, I have made a traverse survey of Wabigoon Lake and- 
other waters in the District of Kenora, and beg to submit the following report: 

I commenced the survey at the iron post, marking the north boundary 
of Indian Reserve No. 27 at the point where it intersects Little Wabigoon Lake. 
The whole of Little Wabigoon Lake (lying south of the south boundary of 
Southworth township). Rock, Turtle and Moose Lakes, Grassy Bay and River, 
Minnehaha and Peak Lakes, were then traversed. 



70 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

The country surrounding these lakes is generally rolling and rocky. It 
has suffered extensively from fire, no doubt due to mining operations there 
in the early days, and the timber now is practically all second growth of various 
sizes. 

The shores of these lakes, with the possible exception of Minnehaha Lake, 
are, in my opinion, unsuitable for summer resort subdivision — where the shores 
are not all rock — that is, when they are composed of high clay banks, extending 
back, erosion has usually occurred, and in the lower shores, the land had been 
flooded back for a considerable distance, leaving dead standing timber, old 
logs, long grass, reeds, etc., in the water, so as to be almost impassable in a 
canoe, or by any other means. The details of this, however, are shown on the 
plan. 

On the 7th day of June, I tied the traverse into the south boundary of 
Southworth township, east side of Little Wabigoon Lake, and proceeded the 
next day to big Wabigoon Lake. Here we continued the traverse, starting from 
the north boundary of Indian Reserve 27, previously mentioned, and continuing 
along the south shore until we tied into the south boundary of Van Home 
township. 

I, then, according to instructions of date 27th June, 1922, carried my 
traverse along the north shore of Big Wabigoon Lake, across the townships of 
Van Home and Zealand, in order that the situation of the eroded clay banks 
should be properly designated. 

On the 26th of June, I was instructed to continue my traverse covering 
Mile, Trap, Dor6, Ingall and Ukik Lakes, all south of Contact Bay. I started 
out on this part of the trip on the first day of August. Mile and Trap Lakes 
are very small with high rocky shores. Here quite a few red and white pine 
were noticeable but were too scattered to be of any economic value. 

Dore and Ingall Lakes are long and narrow with high, rocky shores. The 
surrounding country is very rough and rocky. In consequence, there are no 
areas fit for agriculture. 

Ukik Lake is broken up into long, narrow, rock bays, which usually end 
up in low, marshy places. 

There is a portage about a mile long from Trap Lake to Dore Lake ending 
up in a marsh or bay about a quarter of a mile long. This portage is very 
rarely used, except possibly as a winter trail. 

There is a portage of about ten (10) chains on the outlet of Dore Lake, 
and three short portages on the outlet of Ukik Lake. 

At the first is a falls nine (9) feet and the last three are falls having natural 
heads of eighteen (18), twelve (12), and twenty-four (24) feet respectively. 
There is a good site for a dam at the first falls but as the drainage area is so 
small, the resultant horsepower would be negligible. 

On completion of this traverse work, I returned to Big Wabigoon Lake 
and subdivided Islands R.K. 185 and R.K. 196, and plans of same accompany 
this report, as instructed. There are several other islands which were large 
enough for subdivision but I considered that the nature of the shorelands 
•was unsuitable for summer resort purposes, more especially on account of the 
erosion which has taken place, the sheer banks and the pollution of the water. 
There are one or two places on the north shore of Wabigoon Lake in the town- 
ships of Van Home and Zealand which would make good summer resorts, but 
they are small and scattered. 

All angles were measured with the transit and the distances obtained by 
stadia. The main stations were plotted day by day on cross section paper 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 71 

on a scale of twenty (20) chains to the inch and by this means any error in 
the traverse was at once located and corrected. Frequent observations for 
meridian were taken and copies of them accompany this report. 

At intervals of about a mile apart on the shore, prominent trees were blazed 
on the side next to the lake and marked thus, "1, 2, 3," etc. In like manner 
trees on islands were marked by the letters "R.K." followed by the number 
of the island. These points were tied into the nearest transit station and the 
bearing and distance recorded in the field notes. Posts were planted well 
above the high water mark, at points where we tied into known lines. 

The details as to shore lands, trees marked, measurements and all posts 
planted are shown on plans accompanying this report. 

All these lakes are well supplied with fish — pike and pickerel being most 
plentiful. Moose and Red Deer were also very plentiful. Beaver and muskrat 
were noticed at one or two points, but seem rather scarce. 

Accompanying this report are three plans covering the whole traverse 
on a scale of twenty (20) chains to an inch; plans of subdivision of islands R.K. 
185 and R.K. 196 on a scale of ten (10) chains to an inch; a table giving a short 
description of each island and its acreage; the field notes of the traverse and 
my accounts in triplicate; the accounts of the day work and the diary, I am 
sending under separate cover, all of which I trust that you will find correct. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Roy S. Kirkup, 

Ontario Land Surveyor, 
To the Honourable the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 26 
Meridian and Base Line, District of Thunder Bay 

Port Arthur, Ont., October 31st, 1923. 

Sir, — In accordance with your instructions, dated April 15th, 1923, we 
have surveyed a merdian and a base line in the District ol Thunder Bay and 
have traversed a portion of the Albany River and beg to submit the following 
report : 

The meridian was a continuation of that surveyed by K. G. Ross, O.L.S., 
in 1921, and the survey of it was commenced at the centre line of the right of way 
of the Canadian National Railway about one mile east of Allanwater Station. 
The mileage of this point was 60 miles plus 32.683 chains and the mileage of 
the northern terminus of the line, that is where it intersects the south shore 
of the Albany River, is now 121 miles plus 63.45 chains. A traverse of the 
Albany River was made from the northerly end of the meridian to connect 
the same with the easterly limit of that Indian Reserve on the south shore of 
Lake. St. Joseph which was surveyed by J. S. Dobie, O.L.S., in 1912. From 
the 84th mile post in the meridian the base line was run west, in six mile chords 
of the parallel of latitude, to intersect the boundary line between the districts 
of Kenora and Thunder Bay. The length of this line was 35 miles plus 10.09 
chains. 



72 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Iron posts were planted at the points indicated in your instructions and 
it was found necessary to erect nine witness monuments. One short iron post 
was planted and another should have been placed at the intersection of our 
base line with the district boundary, but our cement had become dampened and 
useless. 

Observations were taken frequently and these will be found recorded in 
the field notes on the proper pages. Owing to smoke and cloudy weather we 
were not able to get an observation at the point of commencement until four 
days after we were in the field and about four miles of line had been completed. 

Topography 

The land along the meridian slopes gradually to the north and few hills 
about fifty feet in height were found along it. In various places the rivers 
divide into two or three channels to reunite several miles farther down. The 
Flint River was the most erratic in this peculiarity. The section for many 
miles south of Lake St. Joseph and the Albany River is filled with a network of 
lakes and rivers so that it is possible to travel in almost any direction by water- 
ways. Pine Lake was the largest lake seen which was not previously shown 
on any maps we have seen. The width of this lake east and west may be fifteen 
miles. 

As the base line crosses the general run of the waterways it was found to 
be considerably rougher than the meridian. Lake Savant is the most im- 
portant topographical feature along this line. The shore line of the lake is 
nearly all of a rocky nature and a considerable amount of the timber along 
the shores has been destroyed by forest fires but the islands, which are very 
numerous, are mostly green and some afford excellent camping places. One 
of the survey trial lines of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway follows closely 
along the course of the base line but this appears to have been run merely as an 
exploration line. 

Soil 

The agricultural possibilities are negligible. Along the Canadian National 
Railway and for thirty or more miles north of it the whole surface is covered 
with rounded boulders some being twenty feet in height. Towards the northerly 
end of the meridian areas of sandy soil of considerable extent occur but none 
seems to furnish any promise as farm lands. 

Rock Formation 

The Department of Mines attached Mr. J. P. Johnson as geologist to 
our party and his report will cover in detail the various formations. The only 
favourable locations for prospecting noted were on the north end of Lake Savant 
where areas of quartz bearing schists may disclose gold and just south of the 
120th mile post on the meridian where a considerable outcrop of magnetic ore 
was noticed. 

Timber 

A timber plan accompanies this report. This will show the areas of green 
timber and of burned. We would say that fifty per cent, of the territory covered 
this season is still green and of sufficient size for cutting now. Along the meri- 
dian from the point of commencement as far north as the 90th mile there is as 
good an average stand of spruce and jack pine, of suitable size for pulp, as we 
have seen at any place in this district. This area also extends west along the 
base line to about the 13th mile. 



I 

I 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 73 

North of the 90th mile on the meridian and more particularly as the Albany 
river is approached, forest fires seem to be of an ever-recurring nature and as 
the country is very seldom traversed during the summer months by any person 
save the Indians from the reserves on Lake St. Joseph, it would seem that they 
are responsible. The waterways are not patrolled by forest rangers north of 
Lake Savant. One very serious fire was started some distance south of our 
base line and this burned for nearly two weeks during the latter part of June. 
It covered an area roughly estimated at forty miles in length and ten miles in 
width and destroyed a great amount of good timber. 

On the first twenty-four miles of our meridian only a few balsam trees were 
noticed and there was nowhere any great number of this species. Cedar was 
also very scarce. Spruce and jack pine in about equal amounts would pre- 
dominate for miles at a stretch. It is doubtful if the northern jack pine is as 
good timber as that farther south as the larger trees seem to have developed a 
great deal of rot. 

We had expected to see large areas of open swamp and muskeg as we pro- 
ceeded north but nearly all the swamps and lowlands were well timbered. 

Routes, etc. 

Our first and second camps were on the Allanwater River. We then 
moved along the line to the portage going into Flint Lake just north of the 
69th mile post. The Allanwater route was found to be properly mapped. 
We used Flint Lake and Flint River, with its various expansions, to the 80th 
mile. From here our supply men went east by way of the north branch of 
the Flint River and returned to the line at the lake in the 83rd and 84th mile. 
This route w^as rather a difficult one as it was found that between the first and 
second lakes east of the line there was a drop of more than one hundred feet, 
the river flowing rapidly between straight rocky banks. Better time would 
have been made by following the line. From the 84th to 100th mile there 
was no route found to parallel the line that was of any benefit to us. Explora- 
tions were made on each side of the line but any lakes found were too far distant 
to be of any benefit. There is a well used route coming into the lake in the 
96th mile. Most of the travel over it seems to be from the east and most likely 
connects with the lake in the 104th mile. This lake is used as a camping ground 
for many families of Indians during the rice season. 

Supplies for the northerly end of the meridian and for the base line were 
brought in from Bucke Station over the route shown on your maps going into 
the south end of Lake Savant. This route continues north to Lake St. Joseph 
and is used by the Hudson's Bay Company as its all year mail route and for 
light freight during the winter months. In all there is less than four miles of 
portage from the railway to Osnaburgh Post on Lake St. Joseph. This route 
is shown approximately on our plan. Eagle Lake and Pine Lake (local names) 
are possibly much larger bodies of water than we have shown them to be. There 
is a direct river route from Eagle Lake to the meridian. This crosses in the 
lake in the 100th mile. This was not used as it was found to be full of stones. 
It is used for light travel about as much as the lake route to the west of it. Our 
supplies were taken over the lake route to the 104th mile. From here to the 
end of the meridian the supply men remained with the party and we made all 
moves by canoe. 

On the base line the route mapped by the Grand Trunk Pacific survey 
was used for transport and camping and was found correct. It will be noticed 
that Long Lake does not extend nearly as far north as shown on your maps. 



74 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

On our return to the track we proceeded south from the end of the base 
line via Long, Cliff, Island, Lewis and Tawatinaw Lakes. From Lewis Lake 
to Tawatinaw Lake there are two routes but the one following the river is the 
easier. 

Water Powers 

Some of the falls and rapids on the Allanwater River will make good power 
developments. There are numerous falls and rapids on the other rivers but 
the flow is small in most of these. 

General 

Big game was comparatively scarce throughout the entire country and 
very little evidence of new beaver workings was seen, but this may be accounted 
for by the fact that we were travelling over well used routes most of the time. 

Pickerel and pike are numerous in all the lakes, especially the former. 
Lake trout were found in Lake Savant. Speckled trout are said to be plentiful 
in some of the streams but none were caught. 

Many of the northern lakes are filled with wild rice. This is gathered 
in large quantities by the local Indians. 

We were unfortunate in having our entire camp outfit destroyed by fire 
on May 24th. The fire was evidently started through the carelessness of one 
of the members of our advance party. No damage was done to the surrounding 
forest save burning over about five acres of brush. 

Accompanying this report you will find the usual notes, plans and accounts. 

We have the honour to be. Sir, 
Your obedient servants, 



Phillips & Benner, 

Ontario Land Surveyors. 



The Honourable the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto. 



Appendix No. 27 
Survey of Base and Meridian Lines, District of Thunder Bay 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., November 14th, 1923. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report on certain base 
and meridian lines in the District of Thunder Bay, surveyed during the summer 
of 1923 under instructions from your department, dated April 15th, 1923. 

I left Sault Ste. Marie for Bucke, Ontario, via A. C. & H. B. Ry. and N. T. 
Ry. on Monday, July 2nd, with a party of six. We stayed over night at Franz 
and were joined by four Indians from Chapleau. When we arrived at Bucke 
at ten o'clock on Wednesday morning I found my assistant, R. P. G. Laurence 
already there with Indians from Lac Seul, together with Mr. T. L. Gledhill,. 
the geologist who was to accompany the party. Our provisions and canoes 
had already been transported to Sturgeon Lake by wagon under the kind super- 
vision of Mr. Halvorsen, the Hudson's Bay Company manager, so that we were 



1 922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 75 

able to camp on the lake that evening. On Thursday, July 5th, we moved 
down Sturgeon Lake and after cacheing the bulk of our supplies at the outlet, 
made two portages down the Sturgeon River and camped at a point from which 
we could run the first six miles of our line. We commenced cutting line on 
July 6th, finished on August the 28th, and arrived back in Sault Ste. Marie 
on September 3rd. 

Our place of beginning was the 120th mile post on O.L.S. Niven's boundary 
between the Districts of Thunder Bay and Rainy River. We then ran east 
astronomically on six mile cords, a distance of approximately 78 miles to the 
westerly boundary of the Nipigon Forest Reserve. Our posts were numbered 
from 1 to 35 m. 33 c. 78 1., 1 to 24 m. and 1 to 17 m. 45 c. 75 1. respectively. 
From our 24 mile post which is 59 m. 33 c. 78 1. east of Niven's line, we ran 
north astronomically to the C. G. Ry., a distance of approximately 13 miles, 
63 chains, 23 links and south astronomically a distance of 12 miles. This 
completed our work. These latter two lines were run north and south when 
we arrived at their starting point on our base line. Seventeen per cent, of the 
territory traversed by our line was water. 

The party consisted of twenty- two in all, made up as follows: 

1 Surveyor. 

1 Assistant. 

2 Chainmen, 
1 Cook. 

1 Cookee. 

5 Axemen. 

6 Packers on line. 

4 Packers with the freighting canoes. 
1 Geologist attached to party. 

This distribution was maintained throughout the whole course of the 
survey. 

Soil 

There are no areas in the country traversed suitable for agriculture. The 
covering is uniformly gravel, sand and boulders. 

Geology 

Inasmuch as a geologist was attached to the party, I did not pay particular 
attention to rock out-croppings. We did not encounter any valuable minerals. 

Timber 

With the exception of the country west of Sturgeon Lake, through which 
the first nine miles of our line passes, the entire area traversed was poorly timbered. 
Fires have run through it all at various times and only a pocket here and there 
has escaped. In some cases second growth timber has attained a diameter of 
eight inches, but the majority of it is still very small. The growth throughout 
is a mixed bush of spruce, balsam, poplar, banksian pine, and white birch. 

Water Powers 
There are no water powers worthy of note. 



76 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Game 

Moose and red deer are very plentiful. Fur-bearing animals are scarce 
on account of the proximity of the railway. There are great numbers of part- 
ridges and rabbits. 

Fish 

Pickerel, pike, whitefish, perch and suckers are found in abundance in all 
the lakes and rivers. 
This is my report. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

K. G. Ross, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
To the Honourable the Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Parliament Buildings, Toronto. 



Appendix No. 28 
Certain Township Outlines, District of Cochrane 

Toronto, October 31st, 1923. 

Sir, — We have the honour to submit the following report on the survey 
of certain township outlines in the District of Cochrane, performed under in- 
structions from your department, dated 15th April, 1923. 

Canoes and other equipment had been left the previous summer at Smooth 
Rock Falls, on the Mattagami River, so in June the party for the season's 
work was assembled at this point, preparatory to descending the river. 

The party left on 15th June, and travelled down the river as far as O.L.S. 
Sutcliffe and Neelands' first base line of 1921. This line crosses the Mattagami 
River about a mile and a half below the mouth of the Kapuskasing River. 
From the crossing, the party packed the supplies and equipment six miles east 
over the base line to the northeast angle of the township of Clay, established 
by us the previous summer. Wet weather delayed the party on the trip, and 
it was 25th June before the line work was begun. 

We commenced our line at our old post marking the northeast angle of 
the township of Clay, and from that point ran north nine miles between the 
townships of Sheldon and Howells. The north boundaries of the townships of 
Sheldon and Howells were run, respectively, east and west from the nine mile 
post. The former line was carried to Sutcliflfe and Neelands' meridian run 
in 1921, and the latter is a meridian run by ourselves in 1911. We continued 
westward past this meridian between the townships of Harmon and Mowbray 
for about three miles and the end of the line was left there for the time being. 
The party then returned to the northeast angle of Howells, and extended our 
meridian north between the townships of Cockshutt and Traill to a base line 
run by Messrs. Sutcliffe and Neelands in 1921. The meridian was then con- 
tinued north between the townships of Emerson and Hamlet. 

The post planted in 1911 to mark the southerly extremity of the east 
boundary of the township of Hecla was picked up about sixteen chains west of our 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 77 

line. The northeast angle of the township of Emerson was then established by 
running the north boundary line of the township east through this post, to 
intersect our meridian. The boundary line was then run westward to the 
meridian run by us in 1911. This completed the portion of our work east of 
the Mattagami River. 

The party then proceeded up the river to the line between the townships 
of Harmon and Mowbray, left partly completed earlier in the season. It was 
extended west across the river to within convenient distance from the westerly 
corners of the townships. We then returned to the river, and continued up 
stream to the crossing of Messrs. Sutcliffe and Neelands' first base line, the 
point from which the party had, at the beginning of the season, travelled east- 
ward. The party then packed westward along the base line to the northwest 
angle of the township of Clay. From the post marking the corner, the line was 
run west between the townships of Mowbray and Hopkins. Considerable 
difficulty was found in locating the north end of the meridian forming the west 
boundary of the township of Hopkins, as the corner was in an extensive brule 
now covered with a dense growth of alders, poplars and birch. The iron and 
wooden posts marked IX M were finally discovered four chains and forty- 
seven links south of our line. The base line was extended westward between 
the townships of Guilfoyle and Boyle, to intersect the west boundary of Guilfoyle 
established in 1906. The intersection lies about fifty chains west of the Opaza- 
tika River. 

Returning to the northwest angle of the township of Hopkins, the meridian 
between the townships of Mowbray and Boyle was run, and the north boundary 
of the township of Mowbray completed to the intersection. The base line 
between the townships of Bradley and Boyle was run westward and as the 
west boundary of these townships has not yet been run the final post was planted 
at IX M. We then ran north between the townships of Bradley and Harmon 
and produced the north boundary of the township of Harmon west, eleven 
chains and seventeen links to an intersection, thus completing the summer's 
work. The last line was cut on 1st September. The return trail to the rail- 
way was made via the Mattagami and Ground Hog Rivers, and Fauquier was 
reached on the 3rd of September. 

The first part of the season was favourable for survey work, but the weather 
became broken about the middle of August, causing much loss of time while 
running the last forty miles of the survey. 

A two-chain steel band was used for measurements throughout the work. 
On broken ground, measurements were made with the aid of a clinometer and 
the horizontal distance was deduced from the vertical angle. Occasions for 
triangulation were few as the lines crossed few lakes, and the Mattagami River 
at the north boundary of the township of Mowbray was the only river crossing 
which could not be measured directly with the band. The Opazatika River 
was barely more than two chains wide at the point struck by our line, and 
no difficulty was found in making the measurement with the band. A poplar 
tree marked by O.L.S. Kenny on his traverse of the Opazatika River was 
located and tied in to our line. 

Frequent observations of Polaris were taken throughout the survey and 
the notes of a number of these are embodied in the field notes. 

The wooden posts used were made of cedar where available, but as a rule 
spruce or jack pine had to serve. All were at least six inches square and firmly 
planted. Iron posts were planted to mark each third mile and the township 
corners. A number of these, however, were placed as witness posts. Several 



78 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

of the points to be marked fell in muskeg and soft ground. Where it was 
thought that the ground was not solid enough to form durable pits and mounds, 
a wooden post was planted at the true point and the iron post was planted as a 
witness post on the nearest solid ground with the required trench and mound. 
No short iron posts were used. In two cases, the regulation iron posts could 
not be sunk flush with the ground, and substantial stone cairns ^were built 
around them. Stone was not available for mounding posts at more than a 
few points. The posts so mounded are indicated on the notes. 

On account of the extent of old brule crossed, suitable trees for use as 
bearing- trees did not exist near a considerable number of the posts planted. 
In most cases, however, the notes show that two trees of some sort were marked. 

General Features 

The larger part of the area traversed by our lines is drained by the Matta- 
gami River and its tributary, the Pike River. The remainder, or western 
part, is drained by the Opazatika River. 

Our meridian east of the Mattagami River followed somewhat closely 
the course of the Pike River. The Pike River originates in a number of small 
streams rising in the northern portion of the townships of Howells and Sheldon. 
These streams have dug ravines, sixty to seventy feet deep, in the sandy ground, 
and as a consequence the northern portion of' these townships, especially near 
our meridian between them, is very broken. The streams themselves are clear 
and cold, and are well stocked with speckled trout. 

In the next tier of townships, the river flows swiftly between clay or sand 
banks, twenty to forty-five feet high, through gently rolling or flat land. Ap- 
proximately two miles below the south boundary of the township of Hamlet 
it enters a rocky gorge about two miles long, emerging at the level of the coastal 
plain where it is bounded by low lands, muskeg and swamp. 

In general, the land along the meridian seems to fall to the north in two 
main steps; the first at about the north boundary of the townships of Howells 
and Sheldon, and the second opposite the gorge mentioned above. 

The last four miles of the east boundary and the north boundary of the 
township of Emerson were run through country eighty-five per cent, swamp 
and muskeg. 

West of the Mattagami River the axes of the ridges seemed to lie approxi- 
mately east and west. Our line along the south limits of the townships of 
Boyle and Mowbray followed one ridge, and the line along the north boundary 
of these townships followed another. Most of the valley between these ridges 
drains to the Opazatika. 

Soil 

The soil over the larger part of the area surveyed is a light sandy loam 
or straight sand. Perhaps twenty per cent, of the soil examined was clay. 
Probably, however, the proportion of clay is greater than would appear from 
such examination as we were able to make. The lower lands were deeply 
covered with moss, and the soil could not be so readily identified. The best 
soil seen from an agricultural standpoint was along the south boundaries of 
the townships of Boyle and Mowbray. 

Timber 

The major portion of the land traversed by our lines was swept by fire 
twenty to twenty-five years ago, and a strip about six miles in length along 
our east meridian was burnt over two years ago. This latter burn seems to 
extend for a considerable distance toward the Abitibi River on the east, and 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 79 

for six or seven miles to the west. The area burnt by these fires extends from 
beyond our south boundary. The fires were only stopped on the north by 
the extensive muskegs in the northern parts of the townships of Emerson and 
Hamlet. 

East of the Mattagami River practically the only timber left is in the 
spruce swamps comprising not more than twenty per cent, of the area. Some 
of this is of a size suitable for pulpwood. The second growth is largely birch 
and poplar or alders and willow. An exception to this is on some of the sand 
hills in the northern part of the townships of Howells and Sheldon. On them 
a dense growth of young jack pine has sprung up. 

West of the Mattagami River, the destruction is not so complete. Several 
areas of a few square miles have escaped. Along the south boundary of the 
township of Mowbray in particular, we saw some good pulpwood. In the 
southerly part of the township of Harmon there is a considerable area of green 
bush. This is a mixed stand of jack pine, spruce, poplar and birch. The 
second growth west of the Mattagami River seems of a more valuable quality 
than that east of the river. 

Rock 

Little rock was seen on the lines of survey. The rock observed was granite 
or granite gneiss. Rock is exposed on the banks of the Mattagami River in 
many places, and in the gorge of the Pike River mentioned above. No econ- 
omic minerals were identified. 

Water Power 

Traverses of the Mattagami and Opazatika Rivers have been obtained 
by your department. A causal inspection is sufficient to show that large 
development of power is possible on the Mattagami River and to a lesser extent 
on the Opazatika. The surveys of the rivers will, of course, indicate the power 
possibilities better than any estimate by us. The Pike River is too small and 
distant to offer any inducement for the immediate development of water power. 

Canoe Routes 
We reached the scene of our work via the Mattagami River, from Smooth 
Rock Falls, but after the first trip, utilized the Ground Hog River instead 
above the junction of the two rivers. This is the shorter and better route. 
The route via the Ground Hog River and the Mattagami River, is considered 
to be the best one from Moose Factory to the railway. The portages are in 
excellent condition. The Opazatika is said to be good between our crossing and 
the railway and below that to be difficult except at the higher stages of water. 
The Pike River is not travelled. 

Fish and Game 
Moose were plentiful, especially in the area west of the Mattagami River. 
Partridge and rabbits were seen more often than usual. Beaver work was 
fairly common. The head waters of the Pike River are well stocked with 
speckled, trout and the fishermen of the party made some good catches of pike 
and pickerel in the Mattagami River. 

We have the honour to be, Sir, 
Your obedient servants, 

Speight & vanNostrand, 
Ontario Land Surveyors. 
The Honourable Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



80 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 29 

Certain Township Outlines, District of Sudbury 

Peterborough, Ont., October 31st, 1923. 

Sir, — I beg to report that, agreeable with instructions from your depart- 
menj;, dated April 15th, 1923, to survey certain township outlines in the district 
of Sudbury, that I have completed this work and beg to submit herewith my 
plans, field notes and report, all of which I trust will be found complete and 
satisfactory to your department. 

I commenced the survey at an iron post planted by myself in 1916 at a 
point on the north boundary of the township of Hall, two miles west of the 
northeast angle of that township. After getting an observation for azimuth 
at this point, I ran four miles west. I then moved my camp to Turnbull Creek 
on the Canadian Pacific Railway and from the iron post planted by Ontario 
Land Surveyor Stewart in 1892 to mark the line between township No. 16 
and Cavell, I ran south to intersect the line between the townships of Cavell 
and Hall. I continued this line south to the north boundary of the township of 
Hubbard. I then returned to the northwest angle of the township of Hall 
and from this point I ran west along the north boundary of the township of 
Faust to intersect the meridian line surveyed by Ontario Land Surveyor Niven 
in 1902. Having completed this work I moved west along the north boundary 
of township 9 Z, recently surveyed by Ontario Land Surveyor Mooney, to a 
point two miles, sixty-eight chains and thirty-seven links west of the northeast 
angle of that township, and from this point I continued west making Township 
9 Z six miles wide on its northern extremity. From this point, I ran south to 
intersect the north boundary of township 8 A and north 6 miles. I then re- 
turned to the northwest angle of township 9 Z and ran west six miles along 
the north boundary of township 9 A from which point I ran south to intersect 
the north boundary of township 8 B and north six miles. I then returned to 
the northwest angle of township 9 A from which point I ran west along the 
north boundary of township 9 B. I then ran south to intersect the north 
boundary of township 8 C and north to intersect a line run this season by 
Ontario Land Surveyors McAuslan, Anderson and Moore. I then returned 
to the northwest angle of township 9 B and ran west six miles along the north 
boundary of township 9 C, from which point I ran north to again intersect 
the line surveyed by Ontario Land Surveyors McAuslan, Anderson and Moore. 

Having finished this part of the work I moved to Woman River Station 
on the Canadian Pacific Railway and from the iron post planted by Ontario 
Land Surveyor Stewart in 1892 to mark the northeast angle of township No, 
19, I ran west 12 miles connecting with my own work and that of McAuslan, 
Anderson and Moore. Wooden posts made of the most durable wood in the 
locality and at least six inches square and three feet high were planted at the 
end of every mile, excepting where that point fell in a lake or river, in which 
case the post was planted on the line at the nearest shore. At the end of every 
third mile the iron posts supplied by your Department were planted and pits 
and mounds made according to instructions. 

All the country covered by these eleven townships is very rough and rocky 
and almost completely devoid of agricultural land, nor does there appear on 
the surface any indications of the existence of economic minerals. Four or 



1 922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 81 

five of these townships, however, contain an immense quantity of valuable 
timber, the location of which will be seen on the timber plan. The whole 
country is traversed by numerous creeks and lakes containing considerable 
good fish, particularly pike and lake trout. Moose and red deer are also very 
plentiful in this locality. In the lowlands between the hills are found the 
usual swampy tracts covered with spruce, dead and decaying tamarac with 
alder and willow underbrush and considerable windfall, the average size of this 
timber runs from two to ten inches. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. W. Fitzgerald, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto. 



Appendix No. 30 
Survey of Township of Mongowin, District of Sudbury 

Little Current, Ont., November 19th, 1923. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit to you the following report on the survey 
of the township of Mongowin, in the district of Sudbury, performed under 
instructions from your department, dated Toronto, June 1st, 1923. 

The manner of the survey was carried on as nearly as practicable to conform 
with the instructions. 

Several iron posts were planted at the intersections of survey lines, as 
recorded in the field notes. In the Lacloche Mountains, in the southern portion 
of the township, on account of there being very little soil, none were planted. 

Where practicable at all the posts were well mounded up with stones, 
most of the mounds, or cairns, are from three to five feet at the base, and where 
there was a depth of soil a hole was dug about two feet deep, and the post set 
up firmly in it. Nearly all the posts are of cedar. 

In the appendix to the field notes will be found the notes of my survey 
of the outlines of the Wallace Mine locations, including Block A, which I made 
in January, 1900, for the late Thomas Frood. All possible information regard- 
ing the original survey of the locations, and a letter of explanation, were obtained 
from the then Director of Surveys, Mr. Kirkpatrick, before proceeding with 
the survey. 

The evidences which I found on the ground of the west limit of the White- 
fish River Indian Reserve are rather unsatisfactory. With the exception of 
its intersection with Lake Huron, and a short distance from there, and the 
intersection at West River, which latter one I found in 1920, also a cairn on 
the north shore of Raven Lake, which is said to be the northwest angle of the 
Reserve, the blazes which I have seen seem to be only a reblazing in a hap- 
hazard way, and made probably 20 to 30 years ago. 

On page three of the instructions of above date, reference is made to an 
apparent discrepancy between O.L.S. Bolger's survey of the first concession 
west of Wallace Mine, at the shore where it connects with O.L.S. Alex. Vidal's 
survey of Wallace Mine, lot 5, I did not find any discrepancy there, nor elsewhere. 



82 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

The soil throughout the township is nearly all a stiff clay. There is some 
sandy and sandy loam on the south side of the Lacloche Mountains. In some 
places there are tracts of soil unbroken by rock, probably from 10 to 15 acres in 
extent, but generally it occurs in small patches between the rocky ridges. A 
settler in lot 11, concession 6, has, however, cleared about 35 acres which seems 
very little broken by rock. Probably from 20 to 30 per cent, at least of con- 
cessions 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, is tillable. Concession 2 is very much broken by the 
Lacloche Mountains. 

The rock formation is almost entirely Huronian. North of Raven Lake 
it is mostly clay slate and various schists. In the central portion there are 
also occasional small ridges of diorite, or diabase. On lots 7 and 11, concession 3, 
there are prospects of mineral, somewhat developed. The Lacloche Mountains, 
extending across the southern portion, are mainly quartzite. Where they 
extend easterly into the Whitefish Indian Reserve, there occurs along the Al- 
goma Eastern Railway a large hill of chert. 

As shown in colour on the timber map north of Raven Lake, concessions 5 
and 6, it is nearly all old brule, with an occasional small patch of scattered 
timber. In concessions 3, 4 and part of 5, there is considerable fair sized balsam, 
spruce, cedar, poplar, white and yellow birch, hemlock, jack pine, maple, tamarac, 
ash and some black spruce. A good deal of it is merchantable. There is also 
considerable large red and white pine in this area. In concessions 1 and 2 
there is the same timber, also some scrub red oak and ironwood. The merch- 
antable pine has been pretty well cut out of this area. There is a tract of old 
brule, with little good timber, lying between Fox Lake and Block A. 

West River, between Raven Lake and Marsh Lake, on account of being 
dammed up is mostly sluggish, and is from 20 to 40 feet wide. Below Marsh 
Lake it is a succession of narrow gorges for some distance, and in this section 
some power might be developed on it. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

T. J. Patten, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 31 



Traverse of Shore Line of Lakes Minnietakie and Big Sandy, 
District of Kenora 

Port Arthur, Ont., December 14th, 1923. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report that in accordance with your instructions, 
dated April 10th, 1923, I have made a traverse of the islands and shore lines 
of Lakes Minnietakie and Big Sandy, both in the District of Kenora, and beg 
to submit the following report : 

I commenced the survey at the intersection of the southerly boundary 
of Drayton township and the westerly shore of Lake Minnietakie and con- 
tinued southwesterly along the shore of said lake to the mouth of Pickerel 
Narrows. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 83 

Pickerel Narrows 

This bay runs in a general direction southwest, a distance of twenty miles 
and varies in width from five to eighty chains. The shores and banks are, 
generally speaking, rock, rough and very steep in places with high rocky hills 
surrounding it, burnt bare in places by fire which has swept all of the area at 
one time or another. 

Two rivers are tributary to this bay (which is by far the longest in the 
whole lake). The one from the southwest about a chain in width empties out 
of Big Sandy Lake; this is still water with the exception of its upper reaches 
near Big Sandy, where there are some small rapids and the remains of an old 
dam, which was used in the early days. The other one enters from the south- 
east and is twenty-five feet wide and is remarkable for the fact that it falls 
twenty-eight feet at its mouth, thus showing up the nature of the shore line 
at this point. 

I continued the traverse, doing both sides of the Narrows at once, to Black- 
fish Portage, which is the end of the Narrows and portage to Big Sandy Lake. 
I tied into Niven's meridian line en route, and was very lucky to find the post 
as the country had been well burnt over and there was no semblance of a line. 
I then traversed the portage and Big Sandy Lake continuing the Portage to 
Dinorwic where I arrived on the 29th of June. 

Big Sandy Lake 

This lake, as its name implies, is a big sandy lake. There are many sandy 
beaches but the rock and gravel beaches are by far in the majority. The westerly 
shore appears to be very rocky on the points and shallow, making it difficult 
to land a canoe or boat. In fact I found ^this difficulty throughout the whole 
lake. It seems very shallow and can churn up and become a turmoil in the 
shortest time of any lake I know. 

The beaches, mostly rock and boulders, have been piled up, both on main 
shore and islands for a distance of twenty links to three chains by the action 
of the water or ice in the old days when the water was raised by dam on the 
outlet of this lake. The difference from the present to the old water level is 
approximately nine feet. The bays with the sandy beaches would be suitable 
for summer resort lots but the others are eliminated on account of the shallow- 
ness, rocks and reefs. 

Portage to Dinorwic 

This portage, approximately nine miles long, varies in width from just a 
trail to one chain and even wider in some places. The portion near the lake 
is rather rough, rocky and high, but it drops down gradually to Dinorwic. 
The latter part of the road is mostly clay and in dry weather one could not 
wish for a better road. 

This leg of trip was then complete and we transported men and what 
supplies we had left back to the mouth of Pickerel Narrows where I had cached 
the bulk of the supplies. I then continued traverse around the various bays 
of Minnietakie Lake till we reached Twin Lake on the 25th of July. 

Twin Lake 

This is more in the nature of a long narrow bay from Minnietakie Lake 
than a separate lake as its name applies. The strip of water that connects 



84 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

it with Minnietakie is in the nature of a river but one cannot detect a current. 
It is very marshy and full of wild rice and reeds and it was only with a great 
deal of difficulty that we were enabled to push our canoe through. The southern 
portion of this lake is surrounded by high rocky hills covered mostly by Banksian 
pine, poplar and white birch. The bays are long and narrow ending up in low 
marshy places. 

I then continued into the southeastern bay into which the English River 
empties, tieing into the English River power reserve line as we proceeded. This 
is, in my opinion, the best part of the main shore of Minnietakie Lakes for 
summer resort lots. The big rounding bays are mostly of a sandy nature and 
the country lends itself generally to this purpose. In fact there are already 
several locations laid out; the big majority, however, are on islands. 

I connected up with the south boundary of Drayton township, where it 
intersects the easterly shore of Minnietakie Lake, on the 7th of August. I had 
no difficulty finding the post, although the country has all been burnt over. 

I then traversed what remained of the islands. This took me considerably 
longer than I anticipated, when I wrote you on the 4th of August, on account 
of adverse weather conditions, but we finally did complete them and returned 
to Sioux Lookout, entraining for Port Arthur on the 16th of August. 

There are two hundred and thirty-seven islands in both lakes ranging 
from small rocks to islands six and seven miles in perimeter, also numerous 
reefs which are shown on the accompanying plan. The acreages and description 
of islands is appended hereto. 

At intervals of about a mile apart on the shore, prominent trees were blazed 
on the side next to the lake and marked thus: "1, 2, 3, etc." In like manner 
trees on islands were marked by the letters "R", "K", followed by the number 
of the island. These points were tied into the nearest transit station and the 
bearing and distance recorded in the field notes. They are also recorded on 
the accompanying plan in red. Whenever we located a suitable spot, a short 
bronze metal post was cemented into the rock with Portland cement and a 
wooden post was planted alongside in a mound of stones as a reference point, 
both posts being marked similarly. These posts are shown circled in red on 
the plan which accompanies the report. Posts were planted well above the 
high water mark at points where I tied into known lines. 

All the details as to shore lands, trees marked, measurements, bearings 
and posts planted are shown on the plan. 

A Watt transit and D.L.S. stadia rod were used throughout with the ex- 
ception of two occasions, when I had the misfortune to fall into the lake and 
wash out my cross hairs, when I used a Davis & Son six-inch transit with good 
results. With the latter transit, however, I had to use a constant of .9434 for 
every chain read on the rod. The main stations were plotted by latitudes 
and departures every day on the cross section paper on a scale of twenty chains 
to the inch so that any error which might creep in was at once located and 
corrected. Frequent observations for meridian were taken, and copies of 
them accompany this report. 

Game 

Both these lakes seems to be well supplied with pike and pickerel, but the 
fishermen met with did not seem to have very good luck. No trout were seen 
at any time throughout this trip. The red deer and moose are the most plentiful 
of any part of the country that I have yet been. Beaver and muskrat are 
present in small numbers. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 85 

Water Power 

No water power was encountered of any commercial value except perhaps 
the English River Falls which has already been investigated. 

In conclusion I would suggest that almost any of the islands in the north- 
easterly section of Lake Minnietakie, the southeasterly bay and the lake shore 
on the southern part of Drayton township, adjacent to the easterly boundary 
of the said township, have portions which would be suitable for summer resort 
lots. The water is pure and various springs are spotted here and there, both 
on islands and main shore, which makes for better camp conditions. The 
only adverse feature being that the lake is fairly shallow and there are rocks 
and reefs lying just underneath its surface which makes it bad for navigation. 

Accompanying this report there are two plans covering the traverse on 
tracing linen on a scale of twenty chains to the inch, a table giving a short 
description of each island and the acreage, copies of observations and my accounts 
in triplicate, all of which I trust that you will find correct. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Roy S. Kirkup, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 32 



Readjustment Survey in the Township of Blount, District of 

TiMISKAMING 

North Bay, Ont., November 27th, 1923. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report on the readjustment 
of survey in the township of Blount, District of Timiskaming, performed by me 
under instructions from your department, dated October 16th, 1923. 

I left North Bay on October 21st, 1923, with a party of five men and 
travelled to Cochrane, remaining in Cochrane over night. The following 
morning travelled by motor truck with supplies to where the Temiskaming and 
Northern Ontario Railway crosses the south boundary of the township of Blount. 

The posts planted to mark the front and rear of lots one to thirty-six con- 
cessions A and B of survey made by me in October, 1922, were removed and 
bearing trees for same obliterated. The iron posts planted last year at one chain 
and seventy-five links in perpendicular width measured westerly from the 
centre line of the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway on the north 
limit of the road allowance of concession I and on the southerly limit of 
road allowance at concessions II, IV, VI, VIII, X and XII remain but the 
marking on same have been obliterated. 

The blazes on the following lines were scored by making three axe marks 
on the blaze facing the line: — 

1. Line west astronomically across lot 21, concession 1, at 59.49 chains 
north of southerly limit of concession 1. 



86 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

2. Line across lot 16, concession III, at 59.59 chains north of southerly 
limit of concession III. 

3. Line across lot 17, concession V, at 59.49 chains north of southerly 
limit of concession V. 

4. Line across lot 23, concession V, at 59.49 chains north of southerly 
lime of concession V. 

5. Line across lot 19, concession VII at 59.49 chains north of southerly 
limit of concession VII. 

6. Line across lot 25, concession VII at 59.49 chains north of southerly 
limit of concession VI I. 

Posts were planted and marked in the prescribed manner to define the 
fronts of the following lots which were removed last year. 



Lost 16 to 21 including concession I. 



Lots 15 to 21 
Lots 16 to 22 
Lots 17 to 24 
Lots 20 to 25 
Lots 20 to 25 
Lots 20 to 25 



II and III. 
IV and V. 
VI and VII. 
VIII and IX. 
X and XL 
XII. 



In addition to the list of lots that have been settled, sent in with my report 
last year, there has been the following: 

A Mr. Wilson of Cochrane has built a frame house, 16 x 20, on old lot 9, 
concession B, which is at the rear of the readjustment survey of lot 19, con- 
cession III. This makes two settlers on lot 19, concession III, as a Mr. Dominic 
Noel has built on this lot last year. 

There is a small clearing at the southeast corner of lot 24, concession XL 

Near the southeast angle of lot 22,. concession XI, there is a small log cabin. 

At the rear of lots 21 and 22, concession XII, men were engaged in cutting 
timber for the erection of camps for the Major Moffatt settlement. 

Accompanying this report are field notes and accounts, all of which I trust 
will be found complete and satisfactory. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

G. P. Angus, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable Minister Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



1923-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 87 

Appendix No. 33 
Traverse of Moose River, District of Cochrane 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., December 7th, 1923. 

Sir, — Under instructions from you, dated April 5th, 1923, to survey the 
Moose River from the confluence of the Mattagami and Missinabi Rivers 
down stream to Moose Factory and beyond to the mouth of the river, I com- 
menced organizing for this work May 5th, 1923, and proceeded to Clute via 
Cochrane. At Clute I bought supplies, etc., and had it teamed to the landing 
on Frederick House River and left May 13th, en route for Moose River via 
Frederick House and Abitibi Rivers. 

The trip to Moose River passed off without mishap of any kind. It took 
considerable time to make the trip. Being heavily loaded I could not take 
the full loads on some parts of the river. 

Having barely enough supplies when I landed at Moose River to make 
the survey, I found it necessary to work from "fly-camps", leaving the cook 
and one man at the main camp, and about every three or four days, he supplying 
us with bread, etc. The "fly-camp" was picked up each morning, carried 
in two canoes while surveying, and pitched again towards evening. I find 
this to be the most effective method of surveying a large river or lake. 

I finished the survey with quite enough supplies to make the trip out, 
which took more time than usual, on account of the water in the rivers being 
very low. 

The Moose River traverses through banks of clay from ten to thirty feet 
high and is swift and rapid, particularly from its source to the French River. 

During the survey of the upper part of the river, rapids were not noticeable 
at high water stage, but the current is fast and heavy, so much so, that lining 
or poling up stream, with even light loads, is the only way good progress can be 
made. 

The river has a quick "run-off" and with the exception of a few places 
is shallow for the greater part of the width at low water stages. 

The river bed from its source to within seven miles of Moose Factory, 
is principally limestone, or limestone covered with clay, gravel and boulders. 
Great stretches of limestone and gravel bars will be found, reaching as far 
out as ten chains from either bank of the river throughout its entire length. 

The islands of the river are generally high and made lip principally of 
clay soil suitable for agricultural purposes, and sparsely timbered with poplar 
and birch, some balsam and spruce. 

The up stream end of the majority of islands are high with almost sheer 
cut banks having been annually torn away by spring floods carrying high 
floats of ice at a great speed, and at the same time depositing high boulders 
weighing almost a ton, I have seen, when the river got low, long wide gravel 
shoals show up, the well defined tract of these boulders made during spring 
floods, which gives the instance of how turbulent these great rivers are during 
high water period. 

The Moose River forms a basin for three of the largest rivers in this section 
of the north, viz: the Abitibi, Missinabi and the Mattagami, besides numerous 
other smaller rivers and creeks, as the French, Cheepasch and Kwaataboahegan 
rivers. 



88 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



The Moose River at its mouth is about three miles wide, and at low tide 
is shallow in many places. The natives of this district have noticed quite a 
change, in the last twenty years, in the way of new islands and water channels 
being formed, due to the tons of silt and debris brought down the river during 
flood season, and again being shoved back by tides, which affect the river up- 
stream to the mouth of the French. A study of the plan in connection with 
this report, will give more plainly the way in which this section of the river is 
changing. For instance, Maidman's Island is known to have been made up 
in the manner already stated. It is also apparent the connection Butler's 
Island is making with Maidman's Island. 

Most of the island area in the vicinity is high enough to not be affected 
by spring floods or high tides and the soil, a clay loam, is excellent for agri- 
cultural purposes. 

The Hudson Bay Company's post on Factory Island is a good example 
of the farming possibilities existing in this district. This may also be said of 
the country through which this great river traverses. There are a few cleared 
pieces of land in this vicinity yielding wonderful crops of root vegetables, hay, 
oats, barley and berries. Although the summer seasons are short the growth 
is very rapid. 

The timber along the Moose River consists chiefly of poplar, spruce, balsam 
and birch, and from a pulp standpoint I would consider it only fair. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 



The Honourable Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



C. R. Kenny, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 




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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



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96 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 34 
Timber Limit Lines, Timagami Forest Reserve 

New Liskeard, Ont., November 3rd, 1923. 

Sir, — In compliance with instructions bearing date of August 30th, to 
survey two Hmit lines, one in Kittson township and the other east of Anima 
Nipissing Lake, we proceeded to said work, October 3rd, commencing work 
at the two mile post on the north boundary of Kittson. Weather conditions 
prevented our getting an observation at this point so the theoretical angle was 
turned off and the line surveyed south astronomically to the northwesterly 
shore of Trout Lake, said point being the southerly end of said line; 

Posts of durable material were planted at each mile, mounded with stones 
and properly referenced by bearing trees and blazed on two sides in the direction 
in which the line was run. 

After completing this work we proceeded to Anima Nipissing Lake, 
camped where the second limit line was supposed to intersect the east boundary 
of Kittson and walked east to the starting point and ran west astronomically 
intersecting said east boundary L72 chains north of the two-mile post and 
making an intersection angle of 90° 02' measured from north to east. Durable 
posts were planted every mile, mounded with stones and referenced the same 
as the first line. 

It was impossible to obtain experienced axemen at New Liskeard so we 
had to get them at North Bay, consequently the transportation expenses. 

Accompanying this report please find attached field notes and chainer's 
affidavits and under separate cover pay list and account in full. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servants, 

SUTCLIFFE & NeELANDS, 

Ontario Land Surveyors. 
The Honourable Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 35 
Algonquin Provincial Park 

Algonquin Park, Ont., November 21st, 1923. 

Honourable Sir,^ — I beg to submit my annual report for the fiscal year 
ending October 31st, 1923. 

Our staff is composed of a superintendent, two chief rangers, thirty-two 
park rangers and a housekeeper. One ranger, J. P. Foran, died during the year, 
and four new rangers were added to the Park Staff. 

Improvements 
Five new rangers' houses were built. Eight of the old houses had new 
roofing put on them, two houses had new foundations placed under them, 
new windows, etc., making them almost as good as new. A number of the 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 97 

houses were re-chinked and plastered and other small repairs made. Nine new 
stoves were placed in rangers' houses, required to replace old stoves that were 
worn or rusted out, and several cooking outfits were replaced. New blankets 
were distributed to any of the rangers on request. Portages and roads were 
much improved. Several new portages were cut out. The credit for the roads 
and trails is due to the Forestry Branch, assisted when possible by members of 
our staff. Telephones were placed in the Eagle Lake and Sligo Ranger Houses 
and attached to the Forestry Branch lines. The telephone situation is very 
much improved, returns to the Department from this source being $329.88. 

Game 

Game has increased in the Park, especially among the fur-bearing animals, 
such as beaver, otter, mink, marten and fisher. Deer are not so plentiful, disease 
among them during the winter of 1922-23 and the increased number of wolves, 
no doubt, accounting for same. 

There was the usual amount of illegal trapping in the Park; our rangers 
succeeding in bringing in six of the offenders. Fines were imposed amounting 
to $357.45, which was forwarded to the Provincial Treasurer through the Depart- 
ment. Nine different trappers' outfits were captured or destroyed. 109 traps 
were brought in to headquarters and possibly as many more destroyed. Nine 
rifles were also captured, all in poor condition, and a quantity of raw furs was 
taken and forwarded to the Department for disposal. 

Fish 

We placed 1,000,000 salmon trout fry in fourteen different lakes along the 
railroad in the southwest part of the Park. 

Fishing was very good throughout the Park waters, many sportsmen 
going to the northern parts of the Park reporting excellent results. The revenue 
from the sale of Fishing Licenses amounted to $2,579.00 and $101.00 was collected 
from the sale of Guides' Licenses. 

Lots and Leases 

A few applications were received for parcels of land upon which to build 
summer cottages. Only two cottages were built. A number of the summer 
residents built small additions to their cottages and a great many of the cottages 
were painted. The revenue collected from rents amounted to $869.59, which 
was forwarded to the Department. 

Other revenue collected was the sale of firewood amounting to $14.25. 
Summer residents were given the down timber and floatwood in the lakes, free 
of charge, for firewood, on condition that all debris should be cleaned up. This 
has resulted in considerable cleaning up along the lake shores and the removal 
of much danger to canoeists from floating driftwood. Rental of the Park team 
brought in $195.50. $72.00 was also paid direct to the Department by the 
Canadian National Railway for work done by the Park team while the pumping 
station was being built. 

The number of fires throughout the Park was less than usual. Only two 
fires amounted to anything. One in Hunter Township started by lightning, 
and the burning in an old slash left by the big fire of 1914 required a lot of hard 
work to keep it from running into the green timber. The cleaning up of this 
slash wood is a real benefit, having removed a dangerous menace to life and 
further destruction of forest in the Park. In the township of Boyle a bad fire 

4 L.F. 



98 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

raged for a couple of days, during which time high winds prevailed. The Forestry 
Branch, assisted by a number of the Park staff, got this fire under control. I 
may say that the increased efficiency of the Forestry Branch is largely responsible 
for the greater number of the fires being put out before any great damage was 
done. Tourists and members of the different Boys' Camps in the Park put out 
several small fires while travelling through the Park. Cigarettes are, possibly, 
the greatest menace to our forests and if visitors could be persuaded to use a 
pipe with a cover, the number of fires would be reduced. Very few fires result 
from careless campers as this class is fast disappearing. There is always the 
danger of fires alcng the railrcad and I would recommend that a small gasoline 
engine and hose be purchased for the Park staff at Algonquin Park Headquarters, 
also a small gasoline car so that it could be sent to any point in a hurry and 
in this way greatly assist in keeping fires under control and extinguishing them 
while they are still small. 

There is one girls' camp (Northway) in the Park. This is a select camp 
and only a limited number of young ladies are accepted. Miss F. Case of 
Rochester, N.Y., is in charge. 

There are four boys' camps in the Park. Ahmek Camp, in charge of Taylor 
Statten, is considered the best camp of the kind in America. There are three 
other camps for boys from the United States, "Pathfinders" at Source Lake, 
H. J, Norton of Rochester being in charge; "Waubeno Camp" at Cache Lake, 
with H. F. Standerwick in charge, and "Minie Wa Wa Camp," with W. L. Wise 
of Bordentown, N.Y., in charge. There is a friendly strife amongst the different 
camps as to which will have the best record regarding fires, etc. A fine type 
of manhood is being developed that will show the results of early training in 
the forests of Northern Ontario. 

In the Park there are fifty-one rangers' houses. There are four townships 
that have no rangers' houses, while a number have only one house. We should 
have at least twenty-four new ranger houses built so that our staff can success- 
fully cover the Park. There are 255 miles of Park border to guard with 120 miles 
of railroad to watch for poachers and only a staff of thirty-five, all told, to cover 
twenty-eight townships and nine half townships. These facts I respectfully 
submit for your consideration. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Mark Robinson, 
Superintendent Algonquin Provincial Park. 
The Honourable James Lyons, 

Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



1 922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 99 

Appendix No. 36 
QuETico Provincial Park 

Kawene P.O., Ont., October 31st, 1923. 

Honourable Sir, — I beg to submit my report on Quetico Provincial Park 
for the year ending October 31st, 1923. 

During the year the staff consisted of about seven rangers, and as the Park 
contains 1 ,000 miles and as all water routes are patrolled entirely by canoe the 
number of rangers is altogether inadequate. During the winter months the 
rangers' principal duty is to guard against poachers, and I am pleased to say 
that owing to the vigilance of the rangers, few, if any, have gained illegal 
entrance to the Park. There are, however, a few points which must be carefully 
guarded, chiefly the American Boundary and that covered by the Shevlin, Clarke 
Company's lumbering operations. 

I regret to state that on April 29th we lost one of our rangers, presumably 
by drowning. Although a careful search was made for the missing man no 
trace of him could be found, so we were forced to the conclusion that he ventured 
on the then insecure ice and was drowned. 

On June 25th and again in July we were visited by severe hail storms that 
did much damage to roofing, etc., and caused much work and expense. The 
portages on all old canoe routes were cleaned of fallen timber and growing 
brush and six new portages cut. 

Fur-bearing animals are steadily increasing, particularly beaver. They 
may be seen in numbers during open water, swimming about and paying little 
attention to gasoline boat or canoe. On one occasion I have seen five otters 
sporting themselves and on another six. Deer and moose do not seem to be as 
numerous as formerly, but I think this is due more to the animals changing their 
feeding grounds to later burnings or cuttings rather than to any decrease in 
numbers. 

Two fires occurred on the Park this summer, one, near the American 
Boundary, which did very little damage, burning about eight or ten acres of 
underwood, the other, on T.B. 48, the extent of which I have not yet learned. 

I will require for the coming season one twin cylinder 7 h.p. heavy duty 
gas engine for purpose of towing the barge as the engine now used for that 
purpose is much too light, thus rendering it unsafe to tow horses as often required. 
I will also require two 17 ft. canvas canoes for use of rangers. I would also 
recommend that a fire' pump, such as is used by the fire rangers with 1,000 feet 
of hose be placed at headquarters for fire protection. This pump could be 
carried on the gasoline boat now at headquarters down the French River and 
Pickeral Lake, a distance of twenty-five miles if necessary. There is no protec- 
tion, whatever, at headquarters for fire and usually with only one or two men 
about in case of fire little could be done to protect buildings and equipment. 

If I may be pardoned for doing so I would suggest a few changes in condition^. 

1. That the superintendent be given power to engage rangers to the number 
allowed by the Department without having to have recourse to Toronto for 
authority, thus giving him an opportunity to secure more efficient men. 

2. That the number of rangers be increased to twelve, these to patrol in 
winter and afford fire protection in summer, thus putting all rangers on the 
Park under one head. The fire rangers are paid more for their services than 



100 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



the park rangers although the duties are the same, thus causing a friction and 
jealousy, which can scarcely be overcome in any other manner. 

At the time of writing, and for three days previous, we are having a very 
severe storm, alternate snow and rain with strong wind from the northwest, 
making it impossible to travel, therefore the mailing of this report may be delayed. 

! have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant. 

Hugh McDonald, 
Superintendent Quetico Provincial Park. 
The Honour able James Lyons, 

Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 37 
Rondeau Provincial Park. 

Morpeth, Ont., October 31st, 1923. 

Honourable Sir, — I beg to submit my report for the fiscal year ending 
October 31st, 1923. 

Rondeau Provincial Park has had a great many visitors this past season, 
and its popularity is well established as a favoured summer resort. Tourists 
come from far and near, and cannot say enough in its praise as being one of the 
finest natural parks in Western Ontario, and as an ideal spot for a real holiday. 

Situated as it is between Rondeau Bay and the blue waters of Lake Erie, 
it is unexcelled as a beauty spot for the erection of summer cottages, which 
may 'be built either on the Bay side or on the Lake side as the parties may 







Superintendent's House — Rondeau Park. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 101 

desire. Each side has its advantages. The Lake beach is admittedly one of 
the best fresh water bathing, grounds in the Dominioniand the fresh breezes 
from Old Lake Erie are most invigorating. While the Bay side has its advantages 
in the way of fishing, sailing, canoeing and motor boating, it has also good 
bathing grounds, as in places the bottom is sandy. 

The Bay is about seven miles long and from two to three miles in width, 
and as it is practically surrounded by land it is ideal for aquatic sports of all 
kinds. In the fall when the wild ducks and geese are flying south the marshes 
of reeds and wild rice are full of birds and it is a most interesting time for 
hunters. 

Rondeau Park proper covers about 5,000 acres and the greater portion of 
it is well wooded with all kinds of valuable timber, considerable pine, walnut, 
whitewood and all other varieties of hardwood being found here, and all the 
trees are tall, straight and well proportioned and are wonderfully free from all 
parsitic growths or fungi. 

In this beautiful woods may be seen any number of deer. They have 
become very numerous of late years so that each season as many as can be dis- 
posed of for venison are being shot. This last year 129 carcases were disposed 
of in this way, being sold on the Park by the carcase, which brought in a revenue 
of over $1,000.00 and as they have hitherto destroyed the young growth in the 
forest to a great extent, already a difference can be noticed in the growth of 
young shrubs in certain portions of the Park where the deer were wont to browse. 
We have a small enclosure of about twelve acres in which are confined about 
sixteen deer. These are of great interest to visitors. 

Our beaver colonies are thriving well. There are at least three families 
and their work shows that they lead a very busy life and are increasing in 
numbers. 

The black squirrels are very numerous, hundreds of the little furry animals 
being seen and heard chattering throughout the forest. 

Owing to the ravages of some red foxes, which have invaded the Park this 
last year, our stock of wild turkeys and Canadian wild geese has diminished 
somewhat in numbers. 

We have been fairly successful this year in rearing pheasants. A goodly 
number of English Ring-necks have been liberated from year to year, and we 
receive many reports from points outside the Park, where the birds have nested 
and hatched and are thriving wonderfully well. We have also supplied eggs 
to those who have desired to rear them and in some cases they have been very 
successful in raising the young pheasant. Our aviary is well stocked with all 
varieties, such as the Goldens, the Silvers, the Reeves, Lady Amhersts, Chinese 
and English Ring-necks. 

Considerable improvements have been carried out in the Park this year. 

Roads to the extent of about five miles have been gravelled. 

The restaurant was thoroughly overhauled, and an addition built to it, 
which makes it much more convenient in every way. 

The pavilion was shingled. 

Two new lavatories equipped with Kaustine equipment were completed 
on the Lake side. 

The two bath-houses were moved together and fitted with lockers. An 
office was placed between them. This has been greatly appreciated by the 
public and has been very satisfactory. 

We must mention also how much the Hydro-Electric has been appreciated 
in the Park. It was installed in July, 1922, and has proved a wonderful boon 



102 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

to the place which was formerly in dense darkness. It has not yet been placed 
in all the cottages but probably in due time will.be. 

The total number of cottages at present on the Park number 130. A 
number will be built this coming season. The lots are nearly all taken, so in 
all probability a new survey will be made at an early date. 

As each year brings more visitors to Rondeau Park, the erection of a summer 
hotel is one of the necessary requirements. Many are asking for such accommoda- 
tion, and if this was provided it would fill a long-felt want. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Geo. Goldworthy, 
Superintendent Rondeau Provincial Park. 
The Honourable James Lyons, 

Minister of Lands and Forests, 

Parliament Buildings, 

Toronto, Ontario. 



Appendix No. 38 



Toronto, Ont., October 31st, 1923. 
Honourable James Lyons, Minister of Lands and Forests, Ontario. 

Sir, — -I have the honour to submit herewith the report of the Colonization 
Roads Branch of the Department of Lands and Forests for the fiscal year ending 
October 31st, 1923. 

The report, as has been the custom for a number of years, is in tabulated 
form, and shows the details of the work and the expenditures in the various 
townships which were made directly by the Government, and also the grants 
which were made to municipalities passing Colonization Roads By-laws. 

At the end of the statement is a summary or recapitulation of all the 
expenditures made during the year. 

The total expenditure for the year was $827,855.98. Of this amount 
$514,236.72 was expended directly by the Government upon roads and bridges 
in three hundred and thirty-one different townships. The amount expended 
upon inspection and miscellaneous services was $44,464.74, and the balance, 
a sum of $269,154.52, was distributed as grants to one hundred and ninety-nine 
municipalities, which had passed Colonization Roads By-laws. 

There is no doubt that the Colonization Roads Branch is playing an 
important part in the development of the Province in that area where 
assistance is given, in aiding agricultural, lumbering and, to some extent, mining 
industries. 

The fostering of the tourist trade is not the least important of the functions 
of this Branch. 

Attention has been given during the past fiscal year to the surveying and 
locating of new roads, and of diversions from roads previously constructed. 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



103 



Municipalities and district organizations are co-operating to some extent 
in our work, but there is still room for improvement. I believe that if all grants 
were conditional on those benefited being compelled to assume some fraction 
of the burden of, and responsibility for, every expenditure, better results would 
be obtained. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. H. FULLERTON, 

Superintendent Colonization Road». 




Road construction difficulties in Frontenac County. 



104 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO 

Annual. State 



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Addington road 

Admaston Township roads 

Airy Township roads 

Albemarle Township roads 

Algona North Township roads 

Algona South Township roads 

Alice and Fraser Township roads 

Allan Township roads 

Allan and Gordon Township roads 

Anglesea Township roads 

Anson Township roads 

Anstruther Township roads 

Appleby Township roads 

Armour and Proudfoot Township roads. 
Armour, Chapman and Ryerson Tp. rds. 

Armstrong Township roads 

Assiginack Township roads 

Aweres Township roads 

Awrey Township roads 

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Bagot and Blythfield Township roads. . 

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Balfour and Dowling Township roads. . 
Bangor, Wicklow and McClure Tp. rds. 

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Barrie Township roads 

Barrie Island Township roads 

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Barry's Bay and Madawaska rd. (Renf.) 

Bastedo Township roads 

Baxter Township roads 

Beauchamp Township roads 

Beckwith Township roads 

Bedford Township roads. 

Bedford Boundary road 

Bedford and Oso Boundary road 

Bedford Tp. Richardson Mine road. . . . 

Bethune Township roads 

Bexley Township roads 

Bexley Township Cameron road 

Bexley Township Victoria road 

Bidwell Township roads 

Bigwood Township roads 

Billings Township roads 

Blezard Township roads 

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Bonfield Township roads 

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1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



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27 








4 
17 

3 
11 


metal 
cedar 
metal 
cedar 






120 
320 


16 
40 


30 

160 

650 

1,270 


20 
22 
18 
15 


gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

stone 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

stone 

gravel 


400 

160 

460 

160 

785 

870 

1,125 

1,560 

680 

'600 

160 

269 

4 

80 


6 
6 

8 

12 

6 

10 

7 

8 

8 

8 

6 

6 

12 

8 


25 
3.00 
2.5C 
4.88 
2.46 
3.00 
8.25 
6.00 
2.15 
6.25 

.50 
1.00 
6.04 
2.85 
2.26 

.25 
2.40 
2.12 
1.00 

.63 
4.00 
5.63 
3.25 
2.45 
1.25 
1.75 
3.25 
2.35 
2.00 
3.00 
. 1 00 


$ c. 

899.96 
11,872.89 

805.25 
1,503.64 
1,004.86 
1,403.20 
2,115.75 
2,063.35 
1,620.81 
1,496.85 

571.50 
1,000.05 

410.00 
1,250.00 

900.25 

253.09 
2,151.61 
1,410.80 
8,632.60 

200.00 
2,868.19 
1,061.00 
1,497.21 

500.70 

501.25 
1,198.74 
1,679.66 

848.05 
1,604.58 
2,970.00 
2,900.35 

100.00 
1,995.50 
1,343.00 
1,006.22 
2,435.15 

558.46 

500.20 

351.75 
1,412.95 
1,200.50 

501.30 
1,201.00 
3,589.76 
2,450.00 
3,054.20 
3,603.19 
6,089.70 
4,498.17 
1,511.87 
8,616.81 


1 


1 


24 


cedar 


stone 


1,800 


2 
3 
















4 
















5 








4 
8 
2 
4 
2 


cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
stone 
wood 






150 

810 

75 

50 

80 


35 
15 
20 
20 

12 


545 

2,220 

1,855 

80 

60 

160 

272 

1,910 

866 


20 
15 
20 
32 
24 
14 
16 
12 
14 


6 












7 












8 








stone 
earth 
stone 
earth 
earth 
clay 


310 
220 

60 
159 

11 
137 











10 








11 




17 


cedar 


1 
1 

10 
2 
2 

11 
2 
9 


stone 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
stone 
cedar 
stone 
cedar 






12 




10 
40 


8 
14 


13 








14 








15 
















80 
520 
340 


14 
30 
24 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


40 
354 
490 


6 
6 

7 


16 


2 
2 


35 
10 


wood 
wood 


clay 

stone 

earth 


4,375 

50 

9,941 


315 
310 


15 
20 


17 
18 
19 
















gravel 
gravel 
grave! 
gravel 
gravel 


200 
760 
1,400 
420 
250 


10 
6 
9 
6 
6 


?0 








6 
7 
5 
2 
8 

12 
4 
2 
2 
8 
5 
3 

12 
6 


metal 
cedar 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 
stone 
stone 
cedar 
c'ment 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 






315 


16 


1,030 
1,800 
560 
450 
400 
573 
470 
520 
430 
960 
320 

90 
765 
320 

80 
594 

70 

95 


12 
18 
16 
33 
33 
14 
18 
14 
20 
20 
25 
14 
18 
30 
20 
14 
14 
14 


?1 












22 








earth 

earth 

gravel 

earth 

clay 

stone 

stone 

stone 

earth 


1,687 

50 

350 

215 

300 

400 

50 

120 

3,000 


110 
550 

80 
140 
303 

30 


30 
20 
18 
20 
16 
10 


73 








?4 








?S 








gravel 


392 


7 


?6 




12 


wood 


?7 




gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


270 
630 
150 


7 

7 

12 


98 








?Q 


2 


8 


cedar 






30 




100 


66 


^^ 








gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


15 
200 
336 
900 
490 
360 


6 
5 
6 
10 
9 
8 


.30 
2.40 
2.25 
2.82 
2.50 
1.13 
.30 
.07 
2.50 
1.65 
2.60 
1.75 
2.90 
5.25 
4.50 
7.25 
5.50 
12.88 
7 fi9 


32 








earth 
clay 


200 
660 






33 








240 


14 


S4 








SS 








11 

4 


metal 
cedar 


stone 


1,200 


480 
45 
46 


15 
20 
18 


36 








^7 








stone 

rock 

stone 

stone 

earth 

stone 

stone 

stone 

earth 

stone 

earth 


800 
110 

75 

482 

473 

450 

525 

40 

1,645 

938 

8,140 


^8 








1 

5 

1 

3 

1 

12 

15 

13 

8 

8 

15 

9 

10 


stone 

cedar 

cedar 

tile 

stone 

stone 

wood 

stone 

cedar 

wood 

cedar 

cedar 

stone 








39 












480 

450 

180 

92 

690 

653 

1,010 

1,650 

300 

3,002 

200 


18 
18 
26 
16 
22 
14 
20 
33 
18 
15 
15 
18 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


795 
456 
185 
469 
885 
273 
795 
330 
600 
1,342 
20 


7 
6 
6 
6 
7 
6 
7 
7 
6 
10 
7 


40 








63 


12 


41 








4? 








335 
260 
22 
450 
1,050 
200 
810 
180 


15 
16 
14 
12 
18 
32 
40 
-10 


43 


2 


10 


wood 


44 
4S 








46 


1 
3 

1 


12 
45 
12 


cedar 
wood 
cedar 


47 
48 
49 








SO 








stone 


1,250 




548 


1,199| 6l 4.20 


51 



106 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO,. 

Annual State 





TOWNSHIPS 


NEW CONSTRUCTION 


Q 




Cleared 

and 
Stumped 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 


a 


« 


m 

-a 
o 

u 

■i-> 
bO 
C 

0) 




2 

*-> 

C 


4J 


3 


in 

'a 

£ 

C 


■I-) 


01 

\ 

to 

c 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


s? 


Brethour Township roads 


520 
740 


66 
40 


240 
30 


24 
18 








340 


53 
.S4 


Bright Township roads 

Bright Additional Township roads 


gravel 


20 


6 


20 


55 


Broder Township roads 

Bromley Township roads 


320 


40 












4,177 


56 














S7 


Brougham Township roads 


190 


40 


321 


20 


gravel 


340 


10 




58 


Brudenell and Lyndoch Township roads. 
Brunei Township roads 




50 


















60 


Bucke Towrship roads 


80 


30 


240 


26 


gravel 


15 


6 




61 


Buckhorn Trunk road 




6? 


Burgess Township roads 


















6.S 


Burleigh Township roads 


















64 


Burleigh Trunk road 


43 
60 


66 
30 


43 
60 


26 
24 


gravel 
gravel 


43 
60 


21 

7 


65 


65 
66 


Burpee Township roads (Manitoulin) . . 
Burpee Township roads (Parry Sound) . 


120 


67 


Burton and MacKenzie Township roads 
Burwash Township roads 


80 
105 


40 
16 


80 
170 


16 
12 








20 


68 


gravel 


140 


6 


97 


60 


Caldwell Township roads 




70 


Calvin Township roads 


200 
180 
295 
470 
160 


40 
40 
20 
40 

35 


200 

276 
465 
400 
455 


15 
16 
16 
26 
24 


gravel 
gravel 


200 
64 


7 

7 


390 


71 


Cameron Township roads 


169 


7? 


Campbell Township roads 


80 


73 


Cane Township roads 








793 


74 


Capreol Township roads 








1,950 


7S 


Carden Township roads 








66 


76 


Cardiff Township roads 
















50 


77 


Cardwell Township roads 


















78 


Carling Township roads 


400 


55 


322 


18 


gravel 


i86 


6 


266 


70 


Carlow Township roads 




80 


Carnarvon Township roads 
















21 


81 


Cartier Township roads 


















8? 


Casey Township roads 


320 
147 


50 
16 


320 
242 


30 
12 








155 


83 


Casimir Township roads 


gravel 


40 


8 


181 


84 


Chaffey Township roads 




8S 


Chandos Township roads 


250 
35 


40 
30 


300 
35 


16 
30 








300 


86 


Chapleau Township roads .... 








70 


87 


Chapman Township roads 










88 


Chisholm Township roads. 


103 
160 


40 
45 


103 
160 


20 
26 


gravel 


15 


5 


249 


80 


Christie Township roads 


160 


00 


Clarendon and Miller Township roads. . 










01 


Cobden Township road 

Cockburn Island roads 


140 


60 


140 


18 








60 


0? 








40 


Q3 


Cosby Township roads 

Cosby and Delamere Township road. . . 

Creighton Township road 

Crerar Township road 

Crosby North Township roads 


755 
400 
650 
661 


16 
16 
33 
16 


800 
400 
290 

822 


12 
14 
16 
12 








370 


04 








24 


95 
96 
07 


gravel 
gravel 


138 
223 


7 
6 


172 
450 


08 


Crosby South Township roads. 


















00 


Dalhousie Township roads . . 


















100 


Dalton Township roads 
















42 


101 


Dana Township road 






300 
120 


14 
24 










10? 


Darling Township roads 






gravel 


120 


12 




103 


Dawson Township roads 


1 







1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



107 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH. 
MENT, 1922-1923. 



-Continued. 













CUT AND FILL 


MAINTENANCE 


o 

< 
w 


w 

Bi 
H 

X 
W 




BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


Side- 
brushed 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 




E 

3 

z 


c 

a 
en 

12 


.2 


E 

3 

z 


4) 


."2 


-a 

u 

> 

o 

3 

u 


O 
u 

ti 
C 
lU 


*-> 


tn 

-o 
o 

u 

J= 

be 
C 
<u 


21 


."2 


tn 
-0 
O 
ii 

-C 
bi) 

c 




ei 

a 
a 
S 


11 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


1 


16 


cedar 


16 


wood 


clay 


2,883 


150 


20 


590 


26 


gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

stone 

gravel 


40 
255 
510 

3,812 
780 
160 

1,360 
115 
671 

1,518 
740 
170 
737 
700 


6 
6 
6 
8 

10 
8 

10 
5 
6 
8 

10 
8 
8 
8 


3.74 
3.11 
1.60 
14.05 
2.44 
1.57 
9.26 

.44 
3.69 
8.44 
2.32 
1.50 
2.43 
3.06 
1.25 
3.00 

.54 

.30 
7.12 
5.00 
6.75 
5.35 
10.50 
2.63 
1.94 
1.25 
1.25 
3.52 
5.06 
1.50 
5.92 
3.75 
1.09 
9.U 

.79 

1.00 

12.30 

.50 
4.00 

.94 
1.06 
6.04 
1.25 
5.05 
4.00 
2.30 
2.25 
4.35 
2.00 

.94 
1.20 
1.22 


$ c. 

2,611.67 

1,007.38 

1,049.39 

7,875.72 

1,007.91 

753.00 

2,033.50 

1,002.06 

3,270.28 

3,002.61 

999.55 

430.11 

5,031.77 

2,203.97 

397.70 

1,820.35 

490.00 

390.00 

3,226.51 

2,559.93 

5,054.83 

2,857.48 

4,114.55 

1,807.97 

1,668.39 

701.03 

906.45 

601.02 

2,524.54 

264.00 

3,098.33 

1,711.10 

1,001.02 

1,302.87 

3,005.65 

422.51 

5,409.76 

1,000.59 

2,155.23 

902.48 

651.00 

2,133.52 

201.25 

1,633.75 

2,213.28 

2,177.02 

1,794.71 

1,954.72 

1,502.90 

301.25 

503.38 

807.25 


52 
53 
























54 


4 
1 


14 
16 


wood 
cedar 


54 


wood 


earth 


2,695 


1,467 


20 


3,139 
200 
100 

2,450 
100 
640 

1,384 
360 
480 
160 
685 
400 
400 


14 
20 
20 
24 
18 
28 
14 
24 
12 
16 
30 
16 
16 


55 
5^ 




2 
9 
3 
3 
8 


cedar 
cedar 
stone 
cedar 
cedar 










57 


1 


8 


cedar 






1,660 


20 


5? 




earth 
clay 


800 
5,870 


55 


1 


12 


wood 






6C 




1,562 


10 


61 












62 




















63 








8 
13 

6 
18 

6 


wood 
metal 
wood 
cedar 
wood 


earth 
earth 


1,060 
402 






6^ 








190 
340 
133 


12 
20 
12 


65 


1 


12 


cedar 


6f 








gravel 


866 


7 


61 


1 


12 


cedar 






6S 












75 

1,715 

1,035 

790 

409 

1,256 

716 

1,620 

40 


14 
15 
12 
26 
24 
33 
20 
18 
18 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


91 
985 
470 

1,640 
609 

1,100 
697 
120 
400 


6 
9 
6 
7 
6 
9 
6 
6 
5 


6S 


2 

1 


11 
10 


cedar 
cedar 


17 
8 
6 
8 
8 
4 

13 
3 
7 
1 

14 


cedar 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
stone 
stone 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 


stone 
earth 
earth 


36 
302 

485 


450 
15 

505 

615 

1,535 

12 

390 


15 
40 
20 
30 
24 
22 
30 


7C 
71 

7: 








Ti 


1 


20 


cedar 


stone 
stone 
gravel 
stone 


1,320 
62 

457 
75 


7^ 
7; 








7( 








r 












ii 
















730 

606 

70 

1,128 

862 

53 

2,400 
218 
320 

2,854 


18 
16 
33 
30 
14 
16 
16 
22 
16 
15 


gravel 
gravel 
cind'rs 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


803 

1,616 

480 

625 

396 

349 

743 

110 

30 

1,622 


7 
6 
8 
6 
6 
5 
6 
10 
7 
9 


7i 








stone 


460 


200 


20 


8( 


1 


60 
34 


wood 
wood 


8 


1 


19 

19 
2 

11 
6 
1 

19 
3 
8 


wood 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 
cedar 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 


stone 
stone 
stone 


40 
202 
425 


360 
147 


14 
16 


8: 
8: 








8^ 


1 


23 
80 


cedar 
wood 


333 


10 


8. 


3 


sand 

clay 

earth 

earth 

stone 


500 
320 
140 
135 
700 


8( 




80 
430 


30 
20 


8' 








8{ 




31 


cedar 


8< 




50 


10 


495 


16 


gravel 
grave! 
gravel 
gravel 


1,150 
160 
340 
730 


8 
6 
8 
6 


9( 








9 








2 
24 
1 
6 
8 
16 
2 


wood 
wood 
cedar 
wood 
wood 
wood 
tile 


stone 
rock 


20 
105 


240 


20 






9 




18 


wood 


700 


12 


9> 








9^ 








stone 
clay 


205 

45 


400 


20 


400 
155 
511 
105 
470 
264 


12 
12 
16 
16 
24 
24 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


320 
52 
895 
696 
1,368 
565 


6 
6 
9 
9 
8 
6 


9. 






rep'd 


9( 




60 

105 

70 

83 


20 
16 
20 
32 


9 












9J 












9< 








4 

8 


tile 
cedar 


stone 


179 


10( 








10 




















gravel 
gravel 


260 
290 


12 

8 


10 








4 


stone 


:::::: 








330 


24 


10 



108 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO, 

Annual State 



1 



TOWNSHIP 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 



Cleared 

and 
Stumped 



Graded 

and 
Shaped 



SURFACED 





en 


■!-> 


-a 
£ 






M 


-C 


-a 


bo 

c 


^ 




4 


5 



104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 



Delamere Township roads 

Denbigh Township roads 

Denison Township roads 

Digby Township roads 

Dill Township roads 

Dorset Minden Trunk road. 

Douglas-Denbigh Trunk road 

Dowling Township roads 

Draper Township roads 

Draper-Macaulay townline 

Dryden Township roads 

Dungannon Township roads 

Dunnet Township roads 

Dymond Township roads 

Eastnor Township road 

Elzevir Township road 

Espanola-Lee Vallej' Trunk road 

Falconer Township roads 

Faraday Township roads 

Fenwick Township roads 

Ferris Township roads 

Ferrie Township roads 

Firstbrook Township roads 

Foley Township road 

Franklin Township roads 

Freeman Township road 

Frontenac Trunk road 

Galbraith Township road 

Galway Township roads 

Galway and Cavendish Township road, 

Garson Township roads 

Gibbons Township roads 

Garson and McLennan Township road. 

Gladstone Township roads 

Glamorgan Township roads -. . . 

Gordon Township roads 

Gould Township roads 

Grant Township roads 

Grasett Township roads 

Grattan Township roads 

Griffith Township roads 

Gurd Township roads 

Haddo Township roads 

Hagar Township roads 

Hagar Township Boundary road 

Hagar and Loughrin Township roads. . 

Hagarty Township roads 

Hallam Township roads 

Hanmer Township roads 

Hardy and McConkey Township roads. 

Harley Township roads 

Harris Township roads 



78 
160 
209 



320 

545 



160 



156 
100 



270 

'6io 



285 
103 



40 



180 
120 



30 

20 

287 

320 

1,125 



325 



160 
570 



164 



33 



26 



33 



40 



130 
709 
160 



160 



53 
320 



270 
610 



285 

m 



100 



200 
120 



560 
280 
207 
320 
564 



820 
240 



100 
420 



144 



gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



24 



gravel 



gravel 



18 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



earth 



160 



85 
160 



53 



285 



190 
60 



640 
460 



134 
280 



160 



18 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



109. 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH. 

MENT, 1922-1923. 



-Continued. 













CUT AND FILL 


MAINTENANCE 





EXPENDITURE 




BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


Side- 
brushed 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 






C 
3 

z 


c 
c 

12 


."2 


B 

3 


."2 

'u 


."2 
'C 


-H 

U 
IS 

3 

u 




-C 

"So 
c 
<u 

18 


t5 
19 


in 

-a 

s 

"So 
c 
dj 


-a 


."2 
'u 


•v 


u 
-C 

"So 
c 
<u 


"S 

-4-1 

-a 


CQ 


11 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 








2 

1 


cedar 
wood 










87 
200 
214 
103 

325 


14 
14 
33 
18 
33 


gravel 
gravel 


110 
265 


6 
8 


.84 
1.33 
1.31 

.81 
2.52 
2.20 

.50 

.45 
1.72 

.33 
4.28 
1.90 
3.38 
8.08 

.79 
1.00 
1.38 

.-90 
1.60 

.75 

21.55 

2.00 

1.00 

.75 

.50 
1.00 
5.20 
1.81 
5.37 

.40 
1.29 
3.40 
5.10 
4.43 
4.34 
. 2.45 
3.47 
2.42 

.67 
3.86 
2.05 
2.89 
1.00 
11.98 
1.00 
4.40 
9.25 
2.15 
6.50 
1.77 
6.20 
5.91 


590.00 

967.63 

399.95 

500.00 

1,450.20 

19,932.98 

4,079.47 

652.58 

1,001.25 

2,551.38 

1,499.36 

1,204.81 

1,450.00 

5,465.69 

600.00 

206.40 

1,001.25 

300.00 

803.43 

1,550.00 

8,088.85 

700.05 

848,52 

399.76 

1,001.76 

700.30 

7,654.37 

1,599.86 

850.00 

100.25 

710.70 

1,029.61 

1,005.75 

3,780.24 

1,492.13 

1,813.56 

1,726.64 

804.50 

947.95 

1,000.50 

1,003.50 

1,575.18 

400.00 

3,266.62 

200.00 

1,004.20 

3,035.21 

1,900.00 

4,365.33 

1,098.76 

3,019.74 

3,627.07 


104 








stone 

stone 

stone 

earth 

earth 

stone 

stone 

rock 

stone 


333 

215 

68 

160 

12,303 

200 

200 

10 

3,087 


40 


15 


lOS 








106 








2 

21 

27 

3 

3 

3 

5 

11 

4 

15 

9 


stone 
cedar 
wood 
c'ment 
cedar 
cedar 
stone 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 
cedar 


25 
228 


30 
33 


gravel 


262 


6 


107 








108 


1 


135 


wood 








10Q 


















110 









145 
100 


40 
16 


105 
420 
106 
790 
315 
793 
1,580 
220 
320 
445 


33 
18 
18 
20 
18 
14 
28 
20 
16 
30 








111 








gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


556 
42 
90 

608 

622 
1,458 

256 
78 

325 


6 
6 
8 
7 
6 
5 
6 
6 
10 


11? 








in 


1 


12 


cedar 


1,190 
196 


25 
10 


114 








lis 


? 


10 

35 


wood 
wood 






116 


4 


clay 


899 


60 


20 


117 
118 












stone 


35 






119 












445 


20 


i-^o 








2 
7 
1 
45 
6 
8 


cedar 
cedar 
wood 
wood 
cedar 
wood 






1?1 








stone 
earth 
earth 


18 
399 
124 


107 

157 

1,120 

640 

40 

20 


12 
25 
40 
15 
45 
18 


291 


14 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
cind'rs 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
stone 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


499 
84 

2,423 
480 
300 
177 
50 
300 

1,335 
585 

' 328 

88 

20 

350 

545 

1,066 
499 
380 

1,000 
150 
215 
600 
200 
138 


7 
6 
7 
6 
6 
6 
5 
5 
9 
6 
6 
8 
6 
6 
8 
6 
6 
7 
6 
6 
6 
8 
15 
6 


1?? 


1 


40 
20 


rep'd 
cedar 


1?^ 


2 


5,075 


15 


124 
1?S 








clay 


1,000 


160 


22 


1?6 








1?7 








7 
2 
14 
4 
6 
1 
4 
5 


stone 

cedar 

tile 

cedar 

cedar 

cedar 

cedar 

cedar 


stone 
earth 
stone 
earth 
stone 


590 

187 

3,300 

932 

20 


150 
147 

1,335 
295 

1,768 
128 
415 

1,105 
960 
450 
657 
110 
100 
780 
40 


16 
18 
18 
22 
12 
14 
33 
12 
8 
22 
16 
30 
18 
14 
16 


1?8 












1?9 












no 












m 


2 


31 


wood 


240 
95 
10 


16 

8 

15 


132 

n3 








clay 


400 


IH 


7 


12 


wood 


ns 








1,650 

1,081 

925 

80 

80 

640 

60 


10 
20 
20 
20 
20 
16 
20 


n6 








1 
9 
6 


wood 
cedar 
wood 
wood 
cedar 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 
metal 
wood 


earth 
rock 
-rock 
stone 


700 
122 
394 
690 


n? 








n8 








n9 








3 

. . 7 


140 








141 








3 

5 

6 

22 

4 

24 

1 

11 

25 

2 

8 

7 

19 

12 


earth 


1,635 


14? 








143 




















144 


1 


14 


cedar 


earth 


350 


240 


12 


640 


16 


145 
146 








rock 


23 


1,564 


30 


1,197 
320 
320 

2,495 
250 
720 


22 
14 

33 
18 
18 
33 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


845 
160 
370 
915 
682 
930 


6 
6 
8 
8 
6 
8 


147 








148 








gravel 
sand 
earth 
gravel 


125 
3,000 

350 
1,330 


290 
1,605 


15 

25 


149 


1 


10 


rep'd 


150 
1S1 


2 
1 


18 
14 
86 
12 


cedar 
cedar 
wood 
wood 


740 


20 


152 

1S3 


1 
I 


earth 
stone 


1,643 
50 


475 


22 


1,680 
840 


16 

20 


gravel 
gravel 


342 
1,315 


6 
6 


154 
155 



no 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO. 

Annual State 





TOWNSHIPS 


NEW CONSTRUCTION 


c 




Cleared 

and 
Stumped 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 


X 

5 


a 


en 

o 

u 

C 
di 


•ii 


tn 

£ 

c 


4-1 

<u 


■i-t 


<n 

O 

u 

ti 

C 
OJ 




tn 

•u 

O 
u 

"So 
c 
o 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1S6 


Harvey Township roads 


















157 
1S8 


Head Township roads 

Henvey Township roads 

Henwood Township roads 

Hilliard Township roads . . 


135 
200 
240 
30 
960 
620 
204 


40 
30 
40 
16 
35 
40 
46 


135 
280 
240 
30 
900 
620 
144 


28 
16 
30 
16 
16 
22 
18 


gravel 


40 


12 


6 


159 
160 


gravel 


270 


6 


50 

233 


161 
169 


Hilton Township roads 

Himsworth North Township roads 

Himsworth South Township roads 

Hinchinbrooke Township roads 


gravel 


20 


6 


80 
38 


163 
164 


gravel 


180 


8 


150 


165 
166 


Hodgins and Gaudette Township roads. 
Horton Township roads 


58 


66 


132 


20 


gravel 


132 


20 


264 


167 


Howland Township roads 
















15 


168 


Hudson Township roads 
















254 


16Q 


Hugel Township roads 

Humphrey Township roads 

Hungerford Township roads 


688 
20 


16 

22 


275 
67 


12 
20 








60 


170 

171 


gravel 


40 


7 


134 


\T> 


Huntingdon Township roads 


















17^ 


Jennings Township roads 


















174 


Jocelyn Township road 


















17S 


Johnson Township roads 


160 

320 

80 

182 


40 
50 
40 
18 


160 

320 

80 

182 


25 
20 
14 
18 


gravel 


100 


6 


320 


176 


Joly Township roads 

Kaladar Township roads 




177 










178 


Kehoe Township road 


gravel 


80 


6 


364 


17Q 


Kennebec Township roads 




180 


Kerns Township roads 


40 
270 


30 
16 


25 
270 


16 

12 








80 


181 


Kirkpatrick Township roads . 








20 


18'> 












183 
184 

185 


Laird Township road 

L'Amable to Maynooth trunk road. . . . 
Laurier Township roads 


160 

40 

136 


35 
40 
40 


160 
100 
136 
160 


14 
24 
14 

24 


gravel 
gravel 


136 
100 


6 

7 


272 
200 


186 


Lavant Township roads 


gravel 


i60 


10 




187 








98 


188 




















18Q 


Lindsay Township roads 


















100 


Lome Township roads 


561 

160 

20 


20 
16 
40 


561 

160 

20 


14 
14 
20 








1,132 


101 


Loudon Township road 










107 


Loughboro Township road 










10^ 


Loughboro Township Desert Lake road 
Loughrin Township roads. ... 








640 


104 


















105 


Louise Township roads 


546 


40 


160 


24 








500 


106 












107 


















573 


108 


Lutterworth Township roads 
















40 


100 


Lyell Township roads 


45 

57 

4 


40 
25 
66 


480 

57 

117 


18 
12 
24 


gravel 


82 


12 


425 


700 


Macaulay Township roads 




701 


Machar Township roads 

Madoc Township road 








234 


?0? 










?03 


Mara Township roads 










gravel 


73 


7 




?04 


Marmora and Lake Township road 












205 
?06 


Martland Township roads 

Mason Township roads 


1,198 
153 


16 
16 


588 
109 


12 
14 


gravel 
gravel 


78 
102 


6 

7 


208 


207 


Matchedash Township roads 


20 



I 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



111 



OLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH.— Continued. 
MENT, 1922-1923. V 



■^ 










CUT AND FILL 


MAINTENANCE 




a 

X 
Q 

■z 

W 

y, 
a 




, BRIDGES 

n 


CULVERTS 


Q.,^ Graded 
bide- J 


SURFACED 






1 

3 

z 

^■ll 


c 
a 

12 




a; 
J^ 

S 

3 

z 


.2 
'C 

0) 


3 


tn 
u 

O 

IS 

3 
U 


en 

2 
+j 

be 

c 
o 


tn 

^ s 


a 
21 


3 

'u 

03 


en 

o <u 
u a; a 
o 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 


22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


H 






2 
2 
4 
17 
16 
6 
7 
5 


cedar 
cedar 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
cedar 
c'ment 


stone 
stone 


88 
200 




1,057 
141 


14 

15 


gravel 
gravel 


844 1 
103 


5.90 
8 1.00 
.87 
6 2.67 
6 4.04 
6 4.23 
6 2.83 

8 1.53 

9 1.30 

.42 
.84 

8 .67 
6 4.64 

6 5.34 

.71 

7 1.43 
7 .77 
6 1.07 

9 .75 
6 2.01 
6 3.30 

2.75 

.57 

9 2.02 

6 2.45 

6 1.93 

2 2.05 

.50 

7 5.21 

.43 
} 1.45 
5 1.83 
7 .25 
5 2.67 
B 5.80 
.50 
.13 
5 4.00 

3 1.03 
1.70 

S 2.78 
3.90 
) 2.83 
) 4.47 
5 .50 
J 1.64 
j .30 
3 2.89 
J .20 
) 11.86 
.48 
i 2.55 


$ c. 

1,997.73 

803.75 

493.00 

1,678.42 

2,403.82 

2,i82.41 

1,702.03 

996.35 

1,355.44 

1,952.27 

503.50 

1,011.89 

3,784.06 

2,076.85 

1,014.65 

1,140.73 

652.95 

790.00 

500.40 

1,303.76 

953.41 

609.03 

301.25 

1,100.00 

1,993.39 

1,750.00 

1,915.05 

300.95 

3,575.73 

498.75 

570.01 

1,648.40 

202.88 

1,201.48 

2,031.60 

199.37 

499.84 

4,994.33 

351.75 

1,209.20 

1,299.90 

1,470.50 

1,211.02 

995.90 

1,402.97 

1,045.75 

199.80 

2,603.45 

201.86 

3,453.90 

300.10 

1,392.38 


1S6 


^^m 






1S7 


^^B 




• 


1S8 


^^v 






clay 

clay 

stone 

gravel 

stone 


2,366 
568 

20 
1,750 

15 


315 

212 

80 

286 

" " 20 


20 580 
12 420 
20 56 
26 75 
240 
10 155 


28 
20 
20 
16 
18 
14 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


170 
861 
394 
164 
160 
420 


1S9 


^■1 


40 
18 


rep'd 
wood 


160 
161 
16'? 


^H 






16^ 


^^K 






164 


^B' 






2 
1 
3 
8 

19 
5 
4 
3 
2 
1 

11 
2 
6 
1 
6 

11 
8 


cedar 
cedar 
stone 
cedar 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 
wood 
wood 
cedar 
stone 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 
wood 


gravel 
rock 
earth 
clay 


5,500 

60 

107 

7,157 


16S 


^H 






""is 

140 
100 
160 


160 

20 


24 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


2701 
200 
1,279 
675 


166 


^■2 


10 
16 


wood 
cedar 


167 


^B2 


12 435 

16 466 

12 160 

300 


24 
14 
16 
16 
16 
16 
20 
22 
22 
14 


168 
169 


^H* 






earth 


744 


170 


^^t. 






gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


455 
199 
193 
240 
295 
710 


171 


^K 












104 


17? 


^^B 












340 


17^ 


^^K 












30 


174 


^B 






earth 


1,455 


240 

20 

400 


33 130 

6 640 

10 120 


17S 


^^F 






176 


^H 






stone 
gravel 
stone 
clay 


100 

80 

106 

1,559 


177 


^H-. 










178 


^H' 






55 
60 


15 600 

30 240 

205 


16 

28 
14 

27 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


585 
490 
510 
660 1 


179 


2 


40 
10 


wood 
wood 


180 

181 




sand 


2,000 




160 


IS"? 








2 

16 

3 


wood 
cedar 
cedar 


18^ 


1 


16 


cedar 


stone 


265 




1,540 


16 


gravel 


1,407 


184 
18S 














100 


12 
18 
20 


gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

stone 

gravel 


300 1 
436 
80 
860 
240 


186 








3 


stone 


gravel 


457 


18 


15 563 
80 


187 








188 




















189 


1 


10 


wood 


22 

2 

1 

8 

1 

5 

11 

12 

15 

11 

4 

5 

2 


wood 
wood 
stone 
wood 
cedar 
wood 
cedar 
wood 
wood 
cedar 
stone 
wood 
wood 


earth 

clay 

stone 

stone 

earth 

earth 


866 
100 
250 
856 
330 
630 


220 


16 1,300 


20 


190 
191 


















19^ 








420 
324 


10 1,280 
24 290 


12 
33 


gravel 
gravel 


720 ( 
250 1( 


19^ 








194 








19S 








740 
538 
272 


20 692 

20 835 

20 880 

950 


16 
18 
20 
15 
18 
18 
18 
27 
18 
U 


gravel 


522 ( 


196 


1 


25 


cedar 


sand 
earth 


260 
130 


107 




gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


335 ( 
35 ^ 
64 . 

383 ' 
96 ( 

626 ( 
64 ■ 

790 ( 


198 








199 








stone 

earth 

stone 

clay 

stone 

stone 


1,251 
2,225 

41 

1,360 

100 

85 


130 

"no 

' ' i66 


51 
30 408 

90 
20 225 

64 
14 1,760 


?00 


2 


14 


wood 


201 
?0? 








?03 








1 

18 

1 
7 


cedar 
wood 
cedar 
metal 


?04 


4 




rep'd 


205 
706 












278 


12 330 


18 


gravel 


609 i 


207 



112 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO, 

Annual State 





TOWNSHIPS 


NEW CONSTRUCTION 


o 




Cleared 

and 
Stumped 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


SURFACED 


X 

S 


Pi 

CQ 


(0 

1 

G 
►J 


Si 

-a 


in 

I 

to 

c 




."2 


in 
'O 
O 
u 

to 

c 

0) 


JZ 
+-> 
•a 


-o 
o 

u 

ti 
C ■ 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 1 8 


9 


10 


"^nx 


Mattawan Township roads 


106 


40 


106 


15 


gravel 


80 


5 


81 


?0Q 


May Township roads 


100 


?,in 


Mayo Township roads 


















711 


McDonald and Meredith Tp. roads. . . . 


















717 


McKellar Township roads 


















713 


McKim Township roads 








.... 










714 


McLean Township road 


















715 


McMurrich Township roads 


















716 


McPherson Township roads 


48 


14 


74 


12 


gravel 


96 


6 


103 


717 


Medonte Township roads 


48 


718 


Medcra and Wood Township road 

Merritt Township roads 


650 

225 


20 
22 












190 


710 


160 


30 


gravel 


60 


6 


15 


770 


Methuen Township roads 




771 


Methuen and Lake Township road .... 


















777 


Michipicoten Harbor road 


















77.S 


Michipicoten roads 


















774 


Mills Township roads (Manitoulin). . . . 
















89 


775 


Mills Township roads (Parry Sound). . . 
Minden Township road 


556 
60 


45 
45 


142 
112 


16 
22 








120 


776 


gravel 


100 


6 


17 


??7 


Monmouth Township road 


60 


778 


Monteagle and Herschel Tp. roads 

Monteith Township road 


30 


40 


31 


18 










??9 










7,sr 


Morgan Township roads 


840 


66 


630 


33 


gravel 


100 


6 


790 


7.S1 


Murchison Township roads 


350 


737 


Muskoka Township roads 


115 


20 


100 


12 










733 


Nairn Township roads 










7S4 


Neelon Township road 


80 
240 


33 
40 


80 
419 


33 
16 


gravel 


80 


9 




73 S 


Nipissing Township roads 


480 


736 


Norman Township roads 








160 


737 


Oakley Township roads. 


















738 


Olden Township roads 


















73Q 


Orillia Township roads 
















284 


740 


Oro Township roads 


















741 


Oso Township roads 


















747 


Pakenham Township roads 






80 
270 


24 
18 


grave! 
gravel 


660 
70 


8 
9 




743 


Palmerston Township roads 








744 


Papineau Township roads 






296 


745 


Parkinson Township roads 


















746 


Patton Township roads 


320 
360 


50 
16 


42 
720 


20 
14 








100 


747 


Pedley Township roads 








180 


748 


Pembroke Township roads 










74Q 


Pennefather Township roads 
















132 


750 


Perry and Bethune Township road .... 


















751 


Perry Chaffey Township road 


100 


40 


80 


16 








40 


757 


Petawawa Township roads 










753 


Phelps Township roads 


1,360 


40 


240 


15 








80 


754 


Plummer Township roads 










7SS 


Plummer Add'l Township road 
















20 


756 


Prince Township roads 


















757 


Pringle Township roads 


















7S8 


Radcliffe Township roads 


100 


40 


460 
300 


24 
28 


gravel 
gravel 


520 
400 


10 
10 


20 


259 


Raglan Township roads 





1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



113 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH— Continued.- 
MENT, 1922-1923. 



■ 










CUT AND FILL 


MAINTENANCE 




w 
as 
D 
H 

3 
Z 
W 

X 

w 




1 


BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


Side- Gmded 


SURFACED 






u 

r- 

3 
11 


C 

a 
12 


!3 
'C 

4) 


XI 

E 

3 


.5 


3 


-v 

<J 

15 

3 

u 


CO 

s 

C 


en 

i ° 


4-1 

<u 

xT 

-0 


."2 
*-> 


en 

-a 


u 

JS 

ba 

c 
<u 


<u 
1 ^ 


m 
m 

■A 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 


21 


22 


23 


24 25 


26 


27 








8 
5 
6 


wood 
wood 
cedar 


earth 
earth 
earth 


530 

310 

32 


620 
170 


40 2,030 

20 900 

49 

500 


15 
20 
16 
18 
18 
33 
18 
16 
14 
22 


grave' 
grave' 
grave: 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
stone 


20c 

735 
246 
365 
920 
320 
170 
235 
1,858 
506 


12 7.73 
6 3.16 
6 .77 
6 2.15 

6 3.50 
8 1.94 

5 .53 

7 1.36 

6 9.10 

8 2.00 
. . 2 . 04 


$ c. 

2,225.56 

1,817.04 

599.79 

749.50 

1,497.84 

702.28 

500.60 

800.24 

3,193.90 

2,652.58 

997.15 

1,241.40 

899.00 

297.75 

209.45 

2,856.91 

2,014.58 

1,170.39 

497.40 

503.31 

1,397.75 

501.99 

2,466.81 

504.25 

700.62 

799.90 

100.00 

1,806.05 

99.50 

801.24 

199.85 

1,708.99 

1,406.81 

700.34 

1,954.55 

2,031.77 

3,482.28 

600.50 

1,168.68 

. 14.22 

411.75 

2,712.00 

421.25 

425.40 

800.46 

3,013.59 

1,702.03 

300.75 

510.85 

899.20 - 

1,206.25 : 

1,209.10: 


708 








709 








710 








711 








16 
5 
6 
2 

19 
8 
9 

10 
1 
5 


cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 
c'ment 
stone 
wood 
stone 
cedar 






200 
300 

'"225 


20 960 

40 320 

100 

20 240 

1,672 


717 


7 


15 


cedar 






713 




earth 
rock 


300 
20 


714 


4 




cedar 


215 
716 








clay 

stone 

earth 


7,777 
100 
500 




328 


717 








718 


1 


20 


wood 


" ioo 


130 

16 319 

640 


25 
12 
12 
12 


gravel 
stone 
stone 


210 
199 

48 


8 2.00 

8 1.55 

7 2.00 

1 . 00 


219 
770 


1 


16 
25 
40 


cedar 
wood 
wood 






771 


? 


stone 


75 


240 
960 
680 


25 240 
10 


777 


5 


2 
6 

7 
4 
2 
17 
7 
2 
3 
5 
1 


wood 
stone 
cedar 
cedar 
stone 
cedar 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
metal 






3.00 


773 




rock 

stone 

earth 

rock 

earth 


60 

30 

110 

132 
591 


20 840 


20 


gravel 


708 


8 3.06 
. . 1 . 75 


794 








775 


















.20 


776 


1 


20 


cedar 


80 

50 

480 


30 200 

40 666 

12 480 

160 

950 


16 
16 
14 
24 
15 
18 
20 






.62 


777 




gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


305 
60 

190 
35 
60 

250 


7 2.35 

7 1.50 

7 3.72 

15 3.00 

5 .63 

6 1.00 

.25 


778 








779 


3 


16 


cedar 


stone 


600 


230 
7S1 








stone 
stone 


105 

685 


" "26 


85 
16 40 


737 








7S3 








734 








7 


cedar 


earth 


390 


260 
160 
160 

""360 
131 

' ' '432 

"266 

""46 


40 590 

24 80 
16 100 

640 
18 740 
16 327 

245 

30 810 

80 

40 3,133 

160 

25 345 


16 
33 
18 
12 
20 
20 
14 
20 
14 
15 
20 
22 


gravel 


800 


7 3.81 
.50 


73 S 








736 








6 

4 
3 
2 


stone 
wood 
metal 
metal 


stone 
stone 
stone 
sand 
stone 


370 

80 

470 

3,534 

110 


gravel 


140 


5 .75 
2.00 


737 








738 








gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


464 
482 
215 
805 
545 
425 
160 
270 


8 3.15 
8 1.75 
8 .90 
8 6.65 
8 2.54 
12 10.13 

5 .50 

6 2.07 
2.25 


7S9 








740 








741 


2 


10 


cedar 






74? 




6 

21 

2 


wood 
cedar 
cedar 


earth 
stone 
earth 
earth 


1,300 

30 

55 

300 


743 








744 








74S 








746 












747 


















320 


18 


gravel 
gravel 


110 
768 


8 1.00 

6 2.40 

.25 


748 


2 


20 
'i2 


wood 
rep'd 
cedar 


6 

1 
2 


wood 

tile 

wood 






760 
80 


20 


749 


1 


sand 


100 


20 50 


14 


750 


1 






.31 


751 








690 

"im 

510 
300 
lOOl 


25 870 

20 

540 

240 

10 240 

25 650 

18 650 

18 300 


18 
18 
20 
20 
30 
14 
18 
20 


gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 


480 
10 

830 
50 

185 

400 


6 3.03 
12 4.32 
6 2.58 
6 .75 
6 .75 
8 2.03 
3 72 


7%^} 


5 


10 


wood 


17 

8 
2 
3 
6 
14 
6 


wood 
wood 
c'ment 
tile 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 


earth 
stone 
stone 
earth 


1,200 

54 

110 

712 


253 
'S4 








>SS 








>S6 


1 


20 


wood 


>57 








>S8 








stone 


1,000 






2.19 


159 



114 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, ONTARIO 

Annual State 



TOWNSHIPS 



NEW CONSTRUCTION 



Cleared 

and 
Stumped 



Graded 

and 
Shaped 





tn 


.^_^ 


-a 


(U 


o 


<u 


u 










J= 




-M 


be 


-a 


C 


■^ 


5 


4 



SURFACED 



to 



10 



260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
281 
282 
283 
284 
285 
286 
287 
288 
289 
290 
291 
292 
293 
294 
295 
296 
297 
298 
299 
300 
301 
302 
303 
304 
305 
306 
307 
308 
309 
310 
311 
312 
313 
314 



Rama Township road 

Ratter Township roads 

Rayside Township roads 

Ridout Township roads 

Robinson Township roads 

Rolph Buchanan Wylie Tp. reads 

Rose Township roads 

Ross Township roads 

Ryde Township roads 

Ryerson Township roads 

Ryerson and McMurrich Tp. road 

Sabine Township roads 

St. Edmunds Township road 

Sandfield Township roads 

Scadding Township roads 

Scollard Township roads 

Sebastopol Township roads 

Shedden Township roads 

Sheffield Township roads 

Sheguiandah Township roads 

Sherbrooke North Township road 

Sherbrcoke South Township road 

Sherwood, Jones and Burns Tp. roads. . 

Sinclair Township roads 

Snowdon Township roads 

Somerville Township roads 

Spence Township roads 

Springer Township roads. . .• 

Stafford Township roads 

Stanhope Township road 

Stevenson Township road 

Stisted Township roads 

Storrington Township roads 

Striker Township roads 

Strong Township roads 

Sunnidale Township roads 

Tarbutt and Tarbutt Add'! Tp. road. . . 

Tarentorus Township road 

Tay Township roads 

Tehkummah Township roads 

Thessalon Township roads 

Thompson Township roads 

Tiny Township roads 

Tudor and Cashel Township roads 

Vankoughnet Township roads 

Vespra Township roads 

Waters Township roads 

Watt Township roads 

Wells Township road 

Westmeath Township Roads 

Widdifield Township roads 

Wilberforce Township roads 

Wilson Burnstown Trunk road 

Wilson and McConkey Township road 
Wollaston Township road 



Total . 



116 
900 
530 
650 
300 
30 
80 



320 



1,520 
350 



160 



80 



500 
116 



170 
160 
125 



731 
50 



320 



40 



50 



14 



37.847 



28 
420 
520 



200 
180 
120 



640 



780 
350 



160 



120 
180 
320 



300 



116 



190 
100 



499 
620 
160 
88 
320 



gravel 



gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



15 



earth 



18 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



12 



gravel 



22 



gravel 



gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
earth 



36,016 



320 



100 
180 



960 



40 

320 

20 

45 



50 



46 



40 



1,940 

540 

88 

320 



10 



10 



320 
1,223 



20 



1,280 



231 
1,920 



42 



200 



86 
9 



80 



30 

128 

822 

100 

90 

86 



426 



317 



14,211 



200 
192 
160 

43.868 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



115 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH.— ConHnuei 
UENT, 1922-1923. 



CULVERTS 



CUT AND FILL 



12 



13 









a 


d 


cd 


X5 


1m 


u 


s 




(U 


3 


a 


cfl 


^; 


^ 


s 


14 


15 


16 



17 



MAINTENANCE 



Side- 
brushed 



Graded | 

and j 

Shaped | 



SURFACED 



18 



19 



20 



21 



22 



23 



24 



25 



26 



rep'd 



12 



cedar 



cedar 
cedar 
cedar 



20 



cedar 



41 



wood 



24 



cedar 



wood 
wood 



124 



cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 



wood 
cedar 
wood 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 



wood 

cedar 

wood 

cedar 

wood 

tile 

wood 



cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
metal 
metal 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 
stone 



cedar 



c'ment 
metal 
stone 
metal 



cedar 
cedar 



metal 
cedar 
stone 
wood 



wood 
wood 
cedar 
cedar 
metal 



sand 
stone 
earth 
earth 
stone 



earth 



earth 

earth 

gravel 

stone 

rock 

earth 



stone 
clay 



stone 



stone 
stone 
stone 
sand 



stone 

tone 

earth 



stone 



stone 
stone 
stone 



stone 

stone 

clay 

sand 

gravel 



earth 
earth 
stone 



earth 



2,935 

265 

315 

70 



199 

580 



85 
500 



650 



360 
240 
840 
118 
100 
1,720 



stone 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 



510 
877 
400 
200 
950 
2.003 



69 
160 



600 
175 
320 
400 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



480 



14 



1,150 



22 



clay 
gravel 



350 
V.350 



580 



18 



100 



12 



102 
830 
320 
50 
380 



gravel 
gravel 



400 



gravel 
gravel 



550 



20 



40 
211 
220 

12 



660 

90 

640 



32 
492 
770 



300 
130 



1,510 
40 
445 
360 
200 
190 
750 
220 



100 
260 



955 
100 
40 
200 
270 



1,380 

455 

50 



842 
70 



1,945 
900 

818 
6,200 

555 



90 
i42 
120 



840 
554 
1,065 
770 
140 
272 
400 
103 



5033 



1,523 
200 
100 



85 
100 



5 

120 

1,000 

3.540 

400 

400 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



500 



1.911 178,537 54,732 153,541 



547 
240 
440 
118 
500 
400 



300 
248 
681 
320 



624 



410 
260 



439 
507 



900 
44 
482 
381 
250 
540 
860 
187 
176 
264 
560 
240 
150 
418 
165 
783 
418 
1,595 
350 
265 
206 
460 
15 
62 
181 
184 
125 
1,040 
1,418 
225 
400 



3.52 
3.69 
4.82 
2.39 
2.54 
6.45 

.50 
1.87 

.79 
2.15 
1.25 
2.00 

.26 
4.25 
4.75 
2.40 
2.40 
1.50 
1.50 
1.60 

.15 
1.00 
6.12 
1.14 
2.07 
1.1 
2.68 
2.69 
2.85 

.69 

.55 

.98 



1.75 
1.12 
1.38 
1.30 

.51 
2.64 
2.75 
7.75 
2.90 
1.14 
1.22 
1.44 

.37 
1.14 
1.22 

.96 

.39 

3.25 

15.37 

7.60 

2.93 

.28 
1.00 



129.427 875.91 512,535.72 



2,778 

1,450 

3,260 

1,000 

2,210 

1,284 

299 

600 

1,003 

1,115 

601 

1,000 

1,199 

2,398 

1,000 

991 

799 

900 

602 

1,002 

1,005 

500 

2,126 

1,129 

1,000 

1,198 

836 

999 

1,001 

499 

996 

999 

592 

802 

504 

799 

300 

2,987 

2,001 

3,786 

1,102 

651 

1,000 

899 

1,400 

1,199 

1,049 

600 

500 

1,010 

4,871 

3,183 

2,161. 

500 

1,001. 



260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
281 
282 
283 
284 
285 
286 
287 
288 
289 
290 
291 
292 
293 
294 
295 
296 
297 
298 
299 
300 
301 
302 
303 
304 
305 
306 
307 
308 
309 
310 
311 
312 
313 
314 



116 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF WORK OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION. 



MUNICIPALITY 



CLEARED 

AND 
STUMPED 



</} 



SURFACED 



J3 



Admaston, By-law No. 262 

Albemarle, By-law No. 623 

Alberton, By-law No. 2 

Algona South, By-law No. 87 

Alice and Fraser, By-law No. 4 

Armour, By-law No. 421 

Armstrong, By-law No. 27 (1922) 

Armstrong, By-law No. 38 ; 

Armstrong, By-law No. 40 

Assiginack, By-law No. 457 

Atwood, By-law No. 127 

Balfour, By-law No. 74a 

Balfour, By-law No. 71 (overseer) 

Bagot and Blythfield, By-law No. 350 

Beauchamp, By-law No. 10 

Bedford, By-law No. 69b 

Belmont and Methuen, By-law No. 639 

Billings, By-law No. 268 

Blezard, By-law No. 146 

Billings, By-law No. 270 (grader) 

Blue, By-law No. 65 

Brethour, By-law No. 55 

Brethour, By-law No. 26 (1922) 

Bromley, By-law No. 335 

Brougham, By-law No. 726 

Bucke, By-law No. 21a 

Burleigh and Anstruther, By-law No. 1 

Burleigh and Anstruther, By-law No. 2 

Burleigh and Anstruther, By-law No. 1 (grader) 

Burpee, By-law No. 125 

Caldwell, By-law No. 328 

Calvert, By-law No. 55 (1922) 

Calvert, By-law No. 66 

Cardwell, By-law No. 204 

Carling, By-law No. 142 

Carlow, By-law No. 150 

Carlow, By-law No. 159 (grader) 

Carnarvon, By-law No. 359 

Casey, By-law No. 70 (1922) 

Casey, By-law No. 79 

Casey, By-law No. 73 (overseer) 

Casimir, Jennings & Appleby, By-law No. 99.. 

Chamberlain, By-law No. 106 

Chandos, By-law No. 80 

Chapman, By-law No. 7 

Chappie, By-law No. 323 

Chisholm, By-law No. 130 (grader) 

Clarendon and Miller, By-law No. 214 

Coleman, By-law No. 305 

Conmee, By-law No. 62 

Cosby and Mason, By-law No. 66 

Crosby North, By-law No. 558 

Crosby South, By-law No. 912 

Dack, By-law No. 31 (1922) 

Dack, By-law No. 5 

Day and Bright, Add't'l By-law No. 12 



187 
320 



320 



240 
380 
320 



160 



261 
600 



396 
800 



60 



160 
180' 



80 
Fire 



4,430 



1,630 



1,436 



Fire 



20 



15 



35 



de 



1,222 
75 
320 
140 
560 
320 

3,240 
480 

1,220 
180 
426 

3,290 



480 
1,920 
295 
328 
540 
960 



261 

580 

955 

4,170 

40 

30 

600 



100 
450 
800 
1,280 
48 
220 
330 



560 
stroyed 
1,177 



2,400 
640 

3,554 
675 

2,661 



125 
640 
1,025 
1,360 
190 
434 
stroyed 
240 
480 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
grave! 



gravel 
gravel 
grave 
c.stone 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
stone 



gravel 
gravel 



cind'rs 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
ords 
gravel 



gravel 

gravel 

stone 

gravel 

gravel 



gravel 
rock 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
stone 
ords 
gravel 
gravel 



1,672 

1,311 

737 

580 

328 

320 

1,131 

1,373 

295 

765 

55 

2,200 



1,920 
600 
990 
671 
600 
680 



709 
595 
1,271 
4,120 
400 
348 
149 



410 
1,350 



1,840 

24 

2,160 

333 



1,565 



560 



1,920 
225 
313 
601 

3,239 



440 
2,920 
217 
625 
112 
750 



390 
250 



15 
6 
6 

10 

12 
7 
6 
6 
7 
6 
6 

10 



6 
9 

8 

7 

10 



6 
6 
6 

10 
8 

10 



15 

5 
7 
7 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



117 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, MUNICIPAL BY-LAWS, 1923. 



DITCHED 


CUT AND FILL 


BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


o 
< 
a 

Q 
< 
O 
« 

a 


o 

< 

J 

s 

o 
< 
o 

Q 


z « 
w g 

z a 
« z 
w w 
> &< 

O X 




CO 

-o 
o 

u 

ti 
c 
<u 


'u 


o -^ 

E 3 


u 

e 

3 






S 

3 


0) 


m 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 














6 


concrete 




5.50 
4.50 
2.25 
2.00 
1.75 
1.00 

10.15 

5.25 

4.50 

2.50 

.50 

12.10 


$ c. 

1,499.80 

999.78 

999.72 

500.00 

499.97 

400.00 

1,842.87 

1,748.72 

899.91 

1,194.82 

1,013.25 

2,509.22 

72.00 

1,781.28 

550.00 

1,250.00 

1,000.00 

700.00 

1,200.00 

91.43 

1,239.71 

1,240.95 

2,118.28 

2,748.50 

300.00 

841.26 

300.00 

400.00 

45.00 

500.00 

1,475.77 

673.20 

3,320.27 

299.95 

1,200.00 

400.00 

45.15 

1,400.00 

1,709.22 

1,105.51 

80.00 

1,700.00 

744.65 

500.00 

500.00 

7,488.62 

91.43 

1,000.00 

2,100.00 

1,148.95 

497.38 

200.00 

650.00 

998.00 

735.40 

300.00 


1 














7 














2 
2 
1 
5 

13 
1 

11 

16 
6 

15 


metal 
cedar 
cedar 
cedar 
wood 
cedar 
metal 
stone 
wood 
cedar 


1.00 
"1^50 


S 














4 














S 














6 




clay 


200 








7 










8 




stone 
stone 
clay 
stone 


100 

205 

10 

320 








9 


66 








10 


480 








11 


3,605 








P 










n 














12 
4 
2 
4 
3 
7 


cedar 

wood 

tile 

metal 

wood 

cedar 




6.00 
6.25 
3.40 
2.60 
3.50 
3.00 


14 




clay 


1,000 


2 




rep'd 


15 
16 














17 








1 


18 


wood 


18 


1,920 


stone 


150 


19 










70 


120 


clay 
clay 
clay 


25 

200 

1,100 








8 

2 

22 

7 


cedar 
wood 
wood 
metal 


1.25 


1.75 
4.00 
6.00 
14.00 
1.25 
.80 
2.20 


^1 


460 








?? 


228 
80 


2 


12 


wood 


23 
?4 














^S 


40 


clay 
stone 
C.Stone 


560 
100 
675 








7 
5 


metal 
cedar 




?6 










77 










?8 


















?9 




rock 


415 








3 
4 


wood 
cedar 


"".'so 

1.00 
"'!32 


1.30 
4.55 
2.00 
5.25 
.25 
5.75 
1.50 


SO 










SI 


640 












S? 




earth 


1,289 


2 

2 


50 
11 


wood 
cedar 


. 3 

2 

16 

6 


wood 
stone 
wood 
cedar 


33 
S4 


3 






SS 


16 


stone 


39 








S6 










S7 


20 


stone 


83 








15 


wood 




5.75 


S8 










39 




clay 


100 








3 


metal 




4.25 


40 










41 




















8.25 
2.50 

11.10 
2.11 

14.00 


4? 




clay 


1,600 








6 

2 

12 
34 


metal 
stone 
cedar 
wood 


""!62 
'8;33 


4S 










44 














4S 


603 


clay 


7,518 








46 










47 








2 




rep'd 


7 
6 
19 
2 
1 
5 


stone 
wood 
wood 
cedar 
concrete 
tile 




"2;82 


1.38 
9.00 
3.00 
4.25 
.60 
2.75 


48 








49 


274 


clay 


1,185 








SO 










SI 


20 


earth 


120 








S? 










SS 
















S4 




clay 


3,480 








42 


wood 




1.50 
1.50 


ss 










56 



118 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF WORK OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION 



MUNICIPALITY 



CLEARED 










AND 


GRADED 


SURFACED 


STUMPED 








m 




U3 








-o 


-;-> 


■D 


,^_, 




T3 


O 


<U 


O 


(U 




O 




0) 


li 


OJ 




u 


« 




. 








XI 


ji 


J3 


,a 


'i-i 


43 


b£ 


+-> 


bfl 


+j 




bit) 


C 


"O 


C 


•a 


rt 


C 




4 




^ 


S 


4) 


3 


5 


6 


7 


8 



Dilke, By-law No. 115. . 

Draper, By-law No. 421. . 

Draper, By-law No. 430 (scraper's and drags). 
Drury, Denison & Graham, By-law No. 215.. 

Dungannon, By-law No. 93 

Dymond, By-law No. 214 (1922) 

Dymond, By-law No. 218 

Dysart, By-law No. 683 

Dysart, By-law No. 673 (overseer) 

Eastnor, By-law No. 64 (1922) 

Eastnor, By-law No. 78 

Eldon, By-law No. 541 

Eldon, By-law No. 338 (overseer) (1922) 

Eldon, By-law No. 545 (gravel) 

Elzevir, By-law No. 70a 

Emo, By-law No. 284 

Evanturel, By-law No. 146 (1922) 

Evanturel, By-law No. 153 

Faraday, By-law No. 141 

Field, By-law No. 54 

Freeman, By-law No. 15 

Freeman, By-law No. 10 (overseer) 

Gillies, By-law No. 14 (1922) ( balance) 

Gillies, By-law No. 22 

Glackmeyer, By-law No. 24. 

Gordon and Allan, By-law No. 174 

Grattan, By-law No. 301 (1922) 

Grattan, By-law No. 319 

Hagarty and Richards, By-law No. 141 

Hanmer, By-law No. 123 

Harley, By-law No. 281 (1922) 

Harley, By-taw No. 301 

Harley, By-law No. 302 

Harris, By-law No. 73 (1922) 

Harris, By-law No. 77 

Harvey, By-law No. 375 (1922) 

Harvey, By-law No. 384 

Harvey, By-law No. 378 (grader) (1922) 

HiUiard, By-law No. 141 (1922) 

Hilliard, By-law No. 149 

Hilton, By-law No. 418 

Hims\vorth South, By-law No. 90b 

Hinchinbrooke, By-law No. 4 

Horton, By-law No. 290 

Howland, By-law No. 186 

Hudson, By-law No. 92 (1922) (balance) 

Hudson, By-law No. 96 

Humphrey, By-law No. 400 

Hungerford, By-law No. 277 

Huntingdon, By-law No. 455 

Jaffray and Melick, By-law No. 124 (1922). . 

Jaffray and Melick, By-law No. 130 

Jocelyn, By-law No. 321 

Johnson, By-law No. 120 

Joly, By-law No. 184 

JKaladar and Anglesea, By-law No. 1 



129 

218 



457 



40 
520 
140 



20 

1,393 

Fire 



10 



300 

1,579 

50 

350 



160 
160 



389 
180 



Fire 

100 

346 

20 

40 



480 



865 

1,046 

40 



120 



30 



10 



20 



20 



10 



200 
568 



2,600 
169 
940 
980 

5,404 



425 

440 

1,044 



43 
892 
stroyed 
1,860 
325 
1,200 
210 



1,620 

5,560 
420 

2,975 
180 
220 
800 
960 

1,090 



100 

160 

927 

3,206 



stroyed 
150 
264 
480 
475 
220 
200 



40 
4,400 
660 
265 
1,088 
920 
160 
475 
260 
270 



18 
24 
rec 
28 
16 
14 
20 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 

ords 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 

cind'rs 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



ords 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



626 
796 



1,130 
284 
1,678 
1,418 
4,276 



1,857 
2,120 
1,677 



184 
2,370 



1,530 
523 
545 
310 



665 

2,296 

972 

1,320 

540 

560 

320 

1,035 

770 

170 



435 
2,116 
1,055 



650 
641 
380 
775 
1,360 
502 



382 
2,400 
750 
265 
415 
325 
370 
1,010 
201 
365 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



119 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, MUNICIPAL BY-LAWS, 1923— Continued. 



DITCHED 


CUT AND FILL 


BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


o 

< 

Q 

<: 
o 
« 


u 
o 
<; 
a 

< 
■ o 

OS 

o 


^ B 

O X 




(0 

O 
u 

■i-> 

C 
<u 


is 

'u 


12. 

1^ 


J 

6 

D 


a; 

« 
a 

C/3 


.5 
■i-i 


<u 

s 

3 


.2 

'u 


n 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


13 


clay 
earth 


40 
315 








1 
35 


wood 
cedar 




2.30 
3.50 


$ c, 

550.00 

996.37 

31.75 

1,188.50 

300.00 

2,929.29 

2,870.87 

4,924.32 

150.00 

1,500.00 

1,500.00 

2,499.80 

64.00 

150.00 

423.75 

3,638.47 

3,717.77 

2,662.40 

600.00 

450.00 

498.25 

53.60 

49.42 

1,383.12 

2,999.42 

1,249.77 

1,300.00 

550.00 

743.25 

800.00 

1,414.97 

1,471.79 

396.05 

87.88 

774.94 

815.84 

990.19 

152.50 

2,609.75 

1,680.17 

675.00 

312.50 

1,750.00 

1,978.80 

750.00 

100.00 

599.97 

1,500.00 

698.33 

299.85 

1,057.42 

1,500.00 

400.00 

600.00 

200.00 

299.01 


5y 


40 








5? 










5<; 


20 


gravel 

stone 

clay 

clay 

earth 


1,225 

25 

200 

5,950 

1,655 


2 


16 


cedar 


4 

2 

10 

7 
47 


cedar 
cedar 
wood 
metal 
metal 




9.00 
1.00 
8.00 
8.00 
30.00 


6C 
61 


465 


3 
2 

5 


14 
35 
20 


wood 
wood 
cedar 


62 
62 
64 
6.= 


80 


stone 


420 








9 
9 

5 


concrete 
metal 
tile 


1.00 


5.50 
6.75 

5.75 


6( 


100 


3 


15 


cedar 


6/ 


208 


earth 


580 


6? 










6f 






















7f 


5 


stone 


197 








1 
18 


cedar 
wood 


0.11 
.25 


.60 
10.75 


71 


280 


2 


60 


wood 


72 








7: 














10 
7 
6 
3 


wood 
cedar 
cedar 
stone 




9.00 
2.00 
5.00 
1.00 


7^ 














7.= 














7f 




earth 


520 


1 


10 


cedar 


77 
7? 






















7(. 


287 


clay 
clay 
stone 


3,604 
365 
140 








27 
9 
8 
8 
1 
1 


metal 

wood 

stone 

tile 

concrete 

cedar 


1.00 


5.25 

20.00 

3.50 

9.30 

1.75 

1.75 

2.50 

6.00 

4.60 

1.00 

.31 

1.50 

8.00 

11.32 


8f 


516 


1 


12 


wood 


81 

8? 










8.^ 














M 














^5 


320 












U 


' 2io 


clay 
clay 
clay 


1,215 

600 

3,000 


2 
1 




rep'd 
rep'd 


15 

14 

22 

1 


wood 

wood 

wood 

cedar 

concrete 

metal 

tile 




87 
8£ 

8<; 










9f 


400 












1 
11 

1 


91 














9? 




stone 


40 








9.1 










94 






















9,=i 


475 


clay 
stone 


2,368 
120 








42 
3 
1 

14 
4 
5 


metal 
cedar 
cedar 
stone 
metal 
stone 





3.00 
2.25 
2.40 
3.15 
4.25 
1.90 


9e 


40 


1 


22 


wood 


97 
98 














99 




clay 
stone 


14,000 
520 








10(1 










101 










10? 




clay 


75 


2 


21 


wood 








1.25 
13.75 
2.40 
1.00 
2.00 
1.25 
1.25 
3.25 
.90 
1.25 


103 


10 


28 

7 


wood 
stone 




104 








1 


24 


wood 


105 








106 


1,070 

170 

15 


gravel 

clay 

earth 

stone 

earth 

stone 


2,104 

4,472 

150 

10 

60 

25 


1 
1 


16 
16 


wood 
wood 


19 

22 

8 

2 

1 
3 


wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
wood 
stone 


1.50 
2.50 


107 
108 
109 










110 




1 


20 


wood 


111 
112 



120 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF WORK OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION, 



TOWNSHIPS 



CLEARED 

AND 
STUMPED 



to 

c 



SURFACED 



Kennebec, By-law No. 2 . . . 

Kerns, By-law No. 200 

Korah, By-law No. 226 (1922) 

Laird, By-law No. 142 

Lavallee, By-law No. 283 

Lavallee, By-law No. 247 (overseer) 

Laxton, Digby and Longford, By-law No. 360 

(grader, cedar and gravel) 

Limerick, By-law No. 5. 

Lindsay, By-law No. 346 

Loughborough, By-law No. 11b 

Macaulay, By-law No. 101 

Machar, By-law No. 593 

Madoc, By-law No. 63 

Ma^doc, By-law No. 66 (graders) 

Mara, By-law No. 611 

Marmora and Lake, By-law No. 574 

Marmora and Lake, By-law No. 576 (culverts, 

scraper and plow) 

Martland, By-law No. 159 

Matchedash, By-law No. 218 

Mayo, By-law No. 363 

McDonald, Meredith and Etc., By-law No. 166 

McDougall, By-law No. 189 

Mclrvine, By-law No. 249 

McKim, By-law No. 195 

McLean, By-law No. 472 

McLean, By-law No. 476 (grader) 

McMurrich, By-law No. 300 

Medonte, By-law No. 600 

Medora and Wood, By-law No. 386 

Medora and Wood, By-law No. 383 (machinery) 
Medora and Wood, By-law No. 377 (overseer) . 

Minden, By-law No. 380 

Monck, By-law No. 493 (overseer) 

Monck, By-law No. 496 

Monmouth, By-law No. 266 (1922) 

Monteagle and Herschel, By-law No. 535 

Morley and Pattullo, By-law No. 267 

Muskoka, By-law No. 308 

Nairn, By-law No. 141 

Neebing, By-law No. 424 

Neelon and Garson, By-law No. 167 

Nipigon, By-law No. 212 (overseer) 

Oakley, By-law No. 225 

Oakley, By-law No. 228 (forge) 

O'Connor, By-law No. 223 

Olden, By-law No. 76b 

Olden, By-law No. 66b (overseer) 

Oliver, By-law No. 204 

Orillia, By-law No. 1122 

Oro, By-law No. 474 

Oso, By-law No. 197 

Paipoonge, By-law No. 192 

Palmerston, By-law No. 263 

Palmerston, By-law No. 257 (overseer) 



90 
720 
512 



855 



132 
132 



160 



20 



1,560 
160 



505 

121 

1,950 



428 



80 

505 

211 

1,178 



30 
2,734 



1,098 
40 



770 
450 



1,785 
90 



30 



10 



24 



20 



15 



2,140 

470 

7,518 



1,362 



640 
900 
125 
1,118 
252 
302 



456 
880 



1,196 

935 

384 

70 

4,655 
145 
240 
360 



520 
1,868 
1,415 



1,218 



410 
869 
592 
590 
290 
50 
2,375 
640 



1,901 
155 



460 
423 
1,114 
295 
430 
330 



28 



18 



18 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 

stone 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 

gravel 

rock 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



2,180 
1,303 
3,387 
1,020 
1,267 



320 
1,351 
1,610 
889 
269 
305 



915 
760 



1,760 
752 
314 
1,615 
3,881 
280 
720 
180 



600 
2,680 
1,800 



304 



1,120 
598 
352 

1,558 
830 
250 

2,068 

1,120 



187 



544 
780 



1,720 
2,972 
952 
1,505 
2,644 
1,190 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



121 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, MUNICIPAL BY-LAWS, \m.— Continued. 



DITCHED 


CUT AND FILL 


BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


w 
o 

< 

S 

< 
o 
a 

& 

w 


o 

< 

Q 
< 
O 
X 

Q 
_) 

o 


^ 9 

> Oh 

o X 

O M 




in 

2 

C 
<U 

►J 




C «3 

O . 


B 

3 

2: 


c 

a 
in 


lU 


0) 

E 

3 


.2 


a 
a 

2; 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


80 


Stone 

clay 

earth 

stone 

earth 


70 

3,514 

939 

20 

1,062 








22 
8 

14 
3 

34 


metal 

wood 

metal 

concrete 

cedar 




10.00 
6.20 

25.75 
3.25 
7.25 


$ c. 
1,499.98 
1,889.10 
3,693.38 
998.12 
3,099.71 
85.36 

75.00 

399.07 

1,250.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

600.00 

798.66 

89.61 

1,497.34 

796.65 

51.25 
1,000.00 

900.00 

395.03 

800.00 
3,200.00 

500.00 
1,500.00 

800.00 
41.80 

750.00 

7,999.87 

4,990.21 

93 . 59 

150.00 

1,200.00 

50.00 

1,848.61 

1,000.00 

750.00 
2,599.50 
1,250.00 

199.85 

5.494.13 

1,250.00 

36.00 

300.00 

4.00 

1,996.25 

1,250.00 

128.07 
2,842.77 
3,952.93 
2,495.69 
1,900.00 
3,997.55 
1,500.00 
60.00 


113 


V,8i9 
65 


2 


20 


rep'd 


114 
115 








116 


196 








1.75 


117 










118 






















119 




earth 


300 








5 
3 
3 
21 
5 
4 


metal 

cedar 

tile 

stone 

cedar 

metal 




2.00 
6.00 
5.10 
4.00 
1.00 
1.25 


120 


120 








121 














122 


""i32 


stone 
stone 
earth 


643 
269 
482 


1 
1 
1 


18 
18 
16 


cedar 
wood 
cedar 


123 
124 
125 
126 




gravel 
earth 


234 
150 








9 

2 


meta! 
metal 




3.00 

2.75 


127 










128 










129 


78 






2 


16 


wood 


16 
7 

10 
6 

30 


wood 
metal 
cedar 
wood 
cedar 


" ' ! 50 


5.50 
4.00 
1.50 
3.50 
19.10 
.75 
2.25 
1.15 


130 


3 


stone 
sand 


41 

576 


131 










132 










133 


20 
145 


stone 


576 


2 


22 


wood 


134 
135 


320 






1 




rep'd 


6 

22 


wood 
wood 


136 




earth 


285 


137 










138 


470 
615 


earth 
earth 
stone 


454 

12.298 

760 


1 
1 


8 
26 


wood 
concrete 


4 
28 
55 


wood 
metal 
stone 




3.00 
9.00 
7.00 


139 
140 
141 










142 






















143 




stone 


400 








24 


wood 




32.00 


144 










145 




stone 
stone 
earth 


530 
108 
475 








21 
28 
13 
11 
12 


stone 
wood 
cedar 
wood 
cedar 


"3!66 


3.50 
3.50 
2.25 
4.50 
2.75 
.80 
9.00 
3.50 


146 


170 








147 










148 


286 








149 




rock 

earth 

clay 


10 

50 
8,123 








150 










151 


346 
640 


1 


12 


pine 


48 
14 


wood 
metal 


3.50 


152 
153 














154 




earth 


145 








5 


cedar 




.75 


155 










156 


144 


clay 
earth 


3,849 
IOC 


1 


12 


wood 


39 

7 


cedar 
tile 


.90 


8.00 
2.50 


157 
158 










159 


120 


earth 
sand 
sand 


1,605 
1,850 
3,200 








21 
15 

7 


cedar 

concrete 

concrete 


.50 


7.66 
10.00 

5.00 

5.00 
16.00 

3.75 


160 


462 








161 


218 








162 










163 


814 


sand 


3,132 








30 
4 


wood 
cedar 


4.00 


164 










165 














166 



122 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SCHEDULE SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF WORK OF ROAD CONSTRUCTION. 



MUNICIPALITY 



CLEARED 






AND 


GRADED 


STUMPED 






tn 




to 




TJ 




-o 




O 


0) 


o 


01 




01 




4J 






^ 




J3 


j£ 


j: 


^"^ 


bo 


■^^ 


&J0 


-w 


C 


-a 


c 


T3 


3 


4 


5 


6 



SURFACED 



Perry, By-law No. 169 . 

Plummer, Add't'l By-law No. 182 

Port Carling, By-law No. 286 

Prince, By-law No. 95 

Rama, By-law No. 401 

Ratter and Dunnet, By-law No. 38 

Rayside, By-law No. 275 

Rear of Yonge and Escott, By-law No. 612. 

Ridout, By-law No. 54 

Ridout, By-law No. 55 

Ross, By-law No. 390 (1922) 

Ross, By-law No. 397 

Ryerson, By-law No. 503 

Ryerson, By-law No. 506 

St. Edmunds, By-law No. 289 

St. Joseph, By-law No. 462 

Sandfield, By-law No. 262 

Sebastopol, By-law No. 307 

Sheffield, By-law No. 686 

Sheffield, By-law No. 678 (overseer) 

Sherbourne, By-law No. 309 

Sherbourne, By-law No. 306 

Sherwood, Jones and Burns, By-law No. 40. 

Shuniah, By-law No. 470 

Snowdon, By-law No. 221 

Somerville, By-law No. 756 

Springer, By-law No. 331 

Stafford, By-law No. 728 

Stanhope, By-law No. 392 

Stanhope, By-law No. 381 (overseer) 

Stephenson, By-law No. 558 

Stephenson, By-law No. 559 (machinery). . . 

Stisted, By-law No. 269 

Stisted, By-law No. 273 (grader and drag). . 

Stisted, By-law No. 276 (gravel pit) 

Storrington, By-law No. 507 

Sunnidale, By-law No. 514 

Tarbutt and Tarbutt, Add'l By-law No. 7a. 

Tarentorus, By-law No. 229 

Tay, By-law No. 826 

Tehkummah, By-law No. 255 

Thessalon, By-law No. 12 . 

Thompson, By-law No. 134 

Tiny, By-law No. 651 

Tisdale, By-law No. 244 

Tudor and Cashel, By-law No. 5 

Tudor and Cashel, By-law No. 9 (culverts) . 

Vespra, By-law No. 663 

Watt, By-law No. 557 

Westmeath, By-law No. 318 

Whitney, By-law No. 94 -. 

Widdifield, By-law No. 329 

Wilberforce, By-law No. 520 

Wollaston, By-law No. 9 

WoUaston, By-law No. 4 (machinery) 

Worthington, By-law No. 118 



220 

397 

1,550 



65 
140 



80 
320 



200 
105 



400 

61 

20 

3,677 



116 



240 
465 



235 

30 

184 



240 

480 

30 



262 



15 



30 



80 

120 

280 

92 

1,639 

3,820 

215 

65 

175 

2,120 

600 

160 

640 



1,460 
30 

175 



54 

61 

270 

6,492 

900 

811 

12,580 

1,535 

466 



700 



43 



618 

32 

320 

3,120 

2,151 

350 

240 

240 

1,076 

118 

900 



1,331 
343 
940 
240 
490 

2,840 
750 



.387 



18 



16 



30 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
stone 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 



gravel 



gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

stone 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 



gravel 
gravel 



gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

gravel 

stone 

stone 



gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 
gravel 



gravel 



320 

1,585 

90 

388 

279 
1,288 
1,160 

300 



985 

1,918 

1,080 

595 

160 

770 

1,324 

225 



1,380 



220 



270 
5,418 

570 

894 
2,480 

898 
80 



980 



418 



1,904 

920 

800 

1,603 

2,290 

690 

575 

35 

1,332 

2,203 

301 



1,996 
2,150 
1,870 

480 
1,480 
2,480 

800 



490 



Total 46,949 



180,116 189,759 ... 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



123 



COLONIZATION ROADS BRANCH, MUNICIPAL BY-LAWS, 1923— Concluded. 



DITCHED 


CUT AND FILL 


BRIDGES 


CULVERTS 


o 

•< 
w 

1—1 

o 

< 
o 
en 


w 


< 
a 

S 
Q 

« 
Q 


> ft- 

X 
u 




"8 

u 

C 
0) 


la 


.S <^ 

3 rt 

O ^ 

S 3 


u 

E 

3 


c 
a 

C/2 


.2 


0) 

s 

3 


.2 

0) 

03 


ai 
a 
m 
S 

z 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




















l.OC 

5.00 

.40 

1.40 

1.75 

10.00 

14.00 

1.50 

"3;iO 
8.50 
3.40 
1.90 
2.00 
2.45 
4.25 
4.60 

"4^50 


$ c. 

483 . 79 

1,425.00 

1,748.25 

460.67 

599.32 

1,472.92 

1,393.64 

496.25 

250.00 

1,000.00 

1,300.00 

1,250.00 

750.00 

200.00 

600.00 

1,200.00 

399.95 

200.00 

1,200.00 

66.60 

350.00 

250.00 

400.00 

8,812.15 

1,000.00 

1,500.00 

3,385.23 

950.00 

493 . 50 

15.20 

1,999.56 

236.66 

449 . 75 

110.12 

10.00 

1,400.00 

1,000.00 

497.75 

1,439.48 

3,726.77 

575.00 

674.72 

99.92 

1,549.97 

5,137.02 

749.00 

31.77 

2,750.00 

1,998.86 

2,006.20 

1,249.26 

1,500.00 

1,750.00 

899.61 

72.50 

800.00 


167 














32 
5 
9 
1 
6 

15 
2 
2 

13 
4 


wood 

stone 

wood 

metal 

cedar 

cedar 

tile 

wood 

cedar 

cedar 


"".25 


168 




earth 
clay 


4,911 
132 








169 


108 








170 










171 


1,78( 


stone 
C.Stone 
stone 
earth 


"'"l5 
102 
59f 

225 


2 
2 


12 
10 


cedar 
cedar 


172 
173 
174 










175 


74 








176 










177 














178 




clay 


210 








2 
3 
6 
3 
5 


wood 
wood 
cedar 
wood 
wood 


""35 


179 










180 














181 














182 




stone 
clay 


350 

237 








183 










184 














185 




















186 


61 


stone 
clay 


40 
724 


2 


11 


wood 


4 
1 


cedar 
stone 


" " 20 


1.25 

""90 
28.00 
8.00 
5.00 
40.00 
5.25 
2.50 


187 
188 










189 


1,301 

548 


earth 

stone 

earth 

rock 

clay 

stone 


3,123 
100 

1,069 
30 
40 
50 


4 


17 


wood 


51 
39 
12 
11 
6 
12 


wood 
cedar 
metal 
cedar 
metal 
cedar 


4.00 


190 
191 


150 








197 


io4 


2 


16 


wood 


193 
194 


85 








195 










196 


40 


stone 


1,960 


1 


10 


wood 


35 


wood 




4.00 


197 
198 




stone 


107 








2 


concrete 




1.40 


199 










200 






















201 




















6.00 
3.00 
2.50 
10.40 
8.50 
2.20 
1.75 
.75 
5.00 
7.00 
3.50 


202 


74 


clay 


195 








5 


metal 




203 










204 


290 


earth 
earth 


498 
2,497 








5 

11 

4 

2 


cedar 
metal 
stone 
concrete 




205 


484 








206 










207 




stone 


20 








208 










209 


150 


earth 
earth 
stone 


460 
200 

255 








2 

7 

lb 


metal 

tile 

cedar 




210 










211 


10 








212 










213 


714 


earth 
earth 


3,435 

875 








15 
30 

5 


metal 
cedar 
metal 




. . 7 . 25 


214 












7.25 
7.00 
1.50 
4.20 
9.00 
2.75 


215 










216 


40 












217 


210 


gravel 


630 








9 
6 
6 


cedar 
cedar 
cedar 




218 










219 




rock 


250 


1 


12 


cedar 


220 
221 


55 












6 


wood 




3.15 


222 
















26,840 




133149 


68 






1,817 




42.05 


942.32 


269,154.52 





124 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



^HOOfr>00i>IV30MO00 
^: CN lO CN •^ Ov OO 0\ fO 



C 

• • • <D 

:::::::::£ 

^ 

u 

;:: :;;::;! 

-o 

<u 

V- 

3 

^ ;:::::: :;? 

a • ■ 

^ :ir : : : : : :fe 
"15 >^S : ■ : : : ■"*" 
? g iS ::::•: «r 

x; I c . . . . +j . bD 

(i b«< (u a3 ■ ^ h ^ Z, 

•^ .&rt^ : 3o£-ti 

fe.tr M = n3 ._ C O 22 
C/3 < ffi C/) Di ►S W 05 U ^ 







1 


- (M ro 








•CM tN -^ 
1^ 10 t^ 

10 •* ID 

ro lO \0 

(M vO 
»-( 'i* 
ID CN 


On 

«D 

ID 

00 
(^ 
(M 

00 


-0 



tn 

'e 


t^ CM 

>* 



0^ 


•T3 



tn 

_4J 


\0 ■* 


On 



en 

u 


-Q 
E 

3 ■ 
C 


°1 oo_ 


00 


CQ 


u 

6 

3 
c 


■* 00 


On 


Cut 
and 
Fill 


en 

3 


t^ On 

T-H >— 1 


00 


T3 
4) 

u 

Q 


tn 
T3 


u 


00 
00^ °° 


00 


0" 


u 


tn 




00 ON 

irT oT 
-* 00 


o> 


Graded 

and 
Shaped 


tn 



ID "-I 

ID '-I ; 

oT 0" • 
00 00 


NO 

On" 

NO 


Cleared , 

and 
Stumped 


tn 

-v 




^_ ^. : 


NO 

On 

<^ 

■*" 

00 




< 
J 

H 

< 
u 
u 
Ce5 


c 

a 

Q 


a 

+-J 
C 

2 


> 


tn 

3 

8 

c 


C 






:^ 1 


- 


(M 


ro 







1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



125 



Appendix No. 39 

Toronto, Ont., October 31st, 1923. 
To the Honourable James Lyons, Minister of Lands and Forests, Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit to you the report on the construction 
and maintenance of highways and bridges, under the provisions of the Northern 
and Northwestern Ontario Development Act, 1912, and amendments, during 
the season ending 31st October, 1923. 

The "Maintenance Patrol" system on the principal roads, assisted by 
construction parties where extensive betterments become necessary, has been 
again followed, with increasing success, a very marked improvement in the 
general condition of the roads being noticeable during all periods of the open 
season. 




Stoney Creek bridge — International Highway. 

Many of the secondary roads have been extended to meet the requirements 
of settlement, and the tabulated statement also shows that considerable progress 
has been made in connecting up and extending trunk roads in practically every 
district to provide "through routes" as far as possible. 

Extensive betterments have been made on existing trunk roads, by sur- 
facing many stretches with crushed stone where gravel was unsuitable or difficult 
to procure. 

The surveys referred to in last year's report, which were started with a 
view to the construction of a road to connect Timiskaming District with the 
roads in Southern Ontario, have not yet been completed, the survey of the 
suggested route northwards from Sturgeon Falls and Field, being now arranged 
for. 

All of which s respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

C. H. FULLERTON, 

Director, Northern Development Branch. 



126 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, 
Annual Report of Work Done, 







Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 


Ditch- 
ing 


Gravelling 




L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


Yards 
used 


1 


Algoma District. 

Trunk Road, Sudbury 
to Sault Ste. Marie. 
Sault Ste. Marie to 
Day Mills, Section I 

Day Mills to Cutler, 
Section II 

Cutler to Copper Cliff 
Section III 

Sault Ste. Marie to 
Garden River 


'7.0 
17.0 
20.5 














5.5 
2 
11.5 


re 
re 
re 






92,400 
clean 'd 




3912 


2 


















5515 


3 


















2650 




11715 


4 




















5 


Garden River to Echo 
Bay 
















3.2 

2.5 


re 
re 










200 


6 


Worthington to Vic- 
toria Mine 




















4126 






7 


At Thessalon 
























8 


At river near Massey 
At Vermillion River. . 






























Q 






























10 


On wes" branch of 
Blind River 






























11 


At Tyadala Creek . . . 






























12 


Othe Roads — 
Little Curren — 

Warencliffe Rd . . . . 
Lorne-Louise Rd . 


4.5 


.75 


30 






.75 

.5 

.8 


30 
18 
20 












3.5 


2025 


n 






.5 
.2 


18 
18 


.25 


14 






14 


Goudreau Rd 




1.14 

.5 


40 
30 








3.6 


3193 


IS 


Lockalsh Rd 
















16 


St. Joseph's Island & 

Campement D'Ours. 
General Maintenance 
Pine Island Ferry Rd. 

(Mainland Section) 
Pine Island Ferry Rd. 

(St. Joseph's Sec'n) 
Pine Island Ferry Rd. 

(Across Pine Is.) 




















6210 
7920 
4050 




2278 


17 




.75 


66 


.75 


66 


.75 
.25 
1 


33 
33 
33 


.75 
.44 
1 


32 
24 
24 






2701 


18 






2344 


19 




.75 


66 


.75 


66 






2436 



















1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



127 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH. 
Year Ending 31st October, 1923. 



Crushed Rock 


Drag- 
ging 

Miles 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Remarks 






-a 
o 

1 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 




6 


Description 






Yds. 
haul- 
ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 




Yds. 
crush- 
ed 


Miles 






705 M 




395 
250 
516 


75 
60 
82 


2 


8 
1 
5 

1 tile 
4 lengt 








2145 c.yd. earth fill. 

830 lin. ft. railing; 300' X 6' 
high masonary wall; 38 
c.yd. rock cut; 207 c.yd. 
stone fill. 

1.33 miles clay road cov- 
ered with sand. 

Cement leads placed on 5 
culverts. 

500 c.yd. stone fill. 

6 mis. road widened. 

Overhead crossing widen- 
ed. 

250 c.yd. rock excavation. 

Cement leads placed on 7 
culverts. 

900 lin. ft. railing. 

53,275 gals. Domtar used 
in road surface. 


1 




1 
12 


3 

9 

1 


Scraped and 
painted. 

Scraped and 

painted. 

Repaired. 


9 








^ 


442 


3741 

6020 
6062 


3.13 

3.1 
3.0 


4 


6020 




2 




hen 


ed 




S 


6080 




.. 1 










6 














1 

1 
1 

1 
1 


110x18 steel bridge 
with 4' side- 
walk, partially 
constructed. 

10x20 concrete. 

Repaired. 

Pile bridge repair- 
ed and rock fill 
replaced. 160' 
span. 

60'xl8'steel bridge 
on concrete 
abutments with 
piled footings. 




7 


















8 


















26,160 F.B.B. timber used. 


Q 


















10 




















11 




















1? 










4.5 


1 
32 


2 
3 








Scow built, 14x30. 


n 
















14 










1.5 
60 










IS 








267 


6 
1 

1 


8 

4 

11 






• 




16 
















17 








2 




1 








18 












Cribs built and filled for 
scow landing. 


1Q 

























128 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, 
Annual Report of Work Done, 





^ 


Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 


Ditch- 
ing 


Gravelling 




L 
mis. 


W 
ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


Yards 
used 


20 


Algoma District. — 

Manitoulin Island. 

GoreBay-Silverwater- 
Meldrum Bay Rd . . 




4.5 


50 


4.5 


50 


4 


30 


10.5 

2.38 

4.25 

.7 


re 
re 

re 

re 








6.25 

3.5 

8.25 
.8 
.06 

1 

4.3 

6.25 
4.8 

2.75 


6458 


21 


Gore Bay-Kagawong 
Road 










2673 


22 


Gore Bay-Providence 
Bay Rd 


.5 
.25 










.25 


24 








8823 


23 


Providence Bay- 
M indemoya-West 
Bay Rd . 














495 


984 


24 


West Bay-Sheguindah 
Road 


















151 


25 


Little Current-Mani- 
towaning Rd 




.75 
.5 


30 
66 


.75 


30 


.5 
.5 

.75 


20 
30 

10 


1 
1.63 

.8 


28 
26 

re 








771 


26 


Little Current-West 
Bay Road 

Manitowaning- 

Mindemoya Rd . . . 
West Bay-Kagawong 

Roa 1 


1.0 

1.4 








3400 


27 











100 


4474 


28 














3718 


29 


Little Current-Espan- 
ola Road 




14.75 

1.26 
1.12 

1.3 
1.42 


66 

66 
66 

66 
66 


10.75 
1.26 


66 
66 


13.75 

1.25 
1.6 
1.5 
.12 

1.14 


2,i 

30 
24 
30 


13.25 


30 






1183 


2186 


^0 


Cochrane- Porcu- 
pine District. 

Blount Township . 










SI 


Brower Township. . . . 
Calder Township 


3.5 


.12 


24 






17757 

5260 

268 
400 
100 

12044 
30100 

810 






^9 














ss 


Calvert Township . . . 




1.42 


66 










.5 


155 


M 


Clergue Township . . . 
Clute Township 

Fournier Township 


1 

2 






.5 
2 

.2 
1 

1 


re 
2^ 

26 
24 

re 








SS 










2 

1 
5.5 


26 
30 


.03 


10 






36 


2 
4.55 


66 
66 


2 
6.55 


66 
66 






37 


Fox Township 


.5. 










S8 





































1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



129 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— Continued. 
Year Ending 3 1st October, 1923. 



Crushed Rock 


Drag- 
ging 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Remarks 






O 

o 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 


■(-> 


d 


Description 






Yds. 
haul- 
ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 




Yds. 
crush- 
ed 


Miles 


Miles 




7663 


7663 


3.25 


40 
12 

28 

30 




5 

6 

2 re 

7 
5 
2 

1 

3 

3 re 

2 

3 

43 


10 








420 c.yd. stone fill. 
375 c.yd. rock exca. 

900 c.yd. earth and stone 
fill. 

300 c.yd. clay fill. 
100 c.yd. stone fill. 

1290 c.yd. stone fill. 
168 c.yd. clay fill. 

200 c.yd. clay fill. 

450 c.yd. stone fill. 

60 c.yd. earth fill. 


^0 










'>! 








paired 








79 








5 








7S 














''4 








22 
38 

7 
20 




2 








75 














96 








paired 








77 
















98 








5 




1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


Timber-cribbed 

piers. 
114x18x6 

18x18x5 

18x16x4 

30x18x4 

36x18x5 


5551 c.yd. rock excav. 
4184 c.yd. earth excav. 

578 c.yd. rock fill. 
26125 c.yd. earth fill. 


99 












30 








1.4 


i.5 
2 


33 
29 re 

15 


4 
paired 




1 

1 
1 
1 


Repaired. 

20x5x17 
20x6x17 
Repaired. 


3680 c.yd. clay used in 
road surfacing. 

5288 c.yd. cut and fill. 

950 ft. lin. corduroy re- 
moved. 

2610 ft. lin. creek cleared. 

100 c.yd. rock in cribs. 

60 c.yd. muskeg excav. 


31 








32 








4 
2 




2 


33 










2 
2 

13 
30 

3 








34 










1 
1 


160x14 
Repaired. 


335 c.yd. clay used in road 
surfacing. 


35 








2 






1 


36 












2288 c.yd. muskeg excav. 
210 c.yd. earth fill 


37 














7 






38 



















5 L.F. 



130 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, 
Annual Report of Work Done, 







Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 




Ditch- 
ing 


Gravelling 




L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 
ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
ft. 


L 
mis. 


Yards 
used 


SQ 


COCHRANE-PORCU- 

piNE District. — 
Continued. 

Glackmeyer Twp .... 




1.5 


66 


1.5 


66 


.5 


33 


1.5 


re 








1.2 


910 


40 


Hanna Township.. . . 












41 


Kennedy Township . . 
Lamarche Township . 

Leitch Township .... 


2 
4.5 


.93 
1. 

.73 
4 
2 
3 


66 
66 

66 
66 
66 
66 


.93 


33 


.93 

1 
1 

.73 
3 
2 
3 
3.5 


33 
33 
24 

33 
33 
33 
33 
33 






.01 


10 


8500 
11045 






4'' 


2 


re 


1.6 


1365 




.73 
4 
2 
3 


66 
66 
66 
£6 








4^ 
















44 


McCart Township . . . 












46840 
6562 
7800 

44880 

5280 


.25 


ioo 


4S 


Mountjoy Township. 








.5 


16 


364 


'16 


Newmarket Twp .... 










47 


Pyne Township 
















-18 


Township Bou: dary 
Lines. 

Blount-Glackmeyer . . 




• .25 


25 


.25 


25 


3.25 
2 


re 
re 










4Q 


Blount-Leitch 
















SO 


Brower-Glackmeyer. . 


























SI 


Brower-Fox 






























S'> 


Brower-Kennedy . . . 
























940 






SS 


Brower-Lamarche . . . 
























1.25 
.56 


844 


54 


Brower, North 

Boundary 


























447 


ss 


Calder-Clute . 




.9 


66 


















550 
900 




56 


Calder-Colquohoun . . 

Calvert-Clergue 

Clute-Fournier 


3 
2 






2.25 
2 


33 
33 


.75 


24 










S7 


















58 










5 
1.02 

3 


re 
30 

re 






264 
3722 


.63 


472 


5Q 


Clute-Ottaway 




1.06 


66 
















60 


Clute-Glackmeyer . . 
















.13 


SO 


61 


Fotrnier-Lamarche . 
























6^ 


German-Matheson . . . 






























63 


Glackmeyer- 

Lamarche 
















4 
4 

3.66 
4.27 


re 
re 

26 
re 








3.2 
1.62 
pairs 

13.62 


2122 


64 


Paymaster Road .... 






















2905 


65 


Timmins-Iroquois 
Falls Trunk Road . 


5.5 










.5 
.26 


26 
33 






Gen'l r 
133572 


669 
12519 



















1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



131 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— Continue i. 
Year Ending 31st October, 1923. 



Crushed Rock 


Drag- 
ging 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 


C 


ulverts 






-a 
1. 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 


4) 




Yds. 
haul- 
ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 


Yds. 
crush- 
ed 


Miles 


Miles 



Bridges 



Description 



Remarks 



20x16 (Pole), 
Rebuilt. 



430 c.yd. clay fill. 



3.25 



Repaired. 
18x10x5 
35x16 
47x16. . . . 
Repaired. 
30' span. 



1695 c.yd. clay fill. 
1350 ft. lineal creek 
cleared and widened. 



700 c.yd. cut and fill. 



16 



14x12x12 



40x16 (Temp.) 



Abitibi Ferry repaired and 
re-installed. 



880 ft. lineal corduroy 

removed. 
940 ft. lineal creek cleared. 



5000 c.yd. cut and fill. 
5500 c.yd. cut and fill. 



15 



At Frederick- 
house. 



215 c.yd. rock fill. 
3963 c.yd. earth fill. 
3832 ft. lineal creek cleared 
121 c.yd. rock in bridge 

piers. 
660 ft. lineal corduroy re 

moved. 
3442 c.yd. cut and fill. 



12473 



821 
12473 



1 
2.25 



16 
16.25 



28 



18 



11 



17 



Completed (from 
last year). 



251 c.yd. clay over muskeg 



29744 c.yd. cut and fill. 
1 . 13 mis. crosslay removed. 
288 ft. concrete pipe made 

and installed. 
2907 c.yd. rock excav. 



132 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, 
Annual Report of Work Done, 







Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 


Ditch- 
ing 


Gravelling 




L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

m,ls. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


Yards 
used 


66 


cochrane-porcu- 
pineDistrict. — 

Continue:. 

River Road west 
across Lots 3 to 10, 
Mountjoy 
















5.5 


re 






1790 


.5 

5.58 


402 


67 


Latchford-Cochrane 
Rd. (Monteith to 
Cochrane) ........ 












•5.5 
2 

1.25 

1.0 

1.55 


33, 
40 

18 
35 
33 






3806 


68 


Monteith- Iroquois 
Falls Road 

Dryden District. 

Aubrey Township . . . 

Browning Road 












7 

1.25 
2.25 
10.0 


24 
26 

24 

22 
re 


.35 
.01 


14 
18 


9655 
11645 




69 


1.48 


2.25 


66 


2.0 

2.25 


66 

47 






70 


1.75 
3.5 


1400 


71 


Dryden-Richan Road 
Eton Township 


2.25 


4.5 
1.5 

1.25 


66 
66 

66 


1 
1.5 

1.25 

.36 

.5 

1.75 

1. 

3.75 

.75 
2.5 

.25 
1. 
3.25 


66 
66 

66 

20 
66 
66 

66 
66 

66 
66 
id, 
40 
66 


1.5 
1.5 

1.25 


33 
33 

33 


5.0 

2.25 
.5 
.75 

1.25 


24 
re 

22 
24 

24 






55431 
16457 

2200 


2108 


79 








73 


Eton-bandford 

Boundary 












74 


Eton-Wainwright 

Boundary 

Finn Settlement Rd.. 


.36 






.5 


400 


7S 


.5 
1.5 

1. 

3.75 

.75 
2.5 


66 
66 

66 
66 

66 
66 


.5 
1.75 


33 
33 


.25 
3 

1.5 
2 
2.5 


22 
re 
24 
22 
22 






675 
2755 

800 
13234 




76 

77 


Ignace-Ossaquin Rd . 
Melgund Township. . 


.5 


.08 


16 


.5 


1267 


78 


Mutrie Township. . . . 




3.75 

.75 
2.5 
.25 

2.8 


33 

33 
33 
33 

40 


1.25 


16 






70 


McLean Creek Rd. . . 








80 


Mining Road 




2.5 
1.47 


24 
22 












81 


Rice Lake Road 

Rice Lake School Rd. 
Rugby Township. 


1.69 






1175 


1.5 


960 


82 


3.25 


66 








8S 













5759 
59836 

10955 






84 


Sandford Township . . 
South west Quibell 
Road 


.85 


.5 
2.5 


66 
60 


.5 
4.75 

1.5 
1.25 


66 
60 

ii 
66 


.5 
4. 


33 
33 


1.0 

2.25 
4.5 


24 

24 
re 


.25 
.08 


16 
18 






85 


1.5 


721 


86 


Vanhorne Township.. 

Vermiliion-Quibell Rd 

Vermillion-Dinorwic 
Rd. (General) 

Eagle River to Dry- 
den Section 

Dryden to Wabigoon 
Section 


.5 

.56 
.60 




87 


1.25 


66 


1.25 


35 


1.75 


24 






438 


1.75 


1450 


88 






1022 


89 




■■ 


.18 


25 














132893 


12.3 

5.5 


9733 


90 


















5900 


91 


Wabigoon- Dinorwic 




6.5 
.25 


66 
66 


3.5 
1.0 


66 
66 


5.5 
1.13 


35 
33 


3.25 
.88 


24 
24 


.06 


16 


8705 




09 


Wabigoon Township . 























1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



133 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— Continued. 
Year Ending 31st October, 1923. 



Crushed Rock 


Drag- 
ging 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Remarks 






G 
O 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 




d 
2 


Description 






Yds. 
haul- 
ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 




Yds. 
crush- 
ed 


Miles 


Miles 














10 

3 
16 

29 












66 








13 

5 




"l" 


1 

6 






1000 c.yd. clay fill. 
4090 c.yd. cut and fill. 
90 yds. lineal fencing and 
guard rail. 

9002 c.yd. clay covering 

swamps. 
906 c.yd. earth fill. 


67 








1 


Timber. 


68 








60 




















70 








2 




10 

8 

5 

2 
9 
3 

3 
9 

1 
6 
8 






1 


Temporary. 


710 c.yd. cut and fill. 
6423 c.yd. earth fill, • 


71 












7? 




















7^ 






















74 








4 
5 














7S 












1 


12x5x18 


1713 c.yd, earth and gravel 

fill. 
533 c.yd. earth fill. 
10755 c.yd. clay covering 

corduroy. 


76 












77 




















78 




















70 






















80 




















1833 c.yd. clay covering 
swamp. 


81 




















8? 
























83 












1 
4 












84 




















1100 c.yd, cut and fill. 
2742 c.yd. clay covering 

swamp. 
1071 c.yd. cut and fill, 
277 c.yd, fill. 


8S 




















86 








8 
146 




2 
2 
2 










87 
















88 
















475 cyd. rock excav, 

3 1 1 cyd. rock and clay fill. 


80 




















00 












24 

7 










1916 cyd, earth fill, 
9000 cyd. clay covering 

swamp. 
293 c.yd. clay covering 

rock, 
1333 c.yd, earth fill. 


01 




















0? 























134 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, 
Annual Report of Work Done, 







Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 


Ditch- 
ing 


Gravelling 




L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


Yards 
used 


93 


Dryden District.— 

Continued. 

Wainwright Twp .... 

Wainwright-Zealand 
Boundary 


2 


.5 


66 


.25 
.5 
1.5 


33 
66 
42 


.2 

.5 

2.0 

.75 


12 
35 

35 

35 


1.5 
3.5 

1.75 
1.0 


24 
re 

24 

24 






2580 
2400 
5500 






Q4 




















Q.S 


Zealand Township . . . 




1.25 


66 


1.25 


66 










Q6 


Englehart District 

Armstrong Township. 

Bayly Township 

Bryce Township 












Q7 


1.25 




























Q8 




























QQ 


Chamberlain Twp. . . 






























100 


Dack Township 
























200 






101 


Evanturel Township. 
















2.5 


re 






.5 


488 


10? 


Ingram Township. . . 
























103 


Kittson Township. . . 




1 


18 






1 

.17 


16 
26 


1.5 


16 










50 


104 


Marter Township. . . . 


















10S 


Robillard Township. . 




















300 






106 


Savard Township .... 
















1 
3 


20 
20 






.07 


84 


107 


Sharpe Township. . . . 
























108 


Township Boundaries 

Armstrong-Evanturel 
Bryce-Robillard 


























100 






























110 


Chamberlain-Pacaud . 
Chamberlain-Savard . 






























111 
















1 


re 








1.5 


1544 


117 


Dack-Evanturel 






















51 


113 


Dack- Robillard 


























1. 


1900 


114 


Evanturel-Igram. . . . 




























IIS 


Evanturel-Marter. . . 






























116 


Robillard-Savard. . . . 


























1.25 


1838 


117 


Robillard-Truax 
















1. 

.75 
5. 


re 

re 
re 






2200 

2000 
700 




118 


Trunk Roads. 
Charlton-Elk Lake.. . 












.5 


24 






.75 
4.5 


365 


110 


Charlton-Englehart. . 
















1069 
























2790 
1725 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



135 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— Continued. 
Year Ending 31st October, 1923 



Crushed Rock 


Drag- 
ging 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Remarks 






-a 
o 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 


a; 


6 


Description 






Yds. 
haul- 
ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 




Yds. 

crnsh- 

ed 


Miles 


Miles 














10 

7 
7 




2 






. 25 mis. creek cleared. 
3497 c.yd. earth fill. 

8976 c.yd. earth fill. 
1277 c.yd. clay and sand 

covering swamp. 
3000 c.yd. clay covering 

swamp. 


93 
















94 








1 












95 










5 






96 








8 


3 












97 












12 

2 

24 

101 

5 








98 






















99 












3 

2 
5 re 


paired 


1 

2 


30' span. 
36' span. 


517 c.yd. clay fill. 

600 ft. lineal corduroy re- 
moved. 
254 c.yd. clay fill. 


100 








9 




101 












102 










1 

2 












103 














4 
59 






. 45 mis. covered with 528 
c.yd. of sand and clay. 

618 c.yd. filling. 

.43 mis. covered with 375 
c.yd. of clay. 

204 c.yd. rubble wall. 

2220 c.yd. hill cutting. 


104 










6 

1 

3 re 

10 








105 








2.5 








106 








paired 








107 














10 

25 






108 






















109 










3.5 


4 










110 












15 
7 

15 
1 
6 






1067 c.yd. hill cutting. 
1333 c.yd. fill. 

900 c.yd. clay fill. 


111 










.5 
6 


1 
1 




1 
1 


100' span steel on 
concrete abut- 
ments. 

20' span. 


112 










113 














114 






















115 
















1 


30' span. 




116 












3 
21 






245 c.yd. clay fill. 

963 c.yd. field stone for 

roads. 
8010 c.yd. cut and fill. 
532 c.yd. concrete end 

walls on culverts. 


117 










.5 

On- 
hills 






1 
1 


Cedar, 16x8 
60' span. 


118 








4 


3 


19 


119 











136 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DtPARlMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, 
Annual Report of Work Done, 







Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Sturr\p- 

ing and 

Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 


Ditch- 
ing 


Gravelling 




L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


Yards 
used 


1?0 


Englehart District 

— Continued. 

Latchford- Cochrane. 

Cobalt to New Lis- 
keard Section 

New Liskeard to 
Englehart Section.. 

Englehart to Kruger- 
dorf Section 
















.8 
1.5 


re 
re 










1382 


1^1 




















1206 


i.5 
...... 

4.5 

.75 


1205 
1368 


122 




















1070 
3225 


1?3 


South Lorrain Road. . 

Hearst District. 
Casgrain Township . . 
Eilber Township .... 


3.85 
.16 


.49 


66 


.49 
1.25 
2.60 


66 
21 
18 


1.98 
.92 

3.75 
1.38 


33 
12 

12 
30 


10.96 

2.16 
.16 


re 

re 
30 






37478 
10390 


4688 


P4 






591 


1?S 


.75 
2.75 

4.25 


66 
66 

66 












1'76 


Hanlan Township. . . 
Kendall Township . . . 


2.8 


2.5 
2.3 
3.58 
3 


66 

6 

66 

30 














31982 
19098 






1?7 


2.3 
3.58 

.75 


6 
30 

30 


.58 


26 






8.35 


6469 


P8 


Lowther Township. . 










1?0 


Way Township. ..... 




1.5 


66 




















i^n 


Township Boundaries. 

Casgrain-Hanlan .... 
Casgrain- Kendall 


3 


3 


6 


3 


6 










2746 






1S1 


















n? 


Kendall- Way. . . 








.75 
3 

9.75 
3 
3 

4.8 
1.75 

.75 

1.5 
3.0 
1 


66 
30 
66 

28 

5 

66 
30 

30 

66 
66 
30 


1.5 
5.3 
3 
3 

1.5 
1.5 
3.34 

.75 


30 
30 

5 
33 

5 
24 
30 
30 


.13 


re 






500 






1S^ 


Lowther- Way 
















n4 


Trunk Road along 
Can. Nat. Rly.... 

Kafuskasing Dist. 
Fauquier Township. . 

O'Brien Township. . . 


1 
1.5 


9.75 
2.3 


66 
66 


.13 
.6 

1.59 


re 

28 

26 






42854 

.16210 
23960 






ns 










n6 










n? 






2.25 
.75 


66 
66 














n8 


Shackleton Township 

Township Boundaries. 
Fauquier-O'Brien 




1 


30 










11355 
7810 






ISQ 














140 


Fauquier- Machin 




.5 


66 


1 

2 
2 

4.25 
5.12 
3. 


66 
30 
24 

66 
66 
66 


2 

.3 
2 
1.6 


30 

24 

5 

30 














141 


Fauquier- Nansen. . . . 
Haggart-Shackleton . 


2 










10045 






14'' 


4.25 
2.38 

.5 
3.5 


66 
66 
66 
66 














I^IS 




















144 
























145 


Owens- Williamson. . . 























1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



137 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— Continued. 
Year Ending 31st October, 1923. 



Crushed Rock 


Drag- 
ging 

Miles 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Remarks 






T3 
O 

o 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 




6 
Z 


Description 






Yds. 
haul- 
ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 




Yds. 
crush- 
ed 


Miles 












9 
10 






26 
13 


1 


Repaired. 


1175 c.yd. fill. 

Vz mile corduroy removed 


170 








34 


1 

16 

1 re 
4 


2 


PI 








1 


Temporary. 


1?9 










19 


paired 


112 




193 








4.5 


2 


30' span. 


3065 c.yd. fill. 

3304 c.yd. clay surfacing. 


1?4 








P'> 












5 

3 
2 re 






1 

1 
1 


12' long. 

198' long. 
72' long. 




1?6 








2.25 








2962 c.yd. rock and clay 
fill. 


177 








paired 


2 


1?8 


















1 


72' long. 


610 c.yd. clay fill. 


179 


















no 








3 75 
















m 












1 




1 






692 clyd. clay surfacing.. . 


137 
















]^^ 








9.25 




1 

1 re 

25 

31 

2 re 


built 


7 


1 
1 


30' span. 
Temporary. 


7684 c.yd. clay surface on 

6.7 mis. 
1605 c.yd. clay fill. 


n4 








ns 












paired 


1 








136 


















137 
























138 
























130 
























140 












7 












141 






















14? 
























143 
























144 

























145 



138 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, 
Annual Report of Work Done, 







Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 


Ditch- 
ing 


Gravelling 




L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


Yards 
used 


146 
147 


Kapuskasing Dist.— 
Continued. 

Trunk Road along 
Can. Nat. Rly 

Kenora District. 
Charlesbois Road .... 


3 


5.75 

1.03 
.5 


66 

16 
to 
36 

40 


5.75 
.50 
3 

1.19 

.88 


66 
36 
24 

16 
to 
36 

35 


1.75 
.50 

1.19 
.74 


30 
36 

16 
to 
36 

35 


.5 
7.97 

1.83 


24 
30 

16 
& 
18 


.10 

.41 
.30 


16 

18 
16 


21220 

12500 
669 


9.77 
4 


6715 
1630 

3878 


148 


East Melick Road. 
Pelletier Bridge 
Diversion 






140 


Jaffray Township. . . . 








.5 
3 


602 


150 


Keewatin-Manitoba 
Boundary Road . . . 
















.87 
.22 

2.3 
1.63 


20 
36 

24 
24 






3500 
400 

11080 

3237 

900 

2500 

22440 


3946 


151 


Kenora-Keewatin Rd. 
Norman Diversion) 

Kenora- Redditt Road 

Pellatt Road 




.06 


66 
















IS'? 






1.01 
1.5 

2.7 


33 
50 

55 


.05 
.17 


18 
20 


.25 
.25 

"3" 
4 
1.75 

1.4 


200 


1S^ 




4. 

.19 
3.03 


10 
66 
40 






270 

244 


154 
1SS 


Pellatt Road, 

Lac Lulu Branch. . 
West Melick Road. . . 




5.75 


40 


.19 
5.03 


33 
40 


.19 

5.53 


22 
24 


.31 


18 


2000 
2600 

588 


1S6 


Matheson District. 
Beatty Township .... 
















2.5 
2.5 
2 

1.9 
.95 
1.25 
1.5 
6 5 
1.93 
1.5 


re 
24 
20 
24 
20 
22 
16 
re 
20 
22 






7752 

2284 

910 

371 


1197 


1S7 


Benoit Township. . . 




.75 
.65 

2.0 


66 
66 

66 


1.5 

.75 
.5 

2.0 

1. 

.88 

2. 


26 
66 
66 

66 

26 
66 

66 


1.5 
.32 
.65 

1.25 

1. 

.75 

3 

.5 
1.7 
1 


26 
33 
26 

26 

26 
26 

26 

26 
26 
26 








1S8 


Bowman Township . '. 








.4 
.1 


350 


1SQ 


Carr Township . . 








126 


160 


Clergue Township . 










161 


Currie Township . 




.88 
3 

.75 
6.5 
6 

4.75 
1.5 


66 
66 

66 
66 
66 

66 
66 


1 

3 

3.75 

1 

1 


20 
22 
24 
20 
22 






2246 
3200 






16"? 


Hislop Township 












16^ 


Maisonville Twp . . 












164 


Playfair Township . . 








.75 
.25 

2.0 

2.5 

1. 

2. 


re 
20 
re 
20 
24 
re 








.38 


314 


16S 


Stock Township . 




1 

3.5 

4.25 

1.5 


26 
66 
66 

66 






5372 
8609 






Taylor Township . . . . 


.5 










•166 


5 
1.5 

2. 


26 
re 

26 




167 































1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



139 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— Continued. 
Year Ending 31st October, 1923. 



Crushed Rock 


Drag- 
ging 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Remarks 






-a 
u 
o 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 




6 


Description 






Yds. 
haul- 
ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 




Yds. 
crush- 
ed 


Miles 


Miles 










4 

8 


2 
5 


36 
7 re 

4 


paired 

2 


14 


1 


Repaired. 


6135 c.yd. cut and fill. 


146 








147 
















148 














3 
3 
1 








400 c.yd. rock excav. 

1000 c.yd. rock excav. 

2710 c.yd. rock excav. 
.22 mis. covered with 585 

c.yd. cinders. 
3284 c.yd. rock excav. 

r 


149 












2 
1 

35 

19 




1 


16x18 


1.50 












151 








10 


4 








IS? 








4 

35 








IS'? 












..1 
1 


16x18 
135x18 (Pole). 


2500 ft. lineal fencing. 
1500 c.yd. rock excav. 


1S4 














1SS 








4 


2.5 


11 
19 
16 

17 




7 






1636 c.yd. clay. 


ISrt 












1S7 














2 
4 


1 

1 
1 


Repaired. 

Repaired. 
50' long. 


1000 c.yd. cut and fill. 
500 c.yd. clay surfacing. 

200 c.yd. clay fill. 

500 c.yd. clay surfacing. 


1S8 








4 




159 








160 












30 

35 






1 


5x16x18 


1092 c.yd. clay surfacing. 
921 c.yd. clay surfacing. 


161 












16? 




















\6^ 


















1 


Repaired. 


791 c.yd. clay fill. 

1460 c.yd. clay surfacing. 

1929 c.yd. clay surfacing. 


164 












2 
23 






16S 
















2 
2 


16' span. 
17' span. 


166 












167 



























140 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, 
Annual Report of Work Done, 







Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 


Ditch- 
ing 


Gravelling 




L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 
ft. 


L 
ft. 


L 

mis. 


Yards 
used 


168 


Matheson District 

— Continued. 

Township Boundaries. 
Beatty-Carr 




1.78 


66 


1.78 


66 


1.78 


26 


.25 


re 










48 


160 


Bond-Stock 


.5 
1.25 






709 
800 






170 


Bowman-Currie 

Bowman-Hislop 














1.25 
2.0 


re 
18 










171 






















172 


Trunk Roads, etc. 

Hattie Road, Beatty 
Township 




2 

2 


45 
66 


2 


45 


2 
2 


24 
33 


2 

2.5 
5 


24 
re 

28 






245 
380 


1 
9.4 


673 


17^ 


Latchford-Cochrane 
Road 








3773 














174 


Ramore — Lightning 
Ri er Road 




175 


Monteith-Shillington 
Road 


























5.0 
1.5 

4.1 
d 


2404 


176 


Munro Road 
















2 
2 


re 
24 






300 

300 
cleane 


890 


177 


Shillington-Porcupine 
Road 


3.5 


















630 
2530 


























178 


MusKOKA District. 

Gravenhurst-Bala- 
Parry Sound Rd . . . 




170 


Huntsville-Dwight 
Road 


.75 










.06 

2 
.5 


55 

40 
10 


22.5 
2.6 
323 


re 
20 
re 






1588 
32620 




















13.25 




180 


Severn-North Bay Rd 

Utterson-Rosseau- 
Parry Sound Road. 

NlPISSING-SuDBURY- 

Renfrew Dist. 

Balfour-Dowling 
Boundary and be- 
tween Cons. II and 
III in both Twps. . 


20060 


181 




1 


66 












182 






1.25 


24 


2 


24 






2840 




60 


183 


Gold Nugget Mine 
Road, Street and 
Scadding Twps . . . 




4.5 


22 












184 


Monte Rouleau Road 












1.25 


16 






200 


1.5 


1100 

























1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



141 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— Continued. 
Year Ending 31st October, 1923. 



Crushed Rock 


Drag- 
ging 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Remarks 






T3 
O 
O 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 




6 


Description 






Yds. 
haul- 
ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 




Yds. 
crush- 
ed 


Miles 


Miles 


















1 






• 
229 c.yd. clay surfacing. 


168 




















169 












2 
4 re 

10 

23 

12 










3375 c.yd. clay surfacing. 


170 












paired 








171 












3 

1 








17? 








7 




1 

1 

1 
2 
1 
1 


45' span. 
15' span. 

60' span pole 

covered. 
50' span pole 

covered. 
15' span pole 

covered. 
12' span pole 

covered. 


800 c.yd. clay surfacing. 

9 acres, cutting to widen 
narrow parts of winter 
road, length, 20 miles. 


173 








174 








21 








17S 










3 




6 






2800 c.yd. clay fill. 

543 c.yd. clay surfacing. . 


176 








25 


2.5 


1 
1 


Floating bridge 
160' long. 

Concrete, 
24x10x6 


177 
















178 












2 

3 
4 re 


1 
paired 


23 
21 


2489 c.yd. rock fill. 
16,258 c.yd. earth fill. 
1500 c.yd. earth excav. 
3462 c.yd. rock in Rip Rap 
290 c.yd. clay surfacing. 
392 c.yd. earth and stone 
fill. 


179 


31539 


31814 


10.63 


492 


43.25 






180 








181 












10 












18? 




















Winter road. 


18^ 






















184 



























142 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, 
Annual Report of Work Done, 







Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 


Ditch- 
ing 


Gravelling 




L 

mis. 


W 
ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft 


L 

mis. 


W 
ft 


L 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


Yards 
used 


185 


NlPISSING-SuDBURY- 

Renfrew District 
— Continued. 

North Bay-Pembroke 
Road. 

Section I, North Bay- 
Callander 


.5 
2 


.54 


66 


.54 


66 


.54 


35 


.75 


re 






13200 


14.5 


405 


186 


Section II, Callander- 
Mattawa 






10977 


187 


Section III, Mattawa- 
Klocks 
























4093 
2973 


188 


Section IV, Klocks- 
Mackeys 


.5 
.75 


9 

1.25 


45 
66 


8.8 


45 


9 

2.5 


30 
24 


11.6 

.75 


24 
18 






895 


1.2 


1105 










180 


Section V, Mackeys- 
Chalk River 

Section VI, Chalk 
River- Petewawa . . . 


233 


190 


9.5 


66 


8.5 


66 


9.6 


24 


11.8 


24 


.05 


10 


788 

1750 
30347 

138 
14890 


1.2 


867 


191 


Section VII, Pete- 
wawa Pembroke . . . 

North Bay-Sudbury 
Road 

North Bay-Widdifield 
Road 


.5 
34.5 

.2 
5 


8 

io.'e' 


1541 


IP? 










.25 

.2 

1 
2 


12 

20 
20 
15 


34 

1.88 
2.5 
3.5 
10 


re 

20 
20 

18 
rt 






6708 


193 






.2 


30 






7449 
1782 


194 


St. Charles-Noelville 
Road 


1.75 


66 






5998 














195 


Sturgeon Falls-Smoky 
Falls Road 


30 


196 


Sturgeon Falls-Field 
Road 


4.25 














6 
39 

42.5 
.6 

10 

8 


re 
re 

re 
20 

re 
18 






8625 
7800 

4250 


3.1 

7.5 

6.1 


2153 


197 


Sudbury-Azilda- 
Chelmsford-Larch- 
wood Road 

Sudbury-Capreol- 
Milnet Road 

Warren-St. Charles 
Road 


















5895 


198 


4.5 


1 


40 






.25 
.5 


40 
24 


.2 


12 


1124 
4823 


199 






167 


?00 


West Shining TreeRd. 


2 














.15 


16 




4.9 


3914 



















1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



143 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH—Continued. 
Year Ending 31st October, 1923. 



Crushed 


Rock 


Drag- 
ging 

Miles 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Remarks 






- -a 
o 
o 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 


a; 


6 


Description 






Yds. 
haul- 
ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 




Yds. 

crush 

ed 


Miles 




6269 


6269 


1.77 


61 


8.5 




4 


1 






150 ft. lineal cement tile 
drain. 


IRS 




1 


Temporary 
30' span. 


186 








240 

132 
14.5 

24 

16.5 

67 


35 
25 

6 
10 








40 c.yd. filling. 
1781 c.yd. rock excav. 
14543 c.yd. earth fill. 
2773 c.yd. loose stone re- 
moved from roadway. 


187 








46 


2 








188 














189 








.1 

9 

2 CO 
2 re 

I 
49 


1 

1 

24 
vered 
paired 

10 

1 








1847 c.yd. cinders surfac- 
ing. 
10660 c.yd. fill. 


190 








1 

1 






191 


4898 


3326 


2.65 


1 
1 


60' span. 
3x5x18, 
concrete. 


1726 c.yd. fill. 

252 c.yd. rock excav. 

424 ft. lineal retaining 

wall. 
322 c.yd. stone in Rip Rap 
4057 c.yd. filling. 
584 c.yd. stone in Rip Rap. 


192 




466 

54.8 
5 


74 
5 

4 


193 








5 






194 












19S 








4 
30.5 

69 












546 c.yd. stone and clay 

filling. 
300 c.yd. rock excav. 

679 c.yd. gravel. 

1077 c.yd. slag. 

219 c.yd. cinders and 139 
c.yd. rock used in gen- 
eral repairs to Sudbury- 
Murray Mine Section. 

30 c.yd. rock excav. 

566 c. yd. rock filling. 

6650 c.vd. rock excav. 

Ill c.yd. rock fill. 


196 








11 
9 


12 
2 CO 

16 
5 re 

2 
56 


3 
vered 

2 
paired 








197 










1 

2 
1 


3x12x100 
corduroy. 

[Repaired. 
33' span. 


198 








199 


















?00 





















144 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 
Annual Report of Work Done, 







Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 


Ditch- 
ing 


Gravelling 




L 
mis. 


W 
ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 
ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


Yards 
used 


'>01 


Parry Sound Dist. 
Booth Road 


























3.0 
3.0 


1290 


90'' 


Burk's Falls-Mag- 
netawan Road .... 

Chisholm-North Bay 
Road 




.90 


66 






1.41 


66 


1.00 

3.475 


33 
22 






5178 


1829 


203 










1796 


''04 


Emsdale- Parry Sound 
Road 




1.20 
.16 


40 

35 






.50 

1.50 

.50 

.50 


40 

25 
30 
35 


1.60 

.75 


20 
re 






5561 














3.00 
3.50 

12.0' 




''OS 


Parry Sound-Mag- 
netawan Road .... 

Road from Parry 
Sound to June, of 
Bala&RosseauRds 

Powassan-Chisholm 
Road 






1228 


206 


1.41 


.50 


66 


.20 


66 


.30 


24 


10.225 
7.0 


16 
re 






57328 

747 
3400 

1529 
13960 

3840 
26123 


10 
1793 


207 






920 


''08 


Powassan-N ipissi ng- 
Restoule Road .. . . 

Cross over road from 
Powassan-Loring 
Rd. to Trout Creek- 
Loring Road Twp. 
of Pringle 

Severn-North Bay 
Trunk Rd.-(Novar- 
Callander Section) . 

Sundridge-Magnet- 
awan Road 

Trout Creek-Loring 
Road 
























1371 5 


209 












1.23 
.9 


30 
24 


1.5 
60.16 

.125 
1.00 
2 
3.90 
1.17 
21.25 


24 
re 

22 
30 
re 
23 
18 
re 






7961.5 


210 


34.50 














■■7.' 50 

1.5 

3.08 
.1 

2.2 
.1 


9583 


''11 


















5486 
2018 


917 


.40 


1.97 
.32 


66 
40 


1.92 


66 


3.63 
1.31 


30 
33 






2241 










213 


Rainy River Dist. 

Barnhart Road Car- 
penter Township . . 


995 


214 


Barwick Consolidated 
Sch. Route, Twps. 
of Dobie and Shen- 
ton and Bdy. Line.. 

Barwick to Black 
Hawk 


.92 
.13 






4.0 
1.0 


30 


.40 


30 


2.41 
2.0 


20 
re 


.09 


10 




1953 


215 






63 


216 


Black Hawk to Deer 
















1420 


217 


Black Hawk to Fin- 
land Road 




2.0 


66 






2,0 


12 


2.0 
2.0 
1.42 


20 
20 
20 






1073 


61 


218 


B urr iss-Carpenter 
Boundary 

Burriss Consolidated 
Scho*ol Road 


2.0 












219 


2.0 


40 


1.0 


40 


2.0 


40 


.1 


9 


3650 

















1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



145 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— Continued 
Year Ending 3 1st October, 1923. 



Crushed Rock 


Drag- 
ging 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Remarks 






o 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 


CO 


6 


Description 






Yds. 

laul- 

ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 




Yds. 
crush- 
ed 


Miles 


Miles 


























?01 








9.875 


6.18 


47 










80269 c.yd. earth fill. 
10454 c.yd. earth excav. 


701 
















^0^ 












14 




5 






982 c.yd. earth fill. 
162 c.yd. earth excav. 
487 c.yd. Rip Rap. 


704 












4 
56 

3 

7 

27 
51 

10 
70 






70S 




















233 c.yd. rock excav. 


706 








8.50 
39.0 

2.10 
356.00 

2.0 
47.07 

24 

18 
44 


3.00 

8.5 

35.25 

6.5 
5.0 










707 
















170 c.yd. earth fill. 

1839 c.yd. Rip Rap. 
6827 c.yd. fill. 
4168 c.yd. excav. 
1868 c.yd. earth fill. 
3.33 c.yd. rock excav. 

672 c.yd. earth fill. 
53 c.yd. rock excav. 

63303 c.yd. fill. 
34042 c.yd. excav. 
396 c.yd. gravel fill. 
648 c.yd. Rip Rap. 


708 
















709 










9 


1 

2 
1 


90' concrete and 

steel. 
10' reinforced 

concrete. 
7' reinforced 

concrete. 


710 








711 












2 


20' span. 


71? 












213 










3 
16 












214 


















215 


















716 










14 














?17 


f- 




















?18 












12 










USOc.yd. clay fill. 


?19 























146 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, 
Annual Report of Work Done, 







Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 


Ditch- 
ing 


Gravelling 




L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 
ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


Yards 
used 


990 


Rainy River Dist. 

— Continued. 
Carpenter School Rd. 

Crozier Road 

Dance Road, Burriss 
















.78 


28 






726 
2500 

2178 






991 


1.0 


















2.0 
.76 

2.65 

5.35 

31.49 

1.00 

.13 


1272 


222 


.35 


36 


















494 


223 


Devlin Road, Burriss 




















1702 


994 


Emo-Off Lake Road. 

Fort Frances-Rainy 

River Road 


.925 
16.88 






















4554 
17928 


3426 


225 










2.25 
.50 
1.0 


30 
12 
30 


15.125 

1.125 

.21 

.31 


re 
20 
20 
20 






20957 


996 


1.25 


60 










600 


227 


Gameland School Rd., 
Pratt Township 














50 


228 


Howse Road, Lash 




1.2 


66 






.25 


32 






4000 




99Q 


Indian Mission Road. 

La Vallee Road, La 
Vallee Village, 
north and south. . . 

McCrosson-Pratt 












2.63 
1.45 


1806 


230 


.25 














1.0 


16 






1485 
3960 


943 


231 


.73 


66 






.78 


20 








9^9 


McGinnis Creek Rd 
















..2.2 


1393 


9^^ 


Mine Centre Road.. . 


7.0 






















3900 

3712 

5774 
8745 


.535 


323 


9^4 
























9SS 


Nelles Pattullo Bdy 
















.03 


20 






.34 


220 


''S(S 


Pattullo-Tait Bdy . . . 
River Road, Ayles- 

worth Township . . . 
School Rd., Atikokan 
Sleeman-BerglandRd. 
Sleeman-BerglandRd. 

Minahico-Morson 


.50 
1.75 




















237 






















.83 


539 


''^S 














.40 


20 






1530 




9^0 




















3.409 

1.64 
1.70 


2884 


240 




1.0 


66 






.67 
1.37 


16 

33 


1.03 


20 






3630 
1485 


1055 


''41 


Spohn Trunk Road. . 
Spohn River Road . . . 
Stratton Con. School 

Route, MorleyTwp 
Stratton-Sifton Road 

and North Br. Rd. 
Tank Road 


8.0 
1.0 

2.25 






.003 


10 


1055 


949 










1.0 

1.0 

1.0 
.75 
.50 
1.70 
1.25 
2.75 

.50 


16 

33 

20 
20 
30 
30 
12 
20 

24 


1.524 

2.09 

1.46 
.16 

.75 
.25 

2.25 

2.0 

.42 


20 

20 

20 
30 
20 
20 

re 

re 




243 


2.09 
.50 


66 
60 










2.18 

3.51 
4.28 


1407 


244 






.01 


16 


11082 

7525 

1555 


2246 


'''IS 


2.0 
2.0 


66 
66 






2789 


246 


West Branch Road, 














217 


Wilson Creek Road . . 
Worthington-Atwood 


2.75 














248 




















249 


Worthington-Dilke 
Boundary 

Swastika-Elk Lake 
District. 

Barry HoUinger Mine 
Road 


.50 




















250 




















3700 
298 


.5 


480 


''SI 


Charlton-Elk LakeRd 
















3.14 


re 






200 

























1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



147 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH—Continued. 
Year Ending 31st October, 1 23. 



Crushed Rock 


Drag- 
ging 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Remarks 






O 

o 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 


re 


6 


Description 






Yds. 
haul- 
ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 




Yds. 
c rush- 
ed 


Miles 


Miles 














. . 1 












??0 








6 

18 
















??1 






















??? 






















??3 








250 
2179 




3 

36 

5 

2 

1 
1 

1 

1 










175 c.yd. clay fill. 
2212 c.yd. earth fill. 


??4 












2 


Repaired. 


??,S 












??6 






















??7 




















800 c.yd. earth fill. 
300 c.yd. clay fill. 


??8 








138 
3.0 












??9 














• 


?^(\ 


















?^i 






















?3? 












2 












?^3 




















• 


?34 








1 
6 

27 




1 












?3S 
















200 c.yd. earth fill. 
60 c.yd. earth fill. 


?36 










1 
1 
2 
5 










?37 
















'y^R 








100 
40 

78 












110 c.yd. clay fill. 
25 c. yd. earth excav. 

2 c.yd. earth fill. 
200 c.yd. clay fill. 

300 c.yd. earth fill. 


?39 
















740 
















741 










6 

1 

4 
6 










U? 




















743 








32 
8.5 












744 












2 
1 


Repaired. 
12' span. 




745 












200 c.yd. earth fill. 


^46 












2 






747 






















748 












1 
15 












749 




1160 


1 
















'?S0 
















409 c.yd. rock and clay 
fill. 


7S1 

























148 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 
Annual Report of Work Done, 







Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 


Ditch- 
ing 

L 

ft. 


Gravelling 




L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mjs. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


Yards 
used 


'>S2 


Swastika-Elk Lake 
DisT. — Continued. 

Dane-Larder Lake Rd. 

Dane-Larder LakeRd. 
Branch to Argonaut 
Mine 


1 














8 


re 












253 














.01 


12 






900 


254 


Elk Lake-Gowganda 
Road 

Elk Lake-Matache- 

wan Road 

Goodfish Road . . 


15 

3.5 














6 

.25 

.7 

5.3 

15.65 

.5 

3.8 
9.7 

.11 


re 

20 

24 
re 
18 
to 
26 

18 

24 

22 


2574 

150 

302 

13200 

7553 

145 
24274 

100 

3432 

760 

3990 
3069 

7885 




2725 


2SS 


1 
3.25 


30 
66 


1 
3.25 


30 
66 


5.15 

3.25 
.15 
.28 
.06 

1.0 
.1 

1.75 
.5 

.8 
1.14 


16 
2,2, 
26 
15 
50 
26 
66 
2i 
26 

20 
40 








'>56 






.5 
cleane 
3.75 


497 


257 


Latchwood-Cochrane 
Road 


.5 
4.5 


1 

1.8 

.5 

1.7 


66 

66 
26 
66 


1 

.63 

.5 

.51 


66 

66 
26 
20 


.18 


10 


d 
3067 


''S8 


Marquis Township 
Roads 






.6 
.04 


12 
16 


.3 

5. 

3.9 

.25 

.25 
1.06 

1.0 

2.2 




259 


Milberta-Elk Lake 
Road 


260 
3330 


260 


Swastika-Kirkland 
Road, and exten- 
sion through Lebel 
Township ... 


2201 


''61 


Thunder Bay Dist. 
Arthur Street Road . . 


9.75 














4153 


OfST 


.75 

.2 

.60 


40 
66 
66 






.5 

.60 
1.06 

1.75 


26 

26 
12 

13 


3.5 

.50 

2.25 

1.75 
2.0 

.04 


20 

24 
24 

24 
24 

20 






963 
246 


'>63 


Cloud Bay Road . 












222 


''61 


Conmee Township . .. 

Current River Road . 
Dawson Road 

Dawson Road Lots 
Township 


2.7 

1.35 
.25 










922 


''65 














24 
930 


'>66 














2231.5 


267 


.02 


40 






.02 


26 






150 


1055 


268 


Dog Lake Road 














150 


260 


Dog River Road .... 
Dona-Finmark Road. 
Dorion Township 


.25 
























1.0 


600 


''70 


.5 


66 






.75 


26 


1.25 
2.0 

.75 

.125 
.5 
.50 
.16 

1.725 
2.0 

.50 


24 
24 
re 

24 
24 
re 
16 
.5 
24 
re 

re 






560 
3556 

50 
140 




971 


1.00 










1.65 


1511 


272 


1.-75 


40 


.125 


26 


.50 

.5 


26 
26 






120 


273 


Gillies Township . 








3.0 
1.0 


2826 


271 


Gillies-Lybster Bdy . . 
Gillies-Scobie Bdy. . . 

Gorham Township . . . 

Gorham-Mclntyre 
Boundary 


.50 
.09 

1.25 














1032 


oys 






















''76 


1.25 
.125 
2.00 


40 
50 
66 






2.625 
.20 


26 
24 






4708 
60 


2.675 


2127 


277 










214 



























1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



149 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— Continued. 
Year, Ending 31st October, 1923. 



Crushed Rock 


Drag- 
ging 

Miles 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 

Miles 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Remarks 






-a 

o 
o 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 


re 


6 


Description 




Yds. 
crush- 
ed 


Yds. 
haul- 
ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 










5 


15 


2 




8 


4 


Repaired. 


1343 c.yd. sand surfacing. 
86 c.yd. stone in swamps. 

General repairs. 

4022 c.yd. stone fill. 
85 c.yd. rock excav. 

1932 c.yd. cut and fill. 
4375 c.yd. filling. 
27 c.yd. rock excav. 
836 c.yd. rock excav. 
1192 c.yd. rock surfacing 

in swamps. 
6265 c.yd. filling. 


7S? 




480 




?S3 






12 


12 


4 

4 

7 
31 








18' span. 

16x46 

Repaired. 

16x18 

12x18 


?S4 








■'SS 












"^Sfi 








.75 


4.6 


8 


29 




20' span. 
Trestle, 12-16' 
bents. 


9S7 








?S8 








5 


4 


1 

12 

2 re 


paired 


44 

17 
8 


1 

1 
1 
2 

2 


16' span. 
44' span. 
74' long. 
30x20 

Repaired. 


8154 c.yd. filling. 


?'>Q 


1406 


2647 




?60 












?61 








68.75 


16.0 


11 

3 
5 

2 re 
10 

12 re 

3 
4 re 

2 

7 

17 

2 

1 

5 

4 re 

14 
3 








300 c.yd. cut and fill. 


?6? 










.50 
4.64 










?63 








2 


5 
paired 








62872 c.yd. cut and fill. 
300 c.yd. cut and fill. 


'?64 














?6S 












paired 

1 




2 


Repaired. 


?66 








12 


13 




?67 










3 


paired 










?68 


















•?6Q 




















250 c.yd. cut and fill. 
570 c.yd. cut and fill. 

75 c.yd. cut and fill. 
500 c.yd. cut and fill. 
100 c.yd. cut and fill. 


?70 










2.0 








30' span. 
30' span. 
45' span. 


971 










?7? 












4 








97^ 


















?74 








1 


4.375 
1.50 


paired 
3 








97S 












24' span. 


460 c.yd. cut and fill. 

75 c.yd. loose rock re- 
moved. 


?76 










?77 





















150 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENTS OF LANDS AND FORESTS 
Annual Report of Work Done. 







Side 
Brush- 
ing 


Cutting 


Burning 


Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 


Grading 


Cross 
Lay 


Ditch- 
ing 


Gravelling 




L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 

mis. 


W 

ft. 


L 
ft. 


L 

mis. 


Yards 
used 


278 


Thunder Bay Dist. 

— Continued. 
Gorham-McGregor 

Boundary 

























100 
678 
200 

1850 

300 

1188 
400 




144 


279 


Gorham-Ware Bdy . . 
Hillside-Strange Rd . . 


3.00 














3.125 
1.25 


re 
24 






240 


7H0 


1.00 


55 






1.00 


26 








281 


Hymers-South Gillies 
Road 












cleane 


d 77 


282 


International High- 
way 


4.31 

2.75 
.25 






















4599 


283 


Kakabeka-Hymers 
Road 






















1961/2 


?84 


Lybster Township . . . 
Lybster-Marks Bdy. . 


.25 
.25 
.30 


60 

55 
40 






.50 


26 


2.0 


20 








?8S 














?86 


Marks Road 

Marks Township .... 

Marks-O'Connor Rd., 
Cons. I and H .. . . 


.75 
1.875 










.75 
4.0 

2.75 
17. 


re 
re 

20 

24 






3920 






'?87 


1.25 


66 






.06 

.375 


24 
26 










288 












4.0 
2.81 

1 


3510 


289 
790 


Nipigon Highway. . . . 
Oliver Road ........ 


1.06 


14.25 

2.75 

.60 


40 
60 

35 






9.875 
3.01 


30 
26 






65952 

11616 
200 


2259 
. 1118 

1368.5 


791 


O'Cohnor Township. . 
O'Connor-Marks 
Boundary 


1.0 














2 


re 






931'/2 


292 


.50 

.5 


40 
66 






.125 

.5 


24 
26 








?9,S 


Old Scott Highway. . . 

Old Silver Mountain 

Road 


.5 

1.00 

.75 






2 
1 


24 
re 








2.125 


2375 


294 










200 
300 

1870 
620 

10463 
1200 
1930 

1095 

11868 

3000 

7880 




99S 


Paipoonge-Scobie 

Boundary 

Pardee Township . . 


i.50 

.375 

1.75 

.90 


33 

40 
66 
40 






.75 

.75 
.375 

.25 
2.10 
1.20 

.1 


24 
re 
26 
20 
26 
24 
26 


.10 


10 






'?96 






.375 

1.75 

2.70 

3.0 

.75 

.25 

2 

1.125 

.50 


20 
24 
20 
re 
20 
20 
re 
24 
20 






?97 


Pearson Townshipp. . 












.25 


149 


798 


Pearson- Pardee Road 
Schreiber Township . . 














799 
















.875 
2 

2.27 


700 


son 


Scobie Road 

Scoble Township .... 


1.25 


1.375 

.43 

4.75 
4.75 
.33 
1.0 
1.25 
1.705 


66 

30 

66 
30 
40 
66 
50 
40 






1.125 

.04 
.31 


30 

26 
24 






l723'/2 


SOI 










39 


so? 


Shebandowan Lake 
Road 


10.80 
2.50 










18 








1.45 

2.35 
1.125 


26 

26 
24 


1.0 
5.20 
1.475 
.30 


re 
24 
20 
18 








SOS 


Silver Mountain 
Road 


1842 












197 


S04 


Ware Township 


565.5 
















Totals 


322.30 


282.24 




222.75 




302.345 




785.63 
312.399 


re 


5.743 
grad- 
ing 




107750 

1562894 

new 


cleane 

404.25 
rep'rs 


d 






317684 
97579 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



151 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH— Continued. 
Year Ending 31st October, 1923 



Crushed Rock 


Drag- 
ging 


Gen- 
eral 
Rep'rs 


Culverts 


Bridges 


Remarks 






•v 
o 

1 


Stone 

or 
Cone. 




6 


Description 






Yds. 
haul- 
ed 






Yds. 
crush- 
ed 


L 
cov- 
ered 


Miles 


Miles 












2.00 
3.125 


4 

7 
12 












?78 














1 


20' span. 




?79 














510 c.yd. cut and fill. 


?80 








20 

1010 

11 


4.0 

47.8 
10 


5. 








?81 








s 


1 


Repaired. 


293 c.yd. gravel fill. 

550 c.yd. cut and fill. 
450 c.yd. cut and fill. 

200 c.yd. cut and fill. 
183 c.yd. cut and fill. 
700 c.yd. cut and fill. 
70 c.yd. fill. 


?8? 








"9 

5 


1 




?83 










1 

1 


12' span. 
16' span. 


?84 
















?8S 
















786 












13 

1 
135 

3 






1 
1 


14' 6" span. 
Repaired. 


"787 
















?88 








161.25 

1 


25.5 

18 
1 






1 
1 

1 
1 


16' span. 
108' trestle. 

22' reinforced 
concrete. 

100' span. 


21065 c.yd. cut and fill. 
450 c.yd. rock cut. 
455 c.yd. rock fill. 
1086 c.yd. gravel fill. 

115.5 c.yd. gravel fill. 
1100 c.yd. fill. 
1300 c.yd. cut and fill. 
2000 c.yd. cut and fill. 
200 c.yd. rock in cribs. 
50 c.yd. cut and fill. 
1250 c.yd. cut. 


?89 




6 




790 








791 








797 








6 


1.625 










793 








21 
3 

2 
23 

5 
6 
5 

4 

36 

37 

26 










794 






















79S 






















796 
















1 
1 


10' span. 
45' span. 


1802 c.yd. cut and fill. 
250 c.yd. fill. 

1264 c.yd. cut and fill. 
40 c.yd. rock fill. 
950 c.yd. cut and fill. 


797 
















798 








.625 












999 
















son 










.50 
1.5 






1 


14' span. 


SOI 










15 
8 




3545 c.yd. cut and fill. 

600 c.yd. cut and fill. 

50' Rip Rapping 3' 0" high 

675 c.yd. cut and fill. 


^0? 
















^o^ 








37.5 


12 

5. 




1 
1 
1 


24' span. 

16' span. 

8' span. 


^04 
















76790 


83139 


32.78 


8534.37 


870.845 


2169 


251 


754 


105 
37 


New. 
Repaired. 


• 





152 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 40 

NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH 
Section 1 (D) 
Farms 

Under this sub-section expenditures were made in connection with the 
purchase of two additional town lots in the town of New Liskeard, as additions 
to complete the demonstration farm there; and also in the payment of accounts 
incurred for the erection of additional farm buildings, fences, and other improve- 
ments upon the farm. The property is now being operated as a demonstration 
farm by the Department of Agriculture. 

The experimental farm at Hearst has also been maintained by that Depart- 
ment, and payments were made by the Northern Development Branch in 
respect of supplies for seeding land, fencing, and labour. 

The total expenditure on these accounts was $11,036.39. 

Fire Relief Committee Accounts 

The Northern Ontario Fire Relief Committee, constituted after the fire 
in Northern Ontario on October 4, 1922, found that the amount of the contribu- 
tions they had received from various sources was not sufficient to meet the 
requirements. Representations were made by the Relief Committee to the 
Government as a result of which it was decided that money be provided out of 
the Northern Development fund, under the provisions of Section 1 {d) of the 
Northern Development Act, to be used for the payment of accounts incurred 
by the Relief Committee, after being audited and passed by the Department 
as represented by the Northern Development Branch. The accounts cover 
materials, supplies, feed and other necessities of the settlers. Further provision 
was made for the payment of accounts incurred for similar objects in connection 
with the fire near Norembega, east of Cochrane, in 1923. The amount expended 
under these heads was $282,060.99, the accounts being rendered to the Fire 
Relief Committee, approved by them and forwarded to the Northern Develop- 
ment Branch, where they were audited prior to payment. 

In the emergency after the fire of 1922, a considerable quantity of army 
equipment was loaned by the Department of Militia and Defence for the imme- 
diate use of the fire sufferers. As living accommodation, equipment and other 
supplies became available for the fire sufferers, the articles so loaned by the 
Militia Department were returned. It was found, however, that a considerable 
quantity of the equipment had become unfit for military use and was not accept- 
able for return to stores and was, therefore, charged by the Militia Department 
against the Fire Relief Committee. The account amounted to $73,742.32; and 
provision was made to meet this charge out of the Northern Development fund. 

Payment was made of a portion of the account amounting to $15,748.28, 
the remainder being left over to be taken care of either by the replacement of 
the articles by repurchasing, or by cash remittance. 

Sawmills 

In order to provide the fire sufferers with sawn lumber from local supplies, 
two portable sawmills were provided by the Northern Development Branch, 
operated in the vicinity of New Liskeard. The cost of these mills, together 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 153 

with their operating expenses, amounted to $4,503.55. The work was under 
the immediate supervision of the local Crown Timber Agent. 

Section 1 (E) — Creamery 

The New Liskeard Creamery, which was operated by a manager under 
the Northern Development Branch, was taken over on the 27th of March last 
by the Department of Agriculture. Prior to that time the expenditures in 
connection with the operation of the institution amounted to $3,975.63, which 
was paid by the Branch out of the Northern Development fund. 

Section 2 (1) — Seed Grain 

In accordance with the practice adopted in 1915 and continued during 
succeeding years, seed grain was provided by the Northern Development Branch 
for distribution to those settlers and farmers in Northern and Northwestern 
Ontario who wished to take advantage of the opportunity of securing a sound 
quality of seed in return for lien notes secured upon the property of the purchaser. 
The total quantities of seed required showed a considerable reduction as compared 
with those of the previous year, owing to more favourable crop conditions 
prevailing in the season of 1922. Exclusive of the supplies for the Temiskaming 
fire area there was supplied 4,206 bushels of oats, 306 bushels wheat, and 468 
bushels barley. The seed was all purchased in Ontario; and wherever supplies 
of the requisite quality were available, preference was given to the purchase 
of local stocks. The distribution was made as formerly under the immediate 
superintendence of the District Representatives of the Department of Agriculture, 
or officers of the Northern Development Branch. 

The situation in the Temiskaming fire area in the district of Haileybury 
with reference to seed requirements was exceptional, and special measures were 
taken in consequence. The Fire Relief Committee, who had been active in 
supplying the needs of the fire sufferers in other respects, did not extend their 
operations to the supplying of seed and this work was, therefore, performed 
under the Northern Development Act. Whereas in other districts throughout 
the North seed was limited to oats, wheat and barley, the requirements in the 
fire area necessitated the supply, in addition, of red clover, 12,554 pounds; 
alsike, 7,660 pounds; timothy, 46,690 pounds; mixed seed, 4,400 pounds; peas, 
1,454 bushels. This was required to reseed cleared land that had already 
been seeded but burned over, and in addition, to seed down additional land 
cleared by the fire. Oats were supplied to the amount of 10,914 bushels; wheat, 
1,200 bushels and barley, 1,522 bushels. The terms granted to the fire sufferers 
were somewhat more liberal than those usually applied, the lien notes instead 
of becoming due on the 1st of December, 1923, were extended to the 1st of 
March, 1924. The mixed grass seed purchased for this area was obtained in 
Northwestern Ontario. The whole of the local arrangements for the purchase 
and distribution to the fire sufferers were carried out by the district Agricultural 
Representatives who received also the co-operation of the Superintendent of the 
Demonstration Farm at New Liskeard. 

The total expenditure incurred in the purchase and distribution of the seed 
amounted to $35,698.75. 

Section 2 (1) — Agricultural Implements for Fire Sufferers 

One of the consequences of the fire in the vicinity of Haileybury on October 
4th, 1922, was that many of the farmers lost the whole of their agricultural 
implements along with their other property. 



154 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

The question of replacing the implements was discussed by the Honourable 
the Minister with the Ontario Fire Relief Committee, and on the 7th of March, 

1923, it was decided that those who had lost farm implements in the fire should 
make application to the Fire Relief Committee to replace their loss. The 
Committee was then to pass upon the applications and transmit those approved 
to the Northern Development Branch. The Branch would then order the imple- 
ments to be supplied. The terms ultimately decided upon for the sale of these 
implements to the fire sufiferers were that the cost price of the articles was 
divided into three equal amounts, for. which promissory notes were signed by 
the purchaser. These notes were made payable respectively on the 1st of October, 

1924, 1925 and 1926 with interest at the rate of 6 per cent, per annum from the 
1st of October, 1923, and under the authority of Section 2 (1) of the Northern 
Development Act, 1918, a lien was placed against the land of the purchaser. 

The implements to be supplied included seed drills, plows, disc harrows, 
scufBers, smoothing harrows, mowers, hay rakes, binders and wagons. Negotia- 
tions were entered into with the principal manufacturers of these implements 
in Ontario, with the result that satisfactory arrangements were made for the 
prompt shipment of the various implements on favourable terms. 

In all, some sixty varieties of the various types of implements were asked 
for by the fire sufTerers, and as the applications were received and the promissory 
notes prepared and signed the shipments were promptly made by the various 
companies. Very valuable co-operation and assistance was rendered by the 
officials of the T. & N. O. in the handling of the distribution. 

The total number of implements ordered was 655, purchased from nine firms. 
Two hundred and eighteen farmers took advantage of this arrangement as 
follows: 

No. of 
Township Purchasers Amount 

Armstrong 14 $3,070 56 

Beauchamp 5 1,532 00 

Brethour 12 3,090 31 

Bryce 3 647 63 

Bucke 19 3,360 05 

Cane 3 379 79 

Casey 21 • 7,044 16 

Dack 24 4,600 15 

Dymond 3 660 21 

Evanturel 15 2,514 98 

Firstbrook 1 94 18 

Harley 21 3,532 29 

Harris 4 734 06 

Henwood 9 1,934 24 

Hilliard 40 8,041 05 

Hudson 2 964 65 

Ingram 3 393 60 

Kerns 7 848 19 

Lorrain 2 295 35 

Robillard 6 1,676 99 

Savard 2 34122 

Sharpe 1 161 63 

Tudhope 1 35 47 

218 $45,952 76 

The cost of implements purchased was $46,771.37; the total amount of the 
promissory notes given in exchange was $45,952.76, and in addition $738.89 
was received in cash, making a total sum realized of $46,691.65. One of the 
chief difficulties encountered in this work was the limited time available from 
the date when the decision was made to provide the implements, and the time 
when the articles were required for seeding; but by giving preference in shipping 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



155 



to the implements most urgently required, the necessities of the case were met. 
The provision of these implements proved to be a very valuable help to the 
farmers of the fire stricken area. 

Section 2 (4) — Schools 

Under this subsection expenditures were made out of the Northern Develop- 
ment fund in connection with the completion of the alterations and extension 
of the former Stock Judging Pavilion at New Liskeard, situated on the lands of 
the Demonstration Farm, for the purpose of a Continuation School. This work 
was commenced in the previous financial year. 

The expenditure for the year ending 31st October, 1923, amounted to 
$32,137.77. 




Road-making in Peterborough County, 



156 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE 

For the Twelve Years Ended 31st October, 1923 
Northern and Northwestern Ontario Development Fund 



Section 



Summary of 
Expenditure 

23rd May 
1912, to 31st 

Oct., 1922 



Expenditure 

for year 

ended 31st 

October, 

1923 



Total 

Expenditure 

to 31st 

October, 

1923 



Section 1 
Section 1 
Section 1 
Section 1 
Section 1 
Section 1 
Section 1 
Section 2 
Section 2 
Section 2 
Section 2 
Section 2 



Returned 



(a) Works and Improvements. . . . 

(b) Roads 

(d) Farms 

(d) Assistance of Settlers, Feed . . . 
(d) Assistance of Settlers, Fire Relief 

(d) Assistance of Settlers, Sawmills.. 

(e) Creamery and Grain Elevators . . 
(1) Seed Grain 

(1) Agricultural Implements 

(2) Cattle Purchase Account 

(4) Schools and other Public Bldgs. . 

(6) Fire Protection 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Land Settle- 



$2,100 00 

9,972,725 31 

110,246 53 

117,898 07 



57,150 53 
227,787 47 



ment Act, 1917. 



21,617 99 

17,353 85 

3,773 45 

1,181,082 51 



,739,863 58 

11,036 39 

6,254 51 

282,060 99 

4,503 55 

3,975 63 

35,698 75 

46,771 37 



32,137 77 



2,832 28 



$2,100 00 

12,712,588 89 

121,282 92 

124,152 5^ 

282,060 99 

4,503 55 

61,126 16 

263,486 22 

46,771 37 

21,617 99 

49,491 62 

3,773 45 

1,183,914 79 



Settlers' Loan Account Amending Act, 1916. . . 



[1,711,735 71 
913,534 93 



5,165,134 82 
167.308 92 



$14,876,870 53 
1,080,843 85 



$12,625,270 64 



$3,332,443 74 



$15,957,714 38 



STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 

Under Northern and Northwestern Ontario Development Acts, 1912 and 1915, and 

Amendments 

For the Year Ended 31st October, 1923 

Expenditure, year 

Districts and Sections " ended 31st October, 1923 
Roads: 

1. Kenora $105,873 55 

2. Dryden 124,967 16 

3. Port Arthur ' 104,639 20 

4. Fort William 127,186 46 

5. Rainy River 121,038 77 

6. Sault Ste. Marie (including Soo-Sudbury Trunk Road) 219,711 86 

7. St. Joseph's Island (and Pine Island) 16,702 75 

8. Sudbury 129,133 89 

9. Manitoulin Island (and Espanola Road) 162,489 12 

10. Nipissing 158,433 75 

11. Parry Sound 171,355 08 

12. Muskoka 203,351 30 

13. Renfrew 35,047 61 

14. Temiskaming and Cochrane 1,027,032 05 

15. General Administration 32,901 03 

$2,739,863 58 

16. Farms 1 1,036 39 

17. Assistance of Settlers — Feed Shortage 6,254 51 

18. " " Fire Relief 282,060 99 

19. " " Sawmills 4,503 55 

20. Creamery 3,975 63 

21. Seed Grain 35,698 75 

22. Agricultural Implements 46,771 37 

23. Schools and other Public Buildings 32,137 77 

24. Returned Soldiers' and Sailors' Settlement Account 2,832 28 

25. Settlers' Loan Account 167,308 92 



$3,332,443 74 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 157 

NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH 

Statement of Expenditure, Year Ended 31st October, 1923 

Making of Roads, Section i (b) : 

Bruce, A. E. D., Secretary and Accountant, salary $3,450 00 

Sinton, James, Road Engineer, salary 2,700 00 

Beardall, F. G., Principal Clerk, salary 2,300 00 

Lawer, W. L., Senior Account Clerk, salary 2,100 00 

Reid, A., Map Draughtsman, salary 1,800 00 

Dicker, C. L., Clerk, salary 1,500 00 

Fleming, Miss E., Clerk, salary 1,300 00 

Carefoot, Miss O., Clerk-Stenographer, salary, 7% months. 712 51 



Wages $1,737,060 82 

Contracts. 181,675 11 

Supplies, Equipment and Services 805,265 14 



Advancement of Settlement and Colonization, Section i {d): 

Wages $1,446 98 

Purchase of Land 125 00 

Supplies, Stock, Fencing and Equipment . 9,464 41 



$15,862 51 

2,724,001 07 
$2,739,863 58 

11,036 39 



Assistance of Settlers — Feed Shortage, Section i (d): 

Feed, Freight, Services and Disbursements 6,254 51 

A ssistance of Settlers — Fire Relief, Section i (d) : 

Material, Provisions, Supplies, Freight, Services and Disbursements 282,060 99 

Assistance of Settlers — Sawmills, Section i (d): 

Wages $2,234 05 

Cost of Mills and Supplies 2,269 50 



Creamery, New Liskeard, Section i (e): 

Wages $1,662 09 

Supplies, Equipment, Freight and Expenses 2,313 54 



4,503 55 



3,975 63 



Seed Grain, Section 2 (/).• 

Seed, Freight, Services and Disbursements 35,698 75 

Agricultural Implements, Section 2 (/).• 

Cost of Implements, Freight and Disbursements 46,771 37 

Schools and other Public Buildings, Section 2 {4): 

Continuation School, New Liskeard, Contracts for erection, 

heating, etc $24,765 94 

Material and Supplies 7,371 83 

32,137 77 

Returned Soldiers' and Sailors' Land Settlement Act, 1917: 

Services, Rentals and Disbursements 2,832 28 



Settlers' Loan Account Amending Act, 1916: 

Dane, F., Commissioner, salary $5,000 00 

Kennedy, W. K. P., Accountant, salary 2,700 00 

Crawford, G., Stenographer 1,050 00 

Jack, F. M., Stenographer 832 00 



$3,165,134 82 



Net amount of loans issued $156,410 00 

Expenses ' 1,316 92 



$9,582 00 
157,726 92 



167,308 92 
$3,332,443 74 



158 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH 

Statement of Revenue for the Year Ended 31st October, 1923 

Section i (b), Roads: 

Sale of Supplies, Camp Buildings and Equipment; Refunds 



Section i (d), Assistance of Settlers: 

Cash Sales of Feed and Notes retired . 

Section 2 (i), Seed Grain: 

Cash Sales and Notes retired 



Section 2 (/), Agricultural Implements: 
Cash Sales and Notes retired . . . . 



Section 2 (2), Purchase of Cattle Account: 
Payment on account of Note 



Clause 5 {1-12), Soldiers' Settlement Account: 
Note retired (Kapuskasing Colony).. . . 
Sale of Buildings (Shackleton Colony) . 



Settlers' Loan Account: 

Payments on account of loans. 



$2,649 29 

24,052 69 

20,131 43 

1,288 10 

15 00 

19,859 11 



Total Revenue under all heads, 1923 account. 



$67,995 62 

110,956 37 

$178,951 99 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH 



Assets, 31st October, 1923 

Cash Balances unexpended : Roads, Farms, Fire Relief, etc 

Soldiers' Settlement 



Settlers' Loan Account , 

Seed Grain, Notes outstanding 

Assistance of Settlers, Notes outstanding 

Implements, Notes outstanding 

Cattle Purchase, Notes outstanding 

Soldiers' Settlement, Notes outstanding 

Settlers' Loans outstanding 



$135,362 49 
14,713 43 



Contingent Assets 
Roads — Buildings, Plant, Equipment, Machinery, Motors, Tractors, etc. 



$150,075 92 

11,590 00 

94,291 58 

62,152 12 

45,405 47 

3,307 16 

32,215 10 

694,150 28 

$1,093,187 63 



$218,202 91 
$1,311,490 54 



RECORD OF CORRESPONDENCE 



Letters received 

Letters mailed 

Circulars mailed (Seed Grain) 



Expenditure on Postage , 
November 15th, 1923. 



13,449 
1,620 



11,386 



15,069 
$906 10 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 159 



Appendix No. 41 

46 Richmond Street West, Toronto, 
19th December, 1923. 

To the Honourable the Minister of Lands and Forests. 

Dear Sir, — It affords me pleasure to present herewith a report of the 
business of this department to the end of October, 1923. 

The Department continues to give careful consideration to each application 
and advances money on the basis of the valuation of the a.ctual improvements 
that have been made to the land. 

It is a pleasure to be able to refer to the manner in which interest payments 
have been made, which from the accompanying statement you will observe is 
90.32 per cent, of interest due. 

The Department frequently receives advice that the loans of this depart- 
ment have been a great help to the development of the property on which the 
loans have been granted, and the object seems to be that the settler is desirous 
of getting sufficient land developed to enable him to carry stock. 

With reference to the loan granted to the Kenora Dairy Company, you 
will observe from the report that this company failed, and the Department 
anticipates that there will be at least a loss of 50 per cent, in connection with 
this loan. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. F. Dane, 

Settlers' Loan Commissioner . 

Memorandum of Loans to Settlers to October 31st, 1923 
A pplications 

Total number of applications received 4,485 

Total amount applied for $1,765,230 00 

Average per application ' 393 58 

Amount applied for under approved applications 1,212,745 00 

Loans 
Number of loans issued 2,960 

Equal to 65% of applications. 
Amount granted $973,110 00 

Equal to 55% of total amount applied for and equal to 80% of total 

amount applied for under approved applications. 

Average loan $328 75 

Total acreage covered by liens 450,492 

Acreage improved land 67,765 

Equal to 15% of total acreage. 

Average loan per care on total acreage $2 16 

Average loan per acre on acreage improved land 14 36 

Memorandum of Loans to Creameries and Other like Associations to October 31st, 1923 

Applications and Loans 

The S.udbury Co-Operative Creamery Co., Ltd $24,000 00 

The Kenora Dairy Co-operative Association, Ltd 13,000 00 

Producers' Co-operative Creamery Co., Ltd., Lavallee, District of Rainy River. . . 3,500 00 

Total $40,500 00 

Note. — The Sudbury Co-operative Creamery Company and the Producers 
Co-operative Creamery Company of Lavallee are in active operation 
and have promptly paid the amounts failing due on their loans. The 
Kenora Dairy Co-operative Association failed to operate successfully 
and went into liquidation on March 8th, 1922, having failed to pay 
any portion of their loan or interest. 



160 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



The land was deeded to the Crown on December 30th, 1922, and registered in 
Land Titles Office at Kenora on January 2nd, 1923, as No. 5882: 
also Bill of Sale covering chattels on January 3rd, 1923, as No. 919, 
by the Clerk of the District Court at Kenora. 

The standing of the account is as follows: — 

Principal ; $13,000 00 

Interest as at June 1st, 1923 1,818 35 

Total $14,818 35 

The Department sold a quantity of cans to the Sudbury Creamery Com- 
pany for which $225.00 was received, leaving balance of amount out- 
standing to be $14,593.35. 



Repayments 
On A ccount of Interest 



Accrued Interest 
Due 



Interest Received 



Per Cent. 



Loans to settlers 

Loans to creameries, etc . 



$153,946 90 
5,188 59 



$139,045 34 
3,595 24 



90.32 
69.29 





On Account 


of Principal 








Payments on 
Principal Due 


Payments on 
Principal 
Received 


Per cent. 


Loans to settlers 


$374,268 83 
233 34 


$325,721 29 
10,233 34 


87 02 


Loans to creameries, etc 









Details of Loans Issued and Outstanding 





Total 








Payments Due 


Payments 
Received 


Per cent. 


Loans to settlers 


$528,215 73 
5,421 93 


$464,766 63 

13,828 58 


87 98 


Loans to creameries, etc 










Totals 




$533,637 66 


$478,595 21 


89.68 



District 



Issued 



No. of 
Loans 



Amount 



Outstanding 



No. of 
Loans 



Unpaid 

Principal and 

Accrued 

Interest 



Algoma 

Kenora 

Manitoulin . . 
Nipissing .... 
Rainy River. 

Sudbury 

Temiskaming 
Thunder Bay 

Totals 



96 
301 

13 
167 
228 
175 
1,288 
695 



$32,260 00 

111,220 00 

5,250 00 

59,495 00 

75,275 00 

89,060 00 

413,020 00 

228,030 00 



83 
239 

12 
150 
175 
158 
951 
583 



$27,540 75 

82,756 08 

4,645 00 

45,747 44 

45,134 97 

69,210 70 

266,370 91 

152,735 43 



2,963 



$1,013,610 00 



2,351 



$694,150 28 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 161 

Appendix No. 42 
Report of the Forestry Branch, 1923 

Sir, — The report of the work of this Branch for the year ending October 
31st, 1923, is given under the sections of Forest Fire Protection, Forest Investiga- 
tions, Reforestation and Forest Pathology. 

I. — Forest Fire Protection 

(1) Legislation 

The "Permit Area," as designated in an Order-in-Council dated the 18th 
day of May, 1917, was by an Order-in-Council dated the 1st day of June, 1923, 
extended to cover the entire Province within the Fire Districts. The benefits 
derived from this extension were, for the balance of the season, immeasurable. 

Forest protection requires the unstinted support of the general public. 
The individual in the woods does not accept sufficient responsibility as a citizen. 
The result is, in many instances, gross carelessness and indifference in causing 
fires, and flat refusal to assist in fighting them. 

The exceptionally dry periods experienced this past season, and the resultant 
serious fire situation, emphasized more strongly than ever the need for jail 
sentences as an alternative to a fine for certain infringements of the Act. 

The failure on the part of the general public to give co-operation towards 
the suppression of a forest fire, not only makes compulsory fire-fighting extremely 
advisable, but points to a crying need for legislation placing the onus of proof 
for responsibility of a fire on the person occupying the land on which the'fiie 
occurs. ' 

The appointment of certain superior field officers as justices of the pea'ie 
for the purpose of taking cognizance of offences against the provisions of the 
Act or the Regulations is also desirable. 

(2) Organization and Personnel 

The Western Inspectorate, comprising the districts of Kenora, Rainy River, 
and Thunder Bay as far east as White River on the Canadian Pacific Railway, 
and Tashota and Caramat on the Canadian National Railways, was under the 
supervision of one Forest Supervisor, with headquarters at Port Arthur. This 
Inspectorate was divided into seven Chief Ranger Districts, namely Kenora, 
with headquarters at Kenora; C.G.R. Western, which consisted of a supervisory 
patrol over the Canadian National Railways from Fort William to Ophir, 
headquarters at Sioux Lookout; C.G.R. Central, headquarters at Armstrong; 
Rainy River, headquarters at Fort Frances; Thunder Bay, headquarters at 
Port Arthur; Nipigon, headquarters at Macdiarmid; and Longlac, headquarters 
at Longlac. 

The Cochrane Inspectorate, comprising the territory along the northern 
line of the Canadian National Railways from the Quebec boundary west to the 
eastern boundary of Nipigon Reserve and extending north to the Albany River 
and James Bay, was supervised by one Fire Inspector with headquarters at 
Cochrane. This area was divided into eight Chief Ranger Districts as follows: 
C.G.R. Eastern, headquarters at Grant; Hearst, headquarters at Hearst; Kapus- 
kasing, headquarters at Kapuskasing; Cochrane, headquarters at Cochrane; 
Abitibi, headquarters at Lowbush; Matheson, headquarters at Matheson; 
Timmins, headquarters at Timmins; New Liskeard, headquarters at New 
Liskeard. 

6 L.F. 



162 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

The old Sudbury Inspectorate, which included the territory adjacent to 
the Canadian Pacific Railway from Mattawa and Bigwood to Sault Ste. Marie 
and White River; the southern line of the Canadian National Railways from 
North Bay and Pickerel River to Jellicoe; the Algoma Central and Hudson Bay 
Railway from Sault Ste. Marie to Oba, and the Temiskaming and Northern 
Ontario Railway from North Bay to Elk Lake, was divided into the Soo and 
Sudbury Inspectorates, with the territory along the Canadian National Rail- 
ways from Caramat to Jellicoe being added to the Western Inspectorate. 

The Soo Inspectorate, which extended from Cutler to Sault Ste. Marie, and 
from Chapleau to White River on the Canadian Pacific Railway; from Dun- 
rankin to Caramat on the southern line of the Canadian National Railways; 
and from Sault Ste. Marie to Oba on the Algoma Central and Hudson Bay 
Railway, was under the direct charge of a District Forester, with headquarters 
at Sault Ste. Marie, who was assisted by one Forestry Assistant and one Fire 
Inspector. The six Chief Ranger Districts were Hornepayne, with headquarters 
at Hornepayne; Oba, headquarters at Oba; Franz, headquarters at Franz; 
A.C.R., headquarters at Sand Lake; Mississagi South, headquarters at Kendio- 
gami Lake; Blind River, headquarters at Blind River. 

The Sudbury Inspectorate extended from Mattawa and Bigwood to Cutler 
and Chapleau on the Canadian Pacific Railway; from North Bay and Pickerel 
River to Dunrankin on the southern line of the Canadian National Railways; 
from North Bay to Elk Lake on the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Rail- 
way; and from Sudbury to Little Current on the Algoma Eastern Railway. A 
District Forester with headquarters at Sudbury was in direct charge of the area, 
and was assisted by one Forestry Assistant and one Fire Inspector. Another 
Forester was placed in charge of each of the Sudbury and North Bay Chief 
Ranger Districts, with headquarters at Sudbury and North Bay respectively, 
each being directly responsible to the Forester in charge of the Inspectorate. 
There were ten Chief Ranger Districts; Foleyet West, headquarters at Elsas; 
Foleyet East, headquarters at Gogama; Mississagi West, headquarters at 
Chapleau; Mississagi East, headquarters at Biscotasing; Timagami West, 
headquarters at Mattagami Post; Timagami East, headquarters at Timagami; 
Webbwood, headquarters at Webbwood; Sudbury, headquarters at Sudbury; 
North Bay, headquarters at North Bay. 

The organization in the territory south of Lake Nipissing and within the 
Fire District, was the same as in 1922, there being three Inspectorates — Georgian 
•Bay, Algonquin, and Trent, each in charge of a District Forester, assisted by a 
Forestry Assistant. 

The Georgian Bay Inspectorate, with headquarters at Parry Sound, com- 
prised the area along the Canadian Pacific Railway from Lovering to Bigwood, 
and along the Canadian National Railways from Rathburn to Pickerel River, 
Rama to North Bay, and Depot Harbour to Ravensworth. This area was 
divided into two Chief Ranger Districts, Georgian Bay West with headquarters 
at Parry Sound, and Georgian Bay East with headquarters at Powassan. 

The Algonquin Inspectorate, with headquarters at Pembroke, included the 
territory from Pembroke to Mattawa on the Canadian Pacific Railway, and 
from Pembroke to North Bay and Douglas to Ravensworth on the Canadian 
National Railways. There were two Chief Ranger Districts, Algonquin North 
with headquarters at Pembroke, and Algonquin South with headquarters at 
Brule Lake. 

The Trent Inspectorate consisted of the balance of the Fire District, the 
area extending from Kinmount and Bannockburn to Wallace on the Canadian 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



163 



NuMBEiR Or Men On ~rEMPOR/RRy Sr^rr At Different Periods. 



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'ATES. 



National Railways, and from Addington to Maberly, and Oconto to Ashdod on 
the Canadian Pacific Railway. There was one Chief Ranger District, Trent, 
with headquarters at Dacre. 

The total field supervisory staff for the seven Inspectorates, which were 
divided into thirty-six Chief Ranger Districts, consisted of twelve Foresters, 
one Forester Supervisor, three Fire Inspectors, thirty-six Chief Rangers, and 
eighty-three Deputy Chief Rangers. This allowed direct supervision of one 
Chief or Deputy Chief Ranger to every ten rangers. 

The average daily force, including the Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers, 
was as follows: April, 24; May, 692; June, 1,160; July, 1,251; August, 1,218; 
September, 797; October, 133. The largest number of men on duty at any one 
time, including 119 Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers, was 1,267. 

Including the Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers there were 205 men on duty 
on the first day of May. By the 15th of the month the number had increased 
to 699, and by the first of June to 1,104. On the 15th of June the total number 
was 1,166; on the first of July, 1,198; on the 15th of July, 1,257; on the first 
of August, 1,220; on the 15th of August, 1,223. In some of the outlying dis- 



164 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

tricts it was possible to discontinue some patrols the last of August which reduced 
the number on duty the first of September to 1,115. Men were taken off duty 
from then on as conditions permitted, the total number on duty on September 
15th being 968, and on the 1st of October, 291. A short period of dry weather 
the first few days of October necessitated the continuance of some patrols longer 
than usual, keeping the total number on the pay roll up to 111 on the 15th of 
the month. Men kept on duty after that date were largely engaged on improve- 
ments or repairing equipment. 

The need of a permanent skeleton staff composed of the Chief and Deputy 
Chief Rangers has become more apparent each season. The number of rangers 
in a Chief Ranger District varied this past season from fourteen to fifty-eight. 
Both Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers should be on duty earlier in the spring 
than is now possible in order that they may arrange their organization of, on the 
average, thirty rangers before the early fire season. They should also be on 
duty longer in the fall to overhaul equipment and work on permanent improve- 
ments. 

To successfully fill the position of a Chief Ranger, or of a Deputy Chief 
Ranger, for so far as possible only men who may eventually become Chief 
Rangers are appointed to the positions of Deputies, a man should be an experi- 
enced woodsman, have organizing and executive ability, be able to handle men, 
be able to deal with the public, be energetic, and above all, be loyal to the 
organization of which he is a part. Men having these requirements, and who 
seek the positions, are not plentiful. If a permanent system of appointment 
could be adopted the efficiency of the organization would be greatly increased 
at a small additional increase in the total pay roll, which without doubt would be 
more than offset by the reduction in the extra fire-fighting costs. There is 
sufificient work to keep a skeleton staff composed of these men employed through- 
out the winter months, and in addition, it would afford an opportunity for 
organizing some system of instruction of these men. 

(3) Expenditure. 
The expenditure for the fiscal year was $1,062, 956.24, classified as below, 
with the figures for -the preceding years given for comparison. Against this 
expenditure, protection accounts for the year totalled $196,888.44. 

(4) Fires 

There was little precipitation in the late summer and fall of 1922, resulting 
in a small amount of moisture in the ground when cold weather set in. The 
snowfall during the following winter was heavier than usual, but when the 
break-up came towards the end of May the exceptionally warm weather and 
prevalent strong winds carried off the snow so quickly that little of it was 
absorbed by the deeply frozen ground. The surface of the ground and the 
covering litter rapidly dried out, and instances occurred of fires starting in areas 
which three days previous had been covered with snow. 

The last week of May and the first week of June was the worst fire period 
of the season, fires being reported from all parts of the Province. The peak was 
reached on the 1st of June when there were over 900 extra fire-fighters on duty, 
in addition to the regular staff of 1,104 on that date. Scattered light showers 
occurred on the 2nd of June and intermittently from then until the middle 
of the month when the number of extra men had been reduced to slightly over 
400. A second seriously dry period then set in and on the 21st the 
number of extra fire-fighters had increased to 800. This period was followed 
by heavy showers and conditions were normal until the middle of July, when 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



165 



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166 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



the third outbreak occurred, which was less serious than either of the previous 
two, the number of extra men employed reaching a total of 450. By the 1st 
of August normal conditions again prevailed. Another outbreak occurred the 
second week in August, but was not general throughout the Province as were 
the others. The last critical period was in October and was confined mostly to 
the southern districts. 





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1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



167 



The fire season as a whole was decidedly abnormal as to weather, not only 
in Ontario, but throughout all of Eastern Canada. It was quite beyond any- 
thing experienced in Ontario over a long period of time and as a result the total 
forest area burned over much exceeded the average. 

CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 
By Month 



Month 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 




No. 


No. 


No. 


■ No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


April 

May 

June 

July 


10 
462 
374 
283 
154 
22 
38 


35 
280 
194 

77 
212 
121 
102 


5 
296 
290 
475 
97 
105 
1 










1* 422 
309 
142 
300 

2* 114 


362 
414 
613 
377 
14 


294 
273 
124 
268 
6 


449 
320 
158 


August 

September 


117 
66 












Totals 


1,343 


1,021 


1,269 


1,287 


1,780 


965 


1,110 







1* April and May. 

2* September and October. 



CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 
By Origin 



Origin 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 




No. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Settlers 


170 

167 

249 

74 

58 

76 

549 


12.7 

12.4 

18.5 

5.5 

4.3 

5.7 

40.9 


16.1 

11.9 

16.3 

5.1 

4.1 

.8 

45.7 


9.6 

8.8 

14.8 

11.0 

5.0 

1.1 

49.7 


11.0 

11.7 

23.9 

1.1 

4.6 

7.2 

40.5 


7.7 
9.2 

37.0 
3.0 
2.5 
4.3 

36.3 


8.1 
9.7 

46.5 
3.8 
4.1 
4.6 

23.2 


8.2 


Campers 


13.9 


Railways 

Lightning 

Logging operations. 

Miscellaneous 

Unknown 


49.5 
2.9 

4.1 

3.6 

17.8 






Totals 


1,343 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 
By Size 



Size 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 




No. 


Per 

cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Quarter acre and under 


203 
351 
111 
267 
192 


15.1 
26.1 
8.4 
19.8 
14.3 


23.7 
29.1 
6.3 
19.2 
12.6 


20.8 
24.0 
6.8 
20.4 
13.3 


23.2 
29.4 
8.1 
17.1 
12.0 


30.5 
27.7 

6.1 
16.5 

8.7 


40.5 

33.7 

6.0 

13.6 

5.1 

1.1 


36.3 


Over quarter to 5 acres 


19.5 


Over 5 to 10 acres 


4.8 


Over 10 to 100 acres 


9.5 


Over 100 to 500 acres 


4.7 


Over 500 acres 


25.2 


Over 500 to 1 ,000 acres 


68 

113 

38 


5.0 
8.4 
2.9 


3.6 

4.9 

.6 


5.5 
8.1 
1.1 


5.0 

4.9 

.3 


3.3 
5.9 
1.3 




Over 1,000 to 10,000 acres 






Over 10,000 acres : . . . . 














1,343 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



168 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Settlers were responsible for 170 fires, or 12.7 per cent, of the total. Of 
this number 26 were permit fires which got beyond control. It is worthy of 
note that the number of fires caused by settlers did not increase in proportion 
to the increase in the total number of fires, due in no small degree to the applica- 
tion of the Permit Regulations to include that portion of Northern Ontario 
formerly exempt. 

During the season twenty-two convictions were secured for setting out 
fires contrary to the Regulations. The majority of these occurred after the 
extension of the Permit Area. 

Campers, by which is meant berry-pickers, picnickers, tourists, trappers, 
Indians and prospectors, were charged with 167 fires, or 12.4 per cent of the 
total. It was not possible to definitely place the responsibility for any one of 
these fires. The adoption of the Travel Permit for certain districts, at least 
during hazardous periods, may be necessary to secure greater caution on the 
part of people in the woods. 

Railways are known to have caused 249 fires, or 18.5 per cent, of the total. 
In part these can be attributed to "hang-overs" from early spring burning in 
cleaning up the rights-of-way, the fires burning deep into the dry ground and 
breaking out again days after all indications of fire had disappeared on the 
surface. In some cases fires were definitely traced to locomotives which, on 
immediate inspection, failed to show any defects in the fire protective appliances. 

The fires of railway origin were distributed as follows: 

AVERAGE NUMBER OF RAILWAY FIRES PER HUNDRED MILES OF LINE 
THROUGH FOREST SECTIONS 



Railway 



1923 



1922 



1921 



Canadian National Railways (exclusive of northern line) 

Canadian Pacific Railway 

Canadian National Railways (northern transcontinental line only) 

Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway 

Algoma Eastern Railway 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 



6.2 
5.3 
2.0 
7.3 
1.1 
3.0 



•■3.2 
2.7 
2.4 
7.3 
4.5 
4.2 



*3.7 
3.9 
1.8 
6.3 
5.9 
0.6 



4.9 



3.3 



3.7 



♦Former C.N.R. and G.T.R. figures combined. 



Railway 


Per cent, of Total Number of 
Railway Fires 




1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


Canadian National Railways (exclusive of northern 
line). 

Canadian Pacific Railway 

Canadian National Railways (northern transcon- 
tinental line only) 

Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway 

Algoma Eastern Railway 


45.9 

32.5 

7.6 

9.6 

.4 

4.0 


*36.1 
25.3 

13.3 

14.5 

2.4 

8.4 


*47.9 
29.8 

7.9 

10.6 

2.8 

1.0 


♦36.4 
27.9 

16.4 
9.9 
5.0 
4.4 


♦28.1 
26.3 

25.9 

17.9 

0.3 

1.5 


♦38.8 
24.9 

21.8 

10.5 

2.9 


Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 


1.1 




100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



♦Former C.N.R. and G.T.R. figures combined. 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



169 



Lightning is known to have caused 74 fires, or 5.5 per cent, of the total 
number. Of this number 16 were in the Sudbury Inspectorate, and. 32 in the 
Algonquin Inspectorate. 

Logging operations were responsible for 58 fires, or 4.3 per cent, of the 
total. Seventy-six fires, or 5.7 per cent, of the total were due to miscellaneous 
known causes. 

A total of 549 fires, or 40.9 per cent, were classed as unknown. In many 
cases the cause was fairly definitely set, but proof could not be obtained. 

A total of 1,343 fires were reported with an area burned of 2,120,148 acres. 
Of this total, 554 fires, or 41.2 per cent., were confined to areas of 5 acres or less; 
one-half the fires were kept within 10 acres in size, and 69.4 per cent, of the 
total within areas of 100 acres or less. 



CLASSIFICATION OF BURNED-OVER AREA 



Forest Conditions 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


Acres 


Per 

cent. 


Per 

cent. 


Per 

cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 

cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Timber land 

Cut-over land (some timber left) 
Young growth (below six inches) . 
Barren and grass land 


593,569 
312,184 
775,012 
439,383 


28.0 
14.7 
36.6 
20.7 


13.4 
20.2 
25.2 
41.2 


13.2 
25.2 
20.2 
41.1 


14.7 
38.8 
26.7 
19.8 


26.8 
27.3 
25.3 
20.6 


15.8 
37.0 
23.5 
23.7 


19.1 
39.2 
19.5 
22.2 






^ 


2,120,148 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



The area of timber land burned over was 593,569 acres, or 28.0 per cent, 
of the total area burned, as is shown in the above table. This percentage is 
attributable to the increased percentage of large fires completely getting beyond 
control. 

Cut-over land formed 14.7 per cent, of the total area burned, and land 
upon which young growth existed 36.6 per cent., or a combined area of 1,087,196 
acres. While the amount of timber land burned over is serious, the area com- 
prised in the former two classes is equally a serious matter as it is from such 
classes of land that our future timber crop will be secured, and every fire on 
such areas not only means a longer lapse of time before lumbering operations 
may be carried on, but in many cases a deterioration in the species of trees on 
the areas. 

The area of barren and grass land burned over totalled 439,383 acres, or 
20.7 per cent, of the total. Much of the barren land, which formed the greater 
part of this area, at one time was covered by merchantable timber. Repeated 
fires have, however, reduced the bulk of it to little better than a rock desert upon 
which merchantable timber will not again be available for very long periods 
of time. 



170 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



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1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



171 



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172 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



(5)" Permits 

A total of 5,907 permits were issued during the season, covering an area 
of 54,784 acres, as compared with an average of 6,739 permits covering 26,260 
acres for the seasons 1917 to 1922 inclusive. Of this number, 5,677 permits 
were issued in 207 townships, 159 in unsurveyed territory, and 25 for railway 
rights-of-way, these latter covering an area of 22,488 acres. With the increase 
in the size of the Permit Area a corresponding increase is naturally to be expected 
in the number of permits issued and the acreage burned over. In June however, 
when a great amount of burning is usually done, the hazard was so great that 
permits were refused in most localities. The number issued in -July and August 
was also small. It was necessary for the first time to keep the Permit Regula- 
tions in operation during October owing to the unusual weather. 



STATEMENT OF PERMITS ISSUED 



District 


Number of Permits 




1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


Cochrane 


1,480 
1,122 
361 
1,000 
406 
531 
362 
216 
429 


2,497 
2,126 

' l',774' ■ 

754 


1,503 
1,599 

916 
1,082 

407 


1,982 

1,887 

1,169 

756 

193 


2,275 

1,691 

1,557 

702 

199 


3,493 

2,346 

2,179 

514 

651 




Matheson 




New Liskeard 




Hearst . . 




Timmins 




Kapuskasing 




Kenora 














Rainy River 














All other districts 


1,452 


459 


167 


211 


407 








Totals 


5,907 


8,603 


5,966 


6,154 


6,635 


9,590 


3,486 







Month 






Num 


Der of Permits 








1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


May 


2,131 

711 

1,314 

1,077 

566 

108 


1,992 
3,034 
1,502 
1,580 
495 


1,154 

3,085 

364 

1,329 

34 


1,003 
2,011 

891 
1,620 

629 


1,536 
2,786 

496 
1,475 

342 


2,248 
2,899 
2,050 
2,156 
237 




June 




July 




August 




September 




October. . 


















Totals 


5,907 


8,603 


5,966 


6,154 


6,635 


9,590 


3,486 







1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



173 



District 


Acreage Burned Over Under Permit 




1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


Cochrane 


4,348 
5,027 
1,160 
2,335 
918 
2,126 
35,006 
1,374 
2,490 


8,108 
7,613 

' 3',837" 
2,591 


4,652 
5,442 
7,726 
2,124 
988 


4,984 
5,427 
9,768 
1,478 
424 


5,437 

4,760 

13,521 

1,379 

925 


10,267 
7,371 

17,863 
1,134 
1,971 




Matheson 




New Liskeard 




Hearst 




Timmins - 




Kapuskasing 




Kenora 














Rainy River 














All other districts 


7,306 


2,746 


686 


768 


1,072 








Totals 


54,784 


29,455 


23,678 


22,767 


26,790 


39,683 


15,186 







(6) Equipment 

The expenditure required annually for the replacement of equipment is 
necessarily large in an organization with a field stafif of over twelve hundred 
men, but the purchase of additional and improved fire-fighting equipment must 
not be overlooked. Forest protection to-day depends largely upon organization 
and equipment, especially on the mechanical side. The combating of fires with 
effective means has also a desirable influence in raising the general spirit of the 
personnel to reduce fire losses. 

Of the total expenditure of $127,186.92 on equipment this past season, 
almost one-half the amount was invested in portable forest fire-fighting units 
and hose. Fifty-four of these units, or pumps as they are commonly called, were 
purchased, with 2,000 feet of hose for each, and paid for themselves many times 
over this one season. They not only took the place of manual labour, which 
was not always available, but enabled the control of fires in places where other- 
wise it would have been impossible. 

That no towns nor settlements were burned and no lives lost was due in some 
instances only to the morale of the field staff and their work with the pumps. 
During early June five northern towns were seriously endangered, but in each 
case it was possible with the use of two or three pumps to check the fire before 
buildings were destroyed. In one instance the situation became so critical that 
the women and children were placed on a special train ready to leave the town, 
but the rangers, with their faces muffled with wet cloths so hot was the blaze, 
were able with three pumps to check the fire and not one building was burned 
within the town limits. 

Even after the close of the forest fire season the greater part of one small 
town, in which is located a Chief Ranger headquarters and storehouse, was 
saved from destruction by a fire which started within the town itself. The 
pumps had been stored away for the winter, but the one man at the headquarters 
was able to have them in operation in a very short time and the fire was stopped 
with comparatively small loss. 

These instances demonstrate the usefulness of the forest fire pump in pro- 
tection work. The average life of a unit is not definitely known, but it is at 
least five years. The initial outlay therefore, distributed over this period 
makes the annual charge reasonably small. There are now 88 pumps in stock 
but many more are needed. 

In districts where the roads will permit, light delivery trucks are used to 
good advantage. They provide a means of rapid transport for men and sup- 



174 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

plies in case of fire, aid a Chief Ranger in the supervision of the district, and in 
the more thickly settled areas where many burning permits are issued enable 
the covering of a large territory by one man. Nine such trucks were purchased 
this past season, six of these being replacements. It is desirable that more be 
purchased next season, from the standpoint of economy as well as efficiency. 

In some of the northern districts railway motor cars take the place of the 
motor trucks, permission being obtained from the railway companies for the 
operation of the cars over their lines. While not as effective as the automobiles, 
because of their limited routes of travel, they are almost indispensable espec- 
ially where the train service is infrequent. Light cars which can be handled 
by one man are used for inspection work, while for general use a heavier car 
capable of pulling a loaded trailer is used. All of these cars can carry two men 
with a pump and 500 feet of hose. A total of nine were purchased during the 
season, two of these being replacements. 

In outlying districts where there are neither roads nor railways and on large 
lakes, motor boats are used, the most common type being the lumberman's 
pointer equipped with a medium duty motor. In some waters these boats are 
necessary for the transport of men and supplies, while in others they are a 
means of economy in that the two boatmen can cover a patrol which would take 
from four to six canoe-men. They are also the safer method of travel on the 
larger lakes. Four pointers were purchased this past season, one cabin cruiser, 
and one open cruiser. 

The replacement of condemned tents and canoes requires the purchase 
annually of a number of both, in addition to those required for new patrols. 
Spares must also be kept on hand for the use of extra fire-fighters. A total of 
345 tents were bought during the season, and 120 canoes, the number of tents 
being exceptional, occasioned by the number required for the large gangs of 
extra fire-fighters. 

A total of 3,055 pairs of blankets were bought, this large number being due 
in part to the supply required for the extra men on duty during the bad fire 
periods, and in part' to the replacement of a large quantity sent to the fire 
sufferers in the vicinity of Haileybury in the fall of 1922. Most of the blankets 
purchased during the past season were made up with distinctive markings. 

The major equipment in stock at the close of the fire season for use by the 
1,200 rangers, consisted of 88 portable fire pumps, 156,500 feet of hose for use 
with these pumps, 13 automobiles, 27 railway motor cars, 151 railway velocipedes, 
29 motor boats, 3 motor canoes, 690 ordinary canoes, 31 riding saddles, 4,300 
pairs of blankets, 957 tents, 2,185 axes, 546 grub and ordinary hoes, and 2,541 
shovels. 

(7) Locomotive Inspection 

As in previous years two men were employed throughout the season on the 
inspection of fire protective appliances on locomotives operating on railways 
under the jurisdiction of the Dominion Board of Railway Commissioners, these 
men acting under appointments as officers of the Board. 

A total of 41 round-houses and gravel pits were visited periodically, and 
1,760 locomotive inspections made, covering 866 locomotives. There were in 
addition, 21 inspections of locomotives operated by lumber companies, bringing 
the total number of inspections up to 1,781. The table below shows a steady 
increase in the number of inspections made each season, and a steady decrease 
since 1918 in the percentage of locomotives found defective; this percentage 
in 1923 was only 2.5. 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



175 



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176 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

(8) Improvements 

The past season was anything but favourable for improvement work, the 
fire situation keeping all men busy until well into late summer. In spite of 
this however, considerable was accomplished, most of the work being done by 
the regular ranging staff. 

A certain amount of work is necessary each spring on all portages and trails 
totalling several hundred miles, to clear them of windfalls and debris accumu- 
lated during the winter months. In addition to the accomplishment of this, 
over 100 miles of new trails were cut during the season. 

A total of 55 ranger cabins were erected, most of these having log walls 
and a pole roof covered with paroid roofing. Nine storehouses were built and 
three others enlarged, two canoe sheds, seven garages and two boat houses. 

The largest building was the combined boat and storehouse at Parry Sound, 
this being a galvanized iron L-shaped building with a plank frame. The boat- 
house is 36 feet square with three boat slips, and is equipped with a two-ton 
combined chain hoist and trolley. The storehouse is 22 feet wide and 50 feet 
long, with skylights throughout. The whole building is set on piling driven to 
an average depth of 10 feet. The construction of the building was under the 
direct supervision of the District Forester. 

The number pf lookout towers was increased by the addition of six 80-foot 
steel towers and 23 wooden towers, the latter all being put up by the rangers 
themselves. 

Several telephone lines were built with a total of 299.5 miles. Principal 
among these were the following: 

French Lake to Sturgeon Narrows and north end of Agnes 

Lake, Rainy River District, ground circuit 50 miles 

Larder Lake to Mt. Chiminiss, Matheson District, ground 
circuit 11 

Kenney to Red Cedar Lake, North Bay District, ground 
circuit 28 

Parry Sound to Go-Home Bay, Georgian Bay West District, 
ground circuit 30 

Killaloe to south-east corner Niven Township, Algonquin 

South District, ground circuit 463^ 

Pembroke to Brent, Algonquin North District, metallic 
circuit 78 

Gilmour to lookout tower in Cashel Township, Trent Dis- 
trict, ground circuit 13 

A light field telephone cable similar to that used for military purposes has 
been found very satisfactory for temporary telephone lines. Eighty-two miles 
of this type of line were in use during the season. 

The total permanent improvements now consist of 253 cabins, 32 store- 
houses, 18 garages, 7 boat-houses, 2 canoe sheds, 17 steel lookout towers, 100 
wooden lookout towers, and 636 miles of telephone line. 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



177 



SUMMARY OF PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS 



Inspectorate 


Cabins 


Store- 
houses 


Garages 


Boat- 
houses 


Other 
Build- 
ings 


Steel 
Towers 


Wooden 
Towers 


Tele- 
phone 
Lines, 
miles 




56 
39 
27 
91 

7 

25 

8 


6 
6 

3 
8 
5 
3 
1 


3 

5 
2 
5 

""2" 
1 


2 

2 

........ 

*1 

1 






20 
17 
10 

27 
1 

19 
6 


175 


Cochrane 






11 


Soo 


2 


' '2 
7 
3 
5 




Sudburv 


144 


Georgian Bay 

Algonquin 

Trent 


50 

213 
43 










Totals 


253 


32 


18 


7 


2 


17 


100 


636 



*Combined boat and storehouse. 



(9) Air Patrol 

Aircraft for forest fire detection were used in Ontario for the second time 
last season. A main flying base was established on Ramsay Lake near Sudbury, 
and a sub-base on Trout Lake near North Bay. 

Patrols were made over the northern part of the Georgian Bay and Algon- 
quin Inspectorates, the greater part of the Sudbury Inspectorate, and the 
eastern part of the Soo Inspectorate, during the peak of the fire season in May 
and June, covering an area of approximately 40,000 square miles. Systematic 
patrols were confined to a part of the Sudbury Inspectorate over an area of 
8,100 square miles. 

The total flying time for the season was 430 hours, the bulk of this being 
done by the H.S. 2 L type of machine, with occasional flights by a Vicker's 
"Viking" machine. The flying season extended from the 22nd of May to 
October 15th, with from two to five machines available. 

New fires located by the patrols were reported either by dropping messages 
to the ground stafif, or by telegraph or telephone upon the landing of the machine. 
Owing to the inability of the H.S. 2 L machines to either land on or take ofT 
from small lakes, they were used only twice during the season for transporting 
men and equipment to specific fires. 

The operations during the two seasons in which aircraft have been used 
have clearly demonstrated the following facts: 

1. That for sighting and locating forest fires aircraft have no equal. 

2. That for country similar to that in the western part of the Province, 
where the expenditure necessary for an efficient ground detection system makes 
that system prohibitive, patrol by aircraft is the best solution. 

3. That in country similar to the above, the use of aircraft of the type 
available at the present time will not allow a reduction in the ground staff in 
that territory sufficient to afTect the total pay roll. These machines can be 
depended upon for detection only, or for transportation for very limited dis- 
tances. The rangers must therefore be located in the area patrolled to combat 
the fires reported to them. They may be taken from long canoe patrols and 
engaged on improvement work at definite points known to the airmen, but 
they cannot be taken from the territory. 

4. That air patrol has a great moral effect both upon the people in the patrol 
area and upon the rangers themselves. 



178 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

5. That a special type of machine should be designed for this class of work. 
The machines available at the present time are not entirely suitable in that the 
operating costs are high and the "performance" low. 

(10) Brush Burning. 

During the winter of 1922-3 an experiment was conducted in the Algonquin 
Inspectorate to determine the possibilities and probable cost of brush disposal 
in connection with logging operations. Two gangs of six men, each in charge 
of a Deputy Chief Ranger, were engaged on this work, one in a pine operation 
and the other in a pulp operation. In both cases a maximum of slash was 
produced as everything was taken out from which a log could be obtained. 
The system of piling and green-burning was followed throughout. 

Little difficulty was experienced in getting the brush to burn, even when 
wet, although the burning operations should follow the cutting operations as 
closely as possible to prevent the covering of the slash by snow. 

The cost of an operation of this kind varies with the depth of the snow, 
condition of the weather, density of the slash, and the attitude and experience 
of the men engaged on the work. Under conditions similar to those existing 
on the above area slash from a pine operation should be disposed of at a cost 
of from seventy-five cents to one dollar per thousand feet, and from a pulp 
operation at a cost of from forty to fifty cents per cord. 



II. FOREST INVESTIGATION. 

During the past season two large forest survey projects were undertaken. 
The details of report on these surveys it is hoped will be published at a later 
date. The following is a summary of the work accomplished. 

MississAGi Forest Survey 

1. Area. — The territory covered in the following report comprises the 
Mississagi Forest Reserve, in all some 5,100 square miles, but of this area 700 
square miles is held under timber license and was not surveyed. The Mississagi 
Reserve may be generally located as lying within the triangle formed by the 
main line of the C.P.R., the Soo Branch of the C.P.R., and the Algoma Central. 

2. Object. — To obtain an estimate of all standing timber of merchantable 
size and to prepare a type map showing forest types and drainage systems. An 
effort was also made to collect data for the construction of composition stand 
tables, paying most attention to the reproduction in the young growth stands, 
also measurements were made on white pine for the construction of a volume 
table based on taper. 

3. Organization. — Field work was organized as a combination of ground 
estimation and aerial forest type mapping. 

{a) Ground Work. — Five separate parties were employed, made up of 
twenty-seven forestry men and twelve others as cooks and packers. 
Work commenced May 22nd to 24th with each party having a specified 
piece of country for their season's work. For most of the men Sep- 
tember 20th closed the season. But an extra party was organized to 
remain another month. 

The strip method was used by the ground parties to obtain type 
boundaries and representative tallies for the estimate, width of line 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 179 

varied from eleven to thirty-three feet, thirty-three feet being used in 
pine stands. Lines were run at one-half mile intervals unless it was 
quite apparent that a particular stretch of country had no timber of 
commercial value, when only a sample plot of the type would be taken. 
Three timber types were recognized : 

Coniferous — less than 20 per cent, hardwood. 

Mixed — 20 per cent, to 80 per cent, hardwood. 

Hardwoods — less than 20 per cent, conifers. 
Each of the above was further classified to show second and young 
growth stands. 

(b) Aerial Type Mapping. — Two foresters were engaged on this work with 
a main base at Biscotasing and two sub-bases at Como and Kirkpatrick 
lakes. Roughly, one-half of the area was mapped in one hundred and 
fifty flying hours. Aerial type work was as far as possible confined to 
country where the timber was of non-commercial value or which was 
unusually difficult of access to the ground party. 

4. Results: Drainage. — The whole reserve falls into four main drainage 
basins, a small area in the north being in the James Bay drainage. Down the 
west side the Montreal, Batchewana and Goulais rivers all flow to Lake Superior. 
The third and largest area is drained by the Mississagi and tributaries, while the 
fourth comprises a small area in the southeast draining into the Spanish. 

Topography. — The area is well-drained, there being less than two per cent, 
classed as muskeg. Across the north and east half there is little re'i^f, the country 
being made up of a succession of low rolling hills. From the Wenebegon river 
westward, however, more rocky outcrops are noted and the whole could be 
termed hilly. The rivers in this western section all have steep sides and rnany 
falls and rapids. 

Forest Conditions, General. — In distribution of species, the reserve marks 
the northern limit of hard maple and yellow birch and also of commercial white 
and red pine. For while pine occurs north of the reserve, the quantity, 125 
million board feet on 4,000 square miles covered by the Missinabie survey, or 
fifty feet per acre, is insignificant. An approximate figure for the Mississagi 
Reserve would be 500 feet board measure per acre. This pine appears to be 
typical, for when the volume table prepared from measurements made on the 
reserve was compared with existing tables very little difference was noted. In 
general, the whole area may be termed a transition between the southern type 
of forest and the more northerly spruce-balsam forest. 

Types, General. — The mixed type is largely composed of jack pine, spruce, 
balsam, and in two-thirds of the area, white and red pine in varying quantities. 
The hardwoods in the mixture are chiefly white birch, poplar, and in the south- 
west a scattering of hard maple and yellow birch. 

The coniferous type is represented by stands of pure spruce, jack pine and 
spruce mixture, and white and red pine mixture. White and red pine also occur 
in pure stands. The coniferous types are generally confined to more poorly 
drained areas, low gravelly plains and rocky uplands. 

The hardwood type is confined to the south-westerly part of the reserve. 
These hardwoods, maple and yellow birch, occur generally on uplands having a 
north or west exposure. The maple and yellow birch are living at the northern 
limit of their distribution and are generally stunted, crooked and limby, with a 
great prevalence to heart rot. 

5. Co5/.— Flying, $17,700; ground work, $23,000. 



180 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

NiPiGON Aerial Forest Survey 

Area. — The territory covered in the following report includes the eastern 
half of the Nipigon Forest Reserve in the District of Thunder Bay, together 
with adjacent territory, mainly draining into Lake Nipigon, though beyond the 
reserve boundaries, in all some 4,800 square miles. In detail, the boundaries 
are as follows: Windigo Bay (Lake Nipigon), north along Rapid creek to the 
north line, Canadian National Railway; east to the Pikitigushi river to White- 
clay lake; east down the Ogoki river to Otter river; south up the Otter river; 
down the Makoki river; up the Kapikotongwa river to the reserve boundary; 
east to the northeast corner of Nipigon Forest Reserve; south by the eastern 
boundary of the reserve to the height of land (Great Lakes-James Bay watershed)' 
along the height of land to Fecteau lake; west to the reserve boundary; along 
the reserve boundary to Hydro falls on the Nipigon river; north along the 
Nipigon river and the east shore of Lake Nipigon to Windigo bay. 

Procedure. — Orient bay, on the Canadian National Railway, at the south 
end of Pijitawabik bay on Lake Nipigon, was used as a main base of operation. 
Subsequently, a sub-base was established on a small island in Ombabika bay 
near the mouth of Ombabika river, in order to facilitate working over the 
northern area, and to minimize ineffective flying time. 

The work commenced on June the 9th and was completed on July 13th. 
It was carried out by two foresters, who sketched the areas flown over from the 
front cockpit of flying boats. One forester had had previous experience at this 
particular kind of work, while the other received training during the course of 
the operation. 

The sketching was done on mounted maps, scale one mile to the inch, which 
showed, when finished, all lakes, large streams and rivers, as well as the forest 
types. These mounted maps were cut to a size of approximately 12x18 inches, 
covering an area of six six-mile townships each. This was found to be the most 
desirable size of map for sketching work in this type of country. 

As soon as a field sheet was finished to the forester's satisfaction, it was 
transferred to a field base map, scale two miles the inch. In this way the base 
map was kept up to date, and any errors in tying in field sheets discovered before 
leaving the operation, and corrections made. 

In cases where types were not readily recognized from the air, landings 
were made in suitable lakes in order to permit an examination of the types on 
the ground. 

Topography. — Topographically, that part of the above territory draining 
into Lake Nipigon is similar to the north shore drainage basin of Lake Superior. 
The surface is rough, and broken by deep ravines, with numerous lakes of 
irregular outline and occurrence, scattered very generally throughout the whole 
region. Streams are usually short and rapid. Soils are typically shallow and 
coarse. 

Where the territory under consideration extends beyond the Nipigon drainage 
into Hudson Bay waters, a more or less gradual modification towards the flat, 
poorly-drained country, typical of the greater part of this whole basin, is dis- 
tinctly noticeable, particularly in the north and northeasterly direction. 

Forest Distribution. — Consideration of the territory from this standpoint 
divides it immediately, on a basis of fire history, into two sharply contrasted 
areas of very unequal size, which may be conveniently referred to as the Northern 
and Southern Areas, respectively, having as a rough common boundary the 
north line of the Canadian National Railway. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 181 

(a) Northern Area — 

The northern area, some fifteen hundred square miles, or 30 per cent, 
of the whole, is unusually dry, or lacking in lakes and rivers, and has been 
subjected to severe and repeated burning, so that, with the exception of 
100 square miles of moderately good spruce pulpwood in the northwest 
corner, tributary to James Ba\ drainage (see type map), fully 85 per cent, 
may now be classified as barren, burned and muskeg, with a liberal 15 per 
cent, allowance for the scrubby remains of former timber stands fringing 
watercourses, and in damp hollows. 

Under the above conditions it was not considered advisable to expend 
the time or run the risks necessary to prepare a detailed type map of this 
territory. 

(b) Southern Area — 

South of the northern line of the Canadian National Railway, very 
much less country has been burned over, at least within the last eighty 
years. 

(1) General Forest Conditions — 

Due to the rugged character of the country, and lack of soil, the 
area as a source of timber is rather disappointing. Rocky uplands, 
sometimes fairly level, with very thin soils, bounded by quite abrupt 
boulder-strewn slopes, and covered with either open park-like stands, 
or undersized slow-growing stands, are of common occurrence and 
might be taken as typical of a great deal of the southern area. 

Better stands are confined to lake basins, valleys, and scattered 
sand plains, with a few notable exceptions, where best quality mixed 
stands occur on high plateaus. 

(2) Occurrence of Types — 

The predominating type is a mixture of spruce or jack pine with 
poplar and birch, though occasionally both spruce and jack pine enter 
into the mixture. 

Pure conifer follows mixed, in order of frequency of occurrence. 
It is found as both a lowland, pure spruce swamp and as an upland 
type, although in this latter situation there is frequently a slight mixture 
of birch and poplar. 

Pure birch and poplar stands occur in such small patches that the 
type was not differentiated, but was thrown in as a mixed type. 

(3) Species occurring in commercial quantities — 

Black spruce, white spruce, jack pine, balsam, poplar and birch. 

(4) Species occurring in non-commercial quantities — 

White pine, red pine, black ash, cedar, tamarack. 

(5) One hundred and four hours' flying — 

Four special landings for sample plot work, and investigation of 
timber conditions. 

(6) Cost- 

Approximately, one-half cent per acre; total cost, approximately, 
$15,000. 



182 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



III.— REFORESTATION 



Provincial Forest Stations : 

Norfolk County (St. Williams). 
Durham County (Orono). 
Simcoe County (Midhurst). 
Kemptville Transplant Nursery. 

Forest Plantations: 
Sand Banks. 
Hendrie. 

Tree Planting: 

Private Planting. 
Demonstration Plots. 
Inspection. 

Seed Collecting. 



NORFOLK COUNTY— (ST. WILLIAMS) 

Seed beds were sown during both the spring and fall season. Fall seeding 
is being favoured and is now possible since a surplus supply of seed is available. 
A more equal division of labour is, however, the chief incentive toward fall 
seeding as this relieves at least one imperative operation during the spring 
rush. 

SPRING SOWING OF CONIFEROUS SEED 



Species 


Collected 


Origin 


No. of 
Beds 
Sown 


Amount Seed Per 
Bed 
lbs. ozs. 


Totals, 
lbs. 


Scotch Pine 


1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 


Norfolk County. . . . 
Norfolk County .... 

Quebec 

Danish 


110 
70 
60 

15 


" T" 


12 

10 

14 

4 




Jack Pine 


White Spruce 


European Larch 




Totals 






255 






1971/2 













FALL SOWING OF CONIFEROUS SEED 



Species 


Collected 


Origin 


No. of 
Beds 
Sown 


Amount Seed Per 

Bed 

lbs. ozs. 


Totals, 
lbs. 


White Pine 


1922 
1923 
1922 
1922 


Simcoe County 

Simcoe County 

Simcoe County 

Simcoe County 


200 

358 

13 


1 
........ 

1 


4 
13 

4 


250 


Red Pine 


290 J^ 

411/4 
13 


White Cedar 


White Spruce 






Totals 






604 






595}^ 















1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



183 



Hardwoods of the various species are propagated in addition to the common 
conifers. 

SOWING OF HARDWOOD SEED 



Species 


Collected 


Origin 


When Sown 


How Sown 


Total 

(Bus.) 


Soft Maple 


1923 
1923 
1923 
1922 
1923 
1923 
1923 
1923 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1923 


Pr. Edward County 

(I u « 
« « « 
« « « 
« (( « 

Lanark County 

Norfolk County 

Pr. Edward County 

Simcoe County 
« « 

Norfolk County 
« « 


Spring 
« 

« 

« 

Fall 

« 

Spring 
u 

u 

« 

Fall 


Seed Beds 

Flats 

Seed beds 
« « 

Flats 
« 

« 

Seed beds 
« « 

« « 
Drills 


2 


« « 


4 


White Elm 


6 


White Ash 


8 


u « 


20 


Hard Maple •. . . 


21/2 


Manitoba Maple 


l'/2 

8 


Red Maple 


White Birch 


l'/2 

V2 


Honey Locust 


Black Locust 


J4 


Black Walnut 


135 






Totals 










189M 















Nursery Lines 

During the spring, 2,927,700 transplants were Hned out on an area of 
approximately fourteen acres. The season's planting indicates rapidly increasing 
production. 

SPRING TRANSPLANTING OF CONIFERS 



Species 



Age. Yrs. 



Origin 



No. of Seedlings 



Scotch Pine 

Scotch Pine 

Red Pine 

Jack Pine 

Jack Pine 

European Larch 
White Spruce . . . 
Red Cedar 



Totals . 



Norfolk County 
Norfolk County 
Simcoe County 
Norfolk County 
Norfolk County 
Danish 

Simcoe County 
Norfolk Countv 



242,000 

446,000 

1,140,000 

94.000 

800,000 

180,000 

25,000 

700 



2,927,700 



In recent years fall transplanting of one and two year old seedlings has 
given satisfactory results. Heaving and winter browning is guarded against 
by protective permanent hedges, intervening rows of sorghum and mulching 
with rye straw or strawy manure. 



184 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



FALL TRANSPLANTING OF CONIFERS 



Species 


Age. Yrs. 


Origin 


No. of Seedlings 


White Pine 


1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Simcoe County 
Simcoe County 
Simcoe County 
Simcoe County 
Simcoe County 
Danish 

Simcoe County 
Norfolk County 


242,800 


White Pine 

Red Pine 


735,000 
633,600 


Red Pine 


225,000 


White Spruce 

Norway Spruce 

White Cedar 


280,000 
275,000 
192,000 


Red Cedar 


480 






Total 






2,583,880 











It has been found advisable to line out hardwoods at the end of their first 
growing season, and cultivate them another year in the nursery before disposal 
for permanent planting. 

During the recent fall the following hardwoods have been transplanted: — 



Species 



White Elm 

Soft Maple 

Red Maple 

Hard Maple .... 
Manitoba Maple. 

White Ash 

Reech 

White Birch .... 
Honey Locust . . . 

Catalpa 

White Walnut . . 
Black Walnut . . . 



Age. Yrs. 



Origin 



Prince Edward County 
Prince Edward County 
Prince Edward County 
Lanark County 
Norfolk County 
Simcoe County 
Prince Edward County 
Prince Edward County 
Prince Edward County 
Norfolk County 
Norfolk County 
Norfolk County 



No. of Seedlings 



65,000 

7,00 

27,000 

74,000 

2,000 

80,000 

11,000 

10,000 

8,700 

1,600 

11,000 

10,000 



Total 



307,300 



Distribution of transplants to other Provincial Forest Stations, and 
Plantations was made as follows: 

SPRING DISTRIBUTION OF TRANSPLANTS TO GOVERNMENT STATIONS 



Species 


Provincial 
Forest Stations 


Provincial 
Forest Plantations 


Totals 




Orono 


Midhurst 


Simcoe Co. 


Sand Banks 




Scotch Pine 


138,000 

380,000 

163,000 

69,000 


121,000 
338,000 
258,000 
170,000 


64,000 
210,000 
531,000 

82,000 


87,500 

74,000 

241,500 

92,000 


410,500 


Red Pine 


1,002,000 


Jack Pine 


1,193,500 


European Larch 


413,000 


Totals 


750,000 


887,000 


887,000 


495,000 


3,019,000 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



185 



FALL DISTRIBUTION OF TRANSPLANTS TO GOVERNMENT STATIONS 



Species 


Provincial 
Forest Stations 


Provincial 
Forest Plantations 


To'als 




Orono 


Midhurst 


Simcoe Co. 


Sand Banks 




White Pine 

Scotch Pine 


480,000 


535,000 


. 154,000 


25,000 
74,000 


1,194,000 
74,000 


Red Pine 


130,000 


137,000 


108,000 


375,000 


Jack Pine 


256,500 
42,500 
24,000 
81,000 


256,500 


White Spruce 

Norway Spruce 

White Cedar 


175,000 
98,000 
42,000 


125,000 
80,000 
45,000 


100,000 

100,000 

27,000 


442,500 
302,000 
195,000 






Totals 


925,000 


922,000 


489,000 


503,000 


2,839,000 



On account of increased seedling production it has been found necessary 
to become more intensive in our nursery practice. This means an almost con- 
tinual cropping of the productive area, which in turn demands heavy fertiHzing. 
Both animal and commercial fertilizers have been applied as tabulated below: 



FERTILIZERS 





Animal Fertilizers 


Mineral Fertilizers 


Location 


Manure 

(tons) 


Dried Blood 

(lbs.) 


Lime 
(tons) 


Acid 

Phosphate 

(lbs.) 


Sulphate of 
Ammonia 

(lbs.) 


Lot 1 


4 
36 
12 
60 
11 
11 

3 

16 
15 
15 
17 
15 
15 
18 

7 
13 

5 

6 
19 
10 
12 
18 
45 

4 
10 
50 

8 
20 
20 
18 
22 
15 


350 

.SOO 

125 

300 

225 

225 
160 


4 
2 
4 


800 
150 
800 

800 

600 

6C0 
800 

800 

400 

400 
400 




Lot 2 


150 


Lot 3 




Lot 4 


150 


Lot 5 




Lot 8 




4 




Lot 9 




Lot 11 




Lot 12 


200 


Lot 13 




Lot 14 




Lot 15 




Lot 16 




Lot 17 




Lot 18 




Lot 19 




Lot 20 




Lot 21 




Lot 22 


150 


Lot 23 




Lot 24 




Lot 25 


150 


Lot 26 


150 


Lot 27 




Lot 28 


■ 








Lot 29 




Lot 30 




Lot 31 




Lot 32 


2 

2 
2 




Lot 34 




Lot 35 




Lot 36. s 












550 
(tons) 


1,685 

(lbs.) 


20 

(tons) 


6,550 
(lbs.) 


950 

(lbs.) 



186 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Additions to Property. — Two very necessary buildings were constructed this 
year. A two storey frame shed 20' x 60' was built to meet the demands of inside 
storage space for seed bed rails, stakes, frames, stringing tables, lath mats, 
crates, crating material and various sorts of dressed lumber requisite to every 
forest station. 

Norfolk County leads in tree planting. Many plantations originated several 
years ago and are now bearing an annually increasing quantity of cones. The 
requirement of a seed extracting plant long felt, has this year been overcome, 
by the building of a three storey concrete structure 20' x 30' in dimension. 
This plant is capable of meeting maximum demands for many years to come, 
and is a most important addition to the station. 

Roads. — All woods roads have been brushed and widened. 

One and three quarter miles of new fire line 24 feet in width was cleared 
and grubbed, while a narrower 16 foot belt one mile in length was cut, delineating 
three one-hundred acre lots. 

With the exception of a short fire line of 650 yards yet to be cleared, the 
entire thirteen lots comprising the station, are now protected by these fire 
roads. All old lines have been maintained by discing and plowing. 

Silviculture. — During the past winter and early spring, eighty acres of 
mixed hardwood type on Lot 23, Concession 6, was subjected to improvement 
cutting. An additional area comprising approximately one hundred acres of 
brush land on Lots 19, 20, 21, 5th Concession, has been cleaned up in anticipation 
of planting permanent stock during the ensuing year. 

Protection. — Three men were employed during the summer months on the 
work of eradicating members of the family "ribes," for the prevention of the 
white pine blister rust. No report of an outbreak of this disease was recorded. 
The immunity belt was considerably enlarged. 

The work of the white pine weevil was apparent and, curiously, more 
prevalent during the latter part of June and in July. It cannot be said, however, 
that more damage than usual was caused by this pest. Infected leaders and 
all trees showing disease were destroyed. 

No fire damage occurred on the property in spite of the fact that the spring 
season was an exceptionally dry one. Several neighbouring fires were reported 
and assistance sent from this point. 

The stock list of material at this station is as follows: 

HARDWOODS 

Ash, White 122,000 

Butternut 59,600 

Basswood 1,200 

Beech 1 1,000 

Birch, White 10,200 

Chestnut 4,000 

Catalpa 2,600 

Elm, American 102,600 

Hickory 250 

Hackberry 450 

Locust, Black 4,000 

Locust. Honey 18,400 

Maple, Manitoba 2,950 

Maple, Soft 61,000 

Maple, Red 27,000 

Maple, Hard 159,000 

Oak, Red 4,000 

Poplar, Rooted 2,000 

Poplar, Cuttings 250,000 

Tulip 10,300 

Walnut, Black 76,000 

Willow, Rooted 300 

Willow, Cuttings 50,000 

978,850 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



187 



CONIFERS 

Balsam 151 ,00 

Cedar, White 2,752,000 

Cedar, Red = 480 

Larch, European 195,600 

Larch, Japanese 28,000 

Pine, White 3,027,800 

Pine, Scotch 2,625,000 

Pine, Jack 3,556,000 

Pine, Red 1,557,000 

Pine, Austrian 8,000 

Spruce, White 1,221,500 

Spruce, Norway 310,000 

15,432,380 

Grand total 16,411,230 

DURHAM COUNTY— (ORONO) 

As this has been the first full season's operations our work has been more 
of a preparative and organizing nature than any extensive nursery work. This 
consisted in the establishing of windbreaks around the outside of the whole 
area, the lining out and establishing of permanent nursery roads, repairing of 
fences, etc., besides general soil culture operations. 

Nursery operations were as follows: 

Seeding. — Spring sowing commenced April 30th and continued until May 
19th, a total of 92 beds being set out. 

SPRING SOWING OF CONIFEROUS BEDS 



Species 


Collected 


Origin 


No. of 
Beds sown 


Amount Seed 

per bed 

lbs. ozs. 


Totals 
lbs. ozs. 


Balsam 

Cedar, White 


1922 
1922 
1921 
1921 
1922 
1022 

1922 
1922 


Smcoe Co. 
Simcoe Co. 
Denmark 
Simcoe Co. 
Norfolk Co. 
Norfolk Co. 

Simcoe Co. 
Simcoe Co. 


5 

5 

1 
10 

5 

2 (ex- 
peri- 
men- 
tal) 
60 

4 


1 

"i 

1 
1 


8 
12 

U 

10 

5 

8 


7 
3 
1 
7 
4 

90 
4 


8 
12 


Larch, Japan 




Pine, Red 


8 


Pine, Scotch 


2 


Pine, Scotch 


10 


Pine. White 




Spruce, White 








Totals 






92 






118 


8 















Work on fall seed beds commenced November 1st and, when weather 
conditions compelled a cessation of work on November 15th, a total of 78 beds 
had been sown. 

FALL SOWING OF CONIFEROUS BEDS 



Species 


Collected 


Origin 


No. of 
Beds sown 


Amount Seed 

per Bed 

lbs. ozs. 


Totals 
lbs. ozs. 


Balsam 


1922 
1922 
1923 
1922 


Simcoe Co. 
Simcoe Co. 
Simcoe Co. 
Simcoe Co. 


2 

10 
36 
30 


1 

i 


10 

14 

12 

8 


3 

9 

27 

45 


4 


Cedar, White 


2 


Pine, Red 




Pine, White 








Totals 






78 






84 


6 















188 



REPORT OF THE 



No 3 



A small quantity of hardwood seed was also sown, the seeding roller used 
so successfully last year being employed throughout except for walnuts which 
were "dibbled in." 



SOWING OF HARDWOOD SEED 



Species 


Origin 


Date of Sowing 


Amount of 

Seed Sown 

bushels 


White Ash 


Prince Edward County 
Prince Edward County 
Prince Edward County and 

York County 
York County 
Durham County 
Lanark County 


April 15 
April 20 

June 21 
June 23 
November 20 
November 23 


5 


Hard Maple 


5 


Soft Maple 




White Elm 


6 

M 


Walnut 


20 


Hard Maple 


¥2 


Totals. 






36% 











Nursery Lines. — During the spring, 760,000 seedlings of verious species 
were received from St. Williams and transplanted in beds. The Yale Trans- 
plant Board was used throughout. 



SPRLNG TRANSPLANTING OF SEEDLINGS 



Species 


Age 


Number received 


Scotch Pine 


2 years 
2 years 
1 year 
1 year 




138,000 


Jack Pine 


163,000 


Red Pine 


380,000 


European Larch 


69,000 






Totals 






750,000 









In the autumn transplanting commenced on August 27th and the quota from 
St. Williams was completed September 20th, During this period 925,000 
seedlings were received and transplanted. 



FALL TRANSPLANTING OF SEEDLINGS 



Species 



White Pine 

White Pine 

White Spruce. . 
Norway Spruce . 
White Cedar. . . 
Red Pine 



Total. 



Age 



1 year 

2 years 
2 years 
2 years 
2 years 
1 year 



Number received 



210,000 
270,000 
175,000 
98,000 
42,000 
130,000 

925 000 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



189 



STOCK ON HAND DECEMBER 15, 1923 

Hardwoods: 

Ash, White. .• 33,250 

Butternut 3,900 

Elm, White f ,300 

Maple, Hard 42,000 

Maple, Red 94,750 

Maple, Silver 26,500 

Walnut 1,150 

Willow Cuttings 200,000 

— 408,850 

Conifers: 

Balsam 125,000 

Cedar, White 1-32,000 

Larch, European 55,000 

Larch, Japanese 10,000 

Pine, Jack 155,000 

Pine, Red .' 622,000 

Pine, Scotch 329,250 

Pine, White 1,105,000 

Spruce, White 342,500 

Spruce, Norwav 170,000 

3,045,750 

Grand total 3,454,600 

Fertilizers. — The greater part of the operations in connection with the 
nursery area were confined to cultural operations for soil fertility, upbuilding 
and tilth improvement. In this connection a crop of Fall rye was ploughed under 
in May and buckwheat, planted immediately after as a weed eradicator, was 
ploughed under in early July. An application of hydrated lime was also made 
to correct soil acidity. 

Fertilizers, other than green manures, applied during the year may be 
summarized as follows: 



Animal 


Mineral 


Manure 

(tons) 


Dried Blood 

(lbs.) 


Acid 
Phosphate 

(lbs.) 


Sulph. of 

Ammonia 

(lbs.) 


Mur. of Pot. 

(lbs.) 


Hyd. Lime 

(tons) 


34 


250 


400 


125 


250 


15 



Additions to Property. — During the early part of the year one of the two 
houses situated on the property was completely renovated and enlarged by 
one room to accommodate the sub-foreman. The interior was replastered and 
redecorated. A shed at the rear of this house was also painted and made weather 
tight to serve as a temporary tool-house and work-shop. 

A headquarters house was built, consisting of seven rooms and an office. 
The house is frame, 30' x 30', and is of the storey and a half bungalow type. 
The headquarters was also connected with the Hydro-Electric system in the 
village. Construction of the necessary 1,000 feet of line was carried out in such 
a manner as to permit of the development of power should this later be considered 
advisable. 

Roads. — The road connecting the forest station with the village was placed 
on a permanent basis, while several of the more necessary nursery roads were 
lined out, graded and gravelled to improve internal communication. 



190 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



SIMCOE COUNTY— (MI DHURST) 

Spring transplanting commenced on April 26th, and continued till May 
30th. The seedlings were received from the St. Williams Station. 

SPRING TRANSPLANTING 



Species 


Age (years) 


No. of Plants 


European Larch 


1 

1 
2 
2 


170 000 


Red Pine 


338,000 


Scotch Pine 


121,000 


Jack Pine 


258 000 






Total 




887,000 









Fall transplanting commenced on August 22nd and finished on September 
9th. A few hardwoods were transplanted on November 10th. The fall stock 
was also received from St. Williams. 



FALL TRANSPLANTING 



Species 



White Pine 

White Pine 

White Spruce. . 
Norway Spruce . 

Red Pine 

White Cedar. . . 
Honey Locust. . 
Hard Maple. . . 
White Elm 



Total . 



Age (years) 



No. of Plants 



295,000 

240,000 

125,000 

80,000 

137,000 

45,000 

2,000 

4,000 

5,000 



933,000 



Total number of transplants 1,820,000. 

Extensive seed bed work was not undertaken this year on account of lack 
of watering facilities. Four seed beds of white pine, jack pine, Scotch pine and 
white spruce were sown on May 25th as an experiment. These did well. It 
is intended to put in a large number of seed beds in the spring as a water system 
will be installed. 

Forty-five acres of old stump land were planted with Scotch and jack pine. 
These were quite successful in protected places, but on open plains on account 
of prolonged drought the grasshoppers played havoc with plantations. Planting 
next spring will largely be shelter belts and hedges. Two mixed hardwood 
plantations were also planted, and these did extra well. 

The nursery ground has been manured and worked. Cow peas were grown 
as a soiling crop. It is thought that this is too far north as they did not develop 
well, but no definite conclusions can be drawn as this was an exceptionally dry 
season. Owing to the dry summer seeds sown in June never germinated. 
Seventeen acres of rye were sown this fall to be turned under next summer. 
Buckwheat was also used as a soiling crop. Five acres were stumped and 
cleaned up. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 191 

Silviculture. — During the fall improvement cuttings in second growth maple, 
ash, elm oak and poplar were carried on. Weed trees, badly formed trees, and 
standing dead t mber were cut for cord wood. Piling and burning and lopping 
were used in brush disposal. 

During early winter a swamp is to be cleaned up. Considerable cutting 
was done a few years back leaving tops and debris. This, along with standing 
dead timber, will be worked up into wood, and we propose burning brush next 
spring. 

Additions to Property. — Considerable building has been done this year. 
Foreman's and teamster's houses have been erected; the former is 26' x 30', 
a two storey frame house; the latter is 28' x 24', a semi bungalow type. Both 
houses are completed and occupied. A driving shed 101' x 30' was constructed 
with steel siding and shingles. In one end is a work-shop and tool-house. An 
up-to-date stable was also built. The stable is cement with a large loft sided 
and shingled with steel. The stable accommodates nineteen horses, and is 
equipped with B.T. steel equipment, A pumping house 14' x 20' is partially 
constructed. 

Water System. — There is a spring creek that has its origin on the property, 
and it is proposed to pump water from this spring into a 20,000 gallon tank 
for seed bed work. The water is flowing at the rate of 9,000 gallons per hour. 

A concrete dam has been built forming a reservoir from which to pump 
water. Buttments for water tank are ready and 4" iron piping, connecting 
pumping station and water tower, is laid, 4" iron piping from tower to buildings 
is also laid and this is tapped by 1" piping for houses, stable and shed. Water 
will be available in the spring as soon as tank and pumping units are installed. 

Fencing. — 500 rods of wire fencing has been constructed. A creosoting 
plant consisting of an iron tank and a wood tank were installed. A large number 
of butts of posts were creosoted, 250 posts from Simcoe County plantation were 
also creosoted. 

Roads. — A beginning has been made in roads through second growth hard- 
woods. On account of gravel being within a mile of station we were able to 
do considerable gravelling of roads around buildings, and to water tower and 
pumping station. 

Survey. — A base line was laid through station by transit. Using this transit 
line as base line a plane table survey of property was made. 

NURSERY STOCK ON HAND, DECEMBER, 1923 
Hardwoods : 

Honey Locust 2,000 

Hard Maple 4,000 

White Elm 5,000 

Butternut 22,000 

33,000 

Conifers: 

White Pine 515,000 

Red Pine 315,000 

Scotch Pine 380,000 

jack Pine 350,000 

European Larch 150,000 

Norway Spruce 80,000 

White Spruce 225,000 

White Cedar. . 45,000 

2,060,000 

Grand total 2,093,000 



192 REPORT OP^ THE No. 3 

KEMPTVILLE TRANSPLANT NURSERY 

A small nursery has been established this year, in conjunction with the 
Kemptville Agricultural School. An area of two acres has been set aside, to be 
enlarged as neecied, on which three hundred thousand transplants were set out. 
These will be used as a demonstration of tree growing for the students of the 
school and will be supplied to private land-owners in the eastern part of the 
Province for reforesting work. 

FOREST PLANTATIONS 
SAND BANKS 

The work done on the Sand Banks of Prince Edward County thus far 
has shown that only trees which will grow under the most adverse conditions 
are of use in work of this kind. The two trees used most up to the present are 
green willow and Carolina poplar, limb material being used on the exposed 
areas and cuttings on the protected places. As suitable willow material for this 
work is available in large quantities close by, an effort was made to get as much 
as possible, to stem the march of the sand. In all during the year one hundred 
and sixty-five cords were planted as well as several thousand cuttings. 

One of the chief difficulties in this work is to prevent the sand from covering 
the planted areas during the time of a severe wind storm. The time of the year 
when this sort of damage is most severe is in winter when the sand mingles 
with snow, or rides rapidly over it accumulating, in some places, several feet 
deep. To prevent such drifting, catch fences have been erected at regular 
intervals and at right angles to the direction of greatest drift. These are made 
of brush woven on wire, laths woven on wire and eight foot plank stood on end. 
Such fences catch the sand much in the same way as snow fences behave on a 
railroad right-of-way, and prevent excessive drifting and give the trees a chance 
to become established. 

During the summer 2,000 feet of plank fence and 3,000 feet of lath and 
brush fence we're "erected for this purpose. 

Besides the work of planting on the Sand Banks some six acres have been 
prepared for nursery work and are being usd for transplants. Material of this 
kind growing at the station is as follows: 

HARDWOODS 

Ash, White 8,300 

Walnut 15,450 

Butternut 11,000 

Red Oak 1,100 

Soft Maple 250 

Hard Maple 20,300 

Honey Locust 7,000 

Elm 4,200 

67,600 

CONIFERS 

Scotch Pine. 156,400 

Jack Pine 684,500 

Red Pine 74,000 

White Pine 46,300 

White Spruce 214,100 

Norway Spruce 24,500 

Cedar, White 72,800 

European Larch .' 20,000 

1,202,600 

Grand total 1,449,600 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



193 



HENDRIE 

Permanent planting and transplanting seedlings from the St. Williams 
Station was done. 

Scotch and jack pine were used in permanent planting. Part of planting 
material was received from St. Williams and the rest was taken from nursery 
lines at the plantation. 163 acres were planted with Scotch and jack pine. 
Fail places in 1922 plantations were planted up. Additional hedges were planted 
around nursery land for windbreaks. 

SPRING TRANSPLANTING 



Species 


Age, Year 


No. of Plants 


Jack Pine 


2 
1 
2 
1 

1 


500,000 


Red Pine 


200,000 


Scotch Pine 

European Larch 


65,000 
82,000 


Elm 


35,000 








Total 




882,000 



FALL TRANSPLANTING 



Species 


Age, Year 


No. of Plants 


White Pine 


2 
2 
2 
1 


69,000 


White Spruce 


242,000 


White Cedar 


25,000 


Red Pine 


85,000 








Total 




321,000 







Total Transplants 1,203,000 

Roads. — The 1,000 acre block has been divided into compartments. Old 
roads were used as much as possible as boundaries of these compartments. 
These roads, along with other roads, made to separate compartments, have 
been plowed and stumps cleaned out. These roads will be maintained as fire 
roads. 

Fencing. — A woven wire fence was constructed around the 1,000 acre block. 
This took 1,300 rods of fencing. 

Nursery Stock on Hand December, 1923 



HARDWOODS 

Walnut 5,000 

Butternut 4,000 

Soft Maple 2,0000 

Sugar Maple 14,000 

White Ash 12,000 



7 L.F. 



55,000 



194 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

CONIFERS 

Jack Pine 446,000 

Scotch Pine 50,000 

Red Pine 220,000 

White Pine 210,000 

European Larch 60,000 

White Spruce 425,000 

White Cedar 45,000 

1,456,000 

Grand total 1,511,000 

SUMMARY OF TREES GROWING IN NURSERIES 

Norfolk County (St. Williams) 16,411,230 

Durham County (Orono) 3,454,600 

Simcoe County (Midhurst) 2,093,000 

Hendrie 1,511,000 

Sand Banks 1,449,000 

Kemptville 300,000 

Total. 25,218,830 

TREE PLANTING 

PRIVATE PLANTING 

This work was carried on in the same manner as in previous years. More 
applications were received than could be filled and for work of this kind 602 
separate persons received material for either commencing a new woodlot or for 
improving their existing one. 

DEMONSTRATION PLOTS 

During the winter of the current year, municipalities were interested in 
establishing demonstration plots, in order to bring before their local residents 
the value of planting trees on non-agricultural land. Several hundred circulars 
were distributed (under the caption "Municipal Demonstration Plots") to 
township councils throughout southern old Ontario where work of this kind 
would be most profitable. 

The following new plots were established during the spring planting season : 

Albemarle (East) — Bruce County 

Situated about one mile west of Colpoys Bay post office on the main road 
north. A fifteen acre plot, seven of which were planted this year with 2,000 
Scotch pine, 6,200 jack pine and 750 mixed hardwoods. 

Albermarle (West) — Bruce County. 

Situated one mile north of Red Bay school-house on the road to Howden 
Vale. A five acre plot of light sand planted with 4,000 jack pine and 2,000 
Scotch pine. 

Innisfil (Community Park) — Simcoe 

This plot forms a part of the township's 100 acre community park on the 
shores of Lake Simcoe. The trees were planted on a part of a thirty acre block 
bordering two roadways, set aside for demonstration purposes. This year there 
were planted 2,500 Scotch pine, and 2,000 jack pine. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 195 

Innisfil (Provincial Highway) — Simcoe County 
Situated on the Provincial Highway to Barrie at the corner of the 7th 
Concession Road. A field of light land, a part of which was planted with 2,000 
Scotch pine, 2,000 jack pine and 500 soft maple. 

Kemptville Agricultural School — Grenville County 
This plot forms a part of the school property, is about twenty acres in 
size and extends along the Ottawa-Prescott Highway. This year ten acres 
were set out with 6,000 Scotch pine, 6,000 jack pine, 300 soft maple, 500 walnut 
and 100 butternut. 

Mountain Village— Dundas County 

This plot forms part of the village community park. Three acres were 
set out with 2,500 Scotch pine and 2,500 jack pine, 200 elm and 200 soft maple. 

Of the plots already established, the following have either had their areas 
extended or have been supplemented where necessary with new trees: 

Beeton Village — 10,000 Scotch pine, 40,000 jack pine. 

Burford Township —500 Scotch pine, 500 red oak, 1,500 soft maple, 

500 elm. 

Colborne Township — 1,000 Scotch pine, 5,000 jack pine. 

Cramahe Township — 1,000 Scotch pine, 4,000 jack pine, 2,000 poplar. 

Darlington Township — 1,000 Scotch pine, 200 walnut, 200 red oak. 

Essa Township — 2,000 Scotch pine, 6,000 jack pine, 1,000 poplar. 

Norfolk County ■ — 10,000 Scotch pine, 40,000 jack pine. 

Plantagenet Township — 3,000 Scotch pine, 4,000 jack pine. 

Sunnidale Township — 3,000 Scotch pine, 9,000 jack pine, 6,000 poplar. 

INSPECTION 

The inspection of plantations owned by individuals and supplied with 
material from the Ontario Forestry Branch, was carried on from the point 
reached last summer (1922). 

The area covered comprises the counties of Bruce, Huron, Kent, Essex, 
and Norfolk. The last named county supports a great number of these planta- 
tions (considerably greater than any of the others). This is due to the proximity 
of the St. Williams Forest Station from which trees may be fetched personally 
by those who wish to plant them. The total number of plantations in Norfolk 
County, including those under 500 trees and those planted this year, amounts 
to 280. The next county to this is York with 138 plantations. 

A total of 124 plantations were visited, which are apportioned among the 

counties as follows: 

Norfolk 72 

Kent 15 

Essex ._ 8 

Bruce ." 13 

Huron 16 

These plantations are of all ages and size, ranging from those planted in 
the spring of 1922 to those commenced in 1907 and 1908. The individual area 
averages approximately one and a half acres. As regards the general success 
of these plantings 84.7 per cent, have made good where the test is a survival 
of 33 per cent, of trees in each case. 

There was very little sign of disease among the trees. A few of the white 
pine plantations have been attacked by the weevil, but in no case to any serious 
extent. The Scotch pine are invariably in a healthy condition. 



196 



REPORT OF THE 



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1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 197 



SEED COLLECTING 

The season of 1923 was the best seed year for red pine in the history of 
the Branch, The centre of the work, as in previous years, was. at Angus in 
Simcoe County, but an effort was made to secure cones anywhere in Ontario 
where it was known suitable trees are located. 

A circular was published entitled "Gathering Red Pine Cones for the 
Ontario Government," which was distributed freely throughout the Province, 
and this, together with newspaper advertisements and dodgers, reached hundreds 
of people who were interested in the work. The total number of bushels gathered 
from all parts of the Province was 3,126. 

In order to handle more adequately the work of seed collecting and extract- 
ing, a station of a permanent nature was opened at Angus. Two acres of land 
were purchased in the village on the railroad and a building was erected, to serve 
as a receiving centre for cones and as a plant for extracting purposes. The 
plant consists of eight drums, each 6' x 3', and has a capacity of twenty-five 
bushels of red pine cones a day. 

IV.— FOREST PATHOLOGY 
(Report of Dr. J. H. Faull for 1923) 

I. Introduction 

Several important problems both from the standpoint of utilization and 
of conservation have received attention during the year. Some have been 
brought to a solution — the nature of the needle blight of white pine and its 
effect on reproduction ; the diagnosis of the various types of heart and butt rots 
of balsam and in part of spruce, and the determination of their causes; the 
diagnosis and determination of the cause of a prevalent heart rot of birch; the 
life history of certain fungi causing needle diseases. Progress can be reported 
also on other problems— spruce diseases; the determination of the age of sus- 
ceptibility to trunk diseases ; the effect of various fungi on the growth of the timber 
attacked. New problems have been presented; among them two appear partic- 
ularly attractive, namely, the nature of "red" jack pine (pertinent to the culling 
of ties), and the pathology of young stands of conifers (important in relation 
to reforestation). Numerous inquiries on pathological matters have been received 
such as, the means of preventing doze in freshly cut birch (applications of zinc 
chloride solution appear to give every promise of success); the cause and control 
of bald spots in coniferous seed beds (in the case in question apparently due 
to local over-fertilization) ; factors favouring deterioration of hardwood and 
coniferous pulpwoods in the log and in the piles. A few tree diseases newly 
observed in Ontario have been reported by correspondents and their causes 
as indicated verified, for example, a twig blight of Manitoba maple caused by 
Coryneum negundinis B. & C. (detected by Professor J. E. Howitt and Dr. 
R. E. Stone of the Ontario Agricultural College), and bark blight of the American 
chestnut (due to the* very destructive fungus, Endothia parasitica) . The latter 
is serious so far as chestnut growing is concerned as most of the existing trees 
of this species, Castanea dentata, are probably doomed. Directly and incidentally 
valuable additions have been made to our reference pathological collections. 

Three technical papers, outgrowths of this work, and one semi-technical 
paper have been published apart from the annual reports in 1922-23. 



198 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Bell, G. H. - — Fern Rusts of Abies. Botanical Gazette. (In press.) 

Faull, J. H. — Forest Pathology in Relation to Forest Conservation. 14th 
Annual Report of the Quebec vSociety for the Protection 
of Plants. 1922. 

Fritz, C. W.— Cultural Criteria for the Distinction of Wood-destroying 
Fungi. Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada. 
1923. 

Moss, E. H. — Observations on Two Poplar Cankers in Ontario. Phyto- 
pathology, Vol. XII, 1922. 

The field work for 1923 was carried on mainly in the Timagami Forest 
Reserve, but in May a careful examination of diseased birch was made at Cache 
Lake in Algonquin Park, and Dr. Faull was permitted to transfer to the service 
of the Laurentide Company, Quebec, during July and August, to direct the 
assembling and grading of defective balsam and spruce for an extensive utiliza- 
tion experiment on pulpwood carried out under the auspices of the Technical 
Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry, the News Print Service Bureau, 
the Forests Products Laboratory at Madison, and a number of interested 
companies. As in the past there has been active co-operation between the 
Ontario Forestry Branch and the Provincial University. Besides to those directly 
associated in the office, field, or laboratory who have aided in carrying forward 
the year's work, an expression of appreciation is especially due Mr. C. E. Hindson, 
Chief Ranger of the Timagami Forest Reserve, and Mr. Mark Robinson, Superin- 
tendent of Algonquin Park. A summary of three researches completed in the 
past season follows. 

II. "Sapin Rouge" or Red Heart Rot of Balsam, its Cause and its 
Relation to Slash Disposal. 

Because of the increasing scarcity of spruce, the newsprint pulp industries 
are now relying more and more on the balsam forests of Eastern Canada for 
their supplies of raw materials. But these heretofore neglected forests prove 
to be frequently overmature and highly defective, hence an acute problem of 
utilization looms large on the horizon at present. Linked with this problem 
is that of the maintenance of the forests. In the forests of to-morrow, balsam 
is bound to have a place; it grows rapidly, it re-forests readily without planting, 
is is especially well adapted to our soil and climate, and its wood makes a good 
quality of pulp. The call, therefore, is urgent for a maximum utilization of 
our diseased virgin forests as we find them and the production of healthy forests 
for the future. 

A study of the pathology of balsam in these connections has revealed an 
almost unexplored field. One of the amazing features has been the encountering 
of a prevalent trunk disease, a heart rot of living trees, the bane of operators, 
often disastrously so, since fifty per cent, or more of affected stands may be 
discarded as unmerchantable, about the cause of which and its mode of Spread 
and establishment nothing has been known. Trees affected with it are individ- 
ually designated sapin rouge by the French-Canadian lumberjacks. The 
disease has been called "hemlock rot of balsam," but the name red heart rot of 
balsam based on the French appellation seems more appropriate. 

-"Sapin rouge" obtruded itself upon the attention of operators when they 
first began to cautiously introduce a few balsam logs into their cuts. It was 
an annoyance and a loss. "Sapin rouge" was believed to be worthless for pulp, 
it was not possible without experience and close observation to detect it before 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 199 

felling a tree, and if made up into logs it was closely culled. Afifected logs were 
called "sinkers"; to what extent this name reflected prejudice remains to be 
seen. 

If utilizable the question of the floating capacity of red heart rot balsam 
becomes of the first importance where the timber is transported by waterways. 
That some of it will float for a sufficiently long time is evidenced by the fact 
that an appreciable percentage of it can be found in the mill log piles from drives 
that have lasted up to two years. Knowing of the pains that are taken in the 
forest to exclude it from the cut, it is a fair assumption that the number of 
affected logs placed on the skids along the waterways is not greatly diminished 
by the time the destination is reached. However, this is not a matter for specula- 
tion, it can be readily determined by direct experiment. To be conclusive the 
larger the number included in a test the better, they should be intermixed with 
many sound logs cut from the same area as controls, and at the close of the 
experiment all the logs employed should be available for checking. 

Red heart rot is very easily recognized in the log, and is not likely to be 
confused with any other disease of the balsam. The defective wood almost 
never occurs in the stump, but is found beginning in the main trunk above 
breast height. Most frequently it centres at about half way up the length of 
the trunk, and extends from there for long distances in both directions. The 
affected wood is inclined to be wetter and hence heavier than normal wood at 
the *time of cutting from living trees. Its colour is a rather bright yellowish 
brown, often radiately figured or irregularly mottled by lighter less decayed 
patches, all rendered the more striking by contrast with the encircling outer 
zone of pure white sapwood. The texture remains remarkably firm for a long 
time, free from pockets, checks or cavities of any kind, and the wood "fibres 
out" in shavings very much the same as normal wood. It is of course softer 
than sound wood and in sawing and chipping greater waste is to be anticipated. 
Eventually soft streaks develop and there is a tendency towards delamination, 
but these features are late in appearing. The fibres seem to remain intact for 
a long time and to retain most of their cellulose. 

The rot enters most frequently by way of dead branches in the lower part 
of the crown; such branches decay away leaving yellowish rotten stubs — they 
serve as a means of detecting diseased trees. Infection may also take place 
through wounds, frost cracks or injured tops. When decay once starts it spreads 
very rapidly in a vertical direction, and involves almost at once all but an outer 
zone of sapwood. So it is that a log or bolt may exhibit a fairly uniform stage 
and amount of the rot throughout its full length. On tracing the rot down- 
wards in the trunk into sound wood it is found to be continuous with "frost 
patches" or watery looking areas, commonly evident in balsam at the time of 
felling; the decay progresses rapidly along these watery streaks which extend 
continuously for long distances vertically through the trunk. Finally the disease 
works out to the bark, killing the tree; but the decay continues in dead standing 
trees or in fallen trunks and slash until all of the wood is involved. Quite com- 
monly afifected trunks break off, sometimes a short distance from the top but 
oftener farther down, so that "chicots" or stubs of all heights are to be seen in 
large numbers throughout a badly infested region. 

The cause of red heart rot, previously unknown, has been determined in 
connection with our work of the past season. Two years ago inoculations on 
to artificial media in the laboratory from diseased wood were made which showed 
at once that the trouble was due to a fungus. Cultures have been maintained 
ever since for the purposes of study and in the hope that they would fruit, 



200 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

thus making identification possible; fruits finally developed in August, 1923. 
Meanwhile opportunity was afforded during the summer of 1923 to concentrate 
on red heart rot in the field while engaged in assembling materials for utilization 
tests of defective pulpwoods. Field observations revealed abundant instances 
of the association of fungus fruit bodies, always of the same kind, with this 
type of heart rot. This fungus {Stereum sangiiinolentum) fruits in great pro- 
fusion on dead trees, J3rush, and fallen trunks. While the indications as seen 
in the forest that Stereiim sanguinolentum is the cause of red heart rot of balsam 
were convincing, additional evidence was essential. This was supplied by the 
artificial cultures referred to above. In December last Miss Irene Mounce 
thoroughly sterilized pieces of sound wood in test tubes plugged with cotton 
wool and inoculated them with incipient red heart rot from living trees. Well 
developed fruit bodies of Stereum sanguinolentum had formed in them before 
the end of August, that is within eight months following inoculation. 

The fructifications of Stereum sanguinolentum are small, thin, leathery, 
scale or bracket-like bodies one-half inch to one inch in width growing out in 
flocks from dead standing timber, or the sides of fallen trunks and brush. When 
growing on the under sides of fallen trunks or brush they are closely appressed, 
brown or drabish, smooth, fungal patches of varying size. .The bracket-like 
bodies are downy or silky on the upper surface, buff or pinkish-buff to dark ash- 
coloured, and marked with darker, narrow, concentric bands. The lower surface 
is smooth and drab to brownish in colour. One of the distinctive features of 
either type of fructification is the fact that its edge or its smooth surface turns 
blood-red where bruised. 

Red heart rot of balsam occurs in Ontario, Quebec, and Maine, and will 
probably be found throughout the range of the balsam. It is especially prevalent 
in balsam forests that have been ravished by the spruce budworm. Is it 
susceptible to. control? 

The first step towards control of a parasite is a knowledge of its life history; 
measures adopted can then be rationally based on known grounds. We now 
know that red heart rot of balsam or "sapin rouge" is due to Stereum sanguino- 
lentum and we know where this fungus fruits, that is we have located the source 
of the germs or spores that are responsible for its spread. There is yet one 
important point that is not fully determined, that is the age at which the balsam 
becomes susceptible. Preliminary analyses indicate that this takes place in 
general as the balsam approaches maturity. If this may be tentatively assumed 
then two procedures are suggested, both of which would result in the prevention 
of infection, one from the standpoint of the host, the other from that of the 
parasite, and both are matters of forest management. In the one case the 
adoption of a cutting cycle within the period of immunity would automatically 
ensure freedom from the disease. In the other case burning of slash would 
prevent the development of fructifications and so cut off the source of the spores. 
The value of slash burning would probably be affected by the amount of dead 
trunks and brush on the floor of the forest included in the burning process. 
A combination of cycle cutting and slash burning would seem to assure complete 
control. 

III. Types of Defective Balsam and Spruce Pulpvvood in Relation to 

THE Problem of Utilization. 

For several years past the Ontario Forestry Branch has been carrying on 
studies of the diseases of pulpwoods, and especially of the trunk diseases of 
balsam and spruce. These studies have embraced a determination of their 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 201 

cause, their nature, their effect on the wood, and factors having a bearing on 
control The economic waste from trunk diseases in mature forests becomes 
stupendous, and dead and wind-thrown trees add tremendously to the fire 
hazard. Eventually systems of management may be put into operation that 
will largely solve the disease problem, but this lies some distance in the future. 
Meanwhile attempts will be made to utilize what has been regarded as waste 
because of defects. Apart altogether from a sudden expansion of the volume of 
supplies, successful utilization would at one stroke conserve and improve our 
existing forests. A preliminary report on tests now in progress (The Paper and 
Pulp Industry, Vol. 4, Nov. 15, 1923) arouses hope that may be practicable. 

"The cooking was done by the sulphite process in the manner in which 
experience has shown will give the maximum yield of news grade sulphite. 

"In the results so far obtained, it would appear that in some instances, 
contrary to previous conclusions, the decayed wood has a higher specific gravity 
than sound wood and what is more surprising has a higher yield of pulp. 

"In one case where balsam, infected with hemlock heart rot contained 55 
per cent, of rot, its specific gravity was 20.95 lb. per cubic foot compared with 
20.75 lb. per cubic foot for sound balsam. In another sample of spruce which 
contained 96 per cent, of rot of Trametes pini type the weight per cubic foot 
was 22.3 lb. and the yield was 52.2 per cent. 

"From the limited evidence at hand, it would appear that the action of 
the decay may have affected the lignocellulose without materially attacking the 
cellulose in the wood. It would also appear very possible that most of the wood 
which is normally discarded in the woods or diverted to the boiler-house as 
fuel might be economically pulped." 

There are many common trunk diseases of balsam and spruce, of varying 
abundance in different areas. Some are found in living trees, some in dead 
timber. The effect produced by them on the wood of their hosts is specific, 
and is characteristic for each kind. Some of them are characterized by a removal 
of the cellulose from the fibres leaving them too brittle to be of any value, others 
by a complete destruction of the fibres in advanced stages, and others by a 
removal of the encrusting substances in the fibres without serious injury to them. 
Of the diseases of living trees there are some that are restricted to the butt, 
others to the main trunk. In nearly every case the characters are well-marked 
and the various types can usually be quite readily diagnosed. The following 
account comprises those of economic importance in the forest. 

A. Types of defective balsam. (1) Brown butt rot of balsam. — This is a decay 
of the heart wood of the lower part of the trunk and the contiguous roots of 
living trees. The affected heart wood loses its firm consistency, then darkens 
more or less in colour, dries out and breaks up more or less into blocks. Cracks 
between the broken masses may fill with indefinite, delicate, white fungus 
sheets. The fully decayed wood powders very easily if rubbed between the 
fingers just as does chalk or charcoal, that is, it is very friable; this is due to 
the removal of cellulose from the wood fibres, the substance to which they owe 
their toughness, so that what is left consists mainly of an easily powdered, 
encrusting substance, lignin. This rot usually starts at wounds or defective 
spots on the inner faces of the main roots just below the stump. It develops 
upwards into the trunk but for not more than a few feet as a rule. It will eventu- 
ally extend out to the bark if the tree be not wind thrown meanwhile, but as 
yet we have no data on the time factor. 

The cause of brown butt rot of balsam was discovered about three years 
ago in connection with our investigations. Independent observations based on 



202 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

comprehensive, carefully executed laboratory tests, made by Dr. E. E. Hubert 
of the U. S. Forest Products Laboratory, fully confirm our findings. The cause 
is a fungus, Polyporus balsameus, the fructifications of which make their appear- 
ance on the surface of the trunk near the ground, or on the exposed wood where 
a diseased tree has cracked or broken over. They are not especially common, 
but by no means infrequent during wet summers or early autumns. They are 
■ small shelf-like bodies, occurring singly, or more typically, several closely super- 
posed, thin, tough, white below, and white to brownish on the upper surface. 
The upper surface is rather faintly zoned. They vary in size from one-half 
inch to one and one-half inches in width. 

Brown heart rot when developed to the friable stage is certainly of no 
value for pulp, and in earlier stages the affected fibres are weakened to a greater 
or less extent. The actual loss in cutting operations usually amounts to a short 
butt log. How much should be rejected would appear to depend in part on 
floating capacity (of which no definite data are at hand) and in part on the 
relative amounts of sound and diseased wood. The latter is valueless. The 
principal economic loss caused by brown butt rot results from windfalls due 
to the weakening of the base of the trunk; and with openings once made in the 
forest the destruction may be very great, involving sound as well as diseased 
trees. 

(2) Feather rot of balsam. — Feather rot is a decay of the heart wood of the 
lower part of the trunk and the contiguous roots of living trees. It is a butt 
rot. The affected wood as it decays changes in colour to clay or buff colour. 
It is soon marked by tiny longitudinal pockets or cavities of indefinite length 
arranged in close concentric series, typically a single row in the fall wood of 
each annual ring. This results in the delamination or flaking of the wood, 
the decayed wood readily falling into sheets, each sheet consisting of an annual 
ring. The surfaces of the sheets are more or less etched. In some cases there 
is a tendency for radial perforations to form quite early in the course of decay, 
often before there is any indication of delamination. Eventually there is a 
shredding of the wood due to radial deepening of the longitudinal furrows. 
This continues until the wood is reduced to cottony shreds, with at the same 
time a fading of colour. In extreme cases the shreds may disappear to a greater 
or less extent, leaving the butt hollow. One of the curious features of feather 
rot is the frequent occurrence, especially in the advanced stages, of small black 
spots. 

This rot usually begins at wounds or defective spots on the inner faces 
of the main roots just below the stump. It develops upwards into the trunk 
but for not more than a few feet as a rule, perhaps not as far as does the brown 
butt rot. In the course of time it extends out to the bark if the tree be not 
wind-thrown meanwhile. Feather rot continues to spread through the wood of 
dead or fallen trees until at last the wood of the entire trunk may be converted 
into a wet, stringy, yellowish mass. 

While the detailed appearance of feather rot is somewhat variable, its 
general features are so well marked that it cannot be mistaken. It may be that 
the variation is due to the action of different fungi, in which case the type would 
consist of two or more sub-types; or the variation may be due to the action of 
secondary fungi following up the primary fungal agent. Further research alone 
will settle this point; but so far as I have been able to observe, the question is 
not one that enters into the problem of utilization. Our investigations have 
determined that a fungus, Poria subacida, produces feather rot. The fructifi- 
cations make their appearance on the surface of the trunks of much decayed 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 203 

standing or fallen trees. They are in the form of white effused patches of variable 
size, up to a foot or more in diameter, closely adherent to the trunk on which 
they grow. Their surfaces are very finely porous. 

Feather rot, except in the later stages, is not marked by an excessive weaken- 
ing of the fibres — apparently the cellulose is more resistant to the action of the 
causal fungus than is the lignin. The actual loss in ordinary cutting operations 
usually amounts to a short butt log; it is doubtful if even this is necessary. 
Since feather rot may be present to the extent of fifty per cent, in some stands 
the avoidance of such a loss would not be inconsiderable. There is also a large 
loss traceable to this rot from windfalls. 

(3) Red heart rot of balsam. — Red heart rot (sapin rouge, or hemlock rot) 
is by far the most important disease in balsam from the standpoint of utilization. 
It is exceedingly prevalent. Fortunately the texture of the wood suffers less 
impairment than in the case of most other rots, and as indicated in the quotation 
introducing this section of the report, there are good grounds for anticipating 
profitable utilization of wood affected with it. For an account of red heart rot 
refer to the preceding section — "Sapin rouge, or Red Heart Rot of Balsam, etc." 

(4) Ahietinus or honeycomb sap rot of balsam. — This type of decay begins at 
the surface of dead standing or fallen timber, or slash, and works inwards; all 
parts of the tree are susceptible. It is one of the commonest of the diseases of 
dead coniferous timber, and it extends with amazing rapidity under suitable 
conditions of temperature and moisture. The affected wood turns a light straw 
colour. Very small empty pockets soon appear in the older decayed parts so 
that such wood is delicately honeycombed. It may continue inwards quite 
regularly — dependent on the moisture content of the wood — until all parts of 
the trunk and branches are involved. 

The cause is due to a fungus, Polyporus abietinus. The fructifications 
develop very abundantly; hundreds of them may be seen scattered about in 
flocks on the surface of diseased timber. They are bracket or scale shaped, thin, 
tough, small (one-half inch to one and one-half inches in width), white or purplish 
when young, ash-coloured to blackish with age, downy and somewhat zonate. 
The lower surface is purplish, but this colour may fade to a cream or bay; it 
is also porous. 

Abietinus rot is not marked by an excessive weakening of the fibres except 
in the later stages. The outer honeycombed wood, however, is valueless; more- 
over, it is largely worn away in handling before the mill is reached. In practice 
it would seem that where this rot is the only defect a great deal of dead wood 
could be profitably salvaged. 

(5) Brown sap rot of balsam. — Brown sap rot begins at the surface of the 
trunks of dead standing and fallen balsam and works inwards. It is rather 
closely restricted to the trunk but may attack the larger branches. In spite 
of statements to the contrary it is doubtful that this is ever a disease of living 
trees, at all events there is no experimental evidence in support of such a claim. 
The affected wood darkens somewhat to a straw colour or dull light brown. 
Very soon the decayed wood dries out and cracks in various directions. The 
checks, large or small, that appear in this way fill up with delicate white sheets 
of fungus tissue. But there is another distinctive feature — the wood has become 
very friable, that is, it powders readily when rubbed between the thumb and 
fingers; this is due to the removal of cellulose from the fibres. The decay, once 
under way, extends in all directions, and very commonly in an irregular line 
across the grain; it develops rapidly along cracks or checks. Eventually all 



204 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

of the wood is involved if favourable moisture conditions prevail, so that in 
the end it is converted into an easily powdered brown mass. 

Brown sap rot is caused by a fungus, Fomes pinicola, the fructifications 
of which are of rather frequent occurrence, but as a rule only one or two or 
three on the same trunk or stump. They are large, thick, hoof-shaped, perennial 
brackets, up to six inches in width and two or more inches in thickness. Their 
upper surface is gray to blackish, with or without a red rim; it is also concentric- 
ally ridged and furrowed. The under surface is very finely and compactly 
porous, and whitish, bufif, or cream-coloured. The substance of the interior of 
a fructification is especially distinctive as it is chamois or pale buff in colour 
and very felty tough. 

Timber much affected with brown sap rot is of no value. In less severe 
cases difficulty might be experienced in grading closely because of the unevenness 
with which the decay extends. 

(6) Yellow sap rot of balsam. — This is a rot of the sapwood of dead standing 
or fallen timber. It is caused by the same fungus agent as that which causes 
red heart rot or sapin rouge, namely,- Stereum sanguinolentum. The general 
features of the decay are the same as were described under the heading, "Red 
heart rot of balsam," except that the decay is more uniform and freer from 
mottling. It resembles the abietinus rot except that there is no honeycombing. 
As with the heart rot, the affected sap wood remains firm and hard for a long 
time so that it is doubtful if its pulping value is materially lessened, at all events 
in the earlier stages. A great many dead trees and chicots or stubs have been 
found in the course of our field work, suffering from no other defect, and from 
which much timber could apparently be salvaged. 

B. Types of defective spruce. (1) Brown butt rot of spruce. — This type of 
decay is like the brown butt rot of balsam. The cause has not yet been defin- 
itely determined, in other respects a separate account here is not necessary. 

(2) Abietinus or honeycomb sap rot of spruce. — This decay of spruce is like 
the abietinus rot of balsam, and the cause is the same. 

(3) Brown sap rot of spruce. — This decay of spruce is like the brown sap 
rot of balsam, and the cause is the same. 

(4) Pecky heart rot of spruce. — This rot is also known as "ring shake." It 
is a heart rot and quite commonly extends through all of the trunk. Occasion- 
ally the stump and main roots may be affected, though not as a rule. A similar 
butt rot (apparently quite identical for all practical considerations) is due to 
an entirely different fungus. Pecky heart rot is primarily a disease of living 
timber, but continues to spread in dead or fallen timber; it is very common in 
spruce and pine; it is infrequent in balsam. 

The affected heart wood in the course of decay darkens to some extent to 
a brownish or reddish colour. Very soon small white "pockets" begin to show 
at many points thickly scattered throughout the discoloured wood. The white 
pockets consist very largely of whitened, more or less separated fibres; this 
result is brought about by the localized removal of the lignin, and of the cement 
that holds the fibres together, so that in these spots the firm wood is changed 
to pure white, loose, cellulose fibres. With the progress of the decay the white 
patches enlarge until the affected wood is entirely filled with them. Eventually 
the white fibres may disappear, leaving the wood quite coarsely honeycombed, 
that is, full of small empty cavities separated from one another by thin parti- 
tions, but that comes about very tardily. This rot is one of the most easily 
recognized in cut timber because of its characteristic white "pockets" and is 
one of the best known because of its frequency in cheap grades of coniferous 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 205 

lumber. The recognition of diseased trees is more difficult, but they can often 
be readily spotted by their rather swollen knots and by the presence of fruit 
bodies at the knots. 

Infection takes place ordinarily through dead or broken branches, but may 
occur at wounds or frost cracks. Having gained entrance, the disease works 
directly into the heart wood, and from the level attained spreads upwards and 
downwards through the heart wood. Once established, the decay then extends 
outwards into the sap wood in all parts throughout the affected region of the 
trunk, and in time, if wind breakage does not happen meanwhile, the death of 
the tree is encompassed. The outermost zone of sap wood succumbs slowly, 
however. 

The cause of pecky heart rot of spruce and other conifers is a fungus, Tra- 
metes pint. Its fructifications are not uncommon on living trees and are plentiful 
on slash and fallen timber. They are bracket shaped, unless growing on the 
under side of prostrate trunks, in which case they are effused. They are tawny 
or chocolate brown or even blackish and vary in size from one to three inches 
in width and one-quarter to one inch in thickness. The upper surface is irregular, 
ridged, hairy or roughened, and the lower surface is porous. The interior sub- 
stance is of a yellowish brown colour. 

It has already been pointed out that wood diseased to the extent of 96 per 
cent, with pecky heart rot gives a very high yield of sulphite pulp. This is due 
to the fact that the fibres are not destroyed by the action of the causal fungus 
until a very advanced stage is reached. It would seem, therefore, that this 
type of defective spruce might be extensively utilized. As a matter of fact, 
some of the spruce now reaching the mills is affected with pecky heart rot and 
finds its way to the digesters. Wherever trees are attacked this rot commonly 
involves the entire length of the trunk, and in some mature stands half or 
more of the spruce timber may be affected; utilization, therefore, would tap a 
considerable supply now wasted. 

The control or pecky heart rot would follow along the same lines as for the 
control of the red heart rot of balsam. What was said in connection with the 
latter may in the main be repeated. The indications are that this disease is 
restricted to mature timber — though at what age spruce becomes susceptible 
has not yet been determined. If this may be tentatively assumed then two 
procedures are suggested, both of which would result in the prevention of infec- 
tion, one from the standpoint of the host, the other from that of the parasite, 
and both are matters of forest management. In the one case the adoption of 
a cutting cycle within the period of immunity would automatically ensure free- 
dom from disease. In the other case burning of slash would prevent the devel- 
opment of fructifications and so cut off the source of infection. The value of 
slash burning would probably be affected by the amount of dead trunks and 
brush on the floor of the forest included in the burning process. A combination 
of cycle cutting and slash burning would seem to assure complete control. 

The adoption of such a system of management may be far in the future. — 
Meanwhile, immense quantities of pecky heart rot spruce are being left in the 
forest, timber that might possibly be used profitably from every point of view. 
Utilization in itself will be to some extent a measure of control. 

The diseases of balsam and spruce described in the foregoing section are 
those of importance in the forest. Some of these continue to develop in the log 
piles, but besides them there are others not referred to which are peculiarly 
incident to the log piles at the mills or in logs long delayed en route. An investi- 
gation of the diseases of pulpwood timber subsequent to cutting would add a new 
chapter of useful information. 

8 L.F. 



206 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

IV. Hyalopsora Fern Rust of Balsam. 

The foliage of the balsam is subject to the attacks of many rust fungi, — 
species of five or six well-marked genera. All of them are known to parasitize 
an alternate host, and, indeed, infection is never from balsam to balsam, but 
from alternate host to balsam. These hosts, depending on the particular kind 
of rust, include the willow, fireweed, chickweed, blueberry and the ferns. The 
chickweed rust causes the "witches' brooms" common enough in some areas, 
but the others with one partial exception affect the needles only, and especially 
of seedlings and small trees. Injuries to the crown may at times be serious 
enough to cause a killing of young trees; this applies particularly to the fern 
rusts, although conditions during the past summer were so favourable to the 
fireweed rust in certain localities that pure natural stands of young balsams up 
to two feet in height were 100 per cent, affected and extremely heavily so. It 
is obvious that these rusts take a heavy toll at times and are a factor of con- 
sequence in reproduction. 

The revealing of the course of the life history of the balsam rusts has resulted 
from the persistent experimentation of several distinguished students of plant 
diseases. Robert Hartig, whose work on the diseases of forest trees laid solid 
foundations for the science of Forest Pathology, discovered the connection 
between a rust on the balsam and blueberry rust in 1880; though the two are 
so unlike in appearance yet they were proved by cross-inoculations to be but 
phases of the same rust, and its continuance is dependent on the association of 
the two hosts. Klebahn discovered the fireweed balsam combination in 1898, 
Fischer the chickweed balsam combination in 1901, Eraser the willow balsam 
combination in 1911, and Eraser a fern balsam combination in 1912. All of 
these connections were established by careful, repeated cross-inoculations under 
controlled conditions. 

A new rust on balsam has now been found in Ontario and Quebec and its 
connection with a long-known group of perplexing fern rusts {Hyalopsora) has 
been determined. 

An immature stage of this rust was observed in the Timagami Forest 
Reserve by the writer in the summer of 1920, and the mature condition found 
by H. P. Bell in the same locality in the spring of 1922. It was found to be not 
infrequent in Timagami during the past summer, and fairly abundant in the 
eastern forests of Quebec. Unlike the majority of balsam rusts it is not evident 
on the needles of the current season; an immature stage (pycnial) shows on two- 
year-old needles, and the mature stage (aecial) on needles beginning their third 
year. Professor Bell named the phase on the balsam Peridermium pycnocon- 
spicuum and made a few partially successful inoculation tests in 1922 that led 
him to tentatively recognize its connection with the Hyalopsora fern rust referred 
to above {Hyalopsora aspidiotus) on the oak leaf fern {Phegopteris dryopteris). 

The Hyalopsora rusts on ferns in Europe were described as far back as 1801, 
though they were not proved to be rusts until 1895. In 1916 Klebahn, one of 
the foremost European rust experts, inoculated balsam and spruce with the 
Hyalopsora rust of the oak fern, without effect on the spruce, and with indeter- 
minate results on the balsam. 

As there was an abundant supply of the newly-discovered rust on the 
balsam in Timagami in June, 1923, inoculations were made, with the help of 
Mr. G. D. Darker, from the balsam to the oak fern and with complete success. 
Twenty fronds in all were inoculated under perfectly-controlled conditions, and 
thirty fronds placed under the same conditions were kept as controls. Every 
inoculated frond showed lesions indicating infection (249 lesions in all), most of 



1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



207 



them bearing rust pustules (283 all told) and not one of the controls developed 
either lesions or pustules. The appended table shows the experiment in detail. 
The experiment demonstrates conclusively that the new rust on balsam is the 
alternate phase of the long-known fern rust Hyalopsora aspidiotus, the first 
species of the Hyalopsora rusts, the connections of which have been elucidated. 

First 



I 


noculated 


Date of 


appearance 


Fronds 


No. of 


No. of 




Fronds 


Inoculation 


of lesions 


Harvested 


lesions 


pustules 


1. 




June 20, 1923 


July 14, 


1923 


July 22, 


1923 


24 


16 


2. 




June 22, 1923 


July 18, 


1923 


« 




36 


4 


3. 




.June 22 & 25, 1923 


« 




« 




8 


10 


4. 




« 


(( 




« 




7 


10 


5. 




« 


« 




<( 




20 


8 


6. 




(( 


<( 




« 




17 





7. 




« 


« 




« 




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1 


8 




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« 


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« 




u 
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2 
6 





9. 







10. 




(( 


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u 




16 


3 


11. 




« 


« 




« 




4 





12. 




« 


« 




« 




6 


5 


13. 




June 21, 1923 


July 9, 


1923 


July 19, 


1923 


19 


66 


14. 




June 24, 1923 


« 




July 22, 


1923 


12 





15. 




« 


July 22, 


1923 


July 22, 


1923 


7 


6 


16. 




June 21, 1923 


July 9, 


1923 


July 18, 


1923 


6 


7 


17. 




June 24, 1923 


July 16, 


1923 


« 




12 


16 


18. 




June 20, 1923 


July 9, 


1923 


July 22, 


1923 


21 


128 


19. 




June 22, 1923 


July 13, 


1923 


« 




3 


3 


20. 




June 24, 1923 


« 




i< 




15 






249 



283 



208 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



211 



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1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



213 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



215 












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1922-23 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



217 



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1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 219 

Appendix No. 44. 

THIS AGREEMENT made in triplicate this fifteenth day of May, 1923. 

BETWEEN 

HIS MAJESTY THE KING, represented by the 
Honourable the Minister of Lands and Forests for the 
Province of Ontario, hereinafter called "The Crown," 

Of the First Part 
— and — 

THE SPANISH RIVER PULP AND PAPER MILLS, 
LIMITED, a Company organized and existing under the 
laws of the Province of Ontario, hereinafter called "The 
Company," 

OF THE Second Part. 

WHEREAS the Company was organized by Letters Patent of the Province 
of Ontario, with an authorized capital of Twenty Million Dollars ($20,000,000.00) 
divided into Two Hundred Thousand (200,000) shares of the par value of One 
Hundred Dollars ($100.00) each, of which One Hundred Thousand (100,000) 
are Preference Shares and One Hundred Thousand (100,000) are Common 
Shares, and 

Whereas the Company is the holder and owner of all of the capital stock 
of the Lake Superior Paper Company, Limited, a company duly incorporated 
under the laws of the Dominion of Canada, and operating a pulp and paper mill 
at the City of Sault Ste. Marie, in the District of Algoma, in the Province of 
Ontario, and 

Whereas the Company has operated continuously for a number of years, 
pulp and paper mills at the town of Espanola in the District of Sudbury, in. the 
Province of Ontario, and at the Town of Sturgeon Falls in the District of 
Nipissing, and 

Whereas at the three said mills of the Company the Company has a daily 
output of 700 tons of newsprint, 700 tons of groundwood, 290 tons of sulphite 
pulp, arid 50 tons of Ijoard or wrapping paper, and 

Whereas the Company has expended in the construction and operation of 
its three said mills large sums of money, and has represented to the Crown that 
it has an insufficient supply of pulpwood to support its said operations, and 

Whereas it is in the public interest that the said mills shall be assured of 
an adequate supply of pulpwood in order to guarantee the continuous operation 
of its mills, thus insuring the employment of a large number of workmen through- 
out each year, and 

Whereas in order to assure the Company of an adequate supply of pulp- 
wood for its mills the Crown, represented by a former Minister of Lands and 
Forests, set aside in September, 1919, an area of ungranted lands of the Crown 
and indicated his intention to grant to the Company the right to cut pulpwood 
over an area the extent and location of which was to be determined later, and 

Whereas in consideration of the setting aside of such area the Company 
has expended large sums of monies in addition to and extensions of its plants, and 

Whereas a Government cruise has been made and an estimate submitted 
and one-half of the cost of such work is chargeable to and payable by the 
Company, and 

Whereas this Agreement has been entered into in fulfilment of the intention 
of such former Minister: 



220 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

NOW THEREFORE THIS INDENTURE WITNESSETH that in 
consideration of the premises and of the mutual covenants, promises and agree- 
ments hereinafter contained, it is hereby agreed as follows: — 

1. In consideration of the premises of the contracts and agreements entered 
into on the part of the Company, the Crown, for the rates hereinafter set forth 
and provided and subject to the terms, conditions and regulations as to locality 
and manner of cutting, measuring, driving and removing same as may from 
time to time be imposed by the Minister, and subject also as hereinafter set forth 
and contained, will and doth grant to the Company for a period of twenty-one 
years from the date hereof 

(a) The right to cut and remove all the timber suitable for pulpwood except 
Red and White Pine and also except all Jack Pine twelve inches and over in 
diameter measured inside the bark eighteen inches from the ground, to supply 
the said mills or extensions thereof or additions thereto in or upon the area 
described as follows: — 

The Townships of Walls, Marjorie, Legge, Hook, Coderre, Stefansson, 
Lerwick and Kirkwall, in the District of Algoma, containing 647 square 
miles more or less; 

and 

the east one-half of the Township of Leeson, the Townships of Baltic- 
Barclay, Calais, Lloyd, Oates, Brackin, Missinabi, Admiral, Busby, 
East one-half of Township of Abbey, Townships of Clifton, Brutus, 
Muskego, Chaplain, Manning, West one-half of Township of Carty, 
Township of Keith, North one-half of Township of Ramsden, Town- 
ships of Mageau, Murdock, West one-half of Township of Evans, the 
unsurveyed area north of the Townships of Newton and Dale and 
south of the Townships of Ivanhoe and Keith, Township of Regan, 
East one-half of Township of Marshall, Township of Sandy, South one- 
half of Township No. ?>2>, unsurveyed area east of the Township of 
McOwen, Townships of Chapleau, Marion, unsurveyed area east of 
Genoa, North one-half .of Township of Tooms, North one-half of Town- 
ship of Greenlaw, North one-half of Township of Cunningham, Town- 
ships of Garnet, Benton, Mallard, Eric, Somme, Osway, Potier, Neville, 
and Chester, in the District of Sudbury, containing 1,598 square miles 
more or less. 

(b) The right to cut and remove all Spruce and Balsam to supply the said 
mills or extensions thereof or additions thereto in or upon that area, described 
as follows: — 

The Townships of Bonar, Lipsett, Copperfield, Sadler and Racine, in 
the District of Sudbury. 

(c) The right to cut and remove all the timber suitable for pulpwood except 
the Red and White Pine and Jack Pine, to supply said mills or extensions thereof 
or additions thereto in or upon the area, described as follows: — 

East one-half of Township of Addison, Township of Hill, West one-half 
of Township of Marshall, North one-half of Township No. 33, South 
one-half of Township No. 32, in the District of Sudbury, containing 
108 square miles, more or less, and the Townships of Amik, Abigo, 
Hay ward, Conking, Nobotik and Makawa, the unsurveyed area east 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 221 

of the Township of Abigo, less Indian Reserve, in the District of 
Algoma, containing 405 square miles, more or less, the total area of 
the herein mentioned lands being 3,066 square miles, more or less. 

2. The Company, for the right to cut the pulpwood on the said area, as 
above described, shall pay such rates as shall be fixed from time to time by the 
Lieutenant-Governor in Council, but in no case shall the Crown dues be fixed 
at higher figures than the price at which the general public shall be permitted 
to cut on other portions of the Crown domain, or than others similarly situated 
shall be permitted to cut. 

3. It is distinctly understood that the Company obtains the right to cut 
the timber only, and has no right to the soil or use thereof, except as may be 
necessary for cutting and removing the wood and timber as aforesaid, subject 
to such terms, conditions and regulations as to the cutting, measuring, removing 
and driving of the same as may from time to time be imposed by the Minister. 

4. The wood and timber shall be cut upon such portions of said territory, 
and in such manner as the Minister may from time to time direct, and such 
precautions shall be taken and means employed to prevent injury or destruction 
by fire on said territory as said Minister may require, including payments of 
such annual charge for fire protection, as may from time to time be fixed by 
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. 

5. All pulpwood cut on the said territory shall be used for the supply of, 
and shall be manufactured at, the said mills or extensions thereof or additions 
thereto. 

6. Pulpwood taken out in 4-foot or 8-foot lengths shall be measured, returned 
and paid for on the basis of 128 cubic feet to each stacked cord. Pulpwood 
taken out in lengths above 8 feet shall be measured in the log on the cubic basis 
and each 100 cubic feet shall constitute a cord. 

7. All slash made about camps, dumps, along tote roads, railroads, or at 
any other points which might constitute a serious fire menace, shall be disposed 
of as directed by an officer of the Department. 

8. In order to reduce possible difficulties arising from dual operations on 
the within mentioned area, no Jack Pine 12 inches and over in diameter measured 
inside the bark 18 inches from the ground will be sold by the Minister until the 
Company has been notified in writing of the proposed sale. 

9. The Crown does not guarantee any particular quantity of wood or 
timber nor undertake to do more than grant the right to cut such quantities of 
wood or timber as may be on said area, subject to the reservations and conditions 
hereinbefore provided. 

10. Proper sworn returns of wood and timber cut each season shall be 
made by the Company to the Crown, in conformity with the Crown Timber 
Act and regulations thereunder, and payment of dues upon all the wood and 
timber cut by the Company, shall be made by the Company to the Crown 
forthwith upon the rendering from time to time by the Crown to the Company 
of an account hereof; and in addition to all other remedies it may have therefor, 
the Crown shall have all the rights and powers in respect of the enforcement of 
such payments and of any interest charges thereon as are now or hereafter may 
be provided in the case of the dues on timber cut under timber license. 

11. The Minister shall have the right to inspect the timber operations on 
the said territory at any time he may deem it advisable or in the public interest; 
and if upon inspection it appears, and the Minister so decides, that the said 
timber operations are carried on in such a way that any merchantable or valuable 
timber that should be removed is being left or destroyed, the Minister shall 



222 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

have the right to estimate the said timber so remaining uncut or being destroyed, 
and charge the same to the Company at, and the Company shall pay therefor, 
the same rate of dues as if the same had been actually removed by the said 
Company. 

12. The cutting and removing of timber on said territory or any part 
thereof shall not be deemed to have been completed until it has been examined 
by an officer of the Crown nor until such operation shall have been declared 
satisfactory by the Minister. 

13. The Company shall not, at any time or in any place, deposit, empty, 
run or turn into any river, stream, or other waters whatsoever, any refuse, 
sawdust, chemicals, or matter of any kind, which shall be injurious to fish life, 
or have the effect of destroying, harming or driving away the fish in such river, 
stream or water. 

14. All water powers and privileges on said territory, and the right of the 
Crown to raise, hold, lower and maintain the waters on the rivers, streams and 
lake in said territory at such height and in such conditions as may be found 
necessary and expedient for the development of such water powers, are reserved 
to the Crown. 

15. The Crown shall retain the right to sell, lease, locate or otherwise dispose 
of any lands included in the said territory on the same terms and conditions 
for settlement, mining or other purposes as ordinary Crown lands situated 
elsewhere, and this agreement is not to impede or retard settlement, or mining 
operations, and nothing herein contained shall limit or affect the right of the 
Crown or its Ministers to sell, lease, locate, or otherwise dispose of lands in 
the aforesaid territory for settlement, mining or other purposes. 

16. Nothing herein contained or to be done hereunder or by virtue hereof, 
shall entitle the Company to a monopoly in the use of any rivers, streams, or 
lakes or tributaries thereof, in the said territory, but the same shall be and 
continue open for the use of the public in accordance with the law in that behalf, 
and in the event of the works of the Company in any way interfering with the 
driving of logs or timber down the said rivers, streams or lakes or tributaries 
thereof, the Minister, as well as such other lawful authority as may be constituted 
therefor, shall have full power to determine from time to time the provisions 
necessary to overcome such interference, and thereupon the said Company, as 
and when directed, will make provisions accordingly. 

17. It is distinctly understood and agreed that the Company shall not cut 
or remove any timber from any territory or area covered by this agreement 
while under license or permit from the Crown, except upon the written consent 
of the Minister. 

18. In the event of failure on the part of the Company to comply with any 
of the terms, requirements, provisions or conditions contained herein, the 
Minister may revoke the right, license or permit to cut the said forest products, 
and upon the said revocation all rights of the Company under the agreement 
shall be and become ipso facto null and void, provided that thirty days' notice 
in writing of intention to revoke the said right, license or permit shall be given 
by registered letter addressed to the Company at Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 

19. The Minister shall have the power to waive the right of revocation 
caused by any failure on the part of the Company herein provided for. 

20. Upon all dues of all kinds on the pulpwood and timber cut under this 
agreement prior to the first day of May in any year during the currency of this 
agreement remaining unpaid on the thirtieth day of September next ensuing 
thereafter, the Company, without prejudice to the power of the Crown to enforce 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 223 

the payment of such dues at any time the Minister may think proper, shall 
pay to the Crown interest at the rate of six per cent. (6%) per annum from 
said thirtieth day of September, and upon all of such dues remaining unpaid 
on the thirty-first day of October then next ensuing, the Company shall pay 
interest at the rate of one per cent. (1%) per month from said thirty-first day 
of October until the same is fully paid. 

21. The word "Minister" shall mean Minister of Lands and Forests of the 
Province of Ontario. 

22. This agreement shall be binding upon and enure to the benefit of the 
Company, its successors and assigns; provided, however, that this agreement 
and the terms created shall not be assigned or transferred without the written 
consent of the Minister, endorsed on said assignment or transfer. 

23. The said parties for themselves, their successors, heirs and assigns, 
respectively, do hereby covenant and agree to the full performance on their 
part, respectively, of everything herein stipulated to be done. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF said Minister of Lands and Forests for the 
Province of Ontario, and the Company, have hereunto set their hands and 
seals. 

Signed, Sealed and Delivered (Sgd.) Beniah Bowman, 

in the Presence of: Minister of Lands and Forests. 

(Sgd.) W. C. Cain, (Sgd.) T. Gibson, 

As to signature of Minister. President, 

Spanish River Pulp &' Paper Mills. 
(Sgd.) M. Lynch, 

As to signature of Company. (Sgd.) J. G. Gibson, 

Secretary, 
(Seal) Spanish River Pulp &" Paper Mills. 

(Seal) 



224 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 45. 

Copy of Agreement. 

Abitibi Power and Paper Company, Limited. 

Additional Area. 

THIS AGREEMENT made in triplicate this Twelfth day of July, 1923. 
BETWEEN:— 

HIS MAJESTY THE KING, represented by the 
Honourable the Minister of Lands and Forests for the 
Province of Ontario, hereinafter called "The Crown," 

OF THE First Part, 
— And— 

THE ABITIBI POWER AND PAPER COMPANY, 
LIMITED, a Company organized and existing under 
the laws of the Province of Ontario, hereinafter called 
"The Company," 

OF the Second Part. 

WHEREAS the Company was organized by Letters Patent of the Dominion 
of Canada, with an authorized capital of two hundred and fifty thousand shares 
of no par value, of which ten thousand are Preference Shares and two hundred 
and forty thousand are Common Shares, and 

Whereas the Company is the owner and operator of a pulp and paper 
mill at the Town of Iroquois Falls in the Province of Ontario, and 

Whereas the Company has operated continuously for a number of years 
a pulp and paper mill at the said town of Iroquois Falls with a daily output of 
400 tons of newsprint paper, and 

Whereas it is in the public interest that the said mill shall be assured of 
an adequate supply of pulpwood in. order to guarantee its continuous operation 
and insure the employment of a large number of workmen, and 

Whereas in order to assure the Company of an adequate supply of pulp- 
wood for its mills the Crown, represented by a former Minister of Lands and 
Forests, set aside in April, 1919, an area of ungranted lands of the Crown and 
indicated his intention to grant to the Company the right to cut pulpwood 
over an area the extent and location of which was to be determined later, and 

Whereas in consideration of the setting aside of such area the Company 
has expended large sums of monies in addition to and extensions of its plants; 

NOW THEREFORE THIS INDENTURE WITNESSETH that in 
consideration of the premises and of the mutual covenants, promises and agree- 
ments hereinafter contained, it is hereby agreed as follows: — 

1. In consideration of the premises of the contracts and agreements entered 
into on the part of the Company, the Crown, for the rates hereinafter set forth 
and provided and subject to the terms, conditions and regulations as to locality 
and manner of cutting, measuring, driving and removing same as may from 
time to time be imposed by the Minister and subject also as hereinafter set 
forth and contained, will and doth grant to the Company for a period of twenty- 
one years the right to cut and remove all the timber suitable for pulpwood, 
except Red and White Pine, and Jack Pine twelve inches and upwards eighteen 
inches from the ground, to supply the said mill or extension thereof or additions 
thereto in or upon the area described as follows: — 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 225 

In the District of Cochrane in the Province of Ontario, commencing at the 
southeasterly angle of the Township of Kennedy; thence easterly along the 
northerly boundaries of the Townships of Stimson, Sweatman, Findlay, Henley, 
Pliny, Steele and Scappa, and the production thereof easterly to a point on 
the Interprovincial Boundary line between the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec; 
thence northerly along the said Interprovincial Boundary eighteen miles (18 
miles) to a point; thence west astronomically twenty-four miles (24 miles) to a 
point; thence south astronomically twelve miles (12 miles) to a point; thence 
west astronomically twelve miles (12 miles) to a point; thence north astronomic- 
ally six miles( 6 miles) to a point; thence west astronomically six miles (6 miles) 
to a point; thence north astronomically fifteen miles (15 miles) to a point; 
thence east astronomically twelve miles (12 miles) to a point; thence north 
astronomically nine miles (9 miles) more or less to a point on Speight's base 
line; thence westerly along said Speight's base line twelve miles (12 miles) to 
a point; thence north astronomically six miles (6 miles) to a point; thence east 
astronomically twelve miles (12 miles) to a point; thence north astronomically 
eighteen miles (18 miles) to a point; thence west astronomically twenty-four 
miles (24 miles) to a point; thence north astronomically six miles (6 miles) to 
a point; thence west astronomically twenty-four miles (24 miles) to a point; 
thence south astronomically twenty-four miles (24 miles) to a point; thence 
east astronomically twelve miles (12 miles) to a point; thence south astronomic- 
cally twelve miles (12 miles) to a point; thence east astronomically six miles 
(6 miles) more or less to the intersection with the production northerly of 
Ontario Land Surveyor Speight's meridian line run in 1904; thence southerly 
along said production and along said Speight's line twenty-one miles (21 miles) 
to a point in the north boundary of the Township of Kennedy; thence easterly 
along the northerly boundary of the Township of Kennedy six miles (6 miles) 
more or less to the northeast angle of said Township; thence south along the 
easterly boundary of the Township of Kennedy nine miles (9 miles) more or 
less to the point of commencement; containing by admeasurement two thousand 
four hundred and sixty-six (2,466) square miles, as shown on the map hereto 
annexed enclosed by heavy black lines and shown in blocks one to seventy 
both inclusive, and the Townships of Barnet, Thackeray, Tannahill, Dokis, 
Elliot, Melba, Bisley, Clifford, Ben Nevis and Pontiac, all in the said District 
of Cochrane. 

2. The Company, for the right to cut the pulpwood on the said area, as 
above described, shall pay such rates as shall be fixed from time to time by the 
Lieutenant-Governor in Council in periods of five years, but in no case shall 
the Crown dues so to be fixed be at higher figures than the price at which the 
general public shall be permitted to cut on other portions of the Crown domain, 
or than others similarly situated shall be permitted to cut. 

3. It is distinctly understood that the Company obtains the right to cut 
the timber only, and has no right to the soil or use thereof, except as may be 
necessary for cutting and removing the wood and timber, as aforesaid, subject 
to such terms, conditions and regulations as to the cutting, measuring, removing 
and driving of the same, as may from time to time be imposed by the Minister. 

4. The wood and timber shall be cut upon such portions of said territory, 
and in such manner as the Minister may from time to time direct, and such 
precautions shall be taken and means employed to prevent injury or destruction 
by fire on said territory as said Minister may require, including payments of 
such annual charge for fire protection, as may from time to time be fixed by the 
Lieutenant-Governor in Council. 



226 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

5. All pulpwood cut on the said territory shall be used for the supply of, 
and shall be manufactured at, the said mill or extensions thereof or additions 
thereto. 

6. The Crown does not guarantee any particular quantity of wood or 
timber nor undertake to do more than grant the right to cut such quantities of 
wood or timber as may be on said area, subject to the reservations and conditions 
hereinbefore provided. 

7. All slash made about camps, dumps, along tote roads, railroads, or at 
any other points which might constitute a serious fire menace, shall be disposed 
of as directed by an officer of the Department. 

8. Proper sworn returns of wood and timber cut each season shall be made 
by the Company to the Crown, in conformity with the Crown Timber Act and 
Regulations thereunder, and payment of dues upon all the wood and timber 
cut by the Company shall be made by the Company to the Crown forthwith 
upon the rendering from time to time by the Crown to the Company of an 
account thereof; and in addition to all other remedies it may have therefor, 
the Crown shall have all the rights and powers in respect of the enforcement 
of such payments and of any interest charges thereon as are now or hereafter 
may be provided in the case of the dues on timber cut under timber license. 

9. Pulpwood taken out in 4-foot or 8-foot lengths shall be measured, returned 
and paid for on the basis of 128 cubic feet to each stacked cord. Pulpwood 
taken out in lengths above 8 feet shall be measured in the log on the cubic basis 
and each 100 cubic feet shall constitute a cord. 

10. The Minister shall have the right to inspect the timber operations on 
the said territory at any time he may deem it advisable or in the public interest; 
and if upon inspection it appears, and the Minister so decides, that the said 
timber operations are carried on in such a way that any merchantable or valuable 
timber that should be removed is being left or destroyed, the Minister shall 
have the right to estimate the said timber so remaining uncut or being destroyed, 
and charge the same to the Company at, and the Company shall pay therefor, 
the same rate of dues as if the same had been actually removed by the said 
Company. 

11. The cutting and removing of timber on said territory or any part thereof 
shall not be deemed to have been completed until it has been examined by an 
officer of the Crown nor until such operation shall have been declared satisfactory 
by the Minister. 

12. The Company shall not, at any time or in any place, deposit, empty, 
run or turn into any river, stream, or other waters whatsoever, any refuse, 
sawdust, chemicals, or matter of any kind, which shall be injurious to fish life, 
or have the effect of destroying, harming or driving away the fish in such river, 
stream or water. 

13. All water powers and privileges on said territory and the right of the 
Crown to raise, hold, lower, and maintain the waters on the rivers, streams 
and lakes in such territory at such height and in such conditions as may be found 
necessary and expedient for the development of such water powers, are reserved 
to the Crown. 

14. The Crown shall retain the right to sell, lease, locate or otherwise dispose 
of any lands included in the said territory on the same terms and conditions for 
settlement, mining, or other purposes as ordinary Crown Lands situated else- 
where, and this agreement is not to impede or retard settlement, or mining 
operations, and nothing herein contained shall limit or affect the right of the 
Crown or its Ministers to sell, lease, locate or otherwise dispose of lands in the 
aforesaid territory for settlement, mining or other purposes. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 227 

15. Nothing herein contained or to be done hereunder or by virtue hereof, 
shall entitle the Company to a monopoly in the use of any rivers, streams, or 
lakes or tributaries thereof, in the said territory, but the same shall be and con- 
tinue open for the use of the public in accordance with the law in that behalf, 
and in the event of the works of the Company in any way interfering with the 
driving of logs or timber down the said rivers, streams or lakes or tributaries 
thereof, the Minister, as well as such other lawful authority as may be consti- 
tuted therefor, shall have full power to determine from time to time the 
provisions necessary to overcome such interference, and thereupon the said 
Company, as and when directed, will make provision accordingly. 

16. It is distinctly understood and agreed that the Company shall not cut 
or remove any timber from any territory or area covered by this agreement 
while under license or permit from the Crown, except upon the written consent 
of the Minister. 

17. Upon all dues of all kinds on the pulpwood and timber cut under this 
agreement prior to the first day of May in any year during the currency of this 
agreement remaining unpaid on the thirtieth day of September next ensuing 
thereafter, the Company, without prejudice to the power of the Crown to enforce 
the payment of such dues at any time the Minister may think proper, shall pay 
to the Crown interest at the rate of six per cent. (6%) per annum from said 
thirtieth day of September, and upon all of such dues remaining unpaid on the 
thirty-first day of October then next ensuing, the Company shall pay interest 
at the rate of one per cent. (1%) per month from said thirty-first day of October 
until the same is fully paid. 

18. In the event of failure on the part of the Company to comply with 
any of the terms, requirements, provisions or conditions contained herein, the 
Minister may revoke the right, license or permit to cut the said forest products 
and upon the said revocation all rights of the Company under the agreement 
shall be and become ipso facto, null and void, provided that thirty days' notice 
in writing of intention to revoke the said right, license or permit shall be given 
by registered letter addressed to the Company at Iroquois Falls, Ont. 

19. The Minister shall have the power to waive the right of the revocation 
caused by any failure on the part of the Company herein provided for. 

20. The word "Minister" shall mean Minister of Lands and Forests of the 
Province of Ontario. 

21. This agreement shall be binding upon and enure to the benefit of the 
Company, its successors and assigns; provided, however, that this agreement 
and the term created shall not be assigned or transferred without the written 
consent of the Minister, endorsed on said assignment or transfer. 

22. The said parties, for themselves, their successors, heirs and assigns, 
respectively, do hereby covenant and agree to the full performance on their 
part, respectively, of everything herein stipulated to be done. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF said Minister of Lands and Forests for the 
Province of Ontario, and the Company, have hereunto set their hands and seals. 

Signed, Sealed and Delivered Beniah Bowman. 

In the Presence of: 
F. J. Niven. The Abitibi Power and Paper Company, 

Limited. 
F. H. Anson, President. 
W. H. Smith. L. R. Wilson, Secretary. 

(Seal) (Seal) 



228 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 46. 
THIS AGREEMENT made in triplicate this Tenth day of July, 1923, 

Between: His Majesty the King, represented by the 
Honourable the Minister of Lands and Forests 
of the Province of Ontario, hereinafter called 
"The Crown," 

OF THE First Part, 
— and — 
Continental Wood Products Company, Limited, 
hereinafter called "The Grantee," 

OF THE Second Part. 

WHEREAS by advertisement, duly published, the Honourable the Minister 
of Lands and Forests for Ontario called for tenders to be received by him up to 
and including the twenty-second day of June, 1923, for the right to cut pulp- 
wood and timber on a certain area situated in the watershed of the Trout and 
Chapleau rivers in the Districts of Sudbury and Algoma, hereinafter more 
particularly described. 

AND WHEREAS on the twenty-second day of June, 1923, the said 
Minister received from the grantee a tender for the right to cut pulpwood and 
timber on said area, which said tender has been approved and accepted. 

AND WHEREAS the right to cut pulpwood and timber on said area was, 
by said advertisement for tenders and by the tender of the said grantee, based 
upon and subject to certain terms, conditions and stipulations. 

AND WHEREAS this agreement is entered into for the purpose of ensuring 
the performance by the grantee of the obligations contained in said tender and 
acceptance thereof as hereinafter defined, and of securing the grantee the said 
supply of pulpwood and timber for the purpose of the mill or mills to be estab- 
lished, maintained, condqcted and carried on within the said area or at some 
point in Ontario approved by the Minister. 

NOW THEREFORE THIS INDENTURE WITNESSETH that in con- 
sideration of the premises it is agreed by and between the grantee and the Crown, 
as follows: 

1. On or before the thirtieth day of December, 1923, the grantee shall 
have commenced construction work on a Kraft pulp mill in the said area or at 
some other place in the Province of Ontario approved by the Minister and will 
thoroughly equip the same so that the expenditure in connection with the erection, 
equipment, and machinery of said Kraft pulp mill contained in said Kraft pulp 
mill will be at least One million five hundred thousand dollars ($1,500,000) and 
shall expend in connection with the erection, equipment and machinery of said 
Kraft pulp mill as follows: On or before the first day of June, 1924, the sum of 
Five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000) ; on or before the first day of January, 
1925, a further sum of Five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000); and on or 
before the first day of June, 1925, a further sum of Five hundred thousand dollars 
($500,000), making in all the said sum of One million five hundred thousand 
dollars ($1,500,000); or on or before which last-mentioned date the grantee 
shall have said Kraft pulp mill fully equipped and in operation. 

2. Upon and after the completion of said Kraft pulp mill, the grantee, 
during the currency of this agreement, shall operate and continue to operate the 
said Kraft pulp mill so that the daily output thereof shall, in each and every 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 229 

year during the currency of this agreement, be not less than seventy-five tons (75) 
of Kraft pulp and shall cut from said area at least fifty thousand cords 
(50,000) of pulpwood in each and every year during the currency of this agree- 
ment and shall for at least ten months in each and every year during the currency 
of this agreement employ and keep employed within the said Kraft pulp mill in 
connection with the operation of the same an average of at least one hundred 
(100) persons, and the employment of said persons as aforesaid shall form part 
of the consideration for the price of said pulpwood and timber. 

3. Within such time and at such place as the Minister may direct, the 
grantee shall erect a Kraft paper mill having a capacity of at least fifty (50) tons 
of paper per day; and, after the erection thereof, shall operate the same con- 
tinuously during the currency of this agreement so that in each year during the 
currency of this agreement, the average daily output of the said Kraft paper mill 
shall not be less than thirty-five (35) tons of Kraft paper. 

4. Commencing with the month of January, 1926, the grantee shall, in the 
month of January of each and every year during the currency of this agreement, 
deliver to the Minister upon such form as the Minister may direct, statements, 
verified by the oath of the secretary of the grantee, showing (first) the persons 
who, during the calendar year ending with the thirty-first day of December then 
next preceding were employed by the grantee in operating the said Kraft pulp 
mill; (second) the daily output of the said Kraft pulp mill during the calendar 
year ending with the thirty-first day of December then next preceding; and in 
each of said statements shall furnish also such other details in connection with 
said matters as the Minister may require. 

5. The cutting of the said pulpwood and timber may begin as soon as but 
not before the sum of One million dollars ($1,000,000) shall have been expended 
on the erection of the said Kraft pulp mill and equipment thereof. 

6. In consideration of the bonus hereinafter mentioned, and of the said 
expenditure, and of the contracts and agreements entered into on the part of 
the grantee, and subject to such terms, conditions and regulations as to locality 
and manner of cutting, driving and removing the same as may from time to time 
be imposed by the Minister, and subject also as hereinafter set forth and con- 
tained, the Crown will and doth grant to the grantee the right to cut and remove 
all the spruce, balsam, banksian or jack pine, poplar and whitewood trees suffi- 
cient to supply the said mill or mills to be erected for a period of twenty-one (21) 
years from the date hereof, and also to remove all red and white pine trees of a 
diameter of ten (10) inches and upwards at two (2) feet from the ground, and 
also spruce, banksian or jack pine, too large for pulpwood purposes, from the 
unlicensed, unsold and unlocated lands of the Crown hereinafter described, 
namely: — 

Being the townships of Lougheed, Davin, Amundsen and Kapuskasing in 
the District of Algoma, and the townships of Bonar, Shenango, Lemoine, Lincoln, 
Copperfield, Lipsett, Floranna, Sadler, Alcorn, Paul, Collins, Pattinson and 
Racine, in the District of Sudbury, having a total area of 1,049 square miles 
more or less. 

Saving, excepting and reserving nevertheless to the Crown all the spruce 
and balsam in the said townships of Bonar, Lipsett, Copperfield, Sadler and 
Racine, having a total area of 306 square miles, more or less; and upon which 
said last described area other persons to whom any right has been already given 
or may hereafter be given to cut and remove timber other than that herein 
granted to the grantee, may so cut and remove said timber; and saving, ex- 
cepting and reserving also the right of way of the National Railway; and also 



230 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

all lands under the waters of all rivers, lakes and streams within the said herein- 
before first described area of 1,094 square miles, more or less, and also all lands 
heretofore patented, licensed, leased, located, or applied for, in respect of which 
such proceedings have been taken or shall hereafter be taken as in the opinion 
of the Minister entitles the applicant or applicants to a lease or patent for such 
lands, together with the right of the Crown to sell, lease, locate or otherwise 
dispose of any lands included in the hereinbefore first described area on the same 
terms and conditions for settlement, mining or other purposes as ordinary Crown 
lands situated elsewhere; and also the right of the Crown and all other authorities 
authorized by statute to lay out and construct on any portion of said hereinbefore 
first described lands a colonization or other road or roads and any road in lieu of 
or partly deviating from any allowance for a road, without making compensation 
therefor. 

7. The Grantee, as to the right to cut the pulpwood and timber on the said 
area as above described, shall pay the following bonus on said pulpwood and 
timber, that is to say: — 

White pine, per thousand feet B.M.. $6.26 

Red pine, per thousand feet B.M 6. 10 

Jack pine, per thousand feet B.M 2 . 65 

Spruce, per thousand feet B.M 5.17 

Spruce, pulpwood, per cord 50 

All pulpwood other than spruce, per cord . .30 

Fuel wood, per cord 05 

Railway ties, per tie 06 

Cedar posts, each 03 

Cedar poles, 30 feet and less in length 05 

Cedar poles, over 30 feet and up to 40 feet 10 

Cedar poles, over 40 feet and up to 50 feet 15 

Cedar poles, over 50 feet 20 

and in addition to said respective bonuses shall pay on each of said classes and 
descriptions of timber the present rate of Crown dues or such other rates of dues 
as may from time to time be fixed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council for 
such pulpwood and timber respectively. 

8. It is distinctly understood that the grantee obtains the right to cut the 
pulpwood and timber only and has no right to the soil or use thereof except as 
may be necessary for cutting and removing the pulpwood and timber as aforesaid 
and subject to such terms, conditions and regulations as to the cutting, measuring, 
removing and driving of the same as may from time to time be imposed by the 
Minister. 

9. The pulpwood and timber shall be cut upon such portions of said terri- 
tory and in such manner as the Minister may from time to time direct. All 
slash made about camps, dumps, along tote-roads, within 300 feet of the right of 
way of railroads, or at any other point which might constitute a serious fire 
menace, shall be disposed of in a manner satisfactory to the Minister, and such 
precautions shall be taken and means employed to prevent injury or destruction 
by fire on said territory as said Minister may require, including payment of such 
annual charge for fire protection as from time to time may be fixed by the 
Lieutenant-Governor in Council. 

10. Pulpwood taken out in 4-foot or 8-foot lengths shall be measured, 
returned and paid for on the basis of 128 cubic feet to each stacked cord. Pulp- 
wood taken out in lengths above eight feet shall be measured in the log on the 
cubic basis and each 100 cubic feet shall constitute a cord. 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 231 

11. All pulpwood cut on the said territory shall be used for the supply of 
and shall be manufactured at the said mills (or extensions thereof or additions 
thereto approved of by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council). All other timber 
shall be sold subject to the manufacturing condition, that is to say, it shall be 
manufactured in the Dominion of Canada. 

12. Proper sworn returns of the quantity of pulpwood and other timber 
cut each season shall be made to the Crown in conformity with The Crown 
Timber Act and regulations thereunder, and payment of bonus and Crown dues 
upon all the pulpwood and other timber cut by the grantee, shall be made by 
the grantee for such pulpwood and timber not later tha,n the first day of October 
in each year, and in addition to all other remedies it may have therefor, the 
Crown shall have all the rights and powers in respect of enforcing such payments 
and the payment of any interest charges thereon, as are now or may hereafter 
be provided in the case of dues on timber cut under timber license. 

13. Upon all bonus and dues of all kinds on the pulpwood and timber cut 
under this agreement prior to the first day of May in any year during the cur- 
rency of this agreement remaining unpaid on the thirtieth day of September 
next ensuing thereafter, the grantee, without prejudice to the power of the 
Crown to enforce the payment of such bonus and dues at any time the Minister 
may think proper, shall pay to the Crown interest at the rate of six per cent. (6%) 
per annum from said, thirtieth day of September, and upon all of such bonus 
and dues remaining unpaid on the thirty-first of October then next ensuing, the 
grantee shall pay interest at the rate of one per cent. (1%) per month from said 
thirty-first day of October until the same is fully paid. 

14. The Minister shall have the right to inspect the timber operations on 
the said territory at any time he may deem it advisable or in the public interest, 
and if upon such inspection it appears to tlie Minister and the Minister so decides 
that the said pulpwood or timber operations are carried on in such a way that 
any merchantable or valuable pulpwood or timber that should be removed is 
being left or destroyed, the said Minister shall have the right to estimate the 
pulpwood and timber so remaining uncut or being destroyed and the grantee 
shall pay therefor the same rates of dues and bonus as if the same had been 
actually removed by the said the grantee. 

15. The cutting and removing of pulpwood and timber in the said area 
or any part thereof shall not be deemed to have been completed until it has been 
examined by an ofificer of the Crown, nor until such operation shall have been 
declared satisfactory by the said Minister. 

16. The grantee shall not at any time or at any place deposit, empty, run 
or turn into any river, stream or other waters whatsoever, any refuse, sawdust, 
chemicals or matter of any kind which shall or may be injurious to fish-life or 
have the effect of destroying, harming or driving away the fish in such river, 
stream or water. 

17. All water powers and privileges on said hereinbefore first described 
area and the right of the Crown to raise, hold, lower, and maintain the waters 
on the rivers, streams and lakes in said area at such height and in such conditions 
as may be found necessary and expedient for the development of such water 
power, are reserved to the Crown, but the Crown will be prepared to negotiate 
with the grantee in order to enable the grantee to secure an undeveloped water 
power to develop for the operation of the mill or mills hereinbefore mentioned. 

18. The Crown shall retain the right to sell, lease, locate or otherwise 
dispose of any lands included in the said hereinbefore first described area on the 
same terms and conditions for settlement, mining or other purposes as ordinary 



232 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Crown lands situated elsewhere, and this agreement is not to impede or retard 
settlement or mining operations, and nothing herein contained shall limit or 
affect the right of the Crown or its Ministers to sell, lease, locate or otherwise 
dispose of lands in the aforesaid hereinbefore first described area for settlement, 
mining or other purposes. 

19. Nothing herein contained or to be done hereunder or by virtue hereof, 
shall entitle the grantee to a monopoly of any rivers, streams or lakes or tribu- 
taries thereof in the said territory, but the same shall be and continue open for 
the use of the public in accordance with the law in that behalf, and in the event 
of the works of the grantee in any way interfering with the driving of logs or 
timber down the said rivers, streams, or lakes, or tributaries thereof, the Minister 
shall have full power to determine from time to time the provisions necessary to 
overcome such an interference, and thereupon the said the grantee as and when 
directed shall make provision accordingly. 

20. It is distinctly understood and agreed that nothing herein contained 
shall, without the consent in writing of the Minister, be deemed to confer any 
right to cut or remove any timber from any area while under license or permit 
from the Crown. 

21. The sum of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) deposited by the grantee 
with its tender for the above area shall remain on deposit until the Kraft pulp 
mill is erected and in operation as hereinbefore provided to guarantee the due 
performance by the grantee of the obligations of the grantee under this agree- 
ment to erect and operate said Kraft pulp mill, which said deposit shall be for- 
feited to the Crown in the event of the failure of the grantee to fulfil all or any 
of said obligations. Any timber cut in the meantime shall be subject to payment 
of dues and bonus as accounts for same are rendered. After the said pulp mill 
is erected and in operation the deposit of $50,000 may be applied on account of 
bonus dues as they accrue, but the regulation dues as mentioned above shall 
be paid in the usual manner as returns for cutting of wood and timber are 
received and accounts rendered. 

22. The Crown does not guarantee any particular quantity of wood or 
timber nor undertake to do more than grant the right to cut such quantities of 
wood or timber of the kind aforesaid as may be on the said area, subject to the 
reservations and conditions hereinbefore provided. 

23. Whenever and as often as it is requested the grantee shall forthwith 
cut and remove all pulpwood and other timber hereby granted to the grantee 
from all road allowances heretofore or hereafter laid out in said first described 
area by the Crown or other authority authorized by statute to lay out or con- 
struct roads therein. 

24. In the event of failure on the part of the grantee to erect, construct 
or operate the said Kraft pulp mill and paper mill, or either of them as herein 
agreed, or in default of the said the grantee keeping said Kraft pulp mill and 
said paper mill in operation after the erection thereof respectively as herein 
agreed, or keeping the required number of persons employed, as herein agreed, 
or upon default of compliance with any other of the terms, requirements or 
conditions as aforesaid, the Crown may revoke the right, license or permit to 
cut the said pulpwood and timber, and upon said revocation all the rights of 
the grantee shall be and become ipso facto null and void, and all moneys paid 
as a deposit, or bonus therein, shall be forfeited to the Crown, provided that 
thirty days notice in writing of intention to revoke the said right license or 
permit shall be given by registered letter addressed to the grantee at Elsas, 



1922-23 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 233 

Ontario, before any revocation, in order that the grantee may have an oppor- 
tunity of being heard should it so desire. 

25. The Minister may, by writing signed by the said Minister, waive the 
right to revocation caused by any failure on the part of the grantee herein 
provided for. 

26. The word "Minister" shall mean Minister of Lands and Forests for 
the Province of Ontario. 

27. This agreement shall be binding upon and enure to the benefit of the 
grantee, its successors and assigns, provided, however, that this agreement and 
the terms created shall not be assigned or transferred without the written con- 
sent of the Minister. 

28. The said parties, for themselves, their heirs and assigns respectively, 
do hereby covenant and agree to the full performance on their part respectively, 
of everything stipulated to be done. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, said Minister of Lands and Forests for the 
Province of Ontario has hereunto set his hand and seal and the grantee has 
affixed its corporate seal and the Vice-President and Secretary of the grantee 
have signed. 

Signed, sealed and delivered ] 

in the presence of I (Sgd.) Beniah Bowman, 

j Minister, Dept. Lands and Forests. 

(Sgd.) F. J. NiVEN.j 

(Sgd.) L. E. Bljss, 
(Seal) Vice-President, ' 

Continental Wood Products Co., Ltd. 

<Sgd.)TE. B. Sagendorf, 
Secretary, 

Continental Wood Products Co., Ltd. 



•«! *'<^- 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Lands and Forests 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

For the Year Ending 31st October 

1924 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO 
Printed and Published by Clarkson W. James, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 5 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Lands and Forests 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

For the Year Ending 31st October 

1924 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO 
Printed and Published by Clarkson W. James, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 5 



f 



PR0DUC6D By 



,The 

lUnitedi Press! 



To His Honour Henry Cockshutt, Esq., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

The undersigned has the honour to present to your Honour, Report on the 
operations of the Department of Lands and Forests for the fiscal year ending 
31st October, 1924. 

JAMES LYONS, 

Minister. 



13] 



Honourable James Lyons, 

Minister of Lands and Forests. 

I have the honour to submit herewith a report on the operations of the 
Department of Lands and Forests for the fiscal year ending 31st October, 1924. 

W. C. CAIN, 

Deputy Minister. 
Toronto, March 31st, 1925. 



(51 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Minister's Preface 7 

Appendices: 

No. 1. Department Inside Officers and Clerks 18 

2. Department Outside Agents and Inspectors 21 

3. Statement of Lands Sold and Leased with Collections 23 

4. Gross Revenue 24 

5. Receipts (Special Funds) 25 

6. Gross Disbursements (exclusive of Northern Development under Appendix 38). 26 

7. Timber Cut and Amounts Accruing re Dues, etc 28 

8. Revenue from Woods and Forests 30 

9. Successful Candidates at Cullers' Examinations 31 

10. Acreage under License and Pulp Concessions 32 

11. Statement of Patents, Leases, etc., Issued iZ 

12. Statement of Work in Military Office (Lands Branch) ii 

13. Locations, etc., under Free Grant Section of Public Lands Act 34 

14. Lands Sold 39 

15. Report of Director of Surveys on Crown Surveys 48 

16. Statement of Municipal Surveys Confirmed 50 

17. " Municipal Surveys Ordered 51 

18. " Crown Surveys in Progress 51 

19. " Crown Surveys Completed 52 

20. Surveyor's Report, Subdivision Part Township of Wicksteed, District of Algoma. 55 

21. " " West Part Township of Thorning, District of Cochrane. ... 55 

22. " " Subdivision Part Township of Ferris, District of Nipissing. . 56 

23. " " Certain Concessions, Township of Sibley, District of Thunder 

Bay 56 

24. " " Subdivision of Horseshoe Island, Township of Baxter, Dis- 

trict of Muskoka 57 

25. " " Cottage Sites Shore Trout Lake, Township of Widdifield, 

District of Nipissing 57 

26. " " Cottage Sites Trout Lake, Townships of Goreham and Ware, 

District of Thunder Bay 58 

27. " " Islands in Gloucester Pool and Severn River, District of 

Muskoka 58 

28. " " Township of Rowe, District of Rainy River 59 

29. " " Township of Goldie, District of Thunder Bay 60 

30. " " Township Outlines, District of Cochrane 61 

31. " " Traverse of Kabinakagami River, Districts of Algcma and 

Cochrane 62 

32. " " Traverse Part of Kabinakagami and Kenogami Rivers, Dis- 

trict of Cochrane 63 

2>}>. " " Traverse of Seine River and Islands, District of Kenora. ... 65 

34. " " Certain Township Outlines South cf Canadian Pacific Rail- 

way, District of Sudbury 66 

35. " " Township Outlines South of Canadian Pacific Railway, Dis- 

trict of Sudbury 67 

36. " " Traverse of English River, Districts of Kenora and Patricia. 69 

37. Colonization Roads, Superintendent's Report 73 

38. Northern Development Branch, Director's Report 74 

39. Settler's Loans — Commissioner's Report 80 

40. Forestry Branch Report — (1) Forest Fire Protection 83 

(2) Air Operations 96 

(3) Forest Survey and Investigation 102 

(4) Reforestation 107 

41. Statement of Timber Sales , 122 



[6] 



Report of the Minister of Lands and Forests 
of the Province of Ontario 

For Year ending 31st October, 1924. 



LAND TRANSACTIONS 

To record with any degree of detail the land transactions during the past 
year would be impossible in a brief space, as they not only cover a large variety 
of purposes but extend over a wide area. 

For agricultural purposes in pioneer settling there were slight increases in 
the number of free grant locations over the previous year although the areas 
allocated for free homesteading is gradually lessening, this class of land having 
been largely sought and granted in the past. The purchase of lands at fifty cents 
an acre for similar purposes increased considerably throughout the year, a large 
number having availed themselves of farm lands in the great clay belt traversed 
by the Transcontinental Railway. Additional lands opened in the vicinity of 
Kapuskasing and Hearst were eagerly sought. The opening of the lands was 
restricted to stretches immediately contiguous to the line of railway, the idea 
being to encourage compactness rather than isolation of settlement, and thus 
develop more readily community life and reduce the per capita cost of road 
construction. 

An important step was taken by the government to foster settlement in 
Northern Ontario, by the appointment of a supervisor of settlement, in the per- 
son of Colonel W. R. Smyth, a northern pioneer of many years' standing, a former 
Member of the Legislature of Ontario and later of the House of Commons. His 
knowledge and experience of the great northland will lessen the task of developing 
a system of closer co-operation between the Department and settler, whereby 
the latter's needs can be more closely studied and sympathetic treatment ac- 
corded. 

Parts of new townships were opened for settlement in the Thunder Bay 
District, where a keen demand arose for land on the part of a number of Scan- 
dinavians, whose general adaptabilities for pioneering work in this section are 
recognized, and whose expressed desires for agricultural areas may result in sub- 
stantial farming settlements. 

The past year showed the greatest advance in pioneer land settlement since 
the war. Notwithstanding the fact that no new land was opened as free grants 
during the season, 98,487 acres were granted to actual settlers free, as compared 
with 90,143 during 1923. 

In the purchased lands there is a ma/ked increase over the former year, of 
approximately 30,000 acres, the actual figures for 1923 being, 137,977 acres, as 
compared with 165,184 acres. Settlement shows a very marked improvement 
in stability, the number of assignments in both free grant and sale land being 
considerably less. 

[71 



REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Seven hundred and twenty-seven free grant locations were carried out as 
against 718 for last year, while 1,204 individual sales, covering farm lots, were 
allowed, or an increase of 226 over the previous year. 

The clay belt continues to be the most attractive, — one reason of course, is 
the larger area from which to select, — but with its productive possibilities, quan- 
tities of pulp and building material, natural drainage, ample waterways and 
railway facilities, it holds a most unique position and is therefore unusually 
attractive to prospective aggressive settlers. 

Exploiting lands of the Crown is prohibited and, while legitimate exchanges 
of holdings are necessary and advisable in some cases, general traffic in un- 
patented land is noticeably diminishing. 

Systematic and periodical inspections result in not only preventing specula- 
tion in any form, but stimulating more vigorous settlement and cultivation of 
the land by bona fide settlers. In a continued endeavour to eliminate the 
timber farmer and absent holder, 535 free grant locations were cancelled and 
507 sale holdings. 

Detailed tables showing the disposition of laoid for settlement purposes 
according to districts, both as to free grant and sa^e transactions, are found in 
appendices 13 and 14. A study of these tables discloses the fact that of the 
total number buying land for settlement purposes, no less than forty-four per 
cent, took up lots on the Transcontinental, between Cochrane and Hearst, 
about twent}^ per cent, along the line of the T. & N. O. Railway, and the balance 
in the various other districts. 

Clergy, Common, and Grammar School Lands 

The areas of lands set apart many years ago for these purposes are prac- 
tically exhausted, and no dealings of any consequence are now consummated, 
although in a few isolated instances parties clean up title, by paying outstanding 
charges, and secure patent. On account of former sales in such cases the collec- 
tions during the year amounted to $2,638.35. 

University Lands 

Some 3,710 acres were sold under this heading for $1,855.01 and $1,290.19 
collected. 

Crown Lands 

For agricultural, townsite and tourist purposes, 173,643.3 acres were sold, 
as against 154,018.94 acres for the previous year. The total collection on this 
acreage and former acreage sold was $119,790.57 as against $107,900.26 for the 
year 1922-23. Throughout the year 11,204.70 acres were leased for various 
purposes, the revenue derived from all leasehold areas amounting to $89,775.48. 

Military Grants 

By an amendment in 1922 to the Vetera,ns' Act, cap. 6, 1 Edw. VH, the time 
for making locations expired and now the holder of a certificate has only the 
privilege of surrendering it for a cash consideration of $50, or applying it as 
payment on Crown land at its face value, $80. During the year eighteen certi- 
ficates were surrendered and twenty-two patents were issued. Under the 
Act approximately 13,998 certificates were issued and all these have now been 
absorbed with the exception of about 1,050 which are still outstanding. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 9 

The aJDove has no reference to the special privilege accorded returned 
Canadian Oversea Soldiers of the Great War, who are entitled to acquire free of 
charge, a half-lot in Northern Ontario, subject, however, to all settlement 
regulations, which require actual residence, systematic clearing and real farming. 
One hundred and thirty-one returned men took advantage of this opportunity 
during the year as against 113 last year, but because of failure to comply with the 
regulations, eighty-two lost their locations as against eighty-three for 1923. 

Tourist Sites and Parks 

That interest is growing in our water resorts for tourist and hunting purposes 
is manifest from the many inquiries and the number of parcels sold and leased. 
Algonquin Park, the Mecca of seekers of health and enjoyment, continues to 
afford opportunities for numerous resident and non-resident summer and winter 
tourists, while beautiful Rondeau Park, in Kent County, is still a favourite point 
for thousands of lovers of the woods and water. A new subdivision of lots 
there was rapidly acquired by intending summer-home builders, who secured 
leases under reasonable terms. Quetico Park, in Rainy River District, had its 
usual quota of summer visitors, many of whom were from the adjoining state of 
Minnesota. Timagami, Nipigon and Mississaga Reserves, with their peerless 
beauty and their fish and game, attracted lovers of nature, anglers and hunters 
from far and wide. 

With a view to providing tourists with the ready me^ns of acquiring sites 
for summer homes within reasonable reach of railways, the Department has 
undertaken to rese^rve and subdivide for such purposes suitable areas and 
such sites will be given due publicity by the railways, which will closely co- 
operate with intending travellers in acquiring parcels from the Crown under 
fair terms and equitable building restrictions. 

Ranching 

Individual settlers desiring to add to their present holdings for grazing 
purposes have availed themselves in ce;-tain sections of very reasonable terms. 
Numerous and insistent inquiries have been made with respect to marsh or low- 
lying lands for the breeding of muskrats and other fur-bearing animals, the 
generally expressed opinion being that an industry of immense proportions may 
be gradually developed without seriously affecting the general areas open as 
common trapping grounds to bona fide trappers. A few licenses of occupastion 
were issued for this purpose and a number of applications are being investigated, 
the desire being to encourage through artificial means and careful protection 
intensive propagation in limited areas now depleted. 

Crown Surveys 

Surveys of Crown lands were carried out only where they were actually 
necessary for the development of settlement and the completion of work under- 
taken the previous year. 

Under the Surveys Act, the municipalities of the County of Lincoln and the 
townships of Sidney and Toronto Gore petitioned for surveys. Municipal 
surveys were performed and confirmed as petitioned for by the municipalities 
of t^e townships of Crowland, North Dumfries and Sidney, and the cities of 
Brantford and Toronto. 

For detailed reports of surveys see appendices 20 to 36 inclusive. 



10 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Water Powers 

An important water-power development in Northern Ontario at Island 
Falls on the Abitibi River, by the Hollinger Gold Mines Limited, tp augment the 
power now used for mining purposes, is nearing completion, t^is undertaking 
being in operation throughout the year, engaging at least one thousand men and 
involving an expenditure of about five million dollars. The capacity of this 
plant is around 20,000 horse-power. 

Important investjigations were pursued on the Lower Mattfigami by the 
Spruce Fails Company, whose plans contemplate the development of powers 
at Smoky Falls for the running of their present pulp mill and future paper mill 
at Kapuskasing. The power requirements at tjie head of the lakes necessitated 
the installation of the fin^ unit at Cameron Falls, but even witji this additional 
supply the needs of the immediate future will scarcely be met. The pulp indus- 
tries existing in this zone, whejn running to their full contemplated capacities, 
will call for a heavy consumption and may accentuate the difficulties experienced 
by the Department during the past season in regulating the control of different 
watersheds to satisfy the requirements of the varied logging, driving and power 
interests. Improvements on the Wahnapitae River, Dryden township, by the 
Wahnapitae Power Company have also been made during the past season to 
increase tiieir power supply. 

Conservation dams in certain parts of the Province-, including the Sheb- 
andowan watersheds, have been built during the year, the Governme^it retaining 
control over same. The Norman dam a«d Lake of the Woods control have 
formed a question of extended discussion between the Province and Dominion 
and Manitoba, but a settlement under which Ontario's rights will be duly re- 
spected is practically accomplished. 

Watpr powers are not alienated by the Crown but are merely leased under 
terms and conditions that provide a fair return to the Province in actual revenue 
and abig return in industrial and commercial prosperity. 

Timber Sales 

A marked change in the general system and practice of offering timber for 
sale was made. Heretofore, bidders were given the situation of the area involved 
and requested to make bids without regard to what the Crown considered a fair 
stumpage value. Each individual party was expected to cruise and estimate the 
kinds and quantities of timber thereon. Where competition was limited, the 
liability to offer a price merely beyond simple dues wa? present, and while the 
Crown could decline to accept any tender, the general practice was to deal fairly 
with the highest bidder and accept his tender if within a reasonable measure of 
what the Crown privately held to be fair. It was decided in fairness both to 
prospective purchasers and the Crown, that the Crown's estimate of the 
various classes of timber should be given and a minimum upset price fixed. 
Consequently all Conditions of Sales duly advertised now contain not only an 
estimafe of the material, but a fair upset price beyond which tenderers are asked 
to bid. Bidders are thus saved considerable time and expense in cruising, since 
there is no necessity of making such a close examination when in possession of 
types and estimated quantities, while the Crown is assured of a fair and reason- 
able price. The results already attained in applying the new method have 
proved the wisdom of the course adopted. 

Timber sales were largely excluded, in pursuance of the announced policy 
of the Government, to areas or limits contiguous to or required by existing 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS II 

industries. It is the desire to afford going concerns opportunities to get addi- 
tional supplies to secure investments, improve labour conditions and maintain 
community life dependent upon the logging and lumber industry. 

In the Mississaga watershed, Algoma District, several townships were sold 
at prices which averaged in t^he case of red and white pine, nearly $3 per thousand 
feet higher than like timber in former sales in the same section. These sales 
were the means of re-establishing on a firmer basis an industry of large propor- 
tions on the north shore of Lake Huron and of continuing in times when labour 
conditions are below normal, a number of going concerns. Certain areas within 
both the Quetico and Timagami Reserves were also sold by public competition. 
Areas of hardwood timber country in the Algonquin Provincial Park were 
especially cruised and found to contain valuable hardwood timber past maturity 
and deteriorating in quality. To provide against unnecessary loss, this timber 
was offered for sale. With a view to adequately maintaining the prime purposes 
for which the Park was created, special restrictions as to types, diameters, etc., 
were provided in the Conditions of Sale, and competition was keen, the prices 
received being regarded as exceptionally good. 

Other hardwood tracts were sold in Merrick Township, Nipissing District, 
and in Proudfoot, Parry Sound District, each area having been acquired by a 
mill owner for manufacturing purposes. The prices for hardwood areas ranged 
from $4 per thousand feet B.M. for poplar to v$6.75 per thousand feet B.M. for 
birch and maple, in addition to dues in each case. All this hardwood thus sold 
will be manufactured within tlie Province, as this class of timber is now subject 
to the manufacturing condition under the special legislation passed in 1923. 

A tract of poplar was also sold in the township of Stratton, the purchaser 
being the Canadian Splint and Lumber Corporation, Limited, and this will furnish 
supplies for the match splint factory at Pembroke. 

A complete list of the limits sold during the year will be found in appendix 
No. 41. 

Logging axd Lumbering 

The general tone of depression evidenced in the latter part of the season of 
1922-23 seriously affected the ability of the lumber operators to meet their 
financial obligations as was pointed out then. The outlook gradually improved 
and with a confidence born of faith in the industry, the operators proceeded with 
their cut and while not continuing as extensively as the year previous in log 
timber for lumbering, nevertheless, produced an output from Crown Lands of 
approximately 335 million feet of pine (including some 61 million feet of 
jackpine), and 62 million feet of other timber, less only by some 20 million 
feet of pine, but greater by 5 million feet with regard to other classes of log 
timber for lumber. The past year saw a marked increase in the railway tie 
production, it being in excess of the previous one by over 1,300,000 pieces. 

Pulpwood operations exceeded expectations, the year showing a cut of 
688,000 cords as against only 573,000 cords for the preceding season. 

These facts prove most interesting when one considers the rather uncertain 
condition of the Canadian pine and spruce market in Eastern Canada during 
the past year. F^xtreme caution was exercised by all dealers and a continuation 
of the unsettled condition to the end of the fiscal year created doubts in the 
minds of several operators on the advisability of pushing bush operations for the 
coming season. Signs are slowly pointing towards a restoration to normal with 
the result that recent surveys by Departmental outside agents, while indicating 
a reduced output, predict larger operations than were anticipated by the trade 
two months ago. 



Y 



12 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Pulp and Paper Industry 

Pulp mills in the north are consuming large supplies of the raw material 
and all mills in operation last year are turning out pulp and paper in quantities 
as great as the preceding year. 

The newsprint plants are probably in a securer position than the others 
and have expanded, while the pulp mills, the high-grade paper mills, wrapping 
and kraft paper mills generally, are sanely cautious, the American tariff on the 
finished product in part being the cause. The Great Lakes Company have 
completed and are operating their new groundwood pulp mill at Fort William, 
its capacity being 180 tons. The Guaranty Investment Company made additions 
to their holdings at Nipigon and are on a fair road to being an important pro- 
ducer. The Thunder Bay Paper Company in Port Arthur made an extension 
to their mill, increasing the capacity from 65 to 120 tons a day, the new 
equipment consisting of new pocket grinders, wet machines, hydraulic presses 
and loose power motors. These improvements will call for an extra 2,500 horse- 
power of electrical energy. 

The Continental Wood Products have secured their site and made consider- 
able expenditure in extending clearances in connection with their contemplated 
kraft mill at Elsas, on the Canadian National Railway, north of Sudbury, and 
it is hoped that another year will see its completion' and the establishment of a 
great industrial centre at that point. The company are now conducting an 
extensive logging and sawmill operation, involving the employment of four to 
five hundred men and the production of large quantities of lumber. 

The Backus interests completed their new 100 ton paper mill at Kenora, 
and same is in operation. 

Forest Cruising and Estimating 

Mapping forest types was continued and a large area hitherto not reported 
on in the western section of the Nipigon watershed, was mapped by means of 
aircraft and this with an additional area on the eastern section of the same 
waters, was covered by land parties for estimating purposes, these areas com- 
prising roughly 6,885 square miles. The extensive work thus carried on by our 
own staff, operating our own aircraft and supervising experienced land parties, 
has placed the Crown in possession of much desired information. The detailed 
data are being tabulated for the permanent records and are essential to an 
intelligent treatment by the Government of the situation at the head of the lakes, 
where certain established concerns are in crying need of raw material for the 
continued development of the pulp and paper business which means so much to 
the industrial and commercial life of the country. 

Further intensive work was done and reports made through the Crown 
timber agents on certain isolated blocks yet to be offered for sale. Reports also 
were made on areas where sales were carried out by public competition. 

Forest Protection 

This past season has been a very favourable one from the standpoint of 
controlling forest fires. The total loss in acreage and timber is very much 
below that of any previous season, since 1917. The most serious fire occurred 
in the south central part of Algonquin Park in the pine limit of the'J. R. Booth, 
Limited, where approximately forty million feet of pine timber was affected, but 
due to the insistence of the Government and the active co-operation of the 
company, a comprehensive operation was undertaken immediately after the 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 13 

fire and continued throughout the summer, the intention being to salvage the 
entire lot so that in the ultimate analysis the real timber loss will be 
infinitesimally small. 

The season opened very early and we began having spring fires in April. 
This was owing to the dry condition in which the woods were left the previous 
autumn, without any water in the swamps. The early opening of the fire hazard 
required quite a large staff earlier than usual. During the middle of the summer, 
however, the favourable weather with rainy periods throughout the most serious 
summer months, enabled us to reduce the staff so that there was approximately 
35 to 40 per cent less than the previous season. 

Another abnormally dry period occurred very late in the autumn, running 
into the first few days of November, which required the maintenance of the 
skeleton staff much later than usual. 

One of the outstanding features of this season's work was the introduction 
of aircraft as a means of patrol and detection, especially for outlying regions, thus 
enabling us to reduce the ground staff to a considerable extent. 

To inaugurate the Provincial Aircraft Service, owned, controlled and 
operated by the Province, some fifteen H. S. 2-L flying boats were purchased. 
Over 2,500 hours were flown in the season of 1924, comprising a mileage of 
167,375. The aircraft was used for patrolling, surveying, sketching, photographing 
and other purposes, and we have every reason to feel from our first year's experi- 
ence that an important advance has been made in the policy of forest protection. 

Another feature of this season's work was the purchase of fifty mechanical 
fire-fighting units in the shape of pumps and hose. This meant an expenditure 
of some $50,000, but from reports gathered throughout many parts of the 
Province, these pumps have more than saved their price in making it possible 
to successfully cope with serious fires. The service now has 140 of such pumps 
with 280,000 feet of hose. 

The total expenditure during the past season amounted to $864,000, which 
is a little over $200,000 less than last year, and this expenditure included the cost 
of all flying boats and maintenance in connection therewith. For closer details 
see special appendix No. 40. 

Reforestation 

The various forest stations reported a very successful season for the develop- 
ment of nursery work and the making of additional plantations, owing to favour- 
able weather conditions. For instance, in the various nurseries there is a 
total of 25,500,000 plants, of which about 6,000,000 are ready for final planting. 

During the past season there were a little over 3,000,000 plants sent out for 
permanent planting, as follows: — 

Provincial Forest Station 437,280 

Municipal plantations 633,260 

Private landowners 1,954,671 



3,025,211 



Seed collecting was carried on during the autumn and a seed extracting 
plant was completed at Angus, in Simcoe County, which lies in the centre of a 
splendid region for collecting red and white pine. 

For complete details see appendix No. 40. 



14 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Colonization Roads 

The total expenditure for colonization roads within the area where this 
service operates . was approximately $450,000, as against $830,000 for the 
previous year. To meet by-law requests under which the Crown spends an amount 
equal to that voted by the township, the sum of $227,196.97 was spent, or ap- 
proximately $42,000 less, while the construction, maintenance and repair of 
roads and bridges, all of which is borne and expended by the Crown, cost in 
round numbers $200,000, or over $300,000 less than in the year 1923. 

This was due in part to a portion of the territory lying north of the French 
River having been withdrawn from direct grants and taken care of by the 
Northern Development Vote, and in part also to restricting the spending of money 
to only such sections as necessity demanded. 

The assistance thus granted those portions of the country where no immedi- 
ate benefit is being derived from the Provincial Highway system is justified and 
appreciated. 

Northern Development Branch 

The construction of roads and bridges hitherto carried on in Northern 
Ontario, both by the Department of Public Works and the Department of Lands 
and Forests, was, under Order-in-Council, dated the 13th March, 1924, entirely 
assumed by the latter. 

In addition certain road and bridge building, formerly chargeable to Coloniza- 
tion Road Vote, was carried on by the Branch. Notwithstanding these added 
services, the expenditure of $3,296,000 throughout the year was a reduction 
from that of the previous one by approximately $155,000, 

Trunk road construction and improvement was responsible for most of the 
outlay although the lateral roadway^ received their share of attention and 
new roads were cut out as far as possible to keep pace with pioneer settlement. 

Expenditures on fire relief, seed grain, agricultural implements, etc., and 
loans to settlers were continued during the year, but most of these show con- 
siderable decreases over previous year. It is interesting and encouraging to 
note that with respect to loans to settlers, repayment as to principal has been 
made to the extent of eighty-five per cent, and as to interest, ninety-one per 
cent. 

For detailed particulars on Northern Development operations see appendix 
No. 38. 

Accruals and Collections 

For the year the total accruals from timber and pulpwood operations were 
$4,249,605.20, or over $540,000 greater than the preceding year; this being very 
largely accounted for by an increase in fire charges of over $200,000, part of 
which had been outstanding, an increase in cash deposits of $135,000 paid at 
time of timber sales, and an increase in timber dues. 

On this account collections to the extent of $4,136,262.67 were received. 
Land sales, leases, fees, etc., added $379,980.80, and payments under Northern 
Development services in the way of retired loans, etc., amounted to $237,276.38, 
making a grand total for the year of $4,753,519.93, the largest in the history of 
the Department. When the uncertain conditions of the lumber industry are 
considered and the apparent difficulties some of the operators are experiencing 
in marketing their assets, it is a source of satisfaction to record such a revenue. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 15 



Disbursements 

The total expenditure for which the Department was responsible amounted 
to $5,735,300.64, or less than the year 1923 by $1,319,211.78. 

In the general service operations which exclude outlays of the Northern 
Development Branch, covered by and charged to a special legislative grant, 
considerable reductions on controllable expenditures were made. For instance, 
a saving of over $200,000 was effected in fire ranging, where the cost was some 
$864,000, and this included the purchase of an up-to-date air fleet comprising 
fifteen planes and additional pumps and hose, with other valuable equipment. 

In a number of other items important reductions are also noted. 

For a complete statement of disbursements under the various services other 
than the Northern Development Branch, see appendix 6, and for the latter see 
appendix No. 38. 



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3 "s rt u aj Co rt 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



23 



Appendix No. 3 

Statement of Lands Sold and Leased. Amount of Sales and Leases and Amount of Collections 
for the year ending October 31st, 1924 



Service. 



Lands Sold: 



Agricultural and Townsites . 

Clergy Lands 

Common School Lands. . . . 
Grammar School Lands . . . , 
University Lands 



Lands Leased: 
Crown . . . . 
Temagami . 



Acres sold 

and 

leased. 



173,643.30 
90. 



3,710. 



11,180.95 

23.75 



188,648. 



Amount of 

sales and 

leases. 



142,459 87 
45 00 



1,855 01 



5,114 60 
370 00 

149,844 48 



Collections 

on sales 
and leases. 



$ c 

119,790 51 
968 55 

1,055 72 
614 08 

1,290 19 



87,924 33 
1,851 15 

213,494 53 



24 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 4 

Statement of Revenue of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 

October 31st, 1924 



Service. 


% c. 


$ c. 


1 c. 


Land Collections. 

Crown Lands: 
Agricultural 


97,930 19 
21,860 32 


119,790 51 
3,928 54 




Townsites 








Clergy Lands 


968 55 
1,055 72 

614 08 
1,290 19 




Common School Lands 




Grammar School Lands 




University Lands 












123,719 05 


Rent: 

Crown Leases 


80,320 23 

2,762 56 

4,091 00 

712 84 

1,851 15 

37 70 


Algonquin Provincial Park 






Rondeau Provincial Park 






Bruce Beach . 






Temagami Leases 






Sand and Gravel 










89,775 48 


Woods and Forests. 
Bonus 


1,352,487 77 

2,275,006 32 

103,558 62 

398,283 71 

6,290 00 

636 25 








Ground Rent 












Transfer Fees 






Mill License Fees 










4,136,262 67 


Parks: 

Algonquin Provincial Park 


6,662 56 
1,142 59 
1,092 00 


Rondeau Provincial Park ., 






Quetico Provincial Park 










8,897 15 




1,514 41 
667 10 
189 00 


Cullers' Fees 






Forest Reserves Guides' Fees 










2,370 51 


Refunds. 
Forest Ranging • 


145,589 65 

4,471 87 

2,403 55 

1,297 56 

461 12 

400 00 

200 00 

200 00 

194 94 








Surveys 






Reforestation 






Clearing Townsites and Removing Fire Hazards. . . 






Way Township 






Agents' Salaries and Disbursements 












Contingencies, 










155,218 69 




3,713 39 
233,562 99 


Colonization Roads and Northern 
Development Branches. 

Colonization Roads — Refunds 


4,516,243 55 


Northern Development 










237,276 38 






Grand Total 


$4,753,519 93 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



25 



Appendix No. 5 

Statement of Receipts of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 
October 31st, 1924, which are considered as Special Funds 



Service. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Principal 


Clergy Lands. 


553 77 
414 78 




Interest 






Common School Lands. 


968 55 


Principal 


665 20 
390 52 


Interest , . 






Grammar School Lands. 


1,055 72 


Principal 


383 80 
230 28 


Interest , 






University Lands. 


614 08 


Principal 


1,007 75 
282 44 


Interest 








1,290 19 








$3,928 54 



26 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 6 

Statement of Disbursements of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 

October 31st, 1924. 



Service 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Agents' Salaries and Disbursements 






98,636 33 


Ottawa Agency 






2,649 91 


Cullers' Act 






466 43 


Algonouin Provincial Park 






40,326 05 


Allowance School Section, South Walsingham.. . 






300 00 


Allowance School Section, Township of Vespra . 






500 00 


Board of Surveyors 




• • < 


200 00 


Burlington Beach Lavatories 






1,079 88 


Clearing Townsites and Removing Fire Hazards. 







35,443 41 


Colonization Roads 






447,444 66 


Compensation to Chippewa and Mississauga 
Indian Tribes 






100,000 00 


Compensation to Mrs. Rosa C. Bonner, for cost 
of Survey 






55 60 


Display at Toronto Exhibition 






920 94 


Fire Ranging 






864,285 98 


Forest Ranging . . 






461,478 59 


Forest Reserves 






5,841 79 


Grant Canadian Forestry Association 






3,000 00 


Insurance 






2,883 62 


Litigation of Constitutional and other Questions 






281 05 


Moving Expenses of Officials 






203 70 


QuETico Provincial Park 






9,523 77 


Reforestation 






201,690 15 


Refunds — Miscellaneous 






10,333 72 


Rondeau Provincial Park 






8,153 79 


Surveys 






80,236 31 


Unforseen and Unprovided 






1,211 74 


Vexerans' Commutation 






851 52 


Workmens' Compensation 






4,582 67 










Carried forward 


2,382,582 51 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



27 



Appendix No. 6 — Continued 



Service 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 






2,382,582 51 
20 00 


Miscellaneous: 

Law Society of Upper Canada, fees 






Contingencies, Advertising, etc 






60,646 20 


Contingencies, Colonization Roads 






2,849 65 












2,446,098 36 



For particulars of expenditure of the Northern Development Branch, see Appendix No. 38. 



28 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix 

Forestry 

Statement of Timber and Amounts accrued from Timber Dues, Ground Rent, 

Quantity and 





Area 
covered 

K 
timber 

licenses 


Saw Logs. 


Agencies. 


Red and Wiiite Pine 


Jack Pine 


Other 




Square 
Miles 


Pieces 


Feet B.M. 


Pieces 


Feet B.M. 


Pieces 


Feet B.M. 


Western Timber District.. . . 
Belleville Timber District. . 


14,150 

570M 
4,415 Ji 


6,149,815 
112.197 
395,375 


245,141,551 

2,208,730 

22,548,682 


3.554.403 


59,716,194 


1.504.166 

97.931 

310,315 


46.182.392 
3.136,788 


Ottawa Timber District 


21.233 


328,275 


10,254,032 




19.136 


6.657,387 


269.898,963 


3.575,636 


60,044,469 


1.912.412 


59.573,212 



Statement 



Agencies 


Shingle 
Bolts 


Cedar 
Posts 


Tele- 
graph 
Poles 


Pulp- 
wood 


Railway 
Ties 


Waney 








Cords 


Pieces 


Pieces 


Cords 


Pieces 


Pieces 


Cubit ft. 


Transfer 
Fees 


Interest 




14 


51,729 

6,979 

88 


16.182 

641 

1.563 


668.656 

275 
19.137 


3.014.943 
4,944 
1.697 






$ c. 
4.605 00 

245 00 

1.440 00 


$ c. 

92,459 14 








55 71 


Ottawa Timber District 


340 


15.351 


3.091 86 










14 


58.796 


18.386 


688.068 


3.021.584 


340 


15.351 


6,290 00 


95.606 71 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



29 



No. 7 

Branch 

Fire Protection and Bonus, etc., during the year ending 31st October, 1924 

Description of Timber 



Boom and Dimension 




Pil 


nc 




Cordwood 

— 


Tan 
bark 


Red and White 
Pine 


Jack Pine 


Other 




Hard 


Soft 




Pieces 


Feet B.M. 


Pieces 


Feet B.M 


Pieces 


Feet B.M 


Pieces 


Lineal 
Feet 


Pieces 


Feet 
B.M. 


Cords 


Cords 


Cords 


31,338 
885 


4,824,366 
146,951 
135,045 


14.609 


1,232,800 


16,774 

752 

3,598 


1,918,009 
114,898 
519,327 


1,449 


55.499 


3,293 


286,197 


2,894 
30 


41,025 

29 

6,312 


992 
9 


1.574 


































33,797 


5,106.362 


14.609 


1,232,800 


21,124 


2,552,234 


1.449 


55,499 


3,293 


286,197 


2,924 


47,366 


1.001 



of Timber — Concluded 



Amounts Accrued. 



Trespass 


Mill License 
Fees 


Timber Dues 


Bonus 


Deposit 
Timber Sales 


Ground 
Rent 


Fire 
Protection 


Total 


« c. 

55.401 89 

1.750 67 


$ c. 

636 25 


$ c. 
1,697.992 86 

U.745 60 

89.987 37 


$ c. 

1,497.565 29 

235 18 
15,612 81 


$ c. 

274.785 00 


$ c. 

77.470 31 

2.954 62 
22,465 00 


$ c. 
365,500 51 

4.028 00 

28,755 20 


$ c. 

4,066,416 25 

21,014 78 


821 93 






162.174 17 










57,974 49 


636 25 


1,799,725 83 


1,513,413 28 


274.785 00 


102,889 93 


398,283 71 


4.249.605 20 



30 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 8 
Forestry Branch 
Statement of Revenue collected during the year ending October 31st, 1924 

Amount of Western Collections at Department $3,965,638 53 

Belleville " " " 15,083 98 

Ottawa " " " 155,540 16 

$4,136,262 67 



Timber Dues $2,275,006 32 

Bonus 1,352,487 77 

Ground Rent 102,558 62 

Fire Protection 398,283 71 

Transfer Fees 6,290 00 

Mill License Fees 636 25 



$4,136,262 67 



Western Division — 

Timber dues $1,797,694 55 

Bonus 1,352,487 77 

Interest, timber dues 91,955 46 

Ground rent 77,470 31 

Interest, ground rent 503 68 

Fire protection 365,500 51 

Timber sale deposits 274,785 00 

Transfer fees 4,605 00 

Mill License Fees 636 25 



5,965,638 53 



Ottawa Division — 

Timber dues $99,788 10 

Interest, timber dues 2,976 66 

Ground rent 22,465 00 

Interest, ground rent 115 20 

Fire protection 28,755 20 

Transfer fees 1,440 00 



Belleville Division — 

Timber dues , 

Interest, timber dues. 

Ground rent 

Interest, ground rent. 

Fire protection 

Transfer fees 



$7,800 65 


5 


90 


2,954 


62 


49 


81 


4,028 


00 


245 


00 



155,540 16 



15,083 98 
1,136,262 67 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 31 

t 

Appendix No. 9 

CULLERS' EXAMLNATION 

As intimated in the last Report, the Ontario Cullers' Act (being Chap, 172 
of the Revised Statutes of Ontario, 1914) was repealed, but notwithstanding 
such repeal all licenses heretofore issued under said Act, and now in force, and 
the holders of which are in good standing, shall remain valid. 

The new Act (14 George V, Chap. 46) now provides that a person may- 
secure a license for measuring sawlogs and pulpwood, or may secure a license 
to enable him to act as scaler of pulpwood only. 

Examinations for Cullers' Licenses under the above Act were held on 
August 14th, 1924, at Callander, Thessalon, Fort Frances, Iroquois Falls and 
Elsas, when seventeen candidates succeeded in passing as sawlog and pulpwood 
cullers, and sixteen candidates were granted licenses to scale pulpwood only. 

A large percentage of candidates was rejected, due mainly to the fact that 
they failed in the practical test. In a good many cases the parties presenting 
themselves had little or no previous experience in the scaling of logs where 
deductions for defects are necessary. 



CULLERS' EXAMINATIONS 

Five examinations were held during the year at Thessalon, Callander, Fort Frances, Iroquois 
Falls and Elsas on the 14th of August, 1924. 

Thirty-three candidates were successful in passing at the examinations, seventeen being 
granted licenses to cull sawlogs and pulpwood, and sixteen obtaining licenses to scale pulpwood 
only. The following is a list of the parties who were successful, together with their post office 
address, place of examination and qualifications: 

Place of License 

Name Address Examination Qualifications 

Anderson, E. R Kapuskasing Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

Bliss, R. Hamilton Oba Elsas Sawlogs and Pulpwood, 

Bailey, J. W Iroquois Falls Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

Brown, J. H Iroquois Falls Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

Crawford, R. J Thessalon Callander Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Charette, J. A Cutler Thessalon Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Charlebois, Peter Sault Ste Marie. . . .Thessalon Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Courtney, James Iroquois Falls Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

Durrell, H New Liskeard Callander Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Fisher, Morris Sault Ste Marie Thessalon Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Foy, K. N Iroquois Falls Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

Fanning, John Kapuskasing Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

Fleming, F. L Haileybury Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

Galbraith,' Angus L Fort Frances Fort Frances Sawlogs and Pulpwood, 

Gibson, Wm, J Chapleau Elsas Pulpwood only. 

Hughes, Duncan Barwick Fort Frances Sawlogs and Pulpwood, 

Huckson, Elmer Sault Ste Marie Thessalon Sawlogs and Pulpwood, 

Jackson, Shirl Sault Ste Marie Thessalon Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Kennedy, E. J South Porcupine.. . .Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

Maxwell, L Eau Clair. Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

Morrison, G. W Iroquois Falls Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

Moore, A. H New Liskeard Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

McBean, Chester W McDougall's Mills.. Fort Frances Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Palmer, Ivan Sault Ste Marie. . . .Thessalon Sawlogs and Pulpwood, 

Poupore, G. W Iroquois Falls Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

Phillips, W. H South Porcupine.. . . Iroquois Falls Pulpwood only. 

Retty, James Sault Ste Marie. . . .Thessalon Sawlogs and Pulpwood 

Ryan, Thos. M Pembroke Elsas Pulpwood only. 



32 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. g — Continued 

Place of License 

Name Address Examination Quallifications 

Saunders, F. G Sudbury Callander Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Stone, Hume Sault Ste Marie. . . .Thessalon Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Smith, Byron W Blind River Thessalon Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Taylor, Angus G Sudbury Elsas Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Wilson, D. M Pembroke. . . .' Iroquois Falls. Pulpwood only. 

In addition to the above candidates who passed in August last, the following were also 
granted licenses after obtaining further experience of one year: 

Elliott, R. B Milton Callander Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Edwards, Ross Powassan Callander Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Legris, H. M Dacre Callander Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Maltby, Wm. E Sturgeon Falls Callander Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

McGuire, Norbert T Arnprior Callander Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

McManus, T. Basil Arnprior Callander ., . .Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 

Regan, Chas. E Elk Lake Callander Sawlogs and Pulpwood. 



Appendix No. 10 

ACREAGE UNDER LICENSE 

The area covered by Timber Licenses where the holder pays Regulation 
Gound Rent and Fire Charges, at the end of the year 1924, was 19,136 square 
miles. 

The number of Crown Timber Licenses issued for the license season of 
1923-24 was 922. 

PULP CONCESSIONS 



The area covered by pulp concessions exclusively amounts to 39,404 
square miles, on which fire protection charges at the rate of $3.20 per square 
mile are payable. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 33 



Appendix No. 11 

PATENTS OFFICE (Lands Branch) 

Statement of Patents, etc., issued from 1st November, 1923, to 31st October, 1924 

Public Lands (late Crown) 447 

« " (late School) 7 

" " (late Clergy Reserves) 3 

" " (University) 10 

Free Grant Lands (Act of 1913) 280 

« " (Act of 1901 Veterans) 22 

Mining Lands (Patents) 344 

Mining Leases 178 

Crown Leases 97 

Licenses of Occupation 99 

Temagami Island Leases 10 

Sand and Gravel Licenses 29 

Pine Patents 6 

Water Power Leases 2 

Releases of Pine 1 

Orders-in-Council 4 

Total 1,539 



Appendix No. 12 

Statement of the work done in Military Office, Lands Branch of the Department of Lands and 
Forests, during the year ending October 31st, 1924. 

Veteran patents issued 22 

Locations under military certificates 

Certificates applied in payment of lands 1 

Certificates surrendered for commutation money 18 



2 L. F. 



34 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 13 



Statement showing the number of Locatees and of acres located; of purchasers and of acres sold; 
of lots resumed for non-performance of the settlement duties; and of patents issued in 
Free Grant Townships during the year ending 31st October, 1924. 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


in 

C 


tn 

^^ 

OX) 

o S 
6 — 
2 


Jl 
u 

3 

a 
'o 
6 


2 
"3 

in 
en 

o 

"o 
6 


en 

ll 

■« u 
o c 

. 03 

o u 


to 

"o ^ 
o >- 


(n 

4-1 

C 
OS 


d o< 


Baxter 

Brunei. . . . 


Muskoka 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 

Haliburton . . . 

Muskoka 

« 

« • 
« 

Parry Sound. . 

« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

u 
« 

Parry Sound. . 
« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

M 

« 


W. B. Gerhart, 

B racebride'e . 


2 


270 


1 


10 


2 


170 


9 


1,106 


Cardwell . . 


« 
« 

« 

<( 

« 

« 
« 

« 

« 

« 

Miss I. M. Camp- 
bell 


















Chaffey 

Draper 

Franklin 














































2 
1 
1 
1 


299 


Freeman 

Macaulay 

Medora . . 


1 


206 


1 


1 


2 


311 


101 
64 










4 


796 


99 


Monck 












Morrison . . 


1 
1 


186 
97 






2 
1 


374 
97 


1 


100 


Muskoka 








McLean 










Oakley 

Ridout 


2 


210 


1 
1 


10 

75 


3 
2 
1 
1 
3 


303 
238 
100 
76 
500 


2 
1 


200 

74 


Ryde. . . 


2 
1 
3 


200 

76 

500 




Sherbourne 






1 

5 
2 


89 


Sinclair 






812 


Stephenson .... 
Stisted . 






219 
















Watt 


















Wood 


2 


204 


4 


55 


3 


500 


1 


126 


Blair 








Burpee 

Carling 

Christie 


« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

Dr. J. S.' Freeborn. . 
« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 


















3 

2 


483 
388 




25 


1 
2 
2 


100 
199 

247 


2 
2 
1 


302M 
392 


Conger 

Cowper 

Foley 




125 


191% 
























Ferguson 

Hagerman 

Harrison .... 


















1 


200 






1 


200 




154 








Henvey 

Humphrey 

McConkey 


1 

1 
1 


200 
199 
100 






1 
1 

1 


200 
199 
100 


















2 


199 


McDougall .... 
McKellar 








1 
1 
1 


100 
100 

177 














McKenzie 

Monteith 


1 


1 


1 

4 


200 

477 


3 
1 


398 
100 


Shawanaga .... 
Wilson . 

Chapman 

Croft 








1 

5 


196 
702 


1 
3 


18 
46 


1 

2 
1 


196 

247 
150 


3 

3 

1 
1 


219 

300 
200 


Ferrie 










200 


Gurd 
















Lount 


4 
1 
1 
5 
1 
5 
2 


422 
200 
94 
673 
143 
966 
382 


1 


22 


3 

1 


400 
200 


2 


352 


Machar 




Mills 




81 


2 
2 
2 


266 


Pringle 


1 
1 
3 
2 


116 
145 
411 
382 


468 


Ryerson 






264 


Spence 

Strong 


1 

1 


6 
10 




2 


300 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



35 



Appendix No. 13 — Continued 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


(0 

"og 
6 




S2 

<u 
to 

o 
ll 

3 

a 
"o 
6 


1 

tn 

£; 

o 

d 
12; 


tn 

C 

dS 


tn 
O (U 


tn 

c 

D 

^ tn 
.S2 
d 


to 
o <u 


Armour 


Parry Sound. . 
« 

« 

Parry Sound. . 
« 

« 

« 

« 

Nipissing 

« 
« 

Haliburton . . . 
« 

« 
« 
« 

Peterborough . 
« 

« 

Haliburton . . . 
« 

« 

Hastings 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 
« 

Renfrew 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 


David Thaw, 

Emsdale. . 

« 
« 

H. J. Ellis, 

Powassan . . 
u 

« 

W. J. Parsons, 

North Bay. . 
<< 

(( 

R. H. Baker, 

Minden . . 


2 
2 
3 
1 
1 
4 

1 
1 

2 
5 
2 

1 
4 

4 
2 

1 


207 
216 
300 
101 
70 
400 

100 
100 
300 
808 
122 

65 
402 
403 
203 

152 






2 
3 
7 


207 

518 
858 


3 
1 
10 
2 
2 


300 


Bethune 






154 


Toly 


4 
2 


76 

108 

24 


1,499 
415 


McMurrich. . . . 


Perry 






270 


Proud foot 


1 


100 




Hardy 

Himsworth .... 

Laurier 

Nipissing 

Patterson 


4 


100 

5 
100 

7 
5 

106 


3 
7 
9 
3 

1 

2 
5 
5 
2 


207 


3 
2 
3 


249 
200 
608 


745 

1,499 

301 

115 


Bonfield 

Boulter 


4 


535 


300 

751M 


Chisholm 

Ferris 


3 


203 


3 

1 

3 


502 
100 

431 


494 
298% 


Anson 








Glamorgan .... 
Hindon 




99 


1 
1 


116 


« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

Wm. Hales, Apsley. 










75M 


Lutterworth. . . 
















Minden 














2 
2 

1 


199 


Snowdon 














300' 


Stanhope 

Anstruther. . . . 






2 


5 


2 
2 


223 
358 


101 








Burleigh, N.D. 
« S.D.. 


« 
« 
« 
« 

A. N. Wilson, 

Kinmount . . 














1 


17 






1 


86 


1 

2 

1 

1 
1 

5 
5 

1 


88 


Chandos 






152 


Methuen 














200 


Cardiff 


2 


200 






2 
1 
2 
3 

1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 


200 
163 
268 
394 

202 
300 
150 
162 
143 
222 
197 
129 
197 
389 


159 


Cavendish 






5 


Galway 

Monmouth. . . . 


« 

W. J. Douglas, 

Maynooth. . 
« 

« 

« 
« 
« 

Frank Blank, 

Wilno . 


3 

3 

1 

2 


383 
400 

81 
325 


3 


216 


598 
762 


Bangor 

Carlow 






82 








Cashel 










Dungannon. . . . 
Faraday 


10 


l,012i 




99 


3 
1 
4 


365}^ 
200 


Herschel 

Limerick 


4 


453 




8 


546 


Mayo 


2 
4 
2 
1 


256 
329 
239 
100 










Monteagle 

McCiure 






6 


655^ 








Wicklow 






1 


200 


Woliaston 












Algona, S 

Brougham 






























1 
1 


50 


Brudenell 


« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 


6 


558J 








315^ 


100 


Burns 








Grattan 


















Griffith 


















Hagarty 


6 
4 
3 
3 


572 
352 
482 
248 








346 
100 


2 
1 


379 


Jones 






51H 


Lyell 


2 


12 
4 




Lyndoch 






3 


405 



36 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 13 — Continued 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


CO 

a 
o 

^^ 
■08 

6 




<u 
en 

tj 

3 

a 

d 
12; 


2 

CO 

en 

01 

Ih 

d 


a (J 

03 




en 

<u 

J! e 

d V. 


tn 

+-1 
C 
(U 
■M 

a!T3 

.2 

d 

iz; 


"* C 

a 
J?: 


Matawatchan . 


Renfrew 

u 

« 
« 

« 

Renfrew 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 

Nipissing 

« 
« 
« 

Algoma 

« 

Algoma 

« 
« 
« 
« 

Algoma 

« 

« 

Sudbury 

« 

Thunder Bay. 
It 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 
« 

« 
u 
u 
u 
u 


Frank Blank, 

Wilno.. 
« 

« 

« 

« 

Finlay Watt, 

Pembroke . 














1 

2 
5 
1 


200 


Radcliffe 

Raglan 

Richards 


11 
1 


1,592 
97 


5 
2 


191 
200 


3 

2 

1 


300 

300 

94 


389 
950 
222 


Sebastopol 

Sherwood 

Algona, N 

Alice 












5 

1 


551 
100 


2 


5 


1 


163 


2 


304 
















<< 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 

Robert Small, 

Mattawa. . 
« 

« 

« 

Thos. Dean, 
Sault Ste. Marie. 


1 


138 


1 


3 






1 


163 
















1 


100 






1 


81 


Head 


3 


300 


1 


100 






, 








McKay 


































Rolph 


2 


316 






1 


100 


2 

1 


169 




1 


10 


UOi 


Wylie Pt 


2 

4 

6 

2 
5 
1 


175 

441 
776 
214 
675 
12 












1 
2 


85 
200 


1 
4 


100 








574 
















5 


675 






Papineau 






4 


488 












Park 




















« 
Thos. Dodds, 






3 


461 


1 


160 


3 
4 


431 








568 


« Addl 






2 


276^ 








Galbraith 

Lef roy 

Plummer 

« Addl. 

St. Joseph Isd.. 

Hilton 

Jocelyn 

Baldwin 

Merritt 

Blake 


« 

« 
« 

W. E. Whybourne. 

M 

M 

Edward Arthurs, 

Espanola . . 

S. H. Wilson, 

Port Arthur. . 
« 

« 

« 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

M 
M 
M 










1 


165 




























1 


117 
















1 
3 


100 

377 






1 
3 


100 

377 


1 
4 

1 
2 
2 

3 
3 
2 
6 
2 
1 
4 
4 
1 
1 


100 






494 






100 


6 

1 

6 
5 
5 

11 
9 
3 

15 
1 
7 
7 


882 
159i 

800 
606 
555 

1,005 

1,428^ 
2391 

1,883 
514i 

1,04U 
923^ 






1 
3 

5 
2 
2 
11 
1 
3 
7 
1 
5 
5 


120 
467i 

720 
225 
256i 
1,277 
160 
2391 
831 
154^ 
714i 
716i 


199f 






155 


1 

2 


80 

75^ 


4,390 


Conmee 

Dawson Road. . 

Dorion 

Gillies 


492i 
336 


2 


96 


7461 
298^ 


"8 
1 
2 
2 


'"6iif 

160 
86f 
161 


79 


Gorham 

Lybster 

Marks 

McGregor 

Mclntyre 

O'Connor 


524f 
465 
164i 
160 






2 

1 
1 


162 
100 






4 
1 
2 


562 






1 


160 


162i 


Paipoonge.N.R. 
S.R. 

Pardee 

Pearson 






199 












4 

5 


600 
7091 






1 
4 


160 

665^ 






"3 


"'81 


3 


403 j 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



37 



Appendix No. 13 — Continued 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


CO 

C 

°^ 

u "O 

d 


TO (U 


cc 
nS 

u 

u 

3 

a 
6 


12 
"3 

CO 

(/] 

(U 

o 

"o 

d 
J5 


cc 

C 

(U — 

ell's 
^ o 
o c 

o w 


en 


m 

C 

d 


to 

V 

1^ 


Scoble 

Stirling 

Strange 

Ware 


Thunder Bay. 
« 

« 

« 

Rainy River. . 
« 

u 

« 

« 

« 
u 
u 
« 

« 
« 
« 
u 
u 
u 

Rainy River. . 
« 

« 

(t 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 

« 

Kenora 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

u 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
u 
« 
« 

Kenora 


S. H. Wilson, 

Port Arthur. . 
« 

« 

Wm. Cameron, 

Stratton . . 
« 

« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

Alex. McFayden, 

Emo. . 

u 

« 
« 

« 
<( 
<< 
(( 
u 
(( 
« 
« 
(i 
« 

J. E. Gibson, 

Dryden . . 
(( 

u 

u 

(I 

« 

a 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

u 

« 

H. E. Holland, 

Kenora. . 


9 
12 

4 
21 


1,295§ 

1,888 J 

641 i 

2,635i 


2 
2 
1 
4 


173 
81 
3 
3171 


2 
5 
3 
8 

2 

5 
1 
5 


300 

797 

482 

l,129t 

322 
765 
164 
599 


1 
4 
1 
9 


1591 

699 
1,144 


Atwood 




Blue 


5 

1 

11 


728 

164 

1,4371 


2 
1 
3 
1 


162 

2 

84 

2 


1 


162 


Curran 




Dewart 

Dilke . 


1 


^ 3 


Morley 

Morson 

McCrosson .... 
Nelles 










3 
2 

2 

2 


402 


22 

19 

6 

7 

12 


3,122 
2,428 
812i 
951i 
1,669 


8 
1 
1 
3 
2 


399f 

8^ 

81 

40 

39 


19 
16 

5 

5 

15 


2,570 
1,673 
734i 
847i 
2,449 


333 
324 
324 


Pattullo . . 




Pratt 






Roseberry 


















1 

3 
1 
3 
3 

1 


153 


Sifton 


6 

18 
13 

5 
14 


932 
2,4351 
l,932i 

658^ 
l,635i 


2 
2 
5 


104f 
83 i 
174 


8 
14 
10 

7 
14 


920i 
1,919^ 
1,52U 

918^ 
l,872f 


4391 


Spohn 

Sutherland 

Tait 


157^ 

493 

274^ 


Tovell 


7 


385i 


161 


Worthington. . . 
Aylesworth .... 




















1 


161 














Burriss 










1 


160 


Carpenter 


1 


160 






2 


240 












Dance 


6 
1 

1 


685i 
161 

152i 


3 


320 


5 


766i 


2 

1 
3 


240i 


Devlin 


16-2 


Dobie 


1 


16^ 


3 


385i 


414^ 


Fleming 

Kingsford 




8 


l,167f 


1 


1 


6 


971 


1 


161 


Mather 

Miscampbell. . . 
Potts 


1 


159 


2 


156f 


1 


172 


7 
1 

3 

2 


401f 
1601 


1 

1 


160i 
159 


2 

1 


1 
48 


5 
5 


675i 
928 


480 


Richardson .... 


288 


Woodyatt 

Aubrey 

Britton 


















8 

36 

11 

3 

6 

9 

3 

13 

4 

13 

8 

12 


1,076^ 
5,515^ 
l,309i 

511^ 

808 
1,219 

4421 
2,052 

640 
1,965 
l,054i 
1,901 


1 
2 


13i 
80^ 


5 

16 
10 
3 
4 
7 
7 
6 
5 
9 
2 
5 


589* 
2,376f 
1,301 
468^ 
531 
887 J 
9941 
89 li 
798^ 
1,375^ 
320 
823 


2 


4161 


Eton 


6 
1 


938^ 


Langton 

Melgund 

Mutrie 


1 


73f 


158^ 






2 
1 


472 


Redvers 






122 




8 
1 
3 

1 
5 
1 


361H 

h 

226? 

731 
3281 

33 




Rugby 

Sanford 


1 

5 


160i 
776 


Temple 

Van Home. . . 


1 
3 

5 
4 

1 

1 
4 


76J 
646 


Wabigo >n 

Wainwright. . . . 
Zealand 

Melick 

Pellatt 


3 

8 

15 

14 

3 


493^ 
l,193i 
1,909 

2,241 
358^ 


3 

7 

10 

12 
3 


464i 
1,033^ 
1,370 

1,827^ 
41U 


681 


1 
3 

2 
2 


79f 
20U 

24 
133 


406 i 
160 

161 
410 



38 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. ij — Continued 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


to 
C 

o 

CO 
u 

d^ 


to 
(JT3 


i2 

ct3 

JS 

3 

a 
d 


1 

■ O 

d 


to 

C 

o 

^^ 

o u 


to 
o <u 

d£i 


(0 

c 

0) 
+J 

OS 

d-2 


to 

") a 
d a 


Balfour 


Sudbury 

« 

« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

Sudbury 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

Nipissing 

« 

« 

« 
« 

Lennox and 

Addington. . 

Frontenac .... 
« 

<( 

Lennox and 

Addington . . 
« 

« 

Haliburton . . . 

Muskoka 

Parry Sound . , 
« 

Nipissing 

u 
« 


J. K. MacLennan, 
Sudbury. . 

« 
« 
« 
u 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

John Brown, 

Markstay. . 

« 

« 

« 

J. P. Marchildon, 

Sturgeon Falts 
« 

« 
Chas. Booth. 




106% 

163 

153 










2 


266% 


Blezard 






1 


163 




Broder 










Capreol 






1 

1 
1 


146 
1601 






Chapleau 


2 


160i 
320 




1 

7 






Dill 


4 


606^ 


Garson 


1 
1 
1 


160 

157^ 
160 


Hanmer 














Lumsden 


1 


160 










Morgan 

Neelon 
















1 






1 


161 


Rayside 

Appleby 

Casimir 


1 

3 
3 


501 

483 

464 


1 

2 
2 


501 

322 
301 






2 
3 










Dunnet 






Hagar 


6 
1 
2 
9 


961 

160 

320 

l,445i 




80 


9 
1 


1,437 
160 


1 


160 


Jennings 

Kirkpatrick. . . . 
Ratter. . 








1 


171 






4 

1 

2 

14 


655i 

160 

293 

l,986i 




Caldwell 










Cosby 


3 
IS 


356 

2,786i 






2 
1 


212 


Grant 


2 


53 


148^ 


Macpherson . . . 

Martland 

Springer 

Abinger 




4 
1 


634 
160 


1 
1 


1 
121 


2 


321i 


1 
2 


161 

245 










« 
« 

« 
« 
« 

Unattached 

« 
« 

« 
« 
« 


















" N 


















Clarendon 














2 
2 


302 


Denbigh 


1 


204 






1 


204 


379 


Miller 










2 

1 


293 
100 


1 


1 


2 


340 














1 


1 










Shawanaga .... 
Wallbridge .... 
Airy 


















2 


m 






2 


13^ 


1 


100 


1 


100 




Finlayson 










1 
10 


90 
1,308 










1 
2 

1 


155 


Sabine 

Burton 


1 
4 


65 

21 


1 


100 


195 

2 






Total 














727 


98,487^6 


197 


9,123Ko 


535 


71,754f 


357 


52,423}^ 



No. of lots assigned 202 



No. of acres assigned 28,465 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



39 



Appendix No. 14 

Statement showing the number of purchasers and of acres sold; of lots resumed for non- 
performance of the settlement duties; and of patents issued in Townships other than 
Free Grant during the year ending 31st October, 1924. 



Township 



District 

or 
County 



Agent 





u 


U) 




^2 


5 <" 


in — ; 





c3 


y 


. cj 


.-C 


. c 





y 


nJ 


^ 


2; 


^ " 



a2i 



o 



Machin 

Blount 

Shackleton. . 

Brower 

Pyne 

Newmarket. . 
Fauquier. . . . 

Fox 

Clute 

Kennedy. . . . 

Kendry 

Calder 

Glackmeyer. . 
Fournier. . . . 

Leitch 

Colquhoun. . 
Lamarche. . . 

Casgrain. . . . 

Devitt 

Eilber 

Hanlan 

Kendall 

Lowther 

O'Brien 

Owens 

Williamson . . 

Nansen 

Iddington. . . 
McCrae 

Bayley 

r?lain 

Chamberlain. 

Dack 

Davidson. . . . 

Eby 

Evanturel. . . 

Gross 

Ingram 

Marter 

Marquis 

Otto 

Pacaud 

Pense 

Robillard.... 

Savard 

Sjharpe 

Truax 

Catharine. . . 



Cochrane. 



Cochrane 



Cochrane 



Timiskaming. 



S. J. Dempsay, 
Cochrane 



John Breshahan, 
Hearst 



H. E. Sheppard 
Kapuskasing 



Joseph Woollings 
Englehart 



2,541 
3,427 
3,628 
3,034 
7,962 
3,978 
3,072 
4,019 
3,260 
1,578 

313 
6,176 

627 
2,750 
4,248 

601 
2,074 



2,332 
5,130 
3,767 
4,096 
4,106 
4,297 



1,680 
5,138 
3,151 
1,494 
4,690 
4,348 



190 



320 
1,440 
2 
159 
320 
480 
457 
469 
1,440 
321 
155 
798 
316 
315 
488 



1,358 
793 
1,448 
1,766 
1,522 
2,011 
2,020 
3,036 
2,025 
1,425 



3,237 
1,467 
1,078K 
1,187 



718 
1,479 
1,188 
3,086 
3,833 
2,907 



1,338 
887 
459 
450 
100 



158)4 



160 
160 



322 

630} 

306K 

307K 

482 

661 



638K 

320 

1161 



7 


2,702 


1 


86 


5 


790}^ 


1 


155 


3 


383 



10 

1 



2 

10 
1 
3 
1 
5 



1 

5 

11 



1,486 
150 



300 
1,494 

164}^ 
419 
228 
798>^ 



583 



145 

743 

1,603 



173 



635M 



119)4 
973M 



471 

389)4 

421 



279)4 

160 

747 

157)4 

160 



40 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 14 — Continued 



Township 



District 
or 

County 



Agent 



in 


u 


(0 




^2 


5 <« 


rt 0) 


M-1 (C 


«*. 4) 





C'S 


y 


. <n 


.^ 


. c 





" 


ni 


^ 


2 


;z; "" 



(J TJ 
O 3 



<L> 



(A 




c 


'R 


0) 


0) 


rt'O 


u 


a- 


rt 


•o ^ 















^ 


z 



Benoit 

Beatty 

Bond 

Bowman . . . 
Calvert .... 

Carr 

Clergue .... 

Currie 

Dundonald . 

Evelyn 

German. . . . 

Hislop 

Matheson . . 
Mountjoy . . 

McCart 

Playfair. . . . 

Stock 

Taylor 

Walker 

Armstrong . , 

Auld 

Beauchamp , 
Brethour . . . 

Bryce 

Bucke 

Cane 

Casey 

Dymond . . . 
Firstbrook . . 

Harley 

Hen wood . . . 

Harris 

Hilliard. ... 
Hudson . . . . 

Kerns 

Lundy 

Tudhope . . . 



Smyth . . 

Lorrain . 

Mason . . 
Scollard. 
Hugel . . . 



Louden . . 
Loughrin . 



Phelps 

Widdifield. 
Hallam.. . . 



Timiskaming. 
Cochrane .... 



J. E. Mills, 

Matheson . 



Timiskaming. . . 



J. R. McCrea, 
New Liskeard . 



Timiskaming. . 
Timiskaming. . 
Nipissing 



Nipissing . 



Mark Morgan, 
Elk Lake. 



Neil J. McAulay, 
Haileybury. . 

J. P. Marchildon, 
Sturgeon Falls. . 



Nipissing . 
« 

Sudbury. . 



John Brown, 

Markstay. . 



W. J. Parsons, 
North Bay. . 



R. A. Teasdale, 
Massey. . 



1,953 
191 
292 
160 

474 



1,270 

3,556 

1,137 

477 

667 

499 

2,120 

860 

1,856 

1,281 

1,734 

317 

154 



159 



478 
161 



318 



2 

13 
6 
3 
6 
2 
4 
4 
11 
5 
3 
2 
2 



954 



923 
320 
461 



318 

2,012 

865 

480 

1,043 

310 

640 

528 

1,674 

786 

476 

318 

314 



163 
100 



316 



335 
164 



641 



160 

200 

3 



3,363 
400 



336 



9 

12 



160 



160 
480 



390 



608 
160 
322 
200 
159 
302 



168 
484 



429 
161 



161 
324 



1,440 
1,809 



3 
14 
1 
8 
2 
9 
5 
13 
6 



2 
7 
4 
1 
10 
1 
5 



341 
1,015 



156 
1,346 

839 
1,288 

159 
80 



387 

2,236 

144 

571 

318 

1,168 

458 

1,577 

937 



634 



628 
242 
319 
84 
647 
280 



213 
920 
644 
100 
1,098 
160 
791 



160 
160 
643 
169 



160 



480 
160 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



41 



Appendix No. 14 — Continued 



Township 



District 

or 
County 



Agent 



(0 






p 


<u 



3 03 


^•0 


g^ 


^2 


to ~ 


rt <u 





rt 


y 


i 


. to 


. j: 


. c 





u 


rt 


a; 


z 


^ 


iz; " 


^^ 






O 0) 
° a. 



May 

Salter 

Shedden 

Victoria 

Bigwood 

Delamere 

Dowling 

Nairn 

Drayton 

Jaff ray 

Watten 

Bright 

Day 

Parkinson 

Striker 

Thompson 

Johnson 

Kirkwood 

Gould 

Aweres 

Prince 

Tarbutt, Add'l. . 
Vankoughnet . . . 

Forbes 

Fowler 

Goldie 

Jacques. ....... 

Lyon 

McTavish 

Nipigon 

Sibley 

Upsala 

Alnwick 

Adamston 

Anglesea 

Bagot 

Badgerow 

Barrie 

Bruce 

Burwash 

Burleigh .South. . 
Bathurst 



Sudbury 



Sudburv. 



Sudbury.. . . 
Kenora 



Rainy River . 



.\lgoma . 



Algoma . 



Thunder Bay. 



Northumber- 
land 

Renfrew 

Lennox and 
Addington. 

Renfrew 

Nipissing. . . . 

PVontenac. . . 

Bruce 

Sudbury 

Peterborough 

Lanark 



R. A. Teasdale, 

Massey . 



J. K. MacLennan 
Sudbury. . . 



E. Arthurs, 

Espanola. 

H. E. Holland, 
Kenora . 



C. J. Holland, 
Fort Frances. 



Thomas Dodds 
Thessalon 



T. Dean, 
SaultSte. Marie. 



S. H. Wilson, 
Port Arthur 



Unattached. 



160 
276 
224 
297 



170 
144 

158 



158 



609 
175 



314 
160 
158 
287 
160 
133 



157 



150 



5,843 

1,904 

1,177 

5,160 

558 

555 

290 

2,091 

3,955 



40 
243 

101 
393 
153 
100 
121 
166 
88 
83 



10 



165 



319 



232 



320 



147 
283 



160 



160 
1.142 



320 
286 



1,495 



94 

175 



120 
231 

329 
276' 



162 
2T5 



170 



81 



158 
126 



320 



2 
431 



150 



606 
3 



164 
191 
956 



40 

344 

4 
300 
160 
100 
111 



105 



42 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 14 — Continued 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


CO 


3 


0) 




(0 

a 

. CO 

<u 


+j 
C 

• in 
CO 


CO 

ca 4^ 
>>> B 
0) 


Burk 


Kenora 

Norfolk 

Leeds . 


Unattached 

« 


22 


1 










Charlotteville . . . 






1 
1 


6 


Crosby 


(( 










10 


Creighton 


Sudbury 

Peterborough. . 

Sudbury 

Algoma 

Grey 


» 
« 
« 
(I 
it 
» 
« 
« 

« 


161 
100 

457 
160 

41 
170 
150 
352 
329 

63 

8 

100 

29K 


1 
1 

3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 








Dummer 










Drury 






2 


282 


Deroche 








Egremont 






1 

1 
1 

t 


95 


Fairbanks 

Falconer 


Sudbury 

Nipissing 

Sudbury 

Kenora 

Renfrew 

Timiskaming. . . 

Frontenac 

Cochrane 

Peterborough. . 

Frontenac 

Timiskaming. . . 

Lennox and 

Addington. . . 

Algoma. 

Sudbury 

Algoma 

Victoria 

Thunder Bay. . 

Sudbury 

Lanark 

Simcoe 

Hastings 

« 

Frontenac 

Grey 




125 


170 
149 


Field 


1 


159 


354 


Gibbons 


452 


Graham 








Hartman 










Horton 






1 


100 


Holmes 








Hinchinbrooke . . 


1 


200 






Hoyle 


« 
« 
« 


8 

81 
301 


1 

1 
4 






Harvey 

Kennebec 




206 


2 
4 


351 
208 


Kendry 

Kaladar 

Kapuskasing. . . . 
Louise 


7 
1 


1,019 
137 




(( 

u 
u 
u 

(C 

u 
« 

« 

« 
« 
« 


180 
965 

82 
200 

96 
160 
742 
200 
100 

50 
100 
203 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 


2 


397 






2 
2 

2 


241 


Lansdowne 






15 


Laxton 






190 


Ledger 








Lome 






7 


894 


Lavant 








Matchedash .... 
Madoc 


1 


200- 


8 


117 








1 
3 
1 
1 
6 


50 


Olden 






245 


Proton 






99 


Somerville 


Victoria 

Essex . 


« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
(( 
<( 
« 

Total 


156 
86 

200 
322 
129 
100 
100 
3 
81 


1 
6 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






100 


Sandwich East 






95 


Seymour 


Northumber- 
land 

Timiskaming. . . 

Sudbury 

Hastings 

Renfrew 

Timiskaming. . . 
Sudbury 








Tisdale 










Trill . . 






1 
1 
1 


129 


Tudor 


1 


131 


75 




110 


Whitney 

^^aters 


3 


163 




















165,184 


1204 


507 


74,773 


399 


49,471 









Number of lots assigned 552 Number of acres assigned 73,903 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



43 



Appendix No. 14 — Continued 

Locations by returned soldiers and cancellations for non-performance of settlement duties. 

District Agency 

Cochrane Matheson 

" Cochrane 

" Hearst 

" Kapuskasing 

Algoma Thessalon 

" Sault Ste. Marie 

Timiskaming Englehart 

" Elk Lake 

" New Liskeard 

Sudbury , Unattached 

" Markstay 

Nipissing North Bay 

Thunder Bay Port Arthur 



Locations 


Cancellations 


21 


8 


53 





9 


^ 


14 


38 


2 


5 


1 


5 


7 


5 


1 





4 





6 





3 


1 


4 


5 


6 






131 



76 



Appendix No. 14 — Continued 

Statement showing the number of purchasers, acres sold and of patents issued in Town sites, 
during the year ending 31st October, 1924. 



Townsite. 



District or County. 



Agent. 







CO 


(0 


1 


C 


?* 


u 







5 "J 

0) 


S 


^oS 


M-. en 

rt 


. 


. j: 


- s 


<o 


«J 


0-2 


'^ 


'^ 


iz; 



u. <L) 
nj C 



O rt 

• a 



Alexandra 

Bobcayggon 

Capr^ol 

Dryden 

Dryden, Additional. .... 

P'oleyet 

Gowanda 

Hearst 

Hilton 

Hornepayne 

Iroquois Falls 

Kapuskasing 

Kirkland Lake 

Larder City 

Low Bush River 

Macfarlane 

Missanabie 

Nakina 

Pembroke 

PenetangLiishene 

Sioux Lookout 

Swastika 

Timmins, Additional.. . . 
Winnipeg River Crossing 



Cochrane. . . '. 
Victoria. .... 

Sudbury 

Kenora 

Kenora 

Sudbury 

Timiskaming. 
Cochrane. . . . 

Algoma 

Algoma 

Timiskaming. 
Cochrane. . . . 
Timiskaming. 
Timiskaming 
Cochrane. . . . 

Kenora 

Algoma 

Thunder Bay 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Kenora 

Timiskaming. 
Timiskaming. 
Kenora 



Unattached. 



H. E. Sheppard 
Unattached 



W. G. A. Wood 
W. G. A. Wood 
Unattached . . . 



2.62 

1.50 

.48 

.50 

.25 

.92 

.36 

1.90 

1.00 

.85 

.21 

8.38 

4.74 

.07 

.43 

4.93 

4.77 

4.03 

.24 

.50 

2.20 

.26 

1.10 

13.78 

56.02 



237 



73 



1.12 

1.00 

.65 

.50 



.06 



4.75 

1.00 

.29 

.21 

1.81 

4.78 

.07 



6 


3.07 


9 


1.70 


5 


1.05 


1 


.50 


4 


1.56 


1 


.21 



1.00 
25.33 



44 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 14 — Continued 
Statement showing islands and parcels sold as summer resorts. 

ISLANDS SOLD 



Part or Parcel 



Township 



District or 
County 



Agent 



No. of Acres 
Sold 



Kawartha Island, Lake 
Nipissing 

Birch Island in Three- 
Mile Lake 

Oak Island in Horse- 
shoe Lake 

Twin Island in Lake 
Nipissing 

Prospect Island in 
Maple Lake 

Parcel 1, Island 188. . .. 

Parcels, Island 188. . . 

Parcel 3, Island 133. . . 

Parcel 1, Island 133. . . 

Opal Island in Skelton 
Lake 

Island in Island Lake. . 

Parcel 35, Pine Island, 
St. Marys River. . . . 

Parcel 34, Pine Island, 
St. Marys River. . . . 

Parcel 10, Pine Island, 
St. Mary's River. . . . 

Island 22, St. Joseph's 
Channel 

Island F. P. 44, Abrams 
Lake 

Island B, Otter Lake 



Nipissing. 

Armour. . 

Foley . . . . 

Nipissing. 

Christie. . 
Baxter. . . 



Cardwell , 
Aweres. . 



Drayton . 
Ashby . . . 



Cameron Island, 
lemcoon Lake. . 



Wes- 



Part Island C, French 

River 

Part Island C, French 

River 

Island A 8, French 

River 

Island N, French River 
Island O, Trout Lake. . 
Little Rock Island. . . . 
Quality Island, Loon 

Lake 

Stephen Island in Pike 

Lake 

Boot Island, Otty Lake 



Effingham . 
Mason . . . . 



Scollard. . . . 

Mason 

Palmerston . 
Chandos. . . 



North Burgess. 
North Elmsley 



Parry Sound 

« « 

« « 

« « 

(( « 
Muskoka 

« 
« 

« 

Algoma 

« 

« 

« 

« 

Kenora 

Lennox and Add 
ington , 

Lennox and Add 
ington 

Nipissing 

u 

u 
« 

Frontenac 

Peterboro 

Lanark 

Leeds 



I. M. Campbell. 
« 

u 

H.J. Ellis 

W.G.Gerhart.'. 



Thos. Dean. 
Unattached 



J. P. Marchildon. 



Unattached . 
Wm. Hales. 



Unattached 



1.2 

.50 

.50 

.10 

5. 
1.7 
.5 
5. 
4.8 

3.5 
1. 

2.4 

3.6 

i.i 

2. 

4.25 

.1» 

.10 

5. 

2.5 

4. 
1. 
1. 
1. 

.95 

1.09 
.80 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



45 



Appendix No. 14 — Continued 
MAINLAND SOLD 



Part or Parcel 

S.E. part lot 11, Con. 18 

Part lot 10, con. 10. . . . 

Part lot 11, con. 19 

Part broken lot 30, con. 
17 

Part broken lot 2, con. 3 

Part lot 29, con. 6 

Part broken lot 34, con. 
13 

Part lot 33, con. 14 

Part broken lot 23, con. 
1 

Part broken lot 13, con. 
15 

Part broken lot 2, con. 3 

Part broken lot 13, con. 
15 

Part broken lot 2, con. 2 

Part broken lot 9, con 
12 

Part broken lot 5, con. 
10 

Part broken lot 3, con. 2 

Parcel 1, C. P. R. Cross- 
ing, French River. . . 

Parcel 2, C.P.R. Cross- 
ing, French River. . . 

Parcel 22, C.P.R. Cross- 
ing, French River. . . 

Parcel 3, C.P.R. Cross- 
ing, French River. . . 

Parcel 21, C.P.R. Cross- 
ing, French River. . . 

Parcel 20, C.P.R. Cross- 
ing, French River. . . 

Part broken lot 48, con. 
5 

Part broken lot 9, con. 
10 

Part lots 18 and 19, con. 
11 

Lot 6, sub. lots 28 and 
29, con. 8 

Part broken lot 31, con. 
14 

Part broken lot 30, con. 
17 

Lot 10, sub. lots 28 and 
29, con. 8 

Part lot 1, con. 1 

Part lot 6, con. 1 

Part broken lot 5, con. 6 

Part broken lot 5, con. 6 

Part broken lot 5, con. 6 

Part broken lot 5, con. 6 

Part broken lot 5, con. 6 

Part lot 35, con. 7 

Part lots 23 and 24, con. 
B 

Part broken lot 24, con. 
B, M.C. 12 

Part broken lot 25, con. 
C 

Part broken lot 21, con. 
1, M.C. 3 



Township 

Nipissing. . . . 
Patterson .... 

Nipissing. . . . 

Wood 

Bigwood .... 
Burton 

« 

Wallbridge. . 

Nipissing. . . . 
Bigwood. . . . 

Nipissing. . . . 
Bigwood .... 

Wilson 

Patterson .... 
Bigwood .... 

Mowat 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

Gibson 

Patterson .... 

Baxter 

Wood 

« 

« 

« 

Striker 

i< 

Malachi 

« 
« 

McKenzie. . . 
South Crosby 
Drayton .... 



District or 
County 

Parry Sound. . 

« 

« 
« 

ti 
u 

« 

« 
« 

« 

« 

« 
Sudbury. . . . . . 

Parry Sound . . 
« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

Muskoka 

« 

« 

« 

« 

Algoma 

« 

Kenora 

« 

Parry Sound. . 

Leeds 

Kenora 




No. of Acres 
Sold 



L M. Campbell. 



J. K. Maclennan. 
L M. Campbell 



J. K. Maclennan. 
L M. Campbell 



W. G. Gerhart 



Thos. Dean 
« 

J. E. Gibson 



L M. Campbel 
Unattached . . 



4. 
1. 

4. 

1.30 

5. 
3. 

2. 
1.15 

3.50 

1. 



75 



1. 

5. 



5. 
4. 

.1 

.22 

.36 

.18 

9.22 
.14 

1. * 

3.75 
10. 
.18 

1. 

1.30 

26.01 
3. 
8.4 
6.5 
1. 

.90 
3.78 
1.74 



9.23 
4.5 
7. 
5. 



46 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 14 — Continued 



Part or Parcel 


Township 


District or 
County 


Agent 


No. of Acres 
Sold 


M.C 3 ... 


Drayton 

« 

« 

Ashby 

Effingham 

(( 

u 

u 

u 

Buchanan 

Hudson 


Kenora 


Unattached 

« 

« 

« 

« 
« 

« 

Findlay Watt 

J. R. McCrea 

Unattached 

« 

« 

« 

« 

R. H. Baker! .".!". '.! 
« 

W. G. Gerhart 


1. 


Part broken lot 17, con. 
3 . . 


u 


3.65 


Lot 1, range 6, Drayton 
Reserve 


<( 


6.12 


Lot 4, range 6, Drayton 
Reserve 


« 


7.7 


Part broken lot 22, con. 
1 


Lennox and Add- 
ington 

Lennox and Add- 
ington 

Lennox and Add- 
ington 

Lennox and Add- 
ington 

Lennox and Add- 
ington 

Lennox and Add- 
ington 

Renfrew 




Part broken lot 25, con. 
15 


5. 


Part broken lot 27, con. 
16 


3. 


Part broken lot 25, con. 
16 


5. 


Part broken lot 25, con. 
16 


3.25 


Part broken lot 25, con. 
15 


4.4 


Parts broken lots 11 
and 12, con. 8 


3.1 
2.42 


Part broken lot 10, con. 
3 


Timiskaming 

Addington 

« 

<( 

u 

C( 

Haliburton 

i< 


5. 


Part broken lot 4, con. 
10 


Anglesea 

« 

« 

« 

« 

Stanhope 

« 

Shrebourne 


5. 


Part broken lot 5, con. 
10 


.86 


Part broken lot 5, con. 
10 


1. 


Part broken lot 6, con. 
10 


.8 


Part broken lot 6, con. 
10 


1.6 


Part lot 2, con. 10 

Part lot 2, con. 10 

South part broken lot 
28 con. 3 


3.1 
1.9 

2.3 








274.83 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



47 



Appendix No. 14 — Continued 

ISLANDS PATENTED 

Statement showing Islands and parts of lots patented as summer resorts 



Part or Parcel 


Township 


District or 
County 


Agent 


No. of Acres 
Patented 


Part of lot 11, con. 2. . 
Part of lot 12, con. 2. . 
Island B. . 


Wallbridge 

Cowper . . . 


Parry Sound 

« 

u 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Muskoka 

« 

Parry Sound 

(( 

u 

« 

« 

« 

« 
Kenora 


I. M. Campbell 

« 

W. G. Gerhart 

H. J. Ellis 


5. 
5. 
4 


Island B or Banana 
Island 


Conger 


1.70 


A small island south of 
lA, Big Island Lake 
Rosseau 


Medora 


.37 


Kawartha Island, South 
Bay, Lake Nipissing. 

Island 133, Gloucester 
Pool 


Nipissing 

Baxter 


1.20 , 


W. G. Gerhart 

I. M. Campbell .'.'.'! 

« 

(( 

<( 
Unattached 


5. 


Parcel 1, Island 188, 
Severn River .... 


« 


1.70 


Part of lot 12, con. 5. . 
Island B 611. . . . 


Wallbridge 

Cowper 


5. 
1.40 


Part of lot 12, con. 5. . 
Island B 722.. . 


Wallbridge 

Cowper 


4.70 
1.30 


Island B 407 


Wallbridge 


3.50 


Part of lot 11, con. 5. . 
Island T.P. 34-72, at the 

mouth of the French 

River .... 


.30 
12. 


Island K.G. 9002 




6. 


Part lot 5, con. 5 


Redditt 


3.85 


Island H, Maskinonge 
Lake 


Kelly 


Sudbury 

Lanark 


3. 


Part of lot 3, con. 3 . . . 


Cox 


1.40 


Waba Island, White 
Lake 


Darling 


2. 


Part of lot 4, con. 3 . . . 


Cox 


Sudbury 


3.10 


Cameron Island, Wes- 
lemcoon Lake 


Effingham 


Lennox and Add- 
ington 


.10 




71.62 



48 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 15 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF SURVEYS 

Honourable James Lyons, 

Minister of Lands and Forests, Ontario. 

Sir, — -The survey work carried on under direction of this Department 
during the past year was considerably limited as compared with the work in 
former years, and consisted only of 900 miles of lake and river traverse and sub- 
division of three townships together with miscellaneous smaller surveys wherever 
occasion required. 

Instructions issued and work was carried on as follows: 

Township Subdivisions 

Township of Goldie, district of Thunder Bay, surveyed by Phillips & 

Benner, Ontario Land Surveyors, Port Arthur. 
Township of Rowe, district of Rainy River, surveyed by Speight & 

vanNostrand, Ontario Land Surveyors, Toronto. 
Part of the township of Wicksteed, district of Algoma, surveyed by 

Lang & Ross, Ontario Land Surveyors, Sault Ste. Marie. 
Resurvey northern part of the township of Sibley, district of Thunder 

Bay, by R. S. Kirkup, Ontario Land Surveyor, Port Arthur. 

Lake and River Traverse 

English River, district of Kenora (westerly part), by James S. Dobie, 

Ontario Land Surveyor, Thessalon. 
Little Current River head waters, district of Thunder Bay, C. R. 

Kenny, Ontario Land Surveyor, Sault Ste. Marie. 
Drowning River and head waters, district of Cochrane, T. J. Patten, 

Ontario Land Surveyor, Little Current. 

Timber Berth Surveys 

Timber berth "E," Otter Tail Creek, district of Nipissing, L. Mooney, 
Ontario Land Surveyor, Sudbury. 

Miscellaneous Surveys 

Subdivision of park lots near Sioux Lookout, township of Drayton, 

district of Kenora, Phillips & Benner, Ontario Land Surveyors, 

Port Arthur. 
Subdivision Port Macdiarmid, district of Thunder Bay, G. L. Ramsey, 

Ontario Land Surveyor, Sault Ste. Marie. 
Subdivision Island Falls Junction, district of Cochrane, John Lanning, 

Ontario Land Surveyor, Cochrane. 
Subdivision addition to Hornepayne townsite, district of Algoma, 

Lang & Ross, Ontario Land Surveyors, Sault Ste. Marie. 
Subdivision of summer resort lots on French River and Severn River, 

districts of Parry Sound and Muskoka, C. E. Fitton, Ontario 

Land Surveyor, Toronto. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 49 

Surveyor of summer resort lots on Ti^out Lake, district of Thunder Bay, 

Phillips & Benner, Ontario Land Surveyors, Port Arthur. 
Survey of summer resort lots on Trout Lake, township of Widdifield, 

district of Nipissing, McAuslan, Anderson & Moore, Ontario Land 

Surveyors, North Bay. 
Resurvey St. Anthony Lake, township of Skead, district of Timis- 

kaming, T. G. Code, Ontario Land Surveyor, Cobalt. 

Town plot subdivisions of lands patented since 1910 have been approved of 
pursuant to R.S.O. 1910, chapter 34, and amendments, as follows: 

Part of north half of lot 2, concession 4, township of Calvert, district 

of Cochrane (Ansonville, Alphonse Tardiff subdivision). 
Part of mining claim T C 711, township of Teck, district of Timis- 

kaming, Kirkland Lake addition (Wright-Hargreaves Mines, 

Limited). 
Part of south half lot 12, concession 3, township of Tisdale, district of 

Cochrane, addition to Timmins (J. P. Bartleman et al). 
Part of lot 5, concession 9, township of Kendall, district of Cochrane 

(Hallewood, N. Darby). 

Extracts from the reports of the several surveyors employed during the 
year denoting the physical features of the country traversed will be found in 
appendices 20 to 36 inclusive. 

L. V. RORKE, 

Director of Surveys. 



50 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 16 

Statement of Municipal Surveys confirmed during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1824. 



No 



Name of 
Surveyor 



No. 



Date of 
Instructions 



Description of Survey 



Date when con- 
firmed under 
Ont. Statutes, 

1920, chap. 48, 
sec. 18. 



George Ross. 



A. L. Nash. 



Roger M. Lee. 



C. H. Wilkins. 



Speight & van- 
Nostrand. 



718 



738 



734 



740 



736 



July 8, 1918 



Survey side line road allowance 
between lots 8 and 9 through the 
whole breadth of the township of 
Crowland in the county of Wel- 
land, and also the side road allow- 
ance between lots 16 and 17, 
across the 6th concession of said 
township 



Dec. 10, 1923 



June 2,1923 



July 29,1924 



Survey road allowance between the 
9th and 10th concessions of the 
township of North Dumfries, in 
county of Waterloo, extending 
easterly from what is known as 
Sprague's Road to the Grand River 

Survey that part of the city of Brant 
ford in the county of Brant, lying 
between the westerly side of Raw 
don St., and the centre line of 
Stanley St., and between the 
southerly side of Colborne St., and 
the lands of the corporation of the 
city of Brantford on the north.. . . 

To survey the road allowance in front 
of the 4th concession, across lots 1 1 
to 16 inclusive, township of Sid- 
ney, county of Hastings 



Aug. 22, 1923 To survey the street known as Spa- 
dina Crescent, in the city of 
Toronto, in the county of York, as 
shown on registered pl^n D 33 



Mar. 3, 1924 



June 12, 1924 



Dec. 10,1923 



Oct. 29,1924 



Mar. 19, 1924 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



51 



Appendix No. ly 

Statement of Municipal Surveys for which instructions issued during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1924. 



No. 


Name of 
Surveyor 


No. 


Date of 
Instructions 


Description of Survey 


1 

2 
3 


F. N. Rutherford... 

C. H. Wilkins 

Speight & van- 
Nostrand. 


739 

740 

741 


June 12, 1924 

July 29,1924 
Sept. 2, 1924 


Survey the original road allowance between the 
townships of Louth and Pelham across lots 7 to 
10 inclusive in the township of Louth, county of 
Lincoln, 

Survey the road allowance in front of the 4th con- 
cession across lots 11 to 16 inclusive, township of 
Sidney, county of Hastings. 

Survey the original road allowance between lots 10 
and 11, across concessions 7 and 8, in the township 
of Toronto Gore. 



Appendix No. i8 
Statement of Crown Surveys in progress during the twelve months ending October 31, 1924. 



No 


Date of 
Instructions 


Name of 
Surveyor 


Description of Survey 


Amount 


1 


March 31,1924 
March 27,1924 
April 24, 1924 


C. R. Kenny 

T.J. Patten 

J. S. Dobie 


Traverse of Little Current River in dis- 
trict of Thunder Bay 


$4,750 00 


2 
.3 


Traverse of Drowning River and head 
water lakes, district of Cochrane 

To complete the traverse of the English 
River, etc., districts of Kenora and 
Patricia 


3,600 00 






7,500 00 










$15,850 00 



52 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. ig 

Statement of Orown Surveys completed and closed during the twelve months ending October 

31st, 1924. 



No. 



Date of 
Instructions 



Name of 
Surveyor 



Description of Survey 



Amount 
paid 



1 
2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 
17 
18 
19 



May 31, 1923 
April 15,1923 
April 9, 1923 

April 8, 1923 
April 8, 1923 



G. P. Angus... 
H. J. Beatty. . 
J. T. Coltham. 

T. G. Code. . . 



Survey of the west part of Thorning, 
district of Cochrane 



Survey certain township outlines in the 
district of Algoma, west of A.C.Ry.. 

Traverse survey of Kabinakagami Lake 
and Kabinakagami River, district of 
Cochrane and Algoma 



J. S. Dobie. 



Traverse part of Kabinakagami and 
Kenogami River, district of Cochrane. . 

Traverse of part of English River and 
islands, districts of Kenora and 
Patricia 



$1,876 05 
2,566 32 

3,420 00 
735 86 



April 
Aug. 
April 
April 
April 
April 
June 
April 
May 
Aug. 



15, 1923 

30, 1923 

5, 1923 

5, 1923 

15,1923 

10, 1923 

1, 1923 

15, 1923 

16, 1923 
30, 1923 



April 15, 1923 

June 18, 1923 

April 15, 1923 

Oct. 16, 1923 



J. W. Fitzgerald. 
J. W. Fitzgerald. 

D. J. Gillon 

C.V.Gallagher. 
C. R. Kenny. .. . 
R. S. Kirkup.... 

T.J. Patten 

K. G. Ross 

G. F. Summers. . 



Survey certain township outlines south 
of C.P.R., district of Sudbury 



Survey of timber lines in township 9 Z, 
district of Sudbury 



Sutcliffe & Neelands. 



Sutcliffe & Neelands. . 



C. H. Wilkins. 



McAuslan, Anderson 
& Moore. 

G. P. Angus 



Traverse of the Seine River, district of 
Rainy River 



Survey certain township outlines along 
the C.P.R., district of Sudbury 



Traverse of Moose River, district of 
Cochrane 



Traverse shores of Minnitaki Lake, dis- 
trict of Kenora 



Survey of township Mongowin, in district 
of Sudbury 



Base and meridian lines in district of 
Thunder Bay 



Survey addition town plot Alexandra, 
district of Cochrane 



Survey timber lines in the township of 
Kitson and east Brigstocke, district of 
Timiskaming 



Survey certain township outlines east of 
the Abitibi River, district of Cochrane. 

Resurvey of shores of Canoe and Smoke 
Lakes 



Survey certain township outlines along 
C.P.R., district of Sudbury 



Readjustment survey, part of the town- 
ship of Blount 



4,160 00 


2,052 47 


495 


26 


2,203 


38 


2,045 


44 


2,104 


50 


4,530 00 


1,373 00 


2,384 


58 


26 30 


401 


47 


1,811 


25 


1,398 90 


2,055 


00 


1,057 


25 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



53 



Appendix No ig — Continued 



Date of 
Instructions 



Name of 
Surveyor 



Description of Survey 



Amount 
paid 



June 

May 

June 
April 

Dec. 
Dec. 



7, 1923 

30, 1923 

7, 1923 
30, 1923 

11, 1923 

12, 1923 



Dec. 
Aug. 



5, 1923 
13, 1923 



Jan. * 9, 1924 



Dec. 
Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

April 

Mar. 

Mar. 



14. 1923 

11. 1924 

19, 1924 
25, 1924 
10, 1924 
27, 1924 
28, 1924 



June 22, 1924 



June 
April 



16, 1924 
16, 1924 



June 12, 1924 



Alex. Matheson.. . 

John L. Lang. . . . 

J. L. Morris 

C. E. Fitton 

Phillips & Benner, 
L. Mooney 

Baines & David . . 

C. E. Fitton 

H.J. Beatty 

T. G. Code 

A. Graham 

R. S. Kirkup 

Phillips & Benner 

G. L. Ramsey. . . . 

Phillips & Benner 

Lang & Ross 

Phillips & Benner 

A. G. Ardagh 

C. E. Fitton 

McAuslan & 
Anderson. 

John Lanning. . . . 



Survey of lots at Pearl Beach townsite, 
township of McVittie 



Inspection of lakes for storage purposes, 
districts of Nipissing and Sudbury. . . . 

Survey certain lots in township Murchison 

Subdivision survey of islands 137, 145, 
188, 133, in Severn River, district of 
Muskoka 



Subdivision of reserve in township of 
Drayton, district of Kenora 



Survey of timber lines, timber berth E, 
on Otter Tail Creek, district of Nipis- 
sing 



Iron posts for surveys 

Subdivision of lands on French River. 



Survey of limit line between Gillies Bros., 
and Hawkesbury Lumber Co., district 
of Nipissing 



Traverse St. Anthony Lake, township of 
Skead 



Services, city of Brantford survey 

Re survey part of township of Sibley, 
district of Thunder Bay 



Survey of township of Goldie, district of 
Thunder Bay 



Survey village of Port Macdiarmid, dis- 
trict of Thunder Bay 



Cottage sites on Trout Lake township 
Gorham, Thunder Bay 



Survey part township Wicksteed, district 
district of Algoma . 



Setting gauges on Shebandowan and 
Kashabowie Lakes, district Thunder 
Bay 



Re survey township Sunnidale, county 
of Simcoe 



Survey of islands in Severn River. 



Survey of summer cottage sites along 
shore of Trout Lake, township of 
Widdifield, district of Nipissing 



Survey of subdivision island Falls June 
tion, district of Cochrane 



$1,288 90 

704 21 
329 35 

237 30 
1,435 93 

254 49 
230 00 
153 20 

687 16 



815 95 


2 00 


2,366 90 


4,376 40 


1,108 96 


674 25 


2,631 65 



78 05 



641 


60 


593 


28 


1,178 


15 


655 


75 



54 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. iq — Continued 



No 



Date of 
Instructions 



Name of 
Surveyor 



Description of Survey 



Amount 
paid 



41 

42 

43 
44 

45 



April 3, 1924 

June 17, 1924 

July 22, 1924 

Mar. 21, 1924 



Lang & Ross 

L. Mooney 

C. E. Fitton 

Speight & van- 
Nostrand. 

Bank of Montreal 



Survey of subdivision town lots at Hor- 
nepayne, district Algoma 

Services June 18 to 24, inspection at 
Bisco, of lake levels 

Inspection of surveys, 1924 

Survey township of Rowe, in district 
Rainy River 

Wire to Sault Ste. Marie, re C. R. Kenny 
survey 



$352 50 



140 50 


2,476 26 


4,276 00 


63 



1,386 31 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 55 



Appendix No. 20 

Extract from O.L.S. Lang & Ross' report, subdivision part of township of 
Wicksteed, Algoma, dated Sault Ste. Marie, September 12th, 1924. 

"The part of this township surveyed by us is in general rolhng land and 
sandy or sandy clay soil. In the northerly part there are rocky hills ranging to 
one hundred feet in height. The rock exposures are gneiss and schist. No 
indications of valuable mineral were observed. 

"The timber in general is second growth spruce, poplar, balsam and jack 
pine up to eight inches in diameter. There are, however, 200 or 300 acres of 
heavy mixed growth up to twenty-four inches in diameter. 

"Moose are fairly plentiful, and one caribou was seen." 



Appendix No. 21 

Extract from O.L.S. G. P. Angus' report on west part of township of Thorning, 
district of Cochrane, dated September 15th, 1924. 

"The country is flats, timbered with spruce up to eight inches diameter, 
and clay ridges timbered with spruce, popular, birch and balsam up to fifteen 
inches diameter. 

"The flats are covered with a heavy moss of about one foot in depth, with 
black muck under of ten or twelve inches, and clay sub-soil, and will make good 
agricultural land after the present crop of valuable pulp timber is taken off and 
the land is drained. 

"Some years ago the country was burnt in patches in a great number of 
places and is now covered with a growth of spruce and poplar of two or three 
inches in diameter. 

"There are four outcrops of granite rock at the following locations: 

"First — In the railway cut at Mileage 20J/^ on the Timiskaming and 
Northern Ontario Railway on lot 24, concession 2. 

"Second — On the south boundary of lot 16, concession 1, about four chains 
west of Chin River. 

"Third — On the easterly limit of lot 25, concession 12, at one half mile 
south of the north boundary. 

"Fourth — On the side road between lots 18 and 19, concession 12, one- 
eighth of a mile south of the north boundary." 



56 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 22 

Extract from O.L.S. E. L. Moore's report on subdivision lot 22, concession 17, 
township of Ferris, Nipissing, dated North Bay, November 8th, 1924. 

"As shown on the plan accompanying this report, the lots range in area 
from one half of an acre to nearly five acres. Lots 2, 3, 4 and 5, are particularly 
desirable while the other lots are more or less rough. Lot 9 comprises a rock 
point which commands a fine view of the lake and for this reason is more desirable 
than some of the others. 

"Cedar posts, three inches square, were planted to mark the various angles 
of the lots, and in all cases were marked and mounded well with stones. The 
iron posts which were supplied were marked and planted as indicated on the plan. 
In all cases these were planted on the northerly side of the wooden post." 



Appendix No. 23 



Extract from O.L.S. R. S. Kirkup's report on certain concessions in township of 
Sibley, Thunder Bay, dated Port Arthur, August, 1924. 
"The soil is clay loam and clay, very rocky in the western half of the town- 
ship and swampy in the southeastern portion, so that really until the swamps 
are cleaned up the only available arable land lies in the northeastern section of 
the township. 

"There is quite a quantity of timber left in the southeastern section which I 
believe the Provincial Pulp and Paper Company will probably have cleared up 
by next year. 

Water Power 

"The portion of Sibley township which I resurveyed lies practically all 
within the watershed of Portage Creek, which flows down through the centre to 
Black Bay, being fed by numerous small creeks en route. The Provincial Pulp 
and Paper Company have an impounding dam located on section three in con- 
cession 2, and this, when closed, backs up the water for over two miles. In fact, 
I was unable to proceed with two of my lines until I had obtained permission to 
let the water go. Below the dam it is fairly rapid and shallow, with a small 
falls which is of no consequence as a water power. The old dam shown on the 
plan is in a state of disrepair and is not used any more. Iron bars were planted 
with pits and mounds at the points indicated on the accompanying plan, with 
the exception of the one at the northwest angle of the township and one on the 
third concession line, witnessing the post between sections 4 and 5, and here the 
nature of the ground was so rocky, that I was unable to make the pits in the 
prescribed matter, but planted the posts in cairns of stones. 

"While traversing the shores of Black Bay, I had the novel sensation of 
being chased by a crazy woman with a very formidable pike pole. In fact, she 
came so near to smashing up my transit that it was not really much of a joke 
at the time. She was living in one of the old lumber camps at the outlet of 
Portage Creek, but I have since learned that she has been removed to a place of 
safety. I completed the survey on the 21st day of June, and returned with my 
party to Port Arthur." 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 57 

Appendix No. 24 

Extract from O.L.S. C. E. Fitton's report on subdivision of Horseshoe Island, 
township of Baxter, Muskoka, dated Toronto, July, 1924. 

"After examining the island I found it would divide into five parcels giving 
a good boat landing and place for a house on each parcel. I also subdivided 
the part of Burrows Island, known as island 22 on the original plan of the town- 
ship of Baxter, north of the parcel lately surveyed by Fitton & Chase for James 
H. Wylie. The contour of the ground on the island was such that I judged it 
advisable to divide it into eleven parcels. Several of these parcels are not of 
much value, but the cost of survey was no more than if these had been omitted 
from the plan. 

"I examined the point known as lot 20, concession 4, in the township of 
Baxter, and laid out six parcels that I thought suitable for summer resort pur- 
poses. Some of these parcels had signs marked 'private property' and I under- 
stand the parties either had or would send in applications for them in due course. 
I have prepared plans in duplicate in accordance with the Registry Act of these 
subdivisions and submit them herewith, also list of the several parcels of land 
giving the number and my valuation of the same." 



Appendix No: 25 



Extract from O.L.S. E. L. Moore's report summer cottage lots along shore of 
Trout Lake, township of Widdifield, Nipissing, dated North Bay, September 
9th, 1924. 

"I commenced the survey on the 9th of July, and upon inspection of the 
ground found a desirable area for cottage lots in the west part of lot 5, concession 
'C The first step was to locate the west limit of lot 5 and after considerable 
searching I located the original bearing tree on the shore of the lake at the north 
end of this line from which I located the site of the original post between lot 5 
and lot 8, concession 'C Retracing the line south, I had no difficulty in 
re-establishing it by the original blazes. 

"From the west limit of lot 5, I began to lay off lots, but soon found that to 
do the work to the best advantage, it was necessary to make a shore traverse, 
project the lots on paper and then lay them out on the ground. This system 
was carried on throughout the survey. In this part of lot 5, I laid out lots 1 
to 18, inclusive, and a few chains farther along the southwesterly shore of lot 5, 
I laid out lots 19, 20, 21 and 22. The balance of lot 5, in concession 'C is mostly 
rough land and wholly burnt. Passing along to lot 4, concession 'C,' I found 
nothing suitable for lots on the south shore for about thirty-one chains east of 
the line between lots 4 and 5, there being no shade trees. Continuing from this 
point easterly I laid out the shore into lots, there being some very good locations, 
which condition continues along the north shore to within about twenty-seven 
chains from the west limit of township lot 4. The balance of lot 4 is too steep a 
hillside to be desirable. In lots 4 and 5 in concession 'B,' I found nothing suitable 
as the land back from the shore is a steep hillside running to aheight of 500 and 
600 feet, and has been burnt over, as is also the case in lot 3, concession 'C,' with 
the exception of one point in the southeast angle of lot 3, which has a good 
building site, plenty of small trees and a good beach, so I laid this out as lot 72. 



58 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

"Between the land that I laid out as lots 11 and 18, I found a portage, and 
as it was much used, I laid off fifty links on either side of it for public used. 

"Every angle of the lots were marked by a cedar post not less than three 
inches square, firmly driven in the ground and around most of these was built 
a stone mound. The posts planted to mark the front angles were set, in most 
cases, a little distance back from the high water mark in order to obtain a more 
permanent position for them. The position of these are shown in my field 
notes of the survey. The twenty iron posts which were supplied were marked 
and planted alongside of the wooden posts at intervals throughout the survey." 



Appendix No. 26 



Extract from O.L.S. Phillips & Benner's report of survey of cottage sites on 
Trout Lake, townships of Gorham and Ware, Thunder Bay, dated Port 
Arthur, July 10th, 1924. 

"We consider this lake very desirable for camping purposes, and there 
should be very little difficulty in disposing of the lots. There are sandy beaches 
fronting on the greater number of the sites and these could be considerably 
improved by opening the dam at the outlet of the lake. This holds up about a 
foot of water at the present time and has not been used for some years. 

"We consider the following lots to be the most desirable: Numbers 1, 10 
to 22 inclusive, 27 to 30 inclusive, 36 to 40 inclusive, 42 to 46 inclusive, 55 to 58 
inclusive and 60. 

"The road from Port Arthur to the lake is in good condition to a point about 
two miles from the lake, and from here in it is very rough and will need con- 
siderable improvement for heavy traffic. The road shown in lot 1, concession 8, 
Ware, has been cut out and a small amount of improvement done on it as far as 
the line between lot 53 and the Reserve. This Reserve was left with the intention 
of it being used for parking purposes and for the erection of garages by the lot 
holders. We did not reserve any part of lots 53 and 54 for road purposes but 
this could be done if considered advisable." 



Appendix No. 27 



Extract from O.L.S. C. E. Fitton's report on islands in Gloucester Pool and 
Severn River, Muskoka, dated Toronto, July, 1924. 

"I find that a good many of these islands that now exist formerly formed 
part of the main land and also that the islands originally known as numbers 
14 and 22 shown on the original plan of the township of Baxter are now divided 
and shown as separate islands on this plan. The following is a list of these 
islands that I consider formerly formed part of the main land and also of those 
that originally formed part of islands 14 and 22. 

"Islands Nos. 133, 137, 138, 146, 148, 153 and Beachwood were formerly 
part of lot 20, concession 4, township of Baxter. 

"Island No. 149 was originally part of lot 21, concession 4, township of 
Baxter, 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 59 

"Island No. 154 was originally part of lot 22, concession 4, township of 
Baxter. 

"Islands Nos. 156-158 were originally part of lot 23, concession 4, township 
of Baxter. 

"Island No. 114 was originally part of lots 20 and 21, concessions 5 and 6, 
township of Baxter. 

"Islands 115, 116, 117, 118, 119 and 96-were all originally part of lot 20, 
concession 5, township of Baxter. 

"Island 135 is part of lots 18 and 19, concession 1, township of Matchedash. 

"Island No. 136 is part of lot 18, concession 1, township of Matchedash. 

"The townline crosses island No. 191 (part of it is in lot 18 , concession 1), 
township of Matchedash, and part in lot 18, concession 14, township of Tay. 

"Islands Nos. 124, 125 and 128 are part of the west half of lot 21, concession 
1, township of Matchedash. 

"Island No. 190 is part of lots 18 and 19, concession 14, township of Tay. 

"Island No. 139 is part of lot 19, concession 14, township of Tay. 

"Island No. 189 is part of lot 19, concession 14, township of Tay. 

"Islands Nos. 188, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 147, 150, 151, 152, 184 and 185, 
originally were all joined together and was known as island No. 14, and shown as 
such on the original plan of the township of Baxter. 

"Island No. 121 and the island known as Broadview were originally part of 
island No. 22 or Burrows Island. 

"Islands No. 188 and 133 and parts of islands Nos. 137 and 145 have been 
surveyed and plans made under former instructions." 



Appendix No. 28 



Extract from O.L.S. Speight & vanNostrand's report on survey of township of 
Rowe, Rainy River, dated Toronto, October 30th, 1924. 

General Features 

"Topographically, the township of Rowe may be divided into two fairly 
distinct parts. The southwesterly part — including practically all of concession 
1, most of the west half of concession 2 and 3, and part of the west half of con- 
cession 4, approximately a third of the township — is, generally speaking, level. 
A few low ridges of granite break through the soil, but seventy-five per cent, of 
this part of the township is probably fit for agricultural use. The soil is clay 
loam to sandy loam, and the general character of the land is very similar to 
that in township of Dewart to the west or Richardson to the south. 

"The remainder of the township, to the north and east, is for the most 
part a succession of low granite ridges, or is rocky table land, varied in the 
northern part by stretches of muskeg of considerable extent. 

"No streams of any importance enter the township. A number of small 
creeks in the vsouth half unite to form the west branch of Split Rock River which 
leaves the township near the middle of the west boundary. No lakes were seen 
with the exception of a small muskeg lake in lot 2, concession 6. 

"The whole township was swept by fire about forty years ago, and very 
little of the timber now growing has attained commercial size. Poplar has 
grown up on the clay soil of the southwest part of the township, and comprises 



60 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

the major part of the new growth. To the northeast, jack pine predominates. 
As is to be expected, part of this new growth is somewhat scattered, and con- 
sequently incHned to be scrubby, but much of it is growing up in good clean 
stands, and in ten or fifteen years, if it is protected from fire, there will be con- 
siderable timber of merchantable size. 

"The swamps in the southern part of the township contain considerable 
cedar and some spruce. 

"On lots 2 to 7, of concession 1, there is a scattered growth of white pine 
which has survived the fires that have burned the other timber. The trees are 
of good size — twenty inches to three feet in diameter. It has been estimated 
that approximately 650,000 feet of this timber is standing. 

"The country rock in the township is a white granite, and no indications of 
economic minerals were seen by the party. 

"Deer were plentiful, as were partridge, but the young broods of the latter 
were very small, one, two or three chick to the hen. No other game was seen, 
and lack of waters rendered the most complete fishing equipment taken by 
members of the party useless. 

"The east branch of the Split Rock River is bordered by hay meadows in 
lots 8, 9 and 10 of concession 3, and a rough wagon road has been opened to 
provide access from the Dewart line, for the purpose of harvesting the crop. A 
similar condition exists on the lower end of the creek which enters the Split Rock 
River in concession 5, the wagon road giving access in this case, being a wagon 
road to Goliere Bay of the Lake-of- the- Woods." 



Appendix No. 29 



Extract from O.L.S. Phillips & Benner's report on survey of township of Goldie' 
Thunder Bay, dated Port Arthur, June 28th, 1924. 

"The greater part of the township has been included in two licenses issued to 
Chas. Greer and associates and the greater part of the jack pine has been cut off 
the northerly and westerly parts of the township. The spruce has not been cut, 
but there is not a great quantity of this species. We understand that a more 
detailed estimate of the timber was made for the local Land Office prior to the 
survey. No part of the township has been burned over very recently, save a 
few acres along the westerly part of the south boundary. 

The soil is, generally, a red clay loam and appears to be of good quality and 
similar to that in the Dawson Road lots and the township of Forbes. Various 
settlers in these latter areas have informed us that they seldom have a crop 
failure in this soil, and that it does not bake hard when d^y. The best land is 
along the Oskondiga River. Concession 6 is rocky, and not of much value for 
farm land save in a few places. We would estimate that well over fifty per cent, 
of the land is suitable for cultivation. 

"The rock formation is Keewatin and no minerals were noticed. 

"The easterly part of the township is more broken than the west. A con- 
siderable area along the Oskondiga River is level land. Concession 6 is rough 
and rocky. 

"The Oskondiga River is the only waterway in the township. This river 
is of art average width of two chains and has numerous rapids. It is now being 
used to drive out some of the logs taken out by Mr. Greer last season. There 
are five small islands and these were lettered 'A' to 'E,' and where possible a 
tree was marked with the letter of the island. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 61 

"There are no government roads constructed now within the Hmits of the 
township. The Dawson Road is about half a mile south of the southwest angle 
and there would be no difficulty in constructing a road to connect with this. 
There is a wagon road running northeast from Buda. This strikes the north 
boundary of the township just west of the northeast angle of lot 3, and then 
continues along the north limit and on into Forbes township. It was cut out for 
a summer road into one of Greer's camps. There are several winter roads 
crossing the northerly and westerly parts of the township. These were used in 
bringing out the logs to the track last winter and the grades on most of them are 
easy. 

"There are no squatters within the limits of the township and the only 
improvements noticed were the Greer camps. The southerly boundary cut off 
a portion of the clearing and a small out-house of the settler located on lot 78, 
concession 'B,' Dawson Road lots. 

"Game is not plentiful, but a few deer and beaver were noticed." 



Appendix No. 30 

Extract from O.L.S. Sutcliffe & Neeland's report on survey of township outlines, 
district of Cochrane, dated New Liskeard, December 3rd, 1923. 

Soil 

"For the most part the soil within the limits of the survey is sand, clay or 
both mixed, but mostly a sandy clay, even in the low ground, and not con- 
sidered from an agricultural standpoint in the same class with soil near Cochrane. 

Timber 

"Spruce, jack pine, poplar, birch and balsam covers the country in quantity 
in the order named, but on the whole, is much smaller than that found farther 
south. In fact over large areas the timber is small and thin. A fairly large 
area also in the vicinity of New Post brook and Little Abitibi River has been 
burned over, but the timber, burnt, generally speaking, was not large. 

Minerals 

"No minerals of economic value were observed, and the only outcroppings 
of rock seen were granite. 

Water Powers 

"A drop of possible eighty (80) or ninety (90) feet occurs on New Post 
brook, about thirty (30) chains east of New Post, but the low water flow is not 
sufficient to make it valuable while larger and better powers on the Abitibi 
within ten (10) miles are undeveloped. 

"The Little Abitibi River averages over three chains in width, and over 
practically the whole length between the second and third base lines is one series 
of rapids, with comparatively low banks and few outcroppings of rock, and 
considered also of small value from the standpoint of power or navigation. 



62 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Water Courses 

"Little Abitibi as stated above is the next largest river to the big Abitibi, 
with the French River a close second. New Post brook has an average width of 
approximately one (1) chain with many small rapids. It provides a fair canoe 
route to the Little Abitibi, which, however, is used little by Indians for reasons 
mentioned above. 

Animal Life 

"A few moose were seen, but from indications, not plentiful. Beaver are 
scarce also, but we saw indications of mink, marten and otter, and in one stream 
named Trout Creek, we caught some nice brook trout." 



Appendix No. 31 



Extract from O.L.S. J. Coltham's report on traverse of Kabinakagami River, 
Algoma and Cochrane, dated Parry Sound, December 24th, 1923. 

"Kabinakagami River lies within the townships of Ermine, Derry and 
Lipton already outlined and in the township west of Ermine outlined this year 
by Ontario Land Surveyor H. J. Beatty, of Pembroke. This lake is a beautiful 
sheet of water dotted with numerous islands, ranging in area from a mere basket 
of foliage to several hundreds of acres. The shores on the greater part of the 
lake are rocky, rising from five to twenty-five feet high, with an occasional marshy 
bay. While most of the rock is solid, there is considerable shore, especially 
around the islands that is made up of loose boulders. At the extreme south end 
of the lake a large grassy meadow extends for some three-quarters of a mile 
southward. This in reality, for the most part cannot be termed a marsh as a 
greater portion of the surface of it is hard firm ground. 

"Along with several smaller ones another grassy meadow of large area 
lies adjoining the lake near and around the mouth of the Little Kabinakagami 
River. As these meadows only rise slightly higher than the surface of the lake, 
and no doubt in high water would be flooded, I thought it advisable to traverse 
them as shown on the plans accompanying this report. The remainder of the 
shore of this lake is rocky except for a number of clay outbanks on the east side 
of the lake commencing near the mouth of the Oba River and numerous fine sand 
beaches. The water appears, generally speaking, quite deep, except for the 
east side, where reeds extend for some distance out in the lake. The shores of 
the islands are rocky rising from five to twenty-five feet high. Most of these 
islands are fairly level, and covered with early and are beautifully situated 
for tourist sites. Only a few tourists were met with on this lake. 

"The Kabinakagami River from its outlet at the lake was traversed down 
stream through the townships of Woolrich, Alderson, McFarlan, Verdun, 
Landry, Irish and Nassau. Numerous portages have to be made around the 
different rapids and falls, but these are mostly short and in good condition. 
The river generally is between two and three chains in width, except in the 
township of Woolrich where it enters and runs through a marshy lake for several 
miles, varying in width from fifteen to thirty chains. From the north end of this 
marshy lake to the Canadian National Railway the water runs swift and shallow. 
Rock along the shore of the river is found in places through the township of 
Derry, but from there on it is conspicuous by its absence. After leaving the 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 63 

Canadian National Railway through to the south boundary of the township of 
Studholme the banks of the river are clay from five to twenty-five feet high, with 
numerous small stretches of marshy shore. Except for a number of small 
rapids and falls the current is slow and sluggish. True it is that there are a 
number of rapids and falls, but no water power of any consequence could be 
developed. 

Timber 

"This whole country appears to be fairly well clothed with timber of a 
medium size; chiefly composed of spruce, birch, balsam, poplar, banksian pine, 
with cedar along the streams, rivers and lakes ranging in diameter from six 
inches to twenty-four inches. While a great part of the forests are only suitable 
for pulpwood, yet there are clumps of spruce that average a fair size. On the 
east shore of the lake, and on the north shore there are small areas covered with 
norway pine between ten inches and twenty inches in diameter. A considerable 
area of country stretching from the northwest Bay of Kabinakagami lake was 
on fire during the progress of the survey. 

Soil 

"For the most part of the land around Kabinakagami Lake appeared clear 
of very much surface rock, and no doubt would be suitable for agriculture as 
soon as a sufficient area of the country was cleared so that climatic conditions 
would not interfere due to the presence of too much bush. The soil is sandy in 
places, while in others it runs to a sandy loam. As you go northward down the 
Kabinakagami River the land is a clay loam much the same nature as the 
country around Hearst and according to the few people at Kabina is very 
productive in the line of vegetables. 

Fish and Game 

"The lake abounds with pickerel, pike and whitefish, with speckled trout in 
the Kabinakagami River and adjoining streams. This country seems to be the 
centre of the game country. Large numbers of moose with an occasional 
caribou and red deer were seen at all times. The smaller fur bearing animals as 
beaver, otter, fisher, mink and muskrat appeared quite plentiful. Wild fowl 
appeared quite numerous. 

"No showings of minerals were met with at all throughout the survey." 



Appendix No. 32 



Extract from O.L.S. T. G. Code's report on traverse of part of Kabinakagami and 
Kenogami Rivers, Cochrane, dated Cobalt, December 31st, 1923. 

"The Kabinakagami River is not used as a route to Mammawinattawa 
Post to any great extent as other rivers flowing north from the Canadian National 
Railway are less rough. In the township of Studholme there is a one-and-a-half 
mile rapids. The portage about the same length, was in very poor condition 
and had to be cut out. In high water considerable of this rapids might be run 
by good canoemen. From the north boundary of the township of Studholme 
all the portages are shown on the plans and field notes. All had to be improved. 



64 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Shores 

"From the Canadian National Railway north to station 44, the shores are 
rocky with a heavy clay and gravel overburden. From station 44, the under- 
lying formation is limestone, with a gravel and clay overburden. 

Falls and Rapids 

"From the Canadian National Railway through to station 107, this river 
is a series of falls and rapids. The volume of water is not exceptional in extreme 
low water, but with storage dams located as to conserve the spring water, 
considerable power is available, where the timber is, to say the least, fair. 

"There are four falls within six and a third miles north of north boundary 
of the township of Studholme. Rapids between the falls permit of considerable 
raise of head without interference with other owners of power, if the power 
rights are owned separately. 

"The survey was made in midsummer with the water extremely low. A 
cross section and flow measurement was not taken as the results would have been 
very misleading. The Canadian National Railway have a gauge at the crossing 
of the Kabinakagami and the exact flow over several years is, therefore, obtain- 
able. 

33^ miles north of Studholme Falls No. 1 Sta. 15 has a head of 14.0 ft. 
43/^ " " 2 23 " 21.0 

5M " " 3 28 " 20.0 

6}4 " " 4 36 " 24.9 

"The head is figured from smooth water above to smooth water below the 
falls, and includes short rapids and falls from where the plans show head to foot. 

The Limestone Rapids 

"The Limestone Rapids is about seventeen and one-half miles in length. 
In low water it is necessary to lighten canoes to not more than 250 pounds inside 
load and lead the canoe through the deepest channels, lifting it over all the 
very shallow places. Two canoes were so badly worn as to be of no future value. 
One was left in the Hudson Bay winter post at the Forks- Kenogami and Albany 
Rivers and the other tarred up to bring us home. The cook's canoe was not used 
for second and third trips back for outfit and was, therefore, not in such bad 
condition. 

"Without an extensive survey, the Limstone Rapids is very doubtful as a 
source of power. 

Timber 

"Except where brule is shown on the plans, the timber seems to be very 
similar to that south of the Canadian National Railway. The difference in 
size varies very little, being somewhat smaller as one travels north. 

Soil 

"With the exception of a few rock outcroppings within seven miles north 
of the Canadian National Railway, the rock formation is limestone with gravel 
overburden, and a top soil of good sandy clay loam suitable for agriculture. 
Potatoes at Mammawimattawa Post compared favourably with around Cobalt, 
except they were probably a little later. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 65 

Kenogami or English River 

"The survey of this river was commenced at the south boundary of the 
Indian Reserve about three and one-half miles north of Mammawimattawa Post. 
The width at this point is about twelve chains. The river increases in size to 
about twenty-four chains a mile or so from the outlet. At its outlet into the 
Albany River is thirty chains. 

"The current is very fast, about three miles per hour on an average. Parts 
of the river have to be tracked where the water is too deep for poling, the rest 
may be paddled. There are no portages, but in low water there are a few 
shallow fast places. The only one of importance being a limestone rapids at 
station 69. There is a good channel near the west bank at this point, where the 
water is sufficiently deep for loaded canoes. 

"This is an excellent route to James Bay. The Hudson Bay Company and 
Revillon Frere use gasoline launches and even fairly large flat bottomed steam 
boats in high water. 

"The route used from the Canadian National Railway commenced at 
Pagwa on the Pagwa River, which flows into the Kenogami. Supplies of all 
kinds are loaded into large scows, about twelve feet wide and thirty feet in 
length, and floated all the way to James Bay when the water is high. The 
Hudson Bay factor told me the scows could be floated to Mammawimattawa in 
fifteen hours, a distance of about seventy miles. It takes about the same time 
from there to the Albany River, a distance of about sixty miles. 

Shores 

"The shores are mostly high and gravelly. The soil is a good sandy clay 
loam. Nearing the Albany River the land is low and flat." 



Appendix No. 33 

Extract from O.L.S. D. J. Gillon's report on traverse of Seine River and islands, 
Kenora, dated Fort Frances, February 13th, 1924. 

"All islands met with in the river and lakes were traversed and marked. A 
table has been prepared showing the numbers of these islands, traverse distances, 
acreage and a short description of each island. On the plans have been shown all 
the traverse courses and distances on shore line and island traverses, with the 
exception of those of some small islands in the river where, to avoid congestion, 
the measurements were omitted. These are shown on a specially prepared 
number of sheets. Those mining locations or groups of locations, which were 
located on the ground during the progress of the survey, have been shown on the 
plans, use having been made of all the data available from my own surveys and 
from information obtained in the past from other Ontario Land Surveyors who 
have assisted me in publishing correct maps by furnishing me with minutes of 
various surveys made by them. Where it was found impossible to locate any 
trace of old lines or posts, whole groups of locations have been omitted. 

"During the course of the survey, water levels were carried up the river and 
across the lakes and check levels and measurements were taken to the contours 
established for the Fort Frances Pulp and Paper Company. All elevations 
refer to the bench marks established by the Department of the Interior of 
Canada along the Canadian National Railway by precise levelling. 

3L.F. 



66 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

"The measurements and levels show that the contours shown on the com- 
pany's plans are substantially correct. While no actual contour lines have been 
run, the plans correctly show their positions. A traverse line has been run 
following as nearly as possible a general elevation not differing more than one 
or two feet from the required contour line. From these traverse lines levels and 
offsets have been taken to the correct contour points where pegs, marked with 
the elevation were planted. The contours on the plans are obtained from these 
points. Water levels were carried along the river and lakes and at intervals 
of about half a mile check levels were run back to the contour traverse line thus 
checking its elevation and position. During the season further investigation by 
the company's engineers has resulted in the decision to still further raise the 
height of the proposed dams so that final contour lines will have to be run. In 
fact since last August the work of running a contour line at elevation 1365, for 
the proposed Moose Lake development has been in progress and is still con- 
tinuing. 

"No efforts had been rnade to the Power Company's survey to locate 
original lines. No lines have been run on the ground to indicate the boundaries 
of those parcels of land shown on the plans as required for power sites so that 
there was nothing on the ground to connect these power sites with the traverse. 
Special efforts were made to locate the nearest original lines and posts and those 
found are shown on the plans. 

"With this report is a profile showing the fall of the river from the Lac des 
Mille Lacs Dam, to the river below Sturgeon Falls, and the power company's 
projected developments thereon. The high water and tailwater levels given are 
those of the latest proposition and it is worthy of notice that the tailwater level 
given for the Sturgeon Falls power development is equivalent to 497 Public 
Works datum which is the present recognized high water level of Rainy Lake 
which would suggest that the proposed raising of the high water level to 500 or 
501 has been abandoned." 



Appendix No. 34 



Extract from O.L.S. Chas. V. Gallagher's report on survey of certain township 
outlines in district of Sudbury, south of Canadian Pacific Railway, dated 
Porcupine, February 22nd, 1924, 

"Part of the area included within these outlines, lying within three miles of 
the Canadian Pacific Railway, has been cut over in the past, apparently to 
secure railway ties. At the present, lumbering operations are in progress on the 
north half of township 32, and a compass line of recent date running east and 
west midway of this township, and another forming the north half of the westerly 
limit of this same township, were encountered. Lumbering operations were also 
carried on in recent years in the central, or north eastern part of township 29. 
On the southerly one mile of this township, and the northerly three-quarter 
mile of township 12F, and extending easterly into township 28 and 12 E, there is 
a fine stand of small black pine. In fact, nature is bountifully reforestering all 
the areas within these outlines that have been devastated by fire in past years, 
recent and remote. The southerly ten miles of the area included in this survey 
is apparently fairly well timbered throughout with spruce, balsam, jack pine, 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 67 

poplar and birch up to fourteen inches, while in the southwesterly part of town- 
ship IIF, there are many large white pine up to thirty inches, also some largr 
cedar. The timber plan accompanying this report gives in detail the timbee 
encountered along the lines. 

Physical Features and Soil 

"While there are some high hills in the area, the district may well be des- 
cribed as undulating. The soil throughout is sandy, boulder strewn in a few 
small isolated areas, and the greater portion appears suitable for agriculture. 

Minerals 

"No indications of economic minerals were observed, the outcrops noted 
being granite and few in number. 

Fish and Game 

"In the lakes in the northwestern part of the district many large pike were 
caught, in all other waters they were scarce and small. No other kinds of fish 
were seen. Moose appeared to be very numerous and there are some red deer. 
Beaver were plentiful in the greater part of the area, and signs of bear were 
common. Indications of other fur-bearing animals were rare. Partridges abound 
through the locality. 

Water Powers 

"No water powers were encountered within the outlines surveyed but there 
is a storage dam on the river which drains Side Burned Hill Lake. This has 
flooded quite a large area, and made line cutting very difficult on the northerly 
part of the west limit of township 29. It had also submerged the posts planted 
at high water mark referencing the southwest corner of Chapleau township, and 
these posts I removed and placed at the present high water mark as is shown 
in the field notes." 



Appendix No. 35 



Extract from O.L.S. McAuslan, Anderson & Moore's report on township outlines, 
south of Canadian Pacific Railway, district of Sudbury, dated North Bay, 
January 24th, 1924. 

Soil 

"The only place we came across any soil having an agricultural possibility 
was along the south boundary of townships IIC and IID, and on the south 
half of the line between townships 11 G and 11 D. These lines pass through 
almost level country with soil of sandy loam and clay. The balance of the 
survey passes through country wholly unsuitable for agricultural purposes, the 
soil being of light sand and in many places hilly and full of boulders. 

Physical Features 

"Township 10 E, 10 F, and 10 G, might be classed as hilly increasing in 
roughness to the west, while townships 23, 24, 25, 11 B, 11 C and 11 D, are more 
or less rolling, with many areas of almost level land. 



68 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

The height of land passes northwesterly through township 11 B, the north- 
east corner of 11 C, the southwest corner of 24 and through 25. Owing to the 
proximity of this the streams through the whole area are small. Only three 
were met with which were at all navigable with a canoe, namely: the Wakami 
River, flowing north out of Wakami Lake in township 20; the Wenebegon River, 
flowing south into Wenebegon Lake in township 10 D, which is navigable with a 
canoe only south of the north boundary of 10 D, and a small stream, which the 
Indians call Spruce River, flowing easterly through townships 10 F, 10 M and 10 D. 

"Small lakes are numerous and are usually of spring water with gravel 
bottoms. Trout Lake, lying in the south corner of townships 11 B and 11 C, is 
a very pretty body of particularly clear water with gravel bottom and high 
shores. 

Timber 

"Judging by the trees this area was nearly all swept by fire between fifty 
and sixty years ago and many large areas again within the last fifteen years. 
Generally the whole area is poorly timbered. Patches of merchantable timber 
are scattered throughout the area. White and red pine from eighteen to thirty- 
six inches was discovered in small quantities around the lakes along the south 
half of the meridian between 11 B and 11 C, and along the south boundary of 
11 B, also white pine of large size was seen in spots in the north part of 10 F, 
and more plentifully in the north part of 10 G. This, however, though very 
large, is of poor quality owing to its great age. Practically no new growth of 
pine appears. 

"Jack pine up to fourteen inches appears in patches. A very good stand of 
this is located in the southeast corner of 25 and the southwest corner of 24, 
extending a short distance in 11 C. The south part of 11 B, and the southeast 
part of 11 C, also contains considerable jack pine of fair size. 

"White birch, spruce and balsam not usually over twelve inches also appears 
in many areas. 

"Cedar and black spruce predominates in the low lands, the cedar being 
usually of poor quality. 

"Hard maple and yellow birch is also to be found on the hill tops in the 
north part of 10 G, and south part of 11 G. 

Game 

"Moose and bear are quite plentiful, a few red deer were seen, but they 
are not numerous. Wolves were heard occasionally. Fresh work of beaver was 
seen on nearly all the lakes and streams and the smaller fur-bearing animals 
are said to be numerous. Partridge are also plentiful. The only fish caught 
were pike and these are numerous in all the lakes of any size, though it is 
there are trout and maskinonge in Trout Lake in townships 11 B and 11 C. 

Mineral 

"The rock formation is principally granite and no evidence of valuable 
mineral was seen, though in this respect a surveyor in charge of a party, par- 
ticularly on this class of^work, has very little opportunity to investigate the 
mineral possibility of the country he passes over." 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 69 



Appendix No. 36 

Extract from O.L.S. James S. Dobie's report on traverse of English River, 
districts of Kenora and Patricia, dated Thessalon, April 12th, 1924. 

"The physical characteristics of the territory adjacent to the portion of the 
English River surveyed during the season of 1923 are, generally speaking, 
similar to those of the portion described in the report for the previous year. 
Indian Lake, where the survey started for the season, is about four a half miles 
long, with high rocky shores timbered with poplar, spruce, jack pine, balsam and 
birch, the relative abundance of each being apparently about in the order 
named. There are considerable areas of old second growth timber of varying 
ages. This lake has two outlets. The one flowing from the southwest end and 
runs southerly between high rocky banks with a few small bays, for a couple of 
miles where it enters Grassy Narrows Lake, about two miles west of the Hudson 
Bay Company's post on island 279. The other outlet leaves the southerly 
shore of Indian Lake about a mile and a half from the north end of the lake,- 
and flows through a labyrinth of islands and channels to Grassy Narrows Lake, 
near the Hudson's Bay Company's post. A long bay runs to the south and east 
from a point about opposite the Hudson's Bay Company's post and from the 
most southerly point on this bay, a canoe route runs through a chain of lakes to 
Jones and Favel stations on the Canadian National Railway. 

"Much of the country in the neighbourhood of Grassy Narrow Lake is covered 
with clay, and there are scattered areas of good land suitable for agriculture. 
It was not possible to gather data as to how large these tracts of clay lands are, 
but the impression one gets from passing along the shores is that they are not 
nearly so extensive as those farther up the English River between Camp Lake 
and Lac Seul. The timber in this section is the prevailing poplar, spruce, jack 
pine, etc., with large areas of second growth of varying ages. 

"There is an Indian Reserve at the east end of Grassy Narrows Lake, and 
some of the larger islands in this neighbourhood are included in the Reserve 
either wholly or in part. The points where the boundaries of the Indian Reserve 
intersect the shores of the lake were located and it was found that at each of 
these points an iron bar had been driven into the ground beside a wooden post. 
The boundaries of the reserve had also been cut out and reblazed not many 
years ago. These iron bars were all tied to the various transit stations and will 
serve as additional monuments for the perpetuation of the survey. 

"There are a large number of Indians who make this reserve their head- 
quarters during the early part of the summer, remaining there until they receive 
their treaty money about the end of June, after which they depart for the railway 
where they spend their time acting as guides for tourists or picking blue berries 
which are shipped to Winnipeg in large quantities during the season. 

"The land around the Indian villages is of excellent quality, but beyond 
raising a few potatoes, no attempt is made at agriculture. 

"The Hudson's Bay Company have a post on Grassy Narrows Lake, 
presided over by Mr. Donald Murchison, whose courtesy is of the happy type 
which makes ones memory linger in happy recollection. 

"From Grassy Narrows Lake, the English River flows westerly through Fox 
and Lount Lakes. It then turns more northerly through Separation Lake to 
Separation Rapids. The lakes named above are all very similar as far as physical 
characteristics go. Shores generally high and rocky, covered with the prevailing 
poplar, spruce, jack pine, etc., deeply indented shore line, with long narrow bays 



70 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

usually ending in fairly extensive marshes and low areas. There are numerous 
islands of all sizes from mere dots to one near the outlet of Lount Lake of 387 
acres. In some places there are small areas of clay land similar to that around 
Grassy Narrows Indian Reserve, but on the whole these are not of great import- 
ance. 

"Froxn the south side of Separation Lake a short distance east of Separation 
Rapids, Fiord Bay extends in a southwesterly direction for about four miles. 
Here a small stream drops into the bay over a rocky ledge about twenty-five 
feet high. From this point a canoe route runs to Minaki via Sand Lake. 

"From the Hudson's Bay Company's post at Grassy Narrows Lake to 
Separation Rapids is twenty-two and a half miles by the canoe route, usually 
followed. 

"At Separation Rapids, the river drops about three feet in a distance of ten 
chains. There are two channels, the water nearly all flowing through the 
northerly one. In fact in exceptionally dry seasons the southerly channel is 
dry. At the time of the survey there was not sufficient water in this channel 
to float a canoe. Geodetic survey bench mark No. 38 K is located on the south 
shore of the southerly channel a few yards from the head of the rapids. A 
portage runs over the island between the two channels. 

"It is not considered likely that there will ever be any water power develop- 
ment at this point. The fall is small and the banks are of such a nature that it 
would be a very expensive matter to concentrate any of the other falls on the 
river at this point. The most feasible plan would appear to be to flood this 
rapids and add the fall to one of the larger falls down stream. For this reason 
no water power reserve was laid out at this point. 

"From Separation Rapids to Upper Kettle Falls is six miles. The river 
flows northwesterly and widens out so as to resemble a long narrow lake, and 
for the first three miles the canoe route leads through a labyrinth of islands where 
one is constantly in d/bubt where to head next. In some places the current is 
fairly strong and about a mile above Kettle Falls there is a drop of about four 
inches, which results in a current up which it is difficult to paddle. 

"The general characteristics along this stretch are about the same as farther 
up stream. There are a few small groves of red and white pine scattered here 
and there, and these are particularly noticeable on some of the islands. The 
red and white pine is, generally speaking, of an inferior quality, and the quantity 
is small. Several long narrow bays lead off" from the main river, each one ending 
in a fairly extensive marsh. 

"These marshy bays all along the river are very much alike in many respects. 
The bay usually terminates in a small creek which dwindles to a mere trickle in a 
short distance. There is usually a considerable area of low grassy land where 
the shore line is of a most indefinite character, and where it is usually impossible 
to determine with any degree of exactness where the lake ends and the shore 
begins. In most cases, a foot or so of a raise in the water level would submerge 
large areas which are ordinarily quite dry. These low areas sometimes extend 
back for considerable distances, and if it is ever considered advisable to utilize 
these lakes as storage reservoirs, considerable contouring would be necessary, 
particularly around the ends of these bays. 

"Upper, Middle and Lower Kettle Falls, with drops of 7.05, 18.60 and 13.35 
feet respectively, amounting to thirty-nine feet in all, occur within a distance of 
about a mile and a half. Lower Kettle Falls is only a 110 feet wide at the crest 
and there are high rocky banks on each side. By building a dam at this point 
and flooding out Upper and Middle Kettle Falls, and Separation Rapids, with the 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 71 

small amount of fall between, a possible head of forty-five feet could be con- 
centrated at this point, which with a regulated minimum flow of 8,000 c.f.s., and 
eighty per cent, efficiency would give approximately 33,000 horsepower. The 
splendid storage facilities provided by the lakes above would render it possible 
to maintain a peak load of very much greater than this for several hours. There 
are two low places on each side of the river where levees would have to be con- 
structed and considerable survey work would have to be done here, to determine 
just what are the possibilities in this direction. 

"On the other hand a dam at Middle Kettle Falls to raise the water level 
back to Maynard Falls, flooding out Separation Rapids, could be constructed as 
the necessary elevation could be obtained within a short distance of the shore 
on either side. There are a couple of places where short levees would be required. 
In order to concentrate the total head of the three falls at this point, it would be 
necessary to pipe the water to a power house below the Lower Kettle Falls, a 
distance of over half a mile, and this might present some difficulty, as some of the 
ground to be crossed is very low. 

"I merely point out these possibilities, but make no recommendation as to 
what is the best plan for development of this power as a great deal of careful 
investigation will have to be undertaken before an intelligent opinion can be 
formed. Suffice it to say that there is here a power possibility of very great 
magnitude. 

"From the Lower Kettle Falls, the river flows in a UDrthwesterly and 
westerly direction to One Man Lake. This stretch of river is fairly wide resemb- 
ling a long narrow lake in places. In other pl$|fes it narrows and flows with a 
strong current. Sturgeon River comes in from the north, about three miles 
upstream from One Man Lake. This stream was traversed for about two miles 
to the first portage, where post No. 313 was planted in a mound of stones on the 
north bank. There is a fall of about twenty feet here, with another one visible 
a short distance upstream. This stream is of fair size, and drains a number of 
small lakes lying to the north. The portion of Sturgeon River traversed is wide 
with no perceptible current. The banks are high a short distance back from 
the shore, although there are some stretches where the shore is low and grassy, 
but the high ground is not far behind. 

"The English River, along this stretch, has high banks for the most part, 
although there are a couple of the marshy bays characteristic of the river, where 
some low ground exists. In these cases, however, it is not far back, to the high 
land. The prevailing timber is similar to that on the upper stretches, poplar, 
spruce, jack pine, etc., with considerable areas of second growth. 

"One Man Lake is seven and a quarter miles long. It has high rocky 
shores, although there are several sections where considerable areas of clay 
soil exist. The largest area is around the north end of the lake. At this end 
of the lake there is an Indian Reserve where a small number of Indians make 
their headquarters. The Hudson's Bay Co. also have an outpost on the north 
shore a short distance east of the Indian Reserve, where the English River 
enters the lake. 

"One Man Lake is a fairly large sheet of water, with a number of high 
rocky islands. There are a number of deep bays on both sides of the lake, each 
one with the characteristic marsh at the end of it. In addition to these marshes 
there is a considerable area of flat hay land around the mouth of the creek which 
flows through the west side of the Indian Reserve. On this wild hay is cut and 



72 R EPORT OF THE No. 3 

used for feed for a few head of cattle owned by the local Indians, and for a team 
of horses which are the property of the Hudson's Bay Co.'s representative at 
this point. 

"The timber around this lake is the usual poplar, spruce, jack pine, birch, 
balsam, etc. and in some cases the quality is good and the quantity fairly large. 
There are, however, large areas of second growth of varying ages, although 
no signs of recent fires were seen. 

"Into a bay on the south side of the lake, a small stream enters, which drains 
Hawk Lake, a fairly large lake lying partly in the Islington Indian Reserve. 
There is a portage on this stream not far from the mouth, and at the upper end 
of it a dam has been built by the Hudson's Bay Co. which floods out a small 
stony rapids a short distance farther up stream. The survey was carried out 
this stream as far as this portage and Post No. 336 was planted in a stone mound 
near the end of the portage. A good canoe route exists from One Man Lake 
to the Winnipeg River via this stream and Hawk Lake, from which a portage 
about half a mile long through the Indian Reserve leads into a small lake con- 
nected with Winnipeg River by a creek with barely perceptible current. My 
party used this route coming out at the end of the season and found it very 
convenient. 

"The English River where it flows out of One Man Lake is divided into two 
channels by Island No. 603 which has an area of twenty acres. There is a 
slight current at this point and the river immediately widens out into a small 
lake expansion. The survey was discontinued for the season at this point on 
the 27th September. Post No. 338 was set in a mound of stones at transit 
station No. 1455 on the north sffbre of the north channel. 

"The portion of the English River and its lake expansions surveyed during 
the season is of great natural beauty and the remarks made in the last year's 
report as to the attractiveness of the English River as a holiday resort, apply 
with equal force to the portion surveyed this season. One wonders why so 
few tourists go that way. 

"The pulpwood resources of the territory covered during the season appear 
to be very great, although it is of course obviously impossible to even hazard 
an estimate as to the total quantity available, as this would have necessitated 
systematic explorations inland, which it was not possible to undertake and 
carry on the work of the survey. As far as could be seen from the river, there 
does not appear to be any difference between the quantity or quality of the 
timber on either side of the river, although it is impossible to say how far back 
that condition continues. The amount of saw log timber is comparatively 
small in proportion to the amount suitable for pulpwood. The scattered areas 
of red and white pine are very small and the timber generally of poor quality, 

"Geologically speaking the greater portion of the area covered by the survey 
is Laurentian. Near the west end of Separation Lake the formation changes 
to diabase and schist which continue to about two miles above Kettle Falls, 
where the granite again comes in and continues throughout the rest of the 
territory covered by the survey. Local magnetic attraction was fairly pro- 
nounced in a few places but no economic minerals were seen. 

"The river and lakes abound in pickerel and pike of large size and in some 
of the lake expansions of the river, white fish are plentiful. Lake trout are 
very plentiful in the lakes on the canoe route from Grassy Narrows Lake to 
Jones Station. The Indians report that sturgeon are plentiful in One Man 
Lake. 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



73 



Deer, moose and the usual feathered game are abundant, ducks being 
very plentiful in the marshes. In some parts, particularly near One Man 
Lake, wild rice is very plentiful. One family of Indians arrived at One Man 
Lake Indian Reserve in September with over a ton of wild rice bagged up for 
use as food during the winter." 



Appendix No. 37 

Toronto, Ont., October 31st, 1924. 
Honourable James Lyons, 

Minister of Lands and Forests, Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith the report of the Colonization 
Roads Branch of the Department of Lands and Forests for the fiscal year ending 
October 31st, 1924. 

The total expenditure for the year was $447,444.66. Of this amount 
$199,478.27 was expended directly by the Government on roads and bridges, 
the number of townships receiving aid being 185. The amount expended on 
inspection, surveys and miscellaneous services was $20,769.42, and the balance, 
a sum of $227,196.97 was distributed as grants to 216 Colonization Road By- 
laws, which were passed by a total of 162 different municipalities. 

The area in which the Colonization Roads Branch makes direct grants 
has been reduced, which accounts for the total expenditure by the Branch for 
the fiscal year showing a reduction of $380,411.32 from the preceding fiscal 
year ending October 31st, 1923. 

The trunk and tourist roads received considerable attention, and it is a 
question if a more intensive construction policy for this class of road should 
not be adopted. 

The co-operation of those interested in the betterment of roads in the 
Colonization Road area has greatly improved, and I suggest perhaps even better 
conditions would develop if townships could be induced to have only one overseer, 

A compilation of the individual reports gives: 



Work 



Cleared and stumped. . . 

Graded and shaped 

Surfaced 

Ditched 

Cut and fill 

Bridges 

Culverts 

New Road construction. 
Old Road maintenance.. 



Direct Grants 



29,560 rods 
67,256 « 
76,798 « 
12,821 " 
49,449 cu. yds 
46 « 
701 " 
17.95 mis 
330.98 " 



By-laws 



62,269 rods 

160,538 « 

182,916 " 

22,594 " 

9li077cu.yds 

57 " 

1,242 " 

66.98 mis 

839.40 " 



Total 



91,829 rods 
227,794 " 
259,714 " 
35,415 « 
140,526 cu.yds 
103 « 
1,943 " 
84.93 mis 
1,170.38 " 



Direct Grants, Total Expenditure. 
By-law Grants, Total Expenditure. 
Miscellaneous, Total Expenditure.. 



Colonization Roads Branch, Total Expenditure. 

Receipts 

Note. — Details printed in Public Accounts. 



$199,478 27 

227,196 97 

20,769 42 

$447,444 66 
$3,713 39 



C. H. FULLERTON, 

Superintendent Colonization Roads. 



74 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Appendix No. 38 

To THE Honourable Jas. Lyons, 

Minister of Lands and Forests, Ontario. 

Toronto, Ont., October 31st, 1924. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit to you the report on the construction 
and maintenance of "Roads and Bridges," together with the operation of 
"Farms," "Saw Mills," "Fire Relief," "Seed Grain" and other activities carried 
on under the provisions of the Northern and Northwestern Ontario Development 
Act, 1912, and Amendments, during the year ending 31st October, 1924. 

The work accomplished and expenditures made in the different districts 
are shown on tabulated statements which are attached hereto. 

Section 1 (B) — Roads and Bridges 

The "Maintenance Patrol" System which had been largely confined to 
trunk roads, was this year extended to many of the main market and leading 
roads with as great success as that shown on the trunk roads in previous years 
and many improvements were effected at a minimum cost. 

Commencement of a more permanent type of road construction for heavily 
travelled roads in Northern Ontario was made by the completion of a cement- 
concrete road between Sudbury and Coniston, and the letting of contracts for 
bituminous-penetration roads between Greighton and Gopper Gliff and between 
Timmins and South Porcupine. A considerable amount of the preliminary 
work and grading has been done on the two last mentioned roads, but the 
contractors did not, in either case, progress far enough to do any of the pene- 
tration surfacing. 

A considerable portion of the increase in road expenditure this year is due 
to the transfer of the "Direct Grant" work previously performed by the Goloniza- 
tion Roads Branch, in the territory north of the French River, to the jurisdiction 
of this branch, the position now being that the Northern Development Branch 
officials supervise all road and bridge work in that territory, although the work 
done under municipal by-laws is carried on under the Golonization Roads Acts. 

The construction of all bridges in the territory north of the French River 
being also placed under the jurisdiction of this branch, there is a considerable 
increase in bridge expenditure as compared with the previous year. 

The total expenditure on roads and bridges amounts to $3,010,078.35. 

Section 1 (D) — Farms 

At New Liskeard Farm, the work of improving the farm buildings and 
erecting fencing was proceeded with under the supervision of the Department of 
Agriculture; the Northern Development Fund providing for an expenditure of 
$10,956.70. 

At the Demonstration Farm, situated at Hearst, twenty-five acres of 
additional land were cleared, fences erected, and preparations made for the 
further development of the farm. Expenditure $3,206.27. 

Section 1 (D) — Fire Relief 

Accounts were paid for material and supplies furnished by the Northern 
Ontario Fire Relief Gommittee to those in the zone of the Haileybury fire of 
1922 who required assistance. Total expenditure, $47,038.51. 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



75 



Section 1 (D) — Saw Mills 

Operation was continued of the two portable saw mills installed in 1923, to 
assist the sufferers from the fire of October, 1922, in the vicinity of New Liskeard. 
The cost of operations during the year was $6,678.10, resulting in the production 
of 1,124,129 feet b.m. of lumber. 

Section 2 (1) — Seed Grain 

The demand for seed distribution through the Northern Development 
Branch, which had shown a decline in 1923, dwindled in the past season to small 
proportions. The majority of the farmers of the north are not now applying 
for government aid in their seed purchases, but are either saving their own grain 
for the purpose or obtaining their supplies locally. The total quantities sold 
by the branch in 1924 were: Oats, 4,251 bushels; wheat, 306 bushels; barley, 
536 bushels, at a total cost of $7,662.69. 

C. H. FULLERTON, 

Director, Northern Development Branch. 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH 
Statements for Report for year ended, 31st, October, 1924. 

SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE 
For the Thirteen Years Ended 31st October, 1924 
Northern and Northwestern Ontario Development Fund 



Section 



Summary of 
Expenditure 

23rd May, 
1912, to Oct. 

31st, 1923 



Expenditure 
for year 

ended Oct. 
31st, 1924 



Total 

Expenditure 

to Oct. 

31st, 1924 



Section 1 (a) Works and Improvements 

Section 1 (b) Roads 

Section 1 (d) Farms 

Section 1 (d) Assistance of Settlers, Feed 

Shortage 

Section 1 (d) Assistanceof Settlers, Fire Relief . 
Section 1 (d) Assistance of Settlers: Saw Mills. 
Section 1 (e) Creamery and Grain Elevators. . 

Section 2(1) Seed Grain 

Section 2 (1) Agricultural Implements 

Section 2 (2) Cattle Purchase Account 

Section 2 (4) Schools and other Public Bldgs. . 

Section 2 (6) Fire Protection 

Returned Soldiers' and Sailors' Land Settlement 
Act. 1917 



Settlers' Loan Account, Amending Act, 1916. 



$ c. 

2,100 00 

12,712,588 89 

121,282 92 

124,152 58 

282,060 99 

4,503 55 

61,126 16 

263,486 22 

46,771 37 

21,617 99 

49,491 62 

3,773 45 

1,183,914 79 



3,010,078 35 
14,226 51 

37 00 

47,038 51 

6,678 lO 

89 00 
7,662 69 

17 55 



3,076 87 



1,653 23 



2,100 00 

15,722,667 24 
135,509 43 

124,189 58 

329,099 50 

11,181 65 

61,215 16 

217,148 91 

46,788 92 

21,617 99 

52,568 49 

3,773 45 

1,185,568 02 



14,876,870 53 
1,080,843 85 

15,957,714 38 



3,090,557 81 
97,513 72 

3,188,071 53 



17,967,428 34 
1,178,357 57 

19,145,785 91 



76 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH 

Statement of Expenditure, Year Ended 31st October, 1924 

Making of Roads, Section i (b) : 

Bruce, A. E. D., Secretary and Accountant, salary 2 months. $575 00 

Sinton, Jas., Chief Engineer and Purchasing Agent, salary. . 2,991 66 

Leitch, J. S., Bridge Engineer, salary 7 months 1,754 16 

Smyth, W. R., Supervisor of Settlement, salary 4 months. . . 1,000 00 

Beardall, F. G., Principal Clerk, salary 2,400 00 

I.awer, W. L., Principal Account Clerk, salary 2,300 00 

Reid, Alex., Draughtsman, salary 2,000 00 

Dicker, C. L., Senior Clerk, salary 1,600 00 

Fleming, Miss E., Clerk, salary 1,400 00 



Wages $1,656,955 78 

Contracts 471,583 46 

Supplies, Equipment, Rentals, Services and Disbursements. . 865,518 29 



Advancement of Settlement and Colonization, Farms, Section i (d): 

Wages $9,101 31 

Supplies, Fencing, Equipment and Disbursements 5,125 20 



$16,020 82 

2,994,057 53 
^3,010,078 35 



14,226 51 

Assistance of Settlers — Feed Shortage, Section i (d): 

Freight and Services 37 00 

A ssistance of Settlers — Fire Relief, Section i (d) : 

Material Supplies, Freight, Services and Disbursements 47,038 51 



A ssistance of Settlers — Saw Mills, Section i (d) : 

Wages $4,786 50 

Gasoline and Supplies 1,891 60 



6,678 10 



Creamery, New Liskeard, Section i (e): 

Butter Wrappers and Supplies 89 00 

Seed, Grain, Section 2 (i): 

Seed, Freight, Services and Disbursements 7,662 69 

Agricultural Implements, Section 2 (i): 

Printing, etc -. 17 55 

Schools and other Public Buildings, Section 2 (4): 

Wages $941 82 

Contract 2,000 00 

Disbursements 135 05 

3,076 87 



Returned Soldiers' and Sailors' Land Settlement Act, 1917: 

Services, Rentals and Disbursements 1,653 23 



Settlers' Loan A ccount, A mending A ct, jgi6: 

Dane, F., Commissioner, salary $5,000 00 

Kennedy, W. K. P., Accountant, salary 2,700 00 

Crawford, G., Stenographer, salary 1,100 00 

Jack, F. M., Stenographer, salary 831 96 



$3,090,557 81 



Net amount of Loans issued $86,965 00 

Expenses 916 76 



$9,631 96 
87,881 76 



97,513 72 



$3,188,071 53 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 77 

NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH 

Statement of Revenue for the Year Ended 31st Ocotber, 1924 

Section i (b), Roads: 

Sale of Supplies, Camp Buildings and Equipment; Rentals, Interest and 

Refunds $4,484 38 

Section i (d), Farms: 

Sale of Hay: 176 81 

Section i (d), Assistance of Settlers 

Cash Sales of Feed and Notes retired 6,361 39 

Section i (d), Assistance of Settlers — Fire Relief: 

Refund on Tents 7,522 69 

Section 2 (7), Seed Grain: 

Cash Sales and Notes retired 28,764 11 

Section 2 (/), Agricultural Implements: 

Notes retired 10,274 82 

Section 2 (2), Purchase of Cattle Account: 

Payment on account of»Notes 183 76 

Clause 5 (1-12), Soldiers' Settlement Account: 

Notes re.ired{<KSt?oTL'ioL7r=nS «.^" 95 

$99,705 91 

Settlers' Loan Account: 

Payments on Principal, Interest, etc 133,857 08 

Total Revenue under all heads, 1924 account $233,562 99 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH 

Assets, 31st October, 1924 

Cash Balances unexpended : Roads and Miscellaneous Services. . $62,750 70 

Soldiers' Settlement Account 13,060 20 

$75,810 90 

Settlers' Loan Account 24,625 00 

Seed Grain, Notes outstanding 78,884 09 

Assistance of Settlers, Feed Shortage, Notes outstanding 56,946 24 

Agricultural Implements, Notes outstanding 35,586 79 

Cattle Purchase, Notes outstanding 3,123 40 

Settlers' Loans outstanding 696,314 68 



$9*/ 1,291 10 



Contingent Assets^ 

Roads — Buildings, Plant, Equipment, Machinery, Motors, Tractors, etc 294,093 62 

$1,265,384 72 



78 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 

Annual Report of Work Done, 

Summary of 



Algoma 

Cochrane 

Fort William 

Kenora 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Parry Sound 

Port Arthur 

Rainy River 

North Renfrew. . . 
Sault Ste Marie. . 

Sturgeon Falls.. . . 
Sudbury 

Temiskamirig 

Totals 



Side 
Brush- 
ing 
L 



21.09 
32 . 05 

36.11 
62.40 

27.70 
34.7 

17.8 

34.25 

24.75 

4.54 
0.28 
7.00 

42.52 
39.5 

9.51 



Cutting 



L 

mis. 



7.55 
66.8 

35.519 
10.61 

5.0 
1.0 

1.98 

12.58 

24.346 



7.82 
36.4 

6.72 



Burning 



L 
mis. 



4.30 



68. 



35.18 

3.8 
3.0 

16.14 



5.25 



0.50 

7.00 
26.80 

17.75 



Stump- 
ing and 
Grubbing 



L 

mls. 



7.04 
77.05 

24.569 
14.81 

5.70 

13.87 

7.0 

11.154 

25.205 
2.05 



16.05 

4.81 
38.30 

9.57 



Grading 



L 
mis. 



3.15 
46.6 



58.75 
322.68 



29.33 
12.5 

25.56 

22.56 



7.60yN 
15. 3~ 

17.83 
84.5 



13.57 
9.04 



34.25 
16.3 



33.6 
6.0 

3.22 
2.0 
25.0 

15.9 

34.25 



8.65 
76.0 

99.81 
57.0 



38.14 
262 . 75 



Cross 
Laying 



L 

mis. 



0.40 



1.85 



1.41 



0.25 



1.251 



0.179 



Ditch- 
ing 



Gravelling 



L 
ft. 



33284 

New 

13000 

420359 

2000 

Cleaned 



61197 
43832 

Cleaned 
84655 
New 
56156 

Cleaned 
21422 

18704 



24425 
40157 

93741 

20325 
2680 

55172 

17215 
319097 



91089 

42850 

Cleaned 



L 
mis. 



115.12 

Cleane 

82.61 



57.4 
32.42 

68.6 
27.975 

5.25 

60.356 

19.025 

32.352 
6.0 

27.1 

4.23 
185.5 

90.34 



Yards 
used 



9894 



62666.14 
5736.21 



52295 
8561.4 

19076 

221 

23696 

22097.21 



4200 
9648 



9028 . 2 



18304 
92308 

1597.61 

5565 

820 

25245 



6704 
4403 

67996 



63572 
1870 



394.20 



225.125 



187.72 



257.18 



389.36 
992.48 



5.34 



1303522 

157838 

Cleaned 



814.254 



919351 
123567.6 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



79 



NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT BRANCH 
Year Ending 31st October, 1924 
Electoral Districts 



Crushed Rock 



Yds. 

crush 

ed 



1056 
Repai 



Repai 
Repai 



3650 



Repa 



Repai 



Repa 



Repa 



Repa 



Repa 

4706 



Yds. 

haul 

ed 



40 



2093 



240 



5230 
Repai 



0.10 



11.0 
red 



as oft 



irs 
12922 



8063 



28588 



L 
cov- 
ered 



2.00 



2.5 



as oft 



as oft 



5.25 



9.85 
11.00 



Drag- 
ging 



Miles 



1514.5 



54884 



2327.25 
683.15 
543.30 

1721.87 



99.30 
en as req 

2754.45 



968.25 



4284.0 

43.0 
en as req 
549. 



111.25 
en as req 

867.47 



95.25 



17110.88 



Repaired 



Other 
Rep'rs 



Miles 



32.00 



21.75 



5.625 

26.0 

157.80 



120.3 
uired. 



43.00 
uired 
21.50 



120.50 
uired. 

86.0 



40.0 



674.47 



Culverts 



170 



299 
150 

38 



51 

New 

11 



18 
222 

201 

65 

3 

19 

8 

186 

77 



1589 



a o 



Cov 
3 



64 
4 

5 

t 

Rep 

26 



26 
aire 



1 
62 

4 

146 



326 



Clay 
Sur- 
facing 



301 



24 



325 



711 



d 
115619.55 



1184 



Bridges 



No. 



116803.55 



Description 



7 New 

9 Repaired . 



146 

106 

27 

1 

1 

1 



Repainted . . 
Temporary. 



Repaired . . 



New 

Repaired . 

New 

Repaired . 

New 

Repaired . 



New. 



Repaired , 



New 

Repaired . 



New 

Repaired . 
Repainted 

New ..... 
Repaired . 

New 

Repaired . 
Repaired . 

New 

Repaired . 
Repainted 

New 

Repaired . 

New 

Repaired . 



New 

Repainted . . 
Repaired . . . 
Partially com 
Scow & pier? 



New 

Repaired . . . 
Repainted . . 
Temporary . . 
Scow& piers. 
Partially 
completed. 



Remarks 



4200 lin. ft. guard rail. 
1749 c.y. cut and fill. 
155 c.y. rock fill. 

43978 c.y. cut and fill. 

38 c.y. rock fill. 
1185 c.y. rock cut. 
223. 18 c.y. rip rap. 
10800 lin. ft. 6" tile drain 
placed. 



37859 c.y. 

20 c.y. 

35541 c.y. 

9532 c.y. 

13828 c.y. 

1145 c.y. 

32 c.y. 

8479 c.y. 

2620 c.y. 

325 c.y. 

/23 c.y. 

13521 c.y. 

145 c.y. 

193 c.y. 

75 lin. 

94338 c.y. 

4110 c.y. 

7332.5 c.y. 

4754 c.y. 

45487 c.y. 

252 c.y. 

1233 c.y. 

6775 c.y. 



cut and fill, 
rock cut. 
cut and fill, 
rock cut. 
cut and fill, 
rock cut and fill 
stone fill, 
cut and fill. 

rock cut. 
rip rap. 
rock fill, 
cut and fill, 
rock fill, 
rock cut. 
ft. rip rap. 
cut and fill, 
rip rap. 
rock cut. 
rock fill, 
cut and fill, 
rock cut. 
rock fill, 
cut and fill. 



90 c.y. earth fill. 



3000 c.y. 

81 c.y. 

2778 c.y. 

60 c.y. 

2223 c.y. 

120865 c.y. 

7270 c.y. 

5130 c.y. 

133 c.y. 

17000 lin. 

37817 c.y. 

3164 c.y. 

2763 c.y. 

pleted. 

556.5 c.y. 



fill. 

rock fill, 
cut and fill, 
rock cut. 
rock fill, 
cut and fill, 
rock fill, 
rock cut. 
rock rip rap. 
ft. weeping tile, 
cut and fill, 
rock fill, 
rock cut. 

rip rap. 



466105 c.y. cut and fill. 

19786 c.y. rock fill. 
302325 c.y. rock cut. 



5423.3 c.y. rip rap. 
27800 lin ft. weeping tile 
drain placed. 



80 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Appendix No. 39 



46 Richmond Street West, 

Toronto, January 6th, 1925. 



The Honourable James Lyons, Minister of Lands and Forests, 
Parliament Buildings, Toronto, Ont. 

Dear Sir, — I have pleasure in presenting herewith a report of the operations 
of this Department to the end of October, 1924. 

All applications for loans received careful consideration. Advances in the 
shape of loans being made on the security of actual improvements to land. 

You will note, with pleasure, the manner in which payments of interest 
have been met by the settlers, which from the statement you will see amounts 
to 91.12 per cent, of interest due. 

Settlers have frequently referred to the help the loan has been to them, 
enabling them to remain on their lots, making improvements. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Yours very truly, 

(Sgd.) F. Dane, 
Settlers Loan Commissioner. 



MEMORANDUM OF LOANS TO SETTLERS TO OCTOBER 31st, 1924 

Applications 

Total number of applications received to October 31st, 1923 4,485 

Year ending October 31st, 1924 511 

4,996 

Total amount applied for $1,954,460 00 

Average per application 391 20 

Amount applied for under applications which were approved 1,326,420 00 

Loans 

Number of loans issued 3,222 

Equal to 64% of applications. 

Amount granted $1,061,025 00 

Equal to 54% of total amount applied for and equal to 80% of total amount 
applied for under applications which were approved. . 

Average loan 329 30 

Total acreage covered by liens 492,500 

Acreage improved land 74,355 

Equal to 15% of total acreage. 

Average loan per acre on total acreage $2 15 

Average loan per acre on acreage improved land 14 26 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



81 



MEMORANDUM OF LOANS TO CREAMERIES AND OTHER LIKE ASSOCIATIONS 

TO OCTOBER 31st, 1924 

Applications and Loans 

The Sudbury Co-operative Creamery Co., Ltd $24,000 00 

The Kenora Dairy Co-operative Association, Ltd 13,000 00 

Producers Co-operative Creamery Co., Ltd., Lavallee, District of Rainy River 3,500 00 

Total $40,500 00 

Note: — The Sudbury Co-operative Creamery Co., and the Producers Co-operative Creamery 
Co., of Lavallee, are in active operation and have promptly paid the amounts falling due on their 
loans. 

The Kenora Dairy Co-operative Association failed to operate successfully, and went into 
liquidation on March 8th, 1922, having failed to pay any portion of their loan or interest. 

The land was deeded to the Crown on December 30th, 1922, and registered in Land Titles 
Office at Kenora on Janury 2nd, 1923, as No. 5882, also Bill of Sale covering chattels on January 
3rd, 1923, as No. 919, by the Clerk of the District Court at Kenora. 

On instruction, the land, building and equipment was handed over to, and placed under the 
jurisdiction of the Northern Development Branch as of date November 1st, 1923, the property 
to be utilized by that branch for their storehouse and other purposes in connection with their 
road construction. 

The standing of the account as at November 1st, 1923, was as follows:— 

Principal $13,000 00 

Accrued interest 1,644 00 

Total $14,644 00 

Some material was sold and partly paid for, leaving balance of account as at October 31st 
1924, to be $14,405.25 and there is an amount of $750 due by the Dryden Clover Belt Creamery 
Co., collection of which is receiving attention. 

REPAYMENTS 
On Account of Interest 





Accrued interest 
Due 


Interest received 


Per cent. 


Loans to settlers 


$193,505 82 
6,584 06 


$176,340 73 
5,178 81 


91.12 


Loans to creameries 


78.65 







On Account of Principal 





Payments on 
Principal due 


Principal 
Received 


Per cent. 


Loans to settlers 


$492,509 50 
466 67 


$413,313 99 
10,466 67 


83.92 


Loans to creameries 









Total 





Payments due 


Payments 
received 


Per cent. 


Loans to settlers 


$686,015 32 
7,050 73 


$589,654 72 
15,645 48 


85.95 


Loans to creameries 








Totals 


$693,066 05 


$605,300 20 


87.33 







82 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DETAILS OF LOANS ISSUED AND OUTSTANDING 



District 



Issued 



No. of 
Loans 



Amount 



Outstanding 



No. of 
Loans 



Unpaid Prin^ 

cipal and 

Accrued 

Interest 



Algoma 

Kenora 

Manitoulin. . . . 

Nipissing 

Rainy River . . . 

Sudbury 

Temiskaming. . 
Thunder Bay . . 

Totals 



121 
339 
14 
173 
245 
190 
1,423 
720 



$39,360 00 

123,020 00 

5,750 00 

61,620 00 

81,775 00 

94,810 00 

456,935 00 

238.255 00 



101 
266 
13 
152 
177 
167 
1,008 
582 



3,225 



$1,101,525 00 



2,466 



$30,087 53 

88,146 54 

4,750 14 

42,806 16 

45,428 46 

68,245 72 

273,066 96 

143,783 17 



,314 68 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 83 

Appendix No. 40 

REPORT OF THE FORESTRY BRANCH, 1924 

Sir, — The report of the work of this Branch for the year ending October 
31st, 1924, is given under the sections of Forest Fire Protection, Air Operations, 
Reforestation, Forest Investigation and Forest Pathology. 

I. Forest Fire Protection 

(1) Legislation 

A Bill was passed in 1924 making several amendments to the Forest Fires 
Prevention Act of 1917 which briefly are as follows: — 

1. The close season for the setting out of fire is extended from the fifteenth 
to the first day of April. 

2. Officers of the Department have the right to summon assistance for the 
purpose of controlling and extinguishing any forest fire. 

3. The unauthorized destruction of, injury to, or removal of any equipment 
placed for forest fire protection purposes is unlawful. 

4. Owners of property are required to protect their property against injury 
by fire, and in addition to a penalty for failure to do so are made liable for any 
expenses incurred by the Department in so protecting their property. 

5. The destruction of inflammable debris resulting from right-of-way 
clearing, or from any operations within three hundred feet of the right-of-way 
of any railway, or within three hundred feet of camps, mines, saw mills, portable 
or stationary engines using fuel other than oil and located within one-half mile 
of any forest or woodland, is made compulsory. 

6. The accumulation of inflammable debris within one-half mile of any 
village, town or city is made prohibitive, as well as the felling of trees or brush 
in such a manner that debris would be created on land not owned by the person 
causing the felling. 

7. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council is given the right to define any 
forest area within any fire district as a travel permit area and require any person 
wishing to enter such area during the close season to previously obtain a permit, 
excepting only those holding a hunting, guide's, fishing or mining license. These 
latter persons, however, are required to produce their license whenever requested 
by a fire ranger and to state their proposed routes of travel and camping sites. 

Persons using or travelling in any forest area are also required to furnish 
to fire rangers when requested their address, routes to be followed, location of 
camps and any other information pertaining to forest fire protection. 

8. A penalty of not less than $25.00 and not more than $300.00 is provided 
for violation of any of the above. Also every person who violates any provision 
of the Act is, in addition to any other penalty, liable to imprisonment for a 
period not exceeding ninety days. 

Two further changes in the present legislation seem desirable; (1) That 
subsection two of section seventeen be so amended that any unauthorized 
person tampering with any Forestry Branch telephone lines be guilty of, an 
offence; (2) That in clause six of the Regulations, the words "during the close 
season" be eliminated. 



84 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



(2) Organization and Personnel 

The Western Inspectorate, under the supervision of a Forest Supervisor 
with headquarters at Port Arthur, was divided into six Chief Ranger Districts; 
C.G.R. Western with headquarters at Sioux Lookout; C.G.R. Central with 
headquarters at Armstrong; Kenora with headquarters at Kenora; Rainy 
River with headquarters at Fort Frances; Thunder Bay with headquarters at 
Port Arthur, and Nipigon with headquarters at Macdiarmid. 

The Cochrane Inspectorate, under the supervision of a Fire Inspector with 
headquarters at Cochrane, was divided into eight Chief Ranger Districts; C.G.R. 
Eastern with headquarters at Nakina; Hearst with headquarters at Hearst; 
Kapuskasing with headquarters at Kapuskasing; Cochrane with headquarters 
at Cochrane; Abitibi with headquarters at Lowbush ; Matheson with headquarters 
at Matheson; Timmins with headquarters at Timmins; New Liskeard with 
headquarters at Englehart, 

The Soo Inspectorate was under the direct supervision of a District Forester, 
with headquarters at Sault Ste. Marie, who was assisted by one Forestry Assistant 
and one Fire Inspector, the latter having his headquarters at Oba. The inspec- 
torate was divided into six Chief Ranger Districts; Longlac with headquarters 
at Longlac; Oba with headquarters at Oba; Franz with headquarters at Franz; 
A.C.R. with headquarters at Sand Lake; Blind River with headquarters at 
Blind River, and Mississagi South with headquarters at Kendiogami Lake 
The Longlac Chief Ranger District was previously in the Western Inspectorate 

The Sudbury Inspectorate with headquarters at Sudbury was under the 
direct supervision of a District Forester who was assisted by two foresters, one 
in charge of the North Bay Chief Ranger District and one in charge of the 
Sudbury North and South Chief Ranger Districts, and by one Forestry Assistant 
and two Fire Inspectors. There were eleven Chief Ranger Districts in the 
inspectorate; Foleyet West with headquarters at Elsas; Foleyet East with 
headquarters at Gogama; Mississagi West with headquarters at Chapleau; 
Mississagi East with headquarters at Biscotasing; Webbwood with headquarters 
at Nairn; Sudbury North with headquarters at Skead; Sudbury South with 
headquarters at Sudbury ; North Bay with headquarters at North Bay; Timagami 
West with headquarters at Mattagami Post; Timagami North with headquarters 
at Elk Lake, and Timagami East with headquarters at Timagami, 

The Georgian Bay Inspectorate with headquarters at Parry Sound was 
directly supervised by a District Forester assisted by one Forestry Assistant. 
The Inspectorate was divided into three Chief Ranger Districts instead of two 
as in previous years; Georgian Bay West with headquarters at Parry Sound; 
Georgian Bay East with headquarters at Powassan, and Georgian Bay South 
with headquarters at Dorset. 

The Algonquin Inspectorate was under the direct supervision of a District 
Forester assisted by a Forestry Assistant, the headquarters being at Pembroke. 
There were two Chief Ranger Districts, Algonquin North with headquarters at 
Pembroke and Algonquin South with headquarters at Brul6 Lake. 

The Trent Inspectorate with headquarters at Tweed was directly super- 
vised by a District Forester assisted by one Forestry Assistant. There was 
only one Chief Ranger District, Trent, with headquarters at Dacre. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 85 

The total field supervisory staff for the seven inspectorates, which were 
divided into thirty-seven Chief Ranger Districts, consisted of twelve technical 
Foresters, one Forest Supervisor, four Fire Inspectors, thirty-seven Chief 
Rangers, and eighty-nine Deputy Chief Rangers. This allowed direct super- 
vision of one Chief or Deputy Chief Ranger to every seven rangers. 

The average daily force, including the Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers, 
was as follows: April, 64; May, 530; June, 808; July, 811; August, 793; Sep- 
tember, 546; October, 57. The largest number of men on duty at any one 
time, including 126 Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers, was 820. 

Including the Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers there were twenty-two 
men on duty on the first day of April. By the 15th of the month the number 
had increased to sixty, and by the first of May to 215. On the 15th of May the 
total number was 525; on the first of June, 756; on the 15th of June, 810; on the 
first of July, 812; on the 15th of July, 813; on the first of August, 806; on the 
15th of August, 792; on the first of September, 745; on the 15th of September, 
626. During the latter part of September it was possible to discontinue the 
patrols in a number of the outlying disticts, so that by the end of the month 
the total number of men on duty had been reduced to 264. Warm dry weather 
was experienced during the most part of the month of October, but the number of 
men kept on duty in the ground organization together with the air patrol were 
able to handle this situation and no serious fires occurred. 

The staff of Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers during the season included a 
number of exceptionally efficient and reliable men, men of a type difficult to 
obtain for temporary employment. If a skeleton staff is built up composed of 
these men whereby they can be given reasonable assurance of yearly employment, 
the efficiency of the protective organization can be greatly increased at very little 
increased expenditure. There would be no lack of employment for such a 
staff during the winter months. 



86 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



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i:2 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 87 

• (4) Fires 

While the snowfall during the winter of 1923-4 was heavy the snow dis- 
appeared fairly early in the spring and the weather was comparatively dry until 
well on towards the end of June. A total of seventy-nine fires were reported 
in April, the largest number on record, and by the end of June, 524 fires or 
sixty-two per cent, of the total for the season had been reported. 

During the months of July, August and September the»hazard was com- 
paratively low due to the frequent and well distributed rains and to the high 
relative humidity. 

The month of October and the first few days in November were quite 
warm and dry and a number of fires occurred, but the damage from these was 
small. 

Taken as a whole the season was almost as abnormal for the low hazard 
as the previous season had been for the particularly high hazard. 



88 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 
By Month 



Month 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 




No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


April , 


79 

197 

248 

119 

61 

50 

53 

44 


10 
462 
374 

283 

154 

22 

38 


35 
280 
194 

77 
212 
121 
102 


5 
296 
290 
475 
97 
105 

1 








May 


4221 

309 

142 

300 

1142 


362 
414 
613 
377 
14 


294 
273 
124 

9fi8 


June 


July 


August 


September 


A 


October 




November 






















Totals 


851 


1,343 


1,021 


1,269 


1,287 


1,780 


965 







^April and May. 
^September and October. 



By Origin 



Origin 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 




No. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Settlers 


131 
140 
140 

28 

61 

77 

274 


15.4 

16.5 

16.5 

3.3 

7.1 

9.0 

32.2 


12.7 

12.4 

18.5 

5.5 

4.3 

5.7 

40.9 


16.1 

11.9 

16.3 

5.1 

4.1 

.8 

45.7 


9.6 

8.8 

14.8 

11.0 

5.0 

1.1 

49.7 


11.0 

11.7 

23.9 

1.1 

4.6 

7.2 

40.5 


7.7 
9.2 

37.0 
3.0 
2.5 
4.3 

36.3 


8 1 


Campers 


9 7 


Railways 


46 5 


Lightning 

Logging operations. 

Miscellaneous 

Unknown 


3.8 

4.1 

4.6 

23 2 






Totals 


851 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



By Size 



Size 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 




No. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Quarter acre and under 


264 
299 

57 
151 

50 


31.0 
35.1 

6.7 
17.8 

5.9 


15.1 
26.1 
8.4 
19.8 
14.3 


23.7 
29.1 
6.3 
19.2 
12.6 


20.8 
24.0 
6.8 
20.4 
13.3 


23.2 
29.4 
8.1 
17.1 
12.0 


30.5 
27.7 

6.1 
16.5 

8.7 


40 5 


Over quarter to 5 acres 


33.7 


Over 5 to 10 acres 


6.0 


Over 10 to 100 acres 


13.6 


Over 100 to 500 acres 


5.1 


Over 500 acres 


1.1 


Over 500 to 1,000 acres 


12 
13 

5 


1.4 
1.5 
0.6 


5.0 

8.4 
2.9 


3.6 

4.9 

.6 


5.5 
8.1 
1.1 


5.0 
4.9 

.3 


3.3 
5.9 
1.3 




Over 1,000 to 10,000 acres 




Over 10,000 acres 








Totals 


851 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 







Settlers were responsible for 131 fires or 15.4 per cent, of the total, a slight 
increase over the previous season. 

Campers, by which is meant berrypickers, picnickers, tourists, trappers, 
Indians and prospectors, were charged with 140 fires or 16.5 per cent, of the total, 
also an increase over the previous season. 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



89 



Railways are known to have caused 140 fires or 16.5 per cent, of the total, 
the same number as charged to campers. Due to the splendid co-operation 
received from the railway companies, however, the fires due to railway agencies 
burned over a very small area. 

The fires of railway origin were distributed as follows: — 

AVERAGE NUMBER OF RAILWAY FIRES PER HUNDRED MILES OF LINE 
THROUGH FOREST SECTIONS 



Railway 



1924 


1923 


1922 


3.3 


6.2 


*3.2 


2.0 


5.3 


2.7 


0.5 


2.0 


2.4 


3.7 


7.3 


7.3 


8.2 


1.1 


4.5 


4.5 


3.0 


4.2 


2.7 


4.9 


3.3 



1921 



Canadian National Railways (exclusive of northern line) . . 

Canadian Pacific Railway 

Canadian National Railways (northern transcontinental 

line only) 

Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway 

Algoma Eastern Railway 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 



•=3.7 
3.9 

1.8 
6.3 
5.9 
0.6 

3.7 



*Former C.N.R. and G.T.R. figures combined. 



Railway 


Per cent, of Total Number of 
Railway Fires 




1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


Canadian National Railways (exclusive of northern 
line) 

Canadian Pacific Railway 

Canadian National Railways (northern transcon- 
tinental line only) 

Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway 

Algoma Eastern Railway 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 


50.3 
21.9 

3.0 

8.8 

5.1 

10.9 


45.9 

32.5 

7.6 

9.6 

.4 

4.0 


*36.1 
25.3 

13.3 

14.5 

2.4 

8.4 


*47.9 
29.8 

7.9 

10.6 

2.8 

1.0 


*36.4 
27.9 

16.4 
9.9 

5.0 

4.4 


♦28.1 
26.3 

25.9 

17.9 

0.3 

1.5 




100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



*Former C.N.R. and G.T.R. figures combined. 



Lightning is known to have caused twenty-eight fires or 3.3 per cent, of 
the total. 

Logging operations were responsible for sixty-one fires or 7.1 per cent, of 
the total. 

Miscellaneous known causes were responsible for seventy-seven fires or 
9.0 per cent, of the total. 

Fires of unknown origin numbered 274 or 32.2 per cent, of the total. As 
the efficiency of the protective organization increases the percentage of the 
total number of fires charged to unknown causes should decrease. 

A total of 851 fires were reported with an area burned of 146,017 acres. 
Of this total area, 101,739 acres or 69.6 per cent, were in the Western Inspectorate. 

Of the 851 fires, 563 or 66.2 per cent, were confined to areas of five acres 
or less in extent, 90.6 per cent, to areas of 100 acres or less, and 96.5 percent, 
to areas of 500 acres or less. While the low hazard unquestionably affected the 



90 



REPORT OF THE 



No. S 



number of fires and the total area burned great credit is due to the field stafif 
for the efficient manner in which the fires which did start were handled. 

CLASSIFICATION OF BURNED-OVER AREA 



Forest Conditions 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


Acres 


Per 

cent. 


Per 

cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 

cent. 


Per 

cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Timber land 


30,660 
23,146 
47,668 
44,543 


21.0 
15.9 
32.6 
30.5 


28.0 
14.7 
36.6 
20.7 


13.4 
20.2 
25.2 
41.2 


13.2 
25.2 
20.2 
41.1 


14.7 
38.8 
26.7 
19.8 


26.8 
37.0 

23.5 
23.7 


19 1 


Cut-over land (some timber left) . 
Young growth (below six inclies) . 
Barren and grass land 


39.2 
19.5 

22 2 






Totals 


146,017 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100 







The area of timber land burned over was 30,660 acres or 21.0 per cent, of 
the total area burned, as is shown in the above table. 

Cut-over land formed 15.9 per cent, of the total area burned, and land 
upon which young growth existed, 32.6 per cent., or a combined area of 70,814 
acres. The seriousness of fires on these two classes of land can not be too 
strongly emphasized, because of the effect on our future timber crop. 

Barren and grass land burned over totalled 44,543 acres or 30.5 per cent, 
of the total area burned. 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



91 






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92 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



(5) Permits 
A total of 7,602 permits were issued during the season, covering an area of 
36,025 acres, as compared with an average of 6,620 permits covering 30,335 
acres for the seasons 1917 to 1923, inclusive. In some districts, little burning 
was done due to the wet weather. Considerable clearing and slashing, however, 
was carried on and the brush and debris piled to be burned this coming season. 

STATEMENT OF PERMITS ISSUED 



District 


Number of Permits 




1924 


1923 . 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


Cochrane 


1,815 

1,275 
408 

1,011 

580 

668 

128 

16 

1,701 


1,480 
1,122 
361 
1,000 
406 
531 
362 
216 
429 


2,497 
2,126 

' 1,774 ' 
754 


1,503 
1,599 

916 
1,082 

407 


1,982 

1,887 

1,169 

756 

193 


2,275 
1,691 

1,557 
702 
199 


3,493 

2,346 

2,179 

514 

651 




Matheson 

New Liskeard 

Hearst 

Timmins 

Kapuskasing 




Kenora 














Rainy River 














All other districts.. 


1,452 


459 


167 


211 


407 




Totals 


7,602 


5,907 


8;603 


5,966 


6,154 


6,635 


9,590 


3,486 



Month 








"^lumber o 


f Permits 










1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


^920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


April 


127 

849 

3,614 

1,388 

1,093 

528 

3 
















May 


2,131 

711 

1,314 

1,077 

566 

108 


1,992 
3,034 
1,502 
1,'580 
495 


1,154 

3,085 

364 

1,329 

34 


1,003 
2,011 

891 
1,620 

629 


1,536 
2,786 

496 
1,475 

342 


2,248 
2,899 
2,050 
2,156 
237 




June 




July 




August 


„ 


September 

October 


















Totals 


7,602 


5,907 


8,603 


5,966 


6,154 


6,635 


9,590 


3,486 



District 






Acreage 


Burned Over Under Permit 








1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


1918 


1917 


Cochrane 


4,010 

4,573 

1,345 

2,311 

1,421 

2,351 

325 

57 

19,632 


4,348 
5,027 
1,160 
2,335 
918 
2,126 
35,006 
1,374 
2,490 


8,108 
7,613 

3,837" 
2,591 


4,652 
5,442 
7,726 
2,124 
988 


4,984 
5,427 
9,768 
1,478 
424 


5,437 

4,760 

13,521 

1,379 

925 


10,267 
7,371. 

17,863 
1,134 
1,971 




Matheson 

New Liskeard 

Hearst 

Timmins 




Kapuskasing 

Kenora. 
















Rainy River 

All other districts.. 














7,306 


2,746 


686 


,768 


1,072 


. . , . 


Totals 


36,025 


54,784 


29,455 


23,678 


22,767 


26,790 


39,683 


15,186 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 93 



(6) Equipment 

The most important equipment purchased during the season was a total 
of fifty-six portable fire fighting units and 129,000 feet of unlined linen hose 
for use with these units. Two old units were also replaced with new ones. 
The total number of portable units now in use is 140 with an average of 2,000 
feet of hose for each. 

These units have proved to be the most important single factor in combating 
forest fires and too much cannot be said in their favour. Along with these, a 
small hand pump was used most effectively. 

Other equipment purchased included fifty tents, three power pointers, 
seven canoes, two railway motor cars and eleven light motor trucks. In addition, 
one motor boat of the open cruiser type was built by the Chief Ranger at 
Timagami for use on Lake Timagami. 

(7) Locomotive Inspection 

Two men were again employed throughout the season on the inspection of 
fire protective appliances on locomotives operating on railways under the juris- 
diction of the Dominion Board of Railway Commissioners, these men acting 
under appointments as officers of the Board. 

A total of forty-eight round houses and gravel pits were visited periodically, 
and 1,920 locomotive inspections made, covering 875 locomotives. In addition, 
seventeen inspections were made of locomotives operated by lumber companies, 
bringing the total number of inspections up to 1,937. The percentage of loco- 
motives found defective and operating on lines under the jurisdiction of the 
Board of Railway Commissioners was 1.6 per cent., a decrease from 32.1 per cent, 
in 1918 as shown in the following table: — 



94 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



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1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



95 



(8) Improvements 

Considerable improvement work was carried out during the season, the 
most important of which was the construction of fourteen ranger cabins, five 
storehouse, three garages, two boat-houses, three chief ranger cabins, three chief 
ranger offices, three bunk houses, two gas and oil houses, fourteen steel lookout 
towers, twenty-one wooden lookout towers and 191.5 miles of telephone line. 
In addition, 128.5 miles of temporary telephone line was laid out in the spring 
and lifted in the fall, and the usual work of cleaning out trails and portages 
was carried out. 

SUMMARY OF PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS 



Inspectorate 


Cabins 


Store- 
houses 


Garages 


Boat- 
houses 


Other 
Build- 
ings 


Steel 
Towers 


Wooden 
Towers 


Tele- 
phone 
lines, 
miles 


Western 


52 
39 
37 
94 

9 
28 

8 


6 
6 
6 
10 
5 
3 
1 


3 

5 
4 
6 


2 
2 

1 
2 






20 
19 

17 
34 

1 
24 

6 


194 


Cochrane 






11 


Soo 


11 
1 


3 
10 

8 
3 

7 


11.5 


Sudbury 


214 


Georgian Bay 


58 


Algonquin 

Trent 


2 
1 


2 




289 
50 










Totals 


267 


37 


21 


9 


12 


31 


121 


827.5 



96 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



II. Air Operations 

During the past year, Ontario has undertaken flying operations as a prov- 
incial service. This work was placed in the Forestry Branch and Mr. W. R. 
Maxwell appointed as director to take charge of the operations. Follov/ing is , 
a summary of his report covering the first season's operations. 

Organization: 

Enrolment of operating personnel commenced April 1st, 1924. 

After a very careful survey of the vast area of the Province to be patrolled, 
it was decided to divide the Province into two districts, the east and the west, 
with Lake Nipigon the dividing line. 

The eastern district extended south to Lake Nipissing, the northern extremity 
of Algonquin Park to the Ottawa River and east to the Province of Quebec. 

The western extended from Nipigon Lake to the Manitoba boundary. 

The main operating base in the eastern section was established on Ramsay 
Lake, three miles from Sudbury, or just across the lake from the city. Re-fueling 
and sub-bases were established at points of vantage in the district, which per- 
mitted machines to patrol or cope with any remote operation. 

In the western district, Sioux Lookout was selected as the base of operation 
and as on the east, sub-bases were established, permitting machines to land, 
re-fuel and carry on with patrol without loss of time or detour. 

The Province divided into two units with gas and oil placed at strategic 
locations, permitted flexibility of control and eliminated unnecessary cross- 
country flying when patrols were required, so necessary to minimize the operating 
cost. 

To meet a possible early fire hazard, arrangement was made for delivery of 
two machines to Toronto Bay, open water being available prior to break-up Ram- 
say Lake. Machines AOH and AOF arrived at Toronto Bay, April 24th and 
26th. Thus with two machines, applicant pilots were tried out and pilots re- 
ceived instruction under rather trying circumstances as Toronto Bay did not 
lend itself to instructional flying, boat landings or practice flights, owing to an 
abundance of floating debris which was quite natural after winter break-up. 

Upon receipt of news of Ramsay Lake being clear, machines were despatched 
to Ramsay Lake and instruction carried on there. 

The patrol season began the last day of April and so instruction of personnel 
was somewhat delayed as the machines, two in number, were actively engaged on 
fire patrol. 

Machines were late in delivery and with a hazard period following break-up 
in the east, machines upon arrival were immediately pressed into service to cope 
with the situation. 

The last machine was delivered June 3rd. It was some days later than this 
ere Sioux Lookout, the western base, was functioning properly. 

For supervision and maintenance of the operating main bases. Major G. A- 
Thompson was chosen superintendent of eastern flying district, and Captain 
J. R. Ross, superintendent of western flying district. 

Pilots under their supervision were graduated according to their commercial 
flying experience, and were classified into senior pilots, junior A pilots, and 
junior B pilots, under instruction. 

Air engineers were also graduated according to service, as follows: Ist-class 
air engineers, 2nd class engineers, and 3rd class engineers. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 97 

All flying in the Provincial Air Service to be according to Air Regulations 
1920, and so, in accordance, all pilots and air engineers were instructed to comply 
strictly to rules and regulations of the R.C.A.F. 

Six machines were allotted to each division and this was increased to seven 
later on in the season when two additional machines were purchased in the 
States, assembled at Sudbury operating base and put into service. 

The duty of the Provincial Air Service was to have machines ready for 
patrol at all times, to supply the flying when and where requested. 

The desire of the Provincial Air Service was to serve co-operatively with the 
ground forces as a detection and supervisory force. 

Gas and oil was shipped in April to the various bases and sub-bases in the 
Province. Field shops were erected at Ramsay Lake, eastern headquarters, and 
at Pellican Lake, western headquarters. Proper tools were installed at these 
depots for the overhaul, assembly and test of engines. Spares were placed in 
stores for maintenance and replacements of machines and engines. After eighty 
hours flying, engines were overhauled. A shop foreman was placed in charge of 
ground engineers and under his practical supervision, all overhaul, repair and 
test was taken care of. 

Late delivery of machines interrupted the operating schedule in May. It 
was not until June that the service was at full strength in each division. 

Classification of flying operation is as follows: Fire patrol, fire-fighting, 
suppression; sketching, photography, instruction, tests, cross-country, remote 
transportation, special flights. 

Forced landings, thirty-three in number, were attributed to light gear 
trouble, faulty valves, leaky cylinders and other mechanical break-downs, 
necessitating landings, the repairs of which did not permit completion of patrol 
within schedule time limits. 

Worthy of mention is the fact that 899 patrols were requisitioned; of this 
number, 866 were completed on schedule time and without incident, which 
shows a machine efficiency of 96.329 per cent. 

The total number of hours flown was 2,597. 

Due to the fact that operations in the east commenced in April, and that 
all instruction, wireless and other test flights were carried out there, the eastern 
division shows 400 hours more flying than in the west. 

Exclusive of landings participated in for instructional and test purposes, 
machines of the service made 1,325 landings during the operating season. In 
view of the fact that fifty per cent, of these landings were made in uncharted 
waters, it is worthy of mention to note the small number of cases of hull damage. 
The greater damage in this connection could in no way be attributed to improper 
handling by air service personnel. 

1. Careless salvage of damaged hull, Toronto Bay. 

2. Two machines torn away from mooring severe gale Nipigon lake. 

3. The remainder of minor importance with practically nil replacement 
requirements. 

As requisitions for fire patrol predominate the majority of flying was done 
in this connection. 

Fires detected from the air — 597. 

Hours flown — 1,505 hours and 03 minutes. 

Area covered — 2,865,608 square miles or 1,833,989,120 acres. 

4 L.F. 



98 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Forty- two hours and fifty-one minutes (42 hrs. 51 mins.), were flown on 
actual suppression duty. Machines were requisitioned on fourteen occasions. 
Each flight was carried out to schedule as per the instructions of the District 
Forester or Inspector concerned 

Three hundred and sixty-four hours and thirty-five minutes (364 hrs. 35 mins.) 
were flown on sketching and aerial survey. Fifteen hundred square miles of 
aerial type survey was accomplished. These machines were available for sketch- 
ing only when the fire hazard permitted 

Forty-seven hours and thirty minutes (47 hrs. 30 mins.) were flown on 
photographic survey; An area of seven hundred and fifty square miles was 
photographed. Machines were allotted to this operation late in the season, and 
this, combined with the poor weather conditions prevailing, greatly curtailed the 
photographic programme. 

Seventy-four hours and thirty minutes (74 hrs. 30 mins.), were flown on 
instruction. Eighteen (18) applicant pilots were tested, twelve (12) of whom 
demonstrated their flying ability sufficiently to justify further instruction. 
Eleven pilots with no previous experience on flying boats, graduated from the 
Provincial Air Service School of Instruction, and passed the necessary R.C.A.F. 
regulations and tests. One Junior B pilot is still under instruction at the present 
time, fulfilling the requirements with regard to practical knowledge of engines 
and aircraft. 

Sixty-seven hours and thirty-seven minutes (67 hrs. 37 mins.) were flown 
for test purposes under the following headings: engine tests, machine tests, 
wireless tests, weather reports and test. 

Three hundred and ninety hours and forty-two minutes (390 hrs. 42 mins.) 
were flown on cross-country. This includes all flights participated in from 
Sudbury to the various operating bases and return to Sault Ste. Marie. It also 
includes hours flown in looking for machines which had not reported to their 
respective bases on schedule time, taking in spares and other general assistance 
in connection with forced landings 

The service rendered to the Department of Health in the transportation of 
Doctor Cockburn converted what is usually a seven-day journey (in addition 
to delays generally encountered with a lady travelling, weather conditions, etc.), 
into a short air trip of but a few hours 

Reference is made to the hours requisitioned by the Forestry Branch, 
totalling 2,291 hours and 43 minutes. This time includes transportation to and 
from the bases and omits all flying spent on tests, instruction, special flights, and 
cross-country, in connection with forced landings and change of engines. 

With reference to the number of hours flown by machines on operations, 
in all two thousand five hundred and ninety-seven hours (2,597) wfere flown. 

The difference between the total number of hours flown by the machines, 
and the total number of hours run by the engines, is accounted for by cross- 
country engine flying time on delivery from Three Rivers to Sudbury, and bench 
tests. 

In conclusion, I take great pleasure in commending every member of the 
Provincial Air Service for their devotion to duty at all times. During serious 
fire hazards and in times of stress, the personnel worked of their own accord from 
daylight to dark. On several occasions during storms they were up at all hours 
of the night safeguarding the machines, often at considerable risk to themselves. 

It is with very sincere regret that in this, my first annual report, I have to 
include reference to the sad accident which occurred in the western half of the 
Province, on August 16th, 1924. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 99 

Two of the personnel, Mr. McBride, Junior Pilot B, and Mr. Gilbert, Forester 
Observer, lost their lives, and Mr. Burton, the pilot, was seriously injured. 

The accident marred an otherwse successful season's operations, and the 
deaths of the airmen were keenly felt and deplored by every member of the air 
service, who tender their most respectful sympathies to the bereaved families. 

No blame, however, can be attached to the pilot or any member of the air 
force personnel. Reference is made to the R.C.A.F. finding. 

Flying Requisitioned by Forestry Department 

Fire-fighting 42 . 51 

Fire Patrol. 1,505.03 

Sketching 364. 35 

Photography 47. 30 

Cross-country 264. 49 

Remote transportation 84. 55 

Total 2,291 hrs. 43 mins. 

The above is flying time actually requisitioned by the Forestry Department 
including transportation to and from bases, and omits all flying spent on tests, 
instructions, special flights and cross-country in connection with forced landings 
and change of engines. 

Total Flying Times 

Hrs. Mins. 

Fire-fighting 42 51 

Fire patrol 1,505 03 

Sketching 364 35 

Photography ^ 47 30 

Tests 67 37 

Instruction 74 30 

Cross-country 390 42 

Remote transport 84 55 

Special flights 19 17 

Total 2,597 hours. 

In order to utilize the aircraft service to the best advantage, it was found 
advisable to have a forest officer in charge. Flying time was required for forest 
fire patrol, forest fire supervision, forest mapping and photography and other 
minor uses. This work was under Mr. R. N. Johnston, of the Forestry Branch, 
and the following is a summary from his report. 

Organi2ation: 

In order to operate a patrol over the whole fire district, it was decided to use 
two units, an eastern and western, with a common boundary at Longlac. In 
each of these units, a main base was established from which general supervision 
and control of all flying was maintained. Mechanical overhaul was also provided 
at these points, such overhaul being absolutely essential to the operation of the 
machines for the required number of hours. 

The main base for the eastern patrol was located at Sudbury, this being a 
centre of distribution, a forest district headquarters, and had been found satis- 
factory during the previous season's operations. 



100 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

The western patrol's main base was at Sioux Lookout, a fairly central point 
for the region, and one from which there had been some previous flying experience 
(1921). 

In so far as possible, the eastern and western patrols were of equal importance, 
and were given the same amount of equipment and personnel, so that each was 
in itself competent to repair and operate its own machines. In each area there 
was, therefore, a head t)f the mechanical staff — the station superintendent — 
charged with the care and operation of the machines, and a Forestry Branch 
officer — observer-in-charge — whose duty it was to utilize flying to the best 
advantage on whatever forestry work was required. 

Though provided with the same equipment and organization, the eastern 
and western patrols did not operate in a similar manner, due to differences in 
local conditions, fire hazard, communication, etc. 

Detection: 

(a) Western Patrols — In the western area only one machine was per- 
manently operated away from the main base at Sioux Lookout, its headquarters 
being Orient Bay, on Lake Nipigon. This machine covered the Nipigon Forest 
Reserve, came as far east as Longlac, and as far south of the Reserve as Port 
Arthur and vicinity, an area of approximately twelve million acres. 

The remainder of the western patrol extending from the western boundary 
of the Nipigon patrol to Manitoba, between the Minnesota boundary and the 
Lake St. Joseph-Lac Seul-English River waterway was patrolled from Sioux 
Lookout, comprising an area of some twenty- three million acres, or more than 
twice the area of the next largest patrol. 

Detached machines in (a) the Quetico region, (b) Minaki, and (c) possibly 
in the neighbourhood of Collins could have covered this area much more effect- 
ively with the same amount of flying time, but such operation of machines was 
found to be only practicable, due to lack of mail and telegraph services, as an 
emergency measure. 

Communication in Sioux Lookout was particularly difficult due to the camp 
being located at some distance from the town. Early in the season, a telephone 
line to connect with the telegraph office was constructed up to the C.N.R. yard 
limits, but although negotiations for authority to carry this line over the com- 
pany's property began before construction of the line, it was not until the operat- 
ing season closed that permission to complete the line was granted. Under 
these conditions, and as it was not feasible to keep a runner on duty in the 
telegraph office continuously, delay in delivery and reply to telegrams was 
unavoidable. Outside of Sioux Lookout and throughout the western district 
generally, the lack of mail services on C.N.R. lines limits the dispatch of reports, 
maps, etc., to a tri-weekly service. Time is also lost whenever telegrams must be 
exchanged between the two telegraph systems — C.N.R and C.P.R. 

Radio communication from machines and sub-bases to Sioux Lookout, and 
from Sioux Lookout to rangers, would be of the greatest value in this region, and 
if proper equipment can be procured, should be provided for the coming season. 

(b) Eastern Patrols — In the eastern area, three sub-bases and the Sudbury 
main base were operated continuously. These were equipped and located as 
follows: Amyot, two machines, between White River and Franz, on the main 
line of the C.P.R. ; Como Lake, one machine, twelve miles west of Chapleau; 
Timagami, one machine, operating from Bear Island, Lake Timagami; Sudbury, 
one machine, operating from Ramsay Lake (one or two machines under over- 
haul). 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 101 

(1). The Amyot patrol covered as far west as Longlac between Lake Superior 
and the C.N.R., and extended south and east over the A.C.R. belt, and the 
northern part of the Mississagi Reserve. This patrol worked in connection with 
the northern division of the Sault Ste. Marie Inspectorate, whose headquarters 
were at Oba. The area covered by this patrol was approximately ten million 
acres. 

(2). The Como Lake patrol was supplied by one machine and covered the 
area east of the A.C.R. belt, including the central and southern Mississagi, and 
as far north as the southern boundary of the clay belt. This patrol worked partly 
in the Sault Ste. Marie Inspectorate and partly in the Sudbury Inspectorate. 
The area covered by this patrol was approximately 7.6 million acres. 

(3). The Sudbury patrol operated north up the main line of the C.P.R. and 
C.N.R. to join the Como Lake patrol and west along the Soo branch of the 
C.P.R. According to the condition of the machines, this patrol was supplied by 
one of two machines, and covered some of the most hazardous country in the 
patrol district. The area of the patrol was approximately ten million acres. 

(4). The Timagami patrol covered theTimagami Reserve and extended as 
far north as the clay belt, north of Night Hawk Lake, and as far west as the 
C.N.R. belt covered by the Sudbury patrol. The area covered by this piatrol 
was over seven million acres. 

Survey: 

(a) Sketching — Classification of timber by aerial observation was carried 
on in the country west of Lake Nipigon, where approximately 2,634,000 acres 
or forty-six per cent, of the allotted season's work were covered. 

About 200 flying hours were used in this operation and bases flown from 
include Savanne, Allanwater, Nipigon House, Orient Bay and Port Arthur, 

The season's sketching programme was not completed for a variety of 
reasons, amongst which might be mentioned the unusually rainy season, the 
necessity of training new men to the work and the attempted alternation of 
machines between aerial survey and fire detection. This scheme of transferring 
machines from one service to another as required and which superficially has 
many attractive features, was thoroughly tried during the past season. 

As was suspected from some slight previous experience in 1923, it was 
found to be unsatisfactory, and also very wasteful of flying due to the loss in 
transference. 

The Nipigon survey also showed that the preparation of a complete type 
map in advance of the commencement of ground estimation, as was the case with 
the eastern half of the watershed, makes a much more effective and cheaper 
survey possible. 

Some of the factors contributing to these results being (1) the possibility, 
where a map is in existence, of picking good routes of travel and concentrating 
work on the more valuable timbered areas, (2) the possibility of laying out an 
intelligent time schedule of work and of properly apportioning supplies, etc. 

There are also less briefly explainable, but none the less real savings, in the 
aerial end of the operation. 

On the basis of this past season's work therefore, and also referring to all 
our previous experience, it would seem advisable to confine estimation to country 
already mapped, and further, to plan survey work so that aerial type mapping 
may continuously keep a season in advance of ground estimation. 



102 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

(b) Photography — In addition to sketching there was also a beginning this 
season of survey based on photography. The system adopted is the one origin- 
nated and developed by the Dominion Topographical Surveys Branch, and is 
generally known as the "distorted grid" system. It is a method whose results 
can be checked mathematically, and which in actual practice has produced very 
accurate results 

Properly developed by the Branch, it will, by supplying an accurate base 
map for aerial timber classification, eliminate one of the chief elements of cost 
and error in our present system of survey. If an organization to carry on this 
method could be assembled and put in working order by the Branch, prior to 
undertaking estimation in Patricia and other poorly-mapped sections of the 
Province, a great saving in time and money and a tremendous gain in accuracy 
and prestige would be effected. Such an organization need not be elaborate nor 
would the equipment cost be high, as compared to the value of the work done. 

III. Forest Survey and Investigation 

Report of the Nipigon Forest Survey, Eastern Portion. 

1. Area Surveyed. — ^The tract surveyed during the first half of the summer 
season of 1924 lies east of Lake Nipigon to the watershed of that lake, and 
extends from the southern boundary of ^the Nipigon Forest Reserve to the 
Transcontinental Railway on the north. 

The total area covered was 2,770 square miles, or 1,772,835 acres, all of 
which is Crown land, with the exception of approximately one-third of the 
townships of Purdom and Ledger, held under veteran claims. 

2. Object of Survey and Method. — The object of the survey was to obtain 
information for — (1) the completion of a forest type map, showing composition 
and age-class conditions, (2) an estimate of standing timber; (3) improving the 
existing map in correcting as far as possible the water routes and adding as many 
unmapped routes as possible. 

The method consisted of a combination of (a) ground-work; (b) aerial type 
mapping. 

(a) Ground work. — Thirty-four men made up the crew for the ground work. 
This number includes five foresters, sixteen forestry students, nine men used 
either as packers or on the strip parties, and four cooks. 

The organization of the work consisted of a chief, and sub-chief and four 
field parties composed of a chief and five men, together with a cook and packers 
where needed. 

Field operations extended from May 26th to October 15th, with two months 
allotted to complete the work on the east side. 

Strips were used in collecting field data. Owing to the limited time to cover 
so large an area, it was not possible to define any set instructions as to the distance 
apart the strips would be run and this was left to the direction of party chiefs. 
Every effort was made to adhere to strips one half-mile apart and run as nearly 
as possible at right angles to the water courses. 

The eleven-foot strip was practically used throughout, and it was only in 
the open jack pine stands that a thirty-three-foot strip was used. 

A two or three-man unit formed a strip crew. Since the whole area does not 
bear any important stands of saw timber species and the strips were eleven-feet 
wide, a two-man unit proved almost as effective as the three men. 

The amount of strip run by all parties amounts to 1,276 miles, or 1,678 acres. 
This was distributed as follows: — 266 acres in the Superior drainage; 226 in the 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 103 

Poskogami; 137 in the Parks Lake; 83 in the Upper Sturgeon; 326 in the Black- 
water; 68 in the Lower Sturgeon; 76 in the North Wind lake; 211 in the Onaman; 
185 in the Ombabika and 100 acres in the North Shore. 

In addition to running strips, data was collected on 200 felled jackpine trees 
for the purpose of constructing a volume table suitable for this region and to be 
used in estimating the contents of the jackpine into feet board measure, cords 
and ties. 

The field data has been compiled by watersheds. Each type has been given 
a number, and corresponding with that number is a summary sheet with whatever 
tally has been taken in that type. 

Maps have been constructed to show: 

1. A key map of forest areas. 

2. Forest types in age classes. 

3. Age class conditions. 

4. Organization of ground work, showing camps and strips. 

5. A base map of waterways. 

(b) Aerial Type Mapping. — During the summer season of t923 the aerial 
type mapping was completed in detail for the tract covered in this survey plus a 
general sketch of an additional 1,800 square miles north of the Transcontinental 
railway and largely confined within the Nipigon watershed. According to the 
report on flying for the northern area, "fully eighty-five per cent, may now be 
classified as barren, burn and muskeg, with a liberal fifteen per cent, allowance 
for the scrubby remains of former timber stands fringing the watercourses and 
in damp hollows. Under the above conditions it was not considered advisable 
to expend the time or run the risks necessary to prepare a detailed type map of 
this territory." 

Flying was carried on from two bases. Orient Bay and a small island near 
the mouth of the Ombabika river. Work commenced June 9th and was com- 
pleted July 13th, 1923. To complete the type mapping for both the area done 
in detail and the northern area in general required 104 hours' flying. 

The field parties were fortunate in having, previous to going into the woods, 
a type map giving a detailed picture of type and age class conditions. 

3. Summary of Forest Conditions (Eastern Watershed).— The area covered 
by this survey comprises a total of 1,773,000 acres east from Lake Nipigon to 
the height of land and extending from the Transcontinental railway on the north 
to the reserve boundary on the south. 

From north to south there is a general change in topographic and' forest 
conditions. Topographically, three subareas are recognizable. The northern 
third, or that section confined in the North Shore, .Ombabika and Onaman blocks 
has a low relief resembling the clay belt. Considerable of the area is occupied 
by stands of scrubby growth and on the whole is not so well drained as the areas 
south of it. Soils, for the most part, are heavier with considerable clay. This 
is reflected in the forest composition as the northern third carries only a small 
percentage of jackpine but a good spruce yield. On the whole the stands are 
older on account of having sufi^ered less from fire. 

Coming south to the middle or intermediate area which parallels the Cana- 
dian National Railway both north and south to include the drainage system of 
North Wind lake, the Sturgeon or Namewaminikan river and Blackwater river, 
the relief becomes slightly more pronounced, drainage improves and the soils 
are more sandy. Jackpine becomes a more important component of the stand, 
furnishing the highest percentage of any of the blocks. This section has, as 



104 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

might be expected, due to its proximity to the railway, suffered more from fire. 
Eighteen per cent, of the Upper and Lower Sturgeon has been reduced to the 
recent burn classification through this agent. 

The southern section of Parks Lake, Poskogami and Lake Superior blocks 
has the most pronounced relief of the three areas. It is characterized topo- 
graphically by being hilly with deep valleys and rocky outcrops common. Soils 
are thinner with the better stands occurring in pockets of deeper soils. This 
area is well drained and carries the highest percentage of mixed stands. The 
hardwoods are more prominent in the south than the north with the greater 
proportion birch. The amount of hardwood is closely related to better drainage 
but more to the average age of the stands, i.e., they are younger than the stands 
in the north, ranging between eighty and one hundred years. 

The whole tract has been classified, showing age-class relationships, and, 
percentically, 69 per cent, is merchantable, 4 per cent, second growth, 8 per cent, 
young growth, and 19 per cent, unproductive. This 19 per cent, includes water, 
recent burn, muskeg and natural or fire barrens. 

Again, considering the whole tract, 81 per cent, is forested and 19 per cent, 
unproductive. 

During the past season investigation of the reproduction and growth of 
white pine stands was undertaken, in charge of Mr. T. W. Dwight of the Faculty 
of Forestry, University of Toronto. Attached is a summary from Mr. Dwight's 
preliminary report in connection with this work. 

Studies of Young White Pine Stands: 

The steady removal of the existing stands of mature white pine in Ontario 
year by year is having a twofold effect, particularly noticeable in the more 
accessible forest areas such as the territory south of Lake Nipissing, where 
lumbering operations have been carried on longest. First, there is an increasing 
tendency to cut small trees, and, second, a more definite value is placed on 
second-growth stands, which, while not yet of merchantable size, may be ex- 
pected to be ready for the market within the present generation. Such changes 
in conditions bring new problems in forest administration. The questions 
naturally arise: How small timber should be allowed to be cut, and in what 
manner can a check best be placed on the cutting of too small timber? 

As regards the stands definitely below merchantable size, data is not avail- 
able for Ontario at least that would permit any accurate prediction for their future 
value when they do reach merchantable size, nor of the amount of wood that is 
being annually added to their volume. Both these items of information it is 
highly desirable to have, not only to demonstrate the concrete benefits that will 
accrue from protection of these young stands from fire, but also to indicate how 
much expenditure is justified for that purpose. 

With the object of securing data along these lines, investigations were made 
during the past summer in six localities where there were available stands of pine 
of seven different ages. All of these had originated after fires, and the timber 
on any one area was consequently of approximately the same age, except where 
two successive fires had occurred. The four localities were decided upon after a 
two-weeks' trip through the forest region lying south of Sudbury and North Bay, 
during which a considerable number of areas were inspected and all possible 
information secured from the Crown timber agents and district foresters. The 
cordial co-operation of all these men is gratefully acknowledged. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 105 

The general conclusions outlined above may be summarized as follows: 

1. White pine grows typically in even-aged stands in which all the trees, 
both large and small, are of approximately the same age. 

2. Trees of small size may be the result not only of lack of age, but of poor 
growing conditions or of crowding by other trees. A small average scale may 
be caused by an excessive amount of rot in logs even though the logs come from 
fairly large trees. 

3. For the purpose of preventing the cutting of timber that is too young or 
too small, a general regulation limiting either the age or the size of the timber 
that may be cut will not give satisfactory results. An inspection of each ques- 
tionable area by a trained official is desirable in order that a decision may be 
made in each case on the basis of the actual conditions, 

4. Many very extensive areas of young growth, including much valuable 
young pine, ranging in age from twenty-five to eighty years of age, are to be found 
in the timbered portion of the Province. This young growth came up after fires 
that burned through virgin timber. 

5. The conditions following the fires of the past twenty-five years will not 
be as favourable as on the areas burned over at earlier times since these later fires 
burned over more young growth and logged-off areas. 

6. The second-growth stands contain a large proportion of poplar which 
investigation shows to die out at a comparatively early age, leaving the pine to 
form the mature stand. These stands, therefore, will produce more pine timber 
than their present condition would indicate superficially. 

7. Detailed studies must be made of the growth of pine and poplar in mixture 
as well as of pine in pure stands, to make it possible to properly appraise the 
present and future value of young second-growth stands. 



5 L.F. 



U)6 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

IV. Reforestation. 

Provincial Forest Stations: 
St. Williams (Norfolk). 
Orono (Durham County). 
Midhurst (Simcoe County). 

Provincial Transplant Nurseries: 

Sand Banks (Prince Edward County). 

Kemptville (Grenville County). 

New Liskeard (Timiskaming District). 

County Forests: 

Hendrie (Simcoe County). 

Vivian (York County). 

Northumberland (Northumberland and Durham Counties). 

Private Forests. 

Tree Planting: 

Private Planting. 
Demonstration Plots. 
Inspection. 

Moss Gathering. 

Seed Collecting. • 

Summary of Nursery Stock. 

Summary of Tree Distribution. 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



107 



Provincial Forest Stations; 



St. Williams 



Seed beds: Spring sowing of seed beds commenced on April 5th and con- 
tinued until May 26th, a total of 244 beds being sown. On October 16th work 
was commenced in connection with fall sowing. A total of 1,080 beds completed 
the season's nursery operations. As may be noted, the tendency toward fall 
seeding has increased. Good results are obtained while a more equal division of 
labour is brought about, permitting more time during the spring for transplanting 
one- and two-year-old seedlings. 

Nursery Lines: The pt^ctice of lining out the bulk of transplants during the 
fall season is gradually being done away with until this work, it is hoped, will be 
carried on entirely as a spring operation. A dry fall, followed by winter-killing 
and frost-heaving during early spring, invariably causes a heavy loss of seedlings 
which have been lined out in the fall. During the spring, 2,852,080 plants were 
lined out. 

In addition to the foregoing disposal of seedlings, a considerable number of 
one- and two-year-old transplants were shipped, both during the spring and fall, 
to the provincial forestry stations situated at Orono and Midhurst. A total of 
3,784,000 plants were shipped to these stations. 

Tree seed is obtained almost entirely from material collected by the Forestry 
Branch. The bulk of seed procured comes from Simcoe county, while the seed 
of such species as scotch and jackpine is collected from older plantations on and 
about the Norfolk Forest Station. Present seed stored at St. Williams is as 
follows: 



Species 



Origin 



When 
Collected 



Pounds 



Ounces 



White Pine 

Red Pine 

Scotch Pine. . . . 

Jack Pine 

Austrian Pine. . 
White Spruce . . , 
White Spruce. . 
Norway Spruce. 
Sitka Spruce. . . 
White Cedar. . . 
White Cedar. . . 

Hemlock 

Tamarack 

Balsam 

Balsam 



Total . 



Simcoe County. . 
Simcoe County. . 
Norfolk County. 
Norfolk County. 
Norfolk County . 
Simcoe County. . 

Danish 

Central Europe. 

B.C 

Simcoe County. , 
Simcoe County. . 
Simcoe County. . 
Simcoe County. . 
Simcoe County. . 
Simcoe County. . 



1924 
1923 
1924 
1923 
1923 
1924 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1922 
1924 
1922 
1924 



114 

1,208 

127 

24 

1 
70 

2 

2 

10 
52 
51 
11 

6 
78 
23 



1,780 



Additions to property: A building 22 feet by 24 feet was constructed to serve 
the purpose of a combined office and storehouse. A full-sized nine-foot basement 
provides ample space for surplus tools and all other equipment, while on the main 
floor, such supplies that are in constant use are conveniently hung on racks. 
Every article is checked out, thereby obtaining a much closer tab on the tools 
that are operating. 

Roads: Several new roads have been constructed, dividing woodland and 
plantation areas into smaller units, thereby facilitating access and reducing fire 
hazard. Roads were brushed and widened where necessary. Old fire roads 



108 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

were ploughed twice and otherwise maintained in good condition. A new fire 
road, sixteen feet in width and 660 yards long, was constructed. 

Fencijig: Four hundred and fifty acres were fenced. This area comprises 
260 acres of young plantation, and a remaining 190 acres of bushland which will 
be planted very shortly. 

Silviculture: The greater portion of the natural woodland section of the 
Norfolk Forest Station is composed of scrub oak type. This type presents a 
very poor picture, and the policy of cutting over, leaving only healthy trees, has 
been continued. This improvement cutting is followed during the ensuing year 
by planting. An area of approximately 150 acres has been cut over during the 
early spring and winter months, while 100 acres were planted out permanently 
to red and white pine this recent fall. 

Since 1909, permanent planting has been carried on annually until we now 
have forty-eight individual plantations ranging from one to fifteen years of age. 
Species used, and .conditions under which planting was carried out, has been 
recorded. Furthermore, all costs in connection with trimming and thinning of 
older plantations are kept. 

Protection {Disease and Insects): The work of combating white pine blister 
rust and the white pine weevil was continued. Three men under experienced 
supervision inspected all white pine plantations at periods of from two to three 
weeks. All weeviled leaders were cut off and immediately put in tight boxes, 
the tops of which were covered with galvanized screening. The purpose- of this 
is to permit the small parasite (the natural enemy of the white pine weevil) to 
escape, and at the same time to prevent the weevil itself from obtaining its 
liberty when it reaches the "fly" stage. 

NURSERY STOCK ON HAND DECEMBER 15th, 1924 
Conifers: 

Balsam 117,700 

Cedar, white 1 ,799,600 

Larch, European 262,000 

Larch, Japanese 27,000 

Pine, white 1,843,000 

Pine, red 3,220,000 

Pine, Scotch 2,542,700 

Pine, Jack 1,302,000 

Pine, Austrian 26,900 

Spruce, white 1,673,000 

Spruce, Norway 1,003,000 

Total 13,816,900 

Hardwoods: 

Ash, white 124,400 

Beech 5,800 

Birch, white 1,200 

Catalpa 1,900 

Chestnut 3,500 

Cherry, black 12,500 

Elm 115,900 

Locust, black 10,000 

Locust, honey 7,000 

Maple, Manitoba 3,550 

Maple, hard 40,700 

Maple, red 13,900 

Maple, soft 9,000 

Walnut, black 50,000 

Walnut, white 35,000 

Poplar, rooted 150 

Poplar, cuttings 200,000 

Willow cuttings 50,000 

Total 684,500 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 109 

Summary of the Year's Operations: 

(a) Total number of seed beds sown 1,324 

(b) Total number of pounds of coniferous seed sown 1,407 

(c) Total number of pounds of coniferous seed on hand. . 1,780 

(d) Total number of transplants lined out 2,852,080 

(e) Total number of transplants shipped to Orono and 

Midhurst Forestry Stations 3,784,000 

(/) Total nursery stock on hand 14,501,400 

Orono 

Seedmg: Owing to the lack of an irrigation system as yet, the seeding oi 
coniferous species has not been carried on extensively. With certain speciesr 
notably white pine and white spruce of the native varieties and scotch pine of 
the exotic varieties, our experimental beds have produced an eighty per cent, to 
eighty-five per cent, stand without irrigation, but with other species the necessity 
for water was very apparent. Twenty-four beds were sown in the spring and 
ninety in the autumn. 

FALL SOWING OF CONIFEROUS BEDS 

lbs. ozs. 

Cedar, white 3 12 

Juniper, red 3 12 

Pine, red 14 4 

Pine, Scotch 1 14 

Pine, white 78 . . 

Spruce, white 8 

109 10 

SOWING OF HARDWOOD SEED 

Bushels 

Ash, white S'/z 

Birch, white '/2 

Birch, yellow ~ '/z 

Elm, white 10 

Maple, hard V2 

Maple, soft 50 

Walnut 30 

97 
Nursery Lines 

SPRING TRANSPLANTING OF CONIFERS 

Seedlings 

Cedar, white (2 years) 4,000 

Pine, Jack (2 years) 30,000 

Pine, Jack (1 year) 125,000 

Pine, red (1 year) 20,000 

Pine, Scotch (1 year). 470,000 

Pine, white (1 year) 475,000 

Spruce, white (2 years) 50,000 

Total 1,174,000 

Transplanting: Fall transplanting has been found to yield very satisfactory 
results although a little more care has been found necessary. As we have no 
protective hedges which have reached a size sufficient to form effective wind- 
breaks, it has been necessary to mulch with rye straw and brush to hold snow. 
In this way snow blankets from two to three feet in depth are found over the 
transplant beds. 

As hardwoods are usually of large enough size for distribution at the end of 
the first growing season, only such as are backward in the first season's growth 
or are excess stock are transplanted, except hard maple which requires two years 
at the nursery. 



no REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Roads: All main roads and nursery roads in the northern part of the 
nursery have now been placed on a permanent basis, gravelled, and, where 
necessary, concrete culverts constructed to carry surface water during the spring 
thaws. The depth of snow makes these culverts a necessity. 

During the summer a road was built connecting the north entrance to the 
nursery with the fifth concession, following the main gully for its full length. 

Demonstration Plantations: Three acres of hillside were planted to a mix- 
ture of white and Austrian pine as a commencement in demonstration plan- 
tations. 

An acre of blowing sand was also brushed and planted to scotch pine. 

Both plantations are doing well. 

Publicity: At the request of the agricultural societies concerned, exhibits 
were placed at the township agricultural fairs in Clarke and Cavan townships, 
Durham county, held at Orono and Millbrook respectively. 

These exhibits took the form of rows of boxes in which were a few specimens 
of each age of all species on hand, placed on a sloping frame. vSeed in Riker 
mounts were placed at the bottom of each row, which then extended upwards 
to the oldest specimens of the species on hand. Bulletins were distributed to 
those interested and advice given on the establishment of new plantations, 
treatment of old plantations and the handling of woodlots where possible. A 
large number of prospective planters were interviewed in this way. 

STOCK ON HAND, DECMEBER 15th, 1924 
Conifers: 

Balsam 165,000 

Cedar, white 197,500 

Larch, Japanese 9,000 

Pine, jack 185,000 

Pine, red 300,000 

Pine, Scotch 400,000 

Pine, white 1,705,000 

Spruce, Norway 96,400 

Spruce, white 380,000 

Total 3,437,900 

Hardwoods: 

Ash, white 155,000 

Butternut 4,000 

Elm, white 120,000 

Maple, hard 5,000 

Maple, red 75,000 

Maple, silver 140,00Q 

Walnut 3,500 

Total 502,.S00 

MiDHURST 

Seeding: Seed beds were sown both in spring and fall. Early in May a 
total of 156 beds were put in. On account of the cold and backward spring, 
germination was slow but good. The sowing of fall beds was done between 
November 3rd and November 21st. A total of 247 beds were sown. 

Transplanting: Transplanting was carried on during both spring and fall. 
The larger portion of the seedlings was received from the St. Williams nursery. 
The spring transplanting was carried on from May 2nd until May 26th, and the 
fall from August 20th to September 16th. The spring transplants made a par- 
ticularly fine showing, the mortality being quite low. A temporary irrigation 



1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



111 



system was used with some of the fall transplanting; 1,243,600 plants were set 
out in the spring and 993,000 in the autumn. 

Permanent Planting: Considerable permanent planting was done on the 
property, including windbreaks and hedges around nursery ground. The per- 
manent planting destroyed by grasshoppers last year was filled in. The planting 
this spring was very successful, the mortality on most of the plantations being 
less than five per cent. The grasshoppers attacked one plantation, but they 
were checked by using bran poison mash. The paris green was found more 
effective than arsenate of lead. There is approximately 200 acres planted up 
permanently now. 

Roads: Fire roads were made, dividing plantations into compartments. 
These were laid out with two objects in view: first, to divide plantations into 
approximately equal compartments; second, to provide roads and drives later on. 



PERMANENT PLANTING— SPRING, 1924 



Plantation 



Red and white pine, mixed 

Red pine 

White pine 

Jack pine 

Scotch pine 

Red pine 

Totals 



Acreage 



5 
30 
40 
40 



128 



Spacing and 
how Planted 



Alternate rows, 
6x6 
6x6 
6x6 
6x6 
6x6 
6x6 



Age of Plants 



Red 

Whi 



1—1 
1—2 



— 1 
—2 
— 1 
— 1 
—I 



Number 



6,050 

9,680 

6,050 

36,300 

48,400 

48,400 



154,800 



PERMANENT PLANTING— FALL, 1924 



Plantation 


Acreage 


Spacing 


How Planted 


Age of Plants 


Number 


Scotch pine mixed with larch, red, 
white and jack pines 

Spruce mixed with larch, red, 
white, Scotch and jack pines .... 

White and red pine, mixed 


20 

30 
10 


6x6 

6x6 
6x6 


.Alternate Rows 
—Blocks 

Alternate Rows 
—Block 

Alternate Rows 


Scotch P. 1—2 
Jack P. 1—2 
Red P. 1—2 
Larch 1—2 
White P. 2—1 

Spruce 2 — 2 — 1 
Jack P. 1—2 
Rfcd P. 1—2 
Larch 1—2 
White P. 2—1 

Red P. 1—2 
White P. 2—1 


24,200 

36,300 
12,100 


Totals 


60 








72,600 





Building: A water system was installed during the year. The water is 
pumped from a spring creek into a 20,000-gallon tank placed on a 100-foot steel 
tower. The system is quite satisfactory and was used this summer with Skinner 
overhead equipment. 

A stable was built at one of the houses and garage at this house was moved 
to site of other buildings. A small gasoline house was also built. 



112 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Silviculture: About thirty-five acres of second-growth hardwoods were sub- 
jected to improvement cutting. These are in pole stage at present. Poor 
especimens, weed trees, etc., were taken out and are being worked into wood. 

About thirty acres of swamp was partly cleaned up. About four years back 
all the good timber in the swamp was taken out. No brush was burned and a 
lot of down logs were left. This, with windfalls, since cutting, left the swamp 
in bad condition. Roads have been made, brush burned up and considerable 
wood from down logs have been worked up. 

Last winter about twenty large trees with soil frozen to roots were moved on 
stoneboat and placed around buildings. This experiment was quite successful. 
Early this winter twenty more sugar and red maple were moved. In the trees 
moved last year it was found that elms would not stand moving; maples were 
fairly successful. The ground was not thoroughly frozen around the hard 
maples. 

Lawns and hedges were made around houses, windbreaks were planted, 
marking roads and dividing the nursery into compartments. Considerable 
stumping and breaking up new land for nursery purposes was done. Fifteen 
acres of low land was fenced to be used for a pasture. 

The nursery land was prepared by fertilizing with manure and ploughing 
under cover crops consisting of rye, buckwheat and peas. The peas grew so tall 
that they had to be cut. Sweet clover has been sown for the same purpose. 

The basin in front of the dam has been cleaned out and the sides stoned. 

NURSERY STOCK ON HAND, DECEMBER 1st, 1924 

Conifers: 

White Pine 1,272,500 

Red Pine 1,646,600 

Scotch Pine 496,000 

Jack Pine 414,000 

European Larch 48,000 

White Cedar 390,000 

Balsam 134,000 

White Spruce 231,500 

Norway Spruce 44,000 

Sitka Spruce 72,000 

Hemlock 6,000 



Hardwoods : 

Silver Maple 75,000 

White Elm 76,320 

White Ash 6,175 

Butternut 16,425 

Walnut 2,100 

Locust 350 

Red Maple 675 



4,754,600 



177,045 



TRANSPLANT NURSERIES 
Sand Banks 

The work at the sand banks this year consisted, for the most part, in filling 
up failed places in the belts already established with poplar cuttings, and in 
lifting and repairing catch fences. 

The transplants in the nursery were supplemented by several thousand 
cuttings which are to be grown as rooted poplars for later transplanting on the 
banks. This material is easily handled in nursery rows and has proven very 
satisfactory in holding the drifting sand. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 113 

The following is a list of trees in the nursery: 

Conifers: 

Jack Pine 807,620 

White Pine 27,360 

Scotch Pine 52,575 

White Cedar 14,840 

Red Pine 139,285 

Norway Sprtice 95,840 

Total 1,137,520 

Hardwoods; 

Oak 1,985 

Soft Maple '. 980 

Elm 1,066 

Locust 15.000 

Hard Maple 21,750 

White Ash 9,000 

Butternut 9,875 

Walnut , 9,905 

. Total 69,561 

Kemptville 

A small transplant nursery at the Kemptville school has served to interest 
landowners in the eastern part of the Province in tree planting. Some of the 
material there was used for demonstrating purposes on the school property and 
some was distributed locally. 

During the spring a quantity of transplants were set out, making a total of 
stock in the nursery as follows: 

Conifers: 

Red Pine 46,000 

White Pine 24,000 

Jack Pine 79,000 

Scotch Pine 1 10,000 

White Spruce 12,000 

Norway Spruce 4,800 

Total 275,800 

Hardwoods: 

White Ash 1,600 

Soft Maple 2,500 

Elm 150 

Hard Maple 350 

Walnut 2,200 

Butternut 2,300 

Poplar 950 

Willow 550 

Total 10,600 

New Liskeard 

For some time the establishing of a small nursery in the northern part of the 
Province has been under consideration. Tree planting in New Ontario, of 
course, has not advanced rapidly because there is not the same need there, due 
to the abundance of forest, as there is in Southern Ontario. It has been found, 
however, that when the forest is removed for agricultural purposes in the north, 
the wind does considerable damage to crops. The purpose, therefore, of estab- 
lishing this nursery is to supply local farmers with suitable material for wind- 
break planting and to have it on hand for local distribution when the spring 
season opens up. 



114 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

During the autumn the following transplants were set out: 

White Spruce 8,500 

Cedar 1,000 

Scotch Pine 500 

Soft Maple 2,750 

Elm 2,250 

Honey Locust 100 

Total 15,100 

COUNTY FORESTS 

Hendrie 

At this forest approximately 250 acres were planted during the spring of 
1924. The species used were the four pines — red, white, scotch, and jack — and 
some plantations were set out pure; others were made of mixtures of two or more 
of these species. During the summer all the plantations at this forest did excep- 
tionally well as was the case generally throughout the Province. Contrary to 
last year when grasshoppers were troublesome, no difficulty was encountered 
in this matter due to the sturdy growth of the trees. 

Besides the large plantations of pine, a quantity of red maple were planted 
around a pond. 

The trees planted are as follows: 

White Pine . 12,300 

Red Pine 71,500 

Scotch Pine 33,500 

Jack Pine 199,800 

Red Maple 5,000 

Total 322,100 

During the summer fire roads were ploughed, harrowed, and underbrush 
cut, and transplants in nursery lines kept clean. 

This fall three compartments of approximately 200 acres were underbrushed 
and furrowed preparatory for planting in the spring. This will leave approx- 
imately 100 acres more to be planted as there is swamp and second-growth on 
south part of property. » * 

STOCK ON HAND DECEMBER 1st, 1924 

White Pine 105,400 

Red Pine 47,700 

Scotch Pine 67,200 

Jack Pine 130,000 

Norway Spruce 27,400 

White Spruce 266,500 

Cedar 500 

Elm 500 

Butternut 500 

Sugar Maple 3,000 

Total 648,700 

Vivian 

During the winter of 1923-4, the County Council of York purchased a block 
of sand land in Whitchurch township, situated about eight miles east of Aurora. 
The area is part of a continuous ridge of tumultuous hills which extend from York 
county on down through Ontario, Durham and Northumberland counties. The 
area purchased comprises 600 acres which is to be increased in the near future to 
1,000 acres. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS US 

During the spring season the following trees were planted: 

White Pine 13,000 

Red Pine 43,000 

Scotch Pine 65,000 

Jack Pine 42,000 

Larch 7,500 

Poplar 6,000 

Total 176,500 

The old buildings on the property were torn down and removed and fences" 
were either rebuilt or repaired, enclosing all planted areas. The only good house 
which was on the property at the time of purchase was re-roofed and placed on a 
concrete foundation with cellar. 

During the summer a contour and type map was made of the area which is 
being used in the preparation of working plans. 



Northumberland 

This forest consists of a' 1,000 acre block in Haldimand township, fourteen 
miles from Cobourg, and is owned by the United Counties of Northumberland 
and Durham. It is part of the same ridge of hills which extends from the Vivian 
forest and forms a watershed between Rice Lake and Lake Ontario. The county 
highway from Cobourg to Hastings runs through the property for two miles, 
thereby making it an ideal demonstration of reforestation. 

During the planting season the following trees were set out: 

White Pine 11,500 

Red Pine 87,700 

Scotch Pine 48,360 

Jack Pine 33,300 

Poplar 300 

Honey Locust 700 

Larch 22,500 

Total 207,060 



In addition, practically all the fencing at the forest was rebuilt or repaired, 
and a wooden tower was erected on the hilltop, commanding a view of the whole 
countryside. 

During the summer a contour and type map was made which is being used 
in the preparation of working plans. 



PRIVATE FORESTS 

In connection with tree-planting work of the Branch, it has always been 
our policy to assist landowners with their planting work, chiefly as regards advice 
through the mail and occasionally, where the size of the area warrants it, by 
personal supervision. This service is also extended in the matter of advice in 
the handling of existing wood lots in so far as facilities will permit. 

During the past year two people have taken advantage of this service on a 
large scale and have not only asked for technical assistance, but have placed 



116 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

their properties under the supervision of this office and have asked that they be 
handled in the same way as county forests except, of course, in the case of private 
forests all financial obligations must be met by the individual. 

OsLER Forest 

This forest is the property of H. S. Osier, Esq. It is situated on Lake 
Scugog and consists of 1,600 acres. About three-quarters of the area is grass 
land and will be planted. The remainder is woodland. 

During the spring the following trees were set out: 

White Pine 12,000 

Jack Pine 33,000 

Scotch Pine 46,000 

Red Pine 11,000 

Elm 2,000 

Soft Maple 10,000 

A contour and type map was prepared during the summer which is being 
used as a basis for working plans. 

Williams Forest 

This forest is the property of Francis Williams, of Bracebridge, Muskoka. 
It is situated eight miles from that town and is 600 acres in size. It comprises, 
for the most part, some of the typical Muskoka hardwood land and is more a 
management proposition than planting. There are, however, some areas of 
grass land which are being planted, and thinning and improvement work is 
being done during the winter. A map of this area was also made during the 
summer and working plans are being prepared. 



TREE PLANTING 

Private Planting 

The planting of trees by private individuals this year increased more than 
double over the previous year. This was due to a more vigorous campaign of 
advertising than previously and also to the interest created by the offer of the 
Branch to supply windbreak material. 

During the winter a seventy-one page illustrated bulletin on "Forest Tree 
Planting" was issued, setting forth in detail the advantages and methods of such 
work. A small circular was also issued, entitled "Windbreaks and Shelter 
Belts." The number of persons supplied with trees were 1,351, and the number 
of trees of all species sent out was 1,954,671. 



DEMONSTRATION PLOTS 

The purpose of establishing demonstration plots througout the Province 
has been to show to persons having non-agricultural land how this might be 
utilized for tree growth and what results might be expected. Some of the plots 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 117 

established have now grown to fifteen or twenty feet in height, notably the one 
set out near the village of Norwood in 1912. To assist in bringing these plots 
to the attention of passersby, signs were prepared and erected during the summer 
at twelve of these plots, stating the year in which they were planted and their 
purpose. 

The following new plots were established during the spring planting season: 

Brant County (Oakland Township) 

This plot is situated ten miles from the city of Brantford on the main road 
to Simcoe. It is one of a number of demonstration plots which the county of 
Brant purposes setting out. The scheme is to establish a plot each year in 
different parts of the county and name it after the warden for that year. This 
plot is three acres in size and the following trees were planted thereon: 

Scotch Pine 500 

Jack Pine 500 

White Pine 500 

Red Pine 1,000 

Hamilton Parks Board (City of Hamilton) 

This planting was planned and carried out under the supervision of the 
Forestry Branch by the city of Hamilton, the purpose being to beautify the face 
of the mountain. The city paid for the planting and the Branch supplied the 
following trees: 

Jack Pine 12,000 

Scotch Pine 1,000 

White Pine 500 

Austrian Pine 200 

White Spruce 500 

Cedar 1,000 

Silver Maple 4,000 

White Ash 2,000 

Walnut 1,000 

Butternut 2,000 

Willow 5,000 

Poplar 1,000 

Red Maple 4,000 

Humberstone Township (Welland County) 

This plot consists of a small part of the township community park on the 
shore of Lake Erie where sand from the lake is being blown inland. The following 
trees were planted: 

Scotch Pine 1,000 

Jack Pine 1 ,000 

Islington Community Park 

This plantation was established on land purchased by Islington for a com- 
munity park, and the area, besides being visited by several hundred people during 
the summer, is in full view from two railways. The following trees were planted: 

White Pine 300 

Jack Pine 300 

Scotch Pine 1.000 



118 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Red Pine 300 

Walnut 400 

White Ash 400 

Soft Maple 500 

Elm 500 

White Spruce 500 



North York Township (York County) 

The land planted for this township comprises an area on both sides of the 
Don river where it is dammed for township water purposes. The planting was 
done on the sides of the river valley and is seen in its entirety from the highway. 
The following trees were used : 

Scotch Pine 4,000 

Jack Pine 500 

White Pine 1 ,000 

Red Pine 1,000 

Cedar 1,000 



Midland (for the Town of Midland) 

The area planted here consists of a part of a forest reserve in which are 
situated springs which supply the town with water. Vacant areas were filled up 
in order to better control the run-off into feeder springs and creeks. This plot 
borders on the Midland-Penetang road. The following trees were planted: 

Jack Pine 2,000 

Scotch Pine 2,000 



Mulmur Township (Dufferin County) 

This plot consists of fifty acres in a large sand area in the heart of Mulmur. 
The property borders a winding road which in past years has been interfered 
with badly by drifting sand. 

Approximately fifteen acres were planted this year with 4,000 scotch, 4,000 
jack, and 8,000 red pine. 



Wainfleet Township (Welland County) 

The area occupied by this plantation is a part of the agricultural park in 
the village of Wainfleet. The following species were planted: 

Walnut 1,000 

Butternut 1,000 

White Ash 500 

Soft Maple • 500 



Lake Shore 

This plot is situated between the lake shore road and the beach. At the 
place where the trees are planted, the wind has gouged a section of the bank, 
causing sand to drift into the road and necessitating the changing of its course. 
One thousand jackpine were planted. 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 119 



PusLiNCH Township (Wellington County) 

The city of Guelph receives its water supply from springs which rise in 
Puslinch township some distance from the city. Considerable planting has been 
done in these areas in years past and this year an additional quantity of 13,000 
of Scotch pine were set out. The Government supplied the trees and the city 
paid for part of the planting. 

Of the plots already established, the following have had their areas extended 
or have been supplemented where necessary with new trees: 

Albemarle (East), Jack Pine 1,000 

Red Pine 2,000 

Albemarle (West), Jack Pine 1,000 

Red Pine 2,000 

Colborne Jack Pine 1,200 

Scotch Pine 1,200 

Cramahe White Pine 2,000 

Red Pine 2,000 

Beeton Jack Pine 10,000 

Red Pine 15,000 

Essa Jack Pine 1,200 

Scotch Pine 1,000 

Innisfil White Pine 2,000 

Red Pine 2,000 

Sunnidale Jack Pine 2,000 

Scotch Pine 1,000 

Kemptville Scotch Pine 4,900 

Jack Pine 2,500 

White Spruce 2,400 

Red Pine 2,400 



PLANTATION INSPECTION 

Inspection of private plantations during the summer of 1924 was carried on 
in two counties only. These were Ontario and Lambton. In Ontario county, 
twenty-one plantations were visited. These are mainly in the southern part 
of the county, several being concentrated in the sand area about Uxbridge. In 
Lambton county, twenty-eight visits were made. Nearly half of these are to be 
found in the extensive waste lands in Bosanquet township between Forest and 
Grand Bend. 

In both of the above cases the plantations visited were those consisting of 
over 500 tre^s established between the years 1907 and 1923. 

With the exception of Elgin county, the whole of southern Old Ontario has 
now been covered in this work. 

MOSS GATHERING 

In the distribution of large quantities of nursery stock, the question of a 
sufficient supply of sphagnum moss has become a serious one. Previous to this 
year the supply was purchased from wholesale nurserymen, who in turn imported 
this material. With the increase of output on the part of our three large nurseries 
and the necessity of shipping trees from two of the three transplant nurseries, it 
was found necessary to secure our supply of moss independently. A suitable 
area for this purpose was found within reasonable distance of Toronto with good 
shipping facilities, and during the autumn 426 bales of good quality moss was 
secured. Each bale when pressed measured \x2x3}/2 feet and the supply is 
intended to serve next season's shipments. 



120 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



SEED COLLECTING 

The work of extracting the red pine harvest of 1923 continued until April 
of this year. The method of extracting and cleaning was the same as that fol- 
lowed for the harvest of 1922. The new building and enlarged equipment was, 
however, a big improvement on former years and indicated what a plant of this 
size can be expected to turn out. 

During the season of 1924 large quantities of seed of different species were 
gathered, as follows: 

White Pine, 2,065 1/8 bushels, at $0 75 

Red Pine, 126 6/8 bushels, at 2 00 

Red Pine, 1,048 bushels, at 2 25 

White Spruce, 13 2/8 bushels, at 2 00 

White Spruce, 198 bushels, at 2 25 

White Cedar, 65 1/32 bushels 4 00 

Red Cedar, 6'/2 bushels, at 

Tamarack, 5 7/8 bushels, at 5 00 

Hemlock, 23 29/32 bushels, at 4 00 

Balsam, 11 1/8 bushels 2 00 

Norway, 12 5/8 bushels 1 00 

Scotch Pine, 45 7/8 bushels 2 00 

White Ash, 23 9/16 bushels 2 00 

White Birch, 7 bushels, at 4 00 

Yellow Birch, 18 29/32 bushels, at 4 00 

Red Oak, 13 3/8 bushels, at 2 00 

Red Oak, 33 6/8 bushels, at 50 

Black Cherry, 15/16 bushels, at 4 00 

Basswood, 19 lbs., at 4 00 

Hard Maple, 19 2/8 bushels, at 2 00 

Beech, 5'/2 qts, at 4 00 

Walnut, 32 7/8 bushels 50 

Manitoba Maple, 19 2/8 bushels, at 2 00 

American Elm, l^Vz bushels, at 

Soft Maple, 45 bushels 

Red Maple, 5 bushels 

Honey Locust, 9 lbs., at 

During the autumn of 1924 a drying shed was erected at Angus. This con- 
sists of a three and a half storey frame building, 30x45 feet. A hand-power hoist 
was installed at the front end for lifting cones from the loading platform to the 
three floors above. At the top floor the drying shed is connected with the ex- 
tracting building by means of an overhead trestle over which cones are carried 
by means of hand car. 

Summary of Nursery Stock, 1924-25 

Nursery Conifers Hardwoods 

St. Williams 13,816,900 684,500 

Orono 3,437,900 502,500 

Midhurst 4,754,600 177,045 

Sand Banks 1,137,520 65,561 

Kemptville 275,000 10,600 

New Liskeard 10,000 5,100 

Hendrie 644,700 4,000 



24,076,620 1,449,306 

1.449,306 



Total 25,525,926 



1925 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 121 



Summary of Trees Used in Permanent Plantations 

Provincial Forest Stations 437,280 

Municipal Plantations (county, township) 633,260 

Private landowners 1,954,671 



Total 3,025,211 



122 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



127 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



129 



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1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



131 



00 
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CO 


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Red and white pine, $1.60 per M. ft. B.M; 
jackpine, 50c. both in addition to Crown dues; 
ties, 10c. each. Crown dues onl3\ 


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1925 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



133 



54319 


00 
00 
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<n a 

HQh 


'6 
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03 


Pine, upset price of $/.50 per M. ft. B.M.; 
poplar, 25c., upset price only; spruce pulp- 
wood, 50c. per cord, upset price only; poplar 
pulpwood, 10c. , upset price only; other pulp- 
wood, 25c., being upset price only. All of the 
above in addition to Crown dues. Ties, 6c. 
each; fuelwood, 5c. per cord, both in addition 
to Crown dues. 


Poplarand basswood, $4.00 perJM. ft.B.M.; 
poplar and basswood, $1.50 per cord, both in 
addition to Crown dues. 


A. B. Evans, and 

Emil Anderson, 

Fort William, 

Ont. 


The Canadian 

Splint & Lumber 

Corporation, Ltd., 

Pembroke, Ont. 


- 


- 


o 

CO 


o 


Area between Wako and Hunt 
on C.N. Railway, designated 
Berth M-1.— Kenora Dist. 


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Rates to be fixed from time to time by Lieu- 
tenant-Governor in Council. Present rates: 
Spruce pulpwood, 80c. per cord; other pulp- 
wood, 40c. per cord. 




Abitibi Power & 
Paper Co., Ltd., 
Iroquois Falls, 


Area 

sq. 

miles 


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By Order-in-Council, dated 
16th July, 1924, approving 
Agreement dated 12th July, 
1923. 



** 



PARLlAlviri^I ^iSy|..:?),iWi^ ^ rn^uMrr^ 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Lands and Forests 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

For the Year Ending 31st October 

1925 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 





ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by Clarkson W. James, Prim 

1 '> 2 n 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Lands and Forests 

OF THE 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

For the Year Ending 31st October 

1925 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE^LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by Clarkson W. James, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1^26 



PRODUCED By 



QJiiifed Press! 



To His Honour Henry Cockshutt, Esq., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

The undersigned has the honour to present to your Honour, Report on the 
operations of the Department of Lands and Forests for the fiscal year ending 
31st October, 1925. 

JAMES LYONS, 

Minister. 



13] 



Honourable James Lyons, 

Minister of Lands and Forests. 



I have the honour to submit herewith a report on the operations of the 
Department of Lands and Forests for the fiscal year ending 31st October, 1925. 

W. C. CAIN, 

Deputy Minister. 



\S\ 



CONTENTS 



Minister's Preface 7 

Appendices: 

No. 1. Department Inside Officers and Clerks 16 

2. DejKirtment Outside Agents and Inspectors 19 

3. Statement of Lands Sold and Leased with Collections 21 

4. Gross Revenue 22 

5. Receipts (Special Funds) 23 

6. Gross Disbursements (exclusive of Northern Development shown in special 

report) 24 

7. Timber cut and Amounts Accruing re Dues, etc 26 

8. Revenue from Woods and Forests 28 

9. Acreage under License and Pulp Concessions 28 

10. Locations, etc., under Free Grant Section of Public Lands Act 29 

11. Lands Sold 34 

12. Statement of Patents, Leases, etc., Issued 42 

13. Statement of Work in Military Office (Lands Branch) 43 

14. Statement of Communications received, dispatched, etc. (Records Branch) 43 

15. Report of Director of Surveys on Crown Surveys 44 

16. Statement of Municipal Surveys Confirmed 46 

17. " Municipal Surveys Ordered 47 

18. " Crown Surveys in Progress 48 

19. " Crown Surveys Completed 49 

20. Surveyor's Report, Residue Township of Farquier, District of Cochrane 50 

21. " " Lakes and Rivers, including parts of Winnipeg and English 

Rivers, District of Kenora 50 

22. ** " Drowning River, District of Cochrane 54 

23. ** ** Base Line Thunder Bay and part of Boundary between 

Cochrane and Thunder Bay Districts 55 

24. " " Traverse Little Current River, District of Cochrane 57 

25. ** " Base and Meridian Lines vicinity Opazatika and Missinaiba 

Rivers, District of Cochrane 59 

26. " " Township Outlines along Canadian Pacific Railway, District 

of Thunder Bay 60 ■ 

2/. " " Township Outlines, District of Kenora 61 

28. Forestry Branch Report — (1) Forest Fire Protection 64 

(2) Air Operations 82 

(3) Reforestation 85 

(4) Forest Investigations 98 

29. Statement of Timber Sales 100 



[6] 



Report of the Minister of Lands and Forests 
of the Province of Ontario 

For the Year ending 31st October, 1925. 



I 



LAND TRANSACTIONS 

The general demand for settlers' lands in Northern Ontario, especially in 
the Clay Belt region, continued throughout the past year, though in a somewhat 
less degree than the previous year. Several important colony settlement pro- 
positions were submitted and considered, always with due regard for the natural 
or acquired capacity as well as the financial bona fides of the would-be settlers. 
It is conceded that our agricultural resources are so extensive and the possi- 
bilities of their development so obvious that pioneer settlers are a necessity. 
But until such time as there is a pronounced clear-cut immigration policy 
established by the Federal Government that invites and encourages the hardy 
type of pioneer, little hope can be held out for much beyond a very gradual 
development of the vast acreage in the Great Clay plains that some day must 
play a large part in feeding the teeming millions of Europe. The greatest 
caution is being exercised in checking up purchasers of pulpwood areas in the 
Clay Belt to eliminate the wood pirate. Insistence on reasonable compliance 
with the Regulations is having its good results and numbers of spurious holders 
have been cancelled and the land resumed by the Crown. 

The Supervisor of Settlement, appointed in 1924, has supplied the hitherto 
missing link between the Government and the settler. The effect of the direct 
touch is already felt. Colonel Smyth is applying his many years' experience 
in the north country to the improvement of the pioneers' conditions, closely 
studying their needs and co-operating with them. 

New regulations were adopted during the year under which the area in the 
Clay Belt to which an applicant is limited was reduced from a half lot of 160 
acres to a quarter lot of 80 acres, more or less. The change aims at more inten- 
sive cultivation in areas practically 100 per cent, fit for production, more com- 
pact settlement with resultant improved social life, and more economical road 
building and local improvements, all for the betterment of the agricultural 
community. 

Certain group settlements established in Thunder Bay District and in the 
Clay Belt, along the National Transcontinental, are progressing favourably and 
give reason to hope for permanent farm communities. The newcomers are 
skilled with the axe and saw and appear to realize that hewing out and main- 
taining homes in new unbroken lands involve trials and hardships, the enduring 
of which paves the way for permanent settlements with high standards of 
industry and thrift. 

The Government is doing its utmost to make more happy the lot of the 
settler of Northern Ontario by building roads, using the settlers on construction, 
providing certain stock at cost, making loans on easy repayment terms, estab- 

[7] 



REPORT OF THE No. 3 



lishing experimental farms at strategic points and making substantial grants for 
education. Encouragement is given the settlers in the disposition of their 
pulpwood, by the Crown urging the large pulp and paper manufacturers to buy 
their wood at equitable prices. 

In the various districts wherein farm lands are opened for settlement at 
50 cents an acre subject to the performance of certain duties, 810 individuals, 
less than the previous year by 400, purchased lots, of which 65 per cent, went 
to the Cochrane District in the Clay Belt along the Transcontinental, 12 
per cent, to the Thunder Bay section, over 5 per cent, to Nipissing and the 
balance to the various other districts. Free grant locations were made to some 
535 persons, nearly 200 less than the year 1924, the largest percentage, as might 
be expected, going to the northern and northwest part of the Province, including 
Rainy River and Kenora Districts. 

While a noticeable reduction is observed in the numbers acquiring land 
throughout 1925 from 1924, it must be recalled that the last mentioned year 
was the best since the war and, pending some important movement of immigrant 
population of the hardy pioneer type, it can scarcely be expected that greater 
demands will be made for colonizing areas. Complete tables in detail showing 
the disposition of land for settlement purposes will be found in appendices 
Nos. 10 and 11. 

Clergy, Common, and Grammar School Lands 

The gradual elimination of this class of land by cleaning up old titles limits 
the transactions and reduces the revenue therefrom to a very small item, some 
$2,315.56. 

University Lands 

Under this head $1,517.05 was collected as against $1,290.19 for the year 
1924. 

Sale Lands 

The total acreage sold for farming, townsite, town lots and tourist purposes 
comprised some 117,488.39 acres. The total amount collected on such sales 
and former ones was $100,042.73, about $19,000 less than for the previous year. 
In all, 8,139.15 acres were leased for a variety of purposes and the receipts for 
all leasehold areas amounted to $119,778.07, or $30,000 in advance of collections 
for similar purposes during 1924. 

Military Grants 

By an amendment in 1922, to the Veterans' Land Grant Act, Cap. 6, 
1 Edw. VII, the time for making locations expired and now the holder of a 
certificate has only the privilege of surrendering it for a cash consideration of 
$50 or applying it as payment on Crown land at its face value of $80. During 
the year five certificates were surrendered and eight patents were issued. Under 
the Act approximately 13,998 certificates were issued and all these have now 
been absorbed, with the exception of about 1,045 which are still outstanding. 

The above has no reference to the special privilege accorded returned 
Canadian oversea soldiers of the Great War, who are entitled to acquire, free 
of charge, a farming location in Northern Ontario, subject, however, to all 
settlement regulations, which require actual residence, systematic clearing and 



1926 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 9 

real farming. Ninety-three returned men took advantage of this opportunity 
during the year, as against 131 last year, but because of failure to comply with 
the regulations, seventy-two lost their locations as against eighty-two for 1924. 

Tourist Lands 

The educational campaign conducted last year by various means caused an 
unprecedented influx of tourists. This was reflected in the number of letters 
received, individual interviews given and applications for summer sites made. 

The Provincial parks, Algonquin in the east, Rondeau in the southwest, 
and Quetico in the northwest, were attractive points where strangers longed tb 
linger. 

The wild life of the parks, carefully protected by special regulations, their 
scenic beauty, preserved in its natural state, and varied allurements are being 
given continued steady publicity through the press and radio by those who have 
come and have seen and have been conquered. Choice parcels of land in the 
parks are leased at reasonable rentals under fair building restrictions. 

Our extensive forest reserves were visited by thousands during the summer, 
employing their time in deep trolling for the lake trout or casting for the speckled 
beauties. Hunters found within the reserves ample opportunities for their 
marksmanship and many a moose and unsuspecting deer paid the penalty. 

To meet the growing demand for canoe trips and summer outings the 
Department of Lands and Forests is considering the advisability of employing 
photographic means, in collaboration with our aircraft service, of detailing our 
parks and thus getting a perfect map of all waters and water routes therein. 
The tourist or health seeker is with us to stay and we must get ready for. more 
of his friends. 

Crown Surveys 

Surveys on Crown lands were performed where it was deemed expedient 
for the necessary disposal of lands for settlement, summer resort and mining. 
Surveys were also continued traversing some of the larger rivers and the extension 
of base and meridian lines in Northern Ontario. 

Special subdivisions of areas on the Shebandawan and Kashabowie Lakes 
in the Thunder Bay region were made and several hundred parcels, averaging 
13^ to 2 acres, were released for sale to tourists at reasonable prices subject to 
fair building conditions. 

It is proposed to have land surveyors collaborate the ensuing year with 
aircraft parties to establish ground controls and make photographic surveys of 
certain areas to enable the making of up-to-date maps of certain rivers, lakes 
and streams hitherto not traversed or plotted. 

Water Powers 

The only new and important water power activity in the northern part of 
the Province was that of the Hydro-Electric Commission at Nipigon. The 
present plant with a 50,000 horsepower development is being augmented by two 
additional units, thus enlarging the capacity to 72,000 horsepower, although 
this will not be sufficient to fully meet the requirements consequent upon the 
expected pulp and paper expansion at the head of the Lakes, a fact which amply 
proves the wisdom of those who predicted success for the undertaking when 
pessimistic critics sought to belittle the proposition. 



10 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

The assured expansion of the paper industry at Kapuskasing on the Trans- 
continental also involves the necessity of a large and expensive development of 
power at Smoky Falls. 

The recent gold discovery in the Red Lake District of Patricia may likewise, 
if its actual development, as contemplated, results and permanency of the camp 
is established, lead to additional water powers in that region being sought and 
used. 

Considerable care is being exercised with regard to these potential powers 
and the policy of the Government is to so dispose of them that they shall always 
remain the inalienable property of the Crown and be subject only to lease under 
such equitable stipulations as will assure a consistent annual revenue to the 
Province and business stability to the industries depending thereon. 

Logging and Lumbering 

Although indications in the early fall of 1924 pointed towards a considerable 
diminution in the output of pine logs for lumber and other products, the actual 
operations for 1925, receiving an unexpected impetus as the season advanced, 
resulted in the production of approximately the same quantities as the previous 
year, some 337 million feet, of which 265 million feet comprised red and white 
pine, against 276 million for the previous year and slightly over 72 million feet 
of jack pine as against 61 million feet for the year 1924. The tie operations, 
though less extensive than for the season immediately preceding, nevertheless 
included an output of almost 2^ million pieces or less by about 300 thousand, 
the contracts with the railways having been somewhat curtailed. 

Log timber, other than pine, was operated to the extent of 78 million feet, 
or 17 million feet beyond that taken out during 1924. 

The pulpwood returns from Crown lands was less than last year by 250,000 
cords, there being only 433,146 cords cut, an evidence, no doubt, of larger pur- 
chases by the pulp companies from settlers and holders of privately owned lands. 

Lumber companies express the feeling that, while the past few years have 
not been promising from a market point of view, signs are beginning to show a 
tendency in the direction of an upward movement. Eastern pine and spruce 
lumber producers have serious competition to meet from Western and Southern 
producers and yet are animated with the lumberman's firm spirit that the 
future may be better and brighter than predicted in some quarters. A real 
campaign of publicity is on foot to buy products manufactured from raw material 
taken from the home forests rather than to favour foreign products of less 
durability. 

Added interest is being shown in the hardwood line, judging from the 
enquiries made and the expressed desire of certain manufacturers to provide 
themselves with supplies. Certain small hardwood areas were disposed of at 
reasonably good stumpage prices ranging from $4 per thousand feet B.M. to 
$7.50 per thousand feet B.M., in addition to dues of $2.50 per thousand feet. 
This hardwood, in pursuance of the special Hardwood Act passed two years 
ago, will be all manufactured within the Province of Ontario. 

Investigations are being pursued with a view to determining on the advisa- 
bility of encouraging the establishment of a large hardwood manufacturing 
plant on the north shore in Algoma District, though actual delimitation of areas 
and laying down conditions will be worked out in due time. 



1926 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS U 

Timber Sales 

Exclusive of the areas in the Nipigon region and Kapuskasing watershed, 
where certain quantities of pulpwood were offered for sale for pulp and paper 
manufacturing, approximately sixty sales were consummated, the smallest area 
being one-quarter square miles and the largest 216 square miles, the latter 
being an area overrun by fire a previous season. Fair prices were received for 
the timber under a competitive basis, the upset price principle adopted by the 
Government proving efficacious from a revenue-producing point of view. 

Care was exercised in the offering of timber and special consideration given 
to the desire to provide, as was pointed out in last year's report, opportunities 
to going concerns of bidding on allotments for the continuance of their industries 
and maintaining populous centres, the existence of which depend so much Upon 
the logging and lumbering business. In certain localities, where the timber was 
found mature and deteriorating, it was placed on the market and sold, the areas 
being required to be properly cleaned and all debris regularly removed. 

The functioning of the Inspector of Operations, an experienced bushman, 
has materially aided in bringing about a much more effective co-operation 
between the timber licensees and the Departmental officials. The practical and 
theoretical is being combined with good results that merit the prediction of a 
successful natural reforestation of the cutover areas provided fire can be 
restrained. 

A complete list of the timber transactions may be observed in Appendix 
No. 29. 

Pulp and Paper Industry 

While no new mills were erected during the year except a small unit of 
about eight to ten tons a day on Manitoulin Island by a company who are 
securing their supply from settlers, considerable activity was shown by the 
existing plants, all of which operated up to their former capacity. Certain 
established concerns, like the Fort William Paper Company at Fort William, 
the Thunder Bay Company at Port Arthur, and Nipigon Corporation, Limited, 
at Nipigon, were all practically directly dependent upon the wood secured from 
settlers and private owners of timber lands, no Provincial Crown areas having 
been acquired by them. 

Following a careful cruise and estimate of the entire Nipigon region con- 
tiguous to these and the other established plants such as the Provincial Paper 
mills, whose concession was limited as to cordage, the Government called for 
tenders, the sale closing September 10th, 1925. Areas also in the Ground Hog 
and Kapuskasing watersheds in Cochrane district were included in the adver- 
tisement. A wide departure in the method of sale was made. Heretofore areas 
were specifically delimited and, without particular regard to the cordage involved 
or the lifetime of the industry, certain building expenditures were called for. 
The new conditions invited all interested parties to definitely state their places 
of building, extent of same, size of plant, cordage requirements, expenditure 
involved and labour concerned, the Crown reserving to itself the right to define 
the areas based upon the cordage requirements for a fixed period and to designate 
each year the exact portion over which operations are to be conducted. 

Four tenders were accepted in the Nipigon region and one in the Cochrane 
district, those in the former being Thunder Bay Company, Nipigon Corporation, 
Limited, Provincial Paper Mills, Limited, and Fort William Paper Company, 
and one in the latter, the Spruce Falls Company, at present with a plant at 
Kapuskasing. 



i^ .^ ,L L,, REPORT OF THE _^ No. 3 

Should the agreements to be entered into by the Crown with these com- 
panies be executed before the Report goes to print, they may appear herein. 

In all these agreements the companies are required to manufacture every 
9tick of pulpwood into the finished article, paper, and not merely pulp. In 
other words, the development of home industry to the limit is the new slogan. 

The newsprint production in Ontario at present is approximately 2,600 tons 
a day.. Under the new agreements, to be made by the Government, the daily 
output will be increased to 4,500 tons, this enlarged production materially bene- 
fitting the Hydro-Electric Power situation at the head of the Lakes, where 
additional development is being proceeded with to meet the growing require- 
ments. At Kapuskasing the Spruce Falls Company are preparing to energetic- 
ally proceed with their new undertakings, which involve a large expenditure in 
the harnessing of Smoky Falls power and the building of sixty miles of railway 
and transmission line from the Falls to Kapuskasing. 

With this substantial increase in the paper development, adding to the 
daily output alone over 2,200 tons of mechanical and sulphite pulp and 2,000 
^piis of newsprint, will come an increase in commerce, addition to the railway 
tonnage, a general stimulation of business, the adoption of sane and modern 
methods of timber conservation, and a resultant maintenance of a consistent 
trade balance with our leading newsprint customers to the south. 

Forest Cruising and Estimating 

Continuing the practice now followed for some years, all areas were duly 
cruised and estimated before sales of timber were advertised. In pursuance of 
a policy adopted in 1923 in all important timber limits offered, subject to annual 
licenses, the estimate of the kinds and quantities of timber are specified and an 
upset price fixed, thus providing the prospective bidder a basis of calculation 
without undertaking intensive surveys. These cruises and estimates were made 
through the District Crown Timber Agents. Mapping of important forest types 
was carried on through the Forestry officials working in conjunction with the 
Provincial Aircraft Service and investigative survey work, and in this way over 
5,000 square miles was covered at a very low acreage cost. For particulars see 
Appendix No. 28. 

Forest Fire Protection 

Several exceptionally dry periods occurred during the season that tested 
the fire-fighting units to the limit, but although called upon to perform herculean 
tasks under almost impossible conditions, the staff succeeded in confining the 
fire scourge to limited areas. 

The Air Patrol Service, working in unison with the land force, proved its 
value throughout the trying time by not only detecting incipient fires but 
actually on different occasions suppressing them. The air craft owned and 
operated by the Province has already had a most salutary effect upon the morale 
of the whole country covered by its operations. The actual loss of commercial 
timber due to fires the past summer was comparatively small, as the areas burnt 
w^ere largely cut-over sections, slashed lands, and barren sections, but these 
fires had to be fought to protect adjacent valuable yields of virgin timber and 
second growth. Of the total acreage overrun by fire, but 4.7 per cent, was 
timber land, as against 21 per cent, for the preceding year and 28 per cent, for 
the year 1923. Confining the burn to such a restricted area means a tremendous 
saving in actual money that is almost impossible to adequately estimate. The 



1926 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 13 

expenditures on fire protection were considerably higher than last year, but 
this was largely due to the capital outlay on the new hangar built at Sault Ste. 
Marie, where, under one roof, eighteen seaplanes are comfortably housed and 
workshops, store rooms, office apartments are adequately provided. This 
structure is the only one of its kind in Canada and has no superior on the con* 
tinent, and this, our centre air base, is the only air harbour in the whole of 
Canada classed as A-1. 

In addition to patrolling for and suppressing fires, the seaplanes are utilized 
in surveying, sketching and photographing timber areas and other natural 
resources. The vast areas covered and the time saved, as against the old 
system of cruising large limits, means the perfecting of an inventory of resources 
that enables the Crown to provide for the early development of its potentialities 
and the establishment of going concerns. 

Several commercial enterprises were undertaken by the flying corps and 
the results attained exceeded expectations. The transportation of men and 
supplies by air ships afforded mining men the opportunity of getting access to 
and undertaking extensive development work in Red Lake District, where com- 
mercial rates were imposed and the aggregate receipts in connection with same 
substantially aid in carrying interest charges on the investment. For detailed 
report see Appendix No. 28. ,^ 

Reforestation 

Intensive work- was continued at the three Provincial Forest Stations of 
St. William in Norfolk County, Orono in Durham County and Midhurst in 
Simcoe County, while considerable transplanting was conducted at the Trans- 
plant Nurseries situated in Prince Edward County at the Sand Banks and irt 
Grenville County at Kemptville. The nursery stock carried at the above 
mentioned stations approximates twenty-seven million conifers and two million 
hardwoods. For detailed information on this work and other branches covering 
municipal and private plantations, see Appendix No. 28. 

Colonization Roads 

The amount expended upon this service was S474,409.34, as against 
$447,444.66 during 1924. Of this total over 50 per cent, is directly chargeable 
to by-law requirements of municipalities under which the Crown spends an 
amount equal to that covered by vote of the township. Forty per cent, was 
directly granted and expended by the Province on the construction and main- 
tenance of roads, the balance, 10 per cent., being conserved in the purchase of 
road-making machinery, inspection of roads and bridges, compeiis.iti ):i to 
injured workmen and certain incidentals. 

Accruals and Collixtions 

The largest revenue ever collected in the history of the Department of Lands 
and Forests was that received during the fiscal year ending 31st October, 1925, 
some $5,013,867.85, exclusive of SI 66,808.25 collected by the Northern Develop- 
ment. The total accruals from timber dues, ground rent, fire protection, bonus,, 
etc., were $4,420,271.17, as shown on statement under Appendix No. 7. Orr 
this Woods and Forests Account, including certain outstandings, the sum of 
$4,610,922.53 was received. The sale of lands for agricultural townsites and 



14 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS No. 3 

other purposes amounted to $103,875.34. Rents on leasehold properties brought 
in $119,778.07. From Parks casual fees and refunds the sum of $179,291.91 
was collected, making in all over five million dollars, as above stated. The 
above is a very creditable showing considering the uncertainty of the timber 
market, and the reduction in the number of farm lots sold. 

Disbursements 

The total expenditure of the Department (excluding Northern Develop- 
ment) was $2,845,762.20, or an increase of approximately $250,000 over that 
for the year 1924. This is more than accounted for by the increase of some 
$323,000 in fire ranging service, largely due to heavy capital expenditure inci- 
dental to the erection of the hangar and aircraft parking station. In 1924 the 
capital expenditure on fire ranging was but $86,000, but in 1925 $276,000, to 
which amount is chargeable the cost of the hangar, some $178,000 in round 
figures Some important additions were made to our fire-fighting equipment 
in the way of portable fire-fighting units, hose and over 200 new portable hand 
or force pumps. In practically one-half the items of service reductions are 
found. For complete statement of disbursements under Northern Development, 
see special report by Northern Development Branch, 



APPENDICES 



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[15] 



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1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



19 



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1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



21 



Appendix No. 3. 

Statement of Lands Sold and Leased, Amount of Sales and Leases, and Amount of Collections 
for the year ending October 31st, 1925. 



Service. 



Acres sold 

and 

leased. 



Amount of 

sales and 

leases. 



Collections 

on sales 
and leases. 



Lands Sold: 



Agricultural and Townsites, etc. 

Clergy Lands 

Common School Lands 

Grammar School Lands 

University Lands 



Lands Leased: 

Crown 

Temagami . 



117,488.39 
50.00 



1,798.00 



8,094.18 
44.97 

127,475.54 



115,507 14 
50 00 



899 00 



5,296 04 
490 00 

122,242 18 



$ c. 

100,042 73 
485 54 

1,608 26 
221 76 

1,517 05 



110,136 32 
2,292 80 

216,304 46 



22 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 4 

Statement of Revenue of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 

October 31st, 1925. 


Service 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Land Collections 

Crown Lands: 
Agricultural 


81,205 62 
18,837 11 


100,042 73 
3,832 61 




Townsites 








Clergy Lands 


485 54 
1,608 26 

221 76 
1,517 05 




Common School Lands. . 

Grammar School Lands. 




University Lands 












103,875 34 


Rent: 

Crown Leases 


101,771 24 
3,055 40 
5,065 00 
244 68 
2,292 80 
7,348 95 


Algonquin Provincial Park 






Rondeau Provincial Park 






Bruce Beach. . . . . r~. . .-. . ..-. .~.~. ...... . . r; . . ; . . . 






Temagami Leases 






Sand and Gravel 










119,778 07 


Woods and Forests 
Bonus 


1,565,896 83 

2,669,587 84 

103,247 58 

266,488 13 

5,380 00 

322 15 


Timber Dues 












Fire Protection 












Mill License Fees 










4,610,922 53 


Parks: 


6,931 IS 
1,624 80 
3,790 23 


Rondeau Provincial Park. , 






Quetico Provincial Park 










12,346 18 


Casual Fees 


1,877 35 
219 00 


Forest Reserves, Guides' Fees 










2,096 35 


Refunds 
Agents' Salaries and Disbursements 


5 60 

11 02 

44 50 

25 48 

161,401 76 

1,739 40 

1,606 62 


Contingencies 






Clearing Townsites and Removing Fire Hazards. . . . 






Display at Toronto Exhibition 












Fire Ranging 






Reforestation 










164,834 38 








$5,013,852 85 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



23 



Appendix No, 5 

Statement of Receipts of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 
October 31st, 1925, which are considered as Special Funds. 



Service 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Principal 


Clergy Lands 


274 25 
211 29 




Interest 






Common School Lands 


485 54 


Principal 


876 40 
731 86 


Interest - - 






Grammar School Lands 


1,608 26 


Principal 


138 60 
83 16 


Interest 






University Lands 


221 76 


Principal 


1,111 31 
354 40 


Interest 








1,465 71 








$3,781 27 



24 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 6 

Statement of Disbursements of the Department of Lands and Forests for the year ending 

October 31st, 1925. 



Service 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 








Agents' Salaries and Disbursements 






102,075 23 


Algonquin PkoViNCiAL Park 






33,518 26 


Allowance School Section, South Walsingham., . 






300 00 


Allowance School Section, Township of Vespra . 






250 00 


Allowance Township Sidney re Survey 






250 00 


Allowance to Mrs. J. P. Secord re Cancellation 
OF Leases 






1,500 CO 


Allowance to W. H. Manning re Cancellation 
OF Leases ... 






1,500 00 


Board of Surveyors 






200 00 


Clearing Townsites and Removing Fire Hazards. 






25,769 47 
474,409 34 


Colonization Roads 






Commissions re Sundry Investigations 






250 00 


Contingencies, Colonization Roads. .^ ,.,.... 






2,008 77 


Contingencies, Advertising, etc 






60,818 15 


Cullers' Act 






50 75 


Display at Toronto Exhibition 






906 01 


Fire Ranging 






1,187,506 18 


Forest Ranging 






443,161 08 
4,841 14 


Forest Reserves 






Grant to Canadian Forestry Association 






3,000 00 


Insurance 






5,026 03 


Legal Fees and Expenses 






1,250 00 


Moving Expenses of Officials 






178 38 


Ottawa Agency 






2,652 54 


Purchase and Maintenance of Automobiles. . . . 






178 13 


QuETico Provincial Park 






10,808 62 


Reforestation 






200,389 75 


Refunds — Miscellaneous 






41,691 40 


Rondeau Provincial Park 






11,211 29 










Carried forward 


2,615,700 52 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



25 



Appendix No. 6 — Concluded 



Service 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 






2,615,700 52 
72,527 39 


SUHVEYS 






Unforeseen and Unprovided 


M I-.- ; 




835 00 


Veterans* Commutation 


■.T" 


T~-; 


250 CO 


WoRKMENs' Compensation 






7,005 61 
2,000 00 
1,827 64 


Gratuities: 

Kenneth" McBride and Victor Gilbert 






Statutory: 

F. H. Keefer 








- 








2,700,146 16 



26 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix 
Statement of Timber and Amounts accrued from Timber Dues, Ground Rent, 

Quantity and 





Area 
covered 

by 
timber 
licenses 


Saw Logs. 


Province 

of 
Ontario 


Red and White Pine 


Jack Pine 


Other 


Square 
Miles 


Pieces 


Feet 


Pieces 


Feet 


Pieces 


Feet 




17,728M 


6,157,600 


259.462,623 


4,246,667 


70,401,499 


2,390.651 


78.424,552 



Statement 





Shingle 
Bolts 


Cedar 
Posts 


Tele- 
graph 
Poles 


Pulp- 
wood 


Railway 
Ties 


P 

Wanej 








Province 


ine 

r & Cubic 


Lagging 




of 
Ontario 


Cords 


Pieces 


Pieces 


Cords 


Pieces 


Pieces 


Cubit ft. 


Pieces 


Timber Dues 




46 


169.572 


36,002 


433.146 


2,702,343 


4,752 


236.089 


3,512 


1.703.224 05 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



27 



No. 7 

Fire Protection and Bonus, etc., during the year ending 31st October, 1925. 

Description of Timber 



Boom and Dimension Timber 


Piling 


Cordwood 




Red and White 
Pine 


Jack Pine 


Other 


Hard 


Soft 


Tan 
bark 


Pieces 


Feet 


Pieces Feet 


Pieces 


Feet 


Feet Lineal 


Cords 


Cords 


Cords 


41.891 


6,514,574 


27,438 


1,792,137 


49,120 


4,146,896 


10,625 


21.041 


43,309 


883 



of Timber — Concluded 



Amounts Accrued. 



Bonus 


Trespass 


Deposits 
Timber Sales 


Ground 
Rent 


Interest 


Transfer 
Fees 


Fire 
Tax 


Mill License 
Fees 


Total 


$ c. 

1,630,697 23 


$ D. 

59,396 77 


$ c. 

543,825 00 


$ c. 
102,389 93 


$ c. 
108,547 91 


$ c. 
5,380 00 


S c. 
266,488 13 


S c. 
322 IS 


S c. 

4,420,271,17 



28 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No, 8 
Forestry Branch 
Statement of Revenue collected during the year ending October 31st, 1925 

Timber Dues , ..... . . . .7. . .TT . . . 7. . $2,669,587 84 

Bonus 1,565.896 83 

Fire Protection ^ . . 266,488 13 

Ground Rent ". , ... , . 103,247 58 

Transfer Fees 5,380 00 

Mill License Fees 322 15 

$4,610,922 53 

Timber dues $2,018,072 58 

Interest, timber dues 107,690 26 

Timber sale deposits 543,825 00 $2,669,587 84 

Bonus 1,565,896 83 

Fire protection 266,488 13 

- Ground rent ....„ $102,389 93 

Interest, ground rent 857 65 103,247 58 

Transfer fees 5,380 00 

Mill License Fees ; 322, 15 



1,610,922 53 



Appendix No. 9 
Acreage Under License 

The area covered by Timber Licenses where the holder pays Regulation 
Ground Rent and Fire Charges, at the end of the fiscal year 1925, was 17,7283^ 
square miles. 

The number of Crown Timber Licenses issued for the license season of 
1924-25 was 930. 

Pulp Concessions 

The area covered by pulp concessions exclusively amounts to 39,437 square 
miles, on which fire protection charges at the rate of $3.20 per square mile are 
payable. 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



29 



Appendix No. 10 



Statement showing the number of Locatees and of acres located ; of purchasers and of acres sold ; 
of lots resumed for non-performance of the settlement duties; and of patents issued in 
Free Grant Townships during the year ending 31st October, 1925. 



Township 



District 

or 
County 



Agent 









-o 








CO 




fti 


o 


CO 






C 




nt 




c 




-i-> 


^ 


(0 


j: 


in 






c 


(U 


CJ 


0) 


(0 13 




0) 










fe^ 






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(j-a 


3 


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03 


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a 




a-43 
o c 




o 3 


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• o 






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. « 




O — 


o-< 


o 


o 


o w 


o >- 


d-- 


'^ 


z 


iz; 


^ 


Z 


12; 


Z 



Baxter. 



Brunei 

Card well. . . 
Chaffey. . . . 
Draper. . . . 
Franklin . . . 
Freeman. . . 
Macau lay. . 
Medora. . . . 
Morrison. . . 
Muskoka. . . 
McLean. . . 

Oakley 

Ridout 

Ryde 

Sherbourne. 
Sinclair. . . . 
Stephenson. 
Wood 



Blair. 



Burpee. . . . 
Carling, . . . 
Christie. . . . 
Conger. . . . 
Cowper. . . . 

Foley 

Hagerman . 
Henvey. . . . 
Humphrey. 
McConkey. 
McDougall. 
McKellar. . 
McKenzie. . 
Monteith. . 
Wilson 



Chapman . 



Croft. . . 
Gurd . . . 
Lount. . 
Machar . 
Mills... 
Pringle. 
Ryerson , 
Spence. . 
Strong. . 



Armour. . . . 
Bethune. . . 

Joly 

McMurrich. 
Proudfoot. . 



Muskoka. 



Haliburton. 
Muskoka. . 



Parrv Sound. 



Parry Sound. 



W. B. Gerhart, 
Bracebridge. 



Miss I. M. Camp- 
bell, Parry Sound 



Dr. J.S. Freeborn 
Magnetawan. . . 



David Thaw, 

Emsdale. 



74 



98 
100 



100 
300 



100 
102 



203 
400 
298 
165 



215 



200 
101 
100 



99 



101 
496 
100 
443 



100 
202 
400 



27Ko 



103 



28 



32^ 

5 



104^ 



51 
5 



105 



100 
68 



47 



3 
4 
2 
2 

10 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 



176 

74 

320 



98 
100 
506 



403 
500 
161 
275 
1,409 
288 
397 
199 
200 
100 



203 
598 
198 

155i 
248 



39 
100 
100 
300 
177 
154 
200 
198 



273 
479 
200 
183 
99 
394 
100 



119 
183 



629 
298 

462' 



30 



REPORT OF THE 



Appendix No. 10 — Continued 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


No. of persons 
located 

No. of acres 
located 


to 

(U 

CO 

nJ 

3 

a 
o 
d 

1^ 


2 
"o 

CO 

CO 

£J 

u 
cfl 

Ml 

o 

i 


CO 


CO 

o a. 

d2i 


No. of patents 
issued 

No. of acres 
patented 


Hardy 


Parry Sound . . 
« 

« 
« 

Nipissing 

« 

Haliburton . . . 
« 

« 
« 
« 

Peterborough . 
« 

« 

Haliburton . . . 
« 

« 

« 

Hastings 

« 

« 

« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

Renfrew 

« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

Renfrew 

« 

« 

« 

« 


H. J. Ellis, 

Powassan. . 
« 

« 

W. J. Parsons, 

North Bay.. . 
« 

« 

R. H. Baker, 

Minden. . . 






2 
3 


5i 
102}{o 






2 
3 
2 
6 


300 


Himsworth 


1 


100 






410 


Laurier 






2561 
591 


Nipissing 

Patterson 


1 


100 


3 
1 

1 

1 
2 
1 


9Ko 
4 

100 

4 
23 
28 


1 

1 


100 
93 


Bonfield 


1 

2 
2 
1 


30 
304 

99 
100 


2 
1 
3 
3 


150 


Boulter 






50J 
301 
2121 


Chisholm 

Ferris 


2 

2 

1 
3 


177 
200 

100 
300 


Anson 


Glamorgan 

Hindon 






1 
1 


1 
2 


1 
1 


100 


« 
« 
« 
« 

Wm. Hales, 

Apslev .... 


3 
1 
1 


291 
98 
95 


102 


Lutterworth. . . . 


2 
1 


291 
95 




Minden 

Snowdon 


1 


100 


3 
1 


350 
100 


Stanhope 

Austruther 






2 
1 


6Ko 
54 


1 


100 




1 


137 


2 
4 


354 


Burleigh, N.D. . 
Chandos 






294 


« 

A. N. Wilson, 

Kinmount. . 










2 


246 




Methuen 






1 

1 

1 


100 

2 
5 






Cardiff 










2 
1 
2 

4 

.... 

5 
2 
7 
2 


200 


Cavendish .... 








100 
101 
685 

110 


121 


Galway 

Monmouth . 


« 
« 

W. J. Douglas, 
Maynooth. . . 






307 


1 
1 


92 
110 






507 


Bangor 

Carlow 


1 


10 


100 


Dungannon .... 
Faraday 


« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

Frank Blank, 

Wilno. . . 
« 

C( 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

Finlay Watt, 

Pembroke. . 


2 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
4 


74 
346 
200 
184 
207 
100 
396 


3 


30 




100 
102 


703 
167 


1 


31 


855i 
159 


Limerick 


3 


184 
129 
100 
632 


Mayo 








Monteagle 

McClure 






5 
2 

1 
1 

3 
3 


485 






197 


Wicklow 






101 


WoUaston . . . 














100 


Brudenell 

Hagarty 

Jones 


2 
2 
7 
3 
1 
1 
7 
5 
4 
1 


200 
208 
54U 
258 
100 
100 
1,055 
416^ 
343 
193 


2 


131 


3 
3 
3 
2 


298 
304 
207 
165 


400 


3 
4 


12 

204 

20 




Lyell 


4 
2 


794 


Lyndoch 

Matachewan 


320 








Radcliffe 

Raglan 

Richards 

Sebastopol 




34 

19 

100 


3 
3 

2 
3 


490 
250 
144 
293 


6 
6 
3 
1 
3 

2 

1 
2 


616 
806i 
575 
200 


2 


100 
185 


419 


Algona, N 

Alice 










127 






1 


100 


100 


Buchanan 


« 
« 


1 
2 
4 
1 
2 


140 

205 
404 
117 
201 






190 


Fraser 












Head .. 






1 


100 


1 


116 


Maria . . 






200 


Petawawa 






2 


301 


158 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



Appendix No. 10 — Continued 



Township 



District 

or 
County 



Agent 







en 
















"O 








CO 

C 




O 
u 

3 


s 


en 

C 




tn 




0} 


ca 

0) 




en 


C 
0) 

rt-O 


"-« 


^^ 


a 


nJ 


^s 


J!H 


O, (U 


Co 


o S 


o 
6 


O 

d 


• Co 

o <-> 


d 2i 


°.2 
6'" 


^ 


;z: 


iz; 


^ 


:2; 


iz; 


^ 



Ralph 

Wilberforce. 
WyliePt... 



Calvin 

Cameron Pt. 

Lauder 

Mattawan. . 
Papineau . . . 



Park. 



Galbraith , 
Lefroy.. . . 



Hilton. . 
Jocelyn. 



Baldwin , 
Merritt . 



Blake 

Conmee 

Crooks 

Dawson Road. . 

Dorion 

Gorham 

Lybster 

Marks 

McGregor 

Mclntyre 

Oliver 

Paipoonge, N.R 
" S.R. 

Pardee 

Pearson 

Scoble 

_Sterling 

trange 

/are 



[twood. 
Hue 



turran 

)ewart 

Mike 

lorley 

lorson 

[cCrosson. . 

Tielles 

Pattulo 

Pratt 

Roseberry. . . 
Shenston .... 

Sif ton 

Spohn 

Sutherland, . 

Tait 

Toveii 

Worthmgton . 



Renfrew. 



Nipissing. 



Algoma . 



Algoma . 



Sudbury. 



Thunder Bay 



Rainy River. 



Finley Watt, 

Pembroke . 



J, A, Fink, 

Mattawa . 



Thos. Dean, Sault 
Ste, Marie. . . 
Albert Grigg, 
Bruce Mines. . . 



W. J. Trainor, 
Hilton Beach. 

Edward .Arthurs, 
Espanola . 



S. H. Wilson, 

Pt. Arthur, 



Wm, Cameron, 
Stratton. 



100 



238 

200 
248 
306 
382 
300 



63 



100 
510 

474^ 



1,1161 

285^ 

228 

755 

l,465i 

2,448i 

160 
1,077 
1,110 



160 

504 

1,485 

1,109 

476^ 

l,446f 



402 i 
160' 
1,323 



40 
1,632^ 

425i 
679 

n\h 

642 J 



100 

255i 

2,553J 

l,120i 

315 

749f 



11 



100 
8U 



80 
791 



85?^ 
'739^ 



4 
242 



160 
158 



406«Mo 



2 

4 

100 i 

U 

43 



1 80 
4 ^2-1' 

..I,'..'.*, 



145 



200 



200 

1104 

312 

190 

200 



164 



200 
426 

334i 
1591 



876^ 
336 
337 
734^ 
697^ 
160 
1,173 
1,548 



160 



344 

1,334 

1,189^ 

476i 

938 



402 i 

320 

913f 



2,456 
422f 
726 
82 

1,004 



100 

400^ 

l,274i 

l,285i 
568 
751i 



32 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 



Appendix 10 — Continued 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


to 

c 
o 

en 

0) OJ 


tn 

o g 
6 o 


w 
u 

^. 

nJ 
-C 
o 
u 

3 

a 

1 


•a 
1 

en 

aj 
u 

6 


in 

c 

°s 

o " 


tn 

11 

O 3 
tn 

1" 


tn 

c 
a; 

a « 
d 


tn 

w 

CO .M 

<*- c 

O 0) 

1- 


Aylsworth 


. Rainy River. 


Alex. McFayden, 
Emo. . . . 


1 


146 








73 






Barwick 


« 
« 

« 

« 
« 
« 

« 
« 

Kenora 

« 

« 
« 
a 
u 
« 
« 

« 

u 
u 

(( 

Kenora 

({ 

Sudbury 

« 
« 
« 










Burriss 


« 
« 
« 
« 
(< 

« 
« 

« 

« 
« 

J. E. Gibson, 

Dryden. . . 
« 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 

H. E. Holland, 

Kenora. . . 

J. K. MacLennan, 
Sudbury. 


2 
3 

2 

5 


344 J 
1,1611 
120 
807^ 








504i 






Carpenter 






3 


316 








120 

l,048i 




Dance 




2^ 


2 


1591 


Devlin 




Dobie 


1 


80i 


1 


6 






1 


176^ 


Fleming 

Kingsford 

Lash 








1 


130i 




1 




291 


2 


24U 


Mather 


6 


982 i 






4 

13 

1 


1,050 
1681 
658 

2,004 
80 


3 
1 
2 


396^ 


Miscampbell 

Potts 

Richardson 






142^ 


8 
6 


1,264 
1,023 


2 


2i 


322^ 


Roddick 










Woodyatt 

Aubrey 

Britton 














10 

10 
2 
2 

11 
2 
7 

22 
1 
7 

11 

10 
2 
2 
4 

14 

12 
3 


1,359 
1,600 

239J 

320 
1,577 

160 
1,1511 
3,038 

160 

953i 
1,254^ 
l,597i 

318 

315 

558 
1,989^5 

l,779i 
343^ 


4 
1 


89| . 
4 


5 
12 
2 
1 
6 
2 
2 
3 
2 
6 
8 
4 


742^ 
l,920i 
208i 
160 
820 
235 
' 238i 
480 
320 
703 
1,098 
452^ 


4 


6881 


Eton 


5 
1 


720 


Langton 

Melgund 

Mutrie 

Redvers . 

Rowell 






1471 


4 
2 
1 
2 


1001 
97i 

80 
83i. 




2 
^ 1 


332 
277 


Rugby 

Sanford 






5 
2 
1 


417 
38f 
80 


5 


26/ 


Temple 

Van Home 


1 

4 
2 
3 
5 

5 
5 


133 
567 


Wabigoon 

Wainwright .... 
Zealand 

Melick 






2 

3 

16 

14 

5 


310 

398 

2,531 

2, 2101 

5321 


350f 






400 


2 

2 

2 


22§ 

53^ 
126^ 


7231 
738 


Pellatt 


536 
























Broder 


« 
« 
« 

« 

« 
« 
« 

John Brown, 

Markstay.. . . 














3 
1 


314f 


Capreol 

Chapleau 

Dill 










1 


80 


208 


1 
1 


1321 
160 












2 


320 


1 


155^ 




« 
« 
« 
« 

« 

Sudbury 

« 

« 

« 

« 

1 








Hanmer 










2 


313^ 


1 


43 














Morgan . 






























1 


781 


Rayside 
















4 
5 


646 
685^ 






2 
1 


322 
142 


1 
2 
2 
3 


162 


Appleby . 






292i 






320 


Dunnet 


« 
« 


5 


796^ 






2 
1 
3 
2 


320 
160 
46H 
326 


400 


Hagar 








Jennings 

Kirkpatrick. . . . 
Ratter 


1 
3 


160 
4981 










2 


15^ j 


2 


323 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



33 



Appendix 10 — Concluded 



Township 



District 

or 
County 



Agent 







in 














ii 


-o 


























UJ 


o 


m 




(n 


c 




nj 


en 


C 




-!-> 


o 




J3 


to 


OT) 


(/] 


c 


i^T3 






a> 


CO a; 


(U 
















S 4) 


OTJ 


3 


o 


^"8 


o^ 


rt-O 






a 


rt 


J!6 


O tn 


o o 


o 


o 


O rt 




• o 






. CJ 


• a> 




o 


o-^ 


o 


o 


o 


o C 


O 


^ 


^ 


Z 


'Z 


^ 


;z: 


;2; 



o a 



Caldwell . . . . 

Cosby 

Grant 

Macpherson. 
Martland. . . 
Springer. . . . 



Abinger. 



Canonto, S. 
Clarendon. . 
Miller 



Denbigh . . . 
Palmerston. 

McClintoch , 

Gibson .... 



Shawanaga . 
Wallbridge . 

Airy 

Finlayson . . 
Murchison. 
Sabine 



Burton , 



Nipissing. 



Lennox and 

Addington. 
Frontenac. . . 



Lennox and 
Addington. 

Haliburton. . 

Muskoka. . . . 

Parry Sound. 



Nipissing. 



Parry Sound. 



J. P. Marchildon, 
Stureon Palls,. 



Chas. Both, 

Denbigh. 



Unattached. 



Total . 



535 



469^ 

1,110 

160^ 

312 

60 



100 
249 



6,9643i 



175 



81^ 

1 

94 



3 
80 



22 



38 
2 



1,283 
503^ 
885^ 
320^ 
163 



100 

448 



93 



6,601K| 494168,019^ 



367 



80 



530 
453^ 
637 
95K 



224 
202 



680 



194*>{o 
185f 



49,2288Koo 



No. of lots assigned 221 



No. of acres assigned 29,757 



2 LF 



34 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 11 

Statement showing the number of purchasers and of acres sold; of lots resumed for non- 
performance of the settlement duties; and of patents issued in Townships other than 
Free Grant during the year ending 31st October, 1925. 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


o 


u 

Q. 1- 

vm [0 
O rt 

d w 


CO 

O CS 


to 
<u 

O 3 

• U3 

O (U 

12; "- 


ID 

c 
6'" 


(0 

O 0) 


Blount 


Cochrane 


S. J. Dempsay, 

Cochrane. . . 

« 
« 
<< 

« 

« 
« 

w 
« 
i< 
(( 
(( 

John Bresnahan, 

Hearst . . . 

« 
« 

H. E. Sheppard, 

Kapuskasing. . 
« 

« 


300 
1,735 
4,956 
1,905 

901 
1,288 
1,247 
2,300 

452 

604 
3,016 

2,024 
1,877 
2,247 
1,505 

2,531 
3,949 
2,475 
2,405 
1,990 
2,041 

1,461 
1,943 
5 251 


3 

11 

34 

13 

6 

8 

8 

16 

6 

4 

22 

'"i4 
13 
14 
11 

18 
24 
22 
16 
15 
14 

23 
13 
35 
18 
58 
14 


3 

7 

12 

6 


366 
1,096 
1,804 

934 


2 
8 
4 
6 




Brower 


277 

1,119 

595 

886 


Calder 


« 


Clute 


« 


Coquhoun 


a 


Fox 


u 


7 
2 
7 
10 
4 
8 
3 
7 
9 
9 
3 

12 
9 
6 

7 
8 
9 

8 
4 


1,126 
313 
970 

1,345 
600 

1,138 
489 
947 

1,404 

1,481 
320 

1,644 
1,440 
826 
1,057 
1,210 
1,329 

744 
600 
4m 






Fournier 


u 


3 

5 

10 

2 
4 

5 


469 


Fauquier 


« 


488 


Glackmeyer 


« 


1,387 
304 


Kennedy 


« 


Leitch 


« 


600 


Lamarche 


(( 


741 


Machin 


« 




Newmarket 


« 


2 


315 


Pyne 


(( 




Shackleton 


« 


1 

3 
1 


135 


Casgrain 


Cochrane 


502 


Devitt 


« 


146 


Eilber 


« 




Hanlan 


« 


5 
5 
1 

15 


685 


Kendall 


« 


676 


Lowther 


« 


143 


O'Brien 


Cochrane 




Nansen 


« 


914 


McCfea 


« 






Owens 


« 


« 
« 
« 

Jos. WooUings, 

Englehart. . 


1,785 
5,624 
1,321 


16 
8 
9 


1,575 
775 
791 


2 


119 


Iddington 


« 




Williamson 


(( 






Bayley 


Timiskaming 

« 
« 

« 

« 
« 
u 
u 
« 
« 

« 

« 

Cochrane 










Blain 


« 
« 
« 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 

M 

u 
« 

J. E. Mills, 

Matheson.. 
« 

« 


156 


1 










Catharine 


1 


160 


14 

2 


677 


Chamberlain 


319 
160 
638 


2 
1 
4 


318 


Dack 








Eby 






5 
1 
4 
1 
1 
5 
3 
1 
? 


142 


Evanturel 






154 


Ingram 


790 


6 


6 

2 


707 
320 


487 


Marter 


149 


Marquis 






158 


Otto 


330 


4 


4 
5 
4 


624 
796 
491 


193 


Pacaud 


395 


Pense 


459 


3 


160 


Robillard 


320 


Savard 


159 
80 

794 


1 
1 

5 


1 


159 






Truax 






Benoit 


1 
2 
4 
3 


163 
364 
643 
481 


1 
3 




Beatty 


160 

332 


Bond 


« 


651 
749 


5 
6 




Bowman 


« 




904 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



35 



Appendix No, 11 — Continued 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


IS) 

<u 

Ul 

u 

o o 

. to 

O 


O rt 

6 " 


in 

in — 

O p3 


CO 
0) 

d « 


C 

6'" 


en 

4) 

<*-, c 

O 01 


Calvert 


Cochrane 

« 


J. E. Mills, 

Matheson. . . . 


772 


5 


5 


774 


9 

6 
3 
2 
4 


1,562 


Carr 


923 


Clergue. ........ 


« 


« 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

« 

J. R. McCrea, 
New Liskeard. . 


120 


1 


3 

7 


318 
1,044 


372 


Currie 


« 


320 


Dundonald 


« 


338 
161 

1,641 
320 

1,840 
788 
251 
600 
630 
308 
277 


3 
1 

10 
2 

13 
5 
3 
4 
5 
2 
4 


318 


Evelyn 


« 


5 

3 

1 

13 


801 
459 
160 
2,047 
803 
115 




German 


« 






Hislop 


« 


5 
1 
3 
15 
4 
6 
8 
5 

1 


862 


Matheson 


« 


162 


McCart 


« 


478 


Mountjoy 

Playfair 


it 


1,985 
640 


Stock 


« 


1 
1 

3 


156 
160 
452 


752 


Taylor 


(( 


1,232 


Walker 


« 


776 


Armstrong 


Timiskaming 

« 
« 

« 
« 

« 
« 

« 
« 

« 
« 

Timiskaming 

Timiskaming 

Nipissing 


160 


Auld 


« 
« 
« 
« 

(i 
« 
« 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

Mark Morgan, 

Elk Lake. . 


319 


2 


1 
1 
3 

1 
1 


141 
162 
448 
160 
160 




Beauchamp 


1 
1 


160 


Brethour 






156 


Bryce 


150 


1 




Bucke 


2 
1 
3 

1 
2 
2 
5 
1 
2 
3 


240 


Cane 






153 


Casey 


40 


1 






315 


Dymond 






157 


Firstbrook 


161 

80 
482 


1 
1 
3 






240 


Harley 


1 

4 


160 
646 


320 


Henwood 

Harris 


779 

157 


Hilliard 






1 


160 


320 


Kerns 


161 


1 


475 


Lundy 


2 
1 

1 

4 

1 
1 


322 
163 

160 

632 

159 

158 




Tudhope 

Smyth 


407 


3 


2 


202 






Lorrain 


Neil J. McAulay, 
flaileybury. . . 






2 






319 


Huge! 


John Brown, 

Markstay.. . 
« 

« 

W. J. Parsons, 

North Bay.. . 
u 

R. A. Teasdale, 

Massey.. . . 
« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

J. K. MacLennan, 
Sudbury. . . 


160 


1 






« 




Louden 






Loughrin 

Phelps 


« 


3,225 

3,044 
559 

322 
476 


20 

19 
4 

2 
3 






Nipissing 


5 
21 


800 
3,167 


2 
4 

3 
ft 




Widdifield 


« 


322 

5ia 


Hallam 


Sudbury 

« 






79 


Harrow 






158 


May 


« 


1 
1 
1 


160 

90 

160 


158 


Salter 


« 






156 


Shedden 


« 


120 
160 

374 


1 
1 

4 


280 


Victoria 


(( 


454 


Bigwood 


Sudbury 













375 



36 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 11 — Continued 



Township 


District 

or 
County 


Agent 


(0 

u 
o 

o 


3 to 

vm (0 

O d 


tn 

in ~ 

°^ 
O rt 


CO 

•si 

. to 
o lu 


(0 

C 

Si 

0.22 

6 


m 

cd 4S 
**- c 

O (U 

|S 


Delamere 


Sudbury 


J. K. MacLennan, 
Sudbury 

E. Arthurs, 

Espanola . . . 

H. E. Holland, 

Kenora. . . 
« 

Albert Grigg, 

Bruce Mines. . 
« 

« 

« 

« 
« 

« 
« 

« 

T. Dean. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

« 
« 

S. H. Wilson, 

Port Arthur.. . 
« 

« 

« 
(( 
U 
« 

Unattached 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

« 

M 

« 
M 
M 
M 
K 
U 
« 

a 

M 


989 
315 

303 

546 
290 

251 


6 

2 

1 

5 
3 

2 






2 
1 


318 


Dowling 


« 


1 


153 


150 


Nairn 


Sudbury . . . 






Kenora 




Drayton 












M 




Taffrav 






2 

1 

2 


255 


Bright 


Algoma 


4 


465 




Cobden 


<( 


165 
226 


Gladstone 


« 


143 


1 


4 


673 




Parkinson 


« 


1 


158 


Haughton 


M 


277 
81 


2 

1 








Striker 


« 


1 
1 


160 
160 






Patton 


« 






Thompson 


« 


404 


3 


1 
1 


162 


Day 


u 






161 


Johnson 


u 






2 


429 




Rose 


u 






2 


323 


Gould 


« 


135 
339 


1 
2 








Aweres 


Algoma 


2 


320 


1 
1 




Tarbutt, Add'l . . 


« 


131 
164 


Tarentorus 


« 


160 


2 








Vankoughnet .... 
Forbes 


« 


2 

7 
2 


266 

1,033 
316 


1 
2 


121 


Thunder Bay 

« 
« 

« 
« 

« 
Nipissing 


4,963 
818 

4,044 
896 
932 
640 

1,093 

2,266 

312 
100 


32 
5 

25 
6 
7 
4 
7 

15 

2 
2 




Fowler 


305 


Goldie 






Jacques 










Lyon 


2 
1 

3 

5 

2 


240 
160 

488 
736 

320 


4 


607 


McTavish 




Sibley 






Upsala 






Badgerow 

Bagot 






Renfrew 


2 
1 
1 

1 
2 
2 
1 
1 


100 


Barber 


Timiskaming 

Frontenac 

Renfrew 






162 


Bedford 






5 


705 


6 


Blithfield 






100 


Bruce 


Bruce 










198 


Cleland ... 


Sudbury 


143 


1 






272 


Cook 


Cochrane 






160 


Creighton 

Crerar 


Sudbury 










164 


Nipissing 


160 
200 
192 
162 


1 
2 
2 
1 








Dalton 


Victoria 










Darling 


Lanark 






2 


192 


Denison 


Sudbury 








Derby 


Grey 






1 


100 


Drury 


Sudbury 


483 
628 
160 

50 


3 
4 
1 

1 


2 


160 




Dryden 


i( 


1 
1 

1 


159 




Peterborough 

Lennox andi 

Addington 






100 


Ernesttown 






50 











1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



37 



Appendix No. 11 — Continued 



Township. 


District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


to 

. o 

O to 


u 

O rt 


tn 

C^ flj 
(0 ^ 

■*; "a; 
O O 

. c 
O rt 
2" 


CO 

(U 

<- e 

O 3 

. <o 

;0£ 


(0 

a 
6.2 




Falconbridge 


Sudbury 


Unattached 

« 

« 

« 

u 

u 

u 

« 

« 

« 

« 

u 

u 

« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 

M 
(( 
« 

« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
(( 
(I 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
« 
M 

Total 


180 
560 
161 
129 


1 

4 
1 
1 






1 
1 


180 


Field 


Nipissing 


1 


165 


159 


Fairbank 


Sudbury 




Foster 


Sudbury 










Georgina 


York.... 






1 


100 


Gibbons 


Nipissing 


71 


1 






1 

2 


71 


Glenelg 


Grey 






200 


Gough 


Sudbury 


104 


1 








Graham 


« 






2 

1 


129 


Hallowell 


Prince Edward. . . . 

Peterborough 

Frontenac 

Grey 










66 


Harvey 


171 
100 


2 
1 








Hinchinbrooke. . . 










Holland 






1 

1 

1 
4 


156 


Horton 


Renfrew 










100 


Kaladar 


Lennox and 

Addington 

Frontenac 

Hastings 














180 


Kennebec 


382 
123 
200 
717 
247 


4 
1 
1 
5 
2 






645 


Lake 








Lavant 


Lanark 










Lome 


Sudbury 




• 


5 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


598 


Louise 


« 






100 


Mara 


Ontario 






110 


Marmora 


Hastings 


100 


1 






50 


McKim 


Sudbury 

Wellington 

Northumberland.. . 
Sudbury 






156 


Minto 










50 


Murray 


100 
303 
88 
200 
100 


1 
2 
1 

3 

1 








Nairn 






3 
1 

3 


422 


Olden 


Frontenac 

Stormont 






88 


Osnabruck 






200 


Oso 


Frontenac 

Grenville 


3 


214 




Oxford 


1 
1 


50 


Proton 


Grey 

Ontario 










99 


Rama 








100 




Roxbo rough 


Stormont 

Sudbury 


200 
322 


1 

2 


1 


97 


Shakespeare 








Sherbrooke, S. . . . 


Lanark 


2 


140 






Somerville 


Victoria 






1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 


99 


Tav 


Simcoe 










196 


Tudor 


Hastings 


201 
60 


2 
1 


4 


398 


86 


Verulam 


Victoria 


60 


Waters 


Sudbury 

Renfrew 






200 


Westmeath 










56 


















109,990 


810 


385 


54,961 


329 


41,777 



Number of lots assigned 505 Number of acres assigned . . 69,752 

Farm locations sold in unsurveyed territory 741% 



38 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 11 — Continued 



Locations by returned soldiers and cancellations for non-performance of settlement duties. 

District Agency 
Cochrane Matheson 

" Cochrane 

" Hearst 

" Kapuskasing 

Algoma . Thessalon. . . v.".~. . . .". . . . .7.'.'. 

Timiskaming Englehart 

" New Liskeard 

County of Victoria Unattached 

Nipissing Markstay 

" North Bay 

Thunder Bay Port Arthur 

Kenora Kenora 



Locations 


Cancellations 


25 


18 


24 


28 


8 


4 


7 


4 







7 




1 









3 




9 




9 










93 



72 



Statement showing the number of purchasers, acres sold and of patents issued in Townsites, 
during the year ending 31st October, 1925. 



Townsite. 



District 

or 
County. 



Agent. 





CO 

4-) 




c 




4) 


3 

aw 


CO 


6-c 


O CO 


2"" 



o 



Alexandra 

Armstrong 

Bartleman. 

Bobcaygeon 

Capreol 

Colchester 

Foleyet . 

Gogoma 

Hearst 

Hilton . 

Hornpayne 

Kapuskasing 

Kirkland Lake 

Lowbush River 

Macfarlane 

Missinaibi 

Moonbeam. 

Nakina 

Shewsbury 

Smyth 

Timmins, Additional. . . . 

Valgagne 

Winnipeg River Crossing 



Cochrane .... 
Thunder Bay 
Timiskaming. 

Victoria 

Sudbury 

Essex 

Sudbury 

Sudbury 

Cochrane .... 

Algoma 

Algoma 

Cochrane .... 
Timiskaming. 
Cochrane .... 

Kenora 

Algoma 

Cochrane. . . . 
Thunder Bay, 

Kent 

Timiskaming. 
Timiskaming. 
Timiskaming. 
Kenora 



Unattached. . . . 

C. A. Duvai .' '. '. 

Unattached. . . . 
« 

« 

« 

« 
« 

H. E. Sheppard 

Unattached . . . . 
« 

« 

« 

« 
« 
« 

C. A. Duvai.'.'! 
Unattached .... 



3.47 

.20 

.33 

.47 

1.12 

2.34 

.23 

.91 

26.52 

.50 

1.55 

3.41 

1.10 

.35 

.34 

.77 

.17 

3.76 

3.09 

1.75 

.47 

.31 

1.23 



13 
1 
4 
1 
3 
7 
2 
8 
7 
1 
9 

30 

11 
2 
2 
3 
1 

22 
2 
6 
1 
1 
2 



3 
2 
2 
4 
40 
20 
1 
7 
2 



2.73 



.18 

.97 

.22 

1.91 



.ii 
2.35 
1.00 

.88 

10.06 

2.13 

.19 
1.84 

.51 



9 


1.55 


2 


3.09 


2 


.75 


3 


.18 







54.39 139 115 



30.87 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



39 



Appendix No. 11 — Continued 

Statement showing islands and parcels sold as summer resorts. 

ISLANDS SOLD 



Part or Parcel 



Township 



District or 
County 



Agent 



No. of 
acres 
sold 



Red Rock Island in Memesaga- 

masing Lake 

Island in Clear Lake 

Island in Wauquimakog Lake.. . 

Beechwood Island 

Island No. 34 

Island opposite Lote 10 and 11, 

Con. 10 

Island in Mattawan River 

Pine Island, Lake Huron, Parcel 

20 

Pine Island, Lake Huron, Parcel 

19... 

Island in Lake Nipissing 

Big Island in Loon Lake 

Island in Pine Lake 

Big Island in Loon Lake 

Parcel 28, Island H in Paudash 

Lake 

Island in Trout Lake 

Rock Island in Green Bay of 

Bobs Lake 

Island in Peter's Lake 

Oak Island in Horseshoe Lake. . 

Island in Calabogie Lake 

Island in Island Lake 

Island A2 in Rainy Lake 

Anderson Island in Weslemcoon 

Lake 



Hardy. . . 
Patterson . 
Wilson . . . 
Baxter. . . 



Burton 

Dawson Road, 



Himsworth . 
Anglesea . . , 
McConkey. 
Anglesea . . , 



Cardiff 

McDougall. 



Bedford.. 
Bethune. . 
Foley . . . . 
Blithfield. 
Aweres . . . 
Watten . . 



Ashby . 



Mcllmoyl Island in Long Lake.. 
Island A 1 in front Lot 5, Con. 3. 

Island in Skelton Lake 

Island in Mill Lake 

Avalion Island in White Lake. . . 



North Burleigh, 

Loudon 

Cardwell 

McDougall. . . . 
Darling 



Parry Sound. 



Muskoka . 



Parry Sound . . . . 
Thunder Bay. . . . 

Algoma 

u 

Parry Sound 

Addington 

Parry Sound 

Addington 

Haliburton 

Parry Sound 

Frontenac 

Parry Sound 

Renfrew 

Algoma 

Rainy River 

Lennox and Add- 
ington 

Peterborough .... 

Nipissing 

Muskoka 

Parry Sound 

Lanark 



H. J. Ellis. 



I. M. Campbell. 
W. G. Gerhart. 



I. M. Campbell 
S.H.Wilson... 

Unattached .... 
« 

H.J.Ellis.!!!! 

Unattached .... 
I. M. Campbell. 
Unattached .... 

A.N.Wilson... 
I.M.Campbell. 

Unattached .... 
David Thaw . . . 
I. M. Campbell. 
Unattached .... 

C.J. Hollands.', 

Unattached .... 
Wm. Hales. . . . 
Jno. Brown .... 
W. G. Gerhart. 
I. M. Campbell. 
Unattached .... 



1. 
4. 

.45 
3.4 

.5 

2. 
.25 

1.4 

2. 

1.1 

3.5 

4.45 
1.75 



2.50 
6. 

.50 
3. 
1. 
2.7 



.60 
.9 

4.7 
1.25 
.50 
.62 

52.97 



40 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix 11 — Continued 
ISLANDS PATENTED 
Statement showing islands patented as summer resorts. 







District or 




No. of 


Part or Parcel 


Township 


County 


Agent 


acres 










patented 


Karwartha Island 


Nipissing 


Parry Sound 


I. M. Campbell.. . 


1 2 


South part Island 14, Ox Bay, 




Lake Nipissing 


Allen 


Sudbury 

Parry Sound 


Unattached 


4 9 


Island 413 A, Georgian Bay. . . . 


Harrison 


I. M. Campbell... 


1.19 


Island 498 A, Georgian Bay. . . . 


« 


« 


(( 


.86 


Parcels 11 and 12, Island 510 A, 










Georgian Bay 


« 


« 


« 


4 7^ 


Island 553 A, Georgian Bay. . . . 


« 


« 


i( 


.16 


Island 940 A, Georgian Bay .... 


« 


(( 


« 


.59 


Island 941 A, Georgian Bay. . . . 


(( 


« 


(( 


.11 


Island 942 A, Georgian Bay .... 


« 


« 


« 


.03 


Echo Island, Boshkung Lake. . . 


Stanhope 


Haliburton 


R. H. Baker 


2.00— 


Part Island C, French River 


Mason 


Sudbury 


J. P. Marchildon. 


5.00 


Parcel 1, Island 133, Severn 










River 


Baxter 


Muskoka 


W. G. Gerhart... 


4 8 


Beech wood Island and Island 




134, Severn River. 


« 
Dawson Road . . 


« 
Thunder Bay. . . . 


S.H.Wilson..!;; 


3 9 


Island in Mattawan River 


.25 


Island B 611, Georgian Bay 


Copwer 


Parry Sound 


I. M.Campbell... 


1.4 


Island B 722, Georgian Bay 


« 


« 


« 


.34 


Island B 407, Georgian Bay. . . . 


« 


« 


<< 


.60 


Island B 704, or part of McLaren 










Island, Georgian Bay 


« 


« 


« 


3.00 


Island B 421, Georgian Bay. . . . 


« 


« 


« 


1.7 


Island B 422, Georgian Bay. . . . 


(( 


« 


(( 


1.3 — 


Island B 118, Georgian Bay. . . . 


(( 


« 


« 


2.00 


S.E. part Franklin Island, Georg- 










ian Bay 


Carling 

Wallbridge 


« 


« 


4.00 


Island B 194, Georgian Bay 


u 


Unattached 


9.54 


East part Island D 191 


« 


« 


« 


5.00 


Island C 


Wilson 

Drayton 


« 
Kenora 


« 


.45 


Island F.P. 97, Pelican Lake.. . . 


.10 


Island F.P. 44, Abrams' Lake.. . 


" 


« 


« 


4.25 


Paudash Island, Loon Lake. . . . 


Chandos 


Peterborough .... 


W. Hales 


2.75 


Quality Island, Loon Lake 


« 


<< 


u 


.95 


Middle Rock Island, Loon Lake. 


« 


« 


u 


1.00 — 


Little Pine Island, Loon Lake.. . 


« 


« 


u 


.34 


Big Pine Island 


« 


« 


u 


1.25 


Island W S 89, French River. . . 


Mowat 


Parry Sound 


Unattached 


4.5 


Red Rock Island, Memesag- 










mesing Lake 


Hardy 


« 


« 


1.00 


Island A 5, French River 


Blair 


« 
Frontenac 


« 


6.00 


Island 0, in Trout Lake 


Palmerston .... 


1.00 


Island in Calabogie Lake 


Blithfield 


Pembroke 


« 


3.00 


Island H, Maskinonge Lake. . . . 
Island S, St. Joseph Lake 


Kelly 


Sudbury 


« 


3.00 


Humphrey 


Parry Sound 


I. M. Campbell.. . 


.40 


Island G, Clear Lake 


Patterson 


« 


H.J.Ellis 


4.00 — 


Cameron Island, Weslemcoon 




Lake 


Effingham 


Lennox and Add- 
ington 


Unattached 






.10 


Island B 921, Georgian Bay. . . . 


Shawanaga .... 


Parry Sound 


« 


.8 


Island 0, Wawashkosh Lake. . . . 


McKenzie 


« 


I. M. Campbell... 


2.00 


Island in Peter's Lake 


Bethune 

Sheffield 


« 

Lennox and Add- 
ington 


David Thaw 

Unattached 


6.00 


Island in Beaver Lake 






.26 




101.12 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



41 



Appendix 11 — Continued 
MAINLAND SOLD 



Part or Parcel 



Township 



District or 
County 




No. of 
acres 
sold 



17. 



10. 
10. 
10. 



Part of lot 3, con. 8 

Part of lot 11, con. 8 

Part of lot 15, con. 8 

Part of lot 12, con. 8 

Part of lot 16, con. 8 

Part of lot 20, con. 8 

Part of lot 9, con. 8 

Part of lot 7, con. 8 , 

Part of lot 8, con. 8 

Part of lot 18, con. 8 

Part of lot 19, con. 8 

Part of lot 1, con. 8 

Part of lot 2, con. 8 

Part of lot 4, con. 8 

Part of lot 31, con. 8 

Lot 23, range 1 

Lot 1, range 5 

Lot 11, range 7 

Lot 19, range 6 

Lot 24, range 1 

Part of lot 2.5, con. 6 

Lot 88, range 1 

Parcel 4, part of lot 22, con 

Part lot 10, con. 4 

Part broken lot 6, con. 10. . 
Part broken lot 6, con. 10. . 
Part broken lot 6, con. 
Part broken lot 6, con. 
Part broken lot 6, con. 
Part broken lot 6, con. 10 
Part broken lot 6, con. 10 
Part broken lot 6, con. 10 
Part broken lot 6, con. 10 
Parts broken lot 6, cons. 9 and 10 
Part broken lot 6, con. 9. 
Part broken lot 6, con. 10 
Parts broken lot 6, cons. 9 and 10 

Part broken lot 6, con. 10 

Part lot 5, con. 6 

Part lot 26, con. 9 

Part broken lot 2, con. 3 

Part broken lot 2, con. 2 

Part broken lot 5, con. 10 

Part lot 6, con. 1 

Part broken lot 31, con. 8 

Parts lots 26 and 27, con. 5. . . . 
Parts broken lots 5 and 6, con 

"A" 

Part broken lot, 5 con. "A". . . 
Part broken lot 5, con, "A". . . 

Part broken lot 13, con. 4 

Parcel 5, part lot 20, con. 4. . . . 

Part broken lot 20, con. 4 

Part broken lot 21, con. 5 

Part lot 18, con. 7 

Part lot 18, con. 8 

Part lot 26, con, 13 

Part lot 17, con, 4 



Wood. 



Drayton. 



Ferris. . . 
Marne, . 
Anglesea , 



Part lots 17 and 18, con, 14 



Malachi. 
Hardy . . 
Bigwood. 
Rowell . . 
Jones . , . 
Striker. . 
Methuen , 
Ridout. . 



McKinnon. 



Stanhope. 
Baxter. . . 



Gorham . 



Glamorgan . 
Ashby .... 



Parry Sound . 



Kenora. 



Nipissing . . 
Algoma. , . 
Addington . 



Kenora 

Parry Sound. 

Sudbury 

Kenora 

Renfrew 

Algoma 

Peterborough . 
Muskoka. . . . 



Algoma . 



Haliburton , 
Muskoka. . 



L M. Campbell,. 



Unattached . 



W, J, Parsons. 
Unattached . . . 



Thunder Bay. . . . 

Haliburton 

Lennox and Add- 
ington 

Lennox and Add- 
ington 



J. E. Gibson. . . . , 

H.J. Ellis 

J. K. MacLennan 

J. E. Gibson 

F. Blank 

Thos. Dean 

Wm. Hales 

W. G, Gerhart... 

R, A, Teasdale. , . 



R, H. Baker, . 
W. G. Gerhart. 



S.H, Wilson. 
« 

R, H. Baker." 
Unattached . . 



.40 

.37 

.53 

.42 

.63 

.57 

.23 

.19 

,. .22 

.57 

.47 

.1 

.08 

.11 

.39 

3.83 

14.32 

4.59 

7.57 

5.50 

3.00 

4.50 

1.00 

3.80 

2.60 

1.70 

2.10 

4.00 

4.10 

4.10 

1.70 

1.70 

4.40 

1.78 

.14 

4.34 

4.43 

1.80 

1.70 

4.55 

4.20 

5.00 

5.00 

8.40 

1.00 

2.00 

5.00 
5.00 
4.60 
5.00 
3.16 
9.30 
5.00 
20.00 
5.00 
1.00 

4.10 

5.00 



42 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No, 11 — Concluded 



Part or Parcel 


Township 


District or 
County 


Agent 


No. of 
acres 
sold 


Part lot 19, con. 4 


Cavendish 

(( 

Aweres 

u 

u 
Effingham 

Maisonville. . . . 
« 


Peterborough .... 
« 

Algoma 


A. N. Wilson 

Thos. Dean 

« 

Unattached 

J.E.Mills 

« 

« 


1 25 


Part lot 19, con. 4 


4 50 


Part N.E. M, sec. 11 


1 25 


Part N.E. M, sec. 11 


u 


1.60 


Part N.E. J4, sec, 11 


u 


3.90 


Part broken lot 26, con. 15 

Part lot 9, con. 1, and small islet 
Part lot 9, con. 1 


Lennox and Add- 

ington 

Temiskaming. . . . 

« 


4.30 
5.00 
5.00 


Part lot 9, con. 1 


5.00 








228.09 



Appendix No. 12 

Patents Office (Lands Branch) 

Statement of Patents, etc., issued from 1st November, 1924, to 31st October, 1925 

Public Lands (late Crown) 582 

" « (late School) 6 

" " (late Clergy Reserves) 3 

" « (University) 10 

Free Grant Lands (Act of 1913) 316 

« « (Act of 1901 Veterans) 8 

Mining Lands (Patents) 415 

Mining Leases 168 

Crown Leases 115 

Licenses of Occupation 112 

Temagami Island Leases 20 

Sand and Gravel Licenses 28 

Pine Patents 13 

Water Power Leases 2 

Orders-in-Council 5 

Total 1,803 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



43 



Appendix No. 13 

Statement of the work done in Military Office, Lands Branch of the Department of Lands and 
Forests, during the year ending October 31st, 1925. 



Veteran patents issued 

Certificates surrendered for commutation money . 



Appendix No. 14 

Report of Records Branch for Year ending October 31st, 1925 

Communications received: 

From Crown Land Agents 7,945 

From Crown Timber Agents 4,483 

From Mining Recorders 2,966 

From Homestead Inspectors 2,042 

From Superintendent Algonquin Park 306 

From Superintendent Quetico Park 128 

From Superintendent Rondeau Park 129 

Orders-in-Council 298 

Telegrams 182 

Loan Commissioner (figures supplied by them) 7,769 

Forestry Branch (figures supplied by them) 35,935 

Colonization Roads (figures supplied by them) 3,362 

All other sources 27,382 

Total incoming (Minister's office not included) 92,927 

Communications sent out : 

To Crown Land, Timber Inspectors and Park Superintendents 20,895 

To General Public 19,267 

Circular letters re timber sales and mill licenses 14,742 

Maps and blueprints by Survey Branch 4,500 

Loan Commissioner (figures supplied by them) 12,809 

Forestry Branch (figures supplied by them) 24,528 

(parcels and calendars, figures supplied by them) 5,745 

Colonization Roads (figures supplied by them) 3,366 

Total outgoing (Minister's office not included) 105,852 

Postage : 

Postage for the year, Records Branch $2,487 02 

Postage for the year, Loan Commissioner 395 44 

Postage for the year, Forestry Branch 802 24 

Postage for the year, Colonization Roads Branch 130 66 

Total for year $3,815 36 

Files: 

New files issued. General 3,919 

New files issued. Accounts chargeable 862 

New files issued, Accounts free 289 



44 ' REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 15 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF SURVEYS 

Honourable James Lyons, 

Minister of Lands and Forests, Ontario. 

Sir, — The survey of Crown lands carried on under direction of this Depart- 
ment during the past year consisted of 1,000 miles of lake, river and island 
traverse and 182 miles base and meridian lines, also township outlines, island 
surveys, subdivision of townships, summer resorts, town plots and other miscel- 
laneous works as follows: 

Lake and River Traverse 

Little Current River, district of Thunder Bay, C. R. Kenny, Ontario 

Land Surveyor, Sault Ste, Marie. 
Allanwater River and head waters of Ogoki river, district of Thunder 

Bay, James S. Dobie, Ontario Land Surveyor, Thessalon. 

Base and Meridian Lines 

Boundary line (part) between districts of Cochrane and Thunder 
Bay and base line west therefrom, Speight & vanNostrand, On- 
tario Land Surveyors, Toronto. 

Base and meridian lines, district of Cochrane, H. W. Sutcliffe, Ontario 
Land Surveyor, New Liskeard. 

Township Outlines 

Townships west of Lake Minnietakie and north of Canadian Pacific 
Railway, district of Kenora, Roy S. Kirkup, Ontario Land Sur- 
veyor, Port Arthur. 

Townships along Canadian Pacific Railway west of Fort William, 
district of Thunder Bay, Lang & Ross, Ontario Land Surveyors, 
Sault Ste. Marie. 

Islands and Summer Resorts 

Lakes in the townships of Bedford, county of Frontenac, Beatty & 
Beatty, Ontario Land Surveyors, Pembroke. 

Lake Wanapitei, district of Sudbury, J. R. Gill, Ontario Land Sur- 
veyor, Sudbury. 

Lakes in the townships of Elmsley, Burgess and Crosby, counties 
of Lanark and Leeds, J. W. Fitzgerald, Ontario Land Surveyor, 
Peterborough. 

Lower and Middle Shebandowan and Kashabowie lakes, district of 
Thunder Bay, Phillips & Benner, Ontario Land Surveyors, Port 
Arthur. 

Township Subdivision 

Residue of the township of Fauquier in the district of Cochrane, 
Thomas G. Code, Ontario Land Surveyor, Cobalt. 

Re survey Sibley township (part), E. R. Bingham, Ontario Land 
Surveyor, Fort William. 



1926 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 45 

Town Plots 

Allanwater, district of Thunder Bay, C. E. Fitton, Ontario Land 
Surveyor, Toronto. 

Nakina (addition), district of Thunder Bay, Speight & vanNostrand, 
Ontario Land Surveyors, Toronto. 

Gogama (addition), district of Sudbury, Lincoln Mooney, Ontario 
Land Surveyor, Sudbury. 

Macfarlane (addition), District of Kenora, C. E. Fitton, Ontario 
Land Surveyor, Toronto. 

Longlac, district of Thunder Bay, C. E. Fitton, Ontario Land Sur- 
veyor, Toronto. 

Miscellaneous 

Location of Geodetic survey stations, county of Renfrew and district 
of Nipissing, J. L. Morris, Ontario Land Surveyor, Pembroke. 

Location of Settlers in township of Phelps, T. G. Code, Ontario Land 
Surveyor, Cobalt. 

Inspection of surveys (field work), C. E. Fitton, Ontario Land Sur- 
veyor, Toronto. 

Town and park lot subdivision of lands patented subsequent to 1910 have 

been approved pursuant to R.S.O. 1914, chapter 34, and amendments as follows: 

Valgagne town plot, north half lot 9, concession six, Taylor township, 

district of Cochrane. 
Ansonville addition (Shisko subdivision), south half lot 2, concession 

4, Calvert township, district of Cochrane. 
Victoria (Harrop subdivision), north half lot 2, concession 4, Calvert 

township, district of Cochrane. 
Pancake town plot, subdivision mining claim L-9513, McVittie town- 
ship, district of Timiskaming, 
Crown City town plot subdivision mining claims L-8825, 8826, Mc- 
Vittie township, district of Timiskaming. 
McCuaig subdivision of mining claim L-4438, McVittie township, 
district of Timiskaming. 
Extracts from reports of the several surveyors employed during the year 
describing the physical features of the country traversed will be found in. 
appendices 20 to 27. 

There has been published during the year a list of the Water Powers of 
the Province compiled from the best available data. For information and 
ready reference this list seems to have met with approval and much appreciation 
by those seeking information regarding the Water Powers of the Province. 
The following maps have been published during the year: 
19-A — New edition of Huron and Ottawa territory. 
2 5- A — New map of easterly part of Cochrane district. 
Map of pulpwood and timber limits, Cochrane district. 
Map pulpwood and timber limits. Thunder Bay district. 
24-B — New edition part of Northern Ontario, comprising districts of 

Algoma, Sudbury, Timiskaming and Cochrane. 
24-D — New edition Georgian Bay islands between Key Harbour and 

Byng Inlet, district of Parry Sound. 
24-E — New edition Georgian Bay islands in front of townships of 
McDougall and Carling, district of Parry Sound. 

L. V. RORKE. 

Director of Surveys. 



46 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 16 

Statement of Municipal Surveys confirmed during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1925 



No 



Name of 
Surveyor 



No. 



Date of 
Instructions 



Description of Survey 



Date when con- 
firmed under 
Ont. Statutes, 

1920, chap. 48, 
sec. 18 



Speight & van- 
Nostrand. 



F. N. Rutherford. 



Speight & van- 
Nostrand. 



George L. Brown. 



737 



739 



741 



742 



Nov. 28, 1923 



June 12, 1924 



Sept. 2, 1924 



Jan. 6, 1925 



Survey the limits of the road allow- 
ance between cons. 1 and 2 east of 
Hurontario St. in front of lots 1 to 
5, incl., in the twp. of Toronto, 
county of Peel 



Survey of road allowance between 
the townships of Louth and Pel- 
ham across lots 7 to 10, incl., in 
the township of Louth 



Survey the original road allowance 
between lots 10 and 11, across 
cons. 7 and 8, in the township of 
Toronto Gore 

Survey the road allowance between 
the townships of the front of 
Yonge and Escott and the rear of 
Yonge and Escott across lots 13 
to 24, incl., being the line between 
the 5th and 6th cons., and to plant 
standard iron monuments 



Roger M. Lee. 



744 



June 26, 1925 



Oct. 3, 1925 



July 6, 1925 



Mar. 3rd, 1925 



June 1, 1925 



Survey front and rear angles of all 
lots in that part of block "Y" east 
of the Wilkes tract in the city of 
Brantford, bounded on the north 
by Grey St., on the east by Mait 
land St., on the south by Marlboro 
St., on the west by the easterly 
limit of that portion of said block 
included in plan No. 338 registered 
in the Registry Office Division 
of the County of Brant on the 
18th April, 1912 



Oct. 15, 1925 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



47 



Appendix No, 17 

Statement of Municipal Surveys for which instructions issued during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1925. 



No, 



Name of 
Surveyor 



No. 



Date of 
Instructions 



Description of Survey 



George L. Brown. 



Speight & van- 
No strand. 



Roger M. Lee. 



742 



743 



744 



Jan. 6, 1925 



April 27, 1925 



June 26, 1925 



Roger M. Lee. 



745 



Aug. 25, 1925 



Survey the road allowance between the townships of 
the front of Yonge and Escott and the rear of 
Yonge and Escott across lots 13 to 24, inch, being 
the line between the 5th and 6th cons., and to 
plant standard iron monuments. 

Survey to define the limits of Simcoe Street in the 
city of Toronto, from King Street to Queen Street 
and to mark the same with standard iron monu- 
ments. 

Survey front and rear angles of all lots in that part 
of block "Y" east of the Wilkes tract in the city 
of Brantford, bounded on the north by Grey St., 
on the east by Maitland St., on the south by 
Marlboro St., on the west by the easterly limit of 
that portion of said block included in plan No. 338 
registered in the Registry Division of the county 
of Brant on the 18th April, 1912. 

Survey the road allowance between the 6th and 7th 
cons, of the township of Burford across lots 13 to 
18, incl., and to place stone or other durable 
monuments to mark the boundaries of the said 
road allowance. 



48 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 18 
Statement of Crown Surveys in progress during the twelve months ending October 31st, 1925 



No 

1 
2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 
12 
13 

14 
15 

16 
17 
18 



Date of 
instructions 



Name of 
Surveyor 



Description of Survey 



Amount 



April 1, 1925 
April 15, 1925 
April 3, 1925 



J. L. Morris. . . . 
Beatty & Beatty . 
C. R. Kenny. . . . 



April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 

April 
April 



1, 1925 

8, 1925 

15, 1925 

15, 1925 

15, 1925 

16, 1925 

21, 1925 

22, 1925 
15. 1925 



Oct. 5, 1925 

Oct. 16, 1925 

Oct. 17, 1925 

Oct. 21, 1925 



J.R.Gill 

J. W. Fitzgerald. . 

Lang & Ross 

H. W. Sutcliflfe... 

T. G. Code 

Phillips & Benner. 

James S. Dobie. . , 

C. E. Fitton 

C. E. Fitton 

Rice Ljewis & Co . , 

Baines & David . . 
R. S. Kirkup 



Survey certain triangulation stations estab- 
lished by the Geodetic Survey 

Traverse survey of shores certain lakes in 
the township of Bedford 

Traverse survey Little Current River 



Survey islands and summer resort lots at 
Lake Wanapitei, district of Sudbury. . . . 

Traverse survey of shores of certain lakes 
in Elmsley, Burgess and Crosby 



Survey township outlines along C.P.R. dis 
trict. Thunder Bay 



Survey certain meridian and base lines, 
district of Cochrane 



Survey residue township Fauquier and 
shore of Remi Lake 



Survey summer cottage sites on shores 
Lower and Middle Shebandowan Lakes . 

Traverse survey Allanwater River and head 
waters Ogoki River 



Inspection of field surveys, 1925. 
Survey town plot Allanwater. . . . 
Iron posts 



E. R. Bingham 

J. T. Coltham 

Lewis & MacRostie, 



Iron posts. 



Subdivide townships Echo and part Pickerel 
and Vermilion townships, district of 
Kenora 



Re-survey of northeast part township 
Sibley, district Thunder Bay 



Survey of islands in southeast end of Lake 
Nipissing, district Parry Sound 



Tracing of interprovincial boundary in 
front of Prescott, Ottawa River 



$500 00 

3,190 00 
3,900 00 



2,300 00 


6,370 00 


4,500 00 


6,400 00 


1,388 00 


5,550 00 


7,500 00 


3,500 00 


200 00 


205 00 



34 50 

1,500 GO 

200 00 

400 00 

18 00 
$47,655 50 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



49 



Appendix No. 19 

Statement of Crown Surveys completed and closed during the twelve months ending 

October 31st, 1925 



No, 



Date of 
Instructions 



Name of 
Surveyor 



Description of Survey 



Amount 
Paid 



1 
2 
3 
4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 



Oct. 24 

Oct. 8 

Nov. 1 

April 24 

Mar. 31 

Mar. 27 

April 10 

May 28 

April 15 

April 15 

April 15 

Aug. 17 

July 4 



1924 

1924 

1924 

1924 

1924 

1924 

1923 

1925 
1925 
1925 

1925 

1925 

1925 



Roy. S. Kirkup. 
E. L. Moore . . . 
C. E. Fitton . . . 

J. S. Dobie 

C. R. Kenny. . . 
T.J. Patten... 
Roy S. Kirkup. 



L. Mooney . . . . 
L. Mooney. . . . 
Roy S. Kirkup. 



Speight & van- 
Nostrand. 

Speight & van- 
Nostrand. 

T. G. Code. . . 



Survey summer cottage lots, White Sand 
Lake 



Survey summer cottage lots, lot 22, con. 17, 
township of Ferris 



Lay out a number of lots, township of 
Bigwood 



Traverse of English River, etc., districts 
Kenora and Patricia 



Traverse of Little Current River, etc., dis- 
trict Thunder Bay 



Traverse of Drowning River, etc., district 
of Cochrane 



Traverse of shore and islands, Minnietakie 
Lake 



Survey lot 34, con. 14, Burton 

Survey addition to Gogama town site . 



Survey township outlines north of C.P.R,, 
district Kenora 



Survey boundary line of Cochrane and 
Thunder Bay 



Survey of lots, town plot, Nakina, 



Survey lots 11, 12, 13, 14, cons. 3 and 4, 
township Phelps 



$1,666 20 

201 75 

257 83 

3,210 00 

2,238 56 

2,951 37 

206 20 

183 55 

235 78 

4,858 50 

8,006 02 

388 13 

468 00 

$24,871 89 



50 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 20 

Extract from report of T. G. Code, O.L.S., survey of residue,' township 
of Fauquier, district of Cochrane. 

Formation 

"There are very few out-croppings of rock except along the shores of Remi 
Lake. These are mostly granite. 

Soil 
"The soil is a sandy clay loam. Very suitable for agriculture. 

Timber 

"On the high land which is about fifty feet above the level of Remi Lake, 
the timber consists of poplar, birch, spruce and balsam. Poplar and birch 
predominating. The size of timber being from 2 to 12 inches. In the swamps 
the timber is mostly spruce of from 2 to 12 inches with some cedar and balsam. 

"There is only one muskeg in this portion of the township, being near the 
west boundary. The timber here is very small spruce and some green tamarac." 



Appendix No. 21 



Extract from report of James S. Dobie, O.L.S., survey of lakes and rivers, 

including parts of Winnipeg and English rivers, district of Kenora. 

"Standard metal posts or monuments were cemented into holes drilled 
in the rock at regular intervals along the shore in a manner similar to that 
described last year. Twenty-two of these monuments were planted during 
the season. In addition to these all permanent bench marks planted by the 
Geodetic Survey of Canada along the line of the survey were located and properly 
tied in. There were six of these bench marks including concrete monument 
No. 82, on the south shore of Winnipeg river where it is crossed by the Ontario- 
Manitoba boundary. 

"The survey of the portion of English and Winnipeg rivers completed 
during the season was started at the outlet of One Man lake where post No. 338 
was planted at the end of the season of 1923. The survey was carried as far 
as the Ontario-Manitoba boundary, and up the Winnipeg river to Hudson's 
Bay Company's post at White Dog, where a connection was made with the 
survey of the Winnipeg river made by T. D. Green, O.L.S., in 1911. It was 
also carried up Scot river as far as the first rapids, and through Swan lake to 
the south of Cygnet river. From this point it was continued up Cygnet river, 
through Cygnet lake and again up the river and into Otter lake where it was 
connected with the north boundary of the township of Malachi. 

"The general characteristics of the country along the portion of the English 
and Winnipeg rivers surveyed during the season of 1924 are very similar to 
those described last year. Immediately below Island No. 603 which divides 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



51 



the outlet of One Man lake into two parts, the English river widens out some- 
what, but about three-quarters of a mile downstream there is a drop of one 
foot. There are several islands here and the northern channel is the main one. 
There is a strong current in this channel and it is the one used by canoes going 
downstream as the water is not so rough. Coming upstream the current can 
all be avoided by a lift of less than the length of a canoe at one of the southern 
channels. 

"A short distance below this rapid, English river widens out into Deer lake 
which is about nine miles long. There are numerous islands in Deer lake, 
some of them large and well timbered. There is a river-like narrows on the 
north side which leads into a bay about a mile and a half across, and a fair- 
sized stream enters the north side of this bay. This stream was traversed as 
far as the first portage, which occurs about a mile upstream. There is here a 
well travelled portage which forms part of a canoe route to some fairly large 
lakes in the interior. 

"During the season of 1924 two fish companies were fishing for sturgeon in 
Deer Lake. One company took their catch to Minaki for shipment, and the 
other shipped from Malachi. 

"A little below Deer lake is Deer falls where the English river takes a 
sudden drop of 11.6 feet. About half a mile down stream there is a further 
drop of 0.3 feet so that by raising Deer lake one foot, and thereby flooding out 
the one foot drop shortly below One Man lake, a total head could be secured 
here of 13 feet. Assuming the flow to be 9,000 c.f.s. this head with 80 per cent, 
efficiency would give 10,700 horsepower. There is an ideal site for building a 
dam and power house, and no expensive flume would be necessary. The splendid 
storage facilities afforded by the many large lakes on the English river add 
much to the attractiveness of Deer Falls as a power proposition. 

"A water power reserve was posted here sufficiently large to afford room 
for any power development that may be projected in the future at this point. 
The boundaries of the water-power reserve were not cut out on the ground. 

"About four and a half miles below Deer Falls the English River joins 
the Winnipeg River, the intervening stretch of country being high and rocky 
with a considerable area of young second growth poplar, jack pine, etc. 

"A short distance below the junction on the east side, the north boundary 
of the Islington Indian Reserve strikes the Winnipeg River. There is an iron 
post near the shore marked I.R. on the south side near this point, and this post 
was tied to the traverse. The shores of Islington Indian Reserve were not 
traversed. 

"Continuing west and southwest the Winnipeg River broadens out into 
a considerable lake expansion with many large islands. The largest of these is 
Island No. 716 which has a total area of 988 acres. Three posts were planted 
on this island. 

"Just below Island No. 716 the Winnipeg River narrows and there is quite 
a perceptible current. A mile or so downstream is North Boundary Falls 
where the river falls 3}^ feet in a few yards. North Boundary Falls is divided 
by a high rocky island, the main stream being on the north side. South Boundary 
Falls is about two and a half miles south of North Boundary Falls, and Boundary 
Island lies between the two. The volume of water passing over South Boundary 
Falls is much less than that passing over North Boundary Falls. 

"Boundary Island is the largest island surveyed during the season, it having 
an area of 1,681 acres. The north part of this island is rough and rocky with 
some small patches of clay, but the southerly part is lower and the proportion 



52 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

of clay is much higher. There is a large marsh lying at the end of a bay running 
to the southeast, just above South Boundary Falls, and there is a fairly extensive 
area of low ground in this neighbourhood. 

"Water power reserves were posted at both North and South Boundary 
Falls, but the lines were not run out on the ground. These reserves were laid 
out so that the water power here might be protected provided at any time in 
the future it might be considered advisable to place dams here which would 
flood out some of the falls higher up on the English and Winnipeg Rivers. There 
would be no difficulty in constructing dams here high enough to raise the water 
in English River as far as the foot of Kettle Falls. This would give a head of 
seventeen feet, and this with the combined flow of both the English and Winnipeg 
Rivers would make a very attractive power possibility of probably 30,000 
horsepower. This, however, would involve the construction of three dams, 
and would also mean reducing the available head at White Dog Falls on the 
Winnipeg River by about thirteen feet, which is a very important consideration. 

"Below Boundary Falls the river unites again and the main stream crosses 
the Ontario-Manitoba boundary about two and a half miles northwest of North 
Boundary Falls. A large bay crosses into Manitoba a little over a mile south 
of where the boundary crosses the river proper. This bay runs for a considerable 
distance into Manitoba and there appears to be much low ground to the west 
and southwest. 

"In my instructions,. I was requested to examine the shores of Winnipeg 
River to see if there is a possibility of a water power concentration below the 
confluence of the English and Winnipeg Rivers which may serve to combine 
White Dog Falls on the Winnipeg River with the falls on the English River. 
Such a concentration would necessitate raising the water of Winnipeg River 
above Boundary Falls about forty-five feet, and the nature of the ground at 
Boundary Falls and for some distance upstream is of such a nature that this 
project is not feasible. 

"While examining the area of clay land in the neighbourhood of the Inter- 
provincial boundary, the lines and monuments were found of a township sur- 
veyed some years ago under the Dominion Lands System. This survey was 
evidently inadvertently carried over the boundary which had not at that time 
been produced that far. 

"In the neighbourhood of the Interprovincial boundary the poplar trees 
were stripped bare of leaves by countless millions of caterpillars. These did 
not appear to have extended more than three or four miles into Ontario. 

"After completing the traverse of English and Winnipeg Rivers, the survey 
was carried up Cygnet River, through Cygnet Lake and then up the river to 
the north boundary of the township of Malachi. 

"Cygnet Lake is six miles long and has high rocky shores with some small 
areas of clay in places. The timber generally speaking is second growth about 
thirty to thirty-five years old, poplar predominating with spruce, jack pine 
and other characteristic throughout. There are twelve islands in Cygnet Lake 
and these were numbered from one to twelve and each island marked as previously 
described. The largest island has an area of 212 acres. 

"Above Cygnet Lake the river is very sluggish and flows through a broad 
valley where there are considerable areas of muskeg, but where high rocky 
hills in some cases come close to the water's edge. A short distance below the 
Canadian National Railway there is a drop of 20.2 feet and at the railway there 
is another drop of 9.8 feet. These two can be combined at the lower falls so 
as to give a drop here of 30 feet. A water power reserve was laid out as a small 



1926 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 53 

power suitable for local purposes could be very conveniently developed here. 
Similarly water power reserves were posted where the river enters Cygnet 
Lake and also where the river falls into the Swan Lake expansion of Winnipeg 
River. Heads of 19.6 feet and 13.9 feet respectively can be developed at these 
points and good sites are available for the construction of the necessary dams 
and power houses. At the south of Cygnet River the natural head of 13.9 feet 
can be materially increased as there are two falls, one of 16.6 feet and one of 
10.8 feet a short distance upstream but it is doubtful if the nature of the ground 
will permit of the whole head being concentrated here. The facilities for a 
good small power here are very good as Cygnet Lake will make a splendid 
storage reservoir. The value of this power would of course be destroyed should 
it ever be decided to concentrate any of the water powers on the English and 
Winnipeg Rivers at Boundary Falls. 

"On the north side of Otter Lake, just north of Malachi township some 
cottage sites have been surveyed. Where posts could be found marking these 
surveys, they were tied to the survey. 

"A survey was made of the portion of Hawk Lake lying north of Islington 
Indian Reserve, as well as of the small stream by which Hawk Lake empties 
into One Man Lake. This waterway forms part of a much travelled canoe 
route from Minaki to One Man Lake. This survey was started at an iron 
post marked I.R. on the south side, on the east shore of Hawk Lake and finished 
at Post No. 336 planted in 1923. 

"The country around this portion of Hawk Lake is high and rocky timbered 
with spruce, jack pine, poplar, birch, etc. There are seven islands in this 
portion of Hawk Lake, and these were surveyed and numbered from one to 
seven in the manner previously described. 

"A traverse was made of the chain of small lakes forming the canoe route 
from Sand Lake to Fiord Bay on English River, where it was connected to 
Standard Metal Post No. 293 planted in 1923. This traverse was started from 
the approximate position of post W. 37, planted by T. D. Green, O.L.S., in his 
survey of Sand Lake and Winnipeg River in 1911. Unfortunately post W. 37 
had been removed from its proper position as it was found lying on the beach 
some distance away. There was not sufficient information available to enable 
me to locate this post exactly so that its correct position had to be estimated. 
From the nature of the ground it is almost a certainty that the true position of 
this post is very close to the estimated position. 

"The traverse of these lakes followed the canoe route in addition to which 
a complete survey was made of all the lakes passed through. There are five 
islands in these lakes all marked in the usual manner. This route is much 
used by tourists, fire rangers and others and forms a short cut from Minaki 
to English River. The country along this route is generally high and rocky and 
is well timbered throughout with spruce, jack pine, poplar, birch, balsam, etc., 
with occasional clumps of red pine. There are some fairly large areas of second 
growth of varying ages and in some cases the second growth is cjuite >'()ung 
following comparatively recent fires. 

"A survey was also made of East Lake at Jones Station on the Canadian 
National Railway. Favel Lake and thence north through Keyes, Bert, De- 
laney and other lakes to a bay running south from Grassy Narrows Lake on 
the English River, where a tie was made to transit station No. 187 of the survey 
of 1923. Returning to the east end of Favel Lake the survey was carried along 
the Canadian National Railway past Favel Station to Canon Lake, of which 



54 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

a complete survey was made, after which the traverse was carried down Canon 
River to the Wagigoon River. 

"East Lake, Favel Lake and Canon Lake occupy a long narrow basin 
running almost due east and west between high hills on both sides. The Cana- 
dian National Railway runs along the north side of East and Favel Lakes, and 
along the south side of almost the whole of Canon Lake. The timber along 
the shores of these lakes is generally spruce, jack pine, poplar, birch, etc., with 
considerable areas of second growth, much of it dating from fires which apparently 
occurred during the construction of the railway. There are some small areas 
of red pine from which the best appears to have been cut." 



Appendix No. 22 



Extract from report by T. J. Patten, O.L.S., survey of Drowning River, district 

of Cochrane. 

"In the Twin Lakes country and down the Drowning River about ten 
miles, there is a good deal of old brul6 with small timber and occasional tracts 
of the old bush with large white and black spruce, poplar, balm of gilead, jack 
pine, white birch, balsam and cedar. The cedar is found only along the shores. 
This country is mostly rolling with some hills, excepting along the flats of the 
river and is mostly sand and gravel and boulders with outcrops of granite, 
hornblende and gneiss. There are some patches of good clay land, but possibly 
not enough for settlement, I have seen, though, a German settlement in the 
county of Renfrew on' the Bonne Cherre River, in apparently no better country 
than the Twin Lakes. 

"Below the 37th post there is little brule and more clay country. The 
clay is mostly of a dark, rich nature, unlike the white clay which occurs in some 
parts of the clay belt. 

"The same timber is found all the way down the river, details of which 
are found on the several plans. New tamarac to about six inches in diameter 
were not observed until pretty well down the river. 

"Below Relief Lake the timber mentioned is mostly of good size all down 
the river for about a quarter of a mile from it, then muskeg, more or less wet 
or open for a mile or so back, is found with black spruce varying in size according 
to the amount of water in the muskeg. Some tracts of black spruce in the 
muskeg were noted to be about ten inches in diameter. 

"Down to about the last portage near the 98th post, there is an occasional 
outcrop of granite and the soil is sand and gravel with some clay. Below the 
last portage there is scarcely any rock, except the cliffs of limestone from the 
182nd to the 186th posts. Some of this limestone is very soft and white. Some 
limestone deposits and "float" were seen in the river above there. 

"The soil below the last portage is sand and clay, which in a number of 
places is mixed together. Some gravel was observed, also cobble stone. 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



55 



"The only considerable falls are at the following points: — 

At the 34th post 11.6 feet fall. 





39th " 




64th " 




70th " 




85th " 




87th " 


Above 93rd " 


Blow 


93rd " 


At 


95th " 



7 


15 " 


18 


7 


15 


4 


15 


3 


25 




9 


3 


22 




9. 


3 



"I have noticed that the height of fall at the 87th post at the confluence 
with the Wabimiga River is marked 35 feet on the maps of the Department. 
It may be only an estimate. I measured carefully the height of the falls. A 
considerable power might be developed at this point by using the water of both 
streams. 

"Pike and pickerel are abundant and down to the Tin Can Portage, Post 
No. 70, there are plenty of speckled (rainbow) trout up to a foot long. American 
tourists are aware of the good fishing and two parties were met with during the 
work. 

"There seems to be lots of moose. We did not see many deer. The fur 
bearing animals do not seem to be plentiful." 



Appendix No. 23 

Extract from report by Speight & van Nostrand, O.L.S., survey of base line 
in district of Thunder Bay and part of boundary between Cochrane^and 
Thunder Bay districts. 

Timber 

"The tremendous loss of timber wrought in the past by fire throughout 
Northern Ontario, was again brought home to us during the progress of the 
survey. Almost 75 per cent, of the land traversed had been burned over during 
the last 25 years and on some of the area the new growth has been repeatedly 
destroyed. The most suitable timber encountered lies to the southeast of 
the valley of the Squaw River, along the east and north boundaries of the town- 
ship of Nakina, and on the east boundary of the township of Alpha. In this 
area are some good stands of jack pine and spruce. From Grave Lake north 
to Percy Lake practically all the commercial timber has been burned. The 
young trees are mostly jack pines or less frequently, spruce, now about 20 to 
25 years old and of very good type. Some of the new growth is very dense. 
North of Percy Lake we found considerable good spruce of medium size. From 
Spider Lake westward along our base line we saw comparatively little unburned 
timber. This was probably accounted for by our proximity to the railway. 
We judge that part of the burn crossed was of a more or less local character, 
possibly due to fires when the right of way was cleared. 



56 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Soil 

"The lands traversed by our lines were, for the most part, unsuited for 
agriculture. Some promising clay soil and clay loam was noted in the vicinity 
of Medugama Lake, while to the north of Percy Lake the land was level or 
gently rolling, and the soil of the type found throughout the northern clay belt. 
Elsewhere the ground was broken or hilly, and under the surface vegetation 
we found rock, or the sand, gravel and boulders left at the end of the ice age. 

Minerals 

"The rocks exposed along the meridian line were granites with an occasional 
dyke of diabase. Along the eastern part of the base line, however, the rocks 
were of a more varied character, showing exposures of porphyry, lava schist, 
horneblends, etc. A number of iron deposits have been located and claims 
staked south of the Canadian National Railways between Paska and Kowkash 
stations. We did not note any development work in progress, however. We 
found that several claims had been restaked recently near the east boundary 
of the Nipigon Forest Reserve. Apparently gold was the objective of the 
prospectors. A geological survey of this area was made by the Ontario Bureau 
of Mines and a map on the scale of two miles to the inch published with a report 
of the Bureau in 1917. 

Water Power 

"We had little opportunity to judge the water power available on the 
rivers crossed, but the Little Current River is apparently the largest potential 
source of power. The survey of the river being made for your department 
will, however, indicate what can be expected in this direction. 

Fish and Game 

"The country crossed by our lines is said to be a good marten area. Beaver 
do not seem to have worked there for many years, as any signs noted were very 
old. Moose were plentiful from Twin Lakes to Grave Lake. To the north 
of Grave Lake, however, not many signs were observed. From the Kowkash 
River west, they seemed to be numerous. Deer were seen at Twin Lakes. 
Rabbits abounded everywhere, but partridge were scarce and the young broods 
had suffered severely from an unfavourable spring. Few of the hens had 
more than two or three chicks. The rivers and lakes abounded in pike and 
pickerel, and many of the streams supply excellent sport to the fisherman after 
trout. 

Canoe Routes 

"The Squaw, Esnagami, and Little Current Rivers are travelled regularly 
by Indians and tourists and the whole area is dotted with lakes, large and 
small, most of which are linked together by portages. 

General Features 

"From the Canadian National Railway to Percy Lake, the country traversed 
by our meridian line is rolling rather than hilly. There are occasional exposures 
of granite, but for the most part the rock is buried under deposits of sand, 



1926 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 57 

gravel and boulders left by the retreating glaciers. North of Percy Lake the 
country is flat and the soil is mostly clay, though it varies somewhat, and in 
some places is a light sand or a sandy loam. The tree growth is largely spruce. 
"Along the base line from near Cavell westward, the country is more 
rugged. The hills attain a height of seventy-five to one hundred feet, and 
considerable areas of bare rock are exposed." 



Appendix No. 24 

Extract from traverse survey by C. R. Kenny, O.L.S., of Little Current River, 
district of Cochrane. 

Wawong Lake 

"Wawong Lake lies about fifty chains north of the Canadian National 
Railways from a point one mile and forty-eight chains measured easterly from 
Cavell Station. 

"The lake has 20 islands and about 34 miles of shore line — has clear water 
of moderate depth and generally free from muddy beaches and bays, and could 
be navigated with small boats or launches. 

"A local height of land occurs near the northerly limit of the lake, causing 
the water to flow in a southerly direction through a creek outlet from the south- 
easterly and reaching the Kawashkagami River in a distance of about a mile 
and eventually flowing into the Little Current River via Abamasagi and O'Sulli- 
van Lakes. 

"The shores slope gently upward and the soil is of clay and sand. 

"The timber adjacent to the lake and surrounding country in general 
consists chiefly of poplar and birch to 15 inches and a moderate quantity of 
spruce and balsam to 10 inches interspersed with areas of jack pine— a good deal 
of it below merchantable size. 

EsNAGAMT Lake 

"Esnagami Lake lies about two and one-half miles northwesterly from 
Wawong Lake and is reached by making five portages there being five small 
lakes between, four of which are headwaters. It has 186 islands and about 
80 miles of shore line. 

"The lake is clear water and of good depth, making it possible to navigate 
with small boats and launches. 

"Upon immediately approaching this lake a decided geographical change 
takes place with the surrounding country which is rock formation overlaid 
with clay and sandy soil, 

"The banks are of exposed rock, sloping gently upward and in no place 
precipitous. The beaches generally are strewn with stones and boulders. 

"The outlet is a small river flowing in a northeasterly direction and emptying 
into the Little Current River in a distance of about 50 miles. 

"Timber along the banks of the lake and in the vicinity consists principally 
of poplar and spruce of pulpwood size — balsam, cedar and birch and occasional 
ridges of jack pine, much of it undersized for timber. 



58 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

O 'Sullivan Lake 

"This lake lies northwest of Esnagami Lake, a portage of about three miles 
between the two having to be made. The lake can be more easily reached by 
using the Kawashkagami River which enters it at the westerly side and outlets 
at the most northerly limit, thence flowing in a northeasterly direction, makes 
its way to the main course of the Little Current River in a distance of about 
18 miles. 

"The lake has 167 islands and about 80 miles of shore line and in appearance 
very similar to Esnagami Lake — rocky banks and beaches of stones and boulders 
or flat rock. 

"The country about is hilly and rocky, overlaid with clay and sandy soil, 
timbered chiefly with poplar and spruce to 15 inches — birch, balsam and cedar, 
and scattered areas of sandy ridges carrying jack pine to 10 inches. In a few 
places the country in the vicinity of the lake has been swept by fire, leaving it 
almost barren. 

Kawashkagami River, from Howard Falls to Abamasagi Lake and thence 

TO O'SuLLiVAN Lake 

"From Howard Falls the Kawashkagami River follows a northerly course 
for a distance of about ten miles to Abamasagi Lake; thence, turning sharply 
sharply to the east, it continues on in a southeasterly direction to the west shore 
of O'Sullivan Lake, a distance of eight miles. The banks are of clay soil and 
well defined, varying from three to seven feet in height. The bed of the stream 
is composed of clay, sand and gravel, with numerous boulders and rock occurring 
at falls and rapids. 

"The river varies in width from four to one chains, with an average of 
two chains and an average depth of about five feet. Its fall from Howard Falls 
to O'Sullivan Lake is sixty-one and one-half feet, about half of this taken up 
in the above mentioned falls and Albert Falls, the balance being mostly in five 
rapids. 

"This section of the river is easily navigated with large or small canoes. 
The portages are short, with good footing and landings and easy approaches. 

"If care is taken, four of the five above mentioned rapids can be used with 
fair loads in large canoes. The second rapid upstream from O'Sullivan Lake 
can only be navigated part way, there being a dangerous chute at the foot. 

"Along the banks and the country adjacent, the timber consists principally 
of poplar and birch to 10 inches, interspersed with a goodly quantity of spruce 
for pulpwood. In a few places near the river fire has destroyed some valuable 
areas of spruce wood. 

"Prospecting for gold in schists and porphyry rock near Howard Falls still 
remains active, much work in stripping, sinking shafts, etc., has been done, 
giving fair results as to mining possibilities." 

Abamasagi Lake 

"Abamasagi Lake has twenty-six islands and about thirty- two miles of 
shore line. 

"The banks are of clay and sandy soil, varying in height from three to 
fifteen feet. The shores throughout are stone and numerous large boulders. 
The water is clear and of moderate depth. 



1926 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 59 

"The lake is a tributary of the Kawashkagami River which enters at the 
southeasterly end, then turns sharply to the east and flows southeasterly to 
O'Sullivan Lake, a distance of eight miles. 

"The country about is of clay and sandy soil and fairly level, with occa- 
sional outcrops of rock, timbered with chiefly poplar and birch to 12 inches, a 
fair quantity of spruce to 20 inches, balsam and cedar and scattered areas of 
jack pine to 12 inches." 



Appendix No. 25 



Extract from report by H. W. Sutclifi"e, O.L.S., survey of base and meridian 
lines in vicinity of Opazatika and Missinaibi rivers, district of Cochrane. 

Timber 

"It will be observed on departmental maps that all the streams flowing to 
James Bay drop several hundred feet in the course of a few miles and along a 
line somewhat parallel to and about thirty or forty miles north of the Cochrane- 
Winnipeg main line of the Canadian National Railway. A considerable portion 
of my work lay in this area. It was very disappointing indeed to find that so 
much of this country had been burned, presumably at the time of railway con- 
struction. Fires evidently started at several points along the railway and ran 
north until they reached the steep slope, which, being better drained, offered 
less resistance to the fire, which seems to have pretty well spread over the 
entire slope in this locality. The timber was naturally somewhat larger on 
this better drained land, with the result that a very large amount of valuable 
timber was destroyed. It would indeed be difficult to estimate the cost of the 
railway in the loss of timber. 

"Meantime second growth timber has sprung up through the old slash. 
On the high and sandy stretches this new timber is largely poplar and jack 
pine, although there are some areas on which considerable young spruce is 
coming along. I would, however, consider the spruce regeneration a little 
disappointing. If fire overruns this area again the spruce will undoubtedly 
practically disappear. 

"Above and below this slope there is some timber mostly in patches. Gen- 
erally speaking, the area covered by this survey certainly cannot at the present 
be considered a timber area of great importance. 

Soil 

"The soil is characteristic of the northern clay belt. On the steep slope 
the soil is sandy, but much of it will be fit for agriculture. On the flat areas it 
is mostly clay and will some day be considered good agricultural land. In this 
area I believe that even the muskegs can be turned into agricultural land, as 
they are on elevations high above the rivers and can be easily drained. 

Watercourses 

"There are a number of small streams between the Opazatika and Mis- 
sinaibi Rivers which can be navigated by canoes. The streams will in the 
future prove useful as drainage outlets. We saw no lakes of importance. 



60 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Rock Formation 

"It was only on the steep slope that we saw any rock exposures which 
were chiefly granite. Limestone showed where we crossed the coal river. 

Animal Life 

"This area seemed to me to be more destitute of animal life than any part 
of Northern Ontario I have been in. This may be partially due to the big fire 
about twenty years ago. 

"On the way down the Opazatika from the railway as far as Indian Sign 
Falls there seemed to be an abundance of animal life, but below that we saw 
very little game. Fish are plentiful in the larger streams, the principal being 
pickerel." 



Appendix No. 26 

Extract from report by Lang & Ross, O.L.S., survey of certain township out- 
lines along Canadian Pacific Railway, district of Thunder Bay. 

"We commenced work in the field on May 7th and completed it on Julv 
16th. 

Soil 

"Level muskegs and ridges are about in the proportion of ten to one. 
Underlying the muskeg, in depths varying from two feet to fifteen feet, is clay 
similar to that found in the clay belt. The ridges are in the main clay loam 
but occasionally consist of glacial deposits of sand, gravel and boulders. The 
best section for agricultural purposes is in the neighbourhood of the north 
boundary of Joynt, in the township of Stedman and in the township of Inwood. 

Mineral 

"No trace of valuable mineral was found. In the township of Stedman 
there are outcroppings of granite which show quartz stringers. 

Timber 

"Spruce predominates over the whole area, being scattered and stunted 
in the large muskegs, but of merchantable size in the swamps which are well 
drained. There is also a good deal of white birch and poplar on the ridges. 
As our timber plan will indicate, almost fifty per cent, of the country has been 
swept by fire and is now covered with second growth timber fifteen to twenty 
feet high. 

Game 

"There are quite a few moose in the district but no evidence of red deer. 
Partridge were scarce. A few English pheasants were seen in the neighbour- 
hood of the railway. We were informed by the Indians that fur bearing animals 
were very scarce. 

Fish 

"There are pike, pickerel and suckers in the rivers and lakes and also a few 
whitefish in Lac des Milles Lacs." 



1926 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 61 



Appendix No. 27 

Extract from report by Roy S. Kirkup, O.L.S., survey of certain township out- 
lines, district of Kenora. 

"We reached the scene of our work via the nine mile portage from Dinorwic 
to Bog Sandy Lake. From there we took the route via Flat Rock, Cross, 
Kathlyn, Maskinonge, Little Vermilion, Cedar and Big Lake to Pickerel 
Narrows. 

"There is a short portage from Little Vermilion to Big Vermilion which is 
the shortest route to Hudson, on the C.N.R. There is also a portage from the 
east end of Little Vermilion to Abram Lake, which is used quite frequently by 
tourists. 

"A Watt five-inch and Davis six-inch transit were used throughout the 
entire survey and great care was taken to keep them in adjustment. Frequent 
observations for meridian were taken to check the direction of my lines and 
copies of these are appended hereto. 

"The weather throughout the season has been the worst I have experienced 
for several years. The rain started on May 30th, and we had rain in various 
quantities every day until June 24th, so the swamps became flooded and even 
on the low ground the water laid in pools which made going very disagreeable. 

"Appended hereto are two plans, one on mounted linen and a timber plan, 
on the scale of one inch to the mile, showing the topography along the lines, 
outlines of interior lakes, the various portages and timber, observations, field 
notes, cruisers' reports, index maps, affidavits for chainmen, and surveyor, and 
my accounts in triplicate, all of which I trust you will find correct. Herewith 
is a report on the land: — 

Big Sandy Lake Block 

"This block of land lies north and west of Big Sandy Lake; the largest 
portion of arable land on this block is north and northeast of Flat Rock Lake; 
the remainder south and southeast of Cross Lake extending close to Big Sandy 
Lake. There are some very small flats of lands in other parts of this block, 
but very much broken with rock. 

Laval Township 

"I must say that this block is very poor; it is very rocky and a quantity 
of sand and gravel and some muskeg with sand bottom and a lot of water. 
The land suitable for agriculture in this township is about forty per cent., the 
best portion being on the east end around Jackfish and Trout Lakes and north 
as far as the second mile post. There is a flat about the middle of the block 
on the north as well as a block on the west side extending southeast. 

Two Miles North of Laval Township 

"Two miles north of Laval this land is somewhat better, fifty per cent, of 
it being fairly good, as far as white clay and clay loam goes together with a 
quantity of muskeg. The remainder of this land is broken with rock and is 
useless. 



62 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Two Miles West of Laval Township 

"In this part the land is rolHng with flats of clay and sandy loam, and low- 
land with a clay bottom. The remainder is very rocky and would be useless. 

Echo Township 

"This township is somewhat better; the percentage of agricultural land 
being about seventy-five per cent., it consisting of white clay and clay loam 
and a small portion in the southwest corner all rock. In the southeast the land 
is rolling and broken. In the northwest there is muskeg and a small portion of 
it is sandy, the remainder is fairly good with some rock scattered over it. 

Two Miles West of Echo Township 

"There is sixty- five per cent, of agricultural land and the southeast corner 
is very rocky, with some wet muskeg. Philcut Lake and west is good clay 
loam, with some small patches of rock. About one-third of the agricultural land 
is covered with twelve-inch black muck with a clay bottom. The extreme 
north is sand and gravel, the rest being rock. 

Lomond Township 

"There is fifty per cent, of the land in this township fit for agriculture. 
It is situated in the southeast corner and consists of white clay and clay loam, 
with small flats of low land, with a surface of black earth 10 inches deep with 
a clay bottom. On the east side of the north line some small flats broken with 
rock and sand. (There is some good land north of Vermilion Lake broken with 
rock.) 

Two Miles West of Lomond Township 

"About thirty per cent, of the land is arable, but is badly scattered and 
broken with rock and would be useless for farming. The arable land consists 
of small flats of white clay and clay loam ; the remaining part of the township 
is very rocky. 

Vermilion Township 

"South of Little Vermilion Lake there is about seventy per cent, of the 
land fit for agriculture. The land is clay loam, with some low land and clay 
bottom ; the remainder is rocky, with a small quantity of muskeg with a sandy 
bottom. North of Little Vermilion Lake the land is very rocky, there being 
not more than twenty-five per cent, of it fit for agricultural purposes. The 
flats northwest of Close Lake are fairly good. The land is mostly clay loam 
and the rest is very rocky. 

Two Miles West of Vermilion Township 

"The land two miles south of Little Vermilion is fairly good, there being 
about seventy-five per cent, of it agricultural. This is composed of rolling laCTid, 
white clay and clay loam, some low land with clay bottom. The remainder ot 
the territory is rock and swamp. 



1926 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 63 

Jordan Township 

"There is about thirty-five per cent, of the land in this township fit for 
agriculture, the main portion of it is on the west side, extending north to Ver- 
milion Lake. The remaining portion is in very small flats, with the south and 
eastern portion of this block very rocky 

Two Miles North of Jordan Township 

"The agricultural land in this portion is about twenty per cent, of the 
block and is of very little use, for it is in very small patches, very rocky and 
therefore no use for farming. 

Two Miles East of Jordan Township 

"The agricultural land forms about twenty per cent, and is in very small 
patches, mostly all in the northeast corner, extending to Poplar Portage. It 
chiefly consists of sandy loam, the balance being flat rock with high rocky 
ridges." 



64 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Appendix No. 28 

REPORT OF THE FORESTRY BRANCH, 1925 

Sir, — The report of the work of this Branch for the year ending October 
31st, 1925, is given under the sections of Forest Fire Protection, Air Operations, 
Reforestation and Forest Investigation. 

I. Forest Fire Protection 
(1) Legislation 

The Forest Fires Prevention Act, 1917, was further amended by adding 
thereto a clause empowering the reeve or deputy reeve of a township to summon 
assistance to fight forest fires within the township, the remuneration to be paid 
to fire fighters to be as fixed by a by-law passed by the municipal council of the 
township, or in the absence of such by-law the remuneration to be such as 
seems just and reasonable in the judgment of the Judge of the county or district 
in which the township is situate. 

An amendment requiring care in setting out fire within the fire districts 
io^ any purpose whatever after the end of the close season, September 30th, 
seems advisable. 

(2) Organization and Personnel 

In the Western Inspectorate, under the supervision of a forest supervisor 
with headquarters at Port Arthur, a change was made in the boundary between 
the C.G.R. West and Kenora Chief Ranger Districts, the territory north of the 
Canadian National Railways between Favel and the Manitoba boundary being 
transferred from the C.G.R. West to the Kenora District. Apart from this 
one change the organization in the Inspectorate was the same as in 1924, there ^ 
being six Chief Ranger Districts: C.G.R. West with headquarters at Sioux 
Lookout; C.G.R. Central with headquarters at Armstrong; Kenora with head- 
quarters at Kenora; Rainy River with headquarters at Fort Frances; Thunder 
Bay with headquarters at Port Arthur, and Nipigon with headquarters at 
Macdiarmid. 

The Oba Inspectorate, a new Inspectorate formed by a combination of 
V parts of the Soo and Cochrane Inspectorates, was under the direct supervision 
^ of a Fire Inspector, assisted by one Assistant Fire Inspector, with headquarters 
at Oba. The Inspectorate consisted of five Chief Ranger Districts: C.G.R. 
East with headquarters at Nakina; Hearst with headquarters at Hearst; <p 
Longlac with headquarters at Longlac; Franz with headquarters at Franz, and 
Oba with headquarters at Oba. The C.G.R. East and Hearst Chief Ranger 
Districts were previously in the Cochrane Inspectorate and the Longlac, Franz 
and Oba Chief Ranger Districts in the Soo Inspectorate. 

The Cochrane Inspectorate, under the supervision of a Fire Inspector with 
headquarters at Cochrane, was divided into six Chief Ranger Districts: Kapus- , 
kasing with headquarters at Kapuskasing; Cochrane with headquarters at ^ 
Cochrane; Abitibi with headquarters at Lowbush; Matheson with head- 
quarters at Matheson; Timmins with headquarters at Timmins, and New 
Liskeard with headquarters at Englehart instead of at New Liskeard as formerly. 
The Soo Inspectorate, under the direct supervision of a District Forester 
with headquarters at Sault Ste. Marie, was divided into three Chief Ranger u^ 
Districts: A.C.R. with headquarters at Sand Lake; Blind River with head- 
quarters at Blind River, and Mississagi South with headquarters at Kendi- 
ogami Lake. 



1926 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 65 

The Sudbury Inspectorate, with headquarters at Sudbury, was under the 
direct supervision of a District Forester, who was assisted by three Foresters, 
one of whom was in charge of the North Bay Chief Ranger District, and one in 
charge of the the Sudbury North and Sudbury South Chief Ranger Districts, 
and by two Fire Inspectors, one of whom also acted as Chief Ranger in the 
Foleyet East Chief Ranger District. There were eleven Chief Ranger Districts 
in the Inspectorate: Foleyet West with headquarters at Elsas; Foleyet East 
with headquarters at Gogama; Mississagi West with headquarters at Chapleau; 
Mississagi East with headquarters at Biscotasing; Webbwood with head- 
quarters at Nairn; Sudbury North with headquarters at Skead; Sudbury South 
with headquarters at Sudbury; North Bay with headquarters at North Bay; 
Temagami West with headquarters at Mattagami Post; Temagami North with 
headquarters at Elk Lake, and Temagami East with headquarters at Tema- 
gami. The Mississagi West District was enlarged somewhat by the addition 
of some territory on the west from the A.C.R. and Franz Districts. 

The Georgian Bay Inspectorate, with headquarters at Parry Sound, was 
directly supervised by a District Forester assisted by one Forestry Assistant, 
The Inspectorate was divided into two Chief Ranger Districts instead of three 
as in the year previous: Georgian Bay West with headquarters at Parry Sound, 
and Geor^Lian Bay East with headquarters at Powassan. 

The Algonquin Inspectorate was under the direct supervision of a District 
Forester assisted by a Forestry Assistant, the headquarters being at Pembroke. 
There were two Chief Ranger Districts, Algonquin North with headquarters 
at Pembroke, and Algonquin South with headquarters at Brule Lake. 

The Trent Inspectorate, with headquarters at Tweed, was directly super- 
vised by a District Forester assisted by a Forestry Assistant. There was one 
Chief Ranger District, Trent, with headquarters at Dacre. 

The total field supervisory staff for the eight inspectorates, which were 
divided into thirty-six Chief Ranger Districts, consisted of eleven technical 
foresters, one Forest Supervisor, four Fire Inspectors, one Assistant Fire Inspec- 
tor, thirty-six Chief Rangers and ninety-one Deputy Chief Rangers. This 
allowed direct supervision of one Chief or Deputy Chief Ranger to an average 
of every six rangers. 

The average daily force, including the Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers, 
was as follows: April, 91; May, 627; June, 840; July, 849; August, 844; 
September, 726; October, 96. The largest number of men on duty at any one 
time, including 127 Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers, was 853. 

Including the Chief and Deputy Chief Rangers there were 24 men on 
duty on the Istday of April. By the 15th of the month the number had increased 
to 62, and by the 1st of May to 264. On the 15th of May the total number was 
648; on the 1st of June, 822; on the 15th of June, 842; on the 1st of July, 847; 
on the 15th of July, 848; on the 1st of August, 845; on the 15th of August, 
841; on the first of September, 835; on the 15th of September, 806. During 
the latter part of September it was possible to discontinue the patrols in most 
of the outlying districts, so that by the end of the month the total number of 
men on duty had been reduced to 377. There were 82 men on duty on October 
15th and 25 at the end of the month. 

(3) Expenditures 

The total expenditure for the year was $1,261,309.74, less $80,000 trans- 
ferred to a charge against Forest Ranging to cover air operations in connection 
with that work, leaving the actual charge against Forest Protection at $1,181,- 
309.74. The amount of fire tax collected for the year was $266,488.13. 

3 LF 



66 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



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1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



67 



(4) Fires 

During the autumn of 1924 the Province as a whole had a small amount 
of rainfall and when freeze-up came the amount of moisture in the soil was 
abnormally small, the water in the rivers and lakes generally was low and 
there was little in the swamps. The following winter was accompanied by 
a light snowfall in all but the more northerly portions of the Province. 
The spring of 1925 was early except in the Cochrane and parts of the Oba 
and Western Inspectorates and this coupled with the dry conditions of 
the soil resulted in a serious fire hazard in some districts during April and 
May. The hazard in June and July was low due to the frequent rains and 
heavy growth of green vegetation. From the 6th of August, however, until 
nearly the middle of September the weather was particularly hot and dry in 
the southern parts of the Soo and Sudbury Inspectorates and in all parts of 
the Georgian Bay, Algonquin and Trent Inspectorates, resulting in the occur- 
rence of a large number of fires in these areas. 

In the Cochrane Inspectorate, with an area of over 18,000,000 acres, only 
twelve fires were reported for the whole season but the weather was ab- 
normally wet over the entire Inspectorate, the records showing some precipita- 
tion on 53 per cent, of the days between the 1st of May and the last of 
September. 



CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 
By Month 



Month 


1925 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 




No. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


April 


152 

307 

65 

48 

437 

135 

5 


13.2 

26.7 

5.7 

4.2 

38.0 

11.8 

0.4 


9.3 

23.1 

29.1 

14.0 

7.2 

5.9 

6.2 

5.2 


0.8 
34.4 
27.8 
21.1 
11.5 
1.6 
2.8 


3.4 
27.4 
19.0 

7.5 
20.8 
11.9 
10.0 


0.4 

23.3 

22.9 

37.4 

7.6 

8.3 

0.1 






May 


*32.8 
24.0 
11.0 
23.3 

**8.9 


20.3 


June 


23.3 


July 


34 4 


August 


21.2 


September 

October 


0.8 


November 






















Totals 


1,149 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



*April and May. 
**September and October. 



By Origin 



Origin 


1925 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 




No. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Settlers 


170 

318 
128 
136 
63 
118 
216 


14.8 
27.7 
11.1 
11.8 
5.5 
10.3 
18.8 


15.4 

16.5 

16.5 

3.3 

7.1 

9.0 

32.2 


12.7 
12.4 
18.5 

5.5 

4.3 

5.7 

40.9 


16.1 

11.9 

16.3 

5.1 

4.1 

0.8 

45.7 


9.6 

8.8 

14.8 

11.0 

5.0 

1.1 

49.7 


11.0 

11.7 

23.9 

1.1 

4.6 

7.2 

40.5 


7.7 


Campers 


9.2 


Railways 


37.0 


Lightning 

Logging operations. 

Miscellaneous 

Unknown 


3.0 

2.5 

4.3 

36.3 






Totals 


1,149 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



68 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 
By Size 



Size 


1925 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 




No. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 

cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 

cent. 


Per 

cent. 


Per 

cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Quarter acre and under 


352 

407 

75 

167 

81 

28 

36 

3 


30.6 
35.4 
6.5 
14.5 
7.1 
2.5 
3.1 
0.3 


31.0 
35.1 
6.7 
17.8 
5.9 
1.4 
1.5 
0.6 


15.1 

26.1 

8.4 

19.8 

14.3 

5.0 

8.4 

2.9 


23.7 

29.1 

6.3 

19.2 

12.6 

3.6 

4.9 

0.6 


20.8 

24.0 

6.8 

20.4 

13.3 

5.5 

8.1 

1.1 


23.2 

29.4 

8.1 

17.1 

12.0 

5.0 

4.9 

0.3 


30.5 


Over quarter to 5 acres 


27.7 


Over 5 to 10 acres 


6.1 


Over 10 to 100 acres 


16.5 


Over 100 to 500 acres 


8.7 


Over 500 to 1,000 acres 


3.3 


Over 1,000 to 10,000 acres 


5.9 


Over 10,000 acres 


1.3 






Totals 


1,149 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 







1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



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1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



71 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF RAILWAY FIRES PER HUNDRED MILES OF LINE 
THROUGH FOREST SECTIONS 



Railway 



1925 



1924 



1923 



1922 



1921 



Canadian National Railways (exclusive of 



Canadian Pacific Railway 

Canadian National Railways (northern trans- 
continental line only) 

Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway.. . 

Algoma Eastern Railway 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 

Nipissing Central Railway 

Miscellaneous Private Railways 



2.4 
2.4 

0.3 
1.1 
9.4 
6.1 



3.3 
2.0 

0.5 

3.7 
8.2 
4.5 



6.2 

5.3 

2.0 
7.3 
1.1 
3.0 



7.7 
2.4 



2.7 



4.9 



*3.2 
2.7 

2.4 
7.3 
4.5 
4.2 



3.3 



♦3.7 
3.9 

1.8 
6.3 
5.9 
0.6 



3.7 



♦Former C.N.R. and G.T.R. figures combined. 



Railway 


Per cent, of Total Number of 
Railway Fires 




1925 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


Canadian National Railways (exclusive of 
northern line) 


38.3 
29.7 

1.6 

3.1 

6.2 

15.6 


50.3 
21.9 

3.0 

8.8 

5.1 

10.9 


45.9 
32.5 

7.6 
9.6 
0.4 
4.0 


♦36.1 
25.3 

13.3 

14.5 

2.4 

8.4 


♦47.9 
29.8 

7.9 

10.6 

2.8 

1.0 


♦36.4 
27.9 

16.4 
9.9 
5.0 
4.4 


♦28 1 


Canadian Pacific Railway 


26 3 


Canadian National Railways (northern 
transcontinental line only) 


25 9 


Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway 
Algoma Eastern Railway 


17.9 
3 


Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway. . 
Nipissing Central Railway 


1.5 


Miscellaneous Private Railways 


5.5 






























100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



♦Former C.N.R. and G.T.R. figures combined. 



CLASSIFICATION OF BURNED-OVER AREA 



Forest Conditions 


1925 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


Acres 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
ceni. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Per 
cent. 


Timber land 


10,189 
35,143 
56,555 
87,656 


5.4 
18.5 
29.8 
46.3 


21.0 
15.9 
32.6 
30.5 


28.0 
14.7 
36.6 
20.7 


13.4 
20.2 
25.2 
41.2 


13.2 

25.2 
20.2 
41.1 


14.7 
38.8 
26.7 
19.8 


26 8 


Cut-over land (some timber left) . 
Young growth (below six inches) . 
Barren and grass land 


37.0 
23.5 
23 7 






Totals 


189,543 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100 







72 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



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1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



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74 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



(5) Permits 

The number of burning permits issued during the season was considerably 
in excess of the number for the previous year, as was to be expected, the season 
of 1924 being so wet in some districts as to make slash burning impossible. 
The increase in the number of new settlers has a direct influence upon the number 
of permits issued, but the greatest influence is probably through the efforts of 
the field staff in educating the settlers to the use and benefits of the system. 

While the number of permits issued and the area covered by these permits 
was greater than in the previous season, there was actually less burning done 
because of the extremely wet weather in the Clay Belt. Hundreds of permits 
issued were never used and there are now slash accumulations of two years 
to be burned at the first favourable opportunity. Unless this burning is carried 
out with the utmost caution it will be accompanied by the gravest of fire hazards. 



STATEMENT OF PERMITS ISSUED 



District 


Number of Permits 




1925 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


C.G.R. West 


99 


70 

1 

128 

16 
100 


28 


23 




1 


8 


C.G.R. Central 


1 


Kenora 


3 
19 

235 


362 
216 
139 


180 
39 
59 


128 
3 


53 

5 


68 


Rainy River 


8 


Thunder Bay 




Nipigon 








C.G.R. East 


95 
1,656 


36 
1,011 


18 

1,000 

50 










Hearst ^ 


1,774 


1,082 


756 


702 


Longlac 




Oba 


11 
10 

1,187 
2,486 

157 
1,515 
1,212 

637 
82 

126 


16 










Franz 












Kapuskasing 


668 

1,815 

2 

1,275 

580 

408 

18 

100 


531 

1,480 

2 

1,122 

406 

361 

10 

36 


587 

2,497 

61 

2,126 

754 


209 

1,503 

2 

1,599 

407 

916 






Cochrane 


1,982 

8 

1,887 

193 

1,169 


2,275 


Abitibi 


5 


Matheson 


1,691 


Timmins 


199 


New Liskeard 


1,557 


A.C.R. 




Blind River 


6 








Mississagi South 








Foleyet West 


3 

169 

20 

12 

162 

36 

411 

691 

19 

253 

174 

100 

159 

33 

84 

106 


34 
102 

15 
9 
119 
173 
149 
360 


11 
1 
1 






} " 

5 




Foleyet East 






36 


Mississagi West 








Mississagi East 








Webbwood 


25 

1 36 

61 


16 


21 






Sudbury North 






Sudbury South 




46 


42 


31 




North Bay 


37 


Temagami West 




Temagami North 


200 
86 


ii' 


387 
48 


24 
15 


10 
14 


19 


Temagami East 


1 


Georgian Bay West 




Georgian Bay East 










1 




Algonquin North 


29 
58 
24 










Algonquin South 






3 
12 


4 
10 


7 


Trent 






21 










Totals 


11,962 


7,602 


5,907 


8,603 


5,966 


6,154 


6,635 







1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



75 



STATEMENT OF PERMITS ISSUED 



Month 



Number of Permits 



1925 1924 1923 1922 1921 1920 1919 



April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

Totals 



451 
2,185 
2,273 
2,172 
2,484 
2,367 
30 



127 

849 

3,614 

1,388 

1,093 

528 

3 



2,131 

711 

1,314 

1,077 

566 

108 



1,992 
3,034 
1,502 
1,580 
495 



1,154 

3,085 

364 

1,329 

34 



1,003 
2,011 

891 
1,620 

629 



11,962 



7,602 



5,907 



8,603 



5,966 



6,154 



1,536 
2,786 

496 
1,475 

342 



6.635 



STATEMENT OF PERMITS ISSUED 



District 


Acreage Covered by Permits 




1925 


1924 


1923 


1922 


1921 


1920 


1919 


C.G.R. West 


416 


215 

1 

325 

57 

463 


95 


26 




1 


27 


C.G.R. Central 




Kenora 


2 

174 

1,029 


35,006 
1,374 
1,081 


624 

331 

1,251 


637 
18 


284 
23 


297 


Rainy River 


89 


Thunder Bay 




Nipigon 








C.G.R. East 


28 
3,721 


25 
2,311 


53 

2,335 

64 










Hearst 


3,837 


2,124 


1,478 


1,379 


Longlac 




Oba • 


1 
1 
4,222 
4,462 
426 
5,211 
2,064 
2,154 
1,257 
1,119 


60 










Franz 












Kapuskasing 


2,351 
4,010 

"4,573" 

1,421 

1,345 

100 

619 


2,126 

4,348 

1 

5,027 

918 

1,160 

36 

294 


2,017 
8,108 
968 
7,613 
2,591 


1,731 
4,652 
13 
5,442 
988 
7,726 






Cochrane 


4,984 

72 

5,427 

424 

9,768 


5,43? 


Abitibi 


20 


Matheson 


4,760 


Timmins 


925 


New Liskeard 


13,521 


A.C.R 


Blind River 


67 








Mississagi South 








Foleyet West 


25 

3,152 

2,555 

4,741 

2,768 

293 

1,957 

1,384 

6 

1,197 

819 

742 

418 

377 

121 

326 


2,959 

3,402 

81 

2 

2,009 

425 

6,900 

518 


52 

5 

408 






1 128 
3 




Foleyet East 






106 


Mississagi West 








Mississagi East 








Webbwood 


81 

\ 187 

92 


66 


101 






Sudbury North 










Sudbury South 

North Bay 


103 


74 


104 


64 


Temagami West 




Temagami North 


303 
172 


4i' 


1,657 
196 


129 

25 


18 

25 


111 


Temagami East 




Georgian Bay West 




Georgian Bay East 










2 




Algonquin North 


719 

599 

60 










Algonquin South 






5 
13 


11 
15 


17 


Trent 






37 










Totals 


47,168 


36,025 


54,784 


29,455 


23,678 


22,767 


26,790 





76 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

(6) Equipment 

Of the major equipment purchased the fifty portable fire fighting units and 
143,200 feet of hose for use with these units were the most important items. 
This addition brought the total number of units up to 189 with 397,860 feet of 
hose. 

Each succeeding season further demonstrates the advantages of the use of 
mechanical equipment in combating forest fires, providing the equipment is in 
charge of competent operators. By the use of the portable fire fighting units 
or pumps fires can not only be kept under control but can be completely extin- 
guished, thereby providing an economy not alone in timber values but in labour 
as well. 

Probably the most important auxiliary to the power pumps is the portable 
hand or force pump, 239 of which were purchased bringing the total up to 300. 
These hand pumps are particularly useful to the individual ranger in extinguish- 
ing small fires and in "mopping up" on the larger fires. 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



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78 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

(7) Locomotive Inspection 

Two men were employed throughout the season on the inspection of fire 
protective appliances on locomotives operating on railways under the jurisdic- 
tion of the Dominion Board of Railway Commissioners and on logging railways 
within the Province. 

A total of forty round houses and gravel pits were visited periodically and 
1,856 locomotive inspections made covering 773 locomotives. In addition, 
thirty-three inspections were made on- locomotives operated by lumber com- 
panies, bringing the total number of inspections up to 1,889. The percentage 
of locomotives found defective and operating on lines under the jurisdiction of 
the Board of Railway Commissioners was 0.6 per cent., a decrease from 32.1 
per cent, in 1918. 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



79 



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80 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

(<^) Improvements 

The policy of constructing suitable and permanent buildings for the housing 
of equipment and field personnel was continued. A number of wooden lookout 
towers were erected and one steel tower. Approximately 106 miles of permanent 
telephone line was built and 190 miles of temporary line was used. The cleaning 
out of old and the construction of new trails and portages totalled over 1,500 
miles but was largely confined to the three southern inspectorates. 



1926 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



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82 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



II. Air Operations 

During the past season the Air Service carried on flying operations in con- 
nection with various phases of forestry work. The following is a summary of 
the detailed report of Mr. W. R. Maxwell, the Director of the Air Service: — 

"The operating season of 1925 extended over a period of 206 days, during 
which time the Service flew a total of 2,738.37 hours. 

No. of machine-days, machines employed 763 days. 

No. of machine-days, machines available and idle 1,737 

No. of clear weather machine-days, machines available and 

idle 932 " 

No. of machine-days, machines available but weather unfit 

for flying 805 " 

Machine-days (1 machine for 1 day) supplied by the Service 

during 1925 2,500 " 

No. of times 1 machine unserviceable for 1 day 229 

No. of times machine unable to complete patrol on account 

of machine trouble 15 

No. of times Service unable to complete patrol 9 

No. of patrols requisitioned 555 

Machine patrol efficiency 97 . 3% 

Service patrol efficiency 98. 4% 

No. of permanent stations operated 10 

No. of temporary stations established 21 

Note: 

(a) In many cases the requisitions cover flying operations of from two to 
four days. 

(b) No instructional flights, cross country to or from operating bases, 
remote transportation, demonstration or operations in Red Lake, Fort 
Cologne and James Bay District Treaty transportation are included in 
the above requisitions. These flights were carried out on schedule. 

Total Load: 

Total weight carried by the Service during 1925 2,364,275 lbs- 
Average total load carried per machine for season 139,070 

Average total load carried per flight 1,848 

Operating Load Carried: 

Total operating load carrie'd season 1925 1,810,735 

Average total operating load carried per machine 111,537 

Average operating load carried per flight 1,432 

Effective or Pay Load: 

Total effective load carried season 1925 553,540 

Average total efl'ective load carried per machine 34,239 

Average effective load carried per flight 427 



1926 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 83 

Passengers Carried: 

Total number of passengers carried 1925 1,214 

Average number of passengers carried per flight 0.9 

Average number of passengers carried per machine for 

the season 71 

Number of miles passengers were carried season 1925.. 156,606 

Total number of passengers and personnel carried 1925 3,938 

Flights: 

Total number of flights carried out 1925 1,312 

Average duration of flights 2 . 06 hrs. 

Average number of miles flown per flight 129 

Average altitude flown 1925 1,990 

Average number of flights per day 6.3 

Average number of miles flown season 1925 165,835 

Area covered on fire detection 2,259,725 sq. mis. 

or 1,446,224,000 acres. 

Note. — In comparing the area covered with the operating season of 1924, 
mention may be made that less requisitions for fire patrol were made in the 
season of 1925 than in the season of 1924, and a greater number of requisitions 
for suppression were made in 1925 than in 1924. 

Hours Flown on Various Phases of Flying Operation, 1925: 

Fire detection 1 ,440 . 40 hours. 52 . 5% of total hours. 

Transportation, fire suppression.. . 155.45 " 5.7% 

Sketching 244.42 " 8.9% 

Photography 53.15 " 1.9% 

Transportation, remote 197.40 " 7.2% 

Instructions to observers 26. 50 " . 09% 

Instruction to pilots 55.48 " 2% 

Forced landings 36.04 " 1.3% 

Service transportation 62.05 " 2.2% 

Ferrying 330.41 " 12% 

Demonstration 87 . 40 " 3.2% 

Test 47.27 " 1.7% 

Detection: 

As in the previous years detection was the largest single item in the 1925 
operating programme and called for 1,440.40 hours flying or 52.5 per cent, of 
the total year's flying. The eastern section contributed 1,804.56 hours and the 
western section 932.49 hours. During the month of August the period in the 
eastern section was particularly dry and the fire hazard extremely grave. All 
aircraft were kept busy from dawn until dark, patrolling and carrying fire 
fighting equipment, crews and food, and made as many as eight flights in one 
day. During the month of August 922.49 hours were flown, which was 34.67 
per cent, of the total hours for the 1925 flying operations. It is worthy of 
mention to note that the total flying in the month of August in the eastern 
section was 552.55 hours or 46.42 per cent, of the total flying for the season 
1925. In other words the operating personnel in the eastern section, during 
the month of August, practically flew one-half of the total amount of flying done 
in this area for the entire season. 



84 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Suppression: 

The operation reports for the season 1925 indicated that greater advantage 
has been taken of the capacity of aircraft to participate in fire suppression work. 
The comparative figures for the two years are as follows: — 

In 1924 the total of 42.52 hours was flown. 

In 1925 the total of 155.45 hours was flown. 

This in the transportation of fire fighters and fire fighting equipment. 

Some very heavy loads were