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Full text of "Report of the President"

WELLESLEY COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



ANNUAL REPORTS NUMBER 

PRESIDENT AND TREASURER 
19334934 



WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS 
FEBRUARY, J935 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



ANNUAL REPORTS NUMBER 



PRESIDENT AND TREASURER 



1933-1934 



Bulletins published eight times a year by Wellesley College, 
Wellesley, Massachusetts. February, 1 number; April, 3; 
May, 1 ; October, 1 ; November, 1 ; December, 1. Entered as 
second-class matter, February 12, 1912, at the Post Office at 
Boston, Massachusetts, under the Acts of July, 1894. 



Volume 24 Number 4 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Report of the President 5 

Report of the Dean of the College IS 

Report of the Dean of Freshmen , . 23 

Report of the Committee on Graduate Instruction 28 

Report of the Dean of Residence 32 

Report of the Librarian 38 

Report of the Director of the Personnel Bureau 49 

Appendix to the President's Report: 

Amendments to the By-Laws 55 

Legacies and Gifts 56 

New Courses in 1934-35 59 

Academic Biography of New Members of the Teaching Staff 

for 1934-35 60 

Leaves of Absence in 1934—35 62 

Promotions of 1934-35 62 

Resignations and Expired Appointments, June, 1934 63 

Fellowship and Graduate Scholarship Awards for 1934—35 ... 64 

Publications of the Faculty 65 

Sunday Services 69 

Addresses 70 

Music 74 

Exhibitions at the Farnsworth Art Museum 75 

Report of the Treasurer 77 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 



To the Board of Trustees: 

As provided by the By-Laws, I hereby present a report 
upon the 59th year of the College, closing on June 30, 1934. 
The supplementary reports should be read to secure a full 
picture of the year. Attention is called to the report of the 
Personnel Bureau, which is included for the first time. 

There have been a number of changes in the membership 
of the Board. At the annual meeting the following new mem- 
bers were elected: Dr. Albert Davis Mead, Professor of 
Biology and Vice-President of Brown University; Mr. 
Edward Allen Whitney, Professor of History and Literature 
at Harvard University; and Mrs. Ruth Baker Pratt, a 
former student of the College, first woman member of the 
Board of Aldermen, New York City, and first Congress- 
woman from New York State, completing in 1933 a term 
of four years. Mrs. Edith Jones Tower, B.A., 1916, suc- 
ceeded Mrs. Helen Knowles Bonnell, of the Class of 1907, 
as alumna trustee for the term 1934—1940. Miss Grace 
Goodnow Crocker has now completed twelve years of con- 
tinuous membership and therefore retires from the voting 
members of the Board. She was, however, elected Secretary 
of the Board at the May meeting, as the By-Laws provide 
that the Secretary need not be a voting member. As Secre- 
tary of the Board she will attend, without vote, the meet- 
ings of the Executive Committee and of the Committee on 
Gifts. 

On August 4 of 1933, Mary Frazer Smith, Recorder of 
the College, died at her summer home on the Maine coast; 
on August 30, less than four weeks later, Eleanor Acheson 
McCulloch Gamble, Ph.D.-, Professor of Psychology and 
Director of the Psychology Laboratory, died suddenly in 



Wellesley College 

South Byfield. A brochure containing appreciations of these 
two officers has been published. It is therefore only neces- 
sary to say here that rarely has the college community 
sustained such a shock and suffered such a loss as was oc- 
casioned by the death of these two members within a month. 

News was received of the death, on January 5, of Fraulein 
Margarethe Miiller, Emeritus Professor of German Lan- 
guage and Literature. Professor Miiller had been living in 
Munich since her retirement in 1923. Many of her Wellesley 
friends had called on her at various times and had re- 
ported her vivid interest in the College. 

With the close of this year Miss Clara Eliza Smith, Ph.D., 
Helen Day Gould Professor of Mathematics, retired from 
active service. She had been connected with the College 
for twenty-five years as Instructor, Associate Professor and 
Professor. Many of her former students bear testimony to 
her friendly aid and to her skill as a teacher. By vote of the 
Trustees she was given the title Professor Emeritus. This 
year also brought to a close the service of three Heads of 
Houses, Mrs. Wheeler, Miss Snyder, and Mrs. Wardwell. 
Mrs. Engles resigned as Head of Stone Hall because of ill 
health. The report of the Dean of Residence will give 
further details in regard to these four officers. All have 
served the College with loyalty and efficiency. Mile. 
Marguerite Mespoulet, Professor of French, presented her 
resignation to accept a position offered her by Barnard Col- 
lege and Columbia University. Mile. Mespoulet has been 
a brilliant and stimulating teacher and we offer her our good 
wishes In her new work. Her resignation creates a vacancy 
which Is difficult to fill. 

The College was honored to have on its staff Professor 
Louis Cazamian of the University of Paris as Visiting Pro- 
fessor of English Literature on the Mary Whiton Calkins 
Memorial Foundation. It Is both a pleasure and a duty to 
testify to the distinction of the lectures which he gave not 
only In the large course (306) but also In his series of eight 
public lectures on "Symbolism in Victorian Literature." His 



President's Report 

many occasional addresses, as well as those of Madame 
Cazamian, were also greatly enjoyed. Altogether, Professor 
and Madame Cazamian with their two daughters made a 
charming and delightful addition to the college community. 
When Professor Cazamian was obliged to return to France at 
the close of the winter term, Miss Vida D. Scudder, Emeritus 
Professor of English Literature, very kindly consented to 
take charge of the course in Victorian Prose for the rest of 
the year. 

In the Appendix will be found, as usual, a complete state- 
ment of other changes in the faculty, together with the 
academic biography of the new members of the staff ap- 
pointed for the year 1934-35 and the list of those members 
who will be on leave for the whole or a part of that year. 

As the guest of the Vereinigung Carl Schurz, Professor 
Elizabeth Donnan will join the group of professors from 
other American colleges who are to make a six weeks' tour 
of Germany. The Dean of the College will also join the 
group for a part of the time. We look forward with interest 
to their reports next fall. In early June, Professor Leland H. 
Jenks was invited to serve on the committee, under the 
chairmanship of Raymond Leslie Buell, to make a survey 
for the social and economic reconstruction of Cuba. This 
committee was appointed by the Foreign Policy Association 
at the request of the President of Cuba and with the ap- 
proval of the United States Government. Doubtless Mr. 
Jenks' appointment was in recognition of his book, "Our 
Cuhan Colony." Miss Sirarpie Der Nersessian, Associate 
Professor of Art, was invited to attend the fourth Inter- 
national Congress of Byzantine Studies, to be held in Sofia 
from September 9 to 16. The invitation was personally ex- 
tended to her by Professor B. Filov, General Secretary of 
the Committee of Organization of the Congress and widely- 
known authority on Bulgarian archaeology. The subject of 
her paper will be ''La legende d'Abgar d'apres un rouleau 
illustre de la bibliotheque Pierpont Morgan in New York." 
This important parchment roll, containing the correspond- 



Wellesley College 

cnce between Abgar, King of Edessa, and Jesus Christ, 
came to the attention of Miss Der Nersessian when she was 
working on the Byzantine manuscripts in the Morgan 
Library. As it is not yet known to Byzantine scholars in 
Europe, the paper will doubtless have unusual interest. Mr. 
W. Alexander Campbell, Associate Professor of Art, who 
has been Assistant Director of the excavations at Antioch, 
has now been made Director of this excavation and next 
year will be absent for the second semester, as he has been 
for the past three years. In recognition of Mr. Campbell's 
service the department of Art has received a part of a 
mosaic border of 100 a.d., found at Antioch in 1932. This 
border was attached to the Judgment of Paris panel, re- 
cently sent to the Louvre, and is valued at a minimum of 
^1,000. Other members of our faculty are constantly in 
demand to undertake publications requiring research for 
which their qualifications are recognized. The College may 
well be proud of the scholars on its faculty. 

Miss Frances L. Knapp, Dean of Freshmen and Chairman 
of the Board of Admission, made in the spring — with the co- 
operation of the Alumnae Association — an extended trip to 
the Pacific Coast and to the Southern States. She visited 
schools and Wellesley Clubs in Omaha, Kansas City, 
Denver, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Pasa- 
dena, Phoenix, Tucson, El Paso, Dallas, San Antonio, At- 
lanta, Birmingham, New Orleans, Richmond, Washington, 
and Baltimore. 

The survey undertaken by the Committee on Curriculum 
and Instruction of the Academic Council was completed and 
a report made to the Council and to the Trustees. Although 
the report was not so far-reaching as it was hoped it might 
prove to be, it undoubtedly led to revision of courses in 
many departments. Attention is called to the new courses 
offered for 1934—35, a list of which is given in the Appendix. 

During the year under review three amendments to the 
By-Laws were voted by the Trustees: the By-Law authoriz- 
ing the Committee on Educational Policy was considerably 

8 



President's Report 

amplified to define more accurately its duties; the By-Law 
naming the degrees was also altered to conform with the 
present usage; and the By-Law concerning the Committee 
on Conference was discontinued. The final form of these two 
By-Laws will be found on page 55 of the Appendix. 

Thirty years ago the Stetson Fund was established by 
will of Amos W. Stetson "to meet the expense of repairing 
the frames or of purchasing new frames as may be required 
for the paintings now or hereafter in the Art Building of 
Wellesley College aforesaid and for no other purpose." 
Since the terms of the bequest limited the use of the income 
of this fund to the framing of pictures only, the question 
came up whether or not it would be possible to use the in- 
come for the cleaning and repairing of canvases incidental 
to their framing. The President of the Board agreed to take 
up the matter with the Probate Court and through his good 
offices the successful outcome was the authorization of the 
Court "to add to the principal of said fund the unexpended 
income now on hand and to apply to the cost of cleaning 
and repairing the paintings in the petitioner's art building 
and to such other expenses as may be incident to the care 
of said paintings such part of the income hereafter accruing 
in any year as may not be required in that year for repair- 
ing the frames of said paintings or purchasing new frames 
therefor." In accordance with this decision, $1,700 from ac- 
cumulated income was added to the principal, making the 
principal of the fund on June 30, 1934, $4,500. The original 
statement of the Judge of the Probate Court is filed in the 
ofiice of the Assistant Treasurer. 

By vote of the Trustees the allocation of the charge of 
$1,000 for tuition and board was slightly altered. Four 
hundred dollars has been the tuition charge, and $600 the 
charge for board and room. Beginning with the year 1934- 
35, the charge for tuition will be $500 and that for board 
and room $500, making the total the same as it was 
heretofore. 



Wellesley College 

The Trustees authorized the publication of "A Book of 
Psalms," prepared by Miss Eliza Hall Kendrick, Professor 
Emeritus of Biblical History. This volume was issued just 
as the year was closing and will be ready for immediate use 
in our chapel services next year. Miss Kendrick has intro- 
duced passages other than the Psalms, suitable for respon- 
sive reading. She has consulted the original Hebrew in mak- 
ing any slight alterations in accepted text. The book has al- 
ready received high praise from friends within and without 
the College. 

The Trustees also authorized the publication of the essays 
written, during her years of retirement in Rome, by the late 
Adeline Belle Hawes, Emeritus Professor of Latin Language 
and Literature. This book will be published by the Oxford 
University Press as one of the Semi-Centennial series. It is 
expected that it will be ready about November first, and it 
is believed that the book will prove valuable to the teachers 
of Latin in making vivid and real the life and people of 
early Rome. 

The Board of Trustees, at its meeting on January 19, 
authorized the construction of a laboratory for Chemistry, 
Physics, and Experimental Psychology. Mr. Charles Z. 
Klauder was chosen as the architect and the contract was 
finally awarded to the J. W. Bishop Co. The erection of 
this laboratory necessitates the removal this coming sum- 
mer of Wood and Freeman, two wooden houses on Norum- 
bega Hill. It is expected that the building will be ready for 
use by September, 1935. 

On November 2 the Alumnae Committee of the Seven 
College group arranged in St. Louis a dinner such as was 
held in previous years at Philadelphia, Chicago, New York, 
and Boston. Walter Lippmann was the outside speaker. He 
made a strong appeal for financial support from the public 
for the women's colleges. Nearly a thousand guests were 
present. On May 3, in the City of Boston, the same alumnae 
committee sponsored a luncheon for lawyers and trust offi- 
cers at the Exchange Club. At this luncheon President 

10 



President's Report 

Comstock and President Neilson made appeals for the 
women's colleges, Miss Comstock emphasizing the need of 
bequests for scholarships, Mr. Neilson the need of funds 
for general endowment. The guests, some seventy men, rep- 
resented the important banks and trust companies in 
Boston. Mr. Dodge, President of the Wellesley Board of 
Trustees, presided. 

A list of the lectures and concerts which have been given 
during the year under review will be found in the Appendix. 
Two events deserve mention here. For several years we have 
had what we have called Honors Day, which sometimes has 
occurred in the fall. This year the date of March 20 was 
selected for this event, and it was scheduled for the hour 
of the morning chapel service, omitting the first class ap- 
pointment to provide suitable time for the exercises. Pro- 
fessor Harlow Shapley, Director of the Harvard Astronom- 
ical Observatory, was the speaker. He spoke delightfully on 
"A Galactic Tramp." The address was very stimulating to 
both his younger and older audience, and echoes of it per- 
sisted throughout the remainder of the year. On this occa- 
sion the elections to Phi Beta Kappa, the assignment of the 
graduate scholarships to three members of the senior class, 
the award of the Alice Freeman Palmer, the Fanny Bullock 
Workman, and the Horton Hallowell fellowships, and the 
Durant and Wellesley College Scholars from the senior and 
junior classes were announced. The event was altogether 
very successful and must have impressed upon the under- 
graduate the value of pure scholarship. 

On May 12 the department of Greek, with the co-opera- 
tion of the Classical Club, gave out of doors a presentation 
of the "Trojan Women" of Euripides in the original Greek. 
In these days when departments of Greek have few students, 
this event was an achievement worthy of notice. Members 
of the classical departments of Harvard, Smith, and Mount 
Holyoke were in the audience and were full of praise of the 
work of the students. 

11 



Wellesley College 

As mentioned in the report of the Dean of Residence, the 
College offered the use of its equipment to four conferences 
in the summer of 1933. One of these, the Summer Institute 
for Social Progress, met for the first time and received much 
commendation. It was organized by a group of alumnse 
and others interested in its theme, "The Direction and Con- 
trol of Our Economic Future." On June 19, 20, 21, 1934, 
the first session of the Wellesley Reunion College was held 
at Tower Court under the management of the Education 
Committee of the Alumnae Association. Lectures and dis- 
cussions were given by some thirty members of the Wellesley 
faculty in four groups: Philosophy and Religion, Natural 
Sciences, Social Sciences, Literature and Fine Arts. This 
Reunion College was enthusiastically received by the alumnae 
who attended. The Alumns Association proposes to hold a 
second session in June, 1935. 

Gifts to the Library are mentioned in the report of the 
Librarian. It is a pleasure to call attention to the organiza- 
tion of the Library Associates, a group who contribute an- 
nually not less than five dollars to the Library for the pur- 
chase of rare or unusual books. It is hoped that the number 
of these associates will increase with the years and form a 
group, similar to the groups which contribute to the libra- 
ries of Oxford, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Dartmouth, and 
other colleges and universities, for the systematic enrich- 
ment of the Library. A list of gifts other than those to the 
Library will be found in the Appendix. Although it is not 
practical to mention all here, certain gifts may be briefly 
named. 

With the close of the year under review, Munger Hall 
has been in service for more than a full year and has proved 
to be an increasingly satisfactory student home. One feature 
of the house should be repeated, if possible, in any future 
halls of residence. This is the library, which has been fur- 
nished by the Misses Catharine H. and Laura M. Dwight 
in memory of their aunt, Mrs. Charlotte Morse Fiske. Not 
only is the room itself proving a useful addition to the house, 

12 



President's Report 

but It beautifully commemorates in Mrs. Fiske a long-time 
friend of Mrs. Durant and a very generous donor to the 
College in its early days. Mrs. Fiske's loyalty and faith in the 
education of women was expressed in her gift of the J. H. 
Fiske Scholarship, and the moving of the old Hunnewell 
school to the college grounds and its equipment as Fiske 
Cottage in 1892. Miss Dwight and her sister are constantly 
adding to their original gift. This year's gifts include a 
large Aggas map of London of Queen Elizabeth's time in 
a 1737 reproduction; and also one of Agnes Abbot's water 
colors. Miss Abbot has just been promoted to Assistant 
Professor of Art, and her exhibition of water colors this 
year in the art museum attracted a good deal of attention 
and admiration from friends outside the College as well as 
from her colleagues. It is delightful to have one of her 
pictures a part of the decoration of this charming room. 

Mention should also be made of the gift of $500 from 
Eleanor and Rosamond Peck, two alumnae of the College, 
in memory of their sister, Jacqueline Peck of the Class of 
1934. The Income of this fund is to be known as the 
Jacqueline Award and is to be given annually to a senior 
for outstanding work in English Composition, with par- 
ticular reference to the abilitv of the student "to write with 
delicacy and beauty of expression as well as power." 

Another gift of $500 from an unnamed friend of Lucy 
Branch Allen of the Class of 1897 creates the Lucy Branch 
Allen Memorial Fund. The income of this fund is to con- 
stitute a graduation gift each year to a senior. 

The Class of 1909, returning for its twenty-fifth reunion, 
presented $5,000 to be used as the Trustees deem best. The 
unrestricted form of this gift is greatly appreciated. 

The demand for scholarships and for other financial aid 
continues to increase. Gifts for this purpose are greatly 
needed, and it is gratifying to find among the gifts of the 
year new scholarship funds and additions to those already 
existing. The College extends Its gratitude for these and all 
other gifts listed In the Appendix. 

13 



Wellesley College 

It is a satisfaction to record that, though the student body 
has been sHghtly smaller, we are closing the year without a 
deficit. 

Again the President wishes to bear testimony to the co- 
operation of members of the teaching and administrative 
staff and of all other officers of the College. 

Ellen F. Pendleton. 

June 30, 1934. 



14 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 



To the President of Wellesley College: 

The academic year 1933-34 found more than half of the 
undergraduate students planning their work in accordance 
with the provisions of the new curriculum adopted by the 
Academic Council two years earlier. These provisions ap- 
pear to have been accepted as, on the whole, satisfactory 
both by members of the faculty and by students, although 
the students have found more difficulty than had been antici- 
pated in meeting the requirement that an examination to 
test the reading knowledge of a foreign language should be 
passed by the beginning of the junior year. It is hoped that 
as students come to realize earlier in their college course the 
necessity of preparing to fulfill this requirement they can 
arrange to do so as a matter of course, and that the difficul- 
ties felt when the plan was new will be reduced to a 
minimum. 

During the first half of the year, the Committee on Curri- 
culum and Instruction completed the work on the survey of 
instruction authorized by the Academic Council in October, 
1932, and begun by the Committee last year. A number of 
reports of different sorts were made to the Academic Council 
as a whole, to the smaller department committees, and to 
individual instructors. And two copies of a large final report 
were filed, one in the President's office and one in the Pierce 
Room in the Library. 

Several changes in the legislation having to do with the 
curriculum and with the granting of the B.A. degree were 
recommended by the Curriculum Committee to the Aca- 
demic Council and were voted by the Council. One change 
allows students to elect six hours of practical work in art 
within the sixty hours offered for the degree instead of four 
and a half as heretofore. Another provides that no fresh- 
men are to be exempted from English composition in the 
first semester, but that a group may be exempted from the 

IS 



Wellesley College 

work of the second semester. A third change provides that 
the B.A. degree with departmental honors shall be awarded 
to students whose work in their general examinations and 
in the courses in their majors has been of marked excellence. 
A review of the regulations covering the giving of the gen- 
eral examination was also undertaken by the Committee in 
the course of the year, and the result of the review was a 
decision by the Academic Council that the regulations in 
effect in the past few years should be retained for the future 
without substantial change. 

On the recommendation of the Administrative Board, the 
Academic Council voted various changes In the calendar for 
the college year. The changes include adjustments in the 
time for beginning and ending the Christmas and spring 
vacations, the giving up of the 22d of February as a holiday, 
and the substitution for this holiday of a day free of classes 
between the first and second semester. 

During the year 1933-34, 319 courses were actually given 
by the various departments, aggregating 646^ hours per 
week, not including hours duplicated because of additional 
sections of the same course. These 319 courses include only 
one course given by the department of Hygiene, namely 
the lecture course prescribed for freshmen. A list of these 
courses by departments with the figures showing enrollment 
by courses is given in the Statistics of Course Enrollment, 
on file in the ofhce of the Deans. 

The following table shows the amount of instruction given 
by the various departments in the past four years. The unit 
of instruction used is the Instruction of one student, one 
hour a week for one academic year. 

1930-31 1931-32 1932-33 1933-34 

Art 1,062^ 1,449 1,389 1,282 

Astronomy 188^ 183 253K 223^/^ 

Biblical History 1.986 1,929 1,914 1,876>^ 

Botany 581^ 544^ SOSJ^ 730i^ 

Chemistry 542J^ 599^^ 593 5833^ 

Economics and Sociology 1,164 1,251 1,360^ 1,638 

Education 5593^ 615 6883^ 5353^ 

16 



1931-32 


1932-33 


1933-34 


1,824 


2,013 


2,005 


1,7183^ 


1,653 


1,756J^ 


1,930 


1,9661^ 


1,781^ 


4181^ 


348 


465 


1,072^ 


1,203^ 


1,087 


162 


185 


186 


132 


72 


93 


1,924H 


1,827 


1,807^2 


448 


440 


429 


267 


231 


289 


365^ 


322 


240 


831 


738 


660 


735 


663 


642 


1,794 


1,684J^ 


1,530 


358 


330;^ 


283^ 


408 


500 


495 


929 


876 


843 


833J^ 


873 H 


902>4 



Report of the Dean of the College 



1930-31 

English Composition 1,683 

English Literature 1,886 

French 1,948 

Geology and Geography 534 

German 992^ 

Greek 159 

Group Leadership 54 

History and Political Science 1,831^ 

Hygiene 45 1 

Italian 264 

Latin 4021^ 

Mathematics 777>4 

Musical Theory 708 

Philosophy and Psychology 2,002j/2 

Physics 339 

Spanish 579 

Speech 838 

Zoology and Physiology 922J^ 



The following figures are based on the preceding table, 
and show the relative size of the different departments of 
instruction for the last four years. The departments of Bib- 
lical History, English Composition, and Speech owe their 
places in the first ranks in part to the fact that they are 
prescribed subjects. 

1930-31 1931-32 1932-33 1933-34 

Art 8 7 7 8 

Astronomy 23 23 22 23 

Biblical' History 2 2 3 2 

Botany 14 16 16 12 

Chemistry 17 15 15 15 

Economics and Sociology 7 8 8 6 

Education 16 14 13 16 

English Composition 6 4 1 1 

English Literature 4 6 6 5 

French 3 1 2 4 

Geology and Geography 18 18 19 18 

German 9 9 9 9 

Greek 24 24 24 24 

17 



Wellesley College 

1930-31 1931-32 1932-33 1933-34 

Group Leadership 25 25 25 25 

History and Political Science S 3 4 3 

Hygiene 19 17 18 19 

Italian 22 22 23 20 

Latin 20 20 21 22 

Mathematics 12 12 12 13 

Musical Theory 13 13 14 14 

Philosophy and Psychology 1 5 5 7 

Physics 21 21 20 21 

Spanish IS 19 17 17 

Speech 11 10 10 11 

Zoology and Physiology 10 11 11 10 

In September, 1933, of six seniors who had failed the 
general examination in June, four met the test and were 
awarded the degree of B.A. at the October meeting of the 
trustees. They are ranked with the Class of 1933. Two other 
candidates, one who had failed the general examination in 
1932, and one special student who completed her work in 
September, 1933, were also awarded the degree of B.A. at 
the October meeting of the trustees. 

In June, 1934, 306 students received the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts. This makes the total number of Bachelor's 
degrees conferred by the College, including those awarded 
in October, 11,557. The academic requirement for this degree 
is the satisfactory completion of sixty year-hours of class 
work, and no student is graduated without passing a general 
examination on a twelve-hour major or a special honors 
examination. In the case of the members of the Class of 
1934, the regulations governing the choice of courses within 
the sixty hours were those of the so-called "old curriculum." 
This is the last class all the members of which will have 
conformed to the provisions of this plan. 

The following table shows the number of students in the 
Class of 1934 who passed the general examination or the 
comprehensive examination for Honors in each department. 

18 



Report of the Dean of the College 



(Rec. Depart- 
mental Honors 
Passed on Basis Passed Exam. 

General of Gen. for Honors in 

Exam. Exam, etc.) Special Meld 

Art 30 1 

Astronomy 1 

Biblical History 1 

Botany 13 

Chemistry 17 (1) 1 

Economics and Sociology 37 4 

English Composition 25 (1) 

English Literature 23 (2) 

French 20 (1) 

Geology and Geography 7 (2) 1 

German 13 (1) 

Greek 2 2 

History and Political Science .... 26 2 

Italian 5 (1) 

Latin 7 (1) 

Mathematics 22 (4) 

Musical Theory 4 

Philosophy and Psychology 16 

Spanish 8 

Zoology and Physiology 18 (1) 

Three failed to pass their general examination in the follow- 
ing subjects: 

Italian 1 

Mathematics 1 

Political Science 1 

Of these three, one also failed to meet the credit requirement. 

Of the 306 students who received the B.A. degree in 
June, 23 won the rank of Durant Honor Scholars, and 43 
the rank of Wellesley College Honor Scholars. 

There was one junior who spent the past year in France, 
one in Spain, and three in Germany. 

The total number of students registered November, 1933, 
was 1,505, classified as follows: 

19 



Wellesley College 

Resident candidates for the M.A. degree 34 

Resident candidates for the M.S. degree in Hygiene and 

Physical Education 11 

Resident candidates for the Certificate in Hygiene and 

Physical Education 11 

Candidates for the B.A. degree 1,442 

Seniors 301 

Juniors 328 

Sophomores 370 

Freshmen 406 

Unclassified 37 

Non-candidates for degrees 18 

1,516 
Duplicates 11 

Total 1,505 

Compared with the registration of November, 1932, the 
figures show a net loss of 25. 





Gain 


Loss 


Seniors 




18 


Juniors 


15 




Soohomores 




8 


Freshmen 




13 


Unclassified 


9 




Crraduate Students 




17 


Nnn-randidates for degrees 


7 






31 


56 
31 


Net loss 




25 



The following tables show the losses and gains in three 
classes between November 1, 1932, and November 1, 1933: 

Loss Gain 

Class of 1934 (Juniors) 313 41 29 (Seniors) ...301 

Class of 1935 (Sophomores) ... 378 77 27 (Juniors) ... 328 

Class of 1936 (Freshmen) 419 55 6 (Sophomores) 370 

20 



Report of the Dean of the College 

Losses 

Class Class Class Total of 

of of of Three 

1934 1935 1936 Classes 

Left College before, or at end of year 17 49 35 101 

Were dropped on account of poor scholar- 
ship and left College 9 20 19 48 

Entered higher class 6 2 8 

Entered lower class 8 1 9 

Junior year abroad 5 5 

Deceased 1 1 2 

Total 41 77 55 173 

Gains 

From higher class 9 9 

From lower class 2 2 

From unclassified 17 10 27 

From students readmitted after an absence . . 10 4 2 16 

From new students 4 4 8 

Total 29 27 6 62 



The total number of new students admitted in September, 
1933, was 476, 2 more than were admitted in September, 
1932. These 476 students are classified as follows: 

Freshmen 404 

Sophomores 4 

Juniors 3 

Unclassified 36 

Graduate Students 13 

Hygiene Graduate Students 6 

Special Students 10 

Of these 476 new students admitted in September, 1933, 
43 applied for advanced standing. These students came from 
the following institutions: 

American University 1 

Barnard College 1 

Colby Junior College 1 

College of New Rochelle ] 

21 



Wellesley College 

College of William and Mary 

Connecticut College 

Denison University 

Florida State College for Women 

Howard University 

Junior College of Kansas City 

Lasell Junior College 

Milwaukee-Downer College 

Monticello Seminary 

New York University 

Northwestern University 

Ohio State University 

Packer Collegiate Institute 

Penn Hall Junior College 

Pine Manor Junior College 

Pomona College 

Radcliffe College 

Sarah Lawrence College 

Skidmore College 

Smith College 

Sorbonne 

Springfield Junior College 

Swarthmore College 

Sweet Briar College 

University of Colorado 

University of Kentucky 

University of Michigan 

University of Minnesota 

University of Texas 

University of Wisconsin 2 

Wheaton College 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary L. Coolidge, 

Dean of the College. 



'>! 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF FRESHMEN 



To the President of Wellesley College: 

I have the honor to submit a report of the class which 
entered Wellesley College in September, 1933. The class 
numbered 404 new students admitted in September and 
three former students who were readmitted as freshmen. 
In February, two students who had completed one semester 
in other colleges were admitted. The total number of stu- 
dents enrolled in the class was, therefore, 409. The distribu- 
tion of the class according to the type of school preparation 
is as follows: 

Preparation entirely in public high school 188 

Preparation entirely in private school 97 

Preparation partly in public and partly in private schools 124 

Attention is called to the increase in representation of stu- 
dents from the high schools. In 1918, the last year in which 
students were admitted by certificate, the ratio of students 
from high school was about .60. In 1919 it dropped to .43 
and after that, from 1921 to 1932, it hovered between .35 
and .41. In 1933 it reached .46, the largest percentage of 
students entering directly from high school in any year 
since the method of admission by examination was put into 
effect. The increase is undoubtedly partly due to the effect 
of the financial depression on the country at large and 
partly to the change in methods of admission which went 
into effect with the present class. The following table indi- 
cates the number of schools represented by the class enter- 
ing in 1933: 

Total number of schools in which preparation was 

completed 247 

High schools 139 

Private schools 108 

Schools in New England 80 

Schools outside New England 167 

23 



Wellesley College 

This table is also interesting in showing an increase in the 
number of high schools represented. 

In the spring of 1933 Wellesley College announced new 
plans of admission in conjunction with Bryn Mawr, Mount 
Holyoke, Smith, and Vassar. These plans provided two new 
methods of admission in addition to Plans A and B — namely, 
Plan C, a modification of Plan B by which the four examina- 
tions and the Scholastic Aptitude Tests may be divided be- 
tween two years, two subject examinations to be taken at 
the end of each of the two years of the candidate's final 
preparation for college; and Plan D, by which a student 
who has ranked in the upper seventh of her class in school 
for the last two years of her course may be admitted with- 
out College Board examinations other than the Scholastic 
Aptitude Tests. These plans were announced so late that 
very few candidates could avail themselves of Plan C, but 
an unexpectedly large group made use of Plan D. The 
experiment of admitting students on the basis of four sub- 
ject examinations and the Scholastic Aptitude Tests taken 
at the end of the junior year, which was called the Junior 
Selection Plan, was allowed for students entering in 1933 
but has been discontinued for later years. The following 
table indicates the method of admission used by the in- 
coming freshmen: 

Plan A C. E. E. B. examinations 18 

Regents examinations 63 

C. E. E. B. and Regents 2 

Canadian and Oxford Matriculation examinations . . 4 

Plan B 218 

PlanC 13 

Junior Selection 2 

PlanD 89 . 



24 



Report of Dean of Freshmen 

The following subjects were offered by the entering class 
in the group of restricted and unrestricted electives: 

Language 

French 2 units 70 

French 3 units 262 

r'rench 4 units 55 

German 2 units 12 

German 3 units 7 

*Latin 4 units 217 

Spanish 2 units 6 

Spanish 3 units 1 

Spanish 4 units 1 

Science 

Botany 9 

Biology Ill 

Chemistry 195 

General Science 69 

Physics 85 

Physical Geography 5 

Physiology 5 

History 

History 2 units 219 

History 3 units 76 

History 4 units 8 

Miscellaneous Subjects 

Art 6 

Bible 6 

Civics 30 

Drama 1 

' Economics 12 

Journalism 1 

Advanced Mathematics 39 

Music Appreciation 4 

Applied Music 3 

Harmony 4 

One should note the continued decrease in the offering in 
Latin and the increase in the number of elective units in 
history. 

*This does not include the number of students offering 3 units of Latin, 
since 3 units is a requirement for all students. 

25 



Wellesley College 

The distribution of electives for the freshman classes for 
the past four years is as follows: 



Greek 

Latin 

French 

German 

Italian 

Spanish 

Astronomy 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Geology 

Physics 

Zoology 

Art 

Economics 

English Literature .... 

History 

Mathematics 

Musical Theory 

Philosophy and Psychology 
Speech 



2.1 
13.5 
85.5 
26.2 

4.2 
14.2 



9.8 
16.1 
17.1 
18. 
10.04 
33.8 



21.02 

34.11 
46.5 
28. 
9.11 

22.2 



1931 


1932 


1.86 


1.44 


13.40 


10.29 


80.28 


83.25 


28.31 


31.58 


3.71 


2.87 


16.24 


13.40 


8.58 


6.94 


19.95 


15,79 


20.42 


17.94 


12.99 


17.22 


12.06 


8.13 


28.77 


31.10 


19.49 


20.33 


.23 


- 


28.77 


38.52 


42.23 


48.80 


29.7 


23.44 


11.83 


9.57 


23.66 


21.05 



2.97 

8.66 

83.17 

26.73 

3.96 

11.39 

10.89 
19.80 
23.51 
14.10 
6.68 
31.68 

21.53 

35.50 
55.20 
18.32 
10.40 

2.48 
22.52 



The relative decrease in the election of Latin in college and 
the increase in the election of history correspond to these 
same tendencies noted in entrance units. 

During the year two students were suspended during the 
first semester for disciplinary reasons, and nine students 
withdrew voluntarily. The cause of withdrawal in five and 
possibly six of these cases was ill health. Illness and death 
in the family accounted for one withdrawal and financial 
reverses for one. 

The following table indicates the number of students who 
failed to reach the standard approved by the College for 
freshmen: 



26 



Report of Dean of Freshmen 



Dropped in February for poor work 
Dropped in June for poor work . . 

Probation in February 

Probation in June 





Class entering in 




1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


2 





1 





20 


18 


18 


12 


135 


92 


91 


69 


125 


83 


98 


78 



It is gratifying to note that the number of students dropped 
for poor work and the number on probation is distinctly 
smaller this year than it has been since 1930, when the 
present standard for diploma grade went into effect. In 
June this year there was a total of 90 members of the class 
who were either dropped or on probation and a total of 
46 members of the class who made 64 or more quality 
points, that is, an average of B or more for the year. In a 
study of the relative reliability of methods of selecting fresh- 
men, the following table will be Interesting. The first column 
indicates the distribution of the 409 members of the fresh- 
man class according to the method of admission used; the 
second column indicates the distribution of the 90 students 
with unsatisfactory freshman records according to the 
method of admission; the third represents the distribution of 
the 46 freshmen who had an average of 64 quality points for 
the year according to the plan of entrance by which they 
entered. 



Plan A (C. E. E. B.) 

Regents 

Regents and C. E. E. B. 
Canadian Matriculation . . . 

Plan B 

Plan D 

Plan C 

Junior Selection 



Class as 
a Whole 


Probation 
Group 


Group with 64 
Quality Points 


.044 


.062 


.04 


.15 


.156 


.12 


.004 


— 


— 


.007 


.01 


.04 


.533 


.614 


45 


.217 


.156 


.306 


.031 


— 


.02 


.004 


— 


.02 



The significant point indicated by this table is that Plan D 
seems to be a rather more reliable basis of admission than 
Plan A, Regents, or Plan B. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frances L. Knapp, 

Dean of Freshmen. 
21 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE 
INSTRUCTION 



To the President of Wellesley College: 

The Committee on Graduate Instruction has the honor to 
present the following report for the academic year ending 
June 18, 1934. 

During the academic year 1933-34, the enrollment of 
graduate students was as follows: 

Students working for the Master of Arts degree 37 

Students working for the Master of Science degree in Hy- 
giene and Physical Education 1 

Students working for the Master of Science degree and the 
Certificate of the Department of Hygiene and Physical 
Education 10 

Students working for the Certificate of the Department of 

Hygiene and Physical Education 1 

Non-candidates for degrees 4 

Total S3 

These figures include 6 special graduate students. 

Of these S3 students, 23 received degrees and certificates 
in June, 1934, as follows: 

Master of Arts degree 17 

Master of Science degree and Certificate of the Department 

of Hygiene and Physical Education 2 

Certificate of the Department of Hygiene and Physical 

Education 4 

In addition, degrees were awarded to non-resident stu- 
dents as follows: 

October Master of Arts degree 1 

June Master of Arts degree 3 

Master of Science degree 4 

Total 8 

28 



Report on Graduate Instruction 

The major subjects of the 53 students in residence during 
the year were as follows: 

Astronomy 1 

Botany 3 

Chemistry 5 

Economics and Sociology 1 

Education 3 

English Composition 2 

English Literature 10 

French 1 

German 2 

History and Political Science 4 

Hygiene and Physical Education 12 

Italian 1 

Musical Theory 1 

Physics 1 

Psychology 1 

Spanish 1 

Zoology and Physiology 4 

The major subjects of the candidates for a degree or cer- 
tificate were as follows: 

Astronomy 1 

Botany 1 

Education 2 

English Composition 2 

English Literature 6 

French 1 

German 1 

History 1 

Hygiene and Physical Education 6 

Physics 1 

Spanish 1 

Total 23 

The Bachelor's degrees of the 53 students in residence 
during the year were received as follows : 

From Wellesley College 23 

From other women's colleges IS 

From co-educational institutions 14 

From foreign universities 1 

29 



Wellesley College 

Of the 53 students in residence 

27 were carrying a full program of 9 to 12 hours 

26 were carrying a part-time program 

20 held graduate tuition scholarships 
1 held a foreign-student scholarship 
1 held the Amy Morris Homans Scholarship 

20 held staff appointments carrying tuition 

13 paid tuition 

As usual, the work of the Committee included the con- 
sideration of applicants for admission to work for the Master 
of Arts degree, the Master of Science in Hygiene and 
Physical Education, and the Certificate of the Department 
of Hygiene; the supervision of students' programs; the con- 
sideration of theses; and the recommendation of candidates 
for degrees. In addition, the Committee admitted in accord- 
ance with the legislation of last year a number of special 
graduate students — students holding a Bachelor of Arts de- 
gree but deficient in some prerequisite necessary for admis- 
sion to candidacy for a Master's degree. The more definite 
and standardized procedure of the treatment of this class 
of students has been a distinct gain from the administrative 
point of view. 

The Committee examined credentials of applicants for the 
Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship, the Fanny Bullock Work- 
man Scholarship, the two Trustee Scholarships, and the 18 
tuition scholarships for residence work. 

The only change in the legislation recommended this year 
was in Article VHI, Sect. l-dA, changed to meet the need 
of the new group of special graduate students. The amend- 
ment recommended and voted by the Academic Council 
reads: 

"A student may not remain in the class of special graduate students 
for more than one year, except by special vote of the Graduate 
Committee." 

The Committee further decided to require that a doctor's 
certificate accompany an application for a graduate scholar- 

30 



Report on Graduate Instruction 

ship hereafter, and to request that departmental letters con- 
veying recommendation of a thesis to the Committee be 
signed by the three members of the department who ap- 
proved the thesis. 

Since during the second semester the Dean of Graduate 
Students was absent on sabbatical leave, the Dean of the 
College assumed the chairmanship of the Committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Helen Sard Hughes, 

Chairman. 



31 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF RESIDENCE 



To the President of Wellesley College: 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
Department of Halls of Residence for the year 1933-34. 

The housing of our students in 1933-34 was taken care of 
in eighteen undergraduate houses, and one house for gradu- 
ates was opened in September of this year for the first 
time. The completion of Munger Hall in the middle of the 
year 1932-33 permitted us to close Crofton, Fiske, Elms, and 
Webb. During that year we had 1,405 resident undergradu- 
ates. During the year 1933-34, although the total number of 
undergraduates remained practically the same, the number 
of non-resident undergraduates increased from 65 to 89, a 
difference of 24 which Involved a corresponding decrease in 
the number of resident students. 

The placing of 110 upper class students in Munger re- 
leased campus rooms for the use of freshmen, and for 
1933-34 Shafer and Freeman were made freshman houses, 
while the group of 20 freshmen in Beebe was continued. 
Twenty freshmen were also included in Norumbega, which 
was continued as a second cooperative house. This brought 
almost two-thirds of the resident freshmen on campus. The 
inclusion of freshmen in the cooperative group did away 
with the plan of having 15 freshmen as waitresses in Eliot. 
A larger number of freshmen were therefore able to benefit 
by a reduction of fees, and they were located much more 
conveniently for their class work. The privilege of living in 
cooperative houses was allowed for 166 students In 1933-34, 
as against 111 in past years. 

In September, 1933, with 1,382 to provide for, we closed 
Washington, Little, and Clinton, and reopened Elms on ac- 
count of its more convenient situation. This involved several 
changes In the assignments for members of the staff. Miss 
Snyder took charge of Pomeroy for the last year of her serv- 
ice. Mrs. Cutter reopened Elms, and Mrs. Clifton was moved 

32 



Report of the Dean of Residence 

to Shafer. Mrs. Denio, who had formerly been on the staff, 
was reappointed to be Head of Homestead. 

Soon after college opened it was found possible to make 
an advantageous arrangement with the Y. W. C. A. of Bos- 
ton for the chaperonage of students who attend entertain- 
ments in town, and with many regrets the Clubhouse at 131 
Commonwealth Avenue was closed. The Y. W. C. A. has 
given our students excellent care through its Pioneer Hotel, 
where a chaperon has been available whenever needed. But 
no hotel could provide the grace and dignity, or the distinc- 
tion of hospitality, which we enjoyed in our Boston Club- 
house. The house reflected the taste of the alumnae on its 
governing committee, and the loyalty of the whole Boston 
Wellesley Club under whose direction it was opened to meet 
a crying need in the social life of the College. For ten years 
it served that need effectively and beautifully. With changing 
conditions, the demands upon the house had lessened, and 
it was now possible for its functions to be carried through 
The Pioneer with careful direction and control from our 
own staff. 

Miss Lincoln had been appointed Head of the Clubhouse 
for 1933-34, but we were grateful for her release when a 
series of illnesses made it necessary to replace three succes- 
sive Heads of Houses at intervals during the fall. At Christ- 
mas, Mrs. Denio resigned from Homestead to accept a very 
attractive post elsewhere and Miss Lincoln was then given 
charge of that house. 

The responsibilities of the dietitian at Tower Court were 
extended this year to include the direction of Munger, 
Cazenove, and Shafer. Two assistants were employed. The 
experiment seems to have proved successful and it is planned 
to enlarge its scope next year. 

In September a graduate house was Inaugurated in Crof- 
ton with the cooperation of the Dean of Graduate Students 
and the Director of Physical Education. Mrs. Ahlers, who 
had recently retired from the work with undergraduates, 
took charge of the house. Fifteen students were Included in 

33 



Wellesley College 

the group by placing three in Ridgeway across the street. 
Mrs. Ahlers arranged a breakfast room and a kitchenette 
on the basement floor which were much appreciated, and 
lunch and dinner were offered in Tower Court and Noanett 
respectively. The house provided a center for graduate stu- 
dents which had long been desired, and will be continued 
next year. 

The retirement of Miss Snyder, Mrs. Wardwell, and Mrs. 
Wheeler, and the resignation of Mrs. Engles make a great 
rift in our ranks this June. Mrs. Engles has served the Col- 
lege for seventeen years; Miss Snyder for sixteen years; 
Mrs. Wardwell for fourteen years; and Mrs. Wheeler for 
twenty-two years. All four have shared in the organization 
of village dormitories. Miss Snyder was for long Head of 
the Village Group. With the exception of Mrs. Wheeler, all 
have also directed upper class houses. A host of alumnae will 
regret the completion of their terms of service and the Com- 
mittee of Heads of Houses will find the next year difficult 
without their experienced counsel. 

The opening of a French house in Crawford three years 
ago involved the inauguration of two French tables in Tower 
Court. This plan has been continued five days a week with 
different members of the department of French presiding in 
turn. In addition, members of the French faculty residing 
in the several houses have conducted a French table twice 
a week regularly at Claflin and once a week in Beebe and 
Stone. French tables were also organized by students in 
Eliot and Noanett and met twice a week for about two 
months in the fall. 

During the year 1932-33, a very successful German Cor- 
ridor was directed by Miss Gertrud Giinther in the fourth 
floor of the tower in Shafer. The five students on the corri- 
dor spoke only German when there, and also at table. Other 
German students were included at the table regularly, or as 
occasional guests, and the group met on the small corridor 
for discussion and singing for the half hour after dinner. 
German newspapers and periodicals were also available. The 

34 



Report of the Dean of Residence 

year proved very profitable to the group and the experi- 
ment was abandoned with regret when Miss Giinther with- 
drew from college. In 1933-34 Dr. Thalmann came to live 
in Shafer and carried on a German table twice a week. The 
enthusiasm of this group has led to the reorganization of a 
German Corridor for next year, which Dr. Thalmann has 
kindly offered to direct. 

This past year a Spanish table met once a week in Norum- 
bega and occasionally in Munger, and an Italian table was 
assembled frequently in Tower Court and every other week 
in Munger. In this way a definite opportunity is offered 
many students for practice in the use of other tongues in 
connection with the regular life of the houses. 

A further opportunity to link the houses with the intellec- 
tual training of the students was brought to the attention of 
alumnae in the President's address at Commencement, when 
Miss Pendleton spoke of her desire to have each house 
equipped with a useful library. The dismantling of Freeman 
has revealed a considerable collection of reference books 
which were assembled through the painstaking effort of 
Miss Dennison while she was Head of that house. These 
have been reviewed by the Librarian and the books still in 
use have been placed in other houses. The set of reference 
books distributed under the Elizabeth Nash foundation has 
now been placed in five houses. This is a collection of fifteen 
books, including ancient and modern atlases, a Webster's 
Unabridged Dictionary, and other similar books of reference. 
When every house has received this set of books, the in- 
come of the Nash Fund will be available for more literary 
purchases. 

Sixteen of our twenty-one houses have bookcases in the 
living rooms which carry a total of 2,284 books. The shelf 
space varies from seventy feet in Munger to twelve feet in 
Crawford, and the libraries range from 50 volumes to 306 in 
Fiske. Beebe, Fiske, Munger, and Tower Court have each 
a small collection of a few standard English authors; Craw- 
ford has about one hundred volumes in French. There are 

35 



Wellesley College 

very few up-to-date books useful in courses of study, prac- 
tically no biography, and almost no modern fiction. Such as 
they are, the books are used, but it would be a great help 
to students to be able to find in the houses certain volumes 
prescribed for reference in the large courses in Biblical His- 
tory, History, and Literature which are always in great de- 
mand on the reserve shelves at the Library. It would also 
be helpful in promoting general culture to have in every 
house a good reading library in which both the past and 
the present should be well represented. 

It is our earnest hope that other alumnas may become 
interested to follow the precedent established by the Misses 
Dwight in Munger, by taking charge of the books in a cer- 
tain house, filling the shelves with discriminating care, and 
adding to the collection from time to time. The house 
libraries would especially welcome collections of books from 
libraries that are being scattered, or small consignments of 
current literature. 

Between Commencement and the reopening of college in 
1933 four large conferences were held on our campus. The 
Episcopal Church Conference brought about 400 members 
to Tower Court and Severance, besides those who came out 
for the day. This lasted ten days. The Institute on Inter- 
national Relations, under the direction of the Society of 
Friends, had 125 members in Stone and Olive Davis for 
eight days. The Wellesley Summer Institute met for two 
full weeks with 130 members housed in Stone and Olive 
Davis. The Massachusetts Conference of Social Workers 
brought us about 300 guests for one or two nights, and a 
much larger group for day and evening meetings. The hous- 
ing was managed very smoothly. The work in Tower Court 
and Severance was carried by the regular Heads of these 
houses, with the dining rooms under the care of the dietitian; 
and the management of Stone and Olive Davis was directed 
by Miss Buell. Every conference has expressed its warm 
appreciation of the accommodations offered in the houses, 

36 



Report of the Dean of Residence 

as well as of the pleasure and privilege of using our class- 
rooms, lecture halls, and grounds. It is a satisfaction to find 
it possible thus to enlarge the usefulness of our beautiful 
buildings. 



'e>^ 



Respectfully submitted, 

Mary C. Ewing, 

Dean of Residence. 

June 30, 1934. 



37 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



To the President of Wellesley College: 

In presenting the report of the Library for 1933-34, the 
first event of importance to be noted is the election by the 
Academic Council of a Library Building Committee to con- 
sider the needs of the Library and what kind of building 
would meet these needs, which are also the needs of the fac- 
ulty and students. Such a committee was suggested in the 
Report of the Librarian for last year. The election followed 
upon the presentation to the Council by the Library Com- 
mittee of a Report setting forth the difficulties under which 
the work of the Library is carried on, owing to the restric- 
tions of space and uneconomical arrangement of rooms. It 
was felt by the Committee that even were the money in 
hand, building should not be undertaken until after careful 
consideration of the needs and wishes of the different de- 
partments who are dependent upon the Library for the 
efficient carrying on of their work. To this end the Library 
Building Committee will serve as a clearing house for the 
consideration of suggestions by other members of the fac- 
ulty, will study the plans of other libraries and eventually 
such architects' plans as may be drawn to carry out the 
matured suggestions of the Committee. It consists of seven 
members who meet with the Librarian and the Associate 
Librarians. The first meeting which was held in May was a 
very enthusiastic one, as everyone felt that the time was 
ripe for considering very carefully what should be done to 
meet the difficulties so often outlined in the Librarian's 
Report. 

One difficulty that has to be met is the lack of any ade- 
quate storage space. The bequest of the library of Pro- 
fessor Palmer is a case in point. This valuable collection of 
several hundred volumes, received during the summer of 
1933, came so close upon the receipt of the Hammond be- 
quest that nothing could be done with it this year except 

38 



Report of the Librarian 

to pile the boxes containing the books in the room formerly- 
used for graduate students, where the books belonging to 
the original gift of the Founder, which are gradually being 
removed from the general circulation, are also shelved. Late 
in the year, most of the Hammond books having been cata- 
logued and sent to the regular shelves, we have been able 
to find shelf room in the basement rooms for the Palmer 
books, and during the summer we hope to have them listed 
so they can be compared with titles in our own catalogue 
and decision made as to what ones are needed as duplicates 
or otherwise to enrich our collection of philosophy, to which 
field most of the books belong. 

Dr. Frederick L. Hoffman, who several years ago pre- 
sented to the department of Geology a valuable collection 
of State Geological Reports and Surveys this year added to 
that gift a large number of books and papers, chiefly on 
earthquakes and related subjects. The gift included a com- 
plete file of the Seismological Journal covering a long period. 
A number of volumes on Egyptology were received from 
Mr. Otto V. Kienbusch. Judge Samuel Seabury courteously 
acceded to our request for the Reports published by the 
Committee to Investigate the Afi"airs of the City of New 
York; a set of the valuable Library Edition of Ruskin was 
received from the estate of George H. Webster. The Music 
Library has received two outstanding gifts, a set of Foster 
Hall Reproductions of the Songs, Compositions and Ar- 
rangements by Stephen Collins Foster, of which one thou- 
sand sets were prepared solely for presentations to libraries: 
and the Belle Skififier Collection of Old Musical Instru- 
ments, an illustrated catalogue and description of a notable 
collection, this being the gift of Mr. William Skinner of 
Holyoke. 

A gift of great interest to the General Library because of 
our long and happy acquaintance with its author is the 
Journal of Gamaliel Bradford presented by Mrs. Bradford, 
and we were happy to receive from Professor Louis 
Cazamian an inscribed copy of his book. La Grande 

39 



Wellesley College 

Bretagne. With the copy of Madame Cazamian's V Autre 
Amerique, given to us by her some time ago, it will always 
recall the year spent by them In Wellesley which is remem- 
bered with so much pleasure by all who knew them. 

As usual, gifts of importance have been received from the 
Federal and State Governments, from the Hispanic Society, 
and from faculty members and other friends of the College, 
of which space does not permit mention. 

Professor Frederick Palmer very kindly presented us with 
a chair from the home of Professor George Herbert Palmer 
and also his inkstand, both of which will find an honored 
place in the new quarters which will be provided for the 
English Poetry Collection when the much desired addition 
to the Library becomes a reality. 

Although the appropriation for the purchase of books and 
periodicals has remained the same, the number of books 
purchased during the year has declined, owing largely to the 
fact that foreign exchange has been unfavorable since the 
devaluation of the dollar. A very large percentage of books 
purchased for a college library is published abroad, and this 
is especially true of periodicals and continuations. Although 
their cost has greatly increased, these must not be allowed 
to lapse, as it would be only at great expense and often 
with the greatest difficulty that they could be secured at 
any later time. 

Among the more important purchases of the year are a 
set of Teatro Critico Universal, 13 vols., and the Gran Dic- 
cionario de la Lengua Castellana, 5 vols., which were ob- 
tained for the work of the Spanish Department, and Gruen- 
wald's Isenheim Altar for the Art Department. Reports of 
State Trials of Great Britain, 8 vols., and the first volume 
of Codices Latini Antiquiores, edited by E. A. Lowes, are 
other acquisitions of importance. 

In October the Library had the honor of joining with 
Professor Avery of the Art Department in entertaining Mgr. 
Eugene Tisserant, Pro-Prefect of the Vatican Library, well 
known to scholars of every nation. Mgr. Tisserant spent two 

40 



Report of the Librarian 

nights at Wellesley and considerable time in the Library- 
examining the collections in the Plimpton and Treasure 
Rooms. The evening of October 31 he lectured to a large 
and interested audience in the Art Lecture Room, on the 
Library of the Vatican. His friendly personality added to 
the distinction of his scholarship made him a visitor long 
to be remembered by the Library staff and those of the 
college community who had the pleasure of meeting him at 
the tea given by Professor Avery in his honor. 

On November 7th, the Library had the pleasure of ex- 
hibiting for the day first editions, letters and memorabilia 
of John Keble, poet and hymnologist, and one of the leaders 
of the Oxford Movement in the Church of England. Among 
the letters were those written to Cardinal Newman with the 
latter's notes. All this material had been brought to this 
country for exhibition at the meeting in Philadelphia held 
In commemoration of the centenary of the Movement. Mr. 
Russell Meiggs of Keble College, Oxford, very kindly con- 
sented to bring a selection of the most interesting letters 
and other things to Wellesley, and to speak informally to a 
small group In the Brooks Room about Keble and the Ox- 
ford Movement. 

In connection with the Ariosto festival which was cele- 
brated by the Italian Department during the months of 
January, February, and March, lectures being given on the 
Romance cycles by different detpartments, the Library held 
an exhibition of the rare editions of Ariosto's works and 
also of the earlier romances and those contemporary with 
Ariosto's masterpiece, the Orlando Furioso, from the collec- 
tion in the Plimpton Room. These were of much Interest to 
the classes studying the subject. The Dante class also visited 
the Plimpton Room In the spring to see the early editions 
of the Divine Comedy and other works. The class studying 
the history of engraving and etching held one session in the 
room and came later In small groups to study and compare 
the early Italian wood engravings which are found in many 
of the books In the Plimpton Collection. 

41 



Wellesley College 

The popularity of the Treasure Room, while gratifying, 
is becoming something of a problem, as the time of the 
Curator which is needed for other important work during 
the hours when the Treasure Room is not open, is constantly 
in demand by visitors. There have been one thousand and 
three of the latter during the college year, and the room has 
been open one hundred and eighty days, twelve times by 
special request. Informal talks illustrated by the display of 
some of the treasures in the English Poetry Collection have 
been given to groups from six neighboring schools, and nine 
college classes have been held in the room. In addition to 
this, five exhibitions have been prepared by the Curator for 
display in the cases outside the room, as follows: in com- 
memoration of the four-hundredth anniversary of the birth 
of Queen Elizabeth; presentation volumes autographed by 
famous authors; first editions of Lady Mary Wortley 
Montagu and Horace Walpole; loan exhibition of manu- 
scripts from Keble College, Oxford; exhibition commemo- 
rating the centenary of the death of Lafayette; exhibition 
to commemorate the birthdays of Alice Freeman Palmer 
and George Herbert Palmer. A selection from the original 
Browning love letters has been on exhibition throughout the 
year because of the almost constant demand to see these on 
the part of students and of visitors from outside the College. 
When, in addition to the work involved in these activities 
is added the accessioning and cataloguing of the additions 
to the collection and the constantly Increasing correspond- 
ence with scholars who write for information, it becomes 
evident that the time is not far off when Miss Weed will 
either have to be released from her duties as head of the 
Circulation Department or will have to have a full time as- 
sistant in the care of the Treasure Room, a position not 
easy to fill, as most of the work requires the specialized 
knowledge of the collection which Miss Weed possesses. 

Ninety-eight volumes from the bequest of Sara Teasdale 
and sixty-nine volumes from the bequest of Eleanor Pres- 
cott Hammond have been accessioned and catalogued for 

42 



Report of the Librarian 

this collection during the present year, besides other gifts 
and purchases. Among the gifts is a valuable addition to the 
first editions of Robert Burns, the Reliques of Robert Burns, 
London, 1808. This was presented by Professor Martha Hale 
Shackford. From Miss Caroline Hazard has come the manu- 
script volume of her poems which were issued by the 
Harbor Press in 1931 with the title: Shards and Scarabs 
from Egypt. All the poems are in Miss Hazard's hand- 
writing and are bound in vellum illuminated in colors and 
gold. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic H. Curtiss have given to the gen- 
eral collection in the Treasure Room a rare and interesting 
old volume of early maps, Accuratissima orbis delineato. 
Sive geographia vetus, sacra & prof ana . . . Autore Georgia 
Hornio. Amestelodami, 1660. 

Four commemorative medals issued by order of Congress 
to commemorate the centenary of the death of George 
Washington were presented by Professor Louise S. 
McDowell. 

Mr. Goodspeed has continued to add to the Ruskin Col- 
lection and a number of volumes from the Hammond be- 
quest have also been added to that Collection. 

The inception of a plan to enlist the support of the many 
friends of the Library in the building up and care of the 
Treasure Room collections was an event of this year. By 
Commencement time folders setting forth the plan to form 
a group to be known as the Wellesley College Library 
Associates had been printed and were ready for distribu- 
tion, and it is hoped that a committee who will consider how 
best to distribute the folders among the friends who might 
be willing to be enrolled as Associates will be appointed 
early next fall. 

The Brooks Room is perhaps the favorite room of the 
Library for the students, and many expressions of apprecia- 
tion for its comfort and quiet are heard by members of the 
Library staff. It was furnished as a memorial by the Class 
of 1891 in 1921, when prices were too high to enable the 

43 



Wellesley College 

Committee to obtain all that they desired In Its furnishings. 
The upholstered chairs are of a kind that have not borne 
up well under hard usage, and though several of them have 
been reupholstered, they are beginning to be badly worn, 
and two have broken down entirely and have had to be re- 
moved from the room. It would seem to be more economical 
to replace them when possible rather than attempt to have 
them repaired. The window draperies should be replaced, 
the walls redecorated and rugs provided for the floor. A rug 
which was loaned for several years by the Misses Dwight 
and which added much to the appearance of the room was 
removed last year to Munger Hall when the library there 
was furnished by them. We appreciate very much the long 
use we have had of this beautiful rug, which gave the color 
and warmth to the room which are lacking at present. 

The work of the Reference Librarian Is a feature of the 
Library which, though very highly appreciated by members 
of the faculty and students, does not lend itself to any de- 
tailed reporting. It would, however, be hard to overestimate 
the value of such service as is given by her and other mem- 
bers of the staff who act as her assistants from time to time. 
The Librarian finds her advice and suggestions for the pur- 
chase of books Invaluable and her expert knowledge of 
out-of-the-way sources of Information Is in frequent demand 
by the cataloguers. The inter-library loan requests also go 
through Miss Metcalf's hands. During the past year, we 
made requests of other libraries for seventy-seven books, 
sixty-one of which were received. During the same period, 
we received forty-one requests for loans, of which we were 
able to supply twenty, the others either being In use here 
or not owned by this library. 

Statistics of the work of other departments will be found 
at the end of this report. Although the Cataloguing Depart- 
ment suffered by the absence of one of the staff on account 
of Illness during most of the academic year, the current 
cataloguing was kept well up to date and the cataloguing 

44 



Report of the Librarian 

of the Hammond bequest nearly completed. Detailed cata- 
loguing for some one hundred and fifty titles was duplicated 
for the Library of Congress Union Catalogue. 

The Librarian cannot close this report without expressing 
appreciation of the fact that in these difficult times the 
amount appropriated by the trustees for the maintenance 
of the Library has not been diminished. The knowledge 
that both they and the college administration regard the 
Library as the vital center of the academic life is very 
heartening to us in our attempt to keep the Library func- 
tioning at its best in spite of difficulties inherent in an out- 
grown building. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ethel D. Roberts, 

Librarian. 



45 



Wellesley College 

ACCESSIONS 1933-34 

Number of volumes added: 

By purchase 3,509 

By gift 1,528 

By binding 560 

To the Treasure Room 182 

To the Plimpton Room 5 

To the Brooks Room 54 

To the Ruskin Collection 40 

Total 5,878 

Total number of volumes now accessioned 160,055 

EXPENDITURES 1933-34 

For books $10,047.37 

For periodical subscriptions 6,227.89 

For binding and repairs 1,785.55 

$18,060.81 
From the following funds: 

Gorham D. Abbott Memorial Fund $44.00 

Avery Fund 26.49 

Blanche G. Bunting Fund 13.16 

Caroline Dayton Fund 324.00 

Dorothea Dean Fund 185.11 

Florence Foley Fund 200.00 

Horsford and other Library Funds 14,769.80 

Arlene Westwood Jackson Fund 100.00 

Sophie Jewett Memorial Fund 35.32 

Edward N. Kirk Library Fund 232.47 

Susan Minns Fund 511.42 

Annie Hooker Morse Fund 28.59 

Niles Memorial Fund 64.00 

Elizabeth Winslow Peters Fund . ' 212.00 

Helen J. Sanborn Spanish Library Fund 224.00 

Seven Women's Colleges Fund 38.80 

Shafer Library Fund 103.60 

Sweet Library Fund 224.00 

Mary Louise Tuck Fund 8.32 

Helen L. Webster Memorial Fund 14.25 

Wenckebach Memorial Fund 51.12 

Elizabeth Nash Fund 52.76 

From the Gift of the Carnegie Corporation to the Art 

Department 46.81 

From the Edith Butler Pool Gift 42.11 

From other Gifts to the Library 43.21 

From Fines 465.47 

$18,060.81 
46 



Report of the Librarian 

STATISTICS OF CIRCULATION 1933-34 

General Library: 

Charged to students (including 20,519 reserved books) 42,954 

Charged to members of the faculty " 5,316 

Charged to alumnae and others 610 

Total 48,880 

Art Library: 

Charged to students (including 1.858 reserved books) 2,844 

Charged to members of the faculty 393 

Total 3,237 

Botany Library: 

Charged to students (including 485 reserved books) 870 

Charged to members of the faculty 682 

Total 1,552 

Hygiene Library: 

Charged to students (including 1,212 reserved books) 1,623 

Charged to members of the faculty 486 

Charged to alumnae and others 112 

Total 2,221 

Music Library: 

Charged to students (including 553 reserved books) 776 

Charged to members of the faculty 223 

Total 999 

Zoology Library: 

Charged to students (including 1,549 reserved books) 1,979 

Charged to members of the faculty 635 

Total 2,614 



STATISTICS OF CATALOGUING 1933-34 

Current Cataloguing: 

Books 5,836 

Periodicals and continuations 3,056 



Total 8,892 

47 



Wellesley College 

Recataloguing: 

Books 1,116 

Periodicals and continuations 2,227 



Total 3,343 

Number of titles added to the catalogue: 

By current cataloguing 3,778 

By recataloguing 684 



Total : 4,462 



STATISTICS OF BINDING 1933-34 

Periodicals 597 

Pamphlets 200 

Music scores 33 

Books rebound and repaired 399 

Total 1,229 



48 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE PERSONNEL 

BUREAU 



To the President of Wellesley College; 

The Director of the Personnel Bureau has the honor of 
presenting the following report for the year ending October 
31, 1934. 

Although positions have been hard to obtain during the 
past year, the calls which have been received at the Personnel 
Bureau have shown an increase over those received in 1932- 
33. The total of teaching and non-teaching calls was 314, 
an increase of about 30 calls in each field. In the teaching 
field, as compared with last year, there was a marked in- 
crease in the calls from colleges (11 to 25), and from public 
schools (9 to 14), a smaller increase in private schools calls 
(36 to 49). The number of calls in the field of educational 
administration decreased from 24 to 18, but included posi- 
tions for two academic deans, a dean of women in a college 
for colored students, five principals of private schools, seven 
heads of houses, the head of a boarding department in a 
private school, and the business manager of a private school. 
The greatest number of calls in the non-teaching group was 
for secretaries. The calls from department stores increased 
from 9 to 19, next to the largest number received. Those for 
social workers increased from 2 to 8. A few calls (6) came 
from agencies, which reported a slight improvement in busi- 
ness conditions. 

Twenty-one teaching calls, or 15 per cent, and 76 non- 
teaching calls, or 43.67 per cent, have been filled by the 
Bureau. The higher percentage of placements in the non- 
teaching field is probably due to the fact that so many of 
the non-teaching positions were in the vicinity of the College 
and could easily be filled. The percentage of placements 
(based on direct calls) was smaller than in the preceding 
year (1933-34, 29.88 per cent; 1932-33, 37.53 per cent), 
when the per cent was the highest for ten years. The salaries 

49 



Wellesley College 

offered were in general about the same as in the preceding 
year. A few graduates have reported that "cuts" had been 
ehminated, restoring salaries to the level of the preceding 
year. No increases were reported. 

Many married alumnae registered for work to supplement 
decreasing family incomes, but comparatively few unmarried 
graduates with successful experience were without positions, 
although many registered with the Bureau for positions 
which offered better salaries, better working conditions or 
more opportunity for advancement. The special problem was 
with the more recent graduates, who needed as soon as pos- 
sible to gain experience. 

For the Class of 1934, particular emphasis was laid upon 
the value, even necessity, of registering with the Personnel 
Bureau, so that the proportion of registrants this year in- 
creased over recent years. The number of registrants Is 264, 
including 20 inactive members of the class — 85.7 per cent 
active registrants and 6.8 per cent of the class inactive reg- 
istrants. Of the class as a whole, 31.8 per cent are working 
either part or full time; of active registrants, 36.6 per cent 
are employed. The ratio of registrants in non-teaching posi- 
tions to those in teaching is 75 per cent to 25 per cent. Last 
year the percentages were 57 per cent to 43 per cent. In the 
teaching field, ever since 1929, the practice of offering ap- 
prenticeships for inexperienced candidates has been growing. 
The number of apprenticeship calls continues high — 31 in 
1933-34, but since 1932, the "peak year," placements in 
that type of position have been dropping off. In that year, 
17 apprentices were recorded, 44 per cent of the entire num- 
ber in teaching. In 1934, only seven members are serving as 
apprentices, less than one-third (30 per cent) of those teach- 
ing. With the continuation of the depression, calls for un- 
paid assistantships in schools came in, under the classifica- 
tion of "apprenticeship," in enlarging numbers, but the 
Personnel Bureau is becoming increasingly selective in Its 
suggestion of these openings. Eliminating the apprentices, 
the ratio of inexperienced candidates in non-teaching to those 

SO 



Report of Director of Personnel Bureau 

in teaching is over 4 to 1 (65-16) as compared to, roughly, 
2 to 1 last year and 3 to 2 the year before. As may be 
expected, the calls for inexperienced teachers have decreased 
steadily. This year only seven calls came to the Bureau for 
which members of 1934 could be considered; two of these 
came through agencies. This trend toward limited opportuni- 
ties in teaching for the inexperienced candidate is a reality. 
On the other hand, there is a waning interest in the teach- 
ing profession, as shown by the fact that only one-third of 
the registrants placed it as first among their occupational 
choices, while another 15 per cent gave it as a secondary 
interest. Whether the undergraduates realize the difficulty of 
access into the profession, and so reflect that in their choices, 
or whether there is, per se, an increasing lack of interest in 
the field, is difficult to determine. In non-teaching positions 
the most striking point is the increase in the number of 
office workers — from 22 per cent in 1933 to 33.5 per cent 
In 1934. Salaries for inexperienced teachers continue to vary, 
with a median of $850, an increase over the median of 1933 
of $50, yet not reaching the $900 of 1932. In the non-teach- 
ing positions, the median has risen again to the 1932 level 
of $18 a week over the $15 level of 1933. The figures for 
1933-34 show just under 20 per cent of active registrants who 
are unoccupied, as compared with 28 per cent the previous 
year and 32 per cent in 1931-32. An examination of the num- 
ber of those studying brings out the rather surprising fact 
that 35. per cent of the registrants, indeed nearly 37 per cent 
of the entire class, are studying full time — a proportion even 
greater than the former "record" of 1932. An additional 7 
per cent are engaged in part-time study. 

There was an increase last summer in the number of reg- 
istrants for summer work from 180 in 1933 to 208 
in 1934. The calls increased from 77 in 1933 to HI in 
1934. The largest increase was in the number of calls from 
summer camps. Very few of these positions paid more than 
a nominal salary {i.e., $25 and expenses) even to counselors 

51 



Wellesley College 

who had had previous experience. The Bureau placed 30 
registrants directly and placed five more indirectly. 

The work involved In obtaining part-time work for stu- 
dents during the college year has increased steadily during 
the past six years since the Personnel Bureau has had charge 
of student employment. The actual number of registrants 
decreased this last year, from 179 in 1932-33 to 147 in 
1933-34, but it was impossible to secure enough work to meet 
the need of these students. Other factors being equal, the 
preference was given to those most needy. The calls from 
business organizations and individuals for students to repre- 
sent them increased the number of agencies to about fifty. 
In addition, under the supervision of the Bureau students 
managed a number of financial activities, among them the 
Furniture Exchange, Campus Exchange, and the agency for 
caps and gowns. The profits from these exchanges bring to 
the students amounts equal to small scholarships. 

The Committee on Vocational Information has this year, 
as last, consisted of the Director and the Associate of the 
Personnel Bureau and 15 student members. The meetings 
were, for the most part, informal, held in connection with 
teas at a society house. There were in all 28 meetings, and 
3 field trips. Four of the meetings were held in connection 
with the Departments of Education, English Composition, 
and Chemistry respectively, and two of the speakers were 
members of the faculty. Alumnae also came to the College to 
serve as speakers upon several occasions, notably in the 
symposium on social work held in February. Miss Florence 
Jackson gave, as last year, a series of discussions and con- 
ferences, extending over three days. The average attend- 
ance, exclusive of Miss Jackson's groups and the symposium, 
was 82; including Miss Jackson's, the average was about 
57. Vocational information arranged on a larger scale was 
offered by several student conferences: Come-and-See Social 
Work program arranged by the Social Agencies of Boston, 
and the New England Junior Month to which Wellesley 
made a contribution and sent a delegate. 

52 



Report of Director of Personnel Bureau 

The individual conferences with students have been car- 
ried on entirely by the Personnel Bureau, since the class 
deans were, much to the regret of the Bureau, unable to 
undertake any additional work. The work with the freshman 
class included two meetings in Freshman Week when two 
tests were given — The Bernreuter Personality Inventory, and 
the Allport and Vernon Study of Values. Other tests offered 
to students by the Bureau during the year were: an 
Ascendency-Submission Test (Allport) ; a Social Intelligence 
Test (Psychological Center) ; a Teaching Aptitude Test 
(Psychological Center); a Clerical Test (Moore). The 
Bureau also directed the Medical Aptitude Test, given by 
the Association of American Medical Colleges, and the Law 
Capacity Examination, which is required for admission to 
the Columbia School of Law. Eight seniors took the medi- 
cal test; of these, six are in medical colleges — ^two in Cornell, 
one each in Tufts, New York University, University of Cin- 
cinnati, and the Woman's Medical College of Philadelphia, 

An experiment was undertaken by the Associate at the re- 
quest of the Dean of Freshmen for the retraining of weak 
students in reading and vocabulary. The plan of work in- 
cluded an individual conference with each student each week 
and one weekly conference of the group with discussions as 
to the value and aims of college education, how to study, 
types of reading and methods of more effective reading, note 
taking, methods of vocabulary building and how to take 
examinations. Since no control group was studied, it Is diffi- 
cult to' judge how much improvement might be attributed 
to the normal development of the college freshmen and how 
much to the remedial work. The group was so small that 
statistical conclusions would be impossible. The principal 
gain to the College would seem to be the beginning of the 
development of a technique for carrying on such a remedial 
program. 

There has been no meeting of the Personnel Board dur- 
ing the year, but a number of investigations are now finished 
or in progress which may be suitable for later meetings, 

S3 



Wellesley College 

These are: a study of vocational histories of superior stu- 
dents — a cooperative study, suggested by Wellesley, to be 
undertaken by six colleges for women; a study of "turn- 
over" for Wellesley graduates in department stores; a cor- 
relation of the Teaching Aptitude Test scores with success 
in teaching in the case of students from 1928-33; the third 
revision of our personality rating blank; a study of vocational 
preferences of the class of 1934. 

A phase of the work with seniors which gives food for 
thought is the growing reluctance to go into teaching, which 
has reached a higher point than in any year so far, as evi- 
denced by registration. It would seem to be a challenge for 
departments of Education and for personnel offices to pre- 
sent the profession of teaching in a way that would show its 
real values for a satisfactory occupation. This is particularly 
desirable in view of the greater stability of teaching positions 
as compared with most occupations, a practical consideration 
for many students who might make at the same time excel- 
lent and contented teachers. 

The year in review shows that the work of the Bureau 
has been marked by an increase in conferences with stu- 
dents and alumnae, by widened correspondence to enlarge 
the resources of vocational information, and an increase in 
assistance given to students applying for scholarships in 
training courses. Financial conditions continue to bring to 
us older alumnae in need of work, and will leave on our 
hands many recent graduates who should be making their 
start in an occupation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Alice I. Perry Wood. 



54 



APPENDIX TO THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



AMENDMENTS TO THE BY-LAWS 

Article II, Section 4 

Covimittee on Educational Policy. This Committee shall consist of not 
more than seven members, including the President of the College. It shall 
have power to call in conference any committee of the Academic Council 
or any other members of the faculty. It shall report to the Board of 
Trustees in writing at least once each year. It shall consider all matters 
pertaining to: 

1. Requirements for admission. 

2. Requirements for degrees including approval of new courses. 

3. Establishment of new departments. 

It shall also consider: 

4. Any matter of educational policy that may be referred to it by the 

Board of Trustees or by the Academic Council of the faculty and 
shall report thereon to the Board. And 

5. With the approval of the Board, it shall suggest for consideration 

and report by the faculty of the College any matter of educa- 
tional policy and shall report to the Board such action as it 
sees fit to take thereon. 

Article VIII 

OF THE DEGREES 

The College may confer the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, of Master of 
Arts, of Doctor of Philosophy, upon students recommended for the same 
by the Academic Council, and such other degrees including honorary 
degrees as the Trustees may from time to time determine. Certificates 
may, in the sam.e manner, be given to students who have completed 
prescribed courses of study. The diplomas and certificates shall be signed 
by the President of the Board of Trustees and the President of the College. 



55 



Wellesley College 

LEGACIES AND GIFTS 

1933-34 
Funds: 

Lucy Branch Allen Memorial Fund $500.00 

Mary Whiton Calkins Professorship (Additional) (Alumnae 

Fund) 1,100.00 

Class of 1884 Scholarship Fund (Additional) (Alumnse 

Fund) 1,000.00 

Art Museum Fund (Additional) 100.00 

George H. Davenport Scholarship (Legacy) 10,000.00 

Jacqueline Award 500.00 

Mary Arnold Petrie Scholarship (Legacy) 4,117.18 

Caroline Frances Pierce Fund 454.93 

Samuel M. and Anna M. Richardson Fund (Additional) 

(Legacy) 20,484.70 

Class of 1909 Fund (Semi-Centennial Fund*) 5,000.00 

Physics Laboratory Fund (Additional) (Semi-Centennial 

Fund*) 250.00 

Swimming Pool Fund (Additional) (Semi-Centennial Fund*) 1,340.62 

Cyrus and Eugenia Stewart Fund (Additional) 100.00 

Jessie Goff Talcott Fund (Additional) (Legacy) 3,150.21 

Gifts : 

To Departments. 
Art. 

From Agnes A. Abbott, a painting, copy of a detail from Botti- 
celli's "Adoration of the Magi," painted by the donor. 

From Gabriella Bosano, Catalogo della Esposizione della pittura 
Ferrarese del Rinascimento. 

From the Committee for the Excavation of Antioch and Vicinity, 
a First Century ajj. fragment of Mosaic, excavated at Antioch 
in April, 1932. This gift was presented in appreciation of 
Wellesley's help to the Expedition in lending Professor 
Campbell to act as Field Director. 

From Frederic H. Curtiss, an 18th Century Chinese painting of 
a heron. 

From friends and members of the Department, photographs, re- 
productions, and lantern slides. 

By bequest of Dr. Eleanor P. Hammond, a painting, landscape 
with figures, attributed to Salvator Rosa. 

From Arthur Johnson, an etching, "Sailboat," a work of the donor. 



*A full accounting of the Semi-Centennial Fund wiU be made when it 
is completed. 

56 



Appendix to the President's Report 

From Katharine P. Jones, '85, plates engraved after paintings and 
sculptures of the early Florentine School, dedicated to John 
Flaxman, and facsimiles of original drawings by Italian 
painters and sculptors, by William Young Ottley. 

From Betsey Baird Neville, '08, 3 pieces of Japanese embroidery. 

By bequest of Professor George Herbert Palmer, terra cotta figurine 
of a woman. Roman. 

From Theodore Sizer, a book: "James Jackson Jarves, a Forgotten 
New Englander," written by the donor. 

From Mrs. Robert Soutter, a slipper of Martha Washington, and 
a cameo: portrait of Mrs. Durant. 

From Candace C. Stimson. '92. a woven textile with figure of 
Penelope. 

By bequest of George H. Webster of Haverhill, 3 oil paintings 
and 8 etchings. 

Friends of the Art Museum, $105. 

Biblical History. 

From Alice H. Bushee, an interesting old book: "Life of Jonathan 

Edwards." 
From Annie H. Giles, '79-'80, a beautiful colored photograph of 

the Antioch chalice. 

Botany. 

From the Arnold Arboretum, some 40 varieties of trees and shrubs. 
From friends and members of the Department, many museum and 

herbarium specimens and living plants and seeds. 
From Elizabeth E. Morse, '26, a valuable collection of Pacific 

Coast fungi. 

Education. 

From Mrs. Emily Burt Berry, a Braille writing set. 

From friends and members of the faculty, old textbooks, manu- 
scripts, rewards of merit and other documents concerning 
schools of the past hundred years. 

English Literature. 

From Professor Louis Cazamlan, a book: "La Grande Bretagne, 

1934," written by the donor. 
By bequest of Dr. Eleanor P. Hammond, books from her library. 

French. 

By bequest of Dr. Eleanor P. Hammond, books from her library. 

57 



Wellesley College 

Geology and Geography. 

From Ina Chipman Smith, '96, files of the National Geographic 
Magazine for the years 1913-31 inclusive. 

Greek and Latin. 

By bequest of Dr. Eleanor P. Hammond, a small collection of 
classical books from her library. 

History and Political Science. 

From Marcia Liberman Markell, '17, $25 for equipment of the 
History Office. 

Mathematics. 

From the library of Professor Eleanor Gamble, a valuable book: 
"Quaedame Newtoni Prlnciplis Philosophise Naturalis." 

Speech. 

From Elizabeth Manwaring, '02, several plays. 

Zoology. 

From Fanny Bugbee Cobb, '86-'89, a collection of shells. 

From F. W. Denton, George Barnard, and Eleanor Olin, '36, a 

collection of fossils. 
From Dr. J. S. M. Gardner and Mary L. Austin, a collection of 

nearly 200 Indian insects. 
From Elisabeth B. Hone, '31, a collection of small rodents, skins 

and skulls. 
From Helen P. Safford, '36, oppossum bones. 
From Lastitia M. Snow and Gordon B. Wellman, valuable bulletins 

and publications. 
From the Estate of Henry N. Sweet, a collection of stuffed animals. 
From Mary A. Wil!co.x, a collection of microscope slides, dissecting 

instruments and other equipment. 
From Alice I. Perry Wood, an evening grosbeak, female. 

To the Library. 

From Marvin Pool, $142.03 for the Edith Butler Pool Memorial, 

for books on English Literature. 
Many other gifts to the Library are described in the Report of the 
Librarian, printed herewith. 

General. 

From the Alumna: Fund, $4,500 for the salary of the Mary Whiton 

Calkins Professor. 
From the Alumnae Fund, $1,505 for scholarships. 

58 



Appendix to the President's Report 

From her former students and other Wellesley friends, a portrait 

of Vida D. Scudder by Charles Hopkinson. 
From Delia S. Jackson, '83-'8S, a painting, "The Play at 

Wellesley," by William Baxter Closson. 
From friends of the College, $1,350.43 for scholarships. 
From Mile. Marguerite Mespoulet, a tree in memory of Flora I. 

MacKinnon. 
From Gertrude J. Owen, '02-'06, reproduction of the "Madonna 

of the Chair," in a carved frame, for Munger Hall. 
By bequest of Mrs. Anna A. Petrie, 4 pieces of a silver tea set, a 

beautiful silver tray, and part of a set of Spode china. 
From Martha Hale Shackford, '96, bust of Miss Anna Hale by 

Miss Anne Whitney and a decorative panel, painted by Miss 

Hale. 
From the Estate of Mary Shannon, 3 oil paintings, presented by 

Mrs. Harrj' M. Taylor. 



NEW COURSES IN 1934-35 

Art 208. Composition. Six periods a week of class instruction and three 

of studio practice, counting three hours a week for the second 

semester. 
Economics 102. Social Organization. Three hours a week for a semester; 

offered in both semesters. 
Economics 304. The Prevention of Poverty. Three hours a week for 

the first semester. 
English Literature 101. English Literature of the Renaissance — An In- 
troduction. Three hours a week for a year. 
French 103. French Life and Institutions. Three hours a week for a 

year. 
French 104. Introduction to the Study of French Literature. Three 

hours a week for a year. 
French 206. Pronunciation and Diction. One hour a week for a year. 
German 104. Outline History of German Literature. Three hours a 

week for a year. 
German 202. History of German Literature. Three hours a week for 

a year. 
History 217. Problems of the Far East. Three hours a week for the 

second semester. 
Music 102. Introduction to the Histon,- of Music. Three hours a week 

for a year. 
Music 207. Instrumental Music. Three hours a week for a year. 
Music 316. Chamber Music. Three hours a week for the second 

semester. 

59 



Wellesley College 

ACADEMIC BIOGRAPHY OF NEW MEMBERS OF THE 
TEACHING STAFF FOR 1934-35 

Astronomy. 
Alice Eleanor Taylor, B.A., Wellesley College, 1933. Assistant. 

Chemistry. 
Kathryn Sue Potter, B.A., Wellesley College, 1934. Assistant. 

English Literature. 

Margaret Antoinette Gerber, B.A., Wellesley College, 1930; State In- 
dustrial School for Girls (Lancaster), 1932-34. Assistant. 

Thomas Hubbard Vail Motter, A.B., Princeton University, 1922; M.A., 
Harvard University, 1925; Ph.D., Yale University, 1929; North- 
western University, 1930-33. Lecturer. 

French. 

Rene Escande de Messieres, Ancien eleve de I'ficole Normale Superieure; 
Licence es Lettres, University of Paris, 1921; Agrege des Lettres, 
1923; Lecturer at the University of Lyon, 1930- ; Professeur de 
premiere superieure, Lycee du Pare, Lyon, 1929- . Visiting 
Professor. 

Nicolette Ina Pernot, Licence es Lettres, University of Paris, 1924; 
Attachee a ITnstitut de Phonetique de I'Universite de Paris, 
1925-32; Director of Phonetic Studies, Middlebury College Summer 
School, 1932- . Lecturer. 

German. 

Melltta Gerhard. Study at the Universities of Leipzig and Heidelberg; 
Ph.D., 1918, Teacher's Diploma, 1921, University of Berlin; Uni- 
versity of Kiel, 1927-33. Lecturer. 

Greek. 
Margaret Elizabeth Taylor, B.A., Vassar College, 1923; M.A., 1927, 
Ph.D., 1933, Yale University; Mount Holyoke College, 1933-34. 
Instructor. 

History and Political Science. 

Grover Clark, B.A., Oberlin College, 1914; M.A., University of Chicago, 
1918; Columbia University, 1930-33. Visiting Lecturer. 

Margaret Winslow Hall, B.A., Mount Holyoke College, 1929; M.A., 
1930, Ph.D., 1933, University of Wisconsin; University of Wis- 
consin, 1930-31, 1932-34. Instructor. 

Elizabeth Runkle, B.A., Vassar College, 1931; B.A., 1933., M.A., 1933, 
Newnham College, Cambridge University; Stuart School, 1933- . 
Instructor. 

60 



Appendix to the President's Report 

Hygiene and Physical Education. 

Margaret Rioch Anthonisen, M.D., University of Manitoba, 1925; 
Massachusetts General Hospital, 1931-34, and New England Home 
for Little Wanderers, 1932-34. Consultant in Mental Hygiene. 

Marion Cotton Loizeaux, B.A., Wellesley College, 1927; M.D., Cornell 
University, 1931; Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N.Y., July 1933- 
July 1934. Assistant Physician. 

Mathematics. 

Ruth Glidden Mason, B.A., Wellesley College, 1926; M.S., 1928, Ph.D., 
1932, University of Chicago; College of the Holy Names (Oakland, 
Calif.), Feb.-June, 1933. Instructor (second semester). 

Music. 

Richard Burgin, Diploma of "Free Artist," Imperial Conservatory at 
St. Petersburg, Russia, 1912; New England Conservatory of Music, 
1927- . Instructor in Violin. 

Paul Henry Lang, Diplome d'fitudes Superieures, 1927, Licence es 
Lettres, 1928, University of Paris; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1934; 
Wells College, 1931-34. Visiting Professor on the Mary Whiton 
Calkins Memorial Foundation. 

Philosophy and Psychology. 

Louise Ward Gates, B.A., Wellesley College, 1928; M.A., Brown Uni- 
versity, 1931; Institute of Child Welfare, University of Minnesota, 
1931-34. Assistant in Psychology. 

Edna Frances Heidbreder, B.A., Knox College, 1911; M.A., University 
of Wisconsin, 1918; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1924; University 
of Minnesota, 1923-34. Professor of Psychology. 

Physics. 

Emily Fisher Buckingham, B.A., 1933, M.A., 1934, Radcliffe College. 

Laboratory Assistant. 

Zoology and Physiology. 

Helen Elizabeth Butts, B.A., 1928, M.A., 1929, Brown University; Ph.D., 
Duke University, 1934; Duke University, 1931-34. Instructor in 
Zoology. 

Eva Elizabeth Jones, B.A., Radcliffe College, 1920; M.A., University 
of Maine, 1924; Ph.D., Radcliflfe College, 1930; Harvard Medical 
School, 1930-34. Instructor in Zoology. 

Altha Louise Palmer, B.A., Southwestern College, 1925; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 1930; High School of Winthrop (Mass.), 
1932-34. Instructor in Zoology. 

61 



Wellesley College 

Pauline Burgess Rohm, B.A., Oberlin College, 1934. Laboratory As- 
sistant in Zoology. 

Marca Isabel Taliaferro, B.A., University of Richmond, 1933. Labora- 
tory Assistant in Physiology. 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE IN 1934-35 

Katharine Canby Balderston, Associate Professor of English Literature. 

Marguerite Juliette Brechaille, Associate Professor of French. 

William Alexander Campbell, Associate Professor of Art. (Second 
semester.) 

Lennie Phoebe Copeland, Associate Professor of Mathematics. (Second 
semester.) 

Helen Isabel Davis, Associate Professor of Botany. 

Olive Dutcher Doggett, Professor of Biblical History. 

Bernard Chapman Heyl, Assistant Professor of Art. (First semester.) 

Edith Christina Johnson, Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Composi- 
tion. (Second semester.) 

Ruth Johnstin, Associate Professor of Chemistry. (Second semester.) 

Helen Hull Law, Associate Professor of Greek and Latin. 

Laura Hibbard Loomis, Professor of English Literature. (First semester.) 

Barnette Miller, Associate Professor of History. 

Margaret Terrell Parker, Associate Professor of Geology and Geography. 
(Second semester.) 

Lilla Weed, Associate Librarian. (Second semester.) 

Lucy Wilson, Associate Professor of Physics. (Second semester.) 



PROMOTIONS OF 1934-35 

Agnes Anne Abbot, from Instructor of Art to Assistant Professor. 
Marguerite Juliette Brechaille, Agregee de I'Universite, from Assistant 

Professor of French to Associate Professor. 
Dorothy Warner Dennis, B.A., Dipl. E. U., from Assistant Professor of 

French to Associate Professor. 
Angeline La Plana, Dottore in Lettere, from Instructor in Italian to 

Assistant Professor. 
Edith Melcher, Ph.D., from Instructor in French to Assistant Professor. 
Alice Maria Ottley, Ph.D., from Associate Professor of Botany to 

Professor. 
Alfred Dwight Sheffield, M.A., from Associate Professor of Rhetoric and 

Composition to Professor of Group Leadership. 

62 



Appendix to the President's Report 

RESIGNATIONS AND EXPIRED APPOINTMENTS, JUNE, 1934 

Ada Thompson Ahearn, Assistant in Physiology. 

Ruth Burr, Assistant Physician and Consultant in Mental Hygiene. 

Alice Caroline Renee Coleno, Instructor in French. 

May Allen Davidson, Head of Norumbega House. 

Elsie Van Dyck DeWitt, Instructor in History.- 

Jessie Ann Engles, Head of Stone Hall. (Retired.) 

Elizabeth Sanders Hobbs, Instructor in Zoology. 

Jj^cques Hoffmann, Instructor in Violin. 

Marjorie Jane Levy, Assistant in Astronomy. 

Anna Mathiesen, Visiting Lecturer in Psychology. 

Marguerite Mespoulet, Professor of French. 

Eleanor Parkhurst, Assistant to the Department of English Literature. 

Gertrude Randolph Bramlette Richards, Lecturer in History. 

Jeannette Roman, Assistant in German. 

Clara Eliza Smith, Professor of Mathematics. (Retired.) 

Olga Steiner, Instructor in German. 

Dorothy Trautwein, Instructor in Political Science. 

Yvonne Tuzet, Instructor in French. 

Belle Morgan Wardwell, Head of Beebe Hall. (Retired.) 

Judith Sill Wardwell, Assistant in Zoology. 

Elizabeth Burroughs Wheeler, Head of Eliot House. (Retired.) 

Marian Eleanor Whitney, Assistant in Physics. 



63 



Wellesley College 



FELLOWSHIPS AND GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS 

FOR 1934-35 

Graduate Scholarships awarded to Members of the Class of 1934 

Mary Alice Eaton 

Hermione Gertrude Kopp 

Mary Virgin la Rice 

Horton-Hallowell Fellowship 

Awarded for the year 1934—35 to Grace Louise Rose, B.A., Wellesley 
College, 1930; candidate for the degree of Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins 
University. Subject: Greek. 

Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship 

Awarded for the year 1934-35 to Helen Margaret Franc, B.A., 
Wellesley College, 1929; M.A., New York University, 1931; Brevet 
de la Sorbonne, LIniversity of Paris, 1932; Eleonora Duse Fellow of 
the Italy America Society in 1932-33; candidate for the degree of 
Ph.D. at New York University. Subject: Art. 

Fanny Bullock Workman Scholarship 

Awarded for the year 1934-35 to Florence Hedwig Knauf, B.A., 
Goucher College, 1925; M.S. in Hygiene and Physical Education, 
Wellesley College, 1928; candidate for the degree of Ph.D. at Rad- 
cliffe College. Subject: Physiology. 



64 



Appendix to the President's Report 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE FACULTY 

July, 1933, to July, 1934 

ART 

SiRARPiE Der Nersessian, Lic. es Let., Dipl. E.S., Dipl. E.H.E., Associate 
Professor. 

The date of the initial miniatures of the Etchmiadzin Gospel — The Art Bulletin, XV, 
327—360. Review of Kurt Weitzmann's Die armenische Buchmalerei des 
10 lund beginnenden 11 Jahrhunderts — Byzantion, VIII, 685—688. 

William Alexander Campbell, M.F.A., Associate Professor. 

The second season of excavations at Antioch on the Orontes. (Official publication 

of the excavations.) 

ASTRONOMY 
Helen Walter Dodson, Ph.D., Instructor. 

Determination of radial velocities from the measurement of microphotometer tracings 
— Publications of the American Astronomical Society, vol. 8, 7, 1934. 

Marjorie Jane Levy, B.A., Assistant. 

A redetermination of the periods of fifteen variable stars in the globular cluster 
Messier IS — Bulletin oj the Harvard College Observatory, 893. 

BIBLICAL HISTORY 
Louise Pettibone Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor. " 

The prophetic Targum as guide and defense for the higher critic — Journal oj Biblical 
Literature, June-Sept. 1933. 

Gordon Boit Wellman, Th.D., Associate Professor. 

Fuchsia foliage — Horticulture, Aug. 1, 1933. A visit to White's Selborne — Majx. 
Audubon Bulletin, Dec. 1933. 

Joseph Garabed Haroutunian, Ph.D., Lecturer. 

A new approach to Channing — Christian Register, Aug. 3, 1933. Humanism and 
Christianity — Ibid., Oct. 26 and Nov. 9, 1933. Review of A. C. Knudson's 
The Doctrine of Redemption— /Aiii., Oct. 19, 1933. 

CHEMISTRY 
Dorothy Jane Woodland, Ph.D., Instructor. 

(With E. Mack, Jr.) The effect of curvature on surface energy. Rate of evapora- 
tion of liquid droplets. Thickness of saturated vapor films — Journal of 
the American Chemical Society, 55, 3149, 1933, 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

Elizabeth Donnan, B.A., Professor. 

Articles on Mary Ashton Livermore, Josephine Shaw Lowell — Dictionary of American 
Biography, XI. 

65 



Wellesley College 
Henry Raymond Mussey, Ph.D., Professor. 

For a virtuous people — Herald Tribune Books, Feb. 4, 1934. The fiscal faro game 
—Nation, Feb. 14, 1934. 

Leland Hamilton Jenks, Ph.D., Professor. 

Viscount Milner — Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, XL Can Cuba recover — 
Nation, Sept. 6, 1933. Review of Angedl's Financial Foreign Policy of 
the United States — American Statistical Association, March, 1934. 

Lucy Winsor Killough, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Wellesley students' families — Wellesley Magazine, Oct. 1933. 

ENGLISH 
ViDA DuTioN ScuDDER, M.A., L.H.D., Professor, Emeritus. 

The next hundred years of the CathoJic revival. (Series.) Alternatives and oppor- 
tunities — Christendom, Oxford, England, Sept. 1933. A Franciscan insti- 
tute — The Commonweal, Sept. 1, 1933. A Franciscan episode — Christa 
Seva Sangha, Poona, India, Oct. 1933. The cross in Utopia — Hibbert 
Journal, Oct. 1933. A Franciscan episode — American Church Monthly, Nov. 
1933. The Church and social justice — Spirit of Missions, Jan. 1934. The 
Anglo-Catholic movement in the next century. Its social outlook. (Series.) 
— The Living Church, March 10, 1934. Christian conflicts — Christendom, 
March, 1934. In defense of dogma — The Woman's Press, April, 1934. St. 
Catherine of Siena — The Holy Cross Magazine, April, 1934. 

Alfred Dwight Sheffield, M.A., Associate Professor. 

Things learned about thinking by thinkers in groups — fEnglish leaflet, April, 1934. 

Bertha Monica Stearns, M.A., Associate Professor. 

John Howard Payne as an editor — Quarterly Journal of American Literature, V, 3, 
Nov. 1933. Biographical sketches: Sarah Edgarton Mayo — Dictionary of 
American Biography, XII, 1933. Sarah Towne Martyn — Ibid. Mary Gove 
Nichols— /Aii., XIII, 1934. Dr. Thomas Nichok— Ibid. 

T. H. Vail Motter, Ph.D., Instructor. 

A new Arnold letter and an old Swinburne quarrel — London Times Literary Supple- 
ment, Aug. 31, 1933. The schoolmaster as dramatist — Herald Tribune, New 
York, Dec. 10, 1933. Germany under inflation — Sun, New York, Dec. 11, 
1933. Arthur Hallam's centenary: a bibliographical note — Yale University 
Library Gazette, Jan. 1934. 

FRENCH 
Andree Bruel, Docteur de I'Universite de Paris, Assistant Professor. 

Un anniversaire. L'Arioste, le grand poete de Ferrare — L^ Monde Illustre, Sept. 2, 
1933. Romans frangais du Moyen Age — Essais. E. Droz, Paris, 1934, 
446 pp. 

HISTORICAL AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Edward Ely Curtis, Ph.D., Professor. 

Review of Allen French's General Gage's Informers — American Historical Revieta, 
July, 1933. Articles on Ebenezer Learned, Benjamin Lynde — Dictionary of 
American Biography, XI, 1933. Richard Kidder Meade, Hugh Mercer — 
Ibid; XII, 1933. Review of Lewis Einstein's Divided Loyalties — American 
Historical Review, April, 1934. 

66 



Appendix to the President's Report 
Judith Blow Williams, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Review* of J. U. Nef's The Rise of the British Coal Industry — Journal of Modern 
History, March, 1934. 

Louise Overacker, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Primaries, Political — Encyclopirdia of the Social Sciences, XII, 396—398. Campaign 
funds in a depression year — American Political Science Review, 21, Oct. 

1933, 769-783. Direct primary legislation in 1932-33— /ii<f., 28, April, 

1934, 265-270. 

Gertrude Randolph Bramlette Richards, Ph.D., Lecturer. 

(With collaboration of students in Course 302) Bargaining in benefices. Harvard 
University Press, 1934. Reviews of: Le Lettere di Girolamo Savonarola — 
Social Studies, Feb. 1934; Guicciardini's Diario del Viaggio in Spagna — 
American Historical Review, July, 1933; Palmarocchi's La Politica Italians 
di Lorenzo dei Medici — Saturday Review of Literature, Jan. 13, 1934. 

HYGIENE AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Elizabeth Beall, M.A., Assistant Professor. 

The Boston Board of Officials for Women's Sports — Journal of Healtli and Physical 
Education, Feb. 1934. 

Fanny Garrison, B.A., Instructor. 

Amy Morris Homans — Wellesley Magazine, Dec. 1933. The Olmstead Travel Camp — 
Mary Hemenway Jlumnte Association Bulletin, 1933—34. 

ITALIAN 

Gabriella Bosano, Dottore in Filologia Moderna, Professor. 

Ariosto — Middlebury News, Sept. 1933. II Novellino — Giornalino, New York, Jan. 
1934. Echi del Centenario Ariosteo — Italica, Ann Arbor, Mich., March, 1934. 

LATIN 

Dorothy Mae Robathan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

The Basilica Argentaria — American Journal of Philology, LV, Jan.-March, 1934. 

The catalogues of the princely and papal libraries of the Italian renaissance 

— Transactions of the American Philological Association, LXIV, 1933. Re- 

' view of B. H. Ulman's Ancient Writing — University of Chicago Magazine, 

Nov. 1933. 

MATHEMATICS 

Helen Gertrude Russell, Ph.D., Instructor. 

(With J. Walsh.) On the convergence and overconvergence of polynomials of best 
approximation — Transactions oj the American Mathematical Society, Jan. 1934. 

MUSIC 

Helen Joy Sleeper, Mus.B., Assistant Professor. 

Clarence Grant Hamilton, Professor of Music 1918—1933 — Wellesley Magazine, June, 
1933. 

67 



Wellesley College 

psychology 
Michael Jacob Zigler, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Review of L. T. Troland's Psychophysiology III; Cerebration and action — American 
Journal of Psychology. 45, 1933, 771-772. (With E. M. Moore and M. 
T. Wilson.) Comparative accuracy in the localization of cutaneous pressure 
and pam— Ibid., 46, 1934, 47-58. 

Edith Brandt Mallory, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Minor studies from the Wellesley College psychological laboratory, V, The recogni- 
tion of relatively simple sensory experiences — American Journal of Psychology, 
Jan. 1934, vol. XLVI, 120—131. Father's occupation, and boarding school 
education as related to the individual's judgment of values — The Psycho- 
logical Bulletin, 30, 9, Nov. 1933, 717. 

SPANISH 

Alice Huntington Bushee, M.A., Professor. 

Tirso de Molina — Revue Hispanique, LXXXI, 1933. Bibliography of La prudencia 
en la mujer — Hispanic Review, Oct. 1933. The greatest Spanish dramatists 
—Hispania. Feb. 1934. 

Ada May Coe, M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Additional notes on Moreto — Hispanic Review, July, 1933. Additional notes on 
Corneille in Spain in the eighteenth century — Romanic Review, Jaily— Sept., 
1933. 

ZOOLOGY 
Helen Warton Kaan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Induction of the Otic Capsule in Amblystoma punctatum — The Anatomical Record, 
vol. 58. 

LIBRARY 

Ethel Dane Roberts, B.A., B.L.S., Librarian. 

Notes on early Christian libraries in Rome — Speculum, April, 1934. 



68 



Appendix to the President's Report 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

Rev. Henry P. Van Dusen, Union Theological Seminary. 

Dr. Robert Seneca Smith, Yale Divinity School. 

Rev. Charles N. Arbuckle, Newton Centre. 

Dr. Russell H. Stafford, Old South Church, Boston. 

Rev. Douglas Horton, United Church of Hyde Park, Chicago. 

Dr. Raymond Calkins, Cambridge. 

Dr. Halford E. Luccock, Yale Divinity School. 

Rt. Rev. Flenr}' K. Sherrill, Bishop of Massachusetts. 

Rev. John C. Schroeder, Portland, Maine. 

Rev. William W. Patton, Glen Ridge, N.J. 

Dr. Alexander C. Purdy, Hartford Theological Seminary. 

Rev. Reinhold Niebuhr, Union Theological Seminary. 

Rev. Phillips E. Osgood, Emmanuel Church, Boston. 

Rev. George A. Buttrick, Madison Avenue Presbyterian 
Church, New York City. 

President J. Edgar Park, Wheaton College. 

Dr. James Gordon Gilkey, Springfield. 

Rev. George A. Bushee, Arlington. 

Dr. Boynton Merrill, West Newton. 

Dr. James A. Richards, Oberlin, Ohio. 

Dr. Bernard I. Bell, Providence. 

Rev. Henry H. Tweedy, Yale Divinity School. (Two 
services.) 
Mar. 11. Dean Willard L. Sperry, Theological School in Harvard 
University. 

President Henry S. Coffin, Union Theological Seminary. 

Rev. Arthur L. Kinsolving, Trinity Church, Boston. 

Rev. Ralph W. Sockman, Madison Avenue Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, New York City. 

Rev. Harold C. Phillips, First Baptist Church, Cleveland. 

President William M. Hudson, Blackburn College. (Two 
services.) 

Professor Rufus M. Jones, Haverford College. (Two 
services.) 

Dr. William P. Merrill, Brick Presbyterian Church, New York 
City. 

Dr. Henry B. Washburn, Episcopal Theological School, 
Cambridge. 

Professor Thomas H. Procter, Wellesley College. 

Dr. Howard C. Robbins, General Theological Seminary, New 
York City. 

Dr. Ashley D. Leavitt, Brookllne. 

Baccalaureate Service. Dr. Charles R. Brown, Dean Emer- 
itus, Yale Divinity School. 

69 



Sept. 


24. 


Oct. 


1. 


Oct. 


8. 


Oct. 


IS. 


Oct. 


22. 


Oct. 


29. 


Nov. 


5. 


Nov. 


12. 


Nov. 


19. 


Nov. 


26. 


Dec. 


3. 


Dec. 


10. 


Jan. 


7. 


Jan. 


14. 


Jan. 


21. 


Jan. 


28. 


Feb. 


4. 


Feb. 


11. 


Feb. 


18. 


Feb. 


25. 


Mar. 


4. 



Mar. 


18. 


April 


8. 


April 


15. 


April 


22. 


April 


29. 


May 


'6. 


May 


13. 


May 


20. 


May 


27. 


June 


3. 


June 


10. 


June 


17. 



Oct. 


16, 


Oct. 


22, 


Oct. 


23. 


Oct. 


25, 



Wellesley College 

ADDRESSES 

Oct. 9. Poet's Reading — Robert Hillyer. 

Oct. 12. Behind the Geneva Disarmament Conference — Professor 
Manley Hudson, Harvard University. Shall We Follow 
Einstein? — Professor Kirtley Mather, Harvard Univer- 
sity. (World Tomorrow Group and International Rela- 
tions Club.) 

Oct. IS. Vesper Service — Joseph G. Haroutunian, Lecturer in Biblical 
History. (Christian Association.) 
Poet's Reading — Abbie Huston Evans. 
Vesper Service — Frances L. Knapp, Dean of Freshmen. 

(Christian Association.) 
Poet's Reading — Laurence Binyon. 

Germany — Dr. Robert Dexter, League of Nations Association. 
(International Relations Club.) 

Oct. 27. Teaching Positions in French Normal Schools for the College 
Graduate — Auguste V. Desclos, Assistant Director of the 
Office National des Universites et ficoles Frangaises. 
(Department of French and Personnel Bureau.) 
European Student Work Camps — Kenneth Howland, Ameri- 
can Executive Secretary of the International Student 
Service. (Wellesley College Forum.) 

Oct. 29. Vesper Service — Margaret D. Christian, Assistant Dean of 
Residence. (Christian Association.) 

Oct. 30. Poet's Reading — Bernice Kenyon Gilkyson, '20. 

Moving Picture, The History of Chocolate — Hershey Chocolate 
Company. (Department of Economics.) 

Oct. 31. The Library of the Vatican — Monsignor Tisserant, Pro-Prefect 
of the Vatican Library. (College Library.) 

Nov. 1. The United States and Its Relations to World Peace Ma- 
chinery — Louise Overacker, Associate Professor of Polit- 
ical Science. (Wellesley College Forum.) 

Nov. 2. Le moyen age et I'esprlt classlque — Professor fitlenne Gllson, 
College de France; Director of the Institute of Medieval 
Studies, University of Toronto. (Department of French.) 

Nov. 4. French Secondary Schools for Girls — Professor Louis 
Cazamlan, The Sorbonne; Mary Whiton Calkins Visit- 
ing Professor. (Wellesley College Teachers Association.) 

Nov. 5. Vesper Service — Dr. Daniel Bliss, Assistant Pastor of Old 
South Church, Boston. (Christian Association.) 

Nov. 7. Teaching in a Progressive School — Katharine Taylor, Prin- 
cipal of Shady Hill School. (Department of Education 
and Personnel Bureau.) 

70 



Appendix to the President's Report 

Nov. 8. Radio Broadcasting: the Opportunities for College Women — 
Merrill Mills Hammond, Jr., Chief Announcer of WBSO. 
(Vocational Information Committee.) 

Nov. 13. Poet's Reading — Archibald MacLeish. 

Nov. 15. Psychological Work. Opportunities in Educational, Social, and 
Industrial Fields — Edith B. Mallory, Assistant Professor 
of Ps)'chology. (Vocational Information Committee.) 

Nov. 17. Symbolism and Poetry — Professor Louis Cazamian, The Sor- 
bonne; Mary Whiton Calkins Visiting Professor. (De- 
partment of English Literature.) 

Nov. 22, Literary^ Work — Bernard A. DeVoto, Harvard University. 
(Department of English Composition, Press Board, Per- 
sonnel Bureau.) 

Nov. 24. The Symbolist Strain in English Romanticism — Professor 
Louis Cazamian. (Department of English Literature.) 

Nov. 27. How to Get a Job — Professor Erwin H. Schell, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. (Vocational Information Com- 
mittee.) 
Students and Politics — Walter Kotschnig, General Secretary 
of International Student Service. (Christian Association 
and Wellesley College Forum.) 

Dec. 1. Victorian Affinities to Symbolism — Professor Louis Cazamian. 
(Department of English Literature.) 

Dec. 4. The N. R. A. — Henry R. Mussey, Professor of Economics. 
(Department of Economics and Sociology.) 

Dec. 5. Boccaccio and the Decameron — Gabrlella Bosano, Professor of 
Italian. (Department of Italian.) 

Dec. 6. The Economic Foundation of World Peace — Dr. Harry 
Laidler, Executive Secretary of the League for Industrial 
Democracy. (Department of Economics and the Forum.) 

Dec. 8. The Prose Poets (I) — Professor Louis Cazamian. (Depart- 
ment of English Literature.) 

Jan. 4. La vie d'un journal, la vie d'une revue modeme — Robert de 
Saint-Jean, Editor of La Revue Hebdomadaire. (De- 
partment of French.) 

Jan. 5. The Prose Poets (II) — Professor Louis Cazamian. (Depart- 
ment of English Literature.) 

Jan. 10. Second Season of Excavations at Antioch-on-the-Orontes — 
W. Alexander Campbell, Associate Professor of Art. 
(Department of Art.) 

Jan. 12. The Poets (I) — Professor Louis Cazamian. (Department of 
English Literature.) 

71 



Wellesley College 

Jan. 14. Lecture on Christian Science — A. Hervey Bathurst, C. S. B., 
of London. 
Gandhi as a Hindu Christian Sees Him — Chinniah Dorai 
Swami. (Christian Association.) 

Jan. IS. The World Outlook for 1934 — Raymond Leslie Buell, Chair- 
man of the Foreign Policy Association. (Lecture Com- 
mittee and International Relations Committee.) 

Jan. 19. The Poets (II) — Professor Louis Cazamian. (Department 
of English Literature.) 

Jan. 23. King Arthur in Italy — Laura H. Loomis, Professor of Eng- 
lish Literature. (Department of Italian.) 

Jan. 26. The Poets (HI) — Professor Louis Cazamian. (Department 
of English Literature.) 
The Legal Profession — Judge Sara M. Soffel '08. (Vocational 
Information Committee.) 

Feb. 12. French Sources of Orlando Furioso — Andree Bruel, Assistant 
Professor of French. (Department of Italian.) 

Feb. 14, IS, 16. Religious Forum. Services and Addresses by Dr. James 
Austin Richards of the First Church in Oberlin, Ohio. 
(Christian Association.) 

Feb. 19. The New Deal and Relief — Mary B. Treudley, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Economics and Sociology. (Department of Eco- 
nomics and Sociology.) 
The Impression We Leave — Elizabeth M. Osborne, New York 
City. (Personnel Bureau.) 

Feb. 20. The Impression We Leave (Second address) — Elizabeth M. 
Osborne. (Personnel Bureau.) 
The Last Phase of Plato's Thought — Professor Paul Elmore 
More of Princeton University. (Horton Lecture.) 

Feb. 23. Poet's Reading. Thomas Hardy — Professor Richard Purdy 
of Yale University. 
Round Table Discussion, Shall we work for economic recon- 
struction or for recovery? — Leader, Max Lerner. (De- 
partment of Economics and Workers Education Group.) 

Feb. 2S. Vesper Service — Djan Gopal Mukerji. (Christian Associa- 
tion.) 

Feb. 26. Ferrara, the City of Chivalry — Gabriella Bosano, Professor of 
Italian. (Department of Italian.) 

Feb. 27. Voyages archeologiques en Afghanistan — ^Jules Barthoux. 

(Departments of French and Art.) 
Feb. 28. Don Juan Tenorio — Professor Guillermo Rivera of Harvard 
University. (Department of Spanish.) 
The Abbey of Monte Cassino and Its Effect upon the Me- 
dieval Culture of South Italy — Dr. Henry M. Willard. 
(Travel Bureau.) 

72 



Appendix to the President's Report 

Mar. S. Symposium on "Work with Young Children." Addresses by- 
Abigail A. Eliot, Director of the Nursery Training 
School, Boston; Anna A. Kingman, Page Memorial 
Kindergarten, Wellesley; Elizabeth Healy, Executive Sec- 
retary of the Cooperative School for Student Teachers, 
New York City. (Department of Education and Voca- 
tional Information Committee.) 

Mar. 6. Symposium on Social Work. Brief addresses by several 
alumns engaged in social work. (Vocational Informa- 
tion Committee.) 

Mar. 7. Orlando Furioso — Gabriella Bosano, Professor of Italian. 
(Department of Italian.) 

Mar. 12. Landscape Architecture — Henry A. Frost, Director of the 
Cambridge School of Landscape Architecture. (Voca- 
tional Information Committee.) 
Ariosto and Spenser — Katharine C. Balderston, Associate Pro- 
fessor of English Literature. (Department of Italian.) 

Mar. 13. Paris Fashions and Department Stores — Mrs. Alice Perkins, 
Fashion Representative in Paris. (Vocational Informa- 
tion Committee.) 

Mar. 14. The Political Basis of International Relations — Norman 
Thomas, Executive Director of the League for Industrial 
Democracy. (International Relations Club, Departments 
of Economics and Political Science.) 

Mar. 16. The Labor of Authorship — Professor Mary Ellen Chase of 
Smith College. (Department of English Composition.) 
Symposium on "Chemistry as a Profession." Addresses by 
Helen T. Jones, Assistant Professor of Chemistr>'; Adela 
Merrill Prentiss '21, Shady Hill School; Dr. Frances Ilg 
'25, Yale School of Human Relations. (Department of 
Chemistry and Vocational Information Committee.) 
Latin Classics in English Literature — Professor Eleanor S. 
Duckett of Smith College. (Classical Club and Depart- 
ment of Latin.) 

Mar. 19. Chivalry in Don Quijote — Helen Phipps Houck, Assistant 
Professor of Spanish. (Department of Italian.) 

Mar. 20. Address — Professor Harlow Shapley, Director of the Harvard 

Astronomical Observatory. (Honors Day.) 
April 6. Reading, from Kipling and Housman — Professor Chauncey 
Brewster Tinker of Yale University. (Poets' Reading 
Fund.) 
April 9. Opportunities for Young Women in Public Service — ^Mrs. 
True Worthy White of the Massachusetts League of 

73 



Wellesley College 

Women Voters, and Mrs. Carroll L. Chase, President of 
the Cambridge League of Women Voters. (Vocational 
Information Committee.) 

April 11. The Pre-Ibsen Period and the Dramatic Renaissance in Eng- 
land from 1880 to 1890— Professor Allardyce NicoU of 
Yale University. (Barnswallows Association.) 

April 16. FIrenze — Maria P. Bizzoni, Instructor In Italian. (Depart- 
ment of Italian.) 

April 17. Opportunities and Training in the Field of Occupational 
Therapy — Constance M. Garrod of the Boston School of 
Occupational Therapy. (Vocational Information Com- 
mittee. ) 

April 20. Government Aid to Students — President Daniel L. Marsh of 
Boston University. (N. S. F. A. Conference.) 

April 21. Youth versus Adult Organized Inertia — Dr. William Trufant 
Foster, Director of PoUak Institute of Economic Re- 
search. (N. S. F. A. Conference.) 

April 23. Une cathedrale francalse: Bourges — Professor Henri Focillon 
of the Sorbonne; Visiting Professor at Yale School of 
Fine Arts. (Department of French.) 

April 25. Education and the Industrial Struggle in the South — Mr. 
Dombrowsky of the Highlander Folk School, Tennessee. 

May 2. \irglnia \'\'oolf — Constance Alexander of Pine Manor Junior 
College. (Department of English Composition.) 

May 3. Modern Architecture — Professor Kenneth J. Conant of Har- 
vard University. (Department of Art.) 

May 4. The Dramas and the Genius of Eugene O'Neill — Professor 
Henry W. L. Dana. (Department of English Com- 
position.) 

May 7. Researches In Sound, Speech, and Electricity — Dr. J. 0. 
Perrine, Associate Editor of the Bell System Technical 
Journal. (Departments of Speech and Physics, College 
Lecture Committee.) 

May 8. Education for International Understanding — Professor Anton 
de Haas of Harvard University. (World Tomorrow 
Group.) 

May 20. Vesper Service — C. Augustus Norwood. (Christian Asso- 
ciation.) 

June 18. Commencement Address — Dr. George E. Vincent. 

MUSIC 

Sept. 28. Faculty recital — Yves Chardon, 'cellist. 

Oct. 1. Faculty recital — Howard HInners, Edward B. Greene, pianists. 

Oct. 4. The Chardon String Quartet. 

74 



Dec. 


s, 


Jan. 


8, 


Jan. 


21, 


Jan. 


25, 


Feb. 


13, 


Feb. 


19, 


Feb. 


25, 


Mar. 


1. 


Mar. 


5. 


Mar. 


14-. 


Mar. 


IS. 


Mar. 


19. 



Appendix to the President's Report 

Oct. 9. Faculty recital — Clarence Watters, organist. 
Oct. 19. The Don Cossacks Choir. 

Nov. 5. Faculty recital — Howard Hinners, Edward B. Greene, pianists. 
Nov. 7. The Pro-Arte String Quartette. 
Nov. 13. The Sedalia Singers from Sedalia, North Carolina. 
Nov. 26. Faculty recital — Malcolm H. Holmes, violinist; Edward B. 
Greene, pianist. 

Wellesley College Symphony Orchestra. 

Faculty recital — Gladys Avery, soprano. 

Facuhy recital — Howard Hinners, Edward B. Greene, pianists. 

Harold Bauer, Ossip Gabrilowitsch, pianists. 
13. The Cleveland Orchestra. 

19. Faculty recital — Blanche Brocklebank, pianist. 
25. Faculty recital — Howard Hinners, Edward B. Greene, pianists. 

Harvard University Glee Club and Wellesley College Choir. 

Faculty recital — Gladys Avery, soprano. 

Student recital. 

The London String Quartette. 

Faculty recital — Jean E. Wilder, pianist. 
April 9, 10. The London String Quartette. (Four concerts.) 
April 11. Lily Pons, coloratura soprano. 
April 22. Faculty recital — Blanche Brocklebank, Jean E. Wilder, 

pianists. 
April 24. Wellesley College Symphony Orchestra. 

May 13. Wellesley College Choir, assisted by Gladys Avery, soprano. 
May 14. Student organ recital. 

In addition to the above, jour special musical vesper services were given 
by the College Choir, with Edward B. Greene as Director and Organist. 



EXHIBITIONS- AT THE FARNSWORTH ART MUSEUM 

June-Nov. 1. Students' work, 1932-33. 

Oct. 9-Nov. 3. Students' summer work, 1933. 

Nov. 1-13. Water colors and portrait drawings by Arthur Johnson. 

Nov. 15-29. Costume designs by Lee Simonson. Under the auspices of 
the Play Production course. 

Dec. 4—14. Portraits by Arthur Johnson. 

Jan. 8-20. Photographs of French Medieval Architecture taken by 
Arthur E. Princehorn, under the direction of Clarence 
Ward of Oberlin College. Lent by Mr. Ward. 

75 



Wellesley College 

Jan. 22-Feb. 12. Etchings and dr>-points by Rembrandt. Circulated 
by the College Art Association. 

Feb. 14— April 7. Water colors by Agnes Anne Abbot. 

April 12-May 4. Plates from "La Tapisserie Gothique" by G. J. 
Demotte. From the Museum Library. 

April 7-May 4. Etchings and drawings by Sam Green. 

April 14-May 12. Miniatures by Artemis Tavshanjian (Mrs. Charles A. 

Karagheusian). 
May 5-31. Paintings and sculpture by the Wellesley Society of Artists. 
June 11-Sept. Students' work, 1933-34. 



76 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TREASURER 

JAMES DEAN 

] 933-1934 



To THE Trustees of Wellesley College: 

A survey- of financial operations for the year 1933-34 affords, on 
the whole, a distinct measure of satisfaction. Although the effort to econo- 
mize wherever possible led to omission or curtailment at certain minor 
points, all major activities proceeded along usual lines, with no reduction 
in salaries, no undue retrenchment of academic expenses, and with a 
small surplus for the year. 

Plant. For the first year since the fire in 1914, there has been no 
important construction; a cessation merely temporary, however, since the 
end of the year marked active preparations for the new Chemistry-Physics 
Building. These plans involved the demolition of Freeman and Wood, 
college homes dear since 1888 and 1889 to many generations of students. 
The two largest items chargeable to the reserve fund for depreciation 
were the installation of a boiler at the power house and the renewing at 
Cazenove of one stack of bathrooms — one step in the gradual replacement 
of all plumbing in the Hazard Quadrangle. 

Funds and Investments. The increase for the year in permanent 
endowment was $57,405, an addition welcome, but small Indeed in com- 
parison with growing needs. The greater part of this increase came from 
$35,913 added to scholarship funds. By its reunion gift of $5,000, the 
Class of 1909 increased our entirely unrestricted funds to $148,515. 
Construction expenditures for the proposed Chemistry-Physics Building 
and some final items at Munger Hall reduced our building funds. Although 
largely offset by accumulated gains for previous periods, loss on the 
sale of securities caused a deficit in the investment reserve fund. This 
balance was not allocated to funds, since the debit will probably soon 
change to a credit item. 

The alteration for the year in the relative proportion of different 
classes of investments was negligible. On June 30, 1934, the market 
value of investments, conservatively estimated, was 10.3 per cent below 
book value, an improvement of 7.1 per cent over the record of the 
previous year. 

Income and Expenditures. The year brought a further decrease 
in income from students, from funds, from miscellaneous sources. Student 
registration again fell slightly less than 2 per cent under that of the 
preceding year. Income from investments declined, primarily because of 
increased acquisition of securities (largely governmeiit issues) yielding 
less than 4 per cent. The decrease in miscellaneous income came from 
several minor factors. The total gross income decreased from that of the 
previous year by 4.42 per cent, while the total distribution decreased by 
4.35 per cent. We were able to Increase the reserve for depreciation, arid 
to reduce to $43,000 the amount of endowment funds Invested In 
dormitories. 

In any survey of figures, the underlying personal element is important; 
but especially so in this time of financial uncertainty and confused cross- 
currents. Although by no means a measure of success, _ even a small 
surplus from financial operations in these days is gratifying. Such a 
result has been possible only through wise guidance by those who deter- 
mine financial policies, and through careful cooperation by those 
responsible for expenditures. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Evelyn A. Munrol, 

Assistant Treasurer. 



79 



\ 

WELLESLEY COLLEGE : 

i 

COMPARATIVE BALANCE SHEET 

ASSETS 

Current ' 

June 30, 1934 June 30, 1933 

WoEKiNO Assets: 

Cash in Banks and on Hand $78,017.65 $110,880.96 

Investment of Current Funds $51,125.00 $ 

Inventories : 

Maintenance Supplies and Fuel OU $41,234.12 $36,193.29 

Dormitory SuppHes 8,981.08 7,630.16 

Total Inventories $50,215.20 $43,823.45 

Accounts Eeceivable $5,782.29 $8,694.73 

Unexpired Insurance $9,891.94 $13,564.26 

Sundry Deferred Items $614.98 $3,735.65 

Total $195,647.06 $180,699.05 

i 

Plant ^ 

Plant (Schedule 3) : 

Land $488,310.70 $488,310.70 

Buildings and Fixed Equipment at Book Value $9,315,504.39 $9,337,948.73 

Less: Dormitory financed by temporary loans from Trust 

Funds 43,000.00 73,000.00 

$9,272,504.39 $9,264,948.73 

Less: Amount written off for Depreciation 1,250,880.86 1,134,403.17 

$8,021,623.53 $8,130,545.56 

Movable Equipment at Book Value $1,370,720.38 $1,368,718.08 

Less: Amount written off for Depreciation of Equipment 

in Faculty Houses 10,020.87 8,931.89 

$1,360,699.51 $1,359,786.19 

Total $9,870,633.74 $9,978,642.45 

Carried Forward $10,066,280.80 $10,159,341.50 

80 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

Exhibit A 
AT JUNE 30, 1934 AND 1933 

LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Current 

June 30, 1934 June 30, 1933 

CuKEENT Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable $50,036.48 $38,220.85 

Income Defeeeed: 

AppUcation Fees Prepaid $22,990.00 $26,215.00 

Unexpended Gifts for Special Purposes 38,001.55 37,868.67 

Unexpended Income of Trust Funds (Schedule 4) 19,932.78 18,827.16 

Unexpended Insurance Awards 206.50 

Sundry Deferred Items 9,168.67 8,945.37 

$90,093.00 $92,062.70 

SUEPLUS $55,517.58 $50,415.50 

Total $195,647.06 $180,699.05 



Plant 
Funds used foe Plant and Equipment: 

Permanent Plant Capital $9,770,633.74 $9,878,642.45 

Plant Capital Subject to Annuity 100,000.00 100,000.00 



Total $9,870,633.74 $9,978,642.45 



Carried Forward $10,066,280.80 $10,159,341.50 

81 



WELLE.SLEV COLLEGE 



COMPAEATIVE BALANCE SHEET 

ASSETS (Continued) 

June 30, 1934 June 30, 1933 

Brought Forward $10,066,280.80 $10,159,341.50 

Trust Funds 
Investment of Trust Funds: 

Securities at Book Value (Schedule 6) $9,361,100.20 $9,152,729.39 

Premiums Paid on Class Life Insurance Policies 35,872.64 35,325.43 

Investment in College Dormitory 43,000.00 73,000.00 

Cash in Banks 452,750.14 654,846.13 



Total $9,892,722.98 $9,915,900.95 



Grand Total $19,959,003.78 $20,075,242.45 



REPORT OF AUDITORS 

We have audited the books of the College for the year ended June 30, 1934 and found 
them to be correct. The securities representing the investment of the trust funds were in- 
spected by us or otherwise satisfactorily accounted for. We report that the foregoing Balance 



82 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

Exhibit A — Concluded 
AT JUNE 30, 1934 AND 1933 

LIABILITIES AND FUNDS (Continued) 

June 30, 1934 June 30, 1933 

Brought Forward $10,066,280.80 $10,159,341.50 

Trust Funds 
Peemanent Endowment: 

General Funds $1,484,814.04 $1,481,663.83 

Special Funds: 

Annuity Funds 179,788.50 229,688.50 

Departmental Funds 182,357.00 176,971.14 

Lecture Funds 20,075.50 20,075.50 

Library Fuuds 260,779.05 259,699.30 

Maintenance Funds 722,779.00 721,072.40 

Miscellaneous Funds 78,927.45 78,360.42 

Salary Funds 4,475,554.20 4,416,569.48 

Scholarship, Fellowship, Prize and Loan Funds 888,478.19 852,046.38 

Total Permanent Endowment $8,293,552.93 $8,236,146.95 

Building, Equipment and Unallocated Funds 481,236.96 506,179.05 

Funds Unrestricted as to Principal and Income 148,515.00 143,515.00 

Eeseeve Fund for Deprecla.tion of Buildinqs 991,058.56 870,511.61 

Securities Investment Eeserve Fund 37,640,4'^ 143,548.34 

Accumulated Profit or Loss from Sale of Securities not yet 
allocated to Funds 

Trustee Accounts 16,000.00 16,000.00 

Total $9,892,722.98 $9,915,900.95 



Grand Total $19,959,003.78 $20,075,242.45 



Sheet and the statements annexed are in accordance with the books and that, in our opinion, 
they show the true state of the financial affairs of the College at June 30, 1934. 

Barrow, Wade, Guthrie & Co., 

Accountants and Auditors. 
Boston, Massachusetts, September 28, 1934. 

83 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



COMPAEATIVE STATEMENT OF 
Foe Years Ended 

Year ended Year ended 

June 30, 1934 June 30, 1933 

Expenditures 
Academic : 
Salaries and Expenses of the Department of Instruction, 
Library, Dean, Eecorder, Board of Admission, and Other 
Expenses of Instruction $644,092.58 $664,731.15 

Maintenance : 

Eepairs and Maintenance of Buildings and Equipment (ex- 
cept Dormitories), Insurance, Maintenance of Grounds, 
etc 203,257.47 193,049.26 

Administrative : 

Salaries and Expenses of the President, Treasurer, Assistant 
Treasurer, Comptroller; also of Publications, Commence- 
ment Exercises, and other Administrative Expenses 128,033.04 122,755.00 

Expense of Faculty Houses (net) 15,676.71 9,663.43 

Appropriation for Contribution to Pension and Insur- 
ance Fund 25,000.00 25,000.00 

Appropriation for Eeserve for Eetiring Grants 4,000.00 4,000.00 

Total Operating Expenses $1,020,059.80 $1,019,198.84 

Current Income used for Additions to Plant: 

Income appropriated for Eepayment of Endowment Funds 

invested in Dormitories $30,000.00 $42,000.00 

Income appropriated for additions to Plant 5,229.46 30,794.55 

$35,229.46 $72,794.55 

Appropriation for Depreciation Eeserve $112,802.09 $119,329.10 

Special Appropriation for Eeserve Fund $ $25,000.00 

Carnegie Foundation Eetiring Allowance (Contra) $41,396.49 $41,423.17 

Surplus of Income for Year $5,102.08 $6,770.56 



$1,214,589.92 $1,284,516.22 



Note: In addition to the expenses shown above, extraordinary repairs met from the 
Eeserve Fund for Depreciation of Buildings amounted to $46,450.85. 



84 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 
JtjrNE 30, 1934 AND 1933 



Exhibit B 



Year ended Year ended 

June 30, 1934 June 30, 1933 



Income 
From Tuition Fees: 

General Tuition $591,167.00 $598,900.00 

Deduct : Scholarships 78,855.13 83,577.44 

$512,311.87 $515,322.56 

Music Tuition 4,500.00 5,356.50 

$516,811.87 $520,679.06 

From Otheb Fees $6,712.43 $7,029.10 

From Endowment: 

Income on Investment of Trust Funds (Schedule 4) $323,311.49 $344,660.72 

From Gifts $7,919.50 $8,268.95 

From Dormitories and Hospital: 

Interest on Investment $173,318.59 $162,271.89 

Operating Surplus (Schedule 1) 106,440.10 142,346.53 

$279,758.69 $304,618.42 

From Other Sources: 

Application Fees Forfeited $9,860.00 $12,460.00 

Insurance Award 1,270.68 

Interest and Rents 11,150.75 15,470.38 

Interest on Investment in Faculty Houses 11,026.85 11,026.85 

Miscellaneous 6,641.85 17,608.89 



$38,679.45 $57,836.80 



Carnegie Foundation Eetirinq Allowance (Contra) . . 



$1,173,193.43 $1,243,093.05 
41,396.49 41,423.17 



$1,214,589.92 $1,284,516.22 



85 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

Schedule 1 

COMPAEATIVE OPEEATING STATEMENT OF DOEMITOEIES, 
HOSPITAL, AND CLUB HOUSE 

Foe Years Ended June 30, 1934 and 1933 

Ytihr ended Year ended Increase 

June 30, 1934 June 30, 1933 Decrease 

Income : 

Faculty Board $32,340.00 $33,926.12 $1,586.12 

Student Board 707,137.65 795,678.00 28,540.35 

Sundries 29,280.29 25,784.01 3,496,28 

Total Income $828,757.94 $855,388.13 ' $26,630.19 

Expenses: 

Operating Expenses: 

Salaries $46,162.29 $50,974.40 $4,812.11 

Wsigos 119,750.50 122,298.79 2,5If8.29 

Provisions 174,941.43 164.258.54 10,682.89 

Laundry 13,834.35 14,350.24 515.89 

Heat, Light, Water and Sewer 44,418.14 43,235.92 1,182.22 

Eepairs and Maintenance 63,285.10 61,113.08 2,172.02 

Eents Payable 4,200.00 6,550.00 2,350.00 

Taxes and Insurance 9,858.36 9,876.56 18.20 

Miscellaneous 39,583.12 39,193.84 389.28 

Use of Sewers (Campus) 3,876.07 3,790,56 85.51 

Total Opebating Expenses $519,909.36 $515,641.93 $4,267.43 

Interest on Invested Endowment 

AT 5 per cent 3,650.00 5,750.00 2,100.00 

Interest on General Capital Fund at 

5 PER CENT 173,318.59 162,271.89 11,046.70 

Total Expenses $098,877.95 $683,663.82 $13,214.13 

Net Income $131,879.99 $171,724.31 $39,8U-S2 

Deduct : 

Net Operating Cost of Hospital 24,879.11 25,998.72 1,119.61 

$107,000.88 $145,725.59 $38,72171 
Deduct : 

Net Operating Cost of Club House . . 560.78 3,379.06 2,818.28 

Total Net Income $106,440.10 $142,346.53 $35,906 JS 



86 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

Schedule 2 

ADDITIONS AND IMPEOVEMENTS TO PLANT 
For Year Ended June 30, 1934 

Land: 

Balance at June 30,- 1933 and 1934 $488,310.70 

Buildings and Fixed Equipment: 

Depreciated Value at June 30, 1933 $8,203,545.56 

Less: Endowment Funds Temporarily In- 
vested in Shafer Hall 73,000.00 .$8;130,545.56 

Additions during year: 

Campus Lighting $3,949.59 

Chemistry-Physics Building 24,512.27 

xMunger Hall 424.34 

Observatory 225.31 

158 Weston Eoad 5,004.15 

Repayment of Endowment Funds Tem- 
porarily Invested in Shafer Hall 30,000.00 64,115.66 

$8,194,661.22 

Retirements during Tear: 

Freeman written off , $36,560.00 

Wood written off 20,000.00 56,560.00 

$8,138,101.22 
Deduct: Depreciation for year 116,477.69 

$8,021,623.53 

Movable Equipment: 

Depreciated Value at June 30, 1933 $1,359,786.19 

Additions during year: 

Biblical History $53.83 

Hetty H. R. Green Hall 4.33 

Sage Hall— Zoology 1,944.14 2,002.30 

$1,361,788.49 

Deduct: Depreciation on Equipment in 

Faculty Houses 1.088.98 

$1,360,699.51 
87 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

Schedule 2 — Concluded 

ADDITIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS TO PLANT 

Foe Year Ended June 30, 1934 

Summary of Expenditures during Yeae for Additions and 
Improvements : 

Buildings and Fixed Equipment $64,115.66 

Movable Equipment 2,002.30 

$66,117.96 

The Foregoing Additions and Improvements were provided 
for as follows : 

From Trust Funds available for this purpose. . $25,008.91 

From Eosenwald Gift 1,930.00 

From Current Funds permanently transferred 
to Plant Capital: 
Provided out of Income for Year ended 

June 30, 1931 $3,949.59 

Provided out of Income for Year ended 

June 30, 1934 35,229.46 39,179.05 

$66,117.96 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



Schedule 3 



SCHEDULE OF PLANT 

June 30, 1934 

(a) Land 

Central Street 

Norfolk Terrace 

Norfolk Terrace 

Norfolk Terrace 

Norfolk Terrace and 
Weston Eoad 

Washington Street 

Washington Street and 
Dover Eoad 

Washington Street 

Washington Street 

Washington Street 
Washington Street 
Washington Street 
Weston Road 

Boston: 131 Commonwealtl 
Total Land 

(b) Buildings and Fixed Equipment 





22.5 acres 


Crofton 


5,400 sq. ft 


Ridgeway 


14,392 sq. ft 


Webster 


4,800 sq. ft 


Corner Lot 


4,800 sq. ft 


Campus 


215 acres 




134 acres 


Eliot 


41,000 sq. f t 


Faculty Houses 


3 acres, 




18,295 sq. ft 


Little 


37,592 sq. ft 


Noanett 


17,275 sq. ft 


Washington 


30,244 sq. ft 




58 acres. 




10,890 sq. ft 


Avenue 







Campus : 

Academic Buildings: 

Art 

Billings 

Chapel 

Chemistry 

Chemistry-Physics (Proposed) 

Founders Hall 

Hetty H. R, Green Hall 

Mary Hemenway Hall 

Library 

Music 

Observatory 

Physics and Geology 

Psychology 



Book Value 

$115,713.35 

29,370.00 

108,000.00 

25,053.84 

49,996.11 

450,938.12 

1,336,667.92 

121,154.45 

241,457.69 

34,100.00 

52,152.18 

45,000.00 

4,521.85 



Book Value 

$20,000.00 

900.00 

2,238.00 

800.00 

800.00 
263,892.00 

109,000.00 
8,300.00 

9,325.00 

10,500.00 

3,450.00 

7,000.00 

25,000.00 
27,105.70 

$488,310.70 



Sage Hall 1,219,219.10 $3,833,344.61 



89 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

Schedule 3 — Continued 

SCHEDULE OF PLANT 

Dormitories: Book Value 

Beebe $120,063.22 

Cazenove 208,337.63 

Claflin 263,707.65 

Crawford 6,400.00 

Dower 60,000.00 

Fiske 25,925.68 

Homestead 50,676.89 

Lake 55,446.81 

Hunger 320,284.91 

Norumbega 54,200.00 

Pomeroy 208,379.67 

Severance 594,915.80 

Shafer $117,950.40 

Less: Endowment Invest- 
ment 43,000.00 74,950.40 

Stone-Olive Davis 772,013.23 

Tower Court 526,271.45 3,341,573,34 

Dwellings : 

East Lodge $8,831.38 

Oakwoods 25,317.95 

OVjservatory House 11,913.30 

President's House 44,487.33 

Webber Cottage 2,000.00 

West Lodge 4,200.00 96,749.96 

Other Buildings: 

Alumnffi Hall $446,573.87 

Bath House 1,000.00 

Boat House 3,000.00 

Dower Garage 600.00 

Gray House 1,840.00 

Greenhouse 74,389.34 

Nursery School 10,596.81 

Oil House 2,776.86 

Power House 125,720.94 

President's House Garage 3,438.88 

Salvage Storehouse 6,877.05 

Service Building 44,907.43 

Simpson Hospital 27,275.00 

Simpson Hospital Garage 659.21 

Skiff House 500.00 

Stable 3,226.00 

Storage Shed 1,028.92 

Tool Sheds 2,426.00 756,836.31 



90 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



Town: 

Dormitories : 



SCHEDULE OF PLANT 



Crof ton 

Eliot 

Little 

Noanett 

Washington 

Washington Annex 



Schedule 3 — CJontinued 



Book Value 
$9,346.46 



35,759.51 

8,500.00 

37,056.79 

24,000.00 

4,000.00 



$118,662.76 



Faculty Houses: 

Garage . . 
Hallowell . 
Horton . . 
Shepard . 



Other Houses: 

Dover Eoad 

Grounds Cottage . . . 
Little House Annex 

Eidgeway 

Waban 

Webster 

#158 Weston Eoad 



$6,222.77 

66,959.32 

100,438.98 

77,643.00 



$2,905.00 
10,233.79 
6,000.00 
30,325.07 
7,925.00 
7,281.79 
5,004.15 



251,264.07 



69,674.80 



Other Buildings: 

Blacksmith Shop 

Golf Club House 

Hen House and Brooder 

Masous' Shed 

Piggery 

Sewerage Building 

Wabau Barn 



Boston : 

Wellesley College Club House 

Total Buildings . 



$1,315.35 

800.00 
650.00 
879.11 

1,500.00 
500.00 

1,325.00 



6,969.46 



Fixed Equipment 



26,000.00 

$8,501,075.31 

771,429.08 

$9,272,504.39 

1,250,880.86 

Depreciated Value $8,021,623.53 



Total Buildinos and Fixed Equipment 
Deduct: Depreciation written off 



91 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

Schedule 3 — Concluded 

SCHEDULE OF PLANT 

(c) Movable Equipment 

Book Value 

Alumnse HaU $9,716.25 

Chapel 14,212.00 

Departments of Instruction and Administration . . 1,066,846.46 

Dormitories 235,176.64 

East Lodge 245.48 

Hallowell House 606.84 

Horton House 8,991.34 

Oakwoods 2,561.40 

Observatory House 961.00 

Portraits in Library 13,500.00 

President's House 5,592.75 

Shepard House 2,369.10 

Simpson Hospital 4,035.42 

Wellesley College Club 5,905.70 

$1,370,720.38 

Deduct: Depreciation on Equipment 

in Faculty Houses 10,020.87 

Total Movable Equipment $1,360,699.51 

sximmaey 

(a) Land $488,310.70 

(b) Buildings and Fixed Equipment at Depreciated Value .... 8,021,623.53 

(c) Movable Equipment 1,360,699.51 

Total Plant, as per Exhibit A $9,870,633.74 



92 



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93 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

Schedule 5 
LIST OF TEUST FUNDS SHOWING PEINCIPAL AND UNEXPENDED 

INCOME 



For Yeae Ended June 30, 1934 

Principal 
June 30, 1934 

PERMANENT ENDOWMENT FUNDS 



Funds foe Generax. Purposes: 

AlumnEe General Endowment Fund 

AJumnse General Endowment Fund (Sanborn) 

Mary Warren Capen Fund 

Francis A. Foster Fund 

General Endowment Fund 

Kate I. Lord Fund 

JuUa Bone Shepard Fund 

Jessie Goff Talcott Fund 



Funds for Special Purposes: 

Annuity Funds: 

Anonymous Salary Fund 

Emilie Jones Barker Scholarship . 
Mary Chamberlain Art Fund . . . . 

Marjorie Day Fund 

Elizabeth F. Fisher Fund 

Amelia A. Hall Scholarship Fund 
Cyrus and Eugenia Stewart Fund 
Treasure Eoom Book Fund 



Departmental Funds: 

Art Department Endowment Fund 

Art Museum Fund 

Avery Fund 

Katie Emma Baldwin Fund (Mathematics) 
Eobert Charles Billings Fund (Botany) . . . 
Margery and Dorothy Borg Fund (Social 

Hygiene ) 

Alfred Clifford Fund 

Annie Godfrey Dewey Fund (Zoology) . . 
Elizabeth E. Downs Fund (Botany) .... 
Miriam Iszard Guest Fund (Botany) .... 
Julia Josephine Irvine Fimd (Greek) .... 

Sarah E. Mann Botany Fund 

NUes Memorial Fund (Geology) 

Rosa Conrad Sanders Fund (Art) 

Edmund Clark Sanford Fund (Psychology) 

Scientific Fund 

Isabella Shaw Fund (History) 

Caroline B. Thompson Fund (Zoology) . . 
Wenckebach Memorial Fund (German) . . 
Sarah E. Whitin Fund (Astronomy) 

Fellowship Funds: 

Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship Fund . . 
Fanny Bullock Workman Scholarship Fund 



$147,005.00 

11,200.00 

500.00 

563,400.00 

180,600.00 

1,100.00 

42,323.00 

538,686.04 

$1,484,814.04 



$100,000.00 

5,515.00 

4,000.00 

5,173.50 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

30,100.00 

15,000.00 

$179,788.50 



$65,650.00 

1,000.00 
2,000.00 
5,600.00 
5,800.00 

5,000.00 
10,000.00 
2,000.00 
6,000.00 
1,000.00 
5,800.00 
1,100.00 
1,600.00 
200.00 
4,182.00 



11,200.00 

25,000.00 

1,125.00 

28,100.00 

$182,357.00 

$35,059.23 
30,000.00 

$65,059.23 



Income 

Unexpended 
June 30, 1934 



$.... 



74.25 
234.31 
280.31 



400.00 
160.50 

' 69.62 

700.15 

' 35.66 
930.48 
240.40 

2,231.56 

6,'l'6'3'.66 
$11,519.64 



$. 



94 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



Lecture Funds: 

Katharine Lee Bates Poetry Fund 

Helen Kate Furness Fund 

Mary E. Horton Fund 

Physics Lecture Fund 

Elizabeth White Memorial Fund . . 



Library Funds: 

Gorham D. Abbott Memorial Fund (Edu- 
cation) 

Blanche G. Bunting Fund (Music) 

Class of 1918 Fund (Music) 

Caroline Dayton Fund (History) 

Dorothea Dean Fund (Music) 

Edith Hemenway Eustis Library Fund 
(Hygiene) 

Florence Foley Fund 

Indian Library Fund 

Arlene Westwood Jackson Fund (French) 

Sophie Jewett Memorial Fund (English 
Literature) 

Edward N. Kirk Library Fund 

Library Permanent Fund 

Susan Minns Fund (Botany) 

Annie Hooker Morse Fund 

Elizabeth Nash Fund (English Literature) 

Elizabeth Winslow Peters Fund 

Caroline Frances Pierce Fund 

Helen J. Sanborn Spanish Library Fund . . 

Seven Women's Colleges Fund 

Shafer Library Fund (Mathematics) 

Sweet Library Fund (Biblical History) . . 

Marie Louise Tuck Memorial Fund (Eng- 
lish Literature) 

Helen L. Webster Memorial Fund 

Loan Funds: 

McDonald-Ellis Memorial Fund 

Helen A. Shafer Loan Fund 

Maintenance Funds: 

Alexandra Botanic Garden Fund 

Alumnse Hall Endowment Fund 

Fiske Hall Fund 

Founders Fund 

H. H. Hunnewell Arboretum Fund 

Maintenance Fund for Academic Buildings 

Organ Fund 

Shakespeare Garden Fund 

Amos W. Stetson Fund 

Mabel Stone Memorial Fund 

Three Sisters Choir Fund 

George William Towle Infirmary Fund . . . 



95 



Schedule 


5 — Continued 




Income 


Principal 


Unexpended 


June 30, 1934 


June 30, 1934 


$11,200.00 


$23.43 


1,600.00 


771.10 


1,660.00 


55.95 


555.50 


45.83 


5,060.00 


644.75 


$20,075.50 


$1,541.06 


$1,100.00 


$ 


1,000.00 


31.59 


5,230.00 


89.12 


8,100.00 




5,000.00 


14.89 


2,200.00 


8.41 


5,000.00 


• ••••• 


2,000.00 


126.78 


2,500.00 


^ ****** 


1,801.34 




6,700.00 


454.ii 


184,050.00 




10,729.71 




1,100.00 


98.19 


2,500.00 


40.81 


5,300.00 




500.00 




5,600.00 




970.00 




2,590.00 




5,600.00 




208.00 




1,000.00 


25.75 


$260,779.05 


$889.65 


$1,000.00 


$ 


1,000.00 




$2,000.00 


$ 


$31,405.00 


$233.15 


119,516.00 


• ••••• 


1,600.00 


228.50 


189,958.00 




27,100.00 


13.47 


322,300.00 




2,200.00 




550.00 




4,500.00 


56.94 


4,000.00 


335.67 


16,700.00 




2,950.00 




$722,779.00 


$867.73 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



Schedule 5 — Continued 



Miscellaneous Funds: 

Lucy Branch Allen Fund 

Class of 1885 Alumnae Fund 

Fund for Graduate Study and Eeseareh 

Susanna Whitney Hawkes Fund 

Horsf ord Fund 

Eliza Mills McClung Fund 

Philadelphia Fund 

Edith S. Tufts Fund 

I. N. Van Nuys Memorial Fund 



Prize Funds: 

Eobert Charles Billings Prize Fund (Music) 

Katharine Coman Memorial Prize Fund 
(Economics and Social History) 

Davenport Prize Fund (Oral Interpreta- 
tion) 

Isabelle Eastman Fisk Prize Fund (Public 
Speaking or Debating) 

Sophia Helen Fisk Fund (Crew) 

Mary G. Hillman Mathematical Scholarship 
(Mathematics) 

Jacqueline Award 

Mary White Peterson Prize Fund (Botany, 
Chemistry, Zoology) 

Stimson Mathematical Scholarship (Mathe- 
matics) 

Ethel H. Folger Williams Memorial Fund 
(German) 



Principal 
June 30, 1934 

$500.00 

1,213.27 
1,000.00 
14,500.00 
20,000.00 
5,114.18 
10,000.00 
16,000.00 
10,600.00 

$78,927.45 



$13,058.75 



Salary Funds: 

Katharine Lee Bates Professorship (Eng- 
lish Literature) $100,000.00 

Eobert Charles Billings Fund (Music) . . . 28,100.00 

Mary Whiton Calkins Professorship 45,820.97 

Currier-Monroe Fund (Speech) 30,000.00 

Endowment Fund for Salaries 957,800.00 

Frisbie Professorship (Economics) 19,100.00 

Helen Day Gould Professorship (Mathe- 
matics) 56,300.00 

Marv Hemenway Fund (Hygiene) 120,762.00 

H. H. Hunnewell Professorship (Botany) 38,100.00 

Ellen Stebbins James Fund 112,600.00 

Ellen A. Kendall Professorship (Greek) . . 67,600.00 

John Stewart Kennedy Fund (Biblical 

History) 56,300.00 

Clara Bertram Kimball Professorship (Art) 84,500.00 

Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial Fund 

(Presidency) 113,800.00 

Semi-Centennial Salary Endowment Fund: 
Anonymous Salary fund $9,000.00 
Class of 1898 Professor- 
ship (English Compo- 
sition) 100,000.00 

96 



Incotne 
Unexpended 
June 30, 1934 



1,196.25 

438'.73 
1,358.15 



$2,993.13 



$3,100.00 


$265.21 


650.00 


4.70 


1,100.00 


175.78 


1,100.00 
890.00 


99.14 
51.23 


1,100.00 
518.75 


189.60 


1,100.00 


21.18 


3,000.00 


155.20 


500.00 


.83 



$962.87 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



Salary Funds — Continued. 

Class of 1898 Professor- 
ship (Physics) $75,000.00 

Class of 1902 Professor- 
ship (English Compo- 
sition) 25,844.00 

Class of 1905 Professor- 
ship (Botany) 42,064.50 

Class of 1914 Professor- 
ship (English Litera- 
ture) 50,445.50 

Class of 1915 Professor- 
ship (Ancient His- 
tory) 50,015.00 

Katharine Coman Pro- 
fessorship (Industrial 
History) 50,000.00 

Ralph Emerson Profes- 
sorship (North Ameri- 
can History) 34,800.00 

Euby Frances Howe 
Farwell Professorship 
(Botany) 103,600.00 

Stephen Greene Profes- 
sorship of Economics 33,125.00 

Susan M. Hallowell Pro- 
fessorship (Botany) 40,000.00 

Edward S. Harkness 

Fund 175,000.00 

Caroline Hazard Profes- 
sorship (Music) ... 103,200.00 

A. Barton Hepburn Pro- 
fessorship (Econom- 
ics) 138,500.00 

Euth Sibley Hilton 

Foundation 25,000.00 

Horsford Fund for Sab- 
batical Grants 10,500.00 

Elizabeth Kimball Ken- 
d a 1 1 Professorship 
(History) 62,900.00 

Hamilton C. Macdougall 

Professorship (Music) 60,560.00 

Alice Freeman Palmer 
Professorship (His- 
tory) 80,950.00 

Ellen Fitz Pendleton 
Fund for Sabbatical 
Grants 77,243.00 

Euth Baker Pratt Pro- 
fessorship (Govern- 
ment) 25,000.00 

97 



Schedule 5 — Continued 

Income 
Principal Unexpended 

June 30, 1934 June 30, 1934 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



Salary Funds — Continued. 

Charlotte Fitch Eoberts 
Professorship (Chem- 
istry) $100,000.00 

Helen J. Sanborn En- 
dowment Fund (Span- 
ish) 132,600.00 

Lewis Atterbury Stimson 
Professorship (Mathe- 
matics) 100,000.00 

Carla Wenckebach Pro- 
fessorship (German) 61,400.00 

Candace Wheeler Fund 
(Sabbatical Grants) 

General 



Schedule 5 — Continued 

Income 
Principal Unexpended 

June 30, 1934 June 30, 1934 



100,000.00 

778,024.23 $2,644,771.23 



$4,475,554.20 



Scholarship Funds : 

Adams Scholarship Fund $2,200.00 

Aldrich Scholarship Fund 650.00 

Edith Baker Scholarship 7,800.00 

Walter Baker Memorial Scholarship 7,800.00 

Dr. Alma Emerson Beale Scholarship 

Fund 3,300.00 

Charles Bill Scholarship Fund 7,800.00 

Charles B. Botsford Scholarship Fund . . . 5,600.00 
Marian Kinney Brookings Scholarship 

Fund 5,000.00 

Florence N. Brown Memorial Scholarship 5,600.00 

Emily Grace Bull Scholarship 20,000.00 

Loretta Fish Carney Memorial Scholarship 1,200.00 

Arthur L. Cams Fund 10,000.00 

Mary Caswell Memorial Scholarship 5,404.50 

Augustus R. Clark Memorial Scholarship . 5,600.00 

Class of 1880 Scholarship 1,194.00 

Class of 1884 Scholarship Fund 6,510.00 

Class of 1889 Memorial Scholarship 1,100.00 

Class of 1893 Memorial Scholarship Fund 5,600.00 

Class of 1916 Scholarship Fund 1,601.48 

Abbie A. Coburn Memorial Scholarship . . 2,200.00 

Connecticut Scholarship 5,600.00 

Margaret McClung Cowan Fund 1,100.00 

Elizabeth and Susan Cushman Fund 23.610.00 

George H. Davenport Scholarship 10,000.00 

Norma Lieberman Decker Scholarship 

Fund 5,487.50 

Durant Memorial Scholarship 5,600.00 

Pauline A. Durant Scholarship 8,250.00 

John Dwight Memorial Scholarship 10,000.00 

Emmelar Scholarship 5,600.00 

Ruby Frances Howe Farwell Memorial 

Scholarship 2,100.00 

Elizabeth S. Fiske Scholarship 5,600.00 

Joseph N. Fiske Memorial Scholarship . . . 9,000.00 

Eufus S. Frost Scholarships 6,700.00 

Howard Cogswell Furman Scholarship .... 5,000.00 

Mary Elizabeth Gere Scholarship Fund . . , 5,600.00 

Josephine Keene Gifford Scholarship .... 2,000.00 

98 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



Schedule 



Principal 

Scholarship Funds — Continued. June 30, 1934 

Goodwin Scholarship $ 5,600.00 

Helen Day Gould Scholarship #1 11,200.00 

Helen Day Gould Scholarship #2 11,200.00 

Helen Day Gould Scholarship #3 11,200.00 

M. Elizabeth Gray Scholarships 11,200.00 

Grover Scholarship 5,600.00 

Sarah Evelyn Hall Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Cora Stickney Harper Fund 2,200.00 

Emily P. Hidden Scholarship Fund 2,200.00 

Winifred Frances Hill Scholarship 20,000.00 

Sarah J. Holbrook Scholarship 3,300.00 

Evelyn and Mary Elizabeth Holmes 

Scholarship Fund 6,000.00 

Amy Morris Homans Scholarship Fund . . 6,700.00 

Sarah J. Houghton Memorial Scholarship.. 6,700.00 

Ada L. Howard Scholarship 6,700.00 

Sarah B. Hyde Scholarship 2,200.00 

John and Jane Jackson Fund 1,000.00 

Eliza C. Jewett Scholarships 6,700.00 

Sophie Jewett Memorial Scholarship .... 1,100.00 

Mildred Keim Fund 11,200.00 

Katharine Knapp Scholarship 5,600.00 

Vinnietta June Libbey Scholarship 3,818.15 

Gertrude C. Munger Scholarships 10,587.50 

Anna S. Newman Memorial Scholarship . . 2,100.00 

New York Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund 6,225.00 

Northfield Seminary Scholarship 5,600.00 

Anna Palen Scholarship 11,200.00 

Mary Arnold Petrie Scholarship 4,130.90 

Adelaide L. Pierce Scholarship Fund 14,806.48 

Eleanor Pillsbury Memorial Scholarship 

Fund 106,500.00 

Pittsburgh Wellesley Club Scholarship . . . 1,500.00 

Catherine Ayer Ransom Scholarship 1,100.00 

Mae nice Memorial Scholarship Fund .... 1,100.00 

Samuel M. and Anna M. Richardson Fund 101,584.70 

Rollins Scholarship 9,000.00 

Helen J. Sanborn Alumnae Scholarship Fund 11.200.00 

Oliver N., Mary C. and Mary Shannon Fund 18,550.00 

Harriet F. Smith Scholarship Fund 22,500.00 

Stoekwell Memorial Scholarship 2,000.00 

Stone Educational Fund 28,100.00 

Sweatman Scholarship 5,600.00 

Julia Ball Thayer Scholarship 6,700.00 

Jane Topliff Memorial Scholarship 6,700.00 

Ann Morton Towle Memorial Scholarship 5,600.00 
George William Towle Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund 7.550.00 

Marie Louise Tuck Scholarship Fund .... 11,200.00 

Union Church Scholarship 2,800.00 

Weston Scholarship 5,600.00 

Jeannie L. White Scholarship 5,600.00 

Araasa J. Whiting Scholarship 2,600.00 

Annie M. Wood Scholarship 11,200.00 

Caroline A. Wood Scholarship 5,600.00 

Warren Mead Wright Scholarship Fund . . 10^000.00 

$808,360.21 



5 — Continued 
Income 
Unexpended 

June 30, 1934 

$ 

$ 



Total Permanent Endowment Funds $8,293,552.93 

99 



$18,774.08 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



OTHEB FUNDS 

BuiLDiNQ, Equipment and UNAiiLOCATED Funds : 

Chemistry-Physics Building Fund 

Emily Grace Bull Morse Fund 

Munger Hall Fund 

Katharine P. Eaymond Memorial Fund .... 

Bestoration Fund 

Semi-Centennial Fund (not yet definitely 

allocated) 

Swimming Pool Fund 

Class of 1917 Fund 

Class of 1921 Fund 

Class of 1922 Fund 

Class of 1924 Fund 

Class of 1927 Fund 



Unrestricted General Funds: 

William Blodget Fund . . . . 

Class of 1909 Fund 

Charles Church Drew Fund . 

Amelia G. Dyer Fund 

Charlotte M. Fiske Fund . . 
Gladys Brown EoUins Fund 
Mary E. Shoemaker Fund . 
Alma Wright Stone Fund . • 
Eichard H. Sturtevant Fund 
Cornelia Warren Fund . . . . 



Eeserve Fund for Depreciation of Buildings. 
Securities Investment Eeserve Fund 

Trustee Accounts: 

Class of 1926 Fund 

Marjorie Day Trust Fund 



Schedule 


5 — Concluded 




Income 


Principal 


Unexpended 


June 30, 1934 


June 30, 1934 


$209,140.25 


$ 


6,121.87 




2,639.86 




1,686.52 




98.22 




107,982.11 




104,892.71 




5,847.43 




17,186.64 




14,192.75 




5,573.08 




5,875.52 




$481,236.96 


■ $ 


$5,000.00 


$ 


5,000.00 




65,415.00 




23,450.00 




18,950.00 


• ••••• 


1,000.00 


270.00 


1,100.00 


888.70 


25,000.00 




1,100.00 




2,500.00 




$148,515.00 


$1,158.70 


$991,058.56 


$ 


$31,GJt04t 


$ 


$6,000.00 


$ 


10,000.00 




$16,000.00 


$ 




$1,599,170.05 


$1,158.70 




$9,892,722.98 


$19,932.78 



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WELLESLEY COLLEGE 



HORSFORD FUND ACCOUNTS 
Foe Yeak Ended June 30, 1934 



Expenditures 



Receipts 



Sabbatical Grants 50% $2,100.00 
Scientific Fund 10% . . . 420.00 

Library Expense 40% . . 1,680.00 



HoKsroRD Fund Income 

From Securities 



Schedule 7 



$4,200.00 



$4,200.00 



$4,200.00 



Sabbatical Grants 



Expended $2,125.00 



$2,125.00 



Balance July 1, 1933 . . 
From Horsford Fund In- 
come 



$25.00 

2,100.00 

$2,125.00 



Expended : 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Zoology 

Balance June 30, 1934 . 



Scientific Fxjnd 



$105.00 

150.00 

65.60 

240.40 



Balance July 1, 1933. . . 
From Horsford Fund In- 



come 



$141.00 
420.00 



$561.00 



$561.00 



Library Expense Account 



Salaries $39,280.00 

Books, Periodicals and 

Bindings 18,014.00 

Books, etc., from Carne- 
gie Gift 292.51 

Expense 2,811.57 



$60,398.08 



Maintenance : 

Repairs, Janitor, etc. 3,680.64 

Heat 1,642.90 

Electricity 621.10 



$66,342.72 



From Horsford Fund In- 
come 

From Library Permanent 

Fund 

From Library Fines . . 
From Carnegie Gift . . . 



Deficit met from other 
Library Funds and 
Current Income 



$1,680.00 

7,362.00 
465.47 
292.51 

$9,799.98 
56,542.74 

$66,342.72 



108