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Full text of "Report of the Minister of Lands and Forests of the Province of Ontario, 1947-51"

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DEPT. LANDS AND FORESTS 
LI B RARV 

No /^^^ 



FISH & W:L>JFE DIV. 



MARL 



*^ DEC 3 1864 *^ 



^ 



.1-5 
el's. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

Minister of Lands and Forests 

OF THE 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

For the Fiscal Year ending 

March 31, 1947 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and PubliBhed by Baptist Johnston, Printer to tho King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1948 



REPORT 

OF THE 

Minister of Lands and Forests 

OF THE 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

For the Fiscal Year ending 

March 31, 1947 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 3, 1948 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by Baptist Johnston, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1948 



To His Honour, 

The Lieutenant-Goveruor of the Province of 0)itnrio. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

The undersigned begs respectfully to present to your Honour, the Annual 
Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for the fiscal year April 1, 1946, 
to March 31, 1947. 

H. R. Scott, 

Minister. 



C O \ T E \ T S 

Page 

ixtroductiox 5 

i )lvision of accouxts 7 

Division of Air ServicI': 27 

Divisiox OF Fish and Wildlific 35 

Division of Forest Protection 81 

Division of Land and Recreational Areas 90 

Divisiox of Law 109 

Division of Operation and Personnel Ill 

Division of Reforestation 135 

Division of Research 139 

Division of Surveys and Engineering 145 

Division of Timber Management 153 



GENERAL I XFRUDrCTIOX 



This report, which covers the \ear ending 31st Alarc-h. 1947, shows the 
De|)artment e.\i)enciiture at a conii)arati\el\" hiyh le\eL Expenditure is more 
than double that of the fiscal \"ear ending in 1939. 

Following the otitbreak of war the Department made every effort to improve 
the qualit\' of service rendered. Progress in this connection was, of course, 
dependent upon av^ailable man power, equipment and supplies. Due to sharph" 
rising costs absorbing an increasing proportion of our financial resources, progress 
was equalh" dej)endent upon a\-ailable funds. 

In the ])re-war period the cost of maintaining a seasonal fire ranger was 
four hundred dollars. The present cost is seven hundred dollars for ranger labour 
of similar qualit\-. Ranger labour of a qualit>' satisfactor\- for Forest Ranger 
School training requires double the ftmds expended on ranger labour in the pre- 
war period. With equipment and operating supplies, together with wages of other 
personnel requiring sharph' increased exj^enditure, a substantial drain is placed 
ui)on funds proxided in the post-war period for expansion of our services. 

Greater emphasis [placed on careful management of resources has offset 
in no small degree, shrinkage in the purchasing value of the dollar. Additional 
funds placed at our disposal have made up the remaining shrinkage in value, 
permitted betterment in qualit\- of service rendered and some expansion in 
service. I'urtlier expansion in the management of the natural resources of the 
Province entrusted to this I)ei)artment, is in no small part dejiendent upon 
increased funds a\-ailable for this j)uri:)ose. 

The report on the work of the Department is listed imder tlie following 
headings: 

-Accounts ( )i)ei'ation and I'eisoniiel 

Air .Serxice Reforestation 

Fish and Wildlife Research 

Forest Protectif)n .Sur\e\ s and j-jigineering 

Land and Recreational .\reas Timi^er Management 

Law 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




God's Country 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 194^ 



UI\ ISION OF ACCOUNTS 

General 

As of loth April. 194(5, the Minister of Lands and Forests was charged with 
the adminstration of the former Department of C^ame and Fisheries, which 
became the Fish and Wildhfe Di\ision of the Department of Lands and Forests. 
For accounting purposes all receipts and expenditures of the former Department 
of Game and Fisheries are included under the Fish and Wildlife Division from 
1st April. 1946, and a separate accounting made for this new Division. 

A. Department of Lands and Forests (other than Fish and Wildlife 
Division) 

The financial report sets out a substantial increase — SI, 862, 412. — in expendi- 
tures appropriation of the Department as compared with the prexious year. 
This increased appropriation was required for — 

(1) Air Service PIquipment. 

(2) Construction of Ranger School at Dorset. 

(3) Expansion in held work of the Reforestation, Forest Research and Timber 
Management Divisions. 

This increased expenditure was partly olTset by an increase in cash receipts — 
sl,ool,o()0. — as compared with the pre\ious year. Revenue for the year was the 
highest in the history of the Department with most sources of revenue showing 
improvement, particularly receipts from sale of Crown timber. This result was 
due to an increase in available woods labour following the close of hostilities, 
and a sharp upswing in tourist trade throughout the Pro\ince. 

Following the policy of obtaining the closest possible co-operation between 
Field and Main Offices, officers of this Division made the following field inspec- 
tions, for purposes of instruction of Field Officers and inspection of work pro- 
grams — and Pro\incial Land Tax Courts of Revision : 

(a) Reforestation Field Offices: Angus, Midhurst, St. Williams. 

ib) District Offices: Algonquin Park, Chapleau, Cochrane, Gait. Fort Frances, 
Geraldton, Gogama. Kapuskasing, Kempt\ille, Kenora, Lindsay. North Bay, 
Parry Sound, Port Arthur. Sault Sie. Marie, .Sioux Lookout, Sudbury, Tweed. 

{c) Other Field Offices: Ottawa, Pembroke, Ranger School (Dorset). 

{d) Sundry: Bracebridge. Lillle Current, Haile\bur\-. 



REPORT OF THE No. 3 



B. Fish and Wildlife Division — Formerly the Department of (^ame 
AND Fisheries 

Receipts and Disl:)ursements for the year are shown separately in Schedule 
G, Page 24. 

A substantial increase — 8449,313.09 — in the expenditure appropriation for 
the year, as compared with the previous year, was required. This increased 
appropriation was required for 

(1) Enforcement of the Game and Fisheries Act. 

(2) Hatcheries — Operation and maintenance. 

(3) Erecting; buildings; Purchase of Land, Buildings and Eciuipment. 

The increase in expenditure was more than offset by an increase in cash 
receipts — 8597.034.99 — as compared with the pre\'ious year. Re\"enue for the 
year was the highest in history, with most sources of rex'enue showing impro\'e- 
ment, particularly receipts from the sale of Hunting and Angling Licences. 
This was due to a sharp upswing in tourist trade throughout the Pro\'ince. 

FINANCLAL REPORT 

L Cash Receipts and Disbursements: 

Statement for the year ending March 31, 1947 is set out on Schedule A, 
page 10. The following summarizes the result of operations for the year. 

Total— Cash Receipts 88,414 947.24 

Total — Cash Disbursements 5,961,805.96 

Excess of Receipts o\'er I)isl)ursements 82,453,141.28 

?. Comparison of Results with those of Prior Years: 

(a) Receipts 

In Schedule B, page 16, cash receipts for the year under review have been 
compared with those of the pre\'ious four years. This data may be summarized 
as follows: 

Years ending March 31 si 

Division- 1943 1944 194.5 1946 1947 

$ $ $ S S 
Accounts — 

Water Power Rentals 648,485 618,901 609,425 654,979 680,568 

Provincial Land Tax 146,014 158,745 175,342 209,459 204,475 

Long Lac Diversion 44,850 21,750 21,300 20,850 20,400 

Miscellaneous 4,267 5,939 20,388 9,048 46,071 

Land and Recreational Areas 173,779 273,754 294,308 338,258 430,644 

Forest Protection 51,825 22,917 26,850 30,943 46,402 

Timber Management 4,982,281 4,-561,734 4,241,581 5,554,781 6,944,104 

Survevs 3,438 13,293 1,275 4.59 1,652 

Air Service 6,946 19,448 12,417 25,284 15,258 

Reforestation 8,4.53 26,138 10,559 19,386 25,373 

Lignite Development 924 16 

6,071,262 .5,722,635 5,413,44.5 6,863,447 8,414,947 



DEPARTMENT (3E LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



ih) The following is a comparison of total disbursements for the fixe years 
ending March 31, 1947: 

Years L'liding March 31st 
1943 1944 194.5 1946 1947 

Total Disbursements — S S S S S 

Chargeable to appropriation as 

voted 2,799,689 3,040,901 3,572.225 3,988.394 5.961,806 

Additional Disbursements — 

Uncontrollable items, chargeable to 

Special Warrants 701,296 111,000 

Total Disbursements 3,500,985 3,040.901 3,572.225 4,099.394 5.961.806 



(c) Trend of Receipts and Disbursements 
i. Receipts 

Annual Receipts 1947 as compared witli 1943 show an increase of approxi- 
mately 82,343,685.00 or 38.6 per cent. This increase is due in large part to 
increased re\enue from: 

Land and Recreational Areas S 256,865.00 

Timber Management 1,961.823.00 

Land Tax 58,461.00 

Miscellaneous 41.804.00 

Water Power 32.083.00 



.v2, 3 5 1.03 6. 00 
//. Disbursements 

Annual Disbursements 1947 as compared with 1943 show an increase of 
82.460,821.00 or 70.3 per cent. This increase is accounted for in large part by 
the following items: 

Main Office 8 161,665.00 

Air Service 334.053.00 

Poorest Research 221 ,174.00 

Basic Organization, Extra Fire Fighting and 

Scaling! ^. . . /. 1.897,489.00 

Construction and Operating Forest Ranger 

School "^ [ . . 323,429.00 

Reforestation 208,976.00 



83,146.786.00 

Less special Disbursements applicable in 194;^: 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission of ()niari() 

're Long Lac Diversion 400,000.00 

Lignite Development Project 299,993.00 



id) Fish and Wildlife Division 



699,993.00 
.82,446,793.00 



Receipts and Disbursements of this Dixision are separateK- shown in 
Schedule G, page 24. 



10 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Schedule A. 



DEPARTMENT OF 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



RECEIPTS 

Division of Accounts 

Water Power Rentals S 680,568.56 

Provincial Land Tax 204,474.57 

Long Lac Diversion 20,400.00 

Casual Fees, Surveys Office Fees, etc 11 ,070.65 

Contractors' Securitv Deposits 

Forest Ranger School 20,000.00 

Forest Resources Invenlor\- 15,000.00 

$ 951.513.78 

DiVISIO.N OF L.\ND .\ND Ri:CKK.\TIO.\.\L ArI'.AS 

Land Sales 

Agricultural S 27,157.22 

Summer Reson 54,976.37 

Townsites 28,377.60 

Universitv 401.49 

Clergy School 288.00 

Common School 148.00 

Miscellaneous 40,151.34 

Unallocated 110,365.94 

261,865.96 

Land Rentals (Other than Parks) 

Leases and Licenses of Occupation 95,445.89 

Bruce Beach 1,591.72 

Timagami Islands 1,855.56 

98,893.17 

Park Revenue 
Algonquin 

Rentals S 9,355.82 

Miscellaneous 21,882.41 

31,238.23 

Rondeau 

Rentals 12,950.03 

Miscellaneous 3,048.61 

15,998.64 

Quetico 

Rentals 60.75 

Miscellaneous 13,694.31 

13,755.06 

Ipperwash Beach 

Miscellaneous 1,238.25 

62,230.18 

.Miscellaneous Revenue 7,655.05 

430,644.36 

Carried Forward .Sl.382.158.14 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 11 



Schedule A. 
LANDS AND FORESTS 

AND DISBURSEMENTS 

^LARC'H 31, 1947 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Main Officp: 

Minister's Salary— Statutory S 8,000.00 

Salaries — Permanent and Temporary 445,994.29 

Travelling Expenses 33,446.70 

Maintenance and Operating 68,199.80 

Damage and Other Claims, Sundr\- Contingencies, etc 595.00 

Compensation for Injured Workmen 23,140.73 

Cost of Living Bonus — Entire Department 1,604.96 

Unemploxment Insurance Stamps 51.51 

Annuities and Bonuses to Indians 24, .508. 00 

Refund to Municipalities re Timber Dues 806.05 

Refund to Universit\- of Toronto re Wild Lands 246.62 



S 606,593.66 



FIELD SERVICES 

Division of Surveys 

Grant — Board of Survevors 200.(X) 

Aerial Surveys, Salaries, etc 1,882.82 

Ground Surveys, Miscellaneous E.xpenses 39,843.07 



41.925.89 



Division of Forest Research (See Schedule "D" Page 21) 

Salaries — Temporary 83,651.45 

Travelling E.xpenses 15,277.29 

Maintenance and Operating 122,245.54 



Field Operations (Including Provincial Parks) 
Basic Organization (See Schedule "E" Page 22) 

Salaries 1,509,860.80 

Travelling Expenses 108,577.75 

Maintenance and Operating 1,689,751.97 



Extra Fire Fighting 

Salaries — Temporarx 205,201.34 

Travelling Expenses 10,367.17 

Maintenance and Operating 86,222.82 



Scaling 

Salaries — TemporarN 343,519. 19 

Travelling Expenses 24,288.82 

Maintenance and Operating 15,592.19 



221.1 74. 2S 



3,308. 190..52 



301,791.33 



383,400.20 



Clearing Townsites and Removal of Fire Hazards 

Salaries, etc. Maintenance and Operating 4,255.28 

Carried Forward 84.867,331.16 



12 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Schedule (A Continued) 

DEPARTMENT OF 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



RECEIPTS 

Brought Forward $1,382,158.14 

Division of Forest Protection 

Miscellaneous 4(),4()1.74 

Division of I'imber Management (Sec SciiLclule "C" Page 20) 

Crown Dues $6,175,443.93 

Ground Rent 125,060.70 

Fire Tax 461,163.51 

Scalers' Wages 9,041.63 

Interest 6.1S4.37 

Mill Licenses 1.000.51 

Cullers Examination Fees and Sundr\- 1,425.63 

Cash Deposits ' 164,784.11 

6,944,104.39 

Division of Surveys 

Aerial Surve\s — Net Receipts 1 .651 .44 

Division of Air Service 

Miscellaneous 15,258.36 

Division of Reforestation 

Miscellaneous 25,373.17 

.$8,414,947.24 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1U47 13 



Schedule A i Continued) 
LANDS AND FORESTS 

AND DLSBLRSEMENTS 

^L\R(;H :]]. 11)47 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Brought Forward S4. 867.33 1.1 6 

Division of Air Skrvice (See Schedule "F" Page 23) 

Salarie.> S 198,985.58 

Travelling Expenses 5,649.17 

Maintenance and Operating 402,433.28 

607,068.03 

Division of Reforestation 

Salaries S 348,298.24 

Travelling Expenses 28,039.14 

Maintenance and Operating 110,662.90 

487,000.28 

Grants to Municipalities in Compensation for 

Loss of School Ta.xes 406.49 

487,406.77 

Total Di>l)ursements 5,96L805.96 

E.xcess of Receipts over Disbursements — Paid into 

the Consolidated Revenue Fund of the Province 2.453,141.28 



5,414,947.24 



Fish and Wildlife Division — Receipts and Disburseineiii< are noi 
included in the foregoing. I'hese are separately shown in .Schi'(hile "G" I'age 24. 



14 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



1938 

1939 

1940 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 



f) (f 



DBL 1BL niL EfL I 



$} ($} ($ 



Sn (Q) tQ] 




V w w d 



$)(?)(> 



I) (1) (I) (1) (I) C^ 



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Rhcripts for thi=; Fiscal Years 1938-1947. 



DEPARTMExNT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



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16 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Schedule B 



DEPARTMENT OF 
COMPARISON OF RECEIPTS FOR 



1943 



Division of Accounts 

Water Power Rentals 

Provincial Land Tax 

Long Lac Diversion 

Refunds — Re Flowage Easements 

Casual Fees, etc. 

Gait Lease 

Contractor's Security Deposit on Forest Insect Lal)()rat()r\- 

Construction Project 

Contractor's Security Deposit on Forest Ranger School 

Contractor's Security Deposit on Forest Resources Invenlorx 

Division of Land and Recri;ati()Nai, Arkas 

Land Sales 

Land Rentals (Other than Parks) 

Park Revenue — Including Park Rt'iitals 

Algonquin 

Rondeau 

Quetico 

Ipperwash Beach 

Miscellaneous Revenue 

Division of Forest Protixtion 

Radio Service 

Miscellaneous 

Division of Timber Management 

Crown Dues, Ground Rent, Fire Tax, etc 

Division of Surveys 

Lac Seul Storage Dam 

Aerial Surveys — Net Recei[Jts 

Division of Air Service 

Miscellaneous 

Division of Reforestation 

Miscellaneous • 

Lignite Development 

Miscellaneous 

Total Receipts 



$ 648,484.87 

146,013.91 

44,850.00 

113.20 

3,191.91 



842,653.89 

69,162.08 
65,982.01 

18,508.87 

13,402.73 

5,983.(;() 

739.()1 

962.06 

174,740.96 

23,155.68 
28,669.50 

51,825.18 
4,982,281.03 



3,438.31 
3,438.31 



6,945.96 



8,453.36 



923.75 
),071, 262.44 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



Schedule B 



LANDS AND FORESTS 

5 YEARS ENDING MARCH :n, 1947 



1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


•S 618,901.26 

158,744.95 

21,750.00 

93.76 


S 609,425.12 

175,341. .55 

21,300.00 


$ 6.54.978.77 

209.459.44 

20.850.00 


.$ 680,.568..56 

204,474.57 

20,400.00 


2,924.52 
2 921 00 


4,719.34 
669.00 

15,000.00 


9,047.69 


11.070.65 












20.000.00 








15.000.00 










805.335.49 


826,455.01 


894,335.90 


951,513.78 


118.745.26 
107,517,94 

22,422.53 
15.201.66 

6,435.81 
235.80 

3,195.43 


155,219.01 
89,484.59 

19,-573.53 
15,152.86 

7,572.01 
623.15 

6,683.40 


193,061.14 
90,988.56 

23,759.48 
15,017.47 

8,868.97 
575.50 

5,986.66 


261,865.96 
98,893.17 

31,238.23 

15,998.64 

13,7.55.06 

1,238.25 

7.655.05 


273.754.43 


294.308.55 


338,257.78 


430.644.36 






1 


22.916.40 


26,850.25 


30,942.78 


46,401.74 


22.916.40 


26,850.25 


30,942.78 


46,401.74 


4, .561, 733.49 


4,241.581.00 


5..5.54, 781.31 


6,944,104.39 


1 1 ,685.22 
1 ,607.26 








1,274.94 


- 4.58.95 


1,651.44 


13,292.48 


1,274.94 


458.95 


1,651.44 


19,448.31 


12,416.85 


25,284.13 


15,2.58.36 


26.137.92 


10,558.66 


19,386.47 


25,373.17 


16.44 
















85,722,634.96 


$5,413,445.26 


.$6,863,447.32 


$8,414,947.24 



Fish and Wiidlik- Division Receipts not inciiulcd in the foregoing. Receipts 
for year ending March 31si, 1947, are shown in Schedule "G" Page 24. 



18 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



TREND OF 
DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

WATER POWER RENTALS 

CROWN LAND SALES AND RENTALS 

PROVINCIAL LAND TAX 



TH OUSANDS 
OF DOLLARS 



FOR THE FIVE YEARS 
ENDING 31 MARCH 1947 



900 



800 



700 



600 



500 



400 



300 



200 



WATER POWER RENTALS 




CROWN LAND SALES 
AND RENTALS 



PROVINCIAL 



1943 



945 



LAND TAX 



1946 



1947 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND EORESTS EUR 1947 



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1 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR l'J47 21 



Schedule D 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 
FOREST RESEARCH DIXISION— PROJECTS 

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 

(Including, General Office) 

FOR YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Project IOiai. Cost 

Bud Worm Spraying s 111 ,730.62 

Experiment Station 38,078.98 

Pump and Hose Test 11,091.10 

Sulphur Fumes Investigation 19.940.33 

Soil Surveys 24.419.78 

Goulais River Road Improvement 1,480.58 

Biology 14,70D.43 

Wild Life 7.809.75 

Seed Production P2xperiment 3,134.65 

Fisheries (Culveri ) 89.18 

Nature Suidy 2,169.78 

Radio Experiments . 4.224.62 

Slumpage. .• 1.243.11 

Regeneration Survexs 22,036.91 

Total Direct Expenditures on Projects 262,169.82 

Main Office Administration 26,706.62 

Total Expenditure on Forest Research S 288,876.44 



DlSTRIUlTION OK EM'i;N"I)ITt KI-; 

Forest Research— Field .Service >^ 221.174.2S 

Forest Research— Main Office 2.-).030.29 

Basic Organization — Equipment and Improvements. 42,(i71.87 

ii 288,876.44 



22 REPORT OF THE *No. 3 

Schedule E 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 

BASIC ORGANIZATION 

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES BY DIVISIONS RESPONSIBLE, ' 

SHOWING COST BY SERVICES 

FOR YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 19.47 

Division Service Amount 

Forest Protection Fire Ranging SI. 368, 718. 41 

Forest Ranger School 323.429.27 

Forest Insect Laboratory 6,567.00 

Parrj" Sound Area seen mapping.. . . 1,484.41 

Si;l,7()().H)<t.0n 

Reforestation Land Purchases 58,760.56 

Equipment 58,928.70 

117,689.26 

Land and Ricrcai ional Are,i> Adniinislralion and In>[K("lions . . . . 134,590.83 

Parks— 

Algon(|uin 90.561.25 

Quetico. . . , 21,921.93 

Sibley 3,022.59 

Lake Superior 4,042.14 

Rondeau 20,015.83 

Ippervvash Beaeli 3,589.45 

277,744.02 

I'inihiT Managinicni Administration and Inspections.... 136,529.67 

Management Surveys — 

Kirkwood Forest 17,278.56 

Petavvawa 1 1.294.87 

Goulais River 2,132.20 

Aerial Surveys 39,128.90 

Forest Resources Inventor\ 336,775.67 

Long Lac Diversion 898.66 

544,038.53 

Operation and Personnel .Storage Warehouse 13,663.64 

Fire Prevention — Information and 

Education 194,349.34 

208.012.98 

Forest Research Equipment 26,894.35 

Improvements 15,777.52 

42,671.87 

TOTAL — By Services — Exclusive of General Administration and Supervision. . . . 2,890,355.75 
General Field Office Administration and .Super\ision 417,834.77 

roTAI $3,308,190.52 



DEPARTMP:NT of lands and forests for H)47 23 



Schedule F 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 

NET COST OF DIMSION OF AIR SERXICE CHARGEABLE TO 

FOREST PROTECTION DISTRK TS 

FOR YEAR ENDING MARCH 3L 1947 

Division of Air Service 

Disbursements per Schedule A S 607,068.03 

Receipts per Schedule A 15.258.36 

Net Cost of Division of Air Service S 591 .809.67 

The above costs have been charged to the following District Offices 
as additional costs of Forest Protection — 

Algonquin 24.029.72 

Chapleau 27.281 .86 

Cochrane 22.488.77 

Fort Frances 39,100.39 

Gogama 15,478.86 

Geraldton .54,053.82 

Kapuskasing 16,920.25 

Kenora 17,695.67 

North Buy 35,034.01 

Port Arthur 95.424.02 

Saull Sle. Marie 65.290.44 

Sioux Lookout 140,184.75 

Sudbur> 29,490.91 

Toronio (Hca(l(|uartcrs Flighi>) 2,334.05 

Dusting 933.62 

Sulphur Funics 6,068.53 

l( ) JAI « 591,809.67 



24 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Schedule G. DEPARTMENT OF 

FISH AND WILD 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS 
ENDING 

(BASED ON THE ESTIMATES 
OF GAME 

RECEIPTS 

Game 
Licences 

Trapping $ 62,498. 15 

Non-resident Hunting 361,887.20 

Deer 196,548.80 

Moose 9,316.45 

Gun 132,906.53 

Dog 11,420.75 

Fur Dealers 34,322.00 

Fur Farmers 8,415.00 

Tanners 130.00 

Cold Storage 295.00 

817,739.88 
RovallN on Furs 211,640.75 



$1,029,380.63 



Fisheries 
Licences 

Fishing (Conunercial) 97,356.00 

Angling 1,000,866.37 

1,09S,222.37 

Royalty on Conimercial^Fisii 12,1 16.85 

Gener.vl 
Licences 

Tourist Canip^ 7,290.00 

Guides 12,734.00 

20,024.00 

Fines (Enforcement of Act) 44,266.85 

Costs Collected (Enforcement of Act'' 1,216.45 

Sales— Confiscated Articles 37,201.91 

Rent from Employees and others 2,718.00 

Commission retained hv Province on sale of licences bv Emplo\ees 

of the Crown ' '. .' . . . 1 ,372.86 

.Miscellaneous 1,680.73 



1,110,339.22 



108,480.80 



$2,248,200.65 



DEPARTMENT OE EAXDS AXI) EORESTS EOR 1947 



1^0 



LA X DS A X D EO R ESTS 

LIEE DI\ ISIOX 

AXD DISBURSEMEXrS EOR YEAR 
^L\RCH 31, 1947 

ALLOTTED TO THE EORMER DEPARTMEXT 
AXD EIS.HERIES) 

DISBURSEMENTS 



Schcflule G. 



(Ordinary 
^lain Office 

.Salaries — Pernianeni 
— Temporar\ 

rraxelling E.xpenses. 
Maintenance 



General 

Mo\"ing Expenses of Officers of the Department 

I'nforeseen and Unpro\iclecl 

Purchase of and Repairs to Boats, Boat houses. Machiner\- and 

X'ehicles 

Compensation for Injured Workmen 

Cost of Living Bonus 

Unemployment Insurance Stamps 

Exhibits, Advertising and Educational 

Districts — (Enforcement of the Ontario Game and Fisheries Act) 

Salaries and Expenses 

Game Animals and Birds 

Purchase of Birds and .Siindr\- Expenses 

Macdiarmid 

•Salaries 

Expenses 



Biological and Fish Culture Brancli 
General Office 

Salaries — Permanent 

— Temporary 



Travx'lling Expenses . 
Maintenance 



14,702.87 
6,961.27 

21,664.14 
4,318.65 
5,400.63 



Hatcheries 

Salaries and Expenses . 



Grants: 

Jack Miner 

Thomas X. Jones 

E. L. Marsh 

Ontario Fur Breeders' Association Inc 

Ontario Federalifjn of Commercial Fishermen. 



Wolf H()iint\- and .Smidr\- Expenses. 
Bear Bfjuniy and .Sundr\ Expenses. 



60,819.35 
14,774.02 
75,593.37 
4,163.94 
15,729.80 



s 


95.487.11 


982.74 
5.00 




2,737.38 
755.45 
301.77 
289.93 

4,220.81 


9,293.08 
516.263.72 






.35.471.25 


3.062. n(i 
1.213.74 


4.275.80 



31,383.42 
314,.560.86 



1 ..lOO.OO 


300.00 


100.00 


2..-)00.00 


1,.")00.00 



345.914.28 



Total Ordinary- 

C.\PIT.\L 

Erecting Buildings, Pur(ha>e of L.ind liiiildingsand Etimpnient 

Total Disbursements 

Excess of Receipts over Disbursements 

Paid intcj the Cf)nsolidated K(\cnuc Fund of the I'roxincc . . 



5,900.00 

59,275.18 

9,797.42 

1,081.707.84 

116,266.61 

1,197,974.45 

1 ,050,226.20 

$2,248,200.65 



26 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




t 



i -^ 



DP:PARTMENT of lands and forests for 1947 



DIMSION of air service 

As tlie tire hazard in the summer of 1946 was moderate, the Air Serxice 
was not oxertaxed in its forest tire detection and suppression duties. 

The Department operated from ti\e winter stations; Smoke Lake (Algonciuin 
Park), E\a Lake (Quetico Park), Geraldton, Gogama and Sioux Lookout. 
The flying- was largely in connection with general forestry administration, 
tish and wildlife, poaching, and emergency sickness and accident cases. 



Equipmoit 

Four new Norseman aircraft were purchased. 

The Department submitted specitications to the De Haxiliand Aircraft 
Company of Canada for the building of a semi-transport type of plane. Company 
engineers examined the specifications, and reports have been encouraging. 

Maintenance and Improvements 

Construction of an addition to the main hangar at Sault Ste. Marie has l)een 
undertaken by the Department of Public Works to proxide storage for approxi- 
mately tiftv aircraft. 



Co-operation icith the Royal Commission on Forestry, and other Covernment Depart- 
ments. 

Assistance was accorded Dominion CoNernment entomologists in tlieir 
forest insect infestation surveys. The agreement effected the prexious \'ear with 
the Department of Health was extended to include the Proxincial Police. Co- 
operation was continued with other Departments of the Ontario Cioxernment in 
supplying their flxing needs, as required. 

In addition the Air Service supplied 272 hours of fl\-ing to the Ro\al Com- 
mission on Forestry, which greatly expedited its work. 



Accidents 

It is a great j)lcasurc to icporl that there were no serious accidents to any 
ot the .\ir -Serxice personnel during the xear. 



Statistics 

The following tables gixc details ol oj^eration: 



28 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Tables 

Table Xo. 1 — Allocation of aircraft. 

Table Xo. 2 — Transport aircraft — hours flown and effective loads carried. 

Table Xo. 3 — Hours flown on various phases of flying operations. 

Table Xo. 4 — Totals. 

Table Xo. 5 — Hours flown at bases. 

Table X'o. 6 — Flying time — Pilots — for the fiscal year ending March 31, 

Table Xo. 7 — FKing time — Aircraft — for the fiscal \ear ending March 31, 



i^m; 
i<m; 



TABLE Xo. 1 

Allocation' of Aircraft 
1946-47 



Base Registration Type 

Algonquin Park CF-BGM Stinson 

CF-BIM Stinson 

Biscotasing CF-OBF Norseman 

G-CAOU Moth 

Caribou Lake CF-OBI Norseman 

Fort Frances CF-OBM Norseman 

Ignace CF-OAV Stinson 

Kenora CF-OBD Norseman 

Oba Lake CF-OBH Norseman 

G-CAOZ Moth 

Orient Bay CF-OBG Norseman 

CF-OBL Norseman 

Pays Plat CF-OAW Stinson 

Port Arthur CF-OBE Norseman 

Pickle Lake CF-OAP Fairchild 71 

Red Lake CF-BGN Stinson 

Remi Lake CF-BGJ Stinson 

Sault Ste. Marie CF-OBA Stinson 

CF-OBO Norseman 
G-CAO\V (Spare) Moth 

Sioux Lookout CF-OBC Norseman 

CF-OBB Stinson 

Sudburv CF-BDQ Waco 

CF-OAS Buhl 

South Porcupine CF-OAY Stinson 

Timagami CF-OBJ Norseman 

Twin Lakes CF-OBN Norseman 

G-CAPB Moth 

G-CAPA Moth 

Toronto CF-OBK Canso 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR U)47 



29 



TABLE No. 2 

Transport Aircraft — Effective Loads Carried 

1946-47 



Aircraft 



Hours 
Flowx 



Effective Load 



Buhl 

Fairchild 71 
Norseman 



Stins 



Waco 

Cansf) 



CF-OAS 

CF-OAP 

CF-OBC 

CF-OBD 

CF-OBE 

CF-OBF 

CF-OBG 

CF-OBH 

CF-OBI 

CF-OBJ 

CF-OBL 

CF-OBM 

CF-OBN 

CF-OBO 

CF-OBA 

CF-OBB 

CF-BGJ 

(T^-BC.M 

CF-BIM 

CF-BGN 

CF-OAV 

CF-OAW 

CF-OAY 

CF-BI)0 

CF-OBK 



219 
193 
247 
297 
375 
391 
484 
384 
299 
308 
276 
252 
103 
117 
298 
276 
374 
343 
451 
282 
247 
347 
364 
228 
422 



.30 
.35 
.00 
.35 
.55 
.55 
.20 
.00 
.10 
.45 
.20 
.05 
.20 
.30 
.25 
.00 
.05 
.35 
.35 
.40 
.45 
.45 
. 50 
. 50 
.25 



72,460 lbs.— 36 Tons, 460 lbs. 



102,870 lbs.— 51 Tons, 870 lbs. 



177,410 lbs. 



tons, 1410 lbs. 



192,250 lbs.— 96 tons, 250 lbs. 
313,320 lbs.— 156 tons, 1320 lbs. 
329,173 lbs.— 164 tons, 1173 lbs. 
307,360 lbs.— 153 tons, 1360 lbs. 
167,356 lbs.— 83 tons, 1356 lbs. 
167,465 lbs.— 83 tons, 1465 lbs. 
229,877 lbs.— 114 tons. 1877 lbs. 
228,310 lbs.— 114 tons, 310 lbs. 
273,200 lbs.— 136 tons, 1200 lbs. 
52,675 lbs.— 26 tons, 675 lbs. 
45,830 lbs.— 22 tons, 1830 lbs. 
131,640 lbs.— 65 tons, 1640 lbs. 
105,912 lbs.— 52 tons, 1912 lbs. 
159,013 lbs.— 79 tons, 1013 lbs. 
204,203 lbs.— 102 tons, 203 lbs. 
197,186 lbs.— 98 tons, 1186 lbs. 



140,285 Ibs.- 


—70 tons, 


285 lbs. 


124,615 Ibs.- 


—62 tons, 


615 lbs. 


169,649 Ibs.- 


-84 tons, 


1649 lbs. 



81,585 lbs.— 40 tons, 1585 lbs. 
106,980 lbs.— 53 tons, 980 lbs. 
998,100 lbs.— 499 tons, 100 lbs. 



ToT.M. Ik.vnsport .Section: — 

Total Flyine: Time Hours 7,588.55 

Total Loading Pounds 5,078,724 

Total Loadins; Tons 2,539 tons, 724 lbs. 



30 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



TABLE No. 3 
Hulks Flowx on Various Phases of Flying Operations 



1924-46 



1946-47 



Total 



Fire Detection 

Game Conservation 

Fire Suppression 

Photography 

Sketching 

Transportation — Ordinar\ 

Transportation — Special 

Mercy Flights 

Ferrying 

Forced Landings 

Flying Instruction 

Observers Instruction 

Operations 

Tests Aircraft 

Dusting Operations — Ont. Govt 

Dusting Operations — B.C. Go\t 

Tests — Radio 

Department of Entomology 

Department of Research (Sulphur Fumes) 



42,483.40 


1,082.40 


43,566.20 


417.00 


446.20 


863.20 


34,815.16 


L230.00 


36,045.16 


1,404.1.5 


9.05 


1,413.20 


3,863.53 


223.40 


4,087.33 


37,383.10 


3,473.50 


40,857.00 


7,105.37 


938.10 


8,043.47 


275.17 


39.15 


314.32 


6,327.37 


210.30 


6,.538.07 


916.24 


27.25 


943.49 


2,962.47 


14.15 


2,977.02 


94.09 




94.09 


5,464.53 


i 230.00 


5,694.53 


1,524.57 


49..50 


1,574.47 


41.35 


284.30 


326.05 




86.20 


86.20 


83.40 


2.00 


85.40 


99.45 


202.15 


302.00 


99.30 


151.05 


250.35 


145,363.25 


S,70L10 


154,064.35 



TABLE No. 4 
Totals 



Passengers Carried 

Personnel Carried 

Total Passengers and Personnel Carried 

Effective Loads Flown, Lbs 

Effective Loads Flown, Tons 



1924-46 



103,170 

75,9.34 
179,124 
37,646,194 
18,823T 
1941bs. 



1946-47 



Total 



18,079 

4,101 

22,180 

5,230,897 

2,615T 

8971bs. 



121,249 

80,055 

201,304 

42,877,091 

21,438T 

l,0911bs 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 31 



Taklk Xo. .5 

Hoi Ks Flown at Bases 

1946-47 

Base Hours Flown 



Algonquin Park 620 4.') 

Biscotasing 606 00 

Caribou Lake 296.00 

Fort Frances i 579 2.") 

Ignace I 248 !•> 

Kenora i 30.3 3.") 

Oba Lake I 565 . 10 

Orient Ba\ 544 . 40 

Pavs Plat: 361 20 

Pickle Lake 188 . 10 

Port Arthur 374 35 

Red Lake 282.50 

Remi Lake 373.50 

Sault Ste. Marie j^.^. -}^. 

South Porcupine 356 2.) 

Sioux Lookou t 675 25 

Sudbury 343 '^'^^ 

Timagami ■ 371 .•)•) 

Twin Lakes 571 . 25 

Toron to 22 . 55 

Dusting Operations — B.C. Govi 

Dusting Operations — Ont. Go\"i 

Sulphur Fumes Sampling 

Tola! 8701 . 10 



8179 


.15 


86 


20 


284 


30 


151 


.05 



32 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table Xo. G 
Flying Time — Pilots 



Pilot; 



1924-46 



1946-47 



Bliss, \V. H. F.... 

Burtt, A. E 

Buckworih, \V. B. 

Burton, E. C 

Blockley, H. T.. . . 
Charity-, G. E. . . . 
Crossley, C. C. . . . 

Cooke, T. C 

Culliton. J. P 

Denley. J. G 

Donnelh", J. T. . . . 

Fiskar, U. W 

Gillard, M. V 

Johnson, A. S 

Kincaid, J 

Kingdon, O. F. . . . 
LeFeuvre, C. J. . . . 
MacDougall, F. A. 
Ponsford, G. E. . . . 

Pipe, J. T 

Parsons, R 

Phillips, G. H. R.. 

Poulin, L. D 

Reid, D. M 

Reillv, J 

Smith, A. B 

Siegel, J 

Speight, H. C 

Trussler, G. E. . . . 

Taylor, J. M 

Westaway, H. W. . 

W'oodside, T 

Delahaye, G 

Noorduvn Pilots. . 
All other Pilots. . . 



Total . 



] ,373.50 
2,.i50.50 
1.144.35 

744.40 
5,711.28 

2,076.35 

581.00 

674.10 

2,113.15 

4,407.55 

72V.35 

185.50 

2,393.05 

3,068.05 

421.50 

868.05 

1,525.15 

6,454.50 

1,384.15 

110.20 

1,172.00 

299.30 

623.35 

3,284.40 

1,919.20 

3,773.10 

3,830.37 

3,801.00 

9.15 

88,138.50 

145,363.25 



91.20 
416.50 
382.50 
307.45 
240.40 
266.30 
373.25 
215.05 
410.15 
268 . 40 
359.30 
161.50 
321.35 
100.20 
221.30 
202.15 
383 . 55 
199.00 

18.30 
290.35 
433 . 25 
406 . 05 
461.35 
163.35 
220.10 
249.25 
210.50 
247.45 
241.40 
171.25 
377 . 40 
285.15 



8,701.10 



Totals 



91.20 

1.790.40 

2.933.40 

1,452.20 

240.40 

1,011.10 

6,084.53 

215.05 

2,486.50 

849.40 

1,033.40 

2,275.05 

4.729.30 

100.20 

943.05 

388.05 

2,777.00 

3,267.05 

440.20 

1,1.>S.40 

1,958.40 

6,860.55 

1,845.50 

273.55 

220.10 

1,421.25 

510.20 

871.20 

3,526.20 

2,090.45 

4,150.50 

4,115.52 

3.801.00 

9.15 

88,138.50 

154,064.35 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



33 



Table Xo. 7 
Flying Time — Aircraft 



Aircraft 


1924-46 


1946-47 


Total 


Buhl 

CF-OAS 


2,624.50 
2,673.10 


219.30 
193.35 


2,844.20 


Fairchild 71 

CF-OAP 


2,866.45 



Moth 
CF-OAA . 
G-CAPA . 
G-CAPB . 
G-CAOU . 
G-CAOW 
G-CAOZ . 

Norseman 
CF-OBC. 
CF-OBD. 
CF-OBE. 
CF-OBF. 
CF-OBG. 
CF-OBH . 
CF-OBI. . 
CF-OBJ.. 
CF-OBL. 
CF-OBM . 
CF-OBN. 
CF-OBO. 



-Stinson 
CF-OBA. 
CF-OBB. 
CF-BGJ.. 
CF-BGM . 
CF-BIM. 
CF-BGN. 
CF-OAV . 
CF-OA\V. 
CF-OAY . 

Waco 
CF-BDQ. 

Canso 
CF-OBK. 



All Other Aircraft. 



813.20 

6.05 
91,139.03 



228.50 



422.25 



5,014.15 


88.25 


5,102.40 


5,034.40 


161.50 


5.196.30 


5,509.25 


220.55 


5,730.20 


5,078.10 


159.15 


5,237.25 


5,096.07 


215.35 


5,311.42 


6,282.40 


266.15 


6,548.55 


280.35 


247.00 


527.35 


285.40 


297.35 


583.15 


517.40 


375.55 


893.35 


465.40 


391.55 


857.35 


214.00 


484.20 


698.20 


172.40 


384.00 


556.40 


135.00 


299.10 


434.10 


94.20 


308.45 


403.05 




276.20 


276.20 




252.05 


252.05 




103.20 


103.20 




117.30 


117.30 


1,213.40 


298.25 


1,512.05 


683.30 


276.00 


959.30 


1,352.20 


374.05 


1,726.25 


2,156.00 


343.35 


2,499.35 


366.10 


451.35 


817.45 


2,055.10 


282.40 


2,337.50 


1,699.25 


247.45 


1,947.10 


2,348.15 


347.45 


2,696.00 


2,051.45 


364.50 


2.416.35 



Tola! 145,363.25 

I 



8,701.10 



1,042.00 

428.30 
91,139.03 



154,064.35 



34 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 








i m 




.n 















^ft 






% 







A FKIKNULY WHITE-TAILED DEEU. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 35 



DIMSIOX OF FISH AXD WILDLIFE 

This is the first report published since the incorporation of the Department 
of Game and Fisheries into the Department of Lands and Forests as the Division 
of Fish and W'ildHfe. 

The ameilgamation of the two Departments was conceixed as a moxe to 
bring all the renewable natural resources of the Province under one administra- 
tion, and the process of transfer was begun in May, 1946. B>- July, 1946. the 
move was complete, and Dr. W. J. K. Harkness was selected as chief of the 
newh' formed Di\'ision. 

Dr. Harkness organized the Division into four separate sections, as follows: 

1. Enforcement: Under the supervision of Mr. J. F. Farrington. The 
Enforcement Section is responsible for the proper enforcement of the Game and 
Fisheries Act and Regulations, has custod>" of all seized materials, and the sale 
thereof. 

2. Wildlife: Dr. C. H. D. Clarke, Supervisor of this Section, has under 
his control the administration of the game resources of the Province, the pa\ nKiit 
of wolf and bear bounties, and the administration of the fur resources, both wild 
and ranch raised. 

."L Game Fish: Mr. H. H. MacKa\ is responsible for the proper admini- 
stration and maintenance of the angling fishery, production of fish by provincial 
hatcheries, and such scientific surveys and projects as are necessary to ensure 
proper placing of hatcher>- raised fish. 

4. Commercial Fish: Mr. W. H. R. Werner is responsible for the admini- 
stration of the commercial fishing resources of the Province, including issue of 
licences and collection of statistical data concerning catches. 

The amalgamation of the two Lepartments was extended into the field, 
all game and fisheries overseers and inspectors being taken into the forest district 
organization. In each District a Fish and Wildlife Six-cialist was appointed, 
to whom all Overseers in the District are responsible. This specialist, in most 
cases a senior Overseer, is himself res[)onsible to the District l-'orester. '' 



36 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



List of Specialists by Districts — 

District Fish and Wildlife Specialist 

Fort Frances H. E. Pearson 

Kenora H. Harris 

Sioux Lookout C. L. Perrie 

Geraldton J. Noble 

Port Arthur R. D. Windsor 

Cochrane L. A. Dent 

Kapuskasinji O. D. Lewis 

Chapleau \\ Crichton 

Gogama C. R. Weaver 

North Bav G. M. Parks 

Sault Ste. Marie C. F. Cook 

Sudbury C. F. Bibby 

Algonquin E. L. Skuce 

Parr\- Sound N. McNaughton 

Quinte R. G. Sheppard 

Rideau R. Baker 

Trent A. M. Hodgson 

Lake Erie W. Keller 

Lake Huron E. R. Meadows 

Lake Simcoe J . S. Ellis 

The staff of the Fish and Wildlife Division works in close cooperation with 
many professional associations and sporting associations. Representatives 
attend meetings of the Ontario Federation of Commercial Fishermen, the Ontario 
Fur Breeders' Association, and many fish and game protective associations 
throughout the Province. 

Grants were given to the two associations mentioned above, and also the 
Niagara District Pheasant Breeders' Association, Mrs. E. L. Marsh, Mr. E. T. 
Jones, and the Jack Miner Migratory Birds Foundation. 

Many members of the Head Office staff are closely connected with the 
Ontario Research Commission, and sit on many of the committees of that 
organization. 

In April, a joint meeting of Fish and Wildlife Technical Personnel of Ontario 
and New York State was held in Toronto under the sponsorship of the former 
Department of Game and Fisheries. 

In December of 1946, a course was organized at the recently opened Forest 
Ranger School at Dorset, for the instruction of Fish and Wildlife Specialists and 
Overseers in the identification and ecology of the principal species of fish, birds 
and mammals of the Province. This course extended for two weeks and the 
instruction received was of considerable value. In addition, an opportunity 
was presented for the instructing staff, drawn from the LTniversity of Toronto, 
the Royal Ontario Museum of Zoology and Head Office, to meet and talk to 
the field staff. 

At the annual meeting of the Department of Lands and Forests, January 
21st, 1947, Mr. Lloyd W. Swift, Chief of the Division of Wildlife Management, 
Ihiited States Forest Service, addressed the staff of the Department. 

Reports are presented under the headings of the four sections as outlined 
above. 

Enforcement 

On April 1st, 1946, Game and Fisheries Enforcement officers in Ontario 
numbered 136. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



These ofificers were responsible for enforcement throughout the Province 
of provisions of the Game and Fisheries Act and Regulations, the F'isheries Act 
(Canada), the Special Fishery- Regulations for the Province of Ontario, and the 
Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations. 

Previous to the amalgamation of the Department of Game and Fisheries 
with the Department of Lands and Forests, these enforcement officers had been 
subject to direct administration from headquarters at Toronto, though in that 
portion of the Province lying north and west of the French and Mattawa Rivers 
and Lake Nipissing, they were under the immediate supervision of district 
superintendents, viz: — 

(a) at North Bay,— 

in the Districts of Nipissing (north of the Mattawa River and Lake 
Nipissing), Timiskaming, Cochrane, Sudbury and Algoma; and 

(b) at Fort William, — 

in the Districts of Thunder Ba\ , Fort Frances and Kenora. 

In the territory south of the French and Mattawa Rivers and Lake Nipissing 
there were 74 officers; in the territor\' under supervision through the North Ba> 
office there were 35 officers; and in the territory under supervision through the 
Fort William office there were 17 officers. 

As of March 31, 1947, there were 177 officers in the enforcement service of 
the Fish and Wildlife Division, — 92 in Southern Ontario, 52 in the districts 
formerly supervised through the North Ba>- office, and 33 in the districts formerly 
supervised through the Fort William office. In general terms. Southern Ontario 
comprises the following forestry districts, viz: Algonquin, Lake Erie, Lake Huron, 
Lake Simcoe, Parry Sound, Quinte, Rideau and Trent. The area formerly 
supervised through the North Bay office comprises the following forestry Dis- 
tricts, viz: Chapleau, Cochrane, Gogama, Kapuskasing, North Bay, Sault Ste. 
Marie and Sudbur>'. The area formerly supervised through the Fort William 
office comprises the following forestry Districts, viz: Fort Frances, Geraldton, 
Kenora, Port Arthur and Siou.x Lookout. 

The Fish and Wildlife enforcement officers assigned to each District are 
under the immediate jurisdiction of the District Forester in charge. There is 
attached to the office of each District Forester a Fish and Wildlife Specialist, 
whose principal responsibility is to advise enforcement officers in the field and to 
co-operate in the supervision of the services of these enforcement officers. 

Border patrols were maintained during the summer months at various ports 
of entry from the United States into Ontario, including Fort Frances, Pigeon 
River, Sault Ste. Marie, Sarnia, Windsor, Fort Erie, Niagara Falls, the Thousand 
Island Bridge at Ivy Lea, Prescott and Cornwall. The principal service of the 
officers engaged in these patrols was to advise American visitors on their arrival 
in Ontario of the requirements of the Special Fishery Regulations and to check 
the exportation of fish by such non-resident anglers on their departure from the 
Province. 

During the oi)en season for deer in the fall, active road patrols were main- 
tained in several Districts and particularh' in those areas in which the him ting 
of deer was intensive, with a view to contacting hunters returning from their 
hunting exix-ditions and checking on the animals whlc-h had been taken. 

Resulting from the operation of these patrols, much \aluai)k' intormation 
accrued io this Division, and there is every reason to believe that the activities 
of the officers who undertook these patrols were responsible for a more rigid 
compliance with the provisions of oiu' legislation and regulations I)\- those par- 
ticipating in the recreation derived from angling and hunting. 



38 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



In their work of enforcement, officers of the Department in their respective 
patrol areas, derived an appreciable degree of assistance from the co-operation 
of those who held appointments as Deputy Game Wardens. These Deputy 
Game ^^'arden appointments are of an honorary nature and are provided, on 
application, to sportsmen and conservationists who are interested in the pro- 
tection of our fish and wildlife resources. During the year under review, such 
appointments were provided to more than thirteen hundred applicants. A large 
percentage of these appointments were made on the, recommendation of the 
respective municipal councils of the various townships established as regulated 
game preserve areas. While these appointments were province-wide in their 
scope, it is quite probable that those so appointed in regulated townships confined 
their assistance to services within the township, along the lines of securing 
compliance by hunters with provisions of the regulations which governed. 

A study of the records reveals the seizure of equipment, as well as fish anfl 
game taken illegalh", in 2,166 cases. 

Particulars of the officers responsible for these seizures are as follows, viz:^ 

Overseers 2,030 cases 

Deputy Game Wardens 46 cases 

Provincial police constables 21 cases 

Municipal police constables 3 cases 

Joint Action : 

Overseers and D. G. W. 43 

Overseers and O. P. P 14 

Overseers and Municipal Police 9 

— 66 cases 

2,166 cases 
The articles seized as a result of these activities included: — 

Live animals and birds in 4 cases 

Game animals (and portions) and birds in 202 cases 

Fire arms in , 976 cases 

Fish in 305 cases 

Nets and fishing gear in 150 cases 

Angling equipment in 321 cases 

Spears in 65 cases 

Pelts and hides in 319 cases 

Traps and snares in 195 cases 

Water craft in 26 cases 

Outboard motors in 10 cases 

Motor vehicles in 4 cases 

Lights (artificial) in 52 cases 

Miscellaneous articles in 73 cases 

Further details regarding these seizures are set forth in the following tables: — 

Game animals (and portions) and birds: — 

Deer and venison and moose and moose meat in . . 137 cases 

Black and Gre\' Squirrels 4 

Pheasants 11 

Quail 1 

Patridge 30 

Ducks 14 

Rabbits 53 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 39 



Fire Arms: — 

.22 calibre rifles 497 

.25 calibre rifles 4 

.25 .20 calibre rifles 6 

.22 410 combination rifle and shotgun 2 

High-power and hea\'\' calibre rifles, in.chuiing the 
following calibres:— .250 .3000;. 25 .35; .30; 
.30 .30;. 303; .30 .40; .32;. 32 .40; .348; .35; 
.351; .38/.40; .38/55.; .405; .44 .40; .45; 

.45 .90; .57; 6.5 M.M.; and 8 M.M 157 

Shot guns, including single barrel, double barrel, 

repeating and automatic. 331 

Revolvers 2 

Air-guns 18 

Fish :— 

("ommercial operations 21 

Illegal netting 26 

Spearing 26 

Angling 232 

Xets and Fishing Gear: — 

Gill nets seized in 114 cases 

Hoop nets seized in 9 cases 

Seine nets seized in 8 cases 

Dip nets seized in 14 cases 

Hook lines seized in 10 cases 

Pelts and Hides: — 

Beaver 749 

Fisher 1 

Fox 68 

Lynx 3 

Alarten . . 1 

Mink 45 

Muskral 472 

Otter 18 

Raccoon . 42 

Skunk 1 

Squirrel 3 

Weasel 30 

Deer and moose hides 68 

Traps and Snares: — 

A total of 1,939 trai)s and snares were seized, a large proportion of which, 

on account of the minor or technical nature of the infractions in\ol\ed, 
were redeemed for nominal fees 1)\ the ])ersons from whom the\' ha<l 
been originalK' seized. 

.\rtilicial Lights: 

Flashlights 36 

Gasoline lanterns 6 

Coal oil lanterns 2 

Carbide lamps 5 

.Spotlights () 

jack-lights . . 2 



40 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Miscellaneous articles: — 

Among the miscellaneous articles which were seized are included the 
following: — 

Decoys 48 

Tarpaulins and tents 4 

Pack-sacks 14 

Haversacks 7 

Suit-cases 4 

Trunks 1 

Axes 9 

Knives 5 

Shovels 3 

Forks 1 

Metal fish containers 6 

Storage batteries 3 

Fish shanties 2 

As in the case of traps and snares, due to the minor and technical nature of 
the ofifences which were responsible for the actual seizures, in a large percentage 
of the cases involving fire-arms and angling equipment, man\' of these articles 
were redeemed for nominal fees by those from whom the seizures were made. 

Prosecutions 

The statistics in the subjoined tables, and the explanatory remarks which 
follow may prove of considerable interest to those concerned. 



INFORMATIONS 





Seizures 


Investigations 


Total 


Overseers 


1,789 
26 
29 


279 
"6 


2,068 


Provincial Police 


26 


Joint Action 


3o 


Total 


1,844 


285 


2.129 



RESULTS OF PROSECUTIONS 





Convictions 


Dismissed 


Withdrawn 


Total 


Overseers 

Provincial Police 

Joint Action 


1,979 
26 
35 


85 


4 


2,068 
26 
35 


Total 


2,040 


85 


4 


2,129 



Resulting from patrols and investigation, charges were laid against violators 
in a total of 2,129 cases in which infractions of provisions of the Game and 
Fisheries Act and Regulations, the Special Fishery Regulations for Ontario and 
the Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations which had been witnessed 
or disclosed upon investigation. 

In 2,040 of these court actions, convictions were registered b\' the xarious 
Magistrates before whom the respective charges were heard; in 85 cases the 
charges were dismissed for lack of sufficient substantiating evidence; and in the 
4 remaining cases the charges were, for various reasons, withdrawn b\' the 
officers who had been responsible for laying the same. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 41 



A review of these 2,129 cases which were prosecuted reveals the following 
information which may presumably be of further interest: 

Fish and Wildlife Overseers laid the charges in 2,068 instances; convictions 
were registered in 1,979 of these, 1,718 of which were subsequent to seizure of 
equipment on observance of infractions, and 261 following investigation of 
information which disclosed infractions. The charges laid by Overseers in 85 
cases, 67 following seizures and 18 following investigation, were dismissed; and 
in the remaining 4 cases, all following seizures, the charges were withdrawn. 

Pro\incial Police Constables were responsible for the laying of charges in 
26 cases, in all of which this action followed seizures, and in all these cases con- 
victions were registered. 

Joint action by Overseers, Deputy Game Wardens, Provincial Police 
Constables and/or Alunicipal Police Constables was subsequently followed by 
the laying of information in 35 cases, all of which were successfully prosecuted 
and convictions recorded. The charges in 29 of these cases were as a result of, 
and subsequent to, seizures and the observance of violations, while in the remain- 
ing 6 cases the informations were laid following the investigation of evidence 
of infractions. 

Wildlife Management 

Genend 

The over-all picture with respect to wildlife management in Ontario during 
the hrst warless year is not entirely satisfactory. Wartime prosperity had 
resulted in a steady increase of hunting pressure, despite the absence of a large 
proportion of able-bodied men in military service, the severe shortage of sporting 
goods, especially ammunition, and the drastic gasoline rationing. The present 
year finds all restrictions removed, our fighting men all home and absorbed into 
civilian occupations, and a general high level of wages and almost complete 
employment. Similar conditions prevail in the United States. The result is an 
intensit\' of hunting pressure, both from residents and non-residents, such as 
our Province has never before known. 

Coupled with increased hunting, there are a number of factors at work 
that are inimical to wildlife. In farm lands, game has alwa\s been dependent 
on patches of weeds and brush for food and cover, especially such species as 
European Hare, Pheasant and Hungarian Partridge that do not frequent wood- 
lots. These patches have always been a blight on the landscape from the point 
of view of clean farming, but, fortunateh' for the game, realh- energetic farmers 
have not been too numerous. We now live in the age of chemical weed and 
brush killers, and what was once wished for in the way of clean farming, now 
becomes {)ossible. We also have rural engineers keeping open roads that were 
formerly allowed to drift in winter, and each jjatch of weeds and brush on the 
roadside is a potential snowdrift. ObviousK-, wildlife management can never 
exist at cross-purposes with scientific agriculture. If the old food and shelter 
patches should go, then go the\- must, but it becomes our task to develop tech- 
niques for providing food and shelter that will not be obji'ctionable. 

Of a similar nature are local increases of pasture land, con\'ersion of waste 
land into tobacco farms, and penetration of the vital deer winter range by 
farming which ma>' superficiall\- leave the country practically imaltered, because 
miles of barren hills still exist, while actualK' clearing the swamps which were 
the sole support in winter of deer ranging the whole area in hunting season. 
They are offset b>- some gains, chiefl\- in the matter of reforestation, and in the 
management of woodlots but wildlife management still remains largely a matter 
of executive orders rather than an established [lart of our land use, though we 
know that wildlife is a product of the land, not of regulations. 



42 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Many of our important wildlife species are at the crossroads toda>", with a 
natural tendency- to sHde into an easy downgrade leading to oblivion — part of 
the famous road paved with good intentions. The condition of our waterfowl 
is alarming. The propagation of exotic species can easily be merely a sink hole 
for public and private funds unless there is food and cover for the birds in the 
area in which they are released, and unless they are protected at release from 
the shock of changing their environment. Our moose have shown a distinct 
tendency to go downhill. Our caribou have nearh" vanished. Xow the>' are 
hanging on and could reasonably be headed upward if we give them a little help. 
Beaver are abundant, and will sta\' that way if we give them help. Other fine 
fur bearers are scarce, but where trappers can get a good revenue from beaver 
the other species can spread out from the game preserves without being perse- 
cuted to extinction. 

Migratory Birds 

The regulations respecting migratory- birds are established l)\ federal 
authorit\- under the Migratory Birds Convention Act. There is no doubt that 
the situation of our ducks and geese is more alarming than it has been since 1936. 
The\" have shown a sharp decline for the second year in succession, and the 
report of the mid-winter inventory organized by the United States Fish and 
Wildlife Service shows a critical condition. Checks of hunters' bags of ducks 
are reported to have shown a shortage of young birds, and this is reflected also 
in reports of goose hunters visiting James Bay. For the first time the mid- 
winter duck count was extended to the entire winter range of ducks and our 
officers participated by counting ducks on Ontario open waters during the 
census period. 

Woodcock seem to be holding their numbers. A series of counts to check 
the abundance of this species on Ontario nesting grounds was commenced. 

Upland Game (Native) 

The various species of grouse now show a general increase, after having 
been at the bottom of their natural cycle. In a few areas the increase is well 
enough advanced that the birds can no longer be called scarce, while in others 
the increase has still not begun. A fairh" general increase in snowshoe rabbits 
is also reported. Cottontail rabbits remain in normal numbers. 

It has been drawn to our attention that our onh' population of pinnated 
grouse, on Manitoulin Island, has been spreading recenth. This fact was 
given publicit\" in the Department's magazine "S\lva" with a view to aiding 
in protection, so that the colony of these birds on the island could be built up 
and perhaps used for propagation. 

Fur-Bearing Animals 

Nearly all fur-bearing animals vary in numbers according to the progress 
of natural cycles. A few, notably the beaver, remain constant excepting as 
their numbers are controlled by trapping. The most notable population change 
is a decrease of mink, which are becoming scarce. Muskrat are also showing 
signs of decline, although in man\- of our best areas the population is still high. 
Weasel and raccoon are reported to be decreasing locally and although skunks 
are still numerous they have fallen off to some extent. In some of these low- 
value furs, the volume of trade gives little indication of populations. Fox 
remains abundant. In a few areas there are stocks of fisher and marten, but 
both of these species, and the lynx as well, are so scarce that natural cycles fail 
to develop normally. The wolverine is practically extinct, a fact which ma>- 
ultimateh- be regretted, as its fur possesses special properties which are making 
it valuable. As a predator the species was hardh- more destructive than other 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



43 



fur-bearers and its depredations on trap-lines were probabh" less serious than 
those of the wolf. Its near-extermination is evidence against any great difficult}' 
of capture. 

Trap-line Management 

A careful stud}' is now being made of the possibility' of imj)roving the basis 
of trap-line management in Ontario. 

Introduced Wildlife 

The ring-necked pheasant was at a low ebb in southern Ontario in tiie 
spring of 1946 after a series of adverse seasons. A study of the wild hatch 
showed large and healthy broods, but the number of broods was extremeh' 
small. As the qualit}" of the shoot is determined by the wild stock it was 
obviously predestined to be poor. Isolated colonies of Hungarian Partridge 
survive, after unfavourable seasons, over a wide area. The\' are reasonabh" 
nimierous in the eastern tip of the Province. European hares are in normal 
numbers, and have practically stopped spreading. 

Wildlife Propagation 

Pheasants were raised under contract at the Department's farms at Norman- 
dale and Codrington. In addition, deficiencies in our supply of birds were 
made up b\' purchase from private breeders. 



DISTRIBUTION OF PHEASANTS IN ONTARIO 
For the fiscal year ending March 31, 1947 



County 


Township 


Poults 


Hens 


Cocks 


Total 


Essex 




1,080 
1,000 
195 
395 
195 
210 
195 
195 
195 
210 
195 
210 
200 
210 
210 
195 
210 
195 
195 
200 
195 
195 
210 
210 
210 
195 
205 
420 
195 
195 
195 


280 
200 

"'38 


128 
36 

" 6 


1,488 
1,236 


Kent. . 




Lambton 


Plympton 

Sarnia 


195 
395 


Klgin 


S. Dorchester 

Ba\'ham 


195 
210 


Middlesex 


Malahide 

Dunwich 

Aldborough 

Westminster 


195 
195 
195 
210 


Norfolk 


Metcalfe 

Woodhouse 

Middleton 

Townsend 

\\ indham 


195 
210 
200 
250 
210 


( )xford 


East Oxford 


195 




Dereham 


210 


lirani 


Burford 

Dumfries South 

Onondaga 

Puslinch 

Dunn 


195 


\\ cllingioii 


195 
200 
195 


Haldimand 


201 




Ca\uga 

Canboro 

Walpole 

Oneida 

Rainham 


210 
210 
210 
195 
205 




Seneca 


420 




Ca\uga South 

Moulton 


195 
195 




Sherbrooi<e 

Total 


195 




8,315 


518 


172 


9,005 



44 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DISTRIBUTION OF PHEASANTS IN ONTARIO 
For the fiscal year ending March 31, 1947 



County 



WYlland 



Lincoln. 



Lincoln & Niagara 
Hahun 



\\ en I worth 



Peel 



York . 



Township 



Ontario 

Prince Edward . 
Durham 

Northumberland 

Frontenac 

Peterborough. . . 



Carried Forward 

Wainfleet 

Humberstone 

Crowland 

Thorold 

Stamford 

Bertie 

Willoughby 

Grimsby South 

Clinton 

Caistor 

Gainsborough 

Grantham 

Louth 

Niagara 

From Niagara District 
Pheasant Breeders Ass'n . 

Trafalgar 

Nelson 

Esquesing 

Nassagaways 

Ancaster 

Barton 

Saltfleet 

Flamboro West 

Flamboro East 

Beverly 

Binbrook 

Glanford 

Toronto 

Chinguacousy 

Albion 

Caledon 

Toronto Gore 

Scarborough 

Markham 

Whitchurch 

Vaughan 

King 

Gwillimbur\ North 

Gwillimbury East 

Pickering 

East Whitby 

West Whitby 

South Marysburg 

Hope 

Cavan 

Brighton 

Presqu'lle Point 

South Monaghan 

Trenton 

Wolfe Island 

Doure 



Poults 



Total 2L025 



8.315 
210 
195 
195 
500 
195 
210 
195 
195 
250 
195 
195 
250 
200 
445 

1,200 
400 
200 
400 
200 
200 
200 
445 
200 
200 
200 
195 
195 
200 
400 
200 
200 
200 
400 
400 
200 
400 
400 
200 
90 
400 
400 
200 
600 

"30 

"40 

15 
45 



25 



Hens Cocks 



518 



172 



128 



20 



132 



161 



30 
'36 



24 



1,023 



20 



11 



16 
16 



12 



267 



Total 

9,005 
210 
195 
195 
500 
195 
210 
195 
195 
250 
195 
195 
250 
200 
445 

1,200 

400 

348 

400 

200 

200 

200 

445 

200 

200 

200 

195 

195 

352 

400 

200 

200 

200 

400 

400 

200 

400 

400 

200 

90 

572 

400 

200 

600 

46 

30 

46 

40 

15 

45 

36 

25 



22 315 



A complete review of the history of the Ring-necked Pheasant in Ontario 
made during the year revealed that, in areas where the snowfall totalled over 
50 inches, pheasants were never established in shootable numbers unless there 
was some local condition related to agricultural practice which provides com- 
pensating food and shelter in winter. Where the snowfall is greater than 70 
inches it is not worth while trying pheasants at all. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 45 



Open Seasons 

In addition to the open seasons established by statute, the following open 
seasons were established b>' Order-in-Council under appropriate sections of the 
Game and Fisheries Act, 1946. 

Ruffed Grouse, Spruce Grouse, Sharp-tailed Grouse and Ptarmigan — An open 
season was established from October oth to October 14th, 1946, both dates 
inclusive, in all parts of Ontario excepting the counties of Essex, Kent, Lambton, 
Middlesex, Elgin, Perth, Oxford, Norfolk, Waterloo, Brant, Haldimand, Went- 
worth, Lincoln, W'elland, Peel, Halton and York, and the townships of Pickering, 
Whitby and Whitb\' East in Ontario County. The bag limit was set at five 
birds per da>' and twenty- for the whole season. 

Pheasants — The open season for pheasants permitted ring-necked pheasants 
to be hunted or killed with guns other than guns using ammunition containing 
onh- one bullet between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., — 

(a) On October 23rd, 26th and 28th, 1946, in the townships of,— Caistor, 
Clinton, Gainsboro, Grantham, Grimsb>" North, Grimsby South, Louth 
and Niagara in the Count\' of Lincoln; Bertie, Crowland, Humberstone, 
Pelham, Stamford, Thorold, Wainfleet and Willoughb\' in the Count\' 
of Welland; and Ancaster, Barton, Beverle\-, Binbrook, Flamboro East, 
Flamboro West, Glanford and Saltfieet in the Count}' of Wentworth; 

(b) On October 25th and 26th. 1946, in the townships of, — Marysburgh 
South in the County of Prince Edward; Pickering, Whitby and Whitb\- 
East in the Count\' of Ontario; Gwillimbury North, King, Markham, 
Scarborough, Wiughan and Whitchurch in the County of York; Albion, 
Caledon, Chinguacousy, and in that portion of the Township of Toronto 
lying North of the Queen Elizabeth Highwa>", in the County of Peel; 
Esquesing, Nassagawe^a, Nelson and Trafalgar in the County of 
Halton; Puslinch in the County of Wellington; Burford, Dumfries 
South and Onandaga in the County of Brant; Dereham and Oxford 
East in the Count>" of Oxford; Aldborough, Bayham, Dorchester 
South, Dunwich and Malahide in the County of P21gin; and West- 
minster in the Count>" of Middlesex (part); 

(c) On October 24th in Lambton county, except the Township of Ph nipton ; 

(d) On October 31st and November 1st in Pelee Island, Essex Count\-. 

The bag limit was set at three cock pheasants per day except in Pelee Island 
where it was set at four cock pheasants per day. 

Black and Gray Squirrels — An open season was established on November 
ISth^and 16th, 1946, with a bag limit of five squirrels i)er da>'. 

Deer — In addition to the deer season provided b\- statute open seasons were 
established whereb>' deer were hunted, killed or destroyed, — 

(a) On Novx>mber 11th to Nowmber 26th, 1946, in (^irleton Count\- west 
of the Rideau River; 

(b) On November 18th to 23rd, both inclusi\e, in the Counties of Bruce 
and Grey; and in the Townships of Williamsburgh and Mountain, in 
the County of Dundas; 

(c) On November 27th to 30th, Ijoth iiulusi\c', in the year 1946 in the 
Townshijjs of Howard and Orford in the Count>' of Kent; Blandford, 
Blenheim and Nissouri East, in the County of Oxford; Erin and Minto 
in the County of Wellington; and Esquesing and Nassagawcya in the 
County of Halton; Puslinch in the County of Wellington. 



46 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Rifles were permitted in Bruce and Gre\- Counties, and in the Township of 
Mountain in the County of Dundas. In all the other areas listed only shotguns 
with .S.S.G. or buckshot loads, and bow and arrow, were permitted. 

A special licence was used in isolated townships. 

Beaver — An open season for beaver was established from December 1st to 
December 21st, both inclusive, in all of Ontario north and west of the French 
and Mattawa Rivers excepting the district of Rainy River and that portion of 
Kenora District south of the main line of the C.N.R. and west of the C.N.R. 
line running from Fort William to Superior Junction. South of the French 
and Mattawa Rivers, the same season was established in the districts of Parry 
Sound and Nipissing, the county of Lanark, and the townships of Artemisia, 
Bentinck, Euphrasia, Glenelg, Holland, \ormanb>". Proton and Sullivan in the 
County of Grey. 

The bag limit was set at ten beaver per trapper. 

Muskrat — Provision was made whereby (including extensions) muskrats 
were hunted, taken or killed, and the carcass, pelt or an\- part thereof possessed, — 

(a) On March 6th to April 12th, both inclusive, in the ^ear 1947 in the 
Counties of Brant, Elgin, Essex, Haldimand, Kent, Lincoln, Norfolk, 
Oxford, Welland and Wentworth; and those parts of the Counties of 
Halton, Lambton, Middlesex, Peel, Perth, Waterloo and Wellington 
lying south of Highway No. 7; 

(b) On March 20th to April 26th, both inclusive, in the year 1947 in the 
Counties of Bruce, Carleton, DufTerin, Dundas, Durham, Glengarry, 
Grenville, Grey, Huron, Leeds, Northumberland, Ontario, Peter- 
borough, Prescott, Prince Edward, Russell, Simcoe, Stormont, Victoria 
and York; and those parts of the Counties of Lambton, Halton, Middle- 
sex, Peel, Perth, Waterloo and \\x'llington lying north of Highway- 
No. 7 ; and those parts of the counties of Frontenac, Hastings and Lennox 
and Addington King south of Highwa>^ No. 7; and that part of the 
County of Lanark King south of Highwav No. 7 and east of Highwavs 
No. 15 and No. 29;' 

(c) On March 20th to May 5th, both inclusive, in the year 1947, in the 
County of Renfrew, the Provisional County of Haliburton and the 
Districts of Muskoka and Parry Sound; and that part of the District 
of Nipissing lying south of the Township of Widdiheld and the Mattawa 
River; and those parts of the Counties of Frontenac, Hastings and 
Lennox and Addington lying north of Highway No. 7; and that part 
of the County of Lanark lying north of Highway- No. 7 and west of 
Highwa>'s No. 15 and No. 29; 

(d) On April 1st to Ma\' 21st, both inclusi\-e, in ihe year 1947, in the 
Districts of Algoma, Rain\' River and Sudbury; and that part of the 
District of Nipissing King north of the south boundary of the Town- 
ship of W'iddiheld and the Mattawa River; 

(e) On April 1st to Ma>- 31st, both inclusive, in the year 1947, in the 
Districts of Cochrane, Kenora, Patricia, Timiskaming and Thunder 
Bay. 

Migratory Birds — A summary of the Federal Regulations for 1946 as the\ 
ai)])lied to Ontario follows: — 

OjK'U Seasons (both dates inclusive) \\'oodcock, October 1 to October 31st. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



Ducks (other than Eiders). 

Geese (other than Brant), Rails, Coots, Galhnules. 

Xorthern District (defined below): September 16th to Xovember 29th. 

Throughout the remainder of the Province: September 25 to December 9, 
except that in the Counties of Essex, Kent and Elgin the open season for geese 
(other than Brant) shall be from Xovember 1 to January 10. 

The Northern District of Ontario is defined as that part of the Province 
lying north and west of a line described as follows: Commencing at the southwest 
angle of Bruce County; thence in a general easterly direction along the souther!}- 
boundaries of Bruce and Grey Counties to the southwest angle of X'^ottawasaga 
Township in the Count\- of Simcoe, along the south boundaries of Xottawasaga, 
Sunnidale and \'espra Townships to the line of mean high water of Lake Simcoe, 
along the said line of mean high water on the south side of Lake Simcoe to the 
northwest angle of Brock Township in the Count}' of Ontario, and along the 
north boundar}' of Brock Township to the centre of King's Highway X'o. 12; 
thence souther!}- along the centre line of the said Highway to the centre line of 
the right-of-way of the Canadian Pacific Railway in the vicinity of ]\I}rtle; 
thence in a genera! easter!}- direction along the said centre line to the cit}- of 
Peterborough, along the centre line of King's Highway X'o. 7 to the west boundar}- 
of Lanark County, along the west and south boundaries of Lanark Count}' to 
the line of mean liigh water on the north side of Rideau Lake, and along the line 
of mean high water on the north side of Rideau Lake and Rideau River to a 
point opposite the northeast angle of Grenville County; thence southerly along 
the east boundary of Grenville County to the northwest angle of Dundas County; 
thence easterly along the northerly boundaries of Dundas, Stormont and Glen- 
garry Counties to the interprovincial boundar}-. 

Eider Ducks — X'orth of the Quebec-Cochrane-Winnipeg line of the C.X.R.: 
September 16 to X'ovember 15. Close Seasons — There is a close season through- 
out the year on Brant, Swans, Cranes, Wilson's Snipe, all other shore birds 
except Woodcock, and all migrator}- non-game and insectivorous birds. 

The possession of migrator}- game birds killed during the oj^en season is 
allowed in Ontario until March 81 following the open season. 

Bag Limits- In an}- da}': Ducks (exclusive of Mergansers), 12, of which 
not more than 1 ma}' be a Wood Duck; Geese (other than Brant), 5; Rails, Coots 
and Callinules. 25; Woodcock, 8. In an}- open season: Ducks (exclusive of 
Mergansers) 150; Geese (other than Brant), 25; Woodcock, 100. 

Guns, Appliances and Hunting Methods 

Forbidden — The use of any automatic (auto-loading) gun w ith a magazine 
that has not been permanentl}- plugged or altered so that it cannot carr}- more 
than two cartridges, or rifle, or swivel or machine gun, or batter}-, or an}- gun 
larger than number 10 gauge, or any weapon other than a gun or a bow and 
arrow; and the use of live birds as dcco}-s, or of any aeroplane, j)ower-boat, 
sail-boat, or night-light, and shooting from an}' motor or wheeled vehicle or a 
xehicle to which a draught animal is attached. The hunting of migrator}- game 
birds !)}■ the use or airl of baiting with grain or othi-r artificial food is |)rohibited. 

Persons using blinds (m- deco}s for hunting migratory game birds are urged 
to consult the Regulations for details of the restrictions upon this nicihod of 
hunting. 

For special restrictions about luinting on waters of kondeau iia}-, see 
Regulations. 



48 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



The shooting of migratory game birds earHer than one-half hour before 
sunrise or later than one-half hour after sunset is prohibited. 

The penalt\' for violation of the migratory bird laws is a fine of not more 
than three hundred dollars and not less than ten dollars, or imprisonment for a 
term not exceeding six months, or both fine and imprisonment. 

Wildlife Surveys — 

A study of various census methods with respect to the ring-necked pheasant, 
carried out by the Research Division in southern Ontario. This was extended b\' the 
Fish and Wildlife Division to include a study of the history of the pheasant in 
Ontario in relation to various factors affecting its survival, done by Head Office 
staff, and a field check of the birds through the pre-hunting season, done b\- 
one-of the officers who had taken part in pheasant distribution during the sum- 
mer. The results have already- been mentioned. A study of cormorant colonies 
on Georgian Bay was also carried out. A special pre-season and hunting season 
check of pheasant numbers was also made on Pelee Island in order to arrive 
at a formula for estimating the pheasant population there. 

Wildlife Harvest— 

As a means of checking the success attending hunting in Ontario, a card 
for recording hunting effort and bag, known as the "Game Bag Census Card" 
was printed and distributed to hunters. 

In addition to these cards we had checks of deer hunters on the high\\a> 
and various reports of game shipped and exported. 

During the hunting season of 1946 the Canadian Pacific Express Company- 
reported handling over its lines in Ontario 689 deer, 41 moose and 41 bear. 

Through the ports of Rain\' River, Fort Frances and Rainier the following 
were exported: moose, 200; deer, 3002; caribou, 2; bear, 141; geese, 8; ducks, 
2,493. Some of this game was taken outside Ontario, e.g. the caribou. 

A check by overseers at the port of Windsor on November 16 (squirrel 
season) and November 23 showed the following exports of game: 



November 23 



Total cars 

Total hunters. . . . 
European hares. . 
Cottontail rabbits 

Squirrels 

Deer 

Ducks 

Bears 

Raccoons 




At the port of Windsor, the Essex County Sportsmen's Association also 
checked on four Saturdays in the fall for five hours each, and counted 3,002 
hunters and 7,171 rabbits. 



7,389 


4,264 


2 


o 


3,280 


3,001 


62 


48 


3 


1 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 49 



It is gcncralK' felt that the border area is over-hunted because of its prox- 
iniit\- to population centres in the United States and. for that reason, there is 
strong local objection to non-resident hunters. This is directed impartialh' 
against the entire non-resident group. 

The Gra\enhurst road check showed llu' following for the period November 
7th to November 21st. It is compared with a check from .\o\-ember 6th to 
November 19th, 1941. 

I 1946 I 1941 

Hunters 

Moose 

Deer j 

I^ear 

W elves 

At Pelee Island, a complete count was made of the pheasants killed during 
I he open season, and b\" means of certain additional counts, the following figures 
were ascertained concerning pheasants on Pelee Island: 

Number of hens before open season 5, 160 

Number of cocks before open season 5,263 

Number of cocks killed 4,615 

Number of hens (illegally) killed 300 

Number of hens after the open season 4,860 

Number of cocks after the open season 648 

All of these figures except the actual kill should be rounded off, but it ma>' 
be taken that there were at least 10,000 birds on the island before the shoot, 
and at least 4,000 hens and 600 cocks left after the shoot. 

The Game Bag Census Cards indicated that, by those reporting in 1946, 
there were 0.7 deer killed per hunter, and the number of deer killed per hunter- 
da\- was 0.09. The area covered was much larger than that funnelled through 
the road block aiul included portions where deer were ver\- abundant. 

Onh' 8% of the hunters reporting were hunting ducks, and some of these 
ma\' have hunted onh' incidentalh. Only 5% as much time was spent on 

duck-hunting as on deer hunting, l)\ hunters reporting. 

Wildlife Library 

A start was made on the assembling of a librarx' on wildlift- management. 
Contributions and exchanges will be welcomed. 

Wildlife Research 

Close co-operation was maintained with wildlitc- rc-starch p.u'ties Irom the 
Research l)i\ision. 

Technical Personnel 

At present there is a serious lack in Ontario of men trained in wildlife 
management. A few service men have shown an interest in the subject and are 
taking up studies at universities which will give them basic knowledge, but the\- 
will not be available for emi)loyment for se\eral \ears, during which time essential 
work is certain to be delaved. 



50 



RFPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



REVENUE RECEINED FROM EXPORT PERMITS 
April 1, 1946 to March 31, 1947 



Species 


Total Amount 
of Pelts 


Total Amount 
of Revenue 


Bear 




90 

45,847 
1,667 


$ 45.00 


Beaver 


91,694.00 


Fisher 


2,620.50 



Fox (Cross) , 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 

Fox (White) 

Fox (Not specified). . 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrai 

Otter 

Raccoon 

.Skunk 

Weasel 

Woh-erine 



2,771 

24,429 

496 

148 



Total Revenue 



4,156.50 

12,214.50 

848.50 

222.00 



766 


1,149.00 


1,919 


1,919.00 


36,541 


18,270.50 


441,478 


44,147.80 


5,158 


5,158.00 


15,922 


1,592.20 


36,644 


1,832.20 


53,778 


2,688.90 


4 


1.80 




$188,560.40 



REVENUE RECEIVED FROM TANNERS PERMITS 
April 1, 1946 to March 31, 1947 



Species 



Total Amount 
of Pelts 



Total Amount 
of Revenue 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 

Fox (White).. 

Fox (Not specified) . . 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Woherine 



280 
61 
50 
99 
3.669 
62 



Fotal Revenue. 



140.00 
122.00 
80.50 
148.50 
1,834.50 
116.50 



11 


16.50 


19 


19.00 


1,120 


560.00 


98,391 


19,807.15 


24 


24.00 


2,4.53 


245.30 


1,393 


69.65 


914 


45.70 



$23,229.30 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



51 



SU.MMARV 



Species 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black). 

Fox (White) 

Fox (Not specified) . . 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrai 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 



Pelts 
Exported 



90 

4o,847 

1,667 

2,771 

24,429 

496 

148 

"'766 

1,919 

36,541 

441,478 

5,158 

15,922 

36.644 

53,778 

4 



Pelts 
Tanned 



280 
61 
50 
99 
3.669 
62 



11 

19 

1,120 

198,391 

24 

2.4.53 

1 ,393 

914 



Total 
Pelts 



370 

45,908 

1,717 

2,870 

28,098 

558 

148 

" ' 777 

1,938 

37,661 

639,869 

5,182 

18,375 

38,037 

54,692 

4 



Revenue received from Export Permits. 
Revenue received from Tanners Permits. 
Total Revenue 



« 188,560.40 

23,229.30 

S21 1,789.70 



TOi AL \ALUE OF PELTS EXPORTED OR lANXED 
During the year ending March 31, 1947 



Species 



Pelts 
Exported 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 

Fox (White) 

Fox (Not specified) . . 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 



90 

45,847 

1,667 

2,771 

24.429 

496 

148 

766 
1,919 
36,541 
Muskrat I 441,478 



Otter. 
Raccoon . . 
Skunk. . . . 
Weasel . . . 
Wolverine. 



5,158 

15,922 

36,644 

53,778 

4 



Total i 667,658 208,546 876,204 



Pelts 
Tanned 



280 
61 
50 
99 
3,669 
62 



11 

19 

1.120 

198.391 

24 

2,453 

1,393 

914 



Total 
Pelts 



370 

45,908 

1,717 

2,870 

28,098 

558 

148 

" ' 777 

1,938 

37,661 

)39,869 

5,182 

18,375 

38,037 

54,692 

4 



\'alue of 
Pelts 



S 814.00 

1,273,947.(X) 

59.803.11 

22,242.."j0 

84,294.00 

9,452..52 

2,396.12 

17,904.60 

45,988.74 

915,538.91 

2,271.534.95 

125,663.50 

39,690.00 

30,429.60 

67,271.16 

49.32 



$4,966,209.43 



STAT i: mi: NT OF RAN'CH RAISED PELTS EXP()Kii:i) OK lANNED 
For the year ending March 31, 1947 



Species 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Silviror Black) 

Fox (Blue) 

Mink 



Exported 



Tanned 



Total 
Pelts 



Value of 
Pelts 



56 

23,0.58 

1,244 

70,982 



8 
3,294 

'2,788 



64 

26,352 

1,244 

73,770 



95,340 



6,090 



101.430 



$ 496.00 

446,402.88 

22.640.80 

1,793,348.70 



$2,262,888.38 



52 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Fur Farming 

The decided slump in the raw fur market during 1946 was responsible for 
mink ranchers receiving up to 25% less for their furs than the\- received last 
year. The demand for long hair furs, principally fox, declined to such an extent 
that auction houses reported only 10 to 20% clearances and in some cases, the 
prices offered were so low that the entire offering of fox was withdrawn. Many 
fox ranchers realized prices equal only to production costs. 

This condition, together with the rising costs of feed, building materials 
and labour has harassed the fur farmer, and caution in the purchase of breeding 
stock and production is the keynote for the coming Near. 

During the calendar >ear 1946, 1,502 Fur Farmers' licences were issued, 
1.187 being renewals of previous licences and 315 for newh' established fur farms. 

Mink and fox continued to be the principal species propagated on ranches 
and Departmental records show that during the fiscal year 1946-47 fur farmers 
disposed of their production of these species in the following manner: — 



Species 


Tanned 


Exported 


Total 


Mink 

Sih"er Fox .... 




2,788 
3.294 


70,982 
23,058 


73,770 
26 352 







The following table shows the location In- Count\' and Districts of licensed 
fur farms in Ontario : — 



County or District 

Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Cochrane 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarr\- 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and Addington . . . 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka 



Number 




County or District Number 

Middlesex 51 

\ipissing , 8 

Norfolk 12 

Northumberland 7 

Ontario 40 

Oxford 26 

Parr\- Sound 19 

Peek 33 

Perth .52 

Peterboro 9 

Prescott 11 

Prince Edward 6 

Rainy River 28 

Renfrew .52 

Russell 2 

Simcoe 89 

Siormonl 3 

Sudbury 12 

Timiskaming 12 

Thunder Ba> 102 

\'ictoria 15 

Waterloo 40 

Welland 10 

W ellington 35 

Wentworth ,56 

York 164 

Total 1,,502 



Wolf Bounty 

At the 1946 session of the Ontario Legislature. The Wolf Bount\- Act and 
The Wolf Bount\- Amendment Act, 1941, were repealed, and The \\'olf and Bear 
Bount\' Act, 1946 was enacted. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



53 



This Act authorizetl the payment of §25. OU as boimtx" on a timber or brush 
wolf three months of age or over and $5.00 as bount>' on a timber or brush wolf 
under the age of three months. 

It will be noted from the following comparative table that more woKes 
were taken during this last fiscal year than in any year showm, and it is interesting 
to note the marked increase in the number of brush wolves taken. The total 
number of wolves taken is unusually large and may indicate that the natural 
peak in population has been reached, and will probabK' recede during the next 
few \ears. 



Perioc 




Timber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Bounty and 
Expenses 


For year ending March 31, 
For vear ending March 31, 


1943 

1944 


935 
i 1,,302 


497 

731 
665 

777 

1.182 


32 

32 

12 
30 
42 


1,464 
2,065 
1,998 
2,073 
2,664 


.S33,606.62 
46 545.75 


For year ending March 31, 
For year ending March 31, 
For year ending March 31, 


1945 

1946 


' 1,321 

1 ,266 


45,993.58 
44,999.87 
59,275.18 


1947 


1.440 



The following is a summary of the number of wolves taken in each of the 
Counties and Districts, on which bounty was claimed during the hscal \ear 
ending March 31, 1947: — 

COUNTIES 



Count V 



Timber 



Brush 



Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Durham 

K'k'in 

Esse.x 

Frontenac 

Grenviile 

Grey 

Haldiniand 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Laml)lon 

Lanari< 

Leeds 

Lenno.x and A(hIington , 

Middlesex ■...., 

Norfolk 

Xorihumiieriand 

(Jnlario 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Victoria 

Welland 

Weilingltjii 

York 



Total. 



70 



4 
28 

1 
12 
29 
28 
35 

1 

io 
366 



Pups 



4 


31 


2 


12 




() 


1 


8 




4 


.") 


13 


1 


9 




I 




1 


8 


55 


1 


2 




4 




1 


1 


43 




10 



13 



26 



54 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



DISTRICTS 



District 



Timber 



Brush 



Pup? 



Algoma 

Cochrane . . . . 
Haliburton . . 

Kenora 

Manitoulin . . 
Muskoka . . . . 
Xipissing. . . . 
Parry Sound . 

Patricia 

Rainy River. 

.Sudbury 

Timiskaming. 
Thunder Ba\ 

Total . 



.J.J 
26 
14 

414 

27 

.") 

108 
.J] 

104 

207 
96 
24 

239 



1,370 



99 
4 
2 

129 

141 
26 
27 
.34 
11 

100 
93 
11 

119 

816 



9 
16 



A total of 1,812 applications for bounty on 2,622 wolves and 42 pups were- 
submitted. However, bounty was allowed on 2,609 wolves and 38 pups with 
13 applications concerninti 13 woKx's and 4 ]jtips being refused for \-arious reasons. 

Bear Bounty 

The Order-in-Counc-il dated August 19th, 1942, which authorized the pa\- 
ment of Bear Bount\" was superceded b\- the enactment of The Wolf and Bear 
Bounty Act, 1946. 

The conditions on which b()iuU\" is paid under this Act however, are essen- 
tially the same. A $10.00 bount>' is paid on any bear 12 months of age or over 
and S5.00 on any bear under 12 months of age, which has been killed between 
April 15th and November 30th in Townships located in certain Counties and 
Districts and of which 25% of the total area is devoted to agriculture. The 
Act further specifies that the bear must be killed in defence or preservation of 
live stock or property", by a bona fide resident of the Township. 



The following table indicates the number of bears and cubs killed in each 
of the Counties and Districts on which applications for bounty have been received 
during the fiscal year ending March 31, 1947. Some 816 applications on 959 
bears and 73 cubs were submitted. Of these, bount\^ was paid on 937 bears 
and 73 cubs and 13 claims concerning 22 bear were refused. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



oo 



County or District 



Bear 
(12 months or over) 



Cubs 
(under 12 months) 



Algoma . . . 
Brant . . . . 
Bruce . . . . 
Carleton . . 
Cochrane . 
Dufferin . . 
Dundas. . . 
Durham . . 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac. 
Glengarr\ . 
Grenville. . 
Gre\- 



Haldimand. 
Haliburton . 

Halton 

Hastings . . 

Huron 

Kenora . . . . 

Kent 

Lambton . . . 
Lanark . . . . 
Leeds 



Lennox and Addington . 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Xipissing 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Norfolk 

Parry Sound 

Patricia 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterboro 

Prescott 

Prince Edward 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Sudl)ur\ 

Timiskamin^ 
Thunder Ba\ 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wen I worth 

York 

Total 



40 

12 
101 



30 
51 
34 

12 



13 

48 



81 



101 
47 



84 

165 

121 

2 



12 
4 



14 



959 



56 REPORT OP^ THE No. 3 



Game Fish 

During the fiscal year ending March 31, 1947, twenty-seven Hatcheries 
and Rearing Stations were operated successfully. No new plants or additions 
were established during the course of the year. 

For the culture of game fish, the development of rearing stations or a com- 
bination of hatcheries and rearing stations instead of a hatchery only, is in 
keeping with the progressive developments in this field. A hatcher}- may be 
defined as a building in which is housed all the necessary equipment for hatching 
and rearing of fish to the fry or advanced fingerling stages. A rearing station 
is an extension of this arrangement, that is, large tanks, raceways or ponds 
being provided for accommodating fish from the fingerling to yearling or adult 
stages. 

Of the twent\'-seven stations, eleven are provided with hatcheries only, 
three with a combination of hatcheries and ponds, eight with a combination of 
hatcheries, racewa\s and ponds. Speckled trout are cultured at fourteen 
stations, rainbow trout at two, brown trout at six, Kamloops trout at one, lake 
trout at ten, largemouth bass at one, smallmouth bass at seven, maskinonge at 
one, perch at one, yellow pickerel at ele\en, whitefish at nine, hiTring at two 
and minnows at one. 

There arc facilities at three rearing stations for retaining a selective stock 
of adult speckled trout for breeding purposes. These are maintained at Dorion, 
Sault Ste. Marie and Hills Lake Hatcheries. A breeding stock of brown, rainbow 
and Kamloops trout are provided for at one other station, namely, Xormandale. 

Practicallx all the speckled trout, brown trout and Kamloops trout dis- 
tributed to suitable and publich" fished waters are \earlings or older fish. Black 
bass, maskinonge, rainbow trout and lake trout are, generalh' speaking, dis- 
tributed in the fr\- or fingerling stages. The raising of lake trout to the yearling 
stage has been developed successfully at certain stations and when additional 
pond space is available, expansion of the culture of lake trout in this direction 
ma\' be undertaken. Whitefish, herring, perch, \ellow pickerel and blue jjickerel 
are all distributed in the fry stage. 

The Culture and Distribution of Fish 

l-'ish culture ma>- be defined as any procedure for increasing the stock of fish. 
One of the procedures used extensively in Ontario is the planting of hatchery 
raised fish. In the majorit}' of cases, this procedure is a supplement and not a 
substitute for nature's means of replenishment. 

A detailed account of the fish distribution from our twent\-seven stations 
b\" county or district, species, age class and numbers planted is given in appendices 
one to five inclusive. In the following paragraphs, comparison of the \ear's 
distribution with that of the previous year, and other pertinent data are given. 
The total output of all species for the year was practically the same as in 1945. 

Speckled Trout 

As in previous years, the objective was the distribution of 3,000,000 speckled 
trout yearlings, but the figures were somewhat lower, nameh, 2,760,780. Due 
to congestion at two or three of our stations it was necessary- to plant about 
85,000 fingerlings. As our stock of breeders was quite good, we were able to 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



make a distribution of doubk- that of tlie previous \ear. The plantings of this 
species b\' age group is as follows: 

50,000 fry 
84,730 tingcriings 
2.760,780 yearlings 
8,656 adults 

Broivn Trout 

The plantings of brown trout \earlings were good, with a total of 268,940 
being distribtited. This was an increase of 20% over the previous year's distri- 
bution. In addition, we had a surplus of fingerlings which we could not hold 
for another \ear, and these made a distribution of 133.025. Taken together, 
the figures for this distribution were excellent, considering the number of ponds 
which we have available for the raising of brown trout. 

Rainboii' Trout 

(a) Steelhead. It is only in the larger rixers and lakes that rainbow trout 
are normalK' found except in their immature stage. A river such as the Xotta- 
wasaga is a good example in which rainbows remain throughout the >"ear. The\' 
survive chiefly in the larger lakes such as Lake Simcoe and the Great Lakes. 
Distribution this \'ear was mainh' confined to the larger rivers flowing into the 
Georgian Ba\ . 

(b) Kamloops. This species was introduced to a number of carefulh" 
selected lakes in Ontario, and the Kamloops in these lakes are showing excellent 
results during the last few years. Up to now, the practice has been to distribute 
this species in the yearling stage, but this year there was a distribution of 4,850 
as adults, which was an excellent contribution to the culture of this species in 
Ontario. 

Lake Trout 

For the last several \ears there has been a decline in the i)ro(luction in the 
spawn collection of this species. Steps are now being taken by the Department 
to ascertain the fact responsible for the decline, with a view to providing a 
remedy. The distribution in 1946 shows a sharp drop over that recorded in 
1945. As stated above, this is wholh- due to the fact that our hatcheries are 
not getting the spawn in such large numbers as previously. The distribution 
of 28,045 yearlings was a considerable decline over the previous year as the 
hatcheries were not able to retain as many fingerlings from the previous \ear 
as had been done formerK-. 

White fish 

I he s])awn collection of this species was considerablx down trom the j)revious 
year. 'I'his gives the reason for the slight dt'cline in the plantings, as shown 
in the tables. 

Herring 

In comparison with the last few >ears, the distribution of herring .was realK' 
excellent. There was a total planting of 69,674,000. This large increase was 
wholly due to a very good run of herring in the spawning season, together with a 
week of good weather, when our sj)awn lakers can work at their best. 

Yelloii' Pickerel 

There was a ])lanting of 142,385,000 fr\ this \eai- which was a decline of 
about 20% from the i)re\ious year. The drop in the distribution was accounted 
for soleK" from the fact that the fish could not i)e captured in large enough 
quantities during the spawning season. The chief spawn taking areas where 



58 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



decrease in spawn occurred were Hay Bay in the Bay of Quinte, Echo Lake in 
Algoma, Whitefish Falls in the North Channel. All our other spawning grounds 
were as good or even better than in previous years. 

Small-mouth Bass 

The number of bass fry planted was approximately 14% less than planted 
in the previous >'ear. The production of fingerlings was also down, but only 
10% from last >ear. 

Large-mouth Bass 

There was an increase of 90% in the output of this species over last year. 
This was very gratifying as there is only one small pond available for this work 
at our Mount Pleasant Hatchery. Instead of planting some of these fish as fr\- 
we were able to hold over our stock until the\' were good sized fingerlings. 

Perch 

The take of perch spawn in Lake Erie is subject to wide variation. This 
spawn is collected mainly from the region off Kingsville. This year we had a 
good spawn collection and we were able to make a 70% increase in our fr\- 
distribution. The total fry planted was 20,450,000. 

Maski?ionge 

The plantings of this species were as follows: 

1,150,000 fry 

6,875 fingerlings 

There was a drop of 43% in the number of fr\- produced, but this was nujre 
than offset by the record production of fingerlings. The fingerling production 
was an all time record from our Deer Lake Hatcher\'. There is reason to believe 
that these figures will be sustained, or even increased, as greater facilities are 
being given the hatcher>". 

Atlantic Salmon 

There was a distribution this year of more than double that made in the 
previous year. All the fish planted were fingerlings of good size. A more 
detailed report on Atlantic Salmon will be found under the heading "Biological 
Surveys". 

Closed Waters 

In addition to the waters already closed for the natural production and 
propagation of fish, the following were closed during the period April 1, 1946 
to March 31, 1947. 

Adam Lake, located in unorganized territor\-, north of Cla\' Lake and 
l)etween Fluke Lake and Segise Lake, District of Kenora. 

The Bog, Newboro Lake, located in township of South C^'osb}-, County of 
Leeds. 

Deep Bay, Sparrow Lake, township of Matchedash, County of Simcoe. 

Harvey or Nogies Creek (Part), located on lot 10, Con. 2, Township of 
Galway, and lot 28, Con. 17, township of Harve\-, Count\- of Peterboro. 

Long Lake, located in the township of Lansdowne, Count\- of Leeds. 

Landons Bay, located on the St. Lawrence River, township of Lansdowne, 
Count\' of Leeds. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 59 



Maskiuouge Creek flowing from .Maskinonge Lake it) Little W'rniillion Lake; 
Maskinonge Lake (Part); Little \'ermillion Lake (Part) located in the township 
of Pickerel, District of Kenora. 

Moose Lake located in unorganized territory- west of the Township of 
Smellie, District of Kenora. 

Biological Surveys 

The Game Fish Section expanded their work, especialh' in respect of bio- 
logical surve\s. Surv'e>s were conducted on a great man\' lakes and streams 
to obtain data basic to the fish management plan. This included four lakes in 
Frontenac County, one in each of Lennox and Addington and Hastings Counties, 
three in Xipissing District, fi\'e in Parr\- Sound District and several minor waters. 

A project was undertaken to assess the value of planting streams in Bruce 
County with hatchery raised speckled trout. The trout were planted as yearlings 
in parts of the S\denham River, Eugenia Hydro Pond and Williams Lake, and 
were marked by removal of the adipose fin. A careful check on all of the fish 
taken from these waters is being obtained b>- means of the creel census. The 
experiment is being continued. 

An exjx'riment begun in 1945, was continued at Round Lake, Renfrew 
County, to determine the eft'ect of removal of coarse fish in quantity, from a lake. 
The lake was heavih- fished b>- means of trap and hoop nets, the coarse fish 
removed and the game fish returned to the lake. This experiment is continuing. 

Creel census sur\-e\'s and assessment of waters was continued in Sibky 
Provincial Park. 

Preliminar\- in\-estigations were begun to obtain information concerning 
the life history and possible means of control of the Sea Lampre\-. Deterioration 
of the lake trout fisher\- of the Great Lakes, particularly in Lake Huron and 
Georgian Bay, is attributed to the abundance of this fish parasite. This most 
important work was begun in the waters of Lake Huron adjacent to Bruce 
Count}', and is cf)ntinuing. 

An extensi\-e siu'vex' of lakes in which Kamlocjps Irout ha\e been introduced 
was undertaken. These waters included Lake Bernard and Poole Lake, Parr\- 
Sound District, Echo Lake, Rill Lake, Clear Lake, Red Chalk Lake, Lake 
Waseosa, Round Lake and Deep Lake, Muskoka District and Lake Timagami. 
.\i|)issing District. .Assessment of fishing for this excellent game fish was made. 
With the excejition of Lake Timagami, the Kamloops trout appears to have 
become well established in ,ill of I he lakes noted and is proxiding fair to good 
fishing. 

Tin- .\tlantic Salmon experinuMit, which was begun in 1944 in Duffin's 
Crick, Ontario Count}-, was continued. The exinriment is being conducted 
for two reasons. First, an effort is being made to establish the Atlantic .Salmon 
in Lake Ontario and its tributary streams, where it was formerh- abundant, and 
second, an effort is being made tf) seciu'e an appraisal of the efficienc\- of restock- 
ing streams with hatcher\' raised lish. As this is a long term in\-estigation, it is 
too earl\ to draw conclusions, though it ma>" be stated that some of the fish 
that were planted in 1944 ha\-e been recaptured, and are showing .satisfactory 
growth. (ieni'ralK' si)eaking. the results are encouraging. 



60 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

Coarse tish removal was undertaken and results shown as follows: 

Removal of Burbot (Ling) from Bobs Lake in 1947. 

Location, Frontenac and Leeds County, township of North Crosby. 

Area 12 sq. miles 

Nets Hoop Type 

Number of Nets 7 

Dec. 30 311 fish 6 nets 

271 " 6 " 

256 " 6 " 

260 " 6 " 

217 " 6 " 

184 " 6 " 

183 " 6 " 

198 " 6 " 

169 " 6 " 

143 " 6 " 

109 " 6 " 

50 " 6 " 

24 " 6 " 

24 " 6 " 

19 " 6 " 

33 " 7 " 

40 " 1 " 

46 " 1 " 

10 " 1 " 

33 " 1 " 

20 days 2,.589 fish 'I'oial of 101 lil't> 

Removal of Burbot (Ling) from Long Lake in 1947. 

Location — Frontenac and Leeds Count\-, townships of Olden and Hinchin- 
brooke. 

Area 2 sq. miles 

Nets Hooj) Type 

Number of Nets 1 

Jan. 2 38 fish 

" 4 26 " 

9 21 " 

" 15 14 " 

" 20 6 " 

" 24 2 " 



Jan. 


1 


" 


3 










" 


7 


" 


9 


li 


11 


" 


13 


" 


15 


ii 


17 


" 


19 


" 


22 


" 


26 


" 


28 


" 


30 


" 


31 


Jan. 


16 


" 


18 


u 


25 


11 


27 



6 days 107 fish 6 lifts 

Removal of Burbot (Ling) from Elbow Lake in 1947. 

Location — Frontenac (\^unt\', township of Hinchinbrooke. 

Area 3^ sq. mile 

Nets Hoop Type 

Number of Nets 1 



Jan. 2 43 fish, 

4 64 " . 

" 9 27 " . 

" 15 9 " . 

" 20 8 " . 

" 24 2 " . 



6 davs 153 fish 6 lift. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



61 



Removal of Burbot (Ling) from dear Lake in 1947. 

Location — Parry Soimd District, township of Perr>'. 

Nets Hoop Type 

Number of Nets 2 

Ian. Ifi 3 fi^ih 

" 19 6 " 

'• 25 8 " 

" 30 9 " 

Feb. 2 3 " 



. 2 nets 
2 '' 
.2 " 
.2 " 
2 " 



5 days 



29 fish 



lifts 



Appendix No. 1 

SUMMARY OF FISH DISTRIHIITJON 
For fiscal year April 1, 1946 to March 31, 1947 



Whitefish. . 
Herring. . . . 
Lake Trout. 
Pickerel ... 



Perch 

Maskinonge 

Atlantic Salmon . . 

Brown Trout 

Kamloops Trout . . 
Rainbow Trout . . . 
.Speckled Trout. . . 
-Small-mouth Bass. 
Large-mou t h Bass . 



205 

69 

5 

142 

20 

1 



,590,000 

,674,000 

,902,240 

385,000 

450,000 

156,875 

88,210 

401,965 

4,850 

1,610 

904,166 

702,128 

9,527 



Total 449,270,571 



Ai'i'i;xui.\ No. 2 

DISIkllUITlON OF FISH BY SPECIES AND HATCHERIES 

April 1, 1946 to March 31, 1947 

BROWN TROUT 



Hatchery 


Fingerlings 


Yearlings 


Chatsworth 




133,025 


34,790 


Codrington 


1,000 


Cilenora 




IngersoU 


71,000 


Mount Pieisant 


24,800 


Nf)rmandale . 


137,350 








Totals 


133,025 


268,940 







RAINBOW TROUT 
Hatcherv 



Yearlings 



Normandale . 



1,610 



62 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



KAMLOOPS TROUT 



Hatchcr\- 



Adults 



Chatsworth . 



4,850 



LAKE TROUT 



Hatcherv 



Frv 



Fingerlings Yearlings 



Chatsworth 

Dorion 

Fort Frances. . . . 

Glenora 

Hills Lake 

Kenora 

Port Arthur 

Sault Ste. Marie 
Southampton . . . 
W iarton 



2,265,000 



Totals 2,265,000 



6,400 

169,795 

5,000 

85,500 

1,855,000 

461,500 

140,000 

886,000 



3,609,195 



12,775 
6,135 



9,135 



28,045 



PERCH 



Hatcherv 



Fry 



Kingsville i 20,450,000 



MASKINONGE 



Hatchery 


Fry 


Fingerlings 


Deer Lake 


1,150,000 


6,875 








Total 


1,150,000 


6,875 







PICKEREL 



Hatcherv 



Fry 



Col ling wood . . . . 

Deer Lake 

Fort Frances. . . . 

Glenora 

Kenora 

Kingsville 

Little Current. . . 

Pembroke 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie. 
Skeleton Lake. . . 



2,550,000 

10,000.000 

23,250,000 

15,160,000 

43,750,000 

150,000 

18,850,000 

3,975,000 

2,200,000 

5,000,000 

17,500,000 



Total 142,385,000 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



63 



SMALL-.MOITH BASS 



Hatchery 


Fry 


Fingerlings 


Yearlings 
and Adults 


Deer Lake 




15,o66 

315,000 
55,000 


35,000 
150 

! 29,550 

. 138,260 

35,600 

74.150 


200 


Glenora 

*Miscellaneous 

Alount Pleasant 


3,149 
100 


Sandfield 

Skeleton Lake 

White Lake 




393 
389 
187 


Total 


385,000 


312,710 


4,418 








*M iscellaneous 


: Lake Placid 






143 




Fox Lake 

Shoe Pack Lake 






1,112 
1,539 




Cooks Lake 






355 



3,149 



LARGE-MOUTH BASS 



Hatcherv 



Fingerlings 



Adultj 



Mount Pleasant. 
Total .... 



9,500 



9,500 



ATLANTIC SALMON 



Hatcherv 



Fingerlings Yearlings 



Glenora . . 
Hills Lakt 



84,210 



Total . 



84.210 



4,000 



4,000 



SPECKLED TROUT 



Hatchery 

Chatsworth 

Codrington 

Deer Lake .,. . . 

Dorion 

Hills Lake 

Midhurst 

Mount Pleasant 

North Hay 

Penihroke 

.Sandfiild 

Saull Ste. Marie 

Skeleton Lake 

White Lake 

Totals 



Eggs 


Fingerlings | 


Yearlings 


Adults 




20,000 ' 


172,910 
43,770 
33,600 






42,600 


261,400 


3,385 






298.650 


715 






75,100 








92,550 








231.900 






22.130 


139.600 
507,700 




50,000 




1 


504,600 
231,000 
168,000 


4.556 


50.000 


84.730 i 


2,760,780 


8,656 



64 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



WHITEFISH 



Hatchery 


Fry 


Collingwood 


39,240,000 




27,215,000 




37,125,000 


Kingsville 


52,300,000 
26,000,000 


Xormandalc 


- 


8,000,000 


Port Arthur 


590,000 




15.030,000 


Sault Ste. Marie . 


90,000 








Total 


205,590,000 







HERRING 





Hatchery 


Fry 




68,750,000 


Sarnia 


924,000 








Total 


69,674,000 



Appendi.x Xo. 3 

DISTRIBUTION OF FISH ACCORDING TO COUNTIES 

April 1, 1946 to March 31, 1947 

MASKINONGE 



Count\- 



Durham 

Grenville 

Hastings 

Leeds 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Peterborough . . . 
Prince Edward. . 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Sudbury 

Victoria 

Total. . . . 



10,000 

30,000 

200,000 



Fry 


Fingerlings 


10,000 




10,000 




95,000 




10,000 




45,000 




50,000 




105,000 


200 


30,000 




565,000 


3,875 



400 
300 



1,100 



1,150,000 



6.875 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AxXD FORESTS FOR 1947 



Go 



KAMLOOPS TROUT 

Couniy 

Muskoka 

Parr\- Sound 

Total 



Adults 



3,600 
1,250 



4,850 



KAIXBOW TROUT 
Count)" 

Elgin 

Dufferin 

Total 



Yearlings 



1,200 
410 

1,610 



PERCH 



Great Lakes 



Frv 



Mitchells Bay 
Lake P>ic . . . . 



1,000,000 
19,450,000 

20,450,000 



All AN'IIC SALMON 





County 


1 Fingerlings 


. Yearlings 


N'ipissing ' 


3,500 


Sudbur\ 
Ontario 




'84,2io 


500 


Total 


1 84.210 


4,000 







66 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



PICKEREL 



Countv 



Fry 



Algoma 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Frontenac 

Grenville 

Haliburton 

Hastings 

Kenora 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parr}- Sound 

Peterborough 

Prince Edward 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Stormonl 

Sudbury 

Thunder Ba\- 

Victoria 

York 

Great Lakes 

Lake Erie 

Georgian Ba\- 

Lake Huron 

North Channel 

-C ake Superior 

Lake-of-the- Woods 

Total 



4,150,000 

715,000 

400,000 

8,600,000 

300,000 

1,300,000 

2.400,000 

9,750,000 

300,000 

2.10.000 

900,000 

1,000,000 

1,550,000 

2,350,000 

400,000 

3,035,000 

10,300,000 

2,1.")0,000 

375,000 

200,000 

10,200,000 

4.300,000 

960,000 

17,250,000 

2,975,000 

525,000 

500,000 

8,100,000 

2,000.000 

1,700,000 

100,000 



150,000 

500,000 

1 ,050,000 

3,200,000 

450,000 

38,000,000 



142,385,000 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



SPECKLED TROUT 



Coiintv 



Eggs Fingerlings 



Algoma 

Bruce 

Cochrane 

Dufferin 

Durham 

Elgin 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 

Lanark 

Lennox-Addington 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskolca 

Xipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland . 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel' 

Perth 

Peterborough .... 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Sudbury 

Thunder Bay .... 
Timiskaming .... 

V^ictoria 

Waterhjo 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 

Totals. . . . 



50,000 



3,000 



20.000 



5,000 



19,130 



3,000 



3Lt)00 



Yearlings Adults 



529,000 

17,200 

138,500 

16,900 

15,1.30 

9,300 

49,.')00 

116,950 

44,200 

4,200 

118,5.50 

10,7.")0 

9,200 

2,400 

38,300 

121,500 

6,000 

115,350 

149,350 

30,900 

23,350 

2,050 

6,985 

211,400 

14,400 

600 

12,900 

2,000 

85,600 

34,100 

390,600 

228.300 

143.200 

8,650 

12,600 

33,850 

3,600 

3,395 



4,.").)6 



3,385 
715 



50,000 



143,386 2,760,780 



8,656 



68 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



WHITEFISH 





Great Lakes 


Fry 


Lake Erie 


60,300,000 


Georgian Ba\' 


'12,240,000 
24,030 000 


Lake Huron 


Lake of the \\ oods . . 


3L62o 000 


North Channel 


14,000 000 


Lake Superior . 


1 680 000 


Kenora 


4,000,000 


Rainv River 


27,215,000 


Thunder Ba\' 


1,500,000 


I'otal 


205 900,000 







HERRING 





Great Lakes 


Fry 


Lake Huron 


924,000 


Lake Erie 


68,750,000 








'lolal 


69,674,000 







SMALL-MOUTH BASS 



County 



Fry 



Fingerlings 



Adults 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Elgin 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Haliburion 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and Addington 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northimiberland 

Ontario 

Parr\- Soimd 

Peel '. 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Sinicoe 

Sudbury 

Thunder Ba\ 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Wellington 



55,000 



165,000 
70,000 



5,000 
75,000 



15,000 



'J'otals 385,000 



40,750 

7,000 
1,000 
40,800 
1 500 
1,800 
5,800 
2,250 

1,000 

19,000 
4,250 
5,100 

19,500 
2,000 
1,500 

28,500 
1,000 
2,000 
2,650 

35,600 

1,000 

650 

18,200 

50 

2,500 

6,500 

49,510 

8,800 
1,500 
1,000 



100 



1,726 

"l43 
90 

l,il2 



393 



389 



110 



355 



312,710 



4,418 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1V)47 



GO 



LARGK-MOr IH I^ASS 



Count V 



Fingerlings Adults 



Brant 

Simcoe 

V'ictoria 

Waterloo. . . . 

Totals 



2,000 
6,500 
1,000 



9.500 



BROWN IROU'l" 



Grey 

Haldimand 

Haiiburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

I.ennox-Acldington , 

Lincoln 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Northumberland . . 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Renfrew 

Sinicoc 

X'ictoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 

'iolal> 





County 


Fingerlings 


Yearlings 


Brant 




5,000 

29,000 


10 400 


Bruce 


12 890 


Carleton 




DufFerin 


9 000 


Durham 


1 000 


Elgin 


2,400 



10,000 
11,000 
5,000 



13,025 
8,000 



42,000 
5,000 

5.000 



16.800 
3.600 

21.400 

7,500 

2.400 

6.300 

44.600 



24,900 

34,000 

3,600 



7,800 

23.400 
7.800 

17,600 
4.200 
7,350 



133.025 268,940 



70 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



LAKE TROUT 



Countv 



Frx' 



Fingerlings 



Yearlings 



Algonia 

Bruce 

Cochrane 

Frontenac 

Haliburton 

Hastings 

Kcnora 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox-Addington 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Parry Sound 

Peterborough 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Sudbur\ 

Thuntier Ba\' 

Timiskaming 

Victoria 

York 

Great Lakes 

Georgian Ba\ 

Lake Huron 

North Channel 

Lake Superior 

Lake-of-the-\\'oods 

Totals 



5,000 



2,110,000 
150,000 



95,500 

5,000 

50,150 

144,415 

33,275 

67,000 

5,100 

7,225 

11,050 

16,000 

140,000 

16,125 

110,000 

36,550 

2,400 

18,000 

4,000 

46,000 

129,000 

905 
25.000 



320,000 

300,000 

121,000 

1,885,000 

18,500 



4,225 
1,200 



6,000 



800 
1,635 
1,135 

8,550 



2,265,000 



3,609,195 



4,.500 



28,045 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



71 



Appendix No. 4 

FISH DISTRIBUTION BY HATCHERIES 

April 1, 1946 to March 31, 1947 



Hatchery 


Fry 


Fingerlings 


Yearlings 


Adults 


Total 


Ch.\tsworth 

Speckled Trout 

Brown Front .... ... 


20,000 

• 

6,875 
35,000 

42,600 

6,400 

" 169,795 

133,025 

150 

84,210 

5,000 


172,910 
34,790 




192,910 
34.790 


Lake Trout 


39,240,000 
2,550,000 

10.000,000 
1,150,000 

23.250,000 
27.215,000 

15,160,000 
15,000 


12,775 1 12.775 


Kaniloops Trout 


43,770 
1,000 


4,850 


4,850 




245,325 


CODRINGTON 

Speckled Trout 

Brown I rout 


43,770 
1,000 








44,770 


COLLINGWOUD 

Whitefish J 

Pickerel 


39,240,000 
2,550,000 










Dei:r Lakk 


33,600 

261.400 
6,135 




200 

3,385 


41,790,000 
33,600 


Pickerel 

Maskinonge 

Bass — .Small-mouili 


10,000,000 

1,156,875 

35,200 




11,220,675 


DOKION 

."Speckled 1 rout 


307,385 


Lake 1 rout 


6,135 








313,520 


FokT Fr.wcks 

F'ickerel 


23,250,000 


Whitefij^h 

Lake Irout 




27,215,000 
6,400 






298,650 
9,135 
4,000 








50,471,400 


Gi-i:nor.\ 

Pickerel 


15.160.000 


Lake Trout 

Brown Trout 

Bass — .Sniall-moutli 

At lani i(" Salnu)n 


169,795 

133,025 

15,150 

84.210 










715 


15,562,180 


i lii,i.> i,.\Ki-; 

-Speckled Trout 

Lake Troiii 


299,365 
14,135 


Atlantic Salmon 




4,000 




317,500 



72 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. 4 

FISH DISTRIBUTION BY HATCHERIES 

April 1, 1946 to March 31, 1947 



Hatchery 


Fry 


Fingerlings 


Yearlings 


Adults Total 


Kenora 

Whitefish 


37,125,000 
43,750,000 

52,300,000 

20,450,000 

150,000 

26,000,000 
18,850,000 

8,000,000 
68,750,000 

3.975,000 
590,000 


85,500 

29,550 
9,500 

22,130 
1,855,000 


75.100 

92,550 
95,800 

137,350 
1,610 

231,900 
139.600 


♦ 

3,149 

100 
27 


37,125.000 


Pickerel 

Lake Trout 


43,750,000 
85,500 




80,960,500 


KiNGSVILLE 

VV'hitefish 


52,300,000 


Perch 


20,450,000 


Pickerel 


150,000 


Little Current 

Whitefish 


72,900,000 
26,000,000 


Perch 


18,850,000 








44,850,000 


MlDHURST 

speckled Trout 


75,100 






MiSCELLANEOl S 

Bass — Small-uiouih 


3,149 


Mount Pleasant 

Speckled Trout 


92,550 


Brown Trout 

Bass — Small-mouth 

Bass — Large-mouth 


95,800 

29,650 

9,527 




227,527 


Normandale 

Whitefish 


8.000,000 


Brown Trout 


137,350 




1,610 


Herring 


68,750,000 








76,888,960 


North Bay 

Speckled Trout 


231,900 


Pembroke 

Speckled Trout 

Pickerel 


161,730 
3,975,000 




4,136,730 


Port Arthur 

Whitefish 


590,000 


Lake Trout 


1,855,000 








2,445,000 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



73 



APPlilNDIX XO. 4 

FISH DISTRIBUTIOX BV HATCHERIES 
April 1, 1946 to March 31, 1947 



1 
Hatchery 


Frx- 


Fingerlings 


Yearlings 


Adults 


Total 


Sandfield 

Speckled Trout 

Bass — Small-mouth 


15,030.000 

924,000 

2.200.000 

90,000 
5.000.000 

50,000 
315,000 


138.260 

461,500 

35,600 

140.000 

1 

' 74,i50 

1 
1 

886,000 


507.700 

504,600 
231 .000 

168.000 


393 

4,556 
389 

i87 




507,700 
138,653 


Sarnia 

Whitefish 

Herring; 

Pickerel 


646,353 

15.030,000 

924,000 

2.200.000 




18,154,000 


Sailt Ste. Marie 

Whitefish 

Pickerel 

Lake Trout 


90,000 

5,000,000 

461,500 


Sault Tkolt Rearing Stn. 
Speckled Trout 


5,551.500 
559, 156 


Skeleton Lake 

Bass — Small-mouth 

Speckled Trout 


350,989 
231,000 


Pickerel 


17,500.000 

55,000 
2.265.000 


17,500,000 








18,081,989 


Southampton 

Lake Trout 


140.000 


W Mill i,AKE 

Speckled Trout 

Bass — Small-mouih 


168,000 
129,337 


WlARTON 

Lake 1 rou i 


297,337 


3,151,000 







74 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Appendix No. .5 

A COMPARATIVE TABLE SHOWING THE FISH DISTRIBUTION 

ACCORDING TO SPECIES 



Species 



1942 



1943 



1944 



1945 



1946 



Bass — Large-mouth 

Fry. 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings and Adults. 

Bass — Small-mouth 

Fry. 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings and Adults. 

Maskinonge 

Fry 

Fingerlings 



Perch — Fry 

Pickerel (\'ello\v) Fry, 
Pickerel (Blue) Fry. . 



Brown Trout 
Eggs and Fr\' 
Fingerlings. . . 
Yearlings . . . . 



185,000 
19,100 
. 290 



1 .535,-500 

718,259 

2,355 



1,. 575,000 
705 

24,175,000 

301,760,000 



Lake Trout 
Eggs and Fr\- 
Fingerlings. . . 
Yearlings. . . . 



Rainbow Trout , 
Fingerlings. . . 
^'earlings. . . . 



Kamloops Trout 

Yearlings 

Adults 



23,000 
359,275 



767,000 

15,429.600 

10.680 



1 1 1 ,000 
12,900 



24,800 



Speckled Trout 

Fr>- 

Fingerlings. . . 
Yearlings. . . . 
Adults.^ 



\\ hitefish — Fry. 
Herring — Fry . . 

Minnows 

Atlantic Salmon , 



500 

631,775 

2,918,513 

7,527 



507,500 

38,500 

290 



1,512,000 

392,700 

1,369 



1.165,000 
2,1,50 

19,000,000 

263,875,000 

150,000 



10.000 

1,000 

303,335 



325.000 

8,048,800 
60.860 



73,242 
15,4.50 



5,000 



5,000 

9,400 

3,083,983 

10,292 



395,052,000 t 371,677,500 

18,430,000 I 24,.560,000 

500 



130,000 

14,600 

51 



2.030.000 

664,400 

2,834 



2,705,000 
2,952 

18,480,000 

271,265,000 



330,750 



3. 176,. 500 

3.475,995 

44.018 



32,186 
3,900 

7,200 



493,840 

2,876,963 

4,360 

259,435,000 

5,662,000 

25,000 

30,000 



5,000 



448,000 

348,368 

5,322 



2,030,000 
200 

12,000,000 

177,595,000 



50,000 
224,749 



765.000 

7,248,040 

88,700 



5,563 

9,900 

5,000 

117,300 

3,005,573 

4,460 

240,786,775 

6,405,000 

4,000 

41,350 



9,.500 
27 



385,000 

312,710 

4,418 



1,150,000 
6,875 

20,450,000 

142,385,000 



133,025 
268.940 



2,265,000 

3,609,195 

28,045 



L610 

4,850 

50,000 

84,730 

2,760,780 

8,656 

205,590,000 

69,674,000 

88,210 



Totals ' 763,750,279 ! 694,833,371 



570,892,549 451,193,300 



449,270,571 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 75 



Commercial Fishing 

Insofar as the ("omnicrcial Fisheries Section of the Division of Fish antl 
W'ildhfe is concerned, the tisciil year ending March 31, 1947, was largeh' 
devoted to reorganization, with a view to estabHshing more direct contact 
with the fishermen themselves and thereb\' increasing the service rendered to 
them, both individually and through their organizations. Particular attention 
was given to matters concerning legislation and toward the securing of an adequate 
statistical set-up to use as a basis for the development of a sound management 
polic\". 

The commercial fisheries maintained in our Xorthern Inland waters caught 
and marketed o\er 14 percent of the total catch for Ontario in 1946. Since 
most of this fishing is done in small inland lakes, it is obvious that commercial 
fishing operations, unrestricted as to size of catch, could quite easih- result in 
depletion of certain species. With this in mind, a system of budgeting the 
catch of indi\-idual licences was instituted in the spring of 1947. Based on the 
previous production records the catch was limited for certain species. This 
ceiling on catch was placed on a level at which it was thought production could 
be maintained b>' leaving sufficient stock in the lake. This limit was set on a 
flexible basis and with a view to changing it from year to >ear. as conditions 
warranted. The possibility of the level being raised at a future date, is as great 
as that it will be lowered, or maintained at the level previously set. 

At the time the Department of Game and Fisheries was taken over by the 
Department of Lands and Forests and formed into what is now known as the 
Di\-ision of Fish and Wildlife, it was decided to bring into being a new method 
of obtaining statistical data regarding the commercial fishing industr\- of the 
Province'. This new system would thus enable the Department to have on 
hand a more detailed collection of data, which heretofore was not available. 

Fp to the present time the only information obtainable is the data sub- 
mitted b\" each holder of a commercial fishing licence at the end of each year. 
These returns are totalled and made up into an Annual Report, as shown in the 
two appendices under the headings "Equipment" and "Quantities of Fish Taken". 
There is, however, no wa\' of obtaining from this Annual Report under the 
heading "Quantities of Fish Taken" an\- information as to what month the fish 
were taken, or from what area or district of a lake the fish were taken. There 
is also no \\a\" of obtaining from this .Annual Report, under both the "Equipment" 
and "Catch" heading, any information regarding the type of gear used to take 
an\- particular species, or the amount of gear used to take an\- particular species. 
This Annual Report, therefore, gives onl\- the total catch In- lake or area of each 
species of fish taken that xear, which is of \alue in itself, but is not sufficient 
for a further statistical anaKsis. 

It was felt, therefore, that in order to properh- administer the commercial 
fisheries, it was essential to have statistical data on hand that would show an 
indication of the changes in the abundance of the commercial species. It was 
essential that this data must, therefore, include a record, not onl\- of the quantities 
of fish taken, but also of the e.xtent of the fishing operations that led to that 
catch or, in other words, the effort that was put forth to obtain that catch. 
The true condition of the fisheries, therefore, cannot be measured accurateh" 
b>- statistics of catch alone but should be expressed in terms of production in 
relation to fishing intensity', that is, "catch per unit of fishing effort". 

With this in luind the Department created a new s\stem b\' which all 
licensed fishermen were required to report their daih' fishing activities. I'nder 
this s\'stem all comiuercial fishermen nnist submit at the end ol each month <i 



REPORT OF THE 



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DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND FORESTS EOR 1947 



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REPORT OF THE No. 3 



complete record of their dail\- fishing activities. This plan of reporting was 
adopted from the monthly report system now in effect in the State of Michigan 
and other states bordering the Great Lakes, where it has been enforced now for 
some fifteen years with very satisfactory results. The monthl\- report includes 
such required data on each da>-'s fishing activities as, the month in which the 
fishing was done, the fishing locality (that is, lake and the section of that lake), 
the kind and amount of gear fished and the catch in pounds of each species taken. 

In order to be able to obtain data for individual areas or districts within a 
lake, all of the Great Lakes have been divided into statistical districts, in such a 
way so as to make the districts on the Ontario side of the Great Lakes comparable 
to the similar districts on the United States side. Therefore, it is hoped that 
data on the commercial fishing in the Great Lakes will be on a more uniform 
basis, as many of the States bordering the Great Lakes, as well as the Province 
of Ontario, have adopted this statistical system of collecting records. B\- 
having our districts coinciding as near as possible with those on the United States 
side of the Great Lakes, a more complete i)icture can be presented. 

The reports are sorted according to the month, the district, and the type 
of gear, and at the end of each year a complete statistical analxsis will be made 
from these reports. This anahsis will make possible an estimation of the 
annual fluctuations and the abundance of the different commercial species in 
the various statistical districts, as these fluctuations are reflected in the "catch 
per net". It is hoped, therefore, to have on hand, data for each of the com- 
mercial species of fish in the Province, as to the quantity of fish taken, the 
amount of gear used to take that catch, the month in which it was taken, and 
the area of a district of a kike from where it was taken. 

These monthly reports do not include an\' information such as the number 
of men employed per licence, the amount of gear on hand and the value of same, 
and with this in mind it has been decided to continue with the Annual Report, 
as it will be used to obtain these facts and also to show the total catch of a lake 
b>' species by year. 

At first, the monthU' re]jorts were incomi)lete and in(li\i(lual rej)orts were 
often fault}-. It is not felt that any reliable data will l)e obtained from the 
reports of 1946 and 1947, as it will take some little time before the system is 
properly functioning and all fishermen are reporting correcth' each month. It 
is hoped that b>' the beginning of 1948 this system should be sufficiently estab- 
lished to be able to make an anah-sis of the data obtained during the months 
of 1948. 

The overall picture of the commercial fisheries in Ontario in 1946, showed 
a net decrease of 1,277,624 pounds as compared with 1945. This reduction in 
catch was spread throughout the fishery in general and at the same time there 
was an increase in the gear used. This would indicate that the fisheries through- 
out the Province were even less productive than the statistics of catch alone 
would indicate when comparison is made with 1945. 

In 1946, Lake Erie produced over half the total catch for the whole Pro- 
vince. The productive capacity of this lake is fairly stable, although there are, 
of course, some years in which the catch drops to a low ebb and in other years, 
reaches a peak. However, this catch in general tends to level off since the 
reduction in numbers of one species, in an>- one year, usually is replaced by an 
increased production of another or several other species in that year. It is 
notable that although there was a decrease of 4,649,899 lbs. in the catch of blue 
pickerel in Lake Erie, the net decrease in total catch for the lake was onl\- 
24,233 lbs. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



Lake Superior and Lake Ontario are also maintaining a fairh- stable level, 
despite the fact that the catch is down in each case this >ear. While these 
lakes are not as productive as Lake Erie and they do not have as great a variet\' 
of fish entering the catch, the fishing effort is not as intensive. The latter ma>- 
account in part for the relative stabiiit>' of the total catch. 

The fisheries in Lake Huron, Georgian Ba\" and North Channel are at a 
\er>- low ebb at present, due to the fact that the lake trout and whitefish catches 
have decreased tremendoush- during the past six years. 

The total catch from northern inland waters was less in 1946 than in 1945, 
whereas the total catch from southern inland waters (largeh' bullheads, carp 
and other coarse fish) shows a slight increase. 



COMPARATI\E STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES 
OF ONTARIO BY LAKE 



Lake 



1945 
Pounds 



1946 
Pounds 



Increase 
Pounds 



Decrease 
Pounds 



Ontario 

Erie 

St. Clair 

Huron 

(k'orgian Ba\ 

Norih Channel 

Superior 

South Inland Waters. 
North Inland Waters. 



2,338,186 
18,949,577 

.-i02,991 
1.070,900 
L.'j24,4S9 

433,990 
3,812,064 

606,002 
5,039,544 



2,058,698 
18,925,344 

493,402 

9.53,799 
1,292.226 

289.710 
3.. 588,689 

678,952 
4,719,299 



34,277.743 33,000,119 



72,950 



72,950 



279,488 
24,233 
9,589 
117,101 
232,263 
144,280 
223,375 

320,245 



1,350,574 



Net Decrease 1,277,624 



COMI'ARATIX E STATEMEXT OF I'HE \IELI) OF THE 
FISHERIES OF ONTARIO 



Species 



1945 
Pounds 



1946 
Pounds 



Increase 
Pounds 



Decrease 
Pounds 



I i erring 

W hitehsh 

I rout 

Pike 

Pickerel (Blue).... 
Pickerel (Yellow; . 

.Sturgeon 

Eels: 

Perch 

lullihei- 

Cathsh 

Car]) 

Mixed ami Coarse. 
Caviar 



9,124,060 

4,265,089 

2,588,980 

1,104,376 

6,582,466 

3,021,173 

139,224 

46,719 

1,695,084 

6<»9.637 

557,546 

()3S,()68 

3,812,355 

2,966 



34,277,743 



11, .576,606 

4,451,055 

2,514,489 

1,015.624 

1 .972,265 

2,716,040 

185,225 

51,484 

2,973,4t)7 

308,570 

()29,695 

759,233 

3,843.559 

2,807 



33,000,119 



2,452,546 
185,966 



4<).00I 

4,765 

1 .278,383 



72,149 
121,165 
31,204 



4,192,179 



74,491 

88,752 

4,610.201 

305,133 



391.067 



159 



5,469,803 



Net Decrease 1,277,624 



80 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




Digging a fire line in Awrey Township 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 81 



DI\ ISION OF FOREST PROTECTION 



FiKic AM) Hazard Conditions 

The lire season was. on the whole, a fairK- moderate one. The number of 
hres was abo\e the average, but the area burned over was relatively small. The 
warm weather at the end of March created a fairh- high hazard in the eastern 
part of the Province for a short period, but in general the weather was favourable 
during April and May. There was a high hazard in the western part of the Pro- 
\ince during the first part of June and in the Sudbury and Parry Sound Districts 
during the latter part of July and first part of August, but apart from a short 
period of high hazard in the early part of October in the same two districts, 
there were no acute or prolonged hazards in the latter part of the summer. 

Legislation 

An Act to amend The Forest P'ires Prevention Act (Bill No. 98) was passed 
at the 1946 session of the Legislature and became law on June 5. 1946. The more 
important changes are: 

1. The office of Pro\incial Forester is abolished. 

2. Proxision made to enter into agreements with municipalities for pre\ention 
and control of fires. 

3. Pro\ision for the entire cost of extinguishing fires confined to Crown Land 
to be borne l)y the Department. 

4. ( )nus of proof placed upon permittee where fire originates in an area in which 
summer operations are being carried on. 

5. Section 24 requiring employees of operators to wear badges was repealed. 

An Order-in-Council re\ising the Regulations under The l-'orest Fires 
Pre\ention Act was passed on July 4th, 1946. This made some changes in the 
general regulations and in the boundaries of the fire districts and tra\el permit 
areas. 

Due to hazardous tire conditions, eight areas in Cochrane District were 
closed to tra\el for ten days in the first part of August and a section of the 
Mississagi Road in Sault Ste. Marie District was closed to traxel from August o 
tf) September 13. 

The number of prosecutions for breaches of the Forest Fires Prexention 
Act was seventeen, all but three of which resulted in comictions. 



Ok(. ANIZ A I ION 

On December 1, 1946 Mr. C. R. Mills resigned as Chief of the Di\ision of 
I'orest Protection and was replaced b>- Mr. T. E. Mackey. who was formerK' 
Regional Forester at North Bav. 



82 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



By Order-in-Council dated July 4, 1946, Manitoulin and Cockburn Islands 
and Lots 16 to 53 of the Wild Land Reserve in the Municipality of Atwood were 
removed from the Fire District and the townships of Morson, McCrosson and 
To\ell were added to the Fire District. 

On April 1, 1946, Chapleau and Biscotasiny; Dixisions of Sudbury District 
were formed into a new district known as Chapleau District, with headquarters 
at Chapleau, and Gogama and Foleyet Divisions and part of Capreol Division 
W'ere formed into a new District known as Gogama District, with headquarters 
at Gogama. 

On May 1, 1946, Mr. J. W. Jones and Mr. R. K. Strang were transferred 
from the Main Office of the Department of Game and Fisheries to the Di\-ision 
of Forest Protection. Mr. Jones will continue in the capacity of Superintendent of 
Construction and Mr. Strang as Mechanical Super\-isor. 

During July and August the hre ranging staff was again augmented by some 
eighty high school students who did \aluable work on improxements and on 
fire suppression. 

Equipment 
There were no new de\elopments during the past fiscal year. 



Improx'E.mexts 

Some ranger cabins and smaller headquarters buildings were constructed 
and some telephone lines built but no extensi\e building programme was carried 
out due to shortage of materials. 

The Department of Public Works continued the construction of buildings at 
the Forest Ranger School. The buildings completed to date are a dormitory, 
boiler house and heating plant, dining hall and kitchen with living quarters fcr 
kitchen staff. Underway are a workshop and garage, the Director's house and 
Administration Office, the school building and two fire hydrant and hose houses. 



Total Improvements Completed to March 31, 1947 

Cabins ,547 

Storehouses 152 

Boathouses 60 

Combined Storehouses and Boathouses 27 

Bunkhouses 62 

Offices 36 

Garages & Car Houses 89 

Other Buildings 213 

Hose Towers 63 

Wooden Lookout Towers 52 

Steel Lookout Towers 227 

Telephone Lines (miles) 3740 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND EORESTS FOR 1947 



83 



Radio Commumcatioxs 
Radio Sets in Use During 1946 , 



District 


Tower 
Sets 


P'tb'le 
Sets 


Boat 
Sets 


Pack 
Sets 


Model 
30 


Model 
300 


Misc. 


Air- 
craft 


Totals 


Sioux Lookout 


14 
14 

w 

9 
10 
14 
27 

12 
11 
11 
20 

12 

1 


1 

1 




1 


6 
2 
6 
5 
4 
5 
3 
4 


2 

1 




4 
2 
1 
3 

2 


28 
20 








18 


Port Arthur 

Gerald ton 


1 


1 




2 
1 


3 


29 
16 


Kapuskasing 








16 












18 


Sault Stc Marie . 


4 

1 
1 

1 






1 




38 


Sudbur\' 






14 


Chapleau 






1 
1 
2 






14 












13 


\orth Ba\' 












23 


Algonquin 










13 


Head Office 


7 


5 


5 


1 




19 










Total 


180 


17 


6 


6 


40 


7 3 20 


279 



An additional four radio 
Air Serxice bringing the total 

CE-OA\- 
CF-OAW 
CF-OAV- 
CF-OBA- 
CF-OBB- 
CF-BGJ- 
CF-BGM 
CF-BGN- 
CF'-OBC- 
CF-OBD- 
CF-OBE- 
CF-OBF- 
CF-OBG- 
CF-OBH- 
( F-OBI- 
CE-OBJ 
CF-OBL- 
GF-()BM 
CF-OBN 
CF-OBO- 



equipped aircraft were added to the Dixision o 
to 20. with the following distribution : 

— Kenora District 
— Geraldton District 
-Cochrane District 
Sault Ste. Marie District 
-Sioux Lookout District 
-Kapuskasing District 
— Aigoncjuin District 
-Sioux Lookout District 
-Sioux Lookout District 
-Kenora District 
-Port Arthur District 
-Sudbury District 
-Port Arthur District 
-Sault Ste. Marie District 
Sioux Lookout District 
North Bay District 
-Port Arthur District 
Fort Frances District 
("jeraldton District 
-Sucll)in'\- I )istrict 



I'ourteen Model M), four fre(|uen(\- t ransmillers were constructed in the 
Department's shops, with distribution as follows: 



lort Frances District 1 

Kenora District 1 

Sioux Lookout District 1 

I'ort Arthur District 2 

(ieraldton District 2 



Kapuskasing District 4 

Cochrane District 1 

North Bay District 1 

Sault Ste. ALirie District 1 



84 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Sexenteen all-\va\e communication recei\ers were purcliased for the above 
transmitters, and eight High Frequency tower trans-receixers obtained and dis- 
tributed throughout the Algonquin District. 



H.vzAKD Disposal 

A certain amount of hazard clearing was carried out. The hre guard at 
Larder Lake was extended by an additional 30 acre clearing and work was done 
on the fire guard at Biscotasing. Hazard clearing was carried out along the 
Nipigon-Beardmore Highwa\- and along three roads in .Sudbury and r'.ogama 
Districts. 



Insect Control 

The Forest Insect Laboratory at Sault Ste. Marie was in full operation during 
the year, the Department of Agriculture, Canada carrying on investigati\e work 
in forest entomology- throughout the Prf)\ince and administering the forest 
insect survev. 



Index of Tables 
Tabic No. Page 

1 Number of men on dut\-, including Chief and Deputy (liief 
Rangers 85 

2 Classification of Forest Fires, b\- month 85 

3 Classification of Poorest Fires, by origin 80 

4 Classification of Forest Fires, by size 87 

5 Classification of area burned o\-er, by month 88 

6 Classification of area burned o\er, by origin 89 

7 Classification of forest areas burned oxer, by forest type 90 

8 Classification of land burned over, by ownership 91 

9 Report of major equipment as of March 3L 1947 92 

10 Statement of Traxel Permits issued 93 

11 Statement of Work Permits issued 94 

12 Statement of Fire Permits issued 95 

13 Means of F'ire Detection 9(i 

14 Fire Damage Table 97 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



85 



Table No. 1 

MMBER OF MEN ON DUTY INCLUDING CHIEF AND DEPUTY 

CHIEF RANGERS 




April 1st. 
April loth 
Mav 1st. . 
May loth 
June 1st . . 
June loth 
July 1st. . 
July loth . 
Aug. 1st.. 
Au^. loth 
Sept. 1st. . 
-Sept. loth 
Oct. 1st.. 
Oct. loth . 
Oct. 31st.. 



82 

116 

362 

709 

1025 

1080 

1088 

1092 

1093 

1094 

1022 

783 

477 

336 

192 



T.\HLK No. 2 

CI.ASSIFICA'IION OF FORKS I FIRKS 

Bv Month 



.Momli 




86 



REPORT OF THE 



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U. l> u u 

o o o a* 
> > 

oc 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 5 

CLASSIFICATION OF AREA BURNED OVER— 1946 

Bv Month 



District 


March 


April 


Max- 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Total 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Sioux Lookout 






196 

8,061 

18 

520 

12 

17 

1,174 

284 

1,343 

15 

4 

763 

211 

303 

159 


6,938 

539 

147 

9,879 

621 

25 

1,817 

1,414 

2,406 

44 

4 

1,462 

15 

18 

9 


9 

706 

538 

824 

1 ,052 

6 

50 

326 

3,166 

28 

"49 

12,195 

13 

1,772 


411 

1,191 

1,921 

127 

13 

12 

472 

3,828 

949 


131 

858 

138 

30 

3 

120 

3 

2 

163 






7,685 
11,501 

2,802 
11,585 

1,702 
180 


Kenora 




145 

40 

200 


1 




Fort Frances 




Port Arthur 




5 

1 




Gerald ton 






Ivapusivasing 






Cochrane 


6 
198 
124 


19 
325 

872 


18 

325 

639 

6 

1 

297 

408 

597 

6 




3,559 
6,702 

Q fifi9 


Sauk Sle. Marie 

Sudbur\' 


Chapleau 


.... 93 


Gogama 

North Bav 


3 


3 

381 

78 

12 

209 


1 

415 

1,341 

184 

223 




5 
52 

8 
7 


16 

3,372 

14 303 


Parrx' Sound 


3 
25 

62 


Algonquin 


1,160 

2,447 


Tweed 


Total 


421 


2,284 


13,080 


25,338 


20.734 


1 1 ,088 


1,520 


2,304 


' 76,769 



4: H^ ST 




I930 I9il i93Z 



r9U8 I9A9 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND EORESTS EOR 1947 



89 



y. 



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Oi CI C2 3; 3: O: 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND EORESTS EOR.1947 



91 



Table No. 8 

CLASSIFICATION OF LAND BURNED 0\ER— 194(j 

By Ownership 



District 



Sioux Lookotit . . 

Kenora 

Fort Frances. . . . 
fort Arthur. . . . 

Gerald ton 

Kapuskasing. . . . 

Cochrane 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Sudbury 

Chapleau 

Gogama 

North Bay 

I'arr\- Sound. . . . 

-Algonquin 

Tweed 

Totals 



Crown Land 



Area in 
Acres 



Private Land 



Area in 
Acres 



7.376 
9,383 
2,582 

878 
1 

142 

L988 

5,655 

2.432 

29 

13 

436 
0.687 
1,131 
1,923 



44,656 



Totals 



309 

2,118 

220 

10.707 

1,701 

38 

1,571 

1,047 

7,230 

64 

3 

2,936 

3.616 

29 

524 



32.113 



No. of 
Fires 



91 
160 

66 
102 

49 

18 
140 
142 
275 

16 

24 
108 
292 

85 
171 



1,739 



Area in 
Acres 



7,685 

11,501 

2,802 

11,585 

1,702 

180 

3.559 

6,702 

9,662 

93 

16 

3,372 

14,303 

1,160 

2.447 

76,769 



ACUAQ,i: BUEN£D BY fOg^ST flg€5 IN QNTAKIO 

1930 TO 1946 




I9^0 I9M I5J2 C955 I9M I9'5 I9»e 1957 19S6 I9»9 I^^O 1311 19^1? le-Ji l^dit I9d» I94e r947 Ua8 I9<»9 



92 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



93 



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REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 






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a a~. c^. c: c^. : 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



95 



Table No. 12 
STATEMENT OF FIRE PERMITS ISSUED 



District 






Num 


ber of Pe 


rmits 






1946 


1945 


1944 


1943 


1942 


1941 


1940 


Sioux Lookout 

Ivenora 


217 
671 
136 

1,246 
289 

1,174 

1,944 
248 

1 ,053 

70 

102 

1,004 
442 
125 
219 


77 
488 
140 
631 

76 

635 

1,676 

984 

627 


71 
447 

90 
614 

99 

226 

1,258 

117 

998 


137 

530 

75 

554 

60 

261 

1.241 

154 

1,052 


123 
470 
195 
529 
101 
1,677 
2.555 
217 
979 


232 
376 
203 
563 


215 
791 


Fort Frances 


300 


Port Arthur 


1,671 






Kapu^kasing 


947 

2.275 

288 

886 


2,757 


Cochrane 


3,397 


Sault Ste. Marie 


361 


Sudbury 


1,436 


Gogama 

North Ba\' 








74 

205 

69 

82 


784 

210 

88 

104 


834 

174 
42 

128 


1,129 

300 

74 

193 


1,458 
306 
124 
175 


2,885 


Parrv Sound 


303 


Algonquin 


178 


Tweed 


228 






Totals 


8,940 


5,764 


5,106 


5,242 


8,542 


7,833 


14,522 



96 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table Xo. ]3 
MEAN'S OF FIRE DETECTION— 1946 



District 



No. of fires detected bv 



Air 
Service 



Towers 



Rangers 



Public 



Total No. 
of Fires 



Sioux Lookout . . . 

Kenora 

Fort Frances . . . . 

Port Arthur 

Geraldton 

Kapuskasing . . . . 

Cochrane 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

.Sudi)ury 

Chapleau 

Gogama 

North Bay 

Parr\- Sound . . . . 

Algonc|iiin 

Tweed 



29 
47 
18 
17 
12 



10 

11 
2 
3 
6 

18 
9 



26 

43 

20 

33 

10 

8 

58 

27 

113 

7 

6 

30 

78 

18 

138 



14 

2.-) 

7 

13 

.") 

3 

43 

28 

40 

1 

2 

32 

32 

10 



22 
4.') 
21 
39 
22 
7 
29 
72 

111 

6 

13 

40 

164 
48 
28 



91 
160 

66 
102 

49 

18 
140 
142 
275 

16 

24 
108 
292 

85 
171 



Total? 



197 
11.3% 



615 
35.3% 



260 

15.0% 



667 

38.4% 



1.739 
100% 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



97 





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98 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




z 

J 
z 

o 

o 

z 

o 



-A^ ^^' 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 99 



DI\ ISION OE LAND AND RECREATIONAL AREAS 

The \olume of work completed in connection with certain phases of land 
administration increased during the last fiscal year, as will be seen by the tables 
and graphs forming part of this Section. This is due to more advanced methods 
of administration, a properly trained stafif, and improved inspection facilities. 
More rapid handling of current transactions and a continued increase in the 
number of long outstanding cases brought to a satisfactory conclusion have been 
gratifying. 

Summer Resort Lands 

Sales of summer resort lands, for both private and commercial use, increased 
o\"er an all-time high during the fiscal year 1945-46, and although the number of 
patents issued also increased, the increase would have been considerably greater 
had it been possible to secure the services of Ontario Land Sur\eyors to do the 
necessary sur\"ey work. 

Agricultural and Allied Uses 

An increase in the number of transactions completed in\ol\ing lands for 
special use, agricultural lands in sale townships, and agricultural lands in free 
grant townships, collectixely, is shown. It was expected that the sale of land for 
this purpose would decrease, in that it was assumed that the demand would fall 
off, due to continued favorable economic conditions. The large percentage of 
sales and patents completed, especially under the special use section, is the result 
directly of improved methods of administration, inspection facilities, and more 
efficiently trained staff, as stated above. 

Provincial Parks 

There was no change made in the status of Provincial Parks, of which there 
are six, as follows: 

Algonquin 2,741 Sq. Miles 

Quetico 1,720 Sq. Miles 

Rondeau 8 Sq. Miles 

Lake Superior 540 Sq. Miles 

Sibley 63 Sq. Miles 

Ipperwash Beach 109 Acres 

Veterans' Lands 

An agreement was concluded lietween the Dominion and Prox iiicial (ioxern- 
nients, which became effective on April 10th, 1966, and which pro\ides for the 
establishment of qualified veterans on Crown lands in Ontario. The agreement 
is generally known as "The Ontario Dominion-Pro\incial Agreement" and it 
was made under and by \irtue of Section 35 of the \'eterans' Land Act ( Dominion) 
1942. The Proxincial C.o\ernment is responsible under the agreement for the 
allocation of Proxincial lands, pro\iding inspection reports and extending all 
ser\ices ordinaril\- pro\ided for persons other than \eterans. At the close of 
the first year of operation, agreements for sale and licenses of occupation, com- 
pleted, total nineteen. Twehe applications are pending, and two were cancelled, 
riiese transactions are summarized in the table included herein. It is expected 
that the number of cases which will be referred to this Department for considera- 
tion during the ensuing year will be considerably increased. The opportunities 
a\ailai)le to rjualified \eterans ha\e been more fully ad\ertised, resulting in 
steadily increasing interest to participate, particularly due to the fact that the 



100 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



assistance granted is not repayable; payment of purchase price of land in the 
case of first-land application is waived by the Province, and in the case of the 
veteran, who has acti\ely served in the armed services overseas, or one full 
year in Canada, and has resumed residence and settlement duties, he is absolved 
from payment of all amounts of principal and interest which may be owing in 
respect of land purchase price and impro\ement charges. 

Tourist Outfitters' Camps 

A prosperous tourist trade during the 1945 season, exceeding the pre-war 
volume, served to stimulate the growing interest in post-war expansion. Whereas 
the erection of 149 new camps was authorized the previous year, over 400 appli- 
cations for permits were considered in 1946. of which 328 were granted as at 
March 31st, 1947. There was also much activity in the rehabilitation and expan- 
sion of established camps. The acute shortage of basic building materials did. 
however, retard the anticipated expansion in the industry, as only 171 new 
camps were completed and licensed to operate. 856 current licenses were issued, 
an annual increase of 35%. including 51 camps which had not operated during 
the war. Ill licenses were issued at a non-resident fee of $25.00 each, and 745 
at a resident fee of SIO.OO each. (See table). 



Statistical Tablp:s and Graphs 

Transactions for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1947. 

Tables Page 

Table No. 1 — The ()niario-Uomini(jn-Pr()\ incial Agreement 101 

Table No. 2 — Tourist Oufitters' Camp Licences 101 

Table No. 3— Agricultural Land 102 

Table No. 4 — Free Grant Land (including soldiers' land) 103 

Table No. 5 — Land for Special l^se 104 

Table No. 6 — Summer Resort Land 105 

Table No. 7 — Cities, Towns and Townsites 10() 

Table No. 8 — Land Use Permits Issued 107 

Table No. 9 — Patents Office (Lands Division) (Statement of Patents, etc. 

issued) 108 

Graphs 

Fig. 1 — Agricultural Land in Sale Townships 102 

Fig. 2 — Agricultural Lands in Free Grant Townships (including soldiers' 

lands) 103 

F"ig. 3 — Lands for Special Use 104 

Fig. 4 — Summer Resort Lands 105 

Fig. 5 — City, Town and Townsite Lands 106 

Fig. 6 — Land L'se Permits, Leases and Licences of Occupation Issued 108 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



101 



Table Xo. 1 

Suniniar\' of transactions under 

THE ONTARIO DOMINTOX-PROVIXCIAL AGREEMENT 



First lands 

Conversion from former sales or locations 

Licence of Occupation 

Awaiting survey only 

Before the Department for consideration . 
Applications cancelled 

A Total of 



8 
10 
1 
6 
6 
2 



33 



Table Xo. 2 

TOIRIST OUTFITTERS' CAMP LICEXCES 

Summary by Districts 

— 1946 — 



Distr 



Licensed 
Camps 



Algoma 

Cochrane. . . . 

Kenora 

Manitoulin . . 
Nipissing. . . . 
Parry Sound . 

Patricia 

Rainy River. 

Renfrew 

Sudhur\ 

Timiskaming 
1 hunder Ba\ 



120 
II 

196 
73 

120 

164 
5 
35 
15 
78 
12 
27 



102 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 3 

AGRICULTURAL LAND 

Transactions for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1947 



Administrative 
District 



District 
Forester 



Sales 



Cancellations 



No. 



Acres ' No. Acres 



Assignments 



No. Acres 



Patents 



No. Acres 



Algonquin 

Cochrane 

Fort Frances . . . 

Geraldton 

Kapuskasing. . . 

Kenora 

Main Office. . . 

North Bay 

Parry Sound . . . 
Port Arthur. . . 
Sault Ste. Marie 
Sioux Lookout. . 

Sudbur\ 

Tweed 



G. H.R.Phillips 
A. S. Bray. . 
G. Delahev. 
U. W. Fiskar 
E. L. Ward . 
G. F. Meyer 
Main Office. 
T. E. Sider.. 
R. L. Snow. 
R. Boultbee. 
A. Leman . . . 
K. Acheson . 
T. Thorpe . . 
A. Crealock. 



Totals- 



66 
303 



1282.00 
2596.42 
2781.50 

1514.42 
2132.81 

2583.41 
764.00 

4362.70 
136.50 



48 5607.79 
5995.67 



29757.22, 



3 
71 
14 

1 

105 

13 

58 
1 

40 
2 



187.00 
5720.. 58 

490.05 

51.00 

9109.45] 

697.87 

5474.06 

1.00 

4072.751 

223.50 



25 

5 

338| 29470.85 



2895.59 
548.00 



2 

62: 
4 
3 

38! 

7 



200.00 
6190.09 

393.50 

53.25, 

3484.72 

983.75 



37 3717.28 



'I' 

1| 
35 
11 



2523.00 

174.50 

79.75 

3692.64 

1309.50 



222 22801.99 



20 
84 
16 

1 
51 
11 

3 
50 
14 
50 
10 

46 

77 

433 



2046.92 

9145.05 

1333.38 

50.30 

5424.51 

955.03 

253.50 

5272.75 

1417.00 

6862.56 

883.23 

5233.99 
13311.47 

52189.69 



i 

V 



.11- 



t 



J 



\x 




I: 



Fig. 1 — .Agricilturai. Land i.\" Sale Townships. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



103 



Table Xo. 4 

FREE GRANT LAND (including soldiers' land) 

Transactions for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1947 



Administrative 


District 


Locations 


Cancellations 


Assignments Patents 




No. 


Acres 


No. 


Acres 


No. 


Acres 


No. 


Acres 


Algonquin 


G. H.R.Phillips 

A. S. Bray 

G. Delahev. . . 
E. L. Ward . . . 
G. F. Mever... 
A. B. Wheatley 
T. E. Sider.... 
R. L. Snow. . . 
R. Boultbee. . . 

A. Leman 

K. Acheson. . . 
T. Thorpe .... 
A. Crealock. . . 


5 
9 
6 

1 
14 

7 

5 

11 

10 
5 

73 


462 00 


31 


.•^090 QQ 


1 


152.00 
384.83 

1864.75 
100.00 

321 1 ."^5 


9 

6 

26 

30 

17 

16 

38 

1 

23 
2 

168 


816 31 


Cochrane. . . . 
Fort Frances. 
Kapuskasing. 
Kenora 




711.03 

688.62 

102.00 

1765.75 


9 943.25 4 
53 7374.00 12 

3 225.50 1 
39| 4914.55 26 


501.50 
3797.00 

4299 12 


Lindsav 




609.00 

493.00 

1640.50 

1319.00 
453.00 

8243.90 


2 270 00 1 Q.T on 




North Bay. . . 
Parry Sound.. 
Port Arthur. . 
Sault Ste. Mar 
Siou.x Lookout 

Sudbur\- 

Tweed 

Totals. . . 


ie 


108 
28 
60 
1 
1 
15 
99 

449 


12202.18 
3310.71 
7722.75 
80.00 
160.00 
1759.59 
9914.00 

51906.52 


11 

7 

23 

3 
14 
19 

122 


1079.75 

890.50 

3361.24 

317.75 
2125.25 
1941.50 

15523 92 


1692.72 

2106.00 

5127.46 

127.00 

2972.86 
228.80 

21668 77 












loo- .;;- 



El 



ii 

















1 
















F 


















J-f 











Fig. 2 — .\grici LTt RAi. Land in Fri;|': Gram rowNsiiii's 
(includiiiiLi soldiers' land). 



104 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



T.A.BLE No. 5 

LAND FOR SPECIAL USE 

Transactions for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1947 



Administrative 
District 


District 
Forester 


Sales 


Cancellations 


Assignments 


Patents 


No. 


Acres 


No. 


Acres 


No. 


Acres 


No. 


Acres 


Algonquin 

Cochrane 


G.H. R.Phillips 
A. S. Bray. . . . 

F. J. Dawson.. 

G. Delahe\ . . . 
U. W. Fiskar.. 
E. L. Ward . . . 
G. F. Meyer. . 
Main Office . . . 
T. E. Sider.... 
R. L. Snow . . . 
R. Boultbee. . . 

A. Leman 

K. Acheson . . . 
T. Thorpe. . . . 
A. Crealock . . . 


19 

4 

2 

8 

3 

1 

9 

28 

14 

17 

4 

7 

8 

27 

60 


863.02 
308.05 
106.17 
504 15 










15 

1 


60 59 






1 



3.59 


1.00 


Chapleau 
















3 

9 


284 50 


Gerald ton . . . . 


149.70 

75.00 

246.82 

609.04 

788.07 

376.52 

3076.80 

176.82 

92.93 

1600.13 

5320.71 

14293.96 










5891 78 


Kapuskasing . . . 
Kenora 




















19 
23 

5 
11 

4 
10 

1 
13 
31 

145 


398 19 


Main Office .... 










727 89 


North Ba\- . ... 






3 


121.61 


176 40 


Parry Sound.. . . 
Port Arthur. . . . 






68 30 










401.26 


Sault Ste. Marie 










141 80 


Sioux Lookout 






1 

1 


6.82 
2.03 


23 


Sudbury 






761.70 


Tweed 






4359.35 


Totals 


1 
i 211 






6 


134.05 


13272.99 




1 









I 

i 











{ 


f ^ - 




R 


;■ ; 




i; 




l^ 







Fig. 3 — L.VNDs FOR Speci.xl Use. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



105 



T.\BLE Xo. 6 

SUMMER RESORT LANDS 
Transactions for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1947 



Administrative 
District 


District 
Forester 


Sales 


Cancellations 


Assignments 


Patents 


No. 


Acres 


No. 


Acres 


No. 


Acres 


No. 


Acres 


Algonquin 

Cochrane 

Fort Frances. . . 

Geraldton 

Gogania 

Kapuskasing. . . 

Kenora 

Main Office 

North Bay 

Parry Sound.. . . 
Port Arthur. . . . 
Sault Ste. Marie 
Sioux Lookout . . 

Sudbury 

Tweed 


G.H. R.Phillips 
A. S. Bray.... 
G. Delahev. . . 
U. \V. Fiskar. . 

J. Tavlor 

E. L.'Ward. .. 
G. F. Me\er. , . 
Main Office . . . 
T. E. Sider. . . . 
R. L. Snow. . . 
R. Boultbee. . . 

A. Leman 

K. Acheson . . . 
T. Thorpe . . . . 
A. Crealock . . . 


' >9 

7 

31 

5 

2 

.5 

123 

2 

96 

97 

37 

74 

4 

114 

51 

666 


41.44 

8.62 

121.04 

16.48 

0.96 

3.10 

285.99 

0.81 

247.74 

275.90 

113.23 

237.45 

15.56 

369.02 

103.88 

1841.25 






3 

1 


5.30 
0.66 


5 

1 

43 

4 


12.44 






.66 


1 


0.33 


206.63 






13.42 

















1 
5 


5.09 
8.30 






1 


.60 


123 
5 
44 
60 
36 
31 
7 
88 
49 

496 


306.97 
19.52 


1 
1 


2.16 
1.3 


6 
6 


15.33 
14.10 


140.68 
201.97 
358.30 






t 

7 
3 

37 


9.83 

3.4 

120.94 

3.36 

186.31 


86.44 






29.64 


1 

1 

6 


0.38 
2.00 

6.77 


296.91 
91.37 


Totals 


1764.95 









I 




1944 I94S 1946 1947 1946 

Fig. 4 — .SiMMi.K Ki;s<)Kr Lands. 



106 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



T.\BLE No. 7 

CITIES, TOWNS AND TOWNSITES 

Transactions for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1947 



Administrative 
District 


District 
Forester 


Sales 


Cancellations 


Assignments 


Patents 


No. 


Acres 


No. 


Acres 


No. 


Acres 


No. 


Acres 


Algonquin 


G.H. R.Phillips 
A. S. Brav.... 
G. Delahev . . . 


1 
33 


2.00 
29.90 






2 

7 


.65 
1.49 


1 
26 

1 
19 


2 00 


Cochrane 






13 02 


Fort Frances . . . 






2.10 


Gerald ton 


U. \V. Fiskar.. 

J. Tavlor 

E. L.'Ward. .. 
G. F. Me\er. . . 
Main Office. . . 
T. E. Sider.... 
R. L. Snow. . . 
R. Boultbee. . . 

A. Leman 

K. Acheson . . . 
T. Thorpe .... 
A. Crealock . . . 


18 

23 

58 

14 

18 

7 

1 

7 

33 

28 

34 


2.85 
3.84 

39.52 
5.88 

28.81 
5.03 
0.25 
1.35 
6.33 
7.55 
4.58 






1 

1 
2 

1 


.17 
.88 
.50 
.30 


2.71 


Gogama 








Kapuskasing. . . 

Kenora 

Main Office .... 


2 

1 


.48 
.23 


14 
11 
27 

2 
11 
18 
22 
25 
11 

1 

249 


15.54 

8.51 

89 25 


North Bav 











.70 


Parr\- Sound.. . . 


1 


1.00 






2.55 


Port Arthur. . . . 


1 


.13 


7.62 


Sault Ste. Marie 






8. 28 


Sioux Lookout. . 
Sudburv 


1 
4 


.22 
0.46 


12 


2.53 


12.42 
10.22 


Tweed 






.47 


Totals 




275 


137.92 


9 


2.39 


27 


6.67 


175 39 










1 






1947 



1945 1946 1947 1946 1949 

Fig. 5 — City, Town .\xd Townsite L.\nds. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



101 



X 

u 
< 



^ — 





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REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




^Fie. 6-LAND rsK Permits, Leases and Licences of Occupation Issued. 



1628 



Table No. 9 

Statement of Patents, etc., issued durino the year ending March 

Public Land Patents ^^9 

Free Grant Patents ^^J 

Patents & Transfers (Town Lots) ^f^_ 

Miscellaneous Documents |^2 

Releases of Pine '_' 

Crown Leases 2 

Algonquin Park Leases "jf 

BrWe Beach Leases j''^* 

Bruce Beach Renewals ^| 

Rondeau Park Leases ' ^ 

Timagami Leases 

Water Power Leases ^ 

Licences of Occupation 82 

Licences of Occupation (Rondeau) ^ 

Licences of Occupation (Algonquin) ^ 

Licences of Occupation Cancelled 219 

Crown Leases Cancelled 2- 



3L 1947 



156 



86 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 109 



DIMSION OF LAW 



The primar\- duties of the Di\ision are as indicated in the Administrati\e 
Chart. 

As a result of the pre\ious Department of (lame and Fisheries cominy 
under the administration of the Department of Lands and Forests, as the Di\i- 
sion of Fish and W'ildhfe, the work of the Law Division was considerabh- in- 
creased. The Game and Fisheries Act, 1946, is a revision of the Act which 
formerly was in effect, and considerable time was necessary in connection with 
the preparation of the many regulations which are required under the provisions 
of the Act. 

Amendments were made to ten Acts governing the administration of the 
Department, and The Forest Management Act was created. This Act permits 
the Minister to require timlier operators on Crown land to submit estimated 
inventories of the timber on the cutting-area respecting age, species, size and 
type, and management plans concerning the utilization of the timber. 

An amendment to The Townsites Act pro\ides that the Crown shall not 
claim any percentage of land in a subdi\ision plan of land which has been patented 
for upwards of fixe years prior to the time of making the subdivision. 

An amendment to The Crown Timber Act permits the Minister, with the 
appro\'al of the Lieutenant-Go\ernor in Council, to enter into long-term timber 
concession agreements concerning all species of timl^er. 

An amendment to The Cullers Act allows the Lieutenant-Governor in 
Council to make regulations with respect to standardization of the measurement 

of timber cut on Crown lands. 

An amendment to The Pul)]ic Lands Act allows the issue of letters patent 
to the widow of a locatee. 

During the year, the policN' of dealing with trespass cases, where a person 
committing a trespass had no authority to cut, by laying a charge of theft ot 
trees under the Criminal Code, was actively followed. In the majority of such 
charges convictions were made, and it is felt that this polic}' will reduce unauthor- 
ized timber-cutting. 

The following is a recapitulation of charges laid under the Criminal Code 
and for offences against provincial statutes and regulations: 

Acts Charges Convictions Acquittals 

Game andl'ishcrics .\ct 1,510 1,433 77 

Forest hires IVevention Act 17 14 3 

Provincial Parks Act 2 2 

Crown Timber Act 1 1 

During the year one timber concession agreement and two supplementar>- 
agreements concerning main agreements pre\ iousl>' in force were prepared. 

Various field trips were made by the Chief of the Dixision to District 
Offices concerning matters requiring legal attention. 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 111 



DIMSIOX OF OPERATION AXD PERSOXXEL 

The termination of hostilities with German\- in Ma\", 1945, and with Japan 
in August, 1945, initiated the retooHng of industry- and diverted the flow of 
personnel from the Armed Forces and industry- to other channels. As a result 
of the processes of reconversion in the personnel and supph' fields, the situation, 
as far as the Department is concerned, has been greath' eased. Urgenth' needed 
supplies ha\e been a little more readih' obtained and in somewhat greater 
volume, but still do not entireh' meet our requirements. 

For some time there was considerable difficult}' in obtaining suitable qualified 
stenographic personnel, and desks and other office furniture are still most difficult 
to obtain. As >ounger people return to pre-war perspectives and as adolescents 
who have been obtaining the wages usualh" paid to adults are eliminated from 
industry, this situation ma\- be considerabh- bettered. It is anticipated, too, 
that the training programmes of the Canadian \'ocational schools will be a 
means of pro\'iding numbers of pro])erl\' trained personnel. 

During this >"ear, eight new administrative districts were created, with the 
result that the greater part of the Province south of the Albany River is now 
under administrative district organization. The creation of these new districts 
will provide more effective administration. 

On Xoxember 28th. 1946, the Honoural)le H. R. Scott was appointed 
Minister of the Department in succession to the Honourable W. G. Thompson, 
who had resigned. 

In April, the Department of Game and Fisheries was amalgamated with 
the Department of Lands and Forests, and a new Departmental Division known 
as the Division of Fish and Wildlife was created. Certain functions of Fish 
and Wildlife Management both at Head Office and in the field were centralized 
in this Division. Other administrative functions of the Department of Game 
and Fisheries have been allocated to the appropriate Divisions alread>' estab- 
lished in this Department. 

The staft of the former Department of Game and Fisheries was redistributed, 
the majorit\' of them being allocated to the Division of Fish and \\'ildlife and 
the remainder to the other Divisions of the Department. The field stalT became 
a part of the various administrative district organizations. B>- this process, 
the Department of Lands and Forests became responsible for the administration 
of the natural resources within the Proxince of Ontario with the single exception 
of those within the purxiew of the Department of Mines. Changes effected 
are dealt with in that {)art of this annual report dexoted to the Dixision of I'ish 
and Wildlife. 

A Forest Resources Inventory" organization was created in the Dixision of 
Timber Management. The details of this organization appear in the section 
of this report devoted to that Di\-ision. 

Due to oxer-crowding at llead Office where the per capita space is at an 
absolute minimum, the .Aerial -Surx-exs section of the Dix-ision of Surx'exs and 
Engineering xvas transferred from the Parliament Buildings to the DeHaxilland 
plant on Sheppard Avenue, where it continues to function as a section of that 
Dix'ision. 



112 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



The organization as of the end of the fiscal year, therefore, is as follows: 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO 
Minister — Hox. \V. G. Thompson' (to November 28, 1946) 
Hon. H. R. Scott (from November 28, 1946) 

Deputy Minister — F. A. MacDougall 

Division Chief 

Accounts J- G. McMillen 

Air Service G. E. Ponsford 

(Sault Ste. Marie) 

Fish and Wildlife W. J. K. Harkness 

F"orest Protection C. R. Mills 

(to October 31, 1946) 

T. E. Macke>- 

(from November 1. 1946) 

Land and Recreational Areas H. W. ("rosbie 

(to November 2, 1946) 

W. D. Cram 

(from March 1, 1947) 

Law F. J. Sullivan 

Operation and Personnel P. (). Rh\nas 

Reforestation E. J. Za\itz 

Research R.N. Johnston 

Surve\s and FIngineering F. W. Beatty 

Timber Management J. )•'. Sharpe 



FIELD OFFICES 

REGION Regional District District 

Forester District Forester Headquarters 

South-Western Lake Erie F. S. Newman. . St. Williams 

Lake Huron . . . I. C. Marritt. . . .Gait 
Lake Simcoe. . . . J. F. L. Simmons. Maj)le 

South-Eastern W'. D. Cram, Quinte A. Crealock Tweed 

Toronto Rideau W'. E. Steele. . . . Kemptville 

Trent A. B. \Vheatle\". . Lindsay 

South-Central. P. McEwen, Algonquin G. H. R. Phillips. Algonquin 

Dorset Parr>- Sound . . . . R. L. Snow Parry Sound 

Central North Ba\" F. E. Sider North Bay 

Chapleau F. J. Dawson . . . Chapleau 

Gogama J -^L Ta\"lor. . . .Gogama 

Sault Ste. Marie. A. Leman Sault Ste. Marie 

Sudbur\- T. Thorpe Sudbury 

Northern E. L. Ward, Kapuskasing. . . T3. L. Ward Kapuskasing 

Kapuskasing. .Cochrane A. S. Bra> Cochrane 

Mid- Western . P. Addison . . . Port Arthur R. Boultbee. . . . Port Arthur 

Port Arthur.. .Geraldton I'. W. Fiskar. . . .Geraldton 

Western K. Acheson Sioux Lookout. . . K. Acheson Sioux Lookout 

Sioux Lookout. Kenora G. F. Meyer. , . Kenora 

Fort Frances. . . .G. Delahev Fort Frances 



FORESTS 



SIGNS 



er 




ATION 


REFt 


VD 




)x\NEL 




E 


Rhynas 


lief 




jgement: — 


Administt 


g, selection, ap- 


Provi] 


classification. 


Foresi 


e. salary rating. 


Seed 


ive statistics. 


germi 


, stall and per- 


P'oresi 


)rd3. 


Expei 


compensation. 


strati( 


e — ^iessengers. 


Foresi 


:ders-ln-Council. 






Extension 


en/.— 


Foresters: 


d distribution of 


Muni' 


nt and supplies. 


Inspei 


ontrol. 


lands 


Locating and 


Rural 


supplies. 


Roadi 


Issue — Re- 


ing. 




Lectu 


i printed matter. 


schoo 


- Space adjust- 


servic 


i Education : — 




uiries. 




•line 




iting. rewrites, 




tribution. 





n forest fire pre- 
Fish and Wild- 
ation. 

jrs in schools, 
nps, outfitters' 
and game asso- 
conservation. 
>, slides, motion 
r lecture tour 

ess, radio, ez- 
and posters on 
I and fire pre- 



n with educa- 
lorities on text 
lers' aids; poster, 
ssay contests as 
them. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISIONS 

1947 

Hon. H. R. SCOTT, Minister 

F. A. MacDOUGALL, Deputy Minister 



ACCOUNTS AIR SERVICE 



FOREST LAND AND 
PROTECTION RECREATIONAL 
AREAS 



LAW 



J. G. McMillcn G. E. Ponsford W. J. K. Harkness T. E. Mackey W. D. Cram F. J. Sulliv 

Chit/ Chief ChUJ Chief Chief Chief 



, LcBislaUon, regulatioiu 



cipMdIlurci. 


Sld'Stlng" 


'^"^a'^f^ 




lUli/e:— 
Management and propa 


mM,lralU,n of Und Tm 


Dra/Uni of all con 
Suptrtitlon of 


w b!^^«"d 




Traoltiie maoagemcDt. 
Game preaerve* and apccia 
hunting atcM— open ms 

VuT deaien ll^ce>. "^"^ 


Depnitmental tlBfl lalary 
Dma for Public AccounU 


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pa..«,en. o. 


C 


Surveyi uid InveatlfStloai 



'l-Uli°'and Wildlife Sile^r^hto^fway for el«^ SpedaJ patents, land 



OPER-ATION 


REFORESTATION 


RESEARCH 


AND 






PERSONNEL 








E, J. Zavitz 




P. 0. Rhynas 


R. N. Johnston 


Chief 


Chief 


a«/ 


„,,^ «..,„„„,-_ 


^J«..ulr«/.o. ./ 


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}?SS5"ViJ"lod"5!i. 


prmioMion and Homge. 


nmcTabto. V,«id. DnUn. 




EipfnmeiitaJ and Demon- 
















rramiM.O«lm.u.-CoiincJ. 


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"SSS S'°pSSt"°«ood. 
















b"^ ih**^ ^'h""v''"^' 


and BlologicaJ Aiialyaia 



SURVEYS 

AND 

EXr.INEKRING 

F. \V. Beatty 
Chief 



J. F. Sharpe 
Chief 






Municipal 












Il«nu held In Mffkccpliig. Klylny Oiyralloni. Hon*. 

Rudiet (oi malo and flatd mentt ot the Govtrnmcnl. The iludy, prevention 

Checking ot iec«lpu and the Service may undeilake. paiaaltn. 

" Fli'Tnd Wlldll(» UcuiCn. "^u'lai a'^Ji^^"''' "" s"^rvUion'"'nT'hrtd 






Equipment. Wooda 



Ma[>9 kuued by tb* Depart' 









>1 Und Tax. 

1 WUdllS^LfeaDcafc 






ttftyint a/:— 

D([>aitnicnl«, and (he public. 

rhr>l<fcraphy required for 
Foieitrv, rilghway and 

I'romJni flima and prepar- 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
DIVISIONS 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

Department of Lands and Forests 

Hon. H. R. Scolt F. A. MacDougall 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 113 



AREAS OF AI)ML\TSTRATI\'E DISTRICTS 

Districts A rea 

Algonquin 3,545,600 acres 

Chapleau 4,085,760 acres 

Cochrane Q, 25 1,840 acres 

Fort Frances 4,377,600 acres 

Geraldton 8,035.840 acres 

Gogama 4,154,880 acres 

Kapuskasing 9,075,000 acres 

Kenora 6,812,160 acres 

Lake Erie 4,416,000 acres 

Lake Huron 5,952,000 acres 

Lake Simcoe 2,949,120 acres 

North Bay 5,580,800 acres 

Parry Sound 3,965,440 acres 

Port Arthur 9,679,360 acres 

Quinte 4,536,320 acres 

Rideau 3,489,280 acres 

Sault Ste. Marie 10,309,120 acres 

Sioux Lookout 18,291,200 acres 

Sudburv 4,610,560 acres 

Trent . ' 3,279,360 acres 

Total 126,397,240 acres 



PERSOWEL MAXAGEMEXT 

Selection and Placement: 

Applications for employment with the Department come to us, for the 
most i)art, through the Office of the Civil Service Commission. A considerable 
number, however, are received direct. All persons making application at Head 
Office are interviewed by the Personnel Officer or his representative and a report 
on each applicant is made summarizing all essential details concerning the 
applicant's qualifications, experience and personal history and, as well, the 
interviewer records his impression of the applicant and makes his recommenda- 
tion to the Chief of this Division. 

The testing and rating of ajjplicants for stenographic, taping and clerical 
positions b\- the Office of the Civil Service Commission has been of great assist- 
ance to us in recruiting competent persons in these classes. 

The Department, has, wherever possible, placed ex-service personnel as 
l)ositions or rephuements became necessary. Of those appointed to the start 
during the fiscal >ear. 70.5% were ex-service personnel. A statement appears 
which indicates the relatixc number of male and female emplo\ees. 

TwentN I'ish and Wildlife Sju'cialists were appointed to give innnediate, 
close sui)ervision to enforcement matters in the various administrative districts 
under the respective District P'oresters. The fisli hatcherx staffs became part 
of the District organizations. 

On \()\cmber 28, 1946, the I lononrabK' II. K. Scott succeeded the llonom- 
al)le W. (".. riiom])son as Minister of Lands and l-'orests. 

On April 1, 1946. 1. M. Ta\ lor was ai)pointed District Forester at Gogama. 
On the s.uue dale V . j. Dawson was ajipointed District Forester at Chapleau. 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



llo 



On June 3. 1946, Dr. \V. J. K. Harkness was appointed (1iief, Division of 
Fish and Wildlife. 

On July 15. 1946, F. E. Sider, after his release from the Armed Services, 
was appointed District Forester at North Ba>-. 

On August 11, 1946, 

W. E. Steele was appointed District Forester of Rideau District. 

A. Crealock was appointed District Forester of Quinte District. 

A. B. Wheatley was appointed District Forester of Trent District. 

I. C. Marritt was appointed District Forester of Lake Huron District. 

F. S. Newman was appointed District Forester of Lake Erie District. 

On September 28, 1946, J. F. L. Simmons was appointed District Forester 
of Lake Simcoe District. 

On November 1, 1946, W. D. Cram was appointed Regional Forester of the 
South Eastern Region. 

As of November 1, 1946, T. E. Mackey, formerh' Regional Forester, 
North Bay, was appointed Chief, Division of Forest Protection. 

As of March 1, 1947, \V. D. Cram became Chief, Division of Land and 
Recreational Areas in addition to his duties as Regional Forester. 

The following members of Staff were superannuated during the fiscal \ear: 

Name Division or District Date 

Barran, J. G. Fish and Wildlife April 22, 1946 

Fish and Wildlife May 16, 1946 

Surve^"s and Engineering June L 1946 

Fish and Wildlife ' July 1.1946 

Surveys and Engineering Aug. 29, 1946 

Cochrane " Sept. 17, 1946 

Parry Sound Oct. 18, 1946 

Gogama Feb. 9, 1947 

Algonquin Feb. 28, 1947 



Taylor, D. J 
Burwash, N. A. 
Beaupre, J. M. 
Heath, W. H. 
Potter, E. E. 
Mclnnis, C. C. 
Bouche\', A. C. 
Ranger, P. 



Veteran Personnel as of March 31. 1947 
(Exclusive of Casual Staff) 



Inside. . 
(Jutside. 

Inside. . 
Outside. 



Male 




Fe 


male 


Total 


146 






6 


152 


318 








318 


464 






6 


470 


1st War 


Znd W 


ar 


Both Wars 


Total 


39 


105 




8 


152 


133 


174 




11 


318 



Total Staff. March 31. 1947, 



Head Office 
Field 



172 



279 



19 





CoiitinKotts 




Perm. 


Temp. 


Casual 


215 


166 


6 


308 


396 


521 



470 



Total 

387 

1225 



'i'otal 



523 



562 



527 



1612 



116 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Permanent Staff 523 

Temporary Staff" 562 

Total 1085 

\ eterans as above 470 

Per cent, of Veterans 43 . 3% 

Male Staff 946 

Male Veterans 464 

Per cent, of \ eterans 49% 

XOTE. — This statement includes Air Service as inside staff. 



PERMANENT AND TEMPORARY EMPLOYEES 
As OF March 31, 1947 





Perm. 


^NENT 


Temporary 


Total 




Division 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Grand 
Total 


Air Service 

Accounts 

Fish and Wildlite 

Forest Protection 


47 

18 

17 

9 

8 
1 
1 

17 
5 
8 

21 
9 


15 
8 
2 

10 

1 
4 
6 

3 
2 
3 


21 

19 

7 

2 

4 

26 
3 
4 

17 
9 


2 
11 
7 
2 
6 

15 
3 

1 
4 
3 


68 

37 

24 

11 

12 

1 

1 

43 

8 


2 
26 
15 

4 
16 

1 

4 
21 

3 


70 
63 
39 

15 


Lands and Recreational Areas 

Law 

Main Office 

Operation and Pi-rsonnei. . . . 
Reforestation 


28 

I 

64 
11 


Research 

Surveys and Engineering. . . . 
Timber Management 


12 4 

38 6 

18 1 6 


16 
44 
24 




161 


54 


112 


54 


273 108 


381 



PERMANENT AND TEMPORARY EMPLOYEES 
As OF March 31, 1947 



District 

.'\igonquin 

Chapleau 

Cochrane 

Fort Frances 

Geraldton 

Gogama 

Kapuskasing 

Kenora 

Lake Erie 

Lake Huron 

Lake Simcoe 

North Ba\ 

Parry Sound 

Port' Arthur 

Quinte 

Ranger School 

Rideau 

.Sauk Ste. Marie. . 
Sioux Lookout. . . . 

Sudbury 

Trent 



Perm.\nent 



Male 

24 

7 
15 
11 

6 

5 
11 
11 
20 
17 
14 
30 
16 
14 
11 



22 

6 

32 

11 



Temporary 



Female Male 



34 
12 
30 
17 

9 
11 
22 
23 
14 
13 
29 
19 
20 
22 
22 

2 
11 



Female 



17 
14 
15 



Total 



Male 

58 
19 
45 
28 
15 
16 
33 
34 
34 
30 
43 
49 
36 
36 
33 
9 
16 
44 
23 
46 
26 



Female 



Grand 
Total 

58 
19 
46 
29 
16 
16 
35 
36 
34 
30 
43 
56 
39 
41 
35 
9 
16 
48 
24 
48 
26 



295 



13 



378 



18 



673 



31 



704 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR- 1947 



u: 



DEPARTMENT 

OF 

AMDS AND FOREST 



550 
525 
500 
475 




































































































450 

425 

400 

375 

3 50 

325 

300 

275 

250 

225 

200 

175 

150 

125 

100 

75 

50 

25 

n 
























































1 






























































1 






1 














































































1 
































H 




1 




























H 






























1 






























H 






























H 






























H 






























H 






























■ 




— 






— 




















B 





















l94o 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 

PERMANENT EMPLOYEES 

AS Of MARCH 3h^- EACH YEAR 



118 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 

TfCHNICAL P£KSONNtL £MPLOY£Dm947 

(foresters only, noted to 1946) 

Oblique shading denotes seasonal Technical Personnel employed 1947 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



119 




Section of the Division of Operation and Personnel. 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES BY MONTHS 
For Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 1947 







Inside 






Outside 






Month 














Total 




Perm. 


Temp. 


Casual 


Perm. 


Temp. 


Casual 




1946 
















April 


136 


86 


5 


238 


277 


1222 


1964 


Maj- 


141 


81 


15 


244 


275 


1469 


2225 


June 


177 


93 


9 


362 


331 


1486 


2458 


July 


174 


107 


12 


349 


341 


1539 


2522 


August 


175 


118 


14 


352 


348 


1369 


2376 


September 


177 


121 


7 


365 


348 


1251 


2528 


October 


177 


124 




362 


378 


882 


2188 


November. . 


175 
174 


130 
135 


2 


351 
353 


374 
375 


671 
702 


1722 


December 


1749 


1947 
















January 


168 


144 


4 


356 


368 


688 


1728 


Februarv 


165 


155 


4 


356 


366 


561 


1607 


March 


168 


143 


3 


355 


419 


524 


1612 



Tables of A^e Classes of employees of Department of Lands and Forests- 
Permanent and Continuous Temporary, as of 31st March, 1947. 

Number of 
Age Employees 

Under 21 40 

21 30 209 

31-40 231 

41-50 280 

51-60 228 

61-70 91 

Over 70 6 

Total ' 1085 



120 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



CHART Of AGE CLASSES 



3 15 














300 
285 
270 


































\ 












\ 




PAdi 










\ 




225 
210 
195 






/ 




\ 












' 


I 






^ 






\ 


m 

d "80 

111 

o 

< 165 

I 
u 

•^ 150 

z 

It 135 
n 1 ?r> 




/ 








\ 




/ 








\ 




/ 








\ 




/ 








\ 




/ 








\ 


a 

ID 

ffi 

2 105 

Z 

90 
75 
60 
45 




/ 








\ 




/ 








\ 




/ 












/ 












/ 










30 

15 




' 























UNDER 21 
YEARS 



21-30 
YEARS 



3 1-40 
YEARS 



4 1-50 
YEARS 



51-60 
YEARS 



1-70 
YEARS 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 121 













DEATHS 










The t 


ollowing 


are rt 


gretfull: 


^ reported : 










J. 


St. 


Louis, F 


orest 


Ranger 


at Kapuskasing. 


on Jul\ 8th. 


1M46 






C. 


E. 


Binkley. 


Game Overseer at North Ba\ , 


on November 


6th. 


1046. 1 


H 


W . Crosbie, C'hief. Division of Land and 
November 2n(l. 1046. 


Recreational 


Areas. 


on 1 



Investigations: 

Constant haison work lias been conducted and essential investigations made 
from time to time throughout the service as required, through which the Head 
Office Relations with the held and vice versa have been facilitated. 

Accident, Health and Safety Measures: 

Medical and X-ra\" examinations have been continued. As a result, a 
large number of the staff have been done, and in this connection, it ma>- be 
observed that it is now essential for emplo\ees recommended for promotion 
to the Permanent Staff to be categorized by the Health Clinic, or under their 
supervision. Health and Accident Prevention literature has been circulated 
and arrangements are being made for this to be followed In- motion {picture 
propaganda. 

Attendance Records: 

These are compiled monthly and are necessarily maintained with con- 
siderable care due to the fact that sick leave accumulations of employees with 
over five years service are worth half pa\- on their separation from the service. 

Staff Suggestion Plan: 

The interest of both emplo\ee and official in this plan has been maintained 
and on Januar\- 13, 1947, thirteen prizes for suggestions were awarded by the 
("ommittee as follows: 

Name Suggestion 

R. H. Keenan, Sudbur\ Displax (\-irds in Railwax' Stations. 

George E. Knight. Parr\ Sound Statement of Mre-i-'ighting Expenses. 

I'. II. I"ole\ , Kenora F^atter\- Tester Holder. 

J. H. Jhompson. I'oronto Publicity' Parke Township. 

Quimb\- I'". Hess. Kapuskasing Use of Fire I4azard Indicators. 

Miss \'. Molcsworth. Toronto Manual of Timber and Pulpwood 

.\greenu'iit ( "lauses. 

J. .\. \\'\ nd, .\rnistrong i'ulpwood Rule. 

W. H. i'orch. AlgoiK|uiii Paik Birds of .\lgonciuin Park. 

B. R. .Somers. .Sudburx (4ialk Holder. 

.S\(ln('\ ^'a\•n(•r, Toronto I )ete(t ( aliulator for -Scaling. 

IT E. I\c(le\ , .Su(ll)ur\- PaiiU Record lorni. 

\\ .liter ( ". l)a\idson. .\ir .Service, 

.Sault -Sic. Marie \'al\'e Depressor Tool. 

TCrnaiul I)c Sourd\ . Port Arthur i-"ine .Spra\ W'att-r Nozzle. 



122 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

STAFF MEETINGS 

Regional Meeting: 

Regional Conferences including all the senior administrative officers of 
each region respectively, were held as follows: — 

Western Region Kenora Oct. 7-8 

Thunder Bay Port Arthur Oct. 10-11 

Southern Ranger School Oct. 31 — Nov. 1 

District Foresters' Meetings: 

The annual District Foresters' Conference was held in Toronto, January 
20th to January 25th, 1947. It was attended b}' Field and Head Office officials, 
and with an organized time table and classified agenda, the proceedings resulted 
in a most beneficial conference. 

Supplementary Conference: 

A supplementary- conference was held from February- 17th to February 
21st, 1947, attended by field foresters other than District Foresters. This 
conference provided an opportunity for Assistant Foresters and other senior 
officials to discuss current and other j)roblems in oj^en forum, for which suitable 
provision could not be made on the agenda of the Regular Conference. Definite 
benefits were immediately apparent, and because of this and the reactions of 
those who attended, it is proposed to continue the practice in an endeavour to 
bring about closer relations between the Field and Head Office and facilitate 
the efficient discharge of the responsibilities of all concerned. 



TRAIN L\G 

The following are the details of First Aid Training, Job Instruction Training 
and the Head Office Staff Courses for the fiscal year. The favourable reaction 
of the staff and their hearty interest in the instruction as given, to say nothing 
of improved performance, is reflected in the ratings obtained by those instructed 
under the various headings. 

The number of employees that completed First Aid Training successfulh', 
as provided by the St. John's Ambulance Association, was 80. 

The number of employees that completed the Job Instruction Training 
Course was 72. 

The number of employees that completed the Head Office Staff Course 
was nine. 



Ontario Forest Ranger School: 

All of the buildings have not >et been completed, but the results obtained 
so far are most gratifying and it is hoped that the building programme will have 
been finished towards the end of 1947. The second term began October 1st, 
1946, and concluded October 31st, 1946. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



123 



The following members of the staff attended from the various districts: 



Algonquin 
M. Getz 

F. P. Mclnt\re 
J. Orme 

J. Tait 

Clmplea u 
E. Collard 

G. T. Godemair 

Cochrane 

S. E. McWhirter 
O. K. Welsh 
P. M. Dolan 

Fort Frances 
D. C. Baldwin 
R. H. Pattison 
S. \'. Ryan 

Geraldton 
S. Maki 



Gogama 
E. Barnes 
L. Morin 

Kapuskasing 

E. A. Boice 

H. E. Hutchinson 
J. M. McDougall 

Kenora 
P. Boruj) 
J. A. AIurph\- 
J. MacKa\' 

F. Xicoll 

North Bay 
D. Burns 
R. Laurin 

Parry Sound 
S. Booker 
H. W. LaBrash 



Port Arthur 
W. J. Gibson 
T. J. Buerard 
W. H. Jarvis 
C. W. McDonald 

Quinte 
K. Legris 

Sault Ste. Marie 
J. Bennett 
C. MacDonald 
H. MacLeod 
C. Tregonning 

Sioux Lookout 
J. E. Anderson 
P. Maskerine 
J. B. Rorke 

Sudburv 
W. \Vetow 



During the period December 2nd to December 19th, 1946, inclusive, a Fish 
and Wildlife course was held at the Ranger School. It was attended by the 
Specialists and Enforcement Officers from the various districts, with obvious 
benefits. 

Scaler's Course: 

Under the direction of the Division of Timber ALanagement, live courses 
were given at Minden, Thessalon, Fort William and Swastika respectiveh . 
Details of the results of examinations which followed these courses are reported 
by the Division of Timber Management on page 156. 



Workmen's Compensation: 

The provisions of the Act are available to the staff' of the Department, 
many of w^hom are from time to time engaged in hazardous work — benefits in 
pay, medical aid and pensions. 

For the past fiscal >ear the cost to the Depart men l was S22,05L73. The 
administrative charge of the Board was S754.50. Last year these figures were 
$12,458.04 and $334.50 respectively. 

Over the period back to 1938, these costs have varied from a minimum of 
812.850.33 in 1944 to 817,129.85 in 1939. 

The \ariations seem to be compatible with the intensit\- of the tire hazard, 
as the number of accidents and the incidence of these rise in the dr\- months 
and decline in the fall. 

Ever\- effort is made to eliminate dangerous or careless practice and so 
reduce cost, man dax' losses and job dela\". 



12-4 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Chief Forest Rangers and their Divisions as of March 31, 1947, 



Division 


District 


Chief Ranger 


A. C. R. 


Sault Ste. Marie 


J. A. MacGillivraN 


Abitibi 


(^ochrane 


R. Woodall 


Algonquin N. 


-Algonquin 


John Mclnt>re 


Algonquin S. 


Algonquin 


T. McCormick 


Armstrong 


Sioux Lookout 


W. H. Favle 


Bancroft 


Quinte 


McK. Wilson 


Biscotasing 


("hapleau 


W. P. O'Donnell 


Black Sturgeon 


Port Arthur 


W. J. Gibson (actg.) 


Blind River 


Sault Ste. Marie 


r. E. Cassid>' 


(\apreol 


Sudbur\- 


r. McGown 


("hapleau 


Chapleau 


j. F:. Morin 


Cochrane 


Cochrane 


C. A. Stanbtu'\' 


Elk Lake 


North Bay 


W. A. Adair 


Espanola 


.Sudl)ur\- 


S. 1). Spence 


Fole>'et 


Gogama 


R. Languerand (actg.) 


Fort William 


Port Arthur 


r. Guerard 


Franz 


Sault Ste. Marie 


J. A. Foster 


Georgian Ba} 


Parr>' Sound 


Walter Armstrong 


Gogama 


Gogama 


L. Berlinguette 


Gooderham 


Trent 


P. Cassid\- 


Hearst 


Kapuskasing 


J. W. Col'lex- 


Huntsville 


I'arrx' Sound 


W. ]. Barber 


Ignace 


Kenora 


k. Alcock 


Kapuskasing 


Kapuskasing 


J. H. (lavelle 


Kenora 


Kenora 


V. R. Parmeter 


Lake St. Josei)h 


Sioux Lookout 


E. Guertin (actg.) 


Longlac 


(ieraldton 


A. Grasser 


Madawaska 


Quinte 


H. M. Legris 


Minaki 


Kenora 


A. Cleaveh- 


Mobert 


Sault Ste. Marie 


D. McMenemy (actg.) 


Nakina 


Gerald ton 


J. Jarvis 


Nipigon 


Port Arthur 


C. W. McDonald (actg.) 


North Ba^• 


North Ba\ 


1). J. Kenned\ 


Oba 


Kapuskasing 


B. Wilson 


Pays Plal 


Geraldton 


G. D. Mac Ad am 


Rainy River 


Fort Frances 


W. Darb^• 


Red Lake 


Sioux Lookout 


R. Tavlor 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Sault Ste. Marie 


H. W. Green 


Shebandowan 


Port Arthur 


|. H. Stirrett 


vSioux Lookout 


Sioux Lookout 


L Rorke 


Sudbur\- 


.Sudbur\ 


J. H. Strain 


Swastika 


( "ochrane 


F. L. Miller (actg.) 


Timagami 


North Ba\- 


P. Hoffman 


Timmins 


(^ochrane 


0. K. Welsh (actg.) 



ROYAL COMMISSION ON FORIvSTRA' 

Under Order-in-Council, dated April 16, 1946 and pursuant to the Public 
Inquiries Act, R.S.O. 1937, chapter 19, Major General Howard Kennedy, 
C.B.E., M.C., B.Sc. (McGill), was appointed a Commissioner to investigate, 
enquire into and report upon the forest resources of Ontario and their conserva- 
tion, management, development and beneficial utilization for all purposes, and 
was given power to summon any person and require him to give evidence on 



DKPARTMKNT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 12o 



oath, and to produce such documents and things "as the commissioner deems 
requisite for the full investigation of the matter into which he is appointed to 
examine, !)>• subi:)oena signed In the commissioner." 

Pursuant thereto, the Commissioner conducted public hearings at various 
points throughout the Province in subsequent months, and submissions to the 
Commissioner of relevant material from the public were invited. In due course 
hearings were conducted at the Parliament Buildings, Queen's Park, Toronto, 
at which briefs were presented at the request of the Commissioner. Briefs 
presented b\- the various divisions of our Department, included charts, graphs 
and explanatory' information. 

( ) 1 • M C K .\ I A X AG E M E X T 

Outside Storage Space 

It became evident some time ago that the space in the Outside Storage 
Building, erected at the Southern Experimental Station, would not be adequate 
to house the increased volume of records brought about b\- the amalgamation 
of the I])epartment of Game and Fisheries with the Dejxirtment of Lands and 
Forests. 

ConsequentK'. it was decided to add two new wings of brick and concrete, 
similar to the original building. Each wing is thirt\' feet long b\" twent\' feet 
wide, one at each end of the main structure, and running at right angles to it. 
The southern wing was constructed with a basement to accommodate a heating 
and air conditioning plant with fuel bins. This installation has been completed. 

Due to the extreme shortage of sheet steel, it was found to be impossible 
to obtain our total requirements of steel transfer cases in which to house the 
records sent for storage. However, about one-third of our requirements were 
obtained, and these cases are now installed and will meet immediate needs. 

Office Space 

Due to a great expansion of staff, space adjustments became incrcasingk- 
necessary, in order to make the utmost use of the offices available. Despite 
planning for effective utilization of sj^ace man\- offices are badh' over-crowded. 

Permanent Records. 

In addition to the transfer of older records to the Outside Storage Building 
at Mai)le, the Records Office Staff had the problem of taking over the files of 
the Dejwrtment of (iame and l^'isheries, and including in the Permanent Records 
Filing S\stem, those files which shoukl properh" be maintained there. At 
l)resent there are over 140, 000 Permanent files and the a\erage mail in con- 
nection with these is 200 letters dail\ , in adflition to other mail on various 
Divisional matters. 

Supply Records 

A visible index card s\steni is maintained to record the receipts, issues 
and stock balance of all equipment and su])plies handled l)\- this sub-section. 
This entails a clerk's full tinu- work. The sxsteni reflects the (juantities and 
location of all equipment. 

Equipment Records 

(a) This com])rises a p( i pet ii.il inxeiitoix oi non-expendable equiiiment 
held by Head Office and all hislriils. I'orest Stations, Regional Caches, etc.. 
in the I )epartment. 



126 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



(b) With the incorporation of the Department of Game and Fisheries with 
this Department, and the organization of five new Districts, the amount 'of 
work involved has become much greater. It is necessary to pick up all items 
of non-expendable equipment from invoices passed for payment, to record them 
in their proper classification and location, and to be able to render a completeh' 
priced statement at any time this might be required. The work of absorbing 
into our system the Game and Fisheries forms and licences was difficult and 
protracted, but in due course accomplished. 

(c) The expansion of Department Staff, together with the inclusion of 
the Department of Game and Fisheries as a new Division, increased tremendoush' 
the volume of equipment and supplies purchased and distributed. This increase 
w-as accentuated by the concentration of all Main Office purchasing under the 
Division of Operation and Personnel, as of December 1st, 1946. 

The volume of requisitions from Field and Main Offices, during the \ear, 
was more than double the number processed in the previous year. 

(d) Distribution of Technical Circulars and Publicity Material: — 

A vastK" increased quantit\' of informative literature, in the form of Tech- 
nical Circulars and Publicit\- material was distributed during the \ear. 

Distribution and Stock Storage 

These functions are detailed jointly rather than indi\^iduall\' because the\" 
are so closely allied. All the equipment and supplies mentioned above received 
in our stockroom are closely checked against King's Printer requisitions, Public 
Works requisitions or purchase orders, as the case may be. Goods which are 
required for the immediate filling of an outstanding order are checked against 
that order and prepared for shipment, in the case of Field Offices. Require- 
ments for Head Olfice needs are checked against the Divisional requisition and 
deliver}' is made to the office of origin where signature is obtained. 

Goods for long term supph", such as printed forms (of which nearly 1,000 
different types are in actual use) maps, advertising and publicity material, bulk 
stationery and office supplies and certain smaller items of equipment, must be 
carefully placed in stock in orderly fashion to be readily available when required. 

In addition to the foregoing, our duplicating machines are loc^lted in the 
stockroom and all duplicating work for the Department is carried out there by 
means of mimeograph or multilith processes. This work includes the pro- 
duction of a large percentage of the Departmental forms now in use, numerous 
technical and other reports, form letters, and a large volume of Technical. 
Policy, Divisional and Information Circulars. A record of cost on all duplicating 
work is maintained. 

The foregoing items must be assembled, stitched, folded w^here necessary, 
placed in envelopes and dispatched to Parliament Buildings' Post Office. In 
addition, a heavy flow- of educational literature is dispatched in a similar manner. 

Some idea of the volume of work carried on in this stockroom may be given 
from the following figures covering activities of the past twelve months:- 

140 tons of goods handled annually. 
8,500 booklets dispatched quarterly. 
2,000 pamphlets dispatched semi-monthly. 
144,000 circulars produced, assembled and dispatched annually. 
250,000 mimeograph impressions made annually. 
1,768,000 multilith impressions made annually. 

21,280 orders, received, filled, checked and shipped. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 W, 



(This figure of 21,280 is made up of 6,280 orders of stationery and supplies, 
and 15,000 shipments containing 469,700 Fish and Game Licences). 

In addition to the recording of all incoming requisitions and outgoing 
shipments, a permanent record is maintained of all serially numbered forms 
such as Cutting Permits, Land Permits, Cash Receipt Books, for casual payroll 
and extra Fire Fighting staff, Main Office receipts, and Rental Due Notices. 

1 . — Servicing — Messenger Service 

A messenger service is maintained and these duties are carried out by 
junior members of the Record's Staff. 

2. — Space Adjustments 

Many adjustments must be made in order to accommodate a greatly in- 
creased staff in alread\' crowded office space. The situation has become critical 
and even with the removal of certain sections of the Department to other quarters 
outside the Parliament Buildings, space is still at a premium. This is con- 
sidered most important in order that the administration of the Department 
ma\' be facilitated properly. 

3. — Relations with Building Superintendent, Department of Public Works and 
Special Arrangements. 

It is difficult to detail the duties carried out under this heading, but they 
nevertheless consume a considerable proportion of' the time of the officer in 
charge of the section and certain members of the staff". This includes arrange- 
ments for moving of office furniture, accommodation for special conferences, etc., 
major moves of section as mentioned in (2) above, and the handling of specially 
large incoming or outgoing freight shipments. 

■INFORMATION AND EDUCATION 

Introduction 

The eagerness with which the people of Ontario have sought information 
concerning their natural resources during the past \ear has been remarkable 
indeed. 

The merger of the Departments of Lands and Forests and Game and Fisheries 
on June 2nd, 1946, increased considerably the scope and volume of work of 
this section. It is felt that good management of our fish and wildlife resources 
depends largely on the understanding and consequent co-operation of anglers 
and hunters. Enforcement of the fish and game laws and regulations is in itself 
economically impossible without such active co-operation. Therefore, the 
increased volume of appeals for observance of the fish and game laws during 
the Near was considered to be justified. 

Staff 

(1) The clerical-stenographic staff was increased from three to four during 
the \ear. 

(2) The man appointed in charge of appeals in February-, 1946, was trans- 
ferred to the field staff in November, 1946, and was not replaced at head office. 

(3) In May, 1946, a former member of the Department of Game and 
I'isheries took over the dut>' of answering general inquiries regarding fish and 
wildlife. 

(4) In the earl\ part of the \ear. two tield lecturers were added to the staff, 



128 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



and one more at a late date, bringing the full-time field staff up to four. Two 
other lecturers operated during the summer season. 

(5) One full-time photographer and a photo-processor were engaged in the 
fall of 1946. 

Publications 

Twenty-three new booklets were published during the >ear, and ten others 
were reprinted, with revisions. Four issues of the Department's magazine 
"SYLVA", started in the previous >ear, were published. 

The demand for publications increased, in man>- cases exceeding the supply. 
A great volume of letter writing b\' administrative officers was eliminated 
through the use of these |)ublications. 

Puhlications for Distribution: 

Air Service 

Wings Ov^er the Bush. 

Fish and Wildlife 

Pur Farming in Ontario 

Summary of the Game and Fisheries Act and Regulations 

Game Birds Need Cover 

Thou Shalt Not 

The C ormorant in Ontario 

The Chapleau Crown Game Preser\e 

Early Experiments in Fish Culture 

Prairie Chicken in Ontario 

Natural Histor\- of .Algonquin Park 

Forest Protection 

Forest Fires Prevention Act and Regulations 
Yes, We Fight Forest Fires 

Land and Recreational Areas 

Manual of Public Land Administration 
Summer Resort Lands in Ontario 
Lands for Settlement in Ontario 
Canada's New Paradise for Sportsmen 
Algonquin Provincial Park 
Quetico Provincial Park 
Rondeau Provincial Park 
Parry Sound District (lands for sale) 
Kenora District (lands for sale) 
Sudbury District (lands for sale) 
Algonquin Story (S2.00 per cop\") 

Research 

Pedology-, the Dirt Science 
D.D.T. in Ontario Forests 

Reforestation 

Care and Planting of Forest Trees 
The Farm Wood lot 
Forest Trees for Distribution 
Windbreaks and Shelterbelts 
Forest Tree Planting 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 129 



Reforestation — Continued 

Glacial Pot Hole Area, Durham ("ouiUn' 
Planning for Tree Plantini; 
Reforestation 

Surveys 

List of Townships in Province of Ontario 
List of Lithographed Maps and Plans 
Ontario Survexs and the Land Surve\"or 
Aerial Surve\s in Ontario 
List of Water Powers in the Proxince of Ontario 

Timber Management 

Forest Resources of Ontario 

Crown Timber Regulations 

Crown Timber Dues 

Procedure to Cut Timber from Crown Lands 

Systems of Forest Cropping 

-Manual of Scaling Listructions 

Woodmen's Emplo\ment Act 

Know Your Forest Frees 

Tree Chart 

Forest Trees of Ontario (50c. per cop\') 

General 

Minister's Annual Report 

Indians of Ontario 

Ontario Forest Atlas (SLOO per co{)\ ) 

The History and Status of P'orestr\- in Ontario 

Definitions of Important Branches of Forestry 

Lecturic ToiRS 

The lecture tours were highh- successful in the past \"ear. It is considered 
that the showing of motion [)ictures is one of the best means of influencing the 
})ublic to become more careful in the use of fire in the w^oods, and in observance 
of the fish and game laws. 

The feature pictures used were "To-morrow's Timber" and "Portage", 
supjiorted b>- a number of short subjects. Towards the close of the ^ear a fish 
and wildlife ])icture, entitled "Realm of the Wild" was i)urchased from a L.S. 
soui'ce. There is a great need for the production ot coiiser\'ation pictures in 
Ontario locale. 

One i^icture, " Timagami Ranger" was produced under Department direction 
during the year, and will be a\ailal)le for showing at the start of the next fiscal 
\ear. 

Articles 

l"ort\-one press releases were issued during the year. In addition, data 
was supjjlied to reporters and editors for numerous articles. The 24,000 column 
inches of si)ace given b\- Ontario newspapers to Department activities and 
interests re[)resented a 20 per cent. in(-rease o\-cr the previous year. 

l-"ift\ articles wiiltcn b\ the slalT of the 1 )c-part menl, were published in 
magazines, in addition to over 1,000 news items. Several articles b\' feature 
writers were published in national magazines, based on material supplied by 

the I )c])artmciit . 



130 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 









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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 131 



Posters 

The following cards were issued during the \ear, for posting in Northern 
Ontario forests: 

Campsite 

Do Not Set Out Fires 

Forest Fire Law 

Forest Fires are Caused By 

A Good Sportsman Stops to Smoke 

He Is Burning Vour Forest 

Look Before You Leave 

Timber Seizure Notice 

Settlers and Others Burning Brush 

Stop — Have You Got Your Travel Permit 

Stop — Did You Put Out Your Campfire 

Trespassing is Forbidden 

Your Campfire 

Radio 

Seven 10-minute interview broadcasts were given over a Toronto station, 
and discs distributed to 16 Ontario stations for recording. All of these were 
informative. 

Radio stations in Ontario rendered valuable assistance to District Foresters 
in broadcasting spot messages in connection with forest fires. 

Advertising 

A total of 98 advertisements were i)laced with Ontario daih and weekl\- 
newspapers, calling for tenders for the sale of Crown Timber. Sixt\- additional 
advertisements were placed in connection with the Railwa\' Fire Charge Act, 
Culler's Examinations, sale and purchase of equipment, etc. An announcement 
of the opening of the hunting seasons for game birds was published in 350 Ontario 
daih' and weekh' newspapers. 

Conservation appeals in the form of display-t\pe advertisements were 
jjublished in four Ontario dailies in connection with special events of associations. 

Sixt\-()iU' conservation appeal display advertisements were published in 
magazines. Fourteen of these were in timber journals, and seven in special 
timber issues of business and financial periodicals. Of the balance, twenty-five 
were placed in fishing and hunting and outdoor magazines or sports programmes, 
three in farm journals, and twelve in war veterans, i)olice, labour and like journals. 

School Work 

A forest fire prevention poster contest was conducted, in co-o])eration with 
the Dej^artment of lulucation, in the 34 School Inspectorates of northern Ontario. 
After i)reliminar\' selections In- the schools and local committees, 285 posters 
were submitted to the final judging committee. i'he excellence of the [josters, 

tile iusti'uction i-ccei\c<l i)\ the pupils, and the fire prex'ention pul)li(-it\- accorded 
by the ]>rcss and magazines tuIK jiislilu-d the contest. 

In addition to the lecture woi'k 1)\ thi- st.ift' in the schools and the general 
l>l)e of literature jjrovided to teachers, it is felt that a limited variet\- of publi- 
cations, specialb' prepared as teachers' aids, would be of great assistance in 
de\-el()l)iiig a greater natural resource consciousness in our oncoming generations. 



132 



REPORT OF THE 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 133 



Correspondence 

The volume of correspondence in response to letters of inquir\- for informa- 
tion increased considerabh' over past years, due particularl\- to the inclusion of 
treneral inquiries concerning fish and wildlife, amounting to approximateh' 
4,200 letters with reference to this subject alone. 

Miscella neons A ctivities 

In addition to other duties in connection with i)rei)aration, statistical 
compilation, research, distribution, and business routine, the Information and 
Education staff conducted tours of inspection with visitors, gave public relations 
training to other staff members, and attended meetings and conventions. 



134 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 135 



DIVISION OF REFORESTATION 



Distribution of Trees 

The distribution of trees for the year under review reached a figure of 
13,175,000, an increase of 2,000,000 over that of the previous season. This 
increase was largely due to the increased demand by private landowners. 

On a cross-section stud\" made of the results of this distribution, it was found 
that on private planting a very large percentage of loss had occured. This was 
especialh' true of those trying to devlop hardwood plantations on heav>' clay 
soil. The losses sustained are attributed to a large number of causes, the out- 
standing being improper or careless planting, grass and weed competition, along 
with loss from rodents such as mice and rabbits, and a large percentage of loss 
from grazing. 

It should be emphasized that the successful distribution of forest trees, 
and their proper development, is dependent on correct plans being made, through 
experienced forest officers or trained men in the field. 



Distribution to Schools 

Interest has continued in school planting through the competitions organized 
b\ the Ontario Horticultural Association. Trees sent out under these Competi- 
tions numbered 560,000. 



Seed Collection and Extraction 

This past season's seed crop was disappointing, as our important conifers, 
such as Red Pine and White Spruce, produced a verj- poor crop. There was a 
good crop of White Pine seed. This condition was brought about owing to the 
abnormal temperatures of early Spring, when hot weather and following freezing 
occurred during the flowering stage. 



Provincial Stations 

A new l-'orcst Nurser\- and Provincial I-orest Station has \)vvn established 
in Norih Western Ontario, near Port Arthur and l-"ort William. This Station, 
containing 400 acres, is located in the Township of Paipoonge. It is expected 
that this Nursery will provide planting stock for reforestation projects in North 
Western Ontario. It was found unsatisfactory to ship material from the older 
Stations in .Southern Ontario. 



136 



REPORT OF THE 



No. S 



Table No. 1 

SUMMARY OF TREES DISTRIBUTED 

(July 1, 1945 to June 30, 1946) 





Total 
Shipments 


Conifers 


Hardwoods 


Total Trees 


Private Lands: 

Reforestation and \\"infll)reaks 

School Children 


5,696 
651 

74 

44 
29 
29 


8,062,231 
401,770 

120,954 

1,576,050 
175,050 
187,625 


1,152,893 

158,378 

33,458 

145,100 
23,100 

7.875 


9,215,124 
560,148 


Semi-Public Properties 


100,412 


Municipal Properties: 

Municipal Forests 


1,721,150 


Forest Plantations 


198,150 


Roads 


195,500 


School Denionsi ration Plots 




Sundr\' 


12 
6 


9,115 
483,200 


5,800 
14,700 


14,915 


Provincial Crown Lands: 

Northern Plantations 


497,900 


Forests 




Ranger Plantations 


3 


2,425 


100 


2,525 


Air Services 




Nurseries 


2 

4 
3 


2,700 
10,800 
91 ,600 


2,350 

900 

33,675 


5,050 


Parks 


11,700 


Highway s 


125.275 


H.E.P.C 




Hospitals 


1 
3 

8 

17 


500 

50,750 

114,425 

181,781 




500 


Penal Institutions 




50,750 


Sundry' 


24,410 
. 9,545 


138,835 


Dominion Crown Lands 


191,326 






Sub-totals 




11,476,936 
55,880 


1,612,284 
30,435 


13,089,260 


Miscellaneous 


21 


86,315 






Totals 


6,603 


11,532,856 


1,642,719 


13,175,575 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



Table No. 2 

TREES DISTRIBUTED TO PRIVATE LANDOWNERS 

(July 1. 1945 to June 30, 1946) 



137 



Countv or District 



Applicants 



Conifers 



Hardwoods 



Totals 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Cochrane 

Duflferin 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarr\ 

Grenvilk 

Gre\- 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and Addington. 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

N'ipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

( )xford 

Parr\- Sound 

Patricia 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

i'rescolt 

Prince Edward 

Rain\- Ri\er 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormoni 

Sudbur\ . . . . . 

Thunder Ba.\ 

Timiskaming 

X'ictoria. . 

Waterloo. . . 

Wclland 

W ellington 

Went worth 

\'ork 



18 

159 

123 

6(5 

3 

51 

41 

148 

181 

141 

32 

36 

19 

226 

109 

36 

111 

58 

112 

5 

56 

116 

27 

68 

34 

94 

6 

219 

160 

6 

279 

98 

207 

124 

72 



36,045 

168,416 

142,642 

35,190 

1,595 

58,437 

30,892 

601,600 

424,299 

98,804 

31,948 

12,897 

12,165 

210,123 

99,542 

61,525 

156,754 

90,855 

84,716 

9,025 

120,885 

201,190 

33,675 

50.030 

48,900 

43,583 

8,300 

261,679 

426,014 

7,325 

557,981 

130,360 

333,191 

231,090 

372,300 



1,721 

65,393 

28.683 

10.949 

115 

4,352 
16,696 
47,328 
58,448 
25,764 
10,182 

4.939 

1.827 
26,056 
35,247 

3,835 
29,799 
13,332 
39.378 

1,350 
16..")()0 
17,264 

4,961 
11,187 

6,758 
14.759 

3,900 
39,720 
18,689 
115 
51,559 
26,785 
36,330 
43,091 

8,680 



37,766 

233.809 

171,325 

46,139 

1,710 

62,789 

47,588 

648,928 

482,747 

124,-568 

42.130 

17.836 

13,992 

236,179 

134,789 

65,360 

186,553 

104,187 

124,094 

10,375 

137,445 

218,4.54 

38,636 

61,217 

55,658 

58,342 

12,200 

301,399 

444,703 

7,440 

609,540 

157,145 

369,521 

274,181 

380,980 



Totals 



198 


223,105 


70 


.58,522 


212 


184,345 


12 


23.206 


34 


26,805 


4 


990 


29 


20,650 


14 


18,261 


465 


1,007,265 


23 


22,277 


12 


7,900 


9 


18,925 


10 


6,. 525 


51 


72.970 


153 


181,265 


151 


104,115 


81 


74,861 


123 


153,077 


812 


663,194 



35,979 

38,470 

23,2.56 

5,375 

3,862 



4,030 
1,418 
67,637 
12,414 
4,270 
1,425 



5,696 



8,062,231 



9,505 
37,151 
25,913 
18,626 
26,749 
111,061 

1,152,893 



259,084 

96,992 

207,601 

28.. 581 

30,667 

990 

24,680 

19,679 

1,074,902 

34,691 

12,170 

20,350 

6,525 

82,475 

218,416 

130,028 

93,487 

179,826 

774,255 

9,215,124 



138 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 139 



DIVISION OF RESEARCH 

The Research Division completed a year of expansion during 1946 despite 
the fact that competent research personnel are difficult to obtain at any time, and 
particularly so under existing conditions of active competition from industry 
and educational institutions. 

During the year three additional staff members were given full time employ- 
ment; a botanical geneticist, a mammalogist. specializing in wildlife; and a 
fisheries biologist. It is hoped to be able to add further to the staff when com- 
petent, thoroughh' trained people are available. 

Because of the nature of research work, and the Division's stage of develop- 
ment, it is felt that only the highest grade of staff" available should be considered 
for permanent appointments. 

The urgenc\' of man\' of the investigations looking to the expansion and 
continuity of forest operations, remains unchanged, and in many cases has been 
accentuated by the cumulative results of war wastage and the growing need for 
more efficient utilization and protection. 

The Division's whole field of work has been broadened by the amalgamation 
of the Game and Fisheries and Lands and Forests Departments. 

The following is a summary- of the work carried out during the fiscal year 
1946-47. Separate special reports have been made on all completed phases of 
the work. 

The following is a summary of people employed by this Division during the 
year : 

Permajient 4 Foresters 

1 Mechanical Engineer 
1 Soils Specialist 



Coiitiuuous Teutpordry 1 Forester Geneticist 

1 Chemist 

3 Draughtsmen 

3 Mechanics 

1 Building Superintendent 



Casual {Students) 30 Forestr\- undergraduates 

18 Biolog>' undergraduates 
6 Other Course undergraduates 
9 High School Students 

63 

The program covered during the \ear is outlined under the following 
headings: 

I. Biological Studies 

Silviculture 
Soils 

.Smelter I'umes 
Forest Genetics 



140 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




Analyzing the Sulphur-Dioxide Content of the Air from an Aircraft. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 141 



Artificial Reforestation by Seeding 
Game and Fisheries 
Forest Pest Control 

II. Economic and Management Studies. 

III. Mechanical and Electrical Investigations. 

I. Biological 

Silviculture: 

The general object of these studies is to obtain information for sustained 
forest management. The work of the Research Division in the period reported 
on was undertaken to determine the adequacy of stocking of desirable species 
following cutting and fire and to devise methods to correct deficiencies. Experi- 
ments are or will be set up to check the results from recommended procedures 
in actual practice. 

Surveys under this heading were carried on in the following areas in 1946: 

(1) Northern Cla>- Belt in the Kapuskasing District. This survey was under the 
direction of Professor R. C. Hosie and was originalh' organized in 1945 as a 
cooperative effort with the University and the Spruce Falls Power & Paper 
Co. The 1946 survey was intended to complete the work of 1945. A report 
has been published on both seasons' work. 

(2) In the Goulais River area north of Sault Ste. Marie. This work was under- 
taken in 1945 to stud\- the effects of logging on a mixed stand and was 
undertaken as a cooperative effort with the Dominion Government. The 
main effort during the past summer was to relocate sample plots set out 
during the late 20's. No report has as yet been issued by the Dominion 
Forest Service who control this project. 

(3) In the Port Arthur and Kenora Districts. These surveys were undertaken 
to study regeneration following logging and fire. The species studied were 
mainly spruce, jack pine and poplar. The work was organized by the 
Research Division and was under the general direction of Mr. Peter Addison 
and Mr. Wilson Cram, Regional Foresters at Port Arthur and Kenora respec- 
tively. The field work was conducted b\- A. P. Leslie and H. C. Larsson, 
assisted by 18 students. Some 150,000 acres were examined during the 
season . 

Soils: 

The main object of this work is the separation of agricultural and forest 
soils and the classification of forest soils to ensure their most productive use. 
It was carried on under the direction of G. A. Hills, l-'icld work was mainly 
in the Cochrane District and covered approximateh" 50,000 acres. A soil anahsis 
laboratory was established at the Southern Research Station near Ahipie, 
Ontario. The results of these soil surveys can be used as a guide to land settle- 
ments and will also define the area of the Province which should be used for 
the growing of forest products. 

.Smelter Fumes: 

This study is a continuation of the work of 1944-45 to determine damage 
to the forest b\- fumes from smelters at Sudbur\- and l-'alconbridge. Meld work 
consisted of aerial sampling in the smelter smoke and on the ground using an 



142 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



automatic recorder in the plane. Automatic ground recorders have now been 
set up at Bear Island, Emerald Lake, Skead, Capreol, Crystal Falls, Burwash 
and Lake Penage. The assistance of Mr. A. W. McCallum, Pathologist of the 
Dominion Department of Agriculture, and Dr. George Duff, of the University 
of Toronto, was obtained in studying pathological effects on trees and the deter- 
ioration of killed material. Meteorological effects were studied b\' the Dominion 
Meteorological Service. A secondary laboratory site was selected near Thessalon 
for controlled experiments in fumigation to be made in 1947. 



Forest Genetics: 

The services of a competent geneticist. Dr. C. C. Heimburger, were obtained 
in August of 1946. Dr. Heimburger will proceed with his work on the selection 
of a blister rust resistant strain of wdiite pine and an aspen which will combine 
good growth, disease resistance and good pulping qualities. He has also started 
the establishment of an arboretum at Maple of all declimatized trees. 

Artificial Reforestation by Seeding: 

This project dealing mainh' with the use of coated seed on burned areas 
commenced in the fall of 1946 and several burned areas wxre sown experimentalh' 
b}^ hand and from an airplane. Seeds were coated at the Maple station using a 
combination of insecticides, rodent repellents and fertilizers. 

A stud\' of the seeding habits of pines, particularly red pine, was started 
this year under the direction of Dr. George Duff, of the University of Toronto, 
assisted by two undergraduates. This work is necessary because little is known 
of the seeding habits of trees or why their seed production is sporadic. It is 
thought that as a result of this work it may be possible finally to produce regular 
cone crops from plantation pine at an economic cost. This will reduce the uncer- 
tainty now attending naturally grown supplies of seed. 

Game and Fish: 

The main object of these studies is to increase the game and fish resources 
of the Province. Fisheries surveys were carried out during this season under the 
direction of Dr. W. J. K. Harkness and Dr. F. E. J. Fry in Algonquin, Sibley 
and Quetico Parks and in Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. The principal studies 
were directed towards the effect of coarse fish on game and commercial species 
and the improvement resulting from a balanced removal of all species or, in 
some cases, a heavy removal of coarse fish and restocking with desirable species. 

Studies of habitat relationships such as water temperatures and food content 
in relation to fish numbers and health were continued at the Fish Laborator\ 
near Whitney. Studies of planting Atlantic salmon were made in Duffin's Creek 
near Pickering, Ontario. 

Wildlife studies were carried out under the direction of Dr. C. H. D. Clarke, 
assisted by 8 students, in Algonquin Park. A wilderness area of 30.5 sq. miles 
for the study of wildlife under natural conditions was established in Algonquin 
Park in 1944 and work was continued in this area. The principal study was 
directed towards obtaining a method of assessing animal populations that can 
be applied in forest and game management. The problem of animal diseases 
also received attention. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 143 



Forest Pest Control: 

The object of this project was a thorough investigation of the possibility 
of controlling major forest insect infestations by the use of insecticides applied 
from aircraft. Following the program of 1945 when 100 square miles w^ere spra>ed, 
an additional 40 square miles were sprayed in the Thunder Bay district. This 
work organized by the Department received important contributions from the 
R.C.A.F. and the Science Service of the Dominion Department of Agriculture. 
The efficienc>' of the cxperiemnt was greath- increased over 1945, when five 
Canso planes under contract were used. In 1946 one Canso plane owned by the 
Department covered almost half the area spra3-ed in 1945. The total cost of 
the spraying operation amounted to $3.23 per acre. Application of DDT ranged 
from 2 to 4 pounds per acre and a kill of budworm of over 90 per cent resulted 
from the 2 pound per acre application. A report has been issued. 



II. Economic and Maxagemext Studies 

Some further work was carried out in connection with the stud>' of stumpage 
as a basis for charges in timber disposal. All operators in Southern Ontario were 
canvassed as to willingness to cooperate in these studies, but no proper field 
work could be carried on because staff with the proper qualifications for this 
work are not \et available. 

A stud\' of the economics of cutting small pine was commenced in the 
southeastern part of Ontario b\' Mr. M. \\ B. Ardenne, assisted b\- two students. 
This work would aid the Department and the operators in determining where 
l)rofit ends and loss begins in the cutting of small timber. The result should 
make it easier to retain small timber for its full economic rotation. 



III. Mechaxical axd Electrical Investigatioxs 

The main mechanical building of the Research Station near Maple was 
completed and mechanical work was undertaken. Tests of various commercial 
forest fire pumping units were carried out as well as tests of fungicides for pre- 
\enting deca\' of fire hose. A prototype cone extracting machine using infra 
red heat lamps was constructed. Some 40 jeeps and vehicles purchased b\- the 
Department were overhauled before being jnit into field use. 

A superintendent's residence was completed, also a garage for storage of 
eight vehicles. A complete soils laboratory for physical and chemical anahsis 
of soils was set up. A start was made on a fisheries research laboratory which 
will feature the unique "artifical lake", where an>" condition found in natural 
lakes may be recreated in the laboratory and thus aid in obtaining knowledge 
of fish that will facilitate artificial and natural stocking and fish culture of all 
kinds. A test well for water suppK" to this lal)orator\- was drilled and an a(lc(|ualc 
supph' of high qualilx' water assurid. 



144 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




A LOW \LTITUDE VERTICAL AERL\L PHOTOGRAPH OF THE SOUTHERN EXPERIMENTAL STATION 

AT Maple, Ontario. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 145 



DIMSIOX OF SL'RXEYS AXD EXGIXEERIXG 

The furtlicr development of the natural resources increased the activities 
of the Department as a whole and this was reflected in the work undertaken by 
this Division. In so far as qualified personnel were available, efforts were made to 
cope with the backlog of field and office work that had accumulated as the 
result of personnel shortages during the past jears. 

In the Forest Inventory Project as undertaken b\- the Department over a 
five >ear plan, the Division of Surveys and Engineering is responsible for covering 
18.000 square miles b\' vertical photography and the preparation of planimetric 
maps to a scale of four inches to one mile. An area of 5,054 square miles has 
been photographed during the past fiscal year. Ground control surveys were 
undertaken in the Districts of ("ochranc and Thunder Ba>' to pro\-ide accurate 
and sufficient ground control points in areas previoush' unsur\-e\ed. 

The preservation of our surve\" records, representing land surveys carried 
out o\-er the length and breadth of the Province over the past 150 >ears, is most 
important. The work of microfilming the field books was commenced this \"ear 
and the films stored in fireproof containers. 

The following aerial and ground surveys were undertaken during the fiscal 
}ear ending March 31st, 1947: 

Ground Surveys Section' 
Surve\" instructions were issued for the following sur\'eys: — 
Croii'ji Surveys 

1. Base lini' sur\e> in the District of Cochrane, extending from Maund Town- 
ship to the boundary' between the Pro\inces of Ontario and Quebec. This 
survey required to provide ground control for aerial photograph}- in connec- 
tion with the forest inventory i>roject. 

2. Re-establishing an orginal surve\' corner on Gold Island, Township of 
( "od\'. District of Cochrane. 

3. Surve\' of additional building lots at Eonglac, in the 'Towiishij) of T)ale>', 
District of Thunder Ba\ . 

4. Survey of additional building lots in the Towusite of .Alexandra, 'To\\iishi|) 
of Shackleton, T^istrict of Cochrane. 

o. Resur\e\- of part of the l)()undar\' between towiishi])s S3 and S4, District 
of Thunder Ba\\ 

6. Surve\ to locate building encroachments on Crown Lands, below high 
water mark, in the Improvement District of W'asaga Beach, Township of 
.Sunnidale. 

7. Retracement Surve\' of the boundaries of the Township of Hearst. (.Sur\ey 
costs borne b\' the Department of Mines). 

8. Retracement survey of the north, west and south boundaries of the Town- 
ship of McEIro\- (.Sur\-e\' costs borne b\ the Department of Mines). 

9. Control traxirse of part of the .\guasabon Ri\er, District of Thunder I^a\". 

10. Retracement sur\c\ of i)art of the third concession from lots 1 to 12 imlusivev 

lo\\nshii)ot Mcthncn, ("ountx of IVterborough. 



146 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



11. Retracement survey of certain boundaries in the Townships of Rolph, Head, 
Maria, Clara, Cameron, Papineau and Mattawan. (Survey costs borne by 
The H\dro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario). 

12. Retracement of boundary between concessions MI and \TII from lot 31 
to the west boundary of the Township of Cornwall and the establishment 
of certain corners of Township lots. 

13. Retracement survey to delimit the boundaries of lots 37, 38, 39 and 40, 
Con. n, N.R. Township of Watten, District of Rainy River. 

Municipal Surveys 

Xo. 818 — Jarvis Street, between King and Queen Streets, Cit\- of Toronto. 

Xo. 820 — Parts of the line between concessions IX and X, Township of Xorth 
Walsingham, County of X'orfolk. 

Xo. 821 — South boundary of the township of Lake, County of Hastings, across 
Concession 5 and the line between Concessions 1 and 2, Lots 1 to 32 
inclusive. 

Xo. 822 — Boundary line between the townships of Methuen and Belmont in 
the Count\- of Peterborough, from the 5th concession line easterly to 
the boundar>- between the Townships of Marmora and Lake. 

Private Surveys on Crown Lands 

Under authority- of Section 37 of the Public Lands Regulations, 388 summer 
resort locations were surveyed and the returns of survey filed in the Department. 
One hundred and thirty surveys of this number were surveyed under direct 
departmental instructions to the surveyor where the applicant paid in the sixty 
dollar survey fee as specified in Section 37 of the Public Lands Regulations. 

Under provisions of the Mining Act, the survey returns of 840 mining 
claims were filed in the Department for examination and approval. 

Toii'nsite Subdivisions 

The following subdi\isions of land affected b>- the provisions of the Town- 
sites Act were surveyed on privately-owned lands, and approved by Orders- 
in-Council. A cash consideration was accepted by the Crown in lieu of selecting 
one quarter of the number of lots as surve},-ed. 

Designation of Subdivision Date of Order-in-Council 

1. Part of Mining Claim MR 6252, Township of Cairo 
in the Townsite of Matachewan, District of Timi- 

skaming Ajjrll 9th, 1946. 

2. Part of mining claim T.B. 4882, Township of Sum- 
mers, Dillabough Townsite, District of Thunder 

Bay Oct. 15th. 1946. 

3. Part of Lot 7, Concession 5, Township of Merritt, 

District of Sudbury Oct. 15th, 1946. 

4. Part of mining claim MR 9947 and MR 10263, 
Township of Cairo, in the Townsite of Matachewan, 

District of Timiskaming Oct. 15th, 1946. 

5. Part of lot 1, Concession 3, Township of Mountjo^■, 

District of Cochrane ' . Xov. 14th, 1946. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 14: 



Map Publications 

The following maps and booklets were revised and printed : — 

Map 21c — District of Timiskaming and Parts of Sudbury and Xipissing. 5,000 
copies of 1944 edition reprinted with some revisions to township 
names and district boundary colour scheme changed to full colours. 

Map 23a — District of Thunder Bay, revised edition; 5,000 copies lithographed 
in full colours. 

Map 21a — Southern Part of Province of Ontario. Reprint edition of 5,000 copies. 

Booklet — "List of Townships" revised and reprinted. 1,000 copies. 

List of — Maps and plans issued by the Division of Surveys and Engineering — 
revised and reprinted 5,000 copies. 

A group of five maps was compiled, reproduced and lithographed relati\'e 
to the book "Algonquin Story" published under the supervision of the Division 
of Operation and Personnel — 10,000 copies of each of the following maps printed : 

(a) Topographic map of Muron and Ottawa Territor}-. 

(b) Area of Algonquin Provincial Park. 

(c) Exploration map of Huron and Ottawa Territory. 

(d) Map showing colonization roads in and around Algonquin Pro\incial Park. 

(e) Watershed map of Algonquin Provincial Park. 

Distribution of Maps 

This Division is the central point for map distribution covering all Pro\-iii- 
cial issues and also the National Topographic Series for Ontario, as published 
by the Department of Mines and Resources in Ottawa. These maps are for 
sale to the public and distributed without charge for official Departmental use 
and publicity purposes. The acquisition of Crown Lands for summer resort 
purposes has increased considerabh' over past years, which, together with 
additional tourist activity-, has resulted in an increased demand for maps as 
compared to the number distributed during the previous fiscal >ear. 

Distribution of Maps 

National Topograijliic Series 10.535 

Provincial Maps 

20A (Free Issue) 3650 

District ALaps 7378 

Island Maps 600 

42A (Township) 1772 

33A (Electoral) 141 

Miscellaneous 3103 

Total 16.644 16,644 

(".rand 'ioial 27.179 



148 



REPORT OF THE 



No. S 



5 400 



SURVEYED SUMMER RESORT LOCATIONS ON CROWN LAND EXAMINED BY THE 
DIVISION OF SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 







1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 



1949 1950 1951 195? 

FISCAL YEAR 



1954 1955 1956 



1958 1959 I960 



Of the total number of maps distributed, approximately twent}' per cent 
were distributed, without charge, for the official use of Provincial and Dominion 
Departments, Clergy, Red Cross and for educational and publicity purposes. 

Cash receipts "over the counter" for maps, photostats and printing show an 
increase of approximately 30% over the previous year. The "over the counter" 
receipts represent 3,000 customers. Approximately an additional 5,000 over- 
the-counter enquiries were made by Departmental or Divisional personnel 
relative to maps and surve\' records. 

5,000 letters of request for maps and copies of surve\' records were received 
and dealt with during the >ear. Revenue from this source shows an increase of 
20% over the previous year. 



Survey Records 

This office has custody- of all survey records of surveys made under instruc- 
tions from this Department and other types of surveys affecting Crown lands. 
Copies are available to the public at the prescribed rates, and for official Depart- 
mental use. The returns of survey made each year comprising plans and field 
notes are registered, indexed and the field notes bound and filed. Numerous 
requests for copies or information pertaining to these surve>' records are received 
each year for Ground Surve>- purposes and as ground control for Aerial Photo- 
graphy and many other uses. 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



140 



SURVEYED MINING CLAIMS ON CROWN LAND EXAMINED BY THE 
DIVISION OF SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



^ 1200 










1 h +- 




1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1956 1959 I960 

FISCAL YEAR 



Number of Survey Records on File 

Munici|)al Sur\c\ Plans ( Approxiniatch') 

IMunicijJal Sui'ncx i'icld Xotes (Approximately) 



800 
800 



Crown Land Surve>- Plans, mounted, filed flat, comprising 
original Townships, Townsites, Islands, Indian Reserves, and 
Miscellaneous 2,500 

Kollcd Plans — Same as above, and including Kailwaxs, Power 
Transmission Lines. T^ooding Lakes and Island 'Tra\"erses, 
Snl)di\-isions, etc 4,300 

T'iled T'lat in X'olumes — Partial Townshij) Pl.ins. Island Plans, 
Mining Location Plans 7,000 

("rown Land Surxcx I'icld Xolc Hooks f Rt'prescnt ing some 2800 
snrvcNs) ' 2,700 

Miscellaneous X'ohmies iiicludinu (roun Land .ind Munit"ii)al 
Instruction Books, Letters Written, Letters Received and 
Letters Relating to Surveys, i'iild Note X'olumes, Surveyors 
Letters, etc.. . . ! '. 350 



150 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



In order to ensure preservation of the survey records, many of which are 
over 100 years' old and fast deteriorating with age, plans are being formulated 
for the treatment of original maps by a chemical process and the services of a 
bookbinder were obtained with the work of reparing and recovering all field 
note books and other volumes commenced in the latter part of January, 1947. 
Under this plan, the microfilming of all of the original survey records was also 
commenced in the latter part of January. By the end of this fiscal year, 1881 
field note books and 94 other volumes representing a total of 259,000 pages had 
been microfilmed. For the present, it is planned to continue to use the original 
records and have the microfilmed negatives available for reproduction purposes 
in the event of the original records becoming indistinguishable with age. 

It is planned to re-index and catalogue all of these records as time permits. 
In this connection the only progress made during this fiscal year was on the re- 
indexing of the field note books and the separation of all municipal survey 
records from the Crown Land Surve\s. Plans only were formulated on the card 
index s\'stem for the re-indexing and cataloguing. 

Photostating 

In Xovember, 1946, the Photostat Section was transferred from the 
Aerial Survey Section to the Ground Surveys under the supervision of the Map 
Ofiice, which is the central point for the ordering of all photostatic material for 
this Department. A notable item was the supplying of some 25,000 photostatic 
copies of pages of field notes for the aerial mapping portion of the Forest Resources 
Inventory Programme. 

The photostat service is available to other Departments of the Government, 
insofar as the cop\'ing of their records is concerned, at the prescribed rates. 
This service extends also to Commissions of the Government and the public 
for copies of records held in this Department and work pertaining thereto. 

It is estimated that it costs 15c to produce one square foot of photostat 
copy. Some 45,000 square feet of photostat paper was used during the fiscal 
year. The following is the approximate square footage of photostatic paper 
used for Departmental Divisions and District Offices, other than this Division, 
during the year: — 

Divisions 

Accounts 130 

Forest Protection 110 

Land & Recreational Areas 310 

Law 340 

Main Office 120 

Operation & Personnel 1,200 

Reforestation 70 

Research 210 

Timber Management 2,000 

Forest Resources Inventor\- 16,480 

Fish & Wildlife '. 30 

Total 21,000 

—or 461^% of the Total 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 151 



District Offices 

Cochrane 5 

Fort Frances 410 

Geraldton 20 

Kapuskasing 140 

Pembroke 70 

Port Arthur 30 

Sault Ste. Marie 75 

Sioux Lookout 1 

Sudbury 135 

Tweed 30 

Chapleau 75 

Gogama 5 

Trent 90 

Total 1,086 

—or 2H% of the Total 

GRAM) TOTAL 22,086 Sq. Ft. 

-or 49% 

The balance or approximately 51% of the paper used was for the official 
work of this Division and for reproduction work for other Departments of the 
Government and the general public. 

Blue and OCE Printing 

The making of Blue and OCE prints is done through sources other than 
this Department. The orders placed through the Ahip Office represented some 
116,000 square feet of paper for the whole Department, including the District 
Offices. Ground Surve>s alone used approximatch- 57,000 square feet of paper, 
for office use and re-sale purposes. 

Through i)ublic demand a stock of prints taken from Township plans, 
covering Parr\- Sound District are now available in this office. These plans are 
a compilation of the original survey with the Aerial Photography work as taken 
from the National Topographic Series maps. 



Aeri.\l Surveys Section 

This Section co\'eri<l 10.708 squari' miles with \erlical i)h()l<)grai)h> during 
the abo\e I'iscal \'ear. 

Of this total, 9,772 square miles were for our own and other De[Kirtments 
of the Provincial Government, (including H.E.P.C.) while the remaining 936 
square miles were for outside concerns. 



152 



REPORT OF THE 



No. S 



Below is a table 8:ivinsf a breakdown of these figures. 



For Outside Companies 

Owen Sound, Town Planning. 
*J. A. Mathieu, Rainx' Lake. . . 

Union Gas Company 

Ontario-Minnesota P. & P. C( 
Bell Telephone Co 



Other Government Dep.\rtmhxts 

Agriculture 

Highwaxs 

*H.E.P.C 

*Mines 

Planning and Development 



Dep.\rtment of L.\nds .vnd Forests 
*Talon Lake 

Rondeau Park 

Kenora District 

*Batchewana E.xtension 

*Inventor\- 



Grand Total. 



*Denotes Mapping Included. 



Area (Sq. 
Miles) 



15 
388 

50 
323 
160 



73 

594 

806 

515 

1,713 



28 

15 

678 

332 

5,054 



Totals 



936 



3,665 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND EORESTS EOR U)47 153 



DIVISION OE TIMBER :\IANAGEMENT 

During the season of 1946-47 there was still a strong demand for all knids 
of forest products, resulting in continued activit\' in timber operations throughout 
the Province. 

Although labor conditions were effected b>- the fact that prisoners-of-war 
were no longer available, this condition was to some extent offset by the return 
to bush operations of war service personnel and available civilians. As a con- 
sequence the timber operators were able to maintain production. 

^^'eather conditions were generally favorable throughout the season enabling 
I he operators to get their timber to the mills without delay. 

A statement of timber cut during 1945-46 season and returned in 1946 is 
shown on Page 158, Table No. 1. 

Statements showing production b\" administrative districts of the Province 
for the 1945-46 season are also shown on Pages 159-171, Tables No. 2 to 2L 
inclusive. 

EoREST Resources Inventory 

A post war project of considerable importance "The Eorest Resources 
Inventory" was organized and placed in operation earh- in the year. The method 
adopted after a thorough stud>- of existing methods and the remarkable advances 
in aerial photograph}- during the war involved a complete coverage of the forested 
area of the Province b\- the most up to date aerial photograph}-. Erom this, 
l^lanimetric base maps were to be prepared and volumetric estimates made 
from a combined use of aerial photographs and the standard methods of ground 
survex". 

The area to be covered consisted of 140,000 square miles. Of this area the 
aerial j)hotography and planimetric mapping on 125,000 square miles was let 
b\- contract to the Photographic Survey- Company, Ltd., the balance of 15,000 
square miles to be done b>- the Aerial Sur\e> s Section of the Division of Surve>- 
and Engineering of the Department of Lands and F^orests. 

The Aerial Photography was underwa\- b>- June 1st and continued through- 
out the summer anrl fall season. An area of 29,777 square miles of aerial photo- 
graph}- was completed under contract and an additional area of photographs- 
was completed by the De})artment. 

Planimetric majjping was under\\a>- b\- November and b\- l-\'l)ruar\- delivery 
of base maps from the contractor were started and 4,429 square miles were 
delivered b\- the end of the \-ear. 

Type mai)ping from aerial photographs was started on recei\-ing delivery 
of base majis. An area of 8,600 square miles i)eing completed b>- tiie end of the 
\ear read}- for held checking and final checking of maps and completion of the 
inventor}-. 

MANAGEMENT PLANS AND CONTROL 

In writing more ri-ct-nt puljjwood and timber concession agreements in 
accordance with the Eorest Management Act of 1947, clauses have been incorj)- 
orated which provide for the submission of plans for the operation and manage- 
ment of the concession areas on a sustained \-ield basis or to maintain their 
production capacit}-. In order to supervise the preparation of these plans, the 
work has recentl}- been put under the direction of a forester apjjointed for that 
purpose. It is his dut}' to prepare the outlines of the minimum requirements 



154 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 155 



for the compilation of plans to work in co-operation with the operators in their 
preparations, to analyze them when submitted, and put into effect the control 
necessary to assure the application of the plans as approved by the Department. 

Additional foresters have been assigned to supervise current management 
projects in the Districts, and as the plans of the various operators are approved 
and additional Crown management units are established, management foresters 
will take over active control of this phase of timber management. 

As at the end of March, 1947, fifty agreements have been written, covering 
approximately 60,000 square miles, which contain clauses providing for some 
form of management control through the submission before beginning operations. 

During the past year the available information on the preparation of 
management plans of other forest authorities was reviewed, as were the agree- 
ments, to obtain a basic understanding of their requirements. A manual was 
prepared outlining the minimum requirements for working or management 
I)lans, operating plans, and annual cutting applications and the compilation of 
forest survey data collected to form a basis for such plans and applications. 
When completed this manual was forwarded to all the operators concerned. 

Plans are now being received from operators, a substantial indication that 
the industry is prepared to co-operate in this program. Many more are activeh' 
engaged in the preparation of plans, but owing to the shortage of foresters avail- 
able for conducting this work as a result of war conditions, there has been con- 
siderable delay. Now that the war is over it is expected that the conditions will 
be stabilized considerably and a great expansion in this program will become 
evident. 

Arrangements have been made to have a closer check on proposed operations 
through the requirements of more detail in annual cutting applications and the 
subsequent inspection of woods operations. By means of the control planned 
there will unquestionably be much better utilization and less opportunity for 
the continuation of wasteful practices which were difificult to control under war 
conditions. 

Timber Sales — 1946-47 

Details of the 78 new sales of timber made during the season, indicate that 
560 square miles of timber limits were sold. 

During the season 53 timber licences, comprising 158.25 square miles, were 
abandoned. 

The status of the timber licensed areas in Ontario as at March 31st, 1947, 
was therefore as follows: 

Area 
No. Sq. Miles 



Licences and Renewals Issued 1946-47 878 11,276.25 

Licences, in .Suspense : 28 433 . 75 



Total 906 11,710.00 

This is 702.25 scjuarc miles less than that undt'r licence as at .March 31st 
of the previous \ear. The 934.25 square miles not accounted for by new sales 
and abandonments, is the result of adjustments in the areas of individual timber 
licences. 



156 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Pulpwood and Timber Agreements — 1946-47 

Area under pulpwood concession and timber agreement as at March 31st, 
1947 — 56,745 square miles. 



Mills Licensed 1946-47 

The mills licensed during the season under the Mills Licensing Act were as 
follows : 

Less than 5,000 ft. daih' capacit\" 506 

5,000 ft. to 30,000 ft. daih- capacity 655 

Over 30,000 ft. daih" capacity 42 

Number of Paper Mills • 35 

Total 1238 



Pulpwood Exports 
Detailed statements of pulpwood exports are shown on Pages 172 and 173. 

Scaling 

Scalers examinations were held during 1946 as follows: 

(1) Fort William (2) '. June 29th 

Sept. 28th 

(2) Minden Ma>- 10th 

(3) Swastika Nov. 2nd 

(4) Thessalon May 31st 

The restilts were as follows: 

Fort William Minden Swastika Thessalon 

Number of Candidates 95 46 47 48 

Number obtaining full licences. . . 29 10 9 19 

Number obtaining Sawlog licences . . 2 5 

No. obtaining Pulpwood licences. .10 3 8 8 

The remainder of the candidates were either recommended for licence after 
further experience, or were not successful. 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND FORESTS EOR 1947 



157 



Area Under Pulpwood and Timber Agreement 

EiscAL Year Sq. Miles 

1937-38 54.625.50 

1938-39 62.643.00 

1939-40 65,330.00 

1940-41 65,497 . 50 

1941-42 66,509.50 

1942-43 71,636.50 

1943-44 56,690.50 

1944-45 59,353.00 

1945-46 53,754.00 

1946-47 56,745.00 



Tables 

Tabic Xo. 1 — Statements of aniouiUs of timber cut durinu the vear ending 
March 31, 1946. 

Table Xo. 2 — Classification of annual timber return? for the \ear ending March 
31. 1946. by Districts. 

2 Algonquin 

2a. Cochrane 

b. Eort Erances 

c. Gerald ton 

d. Kapuskasing 

e. Kenora 
.North Ba\- 
Parr\' Sound 
Port Arthur 
Sault Ste. Marie 
-Siou.x Lookout 
-Sudburx 

Tweed 

Table Xo. 3 — E.xporled i)uI|)\vood — cords, for the \ear ending March 31, 1946. 

Table Xo 4 — Exported pulpwood — species, for the year ending March 31, 1946. 
Table Xo. 5 — Timber areas sold during the \ear ending March 31, 1947. 

Table .\o. 6 Timber areas abandoned during the \ ear ending March 31, 1947. 

'Table .\o. 7 Timber areas transferred during the \ear ending March 31, 1947. 



158 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 1 

STATEMENT OF AMOUNT OF TIMBER CUT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 











Equivalent 


Species 


Pieces 


Feet 


Cords 


Volume 
in Cubic Feet 


White and Red Pine. 


2,408,570 


114,356,073 




30,549,783 


Jaciv Pine. . 


4 870 136 


73 804 189 


286 625 72 


60 449 730 


Spruce 


1,987,256 


43,894,185 


1,971 !.579.91 


1931286! 173 


Balsam 


36,116 


548,966 


165,413.69 


15,145,749 


Hemlock 


521,732 


20,154.096 




5,462,014 


Birch 


218,998 


14,812,385 




3,214,204 


Maple 


110,285 


5,942,131 




1,. 527, 094 


Other Hardwoods. . . . 


72,453 


4,086,-550 




963,978 


Poplar 


442,674 


7,839,234 


29,584.91 


6,086, .565 


Cedar 


6,973 


87,969 




46,217 


Tamarac 


1,083 


14,289 




6,776 




10,676,276 


285,540,067 


2,453,204.23 


316,738,283 


Species 


Pieces 


Lin. Ft. 


Cords 


Cu-Ft. 


Ties 


246,571 






739,713 


Poles 


116,711 






1,108,511 


Posts 


20,730 






31,095 


Fuelwood 






19,777.08 


1,779,930 


Lagging and Mining 










Timber 




41,413 






Piling 








414,503 




384,012 


41,413 


19,777.08 


4,073,752 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



159 



Table Xo. 2 

ALGONQUIN DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 



Species 

Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Jack Pine Logs 

Jack Pine Booms. . . 

Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs 

Basswood Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Cherry Logs 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Maple Logs . 

Oak Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Fuehvood (Hard). . . 

Ties 

Posts 

Poles 

Poles (Cu-Ft.) 

Balsam Pulpwood . . 
Poplar Pulpwood. . . 
Spruce Pulpwood. . . 
Jack Pine Pit Props. 
J. P. Props Exported 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



62.70 



793.34 

705.92 

10,154.60 

1,272.54 

1,272.54 



225,651 

81 

90,024 

70 

213 

3,324 

1,870 

44,654 

73 

233 

380 

73,044 

21,883 

3 

150,420 

51,036 

554 



7,449,400 

5,798 

1,259,934 

6,442 

10.357 

38,429 

74,597 

2,818,641 

1,141 

7,724 

20,969 

2,977,527 

1,166,244 

74 

3,056,909 

1,098,033 

69,675 



115 
610 
3,530 
33,819 279.C66.53 



$18,623.43 

14.50 

3.149.86 

16.11 

25.89 

76.86 

186.47 

7.046.62 

1.71 

19.31 

52.42 

4,466.29 

2.915.59 

.IS 

6,113.84 

2.196.00 

174.18 

31.35 

11. .50 

12.20 

1,095.25 

9,750.98 

555.33 

282.38 

14,216.44 

509.02 



$12,546.93 

772.45 

2.78 

2.52 

285.54 

5,818.85 

1.64 

22.48 

78.78 

421.57 

3,277.83 

.33 

4.889.90 

941.52 

178.91 

14.50 

19.20 

906.75 



168.38 
135.66 
763.12 
318.13 



$31,170.36 

14.. 50 

3,922.31 

18.89 

25.89 

79.38 

472.01 

12,865.47 

3.35 

41.79 

131.20 

4,887.86 

6,193.42 

.51 

11,003.74 

3,137..52 

353.09 

31.35 

26.00 

31.40 

2,002.00 

9,7.50.98 

555.33 

4.50.76 

14,3.52.10 

1,272.14 

318.13 



$71,543.71 i .S31,.567.77 |$103,111.48 



Cut Under Permit 

Hemlock Logs 4.50,000 Ft. B. M. 

Birch Logs 4.50.000 Ft. B. M. 

Pine Logs 240,643 Ft. B. .M. 

Fuehvood (Hard) 2,303.80 Cords 

Spruce Pulpwood 1.700.47 Cords 

Ties 416 Pieces 

Poles 2,759 Pieces 

Posts 515 Pieces 



160 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 2a 

COCHRANE DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 



Species 



Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

J. Pine Logs 

J. Pine Booms 

Balsam Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Tamarac Logs 

Fuelwood (Hard) . . . 
Fueiwood (Soft) .... 

Ties 

Poles 

Posts 

Balsam Pulpwood . . 
Jack Pine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood. . . 
Spruce Pulpwood. . . 
Spruce Pit Props. . . 
Jack Pine Pit Props . 
Pulpwood Exported. 

Balsam 

Jack Pine 

Spruce 

Spruce Pit Props. 

J. Pine Pit Props. 



Cords 



1,924.70 
3,702.96 



7,141.97 
1,720.14 
7,062.64 
320,361.29 
1,210.26 
13,843.17 

143.72 

410.63 

13,867.72 

1,210.26 

13,843.17 



Pieces 



22,594 

7 

1,295,300 

2,035 

17,799 

6,281 

53 

133,075 

398,475 

6,272 

10 



2,921 

9 

738 



Feet 



2,143,852 

1,773 

14,703,315 

110,293 

343,840 

56,105 

240 

1,920,709 

9,418,957 

544,799 

105 



Dues 



$ 5,359.61 

4.43 

29,252.13 

275.73 

687.66 

140.26 

.36 

3,841.42 

18,837.90 

1,361.96 

.16 

962.32 

925.74 

292.10 

3.50 

14.76 

5,018.18 

688.06 

2,825.06 

448,319.26 

1,694.36 

5,537.37 



Bonus 



Total 



S 13,549.74 

13.73 

72,230.06 

506.27 

1,548.40 

205.08 

1.32 

5,501.64 

55.808.47 

2,943.83 

1.19 

241.97 

1 ,390.94 

175.26 

5.75 

41.45 

1,813.75 

721.25 

2,118.08 

115,809.77 

290.60 

11,127.61 

93.42 
102.66 

9,014.00 
786.69 

3,460.72 



$18,909.35 

18.16 

101,482.19 

782.00 

2,236.06 

345.34 

1.68 

9,343.06 

74,646.37 

4,305.79 

1.35 

1,204.29 

2,316.68 

467.36 

9.25 

56.21 

6,831.93 

1,409.31 

4,943.14 

564,129.03 

1,984.96 

16,664.98 

93.42 
102.66 

9,014.00 
786.69 

3,460.72 



$526,042.33 $299,503.65 



25,545.98 



Cut Under Permit 

Balsam Logs 1,401 Ft. B. M. 

Birch Logs 3,072 Ft. B. M. 

Cedar Logs 1,147 Ft. B. M. 

Jack Pine Logs 2,283,689 Ft. B. M. 

Poplar Logs 934,148 Ft. B. M. 

Spruce Logs 620,356 Ft. B. M. 

Fuelwood (Hard).. . . 10,851.77 Cords 

Fuelwood (Soft) 10,000.00 Cords 

Spruce Pulpwood.. . . 42,802.95 Cords 

Ties 18,057 Pieces 

Poles 2,202 Pieces 

Posts 1,881 Pieces 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



101 



r.\BLE No. 2b 

FORT FRANCES DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TLMBER RETURN 





FOR THE 


YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 




Species 


Cords 


Pieces 


Feet 


Dues 


Bonus 


Total 


Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Jack Pine Logs 

Jack Pine Booms. . . . 

Ash Logs 

Birch Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Poplar Booms 

Spruce Logs 

.Spruce Booms 

Poles 

Posts 


642.00 
215.10 

25,875.83 
3,829.15 

44,465.89 

16,616.55 


203,075 

1,199 

234,718 

3,486 

136 

105 

25,726 

314 

15,462 

378 

205 

7,130 


10.803,135 

269,138 

3,364,649 

226,643 

2,380 

2,886 

326,689 

16,574 

303,058 

48,957 


827,007.81 

672.83 

5,192.96 

566.60 

5.95 

7.21 

653.37 

41.43 

606.13 

122.38 

51.25 

142.60 

160..50 

150.57 

10,350.33 

1,531.67 

62,252.25 


$35,379.81 

1,171.59 

10,341.53 

608.91 

5.95 

7.21 

522.53 

32.94 

819.73 

191.52 

119.30 

24.22 

4,095.30 

470.27 

11,275.37 

4,154.12 


.$62,387.62 

1,844.42 

15,534.49 

1,175.51 

11.90 

14.42 

1,175.90 

74.37 

1,425.86 

313.90 

51.25 

142.60 


Fuehvood (Soft) 

Balsam Pulpwood . . . 
Jack Pine Pulpwood . 
Poplar Pulpwood. . . . 
Spruce Pulpwood .... 
Pulpwood E.xported 
Jack Pine 


279.80 

174.79 

14,445.63 

2,001.94 

73,.-)27.62 

4,154.12 








$109,515.84 $69,220.30 

1 


$178,736.14 



Cut Under Permit 

Jack Pine Logs 21,673 Ft. B. M. 

Pine Logs 26,984 Ft. B. M. 

Poplar Logs 113,100 Ft. B. M. 

Spruce Logs 20,104 Ft. B. M. 

Poles 21 Pieces 

Posts 7,687 Pieces 

Fuehvood (Hard) 160.00 Cords 

Fuehvood (Soft) 686.10 Cords 

Balsam Pulpwood 138.24 Cords 

Jack Pine Pulpwood. . .303.65 Cords 

Poplar Pulpwood 2,554.48 Cords 

Spruce 1,002.68 Cords 



162 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



T.\BLE No. 2c 

GERALDTON DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 



Species 


Cords 


Pieces 


Feet 


Dues 


Bonus 


Total 


Jack Pine Logs 




180,359 


2,318,502 


$ 5,684.48 


.$11,119.34 


$16,803.82 


Jack Pine Booms. . . 




367 


35,258 


88.15 


165.47 


253.62 


Poplar Logs 




174 


2,565 


5.13 


5.13 


10.26 


Spruce Logs 




46,029 


574,821 


1,149.64 


3,298.17 


4,447.81 


Spruce Booms 




2,155 


362,192 


905.47 


2,147.39 


3,052.86 


Poles (Cu-Ft.) 




18,310 


191,590.61 


7,568.14 




7,568.14 


Balsam Pulpwood. . 


27,578.04 






19,304.62 


11,114.52 


30,419.14 


Jack Pine Pulpwood 


42,719.06 






17,087.62 


685.92 


17,773.-54 


Poplar Pulpwood. . . 


4.132.32 






1,652.92 




1,652.92 


Spruce Pulpwood. . . 


276,421.18 






386,989.65 


50,629.59 


437,619.24 


Pulpwood Exported 














Balsam 


13,232.28 
8,416.66 








8,600.98 
2,104.16 


8,600.98 


Jack Pine 


2,104.16 


Spruce 


210,411.25 








136,767.31 


136,767.31 














$440,435.82 


.$226,637.98 


$667,073.80 



Cut Under Permit 

Jack Pine Logs 12,190 FT. B. M. 

Poplar Logs 1,642 Ft. B. M. 

Fuelwood (Soft) 3,857 Cords 

Spruce Pulpwood 61 Cords 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



i(j;5 



Table No. 2d 

KAPUSKASIXG DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 



Species 

Jack Pine Logs 

Jack Pine Booms. . . 

Birch Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Piling (Lin-Ft.). ■ ■ ■ 

Piling (Cu-Ft.) 

Fuelwoocl (Hard). . . 
Fuelwood (Soft). . . . 

Ties 

Poles (Cu-Ft.) 

Poles 

Balsam Pulpwood . . 
Jack Pine PulpwoiM 
Poplar Pulpwood. . . 
Spruce Pulpwood. . . 
Pulpwood Exported 

Jack Pine 

Balsam 

Spruce 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



2,090.79 

288.62 



32,663.94 

2,193.67 

2.-). 18 

408,40.3.72 

500.00 

1,880.94 

278,047.64 



55,151 

198 

15 

18,742 

585,488 

2,686 

203 

70,934 



1,630 
909 
941 



976,164 

19,057 

387 

573,517 

9,447,385 

309,211 

7,555 

414,503.93 



11,585.43 



S 2,062.16 

47.63 

.97 

1,147.05 

18,894.76 

773.02 

188.88 

7,461.07 

1,045.39 

72.16 

163.00 

461.13 

282.00 

22,864.76 

877.47 

10.07 

571,768.01 



$ 3,963.08 

89.97 

.97 

693.80 

25,966.40 

1,290.74 



104.53 
36.16 
32.60 

282.00 

17,599.93 

33.99 

13.85 

108,474.88 

125.00 

1,222.60 

180,730.95 



.S6,025.24 

137.60 

1.94 

1,840.85 

44,861.16 

2,063.76 

188.88 

7,461.07 

1,149.92 

108.32 

195.60 

461.13 

564.00 

40,464.69 

911.46 

23.92 

680,242.89 

125.00 

1,222.60 

180,730.95 



S628, 119.53 §340,661.45 i.S968,780.98 



Cut Under Permit 

Poplar Logs 279.266 Ft. B. 

Spruce Logs 622,741 Ft. B. 

Poles 243 Pieces 

Posts 550 Pieces 

Fuelwood (Hard).. . . 1.381.95 Cords 

Fuelwood (.Soft) 3.782.77 Cords 

Spruce Pulpwood. . . . 19,289.02 Cords 



M. 
M. 



164 



REPORT OP^ THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 2k 

KENORA DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 





FOR THE 


YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 




Species 


Cords 


Pieces 


Feet 


Dues 


Bonus 


Total 


Pine Logs 




4,004 


226,605 


$ 566.50 


$ 932.08 


$ 1,498.58 


Pine Booms 




497 


67,050 


167.61 


2.58.62 


426.23 


Jack Pine Logs 




49,707 


863,806 


1,841.79 


3,799.98 


5,641.77 


Jack Pine Booms. . . 




531 


30,495 


76.23 


172.34 


248.57 


Poplar Logs 




1,411 


21,709 


43.42 


21.71 


65.13 


Spruce Logs 




12,690 


273,685 


547.36 


1,386.98 


1,934.34 


Spruce Booms 




1,392 


237,675 


594.17 


1,050.12 


1,644.29 


Piling (Lin-Ft.) 




575 


29,458 


79.99 




79.99 


Fuelwood (Hard). . . 


54.48 






27.24 


8.20 


35.44 


Fuelwood (Soft) .... 


3,096.31 






774.08 


369.15 


1,143.23 


Ties 




21,665 
3,682 


4,617.36 


2,166.50 
138.52 


912.48 


3,078.98 


Poles (Cu-Ft.) 


138.52 


Poles 


6,414.14 


131 
804 




33.25 

16.08 

4,489.89 


13.10 

64.32 

252.44 


46.35 


Posts 


80.40 


Balsam Pulpw ocjd . . 


4,742.33 


Jack Pine Pulpwood 


62,299.99 






24,920.00 


8,175.71 


33,095.71 


Poplar Pulpwood. . . 


297.70 






118.68 


27.00 


145.68 


Spruce Pulpwood . . . 


90,251.34 






126,351.89 


15,417.27 


141,769.16 










$162,953.20 


$32,861.50 


$195,814.70 



Cut Under Permit 

Pine Logs 60,229 Ft. B. M. 

Jack Pine Logs 37,089 Ft. B. M. 

Spruce Logs 105,233 Ft. B. M. 

Piling (Lin-Ft.) 13,048 

Fuelwood (Soft) 5,161 Cords 

Spruce Pulpwood 2,836 Cords 



UEPARTMP:NT of lands and forests for 1947 



165 



Table Xo. 2f 

NORTH BAY DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 



Species 

Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Jack Pine Logs. . . . , 
Jack Pine Booms. . 

Balsam Logs 

Basswood Logs. ... 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs , 

Hemlock Logs , 

Hemlock Booms. . . 

Poplar Logs 

.Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Fuehvood (Hard). . . 
Fuelwood (Soft). . . . 

Ties 

Poles 

Posts 

Balsam Puipwood . . 
Jack Pine I'ldpwonc 
Poplar Puipwood. . . 
Spruce Puipwood. . . 
Jack Pine Pit Props 
Puipwood Exported 

Spruce 

J. Pine Pit Props. 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



333.13 
107.46 



169.17 

4,220.84 

1,495.23 

19,345.99 

681.26 

44.81 
681.26 



927,676 

2,. 505 

217,000 

661 

1,650 

23,449 

29,763 

100 

17,312 

16 

21,280 

67.575 

1,099 



3,319 

1,923 

926 



49,075,583 

432,110 

2,.5.5S,316 

46,915 

20,641 

2,052,607 

1,931,611 

621 

663,376 

2,691 

314,010 

1.461.281 

140,203 



$122,688.91 

1 ,080.24 

5,783.84 

117.28 

41.29 

5,131.51 

4,829.02 

.93 

995.07 

6.73 

628.02 

2,992.53 

347.49 

166.56 

26.86 

331.90 

655.00 

18.52 

118.42 

1,688.34 

598.10 

27,084.55 

272.50 



$319,563.24 
2,397.02 

8,856.78 

114.21 

.54.70 

2,241.80 

.73 

196.79 

8.07 

791.98 

4,531.54 

214.28 

35.01 

331.90 

415.95 

18.52 

.37 

509.56 

142.00 

3,382.85 

408.76 

29.13 
170.31 



$442,252.15 

3,477.26 

14,640.62 

231.49 

95.99 

5,131.51 

7,070.82 

1.66 

1,191.86 

14.80 

1,420.00 

7,4.54.07 

561.77 

166.56 

61.87 

663.80 

1,070.95 

37.04 

118.79 

2,197.90 

740.10 

30,4()7.40 

681.26 

29.13 
170.31 



$175,533.61 



$344,415.50 $519,949.11 



Cut Under Permit 

Basswood Logs 35,000 Ft. B. M. 

Birch Logs 587,000 Ft. B. M. 

Hemlock Logs 15,000 Ft. B. M. 

Pine Logs 1,978,000 Ft. B. M. 

Jack Pine Logs 844,000 Ft. B. M. 

Poplar Logs 106,000 Ft. B. M. 

Spruce Logs .543,000 Ft. B. M. 

Fuelwood (Hard). . . . 15,497 Cords 

Fuelwood (Soft) 13,010 Cords 

Ties 12,185 Pieces 

Poles 3,699 Pieces 

Posts 3,126 Pieces 



166 



REPORT OF THE 



No. ^ 



Table No. 2g 

PARRY SOUND DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 



Species 


Cords 


Pieces 


Feet 


Dues 


Bonus 


Total 


Pine Logs 


835.06 


25,728 

19 

322 

801 

9,298 

2,008 

93,947 

462 

256 

1,364 

259,105 

42 

43,797 

691 

355 

44,233 

611 

393 


1,515,962 

1,408 

17,926 

9,647 

375,570 

96,942 

7,368,834 

8,518 

8,414 

104,803 

10,717,236 

3,787 

2,374,315 

28,877 

9,069 

1,198,827 

53,858 

3,888 


$ 3,789.91 

3.52 

44.85 

19.29 

938.95 

242.35 

18,422.15 

12.78 

21.77 

261.99 

16,075.90 

9.47 

5,935.79 

72.19 

18.14 

2,397.66 

134.70 

5.83 

417.52 


$ 581.96 

.91 

18.00 

174.24 

42.73 

8,319.39 

.91 

7.74 

90.67 

4,783.36 

3.00 

1,851.36 

10.01 

636.05 

7.80 

80.90 


$ 4,371.87 


Pine Booms 

Ash Logs 


4.43 

62.85 


Balsam Logs 

Basswood Logs 

Beech Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Cherry Logs. 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Hemlock Booms. . . . 
Maple Logs 


19.29 

1,113.19 

285.08 

26,741.54 

13.69 

29.51 

352.66 

20,859.26 

12.47 

7,787.15 


Oak Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Tamarac Logs 

Fuelwood (Hard). . . 


82.20 

18.14 

3,033.71 

142.50 

5.83 

498.42 










$48,824.76 


$16,609.03 


$65,433.79 



Cut Ihider Permit 

Ash Logs 5,000 Ft. B. M. 

Balsam Logs 2,700 Ft. B. M. 

Bass Logs 225,000 Ft. B. M. 

Beech Logs 15,000 Ft. B. M. 

Birch Logs 394,699 Ft. B. M. 

Cedar Logs 4,.500 Ft. B. M. 

Hemlock Logs 1,153,474 Ft. B. M. 

iMaple Logs 95,024 Ft. B. M. 

Pine Logs 1,401,302 Fl. B. M. 

Spruce Logs 139,418 Ft. B. M. 

Fuelwood (Hard). . . . 7,634 Cords 

Posts 1,218 Pieces 

Poles 4,174 Pieces 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



167 



Table Xo. 2h 

PORT ARTHUR DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 



Species 


Cords 


Pieces 


Feet 


Dues 


Bonus 


Total 


Pine Logs 




22,303 


1,060.387 


S 2,650,94 


$ 5,881.23 


S 8,532.17 


Pine Booms 




76 


18,033 


45.08 


135.25 


180.33 


Jack Pine Logs. . . 




1,374,217 


23,490,268 


42,362.85 


38,297.74 


80,660.59 


Jack Pine Booms. 




1.531 


69.917 


174.78 


296.78 


471.56 


Balsam Logs 




5,901 


65,688 


131.37 


230.30 


361.67 


Birch Logs 




357 


6,883 


17.20 


7.75 


24.95 


Cedar Logs 




1,664 


21,914 


32.87 


57.24 


90.11 


Poplar Logs 




31,481 


524,952 


1,049.91 


1.106.42 


2,156.33 


Spruce Logs 




406,654 


9,273,872 


18,547.76 


29,939.69 


48,487.45 


Spruce Booms. . . . 




10,969 


1.893,218 


4,733.01 


9,448.45 


14,181.46 


Tamarac Logs. . . . 




9 


166 


.25 


.58 


.83 


Piling 




141 


8,694 


20.02 


10.25 


30.27 


Ties 




35,754 




3,575.40 


1,388.53 


4.963.93 


Posts 




110 




2.20 


6.60 


8.80 


Poles (Cu-Ft.) . . . 




20,358 


266,772.59 


10,699.63 




10.699.63 


Fuelwood (Hard) 


52.25 






26.12 


7.84 


33.96 


Fuel wood (Soft). . 


1,604.27 






401.06 


356.21 


757.27 


Balsam Pulpwood 


68,403.33 






47,877.11 


27,173.54 


75,050.65 


J. Pine Pulpwood. 


77,143.02 






30,857.21 


10,609.07 


41,466.28 


Poplar Pulpwood. 


5,391.71 






2,156.68 


104.36 


2,261.04 


Spruce Pulpwood. 


490.974.27 






677,928.23 


196,007.49 


873,935.72 


Pulpwood Exp't'd. 














Balsam 


26,151.14 








16,998.22 


16,998.22 


Jack Pine 


32,970.18 








8,242.54 


8,242.54 


Spruce 


84,267.63 








54,773.95 


54,773.95 


! 


1 
1 


$843,289.68 


$401,068.87 


$1,244,369.71 



Cut L'nder Permit 

Balsam Logs 43,932 Ft. B. M. 

Birch Logs 4,320 Ft. B. M. 

Pine Logs 124,514 Ft. B. M. 

Jack Pine Logs 275,773 Ft. B. M. 

Poplar Logs 46,596 Ft. B. M. 

Spruce Logs 57,399 Ft. B. M. 

Fuelwood (Hard) 1,488.50 Cords 

F"uelwood (Soft) 565.50 Cords 

Balsam Pulpwood. . . . 55.00 Cords 

Jack Pine Pulpwood. . 356.00 Cords 

I'oplar Pulpwood 630.84 Cords 

Spruce Pulpwood 565.50 Cords 

Ties 526 Pieces 

Poles 2,140 Pieces 

Posts 300 Pieces 



168 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 2i 

SAULT STE. MARIE DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 



Species 


Cords 


Pieces 


Feet 


Dues 


Bonus 


Total 


Pine Logs 


15,393.02 

7,268.41 

563.10 

176,105.72 

28.10 
47.89 


309,927 

4,818 

112,901 

1,227 

40 

326 

7,951 

140 

1 

6 

3,788 

7 

5,103 

595 

54,200 

1,937 


21,121,508 

797,489 

3,149,623 

81,107 

1,230 

3,794 

462,184 

3,765 

50 

804 

224,611 

488 

166,309 

39,814 

1,541,734 

202,565 

35,139 

296 

2,096 


% 52,803.93 

1,993.71 

7,874.05 

202.76 

3.07 

7.59 

1,167.94 

5.64 

.12 

2.01 


$ 56,655.93 

3,393.47 

11,803.89 

382.10 

3.47 

16.87 

2,227.30 

9.41 

.10 

2.21 


$109,459.76 


Pine Booms 

Jaciv Pine Logs 

Jaciv Pine Booms. . . 


5,387.18 

19,677.94 

584.86 

6.54 


Balsam Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Cedar Booms 

Elm Logs 


24.46 

3,395.24 

15.05 

.22 

4.22 


Hemlock Logs 

Hemlock Booms. . . . 

Maple Logs 

Oak Logs 


336.90 521.01 

1.22 1.10 

415.75 , 511.47 

99.53 112.41 


857.91 

2.32 

927.22 

211.94 


Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 


3,083.45 

506.39 

3,513.90 

89.50 

41.92 

10,775.11 

2,907.36 

225.24 

246,548.01 


5,000.98 

1,043.78 

1,405.56 

77.50 

1,719.04 

726.84 

168.93 

35,836.69 

18.26 
31.13 


8,084.43 
1,550.17 
4,919.46 


Poles 


167.00 


Car Stakes 


41.92 


Balsam Pulpvvood . . 
Jack Pine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood. . . 
Spruce Pulpwood . . . 
Pulpwood Exported 

Spruce 

Balsam 


12,494.18 

3,634.20 

394.17 

282,384.70 

18.26 
31.13 












$332,605.03 


$121,669.45 


$454,274.48 



Cut Under Permit 

Birch Logs 801,464 Ft. H. M 

Hemlock Logs 245,760 Ft. B. M 

Maple Logs 99,304 Ft. B. M 

Pine Logs 241,562 Ft. B. M 

Spruce Logs 144,762 Ft. B. M 

Fuelwood (Hard) 2,333.94 Cords 

Spruce Pulpwood 28.00 Cords 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



169 



Table Xo. 2j 

SIOUX LOOKOUT DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 



Species 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



Pine Logs 




Pine Booms 




Jack Pine Logs 




Jack Pine Booms. . . 




Birch Logs 




Spruce Logs 




Spruce Booms 




Lagging (Lin-Ft.).. • 




Ties 




Fuelwood (Soft). . . . 


983.50 


Jialsam Pulpwooci . . 


5,508.33 


Jack Pine Pulpwood 


7.384.29 


Spruce Pulpwood. . . 


115,908.02 


Pulpwood Exported 




Balsam 


1,622.58 


Jack Pine 


2,155.24 


Spruce 


21,459.21 



11,232 
12 

199,318 

288 

456 

20,416 

1,611 

200 

125,961 



444,582 

3,695 

3.141,700 

11.646 

4,412 

410.401 

189,726 

4,400 



S 1,111.45 

9.24 

7.427.50 

29.11 

11.02 

820.80 

474.30 

14.67 

12,596.10 

245.90 

3,855.84 

2,953.72 

161,934.93 



$ 3,843.52 

35.10 

14.512.27 

52.20 

17.60 

1,944.30 

999.65 

2,519.22 
17.55 
39.19 

1,277.23 
9,142.93 

1,054.67 

538.81 

13,948.49 



$ 4,954.97 

44.34 

21.939.77 

81.31 

28.62 

2,765.10 

1,473.95 

14.67 

15.115.32 

263.45 

3,895.03 

4,230.85 

171.077.86 

1,054.67 

538.81 

13,948.49 



$191,484.58 §49,942.73 $241,427.31 



Cut Under Permit 

Jack Pine Logs 60,103 Ft. B. M. 

Spruce Logs 1.810,414 Ft. B. M. 

Fuelwood (Soft) 11 ,890.75 Cords 

Spruce Pulpwood.. . . 1,275.62 Cords 

Ties 677 Pieces 

Poles 46 Pieces 

Posts 49 Pieces 

Lagging 392,378 Lin-Ft. 



170 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 2k 

SUDBURY DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 



Species 

Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Jack Pine Logs 

Jack Pine Booms. . . 

Ash Logs 

Basswood Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Hemlock Booms. . . . 

Maple Logs 

Oak Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Fuelwood (Hard). . . 
Fuelwood (Soft) . . . . 

Ties 

Poles Cu-Ft 

Poles 

Piling 

Posts 

Car Stakes 

Balsam Pulpvvood . . 
Jack Pine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood. . . 
Spruce Pulpwood. . . 
Jack Pine Pit Props. 
Spruce Pit Props. . . 
Pulpwood Exported 

Balsam 

Jack Pine 

Spruce 

Pit Props Exported 

Jack Pine 

Spruce 



Cords 



552.30 
748.00 



851.49 

55,800.47 

4,929.81 

18,692.22 

857.92 

185.15 

99.71 

110.50 

1,203.97 

857.92 
185.15 



Pieces 



410,571 

1,029 

1,046,211 

4,836 

23 

1 ,433 

3,912 

236 

32 

13,965 

25 

402 

78 

20,288 

165,343 

3,802 



19,824 

31,520 

494 

7,802 

7.917 

16,081 



Feet 



12,225,771 

114,426 

17,125,666 

214,473 

1,258 

38,419 

101,546 

4,570 

1,106 

578,391 

1,637 

11,734 

3,110 

299,788 

2,888,162 

210,248 



354,755.83 



Dues 



$30,564.44 

286.06 

35,788.29 

536.17 

3.14 

96.05 

253.86 

7.00 

2.76 

867.59 

4.09 

29.33 

7.77 

599.60 

5,776.31 

525.57 

276.15 

187.00 

1,982.40 

13,582.41 

162.75 

486.45 

158.34 

321.68 

596.05 

22,320.20 

1,971.93 

26,169.11 

343.17 

259.21 



Bonus 



.«144, 164.88 



$61,431.25 

640.60 

82,800.94 

998.61 

96.05 

130.85 

14.01 

3.32 

381.96 

3.27 

35.20 

6.93 

642.73 

13,223.86 

942.98 

42.19 

30.10 

900.90 

189.20 

234.11 
26.77 
81.65 

726.79 

621.31 
1,. 552.37 

519.16 
46.29 

64.81 

27.62 

782.59 

214.47 
120.36 



Total 



$167..533.24 



$91,995.69 

926.66 

118,589.23 

1,534.78 

3.14 

192.10 

384.71 

21.01 

6.08 

1,249.55 

7.36 

64.53 

14.70 

1,242.33 

19,000.17 

1,468.55 

318.34 

217.10 

2,883.30 

13,582.41 

351.95 

486.45 

392.45 

348.45 

677.70 

23,046.99 

2,.593.24 

27,721.48 

862.33 

305.50 

64.81 
27.62 

782.59 

214.47 
120.36 



.$311,698.12 



Cut Under Permit 

Basswood Logs 458 Ft. B. M. 

Birch Logs 4,206 Ft. B. M. 

Cedar Logs 11,508 Ft. B. M. 

Hemlock Logs 95,460 Ft. B. M. 

Pine Logs 1,985,704 Ft. B. M. 

Jack Pine Logs 315,899 Ft. B. M. 

Poplar Logs 105,161 Ft. B. M. 

Spruce Logs 270,218 Ft. B. M. 

Fuelwood (Hard) 4,000 Cords 

Fuelwood (Soft) 3,983 Cords 

Ties 7,304 Pieces 

Poles 3,372 Pieces 

Posts 3,312 Pieces 

Jack Pine Pulpwood 887 Cords 

Jack Pine Pit Props 1,440 Cords 

Poplar Pulp Wood 1,695 Cords 

Spruce Pulpwood 1,595 Cords 

Car Stakes 8.50 Pieces 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



171 



T.\BLE No. 2l 

TRENT DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1946 



Species Cords 


Pieces 


Feet 


Dues 


Bonus 


Total 


Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs 

Basswood Logs 

Beech Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Cherry Logs 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Hemlock Booms. . . . 

Maple Logs 

Oak Logs 




234,838 

728 

1..3.30 

6,315 

18,608 

6,885 

31,557 

4,244 

119 

2,535 

154,269 

159 

39,100 

546 

39,408 

85,713 

476 

671 

20 

243 

584 

2,495 


6,514,474 

63,894 

40,.553 

66,927 

668,270 

281,235 

2,0.58,864 

47,150 

6,360 

184,301 

4,972,930 

11,422 

2,223,529 

18,850 

772.743 

1,694,485 

47,157 

10,130 


.$16,286.10 

1.59.73 

101.38 

133.85 

1.670.67 

730.08 

5,147.19 

70.73 

15.90 

460.70 

7,4.59.45 

28.. 54 

5, .558.81 

47.13 

1,. 545.50 

3.388.98 

117.87 

15.19 

5.00 

24.30 

181.75 

49.90 

1,324.67 

12.44 

267.26 

460.85 

691.13 


$26,826.72 

72.06 

64.81 

70.78 

991.51 

186.92 

2,534.12 

139.37 

11.31 

486.73 

1,714.90 

8.08 

2,933.00 

.54.31 

1,025.66 

3,915.20 

134.95 

42.69 

4.86 
1.50.25 
111.97 
408.73 
1.39 
88.81 
191.08 

233.72 
251.10 


.$43,112.82 

231.79 

166.19 

204.63 

2,662.18 

917.00 

7,681.23 

210.10 

27.21 

947.43 

9,174.35 

36.62 

8,491.81 

101.44 


Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Tamarac Logs 

Trees 


2,.571.16 
7,304.18 

252.82 

57.88 

5.00 


Ties 


29.16 


Poles 


332.00 


Posts 




161.87 


Fuelwood (Hard) . . . 
Fuelwood (Soft). . . . 
Balsam Pulpwood . . 
Poplar Pulpwood. . . 
Spruce Pulpwood. . . 
Pulpwood Exported 
Balsam . 


2,649.36 
49.09 

381.82 
1,152.15 

493.67 

359.57 


1,733.40 

13.83 

356.07 

651.93 

691.13 

233.72 


Spruce 


386.31 


251.10 










$45,9.55.11 


$42,655.03 


$88,610.04 



Cut Under Permit 

Birch Logs 140,055 Fl. B. M. 

Hemlock Logs 612,752 Ft. B. M. 

-Maple Logs 437,187 Ft. B. M. 

I^ine Logs 1,137,259 Ft. B. M. 

Spruce Logs 595,744 Ft. B. M. 

Ties 294 Pieces 

Poplar Pulpwood 2,032.36 Cords 

Spruce Pulpwood 242.00 Cords 



172 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table Xo. 3 

FINAL STATEMENT OF PULPWOOD EXPORTED FROM ONTARIO 

January 1 to December 31, 1946 



District 


Crown Lands 
(Cords) 


Private Lands 

(Cords) 


Total 
(Cords) 


Value 

$ 


Chapleau 

Cochrane 

Fort Frances 

Geraldton 

Gogama 

Kapuskasing 


Xil 

32.736.00 

5,201.82 

5.738.00 

37.41 

220,897.80 

'2.620'. 99 

500.00 

281,918.49 

10,443.66 

13,993.00 

3.788.45 

1,532.00 


Xil 

23,164.00 

5,234.97 

56,'989.87 
114.00 

7,403.50 

105.00 

11,068.00 

43,805.00 

1,4.50.34 

2,359.50 
17,388.00 

8,988.00 


55,900.66 

10,436.79 

5,738.00 

37.41 

277,887.67 

114.00 

10,024.49 

105.00 

11,568.00 

325,723.49 

11,894.00 

16,352.50 

21,176.45 

10,520.00 


556,359.50 

103,404.58 

103,284.00 

439.57 

3,288,071.58 


Kenora 


1,368.00 


Xorth Bav 


98,441.90 


Parry Sound 

Pembroke 

Port Arthur 


1,049.50 

117,854.00 

6,603,971.12 


Sault Ste. Marie 

Sioux Lookf)ut 


143,121.76 
271,077.61 


Sudbur\" 


144,696.27 


Tweed 


13,680.00 






Total 


579,407.62 


178,070.18 


757,477.80 


$11,446,819.39 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



173 



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174 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



o 


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a 
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$14.00 Per MBM 
10.00 Per MBM 
10.00 Per MBM 

6.00 Per MBM 
14.00 Per MBM 

2.75 Per Cd. 

1 00 Per VA. 




. 
U 

Oh O 

lo a 

c 
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15.00 Per MBM 
12.00 Per MBM 

8.00 Per MBM 
10.00 Per MBM 
11.00 Per MBM 
12.00 Per MBM 

8.00 Per MBM 


13.27 Per MBM 
11.27 Per MBM 


10.50 Per MBM 

10.50 Per MBM 

1.75 Per Cd. 

.85Per Cd. 


U 

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- 


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CO 


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Area 

sq. 

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Date 
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1946 


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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



175 






Total 


sSlO.OO Per MBM 

2.00 Per Cd. 

.90Per Cd. 

2.05 Per Cd. 


12.00 Per MBM 
12.00 I'er MBM 

1.00 i'er Cd. 

2.00 Per Cd. 


05 Per MBM 
05 Per MBM 
05 Per MBM 
05 Per MBM 
50 Per Cd. 


-6-6 
UU 

u u 

QJ CJ 

CUCU 


00 Per MBM 
50 Per MBM 
00 Per MBM 
50 Per MBM 
50 Per MBM 
00 Per MBM 
50 Per MBM 
00 Per MBM 
55 Each 
05 Each 


00 Per MBM 
85 Per Cd. 
10 Per Cd. 


t^t^iOO 


(MC^ 


05?OOiOi-0 0i00(N 


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1.10 

.25 

.40 


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Jackpine Logs 
Jackpine Pitprops 
Pojjlar Pulpwood 
Spruce Pulpwood 


Spruce Logs 
Jackpine Logs 
Jackpine Pulpwood 
S[)ruce Pulpwood 


Maple, Birch and 
Basswood Logs 
Spruce & Balsam Logs 
Hemlock Logs 
Poplar Logs 
Fuelwood (Hard) 


o § 
u — 


Birch Logs 
Maple Logs 
Oak Logs 
Poplar Logs 
Hemlock Logs 
.Spruce Logs 
Balsam Logs 
White Pine Logs 
Cedar Poles 
Cedar Posts 


Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 


To Whom Sold 


Harr>- Block, 
Swastika, Ont. 


Hembruff Timber Co. 
Matheson, Ont. 


Mac, Fitzgerald, 
Maynooth, Ont. 


i.1 


Elliott Lumber Co., 
281 Conmee Ave., 
-Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 


So 

X ^ 
u 5J 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 

1 


CO 


- 


^ 


(N 


CO 


Area 

sq. 

miles 


:^ 


- 


? 


s 




:^ 




Ebvand BurtTwps. 
Parcel 2 


d 

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tr. 

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o .- 


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■s 
H 

u 
u 


d 

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<u 

c 
c 

CJ 


d 

is 
B 

CS 

U 


Date 
Sold 
1946 


QO 


00 


1— > 






3 


35 


JO 

5^" 


(M 


fO 


CO 


't 


^ 


CO 

"3 
•— > 



176 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



o 



H 



~3 
o 


s$ 9.50 Per MBM 
MBM inc. of dues. 


8.60 Per MBM 
4.00 Per MBM 
8.25 Per MBM 
5.00 Per MBM 
4.00 Per MBM 


18.15 Per MBM 


10.50 Per MBM 
4.75 Per MBM 
1.00 Per Cd. 
.75 Per Cd. 
1 . 75 Per Cd. 
1.75 Per Cd. 
1.00 Per Cd. 
1.75 PerCd. 




CO 

1- 

(J 

Ch 


7.50 Per MBM 
7.50 Per MBM 
1.70 PerCd. 


Oh 


3 

Q 


$2.50 
00 per 


OOOOO 

lo >o ooo 

(M — (N CO -H 


o 

CO 


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1.50 
2.00 
1.40 


0) 

a 


$5.00 

te of $2. 


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lO iC o o o 

CO 'H CO CO 'H 


o 

o 

to 


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lO LO CO CO 05 CO o 

odco 




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m 


$2.00 
Flat ra 


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CO oco o o 
CO— 'co^ --H 


o 


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lOCOCO-Hrt^COt^ 


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lO 
CO 






S 


E 

H 

_3 


Pine Logs 
Fire Damaged 
Jackpine 


Pine Logs 
Hemlock Logs 
Hardwood Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Tamarac Logs 


-J 

ZJ 
3 


Jackpine Logs 
Poplar Logs 
Jackpine Pulp 
Poplar Pulp 
Balsam Pulp 
Spruce Pulp 
Jackpine Fuclwood 
Jackpine Pitprops 


•r. 
O 

-a 
o 
o 
> 

1 


Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Spruce Pulp 


CD 

O 

o 


W. V. Seigner 
Lumber Co. Ltd., 
49 King St. E., 
Kitchener, Ont. 


Whitehorn & Skinner 
Lumber Co., 
216 Heath St. W., 
Toronto, Ont. 


The McGibbon 
Lumber Co. Ltd., 
I'enetanguishene, 
Ont. 


E. Mainville, 
66 Main Ave., 
Timmins, Ont. 


CO 

Oi 
CO 

y. 

o ,• 

ffl 3 

.p-O 

. J= 

Qt 
. o 


Ed. Smith & Co., 
153 Lawrence Ave. E. 
Toronto, Ont. 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


(N 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


- 




CO 


GO 


CO Co 

1 


? 


CO 


1 
o 


d 
is 

H 

bo 

73. 


_iS 

o 

o 
U 


Island E54 and 
Part 500A. Georgian 
Bay, opposite 
Shawanaga 'Twp. 


d 

3 
O 

03 
u 

OJ 


d 
is 

s 


d 

H 

S 

CD 


Date 
Sold 
1946 


■-0 
1—1 


05 
CO 


< 


^ 


CO 

bJo 
3 
< 


CO 
CO 

< 


03 


SJ CO 

£2 


GO 
1—1 


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1 
CO 




LO 


00 
1— > 





DP:PARTMENT of lands and forests for 1947 



177 



H 



"^ Zh 



r- 


00 Per MBM 
00 Per MBM 
00 Per MBM 
60 Per Cd. 


00 Per MBM 
50 Per Cd. 
75 i'er Cd. 


00 Per MBM 
90 Per Cd. 


CQ22_;_: _:_:_;_:_:_; 

§SuUj= uuuuuu 

'C O O O X CO -+ '^ w t- X 
(Ni-tOOO OOOOOO 


10 Per MBM 
00 Per MBM 
00 Per MBM 


17 Per MBM 
53 Per MBM 
57 Per MBM 
14 Per MBM 
50 Per MBM 


tC t^ L-r 


eo^- i 


IM 


iCXCM — 


IMOO 


— 1 00 iC LO CD 


'i 

o 


tn 

3 

Q 


oooo 

iC lO lO lO 


O'-OO 
0(N ■* 


OO 


OOOOIM CO'^iOcCt^X 
iC O ■* ^ O OOOOOO 


OOO 

LOO'-': 


ooooo 

lO O O O lO 




1— 1 


-^ 


(N(N-< 


(M(N -H 


(N(N(N^<N 


o 
a 


cooo 


OOLO 

lOOX 


O lO 




O O i-O O CO 

O >0 (M Tti O 


OOO 
lO O o 


OOOOO 
lO O lO lO »o 


JO CD (M 


O-i 


t> 


I> O ; 


COLQO 


I>CD (NCOCO 


S 


iC lO • • 


OiCO 
0<M O 


OLO 

0(N 


1 

i-O O O O CO 1 o o o 

I> O CO --H O rt iC lO 


t^C0t^-t<O 
.— iC O — ' LO 


(OX ■ • 


y~-\ 


CO 


O— 1 COIMIM--'— 1 1 


'^ 


Yellow Birch Logs 
Maple Logs 
Other Hardwoods 
Birch Tops 


Jackpine Logs 
Fuelwood-Jackpine 
Jackpine Pilwood 


Jackpine Logs 
Poplar Pulpwood 


Red and W. Pine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Poplar Ptdpwood 
Cedar Posts 8' 
Cedar Poles 
UptolOCu.Fl. 
Over 10 to 20 Cu. Ft. 
Over 20 to 30 Cu. Ft. 
Over 30 to 40 Cu. Ft. 
Over 40 to 50 Cu. Ft. 
Over 50 Cu. Fl. 


Red and White Pine 
Spruce Logs 
Jackpine Logs 


Red and W. Pine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Poplar Logs 
Hemlock Logs 
Hardwood Logs 


-a 
o 

CD 

5 


■ « 

Z X 


Bouchard Timber, 
125 Wilson Ave., 
Tinimins, Ont. 


X • 

.E -^ 

5 XL 

^ • o 
> b* 


X r^ 

S,6 


Lafreniere Pine 
Lumber Co., 
Mattawa, Ont. 


E 

l| 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


(N (N 


CO 


CD 


CO 


- 


Area 

sq. 

miles 


CO 


1^ 


CI 


■o 


(N 


1 


X 


c 
c75 


d 
o 

O 


Hartle anil 
Burnaln Twps. 
(Parcel 1 ) 


Burnaby and 
Packman Tw])s. 
(Parcel 2) 


Twp. 136 


Date 
Sold 
1946 


i/. 

< 


i-O 

< 




CO 

a 
o 


CO 


o 

u 
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1 
1 

Q 




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a-. 

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< 


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3 
< 

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178 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 







« 




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be — ^ 
3P 


J ^^o-r^3-|^ 


ca 




"O 


iJJ JOhOh 3 


JjC-iaH = o-^ 


JhJ aJCLnCi, a 


5J— Jj'^^^C^ aj 


S 




_c 


•S a; u cj u^ 


OJ 1- aj V- ^ ,?^ C 
'•J c3 V rej^tt- ;5 


n c 


o u D s 


C r- r- C 

• — 'ijucajci-..— 


be 

c 




K> 


O. O r3 O rt j2 


rt Q. cj c^ a. 


CJ rt u M 


dorat-o-jriO, 






l5 5 a5 ah! 


S aS ay,ii-£ 


2 aijS aij 


2 ad^ 


ij 2 a-£ 2i^ a-TJ 
Ac/) 0- CQ c>5 03 Cu ►S, 








S a o a o -^ 


a o a o-=i o <« 


a J5 ao ^ 


a a t« 


c 






i^c/) Dh c/} CL, oa 


c/) Oh c/5 D-i cQ c/2 ea 


c/) 0. ►iH.c/) Dh .2, 


C/2CUC/2 03 














^ -i^ 


o; 


-a 








^ r^ 


c 


0) 


o 




> . 


d 




3 tn~ 


-C 


S 


^ 


< = 


r i 


_< 


OJ 


W) 


o 


- c 


-co 


a. 6? 




3 


J5 
O 


.SO 







J 


5 

.S C 3 

zn 

tUC/)C/) 




"o ■ t/i 










5^ 


c £ 












< 


OH--S 


^ 


IN 


C^ 


'-' 


(N 


0) 












s 










:^ ;:^ 


H 




Tf 


§ 


CD 










d. 






>, 




d 
is 


^ 

h 


d 


d 






d. 


H 


<u 


^ 
h 




J 


H 


_o 





c 


be 








c 

u 

3 
O 


u 



c 

03 
X 




Oj 






<£> 


TO 


TT t^ 


t^ 








IM 








"tj -5 Tfi 












=5 O 05 


+J 










QCOri 


a 


-*— 


4-' 4-' 


-*— 






OJ 


u 












C/) 


O 


C 









o 


TO 


1 

CD 


Oi 


c:= 




., "^ 


(M 












<U OJ CO 














IP 


b/j 


a 


a 

4) 


a 


a. 




o 




< 






C/2 

1 


CO 




1 


tri 


C/l 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



179 



B 
p 


O O 

UU 

1) U 
O lO 


9.50 Per MBM 
1.85 Per Cord 
4.50 Per MBM 
1.60 Per Cord 


8.50 Per MBM 
1.90 Per Cord 
1.90 Per Cord 



UU 

00 

(N(M 
(N(M 



UU 

U I-. 



DhCL, 
00 


25 2C 25 C9 ^ ^ ■- 

SSSScjuu 

U 1- u i_ •_ u u 

i/ 


Vr MBM 
»er MBM 
•er MBM 
'er MBM 
>er MBM 




u 

u 

a. 


>o c i-T L-: 

i> c X t- o 


c OiO 
1> 




CO soTf C5 


^ 00 »0 l> :0 




in 


3 

Q 


00 

5 


0000 

Ot}<OI> 


000 

(N'-H 


00 


00 


10 

uO lO ^ (N 


00000c 

10 i-O '^ 




^<M(N (N 


, CM CM C^CM --H 




a 
D 


10 

e«3(N 


OIM>OC5 


000 

'-! 


r-l 







C lO 1.0 i-O 
'-0 IM -^ >-^ 


'-0 

LO 1.0 cc 




t^COt^iM 


t^ ^ CO 1^ ^ 




"2 

s 


10 




i-O 
>0(N 








00 


COCO 





10 c 
i> c Ol -H ^ 


88 









■* (M -rt< 


^ r^ 






p 

-a 

c 


s s 


a. a. 

CI 

5 a 
a 

C/]CU 


"2 
2 

i ^ 

be±r M"5 

3 rT 

cj a; u S 

^ 5 0.^ 

C/5cn2-22 


§1 
= = 

s 

u p 


II 

Q.°- 

3 1 
u — 
Q. n! 
C/}CQ 


"3 

a* 3 
1- — 

Q. 03 


* '/; a— 

^ S "^ "^ '—' S - 

■5.;^ s s £ 


-0 
M p 

M § J -I ^ 2h 
""— :^ iJ b =13 

2u d: 2- c/:' U Oh 


2 
o 

5 
o 


1 


.0 

2 3 

;:i = . 

.3 C ^ 

C 

< 


3-2 

^ 3 

■Si 3 

p tn 

^ 5. 

ii t: ti 

J- ^ w 
u 


1.1 

1 

— 


6 2 
U g 4J 

t"^ - 
.= -^- 

^ '■^' 

1^ 


i ^ 

III 


3 

dJ 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


(N 


- 


(N 


c^ 


CO 


(M 


- 


Area 

sq. 

miles 


:^ 


? 


::^ 


\^ 


\N 


(M 


? 


"i 

o 


d 


c 
c 


a. 


d 

u 


d 
H 

.3' 

a 

u 


d 

H 
5 

2 
G 


•X 

C. 

is 

.2fe 

P 


d 
H 

u 

X 

'— 


Date 
Sold 
194G 



C 



2: 











CM 




CO 

i 

2; 


IJ 


5'" 



IN 

a 











2 
c 






05 

c 




CM 
CM 


CM 











180 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



r 





$12,00 Per MBM 
10.00 Per MBM 

8.00 Per MBM 
10.00 Per MBM 
10.00 Per MBM 

8.00 Per MBM 


Cs 
1 '^ 


U 


o o 
oo 

•O >-0 
l>CO 


7.50 Per MBM 
7.50 Per MBM 
1.65 Per Cord 


-co 
o o 
UU 

y y 
3-1 2-c 
lO O 

coc^ 


4.25 Per MBM 
8.40 Per MBM 
6.25 Per MBM 

.60 Each 

.06 Each 


9.50 Per MBM 

8.25 Per MBM 

5.00 Per MBM 

8.00 Per MBM 

12.00 Per MBM 

.50 Each 

.75 Each 
1.00 Each 


'3 

■Si 

'u, 


X 

o 

3 

Q 


$2.r.o 

2.00 
1 , 50 

1 . 50 




2.00 

1 . 50 
2.00 
1.40 

1.40 
1.40 


1 , 50 

2.50 

2 . 50 

.25 

.02 


O O O O O i-O O lO 
'- ■- '~ O iC CO OI> 

C^l M — C-l CO ' ' ' 


en 

a 

ID 


ocooco 

O O i^ iC o »c 

1-- U- -p -rj- -fi CO 


X 

—1 s 


5 . 50 
.20 

6.00 

5 . 50 

.25 

.60 
.30 


O O O O CO O O O O O iC O o 
iC L'^ O CO O iC L-t iC C >C CO CO CO 

CO L-: CO -* CO CO "- t^ 


."H 


oooooo 
ooocoo 

CO coco CO CO CO 


X 




s 










lO O O O CO 
CO TfCO T^ o 


2.50 

2.25 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 




: 


o 
c 


While Pine Logs 
Spruce & Balsam Logs 
Cedar Logs 
Birch Logs 
Basswood Logs 
Poplar Logs 


Spruce and Balsam 
Pulp wood 


o 
o 
'■$■ 

■r. r\ 

y o 
Q. a 


r 

"5 


c 




d.d. 

y y 
y o 

aa 
y c 

£i 3 

Offl 


Hemlock Logs 
Birch Logs 
Maple Logs 
Cedar Poles 
Cedar Posts 


Birch Logs 
Maple and Other 

Hardwoods 
Hemlock 

Spruce & Balsam Logs 
Pine Logs 

Cedar Poles 21' to 30' 
Cedar Poles 31' to 40' 
Cedar Poles 41' to 50' 


u u 

a c 


5 
_o 


c3 ■^ 
>, — 


Me.ssrs. D' Amours 
Bros., 
Moonbeam, Ont. 


O 

<■ 


'-5 — 
1— > 


c 

q. 

c:? 

o 

r- C 

O^ 

y CO 

rtO 


c 
yO 

' — ' u 


Pennington Lumber 
Co. (Canada) Ltd., 
Thessalon, Onl. 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


- 


- 


CO 


- 


- 


- 


CO 


Area 

sq. 

miles 


:^ 


CO 


5- 


00 


c^ 


- 




1 


Lullerworth Twp. 


X 

z 




1 
'> 

=«x 

c?5 


n 

"be 
O 


< 


Bridgland Twp. 


Dale 
Sold 
1946 


CO 

c 
Z 


00 
Z 


2 1 

o 
Z 


C5 

c 
Z 


CO 

o 
Z 


CO 

Z 


CO 

> 
Z ' 


Si 


; CO 


O 


CO 


1 


z 


! 


c 
Z 






z 


CO 

Z 


> 

z 







DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



181 



o 


'^ ~ '-S 12 S Z 1.^ = t; 


.-)() IVr MBM 
00 I'cr MBM 
00 IVr A1BM 
00 IVr MBM 




^v^ o^ ^^ ^ 

•_ •_ l_ o ■_ 




o o 
UU 


CO 00 1 (Mt^^ 05 


O O O (N ^ 


00 coo 


(N(N 


-a 
I 


o 

3 

Q 


gggs ; i ; ; ; ggss 


ooccoooo 

O O lO TT ^ O T)< TfH 


o o o L': o 

O >0 lO (M ^ 


oo 


(N<N 1 <N(N(N(N 


(MIM — -H 


(M(N(N 


-' 


■j: 

a. 


osgE gs'esfe g88§ 


C O O O L'T O O iC 
u-; O lO "* <M — 1 O CO 


o o o >o o 

O iC lO (N C^l 


OO 

ceo 


co;c 1 C:ccc-*i 


(Mt^t^ 


lOCCt^ 


— 






So c S 

O ci c: (M 


?gSg22 






(N 


o 






oo 


o 
Si 

5 


1 ^ ^ 'o Ci u 

X r. — h _= ?5 ?5 ^ S 


^ 8 

~ n — ^ 

:2 r^:S f 


^ _ 

£5 5 8.-3 


"o 
o 

, '^ iy •— •— 


II 

■^ s 

y: — 


To Whom Sold 


C c 


go 
§•1 

Id 
' . "^ 


(« - 

— u 
C rt 




c 

•- j= 

3 to 

o c 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


- 


t* 


- 


i-H 


(M 


Area 

sq. 

miles 


? 


:^ 


-r 


(N 


? 


o 
c 


1^ 

c 
o 


d 

c 
o 
1 

B 

CS 


J 
o 


d 

(A 

C/5 


d 

c 

S 
u 
o 

o 


Date 
Sold 
1946 


00 




C 


00 

Q 


00 

Q 




5"" 


> 

c 


CO 
> 

o 
Z 


> 

o 






05 
> 

o 
Z 








OS 

6 

Z 



182 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



o 









§^^S^^ 




sss 


[li^^tt^ 


SSSSSSSS 


SS^ 






fficnmca i; ^ 


mffiffl 


3 D 3 3 3 3 

uuuuuu 


1*^ r^ r^ i"^. r^ i'*^ f^ rn 






:« 


SSS^UU^ 


S^S 


SSSS^SSS 








U, V- t. u. u t- 


UUl-UUl-UU 


■u u u 




O 




0) a; oj 


5J (U CJ O OJ o 


CJCJOCJOOCJO 


CJ CJ CJ 




Uh 


a, ;i. ;i, Hh Ch cl, w 


2h0h[1. 


Cu fl. 2h Oh a. CL, 


aHCHCHOH^^C^DHOH 


DhOhCLh 






O O C O O lO o 


COO 


CO ^ O CO t^ 00 


O iC O lO O 'O o o 


O O lO 






OOOCOCCIM 
Tf ^ QC !>. (M 


ooo 


oooooo 


Ot^(MIMO(MOO 


oot> 




ooooiooot^oo 


-+ TtH <M 












^H ^H 


^H 1-H 






^/> 














4J 


OO O CC OIM 


ooo 




oooooooo 


ooo 






Q 


iC O C lO '^ Tti o 


IC lO LO 
M -H (M 




O "O O O i-O >0 O lO 


lOO ^ 




(N <N (N (N ^ 


(N— i(N<N(MIM(M^ 


r-iCN— 1 




o 


o o c o o 1-"; "-T 


ooo 




OOOOOOOO 


OOO 








lO O iC L-; 00 (M o 

o t^ -f CO 


O O lO 

rococo 




O^CiOiOiOiOOiO 


>00'* 




iQCO-^-^-f'tCO'* 


00 00 








«^ 
















1 














-a 


O O C C i^ 


X 


r^ ^~i r*^. 




O 'O 'O LC O "-0 o o 


O O lO 




c2 


ffi 


O O O O C^) 


— 1 


ro-H (M 




Ot^lMC-IOOlOO 


O 005 




-f IM — ' " 




COCO<N(MCO(N(N(M 


'^ 't 




CJ 

o 




</> 


























t^ 
















•^ 


Ph 


^ 




o 


[iUHpI-fc 












= a^-a 


■£ 


3-3333 


5 ^ 


-T3 


CO 




H 


o S o 
^ p o 

-a _ =^ ^ 




£] .oooo^ 

, 3 C<1 CO Tf 'O • 




be ? 






o 


^ o ^ti'Sr^ 


^^•^ ^ 


i^SS35u 


J ^3 


>5 




-v 


^jj-^^^ ° 


~c ^— R 


,^. 2 o o o o o 

Vj rllM CO'* lO 




^ JOh 


<H 






y B ^ o s ^ >- 


§;'^.^ 


CJ M.i _c: — ^ ^ « c« 


Q, CJ CJ 


fcJO 

c 










CJ CJ CJ CJ u 

a > > > > > 




^33 
" k k 


c 

CJ 






s;(^:2:^c^(^u 


C^ XX 


DOOOOO 




■o 


— 






CJ 




_ 


:: 


= 






s ^ 




"5 


^ 9 


O 3 




cSO 


^-'° 
^^s 




^ 


^ ^ ^ ^^ — 


J= ci ■ 






c >.-^ 


■5 


o 


S 8 > ^a 

Cfi O r- U-- 








* CJ c« 


o 
c/) 












t5g5 




"o 1 tn 














C c 












< 


d^^ 


(N 


(N 




I— ( 


Tt^ 




Z' 












o 
























:^ 




ti; 


< ^'s 


(M 


(N 




CO 


00 






."o 














c^ S- 


d 










>> 


-a o '3 


^ 






a 




— ' 




^ 






^ 




c^ 


- 




^ 


H 




o 


S-^^ '" 


- 






>. 








c 




c 


u 






















u 

s 




be 


u 






o> 


00 




CO 


CO 












(M 


(M 




«J-30 




























Jo O OS 








CJ 

1) 


0) 






Q 


Q 




Q 


Q 






05 


o 




IM 


lO 




'U 








(M 


(M 




i) O CD 














:^ i^.^ 


^ 


> 




> 


> 




Q 




o 




o 
Z 




O 


O 

Z 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



183 



"* Cl, 



3 


i> cj o cj ^y _o ^y ra y 
00,2.2 2222:? 


L. U I. U L. U 

^y ^y ^y ^y ^y ^y 
o >o o o o o 

t^ t^ 0(M O O 


^ 
^ 




1.70 Per Cord 


8.00 I'er MBM 
6.00 Per MBM 

8.00 Per MBM 
0.00 Per MBM 


10.00 Per MBM 

12.00 Per MBM 

10.00 Per MBM 

12.00 I'er MBM 

8.00 Per MBM 

12. jO Per MBM 




05 (M O O t^ O -+ 


■ji 

V 


m 

o 

3 

Q 


0000000(N0 


OOCOOOO 

o o o o o o o 




o 


oo oo 
o o o o 


o o oooo 
o o oooo 

(N (M — 01(M(M 




(M (N C^ — ' C<J (N (N 




ooooooooo 

O O O tO o o o o >^ 


2 2 2 i5 2 ^ 2 




?5 




r. ,? ?88? 




rc'- o c^t *.-: t^ c^ 


'- rc -r CO 1 t^ -r yi >t n -^ 




OOCOOOO-^O 

o o o o o o o o o 


o o o o 

(N<M 0<N 








o 


1 

88 88 18 8 888§ 


(M CO -f -?*-"-+ -t< -t< 


Tf< 0(M ^ 






^_ — 


■-C >~. .-".-ceo 


y 
5 


~ -r-^ -^ ■? ■-" 


O 

•X 1 
O i* X K> if 3 


-a 
o 
o 

y 


- y 

-o y 


.T3 


5 


y 
a_. 

II 


^ r- 
. X 


11 

be »- 

o u 
y o 


y . 


y 

-a . 

CO 
x"> 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


CO 


.— I 


OJ 


- 


IM 


Area 

sq. 

miles 


3 


s 


:i' 


3 


^N 




_y 

o 

n 
Q 


d 

S 

o 


d 

y 
y" 
£ 

y 

o 


X 

a 
II 


i 

-a 
c 
>% 


Dale 
Sold 
194G 


O 

u 
Q 


U 

y 
Q 


'J 

Q 


6 

y 

Q 


o 

CO 

d 

y 

Q 




!- 


C5 


05 

5 








CO 


eo 

Q 


1 

y 

Q 



184 



REPORT OP^ THE 



No. 3 



H 



H 



B 

O 

H 


$10.50 Per MBM 
7.00 Per MBM 
7.00 Per MBM 
6.00 Per MBM 


o o 
OO 

o o 




20.00 Per MBM 
17.00 Per MBM 
15.00 Per MBM 
17.00 Per MBM 
15.00 Per MBM 


13.50 Per MBM 
11.50 Per MBM 
11.50 Per MBM 
11.50 Per MBM 
9.00 Per MBM 
5.50 Per MBM 
11.00 Per MBM 


15.50 Per MBM 

9.00 Per MBM 

1.85 Per Cord 

. 85 Per Cord 




12.00 Per MBM 
10.00 Per MBM 

7.50 Per MBM 
10.00 Per MBM 

8.00 Per MBM 


8.50 Per MBM 
8.50 Per MBM 
6.00 Per MBM 


in 


o 

3 
Q 


oooo o o 

oooo (MO 
(MiM C^ (M 


2 . 50 
2.00 
1.50 
2.50 
2.00 


<M — (N !N (M (M -^ 


oooo 

O O -* M< 
(N(N --1 


ooooo 

o oooo 

(M(N -^ (N<M 


2.00 
1.50 
2.00 


If) 

a 


oooo o >o 

O O O 'O IN IM 

t^ <6 o CO 


ooooo 
o o o o o 

t^ O CO '^i CO 


ooooooo 
o o o o o o o 

t^ CD CO CO CO (N CO 


OOOO 
OOtJItJh 

00 CO 


OOOOO 

ooooo 
t>. o CO T}H eo 


6.00 
6.50 
3.00 


■a 


o 
o 










ooooo 
ooooo 

ddooo 


ooooooo 
o o o o o o o 

00 CO CO CO CO —1 CO 


OO 
OO 

o^ 






ooooo 
ooooo 

(M CO (N CO CO 


ooo 
ooo 


5 


Red& White I'ineLogs 
Spruce Logs 
Balsam Logs 
Hardwood Logs 

Cedar Poles 
21 to 30 Ft. 
31 to 40 Ft. 


Pine Logs 

Spruce & Balsam Logs 
Hemlock Logs 
Hardwood Logs 
Poplar Logs 


Red & W. Pine Logs 
Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Balsam Logs 
Birch and Ash Logs 
Poplar Logs 
Cedar Logs 


Red & W. Pine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 


Red cSc W. Pine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Hemlock Logs 
Hardwood Logs 
Poplar Logs 


Spruce Logs 
Jackpine Logs 
Poplar Logs 


T3 
C/) 

o 

c 
H 


c 
O 

? 5 

. u 
*■ cu 


S 

Oo 


L. Porteiance, 
5 Carleton St., 
Sudl)ur\-, On I. 


Id 


tn 

O . 
l-i ^ 

(T. C 




No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


- 


c^ ^ 


Oi 


CO 


- 


Area 

sq. 

miles 


^ 


\^' 


^T 


Ci 


:S^ 


- 


03 
O 
O 


d. 

X 

3 

o 


d 

tJiO 

IS 
c 

a> 
Q 


d 

c 

o 
Q 




d 

cC 

CG 


d 
is 

c 
o 


Date 
Sold 
1947 


CO 

' — . 


CO 

c 

03 


CO 




00 

c' 


o 


03 

Q 


|3 


- 










o 
o 

Q 


00 

G 


4) 

Q 






o 
o 

Q 


CO 

CM 

cJ 
o 

a 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



185 



bo 

■5 



c/) 



H 





$11.00 per MBM 
9.75 Per MBM 
9.75 Per MBM 


8.00 Per MBM 
8.00 Per MBM 
5.50 I'er MBM 


erMBM 
er MBM 
er MBM 
er MBM 
er MBM 

er Pole 
er Pok- 
er Pole 


er MBM 
er Cord 
er Cord 
er Cord 
er Cord 


erMBM 

er Cord 
er Cord 


iiiii 

U U. 1- U 1_ 

y y y y y 


o !>5 5 5 § S X 2 


o t-^ t-^ S -o 


O o o 

OXI> 


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2.00 


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3.50 


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Red & W. Pine Logs 
Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 


Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Poplar Logs 


Hemlock Logs 

Hardwood Logs 

Poplar Logs 

.Spruce & Balsam Logs 

Pine Logs 

Cedar Poles 

21 to 30 Feet 

31 to 40 Feet 

Mp to 50 Feet 


.Spruce Logs 
S|)ruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 
Hard Fuelwood 
.Soft Fuelwood 


Jackpine L(jgs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 


Pine Logs 

.Spruce <& Balsam Logs 
Hemlock Logs 
Hardwo(Kl Logs 
Cedar Logs 


o 

B 
o 


Milton Irvine, 
Bo.\ 109, 
Englcliart, Ont. 


William Gregory 
Charlton .Station, 
Ont. 




O 

x" 


Herbert A. Palmer, 
Charlton, Ont. 


5; — 
is k 

hi 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


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Area 

sq. 

miles 


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Sold 
1947 


5 


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ta 

1— > 



186 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



5 
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02 per Cu. Ft. 
03^ per Cu. Ft. 
02 per Cu. Ft. 
033^ per Cu. Ft. 

01 per Cu. Ft. 

02 per Cu. Ft. 
OlMperCu.Ft. 


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85 Per Cord 
75 Per Cord 


05 Per MBM 
50 Per MBM 
05 Per Cord 
05 Per Cord 
80 Per Cord 
55 Per Cord 


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90 Per Cord 
85 Per Cord 


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50 Per Cord 
75 Per Cord 
75 Per Cord 


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Jackpine Pulpwood 
Spruce Logs 
Spruce Pulp 
Spruce Logs 
Poplar Pulpwood 
Poplar Logs 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 


Spruce Logs 
Poplar Logs 
.Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 
Fuelwood (Hard) 
Fuelwood (Soft) 


o 
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Poplar Logs 
Jackpine Pulpwood 
Poplar 


Jackpine Logs 
Poplar Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
J. Pine Pit Props 
Poplar Pulpwood 
Birch Fuelwood 


-a 
o 

o 


Steinbach Lumber 

Yards 
Quibell, Ont. 


o 

<% 
o — 

O J= 


Thomas Moore, 
Smooth Rock Falls, 
Ont. 


Briscoe Bros., 
Box 103, 
Matheson, Ont. 


Messrs. H. G. 
Winslow and Sons, 
Kakabeka Falls, Ont. 


R. Sparks, 
Swastika, Onl. 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


CO 


(M 


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Area 

sq. 

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1947 


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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



181 





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188 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 6 





Timber Areas Abandoned in the Year Ending March 31, 1947 


Date Sold 


Date 

of 

Abandonment 


Localit}- 


Area 
-Scjuare 
Miles 


Licensee 


Kind of Timber 


Oct. 15/42 


Mar 


1/46 


Best Twp. 


IK 


A. J. Murphy Lbr. 

Co., 

Latchford, Out. 


Red and White Pine 
Spruce and Jack- 
pine Logs 


Sept. 4/29 


May 


1/46 


Area Iving West 
of W-2 


2 


Peter A. Legrow, 
242 N. Algoma St., 
Port Arthur, Ont. 


Jackpine Ties 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Jackpine Logs 


July 17/41 


May 


7/46 


Devitt Twp. 


M 


E. Comeau, 
Val Cote, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


May 25/45 


May 


1/46 


Rickaby and 
Lapierre Twps. 


2 


Sturgeon Tbr. Co., 
per P. A. Legrow, 
Box 506, 
Port Arthur, Ont. 


Jackpine Pulpwood 
Spruce Pulpwood 


Dec. 27/20 


May 


9/46 


Nichol Twp. 


36 


Booth Lumber Ltd., 
Ottawa, Ont. 


Red and White 
Pine Logs 


Dec. 27/20 


Ma> 


9/46 


Charters Twp. 


36 


Booth Lumber Ltd., 
Ottawa, Ont. 


Red and White 
Pine Logs 


Ma> 29/44 


May 


15/46 


B rower Twp. 


M 


T. B. Skidmore, 
Brower, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 


June 12/41 


Ma>- 


15/46 


Kendrey Twp. 


IK 


J. M. Charpentier, 
Driftwood, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


June 8/43 


Ma> 


29/46 


Morrisette Twp. 


4K> 


Haile^•bur\■ Luml)er 
Co., Ltd.," 
Haileybury, Ont. 


-Spruce Logs 
Jackpine Logs 
White Pine Logs 


Mar. 3/38 


May 


28/46 


Tudor Twp. 


>2 


H. C. Lloyd, 
Bannockburn, Ont. 


All Species 


Sept. 30/40 


Ma> 


28/46 


Tudor Twp. 


1 


H. C. Lloyd, 
Bannockburn, Ont. 


All Species 


Dec. 1/39 


Ma>- 


2/46 


Aberdeen- 
Additional Twp. 


M 


John 0. McLeod, 
Leeburn, Ont. 


All Species 


Mar. 20/40 


Max- 


23/46 


Skead Twp. 


Vo 


T. S. Woollings, 
Englehart, Ont. 


Spruce Logs 
Balsam Pulpwood 
Spruce Pulpwood 


Sept. 29/41 


June 


13/46 


Area unsurve\ed 
West of Redditt 
Twp. Designated 
as T.B. 48 


H 


A. Le\dier, 
Kenora, Ont. 


Spruce Logs 
Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Aug. 21/44 


May 


30/46 


Owens Twp. 


y^ 


F. Gallant, 
Val Rita, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Jan. 26/42 


June 


31/46 


Somerville Twp. 


M 


S. Bryant, 
Norland, Ont. 


All Species 


Sept. 22/41 


June 


17/46 


Williamson Twp. 


Vi 


J. E. Tremblaj', 
Harty, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


July 29/43 


June 


17/46 


Owens Twp. 


Yi 


W. Bergeron, 
Harty, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



189 



Table No. 6 



Timber Areas Abandoned in the Year Ending March 31, 1947 



Date Sold 


Date 

of 

Abandonment 


Locality 


Area 

Square 

Miles 


Licensee 


Kind of Timl)eT 


Aug. 16/43 


June 21/46 


Nansen Twp. 


M 


W. Lamontagne, 
Moonbeam, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Apr. 20/39 


June 21/46 


Tudor Twp. 


Ya. 


G. \V. Jones, 
Bancroft, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 


Jan. 22/38 


May 17/46 


Barrie Twp. 


% 


J. A. Newton, 
Arden, Ont. 


All Species 


Nov. 21/38 


July 15/46 


Firstbrook Twp. 


% 


S. Norfolk, 
Haileybur\ , Ont. 


Red and White 
Pine Logs 
Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Cedar Logs 


May 30/40 


July 8/46 


Crerar Twp. 


1 


Alfred Gignac, 
River Valley, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 


Nov. 12/40 


July 15/46 


Bayly and 
Skead Twps. 


Wz 


Robt. MacCallum, 
Earl ton, Ont. 


Spruce Logs 
Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 


May 17/45 


July 15/46 


Leith and 
Ray Twps. 


5 


W. H. Durrell, 
New Liskeard, Ont. 


All Species 


Dec. 30/40 


July 22/46 


Machin Twp. 


Va 


Arthur Gauthier, 
Fauquier, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Jan. 23/41 


Aug. 7/46 


Aweres Twp. 


% 


William Boston, 
SaultSte. Marie, 
Ont. 


Hardwood 


May 20/39 


Aug. 13/46 


Lake Twp. 


Vi 


W. J. McCoy, 
Eldorado, Ont. 


Maple Logs 
Basswood Logs 
Elm Logs 
.Spruce Logs 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Dec. 30/41 


Aug. 13/46 


Mayo Twp. 


Va 


Howard Hostler, 
Hermon. Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 
Maple Logs 
Spruce Logs 


Jan. 17/42 


Aug. 13/46 


Sabine Twp. 


1 


Judson A. Gunter, 
Princes Lake, Ont. 


Birch Logs 
Pine Logs 
Hemlock Logs 
Maple Logs 
Beech Logs 


Mar. 18/37 


Aug. 1.3/4() Sal line iwp. 


1^ 


Jud.son A. Gunter, 
Princes Lake, Ont. 


All Species 


May 22/40 


Aug. 19/46 


Richardson Twp. 


M 


Harvey Isberg, 
Sleeman, Ont. 


Jackpine Logs 
Jackpine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 
Spruce Pulpwood 



190 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 6 



Timber Areas Abandoned in the Year Ending March 31, 1947 



Date Sold 


Date 

of 
Abandonment 


Locality 


Area 
Square 
Miles 


Licensee 


Kind of Timber 


Jan. 13/25 


Aug. 19/46 


Gladman Twp. 


10 


L. B. Christie, 

Box 7, 24 Eraser St. 

North Bay, Ont. 


Red and White 
Pine Logs 
Cedar Poles 


Apr. 20/39 


Sept. 13/46 


Herschell Twp. 


1 


G. W. Jones, 
Bancroft, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Apr. 20/39 


Sept. 13/46 


Mayo and Ashby 
Twps. 


1 


G. W. Jones, 
Bancroft, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 


Apr. 20/39 


Sept. 13/46 


Wollaston Twp. 


% 


G. VV. Jones, 
Bancroft, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 
Popkir Pulpwood 


Nov. 29/43 


Sept. 13/46 


Hartman Twp. 


M 


G. L. Pidgeon, 
Wabigoon, Oni. 


Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Jackpine Pulpwood 


Nov. 12/40 


Sept. 13/46 


Montgomery and 
Patton Twps. 


Vi 


Wm. Laforge, 
Iron Bridge, Ont. 


Hardwood Logs 
Hemlock Logs 


Nov. 5/28 


Sept. 13/46 


Bond Twp. 


M 


J. W. Quirion, 
Con naught .Sin., 
Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Sept. 30/37 


Oct. 1/46 


Zealand Twp. 


H 


George H. Leach, 
Dryden, Ont. 


Jackpine Pulpwood 
Spruce Pulpwood 


Oct. 27/43 


Oct. 8/46 


Ha>cock Twp. 


H 


John Shamlock, 
Box 944, 
Kenora, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 


Nov. 27/44 


Oct. 10/46 


Janes Twp. 


iH 


Mattawa Wood 
Products, Ltd., 
North Bay, Ont. 


Jackpine Pulpwood 


Oct. 30/39 


Oct. 11/46 


Clement and 
Scholes Twp. 


17 


Geo. Gordon & 
Co., Ltd., 
Cache Bay, Ont. 


Red and White 
Pine Logs 


Nov. 12/37 


Oct. 8/46 


Galbraith Twp. 


K 


Murray Bean, 
Bruce Stn., Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


July 25/41 


Oct. 8/46 


Radcliffe Twp. 


K 


F. A. Smaglinskie, 
Wilno, Ont. 


Poplar Pulpwood 


Aug. 17/38 


Nov. 25/46 


Doyle Twp. 


5 


John W. Fogg, Ltd., 
Timmins, Ont. 


Red and White 
Pine Logs 
Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 


Dec. 20/40 


Dec. 2/46 


Melick Twp. 


M 


John Wyder, 
Box 352, 
Kenora, Ont. 


Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Nov. 3/42 


Nov. 28/46 


Between Twps. 
83 and 84 


2 


J. Cebrario, 
Schrieber, Ont. 


Spruce Logs 
Jackpine Logs 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 



191 



T.\BLE No. 6 



Timber Areas Abandoned in the Year Ending March 31, 1947 



Date Sold 


1 

Date 1 

of Locality- 
Abandonment 


Area 
Square 
Miles 


Licensee 


Kind of TinilxT 


Dec. 4/39 


Dec. 27/46 \ictoria Twp. 


1 


J. Whalen, 
Walford, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Oct. 11/41 


Mar. 31/46 


Denbigh Twp. 


Yi 


Frank Edwards, 
Denbigh, Ont. 


All Species 


Nov. 23/43 


.Mar. 31/47 


Head Twp. 


^Vi 


Emil & Albert 

Zadow, 

670 Pembroke St.W. 

Pembroke, Ont. 


Red and White 
Pine Logs 
Poplar Logs 


Nov. 23/36 


Mar. 3/47 


Parcels 1, 2, 3 & 4 
on South Arm of 
Kenogamis Lake 


9 


Lars Lahti, 
Geraldton, Ont. 


Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 



Table No. 7 





Timber Areas Transferred durin 


g the year ending March 31 


1947 


Date Sold 


Date 
Transferred 


Localit}- 


Area 
Square 
Miles 


Transferee 


Kind of Timber 


.Mar. 1/27 


Apr. 10 46 


Beniah, Menapie 
and Thorning 
Twps. 


143,1-^ 


A. E. Wicks, Ltd., 
Cochrane, Ont. 


Spruce Logs 
Balsam Logs 
Spruce, Balsam and 
other Pulpwoods 


Dec. 18/44 


June 4/46 


Twp. 28 


4 


Armour & 
Graham, Ltd., 
24 King St. W., 
Toronto, Ont. 


Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Jackpine Pitprops 
Spruce Pitprops 


Jan. 3/45 


June 17/46 


Han Ian Twp. 


13^ 


Leonides Boisvert, 
La Sarre, Que. 


Poplar Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Apr. 26/37 


June 7/46 


Adrian Twp. 


6M 


Nicholas Enders, 
Kakabeka Falls, 
Ont. 


White Pine Logs 
Spruce and Balsam 
Pulpwood 
Birch, Spruce and 
Balsam Logs 
Birch Fuelwood 


May 16/45 


July 11/46 


Rupert and 
Esnagami Twps. 


15 


Donald A. Clark, 
Port Arthur, Ont. 


Jackpine 


Jan. 12/07 


June 19/46 


Montreal River 
I'ulp Cone. 


1152 


E. B. Eddy Co., 
Hull, Que. 


Spruce, Balsam and 
other Pulpwood 


May 30/40 


Sept. 5/46 


Area in vicinity of 
Nulla Lake 


1 


Harry Thomas, 
Port Arthur, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 
Pine Timber 
Spruce Logs 
Balsam Logs 



192 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 7 





Timber Areas Transferred durin 


g the year ending March 31 


1947 


Date Sold 


Date 
Transferred 


Locality 


Area 
Square 
Miles 


Transferee 


Kind of Timber 


Jan. 20/43 


Sept. 5/46 


Black Twp. 


6 


E. V. Woollings, 
Englehart, Oni. 


Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam I'ulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 


Nov. 26/45 


Jan. 13/47 


Cochrane Twp. 


\K 


K. W. Biglow, 
Devon, Ont. 


Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Pitprops 
Jackpine Pitprops 


July 18/46 


Nov. 5/46 


Eby Twp. 


H 


Chas. Marshall, 
Swastika, Ont. 


Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Dec. 18/87 


Oct. 15/46 


Livingstone Twp. 


4M 


National Lumber 
Co., Ltd., 

80 Richmond St. \V. 
Toronto, Ont. 


All Species 


Feb. 28/44 


Jan. 13/47 


North Indian 
Res. No. 23 


6 


Eric Pearson and 
Paul Engblom, 
Fort Frances, Ont. 


Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Poplar Logs 
Jackpine Pulpwood 


Jan. 11 37 


Nov. 28/46 


MacLennan Twp. 


3M 


Del Doaust and 
John Morbin, 
Skead, Ont. 


Red and White 
Pine Logs 
Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Poplar Pulpwood 
Spruce Pulpwood 


Nov. 1/46 


Dec. 21/46 


Little Twp. 


1% 


Feldman Timber 
Co. Ltd., 
Schumacher, Ont. 


Spruce Logs 
Poplar Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 


Dec. 9/35 


Jan. 27/47 


Pense Twp. 


1 .-, 


Ben Crick, 
Hilliardton, Ont. 


White Pine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 


Oct. 4/39 


Jan. 27/47 


Pense Twp. 


1% 


Ben Crick, 
Hilliardton, Ont. 


Red and White 
Pine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Birch Logs 


Sept. 19/45 


Nov. 19/46 


Phelps Twp. 


9 


Pannill Lumber 
Co. Ltd., 
42 Edward St., 
Kitchener, Ont. 


Hardwood Logs 
Hemlock Logs 
Spruce Logs 


1895-96 


June 24/46 


Pentland Twp. 


24 Ji 


Staniforth Lumber 

Co., 

437 James St., 

Montreal, Que. 


All Species 


1878-79 


Jan. 13/47 


La van t Twp. 


im 


MarvC. Herron, 
R.R.'2, 

Lanark, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


Dec. 16/46 


Anstruther Twp. 


oVa 


Ernest Caldwell, 
Hockley, Ont. 


All Species 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 194: 



193 



Table No. 7 





Tim 


xr Areas Transferred during the year ending March 3 


. 1947 


Date Sold 


Date 

Transferred 


Locality 


Area 
Square Transferee 
Miles 


Kind of Timber 


1878-79 


Sept. 


26/46 


Admaston Twp. 


2V4 


M. E. McXulty, 
Mt. St. Patrick, 
Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


Jan. 


13 47 


Berth 17.5 


18 


L E. Proxencher, 
Blind River, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


Nov. 


19 46 


Bethune Twp. 


m 


Frank H. Harris 
Lumber Co. Ltd., 
Excelsior Life Bldg., 
Toronto, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


Max- 


19 46 


South Canonto 
Twp. 


IK 


B. \V. and 0. E. 

Rothwell, 
Lanark, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


May 


19,46 


South Canonto 
Twp. 


2 


B. \V. and 0. E. 

Rothwell, 
Lanark, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


June 


3 46 


Pts. Burnaby, 
Hebert and 
Eldridge Twps. 


Gillies Bros, and 
50 Co. Ltd., 

Braeside, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


June 


3 46 


Pts. Flett, 
Angus and 
Parkman Twps. 


36 


Gillies Bros, and 
Co. Ltd., 
Braeside, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


June 


3 46 


Pts. LaSalle, 
Angus, McAusland, 
and Parkman 
Twps. 


59 


Gillies, Bros, and 
Co. Ltd., 
Braeside, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


June 


3 46 


Pts. Wyse, 
Parkman and 
McAusland Twps. 


36 


Gillies Bros, and 
Co. Ltd., 
Braeside, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


June 


3 46 


Ft. Parkman 
Twp. 


17.1 2 


Gillies Bros, and 
Co. Ltd., 
Braeside, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


May 


19 46 


South Canonto 
Twp. 


Vi 


B. \V. and O.E. 
Rothwell, 
Lanark, Ont. 


\\\ -Species 


1890-91 


May 


19/46 


South Canonto 
Twp. 


4J4 


B. \V. and O. E. 
Rothwell, 
Lanark, Ont. 


All Species 


July 30 46 


Jan. 


9/47 


Sheraton Twp. 


2M 


Bouchard Timber 

Co.. 

125 Wilson Ave., 

Timmins, Ont. 


Jackpine Logs 
Poplar Logs 
Jackpine Pulp wood 
Poplar Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Jackpine Fuelwood 
and Pitprops 


Aug. 15/46 


Jan. 


9/47 


Sheraton Twp. 


Wz 


E. Mainvilie, 
66 Main St., 
Timmins, Ont. 


Jackpine Logs 
Jackpine Fuelwood 
Jackpine Pitprops 



194 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1947 No. 3 



Table No. 7 





Timber Areas Transferred during the year ending March 31 


1947 


Date Sold 


Date 
Transferred 


Area 
Locality Square 
Miles 


Transferee 


Kind of Timber 


Prior to 
1879 


June 21/46 


Berth 107 36 


K.V.P. Co. Ltd., 
Kalamazoo, Mich., 
U.S.A. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


June 21/46 


Bigelovv Twp. 3% 


K.V.P. Co. Ltd., 
Kalamazoo, Mich., 
U.S.A. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


June 21/46 


Acheson Twp. 36 


K.V.P. Co. Ltd., 
Kalamazoo, Mich., 
U.S.A. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


June 21/46 


Vernon Twp. 36 


K.V.P. Co. Ltd., 
Kalamazoo, Mich., 
U.S.A. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


June 21/46 


Hyman Twp. 36 


K.V.P. Co. Ltd., 
Kalamazoo, Mich., 
U.S.A. 


All Species 


Prior to 

1879 


June 21/46 


Tottcn Twp. 36 


K.V.P. Co. Ltd., 
Kalamazoo, Mich., 
LI.S.A. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


June 21/46 


Porter Twp. 36 


K.V.P. Co. Ltd., 
Kalamazoo, Mich., 
U.S.A. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


Feb. 17/47 


Stanhope Twp. 5 


Hodgson Jones 
Lumber Co. Ltd., 
320 Bay St., 
Toronto, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


Feb. 17/47 


Sherbournc Twp. lOM 


Hodgson Jones 
Lumber Co. Ltd., 
320 Bay St., 
Toronto, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


Feb. 17/47 


Stanhope Twp. 11 


Hodgson Jones 
Lumber Co. Ltd., 
320 Bay St., 
Toronto, Ont. 


All Species 


Prior to 
1879 


July 17/47 


Pts. Eddy, Jocko, 50 
Clarkson, W'yse 
and Poitras Twps. 


Guelph Cask, 
Veneer & Phwood 
Co. Ltd., 
Scotstown, Ont. 


All Species 


Feb. 5/45 


Mar. 20/47 


McFadden Twp. 12 


Chesterville Mines 

Ltd., 

330 Bay St., 

Toronto, Ont. 


White Pine Logs 
Red Pine Logs 
Jackpine Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Spruce Pulpwood 
Balsam Pulpwood 




INISTER OF LANDS 

' AND FORESTS " 

I 

OF THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



For the Fiscal Year ending 

MARCH 31, 1948 

PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by Baptist lohnston, . . 

Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty Ks^^' mI^- 









mt-^i 



REPORT 

OF THE 

Minister of Lands and Forests 

OF THE 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

For the Fiscal Year ending 

March 31, 1948 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 3, 1949 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by Baptist Johnston, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1949 



To His Honour, 

The Lieutendut-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

The undersigned begs respectfulh' to present to xour Honour, the Annual 
Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for the fiscal year April 1, 1947, 
to March 81. 1948. 

H. R. Scott, 

Minister. 



C O X T E X T S 

Page 

Introduction 5 

Division of Accounts 7 

Division of Air Service 15 

Division of Fish and Wildlife 21 

Division of Forest Protection 35 

Division of Land and Recreational Areas 45 

Division of Law 53 

Division of Operation and Personnel 55 

Division of Reforestation 63 

Division of Research 67 

Division of Surveys and Engineering 71 

Division of Timber Management 81 



4] 



REPORT 

OF THE 

MINISTER OF LANDS AXD FORESTS 

OF THE 

PROMXCE OF ONTARIO 
For the Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1948 



The work of the Department is dealt with in the following pages under 
the names of the various Divisions as follows: 

The Division of Accounts 

The Division of Air Service 

The Division of Fish and Wildlife 

The Division of Forest Protection 

The Division of Land and Recreational Areas 

The Division of Law 

The Division of Operation and Personnel 

The Division of Reforestation 

The Division of Research 

The Division of Surveys and Engineering 

The Division of Timber Management 

All events of note are recf)r(k'(l under the above headings. 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




A Bp:avkr Kit Exploring the Top of His Lodge 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



UniSION OF ACCOUNTS 



General 

The financial report sets out a substantial increase — $438,832. — in expendi- 
ture appropriation of the Department as compared with the previous \ear. This 
increased appropriation was required for: — 

(1) Extra Fire Fighting. 

(2) Expansion in the field work of the Fish and Wildlife, Timber Manage- 
ment, and Reforestation Divisions. 

Accounting for the Division of Air Service was re-organized as of 1st April 
1947. The result of this re-organization is illustrated b>- the several accounting 
statements appearing herein, particularh- those having reference to the detailed 
costs of operating. 

FLXAXCIAL REPORT 

1. Cash Receipts and Disbursements: 

The following summarizes the result of operations for the vear ending 
March 31, 1948: 

Total— Cash Receipts $10,682,403.47 

Total— Cash Disbursements 7,598,611.94 



Excess of Receipts over Disbursements $3,083,791.53 

2. Com piirison of Results ivith Those of Prior Years: 

(a) Receipts 

In Schedule A, page 10, cash receipts for the >ear under re\ie\\ ha\e been 
compared with those of the previous four years. This data ma\- be summarized 
as follows: 

'W'ars ending March 31st 
Division 1944 1945 194(i 1947 1948 

d^ J> C> d> ^ 

.lb .f .IP 'lb ^ 

.\ccounts — 

Water Power Kemals 

Provincial Land Tax 

Long Lac Diversion 

Miscellaneous 

.\ir .Service 

Fish & Wildlife (1944-47) 

(Game i!v: Fisheries Dept.) 

Forest I'roiection 

Land and Kecreationai .Areas 

Reforestation 

Surveys 

Timber Management 

Lignite I )c\-cj()()niciii 



618,901 


609,425 


654,979 


680,568 


694,859 


].-)8,74.-) 


175,342 


209,459 


204,475 


185,470 


21,750 


21,300 


20,850 


20,400 


19,950 


5,939 


20,388 


9,048 


46,071 


24,825 


19,448 


12,417 


25,284 


15,258 


8,376 


975,073 


1,193,034 


1,651,166 


2,248,201 


2,420,()61 


22,917 


26,850 


30,943 


4().402 


53,230 


273,754 


294,308 


338.258 


430,644 


393,938 


26,138 


10,5.-)9 


19,3X() 


25,373 


25,562 


13,293 


1,275 


459 


I ,()52 


.-)01 


4,561,734 


4,241,581 


5,.5.54,781 


(),944,104 


6,8.55,031 


16 











6,697,708 6,606,479 8,514,613 10,663,148 10,682,403 



8 REPORT OF THE No. 3 

(b) The following is a comparison of total disbursements for the five years 
ending March 31^ 1948: 

Years ending March 31st 

1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 

(P d> © (J- ffi* 

$ .J) •If •!> 'JP 

Department of Lands and Forests 

Total Disbursements — 

Chargeable to Appropriation as 

voted 3,040,901 3,572,225 3,988,394 5,961,806 7,598,612 

Additional Disbursements — 

Uncontrollable items chargeable 

to Special Warrants 1 1 1 .000 

Department of Game and Fisheries 
Total Disbursements — 

Chargeable to Appropriation as 

voted 574,525 638,765 748,661 1,197,974 

Total Disbursements 3,615,426 4,210,990 4,848,055 7,159,780 7,598,612 



TREND OF DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

TIMBBH RETURNS-CROWN DUES-GROUND RENT & FIRE TAX CHANGES 

FO/? THE FIVE YEARS ENDING 31 MARCH 1948 
7 




^S.JS4.78l 



1947 

^e.S44.io4 



1946 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



900 



800 



700 



Q^ 600 

< 



o 

^ 500 



to 

o 



400 



I^ 300 



200 



100 



TREND OF 
DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

WATER POWER RENTALS 

CR.OWN LAND SALES AND RENTALS 

PROVINCIAL LAND TAX 

FOR THE FIVE YEARS ENDING 31 MARCH 1948 




WATER POWER RENTA 



CROWN LAND SALES 



AND 



PROVI 



RENTALS 



NCIAL LAND 



TAX 



944 



1945 



1946 



1947 



1948 



10 



rp:port of the 



No. 3 



Schedule A 



DEPARTMENT OF 
COMPARISON OF RECEIPTS FOR 



Division of Accounts 

Water Power Rentals 

Provincial Land Tax 

Long Lac Diversion 

Refunds — Re Flowage Easements 

Casual Fees, Etc 

Gait Lease ■ ■ ■ 

Contractor's Security Deposit on Forest Insect Laboratory Construction 

Project 

Contractor's Security Deposit on Forest Ranger School 

Contractor's Security Deposit on Forest Resources Inventory 

Contractor's Security Deposit on Petawawa Forest Access Road 



1944 



Division of Air Service 
Miscellaneous 



Division of Fish and Wildlife 

Licenses, Royalty, Sundry (1944-47 Game and Fisheries Dt'in.) 



Division of Forest Protection 
Miscellaneous 



Division of Lands and Recreational Areas 

Land Sales 

Land Rentals (Other than Parks) 

Park Revenue — Including Park Rentals 

Algonquin 

Rondeau 

Quetico 

Ipperwash Beach 

Miscellaneous Revenue 



Division of Reforestation 
Miscellaneous 



Division of Surveys 

Lac Seul Storage Dam 

Aerial Surveys — Net Receipts 



Division of Timber Management 

Crown Dues, Ground Rent, Fire Tax. Etc. 

Lignite Development 

Miscellaneous 



Total Receipts 



618,901.26 

158,744.95 

21,750.00 

93.76 

2,924.52 

2,921.00 



805,335.49 



19,448.31 



975,072.60 



22,916.40 



118,745.26 
107,517.94 

22,422.-53 
15,201.66 

6,435.81 
235.80 

3,195.43 

273,754.43 



26,137.92 



11,685.22 
1,607.26 

13,292.48 



4,-561,733.49 



16.44 
6,697,707.56 



DEPARTMEXT OF LANDS AXD FORESTS FOR 1948 



11 



LAXDS AXD FORESTS 

5 YEARS EXDLXG MARC^H 31, 1948 



Schedule A 



1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


S 609,425.12 

175,341.55 

21,300.00 


$ 654,978.77 

209,459.44 

20,850.00 


$ 680,568.56 

204,474.57 

20,400.00 


$ 694,859.07 

185,470.29 

19,950.00 


4,719.34 
669.00 


9,047.69 


11,070.65 


13,825.05 


15 000.00 












20,000.00 
15,000.00 














11,000.00 










826,455.01 


894,335.90 


951,513.78 


925,104.41 


12,416.85 


25,284.13 


15,258.36 


8,376.00 


1,193,033.72 


1,651,165.66 


2,248,200.65 


2,420.661.17 


26,850.25 


30,942.78 


46,401.74 


53,229.92 


155.219.01 
89,484.59 

19,573.53 
15.152.86 

7,572.01 
623.15 

6,683.40 


193,061.14 
90,988.56 

23,759.48 
15,017.47 

8,868.97 
575.50 

5,986.66 


261,865.96 
98,893.17 

31,238.23 

15,998.64 

13.755.06 

1,238.25 

7,655.05 


215,151.77 
108,676.48 

32,324.38 

17,400.74 

1,072.03 

2,111.94 

17,200.79 


294,308.55 


338,257.78 


430,644.36 


393,938.13 


10,558.66 


19,386.47 


25,373.17 


25,562.25 










1,274.94 


458.95 


1,651.44 


500.61 


1,274.94 


458.95 


1,651.44 

6,944.104.39 


500.61 


4,241,581.00 


5,554,781.31 


6,855,030.98 
















6,606,478.98 


8,514,612.98 


10,663,174.89 


10,682,403.47 









12 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



13 



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14 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 







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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 15 



DIXISION OF AIR SERVICE 



General 



During the fiscal period involved, the Service took out a Class 5 Licence 
as issued by the Air Transport Board. This licence permits of our engaging in, 
for hire, an>- t\pe of emergenc>- or philanthropic fixing, as well as a certain 
limited amount of co-operation with timber operators. 



New Construction and Expansion 

Construction has been started on a splendid new addition to the Air Service 
hangar and work shops. At the time of reporting, this work is well on its wax- 
to completion. 

The Department of Public Works built for the Department of Lands and 
Forests, three new summer staff cottages at Orient Ba>-, as well as two at Port 

Arthur and two at Geraldton for all-\ear-round occupanc\-. 

The Air Service also constructed from materials which had been on hand 
for a couple of years, one summer staft' cottage at Caribou Lake. 



Equipment 

Three new Norseman seaplanes were delix'ered in the earl\- spring of 1947. 
One was lost on ojjcrations at Poshkokagan Lake duiing the summer. 

The 1 )epartm(.-nt was able to interest a (^madian manufacturer in the 
design and development of a semi-suppression bush seaplane, designed and 
built to a specification laid down by our own Department. The Beaver is now 
actualK- licensed for w heels, skis and fioats and is in i)roduclion. This se.iplane 
gives ever\- evidence of unusualK' fine performance and the Department has 
presenth' placed an order for twelve to be delivered as quickh' as the>- can be 
manufactured. 

During the same period, the I)e|)artment |)urch.isc-(l six w ai-suri)lus I l.u'xards 
for the express i)urpose of recox'ering the engines, ijropellers and instruments. 

A change has been made in icspect of servicing aircraft radio t-cpiiijuient. 
Two specially trained men of the Radio .Section of the l)i\ision of i-'orest Pro- 
tection were assigned to this important work; one with headquarters at Sault 
Ste. Marie and the other at our Western Divisional Headquarters at Sioux 
Lookout. .All aircraft radio ser\icinu was done l)\ these two men. 



16 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Wifiter Operations 

Normal winter operations were again carried out from Algonquin Park, 
Quetico Park, Gogama and Sioux Lookout. 



Maintenance of Service Buildings 

Normal maintenance of Service property and buildings was carried out 
as usual. 



Accidents 

It is a pleasure to report that there were no serious accidents to any of our 
personnel during the period dealt with. 



Neiv Housing Statistics 

Permanent Dwellings 4 

Summer Dwellings 4 

Type of Construction Frame 

Approximate Accommodation (in each) Family of 4 

The following tables are submitted as supplementary' to this Report: 

Table I — Allocation of Aircraft. 

Table II — Hours Flown on \'arious Phases of Fhing Operations. 

Table III— Totals. 

Table IV — Flying Time — Pilots. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



17 



TABLE No. I 



Allocation of Aircraft 

1947-48 

Base Registration Type 

Algonquin Park CF'-BGN Stinson 

Biscotasing CF-OBF Norseman 

Caribou Lake CF'-OBP Norseman 

Fort Frances CF-OBM Norseman 

Geraldton G-CAPA Moth 

Gogama G-CAPB Moth 

Ignace CF-BGM Stinson 

Kenora CF-OBO Norseman 

Oba Lake CF-OBH Norseman 

G-CAOW Moth 

Orient Bay CF-OBL Norseman 

CF-OBQ Norseman 

Pa\s Plat CF-OAW Stinson 

Parr\- Sound CF-BGJ Stinson 

Pickle Lake - CF-OBR Norseman 

Port Arthur CF-OBE Norseman 

Red Lake CF-OBD Norseman 

Remi Lake CF-OAY Stinson 

Sank Ste. Marie CF-OBI Norseman 

CF'-OBA Stinson 

Sioux Lookout CF-OBG Norseman 

C^F-OBB Stinson 

CF-OBJ Norseman 

South Porcui)ine CF-OB(" Norseman 

Sudbury GI-OAP I'^airchikl 71 

CF-OAS Buhl 

Timagami GI"-() W Stinson 

Twin Lakes CF-OBN Norseman 

G-CAOL Moth 

I "oronlo CF-BLM Stinson 



18 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



TABLE No. II 



Hours Flown on V.\rious Phases of Flying Oper.\tions 



192-4-47 



1947-48 



Total 



Fire Detection 

Game Conservation (Fish and Wildlife). . 

Fire Suppression 

Photography 

Sketching 

Transportation — Ordinary- 

Transportation — Special 

Mercy Flights 

Ferrying 

Forced Landings 

Fhing Instruction 

Observers Instruction 

Operations 

Tests — Aircraft 

Dusting Operations — Ont. Govt 

Dusting Operations — B.C. Govt 

Tests — Radio 

Department of Entomology 

Department of Research (Sulphur Fimies) 



566.20 
863.20 
045.16 
413.20 
087.33 
,857.00 
,043.47 
314.32 
,538.07 
943.49 
,977.02 
94.09 
,694.53 
,574.47 
326.05 
86.20 
85.40 
302.00 
250.35 



154,064.35 



1,784.45 

724.00 

1,895.15 

.20 

45.45 

2,938.45 

312.50 

15.45 

276.25 

72.40 

8.50 

268.15 
31.50 



2.40 

81.35 

187.20 



8,647.00 



45,351.05 

1,587.20 

37,940.31 

1,413.40 

4,133.18 

43,795.45 

8,356.37 

330.17 

6,814.32 

1,016.29 

2,985.52 

94.09 

5,963.08 

1,606.37 

326.05 

86.20 

88.20 

383.35 

437.55 



162,711.35 



TABLE No. Ill 



Totals 



Passengers Carried 

Personnel Carried 

Total Passengers and Personnel Carried 

Effective Loads Flown, Lbs 

Effective Loads Flown, Tons 



1924-47 



121,249 

80,055 

201,304 

42,877,091 

21,438T 

1,091 lbs. 



1947-48 



17,962 

3,932 

21,894 

4,821,225 

2,410T 

1,225 lbs. 



Total 



139,211 

83,987 

223,198 

47,698,316 

23,849T 

316 lbs. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



19 



TABLE Xo. IV 



Flying Time — Pilots 



Pilots 



1924-47 


1947-48 


Total 


91.20 


395.50 


487.10 


1.790.40 


302.10 


2,092.50 


2,933.40 


62.15 


2,995.55 


1,4.52.20 


203.50 


1,656.10 




278.05 


278.05 


240.40 


355.55 


596.35 


215.05 


408.15 


623.20 


2,486.50 


186.30 


2,673.20 


849.40 


297.55 


1,147.35 


1.033.40 


303.30 


1.337.10 


2,275.05 


66.50 


2,341.55 


4,729.30 


214.40 


4.944.10 




264.55 


264.55 




304.00 


304.00 


943.05 


222.20 


1.165.25 


388.05 


307.40 


695.45 




143.05 


143.05 


2,777.00 


274.40 


3,051.40 


3,267.05 


199.55 


3.467.00 


440.20 


26.15 


466.35 


1,158.40 


386.35 


1,545.15 


1,958.40 


507.05 


2,465.45 


6,860.55 


343.15 


7.204.10 


1.845.50 


492.00 


2,337.50 


273.55 


220.30 


494.25 


1.421.25 


349.10 


1.770.35 


510.20 


209.55 


720.15 


871.20 


218.35 


1 .089.55 


3.526.20 


331.00 


3.857.20 


2,090.45 


238.40 


2.329.25 


4.150.50 


414.25 


4. .565. 15 


4,115.52 


117.15 


4.233.07 


9.15 




9.15 


99,356.23 




99,356.23 


154,064.35 


8,647.00 


162,711.35 



Bliss, \V. H. F. . . . 

Burtt. A. E 

Buckworth, W. B. 

Burton, E. C 

Burton, J. O 

Blockley, H. T.... 

Cooke, T. C 

CuUiton, J. P 

Denley. J. G. . 
Donnelh'. J. T. . . . 

Fiskar, U. W 

Gillard, M. \' 

Hallatt, H. M.. . . 

Hull. C. L 

Kincaid. J 

Kingdon. O. F. . . . 

Larden. J. K 

LeFeuvre, C. J. . . . 
MacDougall. F. A. 
Ponsford. G. P'. . . 

Pipe, J. T 

Parsons, R 

Phillips, G. H. R.. 

Poulin. L. D 

Reid. D. M 

Smith, A. B 

Siege!. J 

Speight. H. C 

Trussler, G. E. . . . 

Taylor, J. M 

Westaway, H. \V. . 

\\o(;dside, T 

Noorduvn Pilots.. 
AH Other Pilots. . 

Total 



20 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




A Raccoon Feeding on a Frog 



DEPARTAIEXT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 21 



DIMSIOX OF FISH AXD WILDLIFE 

Wildlife Management 
Migratory Birds 

The duck and goose population of Xorth America dropi)ed to a criticalh' 
low le\'el in the winter of 1946-47. 

The nimiber of da\"s shooting was cut from 23/^ months to 45 da\s. The 
bag limit for ducks was cut from 12 per day to 7 per da>'. The seasonal bag 
limit for ducks was removed and in its place a possession limit of 14 ducks was 
established. The seasonal bag limit for geese was retained at 25, but a pos- 
session limit of 15 was also enforced. 

A spring woodcock census, along lines developed b\" the Dominion Wildlife 
Ser\ice, was commenced this year. 

Upland Game 

The numbers and distribution of the various groujjs of pinnated grouse 
on Manitoulin Island were studied and majjped during the sunmier. 

Fur-Bearing Animals 

Statistics regarding the actual harvest of \arious species are gi\-en at the 
end of this report. 

Introduced Wildlife 

There was a general increase in the suppL' of pheasants in the whole Lake 
Erie area, from X'iagara to \\^indsor. In the Toronto region, on the other 
hand, pheasant populations remain very low. As the difference cannot be 
accounted for b>" differences in the distribution of hatchery stock which was 
spread over the whole area, it must be explained b\' a local improvement in the 
suppK of wild-hatched birds, which is still not general over the pheasant area. 

Hungarian Partridge are still not numerous enough to ]:)ro\-ide an open 
season . 

A sharp local decline in the numbers of European hare has focussed attention 
on that species. It has hitherto not manifested an\' major fluctuations in 
numbers. Because the decline is local it is hard to sa>' whether the cause is 
natural fluctuations or intensive hunting, but the "jacks" are certainK not able 
to stand up under heav\- hunting as well as the>' did in the past. 

Control of Cormorants 

Investigations carried out in 1946 rexealed that the population of Double- 
crested Cormorants on the Great Lakes and Lake of the Woods had ver\ laigelx 
increased during recent \ears. A circular report has been issued on this. 

Trap-line Managemoit 

During the 1947 Session the following new section w.is added to the (lainc 
and I'isheries Act: — 

8a — "A licence to trap fur-bearing animals on ( "row u lands shall be 

(1) subject to such limitations as to territor\ and tin- number of fur-bear- 
ing animals which ma\ be taken as the Minister max deem i)roper. 



22 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



(2) The Minister may limit the number of Hcences to be issued for any 
area of Crown land. 1947, Amendment." 

The purpose of this amendment was to give a legislative basis to the system 
of trap-line management wherein the trapping on any one area is carried out by 
one licensee only. Forms of licence and application were duly established by 
regulation, and the way was cleared for registering trap-lines on Crown lands 
in Ontario. 

An essential feature of trap-line management is the adjustment of the take 
of furs to the actual production. The basis for establishing this has to be a 
knowledge of the number of animals. For beaver this information is easy to 
obtain and is required from the trappers on their licence application form. A 
quota can likewise be fixed in the annual open season. In order to consolidate 
beaver management, the following section was added to the Act during the 1947 
Session of the Legislature: 

27 (la) "Beaver skins and pelts shall be sealed or marked by an officer 
before sale, and no fur dealer or buyer shall have unsealed or unmarked beaver 
skins or pelts in his possession. 1947, Amendment." 

SerialK' numbered lock seals of the box-car seal t\pe have been provided. 

A close estimate of the number of Trap-line Licences issued during the 
1947-48 trapping season is 5,215. This includes approximately 2,000 licences 
issued to Indian trappers on famih^ group trap-lines in the Patricia District 
and 250 to Indian trappers north of Cochrane. The breakdown by districts is 
as follows: — 

District Trap-line Licences 

Algonquin 40 

Chapleaii 275 

Cochrane 200+250 Indian 

Fort Frances 125 

Geraldton 100 

Gogama 150 

Kapuskasing 250 

Kenora 275 

Lake Simcoe 25 

North Ba\' 200 

Parry Sound 100 

Port Arthur 300 

Quinte 125 

Sault Ste. Marie 350 

Sioux Lookout 250+2,000 Indian 

Sudbury 200 

2,965 

On the whole the new regulations have worked out very well during the 
past trapping season and considering the number of licences issued comparatively 
few complaints have been received. Several minor changes to the regulations 
were recommended at the recent Specialists and Indian Agents meetings which 
can be put into effect in time for the next trapping season. 

Co-operation with Wildlife Management Institute 

The Department engaged in a pheasant scheme for Pelee Island in co- 
operation with the Wildlife Management Institute, Washington, D.C. 



DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS AXD FORESTS FOR 1948 23 



Wildlife Propagaliou 

Pheasants were raised under contract at the Department's farms at Xorman- 
dale and Codrington. In addition, deficiencies in our requirements were made 
up by purchase from private breeders. 22,000 pheasants were distributed. 

Wildlife Harvest 

Records returned b\' 161 hunters in the central "deer block" of Ontario 
show a kill of 69 deer, or 1 per 2.2 hunters, about the same as last year. The 
number of da\"s hunted was 1,201, so that 17 da\s were required to kill a deer, 
on the average, or one more da\' than the length of the season. In Bruce Count>", 
-47 hunters killed 27 deer in 237 da\s, which indicates somewhat better hunting. 
Other records not tabulated show that deer hunting was best in Manitoulin 
Island and near the Manitoba border. In some parts of the latter area an over- 
population of deer is indicated. Detailed tabulation of voluntary returns for 
biological anah'sis is deferred until their \-olume is great enough to give statisti- 
cally useful figures. 

There were 1,500 deer and 101 moose exported in 1947 through the port of 
Sault Ste. Marie. Through ports in the Rain\- River District there were exported 
304 moose, 3,860 deer, 188 bear and 2 caribou. The two caribou and an unknown 
proportion of the other game originated west of Ontario. 

On Xo. 11 Highway officers of the Department checked 9,570 returning 
hunters from X'ovember 12 to 25th, including 1,359 non-residents. The\" had 
killed 3,277 deer, 4 moose, 112 bears and 3 wolves. This makes 1 deer per 2.9 
hunters, probabh' more accurate a figure than that obtained from the small 
voluntar\- return sample, although it covers a smaller area. 

Road patrols in the Haliburton and Peterborough county areas checked 
1,478 hunters who had killed 787 deer, 27 bears and 1 wolf. This works out to 
1 deer per 1.9 hunters. The voluntary return previoush' cited covers all the 
areas touched by road checks, and the figures of 1 deer per 2.2 hunters and 1 per 
2.7 hunters may be compared. The latter is certainly more accurate. 

On Pelee Island there were 4,800 cock pheasants taken. Using the method 
of estimation by the sex-ratio before and after the shoot, the total population of 
pheasants on the island at the time of the shoot was 5,500 cock and 6,500 hen 
pheasants, a total of 12,000. 

The take of pheasants in the Toronto and Hamilton areas was extremeh' 
light, probably as low as it has ever been, but the kill in the Lake Erie region 
was higher than in years immediately preceding. The kill of ruffed grouse in 
the Province was evidenth' much greater than 1946, so that the low period of 
the grouse c\'cle ma\' be said to lia\e been [)assed. 

Wildlife Surveys 

During the summer two field parties carried out wildlife inventories of the 
counties of Lambton and Durham. These were for the purpose of obtaining 
accurate records of the condition of streams, j)onds, marshes, forests and fields 
with respect to wildlife, and the local interrelationships of physiography and 
land use with wildlife management. 

Fur Fiirniing 

During the calendar \ear 1947, 1,768 Fur Farmers' Licences were issued; 



24 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



1,389 being renewals of previous licences; 346 for newly-established fur farms 
and 33 licences were issued with retroactive provisions to legalize the possession 
of fur-bearing animals during the previous year. 

Departmental records show that during the fiscal year 1947-48, ranchers 
disposed of the fox and mink production in the following manner: 



Species 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Silver or Blacl<j 

Fox (Blue) 

Mink 

Total 



Exported 



Tanned 



Total Pelts 



6 

25,051 

2,081 

120,621 



147,759 



3 

2,458 

40 

5,208 



7,709 



9 

27,509 

2,121 

125,829 



155,468 



Wolf Bounty 

In accordance with the regulations made under The Wolf and Bear Bount\- 
Act, 1946, certain changes with respect to wolf bount\- procedure were im- 
plemented. 

Effective November 1st, 1947, the District Foresters, other than those 
located in counties, were appointed as officers authorized to accept and mark 
wolf pelts that are i)roduced as evidence to support claims for bounty. 

The pelts of wolves killed in counties continue to be marked at Head Office. 

In investing District Foresters with this power, it was felt that the necessar\- 
changes would modernize and bring wolf bount\- procedure in line with the 
general policy of the Department in decentralising administration duties. 

This change also carried with it benefits to all concerned, i.e., the applicant, 
District Office and Head Office. 

The wolf bount>- claim form was amended to embody the changes and 
separate forms are now in use for claiming bount\- on wolves killed in counties 
and on wolves killed in districts. 

A change with respect to the payment of claims b\- Count\- Treasurers on 
wolves killed in counties, was also implemented which provides a direct safeguard 
to County Treasurers. 

A uniform method of marking the pelts was adopted to ensure that the 
same pelt could not be resubmitted for bounty in another district. 

Under The WoU and Bear Bounty Act, 1946, a $25.00 bount\- on a timber 
or brush wolf three months of age or over and a $5.00 bounty on a timber or 
brush wolf under three months of age, is paid. 

The following is a comparative statement showing annual wolf t)oinU\- 
statistics for a period of five years, ending with the fiscal \ear 1947-48: 



DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS AXD FORESTS FOR 1948 



25 



Period 



Timber 



Brush 



Pups 



Total 



Bounty & 
Expenses 



For vear ending March 31, 


1944. .. 


J 1,302 


731 


32 


2,065 


$46,54.5.75 


For vear ending March 31, 


194.5. . 


1.321 


665 


12 


1,998 


45,993.58 


For vear endins; March 31, 


1946. . 


1,266 


777 


30 


2,073 


44,999.87 


For vear ending March 31, 


1947 . . . 


1,440 


1,182 


42 


2,664 


59,275.18 


For year ending March 31, 


1948 . . . 


1,515 


961 


74 


2,540 


54,923.38 



Bear Bounty 

There was a marked decrease in the iitimber of bears killed during the period 
covered by this report. 



1946-47 



1947-48 



Bears 



Cubs 



Bears 



Cubs 



959 



73 



509 



17 



TOTAL \ALUE OF PELTS EXPORTED OR TANNED 
During the year ending March 31, 1948 





Pelts 
Exported 


Pelts 
Tanned 


Total 
Pelts 


Value of 
Pelts 


Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher . 


70 

20.083 

1.133 

768 

14,363 

81 

118 

2 

615 

1 .289 

26,920 

568.404 

5,067 

21.468 

15.804 

38,754 

2 


267 

19 

26 

67 

3,611 

44 

8 

9 

27 

44 

718 

279.965 

985 

260 

2.52 

1 


337 

20,102 

1,159 

835 

17,974 

125 

126 

11 

642 

1,333 

27,638 

848,369 

15.072 

22.4.53 

Iti.Oii) 

.'3it 006 

3 


S 842.50 

671,406.80 

43.462..50 


Fox (Cross ) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 

Fox (White) 

Fox (Not Specilied ) 

Lvn.x 


4.358.70 

38,464.36 

1,793.75 

2.142.00 

23.54 
15,196.14 


\Iarten ... 


31.392.15 


Mink 

Muskrat . 


959.038.60 
2.010,634. .53 


Otter 

Raccoon 


124,771.20 
.56.132.50 


Skunk .... 


11,726.72 


Weasel 


69,430.68 


\\ olverine . 


30.00 






TOT.\L 


714,941 


286,308 


1,001,249 


$4,040,846.67 



ST.\TK.ME.\ T OF RA.NCH RAISED l'i:i.TS I-:Xl'ORi'l-:i ) OR TA.WED 
For the year ending March 31, 1948 





Pelts 
Exported 


Pelts 
Tanned 


Total 
Pelts 


\'aUie of 
Pelts 


Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 

Fox (Blue) 

Mink 


6 1 
25,051 
2,081 
120,621 


3 

2.458 

40 

5,208 


9 

27,509 

2,121 

125,829 


$ 46.98 

394.754.13 

32.345.25 

1,918,892.25 








ToT.M, 


1 «7.7.59 


7.709 


155,468 


$2,346,038.61 



26 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Enforcement 

A total in excess of $4,700.00 was realized from the sale of confiscated 
articles. 

Game Fish and Hatcheries Section 

During the \'ear, twenty-seven hatcheries and rearing stations were in 
operation. The following is a summary of the >ear's distribution. 

Brown Trout 

The 375,850 yearlings that were planted constitute an all time record for 
this species. There was an increase of 40% over the previous year's planting 
of yearlings. 



SUMM.ARY OF FI.SH DISTRIBUTIOX BY .\GE GROUPS 
April 1, 1947 to March 31, 1948 



Species 


Fry 


FiNGERLlNGS 


Yearlings 


Adults 


TOT.VLS 


W'hitefish 

Herrixg 


233.316,125 
23.940.000 
12,000,000 

254,030,000 
2,790,000 


11,540 

517,400 
3,467,645 

' 3,850 

579,925 

6,100 

59,000 


' 375,850 

2,802,150 

89,050 

16,100 


'"'l27 

' V.860 

■'ll5 

5,099 
876 




233,316,125 
23,940,000 


Perch 

Pickerel 


12,000,000 
254,030,000 


M.\SKIXON'GE 


2,801,667 


Brown Trout 


375,850 


Speckled Trout 




3,321,410 


Lake Trout ', 

K.\MLOOPs Trout 

R.viNBOw Trout 


3,556,695 

16,215 

3,850 


Smallmouth Bass 

Largemouth Bass 

Atlantic Salmon 


1,457,000 
305,000 


2,042,024 

311,976 

59,000 




527,838,125 


4,645,460 


3,283,150 


8,077 


535,774,812 



Commercial Fishing 

A total of 2,421 commercial fishing licences were issued in Ontario for 1947 
and the industry employed some 4,026 persons. The total production of all 
species of fish from these licences was 24,922,420 pounds, bringing in a revenue 
to the fishermen of S4. 803, 253. 97. In comparison the total catch for 1946 was 
33.000,119 pounds and the revenue to the fishermen was $5,597,028.88. The 
value of commercial fishing equipment, as reported for 1947, was $5,147,029.00. 
This shows an increase of $383,251.00 over the previous year's value of equipment. 

The overall picture of the market value of the catch to the fishermen for 
the year 1947 showed a value of $4,803,253.97. This was a decrease of $793,774.91 
as compared to the preceding year, 1946, which was $5,597,028.88. The decrease 
in the catch of Lake Herring in Lake Erie undoubtedly pla\ed a big part in this 
decline. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



27 



COMPARATIXE TABLE OF FISH DISTRIBUTION' ACCORDING TO SPECIES 

1943 to 1947 



Species 



1943 



1944 



1945 



1946 



1947 



Largemouth Bass 

Fry. 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings and Adults. 

S.MALLMOUTH BasS 

Fry. 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings and Adults. 

MASKIXOXGiE 

Fry. 

Fingerlings 

Adults 

Perch 

Fr>- 

Pickerel (Yellow) 

Fry 

Pickerel (Blue) 

Fr>- 

Brown Trout 

Eggs and Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Lake Trout 

Eggs and Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Rainbow Trout 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Kamloops Trout 

Yearlings 

Adults 

Speckled Trout 

Fn- 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Adults 

Whitefish 

Fry 

Herring 

Fry 

Minnows 

Adults 

Atlantic Salmon 

Fingerlings 



507,500 

38,500 

290 

1,512,000 

392,700 

1,369 

1,165,000 
2,150 



19,000,000 

263,875,000 

150,000 

10,000 

1,000 

303.335 

325,000 

8,048,800 

60,860 

73,242 
15,450 

5,000 



5,000 

9,400 

3,083,983 

10,292 

371,677,500 

24,560,000 



130,000 

14,600 

51 

2,030,000 

664,400 

2,834 

2,705,000 
2,952 



18,480,000 
271,265,000 



330,750 

3,176,500 

3,475,995 

44,108 

32,186 
3,900 

7,200 



493,840 

2,876,963 

4,360 

259,435,000 

5,662,000 

25,000 

30,000 



5,000 



448,000 

348,368 

5,322 

2,030,000 
200 



9,500 
27 

385,000 
312,710 

4,418 

1,150,000 
6,875 



50,000 

224,749 



765,000 

7,248,040 

88,700 

5,563 



9,900 

5,000 

117,300 

3,005,573 

4,467 

240,786,775 

6,405,000 

4,000 

41,350 



133,025 
268,940 

2,265,000 

3,609.195 

28,045 



1,610 



4,850 

50,000 

84,730 

2,760,780 

8,656 

205,590,000 

69,674,000 



88,210 



12,000,000 20,450,000 
177,595,000 ! 142,385,000 



305,000 

6,100 

876 

1,457,000 

579,925 

5,099 

2,790,000 

11,540 

127 

12,000,000 

254,030,000 



375,850 



3,467,645 
89,050 

3.850 



16.100 
115 



517,400 

2,802,150 

1,860 

233,316,125 

23,940,000 

59,000 



Totals 694,833,371 



570,892,549 



451,193,307 



449,270,571 



535,774,812 



28 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 



Commercial Fishing Investigations 

1. Baited Hook Lines — Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair 

Investigations were carried out during the summer to determine the effect, 
beneficial or otherwise, of the baited hooks, especiall}' catfish hooks, on (a) 
angUng (b) other commercial fishing. The results of this investigation would 
indicate that this is a suitable method for taking catfish and bullheads and does 
not interfere, in general, with either angling or other commercial fishing. 

The investigation in Lake St. Clair, where both catfish and sturgeon hooks 
are fished, indicated the desirabilitA" of issuing onh- one licence to cover the taking 
of both species of fish, rather than a separate licence for each species. 

2. Trout Hooks — Georgian Bay 

Some investigation of the operation of trout hooks in Georgian Bay was 
carried out but insufficient information was obtained to warrant the drawing of 
an>' conclusion. 

3. Blue Pickerel and Perch Fishiytg — Lake Ontario 

A short stud\ of this industry was made and the information obtained, 
while very limited, has ])roved valuable and indicates the size of mesh suitable 
for taking these fish in gill nets. 



Pollution Investigations 

The following waters were examined with reference to possible ix)llulion 
Laurel Stream at \\'aterloo 
Gengrich Stream at Baden 
Canagagigue Stream at Baden 
Speed River near Hespeler 
Spanish River near Espanola 
Seine River in Rainy Ri\er District 
Nith River at Xew Hamburg 
vSt. Lawrence River near (^ornwall 
Xation Ri\er at Chesterville, and 
Ottawa River near Ottawa. 



DEPARTMEXT OF LAXDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



29 



CO.MPARATIXK STATKMEXT OF THE \IKLI) OF THE FISHERIES 
OF ONTARIO HV LAKE 



Lake 



1946 
Pounds 



1947 
Pounds 



Increase 
Pounds 



Decrease 
Pounds 



Ontario 

Erie 

St. Clair 

Huron 

Georgian Ba\- 

North Channel 

Superior 

North Inland Waters. 
South Inland Waters. 



2.058.698 
18.92.5.344 

493,402 

953.799 
1,292.226 

289.710 
3,58S.6S9 
4,719,299 

678,952 



2,001,519 
12.333,922 

466,386 
1,106,986 

666,488 

266,640 
2,S29.606 
4,802.434 

448,439 



153,187 



83,135 



57,179 

6.591,422 

27,016 

625,738 

23,070 

759,083 

230,513 



Total 


33,000,119 


24,922,420 


236,322 


8,314,021 


Net Decrease 


1 




8 077 699 









COMPARATIXE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES 

OF ONTARIO 



Kind 



1946 
Pounds 




Increase 
Pounds 



Decrease 
Pounds 



Carp 

Catfish 

Caviare 

Eels 

Herring 

Mixed and Coarse. 

Perch 

Pickerel (Blue) . . . . 
Pickerel (Yellow) 

Pike 

Saugers 

Sturgeon 

Lake Trout 

Tullibee. 
Whitefish 



759,233 

629,695 

2,807 

51,484 

11,576,606 

3,843,559 

2,973.467 

1,972,265 

2.716,040 

1.015,624 

185,225 
2,514,489 

308,570 
4,451,0.55 



505 

667 

3 

35 

4,310 

3.566 

2,646 

1,752 

2,947 

1,020 

162 

176 

1,878 

305 

4,941, 



,749 

,185 

,164 

,734 

953 

,275 

911 

,695* 

395 

823 

808* 

675 

547 

742 

764 



37,490 
357 



231,355 
5,199 
162,808* 



490,709 



253,484 



15,750 

7.265,653 

277,284 

326.5.56 

219,570* 



8,550 

635,942 

2,828 



Totals 


1 33 000 1 1 9 


24,922,420 


927,918 


9,005,617 






Net Decrease 








8,077,699 







*Previous to 1947, .Saugers were grouped with Hlue Pickerel. In 1947. however, Saugers 
have been segregated iVorn Hhie Pickerel and listed scparateN'. 



30 



REPORT OF THE 



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32 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 



Biological Surveys 

A creel census was commenced in the Kawartha Lakes area and intensive 
studies were conducted on the maskinonge in its natural environment. 

Studies were made on the establishment of sanctuaries for smallniouth bass 
in the Georgian Bay region. 

By checking the commercial fishermen's chub nets in Georgian Ba\- and 
Lake Huron a surve\' was made to ascertain to what extent these nets catch 
Lake Trout. 

An investigation was conducted on East Lake, Prince Edward County, to 
determine the effect of commercial hoop net fishing on the game fish. 

A creel census was undertaken in Grey County to determine the proportion 
of hatchery-reared speckled trout in the angler's catch. 

A creel census programme was undertaken in the District of Thunder I3a\-. 

The experiment on Round Lake, Renfrew County to determine the effect of 
removal of coarse fish on the game fish population was continued. The lake was 
fished heavily during the summer and a large number of coarse fish removed. 

Operations for the control of the sea lamprey were continued. 

During the past few >ears, a pound net was set in the causeway leading to 
Osier Marsh in Lake Scugog, Ontario County, to control carp and stud>' maskin- 
onge and bass. 

During the summer, smallniouth bass adults were harvested from the 
following waters: — Cook's Lake, Thunder Bay District; Fox Lake, Kenora 
District; Little Gull Lake, Haliburton District; and Burnt Lake, Parry Sound 
District. 

In addition to these small mouth bass harvesting operations, one project 
was undertaken for the transfer of largemouth bass and maskinonge from Xogies 
Creek Sanctuary, Peterborough County. 

Biological investigations were made on a number of lakes and streams with 
a view to the establishment of a sound fish management plan. These were either 
initial surveys or an extension of a previous one. The w^aters studied were as 
follows: — 

Carleton County Nipissing District 

Sn\e River Blue I>ake 

„ , T-, • . ■ . Finlavson Lake 

Cochrane Dtstnct Laroche Lake 

Black River \\a ershed Loon Lake 

Brown Trout Lake Lake Timagami 

Clearvyater Lake ^^^^^^^ Lake 

Deep L,ake ^j^^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

Heart Lake McConnell Lake 
Ice L hisel Lake 

Kamiskotia Lake Ontario County 

Kesagami Lake Beaverton River 

Pexton Lake Black River 

Slab Lake Maskinonge River 

Red Sucker River St. John Lake 

Leg of Lamb Lake Uxbridge Brook 
Tom Lake 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



33 



Dufferin County 
Bear Creek 

Durham County 
Barkwell's Stream 

Frontenac County 
Fall River 
Granite Lake 
Little Round Lake 
Little Silver Lake 

Lanark County 
Adam Lake 
Barber Lake 
Bennett Lake 
Davern Lake 
Farren Lake 
Jebb Creek 
Little Silver Lake 
Long Lake 
Lower Rideau Lake 
McGowan Lake 
O'Brien Lake 

Leeds County 
L\"ndhurst Lake 

Lennox and Addington Cou)ity 
Cedar Lake 

Middlesex County 
Thames River 

ManitouUn District 
Lake Manitou 

Muskoka District 
(^rooked Lake 
Kahshe River 
Six Mile Lake 



Peterborough County 
Bottle Lake 
Stinson Creek 
Squaw River 

Prince Edward County 
East Lake 

Simcoe County 
Bass Lake 
Grouse Creek 
Hawkestone Creek 
Lake Couchiching 
Lover Creek 
Orr Lake 
Silver Creek 
Sparrow Lake 
Severn River 

Sudbury District 
Ramsa>" Lake 
Spanish River 

Timiskaming District 
Smith Lake 
Tay Lake 

Thunder Bay District 
. Annette Lake 
Dafoe Lake 
Fish Lake 
Forester Lake 
Little Long Lac 
Spectacle Lake 
Stillwater Creek 
Trout Creek 

York County 

Mount Albert Oeek 
Pefferlaw Brook 
X'ivian Creek 



34 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 




Fire Fighters Move a Pump up to a Relay Position on the Fireline 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 35 



DI\ISION OF FOREST PROTECTION 



Fire axd Hazard Conditions 

The 1947 fire season was marked b\' an abnormalK- low hazard in the spring 
and earh" summer, a normal hazard during the latter part of the summer and 
an unusualh' high hazard during the month of October. 

The number of fires which occurred, 1,393, is somewhat above the average 
number of 1,144 for the past five years but the area burned over, 84,032 acres, is 
well below the five >ear average of 93,139 acres. 

Fire ("ontrol Planning 

Progress in fire control planning during the year included the following 
projects: — 

1. Installation of 25 additional fire weather stations. 

2. First Edition of a 'T'orest Protection Manual" was completed, printed, 
and issued. 

3. First Edition of a "I'ire C^ontrol Planning Manual" was completed, 
printed, and issued. 

4. The "Area Seen Survey" was continued with four men taking part. 
Sixt>-nine towers were mapped in the following Districts: — Cochrane, 
Sudbury, (liapleau, dogama and j~)art of Sault Ste. Marie. 

5. Introduction of the use of the portable tower for tower location work in 
the Port Arthur District. 



Hazard Disposal 

No major hazard disposal projects were undertaken but some brush burning 
along telephone lines and roads was carried out and supervision given to a con- 
siderable amount of brush burning b\- settlers and woods operators along roads 
and around camps, etc. 

Insect Control 

The Dominion Department of Agriculture continued to administer the 
forest insect surve>- and to carr\- on investigative work in forest entomology 
in the I*ro\ince during the past \ear. 

The spruce budworm infestation continued during the year, particularh" in 
the vSioux Lookout, Cochrane and Kaj:)uskasing Districts and northern portion 
of the Sault Ste. Marie District. 



Expenditures 

I he total e\i)eiidit uics on hre protection lor the \car, excluding the cost ot 
-Administration and Air SciNice, was .|L91(). 124.26. The amount of fire tax 
collected from woods (jperators was $456,443.81. .Miscellaneous revenue 
amounted to $53,229.92. 



36 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Improvements 
Total Improvements Completed to March 31, 1948 

■ Cabins 561 

Storehouses 150 

Boathouses 61 

Combined Storehouses and Boathouses 14 

Bunkhouses 64 

Offices 36 

Garages and Car Houses 92 

Other Buildings 220 

Hose Towers 51 

Wooden Lookout Towers 56 

Steel Lookout Towers 234 

Telephone Lines (Miles) 3,956 

Radio Communications 
Radio Sets in Use 1947 

Tower Sets 179 

Portable Sets 17 

Boat Sets 6 

Pack Sets 6 

Model 30 43 

Model 150 4 

Model 300 7 

Model 32RA 1 

Aircraft 22 

Total 285 

Index of Tables 
Table No. Page 

1 Classification of forest fires, by month 37 

2 Classification of forest fires, by origin 37 

3 Classification of forest fires, by size 38 

4 Classification of land burned over, by ownership 38 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



37 



5 Classification of area burned over, by month 39 

6 Classification of area burned over, by origin 40 

7 Statement of travel jjermits issued, 1947 40 

8 Statement of fire permits issued, 1947 40 

9 Means of fire detection, 1947 40 

10 Classification of forest area burned over, b\- forest t>pe 41 

11 Statement of work permits issued, 1947-1948 41 

12 Fire damage table, 1947 42 

13 Major equipment purchased and in use, as of March 31, 1948 43 



Table No. 1 

CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 

By Month— 1947 



Month 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . 

October 

November . . . 

Totals. . . 



1947 
No. 



11 
135 
170 
202 
466 
12.5 
260 

24 



1,393 



1946 
No. 



43 
140 
248 
298 
404 
404 
117 

83 
2 



1945 
No. 



1,739 



15 

134 

182 

121 

160 

318 

26 

9 

1 



1944 
No. 



966 



128 

352 

112 

253 

233 

16 

37 

6 



1943 
No. 



1,137 



15 
188 
33 
96 
86 
20 
186 



624 



1942 

No. 



286 
102 
137 
235 
287 
61 
116 



1,224 



1941 

No. 



85 
398 
273 
331 
124 

52 
2 



1,265 



Table No. 2 

CLASSIFICATION OF FORKS'!" FIRES 

By Origin— 1947 



Origin 



Settlers 

Campers 

Railways 

Lightning 

Logging Operations 
-Mining Operations. 

-Smokers 

Road Construction . 

Inrencliar\- 

Prospectors 

Miscellaneous 

Unknown 



1947 

No. 

75 

298 

ISO 

410 

56 

6 

248 

30 

15 

2 

31 

42 



1946 

No. 

80 

481 

249 

303 

68 

11 

383 

21 

31 

2 

68 

42 



1945 
No. 

44 

289 

163 

121 

32 

3 

231 

4 

8 

3 

36 

:■!•_> 



1944 
No. 

96 

247 

218 

185 

37 

1 

243 

4 

23 

2 

55 

2l\ 



1943 
No. 

55 

187 

82 

100 

26 

3 

132 

5 

4 

1 

25 

4 



1942 
No. 

114 

296 

143 

195 

34 

3 

243 

8 

13 

3 

56 

116 



1941 
No. 

103 
271 

81 
278 

45 

2 

219 

20 

23 
3 

60 
160 



Totals. 



1,393 



1.730 



\.\M 



tiL'l 



1.221 



1.265 



38 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 3 

CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 

Bv Size— 1947 



Size 


1947 

No. 


1946 

No. 


1945 

No. 


1944 

No. 


1943 

No. 


1942 

No. 


1941 

No. 


34 Acre and under 

Over 34 to 5 acres 


412 
026 
97 
177 
50 
12 
19 


490 

784 

129 

233 

78 

13 

12 


211 
457 
75 
159 
43 
11 
10 


241 

519 

93 

211 

47 

7 

17 

2 


155 
237 
58 
108 
41 
15 
10 


276 

487 

97 

244 

86 

20 

13 

1 


278 
506 


Over 5 to 10 acres 

Over 10 lo 100 acres 

Over 100 to .500 acres 

Over 500 to 1,000 acres 

Over 1,000 lo 10,000 acres 

Over 10,000 acres 


94 
235 
89 
23 
32 
8 


Totals 


1,393 


1,739 


966 


1,137 


624 


1,224 


1,265 



Table No. 4 

CLASSIFICATION OF LAND BURNED OVER 

By Ownership— 1947 



Classification 

Crown Land — Acres 

Private Land — Acres 

Number of Fires 

Total Area in Acres 



1947 



1946 



1945 



38,093 

45,939 

1,393 

84,032 



44,656 

32,113 

1,739 

76,769 



17,997 

30,513 

966 

48,510 



4: Rt ST f I e^S IN ONTARIO 




• 930 1931 [Sii 035 1934 1936 1936 193/ I93« i939 I9d0 I9.li 



1? 1343 1944 I9d5 1946 |947 1948 1949 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



39 



Table No. 5 

CLASSIFICATION OF AREA BURNED OVER 

Bv Month— 1947 



District 


March 


April May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Total 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Acres 


Sioux Lookout 






9 


570 

79 

5 

589 

4,367 


1,080 

161 

11 

2,664 

6 


548 
239 

1 

984 

7 

3,055 

1.186 


26 

8 

9 

52 

7 

1 

1 

1,723 

3 

22 

326 

33 

18 

18 

1 


1 
2 




2,234 


Kenora . . 




50 

1 

953 


539 


Fort Frances 


27 


Port Arthur 


1 


1,000 

9 

253 

861 

21,659 

101 

20 

672 

3,470 

393 

130 


4 

618 
3 

" "44 
45 
15 


6,243 


Geraldton 




32 


4,428 


Kapuskasing 




14,7971 16 

780| 26 

3,557 470 


15,067 


Cochrane 




125 

89 

8 


4,852 


Sault Ste. Marie 




10 


29,312 


Gogama ... 




271 14 130 


530 


Chapleau 








5,676 

3,267 

2,188 

41 

32 

5 

1 


5,718 


Siidbur\' 




43 


997 
281 
126 

5 
34 

2 


919! 24 


6,292 


North Ba\' ... 




818 
8 
1 
1 
6 


325 
5 


7,160 


Parr\" Sound 






606 


Algonquin 






186 


Quinte 




3 


403 1 448 


Trent ... .... 




3811 

i 


390 










Totals 




57 


2,712 


26,768 


4,802 


17,360 


2,248 


29,355 730 


84,032 












1946 Totals 

1945 Totals 


421 
373 


2,284 

6,788 


13,080 
12,171 


25,338 
4,389 


20,734 

8,379 


11,088 
16.186 


1,520 
39 


2,304 
165 


20 


76,769 
48,510 



AC^^ACi: BUeN^D BY fOR^ST flg€5 IN QNTAglO 

1947 




'?>0 '951 '95? l-iSV lOM l'3>» I9>t> lOi 



IC r3dt Odt- 19^3 I3ad 1-3-J") I'yO.e 



i">ae 19^9 



40 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 6 

CLASSIFICATION OF AREA BURNED OVER 

By Origin— 1947 



Classification 



1947 
Acres 



1946 
Acres 



1945 
Acres 



Settlers 

Campers 

Railways 

Lightning 

Logging 

Mining 

Smokers 

Road Construction 

Incendiary 

Prospectors 

Aliscellaneous 

L^nknown 

Totals 



3,449 

3,091 

12,606 

20,353 

14.921 

385 

24,515 

1,379 

577 

16 

2,244 

496 



2,677 

21,898 

9,406 

20,630 

7,085 

2.56 

12,109 

873 

490 

4 

673 

668 



1,789 

17,902 

3,164 

1,517 

5,789 

8 

15,412 

1 

134 

15 

2,557 

222 



84,032 



76,769 



48,510 



Table No. 7 
STATEMENT OF TRAXEL PER.MITS ISSUED— 1947 





1947 


1946 


1945 


1944 


1943 


1942 


1941 


Permits 

Persons 


51,187 
146,185 


35,794 
112,191 


20,393 
70,085 


13,510 
41,. 569 


11,004 

28,.567 


8,358 
24,725 


11,353 
36,315 



Table No. 8 

STATEMENT OF FIRE PERMITS ISSUED— 1947 

Number of Permits 



1947 


1946 


1945 


1944 


1943 1942 


1941 


7,925 


8,940 


5,764 


5,106 


5,242 


8,542 


7,833 



Table No. 9 
MEANS OF FIRE DETECTION— 1947 





Towers 


Rangers 


Public 


Aircraft 


Total Fires 


1947 Totals 

1946 Totals 

1945 Totals 


424 
615 
314 


1.58 

260 

1 134 


547 
667 
397 


264 
197 

121 


1,393 

1,739 

966 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



41 



o -- ■ 
^ - i 

:_ ~ >. 



r 


— T. 


84,032 

70,709 
48,510 

108,891 
52,817 

113,710 


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3,891 
1,774 
2,810 
181 
2,172 


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Slash 
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15,795 

12,727 

5,894 

47,849 

8,450 

8,993 


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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



43 





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44 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 




Tall Pines Make a Blaitiful Setting for this Cabin on Three Mile Lake 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 45 



DIVISION OF LAND AND RECREATIONAL AREAS 

The volume of work undertaken and completed in connection with the 
administration of Crown lands has continued to increase. This is due to three 
main factors: — 

(1) A clean-up of a tremendous backlog of old cases which accumulated 
over a period of a great many years. 

(2) Economic conditions resulting in more people having more money to 
buy Crown land, on the one hand, and more people having the abilit\- 
financially to pay up old, long standing debts to the Crown and thereb}- 
securing proper title. 

(3) The employment of improved methods of dealing with land matters, 
effected through the adoption and practical application of specific 
regulations and by advanced training of Head Office and Field Office 
personnel, in addition to the implementation of policy based on uni- 
formity of action, simplicity and co-operation generally with and b>- 
the public with whom we do business. The graphs and tables which 
form part of this appendix do not necessarily reflect the volume of 
work done, but show the number of transactions brought to final 
completion. 

Continued study has been given to better planning for the disposition 
and public use of land for recreational, agricultural and other purposes 
in the best interests of the people generally. 

Agriculturdl and Allied Uses 

Disposition of Crown land for these purposes continued at about the same 
rate as the i)revious >ear. 



Provincial Parks 

ProN'incial Parks consist of: 

Algonquin 2,741 Sq. Miles 

Quetico 1,720 Sq. Miles 

Lake Superior 540 .Sq. Miles 

Sibley 63 -Sq. Miles 

Kondeau 8 Sq. Miles 

Ipl)erwash Beach 109 .Acres 



46 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 



Veterans' Lands 



The Department has co-operated most fully with the Federal Government 
in the matter of placement of veterans on Crown land, pursuant to the terms 
of an agreement completed between the Federal and Provincial Governments 
on April 10th, 1946, under the provisions of the \'eterans' Land Act (Dominion), 
Section 35, 6 George M, 1942. 

Tourist Outfitters' Camps 

Tourist Outfitters' Camps were effectiveh- supervised during the fishing 
and hunting season, and conservation laws were stricth' enforced. 



Statement of Patents, Etc. 

Issued During the Year Ending March 31, 1948 

Public Land Patents 745 

Free Grant Patents 164 

Patents and Transfers (Town Lots) 153 

Miscellaneous Documents 188 

Releases of Pine 137 

1387 

Crown Leases 9 

Algonquin Park Leases 40 

Bruce Beach Leases 4 

Bruce Beach Renewals 6 

Rondeau Park Leases 48 

Timagami Leases 2 

Water Power Leases 

109 

Licences of Occupation 93 

Licences of Occupation (Rondeau) 1 

Licences of Occupation (Algonquin) 4 

Licences of Occupation (Timagami) 10 



108 



Licences of Occupation Cancelled 138 

Crown Leases Cancelled 26 



DEPARTMEXT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



47 



AGRICULTURAL LANDS IN SALE TOWNSHIPS 




1942 



1943 



1945 



1946 



I94« 



48 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



AGRICULTURAL LANDS IN FREE GRANT TOWNSHIPS 
INCLUDING SOLDIERS 



i 



V 






/, 



LEGEND 



I 





LOCATIONS 
CANCELLATIONS 
PATENTS 



f 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



49 



LANDS FOR SPECIAL USE 



LEGEND 



».<1 PA.XENJTS 



z 
o 

I- 
o 

< 

I/) 200 

z 
< 
a. 



I 



t 



I 

s 



^ 



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■k. 



50 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



CITY. TOWN AND TOWNSITE LANDS 



_ 200 



q: 160 




194^ 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



51 



SUMMER RESORT LANDS 




RKPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



LAND USE PERMITS. LEASES, AND LICENSES OF OCCUPATION ISSUED 



yi 1500 




DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 53 



DIMSIOX OF LAW 

The following is the report of the eictivities of this Division for the period 
from April 1, 1947, to March 31, 1948. The primar\ duties of the Division are as 
indicated in the Administrative ("hart. 

Amendments were made to seven Acts covering the administration of the 
Department, as follows: 

The Forest Fires Prevention Act was rewritten and amended in certain 
respects, and is now so arranged that the various sections relate in themseK'es 
to kindred matters. 

The Crown Timber Act was amended principalh" with respect to the manu- 
facturing conditions and to provide for regulations to be made b\" the Lieutenant- 
Tjovernor in Council concerning wasteful practices in cutting operations. 

There was an amendment to the Forestr\- Act to allow for creation b\' the 
Lieutenant-Governor in Council of a Committee to be known as the ".Advisorx 
Committee to the Minister of Lands and Forests." 

Several amendments were made to the Game and Fisheries Act, with a view 
to strengthening the provisions respecting conservation of game and fish 
resources. 

An amendment to the Public Lands Act allows the Lieutenant-Governor 
in Council to make regulations to provide for free grants of public land up to 
160 acres to former members of the forces. 

There were minor amendments to the Lakes and Ri\ers Ln[)rovement 
.Act and the Surve\s Act. 

Approximate!) 2,300 intorniations were laid for infractions of the Game 
and Fisheries Act, the Forest Fires Prevention Act and the Criminal Code. The 
great majority of these concern offences respecting the Game and Fisheries 
.\ct, and the ratio of convictions to acquittals was appro.ximateh' 99 to 1. 

X'arious field trips were made 1)\ the Chief of the Dixision during the \ear, 
and meetings with the enforcement officers in the Cochrane and Oiiinte Districts 
were held. Round-table discussions resulted in [)enefit to the enforcement officers 
and also brought to the attention of the Law Dixision practical difficulties en- 
countered b\- the field men in enforccmenl matters. \aUi.ible suggestions respect- 
ing amendments resulted, and it is anticijjated that this t\ pe of discussion will be 
continued until all the Districts have been covered. 

Classes dealing with the statutes, re;^ulalions and entorcemeiU matters were 
held at the Ranger .School. 



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DEPARTMENT OP^ LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



55 



DIMSION OF OPERATION AND PERSONNEL 

Gexeral 

Head Office Organization 

Minister — Hon. H. R. Scott 

Deputy Minister — F. A. AL\cDougall 

Division Chief 

Accounts J- G. McMillen 

Air Service G. E. Ponsford 

Fish and Wildlife W. J. K. Harkness 

Forest Protection T. E. Alackey 

Land and Recreational Areas W. D. Cram 

Law F. J. Sullivan 

Operation and Personnel P. O. Rh\nas 

Reforestation E. J. Zavitz 

Research R.N. Johnston 

Survey's and Engineering F. \V. Beatt\- 

Timber Management J. F. Sharpe 

Field Organization 



Regional 
Region Forester 

South F. S. Newman, 

Western. .St. Williams. . 

South W. D. Cram, 
Eastern. . .Toronto 



South 
Central 

Central 



P. McEwen, 
I^anger School 

!•:. L. Ward, 
.\orth Ba\-. . . , 



District 

Lake Erie. . . 
Lake Huron . 
Lake Simcoe 

Quinte 

Rideau 

Trent 

Algonquin . . . 
Parrx' .Sound . 



District District 

Forester Headquarters 

S. Newman. . . St. Williams 
C. Marritt Gait 



J. F. L. Simmons. .Maple 

A. Crealock Tweed 

W. E. Steele Kemptville 

K. B. Wheatlex . . . Lindsa>- 

G. H. R. Phillips. Algonquin Park 
R. L. Snow Parr\- Sound 



.\orihern .\. .S. Bra>-, 

Kapuskasing. 

Mid- P. Addison, 

Wcslern . . j'(jrt .Arthur. 

Western . . K. .Xchesou, 
Kenf)ra 



North Bay V. E. Sider North Bay 

. (liai)leau J- M- Whalen Chapleau 

Gogama J- M- Ta\lor Gogama 

Sault Ste. Marie. A. W. Leman Sault Ste. Marie 

Sudhur>- T. Thorpe Sudbur}- 

Kapuskasing A. .S. Bra\' Kapuskasing 

.Cochrane A. .S. Bra\- Cochrane 

Tiniiskaniing . . . .F. J. Dawson Swastika 

Port .Arthur R. Boultbce Port Arthur 

Geraldton U. W. Fiskar Cieraldton 

.Siou.x Lookout . . . V. L. Hall Siou.x Lookout 

. Kenora (i. V . Mexer Kenora 

Fort l-Vances G. 1 )elalH'\ Fort Frances 



The com])lete organization is covered b\ the chart which follows. 



56 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



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ADMINISTRATIVE 
DIVISIONS 




PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



Department of Lands and Forests 

Hon. H. R. Scott F. A. MacDougall 

Minister Deputy Minister 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISIONS 

1948 

Hon. H. R. SCOTT, Minister 

F. A. MacDOUGALL, Deputy Minister 



AIR SERVICE FISH^AND __!;OREST_ _AAND_AND LAW OPERATION REFORESTATION RESEARCH SURVEYS TIMBER 

AND iMANAGEMENT 



FISH AND 
WILDLIFE 


FOREST 
PROTECTION 


LAND AND 

RECREATIONAL 

AREAS 


LAW 

F. J. Sullivan 
Chief 


OPERATION 

AND 
PERSONNEL 


REFORESTATION 


RESEARCH 




T. E. Mackey 
Chief 


E. J. ZaviU 
Chief 




J. K. Harkness 
Chief 


W. D. Cram 
Chief 


P. 0. Rhynas 
Chief 


R. N. Johnston 
Chief 



ENGINEERING 



W. Beatty J. F. Sharpe 

Chief Chief 









lon» lo auure that all tcnancc or telephone Uneg ture and athei uses various erifvancea which Informalion and Educalton:— Equipment. ReToreatatlon Pnparolionof:— ResUtration ol Kalen. 

lying requisitions arc met. FoHulwn,— and a pro-.incc-wide radio we estra-DeparlmentaJ. Equipment. Woods UtUUd- Maps iwued by the Depart- 

is flying condllloM permit. PoUallon control Inspw- telephone »y Mem of port- Land Jnspielioiu:— Correipoidenct:— tion Equipment. ment. La d S Surwyi and Invinloriu.— 

ratal of:— lUlions. '""' iand*""^' 0rof>tT use o DUpules-^CIaims. ' Co-optrolion vUH:— veys. viXn. 

iilci of all boKt. PiihDiMi^ and PofOJi(«i.— Buildings to bouse etaff Eligibility to acquire patent Appeals re Land Tax collec- Diparlmtnt Routine Oniverslly ot Toionlo. Nn- De«:riptloQ ot^ arens for Pyeparatlon of map*. 









FUh and Wlldllfi 















































Interpretation o 


the Act*. 




















ment of Public Works aa 






Ai^meata with omanlied 







ADMINISTRATIVE 
DIVISIONS 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



Department of Lands and Forests 

Hon. H. R. Scoll F. A. MacUouga 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



57 



CHART Of AG£ CLASSfS 



300 




58 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 



Selection and Placement 

As of December 1st, 1947, Air. K. Acheson, Regional Forester of the Western 
Region, moved his headquarters from Sioux Lookout to Kenora. By Circular 
M-17, issued January 9th, 1948, E. L. Ward, Regional Forester of the Northern 
Region, was transferred to North Bay as Regional Forester of the Central 
Region, and A. S. Bray, District F"orester of the Cochrane District, was trans- 
ferred to Kapuskasing as Regional Forester of the Northern Region as well as 
District Forester of Cochrane and Kapuskasing Districts. 

As of March 1st, 1948, J. M. Whalen was appointed District Forester at 
Chapleau, and F. J. Dawson was appointed District Forester for the new District 
of Timiskaming. 



Information' and Education 

Public interest in the conservation of natural resources is increasing con- 
stantly, as indicated b)' the number of enquiries b\- letter, telephone and per- 
sonal calls. 

The Information and Txlucation office concentrated again in the past >ear 
in appeals for greater care on the part of the public in the pre\-ention of forest 
fires and observance of fish and game laws. 



Publications 

Ten new booklets were published during the year, and ten others were 
reprinted with revisions. Six issues of the magazine Sylva, The Lands and 
Forests Review, were issued bi-monthl\-, as compared with quarterh- in the 
previous year. 

Lecture Tours 

Lecture tours were again successful in furthering the interests of conserva- 
tion to the public. 

One picture, "Timagami Ranger", produced in the previous year, was made 
available for ])ublic showing. 

Pictures available from outside sources on the subject of fish and wildlife 
are lacking in an\- real appeal for conservation. 

The following table gives the record of lecture tours during the past >ear. 
It will be noted that our pictures were shown to approximately (159,975), nearly 
twice as man\- people as in the previous year (83,471). 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 59 




60 



rp:port of the 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



61 



Region" 



District 



School 
Meetings 



No. Attendance 



Plblic 
Meetings 



No. Attendance 



Totals 



No. 



Attendance 



Western 



Mid- 
Western 

Central 



Northern 



South 
Central 

South 
Eastern 



South 
Western 



Kenora 

Fort Frances. . 
Sioux Lookout 



Port Arthur. 
Gerald ton . . 



Sault Ste. Marie. 

Sudbury 

Chapleau 

Gogama 

North Bav 



Kapuskasing. 
Cochrane. . . . 



Parr\- Sound ... 
Algonquin Park . 



Rideau. 
Quinte . 
Trent. . 



Lake Simcoe. 
Lake Huron . 
Lake Erie . . . 



34 
30 



196 

18 

31 



8 

10 

133 

8 
7 

130 
35 

21 
15 
13 

12 
65 
14 



2,055 
1,639 



25,071 
2,933 

1,623 

"768 

612 

13,291 

1,340 
6,557 

8,606 
4,482 

4,114 
4,598 
5,320 

5,365 

10.456 

2,530 



42 

2 

14 

84 
27 

14 
24 
10 
3 
31 

31 
52 

53 
11 

30 
28" 
40 



98 
60 



1,821 

119 

1,325 

6.524 
3,520 

1,007 

1,779 

567 

317 

1,919 

2,140 
2,123 

1,913 
1,105 

3,401 
1,115 
3,211 

9.570 
9.411 
5,728 



76 
32 
14 

280 
45 

45 
24 
18 
13 
164 

39 
59 

183 
46 

51 
43 
53 

110 
163 

74 



3.876 
1,758 
1,325 

31.595 
6,453 

2,630 

1,779 

1 ,335 

929 

15,210 

3.480 
8.680 

10.519 

5.587 

7,515 
5,713 
8,.531 

14,935 

19,867 

8,258 



Totals . 



780 



101,360 



752 



58,615 



1,532 



159,975 



Exhibits 

Kxhibil w (jrk (luring the past \'ear more than quadrupled oxer the ])re\-ious 
>ear due to the inclusion of the Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto, and 
the Central C^inada Exhibition, Ottawa. (See table). 

School Work 



Our lecturers gave addresses and showed motion pictures dtiring the \ear 
to most of the schools of Northern Ontario. (See table above). 



62 



REPORT OF THE 



\o. 3 




< 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 63 



DIMSION OF REFORESTATION 



Distribution of Trees 

The year under re\'ie\v was similar to the previous six \ears in that tree 
production was still relati\ely low as a result of curtailment of nurser\- work 
during the war. Total distribution of trees was 12,269,533, of which approxi- 
mately 7,000,000 were distributed to pri\-ate landowners, 3,150,000 trees were 
planted on municipal and authority- forests, 250,000 on roadside planting, about 
20,000 on school demonstration plots, and just under 1,275,000 on various 
classes of Crown land. The remaining 400,000 were classed as semi-public 
and extraneous. A cross-section study of private plantations indicates the need 
for more intensive work on the choice of species to plant, and the methods of 
planting on heav>- and wet lands. Studies along these lines are being carried out. 



Mil 11 icipa I Reforestd tion 

A start has been made during the past two years to make thinnings in 
municipal plantations. Man\- of these are now approaching twenty-h\'e \ears 
of age and require thinning out in order to achieve a better development of the 
stand. Several hundred cords of pit-props have been removed and sold to the 
British Government. Some pulpwood has been sold from these plantations 
and it is expected that the thinnings for this market will increase rapidly. 

Studies are being conducted into the methods of thinning plantations to 
achieve the best jjossible economy-, and at the same time allo\\' for the best 
development of the stand. 

This \ear saw the continued development of mechanical tree i:)lanters, 
which are overcoming the shortage of seasonal laboiu- normalK' used for this 
purpose. These machines have proved of considerable value in the i)lanting of 
large open fields, where they can put in an axerage of approximateK' 10,000 trees 
per da>'. The\- are also effccti\e in reducing the (-ost of i)lanting \-cry con- 
siderably. 

Several counties made land purchases, increasing the area of land under 
the Municipal Reforestation .\ct. The increases were roughly as follows: 
Prescottand Russell Counties ajiproximateh- 1,000 acres; Durham and Northum- 
berland Counties, 282 acres; \'ictoria County, 701 acres; ^'ork County, 354 acres; 
Simcoe Count\-, 696 acres; Grey Count>-, 750 acres; Bruce Count \, 2,469 acres. 

The Ganaraska Authoritx acquired a further 1,328 acres, increasing the 
size of Ganaraska I'orest to 1,968 acres. 



64 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Provincial Forest Stations 

Development work continued on the two new nurseries at Port Arthur 
and Kemptville. These nurseries will have small quantities of trees ready for 
shipping in the spring of 1949. Additional areas have been added at St. Williams 
and Orono nurseries, and development of these properties continues. 

Xew machinery is rapidh' being developed for the greater mechanization of 
nurseries. Amongst the first new types to be put into oi^eration are the 
mechanical transplanters, which are now in use at Midhurst and Orono. 

The following tables furnish details of nurser>' tree distribution. 



Table No. 1 

SCMMARV OF TkKKS DiSTRIBCTED 

(July 1, 1946 to June 30, 1947) 



Total 
Shipments 



Conifers 



Hardwoods 



Total Trees 



Private Lands: 

Reforestation and Windbreaks. . . . 

School Children 

Semi-Public Properties 

Municipal Properties: 

Municipal Forests 

Forest Plantations 

Roads 

School Demonstration Plots 

Sundry 

Provincial Crown Lands: 

Northern Plantations 

Forests 

Ranger Plantations 

Air Services 

Nurseries 

Parks 

Highways 

Hydro Electric Power Commission 

Hospitals 

Penal Institutions 

Sundry 

Dominion Crown Lands 

Extraneous 

Totals 



4,782 
78 

75 



50 
47 
16 
25 
11 



7 
3 
2 
1 
3 
3 
9 

13 

37 



5,897,379 

58,284 

98,149 



2,448,675 

365,150 

234,400 

15,805 

8,605 



379,000 

40,900 

195,200 

9,150 

12,000 

19,000 

6,200 

94,950 

381,315 

211,456 

151,325 



997,873 
45,347 

34,416 



201,351 

88,000 

18,600 

3,380 

4,960 



75 

9,100 
1 ,8.50 

22,7.50 
5,200 
3,060 
4,200 

89,885 

58,055 
54,488 



6,895,252 
103,631 

132,565 



2,650,026 

453,150 

253,000 

19,185 

13,565 



379,000 
' 40,975 

204,300 
11,000 
34,750 
24,200 
9,260 
99,150 

471,200 

269,511 
205,813 



5,168 



10,626,943 



1,642,590 



12,269,533 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 

Table No. 2 

Private Planting 

(July 1, 1946 to June 30, 1947) 



65 



Conifers 



Hardwoods 



Totals 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Cochrane 

Duft'erin 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarr\- 

Grenville 

Gre\- 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and Addington . 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Xipissing 

Norfolk 

Xorlhuniberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Patricia 

Peel 



Perth 

Peterborough. . 

Prescott 

Prince Edward . 
Kainy River. . . 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Sudbury 

rhunder Bay. . 
1 iniiskaniing. . 

\ icloria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington. ... 
Wentworth . . . . 
York 



40,425 
97,564 
85,275 
29,800 
400 
49,142 
11,850 

533,475 
170,553 
64,931 
41,797 
22,425 
26,. 585 

184,575 
69,675 
63,768 
60,687 
94,780 
96,350 
5,820 
84,195 
95,560 
37,850 
42,375 
24,175 
27,980 
8,8.50 

180,015 

246,392 
6,449 

371,152 
79,600 

280,607 
76,771 

227,415 

24l',828 

46,193 

170.920 

23.975 

17,736 

2,935 

38.. 525 

9,420 

762,649 

15,.')05 

1 ,600 

1,625 

4,940 

28.975 

101,732 

83,741 

56,075 

181,275 

568,467 



820 

23,970 

27,181 

8,991 

14,001 

11,010 

46,330 

42,504 

16,600 

4,480 

6,850 

4,760 

63,733 

54,762 

2,631 

9,325 

7,738 

27,885 

8,727 

7,837 

1,825 

9,705 

2,060 

4,905 

1,050 

37,210 

20,.569 

310 

47,676 

9,810 

25,134 

36,928 

8,375 

' 40,582 

23,993 

13,003 

7,991 

28,902 

1,.537 

545 

855 

70,885 

2,135 

2,875 

50 

2,360 

3.632 

30,983 

27,.577 

19,268 

20,692 

104,316 



41,245 

121,-534 

112,456 

38,791 

400 

63,143 

22,860 

579,805 

213,057 

81,531 

46,277 

29,275 

31,345 

248,308 

124,437 

66,399 

70,012 

102,518 

124,235 

5,820 

92,922 

103,397 

39,675 

52,080 

26,235 

32,885 

9,900 

217,225 

266,961 

6,759 

418,828 

89,410 

305,741 

113,699 

235,790 

282,410 

70,186 

183,923 

31,966 

46,638 

4,472 

39,070 

10,275 

833,534 

17,640 

4,475 

1,675 

7,300 

32,607 

132,715 

111,318 

75,343 

201,967 

672,783 



Totals I 5,897,379 



997,873 



6,895,252 



66 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



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1 



DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 67 



DIVISION OF RESEARCH 

The Division now has the following staff: 

Permanent 
4 Foresters 
2 Biologists 

2 Soil Specialists 

1 Forester-Geneticist 
1 Office Manager 

3 Stenographers 

1 Building Superintendent 

2 Draughtsmen 

1 Technician 

2 Mechanics 

3 Lal)orers 

Continuous Temporary 
2 Chemists 

1 \'ari-Typer Operator 
1 Librarian 
1 Draughtsman 

Casual and Students 
77 

The Division's programme during the >"ear came under the following 
headings: 

(1) Regeneration Surveys, Seed Studies. Tree Breeding. Aerial Seeding, 
Slash Burning, etc. 

(2) Growth and \ivU\ Studies. 

(3) Soil Sur\e\"s. 

(4) l-'isheries Investigations. 

(5) Wiidhfe Studies. 

(6) X'aluation of Effect of Smelter Fumes on l->)rest Cirow th. 

(7) Building and Mechanical-l-'lcctrical I )e\('l()pm('nts. 

1. — Rege>ienilinn Surveys and Other Forestry Work 

Sur\'e>s of this t\|)e were carried out in the Kenora and Thunder Ba\ 
Regions and Lake Abitihi Area during 1947. Work in the Thunder Ba\ -Kenora 
Regions, principalh concerned with jack pine and white spruce, was under the 
general direction of A. P. Leslie and Held direction of 11. C. Larsson and .\. V . 
L\ on. 



68 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




Mr. a. p. Leslie of the Division of Research Loading Apparatus Used in 
Aircraft for Planting Seed by Air 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND F^ORESTS FOR 1948 69 



A similar stud\- under the general direction of A. P. Leslie and field direction 
of D. H. Burton was made in the clay belt area adjacent to Lake Abitibi. 

An opportunit>" was presented here to re-examine some 43 plots established 
during 1925 following various t\pes of logging. The report of the survey has 
been completed and issued as Report No. 16. 

A stud\' of Red pine seeding habits under Dr. George Duff was continued 
this year. 

Tree breeding under Dr. C. C. Heimburger is concerned with the pro- 
duction of a rapid-growing hybrid aspen of good color and pulping qualities 
and resistant to disease. 

During the >'ear, over one thousand acres of burned forest land in Sault 
Ste. Marie and the Tweed and Parry Sound districts were seeded from the air, 
under the direction of A. P. Leslie, using seed coated with fertilizers, rodent 
repellents, fungicides, etc. This was a follow-up of work started in 1946. 

Slash on about 400 acres of cut-over land on Shiningwood Ba>-, Lake 
Timagami, was piled and burned, and broadcast burned after October 1, 1947. 
Prices of $1.00 per thousand for broadcast burning and $6.00 per thousand for 
complete cleaning of an area carrying a stand of 15 thousand per acre were 
established. 



2. — Growth II nd Yield Studies 

This survey was under the direction of M. A. Ardenne and has pro\-ided 
an assessment of growth conditions on white and red pine in the Ottawa \'alle>'. 



3. — Soil Surveys 

The soil surve\s, directed In Mr. (i. A. Hills, aiming at a preliminar\- classi- 
fication and separation of agricultural and forest lands started during 1944, 
were continued b\' the Division. 



4. — Fisheries Investigations 

Fisheries studies under Dr. V . li. J. Fry of the University of Toronto were 
e.xpanded in 1947 b\- the initiation of the South Bay experiment. This project 
has been organized in co-oj)eration with the F'ederation of Commercial Fishermen. 
The anticipated duration of the test will ajjproximate five to ten years. I-^ield 
laboratories and working space are practicalK completed at .South I?a\ 
Mouth. 

The other fisheries ])rojects can onl\' be listed here witli brief conunents 
on each. 



70 REPORT OF THE Xo. 3 



Algonquin Park 

Studies of plankton in Algonquin Park in artiticialh' fertilized and un- 
fertilized lakes. 

Studies of water temperature and chemical content of water in relation to tish. 

Creel census. 

Thunder Bay and Fort Frances Area 

Netting of coarse fish from certain lakes in Sible>- Peninsula to iiscertain 
effect on game fish population. Introduction of bass and other game fish to 
suitable lakes in the same area. 

Creel census to determine catch of \arious species. 

5. — Wildlife Studies 

This project under Mr. Diivid Fowle was mainly carried on in Algonquin 
Park. The principal aim was to devise a satisfactory method of assessing small 
mammal, particularly rodent populations, and determining their effect on and 
response to the forest environment. 

6. — Valuation of Effect of Smelter Fumes on Forest Growth. 

This is a continuation of the survey started in 1944 to determine the extent 
and degree of the forest damage caused by smelter fumes. Sampling by airplane 
in the air and on the surface of lakes was continued and new automatic recorders 
were set up. 

7 — Building and Mechanical Electrical Development 

During the year, a fisheries research building, incorporating the unique 
"artificial lake", was almost completed and a well giving 200 Imperial gallons 
per minute to supply water for this project was completed. This artificial lake, 
which is a cylindrical enclosed tank, will have provision made for refrigeration 
or warming, or addition of oxygen and other gases so that the effect of any of 
these factors on fish ma>- be studied. The results when applied to fish planting 
and other practical projects should be valuable. 

The mechanical section produced an infra-red cone dr\er for tree seed 
production. 

The section also manufactured an aerial seeder for use in reforesting burned 
areas from the air and a machine for applying coatings, containing fertilizers, 
fungicides, rodent repellents, etc., to the seed to increase chances of survival. 

A power pruner for count}- forests was also made to order for the Division 
of Reforestation. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 71 



DIVISION OF SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING 

The Ontario-Manitoba Boundary Commissioners continued the surve\" of 
the trial Hne of the most northerh- portion of this boundar\-. 

BaseHnes were surveyed in the Districts of Thunder Ba>- and Cochrane to 
furnish control for areas being mapped, in connection with the Forest Inventory 
Project. The work in the Cochrane District was carried out during the winter. 

The following aerial and ground surveys were undertaken during the fiscal 
\ear ending March 31, 1948. 



Ground Surveys Section 
Surve\- instructions were issued for the following surveys: — 

Crown Surveys 

1. Surve>' of vSummer Resort Locations fronting on wSouth Tea Lake and 
Source Lake in Townships of Peck and Canisba>-. 

2. Contour surve\' at the Provincial Government Ranger School in the 
Township of Ridout. 

3. Retrace certain boundaries in the Township of Hindon. 

4. Retracement survey of the boundaries of the Township of Garrison. 
(Survey costs borne by the Department of Mines.) 

5. Survey to subdivide a portion of the west half of Lot 15, Concession 3, 
Township of Wicksteed, for townsite purposes. 

6. Retracement surve>- in the north half of the Township of Skead. (Surve\- 
costs borne b\- the Department of Mines.) 

7. Tra\-erse of Long Lake, District of Thunder Ba\-, to provide ground 
control for mapping b>- aerial photograph\- in connection with the Forest 
Inventory Programme. 

8. Continuation of survc\- (jf the baseline in the District of Cochrane, 
easterh' from the 29-mile post established the previous \ear, to provide 
ground control for mapi)ing b\- aerial {photography in connection with 
the l-'orest In\-entor\- Programme. 

9. Retracement surve\- of the south boundar\- of Sible>- Park in the District 
of Thunder Ba\'. 

10. .Surve\" of a baseline easterl\- from the southeast corner of the Nipigon 
Forest Reserve, District of Thunder Ba\- to proN^de ground control for 
aerial mai)i)ing in connection with the Forest Inventor\- Programme. 

11. Retracement sur\'e\- of the line between Concessions 1 and 2, in the 
Township of W'ilkie. 

12. Control traverse of section of Lake Talon, District of Nipissing. 

13. Preliminar\- survey of the proposed townsite at the crossing of the Red 
Lake Highwa\- and the Canadian National Railwa> s, District of Kenora. 



72 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 




Transit Man Signals Picket Man for Ci;ntrh Line. 



74 REPORT OF THE \o. 3 



14. Survey traverse from "Gravel" Triangulation Station to Townships 
88 or 87 and retracing of township boundary northerly to the inter- 
section with the transmission line of the Hydro-Electric Power Com- 
mission of Ontario, for ground control purposes in connection with the 
Forest Inventory Programme. 

15. Subdivision of Block Z, Townplot of Hearst, formerh- the Demonstration 
Farm, for townsite purposes. 

16. Survey of part of a gravel pit and former Licence of Occupation in the 
Township of Strathy. 

17. Ground Control traverse in the Cobalt area for jjroposed aerial pho- 
tography and geological survey b\" the Department of Mines. (Surve>' 
costs to be borne b\- the Department of Mines.) 

18. Preliminar\- surve\' of extension of Gogama Townsite, in the Townships 
of Jack and Xoble. 

19. Surve\- of part of the trial line for the northern portion of the boundary 
between the Provinces of Ontario and Manitoba. 



Private Surveys on Crown Lands 

Under authority of Section 37 of the Public Lands Regulations, 692 summer 
resort locations were surveyed and the returns of survey filed in the Department 
for examination and approval. Three hundred and fift\-eight surveys of this 
number were surve>ed under direct departmental instructions to the surveyor 
where the applicant paid in the survey fee as specified in Section 37 of the Public 
Lands Regulations and amendments thereto. This is an increase of three 
hundred surveys over the fiscal \ear ending March 31, 1947. 

Lender the provisions of the Mining Act, 798 mining claims were surveyed 
and the returns of surve>' filed in the Department for examination and approval. 

Townsite Subdivisions 

The following subdivisions of land aftected by the provisions of The Town- 
sites Act were surveyed on privately-owned lands and approved by Orders-in- 
Council. A cash consideration was accepted by the Crown in lieu of selecting 
one-quarter of the number of lots as surveyed. By an amendment made to 
The Townsites Act which came into effect as from the 1st day of June, 1947, 
the provisions of The Townsites Act now only apply to the subdivision of land 
for commercial, industrial, residential or summer resort purposes, within five 
years of the issuance of Letters Patent. 

Designation of Subdivision Date of Order-in-Cotincil 

1. Part of Mining Claim T.B. 10733, 

Town of Gerald ton. District of 

Thunder Bay. May 1, 1947 

2. Terrace Ba^■ Townsite, District of 

thunder Bav. Dec. 18, 1947 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



75 



SURVEYED SUMMER RESORT LOCATIONS ON CROWN LAND 
EXAMINED BY THE DIVISION OF SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 
1200 



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1000 



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800 



700 



600 



500 



400 



300 



200 



100 



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1942 19^3 1944 I94S 1946 1947 194Q 



Fl SCAL YEAR 



76 



REPORT OP^ THE 



No. 3 



SURVEYED MINING CLAIMS ON CROWN LAND EXAMINED BY THE 
DIVISION OF SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING 







DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND 


FORESTS 














































































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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 77 



Map Publications and Geographic Nomenclature 

Place names, including those for lakes, rivers and streams, have been 
verified for sectional maps prepared for the Ontario Poorest Resources Inventory- 
Series, covering an area of 30,000 square miles. 

The following maps were revised and lithographed: — 

Map 32a — Districts of Algoma and Sudbur\', scale of 4 miles to 1 inch. 

Map 47a — Algonquin Provincial Park, scale 2 miles to 1 inch. This map was 
compiled and drawn from latest available information. 

Map 10a — Islands in Georgian Ba\' in front of the Township of Harrison, scale 
4 inches to 1 mile. 

Distribiition of Maps 

National Topographic Series 11,215 

Provincial Maps 

20A (Free Issue) 1,975 

District Maps 7,373 

Island Maps 168 

Miscellaneous 1,100 

33A (Electoral) 25 

42A (Township) 506 

11,147 11,147 

Total 22,362 

Provincial Maps 

The demand for the free issue map 2()A is lessening, Init remains the same 
as last \-ear for District Maps. 

Photostating 

Photostating required the use of 52,000 square feet of photostat pa])er. 

Printing 

Paper re])roductions of surve\' jilans and other matter consumed 87,200 
square feet of sensitized i)aper. 

Survey Records 

Thirty-two original township subdivision plans which were rai)idl\- deterior- 
ating have been remounted and 200 other i)lans were cellulosed. 

The rebinding of surve\- field notes, reports and other records, was continued 
this \car. 



78 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 









TREND 


OF 


MAP 


DISTRIBUTION 


DEPARTMENT 


OF 


LANDS 


AND 


FORESTS 



13000 



12000 



1 1000 



10000 



\ 



9000 



8000 



7000 



6000 



5000 



4000 



3000 



2000 



1000 



LEGEND 



NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC SERIES 

DISTRICT MAPS 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO N»20A FREE ISSUE 

TOWNSHIP MAP N»42A 

ISLAND MAPS 

ELECTORAL DISTRICTS N»33A ■■ 

MISCELLANEOUS MAPS 

NOTE FIGURES PRIOR TO 1945-6 ARE AVERAGES ONLY. 



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1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 

1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 

FISCAL YEAR 




AREA PHOTOGRAPHED 
BY THE DEPARTMENT OF 
LANDS AND FORESTS 
IN THE 



Scale of Milet 



MARCH 1948 



DEPARTAIEXT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



79 



Aerial Surveys Section 

Vertical photographs covering an area of 11,613 square miles were taken 
during this fiscal \ear. 

Photographs at a scale of 500 feet to 1 inch were taken over an area of two 
square miles for the Department of Planning and Development. From these 
photographs, it is possible to produce maps showing contours at 5-foot intervals 
b\- using the Multijjlex Projector. These maps are used for conservation schemes 
and power develojjments. 

In addition to the development of fihn, cop\' negatives and enlargements, 
42,000 photographs were printed during the year. 

The following table shows the distribution of the work performed: 





Area 
(Sq. Miles) 


Totals 


For Outside Companies 
Hammermill Paper Conipan\- 


30 

384 
1,938 

200 
2,203 


30 


Other Government Departments 
High\va\s. 




*Hvdro-Electric Power Commission 




*Mines 




*Planning and Development 






4,72.5 


Department of Lands and Forests 
DufFerin Couniv Forest 


100 

22 

26 

2 

20 

7 
6,681 


Belmont Lake Fish Hatcherv ^ 




Pelee Point Area 




Southern Research Station 

Loughboro Lake Area 




Vivian Forest 




*Inventorv 






6,858 






Total 


11,613 







*Denotes Mapi)int; n(|iiirt-(i. 



80 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 




o 
o 

O 



DEPARTMENT OP^ LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 81 



DIVISION OF TIMBER MANAGEMENT 

The Division of Timber Management is primarily concerned with the 
proper utiHzation of Crown timber. The immense timber resources of the 
Province, if they are to be intelHgently used, require an intimate and scientific 
knowledge of what timber is growing throughout the Province and what has 
reached the stage where it should be harvested. With this in mind a Forest 
Inventor}' is now in progress and is reported on herein. 

The proper utilization of timber which has been sold is also of the utmost 
importance and under present management plans (with the co-operation of the 
operators) progress is being made in this regard. This is also reported on. 

Conditions for lumbering were favourable throughout the 1947-48 season 
and production of forest products was maintained. 

Complete figures for 1947-48 production are not available at this time but a 
statement of timber cut 1946-47 and returned in 1947 is shown on Page 84, 
Table 1. Statements showing production by administrative districts of the 
Province for the season 1946-47 are also shown on Pages 85-99, Tables 2 to 2o 
inclusive. 

Other activities of the Di\-ision are reported on herein, including: 

Timber areas sold \ear ending March 31, 1948. 

Mills Licensed. 

Results of Scaler's examinations. 

Timber agreements consummated. 



FOREST RESOURCES INVENTORY 
Annual Report Fiscal Year ending March 31, 1948 

The resources inventory project started in the previous fiscal year was well 
under way at the commencement of the year. Photograph}- completed during 
the \ear amounted to 46,043 square miles under contract and 6,681 square miles 
by the Department staff, making a total of 52,724 square miles for the entire 
programme. 

MANACRMFNT PLANS AND CONTROL 

During the fiscal year 1947-48 increasing activit>- has been in evidence in 
connection with the preparation of management plans. The photographs and 
planimetric base maps supplied b\- the I3epartment have been of great assistance 
in providing basic control and in speeding up the coverage of the forest area in 
the surve\s required to f)r()(luce the management jilans. The majority of the 
agreement holders are acti\'el\' engaged in the preparation of forest in\'entories 
and management ]:)lans although there has been some difficult}' in obtaining 
adequate personnel to carr\' on this work. As a result of issuing the manual of 
requirements for these plans, more satisfactory and uniform reports are being 
submitted. 



82 REPORT OF THE No. 3 



TIMBER SALES— 1947-48 

Details of the 53 new sales of timber made during the season indicate that 
746.25 square miles of timber limits were sold. 

During the season, 58 timber licences comprising 187 square miles, were 
abandoned. 

The status of the timber licensed areas in Ontario as at March 31st, 1948, 
was therefore as follows: 

Area 
No. Sq. Miles 

Licences and Renewals Issued 1947-48 887 11,490.50 

Licences, in Suspense 58 604.75 

Total 945 12,095.25 



PL'LPWOOD AND TIMBER .ACxR1:i:ME\TS— 1947-48 

Area under pulpwood concession and timber agreement as at March 31, 
1948—66,254.50 square miles. 



MILLS LICENSED— 1947-48 

The mills licensed during the season under The Mills Licensing Act, were 
as follows: 

Less than 5,000 ft. daily capacity 544 

5,000 to 30,000 ft. daily capacity 661 

Over 30,000 ft. daily capacity . * 49 

Number of Paper Mills 35 

1289 
SCAL I NCx 

Scalers examinations were held during 1947 as follows: 

(1) Fort William September 27th 

(2) Huntsville November 1st 

(3) Minden May 9th 

(4) Thessalon June 6th 



DEPARTMEXT OF LANDS AXD FORESTS FOR 1948 83 



AREA UNDER PILPWOOD AND TIMBER AGREEMENT 

Fiscal Year Sq. Miles 

1938-39 62,643.00 

1939-40 65,330.00 

1940-41 65.497.50 

1941-42 66.509.50 

1942-43 71,636.50 

1943-44 56,690.50 

1944-45 59.353.00 

1945-46 53,754.00 

1946-47 56,745.00 

1947-48 66,254.50 



TABLES 

Table No. 1 — Statement of amounts of timber cut durinti the vear ending 
March 31, 1947. 

Table No. 2 — Classification of annual limber returns for the vear ending ALirch 
31, 1947. by Districts: 

2. Algonquin 

2a. Chapleau 

b. Cochrane 

c. Fort Frances 

d. Gerald ton 

e. Gogama 

f. Kapuskasing 

g. Kenora 

h. Lindsax' (Trent) 

i. North Bay 

j. Parr\ Sound 

k. Port Arthur 

I. .Sault Ste. Marie 

m. Sioux Lookout 

n. Sudbur\ 

o. 'I\vee(i fOuinte) 

Table No. 3 — Timljer areas sold during the year ending March 31. 1948. 



84 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 1 
AMOUNTS OF TIMBER CUT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 


Pieces 


Feet 


Cords 


Cubic Feet 




2,043,152 

6,098,443 

1,772,905 

41,531 

509,438 

282,496 

135.043 

66.444 

1,220,028 

7,430 

643 


102,501,390 

82,863,112 

37,826,169 

524,368 

21,232,731 

18.513,711 

7,364.151 

2,553.871 

22,727,026 

113,020 

9,593 




25,614,033 


Jackpine . 


316,583.64 

1,738.982.33 

125,678.15 


78,297,004 


Spruce 

Balsam 


188,644,656 
11,563,064 




5,731,428 


Birch 




4,091,594 


Maple 




1.796,816 




579,641 


Poplar 


58,172.06 


14,189,918 
52,035 






4,230 










12,177,553 


296,229,142 


2,239,416.18 


330,564,410 


Species 


Pieces 


Lineal Feet 


Cords 


Cubic Feet 




119,386 

156,011 

58,135 






358,158 


Poles 






237,533 


Posts 






87,203 






24.502.65 


2,205,180 


Lagging and Mining 




541 




Piling 






71,519 












333,532 


541 


24,502.65 


2,959,593 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



85 



T.VBLE No. 2 

ALGONQUIN 
CLA.SSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 
YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 


Cords 


Pieces 


Feet 


Dues 


Bonus 


Total 


Pine Logs 




227,510 

12 

162,630 

29 

611 

2,451 

1,262 

61,446 

329 

514 

664 

64,070 

28 

33,811 

17 

127,807 

40,170 

596 

12,081 

96 


7,879,001 

3,788 

2,182,029 

1,991 

6,000 

109,172 

61,889 

3,941.619 

4,838 

23,308 

54,905 

2,894,734 

2,075 

2.062,933 

420 

2,709,209 

984,001 

81,584 

117,181.30 


$19,695.46 

9.47 

5,454.81 

4.98 

12.00 

272.92 

154.72 

9,854.03 

7.25 

58.27 

137.26 

4,342.08 

5.18 

5,157.32 

1.05 

5,418.43 

1,968.00 

203.95 

4,231.40 

35.00 

1.00 

99.00 

12.50 

3.67 

114.40 

409.82 

331.97 

25.61 


$18,054.29 
3,989.06 

394.14 

172.61 

10,353.86 

7.80 

140.89 

239.71 

764.26 

2.26 

7.214.08 

1,653.06 

1,765.95 

235.03 

35.00 

1.50 

34.00 

45.71 
497.94 

" 11.89 
492.47 


$37,749.75 

9.47 

9,443.87 

4.98 

12.00 

667.06 

327 33 


Pine Booms 

Jackpine Logs 

Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs 

Basswood Logs 

Beech Logs 


1,' 


L 98.00 

50.00 

5.25 

>86.00 

>92.73 

^29.91 

18.29 

18.29 

J33.91 


Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Cherry Logs 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Hemlock Booms 

Maple Logs 

Oak Logs 


20,207.89 

15.05 

199.16 

376.97 

5,106.34 

7.44 

12,371.40 

1 05 


Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Poles (Cu. Ft.) 

Poles 


7,071.49 

3,733.95 

438.98 

4,231.40 

70 00 


Posts 

Fuelwood (Hard) 

Fuelwood (Soft) 

Balsam Pulpwood 

Poplar Pulpwood 

Spruce Pulpwood 

Jackpine Props 

Spruce Pit Props 

Props (E.xport) 

Props (E.xport) 




50 






2.50 

133.00 

12.50 

3.67 

114.40 

455.53 

829.91 

25.61 

11.89 

492.47 










$58,021.55 


$46,105.51 


$104,127.06 



Cut Under Permit 

Logs 287,949 Ft. B. 

Pulpwood 396.34 Cords 

Pitwood 17.57 Cords 

Fuelwood 319.20 Cords 

Poles 527 Pieces 

Posts 455 Pieces 

Ties 50 Pieces 



M. 



86 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Tabu-; No. 2a 

CHAPLEAU 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 

Pine Logs 

Jackpine Logs 

Jackpine Dim 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Fuelwood (Hard). . 
Fiielvvood (Soft) . . . 
Poles (Cu. Ft.)... . 
Balsam Pulpvvood . 
Jackpine Pulpwootl 
Poplar Pulpwood . . 
Spruce Pulpwood.. 
Car .Stakes 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Di 



Bonus 



Total 



38.00 
122.00 

443.07 

18,995.74 

2,332.34 

14,943.30 



52 

352,382 

690 

12,500 

' 14,878 

4,025 



30,492 

6,426,955 

30,962 

400 

241,444 



120,074.95 



S 76.23 

13,-557.85 

77.40 

.80 

482.89 

19.00 

30.50 

4,103.76 

310.15 

7,598.29 

932.94 

20,920.62 

80.50 



$ 188.59 

26,004.61 

126.99 

.80 

891.71 

3.80 

6.10 



547.80 



54.38 
7.16 



» 264.82 

39,562.46 

204.39 

1.60 

1,374.60 

22.80 

36.60 

4,103.76 

310.15 

8,146.09 

932.94 

20,975.00 

87.66 



$48,190.93 



$27,831.94 



$76,022.87 



Cut T'nder Permit 

Jackpine 2,200 Feet 

Birch 417 Feet 

Jackpine Pulpwood 1,655 Cords 

Fuelwood (Soft) 720 Cords 

Fuelwood (Hard) 287 Cords 

Poles 8,080 Lin. Ft. 

Spruce 350 Pieces 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



87 



Table No. 2b 

COCHRANE 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Jackpine Logs 

Jackpine Booms 

Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs 

Beech Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Tamarac Logs 

Piling (Cu. Ft.) 

Ties 

Poles 

Posts 

Fuehvood (Hard) 

Fuelwood (Soft) 

Balsam Pulpwood 

Jackpine Pulpwood . . 

Poplar Pulpwood 

Spruce Pulpwood 

Spruce Pit Props 

Jackpine Pit Props. . . 

Balsam Exported 

Poplar Exported 

Spruce Exported 

Jackpine Props 

Exported 

Spruce Props Exported 



3,304.63 

8,116.76 

13.674.11 

2,021.61 

7.985.81 

326,963.91 

46.03 

23,986.39 

477.00 

179.37 

5,301.22 

24,044.34 
46.03 



19,213 

1 

1,753,424 

3,436 

72 

12,612 

40 

11,481 

23 

359,541 

417,938 

4,345 

106. 

1,391 

2,408 
1,610 



1,543,251 S 3,858 

169 

19,386,314 33.593 

160,823 402 

433 1 

226,251 452 

319: 

154,847 387 

345 

5,377,986 10,776 

7,228,051j 14,456 

579,686 1,449 

621 

1,897,141.07 42,0.54 
139 
871 
32 
1,652 
2.029 
9,721 
808 
3,194 
457,284 
64 
9,814 



12 S 9 

42 

18 111, 

01 

08 

49 1, 

80 

Hi 

52 

.53 14, 

14 45, 

17 3, 

93 

25 

10 

00 

20 

27 

25 4, 

34 2 

64 

33 2 

83 122, 

44 

62 17, 



,385.92 

1.27 
,306.. 56 
796.71 

2.381 

,019.00! 

.64 

689.98 

1..55 
,395.95 
,382.68 
,375.46 

4.04 
.... ! 

7.75 
.566.19 
113.83 
499.26 
,357.04 
,747.79 
656.90 
,236.28 
,201.62 
11.49 
,689.82 
310.05 
17.94 
,630.41 



7,472.64 
29.92 



S 13 

144 
1 

1 

1 

25 

.59 

4 

42 

1 

2 
6 
12 
1 
5 
379 

27 



244.04 

1.69 
899.74 
198.72 

3.46 
471.49 

1.44 
077.09 

2.07 
172.48 
838.82 
824.63 

4.97 
054.25 
146.85 
437.19 
146.03 
151.53 
386.29 
469.13 
465.54 
430.61 
486.45 
75.93 
.504.44 
310.05 
17.94 
3,630.41 

7,472.64 
29.92 



$593,044.77 



$348,911.07 



$941,955.84 



Cut Under Permit 

Jackpine Logs 882,286 Feet 

Pine Logs 285 Feet 

Spruce Logs 893,356 Feet 

Poplar Logs 1,368,652 Feet 

Birch Logs 3,393 Feet 

Posts 2,358 Pieces 

Poles 2,668 Pieces 

Ties 9, .597 Pieces 

Spruce Pulpwood 13.369.81 Cords 

Jackpine Pulpwood 2,915.()7 Cords 

Poplar Pulpwood 22.005.43 Cords 

Fuelwood 23,549.81 Cords 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



Table No. 2c 

FORT FRANCES 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



Pine Logs '. . . 

Pine Booms 

Jackpine Logs 

Jackpine Booms. . . 

Balsam Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Fuehvood (Hard).. 
Fuelwood (Soft). . . 

Poles 

Posts 

Balsam Pulpwood . 
Jackpine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood . . 
Spruce Pulpwood . . 
Jackpine Exported. 



91.271 
244.44 



290.41 

28,596.43 

8,709.74 

34,673.7.3 

15,830.59 



10,573 

874 

464,212 

799 

395 

1,298 

214 

88,724 

24,545 

751 



179 
8,971 



446,561 

183,566 

5.970,175 

56.787 

2.251 

1(1.S.34 

4,034 

1,234.667 

292,212 



98 



427 



S 1,116.37 

458.89 

9,149.48 

141.96 

4.50 

42.08 

6.18 

2,469.33 

584.42 

246.05 

45.63 

61.10 

51.00 

179.42 

203.28 

11,438.57 

3,483.89 

48,543.31 



$ 2,273.76 

781.11 

19,215.10 

157.05 

8.01 

43.17 

15.37 

1,794.61 

1,177.93 

397.11 

151.57 



37.04 

3,932.42 

915.43 

8,807.06 

4,207.40 



i; 3,390.13 

1,240.00 

28,364.58 

299.01 

12.51 

85.25 

21.55 

4,263.94 

1,762.35 

643.16 

45.63 

212.67 

51.00 

179.42 

240.32 

15,370.99 

4,399.32 

57,350.37 

4,207.40 



$78,225.46 



$43,914.14 



$122,139.60 



Cut Under Permit 

Jackpine Loes 5,373 Feet 

Pine Logs 155,890 Feet 

Balsam Logs 7,240 Feet 

Spruce Logs 33,816 Feet 

Poplar Logs 581,471 Feet 

Jackpine 800 Lin. Ft. 

Balsam 3,290 Lin. Fi. 

Spruce Pulpwood 2,579.45 Cords 

Poplar Pulpwood 173.43 Cords 

Balsam Pulpwood 89.71 Cords 

Jackpine Pulpwood. . . . 41.37 Cords 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



89 



Table No. 2d 

GERALDTON 

CLASSIFICATION' OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31. 1947 



Species 

Jackpine Logs 

Jackpine Booms. . . 

Balsam Logs 

Birch Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Ties 

Poles (Cu. Ft.).. . . 
Fuehvood (Hard; . . 
Fuehvood (Soft) . . . 
Balsam Pulpwood . 
Jackpine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood . 
Spruce Pulpwood . . 
Balsam Exported. . 
Jackpine Exported. 
Spruce Exported . 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



479.88 

1,035.93 

14.420.90 

61,026.14 
14. .520.47 

182.629.34 

4,321.71 

13,577.58 

121,271.78 



415,915 

1,082 

1,425 

3,070 

128,284 

97.916 

2.032 

151 

61,126 



6,430,505 

71.749 

16,425 

58,106j 

2,588,9281 

1,826,747 

217,390 



2,469,107.53 



•515,184.99 

179.36 

32.84 

145.25 

5,177.86 

3.6.53.49 

.543.46 

15.10 

95.351.56 

239.93 

258.98 

10.094.62 

24,410.46 

5,808.18 

2.55.1.52.94 



$26,987.47 

441.96 

61.01 

8.58 
3,988.55 
8,895.48 
1,237.81 

7.55 



6,491.41 
950.83 

40,274.12 

5,031.27 

3,548.36 

109,013.10 



§42,172.46. 

621.32 

93.85. 

153.8a 

9,166.41 

12,-548.97 

1,781.27 

22.601 

95,351.. 56 

239.9a 

258.98 

16,586.0a 

25.361.29 

5.808.18 

295.427.06 

5,031.27 

3.-548.36 

109.013.10 



1416,249.02 $206,937.50[S623, 186.52 



Cut Under Permit 

Mixed Logs 1-53,312 Feet 

Poles 147 Pieces 

Posts 83 Pieces 

Fuehvood 4,288 Cords 



90 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 2e 

GOGAMA 

CLASSIFICATIOxN OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



Pine Logs 

Jackpine Logs 

Jackpine Dim 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Ties 

Car Stakes 

Poles (Cu. Ft.)... . 
Balsam Pulpvvood . 
Jackpine Pulpwood 
Spruce Pulpwood. . 
Spruce E.xported . . 



202.87 

18.650.97 

16,269.14 

1,723.05 



8,977 

205,056 

1,287 

44,049 

169 

369 

5,887 



21 



035 



763,681 

3,919,514 

63,716 

816,945 

11,536 



336,546.05 



ii 1,909.19 

9,740.74 

1.59.29 

1,633.88 

28.84 

36.90 

117.74 

14,404.15 

142.01 

7,460.38 

22,776.81 



i 4,636..53 

12,880.83 

195.15 

3,733.28 

48.56 

18.45 

58.87 

240.37 
5,095.55 
7,043.92 
1,119.98 



.545.72 
621.57 
354.44 
367.16 
77.40 
55.35 
176.61 
404.15 
382.38 
.555.93 
,820.73 
,119.98 



$58,409.93 



$35,071.49 



$93,481.42 



Cut Under Permit 

Pine Logs 1,142,198 Feel 

Jackpine Logs 69,974 Feet 

Spruce Logs 29,982 Feet 

Balsam Logs 835 Feet 

Poplar Logs 25,743 Feet 

Poles 5,278 Pieces 

Fuelwood 2,134 Pieces 



DEPARTMENT OF LAXDS AND F'ORESTS FOR 1948 



91 



Table No. 2f 

KAPUSKASING 

CLASSIFICATIOxN OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 

Jackpine Logs 

Jackpine Booms. . . 

Birch Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Piling (Lin. Ft.).. . 
Spruce (Cu. Ft.) . . 
Fuelwood (Hard).. 
Fuel wood (Soft). . . 

Poles 

Posts 

Balsam Pulpwood . 
Jackpine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood. . 
Spruce Pulpwood. . 
Balsam E.xported.. 
Jackpine E.xported. 
Spruce Exported . . 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



1,1.51.42 
1,138.06 



38,056.39 

36.66 

688.94 

396,916.49 

5,291.50 

15.83 

200,742.94 



38,649 

200 

1,224 

157,514 

422,907 

3,371 

579 

102,498 



429 
962 



499,916 

9,126 

15,754 

3,966,078 

8,350,438 

322,339 

17,045 

499,813.56 



»; 962.36 

22.81 

39.38 

7,932.16 

16,700.87 

805.84 

426.12 

9,039.21 

572.70 

284.51 

123.50 

19.24 

26,639.44 

14.67 

278.57 

555,683.08 



2,090. 

46. 

7. 

4,462. 

38,745. 

1,645. 



57. 
132. 
123. 

19. 
20,418. 

234^ 

111,511. 

3,678. 

3. 

140,691, 



88$ 

69 

88 

50 

37 

91 



12 



47 



667 
3 

140 



,053.24 

69.50 

47.26 

,394.66 

,446.24 

,451.75 

426.12 

,039.21 

630.27 

416.51 

247.00 

38.63 

057.62 

15.60 

513.30 

494.89 

,678.32 

3.96 

.691.21 



$619,544.46 



$323,870.83 



,415.29 



Cut Under Permit 

Spruce Logs 1,523,143 Feet 

Poplar Logs 1,610,512 Feet 

Balsam Logs ^. 3,871 Feet 

Spruce and Balsam Pulpwood 30,600.06 Cords 

Cedar 212.50 Cords 

Fuelwood 5,306.72 Cords 

Poles 41 Pieces 

Posts 205 Pieces 



92 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



Table No. 2g 

KENORA 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 

Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Jackpine Logs 

Jackpine Booms. . . 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Piling (Lin. Ft.). . . 
Fuelwood (Hard).. 
Fuelwood (Soft) . . . 

Ties 

Poles (Cu. Ft.).. .. 

Posts 

Balsam Pulpwood . 
Jackpine Pulpvvooc 
Poplar Pulpwood. . 
Spruce Pulpwood . . 
Spruce Exported . . 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



37.45 
,564.55 



5,256.16 

47,497.67 

320.22 

60,671.90 

2,600.00 



15,103 

239 

22,709 

201 

5,095 

9,614 

770 

1,305 



21,491 
125 
750 



814,471 
32,650 

569,156 

9,224 

69,468 

246,241 

116,881 
16,199 



550.72 



B 2,036.17 

81.63 

1,211.19 

23.06 

138.94 

492.48 

292.19 

41.70 

18.72 

391.13 

2,149.10 

16.73 

15.00 

3,679.31 

18,999.05 

128.09 

84,940.65 



3,002.87 
128.36 

2,715.99 

53.25 

123.66 

1,252.89 
687.20 

'" 1.45 
148.67 
883.90 

60.00 

26.80 
5,567.44 

30.29 
8,838.86 
3,900.00 



$ 5,039.04 

209.99 

3,927.18 

76.31 

262.60 

1,745.37 

979.39 

41.70 

20.17 

539.80 

3,033.00 

16.73 

75.00 

3,706.11 

24,566.49 

158.38 

93,779.51 

3,900.00 



$114,655.14 



$27,421.63 



$142,076.77 



Cut Under Permit 

Pine Logs 41,000 Feet 

Jackpine Logs 24,000 Feet 

Poplar Logs 30,000 Feet 

Spruce Logs 128,000 Feet 

Pine 1,948 Lin. Ft. 

Spruce 6,408 Lin. Ft. 

Pulpwood 1,986 Cords 

Fuelwood 3,012 Cords 



Table No. 2h 

LINDSAY 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 


Cords 


Pieces 


Feet 


Dues 


Bonus 


Total 


Pine Logs 




42 
106 
154 
233 
330 
7 
8 


1,553 

3,826 

8,045 

6,379 

20,399 

219 

343 


$ 3.88 

9.56 

20.11 

9.57 

51.00 

.55 

.86 




$ 3 88 


Basswood Logs 

Birch Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Maple Logs 

Spruce Dim 

Hemlock Dim. . . . 










9.56 

20.11 

9.57 

51.00 

.55 

86 














$95.53 




$95.53 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



93 



Table No. 2i 

NORTH BAY 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 

Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Jackpine Logs .... 
Jackpine Booms. . . 

Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs 

Basswood Logs. . . . 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs .... 

Maple Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms .... 
Tamarac Logs .... 
Birch (Cu. Ft.).... 
Poles 

Posts 

Fuehvood (Hard).. 
Fuehvood (Soft) . . . 
Balsam Pulpwood . 
Jackpine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood. . 
Spruce Pulpwood. . 
Jackpine E.xported. 
Poplar E.xported . . 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



66.15 

2.00 

128.49 

1,910.77 

2,053.08 

12,751.81 

182.73 

70.50 



780,996 

2,727 

526,762 

937 

316 

31 

1,214 

49,982 

597 

37 

37,976 

2 

64,618 

66,025 

1,307 

455 

" 952 
1,271 



46,932,328 

485,276 

4,747,004 

39,287 

8,752 

469 

53,078 

3,837,780 

8,231 

3,346 

1,398,467 

78 

1 ,076,858 

1,352,140 

162,570 

7,783 

65,119.35 



$117 
1 

7 



17 



,330.78 
,213.15 
,263.69 

98.20 

21.87 

.94 

132.69 

,594.41 

12.35 
8.36 
,097.70 
.19 
,153.71 
,704.28 
406.40 

11.67 
651.19 
280.75 

25.42 

33.07 
.50 

89.94 
764.30 
821.24 
,852.53 



$309,617.74 

5,507.08 

29,131.20 

244.30 

2.62 



6,477.77 
25.11 

304.23 

.27 

2,706.50 

5,109.78 

529.66 

2.15 

94.25 
36.89 

.72 
.20 

352.18 

193.57 

1,400.25 

45.68 

7.05 



$426,948.52 

6,720.23 

36,394.89 

342.50 

24.49 

.94 

132.69 

16,072.18 

37.46 

8.36 

2,401.93 

.46 

4,860.21 

7,814.06 

936. 6 

13.82 

651.19 

375.00 

62.31 

33.79 

.70 

89.94 

1,116.48 

1,014.81 

19.252.78 

45.68 

7.05 



$163,569.33 



$361,789.20 



$525,358.53 



Cut Under Permit 

Pine Logs 1,140,000 Feet 

Jackpine Logs 934,000 Feet 

Hemlock Logs 3,000 Feet 

Spruce Logs 691 ,000 Feet 

Birch Logs 182,000 Feet 

Poplar Logs 305,000 Feet 

Poles 5,458 Pieces 

Posts 3,538 Pieces 

Ties 6,070 Pieces 

Pulpwood 11,141 Cords 

Fuehvood 9,135 Cords 



94 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 2j 
PARRY SOUND 
CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN- 
YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 


Cords 


Pieces 


Feet 


Dues 


Bonus 


Total 


Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 






40,279 2,092,099 
246 20,226 


$ 5,230.21 
50.56 


$ 1,102.99 

11.41 

' 229.62 

52..57 

11,682.19 

.62 

4.06 

97.20 

2,326.49 

8.27 

2,876.44 

18.33 

33.77 

667.96 

12.44 

5.50 

2.94 

9.80 


$ 6,333.20 
.50.. 56 


Ash Logs 


1,190 62.005 1.54.98 


166.39 


Balsam Logs 

Basswood Logs 

Beech Logs 

Birch Logs 


237 

10,642 

1,539 

110,4.55 

257 

199 

1,225 

246,004 

199 

.50,752 

1,091 

8,164 

49,791 

1,299 

304 

6,317 


2,2(i() 4..53 

423,377 1,0.58.40 

67,.532! 168.82 

8,311.187, 20.777.89 


4..53 

1,288.02 

221.39 

32,460.08 


Cedar Logs 

Cherry Logs 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Hemlock Booms 

Maple Logs 

Oak Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Poles 

Posts 

Fuehvood (Hard) 

Balsam Pulpwood 

Poplar Pulpwood 

Spruce Pulpwood 


749.50 

17.00 

262..50 

102..50 


1 
10,5 

2,6 

1 
L2 


4,172 
7,029 
09,798 
95,834 
19,.580 
72,985 
42,111 
34,140 
40,9.52 
82,627 


6.78 

17..57 

274.45 

15,893.21 

48.94 

6,682.41 

105.29 

268.27 

2,491.44 

206.54 

88.50 

126.35 

374.75 

11.90 

105.00 

143.50 


7.40 

21.63 

371.65 

18,219.70 

57.21 

9,558.85 

123.62 

302.04 

3.1.59.40 

218.98 

94.00 

129.29 

384.. 55 

11.90 

105.00 

143.. 50 










$54,290.29 


$19,142.60 


.$73,432.89 



Cut Under Permit 

Pine Logs 1,698,832 Feet 

Poplar Logs 409.388 Feet 

Hemlock Logs 2,318,8.58 Feet 

Spruce Logs .381,627 Feet 

Birch Logs 713,.3.34 Feet 

Maple Logs 373,006 Feet 

Sundry 945,076 Feet 

Posts 2,283 Pieces 

Poles 1,777 Pieces 

Fuehvood 5,174.65 Cords 

Pulpwood 4, 364. .50 Cords 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



95 



Table Xo. 2k; 

PORT ARTHUR 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 

Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Jackpine Logs .... 
Jackpine Booms. . . 

Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms . . 

Ties 

Posts 

Poles (Cu. Ft.).. . . 
Fuelvvood (Hard) . . 
Fuehvood (Soft) . . . 
Balsam Pulpwood . 
Jackpine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood. . 
Spruce Pulpwood . . 
Balsam Exported.. 
Jackpine E.xported. 
Poplar Exported . . 
Spruce Exported . . 



Cords 



258.56 

656.37 

33,129.66 

44,808.78 

5,027.63 

329,284.59 

12,181.63 

20,492.30 

728.00 

51,167.53 



Pieces 



28,972 

57 

1,364,968 

5,713 

35 

18,271 

1,470 

580 

160,711 

324,752 

8,417 

8,129 

42 

27,019 



Feet 



Dues 



1,586,708 

6,432 

20,360,977 

329,348 

795 

191,746 

26,918 

11,017 

3,396,162 

6.590,837 

9.56,253 



369,791.03 



Bonus 



> 3,966.76 

16.07 

33,003.29 

823.33 

1.99 

383.51 

67.28 

16.52 

6,792.31 

13,181.66 

2,390.57 

812.90 

.84 

14,982.48 

129.28 

164.09 

23,188.02 

17,923.20 

2,011.06 

454,000.63 



Total 



; 8,897.77 

34.19 

31,704.42 

1,466.20 

1.99 

834.881 

74.20! 

28.801 

4,260.29 

25,621. .56 

4.498.84 

352.24 

1.26 

38.781 

161.43 

ll,.-)99.84i 

6,758.22! 

605.16 

115,623.75 

9..580.76 

6,023.05 

72.80 

39,724.41 



; 12,864..53 

.50.26 

64,707.71 

2,289.53 

3.98 

1,218.39 

141.48 

45.32 

11.0.52.60 

38,803.22 

6,889.41 

1,165.14 

2.10 

14,982.48 

168.06 

325.52 

34,787.86 

24,681.42 

2,616.22 

.569,624.38 

9.580.76 

6.023.05 

72.80 

39.724.41 



$573,855.79 S267,964.84 s.s4 1 ,s20.63 



Cut Under Permit 

White Pine Logs 251,101 Feet 

Jackpine Logs 421,475 Feet 

Spruce Logs 43,953 Feet 

Balsam Logs 43,120 Feet 

Cedar Logs 7,018 Feet 

Poplar Logs 75,476 Feet 

Birch Logs 1 ,267 Feet 

Jackpine Pulpwood 1,017.00 Cords 

.Spruce Pulpwood 879.00 Cords 

Balsam Pulpwood 1,424.00 Cords 

Poplar Pulpwood 3.50.00 Cords 

Fuehvood (Soft) 1,937.00 Cords 

Fuehvood (Hard) 1,943.00 Cords 

Ties 2,907 Pieces 

Poles 633 Pieces 

Posts 1,249 Pieces 



96 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



Table No. 21 

SAULT STE. MARIE 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Jackpine Logs 

Jackpine Booms. . . 

Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs .... 

Maple Logs 

Oak Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Tamarac Logs 

Fuelwood (Hard). . 

Ties 

Poles 

Posts 

Car Stakes 

Balsam Pulpwood . . 
Jackpine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood. . 
Spruce Pulpwood. . 
Jackpine E.xported . 
Spruce Exported . . . 



.65 
5.32 



14,37 
21,65 

530.19 

1.56,106.74 

15.00 

20,206.71 



9.00 



334,451 

3,156 

347,489 

2,176 

49 

232 

12,897 

258 

18 

8,244 

7,146 

596 

50,104 

5,124 

35 

202 

186 

5 

5,430 



19,559,321 

521,487 

5,891,259 

111,902 

3,323 

5,538 

774,392 

3,9.-)6 

2,013 

495,163 

319,460 

- 47,414 

1,373,279 

377,244 

289 



$ 48,898.27 

1,303.71 

10,716.73 

279.74 

8.32 

11.07 

1,935.95 

5.93 

5.03 

742.72 

798.62 

118.51 

2,746.56 

943.09 

.43 

9.50 

20.20 

59.00 

.10 

325.80 

10,060.66 

8,662.13 

212.07 

218,549.44 



83,097 

3,911 

35,135 

588 

12 

22 

2,742 

14 

8 

1 ,260 

851 

215 

6,733 

1,802 

1 

2 

4 

42 



3,911.77 

3,209.37 

78.20 

37,823.61 

3.75 

13,134!36 



•HI 31 

5 

45 



13 
11 

256 

13 



,995.34 

,215.23 

,852.17 

868.44 

20.76 

33.94 

,678.12 

20.07 

13.81 

,003.27 

,650.03 

334.50 

,479.61 

,745.53 

2.02 

12.35 

24.24 

101.25 

.20 

325.80 

,972.43 

,871.50 

290.27 

,373.05 

3.75 

134.36 



$306,413.581194,608.46 



$501,022.04 



Cut Under Permit 

Pine Logs 443,879 Feet 

Jackpine 1 13,385 Feet 

Spruce Logs 43,946 Feet 

Hemlock Logs 565,538 Feet 

Birch Logs 853,281 Feet 

Maple Logs 216,050 Feet 

Oak Logs 54,460 Feet 

Elm Logs 6,747 Feet 

Ash Logs 2,999 Feet 

Poplar Logs 25,536 Feet 

Cedar Logs 2,696 Feet 

Pulpwood 414.57 Cords 

Fuelwood 1,477.57 Cords 

Ties 1,299 Pieces 

Poles 267 Pieces 

Posts 1,382 Pieces 

Cedar 3,137 Lin. Ft. 



DEPARTMENT OE LANDS AND EORESTS FOR 1948 



97 



Table No. 2m 

SIOUX LOOKOUT 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RETURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 3L 1947 



Species 

Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Jackpine Logs .... 
Jiickpine Booms. . . 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms .... 
Fuelvvood (Soft) . . . 

Ties 

Lagging (Lin. Ft.). 
Poles (Cu. Ft.).... 

Poles 

Balsam Pulpwood . 
Jackpine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood. . 
Spruce Pulpwood.. 
Spruce E.xported . . 



Cords 



204.78 



4,993.31 

17.194.09 

1,311.71 

196,776.50 

60,213.88 



Pieces 



24,109 

789 

183,751 

1,708 

887 

49,469 

4,696 

85,460 

541 

9,708 

7 



Feet 



686,2.59 

157,820 

2,731,986 

99,201 

25,294 

877,877 

645,025 



11,890 
81,970.96 



Dues 



1,715.65 

394.55 

5,882.49 

247.99 

.50.59 

1,755.75 

1,612.54 

51.19 

8,546.00 

39.63 

3,047.17 

1.75 

3,495.31 

6,877.64 

524.68 

275,009.22 



Bonus 



i 3,981.11 

1,027.27 

13,638.98 

404.21 

44.26 

4,302.48 

3,187.80 

2,761.40 

1,163.12 

1.75 

158.41 

5,493.23 

123.44 

21,769.28 

40,786.17 



Total 



i 5,696.76 

1,421.82 

19,521.47 

652.20 

94.85 

6,058.23 

4,800.34 

51.19 

11,307.40 

39.63 

4,210.29 

3.50 

3,6.53.72 

12,370.87 

648.12 

296,778.50 

40,786.17 



,252.15 



$98,842.91 



$408,095.06 



Cut Under[^Permit 

Pine Logs 63,395 Feet 

Jackpine Logs 1,077,522 Feet 

Hemlock Logs 43,956 Feet 

Spruce Logs 2,602,533 Feet 

Pulpwood 2,527.00 Cords 

Fuelwood 17,638.00 Cords 



98 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



Table No. 2n 

SUDBURY 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TI.MHKR RKTURN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 



Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Jackpine Logs 

Jackpine Booms. . . 
Basswood Logs. . . . 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Cedar Booms 

Hemlock Logs ... 

Maple Logs 

Oak Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms .... 
Piling (Cu. Ft.). . . 
Piling (Lin. Ft.).. . 
Piling (Pieces) . . . . 
Fiiehvood (Hard). . 
F'uelwood (.Sofi) . . . 

Shingle Bolts 

Ties 

Poles (Cu. Ft.)... . 
Poles 

Posts 

Car Stakes 

Balsam Pulpwood . 
Jackpine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood . . 
Spruce Pulpwood . . 
Balsam E.xported . . 
Jackpine E.xported 
Poplar Exported . . 
Spruce Exported . . 



Cords 



533.90 

718.39 

1.63 



29.").20 

.34.189.46 

12.923.86 

10.24.3.84 

239.51 

923.74 

353.17 

1,894.54 



Pieces 



347,620 

2,028 

240,889 

1,378 

6,6.53 

5,667 

764 

25 

12,170 

4,854 

22 

49,530 

43,639 

1.251 

' 40 
175 



1,714 

981 

4.431 

32,586 

2,040 



Feet 



13.030.249 

257.336 

2,698,786 

66,411 

212.857 

135.048 

12,402 

867 

.306,744 

145,708 

516 

761,968 

731,220 

77,960 

5,248.25 

1.135.00 



Dues 



11 



.412.28 



$32,575.56 

643.31 

6,392.51 

166.01 

532.14 

337.59 

18.62 

2.16 

760.10 

364.27 

1.29 

1 .523.92 

1.462.43 

194.87 

355.21 

34.05 

8.75 

266.95 

179.59 

1.63 

253.10 

427.94 

1.493.25 

7.39.90 

40.80 

206.64 

21,675.80 

5,169..36 

14,344.19 



,192.14 



Bonus 

.158.605.18 

1.446.19 

6.433.91 

223.47 

554.82J 

358.071 

57.471 

2.70 

301.96 

499.48 

2.06 

1,922.48 

2,382.65 

383.18 



Total 



24.80 
25.70 

4.00 

233.25 

888.08 

7.21 

47.06 
206.39 
808.42 
205.95 
155.68 
230.93 

35.31 
1,298.90 



$77,345.30 



$91,180.74 

2,089.50 

12,826.42 

389.48 

1 ,086.96 

695.66 

76.09 

4.86 

1,062.06 

863.75 

3.35 

3.446.40 

3.845.08 

578.05 

355.21 

34.05 

8.75 

291.75 

205.29 

1.63 

257.10 

427.94 

1.726.50 

1.647.98 

48.01 

2.33.70 

21,882.19 

5,977.98 

14,550.14 

155.68 

230.93 

35.31 

1,298.90 

$167,537.44 



Cut Under Permit 

Red & White Pine 837.815 Feet 

Jackpine 345,752 Feel 

Spruce 158,347 Feet 

Hemlock 131,072 Feet 

Birch 199,219 Feet 

Maple 66,406 Feet 

Hardwood Logs 5,200 Feet 

Poplar Logs 192.257 Feet 

Jackpine Pulpwood 271.31 Cords 

Spruce Pulpwood 604. .30 Cords 

Balsam Pulpwood 52. .30 Cords 

Poplar Pulpwood 1,557.28 Cords 

Ties 5,181 Pieces 

Poles 6.925 Pieces 

Posts .- 4,061 Pieces 

Spruce 657 Pieces 

Fuelwood 3,388.25 Cords 



DEPARTMEXT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



99 



Table No. 2o 

TWEED 

CLASSIFICATION OF ANNUAL TIMBER RFTIRN 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1947 



Species 



Cords 



Pieces 



Feet 



Dues 



Bonus 



Total 



Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs 

Basswood Logs . 

Beech Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Cedar Booms . . . . 

Cherr\- Logs 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs . . . 
Hemlock Booms. . 

Maple Logs 

Oak Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs . . . . 
Spruce Booms 
Tamarac Logs 
Piling (Cu. Ft.) . 
Shingle Bolts. . . . 
Fuelwood (Hard). 
Fuel wood (Soft). . 

Ties 

Trees 

Pole> 

Posts 

Balsam I'ulpwood 
Poplar I'ulpwood . 
Spruce Pulpwood. 
Balsam E.xported . 
Spruce E.xported 



4.00 

2,845.61 

876.00 



403.68 
1,219.57 
353.79 
229.55 
142.34 



194,567 

559 

1,612 

7,717 

22,513 

5,958 

23,352 

4,326 

57 1 

128| 

2,393 

140,478 

28 1 

38,148| 

3,859 

69,1531 

81,623 

3,728 

47 



479 
20 
66 

,571 



5,412,216 

54,450 

72,824 

73,422 

722,009 

191,325 

1,233,181 

.59.017 

4,141 

5,673| 

158,3951 

5,309,355 

4,057 

2,142,-588 

103,436 

1,385,868 

1,655,848 

288,196 

900 

1,151.85 



S13,529.76 

136.12 

182.00 

147.91 

1,801.63 

478.29 

3,082.86 

90.30 

8.45 

14.18 

395.95 

7.964.13 

10.15 

5,356.42 

2.58.53 

2,772.72 

3,311.70 

720.37 

1.44 

58.76 

3.00 

1,422.79 

219.00 

47.90 

20.00 

19.25 

111.42 

282.57 

487.84 

495.31 



§22,368.09 

56.47 

120.11 

169.87 

1,168.68 

136.21 

2,492.62 

168.84' 

1.40 

23.49 

308.25 

2,187.19 

2,436.68 

151.05 

1,575.751 

2,820.52 

77.20 

1.92 



366.50 

3.75 

12.35 

4.75 
.54.93 
77.96 

1.53.64 
17.03 

149.19 
92.52 



$35,897.85 

192..59 

302.11 

317.78 

2.970.31 

614. .50 

5,575.48 

259.14 

9.85 

37.67 

704.20 

10,151.32 

10.15 

7.793.10 

409.58 

4,348.47 

6,132.22 

797.57 

3.36 

.58.76 

3.00 

1,789.29 

222.75 

60.25 

20.00 

24.00 

166.35 

360.53 

641.48 

512.34 

149.19 

92.52 



$43,430.75 



$37,196.96 



$80,627.71 



Cut Under Permit 

Pine Logs 1,102,136 Feet 

Maple Logs 9f),885 Feet 

Basswood Logs .58,964 Feet 

Hemlock Logs 131,223 F'eet 

Beech Logs 3,941 Feet 

Elm Logs 46,8.53 Feet 

Ash Logs 10,482 Feet 

Poplar Logs . 409,224 Feet 

Balsam Logs 115,664 Feet 

Birch Logs. 60,()65 Feet 

Spruce Logs 160,231 Feet 

Hardwood Logs 1 1,105 Feet 

Cedar Logs 33,0.58 Feet 

Oak Logs 31.1SS Feet 

Fuelwood 17 1.00 Cords 

.Spruce Pidpw(jo(i 132.75 Cords 

iialsam Pulpwood 373.63 Cords 

Poplar Pulpwood 1,038.81 Cords 

Jackpine I'ulpwood 3.00 Cords 

Tamarac Pulpwood 1 1.50 Cords 



100 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 









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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



101 



a 

< 



o 


$ 7.00 Per M.H.M. 
9.00 Per M.H.M. 


14.00 Per M.H.M. 

9.00 F'er M.H.M. 

12.00 F'er M.H.M. 


28.10 F'er M.H.M. 

7.00 Per M.H.M. 
21.60 F'er M.H.M. 

2.50 F'er Cord 
me tendered rate on 

2.00 F\^r Cord 


12.00 Per M.H.M. 
6.50 I'er M.H.M. 
2.25 I'er Cord 
1.00 Per Cord 
2.00 I'er Cord 


15.00 I'er M.H.AL 
9.00 I'er M.H.M. 

10.00 Per M.H.M. 

10.00 Per M.H.M. 
4.25 Per Cord 
3.25 F'er Cord 


1.95 Per Cord 
ate as tendered on 

1.00 F'er Cord 


X 


Q 


$1.50 
2.50 


ooo 

O O iC 


X 

OCOOo o ooooo 
LC O CJ Tt- ^ _ Tt; O O "^ 't ^_ 

oi ci (N ' "''-6 ' — ■ c^ ^ 


c o o o o o 

iO '-'^ O lO T}> t--. 
(N (m' (N ^' ~ 


1.40 
t same r 
od. 
.40 


01 
X 

a 


$ 4.00 
4.50 


OOO 
iC O "O 


7.50 

3.00 

5.00 

.10 

aid for a 

F'ulpwo 

.35 

7.50 

2.50 

.35 

.25 

.60 


O O O O 'C 'C 

O lO O O 00 lO 


.40 
aid for a 
Pulpwo 

.35 


JO 


$ 1.50 
2.00 


4.00 
1.00 
2.00 


18.10 
2.00 

14.60 

1.00 

'F'o he p 

Spruce 
1.25 


O O O LO o 

q q 'C CO q 


oooooo 
ci oi oi -v oi i>i 


.15 

To he p 

Spruce 

.25 


"o 

c 

t2 


Hemlock Logs 
Maple, Birch, Hass- 
wood and Oak 


Red and White Pine 
Spruce Logs 
Hardwood Logs 


F'ine Logs 
F'oplar Logs 
.Spruce Logs 
S[)ruce Pulpwood 
Halsam Pulpwood 

Poplar Pulpwood 


Jackpine Logs 
Poplar I^ogs 
.Spruce F'ulpwood 
F'oplar F'ulpwood 
Jackpine I'itprops 


Red, White I^ine Logs 
IF.irdwood Logs 
.S[)ruce Logs 
Hemlock Logs 
.Spruce F'ulpwood 
Halsam F'ulpwood 


Spruce F'ulpwood 
F^alsam F'ulpwood 

Poplar F'ulpwood 


-a 
o 
c/) 

c 
o 
J= 
>• 


c 
CO 


X iJ 

C c 

— > o 


X 

? 2 


.HO 

6 1 


D. H. Clarke, 
Suite 101. 
371 Fiay Si. 
'F'oronto, Out. 


r. - 

5:5 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


- 


(N 


00 


(N 


c^ 


(N 


.Area 

sq. 
miles 


\=^ 




^°^ 


(M 


- 


:S^ ■ 


J 


d 

15 
c 
o 
C 


-X 

_4; 

o 


d 

1 


d 

o 
CQ 


d 
o 

u 

a 


d 


Date 
Sold 
1947 




>— > 


00 
V 


a; 
c 


O 
C 

I— > 


3 


c 




IS 






cc 

o 
c 

•—> 




CO 
01 

c 

3 



102 



REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 3 



1 
















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1 










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1 ^ ^ ^ ^ 










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^'^S 


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s 


000 

uuu 


SSuu 


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ss'ss' ^ 




X 


l_ !_ U 


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u 




U U. L. L> 


S« £ 


U L. U I. ~ 


"0 




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aj y S 


^0 


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1) (D CJ 


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•;:; ir 


cccct 


>~ ^^ 




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qioco 


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q —_ -; q c 


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(N C CO X 


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2 


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sil 


^•^c5 


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5^ 




No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


(N 


CO 


(N 


- 


CO 


- 


- 


Area 

sq. 

miles 


^5^ 




::5^ 


? 


;s^ 


- 


:^ 




d 


















^ 












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>• 


r- 


C 


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02 









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C5 








<-^ 


(M 


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(N 








o-ci> 


















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2^ 


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_>> 


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>_■ 


ci 


c>. 






^, 


^ 


^ 


£, 


JX. 


< 


< 








OC 


l> 






(M 


CO 




~ 


^— 




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t^ 


c; 


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c^ 




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c 


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>. 


>_■ 




C^^ 


^ 


~ 


^ 


3 


3 


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C 


5 
















1 •^ 











DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



103 



SS u 

< a 



.- 


1 . . 





u 

c 




O ii 

U S3 

si 

<N (U 


12.00 Per M.H.M 
5.00 Per M.H..M 
2.80 Per Cord 
ate as tendered on 

2.00 Per Cord 


10.20 Per M.H.M 

10.20 Per M.H..M 

11.00 Per M.H.M 

11.00 Per M.H.M 

9.00 Per M.H.M 

6.00 Per M.H.M 

9.10 Per M.H.M 

9.40 Per M.H.M 

9.10 Per M.H.M 

9.40 Per M.H.M 

.05 each 

.04 each 

.05 e;H4i 


2.75 Per Cord 
me rate as tenderec 

.90 Per Cord 
.65 Per Cord 


tn 

y 


Q 


$1.40 
t same r 
od. 


1.50 
2.00 
1.40 

t .same r 
od. 
.40 


CCCCCCCCCCC^J rC-^iC 
i~ O C C i-t C i-r i-~ u~ i~ C c c c 
^' — ■ (N in" csi <N (N <N (N (N 


1.40 
t the .sa 
Ipwood 

.50 

.25 


tn 

a 


« .40 
aid for a 
Pulpwo 


8.50 
3.00 
.40 
aid for a 
Pulpwo 
1.10 


(N c^ t^ t^ "^ c i^ "^ ■?: '"^ c 
ao X t>^ t^ 'C CO ic L-i ic ic 






1.35 
aid for a 
ruce Pu 

.40 

.40 




$^ .45 
To be p 
Spruce 


c^' 


1.00 
To be p 
Sprtice 
.50 


.45 

.45 
1 .25 
1.25 
1 .00 
1 .00 
1.10 
1.10 
1.40 
1.40 

.01 

.01 
.01 
.01 

'l"o be p 
for Sp 






y 

s 

-a 

c 

5 


^8 


Jackpine Logs 
Po|)lar Logs 

Spruce Pulpwood 

Halsani Pulpwood 

Jackpine Pitjirops 


1 5- i "3 '^ 


.Spruce Pul )W(jod 
Halsani Pu jjwood 

Fuelwood, Hard 
Fuelwood, .Soft 




. 

O 

o 

OJ — 


R. Gtiertin, 
Raniore, Ont. 


Northern Ski 
Co. Ltd., 
581 l-:dna .\ve., 
Siidl)ur\-, Ont. 


L. G. Lamothe, 
16 Tisdale .Ave., 
South Pore u [line, 
Ont. 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 




C^l 


(N 


- 


Area 

sq. 

miles 


:^ 


- 




:5^ 


o 


d 
U 


d. 
is 

51 


a 

u 
il 
J= 
U 


a 

W 

c 


Date 
Sold 
1947 


< 


< 


<N 

< 


(N 

< 


<U ( 


5*^ 


(N 


IN 




(N 






3 







104 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



o °^ 



a 



H 





































£fc 


§ 


^^^^^ 


^^ 




S»"^ 




er Cu. 

er Cu. 
Cord 
Cord 
Cord 


rQ-O-D 


cd ffi cc cd cc 


^A '^ 




m 02 cd cd 


5 


^ O O 


SSSSS 


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[i £ ii; £ (l! ui 


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u u u u u 






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0) OJ 11 


ni ^ U Z) i. 


W (U 




0) OJ (1) 0) 


t-, 


\^\*CL 0- ™ 


C-0-2- 




a-Cu 


uuuuuu 


CO^OhCL, 




COIN 'C O O 


ooo 


o o o o c 


oo 


CO -t lO CO t^ oc 


OOOO 




OC0005 


OO 'C 


o o o o c 


■ C iC 


q q q q q c 


lC O lO O 




■(N(N 


IN(N-H 


(N CD CO O CC 


Tt^Vc 




ot^ ^ CO 














(N rt ^ — 




m 














(« 


















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ooo 


ooooc 


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o q lo q 




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X 

l^* X 

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J O X y 


OJ 

'r^ X 


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^ .Oncotic 

C Jl o o o = 


X 

^ 03 X 




"o 

T3 

C 


e Log 
r Log 
e Pui] 
tn Pul 

r 


ine Li 
e Pull 
ine Pi 


Logs 
Iwood 
lock L 
ce Log 




jjOoOOOC 
C "^ — ' IN CO -+ '^ 
rT O u u u u t- 


nd W 
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rac L 
r Log 




5 


U 0! O nj 03 


a. cj a 


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►— — > OJ OJ a> OJ 1 


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"P. 2 £"5. 






a o a t« o 


i^^ 


.i; rt OJ r^ - 




jj„ _ _ _ _ - 
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c 












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OJ c o 




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S ^U 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


(N 


(N 


- 


- 


(N 


Area 

sq. 

miles 






:^ 


:^ 




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IN 


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^^ 


























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Q. 






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00 


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Date 
Sold 
1947 


^ 


iJ 


u 


u 




tj 




< 


o 


O 


O 




o 








lO 


^ 




lo 


-o 


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IN 




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b£ 


a 


a 


a 




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c^ 






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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS FOR 1948 



105 



3 


UI-I-I-UI-UU 

_K JlJ _0 O H ii Sj i 

O O ''T 't '" O lT u'; 
C "^ C^ (M. C^l q (M 1^ 

00 « 00 00 <© CC) lO 




.03 Cu. Ft. 
.04 Cu. Ft. 
.05 Cu. Ft. 
.06 Cu. Ft. 
.07 Cu. Ft. 
.08 Cu. Ft. 
6.00 Per M.H.M. 


^§ 

I. u 

oc 
t c 

00^' 


CC 

u 

o 
It 

00 


8.50 Per M.H.M. 
10.50 Per M.H.M. 
10.50 Per M.H.M. 

6..50 Per M.H.M. 


-a 
I 

u 


■I. 


ooocoooo 

It Lt C O 'T 1-C O "O 
C<i CVJ (N C^ '-■ -! (N 

a© 


c^ 


cc 

Lt It 


o 

It 


oooo 

It It tt t 
M (N (N — ■ 


0) 
73 

a 
D 


O C C: C O O C 
It «t c q o o q 

-*' CO O It -^' cc cc 

#1= 




M M Ms 
^ 


oo 
It q 




qc OC 
CO It It CO 


."2 


O C 't >t <t O t lO 

q It (N (M (M q c^ (N 

— — — — 




oo 
It It 


§ 


qqqq 

(M' (N <N — ■ 


5 


71 

7) 

-■a c jj p ^ u 3 

lilslllll 

S :i: xa: u 3: £ u^ 


a; _:_;_:_• 

o o o u _ 

7) c CV> ^ "^ '-'^ 

^^30000= ^ 

aJ^,•'-''^<^^w-fLtJ 

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7) 

O 

J 

is-) 
1:1. 


73 
-1 

1 


73 

73 ^ 


o 

s 


a;' 

c 

o +: 

J= c 

^% 
c tn 

^0 


C 

i € 

a 2 


73 o a; ^ 
1 = 5^ 


s ^^ . 

oj -de 
c o - 

— ] ^ n 

X ii CB w. 


C rt _ 

2 5 = 

C . 73 

c o a> 


No. of 
Ten- 
ders 


r-l 


- 


- 


— I 


(M 


Area 

sq. 

miles 


:^ 


(M 


1 


o 


:^ 


'i 


O 

c 
U 


d 

> 

H 


>^6 ^ 

U J: 73' 73 


>t 

73 „ 5 

.9-Ci M 
5 cc 00 


d. 

o 
2^ 


Date 
Sold 
1947 


c5 


o 

o 
O 






o 


c 


^ 


05 

a 




00 

O 


00 

O 


00 


O 



106 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 3 



a 
< 



:- 


!_ I. 1- •_ U U "5 

i; Cj o :^ O CJ - 












ss's's' 


S'SSS 


SSSS^ 


s"ssss' ss = 


— :c^x. 


2: 2C 2: s: 




X.~~tCX. ^ CC i:; -^ 


L. ■_ L. U 

CJ O CJ CJ 


■_ I- u u 

CJ 1) CJ CJ 


3 CJ 


1- I- •_ 1_ t. 

-? -- -=^ -^ »=^ 


er M 
er M 
er C(j 
ndere 


CO ?c 5c ?5 3c c q 
cJ to o M" t^ iri 

4# 





— — 




z.:i.::_:_:l 


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LANDS and FORESTS 



OF THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 



THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 



TORONTO 




^m^"^"^' 



rilNTID AND PU.IISHIO it tAPTIST JOHNSTON 
PIINTII TO TMI KINGS MOST IXCIltINT MAJISTT 




To His Honour, 

The Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

The undersigned begs respectfully to present to your 
Honour, the Annual Report of the Department of Lands and 
Forests for the fiscal year April 1, 1948, to March 31, 1949. 

H. R. Scott, 

Minister. 



^% M 




ONTARiO 



^efratt 



of the 

MINISTER 
OF LANDS and FORESTS 

OF THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



March 31, 1949 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 3, 1950 



TORONTO, 1950 
Printed and Published by Baptist Johnston, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Maiesty 



L^ontentA 



PAGE 

Introduction --. i 

Division of Accounts ------------- 3 

Division of Air Service ..- 13 

Division of Fish and Wildlife --- 23 

Division of Forest Protection --------- 45 

Division of Land and Recreational Areas ------ 57 

Division of Law ---- - 71 

Division of Operation and Personnel ------- 73 

Division of Reforestation ----------- 129 

Division of Research ---- ---135 

Division of Surveys and Engineering ------- 151 

Division of Timber Management ---------161 




CRJOIT 



Division 



of 

ACCOUNTS 



j^ 





Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3' 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 

General 

The financial report sets out a substantial increase — $3,802,190.00 — in ex- 
penditure appropriation of the Department as compared with the previous year. This 
increased appropriation was required for: 

(1) Suppression of forest fires 

(2) Salvaging of fire killed timber 

(3) Air Service expansion 

(4) Cost of Living Bonus to employees. 

There was an increase in the cash receipts — $952,833.59 — as compared with 
the previous year. Revenue for the year reached a new high in the history of the 
Department, due to increased receipts from sale of fish and game licenses, and from 
sale of Crown timber. 

FINANCIAL REPORT 
I. Cash Receipts and Disbursements 

Statement for the year ending March 31, 1949, is set out on Schedule A, page 
6. The following summarizes the result of operations for the year. 

Total— Cash Receipts $11,635,237.06 

—Cash Disbursements 11,400,801.97 



Excess of Receipts over Disbursements . $234,435.09 

2. Comparison of Results with those of prior years 

(a) Receipts 

Cash receipts for the year under review compare with those of the previous 
four years as follows: 



YEARS ENDING MARCH 31ST 



DIVISION 

Accounts 

Water Power Rentals . 

Provincial Land Tax 

Long Lac Diversion 

Miscellaneous -_- 

Air Service 

Fish and Wildlife 

Forest Protection 

Land and Recrejitional Areas 

Reforestation 

Surveys 

Timber Management 



1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


609,425 


654,979 


680,568 


694,859 


759,570 


175,342 


209,459 


204,475 


185,470 


217,521 


21,300 


20,850 


20,400 


19,950 


19,500 


20,388 


9,048 


46,071 


24,825 


26,225 


12,417 


25,284 


15,258 


8,376 


6,373 


1,193,034 


1,651,166 


2,248,201 


2,420,661 


2,813,876 


26,850 


30,943 


46,402 


53,230 


48,330 


294,308 


338,258 


430,644 


393,938 


409,465 


10,559 


19,386 


25,373 


25,562 


1,685 


1,275 


459 


1,652 


501 


402 


4,241,581 


5,554,781 


6,944,104 


6,855,031 


7,332,290 


6,606.479 


8,514,613 


10,663,148 


10,682,403 


11,635,237 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



(b) The following is a comparison of total disbursements for the five years ending 
March 31, 1949: 



Department of Lands & Forests 
Total Disbursements 

Chargeable to Appropriation 
as voted 



YEARS ENDING MARCH 31ST 

194S 1946 1947 1948 

$ $ $ $ 



1949 



3,572,225 3,988,394 5,961,806 7,598,612 9,693,336 



Additional Disbursements 

Uncontrollable items charge- 
able to Special Warrants — . 



111,000 



1,707,466 



Department of Game "s. Fisheries 
Total Disbursements 

Chargeable to Appropriation 
as voted 

Total Disbursements 



638,765 748,661 1,197,974 



4,210,990 4,848,055 7,159,780 7,598,612 11,400.802 



TREND OF DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

r/MEfR RETU RNS — C ROW N DUES —GROUND RENT AND FIRE TAX CHARGES 

FOR THE FIVE YEARS ENDING 31 MARCH J949 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



TREND OF DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

WATER POWER RENTALS — CROWN LAND SALES AND RENTALS — 
PROVINCIAL LAND TAX 

FOR THE FIVE YEARS ENDING 31 MARCH 1949 



700 



600 



^ 500 
O 



300 




WATER POWER RENTALS 



CROWN LAND SALES 
AND RENTALS 






PROVINCIAL LAND TAX 



1945 



1949 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
Schedule A FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1949 

Division of Accounts RECEIPTS 

Water Power 5759,569.67 

Provincial Land Tax 217,520.66 

Long Lac Diversion 10,500.00 

Casual Fees, Surveys. Office Fees, etc. 17,225.04 

Contractors' Security Deposits 9,000.00 



SI 



Division of Air Service 

Miscellaneous - — 

Division of Fish and Wildlife 

Licenses, Royalty and Sundry 2 

Division of Forest Protection 

Miscellaneous 

DiNTSION OF h.\ND .KSD ReCRE.\TI0N.\L ArE.AS 

Land Sales 

Agricultural -. $ 15,287.46 

Summer Resort 62,244.97 

Townsites 6,798.73 

University — - 192.39 

Miscellaneous 22,503.03 

Unallocated 108,858.32 



,022,815.37 

6,373.00 

,813,876.43 

48,330.64 



215,884,90 

Carried forward 83,891,395.44 



Xo.3 Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Schedule A {continued) RECEIPTS 

Brought forward _- $3,891, 3Q5.44 

Division* of Land and Recreational Akeas (continued) 
Land Rentals (Other than Parks) 

Leases and Licenses of Occupation __ 113,559.42 

Timagami Islands 1,932.19 



Park Revenue 
Algonquin 

Rentals . S 1 3 ,93 2 . 1 5 

Miscellaneous 14,581.63 



115,491.61 



Rondeau 

Rentals 822,007.79 

Miscellaneous 6,631,11 



$ 28,513.78 



Quetico 

Rentals $ 60.00 

Miscellaneous 1,390.00 



Park Revenue 

Ipperwash Beach 

Rentals $ 355.00 

Miscellaneous - 1,572.25 



28,638.90 



1,450.00 



S 1,927.25 

$ 60,529.93 

Tourist Outfitters Licenses 13,897.50 

Other Lands Division Receipts 3,661.20 



409,465.14 

Division of Reforestation 

Miscellaneous _. 1 ,684.7 1 

Division of Surveys 

Aerial Surveys — Net Receipts 401.66 

Division of TiiiBER M.^n.^^gement (See Schedule "B") 

Crown Dues $6,899,106.93 

Ground Rent 108,934.25 

Fire Tax 440,010.56 

Scalers' Wages 4,01 7.15 

Interest 6,418.43 

Mill Licenses and Sundry 4,308.70 

87,462,796.02 

Less Cash Depcsit refunds in excess of Cash Deposits receipts 130,505.91 

7,332,290.11 



TOTAL RECEIPTS „ $11,635,237.06 

M.AI.X OFFICE DISBURSEMENTS Schedule A 

Minister's Salary — Statutory $ 8,000.00 

Salaries — Permanent and Temporary 711,775.20 

Travelling Expenses „ 52,549.02 

Maintenance and Operating 16,837.83 

Damage and Other Claims, Sundry Contingencies, etc 1,770.25 

Compensation for Injured Workmen ._ 37,078.97 

Unemployment Insurance Stamps 586.17 

.Annuities and Bonuses to Indians - -- 25,332.00 

To provide for acquirini: flowage easements and discharging claims, etc 9.00 

8 853,938.44 



Carried forward $ 853,938.44 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests jor 1950 No. 3 

DISBURSEMENTS Schedule A (continued) 

Brought forward $ 853,938.44 

FIELD SERVICES 

Basic Organization — including District Offices 

Salaries -- $3,387,409.76 

Travelling Expenses 449,908.35 

Maintenance and Operating 1,845,287.88 

• 5,682,605.99 



Extra Fire Fighting 

Salaries— Temporary = $1,028,237.63 

Travelling Expenses ::^.....i::::^::^i::::i^:..:".:.^::...:-.:-..: — :. — .:... — 49,607.01 

Maintenance and Operating - — — 637,030.26 



1,714,874.90 



Fire Prevention, Conservation of Fish and Wildlife 
AND Reforestation 

Salaries - - --- - -— $ 22,711.42 

Travelling Expenses — - - 13,836.66 

Maintenance and Operating _ 86,530.86 



123,078.94 



Grants 

Association of Ontario Land Surveyors $ 200.00 

Municipalities in lieu of School Fees _ — 1,670.67 

Jack Miner Migratory Bird Foundation Inc. _..- 1,500.00 

Thomas R. Jones - 300.00 

E. L. Marsh - -- 100.00 

Niagara District Pheasant Breeders Association . — 500.00 

Ontario Fur Breeders' Association Inc. _ 2,500.00 

Ontario Federation of Commercial Fishermen 1,500.00 

8,270.67 

Wolf Bounty 57,977.00 

Bear Bounty 6,035.00 

Division of Air Service 

Salaries -- -- $ 252,869.51 

Travelling Expenses 11,215.77 

Maintenance and Operating — including purchase of aircraft 687,477.73 

951,563.01 



Division of Research 

Salaries— Temporary $ 116,279.30 

Travelling Expenses 13,735.92 

Maintenance and Operating — - 56,743.12 

Division of Surveys 

Aerial Surveys - 

Ground Surveys — Miscellaneous Expenses 

Lac Seul Storage Dam — Control and Maintenance 



Special Warrants 

Timber Salvage Project 
Cost of Living Bonus ..... 



1,058.10 

106,311.36 

864.03 


186,758.34 
ins 7 ^^ 40 


. $1,489,844.65 
217,621.54 


1,707,466.19 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS -- $11,400,801.97 

Excess of Receipts over Disbursements — 

Paid into the Consolidated Revenue Fund of the Province 234,435.09 



$11,635,237.06 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



12 
11 
10 

< 

-• 8 
O 

^ 7 

O 6 

Z 5 
O 

3 4 

i 3 

2 
1 




TREND OF TOTAL ANNUAL RECEIPTS 

FOR THE TEN YEARS ENDING 31st MARCH 1949 

(INCIUDES FORMER CAME AND FISHERIES DEPARTMENT) 



^ 
i) 



LEGEND 
1 BAG = SI, 000,000 

Port of bog equols 
fraction thereof. 



(I) 



<S) 






d? 



d) 

d) 



d) 
d) 
d) 
d) 



d) 



d) 



d) 
d) 



d) 



d) 



d) 



d) 



1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 

J4,729.676 $6,137,351 $6,348,601 $7,033,613 $6,697,708 $6,606,479 $8,514,613 $10,663,148 $10,682,403 $11,635,237 



TREND OF TOTAL ANNUAL DISBURSEMENTS 

FOR THE TEN YEARS ENDING 31sf MARCH 1949 

[INCLUDES FORMER CAME AND FISHERIES DEP A RTMENT) 




1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 

$3,095,903 $2,967,331 $3,231,118 $4,075,717 $3,615,426 $4,210,990 $4,848,055 $7,159,780 $7,598,612 



1949 

SI 1.400,802 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



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.\o. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Schedule C 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 

DIVISION OF FOREST RESEARCH — PROJECTS 
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 
(INCLUDING GENERAL OFFICE) 
For Year Ending March 31, 1949 

PROJECT 

Southern Research Station 

Sulphur Fumes Investigation 

L. M. Morrison (Statistician) 

Soil Surve\"S 

Regeneration Surveys 

Wildlife 

Pump and Hose Test 

Forest Genetics 

Biology 

South Bay Experiment 1 

South Bay Experiment 2 

Seed Production Experiment 

Patholog>- 

Radio . 



^S 24,859.62 

. 2,479.58 

_ 1,308.32 

_ 21,297.99 

._ 29,261.70 

_ 20,004.52 

_ 12,153.08 

7,051.03 

34,137.89 

17,176.62 

26,567.75 

9,077.92 

4,525.31 

259.12 



Total Direct Expenditure on Projects 

Deduct — Sale of Fish (South Bay Experiment 2) 



Net Direct Expenditure on Projects 
Main Office Administration 



.$210,160.45 
, 7,159.07 

4203,001.38 
_ 20,490.50 



TOTAL EXPENDITURE ON FOREST RESEARCH 

DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENDITURE 

Forest Research — Field Service 

Forest Research — Main Office 



Basic Organization — Equipment and Improvements 



....$223,491.88 



..5186,758.34 
- 19,542.28 



17,191.26 



Game 
Licenses 

Trapping 

No n- Resident Hunting _ 

Deer 

Moose 

Gun 

Dog _.. 

Fur Dealers 

Fur Farmers 
Tanners 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 

DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE 

ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIPTS 

For Year Exdixg March 31, 1949 



Cold Storage 



Rovaltv Game 



$ 62,745.97 

468,705.05 

237,707.05 

16,787.39 

160,378.15 

15,922.87 

30,674.00 

7,300.00 

200.00 

737.00 

$1,001,157.48 
265,425.18 



$223,491.88 
Schedule D 



Carried forward 



$1,266,582.66 
$1,266,582.66 

11 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Brought forward _ - -- $1,266,582.66 

Fisheries 
Licenses 

Fishing (Commercial) $ 108,O83.OZ 

Angling - 1,350,500.93 

$1,458,583.95 
Royalty on Commercial Fish _ 8,514.28 

1,467,098.23 

General 

Licenses 

Guides - _ 14,648.00 

Fines 46,947.00 

Costs Collected - -- 1 ,45 2 .50 

Sales — Confiscated Articles - - 16,742.15 

Miscellaneous — — 405.89 

80,195.54 

$2,813,876.43 



12 



ONTARIO 

CIVISICN or AIR SERVICE 



— &s 




V^' 




^ 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. . 



DIVISION OF AIR SERVICE 

General 

The fire hazard in the summer of 1948 was one of the worst encountered in 
several years and taxed our resources to the limit in certain localities. In other areas, 
considerable purchased flying was required because of the size and extent of the fires 
involved. 

Normal relations were maintained with the Department of Transport in respect 
of the operation of our aircraft and our responsibilities in respect of the Class V 
licence issued early in the year. 

The Division of Air Service has working arrangements with the Departments 
of Health, Mines, Public Works and the Provincial Police, and carried out all flying 
requisitions for these Departments as required. 

This flying included the carrying of Police officials on investigations, flying of 
prisoners from remote areas, servicing of geological parties under the Department of 
Mines, transportation of Inspectors for the Department of Public Works, mercy 
flights enabling emergency care for the Department of Health and so forth. 

Some additional flying was also done for the Department of Highways, in- 
cluding transportation of their Inspectors and Senior Officials and for the Department 
of Attorney-General in the transportation of Judicial officials for the purpose of hold- 
ing court in remote areas. Flying was also carried out on co-operative projects with 
Federal Departments of Indian Affairs and Entomology. 

New Construction and Expansion 

The new hangar building, started by the Department of Public Works in 1947, 
was brought almost to completion during the fiscal year under review. Apart from 
some very small items which are in critical supply, the work can be considered com- 
pleted. The addition is very welcome and now provides storage space for some fifty 
aeroplanes if required. 

The Department of Public Works also constructed for the Air Service, staff 
housing accommodation at Parry Sound, Sudbury, Oba Lake, Gogama and Chapleau. 
Further accommodation is required at Eva Lake and other points at which the Depart- 
ment may decide to establish Air Service bases. 

Equipment 

In the fall of 1947, an order was placed with the DeHavilland Aircraft Company 
of Canada for twelve Beaver aircraft. These were all delivered during the fiscal period 
under review. As these aeroplanes were delivered, they were put in service and per- 
formed very creditably throughout the entire summer. Their outstanding take-off and 
climb performance enables them to operate out of much smaller bodies of water than 
has ever been the case with any seaplane used by the Department before this time. 
In order to procure the best type of aerial fire fighting equipment for the Department, 
it was decided to sell off much of our old and semi-obsolete equipment and replace it 
with the new and much more efficient Beaver type. To completely accomplish this 
purpose, a further order for fifteen of these aircraft was given to the DeHavilland 
Company late in 1948, and three were delivered before the freeze-up period. The 
balance of the order will be delivered for the opening of the 1949 fire season. 

14 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



A pilot and engineer begin preparation for a take-off during iiinter flying operations. Patrols 
are maintained to uncover poaching and illegal cutting of timber. 




15 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



Additional equipment was supplied by the Department of Public Works in 
the form of new machinery for our tool room; new test equipment for our instrument 
and accessory departments; a plating and battery room for use in their respective 
fields; and the Service purchased out of its own appropriation, a water spray booth for 
the dope room. 

During the period involved, the Department purchased another six war surplus 
Anson aircraft which were dismantled for recovery of engines, propellers and instru- 
ments intended for later use in Beaver aircraft. 

Winter Operations 

Winter operations were materially extended in the winter of 1948-1949. Beaver 
aircraft were operated from Toronto, Algonquin Park, Sudbury, Gogama, Chapleau, 
Geraldton, Eva Lake and Sioux Lookout, and one Norseman each was also operated 
at Port Arthur and Sioux Lookout. Much of the winter work involved was for the 
Division of Fish and Wildlife in the supervision of their interests and the sealing of 
beaver pelts, but work was also performed for other Divisions of the Department, as 
well as other Departments of Government as required. Little or no difficulty was 
encountered on winter operations and it is expected that the same complement will 
operate next year, with some possible additions. 

Maintenance of Service Buildings 

Normal maintenance of all Service property was carried out as usual. Painting 
and normal repairs were undertaken where necessary in order to keep our property 
to a proper standard. 

Accidents 

I regret to report that one fatal accident involving the late pilot H. W. 
Westaway occurred at Parry Sound in ^lay, 1948. We also lost one Norseman in an 
accident at Caribou Lake in September, but no fatalities occurred in this latter 
accident. 



The following tables are submitted as supplementary to this Report: — 

Table Page 

No. 

1 Allocation of Aircraft ._. _ 17 

la Allocation of Aircraft 17 

2 Tr.\nsport Aircraft — Effective Loads Carried — . 17 

3 Hours Flown on Various Phases of Flying Operations - 18 

4 Totals 20 

5 Hours Flown at Bases - 20 

6 Flying Time — Pilots 20 

7 Flying Time— Aircraft -- 21 



16 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Table I 
ALLOCATION OF AIRCRAFT- 



-1Q48-4Q 



Base 



Registration 



Algonquin Park CF-OBY 

Biscotasing CF-OBH 

Caribou Lake CF-OBJ 

Chapleau „. CF-OCC 

Eva Lake _ CF-OCA 

Fort Frances CF-OBM 

Geraldton CF-OCB 

Gogama .__. CF-OCD 

Ignace CF-BGM 

Kenora CF-OBO 

Oba Lake ...CF-OB\V 

CF-OBX 
Orient Bav CF-OBL 

CF-OBQ 
Pays Plat CF-OA\V 



Type Base Registration' Type 

Beaver Parry Sound CF-OAV Stinson 

Norseman Pickle Lake _...CF-OBC Norseman 

Norseman Port Arthur CF-OBR Norseman 

Beaver Red Lake CF-OBD Norseman 

Beaver Remi Lake CF-OAY Stinson 

Norseman Sault Ste. Marie ._- .CF-OBI Norseman 

Beaver CF-OBF Norseman 

Beaver Sioux Lookout CF-OBE Norseman 

Stinson CF-OBG Norseman 

Norseman CF-OBB Stinson 

Beaver South Porcupine CF-OBN Norseman 

Beaver Sudbury CF-OBS Beaver 

Norseman Temagami CF-OBA Stinson 

Norseman Twin Lakes CF-OBLT Beaver 

Stinson Toronto CF-OBZ Beaver 



Table \\ 
ALLOCATION OF AIRCRAFT 

Note: Although Table 1 shows allocation of aircraft at the termination of the season; due to the 
necessity of replacing aircraft with Beavers and retiring our older aircraft, as well as making 
aircraft available for winter operations, the following machines operated for periods at Bases set 
forth below: — 



Base Registration Type 

Algonquin Park CF-BGN Stinson 

Chapleau CF-OCC Beaver 

Eva Lake G-CAPA Moth 

Geraldton CF-OBT Beaver 

CF-OCB Beaver 

Gogama CF-BIM Stinson 



Base Registration Type 

Parry Sound CF-BGJ Stinson 

Port Arthur CF-OBI Norseman 

Sudbury CF-OAP Fairchild 71 

CF-OBS Beaver 

Twin Lakes ..CF-OBU Beaver 

Toronto CF-OBS Beaver 



Table II 
TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT— EFFECTIVE LOADS CARRIED 1Q48-49 



AiK( raft 
Fairchild 71 
CF-OAP .. 

Norseman 
CF-OBC .. 
CF OBD .. 
CF-OBE .. 
CF-OBF .. 
CF-OBG .. 



Hours 
Flown 

128.35 

431.45 
551.55 
172.50 
269.15 
386.20 



CF-OBH _ _ _... 536.30 

CF-OBI 512.15 

CF-OBJ _ 341 .45 



CF-OBL 
CF-OBM 
CF-OBN 
CF-OBO 
CF-OBQ 
CF-OBR 



317.45 
398.25 
492.25 
376.35 
322.15 
337.25 



Effective Loads 
77,710 Lbs.— 38 Tons, 1710 Lbs. 



106,760 Lbs.- 
400,005 Lbs.- 
58,295 Lbs.- 
168,620 Lbs.- 
284,890 Lbs.- 
755,095 Lbs.- 
411,250 Lbs.- 
154,065 Lbs.- 
155,067 Lbs.- 
374,195 Lbs.- 
428,320 Lbs.- 
254,570 Lbs.- 
181,140 Lbs.- 
249,715 Lbs.- 



- 53 Tons, 
-200 Tons, 

- 29 Tons, 

- 84 Tons, 
-142 Tons, 
-377 Tons, 
-205 Tons, 
-77 Tons, 

- 77 Tons, 
-187 Tons, 
-214 Tons, 
-127 Tons, 

- 90 Tons. 
-124 Tons, 



760 Lbs. 
5 Lbs. 

295 Lbs. 

620 Lbs. 

890 Lbs. 

1095 Lbs. 

1250 Lbs. 

65 Lbs. 

1067 Lbs. 

195 Lbs. 

320 Lbs. 

570 Lbs. 
1140 Lbs. 
1715 Lbs. 



17 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Beaver 

CF-OBS 3Q8.4S 

CF-OBT , 300.05 

CF-OBU 346.40 

CF-OBV 591.10 

CF-OBW ...._. - 415.30 

CF-OBX 293.35 

CF-OB Y 212.10 

CF-OBZ -. 46.55 

CF-OCA -.- 293.25 

CF-OCB _ 135.30 

CF-OCC 182.50 

CF-OCD 1 70.25 

Stinson 

CF-OBA 408.30 

CF-OBB 265.20 

CF-BGJ _ 116.20 

CF-BGM 421.10 

CF-BIM „ 367.55 

CF-BGN 337.10 

CF-0 AV 2 7 .45 

CF-OAW 343.50 

CF-OAY 346.50 



208,260 Lbs.- 

210,930 Lbs.- 

121,115 Lbs.- 

210,365 Lbs.- 

183,010 Lbs.- 

138,165 Lbs.- 

67,227 Lbs.- 

15,575 Lbs.- 

205,980 Lbs.- 

60,970 Lbs.- 

62,760 Lbs.- 

93,670 Lbs.- 

213,755 Lbs.- 
124,331 Lbs.- 

26,540 Lbs.- 
108,210 Lbs.- 
222,345 Lbs.- 
159,391 Lbs.- 
7,195 Lbs.- 
187,080 Lbs.- 

82,180 Lbs.- 



-104 Tons 
-105 Tons 

- 60 Tons 
-105 Tons 

- 91 Tons 

- 69 Tons 

- 33 Tons 

- 7 Tons 
-102 Tons 

- 30 Tons 
-31 Tons 

- 46 Tons 

-106 Tons 

- 62 Tons 

- 13 Tons 

- 54 Tons 
-111 Tons 

- 79 Tons 

- 3 Tons 

- 93 Tons 

- 41 Tons 



260 Lbs. 

930 Lbs. 
1115 Lbs. 

365 Lbs. 
1010 Lbs. 

165 Lbs. 
1227 Lbs. 
1575 Lbs. 
1980 Lbs. 

970 Lbs. 

760 Lbs. 
1670 Lbs. 

1755 Lbs. 

331 Lbs. 

540 Lbs. 

210 Lbs. 

345 Lbs. 
1391 Lbs. 
1195 Lbs. 
1080 Lbs. 

180 Lbs. 



Total Transport Section: — 
Total Flying Time, Hours 

Total Loading, Lbs. 

Total Loading, Tons 



11,597.50 

. 6,768.751 

.3,384 Tons, 751 Lbs. 



Table III 
HOURS FLOWN ON VARIOUS PHASES OF FLYING OPERATIONS 



1924-48 



1948-49 



Total 



Fire Detection 

Game Conservation (Fish and Wildlife) 

Fire Suppression 

Photography 

Sketching 

Transportation — Ordinary 

Transportation — Special 

Mercy Flights 

Ferrying 

Forced Landings 

Flying Instruction 

Observers Instruction 

Operations 

Tests Aircraft 

Dusting Operations, Ont. Govt. 

Dusting Operations, B.C. Govt. 

Tests Radio 

Dept. of Entomology 

Dept. of Research 



45, 
1 

37 
1 
4 

43 



162 



351.05 

,587.20 

,940.31 

,413.40 

,133.18 

,795.45 

,356.37 

330.17 

,814.32 

,016.29 

,985.52 

94.09 

,963.08 

,606.37 

326.05 

86.20 

88.20 

383.35 

437.55 

711.35 



2,163.25 


47,514.30 


1,397.20 


2,984.40 


3,276.45 


41,217.16 


1.35 


1,415.15 


48.25 


4,181.43 


3,091.15 


46,887.00 


836.10 


9,192.47 


30.15 


360.32 


246.35 


7,061.07 


6.55 


1,023.24 


21.40 


3,007.32 




94.09 


250.20 


6,213.28 


54.45 


1,661.22 




326.05 




86.20 


33.20 


121.40 


170.50 


554.25 


37.25 


475.20 


11.667.00 


174,378.35 



18 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Flying in supplies for a tourr, this Beaver aircraft of the Divisoin of Air Service is being moored 
prior to unloading. 




Through rapid transportation of men and equipment by plane many forest fires can be brought 
under control before they reach large proportions. — A Beaver aircraft circles a fire to ascertain its 
extent before landing. 



M^^iiiiiilJfSi^^. 




rifsf* 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Table IV 
TOTALS 

1924-48 

Passengers Carried 139,211 

Personnel Carried 83,987 

Total Passengers and Personnel Carried 223,198 

Effective Loads Flown Lbs _.._- 47,698,316 

Effective Loads Flown Tons 23,849 Ton 

316 Lbs. 



1948-49 


Total 


26,372 


165,583 


5,219 


89,206 


31,591 


254,789 


6,768,751 


54,467,067 


3,384 Ton 


27,233 Tons 


751 Lbs. 


1,067 Lbs. 



Table V 
HOURS FLOWN AT BASES 1948-49 



Base 
Algonquin Park 

Biscotasing 

Caribou Lake - 

Chapleau 

Eva Lake 

Fort Frances — 

Geraldton 

Gogama __.. 

Ignace — . 

Kenora 

Oba Lake 

Orient Bay 

Pays Plat _. 

Parry Sound 



Hours Flown 

466.45 

..__._ 535.30 

...... 329.20 

...... 168.40 

...... 279.40 

...... 402.10 

413.10 

...... 534.30 

. 416.45 

394.40 

...... 1003.00 

534.45 

342.20 

...... 55.55 



Base Hours Flown 

Pickle Lake 447.40 

Port Arthur 544.40 

Red Lake 519.55 

Remi Lake 336.05 

Sault Ste. Marie 958.25 

Sioux Lookout 913.50 

South Porcupine 488.50 

Sudbury — 554.45 

Temagami 407.10 

Twin Lakes 328.05 

Toronto _ _ - 290.25 



11,667.00 



Pilots 



Table \T 
FLYING TIME— PILOTS 

1024-48 



1948-49 



Total 



Bliss, W. H. F 

Blockley, H. T. ..... 

Burton, E. C 

Burton, J. O. 

Burtt, A. E. 

Buckworth, W. B. 

Cooke, T. C. 

Culliton, J. P. 

Denley, J. G 

Donnelly, J. T 

Duncanson, I. C. ... 

Fiskar, U. W 

Gillard, M. V 

Hallatt, H. M 

Hull, C. L 

Kingdon, O. F 

Kincaid, J. 

LeFeuvre, C. J 

MacDougall, F. A. 

Parsons, R 

Phillips, G. H. R. . 



487.10 

596.35 
1,656.10 

278.05 
2,092.50 
2,995.55 

623.20 
2,673.20 
1,147.35 
1,337.10 

2,341.55 

4,944.10 

264.55 

304.00 

695.45 

1,165.25 

3,051.40 

3,467.00 

2,465.45 

7.204.10 



347.30 
314.10 
376.40 
318.15 
432.25 
9.25 
494.50 
266.05 
568.35 
445.15 
339.15 

10.40 
334.55 
450.55 
421.25 
337.50 
391.35 
269.15 
709.05 
442,20 



834.40 

910.45 

2,032.50 

596.20 

2,525.15 

3,005.20 

1,118.10 

2,939.25 

1,716.10 

1,782.25 

339.15 

2,341.55 

4,954.50 

599.50 

754.55 

1,117.10 

1,503.15 

3,443.15 

3,736.15 

3,174.50 

7,646.30 



Continued on next page. 



20 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



1024-48 



1048-40 



TOT.AX 



Piper, O. xM. 

Pcnsford, G. E. __ 

Poulin, L. D „ 

Reid, D. M. 

Siegel, J. 

Smith, A. B. 

Stone, R. W. E. _.. 
Speight, H. C. -- 

Taylor, J. M 

Trussler, G. E. 

Westaway, H. W. 

Woodside, T. 

.\oorduyn Pilots.. 
.\II Other Pilots 

Tot.al: 



466.35 

2,337.50 

404.25 

720.15 

1,770.35 

1,089.55 

2.329.25 

3,857.20 

4,565.15 

4,233.07 

9.15 

101,044.43 

162,711.35 



502.35 
57.25 
681.50 
251.50 
551.55 
553.10 
548.45 
405.55 
378.55 
375.55 
58.00 



20.20 



11 667.00 



502.35 

524.00 

3,010.40 

746.15 

1,272.10 

2,323.45 

548.45 

1,495.50 

2,708.20 

4,233.15 

4,623.15 

4,233.07 

9.15 

101,065.03 

174,378..<5 



T.\BLE VII 

FLYING TIME— .AIRCR.\FT 



.Aircraft 


1024-48 


1048-40 


TOT.U, 


Bum. 








CF-OAS 


3,063.05 


.20 


3,063.25 


F.MRCHILD 71- 




CF-OAP .. . 


3,181.30 


128.35 


3,310.05 


Moth 








G-CAPA 


5,479.30 
5,867.40 


54.10 
.20 


5,533.40 


G-CAPB 


5,868.00 


G-CAOU . „ 


5,511.50 
5,591.32 


.30 
4.50 


5,512.20 


G-CAOVV .- 


5,596.22 


XoRSEM.AX 








CF-OBC 


045.45 
781.00 


431.45 
551.55 


1,377.30 


CF-OBD 


1,332.55 


CF-OBE 


1,106.05 


172.50 


1,368.55 


CF-OBF 


1,364.25 


269.15 


1,633.40 


CF-OBG . . 


1,052.00 


386.20 


1,438.20 


CF-OBH 


047.55 


536.30 


1,484.25 


CF-OBI 


774.10 


512.15 


1,286.25 


CF-OBJ 


633.40 


341.45 


975.25 


CF-OBL .. 


685 10 


317 45 


1,002.55 
950.55 


CF-OBM 


552.30 


398.25 


CF-OBX .. . 


i22.2S 


492.25 


814.50 


CF-OBO _ _..... 


324.15 


376.35 


700.50 


CF-OBQ 


243.05 


322.15 


565.20 


CF-OHR ... 


302.05 


337.25 


639.30 


Stinsox 








CF-OBA 


1,712.35 


408.30 


2,121.05 


CF-OBB 


1,167.45 


265.20 


1,433.05 


CF- B G J „ 


1 ,000.45 


116.20 


2,107.05 


CF-BGM 


2,828.20 


421.10 


3,249.30 


CF-BIM 


1.040.50 


367.55 


1,408.45 


CF- BGX 


2,682.35 


337.10 


' 3,019.45 


CF-OA\- 


2,334.50 


27.45 


2,362.35 


CF-OAVV 


3,001.50 


343.50 


3,435.40 


CF-OAV 


2.710.00 


^40. 50 


3. 065. .50 



Continued on next pa^e. 
21 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 





1924-48 


1948-49 


Total 


Beaver 

CF-OBS . 

CF-OBT 

CF-OBU .. 

CF-OBV 

CF-OBW 

CF-OBX 

CF-OBY ._ 

CF -0 B Z 

CF-OCA 

CF-OCB 

CF-OCC 


104,323.28 
162,711.35 


398.45 

300.05 

346.40 

591.10 

415.30 

293.35 

212.10 

46.55 

293.25 

135.30 

182.50 

170.25 

3.00 

3.20 

2.40 


398.45 
300.05 
346.40 
591.10 
415.30 
293.35 
212.10 
46.55 
293.25 
135.30 
182 50 


CF-OCD 

CF-OCE 


170.25 
3 00 


CF-OCF .._.__ 

CF-OCG 


3.20 
2 40 


All Other Aircraft - — 


104,323.28 


Total : 


11.667.00 


174,378.35 



C=:^3^ 



22 





Division 
of 

FISH 

and 

WILDLIFE 



-^'^ *. 



' 




i 


5S- 


==•3 ^- • 


-"*!£: ^ 


Sir: 


-.->'--., 
_j-^^. 


_ ^^/^ 




Sk. 






Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE 

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT: 

General 

Hunting pressure on big game species has increased steadily in recent years. 
A special study of moose hunting revealed a concentration of hunting in remaining 
accessible areas of moose abundance. 

Upland game species showed gratifying increases and the open season on grouse 
was extended. An exception in this case is the European hare (jack rabbit) which 
is scarcer than at any time since it first became generally distributed in southern 
Ontario. 

Fur-bearing animals were generally in satisfactory numbers. Lynx, fisher and 
marten are still scarce, however, and a close season was established on marten. A 
serious die-off of beaver took place in the Severn River drainage of Patricia District, 
from causes not yet definitely established. 

Trap-Line Management 

The organization of registered trap-lines under trap-line licence was extended 
to Patricia District, where practically all trappers are Indians. The number of trap- 
line licenses issued during the year was 4,736, of which 3,008 were issued to Treaty 
Indians. 

Co-operation With Wildlife Management Institute 

The Department continued to co-operate in the Wildlife Management 
Institute's Pheasant studies on Pelee Island. 

Restocking 

A total of 42,650 pheasants were distributed from Departmental bird farms. 
Of these 6,266 were day-old chicks. Subsequent care and release of all birds was 
generally carried out by rural municipalities. 

Fur Farming 

The recession in the raw fur market which occurred during the latter part 
of 1946, continued in 1948, and became progressively worse for the fox rancher. It 
is attributed to the lack in popularity and demand for long-haired furs and the over- 
abundance of inferior quality pelts which have flooded the market and forced prices 
down. Two main factors have been responsible in enabling fox ranchers to withstand 
the recession and remain in business, namely, the protection afforded under The 
Agricultural Products Co-operative Marketing Act, and the fact that many of these 
ranchers were also producing mink for which fair prices were received. However, 
mink pelt prices have been on a gradual decline and have now reached the point 
where prices received for average to good quality standard mink, have been only 
slightly above production costs. In addition, the rancher has been faced with an 
increase in production costs during the recession of from 20% to 25%. 

The general condition of the industry was reflected in a net decrease of 85 
ranches in the Province, during 1948. The total number of licenses issued was 1,694 
with 1,421 beings renewals of previous licenses, 229 for newly established ranches, 
many of which covered only a few mink, and 44 licenses were issued with retroactive 
provisions to legalize the possession of fur-bearing animals during the previous year. 

24 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Jj^ndex of ^ able A 

Table No. Page 

1. Summary of breeding stock — Licensed fur farms - - - - 25 

2. Comparative table showing annual wolf bounty statistics - 26 

3. Wolf bounty for fiscal years 1Q47-4S and 1948-49 — Counties 27 

4. Wolf bounty for fiscal years 1947-48 and 1948-49 — Districts 27 

5. Comparative table showing annual bear bounty statistics - 28 

6. Bear bounty for fiscal years 1947-48 and 1948-49 - - - - 29 

7. Revenue received from export permits --------29 

8. Revenue received from tanner's permits -------30 

9. Summary of pelts exported and pelts tanned ----- 30 

10. Total value of pelts exported and pelts tanned - - - - - i2 

11. Statement of r.anch raised pelts exported of t.anned - - - i2 

12. Det.\ils of officers responsible for seizures ------ 34 

13. .Articles seized ----------------34 

14. Firearms seized ------------ ----35 

15. Pelts and hides seized --------------35 

16. Miscellaneous .articles seized -----------35 

17. Inform.ations ----------------35 

18. Results of prosecutions -------------35 

19. Convictions for fiscal year ending March 31, 1940 - - - - 36 

20. Amounts re.\lized from sales of articles -------37 

21. Comparative table showing the fish distribution according 

TO species, 1947-48 ---------------40 

22. Distribution of fish --------------40 

23. Comparative statement of the yield of the fisheries of 
Ontario by lake ---------------42 

24. Statistics of the fishing industry in the public waters of 
Ontario for the year ending December 31, 1948 ----- 43 

25. Quantities of fish taken ------------43 

26. Comparativte statement of the yield of the fisheries of 
Ontario by species ---------------44 



Table No. 1 

summ.ary of breeding stock 
licensed fur f.\rms 

J.\NU.\RY 1st 

1945 1946 



194; 



1948 



Heaver 

Fisher 

Blue Fox 

Cross Fox - 

Pearl Platinum Fox . 

Platinum Fox 

Red Fox 

Standard Silver Fox.. 

White Fox 

White marked Fox... 

Lynx 

.Marten 

Mink „.... 

Muskrat 

Raccoon 

Skunk 



44 


30 


45 


70 


14 


35 


45 


46 


955 


1,283 


1,276 


1,450 


64 


47 


36 


23 


* 


* 


378 


368 


1,514 


2,?>)^2 


3,133 


2,437 


106 


110 


94 


38 


11,238 


10.772 


9,400 


6,654 


* 


* 


5 


1 


2,629 


3,115 


3,179 


1,690 


2 


1 


1 


1 


17 


16 


28 


35 


36,912 


50,677 


72,992 


75,192 


26 


2 


92 


65 


128 

1 


130 


127 


07 
1 



* Shoun under (dlied types. 



25 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Wolf Bounty 

Under The Wolf and Bear Bounty Act, a $25.00 bounty is paid on either a 
timber or brush wolf three months of age or over, and a $5.00 bounty is paid on 
either a timber or brush wolf under three months of age. 

On wolves killed in the provisional judicial districts, the Department pays 
the whole bounty, whereas on those killed in counties, the Department pays 40% 
of the bounty with the remaining 60 /t paid by the respective county. 

Table No. 2 
The following is a comparative table showing annual wolf bounty statistics for a period of 
five years, ending with the fiscal year 1948-1949. 

Bounty and 
Period Timber Brush Pups Total Expenses 



For year ending Mar. 31, 1945 


1,321 


665 


12 


1,998 


$45,993.58 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1946 


1,266 


777 


30 


2,073 


$44,999.87 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1947 


1,440 


1,182 


42 


2,664 


$59,275.18 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1948 


1,515 


961 


74 


2,540 


$54,923.38 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1949 


1,581 


1,062 


84 


2,727 


$57,977.00 



The Department considered 1,936 claims for bounty on 2,727 wolves, 4 claims 
representing 4 wolves were refused for failure of the claimant to produce the whole 
pelt. In addition, 14 claims were refused, with which 10 dog pelts and 6 fox pelts 
were submitted. 



Making preparations to blow up a beaver dam to prevent flooding of a road bed. 




No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



The following is a summary of the number of wolves killed in each of the 
counties and districts, in the years shown, on which applications for bounty were 
received. 

Table No. 3 

WOLF BOUNTY FOR FISCAL YEARS 

1947/1Q48 AND 1948/1949 

Counties 

timber brush pups total 

COUNTY 1947/48 1948/49 1947/48 1948/49 1947/48 1948/49 1947/48 1948/49 



Brant 


6 

13 

5 
2 

1 
16 

34 

1 
1 


1 

1 
5 

1 

29 

2 
4 

6 
49 

3 


20 
19 

5 

1 

48 
6 

11 
6 
2 
1 

38 
4 
2 
2 

34 
7 

12 

9 

4 

10 

10 

1 

59 

1 

45 

24 
3 


1 

29 

9 

6 

3 
4 

39 
1 

22 

12 
2 
4 

55 
5 

3 
14 

21 

20 

10 
14 

5 

19 

1 
49 

39 

1 
60 

1 
1 
1 
4 


2 

9 

10 

14 

2 

12 


1 
9 

18 

6 
6 

5 
12 


20 

19 

S 

1 

54 
6 

13 
6 
2 
1 

51 

13 

12 
2 

53 
7 

14 

9 

6 

11 

26 

1 

93 

1 

46 

37 
3 


1 


Bruce 


30 


Carleton.. _. 

Durham 

Elgin 


9 

15 

4 


Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 


4 

44 

1 


Grenville 


40 


Grey 

Haldimand 

Halton 


13 

2 
4 


Hastings 

Huron 

Kent . ___ 

Lambton — 

Lanark 


84 
5 

3 
16 


Leeds 


27 


Len. and Add. .... 

Middlesex 

Norfolk - 


24 
16 


Northum'd .- 

Ontario 


14 
5 


Perth 




Peterb'h 


25 


Prescott 




Prince Ed. 


1 


Renfrew 

Russell 


98 


Simcoe .-. 


44 


Stormont 

Victoria . 


1 

75 


Waterloo 


1 


Welland ._. 

Wellington 

York _ _.. 


1 

1 
4 


T0TAI> 


79 


101 


384 


455 


49 


56 


512 


612 



Table No. 4 

WOLF BOUNTY FOR FISCAL YEARS 

1947/1948 AND 1948/1949 

DISTRICTS 
TIMBER BRUSH PUPS 

1Q47/48 1048/49 1947/48 1948/49 1947/48 1048/49 



TOTAL 
1947/48 1948/49 



Algoma 


64 


95 


103 


106 






167 


201 


Cochrane 


14 


24 


2 


2 




4 


16 


30 


Halihurton 


IS 


11 




2 






18 


13 



Continued on next page. 
27 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



TIMBER BRUSH PUPS TOTALS 

1947/48 1947/48 1947/48 1Q47/48 1948/49 1948/49 1948/49 1948/49 



Kenora 


544 


537 


102 


84 


1 




647 


621 


Manitoulin 


6 


13 


124 


83 


19 


9 


149 


105 


Muskoka 


13 


11 


12 


10 






25 


21 


Nipissing 


91 


103 


11 


10 






102 


113 


Parry Sd. 


83 


80 


12 


16 






95 


96 


Patricia _ _ 


53 


32 


6 


7 






59 


39 


Rainv River 


225 


164 


79 


143 


5 


9 


309 


316 


Sudbury 


89 
18 


124 
44 


52 
1 


66 
6 






141 
19 


190 


Timiskaming ... 


50 


Th. Bay 


208 


242 


73 


72 




6 


281 


320 






Total ... . 


1426 


1480 


577 


607 


25 


28 


2028 


2115 


Grand 




Total . ... 


1505 


1581 


961 


1062 


74 


84 


2540 


2727 







Bear Bounty 

A resume of the conditions on which bear bounty is paid under The Wolf and 
Bear Bounty Act, is as follows. A $10.00 boimty is paid on an}- bear 12 months of 
age or over, and a $5.00 bounty on any bear under 12 months of age, which was 
killed between April 15th and November 30th, in a township of which 25 'y of the 
total area is devoted to agriculture and which is located in the counties and districts 
described in the regulations made under the Act. The Act further specifies that the 
bear must be killed in defence or preservation of livestock or property, by a bona 
fide resident of the township. 

Table No. 5 

The following is a comparative table, showing annual bear bounty statistics for a period oi 
five years, ending with the fiscal year 1948-1949. 



PERIOD 


ADULTS 


CUBS 


BOUNTY 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1945 


910 




$ 8,790.00 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1946 


1167 




11,330.00 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1947... 


959 


73 


9,735.00 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1948 


509 


17 


5,095.00 


F-^r year ending Mar. 31, 1949 


592 


67 


6,035.00 



It is felt that the marked decrease in the number of bears killed during the 
last two fiscal years, is due to the natural fluctuation in bear population. 

A total of 494 claims on 592 bears and 67 cubs, were considered by the 
Department. Of these, 19 claims representing 20 bears and 4 cubs, were refused 
for failure to comply with the Act or regulation. 

A breakdown showing the number of adult bears and cubs on which bounty 
was paid in the counties and districts specified by regulation, for years shown, follows. 

28 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



COUNTY OR 
DISTRICT 



Table No. 6 
BEAR BOUNTY FOR FISCAL YEARS 

1947/1948 — 1948/1949 

ADULTS CUBS TOTAL 

1947/48 1948/49 1947/48 1948/49 1947/48 1948/49 



Algoma 

Bruce 

Cochrane 

Frontenac - 

Haliburton 

Hastings 

Kenora 

Len. and Add. 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Parry Sound- 
Patricia 

Peterboro 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Sudbury 

Timiskaming.. 
Thunder Bay- 
Victoria 



Total 



18 

12 

53 

2 

4 

9 

26 

7 

S 

1 

32 

40 

1 
54 
17 
55 
112 
60 

1 



500 



21 

18 

86 

2 

6 

17 

5 

4 

3 

10 
18 
37 

1 
60 
12 
64 
184 
43 
1 



502 



17 



2 

3 

20 

7 



19 

13 

54 

3 

5 

9 

26 

7 

5 

1 

n 

42 

1 

58 
18 
56 
113 
63 
1 



67 



526 



21 

22 

93 

2 

6 

22, 

5 

6 

3 

12 

20 

39 

3 
68 
14 

67 

204 

50 

1 



659 



Table No. 7 

REVENUE RECEIVED FROM EXPORT PERMITS 

APRIL 1, 1948, TO MARCH 31, 1949 

total number 

of PELTS 



TOTAL AMOUNT 
OF REVENUE 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher... 

Fox (Cross)- 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black). 

Fox (White) 

Fox ((Not specified)... 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 



21 

74,253 

1,333 

431 

10,510 

63 

48 

3 

554 

162 

36,429 

582,722 

4.876 

11,234 

10,139 

51,498 



5 10.50 

148,506.00 

1,999.50 

646.50 

1,051.00 

126.00 

72.00 

1.50 

831.00 

162.00 

18,214.50 

58,272.20 

4,876.00 

1,123.40 

506.95 

2,574.90 



Total Revenue 



$238,973.95 



29 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Table No. S 

REVENUE RECEIVED FROM TANNERS' PERMITS 
APRIL 1, 1948, TO MARCH 31, 1949 

TOTAL NUMBER 
OF PELTS 



TOTAL AMOUNT 
OF REVENUE 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross). 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black). 

Fox (White) 

Fox ((Not specified)- 

Lynx 

Marten.. 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter...... 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 

Total Revenue 



29 

161 

12 

55 

4,543 

26 

2 

4 

26 

13 

906 

253,187 

75 

1,132 

1,072 

1,049 



14.50 
322.00 
108.00 

82.50 
454.30 

52.00 
3.00 
2.00 

39.00 

13.00 

453.00 

25,318.70 

75.00 
113.20 

53.60 

52.45 



$27,156.25 



Table No. 9 






SUMMARY 






PELTS 


PELTS 


TOTAL 


EXPORTED 


TANNED 


PELTS 



Bear 

Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black). 

Fox (White) 

Fox ((Not specified)... 

Lynx 

Marten 

M ink 

Muskrat 

Otter... 

Raccoon 

Skunk ._ 

Weasel 



21 

74,253 

1,333 

431 

10,510 

63 

48 

3 

554 

162 

36,429 

582,722 

4,876 

11,234 

10,139 

51,498 



29 

161 

72 

55 

4,543 

26 

2 

4 

26 

13 

906 

253,187 

75 

1,132 

1,072 

1,049 



50 

74,414 

1,405 

486 

15,053 

89 

50 

7 

580 

175 

37,335 

835,909 

4,951 

12,366 

11,211 

52,547 



Revenue received from Export Permits 
Revenue received from Tanners" Permits 



$238,973.95 
27,156.25 



Total Revenue $266,130.20 



30 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



A Conservation Officer checks a hunter's bag at a road block. 




31 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Table No. 10 

TOTAL VALUE OF PELTS EXPORTED OR TANNED 
DURING THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1949 



PELTS 


PELTS 


TOTAL 


VALUE OF 


EXPORTED 


TANNED 


PELTS 


PELTS 


21 


29 


50 


$ 50.00 


74,253 


161 


74,414 


1,592,459.60 


1,333 


72 


1,405 


35,307.65 


431 


55 


486 


1,458.00 


10,510 


4,543 


15,053 


20,321.55 


63 


26 


89 


679.07 


48 


2 


50 


440.00 


3 


4 


7 


9.45 


554 


26 


580 


7,366.00 


162 


13 


175 


2,493.75 


36,429 


906 


37,335 


832,570.50 


582,722 


253,187 


835,909 


2,507,727.00 


4,876 


75 


4,951 


93,821.45 


11,234 


1,132 


12,366 


24,732.00 


10,139 


1,072 


11,211 


7,735.59 


51,498 


1,049 


52,547 


59,903.58 


784,276 


262,352 


1,046,628 


$5,187,075.19 



Bear 

Beaver _-_ 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 

Fox (White) 

Fox ((Not specified )- 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrat 

Otter... 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel..... 

Wolverine 



Table No. 11 

STATEMENT OF RANCH RAISED PELTS EXPORTED OR 
TANNED FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1949 





exported 


tanned 


total pelts 


value of 

PELTS 


Fox (Blue) 

Fox ( Cross) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 

Mink 


892 

12 

18,321 

136,877 


2 

5 

2,327 

6,481 


894 

17 

20,648 

143,358 


.f; 6,706.28 

42.50 

235,387.20 

1,404,908.40 




156,102 


8,815 


164,917 


$1,647,044.38 



ENFORCEMENT 

The Fish and Wildlife Division is responsible for the administration and 
enforcement of the following legislation and regulations, viz: The Game and Fisheries 
Act, and the Regulations adopted in accordance with the provisions thereof; The 
Special Fishery Regulations for the Province of Ontario, provided under The Fisheries 
Act (Canada) by the Federal Government with the approval of the Province; and 
the Migratory Birds Convention Act and Regulations, also a Federal enactment. 

Patrol services to assure that the provisions of these various enactments and 
regulations are obeyed throughout the Province are carried out by a staff of Con- 
servation Officers. These Officers, in their respective areas, are under the immediate 
control and supervision of the District Foresters in charge and the Fish and Wildlife 
Inspectors assigned for duty in the twenty-one districts into which the Province is 



32 



Xo. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



divided. Quite an appreciable degree of co-operation in this work of enforcement 
is provided by members of the Ontario Provincial Police force, local municipal police 
forces, and by interested sportsmen under the authority of appointments as honorary 
deputy game wardens. Members of the regular staff of Conservation Officers are 
expected to carry out their duties in an efficient and effective manner, and to be 
courteous to those with whom they come into contact in the course of their general 
work. 

In our efforts to provide a satisfactory and beneficial degree of enforcement 
it is difficult to estimate the value of the assistance and co-operation which is derived 
from the extensive campaign of education and publicity provided by the many local 
organizations interested in the protection and conservation of our fish and game 
resources. It is perhaps superfluous to reiterate the appreciation which is felt by 
those in charge of this branch of the administration. 

In addition, it is a branch of the service in which we are fortunate to have 
associated with us in the work those who perform their duties with the idea that 
effective service will maintain our natural resources in such a condition that they 
will in future years provide a measure of enjoyment for our own residents as well 



Trapline management increases the productivity of a trapper's line and assures him of a substantial 
yield from season to season. Here a trapper prepares to set a trap. 




33 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



as for the thousands of visitors from outside our boundaries who annually visit this 
great Province for a period of rest and healthful recreation. Without such attractions 
to stimulate and develop this traflic within Ontario our loss from the financial 
standpoint would be inconceivable. 

It has been necessary that Conservation Officers, in the course of their patrols, 
should provide action in the case of those with whom they have come into contact 
while in the act of committing some infraction of our legislation and regulations. 
Such action has been subsequently followed by prosecution, and the statistical details 
which follow will indicate in a degree some of the activities of these officers and the 
results which have accrued therefrom. 

Seizures 

During the annual period covered by this review, extending from April 1, 1948, 
to March 31, 1949, an examination of our records maintained in the Enforcement 
Section reveals the following information. 

There was a total of 2,915 cases in which equipment was seized by reason of 
the fact that the same was being used in various ways which apparently constituted 
infractions of the legislation and regulations. 

Table No. 12 
Details of the officers who were responsible for these seizures are as follows, viz: — 

Conservation Officers — - 2,713 cases 

Provincial Police Constables - - - IS cases 

Deputy Game Wardens 3 cases 

Joint Action: 

Conservation officers and O.P.P - 16 

Conservation officers and D.G.W. - 162 

Conservation officers and Municipal Police - 6 

184 cases 



2,915 cases 

In 280 of these cases the seizures were made from unknown persons, prin- 
cipally involving traps and fishing gear which were set in an unlawful manner, and 
in which cases it was impossible for the officers concerned to develop definite evidence 
regarding the ownership of these articles. The seized equipment in these cases was 
confiscated to the Crown. 

Table No. 13 
The articles seized in these 2,915 cases included: — 

Game animals (or portions) 

and birds in 319 cases Traps and snares in 224 cases 

Firearms in 1,292 cases Water craft in 44 cases 

Fish in 389 cases Outboard motors in — — 11 cases 

Nets and fishing gear in __. 241 cases Motor vehicles in 8 cases 

Angling equipment in .._ 492 cases Lights (artificial) in 52 cases 

Spears in .._.. 85 cases Aeroplanes in 2 cases 

Pelts and hides in 1,926 pieces Miscellaneous articles 345 pieces 

Further details concerning these various seizures are enumerated in the following tables: — 

34 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Table No. 14 

FIREARMS 

.22 calibre rifles 654 cases Combination rifles and shotguns 

High-power rifles 235 cases Revolvers and pistols 

Shotguns 391 cases .^ir rifles 



6 cases 
5 cases 
1 case 



1,292 cases 



Table No. 15 
PELTS .\XD HIDES 



Bear .._ 3 

Beaver 483 

Fisher 7 

Fox (Cross) — 2 

Fox (Silver) . 2 

Fox (Red) 43 

Lynx 5 

Marten 7 



Mink 184 

Muskrat 660 

Otter 25 

Raccoon 39 

Squirrel 358 

Weasels 102 

Wolves -- 6 



1,926 



T.^BLE No. 16 
MISCELLANEOUS ARTICLES 



Packsacks and Haversacks 48 

Cameras _ 1 

Hunting Knives 15 

Tackle Boxes 87 

Dynamite (sticks) 6 

Snaggers _ 1 1 

C reels _ 8 

Sleeping Bags 2 

Ice Boxes ._ 2 



Minnow Pails 7 

Anchors 2 

Tents _ 2 

Tip-Ups 4 

Duck Decoys 31 



Suit Cases 
Ice Chisels 

Ferrets 

Shovels 

Dogs 



2 



Prosecutions 

The information contained in the followino; statistical tables emphasizes one 
phase of enforcement and the necessity for the maintenance of a capable and efficient 
staff to perform these duties. 

T.4BLE No. 17 
INFORMATIONS 





SEIZURES 


IXVESTIGATIOXS 


TOT.^L 




Conservation Oft'icer? 

Provincial Poli r 


2.386 
16 


log 


2.585 
16 


ToTAI 


2,402 


199 


2.601 





Table No. 18 
RESULTS OF PROSECUTIONS 





COXVICTIONS 


DISMISSED 


WITIIDKAWN 


TOTAL 


Conservation OfficiT> 
Provincial Police 


2.:s(. 1 

10 


100 


lOS 


2,5S5 
16 








Total 


2.302 


106 


193 


2.601 



35 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Table No. 19 
CONVICTIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1949 



Angling without Non-Resident 

Licenses 

Exporting undersized or over-limit 

of fish 

Taking undersized or over-limit of 

fish 

Angling with more than one line 



194 



34 



136 
31 



Fishing other than by angling 93 

Illegal possession of gill nets 61 

Illegal possession of fish in closed 

season 

Setting nets in restricted areas 

Taking undersized or Game Fish in 

nets 

Taking fish by use of artificial lights 

Angling in restricted waters 

Pollution of waters 

Commercial fishing without licenses _ 

Exporting filleted fish 

Allowing fish to spoil 

Importing live minnows 

Guiding without licenses 

Hunting without licenses 

Hunting in closed season 103 

91 



9. 

10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
IS. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 

20. Hunting during prohibited hours .... 

21. Hunting deer without licensed guides 
(Rainy River and Kenora Districts) 

22. Hunting with unplugged shotguns .... 
2i. Hunting ducks from power boats 

24. Jacklighting deer 

25. Illegal possession of game in closed 
season 

26. Illegal possession of female deer or 
fawns 

27. Killing cow moose _ 



152 



2 

14 

26 

4 

3 

2 

4 

8 

10 

543 



11 
19 
10 

2 

99 

12 

5 



28. Illegal use of poison 1 

29. Trespassing 12 

30. Loaded firearms in motor 

vehicles, etc. 129 

Illegal possession of firearms in 
Crown Game Preserves and 

Provincial Parks 98 

Illegal possession of firearms in 

lumber and mining camps, etc. 70 

Firearms not encased or dismantled 

at night 13 

Illegal possession of and transporting 

unsealed deer 33 

Shooting from motor cars or across 

highways 7 

Allowing dogs to run at large 6 

Hunting with dogs not licenced 2 

Hunting migratory birds and 

pheasants with rifles 14 

Obstructing an Officer 7 

Taking hen pheasants 6 

Killing wild native birds 3 

42. Operating Tourist Outfitters' Camps 

without licenses 4 

Trapping without licenses 71 

Illegal possession of furs 104 

Set snares in closed season _ 6 

Trapping during closed season 13 

Trapping in Game Preserves and 

Provincial Parks 10 

Set traps in muskrat burrows and 

beaver houses 16 

Ship furs by plane without licenses... 1 

Keep wild animals without permits .. 2 

2,302 



31. 



2,2. 

U. 

34. 

35. 

36. 
37. 
38. 

39. 
40. 
41. 



43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 

48. 

49. 
50. 



Charges were laid against violators in a total of 2,601 cases in which infractions 
of the legislation and regulations it is our duty to administer and enforce had either 
been witnessed or disclosed upon investigation. 

In 2.302 cases, convictions were registered by the presiding magistrates before 
whom the respective charges were heard. Charges were dismissed due to lack of 
evidence in 106 cases. In the remaining 193 cases the charges were withdrawn. 

It may be of interest to relate that while quite a large percentage of these 
cases constituted infractions of but a minor nature, there were many deliberate viola- 
tions in which, following prosecution and conviction of the offenders, severe penalties 
were imposed, important amongst which were: 

(a) Illegal taking and possession of beaver 

(b) Unlawful hunting and trapping in Provincial Parks and Crown Game 
Preserves 

(c) Assaulting and obstructing officers 

(d) Illegal killing of cow moose 



36 



A'o. 3 Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



(e) Possession of gill nets without proper authority 

(f) Operating gill nets without a licence. 

General 

The Game and Fisheries Act provides that articles "used in violation of this 
Act and found in the possession of any person suspected of having committed an 
offence against this Act shall be seized, and upon conviction, be forfeited to and 
become the property of the Crown in right of Ontario and sold by the Department''. 

In many cases in which articles are seized following offences, particularly 
where such offences are of a minor character, the persons concerned, following dis- 
position of the charges which were laid, have been provided with an opportunity to 
redeem the articles seized from them on payment of a specified fee assessed by the 
Department for the return of such articles. This arrangement applies principally 
to firearms and fishing tackle. 

However, there is a percentage of offences in which the circumstances are 
sufficiently serious to warrant the definite confiscation to the Crown of the seized 
articles. These confiscated articles are disposed of by the Department at annual 
public sales. 

Four such sales were conducted by the Department during the period under 
review, a fishing tackle sale in May. fur sales in May and July, and a sale of firearms 
in October. 

Table No. 20 
.\mounts realized from sales of these articles were as follows: 

May fishing tackle sale $ 927.01 

May fur sale — confiscated furs 5,639.90 

July fur sale — -- - - — 5,643.50 

October sale of firearms — 3,304.43 



Total $15,514.84 

During the period under review Conservation Officers numbering close to 
200, in the course of their operations, and in addition to a multiplicity of other duties, 
performed the following services: 

1. Seized equipment in 2,915 cases, 208 of which covered persons unknown, and 
involved traps and fishing gear unlawfully set. 

2. Prosecuted some 2,585 cases and obtained convictions in 2.286. 

3. Obtained fines totalling $47,98.S. 

4. Realized $15,514.84 from the sale of confiscated articles. 

5. Travelled well over 2.000,000 miles using every available means of transportation, 
to ensure law observance. 

6. Aided in the distribution of millions of fish and the re-stocking of thousands of 
pheasants. 

7. Spent a great deal of time — after hours, working with organized groups in the 
interests of conservation. 

GAMK FISH AXD HATCHERIES 

During the year, twenty-seven hatcheries and rearing stations were in opera- 
tion. Dorion. one of our largest trout rearing stations, which was closed for two 

37 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



years for renovation and improvement, is in full operation again. It is one of the 
largest and most modern rearing stations of its kind on the continent. 

Good progress was made in the culture and distribution of the various species 
of fish reared in our hatcheries. The total output of fish this year was decidedly 
greater than the output during any one of the three preceding years. Generally speak- 
ing, the game fish distribution was unchanged during the past few years, but there 
was a decidedly good increase in the distribution of the commercial fish, notably 
yellow pickerel. 

Biological Projects 

(a) The creel census which was commenced last year in the Kawartha Lakes 
area was continued. Intensive studies were made on the maskinonge in its natural 
environment. 

(b) Studies were made on the establishment of more sanctuaries for small- 
mouth bass in the Georgian Bay region. 

(c) The creel census was continued in Grey county to determine the propor- 
tion of hatchery-reared trout in the angler's catch. The specific waters investigated 
were, Eugenia Hydro Pond. Williams Lake and sections of the Sydenham River. 

(d) The creel census programme was continued on a few waters in the 
Thunder Bay district. A considerable number of lake trout fingerlings were marked 
by fin-clipping, prior to their release in Lake Superior (Rossport area) and in two 
inland lakes, namely, Oliver and Arrow in the Port Arthur district. This project will 
be continued for a number of years. 

(e) Nets were operated on the following waters for the removal of undesirable 
species: 

Nonquon River Round Lake Wolfe Lake 

Lake Scugog Marsh Bob's Lake Sand Lake 

Westport Pond 

(f) During the summer months, smallmouth black bass, largemouth black 
bass and maskinonge adults were distributed in suitable waters from netting 
operations conducted on the following sites: 

Nogies Creek Little Gull Lake Westport Pond 

Salmon Lake Fox Lake Cook Lake 

(g) Experimental operations were conducted on Trout Lake for the collection 
of lake trout and ouananiche spawn, and on Lake Bernard for the taking of Kamloops 
trout spawn. 

(h) Operations for the control of the sea lamprey were continued. A number 
of weirs were set in selected streams flowing into the North Channel. Further studies 
of this problem are being continued. 

(i) Small experimental projects were conducted (1) on the Nottawasaga 
River for assisting rainbow trout over the dam, and (2) on the Thames River for 
transferring pickerel and bass to the upper river. 

(j) Studies relating to the re-establishing of the Atlantic salmon in Lake 
Ontario were continued in Duffin Creek at Pickering. 

(k) Further studies were continued on the relationship of commercial fishing 
and angling in Long Point Bay. This project will be continued for several years. 

3i 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



(1) A Study of the growth of transplanted adult bass in Cache Lake was com- 
menced by tagging and subsequent creel census. 

(m) Biolo-ical investigations were made on a number of lakes and streams 
with a view to the establishment of a sound f^sh-management plan. These were either 
initial surveys or extensions of previous ones. The waters studied were as follows: 



ALGOMA 

Beaver Lake 
Francis Lake 
Johnson Creek 
Lonely Lake 

BRANT 

Crystal Springs 

BRUCE 

Arran Lake 
Beattie Lake 
Berford Lake 
Boat Lake 
Chesley Lake 
Colpoy Bay Creek 
Gould Lake 
Isaac Lake 
John Lake 
Judge's Creek 
Maryville Lake 
Silver Lake 
Sky Lake 
Spring Creek 
Spry Lake 

COCHRANE 

Xighthawk Lake 

DURHAM 
Baxter Creek 
Fleetwood Creek 
Indian Springs 
Mount Pleasant Creek 
Shea Creek 
Tripp Creek 
Upper Pigeon Creek 

FRONTENAC 

Loughboro Lake 
Shoe Pac Lake 

GREY 

Anderson Lake 
Beaver River 
Bighead River 



Irish Lake 
Middleton Creek 
Macintosh Lake 
McCullough Lake 
Robson Lake 

HALIBURTON 

Elephant Lake 
Kabakwa Lake 

HURON 

Caudle Lake 
Cemetery Creek 
Duncan Creek 

KENORA 

Blindfold Lake 

Cedar Lake 
Granite Lake 
Longbow Lake 
Lulu Lake 
Marchington Lake 
Misfit Lake 
Muskie Lake 
Perrault Lake 
Royal Lake 
Silver Lake 
Wabaskong Lake 
Winnipeg River 
(The Dalles) 

NIPISSING 

Barker Lake 
Birch Lake 
Dean Lake 
Minnow Lake 
Peach Lake 
Price Lake 
Rib Lake 
Seafoam Lake 
Sharpe Lake 
Timagami Lake 

NORTHUMBERLAND 

Healev Falls 



ONTARIO 

Beaverton River 

PARRY SOUND 

Crooked Lake 
Six Mile Lake 
Trout Lake 

PETERBOROUGH 

Birch Bark Lake 
Plato Creek 
Lnion Creek 
West Ouse Creek 

RENFREW 

Green Lake 
Jamieson Lake 
Little Joe Lake 
Loon Lake 
Tucker Creek 
Wabun Lake 

SUDBURY 

Koko Lake 
Red Cedar Lake 

THUNDER BAY 

Cross Lake 
Lake Marie Louise 
Oxaline Lake 
Surprise Lake 
Upsala Lake 

VICTORL\ 

Archer Creek 
Mount Xebo Creek 
Pigeon Creek 
Potash Creek 
Reforest Creek 

YORK 

Grenadier Pond 
Haynes Lake 
Holland Marsh 



JP 



Report of ike Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



T.ABLE No. 21 

COMPARATIVE TABLE SHOWING THE FISH DISTRIBUTION ACCORDING 

TO SPECIES— 1944-1948 



1944 



1945 



1946 



1947 



1948 



Largemouth Bass 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings and Adults^ 

Smallmouth Bass 
Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings and Adults 

Maskinonge 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Adults 

Perch 

Fry 

Pickerel (Yellow) 
Fry 

Brown Trout 

Eggs and Fry 

Fingerlings -- 

Yearlings 

Lake Trout 

Eggs and Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Rainbow Trout 

Fingerlings -— -— 

Yearlings 

Kamloops Trout 

Yearlings — — 

Adults - 

Speckled Trout 

Fry 

Fingerlings _. 

Yearlings 

Adults 

Whitefish 

Fry — - 

Herring 

Fry 

Minnows 

Adults 

.■\tlantic Salmon 

Fingerlings 

Totals 



130,000 

14,600 

51 

2,030,000 

664,400 

2,834 

2,705,000 
2,952 



18,480,000 
271,265,000 

330,750 

3,176,500 

3,475,995 

44,108 

32,186 
3,900 

7,200 

493,840 

2,876,963 

4.360 

259,435,000 

5,662.000 

25,000 

30,000 



570,892,549 



5,000 



448,000 

348,368 

5,322 

2,030,000 
200 



12,000,000 

177,595,000 

50,000 

224,749 

765,000 

7,248,040 

88,700 

5,563 

9,900 

5,000 

117,300 

3,005,573 

4,467 

240,786,775 

6,405,000 

4,000 

41,350 



9,500 
27 

385,000 

312,710 

4,418 

1,150,000 
6,875 



20,450,000 
142.385,000 



133,025 
268,940 

2,265,000 

3,609,195 

28,045 



1,610 

4,850 

50,000 

84,730 

2,760,780 

8,656 

205,590,000 

69,674,000 



88,210 



305.000 

6,100 

876 

1,457,000 

579,925 

5,099 

2,790,000 

11,540 

127 

12,000,000 

254,030,000 



375,850 



3,467,645 
89,050 

3,850 



451,193,307 I 449,270.571 



16,100 
115 



517,400 

2,802,150 

1,860 

233,316,125 

23,940,000 

59.000 



535,774,812 



410,000 
300 
789 

1,402,500 

554,900 

3,459 

3,135,000 

24,600 

195 



267,170,000 

9,000 
557,505 
350,113 

1,000,000 

4,858,300 

77,055 

27,900 
8,350 

4,600 
100 

1,000 

882,450 

2,333,910 

5,270 

243,482,000 
20,375,000 



101,400 



546,775,696 



40 



Table No. 22 
DISTRIBUTION OF FISH 



SPECIES 


EGGS AND FRY 


FIXGERLIXGS 


YEARLINGS 


ADULTS 


TOTALS 


Largemouth Bass 

Smallmouth Bass 


410,000 

1,402,500 

3,135,000 

267.170.000 


300 

554,900 
24,600 




789 

3,459 
195 


411,089 
1,960,859 


Maskinonge 

Pickerel ( Yellow) 


3,159,795 
267,170,000 



Continued on next page. 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



SPECIES 

Brown Trout 

Lake Trout.. 

Rainbow Trout 

Kamloops Trout _ 

Speckled Trout.. 

Whitefish... 

Herring 

Atlantic Salmon 



EGGS AND FRY FINGERLINGS YEARLINGS 



9,000 
1,000,000 



1,000 

243,482,000 

20,375,000 



557,505 

4,858,300 

27,900 

882,450 



101,400 



536.984,500 



7,007,355 



350,113 

77,055 

8,350 

4,600 

2,333,910 



2,774,028 



100 
5,270 



9,813 



916,618 

5,935,355 

36,250 

4,700 

3,222,630 

243,482,000 

20,375,000 

101,400 



546,775,696 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES 

During the calendar year ending December 31, 1948, the commercial catch 
of fish totalled 28,941,791 lbs. and the total value was $5,735,072.72. Comparison 
with the catch of 1947 shows an increase of 16.1% or 4,019,371 lbs. and an increased 
return to the fishermen to the amount of $931,818.75. On the other hand, value of 
equipment used increased from $5,147,029 in 1947 to $5,716,075 in 1948, an increase 
of $569,046. Additional stocks of gear on hand and increased costs of twine, etc. 
would appear to be the cause of this. 

It is notable that there was an increase in catch of all species of fish except 
herring, mixed and coarse, perch and pike. With reference to herring, attention 
should be drawn to the fact that it was expected that the Lake Erie catch would 
continue to decline since the enormous catches of previous years had been largely 
of one year-class of these fish and this year-class is now passing out of the fishery. 
Thus, while the total catch of herring was 1,790,747 lbs. less than in 1947, the drop 
in the Lake Erie catch was 1,881,082 lbs. for that same period. 

The most outstanding increases in catch were in blue pickerel and whitefish. 
More than 5^ million pounds of blue pickerel were taken, with a resultant increase 
over the previous year of 4,031,445 lbs. All but 41,983 lbs. of these fish were taken 
in Lake Erie. The whitefish catch amounted to 6^ million lbs. and represents an 
increase of 1,598,172 lbs. over the 1947 catch. It is to be noted that increases in the 
whitefish catch were shown for all waters in which this species is taken with the 
exception of Lake Ontario. Of particular significance are the increased catches of 
whitefish in the North Channel and Lake Huron, where fishing has fallen off badly 
in the past seven years. The catch of 537,939 lbs. of whitefish in Lake Huron is the 
largest recorded for the Lake since 1920. While the catch from Georgian Bay shows 
an increase over that for 1947, it still falls far below the catches of previous years. 

Another point of interest is that all the waters of Ontario, with the exception 
of Northern Inland waters and Lake St. Clair, .show an increase in total catch over 
1947 and in all waters except Lake Ontario an increase in catch value is shown. 

Closukf. of W.atfks During Spawning Season 

In the fall of 1948, part of Georgian Bay was closed to angling and com- 
mercial fishing. This closure was to have been in effect from October 25, 1948, to 
December 31, 1948, and included all waters of the Georgian Bay south of an 
imaginary straight line drawn from Cape Commodore in the Township of Keppel, 



41 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



County of Grey, on the west, to Gidley Point in the Township of Tiny. County of 
Simcoe, on the east. Actually, closure was effective from November 11, to the end 
of the year. The purpose of this closure was the protection of Lake Trout during 
spawning season. 

Investigations 

During the summer of 1948, a study of the relation of pike to other fish species 
in the Bay of Quinte Area was carried out. This study was especially concerned with 
the availability and desirability of the pike in the anglers' catch and with the effect 
of the commercial catch of this species from the anglers' point of view. 

Angling pressure and commercial fishing pressure were assessed. It is hoped 
to continue these studies in 1949. 

Investigations were carried out in Northern Inland Waters in an effort to 
assess the amount of parasitic infestation of whitefish. 

Commercial fishing operations, under close Departmental supervision, were 
started in Bigstone Bay of Lake of the Woods, in order to determine if fishing 
pressure against the non-game-fish species would improve the angling in these waters 
which have been closed to all commercial fishing for many years. 

During the year consideration was given and discussions were held with 
reference to: 

(1) Readjustment of boundary between the Essex and Kent County line as 
it affects gill-net fishermen. 

(2) Use of trap-nets in Lake Erie. 

(3) Mesh of gill-nets to be used in Lake Superior for catching Lake Trout. 

rOLLUTION 

Pollution investigations in 194S were limited by the fact that no suitable field 
men were available for this work. Some investigations were carried out however 
at the Nation River in Dundas County and Effingham and St. John's Streams in 
Welland and Lincoln Counties. 



Table No. 22, 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES 
OF ONTARIO BY LAKE 





1047 


1048 


IXCREASE 


DECREASE 


LAKE 


porxDS 


POI'NUS 


POUNDS 


porxDr, 


Ontario — 


2,001,519 


2,045,441 


43,922 




Erie 


12,333,022 


14,926,190 


2,592,268 




St. Clair ..-. _ -. 


466,386 


437,289 




29,097 


Hurcn 


1,106,086 


1,439,692 


332,706 




Georgian Bay 


666,488 


913,317 


246,829 




North Channel - 


266.640 


444,995 


178,355 




Superior - 


2,829,606 


3,371,040 


541,434 




No-th Inland Waters 


4,802,434 


4,629,365 




173,069 


South Inland Waters 


448,439 


734,462 


286,023 








Total 


24,922,420 


28,041,791 


4,221,537 


202,166 


Net Increase 






4.010,371 





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1 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Table No. 26 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES OF 
ONTARIO BY SPECIES 



1947 

POUNDS 



1048 

POUNDS 



INCREASE 

POUNDS 



DECREASE 
POUNDS 



Carp - 

Catfish and Bullheads . 

Caviare 

Eels-_. 

Goldeye _ 

Herring 

Mixed and Coarse 

Perch 

Pickerel (blue) 

Pickerel (yellow) 

Pike - 

Sauger.. 

Sturgeon 

Lake Trout 

Tullibee 

Whitefish 

Total _.. 

Net Increase 



505 

667 

3 

35 

4,310 

3,566 

2,646 

1,752 

2,947 

1,020 

162 

176 

1,878 

305 

4,941 



,749 
,185 
,164 
,734 

,953 
,275 
911 
695 
,395 
823 
,808 
,675 
,547 
,742 
,764 



24,922,420 



612,359 

907,800 

2,348 

41,974 

2S,232 

2,520,206 

3,499,205 

2,257,086 

5,784,140 

3,088,595 

928,377 

163,921 

185,287 

1,978,295 

404,030 

6,539,936 



28,941,791 



106,610 
240,615 

6,240 
28,232 



4,031,445 
141,200 

1,113 

8,612 

99,748 

98,288 

1,598,172 



6,360,275 
4,019,371 



816 



1,790,747 

67,070 

389,825 



92,446 



2,340,904 






44 




of 
FOREST 

PROTECTION 






Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



DIVISION OF FOREST PROTECTION 

FIRE AND HAZARD CONDITIONS 

The 1948 fire season was one of the most severe on record. During May and 
June, extremely bad burning conditions prevailed across the Province, particularly 
in the area north of Georgian Bay. During July and August, rains alleviated the 
situation considerably, but in September, drought conditions again prevailed and 
severe lightning storms occurred particularly in the Central Region. The drought 
conditions lessened in the eastern half of the Province during October but became 
worse in the western part, particularly in Rainy Lake area and along the Ontario- 
Manitoba boundary. This condition obtained until November 10th when fall rains 
and colder weather brought the fire season to a close. 

Two fires which broke out on ]\Iay 25th in the ^vlississagi Provincial Forest 
burned a total of 645,340 acres or 63 -r of the total area burned over and accounted 
for 76 '^t of the total timber damage. 

FIRE CONTROL PLANNING 

Progress in fire control planning during the year included the following 
projects. 

1. Installation of 15 additional weather stations and improvement of existing 
stations. This brings the total number of main weather recording stations to 
73 and the number of supplementary stations to 57. 

2. First edition of a manual "Instructions for Rating the Fire Danger and Laying 
out Fire Weather Stations'' was completed, printed, and issued. 

3. First edition of a manual "Fuel Type Mapping Instructions'' was completed, 
printed and issued. 

4. First edition of a manual "Area Seen flapping Instructions" was completed, 
printed and issued. 

5. The fire report form was completely revised and brought up to date. 

6. The "Area Seen Survey" was continued with five men taking part. This survey 
was completed and a report on the present tower system in the province on the 
basis of this survey was compiled. 

7. Basic data required in fire control planning was compiled for the province. This 
included the zones of constant fire danger, accessibility map, fire occurrence 
map, climatic data, soil moisture conditions, etc. 

8. The transportation plan, particularly for the less accessible areas in the province, 
was completely revised and brought up to date. 

9. The detection plan for the province was revised and brought up to date. 
10. The use of the portable tower for tower location work was continued. 

HAZARD DISPOSAL 

The fire guard at Larder Lake was extended by thirty acres and thirty-five 
acres at Kearns Townsite was cleared. The work was carried out by a local firm 
and the cost credited to their account for timber dues. 

46 



j^o. 3 Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



INSECT CONTROL 

The Department again co-operated with the Dominion Department of Agri- 
culture in the forest insect survey and in entomological research. 

EXPENDITURES 

The total expenditures on fire protection for the year, excluding the cost of 
Administration and Air Service, was $3,257,421.17. The amount of fire tax collected 
from woods operators was S440.0 10.56. Miscellaneous revenue amounted to 
$48,330.64. 



^ndex of- ^ able A 

Table No. Page 

1. Total iaiprovemexts completed to March 31, 1Q49 - - - - 47 

2. R.4DI0 equipment in use during 194S ---------48 

3. Classification of forest fires, by month -------48 

4. Classification of forest fires, by origin --------48 

5. Classification of forest fires, by size --------49 

6. Classification of area burned over, by month ------ 49 

7. Classification of area burned over, by origin ------ 4Q 

8. Classification of area burned over, by forest type - - - - 51 

9. Classification of land burned over, by ownership - - - - 51 

10. Means of fire detection -------------51 

11. Statement of fire permits issued ----------51 

12. Statement of tr.avel permits issued ---------53 

13. Statement of work permits issued ---------S3 

14. Fire d.amage table ---------------54 

15. Major equipment pirchased and in use --------56 



niPROVEMENTS 

The Department of Pul)lic Works supervised the construction of the larger 
buildings and the renovation of fish hatcheries, while the Department of Lands and 
Forests carried out the construction of the smaller buildings and the repair and 
maintenance of buildings, fish hatcheries, telephone lines, etc. 

Table No. 1 
Total improvements completed to March 31, 1949. 



Cabins 


537 
149 

56 
17 
57 
39 


Garajtes and Carhouses 


99 


Storehouses . 


Other Buildings — 


269 

62 


Combined Storehouses and Boathouses .. 


Wooden Lookout Towers 

Steel Lookout Towers 


52 

230 


Offices 


Telephone Lines (Miles) 


3,769 



47 



Report GJ the Department cj Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



RADIO COMMUNICATIONS 
During the year 1948 the Department's radio communication system handled 
a total of 19.475 messages for a total word count of 487.997. 



Table No. 2 



Radio equipment in use during 1Q48. 

Tower Sets 174 

17 

2 

IQ 

SO 



Portable Tower Sets 

Boat Sets 

Portable Ground Sets .— 
Model 30 Ground Sets 



Model 75 Ground Sets 
Model ISO Ground Sets 
Model 300 Ground Sets 
Aircraft Sets 



TnTAL 



2 

4 

7 

35 

310 



Table No. 3 

CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 

By Month 1948 



1948 
No. 



1947 
No.. 



1946 
No. 



1945 
No. 



1944 
No. 



1043 
No. 



1942 
No. 



March 


1 
119 


11 


43 
140 


IS 
134 


128 


15 




April 


286 


May 


473 


135 


248 


182 


352 


188 


102 


June 


437 


170 


298 


121 


112 


33 


137 


July- - -- - 


288 


202 


404 


160 


253 


96 


235 


August 


146 


466 


404 


318 


233 


86 


287 


September 


370 


125 


117 


26 


16 


20 


61 


October 


197 


260 


83 


9 


37 


186 


116 


November 


S 


24 


2 


1 


6 






Totals 


2,036 


1,393 


1.739 


966 


1,137 


624 


1,224 



Table No. 4 

CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 

Bv Origin- 1948 



Or.K IN 

Settlers 

Campers . 

Railways 

Lightning 

Legging Operations 
Mining Operations 

Smokers 

Road Construction 

Incendiary 

Prospectors 

Miscellaneous 

Unknown... 

Totals 



1948 


1947 


1946 


1945 


1944 


1943 


1942 


No. 


No. 


No, 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 



147 

432 

333 

433 

52 

6 

^61 

46 

35 

2 

80 

9 



2.036 



75 

298 

180 

410 

56 

6 

248 

30 

IS 

2 

31 

42 



1,393 



80 

481 

249 

303 

68 

11 

383 

21 

31 

2 

68 

42 



1.7,39 



44 

289 

163 

121 

32 

3 

231 

4 

8 

3 

36 

32 



966 



1,137 



96 


55 


247 


187 


218 


82 


185 


100 


37 


26 


1 


3 


243 


132 


4 


5 


23 


4 


2 


1 


55 


25 


26 


4 



624 



114 

296 

143 

195 

34 

3 

243 

8 

13 

3 

56 

116 



1,224 



48 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Table No. 5 
CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 
By Size — 1948 





1948 


1947 


1946 


1945 


1944 


1943 


1942 


SIZE 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


14 Acre and under 


571 


412 


490 


211 


241 


155 


276 


Over /4 to 5 acres 


894 


626 


784 


457 


519 


237 


487 


Over 5 to 10 acres. 


155 


97 


129 


75 


93 


58 


97 


Over 10 to 100 acres 


285 


177 


233 


159 


211 


108 


244 


Over 100 to 500 acres 


74 


50 


78 


43 


47 


41 


86 


Over 500 to 1,000 acres 


24 


12 


13 


11 


7 


15 


20 


Over 1,000 to 10,000 acres 


33 


19 


12 


10 


17 


10 


13 


Over 10,000 acres 










2 




1 


Totals 


2,036 


1,393 


1,739 


966 


1,137 


624 


1,224 



Table No. 6 

CLASSIFICATION OF AREA BURNED OVER 

By Month— 1948 



1948 

ACRES 



1947 

ACRES 



1946 

ACRKS 



1945 

ACRES 



March 
ApriL- 
May.— . 
June 



July 

August 

September,. 

October. 

November.. 



1,990 

801,612 

185,706 

3,968 

1,250 

5,286 

17,506 

63 



3/ 

2,712 

26,768 

4,802 

17,360 

2,248 

29,355 

730 



421 

2,284 

13,080 

25,338 

20,734 

11,088 

1.520 

2,304 



373 

6,788 

12,171 

4,389 

8,379 

16,186 

39 

165 

20 



Totals 



1,017,389 



84,032 



76,769 



48.510 



CLASSIFICATIO.V 

Settlers 

Campers 

Railways 

Lightning 

Logging Operations 
Mining Operations 

Smokers 

Road Construction 

Incendiary 

Prospectors 

Miscellaneous.- 

Unknown 

Totals ... 



Table No. 7 

CLASSIFICATION OF AREA BURNED OVER 

Bv Origin — 1948 



1948 

ACRES 



1047 
ACRES 



1046 

ACKKS 



1045 

ACRES 



18,613 

393,696 

8,129 

139,822 

35,903 

26,015 

23,318 

365,355 

1,446 

3 

3,146 

1,943 



1.017,389 



3,449 

3,091 

12,606 

20,353 

14,921 

385 

24,515 

1,379 

577 

16 

2,244 

496 



84.032 



2,677 

21,898 

9,406 

20,630 

7,085 

256 

12,109 

873 

490 

4 

673 

668 



76,769 



1,789 

17,902 

3,164 

1,517 

5,789 

8 

15.412 

1 

134 

IS 

2,557 

222 



48,510 



49 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



A camp set up for forest fire fighters on the shore of a lake during the Chapleau fire. 




50 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



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57 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



FOREST FIRES IN ONTARIO 



FROM J930 TO ] 9 4, 




1930 1931 1932 1933 193^ 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 



ACREAGE BURNED BY FOREST FIRES I 



ONTARIO 



1400 

1300 

1200 

U5 1100 

u 1000 
< 

u. 900 

o 

ui 800 

o 

< 700 

=> 600 
O 

^ 500 

400 
300 
200 



FROM 1930 TO I94J 



















YEAR 


ACPES 
BURNED 


YEAR 


ACRES 
BURNED 






- 


1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 


711,309 
138 207 
679,021 
349,958 
198.633 
250,662 
1,264 433 
224,746 
138,245 
29,098 


1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 


121 614 
666 547 
11 3 716 
52,817 
168,891 
48 510 
76,769 
84.032 
I 017 389 




- 










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1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 



1945 1946 1947 



52 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Communications are an important factor in forest protection. — The transmitting and receiving 
equipment at Maple, Ontario, thrnut^h zchich fire reports are channelled into Head Office 




Table No. 12 
STATEMENT OF TRAVEL PERMITS ISSUED — 1948 
1948 1947 1946 1945 1944 



104.^ 



1042 



Permits 
Persons 



61,384 
194,617 



51,187 
146,185 



35,794 20,393 
112,191 I 70,085 



13,510 
41,569 



1 1 ,004 
28,567 



8,358 
24,725 



Table No. 13 
STATEMENT OF WORK PERMITS ISSUED 1948-1949 



MINING 

OPERATIONS 

NO. OF MEN 

PERMITS ENGAGED 



WOODS 

OPERATIONS 

NO. OF MEN 

PERMITS E.VGAGED 



MISCELLANEOUS 

OPERATIONS 

NO. OF MEN 

PERMITS ENGAGED 



TOTALS 

NO. OF MEN 

PERMITS ENG.AGED 



1048-1040 


73S 


3,525 


2,024 


41,649 


268 


6,562 


3.030 


51.736 


1947-1948 


1,156 


6,506 


2,083 


48,059 


252 


6,575 


3,491 


61,140 


1946-1947 


1,532 


8,737 


1,871 


54,217 


93 


4,392 


3,496 


67,346 


1945-1946 


1,209 


6,611 


1,520 


39,496 


70 


1,173 


2,799 


47,280 


1944-1945 


1.047 


4,702 


915 


29,047 


211 


1,178 


2,173 


34,927 


1043-1044 


750 


3,507 


090 


29,292 


532 


1.641 


2,272 


34.440 


1042-104^ 


7r.l 


3,633 


S6S 


34.463 


107 


2.00S 


1,826 


40.104 



53 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



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54 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Fire fighting necessitates hard manual labour. Here a Ranger is loaded nith a fire pump on 
pack beard uliich he n'ill carry through the bush to the scene of operations. 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



VO I— I 



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Division of 

LAND 

and 

RECREATIONAL 
AREAS 





Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



DIVISION OF LAND AND RECREATIONAL AREAS 

The continued application of rejiulations and policy, which are constantly 
brought up to date to effect improved administrative practice, has again resulted in 
bringing to a finalization a great number of cases with increased dispatch and 
efficiency. The graphs and tables forming part of this section show the volume and 
work completed. An increase in some forms of land use is indicated, while there was 
a decrease in others over the previous year. This is due to several factors. In the 
case of summer resorts the demand remained about the same but it was possible to 
finalize more applications by reason of being able to get more surveys completed. 
In the case of land use permits, the increase is due primarily to the fact that occupa- 
tion of land by this method of tenure is preferable to lease or licence of occupation, 
and the cost of administration is only a fraction of that of the last two mentioned. 
The decreases indicated are largely the result of clean-up of old cases during the 
past few years, excepting in the case of free grant locations which were discontinued 
in 1942, except to ex-service personnel. 

Licensing of Tourist Outfitters' Camps 

Prior to 1936. there was no licensing of Tourist Outfitters' Camps, whereas 
now, all Commercial Tourist Outfitters' Crimps in the Province are licensed by either 
the Department of Travel and Publicity or the Department of Lands and Forests. 
Camps not classified as Tourist Outfitters' north of the railroad from Parry Sound 
to Pembroke are licensed by the Department of Travel and Publicity. These Licences 
are issued by the Municipal Clerks in organized territory, who retain the fee, and by 
the Provincial Police in unorganized territory. The fee is $5.00 for the first licence 
and $2.50 for renewal. 

The Legislation of the Department of Travel and Publicity covers the entire 
Province, but that Department exempts those camps north of the Railroad from 
Parry Sound to Pembroke licensed as Tourist Outfitters" Camps by this Department. 



^nciex of tabled and Kj rap It A 

Table No. Page 

1. Tourist outfitters' camp licenses ----------59 

2. Agricultural land ---------.--.--60 

3. Free Grant Land (including soldiers' land) -------61 

4. Land for special use -------------- t2 

5. Summer resort lands --------------64 

6. Cities, towns and townsites ------------66 

7. Land use permits issued -------------67 

8. Statement of patents, etc issued ----------68 

Figure No. GR.\PHS p^^^ 

1. Licensed tourist outfitters' camps --------- 5Q 

2. The Ontario Dominion-Provincial Agreement ------ 60 

3. Lands for special use --------------61 

4. Agricultural lands in sale townships ---------62 

5. Agricultural lands in free grant townships (including 
soldiers' land) ----------------64 

6. Summer resort lands --------------66 

7. City, town and townsite lands -----------69 

8. Land use permits, leases, and licenses of occupation issued 69 

58 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Table No. 1 

TOURIST OUTFITTERS' CAMP LICENSES 

For Fiscal Year Exdixg March 31, 1949 

camps licensed 

tourist season 1948 

number ratio 



RAiE OF INCREASE 
OVER LAST YEAR 

(1947) 



Algoma 


170 


14.69c 


15% 


Cochrane - 


22 


1.9% 


37% 


Kenora - 


286 


24.3% 


13% 


Manitoulin 


89 


7.6% 


9% 


Nipissing 


157 


13.4% 


12% 


Parry Sound — 


207 


17.7% 


10% 


Rainv River 


43 


3.7% 


D-14% 


Sudburv _ 


100 


8.8% 


3%, 


Timiskaming — 


24 


2.1% 


50% 


Thunder Bay.. .._ -- 


49 


4.2% 


9% 


Renfrew County 


20 


1.7% 


25% 


Total— 1948..... 


1,167 


100.00% 


11% 




1.024 


88.00% 


87% 


Non-Refident fee of .S25.0O 


143 


12.00% 


13 7f 



Figure No. 1 
LICENSED TOURIST OUTFITTERS' CAMPS 






EACH SYMtOl =- 200 CAMPS 



59 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Figure No. 2 
TRANSACTIONS UNDER THE ONTARIO 
D O M I N I O N - P R O V I N C I A L AGREEMENT 

SECTION 35 OF THE VETERANS' LAND ACT 



30 



to 




Z25 


O 




»— 




< 


20 


«/) 




z 




< 




1— 


15 


11. 




o 




Q£ 


10 




LEGEND 
AGRICULTURE LANDS 
SMALL HOLDINGS 



1 947 



1 948 



1 949 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
DISTRICT 



Table No. 2 
AGRICULTURAL LAND 

Transactions for the Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1949 

DISTRICT sales CANCELLATIONS ASSIGNMENTS 

forester no. ACRES NO. ACRES NO. ACRES 



PATENTS 
NO. ACRES 



Algonquin Park G. H. R. Phillips 
Chapleau J. M. Whelan 
Cochrane A. Crealock 
Fort Frances G. Delahey 
Geraldton U. W. Fiskar 
Gogama J. Taylor 
Kapuskasing G. F. Meyer 
Kenora K. Acheson 
Lake Simcoe J. F. L. Simmons 
Lake Huron I. C. Marritt 
Lake Erie F. S. Newman 
North Bay F. E. Sider 
Parry Sound R. L. Snow 
Port Arthur R. Boultbee 
Quinte A. Leman 
Rideau W. E. Steele 
Sault Ste. Marie Q. Hess 
Sioux Lookout H. Middleton 
Sudbury F. L, Hall 
Temiskaming F. J. Dawson 
Trent A. B. Wheatley 


8 

49 

20 

23 
15 

17 

6 

49 

31 

2 

37 

15 

2 


676. 

3,818.255 
2,320.375 



2,070. 
1,678. 

1,807.50 

448. 
6,840.10 
2,614.65 

340.50 

4,441.85 
1,284. 
160. 


2 

61 
18 

2 

1 

147 

7 

28 
3 

23 
9 

7 
2 

17 

48 

3 


197. 

5,958.42 

1,210.25 

32.5 

75. 

12,868.305 

303.60 

2,604.73 
203.9 

2,839.50 
904. 

935.875 
330.50 
1,848.75 
4,480.06 
303. 


2 

23 
2 

24 
5 

5 
12 

2 

1 

18 

11 


199. 

2,536.288 
240.75 

2,506.535 
741.484 

538. 
1,665.50 

320. 

154.50 
2,287.84 
1,202.75 


7 

26 

5 

40 
4 

23 
6 

27 
25 

4 

1 

29 

27 

1 


598. 

2,885.37 
728.966 

4,428.53 
294.75 

2,911.85 

649. 
3,936. 
2,793.90 

593.56 

144. 
3,330.79 
3,040.75 

100. 


Totals 

Temiskaming University Sales 


274 
3 


28,499.230 
241.75 


378 


35,095.390 


105 


12,392.647 


225 


26,435.466 




277 


28,740.980 


378 


35.095.390 


105 


12,392.647 


225 


26,435.466 



60 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Table No. 3 

FREE GRAXT LAND (Including Soldiers' Land) 

Transactions for the Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1949 



ADMINISTRATIVE 


DISTRICT 


locations 


CANCELLATIONS 


ASSIGNMENTS 


PATENTS 


DISTRICT 


FORESTER 


NO. 


ACRES 


NO. 


ACRES 


NO. 


ACRES 


NO. 


ACRES 


Algonquin Park 


G. H. R. Phillips 


3 


282.910 


26 


2,795.50 


2 


254. 


12 


1,526. 


Chapleau 


J.M.Whelan 


— 




— 




— 




— 




Cochrane 


A. Crealock 


3 


303.50 


4 


381.25 


2 


220.84 


1 


77.25 


Fort Frances 


G. Delahev 


6 


838.50 


45 


5,277.62 


5 


613.25 


16 


2,316.965 


Geraldton 


U. W. Fiskar 


— 




— 




— 




— 




Gogama 


J. Taylor 


— 




1 


149. 


— 




— 




Kapuskasing 


G. F. Meyer 


S 


616.955 


6 


575. 


— 




— 




Kenora 


K. Acheson 


3 


383.75 


24 


3,126. 


16 


2,244.454 


10 


1,505.83 


Lake Simcoe 


J. F. L. Simmons 


— 




— 




— 




— 




Lake Huron 


L C. Marritt 


— 




— 




— 




— 




Lake Erie 


F. S. Newman 


— 




— 




— 




— 




North Bav 


F. E. Sider 


— 




18 


2,487. 


— 




6 


947. 


Parrv Sound 


R. L. Snow 


— 




Z2, 


3,294.50 


5 


^87. 


7 


782. 


Port Arthur 


R. Boultbee 


10 


1,566. 


21 


3,051. 


14 


1,849.15 


24 


3,222.88 


Quinte 


A. Leman 


1 


34. 


52 


4,891.10 


3 


414. 


12 


1,546. 


Rideau 


W. E. Steele 


— 




— 




— 




— 




Sault Ste. Marie 


Q. Hess 


— 




— 




— 




— 




Sioux Lookout 


H. Middleton 


— 




1 


79.50 


— 




— 




Sudburv 


F. L. Hall 


5 


471.3525 


10 


1,461.06 


7 


1,002.50 


11 


1,592.705 


Temiskaming 


F. J. Dawson 


12 


1,294. 


7 


618.25 


— 




3 


317.75 


Trent 


A. B. Wheatley 


1 


82. 


32 


2,350. 


— 




3 


526. 


Totals 


40 


5.872.9675 


280 


30,536.78 


54 


7,085.194 


107 


14,360.380 



Figure No. 3 
LANDS FOR SPECIAL USE 



250 



200 



150 



O 100 



50 




61 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Table No. 4 
LAND FOR SPECIAL USE 

Transactions for the Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1949 



ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT 
DISTRICT FORESTER 



SALES 
NO. ACRES 



CANCELLATIONS 
NO. ACRES 



ASSIGNMENTS 
NO. ACRES 



PATENTS 
NO. ACRES 



Algonquin Park 


G. H. R. Phillips 


6 


163.13 


— 




— 




6 


371.485 


Chapleau 


J.M.Whelan 


— 


— 


— 




— 




1 


0.66 


Cochrane 


A. Crealock 


4 


503.08 


— 




— 




3 


161.51 


Fort Frances 


G. Delahey 


8 


360.49 










10 


378.12 


Geraldton 


U. W. Fiskar 


8 


4,221.43 










12 


4,267.348 


Gogama 


J. Taylor 


1 


12. 










2 


30.04 


Kapuskasing 


G. F. Meyer 


5 


410.300 










11 


802.916 


Kenora 


K. .Acheson 


25 


365.140 










14 


65.91 


Lake Simcoe 


J. F. L. Simmons 


1 


.028 










2 


2.028 


Lake Huron 


L C. Marritt 


3 


161. 










5 


44.346 


Lake Erie 


F. S. Newman 


2 


16.59 










5 


26.02 


North Bay 


F. E. Sider 


19 


1,186.891 


2 


65. 






13 


1,260.715 


Parry Sound 


R. L. Snow 


IS 


162.024 


1 


24. 


1 


16.90 


11 


57.964 


Port Arthur 


R. Boultbee 


6 


290.34 










4 


274.07 


Quinte 


A. Leman 


30 


2,620.14 










43 


3,849.13 


Rideau 


W. E. Steele 


1 


100. 










1 


100. 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Q. Hess 


5 


225.282 


1 


1. 






4 


64.712 


Sioux Lookout 


H. Middleton 


11 


119.07 


1 


20. 






10 


72.43 


Sudburv 


F. L. Hall 


25 


1,845.335 






1 


164.63 


14 


405.065 


Swastika 


F. J. Dawson 


13 


587.263 






1 


3. 


3 


80.454 


Trent 


A. B. Wheatley 


11 


7,192.38 










13 


817.50 


Totals 


199 


20,541.913 


5 


110. 


3 


184.53 


187 


13,132.423 



Figure No. 4 
AGRICULTURAL LANDS IN SALE TOWNSHIPS 



700 



600 




194a 1945 1946 



62 



.Vo. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests jor 1950 



The beauty of Northern Ontario has attracted many people ^^ho find it the ideal location Jor their 
summer homes. 




63 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Figure No. S 
AGRICULTURAL LANDS IN FREE GRANT TOWNSHIPS 

INCLUDING SOLDIERS' LAND 



700 



300 



100 



LOCATIONS 

CANCELLATIONS 

PATENTS 



1 






1 



I 



194 8 



1 



1942 



194 3 



194 4 



1945 



1946 



194 7 



Table No. 5 
SUMMER RESORT LANDS 

Transactions for the Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1949 



ADMINISTRATIVE DISTRICT 
DISTRICT FORESTER 



SALES 
NO. ACRES 



CANCELLATIONS ASSIGNMENTS 
NO. .ACRES NO. ACRES 



PATENTS 
NO. ACRES 



Algonquin Park 


G.H.R. Phillips 


17 


46.712 










25 


70.14 


Chapleau 


J.M.Whelan 


11 


46.09 










8 


40.41 


Cochrane 


A. Crealock 


16 


7.58 










6 


3.07 


Fort Frances 


G. Delahev 


37 


83.78 


3 


92.50 






9 


26.57 


Geraldton 


U. W. Fiskar 


3 


1.99 






1 


4.68 


2 


6.60 


Gogama 


J. Taylor 


5 


6.29 










4 


11.42 


Kapuskasing 


G. F. Meyer 


8 


28.303 






1 


1.063 


6 


19.75 


Kenora 


K. Acheson 


168 


342.511 


15 


46.69 


2 


4.11 


143 


357.63 


Lake Simcoe 


J. F. L. Simmons 


















Lake Huron 


I. C. Marritt 


















Lake Erie 


F. S. Newman 


















North Bay 


F. E. Sider 


181 


400.062 


4 


5.14 


7 


10.74 


115 


272.715 


Parrv Sound 


R. L. Snow 


130 


320.402 


6 


11.43 


5 


14.38 


86 


230.406 


Port Arthur 


R. Boultbee 


48 


130.19 


3 


27.36 






49 


149.08 


Quinte 


A. Leman 


41 


94.798 


4 


9.47 


3 


1.57 


30 


57.016 


Rideau 


W. E. Steele 


1 


4.5 














Sault Ste. Marie 


Q. Hess 


95 


170.524 


1 


1.62 


5 


6.77 


85 


206.071 


Sioux Lookout 


H. Middleton 


28 


95.269 


1 


4.9 


2 


8. 


18 


66.72 


Sudburv 


F. L. Hall 


111 


346.309 


5 


15.662 


12 


52.01 


99 


300.595 


Swastika 


F. J. Dawson 


28 


57.275 


3 


3.36 






13 


34.44 


Trent 


A. B. VVheatley 


82 
1,010 


153.720 






2 


3.75 


58 


131.871 


Totals 


2.336.305 


45 


218.132 


40 


107.073 


756 


1.984.504 



64 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Ontario's many lakes and streams make this Province a paradise for the fisherman.— White water 
near Spanish River. 




65 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Table No. 6 

CITIES, TOWNS AND TOWN SITES 

Transactions for the Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1949 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
DISTRICT 



DISTRICT 
FORESTER 



SALES 
ACRES 



CANCELLATIONS 
NO. ACRES 



ASSIGNMENTS 
NO. ACRES 



PATENTS 
NO. ACRES 



Algonquin Park 


G.H.R. Phillips 


5 


1.100 










2 


0.617 


Chapleau 


J.M. Whelan 


















Cochrane 


A. Crealock 


18 


2.913 


2 


0.184 


2 


0.177 


11 


3.001 


Fort Frances 


G. Delahey 


















Geraldton 


U. W. Fiskar 


10 


2.502 






2 


0.34 


4 


0.618 


Gogama 


J. Taylor 


6 


.955 


1 


0.196 






8 


1.105 


Kapuskasing 


G. F. Meyer 


42 


19.390 


3 


0.95 


7 


4.929 


3i 


23.720 


Kenora 


K. Acheson 


4 


1.56 










4 


1.49 


Lake Simcoe 


J. F. L. Simmons 


1 


.062 










1 


0.326 


Lake Huron 


I.C.Marritt 


12 


15.014 


1 


0.35 






18 


15.913 


Lake Erie 


F. S. Newman 


2 


2.7 






1 


2.2 


3 


7.72 


North Bay 


F.E.Sider 


2 


10.141 










2 


0.210 


Parry Sound 


R. L. Snow 


















Port Arthur 


R. Boultbee 


1 


0.13 






1 


.128 


2 


0.31 


Quinte 


A. Leman 


2 


1.5 










2 


1.5 


Rideau 


W. E. Steele 


















Sault Ste. Marie 


Q. Hess 


5 


2.84 






3 


0.33 


25 


4.385 


Sioux Lookout 


H. Middleton 


14 


2.394 


6 


12.26 


1 


0.38 


15 


2.872 


Sudbury 


F. L. Hall 


18 


2.891 


1 


2.492 






10 


1.71 


Swastika 


F. J. Dawson 


8 


2.034 


3 


0.75 


5 


0.42 


5 


0.637 


Trent 


A. B. Wheatley 


1 


0.50 










1 


0.50 


Totals 


151 


68.626 


17 


17.182 


22 


8.004 


146 


66.6.M 



Fku're No. 6 
SUMMER RESORT LANDS 




1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 



66 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



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07 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Sunset on Bark Lake in the beautiful Haliburton District, a favourite vacation spot. 




Table No. 8 
STATEMENT OF PATENTS, Etc., Issued Durinx the Year Ending March 31, 1949 

Public Land Patents ..- 981 

Free Grant Patents - 107 

Patents and Transfers (Town Lots) - 146 

Miscellaneous Documents 187 

Releases of Pine 177 



Crown Leases ._ — . 9 

Algonquin Park Leases — 26 

Rondeau Park Leases 54 

Temagami Leases - 3 

Water Power Leases 2 

Licenses of Occupation _. .._ 81 

Licenses of Occupation (Rondeau) — 

Licenses of Occupation (Algonquin) 6 

Licenses of Occupation (Temagami) — 

Licenses of Occupation Cancelled 125 

Crown Leases Cancelled 44 



-1,598 



94 



87 



68 



.Vo. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Figure No. 7 
CITY, TOWN AND TOWNSITE LANDS 




1942 1943 1944 



1945 1946 



1947 1948 1949 



Figure No. 8 

LAND USE PERMITS, LEASES AND 
LICENSES OF OCCUPATION ISSUED 



1 - 1 


1 


un' 




^1 LAND USE PERMITS 


1 


- 


1 1 LEASES 

^^ LICENSES OF OCCUPATION 


■ 












1 


- 




- 










■ 










1 






















" n 




n 


Hn 


Hn 


un 



1943 



1945 



1947 



1948 



69 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 




No. 3 



70 



< 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 

DIVISION OF LAW 

The following is a report of the activities of this Division for the period from 
April 1, 1948, to March 31, 1949. The primary duties of the Division are as indicated 
in the Administrative Chart. 

Amendments were made to ten (10) Acts governing the administration of the 
Department as follows: 

By amendment to The Crown Timber Act the ^Minister is empowered to enter 
into timber concession agreements with respect to the salvaging of damaged timber, 
and the procedure with respect to the sale of timber seized for arrears of accounts 
due the Crown was simplified. 

By an amendment to The Cullers Act the Minister is empowered to authorize 
a Manual of Scaling Instructions respecting the measurement of Crown timber. 

The Forest Fires Prevention Act was amended with respect to the destruction 
of refuse on land being cleared; to allow the requisition of privately-owned equipment 
for use in fire-fighting; and to make the reporting of a fire obligatory upon any 
person coming upon a fire. 

An amendment to The Forest Management Act allows the ^linister to make 
orders governing timber concession areas for the purpose of forest management. 

There were several amendments to The Game and Fisheries Act for the general 
purpose of improving administration and promoting conservation. The penalties with 
respect to the illegal killing of deer and moose were substantially increased. 

By an amendment to The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act the Minister is 
authorized to order the repair or reconstruction of privately-owned dams, and if 
necessary to expropriate the works and the adjacent land. The section with respect 
to the pollution of waters by refuse and effluent, which previously applied to sawmills 
only, was enlarged to apply henceforth to all mills in which logs or woodbolts are 
processed. 

Amendments were made to The Mills Licensing Act for the purpose of bringing 
the legislation into line with administration. 

By an amendment to The Public Lands Act the Minister may release land 
from the reservation of pine trees contained in letters patent issued after the 30th 
of April, 1880, and may compensate a timber licensee who is affected by such 
release. The section of the Act concerning the disposition of water powers was 
repealed and re-enacted in The Water Powers Regulation Act. 

By an amendment to The Water Powers Regulation Act the Minister is em- 
powered to fix the terms and conditions upon which water powers and the adjacent 
land necessary therefor are sold or leased. 

By provisions in The Wolf and Bear Bounty Act the bounty on wolf cubs 
is increased to $15 and the Minister may make regulations concerning the keeping of 
wolves and bear in captivity. 

Various field trips were made by the Chief of the Division during the year for 
the purpose of prosecuting certain cases under The Game and Fisheries Act; with 
respect to hearings by the Surveyor-General under The Surveys Act: and for round- 
table discussions with enforcement officers which, started the previous year, were 
continued in some districts. 

Lectures at the Ranger School were given to various classes concerning the 
Statutes. Regulations and enforcement matters. 

Due to increased responsibilities in the Division, the services of an additional 
Solicitor were obtained. 

72 




1^ 



>^ES^^ 




Division 
of 

OPERATION 

and 

PERSONNEL 





Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



^ndex of- babies 

Table No. Page 

1. Areas of the administrative districts --------77 

2. Numerical strength and status of employees ------77 

3. Veteran personnel as of March 31, 104Q --------77 

4. Numerical strength — inside service ---------78 

5. Numerical strength — outside service --------79 

6. Distribution of male and female employees at head office 80 

7. Classifications as of March 31, 1949 ---------90 

8. Distribution of age groups ------------92 

9. Staff transfer ----------------93 

10. Workmen's compensation report — summary ------ 94 

11. Breakdown of claims — by cause ----------94 

12. Number of claims made to Workmen's Compensation Board 
during fiscal year 1947-48 ------------95 

13. Number of claims m.^de to Workmen's Compensation Board 
during fiscal years 1936-37 to 1948-49 --------96 

14. Current pensions ---------------97 

15. Amounts paid by Workmen's Compensation Board during the 
period April 1, 1947, to March 31, 1948 -------- 97 

16. Amounts p.md by Workmen's Compensation Board during the 
PERIOD April 1, 1948, to March 31, 1949 -------- 97 

17. New pensions during the fiscal year 1948-49 ------ 97 

18. Current pension for the period 1948-49 --------98 

19. Comparison of costs for the last four years ------ 98 

20. Staff suggestions, plan awards ----------100 

21. Resltlts of examinations held at scalers' schools - - - - 109 

22. Distribution of JUNIOR forest rangers, 1947 - - - - - - 111 

23. Distribution OF JUNIOR FOREST rangers, 1948 ------ HI 

^ndex Of (^ nartd una L^ rap Its 

Figure No. Page 

1. Organization charts with chain of responsibility - - - - 76 
Insert — Chart of Administrative Divisions ------ Facinp 76 

2. Chart of Division of Operation and Personnel - - Facing 77 

3. Permanent employees as of M.arch 31st each year - - - - 88 

4. Technical personnel employed ----------- 88 

5. Chart of age classes ------------- 93 

6. Trent) in Workmen's Compensation claims prepared from 
average figures for past thirteen years -------- 99 

7. Trend in Workmen's Compensation claims prepared from 

TOTAL claims FOR PAST THIRTEEN YEARS --------- 99 

8. Grade in trend of Workmen's Compensation claims prepared 
from tot.al cost for past ten years ---------ico 



DIVISION OF OPERATION AND PERSONNEL 

GENERAL 

As an Organization responsible for service to the other Head Office Divisions 
and the field, the work of Operation and Personnel is conducted under the three 
headings of: 

Personnel Management 

Office Management 

Information and Education 
as set forth in the Administrative Chart which is a part of this report. 

74 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



The Department organization which we serve is also covered by chart herein, 
and is set up as follows: 

Head Office Organ izatiox 

Minister — Hon. H. R. Scott 
Deputy Minister — F. A. ^IacDougall 

Division Chief 

Accounts J. G. McMillen 

Air Service G. E. Ponsford 

Fish and Wildlife \V. J. K. Harkness 

Forest Protection T. E. Mackey 

Land and Recreational Areas W. D. Cram 

Law F. J. Sullivan 

Operation and Personnel P. O. Rhynas 

Reforestation E. J. Zavitz 

Research R. X. Johnston 

Surveys and Engineering F. W. Beatty 

Timber Management J. F. Sharpe 

The Divisions named in the foregoing constitute the administrative body of 
Head Office which directs the Field operations. The functional chart appearing herein 
gives the details of functions of the various Divisions. The Chiefs of each Division 
are responsble directly to the Deputy ^Minister. 

Field Operations 





REGIOXAL 




DISTRICT 




REGION' 


FORESTER 


DISTRICT 


FORESTER 


DISTRICT H.O. 


South 


F. S. Newman, 


Lake Erie 


F. S. Newman 


St. Williams 


Western 


St. Williams 


Lake Huron 


I. C. Marritt 


Gait 






Lake Simcoe 


J. F. L. Simmons 


Maple 


South 


W. D. Cram, 


Quinte 


A. Leman 


Tweed 


Eastern 


Toronto 


Rideau 


W. E. Steele 


Kemptville 






Trent 


A. B. Wheatlev 


Lindsav 


South 


P. McEwen, 


.■\lsonquin 


G. H. R. Phillips 


-Algonquin Pk. 


Central 


Ranger School 


Parry Sound 


R. L. Snow 


Parrv Sound 


Central 


E. L. Ward. 


North Bay 


F. E. Sider 


North Bav 




North Bay 


Chapleau 


J.M.Whalen 


Chapleau 






Gogama 


J. M. Taylor 


Gogama 






Sault Ste. Marie 


Q. Hess 


Sault Ste. Marie 






Sudbury 


F. L. Hall 


Sudbury 


Northern 


A. S. Bray, 


Kapuskasing 


G. F. Mever 


Kapuskasing 




Kapuskasing 


Cochrane 


A. Crealock 


Cochrane 






Temiskaming 


F. J. Dawson 


Swastika 


Mid-Western 


P. .Addison, 


Port .Arthur 


R. Bouitbce 


Port .Arthur 




Port Arthur 


Geraldton 


U. W. Fiskar 


Geraldton 


Western 


K. Acheson, 


Sioux Lookout 


K. Middleton 


Sioux Lookout 




Kenora 


Kenora 




Kenora 






F'ort France- 


G. Dclahey 


Flirt Frances 



The complete organization is covered bv the chart which follows: 



75 



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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 

ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISIONS 

19 4 9 
Hon. H. R. SCOTT, Mini'srer F. A. MacDOUGALL. Deputy Minister 



ACCOUNTS AIR SERVICE FISH AND FOREST LAND AND 

WILDLIFE PROTECTION RECREATIONAL 

' - — - AREAS 

Dr. 

J. G. McMillen G. E. Ponsford W. J. K. Harkness T. E Mackey W. D. Cram 

Chief Cli.ef Chief Chief Chief 



OPERATION 



P. O. Rhyna 
Chief 



REFORESTATION 



ENGINEERING 



E. J. Zavitz R. N. Johnston F. W. Beotty J. F. Sharpe 

Chief Chief Chief Chief 



XLZZ 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
DIVISIONS 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



Department of Lands and Forests 



Hon. H. R. Scott 



F. A. MacDougall 





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Xo. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Table No. 1 
The areas of the administrative districts are as follows: 



ADMINISTRATI\'E 
DISTRICT 

Algonquin 

Chapleau 



GROSS .- 
SQUARE MILES 

5,396 
6,376 



Cochrane .- 12,260 

Fort Frances 7,192 

Geraldton 13,448 

Gogama 6,424 

Kapuskasing 14,288 

Kenora .._. 12,368 

Lake Erie 7,252 

Lake Huron __ 8,936 

Lake Simcoe 5,304 



ACRES 

3,453,440 
4,080,640 
7,846,400 
4,602,880 
8,606,720 
4,111,360 
9,144,320 
7,915,520 
4,641,280 
5,719,040 
3,394,560 



ADMIXISTRATIVE GROSS AREA 

DISTRICT SQUARE MILES ACRES 

North Bay 5,672 3,630,080 

Parry Sound 6,460 4,134,400 

Port' Arthur 17,784 11,381,760 

Quinte 7,708 4,933,120 

Rideau 5,464 3,496,960 

Sault Ste. Marie -- 16,161 10,343,280 

Sioux Lookout 43,922 28,110,380 

Sudbury 7,716 4,938,240 

Temiskaming 5,436 3,479,040 

Trent - - 5,328 3,409,920 



Totals ..- 220,8Q5 



141,373,340 



PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 

This table indicates the numerical strength and status of employees. It reflects 
something of the volume of work in Personnel Management. 

The symbol E.F.F. is an abbreviation of Extra Fire Fighters. 

New employees included 54.28 '/c personnel released from Armed Forces. 

Table No. 2 
NUMERICAL STRENGTH AND STATUS OF EMPLOYEES 



1948 



HEAD OFFICE FIELD 

PERM. TEMP. CAS. PERM. TEMP. CAS. 



total 



E.F.F. 



GR.AND 
TOTAL 



-Apr. 
May- 
June. 
July- 
Aug... 
Sept. 
Oct. . 
Nov. 
Dec. 
1949 
Jan. . 
Feb.. 
Mar. 



221 


138 


234 


141 


217 


161 


225 


156 


227 


154 


254 


134 


266 


122 


273 


122 


297 


107 


303 


104 


312 


100 


314 


93 



30 

70 

95 

118 

117 

103 

23 

21 

16 

13 
13 

8 



683 
721 
725 
747 
752 
772 
783 
785 
816 

845 
846 

853 



243 


1,146 


215 


1,697 


216 


1,533 


200 


1,562 


207 


1,534 


192 


1,390 


175 


1,103 


157 


788 


134 


651 


108 


606 


109 


564 


103 


554 



2,461 
3,078 
2,947 
3,008 
2,991 
2,845 
2,472 
2,146 
2,021 

1,979 
1,944 
1.925 



73 

591 

3,022 

562 

161 

475 

350 

16 

9 









2,534 
3,669 
5,969 
3,570 
3,152 
3,320 
2,822 
2,162 
2,030 

1,979 
1,944 

\.Q2> 



Total New Personnel 315 

Head Office _ 107 

Field - - 208 

% New Service Personnel 



Total New Service Personnel - 166 

Head Office - 46 

Field 120 

52.69 



As a further indication of the recognition of veterans from the Armed Services, 
the following table is submitted: 

Table No. 3 

VETERAN PERSONNEL AS OF MARCH 31, 1049 

{Exclusive of Casuals) 



Head Office 
Field 



male 
172 

453 



female 
8 
1 



TOTAL 

180 
4S4 



Total 



625 



634 

Continued on next page. 
77 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Head Office 
Field 



1 ST WAR 


2nd war 


BOTH WARS 


TOTAL 


38 


137 


5 


180 


142 


291 


21 


454 



Total 180 

Total Staff March 31, 1949. 



Head Office 
Field 



PERMANENT 

314 

...... 853 



Total 1,167 



Permanent Staff 
Temporary Staff 

Total 



._ 1,167 
_. 196 



1,363 



428 

temporary 
93 
103 

196 

Veterans as above 
9c Veterans 



26 



554 
562 



634 

TOTAL 

415 
1,510 

1,925 

634 

46.52 



Male Staff 



1,198 



Male Veterans _ 625 

% Veterans 52.12 

Xote: This statement includes .-Mr Service as Outside Staff. 

The foregoing groups are included in the following staff distribution tables 
which show as of March 31, 1949. the numerical strength of the various Divisions 
and Administrative Districts, the Ontario Forest Ranger School and the Nurseries 
by classes: 

Table No. 4 
NUMERICAL STRENGTH — INSIDE SERVICE 





permanent 


temporary 


CASUAL 


SPECIAL 


total 


Head Office 


3 








3 


Deputy Minister's 












Office... 


3 








3 


Division of Accounts 


56 


16 






72 


Division of Fish and 












Wildlife 


43 


9 


1 




53 


Division of Forest 




Protection 


13 


1 


1 




15 


Division of Land and 












Rerreatinnal Areas 


27 
2 


5 

1 






32 


Division of Law 


3 


Division of Operation 












and Personnel 


48 


23 






71 


Division of 












Reforestation 


9 


3 






12 


Division of Research 


21 


7 






28 


Division of Survevs 












and Engineering 


47 


8 






55 


Division of Timber 












Management 


42 


20 


6 




68 


Inside Service 


314 


93 


8 




415 


Outside Service 


853 


103 


554 




1,510 


Total Service . 


1,167 


196 


562 




1.925 







78 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Table No. 5 
NUMERICAL STRENGTH — OUTSIDE SERVICE 





permanent 


temporary 


CASUAL 


SPECI.A.L 


TOT.Ai 


Air Service 

■Mf^nqnin 


74 
61 
18 
41 

43 
36 
18 
15 

30 
35 
33 
46 
40 
49 
34 
18 
44 
26 
30 
46 
31 
22 
10 
16 
28 
9 


12 
4 
3 

S 
2 

1 
5 
8 
1 
3 
4 
9 

10 
2 

7 

2 
1 
5 
5 
4 
1 
9 


3 

24 


89 
89 


Chapleau - . — 

Cochrane, ... . 

Lake Erie 


16 
19 

7 
14 
27 
21 
16 
19 
13 
29 
12 
42 
21 
18 
21 
40 
35 
25 
21 
45 
16 

7 
13 
18 




37 
60 

55 


Fort Frances _„ 

Geraldton. .. 

Gopama 


52 
46 
41 


Lake Huron 

Kapuskasing 

Kennra 


54 
55 
49 


North Rav 


79 


Parrv Sound . 
Port Arthur 
Ouinte 


61 

101 
63 


R idea II 


36 


Sault Ste. Marie 
T,akp Simrnp 


78 
66 


Sioux T,nnkout 


67 


Sudburv _ __. . 

Temiskaming 


72 
57 


Trent _.. _ . . . _. 


72 


Forest Ranger School 

Angus... 

Midhurst 

Orono 


30 

24 
50 

27 


Outside SERncE 

IxsinE Service 


853 
314 


103 
93 


554 
8 




1,510 
415 


Total Ser\-ice as of 
March 31, 1949 


1,167 


l<Jo 


562 


l.'J-.=; 











The new Lecture Hall is one of a group of buildings comprising the Ranger School at Dorset, 
Ontario. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



The following chart shows the number of Permanent employees year by year 
over the period from the beginning in 1940. 

Technical Personnel 

Technical personnel as of March 31, 1949, is reflected in the chart herewith. 

Distribution of Male and Female Employees at Head Office 

The relation of the respective numerical strengths of the male and female em- 
ployees at Head Office as of March 31, 1949, with their distribution is as follows: 

DISTRIBUTION SUMMARY BY UNIVERSITIES 
OF GRADUATE FORESTERS IN ONTARIO 

DEPARTMENT 



UNIVERSITY 


HEAD OFFICE 


FIELD 


INDUSTRY 


TOTAL 


Toronto 


28 


44 


120 


192 


New Brunswick 


6 




29 


35 


British Columbia__. 






2 


2 


Quebec School of Forestry 






1 


1 


Michigan 


1 


2 


5 


8 


Penn. State 






4 


4 


Yale 






4 


4 


Maine _ 






1 




Idaho 






1 




Purdue, Lafayette, Ind. 




1 






Iowa State 






1 




Edinburgh 




1 






Riga, Latvia 




1 






Stockholm, Sweden 


1 








Eberswalde, Prussia 






1 




French 






1 




Forestry College, Norway 






1 




Unallocated 






3 


3 


Totals 


36 


40 


174 


259 



Junior Rangers are taught all the duties of a Forest Ranger by experienced instructors. In this 

ph<iti> tluy lire shaken as they take time out to answer th' 

l|||||||llllllll|||| II III ill 



% ,;t.^/ „ %--'^.r 



■mmr^ 



Xo. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



EMPLOYED BY 


THE DEPARTMENT AT 


HEAD OFFICE 








YE.\R 






NAME 


DEGREE 


GRADUATED 


VXIVERSITY 


DIVISION 


Ardenne, M. 


B.Sc.F. 


1924 


Toronto 


Research 


Bayly. G. H. U. 


B.Sc.F. 


1939 


Toronto 


Reforestation 


Boissoneau, A. N. 


B.Sc.F. 


1943 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Brodie, J. A. 


B.Sc.F. 


1923 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Brown. \V. G. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1947 


Toronto 


Research 


Clarke. C.H.D. 


B.Sc.F. 


1931 


Toronto 


Fish and Wildlife 


Clarke. W. B. M. 


B.Sc.F. 


1933 


New Brunswick 


Timber Management 


Cram. W. D. 


B.Sc.F. 


1923 


Toronto 


Land and Recreational .\reas 


Fenwick, A. R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1925 


Toronto 


Operation and Personnel 


Foster. \V. T. 


B.Sc.F. 


1947 


Toronto 


Reforestation 


Greenwood, W. B. 


B.Sc.F. 


1925 


Toronto 


Land and Recreational Areas 


Grinnell. W. R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1940 


Toronto 


Reforestation 


Haddow. W. R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1923 


Toronto 


Operation and Personnel 


Hansson. L. T. 


F.E. 


1945 


Stockholm, Sweden 


Timber Management 


Hare. J. P. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Heimburger, C. C. 


B.Sc.F. 


1928 


Toronto 


Research 


Hess. Q. F. 


B.Sc.F. 


1940 


Toronto 


Forest Protection 


Howard, C. P. 


B.Sc.F. 


1934 


Toronto 


Reforestation 


Hueston, T. VV. 


B.Sc.F. 


1946 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Johnston, R. N. 


B.Sc.F. 


1917 


Toronto 


Research 


Larsson. H. C. 


B.Sc.F. 


1942 


Toronto 


Research 


Leslie, A. P. 


B.Sc.F. 


1929 


Toronto 


Research 


Lockhart. R. A. 


B.Sc.F. 


1942 


New Brunswick 


Timber Management 


Mackey. T. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1926 


Toronto 


Forest Protection 


Mackinnon, G. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1940 


New Brunswick 


Timber Management 


Morison. M. B. 


B.Sc.F. ] 
M.Sc.F.l 


1924| 
1939 f 


New Brunswick 


Timber Management 


MacDoupall, F. A. 


B.Sc.F. 


1923 


Toronto 


Deputy Minister 


McEwen, J. G. K. 


B.Sc.F. 


1934 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Patterson, S. J. 


B.Sc.F. 


1933 


New Brunswick 


Timber Management 


Russell. A. A. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Reforestation 


Scott, J. D. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


New Brunswick 


Timber Management 


Shand,J.H. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Sharpe, J. F. 


B.ScF. 


1922 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Townsend. P. B. 


B.Sc.F. 


1934 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Westland, C. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1923 


Toronto 


Forest Protection 


Zavitz, E. J. 


B.Sc.F. 


1905 


Michigan 


Reforestation 


EMPLOYED BY 


THE DEPARTMENT IN THE FIELD 








YEAR 






NAME 


DEGREE 


GRADTATED 


UNIVERSITY 


DISTRICT 


Acheson. K. 


B.Sc.F. 


1933 


Toronto 


Kenora 


Adamson. M. A. 


B.Sc.F. 


1928 


Toronto 


Midhurst 


Addison, P. 


B.Sc.F. 


1929 


Toronto 


Port .Arthur 


Ball, J. S. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Lake Erie 


Barron, J. 


B.Sc.F. 


1938 


Toronto 


Port Arthur 


Hell, J. G. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Purdue University, 
Lafayette, Ind. 


Trent 


Boultbec, R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1929 


Toronto 


Port Arthur 


Hray. A. S. 


B.Sc.F. 


1931 


Toronto 


Kapuskasing 


Bruce, D.S. 


B.Sc.F. 


1942 


Toronto 


Algonquin Park 


Carman. R. S. 


B.Sc.F. 


1921 


Toronto 


Angus 


Carmichael, A. D. 


J. B.Sc.F. 


1947 


Toronto 


Angus 


Crealock. A. 


B.Sc.F. 


1932 


Toronto 


Quinte 


Edwards, W. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1934 


Toronto 


Quinte 


Eggeling. M. D. 


B.Sc.F. 


1944 


Edinburuh 


Lake Erie 



HI 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Gage, D. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Lake Simcoe 


Gimby, W. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1927 


Toronto 


Algonquin Park 


Graham, H. D. 


B.Sc.F. 


1945 


Toronto 


Cochrane 


Hall, F. L. 


B.Sc.F. 


1942 


Toronto 


Sioux Lookout 


Halpenny, J. M. 


B.Sc.F. 


1947 


Toronto 


Rideau 


Hambly, R. H. 


B.Sc.F. 


1947 


Toronto 


Temiskaming 


Hamilton, L. S. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Lake Huron 


Hope, J. H. 


B.Sc.F. 


1942 


Toronto 


North Bay 


Hyslop, R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1937 


Toronto 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Jackson, J. C. 


B.Sc.F. 


1932 


Toronto 


Lake Huron 


Kirk,M.D. 


B.Sc.F. 


1942 


Toronto 


Trent 


Lane, G. R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1926 


Toronto 


Lake Simcoe 


Leman, A. W. 


B.Sc.F. 


1930 


Toronto 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Linton, G. M. 


B.Sc.F. 


1919 


Toronto 


Orono 


Marritt, I. C. 


B.Sc.F. 


1922 


Toronto 


Lake Huron 


Mennill, J. L. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Lake Simcoe 


Meyer, G. F. 


B.Sc.F. 


1932 


Toronto 


Kenora 


Middleton, H. X. 


B.Sc.F. 


1940 


Toronto 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Morrison, G. R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Mullin, R. 


M.F. 


1946 


Michigan 


Rideau 


McEwen, P. 


B.Sc.F. 


1916 


Toronto 


Ranger School 


Newman, F. S. 


B.Sc.F. 


1913 


Toronto 


Lake Erie 


Raminsh. A. 


F.E. 


1932 


Riga, Latvia 


Kapuskasing 


Sider, F. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1938 


Toronto 


North Bay 


Simmons, J. F. L. 


B.Sc.F. 


1915 


Toronto 


Lake Simcoe 


Snow, R. L. 


B.Sc.F. 


1928 


Toronto 


Parry Sound 


Steele, W. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1927 


Toronto 


Rideau 


Thurston, W. A. G. 


B.Sc.F. 


1943 


Toronto 


Lake Huron 


Turner, K. B. 


B.Sc.F. 


1945 


Toronto 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Ussher, R. D. 


B.Sc.F. 


1927 


Toronto 


Lake Simcoe 


Walroth, A. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Rideau 


Ward, E. L. 


B.Sc.F. 


1927 


Toronto 


North Bay 


Wheatley, A. B. 


B.Sc.F. 


1930 


Toronto 


Trent 


Zavitz, C. H. 


B.Sc.F. 1 
M.F. ] 


1932] 
I933J 


Michigan 


Lake Erie 



EMPLOYED IN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 

Algonquin District 







YEAR 










NAME 


DEGREE 


GRADUATED 


UNIVERSITY 




1 


EMPLOYED BY 

Dominion Forest 


Heaney, H. D. 


Not stated 


1927 


New Brunswick 


\ 


Service 












J 


Chalk River 


Bickerstaff, A. 




1937 


Toronto 








Farrar, J. L. 




1936 


Toronto 








Foote, C.E. 




1923 


Toronto | 






Canadian Splint and 


Capp, H. E. 




1931 


Toronto j 






Lumber Corp., Pembroke 


Gledhill, R. A. 




1927 


Quebec Schc 


olof 


Odenbach, Limited 








Forestry 









Cochrane District {Employed by Abitibi Power and Paper Company, Limited, 
Iroquois Falls Division) 

YEAR 

NAME DEGREE GR.ADUATED UNIVERSITY 

Carlisle, K. B.Sc.F. 1924 British Columbia 

Cowan, D. P. B.Sc.F. 1937 Toronto 

Day, C.W. R. B.Sc.F. 1929 Toronto 

Groome, E.S. B.Sc.F. 1946 Toronto 

Larsson.O. G. B.Sc.F. 1937 Toronto 



82 



Xo. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Parker. DM. 
Mundy, G. \V. 
Day. B. G. 
MatatalK B. .A. 
Sevinsky. J. R. 
Donefran. F. 



Hooper. B. 



{Employed by Abitibi Poner and Paper Company, Limited, 
Smooth Rock Falls Division) 

B.Sc.F. 1928 Toronto 

B.Sc.F. 1936 Toronto 

B.Sc.F. 1941 Toronto 

B.Sc.F. 1945 New Brunswick 

B.Sc.F. 1947 Penn. State 

B.Sc.F. 1948 Michigan 

{Employed by Fieldman Timber Company, Limited) 

B.ScF. Not stated Michigan 



Ger.aldtox District 



{Employed by Marathon Paper Mills of Canada) 



Faber, \V. 0. 




B.Sc.F. 




1935 


Toronto 


Harkness, \V. D. 




B.Sc.F. 




1941 


New Brunswick 


Kagetsu, H. 




F.E. 




1942 


British Columbia 


Kissick, X. L. 




B.Sc.F. 




1948 


Toronto 


Sievers, H. 




State E.xam. 


1929 


Eberswalde (Prussia) 


Sonlev, G. R. 




B.Sc.F. 




1930 


Toronto 


Tait.j. 




B.Sc.F. 




1948 


Toronto 




{Employed by the Longlac 


Pulp and Paper Com 


pany Limited) 


Bueil, A. F. 




B.Sc.F. 




1931 


Toronto 


Switzer, A. L. K. 




B.Sc.F. 




1034 


Toronto 


Samuelson, C. .\. 




B.Sc.F., 


M.F. 


1936 


Michigan 


Sexsmith, E. R. 




B.Sc.F. 




1938 


Toronto 


Carlson, W.S. 




B.Sc.F. 




1936 


Toronto 


Xoake=;. J. V. 




B.Sc.F. 




1936 


Toronto 


Renaud, H.T. 




B.Sc.F. 




1943 


Toronto 


Robertson. D. C. 




B.Sc.F. 




1947 


Toronto 


Puttock, G. L. 




B.ScF. 




1947 


Toronto 


Boultbee, J. G. 




B.SC.F. 




1947 


Toronto 


K.APusKAsiXG District 












{Employed by th 


e Spruce 


Falls Power and Papi 


?r Company Limited) 


Ballantyne, S. 




B.Sc.F. 




1941 


Toronto 


Beare, G. E. 




B.Sc.F. 




1947 


Toronto 


Bonner, E. 




B.Sc.F., 


M.Sc.F. 


1934 


Toronto 


Breckon, J. L. 




B.Sc.F. 




1935 


Toronto 


Davidson, D. L. 




B.Sc.F. 




1943 


Toronto 


Day.J.C. 




B.Sc.F. 




1936 


Toronto 


Di.xon, M. M. 




B.Sc.F. 




1941 


Toronto 


Dyer, D. M. 




B.Sc.F. 




1936 


Toronto 


Flatt,F.L. 




B.Sc.F. 




1931 


Toronto 


McConneli.L. E. 




B.Sc.F. 




1938 


Toronto 


McCrae, G. 




B.Sc.F. 




1935 


Toronto 


Phipps, G. W. 




B.Sc.F. 




1927 


Toronto 


Taylor. M. G. 




B.Sc.F. 




1936 


Toronto 


Walkom.H.C. 




B.Sc.F. 




1931 


Toronto 


Wiley, F. \. 




B.Sc.F. 




1931 


Toronto 




{Employed by Northern Pi 


aper Mills, Limited) 




Lambrecht,D. G. 




B.Sc.F. 




1943 


Michigan 


De la Touche, C. 




F.E. 




1924 


Ecole de Sylviculture and des 
Industries Forestieres, 
France 



83 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Kfnora District 

Start, W. D. 
Colder, S. N. 
Cox, C. 
Blair, J. 
Seppala, B. 

Moore, W. S. 



(Employed by the Ontario Minnesota Pulp and Paper Company, Kenora) 



B.Sc.F. 


1930 


Toronto 


B.Sc.F. 


1936 


Toronto 


B.Sc.F. 


1947 


Toronto 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


New Brunswick 



[Employed by Dry den Paper Company) 
B.Sc.F. 1948 



Toronto 



Lake Simcoe District 

(Employed by Department of Planning and Development) 
Barnes, A. S. L. Not stated 1930 Toronto 

Mayall, K. M. Not stated 1935 Toronto 

Richardson, A. H. Not stated Not stated Toronto 

(Employed by Dominion Department of Agriculture, Division Forest Pathology, 
Department of Botany, University of Toronto) 
Basham.J.T. Not stated 1948 Toronto 

Bier, J. E. Not stated 1932 Toronto 

Eggertson, E. Not stated 1948 Toronto 

Linzon, S.N. Not stated 1948 Toronto 

Sinclair, G. A. Not stated 1948 Toronto 



Lake Simcoe District 

(Employed by Department of Highways) 
Allman,A.F. Not stated 1947 Toronto 

{Employed by Facidty of Forestry, University of Toronto) 



Buckley, T.C.E.H. 


Not stated 


1947 


Toronto 


Dwight,T. W. 


Not stated 


1910 


Toronto 


Crant, J. A. C. 


Not stated 


1947 


Toronto 


Love, D. V. 


Not stated 


Not stated 


University of New 

Brunswick and Michigan 


Hosie, R. C. 


Not stated 


1924 


Toronto 


Jackson, F. C. 


Not stated 


1932 


Toronto 


Michell, A. S. 


Not stated 


1940 


Toronto 


Sisam.J.W.B. 


Not stated 


Not stated 


University of New Brunswick 
and Yale 




(Employed by H.E.P.C. 


()/ Ontario) 




Carrique, H. C. 


Not stated 


1935 


Toronto 


Corin, E. 


Not stated 


1931 


Toronto 


Kelly. T. W. 


Not stated 


1929 


Toronto 



(Employed by Telfer and Cooper, 6 Adelaide Street East, Toronto) 
Cooper, C. Not stated 1932 Toronto 

(Employed by Kimberly-Clark Corporation of Canada Limited, 
50 King Street West, Toronto) 
Cosens, G. G. Not stated 1923 Toronto 

(Employed by the Great Lakes Paper Company, Limited, 159 Bay Street, 
Toronto) 
Delahey,W. A. Not stated 1915 Toronto 

(Employed by Glendale Theatre, Avenue Road, Toronto) 
Garrette, G. G. Not stated 1935 Toronto 



84 



.Vo. J 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



(Employed by Abitibi Poiicr and Paper Company, Limited, Toronto) 
Harrison, W. C. Not stated 1936 Toronto 

Matthews. J. B. Not stated 1929 Toronto 

Willson, W.E. Not stated 1925 Toronto 

{Employed by Johnston, Everson and Charlesuorth, 330 Bay Street, Toronto) 
Higgins. W. A. Not stated 1927 Toronto 

Lake Simcoe District 

(Employed by Book Society of Canada Limited, SS Richmond St. West, 
Toronto) 

Not stated 1922 Toronto 

{Employed by Photographic Survey Company Limited, De Havilland Airport, 
Toronto) 

Not stated 1947 Toronto 

Not stated 1946 Toronto 

Not stated 1946 Toronto 

(Employed by Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, University of 
Toronto) 

Not stated 1943 Toronto 



Irwin. J.C.W 



Jenkins, J. L. 
Robinson, J. E. 
Schafer, R. 



McEride,J.\V. 
Mills. C. R. 
Osborne, J. D. 
Thomson, G. J. 
White. L. T. 
Vavner, S. Y. 



{Employed by Ontario Forest Industries Ass., 159 Bay St., Toronto) 
Not stated 1943 Toronto 

{Employed by Moore Business Forms Limited, Mount Dennis) 
Not stated 1948 Toronto 

{Employed by Peter Thomson and Sons, Creemore) 

Not stated 1925 Toronto 

{Employed by Department of Botany, University of Toronto) 
Not stated 1932 Toronto 

{Employed by Arcade Florist, Bloor and Yonge, Toronto) 
Not stated 1940 Toronto 



North Bay District 

(Employed by William Milne and Sons, Timagami) 

McNutt. J.W. B.Sc.F. 1932 Toronto 

{Employed by Gillies Brothers Company, Limited, Timagami) 
Caldwell, E. R. B.Sc.F. 1948 New Brunswick 

NoKTir Bay District 

{Employed by Geo. Gordon Company Limited, Cache Bay) 

Robinson, F. C. B.Sc.F. 1948 Toronto 

Parry Sound District 

{Employed by Peter Thompson Lumber Company at Kearney) 

Thompson, G. Degree, University and Graduation Year not stated. 

Port Arthur District 

(Employed by the Brompton Pulp and Paper Company, Sipigon, Ontario) 

Merrill, J. H. B.Sc.F. 1924 Maine 

Jones. A. M. B.Sc.F. 1930 New Brunswick 

Smith, E. A. B.Sc.F. 1934 New Brunswick 

Sainsbury, \V. D. B.Sc.F. 1947 New Brunswick 

Stevens, D. R. B.Sc.F. 1933 New Brunswick 

Lane, L. B.Sc.F. 1937 Toronto 



85 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Pickard, D. 
Boyle, A. A. 

Clark, D.C. 

Young, R. I. 
Johnstone, H. J. 

Styffe, H. H. 

Finstad, Jens 
Kantola, H. O. 

Kasturik, A. M. 



B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 



1948 

1948 



New Brunswick 
New Brunswick 



(Employed by Nipigon Lake Timber Company, Port Arthur) 
B.Sc.F. 1947 Toronto 

(Employed by Hammermill Paper Company, Port Arthur) 
B.Sc.F. 1934 Toronto 

B.Sc.F. 1935 Toronto 

(Employed by Oscar Styffe, Limited, Port Arthur) 

B.Sc.F. 1937 Idaho 

(Employed by Newaygo Timber Company, Port Arthur) 

Forester 1926 Forestry College, 

Norway 
B.Sc.F. 1935 Toronto 

(Employed by Great Lakes Lumber and Shipping Limited, Fort William) 
B.Sc.F. 1947 Toronto 



Port Arthur District 

(Employed by Kallio's Timber Contracting Firm, Port Arthur) 
Kallio, R. B.Sc.F. 1948 Toronto 



Auden, A. J. 
Stevens, F. L. 
Hick, F. S. 
Seeley, M. 
Nielsen, K. 
Moodie, R. L. 
Hearnden, K. 
Lockhart, T. M. 
Pingree, A. V. 

Godden, J.H. 
Young, R. S. 
Ward, P. 
McKay, M. R. 
Robb,D.L. 

QuiNTE District 

Smith, J. O. 
RiDEAu District 

VVhitelaw, W. A. 



Morley, P. 



(Employed by the Abitibi Power and Paper Company, Limited, Port Arthur) 

M.F. 1927 Yale 

B.Sc.F. 1934 Toronto 

B.Sc.F. 1939 Toronto 

B.Sc.F. .1947 New Brunswick 

B.Sc.F. 1948 New Brunswick 

B.Sc.F. 1948 New Brunswick 

B.Sc.F. 1946 Toronto 

B.Sc.F. 1942 New Brunswick 

M.F. 1946 Yale 

(Employed by the Great Lakes Paper Company, Fort William) 

B.Sc.F. 1935 Toronto 

B.Sc.F. 1934 Toronto 

B.Sc.F. 1938 Toronto 

B.Sc.F. 1944 Toronto 

B.Sc.F. 1940 Toronto 



(Employed by Gillies Brothers, Brae side) 
Not stated 1942 



Toronto 



(Employed by Howard Smith Paper Mills, Cornwall) 

B.Sc.F. Not stated Toronto 

(Employed by Canadian International Plywoods, Gatineau Point) 
Not stated Not stated Not stated 



Sault Ste. Marie District 

(Employed by the Abitibi Power and Paper Company, Limited, Sault Ste. Marie 
Division) 

year 

NAME degree GRADUATED UNIVERSITY 

Ball, G. E. B.Sc.F. 1933 Toronto 

Grainger, E. E. B.Sc.F. 1930 Toronto 



86 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Losee, S.T. B. 






B.Sc.F. 


1031 






Toronto 


McKenzie, A. R. 






B.Sc.F. 


1926 






Toronto 


Munro, D. J. 






B.Sc.F. 


1926 






Toronto 


Xaysmith, D. 






B.Sc.F. 


1946 






Toronto 


Smith, B.J. 






B.Sc.F. 


1935 






Toronto 


Van Vlymen, V.P. 






B.Sc.F. 


1946 






Toronto 


Campbell, D. 






B.Sc.F. 


1943 






Toronto 


Myers, L. M. 






B.Sc.F. 


Not stated 


1 




New Brunswick. 


Sansom, A. D. 






B.Sc.F. 


1948 






New Brunswick 


True, CD. 






B.Sc.F. 


1942 






New Brunswick 


Breckenridge, G. P. 






B.Sc.F. 


1947 






Iowa State College 


Doerr, R. W. 






B.Sc.F. 


1947 






Penn. State 


Wessel, H. 






B.Sc.F. 


1948 






Penn. State 


Ely, R. 






B.Sc.F. 


1948 






Penn. State 


Miller, C. 






B.Sc.F. 


1948 






New Brunswick 




(Employed by Algoma 


Central and Hu^ 


dson 


Bay Railway) 


Rovve, C. A. 






B.Sc.F. 


1925 






Toronto 


Fytche, R. F. 






B.ScF. 


1947 






New Brunswick 




(Employed by Ontario 


Paper Company 


Limited) 




Horncastle, C. 






B.Sc.F. 


1947 






New Brunswick 


Thomson, R. W. B. 






B.Sc.F. 


1943 






New Brunswick 


Turner, W. I. 






B.Sc.F. 


1030 






New Brunswick 




(Employed by J . J. McFadden Lumber 


Company Limited) 


Mix, D. D. 






B.Sc.F. 


1034 






New Brunswick 


Hall.D. 






B.ScF. 


1048 






Toronto 




(Emph 


}yed by the Dep 


Hirtment of Agrit 


-idture, F 


orest Insect Laboratory) 


Prebble, M. L. 






B.Sc.F. 


1030 






New Brunswick 


Fettes.J.J. 






B.Sc.F. 


1045 






New Brunswick 


Turner, K. B. 






B.Sc.F. 


1045 






Toronto 


Blais,J.R. 






B.Sc.F. 


1045 






Toronto 



Sioux Lookout District 

(Employed by Alexander -Clark) 

Kals, Hans Not stated Not stated 

(Employed by Ontario-Minnesota) 
Start, D. B.Sc.F. 1030 



Blais, R. 
Sudbury District 

Avery, B. F. 
Hurk,A. H. 
Gray, D. W. 
Avery, D. D. 
McGee, C. J. 
Hayes, T. J. 

Walker, J. F. 



(Employed by Department of Agricidture) 
M.Sc.F. 1044 

(Employed by Kalamazoo Vegetable Parchment) 



Not stated 


1016 


Not stated 


1024 


Not stated 


1030 


Not stated 


1946 


Not stated 


1046 


Not stated 


1946 



(Employed by Ontario Paper Company) 
Not stated 1944 



TiMisKAMiNc; District 

(Employed by Elk Lake Fur Company) 
Voung, D.R. B.ScF. 1935 



Not stated 

Toronto 

Toronto 



Vale Forest School 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

New Brunswick 



Toronto 



87 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Figure No. 3 

PERMANENT EMPLOYEES AS OF 

MARCH 31st EACH YEAR 



1200 




1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 



Figure No. 4 
TECHNICAL PERSONNEL EMPLOYED 

[FORESTERS ONLY TO 1946) 

UNSHADED PORTIONS DENOTE SEASONAL EMPLOYEES 



200 



150 




1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 



8S 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Departmental activities are recorded />v the camera for educational purposes. Staff photographer 
Richard Robinson is sho'wn filming a pari oj the log drive during Mississagi salvage operations. 




Tadle No. 6 
DISTRIBUTION OF MALE AND FEMALE EMPLOYEES AT HEAD OFFICE 



PERMANENT 
M.\I.E FEMALE 



TEMPORARY 
MALE FEMALE 



TOTAL 
MALE FEMALE 



GRAND 
TOTAL 



Air Service .„ — 


71 


3 


12 


— 


83 


3 


86 


Accounts 


36 


20 


Q 


7 


45 


27 


72 


Fish and Wildlife 


26 
13 


17 
1 


4 


5 


30 
13 


22 
1 


52 


Forest Protection 


14 


Lands 


13 


14 


2 


3 


IS 


17 


il 


Law... 


1 


1 


1 


— 


2 


1 


3 


Main Office ... 


1 


5 


— 


— 


1 


5 


6 


Operation and Personnel... 


30 


18 


18 


5 


48 


23 


71 


Rcforestation 


7 


2 


1 


2 


8 


4 


12 


Research 


18 


3 


6 


1 


24 


4 


28 


Surveys _ „ 


42 


S 


6 


2 


48 


7 


55 


Timber Management 


39 


3 


18 


2 


57 


3 


62 


ToTAI„S 


207 


0? 


77 


27 


374 


110 


40^ 



89 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



The following is a list of the classifications: 

Table No. 7 



CLASSIFICATIONS AS OF MARCH 31, 1949 

HEAD OFFICE FIELD 



Accountant, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group 4 

Accounting Machine Operator, Gr. 1 

Acting Chief Forest Ranger 

Acting Supt. Scaling, Group 1 

Aerial Photographer, Group 1 

Air Engineer, Group 1. — 

Group 2 

Assistant Inspector 

Asst. Supt. Prov. Air Service 

Asst. Supt. of Hatcheries 

Automotive Mechanic, Journeyman 

Biologist, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group 4 

Boat Captain. Group 1 : 

Group 2 

Caretaker, Group 1 

Carpenter, Improver 

Foreman - 

Chemist, Group 1 

Chief, Dept. of Lands and Forests — 

Chief Clerk 

Chief Inspector, Timber Management 

Civil Engineer, Group 1 

Clerk, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group 3 

Clerk Messenger, Group 1 

Group 2 

Clerk-Stenographer, Group 1 

Group 2 

Clerk-Typist, Group 1 

Group 2 

Communications Technician, Group 1 



Group 2 _ 



Conservation Officer, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group 3 

Group 4 

Group 5 

Custodian of Furs 

Depu t y M in ister 

District Forester 

District Supt. Prov. Air Service 

Draughtsman, Group 1 

Group 2 

Executive Assistant, Group 1 

Group 2 

Filing Clerk, Group 1 

Group 2 



1 

9 

2 

1 

1 

17 

32 

23 

5 



33 

23 

4 



3 
32 



2 
30 
19 

1 

23 

13 

3 



97 

43 

18 

3 

2 



2 

3 

1 

4 

1 

1 

2 

3 

32 

1 

2 

1 

2 

9 

6 

3 

1 

2 

6 

3 

3 

1 

10 

2 

1 

1 

19 

62 

42 

S 

1 

31 

46 

26 

4 

1 

1 

97 

44 

18 

3 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

7 

3 

2 

1 

2 

2 



Continued on next page 



90 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



CLASSIFICATIONS AS OF MARCH 31, 1949 (Continued) 

HEAD OFFICE FIELD 



Foreman, Group 2 

Forester, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group 3 

Group 4 

Group 5 

Forest Ranger, Group 1- 
Group 2. 
Group 3^ 

Group 4 

Group 5 

Forest Pathologist 

Gardener, Group 1 

Group 2 

Gen. Supt. of Construction, Gr. 1_ 

Hatchery Manager 

Hatchery Manager, Group 1 

Group 2 

Hatchery Assistant 

Hatchery Assistant, Group 1 

Group 2 

Head Clerk 

Head Cook.. 
Head Teamster., 



Inspector. Group 2 

Inspector of Surveys, Group 1 

Group 3 

Junior Accounting Machine Operator.. 
Junior Accounting Machine Op., Gr. 2. 

Junior Clerk 

Junior Draughtsman, Group 1 

Junior Office Appliance Operator 

Laboratory Assistant, Group 3 

La bourer 



Land Tax Collector 

Maintenance Mechanic, Group 1 

Group 2. 

Group 3 

Maintenance Mechanic, Foreman,... 

Mechanic, Group 1 

Group 2 

Mechanic, Foreman 

Mechanical Engineer, Group 3 

Mechanical Supervisor _. 

Nurse, Group 2 __ 

Office Appliance Operator, Group 1. 
Group 2. 

Office Boy 

Plant Supt. Prov. Air Service 

Painter and Decorator Foreman 

Personnel Officer, Group 1 

Photogrammetrist, Group 1 

Group 2 

Photographer, Group 1 

Photo Processor, Group 1 

Group 2 



9 
9 
4 
3 
2 
10 
5 



1 
1 
1 
1 
10 
1 
5 
3 
2 



1 
13 

5 

10 
17 

4 

110 

116 

47 

56 



3 
1 

9 
14 

9 

10 

9 



48 

2 
8 
4 
6 
6 
18 
7 

S 
1 



1 

22 

14 

14 

20 

6 

120 

121 

47 

56 

5 

1 

3 

1 

1 

9 

15 

1 

9 

14 

9 

9 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

10 

2 

5 

3 

2 

48 

1 

2 

8 

4 

7 

6 

18 

7 

1 

6 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

6 

S 

2 

4 

1 



Continued an next page. 
91 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



CLASSIFICATIONS AS OF MARCH 31, 194Q (Continued) 



HEAD OFFICE 



Pilot, Group 1 

Group 2 

Principal Clerk 

Property Supt. 

Public Relations Assistant, Gr. l.._ 
Gr. 2.-. 

Purchasing Officer, Group 2.. 

Radio Operator 

Radio and Telephone Technician- 
Secretarial Stenographer 

Secretary to the Minister 

Secretary to the Deputy Minister. 

Senior Clerk 

Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

Senior Draughtsman, Group 1 

Group 2 

Senior Filing Clerk 

Shop Foreman -.. 

Solicitor, Group 1 

Group 4 -. 

Soil Specialist, Chief... 

Group 2 

Stationary Engineer, Group 2(a). 

Stationary Engineer 

Statistician, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group S. 

Stockkeeper, Group 1 

Group 2 

Storekeeper Group 1 

Supervisor of Hatcheries 

Supervisor of Scaling, Group 1 

Group 2 

Surveyor, Group 1 

Group 2 

Teamster 

Telephone Operator, Group 1... 

Truck Driver, Group 1 

Group 2 

Total 



7 
1 
S 
1 
1 

2 
4 
1 
1 
23 
12 
3 
3 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 



19 
4 



5 
10 



23 



19 

11 

1 

6 

2 

1 

5 

12 

4 

1 

1 

46 

12 

3 

3 



1,363 



This table reflects the Permanent and Temporary staff throughout the Department and shows 
the numbers of the various classifications that were employed as of March 31, 1949. 

The chart herewith covers Permanent and Temporary staff and indicates that the largest 
age groups are between 21 and 40 years of age. 

The numerical distribution between Head Office and the Field was as follows: 

Table No. 8 
DISTRIBUTION OF AGE GROUPS 

l'nder21 21-30 31-40 41-50 51-60 61-70 over 70 



Head Office 














26 


145 


105 


58 


56 


14 


3 


Field 4 


178 


217 


233 


282 


90 


8 


Totals 30 


323 


322 


291 


226 


104 


11 



92 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Figure No. 5 
CHART OF AGE CLASSES 



^ 250 
< 



O 100 



o 50 

z 







AS OF 3 1 


!* MARCH 19 49 












.^ 































































































UNDER 21 
YEARS 



21 30 
YEARS 



3140 
YEAR S 



41-50 
YEARS 



51-60 
YEARS 



61 -70 
YEARS 



To Kapuskasing 

As District Forester 

To Sudbury 

As District Forester 

To Sioux Lookout 

As District Forester 

To Quinte 

As District Forester 

To Cochrane 

As District Forester 

To Sault Ste. Marie 

As District Forester 



Table No. 9 
STAFF TRANSFERS 

Effective January 1, 1949, the following transfers were made: 
G. F. Meyer 

District Forester, Kenora 
F. L. Hall 

District Forester, Sioux Lookout 
H. Middleton 
Sault Ste. Marie 
A. Leman 

District Forester, Sault Ste. Marie 
A. Crealock 

District Forester, Quinte 
Q. Hess 

Division of Forest Protection, Toronto 
Effective December 1, 1948, J. C. Dillon, Forest Protection Specialist at Sudbury was trans- 
ferred to the Division of Forest Protection at Toronto as Supervisor of Forest Protection control. 

Workmen's Compensation 

As will be noted from the tables and charts followhi.u;, a new hi,<i;h in costs was 
reflected in last year's report. 

During the summer of 1948, the most difficult season in the history of the 
Department developed. 

The total number of claims increased to 494. and the total net cost to 
$37,078.97. 

It is regretfully reported that there were a number of fatalities due to excep- 
tional conditions surrounding widespread smoke and large scale conflagrations. 

To date, the annual average cost for ten years is therefore $18,985.61. The 
average has consequently increased by nearly S2,000.00 due to the costs in the 
disastrous year 1948. 



93 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Every effort is continued to cultivate safety practices and enforce them by 
training and distribution of literature. 

Table No. 10 
WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION REPORT 



SUMM.^RY 



AVERAGE NO. OF EMPLOYEES 
DURING PEAK SEASON OF 



YEAR 


TOTAL COST 


NO. OF CLAIMS 


JULY AND AUGUST 


1938-39 --- 


$ 16,207.22 
17,129.85 
16,921.36 
13,755.68 
14,581.84 
12,850.33 
14,540.02 
14,248.76 
21,560.24 
27,189.07 
35,989.21 


118 

223 
110 
130 
103 
98 
120 
129 
182 
328 
494 


1,750 


1939-40 — .. 


2,000 


1940-41 


2,032 


1 94 1 -42 . - - 


1,835 


1942-43 -- 


3,095 


1943 44 _ ._— 


2,126 


1944-45 


3,382 


1945-46 


2,960 


1946-47 


3,466 


1 94 7 -48 - 


3,547 


1948-49 - — 


4,770 June & July 




$204,973.58 


2,035 





The above figures do not include W.C.B. Administrative Costs. 



For 



Table No. 11 
BREAKDOWN OF CLAIMS 

Fiscal Year 1948-49— By Causes 



NO. 



% 



% 



Falls 


81 
71 

18 
21 
23 
18 
17 

2 
11 

1 

210 
8 
1 
4 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 


16.50 
14.48 

3.74 
4.36 
4.76 
3.75 
3.45 

.41 
2.23 

.03 

42.70 
1.63 
.03 
.82 
.03 
.03 
.61 
.41 
.03 


$ 4,964.73 
3,234.38 

671.22 

644.44 

273.10 

549.36 

2,148.54 

25.50 

235.55 

3.00 

5,295.44 
853.00 
744.69 
552.85 
340.80 
13.00 

12.00 
26.00 


24.14 


Axe 

Cutting Tools 
Chisels, Knives, Saws, etc — 

Fallinp' Ohierts 


15.81 

3.26 
3.15 




1.33 


Poison (Insect and Plants) 


2.67 


Burns 


10.50 


Stepping on Nails— - — 

Car Accidents 


.02 
1.15 


Electric Shock (Lightning) 


.01 


Miscellaneous - 

Bruises, Scratches, Slivers, 
Strains, Sprains, etc 


25.81 


Drowning 

Motor Car Trailer 


4.14 
3.62 


Plane Crash 


2.70 


Heart Attack - 


1.65 


Sunstroke.. 

Missing 


.01 


Scoot Accident - 


.01 


Dog Bite 


.02 








494 


100.00 


$20,587.60 


100.00 



Cost of accidents sustained previous to fiscal period 1948-49 $ 2,920.65 

Cost of accidents sustained during fiscal period 1948-49 17,666.95 

Total Cost 

*Total Cost includes Compensation and Medical Aid. 



$20,587.60 



Compensation and Medical Aid $20,587.60 

Pensions and Medical Aid 15,401.61 



Total Cost for year ...-. $35,989.21 

Plus Costs 1 ,347.00 

Less Public Works - -- 257.24 

Total . $37,078.97 



94 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 





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96 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



PENSIONS 

Table Xu. 14 
CURRENT PENSIONS 



NO. BY YEAR 
OF ORIGIX 



YEAR 


Ml. 


WIDiiW.- 


CHILDREN' 


MOTHER 


1920 


1 


1 






1024 


1 








1930 


2 








1932 . . ..... 


1 


1 






1034 


1 








1935.... .. 


1 








103 A 


2 
1 


2 


3 
3 








1038 


2 








1940.. 


3 








1941 


1 








1943 


1 








1944 -. .- 


2 








1945 . - 


4 


3 






1946 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1947 


4 


2 


1 




1948 


4 


3 


4 






34 


13 


12 


1 



Amounts paid between April 1, 1948, and March 31, 1949 

Pensions 512,872.19 

Medical Aid 2,529.42 

Total $15,401.61 

Table No. 15 

AMOUNTS PAID BY THE WORKMEN'S COMPENS.\TION BOARD 

During The Period April 1, 1947 to March 31. 1948 



NO. OF CURRENT 








PENSIONS 


WIDOWS 


CHILDREN MOTHERS 


PENSION 


31 


10 


8 1 

Total Cost of Pensions $13,118.40 


S10,936.42 



MEDICAL 

AID 
$2,181.98 



Table No. 16 
AMOUNTS PAID BY THE WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION BOARD 

During The Period April 1. 1948. to M.arch 31, 1949 



NO. of current 

PENSIONS 

34 



WIDOWS children mothers PENSION 

13 12 1 $12,872.19 

Total Cost of Pensions $15,401.61 
Total Cost of Pensions for the above two vears $28,520.01 



medical 
aid 

$2,529.42 



Table No. 17 

LIST OF NEW PENSIONS 

During The Fiscal Year 1948-49 





year of 








total paid 


name 


origin 


widows MiiTIIKKS rilH.nRF.N- 


PER MONTH 


Mrs. Ross Retty 


1948 


1 






$50.00 


Wm. H. Trickett .. . 


1948 








13.75 


Mrs. H. W. Westaway 


1948 


1 






50.00 


Mrs. R. Wilcox 


1048 


1 


4 


08.00 



97 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Table No. 18 

LIST OF CURRENT PENSIONS 

For The Period 1948-49 



NAMES 

Mrs. A. Albright — 

Mrs. Nat Brown 

F. Brown _. 

E. C. Burton 

Mrs. L. Curik 

Mrs. C. Deacon .-. 

Mrs. J. L. Depencier... 

Mrs. Rose Faubert 

A. F. Grant... 

R. J. Henderson 

C. Kurd 

Mrs. P. A. Hutton 

D. Leprett 

Jas. Maltby 

Mrs. C. Maydanuk 

G. McAinsh 

Mrs. McFarland 

H. F. McMinn 

Mrs. C. Merrifield 

M.MuIvihill 

Thos. Naveau 

Thos. O'Brien _... 

John Paquette 

Mrs. R. G. Reid 

Mrs. Ross Retty 

W. C. Sanders 

VVm. Shoup 

Mrs. J.M. Stevens 

P. Sullivan 

Wm. H. Trickett 

Louis Turner 

Mrs. H. W. Westaway 

Mrs. R. Wilcox 

G. J. Wrigglesworth ... 

Totals 



CHILDREN MOTHERS 



COST OF YEAR OF 

PENSION PAID ORIGIN OF 
PER MONTH PENSION 



13 



12 



$1,199.75 



20.00 


1946 


50.00 


1920 


7.50 


1944 


24.00 


1930 


62.00 


1947 


50.00 


1947 


50.00 


1945 


50.00 


1945 


88.25 


1938 


12.25 


1947 


17.75 


1946 


62.00 


1946 


12.00 


1934 


5.50 


1938 


36.00 


1937 


16.25 


1941 


50.00 


1945 


19.25 


1947 


50.00 


1932 


7.25 


1944 


7.75 


1945 


11.00 


1940 


9.75 


1943 


86.00 


1936 


50.00 


1948 


10.00 


1924 


13.75 


1940 


50.00 


1936 


50.00 


1930 


13.75 


1948 


6.50 


1935 


50.03 


1948 


98.00 


1948 


53.25 


1940 



Table No. 19 

COMPARISON OF COSTS FOR THE 
LAST FOUR YEARS 



YE.AR 
ENDING 


MEDICAL, 

COMPENSATION 

AND PENSION 

COSTS 


ADMINISTRATIVE 

COSTS ASSESSED 

BY W.C.B. 


NO. OF 
CLAIMS 


March 31, 1946.. 


$14,248.76 

21,560.24 

27,189.07 

35,989.21 

1,347.00* 

$37,336.21 

257.24 

S37.078.97 


$ 334.50 
754.50 
1,045.50 
1,347.00* 


129 


March 31, 1947 


182 


March 31, 1948 

March 31, 1949 


328 
494 


Plus Costs 




Less Public Works _ _ 





08 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



FlGfRE Xo. 6 

GRAPH OF TREND IN WORKMEN'S 
COMPENSATION CLAIMS 

PREPARED FROM AVERAGE FIGURES FOR PAST THIRTEEN YEARS 



450 

400 

</5 350 

< 300 

250 

O 200 

< 

a: 

^ 150 

> 

** 100 

50 
n 








1936-37 TO 19 48 


-49 
















\, 






















X 






































































\ 






















V 












/ 












\ 






V 




/ 




















.--' 

























APR. MAY 



JUNE 



JULY 



AUG 



SEPT. 



OCT. 



NOV. 



DEC. 



JAN 



FEB MAR. 



Figure Xo. 7 

GRAPH OF TREND IN WORKMEN'S 

COMPENSATION CLAIMS 

PREPARED FROM TOTAL CLAIMS FOR PAST THIRTEEN YEARS 
19 36-37 TO 19 4 8-49 



500 
























l\ 




< 
























/ 




>■ 
























/ 




-' 400 
< 
























/ 




U1 
























/ 




Z 300 






















/ 


























/ 






U1 






















/ 






5 






















/ 






< 






















/ 






—1 






/ 


I 














/ 






^ 200 






/ 


\ 














/ 










/ 


\ 














/ 






_, 






/ 


\ 












y 








< 






/ 


\ 












/ 








\— 


y \ 


/ 


\ 












/ 








O 


/ 


\ 


/ 


\ 












/ 








100 


/ 


N 


/ 


\ 


^^ 






^ 


























^ 













1936-7 1937-8 1938 9 1939-40 1940 1 1941-2 1942-3 1943 4 1944-5 1945 6 1946-7 1947-8 1948-9 



99 



Report oj the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



1^0.3 



Figure Xo. S 
TREND IN WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION CLAIMS 

PREPARED FROM TOTAL COST FOR PAST TEN YEARS 



40,000 

1/5 

^ 35,000 

> 
o 

u. 30,000 


o 

O 

Z 25,000 

a. 

< 

Z 20,000 

> 



1/5 

15,000 








19 39-40 TO 19 4 8-49 
































































/ 


















/ 


/ 








\ 










/ 










\ 




^ 














10,000 





1939-40 1940-1 



1942-3 1943 4 



1945-6 1946-7 



Table Xo. 20 
STAFF SUGGESTIOX PLAX 

SUGGESTION 

Re "Simplification of Conventional Tree Planter" 

S. O. Robinson, Thessalon 

Re "Printing of Instructions and Procedure on Cover Form A. 110" 

E. L. Skuce, Algonquin Park 

Re "Air to Ground Distance Sights" 

T. C. Cooke, .^ir Service _ 

Re "Stove-pipe Spark Arrester" 

C. Pineault, Sudbury 

Re "Suction Hose Stand" 

A. King, Latchford 

Re "Utilizaton of Three Dimensional Contour Maps" 

H. K. Campbell, Cochrane 

Re "Fish Egg Hatching Trays" 

G. H. Williams, Redbridge 

Re "Two or Three Card Tally Board" 

H. W. Green. Sault Ste. Marie 

Re "Metal Seal for Beaver Pelts" 

A. M. Hodgson, Cochrane 

Total Xumber of Awards 9 Total value S145.00 

REGIONAL AND DISTRICT FORESTERS' CONFERENXES 

It was decided to dispense with Regional Meetings for the current year. 

The Regional Foresters had an opportunity to have a one-day meeting at the 
respective District Headquarters for the purpose of going over the seasons operations 
and formulating any recommendations to Head Office or adjustments or improvements 
with the Districts. 



AWARD 
...,$10.00 

..-.S25.00 
..-.$10.00 
....$50.00 
....$10.00 
._ SIO.OO 
..$10.00 
....$15.00 
..$ 5.00 



100 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



These were duly presented at the Annual District Foresters" Conference, which 
was held in Toronto. January 6th to January 15th. 1Q49. 

Inspections and Investig.atioxs 

From time to time it is necessary for Division Heads to go into matters of 
concern to them locally, in the field or elsewhere. Contacts, conferences and dis- 
cussions with outside administrative bodies in Canada and the United States are also 
more or less essential in the interest of co-ordination and observance of new develop- 
ments having a relation to our work. 

For such purposes Division Chiefs visited various Departmental establishments 
in addition to points in other Provinces and States of the Union. 

These included Quebec and Saskatchewan in Air Service matters, numerous 
meetings and functions in Quebec and Ontario in Fish and Wildlife activities, various 
items in Forest Protection work in Ontario. Quebec and Michigan. In land work the 
Division Chief visited British Columbia in addition to attending local conferences 
and inspections in Ontario. The Solicitor visited Quebec in connection with the 
Game and Fisheries Act and attended at eight points in Ontario on Departmental 
business during the year. The Chief. Division of Reforestation went to Quebec and 
Prince Edward Island in addition to a number of functions and conferences in Ontario. 
The Surveyor General visited ^lanitoba re the Provincial Boundaries and a number 
of Ontario locations and the Chief, Division of Timber Management included visits 
to Minnesota and Quebec in his work. The Chief. Division of Operation and Personnel 
visited United States and various points in Ontario. The following is a list of some 
of the trips made by these officials during the past two or three years: 



June 12 
June 14 
June 19 
June 23 
June 29 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 4 
Aug. 6 
Aug. 9 
Aug. 15 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 29 
Aug. 30 
Aug. 31 
Sept. 6 
Sept. 10 
Sept. 12 
Sept. 17 
Oct. 19 
Oct. 20 
Oct. 25 
Nov. 8 
Nov. 16 
Nov. 28 



J. G. McMILLEX— DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 

TO PURPOSE 

-Lindsay District Office Inspection 

..-Forest Ranger School, Dorset Inspection 

—Tweed District Office Inspection 

—Algonquin District Office, Pembroke Inspection 

...VViarton-Tobermory re South Bay Fisheries Experiment Inspection 



1947 

1947 

1947 

1947 

1947 

1947 St. Williams District Office _ .;_-. 

1947 Rondeau Park Office .._ 

1947 _.Galt District Office _.. 

1947... Maple District Office 

1947 Parry Sound District Office 

1947 Kemptville District Office 

1947 North Bay District Office .._ 

1947. Powassan Division Office 

1947 Forest Ranger School, Dorset 

1947 „MapIe District Office 

1947 Sault Ste. Marie District Office _. 

1947 Thcssalon Office 

1947 Sudbury District Office 

1947 Sudbury 

1947 North Bay 

1947 St. Williams District Office 

1947 Port Arthur 

1947 Sault Ste. Marie 

1947 Maple District Office 



Inspection 

Inspection 

Inspection 

Inspection 

Inspection 

Inspection 

Inspection 

Inspection 

Inspection 

Inspection 

Inspection 

Inspection 

Inspection 

Inspection 

._ Inspection 

Change in staff 

Regional Meeting 
.Regional Meeting 
_ Inspection 



Continued on next page. 
101 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



G. E. POXSFORD— DIVISION OF AIR SERVICE 

DATE PURPOSE 

Apr. 18-26, 1947 Trip to Ottawa re Air Transport Board 

May 14-17,1947 ._Trip to Toronto and Ranger School at Dorset — by aircraft 

June 2- 5, 1947 Trip to Toronto — administrative 

June 21-25, 1947 Inspection Western Division and search for CF-OBP — by aircraft 

July 8-11,1947 _Trip to Toronto — administrative 

July 23-30, 1947 Inspection Western Division — by aircraft 

Aug. 11-18, 1947 Trip to Toronto — administrative 

Oct. 5- 9, 1947 Trip to Toronto — administrative 

Dec. Ij, 1947-Jan. 25, 1948 Trip to Prince Albert, Sask. and Toronto — administrative — by 

aircraft and car 

Feb. 12-20, 1948 Trip to Toronto— administrative 

Feb. 26-29, 1948 Trip to Toronto accompanied by J. Hyde and S. Macauley — 

administrative 

Mar. 17-25,1948- ._.Trip to Toronto and Montreal — administrative 



DATE 

Apr. 7/47 

Apr. 17/47 
Apr. 21-23/47 
-Apr. 27/47 

May 8/47 
May 9/47 
May 12/47 
May 12/47 
May 12/47 

May 18/47 

May 23/47 
May 23/47 

June 5- 8/47 
June 9-11/47 

June 19/47 

June 21/47 

July 3/47 

102 



\V. J. K. HARKNESS— DIVISION 

PLACE 

Gravenhurst, Ont. 

Woodstock, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Port Dalhousie 

Brighton, Ont. 

Codrington, Ont. 

District Office, 
St. Williams, Ont. 
Port Rowan, Ont. 

Dunnville, Ont. 



Port Perry, Lake Scugog 
and Duffin Creek 
Chatsworth, Ont. 
Sullivan Township 



Kingston, Ont. 
South Bay Mouth 

Orillia, Ont. 

Van Wagners Beach and 

Cherry Beach 

Algonquin Park and Dorset 



OF FISH AND WILDLIFE 

PURPOSE 

To attend annual banquet of the Gravenhurst 

Game and Fish Protective Association, and to 

address the members of the Association. 

To attend annual dinner of the Oxford Fish 

and Game Protective Association. 

To attend meeting of Fisheries Council of 

Canada. 

Inspection trip to Lincoln County, inspect 

vessel "Sphinx'' and inspect pollution in 

streams. 

Attendance at meeting of Eastern Lake Ontario 

Commercial Fishermens' Association. 

Inspection of Bird Farm and Inspection of 

Hatchery. 

Divisional business at the District Office. 

Visiting Leon Schram and other fishermen re 
Long Point Seine Nets. 

Attending meeting and addressing members of 
the Haldimand County Hunters' and Anglers' 
Association. 

Departmental business and to inspect salmon 
weir and trap. 

Inspection of Chatsworth Hatchery. 
Inspection of Grey County Forest, and attend- 
ing opening ceremonies of the Grey County 
Forest. 

Visiting ponds near Tamworth. 
Inspection of work being carried on in connec- 
tion with the South Bay Experiment. 
To attend meeting of Game and Fish Protec- 
tive Association. 

Inspect pound nets of Mr. Sargent set up off 
these beaches. 

To visit Algonquin Park and Ontario Forest 
Ranger School. 

Continued on next page. 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



DATE 

July 10-21/47 



Aug. 13-16/47 

Aug. 20-21/47 
Sept. 3/47 
Sept. 6-12/47 

Sept. 17-18/47 
Sept. 19-20/47 
Sept. 28/47 

Oct. 11/47 

Oct. 11/47 

Oct. 13/47 
Oct. 17/47 

Nov. 3/47 



Nov. 9-13/47 
Nov. 17/47 



Nov. 18/47 

Nov. 19/47 

Nov. 25/47 

Nov. 27/47 

Dec. 1/47 
Dec. 1/47 

Dec. 2- 3/47 

Dec. 9-10/47 

Jan. 6- 7/48 



PLACE 

Winnipeg, Man. 
Kenora. Sioux Lookout, 
Port Arthur, Dorion, 
Rossport. Terrace Bay, 
Geraldton, Quetico and 
Sibley Parks 
Skeleton Lake Hatchery 
Magnetewan 
North Bay Hatchery 
Hill's Lake Hatchery 
Cochrane 
Burlington, Ont. 

Picton, Ont. 
Belleville. Ont. 
Denver. Col. 



Camp Borden, Ont. 

French River, Ont. 

Toronto to Steele and 
Bathurst and return 
(morning session) 
Toronto to Steele and 
Bathurst and return 
(afternoon session) 
Toronto to Mono Mills 
and return 
Maple 
Fort Erie, Ont. 

Toronto, Ont. 

Simpson's .-Orcadian 

Court 

Port Arthur, Ont. 

Roval Ontario Museum 



Bridgeport, Ont. 

Ontario Club. Toronto 

Preston. Ont. 

Forest, Ont. 

Orillia, Ont. 

Dorset and Algonquin Park 

Renfrew, Ont. 

North Bay, Ont. 

Ottawa, Ont. 



PURPOSE 

Confer with Mr. Malaher, and general inspec- 
tion trips to Kenora, Sioux Lookout. Port 
Arthur. Dorion, Rossport. Terrace Bay, Gerald- 
ton. Sibley and Quetico Parks. 



Inspection trip. 



To meet with the Burlington Beach Commer- 
cial Fishermen. 

To attend open meeting of Bay of Quinte 
Hoop Net Fishermen. 

To attend meeting of International Association 
of Game Fish and Conservation and The 
American Fisheries. 

To attend Camp Borden Conservation Club 
meeting. 

To attend meeting of French and Pickerel 
Rivers Resort Association. 
Bird Dog Trials. 



Bird Dog Trials. 



Inspect Trout Ponds. 

South Experimental Station. 

To attend the field dog trial of the Ontario 

Bird Dog .Association and the banquet. 

To attend luncheon and address meeting of the 

International Alumni Association. 

Regional Meeting. 

To address the Conservation Co-ordinating 

Committee meeting on "Conservation Now" 

Subject — Re-stocking Rivers. 

To address members of the Ontario Fur 

Breeders' Association at the Live Mink Show 

and Banquet. 

To attend meeting of advisory Committee on 

Fisheries and Wildlife Ontario Research 

Commission. 

.Attend annual meeting and banquet of Preston 

Rod and Gun Club. 

-Attend meeting of Lake Huron Commercial 

Fishermens' Association. 

To address the Orillia Kiwanis Club. 

To address the Fish and Wildlife Overseers in 

attendance at the Ranger School. 

Attend meeting of Fish and Game Protective 

Association. 

To address the North Bay Fish and Game 

Protective Association. 

Attending meeting of Fisheries Research Board 

of Canada. 

Continued on next Page. 
103 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



DATE 

Jan. 8/48 

Jan. 12/48 

Jan. 17-19/48 

Jan. 20/48 

Jan. 27-29/48 

Feb. 2/48 

Feb. 4- 5/48 
Feb. 11-12/48 

Feb. 18/48 

Feb. 19/48 

Feb. 19/48 

Feb. 23/48 

Feb. 24/48 

Feb. 27/48 

Feb. 27/48 
Feb. 28/48 

Apr. 2/48 

Apr. 8/48 

Apr. 12/48 

Apr. 15/48 

Apr. 16/48 

Apr. 17/48 

Apr. 23/48 

Apr. 26/48 
Apr. 27/48 
May 13/48 
May 17/48 
May 22/48 

104 



PLACE 

King Edward Hotel, 
Toronto 
Alexandra Palace 

Port Dover, Ont. 

Kingston, Ont. 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Niagara Falls, Ont. 

Quebec, Que. 
Chatham, Ont. 

Maison Dore 

King Edward Hotel 

Granite Club 

St. Catharines, Ont. 

Oshawa, Ont. 

Lecture Room, Ontario 
Research Foundation 
Hamilton, Ont. 
Room 110, Department of 
Zoology, University 
Carleton Place, Ont. 

District Office, Gait, Ont. 

Peterborough, Ont. 

North Bay 

Manitoulin Island 

Little Current 

Peterborough, Ont. 

Hart House, Toronto 
Simcoe, Ont. 
Marmora, Ont. 
Ottawa, Ont. 
Port Carling, Muskoka 



PURPOSE 

To attend meeting and dinner of Ontario Fur 
Breeders' Association. 

To attend luncheon of Ontario Federation of 
Commercial Fishermen. 

To attend meeting of Central Lake Erie Com- 
mercial Fishermen's Association. 
Discussion with local Game and Fish Protec- 
tive Association. 

Attending annual convention of the Northern 
Ontario Outfitters' Association. 
To attend the meeting of the Ontario Federa- 
tion of Hunters and Anglers. 
To attend the East Coast Fisheries Conference. 
To attend the meeting of the West Erie Com- 
mercial Fishermens' Association. 
To attend meeting and banquet of Jolly 
Anglers Fish and Hunt Club. 
To attend luncheon of the Tourist Resort 
Outfitters' Association. 

To attend meeting of Georgian Bay Cottagers' 
Association. 

To attend meeting and annual banquet of St. 
Catharines and Lincoln County Fish and Game 
Protective Association. 

To attend reorganization meeting of the Oshawa 
Fish and Game Association. 
Attending Technical Sessions. 

To attend meeting of Hamilton Anglers. 
Acting as Chairman of the Technical Sessions. 

To attend meeting and deliver address, Missis- 
sippi Game and Fish Association. 
To attend meeting of Conservation Officers of 
Lake Huron District. 

To attend meeting and deliver address, Peter- 
borough Fish and Game Protective Association. 
To attend farewell banquet in honour of Mr. 
G. M. Parks and Mr. D. Kennedy. 
To visit the hatcheries and rearing stations on 
Manitoulin Island. 

To attend a conference of commercial fisher- 
men and sportsmen and to attend a meeting of 
the Little Current Council with Mr. J. A. 
Fullerton, M.P.P. 

To attend meeting and address members of 
Peterborough Trout and Stream Conservation 
Club. 

To attend meeting and address members of The 
Georgian Bay Association. 

To attend dinner and address members of 
Norfolk Fish and Game Protective Association. 
To attend meeting and address members of the 
Marmora Fish and Game Club. 
To attend meeting of Whitefish Inspection 
Committee. 

To supervise the planting of Kamloops trout 
in Lake Rousseau with Mr. E. W. Mills. 

Continued on next page. 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



DATE 

May 20/48 
June 1/48 
June 2/48 



June 3- 4/48 
June 5/48 

June Q/48 

June 14/48 
June 28/48 



June 29/48 
June 30/48 



PLACE 

Parry Sound and Dorset 
Codrington and Glenora 
Rideau District — Cornwall, 
Gananoque, Prescott and the 
District Office at Kemptville 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Returning home via White 

Lake and Deer Lake 

Hatcheries 

Huttonville Park near 

Brampton 

Pembroke, Ont. 

Chicago, Illinois 



Chicago. Illinois 
Winnipeg, Man. 



June 30-July 1/48 Kenora,Ont. 

July 2, 3, 4, 5/48 Fort Frances and 
Rainv River 



July 5,6, 7/48 
Aug. 11-12/48 

Aug. 23/48 
Sept. 3/48 
Sept. 13/48 

Sept. 24/48 
Sept. 26/48 
Oct. 1/48 
Oct. 4/48 
Oct. 5/48 
Oct. 6/48 



Port .Arthur and 
Geraldton 

Wellington, Ont. and 
eastern part of the province 



Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 
District Office 
Port Dover, Ont. 

Atlantic City. \.J. 
Chalfonte-Haddon Hall 



Deseronto, Ont. 

Schumacher, Ont. 

London, Ont. 

University of Toronto, 
Dept. of Zoology 
Royal York Hotel, 
Toronto, Ont. 
St. Thomas, Ont. 
Radio Station CHLO 



PURPOSE 

To visit the Ranger School. 

To visit the hatcheries and the bird farm. 

General inspection trip contacting the Fish and 

Wildlife Officers and inspecting the Department 

boat at Prescott. 

Attending the Dominion-Provincial Wildlife 

Conference. 

Inspection of above two hatcheries. 



Attending meeting of Peel County Fish and 

Game Protective Association. 

To attend Kiwanis Club Luncheon. 

Attending Meeting of Program Committee of 

the International Association of Game. Fish 

and Conservation Commissioners. 

Left in the evening for Minneapolis. 

Meeting with Mr. G. W. Malaher, a/Director 

Game and Fisheries Branch, Dept. of Mines 

and Natural Resources, Winnipeg. Meeting 

with Dr. K. R. Doan, Dr. W. A. Kennedy and 

Dr. W. Sprules of the Fisheries Research Board 

of Canada, McArthur Bldg. Meeting with Mr. 

H. V. Dempsey. Chief Inspector of Whitefish 

Inspection Bureau. 

District Office and Kenricia Hotel. General 

inspection tour. 

General inspection tour. District Office. Meet 

with Mr. Kendal Hanson, Secretary, Northern 

Ontario Outfitters' Association, Calvert's 

Camps, Rainy River. 

General Inspection tour. District Offices. 

To attend meeting of Wellington Board of 
Trade and investigate West Lake situation and 
to inspect hatcheries in that portion of the 
province. 

General inspection trip (Tourist Outfitters, 
Commercial Fishermen, Hatcheries, etc.). 
Meeting with the Commercial Fishermen of 
the district. 

Attending convention of the International 
Association of Game, Fish and Conservation 
Commissioners and the American Fisheries 
Society. 

To meet commercial fishermen of Quinte 
District. 

To attend meeting of Porcupine Rod and Gun 
Club. 

To attend meeting of Fisheries and Wildlife 
Committee of Ontario Research Council. 
To attend meeting of Salmon .Associates Com- 
mittee. 

To attend Gyro Club meeting and luncheon 
and to address the members (Mr. J. Reynolds). 
To inaugurate a series of wildlife conservation 
programmes sponsored by the Middlesex 
County Sportsmen's Association. 

Continued on next page. 
105 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



DATE 


PLACE 


Oct. 12/48 


Lindsay 




Nogie's Creek 




Deer Lake 




Tweed 




Westport 




Carleton Place 




Kemptville 


Oct. 13/48 


Ottawa, Ont. 


Oct. 14/48 


Ottawa, Ont. 


Oct. 15/48 


Pembroke, Ont. 


Oct. 16/48 


Dorset, Ont. 




Algonquin Park 




Mountain Lake 


Oct. 18/48 


Peterborough, Ont. 


Oct. 23/48 


University of Toronto 




Biology Bldg. 


Oct. 23/48 


Orangeville, Ont. 


Oct. 25/48 


Port Perry, Ont. 


Oct. 26/48 


Woodbridge, Ont. 


Oct. 29/48 


Campbellford, Ont. 


Nov. 4/48 


Peterborough, Ont. 


Nov. 20/48 


Toronto, Ont. 




.■\lbany Club 


Nov. 29/48 


Ranger School, 




Dorset, Ont. 


Nov. 30/48 


Sudbury, Ont. 


Dec. 3/48 


Cooksville, Ont. 


Dec. 7-8/48 


Delavan, Wisconsin 



Lake Lawn Hotel 
Dec. 9,10,11/48 Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Dec. 29/48 Belleville, Ont. 



Jan. 3/49 
Jan. 27/49 
Jan. 31/49 
Feb. 1/49 

106 



Ottawa, Ont. 
Sudbury, Ont. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Fort William, Ont. 



PURPOSE 

Visit District Office. Attend ploughing match. 
Inspection of maskinonge recovery programme. 
Visit hatchery. 

Visit District Office (discuss trucks for over- 
seers with Mr. Baker). 
Visit Bass rearing ponds. 

Visit Mr. Findlay (Mississippi Fish and Game 
Protective Association). 
Visit District Office. 

.•\ttend meetings of Whitefish Parasite Con- 
ference. Dr. Needler's Office, Room 214, West 
Block. 

Attend meetings of Dominion-Provincial 
Fisheries Conference. 

Pre-inspection of fish to improve quality. 
Visit District Office for conference. 
Visit the Ranger School. 

Contact Mr. Bebee re fishing in Algonquin 
Park. 

Carp control experiment. 

To attend meeting of Peterborough Chamber 
of Commerce and County Council to discuss 
the Peterborough Crown Game Preserve. 
To attend meeting on Great Lakes studies. 

To attend meeting and address members of 
Dufferin Northern Peel Angling and Hunting 
Association. 

To inspect Lake Scugog marshes. 
Presentation of Report of Humber Valley Con- 
servation .Authority. 

To attend meeting of Campbellford and Dis- 
trict Fish and Game Protective Association. 
To attend Peterborough Game and Fish Pro- 
tective Association annual ladies' night. 
To address Paracelsus Club. 

To attend meeting of Advisory Council. 

To address Lions Club re Conservation prob- 
lems, possibly visit some hatcheries in that 
area. 

Annual Banquet of The Hunting and Field 
Archers of Ontario. 

To attend meeting of the Northern Great Lakes 
-Area Council. 

To attend Mid-West Wildlife Conference. 
Meeting of Bay of Quinte Commercial Fisher- 
men to discuss the question of the use of 
double and single hoop nets. 
To attend meeting of the Canadian Committee 
on Fresh Water Fisheries Research. 
To attend annual banquet of Sudbury and Dis- 
trict Fish and Game Protective Association. 
To attend meeting of the Ontario Federation of 
Anglers and Hunters. 

To attend annual meeting and banquet of 
Northern Ontario Outfitters' Association. 

Continued on next Page. 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



DATE PLACE PURPOSE 

Feb. 7/40 Forest, Ont. Meeting with Mr. C. E. Janes, M.P.P., Mr. 

B. Cathcart. M.P.P., and Lake Huron Fisher- 
men. 
Feb. 8/49 Chatham, Ont. To attend the annual meeting of the West Erie 

Commercial Fishermen's Association at 2 p.m. 

To attend the banquet of above Association 

at 7 p.m. 
Feb. 28/49 St. Catharines, Ont. To attend meeting and annual banquet of St. 

Catharines and Lincoln County Game and Fish 

Protective Association. 
Mar. 1-2/49 Niagara Falls, Ont. To attend the 1st annual Ontario Tourist 

Conference. 
Mar. 7-12/49 Washington, D.C. To attend the American Wildlife Conference. 

Mar. 21/49 Gait, District Office To attend Lake Huron District Meeting of 

Hatchery men and Conservation Officers. 
Mar 29/49 Petrolia, Ont. To attend banquet and address members 

of The Lambton Rural Game Protective 

Association. 

T. E. MACKEY— DIVISION OF FOREST PROTECTION 
April 22-24, 1947 Inspection of Rideau District including fire hazard conditions in Limerick 

and Larcse County Forests. 
May 19-22. 1947 Meeting of Advisory Council, Ontario Forest Ranger School and inspection 

North Bay District. 
June 10-23, 1047 Inspection trip North Bay, Sudbury, part of Sault Ste. Marie and Algonquin 

District. 

July 6, 1947 Jnspection trip Ipperwash Park. 

July 7- 8, 1947 Jnspection trip Tweed District. 

July 20-24, 1947 Jnspection trip North Bay and Sudbury District. 

.•\ug. 10-14, 1947 Inspection trip Cochrane, Kapuskasing and Geraldton Districts. 

Sept. 16-19, 1947 Inspection trip Algonquin, Rideau and Quinte Districts. 

Sept. 28-30, 1947 Inspection trip Rideau, Quinte and Trent Districts. 

Nov. 4-20, 1947 Attending Regional Conferences at Port Arthur and Sault Ste. Marie. 

Jan. 23-27, 1948 Attending Northern Ontario Outfitters' Association Convention at Sault 

Ste. Marie. 

Jan. 28-31,1948 Visit to Roscommon, Michigan, Michigan Forest Fire Experiment Station. 

Feb. 4- 5, 1948 Attending Forest Fire Committee meeting at National Research Foundation, 

Ottawa. 
W. D. CRAM— DIVISION OF LAND AND RECREATIONAL AREAS 

Mar. 23-24, 1947 Tweed— Regional work. 

Apr. 11-12,1947 Trip to Little Current re Low Island, met Town Council. 

Apr. 26-30, 1947 Visit to British Columbia Forest Service. 

May 11-12, 1947 Trip to Rondeau Park, inspection of improvements to be made. 

May 21-22,1947 Tweed — Regional work. 

May 28, 1947 At Ranger School. 

May 29, 1947 To Sudbury, Rocky Island Lake fire and Soo with Deputy. 

July 16, 1947 To Madoc, Bancroft, Barry's Bay, Pembroke, inspection of forest lands. 

.\ug. 13, 1947 _....To Manitoulin Island, inspection of licensed camps re zoning. 

Aug. 14, 1947 To Capreol, inspection of Ella Park, then by plane to Parry Sound over 

islands in Georgian Bay. 

Aug. 15,1947 Boat from Parry Sound to Midland, inspection of Georgian Bay Islands. 

Aug. 21,1947 Port Arthur to Pine Portage, inspection of area requested by Hydro, on 

to Terrace Bay inspecting townsite. 

Aug. 22, 1947 _ __Inspcction of Tourist Camps between Geraldton and Hearst. 

Aug. 23, 1947 Inspection resort lands, Remi Lake. 

Aug. 27, 1947 .^Inspection Gogama Townsite. 

Aug. 28, 1947 Inspection of islands. Lake Temagami, sale to Ontario Northland Rly. of 

areas held under L.O. 

Continued on next page. 
107 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



DATE PURPOSE 

Sept. 11, 1947 Inspection of Hersenhoren's property. Lake Simcoe. 

Sept. 16, 1947 Inspections Lavielle, Dickson and Booth Lake Cabins. 

Sept. 21, 1947 To Wasaga Beach, Dr. Nettleton complaint. 

Sept. 22, 1947 Inspection of applications around Owen Sound. 

Oct. 2, 1947 To Port Colborne, inspection of application for land by Yacht Club. 

Oct. 3, 1947- Inspection of area applied for by Mr. Queen, also area at Mitchell's Bay. 

Inspections at Ipperwash Park and Grand Bend. 

Oct. 7, 1947-- Tweed, Regional Work. 

Oct. 16, 1947 Inspection of applications for resort lands Mississauga Lake. 

Nov. 29-30, 1947 .^t Rondeau Park re long-term plan for development. 

Dec. 22, 1947 Tweed, Regional work. 

F. J. SULLIVAN— DIVISION OF L.\W 

Trips to the following places: 

Sault Ste. Marie Cornwall Ottawa 

Cochrane Montreal Marmora 

North Bay Kemptville Kapuska.sing 

Sudbury Brockville in connection with a matter 

under the Game and Fisheries Act. 

E. J. Z.JlVITZ— DIVISION OF REFORESTATION 
June 24, 1947 Ontario Conservation and Reforestation Association Meeting at Carleton 

Place. 

June 29, 1947 Visit to Soo and Sudbury Districts, on inspection of reforestation projects. 

July 17, 1947 Petawawa Meeting of Woodlands Section of the Pulp and Paper Association. 

Sept. 5, 1947 Visit to Prince Edward Island, on instructions of the Minister, to give 

advice on reforestation. 
Oct. 3, 1947 Quebec City and Sherbrooke, in reference to pulpwood export restrictions 

by the Quebec Government, on the instructions of the Deputy Minister. 

R. N. JOHNSTON— DIVISION OF RESEARCH 

July 1-15, 1947 ...-U.S. Forest Service; State Forest Services of Vermont, New Hampshire, 

Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Maryland, Forestry Foundation. 

September, 1947 Provincial Forest Service New Brunswick, Quebec; Federal Department of 

Agriculture; 10 visits — Forest Service, National Research Council; 3 visits — 
Forest Products Laboratory — twice. 

F. W. BEATTY— DIVISION OF SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING 

1. Inspection of the Baseline in the Thunder Bay District. 

2. Inspection of the trial line of the Ontario-Manitoba Boundary. 

3. Visit to Sault Ste. Marie, re municipal survey. 

4. Visit to the District Offices at Parry Sound, .Algonquin Park. North Bay, Tweed, in connection 
with the survey of summer resort locations. 

5. Visit to the Districts of Sudbury, .\lgonquin. North Bay. Tweed and Trent, in connection with 
water conservation. 

6. Visits to Ottawa — Department of National Defence and Department of Mines and Resources, 
re production of maps for the various portions of the Province. 

7. Attending the Regional Meetings at Port .Arthur, of the Western and Mid-Western Regions. 

8. Visit to the Canadian Board on Geographical Names in Ottawa. 

J. F. SHARPE— DIVISION OF TIMBER MANAGEMENT 

Apr. 27-May 1, 1947 North Bay and Timagami. 

May 8-10,1947 Minden (attending Culler's Examination). 

July 3- 9,1947 Timagami, Gowganda and other points (the late D. M. Matthews and 

Mr. Sharpe). 

Aug. 19-21,1947 Callander. North Bay and Parry Sound. 

Sept. 18 and 19, 1947 Dorset— Ranger School. 

Sept.24-Oct. 2, 1947 Port Arthur and Fort Frances (The Ontario-Minnesota Pulp and Paper 

Co. Ltd.). 

Continued on next page. 
108 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



DATE PURPOSE 

Dec. 16-22, 1Q47 ..Minneapolis, Minnesota — Attending Annual Meeting, Society of American 

Foresters. 

Feb. 8-11, 1948 Montreal — Canadian Lumbermen's Association Convention. 

Mar. 30- Apr. 1, 1Q48 Montreal — Woodlands Section Pulp and Paper Association. 

TRAINING 

The departmental training programme for staff members, after the pattern 
of the Training Within Industry programme, and in First Aid training, was rudely 
halted on August 1st, 1948, by the tragic and sudden passing of Kennet Blackwell 
Smith. Training Officer for the Department, after which it was decided that it would 
be in our best interests to proceed slowly in the matter of selection, so that the best 
Training Officer possible could be obtained as a replacement for Mr. Smith. Our 
report, therefore, indicates a smaller number of persons trained than in the previous 
year, due to the fact that only one-third of the year's programme was completed prior 
to Mr. Smith's passing. 

The Job Instruction Training Course was made available to 28 employees. 
All trainess qualified and received certificates. 

The Job Relation Training Course was made available to 24 members, all of 
whom were successful in qualifying for certificates. 

First Aid Training was likewise halted and apart from a refresher course in 
Artificial Respiration to certain personnel of the Ontario Forest Ranger School and 
at the Algonquin District headquarters, there was not actually any further training 
of staff in this regard. 
Head Office Staff Course 

Following our practice, instituted in the fiscal year 1942 '43, the Head Office 
Staff Course was given to members from both Field and Head Office staffs. 

In all, 18 employees were enrolled in the course. 7 of whom were from Head 
Office and the remainder from the Field. 

The Districts represented on the course were Geraldton. Gogama. Kapus- 
kasing, Kenora, Lake Huron, North Bay. Port Arthur. Sioux Lookout and 
Timiskaming. 

Because of the growth in departmental activities, consideration is now being 
given to revising the time schedules for this course as it is apparent that greater 
consideration may have to be given to certain aspects of our work. 

Scalers' Schools Held During Fiscal Year 1948-49 
Examinations were held during 1948 as follows: 

1. Carnarvon May 7. 1948 3. Ft. William October 9. 1948 

2. The.ssalon June 4. 1948 4. Huntsville November 5. 1948 

T.ABI.E \o. 21 

RESULTS OF EXAMIX.\TIO\S HELD AT SCALERS' SCHOOLS 

( ARNAR\ ox THESSAEOX FT. WILLIAM HVNTSVILLE 



Sawlog and Pulpwood Licence .... 


16 


.■\fter further experience 


SO 


Sand Pajjer Specie test 




PnlpwooH Licence 


2 


.\fter further experience . 


16 


-After further experience and 




Species Test 


1 



85 



15 
2 
4 

12 



11 

"44" 



2 
2 
6 
6 
1 

10 



29 

s 



37 



109 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



Accident Prevention, Health, Safety Measures 

As in the case of direct training in First Aid, the distribution of literature on 
Accident Prevention, Health and Safety Measures was handicapped for the latter part 
of the iiscal year. The selection of material and the planning for further distribution 
of literature, is in hand and proceeding. 

We wish again to pay tribute to the Tuberculosis Prevention Branch, Depart- 
ment of Health, for its excellent provisions for Chest X-Ray examinations for per- 
sonnel at Head Office and for Field Staff members in many centres throughout the 
Province, by means of the Department's Travelling Clinics. 

The Health Centre, at the Parliament Buildings, has proved to be of increased 
value to the members of the Department employed at Head Office and in nearby 
establishments. This service has been the means of more than one staff member dis- 
covering that he or she had some serious ailment of which they were previously 
unaware. In each case of this nature, the employee was advised to contact his or 
her own physician. 

Members of Field Staff continued to enjoy the facilities provided by the 
Travelling Chest Clinics and by this means, or by examination at the nearest hospital, 
the reports were made available to the Department of Health by which employees are 
categorized prior to Permanent Staff appointment. Again, we wish to pay tribute to 
the Department of Health for their co-operation as a whole and to Dr. A. Griffith Hill, 
Physician-in-charge of the Health Centre, with whom we have almost daily contact. 

JUNIOR FOREST RANGERS 

The business of Forest Protection is one of the primary functions of the 
Department. Man power requirements of the nation in time of war adversely 
affected that particular function during the recent conflict. With the constantly in- 
creasing demand for trained men after the termination of the war, the Department 
conceived the idea of employing youths of high school age as a supplement to the 
Department's seasonal Forest Ranging Staff. From this developed the policy of em- 
ploying youths of 17 to 19 years of age during the summer season, and instructing 
them in the work. The accomplishments of the first group were sufficiently satisfactory 
to justify the enlargement and continuation of the processes inasmuch as the manual 
labour performed by these unskilled but vigorous youngsters relieved trained men for 
more important duties, particularly during the period of the worst forest fire hazards. 

Each year a number are chosen from a large group of applicants including 
local boys, as well as others from southern Ontario. When selection is made, the 
applicant is directed to report to one of the northern Administrative Districts, where 
work and training is laid out for the group or groups of Junior Forest Rangers, under 
a foreman and, if necessary, assistants, who are trained men. in addition to a cook. 
They are provided with a daily rate of pay and their board and lodging in suitable 
buildings or tent camps, and they are kept together in groups of six to twelve in order 
that the training and discipline may be effective. Due attention is paid to recreation, 
comfort and health, and the work consists of construction and maintenance of tele- 
phone lines, clearing portages and trails, repairing docks and dams, clearing camp 
sites, preparing fireplaces, repairing buildings, painting, construction work and forest 
fire fighting. 

110 



A'o. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 195'J 



Many of these young men have proven themselves of considerable value. To 
some the experience has opened the way to a career. At the end of the season, the 
local reports on their services are analyzed and the value not only of the training, 
but also of the actual work accomplished, is assessed and evaluated. 

The Junior Ranger idea has been developed from a small group to where, in 
1948, groups were distributed as far west as Sault Ste. Marie, and as far north as 
Kapuskasing and Cochrane. 

Table No. 22 
During the summer of 1047, Junior Forest Rangers were distributed as follows: 

DISTRICT NUMBER 

.•Mgonquin 20 Sudbun.- ___ _._ 13 

North Bay 18 Sault Ste. Marie 11 

Parr>- Sound 12 

Quinte 9 Total 83 

T^BLE No. 23 
During the summer of 1948, the distribution was as follows: 

DISTRICT NUMBER 

.■\lgonquin 20 Quinte — 21 

Cochrane 12 Sault Ste. Marie 13 

Kapuskasing 8 Sudbury 20 

North Bay 21 Timiskaming 8 

Parry Sound 2S 

Total 148 

The following is a brief report of operations during the summer of 1948: 
location of camps accommodation work done 

Algonquin District 
2 camps on Tents Construction and maintenajice of tele- 

Highway No. 60 phone lines. Cleared about 20 miles of 

canoe portage. Assisted Rangers to issue 

travel permits. General instruction. 

Cochrane District 

Waterhen Creek 8' x 10' tents, wood floors, Hauled, peeled, and treated telephone 

and Kamiskotia mosquito netting poles. Approximately 13 miles of poles 

Lake erected. Fire fighting and guarding 

roads. Instructed in use of fire fighting 
equipment. 
K.\PusKASiNG District 
Remi Lake and Tents 40 ft. addition to the Remi Lake air- 

Nagagami River base dock. Set up camping sites on 

islands of Remi Lake. Cleared out 20 
miles of a telephone line. 
North Bay District 
Horseshoe Lake, Tents with tent bottoms, Telephone lines brushed out, constructed 

Silver Creek, drive camp, bunkhouses and repaired. Jack Pine transplanted 

Sand Dam, with double deck bunks, for snow fence. Cut and skidded approx. 

Temagami Island mattress and blankets 30 cords hardwood. 16 camp sites 

and Bear Island worked on. Improvements to Dept. 

Bldgs., and grounds. General instruc- 
tion. 12 miles of portages cleaned. 
Parry Sound District 
Clear Lake and in Frame bunkhousc and tents Road construction and maintenance. 

Townships of with flooring Telephone lines brushed, mowed, cleaned 

Conger, Foley and out. V/z miles portage mowed. 

Burpee 

Continued an next page. 
Ill 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 





QuiNTE District 


Bancroft, 


Warehouse, Lumber Camp 


Mazinaw Lake, 




Stoco, 




Calabogie 






Sault Ste. Marie Dis 


Mount Lake, 


2-12' X 14' tents with wood 


Rawhide Lake, 


floors. Regular tent camps 


White River Road 


while fire fighting. 



Collected Black Spruce foliage and 
Sweet Fern for distillation. Cut cord- 
wood. Telephone lines brushed out. 
Telephone poles cut, also posts and 
cribbing timber. 
trict 

Helped combat Mississagi fire. One 
used as temporary Radio Operator. 
Brushed out telephone lines. Peeled and 
helped transport poles. Dug telephone 
pole holes and anchor holes. General 
instruction. 



Lot 7, Con. V, 
Cascaden Twp. 
12 miles S.E. of 
Cartier 

Amikougami 
Creek, 
Wendigo Lake 



Sudbury District 
16' X 24' tents, single 
double-decked iron beds, 
mattresses and blankets 



Fire fighting; telephone lines brushed 
out and constructed which included 
peeling and treating poles. General 
instruction. 
TiMisKAMiNG District 
Tents Improved grounds around District head- 

quarters; portages cut; telephone lines 
and bush roads brushed out. 8 miles of 
poles erected which included cutting, 
peeling, treating, skidding and trans- 
porting poles, repaired dam. Dug a well. 

Reports from the District Foresters indicate that more satisfactory results are 
obtained from the services of such Rangers working in small groups. 

OFFICE MANAGEMENT 

Purchasing 

Locating:, Purchasing and Expediting of Equipment and Supplies 

The supply of materials available continued to improve throughout the year, 
and many lines that had been practically non-existent for some time, were again 
plentiful. In some lines, new products of exceptional quality were offered, and due 
to the comparative tests made by the Supply Office on these items, the Department 
as a whole was benefited. This was particularly true of stationery and office supply 
items. To summarize, it might be said that the situation with regard to availability 
had improved across the board, and in many cases, quality was better. 

A considerable quantity of office furniture was required during the year for 
expansion and replacement purposes, and generally speaking, distributors were able 
to deliver from stock, or without undue delay. Steel filing cabinets, however, were 
very difficult to obtain during the early part of the year, and only slight improvement 
has been noted, though cabinets of inferior quality at high prices are available. 
Although we were able to purchase desks, chairs, tables, etc., at slightly reduced 
prices as compared to the previous year, all steel products such as filing cabinets, etc. 
were considerably higher. 

Stockroom 

Receipt, Issue, Care and Storage of Equipment, Supplies and Uniforms — 

Stock Control 

The volume of goods handled through this section has greatly increased again, 
and this condition, in an already overcrowded stockroom, has produced a serious 
situation that can only be alleviated by the acquisition of additional space. 



112 



.Vo. J Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Shipments of stationery and supplies to District Offices, etc.. by express and 
freight reached a total of approximately 10,000 parcels, weighing about 150 tons. 
This was almost double the quantity handled during the previous fiscal year. Besides 
this, there were 9.650 orders covering 701.410 licences of various kinds prepared, 
and mailed. 

In considering the receiving and issuing of various kinds of supplies, it should 
be remembered that, of necessity, two handlings are required, receiving and checking 
into stock, and withdrawing from stock for issue. 

The storing and distribution of uniform equipment is also handled by this 
section, and with the quantity of spare clothing necessary for replacement purposes 
as uniform clothing becomes unserviceable, the lack of space becomes more 
aggravated. 

There are now approximately 400 uniformed personnel, about 30 of which 
have been added during the past year. The uniforms supplied to these men have been 
found very satisfactory, having an average service life of 2 years, or slightly more. 

During the year, 3 new pieces were added to the uniform equipment; a bush 
jacket, of light weight khaki material for wear with the summer uniform kit; winter 
caps of brown duck to match the parkas, with brown mouton trim; waterproof plastic 
cap covers for wear over peaked caps during rainy weather. 

Inventory 

The plan to decentralize the equipment accounting procedure was advanced 
to a great extent by the design of a card system for use by the District Offices. This 
card. Form O.P. 97, has been produced in two colours, white for items classed as equip- 
ment, which must appear on the Annual Inventory, and buff for expendable items. 
This card system is now in use in the District Offices and is being found less cumber- 
some and more accurate than the previous system. Before the desired result can be 
achieved however, we will require a firm statement as to which items shall be classed 
as equipment and which expendable. When this is done, each District Office will 
be visited by a member of our staff and given instruction so that the method of keeping 
District Equipment Inventories will be standard. 

Preparation of Plates 

An increased number of departmental forms was designed, and plates made 
up on our Vari-typer Machine. There are special- paper composition plates for print- 
ing by Multilith process and these can be used to advantage where the total number 
of impressions required runs from 2,000 to 3,000. This makes a very inexpensive 
process, as the cost per plate varies from 10c to 20c each according to type. 

Where a larger number of impressions is called for, or where it is anticipated 
that the form concerned will continue in service for some time, copy is produced on 
the Vari-typer, and reproduced on aluminum plates by means of photography. The 
resultant plate may be used again and again for reprinting the form and these are 
filed for quick reference. 

In addition to printed forms, our output of reports was expanded considerably 
as we produced more of these by means of plates. 

Printing 

Duplicating and Printing 

After many delays, we finally managed to get all the printing and duplicating 
equipment moved to room B 305. This was done in November, and although the room 

113 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



is small, it is a great improvement over the previous arrangement. Delivery of a second 
Multilith machine was made in the last of February, so that it was possible to bring 
the work up to date. 

Production by the Multilith process totalled 2,768,485 impressions, of which 
589,500 was letterhead. This was an increase of approximately 660,000 impressions 
over the previous year. With the addition of the extra ^Multilith machine, our produc- 
tion will rise still further, as we shall be able to undertake work which was not 
possible previously. 

The Mimeograph machine had its share of increased work as well, with a total 
production of 353,765 impressions from 1.625 different stencils. This represented 
an increase of about 52,000 impressions. 

Distribution of Printed Matter 

A large proportion of the production of this section consists of various forms 
which are carried in stock and distributed by requisition, but reports, circulars, news 
releases, etc. are prepared and mailed immediately. During the year we prepared 
and distributed 20,000 copies of various news releases, 30,000 copies of circulars, 
120,000 of the Department's magazine Sylva, as well as many other items. 

Servicing and Space Adjustments 

The very crowded conditions existing throughout the various offices, etc., have 
not been changed by space adjustment, an impossibility where every bit of space 
is being used to the best advantage. We were, however, able to obtain some tem- 
porary outside storage space over the engine room in the premises occupied by the 
Department of Education, at College and Huron Streets. In this, we were able to 
store part of our stock of publications, thereby making room for other stocks in the 
stockrooms. 

In most cases, requests for service of various kinds were completed without 
undue delay where we were able to complete the service ourselves, but a considerable 
amount of follow-up work was sometimes required when we were dependent on 
outside help. 

It is pointed out that repairs, alterations, etc.. involving the services of the 
Department of Public Works, have been very slow, apparently owing mainly to lack 
of adequate staff, as well as shortage of certain materials. 

INFORMATION AND EDUCATION 

IXTRODUCTIOX 

The primary function of the Information and Education Section is to enlist 
the active co-operation of the people of Ontario in the conservation of their renewable 
natural resources. 

The success of management plans depends in large measure upon public under- 
standing and appreciation of the value of the land, forest and water resources being 
administered by the Department. 

These resources are of very great importance to the security and well being of 
the people of the Province and represent a major part of our total economy. 

To ensure that the public will be conversant with the values involved and the 
need for constant vigil in protecting the resources from destruction by careless or unwise 

114 



.Vo. 3 Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



use, the Information and Education Section has carried on an extensive program 
designed to meet these objectives. 

Details of the work which has been accomplished will be found elsewhere herein, 
but a brief resume of some of the more important activities and their scope follows. 

Protectiox 

In connection with the necessit\' for protecting the resources, the Information 
and Education Section has directed its appeals along lines designed to encourage a 
more active public co-operation in furthering management plans for forest protection 
through fire prevention, and the conservation of fish and wildlife through a greater 
degree of personal responsibility for law observance. 

The prevention of fires, with consequent saving of timber and wildlife habitat, 
is the most economical method of handling the forest protection problem, since it 
attacks it at its source. An awakened public consciousness of the danger from the 
careless use of camp fires and smoking materials will materially reduce the loss by 
fire. 

Education 

An enlightened public affords the best opportunity for ensuring the co-operation 
which is an essential part of successful administration. 

The Department has a staff of specialists who possess, through training and 
experience, a comprehensive knowledge of natural resources, are sincere, creative and 
imaginative in their work and have a broad knowledge of the specific values inherent 
in the various media and tools which may be most effectively utilized. 

During the period under revaew. and in line with its educational program, the 
Section specialized in the preparation and distribution of Department publications; in 
conducting lecture tours, utilizing motion pictures of conservational appeal; in the 
design and construction of feature exhibits used, as indicated elsewhere in this report, 
and in a regular schedule of news releases to newspapers, magazines, radio stations and 
writers. 

These activities, by their wide coverage and general appeal, have served to 
stimulate adult interest which is being reflected in a larger measure of public support. 

The work of the lecturers, particular!}- in the schools of the Province and among 
youth organizations, has been particularly valuable. 

Enquiries 

An important phase of the year's work was the answering of a large volume of 
letters of enquiry for information and an equally large volume of enquiries by telephone 
and personal call. 

Photography 

The production of black and while photograi)hs for use in Department publi- 
cations and for distribution to newspapers and magazines was stepped u|i during the 
year. 

Radio 

Radio was used quite frequently for spot announcements concerning fire hazards, 
etc., and with the co-operation of the radio stations a great deal of the material contained 
in news releases was broadcast. 

115 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Posters 

Signs and posters covering all phases of the conservation program were designed 
and produced by the Section. 

Co-operation 

In addition to working closely with all other branches of the Ontario Govern- 
ment, the Department co-operates with other similar Departments in the Federal 
Government and the various provinces, by frequent exchange of information with 
respect to matters of mutual interest covering all phases of administrative work. 

DEPARTMENT PUBLICATIONS 

Publication work consisted of the production of manuals, official reports and 
administrative booklets. This was in addition to the editing and production of the staff 
magazine SYLVA. 

The work necessary to produce these publications involved editing, design, 
layout, cost estimates, approvals and proof-reading, together with the selection of 
photos and art work. 

During the year 28 publications were produced, including 5 manuals, 13 
administrative pieces, 4 reports and 6 issues of SYLVA. These publications included 
4 which were carried over from the previous fiscal year. 

The following table lists the publications completed during the year: 

Manuals 

Timber Management, Pt. I Timber Management, Pt. I\' 

Timber Management, Pt. II 

Timber Management, Pt. Ill 



Timber Management, Pt. \' 



Administrative Pieces 

Game & Fisheries Act (Blue Bk.) Administrative Chart, 1949 
Summary of Game and Fisheries Act Care and Planting of Forest Trees 

Summary — Errata Planning for Tree Planting 

Law Enforcement Guide Reforestation (and Management) 

Forest Fires Prevention Act Crown Timber Dues 

Lands for Settlement Letterhead (N.R.) 
Administrative Chart, 1948 

Reports 

Annual Report, 1948 Sylva, Vol. 4, No. 2 Sylva, \'o1. 4, No. 5 

Annual Report, 1947 Sylva, Vol. 4, No. 3 Sylva, Vol. 4, No. 6 

Annual Report! 1946 (G.&F.) Sylva, Vol. 4, No. 4 Sylva, Vol. 5, No. 1 
District Forest Management 

A COMPLETE LIST OF THE PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE FOR 
DISTRIBUTION FOLLOWS: 
Accounts 

1, Accounting for Logging Operations 

Air Service 

2. Wings Over the Bush 

116 



No. 3 Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Fish and Wildlife 

3. Game and Fisheries Act and Regulations 

4. Summary of the Game and Fisheries Act 

5. Game Birds Need Cover on Your Farm 

6. Alternate Closure of Lakes in Algonquin Park 

7. Sporting Ethics 

8. Chapleau Crown Game Preserve 

9. Prairie Chickens in Ontario 

10. Fluctuations in Populations 

11. The Cormorant in Ontario 

12. Registered Traplines (Mimeographed) 

13. A Survey of the Aquatic Vegetation of Whitewater Lake (Mimeographed) 

14. Description of Wisconsin Pheasant Release (Mimeographed) 

15. Care and Handling of Pheasant Chicks (Mimeographed) 

16. Winter Feeding of Pheasant Chicks (Mimeographed) 

17. Advance Report on Wildlife Conditions in Lambton County 
(Mimeographed) 

18. Report on Wildlife Survey in Durham County (Mimeographed) 

Forest Protection 

19. Forest Fires Prevention Act and Regulations 

20. Yes. We Fight Forest Fires 

21. Forest Protection Manual 

Land and Recreational Areas 

22. Lands for Settlement in Ontario 

23. Summer Resort Lands in Ontario 

24. The Natural History of Algonquin Park 

25. Algonquin Provincial Park Folder 

26. Rondeau Provincial Park 

27. Come to Quetico 

28. Parry Sound Forest District 

29. Sault Ste. Marie Forest District 

30. Sudbury Forest District 

31. Kenora Forest District 

il. Fort Frances Forest District 

a. North Bay Forest District 

34. Cottage Sites on Crown Lands 

Law 

35. Law Enforcement Guide and Related Subjects 

Reforestation 

36. Windbreaks and Shelterbelts 

37. Forest Trees for Distribution 

38. Reforestation and Woodlot Management 

39. Planning for Tree Planting 

40. Care and Planting of Forest Trees 

41. Glacial Pot Hole Area. Durham County 

42. Forest Trees of Ontario (50c) 

117 



Report of the Department oj Lands and Forests for IQSO No. 3 



43. The Farm Woodlot 

44. Forest Tree Planting 

45. Reforestation in Ontario 

46. Forest Spraying and Some Effects of DDT. 

47. Bibliography of Canadian Biological Publications, 1946 

Surveys 

48. List of Geographical Townships in the Province of Ontario (25c) 

49. List of Water Powers in the Province of Ontario (75c) 

50. List of Lithographed Maps and Plans 

51. Ontario Surveys and the Land Surveyor 

52. Aerial Surveys in Ontario 

Timber Management 

53. Crown Timber Dues 

54. Procedure to Obtain Authority to Cut Timber on Crown Lands 

55. Systems of Forest Cropping 

56. Manual of Scaling Instructions 

57. Timber Management Manual — Part I — Legislation (50c) 

58. Timber Management Manual— Supplement to Part I 

59. Timber Management Manual — Part II — Timber Estimating 
(Field Work) (50c) 

60. Timber Management Manual — Part III — Timber Estimating 
(Compilations) (50c) 

61. Timber Management Manual — Part IV — Timber Marking for Special 
Cutting Operations (50c) 

62. Timber Management Manual — Part V — Methods of Stumpage Appraisal 
(50c) 

(Complete set comprised of five parts — $1.00). 

General 

63. Annual Report of the Minister of Lands and Forests 

64. Administrative Chart 

65. Indians of Ontario 

66. Ontario Forest Atlas ($1.00) 

67. The History and Status of Forestry in Ontario 

68. Definitions of Important Branches of Forestry 

69. Know Your Forest Trees 

70. Algonquin Story ($2.00) 

71. Building with Mud 

72. Sylva, The Lands and Forests Review ($1.50 per year, six issues). 

LECTURE TOURS 

Field lecturers operated in six of the seven Regions during the year. Messrs. 
R. V. Whelan, C. W. Dill, H. K. Campbell and B. A. S. MacDonald operated in the 
Central, Mid-Western, Northern and South-Western Regions respectively throughout 
the year. Mr. R. W. Arkwright was appointed to the Central Region during the early 
part of the year and coverage for three months of the period was provided for the 
Western Region by Mr. D. Gillespie. 

118 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



In each of the Regions a schedule of meetings was arranged through close 
co-operation with the District Foresters. This made it possible for the lecture staff 
to spend some time in each district thus ensuring a wider coverage. 

It will be noted from the table provided herein that emphasis was placed on 
school meetings. The co-operation of principals and teachers served to assure the 
success of these gatherings. Some 876 lectures were given in schools with an attendance 

of 8Q.020. 

The reaction of pupils to this phase of educational work is reflected in the 
continuing demand for return visits. Motion pictures supplemented by suitable talks 
were the media used and the character of these was greatly appreciated by teachers 
and pupils alike. 

In addition to the school work the lecturers addressed some 655 public meetings 
with an attendance of almost 72,000 persons. 

It is interesting to note that the total number of meetings held during the year 
was 1.531 with a total attendance of 160,989. 



SCHOOL 

MEETINGS 

NO. ATTENDANCE 



PUBLIC 

MEETINGS 

NO. ATTENDANCE 



TOTAL 
ATTENDANCE 



Western 


Kenora 


IS 


3,101 


3 


409 


18 


3,510 




Fort Frances 


7 


186 


— 


— 


7 


186 




Sioux Lookout 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Mid-Western 


Port Arthur 


112 


12,225 


99 


11,414 


211 


23,639 




Geraldton 


24 


2,923 


39 


4,708 


63 


7,631 


Central 


Sault Ste. Marie 


119 


10,571 


41 


4,111 


160 


14,682 




Sudbury 


88 


10,094 


20 


2,535 


108 


12,629 




Chapleau 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




North Bay 


8 


725 


9 


754 


17 


1,479 




Gogama 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Northern 


Kapuskasing 


29 


2.169 


14 


1,520 


43 


3,689 




Cochrane 


66 


6,654 


18 


1,989 


84 


8,643 




Timiskaming 


24 


560 


5 


1,008 


29 


1,568 


South-Central 


Parry Sound 


78 


4,503 


21 


1,855 


99 


6,358 




Algonquin Park 


40 


2,514 


2 


373 


42 


2,887 


South-Eastern 


Rideau 


■ — 


— 


6 


887 


6 


887 




Quinte 


1 


55 


4 


357 


5 


412 




Trent 


7 


932 


17 


1,513 


24 


2,445 


South-Western 


Lake Erie 


164 


16,067 


158 


14,896 


7,22 


30,963 




Lake Huron 


62 


10,244 


66 


9,035 


128 


19,279 




Lake Simcoe 


32 


5,497 


133 


14,605 


165 


20,102 


Totals 


876 


89,020 


655 


71,969 


1,531 


160,989 



In addition to the meetings attended by the staff of lecturers, motion pictures 
were shown during the year at Department exhibits set up as a part of larger exhibitions, 
fall fairs, etc.. held throughout the country. The attendance at the.se showings approxi- 
mated 60.000 people. The theme of forest protection and fish and wildlife conservation 
was stressefl in the films shown. 

This phase of the work was of considerable value in emphasizing the conser- 
vation appeals which were a \ydr{ of every Department exhibit. Reference to these will 
be found elsewhere in this report. 



119 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Motion Picture Films 

Several prints of two new motion pictures on reforestation "Return of the Trees" 
(2 reels, 800 ft.) and "Farm Forestry" (1 reel, 400 ft.) were added to the Hbrary. 
These films were started during the previous fiscal year. 

In addition to replacements for certain of the lilms which had become worn out, 
a number of new prints suitable for rounding out a complete program were purchased. 

Work was also commenced by the staff photographers on a new tilm covering 
timber salvage operations, to which further reference is made under "Photography." 



A list of motion pictures in stock follows: 



Forest Fire Prevention 

Timagami Ranger 10 copies 

Forest Commandos 8 copies 

Tomorrow's Timber 5 copies 

Fish and Wildlife (Conservation) 

Realm of the Wild 8 copies 

Reforestation (Conservation) 
Return of the Trees 

Fishing 
Fish Tales 

Hunting 

Pheasant Fever 

Cartoon Comedies 
Cupid Gets His Man 
Here Comes the Circus 
MoUie Moo Cow and 

Robinson Crusoe 
Mollie Moo Cow and 

the Indians 
Neptune's Nonsense 

Safety (Instructional) 
Aim for Safety 
Hook, Line and Safety 

Training 

Common Errors in Fighting 

Forest Fires 1 copy 

One Lick Method 1 copy 

Miscellaneous 

A Fish is Born 9 copies 

Beneath Coral Seas 3 copies 

Birds of Canada 2 copies 

City of Wax 7 copies 

Demons of the Deep 8 copies 

Grey Owl's Little Brother 3 copies 

Log Rolling 7 copies 

Living Flowers 2 copies 

Portage 7 copies 

Roadrunner Versus Rattlesnake 7 copies 

Three Little Bruins in the Woods 6 copies 

Wild Company 3 copies 



One Match Can Do It 
Scout in the Forest 
Timber Front 



8 copies 
1 copy 
1 copy 



2 copies 


Farm Forestry 




1 copy 


11 copies 


Great Xorlhern Tackle 


Busters 


2 copies 


2 copies 








9 copies 


Trolley Ahoy 




6 copies 


7 copies 


Three Little Bruins Make Mischief 


8 copies 




Woody Woodpecker 




6 copies 


6 copies 


Waif's Welcome 




6 copies 




Rasslin Match 




9 copies 


6 copies 


Bird Scouts 




9 copies 


7 copies 








8 copies 


Poison Ivy 




8 copies 


9 copies 


The Sun 




7 copies 



Forest Fire Fighting in the South 1 copy 

Management of Men on the Fire Line 1 copy 



Wildfowl in Slow Motion 9 copies 

Clean Water 9 copies 

Dutch Elm Disease 1 copy 

Antarctic Whale Hunt 9 copies 

Sharp Eyes 4 copies 

Spearheads in the Sky 3 copies 

Eskimo Summer 9 copies 

Four Seasons 9 copies 

For Which He Hath Planted 2 copies 

Forests Forever 6 copies 

New Voice of Mr. X 1 copy 

Eskimo -Arts and Crafts 1 1 copies 



120 



No. 3 Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



LECTURE TOUR EQUIPMENT 

Seven panel trucks were operated by the Information and Education Section 
during the year. These have accumulated heavy mileage due to their continuous use by 
members of the field staff. Each member of the staff engaged in lecture work, is provided 
with a truck in which is carried all the equipment necessary to put on a complete 
showing of motion pictures, whether or not power is available at the place of the 
meeting. 

Generators 

To make it possible to provide motion picture programs in places where hydro 
power is not available, each lecturer is provided with a separate generator. This forms 
a permanent part of the truck equipment and is readily available whenever necessary. 

The number of generators on hand totals 7. 

\'oLT.AGE Regulators 

Power fluctuations often cause the voltage to drop below operating level and 
result in program failures. To help avoid this, voltage regulators are provided. These 
are portable and readily carried as a part of the regular equipment. A total of five 
voltage regulators were in use during the year under review. 

Projection Screens 

A total of ten portable screens of a suitable size for most halls and auditoriums 
are at present in use. These are provided with tripod folding legs and are quickly set 
up even in limited space. The use of these portable beaded screens has greatly improved 
the showing of coloured motion pictures. 

EXHIBITS 

The volume of exhibit work exceeded that of the preceding year. This type of 
educational and conservational work has assumed major importance in the program of 
the Department. Fifteen exhibits were put on, as compared with thirteen in the previous 
year. Of these seven were feature exhibits which formed major attractions at the larger 
shows. The balance were district exhibits mostly at fall fairs and other shows. Public 
interest in these exhibits was very keen, and their educational value most pronounced. 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Motion Picture Production 

On December 1, 1948. Mr. R. D. Robinson with the assistance of Mrs. K. M. 
Andresen. both staff photographers, commenced shooting a colour motion picture on 
the subject of salvage of timber killed in the Mississagi-Chapleau lire which occurred 
in the summer of 1948. The shooting locale was near Chapleau. By the end of the 
fiscal year some 2.300 feet of 16 mm Kodachrome were exposed covering all phases'of 
the winter operations. The actual work of photographing the operations presented 
many difficulties due, in part, to the extreme cold which frequently prevailed, and the 
necessity for securing proper light conditions. 

During the first few days in June while the actual fire was raging the staff photog- 
raphers were able to secure numerous excellent shots of the conflagration. These will 
probably be incorporated in the .salvage film in order to round out the picture. Work 
on this production will continue as the salvage operations develop. 

121 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



Still Photography 

A continuous supply of good photographs is necessary in order that these may 
be available for the illustration of departmental publications and to meet the ever- 
increasing demand for newspapers, magazines and writers for illustrative material 
covering every j^hase of the conservation program. 

The staff photographers took a large number of photographs during the year and 
a file of good pictures is being steadily built up. Specific photographs, such as wildlife 
shots, are frequently difficult to secure because they require time and patience to obtain 
satisfactory results. Every opportunity is taken, however, to secure suitable material. 

The development of a more suitable photo filing system which will facilitate the 
classification of and easy reference to every type of photograph has received consider- 
able study. 

The effective use of good photographs in departmental publications has given 
them a much wider appeal. This is particularly true where the subject matter is of 
general interest and lends itself to actual photographs of the resources or operations 
under discussion. 

Developments in the use of Kodachrome for still photography are being care- 
fulh' watched. To date, however, the job of processing is involved and costly, and 
publication charges high. 

Lantern Slides 

Lantern slides have their place in lecture work although this phase of work does 
not have the same popular appeal as motion pictures. 

The general use of colour photography for this type of work has revived interest 
in slide material. The Section is gradually acquiring suitable photographs from which 
slides can be made. At the present time many of the District Offices are using slides to 
supplement the motion pictures and other available media for lecture work. It is 
planned, however, as the facilities for colour photography are expanded, to build up 
sets of slides on specific subjects which will be available to field lecturers as well as to 
members of the Head Office staff. 

Film Strips 

The use of film strips for illustrating lectures of an instructional nature has not 
been overlooked. Initial investigation has shown that commercial production costs are 
high, but with increased facilities it is believed that it is possible for these to be pro- 
duced by members of the staff. 

Photo Processing 

The work of photo processing is an important phase in the general program of 
producing suitable photographic material. 

The dark room is fairly well equipped for all general purposes and during the 
year one photo processor has been able to keep abreast of present production. The 
time of the processor is fully taken up with the primary work of developing, printing 
and enlarging. The augmentation of certain plans referred to herein for the extension 
of photographic services will require a readjustment of the work and some additional 
equipment. 

122 



yo.3 Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



PRESS AND NEWS RELEASES 

In a further effort to ensure the co-operation of the public in administering the 
29 Acts under which the Department functions a system of Weekly News Releases has 
been carried on. These contain reports on every phase of departmental activities, 
current changes in the regulations and conservation appeals in the interest of forest 
protection and law observance. The Weekly News Release circulates to every news- 
paper in the Province, to magazines covering natural resources, radio stations as well 
as to a list of outdoor writers and Fish and Game Protective Associations. 

Forty-six news releases were issued during the year and were given extensive 
coverage by both the press and radio. 

In addition to the News Release, which usually covers about 2.000 words of 
copy. thirt}--five press releases were also issued during the period under review. These 
contained matters of more or less urgency requiring immediate release and were given 
coverage through the co-operation of the press wire services and radio. 

A number of articles for outdoor magazines were prepared by members of the 
Information and Education staff, while interviews were given and information provided 
for the preparation of articles by representatives of the press and various magazines. 

ADVERTISING 

Conservation appeals in the form of display-type advertisements to the number 
of fifty-seven were prepared and published in newspapers and magazines. Of this total, 
five appeared in newspapers, twenty-one in magazines dealing with forests and forest 
products, six in special timber issues of business and financial journals, twenty-one in 
fishing and hunting magazines and four in sports programs. 

A further total of seventy-four advertisements calling for tenders for the sale of 
Crown Timber were placed with Ontario daily and weekly newspapers. In addition 
fifty-six miscellaneous advertisements covering sales of various kinds and operational 
requirements were also placed with Ontario newspapers. 

RADIO SCRIPTS 

The staff of the Information and Education section lent assistance in the pre- 
paration of five radio scripts during the year. Three of these were broadcast during the 
summer fire hazard period and were designed to call attention to the responsibility of 
the individual in the matter of forest protection through fire prevention. 

POSTERS 

The following is a list of posters completed during the year: 

Crown Fish Sanctu.akv Poster Forest Fire Law 

Conservation— Fish and Wildlife Law — Forest Protection 

Notice! This Telephone Line Travel Permits Issued Here 

Property trespass — Forest Protection Administrative — Forest Protection 

Warning! Persons Climbing This Stop! Did You Put Out Your 

Tower Campfire 

Property trespass — Forest Protection Conservation — Forest Protection 

123 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



This Area Reserved 
Administrative — Lands and 
Recreational Areas 

Extracts from the Game and 

Fisheries Act 
Administrative — Fish and Wildlife 

Fire Permits Issued Here 
Administrative — -Forest Protection 

Your Campfire 

Conservation — Forest Protection 



Do Not Set Out Fire 
Law — Forest Protection 
Forest Fires Are Caused By 
Conservation — Forest Protection 

Look Before You Leave 
Conservation — Forest Protection 
Stop! Have You Got Your Travel 

Permit 
Law observance — Forest Protection 

Seizure Notice 

Law observance — Timber Management 



SCHOOL WORK 
An investigation to determine the amount of natural resource material in prog- 
rams of study in Ontario Schools was made during the year. The report on the investi- 
gation indicated that while there are options in the courses of study provided to teachers, 
the supply of teaching material is inadequate. A thorough investigation of this subject 
will be commenced as soon as possible in co-operation with the Department of Educa- 
tion in order to evolve a more intensive study of conservation problems as related to 
the natural resources of the Province, and the provision of suitable material for teaching 
purposes. 

Publications already prepared by this Department have been widely circulated 
to teachers and pupils on request. 

The table of lecture tours undertaken during the period under review gives some 
indication of the extent of the work carried on to assist teachers and pupils to a clearer 
understanding of the value of our natural resources and the steps necessary for their 
protection and wise use. 

YOUTH PROGRAMS 

The development of the Junior Ranger plan is referred to on page 110 of this 
report. 

A number of the District Foresters in Southern Ontario have co-operated with 
the Department of Agriculture in the organization of forestry clubs to stimulate greater 
interest in the conservation and better management of farm woodland, thus increasing 
the financial returns to the owners. 

Co-operation with Boy Scouts and young farmer groups has been carried on 
through lectures and the showing of suitable conservation motion pictures. This work 
is being co-ordinated and gradually developed as circumstances permit. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

The volume of correspondence in response to letters of enquiry for information 
increased slightly over that of the previous year, which was an all time high. Approxi- 
mately 7,700 letters were received as compared with 6,900 in the previous year. The 
enquiries covered, in a general way, most phases of departmental administration. A 
large percentage of the correspondence handled was from prospective visitors in the 
United States. These were concerned, for most part, with open seasons for fishing and 



124 



jVo. 3 Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



hunting, the regulations in connection therewith, accommodation, guides, transporta- 
tion, etc. In this connection the various publications available for distribution by the 
Department were most helpful. 

The balance of the correspondence handled covered a wide field. Requests for 
publications or information concerning publications were heavy. In many cases the 
information asked for required a great deal of research and the securing of factual data 
from other Divisions. 

MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES 

Other duties undertaken by the staff were the compilation of mailing lists, veri- 
fication of publicity material, distribution of literature and arrangements for attending 
public meetings in the Toronto-Simcoe district. Members of the Head Office Informa- 
tion and Education staff also represented the Department at 100 such meetings, for 
the purpose of lecturing and showing motion pictures. 



125 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



THROUGH FIFTY YEARS 




1900 "^^^ 

Forest protection in the 1900's consisted 
of rangers in canoes locating fires and 
paddling to the nearest centre for 
assistance. 




1900 

In 1900 the staff of the Department con- 
sisted of 71 persons including one tech- 
nical forester. 




1900 

The installed capacity under leases 
granted by the Department for water 
power development was approximately 
7,000 horsepoiver. 




1900 

Published maps only show topographic 
features obtained from the limited in- 
formation gathered by ground survey. 




1950 

An efficient combined system of air, 
tower lookouts and radios now bring 
qualified rangers and assistants to help 
control all fires. 




1950 

The tremendous growth of the Depart- 
ment in 1950 is indicated by a staff of 
504 and 2961 in the field. There are 
now 148 foresters on the staff. 




1950 

Leases granted by the Department for 
water power development having an 
installed capacity of approximately 
1,000,000 horsepower. 




1950 

To-day an efficient map making organi- 
zation has been set up and by use of 
aerial photographs, topographic features 
are noiv shown in minute detail on all 
maps. 



126 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 








1900 

Water pails and hand equipment only 

for fire suppression. 




1950 

Mechanical fire pumps, hand fire pumps, 
pulaskis and other more modern equip- 
ment noiv used to fight fires. 







^ 



^ 



1900 \>^' 

Land agents dealt with land matters on 
the field while often working part time 
at other jobs. No liaison between them 
and Crown officers. 




1900 

Passenger pigeon nearly all gone; On- 
tario just finishing off its wild turkeys 
and bob-white quail, the featured game 
bird of the settled area. 




1950 

Land administration responsibility of 
trained personnel in 22 District offices 
with proper liaison bet'ween all branches 
of the Department in the field. 




1950 

Passenger pigeon gone; wild turkey gone 
except for a small colony established in 
1949 by release of imported birds; bob- 
' white quail rare and season closed; 
featured game in southern area the 
ring-necked pheasant. 




1900 

Woodland caribou abundant in Northern 
Ontario, moose just beginning to pene- 
trate many areas and deer unknown in 
the greater part of northern Ontario. 




1950 

Caribou nearly extinct, moose in many 
areas scarce. Deer now penetrating to 
all parts and abundance in many. 



127 



Report of the Department of Lands atid Forests for 1950 



No. 3 




1900 

Pulpwood production in the 1900's was 

65,051 cords. 




«1\l^*^ 1950 

By proper care and attention the pro- 
duction was 2,535,071 cords. 




1900 

Staff in 1900 was small and with few 

specialists. 




1950 

Department in 1950 organized into 
eleven Divisions each with specialists and 
technically trained personnel. 




1900 

The distribution of Information in 1900 
was confined to the occasional small 
folder or pamphlet. 




^^y'' 1950 

Information and Education section or- 
ganized with trained staff to prepare 
numerous folders and pamphlets as well 
as handle lectures, moving pictures, radio 
broadcasts and exhibitions. 




1900 

Revenue, Dept. of Fisheries was 

$35,443.85. 




1950 

Revenue, Fish and Wildlife Division, 
Dept. of Lands and Forests was over 
$2,400,000. 



128 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



DIVISION OF REFORESTATION 

Tree Distribution 

The distribution increased from a figure of 12,200,000 in the previous year, to 
13,000,000 in the year under review. The increase was distributed to private land- 
owners, giving them nearly 7,800,000, while municipal planting was reduced slightly 
to 3,600,000. Slightly more than 1,000,000 trees were planted on provincial crown 
lands, 160,000 on dominion crown lands, while the balance of nearly 500.000 were 
used in semi-public and miscellaneous projects. 
Nurseries 

Additional land was purchased for both St. Williams and Orono nurseries, in 
order to prepare increased area for transplanting seedlings. Mechanization of nur- 
series continued, with the purchase of more transplanting machines; the development 
of a seeding machine at Port Arthur; and the construction of a new tree lifter at 
Midhurst. Irrigation equipment is rapidly being modernized by the purchase of 
portable aluminum pipes and sprayers. Six foresters are now employed as nursery 
superintendents and assistant nursery superintendents. 
Extension Forestry and Municipal Forest Management 

The number of foresters employed as zone foresters is now twelve, which, 
although it is an increase of five from the previous year, means that extension forestry 
is still spread very thinly across the southern part of the province. 

The area of municipal and authority forests under agreement increased by 
about 9,000 acres, to reach a figure of 63,337 acres. This is an increase from approxi- 
mately 35,000 acres in 1945. The greatest expansion took place in Bruce County, 
where over 4,000 acres were purchased, and in the Ganaraska Forest which increased 
by over 2,000 acres in the year under review. 

The zone foresters now give technical assistance to several counties operating 
municipal forests which are not under agreement. 

The gathering of basic field data and their compilation for sustained yield 



Packing white spruce for shipment at the St. Williams Nursery. Millions of seedlings are distributed 
each year from government nurseries. 



liSS 



I 



L«*.4,« 



"^.-i-? 




No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



working plans of municipal forests was continued. Mapping has also progressed so 
that about two-thirds of the major areas are covered, using a revised method. 

The regulated crop cut was allocated in one forest. Similar control is nearing 
completion in all municipal forests. A system of sustained thinnings in plantations 
was formulated for the above area, while the field surveys for this phase on other 
forests are planned for completion during the coming year. 

Approximately two thousand cords of pulpwood thinnings were taken from 
municipal forest plantations and sold to pulp and paper companies. 

The department now operates nineteen planting machines for municipal forest 
planting. The following tables furnish details of tree distribution: 

Table No. 1 

TREES DISTRIBUTED TO PRIVATE L.\NDOWNERS 

(July 1, 1947 to June 30, 1Q48) 



COUNTY OR DISTRICT 



APPLICANTS 



HARDWOODS 



.'Mgoma— 

Brant.- 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Cochrane 

Dufferin 

Du ndas 

Durham 

Elgin _ 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville.- 

Grey 

Haldimand - 

Haliburton 

Halton... 

Hastings 

Hu ron 

Kenora 

Kent 

La m b 1 n _ 

Lanark... 

Leeds _ 

Lennox and Addington.. 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

M u sk oka 

\i[)is.sing 

Norfolk 



N'orthumberiand 

Ontario.. 

O.xford 

Parry Sound 

Patricia 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 
Prcscott 



20 


24,585 


933 


25,518 


149 


124,294 


20,789 


145,083 


137 


115,480 


23,111 


138,591 


74 


55,298 


6,668 


61,966 


3 


3,600 


5,300 


8,900 


44 


66,520 


10,790 


77,310 


13 


7,133 


11,245 


18,378 


133 


632,754 


32,050 


664,804 


123 


206,970 


n,U2 


234,302 


106 


65,246 


9,054 


74,300 


63 


58,324 


3,507 


61,831 


29 


13,977 


1,428 


15,405 


13 


23,170 


9,290 


32,460 


227 


182,956 


31,987 


214,943 


65 


40,193 


22,078 


62,271 


46 


63,185 


4,519 


67,704 


96 


69,817 


12,445 


82,262 


56 


51,665 


5.665 


57,330 


100 


105,863 


32,824 


138,689 


7 


7,275 


295 


7,570 


47 


107,042 


10,663 


117,705 


58 


125,069 


8,399 


133,463 


25 


37,530 


3,113 


40,643 


30 


25,945 


3,065 


29,010 


36 


48,780 


6,360 


55,140 


39 


33.042 


9,788 


42,8.50 


11 


45,210 


1,225 


46,435 


189 


203,752 


29,196 


232,948 


133 


140,330 


15,405 


155,735 


12 


6,400 


2,075 


8,475 


404 


499,655 


65,163 


564,818 


74 


95,225 


26,552 


121,777 


185 


391,705 


44,938 


436,643 


126 


209,584 


41,423 


251,007 


78 



206 


262,560 


5,870 


268,430 


205,788 


22,848 


228,636 


69 


50,379 


19,367 


69,746 


118 


87,209 


6.829 


94,038 


16 


.^0,910 


7.845 


.^8.755 



Continued on next page. 
131 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 





APPLICANTS 


CONIFERS 


HARDWOODS 


TOTALS 


Prince Ed ward 


41 


31,794 


2,156 


33,950 


Rainy Rivpr 


4 


1,150 


575 


1,725 


Renfrew - 


25 


26,460 


3,926 


30,386 


Russell - - - 


9 


6,835 


425 


7,260 


Simcoe . .. — 


455 


1,042,300 


121,314 


1,163,614 


Stormont . 


18 


11,505 


5,020 


16,525 


Sudbury 


16 


5,190 


985 


6,175 


Thunder Ray 


4 


4,850 




4,850 


Timiskaming 


9 


6,825 


1,460 


8,285 


Victoria 


50 


23,912 


6.469 


30,381 


Waterloo 


160 


168,102 


39,366 


207,468 


Welland _ - 


91 


65,633 


16,370 


82,003 


Wellington 


74 


92,648 


18,855 


111,503 


Wentworth 


111 


124,169 


19,331 


143,500 


York 


895 


658,272 


100,801 


759,073 


Totals 


5.322 


6,794,067 


938,487 


7,732,554 



Table Xo. 2 
COUNTY FORESTS 



Under Agreement: 

Bruce - 11,960 acres 

Dufferin _ 1,610 acres 

Durham and Northumberland 3,912 acres 

Grey 3,897 acres 

Lanark 2,100 acres 

Leeds and Grenville — 1,782 acres 



Ontario 1,285 acres 

Prescott and Russell 14,416 acres 

Simcoe 10,491 acres 



Victoria 
York ... 



4 504 acres 
3,191 acres 



59,148 acres 



CONSERVATION AUTHORITIES 
Under Agreement: 
Ganaraska 4,189 acres 



Total under Agreement 63,337 acres 



A firebreak in Vivian Forest, one of a number of Provincial forests. 



'-•'v'^ 




yo. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1953 



Table No. 3 

SUMMARY OF TREES DISTRIBUTED 

(July 1, 1947 to June 30, 1948) 





TOTAL 






TOTAL 




SHIPMENT? 


CONIFERS 


HARDWOODS 


TREES 


Prlvate Laxds: 










Reforestation and Windbreak 


5,322 


6,794,067 


938,487 


7,732,554 


School Children 


65 


22,390 


17,828 


40,218 


Semi-PiibliV Propprtipi; 


81 


1 13.001 


63,649 


176,650 


Municipal Properties; 










Municipal Forests 


93 


2,378,375 


239,775 


2,618,150 


Forest Plantations 


66 


290,960 


95,416 


386,376 


Roads — - - 


29 


249,300 


12,650 


261,950 


School Demonstration Plots 


78 


46,831 


10,898 


57,729 


Conservation Authorities 


3 


161,000 


66,500 


227,500 


Sundry . _ - — 


13 


26,650 


4,510 


31,160 


Provincial Lands: 










Northern Plantations .. 


8 


613,753 


SO 


613,800 


Forests^ 


— 








Ranger Plantations . . . _ 


3 


6,550 


115 


6.665 


Air Services 


— 








Nur^ries 


6 


150,850 


40,450 


191,300 


Parks ____ . . 


3 


2,800 


200 


3,000 


Highwavs . - 


8 


40,000 


12.800 


52,800 


H.E.P.C- - -- 


2 


27,400 


9.600 


37,000 


Hospitals ... 


4 


4,662 


5,000 


9,662 


Penal Institutions 


4 


40,002 


2,000 


42,002 


Sundry 


11 


77,470 


34,030 


111,500 


Dominion Crown Lands 


25 


115,293 


36.658 


151.951 


Si'B-ToTAI.S 




11,161,351 


1,590.616 


12.751.967 


Miscellaneous 


32 


241,084 


56,725 


297,809 


Totals 


5,856 


11.402,435 


1,647.341 


13,049,776 



Warkirs transplanting spruce seedlings at the nursery, St. Williams, Ontario. 




Report of the Department oj Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Table No. 4 
NUMBER OF TREES DISTRIBUTED EACH YEAR— 1939-1948 





1939 


1940 


1941 


1942 


1943 


Conifers . - ^ 


13,963,646 

2,487,607 

470,653 


13,831.098 

2,907,437 

528,162 


10,946,196 

2,327,438 

237,665 


9,480,743 

1,621,904 

200,540 


8,434,371 


Hardwocds _ — 

Cuttings... — 


1,896,198 
192,348 


Totals 


16,921,906 


17,266,697 


13,511,299 


11.303,187 


10,522,917 



Conifers 

Hardwoods.. 

Cuttings 

Totals .... 



1944 



9,232,205 
1,767,174 



10.999,379 



1945 



1946 



IQ4; 



9,649,424 
1,631,557 



11.280.981 



11,532,856 
1,642,719 



10,626,943 
1,642.550 



1948 



11,402,435 
1,647,341 



13.175.575 I 12,269.533 I 13,049,776 






134 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 5 



DIVISION OF RESEARCH 

The Division operated during the year with the following staff: 

Permanent and Temporary 

Biologists 2 Stenographers and Vari-typer Operator 5 

Chemists 3 Others 4 

Draftsmen 3 — 

Foresters .___ 6 Total 31 

Librarian ._„ _._.. 1 

Mechanical Engineer 1 Part Time Employees 

Motor Mechanics _ 2 Students: Forestry 20 

Research Station, Property Biology S3 

Superintendent _ 1 Laborers and others 5 

Soils Specialists 2 — 

Statistician 1 Total 78 

A start was made in 1948 on a regional research staff by appointing Mr. N. F. 
Lyon as a full time research assistant to the Regional Forester at Port Arthur. This 
regional scheme of research will be expanded gradually as staff and funds permit. 

The program for 1948 included work under the following headings: 

Electrical — mechanical Mensuration Sylviculture Tree Breeding 

Entomology Pathology Smelter Fumes Wildlife 

Fisheries — Great Lakes, Inland Research Station Soils Miscellaneous 
Lakes, Southern Ontario 

Electrical-Mechanical Studies 

This work is under the direction of M. H. Baker. The first project of the 
year was the manufacture of a production model of an infra-red cone drying machine 
and installing it in the tree seed extraction plant at Angus. The manufacture of the 
prototype machine was mentioned in the report of 1947. The machine at Angus is 
now in use and has proved satisfactory. 

An improved machine was made for seeding by aircraft. The original gravity 
feed was replaced by a positive drive operated from the electrical system of the aero- 
plane or a separate battery. A wide range of speeds is possible to suit different sizes 
of seeds and air speeds and almost any desired quantity of se;d can be sown on a given 
area with one pass of the aircraft. 

Following the ^lississagi-Chapleau fires, a meeting of Regional Foresters, the 
Chief of the Research Division, the Director of the Ontario Research Council, and 
a consulting engineer, was held at Dorset to decide what was the most pressing need 
in mechanical equipment for fire suppression. Two suggestions were made, one was 
that tipping of bush tools, especially grub hoes with hard materials such as "stellite" 
or "carboloy" and the second that manufacture of a small crawler tractor, or mechani- 
cal pack horse, would be a great help. The first would increase the effectiveness of the 
tools and reduce time loss by repeated sharpening, or by breakage, and the second 
would enable an effective load to be taken to the fire by the first suppression crew. 
The men would arrive fresh for fire fighting and not exhausted from carrying equip- 
ment. The tractor would be equipped with a power take-off for operating a pump, 
generator, or trench digger. 

These two projects were started and pulaski tools were tipped with stellite and 
carboloy and tested. The stellite and carboloy proved far more resistant than ordinary 
steel; the stellite tip. though not as hard as the carboloy. is more feasible economically. 

:36 



jVo. 3 Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



The small tractor was designed and built and is undergoing test and 
development. 

A hose folding machine was designed and built. This was based on the original 
model obtained from Mr. P. Hoffman and Mr. A. King at Timagami and Latchford. 

Some work was done on the use of dry ice and fog nozzles for fire fighting 
and also on a number of smaller projects. 
Entomology 

The arrangement of previous years of engaging Dr. C. E. Atwood as a con- 
sultant was continued. Dr. Atwood is regularly employed as a Professor of Zoology 
by the University of Toronto. The work done during the last year consisted of 
examination and reports on a number of insect infestations. A heavy infestation of 
Lecontei's sawfiy pine in the Sauble Forest was of particular interest. It was necessary 
to determine the degree of infestation and the possibility of control. DDT spraying 
at the rate of two pounds per acre gave satisfactory control. 
Fisheries — Great Lakes 

Research in fisheries on the Great Lakes was centred at the South Bay Station 
mentioned in last year's report. This Station has been enlarged and a laboratory, 
cook-house, sleeping quarters, ice-house and boat shed, have been constructed. The 
object of the experiment is to lish South Bay, which is almost completely land locked, 
so as to put equal pressure on all elements of the fish population and ascertain if this 
will result in an increase of the commercial and game fish. A further object of the 
study is to find a sales outlet for coarse fish and fish by-products such as scales, fish 
meal, etc. 

Studies of other factors affecting the fish population are being carried on at 
the same time and the data recorded on punch cards for analysis. A creel census is 
also conducted in this region. 

The study is co-operative with the Ontario Federation of Commercial Fisher- 
men, the Anglers and Hunters Association and the Northern Outfitters' Association. 
Dr. F. E. J. Fry of the University of Toronto is in charge of this project and of all 
fisheries research for the Department. 





CATCH AND SALE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 

LBS. ALL SPECIES LBS. SMELT 


1Q48, 194Q 

SALE PRICE 


1948 


129,921 

19.S.450 51. .VU 


.S6,207.22 


1949 


$7,150.07 



Fisheries — Inland Lakes 

This is directed by Dr. R. R. Langford under Dr. F. E. J. Fry. The work is 
centred at the Fisheries Research Laboratory at Opeongo Lake and is confined largely 
to the nearby lakes. Among other things, it is concerned with a creel census or record 
of catch by anglers. Returns provide a valuable record of species and yield from 
specific bodies of water. 

Another project is the fertilizing of lakes with commercial fertilizers, to increase 
the amount of plant and animal plankton available for fish food. Cache, Brewer, 
Costello and Little McCawley lakes have been fertilized. Chemical analyses of the 
waters of treated lakes are being made to determine the need for fertilizer and its 
effect. Plankton studies and studies of bottom fauna ar being conducted simul- 
taneously with the fertilizing experiments both in the treated lakes and in untreated 
control lakes. 

137 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Three of the fertilized lakes and one control lake were fished to determine the 
forage fish population present and the effect on the remaining population of the 
presence of these fish. 

As a sidelight on the fertilization problem, a study was made of incoming nu- 
trients in the feeder streams of various lakes. This was done by analyzing water 
samples from the streams and determining the quantity of water delivered in each. 
Ultimately the run-off for the whole water-shed of each lake will be computed and 
the total possible productivity in fish of each lake assessed. 

192,000 speckled trout, bass, lake trout and cisco were planted experimentally 
in thirteen lakes and streams of the southern part of Algonquin Park. This was done 
to determine the effect of planting and the fate of the fish so introduced. An improved 
fish tagging system was put into effect in 1948. 

A list of lakes for closure in alternate years was compiled for the use of park 
authorities as a means of building up the fish population. 

Fisheries — Southern Ontario 

This project, under the direction of X. S. Baldwin, was carried out in Wilmot 
Creek to determine the brown trout population; fish movements in response to tem- 
perature, and the effect of planting as against natural increase. 

Productivity was determined at seven pounds per acre per annum; availability 
of fish per 100 rod hours was determined as 55 for the stream. Brown trout were 
found to be larger than speckled trout, less predatory on fish and less vulnerable to 
angling. 
Fisheries — Southern Research Station 

Water analyses, stomach analyses and scale readings were carried on here on 
samples collected at all the centres of fisheries research. The work was done by M. 
B. Gibson, X. S. Baldwin and A. Papson. 



The Fish Laboratory at the Southern Research Station, at Maple, Ontario. 




^J^l 




IB 


a m 
m m 


m 
m 


i 


■^fc^-iS^^^i^ 


H 



ffo. 3 Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Mensuration 

This is a study of growth and yield by Mr. M. Ardenne in the hardwoods of 
Southern Ontario and as a first step involves the preparation of volume tables for the 
principal species. Two student assistants were employed on this project. To facilitate 
computation, the Reinecke form for tree volumes was used. 

Pathology 

For the first time, a serious attempt to meet the forest tree disease menace on 
a large scale is being made. Through a co-operative arrangement with the Dominion 
Government, and the University of Toronto. Dr. J. E. Bier of the Science Service 
has transferred to Toronto from British Columbia. He instructs students at the 
University of Toronto in Pathology and supervises all the field work agreed on by the 
Dominion and Provincial Governments. A complete laboratory is being set up in 
Toronto. This Division pays the salaries of two students on Dr. Bier's staff. Studies 
of birch die back, white pine needle blight and Dutch elm disease are under way. and 
will be greatly expanded. An assessment of the rate of deterioration of damaged trees 
in budworm infested areas has been made. 

Southern and Other Research Stations 

Some additional land was added to the Southern Research Station during the 
year, increasing its area to 100 acres. The fisheries research building and the artificial 
lake are now practically completed. A greenhouse was completed. 

Apart from purely research activities, a water reservoir and w^ater supply 
system was constructed on the property as well as a radio station and house for the 
operator. This radio station, connected by direct wire to the Parliament Buildings, 
will give immediate contact with the Districts in the north. This will be especially 
important during the fire season when the commercial telephone and telegraph lines 
are overloaded. 

A start was made on the use of all possible material from the Station woodlot 
for lumber, fuel, and other uses. 

Areas were selected in the South Central, Central. Northern and Midwestern 
Regions to serve as research and demonstration areas and when legally set aside, they 
will be used to demonstrate the lessons learned in regeneration surveys, and to 
provide a forest working space for co-operating research bodies. 

The Fisheries Research Station at South Bay has been referred to under 
"Great Lakes Fisheries". 

Sylviculture 

Under this heading are grouped all the Departmental activities in forest tree 
seed production and treatment, regeneration surveys and co-operative cutting ventures 
with operating companies. The sylviculture and regeneration section is under the 
direction of A. P. Leslie. 

The seed production experiment in red pine under Dr. George Duff, University 
of Toronto, has now reached the stage where plots of jiine are being treated along 
the lines determined by Dr. Duff to intluence the productions of seed. The ultimate 
end of this study is the establishment of controlled areas (seed orchards) where 
destructive agencies such as diseases and insects may be kept in check and maximum 
yields of seeds of desirable strains obtained. 

139 



Report of the Department of Lands end Forests for 1950 No. 3 



Regeneration surveys were carried on in the Fort Frances and Port Arthur 
Districts. After the Mississagi fire, the Fort Frances party was withdrawn and set 
to work gathering seed for the proposed aerial seeding of part of the burn, that 
would probably not regenerate naturally to valuable species. 

The large scale regeneration survey program has now reached the point where 
the principal forest regions of the Province have been covered and surveys will be 
done only on special demand. At was predicted by this Division, operating com- 
panies have found that, as a matter of intelligent stock taking and planning, regenera- 
tion surveys are as important as timber estimations prior to cutting. These surveys 
probably will be continued and expanded by the companies though some areas will 
still need to be covered by the Department. 

A co-operative cutting program for regeneration research was started in 1948 
by this Division in the Port Arthur District and will be extended to the other regions 
as staff and funds permit. This program will enable the Division to establish areas 
in all the principal forest site types on the limits of the major companies and enter 
into an agreement with the company to cut these selected areas in a specific manner 
so as to influence regeneration. Some areas will also receive special treatment such 
as scarification, fertilization, etc. This work was started on the limits of the Great 
Lakes Paper Company, the Abitibi Power and Paper Company and the Marathon 
Paper Company. 

An examination was made of the Gogoma fire area of 1941 by a party of two 
men, and of burned areas in the Parry Sound area by a party of two. 

Permanent plots established in 1930-32, in the Timagami region were re- 
examined. 

Seed Treatment and Aerial Seeding 

The question of coating seed ( 1 ) to increase the ease with which it may be 
dispensed from a seeding mechanism in the air or on the ground (2) to increase 
germination and give protection against diseases, rodents and insects is proceeding. 
An improved seed coating mechanism was set up at Maple and the technique of 
coating has been perfected so that it is now simple, cheap and effective. Extensive 
experiments are proceeding in coating materials, fungicides, rodent repellents and 
fertilizers. Emphasis is placed on the first two, and interesting results are being 
obtained. The problem of delayed germination of pellets has been solved and can 
now be controlled at will. 

It is certain that even if nothing further is accomplished, the increased bulk 
and weight of coated seed gives advantages for aerial seeding and somes types of hand 
seeding that exceeds the cost of coating. 

A quantity of Jack pine seed was gathered in the Port Arthur Region and 
enough additional seed obtained from the seed plant at Angus to sow 15,000 acres 
that probably would not otherwise regenerate in the Mississagi fire area. The seeds 
were coated at Maple. Jack pine, red, white and Scots pine and white spruce seed 
was sown on sites suited to each species as far as could be determined. A Stinson 
Reliant aircraft of the Division of Air Service was used for distribution, and the seeds 
were sown at the rate of five thousand per acre. 

The total cost of seeding, amounted to about 60c per acre. Past experience in 
seeding indicates that a minimum of 1 % survival may be expected under bad con- 
ditions. A small fraction of 1 % would pay the cost of operation, as indicated above. 

140 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



If the early part of 1949 is favorable in respect to precipitation and temperature, sur- 
vival may be much higher. Survivals of 2S',[ have been obtained in other areas 
under very favorable conditions. 

Smelter Fumes 

The smelter fumes survey, under R. H. Murray, that was started in 1944 was 
stopped in 1948 to assess the results of the work and establish a proper basis for 
possible continuance on an enlarged scale. 

Soils 

The soils survey, under G. A. Hills, during 1948 was continued in the Hali- 
burton region, which is the fifth area covered since the start of soil surveys in 1944. 
As in past years, the principal effort has been to map soils in terms of possible use 
and yield for forestry and farming purposes and thus to define, in general, those 
areas best suited for forest or farm development. 

During the field season, 36.000 acres of land were covered, extending from 
Coboconk to Huntsville and including the University of Toronto Forest. 

Work was continued on chemical and physical analyses, and base exchange 
of soils at the Maple Laboratory. Work was almost completed on reports and maps 
of Grant and McLaren townships in the North Bay district. 

Statistics 

A start was made on detailed statistical studies when Dr. DeLury was engaged 
as a consultant of the Ontario Research Foundation. ]Mr. Lachlan M. Morrison has 
been added to the Division staff to assist Dr. DeLury and perform other work. 

An improved system of forest sampling has already been developed by Dr. 
DeLury and will be tried out thoroughly in the field. 



Chemist A. C. Shaif examines an X-Ray showing diffraction patterns of camphor taken from 
distillation process. 




Report of the Department of Lar.ds and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



Tree Breeding 

The activities of the tree breeding section of the Division under Dr. C. C. Heim- 
burger are progressing steadily. The widespread interest in tree breeding, which was 
not too long ago considered as a useless fad, is evidenced by the appearance of a 
publication of the Swedish Government describing the work of a number of individual 
research workers and organizations in this field. 

The Research Division's program is divided into three parts: 
(1) White pine; (2) Poplar; (3) Arboretum. 

The object in the white pine project is to select white pine seed from trees 
throughout the Province that appear to be resistant to blister rust and to determine 
if the progeny are also resistant to heavy infections. Crosses are also made using 
native and exotic pines that are resistant to rust in an effort to produce resistant 
strains that can be propagated. Some 600,000 seedlings grown from seed of selected 
stock of apparent rust resistance have been produced at Orono, St. Williams, and 
Midhurst and will be transferred to Maple in 1949. 

The chief effort in the case of poplar breeding is to produce an aspen hybrid of 
good wood quality that will thrive on medium fertile sites and also a hybrid cotton- 
wood for windbreak planting in Southern Ontario. The production of hybrid poplars 
for wood pulp is a subject of active interest to certain pulp and paper companies in 
the United States and Canada. 

An arboretum of all useful native and exotic species is being established at 
the Maple Research Station. Fifty-three species have already been planted there. 
This will form a reserve from which material may be drawn for research purposes. 

Wildlife Research 

This phase of Research work under Mr. C. D. Fowle, deals particularly with the 
relation of wildlife to its environment. A wildlife research centre and wilderness area 
was established near Lake of Two Rivers, Algonquin Park. Studies undertaken were: 

The physiology of the deer mouse, Determination of age in young pheasants, 

The introduction of ruffed grouse to Beckwith Study of wildlife food and cover plants, 

Island, Pelee Island pheasant study. 

For those concerned with the practical aspect, the projects are as follows: 

Mouse studies and records of numbers of these animals are of great importance 
because they form the food of many other animals and feed to a large extent on tree 
seeds, thus working to some extent against regeneration of the forest. Obviously, a 
knowledge of their physiology and habits is important in all game management and 
forest operations. 

The purpose of the Beckwith Island ruffed grouse study is to introduce disease 
free grouse into an area that has not had grouse for many years and to observe if the 
grouse disease that periodically decimates the population of this bird elsewhere, will 
appear here. The Islands have been surveyed and the birds will be introduced in 1949. 

Studies of food plants for wild game and other birds is very important. It is 
proposed to set up small local plantations of all species found useful. A start has been 
made at the Southern Research Station. 

Miscellaneous 

An interesting and far reaching experiment dealing with the water require- 
ments of soils according to the Thornthwaite index was carried out at the Orono 

142 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



nursery at the request of this Division with the permission of Mr. Zavitz. This work 
was done by Mr. Chapman and Miss Sanderson of the Ontario Research Foundation 
and may revolutionize nursery irrigation practice and produce bigger stock in a shorter 
time with less cost. 

In co-operation with the Ontario Research Foundation, foliage and cones from 
all native trees and some planted varieties, were distilled for essential oils. The first 
distillation of 3,000 pounds of foliage from each species was done in a commercial still 
at Bancroft. The yield proved erratic, however, and a second run of small quantities 
of pure foliage without branches is being made under carefully controlled laboratory 
conditions to determine potential yields and the constituents of the oils. Markets also 
will be studied. 

This Division co-operated in the seeding of clouds with dry ice during the 
Mississagi-Chapleau fire. The full effects are not known but the observable effects 
have been covered in a report by Mr. K. G. Pettit, Dominion Meteorological Service. 

In co-operation with the Ontario and the National Research Council, a 
thorough test of the possibility of locating forest fires by infra-red ray devices (bolo- 
meters) and radar, was made. The tests took place at Scarboro and the devices and 
operators were supplied by the National Research Council. Results were negative. 
The fire used was of fair size: the instruments highly perfected, and the operators 
well trained. Therefore, the prospects of getting a detectable anomaly above a small 
fire with less perfect equipment and ine.xperienced operators seems to be small, for 
the near future at least. 

E.xploded vermiculite was supplied to the Orono and Fort William nurseries 
for a test of this material on seedbeds. A small quantity of wa.x emulsion for reducing 
transpiration loss from coniferous seedlings was supplied to Orono. This was tried 
out on unsheltered transplants during the winter of 1948-49. and reduced the loss 
appreciably. The Division co-operated with Mr. Linton at Orono in testing the 
effect of herbicides such as 2-4D on woodv shrubs and trees. 



.1 sample of Birch infestation. 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



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Division 
of 

SURVEYS 

and 

ENGINEERING 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



DIVISION OF SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING 

Early in April, 1948, the survey of the portion of the Ontario-INIanitoba 
Boundary between Island Lake and the intersection of the 89th meridian of west 
longitude of Hudson Bay was completed. Astronomical observations to determine 
the position of this point had previously been made and a concrete monument planted 
to reference this point. The line struck 15.8 feet off the point so determined. This 
remarkable closing shows the accuracy with which the work was carried out. Credit 
is due to those in charge of the field work. 

The nature of the terrain over which the line passed was such that the work 
could only be carried on during the winter months. The Manitoba Government Air 
Service, operating from a base at God's Lake, was used to transport the party and 
supplies. When suitable lakes were adjacent to the line, the aircraft was used to move 
camp and ferry the members of the party to work from camp. Without this service, 
it would not have been possible to accomplish the amount of work completed. 

When the line has been accepted by the Governments concerned, permanent 
monuments will be established at convenient intervals. Legislation confirming the 
Boundary as established, will then be passed by the Parliaments. 

The baseline from the south east corner of the Nipigon Forest Reserve was 
completed to the boundary between the Districts of Thunder Bay and Algoma. 

The Department has adopted the policy of preparing plans for registration, 
when five or more adjacent summer resort locations or five or more locations within 
the same township lot are surveyed simultaneously. This simplifies the issuing of the 
patents of these locations and subsequent transfers if so desired. 

Power developments at Terrace Bay on the Aquasabon River in the District of 
Thunder Bay, at Stewartville on the Madawaska River, in the County of Renfrew 
and on the Muskoka River, in the District of Muskoka, were completed during the 
year and are now providing electric energy. 

The concentrated survey programme of uncompleted surveys of summer resort 
parcels was continued and 1,199 surveys were completed, an increase of 73.3 per cent 
ov^er the previous fiscal year. 



Jj^ndex of Rubles 



Table No. Page 

1. Distribution of maps ----._-._.--- 1S7 

2. Public requests for maps and survey records ------ 157 

3. Area covered with vertical photography -------160 

4. Total of aerial surveys — 1924-1948 ---------160 



^ndex of L^ harts and i^ranli^ 



fiA 

Figure No. Page 

1. Surveyed mining claims on Crown land examined by the 
Division of Surveys and Engineering ---------153 

2. Surveyed summer resort locations on Crown land examined 

BY the Division of Surveys and Engineering ------ 153 

3. Trend of map distribution ------------158 

Insert — Map of part of the Province of Ont.ario - - - - Facing 158 



152 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Figure No. 1 
SURVEYED MINING CLAIMS ON CROWN LAND 

EXAMINED 8/ THE DIVISION OF SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING 
D EP ARTf/ ENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



900 



800 



700 



600 



500 



400 



300 



200 



100 




1944 U 

FISCAL YEAR 



1946 1947 1948 1949 



Figure No. 2 

SURVEYED SUMMER RESORT LOCATIONS 

ON CROWN LAND 

EXAM/NED BY THE DIVISION OF SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 




1941 1942 



FISCAL YEAR 



L13 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



Through arrangements made with the Army Survey Establishment, Department 
of National Defence, Ottawa, a new national topographic map series on a scale of 2 
miles to one inch in the unmapped area bounded on the north by latitude 49 degrees, 
on the south by latitude 48 degrees, on the west by longitude 82 degrees and on the 
east by longitude 80 degrees was commenced. Four sheets will be published from the 
planimetric maps produced by the Forest Resources Inventory. The first of these sheets 
known as the "Timmins" sheet has been published. 

GROUND SURVEYS SECTION 
Survey instructions were issued for the following surveys: 
Crown Surveys 

1. Retracement Survey of southern portion of the Township of Skead in the District 
of Timiskaming. (Survey costs borne by the Department of Mines.) 

2. Continuation of the survey of a baseline extending easterly from the south east 
corner of the Nipigon Provincial Forest to the boundary between the Districts 
of Thunder Bay and Algoma to provide ground control for aerial mapping in con- 
nection with the Forest Inventory Programme. 

3. Retracement survey of certain lines in the Township of Methuen in the County 
of Peterborough to facilitate surveys of summer resort locations in the vicinity 
of Oak Lake. 

4. Retracement survey of certain lines in the Township of Baxter in the District of 
Muskoka to facilitate the surveys of summer resort locations in the vicinity of 
Six Mile Lake. 

5. To subdivide portions of the Townships of Noble and Jack in the vicinity of 
Sudbury into town lots as an addition to the Townsite of Gogama. 

6. To subdivide into town lots parts of the Townships of Wabigoon and Redvers in 
the District of Kenora at the crossing of the Red Lake Highway and the Canadian 
National Railway. (Kenricia Townsite.) 

7. Retracement survey of the side line between Lots 25 and 26, Concession 4, Town- 
ship of iNIatawatchan in the County of Renfrew. 

8. Retracement survey of the boundary line between the Townships of Watten and 
Halkirk and also to run certain control traverses in the District of Rainy River to 
provide ground control for mapping by aerial photography in connection with 
the Forest Inventory Programme. 

9. Retracement survey of certain lines in the Township of Methuen in the County 
of Peterborough to facilitate the survey of summer resort locations in the vicinity 
of Jack's Lake. 

10. Retracement survey of certain lines in the Township of Harvey in the County of 
Peterborough to facilitate the surveys of summer resort locations in the vicinity 
of Mississauga Lake. 

11. Survey of a meridian line extending from the Five Mile Post on the south boundary 
of the Township of McVittie in the District of Timiskaming to intersect the 
north boundary thereof. (Survey costs borne by the Improvement District of 
McGarry.) 

154 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Front to Back: — District Foresters G. Delahey, U. W. Fiskar and F. L. Hall examine a Multiplex 
Aero-projector in the Division of Surveys and Engineering. 




Report af the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



12. Survey of a tie line from lot 5, Concession 4, to the east boundary of the Township 
of Whitman, District of Algoma. 

13. Survey of the Dawson Portage from Portage Bay of Sand Point Lake to Wilkins 
Bay of Lac la Croix, District of Rainy River. 

Municipal Surveys 

No. 823 — re Establishment of certain lines in the Townplot of Tobermory in the 
Township of St. Edmund in the County of Bruce. 

No. 824 — re Establishment of the Road Allowance between Concessions 11 and 12 
across Lots 6-13 inclusive in the Township of Bathurst in the County of 
Lanark. 

No. 825 — re Establishment of the Road Allowance between Concessions 1 and 2 across 
Lots 1 to 5 inclusive in the Township of Gloucester in the County of 
Carleton. 

No. 826 — re Establishment of the Road Allowance in the Front Lake Range across 
Lots 11 to 70 inclusive in the County of Bruce. 

No. 827 — re Establishment of the Road Allowance between Lots 9 and 10 in Con- 
cession 16, from the Xottawasaga River to the Georgian Bay in the Town- 
ship of Sunnidale in the County of Simcoe. 

Private Surveys on Crown Lands 

Under authority of Section 37 of the Public Lands Regulations 1,199 summer 
resort locations were surveyed and the returns of survey filed in the Department for 
examination and approval. Five hundred and two surveys of this number were sur- 
veyed under direct departmental instructions to the surveyor where the applicant paid 
in the survey fee as specified in Section 37 of the Public Lands Regulations and 
amendments thereto. This is an increase of five hundred and seven surveys over the 
fiscal year ending March 31, 1948. 

Under the provisions of the Mining Act. 509 mining claims were surveyed and 
the returns of survey filed in the Department for examination and approval. This is 
a reduction of 36 per cent in the number of surveys made for the fiscal year ending 
March 31, 1948. 

Townsite Subdivisions 

The Kenricia Townsite located at the junction of the Red Lake Highway and 
the Canadian National Railway and containing about 100 residential, business and 
industrial lots was surveyed by the Department. During the past fiscal year no 
subdivisions of land affected by the provisions of the Townsites Act were filed in the 
Department. 

Map Publications and Geographic Nomenclature 

The following maps were revised and lithographed: — 
Map 24A — -Districts of Kenora and Rainy River, scale 8 miles to 1 inch. 
Map 17A — Islands in the Western Part of Rainy Lake, scale 1 mile to 1 inch. 
Map 22C — Islands in the Georgian Bay in Front of Townships of Conger and Cowper, 
scale 4 inches to 1 mile. 

Place names, including those for lakes, rivers and streams, have been verified 
for 331 sectional maps prepared for the Ontario Forest Resources Inventory Series 

1S6 



Xo. 3 Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



and which cover an area of approximately 33.100 square miles. Each sectional map 
drawn to a scale of 4 inches to one mile covers an area of V2 minutes of latitude by 
15 minutes of longitude. 

During the fiscal year, some 3.000 name index cards belonging to the Canadian 
Board on Geographical Names were compared with our reference records and sup- 
plementary information added to them, relative to the publication of a Gazeteer of 
Place Xames in Ontario. Compiled information of place names was supplied to the 
Ontario Department of Mines, the Federal Departments of National Defence and 
Mines and Resources, required in the preparation of new maps being published by 
these bureaux. 

Table No. 1 
DISTRIBUTION OF MAPS 

National Topographic Series - 15,241 

Provincial Maps 

20A (Free Issue) 4,800 

District Maps 8,169 

Island Maps 357 

Miscellaneous 2,030 

33 A ( Electoral) 169 

42 A ( Townships) 1 ,004 

16.529 



Total 31,7/0 

N.ATioNAL Topographic Series 

The demand for the National Topographic Series map sheets has increased 
over that of last }ear by 36*^^ . 

Provincial Maps 

A slight increase was noted in the demand for District maps. The distribution 
of the balance of the provincial issues was approximately doubled over that of the 
l)revious year. 

T.ABLE No. 2 
PUBLIC REQUESTS FOR MAPS AN'D SURVEY RECORDS 

Counter Sales -— — 3,659 

Sales by Invoice - 2,415 

Sales by Cash in Advance, approximately 3,000 

Inquiries only, approximately 2,500 



11,574 



Photostating 

A considerable increase in the photostatic reproductions of original survey and 
other records was noted this year. 65.000 square feet of photostat paper was used, 
being an increase of 13.000 square feet over the amount used last year. 

An accelerated programme of ground surveys in summer resorts. Hydro and 
Highways work accounts for the increased outi:)ut over that of last year. 

13.650 pages of original township surveys and base and meridian line survey 
field notes were photostated in connection with the aerial mapping portion of the 
Forest Resources Inventory programme. 

157 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Figure No. 3 
TREND OF MAP DISTRIBUTION 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



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12000 




PROVINrF Oh cjniakk; no. /ua rKtt i^.MJt 
TOWNSHIP MAP No. 42A 

ISLAND MAPS 






ELECTORAL DISTRICTS No 
MISCELLANEOUS MAPS_ 


-^lA 




r' 


11000 




NOTE: FIGURES PRIOR TO 1945-6 ARE AVERAGES ONLY 






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9000 
8000 
7000 
6D00 
5000 
4000 
3000 
2000 
1000 






















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1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 

1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 

FISCAL YEAR 



158 




AREAS PHOTOGRAPHED 
: FOR FOREST INVENTORY 



, TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS 

PREPARED FOR FOREST 
-- INVENTORY 



/////// 


/ 


/ 


// 


/ / / / / 



FIELD WORK COMPLETED 
FOR FOREST INVENTORY 




No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



A thin photostatic paper from which ozalid prints can be made was tried out 
this year with considerable success. By this method, the cost of reproductions in 
quantity was kept to a minimum. 

Printing and Transparent 
Linen Reproductions 

Paper and contact photographic linen reproductions of survey plans and other 
matters shows an increase in the quantity used this year. 92.700 square feet of sen- 
sitized paper or linen was consumed. 

Survey Records 

^Microfilming of the original survey records was resumed this year and in this 
connection, 138.000 plans, pages of field notes and survey records were filmed. 

2.600 plans were numbered consecutively in preparation of the cataloguing 
of all survey records. 

The work of repairing and rebinding the original survey field notes and other 
volumes was continued. 

Field Survey Party Equipment and Supply 

The equipping and supplying of an eighteen-man baseline survey party, operat- 
ing in the field, as well as for smaller summer resort parties, and survey inspection 
work, was taken care of during the year. 

The truck which was acquired last year and outfitted as a mobile survey 
unit, covered 11.000 miles. 



L. to R.: — Regional Forester K. Acheson, District Foresters W. E. Steele and A. B. Wheatley and 
Regional Foresters E. L. Ward and P. McEwen, listen attentively as operator G. Copping explains 
the use of the huge enlarger used by the Division of Surveys and Engiiteering. 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



Preliminary survey metal tags for the use of District Offices were designed and 
obtained. These were tried out in certain Districts with considerable success. They 
are made of nickel silver which has a high melting point. These are for use in the 
field to designate preliminary summer resort locations prior to survey. 

Provincial Air Photographic Libr.ary 

Plans were formulated for the creation of an Air Photographic Library where 
a copy of all aerial photographs covering the Province will be filed for reference 
purposes. 

AERIAL SURVEYS SECTION 

During the fiscal year the Aerial Surveys Section covered 7,239 square miles 
with vertical photography. 

The following table illustrates the breakdown of these figures: — 



Table No. 3 

AREA 

For Outside Concerns (sq. miles) 

xOnt.-Minn. Pulp and Paper Co. Ltd. _-.. 108 

City of St. Catharines 30 



138 



Other Government Departments 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission - — 737 

Highways — - 477 

xMines - — -- 172 

xxPlanning and Development 789 

Faculty of Forestry, U. of T. 44 

Department of Lands and Forests 

xForest Resources Inventory __- - 4,882 



2,219 



4,882 



Grand Total - - - 7,239 

X — Denotes Mapping included. 
XX — Denotes Multiplex Work included {112 Sq. Miles). 



Table No. 4 

TOTAL OF .\ERIAL SURVEYS 1024 TO 1948 (MARCH 31) 

IN SQUARE MILES 

Aerial Sketching -- - 26,903 Sq. Miles 

Oblique Photography - 10,780 Sq. Miles 

Vertical Photography .- 89,974 Sq. Miles 



160 





Division 
of 

TIMBER 

MANAGEMENT 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 No. 3 



DIVISION OF TIMBER MANAGEMENT 

While complete figures for the production of timber from Crown Lands for the 
period covered by this report are not available at this time, it is indicated that the 
high level of production and of employment in the bush was maintained. 

The disastrous forest fires during the summer of 1948 created an immediate and 
major problem to salvage as much of the fire damaged timber as quickly as possible. 
No effort has been spared to save and bring to market this valuable timber. For the 
period ending March 31, 1949, some 80 million feet board measure have been salvaged 
and operations are continuing with all possible vigor. 

Other activities of the division follow under their respective headings. 

FOREST RESOURCES INVENTORY 
The forest resources inventory project was started in 1946. Photography com- 
pleted during the year amounted to 26.708 square miles under contract and 4,462 
square miles by the Department, making a total area photographed during the year 
of 31,170 square miles. 

Mapping completed during the year amounted to 34.223 square miles under 
contract and 8.000 square miles by the Department making a total area mapped of 
42.223 square miles. 

Field work was completed on a total of 14.865 square miles. 

Total work accomplished to the end of the fiscal year, amounted to: 

Photography 118,711 square miles 

Mapping 81,082 square miles 

Completed Field Work 18,465 square miles 

MANAGEMENT PLANS AND CONTROL 

Increased activity in the preparation of management plans has been shown by 
agreement holders during the fiscal year 1948-49, resulting largely from the prepara- 
tion by the Department of up to date planimetric base maps in connection with the 
Forest Resources Inventory and also from the increased supply of foresters who have 
been graduating from the Universities. As at March 31. 1949, thirteen companies have 
submitted plans on 6,773 square miles. Additional plans doubling the above men- 
tioned mileage have been received since and it is expected that plans will be submitted 
with greatly increased tempo during the next two years. 

The control of operations has improved considerably during the past season 
through the implementation of standard procedure in the submission of cutting 
applications by the companies and the inspection of the operations by the field staff 
of the Department. 

In keeping with the progressive outlook of the Department to manage the 
Crown forests for the purpose of maintaining an adequate supply of timber in per- 
petuity and obtaining the greatest utilization possible, a course in stumpage appraisal 
was given in July, 1948, under the direction of the late Professor D. M. JNIatthews. 
This course was given to twenty-two foresters, ten of whom were from the Department 
and twelve from the industry. It was divided into three parts: pulpwood appraisal, 
sawlog appraisal and differential joint appraisal of two or more products. Methods 
and techniques were thoroughly discussed, case data w^as used for solving problems, 
a break-down of factors affecting costs and a cost classification was presented and 
explained. As a result of this course management foresters were given the technical 

162 



\'(j J , Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



foundation required for determining relative stumpage values under varying con- 
ditions of size and quality of timber stands, under varying market prices and under 
different operating techniques. 

^naex of ^aoieS 

Table No. Page 

1. mills licensed ---------------- 163 

2. Status of timber licensed are.\s ---------- 163 

3. .\rea under pulpwood and timber .agreement ------ 164 

4. Statement of amounts of timber cut during the year ending 
March 31st, 1948 --------------- 164 

5. Classification of .annual timber returns for the ye.ar ending 

March 31st, 1948, by districts ----- 164 

5. algonquin (pembroke) 164 5-h. north bay - - - - 170 

5-a. ch.aple.au ----- 166 5-i. parry sound - - - 171 

S-b. COCHRANE ----- 166 5-j. port ARTHUR - - - 171 

S-C. fort FRANCES - - - - 167 5-k. QUINTE ( TWEED) - - 172 

5-d. GER.ALDTON ----- 167 5-1. SAULT STE. M.ARIE - - 173 

5-e. GOGAMA ------ 168 5-m. sioux lookout - - 173 

S-f. KAPUSKASING - - - - 168 5-n. SUDBURY - - - - 1 74 

5-g. kenora - - - - - -170 5-0. trent (lindsay ) - - 175 

6. Timber areas sold during the year ending M.arch 31. 1949 - 176 



MILLS LICENSED 
The mills licensed during the year under the Mills Licensing Act, were as 
follows: 

Table No. 1 

Less than 5,000 ft. daily capacity 562 

5,000 to 30,000 ft. daily capacity 681 

Over 30,000 ft. daily capacity 40 

Number of Paper Mills 35 



1,318 



SCALING 
Scalers examinations were held as follows: 

Carnarvon May 7th, 1948 Fort William Oct. 9th. 1948 

Thessalon June 4th, 1948 Huntsville Nov. 5th, 1948 

TIMBER SALES 1948-49 
Details of the 43 new sales of timber made during the season indicate that 
100.75 square miles of timber limits were sold. 

During the season, 61 timber licenses comprising 174.25 square miles, were 
abandoned. 

The status of the timber licensed areas in Ontario as at March 31, 1949, was 
therefore as follows: 

Table No. 2 area 

NO. so. MILES 

Licenses and Renewals Issued 1948-49 879 11,733.75 

Licenses, in Suspense _ 27 241.75 

Total 906 11,975.50 

163 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



PULPWOOD AND TIMBER AGREEMENTS 1948-49 
Area under pulpwood concession and timber agreement as at March 31, 1949: 
66,980.75 square miles. 

Table No. 3 
AREA UNDER PULPWOOD AND TIMBER AGREEMENT 



FISCAL YEAR SQ. MILES 

1 039-40 65 ,330.00 

1940-41 65,497.50 

1941-42 66,509.50 

1942-43 71,636.50 

1943-44 .__ 56,690.50 



FISCAL YEAR SQ. MILES 

1944-45 59,353.00 

1945-46 53,754.00 

1946-47 _ 56,745.00 

1947-48 -. 66,254.50 

1948-49 66,980.75 



Table No. 4 
AMOUNTS OF TIMBER CUT 

For the Year Ending March 31, 1948 

pieces feet cords 



CTJ. FT. 



Red and White Pine 

Jaclipine 

Spruce 

Balsam 

Hemlock 

Birch 

Maple 

Other Hardwood 

Poplar 

Cedar 

Tamarac 




9,054,561 



110,886,075 

81,830,140 

40,141,775 

680,037 

20,126,867 

21,364,084 

9,206.455 

4,683,353 

12,346,806 

197,867 

18,751 



301,482,210 



453,680.07 

2,162,419.96 

162,734.58 



77,425.91 



2,856,260.52 



26,314,985 

79,122,415 

208,678,376 

15,003,060 

5,272,086 

4,764,172 

2,052,938 

1,754,689 

11,576,096 

99,990 

7,068 



354,645,875 



SPECIES 


PIECES 


lineal ft. 


CORDS 


CU. FT. 


Ties 


78,482 






235,446 


Poles 


21,888 






21,888 


Poles 








2,919,173 


Posts 


53,517 






80,275 


Fuel woo d 






40,027.89 


3,602,430 


Piling 




342,510 






Piling 








3,246,068 




153,887 


342,510 


40.027.89 


10,105,280 



SPECIES 



Table No. 5 
ALGONQUIN (PEMBROKE) 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1948 

COKDS pieces feet DUES BONUS TOTAL 



Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

J. Pine Logs ..... 
J. Pine Booms . 

Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs..... 

Bass Logs 

Beech Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Cherry Logs .... 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs 



277,349 

12,457 

295,353 

126 

64 

228 

3,910 

386 

62,070 

470 

260 

611 

99.385 



15,197,350 

1,413,131 

3,707,710 

11,945 

2,062 

3,003 

116,639 

30,517 

4,659,285 

6,658 

11,046 

40,888 

4,322,584 



.'j; 37,993.01 

3,532.82 

9,197.13 

29.86 

5.15 

6.01 

291.59 

76.29 

11,648.16 

9.98 

27.61 

102.22 

6,483.86 



36,760.73 

17,582.07 

7,228.37 

36.96 

.84 

3.60 

214.14 

81.78 

11,339.98 

11.6S 

45.65 

110.05 

6,194.70 



74,753.74 

21,114.89 

16,425.50 

66.82 

5.99 

9.61 

505.73 

158.07 

22,988.14 

21.66 

73.26 

212.27 

12,678.56 



Continued on next pag( . 



164 



No. 3 



Report of the Department oj Lands and Forests for 1950 



FEET 



Hemlock Booms ... 

Maple Logs 

Oak. Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Tamarac Logs 

Posts 

Poles (cu.ft.) _ 

Shingle Bolts 

Fuelvvood (Hard). 
Fuel wood (Soft)-.. 
Balsam Pulpwood 
J. Pine Pulpwood . 
Poplar Pulpwood . 
Spruce Pulpwood.. 
J. Pine Pit Props .. 
J. Pine Pit Props 

Exported 

Balsam Pulp 

Exported 

Poplar Pulp 

Exported 

Spruce Pulp 

Exported 



396.71 
6,445.60 

498.00 
1.712.24 

2,046.64 

12,808.44 

4,588.79 

598.98 

598.98 
14.00 

486.34 
86.00 



72 

45,767 

1,213 

137,026 

57,592 

11,001 

10 

2,031 

48,376 



4,216 

2,695,793 

50,148 

2,780,320 

1,368,486 

881,643 

62 

454,970.23 



10.54 

6.739.45 

125.37 

5,560.63 

2,737.10 

2,204.09 

.09 

40.62 

16,250.80 

297.53 

3,222.79 

124.50 

1,198.56 

818.66 

5,159.38 

6,424.32 

239.59 



5120,557.71 



8.43 
6,208.66 
328.90 
3,812.71 
3,310.59 
5,310.86 

40.90 



87.67 

69.50 

241.25 

239.11 

87.83 
347.77 
359.39 

299.49 

9.10 

48.63 

55.90 



$100,477.24 



18,97 

12.948.11 

454.27 

9,373.34 

6,047.69 

7,514.95 

.09 

81.52 

16,250.80 

297.53 

3,310.46 

194.00 

1,439.81 

1,057.77 

5,247.21 

6,772.09 

508.98 

200.40 

0.10 

48.63 

55.00 



$221,034.95 



Pulpwood 

Fuelwood 

Pit wood 

Shingle Bolts 



Cut Under Permit 
528.88 Cords Mixed Logs 
Ui.2?, Cords Poles 

45.30 Cords Posts 

10.96 Cords 



.468,073 ft. B.M. 
51 Pieces 
96 Pieces 



Scaling white pine loi^s at Flame Lake. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 



Table No. 5a 
CHAPLEAU 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending 



CORDS 



pieces 



DUES 



March 31, 1948 

bonus total 



Pine Logs 




4,827 


718,103 


$ 1,795.25 


$ 3,417.77 


$ 5,213.02 


Pine Booms 




132 
492,375 


18,534 
9,162,457 


46.33 
18,001.81 


120.47 
51,435.69 


166.80 


J. Pine Logs 


69,437.50 


J. Pine Booms 




2,030 
36 


96,199 
305 


240.49 
.61 


535.39 
.61 


775.88 


Poplar Logs - 


1.22 


Spruce Logs 




18,891 


342,532 


685.06 


1,585.93 


2,270.99 


Spruce Booms 




13 


729 


1.82 


2.92 


4.74 


Poles (cu. ft.)-.. 




20,651 


207,371.72 


7,596.23 




7,596.23 


Car Stakes 




2,634 




56.85 




56.85 


Balsam Pulpwood . 


96.58 






67.61 




67.61 


J. Pine Pulpwood .... 


42,033.80 






16,813.52 


4,205.03 


21,018.55 


Poplar Pulpwood..... 


21.83 






8.73 




8.73 


Spruce Pulpwood .. 


13,633.43 






19,086.80 


1,812.36 
$63,116.17 


20,899.16 




?64,401.11 


$127,517.28 






Cut Under Permit 






J. Pine 

Spruce P. Wood 




.2,356 ft. B.M. Fuelv 
199.31 Cords Poles 
88.65 Cords Posts 
2.00 Cords 


k'ood - 




.664.73 Cords 






..209 Pieces 


Poplar P Wood 








.210 Pieces 


Balsam P. Wood ... 














Table No. 5b 












COCHRANE 








Classifi 


CATION OF Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1948 


SPECIES 


CORDS 


pieces feet 


DUES 


BONUS 


total 


Pine Logs... 




14,697 


978,206 


$ 2,445.49 


$ 5,349.25 


$ 7,794.74 


J. Pine Logs. 




1,048,785 


12,655,001 


21,647.78 


68,921.79 


90,569.57 


J. Pine Booms... 




1,146 


52,805 


132.00 


297.12 


429.12 


Balsam Logs 





5,874 


93,330 


186.68 


561.34 


748.02 


Birch Logs 




678 
407 


15,634 
5,406 


39.08 
8.11 


58.37 
45.95 


97.45 


Cedar Logs 


54.06 


Poplar Logs 




65,366 


1,179,625 


2,359.24 


3,057.31 


5,416.55 


Spruce Logs 




441,860 


7,135,729 


14,264.24 


71,529.17 


85,793.41 


Spruce Booms 




7,393 


877,917 


2,196.74 


4,908.54 


7,105.28 


Tamarac Logs 




767 


8,963 


13.44 


57.56 


71.00 


Piling (cu. ft.) 




182,525 


1,458,069.43 


33,991.46 




33,991.46 


Ties (Pieces) 




447 




44.70 


26.82 


71.52 


Poles (Pieces) 




2,804 




850.00 


1,425.35 


2,275.35 


Posts (Pieces) 




3,819 




76.38 


431.67 


508.05 


Fuelwood (Hard).... 


2,084.28 






1,042.17 


524.77 


1,566.94 


Fuelwood (Soft) 


5,624.95 






1,406.21 


3,064.85 


4,471.06 


Balsam Pulpwood... 


14,718.96 






10,268.59 


3,337.55 


13,606.14 


J. Pine Pulpwood 


6,554.48 






2,621.80 


1,860.37 


4,482.17 


Poplar Pulpwood 


7,913.85 






3,165.52 


2,605.76 


5,771.28 


Spruce Pulpwood 


377,521.77 






528,328.35 


147,957.10 


676,285.45 


J. Pine Pit Props 


23,013.97 






9,205.58 


20,099.14 


29,304.72 


Spruce Pit Props 


21.38 






29.93 


5.34 


35.27 


Spruce Pit Props 














Exported 


21.38 








21.38 


21.38 


J. Pine Pit Props 














Exported.. 


23,013.97 








11,269.19 


11,269.19 


Balsam Exported 


491.32 








491.32 


491.32 


Poplar Exported 


4,632.72 




— 




463.27 


463.27 


Spruce Exported 


9,673.87 








9,673.87 


9,673.87 




$634,323.49 


$358,044.15 


$992,367.64 



166 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Cut Under Permit 



Poplar Logs 3,400 Pieces 

Spruce Logs 19,470 Pieces 

Poles — 3,546 Pieces 

Posts 2,902 Pieces 



J. Pine Logs 599,250 ft. B.M. 

Poplar Logs 79,727 ft. B.M. 

Spruce Logs 349,363 ft. B.M. 

Balsam Logs 15,500 ft. B.M. 

Pulpwood 85,201.22 Cords 

T.ABLE No. Sc 

FORT FRANCES 

Cl.assific.ation of Anxu.\l Timber Return Ye.ar Ending March 31, 1948 



SPECIES 


cords 


PIECES 


FEET 


DUES 


BONUS 


TOTAL 


Pine Logs 




7,821 


265,109 


$ 662.77 


$ 1,212.26 


$ 1,875.03 


Pine Rnnmfi 




3,305 


625,218 


1,563.05 


5,825.38 


7,388.43 


J Pinp T.nor'; 




434,266 


5,850,024 


12,023.57 


17,135.97 


29,159.54 


J. Pine Booms 




2,631 


201,418 


503.54 


1,420.45 


1,923.99 


Balsam Logs 




22 


784 


1.57 


2.35 


3.92 


Poplar Logs 




19,734 


264,658 


537.52 


279.36 


816.88 


Spruce Logs... 




20,442 


220,978 


441.97 


1,018.82 


1,460.79 


Spruce Booms 





98 


17,571 


43.93 


76.88 


120.81 


Posts 




1,425 




28.50 




28.50 


Car Stakes 




641 




19.23 




19.23 


Poles (cu.ft.) 




6,739 


105,276.61 


4,365.58 




4,365.58 


Fuelwood (Hard) 


125.05 






62.52 


1.47 


63.99 


Fuehvood (Soft) 


3445 






8.61 


5.17 


13.78 


Balsam Pulpwood. _ 


158.84 






111.17 


17.90 


129.07 


J. Pine Pulpwood-.... 


31,093.54 






12,437.40 


4,469.87 


16,907.27 


Poplar Pulpwood...... 


4,419.60 






1,767.84 


417.49 


2,185.33 


Spruce Pulpwood 


17,157.25 






24,020.14 


3,855.62 


27,875.76 


J. Pine E.xported 


28,313.19 








14,156.58 


14,156.58 




$58,598.91 


$49,895.57 


$108,494.48 



Pine ... 
J. Pine 
Poplar 
Balsam 



Classific 



Cut Under Permit 

33,100 ft. B.M. Spruce 3,287 ft. B.M. 

10,934 ft. B.M. Pulpwood ...1,931.92 Cords 

105,464 ft. B.M. Fuelwood 1,039.26 Cords 

3,252 ft. B.M. 

Table No. 5d 
GER.\LDTON 

ATiON OF Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1948 
cords pieces feet dues bonus total 



J. Pine Logs 




387,533 


7,156,368 


$ 10,734.55 


$ 34,848.80 


$ 45,583.35 


J. Pine Booms 




41 


2,541 


6.35 


15.25 


21.60 


Balsam Logs 




754 


6,646 


13.28 


36.23 


49.51 


Birch Logs 




1,015 


12,614 


31.53 


6.61 


38.14 


Cedar Logs 




72 


2,094 


3.14 


5.23 


8.37 


Poplar Logs - 




44,584 


957,193 


1,914.40 


2,169.46 


4,083.86 


Spruce T-ogs 




80,051 


1,929,430 


3,858.85 


9,484.68 


13,343.53 


Spruce Booms 




8,712 


1,210,106 


3,025.27 


7,171.80 


10,197.07 


Posts (Pieces) . . 




60S 
33,292 


177,398.09 


12.10 
5,644.12 


18.15 


30.25 


Piling (cu.ft.) _- 


5,644.12 


Poles (cu.ft.). _ 






672,852.93 


31,194.62 




31,194.62 


Fuelwood (Hard).— 


1,189.76 






594.88 


41642 


1,011.30 


Fuelwood (Soft) 


2,260.75 







565.19 


578.27 


1,143.46 


Balsam Pulpwood ... 


9,547.97 






6,683.58 


3,542.40 


10,225.98 


J. Pine Pulpwood 


137,632.67 






55,053.06 


6,110.76 


61,163.82 


Poplar Pulpwood 


21,122.60 






8,449.04 


43.26 


8,492.30 


Spruce Pulpwood 


219,760.33 






306,606.14 


33,916.74 


340,522.88 


Spruce Exported 


37,394.08 








55,061.74 


55,061.74 


Balsam Exported 


1,220.30 








1,830.45 


1,830.45 


J. Pine Exported . 


15,788.36 








2,925.34 


2,925.34 




$434,390.10 


$158,181.59 


$592,571.69 



167 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. J 



Mixed Logs 



Cut Uxder Permit 
.213,237 ft. B.M. Fuelwood 



.3,255 Cords 



Table No. 5e 
GOGOMA 
Classificatiox of Axxual Timber Return 



CORDS 



PIECES 



Ye.\r Exdixg 

DUES 



M.arch 31, 1048 

BOX us 



Pine Logs 




30,496 


2,327,686 


S 5,819.21 


$14,870.53 


$ 20,680.74 


Pine Booms 




5 


1,999 


5.00 


12.99 


17.99 


J. Pine Logs 




307,716 


6,782,924 


15,260.50 


27,378.85 


42,639.35 


J. Pine Booms 




2,178 


141,110 


352.77 


519.93 


872.70 


Spruce Logs 




53,800 


1,151,029 


2,302.05 


6,288.30 


8,590.35 


Spruce Booms 




860 


58,335 


145.83 


339.27 


485.10 


Piling din. ft.) 




887 
7,939 


15,856 


79.28 
238.17 




79.28 


Car Stakes 


238.17 


Posts 




3,434 




68.68 


102.93 


171.61 


Poles 




4,488 




1,397.00 


1,122.00 


2,519.00 


Poles (cu. ft.) 




52,522 


655,476.85 


25,612.00 




25,612.00 


Balsam Pulpwood... 


161.96 






113.36 


149.35 


262.71 


J. Pine Pulpwood .. 


34,557.55 






13,823.01 


9,984.09 


23,807.10 


Poplar Pulpwood .... 


956.19 







382.48 


273.85 


656.33 


Spruce Pulpwood ... 


10,355.95 






14,498.32 


4,596.58 


19,094.90 




S80.097.66 


.?65,638.67 


$145,736.33 



Pine .. 
J. Pine 
Spruce 
Poles . 



Cut Under Permit 

2,230,703 ft. B.M. Posts 

. 81,263 ft. B.M. Pulpwood 

. 63,516 ft. B.M. Fuelwood 

2,422 Pieces 



229 Pieces 

265 Cords 

2,113 Cords 



T.ABLE No. 5f 
K.\PUSK.\SING 
Classificatiox of .■\nnual Timber Return Y 

CORDS PIECES feet 



EAR Ending 
dues 



M.ARCH 31, 1948 

BONUS 



J. Pine Logs 




37,779 


639,813 


$ 959.71 


S 3,137.22 


$ 4,096.93 


J. Pine Booms 




118 


12,718 


31.80 


66.02 


97.82 


Balsam Logs 




3,890 


61.224 


122.45 


343.54 


465.99 


Birch Logs 




2 


13 


.03 


.01 


.04 


Poplar Logs 




20.858 


431,760 


863.52 


786.40 


1,649.92 


Spruce Logs 




298,888 


5,924,211 


11,875.91 


28,782.50 


40,658.41 


Spruce Booms 




4,040 


510.567 


1,276.40 


2,499.31 


3,775.71 


Posts (Pieces). 




19 




.38 


.38 


.76 


Spruce (cu. ft.) 




310,632 


1,224,945.10 


23,956.37 


250.41 


24,206.78 


Poles (cu. ft.) 




30 


643.24 


31.09 




31.09 


Fuelwood (Hard) 


27.37 






13.68 


1.37 


15.05 


Fuelwood (Soft). 


336.45 






84.11 


64.29 


148.40 


Balsam Pulpwood.... 


46,497.59 






32,518.16 


24,508.09 


57,026.25 


J. Pine Pulpwood 


23.81 






13.53 


1.07 


14.60 


Poplar Pulpwood 


81.80 






32.72 


28.63 


61.35 


Spruce Pulpwood 


446,213.23 






616,585.55 


126,516.23 


743,101.78 


Spruce Exported 


214,637.15 








214,637.15 


214.637.15 


Balsam Exported. 


14,926.81 








14,926.81 


14.926.81 


J. Pine Exported 


5.57 








2.78 


2.78 


Poplar E.xported 


81.80 








8.18 


8.18 




$688,365.41 


$416,560.39 


$1,104,925.80 



Cut Under Permit 

Spruce ....1,214,607 ft. B.M. Posts _ 

Poplar 374,580 ft. B.M. Pulpwood 

Birch 484,000 ft. B.M. Fuelwood 



220 Pieces 
.33,092.24 Cords 
. 5,201.41 Cords 



168 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Passing logs into flume — Aubrey Falls. 




...a^-u^-'.'^r- ^-r^r,^^::* -'f^.^-; ^^^^Mt^f^..f..^i^■^:i»,l^^:i:.ir 



169 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



Table Xo. 5g 

KEXORA 

Classification of Anxu.^l Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1948 



SPECIES 


cords 


PIECES 


FEET 


DUES 


BONUS 


TOT.VL 


Pine Logs 




5,769 


351,508 


S 878.77 


S 1,406.86 


$ 2,285.63 


Pine Booms 




402 


117,949 


294.87 


412.82 


707.69 


J. Pine Logs .. 




24,231 


506,651 


856.97 


2,544.87 


3,401.84 


J. Pine Booms..- __ 




261 


8,348 


20.86 


44.68 


65.54 


Balsam Logs 




116 


1,187 


2.37 


7.12 


9.49 


Birch Logs 




2 


28 


.07 


.18 


.25 


Poplar Logs 




1,073 


38,976 


77.95 


97.44 


175.39 


Spruce Logs 




16,760 


370,402 


740.79 


2,086.02 


2,826.81 


Spruce Booms 




1,699 


283,707 


709.26 


1,686.86 


2,396.12 


Piling din. ft.) 




97 


1,514 


5.03 




5.03 


Piling (cu. ft.) 




34,331. 


120,064.72 


3,063.48 




3,063.48 


Poles (cu.ft.) 




2,473. 


34,359.22 


1,391.53 




1,391.53 


Ties 




25,166 




2,516.60 


1,042.45 


3,559.05 


Fuelwood (Hard)-... 


51.13 






25.56 


2.56 


28.12 


Fuelwood (Soft) 


1,022.60 






255.64 


98.22 


353.86 


Balsam Pulpwood ... 


2,818.46 






1,972.92 


73.78 


2,046.70 


J. Pine Pulpwood 


64,990.29 






25,996.20 


12,201.44 


38,197.64 


Poplar Pulpwood 


1,339.10 






535.64 


119.45 


655.09 


Spruce Pulpwood 


82,118.45 






114,965.83 


16,629.10 


131,594.93 


Spruce Exported 


1,560.89 








1,560.89 


1,560.89 


J. Pine Exported 


10,121.81 








5,060.90 


5,060.90 




$154,310.34 


$45,075.64 


$199,385.98 



Table No. 5h 
NORTH BAY 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1948 
cords pieces feet dues bonus 



Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

J. Pine Logs 

J. Pine Booms 

Balsam Logs 

Bass Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Ties ( Pieces) __.; 

Posts (Pieces) 

Poles (Pieces) 

Poles (cu. ft.) 

Birch (cu.ft.) 

Fuelwood (Hard).... 

Fuelwood (Soft) 

Balsam Pulpwood... 
J. Pine Pulpwood.... 
Poplar Pulpwood .... 
Spruce Pulpwood... 

J. Pine Pit Props 

J. Pine Pit Props 

Exported 

Poplar Exported 



773.36 

1,874.38 

211.45 

2,448.59 

2,030.04 

17,834.44 

60.02 

60.02 
284.10 



761,269 

5,035 

458,180 

1,124 

3,568 

25,731 

65,873 

1,252 

44,092 

78,451 

73,766 

1,902 

182 

3,277 

3,493 

1,873 



47,460,258 

640,945 

4,252,815 

84,853 

67,254 

1,963,424 

4,643,414 

19,994 

1,542,579 

1,348,318 

1,394,909 

160,152 



34,794.20 
219,665.50 



$118,263.71 

1,602.33 

6,470.24 

212.12 

134.50 

4,908.53 

11,608.53 

29.91 

2,313.86 

2,696.55 

2,790.01 

400.35 

18.20 

65.54 

1,173.25 

1,214.40 

2,196.65 

386.67 

468.59 

148.01 

979.41 

812.01 

24,698.23 

24.01 



$183,885.71 



$319,121.53 

3,562.30 

26,153.44 

687.14 

189.08 

2,926.26 

6,945.73 

59.67 

204.19 

3,566.83 

5,355.85 

652.24 

9.10 

97.46 

656.20 



38.12 

312.99 

8.02 

918.41 

954.14 

3,352.23 

58.28 



20.57 

28.41 

$375,878.19 



$437,385.24 

5,164.63 

32,623.68 

899.26 

323.58 

7,834.79 

18,554.26 

89.58 

2,518.05 

6,263.48 

8,145.86 

1,052.59 

27.30 

163.00 

1,829.45 

1,214.40 

2,196.65 

424.79 

781.58 

156.03 

1,897.82 

1,766.15 

28,320.46 

82.29 

20.57 

28.41 

$559,763.90 



170 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Pine . 

J. Pine 

Hemlock 
Spruce 

Birch 

Poplar _ 



Cut Under Permit 



J,225.000ft. B.M. 
. 897,000 ft. B.M. 
. 27,000 ft. B.M. 
. 448,000 ft. B.M. 
. 86.000 ft. B.M. 
. 471,000 ft. B.M. 



Ties 

Posts 

Poles 

Pulpwood 
Fuelwood 



4,137 Pieces 

8,005 Pieces 

2,115 Pieces 

.16,831.00 Cords 

. 5,859.00 Cords 



T.A.BLE No. 5l 

P.\RRY SOUND 
Classificatiox of Axxu.al Timber Return Year Ending M..\rch 31, 1948 

feet dues bonus 



CORDS 



PIECES 



Pine Logs .. .. 
Pine Booms.- 

Ash Logs 

Bass Logs 

Beech Logs__ 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs__ 
Cherry LogS- 
Elm Logs 



Hemlock Logs 

Hemlock Booms 

Maple Logs 

Oak Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Poles (Pieces) 

Posts (Pieces) 

Fuelwood (Hard)_ 
Balsam Pulpwood.. 
Spruce Pulpwood... 




32,571 

78 

690 

11,109 

1,707 

110,946 

823 

200 

984 

140,647 

205 

52,612 

503 

566 

35,904 

539 

231 

230 



1,838,998 

13,053 

40,507 

490,306 

96,388 

9,388,407 

12,123 

7,034 

91,852 

6,461,608 
16,840 

3,373,789 

26,185 

14,655 

978,029 

53,030 



S 4,597.48 

32.63 

101.26 

1,225.71 

240.96 

23,470.99 

18.17 

17.57 

229.61 

9,692.36 

42.09 

8,434.38 

65.46 

29.31 

1,956.06 

132.56 

71.50 

4.60 

1,425.25 

134.40 

21.00 



S5 1,943.35 



; 8,808.46 

195.28 

50.90 

869.07 

24.89 

16,880.41 

22.55 

16.71 

147.21 

4,380.72 

17.01 

3,947.75 

43.28 

9.70 

1,615.55 

71.42 



48.47 



$37,149.38 



?13,405.94 

227.91 

152.16 

2,094.78 

265.85 

40,351.40 

40.72 

34.28 

376.82 

14,073.08 

59.10 

12,382.13 

108.74 

39.01 

3,571.61 

203.98 

71.50 

4.60 

1,473.72 

134.40 

21.00 



§89,092.73 



Mixed Logs 

Mi.xed Logs 

Posts 



Cut Under Permit 

.3,816,279 ft. B.M. Poles 

Pulpwood 



53,046 lin. ft. 
1,667 Pieces 



Fuelwood 



859 Pieces 
.3,635.50 Cords 
.6,990.55 Cords 



T.\ble No. 5j 
PORT ARTHUR 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1948 



SPECIES 


CORDS 


pieces 


FEET 


DUES 


BONUS 


TOTAL 


Pine Logs 




59,543 


5,640,801 


S 14,124.50 


S 34,442.11 


$ 48,566.61 


Pine Booms 




1,037 


244,925 


612.31 


1,590.45 


2,202.76 


J. Pine Logs 




1,103,701 


17,721,480 


32,742.18 


70,625.54 


103,367.72 


J. Pine Booms____. 




9,433 


405,159 


1,012.89 


1,756.96 


2,769.85 


Balsam Logs .._ 




24,900 


311,403 


622.80 


1,130.68 


1,753.48 


Birch Logs 




980 


18,224 


45.55 


38.24 


83.79 


Cedar Logs 




3,767 


59,969 


89.95 


166.22 


256.17 


Poplar Logs..__ 




87,178 


3,697,182 


5,977.31 


2,069.86 


8,047.17 


Spnire Lops 




299,738 


7,890,434 


15,780.84 


32,488.31 


48,269.15 


Spruce Booms. 




9,149 


1,109,676 


2,772.16 


5,488.74 


8,260.90 


Ties (Pieces) 




2,371 




237.10 


86.66 


323.76 


Piling (lin ft ) 




84 


3,380 


67.60 




6760 


Piling (cu. ft.) ! 


1,693 


44,206.16 


2,305.05 




2, .305 .05 


Poles (cu. ft. 1 ,>0.500 


726,378.97 


30,444.74 




30,444.74 



Continued 



on next page. 
171 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 



SPECIES 

Fuelwood (Hard) 
Fuelwood (Soft) _ 
Balsam Pulpwood 
J. Pine Pulpwood. 
Poplar Pulpwood . 
Spruce Pulpwood. 
Spruce Exported... 
Balsam Exported.. 
J. Pine Exported... 
Poplar Exported .. 



CORDS 



144.50 

1,513.61 

57,349.03 

58,298.20 

7,649.80 

524,690.06 

55,162.33 

24,250.92 

17,729.31 

1,947.44 



72.25 


21.67 


93.92 


378.40 


333.14 


711.54 


40,141.12 


19,776.74 


59,917.86 


25,140.58 


6,133.66 


31,274.24 


3,094.12 


905.41 


3,999.53 


722,859.79 


159,948.91 


882,808.70 




82,743.00 


82,743.00 




36,376.37 


36,376.37 




8,864.66 


8,864.66 




194.74 


194.74 


$898,521.24 


$465,182.07 


$1,363,703.31 



Cut Under Permit 



W. Pine Logs 164,501 ft. B.M. 

J. Pine Logs _ 478,754 ft. B.M. 

Spruce Logs 65,387 ft. B.M. 

Balsam Logs 18,392 ft. B.M. 

Poplar Logs 45,867 ft. B.M. 



Pulpwood 2,169. Cords 

Fuelwood 1,886. Cords 

Poles 1 , 1 70 Pieces 

Posts _ 1 ,000 Pieces 



T.^ble No. 5k 
QUINTE (TWEED) 
Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1948 
cords pieces feet dues bonus 



total 



Pine Logs _. 

Pine Booms 

Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs.. 

Bass Logs 

Beech Logs _ 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Cherry Logs 

Elm Logs ._ 

Hemlock Logs 

Maple Logs 

Oak Logs 

Poplar Logs.- 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Tamarac Logs 

Piling (cu. ft.).. 

Poles 

Posts— 

Trees „ 

Shingle Bolts 

Fuelwood (Hard)... 

Fuelwood (Soft) 

Balsam Pulpwood..., 
Poplar Pulpwood .... 
Spruce Pulpwood .. 
Balsam Exported .... 

Poplar Exported 

Spruce Exported 



1.12 
2,995.94 
70.81 
488.23 
935.44 
544.26 
308.24 
710.07 
416.71 



179,814 

226 

1,174 

9,499 

18,223 

6,533 

13,044 

2,033 

84 

1,973 

96,082 

35,257 

2,150 

32,942 

42,387 

1,714 

247 

180 

33 

355 

18 



5,487,532 

15,703 

36,844 

111,684 

689,783 

259,220 

682,779 

33,503 

3,992 

152,762 

3,910,380 

2,011,083 

65,791 

763,020 

992,435 

134,188 

5,616 

1,719.23 



$13,796.75 

39.25 

89.83 

212.72 

1,723.80 

648.04 

1,692.44 

49.88 

9.98 

380.41 

5,864.40 

4,995.35 

164.31 

1,455.22 

1,947.54 

333.23 

8.41 

59.31 

9.50 

7.10 

13.50 

.67 

1,497.96 

17.70 

345.00 

374.18 

761.98 



$36,498.46 



$22,511.53 

1.32 

71.10 

146.23 

991.74 

291.53 

1,383.74 

36.05 

13.89 

208.76 

3,845.51 

3,693.82 

163.56 

955.01 

2,716.98 

185.70 

6.23 

.50 
4.53 



772.20 

19.40 

63.99 

174.48 

1.03 

308.24 

71.00 

416.71 

$39,054.78 



$36,308.28 

40.57 

160.93 

358.95 

2,715.54 

939.57 

3,076.18 

85.93 

23.87 

589.17 

9,709.91 

8,689.17 

327.87 

2,410.23 

4,664.52 

518.93 

14.64 

59.31 

10.00 

11.63 

13.50 

.67 

2,270.16 

37.10 

408.99 

548.66 

763.01 

308.24 

71.00 

416.71 

$75,553.24 



172 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



Cut Under Permit 



Pine - 611,166 ft. B.M. 

H. Wood -- 258,965 ft. B.M. 

Balsam . -- 38,292 ft. B.M. 

Cedar 14,341 ft. B.M. 

Hemlock .._ 157,403 ft. B.M. 

Poplar 96,028 ft. B.M. 

Spruce 1 68,9 1 4 ft. B .M . 



TamaracLogs 2,914 ft. B.M. 

Pulpwood 1,094.72 Cords 

Fuelwood -- — ...-1,930.00 Cords 

Lagging 47.39 Cords 

Poles 618 Pieces 

Posts 1,079 Pieces 



Table No. 5l 

SAULT STE. MARIE 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1948 

CORDS PIECES feet DUES BONUS 



Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

J. Pine Logs 

J. Pine Booms 

.Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Hemlock Booms... 

Maple Logs. ._ 

Oak Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms... 

Car Stakes... 

Poles 

Posts 

Shingle Bolts 

Balsam Pulpwood 
J. Pine Pulpwood.. 
Poplar Pulpwood - 
Spruce Pulpwood.. 



5.25 

20,481.41 

14,986.61 

1,618.73 

221,964.72 



282,169 

6,330 

122,463 

2,124 

85 

2,619 

15,227 

114 

117 

8,478 

818 

5,838 

679 

4,790 

60,859 

5,443 

1,502 

112 

114 



17,613,854 

694,532 

2,914,671 

96,545 

4,650 

17,084 

1,091,813 

782 

10,149 

531,947 

28,992 

281,021 

55,439 

64,597 

1,589,979 

269,644 



> 44,034.62 

1,736.34 

7,185.88 

241.36 

11.62 

34.17 

2,729.50 

1.17 

25.36 

797.91 

72.48 

702.52 

138.57 

129.19 

3,179.93 

674.11 

90.12 

32.75 

8.04 

10.50 

14,336.99 

5,994.64 

647.50 

310,750.61 



$393,565.88 



$ 83,750.24 

4,428.43 

9,332.33 

462.93 

21.92 

70.22 

7,955.59 

1.96 

36.29 

1,662.18 

117.00 

1,464.11 

296.75 

256.47 

6,209.41 

1,150.31 

28.70 
.54 

4,593.58 

4,660.11 

485.32 

53,592.44 



$180,576.83 



$127,784.86 

6,164.77 

16,518.21 

704.29 

33.54 

104.39 

10,685.09 

3.13 

61.65 

2,460.09 

189.48 

2,166.63 

435.32 

385.66 

9,389.34 

1,824.42 

90.12 

61.45 

8.58 

10.50 

18,930.57 

10,654.75 

1,132.82 

364,343.05 



$574,142.71 



Cut Under Permit 



Pine 443,879 ft. B.M. 

J. Pine - .113,385 ft. B.M. 

Spruce _ 43,946 ft. B.M. 

Hemlock _ 565,538 ft. B.M. 

Birch 853,281 ft. B.M. 

Maple ...216,050 ft. B.M. 

Oak „ _... 54,460 ft. B.M. 

Elm 6,747 ft. B.M. 



Ash 2.999 ft. B.M. 

Poplar - 25,536 ft. B.M. 

Cedar 2,696 ft. B.M. 

Ties - 1,299 Pieces 

Poles - 267 Pieces 

Posts 1,382 Pieces 

Pulpwood _ 414.57 Cords 

Fuelwood .1,477.57 Cords 



Table No. 5m 

SIOUX LOOKOUT 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1948 

CORDS PIECES feet DUES BONITS 



TOTAL 



Pine Logs . 

Pine Booms 

J. Pine Logs . 
J. Pine Booms 



9,718 

87 

486,397 

1,255 



399,801 

6,284 

7,388,394 

95,300 



$ 



999.50 

15.71 

15,383.61 

238.25 



3,490.85 

33.34 

35,800.42 

454.99 



$ 



4,490.35 

49.05 

51,184.03 

6Q3.24 



Continued on next page. 
173 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



SPECIES 


CORDS 


PIECES 


FEET 


DUES 


BONUS 


TOTAL 


Birch Logs 




47 


2,077 


5.19 


9.35 


14.54 


Poplar Logs.- — 




380 


7,356 


14.71 


5.74 


20.45 


Spruce Logs 




72,481 


2,186,829 


4,373.65 


10,775.52 


15,149.17 


Spruce Booms 




5,093 


696,114 


1,740.27 


3,913.62 


5,653.89 


Spruce (lin. ft.).. 






321,760 


1,072.53 




1,072.53 


Poles (cu. ft.) 




1,673 


27,049.18 


1,142.66 




1,142.66 


Poles C Pieces) 




26 




6.75 


6.75 


13.50 


Ties 




49,904 




4,933.20 


1,938.96 


6,872.16 


Fuelwood (Soft) 


7,Q05.00 






1,976.25 




1,976.25 


Balsam Pulpwood.— . 


7,587.38 






5,311.17 


210.37 


5,521.54 


J. Pine Pulpwood 


31,085.40 






12,434.17 


8,627.96 


21,062.13 


Poplar Pulpwood 


736.54 






294.61 


52.82 


347.43 


Spruce Pulpwood 


216,984.09 






300,457.72 


25,811.57 


326,269.29 


Spruce Exported 


57,658.16 








57,658.16 


57,658.16 


Balsam Exported 


1,767.45 








1,767.45 


1,767.45 


J. Pine Exported 


134.61 








67.30 


67.30 


Poplar Exported 


208.38 








20.84 


20.84 




$350,399.95 


$150,646.01 


$501,045.96 



Cut Under Permit 
J. Pine - -- 366,583 ft. B.M. Lagging 199,313 cu. ft. 



Spruce 1,239,680 ft. B.M. 

Poplar - 100,234 ft. B.M. 



Posts 

Pulpwood 



300 Pieces 
.1,286.69 Cords 



Table No. 5n 

SUDBURY 

Classification of Annu.'VL Timber Return Ye.ar Ending March 31, 1948 

CORDS pieces feet DUES BONUS TOTAL 



Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

J. Pine Logs ._- 

J. Pine Booms 

Ash Logs 

Bass Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Hemlock Booms.- 

Maple Logs 

Oak Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Spruce Logs 

Tamarac Logs 

Spruce (Pieces)..-. 
J. Pine (Pieces).... 
Car Stakes (Pieces).. 

Poles (Pieces) 

Posts (Pieces) 

Fuelwood (Hard) 
Fuelwood (Soft) . 
Balsam Pulpwood 
J. Pine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 



1,155.29 

530.61 

620.91 

27,928.49 

15,152.75 



163,208 

1,653 

159,779 

458 

447 

2,508 

22,808 

1,041 

151 

5,660 

25 

73 

123 

2,955 

390 

20,948 

ISO 

14,226 

512 

3,786 

10,341 

28,347 



7,670,496 

235,526 

1,868,431 

14,460 

20,662 

73,762 

391,581 

8,237 

2,002 

206,323 

2,299 

1,724 

2,075 

52,538 

29,369 

345,547 

450 



$19,176.19 

588.81 

4,426.08 

36.14 

51.65 

184.40 

978.94 

12.35 

5.00 

309.48 

5.75 

4.31 

5.19 

105.07 

73.40 

691.10 

.67 

1,051.75 

25.60 

113.58 

2,990.75 

798.44 

577.64 

132.65 

434.63 

11,171.39 

6,061.10 



$38,294.01 

1,361.28 

3,337.33 

58.59 

72.35 

183.74 

1,496.98 

51.82 

476.01 

5.60 

14.32 

109.54 

112.93 

1,358.87 



96.55 

678.08 

52.45 

19.70 

119.59 

40.83 

1,773.78 



57,470.20 

1,950.09 

7,763.41 

94.73 

124.00 

368.14 

2,475.92 

64.17 

5.00 

785.49 

5.75 

9.91 

19.51 

214.61 

186.33 

2,049.97 

.67 

1,051.75 

25.60 

113.58 

3,087.30 

1,476.52 

630.09 

152.35 

544.22 

11,212.22 

7,834.88 



Continued on next page. 



174 



No. 3 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



SPECIES 


CORDS 


PIECES 


FEET 


DVtS 


BONUS 


TOTAL 


Spruce Pulpwood— . 


8.902.65 






12,403.72 


99.35 


12,563.07 


Spruce Exported 


2,297.07 








3,445.60 


3,445.60 


Balsam Exported 


301.70 








452.55 


452.55 


J. Fine Exported 


5.00 








2.50 


2.50 


Poplar Exported 


8,936.56 








893.66 


893.66 




$62,475.78 


$54,608.01 


$117,083.79 



Pine 

J. Pine 

Spruce — - 

Hemlock 

Hardwood 

Poplar 



Cut Uxder Permit 

.1,136,228 ft. B.M. Cedar 13,347 ft. B.M. 

. 349,880 ft. B.M. Pulpwood _... 3,438.55 Cords 

- 379,951 ft. B.M. Fuelwood .4,218.78 Cords 

. 298,070 ft. B.M. Poles 3,950 Pieces 

. 119,115 ft. B.M. Posts 13,878 Pieces 

- 302,680 ft. B.M. Lagging _ 3,376 Pieces 



T.able No. 5o 

TRENT (LINDSAY) 

Cl.^ssificatiox of Axxu.al Timber Return* Ye.ar Ending M.arch 31, 1948 

CORDS pieces feet DUES BONUS 



tot.al 



.■\5h Logs 

Balsam Logs 

Basswood Logs 

Beech Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Hemlock Booms 

Maple Logs.- 

Oak Logs 

Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Tamarac Logs 

Ties 

Poles 

Posts 

Fuelwood (Hard)... 

Fuelwood (Soft) 

Balsam Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 
Spruce PuI[)wood 



511.50 

2.00 

91.57 

549.20 

135.54 



22 

11 

4,282 

1,882 

5,152 

4,239 

606 

n,2A^ 

99 

10,776 

946 

22,242 

241 

3,343 

21,821 

276 

412 

360 

9,861 



7.488 

6,438 

139,567 

108,064 

458,215 

49,151 

45,134 

3,107,674 

14,460 

843,045 

38,973 

871,891 

27,683 

143,551 

583,193 

24,592 

3.660 



.S 18.71 

12.88 

348.90 

270.15 

1,145.52 

73.72 

112.82 

4,661.49 

36.14 

2,107.60 

97.42 

2,179.70 

69.20 

287.11 

1,166.40 

61.48 

5.49 

41.20 

105.75 

197.22 

255.75 

.50 

64.10 

219.68 

189.75 



$13,728.68 



? 28.08 

22.06 

216.99 

89.38 

468.12 

65.25 

102.99 

1,480.89 

35.77 

546.84 

63.75 

2,208.77 

43.54 

364.22 

541.47 

25.78 

5.49 

8.24 

91.75 

161.55 

216.45 

1.30 

40.71 

272.80 

26.82 



$7,129.01 



46.70 

34.94 

565.89 

359.53 

1,613.64 

138.97 

215.81 

6,142.38 

71.91 

2,654.44 

161.17 

4,388.47 

112.74 

651.33 

1,707.87 

87.26 

10.98 

40.44 

107.50 

358.77 

472.20 

1.80 

104.81 

492.48 

216.57 



$20,857.69 



Pine 

Spruce .. 
Balsam .. 
Hemlock 
H. Wood 



Cut Under Permit 
..169,028 ft. B.M. Ties 

. 45,388 ft. B.M. Posts 

. 30,281 ft. B.M. Fuelwood 

. 87,127 ft. B.M. Pulpwood 

364,408 ft. B.M. Lagging ... 



113 Pieces 

825 Pieces 

.742.13 Cords 

.268.10 Cords 

. 5,362 lin. ft. 



175 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for 1950 



No. 3 



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of 

LANDS AND FORESTS 

OF THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

for fhe fiscal year ending 
MARCH 31, 1950 

PKINTED BY OKDER Of 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY 

OF ONTARIO 

TORONTO 



<l o<i 



i^S 



To His Honour, 

The Lieutenant-Governor of the Province 
of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

The undersigned begs respectfully to present 
to your Honour, the Annual Report of the Depart- 
ment of Lands and Forests for the fiscal year April 
1, 1949 to March 31, 1950. 

H. R. Scott, 

Minister. 




ONTARIO 



^\^l^^^ of the MINISTER of 

LANDS AND FORESTS 



OF THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

• 

for fhe fiscal year ending 

MARCH 31, 1950 

PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY 
OF ONTARIO 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 15, 1951 



TORONTO, 1951 

P rinfed and Published by Bapii st Johnston, 
Printer to the King's Most Excellent Maiesty 



i^onienid 



PAGE 

Title Page -- 1 

Division of Accounts -- 3 

Division of Air Service --- ____ 13 

Division OF Fish AND Wildlife - - -._ 2I 

Division of Forest Protection -- 45 

Division of Land and Recreational Areas ------ 57 

Division of Law ----- 69 

Division of Operation and Personnel 71 

Division of Reforestation - -117 

Division of Research --- 123 

Division of Surveys and Engineering 137 

Division of Timber Management - - - 149 



^i^ 



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ACCOUNTS 







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Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 4 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 

General 

The financial report sets out a substantial increase — $479,150.00 — in expen- 
diture appropriation of the Department as compared with the previous year. This 
increased appropriation was required for: 

(1) Suppression of Forest Fires; (2) Salvaging of fire killed timber; (3) Air Service 
Expansion; (4) Cost of Living Bonus to employees 

There was a decrease in the cash receipts — $32.981.37 — as compared with the 
previous year. 



Jj^ndex o/ ^abie 



eS 

Table No. Page 

1. Analysis of cash receipts by districts -------- lo 

^naex of (^ncirts ana L^raolti 

Figure Xo. Page 

1. Timber returns, crow^' dues, ground rent, etc. ----- 5 

2. Water power rentals, crown sales and rentals, etc. - - - 6 

3. Trend of total annual receipts ---------- Q 

4. Trend of tot.^vl annual disbursements ------ ^ - q 

FINANCIAL REPORT 
Cash Receipts and Disbursements 

Statement for the year ending March 31, 1950. is set out on Schedule A, page 
6. The following summarizes the result of operations for the year. 

Total— Cash Disbursements $14,536,859.74 

—Cash Receipts 11,602,255.69 



Excess of Disbursements over Receipts $2,934,604.05 

2. Comparison of Results with those of prior years 

(a) Receipts 

Cash receipts for the year under review compare with those of the previous 
four years as follows: 

years ending march 31st 



division 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 




$ 


$ 


$ 


s 


S 


Accounts 












Water Power Rentals 


6S4,Q7Q 


680,568 


694,859 


759,570 


811,664 


Provincial Land Tax 


209,459 


204,475 


185,470 


217,521 


242,292 


T/ong T.ac Diversion 


20,850 


20,400 


19,950 


19,500 


19,050 


Misrellaneons 


9,048 


46,071 


24,825 


26,225 


21,778 


Air Service 


25,284 


15,258 


8,376 


6,373 


10,734 


Fi<;h and Wildlife 


1,651,166 


2,248,201 


2,420,661 


2,813,876 


2,774,518 


Forest Protection . __ 


30,943 


46,402 


53,230 


48,330 


70,707 


Land and Recreational Areas 


338,258 


430,644 


393,938 


409,465 


400,223 


Reforestation 


19,386 


25,373 


25,562 


1,685 


153 


Surveys 


459 


1,652 


501 


402 


534 


Timber Management 


5,554,781 


6,944,104 


6,855,031 


7,332,290 


6,789,235 


Mississagi Salvage Project - - 










459,961 


Operation and Personnel (Sylva) 










1,406 




8,514,613 


10,663,148 


10,682,403 


11,635,237 


11,602,255 



Page 5 



Division of Accounts 



(b) The following is a comparison of total disbursements for the five years ending 
March 31. 1950. 

VEARS ENDING MARCH 31 ST 

DIVISION- 1946 1947 1948 1949 19S0 

V Ip 1^ Ij) Ip 

Department of Lands & Forests 
Total Disbursements 

Chargeable to Appropriation 
as voted 

Mississagi Salvage Project _ 

Additional Disbursements 

Uncontrollable items Special 



3,988,394 5,961,806 7,598,612 9,693,336 9,913,521 

1,489,845 4,623,339 



Warrant 



111,000 



217,621 



Dept. of Game & Fisheries 
Total Disbursements 

Chargeable to Appropriation 
as voted 

Total Disbursements 



748,661 1,197,974 



4,848,055 7,159,780 7,598,612 11,400,802 14,536,860 



FlGt"RE No. 1 



TREND OF DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

TIMBER KETURNS-CKOWN DUES-GROUND RENT 6 FIRE TAX CHARGES 

FOFl THE FIVE YEA[^S ENDING 31 MARCH 1950 



CO 



Q 5 



O 4 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 6 



Figure No. 2 

TREND OF DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

WATEK POWEK RENTALS - CROWN LAND SALES 6 RENTALS 
PROVINCIAL LAND TAX 

FOR THE FIVE YEAR-S ENDING 31 MARCH 1950 



900 



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< 






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RENTALS 












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1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
Schedule A FOR YEAR ENDING 31st MARCH, 1950 

DmsiON OF Accounts RECEIPTS 

Water Power _____ $ 811,663.96 

Provincial Land Tax 242,292.14 

Long Lac Diversion 19,050.00 

Casual Fees, Surveys, Office Fees, etc. 18,778.07 

Security Deposits . 3,000.00 



Division of Air Service 

Miscellaneous . 

Division of Fish and Wildlife 

Licences, Royalty and Sundry ._ 

Di\asiON OF Forest Protection 

Miscellaneous 

Division of L.-^nd .and Recreational Areas 
Land Sales 

Agricultural $ 14,104.58 

Summer Resort _. 20,701.13 

Townsites 5,308.63 

University _ 148.16 

Miscellaneous ___ 14,194.01 

Unallocated __ 163,185.74 



$1,094,784.17 

10,733.90 

2,774,518.06 

70,706.89 



$ 217,642.25 
Carried Forward _ $3,950,742.92 



PaseJ Division of Accounts 

Schedule A {Continued) 

RECEIPTS 

Brought Forward $3,950,742.92 

Land Rentals (Other than Parks) 

Leases and Licenses of Occupation — .— 112,061.86 

Temagami Islands 1,959.54 



114,021.40 



Park Revenue 
Algonquin 

Rentals $ 13,636.73 

Miscellaneous 14,091.12 



Rondeau 

Rentals ....$ 15,305.09 

Miscellaneous 2,825.98 



-5 27,727.85 



-$ 18,131.07 



Quetico 

Rentals $ 93.05 

Miscellaneous 1 ,284.00 

$ 1,377.05 

Ipperwash Beach 

Rentals $ 710.00 

Miscellaneous 2,329.25 

$ 3,039.25 

S 50,275.22 

Tourist Outfitters Licenses 16,192.76 

Other Lands Division Receipts - 2,091.54 

$ 400,223.17 

Division of Operation and Personnel 

Sylva Subscriptions 1,406.39 

Division of Reforestation 

Miscellaneous — 153.35 

Division of Surveys 

Aerial Surveys — Net Receipts - 533.65 

Division of Timber Management (See Schedule "B") 

Crown Dues $6,146,884.32 

Ground Rent _ - - _ - 112,139.00 

Fire Tax — 485,313.46 

Scalers' Wages - - - 5,632 .36 

Interest -.- 5,868.38 

Mill Licenses and Sundry 4,202.28 



$6,760,039.80 
Cash Deposits -- 29,195.24 



$6,789,235.04 



MississAGi Salvage -. 459,961 .07 



Total Receipts _ _ $11,602,255.69 

E.\cess of Disbursements over Receipts _ ~ - 2,934,604.05 



$14,536,859.74 



Carried Forward $14,536,859.74 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 8 



Schedule A {Continued) 
DISBURSEMENTS 

Brought Forward $14,536,859.74 

MAIN OFFICE 

Minister's Salary — Statutory $ 8,000.00 

Salaries — Permanent and Temporary 766,969.21 

Travelling Expenses . 47,525,95 

Maintenance and Operating 18,813.19 

Damage and Other Claims, Sundry Contingencies, etc. 1,850.96 

Compensation for Injured Workmen 52,591.43 

Cost of Living Bonus — Entire Department 477,357.98 

Unemployment Insurance Stamps 1,456.04 

Annuities and Bonuses to Indians 23,580.00 

$1,398,144.76 



FIELD SERVICES 

Basic Org.\xization — including District Offices 

Salaries _ $3,399,623.25 

Travelling Expenses _. 479,5 75 .49 

Maintenance and Operating 1,838,845.82 



Extra Fire Fighting 

Salaries— Temporary __ $1,018,087.18 

Travelling Expenses 1 7 ,965 .03 

Maintenance and Operating 464,904.72 



$5,718,044.56 



$1,500,956.93 



Fire Prevention, Conservation of Fish and Wildlife 
AND Reforestation 
Salaries, etc.. Maintenance and Operating $ 129,874.78 

Grants 

Association of Ontario Land Surveyors _ $ 200.00 

Municipalities in lieu of School Fees _ 632.54 

Jack Miner Migratory Bird Foundation Inc 1,500.00 

Thomas R. Jones . 300.00 

E. L. Marsh 100.00 

Niagara District Pheasant Breeders' Association 500.00 

Ontario Fur Breeders' .\ssociation Inc. 2,500.00 

Ontario Federation of Commercial Fishermen . 1,500.00 

$ 7,232.54 



Wolf Bounty $ 56,927.00 

Bear Bounty ._ $ 8,530.00 

Division of Air Serwce 

Salaries $ 288,916.67 

Travelling Expenses 9,928.34 

Maintenance and Operating — including purchase of Aircraft 447,277.88 

$ 746,122.89 



Division of Research 

Salaries — Tempo rary $ 131,016.85 

Travelling Expenses 18,477.11 

Maintenance and Operating 55,722.83 



$ 205,216.79 



Division of Surveys 

Aerial Surveys $ 21,558.91 

Ground Surveys — Miscellaneous Expenses 120,911.46 

T. -r A/r ■ 5 142,470.37 

Division of Timber M.axagement 

Salvaging Fire-Damaged Timber, Salaries, Travelling, Maintenance Expenses, 

Advances to Contractors, Equipment Purchases $4,623,339.12 



Total Disbursements $14,536,859.74 



Page 9 



Division of Accounts 



Figure No. 3 



TREND OF TOTAL ANNUAL RECEIPTS 

FOR. THE TEN YEAR.S ENDING 31 MARCH 1950 



INCLUDES FORMER GAME AND 
FISHERIES DEPARTMENT 



DOES NOT INCLUDE MI5SISSAGI 
SALVAGE PROJECT 



O 

-z. 
O 




1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 

is. 137,351 $6,348,601 $7,033,613 $6,697,708 $6,606,479 $8,514,613 $10,663,148 $10,682403 $11635237 $11,142,295 

Figure No. 4 

TREND OF TOTAL ANNUAL DISBURSEMENTS 

FOR THE TEN YEARS ENDING 31 MAR.CH 1950 



INCLUDES FORMER GAME AND 
FISHERIES DEPARTMENT 



DOES NOT INCLUDE MISSISSAGI 
SALVAGE PROJECT 



O 



O 




194! 

$2,967: 



1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 

$3,231,118 $4,075,717 $3,615,426 $4,210,990 $4,848,055 $7159,780 



1948 
$7598,612 



1949 
$9,910,957 



1950 

* 9.91 3.521 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 10 



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Page 11 



Division of Accounts 




-%' 



Mary Wilson working at an accounts ledger. 



y .^M 




^::-:iiln 



FOREST RESEARCH DIVISION— PROJECTS Schedule C 

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 
(INCLUDING GENERAL OFFICE) 
Protect ^^^ Year Ending March 31, 1950 

Experiment Station . ._ $ 45,733.85 

L. M. Morrison (Statistician) 3,620.95 

Soil Surveys -..-. — -- 24,115.12 

Regeneration Surveys — 35,014.2S 



Wildlife 

Pump and Hose Test 

Forest Genetics 

Biology 

South Bay Experiment 1 

South Bay Experiment 2 

Seed Production Experiment 
Pathology — 



22,755.27 
16,565.35 

7,051.09 
36,976.24- 
16,065.72 
18,750.00 
11,446.6S 

4,310.65 



Total Direct Expenditure on Projects - $242,405.0^ 

Deduct— Sale of Fish (South Bay Experiment 2) 6,553.01 



Net Direct Expenditure on Projects - - $235,852.08 

Main Office Administration — 23,240.38 



Total Expenditure by Forest Research Division $259,092.46 

Carried Forward _ $259,092.46 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 12 



DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENDITURE 

Brought Forward ._. ._._$259,092.46 

Forest Research— Field Service $205,216.79 

Forest Research — Main Office 21,362.70 

Basic Organization — Equipment and Improvements 32,512.97 



$259,092.46 



Schedide D 



Game 
Licenses 

Trapping 



DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE 
ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For Ye.ar Ending March 31, 1950 



Non-Resident Hunting 

Deer 

Moose 

Gun 

Dog 

Fur Dealers 

Fur Farmers 

Tanners 

Cold Storage 



Royalty Game 

Fisheries 
Licenses 

Fishing (Commercial) 
Angling 



Royally on Commercial Fish 

General 
Licenses 

Guides 

Fines 

Costs Collected 

Sales — Confiscated Articles - 
Miscellaneous 



56,389.65 

364,921.85 

242,208.18 

352.21 

178,016.26 

16,212.14 

27,787.00 

5,835.00 

190.00 

637.15 

892,549.44 
237,036.67 



$1,129,586.11 



106,251.35 
1,450,180.46 



1,556,431.81 
9,093.11 



31,565,524.92 



14,236.00 

45,807.70 

1,746.25 

17,222.31 

394.77 



$ 79,407.03 
$2,774,518.06 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 14 



DIVISION OF AIR SERVICE 

General 

The fiscal year 1949-50 saw considerable expansion of the activities of this 
Division. Provision had been made in the two previous years through the addition of 
our new Hangar and the procurement of additional equipment — and the fiscal year 
concerned saw us in a favorable position to undertake these expanded activities. The 
fire season itself could be regarded as normal, and although there were more fires than 
in the preceding two years, fewer reached the out-of-control stage, and the aggregate 
damage as a result thereof was considerably less than in former years. We attribute 
this, to some extent, to the fact that we now have more aeroplanes of a type that will 
operate out of smaller bodies of water, thus enabling us to get at the source of incipient 
fires much more easily and much more quickly than has been the case in the past. 

There has also been considerable expansion of the activities incident to Fish 
and Wildlife administration. The inauguration of registered trap lines necessitated a 
tremendous amount of travel by oflicers of the Fish and Wildlife Division, and in its 
initial stages it probably required a lot more supervision than will be the case in 
succeeding years when the program has become solidly established. This not only 
involved increased travel in areas with which we had been dealing, but also involved 
our taking in a very sizeable piece of country which we generally refer to as the 
Patricia area. To facilitate travel in this district it became necessary to establish quite 
a number of gasoline caches. We now carry gasoline at two points on Hudson's Bay, 
namely, Weenusk and Severn, and quite a number of inland caches, among which are 
Lansdowne House, Big Trout Lake, Big Sandy Lake. Bear Skin Lake, and several 
others. Gasoline at most of these inland points has to be placed there either by air 
or by winter transport — and because of the cost involved, we use as little as is neces- 
sary, preferring rather to re-fuel our aeroplanes at points where the cost of fuel is 
much less. 

Normal co-operation with other departments of Government was carried out as 
usual. Considerable flying was done for the Department of Mines; the usual amount 
for the Provincial Police, the Department of Health, the Department of Highways, 
etc. Some measure of co-operation was also accorded the Federal Department of Indian 
Affairs, with whom we work very closely in the establishing of registered trap lines. 

Emergency flights were carried out as required. 

Normal amiable relations were maintained with the Department of Transport 
and with the Air Transport Board. 

New Construction and Expansion 

During the period involved the Department of Public Works built two new 
year-round cottages and a workshop for us at Eva Lake; two more cottages and a 
workshop at Carey Lake and Kenogami; and it seems quite probable that we will 
require to open additional bases at Lauzon Lake and somewhere in the vicinity of 
White River at which latter place a new District Headquarters has been established. 
There are still a few odds and ends to be cleaned up in the absolute completion of our 
new Hangar, but it is hoped that the Department of Public Works will complete this 
project in the next fiscal period. 

Equipment 

During the year the Service took delivery of thirteen Beaver aircraft from the 
DeHavilland Company of Canada, and most of these were put in service as they were 



Page 15 Division of Air Service 



delivered. We have found this aeroplane to be a very useful piece of equipment. Its 
maintenance problems are not particularly difficult, and its performance far excels 
anything that Canada has ever seen before. Five more of the same type are on order 
for delivery in 1950 — and this will bring our fleet up to a total of forty-five aircraft. 
In the preceding year our Stinson S.R.9 aircraft were retired from service and were 
put up for sale. The last of them has just been sold at the time of compiling this report. 

Winter Operations 

Winter operations as expanded during the winter of 1948-49 were continued 
during the past winter. Beaver aircraft were operated on skis from Toronto. Algonquin 
Park, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie, Gogama, Chapleau, Geraldton, Port Arthur, Eva 
Lake; and two Norseman were operated from Sioux Lookout. This gave us a total of 
ten aircraft on winter operations. A good deal of their flying was occupied in the 
supervision and enforcement of the Fish and Wildlife regulations, but considerable 
flying was also done in the supervision of timber and logging operations, transportation 
of scalers, selection of tower sites, and normal transportation incident to the movement 
of senior officials through parts of the country which are relatively inaccessible by any 
other means of travel. 

Maintenance of Service Buildings 

Normal maintenance of all Service property was carried out as usual. Painting 
and normal repairs were undertaken where necessary in order to keep our property up 
to proper standards. 

Accidents 

During the period involved the Service lost one aircraft Norseman CF-OBC, 
which was burned in a forest fire at Sutton Lake in August of 1949. The engine, floats, 
and propeller were salvaged, but apart from these the aeroplane was a total loss. A 
Beaver went through the ice on early winter operations, north of Chapleau in December 
of 1949, but we were able to salvage the aeroplane intact and it was actually flown 
back to Sault Ste. Marie for necessary reconditioning. We are very pleased to report 
that we had no fatal or serious accidents. 

The following tables are submitted as supplementary to this Report: — 



^ndex of Jabtei 



Table No. Page 

1. Allocation of aircraft ------------- 16 

2. Flying time — pilots -------------- i6 

3. Hours FLOWN on VARIOUS PHASES OF FLYING operations - - - 17 

4. Totals ----.--..-.---.---17 

5. Hours flown at bases --------------17 

6. Flying time aircraft - -----..17 

7. .Allocation of aircraft -------- is 

8. Transport aircraft — effective loads carrtep ------ iq 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 16 



Table No. 1 

Table 7 shows the allocation of aircraft at the termination of the season, but the following aircraft 
operated for periods at the Bases shown: 



BASE REGISTRATION TYPE 

Algonquin Park CF-OBZ Beaver 

Chapleau CF-OCH Beaver 

CF-OCQ Beaver 

Eva Lake CF-OBT Beaver 

Geraldton CF-OBI Norseman 

Gogama -. CF-OCC Beaver 

Pays Plat CF-OCN Beaver 



BASE REGISTRATION TYPE 

Pickle Lake CF-OBC Norseman 

Port Arthur _. CF-OCB Beaver 

Sault Ste. Marie CF-OBV Beaver 

CF-OCO Beaver 

CF-OCR Beaver 

Sioux Lookout CF-OCK Beaver 

Sudbury CF-OBX Beaver 



Table No. 2 



FLYING TIME— PILOTS 



Pilots 

Blockley, H. T. ... 

Burton, E. C.- 

Burton, J. O 

Burtt, A. E 

Buckworth, W. B 
Calladine, T. J. - 

Cooke, T. C 

Culliton, J. P.- 

Denley, J. G. 

Donnelly, J. T 

Duncanson, I. C. 

Evans, F. B. 

Fawcett, T. B 

Hoar, H. A. __-__ 

Hull, C. L 

Hutnick, S..._. 

Kingdon, 0. F 

Kincaid, J 

Kirk, C. J 

LeFeuvre, C. J 

MacDougall, F. A 

Parsons, R 

Phillips, G. H. R. 

Piper, O. M.. 

Poulin, L. D 

Ponsford, G. E._.-. 

Reid, D. M... 

Siegel, J 

Speight, H. C 

Sandison, A. G 

Stone, R. W. E. ... 

Shrive, A. N 

Smith, A. B 

Trussler, G. E 

Taylor, J. M 

All Other Pilots... 
Total: 



1924-4Q 



1040-50 



Total 



910.45 


i22.2S 


1,233.10 


2,032.50 


397.20 


2,430.10 


596.20 


466.40 


1,063.00 


2,525.15 


421.10 


2,946.25 


3,005.20 


6.10 


3,011.30 




315.15 


315.15 


1,118.10 


515.10 


1,633.20 


2,939.25 


283.55 


3,223.20 


1,716.10 


559.35 


2,275.45 


1,782.25 


555.00 


2,337.25 


339.15 


257.05 


596.20 




329.55 


329.55 




414.45 


414.45 




161.40 


161.40 


754.55 


620.10 


1,375.05 




431.25 


431.25 


1,117.10 


480.55 


1,598.05 


1,503.15 


506.20 


2,009.35 




304.30 


304.30 


3,443.15 


316.40 


3,759.55 


3,736.15 


299.00 


4,035.15 


3,174.50 


596.55 


3.771.45 


7,646.30 


571.25 


8,217.55 


502.35 


554.00 


1,056.35 


3,019.40 


448.25 


3,468.05 


524.00 


105.40 


629.40 


746.15 


402.50 


1,149.05 


1,272.10 


428.35 


1,700.45 


1,495.50 


440.10 


1,936.00 




406.05 


406.05 


548.45 


558.15 


1,107.00 




364.25 


364.25 


2,323.45 


406.25 


2,730.10 


4,233.15 


185.20 


4,418.35 


2,708.20 


53.05 


2,761.25 


119,572.40 


44.05 


119,616.45 


175,289.20 


13,530.45 


188,820.05 



Page i/" 



Division of Air Service 



Table No. 3 
HOURS FLOWX OX \ARIOUS PHASES OF FLYING OPERATIONS 

1Q49-50 Total 



Fire Ranging (Detection and Supervision) 

Timber Management — - 

Fish and Wildlife 

Lands 

Commercial Flying 

Administration 



6,925.55 


6,925.55 


603.35 


603.35 


1,644.10 


1,644.10 


110.25 


110.25 


278.30 


278.30 


3,968.10 


3,968.10 


3,530.45 


13,530.45 



Table No. 4 

1924-49 

Passengers Carried 165,583 

Personnel Carried 89,206 

Total Passengers and Personnel Carried 254,789 

Effective Loads Flown, Lbs 54,467,067 

Effective Loads Flown, Tons 27,233 Tons 

1,067 Lbs. 



Table No. 5 
HOURS FLOWN AT BASES 1949-50 



1949-50 


TOT.^L 


30,687 


196,270 


5,918 


95,124 


36,605 


291,394 


7,964,076 


62,431,143 


3,982 Tons 


31,215 Tons 


76 Lbs. 


1,143 Lbs. 



Base Hours Flown 

Algonquin Park 568.45 

Biscotasing 419.25 

Caribou Lake 402.45 

Chapleau 447.50 

Eva Lake 482.35 

Fort Frances 255.35 

Geraldton 420.50 

Gogama 614.05 

Ignace 473.50 

Kenora 405.25 

Oba Lake 1063.45 

Orient Bay 639.50 

Pays Plat 405.00 



Base Hours Flown 

Parry Sound 406.10 

Pickle Lake _... 297.45 

Port Arthur _... 555.25 

Red Lake _ 420.20 

Remi Lake 359.25 

Sault Ste. Marie 1606.10 

Sioux Lookout 1063.30 

South Porcupine 502.35 

Sudbury 442.40 

Temagami 611.55 

Twin Lakes 313.15 

Toronto 351.55 



13,530.45 



Aircraft 



Table No. 6 
FLYING TIME— AIRCRAFT 

1Q24-49 1Q4Q-50 



Total 



Norseman 
CF-OBC . 
CF-OBD. 
CF-OBE 
CF-OBF 
CF-OBG 
CF-OBH . 
CF-OBI .. 
CF-OBL . 
CF-OBM 
CF-OBN. 
CF-OBO. 
CF-OBQ . 
rF-OMR 



1,377.30 


109.05 


1,486.35 


1,332.55 


419.45 


1,752.40 


1,368.55 


254.55 


1,623.50 


1,633.40 


71.15 


1,704.55 


1.4.58.20 


430.05 


1,868.25 


1,484.25 


427.05 


1,911.30 


1,286.25 


446.30 


1,732.55 


1,002.55 


325.55 


1,328.50 


950.55 


256.20 


1,207.15 


814.50 


406.45 


1,221.35 


700.50 


397.55 


1,098.45 


565.20 


502.55 


1,068.15 


6<0 50 


414.20 


1.C53.S0 



Continurd on Next Page. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 18 



Aircraft 


1024-40 


1949-50 


Total 


Beaver 

CF-OBS 

CF-OBT 


398.45 

300.05 

346.40 

591.10 

415.30 

293.35 

212.10 

46.55 

293.25 

135.30 

182.50 

170.25 

3.00 

3.20 

2.40 

156,386.05 


548.35 
380.15 
540.45 
148.05 
481.40 

65.15 
161.25 
467.20 

94.45 
279.45 

65.35 
358.40 
412.00 
618.00 
316.15 
274.55 
477.45 
269.45 
541.30 
364.55 
329.40 
338.25 
107.40 
223.00 
265.25 
370.25 
459.30 
106.40 


947.20 
680.20 


CF-OBU - 

CF-OBV 


887.25 
739.15 


CF-OBW 


897.10 


CF-OBX - 


358.50 


CF-OBY .- - - 


373.35 


CF-OBZ 


514.15 


CF-OCA 


388.10 


CF-OCB 


415.15 


CF-OCC 


248.25 


CF-OCD 


529.05 


CF-OCE - _.-. 


415.00 


CF-OCF 


621.20 


CF-OCG 


318.55 


CF-OCH 


274.55 


CF-OCI 


477.45 


CF-OCJ 


269.45 


CF-OCK _. 

CF-OCL 

CF-OCM 


541.30 
364.55 
329.40 


CF-OCN 


338.25 


CF-OCO 


107.40 


CF-OCP _ 

CF-OCQ 


223.00 
265.25 


CF-OCR 


370.25 


CF-OCS 


459.30 


CF-OCT 


106.40 


All Other Aircraft 

(104,323.28 + 52,062.37) 


156,386.05 


Total: 


174,378.35 


13,530.45 


187,909.20 



Table No. 7 
ALLOCATION OF AIRCRAFT— 1949-50 



base registration type 

Algonquin Park CF-OBY Beaver 

Biscotasing CF-OBH Norseman 

Caribou Lake CF-OBN Norseman 

Chapleau CF-OCA Beaver 

Eva Lake CF-OCJ Beaver 

Fort Frances CF-OBM Norseman 

Geraldton ...CF-OCB Beaver 

Gogama CF-OCS Beaver 

Ignace ...CF-OCI Beaver 

Kenora CF-OBO Norseman 

Oba Lake ......CF-OBU Beaver 

CF-OBS Beaver 

Orient Bay CF-OBL Norseman 

CF-OCM Beaver 

Pays Plat CF-OCH Beaver 

Parry Sound CF-OCE Beaver 



base registration tvpe 

Pickle Lake CF-OBE Norseman 

Port Arthur CF-OCK Beaver 

Red Lake CF-OBD Norseman 

Remi Lake CF-OCL Beaver 

Sault Ste. Marie CF-OBR Norseman 

CF-OBW Beaver 

CF-OBF Norseman 

Sioux Lookout CF-OBG Norseman 

CF-OBI Norseman 

CF-OCP Beaver 

South Porcupine ......CF-OBQ Norseman 

Sudbury CF-OCD Beaver 

Temagami CF-OCF Beaver 

Twin Lakes CF-OCG Beaver 

Toronto CF-OCT Beaver 



Page 19 



Division of Air Service 




Beaver aircraft on Opeongo Lake, Algonquin Park. 



Table No. 8 
TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT— EFFECTIVE LOADS CARRIED 1940-50 



Aircraft 



Hours 
Flown 



Norseman 

CF-OBC - - 109.05 



CF-OBD 
CF-OBE 
CF-OBF 
CF-OBG 
CF-OBH 



419.45 
254.55 
71.15 
430.05 
427.05 



CF-OBI 446.30 

CF-OBL 325.55 

CF-OBM 256.20 

CF-OBN 406.45 

CF-OBO 397.55 

CF-OBQ 502.55 

CF-OBR __ 414.20 

Beaver 

CF-OBS 548.35 

CF-OBT 380.1 5 

CF-OBU _ _ 540.45 

C V - O B V _ 1 48 .05 



Effective Loads 



49,190 Lbs.- 
179,960 Lbs.- 
123,393 Lbs.- 

26,250 Lbs.- 
337,386 Lbs.- 
359,631 Lbs.- 
306,014 Lbs.- 
276,925 Lbs.- 
287,175 Lbs.- 
290,870 Lbs.- 
228,980 Lbs.- 
320,530 Lbs.- 
289,085 Lbs.- 



- 24 Tons. 

- 89 Tons, 
-61 Tons, 

- 13 Tons, 
-168 Tons, 
-179 Tons, 
-153 Tons, 
-138 Tons, 
-143 Tons, 
-145 Tons, 
-114 Tons, 
-160 Tons, 
-144 Tons, 



1190 Lbs. 
19b0 Lbs. 
1393 Lbs. 

250 Lbs. 

1386 Lbs. 

1631 Lbs. 

14 Lbs. 

925 Lbs. 
1175 Lbs. 

870 Lbs. 

980 Lbs. 

530 Lbs. 
1085 Lbs. 



355,478 Lbs.— 177 Tons, 1478 Lbs. 

237,020 Lbs.— 118 Tons, 1020 Lbs. 

214,800 Lbs.— 107 Tons, 800 Lbs. 

26,375 Lbs.— 13 Tons. 375 Lbs. 



Continued on Next Page. 



Report of the Department oj Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 20 



Aircraft 



Hours 
Flown 



Effective Loads 



Beaver 

CF-OBW -. - - -- - - - 481 .40 

CF-OBX 65.15 

CF-OB Y - - - -- 161.25 

CF-OBZ -— 467.20 

CF-OCA - 94.45 

CF-OCB 279.45 

CF-OCC --- 65.35 

CF-OCD 35 8 .40 

CF-OCE .__ .-- 41 2 .00 

CF-OCF 618.00 

CF-OC G --- 316.15 

CF-OCH 274.55 

CF-OCI - 47 7.45 

CF-OCJ 269.45 

CF-OCK _...- 541.30 

CF-OCL _ 364.55 

CF-OCM .__.. ._ 329.40 

CF-OCN 338.25 

CF-OCO .._ 107 .40 

CF-OCP - -.. 2 23 .00 

CF-OCQ ..._ 265.25 

CF-OCR 370.25 

CF-OCS __._. 459.30 

CF-OCT 106.40 

Total Transport Section:— 

Total Flying Time, Hours - 

Total Loading, Lbs. 

Total Loading, Tons 



231,262 Lbs.- 

32,460 Lbs.- 

82,688 Lbs.- 

220,720 Lbs.- 

54,640 Lbs.- 

153,720 Lbs.- 

29,010 Lbs.- 

188,930 Lbs.- 

126,422 Lbs.- 

335,130 Lbs.- 

241,920 Lbs.- 

173,030 Lbs.- 

208,985 Lbs.- 

230,092 Lbs.- 

367,640 Lbs.- 

188,150 Lbs.- 

187,855 Lbs.- 

174,750 Lbs.- 

63,185 Lbs.- 

88,510 Lbs.- 

174,565 Lbs.- 

92,035 Lbs.- 

381,895 Lbs.- 

27,420 Lbs.- 



-115 Tons 

- 16 Tons 

- 41 Tons 
-110 Tons 
-27 Tons 

- 76 Tons 

- 14 Tons 

- 94 Tons 

- 63 Tons 
-167 Tons 
-120 Tons 

- 86 Tons 
-104 Tons 
-115 Tons 
-183 Tons 

- 94 Tons 

- 93 Tons 

- 87 Tons 

- 31 Tons 

- 44 Tons 

- 87 Tons 

- 46 Tons 
-190 Tons 

- 13 Tons 



1262 Lbs. 

460 Lbs. 

688 Lbs. 

720 Lbs. 

640 Lbs. 
1720 Lbs. 
1010 Lbs. 

930 Lbs. 

422 Lbs. 
1130 Lbs. 
1Q20 Lbs. 
1030 Lbs. 

985 Lbs. 

092 Lbs. 
1640 Lbs. 

150 Lbs. 
1855 Lbs. 

750 Lbs. 
1185 Lbs. 

510 Lbs. 

565 Lbs. 

035 Lbs. 
1895 Lbs. 
1420 Lbs. 



.13,530.45 

...7,964,076 

.3,982 Tons, 76 Lbs. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 21 



DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE 

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

General 

The moose season was closed as a result of findings of last year. Hunting 
pressure on deer continued to increase, though much of the increase this year was 
absorbed by the north-western part of the province. 

Upland game increased in all sections, though the European Hare population 
is still low. More generous open seasons were provided and a special feature was an 
open season on Hungarian Partridge in our six easternmost counties. These birds 
were very abundant. 

Fur bearing animals were generally in reasonable supply, and there was con- 
tinued progress in the establishment of trap-line management on both public and 
private lands. As a necessary preliminary to the establishment of trapping on a quota 
basis, the season on marten was closed generally and fisher closed north and west of 
North Bay. Over the whole far northern area the recent die-off of beaver produced 
a slightly lower crop, but the beaver harvest over the whole province remains high. 

The Division co-operated with the Wildlife Management Institute Pelee Island 
pheasant investigation and with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service on 
woodcock investigations. 

There were 41,823 pheasants distributed of which 5.666 were day-old chicks, 
35,199 poults and 958 adults. 



^nuex of- ^ able A 

Table No. Page 

1. Bear bounty for fiscal year 1949-50 ---------24 

2. Summary of breeding stock — licensed fur farms - - - - 26 

3. Comparative table showing annual wolf bounty statistics - 27 

4. Summary of wolves killed, counties and districts - - - - 27 

5. Wolf bounty for fiscal year 1949-50 ---------28 

6. Revenue received from export permits --------28 

7. Revenue received from t.\nners' permits -------29 

8. Summary of pelts exports and pelts tanned ------ 29 

9. Total value of pelts exported or tanned -------30 

10. Statement of ranch raised pelts exported or tanned - - - 30 

11. Details of officers responsible for seizures ------ 30 

12. Articles seized ----------------31 

13. Firearms seized ----------------31 

14. Pelts and hides seized -------------31 

15. Miscellaneous articles seized -----------31 

16. Informations ----------------31 

17. Results of prosecutions -------------32 

18. Convictions for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 - - - - 32 

19. Amounts realized from sale of articles ------- 34 

20. Sltmmary of fish distribution -----------36 

21. Comparative table showing distribution according to species 37 

22. Distribution by age groups ------------39 

23. Distribution of fish by species and hatcheries ----- 39 

24. Statistics of the fishing industry in the public waters of 
Ontario for year ending December 31, 1949 ------ 42 

25. Quantities of fish taken ------------42 

26. Comparative statement of the yield of the fisheries of 
Ontario by Lake ---------------44 

27. Comparative statement of the yield of the fisheries of 
Ontario ------------------44 



Page 23 Division of Fish and Wildlife 



ALGONQUIN PROVINCIAL PARK NATURALIST PROGRAM 

The season 1949-50 was the sixth for the Alsionquin Park Naturalist Program. 
Despite its similarity to programs in national and state parks in the L'nited States, 
it arose spontaneously, as a result of public demand. The program of the summer of 
1944 was organized by Prof. J. R. Dymond, of the L'niversity of Toronto, a summer 
resident of Smoke Lake, at the urgent request of the Department. It has since been 
expanded and organized to meet public needs. 

This year one nature trail was enlarged to make a total of three trails with 
labels identifying the plants, trees, shrubs and other points of nature interest. Accord- 
ing to actual count of nature trail registration. 6.440 Park visitors used the trails 
and there were many requests for more trails. 

The Park Naturalists gave 34 nature talks at the various hotels and lodges. 
These evening gatherings were attended by a total of 1.200 people. Coloured slides 
were used to illustrate the geography, history and purpose of the Park. Stress was 
laid upon the wildlife and its natural environment, and the interdependence of plants 
and animals. These points, as well as identification of the Park flora and fauna were 
again emphasized in the nature hikes. A total of 353 hikers attended the 26 conducted 
nature hikes. 

This year also saw the beginning of construction on the Park Museum of 
Natural History. When completed, this will serve as a focal point for the nature 
program. Here, on display, will be specimens and exhibits explaining the wildlife 
of the Park. With this in mind, a representative insect collection was started this 
year. In addition, collections representing the trees, shrubs, plants, and small mammals 
were made. A project was started to study the ecology of a typical bog lake. With 
the information and specimens gathered it is hoped that an exhibit can be built to 
show the history, flora, fauna and the importance of such a lake. 

To further the enjoyment and the education of the visitor, a pamphlet was 
written to describe the Park and the program. This was distributed at the Park 
entrances with the travel permits. 

In Algonquin Park, w'here conventional entertainment is at a minimum and 
where the emphasis is placed upon the natural environment, an interpretive service 
such as this is a step toward public education as a means of gaining public co-operation. 
Only through public contact on a popular level, can the work of management and 
research be brought to light and appreciated. It is recognized that an interest in 
natural history is an important incentiv^e in bringing people to Algonquin Park rather 
than to one of the many other places where outdoor recreation is available. 

BEAR BOUNTY 1949-1950 

Lender The Wolf and Bear Bountx- Act. 1946, a SIO.OO l)ount>- is [laid on any 
bear 12 months of age or over, and a $5.00 bounty is paid on any bear under 12 months 
of age. which has been killed between April 15th. and November 30th. in a township 
of which 25 'r of the total area is devoted to agriculture, and which is located in one 
of the counties or districts described in the Regulations. The Act further specifies that 
the bear must be killed in defence or preservation of livestock or property, by a bona 
fide resident of the township. 

The following is a comparative statement, showing the bear bounty statistics 
for a period of five years, ending with the fiscal year 1949-1950. 



Kcport of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 24 



PERIOD 


.■\DITLTS 


CUBS 


BOUNTY 


For year ending Mar. ,U, 1946 


1167 




.SI 1,330.00 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1947 


959 


73 


9,735.00 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1948 


509 


17 


5,095.00 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1949 ...._ 


592 


67 


6,035.00 


VoY year ending Mar. 31, 1950 


803 


122 


8,530.00 



It will be noted from the above table that the statistics for the last fiscal year, 
show a marked increase in the number of bears killed. This may indicate that the low 
period in the bear cycle, was reached in the fiscal year ending 1948. 

There were 750 claims for bounty involving 803 bears, and 122 bear cubs 
considered by the Department, of which. 1 1 claims representing 1 1 bears, were refused 
for various reasons. 

The following table shows the number of bears and cubs killed in each of the 
counties and districts on which applications for bounty were received. These figures 
do not include the bears hunted and killed by sportsmen, on which bounty is not 
applicable. T.^ble No. i 

BEAR BOUNTY FOR FISCAL YEAR 1949-1950 



County or 
District 



Be.ar 

12 months or over 



Cubs 
under 12 months 



Total 



Algoma 


63 


26 


89 


Bruce ... - — . 


8 


1 


9 


Cochrane 


179 


21 


200 


Frontenac _ _ 


3 




3 


Haliburton 


4 


3 


7 


Hastings 


28 


3 


31 


Kenora _. 


19 


4 


23 


Lennox and Addington... 


2 


2 


4 


Manitoulin 


S 


1 


6 


Muskoka 


9 




9 


Nipissing 


19 


4 


22, 


Parry Sound 


41 


3 


44 


Peterboro 


6 




6 


Rainy River 


70 


14 


84 


Renfrew 


26 


12 


38 


Sudbury 


51 


3 


54 


Timiskaming 


128 

142 


8 
17 


136 


Thunder Bay 


159 






Total: 


803 


122 


925 



FUR FARMING 1949 

During the first part of the calendar year 1949, the market for ranch raised 
mink pelts appears to have struck the low level on its gradual decline from the high 
wartime prices. These prices insofar as good quality standard mink were concerned, 
were slightly above the high cost of production. However, by fall, the market showed 
a steady improvement in demand and price levels, and ranchers once again received, 
for good quality pelts, prices reminiscent of wartime. 

Silver fox in all its phases, continued to bring prices well below production 
costs. The depressed fox market has been an asset in one sense, in that it has forced 
a general housecleaning in the fox industry which was long overdue. Many ranchers 
who raised inferior pelts have been forced out of the business, the remainder pelted 
out all but a nucleus of their finest breeding stock. These circumstances would indicate 
that only the finest pelts will be available when market conditions improve to the 



Page 25 



Division of Fish and Wildlife 




Moose calf (jemale), Faiponge Tup. Criiinulrr Buy). 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 26 



point where profit can be realized, which should put the fox industry on the soundest 
basis in its history. 

The unstable market in the first part of this year and the general condition of 
the industry resulted in a net decrease of 268 ranches in the Province. There was a 
total of 1,392 licences issued during the calendar year 1949. Of these. 1,274 were 
renewals of previous licences, 108 for newly established ranches and 10 licences were 
issued with retroactive provisions to legalize the operation of ranches during the 
previous year. Table No. 2 

SUMMARY OF BREEDING STOCK— LICENSED FUR FARMS 
JANUARY 1st 
1045 1046 1047 1048 1040 



Beaver 


44 


30 


45 


70 


71 


Fisher 


14 


35 


45 


46 


26 


Rliip Fox 


055 


1283 


1276 


1450 


385 


Cross Fox 


64 


47 


36 


22> 


11 


Pearl Platinum Fox — - 


* 


* 


378 


368 


565 


Platinum Fox 


1514 


2382 


3133 


2437 


1549 


Red Fox 


106 


110 


94 


38 


23 


Standard Silver Fox 


11238 


10772 


9400 


6654 


5016 


White Fox . 


* 


* 


5 


1 


4 


White Marked Fox. 


2629 


3115 


3179 


1600 


927 


Lynx 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Marten 


17 


16 


28 


35 


35 


Mink -_ 


.36012 


50677 


72992 


75192 


71130 




26 


2 


92 


65 


55 


Raccoon 


128 


130 


127 


97 


04 


Skunk „. 


1 


^ 


2 


1 1 


5 



*Sho'u.'n tinder allied types. 

The following table shows the location 
County or 
District 



bv 



.Mgoma .— . 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton ... 
Cochrane 
Dufferin ... 
Dundas . .. 
Durham .. 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 
Glengarry 
Grenville .. 

Grey 

Haldimand 
Halton .... 
Hastings .. 

Huron 

Kenora ... . 

Kent 

Lambton .. 
Lanark . .. 
Leeds 



Number 
17 


47 
14 

6 



County or District of licensed fur farms 1040. 
County or 
District Number 



Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka 



2 
13 
15 
19 
13 
3 
5 

79 

19 

31 

5 

40 

25 

27 

17 

48 

9 

5 

24 

14 

10 



Middlesex 

Xipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward .. 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Sudbury 

Timiskaming 

Thunder Bay 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 
Wentworth 
York 



Total 



43 
9 

9 
13 
28 
29 
20 
28 
SO 
13 
14 

3 
30 
43 

4 
90 

1 
23 

7 

104 

13 

35 

17 

37 

SI 

145 

1382 



Page 27 



Division of Fish and Wildlife 



WOLF BOUNTY 1949-1950 

In accordance with the provisions of The Wolf and Bear Bounty Act, 1946, 
a $25.00 bounty was paid on timber and brush wolves three months of age and over 
and a S5.00 bounty was paid on timber and brush wolves under three months of 
age. However, under an amendment to this Act. the bounty on wolf pups was 
increased from S5.00 to 515.00. effective June 7th. 1949. and all claims for bounty 
on wolf pups submitted on and after that date, were paid at the new rate. 

On wolves killed in provisional judicial districts, the Department pays the 
whole bounty, whereas on those killed in counties, the Department pays 40 'c of the 
bounty with the remaining 60'* being paid by the respective county. 

Table No. 3 
The following tabulation shows the annual wolf bounty statistics for a period 
of five vears: 



Period 



Timber 









Bounty and 


Bri'Sh 


Pups 


Total 


Expenses 


777 


,^0 


2,073 


S44,QQ9.87 


1.182 


42 


2,664 


SS9,275.18 


Q61 


74 


2,540 


S54,923.38 


1.062 


84 


2,727 


S57.977.00 


890 


41 


2.544 


S56.927.0O 



For year ending Mar. 31. 1946 1.266 

For year ending Mar. 31, 1947 1,440 

For year ending Mar. 31, 1948 1,515 

For year ending Mar. 31, 1949 1,581 

For vear ending Mar. 31. 1950 1.613 



During the 25-year-period from 1925 to March 31st. 1950. the Province has 
expended SI. 183.464.00 in bounty for the destruction of 65,972 wolves and 1.048 wolf 
pups. This figure does not include the monies expended by the counties on wolf 
bounty. 

In the period covered by this report, the Department considered 1,757 claims 
for bounty on 2.544 wolves. Of these, 24 claims on 30 wolves were refused for various 
reasons, principally because of the illegal use of snares during the deer season. 

The following is a computation of the bounty paid in counties and districts, 
and showing the bounty paid on wolf pups at the old and new rates. 



COUNTIES 

Timber— 27 @ SIO $ 270.00 

Brush— 328 @ $10 3,280.00 

Pups — 4 @ $2 8.00 

Pups— 9 @ S6 54.00 



DISTRICTS 

Timber— 1,563 @ $25 $39,075.00 

Brush— 555 @ $25 _ 13,875.00 

Pups— 7 @ S5 35.00 

Pups— 22 (2) SI 5 330.00 



Total 

Grand Total 



.$3,612.00 



Total 



-553,315.00 
S56.927.00 



Table No. 4 
The following is a summar}- of the number of wolves killed in each of the 
counties and districts, on which applications for bounty were submitted. 



County 


TrNfBER 


Brush 


Pups 


Tot.\l 


Bruce 
Carleton 

D u ff eri n 

Durham _ . 

Essex 


1 


5 

1 

10 

1 

10 

1 




5 

1 

10 

1 


Frontcnac 
Grenvilk- 


20 

1 



Continued on Sext Page. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 28 



CorxTv 


Timber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Grev 




10 
3 




10 


Halton 


3 


Hastings 


S 


32 




37 


Hu ron 




4 




4 


Lambton .-. 




5 




5 


Lanark . _. 




15 




IS 


Leeds -. 




12 


1 


13 


Lennox and Addinston 




4 




4 


Norfolk 




6 


7 


13 


Northumberland 


1 


24 
8 




24 


Ontario 


9 


Oxford _ 




' 




1 


Peel 


1 






1 


Peterboro 


1 


21 




22 


Renfrew .- 


ig 


44 


4 


67 


Simcoe .— . 




30 




30 


\'ictoria 


1 


44 


1 


46 


Welland 




6 




6 


Wellington — - 




4 




4 


Wentworth 




1 




1 


York - 




2 




2 


Total for Counties 


20 


,vV^ 


\^ 


;.75 




Tabl 


E No. 5 






WOLF 


BOUNTY FOR 


FISCAL YEAR 


1040-1050 




District 


Timber 


Brush 


Pups 


Total 


Algoma 


112 


70 


7 


189 


Cochrane .— 


43 


9 




52 


Haliburton 


8 


2 


7 


17 


Kenora 


557 


102 


3 


664 


Manitoulin 


19 


88 


5 


112 


Muskoka 


8 


10 




18 


Xipissing 


127 


7 




134 


Parrv Sound — - 


104 


11 




115 


Patricia 


40 


6 




46 


Rainy River 


158 


96 


4 


258 


Sudburv 


1C8 


97 




205 


Timiskaming 


37 






37 


Thunder Bav 


263 


59 




322 


Total Districts 


1,584 


557 


28 


2,169 


Total Counties 


29 


333 


13 


375 






Gr\vd Tot^l 


1.613 


1 890 


41 


2.544 







Table No. 6 

REYENUE RECEIYED FROM EXPORT PERMITS 

APRIL 1st, 1949, TO MARCH 31st, 1950 



total amount 


tot.^l amount 


OF pelts 


OF REVENUE 


65,600 


§131,200.00 


454 


681.00 


231 


162.50 


7,845 


784.50 


27 


34.50 


62 


93.00 


2 


1.00 


,^^01 


586.50 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black). 

Fox (White) 

Fox (not specified)..... 
Lynx 



Continued on \ext Page. 



Page 29 



Division of Fish and Wildlife 



TOTAL AMOUXT 
OF PELTS 



TOTAL AMOUNT 
OF REVEXUE 



Marten 

Mink 

Muskrats .. 

Otter 

Raccoon- 
Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine. 



TdiAi Revenue.. 



393 

41,712 

555,804 

5,152 

7,790 

5,856 

67,052 



393.00 

20,856.00 

55,580.40 

5,152.00 

779.00 

292.80 

3,332.60 



$219,928.80 



Table No. 7 

REVENUE RECEIVED FROM TANNERS' PERMITS 

APRIL 1st, 1049, TO MARCH 31st, 1950 

TOTAL AMOUNT 
OF PELTS 



TOTAL AMOUNT 
OF REVEXUE 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black). ._ 

Fox (White) 

Fox (not specified) 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink _. 

M uskr ats 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 



T'iTAL Revenue 




256.00 
33.00 
57.50 

278.10 

40.50 

2.00 

24.00 

14.00 

345.50 

16,813.20 

79.00 

106.00 

10.30 

15.05 

.80 



Table No. 8 
SUMMARY 

PELTS 
EXPORTED 



PELTS 
TANNED 



TOTAL 
PELTS 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black). 

Fox (White) 

Fox (not specified) 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrats 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 



65,600 

454 

231 

7.845 

27 

62 

2 

391 

393 

41,712 

555,804 

5,152 

7,790 

5,856 

67.052 



128 

22 

S3 

2,781 

30 

4 

16 

14 

691 

168,132 

79 

1,060 

206 

.^01 



65,728 

476 

284 

10,626 

57 

66 

2 

407 

407 

42,403 

723,936 

5,231 

8,850 

6,062 

67.353 



Revenue received from Export Permits 
Revenue received from Tanners Permits 
Total Revenue 



$219,948.80 

18,074.95 

$238,023.75 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 30 



Table No. Q 

TOTAL VALUE OF PELTS EXPORTED OR TANNED 

DURING THE YEAR ENDLNG MARCH 31st, 1Q50 



PELTS 
EXPORTED 



PELTS 
TANNED 



TOTAL 
PELTS 



VALUE OF 
PELTS 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red)__ 

Fox (Silver or Black). 

Fox (White) 

Fox (not specified)— .- 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrats 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel .— _. 

Wolverine 



65,600 


128 


65,728 


$1,311,273.60 


454 


22 


476 


16,360.12 


231 


53 


284 


582.20 


7,845 


2,781 


10,626 


8,288.28 


27 


30 


57 


329.60 


62 


4 


66 


516.78 


2 




2 


1.56 


391 


16 


407 


3,101.34 


393 


14 


407 


7,448.10 


41,712 


691 


42,403 


1,219,934.31 


555,804 


168.132 


723,936 


1,476,829.44 


5,152 


79 


5,231 


111,263.37 


7,790 


1,060 


8,850 


11,505.00 


5,856 


206 


6,062 


3,394.72 


67,052 


301 


67,353 


77,455.95 




2 


2 


13.00 


758,371 


173,519 


031,890 


?4,248,297.37 



Table No. 10 

STATEMENT OF RANCH RAISED PELTS EXPORTED OR 

TANNED FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31st, 1950 

E.XPORTED T.\NNED TOTAL PELTS 



Fox (Blue) 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 
Mink... 



456 

13,072 
137,172 



4 

2 

1,857 

6,341 



150,708 



8,204 



460 

10 

14,929 

143,513 



158,912 



2,911.80 

20.50 

170,339.89 

1,991,960.44 



.$2,165,232.63 



ENFORCEMENT 
A staff of some two hundred conservation officers patrol the province to insure 
enforcement of the Game and Fisheries Act. the Special Fishery Regulations and the 
Migratory Birds Convention Act. These officers are under the direct control of the 
District Foresters in their respective areas, and are assisted by the Ontario Provincial 
Police, Royal Canadian Mounted Police and deputy game wardens appointed from 
interested sportsmen. The following details show some results of their activities. 

Seizures 

During the annual period April 1, 1949 to March 31, 1950. there was a total 
of 2.697 cases in which equipment was seized due to the fact that it was being used in 
various ways which constituted infractions of the legislation and regulations. 

Table No. 11 
Details of the officers who were responsible for these seizures are as follows, viz: — 



Conservation Officers 

Provincial Police Constables 

Deputy Game Wardens 

Joint Action: 

Conservation Ofticers and O.P.P. .... 
Conservation Officers and D.G.W. .. 
Conservation Officers and R.C.M.P. 



61 

299 

1 



2,315 cases 

12 cases 

9 cases 



361 cases 
2,697 cases 



Page 31 



Division of Fish and Wildlife 



In 166 of these cases the seizures were made from unknown persons, principally 
traps and fishing gear which were set in an unlawful manner, and in which cases it 
was impossible for the officers concerned to develop definite evidence regarding the 
ownership of the articles. The equipment seized in these cases was confiscated to the 
Crown. -p^gLE No. 12 

The articles seized in these 2.697 cases included: 



Game animals (or portions) 
and birds — - 184 cases 



Firearms 

Fish 

Nets and fishing gear 

.Angling equipment, including 

tackle boxes 

Spears 

Further details concerning 



1.434 cases 

475 cases 

166 cases 

422 cases 

76 cases 



Pelts and hides 

Traps and snares 

Water craft 

Outboard motors 

Motor vehicles 

Artificial lights 

Miscellaneous articles 



.22 calibre rifles 

High-power rifles 

Shotguns 

Combination rifles and shotguns 



Bear 

Beaver . .. 

Fisher 

Fo.x, red .. 
Fox, silver 
Marten .._ 
Mink ..... 



these various seizures are enumerated in the foUowini 

Table No. 13 
FIREARMS 
691 cases Revolvers and pistols 



179 cases 

551 cases 

6 cases 



.\ir rifles 



1.879 cases 
135 cases 
28 cases 
12 cases 
11 cases 
42 cases 
85 pieces 

; tables: 



3 cases 

4 cases 



1.434 cases 



T.ABLE Xo. 14 
PELTS AND HIDES 



1 
261 

4 
18 

1 

4 
72 



Muskrat 
Otter ..... 
Raccoon 
Squirrels 
Weasels 
Wolves . 



T.ABLE No. 15 
MISCELLANEOUS ARTICLES 



Packsacks and haversacks 

Axes 

Hunting Knives 

Snaggers 

Creels 

Minnow pails and traps 

Tip-ups 

Ice Chisels 

.\nchors 



20 
5 
2 

16 
2 
4 
3 
7 
1 



Dynamite (Sticks) 
Storage Batteries ... 

Gaff Hooks 

Oars (Pair) 

Skis (Pair) 

Suitcases 

Dogs - 



.1,227 
6 
. 10 
. 151 
. 121 
3 

1,879 



10 
S 
5 
1 
1 
1 
2 

85 



Prosecutions 

The information contained in the following statistical tables emphasizes one 
phase of enforcement and the necessity for the maintenance of a capable and efficient 
staff to perform these duties. 

Table No. 16 
LXFORM.JiTIONS 

SEIZURES IVVESTIOATIOXS TOTAI 



Conservation Officers 

Provincial Police 



2,644 
12 



290 



200 



2.934 
12 

To4(r 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 32 



Table No. 17 
RESULTS OF PROSECUTION 





CONVICTIONS 


DISMISSED 


WITHDRAWN 


TOTAL 


Conservation Officers 

Provincial Police 


2,692 
12 


102 


140 


2,934 
12 




2,704 


102 


140 


2,946 



Table No. 18 



CONVICTIONS FOR FISCAL 

Angling without non-resident licences — 188 
Exporting over limit, or undersized fish, 

or without coupons 45 

Angling with more than one line 22 

Fishing other than by angling 1S8 

Illegal possession of gill nets 42 

Taking undersized or over limit of fish 168 

Illegal possession of fish in closed season 224 

Setting nets in restricted areas _ 9 

Taking fish by use of artificial lights 16 

Angling in restricted waters 27 

Guiding without licence and violation of 

condition of guide's licence 18 

Hunting without licence 637 

Hunting in closed season 80 

Hunting in prohibited hours 141 

Hunting deer without licenced guides, 

Kenora and Rainy River districts 9 

Hunting with unplugged shotguns 113 

Huntings ducks from a power boat 6 

Jacklighting deer 20 

Illegal possession of game in closed season 128 

Commercial fishing without licences 14 

Filleting fish for export 2 

Allow fish or game to spoil _ S 

Pollution of waters -— 1 

Illegal possession of female deer or fawn. 13 

Trespassing 5 

Killing moose in closed season 12 

Illegal possession of bull frogs 7 

•Antedating licences S 

Transporting unsealed deer 13 

Keeping animals in captivity without 

licence 1 



YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1950 

Setting snares 2 

Transferring hunting or fishing licences.— 11 

Loaded firearms in motor vehicles 164 

Illegal possession of firearms in Crown 

Game Preserves or Provincial Parks ... 88 
Illegal possession of firearms in lumber 

and mining camps, etc. 42 

Firearms not encased or dismantled at 

night 7 

Shooting across highways or from motor 

cars 13 

Allow dogs to run at large 20 

Hunting with unlicenced dogs 2 

Hunting migratory birds and pheasants 

with rifle 21 

Obstructing an officer 1.^ 

Taking hen pheasants 3 

Killing wild native birds 6 

Trapping without licence 68 

Illegal possession of furs 74 

Trapping during closed season 10 

Set traps in muskrat and beaver houses .. 8 
Trap in Game Preserves and Provincial 

Parks 3 

Operating Tourist Outfitters' Camps 

without licences 9 

Violation of condition of fur buyers' 

licence 2 

Importing live minnows 2 

Operating fur farms without licences 2 

Failure to make fur dealers' returns 1 

Breaking beaver dams 2 

Setting nets without tags or buoys 2 

2,704 



Charges were laid against violators in a total of 2,946 cases in which infrac- 
tions of the legislation and regulations it is our duty to enforce had either been wit- 
nessed or disclosed upon investigation. 

In 2,704 cases convictions were registered. Charges were dismissed in 102 
cases. Charges were withdrawn in 140 cases for various reasons such as where two 
or more charges were originally laid against an individual, or for lack of supporting 
evidence when the case was further investigated 

Many violations were of an extremely important nature, such as: 

Illegal taking and possession of beaver 

Unlawful hunting and trapping in Crown Game Preserves and Provincial Parks 



Page 33 



Division of Fish and Wildlife 







CormuiLLnt t\,< dipping operation — Fish and Wildlife specialist \fil Mc.Wiui^liton {in uniform] 
assisted by Major C. E. Sinclair, Parry Sound. 



Assaultin.s; and obstructing officers 

Illegal killing of cow moose 

Jacklighting deer 

Possession of gill nets without proper authority 

Operating gill nets without a licence 

Hunting in closed season. 



General 

The Game and Fisheries Act provides that articles "used in violation of this 
Act and found in the possession of any person suspected of having committed an offence 
against this Act shall be seized, and upon conviction, be forfeited to and become the 
property of the Crown in the right of Ontario and sold by the Department." 

In many cases where the offences were of a minor character, the jiersons from 
whom seizures were made were given an opportunity to redeem the articles seized u[-)on 
payment of a specified fee fi.xed by the Department. This arrangement applies prin- 
cipally to firearms and fhshing tackle. The amount realized from such .sales amounted 
to $5,319.80. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 34 



There are also many cases which are sufficiently serious to warrant definite 
confiscation to the Crown. Such articles are disposed of in annual public sales. 

Table No. 19 

Three such sales were conducted by the Department during the period under 
review, as follows: 

May fishing tackle sale $ 807.56 

June fur sale, confiscated furs 2,457.45 

October sale of firearms and miscellaneous equipment 3,788.26 



Total $7,053.27 

During the period under review Conservation Officers in the course of their 
operations, and in addition to many other duties, performed the following services: 

1. Seized equipment in 2,697 cases, 166 of which covered unknown persons. 

2. Prosecuted some 2,934 cases and obtained convictions in 2,692 cases. 

3. Obtained fines totalling $47,854. 

4. Realized $12,373.77 from the sale of confiscated articles. 

5. Aided in distribution of millions of fish and the re-stocking of thousands of 
pheasants. 

6. Spent a great deal of time, after hours, working with organized groups in the 
interest of conservation. 



GAME FISH SECTION 

Hatcheries and Rearing Stations 

Excellent progress was made in the culture and distribution of the various 
species of both commercial and game fish which were reared in 27 provincial hatcheries 
this year. The total output of fish was in excess of any yearly distribution since 1943. 

It is of particular interest that 37.550 maskinonge fingerlings, ranging in size 
from 2" to 7", were distributed to suitable waters. This number is greater than that 
of any previous distribution and followed special investigation of waters to insure for 
the species a high degree of suitability. 

Another important item was the re-stocking of Trout Lake, in Widdifield 
Township, District of Xipissing, with 800 Ouananiche fingerlings. These were the 
result of spawn-taking operations on this lake in the autumn of the previous year. 
The breeding stock has resulted from Ouananiche yearlings which the former Depart- 
ment of Game and Fisheries originally planted in Trout Lake in 1935. 

Pembroke Trout Rearing Station was closed during the year so that extensive 
repairs and alterations could be made in order to increase the efficiency of the 
hatchery. 



Page 35 Division of Fish and Wildlife 



Biological Projects 

The biological projects undertaken during the year, consisted of the following: 
bass harvesting, sea lamprey control, Atlantic salmon experiments, controlled poisoning 
of a lake containing undesirable species of fish to determine the possibility of establish- 
ing desirable species, creel census studies, fish tagging and biological surveys of lakes 
and streams. 

Bass Harvesting 

During the summer months, adult smallmouth bass and largemouth bass were 
harvested from the following lakes and distributed to suitable waters: Barton, Bastedo, 
Cat. Davern, Fox, Little Gull. Little Silver, O'Reilly and Shoepac. 

Sea Lamprey Control 

Operations for the control of sea lamprey were continued. A number of weirs 
were set in selected streams flowing into the North Channel. ^Nlany other locations 
are being studied to determine their suitability for lamprey control operations. 

Removal of Coarse Fish 

Xets were operated on the following waters for the removal of undesirable 
species: Bark Lake, Emily Creek. Kamaniskeg Lake, Xonquon River, Scugog Lake, 
Twenty-Minute Lake and Wolfe Lake. 

Atlantic Salmon Experiment 

Studies relating to the re-establishment of the Atlantic salmon in Lake Ontario 
were continued in Duffin Creek at Pickering. 

Fish Poisoning 

In Silver Lake at Port Dover, the coarse fish were removed by poisoning, and 
yellow pickerel fry were planted. This plan seemed to offer considerable prospect for 
the production of fingerling pickerel. 

Creel Census Studies 

Creel census studies were conducted on a number of waters to determine the 
proportion of hatchery-reared trout in the angler's catch. This project included waters 
in the district of Thunder Bay and Algoma. and in the counties of Bruce, Grey, 
V'ictoria, Peterborough and Haliburton. 

Fish Tagging 

Six hundred yellow pickerel were tagged at the outlets of the Moon, Shawanaga 
and French rivers to determine the facts regarding the movements of this species and 
its availability to the anglers and commercial fishermen. 

The program, initiated last year, of tagging smallmouth bass in Georgian 
Bay, was continued and 250 additional smallmouth bass were tagged. 

Biological Surveys 

A long term project is being conducted on Long Point Bay, Lake Erie, to 
determine the relationshop of commercial fishing to angling. 

Investigations of a biological nature were made on a number of lakes and 
streams, with a view to the establishment of a sound fish-management plan. These 
were either initial surveys or extensions of previous ones. The waters studied were 
as follows : 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 36 



Algoma 

Burtt Lake 
Cataract Lake 
Conacher Lake 
Dubourne Lake 
Frobel Lake 
Heron Lake 
Jimmy Lake 
Lauzon Lake 
Pistol Lake 
Pot Lake 
Skull Lake 
Wigwam Lake 

Brant 

Blue Lake 
Pinehurst Lake 
Scotland Pond 

Bruce 

Gillies Lake 

Grey 

Eugenia Pond 
Gully Creek 
Little Lake 
Mad River 
Priddle Creek 

Huron 
Naeftel's Creek 
Rau's Creek 

Kenora 

Broadtail Lake 
Eagle Lake 
Fox Lake 
Gun Lake 
Indian Lake 
Malachi Lake 
Nixon Lake 



Otter Lake 
Pelican-pouch Lake 
Rice Lake 
Twin Lake 
Upper Manitou Lake 
Winnipeg River 

MUSKOKA 

Oxtongue Lake 
Pine Lake 

South Muskoka River 
Torrance Lake 

NiPISSING 

Bass Lake 
Emerald Lake 
Gravel-pit Lake 
Herridge Lake 
James Lake 
Kanichee Lake 
Pleasant Lake 
Twenty-minute Lake 
Whitney Lake 
Wickstead Lake 

Northumberland 
Healey Falls 

Ontario 

Frenchman's Bay 
Scugog Lake 

Parry Sound 

Bernard Lake 
Cecebe Lake 
French River 
Gull Wing Lake 
Memesagamesing Lake 
Pickerel River 

Peel 

Credit River 



Peterboro 

Pigeon Lake 
Trent Canals 

SiMCOE 

Beckwith Island Area 
Christian Island Area 
Honey Harbour 
McDonald Bay 
McRae Lake 
Nottawasaga River 
Severn River 
Simcoe Lake 
Wasdell Falls 
Waubaushene Bay 

Sudbury 

Ice Lake 
Lily Lake 
Silver Lake 
Tobacco Lake 
Wanapitei Lake 

Thunder Bay 

Arrow Bay 
Bass Lake 
Greenwater Lake 
Jack Lake 
Jill Lake 
Kama Lake 
Mignet Lake 
Pickerel Lake 
Ravine Lake 
Rita Lake 
Sandy Lake 
Shebandowan Lake 
Shelter Lake 
Whitefish Lake 

Waterloo 

Gingrich Creek 

York 

Cook Bay 

Holland River and Marsh 

Humber River 






Table No. 20 

SUMMARY OF FISH DISTRIBUTION 

For Fiscal Year April 1st, 1949, TO MARCH 31st, 19S0 



Herring _. -- -- 8,400,000 

Whitefish 245,150,000 

Pickerel _ 312,900,000 

Maskinonge 2,787,550 

Bass— Smallmouth 1,937,329 

Bass — Largemouth 565,749 

Atlantic Salmon 112,000 



Lake Trout 

Speckled Trout . 
Brown Trout — - 
Kamloops Trout 
Ouananiche 



6,642,900 

4,431,671 

406,800 

34,000 

800 



Total 583,368,799 



Page 37 



Division of Fish and Wildlife 



Table No. 21 
COMPARATIVE TABLE SHOWING DISTRIBUTION ACCORDING TO SPECIES 



1045 



1046 



Smallmouth Bass 

Fry - 

Finperlings 

Yearlings and Adults.. 

Largemouth Bass 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings and Adults 



Maskinonge 
Fry 

Fingerlings 
Adults 



Perch 
Fry..... 

Pickerel 
Frv 



Brown Trout 
Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Lake Trout 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Rainbow Trout 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Kamloops Trout 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Adults 



Speckled Trout 
Fry 

Fingerlings. 

Yearlings 

Adults 



Whitefish 
Fry 

Herring 
Fry 

Minnows 

Adults . 



Atlantic Salmon 
Fingerlings .... 



Ouananiche 
Fingerlings 

TiJi \i s 



448,000 

348,368 

5,322 



5,000 



2,030,000 
20O 



12,000,000 

177,595,000 

50,000 
224,749 

765,000 

7,248,040 

88,700 

5,563 

9,900 

5,000 

117,300 

3,005,573 

4,460 

240,786,775 

6,405,000 

4,000 

41,350 



385,000 

312,710 

4,418 



9,500 
27 

1,150,000 
6,875 



20,450,000 
142,485,000 



133,025 
268.940 

2,265,000 

3,609,195 

28,045 



1,610 



4,850 

50,000 

84,730 

2,760,780 

8,656 

205,590,000 

69,974,000 



88,210 



1947 



4,>1. 103.300 I 449.270,571 535,774,812 



1,457,000 

579,925 

5,099 

305,000 

6,100 

876 

2,790,000 

11,540 

127 

12,000,000 

254,030,000 



375,850 



3,467,645 
89,050 

3,850 



16,100 
115 



517,400 

2,802,150 

1,860 

233,316,125 

23,940,000 



59,000 



1948 



1,402,500 

554,900 

3,459 

410,000 
300 
789 

3,135,000 

24,600 

195 



267,170,000 

9,000 
557,505 
350,113 

1,000,000 

4,858,300 

77,055 

27,900 
8,350 



4,600 
100 

1,000 

882,450 

2,333,910 

5,270 

243,482,000 

20,375.000 



101,400 



546,775,696 



1949 



1,532,500 

398,100 

6,729 

550,000 

15,500 

249 

2,750,000 

37,550 

6,729 



312,900,000 

10,000 

175,000 
221,800 

1,000,000 

5,561,700 

81,200 



2,000 
32,000 



16,000 
1,475.300 

2,938,325 
2,046 

245,150,000 

8,400,000 



112.000 



800 



583,368,799 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 38 




Julian Kenny checking fish food supply in sample taken from lake bottom. 



Page 39 



Di vi sio It of Fish and Wildlife 



Table No. 22 
DISTRIBUTIOX BY AGE GROUPS— 1949 



SPECIES 


FRY 


FIXGERLINGS 


YEARLINGS 


ADULTS 


TOTAL 


Herring 


8,400,000 








8,400,000 


VVhitefish 


245,150,000 








245,150,000 


Pickerel 


312,900,000 









312,900,000 


Maskinonge 


2,750,000 


37,550 






2,787,550 


Bass — Smallmouth 


1,532,500 


398,100 




6,729 


1,937,329 


Bass — Largemouth 


550,000 


15,500 




249 


565,749 


Atlantic Salmon _.. 




112,000 






112.000 


Lake Trout 


1,000,000 


5,561,700 


81.200 




6,642,900 


Speckled Trout 


16,000 


1,475,300 


2,938,325 


2,046 


4,431.671 


Brown Trout 


10,000 


175,000 


221,800 




406,800 


Kamloops Trout 




2,000 


32,000 




34,000 


Ouananiche _ - -. 




800 






800 






Totals „- 


572,308,500 


7,777,950 


3,273,325 


9,024 


583,368,799 



Table No. 2i 
DISTRIBUTIOX OF FISH BY SPECIES AND HATCHERIES 

Aprll 1st, 1949, TO March 31st, 1950 



WHITEFISH 



PICKEREL 



hatchery 



Collingwood 

Fort Frances 

Kenora 

Kingsville 

Little Current .„. 

Normandale 

Port Arthur 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie 
Tot.u.,... 



33,600.000 
13.100.000 
28.850,000 
64.500,000 
42.500,000 
31,600,000 
700,000 
26.500,000 
3,800,000 



245.150.000 



hatchery 

Collingwood 

Fort Frances — . 

Glenora 

Kenora 

Kingsville 

Little Current ... 

Pembroke 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Skeleton Lake... 

TOT.AL .... 



HERRING 



FRY 



39.900,000 
26,300,000 
38.750,000 
49.900.000 
56,000,000 
44.100,000 
9.700,000 
7,350,000 
20.900,000 
20,000,000 



312,000.000 



ilxtchery 

Collingwood -. 

Kingsville 

Little Current 
Normandale .. 

TdTAL 



2,100.000 

300.000 

3,500.000 

2,500,000 



S.400,000 



BROWN TROUT 



hatchery 


EGGS 


FIXGERLINGS 


YEARLINGS 


TOTAL 


Chatsworth 






69,500 


69.500 


Codrington _ 






67,900 


67,900 


Glenora _ 




75,000 




75,000 


Ingersoll 






51.400 


51,400 


Mount Pleasant 






33,000 


33,000 


Normandale 


10,000 


100,000 




110,000 


TciTAI. 


10,000 


175.000 


221,800 


406.800 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 40 



MASKINONGE 



HATCHERY 


FRY 


FINGERLINGS 


TOTAL 


Deer Lake 


2,750,000 


37,550 


2,787,550 





LAKE 


TROUT 






HATCHERY 


FRY 


FINGERLINGS 


YEARLINGS 


TOTAL 


Chatsworth 

Fort Frances 

Glenora .- 

Hills Lake 


1,000,000 


20,000 

51,000 

142,000 

114,500 

2,674,000 
781,200 
299,000 

1,480,000 


12,500 

60,300 
8,400 


32,500 

51,000 

142,000 

60,300 


Kenora 

North Bay 


114,500 
8,400 


Port Arthur.... 


2,674,000 


Sault Ste. Marie 

Southampton 

Wiarton 


1,781,200 

299,000 

1,480,000 


Total 


1,000,000 


5,561,700 


81,200 


6,642,900 



SMALLMOUTH BASS 



HATCHERY 


FRY 


FINGERLINGS 


ADULTS 


TOTALS 


Miscellaneous ._ 

Mount Pleasant.... 


1,300,000 
232,500 


19,000 
157,600 

41,700 
179,800 


5,737 
240 
125 
275 
352 


5,737 
1,319,240 


Sandfield 

Skeleton Lake 

White Lake 


157,725 

41,975 

412,652 


Total 


1,532,500 


398.100 


6.729 


1,937.329 









LARGEMOUTH BASS 



HATCHERY 


FRY 


FINGERLINGS 


adults 


totals 


Miscellaneous 

Mount Pleasant 


550,000 


15,500 


172 
77 


172 
565,577 






Total 


550,000 


15.500 


249 


565,749 



SPECKLED TROUT 



HATCHERY 


EGGS AND FRY' 


FINGERLINGS 


YEARLINGS 


ADULTS 


TOTAL 


Chatsworth 




500 


316,600 




317,100 


Codrington 




55,000 


65,600 




120,600 


Deer Lake 






39,625 




39,625 


Dorion 




452,100 






452,100 


Glenora 




382,000 






382,000 


Hill Lake 




87,000 
77,900 


258,400 


11 


345,011 


Ken ra 


77,900 


Midhurst 


1,000 


■ - - 


72,700 
113,900 


780 


72,700 


M ou nt P leasant 


115,680 


Normandale 




4,000 


75,800 




79,800 


North Bay.. 






255,100 


85 


255,185 


Pembroke 




4,500 


2,900 




7,400 


Sandfield 






750,500 




750,500 


Sault Ste. Marie 


15,000 


412,300 


534,700 


1,170 


965,170 


Skeleton Lake 






278,100 




278,100 


White Lake.. . 






174,400 




174,400 


Total 


16.000 


1,475,300 


2,938.325 


2,046 


4,431,671 



Page 41 Division of Fish and Wildlife 



KAMLOOPS TROUT 


HATCHERY 


FINGERLIXGS YEARLINGS 


TOTAL 


Xormandale 


2,000 32,000 


34,000 



OUAXAXICHE 



HATCHERY 


FIXGERLIXGS 


Xorth Bay 


800 





ATLAXTIC 


SALMOX 


HATCHERY 




1 FINGERLINGS 


Glenora .. 


112,000 







com:\iercial fishing 

Commercial fishing licences issued for Ontario waters in 1949 totalled 2.675 
and the industry employed some 3.930 persons. The principal gear fished was gill 
nets and there were 1.071 gill net licences issued. The main areas for pound net fishing 
were Lakes Erie, St. Clair and Rainy Lake and the total of all pound net licences for 
Ontario was 183. Hoop net licences issued totalled 275, and the majority were issued 
for eastern Lake Ontario, the waters of the Rideau system, in south-eastern Ontario 
and Lake of the Woods in the Kenora district. Other commercial fishing licences 
issued included — seines for coarse fish; separate baited hook licences for sturgeon. 
lake trout, catfish and bullheads; and 710 commercial minnow licences. 

The harvest of commercial fish for the calendar year ending December 31. 1949 
was 34.061.361 lbs. and the landed value of this catch amounted to S5.496.836.88. The 
1949 production is an increase of 5.119.570 lbs. or 17.7' r over the yield of 1948. 

This 1949 production was the highest since 1945 when the catch reached 34^:; 
million. The principal factor which brought about this highest catch over the past four 
years, may be attributed to the harvest of the blue pickerel (blue pike-perch) which 
for 1949 was 9,830.912 lbs. This in an increase of this species of some 4.046.772 lbs. 
or 69.9 'f over the previous year. 

The blue pickerel population of Lake Erie produces the bulk of the provincial 
yield of this species and the production for Lake Erie blue pickerel for 1949 was 
9,783.819, which is an increa.se of 70.4',/ or 4.041.622 pounds over 1948. 

The blue pickerel in Lake Erie, as a general rule, appear in large numbers 
every four to five years, thus the large yield of this species, in all probability, came 
from the 1944 hatch. The previous peak production years were in 1943. 44 and 45. 
From catch data available it would therefore seem reasonable to assume that the 
harvest of blue pickerel in Lake Erie will drop considerably after 1950. Two other 
species, although not as significant as the blue pickerel, contributed somewhat to 
the overall increase in production for 1949. These were whitefish and yellow pickerel, 
both with an increase of approximately ' j million ])i)unds respectively over the 1948 
yield. 

Only two .species, lake herring and lake trout, showed any marked decrease in 
catch over the previous year. The peak of the lake herring harvest in recent years 
was reached in period 1945-47 and a decrease was anticipated in the yield of this 
species. Lake trout, which has shown an alarming drop in the provincial annual yield 



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Page 43 Division of Fish and Wildlife 



for a number of years, has again decreased in production over the previous year. 
This decrease amounted to 86,331 lbs. and the lower yield of lake trout in Lakes 
Superior and Ontario and in northern inland waters accounted for this. Lake Huron 
lake trout harvest is again insignificant. This once great lake trout area, which in 
1936, the last good production year, yielded over 2 million pounds, produced in 1949 
only 3.207 lbs 

Lake Erie. Georgian Bay and northern inland waters all had a substantial 
increase in total catch for 1949 over the previous year. Lake Erie had an overall 
increase of 4,166,686 lbs. due to the large yield of blue pickerel. Georgian Bay 
produced an overall increase of 650.087 lbs., attributable mainly to a larger catch of 
whitefish. The whitefish in Georgian Bay showed a steady decline from 1939 to 1947. 
decreasing from a catch of over one million pounds and reaching its lowest production 
of 87,316 lbs. in 1947. The prospects of an increased yield in whitefish in Georgian 
Bay appeared evident in that 1948 showed a substantial gain over the low catch of 
1947 and again in 1949 the yield of whitefish in Georgian Bay reached 804.947 lbs. 
which is the highest catch since 1940. 

A general increase in production for all species in the commercial catch was 
recorded for northern inland waters. The gain amounted to some 624.764 lbs. and 
was attributed to a slight increase in whitefish. northern pike, yellow pickerel and 
tullibee. 



DEVELOPMENTS IX THE FISHING INDUSTRY 

Nylon Nets 

The introduction of the use of nylon twine in gill net fishing in the Great 
Lakes has brought about a very definite improvement, according to the fishermen, in 
netting fish. Many of the gill netters of Lake Erie in the past year have replaced their 
cotton and linen twine with nylon and reports from these fishermen indicate, in some 
instances, that the nylon net may be as much as three times as efficient as either cotton 
or linen twine. 

Trap Nets 

The pound net fishing industry of Lake Erie is also looking for improvement in 
fishing methods through a more efficient and economical type of gear. During the 
past year a few of the pound netters have replaced some of their pound nets with 
trap nets on an experimental basis for the purpose of obtaining some definite data 
as to the efficiency of trap nets as compared to pound nets. 

INVESTIGATIONS 

Lake Trout Baited Hook Licences 

Investigations were continued in connection with the baited hook licences in 
the Georgian Bay area. This investigation has been conducted during the summer 
months of 1948 and 1949 and additional work is to be carried on next vear as well. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 44 



Pollution 

Investigations of the following lakes and streams were made to evaluate the 
effects of domestic and industrial wastes on fisheries, and to indicate corrective control 
measures which would be beneficial in obtaining desirable water quality objectives. 



Period: April 1, 1949, to March 

31, 1950. 
Location 

Balmer Creek at Red Lake. 
Beardmore Creek at Acton. 
Burnt River at Kinmount. 
Credit River at Port Credit. 
Duffin's Creek at Ajax. 
Effingham Stream in Welland 

County. 



Gingrich Creek in Waterloo 

County. 
Humber River at Woodbridge. 
Lake Nipigon in Orient Bay. 
Leskard in Durham County. 
Lynn River at Simcoe. 
McGregor's Creek at Chatham. 
Moira River at Corbyville. 
Muskoka River at Baysville. 
Napanee River at Strathcona. 



Lake Ontario at Mimico. 
Lake Ontario at Port Union. 
Bay of Quinte at Bath. 
Spanish River at Espanola. 
Sydenham River at Owen 

Sound. 
Thames River at Ingersoll. 
Thames River at Chatham. 
Toronto Harbour. 
Trent River at Trenton. 
Turkev Creek at Petrolia. 



Table No. 26 

COMPARATIVE ST.\TEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES 

OF ONTARIO BY LAKE 



LAKE 


1948 

POUNDS 


1949 

POUNDS 


INCREASE 
POUNDS 


DECREASE 
POUNDS 


Ontario 

Erie 

St. Clair - 

Huron 

Georgian Bay 


2,045,441 
14,926,190 

437,289 
1,439,692 

913,317 

444,995 
3,371,040 
4,629,365 

734,462 


2,005,897 
19,092,876 

540,022 
1,259,671 
1,563,404 

549,627 
3,188,397 
5.254,129 

607,338 


4,166,686 
102,733 

650,087 
104,632 

624,764 


39,544 
180,021 


North Channel 




Superior 


182,643 


Northern Inland Waters 




Southern Inland Waters 


127,124 






Total 

Net Increase 


28,941,791 


34,061,361 


5,648,902 
5,119,570 


529,332 


COMPARATIVE 

KIND 


Table No. 27 
STATEMENT OF THE YIELD C 
OF ONTARIO 

1948 1949 

POUNDS POUNT)S 


)F THE FISHEP 

INCREASE 
POUNDS 


lES 

DECREASE 
POUNDS 


(^arp 


612,359 

907,800 

2,348 

41,974 

28,232 

2,520,206 

3,499,205 

2,257,086 

5,784,140 

3,088,595 

928,377 

163,921 

185,287 

1,978,295 

404,030 

6,539,936 


646,184 

902,132 

1,850 

47,861 

49,800 

2,136,951 

3,716,650 

2,698,438 

9,830,912 

3,235,222 

1,027,460 

190,633 

183,814 

1,891,964 

438,174 

7,063,316 


33,825 

5,887 
21,568 

217,445 

441,352 

4,046,772 

146,627 

99,083 

26,712 

34,144 
523,380 




Catfish and Bullheads 


5,668 




498 


Eels - 




Goldeye - 

Herring 


383,255 


Mixed and Coarse 




Perch 




Pickerel (Blue) 




Pickerel (Yellow) 

Pike 




Saugers 






1,473 


Lake Trout - 


86,331 


TuUibee 

Whitefish 




Total 


28,941,791 


34,061,361 


5,596,795 
5 119.570 


477,225 


Net Increase 













Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 46 

DIVISION OF FOREST PROTECTION 

FIRE AND HAZARD CONDITIONS 

Meteorological records indicate that the 1949 season was the driest on record 
in some areas, especially the southerly portion of the Province. When precipitation did 
occur it was, in most instances, accompanied by lightning which resulted in a total 
of 468 fires starting from that source. This number of lightning fires is considerably 
above the average for a normal season. During the last few days of August, 68 
lightning fires were being fought. 

Periods of high hazard occurred in early IMay in the Western and Mid- Western 
Regions, early June in the Northern and Central Regions, early July across the 
Province and the most severe hazard was from August 8th to August 30th in the 
Central and Southern Regions. On August 19th, 170 fires were being fought. No 
serious fail hazard developed. 

The area under protection in 1950 was approximately 173,000 square miles or 
110,720,000 acres. 

FIRE CONTROL PLANNING 

Progress in fire control planning during the year included the placing of fly- 
wheel magnetizers and coil and condenser test sets in each district workshop, the 
supplying of aerial cameras to all aircraft, the installation of a Fire Data Board in 
Main Office, the testing of various types of tractors and the Michigan Sulky Plow for 
fire line construction, the ordering of fifty steel lookout towers for erection in 1950, 
the adoption of standard terminology for describing the condition of fires, the develop- 
ment of a standard aircraft fire detection form, the planning of a tank truck unit for 
development and construction in 1950 and the establishment of an Equipment Com- 
mittee to act as a clearing agency for all problems pertaining to equipment. 

FOREST INSECT AND DISEASE CONTROL 

The policy of co-operating with the Dominion Department of Agriculture in 
the study and control of forest insects and tree diseases was continued. The Forest 
Insect Laboratory at Sault Ste. Marie owned by the Ontario Government and staffed 
and operated by the Dominion provides a ready source of information concerning the 
location and degree of insect infestation and effective control measures. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

The Department of Public Works carried out the construction of the larger 
buildings and renovation of fish hatcheries. The Department of Lands and Forests 
carried out the construction of the smaller buildings and repair and maintenance of 
buildings, fish hatcheries, telephone lines, etc. 



^ndex ojr tabled 

Table No. Page 

1. Total improvements completed to March 31, 1950 - - - - 47 

2. Radio stations in operation in 1949 ---------47 

3. Classification of forest fires, by month -------47 

4. Classification of forest fires, by origin -------48 

5. Classification of forest fires, by size --------48 

6. Classification of area burned over, by month ----- 48 



Page 47 



Division of Forest Protection 



8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 



Classificatiox of area burxed over, by ownership - - - - 49 

Classification of .\rea burned over, by origin ------ 49 

Classification of area burned over, by forest type - - - - 51 

Statement of work permits issued 1949-50 ------ 51 

Fire damage table 1949 --------.--..53 

Report of major equipment as of March 31, 1950 - - - - 55 

Means of fire detection 1949 ----------- Sd 

Statement of travel permits issued 1949 -------56 

Statement of fire permits issued 1949 --------56 



^ndex oj- L^ltarts and L^rapni 



ftapl 

Figure No. Page 

1. Forest fires in Ontario from 1930 to 1949 -------49 

2. Acreage burned by forest fires in Ontario from 1030 to 1949 - 56 



Table Xo. 1 
The total improvements completed to ]March 31, 1950, were as follows: 



Cabins 514 

Storehouses 150 

Boathouses 63 

Combined Storehouses and Boathouses — IS 

Bunkhouses 60 

Offices 46 



Garages and Carhouses .._ 

Other Buildings 

Hose Towers 



Wooden Lookout Towers 

Steel Lookout Towers 

Telephone Lines (Miles) 



93 

232 

58 

39 

231 

3,775 



RADIO COMMUNICATIONS 

Table No. 2 
Radio stations in operation in 1949 were as follows: 



Tower radio installations .— 

Portable tower sets 

Marine radio installations .. 

Portable ground sets 

30 watt ground radio sets 



173 
2 

S 
59 
55 



75 watt ground radio sets 

ISO watt ground radio sets 

300 watt ground radio sets 

500 watt ground radio sets 

Aircraft radio installations 



2 
4 
7 
1 
39 



The Toronto radio station located at the Southern Research Experimental 
Station near Maple, and installed early in the 1949 season provides direct radio tele- 
graph communication to field offices and radio telephone communication with aircraft 
in flight. TeletvT^e service between the Toronto radio station and main office was 
installed late in 1949 to provide a more direct contact with field offices. 

Table No. 3 

CL.\SSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 

By Month — 1949 





1949 


1948 


1947 


1046 


1045 


1044 


1943 


month 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


March.. 


1 


1 




43 


15 






April 


181 


119 


11 


140 


134 


128 


15 


May 


286 


473 


135 


248 


182 


352 


188 


June 


258 


437 


170 


298 


121 


112 


33 


July-- _ 


314 


288 


202 


404 


160 


253 


96 


August _ 


664 


146 


466 


404 


318 


233 


86 


September .. 


46 


370 


125 


117 


26 


16 


20 


October „ 


77 


197 


260 


83 


9 


37 


186 


November 


7 


5 


24 


2 


1 


6 








Totals 


1.834 


2.036 


1,393 


1,739 


966 


1.137 


624 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 48 



Table No. 4 

CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 

By Origin— 1949 





1949 


1948 


1947 


1946 


1945 


1944 


1943 


ORIGIN 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


Settlers 


152 


147 


75 


80 


44 


96 


55 


Campers 


451 


432 


298 


481 


289 


247 


187 


Railways... 


138 


333 


180 


249 


163 


218 


82 


Lightning 


468 


433 


410 


303 


121 


185 


100 


Logging Operations 


52 


52 


56 


68 


32 


37 


26 


Mining Operations 


6 


6 


6 


11 


3 


1 


3 


Smokers 


340 
85 
32 


461 
46 
35 


248 
30 
15 


383 
21 
31 


231 
4 
8 


243 

4 

23 


132 
5 
4 


Road Construction 


Incendiary 


Prospectors 


6 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


1 


Miscellaneous 


94 


80 


31 


68 


36 


55 


25 1 


Tlnl-'rovvn 


10 


9 


42 


42 


32 


26 


' 1 




Totals 


1,834 


2,036 


1,393 


1,739 


966 


1,137 


624 1 



Table No. 5 

CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 

By Size— 1949 



SIZE 




1040 


1048 

No. 


1047 

Xo. 


1046 

Xo. 


1945 
Xo. 


1944 
No. 


1943 
No. 


14 Acre and under 
Over % to 
Over 5 to 
Over 10 to 
Over 100 to 
Over 500 to 
Over 1,000 to 
Over 10,000 acres. 


5 acres .. 

10 acres.. 

100 acres .. 

500 acres .. 

1,000 acres.- 

10,000 acres .. 


574 

811 

122 

242 

61 

16 

7 

1 


571 
894 
155 

285 
74 
24 
33 


412 
626 
97 
177 
50 
12 
19 


490 

784 

129 

233 

78 

13 

12 


211 
457 
75 
159 
43 
11 
10 


241 

519 

93 

211 

47 

7 

17 

2 


155 
237 
58 
108 
41 
15 
10 


Totals . 


1,834 


2,036 


1,393 


1,739 


966 


1,137 


624 







Table No. 6 

CLASSIFICATION OF AREA BURNED OVER 

By Month- 1949 



MONTH 


1949 

ACRES 


1948 

ACRES 


1947 

ACRES 


1946 

ACRES 


March .- 


11,622 

4.316 

6,665 

6.134 

30,011 

809 

500 

8 


8 

1,990 

801,612 

185,706 

3,968 

1,250 

5,286 

17,506 

63 


57 

2,712 
26,768 

4,802 
17,360 

2,248 

29,355 

730 


421 

2,284 

13,080 




25,338 


July 

August 

September 

October 

November 


20,734 

11,088 

1,520 

2,304 


Totals 


60,065 


1,017,389 


84.032 


76,769 







Purer? 



Division of Forest Protection 



Table Xo. 7 

CLASSIFICATION OF LAND BURNED 0\ER 

By Ownership— 1040 



CLASSLFICATIOX 


1949 


1048 


1947 


Crown Land — Acres 

Private Lands — Acres 

Number of Fires 


40,593 

19,472 

1,834 


854.778 

162,611 

2,036 


38,093 

45,939 

1,393 






Total Area in Acres 


60,065 


1,017.389 


84.032 



Table No. 8 

CLASSIFICATION OF AREA BURNED OVER 

By Origin— 1040 



CLASSinCATIOX 

Settlers _ 

Campers 

Railways ._ — 

Lightning 

Logging Operations 
Mining Operations.. 

Smokers 

Road Construction- 
Incendiary- 

Prospectors 

Miscellaneous 

L'nknown.._ _ 

TOT.ALS 



1949 

ACRES 



1948 

ACRES 



1047 
ACRES 



1946 

ACRES 



6.762 

14,147 

2,022 

19,037 

3,033 

42 

5,177 

3,607 

3,420 

191 

1,321 

1,306 



60,065 



IS.613 

393,696 

8,129 

139,822 

35,903 

26,015 

23,318 

365,355 

1.446 

3 

3,146 

1.943 



3.440 

3,091 

12,606 

20.353 

14.921 

385 

24.515 

1.379 

577 

16 

2.244 

496 



1,017,389 



84,032 



2,677 

21,898 

9,406 

20,630 

7,085 

256 

12,109 

873 

490 

4 

673 

668 



76.769 



Figure No. 1 



4:Olit5T fll2€S IN ONTAIilO 



•F e M 19 3 



1949 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 50 




Midhnrsl water tower, Midhurst, Lake Simcoe. 



Page SI 



Division of Forest Protection 



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Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 52 




Douglas Peacock investigates the Tent Caterpillar situation near Gravenhjtrst. 



Page 33 



Division of Forest Protection 






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