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Full text of "Report of the receipts and expenditures of the City of Nashua"




^nuiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Hsriculturc, 



Ilibk'ral HttjS 



_JIIl!£^)erhtt.olo3gj 







POLICE STATION. 



FORTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



-OF THE- 



jVIanicipal Government 



—OF THE— 



CiTv OF Nashua, 



—FOR THE— 



Kinaocial Year, 1894:. 




NASHUA, N. H. : 

TELEGRAPH PUBLISHING CO., PRINTERS, 
1895. 



N253 

IS9A 

NASHUA CITY GOVERNMENT. 

ORGANIZATION, 1894. 



MAYOR, 

Hon. THOMAS SANDS. 

CITY CLEKK, 

EUGENE M. BOWMAN. 

TAX COLLECTOR, 

HARRY W. RAMSDELL. 

CITY SOLICITOR, 

EDWARD H. VVASON. 

CITY PHYSICIAN, 

CHARLES B. HAMMOND. 

CITY TREASURER, 

WILLIAM E. SPALDING. 

CITY ENGINEER, 

ALBERT H. SAUNDERS. 

STREET COMMISSIONERS. 

GEORGE H. BRIGHAM, Dist. No. 1. 
JOHN L. H. MARSHALL, Dist. No. 2. 

CITY MESSENGER, 

JOHN VV. LADD. 

CITY MARSHAL, 

ALVIN S. EATON. 

DEPUTY MARSHAL. 

WILLIAM W. WHEELER. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



AKDEKMEK, 

Ward 1 — TiLSON D. Fuei.er, Benjamin B. Otis. 
2 — Ei.MEK W. Eaton, Henry W. Keith. 
3 — Hermengiede Lavoie, Chauees H. Webster. 
4 — Lester F. Thuhber. 
5 — James D. Coffee. 

G — George Guertix, Milton A. Taylor. 
7 — Luke B. Colby, Nathaniel H. Proctor. 
8 — Fred C. Anderson, George F. Caldavell. 
9 — Bernard Clancey. Joseph C. Lagace. 

president common council, 
WILLIAM D. SWART. 

CLERK COMMON COUNCIL, 

GEORGE E. DANFORTH. 

COMMON COUNCIL, 

Ward 1 — James E. Colbukn, Joi[N K. Hall, Charles J. 

Hamblett, Charles a. Roby. 
2 — Barnet C. Buttrick, Edward W. Dowd, 

Frank E. Wilson, Calvin R. Wood. 
3--Harry J. Bell, Frederick A. Brunelle, 

Joseph F. Garvey, Hiram H. Holbhook. 
4 — Frank L. Kimball, William D. Swart. 
5 — James F. Christie. James F. Mockler. 
6 — Frank E. Dewey, Fayette S. Sargent, 

Thomas Shaughnesy, Mark W. Warren. 
7 — Justin E. Hill, Napoleon E. Jones, Frank A. 

Rogers, James M. Taylor. 
8 — Mederic T. Lajoie, Ned A. Rogers, Henry 

L. Sanderson, Albert T. Tyler. 
*.» — Louis Cusson, John M. Early, John B. Fos- 

DicK, George W. Witham. 



NASHUA CITY GOVERNMENT. 

ORGANIZATION, 1895. 



MAYOR, 

Hon. JOSEPH W. HOWARD. 

CITY CLERK, 

EUGENE M. BOWMAN. 

TAX COLLECTOR, 

HARRY W. RAMSDELL. 

CITY SOr,IClTOR, 

EDWARD H. WASON. 

CITY PHYSICIAN, 

CHARLES B. HAMMOND. 

CITY TREASURER, 

WILLIAM E. SPALDING. 

CITY ENGINEER, 

ALBERT H. SAUNDERS. 

STREET COMMISSIONERS, 

GEORGE H. BRIGHAM, Dist. No. 1. 
ARTHUR K. WOODBURY, Dist. No. 2. 

CITY MESSENGER, 

JOHN W. LADD. 

CITY MARSHAL, 

ALVIN S. EATON. 

DEPUTY MARSHAL, 

WILLIAM W. WHEELER. 



CITY GOVEUNMENT. 



ALDEUME.V, 

Ward 1 — James E. Coi.buun, Chaki.es A. Roi3v. 

2 — Barnet C. Buttkick. Oscar D. Hartweli,. 

3 — Joseph F. Garvey, Charles H. Webster. 

4 — Frank L. Kimbali-. 

5 — William T. Fitzgerald. 

6 — George E. Balcom, Willard A. Cummings. 

7 — Alfred M. Hills, James M. Taylor. 

8 — Fred C Anderson, Albkrt T. Tyler. 

9 — Louis Cusso.v, Michael MoGlynn. 

president common council, 
WILLIAM D. SWART. 

CLERK COMMON COUNCIL, 

GEORGE E. DANFORTH. 

COMMON COUNCIL, 

Ward 1 — George A. Burge, John K. Hall, Charles J. 
Hamblett, William J. Putnam. 

2 — Henry M. Buli-ard, ED^vARD W. Dowd, George 
E. Eaton, Calvin R. Wood. 

3 — Thomas E, Ingham, George E. Law, Henri .T. 
Ledoux, John B. McGuire. 

4 — Frank B. Goodhue, William D. Swart. 

5 — James P. Mockler, Michael H, Siske. 

6 — Joseph O. Bodwell, George E. Buxton, Ed- 
ward E. Cheney, William R. Spellman. 

7 — Justin E. Hill, Herbert L. Morse, Horace 
W. Page, Willis A. Shedd. 

8— Lowell G. Holt, Edward F. Marsh, Ned E. 
Rogers, Henry L. Sanderson. 

9 — Prospere Charpentier, John M. Early, Ed- 
win F. Garland, Melvin H. Moss, Jr. 



STANDING COMMITTEES, 1895. 



IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN, 

Enrollment — Aid, Kimball, Cummings, Cusson. 
Elections and Returns — Aid. Hills, Balcom, Fitzgerald. 
Highways and Bridges — Mayor Howard, Aid. Roby, Ander- 
son. 
Licenses — Aid. Tyler, Colburn, McGlynn. 
Street Lights — Aid. Anderson, Kimball, Hartwell. 



IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL, 

Enrollment — Councilmen Ledonx, Charpentier, Garland. 
Election and Returns — Councilmen Hall, Hill, Ingham. 
Bills in Second Reading — Councilmen Sanderson, Rogers, 
Moss. 



JOIXT STANDING COMMITTEE, 

Accounts and Finance — Mayor, Aid. Taylor, Webster, 
Councilmen Hamblett, Hall, Wood, Early. 

Claims — Mayor, Aid. Hartwell, Balcom, Councilmen San- 
derson, Bullard, Cheney, Spellman. 

Commons and Cemeteries — Mayor, Aid. Cummings, Kimball, 
Councilmen Dowd, Putnam, Buxton, Law. 

Lands and Buildings — Mayor, Aid. Colburn, Hills, Coun- 
cilmen Eaton, Morse, Page, Mockler. 

City Farm and House of Correction — Mayor, Aid. Buttrick, 
Garvey Councilmen Goodhue, Holt, Bodwell, Siske. 

Printing and Stationery — Mayor, Aid. Colburn, McGlynn. 
Councilmen Rogers, Burge, Wood, McGuire. 

Sewers and Drains — Mavor, Aid. Taylor, Tvler, Council- 
men Hamblett, Hill, .Shedd, Marsh. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



POLICE COURT, 

Hon. Charles W. Hoilt, Justice ; Hon. William O. Clough, 
Associate Justice ; James H. Willoughby, Clerk. 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS, 

Eugene F. Whitney, Chairman; William O. Clough, Clerk ; 
Charles O. Andrews, Charles S. Dudley, George 
. W. Badger, Daniel D. Coffey, Tyler M. Shattuck, 
Charles F. Tolles, James H. Waters. 



BOARD OF HEALTH, 

Charles B. Hammond. M. D., Mederic. T. Lajoie, M. D., 
James T. Greeley, M. D. 



OVERSEER OF THE POOR, 

Isaac Eaton. 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK LISTS, 

William P. Clark, Edward B. Towne, Henry A, Olivier, 
Levi W. Goodrich, Patrick B. Gaffney, Joel C. An- 
nis, Ai A. Reynolds, Calvin T. Robinson, Alphonse 
Dion. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF THE CITY FARM, 

Charles E. Buckham. 



TRUSTEES OF GREELEY FARM, 

Joseph W. Howard, Mayor, Ex-Offiico, Chairman ; James 
Barnard, James F. Wallace. 



TRUSTEES OF HUNT LEGACY. 

Hon. Joseph W. Howard, Mayor ; 

William D. Svvart, President, of Council ; 

Edward H. Wason, Pres. School Board ; 

John P. Goggin, Frank W. Maynard. 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, 

Levi W. Goodrich. 



MEASUSERS OF BRICK, STONE, PAIN TING, PLASTERING 

Henry F. Richmond, Charles W. Stevens, George W. Badg- 
er, Charles E. Emerson, Albert H. Saunders, Job 
Wallace, J. B. Putnam, Ernest V. Booth. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM, 

Alfred W. Heald. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

J. L. H. Marshall, Walter M. Gilson, Albert H. Saunders. 



SURVEYORS OF 

James H. Tolles, 
Charles A. Stearns, 
Warren J. Cooper, 
Edward O. Blunt, 
Rufus G. Sargent, 
Henry O. Atwood, 
Stillman Churchill, 
James H. Hall, 
Frank D. Cook, 
Albert Shedd, 
John W. Morrill, 
John A. Small, 
Dennis B. Leazott, 
Felix Lampron, 
George F. Whitney, 
Frank Temple, 
Benjamin K. Jones, 
James E. Humphrey, 



WOOD AND LUMBER, 

John p. Cummings, 
John L. H. Marshall, 
Harlan Gregg, 
George F. Hammond, 
Ira Cross, 

Charles W. Collins, 
James E. Billings, 
Henry C. Roby, 
Nathaniel H. Proctor. 
Lewis E. Robbins, 
Charles S. Flanders, 
Isaac N. Cummings, 
Charles A. Roby, 
William D. Swart, 
Russell White, 
Frank E. Burnham, 
Charles H. Slate, 
Frank P. Chandler, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Geo. F. Lowe, John VV. Anderson, 

James U. Tolles, Thos. H. Rogers, 

beo. H. Menter, W. H. Cadwell, 

John A. Cross, Walter E. Locke. 

WEIGHERS, 

Seth D. Chandler, Lorrain Giddings, 

George T. Wilkins, John McKeav, 

Arthur C. Gordon, George W. Witham, 

William H. Sexton, John H. Vickery, 

George Turner, Walter A. Lovering, 

Fred O. Swallow, Stillman Swallow, 

Barnet C. Buttrick, George S. Rollins, 

Aaron P. Hughes, Patrick Barry, 

Nicholas B. Lougee, George E. Balcom, 

John S. Wicom, Louis M. Valcour, 

Frank Pombrio, Alphonse Burque, 

Joel C. Annis, Mark Methuen, 

Emery Parker, Edmond Mousette, 

Frank A. Andrews, Tyler M. Shattuck, 

Edmund B. Rice, Lyman Cheney, Jr., 

Perley A. Kendall, John B. Phaneuf, 

John H. O'Brien, William H. Coding, 

Frank E. Parker, Odile Chamberlain, 

F. C. Crawford, William H. Cadwell. 



CITY TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Nashua, N. H., March 12, 1895. 
To His Honor, the Mayor., and the City Councils of Nashua: 
Gentlemen: — I hereby submit the Report of City Treas- 
urer for the financial year eijding Dec. 31, 1894. 
Very respectfully, 

WILLIAM! E. SPALDING, 

City Treasurer. 



12 MUMCIPAI- GOVEKNMKNT REPORT. 

Dr. Wm. E. Spalding., City Treasurer, 

Balance January 1st, 1894, . . ?^2,639 81 

A. S. Eaton, city marshal, . . 7,864 li) 
H. W. Ramsdell, tax collector, taxes 

1893, 36,212 (ri 

H. W. Ramsdell, tax collector, abate- 
ment, 1693, .... 681 25 

H. VV. Ramsdell, tax collector, inter- 
est, 1893, . . . . ^39 00 
II. W. Ramsdell, tax collector, taxes, 

1894, .... 196.666 00 
H. W, Ramsdell, tax collector, abate- 
ments, 1894, .... 1,0.S7 23 

County of Hillsborovigb, State Indus- 
trial School, . • . . 585 85 
Edgerly & Ciocker, Boston, temporary 

loan, 345,000 OH 

Edgerly & Crocker, city debt, . 150,0(0 00 

National Bank of Commonwealth, 

Boston, temp, loan, . . • 25,000 00 

J, H. Fassett, supt., tuition, etc, . 295 45 

C. T. Lund, commissioner, fire depart- 
ment, . . . . • 176 48 
C. E. Buckham, supt. city farm, . 2,213 20 
E. M. Bowman, city clerk, pools, . 460 00 
E. M. Bowman, city clerk, dog licences, 1,379 50 
E. M. Bowman, city clerk. City Hall 

rents, 127 00 

E. M. Bowman, city clerk, pedlars' li- 
censes, . . . • • 110 00 
Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, insur- 
ance tax, ..... 1,023 <o 



Am oiint carried forvxird to page 14, $771,961 33 



CITY TREASURER S REPORT 



13 



III Account vnth City of JSTashua, 



Cr 



Abatement of taxes, 

Armory expenses, 

Amherst street school house, 

Amherst street engine house, 

City debt. 

City interest. 

City Hall building, 

City Farm and House of Con 

Cemeteries, 

Common, north. 

Common, south, 

Edge stone. 

Engineer's department, 

Fire Department, 

Highways and bridges, 

Incidentals, 

Paupers oft" Farm, 

Police department. 

Public Library, 

Printing and stationery. 

Sinking fund. 

Salary account, 

Sewers and drains. 

Soldiers and sailors, 

Street lights. 

State and county tax, . ■ 

Temporary loan, 

Ward expenses, 

Water supply, 

Edgewood Cemetery, 

Nashua Hospital Association. 



ction 



$1,768 48 

800 00 

462 63 

14,697 27 

26,0G0 ( 

30,557 82 

2,466 59 

9,296 92 

2,477 90 

112 43 

2 00 

4,835 29 

3,446 17 

29,172 93 

62,256 93 

27.515 54 

6,618 16 

22,292 45 

3,ono 00 

1,385 76 

6,000 00 

10,06't 00 

15,920 79 

1,784 30 

22,182 82 

57,664 37 

870,000 00 

1,098 25 

5,720 00 

1,50'> 00 

2,500 00 



Amowit carried for vKird to page \b, 



$743,595 80 



14 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Dr. Wm. E. Spalding., City 


Treasurer., 




Ami. hr ought foricard from page 12, 


1771,661 


33 




Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, rail 








road tax, .... 


9,597 


56 




Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, Sav 


- 






ings Bank tax, . . . . 


30,575 


68 




Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, liter 


- 






ary fund, .... 


2,884 


17 




Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, dis 








eased cattle, .... 


8 


00 




Custodian James Baldwin bequest, 


250 


00 




EllaC- Sanders 


100 


00 




" W. B. Need ham " 


200 


00 




" Rosan Wallace " 


103 


35 




" Lewis B. Ball 


105 


37 




Geo. F. Sawyer, supt. Hollis Stree 








Cemetery, .... 


525 


00 




N. E. Jones, supt., . 


90 


00 




Sundry persons, Hollis Street Ceme 








tery, 


17 


00 




Isaac Eaton, overseer of the poor, 


779 


08 




A. E. Sanderson, guardian. 


198 


29 




It 


84 


20 




F, H. Terrell, .... 


3 


00 




G. H. Brigham, 


38 


00 




J. L. H. Marshall, . 


28 


95 




C. E. Buckham, 


50 


00 




Nashua Street Railway, 


250 


00 




Town of Goshen, 


10 


00 








$817,858 


98 



CITY treasurer's REPORT. 15 



In account with the City of Nashua . Or. 



Ami. brought foioord from page \^, $743,595 80 
Memorial Day, .... 200 00 

Schools, . . ' . . . 56,180 45 



$799,976 25 
Balance cash, .... 17,882 73 

$817,858 98 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS AND FINANCES. 



Nashua, N. H., Dec. 31, 1894. 
The undersigned Committee on Accounts and Finances for 
the City of Nashua have carefully examined the accounts of 
William E. Spalding, City Treasurer, and find the same cor- 
rectly cast, and each payment properly vouched for by treas- 
ury orders for the same, corresponding in amounts with the 
vouchers in the hands of the City Clerk of said city. We 
have also examined the source from which the income of the 
past year has been derived, and are satisfied that he has 
charged himself with the entire amount as City Treasurer 
paid to him, and has made a correct exhibit of same in detail. 
We find the balance in the hands of said treasurer to be 
seventeen thousand eight hundred and eighty-two dollars and 
seventy-three cents. 

THOS. SANDS, 
MILTON A. TAYLOR, 
GEO. GUERTIN, 
JAS. M. TAYLOR, 
F. S. SARGENT, 
CALVIN R. WOOD, 



NOYES PRIZE MEDAL FUND. 17 



CITY OF NASHUA 

IN ACCOUNT WITH NOYES PRIZE iMEDAL FUND. 



Dr. 

Jan. 1, 18ii4, Balance in Nashua 
Savings Bank, 
Interest on deposit, . 
Interest on City note, 



Cr. 



$130 01 




4 Q5 




60 00 




$194 66 



Jan. 1, 1895, Balance in Nashua 

Savings Bank. . $146 QG 

Paid for four medals, 48 00 



$194 66 



WM. E. SPALDING. 

Custodian. 



1<S MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



CITY OF NASHUA 



IN ACCOUNT WITH HUNT LIBRARY FUND. 



Dr. 

Sept. 16, 1892, Received of Mis. 
John M. and Miss 
Mary E. Hunt for 
Library Building, $50,000 



Xr. 

By order of Trustees Public Library, 
Sept. 16, 1892, Deposit, Nashua 
Savings Bank, Nash- 
ua, $12,500 
City Guaranty Sav- 
ings Bank, Nashua, 12,500 
New Hampshire 
Banking Co., 
Nashua, 12,500 
Mechanics' Savings 

Bank, Nashua, 12,500 



$50,000 



$50,000 



VVM. E. SPALDING, 

Custodian. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



TAXES FOR kS93. 
Balance due Dec. :J1, 1893, . $38,470 33 



$38,470 33 



H. W. Ramsdell, collector. . $36,893 87 

Balance uncollected, . . 1,576 46 



$38,470 33 



TAXES FOR 1894. 

Amount given to H. \V. Ramsdell 

for collection . $286,637 84 



Collector, cash. 
Balance uncollected. 





$236,637 


84 


$197,753 
38,884 


23 
61 




- 


$236,637 


84 



20 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

H. W. Ramsdell, coll. 1893, . $681 25 

- 1894, . 1,087 23 



$1,768 •48 



ARMORY EXPENSES. 

Appropriation, • $800 00 



PAID. 

F. O. Giddings, treasurer. 





$800 00 


$800 00 


$800 00 



AMHERST STREET SCHOOL HOUSE. 



Howard & Co., furniture, 
vSmead Ventilating Co., -contract, 
L. F. Duncklee, labor. 



$02 


88 






350 


00 






49 


75 










$462 


63 



AMHERST STREET ENGINE HOUSE. 



PAID. 



J. H. Clark, supplies, • . . $463 31 

Barr & Co., " . . 3 51 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



21 



Lynn Stall Co., supplies, 
H. F. Dane, labor, 
Marden & Mygatt, labor, 
C. E. Batchelder, 
Cone & Malhoit, 
F. O. Ray, 
Ashley & Lund, 
A. D. Melendy, 
Fenn. W. W., 

A. K. Woodbury & Co., labor, . 
M. Moran, labor, 

L. P. Duncklee, labor, 

O. F. Winslow, labor, 

J. D. Bickford, painting, 

Williams Hall, cement, 

Roby & Swart, lumber, 

Nashua Iron and Steel Co., labor, 

Nashua Coal Co., coal, 

Nashua Iron and Brass Foundry 

Co., patterns, 
Nashua Concrete Co., concreting, 
C. & M. R. R., freight, 

B. & M. R. R., 

C. B. Jackman & Son, piping and 

labor, .... 
C. S. Hibbert, trough, 
N. Batchelder, sand, 
Atlantic Works, boiler, etc., 
Presby Stove Lining Co., fire 

brick, .... 
J. Knapp, furnishing, 
J. Barnard, hardware, 

B. B. Otis, doors and sash, 

C. W. Stevens, stone, 
F. W. Hall, wiring, 



$3G 00 



5 


00 


11 


74 


22 


63 


61.S 


12 


46 


i»4 


2,884 


73 


55 


33 


48 


r.) 


21 


02 


198 


04 


55 


60 


2 


50 


886 


65 


265 


95 


3,264 


72 


11 


16 


195 


GO 


2 


00 


372 


11 


32 


00 


13 


03 


1,528 


96 


80 


00 


48 


00 


384 


95 


23 


GO 


865 


21 


44 


33 


618 


37 


253 


49 


453 


20 



22 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



H. T. Simpson, brick, 

J. Nassau, varnish, etc., 

A. S. Jackson, door springs, 

A. A. Davis, tablet and labor, 

B. E. Osgood, grading, 
Pay roll, paving, 
Sturtevant & Gale, wardrobe, etc 
Geo. H. Richter & Co., supplies 
White Mountain Freezer Co 

muriatic acid, 
Flather Foundry Co, iron work, 



$192 


00 


155 


00 


42 


00 


G6 


50 


130 


45 


OS 


75 


., 185 


00 


3 


25 



IS 31 
SO 62 



$14,697 27 



CITY DEBT. 



VV. E. Spalding, treasurer, city 

note, . . . '. $20,000 00 

F. A. McKean, city note, . 6,000 00 



$26,000 00 



CITY INTEREST. 



Appropriation, 

H. W. Ramsdell, int. taxes, 1803, 

Overdrawn, . . . . 



$25,000 00 

439 00 

5,118 82 



$30,557 82 



PAID. 



Edgerly & Crocker, notes, . $5,111 45 

Fall River Savings Bank, notes, 482 20 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



23 



Lowell Institution for Savings, 
notes, .... 
Millbury Savings Bank, 
City Institution for Saving, 
E. H. Rollins & Son, premium on 

bonds, etc., 
Edgewood Cemetery, note, 
W. E. Spalding, treasurer Noyes 

medal fund, 
W. E. Spalding, treasurer, note. 
Coupons, .... 



$240 


00 






750 


00 






240 


00 






381 


67 






227 


50 






60 


00 






925 


00 






22,140 


00 








$30, 


557 


82 



NORTH COMMON. 



Appropriation, 



PAID. 



150 00 



$150 00 



T. E. Sherwin, labor. 


3 00 




I. Dane, labor, 


5 00 




A. E. Gay, labor, 


3 31 




G. W. Harris, sprinkling, . 


5 00 




Pay Rolls, .... 


i)6 12 




Undraw^n, .... 


37 57 




• 




$1.50 00 



24 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

SOUTH COMMON. 
Appropriation, .... $150 00 



$150 00 



PAID. 



C. W. Stevens, stone, • . $2 00 

Undrawn, .... 148 00 



$150 00 



CITY HALL BUILDING. 
Appropriation, . . . $3,000 00 



$3,000 00 



PAID. 

Nashua Light Co., light, 

Nashua Coal Co., coal, 

Nashua Building Co., lumber and 

labor, .... 
Pennichuck Water Works, water, 
Telephone Co., rent and messages. 
Silver Spring Water Co., water, 
Geo. E. Balcom, ice, 
J. W. Ladd, cash paid for running 

boiler, .... 
Crawford & Son, labor, 
F. O. Ray, 
A. E. Gay, 



$340 


70 


1,112 


00 


32 


67 


•2b 


80 


43 


46 


11 


20 


12 


00 


556 


90 


13 


05 


3 


94 


61 


11 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



25 



M. C. Barker, labor and supplies, 
J. Wallace, labor, . 
S. S. Whitcomb, labor, 

B. McKune. " 

A. J. Phillips, 

F. E. Fisher, papering, 

India Alk. Works, cleansing pow 

der, 
Howard & Co., furnishing Mayor' 

room, 
H. G. Lendrim, bell calls, 
W. A. Lovering, supplies . 
H. M. Goodrich, ^' 
J. Barnard, '* 

J. H. Clark, 

G. H. Brigham, "'• 

C. F. Reed, wood, 

J, L. H, Marshall, wood, . 

B. O. Rob}', painting sign, 
Roby & Swart, lumber, 
Morgan & Morgan, plastering, 
F. R. Arnold, wiring, 

E. F. Marsh, soap, 
Undrawn, 



$3 90 
5 -21 
2 13 
4 00 

25 00 
9 00 

9 36 



105 


05 




7 


00 




1 


CO 




1 


25 




3 


20 




30 


53 




4 


80 




15 


00 




6 


00 




1 


50 




1 


99 




9 


24 




1 


00 




4 


00 




533 


41 




$3,C00 00 



CITY FARM AND HOUSE OF CORRECTION. 



Appropriation, 
Overdrawn, 



$7,500 00 
1.7itfi 92 



$9,296 92 



26 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Marden & Mygatt, labor and sup- 
plies, . . . . 
C. A. Voter, labor and supplies, 

C. B. Jackman & Son, '' 
Barr & Co., supplies, 
L. Ryan, 

Sexton & Hooper, supplies, 
W. H. Reed, - . 

A.J. Blood & Co., 
Wm. Molloy, 
Geo. E. W'heat, 

D. F. Runnells, clothing, 

E. A. Terrell, boots and shoes, 
H. A. Holt, labor, 

F. VV. Gorham, labor, 

A. C. Plaisted, 

B. O. Roby, 

Pennichuck Water Works, water 
Jos. Jelly, cobbling, 

C. W. Wilson, swill, 
Gep. K. Clark, fish, 
Telephone Co., rents and mes 

sages, 
A. Welcome, barrels, 
H. W. Tolles, veterinary surgeo 
Jackman & Sexton, furniture, 
W. Hall, grain, 
S. D. Chandler, grain, 
P. J. Reynolds, manure, 
T. F. Keegan, " 

L. M. Valcour, " 

L. H. Parker, ox sled, etc., 
O. A. Kelley & Co., horse, 



$44 


37 


59 


65 


67 


60 


134 


32 


6 


00 


270 


00 


376 


01 


752 


64 


39 


41 


10 


95 


171 


28 


171 


90 


68 


75 


34 


45 


9 


00 


20 


75 


168 


77 


18 


55 


12 


50 


139 


99 


41 


44 


2 


16 


14 


00 


29 


08 


470 


80 


550 


64 


30 


00 


7 


00 


19 


00 


28 


75 


165 


00 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Marshall Bros., cider, etc.. 
E. F. Marsh, soap, 

D. J. Hallise}, medicine, 
A. Lucier, labor, 
Plaisted & Balser, labor, 

E. A. Benton, 
J. Lamarsh, 
A. McCann, " 
Mrs. Fairbanks, " 
J. F. Barrett, 
Edward Labree, manure, 
W. D. Roberts, 

F. A. Rogers, " 
Geo. W. Harris, '■ 
J. Morin, '^ 
Geo. Witham, " 
Mrs. Maher. '^ 
J. Campbell, " 
T. J. Dowd, tobacco, 
Lowell Steam Boiler Works 
Howard & Co., furniture, 
J. H. Clark, hardware, 
J. Barnard, 

Heath & Lakeman, hardwar 
R. A. Woodbury, w^ood and pas 

turing, 
N. S. Whitman, drugs, 
H. Stearns, grain, 
Roby & Swart, lumber, 
Sanitas Co., deodorizer, 
H. J. Whipple, straw, 
Nashua Coal Co., coal, 
A. Lafayette, potatoes, 
J. O. Wyman, baskets, 
Kimball & Co., supplies. 



, tank 



e, 



$13 


75 


107 


65 


4 


95 


122 


50 


2 


40 


GS 


40 


150 


20 


39 


00 


78 


00 


112 


50 


17 


00 


17 


00 


t; 


00 


43 


50 


20 


00 


12 


00 


6 


00 


14 


00 


18 


22 


38 


00 


76 


35 


125 


89 


45 


32 


14 


60 


50 


62 


63 


60 


108 


37 


231 


35 


33 


00 


71 


32 


322 


93 


13 


50 


6 


00 


66 


11 



■28 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT 



Chamberlain, Patten & Co., sup 

plies, 
N. E. Rogers, . 
F. A. Barney, supplies 
Cotton & Allton, '• 
C. E. Buckbam, supt., 
Mrs. C. E. Buckliam, matron, 
Needbam estate, goods at auction 

A. L. Bixby, peat moss, 

B. B. Otis, glazing, etc., 
Talbot & Co., clothing, 
Morgan & Morgan, brick, 
J. Morrill, manure, 

J. O. Bodwell, manure. 
Woodward & Son, harness, 
W. H. Wright, hay. 
Woodward & Cory, traces, etc 
Champion Flue Scraper Co 

scraper, 
A. J. Tuck, insurance on stocl 
Cross & ToUes, lumber, 
Geo. E. Buxton, plants, 
McQiiesten & Co., grain, 
Tremont House, swill, 
J. B. Manseau, harness, etc, 
W. H. Campbell, grass, 
V. C. Oilman, Jersey bull and calf, 
E.J. Thompson, plan, 
Mrs. C!loffey, tobacco, 
O. F. Caldwell, boar . 
F. W. Mann & Co., bone cutter, 
F. D. Cook Lumber Co., lumber. 
Chandler & Fletcher, supplies, 
J. H. Blake, 
W^ A. Lovering, " 



$87 


08 


120 


84 


58 


01 


166 


30 


600 


00 


200 


00 


2 


20 


3 


35 


9 


75 


22 


85 


1 


50 


5 


00 


12 


00 


18 


00 


69 


19 


29 


50 


2 


50 


26 


25 


215 


03 


8 


07 


388 


95 


25 


00 


50 


34 


80 


00 


38 


00 


50 


GO 


1 


40 


50 


00 


18 


40 


15 


00 


24 


00 


1 


80 


2 


25 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 29 



C. H. Burke, supplies, . . $57 28 
H. S. Norwell, " . . 1 88 
Crowley Bros., "• . . 12 50 

D. E. Martin, labor, . . 31 60 
F. O. Ray, labor and supplies, . 39 01 
J. O. Hildreth, labor, ... 44 00 
Pay Rolls, help, . . . (Vd'd 20 
y. E. Colburn, taking account of 

stock, ... 50 
B. C. Buttrick, taking account of 

stock, .... 5 00 



$9,29(5 92 



CITY FARM AND HOUSE OF CORRECTION. 

in account with city of nashua. 

Dr. 

To personal property on hand 

Dec. 18, 1893, . . $11,94'2 11 

To cash paid on treasury orders, 9, 29(5 92 



$21,239 03 



Cr. 

By personal property on hand 

Dec. 18, 1894, . . $13,003 48 

By C. E. Buckham, superinten- 
dent, . . . . 2,213 20 

$15,21(3 68 
Balance against farm, $6,022 35 



30 



MUNICIPAL GOA'EHNMENT REPORT. 



CEMETERIES. 



Appropriation, 
Overdrawn, 



PAID. 



$2,000 00 
477 90 



82,477 90 



Pennichuck W. W 



water, 
pplies. 



S. D. Chandler, su 

J. H. Clark, 

A. E. Sanderson 

W. Hall, 

A. E. Gay, 

Howard & Co 

M. Early, turf, 

P. H. Dolan, loam, etc.. 

Proctor Bros. & Co., loam 

Geo. E. Buxton, plants, 

C. VV. Stevens, stone, 
M. Moran, stone, 
G. N. Trowbridge, sharpenin 

mower, 

D. H. Smith & Son, canvas 
Cross & Tolles, lumber, 
F. D. Cook & Co., lumber, 
Nashua Iron and Brass Foundi 

Co. metal signs, 
\V. C. Tolles, safe, 
INIcQiiesten & Co., fertilizers, 
C. R. Pease, loan of oil stove, etc. 
Nashua Concreting Co., concret 

inof. 



^84 


93 


10 


40 


o(; 


44 


4 


00 


3 


50 


40 


87 


14 


00 


5 


00 


85 


00 


4 


50 


42 


00 


2 


50 


19 


50 


1 


50 


9 


25 


7 


06 


1 


10 


7 


25 


25 


00 


2 


88 


5 


40 



F4 50 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



ai 



C. A. Voter, 1 


abor. 


$4 


00 


B. E. Osgood, 




123 


00 


N. A. Chase, 




64 


50 


N. E. Jones, 




58 


00 


M. C. Barker, 




5 


60 


T. F. Curtis, 




24 


00 


Marden & Mygatt, 




3 


81) 


M. V. B. Thompson, labor. 


t 


00 


Pay Rolls, 


i I 


1,701 


00 






$2,477 90 









EDGEVVOOD CEMETERY. 

Appropriation, . . . $1,500 00 



$1,500 00 



W. E. Spalding, treasurer. 



$1,500 00 



$1,500 00 



EDGE STONE. 



Appropriations, 
Overdrawn, 



$4,000 000 
835 29 



$4,835 29 



32 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPOKT. 



C. W. Stevens, stone, . . $2,674 40 

M. Moran, .... 874 60 

L. P. Duncklee, stone and labor, 107 60 

Pay Rolls, . • . . 1,088 69 



$4,835 21> 



ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 
Appropriation .... $3,500 00 



$3,500 00 



Hunt & Co., supplies. 

Frost & Adams " 

J. H. Clark, 

Smith's, "• 

C. G. Hurlburt, " 

Tel. Publishing Co., reports and 

printing, 
Geo. H. Walker, maps, 
J. H. Willoughby, type writer' 

desk, 
Ritchter & Co., typewriter, 
J. H. Hunt, livery. 
Cross & Tolles. lumber, 
A. H. Saunders, extra service, 

etc., . . . . 



$7 


00 


58 


75 


1 


50 


62 


15 


3 


50 


35 


50 


109 


50 


25 


00 


100 


00 


197 


20 


12 


40 



323 30 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



33 



Pay Rolls, 
Undrawn, 



$2,510 37 
53 83 



$3,500 00 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES, DIST. NO. 1. 



PAID. 



Heath & Lakeman, supplies, 
J. H. Clark, 
A. E. Gay, 

W.J.Putnam, labor, 

Marden & Mygatt, " 
J. P. Howe, 

A. Chase, " 
C. E. Batchelder, 

O. F. Winslow, 

G. A. Currier, " 

C. H. Holden, 

Nashua Concrete Co*, cor 

creteing, etc., 
Nashua Building Co., labor o 

bridge, 
F. D. Cook Lumber Co., lumbe 

for Hudson bridge, . 
Roby & Swart, lumber, 
Berlin Iron Bridge Co., labor o 

Taylor Falls bridge, 

B. B. Otis, labor and stock, 
H. Stearns, rent, 

H. F. Chase, use of land, 

A. K. Woodbury & Co., sand. 



$21 


10 


168 


63 


1 


70 


17 


70 


3 


60 


51 


15 


22 


00 


89 


58 


4 


55 


288 


85 


135 


93 


791 


18 


89 


11 


171 


60 


239 


19 


41 


40 


73 


30 


56 


00 


5 


00 


116 


25 



34 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



J. Barnard, shovels, etc., 
G. W. Harris, sprinkling Con- 
cord street, 
P. A. Kendall, filing saws, etc., 
Pay Rolls, . . . . 



$26 60 

8 00 

8 00 

10,893 76 



$13,324 18 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES, DIST. NO. 2. 



PAID. 



C. T. Robinson, stone 


and 


labor 


$726 17 


Alex Woods, " " 252 00 


M. Batchelder, sand and labor, 53 50 


Pombrio & Co., wood and labor, 34 18 


A. Blain, labor, ... 15 00 


I. Goyette, 






5 62 


J. Lamarsh, " 






86 70 


O. F. Winslow, '• 






5 30 


J. H. Hall, 






16 00 


J. E. Bailey, '' 






55 87 


C. Jeanotte, '' 






164 15 


J. Peters, " 






8 25 


S. Benolt, " 






37 50 


D. A. Wills, ^' 






18 00 


D. E. Martin, " 






29 71 


J. H.Jackman, " 






117 96 


b. F. Searles, " 






18 90 


P. Cormody, " 






15 00 


C. E. Smith, 






97 00 


H. J. Whipple " 






189 20 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



35 



C. F. Tolles, labor, 

Chas. Lund, " 

G. W. Davis, 

H, Stearns, rent tool houses, 

B. & M. Railroad, freight, etc., 
T. Mulvanity, sharpening tools, 
J. H. Clark, supplies. 

J. Barnard, supplies, . 
Heath & Lakeman, supplies, 
Nashua Iron and Steel Co 

wedges, 
Nashua Concrete Co., crossings 
Nashua Coal Co., coal, 
Roby & Swart, lumber, 
J. Atwood, barrows, 
Morgan & Morgan, bricks, etc., 
M. Moran, stone, 
J. L. H. Marshall, salary, etc., 
Geo. J. Roller, engineer, roa( 

machine, 
F. D. Cook & Co., lumber, 

F. D. Cook Lumber Co., lumber 

C. & M. Railroad, freight, . 
W. H. Campbell, watering trough 

G. Decelle, stone, 
G. E. Balcom. " 
A. J.Tetro, 

C. F. Dow, 

Leon Lemay, •' 

C. E. Buckham, stone and labor, 

S. Freiser, stone, 

J. P. & W. B. Cummings, stone 

Proctor Bros. & Co., stone, 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., stone, 

F. H. Stearns, stone . 



$i»l 


75 


84 


35 


140 


37 


192 


00 


296 


12 


41 


45 


177 


79 


23 


14 


35 


43 


9 


45 


1,125 


86 


IG 


06 


100 


67 


14 


00 


54 


40 


305 


10 


539 


46 


34 


00 


69 


05 


16 


62 


29 


85 


5 


00 


95 


00 


178 


00 


24 


00 


31 


00 


11 


15 


67 


50 


138 


00 


53 


00 


80 


50 


1,376 


86 


41 


00 



36 



MUNICIPAT. GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



White Mountain Freezer Co., 

labor, etc., 
A. E. Gay, supplies, 
Marden & Mygatt, supplies, 
Heath Hardware Co., supplies, 
H. AI. Goodrich, 
G. W. Harris, sprinkling, etc., 
S. D. Chandler, pipe, etc., 
Phelps & Son, coal, 
Geo. Phelps, brick, 
L. A. Terrell & Co., oil, . 
S. E. Balcom, rent of land, 
Pennichuck Water Works, water 
A. K. Woodbury, roofing. 
Western Union Tel. Co., message 
J. P. Howe, wood, 
L. A. Roby & Son, lumber. 
Vale Mills, waste, 
C. W. Stevens, paving and curb 

ing, 
Pay Rolls, 



$5 


50 


2 


40 


1 


20 


1 


61 


1 


38 


64 


00 


13 


11 


73 


13 


6 


00 


I 


30 


62 


00 


r, - 4 


65 


6 


00 


>5 ' 


33 


107 


50 


89 


00 


2 


80 


7,055 


89 


24,117 


55 


$30,059 29 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. RECAPITULATION. 



Appropriation, 
Overdrawn, 



$40,000 00 
22.256 93 



$62,256 93 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



J. Lamarsh, labor, 

M. T. Emery, 

J. F. Cotton, 

J. T. J. Robbins, 

L. E. Robbins, 

A. A. Davis, 

A. K. Woodbury & Co., labor, 

J. L. H. Marshall 

C. B. Jackiiian & Son, 

E. A. Robbins cSt Co., 
L. P. Duncklee, 

A. J. Tatro, 

D. E. Martin, 
C. E. Batchelder, 
T. F. Lewis, 

F. O. Ray, 

Nashua Iron and Steel Co., 
Nightingale & Childs, 
Hildreth & Co., labor, 1893, 

B. B. Otis, 
J. P. Howe, 
J. H. Clark, supplies, 
S. D. Chandler, " 
Barr & Co., 
M. G. Fletcher, gravel, 
N. Batchelder, " 
M. Earley, 
F. E. Miller, painting signs, 
Concord Foundry Co., grates, 
Webb Gran, and Cons. Co., pav 

ing stone, 

C. VV". Stevens, stone. 



$20 95 

10 00 

28 45 

2 00 

2 00 
50 

114 75 
100 23 

14 49 

8 50 
83 00 

10 13 
12 00 
44 80 

1 00 

9 38 

6 80 
74 00 

7 00 
1 50 

3 00 
3 50 

34 19 

11 87 
25 00 
GO 00 
09 75 

15 75 
161 00 

1,086 40 
300 00 



115 


00 


217 


00 


72 


17 


2 


34 


1 


00 


4 


18 


4 


75 


4 


50 


16 


00 


3 


00 


231 


75 


3 


00 



38 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT 

G. E. Balconi, stone, 
M. Moran, " . . 

Massachusetts Broken Stone Co., 
stone, .... 

A. J. Blood & Co., oil, 
Terrell & Co., " 
T. Mulvanity, sharpening tools, 
M. H. Ryan, running snow plow, 
Geo. E. Law, '• " " 
H. Stearns, rent, 
Jackson Co., sand. 
Proctor Bros., wood, 
J. P. & W. B. Cummings, wood, 
Roby & Swart, lumber for street 

roller . . . . 91 58 

J. H. & F. Barr and Mrs. Haines, 

land damages, 
Nashua Concrete Co., walks. 
Vale Mills, waste, '03, 
Paul Lucier, breaking roads, '93, 
Cross & Tolles, lumber, '93, 
C. W. Dodge, dynamite, '93 
Erb & Wilson, hoe handles, '92 
Ames Plow Co., plow, 
Morgan & Morgan, brick, . 
Farrell Foundry and Machine Co., 

babbetting, 
Pennichuck Water Works, water, 
W. R. Fleming & Co., roller, 

B. & M. Railroad, freight on 

roller, .... 70 73 

B. & M. Railroad, freight on cast- 
ings, .... 



300 


00 


389 


02 


1 


50 


14 


50 


3 


50 


3 


13 


4 


10 


21 


67 


13 


80 


6 


00 


10 


00 


3,729 


27 



25 



Pay Rolls, .... 2,217 78 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



39 



Expended, Dist. No. 1, 
" " '' 2, 



$13,324 18 
39,059 29 



$62,256 93 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Appropriation, 
Overdrawn, 



$27,120 00 
2,052 93 



$29,172 93 



PAID. 

Nashua Light Co., light, 
Nashua Coal Co., coal, 
Nashua Oil Co., oil, . 
Nashua Iron and Steel Co., use of 

gong, etc., 
Nashua Saddlery Co., supplies, 
Pennichuck Water Works, water, 
Telephone Co., rents and messages 
Electric Gas Light Co., supplies, 
J. Lamarsh, labor, 

F. A. Houle, 
A. E. Gay, 
O. F. Winslow, 
Harden & Mygatt, 
J. J. Crawford & Son, labor, 
Q. A. Woodward, " 

C. B. Jackman & Son, labor and 

stock, 
F. O. Ray, labor and stock, 
W. T. Russell, veterinary surgeon, 



$413 


98 


811 


08 


4 


00 


80 


94 


13 


25 


lOo 


65 


263 


36 


62 


04 


87 


00 


23 


10 


28 


10 


57 


20 


11 


37 


12 


05 


22 


85 


155 


08 


34 


60 


60 


00 



40 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Mrs. Bean, washing, 

Sarah Scully, washing. 

Woodward & Co., harness work, 

S. D. Chandler, grain, 

McQiiesten & Co., grain. . 

W. Hall, grain, 

F. E. Marsh, wood, . 

Geo. O. Osborn, incidentals, 

F. D. Cook & Co., lumber, 
E. F. Marsh, soap, 
Geo. E. Peno, oil, 
Terrell & Co., oil. 
Marsh's Express, express, 
Abbott Downing Co., hose 

wagon, 

B. O. Roby, painting, etc., 
J. Barnard, supplies, 
Talbot Drug and Chemical Co., 

supplies, ... 
Washburn Manufacturing Co. 

supplies, 
Gamewell Co., supplies, 
A. E. Wallace, 
Jackman & Sexton, supplies 
W. A. Lovering, " 

Kimball & Co., '• 

G. H. Brigham, '^ 
A. S. Jackson, " 
Ashley & Lund, labor, 
G. H. Whitney, 
J. A. Moore, " ' 

C. T. Lund, 
O. W. Reed, 
C. E. Batchelder, '' 
Smith & Gould, suj^plies, 



$75 63 
18 72 
300 52 
185 05 
374 01 
339 83 

6 00 

34 62 
26 88 
20 50 
10 40 

5 00 
2 50 

515 00 
97 00 
95 80 

84 28 

35 78 
361 55 

17 57 
72 41 

2 50 
14 19 
25 83 

48 00 

49 50 

3 33 
1 75 

7 20 
9 30 

109 10 
12 00 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



41 



G. E. Balcom, ice, . . . $26 40 

Gumming & Wood, balance on 
horses, . . . , 

L. J. Mowry, two poles, 
G. T. Lund, fire commissioner. 
Q. A. Woodward, '• 

G. H. Whitney, 
F. B. Fellows, fireman, 
Geo. E. Peno, 
VV^ J. Knott, 
F. R. Webster, 
P. McLaughlin. 
M. H. Buckley, 

F. P. Hunkins, 
Howard & Go., furnishing, 

J. H. Hunt, livery, 

G. F. Spalding, straw, 
M. G. Mullen, painting, 
G. & M. Railroad, freight, 
B. and M. Railroad, freight, 
J. F. VV^atson, carrots, 
S. F. Hay ward & Go., combina- 
tion truck, etc. 

G. W. H. Moulton, guy pole, 
Jackson Go., waste, etc., 
Gregg & Son, sash, etc., 
Jos. Labine, hay, 
H. O. Proctor, hay, 
J. F. Gilfoile, painting, 
B. W. Rideout, horse. 
Revere Rubber Go., hose, . 
Ghampion Flue .Scraper Go., 

scraper, . . . . ' 4 50 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 

repairs, .... 2,104 50 



200 


00 


150 


ou 


125 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


9 


75 


20 


16 


33 


30 


29 


16 


29 


16 


29 


16 


19 


42 


190 


91 


2 


00 


85 


24 


44 


00 


6 


40 


57 


12 


15 


00 


2,219 


00 


6 


00 


47 


78 


3 


25 


561 


93 


210 


19 


12 


00 


160 


00 


1,451 


00 



42 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT, 



Cross & Tolles, lumber, 
Gazette Co., printing, 
Geo. H. Parker, laundry, 
F. B. Trow, pair of horses, 
Torrent Co., furnishing room, 
W. B. Needham estate, hay, 
F. E. Burns, damage to team, 
J. B. Manseau, harness work. 
Knights of Pvthias, oak desk, 
I. N. Cummings, wood, 
S. R. Collins, ice, 
H. O. Smith, hay, 
Phelps & Son, coal, 
American Soap & W. Co., soap 
Combination Ladder Co., ladder 
Lawrence Decorating Co., decora 
ting, merchants' week, 

F. E. Adams, wood, . 
H. Thompson, brooms. 
Smith's, supplies. 
Woodward & Son, supplies, 
Barr Hardware Co., " 
Carpenter & Son, '' 
Thompson Hardware Co., sup 

plies, 
H. S. Norwell, supplies, 

A. Thompson, " 
C. A. Berry, 
C. S. Hilbeit, 
LynnS. B. &F., " 

B. B. Otis, labor and stock, 
J. A. Hamilton, " . 

G. C. Sanderson, "■ 
A. D, Melendy, " . 
W. F. Barnes, " . 



$123 


90 


2 


25 


1(5 


14 


325 


00 


75 


00 


11 


07 


50 


00 


2 


05 


10 


00 


1 


50 


10 


75 


65 


11 


162 


50 


8 


46 


18 


00 


15 


00 


3 


00 


4 


00 


- 4 


00 


26 


55 


92 


26 


3 


00 


3 


50 


9 


92 


20 


00 


3 


80 


66 


00 


144 


00 


24 


33 


4 


90 


54 


75 


10 


00 


27 


50 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



43 



G. A. Willard, labor, 

A. K. Woodbury, labor and roof- 

ing, . . . . 

F. R. Arnold, labor and electric 

wire, 
Reilly, supplies, 

B. S. Woods, supplies. 
Hay ward & Co., supplies, . 
Roby & Swart, lumber, 
L. A. Roby & Son, lumber, 
Tremont House, entertaining vis 

itors, merchant's week, 
J. H. Barker, printing, 
Flather Foundry Co., castings, 
A. E. Sanderson, harness work, 
American Shearer Co., sharpen 

ing shears, 
Morin & Goyette, hay. 
Fay Rolls, Niagara Co., 

" " Indian Head Co., 

" " Fennichuck Hose Co 

" " engineers, 

" " Chemical Co., 

" " Torrent Co., 

" " Hook and Ladder Co., 

" " permanent men. 



$4 65 



29 .50 



4 


50 


6 


75 


6 


11 


1 


00 


44 


18 


75 


68 


18 


70 


12 


35 


13 


46 


2 


50 


1 


50 


208 


28 


1)60 


00 


77i) 


16 


859 


17 


370 


00 


235 


00 


1,030 


00 


1,244 


50 


8,584 


92 




$29,172 93 




— 



INCIDENTALS. 



Appropriation, 
Overdrawn, 



$10,000 00 
17,515 54 



$27,515 .54 



44 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMKNT REPORT. 



Nashua Light Co., lighting county 
building, 

Nashua P. O., stamps, postals 
etc., 

Nashua Building Co., furnishing 
inspector's room, 

Nashua Sanitary Co., burying, 

Nashua Concrete Co., Orange 
square, 

Nashua Card and Glazed pape: 
Co., card board for assess 
ors, ... 

Pennichuck Water Works, water 

Insane Asylum, board. 

Industrial School, board, 

Hillsboro County, board, Dionne 

Pay Roll, Orange square, 
" ringing bells, 

" inspectors of check lists 

McKean & Andrews, insurance, 

Chandler & Taylor, " 

A. J. Tuck, 

J. F. Stark, 

M. R. Buxton, " 

M. A. Taylor, 

J. F. Whitney, " 

Telegraph Publishing Co., print- 
ing, Edgewood Cemetery 

Telegraph Publishing Co., print 
ing and advertising, 

W. D. Swart, auditing accounts 

C. A. Voter, supplies, 

D. Marshall, livery, . 



$180 


91 


100 


90 


20 


37 


1 


00 



IOC 50 



6 00 

234 50 

1,347 88 

849 42 

104 00 

42 75 

27 00 

847 00 

129 00 

37 50 

93 76 

67 50 

71 00 

155 00 

30 00 

35 00 

13 05 

12 00 

2 25 

1 50 



$1 


00 


4 


00 


18 


60 


187 


37 


19 


50 


68 


25 


200 


00 


2 


75 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 45 

W. D. Roberts, trucking, 

T. Degnan, flooding common, 

Howard & Co., furnishing library, 
etc., .... 

J. A. Ingalls, copying, etc., 

C. W. Classon, rubber stamps 
and services, 

J. H. Hunt, livery, etc., 

I. F. Graves, salary milk inspector, 

Geo. A. Macabe, sign, 

Boge & Mlcheline, dinner, Fitch- 
burg committee . . .'52 00 

Marsh & Hovv'ard, carriages, 
Fitchburg committee. 

Marsh & Howard, livery, 

Cross & Tolles, old bill, 

C. E. Clement, order book for 
overseer of poor, 

Drs. Greeley, prof, services, 

Isaac Eaton, cash paid, etc., 

L. I. Minard, serving notices, 

W. A. Lovering, order, city phy- 
sician, .... 354 98 

N. S. Whitman, order city physi- 
cian, .... 

A. E. Wallace, drugs, 
R. D. Andrews, board of daugh- 
ter at asylum, . 

Ti'ustees Hunt fund, 
J. H. Bai'ker, circulars for over- 
seer of poor, 
Silsby & Co., dog license blanks, 

B. & M. Railroad, rent of opera 

house, .... 
A. S. Eaton, services, 



12 


00 


10 


00 


1 


75 


11 


00 


20 


00 


20 


33 


47 


13 



253 


63 


111 


80 


60 


00 


655 


00 


I 


50 


5 


it 5 


120 


00 


5 


60 



46 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



F. O. Ray, labor, 1 . . . 

G. E. Law, trucking, 
T. D. Luce, copy, 

B. B. Otis, labor, 

C. B. Jackman & Son, 

C. W. Edwards, directory, 

H. R. Wheeler, printing, assess- 
ors, .... 

H. M. Willoby, livery, assessors, 

Bagley & Co., supplies, 

Western Union Tel. Co., messages 

B., E. Osgood, labor, county 
building, 

A. y. Tatro, curbing Orange 
square, .... 

City Farm and House of Correc- 
tion, running garbage team, 

McQiiesten & Co., fertilizers for 
squares, .... 

E. W. Clark, labor, county build- 

ing, .... 

F. E. Thomas, nursing Benson, . 

F. E. Marsh, wood for Benson, . 
R. R. Hooper, Manchester Union, 
Peter Gerward, supplies, 

L. D. Blood, moving pauper, 
Richards & Dexter, labor, pro- 
bate office 
Smith's, supplies, assessors and 
overseer of poor, 

G. W. Badger, labor county of- 

fice, .... 

Keeley & Co., undertakers, 

C. H. Wilson, rent, . 

D. W. King, recording fees, 
F. E. Weston, services, 



$5 


07 


5 


45 


1 


50 


4 


75 


3 


21 


2 


00 


22 


75 


2 


00 


1 


00 


4 


92 


10 


00 


410 


70 


1,050 


00 


17 


96 


33 


73 


76 


00 


2 


25 


4 


50 


19 


00 


3 


00 


67 


78 


14 


43 


46 


49 


8 


00 


20 


00 


1 


90 


25 


80 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 47 

C. E. Blunt, horse killed, . . $5 00 

Lawrence Decorating Co., decora- 
ting City Hall and County 
building, 

Tremont House, entertaining vis- 
itors. Merchant's week, 

E. E. Parker, expense, Hunt mat- 
ter, .... 

H. S. Norwell, supplies, milk in- 
spector, .... 

L. B. Colby, damage to hens, 

Greenough & Co., three directo- 
ries, .... 

G. VV. Harris, sprinkling, . 

J. McFadden, rebuilding fence, . 

G. E. Balcom, ice fountain, court 
room, .... 

C. H. Webster, witness fees, 

W. E. Spalding, Tr., travelling 
expenses, 

Matthew Walch, inspector's fares, 

E. M. Bowman, registering births, 

Geo. F. Wilbur, examining Brown 

and Greenleaf, . . 50 00 

P. Heath, Fox historv of Dunsta- 
ble, . " . 

C. R. Wood, auditing, 

C. H. Burns, professional services, 
1893, .... 

J. J. Doyle, fees. Shea case, et als, 

C. J. Hamblett, professional ser- 
vices, .... 75 00 

C. J. Hamblett, settlement, suit 

L. J. Knott ... 300 00 

W. C. Tolles, services, . . 7 50 



48 


00 


35 


80 


33 


75 


1 


80 


4 


00 


6 


00 


43 


00 


30 


00 


87 


75 


3 


00 


3 


50 


3 


90 


94 


75 



2 


50 


10 


00 


•25 


00 


50 


00 



48 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



B. G. Moran, witness, claim 


cases, 


. 


$85 00 


G. F. Jackson, services 


> 


10 00 


E. H. Wason, ex. cases 


vs. city 


20 90 


G. A. Underbill, witness. Green 




leaf case. 




25 00 


Chas. Finning, land 


damages 


200 00 


Richard & Cardin, lease. 


Commer- 




cial street. 


. 


500 00 


Mrs. W. F. Jackman, 


damages 


10 00 


Eliza Lucier, claim, '93, 


. 


600 00 


J. M. Lincoln, claim. 


. 


775 00 


M. Sughrue, '• 




2,500 00 


G. W. CusselK - 


. 


1,000 00 


Geo. A. Pino 


. 


4,133 00 


E. F. Doyle, 


. 


500 00 


A. W. Shea, 




150 00 


J. S. Keeley 


. 


100 00 


T. W. Keeley, '• 


. 


100 00 


— Greenleaf, 


. 


2,354 12 


D. J. Sullivan, 




100 00 


Wm. Rock, 


. 


100 00 


E. F. Whitney, salary. 


assessor, 




etc., 


. 


438 21 


W. O. Clongh, salary, assessor, . 


400 00 


G. W. Badger, 


V i. 


300 00 


J. R. Perkins, salary, assessor, etc., 


306 25 


J. H. Waters, '' 


i 1. 


300 00 


C. F. Tolles, salary, assessor, etc. 


315 00 


D. D. Coffey, " 


I . 


300 00 


Victor Lagasse, interpreter. 


18 00 


T. D. Grandpre, 


. 


24 00 


Jackman & Sexton, furn 


iture, etc. 




board of health, 


. 


76 30 


Smith's, supplies, board 


of health, 


17 02 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 49' 



Geo. A. Macabe, sign, board of 

health, .... 

Smith's, supplies, board of health, 

H. G. Lendrim, labor, board of 

health, .... 

F. E. Fisher, papering, board of 

health, .... 

Roby & Swart, lumber and labor, 

board of health, 
Dumas & Co., binding, 
A. E. Gay, labor, board of health, 
J. Tatro, •• '- " 

J. D. Shedd, sign, " " 

Havard & Co., furnishing, board 

of health, 
Telegraph Publishing Co., print- 
ing, board of health, 
J. F. Whitmarsh, summons, board 

of health, 
J. H. Hunt, livery, board of health 

G. H. Brigham, supplies, order 

board of health, 

Jos Gervvard, supplies, board of 
health, .... 

H. R. Lindsey, milk order, board 

of health, 
A. Riendeau, wood, order board 

of health, .... 
C. Richardson, rent, order board 

of health, 
C. E. Hardy, milk, order board of 

health, .... 
VV. H. Marsh, milk, order board 

of health, 
R. Durant, milk, order board of 

health, .... 



$2 


00 


17 


02 


13 


87 


14 


00 


81 




21 


00 


4 


80 


26 


00 


5 


60 


41 


00 


33 


25 


9 


40 


83 


50 


80 


59 


2 


40 


3 


40 


1 


75 


18 


00 


3 


55 


1 


30 


2 


18 



50 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

C. B. Hammond, board of health, 
I. F. Graves, cash paid '93, board 

of health, 
Kimball & Co., supplies, board of 

health, .... 
Nodding & Wright, supplies, 

board of health, 
Lund Cafe, dinner, board of health 
H. W. Kelley, writing, board of 

health, .... 
G. W. Badger, labor, room, 

board of health. 
Board of health, cleaning school 

house, .... 
E. Simard, M. D., attending con- 
tagious diseases, 
J. T. Greeley, M. D. attending 

contagious diseases, 

D. B. Leazott, supplies, contagious 

diseases, 

Wallace & Kittredge, M. D., at- 
tending contagious diseases, 

R. L. Vaillancour, M. D., attend- 
ing contagious diseases, 

J. D. Chandler, rent, contagious 
diseases, 

G. A. Underbill, M. D., attend- 
ing contagious diseases, 

A. W. Shea, M. D., attending 
contagious diseases, 

C. P. Ober, milk, contagious 
diseases, 

M. T. Lajoie, M. D., attending 
Brunelle in contagious di- 
sease, .... 86 75 



33 


75 


7 


28 


2 


15 


22 


12 


2 


50 


3 


50 


21 


66 


34 


13 


27 


00 


43 


50 


31 


27 


15 


00 


70 


00 


17 


50 


25 


00 


3 


00 


2 


50 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



51 



H. G. Lendrim, wiring room, 

register of probate, 
Roby & Swart, lumber, 
Dumas & Co., binding books, as 

sessors, 
A. E. Gay, labor, library, etc., 

E. M. Bowman, registering births 

deaths and marriages, 
Returns of births and deaths, 1893. 
J. A. Lagace, M. D., 
P. E. Dansereau " 
A. W. Petit, 

F. E. Kittredge, " 

A. S. Wallace, 
E. F. McQiiesten, " 

B. G. Moran, 
K. Pritchaid, "■ 

B. Allen, 
M. T. Lajoie, " 

G. F. VVilber, 
G. W. Currier, 
E. Blaylock, " 
J. N. Woodward, '' 
i. F. Graves, " 
I. G. Anthoine, '• 
A. VV. Shea, 
Drs. Dearborn, " 
M. H. Tierney, " 
W. I. Blanchard, '' 
R. L. Valllancour, " 
H. H.Jewell, 

C. T. Lund, undertaker, deaths, 
A. A. Davis, " " 

Return of marriages. 1893. 
Rev. O. J. White, '92 and '93, . 



$6 


•25 


8 


59 


13 


30 


91 


34 



218 90 



37 


25 


28 


75 


30 


00 


7 


25 


19 


75 


4 


50 


6 


00 


1 


00 


6 


25 


8 


25 


9 


00 


1 


00 


6 


75 


2 


25 


1 


50 


3 


75 


31 


25 


3 


50 


4 


00 


4 


00 


13 


25 


4 


25 


7 


75 


3 


00 



13 00 



52 



MUNICIPAT. GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



VV. H. Eaton, . 
C. W. Rowle). . 
T. A. Howard, 
J. B. H. V. Milette, 
L. G. A. DoLicet, 
J. J. Richard, 
H. A. Lessard, . 
Chas. Bancroft, 
H. B. Smith, 
E. E. Buckle, 
Geo. VV. G rover, 

D. Parker, J. P., 

S. Eaton, 





iO 




$6 75 




1 75 




12 50 




1 25 




4 00 




2 50 




I 00 




1 25 




5 75 




1 25 




50 




1 00 




$27,515 54 



MEMORIAL DAY. 

Appropriation, . . . $300 00 



$300 00 



R. O. Greenleaf, Q. M., . 
Undrawn, 



$200 00 
100 00 



$300 00 



NASHUA HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION. 
Appropriation, - . . $2,500 00 



$2,500 00 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



53 



PAID. 



F. E. Kittredge, Tr. 



$2,500 00 



$2,500 00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Appropriation, 
Overdrawn, 



PAID. 



$17,000 00 
5,292 45 



$22,2y2 45 



G. E. Anderson, salary, commis 

sioner, 
J. A. Spalding, salary, commis 

sioner, 
C. H. Burke, salary, commission 

er and clerk, 
C. H. Burke, supplies, 
H. M. Goodrich, 
W. A. Lovering, " 
A. H. Dunlap & Son, supplies, 
H. S. Norvvell, 
Cotton & Allton, " 

J. Barnard, " 

J. G. Blunt & Son, " 

Jackman & Sexton, " 

Howard & Co., furniture, . 
E. F. Marsh, soap. 
Gazette Co., printing. 
Telegraph Publishing Co., reports, 



100 


00 


100 


00 


125 


00 


109 


96 


55 


32 


12 


85 


1 


14 


3 


32 


2 


93 


3 


35 


41 


00 


4 


00 


8 


00 


3 


65 


50 


85 


18 


75 



54 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Greenwood & Whitmarsh, rubber 

goods, 
Smith's, stationery, 
Dumas & Co., binding, etc., 
G. F. Goddard, fire extinguisher 
First Aid to the Injured, papers 
Damrell & Upham, papers, 
H. M. Willoby, Hvery, 
J. H. Hunt, 
G. E. Balcom, ice, 
W. D. Roberts,, jobbing, 
Morse & Whyte, cage, 
A. E. Gay, labor, 

F. O. Ray, 
Morgan & Morgan, labor, 
Pennichuck Water Works, labor 

and water, 
Telephone Co., rents and mes 

sages 
A. S. Eaton, bills paid, 
Nashua Light Co., light, 
A. S. Eaton, salary, 
W. W. Wheeler, salary, 

G. H. Campbell, 
Pay Rolls, 



$8 00 

8 80 

33 25 

15 00 

5 62 

6 00 

21 50 
95 00 
28 00 

2 50 
80 00 

57 92 

22 83 
62 61 

58 36 





180 


11 










91 


21 










982 


12 








1 


,000 
75 

75 


00 
00 
00 








18 


743 


50 












$•- 


>2 


292 


45 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Appropriation, 
Overdrawn, 



$1,000 00 
385 76 



$1,385 76 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



55 



Telegraph Publishing Co., reports 

and printing, 
Gazette Co., printing, 
H. R. Wheeler, printing manuals 

and check lists, 
J. H. Barker, printing assessors 

books and tax bills, 
Dumas & Co., binding, 
W. A. Howard & Co., binding 

and printing, 
M. V. B. Greene, supplies, 
C. E. Clement, note sheets, 
Samuel Ward Co., index and 

paper. 
Smith's, stationery, 



$951 42 
55 75 

115 CO 



107 


25 


50 


00 


77 


25 


2 


50 


3 


00 


5 


65 


17 


34 



$1,385 76 



Appropriation 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

$3,000 00 



PAID 



$3,000 00 



V. C. Gilman, treasurer. 
Odd Fellows Building Association, 
rent, .... 

C. H. Austin, janitor and cash 
paid, .... 

Nashua Light Co., light, 



$1, 


,370 


73 


1 


,004 


02 




178 


02 




27 


60 



56 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT 



Nashua Building Co., shelves, etc 
H. G. Lendrim, electric work, 
Roby & Swart, lumber, 
Howard & Co., supplies, 
B. B. Otis, sash, etc., 



., $35 


45 






35 


IS 






285 


08 






52 


G5 






11 


27 










$8,000 


00 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 
Appropriation .... $8,000 00 



$8,000 00 



C. E. Emerson, rent, 


$81 00 


J. D. Chandler, 


rent. 


54 50 


J. N. Woodward, 


(. i 


14 00 


J. O. Bodwell, 


a 


69 00 


L. W. Parker, 


i i 


171 50 


A. Jaquith, 


'' 


7 50 


W. S. Atwood, bills paid and rent 


32 79 


H. A. Cutter, 


rent. 


20 on 


D, Stevens, 




243 20 


F. Wright, 




32 50 


Mrs. Tourgeney, 




4 42 


A. Webster, 




134 00 


E. Boucher, 




72 00 


A. Auclair, 




29 82 


Charles Finning, 




160 00 


G. W. Howard, rent. 


45 00 


W. M. Wilkins, 


' 


4 00 


G. Martin, 


' 


40 00 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



A. A. Wheeler, 


$96 


00 


M. Downing " 


70 


00 


J. B. Parker, 


12 


00 


Nashua I. & S. Co, rent, 


168 


00 


VVm. Hamilton, board and rent 


101 


95 


[. Brennan, rent, 


7 


00 


E. Morse, '' 


14 


00 


Hammond estate, rent, 


60 


00 


M. Moran, '• 


21 


00 


J. Fontaine, " 


3 


00 


Joseph Charet, '•' 


20 


35 


W. P. Clark, 


40 


00 


D. Marshall, 


16 


00 


F. H. Ayer, 


12 


00 


Remi Gaudette, " 


9 


00 


Mrs. Clancy, '' 


16 


01 


Mrs. W. T. Foss 


1 


00 


Follett & Fullonton, supplies, 


65 


50 


Carpenter & Record, '"■ 


6 


00 


R. I. Stevens, '' 


12 


00 


J. VV. Clark, 


243 


50 


W. B. Chase, 


94 


70 


G. B. McQiiesten, " 


78 


27 


Deschamps & Houde, " 


102 


55 


Richard & Cardin, " 


174 


71 


G. H. Brigham, " 


247 


16 


A. Budro, " 


339 


51 


B. S. Woods, " 


120 


68 


Daggett & Cross, " 


325 


38 


Cotton & Allton, " 


159 


50 


C. Brodeur & Co., " 


14 


00 


S. B. Collins, " 


68 


50 


C. Sullivan, " 


100 


75 


Newton & Co., " 


11 


98 


Kimball & Co., 


1 


83 



58 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

J. Molloy. " . $46 41 

T. N. Hart, '• . 39 00 

J. G. Blunt & Son, •■ . 157 00 

A. Bowman, " . 2 50 

H. Lavoie, " . 25 1 1 

A. F. Kehoc, " . 99 04 

N. E. Rogers, " . 98 00 

Shattuck & Eaton, '• . 105 50 

J. H. Field, '• . 18 00 

v. E. Tup per, '• . 7 00 

P. Clancy, '• . 4 30 

Nodding'& Wright, '^ 31 00 

E. A. Terrell & Co., - . 14 00 
M. Buckley, board of White 

children, ... 185 00 
W. H. Colburn, board ot Farns- 

worth, .... 20 75 

D. A. Wells, board ofCussell, 7 00 

Mrs. Wright, board, . . 30 12 
Orphans' home, board of Moran 

children, ... 260 00 
St Patrick's home, board of Blom- 

berg children, ... 15 00 

Emma Bailey, board and nursing, 12 00 

D J. Hallisev, medicine, . . 74 50 

Blanchard & Co., '• . . 24 75 

G. W. Shaw, •' . . 2 25 

W. A. Lovering, '' . . 1 80 

C. M. Morse, " . . 36 20 

T. A. McCarthy, extracting teeth, 5 50 

C. Jeanotte, milk, ... 21 36 

A. W. Hazeltine, milk, . . 4 56 

J. R. Kimball, " . • 29 43 

Julia Coffey, •" . • 5 ^»9 

C. P. Ober. '• . . 20 25 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



59 



Marsh & Howard, liverv, 
S. G. Hooper, aid, 
I. N. Cummings, wood, 
J. P. Cummings, 
Pombrio & Co., 

F. E, Marsh, 

G. L. Glazier, 
J. H. Craig, 
F. H. McQiiesten, 
F. E. Adams. 
Roby & Swart, 
C. F. Reed, 
Gregg & Son, 

F. Lampron, 
Geo. Phelps & Son, coal, 
A. T. Laton, 

G. E. Balcom, "■ 
Emery Parker, " 
Nashua Coal Co., " 
M. T. Lajoie, M. D., medical at- 
tendance, 

Drs. Greeley, medical attendance, 
I. F. Graves, M. D., medical at- 
tendance, 
J. A. Lagace, M. D., medical at- 
tendance, 
R. D. Andrews, board of daugh 

ter, 
Emma Wright, nursing, 
E. H. Everett, old bill, 
Sexton & Hooper, old bill, 
S. A Lamudge, care of Rowell, 
M. W. Wheeler, nursing, 
Harry J. Bell, cleansing clothes, 
W. H. Ely, meals, 



$1 


(10 


144 


ou 


8 


50 


4 


50 


95 


17 


136 


97 


9 


00 


75 


25 


23 


75 


27 


00 


14 


00 


3 


75 


1 


50 


27 


04 


26 


40 


3') 


00 


35 


00 


19 


50 


197 


50 


15 


00 


5 


00 



10 00 



o 

20 


00 


34 


50 


1 


50 


5 


00 


36 


00 


18 


50 


15 


00 


10 


00 



60 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Isaac Eaton, cash paid, ;. 

Nashua Boot & .Shoe i^Co., shoes, 

S. W. Mansfield, shoes, 

T. W. Keele\', burials, 

C. T. Lund,' 

A. A. Davis, 

P. Robichaud, " 

J. Charron, *•' 

Undrawn, 



$3 


30 


2 


25 


7 


90 


10 


00 


25 


00 


U 


50 


14 


50 


25 


00 


1,381 


84 



18,000 00 



SINKING FUND. 
Appropriation, ... $6 000 00 



$6,000 00 



E. H. Rollins & Son, bonds, 



$6,000 00 



$6,000 00 



STATE AND COUNTY TAX. 



County tax, 
State tax, 



$28,449 37 
29,215 00 



$57,664 37 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



61 



PAID. 



E. F. Jones, county treasurer, 
S. A. Carter, state treasurer. 



$28,449 37 
29,215 00 



$57,664 37 



SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. 

Appropriation, . . . $2,500 00 



$2,500 00 



R. R. Dube, rent, 
J. Wolf man, " 
Estate M. D. Merrill, rent, 
Dunlap & Son, 
G. W. Howard, 
J. B- Parker, 
J. W. Ladd, 
E. Morse, 
W. C. Tolles, 
Julia Coffey, 
J. E. Dearborn, 
M. Brennan, board of Sullivan 
children, 

E. M. Walker, board of Richardson 
P. Shea, " 

F. E. Marsh, wood, 
Pombrio & Co., " 
J. H. Craig, 
Nashua Coal Co., coal, 
Emery Parker, " 



$64 


00 


24 


00 


101 


25 


164 


00 


41 


00 


32 


00 


5 


00 


68 


00 


25 


00 


6 


00 


r. 


00 


204 


00 


129 


97 


85 


00 


24 


75 


3 


50 


2 


75 


49 


25 


6 


50 



62 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Geo. Phelps & Son, 


coal, 


$10 


50 




A. T. Eaton, 


a 


20 


50 




G. E. Balcom, 


(k 


21 


00 




M. H. Ryan, coke 


• 


2 


00 




Nashua h'ght Co., " 


. 


2 


00 




W. B. Wakelin, su 


pplies. 


1 


25 




A. K. Chase & Co., 


I i 


1 


85 




R. 1. Stevens & Co., 


a 


100 


16 




J. G. Blunt & Son, 


1 1. 


55 


00 




G. H. Brigham, 


'• 


71 


80 




C. Sullivan, 


( . 


48 


23 




Nodding & Wright, 


i i 


32 


00 




N. E. Rogers, 


1 1. 


35 


00 




B. S. Woods, 


t ( 


100 


00 




Cotton & Allton, 


'• 


61 


00 




Shattuck & Eaton, 


i ( 


16 


00 




Daggett & Cross, 


1 1 


30 


00 




W. B. Chase, 


i i 


36 


00 




Wm. Molloy, 


i 1. 


25 


00 




F. Newton & Co., 


(, I 


41 


44 




Brodeur & Co., 


ii, 


3 


00 




Kimball & Co., 


li, 


1 


20 




J. H. Reed, shoes. 


(I 


11 


25 




E. A. Terrell & Co., 


shoes, 


3 


15 




A. E. Wallace, truss 


1 * 


5 


00 




Undrawn, 


* ■ ' 


715 


70 








$2,500 


00 



SALARY ACCOUNT. 



Appropriation, 



$13,000 00 



$13,000 00 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITUHES. 63 



Thomas Sands, mayor, . . $1,000 00 

E. M. Bowman, city clerk, . 900 00 

E. H. Wason, city solicitor, . 500 00 

A. H. Saunders, city engineer, . 1,200 00 

A. H. Saunders, " bal, '93 200 00 

J. W. Ladd, city messenger, . 780 00 

C. B. Hammond, city physician, 400 00 

W. E. Spalding, city treasurer, . 300 00 

C. W. Hoitt, police justice, . 1,000 00 

W. O. Clough, associate justice, 300 00 
J. H. Wiiloughby, clerk police 

court, .... 360 00 

H. W. Ramsdell, tax collector, . 1,670 00 
Geo. E. Danforth, clerk common 

council, .... 150 00 

Isaac Eaton, overseer of the poor, 1,000 00 

C. B. Hammond, board of health, 100 00 

M. T. Lajoie, " " ]00 00 

J. T. Greeley, " " 100 00 

Undrawn, .... 2,940 00 



$13,000 00 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Appropriation, .... $15,000 00 

Overdrawn, .... 920 79 



$15,920 79 



PAID. 



J. Lamarsh, labor, . . 48 50 

Cone & Malhoit, '• . . 34 13 



64 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



L. P. Dimcklee, Libor, 

J. Searles, " 

\V. Wheeler, 

J. Cullen, - '93 

C. B. Jackmnn & Son, labor. 

A. A. Davis, labor, 

M. Mahar, 

Thos. Kell}', " 

James Burchall, " 

C. E. Batchelder, '' 

F. O. Ray, 
T. Mulvanity, 

D. E. Martin, 
Nashua Co-operative Iron Foun- 
dry Co., labor and castings, 

A. E. Gay, labor and pipe, 
Concord & Montreal Railroad, 
freight, . . . . 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight, 
A. VV. Shea, M. D., services. 
J. H. Clark, supplies, 
Barr & Co., 

G. H. Brighani, '' 
C. Sullivan, ^ 
Roby & Swart, lumber, 

W. D. Roberts, trucking, . 

S. D. Chandler, cement, etc., 

W. Hall, 

Morgan & Morgan, cement and 
brick, . . . . 

Porter Blanchard Sons Co., re- 
building fence, . 

Nashua Iron & Brass Foundry Co., 
traps, . . . . 

Portland Stone Ware Co., pipe, . 



$81 


40 


2 


62 


5 


25 


1 


50 


34 


65 


1 


00 


1 


50 


208 


18 


7 


50 


21 


85 


4 


54 


4 


44 


23 


22 


206 


80 


1,339 


85 


3 


70 


115 


43 


17 


50 


78 


87 


3.5 


60 


9 


00 


11 


82 


215 


51 


19 


50 


53 


41 


22 


50 


571 


57 


1 


32 


147 


00 


1,151 


51 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



65 



E. A. Terrell, rubber boots, 
S. VV. Mansfield, 

F. M. Lund, 

Nashua Boot & Shoe Co., rubbe 

boots. 
Woodward & Cory, oil coat and 

hat. 
Greenwood & VVhitmarsh, oil 

pants, 
T. Mul vanity, stone, . 
Concord Foundry Co., traps and 

Gi"ates, 
F. D. Cook & Co., lumber,. 
Jackson Co., land rent. 
Proctor Bros. &Co., pails, '9.3, 
C. W. Dodge, podwer, 
A. Chase, brick, 
Pay Rolls, 



$14 7.5 
8 .50 
3 95 

6 25 

1 50 



1 


25 


1 


45 


896 


94 


106 


83 


1 


00 


3 


84 


1 


70 


6 


40 


10,885 


26 


$15,920 79 



Appropriation, 
Overdrawn, 



STREET LIGHTS. 



Paid. 



$22,000 00 
182 82 



$22,182 82 



Nashua Light Co., light, 
E. Sullivan, lighting, 
D. J. Collins, lighting, 
C. Sullivan, oil, 



22,164 


12 


3 


00 


9 


00 


6 


70 


$22,182 82 



66 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



TEMPORARY LOAN, 



W. E. Spalding, Treasurer, . $370,000 00 



$370,000 00 



Paid. 



W. E. Spalding, Treasurer, . $370,000 00 



$370,000 00 



WATER SUPPLY. 



Appropriation, .... $5,500 00 

Overdrawn, . . .' . 220 00 



$5,720-00 



Paid. 



Pennichuck Water Works, water, $5,720 00 

' $5,720 00 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



WARD EXPENSES. 
Appropriation, .... $1,300 00 



Paid. 

C. H. Aver\', furniture, 
Howard & Co., chairs. 
Smith's, paper, etc., . 
Marden & Mygatt, labor, 
H. L. Fiske, selectman, '90, 
C. A. Hunt, expenses, etc., 
H. L. Morse, '^ 

Erb & Wilson, building booths, '92 
Roby & Swart, sawdust, 
Nashua Building Co., labor, 
Henry Harwood, labor on booths 
H. S. Ashley, labor, . 

F. E. Marsh, wood, . 
L. M. Valcour, trucking ballot 
^ boxes, 
H. A. Wentworth, trucking Ijallot 

boxes, 

St. Jean Baptiste Society, rent o 
hall, 

G. B. McQiiesten, rent of hall, 
A. H. Davis, rent of theatre. 
Pay rolls, clerks, 

" moderators, 
" selectmen, 
" ballot inspectors. 
Undrawn, .... 



$1,300 00 



$5 88 
6 05 
2 53 

2 35 
5 00 

3 42 
2 25 

25 02 

1 70 

2 40 
36 20 

1 50 

1 00 

2 00 
1 00 



40 


00 




50 


00 




100 


00 




90 


00 




90 


00 




270 


00 




360 


00 




201 


75 








$1,300 00 



68 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



SCHOOLS. 

Appropriation, .... 
School Tax, 1894, 
Literary Fund, .... 
J. H. Fassett, Superintendent, 
Tuition, .... 



Paid. 



$37,000 00 

20,450 50 

2,884 17 

295 45 



$60,630 12 



Caprori Brothers supplies, . 


$59 25 


W. Reed & Sons, 


58 00 


Balch Brothers, " 


4 80 


W. K. Day, 


22 50 


M. Bradley Co., " 


51 76 


Lee & Shepard, " 


23 55 


Geo. S. Perry & Co ," 


346 92 


E..H. Butler"^& Co., " 


3,18 


H. Holt & Co., 


8 75 


Silver, Burdett & Co. " 


326 74 


Prang Educational Co., supplies. 


113 01 


Ginn&Co , supplies, . 


575 88 


W. Ware & Co., supplies, . 


88 32 


University Publishing Co., sup 




plies, 


23 05 


Heath & Co., supplies. 


171 68 


Putnam Sons, " 


2 00 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co., supplies 


, 149 24 


Boston School Supply Co., sup 




plies. 


28 55 


Meade, Dodge & Co.,- supplies. 


87 00 


W. B. Clark & Co., supplies, 


49 68 


American Book Co., supplies. 


95 44 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



69 



Maynard, M. & Co., si 


pplies 


$13 


00 


D. Lothrop & Co., 


1 1 


9 


30 


Kellogg & Co., 


a 


16 


5.J 


Bobrick School Furni 


ture Co. 






supplies. 


. 


67 


99 


Frost & Adams, supplies 


367 


76 


J. Thaxter, supplies, 


. 


22 


50 


Allyu & Bacon, supplies, 


29 


00 


G. W. Libbey, 


. 


32 


10 


Educational Publishing 


Co., sup 






plies, 


. 


26 


18 


G. & C. Merriam Co., supplies, 


55 


50 


King & Merrill, 




91 


62 


Franklin Educational C 


0. " 


104 


59 


J. L. Hammett, 




47 


11 


Harper Bros., 




7 


20 


Smith & White Co., 




67 


06 


Holden Cover Co., 




235 


11 


P. D. Aldrich, 




12 


.S2 


A. K. Cross, 




12 


00 


0. Ditson Co., 




2 


95 


A. B. Dick & Co., 




3 


60 


J. E. Potter, 




36 


00 


March Bros., 




1 


50 


Thorp & Martin Co., 




627 


63 


Leach, S. & Sanborn, 




14 


67 


Thompson, Brown & 


Co., sup 






plies. 


. 


143 


30 


Novello, Ewer & Co., supplies, 


11 


05 


Babb & Co., 




44 


00 


A. S. Doane & Co., 




66 


00 


G. A. Richter & Co., 




27 


80 


Carl Schoenhof, 




102 


40 


B. \V. Jewett, 




5 


62 


Dewolfe, Fiske & Co., 




20 


00 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Central School vSupply Co., suppl 

J. H. Clark, supplies, 

Oliver Dodge, " 

Heath Hardware Co. supplies, 

H. McElvin, 

Haynes & Co., 

Harry Benson, 

H. C. Smith, 

W. A. Lovering, 

Jackman & Sexton, 

E. E. Cheney, 
H. S. Norwell, 
Kimball & Co., 
Schirmir, music, 

F, D. Cook & Co., lumber, 
F. D. Cook Lumber Co., lumber 
L. E. Gould, old bill, '92, 
Cross & ToUes, lumber, 
H. G. Lendrim, wiring, 
J. P. Cummings, wood, 
Chas. Harris, painting, 
S. D. Chandler, cement, 
W. H. Campbell, boxes, 
J. H. Moore, labor, 
W. A. Miller, 

B. F. Hargraves, ' 
E. VV. Clark, 
J. C. Whalen, 
D. Shea, •• 
D. E. Martin, 
J. H. French & Co., ' 
S. S. VVhitcomb & Co., labor, 

C. Froulx, 
A. E. Gay, 
A. D. Melendy, 



es, 



$37 


50 


156 


73 


11 


50 


3 


00 


100 


00 


2 


90 


4 


50 


1 


75 


27 


49 


1 


25 


8 


50 


2 


01 


1 


50 


3 


29 


91 


74 


3 


66 




70 


69 


04 


98 


40 


8 


30 


9 


73 




60 


U 


00 


11 


00 




75 


70 


00 


43 


30 


1 


00 


2 


50 


8 


95 


26 


50 


29 


37 


1 


00 


53 


17 


2 


60 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



71 



A. P. Kelsey, " 

V. Chalifoux, 
J. F. Sloan, 

D. P. Alexander, '' 
J. A. Hamilton, '• 

E. F. Garlanil, supplies, 
J. D. Shedd, 

A. McMillian, " 
Geo. A. VVillard, '• 
White Mountain Freezer Co 

labor, 
M. E. Gaskell, labor, 
W. O. Gaskell, 

B. B. Otis, " 

C. E. Batchelder, 

C. R. Pease, labor and supplies 

F. O. Ray, labor and stock, 
Nashua Co-operative Foundry Co 

labor and castings, 
Nashua Iron and Brass Foundr 

Co., labor and castings, 
Nashua Building Co., labor, 
Nashua Card and Glazed Pape 

Co., card board, 
Nashua Concrete Co., concreting 
Nashua Rasp Co., files, 
Nashua Coal Co., coal, 
Nashua Light Co., light, 
J. J. Crawford & Son, labor, 
C. A. Voter, " 

Alarden & Mygatt, labor, etc., 

F. V. Marshall, labor and cash 

paid, 
C. H. Wilson, labor, 

G. M. Vickery, 



631 


75 


4 


10 


73 


29 


17 


75 


19 


50 


$6 


00 


2 


75 


3 


25 


38 


93 


24 


00 


5 


32 


1 


50 


4 


75 




65 


7 


05 


304 


97 



57 52 



37 


48 


9 


32 


6 


00 


23 


84 


4 


00 


2,280 


16 


254 


61 


109 


36 


38 


77 


104 


29 


12 


75 


2 


50 


40 


CO 



72 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



J. A. Sanders, labor, 

S. B. Lewis, " 

Geo. Dane, " 

J. L. H. Marshall, wood,. 

J. P. Howe, " 

E. F. French, wood, . 

C. B. Jackman & Son, labor and 

stock, 
A. E. Wallace, supplies, 
N. S. Whitman, " 
H. M. Goodrich, -' 
Smith's, '' 

H. A. Holt, labor, etc, 
G. H. Brigham, supplies, 
Thos. Pinault, plumbing, 
W. D. Roberts, trucking, 
G. E. Law, 
N. O. Marshall, 
Theriault, concrete, 
J. H. Hunt, livery, 
C. W. Classen, stamp, 
J. Wallace, mason work, 
W. H. Campbell, painting an 

stock, 
W. Hall, lime and cement, 
Cone & Malhoit, mason work, etc. 
Morgan & Morgan, brick, 
M. Mitchell, books, . 
Roby & Swart, lumber, 
C. J. Walton, clocks and labor, 
Mrs. Emery, cleaning, 
Mrs. Robbins, " . 
Mrs. Doyette, " . 
G. A. Makepeace, painting, etc., 
C. C. Parker, supplies, etc.. 



$14 


43 


111 


25 


5 


00 


1G3 


00 


100 


50 


116 


50 


393 


15 


1 


75 


11 


00 


5 


00 


69 


85 


37 


41 


6 


96 


5 


57 


41 


71 


32 


60 




75 


19 


25 


18 


75 


1 


25 


18 


12 


10 


05 


19 


18 


101 


73 


3 


00 


5 


00 


23 


28 


35 


50 


14 


50 


9 


50 


13 


50 


31 


00 


5 


06 



RECEIP'I'S AND EXPENDITURES. 



73 



J. H. Fassett, '• " 

N. T. Joy, ink, 

L. S. Hastings, bills paid, . 

Dumas & Co., binding, 

W. A. Cummings, tuning piano 

etc., 
Higgins & Co , piano stool, 
W. C. Tolles, fire extinguishers, 
Greenough & Co , directory, 
M. H, Pombrio & Co., wood, 
J. Barnard, supplies, 
Howard & Co., supplies, 
Barr&Co.. 

Barr Haidware Co., supplies, 
G. W. Badger, painting, etc., 
Champion Flue Scraper Co. 

Scraper, ' . 
Republican Press Association 

mem. day ex., 
J. H. VVilloughb}-, type writer, etc 
L. F. Jackman, carrying children 

to school, 
Lizzie Robbins, carrying children 

to school. 
Telegraph Publishing Co., reports 

etc., 
Gazette Co., printing, 
F. P. Whittemore, " 
H. R. Wheeler 
J. H. Barker, 
H. F. Mears, 

E. W, Pearson, music, etc., 
M. S. French, filling diplomas, 
American Express Co., express. 
Marsh's Express, express, . 



$139 


45 


30 


00 


6 


80 


50 


40 


9 


40 


3 


50 


30 


00 


2 


00 


369 


20 


47 


71 


429 


17 


13 


61 


9 


14 


155 


46 



9 00 

52 50 

105 20 

106 00 

82 50 

296 50 

58 50 

117 80 

147 75 

7 25 

25 00 

22 20 

7 01 

55 20 

15 85 



74 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

J. E. Tolles, salary, etc., . . $103 75 

Pennichuck Water Works, water, 400 72 
Telephone Co., rents and mes- 

sages, ... 45 94 

Pay Roll, teachers, . . . 35,526 87 
" " evening and drawing 

school, . . . . 924 00 

Pay Rolls, janitors. . . . ' 6,282 68 

Balance carried to new account, 4,449 67 



$60,630 12 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



iO 



RECAPITULATION. 



FOR WHAT PAID. 


APPROPRI- 
ATION. 


UNDRAWN 


EXPENDED. 


OVER- 
DKAAVN. 


Abatement of Taxes, . 






.$1,768 48 




Amherst St. School House, 






462 63 




Amherst St. Engine House- 






14,697 27 




Armory Expenses, 


S800 00 




800 00 




Citv Hall Building, 


3,000 00 


§533 41 


2,466 59 




City Debt, .... 






26,000 00 




Citv interest. 


25,000 00 




30,557 82 


$5,557 82 


City Farm and H. of C. 


7,500 00 




9,296 92 


1,796 92 


Cemetery, Edgewond, . 


1,500 00 




1,-500 00 




Cemeteries, .... 


2,000 00 




2,477 90 


477 90 


Common, North, . 


150 00 


37 50 


112 43 




Common, South, . 


150 00 


148 00 


2 00 




Edgestone 


4,000 00 




4,835 29 


835 29 


Engineer's Department 


3,500 00 


5,383 00 


3,446 17 




Fire Department, 


27,120 00 




29,172 93 


2,052 93 


Highways and Bridges, 


40,000 00 




62,256 93 


22,256 93 


Incidentals, .... 


10,000 00 




27,515 54 


17,515 54 


Memorial Day, 


300 00 


100 00 


200 00 




Nashua Hosjiital, . 


2,500 00 




2,500 00 




Paupers oft' farm, . 


8,000 00 


1,381 84 


6,618 16 




Police Department, 


17,000 00 




22,292 45 


5,292 45 


Public Library, 


3,000 00 




3,000 00 




Printing and Stationery, 


1,000 00 




1,385 76 


385 76 


Salary Account, . 


13.000 00 


2,940 00 


10.060 00 




Sewers and Drains, 


15,000 00 




15,920 79 


920 79 


SinkmgFund, 


6,000 00 




6,000 00 




Street Lights, 


22,000 00 




22,182 82 


182 82 


Soldiers and Sailors, . 


2,500 00 


715 70 


1,784 30 




State and County Tax, 






57,664 37 




Temporary Loan, 






370,000 00 




Ward Expenses, . 


1,030 43 


201 75 


1,098 25 




Water Supply , . . . 


5,. 00 00 




5,720 00 


220 00 


Schools, .... 


60,530 12 


4,449 67 


56,180 45 
$799,875 25 





Nashua, December 31, 1894. 
The undersigned. Joint Standing Committee of Accounts and Finances, ot 
the Ciij- of Nashua, for the year ending Dec. 31, 1894, liave examined the forego- 
ing accounts of Eugene M. Bowman, City Clerk, and find the same to be correct- 
ly cast and sustained by proper vouchers, which are now on rile at the City 
Clerk's office. 

THOMAS SANDS, 
GEORGE GUERTIN, 
JAMES M. TAYLOR, 
F. S. SARGENT, 
CALVIN R. WOOD, 
MILTON A. TAYLOR. 



CITY INDEBTEDNESS, 



BONDED DEBT. 



City bonds issued Jan. 2, 1865 

payable 1895, . 
City bonds issued July 1, 1876 

payable 1901, . 
City bonds, 4's, issued Aug. 1, '89 

payable 1899, . 
City bonds, 4's, issued Aug. 

1889, payable 1904, . 
City bonds, 4's, issued Aug. 

1889, payable 1900, . 
City bonds, 4's, issued June 

1891, payable 1911, . 
City bonds, 4's, issued June 

1891, payable 1912, . 
City bonds, 4's issued June, 

1891, payable 1913, . 
City bonds, 4's, issued June 

1891, payable 1914, . 
City bonds, 4's, issued June 

1891, payable 1915, . 
City bonds, 4's, issued June 

1893, payable 1913, . 
City bonds, 4's, issued June 

1893, payable 1918, . 



$2,000 00 
75,000 00 
5,000 OO' 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
40,000 00 
40,000 00 
40,000 00 
40,000 00 
40,000 00 
200,000 00 
15,000 00 



$517,800 00 



CITY INDEBTEDNESS. 



// 



TIME NOTES. 



City 


note issued Oct. 


27, 


1866. 








payable 1896, . 






$8,000 


00 


City 


note issued Nov. 


•23, 


1866 








payable 1895, . 






12,500 


00 


City 


note issued Sept. 


1, 


1889, 








payable 1905, . 






6,000 


00 


City 


note issued Nov. 


27, 


1894 








payable 1895, . 






25,000 


00 


City 


note issued Dec 


7, 


1894 








payable 1895, . 






25,000 


00 


City 


note issued Dec. 


7, 


1891 








payable 1895, . 






25,000 


00 


City 


note issued Dec. 


12, 


1S94, 








payable 1895, . 






25,000 


00 


City 


note issued Dec. 


12, 


1894 








payable 1895, 






25,000 


00 


City 


note issued Dec. 


15, 


1894 








payable 1895, 






25,000 


00 



DEMAND NOTES. 



Six per cent, note " Noyes Prize 
Medal Fund " issued Feb. 
11, 1878, . . . $1,000 00 

Note "M. A. Crow^ley " Bequest 

issued Sept 20, 1887, . 300 00 

Note Trustees " Edgewood Ceme- 
tery " issued July 1, 1894, 100 00 

Note Trustees " Edgewood Ceme- 
tery" issued July 1, 1894, 333 33 

Note Trustees " Edgev^^ood Ceme- 
tery " issued July 1, 1894, 1,000 00 



78 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

Note "Allen Wilson Bequest" 

issued July 1, 1804, . . $166 67 

Note "Jos. KnoAvlton Bequest" 

issued June 15, 1892, . 100 00 

Note "Sarah E. Searles Gift" 

issued Nov. 28, 1892, . 100 00 

Note "Ball Gift" issued April 1, 

1893, .... 100 00 

Note " Rosan Wallace Bequest" 

issued Nov. 28, 1893, . 100 00 

Three and a half per cent note 

" James Baldwin Bequest" 

iss\ied March 27, 1894, 250 00 

Three per cent, note "Ella C. 

Saunders Bequest " issued 

May 4, 1894, ... 100 00 

Three per cent, note " W. B. 

Needham Bequest " issued 

June 14, 1894, . . 200 00 



$180,350 00 



ASSETS. 

Uncollected taxes for 1893, . $1,576 46 

Uncollected taxes for 1894, . 38,884 61 

Sinking fund, . . . . 12,000 00 

Cash in treasurv, . • . 17,882 24 



$70,343 31 



Total city debt, . . . $698,150 00 
Assets, 70,343 31 



Net city debt, . . . $627,806 69 



ESTIMATE VALUE OF CITY PROPERTY, 



City Hj.11 Buildino and Lot, . $41,000 00 

County " " . . 25,000 00 

City Farm and Buildings, . • 12,500 00 

City Hospital and Furniture, • 1,500 00 

North Common, . . • 10,000 00 

South Common, . . • 10,000 00 

Land, Arlington street, . . 3,000 00 

Greeley Farm, .... 45,00 00 
Engine House and Stable, Olive 

street, .... 34,000 00 
Engine House and Stable, Arling- 
ton street, . .' . 6,000 00 
Engine House and Stable, Qiiincy 

street 4,000 00 

Engine House, Amherst street, . 41,000 00 
Property in Hands of Fire Depart- 
ment, including engines, 
trucks, hose, horses, blank- 
ets, tools, etc., . . 28,500 00 

Hydrants 5,000 00 

Fire Alarm Telegraph, . . 10,000 00 
Property in Hands of City Engi- 
neer, .... 
Highway Tools, . . . 1,300 00 
Watering Troughs and Fountains, 600 00 
Property in hands of Police De- 
partment, . . . 1,600 00 



f800 00 



80 



MUNICIPAI, GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Steam Roller, .... 
Police Station and Furniture, 
Heating Apparatus, Furniture and 

fixtures City Hall Building, 
Furniture and Fixtures, County 

building. 
Personal Property at City Farm, . 



$4,000 00 
35,000 00 

5,000 00 

800 00 
13,000 00 



$305,300 00 



SCHOOL HOUSES. 



District No. 1, Lowell road. 

2, - •' . 

3, Spring street, 
3, Main street, 
3, East Pearl street 
3, Palm street, 
3, Mulberr}^ street, 
3, Lake street, 

3, Edgeville, . 

4, Belvidere, . 

5, Chandler street, 

5, Mt. Pleasant, 

6, Amherst road, 

7, Hollis road 
9, Dunstable road, 

10, " " 

11, 

Apparatus and Furniture, 
Arlington Street School House, 
Furniture, 
Amherst Street School House, 



$1,200 00 

1,000 00 

109,585 00 

20,000 OO 
3,500 00 
5,000 00 
2,500 00 

12,560 00 
1,500 00 
3,500 00 
4,000 00 

51,590 00 
1,500 00 
1,000 00 
600 00 
1,500 00 
1,200 00 

10,660 00 

25,000 00 
2,000 00 

15,000 



$545,282 00 



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6 



REPORT 



OF THE 



PI^E COMMISSIO^EP^S 



CITY. OF NASHUA, 



To His Honor ^ the Alayor^ and the Board of Aldet'inen : 

Gentlemen: — We, the undersigned Fire Commissioners 
of Nashua, respectfully submit the fourth annual report of 
the Fire Department for the year ending December 31, 1894. 



FIRE RECORD, 1894. 



The department has responded to seventy-four alarms. 

Total loss, $11,372 49 

Insurance paid, ...... 10,576 95 



Net loss, $795 54 

Box 72 : Jan. 12, 6 :10 p. m. Caused by fire in chimnev on 
the wood frame house owned by Doyle & Lucier on Pine 
street. No loss. 



84- >ri"XTCTPAT. GOVEI?X>rF.NT KF.PORT. 

Box 18: Jan. 2o, 4:25 p. m. Caused by a slight fire on 
the roof of the wood frame house owned by the McKean heirs, 
occupied by Clara E. McKean. Cause of fire, burning chim- 
ney. No loss. 

Box 69: Feb. 7, 4:25 p. m. Caused by fire in the wood 
frame house owned and occupied by Jacob Stabowski. 
Cause of fire, burning of rags by carelessness. Damage slight. 
Still alarm : Feb. 10, 1.20 p. m. Caused by a slight fire in 
a suite of rooms in the brick building known as the Currier 
block. Cause of fire, oil stove. Damage slight. 

Box 81 : Feb. 16, 'J :30 p. m. Caused by steam coming out 
of the brick building known as the Tessier block Caused by 
drying plastering. 

Box 45 : Feb. 28, 5 :15 p. m. Caused by a fire in the wood 
frame building owned by C. Dubois. Occupied by F. Rob- 
inson. Cause of fire, children playing with matches. Value 
of building, $1,500 ; damage to building, $22 ; insurance on 
building, $900; insurance paid, $22; value of contents, $100; 
damage to contents, $35; no insurance. 

Box 84: Feb, 28. 11.15 p. m. Caused by a burning chim- 
ney on the wood frame building owned and occupied by G. 
Y. Sawyer on Temple street. No loss. 

Still alarm : March 14, 7 :40 p. m. Caused by a chimney 
fire in the wood frame house owned by Mrs. M. Moran on 
High street. No loss. 

Box 52: March 14, 7:55 p. m. Caused by a chimney fire 
at machine works of G. H. Whitney. No loss. 

Box 23 : March 27, 4:10 p. m. Caused by a fire in the 
brush on Broad street. No loss. 

Box 87: March 27, 12:40 p. m. Caused by a fire in the 
wood frame building owned and occcupied by Patrick Con- 
Ion as a pawn. shop. Cause of fire, defective chimney. 
Damage to building, $100; value of building, $1,500; insur- 
ance on building, $1,000; insurance paid, $100 ; value of con- 



FIRE COMMISSIONEUiS' REPORT. 



tents, $2,000 ; damage to contents, $152; insurance on con- 
tents, $1,000; insurance paid, $152. 

Box 92: iMarch 31, 3:30 p. m. Caused by a fire in the 
woods on Manchester street. Detail of men sent to place of 
fire in charge of Asst. Putnam. 

Still alarm, Apr. 8, 4:15 p. m. Caused by a chimnev fire 
in the wood frame building owned bv P. J. Reynolds on 
Washington street. No loss. 

Box 45 : Apr. 13, 12:45 a. m. Caused bv a fire in the 
wood frame building owned and occupied by VV. G. Wood 
as a carpenter's shop. Cause unknown. Value of building, 
$100; damage to building $100; insurance on building, $50; 
insurance paid, $50; value of contents, $25; damage to con- 
tents, $25 ; no insurance. 

Box 18 : (general alarm) Apr. 14, 5 :25 p. m. Caused by a fire 
in the wood frame building owned bv J. W. Howard, occu- 
pied by the Howard Furniture Co. General alarm sent in at 
5:30 p. m. Cause of fire, burning waste. Value of build- 
ing, $10,000; damage to building, $1,033; insurance on 
building, $7,000 ; insurance paid, $1,033 ; value of contents, 
$15,000; damage to contents, $G, 400 ; insurance on con- 
tents, $10,000; insurance paid, $6,400. 

Box 92: April 16, 3:20 p. m. Caused by a fire in the 
woods on Ledge street. Detail of men sent in charge of 
Asst. Barnes. 

Still alarm : April 20, 10 :53 a. m. Caused by a fire in the 
lunch cart owned and occupied by W. A. George. Cause of 
fire, overturned oil stove. Damage slight. 

Still alarm : April 21,3:15 a. m. Caused by a fire in the 
rubbish on Prospect street. No loss. 

Still alarm ; April 27, 11 :58 a. m. Caused by a fire in the 
grass on the land owned by Mrs. Bixby. No loss. 

Box 29: April 29, 4:15 p. m. Caused by a fire in the 



86 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

woods near Pennichuck pumping station. Detail of men 
sent. 

Box 62: April 29, 5 :15 p. m. Caused by fire in the bush 
near Salmon brook. 

Still alarm : Apr. 30, 10 :20 a. m. Caused by a chimney fire 
in the wood frame building owned by A. H. Dunlap, No 
loss. 

Still alarm : May 2, 9 :05 a. m. Caused by a brush fire on 
Shattuck street. The chemical and five men sent to place of 
fire. 

Box 53 ; May 12, 3 :-i5 a. m. Caused by a fire in the wood 
frame building owned by Cross & Tolles. Ashes in wood 
box. Damage to building, $35; insurance on building, 
$1,000; value of building, $2,500 ; insurance paid, $35; dam- 
age to contents, none. 

Still alarm : May 12, 11:15 p. m. Caused by fire in the 
wood frame building owned by Marshall & Page on C^anal 
street. No loss. 

Box 34: May 13, 1 :50 p. m. Caused by a brush fire on 
the land owned by the Laton heirs. Detail of men sent to 
the place of fire. No Loss. 

Box 92 : May 13, 5 :05 p. m. Caused by a fire on the land 
owned by the Laton heirs. Detail of men sent. No loss. 

Still alarm : May 14, 1 :20 p. m. Caused by a brush fire 
partly burning the French cemetery fence. Detail of men 
sent. Damage slight. 

Still alarm; May 14, 9.20 p. m. Caused by a fire in the 
brick building owned and occupied by the Co-operative Iron 
Foundry. Cause of fire, hot castings. Damage slight. 

Box 87 : May 15, 8 :05 p. m. Caused by a fire in the wood 
frame building owned by A. W. Lowe, occupied by Manuel 
Goldman. Cause of fire, oil stove. Value of building, 
$1,000 ; damage to building, $23 ; insurance on building, $500 ; 



FIRE COMMISSIONERS REPORT. 



insurance paid, $23 ; value ot contents, $500 ; damage to con- 
tents, $25 ; no insurance. 

Still alarm : may 17, 2:15 p.m. Caused by a brush fire 
near the driving park. Detail of men sent. No loss. 

Box 31 : May 22, 3 :55 p. m. Caused by a fire in the wood 
frame building owned by Chandler & Marshall, occupied by 
E. W. Gould as a dyeing and cleansing shop. Cause of fire, 
stove. Value of building, $1,500 ; damage to building, $130 ; 
insurance on building, $700 ; insurance paid, $130 ; value of 
contents, $150 ; damage to contents, $150; insurance, none. 

Box 87 : May 27, 5 :10 p. m. Claused by a slight fire in the 
wood frame building on Mechanic's court, owned by C. T. 
Ridgway. No loss 

Box 45 : June 1, 11 :20 a. m. Caused by fire in the wood 
frame building owned by E. J. Copp, occupied by McLennan 
& Wyeth as a grocery store. Value of buildmg, $3,500 : 
damage to building, $140; insurance on building, $2,500; 
insurance paid, $140; value of contents, $800; damage to 
contents, $350 ; Insurance on contents, $500 ; insurance paid, 
$350. 

Box 81 : June 24,4:18 a.m. Caused by a fire in the 
wood frame building owned by Mrs. E. A. Wheeler and 
occupied by F. Daniels and N. McDewev as a dwelling 
house. Cause, unknown. Value of building, $,4,000 ; dam- 
age to building, $230 ; insurance on building, $2,300; insur- 
ance paid $230 ; value of contents, $500 ; damage to contents, 
$100, insurance, none. 

Still alarm: June 27, 12:30 p. m. Caused by a chimney 
fire in the wood frame building, 21 Scripture street, owned 
by the Williams heirs. No loss. 

Still alarm: June 27, 11.30 p. m. Caused by fire in the 
grass on the land owned by the Jackson Co. on Temple 
street. No. loss. 



'88 MUNICIPAI- GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

Box 38, July 2, 5 :45 a. m. Caused by a fire in the wood 
frame building owned and occupied by the Light, Heat and 
Power Co. Cause of fire, spontaneous combustion. Value 
of building, $700; damage to building, $700; insurance on 
building, $700; insuraPiCe paid, $700. No damage to con- 
tents. 

Box 49 : Jul}' 4, 3:15 a. m. caused by a fiie in the wood 
frame building owned by the McSherry heirs, unoccupied. 
Cause, incendiary. Value of building, $800; ilamage to 
building, $50 ; insurance on building, $800; insurance paid, 
:$50. 

Box 81 : July 11,6 :59 a. m. Caused by a fire in the brick 
building on Pearl street known as the "Old Brick" and occu- 
pied by J. D. Bickford as a paint shop. Cause, explosion of 
■drying. No loss. 

Box 31 : July 11, 11 :45 a. m. Caused by a slight fire in 
the wood frame building owned by Marshall & Chandler, and 
occupied b}' E. VV. Gould as a dye and dry cleansing shop. 
Cause of fire, explosion of naptha. Value of building, 
$1,500; damage to building, $32; insurance on building, 
$700; insuarance paid, $32; value of contents, $175; damage 
to contents, $85 ; insurance on contents, $500 ; insurance paid, 
$85. 

Box 52 ; July 11,8 :59 p. m. Caused by a fire in the wood 
frame building owned and occupied by the Nashua Saddlery 
Hardware Co. as a foundry. Cause of fire, spark from fur- 
nace. Value ofb^uilding, $1,000 ; damage to building, $150; 
insurance on building, $500; insurance paid, $150; value of 
contents, $1,000 ; no damage. 

Box 73 ; July 28, 10 :15 p. m. Caused by a fire in the wood 
frame building owned by W. O. Flanders. Unoccupied. 
Cause, incendiary. Value of building, $600 ; loss on build- 
ing, $600; insurance, $1,000; refused to settle. 

Box 31 ; July 27, 11 :40 a. m. Caused by a slight fire in 



FIRE COMMISSIONRS' REPORT. 89 



the wood frame building owned by G. W. Badger. Cause, 
stove. No loss. 

Still alarm, August 1,12 :30 p. m. caused by a fire on the 
land owned bv the Nashua Mfg. Co. Damage slight. 

Box 23: August 25, 4:05 p. m. Caused by a fire in the 
woods on the land owned by the St. Xavier church. No loss. 

Box 72 : August 26, 10:10 p. m. caused bv a fire in the 
wood frame building owned by C. A. Stevens, occupied by 
Paul Bellerose. Cause, overturned lamp. Slight damage. 

Still alarm: Aug. 27, 4:10 p. m. Caused by a fire on the 
roof of the wood frame building owned by the Iron and Brass 
Foundry. Cause, spark from furnace. Damage slight. 

Still alarm: August 28, 7:lo p. m. Caused by smoke 
coming out of dwelling owned by \V. A. Gregg. Cause, 
smoking oil stove. 

Still alarm : Sept. 1,12 :42. Caused by a brush fire on the 
land owned by Cross & Tolles. No loss. 

Box 71 : Sept. 2, 4:10 a. m. Caused by fire in the wood 
frame building owned and occupied by the B. & M. R. R. as 
s. switch shanty. Cause of fire, incendiarv. \"alue ot build- 
ing, $200; damage to building, $200; insurance on building, 
$200 ; paid, $200 ; value of contents, $50 ; damage to contents, 
$50; insurance on contents, $50; insurance paid, $50. 

Still alarm: Sept 4, 3:40 p. m. Caused by a fire in the 
brush on Broad stret. No loss. 

Box 23 : Sept. 5, 3 :50 p. m. Caused by a fire in the woods 
on Amherst street. No loss. 

Box 27 : Sept. 17, 9:30 p. m. Caused by a chimney fire 
in the building occupied by A. E. Atwood on Lock street. 
No loss. 

Box 65 : Sept. 20, 3:10 p. m. Caused by a fire in the 
building occupied by John Hellchirst as a dwelling. Cause, 
burning clothing. No loss. 



90 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

Box 81 : Sept. 22, 4 :25 p. m. Causetl by explosion of gas 
in wood frame building owned by Q. A. Woodward. Dam- 
age by fire, none. 

Box 84: Oct. 3, 11 :]5 a. m. Caused by a fire in the awn- 
ing in front of Talbot & Co.'s store. No loss. 

Still alarm : Oct. 10, 9 :10 a. m. Caused by a chimney fire 
in the wood frame building No. 1 Mechanic street. No loss. 

Box 87 : Oct. 12, 7 :20 p. m. Caused by a fire in the brick 
building owned by D. W. Lakeman. Occupied by Chas. 
Taylor as a dwelling house. Cause of fire, explosion of lamp. 
Value of building, $12,000, damage to building, $75 ; insur- 
ance on building, $8,000 ; insurance paid, $75 ; value of con- 
tents, $576.75; damage to contents, $460; insurance on con- 
tents, $500, insurance paid, $460. 

Still alarm : Oct. 13, 12:10 a. m. Caused by a chimney 
fire in the building, No. 1 Mechanic street. No loss. 

Still alarm : Oct. 15, 7 :40 a. m. Caused by a fire in the 
brick building owned and occupied by W. D. Brackett as a 
boiler room. Cause of fire, spark from chimney. Damage 
slight. 

Box 64 : Oct. 17, 11 .55 a. m. Caused by a fire in a wood 
frame building owned and occupied by the Shearer Co. 
Cause of fire, spark from chimney. Value of building, $3,000 ; 
damage to building, $31 ; insurance on building, $2,500; in- 
surance paid, $31 ; value of contents, $1,500; damage to con- 
tents, $10; insurance on contents, $1,300; insurance paid, 
$10.' 

Still alarm : Oct. 22, 5 :25 p. m. Caused by a fire in the 
wood frame building owned by the Sackllery Hardware Co. 
Cause, unknown. Damage slight. 

Still alarm : Nov, 18, 11 :35 a. m. Caused by a fire in the 
wood frame building owned by G. VV. Andrews, occupied by 
G. L. Swain. Cause of fire, explosion of naptha. Value of 
building, $1,800 ; damage to building, $15.85; insurance on 



FIRE commissioners' REPORT. 91 

building, $1,000 ; insurance paid, $15.85 ; value of contents, 
Si, 200; damage to contents, $152.80; insurance on contents, 
$700; insurance paid, $152.80. 

Box 74 : Nov. 18, 12 :15 p. m. Caused by a fire in the wood 
frame building owned by F. O. Ray, occupied by ten French 
families. Cause of fire, defective chimney. Value of build- 
ing, $9,000; damage to building, $11.43; insurance on bi5ild- 
ing, $7,500 ; insurance paid, $1 1.43 ; damage to contents, $50 ; 
no insurance. 

Still alarm: Nov. 23, 6:20 p. m. Caused by a fire in the 
wood frame building owned and occupied by J. W. Howard 
as a furnishing shop. Damage slight. Cause, incendiary. 

Still alarm; Nov. 25, 5:45 p. m. Caused by a chimney 
fire on Pearl street ; no loss. 

Box 91 : Dec. 2, 12:10 p. m. Caused by fire in a wood 
frame building owned by the Collins heirs, occupied by Mrs. 
C. S. Collins. Cause of fire, overheated pipe from boiler. 
Value of building, $5,000; damage to building, $250; insur- 
ance on building, $4,000 ; insurance paid, $250 ; no damage 
to contents. 

Still alarm; Dec. 2, 3:10 p. m. Caused by a chimney fire 
on Amherst street. No loss. 

Still alarm : Dec. 11, 9 :35 p. m. Caused by a transformer 
burning out on the roof of the brick building owned by 
Frank Ayers. No damage. 

Still alarm : Dec. 17, 9 :30 a. m. Caused by smoke com- 
ing out of a thimble hole in chimney in brick building owned 
by Spaulding heirs. 

Still alarm: Dec. 21, 10:20 p. m. Caused by a fire in the 
Nashua Iron and Brass Foundry. Cause of fire, spark from 
chimney. Damage slight. 

Box 42 : Dec. 23, 7 :05 p. m. Caused by a fire in a wood 
frame building ow-ned and occupied by the B. & M. R. R. as 



92 MUNICIPAI. GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



a signal house. Cause of five, stove. Value of building, 
$400; damage to building, $150; insurance on building, 
$400; insusance paid, $150; no damage to contents. 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

This branch of the service is in good condition. Tiiere have 
been no new^ boxes added this year. With the building of 
an electric road it will be necessary to have higher poles, to 
be out of their way, which expense should be borne by the 
electric road. 

INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY HOLT)Ei;S AND CITIZENS. 

L Upon the discoveiy of a fire go to the nearest box, turn 
key in lock, and hold bolt back with key as it is a spring-lock, 
pull down the hook as far as it will go; shut the door. Do 
not try to remove the key as it is locked in, and cannot be re- 
moved unless by one of the engineers who will, as soon as 
convenient, release and return it. 

IL All persons giving fire alarms should remain awhile 
by the box so as to direct the firemen to the fire. 

III. No person will give an alarm for the same fire after 
the first alarm has been given without an order from an engi- 
neer or the officer in command ; and the person so ordered 
w^ill be sure to go to the same box from which the first alarm 
was given, and report to the chief engineer. 

IV. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance ; never 
touch a box except to give an alarm of fire ; do not give an 
alarm for a chimney fire. 

V. Never let a key go out of your possession unless called 
for by the chief engineer. If you change your residence or 
place of business, where the keys are kept, return the keys to 
the same officer. 



FIRE COiMMISSlOXERS' KF.P(1KT. 93 

FIRE ALARM BOXES. 

4. White Mountain Freezer works. [Private.] 

6. Roby & Swart's works, Edgeville. [Private.] 

16. Railroad Square, front American House. 

17. Nashua Card & Glazed Paper Co., Franklin street. 

[Private.] 

18. Locust, corner Winter street. 

19. Amherst, corner Merrimack street. 
21. Amherst, opposite Common. 

23. Broad, near junction of Amherst street. 

24. Manchester, junction Merrimack street. 

25. Concord, corner Courtland street. 

26. Stark square. 

27. Orange square. 

28. Summer, corner Cross street. 
31. Canal, corner Cross street. 

34. Whitney, corner Tolles street. 

35. Jackson Company's office. 
38. Bridge, corner Jackson street. 

42. Crown, corner Denton street. 

43. Burke, corner Arlington street. 

45. Arlington, corner Williams street. 

46. East Hollis street, near Freezer Company's works. 
49. Temple street, opposite Roby & Swart's lumberyard. 

52. Tyler street, near Nashua Iron and Steel works. 

53. Qiiincy street, opposite Cross & Tolles' mill. 

57. Main, corner East Hollis street. 

58. Hollis, corner Chestnut street. 

61. Main, corner Otterson street. 

62. Allds street, corner Harbor avenue. 

64. Main street, opposite Vale mills. 

65. Main street opposite Lincoln avenue. 

67. Corner Lake and Vine streets. 

68, Kinsley, corner Chestnut street. 



94 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

69. Pine, corner Kinsley street. 

71. Shoe factory, Palm street, near railroad crossing. 

72. Ledge, head of Central street. 

73. Hanover, corner West HoUis street. 

74. Basin street, west Nashua Manufacturing Co.'s gate. 
78. Chestnut, corner Central street. 

81. Pearl, corner Elm street. 

84. Main, foot of High street. 

87. Factory, corner Washington street. 

91. Temple, corner Cottage street. 

92. Central fire station, Olive street. 
94. Main, corner Park street. 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

WARD ONE. 

Abbott street, junction of Manchester. 
Abbott square. 

Amherst street, corner Abbott. 
Amherst street, opposite Vernon. 
Amherst street, opposite Bruce. 
Amherst street, opposite Mitchell. 
Amherst street, front of W. B. Needham's, 127. 
Amherst street, corner Wellman's avenue. 
Auburn street, front of No. 9. 
Broad street, front of No. 2. 
Off Broad street, opposite Hatch's mill. 

Concord street, corner of new street near Mrs. E. A. Col- 
burn's. 
Courtland street, corner of Webster. 
Courtland street, corner Manchester. 



FIRE commissioners' REPORT. 95 



Charles street, corner of Franklin. 

Fairmoiint street, corner of Highland. 

Fletcher street, corner of Beard. 

Franklin street, corner of Wain. 

Franklin street, corner of Front. 

Franklin street, corner of Front at Locust. 

French street, corner Merrimack. 

Front street. 

Merrimack street, corner of Amherst. 

Rogers street, corner of Concord. 

Rural street, corner of Concord. 

Sargent's avenue, front of L. B. Hall's. 

Sargent's avenue, front of A. S. Davis's. 

Stark square. 

Stark street, corner of Farley. 

Thayer's court, corner of Main. 

Fen-y road, corner Concord road. 

Mt. Pleasant street, corner of Merrimack. 



WARD I- WO. 

Berkley street, front of W, D. Cadwell's. 

Canal street, corner of Tolles. 

Concord street, north of Paul Otis's, No. 93. 

Courtland street, corner of Concord. 

Cross street, corner of Canal. 

Cross street, corner of Whitney. 

Cross street, corner of Summer. 

Summer street, corner of Granite. 

Lock street, junction of Lowell. 

Lock street, corner of Granite. 

Lock street, corner of Cross. 

Lock street, opposite Salem. 

Lowell street, corner of Orange. 



96 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

Ofange street, coiner oT Canal. 
Railroad square. 
Stark street, corner of Concord. 
Whitney street, head of Lemon. 

WARD THREE. 

Amorv street, corner of Bridge. 
Aniory street, corner of Union. 
Belknap street, opposite Woodward house. 
Bridge street, opposite Jackson. 
Chandler street, corner of Canal. 
Crown street, corner of Chase. 
East Hollis street, corner of Chase. 
East Hollis stieet, front of No. 131. 
Indian Head avenue, corner of Canal. 
Indian Head avenue, north end. 
Jackson avenue, corner of Canal. 
Jackson avenue. 
Lock street, corner of Chandler. 
Sanders street, north end. 
Tolles street, corner of Whitney. 
Tolles street, opposite Shattuck. 
Warren street, corner of Bridge. 
Chandler street, corner of Linden street. 

WARD FOUR. 

Church street, corner of Cottage. 
Main street, front of City Hall. 
Main street, opposite High. 
Olive street, corner of Church. 
Park street, corner of Main. 
Pearl street, corner of Spring. 



FIRE commissioners' REPORT. 97 

Pearl street, corner of Cottage. 
Pearl street, corner of South. 
Pearson's avenue, corner of Main. 
Pearson's avenue, east end. 
Temple street, at head of Spring. 
Temple street, corner Temple place. 
Temple street, corner of Scripture. 
Temple street, corner of Worthen. 
Worcester street, corner of Howard. 

WARD FIVE. 

Ash street, north of Pearl. 
Chestnut street, north of Pearl. 
Factory street, corner of Washington. 
Factory street, opposite Mechanic. 
Factory street, opposite Harrison. 
Mechanic street, rear of Howard block. 
School street, corner of High. 
Vine street, north of Pearl. 
Walnut street, corner of High. 
Water street, corner of Mechanic. 
Water street, east of Washington. 
Water street, west of Washington. 

WARD SIX AND NINE. 

Chestnut street, south of Pearl. 

Chestnut street, between Pearl and West Hollis. 

Chestnut street, north of West Hollis. 

Elm street, opposite theati-e. 

Elm street, corner ot Cedar. 

Garden street, corner of Pearl. 

Kinsley street, front of Julius Wolfman, No 95. 

7 



98 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

Kinsley street, corner of Elm. 
Kinsley street, corner of Vine. 
Ledge street, corner of Pine. 
Mulberry street, opposite Maple. 
Palm street, corner of Central. 
Palm street, near shoe shop. 
Pearl sti'eet, corner of Elm. 
Pearl street, corner of Walnut. 
Pine street, rear of Palm street school. 
Vine street, corner of Pearl. 

Walnut street, head of Cedar. 

Walnut street, head of Pleasant. 

Walnut street, corner of Kinsley. 

West Hollis street, corner Beech. 

West Hollis street, corner of Vine. 

West Hollis street, corner of Pine. 

West Hollis street, corner of Hanover. 

West Hollis street, opposite cemetery. 

West Hollis street, near Nashua Machine Co. 

West Hollis street, opposite cemetery. 

WARD SEVEN. 

Allds street, corner of Harvard. 
Allds street, corner of Gillis. 
Allds street, south of Burke. 
Arlington street, south of McKean. 
Arlington street, north of Burke. 
Arlington street, corner of Bowers. 
Arlington street, opposite Williams. 
Bowers street, corner of Allds. 
Bowers street, corner of Dearborn. 
Burke street, opposite Benson avenue. 
Crown street, west of Arlington. 
Crown street, east of Denton. 



FIRE commissioners' REPORT. , 99 

East Hollis street, corner of Main. 
East Hollis street, opposite Spring. 
East Hollis street, opposite Qiiincy. 
East Hollis street, corner of Harbor avenue. 
East Hollis street, front of Proctor Bros. 
East Hollis street, front of White Mountain Freezer Co. 
East Hollis street, corner Allds. 
East Hollis street, corner Denton. 
Gillis street, corner of Arlington. 
Harbor avenue, opposite Otterson. 
Holmes street, corner of Foundry. 
King street, opposite Barker's avenue. 
Main street, corner of Eldredge. 
Main street, opposite Kinsley- 
Marshall street, north of Acton railroad. 
McKean street, corner of Allds. 
Newbury street, corner of McKean. 
Otterson street, corner of Main. 
Fond street, corner of Otterson. 
Prospect street, corner of Dearborn. 
Prospect street, corner of Harbor avenue. 
Qiiincv street, opposite Foundry. 
QjLiincy street, north of W. & N. railroad. 
Spalding street, opposite shoe factory. 
Spring street, opposite Eldredge. 
Worcester street, corner of Mason. 
Mason street, corner of Pearl. 
Worcester street, west corner of Spruce. 

WARD EIGHT. 

Ash street, corner of Lake. 
Blossom street, head of Wilder. 
Chestnut street, corner of Nevada. 
Elm street, opposite Oak. 



100 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

Kinsley street, corner of Pine. 

Kinsley street, corner of Hanover. 

Lake street, corner of Vine. 

Lake street, corner of Pine. 

Lake street, west of Hunt. 

Lake street, opposite entrance to trotting park. 

Main street, opposite Lake. 

Main street, corner of Salmon. 

Main street, corner of Alltls. 

Main street, corner of Russell avenue. 

Main street, corner of Orchard avenue. 

Main street, corner of Dunstable road. 

Main street, at City Farm (2). 

Middle street, corner of Otterson, 

Palm street, front of No. 98. 

Main street, opposite D. F. Holt's house. 

Ritter street, front of D. vStevens's house. 

Russell avenue, corner of Fifield. 

Taylor street, rear of box shop. 

Vine street, corner of Otterson. 



LOCATION OF RESERVOIRS. 

Amherst street, head of Fairmount. 
Abbott street, crossing of French. 
Summer street, crossing of Norton. 
Bridge street, schoolhouse yard. 
Arlington street, corner of Harvard. 
East Hollis street, crossing of Allds. 
East Hollis street, head of Qiiincy. 
Main street, crossing of Pearl. 



FIRE commissioners' REPORT. 101 



Main street, head of Prospect. 

West Hollis street, front ot French church. 

Pine street, rear of shoe shop. 

Temple street, corner of Main. 

Temple street, crossing of Cottage. 

Factory street, head of Chestnut, supplied from Nashua Man- 

ufjicturing Company's canal. 
Fire station, Pearsons avenue, supplied from river. 

APPARATUS AND HOSE. 

The apparatus consists of three Amoskeag steam hre en- 
gines, one-horse hose reel, two one-horse and one two-horse 
hose wagons, one hook and ladder tiuck, one combination 
chemical and hook and ladder truck, one Babcock chemical 
engine, all in good condition. There are at present 9,000 
feet of fabric hose all of which is in good condition. 

PURCHASES. 

There have been purchased during the year one pair of 
swing harnesses, five horses and 1.50U feet of fabric hose. 

PERMANENT FORCE. 

George O. Osborn, . . Chief Engineer. 

Leslie A. Hamilton, . Engineer Chemical. 

George Hidden, . • . Driver Chemical. 

Alvin E. Hobart, . Driver Engine No. 1. ' 

Frank D. Marston, Driver Hose Engine No. 1. 

Charles E. Farnsworth, Driver Engine No 2. 

Paul Hysette, . Driver Hose Engine No. 2. 

Robert Poft', . . . Driver Engine No. 3. 

Patrick H. Herlihy, Driver Hose Engine No. 3. 



102 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Bart E. Harris, . . Driver Hose No. 1. 

John H. Kilbride, Driver Hook and Ladder No. 1. 
Albert C. Melendy, Driver C. and H. and L. No. 2. 

CALL FORCE. 

The call men of the department consist of four assistant 
engineers, twelve members of engines No. 1, No. 2 and No. 
3, three members of chemical engine, fourteen members of 
hook and ladder No. 1, twelve members of combination 
chemical and hook and ladder, twelve members of hose No. 1. 
Total membership of call force, . . 81 

Permanent force, . . . . 12 

— 93 

ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 



Torrent engine, 

Niagara '• 

Indian Head engine, 

Hook and ladder truck, 

Combination chemical i 

Old ladder truck. 

Hose wagon No. 1, 

Hose wagon, engine No. 1, 

Hose wagon, " 

Hose reel, " 

Hose carriage, hand, 

Two hose jumpers, 

Supply wagon. 

Hose, 

93 hydrants, two reservoirs, 

19 horses and blankets. 

Carts and sleds. 





$3,000 




3,000 




3,000 




1,900 


H. and L 


2,100 


. 


200 




425 


1 


425 


9 


425 


3, . 


200 




300 




100 




150 




5,500 


) • 


5,000 


. 


4,000 


, , 


700 



FIRE COMMISSIONERS REPORT. 



10 



Harnesses, 


$2,000 


Tools, . . • • ' 


200 


Chief's wagon, 


150 


Furniture, bedding, etc., 


1,200 


Central station, 


34,000 


Qiiincy street station. 


4,000 


Arlington street station, 


6,000 


Amherst street station, 


41,000 


Fire alarm telegraph. 


10,000 



128,975 



RECOMMENDATIONS, 



It will require an appropriation of $28,000 for this depart- 
ment. We trust the recommendation will meet with your 
approval. Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. H. WHITNEY, Chairman, 
QUINCY A. WOODWARD, 
CHAS. T. LUND, Clerk, 

Cotnniissioncrs . 



REPORT 



0¥ THE 



Police Goromissioners 



OF THE 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



Nashua, N. H. Dec. 31, 18'.)4. 

To JI/s Honor., the AIayoi\ afid tke Board of Aldermen : 

The third annual report of the board of police commissioners 
of the city of Nashua, for the year ending De^cemher 31, 1894, 
is respectfully submitted. 

During the past year but few changes hav^e been made In 
the roster of the police department. Complaints against 
three officers, — Thomas Downey, Magloire Duprey and 
George A. Hutchins, — have been filed. A hearing was 
granted in each case, resulting in the exoneration from the 
charges in the cases of officers Downey and Duprey; the 
complaint against officer Hutchins was sustained and the offi- 
cer discharged from the force. The charges were for violence 
used during arrest and for conduct unbecoming an officer. 

The resignation of William C. Higgins, policeman, was re- 
ceived, and Alfred F. Johnson, George F. Sawyer and 



106 MUNICIPAI, GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

George W. Squires were appointed policemen. The force 
consists of city marshal, assistant marshal, police matron, 
captain and sergeant of the night patrol, inspector, turnkey, 
fifteen patrolmen and a reserve force of 68 policemen. 

We present for your consideration the report of the city 
marshal to the board of police commissioners for the year 
ending December 31st, 1894. The report in detail shows a 
considerable falling off in the business of the department, 
noticeable in the number of arrests and the receipts of the 
police court. The number of tramps and lodgers furnished 
with food and shelter shows a large increase, which is attrib- 
utable to the business depression of the last year and the 
large number of unemployed travelling through the country. 
The discipline of the force continues to be good, and its 
efficiency will compare favorably with any police department 
in the state. 

By direction of the board of police commissioners, 

CHAS. H. BURKE, Clerk. 



NASHUA POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

ROSTER. 

POLICE COMMISSIONERS. 

Hon. JOHN A. SPALDING, Chairman, 
Term expires Jan. 1st, 1898. 
GEORGE E. ANDERSON, 

Term expires Jan, 1st, 1896. 

Hon. CHARLES H. BURKE, Clerk. 
Term expires Jan. 1st, 1900. 

POLICE COURT. 

CHARLES W. HOrrT, Justice. 

\VM. O. CLOUGH, Associate Justice, 

JAMES H. WILLOUGHBY, Clerk, 

EDWARD H.VVASON, City Solicitor. 

OFFICERS. 

ALVIN S. EATON, City Marshal, 

WILLIAM W. WHEELER, Deputy Marshal, 

GEORGE H. CAMPBELL, Capt. Night Watch, 
MARK E. WATSON, Sergeant, 
THOMAS FLOOD, Inspector, 

CHARLES C. CAMERON, Turnkey. 
Mrs. ELIZA CAREY, Matron. 

DAY OFFICERS. 

HORACE A. BALLOU, HENRY E JELLEY. 



108 



MUNICIPAL GOV'ERNMENT REPORT. 



NIGHT 

JAMES CLEARY, 
NATT N. WHEELER, 
FILVIORE J. DUBREY, 
PATRICK MAHAR, 
EDWARD FIELD, 
NAPOLEAN DICHARD, 
JAMES 



PATUOLMEN. 

HARVEY POLLARD. 
'l^HOMAS DOWNEY, 
HUGH ROGERS, 
MAGLOIRE DUPREZ, 

THOMAS McLaughlin, 

PETER BETTERS. 
L. GARSIDE. 



RESERVE FORCE. 



Calvin T. Robinson, Lowell road, 
Henry B. McCaffrey, 99 Elm, 
Thomas J. Robbins, Hollis road, 
Samuel R. Collins, 45 Pine, 
John Doherty, 4 John, 
John N. Hannon, 18 Cross, 
Albion T. Brown, 10 Bnrritt, 
John E. Sullivan, 185 West Pearl, 
Frank Lawrence, 26 Canal, 
John Budro, 47 Walnut, 
Peter Degnan, 8 Wilder. 
Joseph Collette, 337 Main, 
Edward R. King, 85 Bowers. 
John Hale, 72 Auburn, 
Daniel Gibson, 19 Otterson, 
Walter D. Roberts, 4 Eklredge, 
Edward Lambert, 19 Elm, 
Martin Fitzpatrick, 6 Spruce, 
Peter A. Emery, 82 Palm, 
John F. Sullivan, 13 Harbor avenue, 
Herbert Jelley, 5 Temple place, 
David Dube, 6 Morgan, 
John Harmon, 103 East Hollis, 
Abram Garrow, 16 Nagle, 
Willard Lindsay, Dunstable road, 
John W. Ladd, City Hall. 
Adolpli Vallencourt, 59 Chestnut, 
Joseph Boulard, Chandler, 
Charles M. Sanborn, 27 Salem, 
Alired F. Johnson, 41 Palm, 
Thomas Madden, 13 Walnut, 
William N. Perkins, 37 Locke, 
Franklin Temple, 8 Mason, 
Nelson Larocke, 23 Front, 



Judson Sawyer, 4 Church, 
Patrick J. Tobin, 93 Temple, 
Stanislas Gravelle, 49 Pine, 
George W. Squires, 125 Walnut, 
George F. Sawyer, 3 Quincy, 
Firman Vallencourt, 172 West Pearl, 
John Mulvanity, 72 Palm. 
Patrick Tracy, 48 Otterson, 
James A. Conlon, Brook near Lake, 
John L. H. Marshall, Lowell road, 
John Tatro, Morgan, 
Moses Hamel, 18 Belknap, 
Frank V. Marshall, 5 Tyler, 
William H. Perkins, 124 Walnut, 
Ross C. Duffy, 6 Sawyer, 
Joseph Harper, 1 Ash, 
David L. Adams, 22 Ash. 
Joseph Levernois, 180 West Pearl, 
Francis A. Barnes, 7 Pleasant, 
George F. Jones, 7 Harvard, 
Charles E. Buckliam, City Farm, 
David M. Rob}', 6 Fairmount, 
Jeremiah D. Cronin. 16 Myrtle, 
Nicholas R. Lougee, 30 Basin, 
Alfred McKinley, Mine Fall. 
James Shea, 90 Palm. 
John Davis, 106 Ash, 
Frank W. Gorham, Lowell road. 
Edward Clark, 32 Harbor avenue, 
John J. Brown, 18 Bridge, 
John A. Small, 34 Locke, 
Frank E. Burns, 105 Ash, 
Frank J. Blood, 58.^ Palm, 
Arthur C. Ford, 88 Concord. 



CITY MARSHAL'S REPORT. 



City Marshal's Office, 



City of Nashua, N. FL, Dec. 31, 1894. 
To the Honorable Board of Police Commhsloners : 

Gentlemen : — 1 have the honor to submit the annual 
report of the Police Department of the City of Nashua, ending 
December 31, 1894, showing what has been done during the 
past year. The following is a statement of the different 
offences for which arrests were made and the number of the 
same, and how disposed of including the amount of fines and 
costs received and paid over to the city treasurer. 



ARRESTS AND CAUSES. 



Arrests, males, 
Arrests, females, 



1,332 
161 

1,493 



CAUSES OF ARREST. 



Assault, ..... 


51 


Aggravated assault, 


2 


Assault on officer, 


6 


Attempt to rape, .... 


1 


Adultery, ..... 


5 



no 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Arrested for out-of-town officers, . 


: 12 


Bastardy, ..... 






5 


Burglary, 








29 


Board beats, 








9 


Breaking windows. 








1 


Cruelty to animals, 








3 


Common drunkard. 








11 


Drunk, 








667 


Disorderly conduct, 








52 


Disorderly house. 








15 


Driving bevond distanc 


s, 






1 


Defacing building. 








6 


Embezzlement, 








14 


Escaped convicts, 








7 


Evading fare. 








15 


Forgery, 








1 


Gambling, . 








5 


Highway robbery. 








1 


Insanity, 








4 


Keeping malt liquor for sale. 






68 


Keeping spirituous liquor for sale, 






56 


Keeping open Sunday, 






15 


Keeping dog without license, 






22 


Larceny from the person. 






4 


Larceny, ..... 






70 


Lewdness, ..... 






5 


Loitering on sidewalk. 






2 


Malicious mischief, . ^ . 






3 


Non-support of child, . 






11 


Noise and brawl, 






47 


Kidnapping, .... 






1 


Obtaining goods under false pretence, 






2 


Obscene and profane language. 






6 


Obscene books and papers, 






1 


Obstructing officers, 


. 






14 



POLICE COMMISSIONERS REPORT. 



Ill 



Obstructing sidewalk, .... 

Sale keeping, ..... 

Running away from home, . . 

Hawking, ...... 

Retained for witness, .... 

Robbery of flowers and shrubs, 

Selling liquor without United States license, 

Selling liquor, ..... 

Stubborn child, ..... 

Selling goods without license, 

Truants, ...... 

Tramps, . . . 

Vagabonds, ..... 

Suspicion, ...... 

Malt liquor, second offence, . 
Spirituous liquor, second offence, . 
Evading taxes, ..... 

Shoplifting, ..... 

Disturbing meeting, .... 

Total, ...... 

HOW DISPOSED OF. 

Discharged on probation, 

Paid' fine and cost, .... 

Sentence suspended by the court, . 
Complaints not sustained. 
Furnished bonds to appear at court, 
Comniitted to County House of Correction, at Wil 
ton, ...... 

Committed to City House of Correction, 
Committed to County Jail, 
Committed to State Industrial School, . 
Escaped prisoners returned, . 



3 

106 

3 

2 

20 

2 

2 

1 

5 

9 

5 

19 

17 

22 

3 

4 

1 

3 

1 

1,493 



286 

442 

138 

46 

22 

119 

272 

59 

5 

6 



112 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Complaints placed on tile, 

Nol pros'd, 

Committed to County House 

Chester, 
Suspended by paying costs, 
Suspended by paying fines, 
Suspended to go out ot liquo 
Mercy home. 
Not brought forward, . 

Total, 



of Correction at 



business. 



Man 



31 

28 

10 
23 
1 
8 
1 
1 



1,493 



LODGERS. 

Whole number of persons furnished with food and 

lodging, ....... 2,740 

PROPERTY STOLEN AND RECOVERED. 



Amount of property reported stolen. 
Amount of property recovered. 



$3,074 75 
2,615 75 



INCIDENTAL SERVICES. 



Accidents reported. 

Disturbances quelled without arrest. 

Dogs killed, .... 

Dangerous dogs, notice served to owners. 

Dangerous sidewalks reported. 

Dangerous streets reported, . 

Nuisances abated. 

Fires extinguished without alarm,. 

Fires discovered and alarms given, 



11 

57 

10 

8 

12 

4 
5 

7 

'7 



POLICE commissioners' REPORT. 113 

Intoxicated persons assisted home, ... 42 

Lost children restored, ..... 38 

Dead bodies recovered, ..... 5 

Obstructions removed from streets, ... 41 

Obstructions removed from sidewalks, ... 38 

Stores found open and secured, .... 287 

Stray teams put up, ...... 32 

AMOUNT OF FINES AND COSTS. 

Amount of fines and costs imposed by police jus- 
tice, $8,275 16 

Less amount paid to witnesses and other expenses, 589 31 



Balance paid to city treasurer, . . . $7,685 85 

DISCIPLINE. 

The discipline of the department has been good, the mem- 
bers, as a rule, have manifested a commendable disposition to 
conform to the requests of their superiors and to cheerfully 
and faithfully perform their duties according to the rules and 
regulations as established tor their government, by the board 
of police commissioners. It is but justice to the officers to say, 
that with a few exceptions, the force has been free from petty 
strife and jealousies, and while there is room for improve- 
ment, I feel assured that the officers of this department will 
strive to make advancement in everything that will tend to 
make the police force of the city of Nashua efficient and 
worthy of the respect of the public and tax payers. It has 
become a known fact that the force has been so conducted as 
to make Nashua a very uncomfortable place for crooks and 
criminals to reside in. By looking over the amount of stolen 
property reported at the police headquarters, $3,074.75, and 



114 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

the amount returned to its owners, $2,615.75, you can see how 
well we have succeeded. It is and has been the policy of this 
department to have the officers keep a strict watch over all 
suspicious persons on ovu" streets, and keep them under close 
surveillance, and if found out upon our streets after eleven 
o'clock in the night time, and could not give a good and sat- 
isfactory account of themselves, to arrest them on suspicion, 
and lock them up at the station-house, where they would be 
examined in the morning. I may say right here, there are 
but a few of our citizens understand as to the duties of our 
police, the unpleasantness connected with their duties, or the 
dangers they are called upon to undergo. He is expected to 
patrol our streets night and day ; to be found at his post of 
duty at all times, in the severest cold, storm or sunshine, he 
he is expected to see who goes here and there ; he is expected 
to be everywhere at once; if there is a fire or a fight, on his 
beat, he is expected to be there. If not, why not ? 

A W^ORD TO BUSINESS PEOPLE. 



The record book kept at the station shows the night officers 
have found 287 store doors open in the business places of the 
city during the past year, and they have either secured them or 
notified the proprietoi s. Were it not for the vigilance of the 
officers many larcenies might have occurred through the 
carelessness of some one, and the police force would have to 
bear a responsibility which would rightfully belong to others. 
I would most respectfully recommend that the public exercise 
more care in the future and secure their "safes" as well as 
their doors and windows before leaving their place of busi- 
ness for the night. 

The Nashua police department is to serve the public and it 
is the duty of every citizen to report to the chief or the police 
commissioners the failure of any officer to perform his duty. 



POLICE commissioners' REPORT. 115 

Such complaint will receive immediate attention. During 
the vear many anonymous letters charging neglect of duty on 
the part of certain officers have been received, but no atten- 
tion will be paid to any anonymous communication on any 
subject. 

DETECT1\'E DEPARTMENT. 

The business in this department has been faithfully and im- 
partially looked after and the work w^ell done by inspector 
Thos. Flood. He has shown skill and energy in his duty, 
and has alwa3's been ready night or day when it was required, 
and rendered good service in the department. 

POLICE MATRON. 

In this trying department the matron, Mrs. Eliza Gary, has 
faithfully looked after the unfortunate women, and always been 
ready and willing to work night and day for this class of 
women, and in looking after them and getting them work, 
and by her kind words and motherly deeds has been the means 
of saving quite a number of these unfortunate women. Mrs. 
Gary takes pride in doing her work well, and she has the love 
and esteem of the whole force. 



POLICE SIGNAL. 

As I have said in other reports, I believe the city govern- 
ment should give this subject their careful attention, for, in 
order to have an efficient police force we should have a pa- 
trol wagon and some kind of a system, either telephone or 
telegraph. Why not commence by having a patrol wagon 
and ambulance at police headquarters. 



IIG MUNICIPAI, GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



JUNK MEN AND PAWNBROKERS. 

This department in almost all other cities is under the 
control of the police department, and I would recommend a 
reasonable license to junk men who run stores or wagons and 
carts, and require them to make reports on suitable blanks 
furnished by the police department, and all persons doing bus- 
iness as pawnbrokers should pay a fair price for a license, 
and be restricted in the time for disposing of pawned goods, 
and he should be required to keep a strict record of all goods 
taken, and such records should be kept open to the police de- 
partment under heavy penalty. 

RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

This is for the relief and assistance of its members, when 
sick or disabled by reason of their services on the force. 
There has been quite a strain on this department the past 
year. 

CONCLUSION. 

To Hon. John A. Spalding, George E. Anderson and Hon. 
Charles H. Burke, board of police commissioners, I wish to 
express my appreciation for their counsels in the duties of my 
office, under whose direction and counsel I have endeavored 
to perform the duties of my office. Gentlemen, I thank you. 
I also desire to acknowledge my obligations to Deputy Mar- 
shal Wheeler, Capt. Geo. H. Campbell, Sergeant M. E. Wat- 
son, and Inspector Thos. Flood, and all the officers of the de- 
partment who have so ably assisted me, and tender to all my 
hearty thanks. I also extend my heartfelt thanks to Judge 
Charles W. Hoitt, Associate Justice Wm. O. Clough, Clerk 
Jas. H. Willoughby, and City Solicitor Edward H. Wason 
for their kind words and assistance. I have the honor to be, 
gentlemen. 

Your obedient servant, 

ALVIN S. EATON, OHy Marshal. 



CITY SOLICITOR'S REPORT. 



7o his Honor the JMmjor and City Councils : 

I herewith submit mv report as Solicitor for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1894. 

During the year several suits against the city have been dis- 
posed of as follows : 

MARY SUGHRUE VS. NASHUA. 

This action was brought to recover for personal injuries re- 
ceived by a fall on an icy walk on Washington street, Febru- 
ary, 1892. The plaintiff's injuries were severe and permanent. 
The case was settled without trial for $2,50 J by the committee 
on claims. 

GEORGE W. CUSSELL VS. NASHUA. 

This action was brought to recover for injuries resulting 
from a tall on Dearborn street in February, 1893, whereby 
the plaintift' broke his limb at the knee joint. The case was 
settled by the committee for $1000 without trial. 

JENNIE M. LINCOLN VS. NASHUA. 

This action was brought to recover for injuries sustained by 
the plaintiff's falling on Main street in front of Whiting Block, 
February, 1893, whereby her shoulder was fractured. The 
committee settled this case for $775. 



118 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

ELLA F. DOYLE VS. NASHUA. 

In this action the plaintiff's ankle was broken by falling on 
an icv walk on Tyler street, in February, 1893. This case 
was settled by the committee for $500. 

GEORGE A. PENO VS. NASHUA. 

This action was brought by plaintiti' who received perma- 
nent injuries to his right limb and hip by falling on the ice on 
Franklin street, in December, 1892. The case was tried, 
and jury awarded the plaintifl'$4000. 

SARAH E. BROWN VS. NASHUA. 

In this action the plaintiti' claimed to have received severe 
and permanent injuries to her spine by reason of a defective 
highway on the Lowell road, near the house of Franklin H. 
Lincoln, in February, 1893. The case was tried and it result- 
ed in a verdict for the city. 

SADIE GREENLEAF VS. NASHUA. 

The plaintiti' broke her ankle by falling on an icy sidewalk 
on Arlington street, opposite the engine house, in March, 
1892. The case was tried and verdict of $2,250 recovered. 

LENA KNOTT VS. NASHUA. 

This case was to recover for an injury to a scholar at Har- 
bor school, who fell on a defective walk at the street line in 
December, 1893, and broke her limb. The case was settled 
for $300. 



CITY solicitor's keport. 119 

During the year only one suit has been brought against the 
city and this is largely due to the change in the highway law 
limiting the liability of towns and cities from accidents re- 
ceived by travelers having occasion to use our streets. 

I wish to call your attention to the encroachment upon our 
highways by abutters who accidentally or intentionally erect 
their buildings so near the highway line that water from the 
roof falls upon the street, causing annoyance and danger to 
travel, and in some cases the building itself is within the 
limits of the highway. Such encroachments are unlawful 
and should be closely watched and prevented. 

I have advised with committee on claims at several meetings 
and responded to all requests from the city councils and city 
officials for opinions upon legal questions, and have tried such 
cases in the police court as the city marshal desired assistance. 

In conclusion permit me to thank one and all with whom I 
have been connected for the many courtesies and kind sug- 
gestions received during the year relating to the duties of my 
office. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD H. WASON, 

Solicit 07'. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To his Honor the Mayor and City Councils : 

The board of health herewith respectfully submit their re- 
port for the year 1804. 

At the beginning of the year it was voted b}' the board that ' 
there should be a monthly mortuary report made and pub- 
lished, together with a report of the contagious diseases, and 
deaths from the same, added, with an appended report from 
the citv physician for the same time. This is a distinct ad- 
vancement on the records as previously kept by the board, 
and becomes quite valuable on the whole from a statistical 
standpoint. It was also seen at the beginning of the year that 
it was almost utterly impossible to obtain accurate reports of 
contagious diseases coming under the care of the various prac- 
titioners ; therefore it was voted that postal cards bearing on 
one side the address of the board of health rooms, and on the 
other a printed form, giving the various data desired, should 
be procured and delivered to each physician for use. These 
have met with hearty favor among the medical profession, and 
the repoit below of the number of contagious diseases proves 
their efficacy. The rules of the board of health have also been 
ordered by the board to be re-printed in a convenient form and 
distributed throughout the city. 

The team for collecting the garbage for the city, which is 
run by Mr. C. E. Buckham of the city farm, was ordered dur- 
ing the summer months, to make daily collections, and notices 
to each householder were distributed by Mr. Buckham, in- 



122 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

forming them on what days the team would visit their sec- 
tion. This has greatly facilitated the work. 

It will be seen by the detailed report that the city has passed 
through a year unprecedented from the number of contagious 
diseases existing; also that the mortality due to the same has 
been somewhat alarming, and that the poor alone were not the 
ones to be especially thus afflicted. 

It is to be recommended by the board that our school build- 
ings should receive careful and circumspect scrutiny as regards 
their sanitary conditions. It is also recommended that imme- 
diate effort should be made for employment of an inspector of 
plumbing and drainage, inasmuch as a large number of build- 
ings are practically lacking the proper connections with our 
sewers. 

The disposal of our garbage has become a very important 
and serious question to handle. That there should be some 
means of utterly destroying the same is beyond question; also 
the disposal of the contents of vaults and drywells has vexed 
the board beyond their power of endurance. 

Cremation, in other cities, seems more fully to meet this 
want. When at some future time the finances of our city are 
in better condition, we would recommend most heartily that 
the consideration of some modern method be seriously under- 
taken for use in our city. 

We have to thank the physicians and the people at large for 
the uniform kindness and courtesy with which they have ac- 
ceded almost invariably to our wishes. Last, but not least, 
we recommend most strongly the constant employment of a 
duly appointed health officer, and that the city councils should 
make an annual appropriation placing the board of health in 
a firm position to do its legitimate work. 
* Number of complaints made to board of health, 400 

" " inspections made by " " " 387 

There were comparatively few notices sent and fewer sheriffs' 
notices served. The inspections were largely those of faulty 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



J23 



privy vaults, and next in number faulty sink connections and 
water closets. 

There were a larger number of water closets put into dwell- 
ings and sinks connected with the sewer during the past year 
than in any other one year of the city's history. 



MORTUARY REPORT. 



Whole number, 



440 



SEX. 



Male, 
Female. 



206 
234 



COLOR. 



White, 



440 



CONDITION. 



Married, 
Widow, 
Widower, 
Single, 



91 

33 

26 

290 





NATIVITY. 




City, . 




254 


New Hampshire, . 




64 


Maine, 




2 


Massachusetts, 




19 


Dakota, 




1 


Vermont. . 




9 


Rhode Island, 




2 



124 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Michigan, ........ 1 


New York, 










10 


Canada, 










46 


Ireland, 










23 


England, 










1 


Scotland, 










1 


Poland, 










1 


Italy, 










1 


Russia, 










4 


Unknown, . 










1 



CEMETERY WHERE INTERRED 



Nashua, 

Hudson, 

Hollis street, 

Edgewood, . 

St. Francis, 

St. Aloysius, 

Hebrew, 

South yard, 

Sent out of town for interment, 

Brought into town for interment, 

Potter's field. 



17 

65 

88 

22 

98 

100 

2 

2 

45 

68 

1 











LOCALITY. 




eaths 


in 


Ward 1, 




28 


i i 






2, 




31 


i . 






3, 




114 


(; 






4, 




23 


1, 1 






0, 

6, 




26 
39 


(( 






'i^ 




58 


( i 






8, 




44 


a 






It, 




77 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



125 



CAUSE OF DEATH. 



Accidental, 

Apoplexy, 

Acute bronchitis. 

Acute bright's disease, 

Acute gastritis, 

Asthma, 

Acute rheumatism, 

Acute consumption. 

Acute phthisis. 

Acute meningitis. 

Blood poisoning. 

Brain disease, 

Bright's disease, . 

Burns, 

Bronchitis, 

Broncho- pneumonia. 

Chronic diarrhoea. 

Cholera infantum. 

Catarrhal pneumonia. 

Capillary bronchitis, 

Cirrhosis of the liver, 

Consumption, 

Cancer, 

Convulsions, 

Congestion of brain, 

Cerebral meningitis, 

Cystitis, 

Catarrh of stomach, 

Cerebral congestion. 

Colitis, 

Cramps, 

Cyanosis, 

Cancer of womb, 



/ 
14 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 

86 
1 
4 
1 

37 
2 
5 



108 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Cancer of intestines, 

Cerebro-spinal meningitis, 

Cerebral hem or rage, 

Congenital malformation of 

Cancer of stomach, 

Cholera moi^bus. 

Congestion of lungs, 

Diptheria, . 

Diptheritic nephritis. 

Dentition, . 

Diabetes mellitus, 

Disease of liver, . 

Drowned, 

Debility, 

Diarrhcea, . 

Dysentery, . 

Dropsy, 

Disease of lungs, . 

Dilatation of heart. 

Enteritis, 

Exhaustion, 

Encephalitis, 

Fever, 

Fracture of skull. 

General paralysis. 

Gastric abscess, . 

General debility. 

Gastritis, 

General cellulitis. 

Gangrene, . 

Heart disease, 

Hepatitis, . 

Hydrocephalous, 

Heart failure. 



eart. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



127 



Heat exhaustion,. ...... 1 


Hiccough, . 








1 


Hypostatic pneumonia, 








1 


Hepatic abscess, . 








3 


Inanition, 








23 


Infantile debility, 








3 


Inflammation of the bowels, 








1 


Infantile weakness. 








3 


Intestinal obstruction, . 








2 


Infantile cholora, 








1 


Influenza, . 








1 


Jaundice, .... 








1 


Lagrippe, . 








2 


Marasmus, . 








9 


Meningitis, . 








15 


Mal-nutrition, 








3 


Malignant disease. 








I 


Measles, 








3 


Nephritis. . 








1 


Old age, .... 








11 


Ovarian tumor, 








1 


Pneumonia, 








20 


Preparturition, 








3 


Peritonitis, 








4 


Paralysis, 








3 


Paralysis of heart. 








2 


Pertussis, .... 








5 


Pyaemia, .... 




. 




1 


Pericarditis, 








I 


Scarlet fever, 








32 


Still born, . 








34 


Females, 17; Males 17. 










Softening of brain. 








2 


wSpasms, 








4 


Suicide, 








4 



128 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



Scrofula, 

Senile gangrene, . 

SeoticaBmia, 

Shock from burns, 

Tonsilitis, . 

Tubercular meningitis. 

Tuberculosis, 

Typhoid fever, 

Ulcer of hip, 

Uremia. 

Uterine tumor. 

Unknown, . 



Under 1 year. 
Over 1 and under 5. 



160 
56 



Total under 5 years, 



216 



5 years and under 10, 



10 
20 
*30 
40 
50 
60 
70 
80 
90 



20, . 

30, . 

40, . 

50, . 

60, . 

70, . 

80, . 

90, . 

100, . 



20 
22 

40 
20 
18 
17 
26 
37 
18 
6 



Total, . 



440 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



129 



There were 352 cases of contagious diseases reported for 
1894, viz: 

Scarlet fever, 1S8 

Typhoid fever, ....... 27 

Diphtheria, ....... 32 

Measles, ........ 105 



Total, 



352 



Num 


ber per ward : 






1 


1 


> 


3 4 5 


6 7 8 


9 


27 


3 


7 


113 16 13 


23 55 42 


27 


Num 


ber o 


f dea 


ths from contagious 


diseases were 46. 




1 in 


ward 1 fr 


om scarlet fever. 






3 




o 


( a (( 






1 




•7 ' 


' typhoid fever. 






1 




3 ' 


' diphtheria. 






2 




3 ' 


' typhoid fever. 






2 




3 ' 


measles. 






19 




3 ' 


' scarlet fever. 






1 




4 ' 


( it, (( 






1 




4 ' 


diphtheria. 






1 




5 ' 


I li 






2 




6 ' 


scarlet fever. 






1 




t) ' 


typhoid fever. 






1 




7 ' 


(( u 






1 




7 ' 


' measles. 






2 




7 ' 


diphtheria. 






1 




7 ' 


scarlet fever. 






3 




8 « 


I a n 






2 




9 ' 


U (( 






1 




9 ' 


typhoid fever. 







130 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

Estimating the population at 25,000, 440 deaths would give 
an annual death rate of 17.60 per 1000. 
Respectfully submitted, 

C. B. HAMMOND, M. D., 
J. T. GREELEY, M. D., 
M. T. LAJOIE, M. D., 

Board of Health. 



CITY PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To his Honor the Mayor and City Councils : 

I herewith submit my report as City Physician for the year 
1894. 

ITEMIZED REPORT. 

The large number of vaccinations which occurred during 
the first part of the year was due to the general fear of small 
pox contagion which spread throughout the entire country ; 
especially to be guarded against in our section on account of 
its close proximity to Canada. There has been a general in- 
crease of city patients coincident to the general depression of 
the times and dependent upon it. It has been especially 
noticeable that large numbers of formerly well-to-do people 
have been unable to meet their physician's bills, and for that 
reason asked aid of the city physician, while in other respects 
they have provided for themselves. 

A detailed report of the monthly work is found appended 
to each monthly mortuary report published by the board of 
health. 

We would recommend that an annual appropriation be 
made to the city physician, which appropriation we think can 
be made with sufficient accuracy to cover all his expenses for 
the year. 



132 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



SUMMARY 



Whole number of calls for service, 


2,686 


Subdivided as follows : 




Vaccinations, ..... 


1,559 


Calls to City Farm . . 


27 


Call to Police Station, .... 


35 


Office calls, ..... 


858 


Visits to homes, ..... 


207 



2,686 



Surgical attendance rendered for 
Abscess of head, 
" hand, 

" neck, 
Cuts on head, 
"■ face, 
" finger, 
" neck, 
" wrist, 
Crushed thumb, . 
Dislocations of shoulders, 
Dog bites, . 
Fractured hip, 

finger, 
foot, 
clavicle, 
skull, . 
wrist, . 
nose, . 
elbow, 
leg, 
ribs. 
Injury to foot. 



CITY PHYSICIAN S REPORT. 



133 



Laceration of head and temple, 
Powder in face, 
Sore leg, 
Scald on head, 
Scald, 
Soi'e arm, 
Sprain of leg. 
Ulcer of leg, 
" face, 
3 births, 5 deaths. 



C. B. HAMMOND, 

City Physician. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 



To the Hon. Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

Herewith I beg leave to present to you my annual report for 
the year ending Dec. 31, 1894, it being the fifth emanating 
from this office. 

The problem which confronted us at the commencement of 
the year was, how, with a reduced appropriation, previously 
too small, the requirements of the office could be met. We 
could not cut loose entirely and, regardless of ultimate cost, 
perform all the work which seemed to us of absolute impor- 
tance, and therefore we were compelled to cast about and see 
what we could neglect which would be the least detrimental 
to the public service. It has been our aim to bring this de- 
partment up to a high standard of efficiency such as is main- 
tained in other communities of equal rank in population and 
intelligence. With a moderately fair expenditure and the 
progress already made, we can readily do so, but I would re- 
spectfully submit that life with us must be continually pro- 
gi'essive in order to be sustaining, and retrenchment after all 
may not be true economy. 

TOWN BOUNDS. 

The Merrimack river forms the eastern boundarv, and the 
Pennichuck brook the northern boundary ; these being natural 
require no attention. The line between Nashua and Hollis is 
variously formed : — Pennichuck pond, Muddy brook and the 



136 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT, 

Nashua river forming a part, and in addition, 14 stones, excel- 
lently well set and plainly marked completely indicate the 
westerly line. On the south, the state line, between Tyngs- 
borough, Dunstable, and Nashua, with but two or three ex- 
ceptions, the line bounds are unsuitable and scarcely serve the 
purpose intended ; they would be recognized as such only when 
pointed out and confirmed by oral testimony. The commis- 
sioners appointed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and 
State of New Hampshire having correctly located the state 
line it would seem eminently proper to verify the accuracy of 
these so called bounds and replace them with suitable monu- 
ments, properly marked, so that they would be known and 
recognized as such on sight. I had hoped that it might have 
been done this past year, but found it impossible with the 
limited means at mv command to move in the matter. 



CITY STREET BOUNDS. 

Substantial stone bounds, indicatively marked, should be 
placed at the intersections and deflections of all street lines and 
exact records made of their locations. Property bounds are 
unreliable for the reason that their position must be depend- 
ent upon something which does not exist, viz., the defining 
city bounds which are not there ; buildings and fences, even if 
correctly located, are transitory in character and therefore un- 
reliable. A commencement was made four years ago by 
placing sixty-one monumental bounds, followed, the succeed- 
ing year, by an increase of thirty-three, since which time, 
owing to the lack of funds, the work has been discontinued. 
The lapse of time adds to the difficulty of establishing them 
correctly, and serves only to increase the ultimate cost and 
quite likely lead to trouble when they are finally adjusted. If 
the lines had been properly defined on Bridge street, one law 
suit would have been prevented and many other encroach- 



CITY ENGINEEU'S REPORT. 137 

ments would not exist. An ounce of prevention in matters of 
this kind may be worth a ton of cm-e. 

MAINTENANCE OF STREET GRADES. 

In mv report of last year I called attention to the matter of 
re-surfacing streets regardless of existing grades, and men- 
tioned Amherst, East Hollis and Main streets as object lessons 
of the most objectionable examples. Amherst street still re- 
mains in the same condition. East Hollis and Main streets 
have both been attended to and their defects remedied. In 
this connection I beg leave to call your attention to the condi- 
tion of the gutters of our streets. In the natural wearing 
away of the road-bed the surface is crowded over into them, 
and in many cases it has been allowed to stay there, and new 
material added to the road bed, which, if not entirely obliter- 
-ating the gutters, certainly impairs their usefulness. The 
proper treatment would be to plow out and place the surplus 
in the street proper, if suitable, or cart it away and thus allow 
the gutter to perform its functional duty. 

The sti'eet railroad has added, within the past year, to the 
•comfort, convenience or pleasure of 537,743 people. In view 
of this fact who can rightfully say that it has not become a 
public necessity and as such entitled to respectful considera- 
tion ? In the early summer the motive power will be changed 
to electricity and connections will be made with Lowell, giv- 
ing us a continuous electric road to the sea. The changing 
over will involve relaying the tracks in definite conformity to 
permanent grades, involving considerable time and labor on 
the part of the city engineering department which will be ad- 
ditional to the ordinary current expenses. It is hoped that 
whenever subsequent repairing of streets becomes necessary a 
rigid adherence to the established grades will be maintained, 
and not, as in times past, left to the whim or ignorance of the 



138 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



road gang. We are here for the purpose of re-establishing 
lines and grades which have been disturbed and can do it cor- 
rectly. The public, including the street railway people, have 
a risfht to demand this of us. 



STREET LINES. 



Monuments indicating divisional lines, when all parties in- 
terested have agreed thereto, should be sacredly respected, but 
in the absence of the consent of one or more parties who may 
be affected thereby, they are of no use legally or morally — 
to illustrate — A and B own adjoining property on, say Temple 
street ; C desires to purchase that of B but will not unless the 
bounds are permanently fixed. B consults A and, amicably 
inclined, they together put down a stone in the line of the 
street, or where they think it is, and the transfer follows in 
due time, and all seems to them to be definitely settled; but 
when it becomes necessary to locate the line of the street, if 
it encroaches upon C, then the trouble commences — by some 
crude reasoning C insists that he owns to that bound and that 
he is being injured, his realty is being taken from him, utterly 
ignoring the fact that the third party did not consent to the 
contract and so litigation commences: — the S} mpathy of a 
jury generally being for the individual, the verdict rendered is 
against the city instead of against A and B who unlawfully, 
possibly unwittingly, established the apparent ownership of 
the land which C has bought and it may be improved. If the 
verdict is rendered for the city the re-establisliment of the 
street line might result in a serious loss to the individual. 

Some otherwise intelligent men. appear densely ignorant in 
matters appertaining to street lines and ignoring entirely the 
importance of maintaining their integrity, even claiming to 
own to the centre of the street, and so, when building, pay lit- 
tle regard to the rights of the public, building directly on the 



CITY engineer's REPORT. 139 

street line, and if projections, such as eaves, bay windows, or 
steps are required, out they go and the public may get by the 
obstructions as best they may. Suits at law have been main- 
tained, verdicts against the city for damages have been obtained 
and j'et the obstructions have been allowed to remain. I 
would earnestly call the attention of the authorities to this 
matter; the time to act should be at once, as soon as the tres- 
pass occurs. In one flagrant case where the invasion was 
prosecuted in a suit at law during the past year, the defense 
set up was "limitation of time," in other words, they admitted 
that they were trespassers, but that it had continued so long 
that they had acquired ownership of that part of the public 
domain which they had so occupied, and the case went up to 
the law term on this demurrer; this, I believe, vvasthe first at- 
tempt ever made, so far as the records show, to peremptorily 
call attention to the fact that the people had vested rights in 
the public streets which the land owner must respect. This 
action was "The City of Nashua vs. Thomas Donahue," in 
which a new building on Bridge street was placed upon an old 
foundation and subsequently bay windows, piazza, an,d steps 
were projected from the front into the street. In this case the 
oflice furnished abstracts of deeds with progressive sketches 
from the first purchase of the land out of the farm of Joshua 
Pierce, April 16, 1825, up to date, showing besides the dedi- 
cation of the included streets, all the changes in ownership as 
well as the additions to, and disintegrations of, the various lots 
— it would seem to me that inasmuch as the defense claimed 
inclosing the disputed land b\ a fence, which was known to be 
non-continuous, it would have taken the case into the domain 
of fact as well as law. A decision has not yet been rendered. 
Other and more flagrant cases could be quoted ; one in which 
the property bound was actually moved out into the street to 
conceal the intrusion of a building; unfortunately for the per- 
petrator it was not moved far enough and the house still re- 
mains, although in less degree, in the street. Still another — 



140 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

a lawn, prettily graded, extends several feet over the street 
line, and singularly enough the line bounds were left project- 
ing above the well-kept turf, possibly in time, or a change of 
grade, they may disappear altogether to be re-adjusted on the 
wrong end of a law suit. 

assessors' maps. 

To be of value, our assessors' maps must be accurate up to 
date ; continual changes are being made, not only in proprie- 
torship but in the outlines of the various lots of which they are 
composed. The duty of noting and recording these constant 
changes has been assumed by this department. Abstracts of 
all deeds must be made and indexed, and the changes made 
not only on the office maps but upon those of the board of as- 
sessors; the changes in ownership must also be recorded to- 
gether with the dates and volume and page of the transfers as 
they appear in the Registry of Deeds. All of this involves 
considerable time — as an illustration of one part only we have 
just cqmpleted Vol. 3 of "abstracts" of deeds, comprising 360 
pages, averaging about three transfers to the page. Very 
many of these are vague in description and require additional 
effort to identify. All of which shows that instead of the 
assessors' maps having been completed, they are simply pro- 
gressional in their character. The residential lots already 
mapped and recorded number 5,235 and more are continually 
being added. 

AMHERST STREET FIRE STATION. 

This building is known technically as a "Three door 
house," and is complete in itself with stable, barn, shed, 
sleeping quarters and company rooms. 

In the construction of this building the services of the city 
engineer, entirely outside of the line of his proscribed duties, 



CITY engineer's REPORT. 141 

were enlisted in the belief that a respectable building in ap- 
pearance as well as structurally entluring in character could be 
added to the list of public buildings already erected. No 
fixed sum was named to cover its construction, but the senti- 
ment of the committee seemed to be to construct in such a 
manner that continual demands upon the city treasury would 
not be required either to correct organic defects or provide in- 
creased room for the needs of the department in the reason- 
ably near future. In furtherance of this design, $15,000 was 
appropriated to be added to the bonded debt of the city as a 
permanent improvement, to be assumed in part by those who 
would, in the future, reap a proportional advantage from pres- 
ent expenditure and the balance of the cost to be included in 
the current expenses of the year. The comparative cost with 
others can hardly be made inasmuch as every dollar expended 
not only inside but -outside the building, such as the cost of 
the grading, street retaining walls, concreting, paving in the 
street and even the sidewalk on Merrimack street, was in- 
cluded in the cost of this. I believe in no other instance has 
this been done. 

With the erection of higher buildings the time may not be 
far distant when it will be advisable for the city to acquire 
heavier apparatus; the city of Hartford has recently put in a 
15,000 pound engine, while those here weigh onlv 7.500. 
For this reason the building has been more heavilv construct- 
ed than present needs might require. The cost, about $3G,- 
000, may seem large, but it will be borne in mind that per- 
fection in building is only reached by an outlay corresponding 
to the required end. The first stone was laid June 27, 1893, 
and the completed building was transferred to the Fire De- 
partment JuJy 17, 1894. 

TOWN MAP. 

Very gratifying progress has been made upon our map 
vvhich embraces the whole of the township. It will show in 



142 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



addition to the streets, every country road and the location of 
every outlying farm house. It only remains to define the riv- 
ers and ponds, which w^ill be done when frozen over. Enough 
has been done however, so that we are able to give the area 
as 33.49 square miles; the extreme length of the city is 6.82 
and the extreme width 4.91 miles. The Merrimack river 
forms our eastern boundary and measures 7.62 miles. 

SEWERS. 

The time is fast approaching when further extension of our 
sewers will be unsafe without providing new outlets. Sewers 
in McKean, Williams and Bowers streets should be put in the 
coming summer which will complete all that can enter the 
main sewer in Hollis street; the remaing part of the Crown 
Hill district, embracing a large territory, all of the Main 
street district south of AUds street together with the large 
territory south and west of the South Common must be left 
until the Burke street sewer shall be completed. 

The following table shows the 

SEWERS CONSTRUCTED IN 1894. 







a 






n 


street. 


LOCATION. 




Size and Material. 


2; 


^ O 

0-5 






33 






Allds, 


Hollis to McKean, 


2014 


24, 20, 18 and 15 in. Portland 


7 


5 


Ash, 


Munroe, southerly, 


468 


12 in. Portland. 


4 





Berkeley 


Stark, north and south. 


1636 


15 and 12 in. Portland. 


7 


2 


Gillis, 


Allds, easterly. 


751 


12 in. Portland, 


4 


2 


Hall ave. 


Webster, easterly, 


286 


12 " Akron, 


2 





Harvard, 


Allds, easterly. 


247 


12 " 


2 





Kinsley, 


Extended westerly. 


242 


12 " 


1 





Martin, 


Tolles to Pearson, 


192 


12 " Portland, 


1 





Marshall 


Bowers, southerly, 


820 


18 and 15 in. Akron, 


5 


1 


School, 


High, south and west, 


244 


10 in. Akron, 








Stark, 


Concord to Berkeley, 


359 


18 " Portland, 








Whitney 


Tolles to Salem, 


145 


15 " 


2 


1 



7404 



35 11 



CITY engineer's REPORT. 143 

Laid by street department, 244 feet. 

Laid by sewer department, 7,160 feet. 



Total, 7,404 feet or 1.4 miles. 

In use previous to 1894, 111,950 feet or 21.2 miles. 



119,354 feet or 22.6 miles. 

The cost of the School street sewer, laid by the street de- 
partment, was $251.18. 

I am unable to give the cost of the others. I learn from 
the city clerk that the sum total expended, including that on 
School street, was $15,920.79. 

COMMERCIAL AND HUDSON STREETS. 

These streets were finished early in the summer. The 
paving at the easterly end of Hudson street was extended on 
and across HolHs street to the track of the Acton railroad, 
5,019 square yards of paving costing $8,266.67 were laid, 
making the cost $1.65 per square yard, laid. By the re- 
establishment of the grade Hollis street was lowered about 
two feet, and what was before the worst railroad crossing in 
the city has become tolerably good. It will be remembered 
that three years ago, a street commissioner using his judg- 
ment raised Hollis street and created a very dangerous cross- 
ing here. This surplus was taken oft" together with enough 
of the underlying dirt so that a Telford road, with the aid of 
our new road roller, could be constructed. This was care- 
fully made, scrupulous attention being paid to the grade 
stakes, and the sidewalk was adjusted to the new street. 
This part of Hollis street will be subject to as hard usage as 
any street in the city, and the experiment of a well made road 
as perfect as crushed stone can make it, will be watched with 
considerable interest in order to ascertain its wearing qualities ; 



144 MUNICIPAI. GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

without the steam road roller it would not have been possible 
to build a road of this character. This roller, it might be 
added, has done very satisfactory work upon other streets in, 
re-surfacing. 

EDGESTONE. 

During the past year, on the north side, 3,502 feet have 
been set, costing $1,848.55; on the south side, 5,853 1-2 
feet, costing $2,986.74, making a total of 9,355 1-2 teet, costT 
ing $4,835.29. About 2,500 feet of old stone have been reset 
which was charged in the cost above. 

CONCRETE. 

There have been 4,623.85 square yards of concrete laid at an. 
expense of $2,412.56. 

STREET NUMBERS 

It is the practice in other cities to have the street numbers 
placed upon the residences by the engineering department, as 
uniformity and continuity both are better obtained if placed 
under the control of that department from which reliable in- 
formation necessaiy for the proper accomplishment of the de- 
sired end can only be furnished. While we are not over- 
anxious to add to the duties required of us, we think the inter- 
est of the city would be greatly served were it so placed. 

STREET SIGNS. 

Possibly it might be well to place the street signs under the 
supervision of the city engineer, and in that case it would be 
safe to say that the public taste would not be offended by such. 





■:a-^ 



T" 



y><" 







Amherst Street Fire Station. 



CITY ENGINEEK's REPORT. 145 

extraordinary erections as now strike the eye, of which the 
following is a photographic reproduction of one of several 
similar, now standing on one of our streets. 



M-PLEIVSANT 



ST 



NEW STREETS. 

During the past year the following additions have been 
made to our public streets : 

Cherry street, . . accepted Aug, 14, 376.75 feet 

Linwood street, . " Nov. 13, 970.25 " 

D street, . . '• Dec. '25, 421.60 " 

Wellington street, . '• '' 25, 487.80 " 

GENEKAL WORK. 

In addition to the above, considerable work has been done 
for the Edgewood cemetery. Surveys made for the city so- 
licitor and grades given on unaccepted streets in order that 
when accepted, suits for damages might be avoided. Plans 
were also made for the curbed enclosure in Orange square, 
and, not the least important of all. Temple street from the 
crossing near the head of Amory street to its junction with 
East Hollis street was defined and alterations made in the 
above mentioned crossing which will serve to improve the 
whole locality as well as to reduce the danger in crossing the 
tracks to a minimum. The office has been kept open to the 
public continuously from eight o'clock in the morning until 

10 



146 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



five o'clock in the afternoon, and an honest endeavor has been 
made to impart information whenever it has been soHcited. 



EXPENSES. 



The expenses of this department for the past year have been 
as follows : — 
Pay rolls, office and field, 
Livery bills, 
City maps. 

Type writing machine with cabinet 
Paper, stationery, etc.. 
Tools, pegs, etc., 
Incidentals, 

Index books for property maps. 
City repoits. 

Balance undrawn, 
Appropriation, 



$2,810 


39 




. ■ 197 


20 




109 


50 




;t, 125 


00 




114 


15 




37 


90 




26 


80 




17 


50 




11 


00 








$3,449 42 






50 58 


$3,500 00 


$3,500 00 


$3,500 00 



Respectfully submitted, 

A. H. S.'XUNDERS, 

City Engineer. 



TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THK 




Of 






To the Honorable City Council: 

In presenting their annual report the trustees would call at- 
tention to the fact that six thousand more books were taken 
from the library this year than were taken during the year 
previous, showing clearl}' the increasing usefulness of the 
library, and how thoroughly its privileges are appreciated, 
also that the opening of a public reading room in connection 
with the library was very much needed, as indicated by the 
attendance, which for the seven months that the room has been 
open amounts to five thousand visitors. 

It is plain to see that this institution is yearly becoming more 
popular with our citizens, and is already of considerable value 
to the educational interests of the city. That it may furnish 
still more assistance to the student, it is the purpose of the 
trustees to add to the reference department from time to time, 
such standaixl works as the liberality of your appropriations 
will permit them to purchase. 

The additions to the library for the year amount to 1,035 
volumes, of wdiich number 442 were purchased, the balance 



148 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

being received by donation from the United States govern- 
ment, the state and from individuals. 

Your attention is called to the reports of the librarian, treas- 
urer and auditor herewith annexed for details of information 
concerning the care and expenses of the library. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH VV. HOWARD, Ex Officio, 

WILLIAM D. SWART, Ex Officio, 

WILLIAM W. BAILEY, 

EDWARD SPALDING, 

OILMAN C. SHATTUCK, 

VIRGIL C. OILMAN, 

CHARLES HOLMAN, 

GEORGE A. RAMSDELL, 

JOHN F. STARK, 

Trusteei; of Public Library. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Nashua, N. H., January 1, 1895. 
To the Trustees of the Nashxia Public Library : 

Gentlemen : The librarian's annual report for the year 
ending December 31, 1894, is respectfully submitted. 

During the year 1,035 books have been added to the library. 
When we consider that 450 have been given by the United 
States government, 97 by our state, and 46 have been the gift 
of individuals, it will be seen that fewer books have been pur- 
chased than in anv one of the past four }cars. 

The reading room not having been contemplated, at the 
beginning of the year, no appropriation was made for that ob- 
ject, and the $1,200 necessar}^ for its furnishing and mainte- 
nance have been taken from the sum designed for the library 
alone. It has been necessary to practice economy to meet the 
expenses of both, making it impossible to purchase as many 
books as usual. 

Although the reading room has encroached upon the library 
funds, it has proved a desirable addition. In the seven 
months since its opening there have been 5,000 visitors. 

We already need more room, many come and seeing the 
chairs occupied are obliged to turn away. Small boys come 
in large numbers. If they are asked to give place to older 
people it means, in many instances, turning them into the 
street away from that which will probably benefit them. 

If a table could be arranged for the boys having magazines 



150 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



and papers suited to their years, it would be a desirable addi- 
tion. 

The reading room gives a much better opportunity for con- 
sulting the reference books which have been placed there. 
The public have free access to them without formal applica- 
tion. The books are much used, and I do not know of an in- 
stance in which they have been defaced or in any way injured. 

More reference books and dictionaries would add much to 
the usefulness of this department. The Century dictionary 
ought to be purchased as soon as possible. We have no dic- 
tionary of a late date. New editions of some of the poets are 
needed, also more works on the arts and sciences. 

There should be duplicates of some of the volumes that we 
now have ; in history and literature particularly, as the de- 
mand for these books in the schools, clubs, and debating so- 
cieties is such that we are not able to meet it. This is unfor- 
tunate, as it often discourages the student from further effort. 

As the library is now open all day, many of the books liter- 
ally get no rest, only coming in to go directly out, as most 
books are so poorly bound it is not surprising that they soon 
require repairing and rebinding; 260 books have been with- 
drawn from circulation as they have become unfit for use. As 
these are in the catalogue they s'nould be replaced. 

Six thousand more books have been taken from the library 
this year than last. There have been nearly 5,000 volumes 
added since the last catalogue was issued; could there be a 
bulletin of these it would be helpful to the public. 

Necessarily the reading room has added considerably to the 
work of the library, and if permission could be given to have 
assistance occasionally as needed, it would allow many things 
to be done more satisfactorily. Many come for information 
on certain subjects, often when there is the largest demand for 
books to be given out, and it is impossible to give them the 
attention they need. As this is one of the most important 
parts of library work it should receive due attention. 



REPORT OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES. 151 

It was necessary to close the library one week in April to 
make the changes required for the fitting of the readingroom. 

The scarlet fever being prevalent the Board of Health re- 
quested that the library and readingroom should be closed on 
the 8th of December, and it was not reopened during the re- 
mainder of the year. 

HARRIET CROMBIE, Librarian. 



152 



MUNICIPAL GOVEUNMENT REPORT. 



GIFTS, 1894. 



VOLS. 



Amiierst College, 

Amory, W., 

Argentine Republic, 

Broadway Central Hotel, 

Concord, 

Davis, Capt. G. E., 

Dodge, Hon. S. H., 

Friend, 

Keene Humane Society, 

Lanier, Mrs. Charles, . 

Libraries, A. L. A., 

Chicago University 

Concord, 

Dover, 

Lenton, England, 

Manchester, 

Newark, 

Philadelphia, 
Nashua, 

New Hampshire, 
N. H. Orphans Home, 
Russia, 
Salt, H. S., 
Seaver, E. P., 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



V- C. Gilman, Treas.^ in account vnth Puhlic Library. 

CONDENSED STATMENT. 

To balance from 1893, . . $136 <S7 

March, To cash received for books, 2 68 

" To cash received for fines 

and catalogues, . . 10 00 

April, To cash received from 

city, .... 

April, To cash received from city. 
May, To cash received for fines 

and catalogues, 
June To cash received from city, 
" " received for fines 

and catalogues, 5 months, 
Dec, 17, To cash received from 

city, .... 

1,581 39 
Advanced by treasurer, . . 189 86 

$1,770 25 



CONTRA. 



250 


00 


500 


00 


19 


11 


500 


00 


42 


00 


120 


73 



By paid librarian, salary. . . $600 00 

" asst. librarian, . . 400 00 



154 MUNICIPAI. GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



By paid for books, 


$430 55 


" for periodicals and papers, 


128 30 


" library supplies, 


25 24 


" for periodical covers, 


74 05 


" for re-binding books, 


92 40 


" for printing and minor ex- 




penses, .... 


20 71 




$1,770 25 







Respectfully submitted, 

V. C. OILMAN, Trmi<xii-er 



I have examined the account of the treasurer, V. C. Gil- 
man, for the year ending Dec. 31, 1894, and find it correct 
and properly vouched. 

G. A. RAMSDELL, Auditor. 

Feb 15, 1895. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES OF EDGEWOOD CEMETERY 

For The Year Ending Dec. 31, 1894. 



To the City Councils: 

Complying with the Legislative enactment, creating them, 
the undersigned, trustees of Edgewood cemetery, respectfully 
submit their second annual report. 

In our report for 1893, we rendered, as fully as possible, a 
detailed report of the past and present condition of the ceme- 
tery, and therefore can now only report what has been accom- 
plished during the past year, with a few suggestions as to 
future aims and requirements. 

MEETINGS. 

Regular stated monthly meetings of the Board have been 
held, and special meetings of the full Board and of committees 
as often as occasion required. 

ENLARGEMENT OF GROUNDS. 

Forseeing the necessity of obtaining more land, in order to 
properly carry out the work of endeavoring to establish and 



] 06 MUNICIPAL GOVKKNMENT HEPORT. 

maintain a niociein cemetery, a special committee was 
appointed early in the season, to effect, if possible, the pur- 
chase of a portion ot the unimproved, wild, sprout land bor- 
dering the grounds on the northerly side as recommended in 
our report of 1893. A portion of this land was owned by the 
New Hampshire Improvement Company, John F. Stark, 
treasurer, and a portion was controlled by Cyrus M. Mitchell, 
although the title to the latter was vested in several other 
parties. A conference was had with Mr. vStark, and on the 
26th day of June we purchased of him a gore-shaped piece of 
land containing about 1 1-3 acres bordering on Forest street,^ 
at the rate of $300 per acre, with payments of one-eighth cash, 
one-eighth in one year, and one-fourth in yearly pa} ments 
thereafter until paid. 

The committee had many meetings and conferences with 
Mr. Mitchell and some of the other parties in interest, but 
after several months fruitless effort to obtain anything like 
reasonable terms, he asking the exhorl:)itant price of over 
$2,000 per acre. The trustees. with some two hundred citizens, 
petitioned the Honorable Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
to acquire or take, by the "right of eminent domain" such 
amount of the Mitchell land as in their judgment was re- 
quired for public use. The petition was duly presented, a 
full, legal and impartial hearing held, a legal and proper 
viewing and appraisal made, and on the 25th day of Decem- 
ber, the Board of Mayor and Aldermen voted unanimously to 
to take 6,96 acres, awarding to the parties interested and 
holding the title the sum of $2,500. 

The area of the cemetery is now about 33 aci'es, bounded 
as follows: On the west by Amherst street, 1030 feet; on the 
south by Cushing street, 780 feet; on the east by Forest street, 
1315 feet; on the north by the proposed Ashland street, 750 
feet; on the northwest by the proposed Mont Vernon or 
Edgewood avenue, 654 feet. With these additions the 
grounds are well adapted for cemetery purposes, compact, 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF EDGEWOOD CEMETERY. 167 

regular in form, surrounded by streets or roadways, with the 
boundary lines on the east, north and north-west sides running 
along the crest of the hill, the land gradually descending 
toward the interior, forming a natural landscape amphitheatre, 
with w^oodland skirting along the borders; a portion of the 
newly acquired land has been cleared of the underbrush and 
debris; further work is contemplated early next season. 

IMPKOXKMKN r OF GROUNDS. 

Upon receipt of the appropriation of $1,500, granted us by 
you in April, we at once set about to expend the same care- 
fully and judiciously, having in view the object of improving 
and beautifving the cemetery in a permanent manner. 

About six acresof the unimproved grounds, from which the 
timber had been cut before v^'e assumed control, was cleared 
up, the stumps and rocks removed, the soil ploughed, harrowed 
and seeded with oats and grass; on account of the ex- 
tremely dry summer the oat crop was not a success, but the 
grass seed took root, and we feel that the impioved appearance 
of these sections, which are now in suitable condition to be 
platted and laid out in lots, is an adequate return for the ex- 
penditure. During the spring season a large number of trees, 
shrubs, plants, bulbs, etc., embracing over 100 vaiieties, were 
procured and planted. A ribbon hedge of shrubber}', from 
seven to 12 feet in width, 500 feet in length was planted along 
the border on Amherst street. This hedge is composed of 
C!)alifornia privet, lonicera, berberis tliunbergii and phlox. It 
grew finely during the season and in a very short time will 
make a perfect mass of foliage and flowers, in striking contrast 
to the weeds, sand and rubbish that laid along the Amherst 
street fence ; the ornamental areas and plats in the new sec- 
tions, the areas around the chapel and the entrance were planted 
with shrubs, vines and flowers; while along the avenues and 



158 MUNICIPAT. GOVERNMENT REPORT. 



walks trees of larger growth were set out. A garden com- 
prising about three-fourths of an acre has been established for 
propogating plants and shrubs from which practical results 
are anticipated. Arbor day was appropriately observed as 
as in the former year. About .400 feet of the old palingfence 
on the southerly side of the old cemetery has been removed, 
the material stored for subsequent use when needed, and a 
hedge of willows and wild barberry planted along the Gush- 
ing street border. 

Tiie opening and gravelling of avenues and paths has 
been continued ; tasty and appropriate sign posts, bearing 
names of avenues, also sign-boards announcing the rules of 
the cemetery have been erected ; several new sections have 
been graded, with the lots defined upon the lawn plan, 
notably section Q_, "Hillside lawn" and section T. "Oak 
circle" and in the old cemetery many neglected and wild 
places have been planted and improved; headstones that had 
fallen over or become loose in their sockets have been replaced, 
a few that had been broken have been removed to the store- 
house and the lots trimmed up, and an effort will be made the 
coming season to construct a portion of the pond. The in- 
terest manifested by many of the early lot holders, in causing 
their heretofore irregular, barren, vmcared-for lots to be re- 
graded, turfed and improved, is very gratifying. 



We have paid $100 on the contract with the Pennichuck 
water works company, thus reducing the interest charge to 
$24 per year. 

About 200 feet of lateral mains have been laid with three- 
hose hydrant connections, two of the faucet hydrants have been 
removed to more suitable locations; additional mains will be 
required very soon. The increased demand for a plentiful 
supply of water is evidence of the^interest shown by the lot 
holders in having the lawns well-kept. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF EDGEWOOD CEMETERY. 159 
DEEDS. 

The sale of lets and giving a deed therefor has been 
greater than was anticipated. In this connection we quote 
from our report of 1893: "There being no record evidence 
of ownership, and no conveyances having ever been made, 
the act of the legislature authorizing the trustees to sell and 
convey lots," it was decided to tender to parties, who held lots 
under the old system, a deed of such lot for the sum of $5. 
The deeds were prepared dated July 28, 1893, and all lot 
owners whose address was known was informed by circular. 

All other lots in both the old and new sections are sold by^ 
tlie square foot at prices varying from ten to 20 cents per 
square foot. Before these lots are sold they are graded and 
improved, seeded down and turfed, making tlie actual cost 
of the lotto the purchaser much less than under the old 
method, which frequently cost the owner from $50 to $100 
to properly grade it." The decided advantages of this plan 
have been clearly demonstrated to purchasers the past season. 

There remain untaken quite a number of the five dollar 
deeds. We trust that all who have not will avail themselves 
of the opportunity, for while the amount is small to them in- 
dividually, in the aggregate a goodly sum is realized, which 
is applied in keeping the walks and avenues in the vicinity 
of their h)ts clean and in repair. 

BUILDINGS, TOOLS AND FURNITURE. 

Thex:hapel is in good condition ; its surroundings have been 
much improved by removal of the conciete paving and the 
substitution of a hiwn and flower plat ; the building is now 
devoted solely to the use for which in was intended. A new 
building or superintendent's lodge, with office and tool room, 
has been erected in the grove on Central avenue, near Oak 
circle. 



160 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT RKPORT. 

INTERMENTS. 

The number of interments during the year 1894, was 29 
adults, 10 children; re-interments, removals from other cem- 
eteries, 11 adults, four children. 

SOLD lERS' GHAVHS. 

Five veteran soldiers have been buried the the past season, 
making the number of soldiers graves, one Revolutionary, 
five War of 1812, one iMexican War, 45 War of 1861-5, total 
52. All of which are appropriately marked by permanent, 
family or Uniled States tablets and the flag. A correct 
lecord of the rank and service of each veteran is preserved. 

ANNUAL CARE. 

The receipts for the annual care of lots has increased 42 per 
cent over the season of 1893, and while in such an extremely 
dry season as the pasr, the amount received barely pays for 
the labor and water, we are pleased to note the increased in- 
terest manifested by the lot owners in this particular and we 
recommend its continuance. The number who personally 
care for their own lots has also increased. 

PERPETUAL CAHK. 

Again we quote from our report of last year. "The trus- 
tees are authorized by the act of the legislature, creating the 
board to receive and hold in trust, property or funds be- 
queathed, donated or deposited for the perpetual care of lots 
in this cemetery, \he principal of such bequest or deposit to 
be permanently invested, the income to be applied to the pur- 
pose designated ; the trustees giving to the owner of the lot or 
his or her representative a bond or obligation binding them- 
selves and their successors to preserve and keep in repair the 



REPORT OP" TRUSTEES OF EDGEWOOD CEMETERY, 



161 



grounds, cut the grass and top-dress. The attention of lot 
owners is especially invited to this important provision. 
The impoverishment of the soil, the destroying influence 
of time upon monuments, tablets and headstones, the decay 
of trees and shrubs, can thus be guarded against, and per- 
manent care be continued for all time." 

Agreeably to a resolution passed by your honorable body, 
the trust funds heretofore received by the city for the per- 
petual care of the burial lots of the late Edward Wheeler, 
Eliphaz \V. Upham, Allen Wilson and Zadock Farmer have 
been transferred to the trustees as required by the act of the 
legislature. 

We have received from the city on account of unexpended 
interest upon said funds as follows: — 

WHEELER FUND. 



Interest for years of 1878-79, . $120 00 
Interest from Apr. 1st, 1893 to 

July 1, 1894, ... 75 00 

Expended for care of lot, 1893-94, $60 00 

" improvement of grounds 135 00 



$195 00 
$195 00 



UPHAM FUND. 



Interest from April 1, 1893 to July 1, 1894, 
Expended for care of lot, 1893-94, 



$7 50 
7 50 



WILSON FUND. 



Interest from April 1, 1893, to July 1, 1894, . $25 00 

Expended for care of Wilson and Farmer 

lots, 1893-94, . . . . . 25 00 

u 



162 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

Herewith is a statement of the trust funds and disposition 
of the same now in our hands. 

EDWARD WHEELER FUND. 

Thirty dollars of income to be devoted annually to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of lot 28, section A, Central avenue. Balance for improve- 
ment of cemetery grounds. 

Capital, $1,000 00 

Invested in City of Nashua note dated July 1, 

1894, 1,000 00 

ELIPHAZ W. UPHAM FUND. 
Income to be devoted to the care of lot 5, section E, Linden avenue. 

Capital, $100 00 

Invested in City of Nashua note dated July 1, 

1894, 100 00 

ALLEN WILSON FUND. 

Income to be devoted to the care of the Allen Wilson lot 4, section M, 
Magnolia avenue, and the Zadock Farmer lot 39, section B, Golden Rod walk. 

Capital, ....... $333 33 

Invested in City of Nashua note dated July 1, 

1894, 333 33 



MARY L. SAWYER FUND. 

Income to be devoted to the care of the Dr. Levi P. Sawyer lot 53, Section 
D, Linden avenue. 

Capital, $150 00 

Deposited in the New Hampshire Banking 

company, ...... 150 00 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF EDGEWOOD CEMETERY. 163 

STILLMAN TARLETON FUND. 

Income to be devoted to the care of the lots of the heirs of Still man Tarle- 
ton, section H, Pine avenue. 

Capital, $200 00 

Deposited in City Guaranty Savings Bank, . 200 00 

CLARISSA p. ABBOTT FUND. 

Income to be devoted to the care of the Clagf^ett and Abbott lot 5, section 
G, Catalpa avenue. 

Capital, $100 00 

Deposited in Nashua Savings Bank, . . 100 00 

EDWARD T. PEIRCE FUND. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot 21, section A, Central avenue. 

Capital, $100 00 

Cash on hand, separate from general fund, . 100 00 

MARY A. MORSE FUND. 

Income to be devoted the care of lot 5, section U, Birch avenue. 

Capital, $200 00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Banking Co., . 200 00 

ROBERT HARRIS FUND. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot 9, section F, Cedar avenue. 

Capital, $100 00 

Deposited in City Guaranty Savings Band, . 100 00 



164 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT HEPOKT. 



FINANCIAL EXHIBIT. 

Statement of receipts and expenditures by the Board during 
the season of 1894. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand, last report, . $25 58 

City appropriation, . . 1,500 00 

City, unexpended interest to July 1, 1804, 

On Wheeler fund, $195 00 

On Wilson fund, 25 GO 

On Upham fund, 7 50 

227 50 



Burial fees, .... 168 00 
Repairing, making and grading 

lots, .... 398 86 

Annual care of lots, . . . 353 50 

Sale of lots, deeds given, . . 1,489 15 



EXPENDITURES. 

Printing, blank-books, stationery. 
Freight, postage, expressage. 
For perpetual care of lots, 1893-94 
Interest, ..... 
Additional land, first payment, 
Payment on note, Pennichuck 

Water Works company, 

Water, 

Tools, furniture, buildings, hose, 

signs, etc., . . . 167 47 



$93 


43 


85 


54 


92 


50 


27 


00 


50 


00 


100 


00 


97 


88 



U162 59 



REPORT OF TKUSTEES OF EDGEWOOD CEMETERY. 165 

Trees, shrubs, plants, bulbs, 

seeds, etc., . . . 405 20 

Loam, manure, fertilizers, gravel, 538 35 

Repairs and extension, water pipe, 68 96 

Pay rolls, labor and teams, . 2,430 88 

$4,157 21 
Balace on hand, ... 5 38 

$4,162 59 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

We have examined the account of William E. Spalding, 
treasurer, also the books of the secretary and superintendent, 
and find the same correctly kept and properly vouched and a 
balance on hand, in the general fund, of $5.38. 
IRA F. HARRIS, 
JOHN D. CHANDLER, 
CHARLES \V. HOITT, 

Finance Committee. 
April 1, 1895. 



SUPERINTENDENT AND EMPLOYEES. 

The services of Mr. Franklin Temple, as superintendent, 
have been continued and as stated at the close of last year 
they have been most satisfactory to the Board and the public. 
The services of a gardner being considered of vital importance 
we employed Mr. Clarence W. Lyon for the season ; his 
work has been faithful and efficient and his services have 



166 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

been secured for another year. . We have found no difficulty 
in obtaining competent labor, paying therefor according to 
the work required $1.25 and $1.00 per day. 

We desire to express our thanks to the members of your 
honorable body, to Mr. George A. Parker, late landscape 
gardner, Old Colony railroad ; Mr. Franklin Brett, landscape 
architect, Brookline, Mass. ; to Col. William E. Spalding, 
city treasurer, to Mr. Albert H. Saunders, city enginner, to 
undertakers Davis, Lund and Lovejoy ; and to all who have 
so generously aided us in our endeavors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

^ CHARLES W. HOITT, President, 

JOSEPH W. HOWARD, 

CHARLES E. CUMMINGS, 

JOHN D. CHANDLER, 

HENRY H. DAVIS, 

ELMER W. EATON, 

HENRY S. NORVVELL, 

WILLIAM T. SPEAR, 

IRA F. HARRIS, 

THOMAS SANDS, Ex-officio, 

WILLIAM H. D. COCHRANE, Secretary. 

Nashua, N. H., Dec. 30, 1894. 



[payor's \i)2iA(^ura\. 



MAYOR HOWARD'S INAUGURAL. 



Delivered in the Court Room, City Hall Building, Tuesday, 
January 1st, 1895. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils: The first require- 
ment which custom demands of me, as mayor, is to address 
you upon the obligations pertaining to the offices to which 
we have been elected. 

I first call your attention to the finances. The following is 
the statement of the condition of our city as given me by the 
city treasurer : 

CITY INDEBTEDNESS, DECEMBER 31, 1894. 

Bonded debt $517,800 GO 

Time notes, 176,500 00 

Demand notes, 3.850 00 

$698,150 00 



ASSETS. 

Uncollected taxes, 1893, .... $1,576 46 

Uncollected taxes, 1894, .... 38,884 61 

Sinking fund, 12,000 00 

Cash in treasury , ..... 17,882 24 

$70,343 31 

Net debt, $627,806 69 



170 MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

There are other claims against the city in the form of de- 
layed bills, the amount of which I am not at this time able 
to estimate. The financial condition of a city depends upon 
its growth in wealth and population. The growth of Nashua 
has been attended with a large outlay of money and additional 
sums must be expended to complete the new systems already 
accepted. Therefore I make no recommendations as to ad- 
ditional improvements, but as occasions present themselves, I 
trust you will give them the consideration and just decision 
which your oath of office requires, never forgetting these 
are times when economy should be the watchword. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

This department is now well organized with a board of fire 
commissioners and is one of the most efficient of the city's 
needs. The officers and the men have the confidence of the 
people and its managers should have our hearty co-operation 
in sustaining its present state of activity. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

This department comes under the control of a police com- 
mission whose report, together with that of the city mar- 
shal's, will show the conditions brought about by the change 
from the old system, and will give the details of the work and 
recommendations. This is one of the most important depart- 
ments in the city government, as the people look to the 
police for the protection of their lives and property. Upon 
the efficiency of this department depends the enforcement of 
the laws and the good name of our city, therefore it should 
strive to attain the highest standard possible and the police 
commissioners and police force should receive our hearty 
co-operation in order to reach this result. 



mayor's inaugural. 171 

highways and sewers. 

The enterprise and thrift of a city are in no better way 
evidenced than by the condition of its streets. Safe and ser- 
viceable highways must be maintained. What methods shall 
be employed to accomplish this can be better determined 
upon as occasions arise for their inspection. 

On the completeness of our sewerage depends the health 
of our citizens. Too much consideration cannot be given 
this subject, and our best judgment should be exercised for 
the preservation of life and health. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

This is one of the most valued of our educational institu- 
tions. The addition ot the reading room has greatly enhanced 
its work to both our younger and older citizens. Our hearty 
co-operation should be given to aid the trustees in their 
attempts to make it meet the demands of a growing city. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE POOR. 

The change of system in caring for the poor has met with 
general approval. As now conducted, an examination of the 
books shows the amount of expenditures and the method of 
distribution, and all needy families can receive the personal ' 
attention of the overseer whose report shows a saving of 
$5,307.55 over last year. 

CEMETERIES. 

The improvements made at Edgewood cemetery by the 
board of trustees are fully appreciated by our citizens. I 
would recommend that a bill be introduced at the next legis- 



172 MUNICIPAI. GOVERNMENT REPORT. 

lature, amending the city chaiterso that a board of trustees 
may be appointed to care for the HoUis street cemetery. 

CITY FARM. 

However well managed, this department incurs heavy 
expense to the city. Its needs will be brought to your atten- 
tion at such time as mav be deemed advisable after a thorough 
examination of its conditions. 

SCHOOLS. 

The needs of our schools are determined by the board of 
education. In so far their expenditures seem judicious and 
necessary for the health and advancement of our scholars, they 
should receive our hearty approval. 

EMERGENCY HOSPITAL. 

This institution has become one of the city's necessities. 
No one can question its helpfulness to the unfortunate and its 
work should be carried on. 

I cannot conclude my remarks without referring to the 
subject of taxation. I know full well the burden it has 
become to the people. There are wa'ys by which our in- 
debtedness may be tided over for the present and the rate of 
taxation not increased. 

But I do not believe in shifting our responsibilities upon 
posterity. Exigencies will always arise and the time to cope 
with them is the present. I would I had the wisdom to 
suggest to you some plan by which an immediate and per- 
manent reduction in our tax rate might be accomplished, but 
time will be required for such a result, and this can be 
brought about only by the most judicious management and 
frugal expenditures of each department. Therefore : I 



mayor's inaugural. 173 

recommend that the city charter be so amended as to provide 
for the selection of an auJitor whose duty it shall be to audit 
all accounts and bills against the city, and shall approve of 
no bill or account unless properly certified, and shall attend 
to such other duties as the city councils shall deem best. 

Gentlemen, in accepting the trust of adminsitering to our 
city's affairs, we have subjected ourselves to the criticism of 
our fellow citizens. 

It is my hope that all our decisions will be the result of 
careful thought and honest convictoin, neither swayed by 
favor nor awed by fear. 



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=- 1* I I Z ^ - '^ '^"3 1? ■ oiJ ^ 3 I S n .1 

S3. 1 |o<?<^ti]a,-:>£[i]acQ ■ -- - • ■ ' ^- 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



"rs 



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ti ■ u .= ii be? ^ 



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c^ ^J C Ol J Ci O 



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a i::^ ^ ^ s M 2 






= c 2 
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c-a y 



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g TJ £ 5 5 3:5 4| 
D >£A0 Q < C. O 






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VITAL STATISTICS. 



X 

'A 



< 



w 

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cq 



t S 



c - t: = !£t: 



CJ 3 > s . ^ cs^ 

ZO «Z(jZ«<;c«ZZoZKc 



Z 5 



J: c c=" 2- 

9 u ^ -a' c«=«" 



1 iil:E^|i^lSl«:i 
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s 


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n 




c 






n 




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&->cj J 



^tlcfl 



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ill-' Jnllls 



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Ok. 



I Sir 

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S S < a t 



c « « 









JH.S.SQ =' 



:^=W 






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•3^ 'PS 

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J" "on: 



l-IC!10lC05:0N • •C-l.^N-*! 1-CC-. COO •rtMCCr1C<l«-10<-iu:! '.^i-ceC 



JO SuiAI-J 



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iSfe: SfeS: - feS- CI.S- fei : : s SfcS: : fei ^sfoSfcS 



c^,ii,u2Q' 



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C^.H S-.S-iiH'^^^'c ^.Ho-H .2 |o 



= 
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W -i -■- — w ^ [/J I 3 W i> — ni « rt ^ :3 I > Cfl — — I fl] " > <« — C Cj 



<NC^CmM!MIM(NlMIM<MCOM 



C5 O^- rH i-l 



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VITAI, STATISTICS. 









3 C = 



c S c: -• 






c 2 s « 



5 S S . >,S 









7) 75 j 5 S O ca J 






1 r iJ 
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— (D — "O O c •- 



-=■ — 1) --- 1- ji; . 






"' ■&■? 
bo's 

C 5 rt « 






:- ^ : 

>-— « 
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= .1! oS = 

b«^ 'S -z s 

S P C r^ c 






. c! C « 



(J o ^ 






^•'? (l- p 






«ti 









u p 



t; ■ e ^^ 
•^ = "3 = .^ u 
^ ^ n ■ te "^ 

i s c 2-3:= 



•3'^ 'PS 

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c-a 



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1 9<5 












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■u.ioq[i!;s 



JO 3n;;\; 



feS: : feStuSi : - - 



[iiS- fe- ; ^ Sfe- - SfciSfe- " 



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(U 



«i o c 
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o<<:a. 









VITAL STATISTICS. 



11 









2-^ 


.2-fi 




1/. « 


« = = 


Si: 


^o 


«o 



c/}6:^o 



lU 



■/'(J 



« a 



5tj 



■a ■ 



; 2 = - 









t: .: - s - 41 



U J-. U £- >- E "J 
1- :^ >- c a; :: t- 






OJ C ^H 

.H Si - 



.«i •= 3 JJ ^ = -^ => 5 






== c c; 



^ 1 OJ -o 




-.10103 


>- . . - 




!>--•- 




JO -OM 
•U4oq[|!Jt; 1 

40 SUIAI'J^ 


e<5iM — 'CC - 


CO -J M ej CI CI CO CI X C^ — • M — r- •?1 -- -i CO Jl M ^ ■* M IM C-ltC i-< 


■» - « ^ « 








•3[HUI3,J 

JO aV'K 


fe: Sfe: 


gfe:S::fe-S::fe-S-:feS- = :c:::feS 












10 m d ■-= -^ I 



L- CC C: O 1-1 <M C^ C-) e-) CO -* ■^ O 00 00 QO CI O O - — — IM ., 1 Cl co 
r^i-(f-»r-ir- «"r-lr-lr^f— II— irHi— li—idc^ltMC^C^ClCNC-lO* 



12 



VITAL STATISTICS. 









Cfl 



Sc3 



jj ;ij " .- u -.- -T" 'TS r^ '^ 



5 « 



,-°k' -• 



Do Dc/2:z5-^og:o^o 



' OJ 



• ^ 



■^ 5 ~hn-R ™ S rt -O i= £ 1= 



13 2 



C/3 



■ c • 



ISo 



W§ 



.2 --W 5 ."^ ^ 
i". ° « o c u o , 



t* O o 



c rt J: J= *.S^ a t. cs 

DC ScflZglgomo 



<u ^ u ^ 



i/3>-J 



.13 hJ) j__^._ 

jj.H-- C U U 



<:n 






■ U .5 Ji 0) 



U u 

So. 



~ O V <^~ 



i! o— « 



' 5 £ o-^ 



= 1) r, n rt-c 



C3 CS « X 01 ; 



OJ -^ 

« c uOt 

J u brig "■ 



oJ E 






3 3;=: 

<wws 



,0 >■ E 0) 'S S • 
^.2^ 5 fc = « 
rtO -i; 0.0-3 






;ir> Cr 



' S,2 ?^ i= ti c J- ccii 



i;2 

O i; 

C_c ^ O u 

uD .0 



u 



S 5 ? =^ S-2 



s-i Cii- c 



c 1/2 HM- 

— m 5 :/! 



IP 

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JO 3[EJV 



SfeSfc:: S^ 



u.'^.x:^ 



feS- - feSfe: I S= fe: 



j= >>• 



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= -a 



■S -7^ oo S-o 

■ ^ "- 3 3 



COD 









6h 






_o^ 

„ e-l(N N CJ (N C^ ff» »» (M IM CO M 



DhO.* 

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VITAL STATISTICS. 



13 



o 








■io\oO 


C 
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•^^ 'pr. 

'lsi'PI!MD 
J" -"M 


"3 


■"""iims 







« ;: — "J ij r* -■. u .^ — 

0^6 «oKo-:So 



'■; ■ 2 ~ 2 ^ .5 " -3 2 « « 

= :1 lis- I =1^1- I 
i :Z626 >oCiZu O 



s-c 

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si*- Knjjrtac;«^_ Sty 



s : - S S c = = 

I ._ •- ^ = - J- Q 1) C 









<L> 



U 



b£ 









• ;'-' u— - 3 C V" pg 



i5 5>'^-l"!3ww'2^d=^ ll^''^S^<t:|<^s| 




<P>£^^(i:u°,Hd^<i>^,0<0^'<<;^b.2,M>£o-:>tf jA::3<aa 



^. = 


: i : c 


; : 


c z 


: I : : 


c : : 






r : 


t- CO 30 C-) ■* ei 


•r* 


•^ ^^ 


ir; M c^^ CO 


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c^(Mcocoiooio:ct-o:ooopOt— I— HC<icoccco»oioco:r:o:ot^aoooo 






CI CI CI !M CI OJ CI CJ CI 0< !>) C< C-1 CO TO CO I 



14 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



"^ 



U 



< 

< 

y^ 

O 

> 
h 

U 

w 

Q 

W 

w 



o 
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>^ •= 



c I. c :: — c 






C O) a r: cc 



ClZZS>0 



C o c ? « c "^ 



u i^ aj - *-' • 

u 11 _> g C ; 

S 4; « -r, — I 

ci V. «; « 5^1 • 

poo^S : 



« o z cj CL, G 5^ !2; > o 



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Oc «£f< 3 

1; c 0) (u 9 
n t.— c :» ■. 



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bee S' 
c ° c. 






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3 > ^ s-i iJ _ 

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is 0) 3 u 

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S .^ 3 (D U — . ^ 



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C3rttaHtw'ajrt4J'~' 

SDS'*^ K c t: t: 

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c "S-: 



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3 i 

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^U^r.r.c.. :............--. = = = 


•32!? 'pr. 

'isi'puMOl 
JO -ON ; 


•*-*<r-linCD^LO-*C^ei-*-*10ei.-IC^O(MCO(MN<MC^Xlr-lM»lCCrH«lrtr-l 


•ujoqinisl 

JO .§UIAIT 

JO ajBiv i 


J. ................ = . . = ....C..= 


S-- s fc: : ; Sfai : SfeS:: fer ISfeSfaSfc- SfeSfeS:: = ta 



'. . a '. 














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2 3 • ^ 






c • ' • 




























r 




ne . . . . 

Johnso 
abeth . 
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1 


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HCMCMC0-^Tt«i0<:0t-l-'G0CiD0DClCiC;OOOO^-''— ti— iiM^lM 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



15 



y. 



y. 






o 



a 



jr c 






til 



;i;-o 






■-_ . -- - _ -- a^~ .- 



c cs 

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:> : 



:> 



H «= C--C c = bug c'^ >> = 



:sjSm^ 






^ a; 5 . '^ ;ii O '•*' ■^ !> 

c Zc¥^ al''^ S S c 
wDJoOcflffiCxOJ 



S ^ I 'S 2 S s 



« X S 



O •!-■ 



X! 3 

I- u o c • . 

M ii "O -: >>i 3 I- i: ■ 

_u ^c ^-5 "3- ^ g.^-B 

'c _2 S _c C S 1) c — ii b 



> -:; "u X. — — 



s ii i: c3 

a, a « =. 






r 2-; 3 _.— IP 

"3 5 

15 gl 



oy. 






> i:^K !^« 3-5 

o a V s c-- 3--.£ X" C--0 



W«' 



g^^^c — ^ 

C C - u ii „• C5 









^ 3 a •- J 



Q = ~ 

J (i; a u : • •- s 5 >> 5"^ 3 - 

— ^ 71 i-l -: -c >i" V C iJ r: 





•jojoo ' 


>:,z.z.z.z.zz..^^z.zz.z.zzzz.zz,z 


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T3 

c 


^^-zz-zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzza 


« 

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JO aiirjv 


gCi,- S- fe= : ^&hS= fc: S: fcSfcSiS- feS- : : feSfeS 



= 1^11 






iw-t-H 



Is 



:KW 



3 a 



< I a Isoo I.^^K^"4-3^Zu lsa£- l^'-^^i^wo £ 



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16 



VITAI. STATISTICS. 









O 



O 

M 
H 

O 

'A 
H 

O 
M 

en 



r § 






uoioo 



'jst 'Pliio 

J" 'ON 



•a.ioq||i}s 
lo SuiAi'Y 



•3[l!tU3j£ 

JO ajBjv 



T3 a^-c .- 



■fl-S.!2 S 






„ „ .. .SK =. 



W r;^ .^ 

"5 C'O _ 5 " 






ozSo 



_ - . a a a ^ a "WcxiS'O 

n-,^w 'S«'^«=«-5«.5~ "Si's -S J5 

: «.^P 3j5 == u § . = g 5 s i^ « = ?■« V. 



j- « 5 



-^ OJ w 



ux> :; «J ^ re 



- ^-' ^ OJ C CJ *-■ 



c -r T, -r 








iowi/S^Sw^dHO^O v^^fc < E S W ^ .At-'£^AMH>^0O<i 



^..c.c....:r... = ...:........ 


<SCO.-H 


eo iM c-i o ^^ o -* 




N r^ 


COiM-* t- 


- 


MN tr<M 


- 


M CO lO (N e^ M 0) 


- 


J- - 


: : : 


: : ; : 


= 


««h5 


zz-.z 


- 


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= 


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h5: : :: = 


-- 


Sfe^ 


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fo 


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fo 


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:: 


% 


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?iW ,^ »,.5!.?iW-E.g ^f°H S •«-- 2 



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VITAL STATISTICS. 



17 









.115 . 

:S - : 

■ V • 

: <="<£ : 
« - - 

c: 2ci o(jc; 













S : rlTj s-^ 


K ; 3 




-c 


rt « rt 






c . . . 

c : : : 
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c • • 
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m s 



:= iji|= i|ii-i- -li.-- ., . « 




V3 tj '. :: c/) J ^ 



&[,§- feSfeSfeSi - " tiS:: [I,: - S- Ci,S- i.S- [i<" Sfa: 



. -u^M •"■•Ex • - c-r'^'" :"- : t ~'- : . i: i: ■ 






I " c I • 3 u I s 



;i; „ ^ 5.) !>j e-j «■) ff) (M (N <M <M <M •?< CM <N (M ©1 W CO 



18 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



U 

.:i: 
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< 



■6 



w 

H 
1— I 
O 
« 

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^o* 



Wo cao J:zo>u >ZJ;ouuZuZc/3>u stjlgZcQ^iD 







w : 
















































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tn' 


















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c« . 


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t« . 


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Ilxsl^l 



« c ; — i^ r> n = 



c — c • c u 






X 



0-3 S-=i! 



fc<6 TiC •^>z>c^oZc3^'JZ'J^u^:^z6 d6&.zcuz;d 



•Ml ^ -s 
3 j^-e t C.-2" - " u =-S^ D. -5 J! " «3 J: ^ S-2= - 



■^ =t = t; = 




•aoioo 



'isi 'PUHO 
JO -ON 



•uaoqnns 

JO SuiAI'J 






II 



:o 5< c ^5 5^^ So 3'= « = 3-i: c g-c c 

r. C rj , » -; M >• r,i r, C ■ , ^ ^ n i-r ' ^ "ri ^ rV.2 



0«\r^a.iA0'S.Xi^<AU,^>(si^0X^<X<U ° "- ■ -~ 



V}SfL.iuOO. 



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VITAL STATISTICS. 




20 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



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'i^ -5 



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JO 3[BK 



i:^:^! 



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: «S :2 : " 



■3 M-S o 

Bz ago 



= 2-' 






-a = 
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• >^ ; 




: -o i : : ; ;^ : : : : • -^ : : : 

.:=::.:: 15 : ^ : ii :: ii' : ' 

• • > • ^ ■ • ■'^ ■ V ■'Z • ■— ■ ■ ■ 

:: c :■=.:' a '<{''-•'■>''■ '■ 





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u o o Z cj ? 6 






2 c « 
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V .: Z 




^ . V , 

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= .2 £ 




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on 

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Salvail. . . 

lard .... 






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I. - 

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: = £«'SS = s :| ' ■-£« •^•^<.=i ^S^o: ^'SS : -lai-^ 

qSm< I I sIxHo I si^ I J x£uQ I u:3 I I l.i-,u I s:^ 

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fe- 


- 


S^ 


= 


6-- 


5-fes 


P.'^z 


?.-. 


fe-S- 


z 


z 


teS 


fcS- 


z 


iS- '* 



Vlf AL STATISTICS. 



21 



'^ 



I 

< 
X 

•Si 

< 

o 

H 
U 

W 

-r* 
H 

Z 

Q 
W 
Bl 









•5 Pt( 



Z £ 



^ 






Z Z Z « cj 



Oy *t3 



z 



p - = : c K 

?i>U. ZU^O (CDWO 



ziO 



r. ^ 



».« uJ^o 









1- u^ 



2 = c H 5 S s^^ "s . h £ ^ - £ S,- 9 > ^ h., S £ C.-5 ;; c S c 



u >.-a ■ • 'C -; ^ =: r; I: 

^ ' S dl -= m : _aj .75 ^ U " ^ 



as . iH c : s: n .-•/!" — 



= 3 = ' i! • 







■ 5->i •— c 



c^.bias : S^ ^ = .5f : s^ii^ g t:^ „ : : 5! S H : S? d S « ^ 



;:: = S ^ £. = ^-5'-^^ Jii S =: c 








•■loioo 





•3-^ 'Pt. 

'?si 'PIUID 
JO "ON 




•ujoqiiiis 

JO SUIAI'X 




•3(BUI3J 
JO 3|KK 



,Z ^=,< J S W <o;<ghChhuZ^Q'(^Z ^i,< i i 3 Ai. 



r-?0(M'Mxr;t-;sM-*r-ic»t-(Ni^t- — >— as— "Xi-i!CccP5cO'jcoc<ico 



^H c-i 



t/:j: 



iSfi,;S:feSfe::Sfe.S--U,::iS:iiSfc^:{i,Sfc::Si.:^ 



1) 


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c 


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c c 

if. K 



■5 :<«§.■£ 






22 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



o 



ffi 



< 

X 

< 

fa 
o 



'J 

w 

s 

Q 
W 

Kl 
W 
H 

O 

w 

H 





























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c^c^xi iic-'acc'3 




n 






4; = t)««---~<u .So) .a 


„ . .„ 2 « c 








— 


J^WiZu 55-Do«i;o 


Szoo 


14-1 




: : 


: i : : : 
















2 








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: 


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a 

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C = V. > « • .• , 

C U 3 ^ c-t ° 
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a « ccO'^-2 
c C-r„ 11 — 




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c 
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S s E .t; S n 


^ 


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(^<^«^£<0Sa,fa^.JMZ 


pa i; 

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U0103 


^■. .:.. = . r r : ... . ...... 


•a 




3?? 'PO 








'isi -pi 


'ID 


^■^ -lO— 'IC^- • rH ;D Or^ ^ r-i Oi 


tc .- i-l ^ ■* 




jo-o 


\r 






•luocill 


us 


1 




V 

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JC 


StllAI-I 


1 J.............. 




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JO 3II:|;\ 


i Sfa: S. : . fa. : . S: faS 


fa:S- -S 











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a « i/i « rt :d 












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rt rt <N ff» <M IM ffl <M '^^ (M IM C>1 (M IM C-1 




























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^ u - .. « - - 
















VITAL STATISTICS. 



OS 



a 

M 

n 

w 
o 

w 

Q 

o 
z 

s 

z 



< 






o 



U 

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o 
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t/3 

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1 


c 


73 


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u 
K 


a 




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c 


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U — 


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SE 







•p..ii:|^ S31UTX 




^. 








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fc 




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U-, 


u 




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c 


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a" 


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j<..io|.)3J 


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t» 










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u 




5 


ti t 1 








■^ ^ 






oi 


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z ■- 



E E S 
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ir. b/) s* *; 



p J' U 0) _o 



o .ii 



woo 



K 


n 


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■ 5-= >- 
^A0 5S 



3 « £ o" 



> 8 



• - •- '^ bC-= m w S c - 

= 15 . = i; S 3 3 «■ 

Dc/)ZW ft, Z « K o 



WZa!5.fc, 



is ;; 



V ^ *^ _ ^ ^ aj 
a --" = =:= " 

. o S 5 S/' & I !: S 3 = ■ 
ciZZ^OHMJjISKaiO 



u'c 

■ — u a 
;£,'JZ 



• c 
. 1- 

1 £ 








3 

3 
C 
« 









rco?ir-OCT::or:WM — oociooa^M 



> iM ?i -M — — > M ■; 



•M M " — -< -f M !■) M TO 



roox;coot-icn;Dcoi-W) — 



;g> WCg (M — — (M • 



:: : I a. 



Z^Z 



Z H 



























































'S. 3 • 




: : S 5 




St 




; ^ 


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? = = bD : 


V ^ 







00^ - 



CO OC 00 00 






(N N (M »> 



24 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



£ ? 



V' S 



= - c 



■Pr'"'tV *'3'"!.l.l 



A 



< 






rs^,"^ J J j-^^r. f^rrfc— i.Q^^ 



w : T, 



-.^ m- „ -3 



iiSi 



^ u« (J '- -j:; j^' 



3 5 M 

y -J 

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JJ ' 


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St. Albans, Vt... 
Canada 






■2 >>>- ; : 
5'?^\->'- : : 

;- ji -o yj c " 

5i c: X Pi c/; c3 










Z5 


■- £ 

Sol 


' if) 




■ . i; 

■ • >, 

. : c 

■ -pi 


; 




« ■ 





















•tpi;3jo.io[o3^ '^: J : : 



•<;ji-3/C III aS VT I I- TC -t< c: cc -o :o — ="■ oc c: c: C-. = ao or. ic cc — o -• (/> c c: 

C r S' 



^ 





X <z 








3 -3 
'XI = 


Keon 

Ilivan 

-ucier . . . 

riault 

-arivee 

esniarais. . 

neuf 

nee 

ludc 

icliard . . . 




X 


Itier 

inboise. . . . 

Wheeler. . 
McKay. . . 

irlev 

^'ield 



X - 









-„<-! 



,X- 






£; £ K i:, i: < .xs ii..^ o < -A'^ ^ ^ a s c-i x <= ^S .£.,a < < < u: li < 



% r. 



H ^ X 





— io~~ 




--^ 


C5 


Ci 


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VITAL STATISTICS. 



25 



O 



< 

< 



u 



O 

M 

W 

o 

< 

5 



. a, :^ 



^i 



'•p..iBI,\[ saiujx 







1 














u 




1 








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•-J 


U 


<- I 


CJ 


















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t*-. 






-' 


-a 






















■^ 


r^ 


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5" 


o 




CQ 


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1 


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J» 


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ui ai^vl 


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. 








































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^ 


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ci 


y 


*t; 



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t3 


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??^ 


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o ] 




1 


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SJj 1 




n ! 


















c 


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<u 








a 




Q 


1 



= a, ^ t, 



"S ■£ S " 

■: Ah k; ..^ 

- Q s ^ 



> " Pi > .i > 
6 \^ 6 6 'i,' 6 



i^ c; s ^ 






_. .= ca 






.- = ■0= c S3 



t;" - si) 



3 r^.2 

c jj S 2 S = = ' 



aww<x£^,6Ji.<Mg^^^ia .H., °., =. 



0, u ^r 



— : cc c 



1. 
c 

C 
u 

a: 


12 

X 

i 


> 


Industry, Me.... 
Manchester 

N. Y 

Lislion, Me 

Abinsrton, Mass. 
Westford, Mass. 


cE 

O n 


; _4. 


Brookline, N. H. 
Francestowii .... 

lanesville, III 

St. Johns, iV. B.. 
Merrimack, N. H 
New Brunswick. 
Boston, Mass... . 
Berlin, Mass.... 

N. B 

England 

Ansnhl^ M V... 


Russia. 






















Fireman 

R. R. employe. 

Operative 

Real Estate ... 
Farmer. ....... 


i 

y 

r 

a 


• • • « 

• *. •. 'i 

• • < u 

... 01 

: : :h 


1> - 

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bxi . 

C ; 
2 '. 

cl : 



^-ooxciosa;— otrttMaoocotDCieoiOi^TooccQOC^-t- — r— oiice-Tiircoo 






■ (?i'>Jc^c^(MTt*-^(MC^c«: — c^c^coe-itccc 



,, 




-i 


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u 
















in 




V 


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J-Z QZti-Z 






c/: ~ o v. o c ; 
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O « « 50 =^ £: 



■iS;;: 






Q — . -J „ _ _ . K 'i' 

O J O J ^Q — .Qi < W Aw fc « 



3 btc'= "i'E • ^- c ^.2 5 - • 




.-■ — CJ 



26 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



I 

Hi 



X 

< 

fa 

O 



V. 

c 

'A 



'A 

W 



^ ^ 



^ o 



p,Jtit\[ saui;x 



3 o CQ 

8 O 



i{ot:a JO .io|o3i 



iJES/C ui a^Y 



u c 





c 


s 

:3 





•^ 


•^ 




c 


u. 






M 














C3 












^ 




U 


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B Oh 






' ^' — r^ ^ * O 



:t >T-. "a 



— >^2 



^ •= 



ca 



W W 0__0 wJ^ 



:S K 



.2 ;: t- = i^ « . 



._ - .- ,„ 3 3 ^ 5 i: 






c-2:: & ^ Mg; 

o S O O ° ct 

UJ i-ii-]MO 



0) .x; 



•5 c bi 
1 J- o i) 



.2^ 



^-.5 ^-7 



• „ « c: c 






g ° i 



W (fl Ci ^ 5: ^ t/) pLi :Z UOiCQ^ WoiWiJ 



be : 



•■^.9 



r^ o t- "<i< 05 GO 'M r-1 

W (M -M (M - ^^ CC C-l 



C^I CC IC C<l 1^ I'- CO C^ 03 -* 05 C<^ 10 CC O; 00 >C tC to 1-^ (M 10 
^1 C-1 -M '^* CO <M OJ iM (M (N C^ M C^ (N <M <M CI C^ (M "' " 



1) u . 

be bl. S 
■o-a •" _ 



J Z^Z 



IZKZ J 







CO CO Ci 1— < 
(M (>) d CO 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



27 



Cj 



K 



< 

D 
K 

< 
O 



U 
s 



Q 

h 

3 

w 

Pi 

M 
O 

2 

< 



. a, S 



^1 






o - 






J K ^ 



>1 c - 



- u. 



■Pl'l'lV ^"''•"l.l, — i-H — ^ — ^i-l-i-H — — r^^^—li-iw— — . — — ' — — I— — '(M>Mr-i!Mg>g l 



— fc. 



<;isc-e-fc 



0) -' S 



-.^ 






-5 5; = =-= = b? £j c.t: v-is^ y--i- 5 S S = - m^ g 
W t, >£.,x >£,< O fe U S > O W w Sh a B O < O 4lAg A— .O 









c c^ = J^~ 



S 3 C C 



■ ^ re " c -; ^ o H " = :" 

» 77 r \ rr. *T^ **■ »-^ r ^ fxl < f 



I ! g|-!Z K <i^CgPc«U mS Ocj M^ O 



2 — ~'r 

u o C s == 








■ QJ 




























• >-. 




























w C 












































































































































r,S 














,j- 


! '. " 




1 




























~^K 


c 

JO 












c 


"^ • ■ • S 


^ 


c 


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ws: 
















(A 


: : :h 


J 


t- 


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■ bB 


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■ c 


1/ • 


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PQ . 



'i[0i!3 joao[o;^ 



>,„^,^--^-. ----.------. --------- 




:oo — oj-^". -^-nc^oic-. oc»n<C'^ 


--IJOCS^lOCCltM-NOOCJOK IC— C-Xr- 



oiufMc-i-a" — c^N— ■^ — — |^ir-^o 


-1 — f ! - 


Jl — 


IM - ' 


^<N — — CCC^MC 


■* -^ 


><:::::: :..::: 














;^ :...:. . : . : : . 














= J r. ' 


^ • • 




_ ■ 






« 



ChZ 



c _2 

c " « " 



7i ? = 
9 £j= 



c — 

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= _ • • • 2 S " 
2§>'S=-3J=S 



ii|i|=|>||i-B||s| 





5 


















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■*-■ 










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b/) 














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a, 


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t- C-. o 



28 



VITAL STATISTICS. 






;3 



ffi 



< 

X 

< 

z 

o 

>< 

h 
U 

w 

a 

H 



Q 
M 

Pi 

3 

M 



w 

o 

<; 





c 

K 










c 
r 














r 




1 












bjj 


1 




n 
re 
E 












esidence, 
ition of P 
m marrie 




" ~ bu 
o o " 


-5 4j ,ijc.^ (D— 1) . .a. 
f^TIo >^o9'^ oSlj ^i-o :, 


■H s >; 




5 >;»; sa;=-Gi.^ii p: <«f. 


5 > 1 

^ = ^. 


II" 


^<-^ 5 C ^ 6 ^ ^ < » . 


2 pa ^ 


o 


6 fc 

— — (M 


ddfeudi-^odxw 


o H-- o 


•p,aBi\[ S311UX 


'^ — _wrt_ rt_->- — _ — — ^— ^__„„^ 


tH Ol — rH — — —1 


1/ 
















































































































« 






•a 
















































(x. 






-a 
o 






el 






C) 


































(*-• 
















H— , _ 


























B 


V 

5 

a 


itii 


" C ") 

" E « 

^ 5 = c 


-jt: < u i^ c/5 ►^ a 


"2 >.o 




r 

D. 


il 


■5i 

O. 1- 


.2 c 


of Birth 
each. 


'■ « ■ 

: = ="•! 


:S 


1 


z 






1 




S i : : : :i 




:> 


Z 






• 




* Tn pH E ri - b 


'S-cre'Ooliics ^--re'trt-iSTSSiScr-ts « 1 






^ C -a t .a , , -a ,C ^ .„ . "3 C! — c 3 


3 c .2 -a P 


« 




Oi 


Swo?!Oi^cici(aJ:oS£Su (:fl^u?^ur^M,S:^^wlcj Z 


O T3 
































: i : 




t 












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0^ 












c : : 1, 




c • 










■^ = T3 










OJ 


.n 


Ui 








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;upa 
rooi 
Bri 




S • 


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3 -^ 


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Ph 


b :i-l 




H 


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^------ = -=" = ===---=-1 


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-^CO'Ts)QOO"^00(MCOCCTjiCC!OCO<»T'0^-t-l_--.rf.'MCO»£:jlOO— iCIC't'O-. 1 


•» CO-* Cf 


CO CO <M C-l (M J^l C-l C^ (M 'M CS* — C^ t>3 <M r-' (N ri CO C^ 'M C^ . CO C-J W (M — 1 








i: 




• c 


























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s § ** 








c- 


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p 


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s ^ ^ 


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-H =^ a 


S .G — 1— . = -° V, 3 c u 3 

re-'- _g«- re---rnre«- §i«------ 




Resi 
each 
of M 


--::-:-, 














a; "" 


■ ; >^ ■ c e 




• C 


- . . Cn3 • 








• . > ■ • . 




















Name and Surnai 
of Groom and Bri 


^ i: — " : 3 "bJc- 
= -E2^-cS = 






a3 = «c|s 

:w.2.A«wzs 




c 

C c 


■ c 


5 C J^"0 1 
— . fc. f- n CS 

""O 3 -"c 

t ^5 rt-5 


Ijfi 






« " 


rt n « 






3 C 3 




— CS 


■^..-'C'o;-----'- 


V. • » 


0. S 


S---3rt------- 


s. - - 


Z K Z 








5 X' ■-" — 
















X> H , , . 


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I 1^ 
































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1 



Vital statistics. 



29 



O 



< 

D 
X 
■J) 

< 

b 
O 






O 

w 
Pi 

H 

C/3 

5 
w 

w 
< 



« -s s 



?;Z 



r OJ 1) «J !U C^ 





ci 


>. 


H 


=: 


C3 


1 


J 


w 


M 









fc 


W 



a. 5 

c 






2 S 



I O f 



p.aBIV S31U1J, 



> J : "^ ,^_^ :-a-T3 
P S ■'- ?, 2 S c 



(U-^ rtl 



3 :: ":: 



o c ^ 






J 513 



^^^ :> 
5; £ • 5 






M 



— c *-^.c -«* ' i£ c -/J 






■SIS -i 



5' P M 

o 



•iI3t!3 joao|iol 



•sJBa-cuianv §?iss^?;^5; 






'S -g irt 



P5 ■- 



Ph ;s 




^ • S = c "S 5 

> o a ^ _ij-g 1. 

O ti-S t/: O w w 



36 



Vital statistics. 



L) 



X 



X 

< 

O 



H 

X 



w 

3 
w 

M 

< 

2 
PS 
< 



^i 





c 








E « c 




.M 






J, 


„• 


^ 




■^ 


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4) 








u c >, 






n.' 




'^ 


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^ 


u £ ?<: 


s. 


w 




^^ 




c 


c 


£^o 


-o" 




5 


C 




c 
c 


^ 


c 
c 


|?'i 


s 


> 


W 


« 


J 


P5 


hJ 


J ;^ 


J 


X 


w 


^ 


W 


S 


W 


^ ^ 


< 


w 


<; 


CJ 


a 


W 


E 


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a 


hA 






CO 


h-1 


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= cE 



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-£,Ha;^.CQ 



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VITAL STATISTICS. 



31 



^3 



O 



'A 



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i:£-^£ biB5 btS-s «i-£- = 1= j; 5 g S P c i;i! = = j; 






~ --a 



• s J: c o • 3 
:z o S e -: ?: t/5 



O -wj 



Z 1. 



??: 



= - <u c £ = S- ^ « 






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u C :u. 



zi ^ CM S CI — ^ ?! ^] ;^i ri 'M If; M* WM - J-i -» CI ri 'X "M J^ '-' - ^^^ — w'>' w ' 








e-i iM ci ffi 



t- o •— 



32 



VITAL STATISTICS. 




u 



K 

< 

b 
O 

h 
U 

w 

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Q 
W 

W 

3 
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c/} 

W 

o 
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_ U = 1/ 






o - < 



u 


<: 


tt 


u 


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t; < 



Wfc 



-=. = ii •= .; T, 









>: o -5 fci J 'i 6 — Ai? 6 £ w^^cS J < « J u :5 Q i ■? .£.^ ► 






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SJE3A Ul 3^ V I (N CI (M - >M <M C< O-l g1 j-i C> -^ •" fM J^ g"M — <N CI (M "^ CI M OO^CMM^O CO O CJ^ 



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00 OU O Oi 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



38 



U 



a 
< 

O 

>^ 
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w 
w 

en 

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H fc - ci 

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■ 03 ce ■* Ci CO e-i CO e-i o ' 



« -M C-* (M C^l *J ^^ — (M ^- C^ C 



5?:i^z 






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M (N C^ <M <M <N 



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34 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



O 



X 



< 

X 
< 

fa 
O 

> 

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W 

H 



Q 
a 
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3 
w 
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Vlf AL STAtlStlCS. 



35 



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36 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



8 



U 



X 



< 

X 
< 

fa 
O 

h 

u 

w 

s 

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Q 
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p.aBJV S31UIX 






!•- c c 'r: c [T — 
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; -■ b, X eu [i, o I ca 



c u 



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SJeaA ui SiJy eococoTf;^ — eM^gigM<NC^TOe<eo<Ncq-"e>r-ig<^gq<Nec<NTiico(MCic^<N 



■s ^ 3 
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C 3 
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X a i-i c): >j >^^ >^^ 



05! 



r-i 1— I CO IN. Oi 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



37 



O 



X 
< 

< 

O 

h 
U 

w 

H 



W 

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a 






•a S 






C u 








-0 




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1) 




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^ 




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■P.-KSPV S3'"!X| 




u 












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w* 













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u- 


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a o 






o 






•ipEa JO joj^o^J 




|-s.tB3jC ui a^vl 




>« u 






° B 












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C5 tC CO — CV5 « C' 



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f- = t 



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»* ts (N C< CM 



111 :g 

CO 00 30 00 O) 00 
<N IM IN (N Cq 



< z 



38 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



O 



^ 



fa 

o 

'3 

X 



^H 



ci .5 i 



- OJ - 



— _ „ 4J 



Pd O 



K " f^ 



w K o 



t; ^ v: 







•sai-;3/( III aiiy 





u 


^ fti 


S ^ 




ij 




.s 


c 


cs ' 






3 


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Cfl 


2 






-5 




c 


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v^ 







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he 




2 














CL, 


S 










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Q 








ipcojo.iuioo; 



c ±i j:: o £ c — 
S <;.£..= (I- SSI ^ 



^^o:: 



EiP E.5 2« 5 S = s 2-S e^ J!-c 







M : 
















> :«>Soi : 




X :.■■:. ■ 


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<^ . t-|<-H ^ . 












oT ■■'^ 'V : 




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rS ts - " I' « 




fc : :'H« ■ 


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.. siS^-os u^i: :•'<£=' 'lit*: 


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a>(Mu:^OL'roCioc'ro(MC;ot-r:c^^occio-^t--Mf2i'00 



I (>^ — - '^1 — (M C-« (N ^ C- 



I (M — r- ^ C^ 



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■ br.— ' . _H Ct( ^ oj . K 2 . 
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c'/)<^ v^s: u >,fa W «; 

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r: =j: c = c 



Q S £.,■-; fa j^i^^s o Quw spaoucffifaK »i^<: E 5^ 



C) C^ M <M 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



39 



O 



< 

X 
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z 5 



pawopi^w JO 



•3[l!ia3_.I .U) 3H!M 



'.'^ 






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(U J^ • • • 






C--C 
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;.2-C ^ si: ;i E''^ t^ SI'S 



. OJ (/; u ^ • • 

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: ^ A- c . -2 = 

•-a o 3 K — i; 



■ n > J! .' 3 '^■ 

'^ S.5W Urvi 

: E E g 5 N S 



4-.^ C 



IK^ 



^ c c . . c 

■r; i, 4) . . u 

c u V ■ • u 

►^ ji • j: ■ t. ^ . 

< u • u • u a - 

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.3C UOuCO.C-«C 



S :§=^ :c«S^S-=^=S :S :^S^ 



fe:: -. : 



Pi,:: g:: : : : ii.: Sfa^- fe^fe- Sfe^ s = - Sfe: 





0, 






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1 l^ CC « T' <M ■* ^) -CO 



- • — CC O I-- 
<0O • COI- CO 










r-( Tf -^lOO 



woo«)cn-22;SS2§5i=55SSSSS'(N6» 



40 



VITAL STATISTICS. 






< 

at 
O 



o 






pit.i.it:j^ '3(;<U!S 



•jojoo 





<; 
































"u 














o 


r ,« « 




W 





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■p •vVP^ c -2 -o c -o £• o -^ o .ii S 



b«i 









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c c 



^ c ^ -^ 

= 2 3ai 

i: c >g 

= ^faO^HJ,2 

-V LC ^*^ ^ r. 



b^kj-qs*; 



-.J. 






aJ^K 



^i ^c : ^:JS7) 



« S = 5, 



= — . 3 
O *j . O 



c "^ 
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S^§ is 



C 3 
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111 



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s^- ?; 



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U -oiiuiiaj JO 3iEj\[ 





CU 




6 
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Sfe- Sfe:: ;;:::: ^fe: : StaSfcr S: = fe 



ifcSSii 



71 C M 

rtT3i;«T3u.5 3-ag 
c— ■ "1— '^TiC — ^tn 






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00t-^l?O-*COt'CO -t-OiOO 



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^OO^OSO: OJIr-^XC^C^OOO — CO ^ 



t- a: r- CO I 



I iM IN <M »^ (N 



CO 0O« rH CO ■* 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



41 






< 



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O 



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3 O 

c«0 



So-f 



5'= 

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: o 3 -j« 2 J - ^ ■ 



S ha V- T- 3 c « -w 
c c •= « 2 5 S-'H 



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if '. S 3 S «* 3 

■ SI! 1) — I' " IJ tn 

• s bn = s rt cn -3 

■ t- 'S - ^ B2 « <; 

:j lcv£..xzs 



^ 3 

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,= ^ :S^^ 



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l^feSfaSfeS- fe: : = = : S: - Jfagfas SfeSto 





0. 




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•sqjuojvr 


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3^ 2 






S « c « ■ 
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fcS^SS iS-^-^ISSJ^S iSJ^^r^^^S-LI^' 



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U 


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s-^ ;o 



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. cs 05 0-. iM M lO in to'o; «-'r-'^'*2222S 



_ ■ (M CO lO la 50 

(M d c-i « e^ *?» <N 



42 



VITAL STATISTICS. 






< 

S 

1/3 
< 

O 

o 

w 



M 

w 

H 

O 

w 

C/3 

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MO 



c ft 



paAvopi^ JO 
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5; 5 





















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Men in 
Soften 
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Killed 
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Jacob Goldstein 
Timothy Sulliv 
John M. Earley 
Matthias Peltie 
















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VITAL STATISTICS. 



43 







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Q 





a, 




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be 




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C K • • • 

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= c c •:= 



^ " 3 c c c « n = T .,>-.'--.»>-, — >r 



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44 



VITAI. STATISTICS. 






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2^ 






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Z -5 



p^I.l.lK|/\[ '3[?iuit; 



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inx « . 
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0,0-- (u 

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feS: feS^foS:: : feS- 



feiSfeS: fesSfK 



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c 3 « 3 . S c re ■ 

K K z az K ;2 



sz 



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r-(r-rHi-ir- ir-r—li— •C^iMC^GSCICS'MCO 






VITAL STATISTICS. 



45 



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46 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



O 



y. 



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fa 

o 






< 

o 



cT O 



> 3 

u G 






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VITAL STATISTICS. 



47 



•^ 



;j) 



o 



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Q 



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48 



VITAL STATISTICS. 






X 



o 



U 



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3 



td 

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:: p = • c 1* i:'"-' >^ c t; O 
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S _U 5 Q _- O 



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bo u) J " "1 ; 



to ^ 



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VITAL STATISTICS. 



49 



X 



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en 

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50 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



O 



'X 






O 

w 






V 



. u . S 



i tU3 



E : : = : s : : : 



. .otn -eC - c ■ y c ^ ^ 

■cm £3^ S-="5'iw.^ So „ = ^Z^Z. 2^^«ll^ 



bp: :t: 



m 2.S '*i^ 



« "i; 'P u ^ 



> -pi. 



jr S '^- « « S t3 « 
,<M£..Q:gcgMS 



■£ ><« 



■ S = • SJ^'S 



: X - « -S £ -^ 



:^-.S 



5 SJ3C 



-^ '^ -^ i^ r c 1^ 

35 -g b ° s = ^ cT, £ ,/ ,^ 



"u J ^ o « jj Pi 



^^>r 



■ 2 rt c ^^ u « 



■.X :K 



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pa.vvopi^V JO 
p3ijjE[\[ 'a|ituis 



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:^ :% 



: E 



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3 C 2"^ '^ •« 

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:::::::•: :^ :::::: : :•=- : : : : 




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C0OC0Q0C5COO1— ■^ — COMMC005"OC<M 









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(M (N IM IM (M CI CO 






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en 

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VITAL STATISTICS. 



51 



V Q 






^i 




i^^ 


•ao[03 


^o 


•3[i:ui3j JO 3n;j,v 





eu 






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< 


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X f i: 



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bX) 



3 • — . ■ — 



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■r — - p .%. -- w« .^ wx fc- f,^ 








4) >> 




















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Uj= • V ._ 


c 








i^" c: . 


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5 = 5 
— h. .y ' 


« 



i;tt, 



tf >■:=< = . a ^' To 












^: iSS 



Sfer gfe: :SJi.:SfeSfer 



:fe- SfeS 



a c K T « " 

Iz xz6z 






C^ M C-lCl C^ CQ — t- 



: E 






u •_:Q 



?ri o' 






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*'--^^^-^*g;^^cS=^-:-':^«=- 



ii £c/;•- 



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Vital statistics. 



< 

X 

< 

O 
> 

U 



w 



Q 



u Q 



■^ s 






•jojoo 


^6 


•3[i:iuajj JO aici\; 



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: o >- u • OJ - 
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- - 0) 
o «' o 



cjM*> o Q o c/3 -; w tfl 



:t3 o - : o 
E — rt . > . tN 

'■ 5 = = o ^ « 

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■^ -fa* *J :Q n 
. .2 c '- " •- "^ °* 



t/j - 

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a« 



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C3 B 



c 

K c 

■s ^ 



^A 



n g c 

I/;— = 

C/} > 






c £ 
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fe: r :: S- : b^JtSfelSfai SfeSfegfeS : 















>i c 




































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". :»^ : 
































-c • 






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C rt 




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X. . K-C TJj= , 


«— K « e • 


"r:- c"?:- =2" 


c «: " c 5 • 






iz 






o^ 






u4^ 


OZ 


Zo^ : 



.= = 55 



(N r-( t- 1- • in eo — I 



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iJ-H = 



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O = = !t 

X.CC 



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1(2^ = 



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1J 1.-=" 



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J cc tc ;c t^ 1^ oc X 00 : 






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VITAL STATISflCS. 



5a 



8 

6 



< 

X 
< 



6 

Q 



O 



c ° 






. C3 o 
■ C i" 



sq 



— 3 ■*-• 






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— c o •'C • 

- .. . _ = bn':i c c : 

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• 0) >— ,^ y C ^ — ' 

: c« ftl w K > U en J !S 



: .5'a c 






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If 



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c«: 



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1) et ^ 



Sen u'S 2 27 
c jj •- bi.5 S ^ 
■= — 3 !5 D £ -5 



CO o;- u K = "^ 
*j re — -*" ^" 






:^.S : :^ : :S 



^:....— 



•3[BIU3 J JO 31BJM 



•sqiuopvi 



§fe: : : - Sfe-r ;§:: fcS: : " : fe: - i S^S 



JK^:=J= 



o:z:; 



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<OZO 



^ — • (M :o c^ o 



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p 




s 


■o 


c 




3 


rt 


cn 




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3 




a 


u 




Xi 


E 


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:* 




Z 












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m 6 • > "H i £ 
w ^ . . . -.Si; >-,±; u IT. oj J re g ■" 
3^ • • •_; — ^^X3p~'~*>^^ 










u 

c 
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3 


^ £:• re 

- CO-* 





54 



VITAL STATISTICS. 






< 
a 

< 

O 

H 
U 
W 



Q 

s 

2 

o 
w 

0^ 












"= o 



•3IKtU3_J JO 3[EIV 



5-ii 












S5 



O ^ c^ 5 cr.is 



S ■- .- 



KU 






m C O = O 

a csCU o — . 

— _u < u S 



■=c=>^C3 = « = " = 

u 0-3 i'S'S i: I 5 I 
j= « o " « ci; >- 



Q 5.'-= " c o 




cu'-l c ^ = 




-r iJ^ jr « :5 


— 3 


<a.£<SS 


^< 



b§: 


- fei 


: : ^ SfeS Sfe^ 




rt 


'•5 2 ' ' "S 2 "' 



J;;^ 









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<Q 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



55 



The Following Persons Died out of Town and were 
Brought to Nashua for Burial. 



Date, 
1894. 



Place of Death. 



Name and Surname 
of the Deceased. 



Age. 



Cause of Death. 



Jan. 


19 


• ' 


^'.I 


" 


■-'6 


Feb. 


1.5 


'< 


20 


" 


2S 


Mar 


21 


" 


24 



Apr. 



May 



June 



lulv 



Sept 



Oct. 



Cambridge, Mass. . . . 

Boston, Mass 

Hudson 

Redlands, Cal 

Merrimack, N. H . . 

Londonderry 

New Hampton 

Springfield, Mass. . . 

N. Y.City 

Barre. Vt 

Henniker 

Dan vers Mass 

Soinerville, Mass . . 

Hopkinton, " 

Concord 

Westford, Mass 

Providence, R.I. 

Lowell, Mass 

5, Port Jervis, N. Y. . . 

8 HoUis 

11 [Lowell, Mass 

28; Boston 

5'Groton, Mass , 

lllTilton 

17, Boston 

]S| Manchester 

19, Boston 

22 Hudson 

24 Chelsea, Mass 

241 Hudson 

28 Lunenburg, Mass.. . 

7 Greenfield, N. H... 

8 Medford, Mass 



Lowell, Mass 

Brookline, N. H 

Lawrence, Mass 

H udson 

Lyme 

Wilton, N. H 

Lakeport 

Westboro, Mass. ... 

Sanborntown 

St. Johnsbury, Vt 

Manchester 

Auburn 

Brookline, N. H 

Hudson. Mass 

Wf 'rcester. Mass 

Pembroke, N. H 

West Newton, Mass 

Laconia 

Wilton 

Melrose, Mass 



Wm. Wallace, Jr i77| 

Emily Farnsworth ... 77 

Geo. F. Conrev 73 

Murray C. Marshall . . .123 

Hugh'McKean ].. 

Leroy O. Durant !2:-t 

VI. A. Noyse 

Horace VV. Oilman ... 

Ida F. Connor 

Jennie M. Buckham .. 

Preston Wheeler 

Richard Temple 

Hosea B.Spalding ... 

Geo. A. Hood 

Wm. E. Taggard 

Mary A. Swett 

Geo. W. Smith 

J. Oilman Howard 

John B. Hav 

Wm. P. Wheeler 

Nettie B. Tuttle 

Mary A. C. Bean 

Lizzie A. Jewett 

VVm. A. Whitmarsh... 

Emily Shaw. 

Plummer Jewell. 

Stephen Harvey 

D. G. Reed 

Jonathan Jones 

Ethel M. Leazotte. ... 

Sarah S. Baldwin 

Ann Cain 

Abbie De F. Shepard.. 

Tohn Ash 

Jos. G. H. Alder 

Chas. A. Lawrence ... 
Georgie W. Page .... 

Harry Warner 

Henry C. May 

Andrew Howard 

Chester A. Curtis 

.Mehitable Woodman.. 
Maude L.Thompson.. 

Olive Blanding 

Chas. P. Allen 

Adaline Guichard 

Amos S. Morse 

Laura E. Wells 

Edinire G. Daudelin... 

John W. Cotton 

lames Thompson 

Chas. Cutler 

Rebecca Fletcher 



8j23 

6 .. 
4,25 



1 14 

'si's 

7 .. 
10 11 



95 



Pneumonia , 



Paralysis 

Pul. Consumption 
Angina Pectoris.. 

Heart disease 

Heart disease 



Endocarditis . 
Acute Cerebritis. 



Rinal Cirrhosis. 



Cerebral hemorrhage 

Consumption 

Rupture 

Val. dis. of heart. . 



Peritonitis 
Marasmus . 



Senile decay . 
Apoplexy ... 
Phthisis. 



Cong, of brain, etc — 
Choi, infantum 

.Vlalig dis. of larymx 
1.3 Cancer of stomach . . . 

Phthisis 

Cholera infantum 

oJPhthisis Pul 

5 Convulsions 



Heart disease 
Old age 



Exhaustion ...... 

Intes. tuberculosis. 

Old age 

Paralysis . 

Choi, infantum .... 



Consumption . . 
Choi, infantum 
Cystitis, etc . . 

Phthisis 

Old age 



56 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



The Following Persons Died out of Town and were 
Brought to Nashua for Burial. — Continued. 





Place of Death 


Name and Surname 
of the Deceased 


Age 




Date, 

1894. 


V 

>< 


c 
o 




Cause of Death. 


Nov. -26 
" 2(i 

" ao 

Dec. 2 

5 
" 19 

" 2.T 

" 28 


Temple 

Montpelier, Vt 

Merrimack 

Gorham Maine.... 

Groton, Mass 

Wilton 

Worcester, Mass . . . 
Naples, Me 












William P. Phelps ... 
William T. Parker . 
Almuda Harmon . ... 

Warren Whitford 

Geo. O. Adams 

Luther M. Wright 

Marianne P. Gammon 


38 

72 

56 

88 
67 
69 


*4 

in 

10 


20 
6 


Aploplexy 

Chronic bronchitis... 
Spinal paralysis. ... 
Heart disease 


Cancer of Stomach. . . 
Heart disease 



TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Board of Eddeatiop, 



AND 



8UP[RINTEND[MT OF SCHOOLS, 



CITY OF NASHUA, N. H 

For the Year 1894. 



NASHUA, N. H.: 

TELEGRAPH PUBLISHING CO., PRINTERS, 
1895. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



OFFICE OF THE CLERK. 



Nashua, N. H., January 25, 1895. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Education, Mr. 
James H. Fassett, superintendent of schools, made his an- 
nual report of the public schools, city of Nashua, for the year 
1894, and bv vote of the board accepted, and the committee 
on schoolhouses and supplies was Instructed to have three 
hundred copies printed. 

J. E. TOLLES, 

Clerk Board of Education. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION, CITY OF NASHUA. 



ORGANIZED FOR THE YEAR 1895. 



EDWARD H. WASON, President. 

JASON E. TOLLES, Cleik 



Term Expires December 31, 1896. • 

Name. Residence. Place of Business. 

John H. Vickery, 12 Spring St., Cor. Main and High. 

Edward H. Wason, 225 Main St., Odd Fellows' Bldg. 

T. a. McCarthy, 130 Pine St., Spalding Block. 

Richard P. Elliott, Currier Block, Masonic Temple. 

Term Expires December 31, 1898, 
Jason E. Tolles, 22 Kinsley St., Howard Block. 

J. H. Dunlap, Fairmovnit St., Dunlap Block. 

S. N. Barker, 71 Concord St., 11 High St. 

C. B. Hammond, 50 E. Pearl St., 182 Main St. 

Term Expires December 31, 1900. 
Joseph Flather, 20 Arlington St., Crown St. 

Geo. A. Underhill. 121 Allds St., Masonic Temple. 

Fred Gowing, 17 Currier Block, State H'se, Concord. 

I. G. Anthoine, 17 Manchester St., Odd Fellows B'd'g. 

Regular meeting of Board, last Friday evening in each 
month, at 7 :45 o'clock. .j 

superintendent of schools. 
JAMES H. FASSETT. 

Residence, No. 33 Orange .St. 

Office : High School Building, Spring St. 

Office hours : 8 :30 to 9 A. m., 4 :3 Oto 5 p. m., on Monday, 

Tuesday and Wednesday; 4 to 5 p. m., Thursday and Friday. 

TRUANT officer. 

Henry B. McCaflrey, No. 99 Elm St. 



STANDING COiMMITTEES. 

Finance, Accounts and Claims — Messrs. Dunlap, El- 
liott and McCartliy. 

ScHooLHOUSES AND SUPPLIES — Messis. Flathcr, Vickery 
and Anthoine. 

Teachers and Text Books — Messrs. Underbill, Gowing, 
Hammond, Tolles and Barker. 

Boundaries and Assignments — Messrs. Barker, Ham- 
mond and Anthoine. 

Music — Messrs. Tolles, McCarthy and Gowing. 

Drawing — Messrs. Elliott, Flather and Gowing. 

Salaries — Messrs. Vickery, Barker and Flather. 

Evening Schools — Messrs. Gowing, Vickery and Dun- 
lap. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

Spring Street School — Messrs. Wason, Gowing, Vick- 
ery, Flather, Tolles and Dunlap. 

Mt. Pleasant School — Messrs. Dunlap, Barker and An- 
thoine. 

Main Street School — Messrs. Elliott, Tolles and Ham- 
mond. 

Arlington Street School — Messrs. Flather, Underhill 
and Vickery. 

Harbor and Edgeville Schools — Messrs. McCarthy, 
Anthoine and Underhill. 

Palm and Mulberry Street Schools — Messrs. Vick- 
ery, Hammond and McCarthy. 

Belvidere and O'Donnell Schools — Messrs. Barker, 
Anthoine and Dunlap. 

Training School — Messrs. Gowing, Barker and Tolles. 

Kindergarten — Messrs. Underhill, Anthoine and Ham- 
mond. 

Suburban Schools — Messrs. Hammond, McCarthy and 
Anthoine. 

Military and Physical Training — Messrs. Tolles, 
Gowing and Flather. 



Superintendent's Report. 



To the Board of Education. Gentlemen : 

The maintaining of schools good in all particulars is the 
great problem which confronts the superintendent; it is so 
natural to accentuate some special branch and by achieving 
remarkable results in this, blind ourselves to the necessary 
loss in other branches. 

The criticisms on our public schools by men of different 
vocations are interesting and instructive. The accountant as- 
sails the writing because it is not better and declares that not 
enough time is spent on acquiring accuracy in mechanical 
forms; the arithmetician would have half the time in schools 
spent on problems in arithmetic, because, he says: "What 
will the child amount to without clear reasoning powers" ; 
the grammarian would have a large share of the time spent 
upon the grammatical forms and the study of English, to 
which he afiirms, all other branches are secondary; the his- 
torian demands a large part of the time for his hobby, for he 
asks: "How can a child have a proper appreciation of his 
patriotic duty to the state without the principles of history 
clearly in mind;" another insists on a complete and exhaust- 
ive study of geography and yet another considers the ability to 
read orally correctly of the utmost importance. 

Obviously, it is impossible to follow the ideas of all. The 
sifting and v/eighing of the different subjects to find their rel- 
ative value requires good judgment and an accurate knowl- 



6 REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

edge of the growth of mind as well as a thorough understand- 
ing of our school system. 

BOOKS. 

During the child's school life a large proportion of his 
reading is done in the schoolroom. The importance, there- 
fore, of leading and develojoing the appreciation of good lit- 
erature is evident. Particularly is this true as many of our 
stores are flooded with printed matter of the vilest sort. I am 
of the opinion that every schoolroom should contain a suffi- 
cient number of well chosen books to keep the children sup- 
plied with fresh reading matter throughout the year. 

I would also have every building, which contains grades 
above the fifth, possess a school library to which the children 
should have free access, in order that they may have good 
wholesome home reading. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

The changes which were made in the course of study have, 
so far as I have yet observed, worked well. The extension of 
the history course by putting the study of English history in- 
to the ninth grade and by giving a brief history of the United 
States to the sixth grades has increased the interest of the pu- 
pils in the subject and gives those who cannot enter the High 
School a broader basis for historical reading. 

The introduction of language books into grades below the 
seventh has tended to make the work in English more uni- 
form. This course was also strengthened by placing a tech- 
nical grammar in the ninth grade. 

The revision of the course of study in the High School was 
made after most careful consideration. The arrangement of a 
course of study in a High School like our own, although ap- 
parently a simple matter, is in reality a most difficult and per- 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



plexino- problem. All courses have to be considered and not 
one can be slighted. They must work in harmony otherwise 
the number of teachers must be increased. 

The course as at present arranged is, in my opinion, giving 
excellent satisfaction. It would seem unwise to make any 
radical change until it has been given a thorough trial in its 
present form. 

ENRICHING THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL COURSE. 

In regard to enriching the grammar school course of study 
there are two distinct classes. One holds that the old way of 
devoting all the school time to reading, writing, grammar and 
arithmetic is the only proper method and that any time spent 
on subjects outside of these detracts just so much from th r 
thorough comprehension by the pupil ; the other class main- 
tains that this course was dry, led the pupils to have a distaste 
for study and through this hatred of school work thwarted one 
of the important ends of education, namely, the desire for self- 
improvement. The enthusiasts in the latter class would al- 
most completely overturn that idea which our grandparents 
had of "schooling." They would begin the study of German 
and French in the fourth or fifth year; Latin and Greek in 
the eighth and ninth year; the study of chemistry, geology, 
botany and zoology introduced early in the course ; elemen- 
tary algebra]and geometry in the later part, beside water color 
painting in connection with drawing. Of the two courses it 
seems to be better to lean towards the old education rather 
than towards the new. The principles of evolution are as 
true in education as in eveiy other line. For this reason, 
while we may add to, or subtract from, the old curriculum, it 
is presumptuous to attempt to revolutionize that form of edu- 
cation which has been the growth of centuries ever subject to 
the law of the survival of the fittest. 

Acting with this idea in mind, while still maintaining the 



O REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

essentials, there has been introduced into the schools a sys- 
tematic course in the study of natural objects. The children 
are taught to carefully observe the trees, shrubs, flowers, ani- 
mals, birds, insects and the common metals and minerals, 
thus awakening their perceptive faculties, [n this line also 
has been the enlarging of our history and language courses. 

NOYES PRIZE MEDALS. 

When the present method of recording the scholarship of 
the pupils was adopted by the board of education it became 
evident that it would be impossible to determine with perfect 
fairness the four pupils to whom the Noyes silver medals 
should be awarded. The matter being presented to Colonel 
Frank G. Noyes, he, after careful consideration, determined 
to make a radical change in the awarding of the medals. In- 
stead of being as heretofore, for general excellence in scholar- 
ship and deportment for the four years, they are to be dis- 
tinctly medals for excellence in English. They are to be 
made of gold and but two will be awarded, one to the boy 
with the highest rank in English, this rank to be kept on the 
decimal system, the other to the girl whose work shows the 
greatest excellence in this subject. 

The money which remains after the medals are bought is 
to be used for the purchase of books for the High School 
library. 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOLS. 

The evening drawing school of last winter and the one at 
present in session places this department upon a secure foot- 
ing. The work has been enthusiastically entered into by pu- 
pils in courses both mechanical, architectural and free-hand. 
Last spring after the close of the school there was an exhibit 
of the work accomplished. Taking into consideration that it 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



was the work of but a sinole term it reflected credit both on 
the instructors and the pu^Diis. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The evening school during the past winter opened at the 
Main street school building. It consisted of four rooms under 
the charge of Messrs. McKay, Clough, Smith and Rice. 
During the first part of the term the attendance was good and 
the interest well sustained; during the last part the attend- 
ance fell away rapidly, so much so that the four rooms were 
contracted into two. This winter the school was opened in 
the High School building where the pupils have the advan- 
tage of larger desks and better light. 

Thus far the attendance has been good and the school bids 
fair to accomplish its purpose, namely, to give men and 
women, who have been unfortunate in securing an early edu- 
cation, a chance to improve themselves and also to offer to 
the ambitious boy or girl a good business course in book- 
keeping, writing and arithmetic. 

BUILDINGS. 

The two requisites in a school building are ventilation and 
light. In regard to the ventilation it has been well said that 
one ought to choose a good ventilating system and then put 
the school building about it. It is hard for people to realize, 
living as they do two or three persons in half a dozen rooms, 
how utterly different the conditions are in school where thirty 
or forty pupils are placed in one room. When thoughtfully 
considered it is easily seen that a method of ventilation appli- 
cable to the home is probably entirely inadequate for the 
school. We have several buildings constructed many years 
ago whose system of ventilation is wretchedly poor. Some- 
thing ought to be done to improve their condition in this re- 



10 REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

spect. I would especially mention the Main street, Harbor, 
O'Donnell and Belvidere schools. 

The importance of good light in the school room is appar- 
ent. The constantly increasing use of glasses among school 
children is very noticeable, and, without question, there are 
many who ought to use them who do not. While imperfect 
light in the school room is not the sole cause of this increase 
in the use of glasses yet I know of several schoolrooms in this 
city where the light on clouded days must be injurious to the 
eyes of the children. This is noticeably so in the upper 
rooms of the Mt. Pleasant building. I venture the opinion 
that were the other buildings, which have been built over 
twenty-five years, remodeled on modern ideas of lighting, 
there would be a larger amoimt of window glass used than 
they have at present. 

The need of two new schoolliouses mentioned in the report 
of last year still exists. The lack of a building in ward Two 
necessitated the opening of a sixth grade in the upper story of 
Mt. Pleasant, and the failure to obtain the school near Kinsley 
street, asked for by the board of education, caused the tearing 
out of the cloak rooms on the second floor of the Harbor 
school and the finishing of this space into a schoolroom. It 
also compelled the overcrowding of the lower grades of the 
Palm and Mulberry street schools; besides the transfer of a 
number of children to other districts. 

A word as to the character of the school buildings. The 
policy of most cities at the present time, unless they erect a 
large central school, is to put up a building at a moderate 
cost. Then, when the city outgrows the school, as all pro- 
gressive cities are bound to do, they have not an expensive 
building to throw away, and usually the increase in the price 
of land will more than equal the original cost of the moderate 
buildinsf. 



superintendent's report. 11 

school money. 

In touching upon the finances of the schools we must take 
into careful consideration the conditions under which the ex- 
penditures exist. We are not dealing with the protection of 
our property from fire, neither are we dealing with the con- 
struction or maintenance of a sewer system, but with the de- 
veloping of the moral and intellectual power of our future cit- 
izens. In conducting a system upon which is based the in- 
tellectual growth of our children is it right to give them poor 
books and not enough of them ; is it right to contract their 
necessities, to crowd fifty or sixty into a poorly lighted and 
poorly ventilated room, there to be kept in order by one 
teacher.^ 

How much mental growth is possible under these condi- 
tions.' This economy, if it is such, can be done in this city. 
By placing fifty or more children in a room the city could re- 
duce the number of schools certainly one-third and the ex- 
penses in nearly the same ratio. But the result would cer- 
tainly be disastrous to the welfare of the pupils, for, while 
saving one-third of the expenses, a far greater part of the effi- 
ciency of the teacher is being lost. How anyone could wish, 
much less take pride, in being parsimonious where the train- 
ing and mental growth of the children of a city is concei^ned 
is beyond my comprehension. Upon the education of to-day 
depends the success of to-morrow. A just criticism would be 
that we are not progressive enough in giving the best to the 
children instead of which one hears only that "we are spend- 
ing too much money on education." Such criticisms when 
rightly considered are in reality the higliest commendations 
and the thoughtful men of the community recognize them as 
such. To one who has watched the growth of the mind of 
the child as he passes through the several stages of school life, 
it becomes apparent that here is happening the most impor- 
tant function of the state, the making of a good intelligent cit- 



12 KEPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION, 

izen. Tliat the accomplishing of this work in the best way 
should be hampered and restricted for the sake of saving a 
fraction of a mill on the tax rate is a narrow and bigoted way 
of looking at a most important subject. The fault finding 
originates from the large property holders without children. 
They fail to realize thi\t if the public school system were abol- 
ished, under the present socialistic tendency of the masses, 
their property in a very few years would be worth absolutely 
nothing. It is the public schools alone which can preserve 
the integrity of the state. 

The expenses of last year will be found in the itemized re- 
port of the city clerk under "School Expenditures." Each 
itemized bill there has been approved by two committees of 
the school board and is open to the inspection of anyone 
who will take the trouble to call for the report. 

TEACHERS. 

It is due to the teachers of this city to speak of the interest 
which actuates the entire corps in their work. They are as a 
whole widely read and have a decided enthusiasm for their 
profession. They have organized and maintained for a num- 
ber of years a teachers' club, the object of which is the con- 
sideration and discussion of pedagogical and literary subjects. 
The standard of literary work done in the club has been and 
is remarkably high. A large proportion of our teachers each 
year attend our summer schools. 

They are keenly alive to the responsibility of their position 
and are constantly working for the improvement of our 
schools. At the present time twenty-five of our city teachers 
(nearly 40 per cent.) have had either college or normal train- 
ing. 

WORK OF SPECIAL INSTRUCTORS. 

For an accurate account of the work done in drawing and 



superintendent's report. 13 



music I would refer to the special reports of these two de- 
partments. It is due them however to speak of the excellent 
work accomplished ; in music throughout all the grades and 
in drawing particularly in the upper grades. I wish also to 
speak here of the very satisfactory results which ai-e being ac- 
complished at the training school. The work both with the 
children and with the normal class deserves the highest com- 
mendation. 

In closing I wish to thank all who are connected with the 
schools for their many acts of kindness and their uniform sup- 
port during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES H. FASSETT, 

Superintendent. 



Report of the Director of Music. 



Nashua, N. H., January 24, 1895. 
To ^Ir. Javies H. Fassett^ Superinlcndent of Schools : 

Dear Sir: — My report for 1890 calletl your attention to or- 
ganization and plans for the future, that for 1891 to labor and 
progress, that for 1892 to growth in matter and method, and 
that for 1893 to results which promised much for the coming 
years. 

In this my fifth annual report, therefore, it becomes us to in- 
quire whether or not the fulfillment of the promise of 1893 is 
at hand. 

OUR STAR. 

Emerson, the sage of Concord, wisely said, "Hitch your 
wagon to a star," thus intimating that when the aim is high 
the achievement cannot but approximate the mark. What is 
the star to which our wagon is hitched and how far from the 
mark is our achievement.'' Do we occupy ourselves "in sen- 
timental directions looking for the aesthetic and spiritual ad- 
vantages to be derived from singing"? Do we "aim at mak- 
ing our pupils good readers of music in the sense of being able 
to sing from notes at sight, with the same ease and certainty 
with which the ordinary person reads language from books" .^ 
Do we "hope to make something of musicians of our boys 
and girls"? To each and all of these questions let us unhesi- 



16 REPORT OF THE BOAKD OF EDUCATION. 

tatingly answer, Yes. But let us not forget, that, while we 
occupy ourselves in sentimental directions, while we strive to 
make good readers of music of our boys and girls, while we 
hope to make of some of them at least something ot musi- 
cians, the great purpose of our work is the development of 
men and women. This is the star to which our wagon is 
hitched. Let us inquire then who is a man, who is a woman, 
and how shall the study of music contribute to the develop- 
ment. A man or a woman is a human being whose every 
power and faculty has reached the highest development 
of which that power or faculty is capable. Every child 
is endowed to a greater or less degree with thought and feel- 
ing. Music is but an expression of thought or feeling. In- 
struction in music therefore should not only teach the child to 
sing, (imitate the expression of the thought or feeling of an- 
other), to sing at sight, (read the representation of the ex- 
pression of the thought or feeling of another), but should 
develop to its highest point of excellence the very thought 
and feeling of the cliild. 

"A thought is like a seed ot corn, 
That springs in the human mind, 
As quickly as the other doth 
From the surface of the earth, 
When it is lodged hy gentle wind 
On some warm, bright April morn. 

And it, if we but cultivate, 
Will grow much like the other, 
And in due time will well mature. 
And stalk and blow, and thus assure 
The silk, and ear, that will mother 
Thousands. 'Twill thus propagate. 

From the one, on second sowing. 
The farmer will an almud 
Gather, which in turn, if cast 
By careful hands, will soon vast 
Acres cover, and like a wood. 
In miniature be growing. 



MUSIC directok's report. 17 

Thus the thought In tlie suul of man, 
Like the corn, doth germinate. 
But grander, vaster, more sublime 
Than all things else, in all time, 
Is the fullness of its fruitage, 
A great and a perfect mind." 

Ill the giowth of the material seed of corn, soil, climate, 
sun, rain, and the watchfid care of the husbandman are es- 
sential elements. In the growth of the human mind, birth, 
parentage, environment, and personal effort contribute much 
toward perfection. Yet in the development of the latter — the 
spiritual part of man, the essential element is communion with 
other and greater minds. 

If, therefore, the child can sing only, (imitate the expres- 
sion of the tliought or feeling of another), his development 
from this source is limited indeed. If he can sing at sight 
even, (read the representation of the expression of the 
thought or feeling of another), his development from com- 
munion with other and greater minds will be enhanced but in 
a small degree, unless we lead him to the vast and ever-in- 
creasing store of thought and feeling as expressed in the com- 
positions of the masters in the art. 

In our Kindergartens the child is led to sing for pure sen- 
sual enjoyment. In our Primary, Intermediate and Grammar 
schools he is taught to sing at sight for pleasure and intellec- 
tual development. In our High school we are beginning to 
afford him a knowledge of the lives and labors of the great 
composers, and opportunity for the study of their creations. 
It is here that he begins to realize the fullness of sensual, in- 
tellectual and spiritual development, and it is alone from such 
development that he can pass from the confines of the school- 
room to active life with its attendant burdens and responsibil- 
ities, possessed of a voice with which to express his highest 
thought and feeling, ability to interpret the representation of 
the expression of the thought and feeling of another, aknowl- 



18 REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

edge of the thought and feeling of the ripest minds who liave 
expressed themselves in the art, and a standard of excellence 
which cannot fail to conduce to pure, elevated feeling, think- 
ing and living. 

Again let me say this — the development of men and 
women, is the star to which our wagon is hitched, and aU 
though the wheels upon its axles may be groaning deep in the 
mire and clay of earth, I rejoice that it is moving onward, 
ever onward, toward the beacon in the clear blue sky above, 
be it ever so far. 

OUR ACHIEVEMENT. 

How far is the star from our wagon? Alas! alas! let us 
ask rather, how far is the wagon from the star? 

In the Kindergarten we are singing. 

In the Primary, Intermediate and Grammar schools we are 
singing at sight. 

In the High school we are entering our boys and girls Vv^ith 
commendable proficiency in the art, so that in September last 
we were able to begin a four years' course of study, based up- 
on the works of the great masters. 

NEW HIGH SCHOOL WORK. 

This work is conducted somewhat as follows: 

The pupils of the school are divided into Glee clubs or 
small classes according to their individual proficiency, and 
meet the Director once each week for a sixty-minute exer- 
cise. 

A composer is selected for especial study during the term, 
and the first five or ten minutes of the music period devoted 
to conversation upon the interesting and important features of 
his life. 

Mendelssohn, for example : Who was he ? When was he 



MUSIC director's report. 19 

born? What was bis parentage? How were the days of his 
boyhood spent ? What did he accomplish in early manhood ? 
Where did he live? Who were his teachers? Whence did 
he draw inspiration? Who v/ere his predecessors? Who 
were his contemporaries? What are considered his most im- 
portant creations? What has been his influence upon his 
successors? 

The study of one of the compositions of the master is then 
undertaken. Mendelssohn's "Morning Prayer," for ex- 
ample : 

The pupils are first led to look over the text for the pur- 
pose of getting at the thought which possessed the master at 
the time of writing. 

"Tlie deep repose of night i-i endi'.iif, 

Still slumbei" lies on every eye; 
The woods alone are gently bending, 

As though the Lord were passing by." 

It is not a difficult matter to lead the pupils to picture Men- 
delssohn in solitary meditation at earlv dawn, with hands 
clasped behind his bending form, slowly pacing to and fro 
beneath the shelter of the foliage surrounding his beloved gar- 
den house. At this early hour not even the birds are awake. 
All is still, save perhaps the treetops gently moving in the 
morning breeze. How beautifully is the thought put — 



''The woods alone are gently bending, 
As though the Lord were passing by." 



Thus even in their unconscious movement acknowledging 
the presence of their creator. 

"I feel myself as new created; 

Care, pain and want are passed away, 
Restored by sleeji, 1 rise elated, 

To praise my God another day.' 



20 REPOKT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

The anxieties of the preceding night are gone, at least for 
the present, and inspired by the very newness of the day, 
even re-creation seems ahnost a realitv. 



"Tliis world where joy and grief abide us, 
Is not the pilgrims' native clime ; 

I pass it as a bridge to guide ns 

To Thee, across the stream of time." 



Hardly has the thought of re-creation possessed his soul, 
when his eye perhaps falls upon the scattered and decaying 
foliage at his feet, and he is reminded that death and dissolu- 
tion to man is nearer even "than is the jugular vein to the 
throat." Yes! ves ! he exclaims: 



"It is but a bridge to guide us 

To Thee, ucross the stream of time." 

This perhaps was the thought of the composer when he 
wrote his "Morning Prayer." 

Now let us see how he clothed it in song, how he expressed 
his thought in melody, and the thought of Mendelssohn has 
become our very own. 

Such stud}^ as this is bringing the minds of our boys and 
girls into communion with the mind of Mendelssohn. vSuch 
thoughts as these cannot lead but to the development of men 
and women. 

RESULTS. 

Some weeks ago, while enthusiastically dilating upon the 
merits of our Nashua High School work in music, my com- 
panion remarked, "You say that you have spent not more 
than ten minutes a week conversing upon Mendelssohn, and 
that the facts stated to the pupils in these ten minutes are the 



MUSIC director's report. 21 

only means of information afforded them in the work. Much 
indeed will they know ot his life and labors at the end of the 
term." 

Mr. Superintendent, let us see what was their knowledge. 

The schools closed abruptly in the eleventh week of the 
term on account of the prevalence of contagious diseases in 
the city. They remained closed four weeks, and at the open- 
ing of the present term, four weeks ago, the study of another 
composer was undertaken. 

Last Wednesday, after a lapse of eight weeks since con- 
versing upon Mendelssohn, the pupils were astonished by be- 
ing provided with pen, ink and paper, instead of music as 
usual, and each one requested to "Tell me all you know about 
the life of Mendelssohn." 

The result was indeed gratifying, as the following speci- 
men paper will indicate : 

MENDELSSOHN. 

Mendelssohn was born in Haniburji, Germany, in 1809. His fatlier was a 
wealtli}- Jewish banker, and Iiis mother a lady ol culture. 

Mendelssohn showed a taste for music at an early age. His mother was his 
first teacher; his second teacher was a good local teacher and his third 
teacher was Zella. Mendelssohn began to compose at the age of twelve. He 
was taken to Mocheles, a celebrated pianist of that ^ime, and Mocheles said 
that he could leach him nothing about music. His father then took him to 
Cherubini, an Italian musician, who was in Paris at that tmie, and Cherubini 
said that Mendelssohn was a fine musician. 

Mendelssohn went to England wiien he was about twenty years old and re- 
mained there for a while l)ut was called home by the death of one of his pa- 
rents. He made another trip through some parts of Europe aiid at this time 
met.Berlioz, a musician of some renown. 

Some of Mendelssohn's most noted compositions are, "The Oratorio of Eli- 
jah," "Oratorio of St. Paul," and "Overture to Midsummer Night's Dream." 
His part songs are considered verj- fine. He had an excellent memoiy and at 
one time the score of one of his orchestral compositions being lost, he wrote 
tlie piece all out again and sometime after the first copy was found and com- 
pared with the second .and they were exactly the same. 



22 REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



Mendelssohn died very suddenly in 1847, having been sick but a sliorl time. 
His predecessors were Bach, Mozart and Beethoven ; his contemporaries, 
Berlioz, Listz and Schuman. 

(Signed) Mabel E. Brown, 

Nashua High School Senior Class Glee Club. 
Nashua, N. H., January 16, 1895. 

PREVIOUS REPORTS. 

In my previous reports I have so fully discussed the work 
of our Primary, Intermediate, Grammar and Suburban schools 
that it seems hardly necessary to add anything at this time. 

It may, however, be pertinent for me to call your attention 
to the following extracts from my reports and other writings 
of 1891, 1892, 1893 and 1894, regarding sight singing in the 
Primary grades : 

If vocal music is to achieve its greatest possible success and accomplish its 
greatest possible good in the public schools of to-day, it, as a study, "must be 
intensely practical, must have a perfectly attainable goal, and a carefully de- 
fined road by which that goal is to be approached." 



It will be well, therefore, for us to consider for a moment the child and the 
purpose for which he is sent to school. Tiie latest advances in pedagogy 
have established that "a child is sent to school to acquire power and to ac- 
quire knowledge." 

To educate, they tell us, "is to develop power ; to instruct, is to impart 
knowledge." In other words, the child is sent to school to be educated, and 
the "end and aim of education is to develop the faculties of the mind and 
body." With respect to music, therefore, the child is sent to school to have 
his mental and physical musical faculties and organs developed. 

As the voice is the sole physical musical organ which he possesses, and as 
voice building should not be undertaken until the voice is matured, our duty 
is to conserve the voice or physical musical organ ot the child until it is ma- 
tured, which places it largely beyoTid the public school period of the child's 
life, and address our attention to the development of the child's mental musi- 
cal faculties, using the voice which we conserve, simply as a vehicle of ex- 
pression on the part of the child of the operation of his mind. 



I maintain that, if the best possible results are to be attained in our High 
and Grammar schools, it is in the Primary school that the foundation must be 



MUSIC director's report. 23 



laid. For many years primary work in music has consisted largely of vote 
singing, that is, sinking by imitation, and but little has been attempted in 
sight work until the third or ibnrtii school-year. Now, rote singing has but 
little influence upon the intellectual powers of the child, appealing chiefly to 
the senses. It is analogous to talking, wliile sight singing is analagous to read- 
ing. As it is necessary for a teacher to talk with a class that the pupils may 
learn to use their voices naturalh' and pleasantly and to call out their imagi- 
nation, so is il necessary that they shall have a proper amount of rote singing to 
the same end ; but a teacher who for three or four years did little with her 
class, save talking, would soon ije obliged to give way to a more intelligent 
instructor; and so the methods of the last lwent3-tive years and more, which 
for the tirst tliree or lour years of the child's school-life do little but rote sing- 
ing, must in the light of the new education, give way to more advanced 
schemes. 



Our business as teachers is to receive tlie child with its child's voice, con- 
serve that child voice during that child's school life, and instruct that child in 
the notation. 



Wlien man is content to sit at the feet of the child in song, and confine his 
jiedagogical efforts to the development of a knowledge of the printed symbols 
of that in wliich the child is already the master of us all, then, and not till 
then, will the greatest possible success attend his labors. 



I maintain that the elementary knowledge of music and sight reading 
should be assured when the classes enter the Grammar school, and not left 
until the time when they shall leave it for tlie High school. Why ? Because it is 
about this time that the vf)ices of our boys begin to trouble us in entering the 
mutation period, with a consequent uncertainty of pitch. The fact that our 
boys in the past twenty-five years :ind more have been obliged to labor with 
their troublesome, changing voices, and the difficulties of notation at one and 
the same time, has been the primary cause of the lack of interest in singing 
manifested by these same boys, which has resulted in most of them giving up 
the work in disgust and discouragement, and being excused from tiie singing 
exercises "because they could not sing." And this one fact, to my mind, 
satisfactorily explains the great dearth of men singers to-day. 

If we are to save our boys, we must place them in command cf the ele- 
ments ol the notation before this period, and to do this it must be accom- 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



plished before the sixth year of scliool, or, in olher words, wlieii tliey enter 
the Grammar school. 



The work that Nashua has accomplished in the past few years in the line ot 
elementary instruction in sight singing, is already attracting the attention of 
educators, and the method of instruction wliich your teachers and director 
have been instrumental in investigating, introducing and developing in the 
first three years of the child's scliool life will grow. It may bo called the 
Nashua system. Inductive Sight Song, or be known by any other name you 
may be pleased to term it. Nasluia, as the place of its inception, may be for- 
gotten, and the name ot your director in connection therewith become un- 
known ; but the idea, its underlying principle, that the eye and not the ear in 
elementary instruction in sight singing is the avenue par excellence to the 
mind, will live and grow, until by one name or another it shall be so recog- 
nized from the metropolis to its veriest suburb. 

T.HE NASHUA DOCTRINE. 

Thus we see that for five years Nashtia has been preaching 
the doctrine of sight singing in the lower grades, and for five 
years has been battling against the traditional schemes of in- 
struction and has maintained that the world vet would follow. 

It is, therefore, with some professional pride, that I quote 
the following from an editorial in the Boston Herald of Janu- 
ary 30, 1895: 

"A thoughtful consideration of the papers that are appearing in the Herald 
regarding the teaching of music in our public schools leads to the conclusion 
that there is too much that is theoretical and too little that is practical in it. 

* * * The most that should be attempted is instructing the pupils in 
sight reading, which, of course, includes imparting knowledge on the subject 
of rhythm and of the prevailing system of notation. * * * Sight reading 
can be made deeply interesting to pupils of even the tenderest years by a 
competent teacher in sympathy with the understanding and the methods of 
thought pursued by children. * * *- Over much of the teaching of music 
in these institutions is waste of time, especially rote singing, which is no 
teaching at all, and leaves the pupils as helpless before a piece of music with 
which ihey are not acquainted as they were before. All that should be at- 
tempted is to teach them to know the intervals at sight, to sound them when 
they see them, and to sing Ihemin the rhythms indicated. This once learned 
is never forgotten. 



MUSIC director's report. 25 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, let me add that it would be egotistical in- 
deed on the part of your director to permit himself to pre- 
sume for one moment that the writer of this editorial is 
aware that for the past few years Nashua has been working 
upon the general lines thus indicated. Yet such is the fact, 
as shown bv our reports, and it is a fact to which, in years to 
come, we may point with commendable pride, for in things 
educational it is no small matter to anticipate the thought of 
the age even by a few short years. 

Acknowledging my obligations to you, sir, the Board of 
Education, the teachers, pupils and citizens of Nashua, I re- 
spectfully submit this, my fifth annual report. 

E. W. PEARSON, 

Director of Music. 



Report of Director of Drawing. 



Nashua, N, H., Januaiy 21, 1895. 
J/r. James H. Fassett^ Superintendefit of Schools : 

Dear Sir : — In this enlightened day I am still occasionally 
asked, "Really now, what good do you think drawing does to 
the average school child? Of course, I know it is ver3' nice, 
but—" 

Let me try to answer the above. In the first place, what is 
meant by drawing? A really good story is never old, hence 
I venture to repeat this one of the child's definition. "Draw- 
ing," she said, meditatively, "drawing is thinking and then 
drawing around the think." 

This is the fundamental idea, unconscioush' stated by the 
little one, of the present system of drawing in the public 
schools. 

Thinking — then drawing — doing! It is not enough that a 
child shall have a certain ability, he must use that ability. 
Individual observation and expression would bring this power 
to do, and the commencement of this observing, thinking, ex- 
pressing, doing must be in the lowest primary grades, the 
earliest attempt at education. But what can these babies ob- 
serve or express, of what can their unformed minds think? 

The child sees with his fingers as much as with his eyes. 
The sense of touch is of as much value to him in the acquire- 
ment of knowledge as is the sense of sight. So there are put 
into the child's hands type solids and the child is led to ob- 



28 UEPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

serve these for himself, to handle, to look at in every possible 
position and to compare with other things. Bnt this self- 
gained knowledge is useless to him unless he can express it. 

The child's vocabulary is necessarily limited l)ut his concep- 
tion of form may be great, and the means of expressing form 
are within his power. What he learns by handling and com- 
paring the type forms he is able to express, after his own 
fashion, by modeling in clay, by cutting in paper, and by 
drawing, long before the necessary words would have much 
meaning to him. 

The most concrete means of expression are by motleling the 
object in clay. Next comes tablet and stick laying, as expres- 
sive of faces and edges. Then naturally would follow draw- 
ing, tending more towards the abstract, and lastly the com- 
pletely abstract written or printed word. 

The question maybe asked — "How are these elements used 
in the present system of form study as taught m our public 
schools .''" 

The sphere is the simplest universal form, and Froebel in- 
sists, not that the teacher shall have a sphere to hold up before 
her class for them to study, but that every child shall be given 
one in his hands, to feel of, to look at, to roll. He holds it 
up in front, traces about it with his finger, thinks of anything, 
everything he has ever seen which was like it. Having found 
that it is smooth, is round in every way, has no edges or cor- 
ners, will roll, and resembles his ball, his marbles, an orange, 
and so many more things, he moulds it in clay. Then he 
finds he can hold up a tablet, a circle which will exactly hide 
his sphere, — cover it. He can trace about this tablet and 
have a perfect picture of a sphere ; he can draw a picture of 
it, a free-hand circle, not so perfect a picture is it, as the one 
he traced, yet it means as much or more to him. By and by 
he models and draws his apple and other approximate spheri- 
cal forms. 

The cube and cylinder are studied in order, compared with 



DRAWING director's REPORT. 29 

the sphere, modeled, drawn, and their approximates studied, 
modeled, drawn. 

Then little stories are told about the models, '"My ball is 
like a sphere"; "The cube has six corners", etc. ; and lastly 
the little stories may be written, and the purely abstract stage 
is reached. 

With the cube and cylinder, the child gets ideas of faces 
and edges, neither of which are found in the sphere. The 
child learns to know the square and oblong, he cuts them 
from paper, makes them with sticks, draws them. Then en- 
tering the region of historic ornament he lays his squares in a 
row, puts a stick above and below and he has a border. 

In due order are studied the prism, the ellipsoid, ovoid, 
pyramid and cone. From his models, he obtains the circle, 
square, oblong, triangles, ellipse, and oval, the plane, round 
and curved faces, straight and curved edges. 

The whole theory of individual drawing is based upon the 
fact that we are not educating children when we are cram- 
ming their heads with facts and theories, but that their educa- 
tion really has commenced when they can give some expres- 
sion of those ideas, some manifestation of those facts. 

The subject of drawing includes, from the first, three grand 
divisions, representation, construction, design. Representa- 
tion includes all free hand drawing of the appearance of ob- 
jects, tablet laying and modeling, illustrative drawing and all 
drawing from nature. 

Constructive drawing — free hand in the lower grades, me- 
chanical in the higher — gives the facts about objects and in- 
cludes working drawings, development of surfaces, geomet- 
rical drawing. 

The subject of design, decoration, includes the study of his- 
toric ornament, the principles of historic design, the applica- 
tion of nature to ornament and the study of original design. 

Each of these three divisions contributes not only towards 
the child's ability in the line of skilled labor, but also to that 



30 REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

no less important element in a successful citizen, his knowl- 
edge and appreciation of the beautiful. 

Now just a word in regard to what has been and still is be- 
ing done in our own schools. It gives nie pleasure to report 
progress all along the line, and a decided gain over the previ- 
ous year's work. 

The spirit shown, both by pupils and teachers and their 
willingness to do whatever has been asked of them in connec- 
tion with my work, has been such a matter of self congratu- 
lation with me that I desire at this time to make mention of 
it. 

An exhibition of the evening drawing and day school work 
was held at the close of the winter term. At this exhibition 
selected drawings from every grade in the city and covering 
the work from September to April were shown together 
with entire lessons from nearly ever\' grade, the object being 
to have every pupil represented, if possible. 

While an exhibition of this kind involves a vast amount of 
work in collecting, assorting and arranging material, I con- 
sider an occasional one a helpful incentive to pupils and 
teachers. Parents and friends of the school are thus able to 
see just what is being done along various lines in our schools. 

That part of the exhibition devoted to the evening drawing 
school showed some very creditable, earnest work done by the 
students there. 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

So far this year the evening drawing school has had a very 
good attendance. When the school opened, the teaching 
corps consisted of the principal and three assistants, Mr. R. 
P. Elliott, in charge of the machine class, Mr. Herzog, in 
charge of the elementary mechanical class and Miss Locke in 
charge of the architectural class, with the free hand class es- 
pecially under my own care. That class was found to be al- 



DRAWING director's REPORT. 31 



together too large for one teacher to handle so at present I am 
ably assisted by Miss Jackman. 

The break in our school term, caused by the unavoidable 
closing of the schools, together with the great amount of sick- 
ness in our city, has caused a falling off in our attendance 
which we exceedingly regret. However, the work in all de- 
partments goes on enthusiastically and it is safe to count on 
some extremely creditable results. 

'Tis well said. "Drawing is the framework of all kinds of 
art and mechanical construction ; drawing is the foundation 
of it all ; in and around and upon it is perfection reached." 
Respectfully submitted, 

KATE B. WENT WORTH, 

Director of Drawing. 



STATISTICS 



AND 



TRUANT OFFICER'S REPORT. 



34 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PZDUCATION. 



TEACHERS, DAY SCHOOLS, JANUARY, 1895. 



GRADE OK POSI- 










NAME AND SCHOOL. 


ELECTION. 


SALARY. 


TION. 










HIGH. 






Principal, 


Lemuel S. Hastings, 


July 1889 


$2,000 


Sub -Master, 


Charles H. Noves, 


JnlV 1892 


1.000 


Assistant, 


Herbert E. Colby, 


April 1894 


650 


" 


Jessie E. Taylor, 


July 1888 


700 


'- 


Josephine F. Hall, 


Julv 1893 


700 


( ■■ 


Clara F. Preston, 


JulV 1893 


700 




M. Josephine Hodgdon, 

SPRING STREET GKA3IMAR. 


Sept 1894 


600 


Grade 9, 


Clara E. Upton, 


July 1883 


600 


8, 


Ida F. Wallace, 


Feb 1881 


450 


8, 


Elsie A. Moulton, 


June 1889 


4^0 


" 7, 


Ella F. Wheeler, 


April 1875 


450 


" 7, 


Mary M. Morrill, 

WT. PLEASANT. 


July 1890 


450 


Grade 9, 


Frank W. Lakeman, Prin 


April 1894 


1,000 




_, R. Thomas, 


June 1889 


500 


rade 8, 


Nellie G. McChire, • 


July 1884 


450 


" 7, 


Mary B. Davis, 


July 1893 


450 


" 6a, 


Cora 15. Wheeler, 


Julv 1893 


450 


" 6b, 


Nellie B. Hobhs, 


Sept 1893 


425 


" 0, 


Hattie M. Gordon, 


April 1890 


400 


" 4, 


Martha M. De Wolfe, 


July 1888 


40v) 


" 3, 


Sara A. Collins, 


Mav 1871 


400 


•' 2, 


Estelle C. Shattuck, 


June 1882 


400 


1, 


Mabelle P. Emerson, 


July 1890 


400 


1, 


Carrie L. Ober, 

ARLINGTON STREET. 


July 1889 


400 


Grade 9, 


Ella M. Armes, Prin. 


July 1890 


700 


" 8, 


ive J. Dodge, 


Juiie 1894 


400 


" 7, 


Carrie J. Tolles, 


Sept 1886 


450 


" 6. 


Anne G. Sliea, 


June 1891 


450 


" 5, 


Euminnie S. Gould, 


Julv 1890 


400 


4, 


Clara J. M. Gage, 


Jul'y 1893 


400 


" 3, 


Lilla M. Hon, 


July 1893 


375 


" 2, 


Ellen M. Nolan, 


Sept 1894 


375 


" 1, 


Ellen L. Reilly, 

MAIN STREET. 


July 1881 


400 


Grade 6, 


Fannie A. Alorrison, Prin. 


Jan 1878 


600 


" 6, 


Harriet R. Spalding, 


June 1891 


450 


" 0, 


Delia P. Fiske, 


Aug 1878 


400 


" 4, 


Augusta W. Putnam, 


Aug 1892 


400 


" 3, 


Gertrude F. Bond, 


June 1892 


400 



STATISTICS. 



35 



TEACHERS, DAY SCHOOLS, JANUARY 189 o.— [Continued. \ 



GRADE OR POSI- 
TIOX. 


XABiE anh school. 


ELECTION. 


SALARY. 




MAIN STREET. 






Grade 2, 
1, 
1, 


Hattie E. Farley, 
Sadie A. Speare, 
Kate L. Wheeler, 


May 1879 
June 1891 
July 1890 


$400 
400 
400 




HARBOR. 


• 




Grade 5, 

4, 

*' 3 and 2, 

" 1, 

" 1, 


I izzie G. Farley, Prin., 
Kate.T. Sullivan," 
Clara M. Wheeler, 
Grace E. Hayden, 
Fannie E. Clark, 

MULBERRY STREET. 


June 1887 
Julv 1890 
Juiy 1893 
April 1893 
July 1880 


;jOO 
400 
400 
376 
400 


Grade 3 and 2, 
1, 


Mary E. Law, Prin. 
Henrietta Starrett, 

PALM STREET. 


Jan 1865 
April 1894 


450 
375 


Grade 4 and 3, 
" 2 and 1, 

" 1, 


Mary L. Hammond, Priii 
Jane E. Thayer, 
Lizzie B. Field, 
Ida E. Smith, 

o'doxxell. 


April 1863 
Sept 1892 
July 1893 
April 1894 


500 
400 
400 
375 


Grade 5 and 4, 
" 3, 
" 2. 
" 1, 


Sara C. Whittle, Prin. 
Lizzie M. Wood, 
Ella M. Wilson, 
Ella (J. Valconr, 

BELVIDERE. 


Jan 1882 
Nov 1894 
Julv 1890 
Oct 1892 


450 
400 
400 
400 


Grade 4 and 3, 
" l", 


Mabel E. Rogers, Prin. 
Ad die L. Wilson, 
Kate A. Burn^s, 

EDGEVILLE. 


June 1887 
June 1889 
Sept 1891 


450 

400 
400 


Grade 1, 2 and 3, 


Marcella E. Shea. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 


July 1891 


400 


Principal, 
Trainers, 


Lilly p. Shepard, 
Josephine Sullivan, 
Florence ]SL Holmes, 
Ada E. Bum]uis, 
Mattie S. Colbin-n, 
Alice S. Hosmer, 
Annie D. MacGregor, 


Aug 1893 


1,400 



36 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



TEACHERS. DAY SCHOOL, JANUAKY, ISdo. — [Concluded.] 



GllADE OR POSI- 
TION. 


NAME AND SCHOOL. 


ELECTION. 


SALARY. 




TRAINING SCHOOL. 








Trainers, 


Helen F. Richmond, 

KINDERGARTEN, PEARL ST. 








Principal, 
Ai-sistant, 


Jennie E. Farley, 
Emma E. Fairbanks, 

AMHERST STREET. 


July 
June 


1892 
1887 


#420 
400 


Principal, 


Pearl Richardson, 

SUBURBANS. 


Sept 


1894 


400 


No. 1, 
" 2, 
" ■^, 
'• 4, 
" fi, 
" <^, 
" 7, 


Bertha H. Hunter, 
Annie S. Tuttle, 
*Alma Hnnt, 
Georoe Graves, 
Walter F. Sargent, 
L. Edith Blaisdell, 
William F. Howe, 


June 
Sept 

Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 


1891 
1894 
1894 
1894 
1894 
1893 
1894 


Per w. 10 00 
10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

9 00 

10 00 


Music, 

Drawing, 

Superintendent, 

Assistant, 


E. W. Pearson. 
K. B. Wentworth, 
J. H. Kassett, 
Grace M. Vickery, 


Aug 1890 
Sept 1892 
April 189.3 
Nov 1894 


11,00 
l.COO 
1,500 

Per d. l.ee 



*Substitute. 



STATISTICS. 



37 



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REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



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44 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



Siimmaiy of Monthly Reports for the year ending Dec. 1894. 



Total 
Enroll- 
ment for 
month. 



Boys, 



'So 

C 

o 



E 



o 



bJO 



be 






bfl 



bJO 






a. 



1st month 
2nd month 
3rd month 
4th month 
5th month 
6th month 
7th month 
8th month 
9th month 

Total 



1154 
1156 
1158 
1198 
1191 
1170 
1332 
1354 
1310 



1012 
1012 
1013 
1101 
1076 
1062 
1199 
1217 
1195 



2166 
2168 
2171 
2299 
2267 
2232 
2531 
2571 
2505 



1224 1097 



2322 



2084 
2117 
2121 
2167 
2205 
2118 
2378 
2461 
2342 



2224 



1663.9 
1882.3 
1892.3 
2032.7 
1991.9 
1942.6 
2224.7 
2248.8 
2126.6 

2000.6 



94.24 

89.77 

89.23 

92.28 

84.9 

92.1 

91.7 

87.4 

83.8 

89.38 



Condensed Statistics^ 

Taken from Monthly Reports for the Fiscal Year of 
1.S93 AND 1894. 



Average number belonging, 1893, 20,09 

" " " 1894, 2,224 

" daily attendance, 1893, 1,818.7 

1894, 2,000.6 

Whole number enrolled for November, 1893, 2,200 

" " " " " 1894, 2.571 

Average number belonging for November, 1893, 2,111 

" " " " " 1894, 2,481 

" daily attendance for November, 1893, 2,001 

" " " " " 1894, 2,24S.S 



Condensed Statistics 

Taken from Registers for the School Year Ending 
June 29, 1894. 



Length of school year, 

Time lost on account of weather, etc., 

G ra m mar Grades, 

Primary Grades, 
Number of pupils who have not been absent. 
Number of teachers who have had normal or college 
training, 

Number of visits of local superintendent, 
Number of visits of local committee, 
Number of visits of parents and others, 
Largest number in any class, 
Smallest number of pupils in any class, 
Number of school buildings. 
Whole number of schoolrooms occupied. 
Whole number of schoolrooms unoccupied, 
Number of classes containing but one grade, 
Number of classes containing two grades. 
Number of classes containing mixed grades, 



36 weeks 


11 days 


14 days 


149 


25 


655 


271 


4,182 


69 


9 


19 


69 





52 


10 


7 



Resignations, Transfers, Etc. 



RESIGNATIONS OF TEACHERS. 

Anna W. Locke, assistant in High School. 
Adella R. Goodrich, Grade 2, Arlington. 
Anna L. Goodrich, Grade 1, Mulberry. 
Lizzie H. Morgan, Suburban No. 2. 
Alice O. vSmith, Suburban No. 3. 
Carrie M. Swallow, Suburban No. 4. 
Eva M. Locke, Suburban No. b. 

TRANSFERS AND APPOINTMENTS. 

Herbert E. Colby, assistant in High School. 

Nellie AL Jlobbs, from Grade 8, Arlington, to Grade 6, Mt. 

Pleasaiflk. 
Nellie Nolan to Grade 2, Arlington. 
Grace Hayden to Grade 1, Harbor. 
Henrietta Starrett to Grade 1, Mulberry. 
Ida E. Smith to Grade 1, Palm. 
Pearl Richardson to Kindergarten, Amherst street. 
Annie S. Tuttle, Suburban No. 2. 
*Alma Hunt, Suburban No. 3. 
George Graves, Suburban No. 4. 
Walter Sargent, Suburban No. 5. 
L. Edith Blaisdell, Suburban No. 6. 
William F. Howe, Suburban No. 7. 

^Substitute. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



FRANK B.MCKEAN, 

As a man and as a teacher re- 
spected and beloved by all, 

DIED: 

January 14, 1894. 



tsanaft-; 



IN MEMORIAM, 



CLARA J. MCKEAN, 

A teacher who devoted her life to 
the cause of education. 

DIED: 

November 16, 1894. 






Hcishua High School 

Graduating Exercises. 

CDflSS OF 1894. 

High School Hall, dune 29tl7, 

AT t) O'CLOCK, A. M. 



5G REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



PROGRAMME. 

Prayer. 
Salutatory, in Latin, 

Ernest L. Collins. 
Song, * A Slumber Song, F. N. Lohr. 

Hie Class. 
Class History, 

Abbie S. Hobart. 
Class Oration, •' Strive to Succeed." 

George F. Hall. 
Violin Solo, Ballade et Polonaise,- \"ieuxtempts. 

Walter S. Cotton. 
Class Prophecies, 

Helen F. Richmond, 
Song, Country Fair, F. Abt. 

^ The Class. 

Address, 

E. J. Goodwin. 
Song, Seguidilla, Charles Vincent. 

The Class. 
Valedictory, 

Lizzie F. Taylor. 
Award of Noyes Prize Medals, 

Superintendent James H. Fassett. 
Presentation of Diplomas, 

H. B. Atherton, President Board of Education. 



GRADUATING EXERCISES. 57 



" Strive to Succeed." 



CIiASS OF 1894, 



HARRY EVERETT BARNARD, 
DENNIS FRANCIS COHAN, 
ERNEST LEON COLLINS. 
WALTER SHAW COTTON, 
FRED DUDLEY CROSS, 

CHARLES WEBSTER GASKELL, 
NATHAN ANDREWS GODDARD, 
GEORGE FREEMAN HALL. 
ERNEST WHITTIER LOWE, 

STANLEY' DWIGHT NELSON, 
FREDERICK LESTER REED, 
JOHN WILLIS UPTON, 

JAMES HENRY^ WAKELIN. 
EDNA HELEN BANCROFT, 
EVA CAROLYN BARNARD, 
MARY' LUELLA BREWER, 

ABBIE SHATTUCK HOBART, 
MARY' CECILIA LENAHAN, 
KATIE AGNES MORL\.RTY, 
JENNIE MAY^ REED, 

HELEN FRANCIS RICHMOND, 
MINNIE BELLE SLOAN, 

IDA ISABEL STEARNS, 

LIZZIE FRENCH TAYLOR, 

MARION ELLA TOLLES. 



STATISTICS. 



59 



SUMMARY OF TRUANT OFFICER'S REPORT. 



. 


1 
o 
p 

o 

"o 

o 
6 


o 

a 

ci 
u 

o 

6 


2 
c 
a 

CO 

x> 

O 
. 

o 


a 
a 

3 
O 

6 


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"p 

s 

01 

II 
a 

a 
o 

6 
z 


a 
o 
•x: 

3 

3 
O 

o 

c 

3 

_o 

6 
'z 


-Ji 

■■n 
9 

O 

6 

IZ 


S 

C3 
p 

c 
o 

"a 
a 

ce 

ci 

"a 

6 


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C 
a; 

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6 
is 


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9 

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6 
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S 
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o 
6 


WINTER TERM. 

4 weeks ending Jan. 26, 
" Feb. 23, 
" Mar. 23, 

SPRLNG TERM. 

4 weeks ending May 4, 
" " June 1, 
" " June 29, 

FALL TERM. 

4 weeks ending Oct. 5, 
" Nov. 2. 
" Nov. 23, 

Total 


175 
143 
189 

187 
181 
182 

202 
184 
151 

1594 


106 
90 
89 

111 
113 
109 

153 
132 
104 

1007 


106 
90 
89 

117 
113 
109 

153 
132 
104 

1013 


9 

9 

12 

24 
22 
19 

18 
23 
26 

162 



3 


2 



11 



16 






? 







9 


1 



1 


2 
2 





6 


1 


1 









2 


1 


1 


2 
2 





6 


106 
90 
89 

HI 
113 
109 

153 
132 
104 

1007 


93 
4j 
95 

130 

263 

49 

116 
63 

56 

910 



INDEX 



Attendance at school, school lepor 

Amherst street engine house, 

Abatement of taxes, 

Account of city treasurer, 

Apparatus, fire, 

Armory, 

Amherst street school house, 

Board of health, report of 

Cemetery, Edge wood, 

Cemeteries, 

City debt, 

City farm and house of correction, 

City hall building. 

City interest, 

Collection of taxes. 

Commons, 

City government, 

City solicitor. 

City physician. 

City treasurer. 

Committee on accomits 

County tax. 

Committees, 

City marshal, report of 

City librarian, report of 

City engineer, 



PACJE 

45 

20-140 

20 

12 

101 

20 

20 

121 

31-155 

30 

22-78 

25 

24 

22 

19 

23 

2-3 

117 

131 

12 

75 

60 

6 

109 

148 

135 



INDEX. 



Edgewood cemetery, 

Edgestone, 

Engineer's department, 

Farm, city, 

Fire department. 

Fires, 1894, 

Finance committee, 

Highways and bridges. 

Hydrants, 

Hunt library fund, 

Incidental expenses, 

Interest, 

Inspectors of check lists 

Inspector petroleum. 

Library, public, 

Lighting streets, 

Loan, temporary, 

Mayor's Address, 

Members of fire department, 

Memorial day, 

Noyes prize medal fund, 

Nashua hospital. 

Paupers oft" farm. 

Police department, 

Public library, 

Printing and stationery. 

Report of board of health, 

" police commissione 

" city solicitor, 

" fire commissioners 
" city physician, 

" public library, 

'* city treasurer, 
" city engineer. 

Salary account, 



31-155 

31 

32-135 

25 

83-39 

83 

6 

33-39 

94 

18 

43 

22 



147 

65 

66 

167 

101 

52 

17 

^2 

56 

53-105 

148-55 

54 

123 

105 

117 

83 

131 

148 

12 

135 

62 



INP' X. 








3 


Scliool houses, ....... 80 


Street lights, 








65 


Sewers, .... 








63 


Sinking fund, 








60 


State tax, .... 








60 


Statistics of taxation. 








57 


Scliools, .... 








68 


Street commissioners, 








4 


Surveyors, 








8 


Sealer, .... 








8 


Tax, county. 








60 


Tax, state. 








60 


Taxes, abatement, 








20 


Taxation, 








57 


Temporary loan, 








66 


Trustees of library report, 








148 


Valuation city property 








79 


Water supply. 








66 


Ward expense, 








67 


Weighers, 








9