(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Report of the President"

ANNUAL REPORTS NUMBER OF THE 

WELLESLEY COLLEGE BULLETIN 



WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS 
OCTOBER X5, 1944 



ANNUAL REPORTS NUMBER OF THE 

WELLESLEY COLLEGE BULLETIN 



OCTOBER 2_5, 1944 



Bulletins published seven times a year by Wellesley Collese, Wellesley 81, Massachusetts. April, 
three; September, one; October, two, November, one. Entered as second-class matter, February 12, 
1912, at the Post OFfice at Boston, Massachusetts, under the Act of July, 1894. Additional entry at 
Concord, N. H. 



Volume 34 Number 3 



CONTENTS 

Report of the President 5 

Appendix: 
Faculty 

Academic Biography of New Members for 1 944-45 . . .13 

Leaves of Absence in 1944-45 16 

Changes in Rank in 1944-45 17 

Resignations and Expired Appointments, June, 1944 . . 17 

Publications of the Faculty, 1943-44 18 

Lectures, Concerts, and Art Exhibitions, 1943-44 

Lectures 24 

Sunday Services 26 

Concerts 27 

Art Exhibitions 28 

Academic Statistics, 1943-44 29 

Scholarships, 1943-44 33 

Report of the Treasurer 34 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 

To the Trustees of Welle si ey College: 

I have the honor to present the report of the year 1 943-44, the 
sixty-ninth session of Wellesley College. 

The Board of Trustees 

The death of Gandace G. Stimson on February 9, 1944, de- 
prived the Board of an active and valued member and took 
from the Gollege an alumna whose generous and wise help had 
been a source of strength ever since her graduation in 1892. 
With the bequest which was left to Wellesley, the Gollege will 
have received over a million dollars from Miss Stimson, but even 
that munificence is no measure of the gifts she gave. Her wisdom 
in controversy, her insight in perplexity, her high-minded convic- 
tion in planning, made her a constant contributor to the building 
of the College. She will be sorely missed. 

The President of the Board, Robert G. Dodge, and the Chair- 
man of the Finance Committee, Frederic H. Curtiss, completed 
their eighteenth year of service on the reorganized Board. The 
by-laws have been amended to make it possible for them to con- 
tinue to serve through the national emergency since their experi- 
ence and leadership and abounding interest seemed to the Board 
to be essential to the direction of the College during these war 
years. 

The term of service as alumnae trustee was completed by Marie 
Rahr Haffenreffer, '11, and the Board was glad to welcome Grace 
Ballard Hynds, '17, as the new alumnae representative. It could 
not, however, afford to lose Mrs. Haffenreffer whose activity as 
Administrative Trustee in the absence of the President of the 
College had made her indispensable. She was, therefore, re- 
elected to the Board, and at the commencement exercises on 
May 21 was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws. 
This degree has been awarded only seven times before during 
the sixty-nine years of the College. 

John P. Chase, the Treasurer of the College, left in June on 

5 



Wellesley College 

an important war assignment in Europe. He will presumably be 
away until the end of the European phase of the war. In his 
absence F. Murray Forbes will add to his duties as Vice-President 
of the Board those of Acting Treasurer. 

The Faculty 

Mary Cross Ewing retired as Dean of Residence after fourteen 
years in that office and twenty-two as a member of the staff. 
Lilla Weed retired from the library staff after forty-two years. 
Agnes F. Perkins became Professor of English Composition, 
Emeritus, and was retired after thirty-eight years on the faculty; 
and Bertha Monica Stearns retired as Professor of English Lit- 
erature, Emeritus, after twenty-two years in that department. 

The community was saddened on November 26 by the death 
of Thomas B. Jeffery, Assistant Professor of Art, a member of the 
faculty since 1932. In a memorial minute, his colleagues expressed 
their high regard for him, as follows: "His exquisite manners, 
his intellectual curiosity, his dry and subtle wit, his love of philo- 
sophical discussion, his keen sense of beauty, . . . his penetrating 
observations, his whole complex and distinguished personality, 
made him a teacher of rare influence in stimulating and illumi- 
nating his students." 

Ruth H. Lindsay, '15, Associate Professor of Botany, was ap- 
pointed to succeed Mrs. Ewing as Dean of Residence. Miss 
Lindsay has been a member of the Botany department since 1929 
and will continue to carry a part-time teaching schedule. Her 
terms as class dean for the classes of 1935 and 1944 proved her to 
be an able administrator as well as a scholar. 

The Faculty Fellowship, made possible by an appropriation 
from the Alumnae Gift Fund, has been held by Justina Ruiz-de- 
Conde, Instructor in Spanish, who spent the year in graduate 
study at Radcliffe. 

It was gratifying that Tilly Edinger, Instructor in Zoology, 
should have a renewal of her Guggenheim Fellowship, and that 
Helen W. Kaan, Associate Professor of Zoology, and Louise T. 
Forest, Instructor in English Composition, should receive fellow- 
ships for post-doctoral study from the American Association of 
University Women. Professor Katharine C. Balderston received 

6 



President's Report 

the Rose May Crawshay Prize awarded by the British Academy 
for her recently published work on Mrs. Thrale. 

The trustees have granted a leave of absence to Sirarpie Der 
Nersessian, Professor of Art and Director of the Museum, in 
order that she may accept an honor conferred upon her by Har- 
vard University. During the next academic year Miss Der Ner- 
sessian will be a Resident Scholar at the Dumbarton Oaks Re- 
search Library and Collection in Washington, D. C, This is the 
first time that Harvard has appointed a woman to this position. 

Six members of the faculty will be absent on war service 
next year. A complete list of leaves of absence will be found in the 
appendix to this Report, together with lists of new members, 
promotions, and resignations. 

The Navy Supply Corps School 

In July, 1943, the Commanding Officer of the Navy Supply 
Corps School at Harvard University, Captain Kenneth Mcin- 
tosh, USN, notified Wellesley College that it was important to 
train more officers than could be accommodated at Harvard. 
Our trustees authorized the rental to the Navy of Cazenove 
and Pomeroy Halls to accommodate four hundred men, the 
establishment of a galley and mess hall in the ballroom of Alum- 
nae Hall, and the sharing of facilities in the Recreation Building 
and Mary Hemenway Hall. On October 1, 1943, the first class 
of two hundred officers arrived. On September 15, 1944, the 
Navy terminates its contract and the fourth and last class will 
be graduated. 

This project has crowded the undergraduates, has imposed a 
heavy burden on the Dietitian, Constance Covey, and has com- 
plicated the administration of the department of Hygiene and 
Physical Education under the direction of Professor Ruth Elliott. 
It has meant additional duty for the Superintendent of Buildings 
and Grounds, the Assistant Treasurer and Business Manager, the 
Comptroller, the Dean of Residence, the Director of Cazenove 
and Pomeroy Halls, Emma Leigh Rhett, and the many college 
students and faculty members whose plans had to be changed in 
view of the last-minute arrival of the training unit. A significant 
comment on the spirit of the College is that all the arrangements 

7 



Wellesley College 

were made with the utmost wiUingness on the part of the indi- 
viduals involved, and the college officers have been unanimous 
in their assertions of gratitude for the opportunity to make this 
contribution to the war effort. 

The constant cooperation of the naval personnel did much to 
explain the sincere warmth of their welcome on the campus. 
Commander Ernest G. Collins, USN, and Lieutenant Com- 
mander Newell F. Varney, USN, as officers-in-charge, made their 
civilian associates glad to do business with the Navy. Wellesley's 
undergraduates have genuinely enjoyed their brief experience in 
co-education. The College will follow its eight hundred alumni- 
by-adoption with pride in its share in their training as naval 
officers. 

Characteristics of 1943-1944 

Self -Evaluation. The year just passed has been marked by many 
faculty and student studies to determine what adaptations should 
be made in view of war demands. The decision not to accelerate 
the course of study, but to maintain the standard four-year course 
leading to the B.A. degree resulted from prolonged study and 
discussion. The faculty Committee on Long-Term Educational 
Policy continued to consider all aspects of college development 
and conducted two stimulating open meetings which were chal- 
lenging to large numbers of the faculty who participated in the 
deliberations. The student committee working on the same prob- 
lems found itself acquiring a liberal education in its effort to 
define what it meant! 

The Student Curriculum Committee conducted a time study to 
offer students an opportunity to check on their use of time and 
to evaluate their academic experience. It disclosed the interesting 
fact that freshmen spend an average of 48.6 hours a week on 
academic work while seniors do their more advanced work in 
42.4 hours. 

The Academic Council voted to establish a committee to con- 
sider its own reorganization. College Government officers made 
drastic revisions in the formulation of student regulations. 

The Personnel Officer, Julia Henderson, also Lecturer in 
Political Science, collected the data for a classification and com- 

8 



PREsroENT's Report 

pensation plan for clerical workers which systematizes the em- 
ployment policy for this group and rounds out the policy which 
had already been formulated in reference to the domestic and 
grounds employees by Union agreement and in reference to the 
faculty by the agreement on tenure and promotion. 

An increased rate of turnover in the clerical staff raised the 
problem of competition with the higher salaries of war industries. 
A step toward lessening this competition was taken on February 
1 when the hours of the office staff were lengthened from thirty- 
six to thirty-nine a week. This increase in time was accompanied 
by a ten percent increase in salary. 

The whole problem of meeting the greatly increased cost of 
living was discussed by a trustee committee appointed to consider 
revision of the scale of faculty salaries. Pending careful and time- 
consuming review of salary range, the trustees voted a bonus of 
one hundred dollars, payable as of April 1, to regular members of 
the faculty and staff who did not participate in the ten percent 
increase mentioned above. Unfortunately there has been a delay 
in securing government permission for this payment, but it is 
hoped the checks may be sent during the summer. 

Expanding Community Relationships. If there was ever a cloistered 
life on the campus, the war has certainly altered it. Students feel 
the impact of the labor shortages because they are carrying a 
large part of the domestic work of the residences. Upperclassmen 
worked three hours a week and freshmen two, finding in the ex- 
perience a great deal of satisfaction as they became acquainted 
with each other and newly aware of the operational problems of 
their households. 

Air-raid protection and war work were tied in with the larger 
community of the town as was the work in the Botany department 
with soil testing for victory gardeners. 

The Page Memorial School had a record enrollment of eighty- 
one children and offered students in various departments of the 
College an opportunity to come into contact with real children 
in real situations. This opportunity has been available for years 
for students in the department of Hygiene and Physical Education 
as they have supervised the Children's Posture Clinic, and to 
students in Education as they have visited neighboring schools. 

9 



Wellesley College 

The Sociology department cooperated with Radcliffe in a sur- 
vey on problems of ethnic relationship for the Cambridge Com- 
munity Council, and they also did some important interviewing 
in Wellesley for the Committee on Food Habits of the National 
Research Council. The Astronomy department has continued to 
make solar observations for war use. The History department gave 
a series of eight lectures on naval history for students planning to 
join the Navy. Internships were arranged by the Political Science 
department for fourteen students who could use their vacations 
to learn about government from the inside. The Academic Coun- 
cil approved for next year a course to study problems of postwar 
reconstruction, and introduced Russian as a course for credit. 

The Service Fund Committee raised SI 5,471. Of this, $7,500 
was allocated to war relief through the Committee on War 
Activities. The latter committee had a very lively part in many 
campus activities. With Forum it sponsored a series of lectures on 
postwar reconstruction; it continued to sponsor extracurricular 
courses in languages, accounting, drafting, typewriting and short- 
hand, home nursing, nutrition, etc. It participated in two war 
loan drives which resulted in the sale of bonds and stamps total- 
ing over $1 10,000. The Committee collected clothes for European 
relief, it conducted paper salvage drives, and continued to super- 
vise the workroom for knitting, sewing, and surgical dressings. 

The faculty gave a production on April 28, "The Thing Is the 
Play," which convinced the students that "the faculty are human 
after all." The sale of war stamps for admission totaled Sl,445. 

The most convincing evidence of the interest of the College in 
expanding community relationships was the decision to establish 
during the summer of 1944 the Wellesley School of Community 
Affairs to work on questions of intercultural relationships within 
the American community under the direction of Dr. Margaret 
Mead. This project in adult education was conceived to be a 
logical expansion of the function of an undergraduate college of 
liberal arts whose faculty and facilities have a contribution to 
make to the common life of our times apart from the stricdy 
academic contribution. 

Without wishing to confuse techniques with the liberalizing 
arts, it was recognized that in a technical age practical skills are 

10 



President's Report 

of immediate value to college-trained people. The establishment 
of the School of Techniques, different from but supplementary 
to the academic course, is in response to that recognition. 

The Wellesley Reconstruction Work School is an elaborate 
name for an important effort to meet a labor shortage in the 
neighborhood while introducing students to farm and factory 
work during the vacation. 

The three schools sponsored by the College during the summer 
of 1944 will be evidence through the years that Wellesley recog- 
nizes itself as part of a wide community. The world-wide scope 
of that community is indicated by the contribution of the alumnae 
of the College to the Mayling Soong Foundation, established in 
1942 "to interpret China and the other nations of the East to 
American college students." In addition to a gift of S25,000 from 
Madame Chiang, the alumnae contributed S42,100, bringing it 
to a total of S88,204. The total of the gifts of alumnae to the Col- 
lege amounted to S51,541 in addition to the contributions made 
indirecdy to the College through the Students' Aid Society. That 
Society received S24,931 which should really be included if one 
were to try to estimate the amount of the alumnae giving to the 
College. 

Scholarship assignments for next year include for the first time 
the recipients of the National Honor Scholarships for Women 
which have been established by the colleges of the Seven College 
Conference. A central committee selected the candidates from 
applicants in specified states of the South, Middle West, and 
West. 

It would not be fitting to close this report without a word of 
appreciation to the many individuals involved in carrying the 
work of the presidency for the President on leave of absence in 
the Navy. The Dean of Instruction and the Dean of Students 
have most directly added my work to theirs, and they have kept 
it all going with efficient good spirits. Other administrative offi- 
cers have had to carry more than their share. To all of them I 
am both personally and professionally indebted. To the trustees 
who have arranged for me to give almost my entire time to the 
Navy, but at the same time to maintain such an association with 
the College that I may continue to call myself its President, I 

11 



Wellesley College 

am ever grateful. It is a satisfaction to plan for the forthcoming 
year when I shall continue on leave from the College for work 
in the Women's Reserve of the Navy with the understanding that 
for ten days each month I shall be on leave from the Navy to 
return to the College. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mildred H. McAfee, 

Captain, U.S.N.R. 
June 30, 1944 



12 



APPENDIX 

FACULTY 

ACADEMIC BIOGRAPHY OF NEW MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY 
AND ADMINISTRATION FOR 1944-45 

Art. 

Walter Littlefield Creese, B.A., Brown University, 1941 ; Harvard University, 
1941-44. Instructor (second semester). 

Edgar de Noailles Mayhew, B.A., Amherst College, 1935; M.A., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1939; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1941. St. Mark's 
School, Southborough, 1942-44. Instructor. 

Julia Gray Phelps, B.A. (cum laude), 1937, M.A., 1943, RadclifTe College. 
Instructor. 

Alfred Salmony, Ph.D., University of Bonn, 1920. Lecturer at Vassar Col- 
lege and New York University, 1938- . Lecturer (first semester). 

Biblical History. 

Herbert Morrison Gale, B.A., State University of Iowa, 1929; M.A., 1931, 
S.T.B., 1932, Ph.D., 1939, Boston University. Northfield Seminary, 
1939-44. Lecturer. 

Botany. 

Elizabeth Unger McCracken, B.A., 1929, M.A., 1932, Wellesley College; 
Ph.D., University of California, 1 937. University of Vermont, 1 943-44, 
Lecturer. 

Chemistry. 

Margaret Ann Weaver Holt, B.A., 1938, M.A., 1940, Ph.D., 1942, Univer- 
sity of Texas. Howe Laboratory, Harvard Medical School, 1 942- . 
Instructor. 

Miles Standish Sherrill, B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1899; 
Ph.D., University of Breslau, 1903. Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1899-1900, 1903-05, 1907- . Lecturer. 

Economics. 

Elizabeth Ringo Braider, B.A., Swarthmore College, 1943. Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology, 1943-44. Instructor. 
Victor Earle Smith, B.A., 1935, M.A., 1936, Michigan State College; Ph.D. 

Northwestern University, 1940. Yale University, 1942-44. Assistant 

Projessor. 

13 



Wellesley College 

Education. 

Ruth Wendell Washburn, B.A., Vassar College, 1913; M.A., Radcliffe 
College, 1922; Ph.D., Yale University, 1929. Consultant in child de- 
velopment at various schools, 1938- . Lecturer, and Consultant at the 
Page Memorial School. 

English. 

Roberta Margaret Grahame, B.A., 1930, M.A., 1931, Ph.D., 1940, Univer- 
sity of Minnesota. U. S. Signal Corps, 1943-44. Instructor in English 
Composition. 

Ingeborg Greeff, B.A. (magna cum laude), Smith College, 1941; M.A., Rad- 
cliffe College, 1942. University of Connecticut, 1942-44. Instructor 
in English Composition. 

Louise Barr Mackenzie, B.A., Wheaton College, 1930; M.A., Radcliffe Col- 
lege, 1934. Wheaton College, 1934-40. Instructor in English Literature. 

Ola EHzabeth Winslow, B.A., 1906, M.A., 1914, Leland Stanford Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1922. Visiting Professor oj English 
Literature. 

French. 

Marie-Helene Frangoise Pauly, Bac. ^s Lettres, Lycee Racine (Paris), 1927; 
Lie. es Lettres, Sorbonne, 1932; Doctorat de I'Universite de Paris, 1939. 
University of Wisconsin, 1939-44. Instructor. 

Marie- Antoinette Brebant Tatum, the Sorbonne, 1917-22; University of 
Pennsylvania, 1937. Rosemont College, Baldwin School, and Haver- 
ford Friends School, 1943-44. Instructor. 

German. 

Helen Meredith Mustard, B.A., Oberlin College, 1929; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1934. Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 1938-44. In- 
structor. 

Hygiene and Physical Education. 

Evelyn Kathryn Dillon, B.S. in Ed., Ohio State University, 1932; M.A., 
Kent State University, 1 942. Old Trail School, Akron, Ohio, 1 940-44. 
Instructor. 

Virginia Lee Home, B.S., 1935, M.S., 1938, University of Wisconsin. Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1939-42. Instructor. 

Mathematics. 

Ellen Elizabeth Fedder, B.A., Rockford College, 1940; M.A., Radcliffe 
College, 1941. Radcliffe College, 1942-44. Instructor. 

Philosophy. 

Nathaniel Morris Lawrence, B.A., Stanford University, 1938; S.T.B., Har- 
vard Divinity School, 1942. Instructor. 

14 



Appendix 

Political Science. 

Herman Finer, B.Sc, 1919, M.Sc, 1921, D.Sc, 1924, University of London. 

Harvard University, 1944- . Lecturer (second semester). 
Helen Vivian Hammarberg, B.A., University of California, 1936; M.A., 

Columbia University, 1938; Ph.D., University of California, 1943. 

Army Specialized Training Program, University of California, Sept. 

1943-March 1944. Instructor. 
Flora Mariotti Houghteling, B.A., Wellesley College, 1 941 . Office of Labor 

Production, War Production Board, Sept. 1942-April 1944. Instructor. 

Reconstruction. 

Florence Pauline Tompkins, B.A., Mount Holyoke College, 1941; M.A., 
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts College, 1942. Pine 
Manor Junior College, 1940-44. Instructor. 

Russian. 

Vladimir Nabokov, B.A., Cambridge University, 1922. Lecture tours 
sponsored by Institute of International Education. Lecturer. 

Sociology. 

Ernestine Friedl, B.A., Hunter College, 1941. Brooklyn College, 1942-44: 
Instructor. 

Spanish. 

Mary-Eleanor Maule, B.A., University of Arizona, 1941; M.A., University 
of Wisconsin, 1944. University of Wisconsin, 1942-44. Instructor. 

Ruth Whittredge, B.A., Wellesley College, 1929; M.A., RadcUffe College, 
1930; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1944. Army Signal Corps, Wash- 
ington, 1943-44. Instructor. 

Speech. 

Inez Elizabeth Hegarty, B.A. (magna cum laude), 1941, M.A., 1943, Mount 
Holyoke College. South Hadley High School, 1 942-44. Instructor. 

Zoology and Physiology. 

Catherine Harris Fales, B.A., 1938, M.A., 1940, Mount Holyoke College. 

Brown University, 1942-43. Instructor. 
Virginia Mayo Fiske, B.A., 1932, M.A., 1934, Mount Holyoke College; 

Ph.D., Radcliffe College, 1939. Winsor School, 1943-44. Instructor 

(first semester). 
Jane Dinsmore McCarrell, B.A., Mount Holyoke College, 1932; M.A., Vas- 

sar College, 1934; Ph.D., Radcliffe College, 1940. Research Fellow, 

Massachusetts General Hospital, 1942- . Instructor (first semester). 

Administration. 

Harriet Blake Akerson, B.A., Wellesley College, 1914. Erskine School, 
1 942-44. Head of Joslin House. 

15 



Wellesley College 

Joan Fiss Bishop, B.Ed., Wisconsin State Teachers College, 1931; M.A., 
Radcliffe College, 1935. Certificate, Personnel Training Course, 
Radcliffe College, 1938. Radcliffe College, 1943-44. Director oj the 
Placement Office. 

Lois Eleanor Engleman, B.A., Millikin University, 1922; B.S. in L.S., West- 
ern Reserve University, 1931; M .S., Columbia University, 1939. Colby 
Junior College, 1 942-44. Assistarit to the Librarian. 

Marian B. Godfrey, Simmons College, 1905-08. Head of Webb House. 

Margreta Anne Hughes, College Preparatory Schools in England. Zion 
Research Library, Brookline, 1927-43. Librarian of the Art Library. 

Nancy Stiles MacMuUen, B.S., Simmons College, 1939. Babson Institute 
Library, 1939-43. Cataloguer in the Library. 

Mabel Powell McGinley, B.S., University of Maine, 1905. University of 
Maine, 1936-44. Household Supervisor. 

Ellen Burditt McKey, B.A., Vassar College, 1908. Head of Elms. 

Glayds S. Morton, National School of Domestic Art and Science, Washing- 
ton, D. C, 1909. Head of Wiswall House. 

Fanny Angelika Rudenberg, B.A., Radcliffe College, 1943; B.S. in L.S., 
Simmons College, 1944. Radcliffe Library, 1942-43. Cataloguer in the 
Library. 

Mary Cooper Walton, B.S., Teachers College, Columbia, 1937; Smith 
College, 1930-32. Buckingham School, 1941-44. Director of the Page 
Memorial School. 

Hope Graves Williams. Head of Abbott House. 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE IN 1944-45 

For the first semester: 

Cecile de Banke, Assistant Professor of Speech. 
Ada Roberta Hall, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

For the second semester: 

Margaret Elizabeth Taylor, Assistant Professor of Latin. 
Florence Rockwood Kluckhohn, Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

For the year: 

Katharine Canby Balderston, Professor of English Literature. 
Laurine Mack Bongiorno, Associate Professor of Art. 
Sirarpie Der Nersessian, Professor of Art. 
Helen Warton Kaan, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

On war service: 

Alice Hall Armstrong, Associate Professor of Physics. 
William Alexander Campbell, Associate Professor of Art. 

16 



Appendix 

Harriet Baldwin Creighton, Associate Professor of Botany. 
Helen Walter Dodson, Assistant Professor of Astronomy. 
Lucy Winsor Killough, Associate Professor of Economics. 
Louise Pettibone Smith, Professor of Biblical History. 

CHANGES IN RANK 1944-45 

M. Margaret Ball, from Assistant Professor of Political Science to Associate 
Professor. 

Andree Bruel, from Associate Professor of French to Professor. 

Herbert Gezork, from Assistant Professor of Biblical History to Lecturer. 

Paul Louis Lehmann, from Assistant Professor of Biblical History to Associate 
Professor. 

Isabella McLaughlin Stephens, from Instructor in Education to Assistant Pro- 
fessor. 

Evelyn Kendrick Wells, from Instructor in English Literature to Assistant 
Professor. 

Evelyn Faye Wilson, from Assistant Professor of History to Associate Professor. 

RESIGNATIONS AND EXPIRED APPOINTMENTS, JUNE, 1944 

iNCLtTDiNG Resignations During 1943-44 

Katherine S. Brehme, Instructor in Zoology. 

Concha Breton, Lecturer in Spanish. 

Virginia L. Conant, Instructor in Spanish. 

Elisabeth A. Curtiss, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

E. Foster Dowell, Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Mary C. Ewing, Dean of Residence (retired), 

Louise T. Forest, Instructor in English Composition. 

Fanny Garrison, Assistant Recorder in the Department of Hygiene and Physical 

Education (retired). 
Leo Gross, Lecturer in Political Science. 

Jane M. Harris, Librarian in Charge of Periodicals and Continuations. 
Julia J. Henderson, Lecturer in Political Science, and Personnel Officer. 
Laura Hooper, Director of the Page Memorial School. 
Ruth Houghton, Director of the Placement Office. 
Beatrice Howell, Instructor in Spanish. 
Thomas B. Jeffery, Assistant Professor of Art (deceased). 
Margaret J. Keidel, Instructor in German. 

Elizabeth A. Lane, Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education. 
Alice Malbot, Instructor in French. 
Marion W. Mariotti, Head of Homestead. 
Agnes F. Perkins, Professor of English Composition (retired). 
Florence D. Pockrandt, Librarian of the Art Library. 
Eveoleen N. Rexford, Consultant in Mental Hygiene. 
George Rowley, Lecturer in Art. 
Alberta Schuettler, Instructor in Mathematics. 

17 



Wellesley College 

Bertha M. Stearns, Professor of English Literature (retired). 

Mildred E. Stearns, Head of Elms. 

Lilla Weed, Associate Librarian (retired). 

Gertrude W. Wellwood, Instructor in Chemistry. 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE FACULTY 
July, 1943 to July, 1944 

Art 

SiRARPiE Der Nersessian, Doctcur es Lettres, Professor. 

Some Aspects of Coptic Painting from Coptic-Egypt — the Brooklyn Museum, 
New York, 1944, pp. 43-50. Reviews of: E. T. DeWald's The Illustra- 
tions in the Manuscripts of the Septuagint, vol. Ill: Psalms and Odes, 
Part 2: Vaticanus Graecus 752— The Art Bulletin, Dec, 1943, vol. XXV, 
no. 4, pp. 375-378; E. Buchthal and O. Kurz's A Hand List of Illuminated 
Oriental Christian Manuscripts — Ibid., March, 1944, vol. XXVI, no. 1, 
pp. 60-61 . The Sculpture of the Church of the Holy Cross at Aghthamar 
— Hayastanyaitz Tegehetzy, Oct., 1943, pp. 72-79 (in Armenian). Arch- 
bishop Gaegin — Ibid., March, 1944 (in Armenian). 

Bernard C. Heyl, M.F.A., Assistant Professor. 

New Bearings in Esthetics and Art Criticism, Yale University Press, New 
Haven, 1943, a Wellesley College Publication. Taste — Dictionary of World 
Literature (J. T. Shipley, Ed.). 

Biblical History 

Muriel S. Curtis, B.A., B.D., Professor. 

Review of: D. Cooper's David (Harper Bros., 1943) — Christendom, vol. VIII, 
no. 4, pp. 573-4. 

Paul L. Lehmann, Th.D., Assistant Professor. 

Christianity and Contemporary Culture — The Student World, vol. XXXVI, no. 
4, 4th Quarter, 1943. Toward a Protestant Analysis of the Ethical Prob- 
lem — The Journal of Religion, vol. XXIV, no. 1, Jan., 1944. The Christian 
Foundations of the Peace — Christianity and Society, Spring, 1 944. Review 
of: Calhoun's God and the Day's Work — Westminster Press Booklet, 
March, 1944. 

Ernest R. Lacheman, B.D., Ph.D., Instructor. 

Miscellaneous Texts from Nuzi— Harvard Semitic Studies (Harvard University 
Press), vol. 13, Sept., 1943. 

Economics 
Elizabeth Donnan, B.A., Professor. 
America at War — Ginn & Co., Boston, 1944. 

18 



Appendix 

Elisabeth A. Curtiss, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Review of: Crawford's Student Spending and Folkways— TA* WellesUy Maga- 
zine, April, 1944. 

Education 
John Pilley, M.A. Oxon, Associate Professor. 

The Work of the Harvard Commission on the Training of Secondary School 
Teachers — (British) Journal of Education, August, 1943. 

Christine M. Gibson, M.A. Instructor. 

Basic English in the Classroom — The Scholastic Magazine, Sept., 1943. (With 
I. A. Richards) Words on Paper, a Publication of the Harvard Commission, 
Oct., 1943. 

English Composition 

Elizabeth W. Manwaring, Ph.D., Professor. 

Reviews of: Life in 18th Century England — Modern Language Notes, Nov., 1943; 
K. C. Balderston's Thraliana— TAe Wellesley Magazine, Feb., 1944; H. P. 
Mitchell's The Stars Stand Watch— /Z'Zi/., June, 1944; G. Meyer's The 
Magic Circle — Ibid., June, 1944. Summer Study at Wellesley — Ibid., 
Dec, 1943. Dean Mary Cross Ewing Retires — Ibid., Feb., 1944. (With 
S. C. Smith) Wellesley Plans Ahead— /At"^., April, 1944. 

M. Eleanor Prentiss, M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Review of: A. Rothery's A Fitting Habitation — The Wellesley Magazine, June, 
1944. 

Ruth C. Child, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Teaching the Book Report — College English, March, 1 944. 

English Literature 

Bertha M. Stearns, M.A., Professor. 

Literary Treatment of Bacon's Rebellion in Virginia — Virginia Magazine of 
History and Biography, ]\x\y, 1944. 

Walter E. Houghton, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Yeats and Crazy Jane: the Hero in Old Age — Modern Philology, XL (1943), pp. 
316-29. Metaphysical Poets — Dictionary of World Literature (Joseph T. 
Shipley, Ed.), 1943, pp. 378-79. 

Marie L. Edel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Willobie His Avisa — Shakespeare'' s Sonnets (H. E. Rollins, Ed.), New Variorum 
Edition, 1944. Review of: T. H.'s Oenone and Paris (J. Q. Adams, Ed.) 
— Journal of English and Germanic Philology, XLHI (1944), pp. 110-12. 

19 



Wellesley College 

French 

Ren6 E. de Messieres, Agrege de TUniversite, Professor. 

Reponsc au General Smuts — Le Travailleur, Dec. 22, 1943 and Jan. 6, 1944. 
Clemenceauetr Affaire Dreyfus — LaRepublique Frangaise, Feb.-March, 1944. 
Lc cas du General Giraud — Le Travailleur, April 27, 1944. 

Andr^e Bruel, Docteur de I'Universite de Paris, Associate Professor. 

Les Silences de la Mer and some other Books on French Resistance — New England 
Modern Language Association Bulletin, May, 1944. 

Christiane M. E. Henry, C.E.S., Admissibilite Agregation, Lecturer. 

Translation of: M. H. Ilsley's Edouard Estaunie's Message {French Review, May, 
1943), Le Legs spirituel d'Edouard Estaunie — La Nouvelle Releve, Montreal, 
June, 1943. 

Greek 

Helen H. Law, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Review of: Bieber, Laocoon's The Influence of the Group Since its Recovery — 
Classical Weekly, vol. 37, 1943, p. 44. Pater's Use of Greek Quotations — 
Modern Language Notes, vol. 58, 1943, pp. 575-585. 

Barbara P. McCarthy, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

A Tribute from Simonides — Lest We Forget Greece (G. Karamanos, Ed.), pp. 
238-239. 

History 

Edward E. Curtis, Ph.D., Professor. 

Review of: J. C. Miller's The Origins of the American Revolution — Mississippi 
Valley Historical Review, March, 1944. 

Judith B. Williams, Ph.D., Professor. 

Wellesley Continues to Offer a Four Year Curriculum of Study — The Wellesley 
Magazine, Dec, 1943. 

George V. Lantzeff, Ph.D., Lecturer. 

Siberia in the Seventeenth Century; a Study of Colonial Administration — Uni- 
versity of California Press, Berkeley, 1943. 

Hygiene and Physical Education 
Elinor M. Sghroeder, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 
On Management of Motor Skills — King's Crown Press, New York, June, 1944. 

Italian 
Gabriella Bosano, Dottorc in Filologia Modcrna, Professor. 
La qucstionc poliana — Italica, vol. XX, p. 105, Sept., 1943. 

20 



Appendix 

Latin 
Dorothy M. Robathan, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Domitian's Midas-touch — Transactions of the American Philological Association, 
LXXIII, 131-144. From the Other Side of the Ticsk— Classical Outlook, 
XXI, 4. A Fifteenth-Century Bluestocking — Medievalia et Humanistica, 
II, 106-111. 

Mathematics 

Marion E. Stark, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

We Look Before and After — National Mathematics Magazine, Dec, 1943, pp. 
116-119. 

Music 

David Barnett, B.A., Instructor in Piano. 

Living with Music — George W. Stewart, New York, 1944. 

Philosophy 
T. Hayes Procter, Ph.D., Professor. 

The Meaning and Basis of Liberal Education— TA<r Wellesley Magazine, April, 
1944. 

Mary L. Coolidge, Ph.D., Professor. 

Purposiveness without Purpose in a New Context — Philosophy and Phenomena- 
logical Research — vol. IV, no. 1, Sept., 1943. 

Political Science 

Louise Overacker, Ph.D., Professor. 

Should the New Deal be Dropped?— Carr^n/ History, vol. 6, pp. 110-15. Review 
of H. S. Commager's Majority Rule and Minority Rights — Yale Law Jour- 
nal, vol. 53, pp. yii-^. 

E. Foster Dov^ell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 
Book review in Journal of Economic History, May, 1944. 
Gladys M. Kammerer, M.A., Instructor. 

The Political Theory oiVichy— The Journal of Politics, vol. 5, no. 4, Nov., 1943, 
pp. 407-434. 

Leo Gross, Ph.D., Lecturer. 

Review of: A. Nussbaum's Principles of Private International Law — Social 
Research, Feb., 1944, pp. 123-25. 

Psychology 
Edna Heidbreder, Ph.D., Professor. 

The Orientation of College Women toward War Needs — Journal of Consulting 
Psychology, 1, 1943, 289-295. Review of: K. Goldstein's After-effects of 
Brain Injuries in War — Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 38, 1943, 
407-408. 

21 



Wellesley College 

Michael J. Zigler, Ph.D., Professor. 

(With F. L. Dimmick) Report of the Delegates to the Inter-Society Color Coun- 
cil to the American Psychological Association — Psychological Bulletin, 40, 

1943, 667-669. Reviews of: E. G. Boring's Sensation and Perception in the 
History of Experimental Psychology — Journal of the Optical Society oj Amer- 
ica, 33, 1943, 352-353; Visual Mechanisms, (H. Kluver, Ed.)— Journal of 
Abnormal and Social Psychology, 38, 1943, 559-561. Abstracts of articles in 
the Journal of Experimental Psychology — Psychological Abstracts. Confi- 
dential reports to the National Defense Research Committee of the Office 
of Scientific Research and Development and to the Office of Strategic 
Services. 

Edith B. Mallory, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

(With T. G. Alper) The Wellesley Spelling Scale, Forms 1 and 2— The Cali- 
fornia Test Bureau, Los Angeles, 1 944. Abstracts of articles in the Journal 
of Educational Psychology and the Journal of Experimental Education — 
Psychological Abstracts. Special publications in the field of child develop- 
ment. 

Babette F. Samelson, M.A., Instructor. 

Revievk' of: M. Mead's And Keep Your Powder Dry — Journal of Abnormal and 
Social Psychology, 38, 1943. 

Sociology 
Leland H. Jenks, Ph.D., Professor. 

Railroads as an Economic Force in American Development — Journal of Economic 
History, May, 1 944, vol. 4, pp. 1-20. Review of: Callcott's The Caribbean 
Policy of the United States, 1890-1920 — American Historical Review, April, 

1944, pp. 516-18. 

Mary B. Treudley, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Psychodramatic Method, A New Technique for Social Case Work — Sociometry, 
May, 1944. 

Spanish 

Jorge Guillen, Doctor en Letras, Catedratico de Universidad, Visiting Pro- 
fessor. 

Poems: Otono, caida — La Prensa (Lima), June 13, 1943; Gallo del 
amanecer — Bitdcora (Caracas), Aug.-Sept., 1943; Mas esplendor — El hijo 
prodigo (Mexico), Sept., 1943; A la intemperie — Sur (Buenos Aires). Las 
hogueras — La Nacion (Buenos Aires), Feb., 13, 1944; Terrestrial Sphere — 
Heart of Europe (An anthology of creative writing in Europe, 1920-40; 
Klaus Mann and Hermann Kesten, Eds.), New York, 1943, p. 183; Paso 
a la aurora — Aurora, no. V, April, 1944 (Herbert Steiner, Northampton, 
Mass., Pub.). 

22 



Appendix 

Courtney Bruerton, Ph.D., Lecturer. 

The Chronology of the Comedias of Guillen de Castro — Hispanic Review, XII, 
April, 1944. 

Speech 

C:6ciLE deBanke, Assistant Professor. 

Ten Years of Choral Speaking at Wellesley College — The French Forum, Fall- 
Christmas issue, 1943. 

Robert J. Wade, B.L.I., Assistant, Theatre Workshop. 

Wartime Staging — Theatre Arts Monthly, July, 1 943. Eclecticism in the Stalls — 
The Players Magazine, Oct., 1943. The Significance of Character Props 
— Ibid., Jan., 1944. The Amazing Conjunction — Ibid., March, 1944. 
(Under pseud. Nancy Lodge) Drama at Emerson College — The Bostonian, 
Nov., 1943. 

^oology and Physiology 

Louise P. Wilson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

(With F. S. Hammett) The nuclear reaction to SH of excised salivary gland cells 
of second and early third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster — Growth, 
7, 1943, 183-197. Tolerance of larvae of Drosophila for nucleic acid 
components: Guanine, 273-278, Uracil, 279-285, Cytosine, 287-290— 
Ibid., 7, 1943. 

Katherine S. Brehme, Ph.D., Instructor. 

(With C. B. Bridges) The mutants of Drosophila melanogaster — Carnegie 
Institution of Washington Publications, 1944, no. 552, p. 257. The 
genetic control of the sex ratio in Drosophila melanogaster — Human Fer- 
tility, 8, 1943, 68-75. 

Library 

Agnes Lytton Reagan, M.A., M.S., Circulation Librarian. 

College Library Exhibits: A Bibliographical Approach — College and Research 
Libraries, vol. V, no. 1, Dec, 1943, pp. 53-61. College Library Exhibits: 
An Investigation and Report — Ibid., vol. V, no. 3, June, 1944, pp. 246-258. 



23 



Wellesley College 

LECTURES, CONCERTS, AND ART EXHIBITIONS 

LECTURES 

Biological Aspects of Marriage — James C. Janney, M.D. (Mar- 
riage Lecture Committee.) 

Lecture by Karel Hudec, Czechoslovakian Consul in New York. 
(Forum and War Activities Committee.) 

Balkan Reconstruction — Charles Davila, former Ambassador from 
Rumania, and Rustem Vambery of the Committee for New 
Democratic Hungary. (Forum and War Activities Commit- 
tee.) 

Poet's Reading — Robert P. Tristram Coffin. 

The Nebulae — John C. Duncan, Professor of Astronomy. (Sigma 
Xi.) 

Les sculptures des grandes cathedrales de France — Sirarpie Der 
Nersessian, Professor of Art. (Department of French.) 

Marriage on a Budget — Elisabeth A. Curtiss, Assistant Professor of 
Economics. (Marriage Lecture Committee.) 

Scandinavian Economic Reconstruction — Arne Skaug, Special 
Economic Adviser to the Norwegian Ministry of Information. 
(Forum and War Activities Committee.) 

Camouflage for Civilian Defense — Agnes A. Abbot, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Art. 

Bureaucracy in the Twentieth Century — Herman Finer of the Inter- 
national Labor Office, Montreal. (Department of Political 
Science.) 

Recent Tendencies in Chinese Music — Yuen Ren Chao, Harvard 
LTniversity. (Mayling Soong Foundation.) 

Basic English — Christine Gibson of the Commission on English 
Language Studies, Harvard University. (Department of 
Education.) 

Obstetrics — Weston Sewall, M.D. (Marriage Lecture Committee.) 

Anticipation — Pierre de Lanux, French author. (Department of 
French.) 
Nov. 9. Political Composition of the German People, Past and Present — 
Arnold Brecht of the New School for Social Research. (De- 
partment of History.) 
Nov. 10. The Jewish Attitude Towards the Law — Rabbi de Sola Pool of 

New York City. (Department of Biblical History.) 
Nov. 15. What's Going to Happen to European Labor? — Hans Fried of the 
International Labor Office, Montreal. (Forum, War Activi- 
ties Committee, Economics Department.) 
Nov. 18. The Postulates of Scientific Inference — Bertrand Russell. (Depart- 
ments of Philosophy, Mathematics, Physics; Lecture Com- 
mittee.) 

24 



Sept. 


15, 


Sept. 


23, 


Sept. 


30, 


Oct. 


4, 


Oct. 


5, 


Oct. 


12, 


Oct. 


20, 


Oct. 


21, 


Oct. 


22, 


Oct. 


25, 


Oct. 


26 


Oct. 


27 


Oct. 


28 


Nov. 


2 



Appendix 

Nov. 22. Poet's Reading — Margaret Walker. 

Jan. 20. Honors Day Address by George Rowley, Lecturer in Art. 

Jan. 26. Interesting Naval Features of the Background of the Present War — 
Captain Newton L. NichoUs, USN. (Department of History.) 

Feb. 1. Adventures with Chinese Books and Manuscripts — Arthur Hum- 
mel, Chief, Asiatic Division, Library of Congress. (Mayling 
Soong Foundation and Library.) 

Feb. 3. Languages for War and Peace — Mario Pei of Columbia University. 
(Department of Italian.) 

Feb. 6-9. Forum on Religion. Lectures by Elmer G. Homrighausen of 
Princeton Theological Seminary. (Christian Association.) 

Feb. 14. Poet's Reading— Robert Hillyer of Harvard University. 

Feb. 16. Reconstruction Work in Europe — Douglas V. Steere, Director of 
Reconstruction and Relief Training, Haverford College. 
(Christian Association, Forum, Placement Office.) 

Feb. 21. The Seven Frontiers of Poland — Grace Humphrey. (History De- 
partment and Forum.) 

Feb. 23. Women in Newspaper Work — Mary Homaday of the Christian 
Science Monitor. (English Composition Department and Place- 
ment Office.) 

Feb. 24. Opportunities in the Fields of Design, Architecture, Landscape 
Architecture, and Horticulture — Elizabeth G. Pattee of the 
Lowthorpe School. (Departments of Art and Botany; Place- 
ment Office.) 

Feb. 28. Relaxation — Josephine Rathbone of Teachers College, Columbia 
University. (Department of Hygiene and Physical Education.) 

Mar. 2. Postwar Problems of Social Security — Thomas Blaisdell of the War 
Production Board. (Forum and War Activities Committee.) 

Mar. 6. La personnalite geographique de la France — Jean Gottmann of the 
Institute of Advanced Study, Princeton. (Department of 
French.) 

Mar. 8. Postwar Problems of Labor Education — Eleanor Coit, Director of 
the American Labor Education Service. (Forum and War 
Activities Committee.) 

Mar. 15. Ships of the Modern Navy — Captain Newton L. Nicholls, USN. 
(Department of History.) 

Mar. 17. La Pronunciacion del espanol en Espana y America — Tomds Na- 
varro of Columbia University. (Department of Spanish.) 

Mar. 20. Chinese Gardens — Helen I. Davis, Associate Professor of Botany. 
(Mayling Soong Foundation.) 

Mar. 22. The Profession of Writing — Agnes Rothery. (Sophie C. Hart 
Lecture.) 

Mar. 23. Prices and the Postwar World — Leon Henderson, former Price 
Administrator. (Forum and War Activities Committee.) 

25 



Wellesley College 

Mar. 24. Poetry Festival — Leonard Bacon, William Rose Benct, Muriel 

Rukeyser, Winfield T. Scott, Theodore Spencer. (Department 

of Speech.) 
Mar. 31. How Radio Brings Us Speech and Music — Louis S. McDowell, 

Professor of Physics. (Department of Physics.) 
Apr. 5. Isolation in the Shakespearean Hero — Theodore Spencer of Harvard 

University. (Furness Lecture.) 
Apr. 10. General Aspects of the Postwar Period — Frank Kingdon. (Forum 

and War Activities Committee.) 
Apr. 11. Poet's Reading — Mark Van Doren. 

Botanical Exploration along the Alaskan Highway — Hugh M. Raup 

of the Arnold Arboretum. (Sigma Xi.) 
Apr. 12, Juvenile Delinquency and the Schools — William C. Kvaraceus, 

Director of the Children's Bureau, Passaic, N. J. (Department 

of Education.) 
Apr. 17. Poet's Reading — Jeremy Ingalls. 
Apr. 18. The Cause of Freedom in Asia — Owen Lattimore of the Office of 

War Information. (Mayling Soong Foundation.) 
Apr. 20. The Theatre: Reminiscences and Predictions — Guthrie McClintic. 

(Barnswallows Association and Theatre Workshop.) 
Apr. 21 . Labor in the Postwar Period — Leo Wolman of the National Institute 

of Economic Research. (Forum and War Activities Com- 
mittee.) 
Apr. 25. The Relation between Government and Business — Mordecai 

Ezekiel, Economic Adviser to the Secretary of Agriculture. 

(Economics Department and Forum.) 
Apr. 26. Brains and Fossil Brains — Tilly Edinger, Instructor in Zoology. 

(Departments of Geology and Zoology.) 
May 2. The Relevance of the Ethics of Jesus for Present Day Problems — 

John Bennett of Union Theological Seminary. (Department 

of Biblical History.) 
May 21. Commencement Address — Vice-Admiral Randall Jacobs, USN, 

Chief of Naval Personnel. 

SUNDAY SERVICES 
Dr. Arthur Lee Kinsolving, Trinity Church, Princeton, N. J. 
Dr. Howard C. Robbins, St. John's Church, Washington, D. C. 
Lt. C. Leslie Glenn, Chaplain, United States Naval Reserve. 
Dr. James Austin Richards, Community Church, Mount Dora, Fla. 
Dr. Ralph W. Sockman, Christ Church, New York City. 
Dr. Basil Mathews, Professor of Christian World Relations, Andover 

Newton Theological School, Newton, Mass. 
President Julius Seelye Bixler, Colby College, Waterville, Me. 
Dr. Raymond Calkins, Pastor Emeritus, First Church, Cambridge, 
Mass. 
Oct. 31. Rt. Rev. Henry K. Sherrill, Bishop of Massachusetts. 

26 



Aug. 


29. 


Sept. 


5, 


Sept. 


12, 


Sept. 


19, 


Sept. 


26 


Oct. 


3 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


24, 



Appendix 

Nov. 7. Dr. Douglas Horton, Minister of the General Council of the Congre- 
gational Christian Churches of the United States. 

Nov. 14. Dr. Edwin P. Booth, School of Theology, Boston University. 

Nov. 21 . Dean Howard H. Thurman, Howard University, Washington, D. C. 

Nov. 28. Professor James T. Cleland, Department of Philosophy and Religion, 
Amherst College. 

Dec. 5. Dean Luther A. Weigle, Divinity School, Yale University. 

Jan. 23. Dr. Charles R. Brown, Dean Emeritus, Divinity School, Yale Uni- 
versity. 

Jan. 30. President John A. Mackay, Princeton Theological Seminary, Prince- 
ton, N. J. 

Feb. 6. Dr. Elmer G. Homrighausen, Princeton Theological Seminary, 
Princeton, N. J. 

Feb. 13. Dr. Rufus M. Jones, Minister of the Society of Friends, Haverford, 
Pa. 

Feb. 20. Dr. Albert B. Coe, First Congregational Church, Oak Park, 111. 

Feb. 27. Dr. Ernest R. Lacheman, Department of Biblical History, Wellesley 
College. 

Mar. 5. Dr. Henry P. Van Dusen, Union Theological Seminary, New York 
City. 

Mar. 19. Dr. Allan Knight Chalmers, Broadway Tabernacle Church, New 
York City. 

Mar. 26. Dr. Boynton Merrill, The First Congregational Church, Columbus, 
Ohio. 

Apr. 2. Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Union Theological Seminary, New York 
City. 

Apr. 9. Dr. John C. Schroeder, The Divinity School, Yale University. 

Apr. 16. Dr. Palfrey Perkins, King's Chapel, Boston. 

Apr. 23. Dean Willard L. Sperry, The Divinity School, Harvard University. 

Apr. 30. Dr. Halford E. Luccock, The Divinity School, Yale University. 

May 7. Dr. Russell H. Stafford, Old South Church, Boston. 

May 14. Professor T. Hayes Procter, Department of Philosophy, Wellesley 
College. 

May 20. Baccalaureate Service. Dr. Boynton Merrill, The First Congrega- 
tional Church, Columbus, Ohio. 

CONCERTS 

(The concerts of the Wellesley Concert Fund were suspended for the duration 

of the war.) 

Oct. 27. Faculty Recital — Carl Weinrich, organist. 
Nov. 21. Wellesley College Orchestra Concert. 
Nov. 28. Faculty Recital — Olga Averino. 

27 



Wellesley College 

Feb. 1 5. Concert of compositions by Hubert W. Lamb, Assistant'^Professor 
of Music. Norma Farber, soprano; James Papoutsakis, flute; 
Richard Burgin, violin; Eugene Lehner, viola; Jean Bedetti, 
'cello. 

Apr. 9. Wellesley College Orchestra Concert. 

Apr. 5, 17, 23, 25. Student Recitals. 

In addition to the above, four special musical vesper services were given by the College 
Choir, with Margaret M. Macdonald as Choir Director and Organist. 

ART EXHIBITIONS 

Aug. 25-Oct. 4. Students' work, 1942-43. 

Oct. 10-Oct. 28. Camouflage. Lent by Museum of Modern Art, 

New York. 
Oct. 30-Nov. 14. Paintings and Sculptureby the Wellesley Society of Artists. 
Nov. 26-Dec. 10. Graphic Arts from Gericault to Renoir. Lent by St. 

Etienne Gallery, New York. 
Jan. 26-Feb. 19. Watercolors by Hazel N. Abbot and Agnes A. Abbot. 
Feb. 22-Mar. 14. Modern French Tapestries. Circulated by the San Fran- 
cisco Museum. 
Mar. 15-Apr. 4. Thirty European and American Paintings. Lent by 

Museum of Modern Art, New York. 
Apr. 10- Apr. 26. Brazil Builds. Lent by Museum of Modern Art, 

New York. 
May 13-Augu3t. Students' work, 1943-44. 



28 



Appendix 

ACADEMIC STATISTICS OF 1943-44 
Preparation of Entering Class 

Entirely in public high school 196 

Entirely in private schools 183 

Partly in public and partly in private schools 87 

466 

Preparatory Schools of Entering Class 
Total number of schools in which preparation was completed . . . 276 

High Schools 147 

Private Schools 129 

Schools in New England 67 

Schools outside New England 209 

Registration, October, 1943 

Resident candidates for the MA. degree 22 

Resident candidates for the M.S. degree in Hygiene and Physical 

Education 9 

Resident candidates for the Certificate in Hygiene and Physical 

Education 9 

Candidates for the B.A. degree 1,505 

Seniors 295 

Juniors 322 

Sophomores 410 

Freshmen 478 

Non-candidates for degrees 13 

1,558 
Duplicates 9 

1,549 

^J'ew Students in August, 1943 

Freshmen 466 

Sophomores 19 

Juniors 22 

Graduates 14 

Special graduate students 8 

Special undergraduate students 3 

532 

Previous Institutions of Graduate Students 

Wellesley College 9 

Other women's colleges 12 

Coeducational institutions 19 

Foreign universities 1 

29 



Wellesley College 

Units of Instruction * 

1941-42 1942-43 1943-44 

Art 2,795 2,466 1,845 

Astronomy 280 330 235 

Biblical History 3,288 2,853 3,336 

Botany 1,314 1,233 945 

Chemistry 1,814 1,759 2,499 

Economics 2,031 2,169 2,523 

Education 1,056 1,257 1,017 

English Composition 3,685 3,725 4,130 

English Literature 3,830 3,460 3,143 

French 2,463 2,308 2,552 

Geology and Geography 1,479 1,169 1,411 

German 1,015 986 941 

Greek 322 384 371 

History 2,925 2,943 3,090 

Hygiene 802 876 960 

Italian 263 210 254 

Latin 442 316 287 

Mathematics 1,229 1,549 1,959 

Musical Theory 1,755 1,386 1,152 

Philosophy 1,339 1,107 1,174 

Physics 745 1,205 1,143 

Political Science 1,062 1,374 2,163 

Psychology 2,336 2,238 2,113 

Sociology 942 1,387 1,173 

Spanish 1,951 2,171 1,888 

Speech 1,319 1,572 1,728 

Zoology and Physiology 1,901 1,845 2,028 

Relative Size of Departments 

1941-42 1942-43 1943-44 

Art 5 5 13 

Astronomy 26 25 27 

Biblical History 3 4 3 

Botany 16 18 22 

Chemistry 11 11 7 

Economics 8 9 6 

Education 19 17 20 

English Composition 2 1 1 

English Literature 1 2 2 

French 6 6 5 

Geology and Geography 13 20 15 

* A unit of instruction equals the instruction of one student one hour a week for 
a semester. 

30 



Appendix 



1941-42 1942-43 1943-44 

German 20 22 23 

Greek 25 24 24 

History 4 3 4 

Hygiene 22 23 21 

Italian 27 27 26 

Latin 24 26 25 

Mathematics 17 13 11 

Musical Theory 12 15 18 

Philosophy 14 21 16 

Physics 23 19 19 

Political Science 18 16 8 

Psychology 7 7 9 

Sociology 21 14 17 

Spanish 9 8 12 

Speech 15 12 14 

Zoology and Physiology 10 10 10 

Distribution of Major Students by Departments 

Graduate 

Seniors Students 

Art 15 1 

Astronomy 1 

Biblical History 7 

Botany 8 4 

Chemistry 30 5 

Economics 12 

EngHsh Composition 30 

English Literature 22 3 

English Composition and Literature 1 1 

French 6 1 

Geography 2 

Geology 1 

German 

Greek 1 

History 31 2 

Hygiene and Physical Education 14 

Italian 1 

Latin 3 

Mathematics 9 

Musical Theory 8 1 

Philosophy 4 

Physics 1 1 

Political Science 15 

Psychology 23 4 

Sociology 16 

31 



Wellesley College 

Graduate 
Seniors Students 

Spanish 12 

Zoology and Physiology 16 3 

274 41 * 

June Statistics, Class of 7944 

Seniors graduated with Honors in a Special Field 9 

Seniors graduated with Departmental Honors 7 

Bachelor of Arts Degrees 

October, 1943 8 

January, 1 944 9 

March, 1944 1 

May, 1944 284 

Total number of B.A. degrees conferred to date 14,659 

Masters' Degrees and Certificates 

October, 1943 

Master of Science 1 

May, 1944 

Master of Arts 8 

Master of Science and Certificate of the Department of Hygiene 

and Physical Education 6 

* 21 carried a full program. 
20 carried a part-time program. 



32 



Appendix 



SCHOLARSHIPS 1943-44 



Undergraduate Scholarships 



bco 
c o 
•r lo 
.- &^ 

Class Pi I 

1944 11 (1)* 

1945 14(1)* 

1946 14(1)* 

1947 15 

54 



be 

c 

■$■ 

" o 



bo 

c 



o 
o 

u-1 



o 

o 

bc^ 

•? 2 

Ho R o 



o; 



7 11 

5 13 

4 8 

6 12 



34 
28 
20 
19 



o 
o 

CO 

bC^ 

C C 

W CO 

32 
23 
33 
50 



u 

C W3 rt 

3 c br 

-o — 



— ^ > 



95 

83 

79 

102 



o tc 
CLh o 

32.20 
25.77 
19.26 
21.33 



22 44 101 138 359 23.84 

Foreign Student Scholarships 

Number of 
Students 

Graduate students 1 

Undergraduate students 2 

Mayling Soong Scholar 1 



Graduate Student Scholarships 
(Exclusive of Foreign Students) 

Number of 
Students 

Scholarships covering tuition plus $100 1 

Full or partial tuition scholarships awarded by the 

Committee on Graduate Instruction 10 

Tuition remitted to members of the staff 20 

Susanna Whitney Hawkes Teaching Fellowship 1 

Amy Morris Homans Scholarship 1 

33 



Amount 
of Aid 

33,980.00 
30,545.00 
26,547.50 
31,098.00 

122,170.50 



Amount 
of Aid 

$ 675.00 
1,445.00 
1,000.00 

$3,120.00 



Amount 

of Aid 

$ 400.00 

2,250.00 

3,800.00 

500.00 

300.00 

$7,250.00 



* Number given in parentheses is the number included in those having over $500 
whose award was dictated by the deed of gift or wish of donor. 



33 



REPORT OF THE ACTING TREASURER 

1943-1944 

To the Trustees of Welle si ey College: 

During the absence of John P. Chase, our Treasurer, on his 
important government mission in the European combat area, 
his legal and routine functions have been taken over by the duly 
elected Acting Treasurer. Mr. Chase's organization, however, 
continues in its research and advisory capacity and furnishes 
the Finance Committee with information and suggestions as to 
the investment of free funds, as well as proposing changes to be 
made in investments already held. Under this arrangement 
the Finance Committee feels it can, until the Treasurer's return, 
keep an informed and watchful mind over the finances of the 
College. 

It is Mr. E. J. Hodder of John P. Chase, Inc., who is sub- 
stituting for Mr. Chase in the matter of investment information 
and recommendations, and we have also the valuable help of 
Mr. H. C. Brainerd who for many years has been in charge of 
the Treasurer's office in Boston. 

Leading features which the accompanying schedules of the 
Treasurer's report bring out are: 

1. An abnormal surplus for the year of S150,823.35 was 
realized due to enforced wartime economies and was added to 
the Administrative Reserve Fund. 

2. An excess of investment income amounting to S3 1,1 38. 8 5 
after the agreed upon interest of 4% had been distributed to 
each one of the endowment and separate funds. 

3. The reduction, as a result of security profits taken during 
the year, of the accumulated deficit in the fund known as Undis- 
tributed Profit or Loss on Investments Sold from S89,673.66 
to S33,330.31. 

Mr. Chase during the year instituted certain accounting 
changes designed to bring about a more reasonable basis for the 

34 



Treasurer's Report 

treatment of the reserve for depreciation of buildings and equip- 
ment and at the same time to cease showing the amount of the 
reserve as a deduction in the plant account. It had been the 
practice of the College for many years to accrue depreciation on 
College buildings and equipment at established rates or fixed 
amounts. The method now adopted is based on budgeting 
each year a sum found to have been an average over several 
years of the cost of all repairs and maintenance, both ordinary 
and extraordinary. If any of this budgeted figure remains 
unused at the end of the year, it is added to the Reserve Fund 
for Depreciation of Buildings and allowed to accumulate therein 
to cover any expenses for repairs and maintenance that may 
exceed the annual budgeted amount in any future year. For 
the year ended June 30, 1944 there was added under this method 
an amount of S76,717.74. The size of this addition to the 
reserve fund for the year may be accounted for largely by our 
inability to purchase the normal amount of equipment and 
materials for our work due to wartime restrictions. 

Another accounting change has been made in the Compara- 
tive Statement of Operating Income and Expenditures, by the 
segregation in a separate section of items termed "non-educa- 
tional," which include scholarships (formerly shown as a 
deduction from tuition), prizes and fellowships (hitherto in- 
cluded in academic expenses) and annuities. Other changes 
in accounting procedure have been made by Mr. Chase and will 
go into effect in the next fiscal year. 

The outstanding event in the status of the endowment funds 
of the College during the year was the receipt of the great be- 
quest of Miss Candace C. Stimson, alumna and trustee, who 
made Wellesley one of her residuary legatees. With her estate 
practically settled and distributed, the amount received so far 
has been $930,303.25. Miss Stimson in her great generosity 
made many gifts to Wellesley during her lifetime, some of them 
with life interests to individuals, the principal to come to Welles- 
ley finally. It seems fitting that all these benefactions should be 
mentioned here. So far as can be ascertained from accessible 
records, the following is a list of Miss Stimson's major gifts to 
the College: 

35 



Wellesley College 

Annuity Funds $1 50,000 . 00 

Salary Funds 

Lewis Atterbury Stimson Professorship 

(Mathematics) $100,000 . 00 

Candace Wheeler Fund 100,000. 00 

200,000.00 

Prize Fund 

Lewis Atterbury Stimson Prize Fund 1,751 . 20 

Building Funds 292,000 . 00 

General Endowment 

Lewis Atterbury Stimson Fund 930,303 . 25 

Miscellaneous Gifts 3,905 . 1 5 



,577,959.60 



Always of great significance to the College is the spirit of the 
Alumnae Association in its continued activities in behalf of the 
College and its gift to the College this year of $51,541.00, sup- 
plemented by other alumnae giving amounting to S39,247.00. 

During the year ended June 30, 1944 trust funds showed a 
net increase of $1,455,976.72, bringing total funds at the end 
of the year up to $12,332,706,44. This increase was con- 
tributed by the following factors; 

Funds income added to principal $ 65,871 . 61 

Legacies and gifts added to principal 1,060,632.27 

Operating surplus for the year 150,823 . 35 

Excess investment income (after payment of 4% interest to 

funds) 31,138.85 

Miscellaneous adjustments and net credits to reserve funds. . . . 147,510.64 

$1,455,976.72 

Included in the above total is an increase of $17,109.05 in 
scholarship funds which brings the total of these funds up to 
$1,058,914.39. 

On June 30, 1944 the market value of general investments, 
including principal cash, was $13,042,332.47, which was 
105.75% of book value of investments, compared with a figure 
of 101.96% on June 30, 1943 and 86.07% on June 30, 1942. 
The portfolio, while maintaining a high degree of security of 
principal, showed a return of 4.33% on average book value and 
4.20% on average market value. 

36 



Treasurer's Report 

SUMMARY OF GENERAL INVESTMENTS 
June 30, 1944 

% of % of % of Book 

Book Value Total Market Value Total Value 
Bonds 

U. S. Government $1,580,736.59 12 .82% $ 1,577,140.00 12.09% 99.77% 

Canadian 269,132.17 2.18 284,343.75 2.18 105.65 

Industrials 596,517.57 4.84 628,431.25 4.82 105.35 

Public Utilities 1,364,190.81 11.06 1,430,758.75 10.97 104.88 

Railroads 1,496,837.03 12.14 1,463,313.75 11.22 97.76 

Miscellaneous 50,330.44 .41 50,386.00 .39 100.11 

Total Bonds $5,357,744.61 43.45 $5,434,373.50 41.67 101.43 

Preferred Stocks $2,159,436.28 17.51 $2,353,943.75 18.05 109.01 

Common Stocks 

Banks $ 522,442.58 4.24 $ 508,275.00 3.90 97.29 

Industrials 2,605,966.62 21.13 3,126,133.13 23.97 119.96 

Insurance 247,297.95 2.01 286,725.00 2.20 115.94 

Public Utilities 548,210.56 4.45 489,898.25 3.75 89.36 

Railroads 325,717.75 2.64 272,725.00 2.09 83.73 

Miscellaneous 39,635.75 .32 44,004.50 .34 111.02 

$ 4,289,271.21 34.79 $ 4,727,760.88 36.25 110.22 
Mortgages and Real Estate Ac- 
count 11,506.75 .09 11,506.75 .09 100.00 

Life Insurance Premiijms 39,348.19 .31 39,348.19 .30 100.00 

Principal Cash 475,399.40 3.85 475,399.40 3.64 100.00 

Total General Investments (includ- 
ing Principal Cash) $12,332,706.44 100.00 $13,042,332.47 100.00 105.75 



Respectfully submitted in the absence of the Treasurer, 



F. Murray Forbes, 

Acting Treasurer 



37 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT TREASURER 

The Wellesley Plant in 7943-7944, and the U. S. Navy 
Supply Corps School 

In August the College was asked to provide quarters for a unit 
of the United States Navy Supply Corps School, 400 strong, 
which later came to be known as the Wellesley Unit, under 
contract No. 303. Rapid evacuation of two quadrangle dormi- 
tories, Cazenove and Pomeroy, was accomplished by renting 
two extra village houses for college students and by doubling up 
many students in regular dormitories. Thus living quarters, 
classrooms, office space and sick bay were provided for the Navy 
unit. Alumnae Hall Ballroom and the Well became respec- 
tively a Mess-hall and a Galley. Further class-room space was 
provided for the Navy in Mary Hemenway Hall, and the use of 
the Recreation Building was regularly divided between Wellesley 
College and U. S. Navy classes. All of the outdoor recreational 
facilities including golf, tennis, skating, swimming, baseball, 
soft ball, and football were provided for and used extensively. 

After the completion of this Navy contract, a part on June 
30th, and the remainder on September 13th, the buildings 
occupied will require that considerable renovations be made. 
The College plans to make various changes in the decorative 
schemes at this same time, while most of the furniture and 
equipment is out of the rooms. 

In the spring of 1944 the lifting of the dim-out regulations 
relating to buildings and street-lights was made effective. 

During this entire year a large proportion of the light and 
heat was manufactured from coal to the extent of approximately 
six thousand tons of coal, instead of the usual fuel oil. Recon- 
version to oil will save a considerable amount of man-power 
now devoted to the handling of coal and ashes. 

The contract between the College and the Building Service 
Employees International Union, local 254, affiliated with the 
American Federation of Labor was rewritten before June 30th, 

38 



f 

Treasurer's Report 



setting up a spread of wages for each worker classification, and 
providing that the contract may extend for a period of two years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. W. Height 



39 



Wellesley College 



Assets 
Current 



Working Assets: 

Cash in Banks and on Hand . 



Securities at Book Value (schedule 6) , 
Accounts Receivable 



Inventories: 

Maintenance Supplies and Fuel Oil . 
Dormitory Supplies 



COMPARATIVE 

As AT June 30, 
June 30, 1944 June 30, 1943 

S 21,528.68 S 46,489.88 
$ 154,500.00 $ 153,642.00 
S 32,607.35 $ 7,664.79 



$ 96,760.03 $ 66,759.07 
41,724.52 45,468.81 



Total Inventories. 

Unexpired Insurance 

Sundry Deferred Items 

Total 



Loan Fund Accounts: 
Cash in Bank 



Loans Receivable: 

Mary Hemenway Loan Fund . 
McDonald-Ellis Loan Fund. . 
Student Aid Fund 



Total . 



$ 


138,484.55 


S 


112,227.88 


$ 


10,528.22 


S 


7,656.51 


$ 

$ 


7,286.52 
364,935.32 




7,620.02 
335,301.08 


$ 


14,094.88 

2,915.00 

100.00 

65.00 

3,080.00 

17,174.88 


$ 


10,085.58 


% 

$ 
s 


8 


3,665.00 

100.00 

65.00 

3,830.00 

13,915.58 



Plant 



Plant at Book Value (Schedule 3) : 
Land 



Buildings and Fixed Equipment 

Less: Amount written off for Depreciation . 



Movable Equipment 

Less: Amount written off for Depreciation of 
Equipment in Faculty Houses 



Total . 
{Carried forward) . 



$ 461,759.06 $ 460,705.00 

$10,729,800.92 $10,729,711.75 
1,788,310.73 

$10,729,800.92 $ 8,941,401.02 

$ 1,894,000.99 $ 1,891,753.67 

19,143.99 

$ 1,894,000.99 $ 1,872,609.68 

$13,085,560.97 $11,274,715.70 



$13,467,671.17 $11,623,932.36 



40 



Treasurer's Report 

Exhibit A 

BALANCE SHEET 

1944 AND 1943 

Liabilities and Funds 

June 30. 1944 June 30, 1943 

Current 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable S 134,638.97 S 152,614.27 

Income Deferred: 

Application Fees Prepaid $ 26,820.00 $ 22,260.00 

Unexpended Gifts for Specific Purposes 69,977 . 94 75,604 . 05 

Unexpended Income of Trust Funds (Schedule 4)... 52,351.22 41,692.20 

Sundry Deferred Items 81,147.19 43,130.56 

$ 230,296.35 $ 182,686.81 
Total $ 364,935.32 S 335,301.08 

Loan Fund Accounts: 

Mary Hemenway Loan Fund S 11,349.30 S 10,950.27 

McDonald-Ellis Loan Fund 575.00 535.00 

Helen A. Shafer Loan Fund 583.43 543.43 

Student Aid Fund 750.23 656.06 

Malvina Bennett Loan Fund 860 . 35 860 . 35 

Mary Whiton Calkins Graduate Fund 556 . 57 370 . 47 

Robert T. Swaine Loan Fund 2,500 .00 

Total $ 17,174.88 S 13,915.58 

Plant 
Funds Used for Plant and EquiPMENT: 

Permanent Plant Capital $12,985,560.97 §11,174,715.70 

Plant Capital Subject to Annuity 100,000.00 100,000.00 



Total $13,085,560.97 $11,274,715.70 



{Carried forward) $13,467,671 . 17 $11,623,932.36 

41 



Wellesley College 



COMPARATIVE 

As AT June 30, 
Assets (Continued) 

June 50, 1944 June 30, 1943 

(Brought forward) $13,467,671.17 511,623,932.36 

Trust Funds 
Investment of Trust Funds: 

Cash in Banks $ 475,399.40 S 241,190.76 

Securities at Book Value (Schedule 6) 11,817,955.85 10,597,035.34 

Premiums paid by Classes of 1921 and 1922 on En- 
dowment Life Insurance Policies 39,348. 19 38,500.62 

Real Estate 3 . 00 3 . 00 



Total $12,332,706.44 $10,876,729.72 



Grand Total $25,800,377 . 61 $22,500,662 . 08 



42 



Treasurer's Report 



BALANCE SHEET 



Exhibit A 
(Concluded) 



1944 AND 1943 

Liabilities and Funds {Continued) 

June 30, 1944 June 30, 1943 

{Brought forward) 513,467,671.17 $11,623,932.36 

Trust Funds 
Permanent Endowment: 

General Funds % 2,511,614.63 S 1,579,012.88 

Special Funds' 

Annuity Funds 417,773.50 417,773.50 

Departmental Funds 220,254.00 219,149.00 

Lecture Funds 61,975.50 61,875.50 

Library Funds 286,417.13 285,624.07 

Maintenance Funds 724,079 . 00 723,854 . 00 

Miscellaneous Funds 105,481 . 56 89,922 . 56 

Salary Funds 4,751,607.74 4,727,386.96 

Scholarship, Fellowship, Prize and Loan Funds . . . 1,195,834.83 1,178,705.76 

Total Permanent Endowment $10,275,037.89 $ 9,283,304.23 

Building and Equipment Funds 14,412.05 14,713.33 

Unallocated Funds 52,852.49 51,681 .99 

Funds Unrestricted as to Principal AND Income . . 569,695.63 486,452.54 

Accidents Reserve Fund 16,954.90 16,302.79 

Administrative Reserve Fund 455,762.60 289,105.29 

Reserve Fund for Depreciation of Buildings ... . 845,876.47 724,707.76 

Securities Income Reserve Fund 118,944.72 83,635.45 

Undistributed Profit or Loss on Investments 

Sold 33,330.31 89,673.66 

Trustee Accounts 16,500.00 16,500.00 

Total $12,332,706.44 510,876,729.72 

Grand Total 325,800,377 . 61 $22,500,662 . 08 



REPORT OF AUDITORS 

We have audited the books of the College for the year ended June 30, 1944 and found 
them to be correct. The securities representing the investment of the Trust Funds were 
inspected by us or otherwise satisfactorily accounted for. VVe report that the foregoing 
balance sheet and the statements annexed are in accordance with the books and that, in 
our opinion, subject to the provisions of the attached report, they show the true state of the 
financial affairs of the College at June 30, 1944 and the results of the year ended that date. 



Boston, Massachusetts, 
September 18, 1944. 



Barrow, Wade, Guthrie & Co., 

Accountants and Auditors. 



43 



Wellesley College 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF 

For Years Ended 
Income 

Year Ended Year Ended 

June 30. 1944 June 30, 1943 

Educational and General: 
Students' Fees: 

General Tuition $ 971,056.95 $ 800,255.02 

Music Tuition 6,376 . 72 6,847 . 10 

Other Fees 6,718.71 5,040.12 



$ 984,152.38 $ 812,142.24 



From Endowment (See Schedule 4 for Total Income 

from Endowment) : 
Allocated to Current Expenses $ 290,225 . 23 $ 290,773 . 59 

Gifts Appropriated FOR Current Expenses $ 7,840.64 $ 11,706.61 



From Other Sources: 

Application Fees Appropriated $ 1 2,975 . 00 $ 1 1 ,545 . 00 

Interest and Rents 14,026.37 14,984.86 

Simpson Infirmary 11,507.66 7,799.36 

Miscellaneous 14,525.27 6,410.18 



$ 53,034.30 $ 40,739.40 



Appropriation from the Reserve Fund for Depre- 
ciation OF Buildings for Extraordinary Repairs 

(Contra) 17,707.96 

Total Educational and General $1,335,252.55 51,173,069.80 

Auxiliary Enterprises: 

Dormitories K 701,562.72 S 797,956.59 

Faculty Houses 42,238 . 66 43,766 . 95 

Page Memorial School 11,908.00 10,996.36 

The Well 27,328.77 22,629.00 

Summer Conferences 10,307.44 

Total Auxiliary Enterprises $ 793,345.59 875,348.90 

(Carried forward) $2,128,598.14 $2,048,418.70 



44 



Treasurer's Report 

OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 
June 30, 1944 and 1943 



Exhibit B 



For Years Ended 



Expenditures 

Year Ended Year Ended 

June 30. 1944 June 30, 1943 

Educational and General: 
Administrative : 

Salaries and Expenses S 134,355.48 $ 146,134.75 

Contribution to Pension and Insurance Fund 65,000.00 65,000.00 

$ 199,355.48 $ 211,134.75 

Academic: 

Salaries and Expenses $ 617,319.55 S 626,273.28 

Library: 

Salaries and Expenses $ 79,642.98 $ 78,344. 14 

Simpson Infirmary: 

Salaries and Expenses S 42,461 .84 S 43,651 .01 

Maintenance: 

Repairs and Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds 

(except Buildings of Auxiliary Enterprises) 208,469 . 46 S 205,679 . 50 

Unexpended portion of Appropriation for Mainte- 
nance (See Note) 36,687.61 29,213.73 

Appropriation for Depreciation Reserve 48,984 . 00 

Extraordinary Repairs Met from the Reserve Fund 

for Depreciation of Buildings (Contra) 17,707 . 96 

S 245,157.07 S 301,585.19 

Addition to Plant: 

Appropriated from Income for Additions to Plant ... $ 1,831 . 68 $ 1 ,246 . 85 

Special Appropriation for Reserve Fund for De- 
preciation of Buildings S S 10,786.27 

Total Educational and General $1,185,768.60 51,273,021 .49 

Auxiliary Enterprises: 

Dormitories $ 579,496.26 S 570,646.66 

Add: Unexpended appropriation for maintenance. . 37,130.63 

(See Note) 

Total Dormitories S 616,626.89 8 570,646.66 

Faculty Houses S 38,902 . 36 S 45,278 . 81 

Add: Unexpended appropriation for maintenance. . 2,899. 50 

(See Note) ■ 

Total Faculty Houses S 41,801 . 86 % 45,278 .81 

Page Memorial School 11,817.94 12,308.13 

The Well 28,931.14 22,609.73 

Summer Conferences 1 2,762 . 04 22,609 . 73 

Total Auxiliary Enterprises $ 711,939.87 650,843. 33 

{Carried forward) 51,897,708.47 51,923,864.82 

45 



Wellesley College 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF 

FOR YEARS ENDED 

Income (Continued) 

Year Ended Year Ended 

June 30, 1944 June 30, 1943 

(Brought forward) $2,128,598 . 14 $2,048,418 . 70 

Non-Educational : 
Scholarships 

Endowed S 50,619.35 $ 52,258.57 

Gifts 5,837.50 6,245.00 



$ 56,456.85 $ 58,503.57 



Prizes 

Endowed $ 408.00 $ 625.00 

Gifts 75.00 55.00 



483.00 680.00 



Fellowships 

Endowed » 4,482.37 S 3,549.62 

Gifts 1,500.00 



$ 5,982.37 $ 3,549.62 



Annihties — Paid from Endowment Income and 

Trustee Accounts $ 20,033.44 $ 18,833.44 



Total Non-Educational $ 82,955.66 S 81,566.63 



Carnegie Foundation Retiring Allowance (Contra) . $ 45,150.00 $ 46,572.64 



$2,256,703.80 $2,176,557.97 



46 



Treasurer's Report 

Exhibit B {Concluded) 



OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

June 30, 1944 and 1943 

Expenditures {Continued) 

Year Ended Year Ended 

June 30, 1944 June 30, 1943 

{Brought forward) $1,897,708 . 47 $1,923,864^82 

Non-Educational : 
Scholarships 

Endowed $ 50,619.35 $ 52,258.57 

Unendowed 77,758.65 69,574.60 

Gifts 5,837.50 6,245.00 



$ 134,215.50 $ 128,078.17 



Prizes 

Endowed $ 408.00 $ 625.00 

Gifts 75.00 55.00 



$ 483.00 $ 680.00 



Fellowships 

Endowed $ 4,482.37 $ 3,549.62 

Gifts 1,500.00 



$ 5,982.37 % 3,549.62 



Annuities $ 22,341.11 $ 20,774.44 



Total Non-Educational $ 163,021.98 $ 153,082.23 



Carnegie Foundation Retiring Allowance (Contra) $ 45,150.00 $ 46,572.64 

Surplus for year Transferred to Administrative 

Reserve Fund $ 150,823.35 $ 53,038.28 



$2,256,703.80 $2,176,557.97 



Note: 

Total unexpended appropriation for maintenance for 
the year transferred to Reserve Fund for Depreciation 
of Buildings $ 76,717.74 $ 29,213.73 



47 



Wellesley College 



Schedule 1 



COMPARATIVE OPERATING STATEMENT OF 
DORMITORIES 

For Years Ended June 30, 1944 and 1943 

Year Ended Year Ended 

June 30. 1944 June 30, 1943 

Dormitories: 
Income: 

Faculty Board $33,836.58 $36,450.86 

Student Board 659,475.15 749,756.48 

Sundries 8,250.99 11,749.25 

Total Income $701,562.72 $797,956.59 

Operating Expenses: 

Salaries $49,006.59 $48,320.39 

Wages 134,560.52 142,257.06 

Provisions 217,146.02 191,773.62 

Laundry 17,599.25 15,488.78 

Heat, Light, Water and Sewer 56,967 . 54 47,672 . 27 

Repairs and Maintenance 56,498 . 28 58,782 . 87 

Unexpended appropriation for re- 
pairs and maintenance 37,130.63 

Rents Payable :. 5,200.00 4,600.00 

Taxes and Insurance 6,695.93 11,509.18 

Use of Sewers (Campus) 915.21 2,038 . 84 

Miscellaneous 34,906.92 48,203.65 

Total Operating Expenses $616,626.89 $570,646.66 

Total Operating Income — Dormitories.. $84,935.83 $227,309.93 



Increase 
Dtcrease 


$ 2,614.28 

90,281.33 

3,498.26 


96,393.87 


% 686.20 


7,696.54 
25,372.40 
2,110.47 
9,295.27 
2,284.59 


37,130.63 
600.00 


4,813.25 

1,123.63 

13,296.73 


$45,980.23 


$142,374. 10 



48 



Treasurer's Report 

Schedule 2 
ADDITIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS TO PLANT 

For Year Ended June 30, 1944 

Land: 

Balance at June 30, 1943 5 460,705.00 

Addition: 2 acres, 9,583 sq. ft. off Weston Road, Wellesley 1 ,054 . 06 

Balance at June 30, 1944 % 461,759.06 

Buildings and Fixed EquiPMENT: 

Depreciated value at June 30, 1943 58,941,401 .02 

Add: Reserve for depreciation accrued in prior years 
and deducted from plant values — now re- 
stored to plant capital 1,788,310.73 $10,729,711 .75 

Additions during year: 

Simpson Infirmary 239 . 17 



$10,729,950.92 
150.00 
Balance at June 30, 1944 $10,729,800.92 



Retirements during year: 

Tool House 150.00 



Movable Equipment: 

Depreciated Value at June 30, 1943 . 51,872,609.68 

Add: Reserve for depreciation accrued in prior 
years and deducted from equipment values 
—now restored to plant capital 19,143.99 $1,891,753.67 

Additions during year: 

Equipment for Simpson Infirmary $ 41 5 . 64 

Equipment for Comptroller's Office 1,831 .68 2,247.32 

Balance at June 30, 1944 $ 1,894,000.99 

Summary of Expenditures for Additions and Improvements Dur- 
ing Year: 

Land $ 1,054.06 

Buildings and Fixed Equipment 239.17 

Movable Equipment 2,247 . 32 

$ 3,540.55 



The Foregoing Additions and Improvements Were Provided for as 
Follows: 

From Trust Funds available for these purposes $ 1,708 . 87 

From Current Funds permanently transferred to Plant Capital 1,831 . 68 



p,540.55 



49 



Wellesley College 

Schedule 3 

SCHEDULE OF PLANT 

June 30, 1944 

(a) Land 

Book Value 

Central Street 22 acres, 24,820 sq. ft $ 20,000.00 

Norfolk Terrace: 

Crofton 5,400 sq. ft 900 . 00 

Ridgeway 14,392 sq. ft 2,238 . 00 

Webster 4,800 sq. ft 800 . 00 

Corner lot at Weston Road 4,800 sq. ft 800.00 

Washington Street: 

Campus 215 acres 263,892.00 

Corner lot at Dover Road 134 acres 108,500.00 

Eliot 41 ,000 sq. ft 8,300 . 00 

Horton, Hallowell and Shepard 3 acres, 1 8,295 sq. ft 9,325 . 00 

Little 37,592 sq. ft 10,500 . 00 

Noanett 17,275 sq. ft 3,450.00 

Washington 30,244 sq. ft 7,000.00 

Weston Road 60 acres, 20,473 sq. ft 26,054 . 06 

Total Land 439 acres, 1,291 sq. ft $461,759.06 



50 



Treasurer's Report 

Schedule 3 
(Continued) 

SCHEDULE OF PLANT 

June 30, 1944 

(i) Buildings and Fixed Equipment 

Book Value 



Academic Buildings: 

Art $ 115,713.35 

Billings HaU 29,370.00 

Chapel 111,832.00 

Founders Hall 450,938.12 

Geology 51,870.70 

Hetty H. R. Green Hall 1,336,667.92 

Mary Hemenway Hall 121,154.45 

Library 242,490. 36 

Music Hall 34,100.00 

Page Memorial School including Nursery School. . . . 36,875 . 19 

Observatory 52,392.08 

Pendleton Hall 815,868.40 

Recreation Building 409,336. 80 

Sage Hall and Greenhouse 1,293,608 . 44 

$ 5,102,217.81 

Dormitories: 

Beebe S 120,063.22 

Cazenove 208,337.63 

Claflin 263,707.65 

Crofton 9,346 . 46 

Dower and Annex 60,000 . 00 

Eliot 35,759 . 51 

Fiske 25,925.68 

Gray 1,840.00 

Homestead 50,676.89 

Lake 55,446 . 81 

Little 8,500.00 

Munger 322,1 1 5.88 

Noanett 37,056.79 

Norumbega 54,200.00 

Pomeroy 208,379.67 

Severance 594,915.80 

Shafer 117,950.40 

Stone— Olive Davis 772,013.23 

Tower Court 526,271 .45 

Washington 24,000.00 

Washington Annex 4,000 . 00 

$ 3,500,507.07 

{Carried forward) $ 8,602,724.88 



51 



Wellesley College 



SCHEDULE OF PLANT 
June 30, 1944 
(b) Buildings and Fixed Equipment (Continued) 



Schedule 3 
(Continued) 



Book Value 



(Brought forward) S 8,602,724. 88 

Dwellings and Garages: 

Crawford S 6,400.00 

Dover Road House 2,905 . 00 

Dower Garage 600 . 00 

East Lodge 8,831.38 

Grounds Cottage 10,233.79 

Little House Annex 6,000 . 00 

Oakwoods 25,317 . 95 

Observatory House 11,913.30 

President's House 44,487 . 33 

President's House Garage 3,438 . 88 

Ridgewav 30,325 . 07 

Waban House 7,925.00 

Waban Barn 1,325.00 

Webber Cottage 2,000.00 

Webster 7,281 .79 

West Lodge 4,200.00 

Weston Road— No. 158 5,004.15 



Faculty Houses: 

Garage S 6,222.77 

HalloweU 66,959.32 

Horton 100,438.98 

Shepard 77,643.00 



Miscellaneous: 

Alumnae Hall S 446,573.87 

Boat House 3,000.00 

Golf Club House 800.00 

Hay Outdoor Theatre 12,326.64 

Simpson Infirmary 257,266 . 1 1 

Simpson Infirmary — Garage 659.21 

SkifTHouse 500.00 



178,188.64 



251,264.07 



721,125.83 



(Carried forward) $ 9,753,303.42 



52 



Treasurer's Report 



SCHEDULE OF PLANT 

June 30, 1944 
(b) Buildings and Fixed Equipment {Continued) 



Schedule 3 
{Continued) 



Book Value 



{Brought forward) S 9,753,303 . 42 

Service Buildings: 

Grounds Service Building % 13,804.21 

Oil House 2,776.86 

Power House 125,720.94 

Service Building 44,907 . 43 

Storage Sheds 3,238 . 12 



190,447.56 

Total Buildings 5 9,943,750.98 

Fixed Equipment 786,049 . 94 



Total Buildings and Fixed Equipment $10,729,800.92 



53 



Wellesley College 



SCHEDULE OF PLANT 

June 30, 1944 
(c) Movable Equipment 



Schedule 3 
{Concluded) 



Book Value 



Alumnae Hall $ 26,360.09 

Boston Office 935 . 14 

Chapel 31,203.51 

Crawford 1,813.93 

Departments of Instruction and Administration 1,382,129.63 

Dormitories 331,955.44 

East Lodge 545.50 

Grounds 25,896.49 

Hallowell House 864.07 

Horton House 16,763.97 

Oakwoods 4,940.50 

Observatory House 1 ,669 . 43 

Orchard 225.00 

President's House 19,793.71 

Ridgewav 424 . 88 

Service Building 17,086.20 

ShepardHouse 1,807.56 

Simpson Infirmary 29,510. 19 

Webster 75.75 



Total Movable Equipment $ 1,894,000.99 

Summary 

(a) Land at book value $ 461,759.06 

(b) Buildings and Fixed Equipment at book value 1 0,729,800 . 92 

(c) Movable Equipment at book value 1,894,000.99 

Total Plant, as per Exhibit A SI 3,085,560 . 97 



54 









'•o 





•o2„ 




?'S.b 




fc-a o 




0.-0 a 




«<'n 


m 


W i-l^ 


S 


o 


o 




u 




?; 


■a 




o 








<« ..^■o 




o o c 




0-" 3 




^ (I. 




< 



<u - 

•oo 






3 B c 

•a "• ui 
Q H 



5 " 

o <u 









»» 






in 









O-^OOO 
-H tNOO 

00 O »^ 0\ 



■O* CS IN 

■ oofo^o 
■00 rs Tj< 

. f/5 00 CN 



> PO PS oo ^ 



u^ ^ lO CS .fO ^ w 



00 vO fO l^ 
O— O 



vOirt O 


,^ 


r'SOO ■* 


>o 


IT) 00 (^1 


vO 


Ot^ IT) 


a 


Tf— U-, 


o 






•*—■!> 


yj% 


•* fO 


00 


"t 


■<t 


«» 


a^ 



fo 
y3 

o 
o 



^ mro 00 fN ^ 'i^NO o "^ "^ u^ lo 00 cs w »o ^ 



O0f0r.n*)>0>00>'0o00f^ 

O^O00OO^O^^»OO^^"^ 

"* K_CM^ oo_o Ov 0_-* vor-. 

»H w Ol 00 ^'^ 



C^ 00 fO VO fS t^ lO 
1^ CO '^ CN 'O NO PO 



« 00 m . ■« 



o-* 


■* 


oo 


PO 


oo 


■o 


>Ot- 


■* 


om 


t^ 


^^ 


1^ 




^ 




■* 




«> 





\0 ro »n O -^ UO (N 
OlOCN 00 ^ If) ^ 


:§S 




1-H -^ (N 00 "^ 


•^ 00 1^ O rN t^ »rj 

^00 (N OiO^ rf 
t^ f^i lO O- \0 C"^ 

O -h" oc'f^* 


•\0 lO 


tr, 



O ^1 o p^ ^ 
o»o OOO PO 

u^^ O f^ O 
fs r^ IT) ^^ (^ 

00 *Or^ »/) 0^ 



• O Ov lO 

. ^ r-l ^J 



mo 

-<o 



•ID 

■ o 






o 



OOfOOfOWOsOf^TtoO 


ooO'^'^O^'^t^'^O^ 


5 


t^iOOr^'^'Ot^oOTfO^ 
t-._^ CN fD O'^ -^^ — ^ 0_ ^^^ Ti|_ >0_ O. 
tCo O ^ -O lO ■** lO u^^"<=0 
■--trNOOoO'-H'NO^iO"^ 

t}4 cs ^ cs r^ ^ f^ ^ 


O'^OOOOvXON'^iOt^ 
r^ lO 00 t-H ^ 

o" 


o 

rO_ 
4* 



► 














14,350.22 
' 566.66 


©■* 

1/5 m 

00 vO 














-0 



■* 
l/> 




S^|I 

vo" 



10 



o 



• o 
■ o 



-OOOOfS 



■10 • Of^ 0*0 (> 

• O • OO* (N CN O 



■00*0 



■ OS 



00lO*OO-^r-CNr0 

OOior-'^iO'OO^ 

O 00 fN PO to 

O ^ 



m 


^ 


in 


w 


^ 


Ifl 


,.^ 


r'5 


r.. 


U1 








1^1 


V-! 


r^ 




"t 




_ 




<» 



00 O O P^l O t^ O O O f^ O '^ r*^ p^ Ov ^ o^ o »o ^o o o> '■^ 
00 lOOcN^oOt^Ou^^O^t^ csp'i^ior^r-^'OO " 



(S 



t^Tj'or-.rM'^iDrS'^XO 



OT^oOiooOf^t^OO 



oO^iOW-^r^oOQo^X 



r^i 




•<1« 


W)(NOOVOO>00 


Ti< 10 PN 


«-( 


•* 


tN t^ C> Ov -H O) 


rooo ■* 


»o 


00 


\r> 0^ t~ \0 -^ 


lOOOCM Ov 


>o 


lO 


CN t^ 10 


Tt (^5 lO 10 


0- 




CS 10 ^ CN t^ 


t^ ^ 10 













vH 


01010 


t<5-< OvO 


10 


rsj 


OMO 


t^tO >- 


00 




(N 


•* 


■* 






<» 


«> 



*^ H 10 



H 

z 

S 

H 
I/l 
H 
> 

Z 
I—) 

s 
o 
a 

fa 

a 

O 

u 



.S3 O m 1J 
a C 3 o 

paD(i.<; 



t" ti s 3 " 



> 

m <U O 
y S O 



o 
u 
z 

»— I 

< 

H 

o 



•* O 

Tf O 

00 O 

■<* lO 



"to 

■<*<o 

00 o 
OvO 

■*o 



o 



m 



a 
3 
o 
o 
o 

«;e < 
> p i) 

•^^ 



OJ 



2 nl ,1- 

d a H 

oj <u o 

o 3 .- 
Q C 

- « c 



T) 




B 




3 




(I. 


4-> 




C3 




>. 


11) 


rt 


Oi 


U 


u 


f= 


> 


3 



.- ^ 



c 
o 

.3 "CI 
o c 



c 






<s§ 

ort o 3 t: 

2 3 CI"— [i,t3 

.— fA ^ ?< - ■ 



w o 
> " 
o-a 

^^ 

^ .^ *< o 
z" 

o5 






s .^c 



C 5 CjTJ 
cij u co-rt 

Mm 5 " 



Ol u 






4; i>t 

c 4; toi3oo-3 



ciZ 



.2 
'o 

c 



HI 3 o'O 



« 



cC^ g-d oiS rt 

H.OC-O C C g 

W.C o rt o o>i; 
4-t w >j *j 4J *j -*j 

c ^ M CO CO CO m 

J5 rt 11 oj 1) 01 11 

2 O (y u u (U (U 

.3, o C C C C C 
U W —i HH « M 1-1 



Q > 

W 3 
Q)-. 

g 0T3 O 

z ij c — 

w 2 o 1) 

XI c 
•0.2 



•a 

c 
3 






to- 

v> c 

c Si 
(u i" 

Ea 

SO 

•O E 

c p 
Wi; 

(Uio 



111 4-1 o 
■SCO 

= go 

— ' Oo 

Em<* 

o C d 
C d c 

Boo'^ 

t-' D 3 

i« b o 

,9 ti <-• 

S K g 

*j ■" i- 
>- c ° 



o". 
— o 
o; o 



SO ■«-> 

2 *^o2 
I -«" 

O <J m 
C Ct) 

to CO — 

toll 

b o 

"0-0.2 
Xi V . 
OT3o 
Cfl Co 



cS.6 
° «S 



c 5 ta-S 
1-1 H > 5 



li ■^ o 

3 ccj ^ 

"^ o tj 
83 Ed 

P<Da 



C <u o 



55 



Wellesley College 

Schedule 5 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 
UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1944 

Unexpended 

Principal Income 

June 30. 1944 June 30. 1944 
Permanent Endowment Funds 
Funds for General Purposes: 

Alumnae General Endowment Fund $ 148,005 .00 $ 

Mary Warren Capen Fund 5,485 .00 

Carnegie Corporation Fund 75,000.00 

Class of 1889 Alumnae Fund 2,248.50 

Classof 1895 Fund 50.00 

Francis A. Foster Fund 563,400 .00 

General Endowment Fund 181,674.00 

Kate I. Lord Fund 1,100.00 

David Prouty Fund 6,000 .00 

Helen J. Sanborn Alumnae Endowment Fund 11 ,200 .00 1 62 . 97 

Julia Bone Shepard Fund 42,749 .50 

Lewis Atterbury Stimson Fund 930,303 .25 

Jessie Goff Talcott Fund 543,399 .38 

Alice Gager Thomas Fund 1,000.00 

$ 2,511,614.63 S 162.97 
Funds for Special Purposes: 
Annuity Funds: 



Anonymous Fund No. 1 $ 149,500.00 

Anonymous Fund No. 2 75,000.00 

Anonymous Fund No. 3 45,000 . 00 

Anonymous Salary Fund 100,000 . 00 

Mary S. Case Fund 500.00 

Mary Chamberlain Art Fund 4,000 . 00 

Marjorie Day Fund 5,173 . 50 

Helen A. Merrill Fund 7,500.00 

Nellie G. Prescott Fund 1,000.00 

Cyrus and Eugenia Stewart Fund 30,100.00 



S 417,773.50 $ 



Departmental Funds: 

Art Department Endowment Fund $ 65,650 .00 % 

Art Museum Fund 1,900 . 00 627 . 91 

Avery Fund (Art, Bible, French, Italian, Music) 2,500 . 00 298 . 85 

Katie Emma Baldwin Fund (Mathematics) 5,600 .00 619 . 34 

Robert Charles Billings Fund (Botany) 5,800 .00 

Margery and Dorothy Borg Fund (Social Hygiene) . . . 5,000 .00 

Charlotte A. Bragg Fund (Chemistry) 1,023 .00 31 . 63 

Alice VanVechten Brown Fund (Art) 1,005 .00 11.16 

Alfred Cliflford Fund (Science) 10,000.00 2,491 .12 

Annie Godfrey Dewey Fund (Zoology) 2,000.00 588 .70 

Elizabeth E. Downs Fund (Botany) 6,000.00 606.19 

Elizabeth F. Fisher Fund (Geology) 10,000.00 1,200.00 

Miriam Iszard Guest Fund (Botany) 1 ,000 .00 80 . 00 

Julia Josephine Irvine (Greek) 5,800.00 

Sarah R. Mann Botany Fund 2,075.00 644.40 

Adelaide Spencer Meredith Fund (Italian) 1,494 . 00 205 . 97 

Niles Memorial Fund (Geology) 1,600.00 

{Carried forward) $ 128,447.00 $ 7,405.27 

56 



Treasurer's Report 

Schedule 5 
{Continued) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 
UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1944 

Unexpended 

Principal Income 

June 30. 1944 June 30. 1944 

Permanent Endowment Funds {Continued) 
Funds for Special Purposes: {Continued) 

Departmental Funds: {Continued) {Brought forward) $ 128,447.00 $ 7,405.27 

Charles A. Pastene 5,000.00 647.21 

Rosa Conrad Sanders Fund (Art) 200 . 00 65.69 

Edmund Clark Sanford Fund (Psychology) 4,182.00 1,723.91 

Scientific Fund 314 . 80 

Isabella Shaw Fund (History) 11,200.00 

Caroline B. Thompson Fund (Zoology) 25,000 . 00 3,951 . 44 

Edith S. Tufts Fund (Latin, Greek) 16,000.00 

Wenckebach Memorial Fund (German) 1,125.00 45.35 

Louise Curtis Whitcomb Fund (French) 1 ,000 .00 99 . 55 

Sarah E. Whitin Fund (Astronomy) 28,100.00 11,544.88 

$ 220,254.00 3{25,798.10 
Graduate Fellowship and Scholarship Funds: 

Anne Louise Barret Fund S 27,000 .00 S 

Loretto Fish Carney Memorial Scholarship 3,750.00 900.00 

Graduate Study and Research Fund 3,000.00 120.00 

Amy Morris Homans Scholarship Fund 7,500.00 

Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship Fund 35,059 .23 126 . 21 

Fanny Bullock Workman Scholarship Fund 30,000.00 

S 106,309.^ $ 1,146.21 

Lecture Funds: 

Katharine Lee Bates Poetry Fund S 11,200.00 S 376.91 

Annette Finnigan Endowment Fund 25,000 . 00 2,291 . 66 

Helen Kate Furness Fund 2,300.00 292.36 

Sophie Hart Fund 15,100.00 939.79 

Mary E. Horton Fund 1,660.00 397.95 

Physics Lecture Fund 1,655.50 224.32 

Elizabeth White Memorial Fund 5,060.00 762.01 

$ 61,975.50 S 5,285.00 

Library Funds: 

Gorham D. Abbott Memorial Fund (Education) $ 1,100.00 8 

Blanche G. Bunting Fund (Music) 1 ,000 .00 20 . 80 

Class of 1918 Fund (Music) 5,230.00 

Caroline Dayton Fund (History) 8,100 . 00 52 . 25 

Dorothea Dean Fund (Music) 5,000 .00 

Edith Hemenway Eustis Library Fund (Hygiene) .... 2,200 .00 69 . 31 

Florence Foley Fund 5,000.00 

Eleanor A. McC. Gamble Fund (Psychology) 768 .71 

Indian Library Fund 2,000.00 

Arlene Westwood Jackson Fund (French) 2,500.00 

Sophie Jewett Memorial Fund (English Literature) .. 2,195.82 3.17 

Edward N. Kirk Library Fund 6,700.00 264.57 

Library Permanent Fund 189,550.00 

Susan Minns Fund (Botany) 12,204.60 316.81 

{Carried forward) $ 243,549.13 $ 726.91 

57 



Wellesley College 

Schedule 5 
{Continued) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 
UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1944 



Principal 
June 30, 1944 

Permanent Endowment Funds {Continued) 
Funds for Special Purposes: {Continued) 

Library Funds: {Continued) {Brought forward) $ 243,549.13 

Annie Hooker Morse Fund 1,100.00 

Elisabeth Nash Fund (English Literature) 5,000 . 00 

George Herbert Palmer Fund 15,000.00 

Elizabeth Winslow Peters Fund 5,300.00 

Caroline Frances Pierce Fund 500 . 00 

Helen J. Sanborn Spanish Library Fund 5,600.00 

Seven Women's Colleges Fund 970 . 00 

Shafer Library Fund (Mathematics) 2,590.00 

Harriet A. Shaw Fund (Music) 

Sweet Library Fund (Biblical History) 5,600.00 

Marie Louise Tuck Memorial Fund (English Litera- 
ture) 208 . 00 

Helen L. Webster Memorial Fund 1,000 . 00 

$ 286,417.13 



Unexpended 

Income 
June 30. 1944 



25 

484, 



62 
09 



22.95 

1,186.51 

3.00 



$ 2,449.08 



Loan Funds: 

Mary Whiton Calkins Graduate Fund $ 

Mary Hemenway Loan Fund 

McDonald-Ellis Memorial Fund 

Helen A. Shafer Loan Fund 



$ 



Maintenance Funds: 

Alexandra Botanic Garden Fund 

Alumnae Hall Endowment Fund 

Fiske Hall Fund 

Founders Fund 

H. H. Hunnewell Aboretum Fund 

Maintenance Fund for Academic Buildings . 

Organ Fund 

Amos W. Stetson Fund 

Mabel A. Stone Memorial Fund 

Three Sisters Choir Fund 

George William Towle Infirmary Fund . . . , 



% 



4,661.78 S 

8,500.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

15,161.78 $ 

31,405.00 $ 454.18 

119,651.00 

1,600.00 838.71 

190,873.00 

27,900.00 502.38 

322,300.00 

2,200.00 

4,500.00 1,021.06 

4,000.00 572.56 

16,700.00 

2,950.00 

724,079.00 $ 3,388.89 



Miscellaneous Funds: 

Lucy Branch Allen Fund $ 500.00 $ 20.00 

Caswell Fund 2,110.18 

Class of 1885 Alumnae Fund 5,108.79 

Sophia Helen Fisk Fund 890.00 315.76 

Horsford Fund 34,477. 14 600.00 

EUza Mills McClung Fund 5,322.45 1,030.15 

Philadelphia Fund 10,000.00 1,547.34 

Mayling Soong (Madame Chiang Kai-shek) Foun- 
dation 36,473.00 

I. N. Van Nuys Memorial Fund 10,600.00 1,310. 17 

% 105,481.56 % 4,823.42 



58 



Treasurer's Report 

Schedule 5 
{Continued) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 
UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1944 

Unexpended 
Principal Income 

June 30, 1944 June 30. 1944 
Permanent Endowment Funds {Continued) 
Funds for Special Purposes: {Continued) 
Prize Funds: 

Robert Charles Billings Prize Fund (Music) $ 3,100 . 00 $ 610 . 40 

Katharine Coman Memorial Fund (Economics and 

Social History) 650.00 121 .87 

Davenport Prize Fund (Oral Interpretation) 1,100.00 127.91 

Erasmus History Prize Fund 500 .00 22 . 71 

Isabelle Eastman Fisk Prize Fund (Public Speaking or 

Debating) 1,100.00 101.27 

Mary G. Hillman Award (Mathematics) 1,250.00 35. 18 

Jacqueline Award (English Composition) 1,020.00 37.50 

Mary White Peterson Prize Fund (Botany, Chemistry, 

Zoology) 1,100.00 13.31 

Lewis Atterbury Stimson Prize (Mathematics) 3,100.00 76.07 

Ethel H. Folger Williams Memorial Fund (German) 500.00 26.24 

Woodrow Wilson Prize Fund (Political Science) 200 .00 .72 

Florence Annette Wing Memorial Fund for Poetry 

Prize 1,000.00 3.60 

Natalie Wipplinger Fund (German) 829 . 43 69 . 34 



% 15,449.43 5 1,246.12 



Salary Funds: 

Katharine Lee Bates Professorship (English Litera- 
ture) $ 100,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund (Music) 28,100.00 

Mary Whiton Calkins Professorship 11 4,740 . 35 

Class of 1898 Professorship (Physics) 75,000.00 

Class of 1902 Professorship (English Composition) . . . 25,844 . 00 

Katharine Coman Professorship (Industrial History) 50,000.00 

Currier-Monroe Fund (Speech) 3C,000 . 00 

Anna White Deveraux Fund 30,000. 00 

Ralph Emerson Fund (History and Government) . . . 35,000 . 00 

Endowment Fimd for Salaries 1,759,403.78 

Ruby Frances Howe Farwell Professorship (Botany) . . 103,600 . 00 

Margaret C. Ferguson Professorship (Botany) 45,000 . 00 

Frisbie Professorship (Economics) 19,100.00 

Helen Day Gould Professorship (Mathematics) 56,300 . 00 

Stephen Greene Professorship of Economics 33,125.00 

Susan M. Hallowell Professorship (Botany) 40,000.00 

Edward S. Harkness Fund 175,000.00 

Sophie Chantal Hart Professorship (English Composi- 
tion) 100,000 . 00 

Caroline Hazard Professorship (Music) 103,200.00 

Mary Hemenway Fund (Hygiene) 120,762 .00 

A. Barton Hepburn Professorship (Economics) 138,500 . 00 

Ruth Sibley Hilton Foundation (Music) 25,000 . 00 

The Elizabeth Hodder Professorship of History 50,015.00 

Horsford Fund for Sabbatical Grants 10,500.00 

H. H. HunneweU Professorship (Botany) 38,100.00 

Ellen Stebbins James Fund 112,600.00 

Elizabeth Kimball Kendall Professorship (History and 

Political Science) 75,000.00 

Ellen A. Kendall Professorship (Greek) 67,600 . 00 

{Carried Jorwari) $ 3,561,490. 13 

59 



Wellesley College 

Schedule 5 
{Continued) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 
UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1944 

Unexpended 

Principal Income 

June 30, 1944 June 30, 1944 
Permanent Endowment Funds {Continued) 
Funds for Special Purposes: {Continued) 

Salary Funds: {Continued) {Brought forward) $ 3,561,490. 13 $ 

John Stewart Kennedy Fund (Biblical History) 56,300.00 

Clara Bertram Kimball Professorship (Art) 84,500.00 

Hamilton C. Macdougall Professorship (Music) 60,560 .00 

Annie S. Montague Fund (Greek) 35,819.07 

Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial Fund (Presidency). 113,800.00 

Alice Freeman Palmer Professorship (History) 80,950.00 

Ellen Fitz Pendleton Fund (Sabbatical Grants) 109,350.00 

Ruth Baker Pratt Professorship (Government) 25,000.00 

Charlotte Fitch Roberts Professorship (Chemistry) . . . 100,000 .00 

Helen J. Sanborn Endowment Fund (Spanish) 132,600.00 

Martha Hale Shackford Professorship (English Lit- 
erature) 50,445 .50 

Lewis Atterbury Stimson Professorship (Mathematics) 100,000.00 

Carla Wenckebach Professorship (German) 61,400.00 

Candace Wheeler Fund (Sabbatical Grants) 100,000.00 

Sarah Frances Whiting Professorship (Physics) 79,393.04 

S 4,751,607 .'74 S 

Scholarship Funds: 

Adams Scholarship Fund $ 2,200 .00 S 

Aldrich Scholarship Fund 1 ,004 .43 

Edith Baker Scholarship 7,800.00 

Walter Baker Memorial Scholarship 7,800 .00 

Emilie Jones Barker Scholarship 6,082 .82 

Dr. Alma Emerson Beale Fund 3,300.00 

Lillian Hunt Bermann Scholarship 5,550 .00 

Lucile Kroger Berne Scholarship Fund 10,000.00 

Charles Bill Scholarship Fund 7,800 .00 

Charles B. Botsford Scholarship Fund 5,600 .00 

Nathan Brezner Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Marian Kinney Brookings Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Florence N. Brown Memorial Scholarship 5,600.00 

Emily Grace Bull Scholarship 20,000 .00 

Arthur L. Cams Fund 10,000 .00 

Mary Caswell Memorial Scholarship 5,404. 50 

Chicago Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund 5,000 .00 

Cincinnati Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund 499 .62 

Augustus R. Clark Memorial Scholarship 5,600.00 

Class of 1880 Scholarship 2,230. 33 

Class of 1884 Scholarship Fund 9,520 .00 

Class of 1889 Memorial Scholarship 1,100.00 

Classof 1893 Memorial Scholarship Fund 6,100.00 

Class of 1916 Scholarship Fund 2,200.00 

Abbie A. Coburn Memorial Scholarship 2,200 .00 

Connecticut Scholarship 5,600 .00 

Margaret McClung Cowan Fund 1,100 . 00 

Elizabeth and Susan Cushman Fund 23,610.00 

{Carried forward) $ 168,901 .70 $ 

60 



Treasurer's Report 

Schedule 5 
{Continued) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 
UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1944 

Unexpended 

Principal Income 

June 30, 1944 June 30, 1944 
Permanent Endowment Funds {Continued) 
Funds for Special Purposes: {Continued) 

Scholarship Funds: {Continued) {Brought forward) $ 168,901 .70 $ 

George H. Davenport Scholarship 10,000.00 

Norma Lieberman Decker Scholarship Fund 6,487 .50 

Durant Memorial Scholarship 5,600.00 

Pauline A. Durant Scholarship 8,250 .00 

John Dwight Memorial Scholarship 10,000.00 

Gertrude Ellis Scholarships 10,000.00 

Emmelar Scholarship 5,600 .00 

Ruby Frances Howe Farwell Scholarship 2,100.00 

Elizabeth S. Fiske Scholarship 5,600 .00 

Joseph N. Fiske Memorial Scholarship 9,000 .00 

Rufus S. Frost Scholarships 6,700 .00 

Howard Cogswell Furman Scholarship 5,000 .00 

Mary Elizabeth Gere Scholarship Fund 5,600.00 

Josephine Keene Gifford Scholarship 2,000.00 

Marguerite Adelaide Godding Scholarsliips 3,000 .00 

Goodwin Scholarship 5,600 .00 

Helen Day Gould Scholarship No. 1 11,200.00 

Helen Day Gould Scholarship No. 2 11,200.00 

Helen Day Gould Scholarship No. 3 11,200.00 

M. Elizabeth Gray Scholarships 1 1,200 .00 

Grover Scholarship 5,600 .00 

Amelia A. Hall Scholarship Fund 10,000 .00 

Sarah Evelyn Hall Scholarship Fund 5,000 .00 

Thomas B. Harbison Memorial Scholarship 1 5,000 .00 

Ethel Martine Harding Scholarship 5,000 .00 

Cora Stickney Harper Fund 2,200 .00 

Emily P. Hidden Scholarship Fund 2,200.00 

Winifred Frances Hill Scholarship 20,000 .00 

Sarah J. Holbrook Scholarship 3,300.00 

Evelyn and Mary Elizabeth Holmes Scholaiship Fund 6,000 .00 

Sarah J. Houghton Memorial Scholarship 6,700 .00 

Ada L. Howard Scholarship 6,700.00 

John R. Hunt Memorial Scholarship 5,550.00 

Sarah V. Hunt Memorial Scholarship 5,550 .00 

Sarah B. Hyde Scholarship 2,200.00 

John and Jane Jackson Fund 1,878.78 

Eliza C. Jewett Scholarships 6,700 .00 

Margaret Weyerhauser Jewett Fund 5,337 .50 

Sophie Jewett Memorial Scholarship 1,100.00 

Ethel A. Jones Juvenal Scholarship 9,691 .94 

Mildred Keim Fund 11,200.00 

Frances L. Knapp Memorial Scholarship Fund 12,528 .25 437 .04 

Katharine Knapp Scholarship 5,600 .00 

Leona Lebus Scholarship Fund 4,000 .00 

Anne A. Lewis Scholarship 13,359. 50 

Vinnietta June Libbey Scholarship 4,000 .00 

Agnes M. Lindsay Fund 25,000.00 500.00 

Alice H. Luce Scholarship Fund 5,383 .41 

McDonald-Ellis Gift Scholarship Fund 10,000 .00 

Janet C. Moore Fund 2,000.00 30.00 

Gertrude C. Munger Scholarships 10,587.50 

{Carrud forward) $ 543,606.08 S 967.04 

61 



Wellesley College 



Schedule 5 
{Continued) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 



UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1944 

Principal 
June 30, 1944 
Permanent Endowthent Funds {Continued) 
Funds FOR Special Purposes: {Continued) 

Scholarship Funds: {Continued) {Brought forward) $ 543,606.08 

Mildred Washburn McLean Memorial Fund 5,000.00 

New Haven Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund 1 ,000 . 00 

New Jersey Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund 2,500.00 

Adelaide M. Newman Fund 3,000. 00 

Anna S. Newman Memorial Scholarship 2,100.00 

New York Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund 6,225 . 00 

Northfield Seminary Scholarship 5,600 . 00 

Anna Palen Scholarship 1 1,200 . 00 

Anna C. Patten Scholarship Fund 10,564. 58 

Mary Arnold Petrie Scholarship 5,000 . 00 

Adelaide L. Pierce Scholarship Fund 15,000.00 

Eleanor Pillsbury Memorial Scholarship Fund 106,500.00 

Pittsburgh Wellesley Club Scholarship 7,600 . 00 

Catherine Ayer Ransom Scholarship 1,100.00 

Mae Rice Memorial Scholarship Fund 1,100.00 

Samuel M. and Anna M. Richardson Fund 104,285 . 70 

Rollins Scholarship 9,000.00 

Helen J. Sanborn Alumnae Scholarship Fund 11,200.00 

Science Hill Alumnae Association Scholarship Fund 5,867.62 

Oliver N., Mary C, and Mary Shannon Fund 18,550.00 

Shattuck Scholarship Fund 5,000 . 00 

Harriet A. Shaw Fund 20,000. 00 

Anne Lawrence Shepard Fund 1,400.00 

Anna Margaret and Mary Sloan Scholarship Fund . . . 13,965 . 41 
David B., Mary B., and Jeannette Cole Smith Memo- 
rial Fund 1,000.00 

Harriet F. Smith Scholarship Fund 22,500.00 

Mary Frazer Smith Scholarship 1,000.00 

Stockwell Memorial Scholarship 2,200 . 00 

Stone Scholarship Fund 28,100 . 00 

Sweatman Scholarship 5,600 . 00 

Julia Ball Thayer Scholarship 6,700.00 

Jane Topliff Memorial Scholarship 6,700 . 00 

Ann Morton Towle Memorial Scholarship 5,600 . 00 

George William Towle Memorial Scholarship Fund . . 7,550 . 00 

Marie Louise Tuck Scholarship Fund 11,200.00 

Union Church Scholarship 2,800.00 

Elizabeth Caralyn Wayne Memorial Scholarship. . . . 1,000.00 

Weston Scholarship 5,600.00 

Jeannie L. White Scholarship 5,600 . 00 

Amasa J. Whiting Scholarship 2,600 . 00 

Annie M. Wood Scholarship 11,200.00 

Caroline A. Wood Scholarship 5,600. 00 

Warren Mead Wright Scholarship Fund 10,000.00 



Total Permanent Endowment Funds . . 

62 



$ 1,058,914.39 
$10,275,037.89 



Unexpended 

Income 
June 30, 1944 



$ 967.04 



297.98 
Y,378!74 



16.67 



$ 2,784.43 
$47,084.22 



Schedule 5 
{Concluded) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 
UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1944 

Unexpended 
Principal Income 

June 30, 1944 June 30, 1944 

Other Funds 
Building and Equipment Funds: 

Art Building Fund S 1,000.00 $ 160.00 

Infirmary Building Fund 4,350 .19 

Emily Grace Bull Morse Fund 9,061.86 

S 14,412.05 $ 160.00 

Unallocated Funds: 

Classof 1921 Fund $ 24,915.01 

Class of 1922 Fund 18,707.33 

Classof 1927 Fund 8,396.15 

Charles Fremont Richardson and Marcia Stevens 

Richardson Memorial Fund 834.00 $ 33.36 

$ 52,852.49 $ 33.36 
Funds Unrestricted as to Principal and Income: 
General: 

Lillian Hunt Bermann Fund $15,582.40 $ 

William Blodget Fund 5,000.00 

Helen R. M. Brady Fund 100.00 

Isabella Campbell Fund 2,500.00 

Angie Clara Chapin Fund 16,268.75 

Jennie M. Deyo Fund 1 ,427 .25 

Charles Church Drew Fund 65,415.00 

Amelia G. Dyer Fund 23,450.00 

Charlotte M. Fisk Fund 18,950.00 

Margaret A. Heath Fund 2,300.00 

Margaret H. Jackson Fund 12,425 .92 

Eliza H. Kendrick Fund 6,041 .34 

John Wells Morss Fund 5,000 .00 

Alice F. Peckham Fund 1,000.00 

Lillian E. Pool Fund 5,554.09 

Gladys Brown Rollins Fund 1,000 . 00 670 . 00 

Margaret Olivia Sage Fund 153.20 

Mary E. Shoemaker Fund 1,100.00 681.70 

Alma Wright Stone Fund 25,000.00 

Richard H. Sturtevant Fund 1,100.00 

Cornelia Warren Fund 2,500.00 % 211,867.95 

Special: 

Alice Cheney Baltzell Fund $267,694.27 

Barnswallows Fund 7,677 .83 

Biblical History Fund 1,000.00 165.00 

Susanna Whitney Hawkes Fund 1 5,500 .00 3,196 . 35 

Mayling Soong (Madame Chiang 

Kai-shek) Foundation 51,731.46 198.30 

Special Unrestricted No. 1 1 ,000 .00 33 . 33 

Wellesley CoUege News Fund 3,224.12 128.96 

Sarah Frances Whiting Fund 10,000.00 357,827.68 

$ 569,695.63 $ 5,073.64 

Acctoents Reserve Fund $ 16,954 .90 $ 

Administrative Reserve Fund $ 455,994.85 S 

Reserve Fund for Depreciation of Buildings $ 845,876.47 $ 

Securities Income Reserve Fund $ 118,712.47 S 

Undistributed Profit or Loss on Investments Sold $ 33,330.31 $ 

Trustee Accounts: 

Classof 1926 Fund $ 6,500.00 

Marjorie Day Trust Fund 10,000.00 



$ 16,500.00 $ 



Total Other Funds $2,057,668.55 $5,267.00 



Wellesley College 

LEGACIES AND GIFTS 1943-44 

Legacies and Gifts Added to Funds 

Administrative Reserve Fund $ 250 . 00 

Art Museum Fund 100.00 

Alice Cheney BaltzeU Fund (additional) (legacy) 20,000.00 

Nathan Brezner Scholarship Fund 1,000 . 00 

Alice VanVechten Brown Fund 1,005.00 

Mary Whiton Calkins Graduate Fund (additional) (legacy) 20 . 02 

Mary Whiton Calkins Professorship 5,500 . 00 

Class of 1884 Scholarship Fund (additional) 875 .00 

Class of 1885 Alumnae Fund (additional) 5.10 

Class of 1889 Alumnae Fund 2,248 . 50 

Class of 1895 Fund 50.00 

Class of 1916 Scholarship Fund 200.00 

Class of 1921 Fund (additional) 570.85 

Class of 1922 Fund (additional) 276.72 

Anna White Devereaux Fund (legacy) 15,000.00 

Founders Fund (additional) 25 . 00 

Thomas B. Harbison Memorial Scholarship (additional) 1 ,000 . 00 

Infirmary Building Fund (additional) 5 . 00 

Frances L. Knapp Memorial Scholarship Fund (additional) 6,200 . 00 

New Haven Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund 1,000 . 00 

Pittsburgh Wellesley Club Scholarship (additional) 300 . 00 

Samuel M. and Anna M. Richardson Fund 1,666.00 

Anne Lawrence Shepard Fund (additional) 200 . 00 

Anna Margaret and Mary Sloan Scholarship Fund (additional) (legacy) 3,648 . 83 

Mayling Soong Foundation (Restricted) 25,100.00 

Mayling Soong Foundation (Unrestricted) 42,083 . 00 

Special Unrestricted No. 1 1,000 . 00 

Lewis Atterbury Stimson Fund (legacy) 930,303 . 25 

Robert T. Swaine Loan Fund 2,500.00 

Elizabeth Caralyn Wayne Memorial Scholarship 1 ,000 . 00 

$1,063,132.27 

Gifts to the College Through the Alumnae Fund 

♦Salary of Mary Whiton Calkins Visiting Professor $ 5,500.00 

*Class of 1884 Scholarship Fund (additional) 875.00 

*Thomas B. Harbison Memorial Scholarship Fund (additional) 1 ,000 . 00 

*Samuel M. and Anna M. Richardson Fund 1,666.00 

*Mayling Soong Foundation (Restricted) 1 00 . 00 

*Mayling Soong Foundation (Unrestricted) 37,381 . 24 

Scholarship from Cleveland Wellesley Club 150.00 

Scholarship Gift from Mr. and Mrs. Alexander S. MacDonald 250 . 00 

* Included in whole or in part in Gifts Added to Funds. 

8 46,922.24 

Gifts for Scholarships (for Current Use) 

Cleveland Wellesley Club $ 150.00 

Springfield College Club 125.00 

Indianapolis Wellesley Club 500.00 

Charles Irwin Travelli Fund 500.00 

Committee of Permanent Charity Fund 1,500.00 

(S500 of this amount received from Theodore C. Hollander Fund) 

Estate of Lucinda Wyman Prince, '91-'93 500 . 00 

Various friends of the College 1 >380 . 00 

$ 4,655.00 
64 



<o 














» 












* 


« 


« 


« 








te 




^1 


oooooooooo • -co -o 


1 00 




•§ 




oooooooooo 




in 


in 


o 




•2 




u-oS; 














^2 




E,"^ - 


iOOOOOC5C)000 




^.^ 


OJ 


c< 




"Q 




oWo 


tN-*(Nmo"^"^"^OLO 




t^ 


vO 


o 




c^ 










CO 










>4 


0^ 


1 ^ 

1^ 








d> 


Csf^OOO^~000000000 


1 *^ 








3 


cnc<^ooo«ooooooooo 


1 U-) 








1 


f0'-i000'~'000000000 


1 o 








vooooof~~ooooooooo 


1 f^ 








M 


t^ \0 o o_o * "-i,'^^'-^„"^„'^„'^^'^^o_"^ 


1 r~- 

"* 1 " 








O 


cc^'^To o '-"OO O o"o"o'o'o"f^ 


o 








oa 


(NcO<Nii-10'^"^"^'=^000000 

T-H ^ ^ l-H ^ CN) Tl -^ ^ 


00 

1 "^ 

1*^ 




■<^ 




•4J 


&? 










^- 


X X x^^xxxxx^x::^ 






c 


tN<NCN(SC^CNCMCNC^(NCSl(NCvJCMCN 










41 


■^lOLOLninLnioioioiriLnLoor-^r^ 






ti 




Q 


C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^O^C^C^C^<:^C^ 






^ 












D 


















>—i 








































H 








































< 








































m 








































« 








































l-H 








































H 








































HH 








































P!^ 








































ID 












o 




ooo 
















U 












u 




en c/l v3 
















ti 












■c 




'C 'u "u 
















CO 




(A 








CO 




D U U 
WC/3 0O 
















pCH 




2 


totowiwTenrrtWrco^wrcococnwtow 











O 


..-nTJ-OTD-aTS-o-a-OTJ-aTJTiTJT: 








n 


HCCCCCcCCCCCGCCC 












ZOOOOOnOOOOOOOOC 




• 


c/5 










0) 






N 


>< 


wa 








»-H 


Q 




a;333333333DJ3332 




^ 


h-) 


Z 














OHHHhHHHHHhhhhhh 




c 

3 












< 




^C0W«W«rrt««'>WW«tOW3WW 




•a 




PS 




WniO«J«JU4jUUOOt)l>lUt)«, 










[-.*s*JtJ*J*J^<-l-l-'*J*J*J*J*J*J*J 








u 








"S 




2 










J5c/3!Z)C/2C/:(Z!c/DV3V2C/3a)C/3!/2IZ)C/3C/: 




B 




o 




-TI-OT3T3T!tJ'OT3T3-OTIT3-OT3-C 




<0 










Q 




E 




tlJ^4-'-t-*4->-t->.tZj-^-'-*-*-*-*.»-*-*4-*-*-*->^-*- 










fc 'S '5 '5 'H 'S '5 'S '5 'S '5 "E "S '5 'S 'c 




*4.J 












H 
O 




zd^^^P;d5^p::)D^;:3DP 




u 




z 








O 






ooooooooooooooc 


o 


tn 








ooooooooooooooc 


o 


flj 




5 




OOOOOOOOOOOOOOun 


in 


^ 










n #t 


o 




H 




inCNOOOCNOOOOOOOOCN 


t-~ 


).< 




CO 


Ph 


CMcOCNiOO-^miriOOOOOOC 


r~- 


^ 
^ 






,-1 ^-1 ■^.-Ht-hCN'-I'^'- 


in 




2 






*-< 


# 




►^ 




M 


* 




























«<» 





65 



^(3 



>3. 



OOOOOCNOOOf^OOOOOOOr^ 
OOOOO^t^OOOOOOOiOOr^ 

ooomij^sorgooooooocouoog 

OO'a-COCNCAGOCNm'— 'OOOOOVDrOo 

c^■^'Or^■^c^T-<c^Loc^^u^OlOLnoooo 



t^ 



6^ 



V 

3 

o 
o 
P3 



CMOM-vooioomONOoooooom 
cooLnr^ocN^<t^oc<^OLnr^asooco 

oooor-o-'-'CNoouot—ooofOoooLncN 

OOtMcO-<^OOOor-~t-^OrOCNIOOOO\0 
CNOm'-iiococMTj-cM'Ttnoog^oooO'-' 

scTocTvo'ro'irr'^ -^Tt-'c^f-^ Cs C\ C^ <X in C^ -r" 






in 





4) 1) 


C7\ 


fi- 


T-H 


1— 1 


^ 




o 




CO 










3 


ti 


Q 






Pi 
p 

O 

o 

H 

i/5 



■S 

c3 



Q 
2 

■J 

OS 

a 
z 

O 



O 



H 

CO 



8 

s 
o 

tn 
D 
Z 

o 

m 






I i^ I 



c^CNloor-c^O^OT-l■^r^Lo^^r^c^l<Noo 
Tj-vof-'^ioioirivom'^soioOLnunLoio 



a 
_o 

i-i 
o 
a, 

US 

So 

xi o 






o 

o 

u >, en 

^ a— 



c 

O <u C . 



o 
o 









c o 



TO Q. 

CX o 



CT3 
nj O 






a c 



<n3Wwrt«,5J^ 
20033J3C/3C! 

Q C C frn n] (u --^ ^ 






— H *t/ ^ •— < ^ tJ Ui f 

S «iPn^ ^ J^ o 
gw^Ow fc t: a, 

« O t, .3 > > r9 

p^ K M ;z; ;z; c« c/3 c« w >• 



Ho 

c c 
o o 



IX 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

ooooooooooooooooo 
o o o_o_o^o_o_o o o o^o^o_oo^o_o_ 

ro-*cgcs-*<Nm<N^CNiminu-)Ti-cMCNLr> 



o 

o 
o 

o\ 
o 



kl 

m 

V 

>> 

M 

3 
"O 

V 

•o 

CO 

E 

s 

o 



•o 

CS 






3 



66 



<0! 



030 






» • ♦ • 

■"Ji-ooooooOLnooOjooooooor^ 
■^OLoocnooo^oo^oooo'^ooo'o 

•r-T^Cvf r-rr-rr--rT-r^'"CsrCNJ CO »-i CS ■.— »-i <N 



a 

> 

o 
o 

m 



ooooLncNOOCNOOOooooooot~~oco 

mOCssOt^OOO\OiricO'-imO\OOCX3C\Ot~~ 
^Ci tS c^ en GsC^<S 00 O^-rSlD -rf^OCiOi tJ- •* O '-' 

■^LnlnT^u^■*c<^m■^■<3■u^c^Jsoc<^u^lOc<^c^^loco 






S2 

C3 






O 

CO 

:z: 

D 

•-:» 

< 

I— ( 

H 

I— ( 

»i 
O 

pa 

o 

H 



3 
Q 



3 



Q 
Z 

D 

< 

u 
z 

u 

O 

a 

H 

o 
z 



3 

■•* 

o 
O 

in 

a 
z 

o 
n 



ecu 



o o J >^ 

n^ii at, S- 

^^ tU H) u ti n 

O C C flj 
0H « cfl ^ 



h 



o o 

_ O 3 ^ 



c « 
.£f§ 



w u 



V 



tlH^^ J= 



.22 >i 



■ u o *-< 2 > 



u 

o 
c>' 
.2 ^ 

D- O 
o >- 

2 o- 
o o 

W c 
c-^ 



a 
a 



o 

.2 w 
•C ■'-' 



O'-'OrOT-cfvifMoooooooiCNf^cvuncsoOTrr-m 

OC^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^C^ 



C 



o ° o 



c 
o 

4J 



oj n! 



CO XI 



c s «j e 

- -1 S c o 
t'— , '^ 

5^- 



-<? ii'2 



-■a u-^ «T3 <« 



6 S 6 



i< t^ ^ 
1^3 4-* ^-i 

c c c 



i:^ ^ C 



•J 

§<<<aoo 



O O 



o .s 



c 
«J 

c 

■^ ID 
O S 

aw 



lis >:^u'^ 



o 
o 

u 

o 

Oh 
T3 

n 



^'C V m ^ - 
g O « I- (U V- -j^ 



c o c 



a 
a 
a. 

a 

o 

a 

C j3 

si 

O cM 

c w 

o ^ 

CO n 



^•3' 



ZOoh 






ooo ooooooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooooooooo 
ooooooooooo o_o_c^o^o^o_o_o_o^ 

oo ^""o"©"© o'o'o'o'oin o vo'oo'tn'uT'o o 
ir)ir)ininLnir)"*totr)iomc^)r^c^inLr)CNCMiocO 



c« 



fie 
c 

3 

•o 
£ 

09 

c 
o 



•a 



J3 



3 



67 



^ 



■? 



■Is 






ana is 

oWo 
(J ^n 

£ a V 



0000 
0000 



« 

t-~- o o o 
•0000 



10 O in O 
04 U-) CM un 



«^ 



(M O ■* O 

10 o r~- r-~ 



t~-. IT) 10 o 

C\ CM Cv o 

in ■^ cN 10 
cvTcNTtN" 



o o r-~ o 
10 \o r~- 10 



:3 


vO -^ vo 00 




10 ^-H 


> 


CO Tf T-l CN 




CM -^ 





CM m in m 







« 





00 10 CM I^ 

r^ 00 •^ o 
cM_^c\ ■^„r~-^ 

TT m in ■^ 



«^ 



CO 



00 

00" 



o 

ON 



cn 



6^ 



O 00 CM 

mt% CM 

CM CM O 

■r^ »n (^ 

00 Cm '-« 



tv O O O 
<o O O O 

<o O 10 o 
'^ O in Tj- 
Its o 00 c> 



o 

o 

o 
o 
in^ 

cnT 



CO 

00 






<A 



t~^ 00 


cs in 





C\ 


in r~- ^ 


\o 


in 





r~- m CM 


csin >o 


CM 


00 


<n t~- en 


in en ro r- 


■«— t 


in 


CN Cs 


r^ CN t^ in 


°°^ 


en 










^ CM 


1^ en (N <N 


y—t 


I~- 


CM in -^ 


■<i- CM in (N 


•* 



en 



e^ 



C^ 







Tj- en Tt en 



"+ Ti- en Tt- 



o 
en 

•— > 

H 

< 

1/) 

H 

I— t 

Pi 
ID 
O 

C/3 

o 

H 



• S 

c3 



Q 
Z 

iJ 
< 

ti 

M 

"2 
O 






h 

z 



3 

Q 



s 
•S 

s 
o 
U 



o 

P3 



r~~ c\ •^ ■* 
t-~- vo vo 

CN Cn C7N C\ 



3 

c3 



>< 

H 

H 
P 






CM [~~ O 

r~~ vo vo 

C- 0> Cn 



c 

a 

S 
o 
U 

D 

o 

T3 
C 



a 
a 
a 

6 
o 

U 

■M 

X! 
bo 



nJ 
3 
+-» 

a 

V 



CO 






5 § • 

6 e c 

O O 



S 
o 



o<J 



lU 



■- -0 
J c 

c ^ 

.iS.2 rt.ii-? 

II|P 

s c ^ -^ -"^ 
(U lU 43 3 3 
Ph Oh Ph Pi Qh 



w bp ^U 
■C! C ^ H 

>H ta c bb 

V U V 
•S O ^ rt 

!3^^ § 
<uT3 -a 

■^ « S*^ 
■^^ => ^^^-^ 

Ji^' ■ 

V -M ■ 

■" lU ^ 
B bo 03 



C 
u 



00000 
00000 
o_^o^o_^o^o^ 
in^c^'o'o'^en 
CM in m m en 



000 
000 
o 0^0^ 

o^^^o" 
in in in 



o 
o 
o^ 

in 
en 



r-- ■* 00 
so in -^ 

C^ Cn cK 



c 

SO) 

O ■<-' 

OX3 



n 



3 
o 

a 



V 
S-. 

3 

a 

JO 

"cS 

3 

o 

a 

Si 

u 

>,^ 

fl >> 

rt 3 

a a, 
§ S 
U 

X) 

O 



o 
O 



ca 



O \0 vO 

Tf CN in 

Cn Cn Cn 



o 



O 

< 
Pi 



^ ° ,, 
C fe [fl o 

^ bo.S rt «> 
<<pqU 



S 
o 
U 

>~ 

w ■ 

^■^ s 

fl efl (U 
"5 O tl 

>~r9 (ail's 
cU^ 3 

S« V 



o-s 3 






u c 



s 

XI 



3 
nj 

S u 

„ ™ (h 
ca ^ 1— I ~ 

Pi rt ^ ^ >' 

_ u o O 3 

cc CX bo bo t^ 

u ca nj 0] O. 

ti ?? u o 

Q CJ .-« .Pi 

D j3 -C j3 

UQOU 



0000 

0000 
o^o^o^^o^ 

in o^o'o'" 
CM in in in 



0000 
0000 
o_^o_^o_^o^ 

in en in O 
CM in f\i in 









a 



M 

a 

3 
•o 
i> 
•d 

E 

m 

.2 
'■*j 

I 



J3 



3 



68 



'^'S- 


•* 


« s 


•o^ 


jl 


ome 
Ende 
0. 19 




o , f^ 


^0 





X4 



* * # « 

OOOoOOt^OOO 


oo 
oo 


* 

O O O O O O O) 

o o o o o o <o 




o 
o 


oo 
oo 


r~unooocoOCNin 
'-"'-'inocvi'-'Ooo 

•^ *> rv -^ ** #s 

VO ■<-l Tl T-l -.-1 .— 


2,500 
1,000 


o o o o o o^o 

O O O O O lO tx 

CnT Tf' \0 tS ^ (nT 




in 

00 


oo 
oo 

00 o 



> 

O 

o 
m 



csoooocscncoooooooo-^or^oooor^-t^- 
^OooLn"^~oinooLnoooot^ocnoLnmor~-oo 



oo 
o in 



oo,-i-»j-,-,ooinoooor~-oooof^O'nLnint--in-*'^ OCJ 

mcsjT— c<^c^1-l■^Lnoooo'noO'-'0»-lt^c<^o^^r^o cSi-i 

f^Tj-cvin'^oo-^r^O'-'Oininunoo-^'-ioomcnr-'^ '^„°^ 

r^ irT'-'^Tr^o r-- r^ 00 so cTirToo c\r--tNot-~r~oorO'^r-'^ "*o 

Oo<iLn<MrncMCN'*'<-'Lnrgcj-^c\'^cNCN'*-*tO(Ncnoo mcs 



e7\ 



o 

CO 

1/3 



u 
o 






o 

2 

13 
bH 

< 

a 
w 
z 

O 

u 
X 
H 

O 

1/3 

H 
2 

U 

s 

H 






Q 




•.-ir~-mO>of^t~-inOincsooooooT)-r^OOf^t~^c\r-~ 
vo^CNmrj-inoinin'^fnr^r— ■^in'^t^^inmcvroin 

C^C^C^C^C^O^C^C^C^C^C7^C^C^C^C^OC\C^C^C^C^C^ 



■*-» 

V 
CO vo 
CO ro 



8 
.8 

C 

O 

o 

VI 

a 
z 

o 

n 



C 
« 

a 

o 
O 

TJ 
W 
O 

S c 
o o 

<§^ 

o > O 



P3 « 

G C 

G. u 

p 3 



05 

>s >s >~ 

C C C 

a a ^ 

. a a D, 

S 6 S 

o o o 

OOU 



g< oO 



• c c 

• es ta 

Xs s 

coo 

CTIT3 

S « tij 

O O O 

U _i- jtj 
CO "2 "rt "cfl 



>.o 

O- o 



1 O O 



rt 



5^C^ 



a 3 



5 « 5 S 



«•; 






c fl P 



1h RJ C/0 



:."1^ 



O o 

>H U 

4) 4J 

QQ 



4J C HJ (i 

fe ^- b 'u 

■H ** -^^ 'S JS 



T3 

C o (u u 
-^ "S t; t^ 



,w 



_ I-, 

■o-o 
c c 

c3 (« 



s 



W T3 



*-; C 



wOOOOa 



(13 « RJ 2 
o ^ a; c 
Si • • <- ■-' 



V 

C-^> 



c c 

> > 

_ nj n) 

O hH hr' 

. s ^ ^ 

<^ 'o U "^ ^ 
J3 Dh ^ ^ ^ 
3 S o o o 

? « ^ ^ ^ 






S "3 C 

o a.g >- 

^ O ^ o, 

n! O "3 

,^ I- ™ "I 

u "> « , "t; 

« «? 3 

Oh c crc/D 

g > nj T! 



•S 
• o 

:o 

• >s 

• tfl 

o S 
O V 

5 3 

ch § 
fe oS 



c 

;r; lyj V] 

CT3 fl) ""^ 

Q VTS'-'Q 



c 
o 



O 

«! 

O 

u 

o 

•D 

(13 

Oh 



c (3 « O -s 



bo (fl 1? 3 

SM^ o 

<« o y 

t) •« q ^ 



II. 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

00000000000000000000000 
oooomoooooooooo o_o^o_o_o_o_o_<o_ 

in"o"irr(crr~-"in"cD^O omoooomu-ioooinoino 
csincNjcocNCsiincNmcN-^inoocsicsinLn'TCsiTroot^ 



>.o 
S X 
c-o 

(Z! 



O 
O 
O^ 
irf 



V 

j= 

eg 

_c 

3 
•o 
1) 
•13 
ci! 

E 

to 

C 

o 
•3 

T3 
(4 



(IS 

3 



t^ 



69 



■|.5 







^ 




•a 


■^ 








ve 




f= 


c 




n 


tt) 


o 


o 

l-H 


as 


to 



>£ 



V 

3 

O 
o 



o o o o in 
o o o o <N 

o O o in T-c 
o o o r^ m 
o o in 00 m 

r, •» «N 

<N CS CM 



Tj-in o 00 o 
C\ CN o vo o 

cn '-I m CO o 
C\ CM CM r^ o 
CM 0^~0 "* 0_ 

rrLfTcrirrin" 

Tj- en ^ CM CM 



«» 



00 

o 

in 
en 

"1, 

cn 

o 

cn 

00 

o 



&% 



o o o 
o o o 

d CD d 
in in o 

CvJ^CM_^0^ 

cM"cn cn" 



rg in o 

00 cn o 

\o in o 
o t~- in 
cn in CM 

invo"!--" 

t^ C\ (TN 



o 
o 

d 
o 
in 



CM 

cn 

CM 



^ I 



o 



o 
o 

in 
cs 



00;^ 
o o ^ 

O ■r-l ON 

cn__ 

o 
in 



O 
in 



CM 
CM 



in I o 

CM I vO 

t-h" I c?r 



•<t 


T-H 


T 


SO 


d 


■* 


cn 


^ 


m 


r~-_^ 


•^ 




O 


i~-" 


in 


in 




cn 




« 




in 


6% 


«.» 



C^ 






Tj- -^t in cn in 



cn cn cn 



in <N cn 



O 
CO 

•— > 
< 

1/5 



u 
o 

H 

!/3 



t3 

a 
•S 






S 



3 

Q 



3 

S 

o 
O 

V) 
Q 
Z 

o 

PQ 



■5 



o 

Qi 
•J 



in o o o CM 
in in i^ CO in 

CN Cs Cn CN Cn 



^ On, 

^Uf2 2 






XI 
O 









;-> 1-1 

V V 

-»-» ■*-» 

3 3 

O O 






DO C 

rt O 



2 



WC/2HP>- 



cn l-H 00 
in vo >o 

Cn C\ C> 



< o o o 

Q C (3 C 

< o o o 

^ s s I 

[I. o o o 
oPQQ 

gxJTJT! 

Z rj rtJ ClJ 

a c fi c 

^ Cd CTJ ra 



vo ■^ in 

Tj- Tf Irt 

C\ On C\ 



u 

V 

C/3 

J3 

-M 

<N 

n) 

o 
U 

o y.a 

•S ^ .5 

3 



o o (J 

o r2 o 

" t™ rn 
< 3 « 



M-2 

D-d 
o rt 






cd Qj 









CO 

Q 
Z 

o 

■< 
H 
O 

H 









OOOOOIOI ooo 

oooooo ooo 

O O O^O 0_^ I "T_ I 0_^0_^0 

C^i^Citnin vo" irTo o 

minincNCMoo r--oo 

in T-H ^ 



*» 



I 6^ 

70 



o 
o 
o^ 

in 

CM 
6ft 



ooo 

1-H O O 

m o^ 

o" 
in 



o 


o 


1— t 


y—l 


in 


in 


#t 




o 


CN 


m 


■^ 




-<J-^ 








in 


«ft 


«ft 






-5 K 



E c - 
oWo 



3 
■(3 
> 

M 
O 
O 

n 



o 
o 

d 
o 
o 



o 






* 

o 
o 

tn 

00 



* * * 

O <0 O) o o 
O Cn '^ O O 


o 
o 


O O 
in in 


o 
o 


****** * * 

ooOf^ooooo 

OO'^NOOinOOCN 


* * 
in 

CN 


oo 
oo 


o °o '^ o o 
in O O in o 
CN '^ '~- CM '^ 


o 

iri 


CO ■* 
00 -^ 


o 
o 
in 


Lno^^omcMOino 
cso'2^r--voOr~-.-H 

>OsO^C\cOin"^cOsO 


in 


oo 
o o 
o lo 


«-4 v^ 


IN 




CM 


^ ^ cS^ 




TfcO 



r^ 


in o o o in 


O 


oo 


VO 


r- o o o o 


O 


oo 


en 


O O o O CO 


O 


o o 


o 


cO|f^ o o ^ 


o 


o o 


■<t 


\0 t^ in en T-i 


O 


O in 










y.^ 


O ^ o T— in 


o 


o ^ 


•^ 


en "^ -* CN c<-i 


m 


in in 



o 

00 



voooocsooinoo 
OOinomenosoo 



en voOininr-mcnino 

en r^OO^^^^CN^OCNO 

CN 00 -^ CN T— T— O 0_^CN^<JT_ 

t~-^ oo"ocr-r-rcN"..-r->:j-''-^'cN --I 

■* en CN m ■* -"r -^ IT) in m 



<r> 


o 


CN O 


CN 


o 


T-ir~ 


<-> 


o 


CN O 


SO 


m 


m ■* 


1^ 


m 


r- \o 








en 


M 


o o 


in 


en 


■<i-'<i- 



ON 

CM 



00 
CN^ 



o 

On 

r- 

CN 



<^ I 6% 



I o> I 






o 

CO 

w 

H 

1— t 

o 

w 

O 
H 

C/3 







-a . • 

u . ■ 



. 3 

;S 

. 3 

• u 

i o 
. in 

; 6* 

; >^ 

. c 
. a 

■ a 

: S 

. o 
• U 



y^Td 



c 
>-< r 

V I— I 



u 



f. (U t- 

g s ^ 



fin C ° C E « u 

> « o e-u^«ii ^ 



V 
PL, 

> 

■4-» 

E 

3 

u 

fe5 



a 

E 
o 
O 



ii=a 






,1) S-, 

u > 

'^ o 

•r-in 



3 

E 

3 

o 

*■»-» 

u 
> 

o 
O 

65 

m 



■o 


• ■ 


u 


• 


u 


•T) 

: ^ 

■ 4J 




■ I. 


V 


■CU 


> 






V 




■ > 



a 



a-di 

o iiO 
^. So 

NO<v, O 
O w 



^ •'t; i! « § 
ko u eg in 3 ■* 



ir,~0 1.9^(1^ 
in 3 <-. CN (-\ 

5 -£^ a. - K^ 
E^ rc5§§ 



• > 

• »-« 

:S 

. 3 

• o 



• a 

• o 
' *■♦-» 

• n 

• u 

■ O 

• a 

• u 

■ O 



■ C/3 V 

!t3 



p3 



M 




_> 

a 

3 
u 
I 

c 
o 



o 
U 



3 



«J D O .S 



O u h! ^i;; 3 .3 - V- Y C -^ C 5 



■;3"ow'-^3'^ 






•S E I ^ Oi S « • ? 
ZPh WCO WW H-l 



< a 

U -I ■ 



u 

Ih 
ti 

J^ 

V 

kl 

C 
o 

<a 

u 
O 
CU 
u 

o 

O 

V 

CO 

V 



iSiTI 



V 

it 

a 

3 

V 

•o 

d 

E 

m 

a 
o 



el 



E-a 

3W 

12 "S 



o 

O 

in 



o o 
o o 
m in 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 
in in CN o m 



o 
o 
in 



oo O OOOOOOQOO c> 5 2 
oo O OOOOOOOOO o o o 
mm in cNenmmmmmenm en m m 



JS 

o 

9 



71 



(O^-, 




* 








* * 




* * * 


j 




OOO 


o 


OOO 


o 


oo 


oo 


o o O o o • 


.. '"<> 


o o o 


o 


OOO 


o 


in in 


oo 


•^ o o o o • 


DTSiS 






• 


• 


. 






^,H - 


O O in 


o 


OOO 


o 


t^ <N 


do 


o o in o o • 


oUo 


lO lO CJ 


o 


in in o 


o 


00 •^ 


m o 


o o CN in m • 


c^e 




CN^(N^>0 


cq 


t--__(N o^ 


"^-, 


-o en 


in in 


CM ■^^no r- «^„ • 




CN ci 


<N 


in CN T-T 


t-" 




cn"'-'" 


of c4" : 




>^ 


t^ 


















OO CO 


o 


o o t-- 


00 


in o 


o o 


o or^ o o vo 






00(N 


o 


t^ o-o 


00 


t- O 


o in 


o o >o o o o 




u 

3 


o lo r^ 


d 


o o ■^ 


in 


r^ o 


O CN 


o o ■* m o 1^ 




13 


O 1^ CN 


o 


CN in ■* 


^ 


CN — 1 


in o 


o o •* r~- m m 




> 


O rO O 


o 


'^'•^„"^" 


en 


in en 


r^ in 


in T-H cN in r^ (^ 














«^ r\ 






y\ 


ro T- eg 


(N 


^~''o'~cC 


<s 


00 CS) 


CN in 


T-H in r~- 00 0^1 m 




O 


un ko 00 


in 


o in '-I 


^— 4 


'i- Tf 


in csi 


in CO ■* cs m en 



o 
C5 



O 

in 
en 

in 

s 






<A 



6© 



o 

CO 

H 
< 



D 
U 
w 

O 

h 

C/3 



• S 



W3 

D 
Z 

.J 
< 

u 
a 
z 

a 

O 



h 
O 

z 



H 

CO 



a 
c 

8 
o 
U 

n 
u 
Pi 

BS 

b 

W 



I/! 

u 
o 

H 



S 2i 



• m u > 
S OS <*< ^ 

^^^ I 

in o 

I-. 4-. c m 
D ta i-, > 

^S^ 5 
o g'Sfx, 






.. -- -1-3 J- bo 



►J _2 






U 03 O g C Ji 



Si 

Oh 

in 



o 



c 

6 
o 
O 

a 
o 

w 
'-0 

W 

T) 

u 

« 

■O -o 

O I. 
to S- 

U 



u 

Oh 
> 



Si :o 

Si S 

o S:! C 

©*^ § 

S CL-C 
O bCT3 



w 



O 

3 3 i- Sh 
5 3 «jt« 



Ih 

CU 

V 

> 

"B 
S 

3 

a 

o 
in 

in 
6© 

>^ 

c 
a 

S 
o 
O 

V 

o 

•? 

Sh 
V 

w 



3 
u 



o o o o 
o o oo 
m in o o 



o 
in 



OOO 

o o in 
m CN oq 






o 
o 
m 



Oh 



in 

h '^ 

i- o 

ir ^ 
Oh O 

og- 
in o 

^ CO 

2^ 
2 S 

O " 

a, o 
O y 

Q, (T3 
^^ 

u ^ c 

0:2; 



^1 
II 

m 3 
30 

in "^ 

6<* ^ 

C 03 

B o 
|0 

-I 

4^ eg 

w 2 u 

« 03 t< 









lb 

^^ 
" u »:; . 

3^ 









^.2"q >.0 

oO O^ 03 

> a p " 



03 



^ ^ 5^0 



■2-2 ^ S « 
ns J3 bc-a -3 

^ 3 3kBh^ 
Ph CU P-i h-' H-) 



O O 
O O 

00 m 



o o 
o o 
en o 



00000 
00000 
00 in m in o 



Si 

be 

"u 

a 

4) 

•o 

0! 



73 
OS 



n 
y 



72 



<0: 



■f.s 


•o5 


oo 
o o 


i^l 


do 


•< c 


oWo 


o o 


..^ o 


(J . **> 


in in 


^o 


In 

Yeai 

June 


iT) O 

NO O 




3 


in O 






CO in 




> 


in o 




•g 


vO ^ 




■>i- C\ 



o 
n 



* 








o 


o 


o 


Cn 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


<3 


o 




o 


o 


o\ 


o 


o 


vO 


Cv 






#v 




r- 


CO 


CO 


CO 


<^ «<* 


t© 


6^ 



in 
in 

00 

in 

CO 



o 
o 

o 
in 

oo" 



«A 



o 


o 


00 


eg 


CM 


CM 


^— t 


K— « 


•o 


(N 


r~- 


CO 


CJ 


r-~ 


■^ 


-+ 


cg 


cC 


in 


r-- 


in 
eg 




«^ 


^ 



* » 

o oo 
o ■o o 


* * 

• O O O O 

• O O o o 


oo 
oo 


o 


O <NO 

O m o 

6* 


•OOOO 

• o oo o 

• O O T o 

*• « #% »\ 

. CSl TT CN ■^ 


oo 
oo 
CN cs 


CM 

o 
o 



inf~-oo^"^Oin 
vo^oof^cMincM 


OO 
OO 


00 

in 


'-'OOLn'^omo 
'-'inT-icMr^CNroco 

"* o oo ■o'o in CM o 
mminrj-ocMvoco 


16,800 
15,000 


CM 

of 

CM 

m 

6* 



O O O O O o o 
o o o o in o o 

o o o o cs m o 

O O O O Cn CM in 

o o ■■— CM CM NO r- 



CM -q- CM 



CO •■-I CO 



c\ r^ Cn o in in t— t 

r^ Cn CM O 00 Tl- 0\ 

in o 00 o in o ■^ 
in NO 00 o ■* ■* in 

Cn ^ '^„f~~-„'^'^ '^"■^ 

'— I TT T-c Tf ■^ CN t~~ 

in -"T NO ^ r- csi NO 



''I- 








On 








y^ 








o 








CO 








W 








^ 








P 






•a • 


•—J 






4J • 


H 






< 














^^ 


h- 1 






in w 


H 






> 


1—4 




« 


>.s? 


C^ 




.8 


Fe Railwa 
% Gumul; 


u 

C/2 


"? 




PIH 




Pi 


vO 


O 




g 






O 


M 


H 


Cj 


Ck. 


^ a 


^ 




iG 


■a a 


(—1 


CO 

Q 
Z 


i<i 


c o 


hJ 


8 


«JU 




ft, 
.J 


s; 


peka 
way 




< 




o ^ 




z 




..^.^ 




■^ 




Q C m 









ROA 

hiso 




ffi 




►J o t. 




S 




^<> 




CO 








f- 

Z 


ss 


oo 




U 


ll 


oo 




S 


in o 




^ 


5w 


CO 




Z>s 






X 







. 


NO • 


. 


6» • 


"O 




flj 


•» * 


u 


c • 


u 


o • 


V 


• •-4 


C5 


■*-J 


l; 


rt • 


u 


s- • 


&H 


O • 




c • 


V 


u • 


> 


O • 


**? 


u : 


js 








3 
6 


1 : 


3 


u 


o 


3 . 




o . 


nO 


«J . 


mv^ . 


C 


C . 


o 


.SPtj 


v» 


u « 


2 


s^ 


ot^^ 


ex 


1> 


o 


T3 CU 


O 




^~« 








O v 

< c 


3 


•J OT3 S 


s^o 


-r=^ 


U.JL 

00 U 


cU 


^HP 


oo 


oo 


CM NO 



u 
o 

h 
C/5 

Q 
Id 

a 
a 

u 

lb 

u 

Ol, 

< 

H 
O 



2 

O 

s 
s 
o 



u 

o 

h 



C 

a 
6 

>'^ 

> <" 

> 3 

V u 



ll 
O 



E09 

Bug 

_<« 3-z: 
c o ,1- « 

g St! cfl 



Jrf ^ o c 
u rt ti 1— I 



O 

c >,?^ 
o '^ <« 

O V 



T3 
C 



o O 



opq 



3 



« c 

Cm 



C C ° 
PQCQ *^ 



Q. ra 



c 



C 

a 

B 
o 



o 

RJ 
CL 

S 
O 

U 

bo' 



m 



CO 



M 



2: s 



4) «J C -3 
•• ^ eg C <-' 
U! c (9 U C 

<muoo 



RJ 

c 
.9.2 

R3 CO ,-( CT3 
to M 2 « 

I-, u 3 (0 



C 

2 « s 

S .-2 o 
o 30 

O c ^ 

C M 

C0< 2 



.S >. 

c s 

V Oh 



1 « 6 



>- o 



d CuoH 

CO C ^ 
CO CO 41 

G ^- — < 

cOu 



u 

^ o'-'.S con S 

O be CO g O t- ■" 

<-acocococoo^ 

■ I-4 .1.^ ••.N .^H '^ ^ (3 
U« l-l t-l I.H . 1^ (-J 

Ji « w Ji E§ ^ I 

c< 






. _ c S B "ij u 



ooooooooo o 

O O O O O nO o o o o 

o o o m o CM o no '-I 

1— CM ^-H t-H »-■ 



ooooooo U 
ooooooo <S 
oor^'>r»-«ino •?, 

^ CM T-i CM ii 

04 



73 






oWo 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



CviriO>^"^OOooOoOOot~~ 
»-i O C^ ^ r^ t^ '^'~' LO C> Cn O^t-^O CO 

c^Tt-Tcn c^ cm <n irTcsT'* T-T-^ CO CO c^r 



* * 

• O O OO 

■ooo o 


* * 

OO o • 


•OOO o 

• IT) lo in O 

• O OJ CN "^ 

; r-Tc^CN f^" 


moo 
r-~ lo o • 

CO so CO . 



•OoOOOOOOOOOO 
■ OOOloOoOOOOOO 



■ OOOCMOOU^OOOOO 
OoOt^OiriCsiOOONOiO 

OTfor~-iocN'-iOcoco-<j-vo 

T^'r— ' CS CvTfO T-1 CM t— VcO CO"CM 



>^ 



t» 



CO CM 



c0c0c0OOV3c000OO00'-'mOiOC\OCMc0LnOir>OL0CMr-~CMOOCM-^c0'*O'O 

CN'OCNiocMc\vOt-(0-*r^r^ooocMT-ioococMu^OOCv'-'<M«-<ooioO'^oooo 



_3 

> 

o 
o 



sOoooooounuoT^-^-T-^TtococMcOTl-olOcooc^sOlnr^ooooooo\oOLncOoooo^^oom 
ooo\oocor~r^cNioir)ocoocNoovococOT-Hor^'<tcMcx!TtoocNOCMOCMt~-cvc\CMvor-- 
Ocoooc>cocNOiomoor-cMC^'<-'T-icOCM"^Lncocoocor^coooooooT-imvooOr-icMO-^'-' 



CO 00 



CNOT-iroooLDoor-ics'^-^CNT-icMCNiocMLncocOT-cTxr^cMLnooLncsiOr^OcocNLno 

■^sO->;fir)-^t~OOsOLnmiOLnr-CMCM'^'OvO'^T-icOcOT-i'^t^vOCM»-icOcOCMir)iDvOcO 



I 






o 
en 

< 



o 

o 

z 

o 

H 

» 

H 
h 

o 



u 
s 



■S 

c3 



c 

e 

o 
O 



a 
a 

a c 

S "^ 
o r 

E'S ' 

i; V, C I- *^ 

«J _C O O 3 






c c " 



a . 
6 >- 

° S 



T3 

u T3 
O nJ 

an 
I- a 



m 

G 

a 



« o 



•^ c o 
g o u 



c 
c 9- 



« 

«J 

o 
a. 

o 
u 

G 



-o 



G 
>^ " G S 

c — <? o 






e-s-9 a = s- s-= »o >,-o s Sv.., § 2 ts-l 2 



cu y< o ra P t, 

O u O U L_| J 



G— ,-_ P « 



t^ G GPh O (u 




G 
nj 

S 
O 

nj O— . 

a 



« 

o 
a 

u 

o 
o • 

G 



G 
O 



lU 
w 

Si 



S 6 
^ fi ° o 



° o 

c 

03 



-a 






-2 c 



(rt u 1) . o (-1 
wOOmOO 



rt U 4) ><j 



4J «> ° 

tie 5 y 



bo G G 
G.2.P 



-« 



a.&^ Sen 

i^3 £3:3 >-S 



►S'ggg 1-^3 ^^^-^kS^S rtS:a.t;3w 3 



o 

O (-1 O c c 

i;^ ?, ^ « tS 

eg D O 4-* 4-> 

1/3 C/2 1/5 1/1 !/) 



G 

s Si 

g-.S 5 

§^ S 



^ ^ is 

WC/3 "S 






O O O O OO O O O O O OOiri Oin O O O O O O O O O O O O in O O O OOO OO m m 

OOOOOinOOOOOOOcOO'^OOOOOOOOOOOOr-.OOOOOOOCM cJ '■ 

iO'-i'<^OinLno<Niooooor~-mocMcooir>oomr--ocMooooioiooLoooiooo •?, fl 

•rH TH .r-i CN C^J Cs] CM T-i CM CM th CM'-' ^ ^ ^ CM ti 04 CM '-i CM «-h H M 



74 






4)13 5-. 

B c - 
oWo 

"(DC 



* * * * * 

OOOOOOloOoO 
OOOOOLDCSOOO 


en 

00 


« » 

o o o o o 
o o o o o 


OOOOOCN-OOOO 
OOOour)T-<LnOoo 


•o 
o 

CO 


o o o o o 
O Lfi "^ o o 
o o r-^uT_o^ 


6% 




<A 



o 
o 

o 
o 
m 



* 

- O O o o 
* O o «N O 


oo 
oo 


• 

• o oo o 

• oo o o 


• o 

• o 


• c^ o Lo o 
■ r~- o 00 o 


1,800 
1,750 


• o o o o 
■ o o o lo 

• \o vo in -"i- 

•v «^ ^ «N 

.cocoes CO 


• o 
■ o 

• ^^ 



'-'Oiriir. CNunioOLnio 
cosovorj-r^ooO'^oo 




o o o o to 
o o cN^o eg 


in 

ON 


iocNC\o o 

tS "-I C7\ O vO 


OOOcOOOOOO 

ooomooom'^ino 


3 OOO'^OCNCNCNOcOt^ 
rs csTfci-iu-jONioOoOT-iCO 

j5 00 t^„<>,CN^'^„cO l~-„f^„CO "^V 

^ CO C\ [~-- irTin^cTiO CO r-^'— 
o ■<tCMcsicoom'*oo\o'0 
o 


o 

LO 

o 


o lo r^ '-' in 
o^r~-„f-~^'^'— ^ 

cO^CN co""^ so" 

vo -"i- c^ CO 00 


ON 


J^ •^ rt rq u-1 

OOcvOt^ CO 
<» CN (>4^Tf in 

r^ O T-H CO 


ootMoot~~incNO 
inO'-<inoot--'-''n 
c\^o_CN^r~-^o^oo o^o_^og 

so -^ •^'' (n" ■*" On" o" '-<" CO 

coco -t m-* r^ CO 


m 




6© 


^ 


«* 





in I 
in I 

(N I 

vO I 

m 



00 

in 



e^ 






o 

CO 

•—J 



U 

oi 

•< 

u 
z 

u 

O 



3 

•S 

8 
o 
Cj 

Z 

o 



Is- 



S 



o 

M 

H 
Z 

w 

s 

H 

CO 

z 



. to lu 

.2 g-.S S 
« S fe c 

sill- 

fl ) O W M 



c 



o 
_o 

o 
ex 

u 

o 

o 



a 

6 
o 

bo 

_n 

3 

■!-> 
U 



fl (« c 

X! .t; « 
■ ^ 2 
Ofec/: 

"O T) "O 
« CJ w 



>, 3 

ex <J . 



c 

s 

o 



03 



c c 

6 e 

o o 

oo 

3 D 
C C 



s 



u c 5 

o rt ex 

« E o 
o oxj 

>s:> 

cxc 

B S 
o 



I 1—1 O 3 



«J 
o 

C 
<A 
u 

3 



«, 



O 55 c 



u 






c 



C 

<o I— I 

o 



3 V 
u > 

O Rj 






£ <u o o o o o o o o o o ooooo 

j3 ij o o o o o o CO o o o ooooo 

p^inoinr-oc^mor^-m inommog 



c 

Rj 

ex 

B 
o 

o 

c a 

O <A 

*5 &) 
g " 

O c 



c 
_o 

u 
O 

a 
(-. 

o 
O 



c 

Ou 

S 
o 
O 

u 

u 

o 

a. 

c 



" aw 
o c 



« 



exx; - „ 
h cxO « 

2 wH.mO 



C be 

R] "i 

ex'-' 
E o 

3 1^ 

■■3 » 



> 

C 



c 

Rl 

ex 

B 
o 
O 

-3 

ex 

R! 

I-I 

bo 
w 

^ ■ — « 



§:;-OgH 
O S t- a-T3 



'b 

RJ 

ex 

B 
o 
O 



RJ R! W -S 

U — o •-' 
O 4) 2 3 

„ E S g-o 
d<<pqO 



n 



RJXI o 

2:3 RJ 

E ow 

ES'B 
00° 
00 



R3 t) 3 C 
Rj Rj O CU^ C 

■o'uO-a.2 2 
o o „ c u-C - 

^<Og,^-^.2^ 

-3~5 boS 3 f^RJ 

^^^^ES-bbcS^ 

3 3 O gO^S-o H 

« tfi w III J 2; ^ > 



000000 
o o o eg o o 
CO in o ■^ o in 

CM <N »-' 



00000000 
00000000 

oomomocso 






c 
*C 
3 
•O 
V 
T3 



T3 
01 



s) 

.a 
o 
i-i 

3 



75 



<o<- 


_•* 


«>^ 


■«.* 


"^^ 


a)c^ 


.3 S 


DTI in 


^•? 


B ■= - 


■« g 


'^a 

^-^ 


4J C 



3 

> 

M 
O 
O 

EQ 



* * * * 

o o o o o o o 
o o o o O O o 

o o o o "^ o o 

IT) O O "^ f^ '— o 

r- o m f^ fN csj 00 

f\f T-T «— I CM ■^ 



T-< .-H m vo o t~~ "^ 
f^ o r- o o T-H Tt 

in rO lO T— I Lf) Tj- c<^ 

LT) cN '^ o r^ 00 c'l 
O '^ ^^ "^ "^ o »— ' 
t~^ Tj- c\ T— 1 vo r^ CN 
ii- CO CO tN r~ CO o 



o 
o 

in 

00 



in 



in 
eg 

CO 



•o 


o 


• o 


o 


• o 


o 


•o 


o 


• in 


m 



o in o 
o t^ o 

Cs o o 
in CN in 

•r- t^ -- 



I <A I 



in 

in 

CO 

so 

CO 



I t^ 



CO 



CM 



00 



CM 

cC 

CO 
CN 

I m 



o O 
o in 

o o 

OvO 

in 



o in 
or- 

O CO 

o o 
o in 



vO 


o 


in 


oo 


o 


CM 


o 


CO 


in 


SO 








in 




O 




Ti- 


^ 


^ 



O ^ •r- 



in 


in 




r-~ 


00 




CO 


in 




o 


in 




in_ 


<7s^ 










^— < 


r-" 




r-< 


00^ 




«^ 


«^ 








o 

CO 

H 
< 

I— I 

H 
I— I 

O 

o 

H 

!/3 



■X3 



Q 

< 

Cd 
Z 

■9 
O 

M 

s 

H 

o 

z 

u 

s 

is 



•S 

8 

O 

z 

o 
s 
s 
o 
u 



u 

o 

H 



U 

u 

Sm 

ID 
U 

, u 
nj eg 

2 S 
u 3 

>s CI 

cfl O 

're I 

^^ 

.2 ^ 

O^ 
|2 

lu ■£ 

-a ^ 
(U o 



li 



c 
a 

g o « 



i^:50 ^^i 



W y W 



^■kt 



« '^ w ii (3 



o (c *- 

3 s S ^ 



V^ -4-J -M 

a 3 3 

4J O O 



5 Ji 

Sen 
2; "5 



o o o o o o o 
o o o o o oo 
o o CM m r- o 00 



c 
« 

s 

o 
U 






5<mO 



u 
o 

H 
Z 

o 
s 

o 

o 

< 

H 

o 
H 



u 

■*-» 

H R3 V 

5 o a 

lu o 

B c 



o e^q o 

o o 

so O 



o 
< 

o 

H 

o 



•J 
< 

O 



u 

00 

.13 m 
CXcnT 

V3 I 
U ' 

J 3 
O ^ 

H 



ll 


&C 


n) 


(U 


?^ 


a 


>. 




o> 


■* 


J= 


fl> 








3 

■a 


■Cjs 


a 


(J 


T3(/J 



li 

O u 



• 5 



76