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Full text of "Report of the Minister of Lands and Forests of the Province of Ontario, 1950"



LANDS AND FORESTS 

OF THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

for the fiscal year ending 
MARCH 31,1950 

PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY 

OF ONTARIO 

TORONTO 



w^. 




To His Honour, 

The Lieutenant-Governor of the Province 
of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour: 

The undersigned begs respectfully to present 
to your Honour, the Annual Report of the Depart- 
ment of Lands and Forests for the fiscal year April 
1, 1949 to March 31, 1950. 

H. R. Scott, 

Minister. 




ONTARIO 



^\%Wtu"' of the MINISTER of 

LANDS AND FORESTS 



OF THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

for the fiscal year ending 

MARCH 31, 1950 

PRINTED BY O RDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY 
OF ONTARIO 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 15, 1951 



TORONTO, 1951 

Printed and Published by Baptist Johnston, 
Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 



L^ontentd 



PAGE 

Title Page ------- -- l 

Division of Accounts -- 3 

Division of Air Service -- 13 

Division of Fish and Wildlife -- 21 

Division of Forest Protection - - - - 45 

Division of Land and Recreational Areas ------ 57 

Division of Law ----- 69 

Division of Operation and Personnel 71 

Division of Reforestation ---- 117 

Division of Research 123 

Division of Surveys and Engineering - - 137 

Division of Timber Management - - - 149 



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L ^ 



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Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 4 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 

General 

The financial report sets out a substantial increase — $479,150.00 — in expen- 
diture appropriation of the Department as compared with the previous year. This 
increased appropriation was required for: 

(1) Suppression of Forest Fires; (2) Salvaging of fire killed timber; (3) Air Service 
Expansion; (4) Cost of Living Bonus to employees 

There was a decrease in the cash receipts — $32,981.37 — as compared with the 
previous year. 

Jsnaex of ^JaoleS 

Table No. Page 

1. Analysis of cash receipts by districts --------10 

Jsnaex of L^narfj ana Ljrapnd 

Figure No. Page 

1. Timber returns, crown dues, ground rent, etc. ----- 5 

2. Water power rentals, crown s^les and rentals, etc. - - - 6 

3. Trend of total annual receipts ---------- o 

4. Trend of total annual disbursements -------- o 



FINANCIAL REPORT 
Cash Receipts and Disbursements 

Statement for the year ending March 31, 1950, is set out on Schedule A, page 
6. The following summarizes the result of operations for the year. 
Total— Cash Disbursements .. $14,536,859.74 

—Cash Receipts _ 11,602,255.69 



Excess of Disbursements over Receipts .. 
2. Comparison of Results with those of prior years 



$2,934,604.05 



(a) Receipts 

Cash receipts for the year under 
four vears as follows: 



review compare with those of the previous 



1946 



YEARS ENDING MARCH 31 ST 

1947 1948 1949 

$ $ $ 



1950 



Accounts 

Water Power Rentals __ 

Provincial Land Tax 

Long Lac Diversion __ 

Miscellaneous 

Air Service 

Fish and Wildlife ... 

Forest Protection 

Land and Recreational Areas 

Reforestation 

Surveys 

Timber Management _ 

Mississagi Salvage Froject 

Operation and Personnel (Sylva) 



654,979 


680,568 


694,859 


759,570 


811,664 


209,459 


204,475 


185,470 


217,521 


242,292 


20,850 


20,400 


19,950 


19,500 


19,050 


9,048 


46,071 


24,825 


26,225 


21,778 


25,284 


15,258 


8,376 


6,373 


10,734 


1,651,166 


2,248,201 


2,420,661 


2,813,876 


2,774,518 


30,943 


46,402 


53,230 


48,330 


70,707 


338,258 


430,644 


393,938 


409,465 


400,223 


19,386 


25,373 


25,562 


1,685 


153 


459 


1,652 


501 


402 


534 


5,554,781 


6,944,104 


6,855,031 


7,332,290 


6,789,235 

459,961 

1,406 



11,602,255 



Page 5 



Division of Accounts 



(b) The following is a comparison of total disbursements for the five years ending 
March 31, 1950. 



Department of Lands & Forests 
Total Disbursements 

Chargeable to Appropriation 
as voted 

Mississagi Salvage Project _ 

Additional Disbursements 

Uncontrollable items Special 
Warrant 

Dept. of Game & Fisheries 
Total Disbursements 

Chargeable to Appropriation 
as voted 



Total Disbursements 



1Q46 



VEARS ENDING MARCH 31 ST 

1947 1948 1949 



1950 



3,988,394 5,961,806 7,598,612 9,693,336 9,913,521 

1,489,845 4,623,339 



111,000 



217,621 



748,661 1,197,974 



4,848,055 7,159,780 7,598,612 11,400,802 14,536,860 



Figure No. 1 



TREND OF DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

TIMBER RETURNS-CROWN DUES-GROUND RENT & FIRE TAX CHARGES 

FOR. THE FIVE YEAR.S ENDING 31 MARCH 1950 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 6 



Figure No. 2 



TREND OF DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

WATER POWER RENTALS - CROWN LAND SALES 6 RENTALS 
PROVINCIAL LAND TAX 

FOR. THE FIVE YEARS ENDING 31 MARCH 1950 



900 



CO 


800 


< 

_l 


700 


o 




Q 


600 


Li_ 
O 


500 


CO 


400 


o 





CO 



300 



200 



100 





















WATER. POWER. 


RENTALS 












«* 


^^^^ 






^^^ 


CROWN LAND S. 


UES 6 RENTALS 














PROVINCIAL LAh 


ID TAX 













1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
Schedule A FOR YEAR ENDING 31st MARCH, 1950 

Division of Accounts RECEIPTS 

Water Power $ 811,663.96 

Provincial Land Tax 242,292.14 

Long Lac Diversion . 19,050.00 

Casual Fees, Surveys, Office Fees, etc. 18,778.07 

Security Deposits _. 3,000.00 



Division of Air Service 

Miscellaneous 

Division of Fish and Wildlife 

Licences, Royalty and Sundry 

Division of Forest Protection 

Miscellaneous 

Division of Land and Recreational Areas 
Land Sales 

Agricultural '..$ 14,104.58 

Summer Resort 20,701.13 

Townsites 5,308.63 

University 148.16 

Miscellaneous 14,194.01 

Unallocated _ 163,185.74 



$1,094,784.17 

10,733.90 

2,774,518.06 

70,706.89 



$ 217,642.25 



Carried Forward 



$3,950,742.92 



Page 7 



Division of Accounts 



Schedule A (Continued) 



RECEIPTS 



Brought Forward 



$3,950,742.92 



Land Rentals (Other than Parks) 

Leases and Licenses of Occupation 112,061.86 

Temagami Islands 1,959.54 



114,021.40 



Park Revenue 
Algonquin 

Rentals 

Miscellaneous 

Rondeau 

Rentals . 

Miscellaneous 



$ 13,636.73 
. 14,091.12 



-$ 27,727.85 



.$ 15,305.09 
. 2,825.98 



-S 18,131.07 



Quetico 

Rentals $ 93.05 

Miscellaneous 1 ,284.00 



Ipperwash Beach 

Rentals $ 710.00 

Miscellaneous _ 2,329.25 



-$ 1,377.05 



-S 3,039.25 



Tourist Outfitters Licenses 

Other Lands Division Receipts 



$ 50,275.22 

16,102.76 

2,091.54 



Division of Operation and Personnel 

Sylva Subscriptions _. 

Division of Reforestation 

Miscellaneous .._ 

Division of Surveys 

Aerial Surveys — Net Receipts 

Division of Timber Management (See Schedule "B") 

Crown Dues 

Ground Rent 

Fire Tax 

Scalers' Wages 

Interest 



$ 400,223.17 
1,406.39 

153.35 

533.65 



Mill Licenses and Sundry 



Cash Deposits 



MlSSISSAGI SA] \ IGE 



$6,146,884.32 

112,139.00 

485,313.46 

5,632.36 

5,868.38 

4,202.28 

$6,760,039.80 
29,195.24 



$6,789,235.04 



459.061.07 



Total Receipts 

Excess of Disbursements over Receipts 



Carried Forward 



$11,602,255.69 
2,0.^4,604.05 

$14,536,859.74 
$14,536,859.74 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 8 

Schedule A (Continued) 
DISBURSEMENTS 

Brought Forward $14,536,859.74 

MAIN OFFICE 

Minister's Salary— Statutory $ 8,000.00 

Salaries — Permanent and Temporary 766,969.21 

Travelling Expenses — _ 47,525,95 

Maintenance and Operating 18,813.19 

Damage and Other Claims, Sundry Contingencies, etc. 1,850.96 

Compensation for Injured Workmen 52,591.43 

Cost of Living Bonus — Entire Department 477,357.98 

Unemployment Insurance Stamps 1,456.04 

Annuities and Bonuses to Indians 23,580.00 

— $1,398,144.76 
FIELD SERVICES 
Basic Organization — including District Offices 

Salaries $3,399,623.25 

Travelling Expenses 479,575.49 

Maintenance and Operating 1,838,845.82 

^ $5,718,044.56 

Extra Fire Fighting 

Salaries— Temporary ...... $1,018,087.18 

Travelling Expenses - 1 7 ,965 .03 

Maintenance and Operating 464,904.72 

$1,500,956.93 

Fire Prevention, Conservation of Fish and Wildlife 

and Reforestation 

Salaries, etc., Maintenance and Operating $ 129,874.78 

Grants 

Association of Ontario Land Surveyors $ 200.00 

Municipalities in lieu of School Fees 632.54 

Jack Miner Migratory Bird Foundation Inc. _ 1,500.00 

Thomas R. Jones 300.00 

E. L. Marsh 100.00 

Niagara District Pheasant Breeders' Association 500.00 

Ontario Fur Breeders' Association Inc. 2,500.00 

Ontario Federation of Commercial Fishermen 1,500.00 

$ 7,232.54 

Woi.f Bounty -.-$ 56,927.00 

Bear Bounty $ 8,530.00 

Division of Air Service 

Salaries _ $ 288,916.67 

Travelling Expenses 9,928.34 

Maintenance and Operating — including purchase of Aircraft 447,277.88 

^ „ $ 746,122.89 

Division of Research 

Salaries — Temporary $ 131,016.85 

Travelling Expenses 18,477.11 

Maintenance and Operating 55,722.83 

■ $ 205,216.79 



Division of Surveys 

Aerial Surveys $ 21,558.91 

Ground Surveys — Miscellaneous Expenses _ 120,911.46 

$ 142,470.37 

Division of Timber Management 

Salvaging Fire-Damaged Timber, Salaries, Travelling, Maintenance Expenses, 

Advances to Contractors, Equipment Purchases $4,623,339.12 



Total Disbursements $14,536,859.74 



Page 9 



Division of Ac count s 



Figure No. 3 



TREND OF TOTAL ANNUAL RECEIPTS 

FOR THE TEN YEARS ENDING 31 MARCH 1950 



INCLUDES FORMER CAME AND 
FISHERIES DEPARTMENT 



DOES NOT INCLUDE MISSISSAGI 
SALVAGE PROJECT 



O 



c 
o 




137.351 $6,348,601 $7,033,613 $6,697,708 $6.606479 $8,514,613 $10,663,148 $10.682403 $11,635,237 $11,142,295 

Figure No. 4 

TREND OF TOTAL ANNUAL DISBURSEMENTS 

FOR THE TEN YEARS ENDING 31 MARCH 1950 



INCLUDES FORMER CAME AND 
FISHERIES DEPARTMENT 



DOES NOT INCLUDE MISSISSAGI 
SALVAGE PROJECT 





Q 



o 



c 




1941 1942 1943 

$2.967331 $3,231,118 $4,075,717 



1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 

$3.615426 $4,210,990 $4848.055 $7159.780 $759S,6I2 



1949 
$9,910,957 



1950 

i 9.91 3.52 1 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 10 



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Page 11 



Division of Accounts 




Mary Wilson working at an accounts ledger. 



FOREST RESEARCH DIVISION— PROJECTS Schedule C 

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 
(INCLUDING GENERAL OFFICE) 
Protect For Year Ending March 31, 1950 

Experiment Station — — $ 45,733.83 

L. M. Morrison (Statistician) 3,620.93 



Soil Surveys 

Regeneration Surveys ... 

Wildlife 

Pump and Hose Test ... 

Forest Genetics 

Biology 

South Bay Experiment 1 

South Hay Experiment 2 

Seed Production Experiment ._ 

Pathology — 



24,115.12 
35,014.25 
22,755.27 
16,565.33 

7,051.09 
36,976.24 
16,065.72 
18,750.00 
1 1.446.6S 

4,310.63 



Total Direct Expenditure on Projects 
Deduct — Sale of Fish (South Bay Experiment 2) 



$242,405.09) 
6,553.01 



Net Direct Expenditure on Projects .. 5,852.08 

Main Office Administration - 23,240.38 



Total Expenditure by Forest Researcb Division- 8259,092.46 



Carried Forward 



$259,092.46 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 12 

DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENDITURE 

Brought Forward $259 ; 092.46 

Forest Research — Field Service $205,2 16.79 

Forest Research — Main Office 21,362.70 

Basic Organization — Equipment and Improvements 32,512.97 



$259,092.46 



Schedule D 



DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE 

ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIPTS 

„ For Year Ending March 31, 1950 

Game 

Licenses 

Trapping $ 56,389.65 

Non-Resident Hunting 364,921.85 

Deer 242,208.18 

Moose - 352.21 

Gun 178,016.26 

Dog 16,212.14 

Fur Dealers 27,787.00 

Fur Farmers 5,835.00 

Tanners 190.00 

Cold Storage - 637.15 



892,549.44 
Rovaltv Game 237,036.67 



$1,129,586.11 



Fisheries 
Licenses 

Fishing (Commercial) 106,251.35 

Angling — 1,450,180.46 



1,556,431.81 
Royalty on Commercial Fish — 9,093.11 



$1,565,524.02 



General 
Licenses 

Guides — 14,236.00 

Fines 45,807.70 

Costs Collected - — 1 ,746.25 

Sales— Confiscated Articles ._... 17,222.31 

Miscellaneous 394.77 



$ 79,407.03 
$2,774,518.06 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 14 



DIVISION OF AIR SERVICE 

General 

The fiscal year 1949-50 saw considerable expansion of the activities of this 
Division. Provision had been made in the two previous years through the addition of 
our new Hangar and the procurement of additional equipment — and the fiscal year 
concerned saw us in a favorable position to undertake these expanded activities. The 
fire season itself could be regarded as normal, and although there were more fires than 
in the preceding two years, fewer reached the out-of-control stage, and the aggregate 
damage as a result thereof was considerably less than in former years. We attribute 
this, to some extent, to the fact that we now have more aeroplanes of a type that will 
operate out of smaller bodies of water, thus enabling us to get at the source of incipient 
fires much more easily and much more quickly than has been the case in the past. 

There has also been considerable expansion of the activities incident to Fish 
and Wildlife administration. The inauguration of registered trap lines necessitated a 
tremendous amount of travel by officers of the Fish and Wildlife Division, and in its 
initial stages it probably required a lot more supervision than will be the case in 
succeeding years when the program has become solidly established. This not only 
involved increased travel in areas with which we had been dealing, but also involved 
our taking in a very sizeable piece of country which we generally refer to as the 
Patricia area. To facilitate travel in this district it became necessary to establish quite 
a number of gasoline caches. We now carry gasoline at two points on Hudson's Bay, 
namely, Weenusk and Severn, and quite a number of inland caches, among which are 
Lansdowne House, Big Trout Lake, Big Sandy Lake, Bear Skin Lake, and several 
others. Gasoline at most of these inland points has to be placed there either by air 
or by winter transport — and because of the cost involved, we use as little as is neces- 
sary, preferring rather to re-fuel our aeroplanes at points where the cost of fuel is 
much less. 

Normal co-operation with other departments of Government was carried out as 
usual. Considerable flying was done for the Department of Mines; the usual amount 
for the Provincial Police, the Department of Health, the Department of Highways, 
etc. Some measure of co-operation was also accorded the Federal Department of Indian 
Affairs, with whom we work very closely in the establishing of registered trap lines. 

Emergency flights were carried out as required. 

Normal amiable relations were maintained with the Department of Transport 
and with the Air Transport Board. 

New Construction and Expansion 

During the period involved the Department of Public Works built two new 
year-round cottages and a workshop for us at Eva Lake; two more cottages and a 
workshop at Carey Lake and Kenogami; and it seems quite probable that we will 
require to open additional bases at Lauzon Lake and somewhere in the vicinity of 
White River at which latter place a new District Headquarters has been established. 
There are still a few odds and ends to be cleaned up in the absolute completion of our 
new Hangar, but it is hoped that the Department of Public Works will complete this 
project in the next fiscal period. 

Equipment 

During the year the Service took delivery of thirteen Beaver aircraft from the 
DeHavilland Company of Canada, and most of these were put in service as they were 



Page 15 Division of Air Service 



delivered. We have found this aeroplane to be a very useful piece of equipment. Its 
maintenance problems are not particularly difficult, and its performance far excels 
anything that Canada has ever seen before. Five more of the same type are on order 
for delivery in 1950 — and this will bring our fleet up to a total of forty-five aircraft. 
In the preceding year our Stinson S.R.9 aircraft were retired from service and were 
put up for sale. The last of them has just been sold at the time of compiling this report. 

Winter Operations 

Winter operations as expanded during the winter of 1948-49 were continued 
during the past winter. Beaver aircraft were operated on skis from Toronto. Algonquin 
Park, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie, Gogama. Chapleau. Geraldton, Port Arthur, Eva 
Lake; and two Norseman were operated from Sioux Lookout. This gave us a total of 
ten aircraft on winter operations. A good deal of their flying was occupied in the 
supervision and enforcement of the Fish and Wildlife regulations, but considerable 
flying was also done in the supervision of timber and logging operations, transportation 
of scalers, selection of tower sites, and normal transportation incident to the movement 
of senior officials through parts of the country which are relatively inaccessible by any 
other means of travel. 

Maintenance of Service Buildings 

Normal maintenance of all Service property was carried out as usual. Painting 
and normal repairs were undertaken where necessary in order to keep our property up 
to proper standards. 

Accidents 

During the period involved the Service lost one aircraft Norseman CF-OBC, 
which was burned in a forest fire at Sutton Lake in August of 1949. The engine, floats, 
and propeller were salvaged, but apart from these the aeroplane was a total loss. A 
Beaver went through the ice on early winter operations, north of Chapleau in December 
of 1949, but we were able to salvage the aeroplane intact and it was actually flown 
back to Sault Ste. Marie for necessary reconditioning. We are very pleased to report 
that we had no fatal or serious accidents. 

The following tables are submitted as supplementary to this Report: — 



J? nil ex of J able A 



Table Xii. Pagi 

1. Allocation of aircraft ------------- io 

2. Flvinc; time — pilots --------------16 

3. Hours flown on various phases of flying operations - - 17 

4. Totals -_____--___-_-__-_ 17 

5. Hours flown' at bases --------------17 

6. Flying timi ur< raft - ._..--_..__- 17 

7. Am in \iiu\ in aircraft ------- 18 

8. Transport aircraft -effecttvi loads i uuued - - - 10 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 16 



Table No. 1 

Table 7 shows the allocation of aircraft at the termination of the season, but the following aircraft 
operated for periods at the Bases shown: 



BASE REGISTRATION TYPE 

Algonquin Park CF-OBZ Beaver 

Chapleau CF-OCH Beaver 

CF-OCQ Beaver 

Eva Lake CF-OBT Beaver 

Geraldton . .CF-OBI Norseman 

Gogama ___ __CF-OCC Beaver 

Pays Plat CF-OCN Beaver 



BASE REGISTRATION TYPE 

Pickle Lake _ .....CF-OBC Norseman 

Port Arthur CF-OCB Beaver 

Sault Ste. Marie CF-OBV Beaver 

CF-OCO Beaver 

CF-OCR Beaver 

Sioux Lookout __ .CF-OCK Beaver 

Sudbury CF-OBX Beaver 



Pilots 



Table No. 2 



FLYING TIME— PILOTS 



1924-49 



1949-50 



Total 



Blockley, H. T._ _ 

Burton, E. C 

Burton, J. O 

Burtt, A. E. . . 

Buck worth, W. B. 
Calladine, T. J. .... 

Cooke, T. C. 

Culliton, J. P.... 
Denley, J. G. _ 
Donnelly, J. T. .... 
Duncanson, I. C. 
Evans, F. B. 

Fawcett, T. B 

Hoar, H. A.. 

Hull, C. L 

Hutnick, S 

Kingdon, O. F 

Kincaid, J 

Kirk, C. J. _ 

LeFeuvre, C. J.. 

MacDougall, F. A. 

Parsons, R 

Phillips, G. H. R. 

Piper, 0. M 

Poulin, L. D 

Ponsford, G. E. 

Reid, D. M 

Siegel, J 

Speight, H. C 

Sandison, A. G 

Stone, R. W. E. .._ 

Shrive, A. N 

Smith, A. B 

Trussler, G. E 

Taylor, J. M. 

All Other Pilots... 
Total: _ 



910.45 


322.25 


1,233.10 


2,032.50 


397.20 


2,430.10 


596.20 


466.40 


1,063.00 


2,525.15 


421.10 


2,946.25 


3,005.20 


6.10 


3,011.30 





315.15 


315.15 


1,118.10 


515.10 


1,633.20 


2,939.25 


283.55 


3,223.20 


1,716.10 


559.35 


2,275.45 


1,782.25 


555.00 


2,337.25 


339.15 


257.05 


596.20 





329.55 


329.55 





414.45 


414.45 





161.40 


161.40 


754.55 


620.10 


1,375.05 





431.25 


431.25 


1,117.10 


480.55 


1,598.05 


1,503.15 


506.20 


2,009.35 





304.30 


304.30 


3,443.15 


316.40 


3,759.55 


3,736.15 


299.00 


4,035.15 


3,174.50 


596.55 


3,771.45 


7,646.30 


571.25 


8,217.55 


502.35 


554.00 


1,056.35 


3,019.40 


448.25 


3,468.05 


524.00 


105.40 


629.40 


746.15 


402.50 


1,149.05 


1,272.10 


428.35 


1,700.45 


1,495.50 


440.10 


1,936.00 





406.05 


406.05 


548.45 


558.15 


1,107.00 


. 


364.25 


364.25 


2,323.45 


406.25 


2,730.10 


4,233.15 


185.20 


4,418.35 


2,708.20 


53.05 


2,761.25 


119,572.40 


44.05 


119,616.45 


175,289.20 


13,530.45 


188,820.05 



Page 1 7 



Division of Air Service 



Table Xo. 3 
HOURS FLOWN OX VARIOUS PHASES OF FLYIXG OPERATIOXS 

1949-50 Total 



Fire Ranging (Detection and Supervision) 

Timber Management 

Fish and Wildlife 

Lands 

Commercial Flying. .... 

Administration... 



6,925.55 
603.35 

1,644.10 
110.25 
278.30 

3,968.10 
13,530.45 



6,925.55 
603.35 

1,644.10 
110.25 
278.30 

3,968.10 
13,530.45 



Table Xo. 4 



Passengers Carried 

Personnel Carried 

Total Passengers and Personnel Carried 

Effective Loads Flown, Lbs 

Effective Loads Flown. Tons 



1924-49 

165,583 

89,206 

254,789 

54,467,067 

27,233 Tons 
1,067 Lbs. 



1949-50 

30,687 

5,918 

36,605 

7,964,076 

3,982 Tons 
76 Lbs. 



Total 

196,270 

95,124 

291,394 

62,431,143 

31,215 Tons 
1,143 Lbs. 



Table Xo. 5 



HOURS FLOWX AT BASES 1949-50 



Base Hours Flown 

Algonquin Park 568.45 

Biscotasing 419.25 

Caribou Lake __ . 402.45 

Chapleau _ 447.50 

Eva Lake __ 482.35 

Fort Frances 255.35 

Geraldton 420.50 

Gogama 614.05 

Ignace . 473.50 

Kenora 405.25 

Oba Lake ... 1063.45 

Orient Bay 639.50 

PavsPlat 405.00 



Base Hours Flown 

Parry Sound .. _ 406.10 

Pickle Lake . 297.45 

Port Arthur 555.25 

Red Lake 420.20 

Remi Lake ... 359.25 

Sault Ste. Marie ... _ 1606.10 

Sioux Lookout 1063.30 

South Porcupine 502.35 

Sudbury 442.40 

Temagami 611.55 

Twin Lakes 313.15 

Toronto .. 351.55 



13,530.45 



Abu r \i i 



Norsi MAN 
CF-OBC 
(I OBD 
CF-OBE 
CF-OBI 
CI OBG 
CI OBH 
I I OBI 
CF-OBL 
CF-OBM 
CI OBN 
HOBO 
CF-OBQ 
CI OBB 



Table Xo. 6 
FLYIXG TIME— AIRCRAFT 

1924-49 1Q4Q-50 



T< 1 1 \ I 



1,377.30 


109.05 


1,486.35 


1,332.55 


419.45 


1.752.40 


1,368.55 


254.55 


1,623.50 


1,633.40 


71.15 


1,704.55 


1,438.20 


430.05 


l,8( 


1,484.25 


427.05 


1.O11.30 


1,286.25 


446.30 


1,732.55 


1,002.55 


325.55 


1,328.50 


950.55 


6.20 


1,207.15 


814.50 


406.45 


1,221.35 


700.50 


397.5S 


1,098.45 


565.20 


502.55 


1,068.15 


639.30 


414.20 


1,053.50 



Continued on Next Pnge. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 18 



Aircraft 


1924-49 


1949-50 


Total 


Beaver 








CF-OBS 


398.45 


548.35 


947.20 


CF-OBT 


300.05 


380.15 


680.20 


CF-OBU 


346.40 


540.45 


887.25 


CF-OBV 


591.10 
415.30 


148.05 
481.40 


739.15 


CF-OBW - 


897.10 


CF-OBX 


293.35 


65.15 


358.50 


CF-OBY 


212.10 


161.25 


373.35 


CF-OBZ 


46.55 


467.20 


514.15 


CF-OCA 


293.25 


04.45 


388.10 


CF-OCB 


135.30 


270.45 


415.15 


CF-OCC 


182.50 


65.35 


248.25 


CF-OCD 


170.25 


358.40 


529.05 


CF-OCE 


3.00 


412.00 


415.00 


CF-OCF 


3.20 


618.00 


621.20 


CF-OCG 


2.40 


316.15 


318.55 


CF-OCH 





274.55 


274.55 


CF-OCI 





477.45 


477.45 


CF-OCJ 





269.45 


269.45 


CF-OCK. 





541.30 


541.30 


CF-OCL 


— — 


364.55 


364.55 


CF-OCM 





329.40 


329.40 


CF-OCN ... 





338.25 


338.25 


CF-OCO . 





107.40 


107.40 


CF-OCP 





223.00 
265.25 


223.00 


CF-OCQ 


265.25 


CF-OCR.. 





370.25 


370.25 


CF-OCS 





459.30 


459.30 


CF-OCT 




106.40 


106.40 


All Other Aircraft 




(104,323.28 + 52,062.37) 


156,386.05 





156,386.05 


Total: 


174,378.35 


13,530.45 


187.909.20 



Table No. 7 
ALLOCATION OF AIRCRAFT— 1949-50 



BASE REGISTRATION TYPE 

Algonquin Park CF-OBY Beaver 

Biscotasing CF-OBH Norseman 

Caribou Lake ...CF-OBN Norseman 

Chapleau _CF-OCA Beaver 

Eva Lake CF-OCJ Beaver 

Fort Frances CF-OBM Norseman 

Geraldton CF-OCB Beaver 

Gogama _ CF-OCS Beaver 

Ignace _.... CF-OCI Beaver 

Kenora _ CF-OBO Norseman 

ObaLake ...CF-OBU Beaver 

CF-OBS Beaver 

Orient Bay ... CF-OBL Norseman 

CF-OCM Beaver 

Pays Plat .CF-OCH Beaver 

Parry Sound CF-OCE Beaver 



BASE REGISTRATION TYPE 

Pickle Lake .. CF-OBE Norseman 

Port Arthur . ...CF-OCK Beaver 

Red Lake ...CF-OBD Norseman 

RemiLake __ CF-OCL Beaver 

Sault Ste. Marie CF-OBR Norseman 

CF-OBW Beaver 

CF-OBF Norseman 

Sioux Lookout CF-OBG Norseman 

CF-OBI Norseman 

CF-OCP Beaver 

South Porcupine ....CF-OBQ Norseman 

Sudbury .....CF-OCD Beaver 

Temagami CF-OCF Beaver 

Twin Lakes CF-OCG Beaver 

Toronto CF-OCT Beaver 



Page 19 



Division of Air Service 




Beaver aircraft on Opeongo Lake, Algonquin P 



Table No. 8 
TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT— EFFECTIVE LOADS CARRIED 1949-50 



Aircraft 
Norseman 
CF-OBC 


Hours 
Flown 

109.05 


CF-OBD 


419.45 


CF-OBE 

CF-OBF 

CF-OBG 

CF-OBH 

CF-OBI 

CF-OBL 


254.55 

430.05 

_. 427.05 

446.30 

325.55 


CF-OHM 


256.20 


CF-OBN 


406.45 


CF-OBO 
CF-OBQ 


397.55 
502.55 


CF-OBR 

Beaver 
CF-OBS 
CF-OBT 


414.20 

548.35 
380.15 


CF-OBU 
CF-OBV 


540.45 
148.05 



Effective Loads 



49,190 Lbs- 
179,960 Lbs.- 
123,393 Lbs- 

26,250 Lbs.- 
337,386 Lbs.- 
359,631 Lbs.- 
306,014 Lbs- 
276,925 Lbs.- 
287,175 Lbs.- 
290,870 Lbs.- 
228,980 Lbs.- 
320,530 Lbs.- 
289,085 Lbs.- 



- 24 Tons, 

- 89 Tons, 

- 61 Tons, 

- 13 Tons, 
-168 Tons, 
-179 Tons, 
-153 Tons, 
-138 Tons, 
-143 Tons, 
-145 Tons. 
-114 Ton.-, 
-160 Tons, 

144 Tons. 



1190 Lbs. 
1960 Lbs. 
1393 Lbs. 

250 Lbs. 

1386 Lbs. 

1631 Lbs. 

14 Lbs. 

925 Lbs. 
1175 Lbs. 

870 Lbs. 

980 Lbs. 

530 Lbs. 
1085 Lbs. 



355,478 Lbs.— 177 Tons. 1478 Lbs. 

237,020 Lbs.— 118 Tons. 1020 Lbs. 

214,800 Lbs.— 107 Tons, 800 Lbs. 

: Lbs. - 13 Tons. 575 Lbs 



Continued on Next Page. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 20 



Aircraft 



Hours 
Flown 



Effective Loads 



Beaver 

CF-OBW 481 .40 

CF-OBX _ 65.15 

CF-OBY 161.25 

CF-OBZ __ 467.20 

CF-OCA 94.45 

CF-OCB 279.45 

CF-OCC _ 65.35 

CF-OCD 358.40 

CF-OCE _ 41 2 .00 

CF-OCF 618.00 

CF-OCG 316.15 

CF-OCH 274.55 

CF-OCI 477.45 

CF-OCJ _ 269.45 

CF-OCK ....... 541.30 

CF-OCL ..... ... 364.55 

CF-OCM . 329.40 

CF-OCN 338.25 

CF-OCO 107.40 

CF-OCP 223.00 

CF-OCQ 265.25 

CF-OCR ... 370.25 

CF-OCS 459.30 

CF-OCT 106.40 



Total Transport Section:— 
Total Flying Time, Hours 
Total Loading, Lbs. 

Total Loading, Tons ... 



231,262 Lbs.- 

32,460 Lbs.- 

82,688 Lbs.- 

220,720 Lbs- 

54,640 Lbs- 

153,720 Lbs- 

29,010 Lbs.- 

188,930 Lbs- 

126,422 Lbs.- 

335,130 Lbs- 

241,920 Lbs.- 

173,030 Lbs.- 

208,985 Lbs- 

230,092 Lbs.- 

367,640 Lbs- 

188,150 Lbs.- 

187,855 Lbs- 

174,750 Lbs.- 

63,185 Lbs- 

88,510 Lbs- 

174,565 Lbs.- 

92,035 Lbs.- 

381,895 Lbs.- 

27,420 Lbs- 



-115 Tons 

- 16 Tons 

- 41 Tons 
-110 Tons 

- 27 Tons 

- 76 Tons 

- 14 Tons 

- 94 Tons 

- 63 Tons 
-167 Tons 
-120 Tons 

- 86 Tons 
-104 Tons 
-115 Tons 
-183 Tons 

- 94 Tons 

- 93 Tons 

- 87 Tons 

- 31 Tons 

- 44 Tons 

- 87 Tons 

- 46 Tons 
-190 Tons 

- 13 Tons 



1262 Lbs. 

460 Lbs. 

688 Lbs. 

720 Lbs. 

640 Lbs. 
1720 Lbs. 
1010 Lbs. 

930 Lbs. 

422 Lbs. 
1130 Lbs. 
1920 Lbs. 
1030 Lbs. 

985 Lbs. 

092 Lbs. 
1640 Lbs. 

150 Lbs. 
1855 Lbs. 

750 Lbs. 
1185 Lbs. 

510 Lbs. 

565 Lbs. 

035 Lbs. 
1805 Lbs. 
1420 Lbs. 



13,530.45 

7,%4,076 

3,982 Tons, 76 Lbs. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 22 



DIVISION OF FISH AND WILDLIFE 

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

General 

The moose season was closed as a result of findings of last year. Hunting 
pressure on deer continued to increase, though much of the increase this year was 
absorbed by the north-western part of the province. 

Upland game increased in all sections, though the European Hare population 
is still low. More generous open seasons were provided and a special feature was an 
open season on Hungarian Partridge in our six easternmost counties. These birds 
were very abundant. 

Fur bearing animals were generally in reasonable supply, and there was con- 
tinued progress in the establishment of trap-line management on both public and 
private lands. As a necessary preliminary to the establishment of trapping on a quota 
basis, the season on marten was closed generally and fisher closed north and west of 
North Bay. Over the whole far northern area the recent die-off of beaver produced 
a slightly lower crop, but the beaver harvest over the whole province remains high. 

The Division co-operated with the Wildlife Management Institute Pelee Island 
pheasant investigation and with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service on 
woodcock investigations. 

There were 41,823 pheasants distributed of which 5,666 were day-old chicks, 
35,199 poults and 958 adults. 



^Jrndex of- ^J able 5 

Table No. Page 

1. Bear bounty for fiscal year 1949-50 --------- 24 

2. Summary of breeding stock — licensed fur farms - - - - 26 

3. Comparative table showing annual wolf bounty statistics - 27 

4. Summary of wolves killed, counties and districts - - - - 27 

5. Wolf bounty for fiscal year 1949-50 --------- 28 

6. Revenue received from export permits -------- 28 

7. Revenue received from tanners' permits -------29 

8. Summary of pelts exports and pelts tanned ------ 29 

9. Total value of pelts exported or tanned -------30 

10. Statement of ranch raised pelts exported or tanned - - - 30 

11. Details of officers responsible for seizures ------ 30 

12. Articles seized ----------------31 

13. Firearms seized ----------------31 

14. Pelts and hides seized -------------31 

15. Miscellaneous articles seized -----------31 

16. Informations ----------------31 

17. Results of prosecutions -------------32 

18. Convictions for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 - - - - 32 

19. Amounts realized from sale of articles ------- 34 

20. Summary of fish distribution -----------36 

21. Comparative table showing distribution according to species 37 

22. Distribution by age groups ------------39 

23. Distribution of fish by species and hatcheries ----- 39 

24. Statistics of the fishing industry in the public waters of 
Ontario for year ending December 31, 1949 ------ 42 

25. Quantities of fish taken ------------42 

26. Comparative statement of the yield of the fisheries of 
Ontario by Lake ---------------44 

27. Comparative statement of the yield of the fisheries of 
Ontario ------------------ 44 



Page 23 Division of Fish and Wildlife 

ALGONQUIN PROVINCIAL PARK NATURALIST PROGRAM 

The season 1949-50 was the sixth for the Algonquin Park Naturalist Program. 
Despite its similarity to programs in national and state parks in the L T nited States, 
it arose spontaneously, as a result of public demand. The program of the summer of 
1944 was organized by Prof. J. R. Dymond, of the University of Toronto, a summer 
resident of Smoke Lake, at the urgent request of the Department. It has since been 
expanded and organized to meet public needs. 

This year one nature trail was enlarged to make a total of three trails with 
labels identifying the plants, trees, shrubs and other points of nature interest. Accord- 
ing to actual count of nature trail registration. 6.440 Park visitors used the trails 
and there were many requests for more trails. 

The Park Naturalists gave 34 nature talks at the various hotels and lodges. 
These evening gatherings were attended by a total of 1,200 people. Coloured slides 
were used to illustrate the geography, history and purpose of the Park. Stress was 
laid upon the wildlife and its natural environment, and the interdependence of plants 
and animals. These points, as well as identification of the Park flora and fauna were 
again emphasized in the nature hikes. A total of 353 hikers attended the 26 conducted 
nature hikes. 

This year also saw the beginning of construction on the Park Museum of 
Natural History. When completed, this will serve as a focal point for the nature 
program. Here, on display, will be specimens and exhibits explaining the wildlife 
of the Park. With this in mind, a representative insect collection was started this 
year. In addition, collections representing the trees, shrubs, plants, and small mammals 
were made. A project was started to study the ecology of a typical bog lake. With 
the information and specimens gathered it is hoped that an exhibit can be built to 
show the history, flora, fauna and the importance of such a lake. 

To further the enjoyment and the education of the visitor, a pamphlet was 
written to describe the Park and the program. This was distributed at the Park 
entrances with the travel permits. 

In Algonquin Park, where conventional entertainment is at a minimum and 
where the emphasis is placed upon the natural environment, an interpretive service 
such as this is a step toward public education as a means of gaining public co-operation. 
Only through public contact on a popular level, can the work of management and 
research be brought to light and appreciated. It is recognized that an interest in 
natural history is an important incentive in bringing people to Algonquin Park rather 
than to one of the many other places where outdoor recreation is available. 

BEAR BOUNTY 1949-1950 

Under The Wolf and Bear Bounty Act. 1946, a §10.00 bounty is paid on any 
hear 1 2 months of age or over, and a S5.00 bounty is paid on any bear under 12 months 
of age, which has been killed between April 15th. and November 30th, in a township 
of which 25' '< of the total area is devoted to agriculture, and which is located in one 
of the counties or districts described in the Regulations. The Act further specifies that 
the bear must be killed in defence or preservation of livestock or property, by a bona 
fide resident of the township. 

The following is a comparative statement, showing the bear bounty statistics 
for a period of five years, ending with the fiscal year 1949-1950. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 24 



PERIOD 


ADULTS 


CUBS 


BOUNTY 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1946 


1167 




SI 1,330.00 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1947 


959 


73 


9,735.00 


For year ending Mar. 31, 1948 


509 


17 


5.095.00 


For year ending Mar. 31. 1949 


592 


o7 


6,035.00 


For vear ending Mar. 31, 1950 


803 


122 


S, 530. 00 







It will be noted from the above table that the statistics for the last fiscal year, 
show a marked increase in the number of bears killed. This may indicate that the low 
period in the bear cycle, was reached in the fiscal year ending 1948. 

There were 750 claims for bounty involving 803 bears, and 122 bear cubs 
considered by the Department, of which. 11 claims representing 11 bears, were refused 
for various reasons. 

The following table shows the number of bears and cubs killed in each of the 
counties and districts on which applications for bounty were received. These figures 
do not include the bears hunted and killed by sportsmen, on which bounty is not 
applicable. Table Xu , 

BEAR BOUNTY FOR FISCAL YEAR 1949-1950 



County or 
District 



Bear 
12 months (>r over 



Cubs 
under 12 months 



Total 



Algoma _ 


63 


26 


89 


Bruce ..... ... 


8 


1 


9 


Cochrane 


179 


21 


200 


Frontenac 


3 




3 


Haliburton 


4 


3 


7 


Hastings 


28 


3 


31 


Kenora 


19 
2 


4 

2 


2i 


Lennox and Addington 


4 


Manitoulin 


5 


1 


6 


Muskoka 


9 




9 


Nipissing 


10 


4 


23 


Parry Sound 


41 


3 


44 


Peterboro 


6 




6 


Rainy River 


70 
26 


14 
12 


84 


Renfrew— 


38 


Sudbury 


51 


3 


54 


Timiskaming ... 


128 
142 


8 
17 


136 


Thunder Bav 


159 


Total: 


803 


122 


925 



FUR FARMING 1949 

During the first part of the calendar year 1949. the market for ranch raised 
mink pelts appears to have struck the low level on its gradual decline from the high 
wartime prices. These prices insofar as good quality standard mink w r ere concerned, 
were slightly above the high cost of production. However, by fall, the market showed 
a steady improvement in demand and price levels, and ranchers once again received. 
for L r ood quality pelts, prices reminiscent of wartime. 

Silver fox in all its phases, continued to bring prices well below- production 
costs. The depressed fox market has been an asset in one sense, in that it has forced 
a general housecleaning in the fox industry which was long overdue. Many ranchers 
who raised inferior pelts have been forced out of the business, the remainder pelted 
out all but a nucleus of their finest breeding stock. These circumstances would indicate 
that only the finest pelts will be available when market conditions improve to the 



Page 25 



Division of Fisb and Wildlife 




Moose calf (female), Paiponge Twp. (Thunder Hay). 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 26 



point where profit can be realized, which should put the fox industry on the soundest 
basis in its history. 

The unstable market in the first part of this year and the general condition of 
the industry resulted in a net decrease of 268 ranches in the Province. There was a 
total of 1,392 licences issued during the calendar year 1949. Of these, 1,274 were 
renewals of previous licences, 108 for newly established ranches and 10 licences were 
issued with retroactive provisions to legalize the operation of ranches during the 
previous year. Table No. 2 

SUMMARY OF BREEDING STOCK — LICENSED FUR FARMS 
JANUARY 1st 
1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 



Beaver 


44 


30 


45 


70 


71 


Fisher 


14 


35 


45 


46 


26 


Blue Fox 


955 


1283 


1276 


1450 


385 


Cross Fox 


64 


47 


36 


23 


11 


Pearl Platinum Fox 


1514 


2382 


378 
3133 


368 
2437 


565 


Platinum Fox 


1549 


Red Fox... 


106 


110 


94 


38 


23 


Standard Silver Fox — — 


11238 


10772 


9400 


6654 


5016 


White Fox 


* 


* 


5 


1 


4 


White Marked Fox 


2629 


3115 


3179 


1690 


927 


Lynx. . . 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Marten 


17 


16 


28 


35 


35 


Mink 


36912 


50677 


72992 


75192 


71139 


Muskrat— - 


26 


2 


92 


65 


55 


Raccoon 


128 


130 


127 


97 


94 


Skunk 


1 


i 


2 


1 


5 



*Shown tinder allied types. 

The following table shows the 
County or 
District 

Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Cochrane 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Halton _ 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kenora 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln _ 

Manitoulin 

Muskoka _... ._ 



location 

Number 
17 

9 
47 
14 

6 

7 

2 
13 
15 
19 
13 

3 

5 
79 
19 
31 

5 
40 
25 
27 
17 
48 

9 

5 
24 
14 
10 



by County or District 
County or 
District 
Middlesex . 
Xipissing _ 
Norfolk _ 
Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford _ 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough ... 

Prescott 

Prince Edward . 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Sudbury 

Timiskaming ... 
Thunder Bay _. 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 



of licensed fur farms 1949. 



Number 
43 

9 

9 
13 
28 
29 
20 
28 
50 
13 
14 

3 
30 
43 

4 
90 

1 
23 

7 
104 
13 
35 
17 
37 
51 
145 



Total 1382 



Page 27 



Division of Fisb and "Wildlife 



WOLF BOUNTY 1949-1950 

In accordance with the provisions of The Wolf and Bear Bounty Act, 1946, 
a $25.00 bounty was paid on timber and brush wolves three months of age and over 
and a $5.00 bounty was paid on timber and brush wolves under three months of 
age. However, under an amendment to this Act. the bounty on wolf pups was 
increased from $5.00 to SI 5.00. effective June 7th, 1949. and all claims for bounty 
on wolf pups submitted on and after that date, were paid at the new rate. 

On wolves killed in provisional judicial districts, the Department pays the 
whole bounty, whereas on those killed in counties, the Department pays 40% of the 
bounty with the remaining 60 r c being paid by the respective county. 

Table No. 3 
The following tabulation shows the annual wolf bounty statistics for a period 
of five years: 

Bounty and 
Period Timber Brush Pups Total Expenses 

For year ending Mar. 31, 1946 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1947 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1948 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1°4Q 
For year ending Mar. 31, 1950 

During the 25-year-period from 1925 to March 31st. 1950. the Province has 
expended 51.183.464.00 in bounty for the destruction of 65,972 wolves and 1.048 wolf 
pups. This figure does not include the monies expended by the counties on wolf 
bounty. 

In the period covered by this report, the Department considered 1.757 claims 
for bounty on 2,544 wolves. Of these. 24 claims on 30 wolves were refused for various 
reasons, principally because of the illegal use of snares during the deer season. 

The following is a computation of the bounty paid in counties and districts, 
and showing the bounty paid on wolf pups at the old and new rates. 



1.266 


777 


30 


2,073 


$44,999.87 


1.440 


1,182 


42 


2,664 


S59.275.18 


1.515 


961 


74 


2,540 


$54,923.38 


1.581 


1.062 


84 


2,727 


$57,977.00 


1.613 


890 


41 


2.544 


S56.927.00 



COUNTIES 



Timber— 27 @ $10 __ 
Brush— 328 @ $10 __ 

Pups — I @ $2 

Pups— 9 @ $6 



Total 

Grand Total 



$ 270.00 

. 3,280.00 

8.00 

54.00 

$3,612.00 



DISTRICTS 

Timber— 1,563 @ $25 — $39,075.00 

Brush— 555 @ $25 ..._ 13,875.00 

Pups— 7 @ $5 35.00 

Pups— 22 @ S15 330.00 



Total 



$53,315.00 

S5o.Q27.00 



Table No. 4 
The following is a summary of the number of wolves killed in each of the 
counties and districts, on which applications for bounty were submitted. 



County 



Timber 



Brush 



Pups 



Total. 



Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Durham 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Grenville 




20 
5 
1 

10 
1 

20 
1 



Continued on Next Page. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 2S 



County 

Grey 
Halton _ 

Hastings 

Huron 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and Addington 

Norfolk 

Northumberland .— ._ 

Ontario 

Oxford 
Peel . 

Peterboro 

Renfrew..-. 

Simcoe 

Victoria 

Welland ..... 

Wellington 

Wentworth .._ 
York 

Total for Counties 



Timber 



Brush 



Pups 



Total 




10 
3 

37 
4 
5 

IS 

13 

4 

13 

24 

9 

1 

1 

22 

67 

30 

46 

6 

4 

1 

2 

375 



District 



Table No. 5 
WOLF BOUNTY FOR FISCAL YEAR 1040-1950 
Timber Brush Pups 



Total 





112 

43 

8 

557 

10 

8 

127 

104 

40 

158 

108 

37 

263 

1,584 

29 


70 

9 

2 

102 

88 

10 

7 

11 

6 

96 

97 

59 
557 
333 


7 

7 
5 
5 

4 

28 
13 


189 




52 




17 




664 




112 


Muskoka 

Nipissing ..... - 

Parry Sound 


18 

134 

115 

46 


Rainy River 


258 


Sudbury 


205 
37 


Thunder Bav 

Total Districts 


322 
2,169 


Total Counties 


375 






Grand Total 


1,613 


890 


41 


2.544 



Table No. 6 

REVENUE RECEIVED FROM EXPORT PERMITS 

APRIL 1st, 1949, TO MARCH 31st, 1950 



TOTAL AMOUNT 


TOTAL AMOUNT 


OF PELTS 


OF REVENL'E 


65,600 


$131,200.00 


454 


681.00 


231 


162.50 


7,845 


784.50 


27 


34.50 


62 


93.00 


2 


1.00 


391 


586.50 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 
Fox (White) ... 
Fox (not specified) ... 
Lynx 



Continued on Next Page. 



Page 29 



Division of Fish and Wildlife 







TOTAL AMOUNT 
OF PELTS 


TOTAL AMOUNT 
OF REVENUE 


Marten 


393 

41,712 

555,804 

5,152 

7,790 

5,856 

67,052 


393.00 


Mink 




20,856.00 


Muskrats 




55,580.40 


Otter 




5,152.00 


Raccoon 




779.00 


Skunk 


292.80 


Weasel 


3,332.60 


Wolverine..... 







Total 


Revenue 




$219,928.80 



Table No. 7 

REVENUE RECEIVED FROM TANNERS' PERMITS 

APRIL 1st, 1940, TO MARCH 31st. 1950 

TOTAL AMOUNT 
OF PELTS 



TOTAL AMOUNT 
OF REVENUE 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 

Fox (White) 

Fox (not specified) 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrats 

Otter 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel .... 

Wolverine 

Total Revenue 




5 256.00 

33.00 

57.50 

278.10 

40.50 

2.00 

24.00 

14.00 

345.50 

16,813.20 

79.00 

106.00 

10.30 

15.05 

.80 



$1S,074.95 



Table No. 8 
SUMMARY 

PELTS 
EXPORTED 



PELTS 
TANNED 



TOTAL 
PELTS 



Beaver 

Fisher 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Red).... 

Fox (Silver or Black) 

Fox (White) 

Fox (not specified) 

Lynx 

Marten 

Mink 

Muskrats 

Otter ..... 

Raccoon 

Skunk 

Weasel 

Wolverine 



65,600 

454 

231 

7,845 

27 

62 

2 

391 

393 

41.712 

555,804 

5,152 

7.7QO 

5,856 

67,052 




65,728 

476 

284 

10,626 

57 

66 

2 

407 

407 

42,403 

723.03d 

5,231 

8,850 

6,062 

67,353 



Revenue received from Export Permits 
Revenue received from Tanners Permit> 
Total Revenue 



S2 10.U4S SO 

18,074.95 

$238,023.75 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 30 



Table No. 9 

TOTAL VALUE OF PELTS EXPORTED OR TANNED 

DURING THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31st, 1950 





PELTS 


PELTS 


TOTAL 


VALUE OF 




EXPORTED 


TANNED 


PELTS 


PELTS 


Beaver 


65,600 


128 


65,728 


51,311,273.60 


Fisher 


454 


22 


476 


16,360.12 


Fox (Cross) - 


231 


53 


284 


582.20 


Fox (Red) 


7,845 


2,781 


10,626 


8,288.28 


Fox (Silver or Black) ._ .. 


27 


30 


57 


329.60 


Fox (White) 


62 


4 


66 


516.78 


Fox (not specified) 


2 





2 


1.56 


Lvnx 


391 


16 


407 


3,101.34 


Marten 


393 


14 


407 


7,448.10 


Mink 


41,712 


691 


42,403 


1,219,934.31 


Muskrats 


555,804 


168,132 


723,936 


1.476,829.44 


Otter 


5,152 


79 


5,231 


111,263.37 


Raccoon 


7,790 


1,060 


8,850 


11,505.00 


Skunk 


5,856 


206 


6,062 


3,394.72 


Weasel — 


67,052 


301 


67,353 


77,455.95 


Wolverine 





2 


2 


13.00 




758,371 


173,519 


931,890 


$4,248,297.37 



Table No. 10 

STATEMENT OF RANCH RAISED PELTS EXPORTED OR 

TANNED FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31st, 1950 

EXPORTED TANNED TOTAL PELTS 



Fox (Blue).... 

Fox (Cross) 

Fox (Silver or Black) 
Mink 



456 


4 


460 


2,911.80 




2 


10 


20.50 


13,072 


1,857 


14,929 


170,339.89 


137,172 


6,341 


143,513 


1,991,960.44 


150,708 


8,204 


158,912 


S2, 165,232.63 



ENFORCEMENT 

A staff of some two hundred conservation officers patrol the province to insure 
enforcement of the Game and Fisheries Act, the Special Fishery Regulations and the 
Migratory Birds Convention Act. These officers are under the direct control of the 
District Foresters in their respective areas, and are assisted by the Ontario Provincial 
Police, Royal Canadian Mounted Police and deputy game wardens appointed from 
interested sportsmen. The following details show some results of their activities. 

Seizures 

During the annual period April 1, 1949 to March 31. 1950. there was a total 
of 2.697 cases in which equipment was seized due to the fact that it was being used in 
various ways which constituted infractions of the legislation and regulations. 

Table No. 11 
Details of the officers who were responsible for these seizures are as follows, viz: — 

Conservation Officers 2,315 cases 

Provincial Police Constables 12 cases 

Deputy Game Wardens 9 cases 

Joint Action: 

Conservation Officers and O.P.P. 61 

Conservation Officers and D.G.W. — 299 

Conservation Officers and R.C.M.P. 1 361 cases 

2,697 cases 



Page 31 



Division of Fish and Wildlife 



In 166 of these cases the seizures were made from unknown persons, principally 
traps and fishing gear which were set in an unlawful manner, and in which cases it 
was impossible for the officers concerned to develop definite evidence regarding the 
ownership of the articles. The equipment seized in these cases was confiscated to the 
Crown. Table Xo. 12 

The articles seized in these 2,697 cases included: 



Game animals (or portions) 

and birds 

Firearms 

Fish 



Nets and fishing gear 

Angling equipment, including 

tackle boxes 

Spears 



184 cases 

1,434 cases 

475 cases 

166 cases 

422 cases 

76 cases 



Pelts and hides ... 
Traps and snares 

Water craft 

Outboard motors 
Motor vehicles _. 
Artificial lights . 



1,879 cases 

135 cases 

28 cases 

12 cases 

11 cases 

42 cases 

85 pieces 



Miscellaneous articles 

Further details concerning these various seizures are enumerated in the following tables: 



.22 calibre rifles _. 

High-power rifles 

Shotguns 

Combination rifles and shotguns. 



Bear 



Table Xo. 13 
FIREARMS 
691 cases Revolvers and pistols 

179 cases Air rifles 

551 cases 
6 cases 

Table Xo. 14 
PELTS AXD HIDES 



Beaver 
Fisher 
Fox, red 
Fox. silver 
Marten 
Mink .... 



1 

261 

4 

18 

1 
4 

72 



Muskrat 

Otter _ 

Raccoon 

Squirrels 

Weasels 

Wolves 



3 cases 

4 cases 

1.434 cases 



.1,227 
6 
. 10 
. 151 
. 121 
3 



Table Xo. 15 
MISCELLAXEOUS ARTICLES 



Packsacks and haversacks . 

Axes 

Hunting Knives 
Snaggers 

Creels 

Minnow pails and trap- 
Tip-up^ 

Ice Chisels 

Anchor? 



20 

5 
2 
16 
2 
4 
3 
7 
1 



Dynamite (Sticks) 
Storage Batteries 
Gaff Hooks 
Oars (Pair) 
Skis (Pair) 
Suitcases 
Dogs 



l.>-- 



10 
5 
5 

1 
1 
1 
2 



85 



Prosecutions 

The information contained in the following statistical tables emphasizes one 
phase of enforcement and the necessity for the maintenance of a capable and efficient 
staff to perform these duties. 

Table Xo. 16 
INFORMATION'S 

SEIZURES INVESTIGATIONS TOTA1 



Conservation Officers 
Provincial Police 


2,644 
12 


200 


12 




2,656 


290 


2,946 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 32 



Table No. 17 
RESULTS OF PROSECUTION 





CONVICTIONS 


DISMISSED 


WITHDRAWN 


TOTAL 


Conservation Officers 


2,602 
12 


102 


140 


2,934 


Provincial Police 


12 




2,704 


102 


140 


2,946 



Table No. 18 



CONVICTIONS FOR FISCAL 

Angling without non-resident licences — 188 
Exporting over limit, or undersized fish, 

or without coupons 45 

Angling with more than one line 22 

Fishing other than by angling 158 

Illegal possession of gill nets 42 

Taking undersized or over limit of fish _ 168 

Illegal possession of fish in closed season 224 

Setting nets in restricted areas 9 

Taking fish by use of artificial lights 16 

Angling in restricted waters 27 

Guiding without licence and violation of 

condition of guide's licence 18 

Hunting without licence 637 

Hunting in closed season 80 

Hunting in prohibited hours __ 141 

Hunting deer without licenced guides, 

Kenora and Rainy River districts Q 

Hunting with unplugged shotguns 113 

Huntings ducks from a power boat 6 

Jacklighting deer 20 

Illegal possession of game in closed season 128 

Commercial fishing without licences 14 

Filleting fish for export 2 

Allow fish or game to spoil 5 

Pollution of waters 1 

Illegal possession of female deer or fawn . 13 

Trespassing 5 

Killing moose in closed season 12 

Illegal possession of bull frogs 7 

Antedating licences 5 

Transporting unsealed deer _ 13 

Keeping animals in captivity without 

licence 1 



2 

11 

164 



YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1950 

Setting snares 

Transferring hunting or fishing licences. 

Loaded firearms in motor vehicles __ 

Illegal possession of firearms in Crown 

Game Preserves or Provincial Parks .... 88 
Illegal possession of firearms in lumber 

and mining camps, etc. 42 

Firearms not encased or dismantled at 

night _ 7 

Shooting across highways or from motor 

cars 13 

Allow dogs to run at large 20 

Hunting with unlicenced dogs 2 

Hunting migratory birds and pheasants 

with rifle 21 

Obstructing an officer 13 

Taking hen pheasants 3 

Killing wild native birds 6 

Trapping without licence 68 

Illegal possession of furs 74 

Trapping during closed season 10 

Set traps in muskrat and beaver houses .. 8 
Trap in Game Preserves and Provincial 

Parks 3 

Operating Tourist Outfitters' Camps 

without licences ° 

Violation of condition of fur buyers' 

licence _ - 2 

Importing live minnows 2 

Operating fur farms without licences 2 

Failure to make fur dealers' returns 1 

Breaking beaver dams 2 

Setting nets without tags or buoys 2 

2,704 



Charges were laid against violators in a total of 2,946 cases in which infrac- 
tions of the legislation and regulations it is our duty to enforce had either been wit- 
nessed or disclosed upon investigation. 

In 2,704 cases convictions were registered. Charges were dismissed in 102 
cases. Charges were withdrawn in 140 cases for various reasons such as where two 
or more charges were originally laid against an individual, or for lack of supporting 
evidence when the case was further investigated 

Many violations were of an extremely important nature, such as: 

Illegal taking and possession of beaver 

Unlawful hunting and trapping in Crown Game Preserves and Provincial Parks 



Page 33 



Division of Fish and Wildlife 




Cormorant 
assisted by 



egg dipping operation — Fish and Wildlife specialist Neil McN aught on (in 
Major C. E. Sinclair, Parry Sound. 



Assaulting and obstructing officers 

Illegal killing of cow moose 

Jacklighting deer 

Possession of gill nets without proper authority 

Operating gill nets without a licence 

Hunting in closed season. 



( .1 NERAL 

The Game and Fisheries Act provides that articles "'used in violation of this 
Act and found in the possession of any person suspected of having committed an offence 
against this Act shall be seized, and upon conviction, be forfeited to and become the 
property of the Crown in the right of Ontario and sold by the Department. ' 

In many cases where the offences were of a minor character, the persons from 
whom seizures were made were given an opportunity to redeem the articles seized upon 
payment of a specified fee fixed by the Department. This arrangement applies prin- 
cipally to firearms and fishing tackle. The amount realized from such sales amounted 
to $5,319.80. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 34 



There are also many cases which are sufficiently serious to warrant definite 
confiscation to the Crown. Such articles are disposed of in annual public sales. 

Table No. 19 

Three such sales were conducted by the Department during the period under 
review, as follows: 

May fishing tackle sale $ 807.56 

June fur sale, confiscated furs 2,457.45 

October sale of firearms and miscellaneous equipment 3,788.26 



Total $7,053.27 

During the period under review Conservation Officers in the course of their 
operations, and in addition to many other duties, performed the following services: 

1. Seized equipment in 2,697 cases, 166 of which covered unknown persons. 

2. Prosecuted some 2,934 cases and obtained convictions in 2,692 cases. 

3. Obtained fines totalling $47,854. 

4. Realized $12,373.77 from the sale of confiscated articles. 

5. Aided in distribution of millions of fish and the re-stocking of thousands of 
pheasants. 

6. Spent a great deal of time, after hours, working with organized groups in the 
interest of conservation. 

GAME FISH SECTION 

Hatcheries and Rearing Stations 

Excellent progress was made in the culture and distribution of the various 
species of both commercial and game fish which were reared in 27 provincial hatcheries 
this year. The total output of fish was in excess of any yearly distribution since 1943. 

It is of particular interest that 37,550 maskinonge fingerlings, ranging in size 
from 2" to 7", were distributed to suitable waters. This number is greater than that 
of any previous distribution and followed special investigation of waters to insure for 
the species a high degree of suitability. 

Another important item was the re-stocking of Trout Lake, in Widdifield 
Township, District of Nipissing, with 800 Ouananiche fingerlings. These were the 
result of spawn-taking operations on this lake in the autumn of the previous year. 
The breeding stock has resulted from Ouananiche yearlings which the former Depart- 
ment of Game and Fisheries originally planted in Trout Lake in 1935. 

Pembroke Trout Rearing Station was closed during the year so that extensive 
repairs and alterations could be made in order to increase the efficiency of the 
hatchery. 



Page 35 Division of Fisb and Wildlife 



Biological Projects 

The biological projects undertaken during the year, consisted of the following: 
bass harvesting, sea lamprey control, Atlantic salmon experiments, controlled poisoning 
of a lake containing undesirable species of fish to determine the possibility of establish- 
ing desirable species, creel census studies, fish tagging and biological surveys of lakes 
and streams. 

Bass Harvesting 

During the summer months, adult smallmouth bass and largemouth bass were 
harvested from the following lakes and distributed to suitable waters: Barton, Bastedo, 
Cat, Davern, Fox, Little Gull. Little Silver. O'Reilly and Shoepac. 

Sea Lamprey Control 

Operations for the control of sea lamprey were continued. A number of weirs 
were set in selected streams flowing into the North Channel. Many other locations 
are being studied to determine their suitability for lamprey control operations. 

Removal of Coarse Fish 

Xets were operated on the following waters for the removal of undesirable 
species: Bark Lake. Emily Creek. Kamaniskeg Lake, Xonquon River. Scugog Lake. 
Twenty-Minute Lake and Wolfe Lake. 

Atlantic Salmon Experiment 

Studies relating to the re-establishment of the Atlantic salmon in Lake Ontario 
were continued in Duffin Creek at Pickering. 

Fish Poisoning 

In Silver Lake at Port Dover, the coarse fish were removed by poisoning, and 
yellow pickerel fry were planted. This plan seemed to offer considerable prospect for 
the production of fingerling pickerel. 

Creel Census Studies 

Creel census studies were conducted on a number of waters to determine the 
proportion of hatchery-reared trout in the angler's catch. This project included waters 
in the district of Thunder Bay and Algoma, and in the counties of Bruce. Grey, 
Victoria, Peterborough and Haliburton. 

Fish Tagging 

Six hundred yellow pickerel were tagged at the outlets of the Moon, Shawanaga 
and French rivers to determine the facts regarding the movements of this species and 
its availability to the anglers and commercial fishermen. 

The program, initiated last year, of tagging smallmouth bass in Georgian 
Bay. was continued and 250 additional smallmouth bass were tagged. 

Biological Surveys 

A long term project is being conducted on Long Point Bay. Lake Erie, to 
determine the relationshop of commercial fishing to angling. 

Investigations of a biological nature were made on a number of lakes and 
streams, with a view to the establishment of a sound fish-management plan. These 
were either initial surveys or extensions of previous ones. The waters studied were 
as follows: 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 36 



Algoma 

Burtt Lake 
Cataract Lake 
Conacher Lake 
Dubourne Lake 
Frobel Lake 
Heron Lake 
Jimmy Lake 
Lauzon Lake 
Pistol Lake 
Pot Lake 
Skull Lake 
Wigwam Lake 

Brant 

Blue Lake 
Pinehurst Lake 
Scotland Pond 

Bruce 

Gillies Lake 

Grey 
Eugenia Pond 
Gully Creek 
Little Lake 
Mad River 
Priddle Creek 

Huron 

Naeftel's Creek 
Rau's Creek 

Kenora 

Broadtail Lake 
Eagle Lake 
Fox Lake 
Gun Lake 
Indian Lake 
Malachi Lake 
Nixon Lake 



Otter Lake 
Pelican-pouch Lake 
Rice Lake 
Twin Lake 
Upper Manitou Lake 
Winnipeg River 

Muskoka 

Oxtongue Lake 
Pine Lake 

South Muskoka River 
Torrance Lake 

Nipissing 

Bass Lake 
Emerald Lake 
Gravel-pit Lake 
Herridge Lake 
James Lake 
Kanichee Lake 
Pleasant Lake 
Twenty-minute Lake 
Whitney Lake 
Wickstead Lake 

Northumberland 
Healey Falls 

Ontario 

Frenchman's Bay 
Scugog Lake 

Parry Sound 
Bernard Lake 
Cecebe Lake 
French River 
Gull Wing Lake 
Memesagamesing Lake 
Pickerel River 

Peel 

Credit River 



Peterboro 

Pigeon Lake 
Trent Canals 

Simcoe 

Beckwith Island Area 
Christian Island Area 
Honey Harbour 
McDonald Bay 
McRae Lake 
Nottawasaga River 
Severn River 
Simcoe Lake 
Wasdell Falls 
Waubaushene Bay 

Sudbury 

Ice Lake 
Lily Lake 
Silver Lake 
Tobacco Lake 
Wanapitei Lake 

Thunder Bay 

Arrow Bay 
Bass Lake 
Greenwater Lake 
Jack Lake 
Jill Lake 
Kama Lake 
Mignet Lake 
Pickerel Lake 
Ravine Lake 
Rita Lake 
Sandy Lake 
Shebandowan Lake 
Shelter Lake 
Whitefish Lake 

Waterloo 

Gingrich Creek 

York 

Cook Bay 

Holland River and Marsh 

Humber River 



Table No. 20 

SUMMARY OF FISH DISTRIBUTION 

For Fiscal Year Aprtl 1st, 1949, TO MARCH 31st, 1950 



Herring 8,400,000 

Whitefish 245,150,000 

Pickerel _ - 312,900,000 

Maskinonge ..__ _ __ 2,787,550 

Bass— Smallmouth 1,937,329 

Bass — Largemouth 565,749 

Atlantic Salmon 112,000 



Lake Trout 6,642,900 

Speckled Trout .. 4,431,671 

Brown Trout 406,800 

Kamloops Trout ._ 34,000 

Ouananiche — 800 

Total 583,368,799 



Page 37 



Division of Fish and Wildlife 



Table No. 21 
COMPARATIVE TABLE SHOWING DISTRIBUTION ACCORDING TO SPECIES 



104: 



lQ4o 



1047 



194S 



1949 



Smallmouth Bass 
Fr\ -.„_ 



Fingerlings 

Yearlings and Adults 

Largemouth Bass 
Fry 
Fingerlings 

Yearlings and Adults 

Maskinonge 

Fry 

Fingerlings 

Adults . 

Perch 

Fry 

Pickerel 
Fry 

Brown Trout 
Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Lake Trout 
Fry 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Rainbow Trout 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Kamloops Trout 

Fingerlings 

Yearlings 

Adults 

Speckled Trout 
Fry ... 

FiriKerlings 

Yearlings 

Adults 



Whitefish 
Fry 

Herring 
Fry 



Minnows 
Adults 



Atlantic Salmon 
Fingerlings 



( hiananiche 
Fingerlings 



Tni \i s 



44S.000 

348,368 

5,322 



5.000 



2,030,000 
200 



12,000,000 

177.595,000 

50.000 
224,749 

765,000 

7,248,040 

88,700 

5,563 

9,900 

5,000 

117,300 

3,005,573 

4,460 

240,786,775 

6,405,000 

4,000 

41,350 



385,000 

312,710 

4,418 



9,500 
27 



1,150.000 
6,875 



20,450.000 
142.485.000 



133,025 
268,940 

2,265,000 

3.609,195 

28.045 



1.610 



4,850 

50,000 

84,730 

2,760,780 

8,656 

205,590,000 

69,974,000 



88,210 



1. 457.000 

579,925 

5,099 

305.000 

6.100 

876 

2.700,000 

11,540 

127 

12,000.000 

254,030.000 



375,850 



3,467,645 
89,050 



151,193,300 449,270,571 5S5.774.slJ 



3,850 



16.100 
115 



517.400 

2,802.150 

1,860 

233,316,125 

23,940,000 



59,000 



1,402,500 

554,900 

3,459 

410,000 
300 
789 

3,135,000 

24,600 

195 



267,170,000 

9,000 

557,505 
350,113 

1 ,000.000 

4,858,300 

77,055 

27,900 
8,350 



4,600 
100 



1.000 

882,450 

2,333.910 

5.270 

243,482,000 

20.375,000 



101,400 



546,775,696 



1,532,500 

398,100 

6,729 

550.000 

15,500 

249 

2.750,000 

37,550 

6,729 



312,900.000 

10.000 
175,000 
221,800 

1.000.000 

5,561,700 

81,200 



2,000 
32.000 



16,000 

1.475.300 

2.038,325 

2,046 

245,150,000 

8,400.000 



112.000 
800 



583,368,799 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 38 




Julian Kenny checking fish food supply in sample taken from lake bottom. 



Page 39 



Division of Fish and Wildlife 



Table No. 22 
DISTRIBUTION BY AGE GROUPS— 1949 



SPECIES 


FRY 


FINGERLLNGS 


YEARLINGS 


ADULTS 


TOTAL 


Herring 


8,400,000 











8,400,000 


Whitefish 


245.150,000 











245,150,000 


Pickerel 


312,900,000 











312,900,000 


Maskinonge ___ 


2,750,000 


37,550 








2,787,550 


Bass — Smallmouth 


1,532,500 


398,100 


■ 


6,729 


1,937,329 


Bass — Largemouth 


550,000 


15,500 





240 


565,749 


Atlantic Salmon 





112,000 








112,000 


Lake Trout 


1,000,000 


5,561,700 


81,200 





6.642,900 


Speckled Trout 


16.000 


1.475,300 


2,938.325 


2,046 


4,431,671 


Brown Trout 


10,000 


175,000 


221,800 





406,800 


Kamloops Trout 





2,000 


32,000 





34,000 


Ouananiche 





800 








800 


Totals 


572,308,500 


7.777,950 


3,273,325 


0,024 


583,368,799 



Table No. 23 
DISTRIBUTION OF FISH BY SPECIES AND HATCHERIES 

April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950 



WHITEFISH 



PICKEREL 



HATCHERY 

Collingwood 

Fort Frances 

Kenora 

Kingsville 

Little Current 

Normandale 

Port Arthur 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie .. 
Total 



33,600,000 
13,100,000 
28,850,000 
64,500,000 
42,500,000 
31,600,000 
700,000 
26,500,000 
3,800.000 



245,150,000 



HATCHERY 


FRY 


Collingwood 

Fort Frances 


39,900,000 
26,300,000 


Glenora 

Kenora 

Kingsville 

Little Current 

Pembroke 

Sarnia — 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Skeleton Lake 


38,750,000 
40,900,000 
56,000,000 
44.100,000 
0,700,000 
7,350,000 
20,000,000 
20.000.000 






Total 


312,900,000 



HERRING 



HATCHERY 

Collingwood 
Kingsville 

Little Current 
Normandale 

Total 



2,100,000 

300,000 

3.500,000 

2,500,000 



8,400,000 



BROWN TROUT 



HATCHERY 


EGGS 


ETNGERLTNGS 


\ 1 \K1 INV.S 


total 


Chatsworth 

Codrinsnon 

Glenora 

Ingersoll 


10,000 


75,000 

loo.ooo 


69,500 
67,900 

51,400 
33,000 


69,500 
7,000 
75.000 
5 1 ,400 


Mount Pleasant 

Normandale 


3S.000 
110,000 


Total 


10,000 


175,000 


221,800 


406,800 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 40 





MASKINONGE 




HATCHERY 


FRY 


FINGERLINGS 


TOTAL 


Deer Lake — . 


2,750,000 


37,550 


2,787,550 









LAKE 


TROUT 






HATCHERY 


FRY 


FINGERLINGS 


YEARLINGS TOTAL 


Chatsworth _ 

Fort Frances 


1,000,000 


20,000 

51,000 

142,000 

114,500 

2,674,000 
781,200 
299,000 

1,480,000 


12,500 

60,300 
8,400 


32,500 
51,000 


Glenora. 

Hills Lake 


142,000 
60,300 


Kenora 

North Bay 


114,500 
8,400 


Port Arthur 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Southampton 

Wiarton 


2,674,000 

1,781,200 

299,000 

1,480,000 






Total 


1,000,000 


5,561,700 


81,200 


6,642,900 



SMALLMOUTH BASS 



HATCHERY 


FRY 


FINGERLINGS 


ADULTS 


TOTALS 


Miscellaneous 

Mount Pleasant..... 

Sandfield 

Skeleton Lake 

White Lake.. 


1.300,000 
232,500 


19,000 
157,600 

41,700 
179,800 


5,737 
240 
125 
275 
352 


5,737 

1,319,240 

157,725 

41,975 

412,652 






Total 


1,532,500 


398,100 


6,729 


1,937,329 



LARGEMOUTH BASS 



HATCHERY 


FRY 


FINGERLINGS 


ADULTS 


TOTALS 


Miscellaneous ... 
Mount Pleasant ... 


550,000 


15,500 


172 

77 


172 

565,577 






Total 


550,000 


15,500 


249 


565,749 



SPECKLED TROUT 



HATCHERY 

Chatsworth 

Codrington 

Deer Lake 

Dorion 

Glenora..... 

Hill Lake 

Kenora 

Midhurst 

Mount Pleasant 

Normandale 

North Bay 

Pembroke. _. 

Sandfield ._ 

Sault Ste. Marie 
Skeleton Lake ... 

White Lake 

Total..... 



EGGS AND FRY FINGERLINGS YEARLINGS 



TOTAL 



1,000 



15,000 



500 
55,000 

452,100 

382,000 

87,000 

77,900 



4,000 

4,500 

412,300 



316,600 
65,600 
39,625 



258,400 

72,700 
113,900 

75,800 
255,100 
2,900 
750,500 
534,700 
278,100 
174,400 



11 

780 
85 

1,170 



317,100 
120,600 

39,625 
452,100 
382,000 
345,011 

77,900 

72,700 
115,680 

79,800 
255,185 
7,400 
750,500 
963,170 
278,100 
174,400 



16,000 



1,475,300 



2,938,325 



2,046 



4,431,671 



Page 41 




Division of Fish and Wildlife 


KAMLOOPS TROUT 


HATCHERY 


FINGERLINGS 


YEARLINGS TOTAL 


Xormandale 


2,000 


32,000 


34,000 



OUANANICHE 



HATCHERY 


FINGERLINGS 


North Bay 


800 









ATLANTIC SALMON 


HATCHERY 


FINGERLINGS 


Glenora 


112,000 







COMMERCIAL FISHING 

Commercial fishing licences issued for Ontario waters in 1949 totalled 2,675 
and the industry employed some 3,930 persons. The principal gear fished was gill 
nets and there were 1,071 gill net licences issued. The main areas for pound net fishing 
were Lakes Erie, St. Clair and Rainy Lake and the total of all pound net licences for 
Ontario was 183. Hoop net licences issued totalled 275, and the majority were issued 
for eastern Lake Ontario, the waters of the Rideau system, in south-eastern Ontario 
and Lake of the Woods in the Kenora district. Other commercial fishing licences 
issued included — seines for coarse fish; separate baited hook licences for sturgeon, 
lake trout, catfish and bullheads; and 710 commercial minnow licences. 

The harvest of commercial fish for the calendar year ending December 31, 1949 
was 34,061,361 lbs. and the landed value of this catch amounted to $5,496,836.88. The 
1949 production is an increase of 5,119,570 lbs. or 17.7$ over the yield of 1948. 

This 1949 production was the highest since 1945 when the catch reached 34*4 
million. The principal factor which brought about this highest catch over the past four 
years, may be attributed to the harvest of the blue pickerel (blue pike-perch) which 
for 1949 was 9,830,912 lbs. This in an increase of this species of some 4,046,772 lbs. 
or 69.9' ,■( over the previous year. 

The blue pickerel population of Lake Erie produces the bulk of the provincial 
yield of this species and the production for Lake Erie blue pickerel for 1949 was 
9,783.819, which is an increase of 70.4' < or 4,041,622 pounds over 1948. 

The blue pickerel in Lake Erie, as a general rule, appear in large numbers 
every four to five years, thus the large yield of this species, in all probability, came 
from the 1944 hatch. The previous peak production years were in 1943, 44 and 45. 
From catch data available it would therefore seem reasonable to assume that the 
harvest of blue pickerel in Lake Erie will drop considerably after 1950. Two other 
species, although not as significant as the blue pickerel, contributed somewhat to 
the overall increase in production for 1949. These were whitefish and yellow pickerel, 
both with an increase of approximately ' j million pounds respectively over the 1948 
yield. 

Only two species, lake herring and lake trout, showed any marked decrease in 
catch over the previous year. The peak of the lake herring harvest in recent years 
was reached in period 1945-47 and a decrease was anticipated in the yield of this 
species. Lake trout, which has shown an alarming drop in the provincial annual yield 



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Page 43 Division of Fish and Wildlife 



for a number of years, has again decreased in production over the previous year. 
This decrease amounted to 86,331 lbs. and the lower yield of lake trout in Lakes 
Superior and Ontario and in northern inland waters accounted for this. Lake Huron 
lake trout harvest is again insignificant. This once great lake trout area, which in 
1936. the last good production year, yielded over 2 million pounds, produced in 1949 
only 3.207 lbs 

Lake Erie, Georgian Bay and northern inland waters all had a substantial 
increase in total catch for 1949 over the previous year. Lake Erie had an overall 
increase of 4,166,686 lbs. due to the large yield of blue pickerel. Georgian Bay 
produced an overall increase of 650.087 lbs., attributable mainly to a larger catch of 
whitefish. The whitefish in Georgian Bay showed a steady decline from 1939 to 1947. 
decreasing from a catch of over one million pounds and reaching its lowest production 
of 87.316 lbs. in 1947. The prospects of an increased yield in whitefish in Georgian 
Bay appeared evident in that 1948 showed a substantial gain over the low catch of 
1947 and again in 1949 the yield of whitefish in Georgian Bay reached 804.947 lbs. 
which is the highest catch since 1940. 

A general increase in production for all species in the commercial catch was 
recorded for northern inland waters. The gain amounted to some 624.764 lbs. and 
was attributed to a slight increase in whitefish, northern pike, yellow pickerel and 
tullibee. 



DEVELOPMENTS IX THE FISHING INDUSTRY 
Nylon Nets 

The introduction of the use of nylon twine in gill net fishing in the Great 
Lakes has brought about a very definite improvement, according to the fishermen, in 
netting fish. Many of the gill netters of Lake Erie in the past year have replaced their 
cotton and linen twine with nylon and reports from these fishermen indicate, in some 
instances, that the nylon net may be as much as three times as efficient as either cotton 
or linen twine. 

Trap Nets 

The pound net fishing industry of Lake Erie is also looking for improvement in 
fishing methods through a more efficient and economical type of gear. During the 
past year a few of the pound netters have replaced some of their pound nets with 
trap nets on an experimental basis for the purpose of obtaining some definite data 
as to the efficiency of trap nets as compared to pound nets. 

INVESTIGATIONS 
Lake Trout Baited Hook Licences 

Investigations were continued in connection with the baited hook licences in 
the Georgian Bay area. This investigation has been conducted during the summer 
months of 1948 and 1949 and additional work is to be carried on next vear as well. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 44 



Pollution 

Investigations of the following lakes and streams were made to evaluate the 
effects of domestic and industrial wastes on fisheries, and to indicate corrective control 
measures which would be beneficial in obtaining desirable water quality objectives. 



Period: April 1, 1949, to March 

31, 1950. 
Location 

Balmer Creek at Red Lake. 
Beardmore Creek at Acton. 
Burnt River at Kinmount. 
Credit River at Port Credit. 
Duffin's Creek at Ajax. 
Effingham Stream in Welland 

County. 



Gingrich Creek in Waterloo 

County. 
Humber River at Woodbridge. 
Lake Nipigon in Orient Bay. 
Leskard in Durham County. 
Lynn River at Simcoe. 
McGregor's Creek at Chatham. 
Moira River at Corbyville. 
Muskoka River at Baysville. 
Napanee River at Strathcona. 



Lake Ontario at Mimico. 
Lake Ontario at Port Union. 
Bay of Quinte at Bath. 
Spanish River at Espanola. 
Sydenham River at Owen 

Sound. 
Thames River at Ingersoll. 
Thames River at Chatham. 
Toronto Harbour. 
Trent River at Trenton. 
Turkey Creek at Petrolia. 



Table No. 26 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES 

OF ONTARIO BY LAKE 



LAKE 


1948 

POUNDS 


1949 

POUNDS 


INCREASE 
POUNDS 


DECREASE 
POUNDS 


Ontario 


2,045,441 
14,026,190 

437,289 
1,439,692 

913,317 

444,995 
3,371,040 
4,629,365 

734,462 


2,005,807 
19,092,876 

540,022 
1,259,671 
1,563,404 

549,627 
3,188,397 
5,254,129 

607,338 


4,166,686 
102,733 

650,087 
104,632 

624,764 


39,544 


Erie 

St. Clair 

Huron 

Georgian Bay 


180,021 


North Channel 





Superior 

Northern Inland Waters 


182,643 


Southern Inland Waters 


127,124 






Total ... 
Net Increase 


28,941,791 


34,061,361 


5,648,902 
5,119,570 


529,332 



Table No. 27 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE YIELD OF THE FISHERIES 

OF ONTARIO 

1948 1949 



Carp.. 

Catfish and Bullheads 

Caviare 

Eels 

Goldeye 

Herring 

Mixed and Coarse 

Perch 

Pickerel (Blue) 

Pickerel (Yellow).. 

Pike 

Saugers 

Sturgeon 

Lake Trout 

Tullibee .... 
Whitefish... 

Total... 

Net Increase 



INCREASE 
POUNDS 



612,359 

907,800 

2,348 

41,974 

28,232 

2,520,206 

3,499,205 

2,257,086 

5,784,140 

3,088,595 

928,377 

163,921 

185, 2S7 

1,978,295 

404,030 

6,530,936 



28,941,791 



646,184 

902,132 

1,850 

47,861 

49,800 

2,136,951 

3,716,650 

2,698,438 

9,830,912 

3,235,222 

1,027,460 

190,633 

183,814 

1,891,964 

438,174 

7,063,316 



34,061,361 



33,825 



5,887 
21,568 

217,445 

441,352 

4,046,772 

146,627 

99,083 

26,712 



34,144 
523,380 



DECREASE 
POUNDS 



5.506,705 
5119,570 



5,668 
498 



383,255 



1,473 
86,331 



477,225 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 46 

DIVISION OF FOREST PROTECTION 

FIRE AND HAZARD CONDITIONS 

Meteorological records indicate that the 1949 season was the driest on record 
in some areas, especially the southerly portion of the Province. When precipitation did 
occur it was, in most instances, accompanied by lightning which resulted in a total 
of 468 fires starting from that source. This number of lightning fires is considerably 
above the average for a normal season. During the last few days of August, 68 
lightning fires were being fought. 

Periods of high hazard occurred in early May in the Western and Mid-Western 
Regions, early June in the Northern and Central Regions, early July across the 
Province and the most severe hazard was from August 8th to August 30th in the 
Central and Southern Regions. On August 19th, 170 fires were being fought. No 
serious fail hazard developed. 

The area under protection in 1950 was approximately 173,000 square miles or 
110,720,000 acres. 

FIRE CONTROL PLANNING 

Progress in fire control planning during the year included the placing of fly- 
wheel magnetizers and coil and condenser test sets in each district workshop, the 
supplying of aerial cameras to all aircraft, the installation of a Fire Data Board in 
Main Office, the testing of various types of tractors and the Michigan Sulky Plow for 
fire line construction, the ordering of fifty steel lookout towers for erection in 1950, 
the adoption of standard terminology for describing the condition of fires, the develop- 
ment of a standard aircraft fire detection form, the planning of a tank truck unit for 
development and construction in 1950 and the establishment of an Equipment Com- 
mittee to act as a clearing agency for all problems pertaining to equipment. 

FOREST INSECT AND DISEASE CONTROL 

The policy of co-operating with the Dominion Department of Agriculture in 
the study and control of forest insects and tree diseases was continued. The Forest 
Insect Laboratory at Sault Ste. Marie owned by the Ontario Government and staffed 
and operated by the Dominion provides a ready source of information concerning the 
location and degree of insect infestation and effective control measures. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

The Department of Public Works carried out the construction of the larger 
buildings and renovation of fish hatcheries. The Department of Lands and Forests 
carried out the construction of the smaller buildings and repair and maintenance of 
buildings, fish hatcheries, telephone lines, etc. 



Jjndex of- ^J able 3 

Table No. Page 

1. Total improvements completed to March 31, 1950 - - - - 47 

2. Radio stations in operation in 1949 ---------47 

3. Classification of forest fires, by month -------47 

4. Classification of forest fires, by origin -------48 

5. Classification of forest fires, by size --------48 

6. Classification of area burned over, by month ----- 48 



Page 47 



Division of Forest Protection 



7. Classification of area burned over, by ownership - - - - 49 

8. Classification of area burned over, by origin ------ 49 

9. Classification of area burned over, by forest type - - - - 51 

10. Statement of work permits issued 1949-50 ------ 51 

11. Fire damage table 1949 -------------53 

12. Report of major equipment as of March 31, 1950 - - - - 55 

13. Means of fire detection 1949 -----------56 

14. Statement of travel permits issued 1949 -------56 

15. Statement of fire permits issued 1949 --------56 

Jsnaex of Charts una LjrapnS 

Figure No. Page 

1. Forest fires in Ontario from 1930 to 1949 -------49 

2. Acreage burned by forest fires in Ontario from 1930 to 1949 - 56 



Table Xo. 1 
The total improvements completed to March 31, 1950, were as follows: 



Cabins 

Storehouses 

Boathouses 

Combined Storehouses and Boathouses 

Bunkhouses 

Offices 



514 
150 
63 
15 
60 
46 



Garages and Carhouses 

Other Buildings 

Hose Towers 

Wooden Lookout Towers 



93 

232 

58 

39 



Steel Lookout Towers 231 

Telephone Lines (Miles) 3,775 



RADIO COMMUNICATIONS 

Table No. 2 
Radio stations in operation in 1949 w T ere as follows: 



Tower radio installations 173 

Portable tower sets 2 

Marine radio installations _ 5 

Portable ground sets 59 

30 watt ground radio sets 55 



75 watt ground radio sets 
150 watt ground radio sets 
300 watt ground radio sets 
500 watt ground radio sets 
Aircraft radio installations 



2 
4 
7 
1 
39 



The Toronto radio station located at the Southern Research Experimental 
Station near Maple, and installed early in the 1949 season provides direct radio tele- 
graph communication to field offices and radio telephone communication with aircraft 
in flight. Teletype service between the Toronto radio station and main office was 
installed late in 1949 to provide a more direct contact with field offices. 

Table No. 3 
CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 

By Month— 1949 





1949 


1948 


1947 


1946 


1945 


1944 


1943 


MONTH 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 




1 
181 


1 
119 


11 


43 
140 


15 

134 


128 





April - 


15 




286 


473 


135 


248 


182 


352 


1S8 


June 


258 


437 


170 


298 


121 


112 


33 


July 


314 


288 


202 


404 


160 


253 


96 


August 


664 


146 


466 


404 


318 


233 


86 


September.. 


46 


370 


125 


117 


26 


16 


20 


October 


77 
7 


197 
5 


260 
24 


83 
2 


9 
1 


37 
6 


186 


November 





Totals 


1,834 


2,036 


1,393 


1.730 


966 


1,137 


624 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 48 



Table No. 4 

CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 

By Origin— 1040 



ORIGIN 


1040 
No. 


1048 
No. 


1047 

No. 


1046 

No. 


1045 
No. 


1044 

No. 


1043 
No. 


Settlers 


152 

451 

138 

468 

52 

6 

340 

85 

32 

6 

04 

10 


147 

432 

32>i 

433 

52 

6 

461 

46 

35 

2 

80 




75 

208 

180 

410 

56 

6 

248 

30 

15 

2 

31 
42 


80 

481 

240 

303 

68 

11 

383 

21 

31 

2 

68 

42 


44 

280 

163 

121 

32 

3 

231 

4 

8 

3 

36 

32 


06 

247 

218 

185 

37 

1 

243 

4 

23 

2 

55 

26 


55 




187 




82 




100 


Logging Operations 

Mining Operations 


26 
3 


Smokers _ 

Road Construction 


132 
5 


Incendiary 


4 
1 


Miscellaneous 

Unknown.. 


25 
4 


Totals 


1,834 


2,036 


1,303 


1,730 


066 


1,137 


624 






Table No. 5 











CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST FIRES 
By Size— 1040 



1040 
No. 



1048 
No. 



1047 
No. 



1046 
No. 



1045 
No. 



1044 
No. 



1043 
No. 



54 Acre and under 
Over % to 




574 


571 


412 


400 


211 


241 


155 


5 acres 


811 


804 


626 


784 


457 


510 


237 


Over 5 to 


10 acres 


122 


155 


07 


120 


75 


03 


58 


Over 10 to 


100 acres 


242 


285 


177 


233 


150 


211 


108 


Over 100 to 


500 acres.. 


61 


74 


50 


78 


43 


47 


41 


Over 500 to 


1,000 acres ... 


16 


24 


12 


13 


11 


7 


15 


Over 1,000 to 


10,000 acres .. 


7 


33 


10 


12 


10 


17 


10 


Over 10,000 acres. 




1 














2 





Totals 


1,834 


2,036 


1,303 


1,730 


066 


1,137 


624 



Table No. 6 
CLASSIFICATION OF AREA BURNED OVER 

By Month— 1049 



MONTH 


1040 

ACRES 


1048 

ACRES 


1047 

ACRES 


1046 

ACRES 




11.622 

4,316 

6,665 

6,134 

30,011 

800 

500 

8 


8 

1,000 

801,612 

185,706 

3,068 

1,250 

5,286 

17,506 

63 


57 

2,712 

26,768 

4,802 

17,360 

2,248 

20,355 

730 


421 

2,284 
13,080 




25,338 


July 


20,734 
11,088 




1,520 




2,304 







Totals 


60,065 


1,017,380 


84,032 


76,760 



. 



Division of Forest Protection 



Table Xo. 7 

CLASSIFICATION OF LAND BURNED OVER 

By Ownership — 1949 



CLASSIFICATION 


1049 


104S 


1947 


Crown Land — Acres 

Private Lands — Acres 


40,593 

19.472 

1,834 


854,778 

162.611 

2,036 


38,093 
45,939 


Number of Fires 


1,393 


Total Area in Acres 


60,065 


1,017,389 


84,032 





Table No. 8 
CLASSIFICATION OF AREA BURNED OVER 

By Origin— 1949 



CLASSIFICATION 



1949 
ACRES 



1948 

ACRES 



1947 

ACRES 



1946 

ACRES 



Settlers 

Campers 

Railways 

Lightning 

Logging Operations 
Mining Operations ... 

Smokers 

Road Construction.. 

Incendiary 

Prospectors 

Miscellaneous 

Unknown 



.762 
.147 
,022 
.037 
,033 
42 
.177 
,607 
,420 

191 

,321 
,306 



Totals 



60,065 



18,613 

393,696 

8,129 

139,822 

35,903 

26,015 

23,318 

365,355 

1.446 

3 

3.146 

1.943 



3.44Q 

3,091 

12,606 

20,353 

14.921 

385 

24,515 

1,379 

577 

16 

2,244 

496 



2,677 

21,898 

9,406 

20.630 

7,085 

256 

12,109 

873 

490 

4 

673 

668 



1,017,389 



84,032 



"6.769 



f H£ ST 



Figure No. 1 

f\ \Ll S IN 



ONTARIO 



1949 




1930 1931 193? 1933 1934 1936 1936 1937 1936 1939 1940 1941 194? 1943 1944 1943 1946 1947 1948 1949 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 



1°50 Page 50 




Midhurst water tower, Midhurst, Lake Simcoe. 



Page 51 



Dix'isio n of Forest Protection 



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Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 52 




Douglas Peacock investigates the Tent Caterpillar situation near Gravenhurst. 



Page 53 



Division of F or est Protection 



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Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 56 



Figure No. 2 



AC1UAGE BUEN£D BY fOR£5T f|g£S IN ONTABIO 

f E M 1^30 TO 194 9 



700 
60O 
5O0 
400 
300 
200 
IOO 





















vut 


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- 


1930 
1331 
1932 
1933 
19 34 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 


711 , 809 
138. 207 
679,021 
349,958 
198,633 
250,662 
1,264.433 
2 2 4,746 
138,245 
29,098 


1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1946 
1949 


121,614 

666,54 7 

113,716 

52,817 

168,891 

48,510 

76,769 

S4.032 

l,OI7,}89 

60,065 












































































































' 















1930 1931 '932 1933 1954 1935 I93e 1937 193© 1939 1940 1941 194? 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 194ft 1949 



Table No. 13 
MEANS OF FIRE DETECTION— 1949 



DWERS 


R.AN'GERS 


PUBLIC 


AIRCRAFT 


TOTAL FIRES 


630 


168 


639 


337 


1,834 


575 


241 


809 


411 


2,036 


424 


158 


547 


264 


1,393 



1949 Totals 
1948 Totals 
1947 Totals 



Table No. 14 
STATEMENT OF TRAVEL PERMITS ISSUED— 1949 





1940 


1948 


1947 


1946 


1945 


1944 


1943 


Permits 


90.206 
256,320 


61,384 
104,617 


51,187 
146,185 


35,794 
112,191 


20,393 
70,085 


13,510 
41,569 


11,004 


Persons 


28,567 



Table No. 15 

STATEMENT OF FIRE PERMITS ISSUED— 1949 

Number of Permits 



1949 
11,546 



1948 
9,237 



1947 
7,925 



1946 

8,940 



1945 
5,764 



1Q44 
5,106 



1943 
5,242 



LAND AND 
RECREATIONAL AREAS 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 58 



DIVISION OF LAND AND RECREATIONAL AREAS 

Based on study of the results of actual practice, policy and procedure relating 
to all forms of land disposition and use was changed from time to time during the year 
with a view, among other things, to treating applications more rapidly and more 
completely, having regard to the necessity of satisfying the applicant and at the same 
time properly enforcing the provisions of The Public Lands Act and the regulations, 
to the eventual benefit of both. The successful application of this policy dictates its 
continuance. New regulations have been drafted and will probably be put into effect 
during the next year. Amendments to the Act simplify the granting of Free Grant 
patents in certain instances and pave the way for a more effective and rapid clean-up 
of this type of land tenure. Also, the granting of pine releases in bona fide cases, 
whether or not the land involved is in timber licence. 

Summer Resort Land 

Sales made and patents issued increased during the year, this being due in large 
measure to the filing of a large number of surveys which in turn was the result to 
some extent of assistance rendered to surveyors by the Department. 

Agricultural and Allied Uses 

A gratifying increase in some phases of land disposition in this category is 
noted, largely because of improved administrative practice. The number of locations 
made to returned soldiers is about the same as last year. A slight increase in the 
number of both sales and patents involving land for special use is noted. This section 
of the regulations has in the past been misused but as a result of change in policy 
has during the past year been used primarily to clean up old outstanding cases, for 
which purpose, specifically, it was originally designed. The number of land use permits 
issued increased. This form of tenure is preferred and encouraged where land use is 
temporary in such cases as hunt camps, the location of which may be moved from 
year to year. In Crown townsites the number of sales made decreased for the reason 
that such land is rapidly becoming scarce. On the other hand the number of patents 
increased, due primarily to improved follow-up and inspection procedure and in some 
cases as a result of modification of sale conditions which, as originally set up, were 
difficult, if not impossible, to execute because of changing conditions. 

Veterans' Land 

Many applications were dealt with pursuant to the provisions of The Ontario 
Dominion-Provincial Agreement (1946) which was made under and by virtue of the 
provisions of the Veterans' Land Act (Dominion), section 35, 6, Geo. VI. 1942. The 
number completed for agricultural use increased while the small holdings decreased. 
The Department continued to co-operate most fully with the Dominion Government 
in the placement of veterans on Crown land, and in addition to new sale agreements 
completed there were a number of conversions from sales made in the ordinary way 
under The Public Lands Act to Agreements for Sale. 



Page 59 



Division of Land and Recreational Areas 



Table Xo 
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 



6. 



Jsndex of ^JabteS p AGE 

Free grant land (including soldiers) -------- 59 

Agricultural land ---------------60 

Summer resort laxds -------------- 62 

Cities, towns and townplots -----------64 

Land use permits issued from April 1. 1949. to March 31. 1950 66 
Land for special use --------------68 



Figure Xo Jrndex ol L^tiarts and kj ranks Page 

1. Agricultural lands in free grant townships (including 
soldiers' land ) -------------_-60 

2. Agricultural lands in sale townships --------61 

3. Land l - se permits, leases and licenses of occupation issued - 62 

4. Transactions under the Ontario Dominion-Provincial 
Agreement -----------------64 

5. Summer resort lands --------------65 

6. Licensed tourist outfitters' camps ---------65 

7. City, town and townsite lands ----------67 

8. Lands for special, use --------------67 



Tourist Outfitters' Camps 

This phase of division administration was again exceptionally 
number of licences being considerably increased over last vear. 



active, the 



Provincial Parks 



Provincial Parks 
consist of: 



Algonquin 
Quetico 

Lake Superior _ 
Sibley . 
Rondeau _ 
Ipperwash Beach 



2.741 sq. miles 

1,860 sq. miles 

540 sq. miles 

63 sq. miles 

8 sq. miles 

109 acres 



administrative 
district 



Table Xo. 1 
FREE GRAXT LAXD (Including Soldiers) 
The Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1950 
district locations cancellations assignments 

forester no. acres no. acres no. acres 



patents 

NO. ACRES 



Algonquin 


G. H. R. Phillips 


6 


677. 


29 


2,891. 


22 


2.006. 


52 


5.206.740 


Chapleau 


J.M.YVhalen 


— 
















Cochrane 


A. Crealock 


2 


239.26 


4 


305.75 


— 





4 


488 ; " 


Fort Frances 


G. Delahey 


3 


402. 


122 


15,464.25 


4 


549. 


34 


4,647.625 


Geraldton 


U.W.Fiskar 


— 





— 





— 











Gogama 


J. Taylor 


— 





— 





— 








. 


Kapuskasing 


G. F. Meyer 


1 


93. 


4 


300.50 


— 





1 


63. 


Kenora 


K. Acheson 


6 


879. 


41 


5.662.60 


8 


1.354.86 


27 


4,163.71 J 


Lake Erie 


F. S. Xewman 


— 





— 





— 











Lake Huron 


I.C.Marritt 


— 





















Lake Simcoe 


J. F. L. Simmons 


— 





— 
















Xorth Bay 


F. E. Sider 


2 


314.15 


23 


2.520.50 


2 


162. 


4 


579.50 


Parry Sound 


R. L. Snow 


2 


200. 


26 


3,051.41 


3 


446. 


16 


2,082.02 


Port Arthur 


R. Boultbee 


6 


922. 


33 


4,400. 


13 


1,568.25 


24 


3,116.60 


Quinte 


A. Leman 


— 





17 


1.765.50 


6 


633.50 


9 


929.85 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Q. Hess 


— 





4 


426. 












Sioux Lookout 


H. Middleton 


— 


















Sudbury 


F.L.Hall 


9 


1,026.82 


10 


1,433.15 


2 


320. 


15 


2,081.00 


Swastika 


b . J . Dawson 


10 


1,339.75 


9 


934.20 


— 





2 


105.75 


Trent 


A. B. Wheatley 


1 


100 


14 


1.4SS 


2 


160.5 


S 


732. 


Totals 


48 


6,192.98 


336 


40,732.86 


62 


7,200.11 


196 


24,287.276 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 60 



Table No. 2 
AGRICULTURAL LAND 

The Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 



1950 



ADMINISTRATIVE 


DISTRICT 




SALES 


CANCELLATIONS 


ASSIGNMENTS 


PATENTS 


DISTRICT 


FORESTER 


NO. 


ACRES 


NO. 


ACRES 


NO. 


ACRES 


NO. 


ACRES 


Algonquin 


G. H. R. Phillips 


16 


1,223.70 


7 


564.70 


4 


445. 


17 


1,631.41 


Chapleau 


J. M. Whalen 


















Cochrane 


A. Crealock 


36 


2,780.10 


71 


6,348.39 


22 


1,868.25 


56 


6,621.386 


Fort Frances 


G. Delahey 


31 


3,279.38 


ii 


1,789. 


2 


2.68 


12 


1,182.665 


Geraldton 


U. W. Fiskar 














1 


51.8 


Gogama 


J. Taylor 


1 


70.5 


— 





2 


200.50 


1 


70.5 


Kapuskasing 


G. F. Meyer 


32 


2,409.005 


60 


5,661.50 


21 


2,132. 


35 


3,118.883 


Kenora 


K. Acheson 


IS 


1,751.764 


11 


1,010.64 


8 


974.536 


14 


1,443.117 


Lake Erie 


F. S. Newman 


















Lake Huron 


I. C.Marritt 


— 





— 





— 





2 


250. 


Lake Simcoe 


J. F. L. Simmons 


— . 





— 





— 





1 


95.21 


North Bay 


F. E. Sider 


18 


2,282. 


19 


2,407. 


8 


1,122.25 


31 


3,970.449 


Parrv Sound 


R. L. Snow 


2 


195.21 


— 





2 


165.02 


3 


284. 


Port Arthur 


R. Boultbee 


35 


4,599.58 


26 


3,488.50 


9 


1,255. 


27 


3,758.65 


Quinte 


A. Leman 


7 


688. 


2 


163. 


— 





13 


1,295.75 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Q. Hess 


3 


420. 


11 


1,689.44 


3 


400.50 








Sioux Lookout 


H. Middleton 


2 


198.20 


— 





1 


171. 


3 


322.50 


Sudbury 


F. L. Hall 


38 


4,309.50 


36 


4,462.35 


16 


1,785.81 


51 


5,988.62 


Swastika 


F. J. Dawson 


31 


2,464.75 


39 


4,046.15 


14 


1,422.50 


49 


5,399.030 


Trent 


A. B. Wheat ley 


— 





2 


53. 


1 


200. 


— 





Totals 


267 


26,671.689 


317 


31,683.67 


113 


12,145.046 


316 


35,483.970 


Swastika Univer 


sity Cancellations 


— 





10 


768.875 


— 





— 







267 


26,671.689 


327 


32,452.545 


113 


12,145.046 


316 


35,483.970 



Figure No. 1 

AGRICULTURAL LANDS IN FREE GRANT TOWNSHIPS 

INCLUDING SOLDIER' S LAND 



700 



^ 600 

-z. 
O 

u 500 
<. 



400 



o 



300 













j 








= 










LEGEND 










L : 










LOCATIONS lllllllllll 










- 




















1 










PATENTS Hi 






i 






-] 




























| 












''~i 












1 








1 
















































1 








■ 






t 






















■ 


















1 






1 






I 






















i 






I 






1 






L 


■ 




1 


■ 






1 








I 








l 




| 


l 


; 


1 


I 




i 




1 





200 = 



100 



1943 



1944 



1945 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



Page 61 



Division of Land and Recreational Areas 




Typical scout camp on Lake Kenabi. 



Figure No. 2 



AGRICULTURAL LANDS IN SALE TOWNSHIPS 



600 




1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 61 



Table No. 3 

SUMMER RESORT LANDS 

The Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1950 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
DISTRICT 



DISTRICT 
FORESTER 



SALES 
NO. ACRES 



CANCELLATIONS 
NO. ACRES 



ASSIGNMENTS 
NO. ACRES 



PATENTS 
NO. ACRES 



Algonquin 

Chapleau 

Cochrane 

Fort Frances 

Geraldton 

Gogama 

Kapuskasing 

Kenora 

Lake Erie 

Lake Huron 

Lake Simcoe 

North Bay 

Parry Sound 

Port Arthur 

Quinte 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Sioux Lookout 

Sudbury 

Swastika 

Trent 

Totals 



G. H. R. Phillips 
J. M. Whalen 
A. Crealock 
G. Delahey 
U. W. Fiskar 
J. Taylor 
G. F. Meyer 
K. Acheson 
F. S. Newman 
I. C.Marritt 
J. F. L. Simmons 
F. E. Sider 

L. Snow 

Boultbee 

Leman 

Hess 
H.Middleton 
F. L. Hall 
F. J. Dawson 
A. B. Wheatley 



28 

6 

63 

37 

21 

9 

8 

130 



19 
131 
155 

45 
131 

54 

52 
155 

20 
137 



1,202 



59.853 


1 


15.86 


— 


33.67 


1 


61.06 


4 


41.57 


— 


33.66 


— 


12.349 


— 


304.0901 


20 


26.034 


1 


293.637 


8 


327.4503 


6 


107.083 


1 


263.480 


4 


97.786 


14 


139.588 


2 


361.869 


14 


32.383 


— 


300.943 


1 


2,512.3654 


77 



4.10 



1.00 
5.69 



22.13 



1.07 

18.59 

22.06 

1.54 

11.90 

18.742 

3.70 

497.429 

2.39 



610.341 38 



1.43 



0.22 
9.98 



20.92 
12.73 

1.34 

9.12 

13.39 

21.17 

.09 

5.03 



95.42 



34 

7 

25 

35 

7 

4 

8 

174 



10 

120 

108 

55 

79 

64 

43 

165 

14 

94 



1,046 



89.378 
27.52 
15.90 
84.76 
22.33 
13.09 
10.455 
523.2161 



14.82 
260.122 
283.833 
123.309 
158.172 
141.351 
130.237 
475.269 

28.67 
211.077 



2,613.5091 



Figure No. 3 



LAND USE PERMITS, LEASES AND 
LICENSES OE OCCUPATION ISSUED 



O 2700 

^ 2400 

-z. 

< 2100 



o 



LEGEND 

LAND USE PERMITS 

LEASES 

LIC. OF OCCUPATION 



1943 



_a_ 



1944 



1945 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



Page 63 



Division of Land and Recreational Areas 




Cabin, Ril> Lake, Tetnagatni District 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 64 



Figure No. 4 

TRANSACTIONS UNDER THE ONTARIO DOMINION- PROVINCIAL AGREEMENT 

SECTION 35 OF THE VETERANS' LAND ACT 




1947 



948 



1949 



1950 



Table No. 4 
CITIES, TOWNS AND TOWNPLOTS 

The Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1950 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
DISTRICT 



DISTRICT 
FORESTER 



SALES 
NO. ACRES 



CANCELLATIONS 
NO. ACRES 



ASSIGNMENTS 
NO. ACRES 



PATENTS 
NO. ACRES 



Algonquin G. H. R. Phillips 
Chapleau J. M. Whalen 
Cochrane A. Crealock 
Fort Frances G. Delahey 
Geraldton U. W. Fiskar 
Gogama J. Taylor 
Kapuskasing G. F. Meyer 
Kenora K. Acheson 
Lake Erie F. S. Newman 
Lake Huron I. C. Marritt 
Lake Simcoe J. F. L. Simmons 
North Bay F. E. Sider 
Parry Sound R. L. Snow 
Port Arthur R. Boultbee 
Quinte A. Leman 
Sault Ste. Marie Q. Hess 
Sioux Lockout H. Middleton 
Sudbury F. L. Hall 
Swastika F.J.Dawson 
Trent A. B. Wheatley 


2 
3 

5 

5 

13 

14 

13 

3 

6 

3 

7 
9 
8 
5 
1 


0AM 

1.30 

15.492 

1.930 

3.84 
13.514 

8.40 

4.0 
29.921 

8.5 

3.007 

1.38 

1.99 

8.651 

0.5T 


1 

1 

2 

6 


0.25 

0.11 
0.32 

0.988 


2 

1 

2 
4 
1 
1 


0.51 
0.22 

0.33 

20.504 

0.11 

0.09 


8 

1 
16 

12 
18 

38 
14 

5 
8 

4 

1 

3 

17 
14 
12 
11 


7.050 

0.46 

4.958 

5.40 

4.500 
25.726 
23.28095 
12. 

3.677 

6.562 

0.5 
0.45 

5.09 
3.515 
2.49 
5.943 


Totals 


97 


102.906 


10 


l.or.S 


11 


21.764 


182 


111.60195 



Page 65 



Division of Land and Recreational Areas 



Figure No. 5 

SUMMER RESORT LANDS 




943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 



Figure No. 6 

LICENSED TOURIST OUTFITTERS' CAMPS 



615 



LEGEND 



EACH SYMBOL- 200 CAMPS 



1290 



167 



1051 



m 



ass &&* ^?r 



^~ 



634 



J^—k 



539 560 

sm -a At 



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^O 



I ] m 






m 



*£— l i At 



M 



1942-43 1943-44 1944-45 1945-46 1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 66 



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Page 67 



Division of Land and Recreational Areas 



Figure Xo. 7 



CITY. TOWN AND TOWN5ITE LANDS 



28o 




1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 



250 



200 



Figure No. 8 

LANDS FOR SPECIAL USE 



O 
u 



C 



LEGEND 




1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 68 



Table No. 6 

LAND FOR SPECIAL USE 

The Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1950 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
DISTRICT 



DISTRICT 
FORESTER 



SALES 
NO. ACRES 



CANCELLATIONS 
NO. ACRES 



ASSIGNMENTS 
NO. ACRES 



PATENTS 
NO. ACRES 



Algonquin 

Chapleau 

Cochrane 

Fort Frances 

Geraldton 

Gogama 

Kapuskasing 

Kenora 

Lake Erie 

Lake Huron 

Lake Simcoe 

North Bay 

Parry Sound 

Port Arthur 

Quinte 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Sioux Lookout 

Sudbury 

Swastika 

Trent 

Totals 



G.H. R.Phillips 
J.M.Whalen 
A. Crealock 
G. Delahev 
U. W. Fiskar 
J.Taylor 
G. F. Meyer 
K. Acheson 
F. S. Newman 
I.C.Marritt 
J. F. L. Simmons 
F. E. Sider 
R. L. Snow 
R. Boultbee 
A. Leman 
Q. Hess 
H. Middleton 
F. L. Hall 
F. J. Dawson 
A. B. Wheatley 



14 
1 

3 

2 

6 

5 

32 

2 

2 

3 

16 

12 

11 

10 

7 

19 

17 

9 

12 


397.1987 

23,013. 

4.60 

84.57 

77.511 

7.44 
573.957 
17.893 
43.836 
432. 
231.333 
306.06 
254.483 
635.029 
557.15 
187.145 
1,660.7705 
397.98 
734.21 


1 

2 

1 

1 


40. 

60.82 
100. 

5.77 


1 

1 
1 

1 


1.50 

0.36 
74. 

20. 


15 
3 

2 
4 
5 

5 
25 

4 

4 

4 
14 
13 

9 
25 
11 

6 
20 

7 
11 


378.197 

24,222.95 

5.09 

9.58 

221.641 

294.064 
469.515 

71.893 
136.51 
533.5 
214.338 
182.88 

68.433 
1,639.545 
868.73 

92.675 
25,068.702 
300.945 
682. 


183 


29,616.1662 


5 


206.59 


4 


05.80 


187 


55,461.188 



PATENTS OFFICE (Lands Division) 
Statement of Patents, Etc., Issued During The Year Ending March 31, 1950 



Public Land Fatents .1,362 

Free Grant Patents ... - 196 

Patents and Transfers (Town Lots) .... . 182 

Miscellaneous Documents 187 

Releases of Pine 73 



2,000 



Temagami Leases ..... 
Water Power Leases 



91 

Licenses of Occupation 84 

Licenses of Occupation (Rondeau) 1 

Licenses of Occupation (Algonquin) 11 

Licenses of Occupation (Temagami) 



Crown Leases 6 

Algonquin Park Leases 47 

Rondeau Park Leases 33 



96 
Licenses of Occupation Cancelled 97 

Crown Leases Cancelled 44 



^2Ml 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 70 



DIVISION OF LAW 

The following is a resume of the activities of this Division for the period from 
the 1st of April, 1949, to the 31st of March, 1950: 

The duties of the Division are as indicated in the Administrative Chart. 

During the 1950 Session of the Legislature there were amendments to five 
Acts governing the administration of the Department, and The Provincial Parks Act, 
1950, was created to replace the previous Provincial Parks Act. 

There was a minor amendment to The Surveys Act adding certain townships 
to the group of townships named in section 21, subsection (2). This was for the 
purpose of improving administration. 

There were 41 amendments to The Game and Fisheries Act, 1946. Of this 
number, several were of a minor nature. Some of the major amendments were for 
the purpose of making it more difficult for hunters and fishermen who have a penchant 
for evading game laws, by strengthening the legislation in instances where technical 
defences with respect to violations had previously been successfully pleaded. A few 
years ago a provision was made for the sealing of beaver pelts. This proved so success- 
ful in minimizing the illegal trapping and shipment of beaver that an amendment to 
seal fisber and marten is expected to lessen illegal trapping and shipping of these 
species also. 

More flexibility in the creation of open seasons for taking certain furs and 
animals is provided by allowing regulations to be made by the Minister rather than 
by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. 

A new section was added to The Public Lands Act to allow greater freedom in 
the issue of Letters Patent to actual settlers who have complied with the statutory 
settlement requirements. 

The previous Provincial Parks Act was repealed, and a new Act allowing greater 
facility of administration of the vast recreational areas of the Province is established. 

An amendment to The Forest Fires Prevention Act substitutes for the words 
"close season" the words "fire season". As the words "close season" are frequently 
used in the Game and Fisheries Act, it was felt that the public would more readily 
understand the intent of the phrase "fire season" when used in the Forest Fires 
Prevention Act. 

There was a minor amendment to The Provincial Land Tax Act which does 
not affect the public generally. 

During the year the Chief of the Division appeared in various courts on 
Departmental business. Some appearances were for matters arising under the Game 
and Fisheries Act, but the majority concerned appeals under the Provincial Land 
Tax Act. In addition, discussion groups were held with conservation officers in 
various districts for the purpose of discussing enforcement problems. Lectures were 
given to various classes at the Ranger School dealing with the Statutes, regulations 
made thereunder and instructions with respect to enforcement matters. 




1 » » » II 

OPERATION 
AND PERSONNEL 



...->< 








Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 7. 



DIVISION OF OPERATION AND PERSONNEL 

GENERAL INTRODUCTION 

The Division of Operation and Personnel is charged with office and personnel 
management, and the added function of supplying information to the public. 

This Division centralizes these functions, effects standardization, and co- 
ordinates procedures to provide economical and efficient administration. 

Specifically, its primary functions are to provide and maintain a suitable staff, 
and to furnish this staff with the accommodation and tools to carry out their work 
effectively. 

In the following report the operations of the Division are described under four 
main headings: — Office Management, Personnel Management, and Information and 
Education (see Division Chart). 

The personnel of the administrative organization which has been set up at 
Head Office and which also directs operations in the field, is as follows: 

Head Office Organization 

Minister — Hon. H. R. Scott 
Deputy Minister — F. A. MacDougall 

Division Chief 

Accounts .. J. G. McMillen 

Air Service ... ... G. E. Ponsford 

Fish and Wildlife W. J. K. Harkness 

Forest Protection T. E. Mackey 

Land and Recreational Areas ... W. D. Cram 

Law .. F. J. Sullivan 

Operation and Personnel P. O. Rhynas 

Reforestation „ E. J. Zavitz 

Research R. N. Johnston 

Surveys and Engineering F. W. Beatty 

Timber Management J. F. Sharpe 

A chart showing the complete organization of the Department with chain of 
responsibility is included in the report. 



Jsndex of ^Jcible 



eS 

Table No. Page 

1. Areas of the administrative districts --------75 

2. Numerical strength and classification of employees - - - 75 

3. War veteran personnel as of March 31, 1050 ------ 76 

4. Numerical strength — inside service, March, 1950 - - - - 76 

5. Numerical strength — outside service, March, 1950 - - - - 77 

6. Classifications as of March 31, 1950 ---------78 

7. Distribution of male and female employees at head office 82 

8. Distribution of staff in age groups ---------83 

9. Workmen's Compensation Report ---------85 



Page 73 



Division of Operation and Person n el 



10. Comparison of costs --------------86 

11. Breakdown of claims -------------87 

12. Number of claims made to Workmen's Compensation Board 
during fiscal year 1948-49 ------------89 

13. Number of claims made to Workmen's Compensation Board 
during fiscal year 1949-50 ------------89 

14. Number of claims made to Workmen's Compensation Board 

TEN YEAR period fiscal YEARS 1940-41 TO 1949-50 ----- 91 

15. Current pensions ---------------92 

16. Amounts paid by the Workmen's Compensation Board during 
the period April 1, 1948, to March 31. 1949 ------ 92 

17. Amounts paid the Workmen's Compensation Board during 
the period April 1. 1949, to March 31, 1950 -------92 

18. List of new pensions dl-ring the fiscal year 1Q4Q-50 - - - 92 
1Q. List of current pensions for the period 1949-50 ----- 93 

20. Distribution of junior forest rangers --------94 

21. Distribution summary by l - niversities of foresters in Ontario 
Government Service --------------96 

22. Areas, populations, staff and investment in primary forest 
industries .....----------99 

23. Summary of lecture tours ------------ 110 

24. Summary of suggestions received and awards in the various 
divisions of the department ----------- 116 



Jsndex of (charts una L^ranni 

Figure No. Page 

1. Organisation charts with chain of responsibility - - - - 74 
Insert — Chart of Administrative Divisions ------ Facing 74 

2. Permanent employees as of March 31st each year - - - - 81 

3. Technical personnel employed as of March 31. 1950 - - - 81 

4. Chart of age classes as of March 31, 1950 -------82 

5. Chart of Division of Operation and Personnel ----- 84 

6. Trend in Workmen's Compensation claims ------ 85 

7. Trend in Wokkmln'> Compensation costs ------- 86 

8. Percentage of staff involved in compensable accidents 
annually ------------------88 

9. Trend in Workmen's Compensation claims prepared from 
total claims for the past ten years ---------88 



Field Organizations 



REGION \] 
KiRLsTEK 



district 
forester 



DISTRICT H.O 



South 
Western 



South 
Eastern 

South 
Central 



F. S. Newman. 
St. Williams 



W. D. Cram, 
Toronto 

1\ McEwen, 
Ranger Schoo 



Lake Erie 
Lake Huron 

Lake Simcoe 

Quinte 

Rideau 

Trent 

Algonquin 

Parry Sound 



F. S. Newman 
I (" Marritt 

J. F. L. Simmons 
A. Leman 
W. E.Steele 
A. B. Wheat ley 
G.H. R. Phillips 
K I. Snow 



St. Williams 
R.R.No 1. 
Hespeler 
Maple 
Tweed 
Kemptville 
Lindsay 
Algonquin Pk. 
Parry Sound 



Continued on Page 75. 



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ADMINISTRATIVE 
DIVISIONS 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



Department of Lands and Forests 



Hon. H. R. Scott 



Minister 



F. A. MacDougall 

Deputy Minister 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 
PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISIONS 

19 5 

Hon. H. R. SCOTT. Minister 

F. A. MacDOUGALL, Deputy Minister 

~~r~ r~ i i i i 1 

OPERATION REFORESTATION RESEARCH SURVEYS IND TIMBER 
AND ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT 
AREAS PERSONNEL , 

j, G. MeMHIen <-. E. Ponsford )>r. U. J. K- Harknese T. E. Mackey W. 1>. Cram F. J. Sullivan P. O. Rhynas E.J. Zaviu '*■ N. Johnston K. \\ . Beatlg J. F. Shorpe 

Ckiej Chief Chief Chief Chief Chief Chief Chiej . Chief Chief Chit} 

„„„„„, ,,„ J vl.m,,. /•„. Enfortemenl - Pitt Ptcucuon Planning- Setting, leasing and tieensing of Preparation of.— Personnel Management.— Atminhtralia* tf- Reran- eh in.- Ground Section Administration Timh,, Salt* and Liu nets 

Hung [■■ ■( ..II •■■,,,„. k'. ^,", ". r'f] i ! ! ■" . m ^ ']' , ! '. ', H V. . . - ''I'^^l'ml/'' T'<l"i ,'"iur ' "f .rmm^ ' {[n'd~ ,11,.-.] t,^~ urn ^^''■"Ui.^m- 'm.'t7.''[' ' " i n ( t r','- "m ^ ' ' ^j ! " - " '. ''""[' '.' " " L . , ^'"'"^"nm"' ('"" ' U I' •■ d Xl '''' : ' " 

ttaraUtmcJ ^Department" aircraft, in- mm."* ' ,rraa— open 3£ Fu? wralher fo«ca»linV. CoK? ™F fee?*""" Office Management.— P*Z'™— *" ' ^ *' W,, "*' I'"*"" ^ ' llu '" '■' ■ v "'" 1 ' Provincial Boim.-Lim- k.- ""■"'" " ■'■i— <"< 

. ludn. u - 1. ... r ;. ,-,..,, ..I Fur i.mi. k-.-n..- t.,.,,rd- I'uhl,. u .,: .; ^ Purchase and rtisirihutK.n ai Mumcii,.-)! ,.-i.t..-. uimn. » J >" EMwrimeni 'J..,',' ,',"""" l:i ;j''" hl , ,'. 
1 !'-'■•">■ ^ n ;''',/"" r)! , ,m'n, Hl '" tif ' T ' r, '"" <1 ' /■',« S-«PPr«j.on— ^ Leading and licensine of ?r?d orV-VsliWoi.™ 8 !! 1 '*'' " 8 Inventory " "waling and R^l'Til ,''l "') ''.IJ'li^.n- m.V' Vli/.Wh'T a!, !h V" ','!! ' "'"" ' ""' R '' '"'''' "' w '"'''' , ' , * t ' ,_ 

,: : ;^:;^;:J^„ --. ' ' ';i . l ; , S-- , "" ! ' H ' r... ;* ■■■",""- J:i , -r.':i,; f !: l : 1 r; , !i;ri; :;::^:;:^:;NV,;::::^ ,, ■' I 

?ihsra mm * M^ti 1 ,.,;,,,,,,,.. sf'BffTs^.wBa * ' ' ' 



9 ■ ,■ '■ ., jitoi arc met, Pollution and a pr„v,,.. . \.,.i. ...:■ i .,„., insertions.— Ire extra- Departmental. 

i. in '"I- I... ,-[„,„.. ,. rlin.K ...n.i, t,..u- ih.t.1,11 l;.,ll,it .iur.il m.pr, - tefcpllcnO system Of DOM- TotT,M.rr|in.[).T.i- and. 

:■ ( ul .p,r.i,i UB .,■«/. ( ■■■.'.. ■ ,",''„"' ',"**■* ^ '"''"' Land '.Manual x pamphlet*, r.mdii.-tion litigation. 

'..'' ™^^' ; " * * assess. *" 

■ c °" ,rri V'.: "Sf- '"-»■ 









ADMINISTRATIVE 
DIVISIONS 



PROVI NCE OF ONTARIO 

Department of Lands and Forests 

Hon. H. R. Scott F. A. MocDougoll 



l! 



- 



Page 75 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



Field Organizations (Continued 

REGIONAL 



DISTRICT 
FORESTER 



DISTRICT H.Q. 



Central 



Northern 

Mid -Western 
Western 



E. L. Ward. 
North Bav 



A. S. Bray, 

Kapuskasing 

P. Addison, 
Port Arthur 
K. Acheson, 
Kenora 



North Bay 

Chapleau 

Gogama 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Sudbury 

White River 

Kapuskasing 

Cochrane 

Temiskaming 

Port Arthur 

Geraldton 

Sioux Lookout 

Kenora 

Fort Frances 



F. E. Sider 
J.M.Whalen 
J. M. Taylor 
Q. Hess 

F. L. Hall 

R. H. Hambly 

G. F. Meyer 
A. Crealock 

F. J. Dawson 
R. Boultbee 
U. W. Fiskar 
H. Middleton 
K. Acheson 

G. Delahev 



North Bay 

Chapleau 

Gogama 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Sudbury 

White River 

Kapuskasing 

Cochrane 

Swastika 

Port Arthur 

Geraldton 

Sioux Lookout 

Kenora 

Fort Frances 



The complete organization is covered by the chart on page 74. 

Table No. 1 
The areas of the administrative districts are as follows: 



ADMINISTRATIVE GROSS AREA 

DISTRICT SQUARE MILES ACRES 

Algonquin 5,396 3,453,440 

Chapleau 6,376 4,080,640 

Cochrane 12,260 7,846,400 

Fort Frances _. _ 7,192 4,602,880 

Geraldton 13,448 8,606,720 

Gogama 6,424 4,111,360 

Kapuskasing 14,288 9,144,320 

Kenora 12,368 7.Q15,520 

Lake Erie 7,252 4,641,280 

Lake Huron _. 8,936 5,719,040 

Lake Simcoe 5,304 3,394,560 

North Bay 5,800 3,712,000 



ADMINISTRATIVE GROSS 

DISTRICT SQUARE MILES 

Parry Sound 6,460 

Port Arthur __ 17,784 

Quinte 7,708 

Rideau 5,464 

Sault Ste. Marie . 9,356 

Sioux Lookout 43,922 

Sudbury 7,774 

Temiskaming 5,436 

Trent ___ 5,328 

White River __ 6,733 



Total 221,009 



AREA 

ACRES 

4,134,400 
11,381,760 
4,933,120 
3,496,960 
5,987,840 
28,110,080 
4,975,360 
3,479,040 
3,409,920 
4,309,120 

141.445,760 



PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 

This table indicates the numerical strength and classification of employees by 
District and Division. It reflects something of the volume of work in Personnel 
Management. 

The symbol E.F.F. is an abbreviation for Extra Fire Fighters. 

Table No. 2 



1949 



HEAD OFFICE FIELD 

PERM. TEMP. CAS. PERM. TEMP. CAS. 



TOTAL 



E.F.F. 



GRAND 
TOTAL 



Apr. 

May 

June 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

1950 

Jan. 

Feb.. 

Mar. 



324 


79 


8 


892 


98 


1,382 


326 


81 


81 


014 


92 


1,798 


319 


101 


84 


922 


105 


1,785 


311 


95 


79 


948 


107 


1,905 


313 


94 


80 


967 


112 


1,932 


317 


87 


72 


968 


106 


1,473 


321 


90 


11 


978 


106 


1,132 


327 


86 


13 


979 


109 


801 


337 


77 


17 


986 


109 


642 


335 


82 


12 


999 


110 


576 


341 


76 


12 


1,004 


95 


520 


348 


65 


12 


1,004 


92 


568 



2,783 
3,292 
3,316 
3,445 
3,498 
3,023 
2,638 
2,315 
2,168 

2,105 
2,048 
2,089 



2 

53 

265 

368 

1,407 

229 

36 











2,785 
3,345 
3,581 
3,813 
4,905 
3,252 
2.674 
2,315 
2,168 

2,105 
2,048 

2,089 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 1 6 



Resignations, Dismissals. Superannuations. Deaths 
New Personnel 

Head Office 



Field 

Total 

New War Veteran Personnel 
Head Office 



Field 

Total 

' ! New War Veteran Personnel 



Table No. 3 

WAR VETERAN PERSONNEL AS OF MARCH 31, 1Q50 
MALE female 

Head Office 182 



Field 




545 


2nd war 
146 
389 

535 

TEMPORARY 

65 
92 

157 


1 


Total 




727 


10 


Head Office 




1st war 
40 
134 


BOTH wars 
5 


Field 




23 










Total 

Head Office 
Field 


174 

PERM AN KM 

348 
1,004 


28 

CAST \l 

12 
56S 








Total 


1,352 


580 




Permanent Staff 
Temporary Staff 

Total 




1,352 








157 




. 1.509 




Veterans as Above 
' , Veterans 










. . 737 

48.84 




Male Staff 

Male Veterans . 






1,328 








727 




' i Male Veterans ... 






54.74 



75 
181 



30 
107 



110 



256 



137 

53.52 



TOTAL 
101 

54b 



73 



TOTAL 
101 

546 
737 

TOTAL 

425 
1,664 

2,080 



Note: This Statement includes Air Service as Outside Staff. 

The foregoing groups are included in the following staff distribution tables 
which show as of March 31st. 1950. the numerical strength of the various Divisions 
and Administrative Districts, the Ontario Forest Ranger School and the Forest 
Stations by classes: 

Table No. 4 

INSIDE SERVICE— MARCH. 1950 

PERMANENT TEMPORARY I WAL SPECIAL TOTAL 



Head Office 

Deputy Minister's Office 

Division of Accounts 


4 

3 

63 

47 


1 


4 

73 


Division of Fish and Wildlife 


54 



Continued on Next Page. 



Page 7/ 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



Table No. 4 
INSIDE SERVICE— MARCH. 1050 (Continued) 

PERMANENT TEMPORARY CASUAL 



Division of Forest Protection 
Division of Lands and 

Recreational Areas 

Division of Law 

Division of Operation and 

Personnel 

Division of Reforestation 

Division of Research 


9 

21 
2 

55 
11 
29 

54 

44 


2 
6 

18 

4 
1 

6 

12 


5 

2 
4 





16 

33 
2 

73 
17 
30 


Division of Surveys and 

Engineering 

Division of Timber 
Management 


60 
60 


Inside Service 

Outside Service 


348 
1.004 


65 
92 


12 
568 





425 
1.664 






Total Service 


1.352 


157 


580 





2,089 



Table No. 5 



OUTSIDE SERVICE— MARCH, 1050 



PERMANENT 


TEMPORARY 


casual 


SPECIAL 


89 





3 





64 


8 


22 





24 





12 





47 


1 


16 





37 


2 


6 





10 











43 





10 





27 


2 


32 





23 


1 


18 





37 


8 


21 





38 


1 


21 





37 


5 


10 





52 


4 


37 





42 


7 








55 


8 


56 





44 


4 


26 





25 


3 


27 





52 


4 


34 





31 


2 


39 





35 





33 





49 


4 


17 





38 


2 


24 





31 


8 


25 





11 


6 


20 





10 


1 


5 





34 


2 


18 





10 





18 






92 


568 




348 


65 


12 




1,352 


157 


580 





Air Service 

Algonquin 

Chapleau 

Cochrane 

Lake Erie District 

St. Williams Forest Station 

Fort Frances 

Geraldton 

Gogama 

Huron . 
Kapuskasing 

Kenora 

North Bay 

Parry Sound 

Port Arthur 

Quinte 

Rideau 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Simcoe 

Sioux Lookout 

Sudbury 

Temiskaming 

Trent 

Forest Ranger School 

Angu> 

Midhursl 

Orono 

Outside Si «\ 

[nside ser\ [( 1 

Ton \' Si r\ [« i 



101 
94 
36 
64 
45 
10 
53 
61 
42 
66 
60 
61 
93 
58 

lio 
74 
55 
90 

7: 

68 
70 
64 
04 
37 
25 
54 
28 



1,664 
42S 



2,089 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 78 



Table No. 6 

CLASSIFICATIONS AS OF MARCH 31, 1950 

Permanent and Temporary 



HEAD OFFICE 



Accountant, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group 3 

Group 4 

Accounting Machine Operator, Group 1. 

Aerial Photographer, Group 1 

Air Engineer, Group 1 - 

Group 2 

Automotive Mechanic, Journeyman 

Improver... 

Biologist, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group 3 

Group 4— 

Boat Captain, Group 2 

Caretaker, Group 1„_ 

Group 2 

Carpenter, Improver..... _ 

Foreman _ - 

Journeyman 

Chemical Engineer, Group l._ — — 

Chemist, Group 2 — 

Chef 

Chief, Dept. of Lands and Forests 

Chief Clerk 

Chief Inspector, Timber Management .... 

Civil Engineer, Group 1 

Clerk, Group 1. 

Group 2 

Group 3 

Clerk Messenger, Group 1 

Group 2.. 

Clerk-Stenographer, Group 1 

Group 2__ 

Clerk-Typist, Group 1_ 

Group 2 

Communications Technician, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group 3 

Conservation Officer, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group 3 

Group 4 

Group 5 

Deputy Minister... 

District Supt. Prov. Air Service 

Draughtsman, Group 1 _ 

Group 2 

Executive Assistant, Group 1 

Group 2 

Filing Clerk, Group 1 

Group 2 




5 
2 
1 
40 
1 
1 
12 
5 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
3 
6 
2 
1 
1 
1 
10 
1 
1 

IS 

S3 

63 

1 

2 

26 

42 

23 

12 

1 

2 

1 

102 

58 

8 

18 

2 

1 

1 

8 

2 

2 

2 

3 

1 



Page 79 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



CLASSIFICATION AS OF MARCH 31, 1950 (Continued) 
Permanent and Temporary 

head office field 



Foreman, Group 2 __ 

Foreman, Sub - 

Foreman ._ 

Forester, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group 3 

Group 4—. 

Group 5 

Group 6 - 

Forest Ranger, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group 3 

Group 4— _ 

Group 5 _ 

Forest Pathologist 

Gardener, Group 1 

Group 2 

Gen. Supt. of Construction, Group 1. 

Hatchery Manager, Group 1 

Group 2 

Hatchery Assistant, Group 1 

Group 2 

Head Clerk ._.... 

Head Teamster 

Inspector of Surveys, Group 1 

Group 3 

Junior Clerk 

Junior Draughtsman, Group 1 

Group 2 

Junior Office Appliance Operator 

Laboratory Assistant, Group 3 

Labourer 

Maintenance Mechanic, Group 1 

Group 2 

Group 3 

Maintenance Mechanic Foreman 
Mechanic, Group 1 

Group 2 

Mechanic, Foreman 

Mechanical Engineer, Group 3 

Mechanical Supervisor 

Nurse, Group 3 

Office Appliance Operator, Group 1 

Group 2 

Office Boy 

Plant Supt. Prov. Air Service 
Painter and Decorator, Foreman 

Improver ... 
Personnel Officer, Group 2 
Personnel Assistant, Group 2 
Photogrammetrist, Group 1 

Group 2 

Photographer, Group 1 

Group 2 

Photo Processor, Group 1 
Group 2 



19 

4 
5 
S 
1 

1 
4 
2 



1 
1 
2 
4 

11 

1 

1 
1 
6 
11 
2 
1 



1 
5 
1 
32 
3 

17 

23 

5 

103 

134 

69 

62 

7 

3 
3 

22 

2 

22 

14 

1 
2 



47 
4 
8 
3 
4 
7 
12 
14 

4 
1 



22 

28 

6 

1 

107 

136 

69 

62 

7 

1 

3 

3 

1 

23 

4 

26 

14 

12 

2 

1 

1 

1 

6 
11 
2 
1 
47 
4 
8 
3 
4 
7 
13 
14 
1 
4 
1 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
S 
3 
1 
1 

o 
1 



Continued on Next Page. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 80 



CLASSIFICATION AS OF MARCH 31, 1950 (Continued) 
Permanent and Temporary 

head office field 



Pilot, Group 1 .... 

Group 2 

Principal Clerk 

Property Supt 

Public Relations Assistant, Group 1. 
Group 2 

Purchasing Officer, Group 3 

Radio Operator 

Radio and Telephone Technician 

Secretarial Stenographer 

Secretary to the Minister ... 
Secretary to the Deputy Minister 
Senior Clerk ... 
Senior Clerk-Stenographer... 

Senior Draughtsman, Group 1 

Group 2 

Senior Filing Clerk 

Shop Foreman 

Solicitor, Group 4 ... 

Group 5 

Soil Specialist, Chief 

Group 2 

Stationary Engineer, Group 2(a)... 

Stationary Engineer 

Statistician, Group 1 

Group 2 

Stockkeeper, Group 1 

Group 2 

Storekeeper, Group 1 

Supervisor of Scaling, Group 1 

Group 2 ... 

Surveyor, Group 2 

Teamster 

Telephone Operator, Group 1 

Truck Driver, Group 1 

Group 2 _ 

Watchman... 

Totals _ 





7 


7 




21 


21 


10 


2 


12 


1 


— 


1 


4 


— 


4 


4 


— 


4 


1 


— 


1 




7 


7 




1 


1 


3 


— 


3 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


21 


20 


41 


18 


1 


19 


3 


— 


3 


4 


— 


4 


2 


— 


2 




1 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


1 




1 


1 




3 


3 


2 


— 


2 


2 


— 


2 


2 


5 


7 


3 


3 


6 




1 


1 




12 


12 


1 


1 


2 


2 


— 


2 




7 


7 




1 


1 


2 


12 


14 




3 


3 




2 


2 


107 


1,102 


1,509 



The following chart shows the number of Permanent employees year by year 
over the period from the beginning in 1940. 

Technical Personnel 

Technical personnel as of March 31st, 1950, is reflected in the chart herewith. 



Page 81 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



Figure No. 2 



HOO 
1300 
1200 
HOO 

1000 

900 

800 
700 
600 
500 
4oo 
300 
200 
100 



PERMANENT EMPLOYEES 

AS OF MARCH 3I ST EACH YEAR 



i 



1 



I 



I 



Si 




1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 

Figure No. 3 

TECHNICAL PERSONNEL EMPLOYED 

AS OF 31 MARCH I 9 5> O 

FORESTERS ONLY NOTED TO 1946 SHADED PORTIONS DENOTE SEASONAL EMPLOYEES 




1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 82 



Figure No. 4 



CHART OF AGE CLASSES 



O 



400 


AS OF 


31 st. MARCH 


1950 










38o 








Un 














34o 












v;o 










300 


















28 o 












26o 












24o 












22o 












2oo 












]Qq 












1 6 O 












1 4 O 












1?0 










1 oo 
















8o 












60 












40 












20 












O 







400 

38o 

B60 

34o 

320 

300 

28 O 

26 O 

24o 

22 O 

200 

180 

160 

140 

120 

ioo 

80 

60 

40 

20 

O 



Distribution of Male and Female Employees at Head Office 

The relation of the respective numerical strengths of the male and female 
employees at Head Office as of March 31st, 1950. with their distribution is as follows: 

Head Office Table No. 7 



UNDER 21 


21 -30 


31-4o 


41-SO 


31-60 


61-70 


YEARS 


YEARS 


YEARS 


YEARS 


YEARS 


YEARS 





PERMANENT 
MALE FEMALE 


TEMPORARY 

MALE FEMALE 


TOTAL 
MALE FEMALE 


GRAND 
TOTAL 


Air Service 

Accounts 


88 

39 
29 

8 
13 

1 

1 
38 

8 
24 
47 
39 


1 
24 
18 

1 
14 
1 
6 
17 
3 
5 
7 
5 


7 
3 
4 

2 

8 
2 
1 
6 
11 


2 
6 
3 
2 

4 

10 
2 

1 


95 
42 
33 

8 
15 

1 

1 

46 
10 

25 
53 
50 


3 

30 

21 

3 

18 

1 

6 

27 

5 

5 

7 

6 


98 
72 


Fish and Wildlife 


54 


Forest Protection 


11 


Lands 


33 


Law 

Main Office 


2 

7 


Operation and Personnel.... 
Reforestation... 


73 
15 


Research 


30 


Surveys 


60 


Timber Management 


56 




335 


102 


44 


30 


379 


132 


511 



The following is a list of the classifications: 

This table reflects the Permanent and Temporary Staff throughout the 
Department and shows the numbers of the various classifications that were employed 
as of March 31st, 1950. 

The chart herewith covers Permanent and Temporary staff and indicates that 
♦he largest age groups are between 21 and 40 years of age. 

The numerical distribution between Head Office and the Field was as follows: 



Page S3 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



Under 21 



Table No. 8 
DISTRIBUTION OF STAFF IN AGE GROUPS 

11-30 31-40 41-50 51-60 61-70 



Over 70 



Head Office 














26 


145 


QQ 


62 


60 


10 


2 


Field 12 


234 


259 


251 


241 


91 


8 


Totals 38 


379 


358 


313 


301 


110 


10 



TRANSFERS OF TECHNICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



The following staff were transferred during the fiscal year:- 
M. D. Eggeling Forester from L. Erie District 



P. J. Hare 

A. J.Herridge 

T. \V. Hueston 
R. A. Lockhart 
J. \V. Lock wood 
G. E. Mackinnon 
S. J. Patterson 
A. A. Russell 



Forester from Timber M. Division (F.R.I.) 
Forester from For. Prot. Div. H.O. 



Forester from 
Forester from 
Forester from 
Forester from 
Forester from 
Forester from 



Timber M. Division (F.R.I 
Timber M. Division (F.R.I 
Timber M. Division (F.R.I 
Timber M. Division (F.R.I 
Timber M. Division (F.R.I 
Reforest. H.O. 



To Reforest. Div. H.O. on 

Sept. 1/40 

To Kapuskasinjz on Apr. 2/40 

To Kapuskasing as Act. F.P. 

Specialist on Sept. 28/49 

To North Bay on June 15/40 

To Geraldton on June 16/40 

To Algonquin Dist. on Aug. 8/49 

To Sudbury on June 15/49 

To Port Arthur on June 1/4Q 

To L. Simcoe on June 11/40 



Ranger School from air, Dorset. 




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Page 85 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



Table No. 9 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION REPORT 
Summary 



TOTAL COST 



NO. OF 

CLAIMS 



AVERAGE NO. 






OF EMPLOYEES 






DURING PEAK 




ACCIDENT 


SEASON OF 


AVERAGE 


RATE PER 


JULY AND 


FOR 


YEAR 


AUGUST 


YEAR 


' { 



1040-41 


? 16,921.36 
13.755.68 
14.581.84 
12,850.33 
14.540.02 
14.248.76 
21.560.24 
27.189.07 
35,989.21 

50,929.11 


110 
130 
103 
98 
120 
120 
182 
328 
404 

501 


2,032 
1,835 
3,095 
2,126 
3,382 
2,960 
3,466 
3,547 

4,770 June 
& July 
4.350 


Not 

Not 
1,822 
1.580 
1,060 
1,784 
2,366 
2.835 
2,923 

2,923 


Available 


1041-42 

1942-43 

1943-44 

1944.45 


Available 
5.65 
6.16 
6.00 


1945-46... 
1946-47 


7.23 
7.60 


1947-48 


11.57 


1948-49 
1049-50 


16.90 
17.14 




$222,565.62 


2,105 





The above figures do not include W.C.B. Administrative Costs 



Figure No. 6 



TREND IN WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION CLAIMS 

PREPARED FROM AVERAGE FIGURES FOR THE PAST TEN YEARS 

1940-41 to 1949-50 
average number of accidents showing incidence by month 



CO 

< 

_l 



< 

UJ 

> 
< 




APR 



MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT OCT. 



NOV. 



DEC. JAN. FEB. MAR. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 86 



Table No. 10 



YEAR 
ENDING 



COMPARISON OF COSTS 
For The Last Four Years 



medical, 

compensation 

and pension 

COSTS 



ADMINISTRATIVE 

COSTS ASSESSED 

BY W.C.B. 



NO. OF 
CLAIMS 



March 31, 1947 


$21,560.24 

27,189.07 

35,989.21 

1,347.00 


$ 754.50 
1,045.50 
1,347.00 

$2,044.50 


182 


March 31, 1948 

March 31, 1949 


328 
494 


Plus Admin. Costs 




Less Public Works Dept 


$37,336.21 
257.24 




Total Costs..— 


$37,078.97 








March 31, 1950... 

Less Public Works Dept... 


50.029.11 
719.66 


501 


Net Costs 


$50,209.45 
2,044.50 




Plus Admin. Costs 




Total Costs 


$52,253.95 









Figure No. 7 



TREND IN WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION COSTS 



PREPARED FROM 



TOTALS FOR THE PAST 
1940-41 to 1949-50 



TEN YEARS 




19401 1941-2 1942-3 1943-4 1944-5 19456 1946-7 1947-8 19489 194950 



Page 87 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



Table No. 11 



BREAKDOWN OF CLAIMS 



For Fiscal Year 1049-50 By Causes 



cause 

Falls 

Axe 

Cutting Tools 

Chisels. Knives. Saws. etc. 

Falling Objects 

Eye Injuries 

Poison (Insect & Plants). ... 

Burns 

Stepping on Nails 

Car Accidents 

Electric Shock (Lightning) 

Miscellaneous 

Bruises. Scratches, Slivers 
Strains, Sprains, etc 

Drowning 

Motor Car Trailer... 

Plane Crash 

Heart Attack 

Sunstroke 

Missing 

Scoot Accident ... 

Animal Bites 

Frostbite 

Rash 

Carbon Monoxide 

Infection 

Heat Prostration 

Assault 

Hernia 

Shot 

Totals 



83 

70 

29 
40 
34 

20 
12 

4 
10 

1 



154 
3 

1 



2 
1 

20 
6 

1 



16.6 

14.0 

5.8 
8.0 
6.8 
3.9 
2.4 

.8 
2.0 

.2 



30.8 
.6 

.2 



.4 

.2 

3.9 

1.2 

.2 
1.4 

.4 



501 



100.0 



8.347.90 
4,239.14 

2.0Q7.22 

985.66 

405.03 

301.87 

1,035.09 

36.40 

2.486.98 

42.01 



5,646.57 
810.00 

2,772.29 
1S0.49 



196.30 

3.00 

6.00 

48.90 

35.75 

824.69 

2oi.r,o 

5.00 

1.308.67 

8.00 



S32. 2Q>.52 



25.400 
13.140 

6.510 
3.062 
1.550 

.034 
3.220 

.112 
7.800 

.130 



17.600 

2.520 

8.700 

.560 



.610 

.000 

.010 
.151 
.110 

2.553 
.940 
.015 

4.340 
.024 



100.000 



Cost of accidents sustained previous to fiscal period 1040-50 
Cost of accidents sustained during fiscal period 1049-50 

Total Cost 



S10.0O6.15 
22,289.37 

S3 2, 295. 5 2 



Total Cost includes Compensation and Medical Aid but not Pensions. 

Compensation and Medical Aid 

Pensions and Medical Aid 

Total Cost for year 

Less Public Works .... _. 



Net Costs 
Plus Administrative Costs 



S32. 205.52 
18.633.59 

S50.O20.ll 
719.66 

$50,209.45 

2,044.50 



Total Cost 



$52,253.95 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 88 



Figure No. 8 



PERCENTAGE OF STAFF INVOLVED 
IN COMPENSABLE ACCIDENTS ANNUALLY 



> 17 

O 16 
> 

z 15 

14 
- 13 

J 12 
1/1 11 
5 ,o 



< 7 

i— 

z 6 

u 5 



19% 

18% 
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% 
% 
% 
% 
% 
% 
% 
% 
% 
% 
% 
% 
% 





OVER 


A PERIOD OF THE LAST EIGHT YEARS 
1942-43 to 1949-50 



















































































































































































































































































19% 

18% 

17% 

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10% 

9% 

8 % 

7% 

6% 

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4% 



< 



O 



1942-3 1943-4 19445 19456 1946-7 1947-8 1948-9 194950 



Figure No. 9 



TREND IN WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION CLAIMS 

PREPARED FROM TOTAL CLAIMS FOR THE PAST TEN YEARS 
1940-41 to 1949-50 

NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS PER YEAR 




19401 1941-2 1942-3 1943-4 1944-5 1945-6 1946-7 1947-8 1948-9 1949-50 



Page 89 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



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Part of the Department's exhibit at the C.S.E. 



Page w 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



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Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 92 



XO. BY YEAR 
OF ORIGIN 



Table No. IS 
CURRENT PENSIONS 



1920 


1 
1 

1 


1 






1924 _ _. 




1925 




1930...... 


1 








1932 


1 


1 






1934 


1 








1935 


1 








1936 


2 


2 


3 




1937 


1 
2 




3 




1938 




1940 


3 








1941 


1 








1943 


1 








1944 


2 








1945 


4 


3 






1946 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1947 _.__„... 


4 


2 


• 1 




1948 


5 


4 


5 




1949 


4 


2 








3u 


16 


13 


1 



Amounts paid between April 1. 1040. and March 31, 1950 
Pensions $17,734.18 

Medical Aid 89941 



Total ... . $18,633.59 

Table No. 16 
AMOUNTS PAID BY THE WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION BOARD 
During The Period April 1. 1948 to March 31, 1949 
no. of current 

pensions widows children mothers pension 

34 13 12 1 $12,872.19 

Total Cost of Pensions $15,401.61 

Table No. 17 

AMOUNTS PAID BY THE WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION BOARD 

During The Period April 1, 194Q to March 31, 1950 



no. of current 
pensions 

39 



widows children mothers pension 

16 13 1 $17,734.18 

Total Cost of Pensions $18,633.59 

Total Cost of Pensions for the above two years S34.035.20 

Table No. 18 

LIST OF NEW PENSIONS 

During The Fiscal Year 1049-50 



medical 
aid 

$2,529.42 



MEDICAL 
AID 

$ 899.41 



YEAR OF 








TOTAL PAID 


ORIGIN 


WIDOWS MOTHERS children 


PER MONTH 


1948 


1 




1 


$62.00 


1940 








5.00 


1040 


1 






50.00 


1040 








55.50 


1949 


1 






50.00 



Mrs. E. A. Buckland 
G. Bolduc 

Mrs. F. O. Chappel 
A. T. Jackson ... 
Mrs. A. Stanfield 



Page 93 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



Table No. 19 



LIST OF CURRENT PENSIONS 

For The Period 1949-50 



COST OF 

PENSION PAID 

PER MONTH 



YEAR OF 
ORIGIN OF 
PENSION 



Mrs. M. Albright 

G. Bolduc 

Mrs. N. Brown 

F. W. Brown 

Mrs. E. A. Buckland ... 

E. C. Burton 

Mrs. F. 0. Chappel ... 
Mrs. L. Curik — (remarried 

now Mrs. Carlson) 

Mrs. C. Deacon 

Mrs. J. L. Depencier 

Mrs. Rose Faubert 

A. F. Grant ...... 

R. J. Henderson 

C. Hurd 

Mrs. P. A. Hutton 



A. T. Jackson 

D. Leprett 

Jas. Maltby 

Mrs. C. Maydanuk . 

G. McAinsh 

Mrs. C. McFarland 
H. F. McMinn ..... 
Mrs. C. Merrineld— 

(remarried) 

M.Mulvihill . 
T. Naveau 
T. O'Brien 
J. Paquette 
Mrs. R.G. Reid 
Mrs. R. Retty... 
W. C. Sanders 
Wm. Shoup 



Mrs. A. Stanfielri 
Mrs. J. M. Stevens 

P. Sullivan 

\V. H. Trickett 
L. J. Turner 



Mrs. H. \V. Westaway 

Mrs. R. Wilcox 

G. J. Wrigclesworth 



16 



1 

(now 

discontinued) 



13 



20.00 
5.00 
50.00 
7.50 
62.00 
24.00 
50.00 

62.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
88.25 
12.25 
17.75 
62.00 



55.50 
12.00 
5.50 
36.00 
16.25 
50.00 
19.25 

50.00 

7.25 

7.75 

11.00 

9.75 

86.00 

50.00 

10.00 

l $.75 

50.00 

50.00 

50.00 

13.75 

6.50 

50.00 

98.00 

53.25 



$1,422.25 



1Q40 
1949 
1920 
1944 
1948 
1925 
1949 

1Q47 
1947 
1945 
1945 
1938 
1047 
1946 
1946 



1949 

1034 

1938 

1037 
1041 
1045 
1047 

1Q32 
1Q44 
1045 
1040 
1043 
103o 
1948 
1024 
1040 
1040 
1936 
1930 
1048 
1935 
1948 
1948 
1940 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 94 



Table No. 20 
JUNIOR FOREST RANGERS 
During the summer of 1949, Junior Rangers were distributed as follows: 



DISTRICT NUMF 

Algonquin 40 

Cochrane 25 

Gogama 10 

Kapuskasing 10 

North Bay 26 

Parry Sound — 1° 



Quinte 19 

Sault Ste. Marie 22 

Sudbury 26 

Temiskaming 28 

Trent 12 

Total - 237 



The following is a brief report of operations during the summer of 1949: 



LOCATION of camps 

1 mile south of 
Murchison cabin on 
W.H. Ranger, 
Crosslake 



East Branch of 

Night Hawk River 

in Langmuir Twp. 

Mouth of Lightning 

River in Lamplugh 

Twp. 

Menapia Twp. near 

Deputy 

Headquarters. 



Ronda Deputy 
Headquarters. 



Oba, Hearst, 
Kapuskasing. 



White Rock Road, 
Twp. of Merrick. 
Tilden Lake. 
Lady Evelyn Lake 
Deputy Head- 
quarters. 
Temagami. 



accommodation 



work done 



Algonquin District 



Tents 



Construction and maintenance of tele- 
phone lines, 54J/2 miles of wagon roads 
mowed. 24^4 miles of telephone line 
mowed. 16 miles of trails mowed. 
Helped combat fires. 22 cords wood cut. 
Assisted rangers to issue travel permits 
and to sell licenses, worked on cabin at 
mileage 130. 208 miles of canoe portages 
mowed. 



Cochrane District 
Camps constructed of lum- 
ber. Tents, springs and 
mattresses and blankets. 



Telephone lines brushed out, new lines 
constructed and some old lines rebuilt. 
Telephone poles cut, treated and erected. 
About 8^2 miles of walking trail cleared 
to proposed site of new tower in Inglis 
Twp. One acre of bush was under- 
brushed and thinned out in Menapia 
Twp. between Island Falls Deputy 
Headquarters and the Abitibi River. 
Tower observation. Instructed how to 
operate Wajax Forest Fire Pumps, some 
boys to handle a canoe. Fire protection 
posters put up. 

Gogama District 
Tents with wooden floors. Cleared 7 miles of the telephone line 

between Ronda and Westree. Assisted to 
right fire in Natal Twp. 

Kapuskasing District 
Tents, blankets and tar- Brushed out portages, cleared telephone 

paulins supplied, spring lines. Maintenance on buildings and 

beds while at Ranger's painting. Assisted to construct cabin. 

Headquarters. 



North Bay District 



Tents, some with lumber 
walls, and double bunk 
beds. 



Brushed out approximately 5 miles of 
the White Rock Road. Built 2 new 
bridges and 3 culverts. Brushed out a 
parking place around the Ranger Cabin 
at Tilden Lake. 3 acres of ground 
underbrushed and burned in the Finlay- 
son Motor Park to provide additional 



Page 95 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



Lot 18, Con. 10, 
Boulter Twp. at 
Clear Lake Cabin. 
Blackstone. 12 mile 
bay. Go Home Bay. 
Perault's Bay, and 
in vicinity of Ard- 
beg at Clear Lake. 



Plevna. Bancroft. 



camping space and larger parking area. 
Approximately 22 miles of portages and 
trails cleaned out with signs and posters 
replaced and some 1,900 feet of bridging 
done along trails in low and wet ground. 
14 miles of telephone line underbrushed 
and necessary maintenance carried out. 
300 yards of sand and gravel and 
spread on roads leading to Finlayson 
Motor Park and to Dept. office on block 
"A" of the Temagami townsite parking 
ground in the Motor Park. Helped to 
suppress 14 fires. General instruction. 

Parry Sound District 
Frame bunkhouses, tents. 33yi miles of telephone line brushed out. 

10 miles of road mowed and graded. 
200 yards of gravel, hauled and spread. 
5 new culverts put in and a bridge 12 
ft. wide and 16 ft. long was built. Fire 
fighting in Ferrie Twp. 



Quinte District 
Tents with flooring, beds, 
mattresses. Upstairs por- 
tion of warehouse. 



Brushed out telephone lines. Wood 
cutting. Carried out improvements to 
tourist camp sites. Fire fighting. Fire 
ranging and protection work. Summer 
resort road improvement. General 
instruction. 



Old Deputy Head- 
quarters. Twp. IB. 
Ranger Lake Rd., 
Island Lake and 
Mica Bav. 



Sault Ste. Marie District 

Tents with walls and 27 miles of telephone line brushed out. 

wooden floors, spring beds Stand-by crew for fire fighting. General 

and mattresses. instruction. 



Lot 3, Con. 1, 
Hart Twp. 



Sudbury District 
Tents with board floors. Approximately 8 miles of telephone line 

Single, double deck bunks constructed between Cartier and Windy 

with springs and mat- Lake Tower. General instruction, 

tresses. 



Temiskaming District 



Elk Lake and 
Swastika Chief 
Ranker Head- 
quarters. 
Matachewan, 
Gowganda and 
Larder Lake 
Deputy Chief 
Ranger Head- 
quarters. Ben 
Nevis Twp. 
Haileybury Lumber 
Co. Camp. Nordica 
Twp. 



Tents, buildings at Chief 
and Deputy Chief Ran- 
ger's Headquarters, also at 
lumber camp. 



Approximately 13 J^ miles of telephone 
lines brushed out and repaired. Brushed 
out 1,087 chains of portages. Repaired 
bridges. Cleared site for proposed dis- 
trict garage and warehouse. Erected a 
25 It. temporary wooden lookout in 
Bayly Twp. Erected a frame cabin 22' 
x 18' for towerman in Ben Nevis Twp. 
Five worked as radio operators and 
clerks on fires, 32, 33, 29 and 31. Fire 
suppression. Cut wood. Completed log 
building on Watabeag Lake for use of 
towerman and Con. Off. Improved 
access roads. Cut and peeled logs for 
proposed dock and boathouse. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 96 



Northerly end of 
Baldwin's Bay, 
Lake Catchacoma, 
Lot 17, Con. 8, 
Cavendish Twp. 



Trent District 
Tents on wooden floors. Development of parking and camping 

site for public use on Catchacoma Lake. 
Improvement of road leading from the 
highway to the camp site. About SH 
miles of telephone lines cleared and con- 
structed. Many poles rock cribbed. Fire 
fighting. 

Reports from the District Foresters indicate that most of the Rangers were 
satisfactory. The normal rate of pay was $3.00 per day, plus cost of living bonus and 
board. 

SCALERS' SCHOOLS 

Examinations were held during 1949 as follows: 

1. Carnarvon May 13th, 1949 2. Sault Ste. Marie June 11th, 1949 



These resulted as follows: 



CARNARVON 



Sawlog and Pulpwood Licence 

After further experience — 

Full licence after further experience and species test .... 
Pulpwood licence after further experience and species test 

After further experience 

Pulpwood licence after further experience and specie test 



SAULT STE. M \RII. 




UNIVERSITY 



Table No. 21 

DISTRIBUTION SUMMARY BY UNIVERSITIES 
OF FORESTERS IN ONTARIO GOVERNMENT SERVICE 

HEAD OFFICE field industry 



Toronto ... 

New Brunswick .... 

British Columbia 

Indiana 

Michigan 

Penn. State 

Iowa State 

Yale... 

Maine.. 

Idaho 

Mich. College of 
Mining and Tech. ... 

Harvard 

Duke.N.C...... 

Edinburgh 

Latvian 

Vilnius, Lithuania ... 
Stockholm, Sweden . 

Lwow, Poland 

Eberswalde, Prussia 

French 

Russian (1915) 

Total 



35 
9 



48 



65 

5 

1 
2 



75 



161 
39 

2 

4 
4 

1 
2 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 



222 



26 

53 



345 



Page 97 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



DEPARTMENT (FIELD) 



YEAR 



NAME 


DEGREE 


GRADUATED 


UNIVERSITY 


DISTRICT 




Acheson, K. 


B.Sc.F. 


1933 


Toronto 


Kenora 




Adamson, M. A. 


B.Sc.F. 


1928 


Toronto 


Midhurst 




Addison. P. 


B.Sc.F. 


1929 


Toronto 


Port Arthur 




Bajoras, A. 


F.E. 


1043 


Vilnius, Lithuania 


Sault Ste. Marie 




Ball, J. S. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Lake Erie 




Barron. J. 


B.Sc.F. 


1938 


Toronto 


Port Arthur 




Bell. J. G 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Perdue Univ., 
Lafayette, Ind. 


Trent 




Benson, B. B. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Algonquin 




Boissoneau, A. \. 


B.Sc.F. 


1943 


Toronto 


Cochrane 




Boultbee. R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1929 


Toronto 


Port Arthur 




Bray, A. S. 


B.Sc.F. 


1031 


Toronto 


Kapuskasing 




Bruce, D. S. 


B.Sc.F. 


1042 


Toronto 


Algonquin 




Carman, R. S. 


B.Sc.F. 


1021 


Toronto 


Angus 




Carmichael, A. D. J. 


B.Sc.F. 


1047 


Toronto 


Angus 




Crealock, A. 


B.Sc.F. 


1032 


Toronto 


Cochrane 




Cressman, E. M. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Lake Huron 




Eckel, L. H. 


B.ScF. 


1040 


Toronto 


Lake Simcoe 




Edwards. W. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1034 


Toronto 


Quinte 




Forfar, R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Sault Ste. Marie 




Gage, D. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Lake Simcoe 




Gimbv, W. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1927 


Toronto 


Algonquin 




Griffiths, J. D. 


B.Sc.F. 


1C40 


Toronto 


Quinte 




Grinnell. H. R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1049 


New Brunswick 


Trent 




Hall, F. L. 


B.Sc.F. 


1042 


Toronto 


Sudbury 




Halpenny, J. M. 


B.Sc.F. 


1047 


Toronto 


Rideau 




Hambly.R. H. 


B.Sc.F. 


1047 


Toronto 


Temiskaming 




Hamilton, L. S. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Lake Huron 




Hamilton, S. R. C. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Lake Huron 




Hare, J. P. 


B.Sc.F. 


1048 


Toronto 


Chapleau 




Herridge, A. J. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Kapuskasing 




Hess, Q. 


B.Sc.F. 


1040 


Toronto 


Sault Ste. Marie 




Hope, J. H. 


B.Sc.F. 


1042 


Toronto 


North Bay 




Hueston, T. VY 


B.Sc.F. 


1946 


Toronto 


North Bay 




Hyslop, R. S. 


B.Sc.F. 


1937 


Toronto 


Sault Ste. Marie 




Jackson, J. C. 


B.Sc.F. 


1032 


Toronto 


Lake Huron 




Jenkins, J. L. 


B.Sc.F. 


1047 


Toronto 


Gogama 




Kirk.M.D. 


B.Sc.F. 


1042 


Toronto 


Trent 




Lane, G. R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1026 


Toronto 


Lake Simcoe 




Leman, A. W. 


B.Sc.F. 


1030 


Toronto 


Quinte 




Lewis, E. A. 


B.Sc.F. 


1040 


Toronto 


Angus 




Linton, G. M. 


B.Sc.F. 


1010 


Toronto 


Orono 




Lockhart, R. A. 


B.Sc.F. 


1Q42 


New Brunswick 


Geraldton 




Lockwood, J \V 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


New Brunswick 


Algonquin 




Lyon, N. F. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Port Arthur 




Marritt, I. C. 


B.Sc.F. 


1022 


Toronto 


Lake Huron 




Mennill. J. L. 


B.Sc.F. 


1048 


Toronto 


Lake Simcoe 




Meyer, G. F. 


B.Sc.F. 


1932 


Toronto 


Kapuskasing 




Middle-ton, H.N. 


B.Sc 1- 


1040 


Toronto 


Sioux Lookout 




Mullin, R. E. 


B.Sc.F.) 


1042/ 


Toronto ) 


RidtMii 






M F. S 


L946J 


Michigan \ 






Murphy, R.J. K. 


B ScF. 


1040 


Toronto 


Lake Erie 




MacKinnon, G. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1040 


New Brunsu ick 


Sudbury 




McEwen. J ('. K 


B.Sc.F. 


1934 


Toronto 


Temiskaming 




McEwen. P. 


B.S, 1 


1916 


Toronto 


Ranger School 




New man, F. S. 


B.ScF. 


I'M i 


Toronto 


Lake Erie 

Continued on .W.< 


/ Page 



Report of the Department of Lands anal Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 98 










YEAR 






NAME 


DEGREE 


GRADUATED 


UNIVERSITY 


DISTRICT 


Patterson, S. J. 


B.Sc.F. 


1933 


New Brunswick 


Port Arthur 


Peacock, A. H. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Lake Simcoe 


Peters, W. D. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Rideau 


Pierce, T. W. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Port Arthur 


Raminsh, A. 


F.E. 


1932 


Riga, Latvia 


Kapuskasing 


Ringham, L. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Kenora 


Russell, A. A. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Midhurst 


Shaw, D. J. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Sudbury 


Sider, D.J. 


B.Sc.F. 


1938 


Toronto 


North Bay 


Simmons, J. F. L. 


B.Sc.F. 


1915 


Toronto 


Lake Simcoe 


Sloane, N. H. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Snow, R. L. 


B.Sc.F. 


1928 


Toronto 


Parry Sound 


Steele, W. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1927 


Toronto 


Rideau 


Thurston, W. A. G. 


B.Sc.F. 


1943 


Toronto 


Lake Huron 


Ussher, R. D. 


B.Sc.F. 


1927 


Toronto 


Lake Simcoe 


Walroth, A. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Rideau 


Ward, E. L. 


B.Sc.F. 


1927 


Toronto 


North Bay 


Wheatley, A. B. 


B.Sc.F. 


1930 


Toronto 


Trent 


Wilson, D. R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Parry Sound 


Zavitz, C. H. 


B.Sc.F.} 
M.F. S 


1932 1 
1933J 


Michigan 


Lake Erie 



DEPARTMENT (HEAD OFFICE) 



Ardenne, M. 
Bastedo, W. M. 
Baxter, R. A. 
Bayly, G. H. U. 
Brodie, J. A. 
Brown, W. G. B. 
Cameron, G. A. 
Campbell, B. L. 
Clarke, C. H. D. 
Clarke, W. B. M. 
Connor, R. C. 
Coyne, G. F. 
Cram, W. D. 
Doyle, E. N. 
Dyer, W. G. 
Eggeling, M. D. 
Fenwick, A. R. 
Flowers, J. F. 
Foster, W. T. 
Fulcher, A. C. 
Giles, J. W. 
Graham, H. D. 
Greenwood, W. B. 
Grinnell, W. R. 
Haddow, W. R. 
Haig, R. A. 
Hansson, L. T. 

Heimburger, C. C. 
Holman, G. E. 
Howard, C. P. 



DEGREE 

B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.ScF. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 
F.E. 

B.ScF. 
B.Sc.F. 
B.Sc.F. 



YEAR 

GRADUATED 

1924 

1948 
1949 
1939 
1923 
1947 
1949 
1949 
1931 
1933 
1949 
1949 
1923 
1949 
1949 
1944 
1925 
1949 
1947 
1949 
1948 
1945 
1925 
1940 
1923 
1949 
1945 

1928 
1949 
1934 



UNIVERSITY 

Toronto 

Toronto 

New Brunswick 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

New Brunswick 

New Brunswick 

Toronto 

New Brunswick 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

New Brunswick 

Toronto 

Edinburgh 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

New Brunswick 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Stockholm, 

Sweden 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 



DIVISION 

Research 

Timber Management 
Timber Management 
Reforestation 
Timber Management 
Research 

Timber Management 
Timber Management 
Fish and Wildlife 
Timber Management 
Timber Management 
Timber Management 
Lands and Rec. Areas 
Timber Management 
Timber Management 
Reforestation 
Operation and Personnel 
Timber Management 
Reforestation 
Timber Management 
Timber Management 
Timber Management 
Lands and Rec. Areas 
Reforestation 
Operation and Personnel 
Timber Management 

Timber Management 

Research 

Timber Management 

Reforestation 

Continued on Next Page. 



Page 99 



Division of Operation and Personnel 







YEAR 






NAME 


DEGREE 


GRADUATED 


UNIVERSITY 


DIVISION 


Johnston, R. X. 


B.Sc.F. 


1917 


Toronto 


Research 


Larsson, H. C. 


B.Sc.F. 


1942 


Toronto 


Research 


Leslie, A. P. 


B.Sc.F. 


1929 


Toronto 


Research 


Mackey, T. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1926 


Toronto 


Forest Protection 


Morison, M. B. 


B.Sc.F. 1 

M.Sc.Fj 


1924 
1939 


Xew Brunswick 


Timber Management 


Morrison, G. R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1948 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


MacDougall, F. AA 


B.Sc.F. 


1923 


Toronto 


Deputy Minister 


Plonski, W. L. f 


F.E. 


1924 


Lwow, Poland 


Timber Management 


Pointing, P. J. x 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Royce, CD. 


B.ScF. 


1949 


Toronto 


Research 


Scott, J. D. 


B^Sc.F. 


1948 


Xew Brunswick 


Timber Management 


Sharpe, J. F. V 


,-g.Sc.F. 


1922 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Townsend, P. B. — "■' 


B.Sc.F. 


1934 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Turner, K. B. 


B.Sc.F. 


1945 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Westland, C. E. 


B.Sc.F. 


1923 


Toronto 


Forest Protection 


Wilde, C. J. R. 


B.Sc.F. 


1949 


Toronto 


Timber Management 


Wile, B. C. 


B.Sc.F. 


1049 


Xew Brunswick 


Timber Management 


Zavitz, E. J. 


B.Sc.F. 


1905 


Michigan 


Reforestation 






Table 


Xo. 22 





AREAS, POPULATIOXS. STAFF AXD IXVESTMEXT IN PRIMARY FOREST IXDUSTRIES 
In the Administrative Districts of the Department as of March 31, 1950 



PERMANENT AND TEMPORARY 
STAFF 









AREA IN 
SQUARE 
MILES 



ESTIMATED 
POPULATION 



ESTIMATED 

INVESTMENT 

IN 

PRIMARY 

FOREST 

INDUSTRIES 



Algonquin 

Chapleau 

Cochrane 

Fort Frances 

Geraldton 

( rogama 
Kapuskasing 

Kenora 

Lake Erie 

Lake Huron_ ... 

Lake Simcoe 

Xorth Bay _ 

Parry Sound 
Port Arthur 

Quinte _ 

Rideau 

Sault Ste. Marie 
Sioux Lookout 
Sudbury 
Temiskaming 

Trent 

Totai s 

*1041 census figu 



6 
2 
4 
1 
2 
4 
3 
3 
3 
8 
12 
5 
5 
7 
4 
5 
6 
1 

3 
5 
6 



7 

8 

5 

2 

2 

8 

2.1 

28 

15 

13 

13 

15 

20 

12 

13 

6 

13 

4 

13 



46 

12 
25 
28 
18 
12 
26 
2.1 



24 
21 
2i 
16 

2. 1 , 
18 
26 
22 
14 



2 
7 
2 
1 
3 
6 
2 

18 
6 

58 
5 
3 

12 
2 
8 
6 
6 
5 
4 

12 



72 
24 
48 
43 
29 
24 
39 
42 
49 
45 
89 
56 
49 
63 
48 
28 
56 
35 
53 
40 
49 



95 



234 



<77 102 



173 



981 



5,396 
6,376 

12,260 
7,192 

13,448 
6,424 

14,288 

12,368 
7,252 
8,936 
5,304 
5,800 
6,460 

17,784 
7,708 
5,464 

16,089 

43,922 
7,774 
5,436 
5,328 



35,000 

3,700* 
60,200* 
22,000 
5,200* 
2,800* 
21,500* 
16,400* 
825,600 
804,200 
1,339,200 
56,000 
57,200 
80,000* 
199,700 
444,500 
57,000 
12,000* 
72,000* 
47,000* 
158,300 



221,009 



S 5,000,000 

4,959,000 
62,545,000 

5,772,000 
62,404,000 

1,219,000 
51,479,000 
17,656,000 
33,064,000 

2,886,000 
11,582,000 
11,435,000 

2,300,000 
72,734,000 

2,975,000 
33,138,000 
33,000,000 

2,520,000 
i:.o44.0O0 

1..' 84,000 

2,021,000 



4,3 1O.500 ,*43 7,61 7,000 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 100 



TRAINING 
Head Office Staff Course 

The Head Office staff course, which was instituted during the 1942-43 fiscal 
year, was again given to members selected from both Field and Head Office staffs. In 
all, 26 employees were enrolled for complete or partial courses under this scheme of 
Training. 

This course may well be described as an orientation course, whereby employees, 
who appear to be of administrative calibre or who have been promoted to administra- 
tive posts and are considered likely to advance in the service of the Department, are 
given instruction by means of lectures and practical application to the work of the 
various Head Office Divisions, thereby acquainting them with all of the functions of 
the Department. It also serves to answer, particularly for those employed in the Field, 
the question — "Why does Head Office do it that way?" 

The Districts represented at these courses were Cochrane. Chapleau. Geraldton, 
Kenora, Lake Erie. Xorth Bay, Parry Sound. Quinte, Sault Ste. Marie and 
Temiskaming 

Job Relations Training 

In July. 1949. Mr. John G. Birkett was appointed as Training Officer. Having 
been employed in Staff and Safety Training in the Mining Industry for some time, 
Mr. Birkett came to us with a good background of experience. He participated in 
lectures given to the students at the Ranger School, and. in January, 1950, conducted 
a Job Relations Training Course at the Ranger School with eight members of the 
teaching and administrative staffs in attendance. All qualified and certificates were 
issued to them accordingly. Mr. Birkett's decision to return to industry shortly there- 
after was regretted by all. as the Department lost, thereby, the services of an 
exceptionally capable training officer. 

Accident Prevention, Health and Safety 

Continued rise in the number of Workmen's Compensation claims and the 
accident rate within the Department is cause for considerable concern. Careful investi- 
gation of all factors concerned show that, while the increase in the accident rate 
appears to have been rapid, it cannot be regarded as an indication of undue careless- 
ness in the organization. In the main, it is due to the acceleration of the Department's 
programme in field activities. A large proportion of these accidents occur in combat- 
ing forest fires. The rapid expansion in this and other services rendered by the 
Department has involved the recruitment of a considerable number of new staff, and, 
as the two major causes of compensatory accidents are "falls" and "axe cuts", it is 
reasonable to conclude that as new staff become accustomed to negotiating rough 
terrain over which many of our activities take them and to handling the implements 
that they are required to use, the accident rate will be lowered considerably. 

Accident Prevention Training is directed towards the reduction of this un- 
wanted condition. Eight Information Circulars dealing with this subject were issued 
for the instruction of staff in accident prevention and safety measures. The subject 
has been one for consideration at all departmental conferences and wherever groups 
of departmental personnel have been gathered together for instruction. 



Page 101 Division of Operation and Personnel 



Because of the large and increasing number of vehicles and pieces of auto- 
motive equipment, it was recognized that training in the supervision and main- 
tenance of vehicles and automotive equipment was most essential. Accordingly, two 
groups from the Department were enrolled in each of the Seventh Annual Motor 
Fleet Supervisory Training Course and the Third Annual Motor Vehicle Maintenance 
Course, both conducted by the Division of Public Safety of the University of Toronto 
(University Extension). As a result of these courses, it was decided to continue enroll- 
ing other groups of departmental personnel in subsequent courses. The Department's 
approach to the accident problem is first from the standpoint of staff welfare, and 
second from that of economic loss in terms of Workmen's Compensation claims, time 
and partial disruption of operations. 

First Aid 

Close to three hundred employees of the Department have qualified for some 
one of the various certificates issued by the St. John Ambulance Association — an 
organization which has given this Department excellent support in First Aid Training. 
In all Departmental establishments, first aid supplies are now a routine item in equip- 
ment. First aid kits of various sizes are provided, to take care of the varying numbers 
of staff employed at each establishment. All department vehicles are equipped with 
first aid kits of a size that may be placed in the glove compartment of the vehicle. 
Individual kits are provided for employees whose work may take them some distance 
from groups of other employees or from bases where larger size first aid kits are 
available. Firms supplying these first aid kits have co-operated by re-arranging the 
standard equipment and by including certain other items that the Department 
considered essential. 

The Department acquired three units of a new type of resuscitator. They 
have been distributed to strategic points and these machines have already proven their 
worth. One of them located at Ipperwash Beach Park was the means of saving the 
life of a holidayer at that resort in August. 1949. As well, these machines have been of 
valuable assistance in cases of illness, serving both as inhalators and aspirators. 

Plans for advancing training in accident prevention, health and safety 
measures are in hand and our programme in that respect will be extended. 

Once again we must pay tribute to the excellent co-operation of the Department 
of Health, through its industrial hygiene, tuberculosis prevention, sanitary engineering 
and other divisions. In particular, we wish to acknowledge the services rendered staff 
at Head Office and nearby establishments, through the Civil Service Health Centre, 
and the whole-hearted co-operation of its physician-in-charge and his very competent 
staff. 

R wger School 

The Ontario Forest Ranger School has continued to provide instruction for 
Departmental personnel, the nominees of the Forest Industries of Ontario student 
groups from the University of Toronto, and. as well, to provide fXcHities iter occasional 
courses given to outside groups. During this fiscal year. 45 student from the various 
Districts attended the Ranger School, and 41 of them complfctjetljire courses success 
fully and qualified for the diploma. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 102 



OFFICE MANAGEMENT 

General 

Owing to the scheduled retirement of a senior member of this Division at the 
end of the year, a considerable proportion of the work previously handled by him 
devolved upon this section and was progressively turned over, so that there would be 
no break in the service when the retirement took effect. Some of the duties so trans- 
ferred consisted of Preparation of Leases and Leasing of Properties, Arranging Con- 
ferences, Supervision of Permanent Records Sub-section, Space Adjustments, etc. 

By means of a re-arrangement of staff, the additional duties were assumed, one 
extra clerk typist being employed. 

Locating. Purchasing and Expediting of Equipment and Supplies 

The conditions of scarcity of equipment and supplies which were so noticeable 
during the immediate post-war period were alleviated considerably. In most lines, 
delivery could be obtained immediately, or within a reasonable time, and through a 
greater competition in the supply field, a slight easing of prices was experienced in 
some cases. This tendency was most noticeable in office furniture and equipment, 
although a general increase in prices took place in certain instances. The importation 
of high quality equipment and steel furniture from Britain was of marked assistance 
in obtaining favourable prices and good delivery. Thus the majority of service 
requirements were filled satisfactorily and without undue delay. 

Inventory Control 

The modified equipment accounting procedure, by which each administrative 
District maintains its own perpetual inventory, was put into effect in all field offices. 
Equipment records are maintained on a card system, which gives an accurate picture 
of total physical stocks and valuation at any time, as well as the distribution of the 
equipment within the District. Inventory Record Cards, in two colours, are used, 
one to record all inventory items, and the other to include minor items which are of 
too small a cost to include in the inventory, but of which a record must be main- 
tained. Work was commenced on a complete vocabulary of equipment, with standard 
nomenclature, as a guide to all concerned as to the items to be shown on inventory 
and those which are classified as maintenance supplies, owing to their low value 
and/or short service life. This work will take some time to complete, in view of the 
very wide range of equipment in use by various activities of the Department, but 
when completed, it will be a much better method of determining correct classifications 
than by the price factor alone, as the latter is difficult to follow because of the 
continual price changes. 

Distribution of Equipment and Supplies 

The work of the stockroom staff is seriously hampered by lack of adequate 
storage space. This condition is particularly noticeable in the case of articles of 
uniform which must be carefully stored to prevent deterioration and damage by moths, 
etc. However, by utilizing every available square foot of space, it has been possible 
to carry on and give efficient and prompt service to all branches. 



Page 103 Division of Operation and Personnel 



Express and Freight shipments to District Offices reached a total of about 160 
tons consisting of approximately 12.000 separate parcels. This was a considerable 
increase over the previous year. Over and above these shipments, 774,470 licenses 
were issued on 1 1.366 separate orders and mailed to License Issuers. This is an increase 
of approximately 73.000 licenses on about 2000 orders more than were filled in the 
previous year. 

Staff Uniforms 

Every effort was made to improve the uniform equipment and thus the appear- 
ance of all personnel so outfitted. Continual research was made to improve the 
standard of materials, as for example, the former summer attire of serge trousers and 
bush jacket, which were found to be lacking in smartness and of unsatisfactory 
quality with regard to wear. Laboratory tests were made on several cloths, and as 
a result, it was decided to adopt a very neat suit of matching serge trousers and wind- 
breaker of a mixture or blended material, the colour of which is slightly lighter than 
standard khaki. The original identification flashes as worn on the shoulders of 
tunics, etc.. were not as smart as could be wished, and after some investigation, it 
was decided to change from the original red lettering on black background, to gold 
lettering on black, using somewhat smaller letters, and thus achieving a much neater 
effect. Also, instead of having Divisional flashes of rectangular shape to indicate 
the individual's sphere of activity stitched on below the Departmental title, the new 
flashes incorporated all the necessary designations in one. Brown leather belts for 
wear with the trousers of summer uniforms were approved and issued to all uniformed 
personnel apart from Conservation Officers, who wear Sam Browne belts. 

Duplicating. Printing, Distribution of Printed Matter 

The addition of a second Multilith machine to the equipment already in use 
in the printing room improved the service from that sub-section considerably. Pre- 
viously, personnel had found it necessary to do a great deal of overtime work to 
keep up to the demand. On receipt of the new machine, the old one was sent out for 
a complete overhaul, and on its return, the back-log of work was brought up to date 
and additional work, previously handled by outside printers, taken on with a resultant 
saving to the Department. A new paper cutter was purchased to replace the old one. 
which was found to be so badly worn that it was impossible to depend on any degree 
of accuracy whatever. 

Production by the Multilith reached a total of 3,933,000 impressions, of which 
about 426.500 were Departmental letterhead. This constitutes an increase of 
1.164.600 impressions. 

Production by mimeograph process increased by 154,300 to a total of 508.100 
impressions. This production was run from 1,786 stencils forwarded by various 
divisions for processing. 

The production of the Multilith machines is almost entirely taken up on the 
production of letterhead and various forms, booklets, pamphlets, etc., while that of 
the mimeograph is mainly circulars, news releases, circular letters, etc. 

When small runs are required from the multilith. the copy is typed directly on 
to a paper plate and 987 of these were prepared by the Yari-tvper Operator. For long 



Report of the Department oi Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 104 



runs, or permanent plates, the copy is typed on paper by the Vari-type Operator and 
photographed for transfer to a metal plate. The Vari-type Operator produced 863 
various pieces of copy of this type during the year. 

Servicing and Space Adjustments 

Servicing continues to assume greater proportions with added mechanical 
devices in Departmental offices. Every effort is made to keep office machinery working 
in the most efficient manner possible and other services are taken care of as required. 

It has not been possible to effect many space adjustments because of the lack 
of space which could be utilized. Owing to the move of certain laboratories of the 
Department of Health to a new location, it is hoped that it will be possible to secure 
additional office space which is so urgently required to enable personnel to perform 
their duties more efficiently. 

Conferences 

The arrangements for various conferences were one of the new duties assigned 
to this section as outlined under the heading "General". The first and largest con- 
ference to be handled was the Annual District Foresters 1 Conference early in 
January. Although the securing of necessary space for such a large group is always 
a problem, it was possible to carry this out satisfactorily and no serious difficulties 
were encountered during the ten days of meetings. Other conferences handled during 
the year were the Trappers' Conference, Timber Operators' Conference. Fish and 
Wildlife Meetings with various Hunting and Angling Clubs, Conservation Officers 
Trainee Groups and two Head Office Staff Courses 

Properties, Leasing, Etc 

This again constituted a new field for this section. The files relating to all 
premises owned or leased by the Department were taken over and given considerable 
study to familiarize the staff with the background. It was found that service along 
these lines could be improved by an efficient follow-up system, which was instituted 
and which resulted in a marked speed-up in operations. Close liaison is maintained 
with the Department of Public Works and the requirements of many field offices for 
additional space, due to marked expansion, were fulfilled expeditiously. It is hoped 
that property leases will be taken over by the Department of Public Works in the 
near future. 

Records Office 

The continued expansion of Departmental activities has resulted in an increase 
in the number of permanent files by about 2,800 per year. This creates an additional 
storage problem as well as much larger volume of file movements to various divisional 
offices. It is necessary to relegate a considerable number of older files to the storage 
vault at Maple each year, in order to accommodate new entries. The increase in 
number of files handled also necessities greater care charging out and crediting files 
as well as greater co-operation from divisional offices in recording the movements of 
all files in their charge. Otherwise a great deal of time must be consumed in tracing 
files which become mislaid, and are thus not available when required. 

An increase in requests for messenger service, which is also supplied by the 
Records Office, was noted, but all calls were carried out without delay. 



Page 105 Division of Operation and Personnel 



INFORMATION 

During the year ending March 31, 1950. there was a sustained demand for 
departmental publications. While these demands were of a general nature they 
received a considerable upswing due to the fact that conservation has been placed on 
the curriculum for school teaching. With the inclusion of this subject, there was a 
very noticeable increase in the number of requests for publications dealing with the 
conservation of our Natural Resources. 

Requests from the public for the staff publication Sylva reached a new high 
during the year. Due to the ever-increasing demand and the mounting costs of 
production it was found necessary to revise the mailing list and place the magazine 
on a subscription basis. Commencing with Volume 5, No. 5. a subscription fee of 
$1.50 per year was instituted. Those already on the mailing list had previously been 
advised of the change. This action had the result of reducing the circulation to about 
4,500 copies for the next few issues. There is still a great deal of public interest in 
the magazine, however, and circulation on the new basis is steadily increasing. 

Distribution of all printed material was given particular attention and the 
various publications received a wide coverage. In this connection it may be said that 
the mailing lists were maintained in good order and are being constantly revised. 

Twenty-five publications were produced and published during the year, as 
indicated in the following list: 

Report of the Royal Commission on Forest Reservation and National Park, 

1893. 

Sylva, Volume 6-1 Sylva, Volume 5-5 Sylva, Volume 5-3 

Sylva, Volume 5-6 Sylva. Volume 5-4 Sylva, Volume 5-2 

Accounting for Logging Operations. 

Alternate Closure of Lakes in Algonquin Park. 

Game Bag Census Cards. 

Summary of The Game and Fisheries Act. 

The Game and Fisheries Act and Regulations. 1949. 

Algonquin Park Recreational Land Sales Folder. 

Lands for Settlement in Ontario. 

Summer Resort Lands. 

Planning for Tree Planting. 

Care and Planting of Forest Trees 

Reforestation and Woodlot Management. 

Southern Hardwood Volume Table. 

Bibliography of Canadian Biological Publications, 1946. 

Building with Mud — Pise de Terre. 

Forest Spraying and Some Fffects of D.D.T. 

List of Geographical Townships in the Province 

Procedure to Obtain Authority to Cut Timber on Crown Land. 

Timber Management Manual. Part I Legislation- Supplement. 

Posters 

Reprints of some fifteen posters were completed during the period under review. 

Publications for Distribution 

At the close of the fiscal year, the following publications were available for 

distribution to the public: 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 106 



Accounts 

Accounting for Logging Operations. 

Air Service 

Wings Over the Bush. 

Fish and Wildlife 

The Game and Fisheries Act and Regulations. 

Game Birds Need Cover on Your Farm. 

Alternate Closure of Lakes in Algonquin Park 

Sporting Ethics. 

Chapleau Crown Game Preserve. 

Prairie Chickens in Ontario. 

Fluctuations in Populations. 

The Cormorant in Ontario. 

Registered Traplines (Mimeographed). 

A Survey of the Aquatic Vegetation on Whitewater Lake (Mimeographed). 

Description of Wisconsin Pheasant Chicks (Mimeographed). 

Care and Handling of Pheasant Chicks (Mimeographed). 

Winter Feeding of Pheasant Chicks (Mimeographed). 

Advance Report on Wildlife Conditions in Lambton County (Mimeographed). 

Report on Wildlife Survey in Durham County (Mimeographed). 

Forest Protection 

Forest Fires Prevention Act and Regulations. 
Yes, We Fight Forest Fires. 
Forest Protection Manual. 

Land and Recreational Areas 

Lands for Settlement in Ontario. 

Summer Resort Lands in Ontario. 

The Natural History of Algonquin Park. 

List of Water Powers in the Province of Ontario (75c). 

List of Lithographed Maps and Plans. 

Aerial Surveys in Ontario. 

Ontario Surveys and the Land Surveyor. 

Timber Management 

Crown Timber Dues. 

Procedure to Obtain Authority to Cut Timber on Crown Lands. 

Systems of Forest Cropping. 

Manual of Scaling Instructions. 

Timber Management Manual — Part I— Legislation (50c). 

Timber Management Manual — Supplement to Part I. 

Timber Management Manual — Part II — Timber Estimating (Field Work) 

(50c). 

Timber Management Manual — Part III — Timber Estimating (Compilations) 

(50c). 



Page 107 Division of Operation and Personnel 



Timber Management Manual — -Part IV — Timber Marking for Special Cutting 

Operations (50c). 

Timber Management Manual — Part V — Methods of Stumpage Appraisal 

(50c). 

(Complete set comprised of five parts— $1.00.) 

General 

Annual Report of the Minister of Lands and Forests. 

Administrative Chart. 

Indians of Ontario. 

Ontario Forest Atlas ($1.00). 

The History and Status of Forestry in Ontario. 

Definitions of Important Branches of Forestry. 

Know Your Forest Trees. 

Algonquin Story ($2.00). 

Building with Mud. 

Sylva, The Lands and Forests Review ($1.50 per year, six issues). 

Algonquin Provincial Park Folder. 

Rondeau Provincial Park. 

Come to Quetico. 

Parry Sound Forest District. 

Sault St. Marie Forest District. 

Sudbury Forest District. 

Kenora Forest District. 

Fort Frances District. 

North Bay Forest District. 

Cottage Sites on Crown Lands. 

Law 

Law Enforcement Guide and Related Subjects. 

Reforestation 

Reforestation and Woodlot Management. 

Planning for Tree Planting. 

Care and Planting of Forest Trees. 

Forest Trees of Ontario (50c). 

The Farm Woodlot. 

Forest Tree Planting. 

Reforestation in Ontario. 

Glacial Pot Hole Area, Durham County. 

Research 

Bibliography of Canadian Biological Publications, 1946. 

Bird Population Studies in the Coniferous Forest Biome during a Spruce 

Budworm Outbreak. 

Forest Spraying and Some Effects of D.D.T. 

Surveys 

List of Geographical Townships in the Province of Ontario (25c). 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 108 



News Releases 

During the year the Weekly News Release aptly named "Conservation Corner" 
was issued regularly to every newspaper throughout the Province in addition to Radio 
Stations, many magazines, outdoor writers and Game and Fish Protective Associations. 
The fifty-two issues of this release averaged about 1,800 words weekly with a grand 
total of approximately 93.600 words. This material received a wide coverage from 
both the press and radio and has proved of very great value in keeping the public 
well informed. 

In addition to the Xews Release, it was found desirable to issue some 47 
press releases for immediate circulation through news agencies. These press items 
contained urgent matters of public interest which it was felt should have immediate 
release rather than wait for the regular channel. 

Radio 

As indicated elsewhere a great deal of radio coverage was secured through 
news releases and fire prevention appeals. Frequent use was also made of the radio 
for spot announcements concerning fire hazards and the broadcast of special instruc- 
tions covering travel in fire areas. 

Assistance was also given in the preparation of several radio scripts relative 
to departmental administration. 

Advertising 

In connection with its conservation work the Information and Education 
Section prepared and published some 44 display advertisements with suitable appeals 
for the prevention of forest fires, law observance and the wise use of the resources. 
A breakdown of these shows that 17 appeared in publications pertaining to the forest 
industry: 17 carried their message in National outdoor magazines, while the remaining 
10 were displayed in special issues of industrial magazines and newspapers. It is felt 
that appeals of this kind are of very great value because of their brief but direct 
approach and the fact that they have a wide circulation. 

Necessary administrative advertisements covering timber sales and other like 
matters to the number of 60 were also placed in newspapers throughout the Province. 

Correspondence 

The volume of correspondence handled by the section showed a slight increase 
over that of the previous year. The total number of letters of enquiry, requests for 
publications and other routine matters dealt with approximated 8,065. 

A fairly large proportion of the enquiries were for specific information not 
readily available in departmental publications, or relating to matters arising out of 
the various Acts and Regulations. A great deal of literature was distributed as a 
result of requests for same as well as a means of supplementing the written replies. 

General 

In addition to the activities referred to herein the Section handled a very 
heavy volume of telephone enquiries from the public as well as personal requests for 
information and publications. 



Page 109 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



EDUCATION 

During the fiscal year of April 1st, 1949. to March 31st. 1950, the Education 
Section carried out the following photography. 

The two Department photographers took 1.130 photographs, Head Office 
officials took 2.342 photos, while field staff took 328 photographs. Enlargements 
totalled 22.388 prints. This work covered all Divisions and all phases of Department 
activity. 

Another five hundred feet of 16 mm. Kodachrome were exposed on the Timber 
Salvage Operations and considerable editing was done on all footage taken to date, 
bringing the film near possible completion. 

A replacement in the position of photographic librarian laid the groundwork 
for a new and extensive filing system to facilitate the release of 1,800 different photo- 
graphs to the newspapers and the public. 

A new negative dryer was installed in the darkroom which has speeded the 
processing of film in emergencies. 

LECTURE TOURS 
Lecture tours were carried out by Public Relations Assistants in six of the 
seven regions during the year. Xo appointment had been made to the Northern 
Region. Mr. B. A. S. Macdonald resigned from the South-Western Region and was 
replaced by Mr. S. C. Hudson. Toward the end of the year. Mr. D. Gillespie was 
transferred from the Western Region to the Information Section of Head Office but 
no replacement was made in the region. 



P. Swanson, Conservation Officer, talks on Beaver, Chapleau High School. 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 110 



As of Febrary 15th. each district was made responsible for its own conservation 
work and the services of Public Relations Assistants attached to the Regions was 
discontinued. 

The reason behind this change was the feeling that a much more intensive 
campaign of public education could be made by having members of staff from each 
district take an active part in the public relations program. This would enable 
qualified officials to speak to the public on their own particular branch of the Depart- 
ment's work, e.g. Forest Protection, Timber Management, Fish and Wildlife, etc. 

Despite the fact that a total of eighty-five school and adult meetings less than 
last year were held, the total attendance was nearly seventy thousand greater. 

The table (below) contains a complete record of meetings held in all Regions. 

Visual Education 

No new films were produced by the Department, but a considerable number of 
prints of commercial films were previewed with a view to selecting films for our 
conservation program. Few of these were fond suitable for our requirements although 
we did purchase a copy of ;i Then It Happened" for forest fire prevention work and 
several suited to woodlot management. 

Exhibits 

There was a considerable increase in exhibits over last year and in addition to 
those listed in the table, this Department participated in thirty-one other exhibitions — 
most of these were in Southern Ontario and mainly in conjunction with agricultural 
fairs. The majority of these smaller exhibits dealt with Reforestation, Forest Protec- 
tion and Fish and Wildlife. Officers of the Department were on hand at all exhibits 
to answer questions on all phases of the Department's work. 

Table Xo. 23 

SUMMARY OF LECTURE TOURS 

April 1, 1949 to March 31, 1950 

MINISTERS REPORT 







SCHOOL MEETINGS 


PUBLIC MEETINGS 




TOTALS 


REGION 


district 


xo. 


ATTENDANCE 


NO. 


ATTENDANCE 


NO. 


ATTENDANCE 


Western 


Kenora 


1 5 


505 


17 


1.713 


30 


2,218 




Fort Frances 


16 


45 7 


2 


135 


18 


592 




Sioux Lookout 






10 


1,549 


10 


1,549 


Mid-Western 


Port Arthur 


163 


16,525 


95 


6,484 


258 


23,009 




Geraldton 


25 


2,678 


18 


1,464 


43 


4,142 


Central 


Sault Ste. Marie 


14 


4.171 


18 


1,870 


32 


6,041 




Sudbury 


52 


6,382 


19 


1,513 


71 


7,895 




Chapleau 


7 


613 


11 


1,294 


18 


1,907 




Gogama 


6 


517 


3 


331 


9 


848 




North Bay 


130 


16,798 


20 


1,675 


150 


18,473 


Northern 


Kapuskasing 
















Cochrane 
















Temiskaming 


10 


814 


7 


1,342 


17 


2,156 


South-Central 


Parry Sound 


63 


2,592 


24 


2,121 


87 


4,713 




Algonquin 


28 


1,065 


9 


1,093 


37 


2,158 


South-Eastern 


Rideau 


95 


13,997 


34 


3,549 


129 


17,546 




Quinte 


65 


8,612 


31 


3,929 


96 


12,541 




Trent 


50 


4,130 


33 


4,053 


83 


8,183 


South-Western 


Lake Simcoe 


10 


2,682 


114 


20.383 


124 


23,065 




Lake Huron 


63 


0.084 


94 


7,477 


157 


16,561 




Lake Erie 


17 


2,273 


70 


74,318 


87 


76,591 


Totals.— 


827 


93,895 


629 


136,293 


1.456 


230.188 



Page 111 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



EXHIBITION 

Canadian National Exhibition 
Central Canada Exhibition 
International Plowing Match 
Royal Winter Fair 

Can. National Sportsmen's Show 

Northern Ont. Outfitters Assoc. 
Lakehead Exhibition 



EXHIBITS 
April 1, 1948, to March 31, 


1949 




SPONSOR 


PLACE 


DATE 


Can. Nat. Ex. Assoc. 


Toronto 


Aug. 27 -Sept. 10/49 


Central Can. Ex. Assoc. 


Ottawa 


Aug. 22 - 27/49 


Ont. Ploughmans Assoc. 


Burford 


Oct. 11 - 14/49 


Royal Agriculture 






Winter Fair Assoc. 


Toronto 


Nov. 15 - 22/49 


Toronto Hunters and 






Anglers Assoc. 


Toronto 


Mar. 17-25/49 


N.O.O.A. 


Kenora 


Jan. 26/49 



Can. Lakehead Ex. Assoc. Port Arthur Aug. 8 - 13/49 



LIST OF CO-OPERATING CONTRACTS 

1. Sault Ste. Marie Laboratory 

This is an agreement whereby the Province (Department of Lands and Forests) 
builds and the Dominion (Science Service) staffs the laboratory which has been com- 
pleted and is in operation at Sault Ste. Marie. The purpose of the laboratory is to 
study forest insect problems. 

2. Pathological Agreement 

Agreement whereby the Province (Department of Lands and Forests) builds 
and the Dominion (Science Service) staffs a laboratory to be built, probably at the 
Southern Research Station. The purpose of the laboratory is the study of forest 
disease problems. 

3. Ranger School 

Agreement between the University of Toronto and the Department of Lands 
and Forests regarding the division of authority and responsibility in the operation of 
the Forest Ranger School. The primary purpose of the school is to train personnel for 
the Ontario Department of Lands and Forests, and the forest industries of the province, 
and to co-operate with the University of Toronto in providing field experience for 
students of the Faculty of Forestry. 

4. Fishing 

Agreement between Federation of Commercial Fishermen. University of 
Toronto. The Royal Ontario Museum of Zoology, and the Department regarding 
operation of fisheries research, especially at South Bay. Opeongo Lake and the 
Southern Research Station. The purpose of the research is: 

(a) To determine the yield per acre of a body of inland water for different 
species of fish. 

(b) To study methods of determining the maximum yield and of increasing 
the yield. 

(c) To determine the effect of so-called "game fish" by removal of the species 
known as "coarse fish" which are not now used to any extent. 

(d) To study possible markets for fish products now wasted. 

(e) To study fish diseases and treatment of same. 

(f) Fishery research in general for the Great Lakes. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 112 



5. Indian Affairs Branch (Forest Protection) 

In this agreement the Department has arranged with the Indian Affairs Branch, 
Ottawa, to extinguish fires on Indian lands, the cost of which is to be repaid to the 
Department by the Indian Affairs Branch. 

6. Municipalities 

The Department has forest protection agreements with 118 municipalities 
which provide that the municipalities take initial action on fires and, if necessary the 
Department assist in fire suppression. The cost of fires on private lands is shared 
equally and the cost of fires on Crown lands is paid by the Department. 

7. International Nickel Company 

The Department has an agreement renewed yearly with this company whereby 
the company pays one cent per acre, and the Department takes care of fire prevention 
and suppression on a block of land owned by the company in Hastings County. 

8. Roddis Lumber and Veneer Company 

A similar agreement to the one with International Nickel Company is made 
each year with Roddis Lumber and Veneer Company in connection with a block of 
land owned by them in Duncan Township. 

9. Army Survey 

Agreement with Army Survey Establishment, Department of National Defence, 
Dominion of Canada for publication of maps on a scale of 1" equals 2 miles and 1" 
equals 4 miles. Department of Lands and Forests supply all map data from Forest 
Resources inventory. Army Survey Establishment publish maps and supply Depart- 
ment of Lands and Forests with 2,000 copies of each without charge and additional 
copies on order at cost of paper and ink only. 

10. The Private Forest Reserves Act 

Briefly, this Act permits private landowners to establish, in agreement with the 
Department, a private forest reserve. The title remains in the owner but no cutting 
may be done without consent of the Minister. 

11. County Forests (The Municipal Reforestation Act) 

Under this Act, municipalities may enter into agreement with the Department 
whereby the Department agrees to manage municipally owned land for a stated period. 
At the end of the contract period, the county may elect to pay all expenses incurred 
by the province and manage the forest themselves: or they may elect that the Depart- 
ment pay the original purchase price of the land and assume control: or they may 
elect to have the Department manage the forests with them on a 50-50 basis. Twenty- 
two counties to date have municipal forests under agreement or awaiting agreement. 

12. Forest Inventory 

The Forest Resources Inventory base maps are supplied to pulp and paper 
and lumber companies in the province at the cost of the printing only, the cost of 
preparation being paid wholly by the province. Aerial photographic prints are 
supplied at a cost of $1.00 per print. The main cost of the photography is borne by 
the province. 



Page 113 Division of Ope rat ion and Personnel 



13. Fisheries Regulations for the Province of Ontario 

The Federal Government of Canada provides regulations under the Fisheries 
Act of Canada relating to both game and commercial fishing activities in the Province 
of Ontario. It then becomes the sole responsibility of the Ontario Department of 
Lands and Forests to implement these regulations. 

X.B.: The recently established Fishery Inspection Regulations of the Federal 
Government are implemented by federally appointed officers, which is 
the only direct action of the Federal Government respecting fisheries 
of Ontario at the present time. 

14. Migratory Birds Convention Act 

Regulations relating to the Migratory Birds Act for the Province of Ontario 
are established by the Federal Government of Canada for the Province of Ontario by 
arrangement between the two governments, and these regulations become the joint 
responsibility of the Ontario Department of Lands and Forests and the R.C.M.P. 
with respect to enforcement. It is also recognized by all provinces that management 
and research efforts should be co-ordinated both with each other and with those of 
the U.S.A. 

15. Pelee Island Pheasant Investigation 

Pelee Island offers a perfect opportunity for studies of pheasant behaviour and 
for the statistical study of a pheasant population throughout the year. In Ontario 
pheasants are of concern in a small portion of the Province, but in the United States 
they are now the principal upland game species. Hence the Wildlife Management 
Institute. Washington. D.C.. carries the project. We supply accommodation and 
other assistance and in return are supplied with information necessary for manage- 
ment of the Pelee pheasant shoot. 

STAFF SUGGESTION PLAN 

The Staff Suggestion Plan operated by the Department has a three-fold purpose, 
namely, to furnish an orderly method of submitting and considering ideas of the staff; 
to recognize and reward the staff for practical and original suggestions; and to promote 
the fullest co-operation of all personnel in the Department's operations. From the 
standpoint of the administration the plan has the added advantage of revealing the 
talents of employees whose suggestions are of a varied and unusually constructive 
nature. 

SUGGESTIONS SUBMITTED DURING FISCAL YEAR 
FOR WHICH \ WARDS WERE GRANTED 

1O4Q — 1Q50 

-i GG1 STION \ ' MBER 

VND DIVISION SUGGESTED BY SUGGESTION 

Suggestion 198 G.E.Mayhew, Re: Blanket Sheet Cover 

(Forest Protection) Ft. Frances This suggestion is considered original in its applica- 

tion. While it will be necessary to conduct field 
experiments to determine its usage, warmth and prac- 
ticability, an award ol si 0.00 is recommended. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 114 



suggestion number 

and division 
Suggestion 200 
(Forest Protection) 



SUGGESTED BY SUGGESTION 

E. Guertin, Re: Fire Protection Poster 

Sioux Lookout The phrasing for a new fire protection poster as con- 

tained in this suggestion is considered original. An 
award of $10.00 is recommended. 



Suggestion 201 
(Forest Protection] 



H.Taylor, Re: Hand Fire Pump Accessory 

Quinte Suggestion of innovation of dipper lid in a hand fire 

pump is considered original and having some practical 
application. Suggestion for carrying provisions in can 
is not considered practical due to baffle plates and the 
possibility of food remaining in can which would 
clog the pump and render it less efficient. An award 
of $10.00 is recommended for the first part of the 
suggestion. 



Suggestion 202 
(Forest Protection) 



H. Taylor, 
Quinte 



Re: Installation of Rotary Pressure Pump on 
Outboard Motors 

The development of this idea would be an engineering 
problem which may or may not have practical 
application. The adoption of the outboard motor and 
a pressure pumper to the operation of pumping water 
and a form of jet propulsion is worthy of considera- 
tion. An award of $5.00 is recommended. 



Suggestion 203 

(Forest Protection) 



E. Guertin Re: Revision of Form F.P. 25 By Plotting Loca- 

Sioux Lookout TION 0F Fires by Rectangular Co-ordinates. 

It is not expected that the location of small fires will 
be accurately shown on the map accompanying Form 
F.P. 25. Such a method would only apply to those 
portions of the Province not surveyed into townships. 
The suggestion has originality, but is considered to 
have little practical value. An award of $5.00 is 
recommended for the merit of the suggestion. 



Suggestion 206 
(Forest Protection) 



H. S. Hutnick Re: Directional Line Method of Locating Fires 

Air Service by Ground Crews from Aircraft 

This suggestion is not considered as original, and 
although the theory is logical, the practical applica- 
tion for use of locating fires appears rather question- 
able. The necessary modification to aircraft, the 
additional weight, the comparatively few times when 
men cannot be landed close to fires, height of timber 
and topographical characteristics would not warrant 
the adoption of the suggestion. It is considered, how- 
ever, that the suggestion has merit and an award of 
$10.00 is recommended. 



Suggestion 210 

(Forest Protection) 



S. D.Roumbanis, Re: Revision of Existing Radio Communication 

Chapleau System 

This suggestion is one of centralization rather than 
decentralization of control. To bring the suggestion 
into effect would require a change in the departmental 
policy of operational costs. While the suggestion can- 
not be considered original in the exact meaning of 
the word, it has merit and an award of $10.00 is 
recommended. 



Page 115 



Division of Operation and Personnel 



suggestion number 
and division 

Suggestion 2 1 1 
(Forest Protection) 



Suggestion 218 

(Forest Protection) 



Suggestion 219 
(Operation and 
Personnel) 



Suggestion 224 

( Timber Management ) 



Suggestion 226 
(Forest Protection) 



Suggestion 229 
(Forest Protection ) 



Suggestion 230 

(Forest Protection i 



Suggestion 22>S 
(Forest Protection ) 



I Forest Protection > 



suggested by 

D. D. Mac Adam, 
Geraldton 



J. Ruxton, 
Ranger School 



E. L. Skuce. 
Algonquin 



A. J. McGoey. 

Temiskaming 



A. J. McGoey, 

Temiskaming 



F. Belmore, 
Sioux Lookout 



S. O. Robinson, 
Sault Ste. Marie 



W. Kitt, 
White River 



H. Steven-. 
Port Arthur 



suggestion 

Re: Utility Packboard 

The device added to the Klondike type of packboard 
to be used for carrying and laying out hose and for 
other purposes when not used for carrying hose is 
considered to be both original and practical. An 
award of $25.00 is recommended. 

Re: Fire Line Construction Information 
This suggestion, if adopted in principle, would be 
that of a special research problem to determine if 
statistics as compiled would improve the efficiency 
of fire fighting operations. While the idea as suggested 
has been the basis of study in United States fire 
control for some time, it is felt that as the suggestion 
has merit and may have some practical value, an 
award of $10.00 is recommended. 

Re: Roll Method of Shouldering a Canoe 
The instructional steps for the proper method of 
shouldering a canoe as contained in this suggestion 
as an accident preventive measure is deserving of an 
award. An award of $15.00 is recommended 

Re: Revision of Form T.M. Ill 
At present there are 18,000 T.M. Ill forms in stock. 
A revision of the form implementing the ideas con- 
tained in this suggestion is not considered warranted 
at this time. The suggestion has some merit and an 
award of $5.00 is recommended. 

Re: Temporary Repair Kit for Fire Hose 
This is a good suggestion and appears to have good 
practical application. Further research work would 
be necessary. An award of $20.00 is recommended. 

Re: Coil Testing Holder 

This coil testing holder is considered to be useful and 
a practical piece of equipment, especially when a 
number of cells are to be tested. A holder of this 
type should be useful for testing more efficiently prac- 
tically all makes of ignition coils used on two cycle 
engines. An award of $25.00 is recommended. 

Re: Tractor Heating Unit 

While there are heating units available on the market, 
the suggestion cannot be considered original. The 
suggestion, however, shows initiative and thought in 
assembling a practical piece of equipment for which 
an award of SI 0.00 is recommended. 

Re: Jackmitf. Pump and Hosf. Packboard 

This piece of equipment is considered original for 

this type of pump. It is believed from experiments 

made that it will be both practical and useful in 

forest fire operations. An award of $25.00 is 

recommended. 

Re: Tower Set Battery El iminator 
This suggestion is not considered original in design, 
but it is original from a standpoint of application. It 
has limited application in our service, hut will Ik? use- 
ful at some m\ to eight tower sets where power is 

available. An award of SI 5.00 is recommended. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 116 



Table No. 24 

SUMMARY OF SUGGESTIONS RECEIVED AND AWARDS IN THE 

VARIOUS DIVISIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

NUMBER OF 





SUGGESTIONS 




TOTAL AMOUNT 


DIVISION 


RECEIVED 


AWARDS 


OF AWARDS 


Accounts 


Nil 


Nil 







2 


Suggestion 









under 








consideration 




Fish and Wildlife . 


2 
24 


Nil 
14 





Forest Protection 


S1Q0.00 


Land and Recreational Areas.. . 


Nil 


Nil 





Law 


Nil 


Nil 





Operation and Personnel ... 


1 


1 


15.00 


Reforestation 


Nil 


Nil 





Research (See Air Service)... 








Surveys and Engineering 


Nil 


Nil 





Timber Management 


3 


1 


5.00 


Ranger School 


1 


Nil 







33 


16 


$2 10.00 



AID RENDERED TO THE PUBLIC 

During the year members of the staff have participated in several rescues of persons whose 
lives were endangered through accidents or otherwise. 

On July 24 a group of Junior Rangers working near Thessalon were instrumental in 
recovering the body of one Walter McCreight within 10 minutes of his drowning while wading in 
McCreight Dam, with two of his children. The Rangers applied artificial respiration for four 
hours but the unfortunate man could not be revived. A son aged 7 was revived with the help of 
the rangers, while the other child suffered no consequences. 

A conservation officer in the Parry Sound District while in the course of his duties protecting 
one of the fish sanctuaries in the Georgian Bay. saw- a boat containing two fishermen capsize 
suddenly and throw the men into the water. Within a few minutes he had reached the scene and 
dragged the two near-exhausted men into his own craft. They apparently suffered no ill effects, but 
it was fortunate help was near. 

One afternoon in June a loudspeaker-equipped aircraft of the Department was diverted from 
i f s patrol by radio, to fly an injured bushworker from a camp near Rufus Lake to hospital at 
Kapuskasing. 

The loudspeaker was used to direct the logging crew on the ground to pack the man to a 
spot near clear water where the plane could be landed 

With the unfortunate man aboard, the officers flew' to Kapuskasing and landed on the river. 
In a comparatively short time after the incident the patient was resting comfortably in the 
hospital at Kapuskasing. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Forest Insect Laboratory, Sault Ste. Marie 
A meeting of the advisory committee of the Forest Insect Laboratory, Sault Ste. Marie, was 
held in the office of the Dominion Entomologist, Science Service, Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, 
on October 29th, 1949. 

This was the seventh meeting of the committee and there was a full discussion of all matters 
relating to forest insect control in Ontario and the program of work for the ensuing year was 
approved. 

MEMBERS OF COMMITTEE 



Dominion Department 
of Agriculture 

H. G. Crawford 

J. J. DE GRYSE 

Dr. M. L. Prebble 



Ontario Department 
of Lands and Forests 

R. N. Johnston 
Dr. C. E. Atwood 
J. A. Brodie 



**K 



REFORESTATION 




•• *=-"«***/ 




Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 118 



DIVISION OF REFORESTATION 

Tree Distribution 

The distribution increased from a figure of 13,000,000 in the previous year, to 
17.700.000 in the year under review. As in the previous year the increase was distri- 
buted to private landowners, giving them over 11.000.000 trees. The number of trees 
planted on municipal and authority forests was increased also to 4.200.000. 

Nurseries 

Development of the new nursery areas at Orono and St. Williams was con- 
tinued. Additional land was purchased at Midhurst in order to expand production. 

Extension Forestry and Municipal Forest Management 

Inspection of private plantation sites by zone foresters was initiated during the 
final four months of the year. The purpose of the inspections is to ensure that the site 
is suitable for tree planting and to ensure that a wise selection of species is made. 

Eighteen foresters are now employed on extension forestry and municipal 
forest management. 

Approximately twenty-five hundred cords of pine pulpwood was cut from 
municipal forests and sold. 



Weeding red pine beds, Kemptvillc Nursery. 




Page 119 



Division of Reforestation 



The area of authority and municipal forests under agreement increased by 
3,454 acres to reach a total of 66.791 acres. The greatest expansion took place in 
Leeds and Grenville Counties, where the area has been increased by 1.923 acres. 
In Bruce County. 1.050 acres were added. Dufferin County increased its property by 
98 acres, Durham and Northumberland by SI acres. Grey by 198 acres, and York 
by 4 acres. 

Regulation of thinning in plantations of seven county forests was completed 
during the year and the recommended operations were put into effect. Working plans 
for woodlots with the resultant cut regulation figures were completed for three county 
forests. 

The following tables furnish details of tree distribution: 

SUMMARY OF TREES DISTRIBUTED 
(July 1, 1948. to June 30, 1949) 





TOTAL 






TREES 




SHIPMENTS 


CONIFERS 


HARDWOODS 


TOTAL 


Private Lands : 










Reforestation and Windbreak 


8,241 


10,023,633 


1.065.021 


11,089.554 


School Children 


23 


33,180 


9,538 


42,727 


Semi-Public Properties 


102 


223.001 


51.401 


2 74.402 



Continued on Next Page. 



Hoeing white spruce beds, Kemptville. 






•>*-■ 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 120 



TOTAL 

SHIPMENTS 



HARDWOODS 



TOTAL 
TREES 



Municipal Properties: 










Municipal Forests 


102 


2,917,745 


294,770 


3,212,515 


Forest Plantations.- 


39 


203,225 


15,750 


218,975 


Roads 


21 


144,800 


1,050 


145,850 


School Demonstration Plots _ 


127 


52,033 


10,615 


62,648 


Conservation Authorities 


5 


561,000 


168,800 


729,800 


Sundry 


15 


13,455 


3,275 


16,730 


Provincial Crown Lands: 










Northern Plantations 


2 


223,500 





223,500 


Management Units 


3 


462,500 


100 


462,600 


Forests 














Ranger Plantations 


3 


6,000 


400 


6,400 


Air Services 














Nurseries 


8 


161.100 


10,025 


180,125 


Parks 


3 


11,600 


2.000 


14,500 


Highwavs 


4 


29,630 


34,325 


63,955 


H.E.P.C _ 


1 


26,400 


15,500 


41,900 


Hospitals 


5 


8,424 


574 


8,998 


Penal Institutions 


9 


23,100 


5,075 





Sundry 


28,175 


Dominion Crown Lands .... 


30 


148,548 


127,112 


275,660 






Sub-Totals 


8,743 


15,272,883 


1,826,131 


17,099.014 


Extraneous 


38 


543,913 


58,043 


601,956 


Totals.. 


8,781 


15,816,796 


1,884,174 


17,700,970 



Workers lift two year white spruce seedlings to be moved to transplant beds, Norfolk County 
Provincial Forest Station. 




Page 121 



Division of Reforestation 



TREES DISTRIBUTED TO PRIVATE LANDOWNERS 
(July 1, 1948, to June 30, 1949) 



COUNTY OR DISTRICT 



APPLICANTS 



HARDWOODS 



TOTALS 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Cochrane 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey __ 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Hastings 

Halton..... 

Huron 

Kenora 

Kent ... ... 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Patricia 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward ..... 
Rainy River 
Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Sudbury 

TimiskaminK 

Thunder Bay 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 
Wentworth 
York 



Totals 



30 

131 

221 

122 

4 

90 

27 

219 

180 

161 

78 

2,2 

27 

396 

133 

66 

123 

170 

147 

8 

80 

106 

49 

86 

66 

90 

22 

267 

1S1 

20 

419 

132 

319 

169 

115 

304 

105 

234 

26 

59 

6 

57 

19 

697 

19 

23 

20 

12 

84 

201 

150 

110 

238 

l.vs: 

S.241 



48,339 

87,656 

171,242 

84,522 

1,000 

120,250 

25,225 

869,565 

244,248 

111,538 

80,448 

12,530 

38,710 

395,627 

61,425 

86,405 

182,806 

107,282 

111,537 

8,225 

185,064 

73,744 

65,530 

61,917 

180,020 

38,549 

464,450 

260,625 

279,147 

11,695 

477,884 

218,093 

542.175 

125,787 

312,001 

232,453 

77,185 

193,376 

53,860 

35,010 

2,030 

69,325 

12,265 

1,543,200 

23,050 

11,138 

10,940 

23,875 

46.43S 

141.677 

120,907 

169.168 

166,007 

945,568 

10,023,633 



1.066 

17.550 

29,104 

1 1 .303 

475 

5,640 

9,684 

37,614 

32,772 

17,925 

8,826 

2,290 

4,547 

35,748 

21,856 

4,535 

9,937 

18,304 

33,468 

550 

9,894 

12,260 

4,770 

0,171 

3,045 

8,204 

2,075 

45,703 

12,241 

1,215 

38,230 

15,844 

47,362 

36,313 

8,484 

36,237 

33,179 

12,503 

8,702 

4.876 

940 

5,520 

2,450 

86,404 

5,600 

1.661 

660 

425 

7,700 

30,187 

22,472 

38,838 

26,635 

173,909 

1.065.921 



40.405 

105.215 

200,346 

95.825 

1,475 

125,890 

34,000 

007,170 

277,020 

129,463 

89,274 

14,820 

43,257 

431.375 

83,281 

90,940 

192,743 

125,586 

145.005 

8,775 

104.058 

86,004 

70,300 

71,088 

183,065 

40.753 

466,525 

306,328 

291,388 

12,910 

516,114 

233,937 

589,537 

162,100 

320,485 

268,690 

110,364 

205,879 

62,562 

39,886 

2,070 

74,845 

14,715 

1,629,604 

28,650 

12,7oo 

1 1 .600 

24,300 

54,147 

180.SO4 

I J3.379 

208,006 

193,542 

1,119,477 

1 l.OSO.554 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 122 



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Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 124 

DIVISION OF RESEARCH 

The Division of Research is a fact-finding organization which furnishes the 
Department with information and develops techniques to enable more effective 
administration of the natural resources under Departmental jurisdiction. In this 
respect the work of the Division is of a pioneering nature, in that it seeks to provide 
workable answers to specific as well as basic problems of development. 

In the long run, human progress depends on the development of natural 
resources, and Ontario's high standard of living and general progress cannot be 
maintained lacking a parallel improvement in the management of her resources of 
lands, forests and waters. 

As the agency of the Provincial Government charged with the administration 
of the bulk of the Province's natural resources, the Department of Lands and Forests 
has a difficult and important public duty. In its efforts to assist the Department, the 
Division of Research has set up three general operating services to provide: 

1. Accurate statements of administrative and technical requirements. 

2. Factual information and improved operating techniques. 

3. A testing and demonstration service. 

To supply the three services indicated above, the Division maintains a staff at the 
main Research Station, near Maple, and regional research officers. The staff has been 
increasing steadily, totalling 31 full-time and 10 temporary employees in 1949, plus 
a seasonal staff averaging 80. Of the permanent staff, 20 were technical and 1 1 non- 
technical, while the temporary staff was composed of 2 technical and 8 non-technical 
employees. The full-time technical staff included 5 biologists, 2 chemists, 9 foresters, 
a mechanical engineer, a photogrammetrist, a soil specialist and a statistician. 

The buildings and facilities at the Southern Research Station, Maple, were 
further expanded and improved in 1949. The new biological research building and 
Quonset storage building were started and largely completed during the year. The 
storage building will be ready about July 30 and the biological building about 
December of 1950. The fisheries laboratory was further equipped, but the refrigerating 
apparatus has still not been delivered. A potting shed was completed for the green- 
house. A portion of the woodlot on the property was thinned and the thinnings utilized 
for lumber and fuel. The remainder will be done when the building program is com- 
pleted. About 500 ornamental trees were set out as well as 300 feet of hedge. A planta- 
tion of food plants for wildlife was established. An experimental plantation has been 
started on 80 acres of land reserved for research purposes in Gwillimbury township. 

The Division co-operates closely with a number of other research organizations 
with respect to projects in Ontario. Whenever possible, working arrangements are 
being recorded in written agreements and contracts. These exist now with the Research 
Council of Ontario, the University of Toronto, and the Science Service of the Federal 
Department of Agriculture. Less formal arrangements are in force with the Ontario 
Research Foundation, the National Research Council, and the Forestry Branch of the 
Department of Resources and Development. Ottawa. 

The work of the Division is reported in the following under the main subject 
heads of Fisheries, Wildlife, Silviculture, Mensuration, Soils, Pathology, Entomology, 
Mechanics and Statistics. 



Page 125 Division of Research 



Fisheries 

Fisheries research, under the direction of Dr. F. E. J. Fry, was concentrated at 
three main centres — the Department's station at South Bay, Manitoulin Island; 
the Ontario Fisheries Laboratory, Algonquin Park; and at the Department's Southern 
Research Station, Maple. 

The South Bay Experiment. To review the object of this experiment, which 
was commenced in 1947. it is to determine the benefits to the yield of the more valuable 
fish which may result from exerting equal fishing pressure on the less valuable or 
worthless fish. Commercial fishing had failed disastrously in several consecutive 
previous years, and the population ratio of non-valuable to valuable fish was estimated 
to be forty to one. 

A responsible advisory committee which sets policy is made up of representatives 
of the Ontario Federation of Commercial Fishermen, the Ontario Federation of Anglers 
and Hunters, the Northern Ontario Outfitters' Association, the Fisheries Research 
Board of Canada, and the Ontario Government. The actual operation of the experi- 
ment is directed by a committee, representing the Ontario Federation of Commercial 
Fishermen and the Research Division of the Department of Lands and Forests, under 
the chairmanship of a representative of the Fisheries Research Board 

The program is in two parts, the first being the actual fishing operations which 
is directed by the Ontario Federation of Commercial Fishermen, and the second is the 
scientific follow-up. which is the responsibility of the Research Division of the 
Department. 

The work has included a survey of the bottom organisms which are the chief 
food of the bass, whitefish and their competitors; the collection of meteorological and 
hydrographic data, and the more prominent biological study which consisted largely 
of an examination of the catches of fish. The primary purpose of this examination is 
to gather information from which a description of the present state of the population 
may be made. Biological statistics, gathered year by year, will enable changes in 
production to be followed. 

Samples are taken of each catch, which are weighed, measured and sex-deter- 
mined. Stomachs are examined and samples of scales taken for determination of age. 
At times of the year when eggs are well developed, samples of them are taken for 
estimation of the fecundity of the various species over their size range. 

From these records, the food, the growth, and the general condition of the 
various species can be determined. The first body of results from analysis of the data 
may be expected soon. 

At the conclusion of this experiment it is expected that an appraisal of all of the 
research data compiled will provide practical answers to the main fisheries management 
problems of Lake Huron. 

In 1949 South Bay fisheries yielded 130,000 pounds of fish, as compared with 
194,000 pounds for 1948. The decline was due largely to a reduced catch of smelt in 
the spring, when streams were low and few entered to spawn. 

One result of the research work is that reasonable predictions of catch can be 
made for one or two years in advance, based on knowledge of the numbers of different 
species of fish present in various age classes. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 126 



Tagging studies of fish caught which were previously captured, tagged and 
released reveal important information as to migrations in and out of South Bay which 
opens into Lake Huron through a narrow channel, and as to movements of fish within 
the bay. For example, intensive studies in 1949 show that only a few lake trout 
leave the bay, and these during the winter. Whitefish, on the other hand, move out of 
the bay in considerable numbers during early summer. Bass show no tendency to leave 
the bay, but move freely from place to place in it. 

Further investigation was made in 1949 as to methods of preparing and dis- 
posing of coarse fish products. Sucker fillets frozen while fresh have proved deliciously 
palatable, and there is promise of a small but flourishing market outlet for this product. 
Fish meal and oil extracts have been prepared experimentally in small quantities. 

During 1949 a start was made in a study of the effects of lamprey preying on 
whitefish and lake trout. 

Routine study continued on food habits and growth of a wide variety of fish 
species. 

Ontario Fisheries Research Laboratory, Algonquin Park. A variety of 
projects are being undertaken co-operatively between the University of Toronto and 
the Department, centering at the laboratory at Opeongo Lake. Brief accounts of 
the main projects follow: 

Creel Census. This recording of fishing success, initiated in 1936, has two 
main purposes. First to follow trends in fishing success in Algonquin Park and thus 
allow the Department to decide which lakes require attention, and secondly to find out 
whether management techniques such as plantings, lake closures, and chemical 
fertilization have any effect in improving fishing. 

The census has disclosed a downward trend in lake trout fishing success in the 
more accessible southern part of the Park. Plantings have been undertaken to improve 
this situation. Speckled trout fishing, although fluctuating, has shown no trend in 
recent years. Plantings of speckled trout have had little effect in improving fishing 
in recent years. Closure of lakes in alternate years has been adopted to build up wild 
stocks of trout in many of the lakes. 

The effect of transferring small mouth bass from lakes in which they are 
crowded and grow slowly to lakes where food is more abundant is also being studied. 

Fertilization of Lakes. In the period 1946 to 1949 fertilizer was applied in 
Cache, Brewer, Kearney and McCauley lakes to determine whether this would increase 
the production of game fish. Costello, Clarke and Found lakes were left untreated 
for check purposes. 

A marked increase was noted in phytoplankton and zooplankton populations 
and bottom fauna in the fertilized lakes, and produced a distinct bloom on the algae. 
A corollary and undesirable effect noted was depletion of oxygen at lower levels, due 
to decay of the increased quantity of plant and animal debris. However, several 
species of smaller fish showed an increase in numbers. It appears that under nine 
pounds of fertilizer to the acre-foot are desirable for continued applications to trout 
waters. 

Spawning Habits of Speckled and Lake Trout. The study in 1949 of 
speckled trout spawning in Algonquin Park lakes indicates that they prefer gravel and 



Page 127 Division of Research 



sand shoals fed by spring seepage. The lack of these facilities in many of the Park 
lakes suggests the construction of artificial beds to encourage natural reproduction. 

Lake trout were found to prefer broken rubble shoals composed of rocks one 
to three inches in diameter, exposed to the prevailing wind. In Lake Opeongo bullheads 
were found preying on lake trout eggs to a considerable degree. Whitefish and suckers 
were minor offenders. 

Investigation of Speckled Trout in Redrock Lake. Tagging studies in 
1949 revealed a very limited population of speckled trout in this lake. About 70 per 
cent of the fish of catchable size (over 10 inches) were taken by anglers during the 
spring of 1949. The production of this lake appears to be only about one trout per 
acre in every alternate year that the lake is open to fishing. Competition of yellow 
perch and poor spawning facilities are possible causes for this low production. Before 
perch reduction is tried the provision of artificial spawning beds is advocated. 

It has also been determined that few speckled trout live longer than six years 
even in the lightly fished waters of Algonquin Park. Prolonged closure of speckled 
trout waters to build up populations is. therefore, not advisable in most situations. 

Southern Research Station, Maple, Ontario. In 1948 the Department 
with the co-operation of the University of Toronto established a laboratory for experi- 
mental limnology at the Southern Research Station near Maple. The building was 
completed in 1949 and its facilities first utilized in the fall of the year. Early work 
dealing with the effects of oxygen and temperature on fish was undertaken by a 
graduate from the University of Toronto under the direction of Dr. Fry. 

It is expected that much of the biological and chemical material collected in 
the field will, in future, be analysed at this laboratory in addition to the physiological 
experiments already mentioned. 

Wildlife 

The Wildlife Section carried on several projects during the year under the 
direction of C. D. Fowie. 

At the Wildlife Research Station and the Wilderness Area in Algonquin Park, 
investigations of the role of birds and mammals in the forest environment were con- 
tinued. Since the importance of birds and mammals with respect to the distribution 
and destruction of seeds and as elements in the food of important fur-bearing predators 
such as the fisher and marten, depends largely upon their numbers, much attention has 
been given to methods of measuring populations. Since populations of small mammals 
show major fluctuations from year to year, studies of reproduction and factors affecting 
survival have been studied with a view to determining the causes of the sudden changes 
in population. 

In an effort to assist Foresters who are interested in the direct seeding of logged 
or burned area, methods of protecting tree seeds from destruction by small mammals 
were under investigation. To date, no suitable method has been found, but sevrral 
promising leads are being followed. 

Studies of the ruffed grouse, an important game bird, have yielded information 
on the most suitable types of environment for the species, as well as information on 
their movements and relationships to one another. 

Through the courtesy of the Indian Affairs Branch of the Department of 
Citizenship and Immigration, the Department has obtained permission to stock an 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 128 



island with disease-free ruffed grouse, reared at one of the Department's Game Farms. 
It is hoped that a study of an isolated island population may throw some light on the 
factors which periodically decimate our grouse population. Since considerable diffi- 
culty in rearing disease-free birds was encountered, not enough grouse reached maturity 
to make stocking practical. The surviving stock will be kept for breeding purposes. 

In order to determine the effect of a few of the climatic factors on the 
activity of the animals in the forest, the laboratory study of the relation between the 
activity of the deer mouse and such factors as temperature and humidity was con- 
tinued in co-operation with the Department of Zoology, University of Toronto. This 
study promises to explain some of the behaviour patterns observed in animals in their 
natural habitat. 

In order to provide a picture of deer management problems in Ontario, a pre- 
liminary survey of the status of the deer throughout the Province was initiated. During 
the year, the forest districts of Rideau, Quinte, Trent, Algonquin and Parry Sound. 
and Manitoulin Island, were surveyed. This survey has emphasized the importance 
of this game animal in southern Ontario and has revealed some problems requiring 
solution in the future. 

During the hunting season, data on success, sex ratio and other statistics were 
collected from hunters. Through the excellent co-operation of sportsmen, a series of 
deer heads were secured for studies of the age classes in our deer. 

The problem of improving the habitat for wildlife on farm areas in southern 
Ontario has been under investigation for three years. Experimental plantings of 
multi-flora rose and other imported shrubs have been established in order to determine 
their hardiness in this latitude. 

Through the year, the Wildlife Section co-operated with several outside agencies 
such as the Ontario Research Foundation and the University of Toronto in providing 
working space at the Wildlife Research Station in Algonquin Park and in providing 
facilities for a field course for biological students. 

Silviculture 

The silvicultural programs are under the general direction of A. P. Leslie. In 
the following the projects are reported under the headings of Seeding Habit of Red 
Pine; Forest Tree Breeding; Seed Treatment; and Silvicultural Field Tests. 

Seeding Habit of Red Pine. This project continues under the direction of 
Dr. George Duff, who began this work in 1946. 

The importance of the project arises from the well-known fact that red pine 
produces appreciable quantities of seed only in occasional years. The result is that 
the expansion of planting programs of this preferred species is seriously restricted. 

The procedure was at first to survey the seeding habits as found in nature. 
More recently the survey work has been increasingly supplemented by experiments 
designed to modify seed productivity. The ultimate objective in view is the production 
of seed from elite trees growing in orchards. 

The work is centered mainly in certain red pine plantations in Simcoe County 
(Angus, Midhurst, Camp Borden, Craighurst) and at Chalk River. 

The survey data to 1949 led to the conclusion that the degree of productivity 
depends mainly upon internal physiological factors. In this respect the chronological 



Page 129 



Division of Research 




Recording data on preferred temperature of fish, fish research laboratory, Maple. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 130 



development of the cone prior to its emergence from the bud has been traced. Con- 
cerning this basically important matter little or nothing has been known hitherto. 
The work of 1949 brought this part of the project to a conclusion. 

In connection with the destruction of formed cones and seeds by insects, the 
data of 1949 confirms Dr. Duff's previously reported view that the insect attacks are 
correlated with the cycle of seed production. It is obvious that if seed orchards are 
to be established reliable methods of insect control will have to be worked out. 

In defining the optimum conditions for seed production in culture, progress 
has been made in ( 1 ) the discovery and bringing into culture of what appear to be 
highly productive seed strains or races of red pine, and ( 2 ) the experimental treatment 
of existing plantation stands, such as thinning, pruning, fertilizing, hormone treatment, 
and protection from insects. 

Forest Tree Breeding. The work, initiated in 1946 under the direction of Dr. 
C. Heimburger, is concerned principally with the selection, breeding and propagation 
of white pine and poplar. Incidental to the above is the establishment of an arboretum, 
essentially for the preservation of authentic material for breeding and genetical 
research. 

(1) White Pine: This species, for many years the mainstay of the lumber 
industry in Ontario, is recognized as one of the most valuable in the province for 
forestry purposes. Nevertheless, its culture is handicapped by blister rust and weevil. 
The white pine project is concerned primarily with the discovery and development 
of superior stock, highly resistant to attack by these enemies. The main effort is still 
centred on the assembling of breeding materials, testing and evaluation of the same, 
and improvement of methods of vegetative propagation. In the course of the year 
breeding material was received in exchange from Denmark, California, Wisconsin, 
eastern States and British Columbia. This has been used with native and other 
stocks in grafting and pollination. Outside grafting was further improved and its 
use extended. Experimental outside fall grafting was started. Inoculation experi- 
ments showed the western pine much easier to infect than the eastern species. 

(2) Poplar: The increasing use of poplar for pulp and lumber warrants con- 
tinued investigation of the breeding potentialities of these species. The aim of this 
project is to produce a rapidly growing hybrid with wood of superior quality, adapted 
to the relatively poor sites of Ontario, and resistant to disease. In addition, it is 
proposed to evaluate poplar material for windbreak planting in the southern part 
of the province. Experience in hybridization indicates that the most promising com- 
binations are Populus alba x P. grandidentata; P. alba x P. tremula; P. tremuloides x 
P. tremula and reciprocals. 

The selection of elite material for these crosses is important. Such material 
was sought both here and abroad. Grafting experiments indicated that native aspens 
are not compatible; but that the European P. tremula can be successfully grafted on 
both our P. grandidentata and P. tremuloides. August budding showed considerable 
promise as a means of propagation. 

(3) Arboretum.: The arboretum of native and foreign species, started in 1948, 
continued to expand rapidly in 1949. It consists of breeding materials for present and 
future use. It is planned to continue the acquisition of seeds, scions and plants, with 
emphasis on the white pine and poplars, and other economically important trees. 



Page 131 Division of Researc b 



Seed Research. The work in seed research includes (1) seed coating, and 
(2) basic seed research. 

(1) Seed coating or pelleting: This has two functions (a) to build up the 
size of small and irregular seeds to permit them to be handled easily, economically 
and without injury in a seeding mechanism, such as the Brohm hand planter which 
dispenses one seed at a time. Much research has been done to get non-injurious, cheap, 
easily-applicable, and non-reactive materials for coating. The second, and at present 
minor, function of coating is to have it act as a vehicle for fungicides, fertilizers, 
hormones and rodent repellents, to reduce loss of seed. Greater importance is being 
given to fungicides in present research, but work on the others is being continued also. 

(2) Basic seed treatment: Research has been started as to the specific con- 
ditions of moisture, temperature and light requirements for germination and growth 
of important tree species. This work will be extended as staff and funds permit. 

Silvicultural Field Tests. Programs were carried on in the Mid-Western 
Region and in the South-Central Region by research foresters stationed at Port Arthur 
and Dorset respectively. The program has been under way in the Mid-Western Region 
for the past three years, and in the South-Central Region for two years. A program 
is about to start in the Northern Region, with a research forester to be stationed at 
Cochrane. It is hoped that at least one research forester will be established eventually 
in each of the main forest regions. 

These men appraise the research requirements of their regions, take the results 
of regeneration or other surveys which lead to well-grounded theories, and test these 
in experiments arranged co-operately with local timber operators, or others. If they 
require the assistance of research specialists, these are supplied from the Central 
Research Station at Maple. 

1949 Field Projects 
A. Mid-Western Region 

1. Establishment of permanent sample plots in uncut stands (Abitibi Co. limits) ; to 
assess logging effects on main stand, residual stand, regeneration and site, over next 
25 years. 

2. Re-examination of permanent sample plots (Marathon Co. limits); to study 
immediate effects of logging on main and residual stands, regeneration and site. 

3. Examination of plots (Marathon Co. limits) to determine waste of wood by 
different logging methods. 

4. Slash-burning experiment (Great Lakes Paper limits); to determine effects of 
slash-burning on regeneration by artificial seeding. 

5. Seeding experiment (Great Lakes Paper limits); to determine practicality of 
seeding burned, cut-over lands. 

6. Seeding experiments (Longlac Co. and Great Lakes Paper limits); to determine 
possibility of stocking understocked cut-over lands. 

7. Study of jack pine cone-gathering techniques (Marathon Co. limits). 

8. Field extraction of jack pine seed: to devise portable seed extractor. 

9. Soil scarifying tests; to evolve a mechanical scarifier and seeder. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 132 

B. South-Central Region 

1. Study of relative growth and quality of the white, red, jack and scotch pines 
previously planted in a number of localities in the region. 

2. Determination of the advisability of planting pine in pure stands, or in association 
with hardwoods; examination of stands of various combinations. 

3. An attempt to determine on what sites white pine is most likely to succeed; 
examination of the sites on which the best white pine stands have occurred. 

4. A study of natural white pine regeneration following cutting; examination of per- 
manent sample plots in area south of North Bay. 

5. Determination of approximate boundaries of the original white pine stands in the 
region. 

6. Study of the suitability of seeds and seedlings from southern sources, in northern 
localities. 

7. Assistance in study of Algonquin Park watersheds for fisheries research; forest 
cover typing and stand tables. 

8. Assistance in development of a new statistical approach to timber cruising; tally 
of trees on 80-acre plot. 

Mensuration 

Volume Tables: The purpose of this project, commenced in 1948 under M. 
Ardenne, is to construct hardwood tables for such species as maple, beech, elm and 
oak, growing in southwestern Ontario. The tables will be useful mainly to woodlot 
owners in this area, but it is possible that they may be applicable to the whole of the 
Ottawa-Huron area. 

Field work during 1949 was a continuation of that of 1948. Adequate data 
were obtained for the construction of tables for sugar maple from 1,130 trees, and for 
beech from 530 trees measured. Data collected on elm and other species were insuffi- 
cient for table preparation, due to the scarcity of these species in the area. It is 
expected, however, that adequate data may be obtainable subsequently on white elm 
and soft maple. 

Other features of tree growth and tree volume were investigated in the course of the 
volume table work. 

Soils 

The soils research program, under G. A. Hills, has two general objectives: 

1. To classify and map the whole forest land area of Ontario on the basis of its 
natural characteristics, in respect to topography, geology, climate and soil. 

2. To evaluate the various types of land according to their capacity to produce forest 
or agricultural crops. 

The program commenced in 1944, was continued during the past year both in the field, 
and at the Southern Research Station, Maple. 

Field Work. In the summer of 1949 field parties, working in the northwestern 
portion of the province, filled in the gaps of information required to complete an 
agricultural use capability map of Northern Ontario. 



Page 133 



Division of Research 




Dr. C. C. Heimburger examines rust-resistant white pine. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 134 



This map is intended to indicate the order and degree in which forestry should 
be replaced by agriculture. That is. which lands should be opened up first to settle- 
ment, and the extent to which they should be developed for agriculture, or a combina- 
tion of forestry and agriculture. 

Field parties also made detailed site classifications in selected sections of the 
North Bay-Mattawa, Algonquin Park and Xipigon areas. The work included mapping 
of representative types, recording of forest and soil relationships, and collection of soil 
samples for laboratory analysis. The data referred to exposure, depth over bedrock, 
relief, drainage, texture, geologic origin, soil profile, past and present forest. 

The information obtained lays the foundation for the silvicultural research, 
such as regeneration and growth studies, which should precede forest management 
planning. 

In the North Bay-Mattawa and Algonquin Park areas, studies were made of 
yellow birch and sugar maple on shallow soils over rolling bedrock, and on moist 
gravelling soils. White pine, red pine and jack pine were studied on deep gravelly and 
sandy soils, and on shallow, rocky soils. 

In the Nipigon area, studies were made of white spruce, black spruce, aspen 
poplar and jack pine on deep soils of shaly gravel, and on shallow soils over slate 
bedrock. It was noted that heavy yields of timber occurred on shale and slate soils, 
in contrast to the lower yields usually found on granitic soils. 

Soils Work at the Southern Research Station. Maps and charts were 
prepared from field notes, work sheets and marked aerial photographs, for graphic 
presentation. 

In the laboratory, physical and chemical analyses were made of the 400 repre- 
sentative soil samples collected in the field. In addition, tests were made periodically 
of soils used in greenhouse experiments. 

During the past year a series of experiments was conducted in the greenhouse 
to determine the nutrient requirements of red pine, in the range of its natural site 
conditions in Ontario. 

Mechanics 

(1) Pack Tractors: In the fall of 1948 it was decided to produce a pilot model 
of a mechanically propelled machine of suitable design to facilitate the transportation 
of fire suppression and other equipment through the bush. From the beginning it was 
realized that this tractor would have to be capable of operating under very adverse 
conditions, such as thick bush, rocky country and swamp areas. As no like equipment 
had ever been produced, it was necessary to prepare original plans. Design was com- 
pleted in the winter of 1948-49. 

Actual construction commenced in March, 1949, and the first prototype was 
ready for testing in May. Tests during the summer and fall showed that performance 
was very satisfactory. It was found that this 500 lb. machine could take a 700 lb. 
payload up a 50 per cent grade with ease, and was readily manoeuverable in rough 
terrain. 

As a result of these tests it was possible to set up improved specifications, and 
in the following winter and spring two machines were constructed, to be ready for 
testing under actual field conditions in the summer of 1950. 



Page 135 Division of Research 



(2) Seedling Lifter: A device for attachment to large tractors for lifting seed- 
lings in forest nurseries has been developed. This consists of a blade that is pulled 
about five inches under the surface of the seedling beds. The purpose is to loosen the 
ground so that the seedlings can be lifted easily by hand for transplanting: it should 
also result in a considerable saving in labour. 

(3) Scarifier for Logged Areas: Although the mechanical section did not build 
the scarifying machine, it did assist in some of the testing and carried out the modifica- 
tions indicated by these tests. The purpose of this machine is to stir up the ground 
in mechanically logged jack pine areas, in order to increase natural regeneration. 

(4) Seeding Staffs: These devices were designed to release a single seed at a 
time, and bury it in the soil. A model is being built which is expected to prove 
satisfactory. 

(5) Hose Tests: Machinery was set up to test the qualities of linen and cotton 
fire hose, and to enable purchase by specification. Tests of the effect of fungicides 
to prevent hose decay are still continuing. 

Pathology 

The Department, continuing to co-operate with the Dominion Department of 
Agriculture, employs two foresters on the research staff who are on Loan to the 
Dominion Laboratory of Forest Pathology. Toronto, for the conduct of co-operative 
studies. The two main current projects are the survey of the condition of yellow birch, 
and the survey of the condition of white pine in the Sudbury sulphur-fume area. 

Yellow Birch Dieback. This study was initiated due to anxiety on the part 
of timber operators and government officials as to the possible spread of "birch 
dieback" from the Maritimes to Ontario. Fourteen one-acre permanent sample plots 
were established in 1949, from the Ottawa Valley to North Bay. An intensive record 
of conditions was made of all species of trees on the plots and all site factors were 
examined. It is hoped that this assessment will determine whether there is an abnormal 
condition of yellow birch, and if so. to make recommendations for control. 

White Pine Xeedle Blight. This study resulted from a confusing similarity 
in symptoms of this disease with symptoms in a certain stage of sulphur fume injury 
in the Sudbury area. A detailed field survey was started in 1949 and ten one-acre 
permanent sample plots were established within a 25-mile radius of the fume sources 
at Sudbury. Ten check plots were established in the Mattawa area on corresponding 
white pine sites in which some trees exhibited signs of similar injury, but which could 
not be due to sulphur fumes. 

For simplification, comparison is being made in these two areas of basic 
relationships only, such as incidence of disease, mortality and loss of wood increment. 

Statistical comparison of these factors should permit evaluation of the relative 
degree of injury from both causes. 

Entomology 

The Division continued its co-operative arrangement with tin- Division of 
Forest Entomology, Federal Department of Agriculture. Work was centred at the 
Sault Ste. Marie Forest Insect Laboratory building, which is the property of the 
Ontario Department and staffed by the Federal Department, under the direction of 
Dr. M. L. Prebble. Dr. I'rebble issues a separate report. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 136 



The Division again retained the services of Dr. C. E. Atwood of the Department 
of Zoology, University of Toronto, in an advisory capacity in matters relating to 
forest entomology. In the summer of 1949 Dr. Atwood made a number of trips to 
areas infested by various insects and obtained a general picture of the forest insect 
situation in Ontario, which he presented in a report. His report includes the following: 

1. Special survey of larch sawfly outbreak in northwestern Ontario. 

2. Spruce budworm in various parts of the province. 

3. Jack pine budworm east of Kenora. 

4. Tent caterpillars in various parts of province. 

5. Coniferous feeding sawflies near Sault Ste. Marie and south of Orillia. 

6. European pine shoot moth in southern Ontario. 

7. Striped maple worm in Algoma district. 

8. Yellow-headed spruce sawfly in various parts of province. 

9. Birch sawfly, Algoma district and eastward. 

10. Birch leaf-miner in Algoma district. 

11. Birch skeletonizer. North Bay to Sudbury 

12. Elm insects: The elm leaf-miner and the elm case-bearer in southern Ontario. 

Statistics 

The statistical work of the Division is supervised by Dr. D. B. DeLury, who 
is retained by the Department as a part-time consultant. Mr. L. M. Morrison is 
employed full time in this work. Assistance has been rendered both in the design of 
experiments and analysis of resulting data. 

The following projects have been undertaken since the statistical section was 
organized in 1948: 

1. Census of deer population. 

2. Forest nursery inventory improvement. 

3. Correlation of height, diameter and age of black spruce. 

4. Spread of game from protected areas into surrounding territory. 

5. Juvenile cock pheasant population of Pelee Island. 

6. Design of silvicultural experiment in Port Arthur area. 

7. Study of hardwood volume table compilation. 

8. Fisheries statistics. 

The results of the recently completed pheasant studies referred to above should 
receive wide attention, as the population assessment and prediction figures are valu- 
able and of great public interest. The forest sampling studies have yielded important 
results. 




SURVEYS 
AND ENGINEERING 





Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 138 

DIVISION OF SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING 

ANNUAL REPORT 

To facilitate and expedite the issuance of water power leases for the develop- 
ment of electric energy, legislation was passed amending the Water Powers Regulation 
Act. 

Under the provisions of this Act as amended. His Majesty the King, in the 
right of Ontario as represented by the Minister of Lands and Forests, may enter into 
an agreement with the lessee for the development of the water power, generally for a 
term of twenty years with the right of renewal for two further and successive terms 
of ten years each. 

It is of interest to note that leases granted by the Department for the develop- 
ment of electric-energy from our natural water power resources cover an installed 
capacity of approximately 1.000.000 horsepower which compares with an installed 
capacity of about 7.000 horsepower at the beginning of this century. 

The control of water for the use of the power companies, timber operators and 
summer resort residents at various seasons of the year, presents a major problem. A 
policy of segregating the use of certain waterways for the specific use of power 
development and that of summer resort development is under review. A survey of 
existing dams in the Province is under way and ultimately, a complete history of 
each dam will be secured, which will enable a policy to be formulated in regard to 
its maintenance and future use to the best interests of everyone. 

The demand for summer resort lots on Crown Lands has continued during the 
past fiscal year, resulting in the continuance of an extensive survey program. The 
surveys of 1,435 parcels were completed, creating a new all time high and being an 
increase of 20 per cent over the previous year. 

The boundary between the Territorial Districts of Thunder Bay and Algoma 
between the Canadian Pacific Railway and Lake Superior was resurveyed and certain 
stations of the Geodetic Survey of Canada were tied in to the survey fabric of Ontario 
to provide control for mapping of aerial photography. Potential water power reserves 
on the Montreal River near Lake Superior were surveyed. 

Retracement surveys were carried out in the newly discovered uranium field in 
the vicinity of Alona Bay of Lake Superior, north of Sault Ste. Marie to provide base 
control for geological surveys made by the Department of Mines and also, to provide 
control for legal surveys for the numerous mining claims which have been staked in 
this area. 

The plans of setting up a photographic library to record prints of all air photo- 
graphs taken in connection with the Forest Resources Inventory have been finalized. 
These photographs will be made available to lumber and mining companies and to 
the general public, from 360,000 negatives. 

The aerial surveys section of this Division has completed the preparation of the 
base maps of the territory, comprising 25,440 square miles south of the French and 
Mattawa Rivers included in the program of the Forest Resources Inventory 
Program. 

In the undeveloped sections of the Province, there are in existence a consider- 
able number of subdivided townships, where due to the passage of time, lumbering 
and fires, it is found the majority of survey posts and survey lines are obliterated. 



Page 139 Division of Surveys and Engineering 



Where such townships are not suitable agricultural possibilities, a policy of annulling 
the township subdivision has been formulated. To date, sixteen township subdivisions 
have been annulled. It is considered in the public interest that the policy of 
annulling townships where such conditions exist should be followed and this method of 
dealing with the situation be adhered to on broader scope when conditions permit. 



Jsndex of ^J able 5 



Table Xo. Page 

1. Distribution of maps ------------- 144 

2. Public requests for maps and survey records ------ 145 

3. Area covered with vertical photography ------- 148 

4. Total of aerial surveys 1924 to 1950 (March 31) - - - - - 148 

^rnaex of L^narti and Lj rap ltd 

Figure No. Page 

1. Surveyed summer resort locations ox crown land examined 

by the Division of Surveys axd Exgixeerixc. ------ 140 

2. Surveyed mixing claims on crowx land examined by the 
Division of Surveys and Engineering -------- 140 

3. Trend of map distribution ------------ 146 



GROUND SURVEYS SECTION 
Survey instructions were issued for the following surveys: 
General 

1. Retracement of certain lines in the Township of Patterson. District of Xipissing. 
in connection with the survey of summer resort locations. 

2. Re-locating streets and block corners in the Town of Gowganda, District of 
Timiskaming. 

3. Survey of part of the east boundary of Township 83 and the boundary of the 
Improvement District of Terrace Bay. 

4. Retracement of the boundaries of the Township of Kincaid, Township 28. Range 
13 and mining locations within those townships, in connection with mining 
activities. 

5. Retracement of the boundaries of Township 28, Range 14 and Township 28, 
Range 15 in the District of Algoma and the boundaries of mineral locations 
within those townships, in connection with mining activities. 

6. Boundary between the Districts of Thunder Bay and Algoma, southerly to the 
C.P.R. to Lake Superior, to provide ground control for aerial mapping in connec- 
tion with the forest Research Inventory Program. 

7. Subdivision of summer resort locations on Tea Lake, on parts of Lots 23 to 27 
inclusive, Concessions 4 and 5, Township of Matchedash in the County of Simcoe. 

8. Survey of Water Power Reserve on the Montreal River in Township 28. Range 
15 and Township 29. Range 14 in the District of Algoma. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 140 



o 

< 

o 



Figure No. 1 

SURVEYED SUMMER RESORT LOCATIONS 
ON CROWN LAND 

EXAMINED BY THE DIVISION OF SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 

1500 
1400 
1300 
1200 
1100 
1000 

900 

600 

700 

600 

SOO 



+ 


+ 


* 


-■- 


* 


* 


* 


,1 



1941 



1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 

FISCAL YEAR 



Figure No. 2 



SURVEYED MINING CLAIMS ON CROWN LAND 

EXAMINED BY THE DIVISION OF SURVEYS AND ENGINEERING 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 

900 



8oo 



700 



± 600 



500 



4oo 



300 



2 2oo 



- 100 




I94I I942 I943 I944 I945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 
FISCAL YEAR 



Page 141 



Division of Surveys and Engineering 




Jim Htissey of Aerial Surveys Division operating Multiplex projector which allows operator to 
interpret contours in third dimension from aerial photographs. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 142 



9. Traverse of part of the shore of Pelee Island near Fishing Point, to determine the 
high water mark on Lake Erie and the limits of certain patented water lots in the 
County of Essex. 

10. To establish the limits of Lots 3 and 4 in Concession 1 of the Township of 
Plummer, in the District of Algoma and the limits of streets in the Village of 
Rydal Bank. 

11. Retracement of the line between Concessions 14 and 15, in front of Lots 35 to 
39 inclusive in the Township of Anstruther. in the County of Peterborough, in 
connection with the determination of boundaries of timber limits 

12. To retrace certain lines in the Township of Sherborne in the Provisional County 
of Haliburton, in connection with the survey of summer resort locations. 

13. To determine the boundaries of lands occupied by squatters, so that letters patent 
could be issued within the mill plot and Lot 45, Concession 14, Township of 
Wallbridge, District of Parry Sound. 

14. To determine the limits of Lot 26, Concession 6, Township of Matchedash, 
County of Simcoe, in connection with the survey of summer resort locations. 

15. Traverse of the right-of-way of the Algoma Central Railway through Townships 
52 and 49, District of Algoma, to provide ground control for mapping by aerial 
photography, in connection with the Forest Resources Inventory Program. 

16. To re-establish the line across the South-West quarter of Section 11, Township of 
Aweres, in the District of Algoma, to determine the limits of land included in 
registered plans. 

17. To survey summer resort locations in the Townships of Cavendish and Harvey, 
County of Peterborough. 

18. Survey of a subdivision of summer resort locations on Wild Goose Lake in the 
Township of Lindsley, District of Thunder Bay. 

19. To retrace certain lines in the Township of Gibson, District of Parry Sound, in 
connection with the survey of summer resort locations. 

20. To re-establish the boundaries of mining locations in the Township of Pic, District 
of Thunder Bay, to determine the boundaries of land within the Improvement 
District of Marathon. 

21. To traverse roads and ties to geodetic monuments in the vicinity of Sault Ste. 
Marie, to furnish ground control for mapping by aerial photography, in connection 
with the Forest Resources Inventory Program 

22. To survey summer resort locations in the Township of Stanhope, in the Provisional 
County of Haliburton. 

23. To re-establish parts of the boundary between the Townships of Harvey and 
Cavendish and the Townships of Galway and Cavendish, to determine the 
boundaries of timber limits. 

24. To re-establish the boundaries of the Township of Baldwin in the District of 
Sudbury, in connection with mining activities. 

25. To establish the boundary between Mining Claim J. S. 145 and the northeast 
part of broken Lot 2 in Concession 5, Township of Coleman, to establish the high 
water mark of Cross Lake, in connection with mining activities. 



Page 143 Division of Surveys and Engineering 



Municipal Surveys 

No. 828 — To re-establish the road allowance between Lots 20 and 21, Township of 

Trafalgar, County of Halton. to the south limit of the Lake Shore Highway 

of Lake Ontario. 
Xo. 829 — To re-establish the boundary between the Townships of Kingston and 

Loughborough, being the allowance for road at the rear of Lots 9, 10 and 

11, Concession 7, Township of Kingston. 
Xo. 830 — To mark with permanent monuments, the corners of the blocks and limits 

of the streets within the Village of Chippawa. 
Xo. 831 — To re-establish the allowance for road between Concessions 2 and 3, in 

front of Lots 25, 26 and 27 in the Township of Belmont, in the County of 

Peterborough. 

Private Surveys on Crown Lands 

Under authority of Section 37 of the Public Land Regulations. 1,435 summer 
resort locations were surveyed and the returns of survey filed in the Department for 
examination and approval. Six hundred and twenty-six surveys of this number were 
surveyed under direct departmental instructions to the surveyor, where the applicant 
paid in the survey fee, as specified in Section 37 of the Public Land Regulations and 
amendments thereto. This is an increase of 236 surveys over the fiscal year March 
31, 1949, and represents an all time high for the number of summer resort locations 
surveyed during any previous fiscal year. 

Under the provisions of the Mining Act, 417 mining claims were surveyed 
and the returns of survey were filed for examination and approval. This is a reduction 
of 18.1 per cent in the number of surveys made for the fiscal year ending March 31, 
1949. 

Townsite Subdivisions 

Parts of patented mining claims TB 12025 and TB 10878 in the Town of 
Geraldton, District of Thunder Bay, were subdivided into town lots. The plans of 
survey were approved and the selection of 25 per cent of the lots laid out as Crown 
Lots was made under authority of the Townsites Act. The survey of additional town 
lots in the Townsite of Gogama was completed and the plans of subdivision registered 
in the Land Titles Office for the District of Sudbury. 

Map Publications and Geographic Xomenclature 

The drawings for two maps of Islands in the Xorth Channel of Lake Huron 
were completed and made ready for lithography. The revision of Map 24H. Districts 
of Algoma, Sudbury. Timiskaming, Cochrane and part of Xipissing" is underway. 

The following maps were reprinted: 

Map 21 A Southern Ontario, Scale 6 miles to 1 inch; 5,000 copies lithographed in 

full colours. 
Map 21C — District of Timiskaming and part of the Districts of Sudbury and 

Xipissing, scale 4 miles to 1 inch; 5,000 copies lithographed in full 

colours. 
Map 32A — Parts of the Districts of Algoma and Sudbury, scale 4 miles to 1 inch; 

3,000 copies lithographed in full colours. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 144 

Map 11A — Islands in Georgian Bay in front of the Township of Wallbridge, scale 20 
chains to 1 inch; 750 copies in black only. 

Map 14D — Islands in McGregor Bay, North Channel of Lake Huron, scale 20 chains 
to 1 inch; 750 copies in black only. 

Map 15D — Islands in the Bay of Islands, North Channel of Lake Huron, scale 20 
chains to 1 inch; 750 copies in black only. 

In accordance with arrangements made by this Department with the Army 
Survey Establishment Bureau in Ottawa, certain lithograph map sheets are being 
produced on a scale of 2 miles to 1 inch, from the basic detail shown on the plani- 
metric maps produced in connection with Forest Resources Inventory Program. 
During the past year, the following map sheets were published under the National 
Topographic series: 

NAME LONGITUDE LATITUDE 

Pamour 81° to 82° 48°30' to 40° 

Iroquois Falls - 80° to 81° 48° 30' to 49° 

Kirkland Lake — . 80° to 81° 48° to 48°30' 

Place names, including those for lakes, rivers and streams have been compiled 
and listed for use in the preparation of sixteen additional map sheets by the Army 
Survey Establishment Bureau. 

Place names, including those for lakes, rivers and streams, have been verified 
for 438 sectional maps prepared for the Ontario Forest Resources Inventory Series 
and which cover an area of approximately 43,800 square miles. Compiled informa- 
tion of place names was supplied to the Ontario Department of Mines, the Federal 
Departments of National Defence and Mines and Resources, required in the prepara- 
tion of new maps being published by these bureaus 

Map Distribution 

Lithographed maps of the National Topographic Series relative to Ontario as 
published by the Department of Mines and Technical Surveys in Ottawa, the Army 
Survey Establishment R.C.E. of the Department of National Defence and provincial 
issues distributed by this Division continue to show an increase. The following list 
shows the quantity distributed and the trend of distribution over a twelve-year period 
is shown 

Table No. 1 
Distribution of Maps 

National Topographic Series (Dominion) 16,437 

National Topographic Series (Provincial) 576 17,013 

Provincial Maps 

20A (Free Issue) - 1,896 

District Maps 7,560 

Island Maps — 1,255 

Miscellaneous 5,062 

33A (Electoral) 152 

42A (Townships) 510 16,435 

Total 33,448 



Page 145 



Division of Surveys and Engineer in; 





'. 



J 



Bill Andrews working. 



National Topographic Skries 

The distribution of the National Topographic Series map sheets continues to 
increase over that of previous years. 

Provincial Maps 

The total distribution of provincial maps remained about the same as the 
previous year, although the demand for various types of maps changed. The greatest 
increase was noted in the island maps due to the newer ones issued which were 
compiled from up-to-date aerial photograph} - . 

Table No. 2 
Public Requests for Maps and Survey Records 

Counter Sales 

Sales by Invoice 

Sales by Cash in Advance and Enquiries only — approximately 



3,515 
3,214 

4,000 

10.720 



Photostating 

A decrease in the photostatic reproductions of original survey and other 
records was noted this year. 54.075 square feet of photostat paper was consumed. 

Approximately 2,000 pages of original township surveys and base and meridian 
line survey field note- required for the aerial mapping portion of the Foresl Resources 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 146 



Figure No. 3 



TREND OF MAP Dl STRIB UTI ON 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS 



20000r 



S 

Q: 
k 
<0 



19000 



18000 



17000 



15000 



14000 



13000 



12000 



1 1000 



10000 



9000 



8000 



6000 



5000 



3000 



2000 



1000 



LEGEND 



NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC SERIES 

NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC SERIES •DOMINION- 
DISTRICT MAPS -• 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO N°20A FREE ISSUE 

TOWNSHIP MAP N°42A 

ISLAND MAPS 

ELECTORAL DISTRICTS N°33A 

MISCELLANEOUS MAPS - 



NOTE: FIGURES PRIOR TO 1945-6 ARE AVERAGES ONLY 



\ 



X 



\ 



\ 



X 



^v 



X; 



/ 



\ 



7 



I 



/ 



V / 



7X 



\ 



\ 



\ 



V 



\/ 



1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 

1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 

FISCAL YEAR 



Page 147 



Division of Surveys and Engineering 




Doug. Clarke and R. A. Masson at Drafting Table. 



Inventory program were photostated early in the year. This completed the main 
requirements for copies of original survey records for this program, with the excep- 
tion of miscellaneous surveys needed periodically. 

The demand for the use of survey records continued this year due to the 
accelerated program of ground surveys in summer resorts. Hydro and Highways 
work. 

Printing and Transparent Linen Reproductions 

The use of paper, opaque linen and transparent linen reproductions of survey 
plans and other material continues to increase in quantity. 93.200 square feet of 
sensitized paper and linen was consumed. 

The use of transparent linen reproductions to eliminate hand drawn copies of 
survey plans required for filing in the Land Titles and Registry Offices was increased 
this year and 875 square feet was used for this purpose. 

Book Binding 

The work of repairing and rebinding the original survey held notes and other 
volumes was continued during the year. The repairing and recovering of the original 
crown survey field note books is nearing conclusion. In addition, some 50 new books 
were made up and other miscellaneous work performed for this and other Divisions. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 148 



Microfilming 

A small amount of microfilming of original survey records was done during 
the year. Some 65 positive reels were made and 1,300 negative exposures of new 
survey records made. 

Survey Records 

One hundred and sixteen volumes of survey references, as well as all deceased 
surveyors' field notes being held by the Crown, were transferred to fireproof storage 
at Maple. 

Field Survey Party Equipment and Supply 

The equipping and supplying of a sixteen man survey party operating in the 
field on the survey of part of the boundary between the Districts of Algoma and 
Thunder Bay, as well as several smaller summer resort parties and for survey inspec- 
tion work, was taken care of during the year 

The Divisional truck which was outfitted as a mobile survey unit covered a 
distance of approximately 9,500 miles. 

The existing storage space for survey equipment and supplies for field work 
was found to be inadequate, and plans for a larger storage area in a building at the 
Southern Experimental Station at Maple were prepared and the construction of same 
commenced. This space will also provide for the storage of certain survey records, 
duplicate plans, field notes, etc. 

AERIAL SURVEYS 

During the past fiscal year, the Aerial Surveys Section covered 13,353 square 
miles with vertical photography. 

The following table illustrates the breakdown of these figures: — 

Table No. 3 
For Outside Concerns area 

(sq. miles) totals 

Cities of Ft. William and Pt. Arthur SO 50 

Other Government Departments 

Hydro Electric Power Commission — 318 

** Planning and Development 1,028 

Faculty of Forestry, U. of T. 25 1,371 

Department of Lands and Forests 

*Forest Resources Inventory 11,882 

Lindsay District 50 1 1,932 

Grand Total 13,353 

^Denotes Mapping Included (14,910 Sq. Miles) 
**Denotes Multiplex Work Included (120 Sq. Miles). 

Table No. 4 

Total of Aerial Surveys 1924 to 1950 (March 31) 

in Square Miles 

Aerial Sketching _. __ __ 26,903 Sq. Miles 

Oblique Photography _.._. 10,780 Sq. Miles 

Vertical Photography _ — 110,566 Sq. Miles 



rtfll^ 





Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 150 



MANAGEMENT PLANS AND CONTROL 

Acting under the provisions of the Forest Management Act, 1947, the Minister 
during the current fiscal year has requested all licensees holding cutting rights on 
more than fifty square miles to furnish forest inventories and master plans, and thus 
as at March 31st, 1950, sixty-nine companies holding an aggregate of 73,699 T 2 square 
miles in timber licenses and concession areas are working to some degree under the 
provisions of the Forest Management Act 

Twenty companies have now furnished plans covering an area of 14,770 square 
miles. Analysis of these plans is under way. 

The field staff in timber management has been augmented by the placing of 
foresters and assistants in four districts whose immediate duties have been aimed 
towards the organization of management units and the maintenance of the forest 
inventory where it has already been completed. 

Control of forest operations has been extended by additional field inspections 
and the extension of requirements under the Forest Management Act. New timber 
sales are under closer inspection and as management units become operative, sales 
are restricted to cutting under the management plan. 



^rndex of- JableS 



51. Sault Ste. Marie - - - 160 
5m. Sioux Lookout - - 161 



Table No. Page 

1. Status of timber licensed areas - - - - - - - - - -151 

2. Area under pulpwood and timber agreement - - - - - -151 

3. Mills license --------------- 151 

4. Statements of amounts of timber cu;t during the year ending 
March 31, 1949 --------------- 152 

5. Classification of annual timber returns for year ending 
March 31, 1949, by districts ----------- 153 

5. Algonquin ----- 152 5i. Parry Sound - - - - 158 

5a. Chapleau ----- 153 5j. Port Arthur - - - - 159 

5b. Cochrane ----- 154 sk. Quinte ------ 159 

5c. Fort Frances - - - - 154 

5d. Geraldton ----- 155 

5e. Gogama ----- 155 

5f. Kapuskasing - - - - 157 Sn - Sudbury - - - - 161 

Sg. Kenora ----- 157 5o. Swastika ----- 162 

5h. North Bay - - - - 158 5p. Trent ------ 164 

6.. Timber areas sold during the y*ear ending March 31, 1950 - - 165 



FOREST RESOURCES INVENTORY 

The forest resources inventory project was started in 1946. Photography com- 
pleted during the current year amounted to 19,036 square miles under contract and 
10.364 square miles by the Department making a total area photographed during 
the year of 29,400 square miles. 

Mapping completed during the year amounted to 22.608 square miles under 
contract and 15,120 square miles by the Department making a total area mapped of 
37,728 square miles. 

Field work was completed on a total of 17,655 square miles. 

Total work accomplished to the end of the fiscal year amounted to: 

Photography 148,111 square miles 

Mapping 118,810 square miles 

Completed Field Work 36.120 square miles 



Page IS] Division of Timber Management 



TIMBER SALES 1949-50 

Details of the 33 new sales of timber made during the season indicate that 
152.25 square miles of timber limits were sold. 

During the season. 92 timber licenses comprising 415.50 square miles, were 
abandoned. 

The status of the timber licensed areas in Ontario as at March 31st. 1950, was 
therefore as follows: 

Table No. 1 

AREA 
NO. (SQ. MILES) 

Licenses and Renewals Issued 1949-50 _. 813 11,571 

Licenses, in Suspense 36 342^4 



Total 849 11,913^ 

PULPWOOD AXD TIMBER AGREEMENTS 1949-50 

Area under pulpwood concession and timber agreement as at March 31st, 
1950—69.860.75 square miles. 

Table No. 2 
AREA UXDER PULPWOOD AXD TIMBER AGREEMEXT 

FISCAL YEAR SQ. MILES FISCAL YEAR SQ. MILES 

1940-41 __ 65,497.50 1945-46 53,754.00 

1041-42 66,509.50 1946-47 56,745.00 

1942-43 71,636.50 1947-48 66,254.50 

1943-44 56,690.50 1948-49 66,980.75 

1944-45 - 59,353.00 1949-50 ... . 69,860.75 

Table No. 3 

MILLS LICEXSED 

The mills licensed during the year under the Mills Licensing Act were as 
follows: — 

Less than 5,000 ft. daily capacity — 597 

5,000 to 30,000 ft. daily capacity _ 713 

Over 30,000 ft. daily capacity 43 

Number of Paper Mills - 35 



1,388 



SCALING 

Scaler's examinations were held as follows: — 

Carnarvon June 11th, 1949 

Sault Ste. Marie May 13th, 1940 

TABLES 

Table Xo. 4. Statement of amounts of timber cut during the year ending March 3 1st, 
1949. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 152 



Table Xo. 5. Classification of annual timber returns for the year ending March 3 1st, 

k. Quinte (Tweed) 

1. Sault Ste. Marie 

m. Sioux Lookout 

n. Sudbury 

o. Swastika 

p. Trent (Lindsay) 

Table Xo. 6. Timber areas sold during the year ending March 31st. 1950. 





1949, by Districts. 






5. 


Algonquin 


e. 


Gogama 




( Pembroke ) 


f. 


Kapuskasing 


5a. 


Chapleau 


or_ 


Kenora 


b. 


Cochrane 


h. 


Xorth Bay 


c. 


Fort Frances 


i. 


Parry Sound 


d. 


Geraldton 


J- 


Port Arthur 



Table No. 4 
AMOUNTS OF TIMBER CUT 
For Year Ending March 31, 1949 

sfecies pieces feet 

Red and White Pine 2,146,209 127.822,550 

Jack Pine ...... 4,467,356 68,645,023 

Spruce 1,593,879 37,378,013 

Balsam 59,915 668,015 

Hemlock 535,715 24.070.347 

Birch 339,179 26,081.019 

Maple 168,214 10.109,598 

Other Hardwood .. 80,247 3,610,864 

Poplar . 307,637 7.740,999 

Cedar 15,658 201.873 

Tamarac 2,398 ■10.293 

0,716,407 306.450.3Q4 

SPECIES PIECES 1 [NEAL Fill 

Ties 324,247 

Poles ...... 94,593 

Posts 16,262 

Fuelvvood ... . 

Piling ..... 515.417 

Filing 

Spoolwood 

435,102 515.417 



CORDS 


CUBIC FEET 





30,459,417 


471,879.88 


74,631,693 


1,702.401.55 


174,651,873 


140.104.38 


13,802,028 





6,299,014 





5,541,138 





2,498,755 





058,531 


121,685.86 


13,653,349 





101,300 





15,750 


2,535,071.67 


322,612,848 


CORDS 


CUBIC FEET 


■ 


1.113,843 





1,957,343 





24,393 


28,870.70 


2,590,110 


126.18 


11,340 





4,147,426 


1,134.72 


102,105 


30,140.69 


9,955,560 



Table No. 5 
ALGONQUIN 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1949 

species cords pieces feet dues bonus total 

Pine Logs _ 251,016 10,613,297 S 26. 533. IS S 29,659.12 $56,192.30 

Pine Booms 1.542 137,627 344.06 1,645.51 1.080.57 

J. Pine Logs .. 181,020 2,632,847 6,536.20 5,253.47 11,789.67 

J. Pine Booms 21 1,905 4.76 4.76 

Ash Logs 326 14,678 36.68 66.59 103.27 

Balsam Logs . 1,004 13,924 27.84 61.76 89.60 

Basswood Logs . 1,322 105,263 263.15 229.17 492.32 

Beech Logs ...... 530 24.097 60.24 107.01 167.25 

Birch Logs 87,406 6,332,884 15,832.17 17,174.37 33,006.54 

Cedar Logs 713 9,335 14.00 14.00 

Continued on Next Page. 



Page 153 



Division of Timber Management 



SPECIES CORDS PIECES FEET IM I - BONUS 

Cherry Logs 254 10,705 26.98 39.38 

Elm Logs 890 64,564 161.41 125.85 

Hemlock Logs _ 77,152 3.820,378 5,730.54 1,341.92 

Hemlock Booms ... 43 8,157 20.39 

Maple Logs __ 52,699 2,014,507 7,286.28 7,550.22 

Oak Logs 8 325 .81 

Poplar Logs _ 100,950 2,326,572 4,653.15 3,389.35 

Spruce Logs 48,486 1,508,613 3,017.23 4,198.99 

Spruce Booms . 1,368 119,836 200.57 516.53 

TamaracLogs 113 2,206 3.31 .70 

Poles (cu. ft.) 41,516 530,931.92 21,356.14 

Posts 2,291 45.82 8.73 

Spoolwood 1.134.72 851.04 

Fuehvood (Hard) _ 658.00 329.00 9.50 

Fuel wood (Soft) _.. 339.00 84.75 38.75 

Balsam Pulpwood _ 379.17 265.42 1.10 

J. Pine Pulpwood .. 10.35 4.14 

Poplar Pulpwood .... 1,020.74 771.00 41.79 

Spruce Pulpwood . 6,925.10 9,695.14 30.87 

Poplar Exported 815.85 81.58 

$104,255.30 $ 71.572.26 

Cut Under Permit 

Mixed Logs _ _..524,948 ft. B.M. Posts .. 

Pulpwood . _. 1,081 Cords Poles 

Fuelwood _ 367 Cords 

Table No. 5a 
CHAPLEAU 

O \SSIIK ATION OK ANNUAL TlMBER RETURN YlAR EnDINC MARCH 31, 1949 

SPECIES CORDS PIECES FEET DUES BONUS 

Pine Logs 9,331 954,320 $ 2,385.79 $ 5,854.03 

Pine Booms 519 116,257 290.64 795.39 

J. Pine Logs 182,640 3,813,596 7,125.04 7.096.92 

J. Pine Booms 868 54,693 136.59 234.40 

Spruce Logs 4,685 72,915 145.82 394.32 

Spruce Booms 35 2,880 7.19 19.35 

Car Stakes .. 5,695 151.08 

Poles (cu. ft.) . 10,258 157,233.48 0,720.60 

Fuelwood (Hard) 36.00 18.00 9.00 

Fuelwood (Soft) 134.00 33.50 10.20 

Balsam Pulpu ood 4.03 2.82 

J. Pine Pulpwood 53,036.99 21,214.70 6,007.04 

Poplar Pulpwood 1,485.10 594.04 

Spruce Pulpwood 13,709.07 1>M0?.69 2,937.79 

$ 58,018.59 s 23,449 I 



TOTAL 

66.36 

287.26 

7,072.46 

20.39 

14.S36.50 

.81 

8,042.50 

7.216.22 

816.10 

4.01 

21,356.14 

54.55 

851.04 

338.50 

123.50 

266.52 

4.14 

813.69 

o. 726.01 

81.58 

$175,827.56 



600 Pieces 
150 Pieces 



TOTAL 

$ 8,239.82 

1 ,086.03 

14,221.96 

371.08 

540.14 

26.54 

151.08 

0.720.60 

27.00 

43.70 

27,312.43 

504.04 

2,130.48 

s 81,467.72 



J. Pine 
Poles 



Ci i Undeh Permi i 



1,000 It KM 
64 I'lo c- 



Posts 
Pulpwood 



Pie< es 
1,337 Cords 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 154 







Table No. 5b 












COCHRANE 








Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March/31, 1949 J 


SPECIES 


CORDS 


pieces 


feet 


DUES 


BONUS 


TOTAL 


Pine Logs 





5,959 


419,401 


$ 1,048.50 


$ 2,677.52 


$ 3,726.02 


Pine Booms 





155 
532,987 


7,042 
7,231,163 


17.60 
11,720.39 


80.98 
41.454.30 


98.58 


J. Pine Logs 


53,174.69 


J. Pine Booms 





2,280 


131,970 


329.92 


880.98 


1,210.90 


Balsam Logs — 





10,663 


149,308 


298.60 


866.19 


1,164.79 


Birch Logs 





535 


19,105 


47.75 


52.55 


100.30 


Poplar Logs 





3,382 


74,263 


148.54 


236.95 


385.49 


Spruce Logs 





352,773 


6,592,951 


13,185.91 


38,627.30 


51,813.21 


Spruce Booms . — 





3,912 


385.402 


963.50 


2,237.42 


2,200.92 


Piling (cu. ft.) 





294,833 2,241,777.10 


49,498.82 





49,498.82 


Poles 





2,202 





680.00 


429.71 


1,109.71 


Posts 





896 





17.92 


54.27 


72.19 


Fuelwood (Hard) ... 


1,865.76 








932.87 


338.92 


1,271.79 


Fuelwood (Soft) ... 


6,261.84 








1,565.46 


3,473.99 


5,039.45 


Balsam Pulpwood 


14,807.42 








10,363.60 


4,260.46 


14,624.06 


J. Pine Pulpwood ... 


3,035.38 








1,214.15 


327.79 


1,541.94 


Poplar Pujpwood ... 


3,000.68 








1,200.27 


690.56 


1,890.83 


Spruce Pulpwood ... 


. 276,649.14 








387,265.17 


111,111.13 


498,376.30 


J. P. Pit Props 


5,590.59 


■ 





2,236.24 


5,951.36 


8,187.60 


J. Pine Pit Props 














Exported 


5,590.59 








— 


2,795.28 


2,795.28 


Balsam Exported ... 


585.83 











585.83 


585.83 


Poplar Exported .... 


889.37 











88.94 


88.94 


Spruce Exported 


8,123.15 






$482,735.21 


8,123.15 
$225,345.58 


8,123.15 
$708,080.79 






Cut U: 


vder Permit 






J. Pine 


.. 8: 


1,647 ft. B.M. 
1,018 ft. B.M. 


Pulpw 
Fuelwi 


ood 


] 


10,989 Cords 


Spruce 


30: 


sod 




6,687 Cords 


Poplar 


... 39.0( 


Poles 






370 Pieces 


Cedar 




225 ft. B.M. 


Posts 






4,789 Pieces 



Balsam 1,000 ft. B.M. 

Table No. 5c 
FORT FRANCES 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 



1949 



SPECIES 


CORDS 


PIECES 


FEET 


DUES 


BONUS 


TOTAL 


Pine Logs 





57,822 


3,234,505 
188,693 


$ 8,086.23 


$ 20,040.02 

1,413.39 

17,222.75 

1,029.14 


$ 28,126.25 
1,885.09 


Pine Booms 




835 


471.70 


J. Pine Logs 




406,855 


5,303,762 


10,341.11 


27,563.86 


J. Pine Booms 


. 


6,052 


228,285 


570.70 


1,599.84 


Balsam Logs „ 





1,931 


20,765 


41.53 


77.87 


119.40 


Poplar Logs 





22,720 


338,842 


677.69 


408.26 


1,085.95 


Spruce Logs 





40,084 


521,467 


1,042.93 


2,647.73 


3,690.66 


Spruce Booms 


— 


295 


32,917 


82.28 


150.69 


232.97 


Posts 


137.77 


1,397 





27.94 
68.88 


4.54 


32.48 


Fuelwood (Hard) 


68.88 


Fuelwood (Soft) 


31.55 








7.89 


11.04 


18.93 


Balsam Pulpwood ~_ 


340.06 








238.04 


33.82 


271.86 


J. Pine Pulpwood 


28,835.01 








11,534.01 


4,214.83 


15,748.84 


Poplar Pulpwood ... 


27,521.43 








11,008.57 


2,267.79 


13,276.36 


Spruce Pulpwood .._ 


23,315.81 








32,642.13 


7,428.61 


40,070.74 


J. Pine Exported ... 


18,793.55 











10,896.78 


10,896.78 


Poplar Exported 


5,896.81 


■ 




$ 76,841.63 


589.69 
$ 68,436.95 


589.69 

$145,278.58 



Page 155 



Division of Timber Management 



Cut Under Permit 



Pine _ 

J. Pine 

Balsam 

Poplar 

Spruce 

Cedar 



_. 43,108 ft. B.M. 

16,108 ft. B.M. 

8,452 ft. B.M. 

_ 121 938 ft. B.M. 

__ 42,551 ft. B.M. 
2,000 ft. B.M. 



Posts 4,805 Pieces 

Fuelwood 623 Cords 

J. Pine Pulp 104 Cords 

Spruce Pulp 1,695 Cords 

Poplar Pulp 1,330 Cords 

Balsam Pulp 57 Cords 



Table No. 5d 

GERALDTOX 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1949 



J. Pine Logs 

J. Pine Booms 

Balsam Logs 

Birch Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Posts 



Poles 

Poles (cu. ft.) ...... 

Ties (cu. ft.) 

Piling 

Fuelwood (Hard) 
Fuelwood (Soft) 
Balsam Pulpwood 
J. Pine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 
Spruce Pulpwood 
J. Pine Exported 



pieces 

107,480 

755 

6,916 

2,232 

21,602 

62,664 

5.716 

144 

58 

135,393 



FEET 

1,991,348 

47,588 

68,487 

25,973 

435,135 

1,007,495 

729.505 



753,778.15 
547.281.51 



126.18 

248.26 

116.50 

12,043.30 

150,884.48 

34,597.27 

157,817.24 

1,872.41 



DUES 

$ 2,987.02 

118.96 

136.97 

64.93 

870.27 

2,014.99 

1,823.76 

2.88 

18.00 

32,380.89 

16,418.44 

176.65 

124.12 

29.12 

8,430.30 

59,729.50 

13,838.91 

219,849.43 

$359,015.14 S 



bonus 

11,732.56 

285.53 

302.75 

25.71 

1,145.32 

5,561.56 

4,368.06 

4.32 



63.09 



4,653.16 

8,130.65 

816.22 

37,423.82 

936.20 

75.448.92 



TOTAL 

$ 14.719.58 

404.49 

439.72 

90.64 

2,015.59 

7.576.55 

6,191.82 

7.20 

18.00 

32,380.89 

16,418.44 

239.74 

124.12 

29.12 

13,083.46 

67,860.15 

14,655.13 

257,273.25 

936.20 

$434,464.06 



Mixed Logs 



Cut Under Permit 
94,903 ft. B.M. Fuelwood 



4.336 Cords 



Table No. 5e 
GOGAMA 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1040 



SPECIES 


CORDS 


PIECES 


feet 


DUES 


BONUS 


total 


Pine Logs 





36,048 


2,872,130 


$ 7,180.33 


$ 17,599.56 


S J4.799.89 


J. Pine Logs 





448,277 


8,684,573 


16,786.32 


37,151.47 


53,937.79 


J. Pine Booms 





3,480 


157,545 


393.85 


595.74 


989.59 


Spruce Logs 





101,489 


2,126,496 


4,252.99 


10,845.45 


15,098.44 


Spruce Booms 





2,006 


133,438 


333.59 


622.0S 


055.67 


Ties 





63,750 





6,142.59 


18.00 


6,160.59 


Rafters din. ft.) __ 





1,436 


19,008 


95.04 





95.04 


Poles (cu. ft.) 





4,193 


56,455.86 


2,230.11 





2,230.11 


Balsam Pulpwood 


429.85 








300.90 


276.19 


577.09 


J. Pine Pulpwood _ 


29,202.38 








11,680.95 


10,226.97 


2 1.007. 92 


Spruce Pulpwood 


27,613.06 








38,658.30 


17,022.5 7 


56.2SO.87 


Balsam Exported 


5.55 











5.55 


5.55 


Spruce Exported 


1,948.68 






$ 88,054.0 7 


1,948.68 
} 96,912.26 


1,948.68 
$184,967.23 






Cut Under Permit 








W Pine 




323 ft B M 


Pulpw 
Fuelwc 


jod 




352 Cords 


J.Pine 




3,827 ft. B.M. 


tod 




1,490 Cords 


Spruce 


16.065 ft. B.M. 











Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 156 



^X^ 



"T 



\ 'V 




Log dump, Mississagi. 



Page 157 



Division of Timber Management 



Table No. Sf 
KAPUSKASING 
Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1949 

species cords pieces feet dues bonus total 

J. Pine Logs _ _ 134,653 2,056,516 $ 3,084.77 $ 8,412.38 $ 11,497.15 

J. Pine Booms 104 5,243 13.11 18.35 31.46 

Balsam Logs _ _ 8,295 79,325 158.65 397.33 555.98 

Poplar Logs _ 18,000 422,803 845.60 566.84 1.412.44 

Spruce Logs 251.090 4,591,987 9.183.97 22,768.94 31,952.91 

Spruce Booms _ 1,841 209.476 523.69 1.117.32 1.641.01 

TamaracLogs 443 2,200 3.43 10.30 13.73 

Piling (cu. ft.) 99,061 1,463,179.13 33,568.29 33,568.29 

Fuelwood (Hard) _ 454.26 227.12 17.47 244.59 

Balsam Pulpwood __ 37,438.07 26,201.53 19,463.71 45,665.24 

J.PinePulpwood .... 1.051.70 420.68 420.68 

Poplar Pulpwood _ 1,008.02 403.20 352.81 756.01 

Spruce Pulpwood _ 411,963.99 576,753.77 132,308.33 709,062.10 

Balsam Exported .... 2,237.45 2,237.45 2,237.45 

J . Pine Exported _ 34.82 17.41 17.41 

Poplar Exported _ 1,008.02 100.81 100.81 

Spruce Exported ...... 199,541.86 199,541.86 199,541.86 

$651,387.81 $387,331.31 $1,038,719.12 



Spruce 
Poplar 
Pulpwood 



Cut Under Permit 



.1,450,788 ft. B.M. 

. 158,283 ft. B.M. 

31,713 ft. B.M. 



Fuelwood 
Posts 



5,432 ft. B.M. 
3,033 Pieces 



Table No. 5g 
KENORA 
Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1949 

species cords pieces feet dues bonus total 

Pine Logs _ 12,871 371,943 $ 929.85 $ 1,495.42 $ 2,425.27 

Pine Booms 612 132.841 332.09 512.89 844.98 

J. Pine Logs 42,523 974,761 1,551.85 4,158.19 5,710.04 

J. Pine Booms 86 6,115 15.28 16.73 32.01 

Balsam Logs 84 603 1.21 3.62 4.83 

Birch Logs 10 319 .80 3.03 3.83 

SpruceLogs __ ■ 10,368 267,344 534.60 1,652.35 2,187.04 

Spruce Booms _ 676 146,142 365.34 756.34 1.121.68 

Piling (cu. ft.) 60,604 254,488.10 7,538.88 7.538.88 

Ties 12,931 1,293.10 554.20 1,847.30 

Poles - — ■ 45 11.25 22.50 33.75 

Fuelwood (Hard) 77.14 38.57 2.16 40.73 

Fuelwood (Soft) .... 421.77 105.43 47.38 152.81 

Balsam Pulpwood _ 2,559.18 1,791.43 21.95 1,813.38 

J.PinePulpwood 61,855.86 — 24,742.36 11,397.59 36,139.95 

Poplar Pulpwood 6,734.12 2.603.64 667.18 3.360.82 

Spruce Pulpwood . 64,026.14 — 89,636.59 11,351.87 100,088.46 

J. Pine Exported .... 6,771.61 3,385.80 5,385.80 

Spruce Fxported _ 623.18 623.18 623.18 

S131.582.36 $ 36,672.38 $168,254.74 



Pine 
J. Pine 
Spruce 



Cut Under Permit 

... 87,000ft. B.M. Pulpwood 1,001 Cords 

218,000 ft. B.M. Fuelwood 5,089 Cords 

33,000 ft. B.M. Ties 1,000 Pieces 



Report oj the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 158 



Table No. 5h 
NORTH BAY 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1949 



CORDS 



Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

J. Pine Logs 

J. Pine Booms . 

Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs 

Basswood Logs .. 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms _ 

Poles 

Posts 

Piling (cu. ft.) 
Piling (lin. ft.) ... 
Fuelwood (Hard ) 
Fuelwood (Soft) 
J. PinePulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 
Spruce Pulpwood 



2,025.33 
169.00 
1,008.66 
2,330.11 
2,281.05 



PIECES 

905,788 

6,045 

15,578 

47 

6 

60 

9,929 

39,880 

612 

21,251 

357 

41,782 

553 

1,153 

1,908 



FEET 

59,172,084 

829,923 

203,090 

1,775 

134 

1,280 

699,433 

3,035,710 

13,453 

952,983 

10,453 

1,364,185 

83,960 



164,580.55 
160 



DUES 

$147,930.18 

2,074.78 

396.08 

4.44 

.33 

2.56 

1,748.58 

7,589.25 

20.17 

1,429.46 

20.90 

2,728.39 

209.87 

394.50 

38.16 

1,645.80 

1.60 

1,041.62 

42.25 

403.46 

932.04 

3,193.47 

SI 71,847.89 



BONUS 

$368,283.93 

9,402.78 

853.02 

11.54 



2,334.01 

4,606.37 

17.80 

159.36 

20.61 

4,352.59 

216.75 

213.85 

53.85 



604.34 

605.20 

900.22 

1,347.91 

$393,984.13 



TOTAL 

$516,214.11 

11,477.56 

1,249.10 

15.98 

.33 

2.56 

4,082.59 

12,195.62 

37.97 

1,588.82 

41.51 

7,080.98 

426.62 

608.35 

92.01 

1,645.80 

1.60 

1,645.96 

42.25 

1,008.66 

1,832.26 

4,541.38 

$565,832.02 



Cut Under Permit 



Pine ___ 652,000 ft. B.M. 

J. Pine ._ .....292,000 ft. B.M. 

Hemlock 54,000 ft. B.M. 

Spruce 567,000 ft. B.M. 



Birch ... ...253,000 ft. B.M. 

Fuelwood _ -- 8,951 Cords 

Pulpwood 8,139 Cords 

Ties 7,697 Pieces 



Table No. 5i 
PARRY SOUND 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1949 

species cords pieces feet dues bonus total 

Pine Logs 29,368 1,890,789 5 4,726.92 $ 4,966.18 $ 9,693.10 

Pine Booms 1,367 133,343 33i.3S 929.21 1,262.56 

Ash Logs 1,041 73,955 184.86 49.66 234.52 

Basswood Logs .. 7,753 340,092 850.20 326.73 1,176.93 

Beech Logs 1,037 56,558 141.39 .47 141.86 

Birch Logs 140,136 11,855,247 29,713.07 20,418.66 50,131.73 

Cedar Logs 436 5,605 8.41 8.41 

Cherry Logs 163 5,377 13.44 7.58 21.02 

Elm Logs — — 1,366 108,783 271.92 134.53 406.45 

Hemlock Logs . 220,593 10,029,832 15,044.73 5,192.35 20,237.08 

Hemlock Booms .. 201 26,715 66.78 8.60 75.38 

Maple Logs 45,621 2,917,606 7,293.95 4,258.56 11,552.51 

Oak Logs 555 34,355 85.88 23.92 109.80 

Spruce Logs 37,692 1,161,191 2,322.36 2,108.84 4,431.20 

Spruce Booms 525 35,925 89.80 74.79 164.59 

Poles 50 15.00 15.00 

Poles (cu. ft.) 32 701.92 34.39 34.39 

Fuelwood 2,776.80 1,388.40 44.95 1,433.35 

Spruce Pulpwood .... 43.41 60.77 66.70 127.47 

$ 62,645.62 $ 38,611.73 $101,257.35 



Page 159 



Division of Timber Management 



Cut Under Permit 

Pine 536,618 ft. B.M. Pulpwood 4,956 Cords 

Spruce 219,633 ft. B.M. Fuelwood 4,039 Cords 

Hemlock 1,494,460 ft. B.M. Poles 504 Pieces 

Hardwood 1,192,518 ft. B.M. Posts 2,501 Pieces 

Building Tbr. 77,885 lin. ft. 

Table No. 5j 

PORT ARTHUR 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1949 

species cords pieces feet dues bonus total 

Pine Logs _ 39,033 4,121,928 $ 10,279.79 $ 24,546.37 $ 34.826.16 

Pine Booms 1,099 200,791 501.97 946.51 1,448.48 

J. Pine Logs 578,293 9,974,578 19,321.33 41,227.15 60,548.48 

J. Pine Booms 3,347 170,319 425.78 794.99 1,220.77 

Balsam Logs 7,621 73,379 146.75 301.07 448.72 

Birch Logs 2,565 32,033 80.07 80.96 161.03 

Cedar Logs 599 3,461 5.19 10.65 15.84 

Poplar Logs 45,275 2,168,383 3,401.17 2,759.99 6,161.16 

Spruce Logs 201,213 6,034,406 12,068.80 25,277.02 37,345.82 

Spruce Booms 10,164 1,302,689 3,256.69 5,878.06 Q.134.75 

Tamarac Logs 37 173 .26 1.12 1.38 

Posts 25 2.50 2.50 

Ties 18.833 1,883.30 683.06 2,566.36 

Poles (cu. ft.) 33,738 438,487.03 17,637.12 17,637.12 

Piling (cu. ft.) 369 8,655.05 444.46 444.46 

Piling (lin. ft.) 200 8,000 160.00 160.00 

Lagging din. ft.) _ 7,813 106.656 266.64 266.64 

Fuelwood (Hard ) 485.16 242.58 72.77 315.35 

Fuelwood (Soft) _ 586.05 146.50 170.36 316.86 

Balsam Pulpwood ... 48,879.29 34,156.71 10.747.29 53,904.00 

J. Pine Pulpwood _ 56,494.28 22,597.81 5,297.76 27,895.57 

Poplar Pulpwood . 15,263.96 6,105.58 888.79 6.994.37 

Spruce Pulpwood .... 435,347.54 597,614.13 146,444.31 744,058.44 

Spruce Exported _ 40,355.45 58,929.72 58,929.72 

Balsam Exported .... 7,861.76 11.788.32 11.788.32 

J. Pine Exported 14.787.67 7,393.83 7.393.83 

Poplar Exported . 3,363.16 336.32 336.32 

$730,745.13 $353,577.32 $1,084,322.45 

Cut Under Permit 

W.Pine 166,489 ft. B.M. Poplar 63,162 ft. B.M. 

J.Pine 269,885 ft. B.M. Pulpwood 1.171 Cords 

Spruce ... 87,850 ft. B.M. Fuelwood 2,701 Cords 

Cedar 1,000 ft. B.M. Posts 1.410 Pieces 

Balsam 13,711 ft. B.M. Ties 1.247 Pieces 

Table No. 5 k 
QUINTE 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1049 

species cords pieces feet dues bonus total 

Pine Logs 186,339 5,933,633 $ 14.S34.03 $ 21,622.28 S 36,456.31 

Pine Booms 852 60,059 172.64 416.74 589.38 

Ash Logs 1,810 57.051 142.59 105.81 248.40 

Balsam Logs _ 20,943 228.420 456.86 508.00 064.05 

Basswood Logs 25,679 832.105 2,080.44 2,708.50 4,788.94 

Beech Logs .. 4,973 205,289 513.21 5 15.64 1.028.85 

Birch Logs 29,655 1.752,276 • -0.65 5,168.38 0.540.03 

Cedar Logs . 6,379 00,618 135.92 172.02 307.94 

Cherry Loir- 175 10,296 25.73 42.82 68.55 

Continued on Next l 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 160 



SPECIES 


CORDS 


PIECES 


FEET 


DUES 


BONUS 


total 


Elm Logs 


■ 


1,658 


125,406 


313.44 


195.86 


509.30 


Hemlock Logs 


■ 


121,875 


4,914,673 


7,371.98 


6,656.99 


14,028.97 


Hemlock Booms 





437 


50,112 


120.27 


8.77 


129.04 


Maple Logs 





37,731 


2,275,401 


5,688.23 


7,287.86 


12,976.09 


Oak Logs 





2,937 


116,335 


290.76 


318.13 


608.89 


Poplar Logs 





29,871 


771,306 


1,542.58 


1,104.98 


2,647.56 


Spruce Logs _ 


■ 


64,207 


1,487,828 


2,975.67 


2,600.95 


5,576.62 


Spruce Booms 





1,327 


127,339 


318.32 


246.48 


564.80 


Tamarac Logs 





545 


9,907 


11.86 


4.74 


16.60 


Poles 





13 





5.25 





5.25 


Posts 


1,306.67 


2,315 


— ■ — ■ 


46.30 
653.31 


14.76 
1Q3.09 


61.06 


Fuel wood (Hard) .... 


846.40 


Fuelwood (Soft) .... 


33.00 





■ 


8.25 





8.25 


Balsam Pulpwood .... 


489.27 








342.48 


122.75 


465.23 


Poplar Pulpwood .... 


2,190.30 








876.11 


433.88 


1,309.99 


Spruce Pulpwood .... 


1,004.11 








1,405.76 


74.04 


1,479.80 


Spruce Exported 


144.70 











144.70 


144.70 


Balsam Exported .... 


238.81 











238.81 


238.81 


Poplar Exported .... 


2,027.37 





■ 





202.73 


202.73 








$ 44,712.64 


$ 51,109.80 


$ 95,822.44 






Cut U: 


"•joer Permit 








Pine 


1,168,021 ft. B.M. 


Tamarac 






1,143 ft. B.M. 




216.302 ft. B.M. 


Ties 






300 Pieces 




12 


1,952 ft. B.M. 
9,184 ft. B.M. 
8,290 ft. B.M. 


Posts 






317 Pieces 


Poplar 


_ 5 


Poles 

Pulpwood 






40 Pieces 


Spruce 


10 


1,760 Cords 


Balsam 


3 


4,998 ft. B.M. 
6,391 ft. B.M. 


Fuelwood 






1,590 Cords 


Cedar 







Table No. 5l 

SAULT STE. MARIE 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1949 



species 

Pine Logs 

Pine Booms 

J. Pine Logs 

J. Pine Booms ... 

Ash Logs .. 

Balsam Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Elm Logs 

Hemlock Logs 

Hemlock Booms _ 
Maple Logs ... 

Oak Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Car Stakes 

Posts 

Poles 

Poles (cu. ft.) ...... 

Piling (cu. ft.) .... 

Piling (lin. ft.) .... 

Balsam Pulpwood 
J. Pine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 
Spruce Pulpwood 



CORDS 



PIECES 

403,084 

3,001 

177,365 

1,262 

86 

862 

23,777 

445 

69 

8,944 

40 

12,829 

1,607 

3,555 

33,685 

1,959 

4,775 

221 

26 

48 

85 



FEET 

25,980,718 

394,314 

4,278,753 

70,407 

7,248 

11,628 

2,350,069 

7,795 

10,033 

891,709 

13,125 

751,615 

150,303 

98,049 

934,055 

144,173 



902.03 

14,747.00 

3.081 



20,450.14 

3,488.32 

1,178.81 

145,264.28 



DUES 

$ 64,951.76 

985.76 

10,616.15 

176.00 

18.10 

23.26 

5,775.13 

11.69 

25.07 

1,337.56 

32.81 

1,878.98 

375.73 

196.10 

1,868.14 

360.42 

286.50 

4.42 

7.75 

42.66 

949.99 

61.62 

14,315.09 

1,395.32 

471.53 

203,370.00 

$309,537.54 



bonus 

$112,549.99 

2,316.91 

13,160.72 

277.88 

32.20 

48.54 

14,040.02 

16.19 

51.07 

3,991.99 

32.81 

2,836.21 

854.38 

392.20 

3,699.65 

607.85 

6.63 
7.10 



4,597.51 

1,383.07 

351.06 

36,132.66 

$197,386.64 



TOTAL 

$177,501.75 

3,302.67 

23,776.87 

453.88 

50.30 

71.80 

19,815.15 

27.88 

76.14 

5,329.55 

65.62 

4,715.19 

1,230.11 

588.30 

5,567.79 

968.27 

286.50 

11.05 

14.85 

42.66 

949.99 

61.62 

18,912.60 

2,778.39 

822.59 

239,502.66 

$506,924.18 



Page 161 



Division of Timber Management 



Cut Under Permit 



Pine 77,219 ft. B.M. 

J. Pine .. 85,123 ft. B.M. 

Spruce -- 37,534 ft. B.M. 

Hemlock ......224,222 ft. B.M. 

Poplar - 3,443 ft. B.M. 

Cedar 1,572 ft. B.M. 



Hardwood ...760,809 ft. B.M. 

Ties 1,004 Pieces 

Poles 60 Pieces 

Posts 226 Pieces 

Fuehvood 812 Cords 

Building Tbr. .. 18,294 lin. ft. 



Table No. 5m 
SIOUX LOOKOUT 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1949 



SPECIES 


CORDS 


PIECES 


FEET 


DUES 


BONUS 


TOTAL 


Pine Logs 





3,886 


202,835 


$ 507.09 


S 1,467.63 


S 1,974.72 


J. Pine Logs 





546,993 


8,440,862 


16,802.22 


40,903.0 7 


57.706.19 


J. Pine Booms 


■ 


283 


29,472 


73.68 


141.30 


215.04 


Balsam Logs 





719 


12,931 


25.86 


53.97 


79.83 


Birch Logs 





Hi 


4,173 


10.43 


4.17 


14.60 


Poplar Logs 


■ 


86 


2,422 


4.84 





4.84 


Spruce Logs 





124,081 


3,100,545 


6,201.09 


15,080.36 


22,181.45 


Spruce Booms ... 





1,933 


353,049 


882.60 


1,684.99 


2,567.59 


Ties 





92,254 





9,225.40 


3.637.82 


12,863.22 


Piling (lin. ft.) 








404,176 


1,347.24 





1,347.24 


Poles (cu. ft.) 





611 


13,450.72 


634.38 





634.38 


Fuehvood (Soft) . 


4,366.75 






1,091.60 





1,091.69 


Balsam Pulpwood . 


10.871.54 








7.610.22 


156.76 


7,766.98 


J. Pine Pulpwood 


29,089.02 








11,635.61 


7,858.40 


19,494.01 


Poplar Pulpwood 


79.97 








31.99 


8.00 


39.99 


Spruce Pulpwood 


175.109.98 








237,231.48 


8,388.01 


245,619.49 


Balsam Exported 


3,322.20 





■ 





3,322.20 


3,322.20 


Spruce Exported . 


... 66,037.85 


Cut U 


nder Permit 


$293,315.82 


66,037.85 
SI 4Q.645.49 


66,037.85 
$442,961.31 


J. Pine 


. .31; 


5,633 ft. B.M. 
?,037 ft. B.M. 
5.680 ft. B.M. 


Posts 
Poles 
Pulpw 






414 Pieces 


Spruce 


.. 27« 






340 Pieces 


Poplar 

Lagging _ 


4. 


ood . 




1,962 Cords 


293,590 lin. ft. 


Fuehvood 




11.302 Cords 



Table No. 5n 

SUDBURY 

Classification of Annum Timber Return Year Ending March 31, l°4u 



CORDS 



Pine Logs 
Pine Booms 
J. Pine Logs 
J. Pine Booms 
Ash Logs . 
Balsam Logs 
Basswood Logs 
Birch Logs 
Cedar Logs 
Hemlock Logs . 
Hemlock Bourn- 
Maple Logs 
Poplar Logs 
Spruce Logs 
Spruce Booms 



PIECES 


FEET 


DUES 


BONUS 


TOTAL 


115,034 


5,477.514 


$ 13,693.76 


s JS.Q04.67 


$42,! 


175 


17,932 


44.81 


47.10 


01.01 


165,461 


2,115,422 


4.624.63 


5.158.53 


9,783 l'' 


404 


26.775 


66.93 


96.29 


82. 0O 


248 


9,122 


22.80 


50. jo 


82.09 


50 


490 


.98 


3.18 


4.1o 


3,372 


103.360 


258.39 


847.15 


1,105.54 


6,255 


185,668 


464.16 


665 55 


1,129.51 


2,612 


21,2,22 


34.98 




127 17 


9,233 


380,522 


570.70 


1,411.56 




26 


3,886 


9.71 


8.52 


is 23 


34 


1,729 


4.32 





4.32 


6,322 


92,730 


185.46 


175.oo 


161 15 


29,033 


524,876 


1,049.74 


109.06 


3,21 3 3i 


556 


22,597 


56.48 


87.81 
Continued <>>• 


144.20 
Next Page. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 162 



SPECIES 


CORDS 


PIECES 


Car Stakes 





810 


Posts 





3,267 


Poles 





230 


Poles (cu. ft.) 





81 


Piling 





32,364 


Lagging 





20,296 


Fuel wood (Hard) __ 


675.15 





Fuelwood (Soft) .— 


623.50 





Balsam Pulpwood .... 


39.41 





J. Pine Pulpwood .... 


31,947.76 





Poplar Pulpwood .... 


9,596.79 





Spruce Pulpwood .... 


7,539.25 


■ 


Poplar Exported __ 


6.834.58 





Spruce Exported __ 


1.418.10 






1,285.98 



DUES 


BONUS 


TOTAL 


24.30 





24.30 


65.34 


42.62 


107.96 


70.75 





70.75 


49.86 





49.86 


2,402.33 





2,402.33 


703.80 





703.80 


337.57 


77.00 


414.57 


155.87 


51.60 


207.47 


27.58 


19.26 


46.84 


12,779.11 


67.79 


12,846.90 


3,838.42 


294.41 


4,132.83 


10,554.96 


322.23 


10,877.19 





683.46 


683.46 





1,653.94 


1,653.94 


52,097.83 


$ 42,939.00 


$ 95,036.83 



Cti Cnder Permit 



Pine .. 5,470,495 ft. B.M. 

J. Pine ... 1,814,804 ft. B.M. 

Spruce „ - 486,450 ft. B.M. 

Hemlock .. 383,628 ft. B.M. 

Hardwood _ 260,265 ft. B.M. 

Poplar 02.879 ft. B.M. 



Cedar 23,230 ft. B.M. 



Pulpwood . 
Fuelwood . 

Poles 

Car Stakes 
Posts 



50,214 Cords 

640 Cords 

311 Pieces 

921 Pieces 

2.960 Pieces 



Table No. 5o 

SWASTIKA 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 1949 



cords 



Pine Logs 

J. Pine Logs 

J. Pine Booms .. 

Balsam Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms 

Tamarac Logs 

Ties 

Poles 

Posts 

Fuelwood (Hard) 
Fuelwood (Soft) 
Balsam Pulpwood 
J. Pine Pulpwood 
Poplar Pulpwood 
Spruce Pulpwood 
J. Pine Pit Props 
J. Pine Props 

Exported 

Poplar Exported 
Spruce Exported 



pieces 

46,485 

927,679 

573 

732 

261 

90 

44,608 

140,874 

244 

516 

1,086 

337 

912 



FEET 

3.205,139 

9,987,493 

24.177 

7,727 

4,163 

866 

951,243 

1,872,221 

21,054 

6,630 



663.10 

4,090.68 

373.65 

9,853.18 

14.760.56 

43.792.38 

6,305.92 

6,395.92 

9,736.60 

20.13 



DUES 

8,012.84 

15,765.66 

60.44 

15.45 

10.40 

1.30 

1,902.50 

3,744.45 

52.63 

9.05 

108.60 

109.00 

18.24 

331.54 

1,022.66 

261.55 

3,941.26 

5,907.81 

61,307.15 

2,558.37 



$105,141.80 



BONUS 

$ 18,200.02 

66,397.07 

195.47 

62.97 

50.60 

2.60 

2,445.13 

13,461.12 

130.54 

41.90 

54.30 

130.75 

102.72 

109.69 

94.36 

165.19 

2,672.48 

5,410.61 

18,374.11 

4,093.74 

3,197.93 

973.65 

20.13 

$136,387.17 



TOTAL 

$ 26,212.86 

82,162.73 

255.91 

78.42 

61.00 

3.90 

4,347.63 

17,205.57 

183.17 

51.94 

162.90 

239.75 

120.96 

441.23 

1,117.02 

426.74 

6,653.74 

11,318.42 

79,641.26 

6,652.11 

3,197.93 

973.65 

20.13 

$241,528.97 



Cut Under Permit 

Mixed Logs .. 1,502,890 ft. B.M. Poles . 

Pulpwood 14,360 Cords Posts . 

Fuelwood 11,148 Cords Ties _. 



2,330 Pieces 
4,570 Pieces 
9,531 Pieces 



Page 163 



Division of Timber Management 





Emerald Lake, Aft on Township. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 164 



Table No. 5p 

TRENT 

Classification of Annual Timber Return Year Ending March 31, 



1949 



Pine Logs — 

Pine Booms 

Ash Logs 

Balsam Logs 

Basswood Logs ... 

Beech Logs 

Birch Logs 

Cedar Logs 

Cedar Booms __. 

F21m Logs 

Hemlock Logs ... 
Hemlock Booms 

Maple Logs 

Oak Logs ... 

Poplar Logs 

Spruce Logs 

Spruce Booms — 
Tamarac Logs - 

Poles 

Posts 

Fuelwood (Hard) 



Pine 

Hemlock . 
Balsam ... 

Spruce 

Hardwood 
Poplar ..... 



296.75 



PIECES 


FEET 


DUES 


BONUS 


TOTAL 


27,670 


1,115,599 $ 


2,788.98 


$ 703.17 


$ 3,492,15 


273 


28,903 


72.25 


22.73 


94.98 


326 


12,311 


30.77 


34.19 


64.96 


35 


639 


1.28 


3.51 


4.79 


9,020 


265,501 


663.74 


703.73 


1,367.47 


1,263 


91,144 


227.85 


7.47 


235.32 


6,134 


454,299 


1,135.73 


824.68 


1,960.41 


3,656 


34,022 


51.03 


23.20 


74.23 


116 


13,396 


33.48 


23.29 


56.77 


841 


37,610 


94.01 


133.85 


227.86 


75,806 


2,969,457 


4,454.18 


2,705.70 


7,159.88 


114 


8,797 


21.99 


.17 


22.16 


19,300 


1,338,740 


3,346.84 


3,922.70 


7,269.54 


1,013 


39,281 


98.19 


101.83 


200.02 


1,892 


48,798 


97.60 


49.36 


146.96 


16,429 


341,972 


683.94 


119.82 


803.76 


144 


17.0S4 


42.69 


31.44 


74.13 


744 


9,087 


13.63 





13.63 


2 





1.00 





1.00 


2,886 





57.72 





57.72 


75 





148.37 


26.25 


174.62 




$ 


14,065.27 


$ 9,437.09 


$ 23,502.36 


Cut Under Permit 








300,431 ft. B.M. 


Cedar 






1,380 ft. B.M. 


194,703 ft. B.M. 


Fuelwood 
Pulpwood 






155 Cords 


15,159 ft. B.M. 






479 Cords 


166,291 ft. B.M. 


Ties 






23 Pieces 


257,118 ft. B.M. 
. 57,976 ft. B.M. 


Posts 






209 Pieces 











Page 165 



Division of Timber Management 



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Page 167 



Division of Timber Management 




White pine logs bein^ dumped into hoi ponds in h-ont o) mill on Flame Lake. 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 



Page 168 







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< H ^ 



w a o 

H J io 

< o o- 

Q 9)h 



s|s 



U ft 



b 



E* e- 

3 £ * 



Report of the Department of Lands and Forests for fiscal year ending March 31, 1950 Page 172