(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Report of the receipts and expenditures of the City of Nashua"

Annual Report 




Cttp of J^asfma, 
J^teto Hampshire 

14ls(t Jfflunictpal (government Report 



1994 



i4i*t fflwm€m®& 






Jftsical Jicar 



f ulp 1, 1993 - ' 



irr.x: 






5 






- v 



, L. hJi 



r:i 




m 



rhb .. 



30, 1994 



xrrrxrzzx 




CZ3 



' 



Compil 



ptieb J3p: 

Cleanor 8. Pension 

$atritia G. Hucter 

fton €. Jffltller 

Jim iWalone 

$rinteb bp: 
alp!) p. Jacfeson 



$rmteb on njs fttcpcleb $aper 



94HBCX 



Administration/Management 24 

Board of A Idermen 1 9 

Boards and Commissions 27 

Dedication 1 

Elections 57 

Election Officials 41 

Inauguration of Nashua 's 97th Municipal Government 15 

Independent A uditor 's Report 66 

Introduction 2 

Mayors of Nashua 14 

Municipal Government 20 

Pres ident of the Board of A Idermen 1 7 

Representatives to the General Court 40 

Resolutions 43 

Seal of the City of Nashua 3 

Statistics of Nashua 4 

Trust Funds 97 

Vital Statistics (Number of births/marriages/deaths) 12 

REPORTS 

Administrative Services 107 

Board of Assessors 109 

Board of Housing Appeals 1 50 

Building Code Board of Appeals 150 

B u i I ding Code 14' 

Child Care Services 134 

City Clerk's Office U2 

Commun ity Development Divis ion 1 44 

Community Services Division 133 

Conservation Commission 153 

Environmental Health 135 

Financial Services 1 14 



mmex 



Fire Marshal 's Office 

Historic District Commission 

Human Resources/Insurance Benefits 

Library 

Management Information Systems 

Mayor 's Office 

Nashua City Planning Board 

Nashua Fire Rescue 

Planning 

Police Department 

Public Health 

Public Works Division 

Purchasing 

School Department 

Urban Programs 

Welfare Department 

Woodlawn Cemetery 

Zoning Board 



171 

154 

119 

178 

123 

105 

155 

169 

145 

158 

137 

126 

117 

187 

151 

142 

193 

156 



PHOTOS 

Joyce L. Arel 

Board of Aldermen 

James Cody 

Dancing in the Park 

James Duchesne 

Kurt Gautier 

Lenny 

Main Street looking south 

Mayor Rob Wagner 

Sam McManus 

Nashua Mall Anniversary 

Penny and Patrick 

Signatures of Candidates 

Teddy Bears 




























17 

19 

1 

130 

116 

157 

192 

125 

14 

113 

143 

111 

8 

186 




IN M EM OR Y O F 



JAMES F. CODY 



James Cody served on the Planning Board for nearly 20 years {Chairman for 10) and had a 
hand in many of the decisions that made Nashua what it is today. All who knew him say he 
worked to better the city and took his position as Planning Board Chairman very seriously. As 
Chairman he allowed everybody to speak their mind and brought an even-handedness to board 
meetings. 

He was also owner-operator of D.F. Shea Company and the Millyard Paint Store in Nashua 
and a past president and longtime member of the Nashua Kiwanis Club. 



The City of Nashua is a better place because of his contributions and it is with much 
appreciation for his years of service to the City that we dedicate this Annual Report to him. 



— INTRODUCTION 



"SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT ASSET 
OF ANY BUSINESS. OUR MISSION IS TO UNDERSTAND THEIR NEEDS, 

VALUES, FEARS AND GOALS." 



This 141st Municipal Government Report for the City of Nashua has been compiled 
through the efforts of local public officials, to serve as a permanent record of the past year. We 
hope that you will find it interesting and informative. 

Your questions and comments regarding any of the information contained in this report 
are welcome. Feel free to call us at 594-3388. 



Eleanor A. Benson 
City Clerk 

Patricia E. Lucier 
Deputy City Clerk 



Municipal Government Report 



SEAL OF NASHUA 



The seal of the City of Nashua shall consist of a circular disk, upon the outer edge 
of which shall be inserted the words "TOWNSHIP OF DUNSTABLE, 1673," and upon the 
bottom of the disc the words "CITY OF NASHUA, 1853." In the foreground shall be an 
anvil and hammer, a plough, a bale of goods, a regulator and a horn of plenty. 

Across the center of the disc shall be represented a bridge and train of railroad cars; 
in the background shall be a cotton mill and iron foundry. In the upper center shall be two 
clasped hands. The whole to be enclosed in a laurel wreath. 



INTERPRETATION 




Laurel - symbolized victory 

The conquest of the wilderness 

Dunstable became a plantation in 1673 

Nashua was incorporated as a city in 1853 

The clasped hands, symbolize the union of 

Nashua and Nashville 



The articles in the foreground symbolize the chief occupations of Nashua. Railroad 
train and bridge, a traffic center and water power. The mill and foundry, leading industries. 



City of Nashua 



STATISTICS OF NASHUA 

October 26, 1673: The General Assembly of Massachusetts granted a Charter to 

the township of Dunstable 

April 4, 1746: The Province of New Hampshire granted a Charter to the 

township of Dunstable (in New Hampshire) 

December 15, 1836: Name of Dunstable changed to Nashua 

January 23, 1842: Nashua divided: 

Nashville: North Side of River 
Nashua: South Side of River 

1843: Town Hall completed 

June 28, 1853: Nashville united with Nashua and received City Charter 



Area of City 32 square miles 

4 Lane State Highway 9 1/2 miles 

Length of Streets and Roads 235 miles 

2 Lane State Highway 25 miles 

For a Total of 1,160 miles 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



1885 April 14: Nashua Horse Railway started. 

1886 Fall: Electric Lights installed in stores only. 

1887 First Electric Street Railway Service Electrified. 
1895 August 13: Street Railway Service Electrified. 

1910 City Farm sold, became Nashua Country Club. 

1913 Sept. 3: Nashua White Way Installed. 

1917 Spring Street School destroyed by fire. 

1919 Dedication of new High School on Spring Street. 

1920 Playground opened on South Common. 
1922 Daniel Webster Highway opened. 

1924 Main Street widened from West Pearl to Hollis Street. 



Municipal Government Report 



1924 




1925 




1928 




1930 


May 4: 


1932 




1934 


July 19: 


1936 


March 19: 


1937 




1937 


Nov. 19: 


1938 


Sept. 20: 


1944 


April 11: 


1945 




1946 




1946 




1947 




1949 




1949 




1950 




1953 




1954 


August 31: 


1954 


Sept. 11: 


1954 


Nov. 12: 


1956 


March 16/19 


1956 


April 8: 


1956 


April 10: 


1957 


February 4: 



Nashua Main Street Bridge destroyed by fire. 

New Main Street Bridge built. 

Nashua celebrated 75th Anniversary as a City. 

Crown Hill fire. 

Nashua Street Railway Service discontinued. 

Police Radio installed. 

Flood. 

Holman Stadium dedicated. 

Teletype System installed. 

Hurricane and Flood. 

Main Street widened from Main Street Bridge to the Southerly line of Montcalm 
Building. 

Airport dedicated at Boire Field. 

Parking meters installed. 

Federal Public Housing for Veterans of World War II (80 units). 

Merrimack River flood control project completed. 

Dike-Pump House. 

South of Lake Street Pump House. 

Main Street widened on Westerly side, from West Hollis Street to Mulberry Street. 

Nashua Centennial Celebration. 

Hurricane "Carol". 

Hurricane "Edna". 

"Red Wing Express" (Montreal to Boston), wrecked at Bridge Street Crossing, near 
Union Street - one killed, twenty-one injured. 

"Twin Blizzards". 

"Blizzard" (one death). 

Fire Alarm Whistle silenced. 

N.H. National Guard Armory destroyed by fire. 



City of Nashua 



1958 


January 7: 


1958 


January 16: 


1958 


January: 


1959 




1959 


March 8: 


1960 


Sept. 1: 


1961 


January 30: 


1962 




1963 




1963 




1964 


Nov. 16: 


1965 




1965 


October 26: 


1965 


November 9 


1966 




1966 


February 1: 


1967 


June 17: 


1967 


June 30: 


1968 


March 13: 


1968 


June 9: 


1969 




1969 


Nov. 25: 


1970 




1970 


Sept. 15: 


1970 


Sept. 15: 


1971 


June 28: 



Twenty-one inch blizzard (one death). 

Sixteen inch blizzard. 

Widening of Main Street bottleneck started (West Side). 

Widening of Main street Bridge Southerly, completed. 

Dedication of New National Guard Armory. 

Chandler Library opened; October 10, formally dedicated. 

Twenty-five inch blizzard (one death). 

Vagge Village, 50 unit Housing for Elderly. 

Federal Aviation Agency (Boston Center) opened. 

New Post Office completed. 

New lights installed in business district. 

Memorial Monument to President Kennedy installed in front of City Hall. 

Lyons Field dedicated (Marshall Street). 

Gardner Field dedicated (Bowers Street). 

Federally Subsidized Housing, Ledge Street, 30 units. 

Ward boundaries changed. 

St. Joseph Hospital dedicated. 

B&M ends passenger train service to Nashua. 

Gift of $800,000 by Eliot Carter for new library. 

Unveiling and dedication of Nashua Firemen's Relief Association Monument on Stark 
Square. 

Veteran's Memorial Field dedicated. 

Second gift of $300,000 by Eliot Carter for new Library. 

Old Post Office demolished. 

Veterans Memorial Bridge dedicated (cost $1.6 million). 

Taylor Falls Bridge closed. 

Hunt Memorial Building listed in National Register of Historic Places. 



Municipal Government Report 



1971 


Sept. 26: 


1971 




1971 


November 2: 


1972 




1972 


May 21: 


1972 


August 8: 


1973 


July 19: 


1973 


July 20: 


1973 


Sept. 19: 


1974 


December: 


1975 




1975 


July 4: 


1976 


July 13: 



1977 

1977 Sept. 7: 

1977 October 2: 

1977 November: 

1978 February 7: 
1978 February 18: 

1978 July: 

1978 August: 

1978 October 25: 



Nashua Public Library dedicated. 

New Communications Center, Nashua Police Department (cost $87,000). 

Voting machine used for first time in Municipal Election. 

Ward boundaries changed. 

Florence Speare Memorial Building dedicated. 

One-way traffic plan adopted. 

Sagamore Point Bridge opened. 

Hunt Building rededicated Hunt Memorial Building. 

Roussel Memorial Field dedicated. 

New bridge opened to traffic (replacer for Taylor Falls Bridge). 

Nashua N.H. Foundation permanently displays historic Mill Bell. 

Cornerstone laying New High School. 

Dedication of Bicentennial Monument to Revolutionary War Soldiers in Bicentennial 
Park. 

City receives one million dollar grant from EDA to build new Police Station, Public 
Works Garage, Court House and Parking Garage. 

Dedication of Richard Belanger Gymnasium (Nashua High School Gym). 

Dedication of Library Media Center at Bicentennial Elementary School to Assistant 
Superintendent Emma Nicol. 

Main Street Amenities (first phase). 

Record 27 inch snowfall paralyzes city. 

President Carter's visit to Nashua for Town Meeting with area High School students. 
President Carter presented Key to the City in box specially made in Santa Rosa with 
inscription carved by laser beam. 

Second phase of Main Street Amenities Program. 

Statue of Major General John G. Foster relocated. 

1903 Time Capsule at Foster Square opened for the first time in 75 years, and a new 
capsuled sealed and placed next to the relocated statue of Major General John Gray 
Foster. 



1978 Nov. 24: 



Municipal Parking Garage opened to the public. 



City of Nashua 



1979 March 5: 

1979 May: 

1979 May 18: 

1979 Sept. 30: 

1980 January 28: 
1980 April 17: 
1980 

1980 August 20: 



1980 


August: 


1980 


October: 


1981 


May 3: 


1981 


May 22: 


1981 


June: 


1981 


July 30: 


1981 




1981 




1981 


September 


1982 




1982 





1982 



1983 Dec. 20: 



Nashua District Courthouse and Municipal Parking Garage dedicated. 

Mine Falls Park Project recipient of 1979 N.H. Outstanding Civil Engineering 
Achievement Award: pedestrian bridge selected by the American Society of Civil 
Engineers for an Award of Merit by the American Institute of Steel Construction. 

Police Station and BPW Garage dedicated. 

Amherst Street School Gym dedicated to Tony Marandos. 

Passenger rail service between N.H. and Boston begun. 

Abbott-Spalding House listed in National Register of Historic Places. 

North Little League ball field near Amherst Street School named for the late Robert 
H. Murray, Sr., former major league baseball star. 

Demolition of Arlington Street School started; demolition completed September 17, 
1980. 

Dedicated Xavier House, 34 unit Housing for the Elderly. 

Nashua Jewish Community marks 20th anniversary of opening of Raymond Street 
Temple. 

Dr. Norman Crisp School dedicated (Arlington Street). 

Arel Manor Dedicated, Housing for Elderly with 110 units. 

Temple Street School and James B. Crowley School closed. 

Laton House celebrates 100th Anniversary. 

Indian Head National Bank marks 130th Anniversary. 

Main Street United Methodist Church celebrates sesquicentennial Anniversary. 

Demolition of Public Works Garage on East Hollis Street begun. 

Nashua Telegraph celebrates its sesquicentennial. 

Goodwill Building, corner Main and E. Pearl Streets, renovated; Now known as City 
Plaza. 

Paper Box Co. Building, corner E. Hollis and Dearborn Streets; renovated for Matthew 
Thornton Health Clinic. 

A three-year lease was signed bringing the Double AA Baseball League to Nashua, 
permitting the Holyoke Millers to become the Nashua Angels for the 1983 Eastern 
League Season. 



1983 



Senior Center, 70 Temple Street, dedicated. 



Municipal Government Report 



1983 

1983 April 7: 

1983 April 7: 

1983 November 4: 
1984 

1984 April: 
1984 July 15: 
1984 Sept. 15: 

1984 Sept. 25: 

1985 July 20: 

1985 Sept. 25: 

1985 Sept. 26: 

1985 Nov. 29: 

1985 December 1: 

1985 Dec. 11: 

1986 July: 

1986 July: 

1986 July 12: 

1986 August 21: 

1986 September: 

1986 Sept. 28: 

1986 November: 

1987 January 18: 
1987 February: 



Youth benefactor Lawrence C. Elliott's statue dedicated at City Plaza, Main Street. 

Rededication of the newly renovated Nashua City Hall. 

Dedication of the Freedom Shrine by the Exchange Club of Nashua to the City of 
Nashua 

Temple Street Manor, former Temple Street Elementary School, now 43 units of 
Housing for the Elderly, dedicated. 

Nashua Pirates replaced the Nashua Angels in becoming the Double AA Baseball team 
in the Eastern League. 

Street light conversion begun. 

Hellenic Circle dedicated (junction Walnut, Chestnut, and Central Streets). 

City Bus, Nashua's new transit system, began operations. 

Alan Soifert Playground at Mine Falls Park dedicated. 

Dedication of maintenance and office building at Nashua Municipal Airport to Airport 
Manager Kenneth Howe. 

Hurricane "Gloria". 

Dedication of the Roby Park, Spit Brook Road. 

Elm Street Garage dedication. 

Elm Street Garage officially opened. 

Power began flowing from the new Mines Falls Hydro-Electric Plant. 

Nashua, the only city or town in New Hampshire to computerize the Vehicle 
Registration process. 

The Pheasant Lane Mall opened (150 stores). 

J.F. Kennedy statue returned to its original location in front of City Hall. 

Dedication of the Park Recreation Building on 100 Concord Street, Nashua, NH. 

Rededication of Deschenes Oval, Railroad Square. 

Dedication of Playing Fields at Mine Falls Park to Marine Sgt. Allen H. Soifert. 

Rededication of Elm Street Junior High School Auditorium. 

Nashua Center for the Arts officially transferred to local developer John Stabile. 

New transit fleet for the CityBus Company arrives. 



City of Nashua 



1987 March: 

1987 March: 

1987 April: 

1987 April 1: 

1987 April 26: 

1987 May: 

1987 July 19: 

1987 Sept. 8: 

1987 Sept. 17: 

1987 Sept. 17: 

1987 Sept. 17: 

1987 Sept. 19: 

1987 October 27: 

1987 October 28: 

1987 October 29: 

1988 July 7: 
1988 Sept. 18: 
1988 October 26: 
1988 October 26: 

1988 Dec. 28: 

1989 January 15: 
1989 January: 

1989 June: 



Conveyance of the former James B. Crowley School to the Nashua Adult Learning 
Center, Inc. 

Arts & Science Center changes its name to the Nashua Center for the Arts. 

Lights installed at soccer and softball fields at Mine Falls Park. 

Residence Tax repealed. 

John P. Howe and Sally Howe Bixby gave a Gift of Land on Broad Street to be known 
as the "Howe Wildlife Sanctuary". 

Ground breaking ceremonies for the new Junior High School 
on Henri Burque Highway. 

Money Magazine designated Nashua and its surrounding communities as the most 
livable area in the United States. Nashua #1 City. 

Sister City relationship established with An Sung, South Korea. 

200lh Anniversary of the United States Constitution. 

Dedication of Veterans Memorial at Woodlawn Cemetery. 

Dedication of Constitution Plaza and Constitution Garden at Main and Spring Streets. 

Planting and dedication of Constitutional Tree at Greeley Park by the Girl and Boy 
Scouts of Nashua. 

Ground breaking for Secondary Sewerage Treatment Plant sewerage facility. 

Dedication and official opening of the play lot at Roby Park. 

Unveiling of painting by Nashua Artist James Aponovich in City Hall rotunda. 

Delegates from An Sun County, South Korea, Sister City to Nashua, visited Nashua. 

Pennichuck Junior High School dedicated (208 Manchester Street). 

Unveiling of 2nd painting by Nashua artist John Aponovich in the City Hall rotunda. 

Volunteer Recycling Program started in the City of Nashua. 

Relocation of the Central Bus Transfer Station to 
the area between City Hall and Garden Street. 

Clocktowcr Place opened. 

Demolition of Spring Street Junior High School completed. Work begun on the new 
Superior Court on Spring Street location. 

Renovation of City Hall Annex, 2nd Floor, completed. 



10 



Municipal Government Report 



1989 July 1: 

1989 July 30: 

1990 April 22: 
1990 June 12: 

1990 Nov. 27: 

1990 Dec. 1: 

1991 January 15: 
1991 June 12: 

1991 November: 

1992 January 31: 
1992 February 18: 
1992 May 13: 

1992 November: 

1993 January 12: 
1993 January: 
1993 May 13: 
1993 

1993 November 2: 

1994 April 26: 
1994 May 10: 

1994 June 1: 



Korean War Veteran Memorial 

Rededication of Fields Grove Park 

20th Anniversary Earth Day Celebration. 

Board of Aldermen authorized the sale of the Nashua District Court House to the State 
of New Hampshire. 

Designated Martin Luther King Jr.'s Birthday as a Municipal Holiday to be observed 
on the third Monday in January each year. 

The Nashua City Bus Contract was awarded to the Greater Nashua Transportation 
Services, Inc. 

Wetlands Legislation approved by Nashua Voters in Special Referendum Election. 

Mt. Auburn Associates prepared a strategic plan for the future for the City of Nashua 
and the Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce. 

City Vehicle Registration Office began issuing license plate decals for State of New 
Hampshire. 

City Clerk's Office relocated to Elm Street side of City Hall. 

New Ward Boundaries were established. 

Amherst Street School celebrated its 100th Anniversary. 

City of Nashua Received "1st Place" award for excellence in Annual Reports by the New 
Hampshire Municipal Association. 

Created Hunt Memorial Building Restoration Fund. 

Regional Roundtable established. 

Relocation of the Nashua Firemen's Monument on Stark Square to Pine Hill Road. 

SARA Title III Regional Meeting and Conference with EPA. 

Budget Control Charter Amendment and Approval of Salaries and Collective Bargaining 
Agreements of the Nashua School District approved by Nashua voters by Referendum 
Question. 

Dedication of Libby Field (lower field at Lincoln Park) in recognition of Linda Libby. 

Dedication of Matt Dube Field (Baseball Field at St Andrew's Playground) in recognition 
of his courage, hope and inspiration. 

Nashua Memorial Hospital changed its name to Southern New Hampshire Regional 
Medical Center. 



11 







r*ITV Cl PBK'S nFPARTMFNTI 


^ 








l_l 1 I l l,r,KI\ J ULiAn I IVUMX 1 










VITAL STATISTICS 






YEAR 


DEATHS 


MARRIAGES 


BIRTHS 


CENSUS 


1920 


466 


585 


786 


28,379 


1921 


426 


464 


853 




1922 


434 


393 


814 




1923 


485 


410 


789 




1924 


418 


435 


870 




1925 


426 


485 


800 




1926 


408 


462 


812 




1927 


447 


426 


749 




1928 


418 


498 


757 




1929 


417 


518 


708 




1930 


410 


485 


699 


31,463 


1931 


418 


589 


685 




1932 


350 


546 


677 




1933 


432 


662 


636 




1934 


442 


713 


648 




1935 


426 


699 


655 




1936 


444 


650 


625 




1937 


441 


742 


628 




1938 


409 


602 


659 




1939 


410 


445 


636 




1940 


345 


479 


661 


32,927 


1941 


410 


532 


755 




1942 


399 


586 


874 




1943 


413 


447 


876 




1944 


411 


441 


793 




1945 


375 


564 


789 




1946 


414 


951 


1114 




1947 


458 


879 


1347 




1948 


464 


795 


1247 




1949 


423 


694 


1192 




1950 


470 


665 


1133 


34,669 


1951 


448 


692 


1263 




1952 


457 


680 


1179 




1953 


418 


649 


1181 




1954 


449 


612 


1232 




1955 


484 


616 


1236 




1956 


470 


667 


1318 




1957 


492 


624 


1410 





12 





YEAR 


DEATHS 


1958 


511 


1959 


494 


1960 


486 


1961 


520 


1962 


481 


1963 


530 


1964 


554 


1965 


580 


1966 


569 


1967 


584 


1968 


627 


1969 


716 


1970 


671 


1971 


677 


1972 


701 


1973 


622 


1974 


436 


1975 


474 


1976 


551 


1977 


600 


1978 


669 


1979 


716 


1980 


735 


1981 


665 


1982 


665 


1983 


753 


1984 


676 


1985 


720 


1986 


665 


1987 


765 


1988 


690 


1989 


682 


1990 


704 


1991 


684 


1992 


727 


1993 


735 



Municipal Government Report 



VITAL STATISTICS (CONT) 

MARRIAGES BIRTHS CENSUS 

652 1447 

649 1384 

560 1437 39,096 

584 1500 

567 1621 

592 1577 

670 1689 

683 1627 

709 1552 

834 1706 

876 1903 

978 1911 

911 2002 55,820 

960 2042 

994 1864 

858 1803 

897 1857 

873 1715 

891 1737 

848 1911 

785 1871 

805 1979 

810 2105 67,817 

942 2167 

1044 2227 

923 2197 

974 2308 

1010 2595 

916 2676 

921 2874 

900 3017 

899 3059 

827 2993 79,662 

732 2758 

711 2638 

702 2650 



13 



City of Nashua 




MAYORS OF NASHUA 



1. Joseph Baldwin 

2. Freeman S. Rogers 

3. Thomas W. Gillis 

4. Albin Beard 

5. Aaron W. Sawyer 

6. George Bowers 

7. Hiram T. Morrill 

8. Edward Spalding 

9. Virgil C. Gilman 

10. Gilman Scripture 

11. George Bowers 

12. Jotham D. Otterson 

13. Dana Sargent 

14. Seth D. Chandler 

15. Frank A. McKean 

16. George H. Whitney 

17. Charles Williams 

18. William H. Cook 

19. Charles Holman 

20. Benjamin Fletcher,Jr 

21. Alfred M. Norton 

22. John A. Spalding 

23. James H. Tolles 

24. Charles H. Burke 

25. William H. Beasom 

26. Williams Hall 



1853-1854 


27. Thomas Sands 


1894 


1855-1856 


28. Joseph W. Howard 


1895-1896 


1857 


29. Jason E. Tolles 


1897-1900 


1858-1859 


30. Milton A. Taylor 


1901-1902 


1860 


31. Jeremiah J. Doyle 


1903-1904 


1861 


32. Andros B. Jones 


1905-1906 


1862-1863 


33. Albert Shedd 


1907-1910 


1864 


34. William H. Barry 


1911-1914 


1865 


35. James B. Crowley 


1915-1919 


1866-1867 


36. Henri A. Burque 


1920-1923 


1868 


37. Eaton D. Sargent 


1924-1927 


1869-1870 


38. William F. Sullivan 


1928-1933 


1871 


39. Alvin A. Lucier 


1934-1937 


1872 


40. Frank A. McMaster 


1938-1939 


1873-1874 


41. Eugene A. Lemay 


1939-1945 


1875 


42. Oswald S. Maynard 


1946-1949 


1876-1877 


43. Hugh Gregg 


1950 


1878 


44. Claude E. Nichols 


1951 


1879-1880 


45. Lester H. Burnham 


1952-1957 


1881-1882 


46. Mario J. Vagge 


1958-1965 


1883-1884 


47. Dennis J. Sullivan 


1966-1977 


1885 


48. Donald C. Davidson 


1977 


1886-1888 


49. Maurice L. Arel 


1977-1984 


1889-1890 


50. Thomas J. Leonard 


1984 


1891-1892 


51. James W. Donchess 


1984-1991 


1893 


52. Rob Wagner 


1992- 



14 



Municipal Government Report 



MAYOR ROB WAGNER 
Inauguration of Nashua's 97th Municipal Government 



Friends and fellow Nashuans: 

I want to begin my remarks by congratulating all the elected officials who have just 
taken their oaths of office and by thanking them for their commitment to our City. 

I also want to acknowledge and thank the families of these officials, since I know, both 
through observation and experience, that it is impossible to dedicate oneself to public service 
without equal dedication on the part of one's family. 

The coming two years offer exciting challenges as together we begin new initiatives 
and complete final implementation of innovative policies and programs begun during the first 
two years of my administration. 

During the recent orientation sessions we have provided, many of the newly elected 
officials have realized that the daily business of City government is much more complex than 
it appears from the outside. While the simplistic view is that government is concerned with 
budgets and property taxes, a more realistic perspective on the issues before us highlights the 
complexity of Nashua's future. 

I have great optimism that our newly constituted City government will join with my 
administration in achieving the realization of our efforts to make Nashua a model of 
progressive policy and organizational efficiency. 

We have started in a positive, new direction in the past two years, focusing on the 
business of government and the citizen as customer. 

We have begun the implementation of continuous improvement (or Total Quality 
Management) practices with the invaluable assistance of Conway Quality of Nashua. 

We have pioneered the use of program budgets to quantify more accurately the 
business of City government. 

We have formulated a comprehensive plan for solid waste collection and disposal at 
our expanded landfill, concentrating recently on leaf and yard waste, landfill gas collection, 
sludge disposal, and state permitting. For the first time, the City has a vision for its solid 
waste future and a framework for a healthy debate as to how to achieve our goals. 

We have led the formation of a regional lobby made up of neighboring communities 
to strengthen our voice in Concord on areas of common interest. 

We have encouraged the addition of an Urban Trails Network and Trails Plan as part 

15 



City of Nashua 



of the City's Master Plan and initiated a revision of sidewalk improvement policies to begin 
the process of implementing a comprehensive, alternative transportation system. 

We have enhanced the City's commitment to economic development through business 
visitation and involvement in the Center of Economic Development. 

We have taken a leadership role in the state and the region to provide equal access 
to people with disabilities through our aggressive efforts to exceed mere compliance with the 
Americans with Disabilities Act. 

We have put into action our absolute commitment to racial equality and ethnic 
diversity. 

These are just several of the initiatives whose continuation and ultimate realization 
depend upon the unity of purpose of this, Nashua's newly inaugurated 97th City Government. 

The coming term heralds other issues which demand heightened attention. 

We must concentrate on controlled growth and the development and imposition of an 
equitable system of impact fees. 

We must work as a unified government to develop a vision of land use and planning 
policies to chart our City into the 21st Century. 

We must rededicate ourselves to the critical goal of downtown revitalization. 

We must unify our community in our commitment to quality education. 

We must fight for the timely completion of the Everett Turnpike and other critical 
transportation projects to counteract the region's growing traffic nightmare. 

We must escalate our commitment to the delivery of quality services to our customers, 
the citizens of Nashua. 

And, perhaps most exciting, we must prepare for the implementation of the 
recommendations of the current management audit, which, I am convinced, will take us 
closer to our common goals of organizational and financial efficiency. 

The business of government is exciting, exhilarating work with the potential to improve 
lives. I eagerly await the opportunity to work together to continue Nashua's legacy as a 
progressive community with a committed citizenry. 

Congratulations, and let us seize the initiative. 



16 



Municipal Government Report 



1903-1904 
1905-1906 
1907-1908 




JOYCE L. AREL 
PRESIDENT, BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

PRESIDENTS, BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL 



Warren H. Prichard 
Moses L. Truel 
James H. Connor 



1909-1910 
1911-1912 
1913-1914 



Harry A. Gregg 
John F. Shea 
Frederick A. Collins 



PRESIDENTS, BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



1915-1919 George H. Alley 1948-1949 

1920-1921 Fred E. Taggart 1950-1953 

1922-1925 Edwin Morey 1954-1955 

1926-1927 Wilbert Blanchard . 1956-1957 

1928-1929 Henry A. Lagasse 1958-1959 

1930-1931 Walter E. Grant 1960-1961 

1932-1933 Charles H. Parker 1962-1963 

1934-1935 Walter E. Grant 1964-1967 

1936-1937 Joseph A.Therriault 1968-1971 

1938-1939 Eugene H. Lemay 1972-1975 

(Elected Mayor 2/14/39) 1976-1977 

1939 Joseph E. Houde 1978-1979 

(Elected on 2/14/39) 1980-1981 

1940-1941 Edward R. Benoit 1982-1985 

1942-1943 Walter B. Mason 1986-1987 

1944-1945 Edward R. Benoit 1988-1991 

1946-1947 Lester H. Burnham 1992-1993 

1994-1995 



Henry J. Ouellette 
Conrad H. Bellavance 
Michael J. Dell Isola 
Francis LaFlamme 
Wilfred Pelletier 
Thomas J. Leonard Jr. 
Henry J. Fortin 
Francis LaFlamme 
Maurice L. Arel 
Donald L. Ethier 
Alice L. Dube 
Donald L. Ethier 
Donald C. Davidson 
Thomas B. Kelley 
Carl Andrade 
Thomas B. Kelley 
Philip J. Grandmaison 
Joyce L. Arel 



17 



City of Nashua 



A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF 
THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



"To improve the golden moment of opportunity, 

and to catch the good that is within our reach, 

is the great art of life." 

Samuel Johnson 



L994 has been a year of great change in Nashua's City Government. Eight new Aldermen assumed office. 
They are: Arthur Ferlan, Thomas Grant, Maureen Lemieux, Brian McCarthy, David Rootovich, Fred Teeboom, 
James Tollner, and Eric Wilson. Claire McGrath was re-elected Alderman-at-Large and voted Vice-President 
of the Board of Aldermen. Of the remaining seven members of the Board only two Aldermen had completed 
more than one term, Aldermcn-at-Large Thomas Kelley and Victor DuVarney. 

The November election also resulted in the voters approval of two Charter change referendum questions 
which significantly impacted aldcrmanic responsibilities. Referendum question number one resulted in a spending 
cap and its' implementation continues to evolve as we enter 1995. Referendum question number two addressed 
approval of school department contracts. The implementation of this legislation will have its' major initial test 
in 1995 when the Board of Aldermen receive the negotiated teachers' contract. 

The focus of this past legislative year has been on long range planning. The Mayor and Board of 
Aldermen met with facilitator Jody Gunnerson of Conway Quality Inc. to set priorities and develop an action plan 
to guide Nashua's City Government in a congruent fashion. The M.A.I, audit of city government was reported, 
discussed, and some of the recommendations therein are being reviewed. Planning for the development of the 
Southwesterly Quadrant of the City, vehicular transportation infrastructure, downtown revitalization, school 
building needs, fourteen Court Street, vacated properties, and solid waste disposal have taken significant, 
thoughtful, and time consuming effort on the part of Nashua's City Government. 

Long range planning, fiscal responsibility, and citizen involvement have been the hallmarks of this 
legislative session. A frugal budget, initially approved in June, was re-opened by Mayor Wagner in order to 
address an Overlay Account deficit. Final budgetary approval in August resulted in further cuts in the operating 
budget, as well as in both the Self-Insurance Reserve Fund and CERF, Capital Equipment Reserve Fund. These 
actions were taken in an effort to provide an affordable tax rate. Citizen involvement has been fostered 
throughout this legislative session. The agenda of Aldcrmanic Meetings includes a scheduled period for public 
comment. 

It takes total (.(immunity effort to address the needs of the City most effectively. I wish to thank (he 
employees and leadership of the various City Divisions for their cooperation during this legislative session. Special 
appreciation is due our Legislative Assistant, Bertha Landry, for her outstanding effort. City Clerk Eleanor 
Benson and Deputy City Clerk Patricia Lucier have been a great support to the Board. I wish to thank each 
member of the Board of Aldermen for their dedication and industry in addressing their responsibilities as elected 
representatives of the citizens of this fine City. 

Sincerely, 

Joyce L. Arel 
President 



18 



Municipal Government Report 




BOARD OF ALDERMEN 
1994-1995 

First row, left to right: 

Alderman-at-Large Fred S. Teeboom; Alderman-at-Large Thomas B. Kelley; Alderman-at- 
Large Joyce L. Arel, President; Mayor Rob Wagner; Alderman-at-Large Katherine E. Hersh; 
Alderman-at-Large Claire M. McGrath, Vice President; Alderman-at-Large Victor C. 
DuVarney Jr; 

Second row, left to right: 

Ward Five Alderman David Rootovich; Ward Eight Alderman Maureen Lane Lemieux; 
Ward Two Alderman Tracy S. Hatch; Ware Five Alderman Brian S. McCarthy; 

Third row, left to right; 

Ward Three Alderman Arthur Ferlan; Ward Seven Alderman Thomas W. Grant; Ward Four 
Alderman Eric R. Wilson; Ward One Alderman James R. Tollner; Ward Six Alderman 
David G. Fredette; Chief Finance Officer Paul Martel; 

Fourth row, left to right: 

Deputy Corporation Counsel Judy Constantian; Legislative Assistant Bertha A. Landry; 
Deputy City Clerk Patricia E. Lucier; City Clerk Eleanor Benson. 



19 



City of Nashua 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 
1994-1995 



MAYOR 

Honorable Rob Wagner 

Fleeted at the December Mayoral Run-Off Election 

for a Four Year Term Expiring December 31,1995 

PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

Alderman-at-Large Joyce L. Arel 

Elected by the Board of Aldermen for a 

Two Year Term Expiring December 31, 1995 

VICE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

Alderman-at-Large Claire M. McGrath 

Elected by the Board of Aldermen for a 

Two Year Term Expiring December 31, 1995 



ALDERMAN-AT-LARGE 

Three members elected at the Municipal Election 



[Catherine E. Hersh 
Thomas B. Kelley 
Victor C. DuVarney, Jr. 

Joyce L. Arel 
Claire M. McGrath 
Fred S. Teeboom 



Term Expires December 31, 1995 



Ward 1 
Ward 2 
Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Ward 5 
Ward 6 
Ward 7 
Ward 8 
Ward 9 



Term Expires December 31, 1997 

WARD ALDERMEN 

James R. Tollner 
Tracy S. Hatch 
Arthur Ferlan 
Eric R. Wilson 
Brian S. McCarthy 
David G. Fredette 
Thomas W. Grant 
Maureen Lane Lemieux 
David Rootovich 



28 Bicentennial Drive 
21 Todd Road 
13 Ritter Street 

10 Virginia Drive 
19 Lojko Drive 
24 Cheyenne Drive 



1 Sequoia Circle 
7 Ferncroft Drive 

6 Glendale Drive 
1 Burns Street 

65 Musket Drive 

17 Hassell Brook Road 

7 Lincoln Avenue 
87 Spindlewick Drive 

5 Shelton Street 



CLERK OF THE HOARD: Eleanor A. Benson 23 Countryside Drive 594-3305 

LEGISLATIVE ASSISTANT: Bertha Ann Landry 101 Tolles Street 594-3381 



20 



Municipal Government Report 

CITY OF NASHUA 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN 
STANDING COMMITTEES 



FINANCE COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS 

ALSO 

PURCHASING AGENCY FOR DEPARTMENTAL PURCHASES 

His Honor, Mayor Rob Wagner, Chairman 

Alderman-at-Large Thomas B. Kelley, Vice Chairman 

Alderman-at-Large Victor C. DuVarney, Jr. 

Alderman-at-Large Claire McGrath 

Ward One Alderman James R. Tollner 

Ward Five Alderman Brian S. McCarthy 

Ward Eight Alderman Maureen Lane Lemieux 

PLANNING & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Alderman-at-Large Katherine E. Hersh, Chairman 

Alderman-at-Large Claire McGrath, Vice Chairman 

Alderman-at-Large Fred S. Teeboom 

Ward One Alderman James R. Tollner 

Ward Five Alderman Brian S. McCarthy 

TRAFFIC COMMITTEE 

Alderman-at-Large Claire McGrath, Chairman 

Ward Four Alderman Eric R. Wilson, Vice Chairman 

Alderman-at-Large Katherine E. Hersh 

Ward One Alderman James R. Tollner 

Ward Seven Alderman Thomas W. Grant 

LANDS AND BUILDINGS 

Alderman-at-Large Thomas B. Kelley, Chairman 

Ward Two Alderman Tracy S. Hatch, Vice Chairman 

Alderman-at-Large Victor C. DuVarney, Jr. 

Ward Three Alderman Arthur Ferlan 

Ward Four Alderman Eric R. Wilson 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

Ward Six Alderman David G. Fredette, Chairman 

Alderman-at-Large Katherine E. Hersh, Vice Chairman 

Alderman-at-Large Fred S. Teeboom 

Ward Two Alderman Tracy S. Hatch 

Ward Four Alderman Eric R. Wilson 

Ward Seven Alderman Thomas W. Grant 

Ward Nine Alderman David Rootovich 



21 



City of Nashua 



PERSONNEL CLASSIFICATION, EMPLOYMENT, 
APPOINTMENTS AND POLICIES 

Altlerman-at-Large Victor C. DuVarney, Jr., Chairman 

Ward Nine Alderman David Rootovich, Vice Chairman 

Ward Three Alderman Arthur Ferlan 

Ward Six Alderman David G. Fredette 

Ward Five Alderman Brian S. McCarthy 



ELECTIONS AND RETURNS 

Ward Two Alderman Tracy S. Hatch, Chairman 

Ward Eight Alderman Maureen Lane Lemieux, Vice Chairman 

Alderman-at-Large Fred S. Teeboom 

Ward Six Alderman David G. Fredette 

Ward Nine Alderman David Rootovich 



RULES AND LICENSES 

Ward One Alderman James R. Tollner, Chairman 

Ward Five Alderman Brian S. McCarthy, Vice Chairman 

Alderman-at-Large Katherine E. Hersh 

Ward Six Alderman David G. Fredette 

Ward Nine Alderman David Rootovich 



STREET ACCEPTANCE AND STREET LIGHTS 

Alderman-at-Large Victor C. DuVarney, Chairman 

Ward Three Alderman Arthur Ferlan, Vice Chairman 

Ward Six Alderman David G. Fredette 

Ward Eight Alderman Maureen Lane Lemieux 

Ward Four Alderman Eric R. Wilson 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Alderman-at-Large Fred S. Teeboom, Chairman 

Ward Seven Alderman Thomas W. Grant, Vice Chairman 

Ward Three Alderman Arthur Ferlan 

Ward Eight Alderman Maureen Lane Lemieux 

Ward Four Alderman Eric R. Wilson 



22 



Municipal Government Report 



JOINT SPECIAL SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

Alderman-at-Large Joyce L. Arel 

Alderman-at-Large Thomas B. Kelley 

Alderman-at-Large Claire McGrath 

Alderman-at-Large Fred S. Teeboom 

Ward Three Alderman Arthur Ferlan 

Ward Seven Alderman Thomas W. Grant 

Ward Eight Alderman Maureen Lane Lemieux 

Ward Five Alderman Brian S. McCarthy 

Ward Nine Alderman David Rootovich 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Steven A. Bolton 

Ann Cohen 

George E. Farrington 

Dorothy Oden 

Athena "Tina" Munroe 

Sue A. Newman 

Jane Schmidt 

Joan Sweeney 

Lindsey Wormley 



SPECIAL LIAISON COMMITTEES 



Board of Health 

Ward Seven Alderman Thomas W. Grant 
Alderman-at-Large Claire McGrath (Alt.) 



Hunt Legacy 

Alderman-at-Large Joyce L. Arel 



BPW Pension 

Ward Six Alderman David G. Fredette 

Ward Seven Alderman Thomas W. Grant (Alt.) 



Nashua Housing Authority 

Ward Four Alderman Eric R. Wilson 

Ward Three Alderman Arthur Ferlan (Alt.) 



Capital Improvements 

Ward Five Alderman Brian S. McCarthy 
Ward Eight Alderman Maureen Lemieux (Alt.) 



Planning Board 

Ward Six Alderman David G. Fredette 



Library 

Alderman-at-Large Joyce L. Arel 



Ira Harris Fund 

Alderman-at-Large Joyce L. Arel 



Cable TV Advisory Board 

Ward Three Alderman Arthur Ferlan 
Alderman-at-Large Fred S. Teeboom (Alt.) 

Municipal Channel Advisory Committee 
Alderman-at-Large Joyce L. Arel 



23 



City of Nashua 



CITY OF NASHUA 



ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION 



Chief administrative office of the City Mayor Rob Wagner 

The Mayor's staff shall consist of those individuals as he shall determine necessary to 
perform the following functions. 



Assistants to the Mayor 

Assistant to Mayor 
Executive Assistant 
Mayoral Assistant 
Secretary/Receptionist 

Legal Department 

City Corporation Counsel 
Deputy Corporation Counsel 
Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Legal Secretary 
Legal Secretary 



Peter Finney 

Christine Nolan Konys 

Georgie Lyons 

Beatrice Dean 

Rita Diggins 

Mark J. Bennett 

Judith T. Constantian 

Sonja Boyan 

Susan Lovering 

Sherri Galbally 



Legislative Assistant to the Aldermen 

Legislative Assistant 



Bertha A. Landry 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 



Director 



Russell R. Marcoux 



Assessor's Department 

Assessing Manager 



Lucien G. Rousseau, Jr. 



City Clerk's (Records and Statistics Department) 

City Clerk 
Deputy City Clerk 



Eleanor A. Benson 
Patricia E. Lucier 



Financial Services (Revenue and Expenditures Department) 

Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer 
Financial Coordinator 



Paul A. Martel 
Dawn Enwright 



24 



Municipal Government Report 



Human Resources/Insurance Benefits 

Manager 

Manager Insurance Benefits 

Management Information Services Department 

Manager 

Purchasing Department 

Manager 

Voter Registration Department 

Deputy Registrar 



Marilyn Baron 
Susan Jeffery 



Louis Simmons 



William A. Thompson 



Ralene Rousseau 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION 



Director 

Planning Department 

Manager 

Code Department 

Code Official 

Urban Programs Department 

Manager 



David S. Boesch, Jr. 

Roger L. Houston 

William Walsh 

Paul E. Newman 



PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION 



Director 
Business Manager 

Engineering 

City Engineer 
Deputy City Engineer 
Deputy City Engineer 
Assistant City Engineer 

City Recycling Coordinator 



Streets 



Superintendent 

Assistant Superintendent (Refuse & Snow) 

Assistant Superintendent (Sewers) 



L. Peter Benet 



Robin Belanger 



James F. Hogan 

Jon Lebrun 

Joseph Morrill 

Arthur Kidd 

Sally Hyland 



Donald Levesque 

Dennis Aussant 

Jim Hall 



25 



City of Nashua 



Landfill 

Supervisor 

Parks & Recreation Department 

Superintendent 
Recreation Supervisor 

Treatment Plant 

Superintendent 



Ron Jenkins 



Frank Dorsey 
June Caron 



Lorraine Sander 



COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 



Director 



Dolores A. Bellavance 



Child Care Services 
Coordinator 



Christine Lister 



Environmental Health Department 

Health Officer 



Michael V. Tremblay 



Community Health Department 

Chief Public Health Nurse 



Joan Schulze 



Welfare Department 

Welfare Officer 



Robert W. Tamposi 



SAFETY AND ENFORCEMENT 



Fire Department 

Chief 

Assistant Fire Chief 
Deputy Chief 
Deputy Chief 
Deputy Chief 
Deputy Chief 
Fire Marshal 



Richard Navaroli 

Michael Buxton 

John Chesnulevich 

Robert Burnham 

Eugene S.Farnum 

John Allison 

Kenneth J. Renoux 



Police Department 

Chief 

Deputy Chief of Police 



Raymond J. Landry 
Clifton D. Largy 



26 



Municipal Government Report 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Director 

Assistant Director 



CEMETERIES 



Clarke Davis 
Robert Frost 



Superintendent, Edge-wood & Suburban Cemeteries 
Superintendent, Woodlawn Cemetery 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



Jeffrey Snow 
Howard Frizzell 



Superintendent 

Assistant Superintendent-Elementary 
Assistant Superintendent-Secondary 
Business Administrator 



Dr. Berard Masse 

Joseph R. Giuliano 

John Cepaitis 

Timothy Corwin 



CITY OF NASHUA 
BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 

AIRPORT AUTHORITY 



Appointed by the Mayor, subject to confirmation by 
the Board of Aldermen, for five year terms ending August 31 



1994 


John A. Potfora* 


102 


Conant Road 


888-0653 


1995 


Randall E. Wilbert** 


51 


Concord Street 


883-5970 


1996 


Barbara L. Cote 


11 


Miami Street 


883-2806 


1997 


Elizabeth A. Cepaitis 


16 


Shakespeare Road 


888-2029 


1998 


Roland Noyes 


16 


Coburn Avenue 


882-0548 



♦Passed away March 13, 1994 
♦♦Resigned May 25, 1994 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation by 
the Board of Aldermen for Indefinite Terms 



Stephen J. Densberger 
Marylou Blaisdell 
Richard G. Ethier 



22 Nova Road 
32 Webster Street 
5 Kingston Drive 



882-8210 
595-7022 
882-0229 



27 



City of Nashua 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 



Four members elected at the Municipal Election of 1977 to 

maintain the nine member board as passed by 

referendum at the Municipal Election of 1971. 

Four year terms ending December 31 



1995 


Steven A. Bolton 


4 


Kyle Avenue 


891-1766 


1995 


Ann Cohen 


46 


Pinehurst Avenue 


888-2861 


1995 


Sue A. Newman 


25 


Charlotte Avenue 


880-8973 


1995 


Dorothy Oden 


16 


Cathedral Circle 


880-8772 


1995 


Lindsey Wormley 


8 


Margaret Circle 


888-7231 


1997 


George Farrington 


24 


Lutheran Drive 


889-2779 


1997 


Athena "Tina" Munroe 


15 


Shelton Street 


888-6227 


1997 


Jane Schmidt 


7 


Acacia Street 


881-3204 


1997 


Joan Sweeney 


7 


Nutmeg Drive 

III?* I TU 


882-1999 



Elected by the Board of Aldermen for two year terms 
ending December 31 



1995 Dr. David W. Brumley 155 Main Dunstable Rd. 

1995 Dr. Donald Levi 155 Kinsley Street 

1995 Dr. Anthony Storace 5 Coliseum Avenue 

1995 Ward Seven Alderman Thomas W. Grant, Liaison Member 

1995 Alderman-at-Large Claire McGrath, Alternate Liaison Member 



883-7970 
889-6671 
882-2921 



— BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS — 

Elected at the Municipal Election 
Four Year Terms ending December 31 



1995 


Mayor Rob Wagner 




Ex-Officio 


594-3341 


1995 


Francis X. Donovan 


2 


Glen Drive 


882-5963 


1995 


Donald J. Dyer 


16 


Radcliffe Drive 


882-2880 


1997 


Ansel S. Grandmaison 


571 


South Main Street 


891-0005 


1997 


Roland Petersen 


4 


Lynn Street 


883-3049 



28 



Municipal Government Report 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS RETIREMENT SYSTEM TRUSTEES 

Four year terms ending December 31 



1994 Ronald Jenkins** 75 Tenby Drive 880-3348 

1994 Lucien Roy** 9 Oakdale Avenue 888-2115 

1995 Ward Six Alderman David G. Fredette, Liaison Member 882-2478 
1995 Ward Seven Alderman Thomas W. Grant, Alternate Liaison Member 888-0955 
1995 Donald J. Dyer* 16 Radcliffe Drive 882-2880 
1995 Robert E. Hussey*** 40 Burnside Street 889-4414 

'Represents Commissioners of the B.P.W. 
* 'Represents Employees of the P.W.D 
** 'Represents the Financial and Investment Community 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Aldermen for a three year term ending December 31 



1994 Katherine K. Fogal 

1995 Theresa A. Marquis 

1996 Maureen Irvine 



38 Whitford Road 
2 Miami Street 
7 Birchbrow Road 



882-5898 
882-3660 
888-0605 



BUILDING CODE/BOARD OF APPEALS 

Part of the Building Code Ordinance 

Original ordinance passed May 12, 1953, Amended June 12 1973 

Members appointed by the Mayor, confirmed by the 

Board of Aldermen, for three year terms ending March 31 



1995 


John A. Carter 


12 


Bartlett Avenue 


882-0201 


1995 


David W. Cheever (Alt) 


8 


Spaulding Avenue 


889-4658 


1995 


David Farr, P.E. 


100 


Perimeter Road 


883-0463 


1996 


Gerard Roberge 


23 


Almont Street 


882-2319 


1996 


George Fallet (Alt) 


32 


Watersedge Drive 


886-5925 


1999 


Alvin Corzilius 


39 


Stark Street 


889-4692 


1999 


Joseph W. Hogan 


31 


Williams Street 


882-9377 


1999 


Richard Cane (Alt) 


21 


Drury Lane 


883-1133 



29 



City of Nashua 



CABLE TELEVISION ADVISORY BOARD 



Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation by the Board of Aldermen 

1993 James Jambard 51 Pioneer Drive 886-4387 

1995 Gertrude Alcock 324 Candlewood Park 889-0963 

1996 Lucille Watt Purgatory Falls Road 654-9579 
Indef. Vacant (Poulin/Resigned 6-22-93) 

Indef. Richard Turgeon, Clerk 19 Beaver Street 594-3637 

Indef. Ann Warren 17V2 Manchester Street 889-5643 

1995 Ward Three Alderman Arthur Ferlan, Liaison Member 
1995 Alderman-at-Large Fred S. Teeboom, Alternate Liaison Member 



CAPITAL EQUIPMENT RESERVE FUND TRUSTEES 

Established by Ordinance passed August 12, 1969 

Five trustees consisting of the Mayor, 

President of the board of Aldermen, The Finance Officer 

and two other members to be appointed by the Mayor 

subject to the approval of the Board of Aldermen 

for two year terms ending December 31 



1995 Honorable Rob Wagner, Mayor 594-3341 

1995 Alderman-at-Large Joyce L. Arel, President Board of Aldermen 

Indef. Paul A. Martel, Treasurer & Chief Finance Officer 594-3315 

1993 Vacant (LaRose/Resigned 12/93) 

1995 Walter Warren 17V* Manchester Street 889-5643 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM 



Four citizens appointed by the Nashua City Planning Board 

an Alderman appointed by the President of the Board of Aldermen 

The Finance Officer, and the Planning Director 

Citizen terms are two years 



Indef. 


Paul A. Martel, Treasurer 


and Chief Finance Officer 


594-3315 


Indef. 


Roger L. Houston, Planni 


ng Director 




594-3360 


1995 


Ward Five Alderman Brian S. McCarthy 


, Liaison Member 




1995 


Ward Eight Alderman Maureen Lane Lemieux, Alternate Liaison Member 


1994 


Hollis E. Harrington 


62 


Farmington Road 


891-2100 


1994 


Alfred F. Turner, Jr. 


15 


Penobscot Road 


889-8868 


1995 


Charles Budris 


2 


Shelley Drive 


888-2150 


1995 


Bette Lasky 


15 


Masefield Road 


888-5557 



30 



Municipal Government Report 



CEMETERY TRUSTEES 



Elected by the Trustees and Board of Aldermen 

in Joint Convention 

for five year terms ending March 31 



EDGEWOOD CEMETERY 

1995 Mayor Rob Wagner, Ex-Officio 

Indef. Paul A. Martel, Treasurer & Chief Finance Office 

Indef. Jeffrey Snow, Superintendent 

1994 Alan Jeffery, President 

1995 Frederick E. Shaw 

1995 Kenneth Spaulding 

1996 George B. Law 

1996 Thomas Maffee, Secretary 

1997 Alan M. Barker 

1997 Norman E. Hall 

1998 Philip L. Hall 

1998 Douglas Barker 

1999 Rev. James S. Chaloner 



3 


Deerhaven Drive 


137 


Manchester Street 


7 


Franconia Drive 


24 


Pine Hill Avenue 


20 


Beauview Avenue 


15 


Bartlett Street 


66 


Manchester Street 


8 


Edson Street 


5 


Royal Oak Drive 


1 


Concord Street 



594-3341 
594-3315 
594-3327 
883-4532 
883-7039 
883-3697 
882-4265 
883-8128 
882-1824 
883-1810 
882-3740 
889-7081 
880-4373 



SUBURBAN CEMETERIES 

1995 Mayor Rob Wagner, Ex-Officio 

Indef. Paul A. Martel, Treasurer & Chief Finance Officer 

Indef. Jeffrey Snow, Superintendent 

1993 Richard I. Hall, President 

1994 Jacob E. Crosby 101 

1995 Conrad E. Thibault, Sec./Treas. 393 

1996 Davis P. Thurber 25 

1997 Daniel Murdock 70 



PO Box 651,Hollis,NH 
Robinson Road 
Main Street 
Swart Terrace 
Berkeley Street 



594-3341 
594-3315 
594-3327 
unlisted 
888-0684 
888-1333 
883-5665 
882-1554 



WOODLAWN CEMETERY 

1995 Mayor Rob Wagner, Ex-Officio 

Indef. Paul A. Martel, Treasurer & Chief Finance Officer 

Indef. Howard Frizzell, Superintendent 



1995 


Nicholas Antonopoulos* 


11 


Hastings Lane 


1995 


Stanley P. Zis 


26 


Kinsley Street 


1996 


Marvis Mellen 


10 


Meade Street 


1996 


Herbert William Snow 


4 


Adelaide Avenue 


1997 


Lester Gidge 


61 


Linwood Street 


1997 


Gordon Tyszko 


41 


Meade Street 


1998 


David Aponovich 


2 


Indiana Drive 


1998 


Niles F. Jensen, Jr. 


57 


Watson Street 


1999 


Charles H. Farwell, Jr.,Sec. 


9 


Todd Road 


1999 


David L. Wells, President 


236 


Manchester Street 



594-3341 
594-3315 
594-3354 
882-1567 
882-3501 
889-9326 
883-8084 
883-7862 
883-2276 
883-2168 
889-0437 
882-3937 
882-4564 



♦Passed away October 16, 1993 



31 



City of Nashua 



CHILD CARE ADVISORY COMMISSION 



Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Aldermen for three year terms ending October 13 



1994 


Joanne Burke 


4 


Berkeley Street 


889-2415 


1994 


Helen Honorow 


9 


Berkeley Street 


598-8433 


1994 


Marcia Landsman 


8 


Lamb Road 


891-1232 


1994 


Elizabeth Paradis 


42 


Balcom Street 


880-7708 


1994 


Diane Ouellette 


26 


Nightingale Road 


882-7316 


1995 


Dawn Easton 


24 


Chester Street 


883-6598 


1995 


Mary Jordan 


4 


Lake Street 


882-9080 


1995 


Devra Cohen 


36 


Columbia Avenue 


595-1586 


1995 


John Fisher 


29A 


Manchester Street 


886-8528 


1995 


Peter Alden 


30 


West Road,Londonderry,NH 


886-5287 


1996 


Kathy Nelson 


230 


Daniel Webster Hwy. 


888-1982 


1996 


Linda Ryan 


35 


Vespa Lane 


883-7726 


1996 


Sr. Nancy Braceland 


3 


Crown Street 


882-0553 


1996 


Ken Renoux 


11 


Broadcrest Lane 


594-3422 


1996 


Kathy Bolton 


2 


Court Street 


594-3412 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Aldermen for three year terms ending December 31 



1992 


Vacant (Mikulis) 










1993 


Geoffrey R. Coble 




m 


Belmont Street 


886-7954 


1994 


Fred A. Elkind 




6 


Baymeadow Drive 


883-4292 


1994 


Leslie Formby 




69 


Avon Drive 


886-4374 


1994 


David Diamond (Alt.) 




4 


Franconia Drive 


889-6975 


1994 


Michael F. Scanlon (Alt.) 


6 


Knightsbridge Drive #207 


886-4936 


1995 


Kathryn A. Nelson 




4 


Massassoit Road 


883-3011 


1995 


Linda Courtney Bretz 




105 


Spit Brook Road, A#8A 


888-4881 


1995 


Craig Worcester 




25 


Cider Lane 


886-9649 


1995 


Ryan Teeboom 




6 


Fox Street 


889-7091 


Indef. 


Mark Fougere, Liaison 


member from the Planning Department 


594-3360 



32 



Municipal Government Report 



COUNCIL ON ELDERLY AFFAIRS 

Established by Resolution on June 28, 1977 to exist until December 31,1987; 

amended February 23, 1982 

Re-established by Resolution November 24, 1987 

Two year terms ending December 31 



1989 


(Vacant/Sr.M.Roy) 


Catholic Clergy 




1991 


(Vacant/Koonz) 


Protestant Clergy 




1993 


Jules Lelchuk 


Jewish Community 


888-4646 


1993 


Rev. Soterios Alexopoulos 


Greek Community 


888-4336 


1993 


Donald White 


A.A.R.P 


883-3982 


1993 


Patricia Francis 


Seniors Place Management 


883-3111 


1993 


Carmella Arciere 


Senior Citizens Club 


882-8932 


1993 


Ruth Matthews 


Golden Age Club 


882-3545 


1993 


Lawrence O'Mara 


Educational Community 


882-4525 


1993 


Rita Diggins 


At-Large-Member 


594-3341 


1993 


Tina Andrade 


At-Large Member 


888-3995 


1993 


Gerald Silver 


At-Large Member 


891-0753 


1993 


Ruby Plummer 


At-Large Member 


889-3440 


1993 


Richard Strand 


At-Large Member 


594-3422 



DEPARTMENTAL TRAFFIC COUNCIL 

Indefinite Terms 



James F. Hogan 
Donald Levesque 
Raymond J. Landry 
Richard Navaroli 
Roger L. Houston 



City Engineer 
Superintendent, PWD 
Chief of Police 
Fire Chief 
Planning Director 



594-3320 
594-3347 
594-3632 
594-3651 
594-3360 



DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

Indefinite Term 



Michael Buxton 



Conant Road Fire Station 



594-3651 



Dana Lewis 



DOWNTOWN TRAFFIC LIAISON COMMITTEE 

Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation 
by the Board of Aldermen for an indefinite term 

6 Hamilton Street 



880-1472 



33 



= City of Nashua 



ENERGY COMMISSION 



Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation 
by the Board of Aldermen for an indefinite term 





Mayor Rob Wagner 
Maurice L. Arel 
Charles E. Clough 
Ronald Moskowitz 
Fred Yochum 

Bob Dawe 

Mark Piekarski 
Maurice Trottier 
David Lavoie 
James P. Monahan 

L'llJL' D 


Ex-Officio 

10 Virginia Drive 
44 Franklin Street 
40 Simon Street 
39 Cathedral Circle 


594-3341 
889-2901 
880-2323 
882-8151 
882-8151 


1995 
1995 
1995 
1997 
1997 


r ike, i_vjivij 

Four year tenns enc 

9 

71 
93 
92 

13 

REVENTION COD 

Three Year Terms e 

39 

21 

22 

Alternate 8 

IfCTADir MICTDII 


ling December 31 

Chaucer Road 
Middle Dunstable Rd. 
Fairview Avenue 
Ash Street A#21 
Chaucer Road 

F OF APPPAI ^ RHARrt 


888-5147 
888-0606 
882-6809 
881-9398 
888-4178 


1994 
1994 
1994 
1994 


Alvin Corzilius 
Richard Cane 
Richard A. Smith 
David W. Cheever, 


H< Ur Ar rLALo D\J/\t\Lf 

nding October 31 

Stark Street 
Drury Lane 
Royal Crest Drive 
Spaulding Street 

^■t rr»i\_iiv/UCcir»M 


889-4692 
883-1133 
888-4365 
889-7713 



Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Aldermen for three year terms ending September 30 



1995 


Mayor Rob Wagner, Ex-Officio 






594-3341 


1993 


Warren Daansen, Alternate 


11 


Shattuck Street 


882-8897 


1994 


Bruce Labbitt 


46 


Concord Street 


880-1422 


1994 


David Pierce, Alternate 


13 


Manchester Street 


882-9853 


1995 


Bette Lasky 


15 


Masefield Road 


888-5557 


1995 


Timothy J. Vadney 


29 


Grand Avenue 




1995 


Alvin B. Corzilius 


39 


Stark Street 


889-4692 


1995 


Frank Mellen 


10 


Meade Street 


889-9326 


1996 


Scott McPhie, Alternate 


24 


Granite Street 


882-3607 


1996 


Helen Morris 


2 


Manchester Street 


889-8037 


Indef. 


Roger Houston, Planning Manager 






594-3360 


Indef. 


Mark Fougere, Deputy/Development 






594-3360 



34 



Municipal Government Report 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Aldermen for five year terms ending October 14 

Indef. George F. Robinson, Director 

1994 Kris E. Durmer 

1995 Thomas Monahan 

1996 William C. Marcoux, Jr. 

1997 Selma Pastor 

1998 Florida C. Lovely 

1995 Alderman Eric R. Wilson, Liaison Member 

1995 Alderman Arthur Ferlan, Alternate Liaison Member 



LEGACY TRUSTEES 



101 


Major Drive 


883-5661 


17 


Berkeley Street 


880-8202 


28 


Swart Terrace 


882-1099 


6 


East Dunstable Road 


888-1899 


24 


Stark Street 


882-3823 


165 


Pine Street 


881-9476 



Appointed by the Board of Aldermen for two year tenns 
ending December 31 

IRA F. HARRIS LECTURE FUND 



1995 Honorable Rob Wagner, Mayor, Ex-Officio 594-3341 

1995 Alderman-at-Large Joyce L. Arel 

President, Board of Aldermen, Ex-Officio 
1995 George E. Farrington 

President, Board of Education, Ex-Officio 889-2779 

1994 Florence Shepard 17 Courtland Street 882-7019 

1995 Donald Marquis 23 Tenby Drive 888-1677 

MOSES HUNT LECTURE FUND 



1995 Honorable Rob Wagner, Mayor, Ex-Officio 594-3341 
1995 Alderman-at-Large Joyce L. Arel 

President, Board of Aldermen, Ex-Officio 880-1944 
1995 George E. Farrington 

President, Board of Education, Ex-Officio 889-2779 

1994 Ruth Gaukstern 26 Adelaide Ave. 882-2033 

1995 Arthur Olsson 169 Coburn Woods 889-1019 



POLICE COMMISSION 



Appointed by the Governor and Executive Council 
for three year terms ending September 1 



1994 Thomas Maffee 

1995 Maurice L. Arel 

1996 Alan Jeffery 



20 


Beauview Avenue 


883-8128 


10 


Virginia Drive 


889-2901 


3 


Deerhaven Drive 


883-4532 



35 



City of Nashua 



MUNICIPAL CHANNEL ADVISORY BOARD 



Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Aldermen for two year terms expiring November 1 



1994 


Dolores Bellavance 


Community Services Division 


594-3357 


1994 


David S. Boesch 


Community Development Director 


594-3360 


1994 


Robert Pariseau 


School Department 


889-4685 


1994 


Sgt. William Barlow 


Police Department 


594-3500 


1994 


Frank Dorsey 


Park & Recreation Department 


594-3346 


1994 


Christine Konys 


Mayor's Office 


594-3341 


1994 


Richard Strand 


Fire Department 


594-3637 


1994 


Ann Warren 


Public Library 


889-5643 


1995 


Joyce L. Arel 

MACI4TT* IMI 


Board of Aldermen 

1ITGTPIAI nFVFI nPMFNT AUTHORITY - 


889-2901 



Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Aldermen for three year terms ending September 13 

1995 Honorable Rob Wagner, Mayor, Ex-Officio 594-3341 
1995 Alderman-at-Large Joyce L. Arel 

President, Board of Aldermen, Ex-Officio 889-2901 
Indef. Paul A. Martel 

Treasurer/Chief Finance Officer, Ex-Officio 594-3315 

1992 Nancie Caron 15 Pennichuck St. 889-1677 

1992 Paul Houde 27 Forest Park Dr. 889-2293 

1993 Edward G. Bryer 9 Beverlee Dr. 882-8014 

1993 Richard E. West 41 Berkeley St. 882-1804 

1994 Thomas J. McAndrews III 21 Ferry Road 881-3325 

1995 Lawrence M. Hersh 28 Bicentennial Drive 888-9686 
1995 Frederick Yochum 39 Cathedral Circle 882-8151 



NASHUA PUBLIC BUS TRANSIT COMMISSION 

Established by Ordinance June 12, 1990 



1994 A. Theresa Drabinowicz 56 Temple Street 882-2864 

1995 Walter Warren IIV2 Manchester Street 889-5643 

1995 Victor C. DuVarney, Jr.,AJderman-at-Large 883-5003 

1996 Janice Sylor 168 Harris Road 888-3998 
Indef. David S. Boesch, Jr., Director Community Development 594-3360 



36 



Municipal Government Report 



NASHUA REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION 

Nashua Representatives nominated by the City Planning Board and 
con finned by the Board of Aldermen for four year terms 



1994 Frank Bolmarcich, NCPB Rep. 
1994 Joseph Goodman 
1994 Audrey Carragher 

1994 Walter Warren 
1993 Shaun T. McMahon, Alternate 

1993 David G. Fredette, Alternate 

1995 Alderman Claire McGrath, Alt. 

1994 Alderman Katherine E. Hersh, Alt. 
Indef. David Boesch, Alternate 

Donald Zizzi 
Ann Caldwell 
Annemarie Hargreaves 



11 


Wagon Trail 


888-6364 


13 
48 


Fountain Lane 
Coburn Woods 


889-8140 


17'/2 


Manchester Street 


889-5643 




Citizen Representative 


882-2415 




NCPB Representative 


880-9024 




Traffic Committee Chairman 


883-5003 




Citizen Representative 


882-2880 




Community Development Div. 


594-3360 




Executive Director NRPC 


883-0366 




Chairman NRPC 


883-0366 




Treasurer NRPC 


883-0366 



PARK AND RECREATION ADVISORY COMMISSION 

Appointed by the Mayor with the consent of the Board of Aldermen 

with a term of office identical with the term of office of the 

Mayor making the appointments or any remainder thereof 

Term ending December 31 



1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
1995 
Indef. 



Pauline Albert 
Richard Valley 
C. Justin Crowley 
James J. Hannon 
Emil Bozek 



26 Dexter Street 

19 Sherwood Drive 

36 Dublin Avenue 

1 Boxwood Court 

15 Bramble Drive 



Frank Dorsey, Superintendent Park & Recreation Department 



Indef. June Caron, Recreation Supervisor Park & Recreation Department 



882-0609 
880-4885 
883-9345 
886-0800 
883-5373 
594-3346 
594-3367 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD 

Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Aldermen for three year terms ending June 30 



1994 


Barbara Foran 


88 


Bluestone Drive 


1995 


Clifford D. Colquitt 


73 


Concord Street 


1996 


Elizabeth T. Cooper 


21 


Shelburne Road 



888-0235 
882-0007 
883-0210 



37 



City of Nashua 



PLANNING BOARD 

Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Aldermen for three year terms ending March 31 



1995 Honorable Rob Wagner, Mayor 

Indef. James F. Hogan 

Indef. Roger Houston 

1995 Alderman David G. Fredette 

1995 Franklin Bolmarcich, Alternate 

1995 Kathleen Veracco 

1995 Bette Lasky 

1996 William T. Hack 

1996 Lyn W. Healy, Alternate 

1996 JodyWilbert 

1997 Richard J. LaRose 
1997 Linda Wormley 





Ex-Officio 


594-3341 




Engineer, Ex-Officio 


594-3320 




Planning Director 


594-3360 




Liaison Member 


882-2880 


11 


Wagon Trail 


888-6364 


5 


Tomolonis Drive 


888-3440 


15 


Masefield Road 


888-5557 


31 


Gushing Avenue 


882-0269 


43 


Monza Road 


880-0386 


51 


Concord Street 


883-5970 


36 


Charlotte Avenu 


889-6049 


8 


Margaret Circle 


888-7231 



PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUSTEES 



His Honor the Mayor, and the President of the Board of Aldermen 

are Trustees ex-officio, one trustee is elected annually 

for a seven year term ending March 31 by the Board of Aldermen 

and Trustees in Joint Convention 



1995 


Honorable Rob Wagner,Mayor 




Ex-Officio 


594-3341 


1995 


Alderman-at-Large Joyce 


L. Arel 










President Board of Aldermen 




Ex-Officio 


889-2901 


1995 


Maurice L. Arel 




10 


Virginia Drive 


889-2901 


1996 


Frank Clancy 




16 


Berkeley Street 


889-9498 


1997 


Arthur L. Barrett 




24 


Deerhaven Drive 


882-6796 


1998 


Mary S. Nelson 




18 


Stanley Lane 


888-5384 


1999 


Roger Osgood 






Osgood Road 


883-7039 


2000 


S. Robert Winer 




56 


Wood Street 


883-3104 


2001 


Dr. Arthur E. Comolli 




16 


Browning Avenue 


888-2064 



38 



Municipal Government Report 



REVIEW AND COMMENT COMMISSION 

Appointed by the Mayor subject to confirmation by 
the Board of Aldennen for a three year term 

1994 Rhonda Karlsberg 25 Hampton Drive 882-1866 

1995 Dorothy H. Turner 3 Fowell Avenue 886-5088 

1996 Elinor W. Hooker 27 Cabot Drive 882-5972 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION 

Appointed by the Mayor 



subject to confinnation by the Board of Aldermen 
for three year terms ending December 31 

1993 Harold Crapo 134 Princeton Road 881-9497 

1995 Richard J. LaRose* 36 Charlotte Avenue 889-6049 

♦Resigned 10/93 



VOTING MACHINE PROGRAMMERS 

Appointed by the Mayor 



subject to confirmation by the Board of Aldermen 
for four year terms ending September 11 

1995 Lucien Roy, Assistant 9 Oakdale Avenue 594-3349 

1996 Steve Davenport, Chief 48 Elm Street 594-3348 

1997 Robert Beaucher, Assistant 12 Benson Avenue 594-3367 



ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Appointed by the Mayor 



subject to confinnation by the Board of Aldermen 
for three year tenns ending September 11 



1992 (Vacant/Alternate) 

1994 Susan Douglas 

1994 Dennis Drake, Alternate 

1994 Kevin P. McAfee 

1995 Hilary Keating 
1995 Robert P. Blaisdell 

1995 Brian McCarthy, Alternate* 
1995 Joan D. Meckel, Alternate 

1995 Bridget Belton-Jette, Alternate 

1996 Chris McGrath 
Indef. Michael Yeomans 
♦Resigned January 11, 1994 



210-4 


Brook Village Rd. 


888-8113 


5 


Grace Drive 


888-2437 


17 


Cassandra Lane 


880-6048 


5 


Coburn Woods 


883-6903 


32 


Webster Street 


595-7022 


65 


Musket Drive 


880-1606 


14 


Turnbridge Drive 


888-8934 


9 


Westbrook Drive 


888-4011 


19 


Lojko Drive 


888-3596 


Zonir 


ig Administrator 


594-3360 



39 





City of 

1993- 


1994 




PI?PI?rrCI?W ir * r r'i\rT7c rrr\ Tiir rrxirnji rnunT 


Ward 1 


irtiir il,o I kj 






Suzan L.R. Franks 


(R) 


26 


42 Cathedral Circle, 03063 


Mark Holt 


(R) 


26 


45 Seminole Drive, 03063 


Jane E. O'Hearn 


(R) 


26 


7 Pope Circle, 03063 


Ward 2 








Robert Mercer 


(R) 


27 


1 1 Dinsmore Street, 03060 


Alice Record 


(R) 


27 


76 Beauview Avenue, 03060 


Stanley R. Vanderlosk 


(R) 


27 


2 Charlotte Street, 03060 


Ward 3 








Normand R. Bergeron 


(D) 


28 


8 Overhill Avenue, 03060 


Robert A. Daigle 


(D) 


28 


133 Colgate Road, 03060 


Sylvia A. Holley 


(R) 


28 


6 Benton Drive, 03060 


Ward 4 








David E. Cote 


(D-R-L) 


29 


96 West Hollis Street, 03060 


A. Haettenschwiller 


(D) 


29 


24 Mulberry St. A#2, 03060 


John W. Smart 


(D) 


29 


94 Chestnut Street, 03060 


Ward 5 








Donnalee Lozeau 


(R) 


30 


125 Shore Drive, 03062 


Paula L. Philbrook 


(D) 


30 


10 Lantern Lane, 03062 


Kathryn Toomey 


(D) 


30 


10 Lantern Lane, 03062 


Ward 6 








Jane A. Clemons 


(D-R) 


31 


177 Kinsley Street, 03060 


Roland J. Lefebvre 


(D) 


31 


19 Dane Street, 03060 


Richard A. Soucy 


(D-R) 


31 


1 Lake Avenue, 03060 


Ward 7 








Lucien Bergeron 


(D) 


32 


11 Lynn Street, 03060 


Claudette R. Jean 


(D) 


32 


52 Burke Street, 03060 


Roland A. Morrissette 


(D) 


32 


69 Burke Street, 03060 


Ward 8 








Elizabeth A. Cepaitis 


(R) 


33 


16 Shakespeare Road, 03062 


George C. Eliades* 


(R) 


33 


5 Masefield Road, 03062 


Joan Sullens 


(R) 


33 


5 Kyle Drive, 03062 


Ward 9 








Frederick Andrews 


(R) 


34 


41 Monica Drive, 03062 


Francis X. Donovan 


(D-R) 


34 


2 Glen Drive, 03062 


Mary Ellen Martin 


(D-R) 


34 


5 Lone Star Drive, 03062 




FLOTERIAL DISTRICTS 




Wards 1, 2, 3 5 








David B. Holt 


(R) 


35 


45 Seminole Drive, 03063 


Wards 4, 6, 7 & 8, 9 








A. Theresa Drabinowicz 


(D-R) 


36 


56 Temple Street, 03060 


♦Resigned 1/94 









40 



Municipal Government Report 





CITY ELECTION OFFICIALS 




1994-1995 


Moderato 

Ward 1 


rs: 

Francis J. Pickett 


Ward 2 


V. Mary Hall 


Ward 3 


Joseph G. Sakey ' 


Ward 4 


Barbara Cote 


Ward 5 


Dennis M. Drake 


Ward 6 


Laurie Michalewicz 


Ward 7 


Adams C. Gureckis, Sr. 


Ward 8 


Tim Dolan 


Ward 9 


Peter D. Curran 



42 Bartemus Trail, 03063 

66 Manchester Street, 03060 

48 Walden Pond Road, 03060 

11 Miami Street, 03060 

5 Grace Drive, 03062 

14 Fowell Avenue, 03060 

1 Cherry Street, 03060 

8 Chaucer Road, 03062 

91 Langhom Drive, 03062 



Ward Clerks 


■ 


Ward 1 


Mary Poston 


Ward 2 


William A. Marshall 


Ward 3 


Carol P. Marshall 


Ward 4 


Muriel C. Mazeika 


Ward 5 


Jean E. Fortier 


Ward 6 


Cynthia P. Sweeney 


Ward 7 


Darryl Courtenay 


Ward 8 


Viola Taranto 


Ward 9 


Ann A. Corbett 



14 Bible Way, 03063 

15 Watson Street, 03060 

14 Abbott Street, 03060 

9 North Seventh Street, 03060 

1070 West Hollis Street, 03062 

14 Fowell Avenue, 03060 

8 Cherry Street, 03060 

5 Belgian Place, 03062 

168 Searles Road, 03062 



41 



City of Nashua 



Selectmen: 



Ward 1 



Paul G. Bergeron 
Patricia Chadwick 
Brooks Thompson 



28 Brian Drive, 03063 

43 Indian Rock Road, 03063 

36 Lutheran Drive, 03063 



Ward 2 



Cheryl Aksten 
Andrew Hall 
Robert Mercer 



43 Sherri-Ann Avenue, 03060 

66 Manchester Street, 03060 

11 Dinsmore Street, 03060 



Ward 3 



Normand R. Bergeron 
Selma Pastor 
A. David Pierce 



8 Overhill Avenue, 03060 

24 Stark Street, 03060 

13 Manchester Street, 03060 



Ward 4 

Joan M. Ellis 
Robert J. McManus 
Rita C. Raucykevich 



44 Amherst Street, 03060 

9 Long Avenue, 03060 

9 Grand Avenue, 03060 



Ward 5 

John Hostage 
Madeline Laflamme 
James E. Malone III 



14 Rosemary Court, 03062 
55 Buckmeadow Road, 03062 
897 West Hollis Street, 03062 



Ward 6 



Carol Anctil 
Doris Maynard 
Patricia R. Morrill 



28 Hunt Street, 03060 

3 Lakeside Avenue, 03060 

3 Emmett Street, 03060 



Ward 7 



Valerie A. Denault 
Lawrence F. Maclntyre 
Anne M. Sirois 



48 Burke Street A#4, 03060 
5 Arlington Street, 03060 
57 Newbury Street, 03060 



Ward 8 



Hallock M. Boutwell 
Martha Gan 
Eric Schneider 



9 Scott Avenue, 03062 

15 Lansing Drive, 03062 

19 Stanley Lane, 03062 



Ward 9 



Mark Avery 
Laurie Dobrowolski 
Barbara Spacek 



5 Westray Drive, 03062 

126 Searles Road, 03062 

3 Lamb Road, P.O. Box 7010, 03062 



42 



Municipal Government Report 



RESOLUTIONS 

Passed by the 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

July 1, 1993 

through 

June 30, 1994 



43 



City of Nashua 



R-93-121 

AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO ENTER INTO A 
COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AGREEMENT WITH 
THE PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYEES OF THE CITY 

R-93-122 

AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO ENTER INTO A 

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AGREEMENT WITH THE 

CLERICAL AND TECHNICAL EMPLOYEES OF THE CITY 

R-93-123 

RELATIVE TO THE TRANSFER OF $21,000 FROM 

ACCOUNT 591-86005 - CONTINGENCY - GENERAL TO 

ACCOUNTS 512-11023, 512-11129, FINANCIAL SERVICES 

PAYROLL AND 513-11168, CITY CLERK PAYROLL 

R-93-124 

RELATIVE TO THE TRANSFER OF $3,000 FROM 

ACCOUNT 591-86005-1 - CONTINGENCY, GENERAL TO 

ACCOUNT 505-81078, NASHUA SENIORS MEAL PROGRAM 

R-93-127 

EXTENDING CONGRATULATIONS TO GIRLS NATION 

AND BOYS NATION REPRESENTATIVES 

R-93-128 

EXTENDING CONGRATULATIONS TO THE GOVERNORS 
OF GIRLS AND BOYS STATE 



The preceding resolutions were passed July 13, 1993 

Philip J. Grandmaison, President 

Approved July 13, 1993 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-93-116 

RELATIVE TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SEWER ASSESSMENTS 
(Amy R. Sherman, 17 Kipling Street) 

R-93-117 

RELATIVE TO THE REMOVAL OF A RESERVATION AT 

49 KINSLEY STREET REGARDING ITS USE 

AS A POLLING PLACE 



44 



Municipal Government Report 



R-93-126 

AUTHORIZING HIS HONOR, THE MAYOR, AND THE 

CITY TREASURER TO ISSUE BONDS NOT TO EXCEED THE 

AMOUNT OF TWO HUNDRED FORTY-SIX THOUSAND AND FIVE HUNDRED 

DOLLARS ($246,500) BONDING FOR CONSTRUCTION OF CONANT ROAD 

FIRE STATION MECHANIC SHOP ADDITION 

R-93-130 

REQUESTING THE GOVERNOR AND COUNCIL TO DECLARE A 

SPECIAL ELECTION TO FILL THE VACANCY FOR 

REPRESENTATIVE TO THE GENERAL COURT FROM DISTRICT 33 



The preceding resolutions were passed August 10, 1993 

Philip J. Grandmaison, President 

Approved August 10, 1993 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-93-129 

AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO SIGN A CONFIRMATORY CORRECTIVE 

QUITCLAIM DEED ON BEHALF OF THE CITY OF NASHUA 

TO THE POLISH AMERICAN CITIZENS CLUB 

R-93-132 

AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO APPLY FOR STATE AID GRANT 
FOR WATER POLLUTION PROJECTS 

R-94-133 

RELATIVE TO THE ACCEPTANCE OF FUNDS INTO SPECIAL 

REVENUE ACCOUNT #375 "MEDIATION COMMUNITY EDUCATION 

FUND" FOR THE NASHUA MEDIATION PROGRAM 

R-93-134 

RELATIVE TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SEWER ASSESSMENTS 
(Chester M. & Gertrude Iwanski, 11 Nightingale Road) 

R-93-137 

RELATIVE TO THE TRANSFER OF $10,000 FROM ACCOUNT 

591-86005 - CONTINGENCY, TO ACCOUNT 

621-01 - VOTING MACHINE REPLACEMENT 

R-93-147 

SETTING NOVEMBER 2, 1993 AS THE DATE FOR HOLDING 

THE 1993 MUNICIPAL ELECTION 



45 



City of Nashua 



The preceding resolutions were Passed September 14, 1993 

Philip J. Grandmaison, President 

Approved September 20, 1993 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-93-131 

AUTHORIZING HIS HONOR, THE MAYOR, AND THE CITY 
TREASURER TO ISSUE BONDS NOT TO EXCEED THE AMOUNT 

OF FOUR HUNDRED EIGHTY-THREE THOUSAND DOLLARS 

($483,000) BONDING FOR PURCHASE OF LAND AND BUILDINGS 

LOCATED AT 6 CHURCH STREET, 6-8 HARTSHORN AVENUE, 

4-6 COTTAGE STREET, AND LAND ON COTTAGE STREET 

R-93-138 

RELATIVE TO THE ACCEPTANCE OF FUNDS FROM HILLSBOROUGH 

COUNTY PREVENTION FUNDING INTO SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT 

#313 "MEDIATION MINI GRANT' (FY '94 - FY'95) 

FOR THE NASHUA MEDIATION PROGRAM 

R-93-139 

RELATIVE TO THE ACCEPTANCE OF CERTAIN FUNDS FROM 

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY FOR A PLAY LEARNING/PARENT 

SUPPORT/HOME VISITOR GROUP 

R-93-144 

AUTHORIZING AN EXCHANGE OF PROPERTY WITH 
FOSTER GRAPHICS REALTY TRUST 

R-93-146 

RELATIVE TO THE TRANSFER OF $100,000 FROM ACCOUNT 

591-86005-4 - CONTINGENCY - OTHER 

TO ACCOUNT 651-03 - SHADY LANE LANDFILL STUDY 

R-93-150 

RELATIVE TO FEDERAL MANDATES, AND SUPPORT OF 
OCTOBER 27, 1993 AS "UNFUNDED FEDERAL MANDATES DAY" 



The preceding resolutions were Passed September 28, 1993 

Philip J. Grandmaison, President 

Approved September 28, 1993 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



46 



Municipal Government Report 



R-93-140 

RELATIVE TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SEWER ASSESSMENTS 

(Linda J. & Richard J. Jancsy, 3 Cannon Drive) 



The preceding resolution was Passed October 12, 1993 

Philip J. Grandmaison, President 

Approved October 12, 1993 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-93-135 

AUTHORIZING HIS HONOR, THE MAYOR, AND THE CITY TREASURER 

TO ISSUE BONDS NOT TO EXCEED THE AMOUNT OF 

THREE HUNDRED TEN THOUSAND AND TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS 

($310,200) BONDING FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE 

LIBRARY WEST WING EXPANSION 

R-93-148 

RELATIVE TO ESTABLISHING A SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT 

FOR ACCEPTING RENT PAYMENTS FROM TENANTS RESIDING 

IN CITY PROPERTIES TAKEN BY TAX COLLECTORS DEED 

R-93-151 

AUTHORIZING THE TRANSFER OF $100,000 FROM ACCOUNT 

591-86605-3 GENERAL CONTINGENCY TO 

ACCOUNT 770 CITYWIDE MANAGEMENT AUDIT 

R-93-155 

IN SUPPORT OF A REGIONAL LOBBY 



The preceding resolutions were Passed October 26, 1993 

Philip J. Grandmaison, President 

Approved October 26, 1993 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-93-141 

AUTHORIZING HIS HONOR, THE MAYOR, AND THE CITY TREASUER 

TO ISSUE BONDS NOT TO EXCEED THE AMOUNT OF 

ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS, ($100,000) FOR 

THE ARCHITECTURAL AND ENGINEERING PHASE OF THE 

NEW ADDITIONS AND RENOVATIONS TO THE NEW SEARLES SCHOOL 



47 



City of Nashua 



The preceding resolution was Passed November 9, 1993 

Philip J. Grandmaison, President 

Approved November 9, 1993 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-93-156 

AUTHORIZING THE ACCEPTANCE OF FUNDS FROM THE TRUSTEES 

OF DARTMOUTH COLLEGE AND THE CITY TO ENTER INTO 

CONTRACTS THEREFORE WITH SAID TRUSTEES 



The preceding resolution was Passed November 23, 1993 

Philip J. Grandmaison, President 

Approved November 23, 1993 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-93-153 
RELATIVE TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SEWER ASSESSMENTS 

(Coleen Brady & Jay Hayes, 21 Meredith Drive 
Edward J. Reilly & Dominique J. Huard, 78 East Glenwood Street) 

R-93-157 

REQUESTING THE GOVERNOR AND COUNCIL TO DECLARE A 

SPECIAL ELECTION TO FILL THE VACANCY FOR REPRESENTATIVE 

TO THE GENERAL COURT FROM DISTRICT 26 

R-93-160 

RELATIVE TO THE TRANSFER OF $14,000 FROM ACCOUNT 

591-86605-6 - CONTINGENCY WELFARE TO ACCOUNT 

544-11099 - CASE TECHNICAIN WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

R-93-165 

RELATIVE TO THE RE-ESTABLISHMENT OF THE NASHUA 
CITIZENS SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

R-93-167 

EXTENDING CONGRATULATIONS TO NATIONAL VOCATIONAL 

INDUSTRIAL CLUBS OF AMERICAN GOLD MEDAL WINNERS 



The preceding resolutions were Passed December 14, 1993 

Philip J. Grandmaison, President 

Approved December 14, 1993 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



48 



Municipal Government Report 



R-93-158 

RELATIVE TO THE TRANSFER OF $3,000 FROM ACCOUNT 

591-86005 - CONTINGENCY TO ACCOUNT 

519-41015 - STANDARD OFFICE SUPPLIES 

R-93-161 

RELATIVE TO THE ACCEPTANCE OF COUNTY PREVENTION 

FUNDING INTO SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT #340 

"MEDIATION SERVICES" FOR THE NASHUA MEDIATION PROGRAM 

R-93-162 

RELATIVE TO THE TRANSFER OF $100,000 FROM ACCOUNT 

591-86605-5 - CONTINGENCY OTHER, NEW SEARLES 

TO ACCOUNT 581-99999 - SCHOOL DEPARTMENT- 

ALDERMANIC ADJUSTMENT 

R-93-163 

RELATIVE TO RESCINDING THE AUTHORIZATION OF THE 

MAYOR AND CITY TREASURER TO ISSUE BOND AMOUNTS 

SET FORTH IN THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTIONS: 

R-89-210, R-89-179, R-93-99 

FOR A TOTAL OF $842,000 

R-94-164 

RELATIVE TO THE TRANSFER OF $241,560 FROM 

CONTINGENCY ACCOUNT 591-86605-1 $120,780 AND 

PRIOR YEAR OBLIGATION ACCOUNT 590-23591 $120,780 

TO VARIOUS ACCOUNTS TO COVER THE COST OF 

THE U.A.W. CONTRACT SETTLEMENT 

R-94-166 
RELATIVE TO THE TRANSFER OF FUNDS TOTALING 

$9,400 FROM VARIOUS ACCOUNTS TO 

ACCOUNT 515-98035 UAW TUITION REIMBURSEMENT 

TO COVER THE COST OF TUITION ASSISTANCE PER 

THE UAW CONTRACT 

R-93-169 

SETTING FEBRUARY 1, 1993 AS THE DATE FOR HOLDING 
A SPECIAL ELECTION IN REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 26 

R-93-170 
AUTHORIZATION FOR DISPOSAL OF TAX-DEEDED PROPERTIES 



49 



City of Nashua 



The preceding resolutions were Passed December 28, 1993 

Philip J. Grandmaison, President 

Approved December 28, 1993 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-94-02 

AUTHORIZING THE ACCEPTANCE OF FUNDS FROM THE 

BUREAU OF MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH AND THE CITY 

TO ENTER INTO CONTRACTS THEREFORE WITH THE 

NEW HAMPSHIRE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 

R-94-03 

RELATIVE TO TRANSFER OF $20,000 FROM ACCOUNT 

591-86005 CONTINGENCY - GENERAL AND $10,000 FROM 

ACCOUNT 571 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION 

TO 671-04 IMPACT FEE STUDY 

R-94-07 

AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO RECONVEY THE PROPERTY 

LOCATED AT 383-391 EAST DUNSTABLE ROAD TO 

THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



The preceding resolutions were Passed January 25, 1994 

Joyce L. Arel, President 

Approved December January 25, 1994 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-94-01 

AUTHORIZING HIS HONOR, THE MAYOR, AND THE CITY TREASURER 

TO ISSUE REFUNDING BONDS IN AN AMOUNT NOT TO 

EXCEED TWENTY MILLION DOLLARS ($20,000,000) FOR 

THE PURPOSE OF ADVANCE REFUNDING THE CITY'S GENERAL 

OBLIGATION BONDS DATED DECEMBER 10, 1989 ORIGINALLY 

ISSUED IN THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF TEN MILLION 

DOLLARS ($10,000,000) AND ADVANCE REFUNDING 

THE CITY'S GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS DATED JULY 1, 1991, 

ORIGINALLY ISSUED IN THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF 

TEN MILLION DOLLARS ($10,000,000) 

R-93-04 

AUTHORIZING THE EXTENSION OF THE MASTER LEASE TO 

THE NASHUA AIRPORT AUTHORITY UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2027, 

AND INCLUDING NEW LAND 

50 



Municipal Government Report 



The preceding resolutions were Passed February 8, 1994 

Joyce L. Arel, President 

Approved February 8, 1994 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-94-09 

AUTHORIZING HIS HONOR, THE MAYOR, AND THE CITY TREASURER 

TO ISSUE BONDS NOT TO EXCEED THE AMOUNT OF 

THREE HUNDRED FORTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ($340,000) 

BONDING FOR CONSTRUCTION OF MISCELLANEOUS 

SEWERAGE AND POLLUTION ABATEMENT IMPROVEMENTS 

R-94-10 

AUTHORIZING HIS HONOR, THE MAYOR, AND THE CITY TREASUER 

TO ISSUE BONDS NOT TO EXCEED THE AMOUNT OF 

ONE MILLION SIX HUNDRED TWENTY SIX THOUSAND 

DOLLARS ($1,626,000) BONDING FOR ENGINEERING 

AND CONSTRUCTION OF FINAL CLOSURE FOR THE 

SHADY LANE LANDFILL 

R-94-12 

RELATIVE TO AN AGREEMENT WITH THE NEW HAMPSHIRE 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 

R-94-15 

AUTHORIZING AND REQUIRING A LEASE AGREEMENT 

FROM MONTH TO MONTH WITH THE 

NASHUA CENTER FOR THE ARTS 



The preceding resolutions were Passed February 22, 1994 

Claire McGrath, Vice President 

Approved February 22, 1994 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-94-13 

AUTHORIZING THE CITY TO ACCEPT TWO PIECES OF 

REAL PROPERTY IN LIEU OF CERTAIN REAL ESTATE TAXES 

R-94-14 

RELATIVE TO TRANSFER OF $75,000 FROM ACCOUNT 

591-86545 - CONTINGENCY WELFARE COSTS AND $25,000 

FROM ACCOUNT 591-86605 - CONTINGENCY OTHER (WELFARE) 

TO ACCOUNT 545-97015 - WELFARE GENERAL ASSISTANCE 

51 



City of Nashua 



R-94-16 

AUTHORIZING THE CONVEYANCE OF CERTAIN INTERESTS 

IN REAL ESTATE TO THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH THE EVERETT 

TURNPIKE IMPROVEMENT PROJECT 



The preceding resolutions were Passed March 8, 1994 

Joyce L. Arel, President 

Approved March 8, 1994 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-94-18 

RELATIVE TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SEWER ASSESSMENTS 

(Douglas R. & Sheila R. Henning, 22 Langholm Drive) 



The preceding resolution was Passed by the March 22, 1994 

Joyce L. Arel, President 

Approved March 22, 1994 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-94-05 

AUTHORIZING THE CONVEYANCE OF A PORTION OF 

DISCONTINUED MAN STREET 

R-94-19 

AUTHORIZING AN EXCHANGE OF PROPERTY 
INTERESTS WITH LOCKHEED SANDERS CORP. 

R-94-20 

AUTHORIZING THE ACCEPTANCE OF FUNDS FROM THE OFFICE 

OF ALCOHOL AND RUG ABUSE PREVENTION, STATE OF 

NEW HAMPSHIRE AND THE CITY TO ENTER IN 

CONTRACTS THEREFOR WITH THE NEW HAMPSHIRE 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 



The preceding resolutions were Passed by the April 12, 1994 

Joyce L. Arel, President 

Approved April 12, 1994 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



52 



~ Municipal Government Report ~ 

R-94-22 

RELATIVE TO THE TRANSFER OF $22,000 FROM 

ACCOUNT 591-86605 CONTINGENCY - GENERAL TO 

ACCOUNTS 512-11039, 512-11129-2 FINANCIAL SERVICES 

PAYROLL AND 516-11135-4, PURCHASING PAYROLL 

R-94-31 

DEDICATING LIBBY FIELD 



The preceding resolutions were Passed by the April 26, 1994 

Joyce L. Arel, President 

Approved April 26, 1994 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-94-21 

AUTHORIZING HIS HONOR, THE MAYOR, AND THE CITY TREASURE 

TO ISSUE BONDS NOT TO EXCEED THE AMOUNT OF 

ONE MILLION NINE HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS 

($1,900,000) BONDING FOR CONSTRUCTION PHASE 

OF THE ADDITIONS AND RENOVATIONS AT 

THE NEW SEARLES SCHOOL 

R-94-25 

AMENDING THE CAPITAL EQUIPMENT RESERVE FUND (CERF) 

R-94-27 

AUTHORIZING THE ACCEPTANCE OF FUNDS FROM 

CHILD HEALTH SERVICES INCLUDING DENTAL AND 

IMMUNIZATION PROGRAM AND AUTHORIZING THE CITY 

TO ENTER INTO CONTRACTS THEREFOR WITH THE 

NH DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 

R-94-28 

AUTHORIZING THE ACCEPTANCE OF FUNDS FROM THE BUREAU 

OF DISEASE CONTROL AND THE CITY TO ENTER 

INTO CONTRACTS THEREFOR WITH THE 

NH DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 

R-94-29 

ESTABLISHING A SCHOOL ATHLETICS FUND FOR 

ACCOUNTING FOR REVENUES AND EXPENSES 

FROM SCHOOL ATHLETICS PROGRAMS 



53 



City of Nashua 



R-94-37 
DEDICATING MATT DUBE FIELD 

The preceding resolutions were Passed May 10, 1994 

Joyce L. A re I, President 

Approved May 10, 1994 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-94-36 

RELATIVE TO AGREEMENTS WITH THE NEW HAMPSHIRE 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 



The preceding resolution was Passed May 24, 1994 

Joyce L. A re I, President 

Approved May 25, 1994 

Rob Wagner Mayor 



R-94-23 

AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO APPLY FOR THE ANNUAL 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT 

R-94-32 

RELATIVE TO THE TRANSFER OF $24,800 FROM ACCOUNT 

591-86005 CONTINGENCY - GENERAL TO 

ACCOUNT 518-11441 INSURANCE ADMINISTRATION, PAYROLL 

R-94-33 

RELATIVE TO ENTERING INTO AN AGREEMENT WITH 

THE HUMANE SOCIETY OF NEW ENGLAND 

R-94-34 
AUTHORIZING THE LEASE OF ADDITIONAL 
PARKING TO THE NASHUA SENIOR CENTER 

R-94-38 

EXTENDING CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NASHUA 

AQUA Y'S SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING TEAM 



The preceding resolutions were Passed May 24, 1994 

Joyce L. Arel, President 

Approved June 2, 1994 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



54 



Municipal Government Report 



R-94-35 

AUTHORIZING THE FILING OF APPLICATIONS WITH THE 

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 

FOR GRANTS UNDER THE URBAN MASS TRANSPORTATION 

ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED 

R-94-39 

AUTHORIZING THE POLICE DEPARTMENT TO ACCEPT 

FUNDS FROM THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

POLICE STANDARDS AND TRAINING COUNCIL 



The preceding resolutions were Passed June 14, 1994 

Joyce L. Arel, President 

Approved June 14, 1994 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



R-94-17 

AUTHORIZING LAND ACQUISITION FOR THE NOWELL 

STREET SEWER SEPARATION PROJECT AREA 2 

R-94-42 

RELATIVE TO TRANSFER OF $20,170 FROM ACCOUNT 

591-86005 - CONTINGENCY, TO ACCOUNT 

553-59100 - MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES 

R-94-47 

RELATIVE TO TRANSFER OF $25,000 FROM ACCOUNT 

591-86531 CONTINGENCY - POLICE DEPARTMENT 

TO ACCOUNT 545-97015 - WELFARE GENERAL ASSISTANCE 

R-94-48 

EXTENDING CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NASHUA SENIOR 

HIGH SCHOOL'S NEW HAMPSHIRE CLASS L STATE 

CHAMPION BOYS' BASEBALL TEAM AND THEIR COACHING STAFF 

R-94-49 

EXTENDING CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NASHUA SENIOR 

HIGH SCHOOL'S NEW HAMPSHIRE CLASS L STATE 

CHAMPION GIRLS' TENNIS TEAM AND THEIR COACHING STAFF 



55 



City of Nashua 



The preceding resolutions were Passed June 28, 1994 

Joyce L. Are I, President 

Approved June 29, 1994 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 

R-94-30 

RELATIVE TO THE ADOPTION OF FISCAL YEAR '95 

PROPOSED BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF NASHUA 

GENERAL FUND 



The preceding resolution was Passed June 28, 1994 

Joyce L. Arel, President 

Approved June 30, 1994 

Rob Wagner, Mayor 



56 



Municipal Government Report 



ELECTION S 



MUNICIPAL ELECTION FOR 

ALDERMEN-AT-LARGE 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

FIRE COMMISSION 

WARD ALDERMEN 

WARD MODERATORS 

WARD CLERKS 

WARD SELECTMEN 

REFERENDUM QUESTIONS (2) 



STATE SPECIAL ELECTION 
FOR 

REPRESENTATIVE TO THE GENERAL COURT 
DISTRICT 33 (Ward 8) 



NOVEMBER 2, 1993 



57 



City of Nashua 









-y 



fYl 



a^ £iZ.1ZL~ , 













i 



vM^ 5 



(? fa 1 






fC 




Signatures of Candidates who took out 
Nomination Papers for the November Election 



58 



Municipal Government Report 



CITY OF NASHUA POLLING AREAS 



Ward 1 



BROAD STREET ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (Gym) 

390 BROAD STREET 



Ward 2 



CHARLOTTE AVENUE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (Gym) 

48 CHARLOTTE AVENUE 



Ward 3 



AMHERST STREET ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

71 AMHERST STREET 



Ward 4 



ST. PATRICK'S YOUTH CENTER 
220 MAIN STREET 



Ward 5 



MAIN DUNSTABLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

20 WHITFORD ROAD 



Ward 6 



FAIRGROUNDS JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
27 CLEVELAND STREET 



Ward 7 



DR. NORMAN CRISP ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

50 ARLINGTON STREET 



Ward 8 



BICENTENNIAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
296 EAST DUNSTABLE ROAD 



Ward 9 



GRACE LUTHERAN CHURCH 
125 NORTHEASTERN BOULEVARD 



59 



mMMMMMMMMI 



City of Nashua 



MUNICIPAL ELECTION 
NOVEMBER 2, 1993 



REFERENDUM QUESTIONS 



QUESTION #1: 

City Charter Amendment adding the 
following paragraphs 

Paragraph 56-c. 

Limitation on Budget Increases 
Paragraph 56-d. 

Exception to Budget Limitation 
Paragraph 56-e. 

Reserve Fund 
Paragraph 56-f. 

Deficit Budget Control 



QUESTION #2 

City Charter Amendment adding the 
following paragraph: 

Paragraph 56-c. 

Approval of Salaries and Collective 
Bargaining Agreements of the 
Nashua School District 



YES: 
NO: 



6252 
5554 



YES: 
NO: 



6019 
5611 



FOR ALDERMEN-AT-LARC-E 



TERM: 4 YEARS 



VOTES 



Claire M. McGrath* 
Fred S. Teeboom* 
Henry L. Nam 
Joyce L. Arel* 
Paul M. Chasse 
Theodore E. Michos 
Ramsay Mcl^auchlan 



56 Pioneer Drive 

24 Cheyenne Drive 

9 Donna Street 

10 Virginia Drive 
1 Melrose Street 

21 Charlotte Avenue 

103 Spitbrook Road 



5572 
5248 
2676 
5669 
3351 
3018 
3706 



FOR BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



TERM: 4 YEARS 



VOTES 



Ansel S. Grandmaison" 
Roland N. Petersen* 
James E. Naro 
Robert A. Durant, Sr. 
Paul T. Okonak 



571 South Main Street 

4 Lynn Street 

31 Grace Drive 

126 Kinsley Street 

229 Cannongate III Drive 



3S40 
5244 
3381 
2833 
1769 



(.0 



Municipal Government Report 

FOR BOARD OF EDUCATION TERM: 4 YEARS 



George E. Farrington* 
Atlant G. Schmidt 
Athena "Tina" Munroe* 
Jane Schmidt* 
George D. Murch III 
Joan Sweeney* 
Ruth Ginsburg 
John F. Kerouac 



24 Lutheran Drive 

33 Dublin Avenue 

15 Shelton Street 

7 Acacia Street 

7 Rochette Drive 

7 Nutmeg Drive 

6 Dover Street 

10 Cosworth Circle 



VOTES 

4747 
4431 
4500 
4826 
3390 
5004 
3765 
3063 



FOR FIRE COMMISSION 

David Lavoie* 
James P. Monahan* 
Richard D. Harrington 



TERM: 4 YEARS 

92 Ash Street Apt. 21 
13 Chaucer Road 
4 Huron Drive 



VOTES 

5808 
4707 
4516 



FOR WARD ALDERMEN 

Wl "Bill" Modis 

James R. Tollner* 
Richard A. Dowd 



TERM: 2 YEARS 

10 Chapel Hill Drive 
1 Sequoia Circle 
7 Columbine Drive 



VOTES 

665 

748 
444 



W2 Tracy S. Hatch* 

William "Tory" Hack 



7 Ferncroft Drive 
21 Cushing Avenue 



618 

558 



W3 Richard D. Chasse 
Arthur Ferlan* 
Marylou Blaisdell 



72 Concord Street 

6 Glendale Drive 

32 Webster Street 



317 
619 
380 



W4 Mark Rufo 

Eric R. Wilson* 



131 West Hollis Street 
111 Palm Street 



213 
413 



W5 Brian S. McCarthy* 
Gary Brackett 
Charles R. Hafemann 



65 Musket Drive 
15 Echo Avenue 
3 Depot Road 



502 
302 
410 



61 



City of Nashua 



W6 David G. Fredette* 



17 Hassel Brook Road 



1209 



W7 Adam C. Gureckis, Sr. 
Thomas W. Grant* 



54 Harbor Avenue 
7 Lincoln Avenue 



525 
752 



W8 Maureen Lane Lemieux* 
George B. Dawe 



87 Spindlewick Drive 
9 Chaucer Road 



676 
371 



W9 John A. Richard 
Joseph Goodman 
David Rootovich* 



107 Flintlock Drive 

13 Fountain Lane 

5 Shelton Street 



217 
594 
596 



FOR MODERATOR 



TERM: 2 YEARS 



VOTES 



Wl 


Francis J. Pickett* 


240 


Bartemus Trail 


1104 


W2 


V. Mary Hall* 


66 


Manchester Street 


817 


W3 


Joseph G. Sakey* 


48 


Walden Pond Drive 


881 


W4 


Barbara L. Cote* 


11 


Miami Street 


520 


W5 


Dennis M. Drake* 


5 


Grace Drive 


748 


W6 


Laurie Michalewicz* 


14 


Fowell Avenue 


915 


W7 


Adam C. Gureckis, Jr.* 


1 


Cherry Street 


823 


W8 


"Tim" Dolan* 


8 


Chaucer Road 


705 


W9 


Peter Curran* 


91 


Langholm Drive 


947 


FOR WARD CLERK 


TERM: 2 YEARS 


VOTES 


Wl 


Mary Poston* 


14 


Bible Way 


1281 


W2 


William A. Marshall* 


15 


Watson Street 


860 


W3 


Carol P.Marshall* 


14 


Abbott Street 


937 


W4 


Muriel C. Mazeika* 


9 


North Seventh Street 


528 


W5 


Jean E. Fortier* 


1070 


West Hollis Street 


809 


W6 


Donna Decato 


117 


Calais Street 


342 




Cynthia P. Sweeney* 


14 


Fowell Avenue 


716 


W7 


Darryl Courtenay* 


8 


Cherry Street 


791 


W8 


Viola J. Taranto* 


5 


Belgian Place 


718 


W9 


Ann A. Corbett* 


168 


Searles Road 


998 



62 



Municipal Government Report 



FOR WARD SELECTMEN 



TERM: 2 YEARS 



VOTES 



Wl Paul G. Bergeron* 

Patricia A. Chadwick* 
Brooks Thompson* 

W2 Cheryl Aksten* 

Robert S. Mercer* 
Andrew R. Hall* 



28 Briand Drive 

43 Indian Rock Road 

36 Lutheran Drive 

43 Sherri-Ann Avenue 

11 Dinsmore Street 

66 Manchester Street 



1143 
1142 
1098 

719 
785 
757 



W3 A. David Pierce* 
Selma R. Pastor* 
Susan M. Sanborn 
Normand R. Bergeron* 

W4 Joan M. Ellis* 

Rita C. Raucykevich* 
Robert J. McManus* 

W5 James E. Malone III* 
John Hostage* 
Madeline Laflamme (write-in)* 

W6 Carol Anctil* 

Doris Maynard* 
Patricia R. Morrill* 
Gerard Anctil 
Earl L. Maynard 
Irene Field 

W7 Lawrence F. Maclntyre* 
Valerie A. Denault* 
Lorraine M. Smart 
Anne M. Sirois* 

W8 Eric Schneider* 

Hallock M. Boutwell* 
Martha Gan (write-in)* 

W9 Mark Avery* 

Laurie Christian* 
Barbara Spacek* 



13 Manchester Street 
24 Stark Street 

72 Walden Pond Drive 

8 Overhill Avenue 

44 Amherst Street 

9 Grand Avenue 
9 Long Avenue 

897 West Hollis Street 

14 Rosemary Court 
55 Buckmeadow Road 



28 


Hunt Street 


3 


Lakeside Avenue 


3 


Emmett Street 


28 


Hunt Street 


5 


Lakeside Avenue 


348 


Lake Street 


5 


Arlington Street 


48 


Burke Street 


55 


Newbury Street 


57 


Newbury Street 


19 


Stanley Lane 


9 


Scott Avenue 


15 


Lansing Drive 


5 


Westray Drive 


126 


Searles Road 


3 


Lamb Road 



646 
776 
551 
596 

436 
446 
436 

736 

655 

4 

620 
658 

477 
433 
471 
290 

532 
714 
520 
700 

625 

585 

13 

815 
900 

843 



♦DENOTES WINNERS 



63 



City of Nashua 



STATE SPECIAL ELECTION 

FOR 

REPRESENTATIVE TO THE GENERAL COURT 

DISTRICT 33 (Ward 8) 

NOVEMBER 2, 1993 



POLITICAL PARTY 



CANDIDATE 



VOTES 



REPUBLICAN 



DEMOCRATIC 



LIBERTARIAN 



JOAN SULLENS* 



"ANGIE" KOPKA 



ERIC POSTPISCHIL 



483 
358 
224 



♦DENOTES WINNER 



NOVEMBER 2, 1993 
CITY VOTER TURNOUT 



WARD 


TOTAL 

NUMBER ON 

CHECKLIST 


REGULAR 
BALLOTS 
CASTS 


ABSENTEE 
BALLOTS 
CASTS 


TOTAL 
BALLOTS CASTS 


% 


1 


5,893 


1,878 


55 


1,933 


32% 


2 


5,522 


1,212 


24 


1,236 


22% 


3 


4,700 


1,358 


32 


1,390 


29% 


4 


3,213 


660 


26 


686 


21% 


5 


5,167 


1,245 


39 


1,284 


25% 


6 


4,729 


1,464 


35 


1,499 


31% 


7 


4,461 


1,247 


47 


1,294 


29% 


8 


5,437 


1,131 


28 


1,159 


22% 


9 


5,103 


1,504 


46 


1,550 


30% 


TOTAL 


44,225 


11,699 


332 


12,031 


27% 



64 



Municipal Government Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
REPORTS 



July 1, 1993 

through 
June 30, 1994 



65 



City of Nashua 



Vachon, Clukay & Co., pc 

Certified Public Accountants 

/:•' Marke In • 

Manchester, '.• Hampshire 03101 



INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT 



To the Honorable Mayor and Board of Aldermen 
City of Nashua, New Hampshire 

We have audited the accompanying general purpose financial statements of the City of 
Nashua, New Hampshire as of and for the year ended June 30, 1994, as listed in the table of 
contents. These general purpose financial statements are the responsibility of the City of 
Nashua, New Hampshire's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these 
general purpose financial statements based on our audit. 

We conducted our audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, 
Government Auditing Standards , issued by the Comptroller General of the United States, and 
the provisions of the Office of Management and Budget Circular A-128, "Audits of State and 
Local Governments". Those standards and OMB Circular A-128 require that we plan and 
perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the general purpose financial 
statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, 
evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the general purpose financial statements. 
An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made 
by management, as well as evaluating the overall general purpose financial statement presenta- 
tion. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. 

As more fully described in Note 1 , the general purpose financial statements referred to 
above do not include the financial statements of the General Fixed Asset Account Group, 
which should be included in order to conform with generally accepted accounting principles. 
The amount that should be recorded in the General Fixed Asset Account Group is not known. 

In our opinion, except for the effect on the general purpose financial statements of the 
omission described in the preceding paragraph, the general purpose financial statements re- 
ferred to in the first paragraph present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of 
the City of Nashua, New Hampshire as of June 30, 1994, and the results of its operations and 
the cash flows of its proprietary fund types and nonexpendable trust funds for the year then 
ended in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles. 

Our audit was made for the purpose of forming an opinion on the general purpose 
financial statements taken as a whole. The combining financial statements and schedules listed 
in the table of contents are presented for purposes of additional analysis and are not a required 
part of the general purpose financial statements of the City of Nashua, New Hampshire. Such 
information has been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the general 
purpose financial statements and, in our opinion, is fairly presented in all material respects in 
relation to the general purpose financial statements taken as a whole. 



September 2, 1994 

66 



oJL t M^Z&. f Pc 



Municipal Government Report 



rt > ^ *- ■ — 



Cm £ 

a mJI 



— . 00 Q 

\o v. O 

*r± o* «-j 

O* vO CM 

v, r- >o 

Ch V"l ** 

vo w-i c^ «— « cm" r** 



oo 

X 


r J 

00 

r- 






c 
r- 
p- 


o 
p- 


8 

CM 


r- 

00 


r- 
O 
oe 


P- 
t J 


r» 
oo 

00 


cm 

CM 



3 
S* 



W-, 


Vt 






8 




•* 


o 




s 


CM 




p- 


•y. 




T 


CM 





00 


CM 


V", 




CM 


r— 


§ 


8 




_ 




VI 



c 
o 
O 



^10 



CC 
IT) 


8 


c 

s 




t 




c 


p- 

IT) 


CM 


■* 


-t 

00 


S 
cc 


r- 


r- 

CC 
00 



op -< 



V, O •— i CM P* 



p- 


r*~. 




00 


V", 




r*\ 


CM 










to 


p- 






00 




O 


I-H 




P- 


s 

CM 

to 





C-J 


i 




3 


en 




- 


C 


r 


o 


3 


a 








C 


CQ 


F 




U, 


u 


C 

u 




< 


C 





e- 


« 


^ 


c 


- 




p 




3 


H 


H 


< 


'J 


c 
^ 


< 


-o 




L^ 




ca 



Er 


M 


U 


M 


ft 






!- 


B 


c 


-3 


o 


2m 


_p 


c 



r- 


r- 




v 


re 




f. 


e 










VO 


<o 










< 


t 1 










r» 


r^ 




t 

IS, 


t 





8 


cc 


55 

C 


cc 


(A 




CM 


CC 


r- 

e 





00 



^- P- CM P- 



00 \0 P- V~, 



<— o r, h 



U £ 






C 



°i 
o 











in 


<s 












o 


r> 












■ — 1 


^i 












v^ 


O 












ir 


&t 












r- 


0\ 












VI 






s? 


Q\ 


R 


o 


s 


i-t 


m 






iri 


Vi 


c^ 


( *i 


c^ 




c-m 


i ! 


c^ 


rl 














OS 


c, 


<N 


cc 


r^ 


1- 


-T 


r*. 


VI 


§ 


m 


8 


r- 


(N 


o 


»H 


■* 


10 





8 



^ ^M 







a 

c 

5 

5J 



o 



<A 



67 



City of Nashua 



« 2 



O 


c 




P-* 


u 




f- 


rt 

c 


--- 

51 


2 


5 




■-j 




















-«t 






O 






r 


1 








~z 


CO 




























tr 


G 


o 






-^ 


—. 


:. 


























— 


c 













"". r- 


■t 
c 


v. 


00 


CM 

c 




c 

-r 


O oo 


SC 

V. 


r- 

O 

CO 


3 

CO 






o 



Tf 


O 


.-, 


w. 


V. 


cm 


r- 


n 




c~. 


-r 


w~> 


v> 


y 


r^ 




vO 


r- 


o 


•* 


00 


r- 


r- 


CM 


*- 1 


,— ( 


DC 


r^ 


-r 


c-, 


<N 


tr . 


3C 


BG 




C 1 


n 


o 


K 




cm 


-.- 


w" 


w 


00 






c 


















CM 


«— t 


v-i 


r^- 






f*". 


O 



o' 

CS 
cc" 



c 


5 


s 


n 




CM 


r- 




:c 




r 



C 


<- 


n-. 


v~, 




*a 


CS 


o 


\o 


r~, 


o 


c. 




r*-, 


s 


CM 


\C 


oc 


r- 


r*- 




tj- 


f, 



•x 


00 


r- 








*o 


o 






c 


c 




r- 


c. 


Tf 



— r- r- — « — f. 



— r» r- 



CM C, 
O O 
CM V~ t 


CM 


cm 


^ r- 




c 





1/", 


V". 




-r 


O 




v. 


f. 


" 


f, 


o 


-r 


? 


v. 


r 


r^ 


»^. 




o 


c 



v. 


u- 


cm 




ri 


i/-, 






f. 


C 


*-4 




v. 


c 


f 




c 


-r 







- 


c-. 


r, 


£ 




CM 


~ 


r*~, 


r- 


f. 


ir 


3^, 


f, 


o> 


^H 


o 

^-^ 


•a 

c 







3 




C 












C 




o 




U 








in 




D- 




3 




o 



















UJ 


3 


a: 


o 

V 




< 


— 


« 




(rt 




U 


<j; 


fe 


I 






c 

3 

u. 


z 


< 


< 


1 


D 


U 

u 


X 


7. 


on 




< 





Z 


cu 






< u. 




= 


= > 


.5 c 


5 h 


E u 


x r - 


o S 


w u 


u 4 



t- il 



■% ~° — 



£ 5 



<i 
■ol 



CI 



> t/i 

I 2 Z 



£1 







00 


f". 


n 


31 


CM 


00 


-j 


SI 


3 


K 


72 


5 


VI 





$ 



•3 



s;^^ 



ol 



o 



<s — 



r^ ^h ^* 



00 



00 



« N O r 

CJ fj C v\ ^O 

Ov "n" op N 

if, N N r, 

*o O^ 00 •- 

— ^* io 



D 

o 

r> 
2 

g S" 

z I 

< t- 

r 3 » - § 

E « x: "— •= 

m ra Xi u 

= S. S> .2 £ 

< S | S-^ 5 

: S a .g S S 

■5 S S u u 



5 



c 

ly-, 


8 


c. 


r. 


cr 


c 


r*2 


^ 


r- 


c 




^t 


(M 


■-_ 


— 


v. 





r> 



f. o oc 




Z 



o 

2 



2 -s ^| 



T' _ -a c 
= 2 



u 
o 

2 

XI 3 
™ C 

C aj 

u * 
CO t) 

2 e 



IE 



.2 .« 



— r~ r~ 



t*~. rj i^. 



O 

2 



■- a> = 



F 




(VI 


V 


r 


n 




(/I 

1 




2 


Xj 


a 




"8 


V) 




u 




« 


■a 






B 


c 




c 




u. 


n 




§ 


B 


*<5 
u 


E 


K 
1 



life -■ 



^^ .3 Z 



S 5- « 






<M 




<-r 


r> 




V. 


tr. 




f*", 


f> 




r- 


V, 




n 


r- 










f, 


« 




CM 







00 


t-^ 




■of 


<: 




^^ 


r~- 




ON 


VO 




0i 


s 










00 


K 




■>!• 







Tt 


r- 




00 


H 




TT 


(N 










" 


X 




O 
t 1 


1^, 





<N 


>"• 


1 


■^ 


r; 


f. 


r- 


vol 


vo 


X 


r- 


VO' 




^1 




** 



CM 







IN 




t 


f 


c> 


00 


S 


CM 









If, 








r- 1 


O 


r» 




— ■ 


if, 



o 
2 



y o 



: E 
c u 



JS g 



. C 
'I I 



3 



2 C C 



3™ '^ .— 






£ ^ 



C a: C < i 



4) yj ~ 

E 2 



c d 



'II 



* u — c 
> C n 

E e 



.3 4> 4J — 



s 


.1 


£ 




■a 


T3 


T3 


c 








r 


r 


.- 




■u 


U 


u 


•■J 


^ 


^ 


(/) 




y 


u 











■2 -5 



,?T 



e j 



so;- 



3 ~: a: a: 3 



6. B 5, 3 - _ 

D u u c ~ ~ 

a ^ 2. ^> -^ ■- 



o 



68 



Municipal Government Report 



E 

3 

■a 

2 



•-Ml 

ess 



£.'=! 

E Dl 
o 
U 



J2 c — 

o o "= 

E- E O 



- 

E 
</* 
a. 

S 
< 

E 

Z 

< 

D 
E 
c/5 

< 

Z 

ete. 

=> 
= H 



c 
« 

cc 
•a 
c 

3 



V 

oo 

c 

B 

u % 

-o a 

C 3 

« fcu 



•a u. 

c n 

e-.i 

W on 

w "a -q- 

3 ro as 

C « — 

U 1) 

> C.O 

O i"src 

Ci f- o 

*— i TJ C 

O e = 

- 3 ^ 

JJ _ u 

E 3 "2 

c u 



■gcS-S 

c = g 
U < U. 



II 




£■8 


u. 


W H 





— M 




2 S 




._ u 




D.- — 


V 


c3£ 


1 




-3 





O 

I 

Oil 



Os re cc Os re C-J 

so re r- v. r- — 

on re »o — ,. — ^ cc 

v' --< \o ^ t" o 

^ h it, tr. ffi - 

rf os_ os_ Os_ ci_ os_ 

re i^r cs ■» «-T -- 

On — 



00 — 

c-i r- 

— <lr- 
oCIon 
r) os 



re c 
re — 

so" ■* 

"» ci 
Csl n 

v» 



OS re O Os re "3- 
SO rC T ■* r- 00 
Os re — •_ Os_ — •_ sC 
I/-" — ." o ■* ■* — < 

■rt ■— -- cc os 00 

•>J os_ r-_ r-_ <n I-; 

f^T U"T T-T T** v* *-4 

OS — 



5 

o" 



ooocu-. r-soooo — 
^o x x — • t f . n r', v, 
-h cj_ -r we oq r[ co r^ e* 

o* ue — * r-* re* os" os" rsf os* 
occoo~cr</~. e^r~cc 
— — re re so sc -t — ci_ 
r-" cc* cc" — « rsf -t rf cc r<-r 



OS 
00. 
rt 

Os 



SO O CC >A. r- sC 00 O Csl 

VO 00 « -f ". N f. ^ 

oj ri -r ir^ oc_ rj oo_ r-_ oc; 

v~* v\ — r^ f. os s n o 

O0COO"<tw-. ~nr~u-, 

sO^ t-^ r^ f^ so^ cc^ -^ ^ r-| 

so" oc" oo" ~ > Csf Tt -3-" 00* rf 



o 
o 
c 
o" 
o 



o r*i 
os r- 



r~- 


oo 


— 


cc 


Os 


O0 






t 


SO 


'J. 


00 


SO 








rr-, 


c~, 


r 1 


* — 







QsON 
OOsh 


T 


oo 


O Csl SO 


so 






rj Os r*", 


r- 


— — . so 


« 


OvMO 






-}• f*~. r^ 


I/'* 







SO 


3 


r, 


-.- 


"*• 


r- 


o 


H 




— 1 


o> 


•/ 


r*- 


-t 


on 


r- 


~— I 






-1 










1 



O tJ- 


r- 


rf 


o SO 


■JO 


o 


o — 


f<-, 


-r 








ir, v^, 


r*-, 


so 




~-r 


u-, 




ir. 











o 
c 
o 
c" 



-r 


w. 


c> 






V 


ur 




-T 


r*-. 


r- 












<: 


r~. 


sf. 




» 


r-i 


c 













o oc 


CC 


f5l 


*r. »/% 


-T 


OS 


Os iy, 


W 


rsij 








O ~t 




re. 


f<-. rf 


CI 


T 


f. C 




rsj 








«-, r-1 


r-l 


ee. 




ra 


^^ 









- 


-- 


^T 


^r 


t : 


<r 




00 


c . 


el 


so 


SO 










CN 


o> 


re. 


r- 


00 


»— ( 


sr; 


re. 


'/ 


c] 


c-. 


O 










■* 


M 


re, 


i/-. 



Csl 


» 


H 


0> 


OS 


o- 


re. 


re. 


o- 








-T 




n 


f> 


»r 


T 


r- 


a 


OSI 






v^ 



C~ 


R 




U", 


: 


vs 






- c 


o 


--. 


rl 




ON 











H 


r- 


T 


r> 


0> 


Os 


re. 


r^ 


»^, 








rr 


r- 




r- 


. — i 


SO 


■ — i 












el 




c-l 



r- ^t 

re. SO 

o o 

Csf C 

re. 00 
Csl Os 

el rr" 



oo 


on 


sc 


ST 


re, 


re. 






V 


ac 










Vi 





OS 
sO 

Os 



3 



•* CC, 

in rr 

os" o" 
c oo 
— ■* 



re, so so C cc, 
ce, oo O re os 
rc^ os Csl r- so 

eH O* -<t" Ot O 

h O ^, M re, 

ON sp^ csl. ^h re 

vcT SO* rC* en" ^ 



re 


r~ 


el 


C4 


sO 


ir. 






n 


r-l 


re 


r| 


re. 


e> 




1 



o 



OS 



oo 
r- 



cc w. c cc r~ os oo o u~. 

so >c, cs Os T W-. csl re .-> 

r» r- sc). o_ oo re ; oc_ r-_ r^. 

O* Os" csf os" rc os" Os* rsf so" 

Tre, ©OTOeHrv CC 

O0_ — _ — _ 0_ SO_ SO_ ■* <-H Csl 

t" oc" r-" — <" rf o" Tf oo" 



n 


£i\ 


-r 


r~ 


re, 


Cs 






■ — 


Csl 


OS 


r- 


-T 


rc 















o os r~ 


cs 


o h oo 


re. 


o csi csl 


Os 






e*i oo r- 


Csl 


00 tj- s_. 


Csl 


00 Csl 








■<* 


V. 



—. 


SO 


""■ll 


sC 


r- 


cc 


rr 


-T 


TM 








0> 


SO 


^■\\ 


-T 


ir. 


OS 


r» 


-T 


csi! 


re. 


re. 


w* 



re. 


i*e 


00 Csl 


r- 


c~. 


Cs) 


CS Csl 


r- 


ir, 




r- "3- 


cc 










-r 


SO 


00 00 


OS 


sC 


-T 


OS Os 


1- 


SC 




— Csl 


Csl 






— * 


Tt 



o 

CO 

sol 



re. Tt 


Os 


OS Csl 


SO 


-^ U~l 


SO 






00 Os 


oo 


so re 


Csl 


re rsi 









r- 


ir. 


CM 




r- 


OS 


r- 




sr 


SO 


re 












c. 


sC 


r- 




r- 


Os 


SC 






SO 


r- 





O 00 


OC 


c— 


v. ue 


CO 


r- 


Os sr-, 


SO 


r- 








O Tt 


,TS 


CS 


re Tt 


-T 


oc 


re o 


»y-. 


00 








re csi 


rl 





ce Tt 


jj 


Os O 


^* 


f o 


in 






re, OS 


ue 


Csl Os 


r- 


•q- r~ 


re 






Csl 


Csl 







C-l Csl 

oo oc 

(N so 

oo" — " 
csi o 



re. re 



SO 1 
s— 1<rti 



I 



4> 
O. 

■a 

B 



5 J '« 

u h G 

X W ft; 

E « -g 



CJ 



i- o 

> 
o u 



C -i "- 

o >< « 

> « .2 

cs: ^ 



C 

«•§ 

L. l_ L. SW 

J - -J m 

SSSi 



V 

3 
C 
U 

> 

cs: 



c 

V 

E 

c 

u 

u 

> 
o 

60 



U ft) 

y 2 



re 



ro sy 

n o u 



« 



■8* 

- « c 

« >s cj 

a 



3 





i: « "> n _ 



.2 c 



Eea "" *" 



'5 J2 — O 



> « 2 U B5 BJ 
S" cu « _ ^- ^ 



ja 



u 1) 3 .Sr o 3 



1) n o 



k_ «. ~j ■_ 

= 0=1.= 



S 8 ^ «s ■« o _ 

-S-.s-cuoS 

Ijj"5o™jVfl"^" " 

uuc « 




« T3 T3 

£•= § 

w u. u. 



69 



City of Nashua 



EXHIBIl < 

CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 
Budgetary Basis - Budget and Actual - General Fund 
For the Year Ended June 30, 1994 



Revenues (Note 1): 
Taxes 

Licenses and permits 
Intergovernmental revenues 
Charges for service 
Interest on deposits 
Miscellaneous revenues 
Total Revenues 







Variance 






Favorable 


Budget 


Actual 


(Unfavorable) 


$96,827,037 


$92,062,094 


($4,764,943) 


5,242,001 


5,911,333 


669,332 


6,754,024 


6,600,986 


(153,038) 


3,816,759 


3,254,206 


(562,553) 


1,200,000 


1,123,730 


(76,270) 


1,351,444 


1,330,693 


(20,751) 


115,191,265 


110,283,042 


(4,908,223) 



Expenditures (Note 1): 
Current; 

General government 

Public safety 

Highways and streets 

Health and welfare 

Culture and recreation 

Education 

Miscellaneous 
County tax 
Capital outlay 
Debt service: 

Principal 

Interest and fiscal charges 
Total Expenditures 

Excess of Revenues Over 
Expenditures 

Other Financing Sources (Uses): 
Operating transfers in 
Operating transfers out 
Total Other Sources (Uses) 



5,034,822 


4,847,493 


187,329 


18,961,687 


18,229,905 


731,782 


7,230,394 


7,185,719 


44,675 


1,045,003 


1,007,522 


37,481 


2,671,502 


2,648,289 


23,213 


50,842,365 


50,676,191 


166,174 


14,694,244 


14,419,828 


274,416 


8,172,730 


8,172,730 




308,752 


208,735 


100,017 


3,330,950 


3,330,950 




2,046,443 


2,044,558 


1,885 


114,338,892 


112,771,920 


1,566,972 


852,373 


(2,488,878) 


(3,341,251) 


404,165 


423,493 


19328 


(2,793,797) 


(2,799,004) 


(5,207) 


(2,389,632) 


(2,375,511) 


14,121 



Excess of Revenues and Other Sources 
Over (Under) Expenditures 
and Other Uses 

Fund Balance, July 1, 1993 

Fund Balance (Deficit), June 30, 1994 



(1.537,259) 
2,489,589 



(4,864,389) 
2,489,589 



(3,327,130) 



$952,330 ($2.374,800) ($3.327,130) 



.*vt'c notes to financial statements 



70 



Municipal Government Report 



EXHIBIT D 

CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Retained Earnings/Fund Balances 
All Proprietary Fund Types and Similar Trust Funds 
For the Year Ended June 30, 1994 



Operating Revenues: 
Interest and dividend income 
Charges for service 
Intergovernmental revenue 
Contributions and gifts 

Total Operating Revenues 
Operating Expenses: 
Benefit payments 
Culture and recreation 
Personnel services 
Operating and maintenance 
Materials and supplies 
Contractual services 
Utilities 

Depreciation (Note 1) 
Miscellaneous equipment 
Landfill closure costs (Note 15) 
Miscellaneous 

Total Operating Expenses 

Operating Income (Loss) 
Non- Operating Revenues (Expenses) 
Gain on sale of securities 
Operating transfers in 
Interest (net) 
Operating transfers out 

Total Non- Operating Revenues 

(Expenses) - Net 

Net Income (Loss) From Operations 
Change in Accounting Estimate (Note 16) 

Net Income (Loss) 

Add depreciation on plant assets acquired 
by giants externally restricted for capital 
acquisitions that reduces contributed capital 

Increase (Decrease) in Retained 

Earnings/Fund Balance 
Retained Earnings/Fund Balances - 

July 1, 1993 restated, (Deficit) -(Note 15) 
Retained Earnings/Fund Balances - 

June 30, 1994 (Deficit) 



Proprietary Fund Types 



Fiduciary Fund Types 



(675,694) 



(675,694) 
(7,294,286) 



Enterprise Funds 


Non- 




Totals 


Solid Waste 


Wastewater 


Expendable 


Pension 


(Memorandum 


Disposal 


Treatment 


Trust 


Trust Funds 


Only) 






$396,443 


$683,490 


$1,079,933 


$2,515,724 


$6,293,596 
334,535 


11,539 




8,820,859 
334,535 






132,112 
540,094 


977,210 
1,660,700 


1,109,322 


2,515,724 


6,628,131 


11,344,649 








408,752 


408,752 






56,980 




56,980 


1,525,164 


1,234,537 






2,759,701 


12,454 


1,481,913 






1,494,367 


56,969 


459,072 






516,041 


1,133,979 


114,505 




54,942 


1,303,426 


100,394 


522,536 






622,930 


11,110 


2,278,175 






2,289,285 


5,858 








5,858 


345,490 








345,490 






144,513 
201,493 


80 
463,774 


144,593 


3,191,418 


6,090,738 


9,947,423 


(675,694) 


537393 


338,601 


1,196,926 


1,397,226 






336,928 


540 


337,468 






3,250 




3,250 




(516,306) 






(516306) 






(158,93-1) 

181,244 
519,845 


540 
1,197,466 


(158,934) 




(516,306) 
21,087 


(334322) 


(675,694) 


1,062,704 




(602377) 






(602,377) 



(581,290) 

1349,805 

768,515 
810,481 



519,845 1,197,466 



519,845 1,197,466 

6,104326 9,239,612 



460327 

1,349,805 

1,810,132 
8,860333 



($7,969,980) $1,578,9% $6.624371 $10,437,078 $10,670,465 



See notes to financial statements 



71 



City of Nashua 



i:\inm i i 

CUT OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Combined Statement of < ash Mows 

All Proprietary Fund Types and Similar Trust Funds 

For the Year Fnded June 30, 1994 



Cash Mows from Operating Activities: 
Cash received from customers 
Cash received from trust investments 
Cash received from bequests to trusts 
Gash paid to suppliers and employees 
Net Cash Provided (Used) by Operating Activities 

Cash Flows from Noncapital Financing Activities: 
Operating transfers in 
Operating transfers out 
Net Cash Used by Noncapital Financing Activities 

Cash Flows from Capital and Related 
Financing Activities: 
Proceeds of long-term debt 
Principal paid on long-term debt 
Interest paid on long-term debt 
Acquisition and construction of capital assets 
Capital contributions 
Net Cash Provided (Used) by Capital and Related 
Financing Activities 

Cash Flows from Investing Activities: 
Net (increase) in investment securities 
Interest income 
Gain on sale of investments 
Net Cash Used by Investing Activities 
Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash and 
Cash Equivalents 
Cash and Cash Equivalents, July 1, 1993 
Cash and Cash Equivalents, June 30, 1994 (Notes 1 & 3) 

Reconciliation of Net Operating Income (I^oss) to 
Net Cash Provided (Used) by Operating Activities 

Net Operating Income (Loss) 

Adjustments to Reconcile Net Operating Income (Loss) 
to Net Cash Provided (Used) by Operating Activities: 
Depreciation and amortization 
Change in accounting estimate 
Changes in assets and liabilities: 

Decrease in accounts receivable 

(Increase) in prepaid expenses 

Decrease in unbilled service fees 

Increase in accounts payable 

(Decrease) in salaries payable 

Increase (decrease) in accrued sick and vacation leave 

Increase in estimated liability for 

landfill closure and postclosure costs 

(Decrease) in retainage payable 
Net Cash Provided (Used) By Operating Activities 

Noncash Transactions Affecting Financial Position 
Amortization of Contributed Capital 

See naics to financial statements 



Proprietary Fund Types 

Enterprise Funds 

Solid Waste Wastewater 

Disposal Treatment 

$2,619,443 $6,197,996 

(2,849,506) (3,642,034) 
(230,063) 2,555,962 


Fiduciary Fi 
Non- 
Expendablc 
Trust 

$13,339 
396,443 
132,112 
(201,493) 
340,401 

3,250 
(158,934) 
(155,684) 


ind Types 

Totals 
Pension (Memorandun- 
Trust Funds Only) 

$977,211 $9,807,989 

683,490 1, 079,933 

132,112 

(463,775) (7,156,808) 

1,196,926 3,863,226 

3,250 
(158,934) 








(155,684) 


484,000 
(204,434) 


340,000 
(779,050) 
(585,080) 
(837,203) 

767,175 

(1,094,158) 

(576,681) 
68,775 




824,000 

(779,050) 

(585,080) 

(1,041,637) 

767,175 


279,566 


(439,658) 

336,928 
(102,730) 

81,987 

209,225 

$291,212 




(814,592) 




(1,285,122) 

540 
(1,284,582) 

(87,656) 

66,216 

($21,440) . 


(2,301,461) 
68,775 
337,468 




(507,906) 

953,898 

1,645,990 

$2,599,888 


(1,895,218) 


49,503 

247,368 

$296,871 


997,732 

2,168,799 

$3,166,531 



($675,694) $537,393 $338,601 $1,196,926 $1,397,226 



11,110 


2,278,175 
(602,377) 




1289,285 
(601377) 


103,719 
(2,390) 

5,937 

(3,107) 

(15,128) 


147,735 
(413) 
24,507 

169,418 
(3,717) 
8,913 


1,800 


153,254 
(1803) 
24,507 

175355 
(6,824) 
(6,205) 


345,490 


(3.682) 

$2,555.%2 




345,490 
(3,682) 


($130,063) 


$340,401 $1,196,926 


$3,863,226 



$1,349,805 



S1.349.S05 



72 



Municipal Government Report 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 1-SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES 

The accounting policies of the City of Nashua, New Hampshire conform to generally accepted 
accounting principles for local governmental units, except as indicated hereinafter. The fol- 
lowing is a summary of significant accounting policies. 

Financial Reporting Entity 

The City of Nashua, New Hampshire (the "City") was incorporated in 1853 under the laws of 
the State of New Hampshire. The City operates under the Board of Aldermen - Mayor form 
of government, and provides services as authorized by its charter. 

The accompanying financial statements of the City present the financial position of the various 
fund types and account groups, the results of operations of the various fund types, and the 
statements of cash flows for its proprietary and fiduciary fund types. 

Generally accepted accounting principles require that all component units for which the City 
maintains financial oversight be included in the general purpose financial statements. Over- 
sight responsibility is derived from a number of criteria including financial interdependency, 
selection of governing authority, designation of management, ability to influence operations 
and accountability for fiscal matters. The relative importance of each criteria must be evaluated 
in light of specific circumstances. 

Although the decision to include or exclude a component unit is left to the professional judg- 
ment of local responsible officials, a positive response to any of the criteria requires that spe- 
cific reason for excluding the component unit be disclosed. 

Discretely Presented Component Units 

The component unit columns in the combined financial statements include the financial data of 
the City's component unit, the Nashua Airport Authority. It is reported in a separate column 
to emphasize that it is legally separate from the City. 

The Nashua Airport Authority, ("the Authority") which is incorporated as a separate legal 
entity by legislative act on August 27, 1961, is included because the City is responsible for 
selection of the Board of Directors, inclusion of the Authority's employees in the City's re- 
tirement system, budgetary appropriations, and debt is issued by the City on behalf of the 
Nashua Airport Authority. Debt issued by the Authority is backed by the full faith and credit 
of the City. The Authority, which provides air traffic control services and airplane tie-down 
rentals at Boire Field in Nashua, New Hampshire, is reported as of its latest fiscal operating 
year of June 30, 1994, which coincides with the City's fiscal year. Separately issued financial 
statements detailing the underlying fund types of the Authority may be obtained from the 
Board of Directors of the Authority. 

Component Units Not Included 

The financial statements presented herein do not include the Nashua Housing Authority, since 
after considering all factors relating to oversight responsibility, financial interdependency and 

73 



City of Nashua 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 1-SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED) 

accountability for fiscal matters, City officials have concluded it is not part of the reporting 
entity. 

Basis of Presentation - Fund Accounting 

The accounts of the City are organized on the basis of funds or account groups, each of which 
is considered a separate accounting entity. The operations of each fund are accounted for with 
a separate set of self-balancing accounts that comprise its assets, liabilities, fund balances, 
revenues, and expenditures. The various funds are summarized by type in the financial state- 
ments. The following fund types and account groups are used by the City: 

Governmental Fund Types 

Governmental Funds are those through which most governmental functions of the City are 
financed. The acquisition, use and balances of the City's expendable financial resources and 
the related liabilities are accounted for through governmental funds. The measurement focus is 
upon determination of changes in financial position, rather than on net income determination. 
The following are the City's governmental fund types: 

General Fund - The General Fund is the general operating fund of the City. It is used to 
account for all financial resources except those required to be accounted for in another fund. 

Special Revenue Funds - Special Revenue Funds are used to account for specific restricted 
revenues and expenditures, which include the following funds: 

School Cafeteria Grants 
Department of Education Grants 
Community Development Block Grants 
Department of Transportation Grants 
Other State and Federal Grants 

Capital Projects Funds - Capital Projects Funds are used to account for financial resources to 
be used for the acquisition or construction of major capital facilities other than those financed 
by the enterprise funds. 

Fiduciary Fund Types 

Fiduciary Funds are used to account for assets held by the City in a trustee capacity or as an 
agent for individuals and other governmental units, and/or other funds. 

Trust Funds - Trust Funds include expendable and non-expendable funds. Non-expendable 
funds are accounted for and reported as proprietary type funds since capital maintenance is 
critical. Trust Funds (Capital Reserve Funds and Self Insurance Fund) are recorded as gov- 
ernmental type funds. 

The Board of Public Works Pension Fund is used to account for the assets of the retirement 
plan available for payment of retirement benefits and administrative expenses of the plan. 



74 



Municipal Government Report 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 1 -SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED) 

Proprietary Fund Types 

Proprietary Funds are used to account for the City's ongoing activities, which are similar to 
those often found in the private sector. The measurement focus is upon determination of net 
income, financial position, and cash flows. 

Enterprise Funds - Enterprise Funds are used to account for operations (a) that are financed 
and operated in a manner similar to private business enterprises - where the intent of the 
governing body is that the costs of providing goods or services to the general public on a 
continuing basis be financed or recovered primarily through user charges; or (b) where the 
governing body has decided that periodic determination of revenues earned, expenses incurred, 
and/or net income is appropriate for capital maintenance, public policy, management control, 
accountability, or other purposes. The City accounts for its Solid Waste Collection and 
Disposal and Wastewater Treatment activities as enterprise funds. 

Account Groups 

General Fixed Asset Account Group - The City does not record the acquisition of fixed assets 
in the General Fixed Asset Account Group as required by generally accepted accounting prin- 
ciples. Fixed assets acquired or constructed for general government services are recorded as 
expenditures in the fund making the expenditures. Funds used to acquire general fixed assets 
and/or debt service payments on borrowings in connection therewith, are accounted for as 
expenditures in the year payments are made. 

Public domain (infrastructure) general fixed assets consisting of roads, bridges and sidewalks 
are also not capitalized. 

Genera! Long-Term Debt Account Group - This group of accounts is established to account for 
all unmatured long-term general obligations payable, except for those accounted for in the 
enterprise funds. Included in this fund are general obligation bonds payable, capital leases 
payable and compensated absences. 

Basis of Accounting - Revenues and Expenditures 

The modified accrual basis of accounting is followed by the governmental funds. Under the 
modified accrual basis of accounting, revenues are recorded when susceptible to accrual, i.e., 
both measurable and available. Available means collectible within the current period or soon 
enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the current period. Expenditures, other than 
interest on long-term debt, are recorded when the liability is incurred, if measurable. 

Property tax revenues are recorded as revenues principally on the cash basis until year end, at 
which time tax receipts within 60 days of the end of the fiscal year are recognized. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to intergovernmental revenues, the legal and 
contractual requirements of the numerous individual programs are used as guidance. There 
are, however, essentially two types of revenues. In one, monies must be expended on the 
specific purpose or project before any amounts will be paid to the City; therefore, revenues 
are recognized based upon the expenditures recorded. In the other, monies are virtually unre- 
stricted as to purpose of expenditure and are usually revocable only for failure to comply with 



75 



City of Nashua 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 1 -SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICES (CONTINUED) 

prescribed compliance requirements. These resources are reflected as revenues at the time of 
receipt or earlier if the susceptible to accrual criteria is met. 

Licenses and permits, charges for services, and miscellaneous revenues (except investment 
earnings) are recorded as revenues when received in cash because they are generally not 
measurable until actually received. Investment earnings are recorded as earned, since they are 
measurable and available. 

The accrual basis of accounting is used by fiduciary and proprietary fund types. Under this 
method, revenues are recorded when earned and expenses are recorded when the liabilities are 
incurred. 

During the course of normal operations, the City has numerous transactions between funds, 
including expenditures and transfers of resources to provide services, construct assets, and 
service debt. The accompanying governmental and fiduciary funds statements reflect such 
transactions as transfers. 

The City reports deferred revenues on its combined balance sheet. Deferred revenues arise 
when a potential revenue does not meet both the "measurable" and "available" criteria for 
recognition during the current period. Deferred revenues are recorded with respect to property 
taxes not received within the 60 day recognition period. Deferred revenues also arise when 
resources are received by the City before it has a legal claim to them, as when grant monies 
are received prior to the incurrence of qualifying expenditures. In subsequent periods, when 
both revenue recognition criteria are met, or when the government has a legal claim to the 
resources, the liability for deferred revenue is removed from the balance sheet and the revenue 
recognized. 

Component Unit 

The component unit's primary functions are accounted for as governmental fund types; there- 
fore the modified accrual basis of accounting is used. Under this method, revenues are 
recorded when susceptible to accrual and expenditures are recorded when the liability is in- 
curred, if measurable. 

Budgetary Accounting 

The revised budget represents adjusted departmental appropriations as authorized by the Board 
of Aldermen. The finance department, at the request of department heads, may transfer funds 
between operating categories within departmental budgets. The Board of Aldermen through 
Aldermanic resolutions may make supplemental appropriations from fund balance or transfer 
funds between departments as they deem appropriate. 

Amounts recorded as budgetary amounts in the Statement of Revenues and Expenditures - 
Budget and Actual for the General Fund (Exhibit C) are presented on the basis budgeted by the 
City. The amounts differ from those reported in conformity with generally accepted account- 
ing principles in the Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance for 
All Governmental and Fiduciary Fund Types (Exhibit B) as follows: 



76 



Municipal Government Report 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 1--SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED) 

Revenues and Other Financing Sources: 

Per Exhibit C $110,706,535 

Adjustments: 

Net change in property taxes 
not meeting 60 day recog- 
nition period 1,383,875 

Per Exhibit B $112,090,410 



Expenditures and Other Financing Uses: 




Per Exhibit C 


$115,570,924 


Adjustments: 




Encumbrances - June 30, 1993 


201,896 


Encumbrances - June 30, 1994 


(424,128) 



Per Exhibit B $115,348,692 



State law requires balanced budgets but permits the use of beginning fund balance to reduce 
the property tax rate. For the year ended June 30, 1994 (1993 Property Tax year), the City 
applied $971,222 of its unappropriated general fund balance to reduce taxes. 

Budget Control Charter Amendment 

An amendment to the City's charter limits increases in departmental budgets to a factor equal 
to the average of the changes in the Consumer Price Index of the three preceding calendar 
year. Specified categories of expenditures are exempt from the limitations upon approval of 
the Board of Aldermen. 

Encumbrances 

Encumbrances are unfilled purchase orders, contracts and other commitments for the expendi- 
ture of City resources. Encumbrances outstanding at June 30, 1994 are reported as a reserva- 
tion of fund balance, since they do not constitute expenditures or liabilities (Note 11). 

Cash 

The City pools cash resources of it's governmental and proprietary fund types to facilitate the 
management of cash. Cash applicable to a particular fund is reflected through interfund bal- 
ances. Cash in excess of current operating requirements is invested in various interest bearing 
securities and is disclosed as part of the City's investments. For the purposes of reporting cash 
flows of the City's proprietary fund types, cash includes demand deposit accounts and the 
interfund balances of those proprietary fund types that represents equity in the City's pooled 
cash. 



77 



City of Nashua 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 1 -SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED) 

Accounts Receivables 

All receivables are reported at their gross value and, where appropriate, are reduced by esti- 
mated portion that is expected to be uncollectible. Estimated unbilled revenues of the Waste- 
water Treatment Enterprise Fund are recognized at the end of each year on a pro-rata basis. 
The estimated amount is based on billings during the months following the close of the fiscal 
year. 

Loans Receivable 

The City, through various federal grants, has extended loans for the development or rehabilita- 
tion of residential properties within the City. As the repayment of these loans is contingent on 
numerous factors outside the control of the City, such as financial viability of the projects, 
these loans are not reflected as loans receivable in these financial statements. It is the City's 
policy to recognize the grant revenues when the loans are repaid. These loans amount to 
$15,945,975 as of June 30, 1994. 

Proprietary Type Funds - Property, Plant and Equipment 

Property, plant and equipment in the Wastewater Treatment Fund and Solid Waste Disposal 
Fund are valued at cost. Assets constructed by the City are based on estimated costs by the 
City's engineering department, including estimated costs for materials and labor. Assets con- 
tributed by independent contractors/developers are based on cost figures supplied by the con- 
tractor to the City. The cost of sewer lines constructed before 1970 are not reflected in the 
financial statements of the Wastewater Treatment Fund. The estimated book value of these 
lines at the inception of the sewer fund is not material to the financial statements of the 
Wastewater Treatment Fund. 

Depreciation is being provided for over the estimated useful lives of the assets using the 
straight-line method. The estimated useful lives are as follows: 

Years 
Buildings and Improvements 40 

Lines and Interceptors 50 

Machinery and Equipment 7-40 

Property Taxes 

The City's property tax was levied November 1 on the assessed valuation listed as of the prior 
April 1 for all real property located within City boundaries. The net assessed valuation as of 
April 1, 1993, upon which the 1993/1994 property tax levy was based, was $3,463,299,556. 
The equalized valuation as computed by the State of New Hampshire was $3,415,247,475 for 
1993 resulting in an assessment ratio of 98.6% of equalized valuation. 

Taxes are due in two installments on June 1 and December 1, with interest assessed thereafter 
on the unpaid balance. Taxes due after December 1 accrue interest at 12% per annum. As 
prescribed by state law, the tax collector shall place a priority lien on properties for which 
taxes remain unpaid in the following year after taxes are due. The City, in addition to its 



78 



Municipal Government Report 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 1 -SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED) 

priority tax lien, accrues interest at 18% per annum on outstanding balances due. If the proper- 
ty taxes and accrued interest are not paid within a two year period, the property is deeded to 
the City. 

Semi-annual property tax billings for the June, 1994 levy recorded prior to June 30, 1994 that 
relate to Fiscal 1995 have been recorded as deferred tax revenues (See Note 5). 

Property Tax Abatements and Refunds 

As provided by New Hampshire Statutes, the City in its annual tax commitment, raises an 
amount (commonly referred to as overlay) to provide for property tax abatements of current 
and prior year taxes as ordered by the assessor or other judicial bodies. The actual abatements 
and refunds incurred during the year are reflected as reductions of the current year property 
tax revenue in Exhibits B and C. 

For the year ended June 30, 1994, $1,979,754 was provided for abatements and refunds. 
Actual abatements and refunds for the year ended June 30, 1994 were $6,979,014 which re- 
sults in a $4,999,260 reduction in reported property tax revenues for the current year. 

Accrued Vacation and Sick Leave 

Employees earn vacation and sick leave as they provide services. Pursuant to City personnel 
policy and certain collective bargaining agreements, employees may accumulate (subject to 
certain limitations) unused sick pay earned and, upon retirement, resignation or death may be 
compensated for such amounts at current rates of pay. 

The amount of sick leave and vacation expected to be paid within the next year is recorded as a 
current liability in the general fund. The non-current portion of the liability for compensated 
absences, which represents the City's estimated commitment to fund such costs from future 
budgets, is reported in the General Long-Term Debt Group of Accounts. 

Total Columns on Combined Financial Statements 

Total columns on the combined statements are captioned "Memorandum Only" to indicate that 
they are presented only to facilitate financial analysis. Data in these columns do not present 
financial position, results of operations, or changes in financial position in conformity with 
generally accepted accounting principles. Interfund transactions have not been eliminated from 
the total column of each financial statement. 

NOTE 2-STEWARDSHIP, COMPLIANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY 

As of June 30, 1994 the following individual funds were in a deficit position. 

General Fund 

The general fund balance is in a deficit position of ($6,329,964) as of June 30, 1994. City 
officials recognize that the settlement of several significant pending court cases resulted in 
property tax abatements and refunds exceeding the budgeted overlay amount by approximately 
$5,000,000 as the primary contributing factor to this deficit. Also impacting the deficit at 



79 



City of Nashua 



CITY OK NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 2 -STEWARDSHIP, COMPLIANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY (CONTINUED) 

June 30, 1994 is the application of the 60 day recognition period for property taxes which is 
required by generally accepted accounting principles. 

The budgetary deficit (as reported on Exhibit C) is $3,995,164 less than the total fund balance 
deficit reported in the combined balance sheet because budgetary reporting does not include the 
effect of the 60 day tax recognition rule which is $4,397,292 at June 30, 1994. Another dif- 
ference is that encumbrances of $424,128 are recognized as expenditures on the budgetary 
basis only (on Exhibit C). 

Capital Project Funds 

Shady Lane landfill closure $119,271 

Capital Project deficits generally result from timing differences in the expenditure and receipt 
of funds from bonded debt or other sources. The City has authorization to issue bonds of 
$1,626,000 for the Shady Lane landfill closure. The City anticipates the issuance of these 
bonds in September 1994. (See Note 19) 

Enterprise Funds 

Solid Waste Disposal Fund $7,858,149 

The Solid Waste Disposal Fund deficit resulted due to the adoption of Governmental Account- 
ing Standards Board Statement No. 18, "Accounting for Municipal Solid Waste Landfill 
Closure and Postclosure Care Costs and required by generally accepted accounting principles. 
Implementation of this accounting standard resulted in the restatement of beginning retained 
earnings of ($7,949,760) to record the accrued closure costs based on the landfill capacity 
utilized from inception through June 30, 1993. See Note 19 for further discussion of the 
landfill closure requirements. 

NOTE 3 -CASH AND INVESTMENTS 

The City's investment policy for Governmental Fund Types requires that deposits and invest- 
ments be made in New Hampshire based institutions that are insured by the Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation or other agencies of the federal government. The City limits its in- 
vestments to U.S. Government obligations, mutual funds consisting of U.S. Government 
obligations, repurchase agreements and certificates of deposit in accordance with New Hamp- 
shire state law (RS A 4 1 :29). Certificates of deposit with a term of less than 90 days are re- 
ported as deposits in these financial statements. Investments for Non-expendable and Pension 
Trust Funds are at the discretion of the various boards of trustees. 

At year end, the carrying amount of the City's deposits were $36,747,920 and the bank bal- 
ance was $39,511,453. Of the bank balance, $35,983,249 was covered by federal depository 
insurance or collateralized and $3,528,204 was uninsured and uncollateralized. 

The City's investments are categorized to provide an indication of the level of risk assumed by 
the City of Nashua. Category 1 includes investments that are insured or registered or for 



80 



Municipal Government Report 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 3 -CASH AND INVESTMENTS (CONTINUED) 

which the securities axe held by the City or its agent in the City's name. Category 2 included 
uninsured and unregistered investments for which the securities are held by the broker's or 
dealer's trust department or agent in the City's name. Category 3 includes uninsured or unreg- 
istered investments for which the securities are held by the broker or dealer, or by its trust 
department or agent but not in the City's name. 

Category 





1 


2 


Carrying 

3 Amount 


Market 
Value 


Certificates of deposit 


$12,400 




$12,400 


$12,400 


U.S. Government 










obligations 




$16,646,415 


16,646,415 


16,288,891 


Corporate bonds 




3,824,450 


3,824,450 


3,748,309 


Corporate stock 




3,593,750 


3,593,750 


4,653,766 


Mutual funds 




6,809,027 


6,809,027 


6,744,448 




$12,400 


$30,873,642 


30,886,042 


31,447,814 


Deferred compen- 










sation plan 






4,690,916 
35,576,958 


4,690,916 
$36,138,730 


Book value of cash 




and deposits 






36,747,920 




Total cash and investments 






$72,324,878 





Other Cash Disclosures 

Of the City's total cash and investments, $71,685 represents unexpended bond proceeds re- 
stricted for use on specific projects for which the debt was raised. These funds are not avail- 
able for the general operations of the City. 

Cash and Equivalents - Statement of Cash Flows 

Cash and equivalents reported in Exhibit E, Combined Statement of Cash Flows, consist of 
the following components: 

Demand Deposit and Savings Accounts: 

Enterprise Fund - Wastewater $3,076,812 

Non-expendable Trusts 291,212 

Interfund Receivable (Payable) Representing 
Equity in Pooled Cash: 

Enterprise Fund - Solid Waste Disposal 296,871 

Enterprise Fund - Wastewater Treatment (476,924) 

Pension Trust (21,440) 

Total Cash and Equivalents, Exhibit E $3,166,531 



81 



City of Nashua 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 



NOTE 4--ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

General Fund 

Taxes receivable are as follows at June 30, 1994: 

Property Taxes (June, 1994 semi-annual) 
Tax Liens 



$4,082,395 
5,379,705 

$9,462,100 



Other receivables, net of reserves, are as follows: 





Gross 




Net 




Receivable 


Reserve 


Receivable 


Accounts Receivable: 








Mortgage receivable 


$61,232 


($61,232) 




Interest receivable 


210,856 




$210,856 


Nashua Airport Authority 


30,000 




30,000 


Other receivables 


217,394 




217,394 



$519,482 



($61,232) 



$458,250 



The City's policy is to reserve the mortgage receivable until such time payments are collected. 

NOTE 5 -DEFERRED REVENUE 

A. General Fund 

Deferred revenue at June 30, 1994 is comprised of the following: 

$48,586,152 
4,379,292 



Semi-annual tax warrant due July 1, 1994 
Taxes levied and not received within 



60 day recognition period 



B. Special Revenue Funds 



$52,965,444 



At June 30, 1994, the special revenues funds reflect deferred revenues of $217,333. This 
balance represents cash received in excess of expenditures from various grants reported in 
special revenue funds. 

NOTE 6-ENTERPRISE FUND - PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT 

Following is a summary of the property, plant and equipment of the Wastewater Treatment 
and Solid Waste Disposal Enterprise Funds at June 30, 1994: 



82 



Municipal Government Report 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 



NOTE 6--ENTERPRISE FUND - PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT 
(CONTINUED) 



Sewerage treatment plant 
Machinery and equipment 
Sewer lines and interceptors 
Construction in progress 


Wastewater 

$28,909,692 

18,085,701 

35,610,642 

2,634,654 


Solid Waste 
$77,773 
615,033 


Total 

$28,909,692 

18,163,474 

35,610,642 

3,249,687 


Less: Accumulated depreciation 


85,240,689 
23,422,125 


692,806 
27,776 


85,933,495 
23,449,901 


Net Property, Plant and Equipment 


$61,818,564 


$665,030 


$62,483,594 



NOTE 7--PENSION PLANS 

New Hampshire Retirement System 

The City participates in the New Hampshire Retirement System, which is a multi-employer 
defined benefit pension plan. The system covers substantially all full-time permanent employ- 
ees, except for the Board of Public Works employees. The Plan which is a cost sharing, 
multi-employer Public Employee Retirement System (PERS), is divided into two membership 
groups. Group I consists of non-public safety employees. Group II consists of public safety 
officers. It requires that both the City and employees contribute to the plan and provides 
retirement, disability and death benefits. 

Group I - Members contributing through age 60 qualify for normal service retirement allow- 
ance based on years of creditable service. The yearly pension amount if 1/60 (1.67%) of 
average final compensation (AFC) multiplied by the years of creditable service. AFC is de- 
fined as the average of the three highest salary years. At age 65 the yearly pension amount is 
recalculated at 1/66 (1.5%) of AFC multiplied by the years of creditable service. Members in 
service with 10 or more years creditable service who are between age 50 and 60 are entitled to 
a retirement allowance at a rate of 2.5% of AFC for each year of creditable service, not to 
exceed 40 years. Members in service at age 60 qualify to receive a prorated retirement allow- 
ance with appropriate graduated reduction based on years of creditable service. 

Group II- After attaining the age of 45, members with 20 years of creditable service qualify to 
receive a retirement allowance at a rate of 2.5% of AFC for each year of creditable service, 
not to exceed 40 years. Members in service at age 60 qualify to receive a prorated retirement 
allowance. 

Members of both groups are entitled to disability allowances and also death benefit allowances 
subject to various requirements and rates based on AFC earnable compensation. 

The State of New Hampshire funds 35% of employer costs for public safety officers (Group 
II) and teachers employed by the City. The State does not participate in funding the employer 
cost of other City employees. The City has not elected early application of GASB Statement 
#24 in these financial statements. 



83 



City of Nashua 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 7 -PENSION PLANS (CONTINUED) 

The City's current year covered wages were $59,143,650, 89.69% of total wages of 
$65,939,137. Employee contributions were $3,537,803. The employee contribution rate is 
9.3% for public safety employees and 5% for teachers and general employees. The City's 
contribution to this plan was $1,667,073. The City's contribution rate for police, fire, teach- 
ers and general employees was 3.45%, 6.78%, 1.96% and 2.8% respectively. 

The amount of total pension benefit obligation is based on a standardized measurement estab- 
lished by GASB Statement 5, Disclosure of Pension Information by Public Employee Retire- 
ment Systems and Local Governmental Employers that must be used by a PERS. The standard- 
ized measurement is the actuarial present value of creditable projected benefits. This pension 
valuation method reflects the present value of estimated pension benefits that will be paid in 
future years as a result of employee services performed to date, and is adjusted for the effects 
of projected salary increases. A standardized measure of the pension benefit obligation was 
adopted by the GASB to enable readers to (a) assess the PERS funding statues on a going- 
concern basis, (b) assess progress made in accumulated sufficient assets to pay benefits when 
due, and (c) make comparisons among other PERS and other employers. 

The Plan's total benefit obligation and net assets available for pension benefits as of June 30, 
1993 are as follows (in millions). (The City's portion of these amounts is not determinable): 

Net assets available for pension benefits, 

at market value $1,865 

Total pension benefit obligation 1,797 

Net assets in excess of pension 

benefit obligation $68 

The measurement of the total pension benefit obligation is based on the June 30, 1993 actuarial 
valuation using an open group aggregate funding method. Demographic assumptions have 
been revised to better reflect actual experience of the Plan. 

The New Hampshire Retirement System began compiling historical trend information in their 
1987 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. When issued, the fiscal year 1994 report will 
include eight years of trend data. The information will eventually include ten years of data 
and will be useful in assessing the Plan's progress in accumulating sufficient assets to pay 
pension benefits as they become due. 

Board of Public Works Employee's Retirement System 

The Board of Public Works Employees' Retirement System is a defined contribution plan with 
the City matching employee contributions to the plan. The plan was adopted by an ordinance 
on July 15, 1947 by the City's Board of Alderman. Participation in the plan is compulsory for 
all employees hired by the public works department. 



84 



Municipal Government Report 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 7-PENSION PLANS (CONTINUED) 

The plan provides retirement, disability and death benefits. Employees are eligible for normal 
retirement after reaching age sixty, provided they have accumulated twenty-five years of con- 
tinuous service. Benefits are vested after 10 years of service. 

Covered wages paid under this plan for the year ended June 30, 1994 were $5,296,385, 
8.303% of total wages of $65,939,137. Employer and employee contributions were each 
$484,619. The employer and employee contribution rate was 9.15% of covered wages. The 
plan was fully funded according to the latest actuarial valuation as of January 1, 1989. 

Plan assets at June 30, 1994 were $10,458,518 and are reported as a fiduciary fund type in 
these financial statements. Investments consist of certificates of deposit, U.S. Government 
Obligations, and corporate stocks and bonds. 

Deferred Compensation Plan 

The City sponsors a voluntary deferred compensation plan under Section 457 of the Internal 
Revenue Code. Under the plan, employees may elect to defer a percentage of their salary up 
to prescribed limitations. The City does not contribute to this plan. Employees are eligible to 
receive benefit payments at retirement, upon termination of employment, or in the event of 
disability. Plan assets, which remain the property of the City until paid or made available to 
the employee, are reported as an agency fund in these financial statements. 

NOTE 8 -CAPITAL LEASES 

The following is a summary of capital lease transactions for the year ended June 30, 1994: 

Capital leases - July 1, 1993 $124,313 

Payments (124,313) 

Capital leases - June 30, 1994 $-0- 



The capital leases represent lease agreements or installment purchase contracts entered into for 
the financing of equipment acquisitions. All such leases have been completed during the year 
ended June 30, 1994. 

NOTE 9 -LONG-TERM DEBT 

The following is a summary of debt transactions of the City for the year ended June 30, 1994: 

General Obligation Debt 
General Long- Enterprise 
Term Debt Fund 

Debt outstanding July 1, 1993 $36,465,650 $9,574,350 

Additions of new debt 4,882,000 824,000 

Retirements and repayments (3,330,950) (779,050) 

Debt outstanding June 30, 1994 $38,016,700 $9,619,300 



85 



City of Nashua 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 9 --LONG-TERM DEBT (CONTINUED) 

Debt reported in the General Long-Term Debt Account Group at June 30, 1994 is comprised 
of the following: 



Bonds Outstanding: 
School 

Parking garage 
Revaluation 
Other 



Bond Anticipation Notes Outstanding: 
School 
Other 



$25,949,500 
2,061,000 
1,215,000 
3,909,200 

33,134,700 



3,843,000 
1,039,000 

4,882,000 

$38,016,700 



The City's general obligation debt bears interest rates ranging from 4.66% to 8.27% at June 
30, 1994. 

The Bond Anticipation Notes have been included in long-term debt as they meet criteria to do 
so under generally accepted accounting principles. The City plans to retire these notes with 
long-term debt issuance in September, 1994. (See Note 19). 

The annual requirements to amortize general obligation bonds outstanding as of June 30, 1994, 
including the $4,882,000 in Bond Anticipation Notes detailed above, are as follows: 

General Ixmg-Term Debt Account Group 



1995 

1996 

1997 

1998 

1999 
2000-2004 
2005-2009 
2010-2013 



Wastewater Treatment Enterprise Fund 



1995 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 



Principal 


Interest 


Total 


$7,977,950 


$1,914,452 


$9,892,402 


2,650,950 


1,566,940 


4,217,890 


2,380,950 


1,421,154 


3,802,104 


2,235,950 


1,324,800 


3,560,750 


2,165,950 


1,219,251 


3,385,201 


10,054,750 


4,522,441 


14,577,191 


7,437,450 


1,537,133 


8,974,583 


3,112,750 


156,523 


3,269,273 


$38,016,700 


$13,662,694 


$51,679,394 


Principal 


Interest 


Total 


$899,050 


$548,340 


$1,447,390 


559,050 


507,913 


1,066,963 


559,050 


472,745 


1,031,795 


559,050 


438,113 


997,163 


564,050 


403,250 


967,300 



86 



~ Municipal Government Report 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 



NOTE 9 -IX)NG-TERM DEBT (CONTINUED) 



2000-2004 
2005-2009 
2010-2013 


2,455,250 

2,612,550 

927,250 


1,538,631 

735,718 
67,623 


3,993,881 

3,348,268 

994,873 




$9,135,300 


$4,712,333 


$13,847,633 


'olid Waste Enterprise Fund 








1995 


$484,000 


$6,373 


$490,373 



The long-term debt of the Wastewater Treatment Enterprise Fund and Solid Waste Enterprise 
Fund includes $340,000 and $484,000 of Bond Anticipation Notes, respectively. The Bond 
Anticipation Notes have been included in long-term debt as they meet criteria to do so under 
generally accepted accounting principles. The City plans to retire these notes with long-term 
debt issuance in September, 1994. (See Note 19) 

Component Unit Debt 

The City's full faith and credit is pledged behind the Nashua Airport Authority's notes pay- 
able. The primary sources of repayment of the notes are the Authority's operating revenues. 
The annual requirement to amortize all debt outstanding of the Authority at June 30, 1994 are 
as follows: 



1995 
1996 



Principal 

$18,192 

16,808 

$35,000 



Interest 
$425 

$425 



Total 
$18,617 
16,808 

$35,425 



Debt Limitations 

The City is subject to state statute which limits debt outstanding to a percentage (depending on 
how funds will be used) of the state's equalized valuation calculation. The percentage limita- 
tions applicable to the City, which differ from the statutory limits, are the result of special 
enabling legislation. Debt incurred for sewer expansion is not included in the limitation calcu- 
lation. The following is a summary, by purpose, of the outstanding debt of the City at June 30, 
1994 and related limitations. For the purposes of debt limitation calculations, debt unauthor- 
ized but unissued is included with issued debt. 



School 
All other 
Sewer bonds 
Landfill bonds 



Net Debt 
Outstanding, 
Authorized- 

Unissued 

$31,692,500 

9,850,900 

9,135,300 

484,000 

$51,162,700 



Percent of 
Assessed Value 
for Debt Limit, 
$3.561.881.480 

6% 

2% 



Available 

Statutory 

Limit 

$213,712,889 

71,237,630 



Debt 
Margin 
$181,020,389 
61,386,730 



87 



City of Nashua 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 9~IX)NG-TERM DEBT (CONTINUED) 

The general obligation debt of the City of Nashua and its proportional share of Hillsborough 
County debt (based on its equalized valuation to the total County equalized valuation) which 
must be borne by property taxes levied on properties located within the City (commonly called 
overlapping debt) is summarized as follows: 

Percentage 
Net Debt Applicable 

Government Outstanding to the City Total Debt 

City $47,636,000 100% $47,636,000 

Hillsborough County 11,615,233 23.29% 2,705,188 

Total $59,251,233 $50,341,188 



The above results in per capita City debt of $603; per capita total debt of $637 and a ratio of 
total overlapping debt to June 30, 1994 assessment valuation of 1.45%. 

NOTE 10--BONDS AUTHORIZED AND UNISSUED 

As of June 30, 1994, the City has authorized and unissued debt for the following purposes: 

School construction $1,900,000 

Shady Lane landfill closure 1,626,000 

Fire department mechanics bay 500 

Library west wing addition 200 

$3,526,700 



NOTE 11 -ENCUMBRANCES 

Encumbrances as of June 30, 1994 consist of the following: 

General government $5,424 

Public safety 113,510 

Highways and streets 89,333 

Cemeteries 1,463 

Community development 3,307 

Culture and recreation 10,084 

School department 156,083 

Capital outlay 44,924 

$424,128 



88 



Municipal Government Report 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 



NOTE 12-INTERFUND BALANCES 

Individual interfund receivable and payable balances at June 30, 1994 are as follows: 



Fund 
General Fund: 

Special Revenue Funds 

Capital Project Funds 

Trust and Agency Funds 

Enterprise Funds 
Special Revenue Funds: 

General Fund 
Capital Projects Funds: 

General Fund 
Enterprise Funds: 

General Fund 
Trust and Agency: 

General Fund 



NOTE 13-GENERAL FUND - DESIGNATED FUND BALANCE 

Designated for Subsequent Years' Expenditures 

Appropriations for certain projects and specific budget items not fully expended at year end are 
carried forward as continuing appropriations to the next year, in which they supplement that 
year's appropriations. At year end, continuing appropriations are reported as a component of 
fund balance and are detailed as follows: 

General government $119,861 

Public safety 7,650 

Highways and streets 22,300 

School department 40,000 

Interest and fiscal charges 70,000 

Capital outlay 92,519 

$352,330 

NOTE 14-CHANGES IN CONTRIBUTED CAPITAL 

Wastewater Treatment Enterprise Fund 

Changes in contributed capital of the Wastewater Treatment Enterprise Fund for the year 
ended June 30 ,1994 are as follows: 



Interfund 
Receivables 


Interfund 
Pavables 


$539,181 

566,917 

91,929 

476,924 


$930,292 

1,023,929 

3,881,412 

296,871 


930,292 


539,181 


1,023,929 


566,917 


296,871 


476,924 


3,881,412 


91,929 


$7,807,455 


$7,807,455 



89 



City of Nashua 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 



NOTE 14--CHANGES IN CONTRIBUTED CAPITAL (CONTINUED) 





Municipal 


Federal and 








Investment 


State Grants 


Developers 


Total 


Balance July 1, 1993 


$11,771,290 


$34,380,783 


$9,659,857 


$55,811,930 


Capital contributed 


116,550 


287,610 


363,015 


767,175 


Depreciation applied to 










contributed capital 




(1,125,337) 
$33,543,056 


(224,467) 
$9,798,405 


(1,349,804; 


Balance June 30,1994 


$11,887,840 


$55,229,301 



Solid Waste Disposal Enterprise Fund 

Contributed capital of the Solid Waste Disposal Enterprise Fund consists of municipal invest- 
ment of $1 10,831 contributed in previous fiscal years. 

NOTE 15--CHANGE EN ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLE 

Effective July 1, 1993, the City changed its method of recognizing the landfill closure and 
postclosure care costs associated with the Four Hills Landfill to conform with a recent pro- 
nouncement of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (Statement No. 18). Under the 
new requirements, the costs of closure and postclosure care costs must be accrued and recog- 
nized as expenses over the useful life of the landfill. As a result, the portion of the estimated 
closure and post-closure costs for the time period from the opening of die landfill through June 
30, 1993 was charged to the 1993 retained earnings of the Solid Waste Disposal Enterprise 
Fund as detailed below. The effect of this change was to decreased net income of the Solid 
Waste Disposal Enterprise Fund for the year ended June 30, 1994 by $345,490. Retained 
earning at July 1 , 1993 has been restated as follows: 

Balance July 1 , 1993 as previously reported $653,474 

Cumulative effect of application 

of new accounting principle (7,947,760) 

Balance July 1, 1993 (Deficit), as restated ($7,294,286) 



NOTE 16-CHANGE EN ACCOUNTING ESTIMATE 

At June 30, 1993, the City established an allowance for doubtful accounts relating to a disput- 
ed receivable in the Wastewater Fund. Subsequent to issuance of the financial statements, 
negotiations on the disputed balance continued and additional information became available 
which indicated that the allowance established was inadequate. The amount of the allowance 
was underestimated by $602,377 as of June 30, 1993. Therefore, this amount is reflected as a 
reduction of net income in the statement of operations of the current year. 



90 



Municipal Government Report 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 17-- LANDFILL CLOSURE AND POSTCLOSURE CARE COSTS 

State and federal laws and regulations require the City to place a final cover on its Four Hills 
landfill when it ceases to accept waste and to perform certain maintenance and monitoring 
functions at the landfill site for thirty years after closure. Although closure and postclosure 
care costs will be paid only near or after the date that the landfill stops accepting waste, the 
City reports a portion of these closure and postclosure care costs as an operating expense in 
each period based on the landfill capacity used as of each balance sheet date. 

The $8,293,250 reported in the Solid Waste Disposal Enterprise Fund as landfill closure and 
postclosure care liability at June 30, 1994, represents the cumulative costs accrued to date 
based on the use of 89 percent of the estimated capacity of the landfill. It is estimated than an 
additional $1,036,750 will be recorded as closure and postclosure care costs between June 30, 
1994 and the date the landfill is expected to be filled to capacity (estimated to be fiscal year 
1997). The estimated total current cost of the landfill closure and postclosure care of 
$9,330,000 is based on the amount that would be paid if all equipment, facilities, and services 
required to close, monitor and maintain the landfill were acquired as of June 30, 1994. 
However, the actual cost of closure and postclosure care may be higher due to inflation, 
changes in technology, or changes in landfill laws and regulations. 

The closure and postclosure care costs are expected to be financed through the issuance of 
long-term debt. 

NOTE 18-COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES 

A. Litigation 

There are various claims and suits pending against the City which arise in the normal course of 
the City's activities. In the opinion of legal counsel and City management, the ultimate dispo- 
sition of these various claims and suits will not have a material effect on the financial position 
of the City. 

B. Insurance 

The City is self-insured with respect to Worker's Compensation Insurance. The first $350,000 
of claims per person, per accident is paid by the City. Any additional per person, per accident 
claims are insured up to $5,000,000 by insurance carriers. 

The City has established a self-insurance fund for the purpose of providing for claims of 
employee benefit programs, property, liability, bond, automobile, long-term disability and 
other commercial or self insurance programs that may be lawfully implemented. The fund is 
currently funded by applying the unexpended balances of insurance appropriations and appro- 
priations recommended by the Mayor and approved by the Board of Aldermen. As the fund is 
in the start-up phase, the City currently maintains outside coverage for all of the risks named 
above. 

This fund is reported as an Expendable Trust Fund in these financial statements. The City 
transferred $1,779,391 of unexpended appropriations to this fund for the year ended June 30, 
1994. The City spent $1,100,000 of funds from the fund to pay for health insurance premi- 
ums. 



91 



City of Nashua 



CITY OF NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NOTES TO GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (CONTINUED) 
June 30, 1994 

NOTE 18--COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (CONTINUED) 

The City does not have a "blanket coverage" policy that extends the liability limits of underly- 
ing policies. 

C. Other Contingencies 

Federally Assisted Programs 

The City participates in a number of federally assisted grant programs. These programs are 
subject to financial and compliance audits by the grantors or their representatives. The 
amount, if any, of expenditures which may be disallowed by the granting agencies cannot be 
determined at this time, although the City expects such amounts, if any, to be immaterial. 

Pending Property Tax Abatements 

There are tax abatement cases pending that may result in payments that may be material to the 
City's financial statements, singly or in the aggregate. However, Corporation Counsel has 
indicated that such claims will be covered by the budgeted overlay amount in the ensuing year. 

NOTE 19 -SUBSEQUENT EVENT 

On September 13, 1994, the City issued $9,684,000 in general obligation bonds. These bonds 
are payable in annual installments ranging from $450,000 to $559,000 over twenty years. 
Interest is variable ranging from 4.95% to 6.5%. As discussed in Note 9, $5,706,000 of these 
bonds were recorded as long-term debt in these financial statements. The remaining 
$3,978,000 will be recorded as debt proceeds in the 1995 fiscal year. 



92 



Municipal Government Report 



SUMMARY INVENTORY OF VALUATION 

LAND 

BUILDINGS 

PUBLIC UTILITIES: 

WATER 

GAS 

ELECTRIC 

TOTAL VALUATION BEFORE EXEMPTIONS 

EXEMPTIONS ALLOWED: 

BLIND 

ELDERLY 

PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED 

SOLAR/WIND POWER 

SCHOOL DIN./DORMITORY/KITCHEN 

TOTAL EXEMPTIONS ALLOWED 

NEW VALUATION ON WHICH THE TAX RATE IS COMPUTED 

STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 
PROTECTION OF LIFE AND PROPERTY 
COMMUNITY SERVICES 
PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION 
PUBLIC SERVICES DIVISION 
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
PUBLIC LIBRARIES 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 
CONTINGENCY 
BONDED DEBT SERVICE 
CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS 



$1,039,206,500 
$2,472,373,120 



$2,599,100 
$40,669,300 
$25,297,500 

$3,580,145,520 



($945.00) 

($64,712,050) 

($668,075) 

($328,500) 

($4,618,300) 

($71,271,925) 

$3,508,873,595 



$16,950,636 

$2,601,831 

$19,915,607 

$1,122,975 

$8,254,935 

$334,544 

$904,838 

$1,433,526 

$51,063,025 

$1,827,905 

$5,056,180 

$145,000 

$109,611,002 



93 



City of Nashua 



STATEMENT OF ESTIMATED REVENUES 



PENSIONS AND FRINGE BENEFITS 

RISK MANAGEMENT 

FINANCIAL SERVICES 

CITY CLERK'S OFFICE 

VOTER REGISTRATION 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 

PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 

WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

PUBLIC WORKS AND ENGINEERING 

PARKS AND RECREATION 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

PARKING GARAGES 

PARKING LOTS 

CEMETERIES 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

MISCELLANEOUS 



$193,059 

$2,252,654 

$12,811,426 

$119,535 

$1,000 

$7,000 

$556,000 

$48,460 

$12,960 

$234,876 

$104,000 

$20,000 

$54,000 

$64,070 

$2,511,538 

$182,500 

$256,430 

$232,475 

$296,000 

$22,100 

$1,261,441 

$423,914 

$21,665,438 



PROPERTY TAXES ASSESSED 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

LESS REVENUES 

ADD: OVERLAY (ABATEMENT ACCOUNT) 

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY TAX 

VETERANS EXEMPTION 

AMOUNT TO BE RAISED FROM TAXES 



$109,611,002 

($21,665,438) 

$5,500,000 

$7,709,100 

$236,600 

$101,391,264 



94 



Municipal Government Report 



FISCAL 


MUNICIPAL 


COUNT\ 


YEAR 






1994 


9.14 


2.15 


1993 


8.04 


2.32 


1992 


7.89 


2.48 


1991 


11.42 


3.59 


1990 


11.23 


3.59 


1989 


10.04 


3.47 


1988 


8.36 


2.83 


1987 


8.65 


2.17 


1986 


9.20 


2.03 


1985 


9.78 


1.85 


1984 


9.28 


1.73 


1983 


9.09 


1.72 


1982 


9.20 


1.50 


1981 


8.40 


1.20 


1980 


19.40 


3.30 


1979 


17.40 


3.20 


1978 


18.60 


2.70 


1977 


18.20 


2.20 


1976 


14.80 


2.60 



TAX RATE HISTORY 

SCHOOL 



TOTAL 



17.61 


29.90 


17.74 


28.10 


17.92 


28.30 (R) 


26.19 


41.20 


23.98 


38.80 


21.79 


35.30 


19.41 


30.60 


17.58 


28.40 


16.77 


28.00 


15.57 


27.20 


16.69 


26.70 


15.19 


26.00 


14.90 


25.60 


14.10 


23.70 (R) 


35.00 


57.70 


34.20 


54.80 


33.50 


54.80 


32.10 


52.20 


31.40 


48.80 



HISTORY OF ASSESSED VALUATION 

FISCAL YEAR VALUATION 



1994 
1993 
1992 
1991 
1990 
1989 
1988 
1987 
1986 
1985 
1984 
1983 
1982 
1981 
1980 
1979 
1978 
1977 
1976 



$3,508,873,595 

$3,463,299,556 

$3,482,583,656 (R) 

$2,238,774,141 

$2,250,401,251 

$2,230,037,778 

$2,218,194,400 

$2,089,387,100 

$1,981,794,500 

$1,839,854,100 

$1,697,638,650 

$1,606,277,150 

$1,535,149,600 

$1,495,814,600 (R) 

$ 558,000,000 

$ 532,000,000 

$ 509,000,000 

$ 190,000,000 

$ 472,000,000 



(R) REVALUATION 



95 



City of Nashua 



LONG TERM DEBT 

The City of Nashua finances its capital projects, acquisitions and improvements through the 
issuance of long term debt. The City customarily issues 20 year bonds through a competitive 
bid process. Statutory limits are imposed to control the level of debt. The limits are 2% of 
the assessed property valuation for City projects and 6% for school projects. At the end of 
FY'94 the City had long term debt of $32,129,500.00 for school related projects and 

$20,350,500.00 for all other City projects. 



YOUR 1994 TAX DOLLAR 



TAX RATE $28.90 per $1,000 




96 



m Municipal Government Report 



CITY OF NASHUA TRUST FUNDS 

The City of Nashua has thirty seven individual Trust Funds devoted to: 

Cemetery perpetual care for three cemeteries. 

Cemetery flower funds. 

Individual perpetual care. 

Scholarship trusts for Nashua High School. 

Concert and lecture series. 

Nashua Public Library. 

Board of Public Works Retirement. 

Capital Equipment Reserve Fund. 

Various other personal and community purposes. 



The following is a report on the City of Nashua's Trust, Capital Reserve Funds and 
Common Trust Fund Investments. 



97 



City of Nashua 




98 



Municipal Government Report 



g g 3 g S_^ S_J 



Oi — - ! — 








J" 


X |CM IO IO C Iff' *T 


K 


u> 




t.D 


n lin Uo Um c 10 |*- 


^ 


1 


5 * JJS 


*. in — I cm in. 
co Ko 01 I'D 1 — 
tji_ I3S |c\ I<d n 


n icj> 




1 


— CJI 

n *j 


ffl 


-0. O 








id icr 


0" Id 


Si 








« £ " •" 




tfi 


CD 






n 












tD iuH 




T, cz 




















*" > 




l*~ 


ty 1^ 


in 


ID ItO 


BD 


«t 








5 " 


O ICN 


CD 


»^ lea 




CM 


CO 








£ ^ -— 


ID 'n 


O 


01 01 


CO 


^ 










1 1 ist 







VO 


OJ l 1 ^ 


S 




n 








10 






o> o> 


CD 


ID 


(\ 








g-g"!- 




0" 
m 


CD 


<o In 


8" 


O 









£ 1 




















1 3 


IO IX) 


cc o> 10 


fM 


O) 


CD 




1 'iio= ; = 2 

*;3z< 515 


■m in 


■^ t in 


ID 




T 




T 'CD 

— 1*. 


t 


\f>j 


O 
CO 


t 


T 




f 1-. I*> 3 = ui 01^. 


m. |\o 


n 


n cd 


o> 


01 


01 




UJ I0'U§>- 
5 5;So 


fa 


V 


O) 
CM 





<B I—" 
ICO 


1 

n 



n 













.1 




















§ 


„f JS 
B|g!S 


5 IS 


ID 


*a 


8 


ID 


m 


5 




8 




X Iff) 

t n 


cn 


3 

CD 


ID 


3 


<D 

01 


u 






— lo 




CM 


T 


*H 











b 1 


id Icm" 


ID* 




iD 




0" 
01 


•S3, 




u. 












n 


CM 










10 


ID it 


□ 


ID I — 


n 


,», 


O 


^. 








ID - 




n |co 


CM 


ID 


Ol 


01 






SB J3 


CD lO 


BJ 


Q I- 


ID 


CO 


O 


n 


5 




r- IT 
V IT 


O) 


Ul I CM 

n 10 


CO 
ID 


Zl 


cn 


n 




O* IV 


n" 


to 


n 


n" 


a 


cm' 


V 


0) 






*D tO 


CO 


"■ 


01 


8. 


m 


PI 


en 


■»— - 




D 1 










T 


^ 


"~ 


n* 


Cf 




lis 

- 


s is 


5i 


a § 


3 


8 


8 




CD 

Uj 




3, 


O 


to 


CM 

6. 





O 


O 


O 




£ 




si 






w 














*3 

~"3 


«. 


* ° SIS 


ED 


ID 
(D 


S IS 


3 


IM 


n 

CM 




i°;t Sim 


- U3 


CD 


O en 


tM, 


O 


CD 




*~ 


J:SS *e. 


D) 

T 1 


iD 


CO 
ID 


he 


1 


O 


n 

CN 




Q 

CO 


z 


e w C ui 
Some 




V" 




r 


3 


cm" 


O' 
CM 




to 


£ 3 


3 


T 


ils 18 


CM 


D 


O 






H? 


O 


T 


IO 





O 








5 3 


O 


ID 


— 1 ■ 


CM 


p 


O 




I 






15 


- 

CD ICD 


<o 


CD, 


ID 
CM. 




5 




i 1 


IS 


n 
1 


CM 

n 


cm" 
cm 

n 


ID* 
CM 




5 




■T 


r> nil 


CO (CM .— 


,.. 


O) 


^ 




is £3 


CD CD 


ID [O «U3 


iO 





ID 




"3 


n men 


h- in — 
Ua ■ en 


O 


CO 


CM 

cn 




3: 


CI IDJO, 11. ICJi U\ 


5> 




IO 




t? - >- - 


t* t ■ V It' ] c *- 




s 


10' 




C/j 


3 Sip 


O HJ'O |T 1 CD ,01 


n 






1 iD CO 1 1 CM 


n 


CM 


0. 




I 




1 


1 r 


V 


T 






'3 

■1 3 


13 lo lo IO 
10 lo 10 


O 
m 


iD 


s 




>v. 


* ' — 


— .— — 1— , — 






-~ 







3 i 




1 | 

1 










^. 


2 !sa 


p C-'p c 


c- 5.:z- 5i z- a 


.'- a 


~ a 






£ 


§S'§a | Sfi|S£jSiS 


Se3 


§s 


5 p 

* C Q 







z |g 3 


5 =la 3 


D £! ci d 


.- 


5 1 


CD O £J 

5 m q 




i Ji 


E -in >- 


E-iE -lE»- 


E - 


^ *— 


££' B 




L^ 


E *:E « 


E *!e -sit? * 


E * 


E ¥ 


5 8 5 




O 


— ". 


S.5ISI 


U^ U.-! u, m 


Si 








- 
























G 


5 - 

u. — ^ 


S 1, 


a | 1- 






CO 




Qj 

Q 
W 


3 - y 

E ^ '! 


ii |! 

1 is 


1 is s 

1 Ii 


_j 

Is 




E £ 


. 

- c ? 
1 ■ 


1 

ai 
a. 

c 

CJ 






r. -n 


n li. :"j 


> n 


til t^ 


.11 D 


n 




1 














T3 


















C 


i 11 










JC 


I 






5 






i 

,2 




a 


z 






■Ui 


1 III 

5 1*5 






la. 




V) S 


2 c 








B 2,1 K 


>T3J >■ 




□ I 


E n 

= 


>-13 

S3 




h- 


l. 11 


Q J ;:■ 
O CZ'.C 

111 


E |E 


>> 


u c 


c 


E v 




Q) 
O 


Is S 

uj |3U 

5 =H 

< 'S s 

Hi 


3^3 

g 31 g 5 

s.li £^ 


E 

, c 

n 2 


55 

3 
EL * 

5 S 


32 

1 E 

B E 
Bl 

n "f 


S3 

la 




-t^ 3 c 


3 olC U 


■a 0113 r 


O B 


a a 


1 s 











m Ljm.i-, 


Zj-.S_X. 








-0 " 


CO 




i^ 




*7 






& 


O ~ '31 

UJ < ] 

— LL 


en 


□ !2 




Q - 


3) 


Ol 


CO 




cc 


< = 


:-> v- 


c °' * 


ft E 











99 



City of Nashua 



Nashua Public 
Library Trust Funds 




Overview: 

Lbrary Trust Funds represent the coopera- 
tive spirit of public and private wealth in 
providing library services to the community. 
Tne following information defines and identi- 
fies each mcividuai fund including their vaiue 
classifications: 

Guidelines: 

A) Trust Fund Categories: 

Th a library currently has fifteen trust runes 
available for a variety of designated purposes 
as specified by the donor Seven basic catego- 
ries 'nclude: 



Trust Fund 

I. Works cf Art 



2. Maintenance of Chandler 
Memorial Library 



3. Maintenance of Main Library. 

4. Lithuanian Studies 

5. Without Condition 



8.30 

13.26 
0.74 
0.74 
0.65 



6. Bill of Rights and Constitution 0. 1 2 

7. Purchase of Reading Matter 76.19 

Total Assets 100.00 

B) Objectives: 
1 . Works of Art 

The Burbank Fund is 8.30* of the funds and is 
for the purpose of providing pictures, paint- 
ings, and works of art by living artists.The 
Burbank Advisory Committee discusses 
objectives, reviews project proposals, and 
makes recommendations to the Board of 
L-brary Trustees. Emphasis is placed on locat- 
ing works of art around the community so 
*."at individuals encounter art m their e\e r y- 
cay lives anc experience aesthetics as par. of 
their daily routine. Parks, puolic buildings and 
ctner outdoor sites are considered with, tne 



goal of promoting an understanding and 
appreciation of visual arts. Purchases have 
included pnnts for the Library circulating collec- 
tion, paintings for public buildings, and sculpture 
for outdoor areas. 

2. Maintenance of 
Chandler Memorial Library: 

The Chandler Fund, 9.43* of assets; 

Hickey Fund, 0.22*; and the Locke Fund, 3.6 1* 

provide income from 1 3.26* of the fund's 

assets for the purpose of maintenance ofThe 

Chandler Memorial Library, with emphasis on 

preserving the architecture and style of the 

building while accommodating library neecs. 

3. Maintenance of Main Library 

The Hunt Fund, 0.74* is under review anc is 
assumed to be for use in maintaining or 
expanding the main library. 

4. Lithuanian Studies 

The Charles Zylonis Fund, 0.74* is for the 
purpose of providing books, programs and 
materials to promote the understanding of 
Lithuanian culture. Books and records are 
regularly bought when available in Lithuanian 
and titles in English as well. Crafts, cooking, 
travel and current affairs are areas where 
books are available. Programs include films 
and guest speakers, usually to celebrate 
holidays and co-sponsor programs by 
churches and community groups. 

5. Without Condition 

The Cramer Fund, 0.46*-, Fairfield Fund. 0. 1 5*; 
and Jaqurth Fund, 0.04% total 0.65* of assets. 
Income is usually used for the purchase of 
media equipment, improvements to the 
theater and sound system and purchase of 
non-book materials. Media equipment in- 
cludes VCRs, CD players, amplifiers, mixers, 
speakers and related hardware. Computer 



100 



~ Municipal Government Report 



Hardware and software are additional catego- 
ries for consideration. Software upgrades, 
printers and enhancements provide new or 
improved services to library patrons and help 
promote computer literacy and state-of-the- 
art media services. 

6. Bill of Rights and Constitution 

The U.S. Constitution Fund, 0. 12* , is the 
newest fund and income is to be used to 
promote the interest appreciation and under- 
standing of these two documents. Films, 
speakers, books and periodicals are possible 
uses for income: co-sponsonng programs for 
holidays and special events are anticipated. 

7. Purchase of Reading Matter 

Tne Harkaway Fund for children's books, 
0.04*; The Harris Fund, 1 .23*: The Hussey 
Fund, I.I l%The A. E. Smrth Fund, 0.29* 
and The Henry Stearns Fund, 73.52*. 
total 76. 1 9* of assets. 

Income from these funds helps the Library 
implement its collection development process 
as summarized mThe Materials Selection 
Policy approved by the Board of Library 
Trustees on March 8, 1982: 

'The major goals of the Nashua Public Library 
are to select acquire, organize, circulate and 
promote the use of a broad range of communi- 
cation matenals and services which are provided: 

• to meet the individual's need for information; 

• to help the individual attain maximum self- 
development through life-long intellectual 
and cultural growth; 

• to supplement both the formal and informal 
educational experience of individuals: 

• to encourage the use of library matenals, 
services ond programs during leisure time; 

• to provide the means for thoughtful ond 
productive participation by individuals and 
groups in the affairs of the community, the 
nation and the world; 



to support the educational, governmental, 
cultural, recreational and economic activities 
within the community, 

• to foster productive diversity, 

• to accommodate the library needs of a 
changing and dynamic community, and to 
sustain trie principles embodied in trie 
Library 8/71 of Rights, Freedom to Read and 
Freedom to View statements, as enunciated 
by the American Library Association." 

"In addition to the requirements of the 
general public served, materials will be 
selected to meet the needs of such groups 
as business, the professions, government 
community organizations, the homebound, 
the visually, physically and mentally cisabled, 
individuals with learning disabilities, adult 
beginning readers, and of people for whom 
English is not the prinapal language. Botri 
trie adult and young people's collections will 
serve as supplementary sources for student 
use, but matenals selected for students must 
also be useful to the general reader." 

When selecting special or exceptional materi- 
als, consideration is given to the availability of 
duplicate editions already in the community. 
Textbooks, classroom manuals, and similar 
curriculum-related matenals are usually not 
acquired or placed in the collection except if 
they also serve the needs of the general 
public and are the only matenal available. 
Materials of varying complexity are selected 
on a topic in an effort to serve patrons from a 
wide range of educational background, age, 
and reading skill. Depth and breadth of 
subject coverage is evaluated based on judg- 
mental factors such as demand and value 
ranging from minimal and selective, represen- 
tative, to comprehensive and exhaustive. 



101 



City of Nashua 



Professional collections in areas such as law 
and medicine are selected with care, with 
emphasis placed on supplying authoritative, 
standard, and popular titles geared to the 
layman. Library literature and practical experi- 
ence indicate an increasing demand from the 
lay public for more specialized and advanced 
material on several levels of difficulty but no 
attempt is made to establish an academic 
library on a topic regardless of occasional 
college student or faculty demand.The role of 
the public library in an era of electronic 
information will increase. The American 
Library Association Commission on Freedom 
and Equality of Access to Information in 1985 
stated the belief. 

"that print will reman a major vehicle for the 
dissemination of information and ideas for the 
indefinite future Nonetheless, information stored and 
disseminated in the newer electronic formats will 
wholly supersede some types of printed information 
and electronic access will become the preferred 
mode of access for other important bodies of 
information." 

". the community library and information 

service center has the potential to serve as a 
primary local resource to help raise the general level 
of community literacy, both traditional pnnt literacy 
and computer or electronic access skills." 

"Libranes and information centers have a vital 
role to play in assunng that all Amencans have ready, 
effective, access to the full range of information 
resources that are essential to meaningful participa- 
tion in modem life." 



In an effort to fulfill our mission statement as a 
public library and in consideration of our 
collection development policy, we recom- 
mend that income from these funds be 
allocated to purchase materials which provide 
additional depth and insight in a variety of 
areas. Most important is the need to provide 
newer expanded Reference resources, avail- 
able in pnnt or electronic formats. We recom- 
mend renewal of our subscription to the UMI 
General Periodicals and Business Periodicals 
on CD-POM. In addition, we recommend 
selection of authoritative, comprehensive, 
printed materials mainly in but not limited to 
the following: 

1) Circulating Art books 

2) Art & Media Reference 
Encyclopedias and mufti-volume sets 

3) Art & Media Periodicals 

4) Business Reference sets and directories 

5) New England area studies/geography/ 
history; includes town and state histories, 
genealogy, travel 

6) General Reference encyclopedias and 
multi-volume sets 

7) General circulating collection; science, law, 
medicine, history, social sciences. 

In conclusion, we must evaluate, select, and 
organize library resources and give continuing 
attention to how our goals relate to the 
development and achievement of public 
policies which ultimately provide for the 
allocation and distribution of our nation's 
wealth. 

"Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a 
people who mean to be their own govemours, must 
arm themselves with the power which knowledge 
gives. A popular government without popular infor- 
mation, or the means of" acquiring if, is but a pro- 
logue to a farce or a tragedy; or perhaps both." 

lames Madison 



102 



Municipal Government Report « 



Nashua Public Library 
Trust Funds 



Bank of NH, na Investment Advisory Acct. #1090024654 




Fund Name 

BURBANK 

CHANDLER 

CONSTITUTION 
FUND 

CRAMER 

FAIRFIELD 

HARK AW AY 

HARRIS 

HICKEY 

HUNT 

HUSSEY 

JACQUITH 

LOCKE 

SMITH 

STEARNS 

ZYLONIS 

Totals 



Market Value 

as of 

6130/93 

127,860.10 

1 45.267.56 

1 .848.58 



1310.72 



1 8,947.94 



616.20 



55,611.44 



4,467.40 



I 1 ,399.58 



% of Principal 

Total Inc./Dec. 

Fund Fy93/94 



8.30 



9.43 



0.12 



7.086.22 0.46 



0.15 



616.20 0.40 



1.23 



3,389.06 0.22 



I 1 .399.58 0.74 



17,099.36 



-4.61112 



-5.240.03 



-66.68 



-255.61 



-83.35 



-2123 



-683.48 



12125 



Market Value Income 

as of Distribution 

6/30/94 FY93/94 



1 23.247.98 



1 40,027.53 



1,781.90 



6,830.61 



1227.37 



593.97 



1 8,264.46 



3,266.8 1 



0.74 



-411.20 



10,988.38 



5.390.3 1 



6,124.18 



77.93 



298.74 



97.41 



25.98 



798.80 



14188 



0.74 


-411.20 


10,988.38 


480.58 


I.I 1 


-6 1 6.80 


1 6,48156 


720.88 


0.40 


-22.23 


593.97 


25.98 


3.61 


-1005.99 


53,605.45 


1344.46 


0.29 


-161.15 


4,306.25 


188.34 



1,131563.22 73.52 -40,853.36 1,091,709.86 47,746.47 



,540.483.16 100.00 -55,567.68 1.484,91548 



480.58 



64,943.52 



103 



City of Nashua 



DEPARTMENTAL 

REPORTS 
JULY 1, 1993 

THROUGH 

JUNE 30, 1994 



104 



Municipal Government Report 

MAYOR'S OFFICE - 



MAYOR ROB WAGNER 



Assistant to Mayor Peter Finney 

Executive Assistant Christine Nolan Konys 

Mayoral Assistant Georgie Lyons 

Secretary/Receptionist Beatrice Dean 

Rita Diggins 



NASHUA'S DOWNTOWN 



Nashua's downtown is alive and well. Coming on the heels of a prolonged recessionary time, this is welcome 
news, but it is more than that. 

Like many other downtowns in America, Nashua's downtown has realized significant change in the past decade, 
and change is a necessary ingredient in the continued growth and development of any city. 

In the course of this change we have realized more and more that the downtown is the heartbeat and the 
signature of our city. It is a reflection of each of us, and how we feel as a community. 

That reflection has revealed change in many ways. The most significant change lies within the context of an 
increased understanding between private and public interests. No longer can these entities survive without each 
other. We are beginning to discover that we need each other, and that the success of our common agendas will 
depend on a spirit of cooperation and collaboration between private and public interests. 

During the administration of Mayor Wagner this partnership has been strengthened on several different levels. 
On a global scale, Mayor Wagner picked up where Mayor Donchess left off in support of the role of Center 
for Economic Development (CED). The efforts of the CED benefit more than just Nashua's downtown, they 
benefit the economic landscape of the entire region. 

Increased channels of communication between the Chamber of Commerce, local business and property owners, 
and people intimate with the process of bringing new business and special events to the downtown, have resulted 
in a friendlier business climate, and the desire to produce team centered results. 

Recently, the Board of Aldermen approved the use of Community Development block Grant money to fund a 
part time downtown specialist position. The creation of this position has helped to forge a lasting relationship 
between the City and the downtown interests, and will help to facilitate the cultural and special events that reflect 
the downtowns strengths. 

Finally, through support of his own office, Mayor Wagner has made it a priority to continue to dedicate assets 
to the downtown. This includes restoration of the Hunt Community Building, ongoing beautification projects, 
creation of a downtown real estate database, community wide special events, and management of the Nashua 
Center for the Arts. 

Significant changes have also occurred in the profile of the market place. National retail anchors of past 
downtowns, stores such as Sears and Woolworths, have been replaced by destination stores that have carved a 
niche in our community. 



105 



City of Nashua 



Stores like Alec's Shoes, Goodales Bikes, and Martha's Exchange demonstrate the type of enterprises that have 
taken the leadership role in the downtown's retail sector. Because of their local ownership, their roots have 
grown deeper into the community, and this will continue to help promote all of our downtown interests. 

Nashua is a vibrant community to both live and work in. The downtown is the heart of that community. It is 
where we come to learn of our history and our heritage. It is where we socialize and experience culture. And 
it is where we come to sec ourselves, through a reflection of the past and a vision of the future, and this is a role 
that only the downtown can play. 



SENSORY GARDEN 

Mayor Rob Wagner, joined by the Nashua Garden Club, dedicated a Sensory Garden at Greeley Park on July 
26, 1994. The groundbreaking for this project was part of the City of Nashua's 2nd Annual Barrier Awareness 
Day activities. The Sensory Garden is a result of a partnership formed by the City of Nashua and the Nashua 
Garden Club. 

The Nashua Garden Club designed the lay-out of the garden during the winter and worked with the Parks and 
Recreation Department this spring in the actual construction and planting. The Garden Club members will be 
responsible for the maintenance of the Sensory Garden. 

Faculty and students from the Perkins School for the Blind in Waltham, Massachusetts were consulted during 
the project. 

In his dedication remarks, Mayor Wagner stated, "This project is a perfect example of Nashua's spirit of 
volunleerism, dedication, and the commitment of the City to full participation in all aspects of daily living for 
everyone." 



SARA TITLE III COMMITTEE 

In 1994, Nashua's Sara Title III Committee (Supcrfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act), which address 
concerns regarding hazardous materials handling and incidents in the City, held its first Informational Conference 
for Nashua industries. 

The Nashua committee, chaired by the Mayor's Executive Assistant Christine Nolan Konys, is the first in the 
state to hold a public informational conference as a service to area industries. 

Following the conference, Chris was invited to address the annual meeting of the Chemical Manufacturer's 
Association in New Orleans. Chris gave a presentation on the importance of the Local Emergency Planning 
Committee, and how such committees can work more closely with industry to reduce the threat of hazardous 
materials incidents. 



106 



Municipal Government Report 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 



Director Russell R. Marcoux 

Administrative Assistant Jean E. Roth 



The Administrative Services Division encompasses several departments involved in 
diverse, yet related, administrative efforts of these departments: Assessor, City Clerk, 
Financial Services, Human Resources, Insurance - Risk Management, Management 
Information Services, Purchasing and Voter Registration. 

In addition to its operating departments, the Director also acts as liaison for other 
autonomous and semi-autonomous departments in the areas of budget preparation, 
personnel administration and financial/payroll procedures. Again this year, the Director was 
actively involved in the N.H. legislative process, testifying and lobbying on behalf of the city. 
He is currently the First Vice President of the New Hampshire Municipal Association and 
will become President in November, 1994. 

During fiscal '94, our division experienced another reduction in the total operating 
budget of the division. At the same time, we experienced a net decrease of two full-time 
employees which included the elimination of a full-time management position. These 
changes allowed us the opportunity to restructure our operation to better meet the needs 
of the city. Although we saw little employee turnover during this fiscal year, we did 
experience a number of retirements: Anne Georgopoulos (18 years) and Fernande Lavoie 
(38 years) of the Financial Services department, Rina Rousseau from the City Clerk's Office 
(10 years), Georgette LeBlanc from Purchasing (5 years) and Peter Cyr Risk Manager (15 
years). 

While we are on the personnel side of the division, we were fortunate to have 
honored two other employees during the course of the year: James Duchesne of our 
Building Maintenance department was named the division's Employee of the year and Sue 
Hill-McCarthy our Payroll Coordinator was honored as an Exemplary Employee by the 
Nashua Rotary West. We are very proud of each one of our employees and their service 
to the city and community. 

A number of innovations occurred during the year, the most notable of which was 
completing our second full year as a Motor Vehicle Municipal agent for the State of New 
Hampshire. This successful program raised $153,622 in revenue, $18,622 more than the 
projected income with minimal additional operating costs. This, coupled with our very 
successful "Mail-In" vehicle registration program, has allowed us to provide excellent 
customer service in a previously very tedious annual project for most citizens. This has been 
our most "visible" success story and the Financial Services area continues to receive 
accolades for it. 



107 



City of Nashua 



This year we finally saw some movement in the Voting Machine replacement area: 
We traded in our 350 pound machines for reconditioned 750 pound machines. These 1970 
vintage machines still remain one of our replacement priorities. Hopefully this year, we'll 
convince the Capital Improvements Committee and Board of Aldermen of the need to 
replace these with optic-scan voting machines, that will save time, money and provide 
quicker results. 

We continue to enhance our computer technology that assists all divisions of the city 
to work more efficiently with a relatively small investment. All of the major enhancements 
are listed in that department's report, however chief among them are: the new Fire Dispatch 
and Reporting system, on-line installation of the Assessor's CAMA (Computer Aided Mass 
Appraisal) system and the enhanced citywide cluster capabilities including school. 
Another successful city auction was held in June which realized a profit of over $5,000. This 
project takes place each year and is staffed by employee volunteers. 

Once again, our tax collections are the envy of all municipalities in the state: 
Another 98.6% was collected prior to the lien date, which allowed us an increase in interest 
earnings. Our tax base increased to $3,508 billion, while our equalized value saw an 
increase to 101% of fair market value! 

Our Purchasing department hosted its 2nd Annual Open House in recognition of 
Purchasing Month in March. Desk top publishing software has allowed our very talented 
in-house Printing Technician to provide services that were previously done outside. 
Additions to the building this year included a generator to provide emergency electrical 
power for the computer system and an electronic building access control system. 

Our Human Resource area saw a consolidation of departments with the 
Insurance/Risk office. This consolidation saw the combining of like efforts and a merger 
of related activities. Our annual Employee Recognition Luncheon was held in May and 
again was well received. This department's innovations are delineated in their department 
report. 

In conclusion, most other innovations are mentioned in the respective department 
reports. Our fiscal year was completed with our annual audit by the firm of Vachon and 
Clukay. The audit, which is included elsewhere in this annual report, clearly makes note 
of these and other accomplishments, both financial and administrative. 

Our division's employees are once again to be commended for their continued 
support and assistance during this year of continued transition and improvement in 
personnel services, processes and equipment enhancement. 



108 



Municipal Government Report 



OFFICE OF THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Board of Assessors Stephen Densberger, Chair 

Richard Ethier 
Marylou Blaisdell 

The duty of the Board of Assessors is to see that department policies are in compliance with 
State Laws and regulations of the State Department of Revenue Administration. The Board 
is ultimately responsible for all assessments and must review all applications for abatement. 
Regularly scheduled meetings of the Board are held the second Wednesday of each month 
at 4:30 PM. The meetings are open and public, but appointments are required for 
appearance before the Board and may easily be made by calling the Department staff at 
594-3301. Accommodating appointments at times other than Wednesdays will be made if 
and when necessary. 

The value of taxable real estate for the city for 1994 is $3,508,873,595. 



ASSESSORS OFFICE 



Assessing Manager Lucien Rousseau, Jr. 

Administrative Assistant Sharolyn Honeycutt 

Assessing Secretary Jeannine Zins 

First Assessor Michael Fedele 

Second Assessor Andrea Heyn 

Third Assessor James Michaud 

Deeds Transfer Carol Savage 

Mapping Sandra Bastien 

Nashua, the second largest city in the state, covering 32 square miles, has been one of New 
Hampshire's fastest growing municipalities in the last decade. Those of us who believe that 
the local spirit of enterprise will turn the soft economy into a healthy growth situation again, 
still find Nashua our most desired living spot. Being within one hour of Boston's cultural 
influence and the New Hampshire/Maine coastline and only two hours from the White 
Mountains, a good highway system, and proximity to some of the most highly respected 
industrial, educational and medical facilities in the world, have all contributed to our growth. 

A Money magazine survey released in August ranked Nashua as the 15th most livable city 
in America. The only New England metropolitan area ranked higher was Stamford-Norwalk, 
Connecticut in sixth place. A high ranking in the survey is nothing new to business-minded 
Nashuans. The magazine's first survey in 1987 had the Gate City at the very top of the list, 
ranked number one among the nation's 300 largest metropolitan areas. Money's "Best Places 
to Live in .America" report ranks cities on a number of most valued qualities, according to 
the magazine's subscribers. A statistically representative sample of subscribers for this year's 
survey yielded a list of 43 factors, including low crime, short commute to work and the local 
unemployment rate. 

109 



City of Nashua 



Nashua, like the rest of the state and region, slumped considerably in the seven years since 
it aced the initial survey, and this year's spot in the top 20 marked a big jump from the 55th 
place ranking of a year ago. While the city continued to enjoy a low crime rate (sixth among 
the lowest reporting crime areas in the country, according to the national crime index), and 
other "quality of life" issues have remained constant, the rebounding economy has been 
given much of the credit for the improved ranking. 

The one million square foot Pheasant Lane Mall with 150 retail shops, innumerable 
shopping strips, plazas, fine restaurants, and excellent schools make Nashua an extremely 
attractive place to live or visit. 

In the early 1980s, 100,000 new jobs were created, many in the Nashua area, and with this 
the population explosion began. Housing availability lagged behind demand, thereby pushing 
the price of housing and land to higher levels. By the mid 1980s, new construction for 
housing literally exploded to meet demands. Nashua's business base and the financial 
security of our community still makes us an attraction for new business and this should 
diminish the impact of a housing backlog. 

The abundance of vacant office and commercial space will lower rents and the cost of doing 
business in the region, encouraging business formations. Pent-up demand for single-family 
homes should lead to a modest recovery in single-family starts in 1995. House prices are 
stabilizing -- the region has successfully avoided the plunge in prices predicted by many 
observers. Eventually, pent-up consumer demand will lead to increased retail sales activity 
by mid 1995. 

The period of modest growth we are now experiencing is the normal market whereas the 
preceding seven years was an anomaly. People seem to be more confident about making a 
long term investment in a home in the Nashua region. 

Downtown Nashua is exciting - a new County Courthouse was built, new law firms are 
moving in and local office space is being occupied. New store fronts, better traffic flow and 
more convenient parking all contribute to a new spark of activity in the downtown area. 

Although new construction is limited, Nashua is still experiencing some exciting events such 
as: 

Filene's 150,000 square foot building and Circuit City's 35,000 square foot building 
on the Daniel Webster Highway; TGIF & Chili's Restaurant, Kenny Rogers Roasted 
Chicken, 17,000 square foot Computer City, Ground Round, Sports Authority, Old 
Navy, Coyote Cafe, True Value Hardware, Penwell and Brookstone Headquarters. 

The Assessors Office has had many challenges this past year. Computer automation will 
enable us to attain our goal of fair and equitable taxation for all property owners. 

We in the Assessors Office strive for accuracy, professionalism and integrity. For all of us, 
the everyday challenges make every day an adventure and our efforts most rewarding. 

110 



Municipal Government Report 



" THE WAY TO A DOG'S HEART 




This very smart mailman (Patrick Humphrey) 

is "Number 1" on Penny's list 

(a/k/a License #36) 



111 



City of Nashua 



CITY CLERK'S OFFICE 

City Clerk Eleanor Benson 

Deputy City Clerk Patricia E. Lucier 

Vital Statistic Clerks Mary Cutter 

Donna Decato 

Colette Trempe 

Donna Worcester 

Deputy Voter Registrar Ralene Rousseau 



The City Clerk's Office is the "Keeper of all Official Records" for the City of Nashua. We 
record all vital records (birth, death and marriage), and U.C.C.'s. In addition, we license 
dogs, taxi cabs/chauffeurs, video games, peddlers and a myriad of other items. 

We also maintain the information line for the city. We consider our office as one of the 
links between the residents and City Government. 

The elections are conducted by this office. In January of 1994 we traded in our 30 column 
voting machines for 40 column reconditioned voting machines. This will enable us to follow 
the state laws in reference to the listing of candidates names. The new machines weigh 750 
pounds as opposed to the old ones that weighed 350 pounds. We are looking into replacing 
these with optic-scan voting devices. 

There were several veteran Ward Workers who decided not to run for re-election. Alice 
Record, Roger and Laure Fortier, and Larry Glennon are among those who will be missed 
for their expertise and dedication. 

Performing marriages is one of the enjoyable duties the City Clerk performs. There are 
approximately 100 couples a year who get married in the Aldermanic Chamber. We're not 
sure whether it's the economy or just the ambiance of being married at City Hall. A picture 
is usually taken of the couple in the "Traditional Corner". Former Mayor Jay Leonard's 
picture overlooks the couple in all wedding photos. 

Marriage and death records are now automated, which means we can transmit this 
information to the state office in a timely period. In the future networking between the 
State and Nashua will allow for a quicker response to our customer needs. 

The price of dog licenses increased by $2.00. This "FEE" goes to a special program for "Pet 
Over Population" to have animals altered at a reduced price. This is for people who adopt 
animals from Humane Societies and for those who are on assistance. 

Much too often individuals who work behind the counter never receive recognition for the 
efforts and dedication to their job. I would like to publicly thank my entire staff for the 
friendly, courteous and professional manner in which they treat our customers. 

112 



Municipal Government Report 







113 



Samual Lucas McManus 

Born : November 20,1993 2:05 PM 

gibs. 3ozs. 

20 3/4 inches 

Proud family, Bob Cheri &• Jake 



City of Nashua 



FINANCIAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 



Treasurer and CFO Paul A. Martel 

Administrative Assistant Jean E. Roth 

Assistant Deputy Treasurer Susan M. Martinelli 

Deputy Tax Collector Ruth E. Raswyck 

Treasury Accountant John A. Lysik 
Customer Service Research Kathryn R. Guillemette 

Customer Service Support Susan L. Decker 

Customer Service Representative Dawn M. Roy 

Financial Analyst Dawn K. Enwright 

Supervisor Financial Reporting Cindy J. Bielawski 

Accountant Financial Reporting Carol A. Cloutier 
Coordinator Waste Water Collections Maurice N. Chamberland 

Coordinator Traffic Violation Bureau Judith A. Miele 

Supervisor Motor Vehicle Registration Pauline M. Lucier 

Assistant Supervisor M.V.R. Elizabeth Scanlon 

Audit Clerk M.V.R Fleurette Rioux 

Motor Vehicle Clerk Sylvie D. Corriveau 

Motor Vehicle Clerk Janet L. Durand 

Motor Vehicle Clerk Sheila Galipeau 

Motor Vehicle Clerk Nancy Naples 

Motor Vehicle Clerk Anita Slusarczyk 

Motor Vehicle Clerk Brenda Y. Sullivan 

Motor Vehicle Clerk Suzanne R. Thibault 



This past year the Financial Services we had two valued and long term employees retire. 
Fernande C. Lavoie (38 years) and Anne Georgopoulos (18 years) we wish both the best 
of luck in their retirement and will miss them. 

We also want to welcome four new employees to out department. Carol Cloutier, Susan 
Decker, John Lysik and Brenda Sullivan. 

The Financial Services Department is divided into three major operating units: 

TREASURY AND TAX COLLECTIONS 

The units responsibility centers around property tax collections, investment of the City's 
funds and the City's bonded debt. All City receivables are billed, collected, invested and 
disbursed through this operation. Additional Tax Collection program enhancements were 
made again this past year to accommodate rapid and accurate customer telephone services 
as well as providing more efficient window service to the City's residents. The continued 
growth of our Municipal Automated Payment System (electronic tape to tape) has provided 
the tax collection unit with more timely collections. The Municipal Automated Payment 

114 



Municipal Government Report 



System in concert with the Lock Box collections through First NH Bank allows the City to 
invest it's funds sooner and resulted in $1,123,730 of income on investments for the year 
ending June 30, 1994. 

MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATION AND TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS BUREAU 

This unit's primary responsibility is the registration of motor vehicles and the collection of 
traffic violations. The registration process incorporates processing motor vehicle title 
applications, collection of all City fees related to MVR processing, distributing State MV 
decals and license plates to Nashua residents, and the collection of State Revenues and the 
processing of and collection of traffic violations and fines. During FY '94 the City registered 
79,460 automobiles and prepared 18,100 title applications for revenue of $5,911,333 in 
addition to 76,253 State decals for $153,622. There were 31,587 traffic violations collected 
for a revenue of $213,844. The City continues to require all traffic violations be paid prior 
to registering any vehicle. In addition, the City has been cooperating with area Towns in 
a reciprocal agreement to not register a Nashua resident's vehicle if there are any 
outstanding violations in other communities. 



FINANCIAL REPORTING 

The responsibilities of this unit are the entire accounting, reporting, budgeting, auditing, bill 
and payment processing functions for the City, culminating in financial reports, annual 
budgets, annual audit, bimonthly warrants and numerous other products for the City's 
citizens, boards, Aldermen, Mayor, divisions, departments and staff. During this fiscal year, 
the position of Financial Analyst was created in lieu of Associate Finance Officer to assist 
in the technical aspects of budgeting and reporting. The Financial Analyst compliments the 
Financial reporting staff with direct assistance and support. Additional enhancements are 
being made on an on going basis to meet the City's various reporting needs. A few labor 
intensive processes were implemented past year which allows the staff more time and 
control over the system. The City's main computer cluster is continuously being upgraded 
to provide more flexible and efficient information gathering and dissemination to the users 
in the General Fund, Special Revenue Funds and the Capital Project Funds. 



115 



City of Nashua 



ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DIVISION 
EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR 



"JAMES DUCHESNE" 




Recognized as a dedicated employee who 

has saved the city thousands of dollars in maintenance 

and beautifying City Hall 



116 



Municipal Government Report 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



Purchasing Department Staff 



Purchasing Manager William A. Thompson 

Assistant Purchasing Manager Shirley C. Bonenfant 

Supervisor, Accounts Payable Bernice N. Diggins 

Purchasing Supply Clerk Carol A. Silva 

Accounts Payable Coordinator Naomi Patch 

Accounts Payable Clerk Mary V. Brazas 

Accounts Payable Clerk Patricia A. Deforte 

Accounts Payable Clerk Nancy M.Deslauriers 

Accounts Payable Clerk Virginia A. Patrician 

Clerk/Typist Mildred S. Maverick 

Printing Technician Ralph B. Jackson 



The goal of providing top service to all city departments was achieved by the Purchasing 
Department. During FY94 a total of 14,207 purchase order documents with a total value 
of $15,203,935 were processed. A total of 33 formal invitations for bids/ requests for 
proposals with a total value of $1,645,764 were processed this year. The Accounts Payable 
section made a number of changes, including the reassignment of Bernice Diggins as the 
Accounts Payable Supervisor and Naomi Patch as the Accounts Payable Coordinator. In 
addition to this change, there has been increased delegation, greater cross training, updating 
of procedural manuals, office layout improvements, improved and streamlined processing 
procedures and elimination of processing steps and paperwork to improve the overall 
efficiency of the purchasing function. A special project completed this year was changing 
over 200 meter numbers used by a major utility company. This project required the 
cooperative efforts of Accounts Payable and the MIS Department. An agreement was 
signed with U.S. Sprint for continuation of long distance telephone carrier service and 
efforts are underway with NYNEX for intrastate account consolidation to achieve the lowest 
possible long distance rates. 

In March 1994, the Purchasing Department hosted its 2nd Annual Purchasing Month Open 
House. This event was even more successful than the first. Shirley Bonenfant arranged 
displays by local suppliers. As a part of this open house, purchasing agents from other New 
Hampshire municipalities were invited for a conference to discuss mutual purchasing 
challenges, policies and issues. 



117 



City of Nashua 



Ralph Jackson continued to provide excellent printing service to all city departments. His 
knowledge and use of the PC have grown to the point where most of the layout work that 
once was done by outside firms is now done in house by him using desk top publishing 
software on the PC. His expertise with the new PC and software is self-taught and he 
continues to learn new tasks to improve print shop efficiency and expand services offered 
to city departments. 



City Hall Maintenance and Custodial Staff 



Building Manager "James" R. Duchesne 

Custodian II Roger J. Bertrand 

Mail/Receiving Clerk Philip D. Hagen 

Custodian Robert C. Fernandes 

Custodian Marcel J. Beaudoin 

Custodian Darlene B. Heatherman 



The building maintenance and custodial crew continued to maintain City Hall in excellent 
condition. Additions to the building this year included a generator to provide emergency 
electrical power for the MIS computer system and an electronic building access control 
system. 

At the annual city employee awards ceremony in April James Duchesne received the 
Administrative Services Division employee of the year award. This recognition was very 
much deserved by a dedicated city employee who is always there to assist others, no matter 
how large or small the task. 

The Hunt Memorial Building at 6 Main Street continues to receive the necessary repair 
attention of our City Hall building maintenance crew. Private donations for the renovation 
of the building are beginning to show results. 



118 



Municipal Government Report 



HUMAN RESOURCE DEPARTMENT 



Manager, Human Resource Marilyn "Mitzi" Baron 

Manager, Insurance Benefits Susan Jeffery 

Human Resource Assistant Barbara Cote 

Human Resource Coordinator Joan M. Ellis 

Payroll Coordinator Sue Hill McCarthy 

Payroll Coordinator Barbara Anctil 

Administrative Assistant Sherry L. Spofford 

Benefits Clerk Kathleen E. Donovan 

Human Resource Specialist (P/T) Diane Denning 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION: 

The duties and responsibilities include but are not limited to budgeting, forecasting, staff 
development, and implementation of programs. 

EMPLOYMENT: 

Recruiting, advertising, testing, interviewing, reference checking, enrollment function, 
recording keeping, benefits enrollment, and management reporting for approximately 800 
regular full time and 180 part time which includes temporary seasonal employees. 

EMPLOYEE RELATIONS: 

Equal employment and affirmative action, employee/management training, policy 
development: implementation and dissemination, Employee Assistance Program, employee 
awards, employee health programs/seminars and administration of the Merit System and 
various union contracts. 

COMPENSATION MANAGEMENT: 

The coordination of salary relationship to classification/grade, maintaining current and 
accurate job descriptions for City employees in accordance with state and federal laws. 

LABOR/MANAGEMENT RELATIONS: 

Assistance with in labor/management agreements with United Auto Workers professional 
and clerical/technical units (UAW), ASFCME union representing the Board of Public 
Works employees, IAFF union representing the Fire department employees and AFT 
representing the Nashua Public Library employees. 



119 



City of Nashua 



PAYROLL OPERATIONS: CITY WIDE FUNCTION 

Management of the City of Nashua payroll process which includes the Board of Education 
employees. This function is responsible for the weekly/biweekly payroll to include 
interfacing with payroll clerks from all divisions, adjustments to payroll due to errors, the 
distribution of manual checks, direct deposit tape process (ACH), quarterly tax audits, and 
the year end W-2 process. 

INSURANCE BENEFITS: THREE MAJOR FUNCTIONS - CITY WIDE 

Briefly, this department administers a combination of twenty-two (22) commercial and self- 
insured programs as well as all health, dental, and life insurance programs for both City and 
Board of Education. 

HEALTH INSURANCE: Responsible for providing insurance protection for all City/School 
assets, personal liability overages, special insurance unique to a municipality, and for 
providing an array of employee benefits. The challenge is in keeping the rate of increase 
in the cost of health benefits as low as possible. 

LOSS PREVENTION: To prevent or minimize the chance of financial loss to the City and 
its taxpayers. This is accomplished through a combination of loss prevention, safety 
awareness and a comprehensive insurance program of self-funded plans and commercial 
policies. 

STANDARDS AND REOUIREMENTS: For types and levels of insurance which assists in 
the maintenance of certificates of insurance to minimize liability from contractors. 



Generally, the Human Resource Department (HR) which includes the insurance benefit 
function continues to provide comprehensive support to all City departments, in their 
delivery of employee related functions. The payroll and insurance benefit functions augment 
the Board of Education employees. 

The year, in retrospect, was a major transition for the Human Resource Department and 
Risk Management. With the retirement of Peter Cyr, Risk Manager, in April 1994 lead to 
discussions regarding function consolidation. In addition to the consolidation efforts, 
undertaking specific tasks and coordinating city efforts and resources in certain areas: the 
"new" department rededicated themselves to providing a higher level of technical resources 
and professional support to the different areas of interaction. 



120 



Municipal Government Report 



In the employment arena, we had an active application and selection process during this 
fiscal year: 



FY94 FY93 FY92 



FULL TIME/REGULAR POSITIONS POSTED 
Applicants 
Applicants per job (approx) 


24 

880 

37 


20 

890 

45 


13 

1251 

97 


SUMMER/TEMPORARY POSITIONS POSTED 
Applicants 
Applicants per job (approx) 


60 

329 

6 


70 

415 

6 


74 
519 

7 


TOTAL APPLICANTS FOR EMPLOYMENT 

(other than Library, Police, uniformed and 
Board of Education) 


1209 


1305 


1770 


TOTAL EMPLOYED AS OF JUNE 30 
Regular full-time employees 


720 


725 


728 



The major challenge has been the coordination of a City wide safety committee. A Central 
Safety Committee (CSC) has been formed with representation from all Divisions. In turn, 
each Division has formed an internal safety committee. Training and safety awareness for 
the first time will be coordinated between Division through the efforts of the CSC. All 
committee personnel will be trained in but not limited to the following: accident review, 
property inspection, loss prevention management techniques and needs Assessment analysis. 
The primary focus of the safety program is to 
manage, minimum, and reduce City losses. 

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law on July 26, 1992. On 
September 30, 1993 the Mayor's ADA Awareness Committee held its second annual Barrier 
Awareness Day. Its primary focus was on the dedication of the recreational attraction at 
Greeley Park, a Sensory Garden. The Sensory Garden will be a way for people with 
disabilities and their families to enjoy the garden by touching, feeling, and lavishing the 
aromas. The Nashua Garden Club is participating in the establishment and maintenance 
of the garden. The Perkins School for the Blind will be advising the Nashua Garden Club 
as to the most appropriate and best way to utilize by the Sensory Garden. 

Employee Awards Luncheon was held to honor employees for perfect attendance and length 
of service to the City of Nashua. Other categories included Division Employee of the Year, 
and the Community Volunteer Award. The committee was comprised of representatives 
from each division. This year's recipients: Division Employee Award include Jacques 
"James" Duchesne, Administrative Services; Scott N. Dowd, Police Department; Philip 



121 



City of Nashua 



Chouinard, Fire Department; Jeffery L. Snow, Edgewood Cemetery; Judy A. Constantian, 
General Government; Michael M. Santa, Community Development; Carol Cookson, Nashua 
Public Library; and Susan C. Lapointe, Community Services. The Community Volunteer 
Award was presented to Richard M. Slosberg, M.D. 

As of this writing the status of the various union contracts which are the responsibility of the 
Human Resource Manager as a team negotiating member: employees of the Board of Public 
Works represented by AFSCME, Local 365; as of this writing, management/labor impasse: 
employees of the Fire Department represented by the IAFF, Local 789; ratified December 
1993: employees represented by the United Auto Workers, Local 2232 professional and 
clerical/technical units; ratified July 1993 and the employees of the Nashua Public Library 
represented by AFT, FPE, AFL-CIO, Local 4831; ratified their first contract June 1994. 



122 



Municipal Government Report 



MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 



M.I.S. Manager Louis H. Simmons 

Systems Resource Manager Michael Roy 

Systems Analyst/Development Specialist Luann Moore 

Systems Analyst/Development Specialist Mary Crawford 

Systems Analyst/Development Specialist Kerri Lunn 

Applications Analyst/Programmer I Doreen Beaulieu 



FY 95 provided a very productive year for the MIS Department. A total of 952 requests 
for services were processed for new systems and enhancements or required operational 
changes. 



ACCOMPLISHMENTS: 

* Assisted in the installation of a Honeywell Security System for City Hall. 

* Worked with the Mayor's office in the development of a system 
to track and improve Downtown Nashua development. 

* Implemented a successful VMS based word processing (Word 
Perfect) for the Mayors office. 

* Enhanced citywide Digital Equipment based cluster 
capabilities including new disc drive technology, additional 
cpu's and a central laser production printer in the data 
center. Additional access for all divisions to cluster based 
resources via modem or direct connect. 

* Continued to address overall system security issues with the 
conversion of existing applications to MENU'S - all new 
application lock users into menus. 

* Assisted Community Development in developing a system to 
track complaint tracking for code enforcement and various 
layers of data in AUTOCAD based on BPW map for the city 
master plan. 

* The new Assessors CAMA (Computer Aided Mass Appraisal) system 
was brought on line. 

* Worked with Public Works on enhancing the Waste Water System. 

123 



City of Nashua 



* In conjunction with the Tax Collectors office - streamlined 
and improved the tax and lien receivables to provide better 
internal controls. 

* Assisted Accounting in the development of the new program 
budget for City. 

* Worked with Community Services on Medicaid reimbursement and 
various process' for Environmental Health including licenses, 

fees for food service, lead samples, solid wastes and pools. 

* Enhancements made to the Welfare System including additional 
work stations, enhanced voucher process to assist in vendor 
tracking, year end reporting, state program tracking and 
billing process. 

* Initial work on a greatly enhanced building application 

process as a result of the TQM process in Community Development. 

* Enhancements made to the voter application. 

* Implemented the new Fire Dispatch and Reporting System - 
enhancements during the year include: 

- Tie in of Rockingham Ambulance 

- All documentation and manuals 

- Preplans/HAZMAT components 

- Fire personnel reporting on-line including roll call, 
daily activities, tie in to payroll process 

- All UFIRS reporting and documentation completed - 
automated "press" release process 

- Worked with Fire Prevention to bring all functions 
on-line 

* Worked with the Purchasing Department to bring NYNEX billing 
tie-in with School/City to save costs. 

* For Human Resources enhanced COBRA System to track associated 
costs for employees who leave the City. 

* Worked with the School Department to improve the federal 
accounting process and employee certification process. 

* Initial work with Police Management on various systems 
planning including CAD-Computer Assisted Dispatch. 



124 



Municipal Government Report 




Main Street looking south 
about 
1865 



125 



City of Nashua 



DIVISION OF PUBLIC WORKS 



Director of Public Works 
City Engineer 
Business Manager 
Superintendent Street Department 
Superintendent Wastewater Treatment Facility 
Superintendent Park & Recreation Department 



L. Peter Benet 

James F. Hogan 

Robin Belanger 

Donald R. Levesque 

Lorraine Sander 

Francis Dorsey 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT: 
A. STREET ACCEPTANCE 

Streets or portions thereof, totaling 0.54 miles were accepted as follows: 



B. 



Arthurs Lane 
Dion Lane 
Terramar Lane 
Lojko Drive 

TOTAL 

STREETS DISCONTINUED 



780' 

400' 

600' 

1.060' 



2,840 ft. or .54 miles 



Streets or portions thereof, totaling 0.03 miles were discontinued as follows: 

Man Street 148 ft. or .03 miles 

SEWERAGE CONSTRUCTION BY CITY 

During this period a total of 1,850 feet (0.35 miles) of Sanitary Sewer was installed 
as follows: 



Location 


From 


Jo 


Length 


Lynn Street 


Intersection 






Oneida Circle 


Lynn Street 


170' 


S. Merrimack 








Interceptor 


Farmington Road 


W.W.T.P. 


1.680' 



TOTAL 



1,850' 



126 



Municipal Government Report 



D. STORM DRAINAGE CONSTRUCTION BY CITY 

During this period a total of 3,747 feet (0.71 miles) of storm drain was installed as 
follows: 



Location 


From 
Fairway Street 


Jo 

Northerly 


Length 


Taylor Street 


981' 


Nowell Street 


Monroe Street 


Outfall at 








PSNH R.O.W. 


680' 


Monroe Street 


Cleveland Street 


Nowell Street 


567' 


Cleveland Street 


Almont Street 


Monroe Street 


276' 


Cleveland Street 


Lund Street 


Monroe Street 


477' 


Cleveland Street 


Fairgrounds School 


Cleveland Street 


324' 


Nowell Street 


Lund Street 


PSNH R.O.W. 


48' 


Acton Street 


New Manholes 


New Catch Basin 


54' 


Linwood Street 


Thorndike Street 


Northerly to 








New DMH 


116' 


Nowell Street Area 


Various Existing 








Catch Basins 


New Drain Pipe 


224' 



TOTAL 



3,747' 



PUBLIC SEWERAGE AND DRAINAGE BY DEVELOPERS 



SEWERAGE: 



Location 

Pinebrook Road 

Ridge Road 
Pinebrook Road 
Tall Pine Circle 
Byfield Circle 
Governor's Lane 
Stable Street 
Chelsea Court 
Cobble Hill Road 
Pittsburg Avenue 

TOTAL 



From 

Pump Station 

Existing S.M.H. 
Ridge Road 
Pinebrook Road 
Pinebrook Road 
Ridge Road 
Governor's Lane 
Monica Drive 
Hammar Road 
Existing S.M.H 



To 



Length 



Ridge Road 

Existing SMH Force 

Pinebrook Road 

Byfield Circle 

Cul-de-Sac 

Cul-de-Sac 

Cul-de-Sac 

Cul-de-Sac 

Tomolonis Drive 

Cul-de-Sac 

Westerly 



1,522' 

Main 
670' 

1,754' 
235' 
325' 
713' 
230' 

1,290' 
840' 

57 

7,636' 



127 



City of Nashua 



DRAINAGE: 



Location 


From 


Jo 


Length 


Cobble Hill Road 


Cul-de-Sac 


Hammar Road 


675' 


Pine Hill Road & 




Southerly 




Coburn Avenue 


Coburn Avenue 


to Exist. 


472' 


Governor's Lane 


Cul-de-Sac 


Ridge Road 


560' 


Monica Drive 


E.Dunstable Road 


Chelsea Court 


386' 


Monica Drive 


Existing Road 


Chelsea Court 


250' 


Chelsea Court 


Monica Drive 


Detention Pond 


756' 


Chelsea Court Easement 


Detention Pond 


Tomolonis Drive 


363' 


Pine Brook Road 


Ridge Road 


Byfield Circle 


1,223' 


Tall Pine Circle 


Pinebrook Road 


Cul-de-Sac 


73' 


Byfield Circle 


Pinebrook Road 


Outfall at 








Cul-de-Sac 


265' 



TOTAL 



5,023' 



SEWER PERMITS 

A total of 322 sewer permits were issued by the City Engineer's Office as follows: 



1. Residential/Commercial Sewer Permits 

2. New and/or Renewed Industrial Sewer Permits as follows: 



Category 

I 

II 

III 
IV 



Industrial Description 

Toxic discharges that required 
pretreatment 

Limited toxic discharges that 
did not require pretreatment 

Non-toxic discharges 

Sanitary discharges only 

TOTAL Industrial Permits 



Issued 




1 

_4 

5 



191 



Renewed 



3 

20 
98 



126 



128 



Municipal Government Report 



TAYLOR ROAD RECONSTRUCTION 

An overabundance of ground water, snow melt and New England roads historically created 
sporadic ice-flow problems throughout most of the winter on the surface of Taylor Road 
immediately adjacent to the Nashua Country Club north of Fairway Street. To alleviate this 
condition, a combined sub-surface and surface drainage system capable of intercepting water 
flowing over and through the rock as well as water flowing on top of the frozen ground was 
included in a total reconstruction design done by the City Engineer's Office of the road's 
alignment and traveling surface. Completion of these improvements by Nashua's Public 
Works Department completely eliminated the winter ice conditions that previously had 
consumed many man-hours of Public Works employees time spent in constantly keeping the 
roadway clear of ice and safe for travel. 



REMOVAL OF RAILROAD CROSSINGS 

Upon notification of their formal Abandonment and Discontinuation of Service by the 
"Boston and Maine Corporation and Springfield Terminal Railway Company" of their 
railroad tracks which ran parallel to East and West Hollis Street, the City Engineer's Office 
undertook the design of sidewalks, granite curbing and road profile changes which would 
be required to be made when the Nashua Public Works Department removed the tracks that 
crossed the several city streets from Spruce to Simon Street. Spring Street, Main Street and 
12th Street were completed by the Nashua Public Works Department this work season. 



129 



mm mi HM MWiK 



City of Nashua 



"SUMMERFEST" 



Dancing in the park 




Dancers from the Academy of Movement in Nashua 
perform in Greeley Park 



130 



■MMKHMMHMMC 



Municipal Government Report 



PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

The Park System encompasses 800 acres. Included are 32 athletic fields; three outdoor 
swimming pools; tennis courts at five locations; eleven ice skating rinks; Holman Stadium; 
a band shell; 24 horseshoe pits, eight outdoor basketball courts; and numerous playlots and 
playgrounds. 

Additionally, there are two boat launches, garden plots, walking/hiking trails, mini- 
parks/leisure areas and a refurbished "grove" on Salmon Brook. 

A unique attribute was added to Greeley Park with the dedication of a sensory garden, 
developed in conjunction with the nashua garden Club and Perkins School for the Blind. 

A new area of approximately 17 acres will come on-line in the spring of 1995 at the Yudicky 
Farm. Requests for specific utilization are numerous and varied, but specific sport 
utilization has not been determined. 

Demand for youth recreation has parallelled the demand for classrooms. In addition to 
youth, there is an apparent increase in requests for activities for all adult age groups, with 
the young adult and seniors becoming more active. 

Space, however, is fully utilized. And each year it is more difficult to meet the needs of all 
groups. Use of facilities is high, and idle time for restoration and rehabilitation of fields is 
at a minimum. 

The department personnel resource is declining and part-time seasonal help is offsetting this 
trend. A flat budget for four years has necessitated cooperative programs with some user 
groups. Consideration is being given to "adoption" programs at certain facilities. 

Personnel continue to assist with City tree maintenance and snow plowing. The nursery at 
Greeley Park had another good year with the tree program for residents. 

Reports from the State of New Hampshire and others indicate that demands for active and 
passive recreation will increase in the next twenty-five years at a rate exceeding the 
population growth. And that the age of the people desiring opportunities for recreational 
participation will also increase. 

This growth in numbers, with its changing participant profile, forecasts a need for more 
facilities. 



131 



City of Nashua 



NASHUA WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY 



Use of Pennichuck water was reduced by 45% by substituting treated effluent wherever 
possible at a saving of $2600.00. 

Electrical consumption was 6% lower than the previous year with the continuation of 
programs designed to conserve electricity. This savings in consumption offset the increase 
in the cost of electricity. 

Work on the heating system, including a complete rebuilding of a boiler, was continued by 
the staff. Heating fuel consumption increased by only 1% in spite of the cold temperatures 
of last winter. 

Odor remediation projects included extending the height of the packed tower scrubber from 
10' to 30' to better disperse and dilute remaining odors. Modifications were also made to 
the air handling system to allow the pretreatment of the air to the scrubber to further 
reduce odors. 

Staff designed, built and installed algae sweeps on secondary clarifiers to keep weirs free 
of growth. This eliminated 6-8 manhours of work per week. Automatic snow plows were 
added to primary clarifiers so that they could continue running during storms, improving the 
efficiency of sludge removal. 

The laboratory has expanded its testing program and obtained the required New Hampshire 
State Certification to take over testing previously contracted out. This resulted in an annual 
savings of $20,000.00. Development by staff of a process control computer program has 
improved plant performance and led to consistent operation without seasonal variation. The 
plant continues to meet and exceed performance standards. 



132 



Municipal Government Report 

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 



Division Director Dolores Bellavance 

Coordinator, Child Care Services Christina Lister 

Coordinator, Nashua Mediation Program Candace Dochstader 

Coordinator, Satellite Mediation Programs Ellen Gardent 

Assistant, Nashua Mediation Program Lisa Beaulieu 

Building Manager Gerard Deschamps 

Administrative Secretary Sandra Weymouth 



MISSION STATEMENT 

The Mission of the Community Services Division is to serve the community by maintaining 
the well being of its citizens. 



ANHEUSER BUSCH OPERATION BRIGHTSIDE 

On October 14, 1993, the dedication of this year's project between the City of Nashua and 
the Anheuser Busch Operation Brightside took place. Sandy Point was the site of the 
seventh annual project, a complete upgrade of an existing playground located adjacent to 
Sandy Pond. 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS 

Proposal regarding purchase of the Vine Street building submitted for 94/95 budget. A B 
3 rating on short term projects was received but not funded at this time due to usage by 
school department continues. 



EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION 

Robert Tamposi, Nashua Welfare Officer was selected as the exemplary worker and 
honored at a breakfast held at the Sheraton Tara Hotel. 

Susan Lapointe, Environmental Health Department secretary was awarded the employee 
recognition award. Loyalty, dedication and concern for fellow workers were some of the 
attributes in the decision for her selection. 

Dr. Richard Slosberg, Nashua's Medical Director was also selected this year for outstanding 
city volunteer achievements in the public health arena, School Department and in outside 
agencies. 



133 



City of Nashua 



MEDIATION PROGRAM 



The Nashua Mediation Program provided conflict resolution services to two hundred fifty- 
eight (258) area youths and families last year. An additional twenty two (22) volunteer 
mediators were trained to work with families referred to mediation. 

The Nashua Mediation Program was honored at the annual NETWORK meeting. 

In May, the mayor issued a proclamation recognizing mediation week and the continued 
efforts of over ninety (90) volunteer mediators. 

OFFICE OF CHILD CARE SERVICES 

The office of Child Care Services established in October of 1987, continues with its objective 
to facilitate the development of quality, affordable child care programs within the city of 
Nashua. 

The coordinator is responsible for participating in local, regional and state child care 
initiatives; enhancing and expanding child care resources; coordinating the effort among city 
agencies for the continued growth of quality child care services; and increasing public 
awareness of child care needs. 

> > Work with the city of Nashua Human Resources Department in the implementation 

of the city's Dependent Care Assistance Plan for municipal employees. 

> > Assist in the development of employee-supported child care initiatives for interested 

area businesses. 

> > Provide technical assistance and information to those interested in becoming licensed 

child care providers. 

> > Facilitate the formation of center-based Director's Network Professional 

Organization. 

> > Provide resource and referral information for the community. 

> > Participate in the Regional Vocational Education Committee for the Child Care 

Committee at Nashua High School. 

> > Serve on the board of School Age School Age Child Care Council. 

The Nashua Child Care Commission consists of fifteen members, is appointed by the mayor 
and meets monthly with the coordinator to review child care issues, as well as plan the 
Week of the Young Child Celebration and the Annual Early Childhood Fair. 



134 



Municipal Government Report 



ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



Health Officer: Michael V. Tremblay 

Laboratory Director: Jeannette T. Kotopoulis 

Environmental Technologist: Thomas E. Livingston 

Sanitarians: Jane E. Ouellette 

Sarah A. Dee 
Secretary: Susan C. Lapointe 

Summer Rodent Control Team: Michael Murray 

Kristin Kotopoulis 

Steve Murray 

Tamara Fucile 

Jennifer Provost 

Summer Laboratory Assistant: Kristen O'Sullivan 



Most programs continue to operate at the same level or have increased slightly. The only 
programs that have shown reductions are the sampling of well water and radon testing. The 
State Food sampling program is ongoing and there has been a positive response by Food 
Service operators relative to the increased number of routine inspections conducted by the 
staff. Food Service operators have made positive comments relative to the food service 
sanitation training course sponsored by the department. The swimming pool/spa program 
continues to operate smoothly with the annual pool/spa seminar being offered yearly prior 
to licensing. 

Public awareness and inquiries continue to grow in the following areas; indoor air quality, 
lead paint and protection of food products. There has been a major increase in inquiries 
by the public relative to the transmission of rabies, pet and human protection from rabies 
and the mode of transmission for the disease. A total of 64 specimens have been submitted 
to the state laboratory for analysis, eight have tested positive. 

Special investigations and accomplishments were conducted in the following areas: 

1. New Searles School Task Force. 

2. RFP for New Searles School Health Study. 

3. Presentation of swimming pool/spa seminar. 

4. Staff presentation of food service training seminar to food service operators. 

5. Review of new state lead paint regulations. 



135 



iinmUh^niiiMtii "iinrniii 1'iiiiiM 



City of Nashua 



6. Participation on Solid Waste Advisory Committee. 

7. Continued investigation of asbestos problems at the former John Manville site. 

8. Several court ordered inspections of housing units for safety and health violations. 

9. Staff members spoke as guests on WMVU on asbestos and lead paint issues. 

10. Meeting with landlords on lead paint ordinance. 

11. Open house for review of renovated lab. 

12. Presentation of rabies issues with U.S. Postal Workers. 

PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT AND DEPARTMENT IMPROVEMENTS: 

A. Lead paint detection. 

B. Teaching techniques for safety and health. 

C. State regulations on smoking. 

D. Responding to chemical contamination of drinking water. 

E. Individual sewage disposal systems. 

F. Total Quality Management. 

G. USDA and FDA programs on recent foodborne disease outbreaks, inspection of 
bakeries, wholesalers and food manufacturers, and food quality/protection. 

H. Participation in Peer Study Groups. 



136 



Municipal Government Report 



NASHUA PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT- 



Chief Public Health Nurse 
Medical Director 
Nurse Practitioner 
Public Health Nurse 
Public Health Nurse 
Public Health Nurse 
Public Health Nurse 
Public Health Nurse 
Public Health Nurse 
Public Health Nurse 
Outreach Worker 
Outreach Worker 
Secretary 
Clinic Assistant 



Joan W. Schulze 

Richard M. Slosberg, MD 

Claire C. Macy 

Christine Caron 

Joan Cote 

Laura Edmands 

Maria Gilmartin 

Cathy Hatfield 

Cynthia Langevin 

Lynne Weihrauch 

Peter Dal Pra 

Linda Purdy 

Annette Rowman 

Elaine Drouin 



MISSION STATEMENT 

The Nashua Public Health Department is dedicated to the 
promotion and preservation of public health through the utilization 
of a holistic approach to the individual, family and community. 



The Nashua Public Health Department is mandated by Nashua Revised Ordinances to be 
responsible for development and implementation of the personal health programs of the 
city. The department continues to seek supplementary funding to support necessary services 
from grant sources. Present grantors are the New Hampshire Bureau of Maternal and Child 
Health, the New Hampshire Bureau of Disease Control, the New Hampshire Bureau of 
Special Medical Services, Hillsborough County 5% Incentive Funds and the Children's Trust 
Fund. 

This year the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment license was reissued as was the 
Pharmacy license and the Outpatient Clinic license was granted. The department was 
notified it must apply for a Home Health Care license. The procedure should be completed 
in July 1994. 

The purchase of a vehicle which is being utilized in outreach programs was made possible 
with the assistance of New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Office 
of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention. The purpose of the van is to provide barrier free, 
off site access to the community residents seeking adult and childhood immunizations, HIV 
counseling and testing, tuberculosis, hepatitis, syphilis and blood pressure screening, height 
and weight checks, referrals for shelter, food or medical care, drug and alcohol 
information/referrals to facilitate entry into chemical treatment programs. The use of the 



137 



City of Nashua 



van has made a significant difference in the number of persons encountered. 



DISEASE CONTROL PROGRAMS 

There is a dramatic increase in the number of tuberculosis clients being identified and 
receiving services. The increase is seen in persons who are HIV infected, the foreign born, 
ethnic and racial minorities, substance abusers and homeless persons. 

Grant funding continues to support a clinic for persons who meet financial guidelines. 
Eighty percent of tuberculosis clients are receiving medical care in the department's clinic. 
Direct observed therapy "DOT' is being implemented with clients who are non-compliant. 

The physician and nurse coordinator have received specialization training at National Jewish 
Hospital in Colorado. 

Increased identification and monitoring activities are necessary to ensure a safe 
environment. The outreach program is referring an increasing number of persons for 
tuberculosis services. 

Nashua's proximity to Lowell, Massachusetts has increased the incidence of sexually 
transmitted diseases seen locally. Lowell is so burdened with large numbers of Acquired 
Immuno-deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and syphilis cases that they do not follow gonorrhea 
cases. In addition, males seeking prostitutes and women living in Nashua and exchanging 
sex for money and drugs are more likely to travel to Lowell than Manchester. In Lowell 
they become infected often with more than one disease. When they return to Nashua and 
their sexual partners here, local rates of syphilis, Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) 
and gonorrhea are increased. 

Nashua's sexually transmitted disease clinic services are much in demand. The investigation, 
reporting, monitoring and screening of diseases are mandatory and necessary to curtail 
disease spread. 

Hepatitis B vaccine was made available to persons at risk. 

Nashua has begun to feel the effects of the AIDS epidemic. The number of individuals 
testing positive or with previously positive tests and now seeking medical treatment has 
increased dramatically. In addition, the profiles of these individuals has changed to include 
more women and injecting drug users and less gay men. This has burdened the Nashua 
health care system and in particular, the health department. 

Gay males were more likely to be educated, working and have adequate support systems to 
provide for their needs and assume responsibility for seeking health care. Now, women 
present, often as single mothers, undereducated, poor, with limited or no support systems. 



138 



Municipal Government Report 



The intravenous drug user presents similarly with lack of access to housing, medical care and 
with a negative support system. 

Compliance for appointments, medication regimes and self health promotion has emerged 
as a major concern. 

Outreach to provide HIV risk reduction education messages to targeted at risk individuals 
has intensified. 

Counseling and testing clinics are extremely busy. The counseling and testing course is in 
much demand. 

The Nashua AIDS Self Help group met each week and was facilitated by a public health 
nurse. The need for this service has increased. 

Immunization services increased with additional grant funding the outreach program. Two 
clinics are offered weekly at the health department and outreach efforts intensified with the 
van. 

Influenza vaccine was offered to seniors, at risk persons and municipal employees. 2440 
doses were administered. 

A three day "Supermarket Mothers Survey of Immunization Levels" in children through age 
two years was conducted. 

Team members provide recommendations to other city department personnel regarding the 
use of universal precautions and general recommendation to decrease the potential for 
disease. 

Team members act as medical referral consultants giving recommendations regarding follow 
up care after unprotected exposures to potentially infectious matter. 

Health education is provided to individuals, persons in groups, service organizations, 
industries and schools regarding health issues, in order to fulfill its responsibilities of 
preventing disease and promoting health/wellness in the community. 



CHILD HEALTH PROGRAMS 

Coordination of discharge planning for mothers and newborns continue. 

Home visits are made to involve families in special programs available through the health 
department and cooperating agencies to promote the health of children and families. Home 
visits are essential in planning interventions to provide individualized education and 
emotional support. 



139 



WELL CHILD CLINIC 



City of Nashua 



The greatest change in the well child clinic is the increase in newborn visits, in ill visits and 
the census in general. 

The census is consistently rising, despite families moving to find employment. It is sustained 
by the fact that area physicians are often reluctant to serve clients with Medicaid or with no 
insurance. Hence, physicals for two week old infants are often not accomplished until weeks 
later. Visits for illness have greatly increased; the emergency rooms are the only alternative 
to clinic at a tremendous cost to the insured population. 

Parents receive one-on-one support, guidance and information on issues of cognitive 
stimulation, safety, nutrition, exercise, quality of life, stress reduction, discipline and care of 
an ill child. Children receive physical and developmental assessments; screening for hearing, 
vision, lead, sickle cell, hemoglobin and immunizations. The key word is prevention. Public 
Health continues to serve Nashua residents with the highest quality of professional service. 

The Play Learning/Parent Support/Home Visitor Program was offered to families who 
could not afford traditional day care programs and who may be having parent/child 
development difficulties. The goal is to educate and support potentially abusive families, 
to keep the family together and to help the individual become health productive citizens. 
Home visits were made to reinforce group process. This program has a waiting list for 
participation. 

The Greater Nashua Child Development Program provided comprehensive developmental 
evaluations of thirty-five children at sixteen clinics. Seventy-six home visits were made for 
intake and care coordination. 

Two families affected by Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) were counseled. 

The Baby Steps, a community collaborative, Program continued to provide comprehensive 
services, chemical dependency treatment, prenatal, postnatal and pediatric care to pregnant 
and their children. Thirty-two women are in the program as of June 1994, all have delivered 
except two. Two children are in foster care. Four women have had two babies since 
entering the program. The program is funded until February, 1996. 

Pre-school audio and visual screening was offered at eleven local day care centers. Five 
hundred sixty-eight children were screened. Failures identified and referred for treatment 
were fourteen audio and forty-seven visual. 

The Nashua Catholic Regional Schools were provided with the following services: health 
record maintenance; immunization review and referral; audio vision and scoliosis/referral; 
tuberculosis skin testing of personnel and health education for student, staff and parents. 



140 



Municipal Government Report 



Mmumm i mnM mui iiuiuui vjw^i iiiiiviiL i icuvi i i—— i — — i mmmmmmmmt mmmmmm mmmm 



OTHER 

The Nashua Public Health Department team members participated in community service 
organizations; Souther NH HIV/ AIDS Task Force, Neighbor to Neighbor Clinic, Head 
Start, Greater Nashua Child Care Center, Gateway Family Health Center, New Hampshire 
Public Health Association, Hispanic Network, Minority Health Coalition. 

Student nurses from St. Anselm College and Rivier College observed and participated in 
department activities. 

A children's Christmas Party was supported by Anheuser-Busch. Senior Citizens made hats 
and mittens for the children. JC Penney Inc. made it possible for every child attending to 
receive a musical Barney. 

Medical students from Dartmouth were precepted by Dr. Richard Slosberg. 

The legal department helped us develop a letter of confidentiality to be signed by volunteers 
who function in the Well Child Clinic and HIV program. Volunteers must also comply with 
licensure rules. 

The team developed infection control and quality assurance committee. A survey was 
conducted requesting ideas to improve services, the lack of a handicap parking place was 
identified and is now in place. 

This was a busy year for the health department team. The growing diversified population, 
the high unemployment and the escalation of new and old diseases have presented health 
challenges. The team continues to develop and implement strategies to make Nashua a 
healthy community. 



141 



City of Nashua 



WELFARE DEPARTMENT 



Welfare Officer Robert W. Tamposi 

Case Technician Lilla Deluca-Khomsky 

Case Technician Edward Roach 

Account Clerk Therese Charest 

Administrative Secretary Marie Savage 



City Welfare provides general maintenance level assistance by voucher to anyone who is 
income eligible, without regard to category. 

The regions unsteady economy continued to effect city welfare expenditures. Although the 
department observed more clientele finding temporary work, these employment 
opportunities paid mostly minimum wages resulting in larger family units still qualifying for 
assistance. Unemployment compensation rates for the Nashua area also decreased since 
many had exhausted their benefits. As a result, state welfare caseloads for Nashua, 
primarily the food stamp program and Aid to Families with Dependent Children program 
continued to grow. Those who did not qualify for other assistance programs for whatever 
reasons, continued to seek help through the city. 

Welfare reform was a major topic of concern to cities and towns during the year. Though 
no formal federal or state reform plan saw the light of day, cities and towns were concerned 
how federal/state reforms would effect local caseloads and expenditures. A legislative bill 
sanctioning repeat voluntary job quitters from local welfare assistance failed to pass by a 
slim margin. 

The Welfare Department continued to require able bodied recipients to work for their 
benefits. The program was also available as alternative sentencing by the courts. 

The Welfare Officer by ordinance, serves as chairman for the Board of Housing Appeals. 
Other memberships include the Executive Committee of the New Hampshire Local Welfare 
Administrators Association and the Southern New Hampshire Aids Task Force. 



142 



MMMWHMHHHHHMMMMM 



Municipal Government Report 




Nashua Mall 
Celebrates 25th-year Anniversary 



143 



City of Nashua 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION 



David S. Boesch Jr Director 

Lorania Graves Secretary 

The Community Development Division is comprised of three separate departments: Urban 
Programs, Planning, and Code. In Fiscal Year 1993-1994, the Division was populated with 
twenty-five people operating a total of sixteen major programs. 

The Community Development Division continued in its lead role in the implementation of 
the Mayor's "Total Quality Through Continuous Improvement" initiative. The Division 
Director maintained his oversight position, working alongside Mayor Wagner in the 
formation of teams and team-based activities. John Gaudet, a citizen volunteer, provided 
assistance and counsel, and Conway Quality, Inc. continued its support by providing training 
services to city employees and lending the facilitation skills of Jody Ayers-Gunnerson as part 
of a strategic planning effort undertaken by the Board of Aldermen. 

Within the Community Development Division, Mike Santa served as Team Leader on a 
major review and reworking of the entire Building Systems Process: involving virtually every 
aspect of the construction permitting and inspection services function. The Team continues 
its work effort into the next fiscal year as it moves from evaluation to implementation. The 
Division also worked closely with the City's Management Audit consultant. Municipal 
Advisors, Inc., of Virginia Beach, Virginia. The Director was part of a steering committee 
that selected and guided the work of the contractor as it evaluated areas where services 
could be improved through organizational changes and increased coordination. Upon 
issuance of the final report in June, the Division began immediately with implementing the 
recommendations provided. A major reorganization was initiated just as the fiscal year 
ended. 

A number of critical studies were begun in FY94 as well. The City contracted with Applied 
Economic Research to evaluate the feasibility of an Impact Fee system. The ongoing work 
of Vanasse, Hangen, Brustlin on the Southwest Parkway Feasibility Study was advanced 
significantly, and the Draft Environmental Impact Study being prepared by Fay, Spofford, 
and Thorndike on the Broad Street Parkway was completed and advertised for Public 
Hearing. The Planning Department has taken major strides toward the updating of the 1985 
Master Plan, focussing first on the issues pertaining to industrial-zoned property in the City, 
and the growth-related impacts of alternative scenarios in southwest Nashua. The City was 
also successful in securing funding for seven out of seven grant applications filed under the 
federal Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA). 

All in all, it was a dynamic and fulfilling year for the employees of the "CD" Division. 



144 



Municipal Government Report 

PLANNING DEPARTMENT 



Roger L. Houston, AICP Planning Director 

Mark Fougere, AICP Deputy Manager Development Review 

Michael Yeomans Deputy Manager Zoning 

Mark Archambault Planner II 

Linda Taylor Administrative Assistant 

William Toomey Planning Technician (Shared Position with Assessing Dept.) 

Carolyn Ryea Secretary (Shared Position with Urban Programs Dept.) 

Responsibilities of the Nashua Planning Department and functions of the Department 
encompass a wide spectrum of topics and issues ranging from review of current development 
plans to conducting long range comprehensive planning aimed at guiding future 
development and promoting responsible managed, quality growth within the community. 
The Department is committed to total quality through continuous improvement in our 
operations. 

Nashua continues to promote quality and sound land use planning with the objective of 
protecting valuable natural resources, planning for necessary future public infrastructure 
improvements, and working toward achieving a proper balance of safe, attractive and fiscally 
sound development. 

The Planning Department provides technical expertise and serves in an advisory capacity 
to the Nashua City Planning Board, the Zoning Board of Adjustment, Capital Improvements 
Committee and the Board of Aldermen and its various Committees through the 
development of land use policies, resolutions, and ordinances. In addition, the Department 
provides, when possible, professional support services to the Nashua Historic District 
Commission, the Nashua Conservation Commission, Nashua Heritage Trail Committee, 
Urban Trails Committee, Facilities Committee, and others as requested. 

In addition to its regular daily functions and responsibilities, the Planning Department 
provided assistance to and initiated the following special processes, projects, reports, 
analyses, and studies during Fiscal Year 1993-94: 

Staff Reports: Over Fiscal Year 1993-94, the Planning Department completed 105 detailed 
reports or reviews on site and subdivision plans for the Nashua City Planning Board. The 
reports are delivered to the Planning Board prior to the meeting date. This process gives 
the Board better information to assist them in their decision process. Also, the Department 
provided the Zoning Board of Adjustment reports on use variances to aid in their decision 
process. 

Automation of Records: The Planning Department is continuing its automation of its record 
system. Stephanie Bouchard, a volunteer from the community has and continues to 
graciously give her time in helping the Department achieve this long term objective. This 
process and completed system to date has been a useful tool to quickly retrieve information 
on past development applications and provide more timely assistance to our customers. 

145 



City of Nashua 



Capital Improvements Program: The Planning Department is the primary agency 
responsible for coordinating and preparing the Capital Improvements Budget and Six-Year 
Plan. The Capital Improvements Committee is a subcommittee of the Planning Board 
established by City Charter which annually recommends a fiscal year capital improvements 
program outlining long range needs and anticipated expenditures. 

Bond Rating Preparation: The most current statistics available were obtained for 
preparation of Nashua's Official Statement; including, history, population, economy, planning 
and development, housing costs, employment base, largest employers, retail sales, 
unemployment, building permits, and state tax receipts. This information and that contained 
in the Capital Improvements Plan was a contributing factor in the City in obtaining 
favorable interest rate on its bond issues. 

Master Plan: With the filling of the Planner II position the Department has begun the 
Mater Plan updating process. The initial focus has been on the Southwest Quadrant of City 
where pressure has been greatest. The Planning Department worked with the Urban Trails 
Alliance and the National Parks Department to produce a "Trails Plan" as a section of the 
Master Plan which was officially adopted by the Planning Board. 

Development: The Planning Department processed several developments which included 
a 63,000 sq. ft. Alexanders Shop N Save Supermarket to be built south of Montgomery 
Wards Store on Coliseum Avenue; the redevelopment of the Grossman's Lumber Co. on 
south D. W. Highway to a Computer City and a Radio Shack store; a 15,500 sq. ft. Small 
World Center for preschool and daycare facility at 138 Spit Brook Road; Lockheed Sanders 
reception building and pedestrian bridge over Canal Street; Nashua Memorial Hospital 
continued with its expansion and construction which received approval in the previous fiscal 
year; Daniel Webster College expanded a dormitory (19,200 sq. ft.) and completed its 
classroom and control tower space at the Nashua Municipal Airport; NFS Savings Bank a 
new 2906 sq. ft. facility and drive-up bank at the Royal Ridge Mall in South Nashua; 
Burger King a 817 sq. ft. drive through only fast food restaurant at 633 Amherst St. and also 
a facility within the BJ's Membership Club on south D. W. Highway; and lastly the Fire 
Rescue a 1758 sq. ft. addition to its Conant Road Fire Station to service fire trucks. In 
Nashua, 92 single family homes were constructed and 13 attached housing units. 

Transportation: The Planning Department continues to be an active member of the Nashua 
Area Transportation Study (NATS) Technical Advisory Committee. This Committee 
membership consists of representative from the municipalities, and the state/federal 
transportation departments. The Department also assisted in working with the City's 
consultants on the Broad St. Parkway and Southwest Parkway projects. 

Although Fiscal Year 1994 was a time of change for the Department with several new staff 
members and new Planning and Zoning Board members, we in the Planning Department 
are pleased with our progress over the last year in helping Nashua become a better place 
in which to live, work and play. 



L46 



Municipal Government Report 

BUILDING/CODE DEPARTMENT - 



William P. Walsh Director 

Michael Santa Plans Examiner/Deputy Director 

Peter F. Perri Chief Building Inspector 

Francis Leahy Electrical Inspector 

Albert J. Finethy Building Inspector 

Tedd P. Evans Plumbing Inspector 

Bruce W. Buttrick Mechanical Inspector 

Robert W. Hatch Code Enforcement Officer II 

Thomas J. Malley Code Enforcement Officer I 

R. E. Miller Code Enforcement Officer I 

Blanche O'Rourke Head Clerk 

June M. Miner Clerk Typist 

Jean M. Lyons Administrative Assistant/Secretary 



During Fiscal Year 94, the Code Department issued 949 building permits, 500 electrical 
permits, 285 plumbing permits, 222 mechanical permits, and 168 other required permits. 
The total fees collected amounted to $221,797.76. The value of this work exceeded forty- 
five million dollars. During this period, 6,569 inspections were performed. By the end of 
the fiscal year, an increase in construction activity was noted. As of this writing, that 
increase is seen at about 20% over the previous year. 

Our office consists of three code enforcement officer that enforce and administer the 
provisions of the Nashua Housing Code adopted by the City. The purpose of the Housing 
Code is to establish minimum standards governing the conditions and maintenance of 
dwellings offered for rent, and fixing certain responsibilities and duties of owners and 
occupants of dwellings. During this fiscal year, we embarked on a program to improve the 
quality of our inspections by completely computerizing our operations and targeting those 
dwellings of highest incidence of violation. Those dwellings consist of 4-8 units. Our 
operations were up and running by 1 January 1994. During the period of 1 January 1994 
to 1 July 1994, our office received 168 complaints, conducted 1,142 inspections, and found, 
documented and issued 1,034 warnings and 443 citations of violation. Two cases of Unfit 
for Human Habitation were heard by the Board of Housing Appeals and the structures were 
ordered condemned. Prior to 1 January 1994, our time was much consumed in the program 
of computerization and developing a database of some 4,000 variables of housing code 
violations. Since we began this new creative approach to our inspection program, we have 
found that compliance with the Housing Code has increased 70%. We look forward to a 
challenging year ahead with a cooperative effort between the property owners and our office 
in bringing all 4-8 unit dwellings into compliance with our Code. 



147 



City of Nashua 



SUMMARY OF CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY 



New Residential Housing: 

Single family detached 
Single family attached 
Total new residential housing 



New Non-Residential Housing: 

Amusement, social, and recreational 
Offices, banks, professional buildings 
Stores, customer services 
Other nonresidential buildings 
Structures other than buildings 
Total new nonresidential housing 



Slumber of 


Number of 


Valuation of 


Buildings 


Units/Rooms 


Construction 


92 


92 


$6,899,000 


13 


J3 


1.350.000 


105 


105 


$8,249,000 


Private 


Public 


Valuation of 


Buildings 


Buildings 


Construction 


1 


- 


$12,000 


2 


- 


1,597,700 


3 


- 


1,593,300 


48 


- 


107,667 


12 


- 


118.400 


66 


- 


$3,429,067 



Addition/Alterations/Conversions: 

Residential 

Nonresidential, nonhousekeeping 
Additions of residential garages/carports 
Total additions, alterations, conversions 

Conversions (information incorporated in Additions/Alterations/Conversions): 
8 permits = increase of 3 more dwelling units 



Private 


Public 


Valuation of 


Buildings 


Buildings 


Construction 


304 


- 


$3,028,088 


176 


3 


28,618,736 


24 


- 


335.230 


504 


3 


$31,982,054 



$255,900 



Demolitions/Razing of Buildings: 

Single family houses 
Two-family buildings 
Five-or-more family building 
All other buildings/structures 
Total demolitions /razings of buildings 



# of 
tildings 


# of 
Units/Rooms 


4 


4 


3 


6 


2 


14 


9 

18 


24 



148 



Municipal Government Report 



Construction valued $500,000 or more: 



Church - Addition/alteration 
School - Addition/alteration 
Hospital - Renovation 
Hospital - Addition 
Restaurant - New 
Restaurant - New 
Commercial - Alteration 
Industrial - Addition/renovation 
Industrial - Alteration 
Industrial - Addition 
Office Bldg - Alteration 
Office Bldg - Alteration 
Retail - Alteration 
Retail - Alteration 
Retail - Addition/renovation 



1 Concord Street (First Church, UCC) $1,400,000 

79 Perimeter Road (Daniel Webster College) 1,173,698 

8 Prospect Street (Nashua Memorial Hospital) 1,300,000 

8 Prospect Street (Nashua Memorial Hospital) 10,000,000 

285 Daniel Webster Highway (Chili's) 550,000 

341 Amherst Street (TGI Friday's) 793,300 

635 Amherst Street (Saturn of NH) 850,000 

8 Cotton Road (Digital Equipment Corp) 1,223,281 

95 Canal Street (Lockheed Sanders) 800,000 

95 Canal Street (Lockheed Sanders) 1,217,700 

10 Tara Boulevard 706,000 

17 Riverside Street 900,000 

213 Daniel Webster Highway (Royal Ridge Mall) 700,000 

213 Daniel Webster Highway (Royal Ridge Mall) 500,000 

252 Daniel Webster Highway (Computer City) 500,000 



Total Permits Issued: 



619 residential and 330 commercial 



949 



Total construction value for permits: 

Includes: 

81 permits - Signs 
195 permits - Miscellaneous/Out of Scope $2,052,511 

Miscellaneous/Out of Scope figure includes: 

3 mobile homes $147,000 

1 mobile home replacement 34,000 



$45,712,632 



149 



City of Nashua 



BOARD OF HOUSING APPEALS 



Robert Tamposi, Welfare Officer, Chairman 
Michael Tremblay, Health Officer 
Chief Richard Navaroli, Fire Rescue 



The Board of Housing Appeals held hearings on 23 August 1993 and 4 April 1994 to view 
complaints and notices of unfit for human habitation. Both buildings were condemned. 



BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS 



John A. Carter, Chairman Gerard Roberge, Vice-Chairman 

Alvin B. Corzilius Richard Cane, Alternate 

David Farr David W. Cheever, Alternate 

Joseph W. Hogan George Fallet, Alternate 



The Building Code Board of Appeals held hearings on 7 September 1993 and 26 October 1993. 
Their decisions were: 

7 September 1993 - Regarding the installation of motorized dampers: The Board approved the 
appeal. 

26 October 1993 - Regarding a variance for an extension of a temporary permit: The Board 
approved the variance with certain restrictions. 



150 



Municipal Government Report 



URBAN PROGRAMS DEPARTMENT 



Paul Newman Manager 

Sarah Hinsley Housing Rehabilitation Coordinator 

James Malone Asst. Housing Rehabilitation Coordinator 

Robert McManus Contract Specialist 

Carolyn Ryea Clerk-Typist II 



Background 



The activities of the Urban Programs Department are principally targeted to the housing needs 
of lower-income households and those with special needs in the City of Nashua. This reflects 
the mandate of the Federally-funded programs for which the Department is responsible. These 
needs are summarized as follow: 

affordable and decent housing 

emergency shelter for the homeless 

transit services for the mobility-impaired 

services, and facilities to provide services, such as education and job training, health, 

nutrition, and recreation 

The Department focuses its efforts on inner-city neighborhoods to revitalize them and eliminate 
substandard housing. It assists non-profits with carrying out renovation projects. 

Many of these activities are accomplished with the cooperation and participation of other City 
agencies, such as the Public Works Department, Building and Planning Departments, and the 
Nashua Housing Authority. 



Statistical Highlights of Fiscal Year 1994 



The Department oversaw expenditures totaling $2,643,323 in Fiscal Year 1994. Community 
Development Block Grant funds in the amount of $870,432 were expended in Fiscal Year 1994. 
The transit system was operated at a cost of $1,087,946, and $149,760 was expended on 
capital items. 



151 



City of Nashua 

Achievements 

Sidewalk Reconstruction 

Work was finished on new sidewalks built by the Public Works Department acting as the 
general contractor, using Block Grant funds principally for materials. Sidewalks on Cross, 
Whitney, Temple, Chestnut, Ash, Charles and Twelfth Streets were done at a cost of $55,000. 
Reconstruction of sidewalks was also contracted out; portions of Harbor Avenue, Jefferson, 
Norton, Hamilton, Lake and Lovell Streets were rebuilt. These replaced sidewalks that had 
become deteriorated. 

Opportunities Acquisition Program 

The building at 2-14 McLaren Avenue was purchased at a cost of $20,000. An investor has 

submitted a proposal to rehabilitate it and another City-owned building at 48 Ledge Street. 

Housing Improvement Program 

In FY 1994, two units were completed. Several others were underway, but funding was 
inadequate to meet the demand. Toward the end of FY94, more funding was included for the 
HIP to meet the accumulated backlog. 

HOME 

The HOME program got under way in earnest with several non-profit organizations submitting 
applications and receiving approval. Commitments of funds exceeded $750,000, and 
expenditures were at $535,000. HOME funds were applied to projects owned by the Nashua 
Soup Kitchen & Shelter, the Nashua Care Center, and Marguerite's Place. 

Transit 

The Department continued to provide support to the Nashua Public Bus Transit Commission 

in the oversight and administration of the fixed-route (Citybus) and paratransit services. 

Delivery of one new lift-equipped, medium-size bus was taken in FY94. 

The City procured a new management and operations contract, culminating with the hiring of 
ATE Management & Service Company, Inc., starting in February of 1994. Eric Myerson was 
named the General Manager. Daily ridership was 1,305. 



152 



Municipal Government Report 



NASHUA CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Fred Elkind, Chair 
Linda Bretz, Vice-Chair 
Katherine Nelson, Treasurer 
Leslie Formby, Clerk 
Ryan Teeboom 
Craig Worcester 
Mike Scanlon 
Bill Barrett 
Dave Diamond 



The Nashua Conservation Commission (NCC) reviews fill and dredge permits, in addition to land 
development plans, and makes recommendations to the State of New Hampshire Wetlands Board. 
Additionally, the Commission is responsible for protection of the City's natural resources. 

The Commission continued support of the Nashua Heritage Trail Committee (NHTC), which is 
developing a series of coordinated trails for pedestrian use to eventually connect with the regional 
Heritage Trail. 

This year, the Commission participated in several community awareness activities. While there 
was no Earth Day celebration for the Commission to participate in, it was active in the Trash 
Bash festivities at the Nashua Landfill in October 1993. 

Over the summer, several children from Nashua attended New Hampshire conservation camps 
through funding provided by the Commission. The Commission was also represented on the 
Citizens Solid Waste Committee. 

Commission members attended educational seminars and related conferences, including the 
Annual Meeting of the New Hampshire Association of Conservation Commissions and quarterly 
meetings of the Southern New Hampshire Association of Conservation Commissions (SNHACC). 



153 



City of Nashua 



INMHMIMIMIMMHMMMMMI 



NASHUA HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION (NHDC) 



Frank H. Mellen, Chairman 

Alvin Corzilius, Vice Chairman 

Mayor Rob Wagner 

Betty Lasky 

Bruce Labitt 

Helen Morris 

Tim Vadney 



Representative of Nashua Historical Society 

Registered Architect 

Ex-Officio Member 

Member of the Nashua City Planning Board 

Citizen 
Resident of the Nashville Historic District 

Alternate 



The Nashua Historic District Commission (NHDC) was established by the Board of Aldermen 
and Mayor on July 9, 1980 to enhance, recognize and strengthen the City's heritage. The NHDC 
is responsible for the review and approval of all building permit applications located within the 
Nashville Historic District. On occasion, the NHDC is also asked to comment regarding 
application scheduled before various city boards in reference to the historic significance of 
properties both within and outside of the Nashville Historic District. 

During Fiscal Year 93/94, the NHDC, with technical assistance from the Planning staff, reviewed 
the following business.: 



Formal Application Reviews: 

Building permits 6 

Sign permits 2 

Concept application reviews: 

Building permits 7 

Sign permits _2 

9 



= 6 approved 
= 2 approved 



The NHDC during this period has updated its handbook, and is in the process of revising its 
handout brochure. Application requirements for eligibility to receive a grant from the Certified 
Local Government Program have been completed and are ready for submission. Long range 
plans include a survey of areas that might be considered for inclusion in the historic district, 
public relations, and a video representation of the historic district. 



154 



BfiftMWMiwiwiinnTwri ajiiniwiTftttt 



Municipal Government Report 



NASHUA CITY PLANNING BOARD (NCPB) 



James F. Cody, Chair (passed away on Sept. 22, 1993) 

Jody Wilbert, Chair (from October 1993) 

Arnold Boucher, Vice Chair (resigned for health reasons 10-4-94) 

Bette Lasky, Vice Chair (from November 1994) 

Richard LaRose, Secretary 

Mayor Rob Wagner, Ex-Officio Member 

David Fredette, Alderman, Ex-Officio Member 

James F. Hogan, City Engineer, Ex-Officio Member 

Kathy Veraco, Member 

W. Torry Hack, Member 

Linda Wormley, Member 

Frank Bolmarcich, Alternate 

The Planning Board, Staff and City were saddened with the sudden death James F. Cody, Chair 
and 20 year member of the Planning Board. The City of Nashua will miss him and all that knew 
him, know that Nashua is a better place because of Jim's contributions to the City. 

Overview 

The Nashua City Planning Board is comprised of appointed members charged with assessing 
various City policies and programs, and advises different agencies regarding public facilities and 
capital projects or improvements. The Board formulates recommendations on and directing the 
future growth of the City. Implementation of the City Master Plan is a primary responsibility of 
the Planning Board. The Planning Board also has legal duty for the review and approval of all 
plans for the subdivision of land into lots, and all site plans for any new or expanded multi-family, 
commercial or industrial facilities. 

Project Review Summary 

During Fiscal Year 1993-94, the Nashua City Planning Board, with technical assistance provided 
by the Planning Staff, reviewed and approved 37 subdivisions and 68 site plans. Also, the 
Planning Board considered additional resolutions and ordinances and sent recommendations 
regarding them to the Board of Aldermen and its applicable Committees in Fiscal Year 1993-94. 



155 



City of Nashua 



ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT (ZBA) 



Chris McGrath, Chair 

Kevin McAfee, Vice Chair 

Hillary Keating, Secretary 

Susan Douglas, Member 

Robert P. Blaisdell, Member 

Dennis Drake, Alternate 

Brian McCarthy, Alternate (resigned January 1994, elected Alderman Ward 5) 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment is a citizen board appointed by the Mayor and confirmed by 
the Aldermen, to hear and decide on the requests for special exception land uses and variances 
to the Nashua Zoning Ordinances. The Board provides a channel for appeals to decisions of the 
Zoning Administrator and has the authority to grant relief to properties having a proven hardship 
which is not addressed in the ordinances. It is the duty of the Zoning Administrator to officially 
interpret, administer, and enforce the Nashua Zoning Ordinances as enacted by the Board of 
Aldermen. The Zoning Board of Adjustment conducts its meetings twice a month in two or more 
sessions. In 1993-94, the Zoning Board of Adjustment heard 47 requests for special exception of 
which 40 were granted and 7 were disapproved. In this same period, the Board heard 85 requests 
for variances of which 79 were granted and 6 were disapproved. There was a total of 6 
applications that were submitted but withdrawn before action by the Board. 



156 



Municipal Government Report 




Detective Kurt Gautier 
Officer of the Year 



Receiving award from Alderrnan-at-Large Thomas B. Kelley 



157 






City of Nashua 



»fltOfliawwotoocflfl>*w» » c « ttwoaw«i 



NASHUA POLICE DEPARTMENT- 
ORGANIZATION 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 



Chairman Alan G. Jeffery 

Clerk Thomas Maffee 

Maurice Arel 



CHIEF OF POLICE 



Raymond J. Landry 
Carol Desrosiers, Executive Assistant 



DEPUTY CHIEF OF OPERATIONS 

Clifton D. Largy 

Michelle Barton 

Executive Secretary 

DETECTIVE BUREAU 

Captain Paul Goupil 
Bureau Commander 

SERVICES BUREAU 

Captain Donald Gross 
Bureau Commander 

UNIFORM FIELD OPERATIONS BUREAU 

Captain James Mulligan 

Captain Kim Johnson 
Captain Donald Forcier 

Bureau Commanders 

LEGAL BUREAU 

Captain Richard Bailey 
Legal Bureau Commander 



ADMINISTRATIVE BUREAU 

Walter Bausha, Jr. 
Administrative Assistant 



158 



Municipal Government Report 



DETECTIVE BUREAU 



LEGAL BUREAU 



Captain Paul Goupil 
Theresa Gravel, Secretary V 

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DIVISION 

Lt. Alan Stuart 

Lisa Francoeur, Secretary III 

Susan Poulin, Secretary III 

Sgt. Timothy Hefferan 
Sgt. Douglas Hayes 
Det. Scott Childs 
Det. John Seusing 
Det. Jamie Provencher 
Det. Peter Segal 
Det. Richard Sprankle 
Det. Frank Paison 
Det. John Gallagher 
Det. Peter Theriault 
Det. Kurt Gautier 

YOUTH SERVICES DIVISION 

Lt. John McDermott 
Diane Mitchel, Secretary III 

Sgt. Gerald Evans 
Det. Stephen Gontarz 
Det. Richard McDonald 
Det. Donald Fournier 
Det. Neal Casale 
Det. Martin Matthews 
Det. Douglas Sparks 

NARCOTICS/INTELLIGENCE DIVISION 

Lt. Roger Vaillancourt 
Bridget Doran, Secretary III 

Sgt. Paul Gravel 
Det. William Moore 
Det. Leonard Kulikowski 
Det. Bruce Hansen 
Det. Timothy Goulden 
Det. Fred Nichols 

EVIDENCE/IDENTIFICATION DIVISION 

Det. James Briggs 



Captain Richard Bailey 
Donna Belzil, Secretary IV 
Evelyn Pride, Secretary III 

PROSECUTION DIVISION 

Sgt. Donald Conley 
Sgt. Stephen Doyle 

COURT SPECIALISTS 

Master Patrolman Robert Roy 
Master Patrolman Thomas Felch 



ADMINISTRATIVE BUREAU 



Walter Bausha, Jr. 

Administrative Assistant 

Sharon Borstel, Secretary IV 



BUDGET & FINANCE DIVISION 
COMPENSATION/BENEFITS DIVISION 

Karen Smith, Account Clerk III 
Michele Guilbeault, Account Clerk II 



RECORDS DIVISION 

Anne-Marie Hutchinson-Records Supervisor 



Clerk Typist ll's: 



Dorothy Cillo 
Charlene Hafner 
Grace Gagne 
Lorette Gagnon 
Susan McHugh 



Louise Knoll 

Jeanne Lavoie 

Debra Provencher 

Betty Waiver 



BUILDING MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

Scott Dowd, Custodian II 
George Miller, Custodian II 

Paul Branchi, Custodian I 
Steve Claire, PT Custodian 



159 



City of Nashua 



UNIFORM FILED OPERATIONS BUREAU 

Captain James Mulligan 

Captain Kim Johnson 

Captain Donald Forcier 

Lieutenant William Barlow, Station Supervisor 
Lieutenant James Brackett, Station Supervisor 
Lieutenant Stephen Closs, Station Supervisor 
Lieutenant Richard George, Station Supervisor 
Lieutenant Robert Goff, Station Supervisor 
Lieutenant Daniel Kerrigan, Station Supervisor 



PATROL DIVISION & DETENTION DIVISION 



Sergeant Donald Campbell 
Sergeant James Eastman 
Sergeant Robert Johnson 
Sergeant Michael Jones 
Sergeant Michael Levesque 



Sergeant Wayne MacDonald 
Sergeant Craig Ritz 
Sergeant Lyall Smith 
Sergeant Kenneth Wilson 



MASTER PATROLMEN, SENIOR PATROLMEN & PATROLMEN 



Scott G. Anderson 
Brian Battaglia 
Karen Becotte 
Bruce Botelho 
Dennis Brown 
Joseph Brown 
Jeffrey Bukunt 
Robert Carey 
James Casey 
Manuel Castillo 
Arthur demons 
Jeffrey Connors 
William Constantineau 
Vince Curtis 
Ronald Dickerson 
Daniel Donahue 
Sean Donovan 
Douglas Dunham 
Robert Eastman 
Keith Enright 
Matthew Eskridge 
Gary Farnsworth 
Barry Fenton 



Mark Fidler 
John Fisher 
Nelson Gerow 
Stephen Gontarz 
Andrew Hagan 
William Hamilton 
Craig Hammond 
Scott Hammond 
James Hargreaves 
Mark Hastbacka 
Gerard Healey 
Sergio Hebra, Jr. 
Robert Henderson 
Scott Howe 
Eden Koerner 
Jeffrey Lamarche 
David Lange 
John Latulippe 
Andrew Lavoie 
Michael Lavoie 
Michael Ledoux 
Brooke Lemoine 
Glenn Levesque 



James Lima 
Alexander Uukan 
Thomas MacLeod, Jr. 
Michael Masella 
George McCarthy 
Raymond McDannell 
Matthew McNulty 
John Newell 
Jeffrey Pangburn 
Christopher Peach 
Kevin Rautenberg 
Richard Reidy 
James Rockett 
Ronald Scaccia 
Mark Schaaf 
Michael Soucy 
Richard Sprankle 
Robert Sullivan 
Todd Therrien 
Ronald Welliver 
Richard Widener 
James Wilkins 



160 



Municipal Government Report 



FIRST YEAR SPECIAL OFFICERS 



Michael Carignan 
Randy Dumais 
Peter Forgione 
Kevin Girouard 



Kevin Landry 
Denis Linehan 
James Maloney, III 
John Marenghi 
Joseph Molinari, Jr. 



Eric Nordengren 
Anthony Pivero 
Glen Stagnita 
Francis Sullivan 



SPECIAL OPERATIONS DIVISION 

Special Reaction Team 

Scuba Diving Team 

Motorcycle Unit 



COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION 



Assistant Dispatchers 

Daniel Archambault 
Mary-Jo Cody 
Kristen Hamilton 
David Lavoie 
Lori N alette 
Debra Van Dervort 



Communication Technicians I: 



Rhonda Bernier 
Althea Chase 
Mary Ann Harris 
Patti Houle 
Cinzia Klinger 



Jane Leger 

Janette Lemire 

Nancy Levesque 

Lynn MacLeod 

Kathy Pacheco 



PARKING ENFORCEMENT DIVISION 

Kathleen Roussel, Specialist II 

Elizabeth Haskell, Specialist II 

Kim Enwright, Specialist I 



ANIMAL CONTROL DIVISION 



Robert Langis, ACQ I 



161 



City of Nashua 



SERVICES BUREAU 



Captain Donald Gross 

Lieutenant Michael Kelleher 

Suzanne Bordeleau, Secretary V 

Kendra Hastbacka, Secretary III 



ACCREDITATION/TRAINING/RECRUITING DIVISION 

Lieutenant Robert Hodges 
Officer Kevin Crowley 



DATA PROCESSING DIVISION 

Kathy Roy, Data Processing Supervisor 
Marsha Colburn, Data Processing Technician 

PLANNING & RESEARCH DIVISION 

Sergeant Peter Bouchard 



FLEET MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

Brian Sojka, Fleet Maintenance Supervisor 
Donald Fournier, Auto Mechanic 2nd Class 
Michael Norway, Auto Mechanic 1st Class 
Jeffrey Waye, Laborer 



COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 



Crime Prevention Specialist 

Master Patrolman Mark Manley 



Community Youth Specialist 

Master Patrolman Paul Wesinger 



Ramona Anderson 
Katherine Arsenault 
Barbara Bouley 
Jacqueline Chouinard 
Louise Corrigan 
Rosemary Crawford-Smith 
Donna Demers 
Susan Douville 
Linda Doyle 



School Specialists 

Master Patrolman William Mansfield 
Master Patrolman Robert Carey 

CROSSING GUARDS 

Constance Erickson 
Jane Fiske 
Sandra Gureckis 
Joanbeth Gurskis 
Pauline Hoitt 
Doris Lancourt 
Patricia Lamonday 
Joanne LeBlanc 
Pauline Marquis 
Janice Matthews 



Cynthia Merrifield 
Marcella Michaud 
Deborah Michaud 
Barbara Pelletier 
Linda Petrain 
Yvonne Piwowarski 
Gloria Plourde 
Vivian Ricard 
Florence Roscoe 



162 



Municipal Government Report 



STRENGTH TABLE AS OF JUNE 30. 1994 



Chief of Police 


AUTHORIZED 


ACTUAL 


DIFFERENCE 


1 


1 




Deputy Chief of Police 


1 


1 




Administrative Assistant 


1 


1 




Captains 


5 


6 


+ 1 


Lieutenant 


12 


11 


-1 


Sergeants 


16 


16 




Patrolmen, 1st and 2nd year 


120 


107 


-13 


Sub-total: 


156 


143 


-13 


Animal Control Officer II 


1 


1 




Animal Control Officer I 


1 





-1 


Parking Enforcement Specialist II 


2 


2 




Parking Enforcement Specialist I 


1 


1 




Sub-total: 


5 


4 


-1 


TOTALS: 


161 


147 


-14 


MERIT: 

Support Personnel (Full Time) 


5 


5 




Regular Crossing Guards 


29 


28 


-1 


Part Time Groundsman 


1 


1 




Sub-total: 


35 


34 


-1 


UNION EMPLOYEES UNDER COMMISSION: 

Clerical Personnel (Full Time) 


23 


22 


-1 


Assistant Dispatchers 


6 


6 




Communication Technicians I 


10 


10 




Automotive Mechanic, First Class 


1 


1 




Automotive Mechanic, Second Class 


1 


1 




Full Time Custodians/Laborer 


4 


4 




Sub-Total: 


45 


44 


-1 


TOTALS: 


80 


78 


-2 



163 



City of Nashua 



JANUARY 1, 1993 - DECEMBER 31, 1993 

CALLS FOR SERVICES LOGGED 

THERE WERE 55,819 CALLS FOR SERVICE LOGGED: 

4,069 Persons Arrested 

9,074 Reports Made (excluding Arrest Reports) 
6,630 Persons Summonsed (excluding w/arrests) 
36,046 Non-investigated Incidents 

CALLS FOR SERVICE INCREASED 4% OVER 1992 

TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS 

THERE WERE 3,521 TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS RECORDED 

Reported accidents increased 6% 

13% of the accidents occurred on Amherst Street 

42% of the accidents occurred on only 5 roadways 

Daniel Webster Highway @ Spit Brook Road was the intersection 

with the most reported accidents (65) 

ARRESTS 

THERE WERE 4,069 ARRESTED 
Persons arrested decreased 6% 

DWI arrests decreased 18% 

Drug arrests decreased 11% 

SUMMONSES 

THERE WERE 6,630 PERSONS SUMMONSED 

Persons summonsed decreased 20% 

Non-Moving Violation summonses decreased 15% 

Moving violation summonses decreased 26% 

INCIDENT LOCATIONS 

THERE WERE 952 CALLS FOR SERVICE LOGGED AT THE NASHUA POLICE DEPARTMENT 

(8% DECREASE) 

381 Arrests; 302 reports; 8 summonses; 261 non-investigated 

23% of the calls occurred in Sector 7 

38% of the calls occurred on only 17 roadways 

CALLS FOR SERVICE BY SHIFT 

7:00 AM - 2:59 PM 20,665 (Increased 5%) 
3:00 PM - 10:59 PM 24,634 (Increased 4%) 
11:00 PM - 6:59 AM 10,520 (Increased 4%) 

164 



Municipal Government Report 



PERSONS CHARGED 



PART 1 OFFENSES 


JUVENILE 


ADULT 


TOTAL 


1. Criminal Homicide 

2. Rape 

3. Robbery 

4. Aggravated Assault 

5. Burglary 

6. Theft 

7. Motor Vehicle Theft 


1 

5 



6 

28 

196 

12 


2 
28 
13 
22 
39 
319 
13 


3 
33 
13 
28 
67 
515 
25 


TOTAL: 


248 


436 


684 



PART II OFFENSES 


JUVENILE 


ADULT 


TOTAL 


8. 


Assaults 


66 


544 


610 


9. 


Arson 


18 


1 


19 


10. 


Forgery/Counterfeiting 





8 


8 


11. 


Fraud 





11 


11 


12. 


Embezzlement 











13. 


Receiving Stolen Property 


15 


31 


46 


14. 


Criminal Mischief 


47 


43 


90 


15. 


Weapon Offenses 


2 


15 


17 


16. 


Prostitution 





5 


5 


17. 


Sex Offenses 


6 


38 


44 


18. 


Narcotic Drug Offenses 


29 


188 


217 


19. 


Gambling 











20. 


Offenses Against Family/Children 





5 


5 


21. 


Driving While Intoxicated 


9 


548 


557 


22. 


Liquor Laws 


18 


36 


54 


23. 


Protective Custody 


7 


47 


54 


24. 


Disorderly Conduct 


37 


264 


301 


25. 


Vagrancy 











26. 


Miscellaneous Crimes 


115 


551 


666 


27. 


Truant 


7 





7 


28. 


Curfew 











29. 


Runaway 


79 





79 


TOTAL: 


455 


2,355 


2,790 



165 



City of Nashua 



CALLS FOR SERVICE BY MONTH 



MONTH 


1993 


1992 


DIFFERENCE 


CHANGE 


JANUARY 


4,274 


4,355 


-81 


-2% 


FEBRUARY 


3,751 


3,858 


-107 


-3% 


MARCH 


4,367 


4,199 


168 


4% 


APRIL 


4,503 


4,577 


-74 


-2% 


MAY 


5,058 


4,691 


367 


8% 


JUNE 


5,168 


4,664 


504 


11% 


JULY 


5,386 


5,012 


374 


7% 


AUGUST 


5,422 


5,036 


386 


8% 


SEPTEMBER 


4,659 


4,475 


184 


4% 


OCTOBER 


4,724 


4,528 


196 


4% 


NOVEMBER 


4,244 


3,940 


304 


8% 


DECEMBER 


4,263 


4,122 


141 


3% 


TOTAL: 


55,819 


53,457 


2,362 


4% 


TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS 


MONTH 


1993 


1992 


DIFFERENCE 


CHANGE 


JANUARY 


266 


286 


-20 


-7% 


FEBRUARY 


322 


251 


71 


28% 


MARCH 


406 


225 


181 


80% 


APRIL 


257 


229 


28 


12% 


MAY 


233 


237 


-4 


2% 


JUNE 


286 


294 


-8 


-3% 


JULY 


274 


282 


-8 


-3% 


AUGUST 


264 


233 


31 


13% 


SEPTEMBER 


258 


266 


-8 


-3% 


OCTOBER 


294 


313 


-19 


-6% 


NOVEMBER 


296 


287 


9 


3% 


DECEMBER 


365 


415 


-50 


-12% 


TOTAL: 


3,521 


3,318 


203 


6% 



166 



Municipal Government Report 



TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS (Continued) 



DAY OF WEEK 


1993 


1992 


DIFFERENCE 


CHANGE 


SUNDAY 


371 


310 


61 


20% 


MONDAY 


473 


451 


22 


5% 


TUESDAY 


481 


481 





0% 


WEDNESDAY 


522 


461 


61 


13% 


THURSDAY 


582 


636 


-54 


-8% 


FRIDAY 


647 


562 


85 


15% 


SATURDAY 


445 


417 


28 


7% 




TYPE OF ACCIDENT 


1993 


1992 


DIFFERENCE 


CHANGE 


FATALITY 


1 


4 


-3 


-75% 


HIT & RUN 


391 


376 


15 


4% 


W/PERSONAL INJURY 


554 


485 


69 


14% 


AUTO PEDESTRIAN 


46 


47 


-1 


-2% 


AUTO/BICYCLE 


75 


73 


2 


3% 


INVOLVING CRUISER 


23 


27 


-4 


-15% 


UNDER $1,000 


1,090 


933 


157 


17% 


OVER $1,000 


1,155 


1,219 


-64 


-5% 


W/DWI ARREST 


85 


77 


8 


10% 


W/ARREST (NOT DWI) 


36 


20 


16 


80% 


W/SUMMONS ISSUED 


65 


57 


8 


14% 



167 



City of Nashua 



INTERSECTIONS W/MOST ACCIDENTS 


# 


SPIT BROOK ROAD @ DANIEL WEBSTER HWY. 


65 


AMHERST ST. @ SOMERSET PKWY. 


50 


AMHERST ST @ CHARRON AVENUE 


28 


MAIN STREET @ KINSLEY STREET 


28 




STREETS W/MOST ACCIDENTS 


# 


AMHERST STREET 


456 


DANIEL WEBSTER HIGHWAY 


302 


MAIN STREET 


299 


F E EVERETT TURNPIKE 


272 


WEST HOLLIS STREET 


166 




DISPOSITION 


# 


ARREST 


121 


CARD MADE 


74 


NON-INVEST. 


1284 


REPORT 


1922 


SUMMONS 


65 


UNFOUNDED 


55 



168 



Municipal Government Report ^ 

NASHUA FIRE RESCUE 

FIRE CHIEF RICHARD J. NAVAROLI 

ASSISTANT FIRE CHIEF MICHAEL BUXTON 



Nashua Fire Rescue continues to provide Nashua citizens, visitors and business with the 
city's needed emergency services. In coordination and cooperation with Nashua Police 
and Rockingham Ambulance each division of this department strives toward a quality City 
of Nashua emergency service system. 

Our Fire Marshal's Division focuses on preventing emergencies through education, Code 
Enforcement and being proficient at cause and arson investigation. 

The Training Division centers it's efforts on readiness for the variety of emergencies such 
as auto accident rescue, first responder first aid, industrial accident rescue, water accident 
emergencies, hazardous materials incidents as well as fire emergencies. 

The department's Communications Division prides itself in timely, efficient handling of 
emergency information. Being prepared with professionally trained/certified emergency 
communications technicians and current state of the art communications resources make 
emergency communications procedures highly effective. 

The Maintenance Division keeps every mechanical resource in safe ready condition as 
well as providing support service at the emergency scene. The emergency services 
groups are ready 24 hours per day, 7 days per week to handle each of your emergencies 
regardless of type 

Our small but efficient Administrative Staff manage the business of emergency services 
in addition to planning, organizing, coordination, evaluating and adjusting all segments 
of the department's emergency and support services. When an emergency call is 
received in Nashua, Nashua Fire Rescue Staff prides itself in its ability to mitigate the 
situation. 



169 



City of Nashua 



Types of Incidents for Fiscal Year 1994 



FIRE EXPLOSION 

Structure Fires: 183 

Outside Structure Fires: 22 

Vehicle Fires: 105 

Trees, Brush, Grass Fires: 107 

Refuse Fires: 54 

Explosion, No After-Fires: 3 

Outside Spill, Leak With Ensuing Fire: 2 
Fire, Explosion Not Classified Above: 8 

Sub Total 484 



OVERPRESSURE RUPTURE 

Steam Rupture: 
Air, Gas Rupture: 
Overpressure Rupture 
Not Classified Above: 



5 

1 



Sub Total 8 

RESCUE CALLS 

Inhalator Call: 15 
Emergency Medical Call: 1725 

Lock - in: 14 

Search: 2 

Extrication: 109 

Rescue Call not Classified Above: 56 
Rescue Call; Insufficient Information: 12 

Sub Total 1933 

HAZARDOUS CONDITION, STANDBY 

Spill, Leak with No Ignition: 183 

Explosive, Bomb Removal: 2 

Excessive Heat: 21 

Power Line Down: 25 

Arcing, Shorted Electrical Equipment: 118 
Aircraft Standby: 24 

Chemical Emergency: 8 

Hazardous Condition, 

Not Classified Above 57 

Hazardous Condition, 

Insufficient Information: 2 



SERVICE CALL 

Lock - Out: 30 

Water Evacuation: 98 

Smoke, Odor Removal: 37 

Animal Rescue: 1 

Assist Police: 23 

Unauthorized Burning: 20 

Cover Assignment: 38 

Service Call Not Classified Above: 57 

Service Call; Insufficient: 1 

Sub Total 305 



GOOD INTENT CALL 

Food on Stove: 
Smoke Scare: 
Wrong Location: 
Controlled Burning: 
Vicinity Alarm: 



56 

258 

6 

12 

7 



Steam, Other Gas Mistaken for Smoke18 
Return in Service before arrival: 102 

Good Intent Call; 

Not Classified Above: 209 

Good Intent Call; 

Insufficient Information 15 



FALSE CALL 




Malicious, Mischievous False Call: 


159 


Bomb Scare, No Bomb: 


8 


System Malfunction: 


785 


Unintentional: 


384 


False Call; Not Classified Above: 


29 


False Call Insufficient Information: 


12 


Sub Total 


. 1377 



OTHER SITUATION FOUND 

Type of Situation Found 
Not Classified Above: 

Sub Total 



35 
35 



Sub Total 440 



TOTAL INCIDENTS 5265 



170 



Municipal Government Report 



-FIRE MARSHAL'S OFFICE 



Fire Marshall Kenneth Renoux 

Inspector Michael Vaccaro 

Inspector Brian Donaldson 

Inspector/Public Education Richard Strand 

Secretary Pat Gerren 

The Fire Marshal's Office is dedicated to the prevention of fires and the life safety of Nashua's citizens. This 
is accomplished through three major areas: code enforcement, fire investigation, and public education. 

Code enforcement ranges from the inspection of existing occupancies to the plan review of new 
construction projects Nearly 242 projects were either reviewed or inspected this year and nearly 3,000 
other inspections were conducted, ranging from simple fire hazards to complex analysis of existing 
buildings. 

Many total quality management concepts have been introduced, resulting in increased efficiency and a 
higher quality product Of particular interest is a computerized work assignment file, which allows easy 
monitoring of activity The new computerized fire reporting system also allows hazards to be picked up on 
immediately rather than waiting for reports to arrive from the six fire stations. We intend to continue 
expanding and improving on these programs. 

The local economy continues to add to the number of vacant buildings in this city. An aggressive program 
of enforcement of the vacant building ordinance continues, including walking patrols in target areas, has 
been extremely successful and cost effective. 

Effective monitoring and lobbying of fire safety issues in the state legislature has given this office a strong 
and credible voice in the legislature. In many cases, pieces of legislation that would have a negative effect 
on this community have been defeated. 

Over 100 fires were investigated by this division. A strong and cooperative relationship with the Nashua 
Police Dept., resulting in many arrests, has kept the arson rate in this city below that of cities of comparable 
size. 

Nashua continues to be a leader in public fire education. A wide variety of programs is available for all age 
groups. The elementary school "Learn Not To Burn" Program is in it's twelfth year and continues to be an 
outstanding success The program is so successful that 10% of all known "saves" in the nationwide program 
have occurred in Nashua. As difficult times call for alternative funding of programs, we are grateful to the 
civic and business associations, who have donated funds and materials for these programs, resulting in 
effective programs at reduced costs. 

Division members attended development courses and seminars at the National Fire Academy, St. Anselms 
College, New York State Fire Academy, National Fire Protection Association, New England Association of 
Fire Marshal's, the Mass Association of Arson Investigators, and Conway Quality Management. In addition, 
members have taught courses regionally on fire investigations, arson awareness and public fire education. 

In closing, the Fire Marshal's Office is here to serve you in lessening your chance of being exposed to the 
devastating effects of a fire Feel free to contact us at any time with your questions or concerns. 



171 



City of Nashua 



mmmimmfmi&iem MNmmMiJiww m ttM wily \Jl hujiiuu mmimmtmtmmm mmmMwiilimimwmHmi i 



The following is a list of itemized activities during the past year: 

NEW CONSTRUCTION: 

242 Building Permit Applications Reviewed 
220 New Building Inspections Made 

MEETINGS. 



1,465 Meetings 

INSPECTIONS 

222 Places of Assembly 

58 Schools 

49 Day Cares 

57 Foster Homes 

15 Health Cares 

248 Residential 

57 Business Occupancies 

10 Mercantiles 

27 Industrial Plants 

Storage Occupancies 
573 Vacant Buildings 
966 Fire Hazards 

169 Night Checks 

91 Other Inspections 

FIRE INVESTIGATIONS: 

115 Fires 

9 False Alarms 

51 Juvenile Firesetter Conferences 

65 Other Investigations 

PERMITS & FIRE REPORTS: 

1 1 Kerosene Heater Permits 
153 Places of Assembly 

33 Storage of Hazardous Materials 

6 Blasting 

33 Abandon/Removal of Underground Tanks 

3 Fireworks 

23 Shows (Carnivals, Circuses, Plays, Sports Events, etc.) 

73 Fire Reports to Insurance Companies 

74 Other - Environmental Searches 
22 Other - Archives Retrievals 

4 Other - Copies Only 
35 Other - Fireguard Duty 

4 Other - Restitution 

1 Other - Overtime Inspection 

1 Other - Appeals 

2 Other - Misc. 

$17,090.86 Income Received from Permits, Reports, etc. 



172 



„,„., n,,,™,,,,, Municipal Cnuornmont Hopnr 


FIRE PREVENTION SERVICES FOR THE PUBLIC: 


43 


Schools Smoke Drills 


152 


Talks Given 


117 


Press Releases for Fires 


6,664 


Press Releases Other 


2,688 


Monthly Public Service Announcements 


368 


Public Education Meetings 


25 


Evacuation Planning 


11 


Evacuation Drills 


1 


Extinguisher Training Session 


4 


Other - Concord Lab 


87 


Other Costco Golf Flyers 


1 


Other - Video of 63 Pine St. for Housing Board 


118 


Other Smoke Drills Packages 


400 


Other Christmas Decoration Letters to P of A. 


14000 


Other Holiday F.S. Flyers to All Christmas Tree Vendors 


48 


Other Distributed Videotapes to Stores & Schools 


3 


Other Interviews with Media 


1 


Other Smokey Bear Demo 


1 


Other - Pluggie at Mt. Pleasant School 


2 


Other Misc 


ENGINE COMPANY ACTIVITIES: 


17 


Wood Stove Inspections 


2 


Chimney Inspections 


2 


Fireplace Inspections 


281 


Single Family Smoke Detector Inspections 


1,041 


1 4 2 Family Smoke Detector Inspections 


1,629 


Multi Family Smoke Detector Inspections 


126 


Smoke Detector Reinspections 


2 


Smoke Detector Computer Training 


4 


Other Burning Permits Issued 


37 


Other Inspections 


1 


Other - Check Complaint 


1 


Other - Hydrant Inspection 


1 


Other - New Construction Inspection 


2 


Other Preplan 


1 


Other - Fire Investigation 


1 


Other - Firewatch 


321 


Tours of Fire Stations by Groups 


10327 


Number of People on Tours 


952.50 Hours Time Spent on Fire Prevention Activities 



173 



City of Nashua 



FIRE DEPARTMENT STAFF 



Richard J. Navaroli 
Michael P. Buxton 
John Chesnulevich 
Robert Burnham 
Eugene Farnum 
John Allison 



(Group I) 
(Group II) 
(Group III) 
(Group IV) 



DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE 



Fire Chief 
Assistant Chief 
Deputy Chief 
Deputy Chief 
Deputy Chief 
Deputy Chief 



Richard Navaroli 
Michael P. Buxton 
Sandra Faucher 
Mary Jane Cormier 



John Marcum 
Frank Kenez 
Raymond Labrecque 



Chief 

Assistant Chief 

Secretary 

Secretary 

MECHANICS 

Superintendent 

Assistant Superintendent 

Mechanic 

FIRE ALARM 



Richard Turgeon 
Marc Brodeur 
Kevin Corbit 



Superintendent 

Assistant Superintendent 

Lineman 



FIRE MARSHAL 



Kenneth Renoux 
Michael Vaccaro 
Brian Donaldson 
Richard Strand 
Pat Gerren 



Roger Hatfield 
Robert Leuci, Jr. 
Mary Pitarys 



TRAINING 



Fire Marshal 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Public Education 

Secretary 



Superintendent 

Assistant Superintendent 

Secretary 



DISPATCHERS 



Fernande Bouley 
Marc Bouley 
Robert Descoteau 
John DuVarney 



Gail Tronkowski 

Charlene Hall 

Raymond Seymour 

John Rafferty 



174 



Municipal Government Report 

DEPARTMENT ROSTER 



GROUP 1 



GROUP 2 



GROUP 3 



GROUP 4 



Amherst Street 



Chesnulevich, John 
Brodeur, Mark 
Cronin, Daniel 
Jenkins, Robert 
Ricard, Ronald 
Blundon, Leslie 
Cyr, Stephen 
Borneman, Alan 
Bernier, Richard 



McAllister, Donald 
Moore, Kenneth 
Kelloway, Ralph Jr. 
Carney, Vincent 
Breda, Byron 
Walker, George 



Bcaudoin, Joseph 
Lingley, Thomas 
McMahon, John 
Smith, David 
Chacos, Thomas Jr. 
Conway, Richard 



Burnham, Robert 
Moreau, Daniel 
Leuci, Robert Sr. 
Pelletier, David 
Gamester, Frederick 
Evans, Robert 
Migneault, Michael 
Lajoie, Peter 
Varney, Jason 



Farnam, Eugene 
Rhodes, Brian 
Cote, Michael 
Cote, Douglas 
Duquette, Robert 
Scire, Robert 
Michael Mansfield 
Adams, Craig 
Kerrigan, Kevin 



Lake Street 



Petrain, Sylvio 
Healey, Mark 
Smart, John 
Lacombe, Michael 
Bartlett, Russell 
Teague, Daniel 



Chouinard, Phillip 
Waller, Elliott 
McGilvary, Robert 
Kobzik, Jeffrey 
Worcester, Jerry 
Murtagh, Gary 



Spit Brook Road 



Anderson, Keith 
Cote, Ralph 
VonHandorf, James 
Wyatt, Richard 
Sage, Ronald 
Finnerty, Thomas 



Rapsis, James 
Vasiliou, Charles 
Courtemanche, Roland 
Vermette, Mark 
Couturier, Bruce 
Paris, John 



Allison, John 
Araujo, John 
Mitchell, James 
Michaud, Leroy 
Deboisbriand, Donald 
Letendre, Michael 
Kaas, Kenneth 
Freire, Joseph Jr. 
Weigand, George 



Nye, Jerry 
Fitz, Robert 
Hurley, Thomas 
Sullivan, Michael 
Doherty, Daniel 
Dubois, Brian 



Suprenant, Arthur 
Fauvel, Roland 
Duval, Keith 
Parlon, Lawrence 
Andrews, Wayne 
Kass, Michael 



Crown Hill 



McHard, Frank 
Gray, Peter 
Cote, John 
Spofford, Donald 



Chacos, Thomas Sr. 
Varney, Steven 
Paine, Arthur 
Gagnon, George 



Laughton, Bruce 
Galipeau, Steven 
Murphy, Michael 
Proulx, Mark 
Barrows, Robert 



Morrissey, Brian 
Theriault, Roland 
O'Brien, Cornelius 
Crowell, Richard 



Dolan, Michael 
Brickey, Ronald 
Henry, Steven Sr. 
Perault, Thomas 



Hunlley, Douglas 
Morse, David 
Lamb, Gary 
Martinage, Scott 
Wood, Richard 



DesLauriers, Donald 
Vaillancourt, Dennis 
Maynard, Timothy 
Hall, Roger 



Airport Station 



O'Brien, Michael 
Defina, Bartholomew 
Wilkins, Richard 
Conti, Fred 



Conant Road 



Miller, David 
Letendre, Richard 
Dobens, Peter 
Duclos, Michael 
Gerhard, Karl 



McNamara, Robert 
Edwards, Robert 
Bronson, Gregory 



MacDonald, Glen 
Marquis, Brian 
Richard, Ronald 
Soucy, Timothy 



Hargreaves, Gary 
Patti, Anthony 
Duprat, David 
Farrar, Lee 
Simard, Matthew 



175 



City of Nashua 



TRAINING DIVISION 



ROGER HATFIELD 



The department continued to spend many hours during the year upgrading the levels of 
personnel certification. Current certification levels with NHFST of our 164 fire suppression and 
support personnel are as follows: 



F.F. Level I 1 

F.F. Career Level 4 

F.F. Level II 81 

F.F. Level III 46 

Driver Operator 19 

Company Officer I & II 11 

Fire Instructor 1 42 

Fire Instructor III 1 

Fire Instructor IV 2 

State Instructors 3 



NHFST Ed. Meth. Inst 2 

NHFST/NFA I.C. Inst 8 

NHFST Haz Mat A/O Inst 2 

Decon Inst 1 

Public Safety Dispatcher 8 

Haz Mat Decon 142 

Haz Mat AW/Operational 128 

Tactical Consideration 26 

Chemistry of Hazmat 9 

Haz Mat Technicians 9 



Along with these certifications, other certifications held by department members include: 

IAFC & NFPA Inspector I 1 

Inspector 1 & 2 3 

IAAI Certified Inspector 3 

Conway Quality 12 



Also various members hold degrees from college level programs. They are as follows: 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE 

Fire Science 

Fire Protection 

Auto Mechanics 

Sociology 

Electronics 

Civil Engineering 

Architectural Engineering 



12 
9 



BACHELOR DEGREE 

Fire Science 1 

Political Science 2 

Physical Education 1 

Psychology 1 

Science/Physics 1 

History 1 

Science 1 



Along with these certification programs, the training division has made the transition over to a 
Competency Based Training Program to keep the membership's competency level at a high level 
in their certification. 

We continue to add new video tape programs to the training division library. Our library 
presently has approximately 537 video tapes that are used daily to assist in furthering the 
education of our members. Some of our tapes are outdated and need to be replaced. 



176 



Municipal Government Report 



The scheduled training breakdown for all Nashua Fire Department suppression during FY94 
consisted of Certified Driver/Pump Operation Program; Firefighter III program; Back Injury 
Program. These hours do not reflect the time spent by the company officers training their 
personnel during the year or individual study time or testing for various levels of certification. 

The Nashua Training Ground Facility, located on W. Hollis Street, continues to be widely used 
throughout the year. All NFD Companies and various Mutual Aid Departments, as well as 
NHFST utilize this facility on a weekly and monthly basis. 



The following Standard Operating Procedures (SOP's) were written and adopted during FY93: 

93-04 Back Belts 

93-05 Rescue Ropes 

93-07 Hazardous Materials Awareness/Operational 

93-08 Radiological Monitoring 

94-01 Personal Protective Clothing 

94-02 Positive Pressure Ventilation 

93-03 Code 500 or Suspected Hazardous Device 

Various department members assisted the training division during the year in writing these 
SOP's. 

Specialized courses/seminars were attended by department members during FY94. They are: 

* NFA EFO Program - 2 members 

* Conway Quality - 2 members 

* NFA: Code Management - 1 

Fire Service Course Design - 1 

Fire Service Instructional Methodology - 1 

* IAFF Master Instructor for HazMat - 1 

* EMS Courses: Aircraft First Responder 
BLS Instructor "F" - 3 

The nations fire service continues to go through changes and encounter new hazards, and our 
firefighters in Nashua are involved in this. The staff of the training division are responsible for 
the training and education to maintain and upgrade our department members to meet these new 
challenges. We are prepared to carry out this function to assure that our members receive the 
best available training, to protect the citizens of Nashua and handle any incident they are called 
upon in a safe manner. 

The citizens of Nashua can be assured that they receive the best protection possible through the 
dedication of the men and women of the Nashua Fire Department throughout the year. 

Again we close another productive year and I would like to thank the other members of the 
training division staff, Officers and members of the department and the citizens of Nashua for 
their continued support. Thank you all. 



177 



City of Nashua 



mmmmmmm i wtmmmmm V^lly Ul lidollUa tMHawM nwnuMmmii ii rmMiimr i JimOT ii L n- i 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES AND DIRECTOR 
NASHUA PUBLIC LIBRARY 

JULY 1, 1993 - JUNE 30 1994 



The Honorable Rob Wagner, President ex-officio 
President of the Board of Aldermen, Joyce L. Arel, Trustee ex-officio 



Board of Trustees 

Frank B. Clancy, Chairman 

S. Robert Winer, Secretary 

Maurice L. Arel 

Arthur L. Barrett, Jr. 

Dr. Arthur E. Comolli 

Mary S. Nelson 
Roger H. Osgood, Jr. 

Director 

Clarke S. Davis 

Assistant Director 

Robert C. Frost 

Administrative Secretary 

Donna M. Cardoza 



178 



Municipal Government Report 



(« ^ <>f^^:frS5y ^rfj i MWMn^VA i uw^ 



STAFF OF THE 
NASHUA PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Bookmobile 

Carol K. Cookson, Supervisor 
Eugene V. Dunn, Library Assistant 
Yvonne R. Lavallee, Library Assistant 

Business Department 

Kristen S. Cunningham, Library Assistant 
Amy R. Friedman, Library Assistant 
Leila A. Kupper, Library Assistant 

Chandler Memorial 
Library and Ethnic Center 

Margaret J. Merrigan, Supervisor 
Elinor F. Antal, Library Assistant 
Helen S. Julier, Library Assistant 

Children's Department 

Kathy E. Bolton, Supervisor 
Sheila E. Dudman, Assistant Supervisor 
Constance L. Vandervort, Library Assistant 
Susan M. Willmore, Library Assistant 

Circulation Department 

Sharon A. Woodman, Supervisor 
Edna M. Anagnost, Assistant Supervisor 
Jane Hanle-Olsson, Library Assistant 
Katherina Springer, Library Assistant 
Holly A. Sullivan, Library Assistant 
Lea L. Touchette, Library Assistant 
Jeannette L. Tripp, Library Assistant 
Doris G. Webb, Library Assistant 

Community Services 

Jeannine T. Levesque, Coordinator 



Exhibits 

Bruce J. Marks, Coordinator 

General Adult Services 

Nancy A. Grant, Supervisor 
Margaret L. Comolli, Reference Librarian 
Kathryn N. Lukasik, Reference Librarian 
D. Julia Papadopoulos, Library Assistant 

Maintenance 

Larry R. Case, Supervisor 
Priscilla T. Marquis 
Timothy J. Samson 
Joseph L. Lavalley 

Music/Art/Media Department 

Ann R. Warren, Supervisor 
Debra K. Flanagan, Assistant Supervisor 
Evelyn A. Carrigan, Library Assistant 
Janice M. Donahue, Library Assistant 

Security 

Richard M. Kiley 

Technical Services 

Susan G. Howes, Supervisor 
Gloria E. Maduzia, Assistant Supervisor 
Helen E. Bonenfant, Library Assistant 
Louise A. Camp, Library Assistant 
Lorraine O. Drouin, Library Assistant 



179 



City of Nashua 



™*«winK'<im}ijimiw<MnMj<tJiM V^lly \J* liuOIIUu mimmmmmmmm mNmAWiM mmmmimimmmtmmmmm 



REPORT OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Frank B. Clancy, Chairman 



As Chairman, I am grateful to the members of the Board of Trustees for their dedicated service 
on behalf of the Citizens of Nashua. 

I wish to welcome Mary S. Nelson who, on September 28, 1993, was selected at a Joint 
Convention, to fill the vacancy left by Caroline B. Mason who resigned and whose term was to 
expire on March 31, l l W8. Special thanks also are given to Arthur E. Comolli, D.M.D., who was 
selected as a Trustee at a Joint Convention held on March 8, 1994, to serve another term which 
expires on March 31, 2001. 

My special appreciation is extended to Hon. Maurice L. Arel and Mary S. Nelson who served 
on the Budget Subcommittee. 

The Honorable Rob Wagner, Mayor of Nashua and President ex-officio addressed the Board 
at the regular meeting held on October 5, 1993, and thanked the Trustees for their efforts to 
bring about the purchase of the 14 Court Street properties partly to secure parking for the 
Library. Special thanks were expressed to Mr. Arel who chaired a special committee to study 
the best use of the building which currently houses the Nashua Center for the Arts. 

At a regular meeting of the Trustees held on February 1, 1994, the Board discussed the 
importance of using strategic planning concepts in forming, implementing, and evaluation library 
programs. The commitment of Mayor Wagner to the principles of Total Quality Management 
in city government coincides with the efforts of the Trustees to strive continuously to improve 
library services. In addition, the Library administration is dedicated to the study and practice 
of management theories of strategists such as organization consultant Peter Senge of M.I.T. who 
believes that the dynamics of the learning organization are an extension of T.Q.M. The concept 
that an organization's vision grows from the convergence of the vision of those within it, is firmly 
based on centuries of Western thought and remains a paradigm of a democratic culture. 

Commitment to learning remains as a goal for the Library. Mr. Arel at the regular meeting held 
on December 7, 1993. stated his concern that many Nashua children are not exposed to books 
and reading in their daily lives. The Nashua 2000 Education Plan includes discussion of ways 
to encourage learning. Use of the Bookmobile to reach disadvantaged neighborhoods, direct 
distribution of books through funded programs, and services to ethnic minorities are a few 
possible useful strategies to address these needs. 

The Trustees continued their commitment to the wise investment of Library Trust Funds. On 
November 2, 1993, the Board welcomed financial advisors Robert E. Hussey, Vice President, 
Bank of New Hampshire Trust and Investment Services Division; Robert B. Esau, Executive 
Vice President, and Ronald R. Camirand, Vice President, Chief of Investment Officer. The 
group explained the Library Trust Fund Five- Year Investment Performance from June 30, 1989, 
to June 30, 1993, and Trustees studied the performance of the portfolio with an eye to making 

180 



Municipal Government Report 



strategic changes to respond to shifts in investment opportunities. 

Income from Library Trust Funds offered supplemental funding for providing new and enhanced 
library resources and services. In particular, The Henry Stearns Fund made it possible to have 
University Microfilm's General Periodicals on Disc and Business Periodicals on Disc for our 
patrons. Language-learning kits, job -search services, CD-ROM telephone directories and 
numerous new reference materials were added. 

The Chandler Fund and Locke Fund provided income to do renovations to the ceilings in the 
hall and two front parlors on the main floor of The Chandler Memorial Library and Ethnic 
Center. Work included careful restoration of the fine moldings and ceiling medallions, Also, 
a lawn sprinkler system was added and many commented on the improved appearance of the 
landscaping. The fine maintenance of the building is provided completely by income from funds 
left in trust by Miss Mabel Chandler, and the stately former home of Miss Chandler remains a 
landmark in downtown Nashua. 

Work continued on The Charles Zylonis Fund, including discussions with William B. Cullimore, 
Esq., New Hampshire Director, Registry of Charitable Trusts, concerning termination of the cy 
pres court decree of February 1, 1989. 

Programs paid for by the Zylonis Fund included a performance by visiting opera singer Danute 
Grauslyte on October 23, 1993; a Lithuanian Independence Day Celebration; and a Lithuanian 
egg decorating workshop. Planning included language classes for the Fall of 1994. 

At the regular meeting of the Board on April 5, 1994, the Trustees unanimously 



Resolved: That the Library staff be commended for their 
loyalty to work this past winter during days 
of inclement weather. 



The spirit of commitment and dedication of our employees is appreciated. 

New staff members included Kristen Cunningham who stayed part of the year as Library Asst. 
1 in the Business Department, resigning effective June 18, 1994, due to the relocation of her 
family. Richard Wiley was appointed Security Guard during August, 1993, to replace Edward 
Shubelka, who retired. 

During the year, contract negotiations began between the Trustees and the Nashua Public 
Library Employees Local #4831, American Federation of Teachers. 

Library safety and security remained a priority of the Trustees and at the regular meeting on 
June 7, 1994, Captain David Harpool from the State of New Hampshire Police Standards and 
Training Council spoke about safety issues. He emphasized the importance of staff training in 
being alert and responsive to potentially dangerous behavior in the workplace. He cautioned 
that we must be aware that anger and aggression are part of our daily lives and we must deal 
with them, diffuse them when possible, and keep them from disrupting our library mission. 

181 



City of Nashua 



Captain Harpool spoke previously on May 9, 1994, in Manchester at the New Hampshire 
Trustees Association meeting attended by Trustees Frank B. Clancy and Mary S. Nelson and 
Mssrs. Davis and Frost of the Library administration. 

At the June 7, 1994 meeting of the Board of Trustees, one final personnel appointment was the 
hiring of Leslie B. Messina as Library Asst. 1 in the Business Department. 

To Mayor Rob Wagner, the Board of Aldermen, City Employees, and fellow citizens of Nashua, 
we extend our gratitude for your support in working toward our common goals. We applaud the 
practice of principles of excellence in government by the City of Nashua and the promotion of 
the spirit of community of all our citizens. 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

Clarke S. Davis 



LIBRARY EXPANSION PROCEEDS 

A unanimous vote by the Nashua Board of Aldermen to bond the $310,197 cost of constructing 
the final stage of the West Wing area of the library resulted in a bid award to the R. C. Foss 
Company of New Hampshire. Construction started in January, and was completed in the early 
Spring. The Mayor and Board of Aldermen approved bonding of $452,000 for furniture and 
equipment to be installed during the summer and fall of 1994, opening for public use shortly 
thereafter. It is projected that upon its opening, the new Music/Art/Media area will attract 25% 
additional daily patronage, boosting total library traffic to 1,600 library users daily! This new 
facility will feature expanded opportunities for individual study and use of computers and other 
electronic information-retrieval technologies in the area labeled "quiet study." 

MANAGEMENT AUDIT STUDIES CITY DEPARTMENTS 

The Mayor and Board of Aldermen commissioned a management audit by Municipal Advisors, 
Inc. of Virginia, with the goal of examining the operation of each city department and making 
recommendations. M.A.I, project team ' "observed activities at the Main Library on several 
occasions and found the facility to be active and well used by patrons of all ages. The facility, 
although crowded, is well designed for use. In particular, the children's section is very suitable 
for its use. There is a customer service orientation on the part of the staff, the activity at the 
Main Library during both daytime and evening hours places a strain on the staff." They noted 
that 2 "the Main Library is in the process of constructing a 10,000 square foot west wing in an 
area. The new wing was included as a shelled area during original construction, with plans for 
later expansion. This is an excellent way to plan for growth." 

"The expansion plan provides for moving the Library's music-art-media department downstairs 
into the wing and renovating the space for special collections. There will also be an area for 

182 



Municipal Government Report 



teenagers and a library store that will sell paper, pens and other items." Comparing Nashua with 
the State's largest city, they cited: 4 "The two most indicative measures of citizen use of the 
Library are circulation and program attendance. Manchester is the only City in New Hampshire 
which is larger than Nashua. The respective populations are 98,722 for Manchester and 79,402 
for Nashua. In comparison, Nashua had a total per capital circulation of 8.0 while Manchester's 
was 5.0 in 1992. Also, the following table reflects an even greater disparity in programs and 
attendance between the two Cities during the same year. 



TOWN 


ADULT 
PROGRAMS 


ATTENDANCE 


CHILDREN'S 
PROGRAMS 


ATTENDANCE 


Manchester 
Nashua 


89 
700 


2,925 
42,000 


186 

555 


5,300 
15,955 


TOTAL 


789 


44,925 


741 


21,255 



The New Hampshire State Library was the Source of these statistics." 



M.A.I.'s top three findings and recommendations were: 

5 Finding #1 

The Library has a manual card catalog system. This system increases the time and difficulty for 
both staff and patrons in locating books. A person may have to search through three different 
card catalogues in different sections of the Library where the book would be located. 

Recommendation #1 

The Library should acquire and implement an automated card catalog system as funds permit. 
The Director and the Trustee with whom the consultants spoke did not rule out the possibility 
that trust funds could be used for this purpose. If funds from a trust cannot be used, an 
automated card catalog should be established as a top priority for the use of Library funds in 
upcoming budgets. 

Finding #2 

The Library's circulation system is manual. A manual system has less impact on patrons. 
However, the system is labor intensive and requires more circulation staff than an automated 
system. 



183 



City of Nashua 



Recommendation #2 



The Library's circulation system should be automated. The possibility of using trust funds for 
this purpose should be evaluated. Part of the cost for an automated circulation system can be 
offset through reduced part-time hours in the circulation department. 

Finding #3 

The Library has minimal staff considering the time it is open to the public. Other libraries 
supplement their paid staff with volunteers. This is one way to involve the community in 
controlling operating costs while maintaining high service levels. 

Recommendation #3 

As part of the proposed City-wide volunteer program, the Library should attempt to integrate 
the use of volunteers into their program of services. This will enhance service and also increase 
the citizen ties to the librarv." 



NOTES 

• 1. Municipal Advisors, Inc. Management Audit for the City of nashua, New Hampshire, June, 1994, p.85. 

• 2. ibid., p. 86. «3. ibid., p. 86. «4. ibid., p.86. «5.ibid., p. 87. 



THE NASHUA PUBLIC LIBRARY 
....MORE THAN "JUST A LIBRARY" 

Although books will perhaps always be our primary product, the Nashua Public Library has 
always enthusiastically pursued information in other formats. An ambitious series of free public 
programs provided much direct information not yet available in print, such as our library 
orientation seminar, Using the Library Today, designed to help adults, including those who may 
be returning to school, get the most out of today's library and its services. 

Major feature films, enhanced by a new wide screen and nine-speaker surround sound, were 
enjoyed Friday nights from October to May at the NPL Theater's Cinema Cabaret series. 
Audiences reached much greater size when Plaza Pics presented family film classics such as the 
Sound of Music and Aladdin on the library plaza lawn Monday nights under balmy summer 
skies. 

Our Ethnic Center at the Chandler Memorial Library celebrated its eleventh anniversary in 
September. The Ethnic Center offers books, magazines, records, films and cooking programs 
throughout the year, giving Nashuan's the opportunity to expand their horizons. Programs 
featured Chinese Cooking, Cooking From the Philippines, along with Ukrainian Egg Decorating, 
Celtic Heritage Month, Mexican Cooking and Scottish Country Dancing. 



184 



Municipal Government Report 



Our Children's Department continued to make the library engaging for the next generation of 
readers and library users by offering a huge weekly selection of library programs, Saturday films 
and live puppet/storytelling sessions. 

Much information and entertainment for adults was provided as well. Bach's Lunch concerts 
packed our theater on hot summer days, while College Financial Strategies, Writing Workshops 
and "Get That Job and Keep it!" seminars helped citizens cope with the serious side of life. 

All of these events and many more kept the Nashua Public Library Calendar full during 1993. ...a 
lot more than just books! 

We are indebted to the New Hampshire Council for their funding assistance on the following 
programs presented at the Library: 

1) The Holocaust: Prejudice as Prelude to Genocide 

2) Of Apples and Origins: Stories of Life on Earth 

3) Comprehending the Land We Call New Hampshire 

4) Around Annapurna: A Trek Through Nepal's Culture & Countryside 

5) Writing Workshops 



THE LIBRARY IN THE COMMUNITY 

The Nashua Public Library serves a purpose beyond the traditional one of circulating books and 
other materials. The Library is very much involved in the community and has served to 
introduce the community to itself and to act as a forum for a great variety of community 
programs. Over 1,800 meetings were held free and open to the public in the Library's various 
meeting rooms during the 75.5 hours per week that the library is open. 

We realize that you will continue to support your library only to the extend that it is responsive 
to your needs. Identifying and satisfying these demands will continue to be our primary goal. 
As always, the factor contributing most significantly to our success is people - a competent and 
dedicated staff, a concerned Board of Trustees, an alert City government and a community 
supportive of the services provided by its public library. 

As its Director, I hope to continue the excellence established by the Nashua Public Library. 



185 



City of Nashua 



LEDGE STREET SCHOOL FIRST GRADERS 
WELCOME BACK THEIR TEDDY BEARS 




First Grader Kyle Jones and teacher Darlene Green 
Kyle's bear visited Australia 



186 



anmnmtwttsnsp IVIUniCipcll xJiOVCi rllllCni rfGpOn mmmmmmmmmmmmHHm 



NASHUA SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Superintendent Berard Masse, Ph.D. 

Assistant Superintendents Joseph Giuliano 

John Cepaitis 
Business Manager Timothy Corwin 

Director of Personnel Jane Bangert 



ATHLETICS 

Nashua High School athletic teams completed their 1993-94 sport season with a record of 296 
wins, 100 losses and one tie 

In the fall season, the boys' soccer team won the state championship. The girls' soccer team 
finished the season with 14 wins, 3 losses, and one tie losing in the state championship finals. 
The girls' swim team won the Merrimack Valley Conference championship which is considered 
the most competitive league in Massachusetts. 

The boys' winter track team won the state championship held at the University of New 
Hampshire. The boys' ski team finished first in jumping in its division. 

The spring sports season brought two state championships. The girls' tennis team won its second 
consecutive state championship. The baseball team defeated previously undefeated Concord in 
the state finals for the championship. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS IN NASHUA 

In June of 1993, the Nashua Board of Education accepted a report by a group of Nashuan's who 
studied the issues of schooling of students at the middle level. This report came on the heels 
of the report of the Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development, Turning Points. Preparing 
Youth for the 21st Century. During the spring of 1994, the Board of Education set a goal to 
implement the precepts of the study it was presented in June of 1993 by June of 1998. 

As the faculty and parents of the City's three junior high schools study and debate the merits of 
various initiatives associated with middle schools, two events in a student's educational 
experience became the focus of concerns: adolescents entering puberty during these transition 
years, and the move from the elementary school organization to the secondary. Puberty is more 
than a physical change in an adolescent, it includes intellectual, emotional, and psychological 
change as well. The change from the elementary setting to a secondary school setting can 
establish a more impersonal environment than the one students previously knew. Each of the 
three schools will be discussing the merits of programmatic and organizational changes needed 
in the middle level school to properly address these two important developmental issues. 



187 



City of Nashua 



READING PROGRAM 



The Houghton Mifflin Reading Program was implemented in Grades 3 and 4 in 1993-94. The 
literature-based, integrated language arts program for Grades 1-6 is being phased in over three 
years and will be implemented in Grades 5 and 6 in 1994-95. 

Houghton Mifflin representatives have offered summer seminars for the past few years to train 
teachers in the program. Training continues during the year through workshops offered on early 
release days. Workshop topics included assessment, flexible grouping, and integrated language 
arts strategies. 

DISTRICT GOALS 1993-94 

1. To establish long term priorities for the school district based on ideas and recommendations 
from the NASHUA 2000 study. 

2. To start implementing those recommendations included in the Middle School Study 
Committee report which can be achieved regardless of grade level configuration (e.g. Grades 
7-9); also, to continue to assess whether the current grade level configuration should be 
altered. 

3. To continue the process of ensuring that employees and students are informed and educated 
in the requirements and goals of ADA, Title IX (covering sexual harassment and 
discrimination), Title VI (covering racial discrimination), and other aspects of civil rights. 

4. To continue with the implementation and refinement of a strengthened health education 
curriculum with specific attention paid to upgrading AIDS-avoidance education at age- 
appropriate levels. 

5. To achieve a long term housing solution for New Searles students in as expeditious a manner 
as possible, while successfully implementing a satisfactory short-term housing and educational 
solution. 

6. To continue to monitor and to assess a variety of school district initiatives including 
heterogeneous/flexible grouping, "Tech Prep", community service/senior projects, and 
increasing the number of credits needed to graduate. 

7. To improve all communications among all who have contact with the school district, including 
the Board, administration, teachers, students, parents, other government officials, taxpayers, 
and other citizens. 

8. To provide training opportunities for teachers so that they are able to use computers for 
classroom instruction and for other professional activities. 



188 



Municipal Government Report 



STUDENT AND FACULTY HONORS 

During 1993-94, Nashua School District students and staff have received many honors and 
awards for individual and group achievement. Among these are: 

Paul Collins, Nashua Senior High School, 1994 Valedictorian 

Alan Hallee and Diane Savage, Nashua High teachers, state level awardees for the Presidential 
Award of Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching 

Victor Espinosa, grade 6 student at Broad Street, one of two New Hampshire students chosen 
to attend NASA Space Camp in Huntsville 

Robert Gifford, Nashua Senior High School, Salutatorian 

John McCarthy, Main Dunstable fourth grader, New Hampshire winner in 5-12 year category 
of 1994 International Aviation Art Contest 

Rachel Soubousky, paraprofessional at Ledge Street, with her family named Nashua YMCA 
Family of the Year. 

Jeremy Rhodes, Nashua High student, selected to represent New Hampshire at the National 
Argonne Laboratory summer program 

Robert Pariseau, Vocational Education Director, selected as the New Hampshire Vocational 
Association's Vocational Educator of the Year 

Greg Poston, Nashua High student, selected to attend Brookhaven National Laboratory summer 
program 

Kay Porter, Broad Street teacher, participant in Hubble Telescope Repair Mission workshops 

Brian Herger, Nashua High student, chosen by Department of Energy to represent the U.S. in 
Particle Physics in Japan in summer 

Joan Cassidy, Main Dunstable art teacher, Carol Fonden, Sunset Heights teacher, and Michael 
McKnight, Sunset Heights teacher, authors of articles appearing in Arts & Activities Magazine. 
September 1993 Writing Teacher, and May 1994 Writing Teacher respectively 

Yudy Chen and Christine Williams, Nashua High students, named to 1994 New Hampshire All- 
State Orchestra; and Jill Bordeleau, Nashua High senior, named to New Hampshire All-State 
Band 

Paul Duquette, teacher at Nashua High, named New Hampshire Vocational Association's 
Vocational Teacher of the Year 

Robert Eames and Brandi Tilton, Nashua High, 1994 National Merit Scholarship finalists 



189 



City of Nashua 



Alan Bernstein, Donna Perreira, Diane Savage, and Marci Woodman, Nashua High School staff 
members, winners of the Cable in the Classroom competition 

Laura Levesque and Rana Juster, Winners of the regional and state Daughters of the American 
Revolution Essay competition 

Sammy Daghir, Mt. Pleasant 4th grader, one of 69 winners out of 25,000 entries in JAL Haiku 
Contest 

Julia Bressler, Language Department Coordinator, awarded honorary doctorate from Rivier 
College 

CAPITAL PROJECTS AND ISSUES 

Architectural/engineer work has begun on the New Searles project. Additions of 11,750 square 
feet, extensive renovations, improved ventilation, and conversion of the heating source from 
electricity to gas are key features of the work planned at New Searles. This facility should be 
ready for student use at the beginning of the 1995-96 school year. 

In the interim, a short term solution for housing most of the New Searles population was found 
at the former St. Louis School. The St. Louis facility was opened on schedule on September 1, 
1993, although some renovation work continued until around the Thanksgiving vacation. St. 
Louis School will be used again during the 1994-95 school year. 

Work may also be expected to start at Fairgrounds Junior High School during 1994-95. 
Additions and renovations are planned in order to increase capacity and to modernize this 32 
year old facility. Once the New Searles and Fairgrounds Junior High projects are completed, 
Nashua will have built and/or renovated all of its 16 school buildings since 1975. 

Despite much progress, many capital needs remain. Some portable classrooms will still be in 
use even after the completion of the New Searles and Fairgrounds Junior High projects. At least 
one more school is needed. 

NASHUA 2000 

The NASHUA 2000 study was largely completed during 1993. The Board of Education has since 
discussed recommendations from various NASHUA 2000 committees, including the groups 
dealing with children entering school ready to learn, safe and drug-free school environments, and 
student proficiencies and standards. 

i 

The NASHUA 2000 committee dealing with standards and proficiencies has continued with its 
work by examining innovative assessment models and looking at restructuring educational 
practices. Assistant Superintendent John Cepaitis was among a group of seven New Hampshire 
representatives to a U.S. Department of Education Conference convened to explain Goals 2000, 
a national education initiative to which Nashua's local plan bears parallels. 



190 



Municipal Government Report 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 

Nashua High School continues to be an active participant in the College Board's Advanced 
Placement Program. During the last 10 years, NHS students have taken nearly 1200 AP 
Examinations, with 82% of the scores being a "3" or higher. Nationally, few than 70% of AP 
examinees earn a score of "3" or higher. Thirteen AP course are now available at Nashua High 
School. 

TECH PREP 

The District's Tech Prep initiative began in earnest during the 1993-94 school year. The 
consortium of schools and colleges to which the District belongs hired a coordinator to 
spearhead planning and development efforts at the consortium level. 

With the District, a district-wide committee called Footsteps to the Future was formed. The 
committee selected a comprehensive R-12 career cluster curriculum model as the framework for 
the Tech Prep/School to Work Transition effort. The model requires an integrated, 
comprehensive career guidance program and reorganizes the curriculum into broad areas of 
study which include both academic and technical courses, and experiences. 

Staff and curriculum development activities are ongoing. Eight people from the District 
attended the National Tech Prep Conference to learn about successful implementation strategies 
and practices. District personnel also attended a variety of related state -level and district based 
workshops and seminars. Introduction of applied academics and interdisciplinary courses 
continues as does the exploration of other academic and vocational integration strategies such 
as the Ford Academy of Manufacturing Sciences. 

Curriculum development work will continue during the summer of 1994. When fully 
implemented, the curriculum model will reflect students' career goals. Each student will be 
assisted in developing realistic career aspirations and related educational goals. Each student 
will have an individual education and career plan to serve as a guide to course selection. Initial 
implementation is planned for the fall of 1995. 

ELEMENTARY HEALTH EDUCATION 

In 1993-94 the health education program in Grades 5 and 6 was expanded. The program is 
taught by a teacher who travels from school to school using the Great Body Shop curriculum and 
focusing on the topics of emotions, puberty, and HIV/AIDS. In conjunction with the program, 
two videos were selected for presentation. Grade 5 boys are shown a film entitled "Everything 
You Wanted to Know About Puberty for Boys"; and Grade 6 boys and girls are shown a video 
entitled "Kids to Kids, Talking About Puberty." 

The program for the most part has been well received by students and parents. 



191 



City of Nashua 



LENNY 




Lenny Holbrook displays many of the fiats 

given to him by students and friends 

at Nashua High School 



192 



Municipal Government Report 
WOODLAWN CEMETERY 



Superintendent Howard Frizzell 

Sub-foreman Dennis Sweeney 

Assistant Horticulturist David Coughlin 

Groundsman John Grafton 

TRUSTEES 

David Wells, President 

Charles Farwell, Jr., Secretary 

David Aponovich 

Lester Gidge 

Niles Jensen, Jr. 

Marvis Mellen 

Herbert Snow 

Gordon Tyszko 

Stanley Zis 



Fiscal year '93 was an eventful year for Woodlawn Cemetery. Highlighting our list of 
accomplishments was the acquisition of a John Deere backhoe/loader, the first ever at 
Woodlawn. This enables us not only to dig our own graves at our convenience, but also to save 
money by not having to contract it out. Added benefits from the backhoe include uprighting and 
leveling heavy monuments, tree pruning, stump removal, loam spreading, and numerous other 
tasks. It was especially helpful in snow removal this past winter. 

Again, because of the purchase of our backhoe, Woodlawn Cemetery is once again selling 
graveboxes for interments within our grounds. While this had been done for a time in the past, 
the health danger of manually putting the covers on the graveboxes (the boxes, but not the 
covers, were previously handled by our contracted backhoe) led us to discontinue the practice. 
Now we do the whole process with added revenue for the city. 

A major step forward was the beginning of construction of the south wing of the Woodlawn 
Chapel Mausoleum. Being built at no cost to the city, it provides the first area above ground 
burial facility. While providing an additional choice for people, it will also extend the life of the 
cemetery by creating an additional 500 plus burial spaces. Mullen Construction Company of 
New Milford, Connecticut, is building the addition to the existing chapel while Eagle Enterprises 
is in charge of sales. The south wing is expected to be finished in late summer or fall with the 
north wing to be built in the spring/summer of '95. 

In continuing to address the safety issues at the cemetery, roughly $3,500.00 worth of electrical 
work was contracted out. Much of it was done to bring the buildings up to code. Other safety 
items were handled by cemetery personnel. 

In an effort to enhance the grounds, Trustee Lester Gidge and his wife Eileen, established an 
arboretum fund for Woodlawn Cemetery. The interest from their generous donation will provide 
yearly seedlings for the new nursery. As they mature, they will be transplanted out to the 

193 



City of Nashua 



grounds. By growing the trees ourselves, it will save hundreds of dollars over purchasing them 
at size. 

Presently, we have 140 specimens that include evergreens and flowering shrubs as well as 
deciduous trees. Among them are 7 disease resistant American Elms. We expect to be planting 
out some of the faster growing trees, such as birch and red maple, next year. 



Included in the purchases of the Arboretum fund will be a newer variety of grass. The Reliant 
Hard Fescue is a slower growing endophytic (resistant to disease and insects) fine textured grass 
that requires virtually no fertilizer after the seedlings mature. We're looking to grow it in newly 
developed areas where it will maintain attractive turf with but two or three cuttings per year. 

To further beautify the grounds and encourage its use as a park for pedestrian use, old 
deteriorated benches that had not been in use for several years were refurbished. Varnished oak 
slats replaced the old boards on the newly painted benches. Six are now in various spots 
throughout the cemetery with more to follow. 

During the July-August drought of '93, the lack of mowing enabled us to do extensive monument 
repairs. An estimated 300 monuments were restored. Leaning and fallen monuments were 
uprighted and the ground packed with gravel to hold those in place that had no base. For those 
that were inserted into bases, plastic wedges were used to keep them in place. For repairing 
breaks, we used the same epoxy that is currently being used to repair and hold the "Old Man 
of the Mountain" together. We also found time to raise back to ground level many sunken 
markers. 

Several other noteworthy accomplishments during the interim were: (1) the continual removal 
of aged and dying trees in preparation for the replacements on the way (2) All bagging mowers 
were replaced with mulching mowers that put nitrogen back to the soil and save us from 
collecting grass piles (3) In a coordinated effort with Don Levesque, Superintendent of the Street 
Department, our most deteriorated road was re-paved (4) Many trees were taken down in an 
unimproved area of the cemetery in anticipation of developing a new area, and lastly (5) Howard 
Frizzell and Jeffrey Snow of Woodlawn and Edgewood Cemeteries respectively, were actively 
involved on behalf of the New Hampshire Cemetery Association in the process of recodifying 
RSA 289 (House Bill 1228) relative to cemeteries. The bill updates obsolete sections and 
provides for the protection of old cemeteries. 

We encourage any and all people to drop by and see all the changes at Woodlawn Cemetery. 



194