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Full text of "Report of Minnesota Commission of Public Safety"




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DEHX. OF BOOMOMICS 
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Report of 

Minnesota Commission 

of 
Public Safety 











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This copy of the Report of the Minnesota 
Commission of Pubhc Safety is presented to 



by direction of the Commission. 

H. W. LIBBY, 

Secretary 






• • • • "• ; • • " 



Minnesota Commission of Public Safety 



J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor, Ex-Officio Chairman 

C. H. MARCH, 
Vice-Chairman 

CLIFFORD L. HILTON, 

Attorney General, Ex-Officio 



HENRY W. LIBBY, 

Secretary 

JOHN F. McGEE 

A. C. WEISS 

THOS. E. CASHMAN 



Ambrose Tighe, Special Counsel 



Mrs. T. G. Winter, Minneapolis, 
Director Women's Auxiliary 



OFFICE STAFF 

Henry W. Libby, Secretary 

M. M. Booth, Assistant Secretary C. W. Henke, Publicity Director 

N. A. Grevstad, 
S. W. Frazier, Organization Agent Publicity Scandinavian Press 

P. A. Ragatz, Marketing Agent 



Miss Ione Rodgers, Stenographer 

Miss Marie Walsh, Stenographer 

Mrs. Georgiana Rossland, 
Stenographer 



Miss Marguerite Walsh, 
Stenographer 

Miss Rose Rodgers, File Clerk 

Miss Helen Semper, Mailing Clerk 



Miss Beatrice Billing, 

Publicity Clerk 



417204 



LOUIS f. OOW CO . ST. PAUL 



Report of 

Minnesota Commission of Public 

Safety 



To J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor of Minnesota 
Sir; 

The act (Chap. 261, Laws 1917) under which the Minnesota Com- 
mission of Public Safety was created provides that, upon the conclu- 
sion of peace, it shall, among other things, make a report to the governor 
of its acts and expenditiires. Although peace has not been concluded, 
the principal part of the Commission's work is done, and it is deemed 
expedient to submit at this time a report containing an outline of its 
more important activities. The period generally covered is from 
April 23, 1917, to December 31, 1918. A supplementary report will 
be rendered when the Commission shall have closed up all of its affairs. 



THE SAFETY COMMISSION ACT 

The 1917 legislature created the Commission that Minnesota might 
have, during the period of the war, a governing body capable of effi- 
ciently mobilizing its resources in men and property, and applying them 
to the war's successful prosecution. A number of specific duties were 
enumerated in the act, some of which will be hereinafter referred to; 
and the general power conferred 

*'to do all acts and things non-inconsistent with the consti- 
tution or laws of Minnesota or of the United States which, 
in the event of war existing between the United States and 
any foreign nation, are necessary or proper for the public 
safety and for the protection of life and public property, or 
private property requiring protection; and *** all acts and 
things necessary or proper so that the military, civil and in- 
dustrial resources of the state may be most efficiently applied 
toward maintenance of the defense of the state and nation, 
and toward the successftd prosecution of such war." 

The law was approved April 23, 1917, two weeks after the declaration 
of war. No state had a similar law at the time, although Connecticut 



i^d'aireakiy-'gi^^' life'' Governor extraordinary powers and the right 
to make unlimited expenditures. On April 29, 1917, California by 
statute provided for a state council of defense, and within a month 
or more afterwards other states adopted similar legislation, but the 
prescribed duties of most of these bodies were mainly of an advisory 
and investigating nature. On May 15, 1917, Pennsylvania, by statute, 
provided for a Commission of Public Safety and Defense which 

"shall take all necessary means to prepare for the defense 
of the Commonwealth, and to provide for the safety of its 
people and the protection of their property, and shall aid the 
government of the United States in protecting and defending 
said Government and the people thereof and their property." 

The powers thus defined were as broad as those of the Minnesota 
Commission's, and the Pennsylvania act appropriated $2,000,000 for 
its Commission's use. In many of the states voluntary coimcils of 
defense had been or were afterwards organized without legal authority, 
and were supported by popular subscription, and several states, like 
North and South Dakota and Montana, later adopted measures framed 
largely on the Minnesota model. But with the exception afforded by 
Pennsylvania, Minnesota was not only the pioneer, but the early 
pioneer in this class of legislation. 

Some of the appropriations made available for war purposes in 
other states were as follows: 

New York $1,000,000.00. 

Pennsylvania 2,000,000.00. 

Michigan 5,000,000.00. 

New Mexico 750,000.00. 

Connecticut: Full power to governor to use all necessary funds. 

Maine: Same as in Connecticut. 

Massachusetts : All that is necessary out of a specified fund, which 

does not exceed $1,000,000. 
New Jersey : Whatever may be necessary. 
Wisconsin: Whatever may be necessary. 

The expenditures in some of the above states, as far as they have 
been ascertained to date, have been as follows: 

Michigan $2,800,000.00. 

Pennsylvania 1,750,000.00. 

New York 860,658.00. 

Massachusetts 700,000.00. 

Connecticut 329,344.00. 

8 



The MINNESOTA act appropriated $1,000,000.00 for the purpose 
of carrying out its provisions. Its section 5 required the Commission 
to pay out of this fund fifty cents a day to each Minnesota enlisted man 
for each day of service on the Mexican border in 1916.' There was 
expended in this way $488,337.78 and left available for the Commission's 
other purposes, $511,662.22. 

Out of this the Commission actually expended up to January 1, 
1919, $259, 643.99 and had on hand in its fund, $252,018.23. 

The details of the expenditures are given in a condensed report of 
the Public Examiner which appears as a supplement hereto. (See 
Appendix.) 

MEMBERSHIP AND ORGANIZATION 

Under the law the Commission consists of seven members, five of 
whom are to be appointed by the Governor with the advice and con- 
sent of the Senate. The Governor and the Attorney General are 
members ex officio, the Governor acting as ex officio Chairman. The 
following were appointed as members by the Governor: C. H. 
March, C. W. Ames, John Lind, John F. McGee, A. C. Weiss. 

On April 23rd, 1917, the Commission held its first meeting, and the 
Governor made the following assignments : Mr. March, who had been 
elected Vice-Chairman, was assigned to the Committee on Agriculture; 
Mr. McGee, Military Affairs; Mr. Ames, Civic Co-Operation; Mr. 
Lind, Labor; Mr. Weiss, Publicity. John S. Pardee was elected 
Secretary. In June, 1917, the Commission made a request imder 
the statute (§105 G. S. 1913) for a special attorney, and the Attorney 
General employed Ambrose Tighe. 

On September 8th, 1917, Mr. Pardee resigned and was succeeded by 
H. W. Libby. Subsequently Commissioners Ames and Lind were 
succeeded, respectively, by H. W. Libby and Thomas E. Cashman. 

The Office Staff is made up as follows: H. W. Libby, Secretary; 
M. M. Booth, Assistant Secretary; C. W. Henke, Publicity Agent, 
N. A. Grevstad, Publicity Agent for the Foreign Press; S. W. Frasier, 
Organization Agent; P. A. Ragatz, Marketing Agent. 

Mrs. T. G. Winter was appointed to take charge of the work of 
organizing the women of the state for war purposes. 

Offices were established at the State Capitol. As a rule the Com- 
mission has held a meeting every week, besides special meetings. In 
all it has met more than one hundred days for transaction of business. 

The Commissioners serve without pay. 



LOCAL AND SPECIAL ORGANIZATION. 

The work of organizing the counties was taken up immediately, 
and within a month every county in the state had its local Safety 
Commission working under the direction of and in close co-operation 
with the central body in St. Paul. The County Commissions are 
manned by a Director and a Secretary, the Director named by the 
State Commission, and, as a rule, by a Chairman for each township of 
the cotmty, named by the county director. 

On June 13th, 1917, the Cotinty Directors, responding to the call 
of the Commission, assembled at the State Capitol to exchange in- 
formation and receive instructions. It was a large and inspiring 
gathering, resulting in a better understanding of the work ahead and 
how best to do it. Intelligent co-operation between the central and the 
local bodies was planned and established, and the whole defense or- 
ganization of the state was knit together in imion and harmony for 
the great common purpose. 



MINNESOTA A PIVOTAL STATE 

Every state in the union is, of course, of value in its contribution 
to the national wealth. Minnesota stands high among them in its 
peace time contributions to the volume of commodities in the pro- 
duction of which other states share. 

Taking some of the essential food stuffs by way of illustration, 
Minnesota, in a normal year, makes in round ntmibers one-seventh 
of all the butter made in the United States, it raises one-fifth of the 
nation's barley, one-tenth of its wheat, one-tenth of its com, and one- 
tenth of its oats. Its mills make one-fifth of the white flour groimd 
in the United States. Its own people consimie but a small fraction 
of its output, and it ranks high in importance among the states as a 
source of supply, if products of this character only are considered. 

But two states have peculiar resources which are absolutely essential 
to the country's industrial life under any conditions and the inter- 
ruption in the production of which in war times would paralyze the 
nation's arms. One of these is Pennsylvania with its exclusive pos- 
session of extensive beds of anthracite coal, and the other is our own 
state. 

The iron mines of the Lake Superior District, most of which are in 
Minnesota, yield eighty-four per cent of all the iron ore produced 
in the United States. Taking no account of Russia's uncertain pro- 
ducts either before or following her collapse, after the occupation 
of Belgium and northern France by Germany, the total iron ore supply 

10 



of the entente powers was only 23 million tons per annum, as against 
the central powers' 48 million tons. Minnesota's annual 45 million 
tons were a controlling factor in such a situation. 

It is a noteworthy fact that with instinctive recognition of their 
importance as the sole source of these indispensable commodities the 
legislatures of Minnesota and Pennsylvania should have been the first 
in 1917 to provide strong and efficient governmental instrumentalities. 



THEORY OF THE LAW 

As one of the country's largest granaries and dairies and the main 
source of indispensable iron ore, Minnesota held a paramount position 
among the states when war came. If we were to win, the maximum 
production of her staples must be in every way stimulated. Govern- 
ment plays only a minor role in production in times of peace. Stated 
broadly it preserves order and leaves the rest to individual or to volun- 
tary concerted enterprise. The hope of profit is then the chief incentive 
to effort. If the best results are not realized because workers are idle, 
dissolute or inefficient, or because the wheels of industry are clogged 
by class quarrels or the application of false social doctrines, those 
who cause the troubles are usually those who suffer from them ; time 
can be coimted on to bring the cure, and the state as a whole is only 
indirectly affected. But when the country's life is at stake, the situa- 
tion is different. The operation of the industrial machine ceases 
then to be a private and becomes a public matter. If our soldiers 
need food and munitions, the man who will not help to their supplying 
according to his ability, or who, by his conduct, interferes with others 
producing, is as much an enemy of the country as those in arms against 
it. As a war power and for purposes of self-preservation, the govern- 
ment can stimulate general production both by any course positively 
effective to that end, and by suppressing the things which are calcu- 
lated to retard it, and in so doing, it is exercising as legitimate and 
constitutional a ftmction and a function of the same sort as that which 
it exercises in maintaining and operating armies. It goes without 
saying that a state which has the right to use its strength to crush 
its foreign enemies can also protect itself against those at home whose 
behavior tends to weaken its war capacity. 

But while all this might be admitted, the creation of a body like 
the Commission to do this sort of work, seemed to many people ex- 
tremely novel and unusual, and the hostility which some of its activ- 
ities excited is a matter of common knowledge. It is true that there 
was no similar legislation in Civil War times. The method of hand- 
ling seditious talk and action and of furthering war activities then 



adopted was not the employment of civil agencies, but was recotirse 
to the strong arm of the military commander. But in revolutionary 
times, there was a council of safety appointed July 2, 1777, in Vermont, 
and in the public interest it effectively discharged functions very similar 
to those exercised by the Minnesota Commission. *The idea is, there- 
fore, not without American precedent, and the law itself and what 
has been done under it, as a proper exercise of legislative power, have 
been sustained by every court before which any of its phases, or any 
of the Commission's procedure, have been put in issue. 

♦Vide Circular by C. D. Greenfield, Secretary Montana Council of Defense 



(A.) THE COMMISSION'S CREATIVE ACTIVITIES 

As a governmental instrumentality, acting otherwise than in co- 
operation with popular organizations, the Commission exercised func- 
tions of two entirely separate sorts. Under one, it undertook creative 
work designed to stimulate industrial life, to concentrate business 
attention on the production of essential commodities, to further the 
physical and mental welfare of our soldiers and sailors, to rouse the 
spirit of loyalty by holding public meetings and by the dissemination 
of literattire, and to weld the people of the state into a coherent whole 
appreciative of the solemn import of the nation's war purposes and 
keen for their actualization. It follows that the business of the 
Commission has had a scope as wide as the state itself, and has in- 
cluded a great variety of important questions. As a matter of fact, 
the work of the Commission has affected, directly or indirectly, all the 
activities of the people of the state, because the great business of the 
war has been the common task of all the people — a task of lofty and 
aggressive patriotism, devoted loyalty, strenuous endeavor, self de- 
nial and sacrifice. The Commission's work under this head is re- 
corded in brief in the following: 

INITIAL MEASURES OF SAFETY. 

The first imperative task confronting the Commission was to main- 
tain public peace and order, to protect the moral and bodily health 
of our soldiers and our people in general, to check or suppress all efforts 
interfering with the mobilization of the man power of the state or 
hampering full and free co-operation with the national government. 

This was done at once by establishing a dry zone around the Fort 
Snelling military reservation and closing the saloons in the Bridge 
Square District of Minneapolis, which were dangerous hotbeds of 
crime and sedition; by the organization of a Home Guard, to which 

12 



a Motor Corps Division was subsequently added, and by providing 
for the appointment of peace officers. 

THE HOME GUARD AND MOTOR CORPS. 

The Commission's Order No. 3, dated April 28th, 1917, provides for 
the organization of a Home Guard to be known as the "Home Guard 
of Minnesota," for service in the state and to consist of such units 
as may be authorized by the Commission. This force has gradually 
grown to a ntimber of 8,373 officers and men, organized into twenty- 
one batallions. A further development of the Home Guard is the 
Motor Corps Division, which has attained a strength of 143 officers 
and 2,440 men, organized as a brigade of ten battalions. 

The moral effect of the existence of this peace force has been marked 
from the day of its organization. It has been an efficient means for 
preserving public peace during threatening strike disturbances, and 
in the distressing calamities of last year it rendered most signal ser- 
vices of rescue and relief. 

PEACE OFFICERS. 

For the protection of life and property and as a matter of military 
expediency and necessity, provisions were made by Order No. 4 for the 
appointment of peace officers, invested with all the powers possessed 
by constables. Some six hundred such officers have been appointed 
and have rendered very useful service in guarding property in a period 
of unrest and danger. The fact that such a force was available and 
that it might be increased to any strength shown to be necessary has 
in itself had a deterrent effect upon evil-minded persons plotting 
crime or destruction of property. 

FOOD PRODUCTION AND CONSERVATION. 

On April 28th, 1917, only a few days after the Safety Commission 
had been organized, the Governor acting as Chief Executive and Ex- 
Officio Chairman of the Commission, issued a Food Proclamation 
emphasizing the great shortage of food prevailing and stating that, 
in order that maximimi production might be attained in this state, 
no effort would be spared to furnish the farmers all needful labor for 
producing and harvesting the crops, and that, as a guaranty against 
an eventual fall in prices, measures would be taken to insure a remunera- 
tive return from the crops and other agricultural produce. A Com- 
mittee on Food Production and Conservation, made up of 36 capable 
and experienced men and women had already been appointed by the 
Governor to study the food question and co-operate with the Safety 

IS 



Commission to be created. The work of the committee was divided 
among eight sub-committees or divisions, including divisions on labor, 
markets, live stock, crops, and home economics. 

All problems relating to the production of crops or agricultural 
produce of any kind were studied by this committee and everything 
done to enHghten the farmers and others on what should be done to 
produce large crops. A special committee headed by a member of 
the Safety Commission was appointed to secure facts as to costs and 
methods of retail distribution of food, fuel and other necessaries of 
life, for the purpose of shortening and cheapening the road between 
producer and consumer for the mutual benefit of both. 

A Labor Bureau was established in Minneapolis early in the siunmer 
of 1917 to supply labor where needed and work for idle hands seeking 
employment; and the farmers of the state were advised to apply to 
this bureau for help of which they might be in need. That the Labor 
Bureau has been an important factor in enabling the farmers to in- 
crease their production in 1917 and still more in 1918 will appear 
from the fact that it furnished farm hands to the number of 2,717 
in 1917 and 6,187 in 1918. 

The Marketing Department of the Safety Commission has accom- 
pHshed much in saving surplus crops by obtaining needed means of 
transportation, securing new or better access to markets, by aiding 
in meeting shortages of hay, oats and other produce in certain districts 
of the state from stuplus stores in other districts, and in many other 
ways. It was due in a large measure to the energetic and practical 
efforts of this department that a substantial part of the bountiful 
crop of potatoes in 1917 was saved. A public potato market estab- 
lished in the Midway District in the early part of 1918 had the effect 
of steadying prices in the Twin Cities for the benefit of sellers as well 
as buyers. On the whole it is to be said that the Marketing Depart- 
ment has been of great aid to the farmers of the state by securing 
to them improved market facilities and better prices. A letter re- 
ceived on December 29th, 1918, from R. S. Doherty, a grower at Harris, 
Minnesota, may be cited as an instance of the value of its assistance. 
He writes that he desires to ship all of his potatoes through the de- 
partment this season because it netted him about $400.00 more last 
season than he was able to secure by disposing of his crop in other ways. 

A Square Deal for the Farmer as to prices and grading of his grain 
has been insisted upon by the Commission as a matter of simple justice 
and as a necessary condition of maximum production of wheat, and 

14 



it has spared no effort to attain this end. On August 22nd, 1917, 
the Chairman of the Commission, Governor Bumquist, wired James 
A. Garfield requesting that no prices on grain be fixed until representa- 
tives from this state had been given an opportunity to be heard, in 
order that no injustice be done to the farmers of Minnesota and the 
Northwest. At the suggestion and request of Governor Bumquist, 
representatives from South Dakota, North Dakota and Montana met 
at the Capitol of Minnesota for the purpose of planning joint action at 
Washington for the protection of the interests of the farmers of these 
four states. 

This was the beginning of a sustained and vigorous campaign to 
secure fair prices and a juster system of wheat grading. In this work 
the Safety Commission has been represented by two of its members, 
who have had the support of representatives of the State Railroad 
and Warehouse Commission. In the course of the past two years 
these spokesmen for our grain growers have made many trips to Wash- 
ington, where they have made an aggressive fight to secure justice 
for the farmers, in co-operation with delegates from the other north- 
western states and supported by the congressional delegations from the 
Northwest. The price level finally agreed upon was regarded as 
acceptable, as is evidenced by the substantial increase of the wheat 
acreage of the state for 1918. 

The insistent demand of the farmers for a radical reform of the 
tmjust federal system of wheat grading was energetically pressed and 
supported by the Commission. Though the Safety Commission did 
not secure all it contended for in the matter of just prices and fair 
grading of wheat, there can be no doubt that its efforts helped materi- 
ally in obtaining such concessions as were made to our farmers and 
which have meant much to them and still more to the coimtry and the 
government. 

An Effective Campaign for the eradication of the common barberry 
bush, which harbors the destructive black stem rust of wheat and other 
cereals and grasses, was inaugurated by Order No. 28, issued on March 
19th, 1918. This measure received general support among the farmers. 
and other residents of the state and was very successful, about 650,000 
of the harmful bushes being destroyed. It is a matter of commorh 
knowledge that a serious failure of the spring wheat crop the past 
year would have been nothing short of a calamity for the nations at 
war with the central powers. Fortunately the yield was above normal, 
and it is but fair to assume, in the light of what is definitely known 
concerning the propagation of the black stem rust, that the absence 
of this destructive pest in 1918 was due, at least in part, to the measure 

16 



of precaution taken by the Safety Commission in co-operation with the 
Department of Agriculture of the United States. 

The Farm Labor and Crop Census approved by the Commission by 
Order No. 27, of March 12th, 1918, deserves attention as a measure of 
great general benefit to the farming commimity and the state at large. 
A vast amount of useful information relating to the supply and needs 
of farm labor in the various localities of the state with accurate data 
on live stock and the areas planted to the different crops has been 
gathered by the state auditor's office at comparatively slight expense. 
It is suggested that provisions be made for taking a similar census 
every year as a means of supplying a deficiency in the agricultural 
statistics of the state. 

Fish as Food Supply. — ^As a means of reducing the high cost of living 
to the people and of saving meats needed to sustain our armies and 
Allies the Safety Commission has taken measures to encourage a more 
general use of fish instead of meat and to increase the fish supply 
available for the market. By a resolution adopted June 26th, 1917, 
the Board of Control was granted permission to take fish, upon certain 
conditions, by its own agents, in waters of the state for consumption 
in the state institutions. 

Of greater importance is the fishing done for state accotmt by the 
Game and Fish Commissioner under authority granted by the Safety 
Commission. The Commission felt that in the existing emergency the 
vast stores of wholesome food contained in the waters of the state 
ought to be made available to the people at low prices, and instructed 
the Game and Fish Commissioner to carry out the suggestion as a war 
measure, and advanced $1,000.00 to defray the initial expenses. 

The experiment has been successful beyond the most sanguine 
expectations. From a small beginning the undertaking has developed 
until it has become an important source of cheap and nourishing food 
for the people. Since October 15th, 1917, till the end of last year 
1,630,366 pounds of fish had been caught and sold for consumption at 
a total cost to the consumers of $132,278.96. The state dealers are 
allowed a margin of three cents per pound and no more, and the retail 
cost to the consvmiers has been about 50% of the current market prices 
for the various kinds of fish; in other words, the experiment had saved 
to the people $132,000.00, in round figures. The fishing has been 
confined to Red Lake and a couple of other lakes so as not to interfere 
with the licensed fishermen. The money advanced by the Safety 
Commission has been repaid, and the profits earned even at the low 
selling cost of the catch has made it possible to increase the equipment 
from time to time and yet leave a net profit of approximately $35,000.00 

16 



in equipment and cash. 182 markets in the state, besides two outside 
markets, have been regularly supplied with "state fish," and applica- 
tions for the establishment of new markets which are coming in from 
time to time, testify to the growing popularity of this new source of 
food. 

It is to be noted that this meritorious undertaking would have been 
unlawful and hence impossible except as a war measure authorized 
by the Safety Commission. 

THE PRODUCTION OF IRON ORE. 

The well known firm attitude of the Safety Commission and the 
timely organization of a reliable and efficient Home Guard have been 
instnmiental in maintaining peace on the Range and preventing dis- 
turbances planned or desired by disloyal organizations or individuals 
for the purpose of hampering the operation of the mines and curtailing 
the output. The Commission has likewise devoted a great deal of 
time and attention to the adjustment of disputes between employers 
and employes in the mining district which were not due to disloyal 
plottings but to differences that are apt to arise between capital and 
labor, especially in periods of unstable prices. If they had not been 
prevented or settled in their incipiency, some of these disputes, relating 
to wages or other working conditions, would have interferred seriously 
with operations and production. All difficulties of this kind were 
obviated by the meditating and conciliating efforts of the Commission. 
In this connection it is but just to state that great credit is due to the 
patriotism and fairness of the mine managers as well as to the loyalty 
and good sense displayed by the mine workers when protected against 
the pernicious influence of disloyal agitators. 

As a result of these combined efforts the production of iron ore 
was not only carried on without interruption but was even increased 
while the United States was actively in the war. In 19 16 the output was 
44,585,423 tons. In 1917 it reached a total of 45,398,787 tons, exceed- 
ing that of the preceding year by 813,365 tons. The figures for 1918 
are not known definitely at the date of this report's preparation. 

LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL PEACE. 

The aim of the labor policy of the Commission has been to enlist the 
full working power of the state for war work as directed by the Govern- 
ment, to bring about harmonious relations between labor and capital 
and to secure full and even handed justice to our work-people. To 
this end it has adopted measures to insure industrial peace during 
the war, and has used its good offices for adjusting differences be- 
tween employers and employes on terms just and equitable to both 

17 



parties; and by its Work Order of June 4th, 1918, it added thousands 
of workers to the ranks of active toilers and put an end to the gross 
injustice done by loafers and other shirkers trying to live by idleness, 
and thereby loading their duty to work upon the shoulders of the 
patriotic work-people. 

By his proclamation of March 30, 1918, the Governor instructed 
the members of the State Board of Arbitration to confer with repre- 
sentatives of employers and employes for the purpose of adjusting all 
industrial disputes and thereby prevent strikes or lock-outs during 
the war. A spirit of conciliation and mutual concession prevailed at 
these conferences, and an agreement was reached, providing that differ- 
ences concerning wages or hours should be referred to the State Board 
of Arbitration for adjudication. The agreement was confirmed and 
given the force of an emergency law by the Commission's Order of 
April 13, 1918. Approximately 40 disputes have been settled by 
the State Board under the arrangement thus effected. 

THE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE. 

The Public Employment Office estabHshed by the Safety Commission 
in Minneapolis was in operation from June 1st, 1917, to November 
1st, 1918, when it was discontinued by being merged into the United 
States Employment Service. It has done creditable and useful work 
in manning the industries of the state and connect idle hands with 
vacant jobs. Its services in supplying farm labor have already been 
referred to. It has also furnished a large ntimber of men for the build- 
ing trades, the railroads, logging, local transportation, and general 
labor. The total nvimber of workers referred to positions during its 
operations is 24,556. 

fflGH COST OF LIVING. 

In November, 1917, the Safety Commission ordered investigations 
to be made relative to the prices of milk and bread. The cost of these 
indispensable necessaries had been steadily rising in the Twin Cities, 
causing wide-spread complaints and great hardships, especially among 
the less well to do. An inquiry into the matter of the milk price was 
imdertaken and served to place the pertinent facts relating to the 
cost of production and distribution of milk before the people and 
thereby cleared up misunderstandings on the part of producers and 
consimiers alike. The maximtim price of 11 cents a quart for milk 
fixed by the Commission by Order No. 13, of December 5th, 1917, was 
generally accepted as just and fair to all concerned. 

The Bread Investigation with attendant experiments conducted in 
Minneapolis indicated that the price of bread in that city was un- 

18 



necessarily high. It was shown that bread could be produced and 
sold with profit at prices materially lower than those that had been 
prevailing; and the poorer classes of the city were supplied with cheaper 
bread during the winter months, and the **cash and carry" plan of 
delivery of merchandise was promoted. The facts established by 
the investigations were an important contribution to economic knowl- 
edge; and on February 26, 1918, the Commission adopted an order 
turning over to the several municipalities in the State the practical 
application of the examples its work in this direction affords. 

THE FUEL QUESTION. 

In July, 1917, the Commission's investigations disclosed the following 
alarming situation: At the close of the 1915 season, 2,000,000 million 
tons of coal were carried over at the head of the lakes, and in 1916, up 
to the last of July, eight million tons were transported to the head of 
the lakes. At the close of the 1916 season only three hundred thousand 
tons were carried over and in 1917 up to the 1st of July only four 
million tons had been transported. Unless this situation was remedied 
it meant a fuel failure in the Northwest in the winter of 1917 and 1918. 
No federal fuel administrator had as yet been appointed for the state, 
and the needs of the section were without representation at Wash- 
ington. 

Recognizing the extreme gravity of the situation and the urgent 
necessity of securing an adequate fuel supply for Minnesota, the Com- 
mission appointed one of its members to act as a committee for this 
purpose; and through this action of the Commission the calamity 
was averted. As a matter of fact, the Northwest has been in 
much better condition than any other section of the country 
during the past two years. On October 8, 1917, the member referred 
to was appointed, by the national government. Federal Fuel Adminis- 
trator for Minnesota, which was of material assistance to the Com- 
mission in its efforts to provide for the needs of the state in the matter 
of fuel supplies. As supplementary to what was thus done for obtain- 
ing coal fuel, the state auditor, by direction of the Commission, caused 
a series of practical steps to be taken for the purpose of making the vast 
stores of fire wood on the state lands available to the people in many 
neighborhoods. 

ALIEN REGISTRATION. 

The Order of February 5th, 1918, requiring all aliens in the state to 
register imder the direction of the State Auditor, was a measure of 
great importance — ^much greater than had been anticipated. The 
registration disclosed 225,000 aliens in the state, many thousands of 

19 



whom were holding property and all of whom were, on account of their 
failure to obtain or perfect their citizenship, exempted from sharing 
with their citizen-neighbors, the full duties and burden of government. 
The registration was a necessary war measure, but was also required 
for a proper equalization of pubHc burdens and a just and equitable 
management of public affairs in times of peace, and made it possible 
to detect fraudulent voting and illegal holding of land. It gave the 
great majority of these residents a needed reminder to acquire citizen- 
ship, which most of them had wished to secure, but had neglected to 
obtain in due form, and in general, it was fully justified as a means to 
secure a more equitable adjustment of public duties and privileges in 
the commonwealth and its subdivisions. 

SOLDIERS AND THEIR DEPENDENTS. 

The Safety Commission has taken special pains to look out for the 
welfare of the soldiers and their families and to protect the rights 
of the soldier from the day of his departure as a recruit to his return 
from the war. On leaving for the camps the recruits have been shielded 
against the temptations of the saloons, which were closed on those 
days by orders of the Commission. While in camp their wants were 
inquired into and ascertained and, in some instances, supplied by the 
Commission out of funds placed at its disposal for that purpose. 

Upon complaints of undue hardships being suffered by Minnesota 
soldiers in certain training camps a thorough investigation was made 
by a special committee headed by the governor, of conditions in Camp 
Cody and some other camps where units from this state were being 
trained, and a report of the deficiencies found to exist was made to 
the Safety Commission and also to the Department of War. It is 
believed that as a result of this action on the part of the Commission 
the ills complained of were remedied sooner than would otherwise 
have been the case. The dangers threatening our soldiers from ven- 
ereal diseases received the attention of the Commission, and the State 
Board of Health was instructed to take all steps deemed advisable 
and necessary to protect our men in arms against the perils of con- 
tamination. 

The civic rights of the soldiers to vote have been carefully guarded 
by the Commission, which, in the face of technical difficulties, succeeded 
in devising practical methods enabling soldiers in camp or abroad 
to vote at the primaries as well as at the election of last year (Orders 
No. 31 of April 30, 1918, and No. 46 of September 10, 1918.) The val- 
idity of Order No. 46 was sustained in a district court, and no appeal 
taken therefrom. (See appendix.) 



BANKS AND PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS. 

Various efforts to establish new and unnecessary banks have been 
checked by the Commission. In disaffected communities groups 
of depositors would withdraw their deposits from loyal banks 
as a means of intimidating their officers and forcing them to relax 
their work in support of the war. Many unpatriotic men or schemers 
were at once ready to fish in the troubled waters and set about to 
start new banks in such localities with the expectation of attracting 
the business of the disloyal elements. These pernicious schemes, 
harmful alike to the cause of the country and the best interests of the 
commimities immediately concerned, were effectually thwarted by 
prompt action on the part of the Commission. 

In advance of the activities of the federal capital issues committee, 
the Commission called public attention to the inadvisability of pro- 
ceeding with the construction of new public improvements and the 
issuance of municipal bonds, one of which would compete with the 
federal government in its need for materials and the other in its demand 
for money. With the patriotic co-operation of public officials, new 
construction work and new bond issues were arrested. 

FOREST FIRE PROTECTION. 

The Safety Commission has rendered effective assistance to the For- 
estry Commission in the matter of preventing and checking forest 
fires. In the early summer of 1917, a season of exceptional drought, 
the danger of devastating forest fires was particularly great, especially 
in view of the fact that the Forestry Commission was not provided 
with sufficient means for maintaining adequate forest protection. On 
June 29th, 1917, the Safety Commission issued its first order against 
setting fires in grass, stubble, etc., applicable to eleven of the northern 
counties of the state, and additional orders covering a larger territory, 
were issued on August 14th, 1917, on April 6th and on October 21st, 
1918. A siun of six thousand dollars was advanced to the Forestry 
Commission to aid in checking numerous incipient fires in the summer 
of 1917. The Safety Commission has done all that it was empowered 
and equipped to do for forest conservation, and its assistance has been 
of material aid to the Forestry Commission. The great calamity of 
last fall has shown conclusively that the protection against forest 
fires hitherto provided by the state has been altogether inadequate. 

EMERGENCY RELIEF. 

During the past year the state was visited by two great calamities, 
and in both instances the Safety Commission rendered instant services 
of rescue and relief. When the City of Tyler was struck by a tornado 



in the month of August, resulting in the death of many residents and 
the practical demolition of the city, the secretary of the Commission 
at once proceeded to the stricken community, followed by a unit of 
the Minneapolis Motor Corps with doctors, nurses, medical supplies 
and food. 

Another calamity appalling in its harvest of death, misery and deso- 
lation, was the terrible fire that, in the first part of October of last year, 
swept St. Louis, Carlton and other counties in the northern part of 
the state. No more destructive forest fire has ever visited Minnesota. 
More than 500 lives were lost; about 12,000 families were made home- 
less, while upwards of 40,000 persons were affected by the fire. Some 
1,500 square miles were turned into a barren, blackened waste strewn 
with charred remains of victims and remnants of ruined homes, and 
the total property loss exceeds 20 million dollars. 

Governor Bumquist, Chairman of the Safety Commission, left 
at once for Moose Lake to take personal charge of the reHef work, 
and the next day a force of some 300 of the Motor Corps arrived with 
supplies of all kinds, besides a staff of doctors and nurses. The Com- 
mission was convened by the Governor to sit at Moose Lake, where 
emergency relief measures were adopted. Financial aid to meet the 
most pressing immediate demands was promised by the Commission. 
Such assistance was made possible by the authorization by the Calamity 
Board of the expenditure of $300,000.00 by the Safety Commission for 
the benefit of the fire sufferers. 

Two orders were issued by the Safety Commission at Moose Lake, 
under date of October 16th, one authorizing the Commissioners of 
St. Louis Cotmty to appropriate moneys for relief purposes, and the 
other confering indentical powers upon the Board of Commissioners 
of Carlton Coimty. The Commission appointed as its agent the Forest 
Fire Relief Commission. By the joint efforts of the Relief Commission 
and the local organizations of the Safety Commission, approximately 
one million dollars in voltmtary subscriptions have been collected to 
date for the benefit of the fire victims. 

AMERICANIZATION. 

The entire work of the Safety Commission has been a powerful 
factor in promoting Americanization, in the broadest sense of this 
term. Some of its measures have had a far-reaching influence in 
seciuing compliance, on the part of a very large nmnber of foreign- 
bom residents, with the first conditions and elementary duties of 
citizenship. This is especially true of Order No. 23, providing for 
alien registration, which probably has done more than any law or 
measure previously adopted in Minnesota to bring foreign-bom civic 

22 



slackers — to the number of 225,000 — ^within the full sway of our laws 
and the American spirit ; to make them realize their duties and appre- 
ciate their high privileges as Americans. 

In the performance of its duties the Commission has, at almost 
every turn, been forcibly impressed with the urgent need of Americani- 
zation in the narrower sense, or a systematic work "to equip the for- 
eign-bom with a knowledge of the United States language, American 
ideals of liberty and principles and institutions of government, so 
that they may become strong, active, right-thinking Americans." 
It appeared that even thousands of children bom in this coimtry were 
not afforded an opportunity to learn the speech of the land. By a 
special investigation it was ascertained that there were in this state 
some 200 parochial or other private schools using a foreign language 
wholly or in part as a mediiim of instruction, and that some 10,000 
children receiving their education in these schools were brought up 
as aliens and foreigners. To put a stop to such unwholesome condi- 
tions the Commission, on November 20th, 1917, adopted a resolution 
to the effect "that school boards, principals and teachers be urged, 
as a patriotic duty, to require the use of the English language as the 
exclusive mediimi of instruction in all schools in the state of Minnesota, 
and to discontinue and prohibit the use of all foreign languages in such 
schools, except as a mediimi for the study of those languages themselves 
or as a medium for religious instruction." 

The question of the study of foreign languages in the public schools 
of the state had already received the attention of the Commission, 
which, in September, 1917, requested the State Superintendent of 
Education to make an inquiry as to the content and tendency of Ger- 
man texts used in the public schools and as to the advisability of dis- 
continuing the teaching of the German language in such schools. A 
member of the Commission who was working in co-operation with a 
special committee appointed by the Superintendent for the purpose 
stated, reported the findings to the Safety Commission. This report 
accompanied with a "white list" and a "black list" of German text 
books used in our public schools, was published by the Commission in 
December, 1917. On April 30, 1918, the Commission adopted an order 
providing, in substance, that no person who is not a citizen of the 
United States shall be qualified to serve as a teacher in any public 
private, or parochial school, or in any normal school in which teachers 
for these schools are trained. 

As stated elsewhere in this report, an energetic and successful 
work of Americanization has been conducted or directed by the Woman's 
Committee. As a result of these efforts night schools for aliens were 
established in many localities. Americanization committees were 



organized in sixty-odd counties and patriotic literature was distributed 
among the foreign bom women of the state. 

In the early months of 1918 a national plan of Americanization 
had been placed in operation by the Coimcil of National Defense 
and the Department of the Interior, acting jointly, and during the 
first week of April, 1918, a conference was held in Washington in the 
interest of organizing the work throughout the country. Governor 
Bumquist,who attended the conference by invitation, appointed, upon 
his return, through the Safety Commission, in conformity with 
the general plan adopted by the National Americanization Com- 
mittee, the "Minnesota State Americanization Committee." This 
Committee has done considerable preliminary work, partly with a view 
to ascertaining how best to co-ordinate the various Americanization 
activities throughout the state, and a tentative plan of operations, 
based upon special investigations by the executive secretary. Miss 
Hester M. Pollock, has been submitted by her. 

WAR RECORDS COMMISSION. 

In justice to Minnesota's host of brave sons who have upheld the 
honor of the flag at the fronts, many of whom are never to return, and 
for the sake of preserving, ere it be too late, invaluable historical ma- 
terial, the Safety Commission has appointed a War Records Commis- 
sion for the purpose indicated by its name. The selection of members 
have been made with a view to secure a number of men for this work 
who are especially qualified for it by reason of their professional studies 
and training. The Commission expects to enlist the active co-opera- 
tion of interested men in every county of the state. Funds have been 
provided by the Commission for carrying on this work. 

THE WORK OF THE WOMAN'S COMMITTEE. 

The Woman's Committee was created in May, 1918, by the appoint- 
ment of an Executive Committee of 16 women, with authority to or- 
ganize the women of the state for all forms of war service. This Com- 
mittee embraced representatives of the chief women's organizations 
and also of the Board of Education, the Department of Labor and the 
Farm School. At the same time, the same committee was authorized 
by the National Council of Defense, to act as the Minnesota unit of 
the National Woman's War Organization. This meant that the women 
who were presidents of all organizations having state-wide constit- 
uencies should form a "War Council," meeting in executive body 
once a month, and that in every county and town women chairmen 
should be appointed who should draw together all the workers in 
their several communities. 



In Minnesota this resulted in the appointment of chairman and 
vice-chairman of the ten congressional districts, under thera eighty- 
six county chairmen, and under them, again, some thirteen hundred 
town chairmen. 

Intensive Organization. In more than twenty towns and cities 
there has been an intensive organization, each ward having its chair- 
man, each precinct and each block, so that every family could be reached 
within 24 hours. Wards have been studied so that the committee 
knew just the ntmiber of families in each, their nationality, the indus- 
tries, churches, schools, etc., of each ward, and how much each had 
contributed to Liberty Loan, War Savings, Red Cross, etc. Through 
these organizations each "drive" or special campaign was put through 
with a maximum of efficiency and a minimum of waste labor. Al- 
together nearly 20,000 active women workers have thus been in the 
Woman's Committee. 

All work imdertaken was that directly requested by the National 
Council of Defense, and was done in accordance with directions sent 
from Washington, with the idea that uniformity of effort over the whole 
United States would be sure to result in more efficient service. 

Food Conservation. The first active work asked by the government 
was to secure signatures to the so-called * 'Hoover Pledge," promising 
family economy in the matter of fats, sugar, wheat and meat. At 
the beginning there was little general understanding of the great world 
shortage and the problems of food distribution. But all over the state 
the women responded heroically. They canvassed every town and 
farm. Training classes in war cooking, demonstrations and demon- 
stration kitchens, prizes for the best local recipes, community work 
in preserving and drying perishable foods, distribution of officially- 
tested recipes, drove home the lesson to which the pledge had called 
attention. In connection with the food problem other matters of 
Home Economics were emphasized, especially wool saving, the ad- 
ministration of the family income and the relation of the family life 
to national well-being. 

Americanization. The war brought home to us the fact that many 
millions of those living in America were not naturalized or, even when 
nominally Americans, had little conception of the ideals of America 
or the purpose for which we had gone to war. Minnesota has an 
unusually large proportion of foreign bom, and had 194 schools in 
which German was the mediimi of instruction. This problem is not 
to be solved in a year or in several years, but a strong beginning has 

26 



been made. In 58 out of 86 counties, Americanization chairmen have 
started working, and an outline of practical methods has been put 
in their hands, covering Self-training in American ideals, Community- 
singing, friendly Meetings, Cooperation between all social and edu- 
cational groups. Social Service, Work among Foreign bom Women, 
Night Schools, * 'English First" Campaigns, Training for Citizenship. 
Particularly in the cities a great deal of most excellent work is under 
way. 

Child Conservation. A program for "Children's Year" was made 
by the U. S. Children's Bureau, such work being considered a war 
work on account of the discoveries made in the draft examinations. 
Since from 25% to 46% (in different localities) of the young men were 
foimd unfit for military service and often from defects that might have 
been remedied in childhood, it was seen that there was a direct re- 
lation between child welfare and military efficiency — and also peace 
efficiency. The weighing and measuring of all babies to discover what 
defects existed and then the setting up of agencies to correct those 
defects constitutes, in brief, the program already well on its way to 
completion. Over 100,000 babies have been tested in the state. Baby 
clinics, more supervised playgrounds, county and school nurses, milk 
supervision, county and state exhibits on child welfare, establishment 
of public baths and out door carnivals are among the phases of follow- 
up work. '4 

Patriotic Education. A representative of the State Board of Edu- 
cation co-operating with the State chairman and the Patriotic Leagues 
of teachers and children arranged a ntimber of pageants and partici- 
pated in nimierous flag raisings. A book entitled SCHOOL PATRIOT- 
ISM dealing with all phases of patriotic education was issued by the 
Board of Education and distributed to the schools. 

Women in Industry. A Survey, covering all phases of women's 
war work was made. (Home conditions, replacement of men by women, 
wages, sanitary conditions, etc. were studied.) This was done in hearty 
cooperation with the Department of Labor, and has covered the whole 
state in a most thorough way. Legislation based on its findings will 
be asked of the coming Legislature. 

Work concerning the Employment of Women has been done in co- 
operation with the Vocational and Emplojnnent agencies in the cities. 

In MinneapoHs 3,100 firms have been reported, employing 19,000 
women; in St. Paul 591 firms, employing 4,313. Fifty-eight counties 
and 162 towns have been covered. About 65,000 women are employed 
outside of the Twin Cities. Nearly 8% of the women are married 
and have children. 

26 



Liberty Loan. As the Allotment system has prevailed in the later 
work, the duties of the women have been confined chiefly to publicity 
and clerical service. This has been done largely all over the state, aiid 
the women are credited with one-fourth of the subscriptions reached. 
Of course Minnesota has gone over the top in all loans. 

Speakers' Bureau. Besides local Speakers' Bureaus in the larger 
cities, about 100 state speakers have been listed for general work. 
Dramatic and Musical artists have been provided for patriotic en- 
tertainments. A Patriotic-Americanization Pageant is now being 
prepared by a special committee, with reference to the needs of Minne- 
sota. 

Nurses* Drive. In response to the Government request to list 
yoimg women to take training for nvirses, a campaign was carried on 
through the counties, resulting in 560 applications being sent in to 
Washington from our state office. Besides these, many applications 
were sent in direct from local offices. 

Young Women's Auxiliary. In Duluth nearly 2,000 young women 
have belonged to the Auxiliary and have served to correlate all the 
younger women's work, for Red Cross, for Hospitals, for Naval Re- 
serve, for service in all "drives" and in the Children's Year. In Minne- 
apolis the organization has parallelled the Council of Defense and 
correlated all organizations of young women and provided volunteer 
workers along all lines where their help was called for. In St. Paul 
four committees provided books and flowers for the Aviation Hospital, 
carried on a War-Information Booth, siuveyed City Gardens and as- 
sisted in Child Welfare work. Becker, Waseca, Steams, Stevens and 
Wright Counties also had efficient Junior Auxiliaries. 

Exhibits. In the State Fairs of 1917 and 1918 the State Committee 
had booths with patriotic exhibits, conducted musical patriotic pro- 
grams, gave out many himdreds of thousands of patriotic publications 
and answered innvimerable questions. In practically every county 
the local chairman had booths at the cotmty fairs, at which food de- 
monstrations and exhibits and patriotic programs were conducted. 

State Meetings. Besides the regular monthly meetings of the War 
Coimcil at which the needs of the state were discussed and action 
decided upon, there have been two State Conferences held in the House 
of Representatives and attended by District and Coimty Chairmen, 
chairmen of committees and members of the War Council. These 

n 



have been three-day meetings, financed by the Safety Commission, 
and have considered all forms of women's war work. 

Publications and Publicity. Besides the circulars and letters sent 
out by special chairmen of Food, Child Welfare, etc., and in addition 
to the printed matter distributed at State and County Fairs, the State 
Office has sent out about 25,000 letters and 12,500 pieces of printed 
matter and received 12,000 letters. Letters have been sent to the 
counties about once in two weeks. Wide newspaper publicity for all 
war service has been obtained, not only in special articles in the press 
of the cities, which has been more than generous, but also in the material 
sent to country papers through agencies, and in the cooperation of 
local editors. The State Committee has printed matter covering all 
phases of its committee work, to the amount of several hundred thousand 
copies. It has also acted as the distributing bureau for great quantities 
of literature sent from Washington. 

Red Cross. A representative of the Red Cross has always been a 
member of the Executive Committee of the Woman's Committee, 
and warm relations have existed between the two bodies, as for instance, 
when the Red Cross allowed the use of its local headquarters for the 
Nurses' drive, and when the machinery of the Woman's Committee 
has been used for Red Cross drives or publicity. Joint letters on food 
conservation were signed by the Food Administrator, the Chairman 
of the Red Cross and the Chairman of the Woman's Committee. 

PUBLICITY WORK. 

The Publicity Department has been the hand maiden of the Com- 
mission for the promotion of loyalty and other work. Since September, 
1917, a weekly Bulletin "Minnesota in the War," has been published 
in the interest of the work of the Commission and its local branches. 
All orders of the Commission and other documents of importance have 
been published in the Bulletin, which has lent consistent support to 
all war work desired by the government or suggested by the Council of 
National Defense, and in particular to all loan and savings stamps 
drives and all campaigns in behalf of the Red Cross or other war or- 
ganizations. Some 700 papers in the state have been provided with 
a weekly service in support of war work. In addition to this a large 
nimiber of foreign-language papers with extensive circulation in the 
state have been supplied with articles in their respective vernaculars 
every week. These articles, the general purpose of which has been 
to instruct, to stimulate loyalty and promote all kinds of war work 
among the readers, have been readily accepted and published, though 



they have been a heavy tax upon the limited space of the publications 
in question. A very large number of booklets and leaflets dealing 
with the various phases of the war have been distributed by this de- 
partment — some of these publications also in several foreign languages. 

The speaking campaign of the Safety Commission has been managed 
by the Publicity Department since September, 1917. About 400 
speakers were kept in the field. These men gave their time and ser- 
vices free of charge. The local expenses have been defrayed by the 
respective County Directors and their committees. Many outside 
speakers of wide reputation sent to the state by the Committee on 
Public Information have likewise been routed by this department. 
In all some 4,000 meetings have been held under its auspices, which 
almost invariably have been very well attended. 

The Liberty Chorus and Community Sing movement suggested by 
the Council of National Defense was inaugurated in this state under 
the auspices of the Publicity Department. In spite of the draw-back 
caused by the recent influenza epidemic the movement has met with 
great favor among the people, and every effort has been made to make 
it helpful in the work of Americanization and up-building of the com- 
munity spirit. Successful Sings have been arranged in many localities 
and have ever5rwhere aroused local interest. 

THE WORK OF THE OFFICE. 

The following facts will serve to indicate the voltime of the business 
transacted : 

Reports demanding the attention of the office or the Commission 
were received as follows: 682 sedition cases; 331 violations of liquor 
laws or regulations; 226 complaints against dance halls; 208 violations 
of the Work- Order; 118 complaints of interference with the Liberty 
Loans in one form or another; 174 complaints relative to the teaching 
of German in schools of the state. These reports or complaints re- 
ceived prompt attention as demanded by the nature of each individual 
case. 

Special requests for orders and literature were received as follows: 
For Orders, 1,187; literature (in general) 4,328; Peril of Prussianism, 
875; Man without Country, 555; Wall Street and the War, 1,356; 
Facts About the War, 790; Posters, 612. All these requests were 
promptly complied with. 

The distribution of the vast amdunt of patriotic literature furnished 
by or through the Safety Commission represented not only considerable 
clerical and physical work but also accurate knowledge of conditions 
throughout the state, judgment and care in order to make stire that 
each booklet or leaflet sent out do the most good. Approximately 



40 titles of literature, aggregating more than a million copies, were 
published by the Commission and distributed by the office, besides 
upwards of one half million copies of literature received from the 
Committee on Public Information or other sources. 21,250 pieces of 
German literature were sent out according to lists of names received 
at the office. 

Many himdreds of thousands of copies of circular letters were sent 
out to the Coimty Directors and the 5,000 members of the county 
organizations, as well as to many others. 

The press service furnished to state papers and papers in foreign 
languages, aggregating more than 700 newspapers receiving matter 
regularly every week, was dispatched through the mailing department 
of the office. 

People would continually call at the office to present complaints 
and to seek advice or help ; the nimiber of such callers aggregate many 
thousands of men and women. In this way such pertinent information 
was received regarding intoxicants sold to men in uniform, hoarding 
of sugar or flour, outcroppings of disloyalty and many other matters, 
and appropriate action taken. Many dependents of men in the service 
who needed assistance were provided for through this office or by 
other organizations on reports from the office of the Commission. 

Telephone messages were constantly received from all parts of the 
state inquiring for information concerning the application of the most 
important orders of the Commission and other matters. At times 
such messages would total several hundred a day, the entire time of 
the secretary or assistant secretary being occupied in attending to 
such telephone calls. 

The number of individual letters sent out wotild average 300 a week, 
and the nimiber of mail sacks would run from 15 to 20 a day. 



(B.) THE COMMISSION'S LAW ENFORCING 
ACTIVITIES 

The other function wliich the Commission exercised is the one which 
attracted especial public attention. The Commission assumed that 
it had the right, if in its judgment the public interest so required, to 
use the strong arm of force to suppress disloyalty, to prevent wastage 
of men and material, and to preserve public order. It not only assumed 
that it had the right, but it also did not hesitate to exercise it. 

The Commission in this branch of its work aimed not alone to jail 
individual traitors and to clean up individual cesspools of vice, but 
also to make malefactors generally realize that many things which in 

30 



peace times wotild be insignificant were serious in war times, and to 
hearten loyal men and women with the thought that the state was 
equipped to help them in their endeavors. It does not think the 
Constitution suffered imder the ordeal, and it is unable to regard the 
Constitution as so delicate a doctiment that its pages will be soiled 
or torn by a little rough usage, while battles are raging. 

It will not be practicable to give here more than some specimen 
episodes by way of illustration of its work in this direction. These 
will serve to present their spirit, purpose and result, and those selected 
for comment are arranged by subjects under their several heads as 
follows : 

I. THE SUPPRESSION OF DISLOYALTY. 

To-day we are at the close of a successful war and our people unitedly 
are welcoming their returning sons and brothers, or honoring the 
heroes among them who died for their country's cause, in a foreign 
land. It is hard in such an environment and at such a time to realize 
the indifference, pacifist sentiment and even opposition to the war 
which prevailed in some parts of Minnesota two years ago. 

Even before Congress declared war in April, 1917, many of our 
people, irrespective of their racial origins or affiliations, appreciated 
the significance of the contest in Europe, and were openly and heartily 
in favor of our entering the war. But this was by no means true of 
all OUT people. Some of them at first could not see why we should 
get into it at all. There are several explanations of this. Many 
of our people did not understand the principles governing ocean traffic 
nor grasp the paramount importance of maintaining the rights of the 
country and its citizens under the established law of the sea. 
We live far from the coast and thousands of us had never seen the 
ocean or the big ships which sail on it. The sentiments of these people 
were reflected in the votes of some of Minnesota's representatives 
in the two houses of congress on the McLemore resolution. Another 
explanation was the racial situation in the state. We had a population 
of about 2,000,000 by the 1910 census, and more tjian seventy per 
cent of these were either foreign bom or of foreign parentage on one 
or both sides. Out of the two million people nearly five hundred 
thousand were either bom in Germany or Austria, or were of German 
or Austrian parentage. There were many sections where the English 
language was not spoken, and in some cases, not imderstood; where 
the English language newspapers did not circulate, and where a 
foreign tongue was the meditmi of communication in church and 
school, in the home and in business relations. 

Thousands of these men of foreign origin, including those of German 

81 



blood, favored the war before we got into it and after the declaration 
thousands of them, who had not before been in S5mipathy with our 
participating, promptly caught the spirit of the nation's war 
purposes, appreciated the consideration which forced us into the war 
and became prominent and active in mobilization. But some of them 
were of another mind. A part of these had personal associations with 
Germany before the United States entered the war, and for this reason 
wanted Germany to win, and even after the United States entered 
the war, could not reconcile themselves to the thought of Germany's 
defeat. It was a shock to others of them who had themselves or whose 
fathers had come from Europe to escape military service and the 
quarrels of dynasties, to see the United States drawn into the whirl- 
pool of world politics. They opposed this before the declaration, 
and the attitude of some of them continued the same even after the 
declaration. The test of loyalty in war times is whether a man is 
wholeheartedly for the war and subordinates everjrthing else to its 
successful prosecution. There were many in Minnesota in 1917 who 
were not loyal in this sense. Some of them were traitors deserving 
of their fate which followed. Some of them were good citizens in 
most of the concerns of life, and as long as this type of the disloyal 
thought and acted as individuals, no serious public danger attended 
their perverted attitude. The public danger came when the anti-war 
feeling assumed the shape of concerted and public propaganda, and it 
assumed this shape here in the spring and summer of 1917. The 
Minnesota men who were disloyal in the sense above defined then formed 
a constituency of considerable size and there appeared leaders and 
spokesmen to organize them and give expression to their opinions. 
Misinterpreting the constitutional guaranty of freedom of speech 
and of the press, these leaders thought or pretended to think that even 
in war times, they could properly oppose the government's policies 
in speech and writings. These leaders were of three classes: 
(1) Professional and theoretical pacifists who organized for a nation- 
wide anti-war campaign, the so-called People's Peace Council and 
similar bodies. (2) Men of pro-German traditions and S5rmpathies, who 
were opposed to the war because Germany was one of the combatants. 
The troubles from this type of leaders showed themselves first most 
conspicuously in the Minnesota Valley culminating in the New Ulm 
episode in July, 1917. (3) Professional politicians of the socialist or Non- 
partisan league stamp, who sought to win votes at their country's 
cost by pandering to a treasonable sentiment. The Commission un- 
dertook to kindle the back fires of patriotism among the rank and file 
of this ilk by the devices already referred to. With the leaders it 
used the mailed fist. 

(1.) The People's Peace Council included the most prominent leaders 



of the socialistic, anarchistic, pacifist, pro-German and other elements 
actively opposed to the war. Among its leading lights were the men 
who had drafted the notorious St. Louis platfonn of the Socialist 
party, which branded the declaration of war by the United States as a 
crime. It was organized in New York for the immediate purpose of 
carrying on a propaganda throughout the country in support of the 
German demand fipr an embargo upon food and munitions of war 
and in opposition to enlistments and subsequently to the draft law. 
The City of Minneapolis was selected as the most suitable place for 
the first great demonstration. The polyglot population of this state 
and section was looked upon as a promising soil by the sowers of sedi- 
tion, and, moreover, the then mayor of Mineapolis had assured them 
of a most hospitable welcome and all needed protection. The pro- 
posed demonstration which was set for the first week in September, 
1917, attracted great attention in this state and in the country at 
large. Reports of the elaborate preparations appeared frequently 
in the press. Special trains were to bring the eastern leaders of the 
movement to Minneapolis, and delegations were expected from other 
parts of the cotmtry. The loyal people in Minneapolis and the state 
at large were alarmed. The projected meeting was regarded not 
only as an overt act of sedition, but also as a blot upon the good name 
of the city, and the sentiment that it should be prevented by the 
loyal people of the city at all costs gained strength from day to day. 
Against this demand stood the repeated assurances of the mayor 
that the full power of the city would be used to shield the demonstrators. 
A few days before the meeting was to take place the situation was 
reported so serious that the Governor sent to the sheriff of Hennepin 
County the following telegram: 

"My attention has been directed to a so-called Peace Council to be 
held in Minneapolis beginning September 1, 1917. If the said meeting 
will in any way tend to injure the government in the prosecution of the 
war or disturb the peace within the city of Minneapolis, you are here- 
by ordered to prevent the holding thereof. Intentional or unintentional 
arousing of anti-American sentiment or the dividing of our forces through 
ill-advice and futile peace talk at this time will only aid and abet the 
enemy. 

Summon to your assistance such forces as you may need to execute 
the laws as herein ordered. Advise me at once as to whether you will 
have sufficient facilities to cope with tiie situation.'* 

In response thereto the sheriff called at the Governor's office on the 
next day when the Commission was in session. The matter was dis- 
cussed with the sheriff and upon his report and the discussion thereof 
the Governor issued the following proclamation forbidding the meeting : 

GOVERNOR'S PROCLAMATION 

WHEREAS, an organization designating itself as the People's Council 
of America has annotmced that it will hold a national convention and 

S3 



public meetings in the city of Minneapolis from September first to Sept- 
ember sixth, 1917, and 

WHEREAS, an order was issued by me to the Sheriff of said Hennepin 
County on August 27, 1917, directing said Sheriff to prevent the holding 
of said convention and said meetings if the same wotUd be likely to hin- 
der the Federal Government in the prosecution of the war and disturb 
the public peace, and 

WHEREAS, the Sheriff of said county has this day, in accordance 
with said order, personally appeared and advised me tiiat said conven- 
tion and meetings, if held, in his opinion, would result in blood-shed, 
rioting and loss of life, and 

WHEREAS, said convention and meetings can, in my opinion, under 
the circtmistances have no other effect than that of aiding and abetting 
the enemies of this country, 

NOW THEREFORE, I, J. A. A. BURNQUIST, Governor of the State 
of Minnesota, do hereby order that the holding of said convention and 
meetings within the cotmty of Hennepin or elsewhere in the state of 
Minnesota be and the same is hereby prohibited: that the peace officers 
of the city of Minneapolis, the county of Hennepin and elsewhere in the 
state of Minnesota are hereby charged with the enforcement of this order 
and are directed to use all the means at their command to secure obedience 
thereto and that, if additional forces are required, they are hereby dir- 
ected to call on me therefor. 

(2) The Commission preferred charges at Washington against the 
pro-German newspapers, in an effort to exclude them from the mails. 
It called some of their editors before it for examination and discovering 
that one of them was an alien enemy, it induced the federal authorities 
to have him interned for the period of the war. It instituted proceedings 
against L. A. Fritsche, Mayor of New Ulm, and Albert Pfaender, 
City Attorney of New Ulm, and they were removed from office by the 
Governor. As a matter of public record and to preserve a picture of 
a now almost forgotten condition, there is printed in the appendix the 
Commission's charges against the New Ulm officials, which tell the 
story in detail. 

(3) The Commission collated the evidence against socialist agi- 
tators by having its agents attend meetings addressed by them, and 
where there appeared a violation of the (Espionage or other 
federal acts, laid the evidence before the United States Attorney and 
secured their indictment. The Commission does not care to include 
their names in this report, but it was at its initiative that many of those 
subsequently convicted, were brought to justice. In September, 1917, 
after U. S. Senator Robert M. LaFoUette, had addressed a meeting 
held in St. Paul under the auspices of the Non-partisan League, it 
cited the president of the League before it for examination and pre- 
ferred charges against Senator La FoUette with the United States 
Senate asking his expulsion. It instructed public officials as to the 
law of free speech and right of assembly during a war and from that 
time exercised a continuous surveillance of public gatherings. 

84 



n. THE PREVENTION OF WASTE. 

Twenty one of the Commission's orders had to do exclusively with 
some phase of the liquor traffic, the dance halls and the pool rooms. 
In the sequence of their numbers, these orders and the subjects with 
which they respectively dealt were as follows: 

Order No. 1, of April 24, 1917, closing the saloons in the Bridge Square 
District, Minneapolis. 

Order No. 2, of April 25, 1917, establishing of dry zone around the 
Fort Snelling military reservation. 

Order No. 6, of May 29, 1917, closing saloons on registration day. 

Order No. 7, of June 5, 1917, relating to saloon hours and cabaret 
entertainemnts. 

Order No. 8, of June 5, 1917, restricting the sale of intoxicants in 
St. Louis County in the proximity to mines and timber 
lands. 

Order No. 10, of September 17, 1917, relating to the sale of liquor 
in Martin and Pipestone Counties. 

Order No. 11, of September 19, 1917, forbidding transport of liquor 
into Koochiching County. 

Order No. 12, of October 25, 1917, forbidding transportation of in- 
toxicants to Beltrami and Clearwater Counties. 

Order No. 14, of November 6, 1917, restricting the operation of pool 
and billiard halls to the hours within 8 A.M and 11 P.M. 

Order No. 17, of December 5, 1917, regulating the sale of intoxicants 
in the village of Blooming Prairie, Steele Coimty. 

Order No. 19, of December 11, 1917, forbidding shipment of transpor- 
tation of intoxicants to Polk County. 

Order No. 20, of January 15, 1918, forbidding transportation of intoxi- 
cants to Clay County. 

Order No. 22, of January 15, 1918, relating to the disposition of seized 
intoxicants by sheriffs or other officers. 

Order No. 24, of January 30, 1918, prohibiting the introduction of 
intoxicants into territory in which the sale of such liquors 
is prohibited by Indian treaty or the county option law. 

Order No. 34, of May 14, 1918, prohibiting three saloon keepers in 
the village of Blooming Prairie from selling intoxicants 
during the period of the war. 

Order No. 35, of May 14, 1918, forbidding the transportation of in- 
toxicants into or through any dry county, city village 
or borough. 

Order No. 39, of July 9, 1918, closing saloons at points of entrainment 
upon days fixed for the entrainment of soldiers. 



Order No. 43, of August 13, 1918, forbidding the sale or keeping for 
sale or delivery of intoxicating liquor in the County of 
Red Lake. 

Order No. 45, of September 10, 1918, suspending all traffic in intoxi- 
cants on registration day. 

Order No. 47, of September 24, 1918, prohibiting the sale of intoxi- 
cants in the Village of Ceylon, Martin Cou<nty. 

Order No. 48, of September 24, 1918, relating to the sale of intoxi- 
cants in the Village of Blooming Prairie. 

Of the above orders Nos. 1, 6, 7, 14, 39 and 45 were pri- 
marily aimed at the protection of the soldiers and incidentally 
to increase the efficieiicy of city workers. Their value to these ends 
is obvious. For example, closing saloons till eight o'clock in the morn- 
ing lessens the temptations to drinking before business hours, and early 
closing of saloons, dance halls and pool rooms and the exclusion of 
women from resorts check night time debauchery. The harlot and 
whiskey are more dangerous to soldiers than bullets, and these measures 
were proper as a matter of military expediency. 

Orders 8, 10, 11, 12, 17, 19, 20, 22, 24, 34, 35, 43, 47 and 49 
were designed to meet a peculiar situation which disclosed itself out- 
side of the big cities. Muteh of the state was dry by the application 
of the county option or local option statutes or by treaties with Indians. 
But in the midst of dry territory there were, here and there, isolated 
communities where liquor was sold under local licenses. The tier of 
cotmties nearest Iowa was saloon-less except for Martin County, and 
in Martin County there were only three villages with licensed saloons. 
In the second tier of counties, Pipestone Coimty was saloon-less except 
for the village of Trosky. South Dakota to the west of Pipestone 
was saloon-less, and so were Murray, Cottonwood and Watonwan 
Counties to the east. All of northwestern Minnesota was dry except 
for two places in Red Lake County, Red Lake Falls and Pltmimer. 
The volume of liquor business done in these small places was amazing. 
Red Lake Falls received 218 tons of whiskey and hard liquor and 
45 carloads of beer within the short period of five months and sixteen 
days. Trosky had 250 people and one saloon, which paid an annual 
license of $8,000.00, and employed fifteen bartenders. The testimony 
showed that in four months between April 1 and July 31, 1917, one 
of the three saloon keepers at Ceylon in Martin County had re- 
ceived shipments of beer aggregating 6,290 cases and shipments of 
hard liquor aggregating seventy-five tons. 

Although Plummer had not to exceed 350 people, 2,728 gallons of 
whiskey, brandy, gin, alcohol and wine, and 100,118 gallons of beer 

36 



were delivered there by the Soo Railroad between July 1, 1917, and July 
1, 1918. 

The liquor shipped to such places was not all consinned there. Part 
of it was, but a large amount was re-distributed through the adjacent 
dry counties. Men from the surrounding coimtry visited these centers 
for the purpose of drinking and the places became nests of disorder. 
The roads leading to and from them were traveled by noisy crowds of 
roisterei^s, decent people were excluded from the highways and out- 
raged by the indecent language and conduct of drunken men, and the 
regular authorities were quite powerless to handle the problem. These 
places were thus also a sburce of demoralization over a wide territory 
extending as far south as Camp Dodge, near Des Moines, in Iowa. 
The reports of the conditions were appalling. So many of oiu" young 
workers had been taken into the army that if the crops were to be har- 
vested the best services of those left at home were required. The 
continued operation of these sources of moral disease and contagion 
was inconsistent with the utilization of the state's man power, and its 
efficient application to satisfy war needs. The Commission first tried 
to remedy the evil by limiting the hours in which liquor could be sold in 
these places to the hours between nine A. M. and five P. M., and by 
limiting sales to liquor consumed on the premises where sold. When 
it appeared that this plan was not effective, it closed the offending 
saloons and put them out of business. 

in. THE PRESERVATION OF PUBLIC ORDER. 

The Commission calls attention to two only of many episodes which 
illustrate its work for the preservation of public order. 

(a) The I. W. W. 

In 1916, there had been labor trouble on the Range, accompanied 
by disorder, violence and the destruction of property. The I. W. W. 
promoted them. In 1917, the headquarters of the I. W. W.'s agri- 
cultural division was in Minneapolis and the elevator and mill district 
along the river was thronged with this organization's loafers. There 
were authentic reports that the 1916 trouble on the Range would be 
repeated in 1917, and meetings at Virginia, Minn., and other points 
were advertised to be held on May day and to be addressed by im- 
ported men and women agitators. 

(1) The Commission closed the saloons and other loitering places in 
the mill and elevator district of Minneapolis by Order No. 1, already 
referred to. 

(2) It prepared a vagrancy ordinance for enactment by municipalities. 
This defined professional agitators as vagrants, and tmder it the agi- 

ST 



tators imported for the May day meeting were arrested and incarcerated 
as soon as they came within the state. With their orators in jail, the 
meetings were abandoned. 

(3) On June 20, 1917, the Commission called a conference at the 
Capitol of the public officials of the Range cities and villages and 
Duluth, explained to them the dangers which would flow from the in- 
terruption of the mining industry during the war as threatened by the 
agitators who were planning meetings and strikes in the Range district, 
and pledged and secured their loyal cooperation for the preservation 
of order and the prosecution of work. 

(4) The Commission sent a representative to Washington who, tmder 
its instructions, laid before the Department of Justice the evidence 
it had acctimulated of the I. W. W. plans and induced the seiztire of 
books and papers of the organization and the subsequent indictment 
of its leaders at Chicago, which were followed by the conviction of 
W. D. Haywood, head of the I. W. W., and one hundred of his fellow 
workers. 

(b) The Street Railway Strike. 

In October, 1917, there was a strike of certain employes of the Twin 
City Rapid Transit Company. The cessation of its service meant 
the interruption of business in all lines, including the munition fac- 
tories and other establishments engaged in war contracts. 

On October 9th the Commission met representatives of the company 
and of the strikers and after a hearing made the foollwing Order: 

"Whereas, a strike is now existing by reason of a dispute between 
the Street Railway Company and a portion of their employes, and 

Whereas, their differences have narrowed down primarily to the 
previous discharge of fifty-seven men and their possible re-employ- 
ment, and 

Whereas, officials of the Street Railway Company have stated 
that it is not the policy of the company tp discharge employes on 
account of membership in any organization, and 

Whereas, unionism or non-unionism should not, dtiring the war, 
be involved, 

IT IS ORDERED that the chairman advise that the strike be 
called off at once by the men striking and that the men go to work 
immediately and, in that event, it is ordered that the Street Railway 
Company reinstate the men who suspended their work on the 
morning of October 6, 1917, in the positions held by them at the 
time and that the status of each of the fifty-seven discharged men 
be immediately thereafter investigated by this Commission, 

38 



and that those who were unfairly discharged be reinstated when 
the Commission shall so order." 

The men returned to work and the troubles ceased until November 
3, 1917, when a communication was received from certain employes to 
the effect that the company was not observing the terms of the order. 
The Commission appointed a committee of three representative citizens 
to investigate and report. On November 19th, 1917, this committee re- 
ported certain recommendations which had been agreed on by all parties 
to the controversy. One of the recommendations so agreed upon was 
that the wearing by the employes of buttons and other insignia of either 
imion or non-union affiliations should be discontinued during working 
hours in the interest of peace and order. The Commission approved 
these recommendations including the button provision, because they 
had been agreed to by all the interested parties. Some of the labor 
leaders thereafter repudiated the arrangements and demanded that 
the button provision be rescinded. Having been made by the agree- 
ment of all parties concerned, it could not be rescinded without the 
consent of all. The Company and the overwhelming majority of the 
employes approved its making, observed it and continued their duties. 
A small minority refused to return to work although the Commission 
had at their request ordered their reinstatement by the company. 

There followed meetings engineered and addressed by Non-Partisan 
League leaders, professional politicians and imported agitators de- 
nouncing and attacking the Commission. Violence and disorder 
occured in the public streets of St. Paul, and the destruction of prop- 
erty, which the local authorities proved unable or unwilling to prevent. 
Forty-two men were injured by the rioters. Then came threats of 
general strikes instigated by political agitators, a demand for federal 
intervention and commimications and visits from federal officials, 
asking that the Commission recede from its position. The Commis- 
sion felt that it could not modify the stand it had taken. The so- 
called button order was made only upon the request and agreement 
of the parties involved. As shown by its previous order in the 
matter it sympathized with the workingmen's aspirations for a better 
status, but it felt that this was a local matter which had been settled 
between the parties, a view taken by President Wilson in September, 
1918, in a similar matter. The stand of the Commission in this con- 
troversy was recently sustained by the National War Labor Board. 

If law and order and the proper administration of government were 
to obtain in the state, the Commission could not yield. A govern- 
ment which would surrender and consent to the repudiation of a 
solemn judgment not only entered in a proceeding to which the ob- 
jecting interest was a party, but entered by his consent and under 

39 



his stipulation, and which woiild surrender under the pressure of 
violence, threats and the appeals of influential officials, would be a 
legitimate object of popular contempt and a traitor to the principles 
of civil liberty on which our institutions rest. The Commission did 
not yield. The Governor called out the Home Guard, which had 
been organized by the Commission. This force patrolled the streets 
of St. Paul and Minneapolis and restored order. The street cars con- 
tinued to operate and to carry the workmen to the factories engaged 
in munition making and other war industries, and the general strike 
did not ensue because the great mass of Minnesota workers are patriots 
who recognize the sanctity of law, and that the victory of our armies 
abroad would be of no value if accompanied by the discrediting and 
overturn of our government at home. 

IV. ENFORCEMENT OF COMISSION'S ORDER BY THE STATE 
EXECUTIVE. 

Under the constitution the military forces of the State are subject 
to the order of the Governor. The act creating the Commission pro- 
vided that the Governor "shall have the same powers in relation to 
the Home Guard as are now conferred upon him by the constitution 
and laws of the State in relation to the other military and naval forces 
of the State.** Pursuant to this power the Governor called out several 
companies of the Home Guard to quell the riots on the streets of St. 
Paul during the aforesaid street car strike. 

The stand taken by the Governor in enforcing the Commission*s 
said labor orders is also shown in the following telegrams sent by him 
to the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of War and Samuel Gompers, 
President of the Federation of Labor, in reply to telegrams from them 
asking him to use his efforts in reopening the Commission's award: 

"Louis F. Post, Acting Secretary of Labor, Washington, D. C. The 
orders of the Public Safety Commission were adopted after the submission 
to it by both parties of the matters in dispute, and said orders were issued 
upon the imderstanding that the recommendations orginally adopted 
were satisfactory to botit sides. Interference at this time will simply 
result in an attempt to defy duly constituted authority of Minnesota. As 
Governor of this commonwealth I shall use every power at my command 
to uphold the dignity of the State and to protect the rights of all concerned. 
Should the time arrive when we need Federal assistance to maintain our 
laws I shall not hesitate to call upon you. J. A. A. Bumquist, Governor of 
Minnesota." 

"To Newton D. Baker, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C. 

"On Dec. 1, I sent the following telegram to the acting secretary of 
labor in reply to telegram from him: 
(Telegram quoted above.) 

"Since sending the above telegram, conditions are less favorable 

40 



to a re-opening of the decision already rendered than at the time of sending 
it because of tiie riots which have since occurred. 

"Submission of disputed questions to arbitration at this time would 
practically mean arbitrating the arbitration already concluded. Re-open- 
ing of the- decision as matters matters now stand would be a surrender 
of government by reason of riots and agitation and would be an incentive 
to further riots and agitation. 

"Under orders adopted by the Safety Commission, men in the employ 
of the street railway company have a right to their union cards. They have 
the privilege of belonging to any union they wish to join. They have a right 
to wear union or non-union buttons on civilian clothes, but because there 
was continual irritation between the men themselves and between the men 
and the public by reason of some wearing non-union buttons and others 
union buttons, a committee appointed by the Commission upon representa- 
tion made to it that such an order would be willingly acquiesced in by both 
sides made a recommendation that buttons be not worn on imiforms at 
the present time. The Safety Commission adopted that recommendation. 
No principle of unionism therefore is attacked. 

"There is no vital issue involved and no reason whatsoever for sjrm- 
pathetic strikes. Because of the technical objection referred to and from 
otiier information we have, it is apparent that there is back of the 
present unrest some other reason for the agitation than the orders of the 
Commission. J. A. A. Bumquist, Governor of Minnesota." 

"Samuel Gompers, Washington, D. C. 

"The dispute referred to in your telegram was submitted to the Safety 
Commission on application of the car-men's tmions and a decision was 
duly rendered. The Safety Commission, by its orders, made it possible 
for them to save their organizations. Obedience on the part of both sides 
is all that is necessary. If you, as President of the American Federation 
of Labor, will use the great influence of your position to secure, on the part 
of the tmion men, a compliance with an order adopted by a department of the 
State government after full hearing and with the understanding that it 
would willingly be complied with by both parties and adopted for the pur- 
pose of preserving pubUc peace, you will be pursuing a just and patriotic 
com-se which will be of benefit to the cause of labor. Violations of govern- 
mental orders cannot be permitted nor can such orders be modified by 
reason of such riots as occurred here last week or because of a continual 
agitation on the part of self-seeking politicians and enemies of our govern- 
ment. Outside interference has only prolonged the controversy, which 
has been greatly exaggerated in reports to you and others. Patriotism 
demands obedience to a just order which, in no way, was intended to 
attack the principles of unionism and which in fact does not do so. J. A. A. 
Bumquist, Governor of Minnesota." 

A similar position was taken by the Executive in enforcing the liquor 
orders of the Safety Commission. 

On July 1, 1918, the Governor, against whom a restraining order 
had been issued in the District Court of Ramsey County, sent the 
following order to the Adjutant General: 

WHEREAS, it is reported that certain saloons at Blooming Prairie are 
openly defying an order of the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety, 
and 

WHEREAS, the conditions in said village are disclosed by ample evi- 
dence before said Commission to have been an intolerable ntiisance and 
the permission of such a defiance of constituted authority would be exceed- 
ingly dangerous to the peace and order of the Commonwealth, 

41 



THEREFORE, you are hereby ordered to investigate the situation in 
said village and close the saloons that are violating ^e law and keep the 
same closed by the use of such of the National Guard as is necessary for 
said purpose, until the validity of the order involved has been determined 
by the courts of this State. 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor. 



Under date of July 13, 1918, said District Court of Ramsey Cotinty 
made an order requiring the Governor and the Adjutant General to 
show cause before the court why they should not be punished as for 
a contempt, the act complained of being the orddir of the governor 
of July 1, 1918, directing the adjutant general to close three liquor 
saloons at the village of Blooming Prairie then operating in defiance 
of the order of the Safety Commission of May 14, 1918. 

In reply to a telegram of the attorneys of the owners of the saloons 
involved asking the Governor to appear in court in response to said 
order of the District Court, he sent the following telegram: 

'*As the people of the state have through their constitution imposed 
solely upon tiie Governor the duties of the Commander in Chief of our 
military forces, I, as the servant of the people and responsible to them, 
have no right under that constitution to consent to the court's jurisdiction 
in the matter referred to in your telegram. To do so would be to admit 
that there are as many commanders-in-chief in this state as there are 
judges of our cotirts. If attorneys for those who are openly and defiantiy 
violating the law are going to be able, especially in war time, to hinder the 
exercise of the executive military authority through the securing of ex 
parte temporary restraining orders and thereafter by the many possible de- 
lays incident to legal procedure, results disastrous to the peace and order 
of the state must necessarily follow. Out of respect therefore to the 
people of our commonwealth and their executive department of government, 
which the courts have uniformly held is not inferior to the judicial, but of 
equal dignity and co-ordinate with it, and in view of the fact that our 
Supreme Court has decided that the Governor cannot be interfered with 
when he is performing political or governmental duties which require the 
exercise of judgment or discretion, and least of all in matters which are mili- 
tary in their nature, I must in answer to your inquiry state that I cannot 
personally attend court on Saturday morning. Out of respect to the 
judicial department, however, I have notified the Attorney General to 
present to tiie courts my position in relation to this litigation. < 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor of Minnesota." 



In the decision filed by the State Supreme Court on August 9, 1918, 
in the case of State of Minnesota ex rel J. A. A. Bumquist et al,* Re- 
lators, vs. District Court 2nd Judicial District et al, the Supreme Court 
held "that the trial court was without jurisdiction to proceed against 
the relator Bumquist, since it appears that in closing the saloon he 
was in good faith discharging a constitutional duty, placed upon him 
as Governor, to take care that a duly enacted law was faithfully ex- 
ecuted." 



TEAM WORK WITHIN THE STATE 

In the performance of its duties the Safety Commission has had 
the benefit of helpful co-operation with volimtary organization, agencies 
or forces working to the same end. The purpose of the creation of 
the Commission was in part to assist in co-ordinating the voluntary- 
agencies and ejfforts and serve them with counsel, direction and aid. 
It goes without saying that but for the splendid initiative and patriot- 
ism of the people and the many voluntary organizations the results 
of the labors of the Commission as a creative force would have been 
comparatively modest. 

The most powerful agency were the newspapers of the state, 
which with few exceptions struck and sustained a high tone of loyal 
agitation. The county officers performed duties outside their statu- 
tory obligations with real zeal and fidelity. The patriotic leagues, 
loyalty leagues, four minute men associations and other similar bodies 
were of great value in kindling the fires of patriotism. The Safety 
Commission acted as a clearing house for the exchange of information 
and ideas between the several local or special agencies and organiza- 
tions of other states or of federal origin, and helped many of them by 
pecuniary allowances from time to time. The Commission's meetings 
were the occasion of hearings of delegations from every section of the 
state and from abroad, and its office was kept busy with correspondence 
with people and bodies on every subject related directly or indirectly 
to the war. In this way effective team work and imion of efforts 
between all were secured and greater results for the public good achievedj 



MINNESOTA'S WAR CONTRIBUTIONS 

Minnesota, with her loins girded up as outlined in the foregoing 
pages, may justly be proud of her contributions to the nation's war 
power. With a population not exceeding 2,400,000 people at the pre- 
sent time, she sent 112,000 men to the military or naval forces of the 
country. From some little hamlets, even before the selective service 
act went into effect, the whole male population of military age enlisted 
in the service. She bought of the successive issues of Liberty bonds 
with increasing liberality, as the following figures will show: 

First Loan, $49,933,750; Second Loan, $74,157,500; Third Loan, 
$98,793,350; Fourth, $133,315,250. In all, $356,199,850.00, or approxi- 
mately $150.00 dollars per capita of the population, or about 730 
dollars for each family of five. The amount of war stamps sold in 
Minnesota aggregates $30,000,000.00 in roimd figures and the State 



contributed nearly $5,000,000.00 to the Red Cross and more than 
$5,000,000.00 to the Y. M. C. A. and associated organizations. In 
spite of the drain upon its man power the state's production of iron 
ore was not only kept up to normal but perceptibly increased. The 
results of the crop census taken last stmimer, as far as they are tabu- 
lated indicate that the area of almost every crop was markedly in- 
creased in 1918, and that the farmers of the state had responded readily 
to the appeals of the national food administration for increased pro- 
duction of hogs, cattle and other live stock. 

Minnesota jimiped from ninth place in 1917 to fifth place in 1918 
among the states in the relative value of her farm products. Only 
Illinois, Iowa, Texas and Georgia outranked her in 1918 in aggregate 
production of the coimtry's great staples. These few statistics which 
make no note of individual doings elsewhere commented on, show that 
Minnesota did its part in the war. 

But greater than all the things that may be coimted, measured or 
weighed was the new spirit bom among our people imder the stress 
of war and the perils of our common country. It is true to a large 
extent that, when it came, the war found Minnesota a state of scattered 
or even disjointed communities, many of which felt that they had 
little or nothing in common with the others. Each lived its life apart 
from the others, and in many instances mutual understanding and 
S5mipathy between them were lacking. These separatist tendencies 
were burned out in the furnace of common duty, which kindled the 
fires of American partiotism even in sluggish hearts and carried even 
to the backwoods man a new vision of America and her mission in 
the world. 

Minnesota has had a new birth in consequence of the world war. 
Her people have become welded into a compact body united in the 
spirit of true Americanism. This is a gain out-weighing all her sacri- 
fices — an invaluable gain for herself and the whole nation. 

Dated as of January 1st, 1919. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BuRNQUiST, Chairman, 

C. H. March, Vice-Chairman, 

H. W. LiBBY, Secretary, 

Clifford L. Hilton, Attorney General, 

J. F. McGee, 

A. C. Weiss, 

Thos. E. Cashman. 

44 



APPENDIX 



REPORT OF EXAMINATION 

of Books and Affairs of the Minnesota Commission'of Public Safety. 

Period covered by examination^ Aprilil6, 1917, to December31)11918. 

Date of Audit January 2, 1919. 

ANDREW E. FRITZ, 



Receipts. 



PUBLIC EXAMINER 



Appropriation, Chapter 261, Laws 1917 .. $1,000,000.00 
Refunds 8.084.00 



Disbursements. 

Warrants issued April 16, 1917, to Dec. 
31, 1918, for Soldiers' Pay and Suste- 
nance $ 488,337.78 

Warrants issued April 16, 1917, to Dec. 

31, 1918, for all other purposes 278,495.01 

Balance, December 31, 1918 241,251.21 



Refunds. 

Commissioners' expense $ 105.35 

Salaries 716.26 

Soldiers' pay roll 308.66 

General expense 97.31 

Printing and publicity 66.50 

Newspaper subscriptions 12.00 

Home Guard expense 20.24 

Soldiers' dependents 210.00 

Revolving Funds: 

John Lind (bread fund) 1,481.90 

Carlos Avery (fish fund) 1,000.00 

Employment Bureau 765.78 

Regimental Funds: 

Col. W. J. Murphy 2,500.00 

4S 



$1,008,084.00 



$1,008,084.00 



Camp Cody Athletic Fund : 

Dr. L. R. S. Ferguson $ 800.00 



$ 8,084.00 

Warrants Issued: 

Commissioners' expenses and steno- 
graphers' services 9,430.47 

Salaries of regular employes 55,539.96 

Miscellaneous service 12,028.18 

General Expense : 

Office supplies, etc. 2,954.06 
Furniture and equipment (including motor truck for 

military, $1,417.00) 3,966.24 

Postage 13,764.39 

Printing and publicity 76,344.86 

Subscriptions to Papers 986.52 

Telephone and telegraph 2,670.92 

Freight and express 1,413.96 

Badges 324.75 

Miscellaneous 1,085.88 

Traveling Expense : 

Employes 7,003.21 

Miscellaneous (itncludes expense of cotmty directors, 
meeting called by Commission, fuel and food bu- 
reaus and womens' committees) 12,115.19 

Salaries and expenses of special investigators 5,933.75 

Labor Bureau: 

Rent 1,750.00 

Salaries 10,588.39 

General expense 1,978.65 

Soldiers' pay and sustenance 488,337.78 

Forest fire fighting 6,718.41 

Street car strike expense 6,558.81 

Home Guard: 

Coats and caps 22;869.50 

Miscellaneous expense 471.41 

Loans to Soldiers' Dependents 747.50 

46 



Revolving Funds: 

Employment Bureau $ 1,000.00 

Carlos Avery (fish marketing) 1,000.00 

John Lind (bread market) 1,500.00 

P. A. Ragatz (produce market) 2,000.00 

Welfare Funds : 

Battleship Minnesota 2,200.00 

1st Regiment 2,500.00 

2nd Regiment 2,500.00 

3rd Regiment 2,500.00 

1st Field Artillery 2,500.00 

2nd Field Artillery 2,500.00 

Brigade Staff Gen. F. E. Resche 250.00 

Camp Cody Athletic Fund (L. R. S. Ferguson) 800.00 



$ 766,832.79 



The sums of $800.00 paid to Dr. Ferguson for the Camp Cody 
Athletic Fund and $2,500.00 paid to Col. Wm. J. Murphy as welfare 
fund for the 2nd Field Artillery have been refunded. 

The Commission has established four departments in connection 
with its various activities, vvz: a labor bureau, a department for 
taking fish from state lakes tmder the supervision of the Game & Fish 
Commissioner, a bread marketing department and a department for 
the marketing of produce. Each of these departments was advanced 
a stun of money for a revolving fund. 

The employment btu*eau received $1,000.00, of which $765.78 has 
been retiumed to the state treasury and there are bills outstanding 
against various persons and firms which when collected will make up 
the difference. 

The fishing department received $1,000.00, which has been refunded 
to the state treastuy. In addition there is cash and property in the 
hands of the Game & Fish Commissioner, aggregating approximately 
$35,000.00, which represents net proceeds from the sale of the fish 
taken from various lakes in the state. 

The bread marketing committee has refimded $1,481.90 of the 
$1,500.00 ttuned over to them as a revolving fund. The balance 
was used for expenses. 

4y 



The produce marketing department was given a revolving fund 
of $2,000.00. This department has not at the date of this examina- 
tion closed up its affairs nor refunded the amount of the contingent 
fund to the state treasury. Cash on hand and bills receivable in ex- 
cess of the amoimt of the revolving fund were found by the examiner, 
full report of which will be made as soon as the accounts are closed up. 

Charles Foster, 

Corporation Examiner. 



CHARGES AGAINST NEW ULM OFFICIALS 

To Hon. J. A. A. Burnquist, 

Governor of Minnesota. 

The Public Safety Commission has carefully investigated the movement which 
had its public expression in the meeting at New Ulm on July 25, 1917, and which 
since then has had expression elsewhere. The facts as disclosed are as follows: 
On Monday, July 23, 1917, four or five young men, residents of Brown Coimty, 
who had been drafted under the conscription act, consulted one Albert Pfaender, 
city attorney of New Ulm, as to whether they could be constitutionally required to 
perform military service for the United States in Europe. Pfaender is an educated 
man, about 40 years old, a member of the bar, and of the Minnesota State Bar 
Association, who has served in the State Legislature and as an officer in the State 
Militia on the Mexican border. Instead of advising them that they could be so 
required as he well knew or ought to have known, and instead of advising them that 
it was a soldier's duty to quietly and without question obey and submit to the 
orders of his superiors, he encouraged them to believe that there was some hope, 
tmder the constitution, of their escaping foreign service, and arranged with them 
for a further conference which others of the drafted men would attend. Under 
this incentive a public meeting was arranged for the following Wednesday evening 
in the city park. What men made the arrangements, does not appear, except that 
the drafted men who consulted Pfaender, and other drafted men, Louis Vogel, 
the county auditor, Henry Berg, the county treasurer. Dr. L. A. Fritsche, the Mayor 
of New Ulm, and the other men who are hereinafter referred to as speakers were 
active in the movement. The secrecy as to the personnel of the promoters is an 
indication that the illegal character of the movement was recognized, as is also 
the method of annoimcement used. 

Published notices were avoided, and the telephone and word of mouth were 
the chief media of spreading information about the proposed gathering. On 
the evening of July 25, 1917, a procession was formed in the city streets, headed 
by Louis Vogel, the county auditor, who acted as marshal, and which included a 
band and many of the drafted men of Brown County, and of adjoining counties. 
This procession marched to the public park where between 8,000 and 10,000 people 
assembled. Dr. L. A. Fritsche, the Mayor of New Ulm, who is also first vice presi- 
dent of the Minnesota German American Alliance, presided over the meeting, 
and the speakers were Captain Albert Steinhauser, F. H. Retzlaff, a local merchant, 
and M. F. Wagner and A. Ackermann, teachers in the Dr. Martin Luther College 



of New Ulm, and the last its president. The only available record of most of the 
speeches is the recollection of the hearers. But Pfaender's speech was written out 
in advance and the Commission has a copy of it. From this and the reports of 
hearers about the other speeches it would appear that their general purport was 
this: With a cunning, but futile effort to observe the letter of the law, while out- 
raging its spirit, the speakers advised the drafted men to submit to the draft in 
form, expressed doubt as to whether they could, under the constitution, be required 
to serve abroad, suggested that before such foreign service was required, some 
method of avoiding it could be foimd, and criticised the war as unworthy of popular 
support. Pfaender, in his speech, was particularly incendiary. Perverting the 
President's declaration that this country had no quarrel with the German people 
as such, he demanded to know why, if this was so, our yoimg men should be sent 
abroad to fight against the German army, as murderers engaged in murder. The 
other speakers took the same key with varying degrees of violence. The words 
they used do not alone disclose their purpose. This is to be found also in the effect 
of their words on their hearers. What they said against the war and the legislation 
in connection with it, excited responsive enthusiasm in their audience, and instead 
of inspiring the drafted men to patriotically do their duty for the cause of God 
and their country, they were pictured as martyrs, dragged to an imjust fate by a 
tyrannical and cruel government. Intoxicated by the success of this meeting, 
and by the reception their speeches had, other meetings were organized in neigh- 
boring villages before which some of the same speakers, including Pfaender, made 
similar addresses. One of these subsequent meetings was held at Gibbons in spite 
of the protest and warning of the local authorities, and of Mr. W. F. Nelson, the 
Commission's representative, who happened to be there. The local authorities 
and Mr. Nelson tbld the organizers and speakers in advance that such a meeting 
was ill advised and was calculated to throw a monkey wrench into the government's 
machinery. But their interference was resented, and it was held in spite of it. 
In the coiu'se of this speech Pfaender is reported to have said: 

"I am going to do my little bit towards keeping the boys from going to 
France to fight." 

The Commission has learned most of these facts from Mr. Pfaender himself, 
who, at his own initiative, appeared before it on his own behalf, and as attorney 
for Mr. Vogel, Mr. Berg and Dr. Fritsche, at its meeting of August 14, 1917, at 
which meeting you were not present. The purpose of Pfaender's appearance was 
to effect some settlement with the Commission of the trouble which had arisen. 
He made no admission that what had happened was a mistake, except as it affected 
him personally, but he did express regret at the situation because it had involved 
him in personal discredit which might diminish his earning capacity. He said in 
substance that if the Commission would assume a concihatory attitude, the whole 
thing might be pleasantly disposed of, but that if it acted in a hostile spirit, there 
would be resistance, and he suggested that to the end that the Commission might 
better understand the nature of the propaganda, it should have a representative 
at the future meetings of the same sort, which he thus disclosed, it was proposed 
to hold in other places. His preposterous idea was that the Commission should 
thus co-operate in such proposed meetings and exercise a kind of benevolent super- 
vision over them, gently suggesting restraint, if it seemed to its representatives that 
the agitation was exceeding safe limits. In reply to inquiries from the Commission 
(a) as to whether Mr. Pfaender and those whom he represented wanted the United 
States to win the war with Germany, Mr. Pfaender gave a qualified answer, saying 
that this depended on what was meant by winning the war, and (b) as to what 
patriotic purpose public officers like himself and Mr. Vogel and Mr. Berg and Dr. 

49 



Fritsche, and a teacher like Professor Ackermann thought they were advancing 
by criticising the government and its motives in the prosecution of the war, he 
stated in substance that Brown County was peopled largely by what he called 
German Americans, that they were reluctant in war with men of their own blood 
and that if the drafted men had not been encouraged by the speakers to believe 
that they might escape foreign service, there would have been organized opposition 
to registration tmder the conscription act. 

It was hard for it to treat with courtesy one so minded, but the Commission 
nonetheless tried to appeal to his patriotism. It called his attention to the local 
discredit he and his assocaties were bringing on Brown County, and to the harm 
they were doing in misguiding yoimg men, and to these facts among others: 

(a) that there was nothing peculiar and special about the situation in Brown 
Cotmty, that nobody wanted our yoimg men to risk their lives in France, and that 
the women in other counties were not making bandages which might be used to 
bind their own children's and brothers' woimds, because they enjoyed doing so; 
that all this was not a matter of pleasure with them, but a matter of duty. 

(b) that when the British Government in the 18th Century tmdertook to mark 
lines on the ocean through which alone colonial commerce could go, as Germany 
did in February last for our ships, although the colonies were weak in population 
and wealth, their people under the leadership of John Hancock and Samuel Adams 
and George Washington, took up arms against men of their own blood, that American 
institutions were bom in this fight of Englishman against Englishman, and that 
fifty years ago, the young men of the North did not hesitate to wage war on their 
kin of the South to the end, that the black man might be freed from the shackles 
which bound him. 

(c) that the United States was not the aggressor in this war, that we went 
into it reluctantly, that it was not a war of races, but a war of principles, and that 
the sacrifices of life and treasure our people are making was in order that the world 
may be safe for democracy, and that a government which kills women and little 
children and destroys the property of non-combatants may not tritimph. 

Without making any promises or giving any assurances as to what would happen 
if this was done, it asked that he and his associates should reflect on their conduct, 
and if they found it in their hearts to do so, they should join in a public statement 
protesting their loyalty, admitting their course had been ill advised, promising 
to participate in no further seditious gatherings, and advising that no more such 
meetings be held. It said to him that in this way he might perform a valuable 
service and help the Commission in its work as defined by the statute of "applying 
the military, civil and industrial resources of the state most efficiently towards the 
defense of the state and nation and toward the successful prosecution of the war." 
When he appeared to acqtdesce in this plan, a moderate writing embodying these 
features was drafted in language which was not inconsistent with the signer's self- 
respect, and he took it to New Ulm on Tuesday to submit to his associates. But 
what was said made no impression. He has since telephoned the Commission's 
attorney that he and his associates are unwilling to sign any writing. In other 
words, they will not help quell the disturbance they have created. 

The Commission is advised by its attorney that imder the constitution the gover- 
nor has no authority to remove an inferior officer except for malfeasance or non- 
feasance in the performance of the duties of his office, and that before an inferior 
officer is removed, he is entitled to a hearing. The Commission is also advised 
by its attorney that the declaration of war by Congress is a law, and that for a 
public officer, like a Mayor or a City Attorney, who is charged with the duty of 
law enforcement, to publicly criticise a law like the declaration of war, and the acts 



of Congress which have been passed for its enforcement, and take any other position 
than that as long as these laws are in force, they should be unquestionably obeyed, 
constitutes malfeasance in the performance of the duties of his office. As far as 
an officer like a county auditor is concerned, the Commission is advised that the 
Governor's powers would not be so clear, were it not for the provisions of the con- 
scription act and the regulations under it, which make him the Clerk of the local 
exemption board but that, in view of this provision and his acceptance of the posi- 
tion, similar conduct on a county auditor's part also constitutes malfeasance in 
office. It is an appalling situation when loyal merchants and bankers can be boy- 
cotted in Minnesota because they are loyal, as the Commission is advised is the case, 
when a county auditor, who is clerk of the local exemption board encourages and 
even leads a procession of drafted malcontents and when the mayor and city attorney 
of one of the most prosperous cities of the Minnesota Valley openly promote a 
Pro-German propaganda. 

The Commission will in due course formulate in more specific shape the charges 
of malfeasance hereinbefore presented, and respectfully advises that proceedings 
be instituted under the appropriate statutes for the removal of L. A. Fritsche from 
the office of mayor of the city of New Uhn, of Albert Pfaender, from the office 
of city attorney of the city of New Ulm and of Louis Vogel from the office of auditor 
of Brown County, Minnesota. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY 

John S. Pardee, 

Secretary. 



THE COAL CRISIS IN THE NORTHWEST 

The following telegrams show efforts made to relieve the coal situation and 
prevent a coal famine in Minnesota and the other northwestern states. 

To the President of the United States, 
White House, Washington, D. C. 

May 28, 1917. 

In consultation today with prominent coal dock men of head of Lake Superior 
it appears that the conditions surrounding the movement of coal from Lake Erie 
to the head of the lakes to supply the Northwest during the coming fall and winter 
with bituminous coal are daily growing more serious. Today the supply is three 
million tons short of a year ago, which shortage represents thirty-three and one 
third per cent of the total requirements, not including the Steel Corporation, of 
bituminous coal absolutely necessary to supply the territory entirely dependent 
upon head of lakes for fuel. 

Unless our fuel supply is adequate the movement of crops, iron ore and other 
necessaries will be seriously handicapped and the people of this section will be 
subject to intense suffering and hardship next winter. 

I am reliably informed that large quantities of coal are being shipped daily 
all rail from eastern mines to points in Ohio, Michigan and Indiana for the sole 

51 



purpose of stocking against next winter's needs. These points can be and normally- 
are taken care of in the fall and winter months by all rail shipments after the lake 
requirements are suppHed. If present conditions continue, reversing the usual 
policy, it will not be possible to get the necessary coal up the lakes. I earnestly 
request that some extraordinary measures be adopted immediately to insure an 
adequate supply of bituminous coal moving to Lake Erie for the head of Lake 
Superior. 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST. 

Washington, D. C, May 30, 1917. 

Hon. J. A. A. Bumquist, Governor of Minnesota, 
St. Paul, Minn. 
The President has ttuned over to me your telegram. We have een looking 
into this situation with much concern and I believe you will find at t e end of the 
season there will be no delinquency in coal for the Northwest. The worst thing 
that can happen is to become alarmed now with regard to coal, for it leads to rush 
orders and hoarding. The coal cars at Lake Erie points have been pooled, which 
will allow greater expedition. Of course we have no means of extending the amount 
of tonnage on the lakes. This matter will be given constant attention. 

LANE, Secretary. 

The White House, Washington, 

St. Paul, Minnesota, July 4, 1917. 
THE PRESIDENT: 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety begs leave to report to you that 
the conditions in this State are eminently satisfactory so far as peace, quiet, and the 
orderly pursuit of industry are concerned, but our people are looking forward to 
the coming winter with much apprehension; the cost of fuel has virtually doubled 
since last year. We may be able to protect the people against local abuses in the 
coal trade, but we are helpless to afford relief against extortion at the mines and in 
interstate operations. The cost of coal at the mines last year, as we are advised, 
was one dollar and forty-five cents a ton for the same coal it is now proposed to 
charge three dollars and fifty cents a ton at the mines, which is virtually the same 
as the cost of the coal at the docks in Duluth last season. The ntunerous ore car- 
riers leaving our state daily return empty, and our coal supply is exhausted. We 
earnestly tu-ge early and adequate action for the relief of the situation. The great 
work of this state in producing food and supplies should not be hampered and the 
well being of our people menaced by the greed of producers and inefficiency of 
carriers in other sections. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, Governor and Chairman ex-officio. 

Senator Frank B. Kellogg, 
Senator Knute Nelson, 
Washington. 

People here exceedingly alarmed over coal situation. Public Safety Commission 
continually besieged for assistance. Can you give us authoritative information 
as to the present status? 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 
Governor. 

52 



Washington, D. C, July 12, 1917. 



Governor J. A. A. Bumqviist, 
St. Paul, Minn. 



Have had interviews with Interstate Commerce Commission and with Advisory 
Committee Council of Defense urging additional shipments to Northwest. Will 
see them again today and wire you. 

Frank B. Kellogg. 

Washington, D. C. July 12, 1917. 

Telegram recdved. Am unable to give you definite information. Situation 
still seems to be in air. Nothing effective can be done until so-called food control 
bill is passed. This bill will provide for control of fuel. 

Knute Nelson. 
Washington, D. C, July 13, 1917. 

We received your telegram. Had conference with Mr. Willard of Advisory 
Committee of Council of National Defense and Mr. Peabody having charge of the 
coal situation. We find that every effort is being made to supply boats with coal 
for the Northwest and that an increasing amount is now moving. Large amotmts 
of bituminous from Illinois and Iowa coal fields are going by rail and being distrib- 
uted to interior points in Minnesota and Dakotas. From now on we believe 
boats will be fairly supplied with coal. They assure us if not sufficient coal goes 
by lake, they will send it up by rail in the winter. We were further told by Mr. 
Peabody that the coal price would not exceed three dollars per ton for bituminous 
at mine and it might be less. This is a considerable reduction in price heretofore. 
So far as congressional action on the coal price is concerned it is still pending in 
the so-called food and fuel control bill. We have done everything possible for the 
last two months to increase shipments to Northwest. 

Knute Nelson, 
Frank B. Kellogg. 



UNITED STATES SENATE, COMMITTEE ON 
INTERSTATE COMMERCE, 

August 10th, 1917. 

TO THE PRESIDENT: 

Dear Mr. President: We are threatened with a great shortage of coal in Minnesota 
at this time, and tmless extreme measures are taken, there will be great suffering 
next winter. Compared with last year, the shortage at Duluth exceeds 3,000,000 
tons. The only way they can get their coal is by the ore boats taking return car- 
goes of coal to Duluth and other large ports. These boats are now, to a consider- 
able extent, going back empty. 



Judge McGee, of the Minnesota Safety Commission, has been here for a week 
and has investigated the situation in connection with the Board of Raikoad Presi- 
dents and Mr. Clark, of the Interstate Commerce Commission. After conferring 
with them, he took a trip to Cleveland and consulted numerous coal operators and 
lake carriers, and from his investigation, it is clear the deficiency in the coal supply 
arises from car shortage as well as motive power on the part of the railroads to move 
coal to Lake Erie ports. Coal is also being diverted to other places where it is 
not needed. 

From a consultation with all of these men and with Judge Lovett, it is apparent 
that the only way to relieve the situation is to have an order issued immediately 
by you, or under your authority, under the so-called Priority Shipment Law just 
passed. Under this law, you maiy issue orders, either direct or through such per- 
son or persons, or the Interstate Commerce Commission, as you may designate. 

We realize it is out of the question for you to direct the matter personally, and 
that it will be necessary for you to appoint some ofl&cial or officials to act for you 
in the premises. It seems to us in an analogy to the Food Control Bill, it woulid 
be best not to have a Committee, but to have one person act in this matter in your 
behalf, and while we do not send this communication with a view of suggesting 
persons for appointment, we know Mr. Clark of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission and Judge Lovett, and believe them exceptionally well qualified for such 
position. 

The coal situation in Minnesota and the Northwestern States depending upon 
the lake ports, is exceedingly urgent, and, therefore, we write you this letter in the 
hope that you will appoint a man as speedily as possible to act in your behalf to 
make such priority orders as may be necessary to insure shipments to the lake 
ports. 

We are. Most respectfully yours, 

(Signed) Knute Nelson, 

Frank B. Kellogg. 

St. Paul, Minnesota, August 14, 1917. 
THE PRESIDENT: 

The coal situation here threatens certain disaster in Minnesota and the two 
Dakotas unless the priority bill passed last week becomes a law and is put into 
effect and its provisions vigorously executed. May we hope for immediate action? 

Commission of Public Safety, 

By J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Chairman and Governor. 

THE WHITE HOUSE, Washington, August 16, 1917. 
My Dear Governor Bumquist: 

Your telegram of August fourteenth has confirmed my impression of the critical 
situation with regard to coal in Minnesota and Wisconsin and the two Dakotas, 
and I write to assiu-e you that I shall do all in my power to make the priority law 
effective for the relief of that pa^ of the country. 

Cordially and sincerely yours, 

WOODROW WILSON. 
Hon. J. A. A. Bumquist, Governor, 
St. Paul, Minnesota. 

M 



LAW CREATING COMMISSION 

. CHAPTER 261— S. F. No. 1006. 



An act providing for the Minnesota Public Safety Commission, defining its 
powers and duties in event of war and otherwise, and appropriating money for 
carrying out the purposes thereof. 

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Minnesota: 

Section 1. Creation of Minnesota Commission of Public Safety. — There is 
hereby created a commission consisting of seven (7) members, to be known as 
the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety. The Governor and Attorney 
General shall be ex-officio members of such commission and the Governor shall 
be chairman thereof, and the other members shall be citizens of the State and shall 
be appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the senate, if in 
session, and if not in session, the confirmation thereof to be as soon thereafter as 
the senate shall be convened, and such appointees shall hold office during the 
pleasm-e of the Governor. 

Sec. 2. Organization. — Such commission shall elect one of its members 
vice-chairman and he shall perform the duties of the chairman as such during the 
absence or inability of the chairman to act. Such commission shall have power 
to adopt by-laws for its government and the convenient transaction of its business, 
to change such by-laws from time to time and to provide for thte discharge of the 
duties of such commission by subordinate officers, agents, sub-committees and 
otherwise, and to prescribe the duties of all such subordinate officers, agents 
sub-committees and employes. All official acts of the commission shall require 
a majority vote of the entire commission. 

Sec. 3. Powers of commission — may acquire property — to cooperate with 
United States government — examination of persons — removal of oflicials other 
than constitutional officers. — In the event of war existing between the United 
States and any foreign nation, such commission shall have power to do all acts 
and things non-inconsistent with the constitution or laws of the State of Minnesota 
or of the United States, which are necessary or proper for the public safety and for 
the protection of life and public property or private property of a character as 
in the judgment of the commission requires protection, and shall do and perform 
all acts and things necessary or proper so that the military, civil and industrial 
resoiu-ces of the state may be most efficiently applied toward maintenance of the 
defense of the State and Nation and toward the successful prosecution of such 
war, and to that end it shall have all necessary power not herein specifically 
enumerated and in addition thereto the following specific powers: 

1. Said Commission may purchase, lease, hire or otherwise acquire any and 
all property of every kind and nature in its judgment necessary or desirable for use 
for any of the purposes aforesaid. 

2. It may seize, condemn and appropriate all such property for any of the 
uses aforesaid, and provide for determining the value of such property and of 
making proper payment therefor. 

3 . Said Commission shall have power and it shall be the duty of said Commis- 
sion to cooperate with the military and other officers and agents of the United 
States Government in all matters pertaining to the duties and functions of such 
commission and shall aid the Government of the United States in the prosecution 
of any such war and in relation to public safety so far as possible. 

6S 



4. Said Commission may require any person to appear before it or before 
any agent or officer of such commission for examination and may examine any 
such person under oath as to any information within the knowledge of such person 
and require such person to produce for inspection any writings or documents 
under his control, and to that end the district court of any county in the State 
shall issue a subpoena upon the request of any of its agents or officers, and all 
said agents and officers shall have power to administer oaths and take testimony 
and to procure the punishment for contempt of any person refusing to answer 
or produce writings or documents requested by such commission, by any such 
district court. 

5. Said Commission may inquire into the method of performance of his 
duty by any public official other than the constitutional officials of this State, 
and may advise the Governor to remove any such official from office, if in the 
judgment of the Commission the public interests demand such removal. Upon 
being advised to remove any such official by said Commission, the Governor is, 
hereby authorized summarily to remove such public official. 

Sec. 4. To provide for comfort of persons in military and naval service. 

— Said Commission shall have power, in addition to the powers hereinbefore 
granted, to provide for the comfort of any persons in the military service of the 
United States or of the State of Minnesota who shall enlist in any such war or 
who, at the time of the commencement thereof, shall be residents of the State of 
Minnesota, and in addition thereto shall also have power to provide and pay for 
the support and maintenance of any person or persons dependent for support 
upon any soldier in the military service of the State of Minnesota, or of the 
United States, while such soldier is in such service, and shall have power to ex- 
pend such sums as it may deem necessary for the relief of any such soldier or any 
person dependent upon him, and shall make proper ru^es and regtilations concern- 
ing the same. Said Commission shall also have power to provide for any comforts, 
clothing or other aid for any person in service of the United States government 
on the battleship Minnesota during the continuance of any such war. 

Sec. 5. Fifty cents per day to be paid to enlisted members of Minnesota 
national guard. — Said Commission shall pay to each enHsted member of the 
national guard of the State of Minnesota who honorably served in the Minnesota 
military organizations on the Mexican border service pursuant to the call of the 
President of the United States made June 18, 1916, in addition to the pay received 
by him from the Federal Government, the sum of fifty (50) cents per day for each 
day of such service and of such enHsted man after being mustered into Federal 
service, such payment to be made upon duly signed and receipted pay rolls to be 
prepared by the commander of the company, battery or detachment of which such 
men were members, blanks therefor to be furnished by the Adjutant General; 
said pay rolls to be checked and approved by such Adjutant General. Such 
payment to be made upon the State Auditor's warrant drawn upon the State 
Treasurer as soon as practicable after the muster out from the United States 
service of any member entitled to such pay. 

Sec. 6. To pay Minnesota national guardsmen from time of mobilization 
until mustered into service of United States Government. — Said Commission is 
also authorized to pay all members of the national guard of Minnesota for service 
from the time said guard was mobilized pursuant to the order of the United 
States Government for service on the Mexican border until the time the members 
of such guard were actually mustered into the service of the United States upon 
pay rolls showing such service, properly certified to by the Adjutant General 



of the State of Minnesota, and all sums so paid, which shall hereafter be refunded 
to the State of Minnesota by the United States Government, shall, when received 
by the State Treasurer, be credited to the appropriation herein provided for said 
Commission and shall be used for any of the purposes provided for in this act. 

Sec. 7. Other powers pertaining to enlistment, organization and main- 
tenance of home guard. — Said Commission is hereby authorized to do all acts and 
things necessary to provide for the enlistment, organization and maintenance of 
a home guard for service in the State of Minnesota, to consist of such numbers 
and units of organization and officers as may be prescribed by said Commission, 
and said Commission may secure proper arms and equipment for said guard from 
the United States Government or otherwise, and shall have full power in all things 
to provide for the organization, equipment, subsistence and maintenance thereof, 
and said home guard may receive pay and allowances not in excess of that pre- 
scribed for the national guard or volunteers in Federal service. All of the officers 
of said guard shall be appointed by the Governor, who shall have the same powers 
in relation to said guard as now conferred upon him by the Constitution and laws 
of the state in relation to the other military and naval forces thereof. 

Sec. 8. Termination at conclusion of peace. — When peace shall be concluded 
between the United States and any and all foreign nations with which the United 
States is now or hereafter may be at war, the Commission shall proceed, as soon as 
practicable, to close up all of its affairs and upon termination thereof shall make 
report to the Governor of its acts and expenditures, and the powers and duties 
of such Commission shall terminate within three (3) months after the conclusion of 
peace and shall sooner terminate if the Governor shall determine and proclaim 
that the exercise of the powers and duties of such Commission are no longer 
necessary for public safety. The Governor is also authorized to determine and 
to proclaim that it is necessary to continue such Commission in existence for a 
longer term than three (3) months after peace and shall, in such case, fix 
the period of the termination of such Commission by proclamation'. 

Sec. 9. $1,000,000 appropriated. — There is hereby appropriated from any 
money not otherwise appropriated, the sum of one million dollars, to be imme- 
diately available, for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this act, the 
same to be paid out on the order of said Commission as provided in its by-laws. 

Sec. 10. Unconstitutionality of one section not to affect other sections. — 
The provisions of this act are separable and not dependent, and if any provision, 
section, or part of either, is held unconstitutional, the same shall not affect any 
other part of this act. 

Sec. 1 1 . This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage. 

Approved April 16, 1917. 

CONSTITUTIONALITY OF THE LAW UPHELD 

COOK V. BURNQUIST et al. 
(District Court, D. Minnesota, Third Division. July 16, 1917.) 

1. Courts 101 — Number of Judges — Preliminary Injunction. 

Judicial Code (Act March 3, 1911, c. 231) § 266, 36 Stat. 1162 (Comp. 
St. 1916, § 1243), providing that no interlocutory injunction suspending or 
restraining the enforcement, operation, or execution of any state statute 
shall be issued, on ground of imconstitutionaHty, unless the application 
shall be heard and determined by three judges, at least one of whom shall 

67 



be a Supreme Court Justice or Circuit Judge, does not include unconstitu- 
tionality under the state Constitution, but only under the federal Con- 
stitution. 
[Ed. Note.— For other cases, see Courts, Cent. Dig. § § 344-550, 629.] 

2. Courts 303 (2) — Federal Courts — ^Jurisdiction — Suits Against State* 

A suit to enjoin the members of the Minnesota Public Safety Commission 
from enforcing an order of such Commission, or prosecuting or threatening 
to prosecute for nonobservance of such order, injunction being asked upon 
the ground that such order is not within the purview of the statute creating 
the Commission, is not a suit against the state, of which federal courts are 
denied jurisdiction. 

[Ed. Note. — ^For other cases, see Courts, Cent. Dig. § 844^-1 

3. Constitutional Law 26 — Grant or Limitation of Power — State Con- 

stitutions. 

State Constitutions are limitations, and not grants, of power. 

[Ed. Note. — For other cases, see Constitutional Law, Cent. Dig. §§ 36-38.] 

4. Constitutional Law 81 — Police Power — Scope and Extent. 

The proper extent of the exercise of the police power by a state is deter- 
mined by the necessities of the situation, within constitutional limitations. 

[Ed. Note. — For dther cases, see Constitutional Law, Cent. Dig. § 148.^ 
6. Injunction 114 (2) — Public Safety Commission — Persons Entitled. 

An order of the Minnesota Public Safety Commission, declaring it neces- 
sary and proper for the public safety, the protection of life and property, 
and as a matter of military expediency and necessity, that licensed saloons 
be closed at 10 p. m. and remain closed until 8 o'clock the following day, 
and providing that the city council, board of trustees, or other governing 
body of municipalities forthwith proceed to enact ordinances executing the 
provisions of such order, is not directed against any individual, and, if 
it orders any one to do anything, is directed only against city councils, 
etc., and hence an individual who has voluntarily closed his saloon at 10 p. 
m., and who has not been ordered by the Public Safety Commission to do 
anything, or been threatened in any way by it, is not entitled to an injunc- 
tion restraining the enforcement of such order, as any loss suffered by him 
is not directly attributable to the Commission's order. 

[Ed. Note.— For other cases, see Injtmction, Cent. Dig. §§ 203-210.' 

6. War 4 — Precautionary Measures — Safety Commission — Powers. 

Such order was within the power granted to such Commission by Laws 
Miim. 1917, c. 261, § 3, providing that, in the event of war, such Commis- 
sion shall have power to do all acts and things not inconsistent with the 
Constitution or laws of the state, or of the United States, which are neces- 
sary or proper for the public safety and the protection of life and public 
property, or private property requiring protection, and to do all acts and 
things necessary or proper, so that the military, civil, and industrial re- 
sources of the state may be most efficiently appHed toward the maintenance 
of the defense of the state and nation, and towards the successful prosecu- 
tion of such war, and it was also authorized by the specific provision of 
such section that the Commission shall have power and it shall be its duty 
to co-operate with the miHtary and other officers and agents of the United 
States government, and to aid it in the prosecution of such war and in re- 
lation to public safety so far as possible. 

58 



7. War 4 — Safety Commission — Powers. 

Laws Minn. 1917, c. 261, § 3, authorizing the Public Safety Commission 
to do all acts and things "non-inconsistent with the Constitution or laws 
of the state of Minnesota or of the United States,'* which are necessary 
and proper for the purposes therein specified, should not be narrowly con- 
strued, but as giving the power to do all things not inconsistent with the 
broad purposes or the underlying principles and fundamental requirements 
of the laws of the state. 

8. Constitutional Law 62 — War 4 — Safety Commission — Powers — 

Statutory Provisions. 

Laws Minn. 1917, c. 261, § 3, construed as authorizing the Public Safety 
Commission to require the closing of saloons at 10 p. m., is not invalid, as 
delegating legislative powers to such Commission, though under other 
statutes saloons may be kept open imtil 11 p. m., and until 12 p. m. under 
a city ordinance, as the Legislature may leave the administrative details 
to a board or officer, and may permit a change of administrative details 
by a public board or individual, even after they have been enacted into 
the statute, and the power in question relates simply to an administrative 
detail. 

[Ed. Note. — For other cases, see Constitutional Law, Cent. Dig. §§ 94-102.] 
In Equity. Suit by Phil Cook against J. A. A. Bumquist and others. On 
application for a preliminary injunction. Motion denied. 

M. H. Boutelle and E. S. Cary, both of Minneapolis, Minn., for complainant. 

Ambrose Tighe, of St. Paul, Minn., for Safety Commission. 

C. D. Gould, of Minneapolis, Minn., for city of Minneapolis and its officers. 

BOOTH, District Judge. This suit is brought by the plaintiff against the 
members of the Public Safety Commission of Minnesota, the city of Minneapolis, 
its mayor its chief of poHce, and its city attorney, seeking to enjoin the defend- 
ants from enforcing an order of the Commission which is known as "Order No. 
7," or from enacting any ordinance or regulation enforcing the same, or from 
threatening to prosecute or from prosecuting for nonobservance of said Com- 
mission's order. 

The motion now under consideration is a motion made on behalf of the 
plaintiff for a preliminary injunction, and has been heard on a verified amended 
bill, several exhibits which have been introduced, and some little oral testimony 
on behalf of plaintiff, and on behalf of defendants a return to the order to show 
cause, consisting of a verified answer, certain affidavits, several exhibits and some 
oral testimony. 

The bill of complaint sets up, among other things, the official character of 
the several defendants, and that plaintiff is, and has been for some time, the 
proprietor of a saloon and restaiu*ant in the city of Minneapolis located at 25 
Washington Avenue North; that he has built up a large and lucrative business, 
and that he has been conducting the same in accordance with the laws of the 
state of Minnesota and the ordinance of the city of Minneapohs. The bill of 
complaint then alleges that on the 16th day of April, 1917, the Legislature of 
the state of Minnesota passed a certain act, which is chapter 261 of the Session 
Laws of 1917, entitled "An act providing for the Minnesota Public Safety Com- 
mission, defining its powers and duties in the event of war and otherwise, and 
appropriating money for canying out the purposes thereof," and the bill sets 
forth a synopsis of the act. It next sets forth that on or about June 5th said 
Commission caused to be adopted a certain order designated as "Order No. 7," 

59 



and served the same upon the various local officials and authorities of the state. 
It then sets out a synopsis of the order. It next sets forth that by various 
threats and otherwise the members of the Commission required the defendant 
mayor of the city of Minneapolis to instruct the superintendent of police of the 
city of MinneapoHs, and through him the police force, to enforce and carry out 
the terms of the order, and that the order has been carried out, and that the 
city council is threatening to pass an ordinance enforcing the provisions of the 
order. It then sets out that plaintiff has obeyed this order and closed his es- 
tablishment at 10 o'clock in the evening, whereas formerly he was accustomed 
to keep it open until 11 o'clock in the evening, in accordance with the provisions 
of the state law, and that by reason thereof he has suffered great loss and damage 
in his business. It then sets forth, first, that the act of the Legislature referred 
to is in contravention of the Constitution of the United States in certain specified 
partictdars; and, second, that said act, if it is construed as authorizing the Com- 
mission to make the Order No. 7, is also in contravention of the Constitution 
of the state of Minnesota; and, third, that if it is construed as not authorizing 
the issuance of the Order No. 7, then the act of the Commission in issuing Order 
No. 7 is without authority of law, and is a usurpation of power; and he prays, 
as I have already stated, an injimction and other relief. 

The answer of the defendants admits the passage of the act of the Legislature, 
and states certain facts and circumstances in view of which it was passed, admits 
the issuance of Order No. 7, and denies the other allegations of the complaint. 

[1, 2] At the commencement of the argument upon the motion for a prelimi- 
nary injunction, coimsel for plaintiff stated that the plaintiff does not seek a 
preliminary injunction on the first ground stated, namely, that chapter 261 violates 
the provisions of the federal Constitution, but that he seeks the injunction only 
on the second and third grounds. With that imderstanding the court overruled 
the objection of the defendants to the jtuisdiction of the court as at present 
organized; they claiming that, if such constitutional question was raised under 
the federal Constitution, at least, it required, under section 266 of the Judicial 
Code, the presence of three judges to constitute the court. The defendants 
also objected to the jurisdiction of the cotirt as at present constituted, claiming 
that the word "imconstitutional," as used in section 266 of the Judicial Code, 
refers not merely to the federal Constitution, but also includes imconstitutionality 
as regards the state Constitution. That objection was also overruled. The 
defendants also attacked the jurisdiction of the court on the ground that, even 
if it should be held that the act of the Commission complained of was not within 
the purview of said chapter 261, still the members could not be enjoined in the 
present suit, as this would be maintaining a suit against the state of Minnesota. 
This objection has also been overruled. 

Taking up the merits of the motion, the first question is: What is it that 
is sought to be enjoined by plaintiff? I have already read the prayer for relief 
contained in the bill. It has reference to Order No. 7. Now there are a number 
of things in Order No. 7, about which either there is no complaint in this bill, 
or no showing made upon which preliminary injunction can be based. For 
instance, there is no complaint here as to that provision of the order covering 
the closing of saloons tmtil 8 o'clock on the following day, instead of 5 o'clock 
on the following day; nor is there any complaint, or, if there is, there is no show- 
ing for an injunction, on the ground that no women or girls be permitted to enter 
such saloon, or be served therefrom at any time, because plaintiff's testimony 
is that he had no such trade; nor is there any complaint, or, if there is, there is 
no showing for an injunction, based upon the order so far as it touches dancing 

60 



performances, because the evidence is that there was no such performance in 
the plaintiff's establishment. 

[3] The really vital question in the case. is this: Whether an injunction 
should issue against the defendants to restrain them from taking any steps 
to prevent the plaintiff from keeping his saloon open between the hoiu-s of 10 
and 11 o'clock at night. The argimients of counsel upon this motion have taken 
a very wide range, and perhaps necessarily so. The question of the poUce 
powers of the state have been discussed; the nature and character and the ex- 
tent of these powers; also the question of the delegation or the right of delegation 
of legislative power by the Legislature to other branches of the government 
or to administrative boards. It is not necessary, in my view of the situation, to 
discuss at great length any of these questions. The police power of the state 
of Minnesota, and indeed the police power of every state in the United States, 
is exceedingly broad, and the state Constitutions are simply limitations of power, 
and not grants of power. 

[4] The question of what is a proper exercise of the police power may be 
determined at one time as including certain matters and excluding others, and 
at another time may be determined as including even those matters that there- 
tofore had been considered as excluded. The proper extent of the exercise of 
the police power is determined by the necessities of the situation, within con- 
stitutional limitations. 

The question of delegation of power by the Legislature, and especially legis- 
lative power to other branches of the government, to administrative boards 
or to individuals, has been a question that has caused a great deal of controversy 
in the courts, not only in the state courts, but also in the federal courts. It 
has been said that the Legislature makes the law, that the executive executes 
the law, and that the judiciary expounds or determines what the law is. Of 
course, that is true as a general statement; but as a matter of fact it is of little 
help in any particular case, because practically all the cases that arise are border 
line cases, and the question to be determined is whether the particular act is a 
legislative act, or whether it is a judicial act, or whether it is an executive or 
an administrative act. This question of delegation of power is one that has 
received the attention of the Supreme Court of the United States, as well as 
the Supreme Courts of the states. The latest decision of the Supreme Court 
of the United States is that of First National Bank of Bay City v. Attorney 

General of Michigan et al., 243 U. S. , 37 Sup. Ct. 734, 61 L. Ed. , handed 

down on June 11th of this year, in which was involved the act of Congress, 
approved December 23, 1913, establishing the Federal Reserve Board (38 Stat. 
261, c. 6 [Comp. St. 1916, § 9794]), and particularly section 11 (k) of the act, 
giving to that board authority "to grant by special permit to national banks 
applying therefor, when not in contravention of state or local law, the right to 
act as trustee, executor, administrator, or registrar of stocks and bonds under 
such rules and regulations as the said board may prescribe." The question 
arose whether or not that was a delegation of legislative power to the Federal 
Reserve Board, such as was not authorized by the Constitution of the United 
States. The Supreme Court in passing upon that question used the following 
language: 

"Before passing to the question of procedure, we think it necessary to do 
no more than say that a contention which was pressed in argument, and which 
it may be was indirectly referred to in the opinion of the court below, that the 
authority given by the section to the Reserve Board was void, because con- 
ferring legislative power on that board, is so plainly adversely disposed of by 

61 



many previous adjudications as to cause it to be necessary only to refer to them.'* 
Then they refer to a number of cases, and among others to the case of the 
United States v. Grimaud, 220 U. S. 506, 31 Sup. Ct. 480, 55 L. Ed. 563, which 
was a case where Congress had passed an act with reference to the preservation 
of forests in the United States, and had placed the carrying out of the plan in 
the hands of the Secretary of Agriculture, with power to make rules and regula- 
tions, and providing that violations of those rules and regulations should be 
followed by punishment. It was claimed that this was giving the Secretary 
of Agriculture power to make a law. It was held by the Supreme Court that 
it was simply a delegation to him of administrative power, and although he had 
made rules and regulations, violation of which was followed by pimishment, 
yet nevertheless this was not a legislative act on his part within the meaning 
of that term in the oft-stated principle that a legislative act could be passed 
by Congress only, and not by boards or by individuals. 

There are many decisions in the state of Minnesota, also, as to this power 
of delegation, and a number of them have been referred to in arguments of 
coimsel at this hearing. The tendency, not only in Congress, but in state Legis- 
latures, is more and more to commit to administrative boards, or to individuals, 
or to some other branch of the government, administrative details. In the 
case of Alexander v. Mclnnis, 129 Minn. 167, 151 N. W. 901, the court in its 
opinion said, quoting from a previous decision of that court: 

"The marked tendency of legislation in recent years, not only in this state 
but in other states, has been, to a large degree, to break away from the theory 
of three separate and independent departments of government, by imposing upon 
other departments duties and powers of a legislative character, which the courts 
have been inclined to sustain. Perhaps few, if any, cases are to be found, how- 
ever, where statutes imposing purely legislative duties and powers upon the 
courts have been upheld; but the authorities are numerous, sustaining statutes 
which impose upon the courts powers involving the exercise of both judicial 
and legislative functions — such as the condemnation of land for public purposes, 
the appointment of commissioners of election in proceedings for adding territory 
to mimicipal corporations, and laying out and establishing highways. The 
proceedings provided for by the statute under consideration involve the exercise 
of both legislative and judicial powers. The question of the propriety or neces- 
sity of public ditches to drain marshy or overflowed lands is one of legislative 
character. The condemnation of land through which such ditches may be 
constructed, the assessment of damages, and the determination of the legal 
rights of parties affected are judicial. The exercise of all these powers is in- 
volved in proceedings imder this statute." 

It must be taken, then, as true in Minnesota that the tendency is more and 
more to leave administrative details of legislation to either some other depart- 
ment of the government or to boards or to individuals. It need not, however, 
be decided in this case whether that has been done in chapter 261, Laws 1917. 
It is possible that this case may be disposed of upon a much narrower basis. 

Order No. 7, which is attacked, reads as follows, so far as appertains to this 



"The Minnesota Commission of Publifc Safety hereby finds and declares it 
necessary and proper for the public safety, for the protection of life and property, 
and as a matter of military expediency and necessity: 

"That all licensed saloons in the state of Minnesota be closed at 10 o'clock 
p. m., and remain closed until 8 o'clock the following day, and that no intoxi- 



eating liquors be sold, served, or otherwise disposed of therein between the 
hours last above stated." 

"That the city council, board of trustees, or other governing bo.dy of all 
municipalities in the state of Minnesota forthwith proceed to enact ordinances 
executing the provisions of this order and prescribing suitable penalties for 
violation of such ordinances," etc. 

[5] Narrowly considered, upon its face, this so-called Order No. 7 does 
not purport to be a law. It does not purport to be an ordinance. It is not 
directed against any individual in the state of Minnesota. There are no pen- 
alties announced in the order for nonperformance of it, or nonobservance of it. 
There are no threats made in the order, saying what will happen or what will 
not happen to persons who pay no attention to the order. 

Narrowly construed, this Order No. 7 is simply an announcement of certain 
findings or a declaration by the PubHc Safety Commission that certain things 
are necessary and proper for public safety, for the protection of life and property, 
and as a matter of military expediency. If any one can be considered to have 
been ordered to do anything, it is the city coimcils, boards of trustees, or other 
governing bodies of mtmicipalities in the state of Minnesota. It is possible 
that the grammatical construction of the order will allow that interpretation 
to be placed upon it, and that it is a direct order to the city council, although 
I think it is fairly open to argimient that it is not such order, even as to the 
city council. But, conceding that it is an order to the city coimcil, the council 
of the city of Minneapolis and the authorities of the city of Minneapolis are 
not here making any complaint. They are not complaining that any threats 
have been issued to them, or that they have been ordered by the Public Safety 
Commission to do anything which they do not wish to do, or which they have 
not the power to do. The complaint here is by a private individual, that by 
this order of the Public Safety Commission he has been injured in some way 
in his business. He has had no direct communication from the Commission. 
He has voluntarily closed his saloon at 10 o'clock p. m., instead of 11 p. m. 
Giving this narrow construction to Order No. 7, the court would not be justified 
in granting the application of the plaintiff for a preliminary injtmction in this 
case, because there is no sufficient showing made by the plaintiff that his loss, 
if any, is so directly attributable to any act of the Commission as woiild authorize 
an injtmction to issue upon such construction of Order No. 7. 

But I do not think that an injtmction should issue if a much broader con- 
struction is given to Order No. 7 than I have indicated. Let us look at the law 
tmder which this Commission of Public Safety was established. It is entitled 
"An act providing for the Minnesota Public Safety Commission, defining its 
powers and duties in event of war and otherwise, and appropriating money 
for canying out the purposes thereof." There are contained in that act ten 
sections. The first section simply is the creating part of the act, creating the 
Commission. The second provides for organization of the board. The fourth 
section grants power to the Commission to make provision for the comfort of 
certain persons in military and naval service, and to provide and pay for the 
support and maintenance of any person or persons dependent for support upon 
Minnesota soldiers in the military service of the state of Minnesota or of the 
United States, while such soldier is in service. Section 5 provides for the pay- 
ment by the Commission of 50 cents per day additional pay to enHsted members 
of the Minnesota National Guard, for their period of service on the Mexican 
Border. Section 6 provides for the payment of National Guardsmen from the 
time of mobilization until they are mustered into the service of the United 

63 



States government. Section 7 relates to enlistment, organization, and main- 
tenance of a Home Guard. 

It is thus seen that the powers conferred on the Commission are of a broad 
and varied character. In this case it is section 3 that is particularly attacked. 
Section 3 grants, in addition to the powers granted in sections 4, 5, 6, and 7, 
certain special powers, five in number, and also certain general powers. The 
special powers are not attacked in this proceeding. It is the general powers 
contained in the first paragraph of section 3 that are attacked. That paragraph 
reads as follows: 

"In the event of war existing between the United States and any foreign 
nation, such Commission shall have power to do all acts and things non-incon- 
sistent with the Constitution or laws of the state of Minnesota or of the United 
States, which are necessary or proper for the public safety and for the protection 
of life and public property or private property of a character as in the judgment 
of the Commission requires protection, and shall do and perform all acts and 
things necessary or proper so that the military, civil and industrial resources 
of the stiate may be most efficiently applied toward maintenance of the defense 
of the state and nation and toward the successful prosecution of such war, and 
to that end it shall have all necessary power not herein specifically enumerated 
and in addition thereto the following specific powers." 

That section contemplates several ends to be attained: First, the public 
safety is to be guarded. Protection is to be afforded to life and public property, 
and also to private property of such a character as in the judgment of the Com- 
mission reqiiires protection, and, further, the Commission is ordered to do all 
acts and things necessary or proper so that the military, civil, and industrial 
resources of the state may be most efficiently applied for the maintenance of 
the defense of the state and nation, and toward the successful prosecution of 
such war. 

[6] No attempt has been made here to show that the acts which are sought 
to be accomplished by Order No. 7 are not germane to the pmposes set forth 
in section 3, namely, pubHc safety and the protection of life and property, and 
the application of the resources of the state to accomplish certain ends. I 
take it that no attack can successfully be made along that line, because it goes 
without saying that the order here in question, if it were carried out, would 
have some relation at least, whether direct or indirect, to the ends sought to be 
attained; that is, public safety, and the protection of life and property, and the 
application of the resoiurces of the state to the specific purposes. In fact, it 
can hardly be disputed that the relation would be direct, and the effect sub- 
stantial. Nor do I think that the issuance of order No. 7 is without the pur- 
view of the provisions of chapter 261. In my judgment, said order is within 
special power No. 3 in section 3 of the act, and also within the powers granted 
in the first paragraph of section 3 of the act. 

[7] The words "non-inconsistent with the * ♦ ♦ laws of the state of 
Minnesota," contained in section 3, shotdd not be given a narrow construction, 
in view of the broad purposes of the act and the great emergency it was intended 
to meet. The words above quoted should rather be held to mean not inconsistent 
with the broad purposes, the underlying principles, and the fundamental re- 
quirements of the laws of Minnesota. With such a construction placed upon 
section 3, the Order No. 7 is well within the purview of the act. 

The only question that remains in the case is whether or not the Legislature 
of the state of Minnesota could authorize the Commission to do the acts here 
in question, namely, to issue Order No. 7. It is claimed that the Legislature 

64 



could not so authorize the Commission, because it would be a delegation of legis- 
lative power. As has been stated here upon the argument by counsel for the 
defendants, the authorities are almost overwhelming to the effect that a federal 
court is very loath to declare a state statute contrary to the state Constitution, 
when that state statute has not received an interpretation at the hands of the 
Supreme Court of the state. That doctrine has been announced by the Supreme 
Court of the United States, not only in the case of Louisville & Nashville Rail- 
road V. Garrett, 231 U. S. 298, 34 Sup. Ct. 48, 58 L. Ed. 229, but also in the 
case of Prentis v Atlantic Coast Line, 211 U. S. 210, 29 Sup. Ct. 67, 53 L. Ed. 
150, also in the very recent case of Pulhnan Co. v. Knott, 235 U. S. 23, 35 Sup. 
Ct. 2, 59 L. Ed. 105, and it has also been announced numbers of times by lower 
courts. So that, imless it is perfectly plain on the face of it that section 3 of 
chapter 261 of the Statutes of Minnesota of 1917 is a delegation of legislative 
power, such as is forbidden or not allowed under the state Constitution, this 
court would hesitate to hold that statute unconstitutional. 

[8] In my view of this section 3, while there may be some doubt as to just 
what powers are conferred on the Commission, yet I think that section 3 pur- 
ports to confer merely administrative powers upon the Commission. It is 
claimed that the act here in question, viz. the issuance of Order No. 7, is not an 
administrative act, but is an exercise of legislative power. The argument of 
counsel for plaintiff seems to proceed along the Hne that, inasmuch as the statutes 
of the state have heretofore allowed saloons to be kept open until 11 o'clock 
at night, and inasmuch as the ordinance of the city of Minneapolis has allowed 
saloons to be kept open tmtil 12 o'clock at night, that this provision of the statute 
is the law, and that this order No. 7, which provides that saloons shall close 
at 10 o'clock at night, imdertakes to change that law; that this is legislation 
and that such legislation cannot be had through this Commission. It seems 
to me that that argument is not sound in all respects. The Legislature of the 
state, in passing a law, may include in that law many administrative details, 
as well as the main vital provisions of the law, or it may pass a law covering a 
matter broadly and in general, leaving the administrative details to a board, 
or to certain designated persons; but the administrative details of any particular 
matter included in a statute still maintain their character of administrative 
details, and the Legislature may pass an act permitting the carrying out of a 
change of these administrative details to a public board or to an individual, 
even after they have been enacted into the statute. It seems to me that this 
was intended to be done by section 3 of chapter 261 ; that it was not an attempt 
to confer the legislative power of the state of Minnesota upon the Public Safety 
Commission, but was simply an attempt to confer power over administrative 
details in respect to matters pertaining to certain specified things. Those 
things are the public safety, the preservation and protection of life and property, 
and the efficient application of the resources of the state toward certain specified 
purposes. So long as the act of the Commission is simply that of administrative 
detail, carrying out those various matters, and looking towards those various 
ends described and designated in section 3, it seems to me that such act is not 
without authority of the statute, nor legislative in the broad sense, but rather 
administrative. 

That being the view that I take of this law and of this order, it follows that 
the law is not in contravention of the state Constitution, and it follows, also, 
that the act of the Commission here complained of is not without the purview 
of the statute,, chapter 261, but is within the purview of the statute; and, that 
being the case, the plaintiff is not entitled to a preliminary injunction, and the 
motion is denied. 

65 



HENNEPIN COUNTY DISTRICT COURT DOCKET NO. 166538 

State of Minnesota, District Court 

County of Hennepin. Fourth Judicial District. 

William R. Carroll, Plaintiff. 

vs. 
J. A. A. Bumquist, C. H. March, Clifford L. Hilton, 
Thomas E. Cashman, John F. McGee, A. C. Weiss, H. 
W. Libby, H. H. Wilburg and William Leehy, 

Defendants. 

The above entitled action was commenced in Ramsey County, and, on 
demand and afiSdavits of the defendants, was removed to Hennepin County. 
Plaintiff made and served notice of motion for a temporary injunction, which 
said motion was returnable on Monday, July 15th, 1918. 

An order to show cause was also made and served herein why a temporary 
injunction should not issue against said defendants, and each of them, as prayed 
for in the plaintiff's complaint, which said order to show cause was made return- 
able on the 15th day of July, 1918. 

The hearing on said motion for a temporary injunction and said order 
to show cause why a temporary injunction should not be issued was postponed 
from time to time, by consent of the Attorneys of the respective parties, or 
by order of this Court, until Tuesday, August 6th, 1918, at which time said 
motion and said order to show cause came duly on to be heard, P. J. McLaughlin 
and F. M. CatHn appearing as Attorneys for and on behalf of the plaintiff and 
James E. Markham, Ambrose Tighe, William A. Lancaster and David F. Simp- 
son appearing for and on behalf of the defendants. 

After hearing the arguments of counsel and duly considering the same. 

It Is Hereby Ordered, that plaintiff's motion for a temporary injunc- 
tion be and the same hereby is denied, and the order to show cause herein why 
a temporary injunction should not issue against said defendants be and the 
same hereby is discharged. 

And It Is Further Ordered, that the temporary restraining order 
which was heretofore and on June 29th, 1918, issued by the Court against said 
defendants be and the same hereby is set aside and discharged. 

By the Court, 

Wm. E. Hale, 
Judge. 
Dated this 9th day of August, 1918. 

MEMORANDUM 

This case was very fully and ably argued before me and at the close of 
the argument I took it under advisement until the Supreme Court of this state 
should decide the case of State of Minnesota ex. rel. J. A. A. Bumquist et al., 
Relators, vs. District Court, Second Judicial District, et al.. Respondents, think- 
ing that perhaps the Court might in its decision in that case touch upon the 
questions involved in the case at bar. That case was decided this morning 
and I have a copy of the opinion. The Coiut declined in that case to pass 
upon the question of the validity of Orders No. 17 and 34 issued by the Public 



Safety Commission appointed by the Legislature of this state and therefore 
it devolves upon me to take the responsibility of determining the validity of 
those orders. 

After listening to the arguments of coimsel and being fully advised in the 
matter I am of the opinion that those orders are valid and binding in all respects. 

W. E. Hale, 
Judge 



FINDINGS OF FACT 

No. 15228 
Alfred E. Rietz vs P. H. O'Keefe 

1. That the contestant, Alfred E. Rietz, has been for five (5) years con- 
tinuously a legal and qualified voter, elector, citizen and resident of the township 
of Empire, county of Dakota, State of Minnesota; that said Rietz, at the gen- 
eral election on the 5th day of November, 1918, was a candidate for the office 
of County Attorney for Dakota Coimty. 

2. That after said election of November 5, 1918, the county canvassing 
board for said Dakota Coimty duly met and canvassed the returns of said elec- 
tion, including the returns and votes as to the office of County Attorney; that 
said county canvassing board did duly make, certify and file with the Auditor 
for said Dakota County its statement that the said contestant had received 
two thousand four hundred and sixty -seven (2, 467) votes for the office of County 
Attorney and the said contestee two thousand four himdred and eighty (2,480) 
votes for said office; and duly declared the said contestee elected thereto; that 
thereafter the said County Auditor, on the application of said contestee issued 
to him a certificate of election to said office. 

4t * * 

4. That on or about the 10th day of September, 1918, the Minnesota 
Commission of Public Safety (established under the provisions of Chapter 261 
of the laws of 1917) duly made, published and issued a certain order called Order 
Nimaber 46, a copy whereof, together with certain instructions prepared by 
the Attorney General of Minnesota, appears in the evidence marked Exhibit 
**C;" that tmder and in pursuance of said order and not otherwise, there were 
cast by duly qualified voters of said coimty in the military or naval service of 
the United States, absent from the precincts where they were entitled to vote, 
sixty-four (64) ballots or votes for said office of County Attorney, whereof the 
said contestant Rietz, received twenty-one (21) and the said contestee, O'Keefe, 
received forty- three (43); that said ballots were known as "war ballots" and 
were separately canvassed by said county canvassing board under the heading 
of * 'soldier vote" and were included by said board in the said official canvass 
or statement above set forth, and credited to the contestant, Rietz, and the 
contestee, O'Keefe, in the respective amounts herein set forth; that said ballots 
and votes were cast under and in compliance with law and the order of said 
Minnesota Commission of Public Safety, and complied with the provisions 
of the laws of the state and with said order, Number 46; that, among other 
things, that the certificates in each case on the so-called "return envelope," 
in which said war ballots and ballot envelopes were enclosed were in the form 
provided by said Order Number 46, (Exhibit "C") and not as provided by 
said Chapter 261, Laws of the state of Minnesota, 1917; that the so-called "di- 
rections to voters" on the voter's certificate were not in the form provided by 

67 



said Chapter261, Laws of 1917, but in the form provided by said Order Num- 
ber 46; that in all other respects said war ballots were applied for, cast, voted, 
returned and counted under and in pursuance of said order Number 46, and 
in accordance with the laws of Minnesota, but not in accordance with Chapter 
261, Laws, 1917; that the said war ballots affected the result of said election 
for the office of County Attorney in favor of the contestee and against the con- 
testant. 

* * * 

7. That the contestee, P. H. O'Keefe, has been, for the past eighteen 
(18) years, continuously a resident and duly qualified voter and elector of the 
city of South St. Paul, Dakota Coimty, Minnesota; that on the said 5th day 
of November, 1918, he was a candidate for the office of County Attorney of 
said Dakota County. 

* * * 

CONCLUSIONS OF LAW 

1. That the contest and appeal herein be dismissed. 

2. That the contestee, P. H. O'Keefe, was, at the said election of the 
5th day of November, 1918, duly elected County Attorney of Dakota County, 
state of Minnesota. 

3. That said Chapter 261, Laws of 1917, is in all respects a constitutional 
enactment, and its provisions within the legislative power of the Legislature. 

4. That order number 46 of the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety, 
in order entitled "An Order Providing a Method Whereby Minnesota Soldiers 
and Sailors may Vote at the 1918 General Election" is a legal, valid and con- 
stitutional order and its provisions were within the terms and provisions of 
said Chapter 261, Laws of 1917, and was a legal and fair exercise of the authority 
and powers of said Commission. 

6. That the ballots and votes of the township of Empire were legally 
and rightfully included by said county canvassing board in its official return. 
6. That the contestee, P. H. O'Keefe, have Ten Dollars ($10.00) costs 
and his disbursements herein. 

Let Judgment Be Entered Accordingly. 
Dated Minneapolis, Minnesota, January 2, 19^19. 

(Signed) C. J. Rockwood, 
District Judge. 
MEMORANDUM 

No point is made against the soldier vote except that Chap. 261, Laws 
1917, is a delegation of legislative power, and that the order providing for this 
vote is not within the powers delegated. 

The argument is that the constitution will not permit the people of the 
State to make effective the whole power of the State for the preservation of 
constitutional government itself, except as the legislature is able to forsee and 
provide against all possible contingencies, — a thing which no legislature is wise 
enough to do. 

Our legislature was in session when war was declared, April 6th, 1917. 
It recognized its own ability to formulate rules that would meet all emergencies. 
It could not remain in continuous session. It did the only thing open to it 
to do, by creating a commission and empowering it in general terms to do during 
the period of the war whatever the exigencies of the war might require. 

The legislature at the same session showed that in its judgment the duty 
of prescribing the details of elections may be left to administrative boards. 

68 



Chap. 34 Laws 1917. 

Some argument has been made against the propriety of the order of the 
Commission designed to preserve to the soldier in France or in camp the right 
of ballot in civil elections. It clearly tends to preserve the morale of the army 
and to increase the country's fighting efficiency. It was not indispensable. 
Neither was chewing gum indispensable. American soldiers would have fought 
without either. Both were justifiable, and abundantly so. This order was 
some mitigation of the loss suffered by every man who bore arms. 

In time of riot the Governor of Pennsylvania called out the National Guard 
and issued an order directing the commanding general to enforce order. This 
officer set guards to a threatened house with instructions to "shoot to kill" 
if persons approaching failed to halt on command. One of the guards obeyed 
the order and killed a citizen who merely entered the gate after being halted. 
The guard was prosecuted. The Supreme Court gave him his freedom without 
trial on evidence that he had simply obeyed the order of his superior. 

Com. Ex. rel. Wadsworth v Shortall 206 Pa. 165. 

The court refused to follow the majority of the federal Supreme Court, 
in Ex. parte Milligan, 71 U. S. 127, where it is said that "martial rule can never 
exist where the courts are open, and in the proper and unobstructed exercise 
of their jurisdiction." It sustained the order of the governor, made without 
express statutory authority, invoking the law martial, and the act of the soldier 
who took human Hfe in obedience to that law. The decision is somewhat 
lengthy. Its essence is in two short paragraphs on page 172. 

"The resort to the military arm of the government, therefore, means that 
the ordinary civil officers to preserve order are subordinated, and the rule of 
force under military methods is substituted to whatever extent may be neces- 
sary in the discretion of the military commander. To call out the military, 
and then have them stand quiet and helpless, while mob law overrides the civil 
authorities, would be to make the government contemptible, and destroy the 
purpose of its existence. 

"The effect of martial law, therefore, is to put into operation the powers 
and methods vested in the commanding officer by military law. So far as his 
powers for the preservation of order and security of Ufe and property are con- 
cerned, there is no limit but the necessities and exigency of the situation. And 
in this respect there is no difference between a public war and domestic insur- 
rection. What has been called the paramoimt law of self-defense, common 
to all coimtries, has established the rule that whatever force is necessary is 
also lawful." 

The Act of 1917 is the institution of martial law by the legislature itself 
not in time of peace but after the outbreak of a war which threatened all con- 
stitutional government the world over. It surely cannot be unconstitutional 
to use all appropriate means to preserve the constitution itself. 

The common law rule which permits the destruction of buildings to stop 
a fire is strictly analogous. 

The Pennsylvania court did not make of the constitution a scrap of paper. 
It simply held that the State is never without lawful power to enforce the only 
conditions under which a constitution can live at all, namely, conditions of 
order, obedience to law, and respect for the rights of others — ^the very con- 
ditions to preserve which the present war was entered by the government and 
people of the United States. Minnesota will never cease to be grateful that 
it had a Legislature wise enough to create the Commission of Public Safety, 

69 



as well as a Governor and a Commission courageous enough to see that the 
arm of the state was not palsied while the war was on. 

C. J. ROCKWOOD, 

District Judge. 

BY-LAWS OF THE COMMISSION 



ARTICLE ONE 



MEETINGS. The Commission shall meet on *Monday in each week at 
10:30 o'clock a. m. at its office in the State Capitol, Saint Paul and at any other 
time or place to which such meetings may be adjourned. No notice need be 
given of these meetings or of any adjournments thereof. Additional meetings 
may be held at such times and places as may be designated in the notice thereof 
and may be called by the chairman or vice-chairman and shall be called by the 
secretary on the request of any two members. Twelve (12) hours notice of any 
such additional meeting, by letter, telegram, telephone or otherwise, shall be 
sufficient and any such additional meeting may be held without notice if all the 
members are present or if those who are absent shall consent to its being held in 
writing or by telephone. It shall not be necessary to specify in any notice of any 
meeting the business to be transacted thereat. All meetings shall be regular 
meetings and at them any business may be transacted. 

A record shall be kept of the proceedings at all meetings in a book to be 
provided for that purpose, and the record of any meeting shall be read or corrected 
at the next succeeding meeting unless such reading is expressly waived. At the 
beginning of the record of each additional meeting shall be recited the facts as 
to the notice of which the same is held. 

The meetings of the Commission shall be executive and attendance shall 
be limited to the membfers of the Commission and such of its employes as it may 
from time to time designate and other persons whose presence it may from time 
to time invite. Information as to the proceedings at any meeting may be given 
to the public only in written form, approved by the chairman or vice-chairman. 
The proceedings of the Commission shall be open to pubHc inspection except to 
such extent and in such particulars as the Commission shall in the public interest 
otherwise provide. 

ARTICLE TWO 

SEAL. The Commission may, by resolution, adopt at its pleasure a seal 
to be used for the authentication or attestation of such instruments as the Com- 
mission may direct. 

ARTICLE THREE 

OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES. The chairman shall preside at meetings of 
the Commission and shall perform such other duties as are incidental to his office 
or as may be from time to time prescribed by the Commission. 

The vice-chairman shall perform the duties of the chairman, as such, during 
the absence or inability of the chairman to act. The vice-chairman shall be 
elected by the Commission and shall hold office, as such, during its pleasiu-e. In 
case of the absence or inability of both the chairman and vice-chairman to act 

*May 23, 1917 amended by substitution of "Tuesday" for Monday. 

70 



the Commission may appoint a chairman pro tern, who shall have the powers 
and perform the duties of the chairman under such conditions. 

There shall be a secretary. *He shall be elected by the Commission and shall 
hold office at its pleasure, and shall receive such compensation as may be fixed 
by the Commission. He shall give his whole time to the work of the Commission, 
shall keep a record of its proceedings, have the custody of its documents and rec- 
ords and perform such other duties as may from time to time be specified by the 
Commission. 

ARTICLE FOUR 

EXECUTION OF INSTRUMENTS. All notices, orders and written con- 
tracts shall run in the name of the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety and 
be signed by the chairman or vice-chairman or chairman pro tem, as the case 
may be, and attested by the secretary or such other person as may be expressly 
designated therefor by the Commission. 

ARTICLE FIVE 

EXPENDITURES. No expendittu-e shall be made or obligation incurred 
on behalf of the Commission without authority from said Commission first had 
and obtained; but, in case of emergency the Governor and Attorney General 
may, on the Commission's behalf and without previous authorization therefor, 
incur obligations or make expenditures involving not to exceed in the aggregate 
one thousand dollars ($1,000.00). 

ARTICLE SIX 

PAYMENTS. Moneys, in the State Treasury available for expenditure by 
the Commission, other than those specified in sections 5 and 6 of chapter 261 
G. L. 1917, shall be paid out on vouchers approved on behalf of the Commission 
by the chairman or vice-chairman. 

ARTICLE SEVEN 

SERVICE OF ORDERS. The orders of the Commission shall, except as 
otherwise provided in special instances, be served by officers empowered under the 
law to serve civil process. 

ARTICLE EIGHT 

AUTHENTICATION OF RECORDS. A copy of any document, order or 
extract from the proceedings of the Commission, when certified to by the secretary 
as being a true copy of the original, shall be prima facie evidence, for all purposes, 
of the contents of the original document, order or record. 

ARTICLE NINE 

EXAMINATIONS AND INVESTIGATIONS. In examinations, disclosures 
and investigations which may be authorized or conducted under the proceedings 
provided for in section 3, subdivision 4 of said chapter 261, G. L. 1917, each mem- 
ber of the Commission shall be and be deemed an agent and officer thereof for 
the purposes of such examinations, disclosures and investigations without special 
order so designating him. 

ARTICLE TEN 

AMENDMENTS. These by-laws may be amended at any meeting of the 
Commission by a majority vote of the entire Commission, 

♦Sept. 11, 1917 amended by adding words "and an assistant secretary." 

71 



ORDERS 



ORDER NO. 1 

Relating to saloons in Bridge Square District. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety hereby finds and declares it 
necessary and proper for the public safety, for the protection of life and property, 
and as a matter of military expediency — 

FIRST 

That the sale of intoxicating liquor in the territory hereinafter described be 
prohibited and that all outstanding licences authorizing the sale of intoxicating 
liquor within said territory be revoked, provided that this prohibition shall not 
apply to licensed saloons now existing in said territory facing on Washington 
Avenue. 

SECOND 

That the operation of pool halls, moving picture theatres and other places of 
amusement of like character within said territory, not facing on Washington, 
Nicollet or Hennepin Avenues, be prohibited. 

IT IS THEREFORE ORDERED: 

I. 

That from and after the first day of May, 1917, and until a treaty of peace 
terminating the existing war is ratified, the sale of intoxicating liquor and the 
operation of pool halls, moving picture theatres and other places of amusement 
of like character within the territory hereinafter described, with the exceptions 
hereinbefore stated in paragraphs First and Second hereof, be and the same are 
hereby prohibited. 

II. 

That the Mayor and City Council of the City of Minneapolis forthwith 
revoke all outstanding licenses of the character designated in paragraphs First and 
Second hereof within said territory, said revocation to be effective as of May 
1, 1917. 

III. 

That in the territory excepted in paragraphs First and Second no licenses 
be issued during the period herein specified except renewals of existing licenses 
and covering the same locations. 

IV. 

The territory hereinbefore referred to is that part of the City of Minneapolis, 
Hennepin County, Minnesota, described as follows: 

Commencing at the intersection of First Avenue North and Washington 
Avenue in the City of Minneapolis, as now laid out, thence northeasterly along 
the center line of said First Avenue North to the center of the Mississippi 
River, thence in a northwesterly direction along the center of said Mississippi 
River to a point which is the center line of Fourth Avenue North produced into 
the center of the Mississippi River, thence in a northeasterly direction along the 
center line of a channel between Boom Island and Nicollet Island to the center 

78 



of what is known as the East Side channel of the Mississippi River, thence 
southeasterly along said East Side channel to the center line of the main channel 
of the Mississippi River, thence southeasterly along the center line of the Missis- 
sippi River to the center line of Tenth Avenue South, produced north, thence 
southwesterly along the center line of Tenth Avenue South to the center 
hne of Washington Avenue South, thence northwesterly along the center line 
of Washington Avenue South to the center line of First Avenue North, being 
the point of beginning. 

V. 

That this order be forthwith served upon the Mayor and President of the 
City Council of the City of Minneapolis by delivering to and leaving a copy of 
the same with the Mayor and President of said City Council. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, this 24th day of April, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J, A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

John S. Pardee, 
Secretary. 

ORDER NO. 2 

Relating to dry zone around Military Reservation. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety hereby finds and declares it 
necessary and proper for the public safety, for the protection of life and prop- 
erty and as a matter of military expediency and necessity: 

FIRST 
That the sale of intoxicating liquor in the district hereinafter described be 
prohibited and that all outstanding licenses authorizing the sale of intoxicating 
liquor within said district be revoked. 

SECOND 
The district above referred to is all that territory in the counties of Hennepin, 
Ramsey and Dakota, in the State of Minnesota, to the width of two and one-half 
(23^) miles, immediately surrounding and adjoining the Fort Snelling Military 
Reservation. 

IT IS THEREFORE ORDERED: 
I. 
That from and after the first day of May, 1917, and until a treaty of peace 
terminating the existing war is ratified, the sale of intoxicating liquor withing the 
district or zone last above described be and the same is hereby prohibited and all 
outstanding licenses authorizing the sale of intoxicating liquor therein are hereby 
revoked. Said revocation to become efiEective as of May first, 1917. 

II. 
That the governing bodies of the Cities of Minneapolis, St. Paul and the 
village of Mendota are hereby forbidden, during the period last above specified 
to grant or issue any licenses authorizing the sale of intoxicating liquor within 
the district or zone hereinbefore specified. 

III. 
That this order be forthwith served upon the mayor of the city. of St. Paul, 
Ramsey county, the mayor and president of the city council of the city of Minne- 
apoHs, Hennepin county, and the president of the village council and recorder of 

73 



the village of Mendota, Dakota county, all in the State of Minnesota. 
Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, this 25th day of April, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OP PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

John S. Pardee, 
Secretary. 

ORDER NO. 3 
Providing for Organization of Home Guard. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety hereby finds and declares it 
necessary and proper for the public safety, for the protection of life and property 
and as a matter of military expediency and necessity, and does hereby order: 

1. That a Home Guard be enlisted, organized and maintained for service 
in the State of Minnesota to consist of such units as may hereafter be authorized 
by this Commission, and to be organized as now prescribed by law for similar 
units in the Minnesota National Guard ; said force shall be known as "Home Guard 
of Minnesota." 

2. The term of enlistment in said Home Guard of Minnesota shall be for 
the period of the present war and until peace shall be concluded between the 
United States and any and all foreign nations with which the United States is 
now or may hereafter be at war. The oath to be taken by the enlisted men of 
said Home Guard of Minnesota shall be in the following form: 

"I, , bom at , in the 

state of , on the day of , A. D. 

19. . . . , by occupation , do hereby acknowledge to have 

voluntarily enlisted this day of , 1917, as a soldier 

in the Home Guard of Minnesota for the period of the present war and until 
peace shall be concluded between the United States and any and all foreign nations 
with which the United States is now or may hereafter be at war, unless sooner 
discharged by proper authority. And I do hereby solemnly swear that I will 
bear true faith and allegiance to the United States of America and to the State 
of Minnesota and that I will serve them honestly and faithfully against all their 
enemies whomsoever within the State of Minnesota, and that I will obey the orders 
of the Governor of the State of Minnesota and of the officers appointed over me 
according to law and the rules and regulations now or hereafter governing the 
Home Guard of Minnesota." 

The officers of the Home Guard shall subscribe the following oath: 

"I, , having been appointed a 

in the Home Guard of Minnesota, do solemnly swear that I will support and de- 
fend the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the State of 
Minnesota against all enemies, foreign and domestic ; that I will bear true faith 
and allegiance to the same; that I will obey the orders of the Governor of the 
State of Minnesota; that I make this obligation freely without any mental reser- 
vation or purpose of evasion, and that I will faithfully discharge the duties of 
my office in the Home Guard of Minnesota upon which I am about to enter; 
so help me God." 

3. Only able-bodied men over the age of twenty-six (26) years shall be 
enlisted in the Home Guard of Minnesota. Any member of the Home Guard 

T4 



who is hereafter enlisted or commissioned in the Federal service or in the Minnesota 
National Guard shall be entitled to an honorable discharge from the Home Guard.* 

4. No member of the Home Guard shall be entitled to any pay for his 
services, or any allowance of any character, except as follows : 

A. Officers when on duty at any place other than their home station shall 
be entitled to the travel expense incurred and $2.00 per day for subsistence. 

B. Officers when held in continuous active service for a longer period than 
five days without an intervening leave of absence of equal dtiration, shall be en- 
titled to receive $2.00 per day for such service. 

C. Enlisted men, performing detached service away from their home sta- 
tion, shall receive the travel expenses actually incurred and $1.00 per day for 
subsistence. 

D. Enlisted men when held in continuous active service for a longer period 
than five days without an intervening furlough of equal duration, shall be entitled 
to receive the same per diem pay as is paid to enlisted men in the service of the 
United States. 

5. The members of the Home Guard shall be subject to the disciplinary 
provisions of the MiUtary Code in so far as they may be appHcable to that organ- 
ization. 

6. The following units of the Home Guard are hereby authorized, and the 
Governor is hereby requested to provide for the organization and enlistment 
thereof, namely: 

Seven (l) separate battalions to be stationedas the Governor may direct and 
in such subdivisions as he may deem ptoper and said number to be increased 
in the discretion of the Governor and upon his order. The Governor may, in his 
discretion, organize said units into regiments. (2) 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, this 28th day of April, A. D., 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

John S. Pardee, 
Secretary. 

ORDER NO. 4 
Providing for the appointment of Peace Officers. 

The Minnesota Commission of PubHc Safety hereby finds and declares it 
necessary and proper for public safety, for the protection of life and property 

and as a matter of military expediency and necessity: 

♦May 29, 1917, amended so as to read: 

"Only able bodied men between the ages of 31 and 52 inclusive, shall be en- 
listed in the Home Guard of Minnesota; provided, however, that able bodied 
men under 31 years of age may be enlisted when it is shown that they are prob- 
ably exempt from service in the Federal Army. Any member of the Home 
Guard who is hereafter enlisted or commissioned in the federal service or in the 
Minnesota National Guard shall be entitled to an honorable discharge from 
the Home Guard." 

(1) May 24, 1917, amended by substituting the word "ten" for "seven." 

(2) Further amended by Order 57, page No. C-22. 

n 



FIRST 
That certain proper persons, voters in the State of Minnesota shall from time 
to time be appointed as Peace Officers in said State, invested with the powers 
now possessed by constables in said State. 

IT IS THEREFORE ORDERED: 

I. 
That said Commission by its resolution at any meeting thereof may appoint 
any voter of the State of Minnesota as a Peace Officer, who shall be vested with, 
and have all the powers now possessed by constables in said State; that said 
Peace Officer shall be furnished with, and entitled to wear a metallic badge on 
which shall be the words "Minnesota Public Safety Commission, Peace Ofificer.'* 

II. 
Any person, corporation or co-partnership who desires to have property 
guarded by any such Peace Officer may make application to the Commission for 
the appointment of any voter of the State of Minnesota as a Peace Officer, and 
upon his appointment he shall be assigned to the duty of guarding the property 
of such applicant. All persons appointed as Peace Officers pursuant to this order 
shall serve without pay or other remuneration from the State of Minnesota. 

III. 

To each person so appointed, pursuant to a resolution as above provided, 
there shall be issued a commission signed by the chairman and secretary of this 
Commission, and the adoption of any such resolution shall, as to each and every 
person named therein, be an appointment of such person as such Peace Officer 
under the authority of this order, and upon the issuance to such person of a 
commission signed by the chairman and secretary, such person to whom such 
issuance is made, shall thereupon be constituted such Peace Officer without the 
taking of an oath or the giving of a bond. All commissions so issued may be 
revoked at the pleasure of the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety at any 
meeting thereof, by motion to be entered upon the minutes. Upon any such 
revocation, the person whose commission is revoked shall retiim the badge then 
in his possession to the secretary of the Commission and shall forthwith cease to 
exercise any of the fimctions or duties theretofore devolving upon him ptirsuant 
to said appointment. Every such Peace Officer, upon request, shall exhibit his 
badge and commission to any person asking to see the same. 

This order shall be effective from and after the fourteenth day of 
May, 1917. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, May 14, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

John S. Pardee, 
Secretary. 

ORDER NO. 5 
Relating to forest fire emergencies. 

Whereas, it appears that the prevalence of forest fires in Northern Minnesota 
is destroying the military resources of the State and creating a grave public 
emergency, therefore be it resolved, by the Minnesota Commission of Public 
Safety that from and after this date for a period of fifteen days, no person shall 

76 



kindle or set any fire, in grass, brush, slash or woods, or kindle any fire except 
for domestic or industrial purposes within the structures and appliances for 
which fires are usually and necessarily biiilt, for such domestic and industrial 
purposes, in the following territory: 

Those parts of the Counties of Lake, Cook, St. Louis, Itasca, Carlton, Kooch- 
iching, Beltrami, Aitkin, Cass, Clearwater and Hubbard, in the vicinity of which 
there are forest fires; provided that this shall not apply to fires kindled or set 
by the State Forester or imder his direction, regulation, or permission. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, this 23rd day of May, A. D. 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A, BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

John S. Pardee, 
Secretary. 

ORDER NO. 6 
Relating to closing of saloons on Registration Day. 

"Whereas, it appears necessary to conserve the peace and the orderly execu- 
tion of the duties of citizenship on Registration Day that all traffic in intoxicants 
be suspended on that day: 

NOW THEREFORE BE IT ORDERED, BY THE MINNESOTA COM- 
MISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY: 

FIRST 
That all saloons and all places for the sale of intoxicants in any quantity 
in the State of Minnesota shall be and remain closed during the whole of the 
fifth day of June, 1917. 

SECOND 
That the Mayor or other governing person or body, of each and every 
municipality in the State of Minnesota, is hereby directed and enjoined to exe- 
cute the preceding order." 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, this 29th day of May, A. D. 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

John S. Pardee, 
Secretary. 

ORDER KO. 7 
Relating to saloon hours and cabaret entertainment. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety hereby finds and declares it 
necessary and proper for the pubHc safety, for the protection of life and property 
and as a matter of military expediency and necessity: 

FIRST 
That all licensed saloons in the State of Minnesota be closed at 10:00 o'clock 
p. m. and remain closed until 8:00 o'clock the following day, and that no intoxi- 
cating liquors be sold, served or otherwise disposed of therein between the hours 



last above stated; and that no women or girls be permitted to enter such saloons 
or to be served therefrom at any time. 

SECOND 

That in all cities having a population of more than 50,000 all cafes and restau- 
rants, whether designated as roof-gardens, chop-suey houses or otherwise, in 
which intoxicating liquor is sold, served or permitted to be sold, served or drunk, 
be closed at 10:00 o'clock p. m., and that no intoxicating liquor be sold, served 
or permitted to be sold, served or drunk therein until 8:00 o'clock a. m. thereafter, 
and that no women or girls be served with or permitted at any time to drink 
intoxicating liquors therein. 

THIRD 

That dancing and cabaret performances in any saloon or place where intoxi- 
cating liquor is sold, served or dnmk within the State of Minnesota is hereby 
prohibited. 

That the City Council, Board of Trustees, or other governing body of all 
mtmicipalities in the State of Minnesota forthwith proceed to enact ordinances 
executing the provisions of this order and prescribing suitable penalties for 
violations of such ordinances, which penalties shall include, for a second offense, 
imprisonment in the county jail without the option of a fine, except in counties 
having workhouses, in which case the imprisonment shall be in the workhouse, 
and that a second conviction for such offense shall operate of itself and without 
any fiuther act to revoke the license of the offender. 

Provided, however, that nothing herein contained shall be construed to 
extend the closing hour for licensed saloons where local ordinances fix an earlier 
hour^than 10:00 o'clock p. m. 

Thisorder shall be effective from and after the 5th day of June, 1917. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, June 5, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

John S. Pardee, 
Secretary. 

ORDER NO. 8 
Relating to sale of liquor in St. Louis County. 

Whereas, all of St. Louis County, Minnesota, outside of the City of 
Duluth, is in proximity to mines and timber lands each producing material essen- 
tial for war uses and ptuposes, and 

Whereas, the unregulated sale of intoxicating liquors in territory in prox- 
imity to producing mines and timber lands unfavorably affects and hampers the 
utilization of such lands and the production of the said materials they furnish, and 

Whereas, such unregulated sale tends to produce and has produced in said 
territory breaches of the peace and violations of law. 

Now Therefore — 

It Is Hereby Ordered that nowhere within St. Louis County, Minnesota, 
except in the City of Duluth, shall intoxicating liquor of any kind or in any quan- 

78 



tity be sold or in any manner disposed of except in duly licensed saloons and in 
drug stores as now regulated by statute. 

This order shall be effective from and after the fifth day of June, 1917. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, Jtme 5, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

John S. Pardee, 
Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 9 
Relating to Forest Fire Emergency. 

It is ordered by the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety that from and 
after this date, for a period of eight weeks, no person shall kindle or set 
fire in grass, stubble, peat, brush, slash or woods, or kindle any fire except for 
domestic or indiistrial purposes, in the following counties : Cook, Lake, St. Louis, 
Carlton, Itasca, Koochiching, Beltrami, Aitkin, Pine, Cass, Crow Wing, Clear- 
water, Hubbard, Becker, Mahnomen, Morrison, Todd, Wadena, Otter Tail, 
Clay, Norman, Polk, Red Lake, Pennington, Marshall, Roseau, Kittson. Pro- 
vided that this order shall not apply to fields aroun^d which an ample firebreak 
has been freshly plowed, or to fires kindled or set by the State Fore ter or under 
his direction, regulation or permission. 

The chairmen of town boards and, for tmorganized townships, the county 
commissioners shall enforce this order. 

The State Forester and Assistant State Forester are hereby appointed as 
commissioners of the Public Safety Commission, to discharge the functions of 
this body in respect to safeguarding life and property from forest and prairie 
fires. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, August 21, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

John S. Pardee, 
Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 10 

In the Matter of the Regulation of the Sale, and Keeping for Sale or Delivery, 
of Intoxicating Liquors in the Counties of Martin and Pipestone, in the State 
of Minnesota: 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety finds that the sale of intoxicating 
liquors, as it has been and is being conducted in the said counties, has interfered 
and is interfering with the production of food and with the health and good 
habits of the soldiers of the national army and of the militia of said counties 
and states herein mentioned, and that it has interfered and is interfering with 
the efficiency of the application of the military, civil and industrial resources of 
the States of Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, and South Dakota, towards the main- 
tenance of the defense of the said states and the nation, and to the successful 
prosecution of the w^ar between the United States and Germany, now existing; 

79 



and to that end that said interference shall cease and comity between this state 
and other states hereinbefore mentioned be restored and maintained. 

It Is Hereby Ordered: 

FIRST 
That the sale, or keeping for sale or delivery, of intoxicating liquors, in the 
counties of Martin and Pipestone, in the State of Minnesota, be and the same is 
hereby prohibited, except when made at retail, between the hours of nine o'clock 
in the forenoon and five o'clock in the afternoon, in licensed saloons, to be drunk 
upon the premises. 

SECOND 
No licensed saloon-keeper in the counties aforesaid shall sell intoxicating 
liquors to be taken from the premises where sold, or permit such removal there- 
from. 

THIRD 
The violation of any of the provisions of this order shall operate in itself, 
and without any further act whatever, to terminate the right of such person to 
sell any intoxicating liquor in said counties. 

FOURTH 

Service of this order shall be made forthwith by the sheriffs of the counties 
herein mentioned, and upon the proprietors of all licensed saloons in said counties, 
and upon all persons, firms or corporations in said counties having intoxicating 
liquors in their possession or under their control, for sale or delivery, and upon 
the president and clerk or recorder of each municipahty in said counties, in 
which intoxicating liquors are sold or kept for sale or delivery. Said service 
shall be made by delivery, to the person, firm or corporation to be served, of a 
copy hereof. 

This order shall take effect and be in force from and after September 17, 1917. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, September 12, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary, 

ORDER NUMBER 11 
Prohibiting Shipments of Liquors into Koochiching County. 

No common carrier, or other carrier, shall accept intoxicating liquors, in any 
container whatsoever, for shipment to any point within Koochiching County, 
Minnesota, and no common carrier or other carrier shall transport into said 
Koochiching County intoxicating liquors, in any container whatsoever, or deliver 
the same to any consignee at any point in said county. 

The sheriff of said county and other peace officers therein, shall seize any 
intoxicating liquors shipped into said county in violation of this order, and forth- 
with report such seizure to the Commission for its further instructions, giving 
a description of the property seized, the names of the carrier, consignor and 
consignee. 



This order is made in the interest of the public safety, after investigation 
into the conditions existing in said county, and shall take effect and be in force 
from and after September 21, 1917. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, September 18, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-ofiicio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 12 

No common carrier, or other carrier, shall accept intoxicating liquors in any 
container whatsoever, for shipment to any point within Beltrami County or 
Clearwater Coimty, Minnesota, and no common carrier or other carrier shall 
transport into said Coimties or either of them intoxicating Hquors in any container 
whatsoever, or deliver the same to any consignee at any point in said counties 
or in either of them. 

The sheriff of each of said counties and other peace officers, therein shall 
seize any intoxicating liquors shipped into said counties respectively in violation 
of this order and forthwith report such seizure to the Commission for its further 
instructions, giving a description of the property seized, the names of the carrier 
consignor and consignee. 

This order is made in the interest of the public safety, after investigation 
into the conditions existing in said coimties and shall take effect and be in force 
effect and be in force from and after October 26, 1917. 

Dated at Saint Paul, Minnesota, October 16, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

AMENDED ORDER NUMBER 12 
Prohibiting Shipments of Liquor into Beltrami and Clearwater Counties. 

No common carrier, or other carrier, shall accept intoxicating liquor, in 
any container whatsoever, for shipment to any point within Beltrami County 
or Clearwater County, Minnesota, and no common carrier, or other carrier, 
shall transport into said counties, or either of them, intoxicating liquor, in any 
container whatsoever, or deliver the same to any consignee at any point in said 
counties, or either of them. 

The sheriff of each of said coimties and other peace officers therein shall 
seize any intoxicating liquor shipped into said coimties, respectively, in violation 
of this order, and forthwith report such seizure to the Commission for its in- 
structions, giving a description of the property seized and the names of the 
carrier, consignor and consignee. 

The sale of intoxicating liquor in said counties by licensed saloon-keepers 
shall henceforth be limited to liquor to be drunk on the premises where sold. 

81 



No saloon-keeper in either of the counties aforesaid shall sell intoxicating liquor 
to be taken from the premises where sold, or permit such removal therefrom, 
and the licenses of all saloon-keepers in the counties aforesaid and each of them 
shall cease, expire and terminate within thirty days from the date hereof, irre- 
spective of any date otherwise fixed for such expiration or termination, and after 
said period of thirty days no liquor shall be sold by any saloon in either of said 
counties. 

This order is made in the interest of public safety, after investigation into 
the conditions existing in said counties, and shall take effect and be in force, 
as to such carriers, from and after October 25th, 1917. 

Service of this order shall be made forthwith by the sheriffs of the coimties 
herein mentioned upon the proprietors of all licensed saloons in said counties, 
and upon the president or clerk or recorder of each municipality in said counties 
in which intoxicating liquors are sold, or kept for sale or delivery. Such service 
shall be made by deHvering to the persons, firms or corporations to be served, of 
a copy hereof. 

Dated at St. Paul, Miimesota, October 25, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Attest: Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 13 
Regulating Price of Milk. 

The Minnesota Commission of PubHc Safety, in the public interest, does 
hereby Find and Order as follows: 

No person, company or association selling and delivering milk in Minne- 
apolis or St. Paul for pasteurization, re-sale and delivery to consumers shall 
ask, charge, or receive a price in excess of six cents per quart for milk of the 
standard grade and quality. 

No person, company or association purchasing such milk for pasteurization 
and re-sale as pasteurized milk, in Minneapolis or St. Paul, shall ask, charge 
or receive a price in excess of ten cents a quart for milk of the standard grade 
and quaUty. 

The council or other governing bodies of Minneapolis and St. Paul shall 
forthwith enact ordinances executing the provisions of this order and prescribing 
suitable penalties for violations of such ordinances, having first submitted a 
copy thereof to the Commission for approval. 

This order shall be effective from and after November fifteenth, 1917, 
shall be served by mailing a copy to any officer of the Twin City Milk Producers 
Association, and to the wholesale distributors in Minneapolis and St. Paul, 
whose names the Commission's Secretary can learn by reasonable inquiry, 
and to the Mayor of each of said cities, and shall continue in force until mod- 
ified by the Commission's order. 

Dated at Saint Paul, Minnesota, November 2, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Attest: Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 



MEMORANDUM 

To The Commission: 

Your Committee, to which was referred among other things the milk problem 
in MinneapoHs and St. Paul, has completed its investigations. 

The committee was originally appointed to make an inquiry into the causes 
of the increaseici cost of the necessities of life and the possible remedies, and as 
constituted for this purpose, included the imdersigned and Mr. W. S. Moscrip. 
Inasmuch as Mr. Moscrip is himself a milk producer, he deemed it improper 
that he should participate in the committee's milk investigations, has therefore 
not done so, and does not join in this report. 

The committee has held three public meetings in the Minneapolis council 
chamber, at which it has heard every one who expressed a desire to be heard. 
Each of these meetings covered an entire day, and one of them extended imtil 
ten o'clock at night. All interested parties who had anything to contribute, or 
thought they had, either in the way of information or opinion, were given the 
fullest opportunity to do so. The committee was represented at the meetings 
by the Commission's attorney, Ambrose Tighe. M. D. Munn, Esq., represented 
the Milk Producers' Association. Hon. G. R. Smith represented citizens and 
consumers acting through the Labor Loyalty League, and James Robertson, 
Esq., represented the wholesale distributers. There were also other attorneys 
present representing other parties. The meetings were continued imtil it ap- 
peared in response to public inquiry of the chairman that no one cared to offer 
further evidence or suggestions. Then, and not until then, were the hearings 
closed. Most of the matter brought out at the meetings was already in the 
committee's possession, and a good deal of it in completer form than there pre- 
sented, and knowledge as the result of its investigations outside of the meetings. 
It has, for its purposes, interviewed a large ntmiber of people besides those who 
appeared at the MinneapoHs hearings; it has had the benefit of the best expert 
advice on all questions involved; it has made examinations and audits of repre- 
sentative concerns operating the various branches of the industry, and has 
proctu-ed information from all parts of the state by correspondence through 
its local organizations. 

The situation which compelled the committee's activity was a most serious 
one. The retail price of milk in MinneapoHs and St. Paul (which will herein- 
after be referred to as the Cities) had increased four cents a quart within a few 
months, was at twelve cents a quart when the committee began its work, existing 
contracts with producers covered a period of two months only, and it was pre- 
dicted, with apparent authority, that by Thanksgiving time there would be a 
further advance. To some people an expenditure for milk of a few additional 
cents a day means Httle. But many famiHes of Hmited income found this grow- 
ing cost of a commodity essential to their children's welfare something to which 
they could not submit with equanimity. The committee has limited itself 
strictly to the milk question, and to it as it affects these people of limited income. 
It has tried to learn the facts and to determine what reHef could be afforded 
without doing injustice to any one. 

Its conclusions are as follows: 

(A) There are roughly speaking two sources of supply for the Cities: 

FIRST 

One of these is the milk sold by the so-called independent producers and 
distributers who Hve on the outskirts, milk their own cows, and themselves 

88 



distribute their product among their customers. The St. Paul ordinances 
require that their product shall be bottled, but do not require that it be pas- 
teurized. The Minneapolis regulations, except as modified by recent legislation 
not yet in force, require neither pasteurization nor bottling. 

SECOND 

The other source of supply is the milk which comes in chiefly by railroads 
from points within a radius of about sixty miles aifooind the Cities. This is 
furnished by farmers or producers operating dairies in this territory, and is 
marketed for the most part through a corporation known as the Milk Producers' 
Association of which the owners of about forty thousand cows al-e stockholders. 
The Association controls the output of its stockholders who agree to sell to and 
through no one else; it secures for them a uniform price in the Cities and accounts 
to each stockholder for his shipments at this price less the freight charges from 
his shipping point and his share of the Association's incidental expenses. Prac- 
tically all milk producers who ship by railroad to the Cities belong to the Associa- 
tion. The average shipping cost appears to be about thirty cents a hundred 
weight, but as each shipper is charged with the actual express charges on his own 
shipments, a uniform charge for the Association's milk in the Cities nets the 
shippers who live near the Cities a larger return than those who live at remote 
points receive. The Milk Producers' Association sells all its milk to eight or 
nine wholesale houses in the Cities who pasteurize, bottle and distribute it. 
These eiglht or nine Wholesale houses, which will herein be called the distributers, 
are in form independent of each other, but are closely affiliated by mutual under- 
standings and they all charge the consumer the same price for the delivered 
milk. It thus appears that all the raw milk which comes to the Cities by rail- 
road is controlled as to price by one organization and the processing or preparation 
of this raw milk for the market and its distribution is controlled as to price by 
another organization. The committee was unable to learn how large a propor- 
tion of the Cities' daily milk supply comes from the independent producers, 
and how large a proportion comes through the Producers' Association and the 
wholesale distributers. There were available no accurate statistics on the sub- 
ject. But surely the Producers' Association suppHes as much as fifty per cent, 
and perhaps as much as seventy-five per cent. And the point is not important 
because in practical operation the Producers' Association and wholesale dis- 
tributers fix the price for milk from both sources. When they together raise 
the price for the product they control, most of the independent producers follow 
their example, and when they lower their price, most of the independent pro- 
ducers have to do the same thing to protect their business. We thus have a 
situation where the price of this most necessary commodity may be dictated 
by two organizations without any restraint except such as is afforded by public 
opinion, their sense of fair dealing, custom and the fear of losing business. On 
the other hand both the Producers' Association and the distributers' organiza- 
tion have features which are of much value. The Producers' Association assures 
the farmer of a certain market at a fixed return, and some one to represent him 
in possible disputes with the distributers, and the distributers' organization 
affords opportunities for economies in preparation and distribution which might 
not exist if there were active competition among them. The immediately 
practical matter before the Commission is to get cheaper milk for the public, 
if this can be achieved without treating the producers and distributers unfairly, 
and the committee thinks that this can be accomplished more promptly and 
efficiently without disturbing either of these organizations at this time than 



by undertaking to dissolve or regulate them. Assuming that they are illegal 
combinations dealing in a necessity of life, they are amenable to legislation, 
and it will be easier to enforce orders on the subject if the parties concerned are 
few in number than if many unrelated individuals had to be dealt with. 

(B) The question then to be first determined is this: Is it possible to 
arrive at a price at which milk supplied by the Producers' Association and pas- 
teurized and distributed by the wholesale distributers can be sold with a fair 
profit to the farmers and distributers? If this price can be arrived at and the 
Commission, through its own action and with the co-operation of the Cities' 
councils can fix it as the selling price in the Cities, the problem will be solved 
for the present. 

It is practically impossible to fix any figtrfes on the actual productico cost 
of milk with any accuracy and in a scientific way in the territory tributary to 
the Cities. Its actual cost varies in the widest degree with different producers. 
In some cases, milk is a by-product of fancy farming or fancy stock raising, and 
much of what its producers get from it is in the nature of profit. In other 
cases the producer raises his own feed to a large extent at a cost perhaps less, 
or perfiaps greater than its quoted market price, so that the market price of 
feed is not in such instia'nces a true measure of this factor of milk production's 
cost. In other cases the producer buys all his feed, sometimes imder favorable 
and sometimes under unfavorable conditions. The recital of individual experi- 
ences of success or failiire in the industry thus does not throw much light on the 
problem. The real test seems to be here: 90 per cent or more of the milk 
produced in the country is used for other purposes than human constunption 
as milk. The price of butter fat on the New York market is well established, 
and easily ascertainable at any time by current quotations. The relations be- 
tween this current price of butter fat and the price of raw milk at any point 
are capable of ready calculation by approved and admitted formulae which 
obtain in the industry. Applying these formulae in a way most liberal and 
fair to the milk producers, and allowing an average transportation expense of 
thirty cents per himdred pounds, it would appear that raw milk can be deliv- 
ered to the Cities' distributers by producers operating within a sixty-mile 
radius of these Cities for about six cents a quart. If they get this price, they 
will be getting more than ninety per cent of the milk producers of the coimtry 
whose product is made into butter and cheese, get for their milk at the pres- 
ent time. The committee to simplify its statement, omits here the details of 
the calculation, but it has confidence in its conclusions and has confirmed 
thepn by a state-wide inquiry as to local prices. There is no shortage of butter 
or cheese in the United States because of the prevailing prices for butter fat, 
and if the farmers of the nation in general find it commercially profitable to 
sell milk at a price which is equivalent to less than six cents per quart f. o. b. 
the Cities, for creamery purposes, there appears to be no reason why the farm- 
ers in the territory tributary to the Cities cannot furnish it for milk purposes 
at this figure. This price may not yield a proper return in all cases any more 
than does the price paid for butter fat in all cases. But under existing average 
conditions of equipment and business efficiency, the result will be fairly satis- 
isctoty* 

When pasteurized milk was being sold lately in the Cities at twelve cents 
a quart, raw milk was costing the distributers seven cents. That is, the dis- 
tributers were charging five cents a quart for their expense and profit. When, 
under suggestion from the Commission, the retail price was reduced to eleven 
cents, the producers reduced their price to six and a quarter cents a quart, which 



left the distributers a margin of four and three-quarters cents for expenses and 
profits. Some of the nine or ten wholesale distributers in the Cities deal in all 
creamery products, including butter, eggs, cheese and ice cream, as well as milk 
and cream. Others carry on a milk and cream business exclusively. Most of 
them have their chief output in a limited section of the city, but supplement this 
with a smaller output in other sections. A few cover the whole city, but these 
are the concerns which do a general creamery business. It has been as hard 
to get any satisfactory information from them as to the expenses of their oper- 
ation or their profits, as it has been to determine the cost of milk production. 
This has not been because they have undertaken to conceal anything, or have 
been otherwise than frank with the committee. But the books of the several 
concerns are not kept on any uniform system, and startling discrepancies as 
to outlays disclose themselves for this reason when comparisons are attempted. 
Some of these houses claimed that it cost two and a half cents a quart for pas- 
teurizing, bottling and otherwise preparing milk for distribution, and a like 
amount per quart for delivery. If this is a fact all of them were selling their 
milk at cost when the retail price was twelve cents, and they have been selling 
it at a loss since the retail price has been eleven cents. But an analysis of their 
books shows that these amoimts are conventional figures roughly adopted by 
the trade for purposes of ready reckoning rather than exact statements based 
on actual experience. The committee is satisfied that five cents or even four 
and three-quarters cents a quart is too much for the wholesale distributer to 
add to the cost for himself, and that a four cents per quart margin will afford 
a handsome profit to any one with sufficient business skill to warrant his being 
in the business at all. The committee is prepared to defend this opinion by 
convincing data in its possession, but it refrains from now giving these data 
publicity because of its natural reluctance to disclose imnecessarily the business 
secrets of the houses in question. 

The committee thinks that the control of the so-called independent pro- 
ducers as to price and methods of operation should be left to the local authorities 
without suggestion or guidance by the Commission. The quality of the milk 
they severally furnish, the conditions under which it is produced in any case, 
and their relations to their customers are all so individual that it is not practicable 
to classify them for treatment by a state body. But the pasteurized milk, in 
its raw state, fimiished the distributers, as already noted, for the most part by 
one organization which has a practical monopoly of the supply, and distributed 
by a few concerns which, while without a formal organization, act together at 
least in the matter of price with complete unanimity, is properly a subject of 
regulation as to price within limits of justice and fairness. 

The committee therefore presents herewith to the Commission an order, 
the adoption of which it recommends. This fixes the maximum price which 
can be charged by milk producers for raw milk delivered to the wholesale dis- 
tributers in the Cities, at six cents a quart, and the price which can be charged 
to the consumer by the wholesale distributer at ten cents a quart. The order 
does not interfere at all with the independent operator producing and vending 
his own milk. But it places on the market a standard product controlled by 
the two combinations at a named price. This price seems to be fair to both 
producer and distributer, and to be as low to the consumer as is possible under 
the methods which obtain in the business. 

It may be that the Cities could effect a further reduction in the price to 
the consumer by undertaking the work of pasteurization and distribution them- 
selves, and if they can do this work for less than four cents a quart, as perhaps 



they can by eliminating the element of profit, the price could be made less than 
ten cents to the consumer. et i^ 

The Commission's order will put the Cities in possession of raw milk at 
six cents a quart and it strongly recommends that the Cities themselves or 
local organizations of public spirited citizens in them establish and operate 
distributing plants in proper localities to the end that the people who need milk 
and cannot afford to pay as much as ten cents a quart, may get it at a lower 
figure. This program seems to be a highly proper field for municipal action. 

C. H. MARCH, 
GEO. W. LAWSON. 
AMBROSE TIGHE, 

Commission's Attorney. 

AMENDED ORDER NUMBER 13 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety does hereby ORDER that 
Order Number Thirteen be, and the same hereby is, amended to read as follows: 

No person, company or association selling and delivering milk in Minneapolis 
and St. Paul for pastetirization, re-sale and delivery to consumers, shall ask, 
charge, or receive a price in excess of Three Dollars and Ten Cents per hundred 
pounds for milk of the standard quality and of the grade of three and five-tenths 
per cent butter fat. 

No person, company or association purchasing such milk for pasteurization 
and re-sale as pasteurized milk in Minneapolis or St. Paul, shall ask, charge or 
receive a price in excess of eleven cents a quart for milk of said quality and grade, 
whether sold in one or more containers, or in excess of six cents per single pint. 

This Order shall take effect and be in force from and after its date, and 
shall be served by mailing a copy to any officers of the Twin City Milk Producers' 
Association, and to the wholesale distributers in MinneapoHs and St. Paul, 
whose names the secretary can learn by reasonable inquiry. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, December 5, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BXJRNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

MEMORANDUM 

The Commission's Order Number Thirteen was made on November 2, 1917, 
and by its terms contemplated that a change of price might be necessary in the 
event that conditions in the cost of production altered. Between the date of 
the making of the Order and the date hereof the prices of feed stuffs have in- 
creased on an average more than thirty per cent. In view of this situation it 
appears only proper to the Commission that aii advance of one cent a quart, 
or ten per cent, made by this Order should be allowed. 

ORDER NUMBER 14 
Regulating Pool and Billiard Halls and Dance Halls. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety finds, declares and orders as 
follows: 

87 



FIRST 

From and after the date of this order all licensed pool halls and pool rooms, 
billiard halls and bilHard rooms within the State of Minnesota shall be closed 
and kept closed on Sundays and shall be closed and kept closed on each secular 
day from 10 o'clock p. m. and shall not open prior to 8 o'clock a. m. of the next 
secular day. 

SECOND 

From and after the date of this order the operation of public dance halls 
in the State of Minnesota on Sunday is prohibited, and on all other days such 
dance halls shall close at 10 o'clock p. m. and shall not open prior to 8 o'clock 
a. m.,of the following day. A public dance hall, within the meaning of this order, 
shall be taken to be any room, place or space open to public patronage generally, 
and without invitation, and in which dancing, wherein the public may partici- 
pate, is carried on, and to which admission may be had by the public generally, 
by payment, either directly or indirectly, of an admission fee or price for dancing, 
and where the receipts from the business are for the private gain of the person, 
firm or corporation conducting such dance hall. 

The Council or other governing body of each and every municipaHty of the 
state shall forthwith enact an appropriate ordinance or ordinances embodying 
the provisions hereof, and providing suitable penalties for violations. 

Dated this sixth day of November, 1917. 

MINNESOTA!COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-ofiicio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA 

Legal Department, St. Paul, Nov. 14, 1917. 

Order Number 14 of the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety, relating 
to Dance Halls seems to be misimderstood by many. It applies only to such 
dance halls as are conducted for gain for their owners or proprietors and are 
commercial enterprises. They are defined and regulated by sections numbered 
8685 to 8692, which are assembled under the sub-title "Dance Halls" in the 
General Statutes of Minnesota, 1913. The definition there found is the one 
used in substance in Order No. 14. 

The order has no application to dances conducted by lodges, societies and 
social clubs or organizations. It does apply to such as are regulated by the 
sections of the statutes above referred to and conducted as a business. 

LYNDON A. SMITH, 

Attorney General. 

AMENDED ORDER NUMBER 14 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety finds, declares and orders as 
follows: 



First — From and after the date of this order all licensed pool halls and pool 
rooms, billiard halls and billiard rooms within the State of Minnesota shall be 
closed and kept closed on Sundays and shall be closed and kept closed on each 
secular day from eleven o'clock P. M. and shall not be open prior to eight o'clock 
A. M. of the next secular day. 

Second — From and after the date of this order the operation of public dance 
halls in the State of Minnesota on Sunday is prohibited and on all other days 
such dance halls shall close at eleven o'clock P. M. and shall not open prior to 
eight o'clock A. M. of the following day. A Public dance, within the meaning 
of this order, shall be taken to be any room, place or space open to public patron- 
age generally, and without invitation, and in which dancing, wherein the public 
may participate, is carried on, and to which admission may be had by the public 
generally, by payment, either directly or indirectly, of an admission fee or price 
for dancing, and where the receipts from the business are for the private gain 
of the person, firm or corporation conducting such dance hall. 

The Coimcil or other governing body of each and every municipality of the 
state shall forthwith enact an appropriate ordinance or ordinances embodying 
the provisions hereof, and providing suitable penalties for violations. 

Dated this sixth day of November, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 15 
Providing and Regulating Sale of Bread. 

By virtue of the power vested in the Commission to condemn and appro- 
priate property in furtherance of the efficient prosecution of the war and for the 
maintenance of public order and safety: 

1 . It IS Hereby Ordered that the Occident Baking Company, of Minneapolis, 
be, and the same is, hereby ordered and required to furnish this Commission, at its 
bakery in Minneapolis, double pound loaves of white wheat bread, manufactured 
from Bakers' patent flour and the required ingredients to make a well-baked, 
wholesome bread, at a price not to exceed five and one-half cents per pound 
and in quantity of not less than five thousand pounds per day, after the first five 
days of the operation of this order. 

2. This order shall be effective from and after the tenth day of November, 
1917, and shall continue until terminated by this Commission on thirty days' 
notice. 

Dated this sixth day of November, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

89 



ORDER NUMBER 16 
Referring to Re-instatement of Employees of Twin City Rapid Transit Co. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety orders as follows: 

1. The Twin City Rapid Transit Company shall, on or before November 
29, 1917, reinstate in their positions and on their appHcation, any employes 
whose connection with the company has been terminated for any reason growing 
out of the Commission's recommendations of November 19, 1917. 

2. The employes referred to in paragraph (1) hereof shall return to the 
company's service within the time hereinbefore stated. 

3. Such employes and all other employes of the company shall, on such 
reinstatement and thereafter, comply with the Commission's recommendations 
of November 19, 1917, which are hereby given the force of orders binding both 
on the company and its employes. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, November 27, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary, 

MEMORANDUM 

A committee was appointed to investigate and report on alleged violations 
by^the Street Railway Company of the order of the Commission adjusting the 
strike. That committee, after full hearing, reported that certain men who had 
been removed had been reinstated by the company, and also made certain recom- 
mendations to insure futtire good relations. The Commission approved the 
committee's report without making any formal order in the premises, except 
to request that its recommendations be carried into effect. Mistmderstanding 
and controversy have arisen between the company and the tmion men in its 
employ, with regard to the action taken to carry out the recommendations as 
requested by the Commission. To end that mistmderstanding and to carry 
out the recommendations of the committee, the Commission has adopted the 
foregoing order. 

ORDER NUMBER 17 

In the Matter of the Regulation of the Sale and Keteping for Sale or Delivery, 
of Intoxicating Liquors, in the Village of Blooming Prairie, in the County of 
Steele, and State of Minnesota. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety finds: That the sale of intoxicating 
liquors, as it has been and is being conducted in the Village of Blooming Prairie 
aforesaid, has interfered and is interfering with the production of food, and with 
the health and good habits of the soldiers of the national army and of the militia 
i n the territory adjacent to said Village, and that it has interfered and is inter- 
fering with the efficiency of the appUcation of the military, civil and industrial 
resoiurces of the states of Minnesota and Iowa, towards the maintenance of the 
defense of the said states and the nation, and to the successful prosecution of 
the war between the United States and Germany, now existing, and to the end 
that said interference shall cease and comity between this state and the state of 
Iowa be restored and maintained. 



It is Hereby Ordered: 

FIRST 

That the sale or keeping for sale or delivery of intoxicating liquors in said 
Village of Blooming Prairie be, and the same is, hereby prohibited, except when 
made at retail between the hours of nine o'clock in the forenoon and five o'clock 
in the afternoon, in licensed saloons, to be dnmk upon the premises. Said 
saloons to close at five o'clock p. m. and remain closed until nine o'clock a. m. 
on the next secular day thereafter. 

SECOND 

No licensed saloon-keeper in said Village of Blooming Prairie shall sell 
intoxicating liquor to be taken from the premises where sold, or permit such 
removal therefrom. 

THIRD 

The violation of any of the provisions of this order shall operate in itself, 
and without any further act whatever, to terminate the right of such offending 
person to sell any intoxicating liquor in said Village. 

FOURTH 

Service of this order shall be made forthwith by the Sheriff of Steele County, 
Minnesota, upon the proprietors of all licensed saloons in said Village, and upon 
all persons, firms or corporations in said Village having intoxicating Hquors in 
their possession or under their control for sale or delivery, and upon the president 
and recorder of said Village. Said service shall be made by delivery, to the 
person, firm or corporation to be served, of a copy thereof. 

This order shall take effect and be in force from and after December 10, 1917. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, December 5, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

MEMORANDUM 

It has been said that the effect of an order like the above will result only in 
moving further north the source from which supplies of intoxicating liquors can 
be had, for the purpose of demoralizing the surrounding country, and that this 
order will result in making Owatonna the distributing point hereafter, instead 
of Blooming Prairie. On a showing that such has been the effect of the order, 
the Commission can be depended upon to deal with the case of Owatonna, or 
any other municipality in that locaUty, and experience may demonstrate that 
instead of restricting the sale of liquor as herein contemplated, more drastic 
action is necessary. The future will determine whether or not this is so. 



ORDER NUMBER 18 
Regulating Manufacture and Sale of Bread. 

Whereas, The Minnesota Commission of Public Saftey has conducted an 
investigation in the City of Minneapolis to ascertain the cost of the production 

91 



and distribution of bread by bakers, subject to the provisions of the Proclama- 
tion of the President, dated November 7, 1917, regulating the licensing of bakers, 
and 

Whereas, It is the duty of this Commission to co-operate with the National 
Food Administration to carry out the rules and regulations promulgated pur- 
suant to said Proclamation, and also to insure the public good bread at a reason- 
able price, 

It is Ordered, By the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety as follows: 

FIRST 
The bread, the manufacture and sale of which is hereby regulated, shall 
be known as "Standard Bread" and shall be baked of imadulterated wheat flour, 
not inferior in grade to that which is commercially known as Bakers' Patent, 
with the added ingredients authorized by the Food Administration and required 
to make a well-baked wholesome, palatable loaf. 

SECOND 
Standard Bread shall be manufactured and delivered to grocers and retailers 
only in two-pound loaves, or multiples thereof, unwrapped, and shall not over- 
run in weight to exceed two ounces to the loaf, nor fall short of two pounds, 
within twelve hours after baking when weighed in lots of ten loaves. 

THIRD 

This order shall apply to every baker in the City of Minneapolis licensed 
by the Food Administration imder the Proclamation of the President, who pro- 
duces in excess of five hundred pounds of bread per day, and every such baker 
shall manufacture and sell, as herein provided, the standard bread defined in 
paragraph 1. 

FOURTH 

This order also appHes to every grocer and other retailer in the City of 
Minneapolis who sells any kind of wheat bread to the consumer; and each such 
grocer, or retailer, who sells any kind of wheat bread shall also at all times have 
on sale and sell the Standard Bread at the prices hereby fixed. 

FIFTH 

Each loaf of Standard Bread shall be labeled with the words "Standard 
Bread" in the first line of the label and the name of the baker and weight, in 
pounds, below. 

SIXTH 

Every baker subject to this order shall sell and deliver, the Standard Bread 
to the grocer or retailer, unwrapped, in lots of not less than twenty pounds at 
not more that thirteen cents (13c) the two-pound loaf. The grocer or retailer 
shall sell the unwrapped two-pound loaf to the consumer "cash and carry" at a 
price not less than that paid the baker and not to exceed fourteen cents (14c). 
If the consumer requests the loaf to be wrapped and delivered at his residence 
the price shall be fifteen cents (15c). 

SEVENTH 
The grocer or retailer shall order from the baker the Standard Bread that 
he requires, on the day before its delivery, and no baker subject to this order 
shall deliver to any grocer or retailer at his store or place of business Standard 
Bread unless the daily sales of such grocer or retailer average twenty pounds per 
day, or more. 

92 



EIGHTH 
This order shall take effect and be in force on'and after December 10, 1917. 
MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETYi 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-ofl&cio Chairman, 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

MEMORANDUM 

It is confidently believed that the regulations contained in the foregoing 
order, and the maximum prices established for Standard Bread to the consumer, 
will settle and satisfactorily adjust the bread situation in Minneapolis with justice 
to all concerned. The Standard Bread produced under this order froqi most of 
the Minneapolis bakeries will undoubtedly be superior in both quality and 
appearance to the bread recently distributed by the Safety Commission. And 
it will be substantially as good as any bread that can be manufactured imder 
the regulations estabUshed by the National Food Administration, which go 
into effect on the tenth of December next. 

The leading bakers of the city have signified their willingness to accept the 
prices established by the order and to co-operate to carry its provisions into 
effect. The cordial co-operation of the grocers is also assumed. Their legiti- 
mate claims are adequately protected. The one cent per loaf allowed the retailer 
for handing out the unwrapped loaf "cash and carry" plan is ample pay for 
that very limited service. If the consiimer requires the same service as has 
been the custom in the past, he must pay for it extra. 

AH the regulations relative to the size of the loaf and the minimum quantity 
to be delivered to any retailer were adopted in the interest of economy. The 
margin of profit to the baker under the selling price fixed by the order is so 
small that every possible economy in production and in distribution must be 
practiced and observed to insure a fair return for the labor and capital involved. 
The high cost of all the ingredients that enter into a good loaf of bread, as well 
as of labor, and especially fuel, necessarily make the cost of production of bread 
very much higher than at any period in the past. The Commission has care- 
fully examined the statistics of the cost of bread making, collected by Mr. Hoover, 
and has given due weight to the data furnished by its own experiment in bread 
distribution in the City of Minneapolis. In the light of the data collected and 
examined, it is believed that no housewife whose time can be employed use- 
fully at any other work, can possibly compete with the bakers in the matter 
of price in baking bread of as good quality as the Standard Bread, that is, at 
the "cash and carry" price. This is not suggested as an argument against 
home baking where circumstances permit, but simply as a statement of fact. 
The natural ambition of the several bakers operating under the order to excel 
in quality, the price and services being fixed, will insure a high quality for the 
Standard Bread, probably as high as the Hoover regulations permit. If this 
expectation is realized, it is believed that it will be the highest economy, both 
private and public, for the people to use the Standard Bread, except in families 
favorably situated for home baking. 

AMENDED ORDER NUMBER 18 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety does hereby ORDER. 
That Order Number 18 be, and the same is hereby amended as follows: 



First. Strike out therefrom Section Number "EIGHTH" and insert in lieu 
thereof the following. 

"EIGHTH" No baker producing standard bread imder the provisions 
of this order shall sell his product to any retailer who is already handling the 
product of two other bakeries, nor shall any retailer who handles the standard 
bread buy, handle or sell the product of more than two bakeries at the same time. 

NINTH The amendments to this order shall take effect and be in force 
from and after January 22nd, 1918. 

Second. That as so amended said order shall stand and be the order of this 
Commission. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, January 15th, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBV, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 19 
Prohibiting Shipment of Liquor into Polk County. 

No common carrier, nor any person, firm or corporation, shall accept intoxi- 
cating liquor, in any container whatsoever, for shipment or transportation 
into the Cotmty of Polk, in the State of Minnesota, or deliver the same to any 
consignee or any other person at any point in said county. 

No person, firm or corporation shall deliver to any common carrier or other 
person whomsoever, any intoxicating liquor, in any container whatsoever, for 
shipment or transportation into said County of Polk. 

Provided, however, the provisions of this order shall not apply to, or affect 
shipments of intoxicating hquors made to any duly licensed pharmacist or 
druggist, actually carrying on business as such in said county. 

The sheriff of said Polk County and all other peace officers therein shall 
seize any and all intoxicating liquor shipped into said county in violation of 
this order, and forthwith report such seizure to this Commission for its instruc- 
tions, giving a description of the property seized, the point at which it was 
seized, and the names of the carrier, consignor and consignee. 

This order is made in the interest of public safety, after investigation into 
the conditions existing in said Polk County, and shall take effect and be in force 
from and after December 11, 1917. 

Service of this order shall be made forthwith by the sheriff of Polk County, 
by delivery of a copy thereof to every railway station agent, and every express 
agent, and every other carrier or carrier's agents at each and all said points. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, December 11, 1917. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 



ORDER NUMBER 20 
Prohibiting Shipment of Liquor into Clay County. 

No common carrier, nor any person, firm or corporation, shall accept in- 
toxicating liquor, in any container whatsoever, for shipment or transportation 
into the County of Clay, in the State of Minnesota, or deliver the same to any 
consignee or any other person at any point in said county. 

No person, firm or corporation shall deliver to any common carrier or other 
person whomsoever, any intoxicating liquor, in any container whatsoever, for 
shipment or transportation into said County of Clay. 

Provided, however, the provisions of this order shall not apply to or affect 
shipments of intoxicating hquors made to any duly licensed pharmacist or 
druggist, actually carrying on business as such in said county. 

The sheriff of said Clay County and all other peace officers therein shall 
seize any and all intoxicating liquor shipped into said county in violation of 
this order, and forthwith report such seizure to this Commission for its instruc- 
tions, giving a description of the property seized, the point at which it was 
seized, and the names of the carrier, consignor and consignee. 

This order is made in the interest of public safety, after investigation into 
the conditions existing in said Clay County, and shall take effect and be in 
force from and after January 18, 1918. 

Service of this order shall be made forthwith by the sheriff of Clay County, 
by delivery of a copy thereof to every railway station agent, and every express 

agent, and every other carrier or carrier's agents at each and all of said points. 
Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, January 16, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 



ORDER NUMBER 21 
Providing Fees for Scaling and Measuring State Timber. 

It is Hereby Ordered that. For the pmpose of eliminating duplication 
of work, reducing expense and expediting the work of scaling and measuring 
state timber, thus preventing delay in lumbering operations, the offices of Sur- 
veyors General and the State Forest Service imder the Forestry Board shall 
co-operate as follows: 

The Forest Service will supervise the scaling and measuring of timber and 
timber products, and from its fund will be paid the salaries and expenses of the 
Surveyors General and their deputies, so far as deputies are needed in addition 
to the forest rangers and patrolmen. 

It is further ordered that, for the purpose hereinabove outlined, the State 
Auditor shall approve payments made out of the Forest Service fimd for scaling 
work from and after August 1, 1917, and credit to the Forest Service ftmd fees 
collected from a'nd after August 1, 1917, and turned into the State Treasury. 

9S 



The fees for scaling and measuring state timber shall be as follows: 

Logs 15c per 1000 feet. 

Ties 3^c each. 

Poles 10c per 100 lineal feet. 

Posts 20c per 100 posts. 

Pulpwood and Lagging 10c per cord. 
The Surveyors General may submit monthly bills of state timber scaled 
under each permit, whereupon the scaling fee shall be collected promptly by 
the State Auditor and credited to the Forest Service fimd. 
Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, January 15, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 21 AS AMENDED 

Order Number Twenty-one of the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety 
is hereby modified to read as follows: 

Whereas, Section 3 of Chapter 261, General Laws 1917, provides that 
for the ptuposes that "The civic and industrial resources of the state may be 
most efficiently applied toward maintenance of the defense of the state and 
nation, and toward a successful prosecution of such war," and 

Whereas, Timber produced from state lands constitutes an industrial 
resotu"ce of the state, used in the construction of ships, in the construction and 
equipment of cantonments, and in the manufacture of war materials, and 

Whereas, The scaling of timber and timber products upon state lands 
has been retarded by a duplication of work, and has become impossible of ex- 
ecution, because of indefinite and inadequate fees for such scaling, an unparalleled 
rise in the cost of labor, and a great increase in the number of small sales; 

It is Hereby Ordered That, For the purpose of eliminating duplication 
of work, reducing expense and expediting the work of scaling and measuring 
state timber, thus preventing delay in limibering operations, the offices of Sur- 
veyors General shall be under the direct jiuisdiction of the State Forest Service, 
under the Forestry Board. 

The Forest Service shall supervise the scaling and measuring of timber and 
timber products; and from its funds shall be paid the salaries and office and 
traveling expenses of the Surveyors General and their deputies, so far as deputies 
are needed in addition to the forest rangers and patrolmen. 

It is Further Ordered That, For the purpose herein above outlined, 
the State Auditor shall audit payments made out of the Forest Service Fund, 
for scaling work, from and after August 1, 1917, and credit to the Forest Service 
Fund, fees collected from and after August 1, 1917, and paid into the State 
Treasury. 

The fees for scaling and measuring state timber shall be as follows: 

Logs 15c per 1000 feet. 

Ties ^c each. 

Poles 10c per 100 linealjfeet. 

Posts 20c per 100 posts. 

Pulpwood and Lagging - 10c per cord. 

96 



The Surveyors General may submit, through the State Forester, monthly 
bills of state timber scaled under each permit; whereupon the scaling fees shall 
be collected promptly by the State Auditor and credited to the Forest Service 
fund. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, February 5, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

» Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 

Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 22 
Providing Disposition of Liquor Confiscated Under Orders of the Commission. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety Orders as follows: 

Sheriffs, or other officers, who have seized or who may hereafter seize any 
intoxicating liquors in pursuance of any order of the Commission, after having 
held the same for thirty days and there being no proceedings pending for its 
restitution, shall dispose of the same as follows: 

If such liquor is beer or other fermented liquor, he shall destroy the same 
in the presence of a witness, and transmit to the Commission a certificate signed 
by himself and such witness, giving the date and place of such destruction, 
and such details as will permit the identification of the liquor destroyed with 
his previous reports of its seizure. 

Liquor other than beer the sheriffs or other officers shall pack and ship 
to W. F. Rhinow, Adjutant General, at St. Paul, Minnesota, advising him as 
to any such shipment and its contents, and the reasonable expense of such pack- 
ing and shipment shall be paid by the Commission on proper vouchers. The 
Adjutant General shall tiu-n over any such liquor to the United States Govern- 
ment under such arrangement as he may make for the purpose. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, January 15, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 23 
Referring to Property of Aliens. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety orders as follows: 

FIRST 

That the Board of County Commissioners of each county of the State of 
Minnesota provide the necessary machinery to conduct an investigation in 
their respective counties: 

(a) To determine the real property each alien holds within each county. 

(b) To determine whether each alien actually lives upon the real estate. 

(c) To determine the names of each corporation, having ahen stock- 
holder or stockholders, holding real estate in each county. 

(d) To give the legal description of all real estate herein above referred to. 

97 



SECOND 

That the State Auditor secure a list of all aliens living within the State of 
Minnesota, and particularly secure copies of lists of all alien enemy registrants 
under the selective drafts, now in existence, or other liuts of aliens which may 
hereafter be compiled. 

THIRD 

That all names of aliens secured by the State Auditor be delivered into 
the hands of the Board of County Commissioners of feach county. 

FOURTH 

That the results of the investigations conducted under the direction of each 
Board of County Commissioners be delivered into the hands of the State Auditor, 
in such form as may be provided by him, on or before March 1, 1918. 

FIFTH 

That a copy of this order be at once transmitted by the Safety Commission 
to each Board of County Commissioners. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, January 15, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest:" 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 24 

An Order Prohibiting the Introduction of Intoxicating Liquors Into Territory 
in the State of Minnesota, in Which by Virtue of the Provisions of any Indian 
Treaty or the County Option Law of the State of Minnesota, the Sale of 
Intoxicating Liquors is Prohibited. 

FIRST 
No common carrier, nor any person, firm or corporation shall transport 
or accept for transportation, intoxicating liquors in any container whatsoever, 
into any coimty in the State of Minnesota or any part thereof, in which the sale 
of intoxicating liquors is now, or may hereafter be prohibited by reason of the 
operation of the Coimty Option law, so called, of the State of Minnesota, or 
by the provisions of any Indian Treaty; or deliver the same to any consignee 
or any other person at any point therein. 

SECOND 

No person, firm or corporation shall deliver to any common carrier, or 
other person whomsoever, any intoxicating liquors in any container whatsoever, 
for shipment or transportation into territory last above described; provided, 
however, the provisions of this order shall not apply to or affect shipments of 
intoxicating liquors made to any duly licensed pharmacist or druggist carrying 
on business in said county to the extent necessary for the legitimate business 
of suth ,pharmacist or druggist. Provided, however, that every druggist or 
pharmacist so receiving intoxicating liquors shall on the date the same is received, 
in writing notify the mayor or presikient of the Board of Trustees of the city 



or village in which his place of business is located, and the sheriff of the county, 
of the receipt by him of the same, stating the amount of each kind received, 
and the name and post-office address of his vendor. 

THIRD 

The sheriff of each county affected hereby, and all other peace officers 
therein, shall seize any and all intoxicating liquors shipped into his county, 
or any sub-division thereof, in violation of this order, and forthwith report 
such seizure to this Commission for its instructions, giving a description of the 
property seized, the point at which it was seized, and the names of the consignor 
and consignee. 

FOURTH 

This order is made in the interest of public safety, after investigation into 
the conditions existing in the territory hereinbefore referred to, and shall take 
effect and be in force from and after January 31, 1918. 

FIFTH 

Service of this order shall be made forthwith by delivering a copy thereof 
to an authorized agent of each railroad company, express company, and other 
common carrier in the State of Minnesota. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, January 30, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

MEMORANDUM 

The purpose of Section II of the above order, is to prohibit dealers in in- 
toxicating liquors, wholesalers and retailers, including brewers, from sending 
intoxicating liquors into dry territory. If they refrain from doing so, the terri- 
tory will be dry. The effect of introducing intoxicating liquors into dry territory 
is to undermine the County Option law, and the will of the people expressed at 
the polls, pursuant to the provisions of that law. It is thought that no person 
engaged in the sale of intoxicating liquors will attempt to infringe the provisions 
of this order, and particularly with the knowledge and information that detection 
of violation on his or its part will result in most drastic action by the Commission 
to compel respect for its order. 

No manufacturer or dealer in intoxicating liquors violating the provision 
of Section II of the above order, will have any right to complain if on detection, 
he finds it necessary to seek a new location and a new field for his operations. 

AMENDMENT TO ORDER NUMBER 24 

It having been made to appear to the Commission that the immediate 
enforcement of Order Number Twenty-fotu* according to its terms may result 
in injustice and serious financial loss to certain manufactiu'ers lawfully oper- 
ating under existing statutes; 

It is Ordered by the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety that Order 
Number Twenty-four be, and the same is hereby modified and amended by 
adding thereto the following: 

Any brewery having stock on hand at the time of the adoption of 



Order Number Twenty-four shall be permitted up to April 1, 1918, to 
dispose of such stock, not exceeding, however, ^5,000 in value, in accordance 
with the laws and orders in force and effect prior to the adoption of Order 
Number Twenty-four. 

Said Order Number Twenty-foiu- shall apply to all counties, sub- 
divisions thereof, and all municipalities and districts within the state in 
which the sale of intoxicating liquor is prohibited. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-ofiicio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 26 

Providing for Registration of Aliens. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety hereby proclaims and desig- 
nates February 25th, 26th, and 27th, 1918, as 

ALIEN REGISTRATION DAYS 

Throughout the entire State of Minnesota, and orders as follows: 

FIRST 

That every Alien shall register on one of the above dates, at places to be 
designated by the board of county commissioners of the county, or village re- 
corder, city or town clerk, of the mimicipality of which said alien is a resident, 
and make certain sworn declarations as to real estate and personal property 
holdings as prescribed by the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety. 

SECOND 

Each board of county commissioners, or village recorder, city or town clerk, 
shall provide necessary and suitable places for registration of aliens, said regis- 
tration to be conducted as far as practical after the manner of a general election. 

THIRD 

Each village recorder, city or town clerk, shall provide necessary registra- 
tion clerks to conduct the said registration. 

FOURTH 

Each board of county commissioners shall cause to be distributed to each 
village recorder, city or town clerk, the necessary supply of forms for said regis- 
tration, who in turn shall distribute the same to the registration clerks; said 
blank forms to be furnished by the State Auditor, and be distributed by him to 
the several county boards. 

FIFTH 

Each board of county commissioners, and each village recorder, city or 
town clerk, shall cause general and widespread publicity of the dates and pur- 
poses of the said registration days. 

100 



SIXTH 

Each clerk of registration who may be selected by the village recorder, 
city or town clerk, is hereby deputized as its agent by the Minnesota Commission 
of Public Safety to administer the oath appearing on the registration blanks 
attached hereto. 

SEVENTH 

Immediately following the last day of registration each village recorder, 
city or town clerk, shall cause all registration blanks to be collected and for- 
warded to the county board, who shall at once forward same to State Auditor 
J. A. O. Preus, St. Paul. 

EIGHTH 

Any alien resident of the State of Minnesota, who fails to register, and make 
prescribed declaration on one of the above designated registration days will 
be interned or subjected to other action which the Minnesota Commission of 
Public Safety will prescribe. 

NINTH 

Provided, however, that no aliens registered under direction of the De- 
partment of Justice, and who owe allegiance to the German Imperial Govern- 
ment need register. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety requests that election judges 
and clerks serving at the last general election, members of Home Guard organi- 
zations, and other patriotic citizens, may volunteer their service to the nation 
and state and co-operate with the county boards and village recorders, city or 
town clerks in the administration of this order, to the end that the work may be 
accomplished with the least possible expense; and also solicits the hearty and 
liberal co-operation of the patriotic press of the state in acquainting the public 
at large with the text of this proclamation and order. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, February, 5, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ALIEN REGISTRATION AND DECLARATION OF HOLDINGS 

Serial No 

This registration bl3,nk to be forwarded to 

J. A. O. Preus, State Auditor, St. Paul, Minn. 

Town 

County Village 

City 

1. Full name of Alien Registrant 

2. Street address, post-office box or R. F. D. route 

3. Village, city or town 

101 



4. Length of residence at the foregoing place 

6. Give age last birthday 

6. To what country do you claim allegiance? 

7. Where bom 

8. Date of birth 

9. Port of entry to United States 

10. Date of arrival in United States 

11. Married? 12. Is wife living? 

13. Residence of wife, if livitig 

14. Do you speak and write English? 

16. Have you a trade or profession, and what? 

16. In exactly what line of work are you at present engaged? 

17. Give names and ages of all living children, and state which are attending 
public schools 

18. Have any of your male relatives taken part in present war, either for or 
against the United States and its allies? If answer yes, give name, re- 
lationship, and state which country served? 

19. Did you register under selective draft, and if so, where? 

20. What is your serial number? 

21. Did you claim exemption from military service and why? 

22. Have you ever taken out first papers of naturalization in the United States? 
If so, state where and date 

23. If you have taken out first papers of naturalization why have you not taken 
out second papers? 

24. If you have never taken out first papers of nattu-alization, why have you 
not done so? 

25. Do you own or have interest in any farm lands in any County of Minnesota? 
If so give legal description, approximate value of your equity, and state 
whether you are resident thereon 

26. When did you acquire interest in above described lands? 

27. Do you own or have interest in any city lots or other real estate in State of 
Minnesota? If so give legal description and approximate value of your 
equity therein 

28. When did you acquire your interest in above described property? 

29. Do you own or have equity in any farm or city property outside of State 
of Minnesota? If so give legal description and approximate value of such 
equity 

30. Do you own any stocks, bonds, or other securities? If so give name of 
corporation and amount owned 

31. Is any person holding in trust for you any Minnesota farm or city property? 
If so give name of person, description, value of such property, and how long 
held in trust 

32. Give legal description of all real and personal property held by minors for 
which you may be guardian, stating when property acquired and relation- 
ship of minor? 

33. Do you own any personal property such as cattle, sheep, horses, autos, 
farm machinery, etc.? If so, what, and approximate value? 

34. Have you sold or transferred any property since the United States declared 
the existence of a state of war with Germany? If so, give description and 
to whom sold or transferred? 

102 



35. Have you a safe deposit vault, and if so, where is it located?. 
Miscellaneous remarks 



Date — Feb 1918. I do solemnly swear that the answers 

Enrollment Taken and Card Issued to Questions Nos. 1 to inclusive 

as above recorded are complete and 

true to the best of my knowledge and 
Agent, Minnesota Commission of belief. 

Public Safety. 



Signature of Registrant. 



AMENDMENT TO ORDER NUMBER 25 

1. That the time for registration of aliens throughout the entire State of 
Minnesota, under Commission Order Number Twenty-five be and is hereby 
extended for a period of two days, i. e., February twenty-eighth and twenty- 
ninth inclusive. 

2. That all aliens who are residents or who may hereafter become residents 
of the State who have failed to register as such as provided in Order Number 
Twenty-five during the three days originally designated for such registration, 
be and are hereby ordered to register with a Village Recorder, City or Town 
Clerk within forty-eight (48) hours after their arrival in the State of Minnesota. 

3. That all registrations recorded pursuant to this order be promptly for- 
warded by the various Village Recorders and City and Town Clerks to the County 
Auditors of their respective counties, who shall at once forward to the Auditor 
of the State of Minnesota all such recorded registrations. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, February 26, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 26 
Referring to the Manufacture and Sale of Bread. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety Orders as follows: 
Order No. 18, as heretofore amended, shall continue in force until March 
9th, 1918. On and after said date it shall no longer be operative. 

MEMORANDUM 

In the course of the Commission's investigation into the reasons for the 
increased prices of the necessaries of life, made in the fall of 1917, it was dis- 
closed, among other things, that the wholesale price for a thirteen ounce loaf 
of bread in Minneapolis was eight cents, and that the retail price was ten cents. 

The Commission thought such prices were imwarranted, and with the pur- 
pose of so demonstrating on November 6, 1917, it made an arrangement with 

108 



Occident Baking Company in the form of Order No. 15 tmder which the Baking 
Company furnished the Commission well-baked wholesome bread manufactured 
from "Bakers' patent wheat flour" at five and one-half cents per loaf of sixteen 
ounces. The Commission retailed this bread at certain central stations in 
Minneapolis on the cash and carry plan at the price of thirteen cents for two 
loaves. The added one cent per loaf charged the consumer covered all the 
Commission's marketing expenses except the pay of its superintendent. The 
Minneapolis public thus were enabled to buy thirty-two ounces of bread for 
thirteen cents where it had been previously paying twenty cents for twenty- 
six ounces. 

This arrangement operated for a month when by agreement with the Minne- 
apolis bakers, Order No. 18 was entered, and the Commission discontinued its 
own participation in the bread business. Under Order No. 18 the wholesale 
price of the bread specified in Order No. 15^ was fixed at six and one-half cents 
and the retail price at seven cents. The six and one-half cents wholesale price 
it was calculated would enable the bakers to make deliveries to the retailers 
and the retailers were allowed to charge one-half a cent profit per loaf. 

Since December, 1917, when Order No. 18 was adopted, the federal food 
regulations have been promulgated and the use of twenty per cent of cereals 
required in the manufacture of bread. The unexpected demand for barley 
- and com flours thus created has increased their price tmtil they are now greater 
than the price of wheat flour, and some complaint has been made that six and 
one-half cents per loaf no longer allows the baking companies a reasonable 
margin over cost. The Commission admits that if the price of the cereal flours 
is further advanced and Order No. 18 were to continue in force, the prices for 
bread which it fixes should be increased. But it thinks the point when this 
is necessary has not yet been reached and will not be for the remaining period 
during which the order is to be operative. 

The Commission's activities in price fixing have been confined in the case 
of milk to Minneapolis and St. Paul, and in the case of bread to Minneapolis 
alone. If its measures were designed to be of substantive character, this would 
be improper. The people of other sections of the State are entitled to the same 
attention at its hands as the people of the large cities, and if the bread order 
were to continue, its provisions should be extended to cover the state at large. 
This would be a very difficult undertaking in view of varying local conditions, 
and because a fair price for commodities in one place might be too big or too 
small in another. But what the Commission has had in mind has been to learn 
by actual experience whether there has been any justification for the constantly 
mounting prices which have obtained in the common food stuffs, and where 
it has been proved that there has not been, to bring this fact home to the public 
and to make it reaUze that there is a remedy available. It has demonstrated 
that ten cents for thirteen ounces of bread in Minneapolis was an unwarranted 
price, and that there is no reason why it should not have been sold for a little 
more than half of this sum. The fact thus established is an important contri- 
bution to economic knowledge. 

Having demonstrated this, the Commission is arresting its work in the 
matter of bread and turning over to the several mimicipalities of the State the 
practical application of the examples its work in this direction affords. It 
puts the date of the repeal of the order far enough ahead to permit the governing 
bodies of these several municipalities to take appropriate action meanwhile 
if they want to do so. That the sale prices in a city of commodities of common 
use like bread can be regulated by ordinance seems a novel proposition to some 

104 



people. But the Commission is advised that under most city charters this 
course is entirely legal, and if any city feels doubt as to its powers in this direction, 
the Commission stands ready to supplement or confirm by its orders any ordi- 
nances on the subject which may be adopted fixing reasonable prices for such 
commodities. The Commission also stands ready to supply any inquiring 
municipality with the information as to cost of bread production which its 
investigations have elicited. Its views are (1) that during the period of the 
war there must be price regulation in many of the necessities of life,* 

(2) that it would be unfortunate from the standpoint of self-government, if, 
in such matters, the several communities should come to depend on a body 
like the Commission for action, and (3) that in the case of many commodities 
price regulation can be most intelligently and effectively accomplished by local 
legislation. The Commission has shown that in the matter of bread much 
can be accompHshed, and in its opinion the same thing can also be accomplished 
in reference to other commodities. If the governing body of any municipality 
asks it to, the Commission will gladly contribute every possible assistance to 
protection against unreasonably high prices. 

Dated at Saint Paul, Minnesota, February twenty-sixth, nineteen hundred 
eighteen. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 27 
Providing for a Farm Crop and Stock Census. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety does Order as follows: 
Whereas, the State Auditor has, under the Commission's instructions, 
prepared blanks for the purpose in the form printed on the reverse side hereof, 
to be distributed in proper quantities among the assessors. 

Each such assessor at the time of his view or call specified in Section 1985, 
General Statutes, 1913, shall present one of said blanks to each person in his 
town or district whose names may be on the list specified in said section, every 
person to whom one of said blanks shall be presented shall forthwith make 
true and full answer to each of the questions on said blank and the assessor 
shall note said answers on such blank and transmit the same without delay to 

*Budd V. New York, 143 U. S. 517 

"Under the powers of goveriiment inherent in every sovereignty, 'the govern- 
ment regulates the conduct of its citizens one toward another, and the manner 
in which each shall use his own property, when such regulation becomes necessary 
for the public good;' and * * * 'm their exercise it has been customary in Eng- 
land from time immemorial, and in this country from its first colonization, to 
regulate ferries, common carriers, hackmen, bakers, millers, wharf-fingers, inn- 
keepers, etc., and in so doing to fix a maximum of charge to be made for services 
rendered, accomodations furnished, and articles sold.' * ♦ * 'To this date, 
statutes are to be found in many of the states upon some or all of these subjects, 
and we think it has never yet been successfully contended that such legislation 
came within any of the constitutional prohibitions against interference with 
private property.' " 



the State Auditor at St. Paul, Minnesota. The word "assessor" as used herein 
shall include assistant or deputy assessors. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, March 12, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 28 
Providing for the Eradication of Barberry. 

Whereas, It has been represented to the Commission by the Secretary 
of Agriculture of the United States, that wheat and other cereals are apt to be 
more seriously injiu-ed by rust when gro^\Ti in the vicinity of barberry bushes 
of the varieties hereinafter specified, and that the black stem rust of wheat 
and other cereals and grasses develops on such barberry bushes in the spring 
and produces countless numbers of spores which are carred by the wind, and 
find lodgment on grain and grasses, and 

Whereas, The action of the Commission has been asked for the eradica- 
tion of such bushes. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety Orders as follows: 

1. All barberry (Berberis sp.) bushes except the species and variety known 
as Japanese barberry (Berberis Thimbergii) are hereby declared to be, and the 
same are, a public nuisance and a menace to the pubUc welfare, and their main- 
tenance, propagation, sale or introduction into the state is forbidden. It shall 
be the duty of every person owning or having charge of any premises on which 
barberry bushes of the rust-producing varieties are grown, or at any time f oimd 
growing, to forthwith destroy such bushes. 

2. The State Entomologist is authorized, and it is hereby made his duty, 
to cause all rust-producing barberry bushes within the State of Minnesota to 
be eradicated, and he is hereby made the Commission's agent for that purpose. 
It shall also be the duty of the coimty board of every county in this state to 
order and cause the eradication of all such rust-producing barberry bushes 
within their respective counties under the instructions, and according to the 
direction of the State Entomologist. The State Entomologist shall make 
rules and regulations relating to the most convenient and expedient method 
of eradicating and destroying such rust-producing barberry bushes, he shall 
have the power to appoint one or more agents to enforce the provisions of this 
order, and he, or his agents, and the several county boards ^vithin their respec- 
tive counties shall have free access at all reasonable hours to any premises to 
determine whether such rust-producing barberry bushes are growing thereon, 
and to require reports from the owners or occupants of any premises as to the 
presence of such bushes thereon. 

3. In pursuance of the powers hereby granted, whenever the State En- 
tomologist or his agents, or any county board, acting under his instructions, 
shall have found barberry bushes of said rust-producing varieties on any premises, 
it shall be the duty of the county board or the State Entomologist, or his agents, 
as the case may be, to immediately notify or cause to be notified, the owner 
and occupant of the premises on which such bushes are growing, such notice 
shall be sent to such owner by mail in such form as the State Entomologist 
shall prescribe, and if such barberry bushes are not destroyed within ten (10) 



days after the mailing of such notice, the State Entomologist, or his agents, 
or the county board, acting under his instructions, as the case may be, shall 
destroy or cause to be destroyed such barberry bushes. The expense of such 
destruction shall be paid to the State Entomologist by the owner of the premises 
within ten (10) days after the rendition of a bill therefor, and if such cost shall 
not be paid within said time the bill shall be reported to the county attorney, 
who shall forthwith collect the same in the name of the state and shall turn 
the amoimt collected over to the State Treasurer to be credited to the appropriate 
fimd. 

4. The State Entomologist, or his agent, whenever requested by any 
county board, or by any resident of the state, shall determine, or cause to be 
determined, whether or not the barberry bushes grown on certain premises are 
of the rust-producing variety, and after such examination the results of the same 
shall be certified to the coimty board, and his determination so certified shall 
be conclusive. 

5. No expenses or outlays chargeable to the Commission's fimd shall 
be incurred or made by the State Entomologist, or by any agent of his, or by 
any county board in connection with the enforcement of this order, except in 
the actual destruct?ion of such bushes. On or before the tenth day of each 
month, the State Entomologist shall report to the Commission all expenses 
incurred or outlays made in such destruction during the preceding month, and 
until the further orders of the Commission, the sum of two hundred and fifty 
dollars is appropriated out of the Commission's fund for the purpose of such 
destruction. 

6. The State Entomologist shall, from time to time, make reports to the 
Commission of his doings hereunder, and of any violations or breaches hereof 
for the Commission's action in the premises. 

This order shall be in force from its date. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, March 19, 1918. 
, MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY^ 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 29 

WARNING 

To Settlers, Campers, Construction Crews and All Citizens. 

SET NO FIRES 

It is ordered by the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety that from 
and after April 15th, for a period of six months, no person shall kindle or set 
any fire in grass, stubble, peat, brush, slash or woods, or kindle any fire, except 
for domestic or industrial purposes, in the following counties: Cook, Lake, 
St. Louis, Carlton, Itasca, Kanabec, Koochiching, Beltrami, Aitkin, Pine, Cass, 
Crow Wing, Clearwater, Hubbard, Becker, Mahnomen, Mille Lacs, Morrison, 
Todd, Wadena, Otter Tail, Clay, Norman, Polk, Red Lake, Pennington, Mar- 
shall, Roseau, Kittson. 

107. 



Provided, That this order shall not apply to fields around which an ample 
firebreak has been freshly plowed, or to fires kindled or set by the State Forester, 
or under his direction, regulation or permission. 

The chairmen of town boards, and, for unorganized townships, the county 
commissioners and the sheriffs, shall enforce this order. 

The State Forester and Assistant State Forester are hereby appointed as 
Commissioners of the Public Safety Commission, to discharge the functions 
of this body in respect to safeguarding life and property from forest and prairie 
fires. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, April 9, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: ^ 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 30 
Providing for the Arbitration of Labor Differences. 

Whereas, Pursuant to the Governor's Proclamation of March 30, 1918, 
the members of the State Board of Arbitration have conferred with represen- 
tatives of employers and employes for the purpose of adjusting all industrial 
disputes and thereby preventing strikes or lockouts during the war; and 

Whereas, As a result of said conference the Executive Coimcil of the 
Minnesota State Federation of Labor, the Minnesota Employers' Association, 
and others have petitioned said board, through petitions of which the following 
is a copy: 

To the Board of Arbitration of the State of Minnesota: 

Gentlemen: 

Realizing that the full activity and energy of every citizen in some form or 
another must be effectively used for the successful prosecution and termination 
of the war, and that personal and selfish aims and ambitions must, at this time, 
be entirely set aside for the welfare of the coimtry, and beHeving that loyalty 
is not confined to any one class or group: 

We Propose, That employer and employe, organized and unorganized, 
shall use every effort to prevent strikes and lockouts, to deal rationally and 
imselfishly with serious wage disputes, and for the period of the war not compel, 
or attempt to compel discriminations in employment by strikes, threats of 
strikes or lockouts. 

To this end the imdersigned suggest the adoption of the following basic 
conditions to cover both employer and employe, organized or unorganized, 
during the period of the war: 

1. That employer and employe must recognize that now, and for the period 
of the war continuous, efficient production can alone equip and sustain our 
military forces; that every dispute, whatever its motive, which interrupts pro- 
duction, furthers the ends and operates to the advantage of the public enemy. 

2. That employes shall not ask for recognition of a union which had not 
been recognized before the war. 

3. That employers, by a lockout or by other means, shall not try to break 
up a union which had been recognized before the war. 

108 



R«aliBiiig %h»Lt th« full aotirlty and «&«rgy of •▼•ry 
«iti29n In soifi* forv ot aJ9u»tbor Kuat b« •fftatlTely ua«d for th« 
•ttootasful prosooutlott ADd ««r»ln»'llon of tho «&r, &nd thst por* 
•Oiml and nolflth &!«!• and •abitions «u«t, at tblt tlm«« b« •»-> 
tlr^l/ sot eisldo for th« wolf art' of %h« oouatry* tatd bolte^lng that 
loyalty 1« not oonflnod to any eao olaso ox group; 

WK PROPOSE that onpl«yor asd oaployo, organisod and 
ttnorsanlxod* •hall uao ©vory •ffoft to proront ■trikos and lookout*, 
to ioal ratiobally and unoelflohly with ••rlouo wago dloputo*, and 
for th« period of th« war rutt ooaptl, or attowpt to oorpol diaorla- 
inationo In employaont by otrikoo, throat* of otrlloa or lookouto. 

To this and tho usdorai^od auggaat tho adoption of 
tho following baalo oonditiona to oovar both ovployor and o«ployO| 
organixad and unorganlxod, during tho period of the war. 

1« That eaployor and eaploye «uat reoogniaa that now 
and for tho period of the war continuoua, effiotont produotion 
oan alone equi . and sustain our allltary forcea: that oTery liapute, 
orhateyer It* aotlva, whloh interrupt* production, furthera the 
end© s^nd operate* to th* advantage of th* publio eneay. 

2« That eaploye* shall not aak for reoognltlon of a 
tmlon whloh haa not been ri'oo^^.nited before the war* 

3. That eaployer*, by & lookout or by other weana, 
ahall not try to br«'».k up h union '^hloh had bo -n reoocnlaou before 

the *Hr. 

4. That employer* fend eaploye* agree in good faith 
to iR'iinthln the exlaiing atrUua, In every plaoe of eKployment, 
of -t union, non-union or open ahop. 

5. That eaployera and employee nftroe that differenoea 
»rith resneot to «»«e8 or houra of labor ahall be referred to the 
8tat3 Boarrt of Arbitration for adjudloatlon under the previa lone 
of Ch;i.ntor 23, feotlon 3941 of the Law* of Mlnneoota. 

6. That luring the period of the war, there ah^ill be 
nalthar strike nor lookout under any clrouffietanoes. 

In the event of an Arbitration, pending the de- 
cision of the Board, work ahall be continued unlnterrur<tad by 
either party. 









4. That employers and employes agree in good faith to maintain the 
existing status, in every phase of employment, of a union, non-union or open 
shop. 

6. That employers and employes agree that differences with respect to 
wages or hours of labor shall be referred to the State Board of Arbitration for 
adjudication under the provisions of Chapter 23, Section 3941, of the Laws 
of Minnesota. 

6. That during the period of the war, there shall be neither strike nor 
lockout imder any circumstances. 

In the event of an Arbitration, pending the decision of the Board, work 
shall be continued uninteraiipted by either party; and 

Whereas, The State Board of Arbitration recommends to the Commission 
of Public Safety that the recommendations contained in said petition be given 
the force and effect of an order of said Commission: 

It is Hereby Ordered, That the aforesaid paragraphs, numbered 2 to 
6 inclusive, be and the same are hereby given the force and effect of orders of 
this Commission during the war, and that the members of the State Board of 
Arbitration be given full power and authority to summon witnesses, and ex- 
amine the same under oath, as provided in Chapter 26, Section 3, Paragraph 4, 
and that the decision of said Board shall be binding on the parties to said dis- 
pute. And pending the decision of the Board "work shall be continued un- 
interrupted by either party" as in said petition requested. 

In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal at the 
Capitol in the City of Saint Paul, this sixteenth day of April, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 
J. A. A. Burnquist, 
Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 31 

An Order Authorizing Minnesota Soldiers and Sailors to Vote at the 1918 Pri- 
mary Election. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety finds and declares: 

That it is necessary and proper for the Commission to provide a method 
by which Minnesota citizens who will be absent because they are engaged in 
the military or naval service of the United States, may participate in the coming 
primary elections, (1) to the end that the public safety at home may be thereby 
subserved, (2) as a matter of military expediency lest enlistments be discoiu-aged 
if the absence necessarily entailed thereby should involve a loss or suspension 
of civil rights, and (3) in order that our men under arms may have the comfort 
of realizing that even while they are away, they are still members of their several 
communities and entitled and expected to exercise all the privileges of citizenship. 

The Commission, under the powers conferred on it by law, therefore Orders 
as follows: 

Section 1. Any person entitled to vote at the primary election to be held 
in the several election districts of this state on the third Monday in June, 1918, 
and who is absent on said day from the election district in which he is entitled 
to vote, and is in the military or naval service of the United States, may vote 

109 



therein by having his primary election ballot delivered by mail to the judges 
of such district on the day of such primary election by complying with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 68, Laws 1917, and any amendments thereof heretofore 
enacted, which said Chapter 68, Laws 1917, is entitled: 

"An act authorizing voters absent from the election district of which 
they are residents on the day when any general election is held to vote 
therein by having their marked ballots delivered to the judges of election 
therein through the agency of the United States Post Office Department; 
prescribing the manner in which the official ballots shall be obtained, marked 
and deHvered to the election judges; imposing certain duties upon the officers 
charged by law with preparing, printing and distributing election ballots 
and election suppHes; regulating the time of making nominations of candi- 
dates for office to be voted for at any such general election and declaring 
it to be a felony to do certain acts prohibited therein;" 
so far as the provisions of said act as so amended are appropriate for application 
to a primary election and the voting thereat and so far as the same are not in- 
consistent with the provisions of this order and by also complying with the 
provisions of this order. 

Section 2. For the purpose of giving effect to the provisions of Section 
1 of this order, the provisions of said Chapter 68, Laws 1917, so far as appropriate 
and except as hereinafter otherwise provided, are hereby extended to and de- 
clared to be applicable to the primary election to be held in this state on the 
third Monday in June, 1918, provided, however, this order shall not be construed 
as authorizing any person not in the miUtary or naval service of the United States 
to so vote by mail. It is hereby made the duty of all public officials in any way 
charged with the performance of any duty under the provisions of said Chapter 
68, Laws 1917, to perform like duties with reference to the said primary election 
and to carry out and give effect to the intent and piu-pose of this order. For 
the piuposes of this order the words "general election" whenever used in said 
Chapter 68, Laws 1917, shall whenever appropriate, be construed to mean 
"primary election." The words "primary election" shall be substituted for 
the words "general election" in all forms prescribed by said Chapter 68, Laws 
1917, when said forms are used with reference to a primary election. 

Section 3. That Section 2 of Chapter 68, Laws 1917, as so made applicable 
to said primary election is modified to this extent, to- wit: that application 
for primary ballots may be made not more than fifty (50) days or less than 
foiu* (4) days before the date of such primary election. The applicant shall 
designate in the manner hereinafter provided the party ballot which he desires 
to have furnished to him and shall be furnished with one such ballot only and 
with one only of each of the non-partisan ballots which he is entitled to vote 
in the district of which he is a resident on such primary election day. The 
applicant shall take the oath hereinafter specified. Such oath may be taken 
by any person in the military or naval service of the United States before any 
commissioned officer of either of said branches of said service and any such 
officer is hereby authorized to administer such oath. Any officer administering 
such oath shall append to his signature a statement of his official rank and or- 
ganization. If the applicant for ballots be a resident of a city of the first, second 
or third class, the application for ballot shall be in the following form: 

APPLICATION FOR BALLOTS 

The undersig^^d, a duly qualified voter (1) of the 

precinct of the ward of the city of 



110 



in the county of ' State of Minnesota, residing at 

(hfere insert stfeet and numbef ) 

in said city (2) residing at 

(here insert street and house number) in the city of 

in the county of State of Minnesota, 

(3) hereby makes application for ballots to be voted on in the district in 
which he so resides at the next ensuing primary election, to be held in sajd dis- 
trict. Please mail ballots and accompanying envelopes to me at 

Ddted at , this day of 

, 19 

(Signature of Applicant.) 
Note: If applicant does not know the description of his election district 
he may strike out paragraph (1) above and fill in paragraph (2), otherwise 
strike out paragraph (2). 

If the applicant for ballots be not a resident of a city of the first, second 
or third class, the application for ballots shall be in the following form: 

The undersigned, a duly qualified voter of the 

(here insert name of town, village or other description of election district) re- 
siding at (town, village or 

city of fourth class) hereby makes application for the ballots to be voted for 
in said district at the next primary election. Please mail said ballots to me at 

(here insert post office address to which to be mailed.) 

Dated at • this day 

of , 19 

(Signature of Applicant.) 
There shall be printed on the back of each of said forms the following: 
This is to certify that ballots were — mailed — delivered in person — as per 

enclosed application, this day of 

, 19 

County Auditor. 

Per 

Deputy. 

The oath to be printed on the back of the application for a primary ballot 
shall be substantially in the following form and with appropriate alterations 
shall be subscribed and sworn to by the applicant: 

OATH 

STATE OF ) 

> ss. 
County of ) 

I do swear that I am a citizen of the United States, that I will be twenty- 
one years of age on the 17th day of June, 1918, and at that time will have been 
a resident of the State of Minnesota for six months immediately preceding 
said date: 

(1) that I am an actual resident of the election district named in the within 
application; or if no election district is named therein, my place of residence 

111 



is at the place set forth in said application; that I am an actual resident of the 
election district wherein is situate the place of residence set forth in said appli- 
cation. 

That on the 17th day of June, 1918, I will have resided in said election 
district thirty days, or more, immediately preceding said date; that I do not 
intend to abandon my residence in said district prior to said date; that at said 
time I will be a qualified voter in said election district. 

(2) I further swear that at the last election I generally supported the can- 
didates of the party and intend to sup- 
port the candidates of that party at the next ensuing general election and desire 
a ballot of said party. 

(3) That I have never voted in Minnesota before and desire a ballot of 
the party. 

(4) I further swear that I am in the — military — ^naval — service of the 

United States, to-wit: ~. 

(here insert description of particular command or unit or branch of service to 
which the applicant belongs.) 

(Signature of Applicant here.) 

^ Subscribed and sworn to before me this day 

of.'. , 19 

Name of Officer. 



Rank or description of office. 



Organization. 

Note: In filling out the oath the applicant should strike out either para- 
graph (2) or (3) as the facts may require, also either the word "military" or 
"naval" where the same appear in paragraph (4). This oath may be taken 
before any commissioned officer in the military or naval service of the United 
States, in which case the officer should give his rank and organization. The 
oath may also be taken before any officer authorized to administer oaths by 
the laws of the place where the oath is taken. If taken before an officer having 
an official seal, the jurat should be authenticated with his seal. 

Section 4. It is hereby made the duty of the several officers charged with 
the duty of preparing the primary election ballots to prepare and have the same 
ready for distribution as soon as possible after the last day for fiUng by candidates. 

Section 5. The county auditor shall forthwith upon the delivery to him 
of the primary election ballots, deliver or mail the ballots applied for to the 
persons who have theretofore made application therefor and shall thereafter 
mail or deliver ballots to persons who shall make application therefor within 
the time hereinbefore limited. 

Section 6. Section 5 of said Chapter 68, Laws 1917, so far as applicable 
to primary elections, is modified as follows: No applicant for ballots who 
swears that he is in the military or naval service of the United States shall be 
required to pay the fee in said Section 5 provided for. The Minnesota Com- 
mission of Public Safety will furnish all necessary blank "Applications for Bal- 

iia 



lots," "Voters' Certificates," "Envelopes" and postage stamps necessary to 
carry out the provisions of this order. The county auditor of each county is 
hereby authorized to employ such extra clerical assistance as may be necessary 
to carry out the provisions of this order and the cost thereof, if volunteer and 
gratuitous assistance cannot be had, will be paid for by the said Minnesota 
Commission of Public Safety. 

Section 7. That Section 6 of said Chapter 68, Laws 1917, so far as the 
same is applicable to primary election, is modified as follows, to-wit: 

(1) That where the voter is in the. military or naval service of the United 
States any commissioned officer of either of said services may also act as an 
attesting witness. 

(2) That the certificate required by said Section 6 of Chapter 68, Laws 
1917, to be printed on the back of the "Return Envelope" shall be modified 
as follows: 

"This is to certify that 

after marking and enveloping the enclosed ballots as set forth in the enclosed 
certificate by me attested, enclosed the said ballot envelope in this return en- 
velope in my presence without opening the said ballot envelope or permitting 
me or any other person to know or learn how he had voted as to any candidate 
or proposition and that this return envelope was sealed in my presence and after 
being sealed was deposited by me or in my presence in the United States Post 
Office or mail box at without being opened. 

Dated this day of ,19 

Attesting Witness. 

(3) That the "Certificate of Attesting Witness" to be printed on the Voter's 
Certificate shall read as follows: 

CERTIFICATE OF ATTESTING WITNESS 

I hereby certify that I have read the foregoing certificate and know the 
contents thereof and that the same is true, so far as it relates to the marking 
of said ballots. 

Dated at this day of , 19 



Attesting Witness. 
Rank or description of office. 



Organization. 

(4) That paragraph (E) of Directions to Voters shall read as follows: 

(E) Enclose "Ballot Envelope" and "Voter's Certificate" in "Return En- 
velope," seal the latter, having attesting witness sign certifioate on back of 
"Return Envelope" and then deposit same in the United States Post Office 
or mail box in the presence of the attesting witness, or deliver to attesting wit- 
ness for deposit by him in post office or mail box. 

(5) That paragraph (h) of the Directions to Voters shall read as follows: 
(h) Any commissioned officer in the military or naval service of the United 

States, any United States postmaster, assistant United States postmaster, 
or any county, village or city officer having an official seal may be an attesting 
witness. 

lis 



If a postmaster or assistant postmaster acts as attesting witness, his sig- 
nature on the "Certificate of Attesting Witness" should be authenticated by 
the cancellation stamp of his respective post office. If a military or naval 
officer acts he should append to his signature a statement of his rank and or- 
ganization. The signature of the attesting witness on the "Return Envelope" 
need not, however, be thus authenticated. 

Section 8. That Section 7 of Chapter 68, Laws 1917, so far as applicable 
to primary elections, is hereby modified as follows: 

The coimty auditor shall cause the applications for primary election ballots 
theretofore received by him to be delivered to the judges of election of the several 
election districts as provided for in said Section 7 of Chapter 68, Laws 1917, 
and when it appears from the oath of the applicant that he is in the military 
or naval service of the United States, and a qualified voter in the election dis- 
trict, the judges of election shall enter the name of such applicant upon the 
registration list of the districts without further requirement, provided such voter's 
name has not already been entered thereon and the ballot of any such applicant 
shall be received at such primary election, if the receipt thereof is otherwise 
lawful, although such voter may not have been previously registered in such 
election district. 

Section 9. The County Auditor before delivering the blank ballots to 
applicants therefor under the provisions of this order shall print or plainly 
stamp on the face thereof in letters as large as bold face pica, the words, "War 
Ballot." 

The coimty auditor shall furnish to the election officers of each election 
district duplicate sets of tally sheets and blanks for returns to the County Can- 
vassing Board of which the election officers shall tally and make return of all 
"War Ballots." The County Canvassing Board shall canvass the returns 
as to "War Ballots" with like effect as the returns as to ballots voted by persons 
voting in person at such primary election. 

Section 10. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Minnesota Com- 
mission of Public Safety to cause a suitable number of blank "Applications 
for Ballots" to be printed and furnished to the several county auditors for dis- 
tribution to applicants or to persons who desire to mail or deliver the same to 
absent voters who are in the military or naval service of the United States. 
It shall be the duty of said Secretary to arrange for the delivery of such blank 
"Applications for Ballots" in quantities to such suitable persons as may be 
selected by him for distribution at camps and cantonments in which it is known 
that there are a considerable number of Minnesota voters. 

Section 11. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Minnesota Com- 
mission of Public Safety to purchase and distribute to the several county audi- 
tors a suitable number of "Envelopes" with the proper printed forms thereon. 
Voter's Certificate with "Certificate of Attesting Witnesses" and Directions 
to Voters and such other blank forms as may be required to give effect to the 
purpose and intent of this order. All blanks prepared shall be approved by 
the Attorney General. 

Section 12. It shall be the duty of the Attorney General to prepare and 
cause to be mailed to the several county auditors plain and concise instructions 
concerning their duties under this order; also to prepare and furnish for distri- 
bution to the county auditors for distribution to the election officials of the 
several election districts similar instructions for the guidance of such officials. 
The printing and distribution of the same to the county auditors shall be paid 
for from the funds of the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety. 

114 



Section 13. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Minnesota Com- 
mission of Public Safety to furnish blank "Applications for Ballots" to such 
publishers of newspapers within the state as apply therefor and agree to pub- 
lish in their respective papers a notice to the effect that they have such blanks 
for free distribution to persons who may desire to send the same to absent voters 
in the military or naval service of the United States. 

Section 14. There may be printed on any blanks herein provided for, 
such notices, explanations or directions as may be prepared by or approved 
by the Attorney General and which he may deem necessary or desirable to 
assist the voters or officials in giving effect to this order. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, April 30, 1918. 



J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 32 
Prohibiting Employment of Aliens as Teachers. 

No person, who is not a citizen of the United States, shall be qualified to 
serve as a teacher in any public, private, or parochial school or in any normal 
school in which teachers for these schools are trained, but the State Superin- 
tendent of Education may grant a permit to teach to an otherwise qualified 
teacher who has made a proper declaration of intention to become a citizen, 
or to a special teacher to be employed for technical work and for such a period 
as the Superintendent of Education shall designate. 

The State Superintendent of Education is authorized and directed to en- 
force and carry into effect this order. 

Dated at Saint Paul, Minnesota, April 30, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 33 
Providing a Penalty for Violation of any Order. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety Orders as follows: 
Any person violating or refusing or failing to obey any order of the Minne- 
sota Commission of Public Safety, heretofore or hereafter made, in which no 
other punishment is specifically provided, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, 
and shall be punished by imprisonment in the county jail for not more than 
three months, or by a fine of not more than One Hundred Dollars. 
Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, April 30, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETYj 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

116 



ORDER NUMBER 34 
Closing Certain Saloons at Blooming Prairie. 

Whereas, P. F. Coggins, Geo. E. Thomas and W. R. Carroll are operating 
saloons in the Village of Blooming Prairie, Steele County, Minnesota, in viola- 
tion and defiance of law, and of the Commission's Order Number 17. 

The President of said Village is directed and ordered to close, said saloons 
forthwith for and during the period of the war, using all lawful means to that end. 

And said P. F. Coggins, Geo. E. Thomas and W. R. Carroll are prohibited 
from engaging, directly or indirectly, in the business of selling intoxicating 
liquor in said Village during the period of the war. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, May 14, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 36 
Prohibiting Transportation of Liquor by Automobile or other vehicles through 
Dry Territory. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety finds and declares as follows: 

The transportation of intoxicating liquor in automobiles and other vehicles 
into and through districts in which the sale of intoxicating liquor is forbidden 
by law, operates to nu Hfy the enforcement of such laws, makes public highways 
dangerous for ordinary travel, tends to the spread of disorder and to breaches 
of peace, and diminishes the efficiency of the man-power of the state, and the 
successful application of its resources to the nation's need. 

The Commission therefore ORDERS: 

The transportation or carrying of intoxicating liquor in any quantity, for 
any purpose, and in any container whatsoever, into or through any county, 
city, village or borough, in which the sale of intoxicating liquor is illegal under 
any law or treaty, is forbidden, and is hereby declared to be unlawful; provided 
that steam railroads may transport intoxicating liquor in this state in the manner, 
and to the extent permitted by existing or futiure orders of this Commission. 

Any peace officer is authorized to arrest the progress of any automobile or 
other vehicle on any highway in any district affected hereby, and if he has 
reasonable ground to believe the same is being used for the transportation of 
intoxicating liquor it shall be his duty to subject the same to search, and in the 
event that he finds intoxicating liquor therein, he shall seize such liquor, and such 
seiztu-e shall operate forthwith as a confiscation thereof to the State of Minnesota. 
The officer seizing such liquor shall dispose of the same according to the pro- 
visions of Order Niunber 22, of this Commission. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, May 14, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

116 



ORDER NUMBER 36 

Providing for Notice to Attorney General in Case of Proceedings Involving 
Commission. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety Orders as follows: 
Whenever any action or proceeding shall be commenced against any munici- 
pality of this state, or against any board, commission, officer or agent of the 
state or of any subdivision thereof, which in any manner involves the validity, 
construction, effect or operation of any order of this Commission, the person 
upon whom service is made shall forthwith give notice in writing to the Attorney 
General of Minnesota, of the commencement of such action or proceeding, 
and of the nature thereof, giving the name of the court, the names of the parties 
and the date of service. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, May 14, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 37 
Providing That All Able Bodied Men Must be Regularly Employed. 

Whereas, It is necessary to enact such regulations as will utiHze to the 
best advantage the human energy of the State of Minnesota for the purposes 
essential to the prosecution of the present war, and 

Whereas, The need of men of Military age to provide reinforcements 
for the Army and the equally urgent need for labor to assist in the production 
of food and other articles essential for war purposes, necessitate special pro- 
visions to the end that all persons domiciled in Minnesota shall, in the absence 
of reasonable cause to the contrary, engage in useful occupations. 

It is Therefore Ordered by the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety: 

First: That every male person residing in Minnesota shall be regularly 
engaged in some useful occupation. 

Second : In any proceeding hereunder it shall be a defense that the person is : 

(a) A bona-fide student in actual attendance at some recognized educa- 
tional institution or proceeding with his training for some useful occupation. 

(b) Children under sixteen years of age. 

(c) Persons physically unable to comply with the provisions of this order. 

(d) Usually employed in some useful occupation and temporarily un- 
employed owing to differences with his employer cormnon to similar employes 
with the same employer. 

Third: It shall be the duty of the sheriffs of the respective counties, and 
of the Peace Officers, and of any other officer, State or Municipal, charged 
with enforcing the law, to seek and continue to seek diligently, names and places 
of residence of able-bodied male persons, within their respective jurisdiction, 
not regularly or continuously employed, as provided by this order, and report 
the same to the County Attorneys in their respective counties. 

Any person violating or refusing or failing to obey this order shall be guilty 

117 



of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by imprisonment in the County Jail 
for not more than three months or by a fine of not more than $100.00. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, June 4, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 
C. H. March 

Vice Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 38 
Providing Municipal Wood Yards. 

Whereas, There exist unlimited quantities of timber available for fuel 
purposes in the forests of certain counties of this state, which in the judgment 
of this Commission can and should be utilized without delay as a substitute 
for coal, insofar as practicable, in order that the military, civil and industrial 
resources of this state may be most efficiently applied towards the maintenance 
of the defense of the state and nation, and the successful prosecution of the 
present war, and 

Whereas, In the judgment of this Commission, if legal authority is granted 
to the boards of county commissioners of counties containing available stands 
of timber suitable for fuel purposes, to engage in the work of acquiring fuel 
timber stumpage, of cutting and preparing the same for fuel from the lands in their 
respective coimties, obtaining the same by purchase, and marketing such fuel 
by disposing of the same to the inhabitants and industries thereof, including 
any municipality therein, at or as near cost as may be, but without financial 
loss to such county, the demands for coal in such counties will be greatly dimin- 
ished, and the military, civil and industrial resources of the state thereby more 
efficiently applied toward the successful prosecution of the present war; 

It is Hereby Ordered, That the Board of County Commissioners of 
St. Louis Coimty, Minnesota, being a county containing an abundance of such 
fuel timber, be and the same hereby is authorized to engage in the work of ac- 
quiring fuel timber stumpage, of cutting and preparing the same for market, 
or purchasing cordwood and marketing such wood fuel purchased, or cut from 
the lands in or adjacent to such coimty, and disposing of such fuel for cash to 
the inhabitants and industries thereof, including any municipaHty therein, 
at as near cost as may be, but without financial loss to said county; 

It is Further Ordered, That said county board is hereby authorized 
to appoint and employ a competent superintendent of such work, who, under 
the direction of said county board, shall have general charge of the work of 
acquiring fuel timber stumpage, of purchasing fuel already cut, and of cutting 
and marketing fuel purchased or cut from lands in such county or adjacent 
thereto, with full authority to employ men, teams and other equipment, and 
do all other acts and things necessary to properly carry out the power hereby 
granted, all subject to the approval of said county board. 

It is Further Ordered, That the warrants of any municipality may be 
accepted in lieu of cash in payment of fuel sold to such municipality. 

It is Further Ordered, That any and all expenses necessarily incurred 
in the carrying out of the powers hereby granted shall be audited, allowed and 
paid out of the revenue funds of said county, in the manner provided by law 
for the payment of other ordinary claims against said county. 

118 



It is Further Ordered, That the board of county commissioners of 
said county be, and it hereby is authorized to set apart from the general revenue 
fund of said county, such amount as it may deem necessary for the carrying 
out of the purposes herein authorized. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, July 3, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. Burnquist, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 39 
Closing Saloons on Entrainment Dates. 

Whereas, The next entrainment of men called from Minnesota under 
the selective service act have been fixed for the five days beginning July 22, 
1918, and the points of entrainment and the several days for entrainment at 
these points have been, or will be designated and announced by the Adjutant 
General, and 

Whereas, Experience has demonstrated that as a matter of military 
expediency all saloons should be closed, and the sale of intoxicating liquors 
should be prohibited at the several points of entrainment on the days thereof; 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety does Order: 

That all saloons located or operating in any city, village or borough in the 
State of Minnesota, which has or shall be designated by the Adjutant General 
as a point of entrainment for men called under the selective service act shall 
be closed on the day or days designated for such entrainment at said point, 
from the beginning of such day or days until the hour of actual departure there- 
from of the railroad trains carrying such men, and the sale of intoxicating liquor 
in all such cities, villages or boroughs during said time is forbidden. 

That the public officials and peace officers of such cities, villages and boroughs 
shall enforce the provisions hereof. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, July 9, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 
C. H. March 

Vice Chairman 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 40 
Providing Municipal Wood Yard. 

Whereas, By its order No. 38, this Commission granted authority to 
the County of St. Louis, Minnesota, to engage in the work of acquiring fuel 
timber stumpage, of cutting and preparing the same for market, purchasing 
cord wood and marketing such wood fuel so purchased or cut from the lands 
in or adjacent to such coimty and disposing of such fuel for cash to the inhab- 
itants and industries thereof, including any mimicipality therein, at as near 
cost as may be, but without financial loss to said county; and 

Whereas, It now appears that express authority should be granted to 
the cities and_^villages in said County of St. Louis, having a population of not 

ll» 



less than five hundred inhabitants, to acquire fuel stumpage and to cut and 
prepare the same for market, to purchase cord wood from St. Louis County 
or any other person or party and dispose of such fuel wood for cash to the in- 
habitants and industries of such municipality; 

It is Hereby Ordered, That each village or city, located in St. Louis 
County, Minnesota, and having a population of not less than five hundred 
inhabitants, be and the same hereby is authorized to engage in the work of 
acquiring fuel timber stumpage, of cutting and preparing the same for market, 
of purchasing cordwood and marketing such wood fuel so purchased or cut 
from lands in said county and disposing of such fuel for cash to the inhabitants 
and industries in such municipality, at as near cost as may be, but without 
financial loss to such municipality; 

It is Further Ordered, That the city or village council of any such 
municipality is hereby authorized to appoint and employ a competent super- 
intendent of such work, who, under the direction of such council, shall have 
general charge of the work of acquiring fuel timber stumpage, of purchasing 
fuel already cut and of cutting and marketing fuel so purchased or cut from 
lands in such county, with full authority to employ men, teams and other equip- 
ment and do all other acts and things necessary to properly carry out the power 
hereby granted, all subject to the approval of such city or village council; 

It is Further Ordered, That any and all expenses necessarily incurred 
in the carrying out of the powers hereby granted shall be audited, allowed and 
paid out of the revenue fund of such municipality in the manner provided by 
law for the payment of other ordinary claims against such municipality. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, July 23, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 
J. A. A. Burnquist, 
Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 41 
Providing Municipal Wood Yard. 

Whereas, It appears that authority should be granted to the Village of 
Crosby, County of Crow Wing, State of Minnesota, to engage in the work of 
acquiring fuel stumpage, of cutting and preparing the same for market, pur- 
chasing cord wood and marketing such wood fuel so purchased or cut from the 
lands in or adjacent to such Village, and disposing of such fuel for cash to the 
inhabitants and industries of such Village at as near cost as may be, but without 
financial loss to said county; 

It is Hereby Ordered, That the Village Council of Crosby, in the County 
of Crow Wing and State of Minnesota, be and the same hereby is authorized 
to engage in the work of acquiring fuel timber stumpage, of cutting and pre- 
paring the same for market, or purchasing cordwood and marketing such wood 
fuel purchased or cut from the lands in or adjacent to such municipality, and 
disposing of such fuel for cash to the inhabitants and industries thereof at as 
near cost as may be, but without financial loss to said Village; 

It is Further Ordered, That the Village Council of said Village be and 
the same hereby is authorized to appoint and employ a competent superintendent 

of such work, who, under the direction of the Village Council, shall have general 

• 
lid 



charge of the work of acquiring fuel timber stumpage, of purchasing fuel already- 
cut, and of cutting and marketing fuel purchased or cut from lands in or ad- 
jacent to such municipality, with full authority to employ men, teams and other 
equipment, and to do all other acts and things necessary to properly carry out 
the power hereby granted, all subject to the approval of said Village Council; 

It is Further Ordered, That any and all expenses necessarily incurred 
in carrying out the powers hereby granted shall be audited, allowed and paid 
out of the revenue funds of said Village in the manner provided by law for the 
payment of other ordinary claims against said Village. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, July 23, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 42 
Providing Municipal Wood Yard. 

Whereas, It appears that authority should be granted to the Village 
of Ironton, County of Crow Wing, State of Minnesota, to engage in the work 
of acquiring fuel stumpage, of cutting and preparing the same for market, pur- 
chasing cord wood and marketing such wood fuel so purchased or cut from the 
lands in or adjacent to such Village, and disposing of such fuel for cash to the 
inhabitants and industries of such Village at as near cost as may be, but without 
financial loss to said county; 

It is Hereby Ordered, That the Village Council of Ironton, in the County 
of Crow Wing and State of Minnesota, be and the same hereby is authorized 
to engage in the work of acquiring fuel timber sttmipage, of cutting and pre- 
paring the same for market, or purchasing cord wood and marketing such wood 
fuel purchased or cut from the lands in or adjacent to such municipality, and 
disposing of such fuel for cash to the inhabitants and industries thereof at as 
near cost as may be, but without financial loss to said Village; 

It is Further Ordered, That the Village Council of said Village be and 
the same hereby is authorized to appoint and employ a competent superintendent 
of such work, who, under the direction of the Village Council, shall have general 
charge of the work of acquiring fuel timber sttunpage, of purchasing fuel already 
cut, and of cutting and marketing fuel purchased or cut from lands in or ad- 
jacent to such municipality, with full authority to employ men, teams and other 
equipment, and to do all other acts and things necessary to properly carry out 
the power hereby granted, all subject to the approval of said Village Coimcil; 

It is Further Ordered, That any and all expenses necessarily incurred 
in carrying out the powers hereby granted shall be audited, allowed and paid 
out of the revenue funds of said Village in the manner provided by law for the 
payment of other ordinary claims against said Village. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, July 30, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 
J. A. A. Burnquist, 
Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 



ORDER NUMBER 43 

In the Matter of the Prohibition of the Sale and Keeping For Sale of Intoxi- 
cating Liquors in the County of Red Lake in the State of Minnesota. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety finds: That the sale of intoxi- 
cating liquors as it has been and is being conducted in the County of Red Lake, 
in the State of Minnesota, has interferred with and is interfering with the pro- 
duction of food and with the health and good habits of men of draft age, in said 
county, and in all of the surrounding territory in northwestern Minnesota, and 
northeastern North Dakota, and is interfering with the efficiency of the appli- 
cation of the military and civil and industrial resources of the states of Minnesota 
and North Dakota, towards the maintenance of the defense of the said states 
and the nation, and is interfering with the successful prosecution of the war 
between the United States and the Central Powers of Europe, now existing, 
and to the end that said interference shall cease. 

It is Hereby Ordered: 

FIRST 

That the sale or keeping for sale or delivery of intoxicating liquors in the 
County of Red Lake, in the State of Minnesota, be and the same is hereby pro- 
hibited during the period of the existing war and for a period of three months 
after the ratification of the Treaty of Peace terminating said war. 

SECOND 
That all existing and outstanding licenses authorizing the sale of intoxi- 
cating liquors at any point or in any place within the boundaries of said Coimty 
of Red Lake, including the city of Red Lake Falls, and the Village of Plummer, 
be and the same hereby is cancelled and revoked. 

THIRD 

That no municipality within said County of Red Lake shall during the 
period mentioned in Section One hereof, grant any license or licenses authorizing 
any person, firm or corporation to sell intoxicating liquors at any point within 
said County of Red Lake. 

FOURTH 

That all stocks of intoxicating liquors now in said County of Red Lake 
shall be removed by rail from said County within ten days from the date of this 
Order, said removal to be to some place or places within or without the State 
of Minnesota at which the sale of intoxicating liquors is authorized by law. 
That on the failure of the owner or owners of any stocks of intoxicating liquors 
hereinbefore referred to, to transport the same from said County of Red Lake 
within ten days from the date of this Order, that the same be seized and held by 
agents of this Commission, the final disposition of the same to await the further 
Order of this Commission. 

FIFTH 

That the Governor of the State of Minnesota be and is hereby requested 
to take the necessary steps to enforce the provisions of this Order in such manner 
as will insure the removal of such stocks of intoxicating liquors and all of the 
same from the said County of Red Lake, as is provided in the fourth subdivision 
of this Order, in order to prevent the distribution of the same in dry territory 
heretofore served with intoxicating liquors from points within the said Coimty 
of Red Lake. 

122 



SIXTH 

Service of this Order shall be made forthwith by a Peace Officer of this 
Commission, upon the proprietors of all licensed saloons and other persons, 
firms or corporations having in their possession or under their control within 
the said County of Red Lake, stocks of intoxicating liquors, and shall also and 
at the same time be served upon the Sheriff of Red Lake County, the Mayor 
of the City of Red Lake Falls, and the President or Recorder of the Village of 
Plummer in said County. Said service shall be made by delivery, to the person, 
firm, or corporation to be served, of a copy of said Order. 

It is ordered that the Memorandum hereto attached be made a part hereof 
as fully as though the same was incorporated herein. 

This order shall take effect and be in force from and after the day of its date. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, August 13, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

MEMORANDUM 

Almost from the date of its organization, complaints in the form of letters, 
affidavits and petitions in rapidly increasing volume have reached the Commission 
denoimcing intoxicating liquor conditions in the City of Red Lake Falls and the 
Village of Plummer and appealing for relief. The complaints mentioned have 
been made by thousands of people — largely residents of dry territory outside 
of Red Lake County. 

The complaints are that the enormous quantities of intoxicating liquors 
distributed from Red Lake Falls and Plummer were and are debauching and 
demoralizing the man power on the farms and men of draft age in northwestern 
Minnesota and northeastern North Dakota, seriously affecting the production 
of food stuffs and the military resources of the territory described, and thus 
in a measure interfering with the successful conduct of the pending war with 
the Central Powers of Europe. 

From the beginning the Commission has been extremely reluctant to in- 
terfere with the local affairs of any community, taking the position that the 
local authorities ought to be required to enforce the laws and maintain order 
in their respective communities. 

In some instances local officials failing to enforce the laws in their localities 
have, on the recommendation of the Commission, been suspended by the Gover- 
nor, and in some cases removed from office. In some cases suspension and re- 
moval have proved sufficient to remedy bad conditions. 

In the case of Martin and Pipestone Counties, an Order was made limiting 
sales to those made at retail over the bar to be consumed on the premises be- 
tween nine o'clock A. M. and five o'clock P. M. of each secular day. A decided 
improvement resulted and within the past week Martin County voted the 
saloons out by a majority of about five hundred. 

The case now before the Commission is peculiar in its facts owing to the 
situation of Red Lake Falls and Plummer, the only wet towns in northern Minne- 
sota. Red Lake County contains only twelve townships. Red Lake Falls, 
the county seat, contains a population of two thousand or twenty-five hundred, 

128 



with five saloons and two liquor supply houses. The population of Plummer 
is from two hundred and fifty to three hundred and fifty with two saloons and 
two wholesale beer warehouses. 

It appears from the testimony of the agent of the Great Northern Railway 
Company, testifying from his freight records, that from January 1st, 1918, 
until the day before he testified, which was June 17th, 1918, or a period of five 
and two-thirds months, there was delivered by the Great Northern Railway to 
consignees in the City of Red Lake Falls, 436,910 pounds of whiskey and hard 
liquor or about 2183^ tons, and that during the same period there was received 
over the Great Northern road, about eight cars of beer per month or about 
forty-five carloads of beer. 

The agent of the Soo Road at Plummer, testifying from his freight records, 
disclosed that between July 1st, 1917, and July 2nd, 1918, a period of one year, 
there was received in this little Village, which this agent testified contained from 
one hundred ninety-five to two hundred people, 2,728 gallons of whiskey, brandy, 
gin, alcohol and wine, and 100,118 gallons of beer. 

The surrounding territory is dry. In Canada on the north and North 
Dakota on the west there is absolute prohibition of the manufacture and sale 
of intoxicating liquors, Minnesota is dry from Red Lake Coimty to its eastern 
boundary, over two hundred and fifty miles. The same conditions exist to 
the south of Red Lake Falls, the first place at which the sale of intoxicating 
liquors is authorized by law being Little Falls, a distance of one hundred and 
eighty-three miles. 

With the sale of intoxicating liquors prohibited in Red Lake County, a 
thirsty resident of that County or of the nearby counties of Polk, Marshall, 
Pennington, Kittson, Roseau and Beltrami and the northeastern counties of 
North Dakota, would have to journey from one hundred and eighty-three to 
three hundred miles to the nearest saloon for relief. 

It is entirely beside the question at issue to say that there is little actual 
crime committed in the little coimty of Red Lake. The proposition is that 
from within that County there passes into the surrounding dry territory intoxi- 
cating liquors in vast quantities sufficient to demoralize the man power in the 
agricultural districts at a time when the greatest crop in the history of the state 
is being gathered, and is demoralizing to a considerable extent, men of draft age, 
rendering them less fit for the military duties they will be called upon to per- 
form. The liquor conditions existing in Red Lake County practically nullify 
the laws under which all siurounding territory is dry. 

While only twenty-four witnesses were examined, a fair inference from 
their testimony is that the demoralization resulting from the conditions existing 
in Red Lake County is very great. The conditions disclosed by that testimony 
are sjmiptomatic of the general conditions in the territory supplied with liquors 
from Red Lake County. 

The region thus demoralized from the saloons and wholesale liquor depots 
in the two small communities in Red Lake County, is one of the most fertile 
and productive agricultural districts in the world, and at this moment there 
is being gathered the largest crops of wheat and other food stuffs ever known, 
with the most distressing shortage (owing to the war) of man power ever ex- 
perienced. 

The roads throughout the territory mentioned herein are well kept and 
automobiles are numerous, making access to Red Lake Falls and Plummer a 
comparatively easy matter. The evidence before the Commission shows that 
a number of men returning from Red Lake Falls and Plummer in a drunken 

1S4 



condition, driving automobiles, have been killed and injured, and the roads 
made unsafe for travel by people having a lawful right to pass along the same. 

In order that the Commission might be advised of the exact conditions 
existing in Red Lake County, the Honorable Thomas D. O'Brien was appointed 
Commissioner with authority to take testimony and report the same with his 
conclusions. Pursuant thereto, public hearings were held and a large voltune 
of testimony taken, which is now before the Commission, with the report and 
recommendations of Mr. O'Brien thereon. 

At the hearings, the saloon interests were represented by F. A. Grady, 
Esq., who in entering his appearance on the first day of the hearing said: "I 
appear for those who are opposed to the petitions and associated with me is 
Mr. Chas. E. Boughten, of Red Lake Falls." Mr. Boughten is the County 
Attorney of Red Lake County. The counties of Polk, Pennington and Mar- 
shall appeared by their County Attorneys and the city of Crookston by its 
City Attorney. 

The principal showing made by those opposed to the granting of the prayer 
of the various petitions was that made by the County Attorney of Red Lake 
County, and was to the effect that the county as a county, and Red Lake Falls 
and Plummer as municipalities therein, were and are peaceful and law-abiding 
communities, and there was an offer made to have this statement corroborated 
by other public officials of the county and of the two municipalities mentioned. 

The testimony reported by Mr. O'Brien and his findings thereon, sustain 
the charges made and he recommends "that in any event" an Order be made 
similar to that in Martin and Pipestone Counties. 

On August 6th, 1918, after notice to all interested parties, a public hearing 
was had before the Commission at St. Paul, at which G. A. Youngquist, County 
Attorney of Polk County, appeared, and urged that the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in Red Lake County be prohibited. At the same time, Mr. F. A. Grady 
appeared in opposition thereto. The matter was argued at length, Mr. Grady 
expressing his personal, but not his professional opinion, stated that the proper 
remedy would be to limit the hours within which sales might be made, to the 
hours between eight A. M. and six P. M. but with no other restrictions. 

On the most careful consideration of the testimony, we have reached the 
conclusion that owing to the location of Red Lake County, surrounded as it 
is for hundreds of miles in every direction by dry territory, the only remedy 
that will correct the evil is that prescribed in the attached Order. 

With the present harvest in progress, to be followed by the threshing season, 
and with the great shortage of man power for the work to be done, it is thought 
that the presence of such large stocks of intoxicating liquors in Red Lake Falls 
and Plummer would be a menace, and hence the provision made in the Order 
for the removal of the same within ten days, from Red Lake County, to some 
other part of the country in which the sale of intoxicating liquors is authorized 
by law. 

ORDER NUMBER 44 
Providing for Investigation in Connection with Sale of Liberty Bonds. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety, under the powers conferred 
on it by law. Orders as follows: 

The County Director of each County in the State, hereinafter called the 
"agent" is appointed the agent of the Commission within his county until 
fiirther action by it, for the following purposes, and with the following powers: 

On being advised at any time in writing by the then acting chairman, 

126 



having in charge the promoting or sale of any pending issues of Liberty Loan 
bonds, that it is desirable or necessary to make investigation as to the property 
and resources of any person, a resident of the county, to the end that the amount 
of his proper subscription to such bonds may be determined, the agent may 
require such person, and any witnesses, to appear before him for examination 
at any convenient place in such county, may adjourn the hearings from time to 
time and from place toplace in said county, may administer oaths, may examine 
such persons under oath as to any information within their knowledge perti- 
nent to said investigations, and require such persons to produce for inspection 
any writings or documents under their control pertinent to said investigations, 
using for all and any such purposes any and all instrumentalities and proceedings 
specified in Chapter 261, Laws 1917, or otherwise permitted by law. 

The agent shall incur no obligations and make no expenditures which shall 
be chargeable against the Commission or its fund, and shall receive no compen- 
sation for any services performed hereunder, and no publicity shall be given 
to the evidence elicited at any such investigation except with the Commission's 
approval first had. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, August 27, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-ofificio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 45 
Prohibiting Sale of Liquor on Registration Day. 

Whereas, It appears necessary in order to conserve the peace and the 
orderly execution of the duties of citizenship on Registration Day, that all 
traffic in intoxicants be suspended on that day. 

The Minnesota Commission of PubHc Safety Orders as follows: 

The sale of intoxicating liquor in the State of Minnesota on September 12, 
1918, by any person, firm or corporation, in any quantities whatsoever, is for- 
bidden. 

All licensed saloons in the State shall be and remain closed during the 
whole of said day. 

The officials and peace officers of the several municipalities shall enforce 
the provisions hereof. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, September 10, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 46 
An Order Providing A Method Whereby Minnesota Soldiers and Sailors May 
Vote at the 1918 General Election. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety finds and declares: 

That it is necessary and proper for the Commission to provide a method 

126 



by which Minnesota citizens who will be absent because they are engaged in 
the military or naval service of the United States, whether within or without 
the territorial limits of the United States, may participate in the coming general 
election, (1) to the end that the public safety at home may be thereby subserved, 
(2) as a matter of military expediency, (s) in order that our men under arms 
may have the comfort of realizing that even while they are away, they are still 
members of their several communities and entitled and expected to exercise 
all the privileges of citizenship. 

The Commission, under the powers conferred on it by law, therefore Orders 
as follows: 

Section 1. Any person entitled to vote at the general election to be held 
in the several election districts ot this state on the 5th day of November, 1918, 
and who is absent on said day from the election district in which he is entitled 
to vote, and is in the military or naval service of the United States, may vote 
therein by having his election ballot delivered by mail to the judges of such 
district on the day of such election by complying with the provisions of Chapter 
68, Laws 1917, and any amendments thereof heretofore enacted, which said 
Chapter 68, Laws 1917, is entitled: 

"An act authorizing voters absent from the election 
district of which they are residents on the day when any 
general election is held to vote therein by having their 
marked ballots delivered to the judges of election therein 
through the agency of the United States Post Office De- 
partment; prescribing the manner in which the official 
ballots shall be obtained, marked and delivered to the 
election judges; imposing certain duties upon the officers 
charged by law with preparing, printing and distributing 
election ballots and election supplies ; regulating the time 
of making nominations of candidates for office to be voted 
for at any such general election and declaring it to be a 
felony to do certain acts prohibited therein," 

so far as the same are not inconsistent with the provisions of this order and by 
also complying with the provisions of this order. 

Section 2. That the provisions of said Chapter 68, Laws 1917, be and 
the same are modified, as to persons in the military or naval service of the United 
States, to this extent; that any such person may mark and mail his ballot at 
any place whether within the territorial limits of the United States or otherwise. 

Section 3. That section 2 of Chapter 68, Laws 1917, is modified to this 
extent, to- wit: that application for ballots may be made not more than fifty 
(50) days or less than four (4) days before the date of such election, by the 
absent voter, or by any voter of the district wherein such absent voter resides, 
or by any relative of the absent voter residing anywhere within the state. 

The applicant shall take the oath hereinafter specified. Such oath may be 
taken by any person in the military or naval service of the United States before 
any commissioned officer of either of said branches of said service and any such 
officer is hereby authorized to administer such oath. Any officer administering 
such oath shall append to his signature a statement of his official rank and 
organization. The appHcation for ballots shall be in the following form: 

127 



APPLICATION FOR BALLOTS 
This application is made on behalf of. 



(here insert name of absent voter) 

(1) of the precinct of the ward 

of the city of in the county of 

, State of Minnesota, residing at 

in said city. 

(here insert street and number) 

(2) residing at 

(here insert street and house number) 

in the city of in the county of 

, State of Minnesota. 

(3) residing at 

(here insert name of town, village or other description of the election district) 

(4) and the undersigned hereby makes application for ballots to be voted 
on in the district in which the person in whose behalf this application is made 
so resides at the next ensuing general election, to be held in said district. Please 
mail ballots and accompanying envelopes to me (him) at 

(here insert post office address to which to be mailed) 

Dated at this day of 

, 1918 

(Signattu-e of AppHcant) 

Note: If application is not made by the absent voter, strike out portion 
not applicable. If applicant does not know the description of the absent voter's 
election district, that is, the ward and precinct number, if it have such a de- 
scription, he should fill in paragraph 2, and if such voter's residence be in a 
town or village constituting a single election district he should fill in paragraph 3. 
There shall be printed on the back of each of said forms the following: 
This is to certify that ballots were — mailed — delivered in person — as per 

enclosed application, this day of 

, 1918. 

County Auditor. 
Per 

Deputy. 
This oath to be printed on the back of the application for a ballot shall be 
substantially in the following form and with appropriate alterations shall be 
subscribed and sworn to by the applicant: 

OATH 

STATE OF ) 

Vss. 

COUNTY OF ) 

I do swear that I (the person on whose behalf this application is made is) 
am a citizen of the United States, that I (he) will be twenty-one years of age 
on the 5th day of November, 1918, and at that time will have been a resident 
of the State of Minnesota for six months immediately preceding said date; 

128 



. (1) That I am (he is) an actual resident of the election district in which I 

(he) reside(s) but that my (his) place of residence is at 

in the 

(here insert house number and name of street) 

of 

(city or village) (name of city or village) 

ill County, Minnesota; 

That on the 5th day of November, 1918, I (he) will have resided in said 
election district thirty days, or more, immediately preceding said date; that I 
do (he does) not intend to abandon my (his) residence in said district prior to 
said date; that at said time I (he) will be a qualified voter in 

(3) said election district - 

(4) the election district wherein said residence so described by me is situate. 

(5) I further swear that I am (he is) in the — military — naval — service 
of tlie United States, to-wit: 

(here insert description of particular command or unit or 

branch of service to which applicant belongs) 

(6) (I do further swear that I am 

(a relative of the person in whose behalf 

this application is made, residing in Minnesota, or a voter of the distrid; wherein 



such person is entitled to vote.) (signature of applicant) 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this day of 

, 19 



Name of Officer. 
Rank or description of Office. 



Organization. 

Note: If the absent voter subscribes to this oath the portion in parentheses 
should be stricken. If a friend or relative makes the application and takes 
the oath, the part not applicable should be stricken out. In filling out the 
oath the applicant should strike out such of paragraphs (1), (2), (3), (4) and (5) 
as the facts may require, also either the word "military" or "naval" where 
the same appear in paragraph (5). This oath may be taken before any com- 
missioned officer in the military or naval service of the United States, in which 
case the officer should give his rank and organization. The oath may 
be taken before any officer authorized to administer oaths by the laws of the 
place where the oath is taken. If taken before an officer having an official 
seal the jurat should be authenticated with his seal. 

Section 4. It is hereby made the duty of the several officers charged 
with the duty of preparing the general election ballots to prepare and have 
the same ready for distriibution as soon as possible after the last day for filing 
by candidates. 

Section 5. The coimty auditor shall forthwith upon the delivery to him 
of the election ballots, deliver or mail one of each of such ballots as he has on 
hand to the persons who have theretofore made application therefor, or in whose 
behalf application has been made, and shall thereafter mail or deliver one of 

129 



each of the remaining ballots to be voted on to persons who shall have made 
application therefor or in whose behalf application shall have been made within 
the time hereinbefore limited, as soon as such ballots are received by him. 

Section 6. Section 5 of said Chapter 68, Laws 1917, is modified as 
follows: 

No applicant for ballotswho swears that he or the person in whose behalf 
application is made, is in the military or naval service of the United States 
shall be required to pay the fee in said section 5 provided for. The Minnesota 
Commission of Public Safety will furnish all blank "Applications for Ballots", 
"Voter's Certificates," "Envelopes and postage stamps" necessary to carry 
out the provisions of this order. The county auditor of each county is hereby 
authorized to employ such extr^a clerical assistance as may be necessary to 
carry out the provisions of this order, and the cost thereof, if volunteer and 
gratuitous assistance canliot be had, will be paid for by the said Minnesota 
Commission of Public Safety. 

Section 7. That section 6 of said Chapter 68, Laws 1917, is modified 
as follows, to-wit: (1) that where the voter is in the miUtary or naval service 
of the United States any commissioned officer of either of said services may 
also act as an attesting witness. 

(2) That the certificate required by said section 6 of Chapter 68, Laws 
1917, to be printed on the back of the "Return Envelope" shall be modified 
as follows: 

"This is to certify that 

after marking and enveloping the enclosed ballots as set forth in the enclosed 
certificate by me attested, enclosed the said ballot envelope in this return en- 
velope in my presence without opening the said ballot envelope or permitting 
me or ajiy other person to know or learn how he had voted as to any candidate 
or proposition and that this retuxii envelope was sealed in my presence and after 

being sealed was deposited by me or in my presence in the post office at 

without being opened. 

Dated this day of , 19 



Attesting Witness. 

(3) That the "Certificate of Attesting Witness" to be printed on the voter's 
certificate shall read as follows: 

CERTIFICATE OF ATTESTING WITNESS 

"I hereby certify that I have read the foregoing certificate and know the 
contents thereof and that the same is true, so far as it relates to the marking 
of said ballots." 

Dated at this day of 

,19 

Attesting Witness. 

Rank 

Organization. 

(4) That paragraph (a) of directions to voters be and the same is modified 
so as to read as follows: 

iso 



(a) You may mark and mail your ballot at any place whether within the 
territorial limits of the United States or otherwise. 

(5) That paragraph (e) of directions to voters shall read as follows: 

(e) Enclose "Ballot Envelope" and "Voter's Certificate" in "Return En- 
velope," seal the latter, have attesting witness sign certificate on back of "Return 
Envelope" and then deposit same in the postoffice in the presence of the attest- 
ing witness, or deliver to attesting witness for deposit by him in postoffice. 

(6) That paragraph (h) of the Directions to Voters shall read as follows: 
(h) Any commissioned officer in the military or naval service of the United 

States, any United States postmaster, assistant United States postmaster, 
or any county, village or city officer having an official seal may be an attesting 
witness. 

If a postmaster or assistant postmaster acts as attesting witness, his 
signature on the "Certificate of Attesting Witness'* should be authenticated 
by the cancellation stamp of his respective postoffice. If a military or naval 
officer acts he should append to his signature a statement of his rank and or- 
ganization. The signattire of the attesting witness on the "Return Envelope" 
need not, however, be thus authenticated. 

Section 8. That section 7 of Chapter 68, Laws 1917, is hereby modified 
as follows: The county auditor shall cause the applications for election ballots 
received by him to be delivered to the judges of election of the several election 
districts as provided for in said section 7 of Chapter 68, Laws 1917, and when 
it appears from the application and oath that the absent voter is in the military 
or naval sevice of the United States, and a qualified voter in the election district, 
the judges of election shall enter the name of such absent voter upon the registra- 
tion list of the district without further requirement, provided such absent voter's 
name has not already been entered thereon, and the ballot of any such absent 
voter shall be received at such election, if the receipt thereof is otherwise 
lawful, although such absent voter may not have been previously registered 
in such election district. 

Section 9. The county auditor, before delivering the blank ballots to 
applicants therefor under the provisions of this order shall print or plainly 
stamp on the face thereof in letters as large as Bold Face Pica the words "War 
Ballot." 

The county auditor shall furnish to the election officers of each election 
district duplicate sets of tally sheets and blanks for returns to the county can- 
vassing board on which the election officers shall tally and make return of all 
"War Ballots." The county canvassing board shall canvass the returns as to 
"War Ballots" with like effect as are the returns as to ballots voted by persons 
voting in person at such general election. 

Section 10. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Minnesota Com- 
mission of Public Safety to cause a suitable number of blank "Applications 
for Ballots" to be printed and furnished to the several county auditors for dis- 
tribution to applicants or to persons who desire to mail or deliver the same to 
absent voters who are in the military or naval service of the United States. 

Section 11. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Minnesota Com- 
mission of Public Safety to purchase and distribute to the several county auditors 
a suitable number of "Envelopes" with the proper printed forms thereon, "Voter's 
Certificate" with "Certificate of Attesting Witness" and "Directions to Voters" 
and such other blank forms as may be required to give effect to the purpose 

181 



and intent of this order. All blanks prepared shall be approved by the Attorney- 
General. 

Section 12. It shall be the duty of the Attorney General to prepare and 
cause to be mailed to the several county auditors plain and concise instruc- 
tions concerning their duties under this order; also to prepare and furnish for 
distribution to the county auditors for distribution to the election officials of 
the several election districts similar instructions for the guidance of such 
officials. The printing and distribution of the same to the county auditors 
shall be paid for from the funds of the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety. 

Section 13. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Minnesota Com- 
mission of Public Safety to furnish blank "Applications for Ballots" to such 
publishers of newspapers within the state as apply therefor and agree to publish 
in their respective papers a notice to the effect that they have such blanks for 
free distribution to persons who may desire to send the same to absent voters 
in the military or naval service of the United States. 

Section 14. There may be printed on any blanks herein provided for, 
such notices, explanations or directions as may be prepared or approved by the 
Attorney General and which he may deem necessary or desirable to assist the 
voters or officials in giving effect to this order. 

Section 15. Section 9 of Chapter 68, Laws 1917, is hereby modified to 
this extent: 

Where an application for ballots is not made by the absentee himself, but 
is made in his behalf by some qualified voter or relative, then and in such case 
the judges of election shall not be required to compare and identify the signa- 
ture of the person who made the application for ballots with the signature of 
the voter who subscribed to the voter's certificate. If said judges of election 
or a majority of them are satisfied that the person attempting to vote by mail is 
a duly qualified voter in such election district and entitled to vote therein at 
such election, they shall receive his ballots. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, September 10th, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 47 

In the Matter of the Prohibition of the Sale and Keeping for Sale of Intoxicating 
Liquor in the Village of Ceylon, in the County of Martin, in the State of 
Minnesota. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety Finds After Investigation: 

<CThat the provisions of Order No. 10, heretofore made for the reasons therein 
recited, have been and are habitually violated and set at naught by the licensed 
saloons operating in the Village of Ceylon, Martin County ,^:^Minnesota, and the 
public interests so requiring, it is hereby ordered as follows: 

132 



FIRST 

That the sale or keeping for sale or delivery of intoxicating liquors in said 
Village of Ceylon, be and the same hereby is prohibited during the period of the 
existing war and for a period of three months after the ratification of the treaty 
of peace terminating said war. 

SECOND 

That all existing and outstanding licenses, authorizing the sale of intoxi- 
cating liquor in said Village of Ceylon, be and the same are hereby cancelled 
and revoked. 

THIRD 

That all stocks of intoxicating liquor now in said Village shall be removed 
by rail therefrom and from said County of Martin, within ten days of the date 
of this order, said removal to be by rail to some place or places within or without 
the State of Minnesota, at which the sale of intoxicating liquor is authorized 
by law. That on the failure of the owner or owners of any stocks of intoxicating 
liquor hereinbefore specified to so remove and transport the same from said 
Village and County within ten days of the date of this order, the same be seized 
and held by agents of this Commission, the final disposition of the same to await 
the Commission's further order. 

FOURTH 

That the Governor of the State of Minnesota be and he is hereby requested 
to take the necessary steps to enforce the provisions of this order in such manner 
as will insure the removal of such stocks of intoxicating liquor and all the same 
from said Village and County as is provided in the third sub-division of this 
order, in order to prevent the distribution of the same in dry territory heretofore 
served with intoxicating liquor from said Village. 

FIFTH 

Service of this order shall be made forthwith by a peace officer of this Com- 
mission upon the proprietors or persons in charge of all licensed saloons and other 
persons, firms or corporations having in their possession or under their control 
within said Village, stocks of intoxicating liquor and shall also at the same time 
be served upon the Sheriff of Martin Coimty and the President of the Village 
of Ceylon in said Coimty, said service be made by delivery to the person, firm 
or corporation to be served with a copy of this order. 

This order shall take effect and be in force from and after its date. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, September 24, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LlBBY, 

Secretary. 

13S 



ORDER NUMBER 48 

In the Matter of the Prohibition of the Sale and Keeping for Sale of Intoxicating 
Liquors in the Village of Blooming Prairie, Steele County, Minnesota. 

The Commission made Orders No. 17 and No. 34 for the reasons therein 
respectively foimd and recited. Investigations show and the Commission 
finds that both orders have been and are violated by the parties to whom they 
are severally appHcable, and that conditions are such in the Village of Blooming 
Prairie, Steele County, Minnesota, that the further operations of saloons therein 
is inconsistent with the public safety and welfare and interferes, and will interfere 
with the efficient application of the miHtary, civil and industrial resources of the 
State towards the maintenance of the defense of the State and Nation; and to 
the end that said interference shall cease, 

THE MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY ORDERS AS 
FOLLOWS: 

FIRST 

That the sale or keeping for sale or deHvery of intoxicating liquors in the 
Village of Blooming Prairie, Steele County, Minnesota, be and the same is 
hereby prohibited during the period of the existing war and for a period of three 
(3) months after the ratification of the treaty of peace terminating said war. 

SECOND 

That all the existing and outstanding licenses authorizing the sale of intoxi- 
cating liquors in said Village, be and the same hereby are cancelled and revoked. 

THIRD 

That during the period specified in Section 1 hereof, no license or Hcenses 
authorizing any person, firm or corporation to sell intoxicating Hquors within 
said Village shall be issued or granted. 

FOURTH 

That all stocks of intoxicating Uquors now in said Village shall be removed 
therefrom imder the supervision and direction of an agent to be designated 
for such pmpose by the Governor, such removal to be made by rail within ten 
(10) days from the date of this order, and to be to some place or places within 
or without the State of Minnesota at which the sale of intoxicating liquors is 
authorized by law; that on the failure of the owner or owners of any stock or 
stocks of intoxicating liquors hereinbefore referred to, to transport and remove 
the same from said Village within ten days from the date of this order, the same 
be seized and held by agents of this Commission, the final disposition of the same 
to await the ftuther order of this Commission. 

FIFTH 

That the Governor be and he is hereby requested to take the necessary 
steps to enforce the provisions of this order in such manner as will insiu"e the 
removal of such stocks of intoxicating liquors and all of the same from the said 
Village, as is provided in the Fourth subdivision hereof. 

SIXTH 

Service of this order shall be made forthwith by a peace officer upon the 
proprietor of any licensed saloons and other persons, firms, or corporations 
having in thair possession or under their control within said Village stocks of 

1S4 



intoxicating liquors, and shall also and at the same time, be served upon the 
Sheriff of Steele County, and upon the President of said Village; the said service 
shall be made by delivery to the person, firm or corporation to be served of a 
copy of this order. 

This order shall take effect and be in force from and after the day of its date. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, September 24th, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 49 
Providing Agents of Commission in St. Louis County. 

It having been made to appear that in view of the size of Saint Louis County, 
it is not practicable that the county director should perform alone the "Agent's" 
ftmctions provided for in Order No. 44, and that other "Agents" for the purpose 
shoiild be designated in addition. 

Minnesota Commission of Public Safety under the powers conferred on it 
by law ORDERS as follows: 

Carl H. Schuster, Biwabik, Minnesota. 

Charles Trezona, Ely, Minnesota. 

Ray Anderson, Gilbert, Minnesota. 

J. H. McNiven, Chisholm, Minnesota. 

Frank R. Campbell, Eveleth, Minnesota. 

E. A. Bergeron, Hibbing, Minnesota. 

H. J. Scharr, Virginia, Minnesota. 
are hereby appointed agents of the Commission for the purpose, with the powers 
and duties and subject to the limitations named in Order No. 44. They shall 
exercise their functions so defined within St. Louis County only, and their ap- 
pointment shall terminate on November 15, 1918, unless hereafter extended 
by the Commission. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, October 8th, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 50 
Authorizing Appropriations for Forest Fire Relief. 

Whereas, Extensive forest fires have devastated large areas of settled 
country in the counties of St. Louis, Carlton, Aitkin, and Itasca, in the State 
of Minnesota, totally destroying many villages and hundr.eds of homes, farm 
buildings and fences, live stock, machinery, all kinds of farm produce, and 
many hundreds of human lives, leaving thousands of people wholly destitute 
and homeless, all in need of immediate relief by being supplied with food, cloth- 

135 



ing, shelter for live stock, and also further relief to aid in rebuilding their houses 
barns and fences all in order that the civil and industrial resources of the State 
may be efficiently applied toward the maintenance of the military, civil and 
industrial resources of the State and to aid in the successful prosecution of the 
war; and 

Whereas, The Board of County Commissioners, of St. Louis County 
has applied to this Commission that authority be granted to said County 
Board to expend public funds in providing immediate and future relief to all 
needy fire sufferers; and 

Whereas, In the judgment of this Commission if such legal authority be 
granted to the Board of County Commissioners of said St. Louis County, where 
such damage by forest fires is the greatest, to expend public funds to provide 
immediate relief to needy fire sufferers by furnishing directly or through coopera- 
tion with the Red Cross Association of Minnesota, or other relief organizations 
all needed supplies and assistance so long as the same shall be reasonably neces- 
sary, so that the present suffering of thousands of men, women, and children 
will be alleviated; live stock saved from loss, farms restored and saved from 
abandonment, the civil and industrial life of the community will be restored 
and the military, civil and industrial life of the State thereby more effectively 
applied toward the successful prosecution of the war, 

It is Ordered, That the Board of County Commissioners of the County 
of St. Louis, in the State of Minnesota, be and the same is hereby authorized 
to appropriate and expend out of the General Revenue Fund of St. Louis County 
such sums of money as the said County Board shall deem necessary and ad- 
visable for the present and future relief of all such persons as shall have suffered 
substantial loss from said forest fires and in the judgment of said County Board 
shall be deserving of relief, such sums to be expended in co-operation with the 
Red Cross Association or other relief organizations engaged in caring for such 
fire sufferers, or to be expended by said County Board independently of such 
relief organizations. That no money shall be paid to any needy person under 
this order, but all relief shall be extended by furnishing supplies or such service 
as may be needed. 

It is Further Ordered, That said County Board is authorized to employ 
such help as it deems necessary to carry out the power hereby granted. 

It is Further Ordered, That all such payments shall be made out of 
the General Revenue Fund of said County, on duly itemized and verified vouch- 
ers, duly filed, audited and allowed by said Coxmty Board the same as are other 
general claims against said County allowed. 

It is Further Ordered, That the Board of County Commissioners of 
said County be and it is hereby authorized to set apart from the General Revenue 
Fund of said County such amount of money as it may deem necessary for the 
carrying out of the purposes herein authorized. 

Dated at Moose Lake, Minnesota, October 16th, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OP PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

136 



ORDER NUMBER 51 

Authorizing Appropriations for Forest Fire Relief. 

Whereas, Extensive forest fires have devastated large areas of settled 
country in the Counties of St. Louis, Carlton, Aitkin, and Itasca, in the State 
of Minnesota, totally destroying many villages and hundreds of homes, farm 
buildings and fences, live stock, machinery, all kinds of farm produce, and 
many hundreds of human lives, leaving thousands of people wholly destitute 
and h'omeless, all in need of immediate relief by being supplied with food, clothing, 
shelter for live stock, and also further relief to aid in rebuilding their houses, 
barns and fences all in order that the civil and industrial resources of the State 
may be efficiently applied toward the maintenance of the military, civil and 
industrial resources of the State, and to aid in the successful prosecution of the 
war; and 

Whereas, The Board of County Commissioners of Carlton County has 
applied to this Commission that authority be granted to said County Board 
to expend public funds in providing immediate and future relief to all needy 
fire sufferers; and 

Whereas, In the judgment of this Commission if such legal authority 
is granted to the Board of County Commissioners, of said Carlton County, 
to expend public funds to provide immediate relief to needy fire sufferers by 
furnishing directly or through co-operation with the Red Cross Association 
of Minnesota, or other relief organizations, all needed supplies and assistance 
so long as the same shall be reasonably necessary, so that the present suffering 
of thousands of men, women, and children will be alleviated; live stock saved 
from loss, farms restored and saved from abandonment, the civil and industrial 
life of the community will be restored, and the military, civil and industrial 
life of the State thereby more effectively applied towards the successful prosecu- 
tion of the war, 

It IS Ordered, That the Board of County Commissioners of the County 
of Carlton, in the State of Minnesota, be and the same is hereby authorized to 
appropriate and expend out of the General Revenue Fund of Carlton County 
such sums of money as the said County Board shall deem necessary and ad- 
visable for the present and future relief of all persons as shall have suffered 
substantial loss from said forest fires and in the judgment of said County Board 
shall be deserving of relief, such sums to be expended in co-operation with the 
Red Cross Association or other relief organizations engaged in caring for such 
fife sufferers, or to be expended by said County Boacd independ^tly of such 
relief organizations. That no money shall be paid to any needy person under 
this order, but all relief shall be extended by furnishing supplies or such services 
as may be needed. 

It is Further Ordered, That said County Board is authorized to employ 
such help as it deems necessary to carry out the power hereby granted. 

It is Further Ordered, That all such payments shall be made out of 
the General Revenue Fund of s'aid County, on duly itemized and verified vouch- 
ers, duly filed, audited -and allowed by said County Board the same as are other 
general claims against said County allowed. 

187 



It is Further Ordered, That the Board of County Commissioners of 
said County be and it is hereby authorized to set apart from the General Revenue 
Fund of said County such amount of money as it may deem necessary for the 
carrying out of the purposes herein authorized. 

Dated at Moose Lake, Minnesota, October 16th, 1918. 



Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 



MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-ofiicio Chairman. 



ORDER NUMBER 52 

Authorizing Appropriations by County Boards in Event of Calamities. 

It having been made to appear to the Commission that public calamities 
of great magnitude a)nd similar to those specified in Orders No. 50 and 51, 
have occurred in several counties of the state by the action of the elements, 
and whereby public and private property has been destroyed and people killed 
or injiured and the Commission being of the opinion that the relief of the 
suffering by such calamities occasioned is a legitimate object for the expendi- 
ture of the public funds of the counties in which such calamities occurreid. 
The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety Orders as follows: 
When there has or shall hereafter be a public calamity in any county caused 
by the action of the elements (such as fire, water, storms, etc.,) of such magni- 
tude as in the County Board's judgment to justify the application of public 
funds to its relief, the County Board of such County is authorized to appropriate 
and expend out of the General Revenue Fund of the County such sums of money 
as the County Board shall deem necessary and advisable for the relief of all 
such persons in said county as shall have suffered substantial loss from said 
calamity, and in the judgment of said County Board shall be deserving of relief. 
Such sums may be expended in co-operation with the Red Cross Association 
or other relief organizations engaged in caring for the sufferers from such calamity, 
or be expended by the County Board independently of such relief organization. 
No money shall be paid to any needy person under this order, but all relief 
shall be extended by furnishing supplies or such services as may be needed. 
The County Board in making any such appropriation is authorized to employ 
such help as it deems necessary to efficiently expend the same. All payments 
shall be made out of the General Revenue Fund of the County on duly itemized 
and verified vouchers duly filed, audited and allowed by the County Board, 
and in the same manner as are other general claims against the county, and the 
County Boards of said several counties are authorized to set apart from the 
General Revenue Funds thereof such sums as they may deem necessary for 
carrying out the purposes herein authorized. 

Dated at Moose Lake, Minnesota, October 16th, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

W8 



ORDER NUMBER 53 
Relating to Forest Fire Emergency, 

It appearing to the Commission that the safeguards provided for in Order 
No. 29 should be continued, 

THE MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY ORDERS as 
follows: 

That from and after October 21, 1918, to November 30, 1918, inclusive, no 
person shall kindle or set any fire in grass, stubble, peat, brush, slash or woods, 
or kindle any fire, except for domestic or industrial purposes in the following 
counties: Cook, Lake, St. Louis, Carlton, Itasca, Kanabec, Koochiching, 
Beltrami, Aitkin, Cass, Crow Wing, Clearwater, Hubbard, Becker, Mahnomen, 
Mille Lacs, Morrison, Todd, Wadena, Otter Tail, Clay, Norman, Polk, Red 
Lake, Pennington, Marshall, Roseau, Kittson. 

Provided: That this order shall not apply to fields around which an ample 
firebreak has been freshly plowed, or to fires kindled or set by the State Forester, 
or under his direction, regulation or permission. 

The chairmen of town boards, and, for unorganized townships, the county 
commissioners, and the sheriffs, shall enforce the order. 

The State Forester and Assistant State Forester are hereby appointed as 
Commissioners of the Public Safety Commission, to discharge the fimctions of 
this body in respect to safeguarding life and property from forest and prairie 
fires. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, October 21st, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Attest: Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 54 
Appointing an "Agent" in Dakota County. 

It having been made to appear in view of the fact that the present County 
Director of Dakota County being a physician is so busily engaged in work inci- 
dent to the Epidemic of Influenza that he cannot fully perform the "Agent's" 
functions provided for in Order No. 44, and that another "Agent" for the pur- 
pose should be designated in addition, 

THE MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY under the 
powers conferred on it by law 

ORDERS as follows: 

That E. C. Anthony is hereby appointed "Agent" of the Minnesota Com- 
mission of Public Safety for the purpose, with the powers and duties and subject 
to the limitations named in Order No. 44. He shall exercise his fimctions so 
defined within Dakota County only, and his appointment shall terminate on 
November 15, 1918, unless hereafter extended by the Commission. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, October 22nd, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Attest: Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

139 



ORDER NUMBER 65 
Providing for Cutting and Sale of Cordwood. 

Whereas: Considering the receipts of coal at the docks at Duluth, it is 
apparent that there will be a shortage of coal in the state of Minnesota during 
the coming winter, and 

Whereas: The state of Minnesota has upon its school and swamp lands 
enormous stands of dry tamarack timber, which, when cut could be immediately- 
utilized for fuel purposes, and 

Whereas: Requests have been received to piirchase from the state cord- 
wood stumpage in large quantities, and 

Whereas: The parties that have made these requests are intending to 
market the cordwood imder the direction of the State Fuel Administration, and 

Whereas: Too much delay would be experienced in offering for sale cord- 
wood sttunpage under the regulations as prescribed by the statute. 

Therefore be it Ordered: 

That the State Auditor be and is hereby directed during season ending March 
31, 1919, to sell dead and down and dead and green standing timber suitable 
for cordwood on state lands in any quantity to all responsible parties making 
application therefor at a rate of not less than twenty-five cents per cord imder 
the same cutting regulations as apply to timber sold under the provisions of the 
statute, except, that the scaling of the cordwood shall be done by a state ap- 
praiser to be designated by the State Auditor, it being imderstood that all wood 
so cut shall be sold imder the direction of the State Auditor who at time of enter- 
ing into contract of sale shall determine the amount for which the same shall 
be sold by the vendors of the state to the ultimate consumer, and same shall be 
disposed of to consiuners prior to May 1, 1919. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, November 6, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 56 
Prohibiting Hunting in Fire Area. 

It Is Hereby Ordered, That htmting or killing of deer and moose diu-ing 
the open htmting season from November 10th to November 30th, 1918, within 
the following named seventy-one (71) towns in the burned district in St. Louis, 
Carlton, Pine and Aitkin Counties be hereby prohibited except as to actual 
residents of the towns named: 

Towns 51 and 52, Range 13, W. 
" 51 and 52, Range 14, W. 
" 50, 51 and 52, Range 15, W. 
" 49, 50, 51, 52 and 53, Range 16, W. 

" 43, W3^ 46, W^ 47, WH 48, 50, 51, 52, 53 and 54, Range 17, W. 
" 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55 and 56, Range 18, 

W. 
" 43, 44, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51 and E^ 53, Range 19, W. 
" 46, 47, 48, 49, 50 and 51, Range 20, W. 

140 



Towns 46, 47, 48, 49, 50 and 51, Range 21, W. 
" 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50 and 51, Range 22, W. 
" 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49 and 50, Range 23, W. 
" 47, 48 and 49, Range 24, W. 
Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, November 12th, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 57 
Referring to Home Guard. 

It having been made to appear to the Commission that in connection with 
the public calamity mentioned in Orders No. 50 and 51, enHsted men in the 
Home Guard of Minnesota have performed faithful and sacrificing service under 
the direction of the Adjutant General in rescue work and in alleviating sufferings 
of settlers aflSicted by said calamity, but that in many instances said enlisted 
men have not been held in continuous service for a longer period than five days, 
and therefore have not been able by reason of the provisions of paragraph D of 
the fourth subdivision of Order No. 3 of this Commission, to receive compensa- 
tion for said services. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety therefore Orders as follows: 

That enHsted men in the Home Guard of Minnesota who have been held in 
continuous service one day or longer under the order and direction of the Adjutant 
General in rescue and relief work in connection with the forest fires mentioned 
in orders 50 and 51 shall be, and are, entitled to receive the same per diem pay 
as is paid to enhsted men in the military service of the United States, and the 
Adjutant General is authorized and directed to see that such payment is made 
upon proper vouchers therefor. 

Dated this 31st day of December, 1918. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-ofi5cio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 68 
Certain Orders to be Inoperative Conditionally. 

Whereas, the Commission of Public Safety having been created in April, 
1917, by Chapter 261 of the General Laws of that year as a war board, did dur- 
ing the progress of the war enact certain orders looking to the public safety and 
the successful conduct of the war, which orders are in full force and effect; and 

Whereas, the signing of the armistice with the conditions attached thereto 
makes a renewal of the war practically impossible, and the Legislature is now in 
session, and might desire, by legislative enactment, to continue said orders or 
some of them in force after the date hereinafter suggested, 

141 



Therefore, it is hereby ordered by the Minnesota Commission of Public 
Safety that all orders made by it now in force shall become inoperative on Feb- 
ruary 5, 1919, unless the Commission is otherwise instructed by the Legislature 
before the meeting of the Commission on February 4, 1919. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, January 14th, 1919. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 

Secretary. 

ORDER NUMBER 69 
Recinding Certain Orders of Commission. 

Whereas, the Minnesota Commission of PubHc Safety, in the passage of 
Order Ntmiber Fifty-eight, did not intend to affect the status of the Home Guard, 
Motor Corps and Peace Officers, and measures are now pending in the Legis- 
lature relating thereto, and 

Whereas, the Legislature has not instructed the Commission pursuant to 
Order Number Fifty-eight, 

It Is Hereby Ordered that all of the orders of said Commission, except 
Order Number Three, and amendments thereto, and Order Number Four be 
and the same are hereby repealed, and said Order Number Three, and the amend- 
ments thereto, and Order Number Four, shall remain in full force and effect 
until otherwise ordered, and any order heretofore adopted and inconsistent 
herewith be and is hereby repealed. 

Dated at St. Paul, Minnesota, February 4, 1919. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LiBBY, 
Secretary. 



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Excerpts from minutes of the Commission's Meetings 
arranged by Subjects. 

LABOR 

LABOR STANDARDS 

Resolvjed, That in accordance with the recommendations of the Council 
of National Defense, 

And in recognition of the importance of maintaining the existing safeguards 
as to health and welfare of workers, 

This Commission is firmly of the opinion that no departure from present 
standards in state laws or state rulings affecting labor should be taken. 

Stated meeting June 19, 1917. 

WAGE CONCILUTION 

Whereas, It appears by a communication from Mr. E. G. Hall, President 
of the Minnesota State Federation of Labor, that there is a controversy between 
the Plasterers Union and the Plaster Tenders Union, of St. Paul, and their em- 
ployers respecting wages, and that it is represented that the employers refuse to 
meet their employees for the purpose of discussing and adjusting the differences 
between them. 

Therefore, Be it Resolved, by the Commission of PubHc Safety that the 
employers and employees in the plastering trade in St. Paul be earnestly re- 
quested and urged forthwith to meet in amicable conference to compose their 
differences in a spirit of fairness to both sides so that the work of the community 
may be carried on without interruption or loss. 

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be forthwith communicated to 
Mr. George Thill, 214 Fairview Ave., St. Paul, President Boss Plasterers Associa- 
tion, and to President Hall of the State Federataon. 

June 13, 1917. 

ENROLLMENT OF WOMEN FOR SERVICE 

"Resolved: That the Governor be requested to call attention to the re- 
quest of the government of the United States for the volunteer enrollment of 
women for training and service diuing the period of the war and ask the women 
of Minnesota to cooperate with the Women's AuxiUary of the Safety Commission 
in securing such registration throughout the State." 

Stated meeting September 18th, 1917. 

STREET CAR CONTROVERSY 

October 9, 1917. Discussion was indulged in concerning the pending 
street car strike in St. Paul and Minneapolis. Moved by Commissioner March 
that Mr. Horace Lowry, President of the Twin City Street Railway Company 
be requested to appear at 2:30 P. M. and Mr. George Lawson, Secretary of 
the State Federation of Labor at 3:00 P. M. and they were notified accordingly. 

Mr. Horace Lowry, Vice-President of the Company, the Attorney for the 
Company and Mr. Crosby were admitted and questioned concerning the pend- 
ing strike. 

143 



upon their retirement Mr. J. H. Cart, Thomas Costello, Presidents of the 
St. Paul and Minneapolis Union of Carmen; Edward McMorrow, General 
Organizer; T. F. Shine, Vice-President of the International Union and George 
Lawson, Secretary of the State Federation of Labor were heard and the claims 
of the strikers presented. 

The following resolutions thereupon were presented by Governor Bum- 
quist and on motion of Mr. Ames adopted. 

"Whereas, a strike is now existing by reason of a dispute between the 
Street Railway Company and a portion of their employees, and 

Whereas, their differences have narrowed down primarily to the previous 
discharge of fifty-seven men and their possible re-employment, and 

Whereas, officials of the Street Railway Company have stated that it is 
not the policy of the company to discharge employees on accoimt of membership 
in any organization, and 

Whereas, unionism or non-unionism should not, during the war, be involved, 

It Is Ordered that the Chairman advise that the strike be called off at 
once by the men striking and that the men go to work immediately and, in that 
event, it is ordered that the Street Railway Company reinstate the men who 
suspended their work on the morning of October 6, 1917, in the positions held 
by them at that time and that the status of each of the fifty-seven discharged 
men be immediately thereafter investigated by this Commission and that those 
who were unfairly discharged be reinstated when the Commission shall so order. 

October 11, 1917. Mr. Robinson, Attorney for the Twin City Street 
Railway Company appeared upon request and stated in what manner the Com- 
pany had put into effect the order passed by the Commission on October 9th. 

T. F. Shine, Vice-President of the International Streetcar Men's Union, 
representing the fifty-seven discharged men, appeared and stated none of the 
men had been taken back as yet. 

Moved by Commissioner Ames and seconded by Commissioner Lind that 
the following men be reinstated at once pursuant to order issued October 9th, 
with pay in full from and on October 10th and the cases of the remainder of 
the fifty-seven men discharged be considered and disposed of as speedily as 
possible. Carried. 

S. J. Harris, Kenneth Arrell, Olaf Lindeberg, Niels Nielson, Raymond 
Johnson, O. D. Tollefsrud, Carl Anderson, Paul Olson, Clarence J. Swanson, 
Otto H. Heimkes, Wm. H. Orbke, J. Hammer, Herbert Nimmo, O. Engen, 
Louis J. Hesse, Henry E. Singley, Axel Johnson, L. A. Weiss, R. M. Pindle, 
I. A. Dunn, Ezra Crum, Robert P. Knutson, Bahumil Hadd, K. C. Farrand, 
Walter Johnson, N. J. Engle, James Reindahl. 

October 12, 1917. Mr. Chase and Mr. Hiller and eighteen members of 
the street car men's cooperative organizations not involved in the recent strike 
were given a hearing. 

N. A. Robinson, Vice-President of the Street Railway Company accom- 
panied by their General Attorney appeared and presented data concerning 
what portion of the fifty-seven men the Company desired not to take back. 

October 12, 1917. It was announced that the thirty street car men pre- 
viously discharged, or resigned were in waiting. They were thereupon given 
an individual hearing and it was found that a number of these men had re- 
signed voluntarily and others were discharged for actions. 

Moved by Commissioner Lind, seconded by Commissioner March: "That 

144 



the following men be reinstated at once, pursuant to order issued October ninth, 
with pay in full from and on October tenth: 

Wm. J. Morris, J. W. Olson, James H. Rogers, James Meehan, M. J. L. 
Finckelson, Jesse E. Horn, G. H. Conley, David E. Fitzgerald, D. J. Fitzgerald, 
Anton Nordahl, F. R. Phelps, Howard Gephart, Conrad Frisk, P. H. Phelps, 
H. R. Jorgenson, Cleo De Marie, W. R. Polsfuss." 

The motion was adopted. 

October 12, 1917. Mr. Lind. "Resol-ved, That in taking this action, 
which concludes the work of the Commission in connection with the recent 
Street Railway Strike, both sides to the controversy be ernestly admonished 
to refrain from any action that will tend to revive or perpetuate past differences." 

Resolution was adopted. 

November 2, 1917. Communication from Union employees of the Twin 
City Rapid Transit Company calHng attention to alleged discrimination by 
the company and other grievances. 

Communication from the oiBficials of the Twin City Rapid Transit Com- 
pany stating that the claims of the Union employees were not well founded 
and furnish 'ng evidence in support thereof. 

Moved by Commissioner March, seconded by Commissioner Weiss that 
a Special Committee of three be appointed consisting of Samuel F. Kerfoot, 
Waldron M. Jerome and Norman Fetter as agents of this Commission to investigate 
alleged violations of orders and resolutions of the Commission on the part of 
the Twin City Rapid Transit Company or its employees. Motion carried. 

Moved by Commissioner March, seconded by Commissioner McGee that 
the following resolution be adopted. Motion carried. 

"Whereas, certain representations have been made to this Commission 
that its order and resolutions relative to the recent street car strike have been 
violated by each of the parties involved, and 

Whereas, the Commission has this day appointed a Committee consist- 
ing of S.F. Kerfoot, Waldron M.Jerome and Norman Fetter to investigate the 
facts in connection with said alleged violations and report on the same. 

Resolved, that if the findings of said committee show a violation of said 
order and resolutions or any of them the Commission 'will take such action 
as may be necessary to secure their strict enforcement, but the Commission 
declares that no facts presented to it at this time justify a strike imder existing 
circumstances and that all agitation on the part of either side ought to cease, 
it being clearly understood, however, that the Commission will not condone 
any violation of said order or resolutions." 

November 20, 1917. A report was read from the Special Committee ap- 
pointed under the Resolution of November 2nd to investigate the facts in con- 
nection with alleged violations of order and resolutions dated October 9th, 1917, 
relative to the street car strike, together with recommendations of the Com- 
mittee. 

Moved by Commissioner Lind, seconded by Commissioner Ames that the 
report of the Committee be received and placed on file and the following recom- 
mendations be adopted in full and copies of the recommendations be sent to the 
Twin City Rapid Transit Company and the presidents of the St. Paul and 
Minneapolis Union Organizations: 

145 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

In order to improve conditions and lessen the friction described in the last 
paragraphs, and to avoid otherwise inevitable controversies, and difficulties, 
your committee earnestly recommends: 

1. The total disuse and abandonment of buttons or other insignia sym- 
bolizing the Union or the Non-Union organizations, except that the Committee 
sees no objections to the badge of the E. M. B. A. to which all employees re- 
ceiving a salary less than $2500 per annum are eligible irrespective of Union 
affiliations. The reason for this recommendation is the fact that the evidence 
discloses in innumerable cases that the buttons of both organizations have been 
one of the principal causes of irritation, not only among the employees them- 
selves but between the employees and the public at large. Both sides have 
signified their willingness to abandon the use of the button or other insignia, 
if the Commission so request. 

2. Your committee further earnestly recommends that all solicitation for 
membership and propaganda of every nature on behalf of the Union organ- 
izations, as well as on behalf of the Non-Union organization shall cease on the 
company's property, in and about stations, and upon the cars. The reason 
for this recommendation is obvious, and needs no discussion. The Committee 
is glad to report that both sides have willingly consented to acquiesce in an 
order or request of the Commission to this effect, 

3. That the Company is requested to prepare and post in all its stations 
rules of the purpose of effectuating the foregoing recommendations, with a 
provision that a violation thereof shall be cause for discipline. 

4. Your committee finally recommends that the employees (both Union 
and Non-Union) and the public at large, be earnestly requested to avoid all 
utterances and conduct that would tend in any way to cause irritation or hard 
feeling; that the incidents of the past be overlooked, and that this request be 
carefully observed as a patriotic duty in this critical time. 

Dated November 19, 1917. 

Norman Fetter 

W. M. Jerome, Secretary 

S. F. Kerfoot, Chairman 

Motion carried. 

November 20, 1917. Commissioner McGee read the following resolutions 
and moved their adoption, seconded by Commissioner Ames: 

"The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety views with alarm the in- 
creasing number of industrial disputes, the effect of which is to impede the move- 
ments of the national government in its conduct of the war, and in order that 
its views may be clearly understood it declares: 

First — ^That industrial combinations and machinations of producers, man- 
ufacturers or distributors, to artificially raise prices to consumers will be sup- 
pressed even to the point where the Commission will take over the plants and 
operate them in the interest of public interest. The Commission's investi- 
gations lead it to the conclusion that in case of many necessities of life the in- 
crease! prices prevailing are justified by no scarcity of supply or increased cost 
of production. 

Second — It looks with disfavor upon the presence within the state of non- 
resident agitators and professional disturbers of the peace. It does not ques- 
tion the right of any man or set of men to peaceably discuss with their employers 
the correction^of abuses or to insist upon proper compensation for work done. 

146 



But it declares that this is not a convenient time for agitation about abstract 
principles like Unionism or Non-Unionism or the closed shop and the open shop. 
The great thing now is to have the work done. 

There must be a truce in such matters until the enemy is conquered. The 
Commission calls on all employers and employees to patriotically treat with 
each other in all matters of moment and settle any differences without publicity, 
and in the same spirit of fairness and mutual concession which obtains among 
right-minded people in the settlement of controversies, and to that end it is 
ordered that in what are commonly known as open or closed shops, in whatever 
industry or activity employed, every employer in the State of Minnesota en- 
tering the period of the war with a union shop shall not by lockout or other 
means undertake to alter such conditions for the duration of the war, nor shall 
any individual or combination of individuals begin to imionize or undertake 
during the like period, to further unionize or close an open or non-union shop 
industry or industries." 

Motion carried. 

November 23, 1917. Moved by Commissioner Ames, seconded by Com- 
missioners McGee and Lind as follows: "After investigating the present sit- 
uation of the Street Railway Company and its employees, the Commission 
sees no reason for further action on its part and expects both company and its 
employees to conform in letter and spirit to its recommendations and requests 
made by the special investigating committee and approved by this Commission." 

Motion carried. 

November 27, 1917. Fred B. Stevens and Horace Bigelow appeared and 
stated that the business men of St. Paul and Minneapolis desired speedy ad- 
justment of the controversy between the Twn City Rapid Transit Company 
and its employees and assured the support of the business interests to that end. 

John Cart, St. Paul; Tom Costello, Minneapolis and J. M. Clancy, St. 
Paul, appeared and were questioned concerning the union-men's side in the 
pending street car controversy. 

Mr. Horace Lowry, President of the Rapid Transit Company and Director 
appeared and stated the attitude of the company in regard to the present .con- 
troversy. 

December 18, 1917. At this point it was announced that the Federal 
Board of Mediation consisting of Secretary of Labor, Honorable William B. 
Wilson, John H. Walker, Felix Frankforter, Cotmsel and Secretary and Max Low- 
enthal, Assistant Secretary and Private Secretary to Mr. Wilson were in waiting. 
Upon appearing the orders and resolutions of the Commission in respect to 
the controversy between the Twin City Rapid Transit Company and its em- 
ployees were reviewed. 

FARM LABOR 

The following statement was adopted and public attention called to same: 
"Authentic reports from all sections of Minnesota indicate a phenomenal 
crop of hay and of wheat, oats and other small grain — the biggest in the history 
of the State. 

The immediate problem is to secure adequate man power for its harvesting. 
If this cannot be seciu-ed, nature's bounty will have been in vain. If it is secured 
the state will make a contribution towards winning the war more important 
and valuable than its other services and contributions in this direction. 

147 



There is a farm labor shortage. More than 50,000 of our young men are 
under arms. 10,000 more will go in the five days beginning July 22nd, or at 
the peak of harvest time. High wages in Canada and the industrial demands 
of the government for its ship building and munition plants have taken away 
thousands of our workers of non-military age. 

There is a cry from the farmers in the country that we come and help them 
as loud as the cry from Macedonia in Bible times. 

Meanwhile there are many idlers in the cities and villages, and thousands 
of able bodied men are engaged in occupations which could be as successfully 
handled by women, children and old people. Public and private repair and 
construction work which could safely be postponed is still going on everywhere, 
and taking the time of laborers used to outdoor work, who would be most useful 
on farms. 

This condition must be arrested. The harvest cannot be postponed, but 
everything else which can be suspended during the six weeks of harvest, should be. 

The Commission urges: 

1. That every man who is free and is fitted for farm work enlist in the 
army of farm laborers for the duration of the harvest. 

2. That employers in all lines release temporarily as many men as they 
can and encourage them to get out into the country. 

3. That civic organizations spread information as to the state's labor 
needs and start a "save the crop" movement at once. 

If any who are willing to work need information as to openings they may 
apply in the cities at the Public Employment Bureau, Marquette Avenue and 
Second Street, Minneapolis, or outside the cities to the Cotmty Director or 
Coimty Agent." 

Stated meeting July 9th, 1918. 



COAL SUPPLY 

June 26, 1917. Mr. Ames reported as to the coal investigation that ac- 
cording to information energetic meastires were being taken in Washington and 
that the supply moving west was to be materially increased so that receipts 
of 12,000,000 tons at Duluth were to be anticipated. 

Addressed to the President: 

"The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety begs leave to report to you 
that the conditions in this state are eminently satisfactory so far as peace, quiet 
and the orderly piu-suit of industry are concerned, but our people are looking 
forward to the coming winter with much apprehension. The cost of fuel has 
virtually doubled since last year. We may be able to protect the people against 
local abuses in the coal trade, but we are helpless to afford relief against ex- 
tortion at the mines and in interstate operations. The cost of coal at the mines 
last year, as we are advised, was $1.45 a ton. For the same coal it is now pro- 
posed to charge $3.50 per ton at the mines, which is virtually the same as the 
cost of the coal at the docks in Duluth last season. The numerous ore carriers 
leaving otir state daily return empty, and our coal supply is exhausted. We 
earnestly urge early and adequate action for the relief of the situation. The 
great work of this state in producing food and supplies should not be hampered, 

148 



and the well being of our people menaced, by the greed of producers and in- 
efficiency of carriers in other sections." 
July 3, 1917. 

July 11, 1917. Upon motion of Mr. Ames it was voted that the Chair 
be authorized in his discretion to appoint a special agent to prosecute inquiry 
in Washington as to means of expediting coal shipments. The Governor ac- 
cordingly appointed Commissioner McGee. 

August 1, 1917. It was reported that Commissioner McGee was in Wash- 
ington on business of the Commission. 

August 14, 1917. Mr. McGee reported upon the coal situation and the 
results of his labor iii Washington and Cleveland. 

October 2, 1917. Moved by Mr. March that Judge McGee be authorized 
to exercise all the powers and discharge all the duties as coal administrator and 
employ agents and do whatever he may deem proper in connection with the 
coal situation in the state. 



FOOD 

FOOD PROCLAMATION 

To THE People of Minnesota: 

Food supply is of first importance in' providing for public safety. 

Food supplies are now short. Surplus is everywhere exhausted, inroads 
have been made on normal stocks, harvests of countries in the southern hemisphere 
are below expectations, oiu* own winter wheat yield shovisagrave reduction, 
European production is shortened, live stock is under alarming shrinkage. 
Famine threatens the whole world except our own coimtry. 

The world looks to America to save it from famine unprecedented. 

To Minnesota especially, one of the few areas which is capable of yielding 
a surplus, the President's appeal comes with compelling force. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety, recently invested with ex- 
traordinary powers by the Legislature, in concert with the Minnesota Food 
Committee, established under authority of the State, is preparing such measures 
as will enable the farmers to meet the demands upon them. 

Therefore, in consultation with the Minnesota Public Safety Commission, 
of which I am ex-officio chairman, and with the Food Committee, and with 
full expectation of co-operation and support from the National Council of De- 
fense, I, J. A. A. Bumquist, Governor of Minnesota, declare: 

That no effort will be spared to enroll, organize and place where needed 
the available labor of Minnesota and other states in order that every farmer 
may have at his disposal all labor needful for producing and harvesting the 
maximum crop his acres will bear: 

That, while all authorities agree that high prices for all farm produce will 
necessarily obtain, in case of unexpected developments measures will be taken, 
however possible, to insure a remimerative return from the crops and other 
agricultural produce. 

Upon these considerations and imder the authority of the President's 
appeal to the people of the United States and the entreaty of all the world to 

149 



avert the disaster of famine, I enjoin upon the people of Minnesota their pa- 
triotic duty of highest import to do all things that may maintain the greatest 
possible yield of food-stuffs from Minnesota for all the world. 

, MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Governor and Ex-ofl&cio Chairman. 
Dated April 28, 1917. 

Voted that the National Council of Defense having requested this Com- 
mission to cooperate with it in eliminating waste of food, and to that end sug- 
gesting that the practice of bakers in accepting the return from retailers of un- 
sold bread be discontinued on and after Jime 24th, 

Now Therefore, Be it Resolved, by the Commission of Public Safety, 
that the bakers be, and are hereby requested to comply with the recommenda- 
tion of the Council of National Defense and discontinue the wasteful practice 
of returns. Motion adopted. 

June 13, 1917. 

June 26, 1917. Mr. March. "Resolved, That the Raihoad and Ware- 
house Commission be requested, on or before the 3rd day of July, A. D. 1917, 
to supply to the Public Safety Commission an accurate statement showing the 
number of empty cars upon the lines of each railroad in the yards, side tracks, 
spiu- tracks, switch tracks, etc., at the Minnesota Transfer, Minneapolis and 
St. Paul." 

The motion was adopted. 

July 3, 1917. Mr. McGee reported that the National Council urged the 
calling of a conference of wholesale bakers. Moved by Mr. McGee that a 
meeting be called of wholesale bakers in the state at 2 P. M., Thursday, July 
5th in the Senate Chamber, to carry out the recommendation of the National 
Council of Defense, Seconded by Mr. Ames and carried. 

Whereas, There is general dissatisfaction about the high cost of living, 
and the repeatedly advancing prices upon the necessities of life, and the wide 
difference in the price paid to the producer and charged the consumer, 

And Whereas, Numerous complaints have been made against speculating 
in food and grain, and the unreasonable prices made by the trusts controlling the 
food products. 

Therefore, Be It Resolved, By this Commission that a thorough investi- 
gation be made by this Commission into the price paid the producer of all food 
products, and the price paid by the constuner of all the said products, and to 
fully investigate the amount of food products held in warehouses and cold storage 
plants in this state, and the effect of such storage upon the price of such food 
products, and to investigate the shortage of railroad cars, and the conditions 
and supply of fuel and coal. 

And be it Further Resolved, That the chairman of this Commission 
appoint a committee of three as its agent to fully investigate said matters and 
report to this Commission. 

July 17, 1917. Mr. March. "Whereas on July 3, this Commission author- 
ized the Chairman to appoint a committee of three to investigate the high 
cost of living, and the repeatedly advancing prices of the necessities of life, 
and the wide difference in the price therefor paid to the producer and charged 
the constmier; and ntunerous complaints have been made against speculation 

160 



and gambling in food and grain, and the unreasonable prices made by the trusts 
controlling food products and coal. 

Pursuant to said resolution, the Chairman has appointed C. H. March, 
W. S. Moscrip and George W. Lawson as such Committee. 

Therefore Be It Resolved: That for the purpose of such an inves- 
tigation and examination, said Committee is hereby designated and appointed 
the agents of this Commission and they and each of them are authorized to 
have and exercise all the rights and powers specified in Chapter 261, Paragraph 
3, Subdivision 4, of 1917, and the Commission's By-Laws: 

That they forthwith proceed with such investigation and examination, employ 
in connection therewith such stenographers and assistants as may be necessary 
and with all convenient speed report to this Commission their findings and 
their recommendations for this Commission's actions in the premises. 

Be it further resolved, that in the absence from any hearing in the con- 
nection with such investigation and examination, of C. H. March, one of said 
committee, any other member of this Commission designated by him may act 
in his stead with all the rights, and powers he would have if present." 

Mr. March moved the adoption which was carried. 

February 26, 1918. After some discussion it was moved by Commissioner 
McGee, seconded by Commissioner March that the following telegram be sent 
to President Wilson: 

St. Paul, Minnesota, 

February 26, 1918. 
Hon. Woodrow Wilson, 
The White House, 
Washington, D. C. 

Minnesota, in response to requests from your administration and as a 
patriotic duty, produced thirty-three million bushels of potatoes last year. 
Thirteen milHon bushels on hand spoiling for want of market but principally 
for want of refrigerator cars to move same. Cannot Supply Division Quar- 
termaster's Department, furnish immediate outlet for large part of same and 
Director of Railways fiumish transportation to move this enormous supply of 
valuable food-stuffs. Failure to do so at once means destruction of supply 
and small acreage this year. All other sources of relief but your good self have 
been appealed to without success. Here is an opportunity to cut red tape 
and produce results. May we hear from you at once. If promises could have 
accompHshed desired results, the potatoes would have moved long ago. What 
can we expect and when. The situation is a critical one both as affecting im- 
mediate stock on hand and acreage to be planted this year. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 

J. A. A. BURNQUIST, 

Motion carried. Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 

PUBLIC MARKETS 

The following resolution was adopted: 

The Safety Commission recommends to the city councils and governing 
bodies of the cities of the State as follows: 

(1) That permanent or temporary market places be established in the 
cities of the State not more than one mile apart, and that producers and vendors 
of food products^be encouraged to offer their products for sale at such markets. 

101 



(2) That all license regulations that hinder the free sale and offering of 
food products at any such markets be suspended for the period of one year. 

(3) That at the request of any municipality this Commission will select 
suitable persons to supervise and direct the conduct of such markets, and ap- 
point them as agents or representatives with police powers to enforce the orderly 
conduct of the business. 

July 24, 1917. 

REGARDING FISH LICENSES 

June 26, 1917. Mr. Lind. "Resolved, by the Minnesota Commission 
of Public Safety that the Game and Fish Commissioner of the State of Minne- 
sota be and he hereby is directed to issue, upon proper application, licenses to 
fish for and take, catch and capture with seines the kinds of fish mentioned in 
Chapter 386, General Laws of 1917, in the waters therein named to such persons 
as may be designated by the State Board of Control as its agents or employees, 
and said Board of Control be and it is hereby authorized to make such appli- 
cations and to do and perform such acts and things as may be necessary to 
carry out the terms of this resolution, the fish so obtained to be used for food 
in the State Institutions under the control of said Board insofar as such use 
may be advantageously made, and the surplus supply remaining to be sold 
by the Board of Control, at a reasonable price taking into consideration as far 
as practicable, the cost of securing said fish. Said Board of Control also shall 
pay, and it shall be an item of the cost referred to, the percentages provided 
in said Chapter 386 supra. 

Resolved Further, that the various County Boards of the State of Min- 
nesota be and they are hereby directed not to prohibit such fishing and seining 
under licenses that may be granted by the Game and Fish Commissioner pur- 
suant to the terms of this resolution; all of the waters under the jurisdiction 
of this State except the portions of the St. Croix and Mississippi rivers referred 
to in said Chapter 386, being deemed to be and hereby are declared to be open 
waters for licensed fishing under application by the Board of Control as in this 
resolution provided. 

Adopted. 

DESTRUCTION OF FOOD 

"Mayor C. R. Magney of the City of Duluth having reported charges that 
certain commission merchants of that city have destroyed useful goods, be it 
resolved by the Public Safety Commission of the State of Minnesota that L. 
U. Young of Duluth be appointed its agent and empowered to make a thorough 
investigation of such charges and to report the results thereof to this Commis- 
sion, it being understood that no expense to the State is to be involved except 
such clerical expenses as may be necessarily inciured in making a thorough 
investigation of the facts and the preparation of a report thereon.'* 
Stated meeting October 16, 1917. 

RELATING TO FISHING IN THE ELY-WINTON DISTRICT 

"Resolved: That Carlos Avery, Agent of the Safety Commission in 
conducting State fishing, be authorized to enter into agreements with fishermen 
in the Ely-Winton district for fishing for the^State imder his direction and con- 
trol, for a period of not to exceed three years." 

Stated meeting March 12th, 1918. 

in 



RELATING TO GRADING OF GRAINS 

February 5, 1918. Moved by Commissioner McGee, seconded by Com- 
missioner Weiss, that Commissioner March be instructed to visit Washington 
and represent the people of Minnesota in the matter of proper grading of grains. 

Motion carried. 

March 19, 1918. Moved by Commissioner McGee, seconded by Com- 
missioner Weiss, that Commissioners March and Cashman be instructed to 
visit Washington again relative to the question of grading grains. 

Motion carried. 

August 13, 1918. It was the sense of the Commission that the members 
of the Minneapolis and Duluth Boards of Grain Appeal, and Commissioners 
March and Cashman of the Public Safety Commission meet August 16th and 
come to some understanding as to imiformity of state and federal grain grades. 



DISLOYALTY 

FEDERAL COOPERATION 

Whereas, The universal enforcement of the conscription law is an effort 
applied toward the successful prosecution of the present war. 

Be It Resolved, That the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety hereby 
tenders to the United States District Attorney its active cooperation in the 
enforcement of said law and asks his specific information as to how this Com- 
mission may be of greatest assistance in such enforcement in this State. 

Mr .Ames. "Resolved, that in the opinion of the Commission, nobody 
should serve on registration or exemption boards who is opposed to the execution 
of the law providing for registration and conscription." 

Unanimously carried. 

May 29, 1917. 

PROSECUTION OF SEDITION 

June 7, 1917. Voted that the Commission request each judge, a part of 
whose court is a grand jury imder his supervision, to instruct such grand jury 
to inquire into all offenses against the provisions of Chapter 463 of the Session 
Laws of Minnesota of 1917, and also that said judge state to such juries general- 
ly, and in popular language, what constitutes the elements of these offenses. 

June 21, 1917. Mr. Lind. "Whereas, It has come to the knowledge of 
this Commission that meetings have been held and are announced to be held 
in various parts of this State, for the advocacy of conduct on the part of the 
people of this State, which is in violation of law, and contrary to the peace and 
welfare of the State and nation. 

Therefore, Be It Resolved by the Minnesota Commission of Public 
Safety, that the attention of the sheriffs of the counties, chiefs of police of vil- 
lages and cities, executive and peace officers of all municipalities in the State 
be called to the provisions of the following sections of the statutes, and they 
are hereby admonished to observe and enforce the same." 

Chapter 463, General Laws of 1917. 

Section 2. It shall be unlawful for any person in any public place, or at 
any meeting where more than five persons are assembled, to advocate or teach 
by word of mouth or otherwise that men should not enlist in the military or 
naval forces of the United States or the State of Minnesota. 

1S3 



Section 3. It shall be unlawful for any person to teach or advocate by 
any written or printed matter whatsoever, or by oral speech, that the citizens 
of this State should not aid or assist the United States in prosecuting or carry- 
ing on war with the public enemies of the United States. 

Chapter 215, General Laws of 1917. 

Section 3. Wherever two or more persons assemble for the piirpose of 
advocating or teaching the doctrines of criminal syndicalism defined in this 
act, such an assemblage is unlawful and every person volimtarily participating 
therein by his presence, aid or instigation is guilty of a felony and punishable 
by imprisonment in the State prison for not more than 10 years or by a fine of 
not more than $5000.00 or both. 

Criminal syndicalism as used in the above section is defined by the act as 
the doctrine which advocates crime, violence, or the malicious damage or injury 
to the property of an employer by an employee, as a means of accomplishing 
industrial or political ends. 

Mr. Ames moved the adoption of the resolution which was carried unan- 
imously. 

June 20, 1917. It was the sense of the Commission that an ordinance be 
drawn for submission to the municipalities providing methods for restraining 
those who advocate opposition to the Government and hindrance to the con- 
duct of the war. 

It was voted that copies of the law relating to syndicalism and the law 
relating to sedition be prepared in the principal languages used on the range 
including Finnish, Croatian, Slovenian, Bulgarian and Italian. 

June 26, 1917. Counsel under instructions presented the following or- 
dinance covering offenders who hinder the conduct of the war. 

AN ORDINANCE DEFINING AND PUNISHING VAGRANCY 

(Proposed by the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety.) 
(ENACTING CLAUSE) 

Section 1. Any person found within the 

of , who by word of mouth or in 

writing advocates or teaches in said 

or is about to advocate or teach therein, or habitually advocates or teaches, 
or is engaged in whole or in part in the occupation, whether for gain or gratui- 
tously, of advocating, advising or teaching the duty, necessity or propriety of 
crime or of violence as a means of accomplishing industrial or political ends, 
shall be guilty of vagrancy. 

Section 2. Any person found within the 

of , who by word of mouth, or in 

writing, advocates or teaches in said 

or is about to advocate or teach therein, or habitually advocates or teaches, 
or is engaged in whole or in part in the occupation, whether for gain or gratui- 
tously, of advocating, advising or teaching the violation or disregard of any 
duty or obligation imposed by any statute of this State, or of the United States, 
upon any person or class of persons, shall be guilty of vagrancy. 

Section 3. Any person foimd within the 

of , who by any written or printed 

matter whatsoever, or by oral speech teaches, advises or advocates or is about 

164 



to teach, advise or advocate or who habitually advocates or teaches or who is 
engaged in whole or in part in the occupation, whether for gain or gratuitously, 
of advocating, teaching or advising that citizens of this State shall not or ought 
not aid or assist the United States in prosecuting or carrying on war with the 
public enemies of the United States, shall be guilty of vagrancy. A citizen of 
this State for the purpose of this ordinance, is hereby defined to be any person 
within the confines of the State. 

Section 4. Any person found guilty of vagrancy as defined in this or- 
dinance shall upon conviction thereof be punished by 



Section 5. Nothing contained in this ordinance shall be deemed to modify 
or repeal any existing ordinance covering vagrancy. 

Section 6. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage, approval 
and publication. 

Moved by Mr. March that form be approved and sent to cities and vil- 
lages. Carried. 

August 1, 1917. Voted that Mr. Joseph Mott, of Die Wanderer and Mr. 
F. Bergmeier, of the Volkszeitimg, be called before the Commission at 2:30 P. M. 

August 1, 1917. Voted that citation be issued to the following to appear 
next Tuesday before the Commission: Louis G. Vogel, Auditor Brown County; 
L. A. Fritsche, Mayor, New Ulm.and Henry J. Berg, County Treasurer, New 
Ulm, to be questioned in regard to the recent meeting at New Ulm. 

August 7, 1917. The charges against the Park Region Echo were taken 
from the table. Voted that the post-office department be requested to issue 
an order excluding this publication from the mails and that copies be sent to 
the proper officials. 

August 21, 1917. Mr. Weiss presented a telegram from Congressman 
Miller referring to the imprisonment of Bergmeier of the Volkszeitimg. It 
was referred back to Mr. Weiss. 

August 21, 1917. The Commission considered a letter prepared by Mr. 
Tighe addressed to the Governor, relating to the New Ulm episode and to the 
removal of the Mayor of New Ulm, the County Auditor, who was also a member 
of the Exemption Board, and the City Attorney of New Ulm. The form of 
letter was adopted by the Commission. 

August 28, 1917. A form of specific charges against New Ulm and Brown 
County officials, Fritsche, Vogel and Pfaender as drafted by Mr. Tighe, was 
considered and adopted. The Secretary was instructed to present the charges 
in the form approved to the Governor. 

August 28, 1917. Otto^S. Langum, Sheriff of Hennepin County, having 
been ordered by telegram from Governor to stop a so-called People's Council 
meeting in Hennepin County, appeared and set forth that in his opinion the 
proposed meeting of the People's Council would result in grave disorder. 

Moved by Mr. McGee that in accordance with the Governor's telegram 
and the representations of Sheriff Langum, that breach of peace will result if 
this meeting is held and in view of the known character of the meeting, the 
Commission of Public Safety recommends to the Governor that he issue an 
order prohibiting the proposed meeting of the People's Council. 

166 



September 18, 1917. Moved by Mr. Weiss that the Commission instruct 
the City Council of New Ulm not to accept the resignations of the City At- 
torney and the Mayor, as these officials are now under investigation. Carried. 

October 16, 1917. Information received concerning the application for 
charter to organize a h&Dk at Glencoe by alleged pro-German signers. Moved 
that it is the sense of the Commission that the Superintendent of Banks be 
asked to exercise extreme caution in the matter of granting charters where 
disloyalty has been shown by applicants. Motion carried. 

• November 13, 1917. Moved by Commissioner Lind, seconded by Com- 
missioner March that the chairman of the Commission be authorized and directed 
to employ a competent person to investigate the report upon the propriety of 
the granting or withholding of authorization for any bank charters in cases 
where it is alleged that the proposed new bank charter is sought by disloyal 
persons or for other than legitimate purposes. Motion carried. 

November 20, 1917. Moved by Commissioner Lind, seconded by Com- 
missioner Ames that Counsel Tighe be instructed to mail a copy of testimony 
taken at Brown County hearing to the trustees of Martin Luther College at 
New Ulm and ask their approval or disapproval of the stand of Professor A. 
Ackerman as given by him therein. Motion carried. 



PUBLIC WELFARE 

Moved that the Commission recommend to the United States Engineer in 
charge of improvement on the upper Mississippi, that the dams be so operated 
this season as to avoid unnecessary damage to hay and other crops, and de- 
struction of forage, which motion was adopted. 

May 29, 1917. 

**Whbrbas, The Council of National Defense has requested the several 
State Councils to cooperate with the Federal Reserve Banks in promoting the 
sale of the new issue of American War Bonds, be it 

Resolved : That Governor Wold of the Federal Reserve Bank of the Ninth 
District be notified that the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety will aid 
in the sale of these bonds by every means in its power, and be it further 

Resolved : That a member of the Commission be designated to take charge 
of the bond campaign in cooperation with the member of the Liberty Loan 
Committee who shall be appointed to act with the Commission in the matter." 
Stated meeting September 18th, 1917. 

December 18, 1917, Moved by Commissioner March, seconded by Com- 
missioner McGee that the State Auditor be directed to sell dead and down 
timber and green hardwood on state lands to parties making application for 
same in amounts not to exceed twenty-five doUars to any one person, at a rate 
of twenty-five cents per cord, it being understood that until further notice, all 
wood so sold shall be used by the parties paying for same and not cut for the 
purpose of seUing. Motion carried. 

**Resolved: That public attention should be called in the several counties 
to the importance of the utiUaation during the coming season of all arable land 
tor crop production and of vacant village and dty lots for individual or neigh- 
bortiood vegetable garden purposes. 



Some suggestion has been made that the Commission apply the powers 
of eminent domain given it by the act of its creation, to compel the cultivation 
of unoccupied farm lands and lots which might otherwise lie idle. The Com- 
mission as at present advised does not think this necessary. It believes that 
consent to their use can be had from their owners by agreement if seasonable 
application for such consent is made by the county organizations, or by people 
wanting to use them. But if it appears that this course is not effective, the 
Commission stands ready on being so informed to provide the machinery for 
the acquisition of the right to use by condemnation. 

Last season's experience has demonstrated the value of the small garden 
idea and has added to popular knowledge on the subject, so that it can be more 
successfully applied another time. Its application helped materially in the 
solution of the living problem for many this winter, and it may be needed still 
more in the future in view of the possible increased stress of next year. 

The high prices prevailing for food products make this whole matter of 
crop production and kitchen gardening worthy of immediate attention, and the 
directors are urged to impress it on their several constituencies through all 
available mediums of communication." 

Stated meeting February 26th, 1918. 

April 23, 1918. Delegation headed by D. W. Doty, St. Paul, Mrs. Vye* 
H. P. Keller and T. R. Kane appeared against proposal to hold a championship 
boxing match July 4th. Colonel C. H. Miller appeared in favor of the proposed 
boxing bout. Mr. Sieberlich, member of the Boxing Commission, was also present. 

It was the unanimous opinion of the Commission that the proposed boxing 
match would be improper, untimely and against the public interest, and should 
not be held, but it appearing the "Boxing Commission" which, under the law, 
has primary jurisdiction in the matter, had not as yet acted on the application 
for a license, the Commission postponed action on the subject imtil the "Boxing 
Commission" had passed on the application. 

October 16, 1918. Moved by Commissioner March, seconded by Com- 
missioner Cashman, that the Minnesota Fire Relief Commission appointed 
by the Governor as follows: W. A. McMonagle, Duluth; C. F. Mahnke, Moose 
Lake; Ben Hassman, Aitkin; C. R. Magney, Duluth; Geo. Partridge, Min- 
neapolis; Colonel W. V. Eva, Duluth; C. I. McNair, Cloquet; C. A. Duncan, 
Duluth, and E. C. Steger, St. Paul, be made agents of the Minnesota Com- 
mission of Public Safety. Motion carried. 

November 12, 1918. Moved by Commissioner March, seconded by Com- 
missioner Cashman, that the following resolution be adopted: 

"Whereas, the present economic condition of the state of Minnesota 
demands more adequate means of transportation on the public highways and 
the relief of congested railways, and 

Whereas, the National Council of Defense has requested that this situ- 
ation be relieved by the establishment of a Highways Transport Committee, 
whose activities shall be directed towards that end, 

Be It Therefore Resolved: That the Minnesota Public Safety Com- 
mission, this 12th day of November, 1918, does hereby assume the financial 
obligation of organization and maintenance of the Highways Transport Com- 
mittee for the State of Minnesota and it is hereby ordered that funds be made 
available for payment of such expenses upon order of C. M. Babcock, State 
Chairman of the Highways Transport Committee. The total expenditures 

1S7 



under this resolution shall not exceed the sum of five thousand dollars. The 
appointment of Harry G. Davis secretary of said committee at a salary of two 
hundred dollars per month effective October 22nd approved." 
Motion carried. 

"Whereas, The usual road of travel to the Brown farm, which is to be 
used in connection with the aviation school, is not in such condition as to permit 
of the transportation of the loads that will necessarily be hauled over the road, and 

Whereas, The application of tarvia or oil would improve the road to 
the extent of permitting it to be used for the required purposes, and 

Whereas, Immediate use of such road is essential to the furtherance 
of the use of said farm as an aviation field and the aviation school authorities 
have asked that this action be taken forthwith; 

Therefore, Be It Resolved, That this Commission request the county 
board of Hennepin County to provide sufficient tarvia or road oils to prepare 
this road without previously advertising for proposals, as provided by Section 
1092 of the General Statutes. 

Be It Resolved Further, That this Commission request the county 
attorney and other officials who may have to do with the legality of such ex- 
penditures to take cognizance of the fact that delay in the repair of this road 
would seriously hinder progress in connection with the country's plans, and 
regard this as of such emergency as would justify the county commissioners 
to comply with the request herein contained, and also provide for the perma- 
nent care of said road." 

Stated meeting July 9th, 1918. 

"Whereas, The Governor of Minnesota has heretofore designated a 
committee, of which J. L. Washbtmi of Duluth, Minnesota, is Chairman, for 
the purposes of inquiring into the causes of the fires which burned extensive 
districts in St. Louis, Carlton, Pine and Aitkin Counties, Minnesota, during 
the month of October 1918, and to suggest legislative and other measures which 
will prevent a repetition of such a calamity, and 

Whereas, It is for the pubHc interest and the conservation of the state's 
resources and the protection of public and private property that said investi- 
gation should be in every way facilitated, 

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved: That J. L. Washburn of Duluth, 
Minnesota, be and he hereby is designated as the agent of the Commission in 
connection with such investigation so to be had through said Committee, and 
that there are conferred on him all the powers provided for by Chapter 261 of 
the Laws in 1917 for agents of the Commission, including herein the power 
to require the attendance of witnesses, the production of papers and the examina- 
tion of witnesses, and the right to employ to such ends all instrumentalities 
provided for by said Chapter 261, or otherwise by law, 

Be It Further Resolved: That said J. L. Washburn so appointed agent 
of the Commission report with all convenient speed to it the results of such 
investigation for the action of the Commission in the premises." 

Stated meeting October 29th, 1918. 

168 



SOLDIERS' WELFARE 

May 23, 1917. The Chair presented the following communication from 
J. E. Lawler, Secretary Hibbing Commercial Club. 

"Hibbing, Minn., May 23. Naval Reserve from Twin Cities quartered 
at Duluth in need of fimds for food and clothing. Are appealing to range for 
assistance. Government failed to provide salaries and boys are trying to live 
on forty cents a day. How about that million dollars at disposal of defense 
committee? Investigate." 

By Mr. Lind: Resolved, That this commimication be forwarded to the 
Secretary of the Navy, with request that he advise this Commission whether it 
•s the desire of the Navy Department that the State provide for the relief of 

hese men. 
t 

July 3, 1917. Upon invitation of the Commission the Military Board and 
the State Auditor appeared, including General Resche, Colonels Mollison, 
Eva and Luce, Captain Rhinow and Mr. Preus. Mr. Preus stated that $30,000 
inspection money due the Guard had not been paid and that there was nothing 
in the fund to cover it and asked that the Guard fund be reimbursed from the 
Public Safety fund. Moved by Mr. Lind that we recommend that the militia 
fund which is temporarily depleted to pay an emergency bill, be reimbursed 
by incurring an indebtedness under the emergency provision of the laws. The 
motion was carried. Ayes 6, Nays 0. 

March 26, 1918. Moved by Commissioner McGee, seconded by Com- 
missioner Hilton that: 

"On recommendation of the Adjutant General, in cases where there ap- 
peared to have been delay in the transmission of the allotment of the dependent 
of a Minnesota citizen engaged in military or naval service, the Governor might 
authorize the advance to such dependent out of the Commission's fund, such 
sums as he deemed appropriate, taking therefore a promise of repayment in 
a form to be drafted by the Commission's attorney." 

Motion carried. 

May 14, 1918. The attention of the Commission was called to the fact 
that a considerable number of Minnesota young men and young men of other 
states who are of conscriptable age and physically fit are engaged in the non 
military service of the government under some arrangements which secure them 
rank and freedom from the risks of military service and that such discrimination 
is a sotu-ce of scandal and popular dissatisfaction. The secretary was instructed 
to secure a list of Minnesota men so favored and by inquiry of them or other- 
wise to learn the reasons for such discrimination to the end that the true facts 
may be made public and a remedy found if possible. 

May 14, 1918. It was the sense of the Commission that eight hundred 
dollars be allowed Camp Dodge with which to buy athletic equipment on con- 
dition that appropriations are made by other states which have sent troops 
to said camp. 

March 26, 1918. Moved by Commissioner McGee, seconded by Com- 
missioner Weiss, that the following resolution be adopted: 

"Whereas, The National Congress has passed a Soldiers and Sailors Civil 
Rights Bill, so called, protecting the men of the Army and Navy, in their prop- 
erty rights during the period of their Federal service, and 

189 



Whereas, The State Auditor has announced that he will withhold from 
re-appraisal and re- sale any State land purchased on contract where the pur- 
chaser or holder is delinquent in his payments but is now engaged in Federal 
service in either the Army or Navy, and 

Whereas, It is necessary that the reqmsite information be secured forth- 
with in order that the greatest protection may be extended to the men of the 
Army and Navy 

Therefore Be It Resolved, That all County Auditors, County Treas- 
urers and Clerks of Courts are hereby directed to immediately notify J. A. O. 
Preus, State Cafitol, St. Paul, of all cases coming within their knowledge, 
where a soldier's or sailor's ownership of real property purchased under contract 
from the state is jeopardized during the period of his Federal service." 

April 30, 1918. Moved by Commissioner Hilton, seconded by Commis- 
sioner Weiss that the following resolution be adopted: 

MORATORIUM RESOLUTION 

"Whereas, A nimiber of petitions have been presented to the Commission 
asking it, by order, to impose a moratoriimi as to the civil liabilities of Minne- 
sota soldiers and sailors, and 

Whereas, From the nimiber of such petitions it appears that the true 
situation in this regard is not as widely known as it should be, 

• Resolved, That the Secretary, through the columns of Minnesota in the 
War, and otherwise, call public attention to the following, to wit: 

That the subject of a moratorium has been before the Commission on a number 
of occasions, but that it bas deferred action "thereon from time to time imder 
authentic information that the Federal Government had the matter before it 
and would, in proper season, take action which would be more comprehensive 
and effective in its scope than action by any state could be; and that in 
keeping with this information the Congress of the United States has passed a 
law, approved March 8, 1918, and now is in full force by which soldiers and 
sailors and their dependents are protected in the fullest regard and in the most 
liberal way as to court proceedings, as to obligations under contracts of all sorts, 
the payment of insiu-ance premiums and taxes and are secured thereby delay 
in general as to all civil liabilities during their term of service and for a pre- 
scribed period thereafter; and that no occasion exists for action by the Com- 
mission. 

That the Secretary procure copies of this Federal act in such numbers as 
is possible and distribute the same among applicants therefor." 

Motion carried. 

VIOLATION OF LAWS COVERING SALE OF LIQUOR 

The following statement was adopted: 

The Commission, at its session today, foimd itself overwhelmed with come 
plaints from different sections of the State, rural and municipal, in regard to 
violations of the liquor laws. Scores of blind pigs were reported, and the Com- 
mission urged to inaugurate drastic action to stop the evil. 

The Commission has not approached the question either from the stand- 
point of prohibition or moral reform, as such. The steps it has taken to date 
have been actuated solely by the necessity of the situation, to insiire peace 
and order and to carry out efficiently the legislation and policy of Congress. 

160 



The Commission, with its many other important duties, of necessity cannot 
fritter away its time in prosecuting violations of the license laws of this State. 

The situation has reached a point where it is up to the manufacturers and 
licensed dealers in intoxicants to see to it that the law is observed. If they 
continue to encourage and sustain blind pigging there is no recourse left to the 
Commission, but to issue an order prohibiting the manufacture and sale of 
liquor in the State or to urge the Governor to call an extra session of the legis- 
lature to pass a bone-dry law. If that be done, imder existing congressional 
legislation which prohibits the shipment of intoxicants over interstate railways 
into dry territory, the State will be dry and there will be no more blind pigging. 

June 19, 1917. 

November 20, 1917. Moved by Commissioner McGee, seconded by Com- 
missioner March as follows: 

That the Attorney General be and he is hereby directed to institute pro- 
ceedings to vacate the charters of all domestic brewery corporations and to 
terminate the right of all foreign brewery corporations to do business in this 
state that habitually violate or connive at the violation of laws of this state. 

Motion carried. 

February 5, 1918. After some discussion it was moved by Commissioner 
Smith, seconded by Commissioner Weiss that in response to the various pe- 
titions and communications received relative to the general closing of saloons 
and breweries, the following statement be issued by the Public Safety Com- 
mission: 

"As matters now stand the general closing of saloons in this state and 
nation is a war measure upon which the Federal Government has already acted. 
Congress and the Commander-in-Chief of otu- forces have considered the revenue 
situation, the waste incident to the business, the readjustment of labor con- 
ditions that would be necessitated by immediate prohibition, together with 
the effect on the morale of otir people. The President, through legislation, 
has now the power to eliminate the liquor traffic throughout all of the states 
and, if he deems it advisable to exercise that power to a greater extent than has 
heretofore been done, he will imdoubtedly do so. Unless additional causes 
should develop justifying a coiu-se which now appears inconsistent with the 
present policy of the Federal Government, on which the responsibility for the 
conduct of the war rests, the Commission does not feel it should act in this 
matter. It takes this position without regard to its own views which are clearly 
disclosed by the course it has heretofore followed in dealing with the general 
problem here involved". 

June 27, 1918. Counsel Tighe reported concerning the Blooming Prairie 
saloon situation and presented a notice signed by F. N. Dicken, Judge of the 
District Court, Second Judicial District, advising the attorney that a hearing 
would be had on Sattirday, June 29th, 1918, of an application in an action pro- 
posed to be begun by one Carroll against the Commission for an order restrain- 
ing the Commission from enforcing Orders Ntunbers 17, 33 and 34 as against 
Carroll. It was voted that the Commissioner's attorney be instructed not 
to appear in response to the notice. 

June 27, 1918. From C. R. Magney, Mayor of Duluth, stating that the 
village of Oliver, Wisconsin, opposite Steel Plant is wet and will continue so 
after Superior goes dry, July 1st. St. Louis County is anticipating considerable 

161 



annoyance. Moved by Commissioner McGee, seconded by Commissioner 
Cashman that Counsel Tighe and Commissioner Weiss be instructed to call 
to the attention of the Wisconsin State Council of Defense the desirability of 
having the saloon license at Oliver annulled. Motion carried. 



SCHOOLS 

GERMAN TEXT-BOOKS 

"Resolved: That the committee on text-books of German be requested 
to reduce the findings of its report to the form of recommendations calling for 
the ehmination from the public school curriculum of Minnesota of all the books 
which they find objectionable on patriotic grounds as to their contents, and that 
the committee be requested to prepare a "white list" of unobjectionable books, 
from which school boards may safely make their selections. 

Resolved: That the Commission will print such copies of the final recom- 
mendations of the Committee as may be required for circulation among the 
school authorities of the State." 

Stated meeting November 13, 1917. 

November 20, 1917. Commissioner Ames hereupon read the following 
resolution and moved its adoption, seconded by Commissioner Lind: 

"Whereas, English is the official language, as well as the language of 
business and literature in the United States, and a thorough famiUarity with 
the English language is essential to American citizenship, and 

Whereas, Complaints have been made to the Commission of a ntmiber 
of private schools, chiefly parochial, where German or some other foreign lan- 
guage is used as the principal vehicle of instruction, and 

Whereas, From a partial survey made by the State Department of Ed- 
ucation, it appears that there are in Minnesota some 200 such schools, using 
a foreign language in whole or in part as a medium of instruction, where some 
10,000 children are being brought up as alien ^ and foreigners, and are not being 
properly prepared for American Citizenship, be it hereby 

Resolved, That school-boards, principals and teachers be recommended 
and urged, as a patriotic duty, to require the use of the EngHsh language as 
the exclusive medium of instruction in all schools in the State of Minnesota, 
and to discontinue and prohibit the use of all foreign languages in such schools 
except as a medium for the study of those languages themselves, or as a medium 
for religious instruction." Motion carried. 

"Resolved: That the State Superintendent of Education be requested 
to send out, in behalf of the Commission, a questionnaire to all superintendents 
of high school systems and all principals of grade schools, to ascertain whether 
they have received the Commission's report, on German text books used in 
Public Schools, and whether any of the books embraced in Group A of said 
report were in use when the report was received, and if so what action has been 
taken to carry out the recommendations. 

Further that the Superintendent be requested to inform the Commission 
as to the results of his inquiry." 

Stated meeting March 19th, 1918. 



NON-PARTISAN LEAGUE 

September 25, 1917. The following resolution presented by Mr. Ames 
was adopted unanimously: 

"Whereas, Senator Robert M. LaFollette made an address of a disloyal 
and seditious nature at a public meeting before a large audience at the Non- 
partisan League Convention in St. Paul on the 20th day of September, 

Whereas, The utterances of Senator LaFollette, with all the prestige of 
his high office as a Senator of the United States made under protection of a 
guaranty by the President of the Non-Partisan League that no disloyal ex- 
pressions would be permitted during the alleged conference between producers 
and consumers on the high cost of living, have already served to create treason- 
able sentiments in the State of Minnesota, and being spread through the public 
press can have no other effect than to weaken the support of the Government 
in carrying on the war, be it hereby 

Resolved, That the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety respectfully 
petitions the Senate of the United States to institute proceedings looking to 
the expulsion of the said Robert M. LaFollette from the Senate, as a teacher 
of disloyalty and sedition giving aid and comfort to our enemies, and hindering 
the Government in the conduct of the war, and be it ftirther 

Resolved, That copies of this resolution together with stenographic copies 
of said LaFoUette's speech, be for ^^•arded to the President of the Senate and 
Senators Nelson and Kellogg." 

Moved, That the matter of the conduct of Senator LaFollette and others 
at the recent Non-Partisan Convention at Saint Paul be taken up with the 
United States District Attorney and that copies of such stenographic reports 
of the speeches as the Commission may have be placed at his disposal with the 
request that same be investigated and the parties if found to have violated any 
law of the United States be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. 

Carried. 

September 25, 1917. Moved by Mr. Smith that A. C. Townley, President 
of the Non-Partisan League, be requested to appear before the Commission 
for examination as to any information within his knowledge as to the attitude 
and relation and conduct of the Non-Partisan League on matters relating to 
the prosecution of the war, and to that end request the District Court of this 
County to issue a subpoena accordingly. Carried. 

Mr. Townley, accompanied by Mr. Manahan, appeared and Mr. Townley, 
being sworn, was examined at length by Mr. Tighe and members of the Com- 
mission. A transcript of the testimony was ordered prepared. 

September 26, 1917. Moved by Mr. Ames: That the Secretary be di- 
rected to request of A. C. Townley transcripts of the speeches and reports in 
full covering the meetings recently held in Saint Paul under the auspices of 
the Non-Partisan League exclusive of closing session or LaFollette meeting, 
such transcripts to be accompanied by affidavit as to their completeness and the 
Commission authorizing any proper expenses incurred in compliances with 
this order. Carried. 

INVESTIGATION OF NON-PARTISAN LEAGUE 

"Whereas, numerous complaints have been made against an organization 
known as *The Non-Partisan League' alleging that said organization is dis- 
loyal and guilty of disseminating sedition and disloyal propaganda: 

163 



Resolved, That the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety, under the 
powers conferred on it by Chapter 261, Laws, Minnesota, 1917, does hereby 
appoint and constitute C. W. Ames its agent, for the purpose of investigating 
and examining into the organization popularly known as the Non-Partisan 
League, of which A. C. Townley is the chief executive officer, and any branches 
of said organization, and any collateral organizations, including herein, among 
other things, an investigation as to the constitution of such organizations, their 
method of operation, their financial methods, their purposes, their various 
activities, and the effect thereof, and to this end said agent may require any 
person before him for examination, may examine any such person under oath 
as to any information within his knowledge, and require him to produce for 
inspection any writings or documents under his control, using for that purpose 
any and all instrumentalities and proceedings specified in said act, or otherwise 
permitted by law. The said agent so appointed shall proceed with all diligence 
to make said investigation, and shall report to the Commission the proceedings 
had, and his conclusions and recommendations, that the Commission may there- 
upon take such action in the premises as it may be advised is in the public in- 
terest." 

Stated meeting October 2, 1917. 

Resolved: That for the purpose of investigating in the public interest 
the organization known as the National Non-Partisan League and the several 
officers and employers thereof, Charles W. Ames is hereby designated and ap- 
pointed the agent of the Commission with authority to have and exercise all 
the rights and powers specified in Chapter 261, Laws of 1917, Paragraph 3, 
Subdivision 4 and the Commission's by-laws. 

That he forthwith proceed with such investigation and examination and 
have authority to employ in connection therewith such stenographers as may be 
necessary, and that he with all convenient speed report to the Commission 
his findings and recommendations for this Commission's action in the premises. 

That the secretary deliver to Mr. Ames a certified copy of this resolution 
as evidence of his appointment as such agent." 

Stated meeting December 11th, 1917. 



PROTECTION OF LIFE AND PROPERTY 

May 23, 1917. Resolved that it is the sense of this Commission that the 
forests of Minnesota be and hereby are declared to be of a character which 
requires protection and that the industrial relations of the state as to the timber 
demands of the present war are such as to require the most rapid extinction 
of the existing fires and the preventing of others; and that this Commission do 
employ such persons and assign to them such duties and labors as may be 
recommended to it by the State Forester. 

That the State Forester be hereby made the agent of this Commission for 
the piurpose of employing such persons as may be necessary for the above in- 
dicated purpose, to an aggregate expense of not to exceed $6,000. 

May 29, 1917. Mr. Lind submitted a report of an agent on the Iron 
Range w'ho had been inquiring into labor conditions and also a report as to 
conditions on the Cuyuna Range. Reports were received. 

164 



July 17, 1917. Mr. Lind described certain conditions on the Cuyuna 
Range and outlined information as to I. W. W. activities. Counsel was in- 
structed to go to Washington to take up with the Department of Justice certain 
matters therein contained. 

August 1, 1917. Mr. Lind reported upon conditions in Michigan and other 
mining districts. 

August 1, 1917. Telegrams were presented by the chairman from Counse^ 
as to his mission in Washington. 

HOME GUARD 

May 29, 1917. Mr. Lind moved to take from the table and adopt the 
following resolution: 

*'It is the sense of the Commission, that members of the Home Guard are 
liable to the general duties and obligations of members of the National Guard. 

It is not the purpose, however, to call on the Home Guards for any duty 
that can be as well performed by civilian officers or private watchmen. 

Wherever in certain strategic locations it may be necessary in time of war 
to have the presence of organized military forces, the Commander-in-Chief 
may require guard duty limited in amount and so adjusted as to cause the min- 
imimi hardship to members." 

The resolution was imanimously adopted. 

December 11, 1917. Moved by Commissioner March, seconded by Com- 
missioner Smith that the Home Guards throughout the state be equipped with 
sheepUned overcoats, the cost of each garment not to exceed twelve dollars, 
and not to exceed twenty- two hundred in number. Motion carried. 

February 19, 1918. Adjutant General Rhinow appeared and recommended 
that the members of the Minneapolis Battalion of the Home Guard of the State 
of Minnesota be allowed remunerative subsistence for the period they were 
engaged in active service during the recent street car strike in the Twin Cities. 

Moved by Commissioner Smith, seconded by Commissioner March that 
said subsistence in the amount of one dollar per day be allowed. Motion carried, 

LIMITING THE ORGANIZATION OF NEW BANKS AND UNNECESSARY 
PUBLIC ENTERPRISES 

January 30, 1918. The following statement was, on motion of Com- 
missioner Weiss, seconded by Commissioner March, adopted and ordered spread 
on the minutes: 

"Communications have been received from several sources asking that the 
Commission take some action in reference: 

(1) To the organization of new banks during the continuance of the war. 

(2) To the prosecution of public enterprises calling for heavy taxation 
and the incurring of public debt during the continuance of the war. 

The opinion of the Superintendent of Banks is that in general the nimiber 
of existing banks is great enough to take care of the present business require- 
ments of the state, that the organization of new banks in communities already 
adequately supplied tends to waste and to tie up rather than to liquefy capital 
and to weaken established institutions at the very time when financial strength 
is most desirable. The law gives the Superindent very extensive powers in this 
field. A new state bank cannot be started without a certificate from the Super- 

165 



in tendent, and he is not required to issue a certificate unless satisfied that the 
bank has been organized under such conditions as to merit and have public 
confidence. In time of peace the main test by which to measure an appHcant's 
title to public confidence has been its pecuniary soundness. But the Com- 
mission sees no reason why under the statute other tests should not be applied, 
and it recommends that the Superintendent give public notice that he will not 
at this time approve the organization of new banks except in places and under 
circumstances where there is a reasonable demand for additional banking facil- 
ities, that he require evidence of these facts from applicants, and that where 
in individual cases he feels the guidance of the Commission should be invoked, 
he apply to it for instructions. 

As to the second matter, to-wit: The prosecution of public enterprises 
calling for heavy taxation and the incurring of public debt during the contin- 
uance of the war, the extraordinary demands of the national government both 
in the way of taxation aind bond issues, requires that local demands in these di- 
rections should be minimized. The high cost of commodities and labor operates 
necessarily to check private activities in construction work except such as re- 
lates to the war, but the same considerations will not in all cases be efficient 
to the same and where public funds are the source of expenditure. 

The Commission is of the opinion: 

(a) That municipal bonds may, of course, be properly issued for funding 
purposes where there are not on hand moneys to otherwise take care of maturing 
obligations. 

(b) That where contracts have already been let for public improvements, 
and their postponement would result in loss, they may be made, and if necessary, 
may be paid for out of the proceeds of bond issues. 

(c) That new enterprises should not be inaugurated except such as are 
calculated within a reasonable time to add to the domain of arable lands in the 
state, or to facilitate the production or transportation of commodities. Other 
enterprises, the primary purpose of which is to increase the comforts, conven- 
ience or pleasure of life in the several commimities should not be undertaken, 
and the power of taxation should not be used nor the money markets be called 
on to supply funds for such objects. 

The Commission makes no order in the premises at this time because it 
feels that there will be a general acquiescence in the views it thus advances, 
but it recommends that when any new public enterprises calling for expenditures 
are contemplated by the several municipalities of the state, the Commission's 
approval be secured before final action is taken." 

' June 4, 1918. On motion of Commissioner McGee, seconded by Com- 
missioner Cashman, the following resolution was adopted: 

"Resolved, That the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety is of the 
opinion that during the continuance of the war new draining enterprises designed 
to improve wild and unoccupied lands should be arrested, but tl at in ca?e5 
of occupied or cultivated lands, the construction of tile drains with the 
necessary outlets is in some instances of the utmost importance for the pro- 
tection of crops and the utilization of valuable tracts, and that the Capital 
Issues Committee can, with propriety, modify its general ruling and substitute 
therefor a ruling to the effect that no drainage enterprises be undertaken with- 
out a preliminary presentation of the facts and express approval of the Com- 
mitte after inquiry into the need and merits of the proposed work. 

That a copy of this resolution be sent to the Committee." 

166 



"In the matter of the proposed new bank at Scandia, further representa- 
tions were made to the Commission that the primary purpose of the bank's 
organization was to punish the existing bank for its activity in patriotic move- 
ments. The Commission was of the opinion that if this is true, the bank would 
not be organized for legitimate purposes, and under such conditions as to merit 
and have public confidence as prescribed by G. S. 1913, Section 6336, but in- 
asmuch as the Commission l4cks the facilities for the satisfactory investigation 
of the facts, it was voted that the Superintendent of Banks be advised to deny 
the application for a charter to the end that if the promoters of the enterprise 
should decide so to do, they might institute proper proceedings in which the. 
truth of the charges made could be legally adjudicated." 

Stated meeting June 27th, 1918. 

CROP SAVING MEASURE 

July 9, 1918. Moved by Commissioner Cashman, seconded by Com- 
missioner Weiss that the following telegram be sent: 

St. Paul, Minn., July 9, 1918. 
Honorable W. B. Wilson, 
Secretary of Labor, 
Washington, D. C. 

The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety understands that Federal 
Labor Bureau in Minnesota is shipping Minnesota labor out of state and offer- 
ing railroad fare and extraordinary wage inducements. 

This Commission emphatically protests against such policy. It is vitally 
necessary that all labor power be kept within this agricultural state now for 
use in gathering the greatest grain crop ever produced in Minnesota. Unusual 
efforts will be necessary to carry out this task and no policy of government 
labor agencies should interfere with local labor agencies in providing farm labor 
that is so vitally essential at this time. 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 
C. H. March, Vice Chairman, 
H. W.*LiBBY, Secretary. 
Motion carried. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

FEDERAL REGISTRATION OF ALIENS PROPOSED 

February 26, 1918. Moved by Commissioner McGee, seconded by Com- 
missioner Weiss, that the following resolution be adopted: 

* 'Resolved, That the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety request 
the Department of Justice of the Federal Government to cause a registration 
of ALL aliens resident in the United States, and that the Governor of the State 
of Minnesota be requested to forward to the Department of Justice such request." 



SPECIAL AGENT APPOINTED 

"Resolved: That the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety, under 
the powers conferred on it by Chapter 261, Laws Minnesota, 1917, and more 

167 



particularly by Section 3, Subdivision 4 of said act, does hereby appoint Jos. J. 
Moriarty of Shakopee, Minnesota, agent of the Commission (hereinafter called 
the "agent") until further action by it for the following purposes and with the 
following powers: 

On being advised at any time that any person resident of Scott County, 
Minnesota, has been guilty of conduct or utterances contravening the provisions of 
Chapter 463, Laws, Minnesota, 1917, or any other statutes of said State of 
similar import, the agent shall submit to the Commission's Secretary a brief 
statement of the facts alleged and the name and address of the person charged 
with the offense, and on the approval by the Secretary of his so doing, shall 
proceed with an investigation in reference thereto. For the purpose of any 
such investigation the agent may require any person to appear before him for 
examination at any convenient place in said County, may adjourn hearings 
from time to time and from place to place in said County, may administer oaths, 
may examine any person appearing before him under oath as to any information 
within his knowledge pertinent to said investigation, and require him to produce 
for inspection any writings or documents under his control, pertinent to said 
investigation, using for all and any such purposes any and all instrumentalities 
and proceedings specified in said Chapter 261, or otherwise permitted by law. 
At the conclusion of any such investigation the agent shall report to the Com- 
mission the proceedings had, and his conclusions and recommendations that the 
Commission may thereupon take such action in the premises as it may be ad- 
vised is in the public interest. The agent shall incur no obligations and make 
no expenditures which shall be chargeable against the Commission or its fund, 
and shall receive no compensation for any services performed hereunder." 

AdjotUTied meeting February 27th, 1918. 



DEATH OF COMMISSIONER SMITH 

"The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety has this day been advised 
of the death of L3nidon A. Smith, Attorney General of the State, and member 
of the Commission. 

The Commission was organized in April 1917, and has held many meetings 
since that time. General Smith, by virtue of his position as Attorney General, 
was an ex officio member of many State boards, administering affairs of a wide 
variety and much importance. Notwithstanding the demands on his time 
made by his work as the State's chief law officer and as a member of these boards, 
he regularly attended the Commission's sessions, remaining till their end, and 
participating actively in all their proceedings. This is an evidence of his con- 
scientious devotion to whatever duties he undertook. He did not delegate 
them to others, as he might have, but gave them his personal attention. The 
Commission's problems have been extremely novel from the legal standpoint, 
and have involved prompt decision and action about many complicated matters 
of great public concern. The history of American law discloses no body with 
functions similar to those which the Commission discharges. General Smith 
contributed in the fullest measure to its work. He had profound learning, 
patriotism, patience, courtesy, sanity of mind, and sympathy with the average 
man — all of which were qualities of the utmost value for what the Commission 
had to do. He was a high type of educated American. He reaped the highest 
rewards of his profession, and earned the respect and affection of the people 
of the State by unselfishly applying his abilities to their service. 

168 



The Commission directs that this expression of its appreciation be spread 
on its records, that a copy be sent to his widow and daughter, and that the 
Commission attend the funeral services as a body." 

Stated meeting March $th, 1918. 



ALIEN REGISTRATION 

"Be It Resolved: That the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety, 
pursuant to the provisions of Paragraph 4, Section 3, Chapter 261, Session 
Laws, 1917, hereby designates and appoints J. A. O. Preus, Fred H. Hester 
and J. F. Gould, and each of them, (hereinafter called the "agent") as its agents 
for the following purpose and with the following powers: 

The agent may cause any person or persons, who he may be advised has 
knowledge as to any facts pertinent to the registration of alien residents of 
the State under Orders 23 and 25 of the Commission or to the public ends sought 
to be effectuated by said orders, to appear before him for examination at any 
convenient place to be fixed by the agent, may adjourn hearings from time to 
time and from place to place, may administer oaths, may examine any person 
appearing before him under oath, as to any information within his knowledge 
pertinent to said investigation, and may require him to produce for inspection 
any writings or documents under his control, bearing on the subject of said 
investigation and may use for all and any such purposes any and all instru- 
mentalities and proceedings specified in said Chapter 261 or otherwise permitted 
by law. At the conclusion of any such investigation the agent shall report 
to the Commission the proceedings had and his conclusions and recommenda- 
tions that the Commission may thereupon take such action in the premises as 
it may be advised is in the public interest." 

Stated meeting March 5th, 1918. 



PROVIDING FOR SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS 

"RESOLVED THAT THE MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC 
SAFETY, under the powers conferred on it by Chapter 261, Laws, Minnesota, 
1917, and more particularly by Section 3, Subdivision 4, of said act, does hereby 
appoint the County Director of each County (hereinafter called the "agent") 
the agent of the Commission within his County, until further action by it, for 
the following purposes and with the following powers: 

On being advised at any time that any person resident of the agent's county, 
has been guilty of conduct or utterances contravening the provisions of Chapter 
463, Laws, Minnesota, 1917, or any other statutes of said State of similar import, 
the agent shall submit to the Commission's Secretary a brief statement of the 
facts alleged and the name and address of the person charged with the offense, 
and on the approval by the Secretary of his doing, shall proceed with an investi- 
gation in reference thereto. For the piu^^ose of any such investigation the agent 
may require any person to appear before him for examination at any convenient 
place in said coimty, may adjourn hearings from time to time and from place to 
place in said Coimty, may administer oaths, may examine any person appearing 
before him under oath as to any information within his knowledge pertinent 
to said investigation, and require him to produce for inspection any writings 
or docimients under his control pertinent to said investigation, using for all 

169 



and any such purposes any and all instrumentalitites and proceedings specified 
in said Chapter 261, or otherwise permitted by law. At the conclusion of any 
such investigation the agent shall report to the Commission the proceedings 
had, and his conclusions and recommendations that the Commission may there- 
upon take such action in the premises as it may be advised is in the public in- 
terest. The agent shall incur no obligations and make no expenditures which 
shall be chargeable against the Commission or its fund, and shall receive no 
compensation for any services performed hereunder." 
Stated meeting March 5th, 1918. 



TIMBER ON STATE LANDS 

"Whereas: It has been called to the attention of the State Safety Com- 
mission that timber permits issued by the State and expiring June 1st, 1918, 
and to whom the statutory two extensions have been granted, have not been 
of full value to the holders of the permits, by reason of the fact that due to the 
war, a great many workers in the woods have left the service and, secondly, 
because the alien registration ruling by the Safety Commission, their Order 
No. 25, drove from the woods of Northern Minnesota more than 2,000 woodmen, 
and third, because the winter has been such as to make it extremely difficult 
on account of snow, as well as labor for the holders of the above mentioned 
permits to execute their contracts. 

Therefore, Be It Resolved: That the State Auditor be requested not 
to dispose of the timber which shall after June 1st, be situated upon the lands 
so under permit, either cut or standing, until the legislature by legislative action 
will give relief to holders of such permits, as in its wisdom and fairness it is 
deemed just and equable that such relief be given." 

Stated meeting May 7th, 1918. 



BUILDING CONSTRUCTION PERMITS 

"Resolved: That Mr. D. R. Cotton, Regional Advisor of the War In- 
dustries Board, is hereby appointed the Commission's agent in respect to the 
matters covered by Circular No. 21 of the War Industries Board, This ap- 
pointment to continue until terminated by further action of the Commission. 
•The agent shall report his doings from time to time to the Commission, and shall 
make no expenditures or incur no obligations chargeable to the Commission, 
or its fund, in excess of specified appropriations made in advance by the Com- 
mission." 

Stated meeting September 24th, 1918. 



UNITED STATES PUBLIC SAFETY RESERVE FOR MINNESOTA 

"Resolved: That Mr. D. R. Cotton of St. Paul be nominated Federal 
Director of the United States PubHc Safety Reserve for Minnesota, pursuant 
to the request of the Department of Labor at Washington, and that one thousand 
dollars be appropriated from the Commission's funds, to be expended under 
Mr. Cotton's direction for clerk hire, traveling expenses, telephone and tele- 
graph tolls, and stationery, in connection with the work of the Safety Reserve 
in the State of Minnesota, it being understood that Mr. Cotton will furnish 
office space and secure the help of competent volunteer assistants." 

Stated meeting October 2, 1917. 

170 



LOCAL EXPENSES 

May 23, 1917. 

Resolved, That it is the sense of the Commission that the local organization 
should provide for its own expense, but that if any county is unable to make 
such provision the Commission will at the end of the year, allow proper bills 
necessarily incurred by the director, not to exceed $100.00 in any county. 



APPOINTMENT OF SPECIAL COUNSEL 

June 12, 1917. Mr. Smith presented the following resolution: 
"Resolved, That the Minnesota Commission of PubHc Safety hereby 
requests and instructs its chairman to put its request in writing, that the Attor- 
ney General employ a special attorney for said Commission and that said attorney 
be authorized to employ such clerical help as he may need, the same to be paid 
reasonably upon the presentation to this Commission of his claim therefore, 
duly approved by the attorney employed as hereinbefore indicated, piurjuant 
to Section 105 of the General Statutes of 1913." 

Mr McGee moved the adoption of the resolution which was carried 
unanimously. 

June 26, 1917. Mr. Ames. "Resolved, That Mrs. T. G. Winter, Di- 
rector of the Women's Committee of Public Safety, be requested to call a 
convention of the District and Coimty Chairmen of the Committee to be held 
at St. Paul, July 10 and 11, with one session at the State Capitol, the traveling 
expenses of the delegates to be paid from the funds of the Commission." 

Seconded by Mr. Weiss, the resolution was adopted. 



CONVENTION OF SHERIFFS 

"Resolved, that a convention of the sheriflEs of the State b,e called to meet 
in St. Paul on August 15th, to consider the organization of special posses with 
automobile squads the enforcement of laws and other matters connected with 
public safety." Stated meeting August 1st, 1917. 



RELATING TO THE COORDINATION OF WAR ACTIVITIES 

"Whereas: It appears that there are many voluntary organizations 
and committees engaged in patriotic service throughout the state and. 

Whereas: In the opinion of the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety 
such organizations and committees can render the most effective service if 
properly coordinated; and 

Whereas: A Public Safety Association has been organized in each county 
to coordinate the war activities within the county and to cooperate with the 
Minnesota Commission of Public Safety; therefore 

Be It Resolved: That the Minnesota Commission of Public Safety 
strongly urges that wherever practicable, voluntary patriotic organizations 
and committees in this state work through and under the guidance of the Minne- 
sota Commission of Public Safety so that the said Commission of Public Safety 

171 



may be the central, coordinating agency for all voluntary patriotic work within 
the state directed toward assisting in the prosecution of the war." 
Stated meeting December 11th, 1917. 



HEALTH 

November 20, 1917. Doctor R. O. Beard and Doctor L. G. Rowntree 
appeared and stated that action had been taken by representatives of the State 
Board of Control, by the University of Minnesota, and by various public welfare 
and service organizations, looking to the promotion of the social hygiene of the 
state, to the better control of vice conditions and to the prevention, discovery, 
isolation and treatment of venereal diseases, concerted effort being made to bring 
these several forces into a single organization for the better attainment of these 
ends. Moved by Commissioner Lind, seconded by Commissioner Ames that 
the following recommendations by Dr. R. O. Beard and others interested be 
approved. Motion carried. 

1. That this proposed Body be endorsed by the Public Safety Commission 
and recommended to the Governor for his official sanction. 

2. That the Governor exercise his function in the appointment or approval 
of this Body. 

3. That the State Board of Health be requested to cooperate with this 
Body, to clothe such of its members or agents as it may select, and require the 
enforcement of such regulations for the control of venereal diseases in the state, 
through the agency of the medical bureau of this Body, as shall have the force 
of law. 

4. That the Public Safety Commission be asked, upon the presentation 
of a budget by this Body to consider the appropriation of such sums of money 
from the emergency fund, as it may deem desirable to devote to the control 
of venereal diseases through the educational preventive and ciu-ative measures 
proposed by this Commission or governed by the regulations provided by the 
State Board of Health. 

"Whereas, The State Board of Health on October 21, 1918, adopted 
the following regulation: 

'Whereas, It has been made to appear to the Minnesota State Board 
of Health after a full investigation and this Board finding that the public safety, 
health, and lives of the people of the state are seriously endangered by a com- 
municable disease known as "Influenza," and that unrestricted and unregulated 
meetings and gatherings of people at this time are calculated to add to the 
public danger, the following regulation be adopted, the same to take effect as 
provided by law: 

220. The holding of all public meetings and gatherings is prohibited 
except as authorized by written order of the State Board of Health or the Execu- 
tive Officer thereof, on application duly made. This regulation shall not apply 
to sessions of public or private schools or to church services, or to moving picture 
and other theatres. The regulation of these gatherings shall be under the con- 
trol and supervision of the local health authorities within the powers now con- 
ferred thereto by this Board or its Executive Officer. 

172 



This regulation shall continue in force until revoked by the Board.' 

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved by the Minnesota Commission of Public 
Safety that in view of the serious situation in this state, the people are hereby 
requested to at once obey and comply with said regulation to the end that the 
life, safety and health of our people may be protected and safeguarded to the 
greatest extent possible." 

Stated meeting October 22nd, 1918. 

January 29, 1918. Chas. L. Sommers, L. W. Feezer, Dr. L. G. Rowntree 
and Dr. H. G. Irvine representing the Minnesota Social Hygiene Commission 
appeared and requested the Commission to make an appropriation of fifty 
thousand one hundred and fifty dollars to cover a proposed budget and plan 
for one year of the Minnesota Social Hygiene Commission. 

Moved by Commissioner Smith, seconded by Commissioner March that 
the following resolution be adopted. 

"Whereas: The Commission is impressed with the importance of the 
general plan of work outlined by the Social Hygiene Committee, and thmks 
it will subserve the public welfare if it is undertaken, and 

Whereas: On the facts presented it is of the opinion that the project is 
one properly within the purview of the State Board of Health rather than of 
the Commission, and that the fimd for its prosecution should be provided out 
of a public health appropriation and not out of the appropriation for the Com- 
mission, and as it was made to appear that the health department has no moneys 
available for the pm'pose. 

Therefore, The Minnesota Commission Of Public safety recom- 
mends: That the plan submitted be referred to the State Board of Health with 
the request that it confer with the above named Committee, devise a plan which 
can be operated tmder the Board of Health's supervision and at a minimum 
expenditure until the next legislative session and present this plan to the Board, 
provided for by Section 115 of the General Statutes with application to it for 
the required funds and that when so presented this Commission recommend 
that the Board make provision imder said Section for sufficient funds to carry 
on said work as herein recommended." 

MINNESOTA COMMISSION OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 
J. A. A. Burnquist, 
Governor and Ex-officio Chairman. 
Attest: 

H. W. LlBBY, 

Secretary. 



173 



COUNTY DIRECTORS 



COUNTY 


DIRECTOR 


ADDRESS 


Anoka 


John Palmer 


Anoka 


Aitkin 


F. M. Shook 

W. F. Knox, Resigned 


Aitkin 


Becker 


Lou Benshoff 


Detroit 


Beltrami 


• Chas. S. Carter 


Bemidji 


No. Beltrami 


John R. Norris 


Williams 


Benton 


OHver Chirhart 

Ed. Indrehus, Resigned 


Sauk Rapids 


Big Stone 


M. S. Stevens 


Grace ville 


Blue Earth 


Samuel B. Wilson 


Mankato 


Brown 


Judge I. M. Olsen 
H. C. Hess, Resigned 


New Ulm 


Carlton 


Fred D. Vibert 


Cloquet 


Carver 


H. F. Lueders 


Norwood 




Chester T. Fenton, Resigned 


Cass 


P. H. McGarry 


Walker 


Chippewa 


S. G. EHason 


Montevideo 


Chisago 


Victor L. Johnson 


Center City 


Clay 


H. E. Roberts 


Moorhead 


Clearwater 


L. Jensen 


Clearbrook 


Cook 


Charles Johnson 


Grand Marais 


Cottonwood 


D. U. Weld 


Windom 


Crow Wing 


R. R. Wise 


Brainerd 


Dakota 


Dr. W. M. Dodge 

R. A. Pollock, Resigned 


Farmington 


Dodge 


John L. Curtis 


Mantorville 


Douglas 


Tollef Jacobson 


Alexandria 


Faribault 


0. D. Ackerman 


Wells 


Fillmore 


M. V. Facey 


Preston 




A. W. Thompson, Resigned 


Freeborn 


Albert Myer 


Albert Lea 


Goodhue 


W. H. Putnam 


Red Wing 


Grant 


E.J. Scofield 
, J. S. Jacobson, Resigned 


Elbow Lake 


Hennepin 


Fred B. Snyder 


Minneapolis 


Houston 


L. L. Duxbiuy 

Alfred Johnson, Resigned 


Caledonia 


Hubbard 


M. J. Woo'ley 


Park Rapids 


Isanti 


Geo. C. Starr 


Cambridge 


Itasca 


E. C. Kiley 


Grand Rapids 


Jackson 


Robert Muir 


Jackson 


Kanabec 


C. F. SerHne 


Mora 


Kandiyohi 


Russel Spicer 

W. A. Rice, Resigned 


Willmar 


Kittson 


G. Goodman 

J. D. Henry, Resigned 


Hallock 


Koochiching 


John Brown 


International Falls 


Lac qui Parle 


John Dale 


Dawson 



174 



COUNTY 


DIRECTOR 


ADDRESS 


Lake 


John Dwan 


Two Harbors 


Le Sueur 


Thos. H. Smullen 


Le Sueur 


Lincoln 


George Graff 


Ivanhoe 


Lyon 


James Hall 


Marshall 


McLeod 


H. H. Bonniwell 


Hutchinson 


Mahnomen 


A. L. Thompson 


Mahnomen 


Marshall 


A. N. Eckstrom 


Warren 


Martin 


Clifford Jones 


Fairmont 


Meeker 


N. I. Peterson 


Litchfield 


Mille Lacs 


I. G. Stanley 


Princeton 


Morrison 


Don M. Cameron 


Little Falls 


Mower 


W. A. Nolan 


Grand Meadow 


Murray- 


Burt I. Weld 


Slayton 


Nicollet 


N. H. Olson 


St. Peter 


Nobles 


W. E. OHver 


Worthington 


Norman 


E. J. Herringer 


Ada 


Olmsted 


J. A. Melone 

A. C. Gooding, Resigned 


Rochester 


Ottertail 


Henry G. Dahl 


Fergus Falls 


Pennington 


C. A. Pitkin 


Thief River Falls 


Pine 


W. J. McAdam 

F. R. Duxbury, Resigned 


Pine City 


Pipestone 


John Gray 


Pipestone 


Polk 


A. D. Stephens 


Crookston 


Pope 


John R. Serrin 


Glenwood 


Ramsey- 


D. R. Cotton 


St. Paul 


Red Lake 


. Dr. N. M. Watson 


Red Lake Falls 


Redwood 


A. D. Stewart 


Redwood 


Renville 


T. O'Connor 


Renville 


Rice 


Richard B. Kent 


Faribault 


Rock 


C. H. Christopherson 


Luveme 


Roseau 


M. J. Hegland 


Roseau 


St. Louis 


W. I. Prince 


Duluth 


Scott 


Theodore Weiland 


Shakopee 


Sherburne 


Andrew Davis 


Elk River 


Sibley 


John W. Boock 


Gibbon 


Steams 


Chas. F. Ladner 


St. Cloud 


Steele 


Fred H. Joesting 


Owatonna 




Thos. E. Cashma,n, Resigned 


Stevens 


R. M. Adams 


Morris 


Swift 


Frank C. Thornton 


Benson 


Todd 


^ A. D. Day 


Long Prairie 


Traverse 


Chas. E. Houston 


Wheaton 


Wabasha 


David C. McKenzie 


Lake City 


Wadena 


John H. Mark 


Wadena 


Waseca 


R. P. Ward 


Waseca 


Washington 


Col. R. A. Wilkinson 


Stillwater 


Watonwan 


0. C. Peterson 


St. James 


Wilkin 


F. L. Pierce 


Breckenridge 




J. B. Buscher, Resigned 




Winona 


H. E. Blair 


Winona 


Wright 


John Kelly 


Waverly 


Yellow Medicine 


H. P. Bengtson 

175 


Granite Falls 



COUNTY ORGANIZATIONS 



AITKIN COUNTY 

Name Address 

B. R. Hassman Acting Director Aitkin 

T. R. Foley, Jr. Secretary Aitkin 

Nicholai Wladimiroff Vice-Chairman Aitkin, R. 1 

W. T. Mount Treasurer Aitkin 



Advisory Council 

Chairman and Clerk of each Township Board 

Township Chairmen 
Clerk of each Township Board. 





Labor Committee 




Name 


Address Name 


Address 


B. R. Hassman 


Aitkin J. 0. Wemtz 


Palisade 


W. T. Mount 


Aitkin A. E. Poison 


Shovel Lake 


J. B. Galameault 


Aitkin 0. H. Ligaard 


Lawler 


R. L. Abrahamson 


Hill City E. E. Ellis 


McGrash 


J. P. Brenner 


Tamarack A. G. Reiter 


McGregor 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Thos. Brusegard 


Hill City 


E. 0. Reiter 


McGrath 


Gustav Berglund 


Pa,lisade 


Martin Newstrom 


Aitkin 


C. W. Brown 


Lawler 


C. W. McDonald 


Tamarack 



War Finance Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Thos. Brusegaard 


HiU City 


Carleton W. Brown 


Lawler 


A. G. Reiter 


McGregor 


Frank Hense 


Aitkin 


A. L. Hamilton 


Aitkin 


C. H. Holmgren 


Aitkin 


W. F. Knox 









176 



ANOKA COUNTY 



Name 




Address 


John Palmer 


County Director 


Anoka 


Theo. A. E. Nelson 


Secretary- 


Anoka 


Roe Chase 


First Vice-President 


Anoka 


Frank King 


2nd Vice-President 


Anoka 


Geo. W. Green 


Treasurer 


Anoka 



Executive Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Dr. S. Bond 


Anoka 


G. W. Wyatt 


Bethel 


W. W. Blanchard 


Anoka 


Adolph Tillong 


Anoka 


J. T. Dunn 


Anoka 


Charles Whipple 


Elk River 


P. J. Nelson 


Anoka 


J. H. Peloquin 


Hugo 


N. P. Moberg 


Anoka 


Ivan Anderson 


Forest Lake 


F. H. Koos 


Anoka 


J. B. Ryberg 


Fridley 


J. P. Coleman 


Anoka 


Frank Patchen 


Constance 


J. B. Jasperson 


Anoka 


Oscar Halberg 


Constance 


C. S. Hosmer 


Anoka 


Frank King 


Stacy 


W. C. Smith 


Bethel 


Bert Sims 


Cedar 


D. Cardinal 


Hugo 


F. W. Wameke 


Dayton 


F. H. Morton 


Columbia Heights 


W. H. Robinson 


St. Francis 


S. Laird 


Anoka 


P. Lyon 


Fridley 



Township Organization 



Thos. Coleman 




Fridley 


A. Tillong 


Fridley 


C. A. Nelson 




Fridley 


Martin Laska 


New Brighton 


E. Christenson 




Fridley 


Frank Patchen 


Constance 


C. M. Locke 




Fridley 


0. Schleshart 


Constance 


J. B. Ryberg 




Fridley 


B. 0. Walter 


Constance 


S. A. Carlisle 




Wyoming 


P. P. Kelsey 


Anoka 


T. A. Grant 




Wyoming 


M. E. Dunn 


Anoka 


C. A. CarHsle 




Wyoming 


S. Laird 


Anoka 


E. P. Holden 




Stacy 


C. M, Barney 


Anoka 


J. B. Meister 




Anoka 










Labor Committee 




Name 




Name 




L. 0. 


Jacobson, Chairman 


All township directors 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Add] 


A. D. W. Johnson 








Chairman 


Anoka 


Geo. W. Wyatt 


Bethel 


Robt. Leathers 


St. Francis 


Johnson Bros. 


Cedar 



177 



Finance Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


N. P. Moberg 


Anoka 


Dr. S. Bond 


Anoka 


J. P. Coleman 


Anoka 







Publicity Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


T. G. J. Pease 


Anoka 


T. J. Abbett 


Anoka 


W. A. Blanchard 


Anoka 







178 



Name 
L. Benshoof 
Chas. H. Kelson 
C. T. Ebeltoft 
F. J. Ruth 



BECKER COUNTY 

Director 
Vice-President 
Secretary- 
Treasurer 

Advisory Council 



Address 
Detroit 
Lake Park 
Detroit 
Callaway 



Name 
L. Benshoof 
Chas. H. Kelson 
C. T. Ebeltoft 
F. J. Ruth 
L. O. Larson 
H. A. Londeen 
L. W. Oberhauser 
Wm. Gallagher 
A. K. Torgerson 
J. W. Nunn 
R. C. Madsen 
Geo. Eidenschink 
Fred Kratschmar 
Frank Frye 
Nels Yilitila 
Ole A. Gire 
Fred Meskimen 



Address 
Detroit 
Lake Park 
Detroit 
Callaway 
Ulen 
Audubon 
Frazee 
Callaway 
Lake Park 
Ponsford 
Detroit, R. F. D. 
Detroit, R. F. D. 
Frazee, R.F.D. 
Sprucedell 
Menahga, R. F. D. 
Audubon, R. F. D. 
Destroit, Star Route 



Name 
Carl Heuters 
E. E. Bumham 
J. M. Brendal 
S. G. Griffin 
Chas. Robinson 
L. G. Zum 
Thos. Doherty 
Gaston Jacobs 
Ambrose Gaylord 
S. G. Davis 
George Brager 
Severt Severtson 
Henry Herlitz 
Peter Engebretson 
Theo. H. BeauHeu 
Chas. Kinnunen 



Address 
Rochert 
Detroit, R.F.D. 
Lake Park 
Detroit, R.F.D. 
Osage 
Callaway 
Detroit, R.F.D. 
Menahga 
Arago 
Ogema 
Brager 
Snellman 
Arago 
Flom 

White Earth 
Frazee, R. 4 



Name 
L. O. Larson 
H. A. Londeen 
L. W. Oberhauser 
Wm. Gallagher 
Ed. McDonnell 
A. K. Torgerson 
J. W. Nunn 
R. C. Madsen 
Geo. Eidenschink 
Fred Kratschmar 
Frank Frye 
Nels Yilitala 
Ole A. Gire 
Fred Meskimen 
E. E. Bumham 
J. M. Brendal 
S. G. Griffin 
Chas. Robinson 
L. G. Zum 
Thos. Doherty 
Gaston Jacobs 
Ambrose Gaylord 
Mike Warters 



Township Organization 

Township 
Atlanta 

Audubon and Village 
Burlington 
Callaway 
Cormorant 
Cuba 

Carsonville 
Detroit 
Erie 

Evergreen 
Grand Park 
•Green Valley 
Hamden 
Height of Land 
Lake Eunice 
Lake Park 
Lake View 
Osage 
Riceville 
Richwood 
Runeberg 
Savannah 
Silver Leaf 



Address 
Ulen 
Audubon 
Frazee 
Callaway 
Audubon, R. F. D. 
Lake Park 
Ponsford 
Detroit 

Detroit, R. F. D. 
Frazee, R. F. D. 
Sprucedell 
Menahga 

Audubon, R. F. D. 
Detroit, Star Route 
Detroit, R. 3 
Lake Park 
Detroit, R. F. D. 
Osage 
Callaway 
Detroit, R. 2 
Menahga 
Arago 
Frazee, R. F. D. 



179 



Name 


Township 


Address 


S. G. Davis 


Spring Creek 


Ogema 


George Brager 


Shell Lake 


Brager 


Severt Severtson 


Toad Lake 


Snellman 


Henry Herlitz 


Two Inlets 


Arago 


Peter Engebretson 


Walworth 


Flom 


Theo. H. Beaulieu 


White Earth 


White Earth 


Chas. Kinnunen 


Wolf Lake 


Frazee, R. 4 



Detroit Greater Crops Association 
Executive Board 
Geo. D. Hamilton J. K. West H. S. Erickson J. B. Hagen 

M. E. Walz Chas. E. Morse Dr. L. C. Weeks 

Officers 
J. B. Hagen, President Dr. L. C. Weeks, Vice-President E. Morse, Sec.-Treas. 

Westbixry Farmers* Club 

Officers 

C. E. Hanson, President R. L. Greenlaw, Vice-President 

Mrs. V. R. Rasmusson, Secretary Miss Nellie Gandrud, Treasiirer 

Ogema Welfare and Safety League 
Executive Board 
S. G. Davis Fred Baker B. Tiken B. P. Rasmussen 

J. C. Gray H. Vorderbruggen M. J. Suchomel 

Officers 
S. G. Davis, President Fred Baker, Secretary-Treasurer 

Lake Park War Committee 
Executive Board 
J. M. Brendal Nels Jahren W. J. Norby Chas. H. Kelson 

C. E. Bjorge Dr. O. K. Winberg Dr. J. A. Anderson 

Officers 
J. M. Brendal, President Nels Jahren, Secretary-Treasurer 

Frazee Crop and Public Safety Association 
Executive Board 
L. W. Oberhauser C. Kittelson P. O. Field F. A. Stillings 

E. B. Bothe Max Jess D. L. Diu-kin 

Officers 
L. W. Oberhauser, President C. Kittelson, Secretary-Treasurer 

Callaway Welfare League 
Executive Board 
William Gallagher F. J. Ruth Albert Lonson D. E. Brown 

Annie Jenkins J. T. Shannon Albert Londeen 

Officers 
Wm. Gallagher, President F. J. Ruth, Vice-President Albert Lonsen, Sec.-Treas. 

180 



Osage Fanners* Club 

Officers 

Jas. Robinson, President F. F. Seigford, Secretary Levi Stevens, Treasurer 

Ponsford Welfare League 
Executive Board 
Clarence Lemon Bryce Stevens Peter Johnson M. E. Stephens 

U. S. G. Henry Guy Smith J. A. Nygren 

Audubon 

Officers 

H. A. Londeen, President O. A. Netland, Secretary-Treasurer 

Floyd Lake Farmers* Club 

Officers 

Thos. Doherty, President A. E. Jones, Secretary -Treasurer 





Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


H. A. Nelson 


Detroit 


Frank Murphy 


Callaway 


Geo. D. Hamilton 


Detroit 


A. E. Wyvell 


Ogema 


J. B. Hagen 


Detroit 


I. 0. Orstad 


Audubon 


C. E. Morse 


Detroit 


J. W. Nunn 


Ponsford 


Peter 0. Field 


Frazee 


Theo. H. Beaulieu 


White Earth 


Chas. H. Kelson 


Lake Park 








Marketing Committee 




H. D. Blanding 


Detroit 


W. H. Constans 


Callaway 


John Nelson 


Lake Park 


Fred M. Hibbard 


Ogema 


J. H. Baldwin 


Frazee 


Chas. L. Johnson 


Westbury 


I. 0. Orstad 


Audubon 







181 



BELTRAMI COUNTY 



Name 




Address 


Chas. S. Carter, 


Director 


Bemidji 


E. H. Winter, Vice-President 


Bemidji 


J. R. Norris, 2nd Vice-President 


Williams 


Frank Smith, 3rd Vice-President 


Solway 


E. H. Denu, Secretary 


Bemidji 


Geo. Rhea, Treasurer 


Bemidji 


Township Chairmen 


Name 


Township 


Address 


M. W. Knox 


Alaska 


Nebish 


Alfred Moen 


Bemidji 


Nebish 


V. M. Owen 


Blackduck 


Hines 


Chas. Hayden 


Blackduck Vil. 


Blackduck 


Simon Torgerson 


Boone 


Baudette 


C. W. Clark 


Durand 


Puposky 


E. W. Hall 


Eckles 


Wilton 


Thos. Slind 


Eugene 


Roosevelt 


F. M. Pendergast 


Bemidji 


Grant Valley 


C. J. Wild 


Hagali 


Tenstrike 


P. J. Millbach 


Jones 


Wilton 


R. N. Holt 


Kelliher 


Kelliher 


L. J. Kramer 


Kelliher Vil. 


Kelliher - 


Geo. W. Secrest 


Lammers 


Solway 


Carl Boe 


Langor 


Blackduck 


A. P. Blom 


Liberty 


Wilton, R. No. 1 


F. Gardner 


Maple Ridge 


Puposky 


Martin Olson 


Myhre 


Roosevelt 


F. B. Cook 


Nebish 


Nebish 


W. A. Worth 


Northern 


Turtle River 


J. C. Riebe 


O'Brien 


Nebish 


Phihp Medley 


Port Hope 


Tenstrike 


Adolph Sorenson 


Prosper 


Dutchie 


Aug. Stromberg 


Quiring 


Quiring 


C. R. Nelson 


Solway Vil. 


Solway 


Christ Lauvik 


Sugar Bush 


Louis 


Wm. Fellows 


Tenstrike Vil. 


Tenstrike 


P. H. Mintey 


Turtle River 


Lavinia 


W. A. Protsman 


Washkish 


Washkish 


C. F. Rogers 


Wilton Vil. 


Wilton 


Geo. H. Newton 


Funkley Vil. 


Funkley 


H. A. Brown 


Turtle River Vil 


. Turtle River 


J. R. Norris 


WiUiams Village 


Williams 


W. F. Dickens 


Red Lake Vil. 


Red Lake 


Geo. W. Butler 


Redby Village 


Redby 



18S 



NORTH BELTRAMI COUNTY 




Name 




Address 


John R. Norris, President 


Wilhams 


Geo. Erickson, Vice-President 


Spooner 


Thos. J. Clauson, Secretary 


Baudette 


Morris Willet, Treasurer 


Baudette 


Advisory CouncU 




Name 


Township 


Address 


A. J. Hilden 


Spooner 


Baudette 


E. J. Tucker 


Wabanica 


Pitt 


A. Chilgren 


McDougald 


Williams 


Martin Olson 


Myre 


Roosevelt 


Richard Olson 


Chilgren 


Roosevelt 


B. A. Arenson 


Lakewood 


Ameson 


Adolph Sorenson 


Prosper 


Dutchie 


Vic Jacobs 


Zipple 


Zipple 


Wm. Zipple 


Wheeler 


Hackett 


Pat Mohan 


Eugene 


Williams 


Ole Clementson 


Gurid 


Clementson 


J. M. Perkins 


Rapid River 


Baudette 


Ray Brown 


Baudette 


Baudette 


Frank Peterson 


Walhalla 


Pitt 


Geo. Bancroft 


Patoma 


Williams 


R. J. Flynn 


Meadowland 


Pitt 


Arthur Tanem 


Swiftwater 


Carp 


C. R. Middleton 


Baudette 


Baudette 


Gus Erickson 


Spooner 


Spooner 


Pat Woods 


McDougal 


Graceton 


Loylan A. Wilson 


159-33 


WilUams 


Edward L. Smith 


Pioneer 


Carp 


T. W. Stanley 


Boone 


Baudette 


Arthur A. Cooley 


Norris 


Roosevelt 


John Pratt 


Williams 


Williams 


Adolph Sorenson 


Prosper (Substitute) 


Dutchie 


Robert Dawson 


N. W. Angle 


Warroad 


Floyd F. Burchett 


N. W. Angle 


Warroad • 


Gust Pahn 


158-30 


Baudette 



Labor Committee 
Name Address 

Vic Jacobs Zipple 

C. R. Middleton Baudette 

Gust Erickson . Spooner 

Executive Committee 

John R. Norris, President Williams 

Thos. J. Clauson, Secretary Baudette 

Morris Willet, Treasurer Baudette 

Marketing Committee 

Jas. Clark Williams 

A. J. Hildon Baudette 

Geo. Bancroft Williams 



18S 



BENTON COUNTY 



Name 




Address 


Oliver Chirhart, Acting Director 




Sauk Rapids 


O.C.] 


Lance, Secretary 




Foley 


Dr. G. 


A. Holdrige, Treasurer 




Foley 




Advisory Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Frank Zulowski 


Gilman, P. 0. 


Al. Loidolt 


Sauk Rapids, R.FD. 


Martin Herman 


Gilman, P. 0. 


C. H. Waldeen 


Rice, R. F. D. 


N. Skogan 


Ronneby, R. F. D. 


0. S. Ellis 


Rice, R. F. D. 


Chas. Hall 


Oak Park 


0. Chirhart 


Sauk Rapids 


A. P. Carlson 


Foley, R. F. D. 


Geo. E. Rice 


Foley 


Nic Herbrand 


Foley, R. F. D. 


Ivan Greener 


Ronneby 


Ed. Brennan 


Sauk Rapids, R.F.D. 


G. C. Magnuson St. Cloud 


Wm. Barthelemy 


Sauk Rapids, R.F.D. 


S. E. Meagher 


St. Cloud 


E. W. Mayman 


Sauk Rapids, R.F.D. 






J. D. L. Oilman 


Sauk Rapids, R.F.D. 








Marketing Committee 




Geo. E. Rice 


Foley 


A. F. Koep 


Sauk Rapids,R.F.D. 


J. H. Coates 


Sauk Rapids 


* Jessie L. Gifford St.Cloud,R.F.D.,R6 


Scott Thomas 


Rice 


John L. Foster 


Foley, R. F. D. 


Christ Mueller 


Rice, R. F. D. 


T. D. Maxson 


Oak Park 


Severon Aker 


Rice, R. F. D. 


Mr. Larson 


Princeton, R. F. D. 


H.H. Koep 


Sauk Rapids, R.F.D. 







♦Deceased. 



184 



BIG STONE COUNTY 



Name 
M. S. Stevens, Director 

E. C. Baird, Secretary 
J. H. Erickson 

O. J. Loftus, Vice-President 

F. L. Collins, Vice-President 
J. D. Ross, Vice-President 

H. H. De Wall, Vice-President 
Wm. Rize, Jr., Vice-President 
F. L. Cliff, Vice-President 
Phil H. Thomas, Vice-President 



Address 
Graceville 
Graceville 
Clinton 
Beardsley 
Barry 
Clinton 
Correll 
Johnson 
Ortonville 
Odessa 



Advisory CouncU 



Name 
A. J. Loftus 
James Fitzharris 
John McNamara 
Jake Luchsinger 
J. N. Welander 
Ole I. Steen 
Oscar Gustafson 



Address 
Beardsley 
Barry 
Graceville 
Johnson 
Clinton 
Ortonville 
Ortonville 



Name 
J. A. Smith 
Chas. Lindquist 
Peter Storm 
C. D. Fifield 
Lars B. Dobak 
L. Wolfmeyar 



Address 
Ortonville 
Ortonville 
Ortonville 
Ortonville 
Correll 
Odessa 



Township 
Akron 

Almond 

Artichoke 

Big Stone 



Township Organization 

Names 



Cliff Baker 

Nels Nelson P. W. Daly Abel Steen 

H. A. Christopherson Egan Anderson 

B. H. Smith Harry Hippie J. M. Hegge 

J. H. Sullivan Cliff Mitchell 



Address 
Correll 
L. Martenson C. G. Johnson 

Clinton 



Graceville 

John McNamara 
Browns 

Chas. Flynn C. A. Wright H. M. O'Neill 
Moonshire 

Jake Lucksinger 
Prior A. G. Knudson 

(Double Township) 



Correll 
Ortonville 
Graceville 
Beardsley 



Johnson 
Fred Wolf Wm. Rixe, Jr. 

Oscar Gustofson 



Malta 

Ortonville 

Otrey 

Odessa 

Toqua 



C.W.Green Ole Steen 



T. G. Anderson 
Arch Williams 



C. D. Fifield N. E. Wilkins Frank Coggswell 
George Gardner Frank Sweland Oscar Olson 

Phil H. Thomas 
Jas. Fitzharris Wm. Nash F. L. Collins 

185 



Clinton 

Clinton 

Ortonville 

Ortonville 

Odessa 

Barry 





Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


M. S. Stevens 


Graeeville 


F. L. Cliff 


Ortonville 


0. J. Lofthus 


Beardsley 


Phil H. Thomas 


Odessa 


F. L. Collins 


Barry 


John C. Littleton 


Graeeville 


J. D. Ross 


Clinton 


b. N. Evans 


Johnson 


H. H. DeWall 


Correll 


John Gowan 


Ortonville 


Wm. Rixe, Jr. 


Johnson 








Marketing 


Committee 




J. D. Ross 


Clinton 


C. N. Evans 


Johnson 


F. L. Cliff 


Ortonville 


H. W. DeWall 


Correll 


0. J. Lofthus 


Beardsley 


Philip H. Thomas 


Odessa 


F. L. Collins 


Barry 


H. J. Vollmer 


Graeeville 


E. A. Smith 


Beardsley 


Samuel Chapman 


Ortonville 



186 



BLUE EARTH COUNTY 




Name 




Address 


S. B. Wilson, County Director 


Mankato 


A. E. Quimby, Secretary 


Mankato 


P. W. Pitcher, Treasurer 


Mankato 


Township Organization 




Name 


Township 


Address 


A. H. Spaulding 


Mankato 


Mankato, R. 4 


John Casper 


Madison Lake 


Madison Lake 


0. V. Karlburg 


Mapleton 


Mapleton 


C. E. Whitney 


Mapleton 


Mapleton, R. 3 


Fred C. Oftdahl 


Medo 


Pemberton 


Louis W. Hintze 


McPherson 


Smith Mill, R. 1 


E. M. Tabott 


Pleasant Mound 


Amboy, R. 3 


Wm. A. Just 


Rapidan 


Rapidan 


H. F. Day 


Shelley 


Amboy 


Moses Roberts 


South Bend 


Mankato, R. 1 


Wm. Mead 


Sterling 


Mapleton, R. 4 


Henry Thielman 


St. Clair 


St. Clair 


L. C. Rew 


Vernon Center Village Vernon Center 


Fred C. Wilber 


Vernon Center 


Vernon Center, R. 2 


Precinct Committee 




Hubert Kinney 


Amboy 


Amboy 


James Will 


Beauford 


Mapleton, R. 1 


Jens Johnson 


Butternut Valley 


Lake Crystal, R. 5 


Ben D. Hughes 


Cambria 


New Ulm, R. 5 


Tom Rooney 


Ceresco 


Madelia, R. 5 


Harry Ogle 


Danville 


Minnesota Lake, R. 1 


C. H. Johnson 


Decoria 


Mankato, R. 1 


John D. Cummins 


Eagle Lake 


Eagle Lake 


M. F. Crane 


Eagle Lake 


Garden City 


F. H. Griffith 


Good Thunder 


Good Thunder 


Mike Farrell 


Jamsestown 


Madison Lake, R. 1 


Henry Nelson 


Judson 


Lake Crystal, R. 2 


David E. Johnson 


LeRay 


Madison Lake 


Mathias Nostdahl 


Lincoln 


Madelia, R. 2 


W. Adams 


Lime 


Mankato, R. 3 


Hiram E. Hanson 


Lyra 


Mapleton, R. 1 


Oliver Olson 


1st Ward 


Mankato 


E. V. Watters 


2nd Ward 


Mankato 


Gus Widen 


3rd Ward 


Mankato 


Lorin Gray 


4th Ward 


Mankato 


Al Quimby 


5th Ward 


Mankato 


L. J. Carney 


6th Ward 


Mankato 



Labor Committee 

Thos. H. Foley, Chairman. All county commissioners. 

Marketing Committee 

Name Address Name Address 

E. F. Searing Mankato P. R. Hammer Pemberton 

John J. Hughes Lake Crystal Frank Nelson Rapidan 

187 



Name 
John M. Chapman 
Henry Kraus 
C. W. Chamberlain 
Pat Lyons 
John L. Cummins 



Address 
Garden City 
Vernon Center 
Amboy 
Madison Lake 
Eagle Lake 



Name 

Geo. Barnard 
B. F. McGregor 
J. P. KJramer 
Wm. Roberts 
M. J. Ryan 



Address 
Good Thunder 
Mapleton 
Minnesota Lake 
Judson 
Smiths' Mill 



Finance Committee 



Name 


Address 


W. D. Willard 


Mankato 


T. J. McGovern 


Mankato 


Chris Steiner 


Mankato 


S. B. Wilson 


Mankato 



Name Address 

H. A. Patterson Mankato 

John H. Hohman Mankato 

E. F. Searing Mankato 



18£ 



BROWN COUNTY 

Name Address 

I. M. Olsen, Director ^ New Ulm 

F. W. Johnson, 1st Vice-President New Ulm 

Dr. J. R. HoUister, 2nd Vice-President Sleepy Eye 

Aug. Erickson, 3rd Vice-President Springfield 

Rev. A. Norman, 4th Vice-President Hanska 

H. D. Reed, 5th Vice-President Comfrey 

J. P. Ed Bertrand, 6th Vice-President Cobden 

Emil Rasmussen, 7th Vice-President Sleepy Eye 

R. B. Kennedy, Secretary New Ulm 



Vice Chairmen 



Name 
F. W. Johnson 
Dr. J. R. HoUister 
Aug. Erickson 
Rev. A. Norman 



Address 
New Ulm 
Sleepy Eye 
Springfield 
Hanska * 



Name 
J. P. Ed Bertrand 
H. D. Reed 
Emil Rasmussen 



Address 
Cobden , j 
Comfrey • 
Sleepy Eye 



Township Organization 



Fred Behnke 


New Ulm 


Jos. Corey 


Sleepy Eye 


J. W. B. Wellcome 


Sleepy Eye 


A. 0, Amundsen 


Hanska 


Fred Bott 


Springfield 




Sleeov Eve 


Mart. B. Erickson 


Hanska 


T. Thormodson 


Hanska 


Mart Windschitl 


Comfrey 


Louis Spelbrink 


New Ulm 


S. C. Frederickson 


Cobden 


Fred Prahl 


Comfrey 


Wall. Hogemann 


Evan 


Peter J. Isackson 


Springfield 


John S. Aspelund 


Hanska 


H. E. Zelhier 


Sleepy Eye 


Fred Mielke 


Springfield 


Anton HiUesheim 


NewUhn 


Peter Newdall 


Springfield 


J. A. HiUesheim 


Sleepy Eye 


J. A. HiUesheim 


Springfield 


Jos. N. Schafer 


New Ulm 


Emil Hammermeister Morgan 








Labor Committee 




F. W. Johnson 


New Ulm 


Rev. A. Norman 


Hanska 


Dr. J. R. HoUister 


Sleepy Eye 


H. D. Reed 


Comfrey 


Aug. Erickson 


Springfield 


J. P. Ed. Bertrand 


Cobden 






Emil Rasmussen 


Sleepy Eye 



Marketing Committee 



Chas. Stuebe 
Chas. Cutting 
J. O. Wood 



New Ulm 
Sleepy Eye 
Comfrey 



Theo. Fred Torgrimson 



Hanska 



189 







CARLTON 


COUNTY 






Name 


Address 




Fred D. Vibert, Director 


Cloquet 






E. S. Davis, Secretary 


Cloquet 








Executive Committee 






H. M. Dixon, Mayor 


Cloquet 






E. S. 


Davis, Secretary Y. 


M. C. A. Cloquet 






Dr. F. W. Raiter 


Cloquet 






Mrs. 


Peter Oleson 


Cloquet 








Districts 




Name 




Address 


Name 


Address 


Dr. Walters 




Moose Lake 


Andrew Frisk 


Cah-ton,R.F.D, 


John H. Mattson 


Kettle River 


Omer Herbert 


Wrenshell 


Ray Barstow 




Cromwell 


W. J. Darby 


Wrenshall 


Ed. Barstow 




Wright 


Oscar Isaacson 


Sawyer 


Martin Christianson 


Bamum 


Alex Esko 


Cloquet, R.F.D, 


Jos. P. Pfeifer 




Iverson 


0. W, Erickson 


Cloquet 


A. C. Willcuts 




Holyoke 


Carl D. Ohman 


Cloquet 


J. A. Gillespie 




Carlton 


John Mattinen 


Cloquet 


C. L. Dixon 




Cloquet 


Mrs. Peter Oleson 


Cloquet 


John Christenson 


Atkinson 










Labor Committee 




Name 




Address 


Name 


Address 


Dr. Walters 




Moose Lake 


Omer Herbert 


Wrenshall 


Martin Christianson 


Bamum 


F. R. Walter 


Mahtowa 


J. A. Gillespi 




Carlton 


Fred D. Vibert 


Cloquet 






Marketing Committee 




Dr. Walters 




Moose Lake 


John Christenson 


Atkinson 


Martin Christianson 


Bamum 


Andrew Frisk 


Carlton, R.F.D. 


Jos. P. Pfeifer 




Iverson 


Omer Herbert 
W. J. Darley 


Wrenshall 
Wrenshall 


A. C. Willcutte 




Holyoke 


Oscar Isaacson 


Sawyer 


J. A. Gillespie 




Carlton 


Alex Esko 


Cloquet,R.F.D. 


Guy Smith 




Carlton 


C. L. Dixon 


Cloquet 


F. R. Walter 




Mahtowa 


0. W. Erickson 
Carl D. Ohman 


Cloquet 
Cloquet 






Coal Committee 




C. D. Ohman 




Cloquet 


Ole Swanson 


Moose Lake 


John Wright 




Cromwell 







190 



CARVER COUNTY 



Name 




Address 


H. F 


. Lueders, Director 


Norwood 


E. F. 


Kelm 




Chanhassen 


Name 


Address 




Name 


Address 


John Boegeman 


Chaska, R. F. 


D. 


A. F. Truwe 


Young America 


A. M. Geske 


Chaska, R. F. 


D. 


Wm. Noll 


Norwood 


E. F. Kelm 


Chanhassen 




H. F. Lueders 


Norwood 


Theo. Quast, Jr. 


Cologne, R. F 


.D. 


H. F. Droege 


Hamburg 


P. A. Mohrbacher 


Cologne 




J. B. Johnson 


Young America 


Peter Kleven 


Carver, R. F. 


D. 


F. F. Block 


Mayer 


R. 0. Funk 


Carver 




Ray G. Olson 




C. A. Riel 


Waconia 




Selby Peterson 


Waconia, R. F. D. 


C. C. Teas 


Watertown 




C. F. Anderson 


Carver, R. F. D. 


Frank Kuntz 


Mayer 




Ehner Fink 


Victoria 


C. H. Gibson 


Chaska 














Name 


Addrees 




Name 


Address 


E. F. Kelm 


Chanhassen 




Wm. Noll 


Norwood 


R. 0. Funk 


Carver 




B. Johnson 


Yoimg America 


P. A. Mohrbacher 


Cologne 




Walter Lundstrom 


New Germany 


Selby Peterson 


Waconia 




Frank Kuntz 


Mayer, R. F. D. 


C. A. Riel 


Waconia 









Marketing Committee 



R. 0. Funk 


Carver 


J. B. Johnson 


Young America 


E. F. Kelm 


Chanhassen 


H. F. Lueders 


Norwood 


Ehner Fink 


Victoria 


H. F. Droege 


Hamburg 


C. A. Riel 


Waconia 


H. D. Mielke 


New Germany 


0. E. WoH 


Augusta 


F. F. Block 


Mayer 


P. A. Mohrbacher 


Cologne 


Frank Barth 


Watertown 






Dana Dutoit 


Chaska 



Ml 



CASS COUNTY 



Name 
P. H. McGarry, Director 
R. F. Ross, Secretary 



Address 

Walker 

Walker 



Executive Committee 



Odin Naustvold, Treasurer 
Mack Kennedy, Committee 
C. D. Bacon, Committee 
Ed. Rogers, Committee 



Walker 
Walker 
Walker 
Walker 



Township Organization 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Geo. Ramsey 


Sylvan 


John A. McFarling 


Backus 


C. E. Clemans 


Remer 


Sam Flanigan 


Oshawa 


A. E. Famum 


Walker 


John A. Sanju 


Bay River 


Ed. Countryman 


Boy River 


Geo. Robinson 


Hackensack 


Al Hansen 


Cyphers 


G. W. Schulz 


Pequot 


Geo. Blnhm 


Snowball 


Ben Clarke 


Longville 


L. R. Ban- 


Remer 


Tom Welsh 


Leech Lake 


Jim Ross 


Cohasset 


Ole Halvorson 


Remer 


Chas. Bunnell 


Jenkins 


Mads C. Anderson 


Pequot 


Frank Kinkel 


Wabedo 


John Schmit 


Pillager 


Chas. Berggren 


Hackinsack 


John Hylen 


Pequot 


Frank Anderson 


Boy River 


August Erickson 


Leader P. 0. 


J. La Page 


Raboin 


John Gilmore 


Grant P. 0. 


A. P. Chenevert 


Outing 


L. Dougherty 


Backus 


J. E. White 


Pine River 


J. P. WilHver 


Mildred 


E. A. Cole 


Pillager 


H. H. Martin 


Cass T/ake 


Carlton M. Hough 


Brainerd 


Al. Schaffman 


Longville 


Mat Barnes 


Ball Club 


T. H. Lauer 


Longville 


Thos. Gallagher 


Ansel P. 0. 


J. M. Ives 


Backus 


J. W. Bickford 


Staples 


Cal. Wetherell 


Poplar 


Alfonzo Olds 


Swatara 


P. N. Kruckaw 


Pontoria 


N. W. Sawyer 


Hackensack 


Gust Holstrum 


Remer 


Mark Foote 


Boy River 


D. H. Slater 


Tobique 


L. J. Thorsett 


Ellis P. 0. 


J. H. Casner 


Shovel Lake 


G. A. Kappenberg 


Pine River 







Marketing Committee 



Name 
Z. E. House 

President 
Ed. Miskella 

Secretary 



Addretss 
Cass Lake 
Cass Lake 



Name 
Ed. Boyce 
Al. E. Nolan 
P. M. Larson 



Address 
Cass Lake 
Cass Lake 
Cass Lake 



IM 



CHIPPEWA COUNTY 



Name 
S. G. Eliason, Director 



Address 
Montevideo 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


E. Thomas 


Montevideo 


A. G. Dahl 


Watson 


W. F. Benson 


Wegdahl 


H. L. Shand 


Maynard 


Henry Marquard 


Clara City 


L. 0. Christenson 


Milan 



Finance Committee 



C. J. Thompson, Vice-Chairman 
J. J. Bohlander, Chairman 
Chas. H. Budd 
S. G. Eliason 



Fred S. McCarger 

J. J. Stennes 

Andrew Rubertus, Secretary 

J. W. Peterson 



193 



CHISAGO COUNTY 



Name 
Victor L. Johnson, Director 



Address 
Center City 



Name 0^^ 
Victor L. Johnson 
Julius E. Vanstrom 
M. W. Tuttle 



Executive Committee 



Address 
Center City 
Chisago City 
Lindstrom 



Name 
J. A. Rystrom 
A. R. Hammargren 



Address 
North Branch 
Harris 



Township Organizatioii 



Hjeknar Anderson 
Herman Berg 
John N. Melin 
Guy Deming 
G. J. Stolberg 
Theo. Thompson 
F. G. Magnuson 
W. Abrahamson 



Rush City 
Rush City 
Harris 
Simrise 
Harris 

North Branch 
North Branch 
Center City 



Frank Sherman 
John A. Johnson 
Jas. A. Tuvey 
C. E. Swenson 
L. J. Andrews 
V. A. Leedhohn 
Ray Seavey 
J. E. Vanstrom 



Stacy 

Center City 
Taylors Falls 
Chisago City 
Lindstrom 
Center City 
Taylors Palls 
Chisago City 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


G. M. Ericson 


Rush City 


Alfred Bloom 


Chisago City 


A. 0. Stark 


Harris 


C. A. Victor 


Lindstrom 


Sen. J. A. Rystrom 


North Branch 


C. G. Bums 


Center City 


A. J. Levander 


Stacy 


C. L. Linstrom 


Shafer 


A. Richner 


Wyoming 


W. P. Hobart 


Taylors Falls 



194 



CLAY COUNTY 




Name 


Address 


H. E. Roberts, Director 


Moorhead 


D. W. Meeker, Secretary 


Moorhead 


Chas. S. Marden, Chairman 


Moorhead 


C. R. Peterson, Treasurer 


Ulen 



Executive Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Tom Gunness 


Bamesville 


R. L. Scott 


Bomp 


A. H. Costain 


Moorhead 


H. P. Hendrickson 


Ulen 


T. B. C. Evans 


Hawley 








District Chairmen 




Chris. Rehder 


Sabin 


Michael Dauner 


Hawley 


C. A. Sieber 


Bamesville 


Alfred Olsonj 


Moorhead 


M. A.Giere 


Hawley 


John I. Smith 


Rustad 


Carl J. KJiutson 


Hawley 


A. T. Berkkerus 


Gl)nidon 


D. A. Lamb 


Bamesville 


P. J. Landin 


Moorhead 


John Schmidt 


Sabin 


Nels N. Melvey 


Moorhead 


Peter Sanders 


Felton 


Martin Olson 


Felton . 


G. 0. Osmundson 


Averill 


0. M. Steen 


Moorhead 


H. P. Skorstad 


Georgetown 


E. 0. Peterson 


Hawley 


E. D. Grant 


Moorhead 


F. J. Raleigh 


Glyndon 


Nils Hammer 


Hitterdal 


Lewis Quam 


Glyndon 


Edw. A. Trennes 


Ulen 


H. T. Wamre 


Hawley 


Chas. Gibbons 


Hawley 


B. P. Solum 


Rollag 


C. J. Cederberg 


Hawley 


L. A. Opsahl 


Ulen 


David Askegaard 


Comstock 


Geo. H. Levitre 


Borup 


F. E. Kieselbach 


Bamesville 


J. M. Manning 


Dilworth 


N. B. Hanson 


Bamesville 


J. H. Northup 


Georgetown 


L. F. Possehl 


Felton 


Knud Wefald 


Hawley 


W. S. North 


Glyndon 


J. T. Johnson 


Ulen 




Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


J. M. Witherow 




H. J. Harris 


Moorhead 


Chairman 


Moorhead 


A. M. Dammen 


Moorhead 



J. H. Northrop 
C. B. Brodine 



Marketing Committee 



Georgetown 
Felton 



R. B. Webb 
T. B. C. Evans 



19S 



Glyndon 
Hawley 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


C. R. Peterson 


Ulen 


F. A. Wyatt 


Sabin 


John Olness 


Kragnes 


Samuel Holland 


Comstock 


M. J. Solum 


Hitterdal 


H. C. Possehl 


Baker 


F. 0. Olson 


Moorhead 


Alf . Haagenson 


Barnes ville 



Clay County War Board 

Moorhead, Minn. 

Leslie Welter, V. Pt. America First Association. 

Prof. J. A. Aasgaard, Chairman, Red Cross. 

Prof. F. A. Weld, Chairman, Y. M. C. A. 

R. B. Webb, Chairman, County Commissioners. 

A. H. Costain, Chairman, Liberty Loan Committee. 

S. O. Tang, County Supt. of Schools. 

H. E. Roberts, County Director. 

Wm. Russell, Chairman War Certificate and Thrift Stamp Committee. 



196 



CLEARWATER COUNTY 



Name 
L. Jensen, Director 



Address 
Clearbrook 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


L. Jensen 


Clearbrook 


Alfred Nelson 


Clearbrook 


Aug. Westerlund 


Clearbrook 


Harden Anderson 


Clearbrook 


0. G. Lee 


Bagley 


C. H. Hovland 


Leonard 


♦James Nelson 


Bagley 


T. E. Rider 


Shevlin 


A. H. Holland 


Gonvick 


G. E. Burfield 


Shevlin 


Martin Quern 


Gonvick 


E. H. Reff 


Bagley 



♦Deceased 



197 



COOK COUNTY 

Name Address 

Chas. J. Johnson, Director Grand Marais 

Dr. F. B. Hicks, Vice-President Grand Marais 

Rev. Wm. Ripon, Secretary Grand Marais 

Jas. G. Scott, Treasurer Grand Marais 



Chairmen 



Name 

Wm. C. Smith 
M. H. Greggs 
T. F. Thomas 
John Marshal 
H. O. Engekow 



Address 
Schroeder 
Tofte 
Lutsen 

Grand Marais 
Tofte 



Name 
L. H. Lien 
Wm. Clinch 
W. J. Bray 
M. D. Archiqette 



Address 
Grand Marais 
Grand Marais 
Hovland 
Hovland 



198 



COTTONWOOD COUNTY 



Name 
D. U. Weld, Director 
Al. T. Anderson, Secretary 
W. J. Clark, Treasurer 



Address 
Windom 
Windom 
Windom 



Executive Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


D. U. Weld 


Windom 


AL T. Anderson 


Wimdon 


W. J. Qark 


Windom 







Township Chairmen 



Name 


Township 


Address 


C. H. Anderson 


Ann 


Revere 


Geo. W. Potter 


Amboy 


Jefifers 


A. 0. Stark 


Amo 


Storden 


Peter Klaassen 


Carson 


Mountain Lake 


John F. Gustafson 


Dale 


Windom 


F. D. Dewey 


Delton 


Comfrey 


A. G. Mereness 


Great Bend 


Windom 


Wm. Juhnke 


Germantown 


Sanborn 


Ellas Warner 


Highwater 


Lamfberton 


A. F. Manee 


Lakeside 


Bingham Lake 


Abr. Teichroew 


Midway 


Moimtain Lake 


J.H.WaU 


Moimtain Lake 


Mountain Lake 


Geo. Eichner 


Rose Hill 


Westbrook 


Emil Altermatt 


Selma 


Comfrey 


Lloyd St. John 


Springfield 


Heron T/ake 


Milo E. Smith 


Southbrook 


Heron Lake 


Hans M. Johnson 


Storden 


Lamberton 


E. Engbretson 


Westbrook 


Westbrook 


Labor Committee 




Gustav Muller 




Windom 


Ralph F. Grim 




Windom 



Market Town Chairmen 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


A. L. Holt 


Bingham Lake 


C. H. Ruhberg 


Storden 


C. E. Perkins 


Jeffers 


John E. Villa 


Westbrook 


H. P. Goertz, Sr. 


Mountain Lake 


C. Beier 


Delft 



199 



Marketing Committee 



Name 
M. S. Porter 
W. J. McGladry 
H. P, Goertz, Sr. 
C. Beier 



Address 
Windom 
Bingham Lake 
Motmtain Lake 
Delft 



Name 
C. E. Perkins 
C. H. Ruhberg 
John E. Villa 



Address 
Jeflfers 
Storden 
Westbrook 



Advisory Council 



Name 

E. H. Klock 
A. W. Annes 
O. J. Finstad 
Wilson Borst 
Paul S. Redding 
A. F. Strunk 
Dr. F. R. Weiser 



Name 

Frank Stedman 
Jens Anderson 
H. E. Hanson 
John J. Rupp 
Dr. H. C. Beise 
A. D. Nelson 
C. W. Gillam 
J. T. Johnson 



Name 

M. L. Fisch 
J. E. Foss 
G. F. Warren 
L. C. Churchill 
T. A. Perkins 
O. G. Peterson 
A. A. Quevli 



Food Administration 
Dr. L. Sogge 



CROW WING COUNTY 





Name 




Address 




R. R. Wise, Director 




Brainerd 




S. A. Adair, Vice-President 


Brainerd 




G. P. O'Brien, Treasurer 


Brainerd 




Fred T. Lincoln, Secretary 


Brainerd 




R. R. Gould, Assistant Secretary 


Brainerd 




Executive Cominittee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


W. H. Gemmel Brainerd 


R. A. Beise Brainerd 


*N. H. Ingersoll Brainerd 


R. M. Sheets Brainerd 


Edward Crust 


Brainerd 


E. A. Colquohoun Brainerd 


H. I. Cohen 


Brainerd 


Mrs. Henry Theviot Brainerd 


J. A. Thabes 


Brainerd 


Miss Anne Mahlum Brainerd 


A. J. Halsted 


Brainerd 


Mrs. J. A. Thabes Brainerd 


W. C. Cobb 


Brainerd 


A. G. Trommald Brainerd 


Elof Nelson 


Brainerd 


D. D. Shrader Brainerd 




Township Organization 






Name 


Township 


Address 




W. H. Jenkins 


Allen 


Cross Lake 




Nels A. Nelson 


Allen 


Cross Lake 




Neils Gaarden 


AUen 


Cross Lake 




L. P. Hall 


Bay T,ake 


Deerwood, R. 1 




H. E. Workman 


Bay Lake 


Deerwood, R. 1 




Chas. Barrett 


Baxter 


Brainerd 




A. R. Cass, Sr. 


Baxter 


Brainerd 




Geo. Spies 


Baxter 


Brainerd 




Fred J. Winquist 


Deerwood 


Deerwood, R.l, Box 12 




Peter E. Nelson 


Deerwood 


Deerwood, R.l, Box 13 




Chas. C. Osterlund 


Village of Deerwood Deerwood 




C. C. Adams 


Village of Deerwood Deerwood 




W. H. Andrews 


Emily 


Outing 




John M. Lambert 


Emily 


Emily 




C. M. Taylor 


Emily 


Outing 




P. Kealy 


Cuyuna 


Cuyuna 




Frank Buchanan 


Cuyima 


Cuyima 




J. R. Britton 


Daggett Brook 


Brainerd 




Walter Caughey 


Daggett Brook 


Brainerd 




M. F. Shannon 


Daggett Brook 


Fort Ripley 




Robt. Terry 


Dean Lake 


Aitkin 




Homer M. Wells 


Dean Lake 


Aitkin 




John Franz 


Dean Lake 


Aitkin 




W. J. Snlh'van 


Garrison 


Garrison 




Tom Dykeman 


Garrison 


Dykeman 




E. M. Prindell 


Deerwood 


Deerwood 




B. McGiffin 


Deerwood 


Deerwood 




Fred Lester 


Hubert 


Hubert R. 5 




C. B. Whitney 


Jenkins 


Jenkins 




John Oberg 


Deerwood 


Deerwood 



"Deceased 



201 



Name 

J. N. Harrison 
A. L. Bratt 
J. J. Tucker 
F. J. Meyers 
John Driver 
Wm. LaBoard 
Fred Dayton 
Ed. Syverson 
H. P. Armstrong 
D. B. McAlpine 
N. R. Bowman 
L. O. Johnson 
Freeman Thorpe 
H. M. Hoff 
C. P. Moore 
Carl Wheeler 
H. G. Hughey 
H. P. Madsen 
Peter Peterson 
Frank Mickelson 
George E. Hughes 
W. A. Kuro 
Frank Bryant 
Fred H. Bock 
J. H. Dickinson 

C. H. Kyloo 
Wm. McCall 
R. E. PhiUips 

Nels G. Olson 

Peter Peterson 

Bert Sabin 

A. T. Kimball 

Harvey Drake 

Geo. McCulloch 

Geo. Keough 

Dick SagH 

M. D. Gorton 

Henry Grand 

W. S. McConnell 

Martin Halvorsen 

Sol Marquis 

A. J. Nelson 

Joseph Prushek 

Robt. Wood 

Judge A. R. Holman 

F. G. Schrader 

Perry Gustafson 

Wm. J. Keeler 

Mose Simpson 

S. S. Rood 

Henry Fellerman 



TOWNSHIP 

Garrison 
Fort Ripley 
Fort Ripley 
Fort Ripley 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Fairfield 
Ironton 
Ironton 
Ironton 
Ideal 
Ideal 

Lake Edward 
Lake Edward 
Lake Edward 
Long Lake 
Long Lake 
Long Lake 
Little Pine 
Little Pine 
Little Pine 
Jenkins 
Jenkins 
Nokay Lake 

Nokay Lake 

Nokay Lake 

Maple Grove 

Maple Grove 
Maple Grove 

Manganese 

Mission 

(Watertown) Mission 

Mission 

Oak Lawn 

Oak Lawn 

Oak Lawn 

Platte Lake 

Platte Lake 

Platte Lake 

Pellican 

Pellican 

Pellican 

Perry Lake 

Perry Lake 

Pequot 

Pequot 

Ross Lake 

Ross Lake 

Ross Lake 

Rabbit Lake 

Rabbit Lake 



Address 

Flak 

Fort Ripley 

Fort Ripley 

Fort Ripley 

Cross Lake 

Cross Lake 

Cross Lake 

Ironton 

Ironton 

Ironton 

Jenkins 

Pequot 

Hubert 

Merrifield 

Merrifield 

Brainerd, R. 1 

Brainerd, R. 3 

Brainerd, R. 3 

Little Pine 

Little Pine 

Little Pine 

Jenkins 

Jenkins 

Brainerd 

Brainerd, R. 2 

Brainerd, R. 3 

Brainerd, R. 3 

Dykeman 

Brainerd, R. 3 

Manganese 

Mission 

Pequot 

Mission 

Brainerd, R. 3 

Brainerd, R. 3 

Brainerd, R. 2 

Brainerd, R. 3 

Dykeman 

Dykeman 

Pequot 

Nisswa 

Pequot 

Cuyuna 

Mission 

Pequot 

Pequot 

Aitkin 

Aitkin 

Aitkin 

Aitkin, R. 3 

Aitkin, R. 3 



202 



Name 

W. H. Gear 
C. H. Ballow 
John Dewing 
James Ingram 
Eugene Dana 
Grover C. Dixon 
P. D. Flansburg 
F. J. Reid 
Henry Longevin 
Wm. Murray 
W. B. Bill 
Melvin Bailey 
Harry Gould 
Neal McKay 
Oscar Peterson 
Benj. Fordyce 
Claud Michel 
R. Wolford 
Joseph Sorg 
Wm. A. Syreen 
Albert Jacobson 
John Peterson 

E. C. Peabody 
H. L. Steams 
Levi Bailey 
Nels Johnson 
R. J. Wetherbee 
W. Koof 

Herman Lefkowitz 
W. S. Pitt 

Jim Sorenson 

F. C. Peabody 



TOWNSHIP 
Rabbit Lake 
Roosevelt 
Roosevelt 
Sibley 
Sibley 
Sibley 

St. Matthias 
St. Matthias 
St. Matthias 
Smiley 
Smiley 
Watertown 
Watertown 
Watertown 
Timothy 
Timothy 
Timothy 
Wolford 
Wolford 
Klondike 
Klondike 
1st Asst. District 
1st. Asst. District 
1st. Asst. District 
Crow Wing 
Crow Wing 
Crow Wing 
Village of Crosby 
Village of Crosby 
Village of Crosby 
Kennedy 
Lietner 



Address 
Aitkin, R. 3 
Dykeman 
Garrison 
Pequot 
Pequot 
Pequot 
Fort Ripley 
Fort Ripley 
Fort Ripley 
Nisswa 
Nisswa 
Cross Lake 
Cross Lake 
Cross Lake 
Swanberg 
Pine River 
Swanberg 
Wolford 
Wolford 
Crosby 
Ironton 
Brainerd 
Brainerd, Box 27 
Brainerd, Box 27 
Crow Wing 
Brainerd 
Crow Wing 
Crosby 
Crosby 
Crosby 
Merrifield 
Merrifield 



Labor Committee 

Name Address Name Address 

F. T. Lincoln Capt. G. A. Anderson Crosby 

Chairman Brainerd R. R. Gould Brainerd 



Marketing Committee 



R. R. Wise 


Brainerd 


E. E. Taylor 


Brainerd 


F. T. Lincoln 


Brainerd 


R. R. Gould 


Brainerd 



Food Administrator 



Name 
R. R. Wise 



Address 
Brainerd 



208 



DAKOTA COUNTY 



Name 
Dr. W. M. Dodge, Director 



Address 
Farmington 



Executive Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


C. J. Zehander 


So. St. Paul 


P. J. Brummel 


Hastings 


James Slater 


Mendota 


A. L. Sayers 


Lakeville 


Chas. Kohls 


Rosemount 


Geo. Hoffman 


Farmington 


Tom Scott 


Rosemount 


H. L. Stevens 


Farmington 


Sam Wallace 


Rich Valley 


J. F. WiUe 


Randolph 


E. H. Chamberlain 


Hastings 


Edward Peter 


Randolph 


Nic Conzemius 


Hastings 


Theo. Kimmes 


Hampton 


I. E. Day 


Hastings 


M. C. Larson 


Northfield 


F. A. Thomas 


Farmington 


A. F. Howland 


Northfield 


Frank Wetterlin 


Farmington 


L. H. Himter 


Randolph 


F. N. Fox 


Hampton 








Labor Committee 


' 


Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


F. A. Ruhn 


Rosemount 


John Heinen 


Hastings 


W. A. Samels 


Lakeville 


A. Muellerleile 


Hampton 



James Ahem 
Fred Groves 
Geo. W. Becker 
Edward Peter 



Marketing Committee 



Hastings 
Farmington 
Hampton 
Randolph 



N. M. Jacobson 
O. M. Christenson 
Albert Hughes 
Oscar Shumway 



Northfield 
Lakeville 
Stanton 
Castle Rock 



DODGE COUNTY 



Name 

J. L. Curtis, Director 

D. A. Hinckley, Secretary 



Address 
Mantorville 
Claremont 



Executive Committee 



Name 
Fred Solle 
Ole Saderahlen 
J. E. Thomdsen 
W. E. Schuck 
L. E. Tucker 
F. Longeigan 
Alfred Tvedt 
Gus Tully 
J. L. Curtis 
J. H. Bell 
John Aitken 
Andrew Anderson 
Henry Yahn 
Ed. Eastman 
W. F. Rosenthal 
F. H. Holstenson 
Ed. O'Conner 
Alfred Yentch 
J. F. Madsen 
Carl Eckman 



Address 

Hayfield 

Kasson 
Kasson 
Kasson 
Mantorville 
Mantorville 
Mantorville 
Dodge Center 
Dodge Center 
West Concord 
Kasson 
Dodge Center 
Hayfield 
Hayfield 
West Concord 
West Concord 
West Concord 
Hayfield 



Name 
Fred Kruger 
Albert Johnston 
K. E. Strandemo 
Albert Johnson 
J. H. Halvorson 
Thos. Tollefson 
P. L. Davis 
C. D. Bell 
Fred Zeller 
F. M. Yenne 

F. H. Noehl 

J. M. T. Cooper 
W. P. Mann 

G. A. Gray 

C. B. Von Ruden 
M. D. Williams 
F. L. Wilson 
P. H. Bielengerg 
H. A. Parker 



Address 
Hayfield 
Hayfield 
Hayfield 
Hayfield 
West Concord 
West Concord 
West Concord 
West Concord 
West Concord 
West Concord 
West Concord 
Mantorville 
Claremont 
Claremont 
Claremont 
Dodge Center 
Dodge Center 
Dodge Center 
Dodge Center 



Labor Committee 



J. L. Curtis, Chairman 
Chairman of each township board 



Mantorville 



* Marketing Committee 



Name Address Name Address 

W. E. McCommins Dodge Center A. R. Britzins Hajrfield 



DOUGLAS COUNTY 



Name 
ToUef Jacobson, Director 
Constant Larson, Secretary 



Address 
Alexandria 
Alexandria 



Township Chairmen 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


B. E. Howe 


Osakis 


Nels Bye 


Brandon 


L. E. Olson 


Nelson 


Jorgen Spilseth 


Kensington 


Clyde Robbins 


Carlos 


0. W. Harrison 


Kensington 


Aug. J. Michaels 


Alexandria 


A. J. Ostrom 


Evansville 


F. E. Meade 


Alexandria 


Frank Buscher 


Brandon, R.F.D. 3 


John Lund 


Alexandria 


0. J. Berg 


Brandon 


C. H. Cooper 


Carlos 


John Nelson 


Garfield 


Gilbert Thompson 


Carlos 


J. B. Hove 


Carlos 


Geo. Freudenberg 


Parkers Prairie 


Geo. Stromlund 


Nelson 


C. J. Christopherson 


Alexandria 


N. P. Norling 


Forada 


N. E. Nelson 


Alexandria 


C. H. Bronson 


Osakis 


T. J. Baros 


Alexandria 


H. E. Gingery 


Osakis 


J. 0. Lewis 


Farwell 


H. A. LeRoy 


Alexandria 


A. J. Hauglie 


Brandon 


Roy Franklin 


Alexandria 


Emil Bergh 


Brandon 


S. R. Drum 


Alexandria 


F. G. Dobmeyer 


Brandon 


H. S. Campbell 


Alexandria 


A. F. Johnson 


Melby 


Geo. Susens 


Alexandria 


D. J. Davidson 


Evansville 






• 


Labor Committee 




Tollef Jacobson, Chairman 




Alexandria 



Local agents of each township. 



Finance Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Constant Larson 


Alexandria 


Andrew Jacobson 




B. E. Howe 


Osakis 


George Susens 


Alexandria 


F. H. Borchert 




Geo. L. Treat 




Tollef Jacobson 


Alexandria 







Marketing Committee 



Richard Johnson 


Melby 


Geo. Stromlund 


Nelson 


L. A. Schwantz 


Evansville 


0. P. SteVens 


Forada 


Anton Strom 


Brandon 


Aug. Kohlhaas 


Carlos 


Aug. Sanstead 


Garfield 


J. A. Hintzen 


Miltona 


0. W. Hanson 


Kensington 


Geo. Herberger 


Osakis 


F. A. Weed 


Alexandria 







206 



FARIBAULT COUNTY 



Name 

O. D. Ackerman, Director 
F. E. Hadley, Secretary 
J. M. Malmin, Treasurer 



Address 
Wells 

Winnebago 
Blue Earth 



Executive Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


C. W. Franklin 


Winnebago 


R. J. Havensen 


Bricelyn 


J. E. Hynes 


Winnebago 


Oscar Mundale 


Frost 


Geo. Root 


Easton 


0. C. Enge 


Elmore 


Albert Sonneck Jr 


Minnesota Lake 


H. E. Stewart 


Elmore 


Geo. Hollands 


Wells 


C. H. Gamsey 


Winnebago 


Oscar Penny 


Wells 


Wm. Haynes 


Delavan 


Paul Dulas 


WeUs 


L. R. Johnson 


Easton 


J. F. Paul 


Easton 


C. W. Moore 


Minnesota Lake 


John Claude 


Delavan 


F. B. Stubbs 


Wells 


E. A. Maiers 


Huntly 


O. H. Koetke 


Walters 


John Clifford 


Guckeen 


John Robertson 


Kiester 


Aug. Bartz 


Blue Earth 


Ed. 0. Lund 


Bricelyn 


E. 0. Dybevick 


Frost 


W. 0. Dustin 


Elmore 


J. M. Bergstetter, 


Bricelyn 


H. J. Frundt 


Blue Earth 


R. F. Drake 


Wells 


Levy Lund 


Frost 


L. Hintz 


Walters 








Labor Committee 






Name 


Address 


J. 


M. Malmin, Chairman 


Blue Earth 


F. 


E. Krause 


Blue Earth 



Township, Village and City Chairman 





Market 


;ing Committee 




F. E. Krause 




E. A. Maiers 


Huntley 


Chairman 


Blue Earth 


Theo. F. Gary 


Gucken 


George Whaley 


Winnebago 


Ehner Wicken 


Elmore 


F. E. Stubbs 


Wells 


Ed. Weber 


Frost 


L. R. Johnson 


Easton 


John Robertson 


Kiester 


0. A. Holt 


Delavan 


Ed. Hohnes 


Elmore 






Arthur Gansmoe 


Bricelyn 



War Finance Committee 

Dr. Wm. H. Barr, Vice-President 
W. A. Streeter, (Resigned) 

S07 



Wells 
Winnebago 



FILLMORE COUNTY 



Name 
M. V. Facey, Director 



Address 
Preston 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


John 0. Rustad 


Whalan 


D. A. Mosher 


Harmony 


E. I. Torgerson 


Whalan 


R. A. Jenson 


Whalan 


H. E. Olson 


Ostrander 


Leon LiUie 


Chatfield 


F. D. Feustemacher 


Spring Valley 


D. W. Bacon 


Mabel 


D. B. Ogg 


Preston 


Gerhard Byholt 


Rushford 


Oscar Dahl 


Prosper 


K. T. Hegland 


Lanesboro 


J. W. Fairbaim 


Preston 


N. W. Wiker 


Mabel 


A. C. Austin 


Lanesboro 


B. A. Lyke 


Spring Valley 


C. H. FarreU 


Chatfield 


C. W. Hale 


Stewartville 


Sidney Baker 


Wykoff 


W. C. Love 


Lime Springsja 


Arthur Sheldon 


Spring Valley 


Asmund Vogen 


Rushford 


John F. Healy 


Fountain 


Rev. S. J. Wallace 


Spring Valley 


Dr. S. L. Boucsein 


Spring Valley 


Fred Bacon 


Mabel 


Ole Brokken 


Preston 


Chas. Utley 


Preston 


Gus Gartner 


Preston 


D.J. Danielson 


Fountain 


Otto Wendorf 


Wykoff 


L. D. HamHn 


Spring Valley 


I. H. Zupee 


Chatfield 


J.C. Ness 


Canton 


D. M. Backman 


Whalan 


J. A. Fife 


Canton 


M. B. Gullickson 


Peterson 


D. F. Sims 


Granger 


Geo. Julsrud 


Rushford 


Chas. Vanderbie 


Greenleafton 


Henry Danglie 


Lanesboro 


E. L. Babcock 


Amherst 





FREEBORN COUNTY 




Name 


Address 


Martin Blacklin, Director 


Albert Lea 


Albert Myer. Secretary 


Albert Lea 




Executive Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


C. H. Day 


Albert Lea 


D. D. Devine 


Albert Lea 


S. 0. Simonson 


Albert Lea 


C. G. Lembke 


Albert Lea 


Albert Iverson 


Albert Lea 


A. F. Wohlhuter 


Albert Lea 


Sam L. Hanson 


Albert Lea 


C. H. Mitchell 


Albert Lea 


H. C. Hanson 


Albert Lea 


S. Haugdahl 


Albert Lea 


Clarence Wedge 


Albert Lea 


B. M. Loeffler 


Albert Lea 


J. F. Hedgecock 


Albert Lea 


Dr. W. L. Devaney 


Albert Lea 


John E. Ransom 


Albert Lea 


W. L. Beadle 


Albert Lea 


C. T. Helgeson 


Albert Lea 


Harold Stoa 


Albert Lea 


H. Carroll Day 


Albert Lea 


G. W. Knorr 


Albert Lea 


L. S. Whitcomb 


Albert Lea 


Mrs. J. A. Fuller 


Albert Lea 


Frank Thompson 


Albert Lea 


Mrs. Earl Dominick 


Albert Lea 


Frank Faville 


Albert Lea 


Mrs. Frank Thompson Albert Lea 


M. M. Jones 


Albert Lea 


Mrs. Henry Harm 


Albert Lea 


Bert Skinner 


Albert Lea 


Mrs.E.H.Haisley 


Albert Lea 


Edward Olson 


Albert Lea 


Mrs. Albert Myer 


Albert Lea 




Freeborn Advisory Coimcil 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


C. H. Day 


Albert Lea 


Geo. L. Sexton 


Albert Lea 


Clarence Wedge 


Albert Lea 


C. T. Helgeson 


Albert Lea 


Frank Thompson 


Albert Lea 


Bert Skinner 


Albert Lea 


C. H. Mitchell 


Albert Lea 


Mrs. J. A. Fuller 


Albert Lea 


Mrs. Frank Thompson 


Albert Lea 


W. C. Gruetzmacher 


Geneva 


John Cimningham 


Twin Lake 


N. H. Hoyne 


Albert Lea 


G. P. Meadowcroft 


London 


R. M. Olson 


Hartland 


P. A. Stensrud 


Hartland 


C. M. Field 


Glenville 


H. M. Christopherson 


Hartland 


S. 0. Singelstad 


Emmons 


N. M. Henry 


Hayward 


0. A. UUand 


Lansing 


Botolf Bridly 


Oakland 


Ole S. Nelson 


Emmons 


M. J. Harty 


Geneva 


C. D. Franklin 


Ellendale 


Frank Sistek 


Oakland 


Charles Nelson 


Hayward 


Jens Talle 


Albert Lea 


Olaf Mauseth 


Alden 


Chas. Ackland 


Albert Lea 








Comity Organization 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


W. C. Gruetzmacher 


Geneva 


John Cimningham 


Twin Lakes 


N. H. Hoyne 


Albert Lea 


C. P. Meadowcroft 


London 


R. M. Olson 


Hartland 


P. A. Stensrud 


Hartland 


C. M. Field 


Glenville 


H. M. Christopherson Hartland 


S. 0. Singelstad 


Emmons 


N. M. Henry 


Hayward 



209 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


0. A. UUand 


Lansing 


Botolf Bridly 


Oakland 


Ole S. Nelson 


Emmons 


M. J. Harty 


Geneva 


C. D. Franklin 


EUendale 


Frank Sistek 


Oakland 


Charles Nelson 


Hajrward 


Jens Talle 


Albert Lea 


Olaf Mauseth 


Alden 


Chas. Ackland 


Albert Lea 



Township Organization 



Name 


Township 


Address 


W. C. Gruetzmaker 


Geneva Village 


Geneva 


B. H. Murray 


Geneva Village 


Geneva 


John Cunningham 


Nimda 


Twin Lakes 


J. F. McKeown 


Nimda 


Twin Lakes 


N. H. Hoyne 


Freeman 


Albert Lea 


G. P. Meadowcroft 


London 


London 


John Bergeson 


London 


Northwood, la., R No. 2 


R. M. Olson 


Hartland 


Hartland 


P. N. Pederson 


Hartland 


Hartland 


P. A. Stensrud 


Freeborn 


Hartland 


C. B. Howard 


Freeborn 


Freeborn 


C. N. Field 


Glenville 


Glenville 


A. T. Sawyer 


Glenville 


Glenville 


H. M. Christopherson 


Hartland 


Hartland 


J. A. Halvorsen 


Hartland 


Hartland 


S. 0. Singelstad 


Emmons 


Emmons 


Albert H. Rasmusson 


Emmons 


Emmons 


N. M. Henry 


Rice'land 


Hayward 


Ole 0. BHdley 


Riceland 


Hayward 


0. A. UUand 


Newry 


Lansing 


B. K. Benson 


Newry 


Blooming Prairie 


Olaf Grant 


Newry 


Blooming Prairie 


Geo. Cashman 


Newry 


Blooming Prairie 


Botlof Bridly 


Moscow 


Oakland 


C. L. Freeman 


Moscow 


Austin, R. No. 4 


Ole S. Nelson 


Mansfield 


Emmons 


Lewis J. Helland 


Mansfield 


Emmons 


M. J. Harty 


Geneva 


Geneva 


C. D. Franklin 


Geneva 


EUendale R. No. 4 


Frank Sistek 


Oakland 


Oakland 


L. 0. Ofstuen 


Oakland 


Oakland 


Charles Nelson 


Hajrward 


Hayward 


A. B. Frydenlimd 


Hayward 


Hayward 


Jens Talle 


Bancroft 


Albert Lea 


Bernhard Jonsrud 


Bancroft 


Albert Lea 


Olaf Mauseth 


Carlston 


Alden 


Chas. Ackland 


Manchester 


Albert Lea 


G. 0. Myran 


Manchester 


Manchester 


John L. Johnson 


Bath 


EUendale 


John G. Stadheim 


Bath 


Clarks Grove 



210 



Name 
Severt P. Nelson 
C. M. Jensen 
A. F. Struck 
S. Rose Buchanan 
A. P. Hansen 
Fred Teide 
T. C. Irvine 
Sylvester Homing 
H. C. Wittmer 



Township 
Albert Lea 
Albert Lea 
Shell Rock 
Shell Rock 
Alden 
Alden 
Alden 

Pickerel Lake 
Pickerel Lake 



Address 



Gordonsville 

Northwood, la. 

Alden 

Alden 

Alden 

Albert Lea, R. No. 4 

Alden, R. No. 1 



Farm Organization Labor 

Name Address 

C. C. Dwight, Chairman Albert Lea 

H. H. Dunn Albert Lea 

N. E. Peterson Albert Lea 

Albert Myer Albert Lea 

Joe Kilbride Albert Lea 

W. G. Chamberlain, President Albert Lea 

L. S. Whitcomb, Secretary Albert Lea 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Oscar Subby 


Albert Lea 


Martin Springer 


Conger 


Theodore Speltz 


Albert Lea 


E. P. Howe 


Glenville 


E. A. Nelson 


Hartland 


John M. Miller 


Gordonville 


C. 0. Myran 


Manchester 


E. E. Dunn 


Myrtle 


H. H. Emmons 


Emmons 


John E. Lukes 


London 


Knudt A. Overland 


Twin Lakes 


P. J. Fibelstad 


Hayw^ard 


C. B. Howard 


Freeborn 


A. Sorenson 


Oakland 


Earl Stanley 


Alden 


0. A. Ulland 


Lansing 


Louis Fogel 


Armstrong 


J. J. Sorenson 


Clarks Grove 



111 



GOODHUE COUNTY 



Name 
W. H. Putnam, Director 
Martin Halvorson, Secretary 



Address 
Red Wing 
Wanamingo 



Name 

Sam Thoretenson 

C. H. Ekblad 

A. F. Johnson 
M. H. Kindseth 
P. J. Tvelstad 
Wm. Gorman 
W. R. Sawyer 
Anton Schafer 
Nick Musty 

E. S. Berggren 
O. E. Harme 

B. C. Peterson 
Cliff W. Gres3 
H. P. Hanson 

A. R. Mensing 
W. R. Collister 
T. T. Comstock 
John J. Quam 
H. H. Young 
Henry Henricks 

B. G. Featherston 
Dan O'ReiUy 

J. Hoffman 

F. Church 

N. H. Husbyn 
W. C. Hayward 
Carl Degner 
A. C. Ylvisuker 
L. L. Comwell 

D. C. Sheldon 
A. W. Parkin 
T. O. Sundry 
P. O. Finstuen 
Louis Tyelstad 
Robt. J. Goudy 
W. A. Dibble 
Geo. Laro 

N. B. Ofelt 
Hjalmer Pearson 
Henry Damman 



W. H. Putnam 
W. C. Krise 



Township 

Address 
Red Wing 
Red Wing 
Red Wing 
Goodhue 
Goodhue 
Goodhue 
Belle Chester 
Lake City 
Goodhue 
Cannon Falls 
Cannon Falls 
Cannon Falls 
Cannon Falls 
Cannon Falls 
Cannon Falls 
Skyberg 
Kenyon 
Kenyon, R. 1 
Lake City 
Red Wing, R. R. 
Red Wing, R. R. 
Goodhue 
Frontenac 
Frontenac 
Zumbrota, R. 1 
Pine Island 
Pine Island 
Zimibrota 
Pine Island 
Pine Island 
Pine Island 
Kenyon, R. R. 
Zumbrota 
Pine Island 
Stanton 
Stanton 
Staton 
Vasa 

Cannon Falls 
Red Wing 



Organization 

Name 
J. H. Nibbe 
J. H. Boxrud 
Fred Volmers 
Chas. F. Sawyer 
C. E. Rucker 
C. L. Parkin 
A. K. Finseth 
I. S. Stegnier 
Geo. Langemo 
L. H. Underdahl 
J. H. Gihlstort 
O. W. Kolshon 
Albert Helmeske 
Henry Sathrum 
John P. Gross 
Geo. Solberg 
A. Finstuen 
J. A. Hanson 
M. F. Gunderson 
F. F. Edstrom 
A. G. Johnson 
A. L. Flom 
A. L. Ballard 
C. A. Erstad 
Martin O. Floan 
A. H. Tongen 
L. J. Roma 
A. I. Haugan 
Severt Charlson 
J. E. Norsvig 
John P. Wangen 
L. F. Gary 
E. E. Nelson 
Frank Boothroyd 
Die Sunnes 

E. J. Nelson 

F. J. Parker 
A. J. Rockne 
Leo. Schafer 
S. B. Barteau 



Marketing Committee 

Red Wing Martin Rudd 



Red Wing 



R. F. Gunderson 



Address 
Goodhue 
Goodhue 
Goodhue 
Goodhue 
Goodhue 
Goodhue 
Kenyon 
Nerstrand 
Kenyon 
Nerstrand 
Red Wing, R. R. 
Red Wing, R. R. 
Red Wing, R. R. 
Kenyon 
Kenyon 
Kenyon 
Kenyon 
Kenyon 
Kenyon 
Cannon Falls 
Cannon Falls 
Cannon Falls 
Zumbrota 
Zumbrota 
Zumbrota, R. 4 
Zumbrota, R. 1 
Kenyon, R. 4 
Kenyon, R. 5 
Dennison 
Dennison 
Dennison 
Welch 
Welch 

Red Wing, R. R. 
Ztunbrota 
Ztunbrota 
Goodhue 
Zumbrota 
Zumbrota 
Zumbrota 



Kenyon 
Kenyon P. O. 



212 



Name 






Address 


Name 


Address 


M. T. Nilaw 






Eggleston 


Wm. Shepard 


Kenyon P. 0. 


R. J. Peterson 






Frontenao 


C. F. Parkin 


Goodhue 


L. F. Gary 






Welch 


W. R. Sawyer 


Belle Chester 


Wm. Tanner 






Cannon Falls 


John M. Holton 


Wanamingo 


A. W. Swinton 






Stanton 


J. D. Grover 


Zumbrota 


CarlVeek 






Dennison 


Arthur W. Parkin 


Pine Island 


Harry Lee 






Kenyon 

Advisory 


Council 






J. 


C. 


E. Holmen 


Kenyon 






Chas 


. F. Sawyer 


Goodhue 






L. 


L. 


Comwell 


Pine Island 



Liberty Loan Committees 
All Campaigns 

County Executive Committee 

W. H. Putnam, County Chairman 

J. C. E. Holmen Kenyon Chas. F. Sawyer Goodhue 

A. R. Mensing Cannon Falls Leo Schafer Zumbrota 

Carl Vik Dennison L. L. Comwell Pine Island 

H. M. Halvorson Wanamingo Jens K. Grondahl Red Wing 



City of Red Wing Executive Committee 

Sam'l H. Lockin, Chairman 
E. C. Bryan Fred W. Putnam 

E. H. Lidberg J. F. Merrill 

D. M. Neill 



Sit 



GRANT COUNTY 



Name 
E. J. Scofield, Director 
N. E. Rulien 
L. C. Johnson, Secretary 



Address 
Elbow Lake 
Hoffman 
Elbow Lake 



County Organization 
Executive Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


A. W. Wells 


Herman 


0. E. Shefloe 


Hoffman 


L. 0. Fobs 


Elbow Lake 


Henry Hessel 


Elbow Lake 


C. A. Bergren 


Elbow Lake 


J. M. Stene 


Ashby 


W. H. Beach 


Barrett 







Advisory Committee 



E. J. Scofield 


Elbow La.ke 


Geo. W. Blume 


Herman 


0. M. Hubred 


Barrett 


Geo. Houps 


Norcross 


K. K. Lee 


Elbow Lake 


Chas. Larson 


Norcross 


A. E. FugHe 


Ashby 


H. L. Marple 


Wendall 


John Brenmn 


Hoffman 


O. W. Jones 


Herman 


Iver Stamnes 


Barrett 


N. E. RuUen 


Hoffman 


Andrew Johnson 


Elbow Lake 


Arthur Smith 


Wendall 


Tosten Hagen 


Elbow Lake 


Mrs. A. W. Wells 


Herman 


A. E. Phinney 


Herman 


John Ferguson 


Elbow Lake 


Adolph Aanerud 


Elbow Lake 








Labor Committee 




Aldred Peterson 


Barrett 


J. T. Lindem 


Herman 


Fred Olson 


Elbow Lake 


W. T. Ziebarth 


Herman 


T. A. Boyd 


Wendall 


Geo. Houps 


Norcross 



Marketing Committee 



Carl H. Larson 


Hereford 


Julius 0. Hagen 


Barrett 


Tosten E. Dybdal 


Elbow Lake 


Paul S. Goodsell 


Herman 


Andrew Olson 


Ashby 


Geo. Houps 


Norcross 


H. T. Harrison 


Erdahl 


Arthur Smith 


Wendall 


N. E. Rulien 


Hoffman 







214 



HENNEPIN COUNTY 



Name 
Fred B. Snyder, President 
A. L. Sorter, 1st Vice-President 
Frank Nelson, 2st Vice-President 
Grant, Robinson, 3rd Vice-President 
Edgar L. Noyes, Secretary 
E. L. Mattson. Treasurer 



Address 
800 Security Building, Minneapolis 
342 Security Bank Bldg., Minneapolis 
Minnesota College, Minneapolis 
Excelsior Minnesota 
1212 Plymouth Building, Minneapolis 
Scand.-Am. Bank Bldg., Minneapolis 



County Organization 
Executive Committee 



Name 


Ward 


Address 


Wallace G. Nye 


3rd 


1215 Queen Ave. N., MinneapoUs 


♦Carl L. Wallace 


8th 


801 Met. Bank Bldg., Minneapolis 


Joseph R. Kingman 


5th 


1010 Security Bank Bldg., Minneapohj 


WilUam A Currie 


4th 


422 First Ave. N., MinneapoUs 


Ernest Malmberg 


13th 


810 Security Bank Bldg., Minneapolis 


J. E. Smith Town 


of Brooklyn 


Osseo 


C.H.White Town of Excelsior 


Excelsior 




Advisory Council 


Name 


Ward 


Minneapolis 


John F. Walsh 


1st 


520 University Ave. N. E. 


Wm. M. Ives 


1st 


2322 Marshall St. N. E. 


F. E. Barney 


2nd 


915 S. E. Fourth 


R. S. Read 


2nd 


406 Fourth St. S. E. 


Francis A. Gross 


3rd 


1411 Fremont Ave. N. 


Wallace G. Nye 


3rd 


1215 Queen Ave. N. 


J. L. KiichU 


3rd 


1501 Dupont Ave. N. 


Geo. H. Selover 


4th 


910 McKnight Bldg. 


E. G. Potter 


4th 


945 Andrus Bldg. 


Joseph Kingman 


4tb 


1010 Security Building 


Charles B. Homes 


4th 


801 N. Y. Life Building 


C. M. Jordan 


6th 


615 E. Eighteenth St. 


John P. Nash 


5th 


516 N. Y. Life Building 


H. M. Lewis 


5th 


1626 Third Ave. S. 


John Auble 


6th 


1406 Second St. S. 


E. M. Jones 


7th 


4017 Park Ave. S. 


George 0. Hauge 


7th 


412 Nicollet Ave. 


Wm. Siegmann 


7th 


2651 Thirteenth Ave. S. 


L. A. Lydiard 


8th 


516 N. Y. Life Building 


Dr. R. R. Todd 


8th 


2816 Blaisdell Ave. 


Frank T. Moody 


8th 


2606 Dupont Ave. S. 


J. C. Mclntyre 


8th 


2721 Colfax Ave. S. 


♦Carl L. Wallace 


8th 


801 Met. Bank Building 


August Johnson 


9th 


716 Adams St. N. E. 


J. F. Conroy 


9th 


1854 Central Ave. 


A. S. Pollock 


9th 


2639 N. E. Jackson 


W. C. Batdorf 


10th 


3011 Girard Ave. N. 


♦Deceased 







316 



Name 


WARD Minneapolis 


L. A. HiUier 


lOth 3635 Fremont Ave. N. 


C. S. Ross 


11th 917 S. Seventh St. 


Chris Nelson 


11th 1830 E. 


Franklin 


C. E. Ryberg 


12th 3008 Forty-First Ave. S. 


Herman Moe 


12th 3936 Thirty-Eighth Ave. S. 


Dr. Thos. T. Warham 


13th 806 Masonic Temple 


E. L. Richardson 


13th 4448 Washburn Ave. S. 


Ernest Halmberg 


13th 810 Security Building 


Name 


Township 


Address 


J. A. BaiUif 


Bloomington 


Station F. R. 1, Mpls. Box 79 


J. E; Smith 


Brooklyn 


Osseo P. 0. 


D. H. Garrett 


Brookljm Center 


Osseo, R. 1 


B. F. Seymour 


Champlain 


Champlain 


Charles Bursch 


Corcoran 


Rogers P. O. 


G. A. Kirkwood 


Crystal Village 


Robbinsdale, R. 1 


Alex McNeil 


Dayton 


Da5rton P. 0. 


J. J. Margens 


Deephaven 


Dayton P. 0. 


A. H. Lyman 


Excelsior Village 


Excelsior 


C. H. White 


Excelsior Town 


Excelsior 


J. W. Pemberton 


Eden Prairie 


Eden Prairie 


Melvin Grimes 


Edina Village 


Eden Prairie 


W. H. Schoening 


Greenwood 


Loretto P. 0. 


Wm. Sweeney 


Golden Valley 


Golden Valley 


G. W. Moore 


Hopkins 


Hopkins 


Albert Fisher 


Hassan 


Rogers P. 0. 


John Lockedellie 


Hanover 


Loretto P. 0. 


0. Styner 


Independence 


Maple Plain P. 0. 


Samuel Rettinger 


Long Lake 


Maple Plain P. 0. 


A. P. Campbell 


Maple Grove 


Osseo 


F. E. Tallant 


Moimd 


Osseo 


John H. Gerber 


Medina 


Wayzata, R. 2 


A. A. Crane 


Minnetonka Beach 


1st & Sec. Nat. Bank, Mpls. 


J. G. Cressy 


Minnetrista Town 


Mound 


E. M. Beal 


Maple Plain 


Mound 


N. Martinson 


Minnetonka Town 


Wayzata P. 0. 


Milo Stubbs 


Orono 


Crystal Bay P. 0. 


M. M. Carpenter 


Orono 


Osseo 


J. B. Howe 


Plymouth 


Hopkins P. 0., R. 3 


E. J. Ohr 


Richfield 


Station F, Minneapolis 


J. H. Morse 


Robbinsdale 


Robbinsdale 


Frank W. Harves 


Rogers Village 


Rogers P. 0. 


Francis Jager 


St. Bonifacious 


Rogers P. 0. 


Louis W. Fuller 


St. Louis Park 


Rogers P. 0. 


Theo. A. Pahl 


St. Anthony 


New Brighton P. 0. 


E. W. Becker 


Tonka Bay 


Excelsior P. 0. 


H. L. Turner 


Wayzata 

At Large 


Excelsior P. O. 


Name 


Address 




John Ryan 


20 Second St. 
S16 


N. E., Minneapolis 



Name 
Wm. A. Currie 
J. G. Robb, 
John Peterson 
T. O. Dahl 
W. H. RendeU 
A. P. Ortquist 
Wm. R. Morris 
Fred G. Smith 
John B. Irwin 
A. W. Ingenhutt 
W. F. Nelson 
Alfred F. Pillsbury 
Jas. D. Williams 
W. L. Martin 



Address 
422 First Ave. N., Minneapolis 

1600 Chicago Ave., Minneapolis 

615 Twenty-First Ave. S., Minneapolis 

1601 E. Lake St., Minneapolis 
210 Seventh St. S., Minneapolis 
1012 E. Fifteenth St., Minneapolis 
818 Met. Life Bldg., Minneapolis 
311 Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis 
Station F, R. 1, Minneapolis 

301 E. Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis 
554 McKnight Building, Minneapolis 
Met. Life Bldg., Minneapolis 
2618 E. Franklin, Minneapolis 
412-16 1st Nat. Soo Line Bldg., Mpls. 



Labor Committee 



Name Township 

David C. Adie, Chairman 



J. A. Baillif 
J. E. Smith 
Charles Bursch 
Alex McNeill 
J. W. Pemberton 
C. H. White 
W. H. Schoening 
Albert Fisher 
O. Styner 
A. F. Campbell 
John H. Gerber 
N. Martinson 
J. G. Cressy 
Milo Stubbs 
J. B. Howe 
Theo. A. Pahl 



Bloomington 

Brooklyn 

Corcoran 

Dayton 

Eden Prairie 

Excelsior 

Greenwood 

Hassan 

Independence 

Maple Grove 

Medina 

Minnetonka 

Minnetrista 

Orono 

Plymouth 

St. Anthony 



Address 

Minneapolis, R. 1, Box 79 

Osseo 

Rogers P. O. 

Anoka 

Eden Prairie 

Excelsior 

Loretto 

Rogers 

Maple Plain 

Osseo 

Wayzata, R. 2 

Hopkins 

Mound 

Crystal Bay 

Hopkins, R. 3 

New Brighton 



Marketing Committee 



Name 

W. H. RendeU, 

Chairman 
M. M. Carpenter 
Prank W. Harves 
A. H. Lyman 



Address 
210 Seventh St. S. 

Minneapolis 
Osseo 
Rogers 
Excelsior 



Name 
G. W. Moore 
F. E. Rallant 
H. L. Turner 
Louis W. Fuller 
Francis Jager 



Address 
Hopkins 
Motmd 
Wayzata 
St. Louis Park 
St. Bonifacious 



Name 
R. M. Bennett 
F. L. Carpenter 
F. A. Chamberlain 
Geo. D. Dayton 
E. W. Decker 



Finance Committee 

Address 
710 Security building, Minneapolis 
900 1st Nat. Soo Bldg., Minneapolis 
1st and Sec. Nat. Bank, Minneapolis 
Dajrton & Co., Minneapolis 
411 Marquette Avenue, Minneapolis 



ai7 



HOUSTON COUNTY 

Name Address 

L. L. Duxbury, Director Caledonia 

Chas. A. Dorival, Secretary Caledonia 

L. H. Briggs, Treasurer Houston 



Township Organization 



Name 
Michael Donahue 
Fred Deters 
Carl T. Trehus 
L. T. Johnson 

0. B. Nelson 
Knut Rauk 
Peter Schmitt 
John P. Bouquet 
Chas. H. Murphy 
Rev. J. F. Lang 
Wm. J. Daley 
Chas. Fetzner 
M. E. Sullivan 
A. W. Krage 
Jos. Orr 

Taylor Robinson 
Rev. B. B. Ostrem 

1. G. Iverson 
W. H. Eberhard 
Allen Cameron 
F. H. Snure 
John J. Geiwitz 
Dan Brown 

Mrs. C. W. Belding 



Township 
Jefferson 
Winnebago 
Wilmington 
Spring Grove 
Spring Grove 
Black Hammer 
Caledonia 
Caledonia 
Mayville 
Crooked Creek 
Brownsville 
Brownsville 
Union 
Sheldon 
Yucatan 
Money Creek 
Houston 
Houston 
Mound Prairie 
La Crescent 
La Crescent 
Hokah 
Hokah 



Address 

New Albin, la. 

Caledonia 

Caledonia 

Spring Grove 

Spring Grove 

Spring Grove 

Caledonia 

Caledonia 

Caledonia 

Freebiu"g 

Caledonia 

Brownsville 

Caledonia 

Houston 

Houston 

Houston 

Houston 

Houston 

Houston 

La Crescent 

La Crescent 

Hokah 

Hokah 

Caledonia 



Labor Committee 

Name Address 

K. P. B. Reishus, Chairman Caledonia 



Crop Improvement Committee 

Name Address Name Address 

L. T. Johnson Spring Grove Frank H. Snure La Cresecent 

Peter Schmitt Caledonia Dan Brown Hokah 

Alex Cox Brownsville 



C. J. SylUng 
Ole Hefte 



Marketing Committee 



Spring Grove 
Caledonia 



J. J. Sliter 
John Harvey 



Houston 
Hokah 



S18 



Finance Committee 

Name Address 

F. A. Duxbury, Chairman Caledonia 

O. E. Burtness, Secretary Caledonia 

R. D. Sprague Caledoina 

O. B. Nelson Spring Grove 

J. C. Kelly Houston 

J. W. McCaflFrey La Crescent 

Louis Bunge Eitzen 

Dr. W. E. Browning Caledonia 



flit 



HUBBARD COUNTY 



Name 
M. J. Woolley, Director 
R. J. Olinger, Secretary 
J. H. Halvorson, Treasurer 



Address 
Park Rapids 

Nevis 
Nevis 



Township Organization 



Name 


Address 


Name ^ • . 


Address 


Chas. Andress 


Chamberlain 


Geo. C. Allen 


Emmaville 


C. B. Talbot 


Akeley 


S. J. Smith 


La Porte 


Gus Rex 


Nevis 


Geo. L. Carver 


Yola 


A. E. Segmiller 


Benedict 


Henry J. Schummer 


Bemidji 


P. E. Peterson 


Guthrie 


C. L. Potter 


Park Rapids 


John Gladen 


Cass Lake 


Fred Wolfe 


Park Rapids 


Fred Sanford 


Hubbard 


David Short 


Arago 


H. M. Johnson 


Nevis 


Joe Cross 


Arago 


Joe Nixon 


Nevis 


Ivan K. Neihus 


Becida 


L B Giles 


Laporte 


Geo. Gress 


Fern Hill 


Robt. Black 


Guthrie 


Fred E. Giese 


Nevis 


A. M. Marks 


Guthrie 


O. W. Ramsdell 


Akeley 


J. Snustad 


Nary 


Ira L. Smith 


La Porte 


B. L. Waterman 


Hubbard 


C. E. Ward 


Park Rapids 


J. W. Jackson 


Park Rapids 


Mrs. M. M. Nygaard 


Park Rapids 


F. C. Tens 


Park Rapids 








Labor Committee 




R. J. Olinger, Chairman 


Fred E. Giese 


Nevis 


R. 0. Webster 


Akeley 


Ira A. Smith 


Laporte 



Marketing Committee 



J. L. Larson, 




Peter Avenson 


Dorset 


Chairman 


Park Rapids 


C. E. Harding 


Nary 


B. F. Daniels 


Akeley 


Anton Almquist 


Laporte 


OUver Halvorson 


Nevis 


W. S. Weimers 


Ferris 



ISANTI COUNTY 



Name 
Geo. C. Starr, Director 
Minerva B. Hixson, Secretary 
A. H. Southerland, Treasurer 

Township Organization 



Address 
Cambridge 
Cambridge 
Cambridge 



Name 
John Irwin 
Wm. Conklin 
A. G. Engberg 
L. M. Peterson 
Ehner V. Erickson 
Fred Falk 
H. E. NoreUus 

A. Wickstrom 
Ray Christie 
C. O. Flodquist 
Peter Jacobson 
O. W. Blomquist 
V. E. Erickson 

B. H. Stoeckel 
Wm. Westling 



Township 
Athens 
Bradford 
Cambridge 
Cambridge Village 
Dalbo 

Braham Village 
Isanti 

Isanti Village 
Maple Ridge 
North Branch 
Oxford 

Spencer Brook 
Stanchfield 
Stanford 
Wyanett 



Address 
Esthel 

Cambridge, R. 3 
Cambridge 
Cambridge 
Dalbo 
Braham 
Isanti, R. 1 
Isanti 

Braham, R. 1 
North Branch, R. 1 
Stacy, R. 2 
Princeton, R. 3 
Stanchfield 
Bethel 
Princeton, R. 2 



Name 
Chas. Nelson 
C. J. Bellin 

C. J. Hammargren 
Alfred Anderson 
Leonard Larson 
A. J. Lillion 
Aug. Otto 
Julius Steinbring 
Wm. Dahlman 
John Linden 
Peter Eastlund 
Eli Norell 
Phebian Bergdahl 
Peter Haldin 
Will Kluck 

Fred W. Goodwin 

D. S. Walker 
Aug. Johnson 
J. O. Krave 



Marketing 
Address 
Stacy, R. 2 
Stacy, R. 2 
North Branch, R. 3 
Isanti 
Isanti 
Isanti 

North Branch, R. 1 
North Branch 
North Branch 
Isanti 
Isanti 
Isanti 
Isanti 

Cambridge, R. 3 
Cambridge, R. 3 
Cambridge, R. 3 
Princeton, R. 3 
Princeton, R. 3 
Princeton 



Committee 

Name 
Louis Palm 
N. R. Englund 
Peter Peterson 
Ed. Peterson 
Miles Usher 
N. E. Nelson 
Alfred Berglund 
Erick Moody 
Henry Lindquist 
John Becklin 
Louis Hilden 
A. J. Groff 
Gust Krona 
O. D. Anderson 
Linus Anlimd 
Nils Mattson 
Fred Carpenter 
Anton Peterson 
Sam Lindbloom 



Address 
Princeton, R. 1 
Stanchfield, R. 1 
Stanchfield, R. 1 
StancMeld, R. 1 
Stanchfield, R. 1 
Braham, R. 2 
Grandy, R. 2 
Cambridge 
Cambridge 
Cambridge 
Cambridge, R. 2 
Cambridge, R. 2 
Cambridge, R. 2 
Dalbo 
Dalbo 
Dalbo 
Dalbo 
Isanti 
Bethel 



Labor Committee 

P. J. Engberg Braham Ehner V. Erickson Dalbo 

M. G. GesUn Grandy W. W. Shulean Isanti 

ICnute Bjorka Cambridge A. C. Smith Isanti, R. 2 

Chas. G. Gustafson North Branch, R. 1 



321 



ITASCA COUNTY 

Name Address 

E. C. Kiley, Director Grand Rapids 

Welfare of Itasca County Soldiers and Sailors 



Name 




District 


Address 


C. M. King, County Commissioner 


No. 1 


Deer River 


R. K. Stokes, 


County Commissioner 


No. 2 


Cohasset 


Andy Nelson, County Commissioner 


No. 3 


Bovey 


Frank Gran, Coimty Commissioner 


No. 4 


Coleraine 


P. J. Zinga, County Commissioner 


No. 5 


Marble 


H. D. Powers 


, Captain, Co. D, 4th Battalion, 




Home Guards of Minnesota 




Grand Rapids 


Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


C. C. Peterson 


Grand Rapids 


Mrs. Geo. E, Keenan Deer River 


Mrs. D. M. Giinn 


Grand Rapids 


Mrs. N . C. Bardsley Alvwood 


Mrs. 0. I. Bergh 


Grand Rapids 


Mrs. H. M. Johnson Jesse Lake 


Mrs. S. G. Benzing 


Grand Rapids 


Mrs. W. J. Doyle 


Liepold 


Mrs. W. C. Gilbert 


Grand Rapids 


Mrs. Charles Leise 


Marble 


Mrs. C. M. Erskin 


Grand Rapids 


Mrs. Earl Carlton 


Orth 


Mrs. N. D. Kean 


Coleraine 


Mrs. May Marshall 


I Bengilly 


Mrs. F. Woods 


Cohasset 


Mrs. J. Latier 


Spring Lake 


Mrs. F. J. Skoodopoli 


B Cohasset 


Mrs. Charlotte Rima Warba 


Mrs.Archie McCuUum Deer River 


Mrs. Wm. Welte 


Big Fork 


Mrs. C. M. King 


Deer River 







W. J. Corwin 
Chairman 



Resources 



Grand Rapids 



Frank Sherman 
J. A. Van Dyke 



Grand Rapids 
Coleraine 



Finances 



Geo. B. Aiton 




V. A. Batzner 


Bovey 


Chairman 


Grand Rapids 


C. E. Aiken 


Grand Rapids 


0. E. Huyelehan 


Deer River 


John T. Ring 


Nashwauk 


S. J. Moran 


Deer River 


D. M. Vermilyea 


Marble 


C. A. Peterson 


Bigfork 


F. J. Skoodopole 


Cohasset 


Grant Seaton 


Coleraine 


A. B. Dudgeon 


Warba 


A. R. Inman 


Coleraine 


F. V. Wakkinen 


Keewatin 




Farm Products 




0. 1. Bergh 




Wm. Welte 


Bigfork 


Chairman 


Grand Rapids 


Martin Nesseth 


Northome 


A. M. Sisler 


Grand Rapids 


B. 0. Hofstad 


Deer River 


Neil McKinley 


Blackberry 


D. A. McLeod 


Nashwauk 


Ole Sherman 


Bovey 







222 



Enlistments 



E. C. Kiley, Chairman 



All Coiinty Postmasters 



Public Safety 



Company D, Minnesota Home Guards: 
H. D. Powers, Captain 
E. J. Luther, 1st Lieutenant 
Carl Eiler, 2nd Lieutenant 



Charles Gunderson, Sheriflf 

All Police Officers of the County 



Name 

W. M. West 
Chairman 
Frank B. Gran 



Labor Committee 
Farming 



Address 

Grand Rapids 
Coleraine 



Name 
C. M. King 
Andy Nelson 



Address 
Deer River 
Bovey 



E. R. Salsich 
Chairman 



Mining 



Coleraine 



B. F. Batchelder 
R. L. Downing 



Nashwauk 
Keewatin 



General 



Geo. Arscott 




C. W. Latvalia 


Nashwauk 


Chairman 


Grand Rapids 


A. C. Bossard 


Grand Rapids 




Marketing 






Henry Hughes, 




J. P. Murphy ' 


Blackberry 


Chairman 


Grand Rapids 


W. J. Stock 


Coleraine 


Geo. Herried 


Deer River 


Erick Johnson 


Bovey 


P. A. McEachin 


Keewatin 


Clarence Bennett 


Taconite 


Jas. Grady 


Cohasset 


Louis Cucci 


Calumet 


J. P. Raattama 


Nashwauk 


A. E. Perrier 


Marble 


Hjlmer Bjorge 


Bigfork 


Swan Carlson 


Warba 


Geo. T. Johnson 


Wawina 







Newspaper 
Herald-Review 
Independent 
Chronicle 
Herald 



Publicity Conmiittee 

Hugh McEwan, Chairman Grand Rapids 



Address 
Grand Rapids 
Grand Rapids 
Keewatin 
Nashwauk 



Newspaper 
Itasca News 
Optic 
Iron News 



Address 
Deer River 
Coleraine 
Coleraine 



ns 



JACKSON COUNTY 

Name Address 

Robert C. Muir, Director Jackson 

B. B. Sontag, Sectretary Heron Lake 

H. L. Bond, Treasurer Lakefield 

A. B. Cheadle, Vice-President Jackson 



Township Organization 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Peter Gunderson 


Kimball 


Otto Kuhlmann 


Lakefield 


R. M. Campbell 


Alpha 


Chas. Buckeye 


Heron Lake 


L. Anderson 


Jackson 


E. J. Kay 


Heron T/ake 


S. 0. Harstad 


Windom 


Geo. H. Smith 


Heron Lake 


E. J. Voda 


Jackson 


E. A. Tripp 


Round Lake 


F. S. Hedge 


Jackson 


Fred Horkey 


Heron Lake 


B. W. Frost 


Windom 


H. L. Mikelson 


W. Heron Lake 


0. L. Barkheim 


Lakefield 


Julius B. Thompson 


Jackson 


Andrew Bakalayer 


Lakefield 


Arthur Peterson 


Estherville, la. 


Fred Tyre 


Spirit Lake, la. 


Mrs. H. J. Leigh 


Lakefield 


J. M. Rentscheller 


Lakefield 







Marketing Committee 



R. A. Gruhlke 
Chas. Evers 
H. A. Rhodes 



Jackson 

Alpha 

Lakefield 



Geo. Behrenfield 
H. L. Mikelson 



Heron Lake 
W. Heron Lake 



Labor Committee 



L. E. McMillan, Chairman 



Lakefield 



Finance Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


W. H. Jarmuth 


Heron Lake 


H. M. Bumham 


Jackson 


0. Thoreson 


Lakefield 


J. J. Pribyl 


Jackson 


W. D. Hunter 


Jackson 


R. C. Muir 


Jackson 


John Branch 


Lakefield 







tu 



KANABEC COUNTY 



Name 
Chas. F. Serline, Director 



Address 
Mora 



Kanabec County Public Safety Association 



Name 
Chas. F. Serline, President 
C. Oscar Peterson, Vice-President 



Name 
Aimer J. Peterson, Secretary 
Geo. H. Newbert, Treasurer 



Executive Committee 



Name 
C. C. Neff 
Ernest Dixon 
Josh B. Clark 
Chas. H. Reynolds 
John Trudell 
Clarence O. Hill 
Victor Elfstrom 
Elmer Wessner 
Frank Spindler 



Address 
Wahkon, R. 1 
Warman 
Mora, R. 2 
Warman 
Wahkon, R. 1 
Ogilvie 

Brookpark, R. 4 
Brookpark, R. 4 
Ogilvie 



Name 
W. M. Spurlin 
Prank P. Powers 
A. C. Mann 
Edwin Skoglund 
John Oscar Serline 
Wm. W. Tenney 
C. M. Wall 
A. T. Westrom 



Address 
Mora 
Mora 

Ogilvie, R. 1 
Brunswick 
Braham, R. 1 
Mora 
Ogilvie 
Grasston 



Chas. F. Serline, 
Chairman 



Labor Committee 



Mora 



E. E. Lilja 
J. G. White 



Grasston 
Ogilvie 



Marketing Committee 



J. A. Grahek, 




A. F. Everett 


Brunswick 


Chairman 


Mora 


Nels 0. Larson 


Mora 


J. G. White 


Ogilvie 


D. W. Murphy 


Braham 


G. A. Gustafson 


Grasston 


Geo. Chamberlain 


Mora 


P. H. Peterson 


Quamba 







Finance Committee 



W. J. Brown 


Mora 


Rev. Oscar Ebb 


Brunswick 


C. M. Wall 


Ogilvie 


A. T. Westrom 


Grasston 


C. A. Gustafson 


Grasston 


John O. Serline 


Braham, R. No. 1 


Ed. Palmer 


Ogilvie 


Geo. Shipton 


Ogilvie 



SS5 



KANDIYOHI COUNTY 

Kandiyohi County Loyalty League 



Name 
Russell Spicer, Director 
G. A. Foster, School Activities 
A. A. Anderson, Farm Labor 



Name 
E. C. Wellin, Municipal Activities 
Victor E. Lawson, Relief 
Peter Bonde, Surveillance 



Young Ladies' Safety Service 

Miss Lillie B. Noren, Chairman Willmar 

Kandiyohi County Red Cross 

Mrs. Russell Spicer, Chairman Willmar 

Mrs. J. Albert Peterson, Secretary Willmar 

Civilian Relief 
Dr. J. M. Rains 

First Liberty Loan 
L. O. Thorpe, Chairman Willmar 

Second Liberty Loan 
L. O. Thorpe, Chairman Willmar 

Third and Fourth Liberty Loan 

C. W. Odell, Chairman Wilhnar 

Y. M. C. A. War CouncU 

Russell Spicer, District Chairman Willmar 

J. P. Millard, County Committee Chairman Willmar 

F. G. Handy, County Committee Willmar 

G. H. Ottemess, County Committee Willmar 



Labor Committee 

A. A. Anderson, Township Chairman 
E. L. Rodegeb, County Agent 
Russell Spicer, Special U. S. Agent 



Willmar 



Name 
John H. Henjum 
Herman Edman 
Syvert Reigs'tad 
M. O. Batterberry 
J. Peter Johnson 



Township Organization 

Township 
Arctander 
Arctander 
Arctander 
Btubank 
Btubank 



Address 
Kerkhoven, R. No. 2 
Pennock, R. No. 2 
Kerkhoven, R. No. 3 
New London 
Georgeville 



Name 

A. L. Lohn 

P. O. Sonstegard 
P. W. Anderson 
G. P. Tangen 
Darwin Johnson 
R. C. Sletten 
N. B. Leiness 
David Swenson 
Ingeberg Johnson 
Erick Norden 
J. B. Gram 
H. J. Hanson 

B. Van Houveln 
Roy Chase 

N. E. Nelson 

C. A. Broman 
C. Christianson 
Gunder B. Samstad 
B. P. Hovey 
Elmer W. Peterson 
Carl V. Carlson 
Ejiute Kloster 
Albert O. Erickson 
Amt. C. Carlson 
Wm. Henderson 

N. E. Halvorson 
Wm. Dickman 
Fred Lindermeier 
Ernest Reetz 
John H. Taatjes 
H. J. Roelofs 
O. L. Olson 
Ole R. Sletten 

B. G. Larson 
M. L. Michelson 
Olof Mattson 

C. J. Swenson 
Arthur Klint 
C. A. Harrison 
J. A. Halvorson 
Oscar Mankell 
L. H. Larson 
H. S. Nelson 
Louis Rosenquist 
C. W. Holmgren 
A. H. Vick 

E. J. Hedlof 
John Bengston 
Otto Holmgren 
A. W. Bergstrom 
Albert Anderson 



Township 
Burbank 
Burbank 
Colfax 
Colfax 
Colfax 
Dovre 
Dovre 
Dovre 

East Lake Lillian 
East Lake Lillian 
East Lake Lillian 
Edwards 
Edwards 
Edwards 
Fahlun 
Fahlun 
Fahlun 
Gennessee 
Gennessee 
Gennessee 
Gennessee 
Green Lake 
Green Lake 
Green Lake 
Green Lake 
Harrison 
Harrison 
Harrison 
HoUand 
Holland 
Holland 
Irving 
Irving 
Irving 
Irving 
Kandiyohi 
Kandiyohi 
Kandiyohi 
Kandiyohi 
Lake Andrew 
Lake Andrew 
Lake Andrew 
Lake Elizabeth 
Lake Elizabeth 
Lake Elizabeth 
Lake Lillian 
Lake Lillian 
Lake Lillian 
Mamre 
Mamre 
Mamre 



Address 
Georgeville 
Georgeville 
Belgrade, R. No. 1 
New London, R. No. 1 
Belgrade, R. No. 1 
Wilhnar, R. No. 1 
Wilhnar, R. No. 1 
Spicer, R. No. 1 
Atwater, R. No. 7 
Bird Island 
Atwater, R. No. 7 
Raymond 
Ra5miond 
Raymond 
Atwater, R. No. 6 
Willmar, R. No. 2 
Willmar, R. No. 2 
Atwater, R. No. 3 
Atwater 

Atwater, R. No. 3 
Atwater, R. No. 6 
Kandiyohi 
Spicer 
Kandiyohi 
Spicer 

Atwater, R. No. 5 
Atwater, R. No. 4 
Atwater, R. No. 4 
Raymond, R. No. 2 
Raymond, R. No. 4 
Ra)maond, R. No. 4 
Spicer 
Atwater 
Hawick 
Spicer 

Willmar, R. No. 2 
Atwater, R. No. 3 
Wilhnar, R. No. 5 
Kandiyohi 

New London, R. No. 3 
New London, R. No. 3. 
Spicer, R. No. 1 
Atwater, R. No. 6 
Atwater, R. No. 1 
Atwater, R. No. 1 
Atwater 
Olivia 

Bird Island, R. No. 3 
Pennock, R. No. 2 
Pennock, R. No. 2 
Pennock 



Name 
N. B. Johnson 
J. R. Carlson 
J. A. Jenson 
E. J. Peterson 
K. A. Botten 
Christ Peterson 
John Zuidema 
Fred Lindquist 
Wm. A. Lindquist 
A. J. Smithson 
K. I. Lunde 

0. B. Thorst»n 
M. J. Rusten 
Leo Blair 
John Swenson 

1. M. Nelson 
S. M. Swenson 
C. T. Eddy 
John P. Johnson 
Nels H. Anderson 
Albert J. Johnson 
G. A. Nord 

C. J. Ellingson 



Township 
New London 
New London 
New London 
Norway Lake 
Norway Lake 
Norway Lake 
Roseland 
Roseland 
Roseland 
Roseville 
Roseville 
Roseville 
St. John 
St. John 
St. John 
St. John 
Whitefield 
Whitefield 
Whitefield 
Willmar 
Willmar 
Wilhnar 
Willmar 



Address 
New London 
Spicer, R. No. 2 
New London, R. No. 2 
New London, R. No. 4 
Brooten, R. No. 3 
Brooten, R. No. 3 
Svea, R. No. 3 
Olivia 
Olivia 

New London 
Regal 
Hawick 

Raymond, R. No. 5 
Pennock, R. No. 1 
Willmar, R. No. 4 
Pennock 
Svea 

Willmar, R. No. 4 
Willmar, R. No. 3 
Willmar, R. No. 4 
Willmar, R. No. 1 
Willmar, R. No. 1 
Willmar, R. No. 2 



SS8 



KITTSON COUNTY 



Name 
G. Goodman, Director 
W. V. Longley, Secretary 



Address 
Hallock 
Hallock 



Executive Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Addr] 


G. Goodman 


Hallock 


C. L. Gast 


Hallock 


W. V. Longley 


Hallock 







Food Conservation 



Mrs. A. E. Nelson Hallock 





Labor Committee 




R. E. Bennet 


St. Vincent 


0. P. Becken 


Halma 


Albert Brown 


Humboldt 


D. S. Andreason 


Karlstad 


R. M. Alexander 


Orleans 


L. Melgard 


Kennedy 


T. W. Shogren 


Lancaster 


A. Arveson 


Donaldson 


John A. Engelbert 


Bronson 


James Cannon 


Northcote 



Township Representatives on General Work 



J. E. Sundberg 


Kennedy 


J. A. Engelbert 


Bronson 


Chas. Widerstrand 


Orleans 


Peter Oiein 


Halma 


Peter Steen 


Lancaster 


Wm. Stein 


Karlstad 


H. P. Ruud 


Bronson 


Carl Johnson 


Cariboo 


Louis Swenson 


Kennedy 


L. D. Khnger 


Lancaster 


John Murray 


Donaldson 


Dennis Rice 


Bronson 


John Mclver 


Lancaster 


Oscar Roos 


Karlstad 


Bernard Berg 


Lancaster 


A. M. Englund 


Karlstad 


J. C. Johnstone 


Humboldt 


Victor Holmquist 


Hallock 


Jas. Reinhold 


Hallock 


Hans Lindberg 


Kennedy 


Axel Norberg 


Hallock 


Peter Nelson 


Orleans 


B. E. Herseth 


Robbin 


Olander Benson 


Lancaster 


G. E. Harrington 


Orleans 


W. H. Hawkyard 


Hallock 


T. D. Winter 


Northcote 


Ole N. Bengtson 


Kennedy 


T. W. Truedson 


Hallock 


Hans Moen 


Hallock 



Village Representatives on General Work 



C. J. Forsberg 

D. J. Campbell 
Frank Keine 
Carl Veblen 
John McEnroe 
Albert Brown 
Wm. Peterson 



Karlstad 

Lancaster 

Kennedy 

Hallock 

Donaldson 

Humboldt 

Lancaster 



R. E. Bennett 
G. Goodman 
W. V. Longley 
J. D. Henry 
Wm. Gamble 
Otto Thorson 



St. Vincent 
Hallock 
Hallock 
Hallock 
St. Vincent 
St. Vincent 



229 





Lab 


or Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


G. Goodman, 




John Engelbert 


Bronson 


Chairman 


Hallock 


O. P. Becken 


Halma 


R. E. Bennett 


St. Vincent 


D. S. Andreasen 


Karlstad 


Albert Brown 


Humboldt 


L. Melgard 


Kennedy- 


R. Alexander 


Orleans 


A. Arveson 


Donaldson 


T. W. Shogren 


Lancaster 


James Cannon 


Northcote 



Marketing Committee 



R. E. Bennett 


St. Vincent 


R. M. Alexander 


Orleans 


Albert Brown 


Humboldt 


T. W. Shogren 


Lancaster 


James Cannon 


Northcote 


G. C. Lee 


Halma 


C. L. Gast 


Hallock 


J. A. Engelbert 


Bronson 


L. Melgard 


Kennedy- 


D. S. Andreasen 


Karlstad 


A. Arveson 


Donaldson 







230 



KOOCHICHING COUNTY 



Name 
John H. Brown, Director 
Geo. S. Langland, Secretary 
G. W. Anderson, Treasurer 



Address 
International Falls 
International Falls 
Ranier 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Rev. E. L. Heermance, 




Chas. Jameson 


Little Fork 


Chairman 


International Falls 


W. G. Richards 


Big Falls 


D. B. Jewell 


International Falls 


Chas. Romans 


Happlyland 


M. M. Abbott 


International Falls 


M. J. McHuge 


Margie 


John Berg 


International Falls 


L. R. Bryant 


Gemmell 


John Brown 


International Falls 


E. W. Kohnhase 


Mizpah 


Martin Marson 


Ericsbnrg 


C. P. Ellingson 


Northome 


Lotiis Peterson 


Ray 







SSI 



LAC QUI PARLE COUNTY 



Name 




Address 


J. W. Dale, 


Director 


Dawson 


William Jackson, Secretary 


Dawson 


J. E. Reyerson, Treasurer 


Dawson 




Advisory Council 


' 


Name 


Township 


Address 


Oscar Skallerus 


Arena 


Madison 


Herman Gloege 


Agassiz 


Bellingham 


C. J. Orton 


Augusta 


Marietta 


H. J. Stratte 


Baxter 


Dawson 


Geo. Blocher 


Bellingham Village 


Bellingham 


A. H. Nibblink 


Boyd Village 


Boyd 


Geo. Jorgenson 


Camp Release 


Montevideo 


J. 0. Hoyum 


Cerro Gordo 


Dawson 


Chas. 0. Hill 


Dawson City 


Dawson 


Andrew Amundson 


Freeland 


Canby 


Sigfred J. Sather 


Garfield 


Madison 


A. E. Schacherer 


Hamlin 


Dawson 


M. 0. Ulstad 


Hantho 


Madison 


M. S. Tinderholt 


Lac qui Parle 


Montevideo 


D. D. Olson 


Lake Shore 


Loui burg 


I. L. Philley 


Louisburg Village 


Louisburg 


J. H. Hayden 


Madison Village 


Madison 


P. A. Olson 


Madison 


Madison 


C. W. Hubbs 


Manfred 


Gary, S. D. 


G. C. Lewis 


Marietta Village 


Marietta 


James Donaldson 


Maxwell 


Dawson 


Frank Willis 


Mehurin 


Marietta 


David Woulfe 


Nassau Village 


Nassau 


A. K. Doyle 


Perry 


Bellingham 


Oscar Quist 


Providence 


Dawson 


John I. Femrite 


Riverside 


Dawson 


0. J. Agre 


Ten Mile Lake 


Boyd 


Andrew Raaf 


Watler 


Bellingham 


J. I. Von Eshen 


Yellow Bank 


Odessa 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


A. B. Amundson 


Dawson 


E. L. Oien 


Boyd 


J. H. Hayden 


Madison 


David Woulfe 


Nassau 


G. C.Blocher 


Bellingham 


Frank Willis 


Marietta 


Knute Kolkjen 


Louisburg 







232 



Publicity Committee 



Name Address 

Prof, Belong Bellingham 

J. H. Driscoll Madison 

Prof. Robert Ringdahl Dawson 



Name 


Address 


G. C. Baker 


Marietta 


A. H. Nibbelink 


Boyd 


Frank Putnam 


Nassau 



Merchandise and Food Products Federal Food Administrator 



Name 
0. T. Mork, Chairman 



Address 

Madison 



Permanent War Finance Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


J. H. Hayden 


Madison 


David Woulfe 


Nassau 


Geo. Gorgenson 


Boyd 


Herman Gloege 


BelHngham 


R. C. Hankins 


Dawson 


D. D. Olson 


Louisbtirg 


Frank WilHs 


Marietta 








Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


E. 0. Sage 


Madison 


August Mittlestadt 


Bellingham 


Chris Emerson 


Dawson 


I. L. Philley 


Louisburg 


E. L. Oien 


Boyd 


Charles Danielson 


Marietta 


David Woulfe 


Nassau 







233 



LAKE COUNTY 
Executive Committee 



Name 
John Dwan, Director 
O. LeClair, Secretary 
Geo. Munford, Treasurer 



Address 
Two Harbors 
Two Harbors 
Two Harbors 



Advisory Council 



Name 
Wm. Feller 
O. D. Bailey 
Col. Reynolds 
Christ Jensen 
Louis M. Lorentson 
A. J. Sonju 



Address 
Two Harbors 
Two Harbors 
Knife River 
Two Harbors 
Beaver Bay 
Finland 



Name 
Alfred M. Fenstadt 
H. G. Good 
E. P. Christensen 
Thos. Owens 
Jas. H. Limz 
A. E. Webb 



Address 
Little Marais 
Winton 
Two Harbors 
Two Harbors 
Two Harbors 
Two Harbors 



984 



LE SUEUR COUNTY 



Name 

Thos. H. Smullen, Director 
M. W. Grimes, Secretary 



Address 
Le Sueur 
Le Sueur 



Name . 
A. G. Smith, Sr. 
Leo Hayden 
C. T. Baker 
John Sprey 
W. H. Becker 
Job. W. Lloyd 
M. McCourtney 
Jas. O'Meara 
Chas. Babcock 
David Turritin 
Milton Cheadle 
Wm. Lloyd 
M. R. Everett 
C. L. Chase 
Wm. K. Wilcox 
John Rosenaue, Jr. 
James A. Meagher 
W. L. Harvey 
Fred Wieland 
John Spence 
Dr. Jas. McKeon 
John Shortall 
Chas. Garvin 



Township Chairmen 

Township 
Le Suetu- 
Tyrone 
Ottawa 

Le Sueur Center 
Lexington 
Sharon 
Derrynane 
Cordova 
Kasota 

Town of Kasota 
Cleveland 
Cleveland Village 
Waterville City 
Waterville Township 
Elysian Village 
Elysian Township 
Washington Town 
New Prague City 
Lanesburgh 
Montgomery Townsh. 
Montgomery City 
Kilkenny Town 
Kilkenny Township 



Address 
Le Sueur 
Le Sueur 
Ottawa 

Le Sueur Center 
Le Sueur Center 
Ottawa 
Le Sueur 
Le Sueur Center 
Kasota 
Kasota 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Waterville 
Waterville 
Elysian 
Elysian 
Madison Lake 
New Prague 
New Prague 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Kilkenny 
Montgomery 



Name 
Thos. H. Smullen 
C. W. Glotfelter 
Dainiel Vollich 
J. P. Foley 
P. J. Keehen 



Address 
Le Sueur 
Waterville 
Le Sueur Center 
Le Sueur 
Montgomery 



LINCOLN COUNTY 



Name 
Geo. Graff, Director 
A. E. Tasker, Secretary 
H. B. Danielson 



Address 
Ivanhoe 
Lake Benton 
Hendricks 



Advisory Council and Town Chairmen 



Name 
John Hanson 
Albert Anderson 
William Boulton 
G. J. Goodmundson 
Ed. Goebel 
John H. Hexum 
H. H. Danielson 
L. M. Townsend 
Geo. Hauswedell 
N. H. Sandager 



Address 

Hendricks 

Canby, R. 4 

Taunton 

Ivanhoe 

Ivanhoe 

Hendricks 

Hendricks 

Ivanhoe 

Arco 

Tyler 



Name 
R. S. Carlisle 
Frank Wirt 
Geo. Maurer 
Nels Hansen 
H. W. Rasmussen 
T. A. Holtey 
Dr. G. L. Jacquot 
Matthew Fowlds 
P. J. Theissen 
Dr. P. J. Bursheim 



Address 
Lake Benton 
Elkton, S. D. 
Verdi 

Lake Benton 
Tyler 
Hendricks 
Ivanhoe 
Arco 
Tyler 
Lake Benton 



Market Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


»hn A. Pukrop 


Ivanhoe 


N. 0. Lien 


Hendricks 


m. P. Stork 


Tyler 


Niels C. Pedersen 


Arco 


mest Osbeck 


Lake Benton 


Ed. Twedt 


Verdi 



Labor Committee 



Name 


Address 


'. P. Hermanson, Chairman 


Tyler 


Jarren Miller 


Verdi 



together with the village members of the Advisory Council 



Fuel Commissioners 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


M. Glemmestad 


Tyler 


Alfred Soderlind 


Lake Benton 


Geo. Graff 


Ivanhoe 







Food Administrator 



Name 
J. T. Clawson 



Address 
Ivanhoe 



236 







LYON COUNTY 




Name 




Address 


James H. Hall, 


Director 


Marshall 


Ame B. Gislason, Secretary 


Minneota 


J.W. 


Pike, Treasurer 


Marshall 






County Organization 




Name 




Township 


Address 


F. T. Shaeffer 




Amiret 


Amiret 


E. F. Whiting 




Village 


Balaton 


V. B. Tubbs 




Clifton 


Marshall 


James Anderson 




Coon Creek 


Russell 


B. M. Olson 




Custer 


Balaton 


J. T. Garry 




Village 


Cottonwood 


L. J. McDonald 




Eidsvold 


Minneota 


C. E. Erickson 




Fairview 


Green Valley 


Adolph Larson 




Village 


Florence 


J. A. Engels 




Grandview 


Ghent 


John Holden, Jr. 




Village 


Garvin 


L. A. Wewetzer 




Island Lake 


Lynd 


C. H. Middleton 




Lake Marshall 


Marshall 


L. E. Larson 




Lucas 


Cottonwood 


E. E. Davis 




Lynd 


Lynd 


Christ Johnson 




Lyons 


Balaton 


A. H. Amundson 




Monroe 


Garvin 


Franklin Edwards 




City 


Marshall 


T. F. Dahl 




City 


Minneota 


J. L. Teiglund 




Nordland 


Minneota 


L. E. Peterson 




Rock Lake 


Balaton 


M. J. Aurandt 




Shelbume 


Balaton 


Charles Ford 




Sodus 


Amiret 


0. S. Todnem 




Stanley 


Marshall 


A. R. English 




City 


Tracy 


P. P. Ahem 




Village 


Taunton 


Siver Erickson 




Vallers 


Minneota 


F. Smith 




Village 


Russell 


J. W. Pike 




Treasurer 


Marshall 






Marketing Committee 


- 


Name 


Address Name 


Address 


F. Edwards, Chm. 


Marshall T. F. Dahl 


Minneota 


D. H. Evans 


Tracy 


Chris Johnson 


Balaton 


A. E. Anderson 


Cottonwood 








Labor Committee 




A. R. English 


Tracy 


E. F. Whiting 


Balaton 


E. Smith 


Russell 


J. A. Engels 


Ghent 


J. T. Garry 


Cottonwood Fred Shaeffer 


Amiret 


T. F. Dahl 


Minneota Adolph Larson 


Florence 


John Holden, Jr. 


Garvin 







237 







McLEOD COUNTY 






Name 


Address 


H. 


, H, 


. Bonniwell, Director 


Hutchinson 


H. 


, H, 


. Bonniwell, Jr., Secretary 

Executive Committee 


Hutchinson 


Name 




Address Name 


Address 


Dr. John Dorsey 




Glencoe Oscar Merrill 


Silver T^nke 


Jay Greaves 




Glencoe William Beise 


Lester Prairie 


Frank Mann 




Brownton C. L. Todd 


Hutchinson 


Fred Rehse 




Stewart 0. W. Lundsten Hutchinson 


Bert Hanlain 




Winsted Geo. Minder 


Plato 



Advisory Council 

Sam. G. Anderson, Jr Hutchinson Dr. K. Wakefield Hutchinson 

Wm. E. Harrington Hutchinson Percy Avery Hutchinson 



Name 
Henry Kuehl 
S. S. Beach 
Geo. Poshek 
Theo. LaMotte 
Louis Larson 
Joseph Popelka 
William Tomlinson 
Geo. Plath 
Dennis Provo 
Ray Newcomb 
W. W. Groupmann 
W. D. Jensen 
E. B. Preston 
L. D. Phillips 
Dr. C. W. Tinker 
M. B. West 
T. F. Miller 
Wm. Beise 
Frank Hawlick 
J. W. Thomas 
L. A. Ritter 
J. A. Lindemberg 
Herman Groupman 
John Bell 



Name' 
C. W. Tinker 
M. B. West 
T. F. Miller 
Wm. Beise 
Frank Hawlick 



Township Organization 
Township 
Acoma 
Hutchinson 
Hale 
Winsted 
Bergen 

Rich Valley • 
Hossau Valley 
Lynn 
Collins 
Sumter 
Helen 
Glencoe 
Penn 

Roimd Grove 
Stewart Village 
Brownton 
Plato 

Lester Prairie 
Silver Lake 
Winsted 

Hutchinson City 
Hutchinson City 
Glencoe City 
Glencoe City 

Marketing Committee 



Address 
Stewart 
Brownton 
Plato 

Lester Prairie 
Silver Lake 



Address 

Hutchinson 

Hutchinson 

Silver Lake 

Silver Lake 

Glencoe 

Glencoe 

Htitchinson 

Huthinson 

Stewart 

Glencoe 

Glencoe 

Glencoe 

Brownton 

Stewart 

Stewart 

Brownton 

Plato 

Lester Prairie 

Silver Lake 

Winsted 

1st Ward 

2nd Ward 

1st Ward 

2nd Ward 



Name 
J. W. Thomas 
L. A. Ritter 
J. A. Lindenberg 
Herman Groupmann 
John Bell 



Address 
Winsted 
Hutchinson 
Hutchinson 
Glencoe 
Glencoe 



288 



MAHNOMEN COUNTY 



Name 
A. L. Thompson, Director 
Dr. F. M. Archibald, Chairman 
G. W. Gunderson, Secretary 
Olaf Qually, Treasurer 



Address 
Mahnomen 
Mahnomen 
Mahnomen 
Mahnomen 



County Districts 



Name 
Otto Horn 
Paul Wille 
Geo. C. Johnson 
Frank Suda 
J. H. Cogswell 
E. A. Watson 
James Staska 
Martin Branchaud 



Address 
Bejou 
Mahnomen 
Mahnomen 
Waubun 
Fosston 
Beaulieu 
Mahnomen 
Waubun 



Name 
W. A. Montgomery 
N. B. Nelson 
C. M. Grannimi 
L. G. Sanders 
Roy F. Everett 
Thos. Gleason 
C. D. Wilkinson 



Address 
Duane 
Mahnomen 
Mahnomen 
Mahnomen 
Waubun 
Lengby 
Naytahwaush 



Township Organization 



Name 

James Longon 
C. V. Lind 
Gunder Boe 
F. J. Lootka 
John King 
Chris Halvorson 
John Ommodt 
Chas. Bmris 
J. H. Cogswell 
Frank Allen 
H. Swiers 
Chas. Bloker 
Henry Larson 
Jos. Sweeney 
Ed. Sleeth 
John Maxwell 
H. P. Jensen 
Ed. Snetzinger 
A. D. McDonnell 
Bert Hart 
Chas. McNiff 
Lewis Larson 
Frank Hopfner 
Alfred Warren 
Thos. Antell 
Philip Star 
Thos. Cahill 



Township 


Address 


Bejou Township 


Bejou 


Bejou Township 


Bejou 


Marsh Creek 


Mahnomen 


Marsh Creek 


Mahnomen 


Pembina Township 


Mahnomen 


Pembina Township 


Mahnomen 


Peoples Grove Township Waubun 


Peoples Grove Twp. 


Waubun 


Gregory Township 


Fosston 


Gregory Township 


Fosston 


Gregory Township 


Bejou 


Chief Township 


Beaulieu 


Chief Township 


Beaulieu 


Rosedale Township 


Mahnomen 


Rosedale Township 


Mahnomen 


Lake Grove Township 


Waubun 


Lake Grove Township 


Waubun 


Heier 


Duane 


Heier 


Duane 


Legard Township 


Waubun 


Legard Township 


BeauUeu 


Beaulieu Township 


Beaulieu 


Beaulieu Township 


Beaulieu 


Island Lake 


Lengby 


Island Lake Township 


Lengby 


Twin T,akes 


Nay tah waush 


Twin Lakes 


Waubun 



U9 





Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Otto Horn 


Bejou 


W. A. Montgomery 


Duane 


Paul Wille 


Mahnomen 


N. B. Nelson 


Waubun 


Geo. C. Johnson 


Mahnomen 


CM. Grannum 


Mahnomen 


Frank Suda 


Waubun 


L. G. Sanders 


Mahnomen 


J. H. Cogswell 


Fosston 


Roy F. Everett 


Waubun 


E. A. Watson 


Beaulieu 


Thos. Gleason 


Lenbgy 


James Staska 


Mahnomen 


John Hill 


Naytahwaush 


Martin Branchaud 


Waubun 







Marketing Committee 



Name 
J. M. Sluke, Ohm. 
V. Dryden 
Geo. O. Lee 
Julius Owen 



Address 

Mahnomen 
Mahnomen 
Mahnomen 
Mahnomen 



Name 
J. W. Nelson 
R. Klubeck 
Henry Harty 



Address 

Mahnomen 
Mahnomen 
Mahnomen 



Fuel Committee 



Name 
A. L. Thompson, Oh. 
H. P. Phillips 



Address 



Name 
CO. Cooper 



Address 



240 



MARSHALL COUNTY 



Name 


Address 


A.N. 


Eckstrom, Director 


Warren 




David Johnson, Secretary 


Warren 






Advisory Council 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


H. L. Wood 


Warren 


Chas. Kimbrough 


Strandquist 


Lewis Hedquist 


Argyle 


M. L. Ihle 


Newfolden 


Christ Nelson 


Thief River Falls 


Albert Larson 


Newfolden 


S. D. Lincoln 


Stephen 


Olof Opseth 


Rosewood 


Carl Haugen 


Oslo 


John Wang 


Oslo 


H. S. Beckwith 


Argyle 


George Haggen 


Stephen 


V. M. Johnson 


Warren 


Richard Nelson 


Gatzke 


Otto Kranz 


Middle River 


• J. W. Field 


Stephen 


Jos. McGregor 


Radium 


E. M. Evans 


Middle River 


Chas. H. Omlid 


Middle River 


F. A. Green 


Stephen 


Perry Bush 


Stephen 


Chas. J. Berg 


Jane 


Otto Haack, Jr. 


Grygla 


Otto Hohle 


Grygla 


Chas. Thibido 


Stephen 


Chas. W. Rodquist 


Warren 


Rasmi Lund 


Karlstad 


Ed. Sheldrew 


Grygla 


John Sorum 


Holt 


Chas. Gustafson 


Viking 


Milton Adams 


Esplee 


Ernest Mack 


Argyle 


John Whitman 


Thief River Falls 


Fred Peterson 


Warren 


Alfred Wilier 


Argyle 


Andrew Ramstad 


Newfolden 


Martin J. Nelson 


Stephen 


H. M. Scovell 


Middle River 


0. A. Rambeck 


Germantown 


John Gratzek 


Strandquist 


T. B. Folden 


Holt 


Henry Sand? 


Alvarado 


S. 0. Hoff 


Jevne 


O. Hendrickson 


Argyle 


C. K. Koland 


Strandquist 


E. P. Modin 


Middle River 


Peter Backlund 


Casperson 


Carl Hanson 


Newfolden 


M. L. Warner 


Warren 


Olger Oseth 


Oslo 


P. W. Cast 


Newfolden 


C. R. Gillespie 


Stephen 


Wm. Erickson 


Argyle 


A. 0. Fladelund 


Grygla 


Fred Solley 


Anstad 


B. Docken 


Holt 


A. P. Nelson 


Gatzke 


J. J. Oistad 


Strandquist 


Christ Norbeck 


Rollis 


Mrs. H. L Yetter 


Stephen 




Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


David Johnson 


Warren 


Henry Sands 


Alvarado 


C. L. Spaulding 


Warren 


0. P. Oseth 


Oslo 


0. Hendrickson 


Argyle 


E. P. Modin 


Middle River 


C. R. Gillespie 


Stephen 


B. Docken 


Holt 




Marketing 


Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


C. L. Spaulding 


Warren 


I. M. Myrho 


Viking 



241 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


0. Hendrickson 


Argyle 


Carl Hanson 


New Folden 


C. R. Gillespie 


Stephen 


J. J. Oistad 


Strandquist 


Anton Hill 


Alvarado 


B. Docken 


Holt 


0. P. Oseth 


Oslo 


E. P. Modin 


Middle River 


Jos. McGregor 


Radium 







Finance Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


H. L. Wood, Chairman 


Warren 


J. J. Olson 


Warren 


C. L. Spaulding 


Warren 


Aug. A. Johnson 


Warren 


0. H. Taralseth 


Warren 


A. N. Eckstrom 


Warren 


H. I. Yetter 


Stephen 


Fred Tiedt 


Argyle 



S41 



MARTIN COUNTY 



Name 
Clifford Jones, Chairman 
J. T. Swearingen, Secretary 
C. E. Landin, Treasurer 



Address 
Fairmont 
Fairmont 
Sherbum 



Executive Committee 

C. E. Jones, Chairman 

J. T. Swearingen, Secretary 

L. J. Hinton, Chairman Liberty Loan 

Attorney Haycraft, Chairman America First 

Rev. Fillmore, Chairman Red Cross 

Supt. Wolfe, Chairman War Savings 

Attorney Ward, Chairman Y. M. C. A. 

John Wolf, Chairman Knights of Colimibus 

A. R. Allen, County Attorney 

W. S. Carver, County Sheriff 

Mr. Volrath, County Commissioner 

Fred Betz, Postmaster 

C. J. Timms, Food Administrator 

Axel Grant, Fuel Administrator 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


F. A. Day 


Fairmont 


R. W. Stewart 


Ceylon 


J. C. Musser 


Fairmont 


J. D. Griggs 


Tnunan 


Geo. Bullock 


Fairmont 


Mons Olson 


Truman 


F. C. Gould 


Fairmont 


L. E. Champine 


Dolliver, Iowa 


Richard Mturay 


Fairmont 


James Prouty 


Granada 


L. A. Milow 


Fairmont 


John Maxwell 


Granada 


Frank Nowicki 


Fairmont 


J. T. McNemey 


Granada 


John Bums 


Fairmont 


C. L. Larson 


Dunnell 


H. H. Canright 


Fairmont 


J. A. Linder 


Dunnell 


C. E. Cohnan 


Fairmont 


H. P. Deneen 


Triimiph 


C. Blanchar 


Sherbimi 


L. W. Steel 


Triumph 


C. E. Landin 


Sherbum 


Harry Sheppard 


Triumph 


0. L. Larson 


Sherbum 


J. H. Hagen 


Ormsby 


John Carlson 


SherbiuTi 


Peter Wortman 


Monterey 


F. H. Wherland 


Welcome 


W. W. Adams 


Winnebago 


0. W. Kinney 


Welcome 








Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


R. W. Stewart 


Ceylon 


B. A. Burton 


Granada 


C. E. Landin 


Sherbtun 


J. A. Linder 


Dunnell 


F. H. Wherland 


Welcome 


Peter Wortman 


Monterey 


L. J. Hinton 


Tmman 


Wm. Doyle 


Fairmont 


Geo. Brockman 


Triumph 


Clifford Jones, Chm. 


Fairmont 



248 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Clifford Jones 


Fairmont 


Christian Scott 


Truman 


Prof. Lawrence 


Fairmont 


Robert Nelson 


East Chain 


J. W. Allison 


Fairmont 


Peter Wortman 


Monterey 


John Gerber 


Welcome 


George Brockman 


Triumph 


John Roepke 


Sherburn 


George Pasely 


Ceylon 


Geo. Winzenberg 


Granada 


Linus Peterson 


Bunnell 


J. H. Sprague 


Northrup 







Following are the names of the Safety Guards of the County, the first name of each 

squad being the Captain 
Welcome 



Name 
A. R. Decker 
Otto Miller 
Geo. E. Van Amber 


Name Name 
L. 0. Thompson Wm. Klusendorf 
H. C. Roloff W. H. Schrotberger 

East Chain 


Name 
H. E. Schwarz 
Bernard Warner 


Name 
John Pytleski 
Geo. Tobin 


Name Name 
Art. Nutin J. H. Wagar 
R. E. Rich Elvin Guy 

Truman 


Name ■ 
R. W. Nelson 
Oscar Carlson 


Name 
L. J. Hinton 
Christian Scott 
Samuel S. Rector 


Name Name 
Charles Morgan Lloyd Parsons 
C.C.Poole G.E.Foster 

Triumph 


Name 
G. M. Sieberg 
T. C. Cole 


Name 
A. A. Harris 
John W. Pixler 


Name Name 
Ellsworth Hallett W. R. Sturgeon 
F. A. Kroeger S. P. Pope 

Sherburn 


Name 
C. M. Stockdill 
C. F. Roforth 


Name 
A. R. Flygare 
Henry G. Seifert 
C. C. McFadden 


Name Name 
Frank Collins B. H. Roth 
A. G. T. Broun E. E. Risley 


Name 
C. E. Landin 
H. J. Whitehead 


Name 
R. W. Stewart 
N. P. Larson 
L. Larson 


Ceylon 

Name Name 
W. C. Cook Neal Bode 
Wm. Drummond Archie Gardner 

Bunnell 


Name 
J. Gundelfinger 
G. W. Clark 


Name 
Frank A. Sandin 
E. G. Mathwig 


Name Name 
Carl F. Carlson August Wenberg 
H. C. Clute Carl G. Applequist 


Name 
C. J. Berg 
M. M. Sorenson 



244 



MEEKER COUNTY 



Name 
H. I. Peterson, Director 
John N. Gayner, Secretary 
E. O. Hammer, Treasurer 



Address 

Litchfield 
Litchfield 
Litchfield 



Township Organization 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Nels C. Brown 


Rt. 3 Grove City 


J. E. Matsen 


Dassel R. 3 


Tanney Johnson 


Dassel 


G. A. Nelson 


Litchfield 


Alfred Oberg 


Darwin 


P. J. Mitchell 


Litchfield 


Emil M. Nelson 


Litchfield 


J. B. Warren 


Grove City Rt 1 


J. E. Nelson 


Darwin 


W. R. Stiff 


Grove City Rt 1 


David Carlson 


Dassel 


0. L. Langren 


Litchfield 


Rudolph Lewerenz 


Darwin 


A. A. Miller 


Grove City 


C. A. Oilman 


Litchfield R 3 


H. E. Swanson 


Dassel 


Theo. Borman 


Watkin 


Jos. Friedman 


Eden Valley 


F. 0. Anderson 


Litchfield R 7 


H. J. Wartman 


Watkins 


A. T. Johnson 


Grove City R 4 


Mrs. Alva R. Hunt 


Litchfield 


Olaf L. Olson 


Dassel 








Marketing 


Committee 




Frank Piefer 


Litchfield 


C. E. Warren 


Grove City 


K. Johnson 


Dassel 








Labor Committee 




0. M. Olson, 


Litchfield 


Joseph Olson 


Dassel 


A. P. Nelson 


Grove City 







Chairman Food Committee 

J. N. Gayner Litchfield 



245 



MILLE LACS COUNTY 



Name 
Ira G. Stanley, Director 



Address 
Princeton 



Executive Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


R. P. Morton 


Princeton 


Nels Robideau 


Princeton, R. 1 


Fred R. Burrell 


Onemia 


C. W. Wills 


Milaca 


C. E. Gilbert 


Foreston 


Nils B. Berg 


Isle 


Charles Malone 


Isle 


Carl Anderson 


Milaca 


D. S. PhilHps 


Milaca 


John J. Axel 


Milaca, R. 2 


Fred Gravel 


Onamia 


F. A. Maynard 


Milaca 


E. K. Evans 


Princeton 


G. H. Carr 


Onamia 


B. H. Potts 


Wahkon 


Thiire Lindberg 


Milaca 


A. J. Fra,n7,en 


Milaca, R. 2 


August F. Meyer 


Princeton, R. 2 


Carl Eckdahl 


Bock 


E. E. Dinwiddle 


Vineland 


Frank Robinson 


Onamia 


Chas. L. Freer 


Onamia 


Oscar C. Anderson 


Opstead 







Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


A. J. Franzen 


Milaca, R. 2 


Carl Eckdahl 


Bock 


Fra,nk Tobinson 


Onamia 


Oscar C. Anderson 


Opstead 


Nels Tobideau 


Princeton 


C. W. Wills 


Milaca 


Nils B. Berg 


Isle 


Carl Anderson 


Milaca 


John J. Axel 


Milaca, R. 2 


F. A. Maynard 


Milaca 


G. H. Carr 


Onamia 


Thure Lindberg 


Milaca 


Aug. F. Meyer 


Princeton, R. 2 


D. E. Dinwiddle 


Vineland 


Chas. L. Freer 


Onamia 


Ira G. Stanley 


Princeton 


Rufus P. Morton 


Princeton 


Fred R. Burrell 


Onamia 


C. E. Gilbert 


Foreston 


Chas. Malone 


Isle 


D. S. Philips 


Milaca 


Fred Gravel 


Onamia 


E. K. Evans 


Princeton 


B. H. Potts 


Wahkon 



Finance Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


E. L. McMillan 


Princeton 


F. R. Burrel 


Onamia 


J. A. Allen 


Milaca 


Roleff Vaaler 


Milaca 


C. E. Gilbert 


Foreston 


S. S. Petterson 


Princeton 


W. H. Smith 


Princeton 


S. P. Skahen 


Princeton 




Labor Committee 






Name 




Address 


R 


. P. Morton 




Princeton 



%H 



MORRISON COUNTY 

Name 
Don M. Cameron, Director 
Andrew Johnson, Secretary 

Executive Committee 

Chas. Sylvester 

Geo. Kiewel 

H. A. Rider 

Mrs. Winnabel M. Cochrane 

J. W. Stephenson 

J. K. Martin 

E. J. Richie 

Rev. Phil E. Gregory 
Geo. H. Peterson 

F. W. Dobbyn 
Jos. Sharrowski 
Eric Erickson 
Chas. E. Nichols 
John H. Hanfler 
I. E. Claassen 
Alb. A. Dominick 
Albert Johnson 
*R. E. Mann 
Jos. E. Brandl 
Gust Franzen 
Earnest G. Haymaker 
R. D. Wheeler 
Herman Lemnitz 
Genore Pelkey 
Alwin P. Sell 

C. E. Look 
Swan Johnson 
E. J. McCollum 
Geo. Danfort 
Mrs. L. D. Brown 



Address 
Little Falls 
Little Falls 



Little Falls 
Little Falls 
Little Falls 
Little Falls 
Little Falls 
Little Falls 
Little Falls 
Little Falls 
Little Falls 
Little Falls 
Pierz, R. 3 
Ramey P. O. 
Randall 

Little Falls, R. 3 
Little FaUs 
Pierz 

Little Falls, R. 7 
Foley, R. 3 
Pierz Route 4 
Pillgaer 
Motley 
Lincoln 
Randall, R. 1 
Little Falls, R. 1 
Hillman 
HiUman, R. 1 
Swanville, R. 1 
Royalton 
Royalton 
Little Falls 



Labor Committee 



Name 
Andrew Johnson 



Address 
Little Falls 



"Deceased 



Marketing Committee 

Name Address 

J. W. Stephenson, Small Grain Little Falls 

*T. W. Dewey, Produce Little Falls 

Samuel Lafond, Live Stock Little Falls 
E. K. McCollum, Grain, Produce and 

Live Stock Royalton 

R. B. Millard, Chairman Liberty Loan Organization 
J. K. Martin, Food and Fuel Administrator 



247 



MOWER COUNTY 



Name 


Address 


W. A. 


Nolan, Director 


Grand Meadow 


E. M. 


Doane, Secretary 


Austin 


P.M. 


Beach, Treasurer 


Lyle 


Name 


Township 


Address 


W. H. Spencer 


Township of Leroy 


Leroy 


N. L. Weber 


Township of Lodi 


Taopi 


Iver Tigen 


Township of Adams 


Adams 


L. M. Eggen 


Township of Nevada 


Lyle 


Jay Monahan 


Township of Lyle 


Austin, R. R. 


T. M. Haggerty 


Township of Bennington 


Grand Meadow 


E. A. Wignes 


Township of Clayton 


Elkton 


B. J. Huseby 


Township of Marshall 


Adams 


A. C. Brooks 


Township of Austin 


Austin, R. R. 


W. H. Goodsell 


Township of Frankford 


Grand Meadow 


Frank Smith 


TowTiship of Windom 


Austin, R. R. 


E. J. Naish 


Township of Grand Meadow 


Grand Meadow 


Jno. Christgau 


Township of Dexter 


Dexter 


S. K. Dahle 


Township of Red Rock 


Brownsdale 


A. E. Bedell 


Township of Lansing 


Lansing 


H. P. Johnson 


Township of Pleasant Valley 


Grand Meadow 


Jacob Gjemess 


Township of Sargeant 


Sargeant 


Geo. Wuertz 


Township of Waltham 


Austin, R. R. 


Robt. Bagley 


Township of Udolpho 


Blooming Prairie 


R. W. Chadwick 


Township of Racine 


Racine 


Chris Madsen 


Village of Leroy 


Leroy 


H. J. Gosha 


Village of Taopi 


Taopi 


P. H. Can- 


Village of Adams 


Adams 


Gill Ferris 


Village of Lyle 


Lyle 


Ed. C. Keefe 


Village of Rose Creek 


Rose Creek 


L. C. Carder 


Village of Elkton 


Elkton 


Geo. Brown 


Village of Grand Meadow 


Grand Meadow 


Sam'l D. Goetsch 


Village of Dexter 


Dexter 


W. H. Lawrence 


Village of Brownsdale 


Brownsdale 


Franklin Grimm 


Village of Sargeant 


Sargeant 


E. J. Markham 


Village of Waltham 


Waltham 


Gen. A. W.Wright 


Village of Austin, 1st Ward 


Austin 


J. N. Nicholsen 


Village of Austin, 2nd Ward 


Austin 


Ira Padden 


Village of Austin, 3rd Ward 


Austin 


The above is a list of village and township chairmen. 


They also constitute 




Labor Committee 





Finance Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


W. A. Nolan 


Grand Meadow 


Ralph P. Crane 


Austin 


C. F. Cook 


Austin 


C. Madsen 


LeRoy 


A. J. Krebsbach 


Adams 


J. H. Skinner 


Austin 


J. N. Nicholsen 


Austin 







248 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


J. W. Hare 


Austin 


Chas. Palmer 


LeRoy 


Carl Syck 


Brownsdale 


N. E. Fedsane 


Lyle 


Stanley Stevenson 


Dexter 


E. Markham 


Waltham 


E. G. Christgau 


Grand Meadow 


Geo, Eastman 


Elkton 


A. E. Bedell 


Lansing 


Henry Hahn 


Sargeant 


John Cronon 


Rose Creek 


Henry Stern 


Renova 


H. Carey 


Adams 


David McKee 


Racine 


G. S. Pitts 


Taopi 








Food Commission 





Name Address 

W. A. Nolan, Chairman Grand Meadow 

Mrs. Nellie M. Allen, Women's Aux. Austin 
Mrs. Eunice L. Rice, Co. Supt. Schools, 

Secretary Austin 



Coal Commission 



Name 
O. W. Oberg 
C. Madsen 
G. A. Wright 
Dr. W. F. Cobb 



Address 

Austin 

Leroy 

Grand Meadow 

Lyle 



249 



MURRAY COUNTY 



Name 

Burt I. Weld, Director 

P. H. Harrington, Secretary 



Address 
Slayton 
Slayton' 



Executive Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


R. P. Lamb, Chairman 


Slayton 


Sam Campbell 


Lake Wilson 


A. W. Tieraey, Counsel 


Fulda 


R. B. Porrest 


Lake Wilson 


P. D. Lindquist 


Pulda 


Alex Lowe 


Hadley 


T. P. Plynn 


Avoca 


Burt I. Weld 


Slayton 


B. DeMersseman 


Currie 


C. H. Helweg 


Pulda 



Labor Committee and Special Agents 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Archie McHarg 


Lime Creek 


P. N. Hansen 


Currie 


John S. Tolverson 


Pulda 


Mike Schrantz 


Slayton 


P. J. Stebor 


lona 


■ J.J.Mihin 


Hadley 


Pred Hart 


Chandler 


W. S. Pattinson 


Lake Wilson 


Thomas Radcliffe 


Chandler 


0. J. Olson 


Ruthton 


A. S. Peters 


Lake Wilson 


E. H. Johnson 


^ Balaton 


C. E. Reed 


Hadley 


John Carlson 


Garvin 


S. C. Escher 


Sla3rton 


George P. Haugen 


Tracy 


T. 0. Westby 


Avoca 


Birch N. Bell 


Walnut Grove 


E. J. Cohrs 


Dovray 


Jennie Hohn 


Slayton 



Marketing Committee 



Name Address 

J. W. Case, Chairman Slayton 
R. B. Porrest Lake Wilson 



Name 
B. DeMersseman 



Address 
Currie 



250 



NICOLLET COUNTY 

Name Address 

N. H. Olson, Director St. Peter 

Andrew Cook, Secretary St. Peter 

Mrs. H. L. Stark, Director Women's Aux. St. Peter 



Name 
J. B. Summers 



Executive Committee 



Address 
Nicollet 



Name 
Rupert Altman 



address 
Gibbon, E. 4 



Name 
C. H. Jackson 
Andrew Cook 
C. G. Seifert 
G. H. Townley 
H. S. Baker 
W. G. Laumann 
W. E. Joem 
J. W. Simimers 
Martin Frey 
O. A. Olin 
Dr. O. L. Peterson 
T. F. Berquist 
Geo. Bobsin 
Herman Poehler 
H. E. Stellmacher 
Thos. Smith 
M. M. Gram 
L. B. Steel 
J. A. Schuck 
Otto H. Anderson 
Jay Miner 
Thos. Wright 
C. H. Poncoin 
Gilbert Gilbertson 
Mtu-de McKenzie 
Albert Annextad 
Mahlan Johnson 
H. H. Tegner 



Township Organization — ^Districts 

District Address 

St. Peter, First Ward St. Peter 

St. Peter, First Ward St. Peter 

St. Peter, First Ward St. Peter 

St. Peter, Second Ward St. Peter 

St. Peter, Second Ward St. Peter 

St. Peter, Second Ward St. Peter 

Nicollet Village Nicollet 

Nicollet Village Nicollet 

Nicollet Village Nicollet 

Lafayette Village Lafayette 

Lafayette Village Lafayette 

Lafayette Village Lafayette 

Courtland Village Courtland 

Courtland Village Courtland 

Courtland Village Coiu-tland 

No. Mankato No. Mankato 

No. Mankato No. Mankato 

No. Mankato No. Mankato 

Oshwa Township St. Peter, R. 1 

Oshwa Township St. Peter, R. 2 

Oshwa Township St. Peter, R. 2 

Traverse Township St. Peter, R. 2 

Traverse Township St. Peter, R. 2 

Traverse Township St. Peter, R. 3 

Lake Prairie St. Peter, R. 5 

Lake Prairie St. Peter, R. 3 

Lake Prairie St. Peter, R. 3 

New Sweden Nicollet, R. 2 



261 



Name 
Christ Hoveland 
J. A. Johnson 
L. W. Samuelson 
John A. Hinquist 
Aug. A. Malmberg 
Julius Hagberg 
J. W. Berger 
Joseph Transig 
Jos. Kienlen 
Alex Russel 
Rupert Altman 
A. F. Pickle 
G. F. Merkel 
W. B. LaFramboise 
J. W. Schroeder 
Louis Hulke 
Louis T. Precht 
Louis Ketner 
J. C. Bode 
Robt. Frietag 
W. W. Randall 
C. P. Langren 
G. M. Cole 
M. J. Schouweiler 
C. J. Doucet 
Louis Wells 
R. E. Anderson 
Chester Nelson 
Fred Gieseke 



District 

New Sweden 

New Sweden 

Bemadotte 

Bemadotte 

Bemadotte 

Lafayette 

Lafayette 

Lafayette 

West Newton 

West Newton 

West Newton 

Ridgely 

Ridgely 

Ridgely 

Courtland 

Courtland 

Courtland 

Nicollet 

Nicollet 

Nicollet 

Belgrade 

Belgrade 

Belgrade 

Granby 

Granby 

Granby 

Brighton 

Brighton 

Brighton 



Address 
St. Peter, R. 2 
Nicollet, R. 2 
Lafayette, R. 1 
Lafayette, R. 1 
Lafayette 
Lafayette 
Klossner 
Lafayette 
Gibbon, R. 4 
New Ulm, R. 1 
Gibbon, R. 4 
Fairfax, R. 3 
Fairfax, R. 3 
Fairfax, R. 3 
Courtland 
Courtland 
Courtland 
Nicollet 
Nicollet 
Nicollet 
Mankato, R. 5 
Mankato, R. 5 
Mankato, R. 5 
Nicollet, R. 2 
Nicollet, 
Nicollet 
Nicollet, R. 3 
New Ulm, R. 3 
New Ulm, R. 3 



Labor Committee 



Name 
C. G. Seifert 
E. R. Jones 
Anton Malmberg 
A. P. Anderson 
Herman Poehler 



Address 
St. Peter 
North Mankato 
Lafayette 
Nicollet 
Courtland 



Name 
J. W. Berger 
John A. Johnson 
Geo. Burke 
J. A. Schuck 



Address 
Klossner 
Nicollet, R. 2 
St. Peter, R. 3 
St. Peter, R. 1 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


A. C. Anderson 


St. Peter 


O. A. OHn 


Lafayette 


John C. Roby 


Nicollet 


John Hinquist 


Lafayette 



2S2 





NOBLES COUNTY 




Name 




Address 


W. E 


'. Oliver, Director 




Worthington 


J.J. 


Kies, Secretary 




Worthington 




Executive Cc 


►mmittee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


J. J. Kies 


Worthington 


A. F. Deihn 


Round Lake 


Ole Johnson 


Bigelow 


John Faragher 


Adrian 


Jas. McRoberts 


Ellsworth 


F. Comiskey 


Li more 


C. W. Becker 


Wilmont 


B. N. Bodelson 


Dundee 


E. W. Kane 


Kinbrae 


F. G. Mitchell 


Brewster 




Township Organization 




Chairman 


Township 




Address 


Jens Langseth 


Indian Lake 




Worthington 


O. B. Thueson 


Bigelow 




Bigelow 


N. A. Early 


Ransom 




Bigelow 


K. T. Feeney 


Little Rock 




Adrian 


J. P. Campbell 


Grand Prairie 


Ellsworth 


F. W. Knapp 


Lorain 




Worthington 


Fred Trunk 


Worthington 




Worthington 


W. C. Renshaw 


Dewald 




Rushmore 


George Beacon 


Olney 




Rushmore 


A. H. Rust 


West Side 




Adrian 


J. S. McCarvel 


Hersey 




Brewster 


W. H. Marquardt 


Elk 




Worthington 


Henry F. Moss 


Summit Lake 


Reading 


Mike Hendel 


Larkin 




Rushmore 


Henry Rust 


Lismore 




Lismore 


John Ramerth 


Graham Lakes 


Kinbrae 


N. R. Jorgensen 


Seward 




Fulda 


John Paradies 


Bloom 




Wilmont 


Fred Hartman 


Wilmont 




Lismore 


Chas. Cook 


Leota 


* 


Edgerton 




Labor Commission 




Name 


Address 


Name 


address 


G. W. Bramer 


Worthington 


Ole Johnson 


Bigelow 


F. J, Cummiskey 


Lismore 


G. W. Bramer 


Worthington 


P. J. Carter 


Adrian 


R. S. Stronks 


Brewster 


F. W. Stanton 


Ellsworth 


A. F. Diehn 


Round Lake 


C. W. Becker 


Wilmont 


E. W. Kane 


Dundee 


Albert Jacobsen 


Rushmore 


Morris Ronan 


Reading 




Marketing 


Committee 




Names 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Dr. J. N. Gould, Chm 


I. Worthington 


C. W. Becker 


Wilmont 


W. H. Christensen 


Rushmore 


Morris Ronan 


Reading 


Edwin Brickson 


Adrian 


Ole Johnson 


Bigelow 


F. W. Stanton 


Ellsworth 


A. F. Diehn 


Round Lake 


A. J. Rice 


Lismore 


Rudolph Guyerman Brewster 



253 







NORMAN COUNTY 




Name 




Address 


E. J. Herringer, Director 


Ada 






Executive Committee 




Name 


Address Name 


Address 


B. F. Tenney 


Ada 


Mrs. W. B. Holmes Ada . 


C. C. Allen 


Ada 


Sam Olson 


Ada 


Rev. A. B. Hinderlie 


Ada 


Township Organization 




Name 




Township 


Address 


Lambert Roesch 




Ada 


Ada 


P. P. Olson 




Anthony 


Ada 


S. J. Lee 




Bear Park 


Flaming 


A. T. Rogen 




Flom 


Flom 


Lars J. Moreland 




Fossum 


Twin Valley 


Lewis Garden 




Gary 


Gary 


John Libak 




Good Hope 


Shelly 


A. H. Betcher 




Green Meadow 


Ada ,R. 4 


N. J. Enger 




Halstad 


Halstad 


C. L. Sulerud 




Halstad, Village 


Halstad 


R. P. Idtse 




Hegne 


Ada 


H. 0. Rask 




Hendrtim 


Hendrtun 


J. J. Nelson 




Hendrum, Village 


Hendrum 


H. 0. EUefson 




Home Lake 


Syre 


J. J. Lindbeck 




Lake Ida 


Twin Valley 


B. 0. Lee 




Lee 


Perley 


A. P. Heinen 




Lockhart 


Lockhart 


John P. Lorentz 




Mary 


Perley 


H. F. Sprung 




McDonaldsville 


Ada 


M. A. Larson 




Village of Perley 


Perley 


Walter Hadler 




Pleasant View 


Ada ,R. 3 


Gilbert Bilden 




Rockwell 


Twin Valley 


A. Aanenson 




Shelly 


Nielsville 


James Hanson 




Shelly Village 


Shelly 


August Swanson 




Spring Creek 


Gary 


N. B. Bagne 




Strand 


Gary 


Jacob E. Eid 




Stmdal 


Fertile 


A. A. Durling 




Twin Valley Village 


Twin Valley 


Rev. G. C. Gjerstad 




Waukon 


Gary 


A. K. Rude 




Wild Rice 


Twin Valley 


G. Kittilson 




Winchester 


Borup 


Mrs. B. F. Tenney 




Labor Committee 


Ada 


Name 


Address Name 


Address 


C. C. Allen 


Ada 


Ed. Engelstad 


Shelly 


G. Kittilson 


Borup 


A. P. Heinen 


Lockhart 


Jos. Gaara 


Perley 


N. B. Bagne 


Gary 


E. F. Rustad 


Hendrum Gust Durling 


Twin Valley 


G. 0. Benson 


Halstad 





264 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


P. W. Beck 


Ada 


James Hanson 


Shelly 


G. Kittilson 


Borup 


A. P. Heinen 


Lockhart 


Martin Anderson 


Perley 


Lewis Garden 


Gary 


E. F. Rustad 


Hendmm 


Bennie Bakke 


Twin Valley 


C. L. Sulenid 


Halstad 







Name 
C. C. Allen 



Quartermaster's Chairman 



Address 
Ada 



Name 
Sam Olson 



Four-Minute Men Chairman 



Address 
Ada 



Military Training Camp Chairman 



Name 
B. F. Tenney 



Address 
Ada 





OLMSTED COUNTY 




Name 


Address 


J. A. 


Melone, Director 


Rochester 


A. C, 


, Gooding, resigned Nov. 26, 1918 


Rochester 


E.G. 


, Hacket, Secretary 


Rochester 


J.F. 


Spencer, Treasurer 

Township Organizations 


Rochester 


Name 


Township 


Address 


E. S. Morris 


Gascade 


Rochester, R. 4 


J. W. Hart 


Dover 


Dover 


Joseph Underlean 


Elmira and Ghatfield 


Ghatfield 


George Wood 


Eyota 


Eyota 


E. B. Harvey 


Farmington 


Rochester, R. 4 


A. B. Shonyo 


Haverhill 


Rochester, R. 3 


J. P. Kelly 


High Forest 


Stewartville 


F. W. Dunnett 


Kalmar 


Byron 


S. W. Morris 


Marion 


Rochester, R. 8 


Frank W. Gomwell 


New Haven 


Pine Island 


G. J. Manahan 


Orion 


Ghatfield, R. 2 


Ghas. E. Postier 


Oronoco 


Oronoco 


Arthur Ayshford 


Pleasant Grove 


Stewartville, R. 1 


J. I. Vermilya 


Quincy 


Dover, R. 1 


John A. Robertson 


Rochester 


Rochester, R. 7 


David B. Brakke 


Rock Dell 


Byron, R. 2 


H. P. Ghristensen 


Salem 


Rochester, R. 6 


George Purves 


Viola 


Eyota,' R. 2 


F. M. Williams 


Byron Village 


Byron 


Harlow Brown 


Dover Village 


Dover 


Homer Woolridge 


Stewartville Village 


Stewartville 


Mrs. H. H. Witherstine 


Rochester 




Marketing Committee 




Name 


Address Name 


Address 


J. F. Spencer 


Rochester G. L. Denny 


Simpson 


J. B. Kendall 


Byron Jos. W. Daly 


Douglas 


W. G. Early 


Eyota M. J. Dixon 


Stewartville 


Harlow Brown 


Dover H. G. Blumentritt Ghester 


♦Geo. R. Thompson 


Ghatfield 




Hiram McHugh 


Viola 

Labor Committee 




Name 


Address Name 


Address 


J. R. Randall 


Rochester W. G. Hagerm 


an Rochester 


John E. McGovern 


Rochester E. G. Green 


Rochester 


W. L. Mercer 


Rochester 

War Finance Committee 




Name 


Address Name 


Address 


J. A. Melone, Ghm. 


Rochester Miss Marg. Sullivan Rochester 


T. R. Lawler 


Rochester S. J. Norsby 


Stewartville 


A. L. Roberts 


Rochester J. W. Hart 


Dover 


H. J. Harwick 


Rochester Elmer E. Dodge Rochester, R. 3 


Mrs. C. H. Mayo 


Rochester 




♦Deceased 







2S6 



OTTER TAIL COUNTY 





Name 




Address 




Henry G. Dahl, Director 




Fergus Falls 




Louis Keane, Secretary 




Fergus Falls 




Executive Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


John L. Townley Fergus Falls 


J. S. Billings 


Fergus Falls 


President 




C. R. Wright 


Fergus Falls 


J. V. Bopp 


Fergus Falls 


R. J. Angus 


Fergus Falls 




Districts 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


G. C. Skeim 


Almora 


W. L. Wilson 


Maine, Under- 


J. A. Otte 


Bluffton 




wood (P. 0.) 


W. A. Wells 


Battle Lake 


E. R. Rosser 


New York Mills 


Theo. Fossen 


CarUsle 


E. W. Perk 


Otter Tail 


H. A. Gosslee 


Clitheral 


C. H. Dahlstrom Parkers Prairie 


J. P. Brendal 


Dalton 


P. C. Frazee 


Pelican Rapids 


E. F. Selvig 


Deer Creek 


J. H. Shea 


Perham 


E. J. StoU 


Dent 


A. B. Ouren 


Richville 


H. F. Maurin 


Elizabeth 


Odin Loscth 


Underwood 


P. M. Knoff 


Erhard 


Jas. Nesbitt 


Vergas 


J. W. Barker 


Henning 


Ole Nyhus 


Vining 




Finance Cc 


►mmittee 






Name 




Address 




E. E. Adams, Chairman 




Fergus Falls 




Bankers of County 







Welfare of Enlisted Men 
Name Name 

E. T. Terry, Chairman Mrs. Geo. B. Wright 

Mrs. G. O. Welch Mrs. F. J, Evans 

Farm Products and Gardens 

Name Address Name Address 

J. V. Bopp, Chairman Hannah J. Kempher Erhard 

H. N. Gray Fergus Falls Fred Syck Campbell 

H. A. Putnam Battle Lake S. M. Skrove Dalton 



Enlistments 
Name Address Name 

Dr. A. B. Cole, Chairman P. C. Frazee 

Dr. A. C. Baker Fergus Falls J. H. Shea 

C. H. Dahlstrom Parkers Prairie 



Address 
Pelican Rapids 
Perham 



Publicity 

Name 
W. L. Robertson, Chairman 
All editors in County 

Sf7 



Public Safety 

Name 
J. S. Billings, Sheriff 
All Peace Officers in County 



Public Health 

Name 
Dr. O. N. Haugan, Chairman 
All Health Officers in County 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


G. C. Skeim 


Almora 


W. L. Wilson 


Underwood 


W. A. Wells 


Battle T,ake 


E. R. Rosser 


New York Mills 


J. A. Otto 


Bluffton 


E. W. Park 


Otter Tail 


Theo. Fossen 


CarUsle 


C. H. Dahlstrom 


Parkers Prairie 


H. A. Gosslee 


CHtherall 


P. C. Frazee 


PeUcan Rapids 


J. P. Brendal 


Dalton 


E. J. Emal 


Perham 


E. P. Selvig 


Deer Creek 


A. B. Ouren 


Richville 


E. J. Stoll 


Dent 


Odin Losesh 


Underwood 


H. F. Maurin 


Elizabeth 


James Nesbitt 


Vergas 


P. M. Knoff 


Erhard 


Ole Nyhus 


Vining 


J. W. Barker 


Henning 







PENNINGTON COUNTY 



Name 
Charles A. Pitkin, Director 
John Morgan, Chairman 
Theo. Quale, Secretary 
T. L. Melgard, Treasurer 



Address 
Thief River Falls 
Thief River Falls 
Thief River Falls 
Thief River Falls 



Advisory Coimcil 



Name 
John Morgan 
Theo. Quale 
T. L. Melgard 
T. A. Way 
Norman J. Silk 
T. H. Bjerke 
Olaf Larson 
John Skjoldsvold 
C. W. Nelson 
Elbert Gunderson 
C. O. Wahlin 
Emil Larson 
Jess Thorstad 
S. O. Lee 
J. M. Thiege 
K. K. Austin 
Joe Johnson 
M. R. Harper 
Paul Borgie 
I. A. Ralstad 
H. C. Jarr 
John Rodervski 
Julius Olson 
Selmer Benson 
Jay Payne 



Address 
Thief River Falls 
Thief River Falls 
Thief River Falls 
Thief River Falls 
Thief River Falls 
Thief River Falls, R. F. D. 
Thief River Falls 
Thief River Falls 
Mavie 
Goodridge 
Torgerson 
Wylie 

St. Hilaire, R. F. D. 
Thief River Falls 
Thief River Falls, R. F. D. 
Kratka 
Erie 

Red Lake Falls 
Hazel 
Hazel 

Plummer, R. P. D. 
Rhoda 
Ruddel 
St. Hilaire 
Goodridge 



Township Organization 
(Same list as above) 



Marketing Committee 

Name Address Name Address 

F. H. Herrick Thief River Falls Karl Korstad High Landing 

W. B. Fuller Thief River Falls Rev. Halvor Bjomson Mavie & Kratka 

C. W. Hooper St. Hilaire Jay Payne Goodridge 

T. J. Sumpter Hazel J. A. McNally Torgerson 



PINE COUNTY 



Name 
W. J. McAdam, Director 
C. L. Jack, Secretary 
A. S. Dean, Treasurer 



Address 
Pine City 
Hinckley 
Sandstone 



Township Organization 



Chairman 

Gust Westman 
M. J. Scoville 
Henry Gould 

F. L. Oleson 

G. M. Scofield 
James Meek 
Alf. R. Merritt 
Tom Hogan 

J. H. Lindgren 
P. D. Baker 
Robt. Blankenship 
Geo. Luckman 
Louis Erickson 
John A. Stenson 
J. F. Brunner 
R. Ruphal 
H. E. Shaffer 
P. M. Rodenberger 
Otis Hankins 
Prank Mortison 
James Hogan 
C. M. Erickson 
Phil Wood 
Anton Kacer 
J. D. Johnson 
Gust Overbeck 
H. B. Lyons 
L. C. Pederson 
A. A. Robinson 
N. Perkins 
Eugene Ryan 
Chas. Peterson 
R. M. Morrow 
Fred Hartz 
Andrew Edin 
Adolph Larson 
George Cimningham 
Lee Bates 
John Selinsk 
Mrs. James Slaven 



Township 
Arlone 
Ama 
Barry 

Birch Creek 
Brook Park 
Bremen 
Barry 
Bruno 

Bruno Village 
Chengwatana 
Clover 
Crosby 
Danford 
Dell Grove 
Dosey 
Finlayson 
Finlayson Village 
Fleming 
Hinckley 
Hinckley Village 
Kerrick 
Kettle River 
Mission Creek 
Munch 
Nickerson 
Norman 
Ogema 
Partridge 
Pine City 
Pine City Village 
Pine City 
Pokegama 
Rock Creek 
Royalton 
Sandstone 
Sandstone Village 
Sturgeon Lake 
Wilma 
Windemere 
Sandstone Village 



Address 
Hinckley 
Markville 
Hinckley 
Denham 
Brook Park 
ElHson 
Belden 
Belden 
Bruno 
Pine City 
Hinckley 
Hinckley 
Sandstone 
Sandstone 
Cloverton 
Sandstone 
Finlayson 
Bnmo 
Hinckley 
Hinckley 
Kerrick 
Willow River 
Brook Park 
Hinckley 
Nickerson 
Willow River 
Hinckley 
Askov 
Pine City 
Pine City 
Finlayson 
Henriette 
Rock Creek 
Pine City 
Sandstone 
Sandstone 
Sturgeon Lake 
Duxbiuy 
Sturgeon Lake 
Sandstone 



Labor Committee 

(Same as Township Chairmen) 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Ludvig Mosbak 


Askov 


W. G. Otte 


Bnino 



Name Address 

Geo. Cimningham Sturgeon Lake 
B. H. Langerak Cloverton 



Y. M. C. A. 

J. Adam Bede, Chairman 



Pine City 



Fuel Administration 

F. T. Lersinger, Chairman 



Hinckley 



Red Cross 

Dr. E. L. Stephen, Chairman 



Hinckley 



Federal Reserve Agent 

C. L. Jack , Hinckley 



261 



PIPESTONE COUNTY 





Name 




Address 




John Gray, Director 




Pipestone 




Chas 


. Dealy 




Pipestone 




S. B. 


Duea, Treasurer 




Pipestone 


Name 




Address 


Name 


Address 


Lee Baldwin 




Edgerton 


John Morgan 


Pipestone 


Alex Sinclair 




Jasper 


Elmer Vaughn 


Haffield 


Robt. Moffett 




Holland 


F. H. Kingsbury Edgerton 


Chas. Anderson 




Pipestone 


S. B. Duea 


Pipestone 


John Pehrs 




Ruthton 


Forest Moffett 


Woodstock 


J. P. Ryan 




Woodstock 


W. E. Keister 


Trosky 


B. J. Mooney 




Woodstock 


Harry Filer 


Pipestone 


Fred Bauman 




Jasper 


G. S. Evarts 


Ruthton 


Chas. Maynard 




Pipestone 


W. J. Dingier 


Cazenovia 


Henry Heeresma 


Pipestone 


Mrs. Grace Hanson Pipestone 






Labor Committee 




Name 




Address 


Name 


Address 


A. E. Enerson 




Pipestone 


B. J. Mooney 


Woodstock 


Chas. Dealy 




Pipestone 


Alex Sinclair 


Jasper 


G. S. Evarts 




Ruthton 







Marketing Committee 



Name Address 


Name 


Address 


B. F. Veach Pipestone 


C. M. Christenson 


Ruthton 


J. P. Peterson Jasper 


Paul Reikow 


Holland 


Lee Baldwin Edgerton 


W. J. Dingier 


Cazenovia 


B. J. Mooney 'J J J^. Woodstock 


Farmers Elevator Co. 


, Ihlen 


L. Nel on . ;- ^ .^ , Trosky 







POLK|COUNTY 



Name 
A. D. Stephens, Director 
Ruth V. Perry, Secretary 



Address 

Crookston 
Crookston 



Executive Committee 



Name 
G. L. McNally 
Martin O'Brien 
Mrs. T. R. Sewald 
N. A. Thorson 



Address 
Mcintosh 
Crookston 
Crookston 
Crookston 



Name 
C. E. Brown 
Wm. Diedrich 
Mrs. C. Q. Roemer 
Rev. E. E. Shawl 



Address 

Crookston 
Crookston 
Crookston 
Crookston 



Townsliip Organization 



Chairman 


Township 


Address 


John Perry 


Andover 


Crookston 


A. J. Peterson 


Angus 


Angus 


W. J. Durbahn 


Brandt 


Euclid 


C. C. Heath 


Beltrami 


Beltrami 


Herman Lee 


Badger 


Erskine 


Herman Berg 


Brandsvold 


Fosston 


Geo. W. Landon 


Belgium 


Euclid 


*J. M. Boyd 


Brislet 


Warren 


George W. Olson 


Bygland 


Fisher 


Edward Lanctot 


Crookston 


Crookston 


B. Siverson 


Columbia 


Lengby 


L. J. O'Neill 


Chester 


Okler 


J. S. Chapin 


Euclid 


EucHd 


Julius Espeseth 


Eden 


Gully 


Wm. Pape 


Esther 


E. Grand Forks 


Theo. Nelson 


Erskine 


Erskine 


Frank Hedleys 


Fairfax 


Crookston 


John P. Peterson 


Farley 


Warren 


J. W. Rose 


Fanny 


EucHd 


J. L. Wentzel 


Fisher 


Fisher 


A. P. Hanson 


Fertile 


Fertile 


S. R. MiUer 


Grand Forks 


E. Grand Forks 


Nels J. Kvenolden 


Garfield 


Fertile 


Hans Johnson 


Garden 


Fertile R. 2 


A. Laliberte 


Gentilly 


Gentilly 


John E. Tice 


Grove Park 


Mentor 


Ed. A. Ness 


Godfrey 


Maplebay 


Oscar Thor 


Gully 


Gully 


H. A. Tofsly 


Hammond 


Crookston 


Christian Anderson 


Helgeland 


Warren 


A. N. Anderson 


Higdem 


Oslo 


L. M. Linfors 


Hill River 


Fosston 


D. B. Ferguson 


Huntsville 


E. Grand Forks 


John T. Orick 


Hubbard 


Nielsville 


*Deceased 







263 



Chairman 


Township 


Address 




A. E. Ness 


Johnson 


Wanke 




D. D. Geddes 


Keystone 


E. Grand Forks 


C. W. Ellinger 


Kertsonville 


Crookston 




Chas. McCarthy 


King 


Mcintosh 




Martin Benson 


Knute 


Erskine 




Nels Clementson 


Liberty 


Fertile 




Chas. Lowry 


Lessar 


Mcintosh 




J. K. Quamme 


Lowell 


Crookston 




Joseph Tagley 


Mentor 


Mentor 




James McDonald 


Nesbit 


Fisher 




Joseph H. Myerchin 


Northland 


Angus 




H. H. Halvorson 


Onstad 


Melvin 




Martin Cazey 


Pamell 


Crookston 




Halvor Johnson 


Queen 


Fosston 




Ole G. Olson 


Reis 


Beltrami 




P. H. Solstad 


Roome 


Eldred 




E. G. Eklund 


Rosebud 


Fosston 




A. R. McCrae 


Russia 


Beltrami 




Gust Peterson 


Rhinehardt 


E. Grand Forks 


H. J. Beardmore 


Sandsville 


Warren 




G. G. Eia 


Scandia 


Beltrami 




Barney Flesch 


Sletton 


Fosston 




Thos. Onneland 


Sullivan 


E. Grand Forks 


A. M. Palya 


Tabor 


Tabor 




John T. Olson 


Tilden 


Mentor 




Edward Quirk 


Tynsed 


Climax 




Carl Gronberg 


Vineland 


Climax 




A. I. Solberg 


Winger 


Winger 




John Hanson 


Woodside 


Mentor 






Labor Committee 




Name Address 


Name 


Address 


Martin O'Brien Crookston 


R. H. Von Scoick 


Crookston 




Marketing Committee 




Name Address 


Name 


Address 


L. S. Kolden Nielsville 


Noramn Rosholt 


Climax 


A. 0. Stortroen Fisher 




N. J. Nelson 


E. Grand Forks 


Joseph Tagley Mentor 




Norman Hanson 


Fertile 


C. L. McNelly Mcintosh 


S. M. Siverton 


Crookston 


J. F. Montgomery Angus 




Lewis Lohn 


Fosston 


A. I. Solberg Winger 




A. D. Stephens 


Crookston 


C. C. Heath Beltrami 


J. F. King 


Euclid 


A. Stark Gully 




Ed. Welte 


Lengby 


Theo Nelson Erskine 










Finance Co: 


mmittee 




Name Address 


Name 


Address 


A. D. Stephens Crookston W. E. McKenzie Crookston 



264 



Name Address Name Address 

S. G. Selvig Crookston G. H. Sanberg Crookston 

W. P. Murphy Crookston S. M. Sivertson Crookston 

N. A. Thoreson Crookston Jos. Ball Crookston 

E. G. Eklund Crookston Chas. Loring Crookston 

Rev. E. E. Shawl Crookston Mrs. C. Q. Roemer Crookston 

L. G. Mustain Crookston Martin O'Brien Crookston 

N. J. Nelson East Grand Forks 



268 



POPE COUNTY 



John R. Serrin, Director 
Carl N. Nelson, Secretary 



Glenwood 
Starbuck 



General Finance Committee 



Name 




Address 


Dr. J. Jeffers, Chairman 4 minute Men 


Glenwood 


G. C. Wollan, Chairman Red Cross 


Glenwood 


Mrs. John R. Serrin, 


Chairman Woman's 


; Comm. Safety Glenwood 


Comm. 








W. J. Carson, Chairman Liberty Loan 


Glenwood 


J. L. McLaury, Chairman War Savings Stamps Glenwood 




General Committee^County 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


0. M. Pederson 


Starbuck 


J. Jeffers 


Glenwood 


Geo. Hughes 


Starbuck 


H. H. Johnson 


Glenwood 


T. N. Torgerson 


Starbuck 


Theo. Aune 


Glenwood 


Ed Chalenberg 


Starbuck 


I. S. Selleseth 


Glenwood 


T. J. Rooney 


Sedan 


G. C. Wollan 


Glenwood 


Robert Volhner 


Sedan 


Julius 0. Haugan 


Glenwood 


W. E. Martin 


Sedan 


Frank Beal 


Glenwood 


I. M. Engebretson 


Lowry 


W. J. Carson 


Glenwood 


A. 0. Lysen 


Lowry 


Nick Webber 


Glenwood 


P. J. Chan 


Lowry 


Henry Ronning 


Glenwood 


L. 0. Lund 


Farwell 


A. Irgens 


Glenwood 


C. M. Peterson 


Farwell 


H. W. Wollan 


Glenwood 


J. F. Taylor 


Villard 


Tory Hoff 


Glenwood 


C. M. Higley 


Villard 


H. A. Greaves 


Glenwood 


P. G. Peterson 


Villard 


Carl Ettesvold 


Glenwood 


C. F. Angel 


Villard 


T. 0. Ofsthun 


Glenwood 


0. E. Bjorgard 


Cynis 


W. F. Dougherty 


Glenwood 


C. 0. Ofsthun 


Cyrus 


Harry Beal 


Glenwood 


H. C. Estby 


Cyrus 


H. Shipstead 


Glenwood 


P. 0. Lee 


C5aiis 


W. S. Toombs 


Glenwood 


Geo. Gilbertson 


Glenwood 


Sam Kroonblawd 


Glenwood 


D. J. Bums 


Glenwood 


W. M. Engbertson 


Glenwood 


B. A. Benson 


Glenwood 


C. H. Addington 


Glenwood 


Frank A. Hill 


Glenwood 


Frank A. Brown 


Glenwood 


Die Irgens 


Glenwood 


E. A. Eberlin 


Glenwood 


Thomas Callaghan 


Glenwood 


J. Eastman 


Glenwood 


C. L. Peterson 


Glenwood 








Labor and Market Committees 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


R. C. Wagness 


Farwell 


I. L. Tobias 


Glenwood 


T. R. Hume 


Lowry 


C. N. Nelson 


Starbuck 


H. C. Eastby 


Cyrus 


W. E. Benner 


Villard 



866 



Food and Fuel Committee 



Name 


Address Name 


Address 


John R. Serrin 


Glenwood T. J. Rooney 


Sedan 


Carl N. Nelson 


Starbuck A. 0. Lysen 


Lowry 


O. E. Bjorgard 


Cyrus Louis Lund 


Farwell 


J. F. Taylor 


Villard 




- 


List of Township and Village Officers 




Town or Village 


Name 


Address 


Westport 


L. J. Buohholz, Clerk 


Westport 


Westport 


J. R. Frederick, Treasurer 


Westport 


Westport 


W. P. White, Chairman 


Villard 


Leven 


F. H. Linow, Clerk 


Glenwood 


Leven 


L. Newmann, Treasurer 


Glenwood 


Leven 


H. A. Schumacher, Chairman 


Glenwood 


Reno 


Wm. E. Andrew, Clerk 


Lowry 


Reno 


Alex Ferguson, Treasurer 


Glenwood 


Reno 


A. K. Johnson, Chairman 


Lowry 


Ben Wade 


Linus Rudgren, Clerk 


Lowry 


Ben Wade 


Anton E. Johnson, Treasurer 


Lowry 


Ben Wade 


Andrew Knutson, Chairman 


Lowry 


Nora 


Edward T. Olson, Clerk 


Farwell 


Nora 


John T. Rotto, Treasurer 


Farwell 


Nora 


B. 0. ToUefson, Chairman 


Farwell 


New Prairie 


Andrew Sansness, Clerk 


Farwell 


New Prairie 


John T. Hogy, Treasurer 


Cyrus 


New Prairie 


Gust Engebretson, Chairman 


Cyrus 


White Bear Lake 


L. E. Finstad, Clerk 


Starbuck 


White Bear Lake 


J. E. Moen, Treasurer 


Starbuck 


White Bear Lake 


C. L. Brevig, Chairman 


Starbuck 


Minnewaska 


L. G. Solhaug, Clerk 


Starbuck 


Minnewaska 


John Dyrstad, Treasurer 


Glenwood 


Minnewaska 


T. 0. Lee, Chairman 


Glenwood 


Glenwood 


W. H. Engebretson, Clerk 


Glenwood 


Glenwood 


E. H. Engebretson, Treasurer 


Glenwood 


Glenwood 


G. M. Gandrud, Chairman 


Glenwood 


Grove Lake 


0. A. Tye, Clerk 


Glenwood 


Grove T,ake 


E. F. Anderson, Treasurer 


Brooten 


Grove Lake 


H. V. Lilienthal, Chairman 


Glenwood 


Bangor 


J. C. Rooney, Clerk 


Brooten 


Bangor 


M. Gannon, Treasurer 


Brooten 


Bangor 


S. A. Mitchell, Chairman 


Brooten 


Chippewa Falls 


L. J. J. Midthun, Clerk 


Sedan 


Chippewa Falls 


G. A. Anderson, Treasurer 


Terrace 


Chippewa Falls 


Gjert Hanson, Chairman 


Glenwood 


Barsness 


H. W. Anderson, Clerk 


Starbuck 


Barsness 


P. D. Gilbertson, Treasurer 


Glenwood 


Barsness 


J. Thorson, Chairman 


Glenwood 


Blue Mounds 


John Engebretson, Clerk 


Starbuck 


Blue Mounds 


S. C. Sorenson, Treasurer 


Starbuck 


Blue Moimds 


John Hovelson, Chairman 


Starbuck 



267 



Town or Village 

Walden 
Walden 
Walden 
Hoff 
Hoff 
Hoff 
Langhie 
Langhie 
Rolling Fork 
Rolling Fork 
Rolling Forks 
Gilchrist 
Gilchrist 
Gilchrist 
Lake Johanna 
Lake Johanna 
Lake Johanna 
City of Glenwood 
City of Glenwood 
City of Glenwood 
Village of Starbuck 
Village of Starbuck 
Village of Starbuck 
Village of Villard 
Village of Villard 
Village of Villard 
Village of Cyrus 
Village of Cyrus 
Village of Cyrus 
Village of Lowry 
Village of Lowry 
Village of Lowry 
Village of Farwell 
Village of Farwell 
Village of Farwell 
Village of Sedan 
Village of Sedan 
Village of Sedan 



Name 
Theo. Wold, Clerk 
A. O. Barsness, Treasurer 
H. W. Yingst, Chairman 
Oscar Maanum, Clerk 
O. K. Maanum, Treasurer 
Swen Nelson, Chairman 
Carl Knutson, Treasurer 

A. M. Lund, Chairman 
J. P. Berge, Clerk 

R. B. Davidson, Treasurer 
C. L. Lund, Chairman 
Oscar K. Iverson, Clerk 
Jewel Syverson, Treasurer 
Ame Hitman, Chairman 
Charies M. Ellis, Clerk 
O. A. Sonstegard, Treasurer 
J. T. Halvorson, Chairman 
Arthur Irgens, Clerk 
W. F. Dougherty, Treasurer 
G. C. WoUan, Chairman 
J. C. Skoglund, Clerk 

B. C. Bergeson, Treasurer 
Ed. Chalenberg, Chairman 

C. F. Angell, Clerk 

C. M. Higley, Treasurer 
Ed. Kurth, Chairman 
C. O. Ofsthun, Clerk 

0. E. Bjorgaard, Treasurer 
Tver Thompson, Chairman 
Ole HopHn, Clerk 

1. M. Engebretson, Treasurer 
I. W. Misensol, Chairman 

L. E. Vollum, Clerk 
Oscar Max, Treasurer 
J. V. Larson, Chairman 
Henry Hess, Clerk 
T. S. Gannon, Treasurer 
J. T. Rooney, Chairman 



Address 
Starbuck 
Starbuck 
Hancock 
Hancock 
Clontarf 
Hancock 
Benson 
Starbuck 
Starbuck 
Terrace 
Starbuck 
Terrace 
Terrace 
Terrace 
Brooten 
Brooten 
Brooten 
Glenwood 
Glenwood 
Glenwood 
Starbuck 
Starbuck 
Starbuck 
Villard 
Villard 
Villard 
Cyrus 
Cyrus 
Cyrus 
Lowry 
Lowry 
Lowry 
Farwell 
Farwell 
Farwell 
Sedan 
Sedan 
Sedan 



Pope County Teachers Patriotic League 

Name Address 

Miss Mae Gannon, President Terrace 

Amanda Sprangrude, Vice-President Starbuck 

Anna Landmark, Secretary Starbuck 

Martin Knutson, Treasurer Brooten 



Food Committee 

(Same as Coal Committee). 



268 



Finance Committee 

Name Address Name Address 

Mrs. John R. Serrin G. C. Woolan 

W. J. Carson John L. McLaury 

John R. Serrin W. T. Christilaw 

Dr. J. Jeflfers 



RAMSEY COUNTY 



Name 

D. R. Cotton, Director 

E. M. McMahon, Secretary 



Address 
St. Paul 
St. Paul Assn., St. Paul 



Dr. A. H. Ahems 
Louis Betz 
C. H. Bigelow 
H. A. Blodgett 
J. Brandtjen 
H. B. R. Briggs 
C. P. Brown 
Wm. Burrows 
Carl W. Cummins 
W. J. Dean 
S. W. Dittenhofer 
B. B. Downs 
H. A. Dreves 
A. B. Driscoll 
J. F. Druar 
J. C. Enright 
F. P. Fellows 
H. J. HadHch 
Max H. Herrmann 
Edw. Randall 
Geo. C. Lambert 

F. C. Listoe 
H. A. Merrill 

G. R. Neilson 
Dr. Walter R 
R. H. Seng 
J. N. Storr 
E. S. Warner 



Executive Committee 

Lowry Bldg. 
State Savings Bank 
Parwell, Ozman Kirk & Co. 
Brown Blodgett & Sperry Co. 
Bamhardt Bros. & Spindler 
Daily News 
First National Bank 
Johnston Land Co. 
Morphy Bradford & Cummins 
Nicols Dean & Gregg 
The Golden Rule 
St. Paul Electric Co. 
Brokerage Bldg. 
McKibbin Driscoll & Dorsey 
321 Commercial Bldg. 
Lindeke Roller Mills 
Capital National Bank Bldg. 
Hamm Brewing Co. 
799 Osceola Ave. 
Randall Printing Co. 
Pioneer Bldg. 
Listoe & Wold 
Merrill, Greer & Chapman 
Swift & Co. 
Ramsey Lowry Bldg. 

Anheuser-Busch Brg. Assn. 
Kuhles & Stock Co. 
McGill-Wamer Co. 



St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
So. St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 



Advisory Council 

Hon. L. C. Hodgson Court House 

P. N. Myers H. L. Collins Co. 

T. D. O'Brien Endicott Bldg. 

Geo. W. Lawson Minn. State Fed. of Labor 

M. N. Goss Coiut House 

F. C. Stevens 1115-20 Merchants Bank Bldg. 

W. C. Koch, Chairman, Invention and Research 

Hugo Koch, Chairman, Labor 

Horace Irvine, Chairman, Military Industrial Co-operation 

Walter Mayo, Chairman, Commercial Economy 

B. C. Gorham, Chairman, Fuel 

N. P. Langford, Chairman, Emergency 
Monte Appel, Chairman, Public Information 
W. J. Dean, Chairman, Transportation 

C. H. Bigelow, Chairman, War Finance 



St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 



S70 



S. W. Dittenhoffer, Chairman, War Relief 
Alex Janes, Chairman, Intelligence Bureau 
Geo. C. Lambert, Chairman, Military Affairs 



St. Paul 
St. Paul 
St. Paul 



Emanuel E. Larson, Chairman, Swedish Am. State Bank 

Andrew J. Newgren, Vice-Chairman, St. Paul State Bank 

John A. Seeger, Chairman, Seeger Refrigerator Co. 

E. C. Mahle, Vice-Chairman, Langford, Schuler & Fahey 

Angus Cameron, Chairman, Sibley and Fourth Sts. 

Wm. Harris, Vice-Chairman, 322 E. Seventh St. 

Dr. Carl A. Ingerson, Chairman, 200 Pittsbiu-gh Bldg. 

Walter King, Vice-Chairman, 89 E. Fifth St. 

Adolph Bremer, Chairman, 855 West Seventh St. 

Otto Rohland, Vice-Chairman, 459 West Seventh St. 

Lloyd Peabody, Chairman, 303 Globe Bldg. 

V. Lauerdale, Vice-Chairman, 225 Exchange Annex 

Homer P. Clark, Chairman, West Publ. Co. 

Perry Gilfillan, Vice-Chairman, 803 Pioneer Bldg. 

A. E. Lehamnn, Chairman, 912-193 N. Y. Life Bldg. 

Dr. B. F. Simon, Chairman, 546 Lowry Bldg. 

Robert McMullen, Vice-Chairman, Ramsey Co. State Bank 

L. C. Simons, Chairman, Twin City State Bank 

Charles Montgomery, Vice-Chairman, Hackney Invest.. Co 

J. C. Ottis, Chairman, 816 Guardian Life Bldg. 

Howard Everett, Vice-Chairman, Luse Land & Devel. Co. 

Martin J. O'Malley, Chairman, Court House 

Fred Gosewisch, Vice-Chairman, Coiut House 



First Ward 

First Ward 

Second Ward 

Second Ward 

Third Ward 

Third Ward 

Fourth Ward 

Fourth Ward 

Fifth Ward 

Fifth Ward 

Sixth Ward 

Sixth Ward 

Seventh Ward 

Seventh Ward 

Eighth Ward 

Ninth Ward 

Ninth Ward 

Tenth Ward 

Tenth Ward 

Eleventh Ward 

Eleventh Ward 

Twelfth Ward 

Twelfth Ward 

New Brighton Village S. W. Reasoner, Chairman 



White Bear 
White Bear 
Mounds View Twp. 
North St. Paul 
North St. Paul 
Town of Rose 
Town of Rose 
New Canada 
New Canada 
New Canada 



H. A. Warner, Chairman 

Geo. S. Belland, Vice-Chairman 

James Ryan, Chairman 

John Effinger, Chairman 

Joseph Cowem, Vice-Chairman 

Nick Lebeus, Chairman 

Nich Reinningen, Vice-Chairman 

Argele Rondeau, Chairman 

C. R. McKenny 

Julius Schoroer 



Gladstone P.O. 



First Ward 

1st Precinct 

2nd Precinct 

3rd Precinct 

4th Precinct 

6th Precinct 

7th Precinct 

8th Precinct 

9th Precinct 

10th Precinct 

11th Precinct 

12th Precinct 

13th Precinct 



Lester Johnson 
G. H. Desilva 
Dr. A. W. Whitney 
A. E. Bjorklund 
W. F. Benz 
Alex Lindahl 
John G. Fischer 
Paul Tararra 
C. A. Oberg 
Lewis Hedman 
Dan J. Nordgren 
J. A. Jackson 



591 OUve St. 

470 Hopkins St. 

673 Burr St. 

485 E. Minnehaha St. 

848 Payne Ave. 

757 Case St. 

1033 Sims St. 

1079 Forest St. 

1110 Payne Ave. 

559 Case St. 

593 Como-Phalen Ave. 

1189 Jessie St. 



871 



Second Ward 

1st Precinct 

2nd Precinct 

3rd Precinct 

4th Precinct 

5th Precinct 

6th Precinct 

7th Precinct 

8th Precinct 

9th Precinct 

10th Precinct 

11th Precinct 

12th Precinct 

13th Precinct 

Third Ward 

1st Precinct 

2nd Precinct 

3rd Precinct 

4th Precinct 

5th Precinct 

6th Precinct 

Fourth Ward 

1st Precinct 

2nd Precinct 

3rd Precinct 

4th Precinct 

5th Precinct 

6th Precinct 

7th Precinct 

8th Precinct 

9th Precinct 

10th Precinct 

11th Precinct 

12th Precinct 

Fifth Ward 

1st Precinct 

2nd Precinct 

3rd Precinct 

4th Precinct 

5th Precinct 

6th Precinct 

7th Precinct 

8th Precinct 

9th Precinct 

10th Precinct 

11th Precinct 

12th Precinct 

13th Precinct 

14th Precinct 

15th Precinct 

16th Precinct 

17th Precinct 



E. A. Otto 
Paul Deebach 
Gilbert Henry 
E. J. Fuchs 
Theo. Blase 
Peter Skoglund 
Geo. L. Siegel 
Louis Soms 
Horace H. Glenn 
Eugene Marien 
Fred Kohnke 
Wm. Bamiester 
Jos. C. Stoffel 

Walter A. Pocock 
D. E. Foley 



955 Hastings Ave. 
138 E. Fourth St. 
Foley Bros. & Quinlan 
Seventh & Senate 
614 Bates Ave. 
750 Maryland E. 
1036 Reaney St. 
1170 E. Seventh St. 
Merchants Bank Bldg. 
Highwood 
896 Fremont Ave. 
1203 Pioneer Bldg. 
985 E. 5th St. 

Merchants Hotel 
Foley Hotel 



Jas. Tiemey 
M. C. Ryan 
Wm. Dailey 

Geo. E. Dilley 
Chas. R. Parker 
Frank Horn 
H. E. Jennings 



471 Sibley St. 
327 Eighth St. 
735 Ohve St. 

Third and Exchange 
Fourth and St. Peter 
281 W. University , 
410 Jackson St. 



E. P. Danz 
Thos. Galvin 
Joseph Barrett 



161 W. Sixth St. 
97 No. Smith Ave. 
Wolf Apts. 



Chas. Christopherson 885 Hague Ave. 
Bester E. Allen 10 E. Summit Ave. 



Andrew Mandel 
Zimmerman 
Geo. E. Adams 
L. J. Pleiss 
John D. Higgins 
Ph. Martin 
Jos. Thornton 
Martin Lillis 
Thos. Walsh 
F. R. Magee 
Paul Schultz 
Chas. Schleck 
James Lynch 
F. X. Mooney 
Joe James 
John Jueneamnn 
John Vogelgesang 



222 Chestnut St. 

246 Pleasant Ave. 

305 Sherman St. 

316 Pleasant Ave. 

71 W. Seventh St. 

293 Harrison Ave. 

369 Von Minden St. 

499 W. Seventh St. 

402 Grace St. 

264 Duke St. 

W. 7th and Tuscarora Ave. 

319 Arbor St. 

682 Armstrong Ave. 

1180 W. Seventh St. 

44 Upper Levee 

49 W. Ninth St. 

899 Watson Ave. 



272 



Sixth Ward 






1st Precinct 


Elmer E. Whistler 


270 W. Filhnore Ave. 


2nd Precinct 


M. L. Niles 


89 So. Robert St. 


3rd Precinct 


Samuel Litschultz 


156 Robertson St. 


4th Precinct 


Frank Warren 


214 State St. 


5th Precinct 


Chas. E. Villaume 


569 Ottawa Ave. 


6th Precinct 


John J. Hiirley 


378 Livingston Ave. 


7th Precinct 


Chas S. Sherman 


142 E. Congress St. 


8th Precinct 


B. E. Harmon 


242 Prescott St. 


9th Precinct 


F. X. Moosbrugger 


422 Stryker Ave. 


10th Precinct 


E. T. Spangler 


837 So. Smith Ave. 


11th Precinct 


Rose R. Miller 


651 Bidwell Ave. 


12th Precinct 


H. L. Curry 


155 E. Belvidere 


13th Precinct 


W. S. Wright 


205 E. Winnifred 


Seventh Ward 






1st Precinct 


John Davern 


267 Farrington Ave. 


2nd Precinct 


M. B. Carpenter 


The Aberdeen 


3rd Precinct 


F. G. Ingersoll 


438 Portland 


4th Precinct 






5th Precinct 


S. Appleton 


117 Mackubin 


6th Precinct 


H. Rotschild 


553 Marshall Ave. 


7th Precinct 


M. F. Bohlig 


737 Dayton Ave. 


8th Precinct 


G. W. Lepwis 


698 Ashland Ave. 


9th Precinct 


F. P. Fellows 


Capital Trust Co. 


10th Precinct 


Kenneth Brill 


1408 Mer. Bank Bldg. 


11th Precinct 


Frank L. Gazzola 


940 Laurel Ave. 


12th Precinct 


Henry J. Lehr 


927 Iglehart Ave. 


13th Precinct 


Howard Bixby 


1017 Portland 


14th Precinct 


S. L. Ringold 


1196 Ashland 


Eighth Ward 






1st Precinct 


E. A. Bodin 


266 Carroll 


2nd Precinct 


G. A. Boelter 


276 Rondo 


3rd Precinct 


A. Fredlund 


275 Rondo St. 


4th Precinct 


R. Deppe 


487 Aurora 


5th Precinct 






6th Precinct 


Frank Horn 


251 University Ave. 


7th Precinct 






8th Precinct 


Wm. Diegl 


Dale and Thomas 


9th Precinct 


Chas. Briasti 


242 Thomas St. 


10th Precinct 






1 1 th Precinct 






X X vXX X X \^V.'XX4.^^ V 

12th Precinct 


J. Hilzinger 


227 Front St. 


13th Precinct 


August Lamb 


536 Como Ave. 


Ninth Ward 






1st Precinct 


James Drummond 


Court House 


2nd Precinct 


Clarence C. Woods 


645 Central Park Place 


3rd Precinct 


F. C. Holman 


612 Temperance St. 


4th Precinct 


T. V. Moberg 


294 E. Thirteenth St. 


5th Precinct 






7th Precinct 


John W. Whitz 

273 


523 Cap. Bk. Bldg. 



Ninth Ward — Cont'd. 



8th Precinct 
9th Precinct 
10th Precinct 
11th Precinct 
12th Precinct 
13th Precinct 

Tenth Ward 
1st Precinct 
2nd Precinct 
3rd Precinct 
4th Precinct 
5th Precinct 
6th Precinct 
7th Precinct 
8th Precinct 
9th Precinct 

Eleventh Ward 
1st Precinct 
2nd Precinct 
3rd Precinct 
4th Precinct 
5th Precinct 
6th Precinct 
7th Precinct 
8th Precinct 
9th Precinct 
10th Precinct 
11th Precinct 

Twelfth Ward 
1st Precinct 
2nd Precinct 
3rd Precinct 
4th Precinct 
5th Precinct 
6th Precinct 



H. J. Malmquaist 
C. B. Holmquist 
J. F. Swenson 
M. Rosness 



116 Winnipeg 
27 W. Acker St. 
109 Poplar 
947 Sylvan St. 



T. J. Greene 



A. S. Billing 



617 Warren St. 



1358 Thomas St. 



Frank Truax 
E. E. Johnson 
A. B. Baker 

S. W. Pinkerton 
L. I. Herrick 
Alvot M. Bull 



N. A. Lytle 
B. B. Douglas 



898 Cromwell Ave. 
21 Langford Pk. Place 
752 Prior St. 

1430 Capitol Ave. 
1657 Minnehaha St. 
2148 Carter Ave. 



Vandalia and Montgomery 
435 Aldine 



R. D. O'Brien 
H. B. Humason 
R. C. Bross 
Noyes C. Robinson 
C. E. Turning 
John A. Lagerman 
Edward P. Davis 
A. V. Fabian 



1749 Portland Ave. 
1941 Laurel 
123 Macalester Ave. 
1616 Portland Ave. 
Otto and Cleveland 
2128 Marshall 
1944 Goodrich Ave. 
1914 Jefferson Ave. 



Frank E. Morrison 
F. L. Bauman 
John Sovereign 
Anton Novak 
Geo. W. Heaton 



Town of White Bear 

Wm. A. Gall 

Village of White Bear 

F. H. Murray 



875 W. Central 
909 Sherburne 
868 Thomas 
747 Van Buren St. 
1104 Argyle St. 

White Bear, R. F. D. 1 

White Bear Lake 



274 



RED LAKE COUNTY 



Name 




Address 


Dr. N. M. 


, Watson, Director 


Red Lake Falls 


Geo. P. Hennings, Secretary 


Red Lake Falls 


J. D. Houston 


Red Lake Falls 


Chas. Fellman 


Red Lake Falls 


C. 0. Kankel 


Red Lake Falls 




Vice-chairmen 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


I. Baril 


Red Lake Falls 


H. J. Enderle 


Plummer 


Frank Deymonaz 


Brooks 


John Konikson 


St. Hilaire 


Jos. Bergeron 


Brooks 


Ed Enright 


Red Lake Falls 


A. P. Toupin 


Oklee 


T. P. Smidesang 


Wylie 


Ole 0. Lee 


Oklee 


Alfred St. Michtel 


Red Lake Falls 


Ingvald Huseby 


Oklee 


Jos. Page 


Crookston Rt 2 


A. J. Hemstad 


Plummer 


Mrs. D. L. Keck 


Red Lake Falls 


Alex Patnode 


Red T^ke Falls 








Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


C. 0. Kankel 


Red Lake Falls 


T. P. Smidesang 


Wylie 


Dr. N. M. Watson 


Red Lake Falls 


A. P. Toupin 


Oklee 


Geo. F. Hennings, Sec. Red Lake Falls 


W. B. Torgerson 


Oklee 


Frank Deymonaz 


Brooks 


J. A. Duffy 


Red Lake Falls 


H. J. Enderle 


Plummer 


W. J. Quesnell 


Red Lake Falls 



Name 
Ed. Enright 
Anton Lee 
Andrew Anderson 
Edward Wickey 
Octave Lefaive 
Nap. Delorme 
Mose Riel 
Frank P. Grenier 
Thos. Moreau 
Geo. W. Nelson 
P. J. Gustafson 
Alcide Perusse 
Ferd Gother 



Township Chairmen 

Township 
Browns Creek Twp. 
Emardville Twp. 
Equality Twp. 
Games Twp. 
Gervais Twp. 
Lake Pleasant Twp. 
Lambert Twp. 
Louisville Twp. 
Poplar River Twp. 
Red Lake Falls Twp. 
River Twp. 
Terrebonne Twp. 
Wylie Twp. 



Wm. Bottineau, Pres. Council 
J. A. C. Torgerson, Pres. Council 
Jos. J. Helm, Pres. Council 



Address 
Red Lake Falls 
Plummer 
Wanke 
Plummer 
Red Lake Falls 
Red Lake Falls 
Brooks 

Red Lake Falls 
Brooks 

Red Lake Falls 
St. Hilaire 
Red Lake Falls 
Red Lake Falls 
Red Lake Falls 
Oklee 
Plummer 



276 



REDWOOD COUNTY 



Name 


Address 


A. D 


. Stewart, Director 


Redwood Falls 


J.S. 


Gunelson, Secretary 


Belview 


W. H. Ball, Treasurer 


Morg 


an 


Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


N. W. Cobleigh 


Redwood Falls 


Albin Anderson 


Revere 


Thos. Hoskins 


Redwood Falls 


H. C. Lau 


Tracy 


Francis Stronach 


Delhi 


Herman Fixen 


Morton 


Daniel McKay- 


Delhi 


C. B. Huschke 


Morgan 


Otto Flom 


Delhi 


A. C. DoUiff 


Redwood Falls 


Chas. Boushek 


Vesta 


W. R. Werring 


Morgan 


H. L. Hogren 


Vesta 


Dr. M. C. Piper 


Sanborn 


W. R. Goudy 


Seaforth 


George Grimm 


Lamberton 


E. W. Butcher 


Morgan 


P. A. Peterson 


Revere 


C. M. Bendixen 


Morgan 


J. F. Hesnault 


Walnut Grove 


Otto Stasson 


Redwood Falls 


Wm. Duncan 


Milroy 


J. M. Little 


Seaforth 


Nels Larson 


Lucan 


J. Neuenberg 


Wabasso 


C. D. Jensen 


Clements 


L. H. Terhell 


Milroy 


S. F. Scott 


Vesta 


S. P. Hicks 


Tracy 


J. J. L. Torrens 


Wabasso 


John Sabin 


Wahiut Grove 


W. A. Hauck 


Seaforth 


John Arends 


Wabasso 


C. A. Johnson 


Belview 


C. W. Whelan 


Sanborn 


E. W. Currier 


No. Redwood 


Christ Fredrickson 


Clements 


D. R. McCorquodale 


Delhi 


S. J. Hanson 


Springfield 


C. W. Hamlon 


Lamberton 


Burt Small 


Lamberton 








Labor Coi 


mmittee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


C. A. Laterbaugh 


Redwood Falls 


Paul Callaghan 


Wabasso 


W. H. Ball 


Morgan 


Theo Blake 


Milroy 


Wm. J. Simondet 


North Redwood 


C. C. Enestvedt 


Belview 


C. B. Fraser 


Vesta 


Jens Larson 


Lucan 


A. W. Olson 


Walnut Grove 


John Longbottom 


Seaforth 


Asmus Bendixen 


Lamberton 







Marketing Committee 

(Same as Labor Committee) 



276 



RENVILLE COUNTY 

Name Address 

Timothy O'Connor, Director Renville 

M. J. Dowling, Vice-President Olivia 

J. L. Jacobs, Secretary and Treasurer Franklin 



Executive Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Ed. Farrell 


Franklin 


Thos. Kirkpatrick 


Bird Island 


Wm. Zumwinkle 


Morton 


Arvid Anderson 


Hector 


Mike Jungers 


Bird Island 


W. D. Wallner 


Buffalo Lake 


John Head 


Franklin 


Charles Clay 


Sacred Heart 


Will Klawitter 


Stewart 


A. W. Black 


Danube 


Mike Halloran 


Hector 


B. Johnson 


Maynard 


J. A. Whitmer 


Fairfax 


Henry Clobers 


Fairfax 


N. J. Olson 


Franklin 


Geo. Billiard 


Danube 


Henry Haen 


Renville 


J. E. Essen 


Bird Island 


Louis Grunert 


Danube 


Fred Sausele 


Danube 


Herman Milsten 


Sacred Heart 


Dr. A. M. Crandall 


Fairfax 


Stephen O'Brien 


Renville 


A. S. Erickson 


Franklin 


W. E. O'Connor 


Granite Falls 


C. H. Nixon 


Hector 


W. E. Koemp 


Hector 


H. F. Rubey 


Morton 


Geo. Siebke 


North Redwood 


J. R. Landy 


OUvia 


Frank J. Polansky 


Olivia 


S. M. Serkland 


Renville 


H. W. Koehler 


Hector . 


A. H. Anderson 


Sacred Heart 


Chas. Leasman 


Hector 


M. J. Dowling 


Olivia 


John McNamara 


Bird Island 







Township Organization 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


G. A. Torgerson 


Franklin 


S. H. Grimpalen 


Fairfax 


C. P. Sather 


Franklin 


W. A. Fiss 


Fairfax 


C. A. Johnson 


Franklin 


Olof Nelson 


Franklin 


Milton Piersol 


Morton 


C. E. Freeman 


Franklin 


John Cheney 


Morton 


Dr. D'Arms 


Hector 


E. H. Roske 


Morton 


Al. E. Schroeder 


Hector 


Anton Kieffer 


Morton 


JuHus Ratzwold 


Morton 


Wm. Fox 


FrankHn 


Rev. S. C. Ferris 


Morton 


Wm. Kirth 


Stewart 


Geo. Gage 


Olivia 


Albert Schramm 


Stewart 


M. J. Dowling 


Olivia 


B. J. Butler 


Hector 


Rev. Father Hart 


Morton 


Joseph Julius, Jr. 


Fairfax 


J. H. McGowan 


Morton 


Louis F. Palmer 


Fairfax 


Grover C. Jaehning 


Morton 


A. H. Peterson 


FrankHn 


W. B. Strom . 


Hector 


Geo. Kvam 


Franklin 


0. A. Allen 


Hector 


P. J. Wigdahl 


Renville 


A. B. Anderson 


Hector 


John Wordes 


Renville 


J. P. Butler 


Hector 


Albert Packow 


Danube 


Joseph Prelvitz 


Hector 


G. W. Wisman 


Hector 







277 



Name 
John Grabow 
S. S. Lanning 
Peter Sjoberg 
Melvin Sagness 
Wm. Johnson 
H. B. Black 
A. K. Hegna 
Steve Odegaard 
John Bakke 
T. A. Nellermoe 
P. P. Schurts 
A. E. Jung 

E. L. Colby 
A. N. Hayes 
Chas. W. Chroup 
W. C. Kodet 
Geo. Chroup 
Herman Draheim 
Al. Pheifer 
Albert Kopacek 
J. H. Tompkins 
Wm. Dehnel 
John Eggers 
Levi Ratz 

John Peterson 
D. W. Brown 
Wm. J. Glesner 
O. F. Freberg 
James Lucas 

F. O. Grimm 
S. H. Rodneyre 
Martin Nelson 
R. E. Sell 

J. C. Nagel 
Carl Oluf son 
NelsT. Hove 
O. F. Haber 
James McCormick 
Ed. Grunert 
Emil Evanson 
Helge Weslen 
Hennan Schmechel 
Robert Kiecker 
Herman Panke 
Fred Schroer 
Chas. Cuta 
Joseph Teeter 
Adoplh Kaiser 
Chas. Heilig 
C. H. Hopkins 



Address 
Renville 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Renville 
Renville 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Hector 
Hector 
Hector 
Hector 

North Redwood 
North Redwood 
North Redwood 
Olivia 
Olivia 
Olivia 
Hector 
Hector 
Hector 
Hector 
Hector 
Bird Island 
Bird Island 
Bird Island 
Bird Island 
Bird Island 
Hector 
Hector 
Buffalo Lake 
Buffalo Lake 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Danube 
Olivia Box 61 
Danube 
Maynard 
Maynard 
Fairfax 
Fairfax 
Danube 
Danube 
Hanube 
Bird Island 
Danube 
Danube 
Fairfax 



Name 
Wm. Peters 
Ed. Kienholz 
N. L. Lundstrum 
Joseph Murrer 
Tim Hurley 
T. A. Kamos 
C. V. Corson 
H. C. Sherwood 
Thos. Foster 
Phil Ploof 
John A. Dalzell 
T. M. Keefe 
R. B. Henton 
Gust A. Daun 
Miss Julia A. Keefe 
Dr. F. W. Penhall 
H. L. Quist 
J. A. McQuire 
Mrs. B. S. McGowan 
G. A. Rieke 
H. F. Dickmeyer 
E. H. Brown 
Adolph Rieke 
Nels Nelson 
Michael Ruddy 
Henry Keuster 
A. E. Melvold 
Thos. Caven 
Peter Nestande 
J. C. Farrell 
Peter Mortenson 
Thomas P. Berg 
Ole P. Edlund 
Ed. Paulson 
W. A. Day 
H. O. Skalbeck 
Jess Paulson 
G. P. Mangerud 
Dr. Harry Evenson 
Charles A. Frantz 
A. T. EUingboe 
P. J. Kolbert 
A. A. Bennett 
S. W. Bierlein 
A. R.-Holmberg 
J. H. Dale 
John Wegner 
Fred Leistikow 
P. J. Bjom 
Emil Sjoberg 



Address 
Hector 
Hector R 6 
Bird Island R 2 
Bird Island 
Bird Island 
Olivia, 
Hector 
Bird Island 
Buffalo Lake 
Fairfax 
Morton 
Morton 
Morton 
Morton 
Morton 
Morton 
Sacred Heart 
Morton 
Morton 
Fairfax 
Fairfax 
Fairfax 
Fairfax 
Fairfax 
Fairfax 
Fairfax 
Fairfax 
Fairfax 
Fairfax 
Fairfax 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 
Morton 
Maynard 
Renville 
Renville 
Renville 
Renville 
Renville 
Renville 
Renville 
Sacred Heart 
Sacred Heart 



278 



Labor Committee 



Name 
W. E. Moms, Chm. 
J. R. Lande 
Chas. Clay 
Fred Sausele 
J. E. Essen 



Address 
Olivia 
Olivia 

Sacred Heart 
Danube 
Bird Island 



Name 
W. D. Wallner 
A. M. Crandall 
A. D. Erickson 
H. F. Ruby 
C. H. Nixon 



Address 
Buffalo Lake 
Fairfax 
Franklin 
Morton 
Hector 



Marketing Committee 



Name 

Timothy O'Connor 
A. S. Erickson 
W. S. Wallner 
J. R. Landy 
Jake Essen 
W. E. Morris 



Address 
Renville 
Franklin 
Btiffalo Lake 
Olivia 
Bird Island 
Morris 



Name 
H. F. Ruby 
A. M. Crandall 
G. H. Nixon 
Fred Sausle 
C. F. Caly 



Address 

Morton 
Fairfax 
Hector 
Danube 
Sacred Heart 



279 



RICE COUNTY 



Name 
Richard B. Kent, Director 



Address 
Faribault 



Advisory CouncU 



Name 
Geo. S. Weston 
Samuel S. Crossett 
Dr. Chas. Robilliard 



Address 

Faribault 
Faribault 
Morristown 



Name 
Dr. Wm. Hunt 
R. B. Kent 
H. B. Smith 



Address 

Northfield 

Faribault 

Faribault 



Name 
Geo. A. Miller 
Edward Hagerty 
Wm. Eddy 
Chas. Hersman 
William Griffith 
J. D. Plummer 

D. A. McLean 
J. W. Topka 
W. F. Schilling 
Geo. S. Weston 

E. E. Flom 
J. E. Clifford 
Chas. Kiel 

Mrs. Fred B. Hill 
Mrs. H. C. Theopold 



Township Organization 

Township 
Forest 
Shieldsville 
Morristown 
Webster 
Warsau 
Wells 

Cannon City 
Wheatland 
Bridgewater 
Walcott 
Richland 
Northfield 
Wheeling 
Northfield 
Faribault 



Address 
Faribault, R. 5 
Faribault, R. 5 
Morristown 
Webster 
Warsau 
Faribault 
Faribault 
Veseli 
Northfield 
Faribault 
Kenyon 
Northfield 
Nerstrand 



Labor Committee 



Name 
R. B. Kent 
Also Township Chairmen 



Address 
Faribault 



Marketing Committee 



Name 
N. M. Jacobson 



Address 
Northfield 



Name 
J. McNeary 



Address 
Faribault 



280 



ROCK COUNTY 




Name 


Address 


C. H. Christopherson, Director Luveme 


A. 0. Moreaux, Secretary 


Luveme 


Advisory Council 




Name Address 


Name 


Address 


Alex Walker Magnolia 


H. Titzer 


Luveme 


Henry Rolfs Edgerton 


J. R. Lester 


Magnolia 


D. C. Ertreim Garretson, S. D. 


T. M. Jacobson 


Hills 


E. A. Appleby Ash Creek 


John Welzenbach 


Luveme 


E. E. Dell Hardwick 


H. D. Schmuck 


Luveme 


A. Jensen Ellsworth 


Otto K. Steen 


Jasper 


I. S. Woodrow Luveme 


Gust N. Oldre 


Kenneth 


Mrs. A. D. LaDue Luveme 






Labor Committee 





Name 
C. H. Christopherson, Chairman 
Local Committeemen 



Address 
Luverne 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


C. H. Christopherson 


. Luveme 


A. Jensen 


Ellsworth 


A. 0. Moreaux 


Luverne 


L. S. Woodrow 


Luveme 


Alex Walker 


Edgerton 


W. H. Williams 


Magnolia 


Henry Rolfe 


Beaver Creek 


J. R. Lester 


Magnolia 


M. 0. Page 


Garretson, S. D. 


T. M. Jacobson 


Hills 


D. C. Eitreim 


Ash Creek 


John Welsenbach 


Luveme, R. 3 


E. A. Appleby 


Hardwick 


H. D. Schmuck 


Luveme 


E. E. Dell 


Hardwick 


Otto K. Steen 


Jasper 


J. P. Kennedy 


Hardwick 


Gust N. Oldre 


Kenneth 


A. A. Hanson 


Hills 







281 



ROSEAU COUNTY 



Name 
M. J. Hegland Director 
Paul Wallin, vSecretary 



Address 
Roseau 
Roseau 



Executive Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Peter Jasmer 


Warroad 


Otto T. Carlson 


Badger 


Frank F. Kluceny 


Klectzen 


U. S. Whaley 


Warroad 


C. H. Carlson 


Greenbush 


Wm. Moser 


Klectzen 


A. P. Hayes 


River 


J. B. Carlson 


Salol 


Ole Benson 


Juneberry 


R. I. Grover 


Roosevelt 


Oscar Sward 


Warroad 


S. M. Sobtzak 


Greenbush 


Elmer Brandli 


America 


Johan J. Vatsdal 


Duxby 


Ole I. Christianson 


Strathcona 


Hogan Bergerson 


Benwood 


M. T. Mickelson 




Emil Benson 
Knut Thorbjomson 


Wannaska 


Ed. Brovold 


Ross 


Badger 


Andrew Nilson 


Penturan 


Andrew Erickson 


Badger 


August Larson 


Falun 


Chas. J. Navak 


Haug 


August Olson 


Casperson 


John P. Norman 


Roseau 


B. 0. Fuglem 


Wannaska 


Peter E. Strandberg 


Badger, R. 2 


Ole J. Olson 


Stratchona 


Henry Wammer 


Badger 


C. S. Richardson 


Roseau 


Jalmer Wellen 


Badger 


Wm. Watt 


Swift 


Olaf Hildahl 


Greenbush 


J. 0. Hendrickson 


Karlstad 


Al L. Minium 


Roosevelt 


August Hedin 


Malung 


Riley Rasmusson 


Roseau 


Lars 0. Valsvik 


Wannaska 


F. F. Spreiter 


Warroad 


Mrs. Geo. McGillivary 


Roy Briggs 


Salol 



Executive Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Thos. Bily 


Greenbush 


E. L. Thompson 


Badger 


Paul Anderson 


Roseau 


Geo. Marvin 


Warroad 


A. E. Abel 


Roosevelt 







Marketing Committee 
O. M. Olson, Member at large. 

Labor Committee 

O. M. Olson, Member at large. 



288 



ST. LOUIS COUNTY 



Name 
W. I. Prince, Director 
J. M. Nolte, Secretary- 
Stephen H. Jones 



Address 

Duluth 

Commercial Club, Duluth 

306 Board of Trade Bldg., Dul. 



County Central Organization 



Name 
W. C. Agnew 
H. R. Armstrong 
B. E. Baker 
Milie Bunnell 
Hon. W. A. Cant 
Robert E. Carroll 
A. H. Comstock 
Dr. J. J. Eklund 
Hon. J. A. Farrell 
M. J. Filiatrault 
Mason M. Forbes 
W. B. Getchell 

E. R. Grignon 
Odin Halden 

F. C. Harris 
G.G.Hartley 

E. B. Hawkins 
J. H. Hearding 
S. W. Hill 

F. E. House 
T. W. Hugo 
M. L. Jenks 
M. H. Kelley 
R. B. Knox 

M. W. Koneczny 

O. J. Larson 

J. S. Lutes 

D. B. McDonald 

J. R. McGiffert 

R. J. Coole 

Frank Crassweller 

Geo. H. Crosby 

F. J. Dacey 

Oscar Dahly 

W. A. McGonagle 

John M. McNaughton 

Hon. C. R. Magney 

J. D. Mahoney 

John J. Moe 

Rev. J. D. Morrison 

William Mumian 

F. A. Patrick 

Oscar Peterson 



Address 
619 Hawthorne Road, Duluth 
Nation Iron Works, Duluth 
321 Board of Trade Bldg., Duluth 
Duluth News-Tribune 
Court House, Duluth 
Duluth Lumber Co., Duluth 
Marshall Wells Hardware Co., Duluth 
7 East Superior St., Duluth 
City Hall, Duluth 
5409 Ramsey St., Duluth 
Court House, Duluth 
319 55th Ave. W., Duluth 
2519 West Third St., Duluth 
Court House, Duluth 
Zenith Furnace Co., West Duluth 
740 East Superior St., Duluth 
205 First National Bank Bldg., Duluth 
Wolvin Bldg., Duluth 
1926 West Superior St., Duluth 
Wolvin Bldg., Duluth 
221 Sixth Ave., W., Duluth 
Board of Trade Bldg., Duluth 
703 Sellwood Bldg., Duluth 
1 Exchange Bldg., Duluth 
1931 West Superior St., Duluth 
804 Lonsdale Bldg., Duluth 
1405 Alworth Bldg., Duluth 
301 Glencoe Bldg., Duluth 
Clyde Iron Works, Duluth 
514 North 52nd Ave., Duluth 
309 Exchange Bldg., Duluth 
607 Lonsdale Bldg., Duluth 
Gogebie Steam Boiler Works, Duluth 
Morgan Park, Duluth 
Wolvin Bldg., Duluth 
527 West Boulevard, Duluth 
City Hall, Duluth 

American Exchange National Bank, Duluth 
2002 West Superior St., Duluth 
2131 East Superior St., Duluth 
509 East Third St., Duluth 
F. A. Patrick & Co., Duluth 
203 Central Ave., Duluth 



283 



Name 
Rt. Rev. James McGolrick 
F. W. SulHvan 
Hon. P. G. Phillips 
George E. Robson 
W. N. Ryerson 
H. F. Salyards 
William C. Sargent 
H. H. Scobie 
R. M. Sellwood 
Rev. T. B. Shorts 
Hon. Bernard Silberstein 
B. Stockman 
E. A. Swanstrom 
Otto Swanstrom 
L. R. Taylor 
E. P. Towne 
Hon. F. J. Voss 
J. L. Washburn 
A. C. Weiss 
L. M. Willcuts 
Dr. R. E. Wheeler 
David Williams 
E. H. Windom 
Parker M. Paine 
P. F. Heimick 
W. S. Telford 
Norton Mattocks 
L. B. Arnold 
A. B. Hostetter 
H. G. Larsen 



Address 
Duluth 
Duluth 

City Hall, Duluth 
Board of Trade Bldg., Duluth 
Great Northern Power Co., Duluth 
Board of Trade, Duluth 
Providence Bldg., Duluth 
3405 West Third St., Duluth 
City National Bank, Duluth 
6009 Raleigh St., Duluth 
City Hall, Duluth 
Board of Trade Bldg., Duluth 
21 N. 21st Ave. W., Duluth 
Diamond Chalk Horseshoe Co., Duluth 
New Duluth 
Torrey Bldg., Duluth 
City Hall, Duluth 
Alworth Bldg., Duluth 
The Herald, Duluth 
205 First National Bank Bldg., Duluth 
2031 West Superior St., Duluth 
First National Bank, Duluth 
Wolvin Bldg., Duluth 
Duluth 
Duluth 
Duluth 
Duluth 
Duluth 
Duluth 
Duluth 



Districts 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


E. T. Sandberg 


Aurora 


A. H. Weigel 


Gilbert 


Carl Schuster 


Biwabik 


E. A. Bergeron 


Hibbing 


M. A. Nichols 


Buhl 


F. H. Cash 


Kinney 


J. H. McNiven 


Chisholm 


Chas. W. Murphy 


Mountain Iron 


L. F. Luthy 


Cook 


Wm. J. Mudge 


Mesaba 


Dr. G. L. A5n-es 


Ely 


C. J. Buell 


Proctor 


Frank Campbell 


Eveleth 


Andrew Rystrom 


Tower 


John Suikkonen 


Embarrass 


H. J. Scharr 


Virginia 


E. B. Robinson 


Floodwood 


Wm. G. Wall 


Winton 


Mrs. Harriet P. Lerch Hibbing 







Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


H. G. Larsen 


Duluth 


W. C. Sargent 


Duluth 


A. H. Hostetter 


Duluth 







284 





SCOTT COUNTY 






Name 


Address 




Theo. Weiland, Director 


Shakopee 




Geo. F. Sullivan, Secretary 


Jordan « 




John H. Moore, Treasurer 


Shakopee 




Township Organization 




Name 


Township 


Address 


J. R. Ryan 


Cedar Lake 


New Prague 


John Vaughn 


Cedar Lake 


New Prague 


Peter Cihlar 


Cedar Lake 


New Prague 


Henry Engler 


Jordan 


Jordan 


Al. C. Hagie 


Jordan 


Jordan 


John Eilinger 


Jordan 


Jordan 


E. G. Bandy 


Louisville 


Jordan 


Henry Bniggemann 


Louisville 


Shakopee 


Wm. Thomquist 


Louisville 


Shakopee 


Nic. Thomas 


New Market 


New Market 


P. J. Welter 


New Market 


New Market 


M. C. Baltes 


New Market 


New Market 


Fred. Sprain 


New Market 


Elko 


Peter Zweber 


New Market 


Elko 


S. 0. MiUer 


New Market 


Elko 


Jas. June 


St. Lawrence 


Jordan 


PhilOrr 


St. Lawrence 


Jordan 


Mr. Riley 


St. Lawrence 


Jordan 


Peter Poetz 


Sand Creek 


Shakopee 


Wm. Arentz 


Sand Creek 


Jordan 


Wm. Bandy 


Sand Creek 


Jordan 


Frank Schneider 


Credit River 


Prior Lake 


Thos. White 


Credit River 


Prior Lake 


M. I. Lannon 


Credit River 


Prior Lake 


Jos. Jasper 


Eagle Creek 


Shakopee 


Anton Marschall 


Eagle Creek 


Shakopee 


Walter W. Duffy 


Eagle Creek 


Shakopee 


D. N. McCall 


Glendale 


Shakopee 


H. J. Fitspatrick 


Glendale 


Shakopee 


F. A. Bean, Jr. 


New Prague 


New Prague 


Mich. Schreiner 


New Prague 


New Prague 


John F. Barta 


New Prague 


New Prague 


G. L. Nye 


Shakopee 


Shakopee 


C. J. Hartmann 


Shakopee 


Shakopee 


Eugene Lucy 


Shakopee 


Shakopee 


F. C. Irwin 


Belle Plaine 


Belle Plaine 


Jos. Grossner 


Belle Plaine 


Belle Plaine 


Ed. Kane 


Belle Plaine 


Belle Plaine 


Allen Taylor 


Belle Plaine 


Belle Plaine 


Norman Chard 


Belle Plaine 


Belle Plaine 


M. C. Moriarty 


Belle Plaine 


Belle Plaine 


J. C. Westenhoff 


Blakeley 


Blakeley 


James O'Neill, Sr. 


Blakeley 


Blakeley 


J. W. Belliveu 


Blakeley 


Blakeley 



286 



Name 


Township 


Address 


R. H. Kaufenberg 


Savage 


Savage 


E. C. Henkel 


Savage 


Savage 


Chas. Kline 


Savage 


Savage 


Dominic Majerus 


Jackson 


Shakopee 


John McGovem 


Jackson 


Shakopee 


Henry Pink 


Jackson 


Shakopee 


John Deegan 


Prior Lake 


Prior Lake 


Jas. Costello 


Prior Lak,e 


Prior Lake 


Thos. Lyons 


Prior Lake 


Prior Lake 


Chas. Miller 


Spring Lake 


Prior Lake 


F. F. Gierlich 


Spring Lake 


Prior Lake 


Wm. Geister 


Spring Lake 


Prior Lake 


Thos. Shimota 


Helena 


New Prague 


John Michael 


Helena 


New Prague 


Jos. Bastys 


Helena 


New Prague 



Finance Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


F. A. Bean, Jr. 


New Prague 


C. H. Casey 


Jordan 


J. A. Coller 


Shakopee 


Dr. E. E. Cannady 


Prior Lake 


Ed. Kane 


Belle Plaine 


Jos. Lenertz 


Shakopee 


Norman Chard 


Belle Plaine 








Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Edw. M. Kane 


Belle Plaine 


Henry Arens 


Jordan 


John Feidler 


Belle Plaine 


R. B. Smith 


Shakopee 


Michael Schreiner 


New Prague 


Jos. Lenertz 


Shakopee 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


a L. Nye 


Shakopee 


F. A. Bean 


New Prague 


J. H. Moore 


Jordan 







S86 



SHERBURNE COUNTY 



Name 
Andrew Davis, Director 
Chas. F. Knapp, Secretary 



Address 
Elk River 
Big Lake 



Executive Committee 



Name 
Andrew Davis, President 
Chas. F. Knapp, Secretary 
Chas. W. Cater, Treasurer 
Younger Dyson, Councilman 
Wm. Mosford, Councilman 
W. V. Davee, Councilman 
E. A. Smyth, Coimcilman 
Chas. Iliff, Councilman 
E. E. Hamilton, Councilman 
Thos. F. Carlin, Councilman 
Clarence Taylor, Councilman 
G. S. Hunt, Councilman 
Earl D. Cross, Councilman 
John E. Odegard, Councilman 



Address 
Elk River 
Big Lake 
Clear Lake 
Becker 
Clear Lake 
Clear Lake 
Zimmerman' 
Zimmerman 
Princeton, R. 1 
St. Cloud, R. 6 
Zimmerman, R. 
St. Cloud, R. 1 
St. Cloud 
Clear Lake, R. 1 



Name 
C. L. White, Ch. 
Andrew Davis 
E. A. Smyth 
E. E. Hamilton 



Farm Labor Organization 



Address 
Big Lake 
Elk River 
Zimmerman 
Princeton, R. 1 



Name 
Chas. Iliff 
W. V. Davee 
Thos. F. Carhn 



Address 
Zimmerman 
Clear Lake 
St. Cloud, R. 6 



Marketing Committee 



Name Address 


Name 


Address 


Chas. E. Brown, Ch. Elk River 


Yoimger Dyson 


Becker 


E. A. Smyth Zimmerman 


John Dingmann 


Clear Lake 


C. L. White Big T,nke 







237 



SIBLEY COUNTY 



Name 
John W. Boock, Director 
J. C. Deterling, Vice-President 
Chas. Wallin, Secretary 



Address 
Gibbon 
Gaylord 
Gaylord 



County Organization 



Name 
E. L. Bauer 
Wesley Beseke 
Ole Swanson 
J. Aug. Swanson 
A. L. Stoner 
A. H. Briest, , 
C. Christofferson 
Jas. M. Scully 
Chas. Purcell 
John O'Meara 
Paul Quandt 
John Mann 



Address 
Arlington 
Arlington 
Winthrop 
Winthrop 
Henderson 
Gaylord, R. 3 
Gibbon 

Henderson, R.F.D. 
Green Isle 
Green Isle 
Stewart, R.F.D. 
Blakely, R F.D. 



Name 
A. D. Johnson 
F. A. Streseman 
Philip Kroehler 
W. G. Sander 
Henning Johnson 
Fred Wick 
F. V. Burdorf 
Albert Kienitz 
A. A. Hubbard 
O. N. Johnson 
E. T. Connelly 
Ben Rieke 



Address 
Gaylord 
Winthrop 
Henderson 
Henderson 
Lafayette 
Winthrop 
Gibbon 
Arlington 
New Auburn 
Gibbon 

Glencoe, R.F.D. 
Gaylord 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


L. A. Guilbert 


Henderson 


Dan Sweeney 


Green Isle 


H. M. Noack 


Arlington 


Jacob Geib 


Gaylord 


0. R. Greene 


Winthrop 


Wm. Hoppenstedt 


Gibbon 




Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


E. L. Bauer 


Arlington 


A. L. Stoner 


Henderson 


J. Aug. Swanson 


Winthrop 


John W. Boock 


Gibbon 


John O'Meara 


Green Isle 







288 



STEARNS COUNTY 



Name 
Chas. F. Ladner, Director 
G. C. Mantor, Secretary 
Rt. Rev. Joseph F. Busch 
Hon. J. D. Sullivan 
Hon. R. B. Brower 
Alvah Eastman 
C. F. Mac Donald 



Address 
St. Cloud 
St. Cloud 
St. Cloud 
St. Cloud 
St. Cloud 
St. Cloud 
St. Cloud 



Township Orgamzation 



Name 
Geo. R. Christen 
W. S. Bartholemew 

F. A. Telschar 
Jos. L. Schaubach 
Geo. Justin 
Geo. Odell 

Ole Strand 
Wm. Arnold 
D. J, Chamberlain 
Frank Willenbring 
Albert Botz 
Victor Woeste 
Geo. Miller 
Chas. A. Boerger 
Sever Brick 
Jos. Nichols 
W. L. Sartell 
Frank Enderle 

G. H. Wells 
W. H. French 
F. J. Weisser 
Anth. Westbrock 
J. J. Ahman 

H. S. Tilletson 
Frank Rieland 
Forest Sheldon 
Geo. Rooney 
John Meinz 
John N. Benoit 
J. J. Hess 
John Lauermann 
Val Haehn 
John Rossman 
H. G. Borgmann 
Jos. Salchert 
P. P. Maurin 
Clem Kost 



Township 
Albany 
Avon 
Ashley 
Brockway 
CoUegeville 
Crow Lake 
Crow River 
Eden Lake 
Fair Haven 
Farming 
Getty 
Grove 

Holdingsford 
Krain 

Lake Henry 
Lake George 
LeSauk 
Luxemburg 
Lynden 
Maine Prairie 
Melrose 
Millwood 
Munson 
North Fork 
Oak 

Pajmesville 
Raymond 
Rockville 
St. Augusta 
St. Cloud 
St. Joseph 
St. Martin 
St. Wendel 
Sauk Centre 
Spring Hill 
Wakefield 
Zion 



Address 
Albany 
Avon 

Sauk Centre 
Rice 

St. Joseph 
Brooten 
Belgrade 
Eden Valley 
South Haven R. 2 
Richmond 
Sauk Centre 
Meh-ose, R. 2 
Holdingsford 
Albany, R. 4 
Paynesville, R. 4 
Belgrade, R. 2 
Sartell 

Watkins, R. 3 
Clearwater 
Kimball 
Melrose 
Freeport 
Richmond 
Brooten, R. 1 
Freeport 
Paynesville 
Brooten 
Rockville 
St. Cloud, R. 3 
St. Cloud 
St. Joseph 
Roscoe 
St. Joseph 
Sauk Centre 
Meh-ose, R. 3 
Cold Spring 
Roscoe 



S89 



Township Organization 



Name 
Thos. Thomasek 
M. F. Reine 
C. M. Iversle 
Joseph Friedman 
Nick Kremer 
Ed. Wardian 
Peter Schmitz 
Henry Terhaar 
Frank Tohnan 
Nick Freidrich 
P. Wirtzfield 
Jos. L. Justin 
Frank Weisser 
Hon. A. DeBeau 
Peter Meinz 



Township 
Albany 
Brooten 
Belgrade 
Eden Valley 
Greenwald 
Holdingford 
Lake Henry 
New Munich 
Paynesville 
St. Anna 
St. Nicholas 
St. Stephen 
Melrose 
Sauk Centre 
Waite Park 



Address 
Albany 
Brooten 
Belgrade 
Eden Valley 
Greenwald 
Holdingford 
Paynesville 
New Munich 
Paynesville 
Avon, R. 2 
Watkins, R. J 
Rice, R. 2 
Melrose 
Sauk Centre 
Waite Park 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


John J. Ahman 


Richmond 


Frank Rieland 


Freeport 


Geo. M. Borgman 


Sauk Centre 


Geo. M. Schaefer 


Albany 


T. J. Anderson 


Belgrade 


Frank Schmidt 


Avon 


N. A. Storage Co. 


Paynesville 


Martin Loso 


St. Joseph 


Ferdinand Peters 


Cold Spring 


John Bohmer 


Brooten 


M. Kleber 


Melrose 







STEELE COUNTY 

Name Address 

Fred H. Joesting, Director and Chairman Owatonna 

Jul Ausin, Secretary Owatonna 



. Executive Committee 



Name 
D. R. Kanne 
WiU Gillman 
Geo. Brush 
M. J. McGrath 
H. J. Luhman 
John Pichner 
Anton Stand 
M. T. McCardy 
M. J. Darmody 
H. Wrede 
M. J. Lonergan 
John Page 
Ed. J. Buche 
Robt. Deininger, Sr. 
Roy Penhallegon 
Otto Kubat 
Armin Bosshard 
Oscar Cedardahl 
D. J. SulHvan 
Mrs. M. S. Alexander 



Address 
Deerfield 
Medford 
Owatonna 
Owatonna 
Meriden 
Owatonna 
Owatonna 
Owatonna, R. 7 
Blooming Prairie 
Owatonna 
EUendale 
Blooming Prairie 
Owatonna 
Owatonna 
Owatonna 
Owatonna 
Owatonna 
Owatonna 
EUendale 
Owatonna 



Labor Committee 



Name 
Jul Ausin 
D. R. Kanne 
Will GiUman 
Geo. Brush 
M. J. McGrath 
H. J. Luhman 
John Pichner 
Anton Stand 
M. T. McCrady 
M. J. Darmody 
Hugo Wrede 



Address 

Owatonna 

Owatonna 

Medford 

Owatonna 

Owatonna 

Meriden 

Owatonna 

Owatonna 

Owatonna, R. 7 

Blooming Prairie 

Owatonna 



Name 
John Pichner 
M. J. Lonergan 
John Page 
E. Buche 
Sam Rask 

Robt. Deininger, Sr. 
Roy Penhallegon 
Otto Kubat 
Armin Bosshard 
Oscar Cedardahl 
D. J. Sullivan 



Address 

Owatonna 

EUendale 

Blooming Prairie 

Owatonna 

Blooming Prairie 

Owatonna 

Owatonna 

Owatonna 

Owatonna 

Owatonna 

EUendale 



Name 
Jul Ausin, Chm. 
Chas. Raymond 
John Lynard 
Chas. Fisher 



Marketing Committee 



Address 

Owatonna 
Owatonna 
Owatonna 
Owatonna 



Name 
H. C. Partridge 
A. M. Lerberg 
Nels Nelson 



Address 
Owatonna 
EUendale 
Blooming Prairie 



STEVENS COUNTY 



Name 
R. M. Adams, Director 
P. E. Miller, Secretary 
Name Address 

C. C. Erstad Donnelly 

H. C. Timbrock Chokio 

L. P. Norby Alberta 



Address 
Morris 
Morris 
Name Address 

A. Overstad Hancock 

P. E. Miller Morris 

L. C. Dorweiler Chokio 



Chairmen for Districts 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


J. H. Devenney 


Morris 


Geo. A. Johnson 


Alberta 


F. J. McLaughlin 


Donnelly 


Lee Eddy 


Chokio 


F. E. Taplin 


Hancock 







Chairmen for Townships 



Name 


Address Name 


Addrej 


Martin Corregan 


Baker Fred Andert 




Frank Vikturek 


E. E. Walpole 


Morris 


Henry Blees 


Donnelly John LeSage 


Morris 


Chas. Heubner 


A. L. Cook 


Morris 


L. L. Hanse 


Detrick Schmeckpeper Chokio 


Dennis DeWane 


A. C. Jessner 


Morris 


0. A. Solvie 


Hodges Geo. H. Farwell 


Alberta 


Mrs. Frank Hancock 


Morris 

Labor Committee ^ 




Name 


Address Name 


Address 


J. H. Devenney 


Morris Geo. A. Johnson 


Alberta 


F. J. McLaughlin 


DonneUy Lee Eddy 


Chokio 


F. E. Taplin 


Hancock 





Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


T. H. McGuire, Ch. 


Morris 


Stephens Burt 


Chokio 


Andrew Oberstadt 


Hancock 


J. J. Schultz 


Alberta 


F. J. McLaughlin 


Donnelly 







SWIFT COUNTY 



Name 
F. C. Thornton, Director 
I. M. Hudson, Secretary 



Address 
Benson 
Benson 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


. Address 


F. C. Thornton, Ch. 


Benson 


A. D. Schendel 


HoUoway 


J. C. Piefer 


Benson 


Y. Laws 


Appleton 


O. G. Hough 


Kerkhoven 


Wm. Perrizo, Jr. 


Clontarf 


E. C. Kiseling 


Murdock 


Henry Olson 


Benson 


G. M. McCarthy 


DeGraff 


Harry M. Nelson 


Benson 


T. H. Connolly 


Danvers 








Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Jos. Sanchagrin 


Benson 


A. D. Schendel 


Holloway 


Geo. M. McCarthy 


DeGraff 


Martin J. McGowan 


Appleton 


T. H. Connolly 


Danvers 


E. C. Kiesling 


Murdock 


Wm. Perizzo, Jr. 


Clontarf 


0. G. Hough 


Kerkhoven 



MS 



TODD COUNTY 



Name 
A. D. Day, Director 
Raymond A. Lee, Secretary 
E. V. Moore, Vice President 



Address 
Long Prairie 
Long Prairie 
Eagle Bend 



Advisory Council 



Name 
N. A. Smith 

F. E. Crosgrove 
Chas. Himter 
J. A. Shaver 
Ola Larson 

P. Perreten 
E. N. Erickson 
Frank Steinkugler 
Wm. Gammelien 
M. T. Klukken 
J. H. Borgert 
O. K. Foreberger 
Jonas Eckberg 

G. E. Curtis 

E. W. Johanson 
J. W. McKeUip 
Wm. McCartney 



Address 
Hewitt 
Bertha 

Ward Springs 
Long Prairie, R. 4 
Burtnmi 
Long Prairie 
Clarissa 
Philbrook 
Bertha 
Osakis, R. 2 
Browerville 
Clarissa 
Sauk Centre 
Osakis 
Browerville 
Round Prairie 
Long Prairie 



Name 
L. Deering 
W. W. Brooks 
Geo. Koonze 
C. Remmilard 
W. H. Miller 
J. S. Hanley 
H. A. Corey 
Chris Dempsey 
Hugh Owen 
F. A. Mason 
J. F. Bassett 
T. H. Mertz 
Wm. Rodman 
S. H. Schowalter 
L. H. Colson 
Wm. Gerling 



Address 
Browerville 
Long Prairie 
Round Prairie 
Staples 
Hewitt 
Browerville 
Philbrook 
Browerville 
West Union 
Bertha 
Browerville 
Burtrum 
Eagle Bend 
Grey Eagle 
Hewitt 
Long Prairie 



Fann Labor Organization 



Name 
C. F. Miller, Chairman 



Address 
Long Prairie 



Marketing Committee 



Name 

A. D. Day 
H. E. Hart 
I. E. Hart 
Louis Langeson 
Wm. Rodman 
Louis Bottemiller 

B. R. Bartlett 



Address 

Long Prairie 

Long Prairie 

Browerville 

Clarissa 

Eagle Bend 

Bertha 

Hewitt 



Name 
Paul Read 
Laurence Smith 
L. R. Branch 
Otto Femstahl 
Chas. Krousey 
Bert Thomson 



Address 

Staples 
Philbrook 
Roimd Prairie 
Little Sauk 
Burtrum 
Grey Eagle 



Federal Fuel Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


A. D. Day, Chm. 


Long Prairie 


Geo. W. Beckell 


Staples 


H. E. Walseth 


Eagle Bend 







294 



TRAVERSE COUNTY 

Name Address 

Chas. E. Houston, President Wheaton 

D. J. Leary, 1st Vice-President Browns Valley 

Geo. Putnam, 2nd Vice-President Tintah 

Wm. H. Zeiher, 4th Vice-President Dumont 

Carl O. Saterbak, Secretary Wheaton 

J. L. Paul, Treasurer Browns Valley 



Name 
Chas. E. Houston 
F. W. Murphy 



Executive Committee 



Address 
Wheaton 
Wheaton 



Name 
Carl O. Saterbak 



Address 
Wheaton 



Advisory Council 



Name 
E. C. Tubbe 

D. J. Leary 
W. H. Zeher 
Geo. Putnam 
J. L. Paul 
Arthur Duffield 
Martin Monson 
Matt Doll 

E. M. Anding 
John Toelle 



Address 

Wheaton 
Browns Valley 
Dumont 
Tintah 

Browns Valley 
Browns Valley 
Wheaton 
CoUis 
Chokio 
Browns Valley 



Name 

C. F. Koch 
Chas. H. Rixe 
Paul Winter 
Joe Benson 

D. J. Neuman 
John Homer 
C. H. Streeter 
J. R. Lane 

Fred Seidensticker 
*0. J. Spafford 



Address 

Wheaton 

Graceville 

White Rock,S.D. 

Graceville 

Wheaton 

Collis 

Tintah 

Tintah 

Wheaton 

Wheaton 



Resources 
Name 
W. H. Zeiher, Chairman 
Traverse Coimty Assessors 



Address 
Dumont 



Name 
J. L. Paul, Chm. 
Andrew Peterson 



Finance 



Address 
Browns Valley 
Wheaton 



Name 
W. H. Zeiher 
Geo. W. Cross 



Address 

Dumont 
Tintah 



Name 
H. B. Cory, Chm. 
E. W. Hayes 
Rev. F. M. Hofman 



Welfare of Enlisted Men 
Address Name Address 

Wheaton Martin Ljmch Dumont 

Browns Valley David Burton Wheaton 

Tintah 



Name 
H. E. Kiger, Chm. 
Frank D. Smith 
Geo. H. Putnam 



Farm Products 

Address Name Address 

Wheaton Andrew Peterson Wheaton 

Browns Valley Louis Bender Wheaton 

Tintah F. J. Steidl Wheaton 



"Deceased 



S9S 



Gardens 



Name 
D. J. Leary, Chm. 
Ed. Robinson 


Address 
Browns Valley 
Dumont 


Name 
Fred Ellwanger 


Address 
Tintah 




Enlistments 




Name 
Van Gordon, Chm. 
W. R. McReynolds 
Otto Paulson 


Address 
Browns Valley 
Wheaton 
Wheaton 


Name 
L. A. Anderson 
Geo. AUanson 


Address 
Tintah 
Wheaton 




Motor Vehicles 




Name 
H. T. Lewis, Chm. 
John A. Hammond 


Address 
Wheaton 
Wheaton 

] 


Name 
Fred J. Wheeler 
Jacob Heidelberger 

Publicity 


Address 
Wheaton 
Wheaton 


Name 
V. E. Anderson, Ch. 
Mrs. A. C. Bayrell 


Address 
Wheaton 
Wheaton 


Name 
E. F. Joubert 
vSam. Y. Gordon 


Address 
Wheaton 
Browns Valley 




Public Safety 




Name 
P. H. Leonard 


Address 
Wheaton 


Name 


Address 








Name 
Wm. Paul 
A. W. Putnam 


Address 
Browns Valley 
Tintah 


Name 
Ole Fuglie 
Bert Pedalty 


Address 
Dumont 
Dakomin 




Marketing Committee 




Name 
F. W. Murphy, Chm 
H. E. Higer 
E. T. Kay 


Address 
. Wheaton 
Wheaton 
Wheaton 


Name 
John A. Norsen 
M. J. Ltmch 
R. C. Davison 


Address 
Wheaton 
Dumont 
Tintah 



296 



WABASHA COUNTY 



Name 




Address 


D. C. McKenzie, Director 


T/ake City 


E. R. Paterick, Secretary 


Lake City 




Advisory Council 




Name 


Town 


Address 


Dr. C. S. Shore 


Lake City 


Lake City 


L. V. Kurd 


Lake City 


Lake City 


W. H. Rafferty 


Wabasha 


Wabasha 


John W. Murdock 


Wabasha 


Wabasha 


Linn Whitmore 


Wabasha 


Wabasha 


Joe Ley 


Plainview Village 


Plainview 


W. H. Grieve 


Plainview Township 


Plainview 


Grant Nichols 


Mazeppa Village 


Mazeppa 


WaUace Whipple 


Mazeppa Township 


Mazeppa 


Sam CM 


Chester 


Zumbro Falls 


Fred Anding 


GiHord 


Lake City 


F. A. Wassmann 


Mt. Pleasant 


Lake City 


Levi Scruby 


Zumbro Falls Village 


Zumbro Falls 


Ole Oleson 


T,ake 


Lake City 


Geo. F. Hayes 


Elgin Village 


Elgin 


R. L. Wood 


Elgin Township 


Elgin 


John McMillan 


Theilman 


Theilman 


John Duffus 


West Albany 


Lake City 


J. W. Nolan 


Oakwood 


MiUville 


W. G. Rilly 


Hyde Park 


MiUville 


S. R. Anderson 


Hammond 


Hammond 


John Robinson 


Zumbro 


Hammond 


H. E. McGuigan 


MiUville 


MiUville 


Peter Koob 


Pepin 


Wabasha 


E. J. McDonough 


Kellogg Village 


Kellogg 


John J. Dady 


Greenfield 


Kellogg 


Alex Huddleston 


Glasgow 


Wabasha 


John Peshon 


Minneiska 


Minneiska 


Richard Montgomery 


Weaver 


Weaver 


E. R. Lee 


Watopa 


KeUogg 


P. E. McDonough 


Highland 


KeUogg 



Marketing Committee 

D. C. McKenzie, Lake City 
Howard Eastman, Lake City 



Labor Committee 
E. G. Quade, Lake City 



StT 



WADENA COUNTY 



Name 




Address 


J. H. Mark, Director 


Wadena 


Geo. M. Stowe, Secretary 


Wadena 


Name 


Township 


Address 


R. L. Benedict 


Aldrich 


Aldrich 


M. L. Wood 


Aldrich 


Vemdale 


Chas. C. Greenwood 


Blueberry 


Menagha 


G. C. Bockhart 


Bullard 


Vemdale R 4 


Roy Petrie 


Huntersville 


Himtersville 


A. J. Marshall 


Leaf River 


Sebeka R 2 


Tom Dahlvang 


Lyons 


Vemdale R 4 


J. H. Hunt 


Meadow 


Sebeka 


Dr. Chas. H. Pierce 


Menagha 


Menahga 


Marvin Perldns 


Orton 


Sebeka 


C. A. Mattson 


Red Eye 


Sebeka 


Wm. H. Dom, Jr. 


Rockwood 


Sebeka 


A. A. Johnson 


Sebeka Village 


Sebeka 


M. E. Isherwood 


Sebeka ViUage 


Sebeka 


John Dom 


North Germany 


Sebeka 


John Jimtiman 


Shell River 


Menahga 


Matthew WilHams 


Thomastown 


Staples 


W. W. Pike 


Vemdale 


Vemdale 


John Dower 


Wadena 


Wadena 


James Boyd 


Wadena 


Wadena 


N.A.Wells 


Wing River 


Vemdale 


Mrs. C. W. Miller 


Wadena 


Wadena 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


John H. Mark 


Wadena 


Ja,mes Boyd 


Wadena 


A. A. Johnson 


Sebeka 


R. L. Benedict 


Aldrich 



S98 



WASECA COUNTY 





Name 


Address 


R. 


P. Ward, Director 


Waseca 


P. 


J. Crandall, Secretary 


Waseca 


Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Carl Sampson 


New Richland 


Charles Woodhall 


Waldorf 


E. A. Everett 


Waseca 


Wm. Schwartz 


Waldorf 


James Sullivan 


Janesville 


S. Y. Harmon 


Waldorf 


E. J. Goltz 


Janesville 


C. E. Root 


New Richland 


J. J. Hogan 


Janesville 


Nick Dineen 


New Richland 


Wm. Roemhelt 


Waseca 


F. F. Kreuger 


New Richland 


A. F. Bethke 


Waseca 


John Spillane 


New Richland 


Justice Reinhardt 


Waseca 


F. H. Quade 


Janesville 


R. T. Maloney 


Waseca 


R. R. Brown 


Janesville 


L. L. Fretham 


Waseca 


John Henry 


Janesville 


John B. Curran 


Waseca 


John Moonan 


Waseca 


Emil Kraske 


Waseca 


F. W. Senn 


Waseca 


Wm. Dimidie 


Waseca 


M. L. Jacobson 


Moorhead 


J. L. Morrel 


Waseca 


Ed Everett 


Waseca 


Dick Ballard 


Waseca 


George Goodspeed 


Waseca 


Gust Mittelstaedt 


Waseca 


Henry Habein 


Waseca 


L. B. Zimmerman 


Waseca 


G. P. Madden 


Waseca 


Hiram Powell 


Waseca 


Wm. Bartlett 


Waseca 


H. Pream 


Janesville 


H. M. Gallagher 


Waseca 


Henry Leeman 


Janesville 


T. K. Sommerstad 


New Richland 


Raymond Doyle 


Waldorf 


John A. Johnson 


New Richland 


Peter Bums 


Waseca 


A. A. Samson 


New Richland 


Ralph Leslie 


Waseca 


John Papke 


Waseca 


Selmer Hanson 


Waseca 


John Bowers 


Waseca 


Oscar Swenson 


Waseca 


Mrs. D. S. Cummings Waseca 




Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


P. J. Crandall 


Waseca 


C. R. Paulson 


Otisco 


J. A. Henry 


Janesville 


Chas. Woodhall 


Waldorf 


J. J. Spillane 


New Richland 







Name 
R. P. Ward 
James Sullivan 



Marketing Committee 



Address 
Waseca 
Janesville 



Name 
T. A. Sommerstad 
Raymond Doyle 



Address 
New Richland 
Waldorf 



Finance Committee 

Name 
R. P. Ward, Chairman Public Safety Commission 
John Moonan, Chairman Loyalty League 
Charles Leuthold, Chairman Red Cross 



Address 
Waseca 
Waseca 
Waseca 



S99 



Name Addbess 

John Jennison , Chairman Liberty Loan and War Stamps Janesville 

Henry C. Johnson, Chairman Y. M. C. A. Waseca 

M. W. Ryan, Chairman Knights of Columbus Waseca 

John L. Hanson, Chairman County Committee New Richland 

Bernard Fisher, Sheriff Waseca 

Harry Van Loh, Superintendent of Schools Waseca 

W. S. Brown, Coal Administrator Waseca 

C. H. Watson, Food Administrator Waseca 

H. F. Gallagher, Publicity Manager Waseca 

E. W. Senn, Manager of Speakers Waseca 

C. H. Norton, Secretary Waseca 

Mr. Lyness, County Agent, County Labor Bureau Waseca 

John L. Hanson, Chrm. County Commissions New Richland 

E. A. Everett, Gen'l. Counselor Waseca 



WASfflNGTON COUNTY 



Name 
R. A. Wilkinson, Director 
A. G. McComiick, Secretary 



Address 
Lake Elmo 
Stillwater 



Executive Committee 



Name Addre 


ss Name Address 


W. R. Sawyer St. Paul Park Geo. E. Munkel Stillwater 


J. R. KoUiner Stillwater H. R. 


Woerz Stillwater 


George H. Atwood Stillwater Frank Morrison Copas 


A. W. Johnson Marine-on-St. Croix W. S. 


Soule Withrow 


P. C. Anderson So. Stillwater Victor Munson Newport 


R. S. Davis Stillwater 






Advisory Council 




Name 


Township 


Address 


John Clarey 




Stillwater 


Wm. Kundy 




Stillwater 


Andrew Anderson 




Marine-on-St. Croix 


Albert Lohman 




Lake Elmo 


H. F. Hartman 


Afton 


Afton 


J. S. Barker 


Baytown 


So. Stillwater 


Walter Stone 


Denmark 


Newport R 2 


• A. H. Bahe 


Cottage Grove 


Newport R 2 


Fred Walquist 


Forest T.ake 


Forest T.ake 


Thomas Minogue 


Grant 


Stillwater R 4 


Sam McKean 


Lakeland 


Stillwater R 7 


Thomas Lynch 


May 


Withrow 


J. D. CoUopy 


Oakdale 


Lake Elmo 


Mike Steiner 


Oneka 


Hugo 


C. W. Grandstand 


Scandia 


Copas 


H. B. Volhner 


Stillwater 


Stillwater 


W. S. Krause 


Woodbury 


Lake Elmo 


Chas. Lindahl 


Vil. of Marine 


Marine-on-St. Croix 


F. E. Heney 


Vil. of Hugo 


Hugo 


J. R. Kolliner 


Stillwater 


Stillwater 


John Mcpherson 


So. Stillwater 


So. Stillwater 


J. F. Chase 




Forest Lake 


C. H. Gilhnore 




St. Paul Park 


J. V. Bailey 




Newport 


W. C. Krog 




Stillwater 


Herbert J. Anderson 




So. Stillwater 


Alfred S. Merrill 




Hastings R 6 


M. H. Brennan 




Hastings R 6 


Jno. G. Wright 




Hastings R 6 


Frank Crippen 




Hastings R 6 


A. W. Johnson 




Marine-on-St. Croix 


Leonard Benson 




Copas 


Abe Shoblom 




Marine Mills 



801 



Name 
Ben J. Long 
T. Enerson 
Geo. S. Taylor 
J. W. Mardous 
Harry A. Swenson 
W. W. Wilcox 
J. E. Gillespie 
H. C. Robertson 
M. C. McMillan 
W. S. Masterman 
W. S. Moscrip 



Address 
Hugo 

Forest Lake 
Withrow 
Stillwater R 1 
Afton 

White Bear, R. 2 
Stillwater 
Stillwater 
Stillwater 
Stillwater 
Lake Elmo 



Labor Committee 



Name 
A. G. McCormick 



Address 
Stillwater 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


J. E. Gillespie 


Stillwater 


N. A. Olson 


Copas 


Maurice Sliney 


Lake Elmo 


W. S. Soule 


Withrow 


August Noltimier 


St. Paul Park 


Henry Raths 


Newport 



Committee on Contributions for Red Cross 



Name 
W. S. Moscrip 
John Wright 
Frank Crippen 
A. W. Johnson 
Leonard Benson 
Geo. S. Taylor 
T. Enerson 
W. W. Wilcox 
F. G. Morisson 



Township 

Denmark 
Cottage Grove 
Scandia 
Copas 



Address 
Lake Elmo 
Hastings, R. 6 
Hastings, R. 5 
Marine Mills 
(Big Lake) Copas 
Withrow 
Forest Lake 
White Bear, R. 2 
Copas 



Name 
Mrs. John Joyce 
Paul Burtzlaff 
Chas. Nelson 



Garden Committee 



Address 
Stillwater, R. 1 
Stillwater 
Afton 



Name 
J. V. Bailey 
Rev. Krutz 



Address 
Newport 
St. Paul Park 



Finance and Membership Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


H. C. Robertson 


Stillwater 


0. Struble 


Forest Lake 


J. D. Bronson 


Stillwater 


Ray Kern 


Lake Elmo 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


J. E. Schow 


South Stillwater 


J. E. Gillespie 


Stillwater 


Henry A. Johnson 


Copas 


W. C. Krog 


Stillwater 


Harry A. Swenson 


Afton 


• 





Enlistment Committee 



Name 
M. C. McMillan 
W. E. Easton 



Address 

Stillwater 
Stillwater 



Name 

J. H. Davis 
John Rosell 
Otto Hoffman 



Address 
Stillwater 
Marine Mills 
Newport 

(Woodbury) 



Publicity Committee 



Name 
W. C. Masterman 
F. M. Welch 
F. T. Wilson 



Address 

Stillwater 
Stillwater 
Stillwater 



Name 
Reuben Thoreen 
M. H. Galer 



Address 
Stillwater 
Forest Lake 



308 



WATONWAN COUNTY 



Name 




Address 


Oliver C. Peterson, 


Director St. 


, James 


Thomas Tonneson, 


Secretary St. 


, James 


Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


P. H. Grogan 


St. James 


W. D. Hinchen 


MadeHa 


Samuel Jackson 


St. James 


E. R. Haycraft 


Madelia 


J. K. Sonneyson 


St. James 


0. F. Larson 


Madelia 


C. N. Sonneyson 


St. James 


A. B. Gjewik 


Madelia 


P. N. Sterrie 


St. James 


Frank Morris 


Madelia 


Wm. Curtis 


St. James 


G. S. Hage 


Madelia 


F. J. Appel 


St. James 


0. A Crosby 


Madelia 


F. H. Schweppe 


St. James 


C. H. Coalin 


Madelia 


Geo. W. Seager 


St. James 


D. E. Raney 


Butterfield 


C. E. Fuller 


St. James 


Ed. McCarthy 


Madelia 


J. L. Lobben 


St. James 


Jacob Broger 


Butterfield 


H. W. Haislet 


St. James 


Oscar Finseht 


Butterfield 


Fred Church 


St. James 


Claus Syverson 


Ormsby 


Oscar P. Anderson 


St. James 


F. A. Nelson 


St. James, R. 4 


J. G. Hotchkiss 


St. James 


T. P. Hunstad 


Odin 


J. 0. West 


St. James 


0. E. Sundt 


La Salle 


Albert Running 


St. James 


Oscar Rask 


Darfur 


H. J. Mellum 


St. James 


J. W. Sommers 


St. James 


E. A. Gibbs 


St. James 


Lewis Larson 


St. James 


C. T. Crowley 


St. James 


Theo. Englin 


Darfur 


Roy Crowley 


St. James 


Frank Dewar 


Lewisville 


Johan Rolf 


St. James 


Henry Mad son 


Madelia 


0. A. Mickelson 


St. James 


Joe Davis 


Lewisville 


Scott Henshaw 


St. James 


John West 


St. James 


Wm. Schabelen 


Madelia 


T. P. Laingen 


Odin 


C. W. Spinter 


Madelia 


Mrs. Wm. Curtis 


St. James 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Oliver C. Peterson 


St. James 


Thos. Englin 


Darfur 


Jacob Brogger 


Butterfield 


T. Laingen 


Odin 


0. Syverson 


Ormsby 


Philip Henderson 


Echlos 


0. E. Sundt 


LaSalle 


Wm. Schalaben 


Madelia 


Adolph Sucker 


Lewisville 


Aimer Rask 


Grogan 



S04 



WILKIN COUNTY 



Name 




Address 


F. L. Pierce, Director 




Breckenridge 


J. B. Busher, Resigned 






Geo. Mace, Chairman 




Campbell 


D. J. Jones 




Breckenridge 


G. W. Burrows 




Breckenridge 


John Hult 




Breckenridge 


J. S. Steams 




Breckenridge 


Labor Committee 




Name Address 


Name 


Address 


T. E. Knudson Wolverton 


Geo. W. Mace 


Campbell 


L. L. Olson Kent 


P. F. Nash 


Nashua 


J. S. Jenson Foxhome 


W. J. McAlpin 


Tenny 


S. C. Bowman Rothsay 


J. J. Brady 


Doran 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Dr. C. P. Rice 


Breckenridge 


S. H. Narum 


Lawndale 


J. P. Buscher 


Breckenridge 


Thos. Juvrud 


Rothsay, R. 5 


Geo. W. Mace 


Campbell 


A. N. Larson 


Tenny 


M. J. Olson 


Wolverton 


J. J. Brady 


Doran 


Olaf Smerud 


Kent 


J. L. Cohen 


Nashua 


Howard Gore 


Childs 


J. S. Jenson 


Foxhome 



306 



WINONA COUNTY 



Name 

H. E. Blair, Director 

H. B. Watkins, Secretary 



Address 

Winona 
Winona 



Advisory Council 



Name 
H. C. Garvin 
J. A. Latsch 
Martin Boyle 
J. M. Voelker 
H. L. Buck 
J. W. S. Gallagher 
S. H. Somsen 
J. W. Lucas 
H. J. McConnon 
Earl Simpson 
John Dietze 
S. L. Prentiss 
Paul Watkins 
S. L. Wright 
JuHus Protz 
Geo. Mallery 
J. F. Bennett 
H. D. Woodward 
W. Krenzke 
Chas. Wolf 
C. P. Robb 

C. A. Anderson 
John Bums 
W. J. Fischer 
Henry McKay 

D. A. Tiffany 
C. G. Corey 
L. J. Brown 

E. F. Baker 
John Madden 
R. D. London 

F. O. Anderson 
Dr. F. H. Rollins 
Jas. Ferrier 

F. A. Crane 
Mike Reiland 
Geo. Church 
Andrew Greden 
Ed. ChurchiU 
Alex Bole 
Albert Kramer 



Township 



Norton 

Hillsdale 

Winona 

Richmond 

Homer 

Wilson 

Warren 

Utica 

Hart 

Wiscoy 

Pleasant Hill 

New Hartford 

Drescach 

Lewiston Village 

Utica 

St. Charles 

St. Charles Village 

Saratoga 

Fremont 

Rollingstone Village 

Minn. City Village 

Mt. Vernon 

White Water 

Elba 

Altura Village 



Address 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Winona 
Bethany 
Stockton 
Lewiston 
Dakota 
Winona, R. 3 
Winona, R. 2 
Lewiston, R. 1 
Lewiston, R. 2 
Rushford, R. 1 
Witoka, R. 1 
Witoka, R. 1 
Dakota, R. 1 
Dakota 
Lewiston 
Utica 

St. Charles 
St. Charles 
St. Charles 
Lewiston 
RolUngstone 
Minnesota City 
Minneiska, R. 1 
Plainview 
St. Charles 
Altiu*a 



306 





Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


J. M. Voelker 


Winona 


H. Kaupbusman 


Town Hart 


James Ferrier 


St. Charles 


A. Lilly 


Town Warren 


John Frisch 


St. Charles 


H. W. Stedman 




W. H. Harrington 


Dakota 







Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


Geo. L. Beck 


Winona 


John Litcher 


Lewiston 


Ed. Forrestelle 


St. Charles 


Henry Spelts 


Altura 


Nick Meyer 


Rollingstone 







807 



WRIGHT COUNTY 



Name 
John Kelly, Director 
Oscar Bjork, Secretary 
W. H. Cutting 
S. A. Johnson 



Address 

Waverly 
Buffalo 
Buffalo 
Buffalo 



Advisory Council 



Name 
Patrick Doherty 
Chas. Aldrich 
H. J. Elsenpeter 
John Ojamferta 
Henry Ransom 
Peter Valesch 
Ed. Kelsey 
L. F. Demarais 
Chas. Dahlberg 



Address 
Maple Lake 
Buffalo 
Buffalo 
Cokato 
Annandale 
St. Michaels 
Delano 
Buffalo 
Howard Lake 



Name 
V. H. Kingsbury 
Edison Washburn, Jr. 
C. C. Hastings 
J. H. Lee 
Anton P. Moody 
A. L. Allen 
Henry Kruz 
J. D. Allen 
Luther Laughton 



Address 
Monticello 
Monticello 
Buffalo 
Annandale 
Cokato 
Howard Lake 
Annandale 
Buffalo 
Clearwater 



Farm Labor Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


A. A. Jewett 


Annandale 


Fred Belden 


Montrose 


Oscar Bjork 


Buffalo 


C. M. Johnson 


Rockford 


Bernard Nelson 


Cokato 


Wm. Elliot 


St. Michaels 


Chas. H. McNaughton 


Delano 


Henry Tessman 


South Haven 


Geo. E. Means 


Howard Lake 


W. H. Boland 


Waverly 


C. F. Merz 


Monticello 







Marketing Committee 



Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


A. A. Jewett 


Annandale 


C. F. Merz 


Monticello 


C. C. Hastings 


Buffalo 


Fred Belden 


Montrose 


Bernard Nelson 


Cokato 


Wm. Elliot 


St. Michaels 


Chas. H. McNaughton 


Delano 


Henry Tessman 


South Haven 


Geo. E. MeflfiR 


Howard Lake 


W. H. Boland 


Waverly 



Speaking Campaign 



Name 
C. A. French 



Address 
Monticello 



Food Commissioner 



Name 
J. P. McDonnell 



Address 
Waverly 



308 



YELLOW MEDICINE COUNTY 

Name Address 

H. P. Bengston, Director Granite Falls 



Marketing Committee 



Name 


Addfrss 


Name 


Address 


H. P. Bengston 


Granite Falls 


C. C. Anderson 


Hazel Rtm 


K. D. Meste 


Granite Falls 


Otto Friberg 


Clarksfield 


Philip Melcher 


Echo 


Gust MiUer 


Porter 


A. E. Martin 


Wood Lake 


Emil Mygren 


Canby 


T. A. Velde 


Hanly Falls 


Herman Krogh 


Burr 




Labor Committee 




Name 


Address 


Name 


Address 


E. C. Watts 


Granite Falls 


Otto Friberg 


Clarkfield 


K. D. Meste 


Granite Falls 


A. E. Martin 


Wood Lake 


B. C. Schram 


Canby 







MINNESOTA WOMAN'S COMMITTEE 



Executive ^Committee 



Director: 

Mrs. Thomas G. Winter 

First Vice-Chairman: 

Mrs. Cordenio Severance 

Second Vice-Chairman: 
Mrs. WiUiam T. Coe 

Mrs. George H. Adams 

Mrs. John N. Jackson 

Mrs. Bertha Dahl Laws 

Mrs. A. MacLaren 

Mrs. W. R. Mandigo 

Mrs. Charles P. Noyes 

Mrs. Frances Buell Olson 

Miss Agnes Peterson 

Miss Annie Shelland 

Mrs. George Squires 

Mrs. James G. Swan 

Mrs. Bertha Allen Van 
Campen 

Mrs. J. L. Washburn 

Miss Mildred Weigley 

Secretary: 

Miss Aimee Fisher 



2617 Dean Boulevard, Minneapolis. 

Cottage Grove, Minnesota. 

Wayzata, Minnesota. 

2411 West Twenty-first Street, Minneapolis. 

483 Grand Avenue, St. Paul. 

Appleton, Minnesota. 

412 Holly Avenue, St. Paul. 

799 Iglehart Avenue, St. Paul. 

89 Virginia Avenue, St. Paul. 

Shubert Building, St. Paul. 

Old Capitol, St. Paul. 

Department of Education, Historical Society 
Building, St. Paul. 

21 South St. Albans Street, St. Paul. 

2216 Kenwood Parkway, Minneapolis. 

Rochester, Minnesota. 
Himter's Park, Duluth. 
University Farm, St. Paul. 

2617 Dean Boulevard, Minneapolis. 



310 



CHAIRMEN OF STANDING COMMITTEES 

Americanization: 

Mrs. Frances Buell Olson Shubert Building, St. Paul. 

Accredited War Organizations, 

Mrs. George H. Partridge 1 Groveland Terrace, Minneapolis. 



Children's Year: 

Mrs. James G. Swan 



2216 Kenwood Parkway, Minneapolis. 



Committee on War Emergency Training Courses: 

Miss Merle Higley 204 Transportation Building, Minneapolis. 



Dress Conservation: 

Miss Marion Weller 



University Farm, St. Paul. 



Food Conservation: 

Miss Mildred Weigley University Farm, St. Paul. 

Legislative Committee: 

Mrs. Charles P. Noyes 89 Virginia Avenue, St. Paul. 

Liberty Loan and War Savings Stamps: 

Mrs. A. MacLaren 412 Holly Avenue, St. Paul 



Maintaining Existing Social Agencies — ^Executive Committee. 

Historical Society Building, St. Paul. 



Patriotic Education: 

Miss Annie Shelland 



Publicity: 

Mrs. George H. Adams 2411 West Twenty-first Street, Minneapolis. 



Red Cross: 

Mrs. John N. Jackson 

Registration: 

Mrs. W. R. Mandigo 

Speakers' Bureau: 

Mrs. Anna H. Phelaji 

Women in Industry: 
Miss Agnes Peterson 



483 Grand Avenue, St. Paul. 
799 Iglehart Avenue, St. Paul. 
612 Tenth Avenue S. E., Minneapolis. 
Old Capitol, St. Paul. 



Young Women's Auxiliary: 

Miss Elisabeth Congdon 3300 London Road, Duluth. 



811 



WAR COUNCIL 

In every state, the presidents of state-wide woman's organizations and 
individuals representing state-wide but unorganized women's work are by- 
request of the National Committee constituted the Women's State Council of 
Defense. (Meeting monthly.) 

Allied Relief: 

Mrs. C. W. Ames 501 Grand Avenue, St. Paul. 

American Red Cross: 

Mrs. John N. Jackson 483 Grand Avenue, St. Paul. 

Anti-Suffrage Association: 

Mrs. J. B. Gilfillan 222 Clifton Avenue, Minneapolis. 

Association of Collegiate Altunnae: 

Mrs. Jas. Richardson 3408 Irving Avenue S., Minneapolis. 

Audubon Society: 

Mrs. Phelps Wyman 5017 3rd Avenue S., Minneapblis. 

Big Sisters: 

Mrs. Robbins Gilman 917 Andrus Building, Minneapolis. 

Children's Protective Work: 

Mrs. C. M. Ferguson 124 E. 13th Street, Minneapolis. 

Churches: 
Baptist: 

Mrs. A. F. Gale 1620 3rd Avenue S., Minneapolis. 

Catholic: 

Mrs. Daniel Coonan 424 W. Franklin Avenue, MinneapoUs. 

Christian Woman's Board of Missions: 

Mrs. W. U. Smith 1044 Dayton Avenue, St. Paul. 

Congregational: 

Mrs. George B. Drake 4044 Sheridan Avenue, MinneapoHs. 

Episcopal: 

Mrs. H. C. Theopold Faribault, Minnesota. 

Liberal Union: 

Mrs. K. E. Mo 701 15th Avenue S. E., Minneapolis. 

Lutheran: 

Mrs. L. F. Gruber 1213 Hague Avenue, St. Paul. 

Methodist: 

Mrs. F. F. Lindsay 25 Seymour Avenue S. E., Minneapolis. 

Methodist Home Missionary Society: 

Mrs. A. J. Matchett 1416 Capitol Avenue, St. Paul. 

National Council of Jewish Wo^en: 

Mrs. Israel Rypins 1049 Lincoln Avenue, St. Paul. 

Presbjrterian: 

Mrs. Willard Weld 2428 Bryant Avenue S., Minneapolis. 

Colonial Dames: .* 

Mrs. Charles Fumess 265 S. Exchange Street, St. Paul. 

Council of Defense (St. Paul) : 

Mrs. J. T. Hale 1005 Commerce Building, St. Paul. 

Daughters of American Revolution: 

Mrs. James Morris 2109 Blaisdell Avenue, Minneapolis. 

Daughters of Revolution: 

Mrs. John A. Schlener 2025 Portland Avenue, Minneapolis. 

812 



Daughters of Veterans: 

Mrs. Clarice Parker 3109 4th Avenue S., Minneapolis. 

Educational: 
Grade Teachers: 

Miss Isabelle Williams 798 Osceola Avenue, St. Paul. 

High School: 

Miss Agnes Dougherty 2078 Siimmit Avenue, St. Paul. 

Kindergarten: 

Miss Stella L. Wood 2500 Grand Avenue, Minneapolis. 

Home Economics Teachers: 

Miss Leila Gerry Girl's Vocational School, Minneapolis. 

Vocational Work: 

Miss Elizabeth Fish Girl's Vocational School, Minneapolis. 

University: 

Dr. Anna Helmholtz-Phelan 612 10th Avenue S. E., Minneapolis. 
Farm Women's Congress: 

Mrs. C. C. Neale 3525 31st Avenue S., Minneapolis. 

Florence Crittenden Home: 

Mrs. Albert Strong 2324 Pillsbury Avenue, Minneapolis. 

Fraternal Orders: 

Mrs. Sara Mathews 1620 W. Lake Street, Minneapolis. 

Intercollegiate Bureau of Occupation: 

Mrs. Frank Warren 3427 Humboldt Avenue S., Minneapolis. 

International Federation of Catholic Alumnae: 

Mrs. John Donohue 1481 Summit Avenue, St. Paul. 

King's Daughters: 

Mrs. G. H. Heidenreich Waconia, Minnesota. 

Minnesota Federation of Women's Clubs: 

Mrs. George Allen Rochester, Minnesota. 

Minnesota Medical Women's Association: 

Dr. Auten Pine 749 Lowry Building, St. Paul. 

Minnesota Garden Flower Society: 

Mrs. H. B. Tillotson 1320 5th Street S. E., Minneapolis. 

Minnesota Board of Nurse Examiners: 

Miss Lydia Keller Old Capitol, St. Paul. 

Minnesota State Sunshine Society: 

Mrs. W. C. Fiske 3025 Irving Avenue S., Minneapolis. 

Minnesota Women's Suffrage Association: 

Mrs. Andreas Ueland Calhoun Boulevard, Minneapolis. 

Minnesota Graduate Nurses Association: 

Miss Minnie Patterson 1409 Stevens Avenue, Minneapolis. 

Minnesota State League of Nursing Education: 

Miss Louise Powell University Hospital, Minneapolis. 

Minnesota Scandinavian Woman Suffrage Association: 

Mrs. Luth Jaeger 615 James Avenue N., Minneapolis. 

Musical Women: 

Mrs. Carlyle Scott 3322 Lyndale Avenue S., Minneapolis. 

Mrs. Charles Sargent 1613 Jefferson Avenue, Duluth. 

National Housewives League: 

Mrs. V. C. Sherman 2209 Humboldt Avenue S., Minneapolis. 

National League for Women's Service: 

Mrs. Cordenio Severance Cottage Grove, Minnesota. St. Paul Hotel. 



Naval Service (Woman's) : 

Mrs. E. W. Backus 75 Oak Grove Street, Minneapolis. 

Needlework Guild 

Mrs. C. G. Bates 3751 Portland Avenue, Minneapolis. 

National Organization for Public Nursing: 

Miss C. E. Epply Hopewell Hospital, Minneapolis. 

State Library Commission: 

Miss Clara Baldwin Historical Society Building, St. Paul. 

United Daughters of Confederacy: 

Mrs. M. B. Harvey 682 Holly Avenue, St. Paul. 

Women's Christian Temperance Union: 

Miss Rosette Hendrix 2408 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis. 

Women's Peace Party 

Miss Hope McDonald 201 Ridgewood Avenue, Minneapolis. 

Woman's Relief Corps: 

Mrs. M. D. Fritz Mankato, Minnesota. 

Woman's River and Harbor Congress: 

Mrs. Delia Armstrong Curtis Court, Minneapolis. 

Young Women's Auxiliary: 

Miss Elisabeth Congdon 3300 London Road, Duluth. 

Young Women's Christian Association: 

Mrs. Chas. P. Noyes 89 Virginia Avenue, St. Paul. 



S14 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT CHAIRMEN AND VICE-CHAIRMEN 

The Congressional Districts are divided geographically between the District 
Chairman and Vice-Chairman, so that each has from four to seven coimties 
"imder her wing," in order to keep closer track of the counties and to be helpful 
to them in local problems in a way that is impossible for the State Chairman. 
These chairmen are members of the State War Council. 

First District: 

Mrs. Charles H. Mayo, Rochester, Chairman. 
Mrs. D. O. Irwin, Lake City, Vice-Chairman. 

Second District: 

Mrs. Frank Manson, Worthington, Chairman. 

Mrs. C. E. Wise, 226 Byron Street, Mankato, Vice-Chairman. 

Third District: 

Mrs. William Duffy, Shakopee, Chairman. 
Mrs. H. C. Theopold, Faribault, Vice-Chairman. 

Fourth District: 

Mrs. Cordenio Severance, Cottage Grove, Chairman. 

Mrs. Robert Earl, 745 York Street, St. Paul, Vice-Chairman. 

Fifth District: 

Mrs. A. W. Strong, 1254 McKnight Building, Minneapolis, Chairman. 
Miss Rosette Hendrix, 2408 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis, Vice-Chairman. 

Sixth District: 

Mrs. W« H. Gemmell, Brainerd, Chairman. 

Mrs. C. A. Weyerhauser, Little Falls, Vice-Chairman. 

Seventh District: 

Mrs. Frank Murphy, Wheaton, Chairman. 
Mrs. John Serrin, Glenwood, Vice-Chairman. 

Eighth District: 

Mrs. C. E. Spring, 1622 East Fourth Street, Duluth, Chairman. 
Mrs. Peter Oleson, Cloquet, Vice-Chairman. 

Ninth District: 

Mrs. C. G. Selvig, Crookston, Chairman. 

Mrs. H. M. Wheelock, Fergus Falls, Vice-Chairman. 

Tenth District: 

Mrs. T, J. Abbott, Anoka, Chairman. 

Mrs. Minerva B. Hixon, Cambridge, Vice-Chairman. 

315 



CHAIRMEN OF COUNTY WOMEN'S COMMITTEES 



Cotanty 


Chairman 


Postoffice 


Aitldn 


Mrs. F. E. Murphy 


Aitkin. 


Anoka 


Mrs. T. E. Coleman 


Anoka. 


Becker 


Mrs. S. D. Ensign 


Detroit. 


Beltrami 


Mrs. W. Z. Robinson 


Bemidji. 


Benton 


Mrs. J. E. Malloy 


Foley. 


Big Stone 


Mrs. M. S. Stevens 


Graceville. 


Blue Earth 


Mrs. H. C. Hotaling 


Mapleton. 


Brovm 


Mrs. Ora Trautman 


Comfrey. 


Carlton 


Mrs. F. R. Walters 


Moose Lake. 


Carver 


Mrs. George Dutoit 


Chaska. 


Cass 


Mrs. C. M. Taylor 


Cass Lake. 


Chippewa 


Mrs. S. G. EHason 


Montevideo. 


Chisago 


Mrs. Marilla Stone 


Rush City. 


Clay 


Mrs. William Russell 


Moorhead. 


Clearwater 


Mrs. J. A. Cogswell 


Bagley. 


Cook 


Mrs. Jack Scott 


Grand Marais. 


Cottonwood 


Mrs. T. C. Colh'ns 


Windom. 


Crow Wing 


Mrs. L. P. Hall 


Deerwood. 


Dakota 


Mrs. T. A. Brown 


Hastings. 


Dodge 


Mrs. P. J. Schwarg 


Dodge Center. 


Douglas 


Mrs. A. D. Haskell 


Alexandria. 


Faribault 


Mrs. D. L. Morse 


Blue Earth. 


Fillmore 


Mrs. H. M. Smith 


Rushford. 


Freeborn 


Mrs. W. H. Walker 


Alden. 


Goodhue 


Mrs. A. R. Mensing 


Cannon Falls. 


Grant 


Mrs. A. W. Wells 


Herman. 


Hennepin (rural) 


Mrs. J. E. Spencer 


Wayzata. 


Houston 


Mrs. C. W. Belding 


Caledonia. 


Hubbard 


Mrs. M. M. Nygaard 


Park Rapids. 


Isanti 


Mrs. W. L. Moody 


Cambridge. 


Itasca 


Mrs. Otto Bergh 


Grand Rapids. 


Jackson 


Mrs. H. J. Leigh 


Lakefield. 


Kanabec 


Mrs. R. J. Streetly 


Mora. 


Kandiyohi 


Mrs. D. N. TaUman 


WiUmar. 


Kittson 


Mrs. Florence Nelson 


Hallock. 


Koochiching 


Mrs. F. C. Correll 


International Falls. 


Lac Qui Parle 


Mrs. Theo. Christian^on 


Dawson. 


lAke 


Mrs. H. C. Hanson 


Two Harbors. 


Le Sueur 


Mrs. C. W. Glotfelder 


Waterville. 


Lincoln 


Mrs. R. F. Schultz 


Ivanhoe. 


Lyon 


Mrs. B. B. Gislason 


Minneota. 


McLeod 


Miss Cora Reed 


Glencoe. 


Mahnomen 


Mrs. H. P. Phillips 


Mahnomen. 


Marshall 


Mrs. H. I. Yetter 


Stephen. 


Martin 


Mrs. M. R. Diment 


Fairmont. 


Meeker 


Mrs. Alvah Hunt 


Litchfield. 


Mille Lacs 


Mrs. H. C. Cooney 


Princeton. 


Morrison 


Mrs. L. D. Brown 


Little Falls. 


Mower 


Mrs. A. W. Allen 


Austin. 



316 



Murray 


Miss Jennie Holm 


Slayton. 


Nicollet 


Mrs. Peter Schuweiler 


Nicollet. 


Nobles 


Mrs. Lee Shell 


Worthington. 


Norman 


Mrs. B. F. Tenney 


Ada. 


Olmsted 


Mrs. H. H. Witherstine 


Rochester. 


Ottertail 


Miss Mildred Lowry 


Fergus Falls. 




*Mrs Charles R. Wright 


Fergus Falls. 


Pennington 


Mrs. J. H. Hardisty 


Thief River Falls. 


Pine 


Mrs. James Slaven 


Sandstone. 


Pipestone 


Mrs. Grace Hanson 


Pipestone. 


Polk 


Mrs. C. Q. Roemer 


Crookston. 


Pope 


Mrs. John Serrin 


Glenwood. 


Ramsey- 


Mrs. J. T. Hale 


1st Floor, Athletic Building, 
St. Paul. 


Red Lake 


Mrs. S. C. Shockley 


Red Lake Falls. 


Redwood 


Mrs. E. A. Pease 


Redwood Falls. 


Renville 


Mrs. M. J. Dowling 


OUvia. 


Rice 


Mrs. H. C. Theopold 


Faribault. 


Rock 


Mrs. A. D. La Due 


Luveme. 


Roseau 


Mrs. George McGillivray 


Roseau. 


St. Louis 


Mrs. Erwin Lerch 


Hibbing. 


Scott 


Mrs. William Duffy 


Shakopee. 


Sherburne 


Mrs. A. Robinson 


Elk River. 


Sibley 


Mrs. Peter Morton 


Winthrop. 


Steams 


Mrs. H. »S. Halvorson 


Sauk Center. 


Steele 


Mrs. M. S. Alexander 


Owatonna. 


Stevens 


Mrs. Frank Hancock 


Morris. 


Swift 


Mrs. JuHus Thorson 


Benson. 


Todd 


Mrs. George Christie 


Long Prairie. 


Traverse 


Mrs. Albert Olin 


Wheaton. 


Wabasha 


Mrs. M. J. Nerbovig 


Plainview. 


Wadena 


Mrs. C. W. Miller 


Wadena. 


Waseca 


Mrs. D. W. Cummings 


Waseca. 


Washington 


Mrs. W. G. Masterman 


Stillwater. 


Watonwan 


Mrs. Will Curtis 


St. James. 


Wilkin 


Mrs. George Mangskau 


Breckenridge. 


Winona 


Mrs. C. H. Robbins 


St. Charles. 


Wright 


Mrs. Charles Hawker 


Buffalo. 


Yellow Medicine 


Mrs. Howard Kerns 


Granite Falls. 



*Died Nov. 1918. 



817 



INDEX 

Americanization 22 

Commission's Law Enforcing Activities 30 

Governor's Proclamation 33 

Prevention of Waste 35 

Suppression of Disloyalty 31 

Commission's Creative Activities 12 

Alien Registration 19 

An Effective Campaign 15 

Banks and Public Improvements 21 

Emergency Relief 21 

Employment Service .- 18 

Farm Crop and Labor Census 16 

Fish and Food Supply 16 

Forest Fire Protection 21 

High Cost of Living 18 

Home Guard and Motor Corps 13 

Initial Measures of Safety 12 

L W. W 37 

Labor Bureau 14 

Labor and Industrial Peace 17 

Marketing Department 14 

Preservation of Public Order 37 

Production of Iron Ore 17 

Production and Conservation of Food 13 

Peace Officers 13 

Soldiers and Their Dependents 20 

Square Deal for the Farmer 14 

Street Railway Strike 38 

Enforcement of Commission's "Order by the State Executive 40 

Membership and Organization 9 

Minnesota a Pivotal State 10 

Minnesota's War Contributions 43 

Publicity Work 28 

Safety Commission Act 7 

Team Work Within the State 43 

Theory of the Law 11 

Work of the Office 29 

War Records Commission 24 

Work of Women's Committee 24 

APPENDIX 

By-laws of the Commission 70 

Charges against New Ulm Officials 48 

Coal Crisis in the Northwest 51 

Constitutionality of Law Upheld 57 

Cook vs Bumquist, et al, re Order No. 7 67 

Rietz vs O'Keefe, re Order No. 46 67 

Law Creating Commission 65 

Orders No. 1-59 72-142 

Report of Examination of Books and Affairs 45 

818 



INDEX— Continued 

MISCELLANEOUS— 

Alien Registration '. 169 

Appointment of Special Council 171 

Co-ordination of War Activities 171 

Convention of Sheriffs 171 

Death of Commissioner Lyndon A. Smith 168 

Federal Registration of Aliens 167 

Special Agent Appointed 167 

Special Investigations 169 

Timber on State Lands 170 

United States Public Safety Reserve 170 

Excerpts from Minutes of Commission's Meetings: 

Banks and Public Enterprises 165 

Coal Supply 148 

Crop Saving Measure 167 

Destruction of Food 152 

Disloyalty: Federal Cooperation 153 

Enrollment of Women for Service 143 

Fishing in Ely-Winton District 152 

Food 149 

Fish Licenses 152 

Funds for Fire Protection, 1917 164 

Farm Labor 147 

Grading of Grains 153 

Home Guard 165 

Labor Standards 143 

Moratorium Resolution 160 

Non-partisan League: La FoUette's Speech 163 

Ordinance Defining and Pimishing Vagrancy 154 

Protection of Life and Property 164 

Prosecution of Sedition 153 

Public Markets 151 

PubUc Welfare: Loans to Dependents 156 

Schools: Resolution re German Text Books 162 

Sale of Liquor at Oliver, Wis 161 

Soldiers Welfare 159 

Street Car Strike 143 

Violations of Liquor Laws 160 

County Directors 175 

County Organization 176 309 

Health 172 

Women's Organization 310 317 

Illustrations : 

Fac-simile of Agreement 0pp. 108 

Minnesota Commission of Public Safety 0pp. 142 



S19 




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