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Full text of "Report of the Secretary of the Interior Being Part of the Messages and Documents Communicated to the Two Houses of Congress at the Beginning of the Second Session of the Fifty-First Congress"

I 




REPORT 



SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR; 



BEING PAKT OF 



THE MESSAGE AND DOCUMENTS 



COMMUNICATED TO THE 



TWO HOUSES OF CONGRESS 



BEGINNING OF THE SECOND SESSION OF THE FIFTY-FIRST CONGRESS 



IN FIVE VOLUMES. 



VOLUME III 



WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 
1890. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/reportofsecretar903unit 






f' 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMISSIONER OF PATENTS 



Department of the Interior, 

United States Patent Office, 
Washington, D. (7., September 11, 1890. 
Sir : I have the honor to submit the following report of the business 
of this office during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890. 

The following statement, prepared in the usual condensed form, 
exhibits the transactions in the office during the period specified, and 
compares them in important particulars with the corresponding trans- 
actions during four previous years. It also shows the balance now in 
the Treasury of the United States on account of the patent fund : 

APPLICATIONS AND CAVEATS RECEIVED. 

Applications for letters patent 40, 201 

Applications for design patents 1,003 

Applications for reissue patents 121 

Applications for registration of trade-marks 1, 617 

Applications for registration of labels 868 

Caveats - 2,330 

Total 46,140 

PATENTS GRANTED AND TRADE-MARKS AND LABELS REGISTERED. 

Letters patent granted, including reissues and designs 25, 857 

Trade-marks registered 1,332 

Labels registered 304 

Total 27,493 

PATENTS WITHHELD AND PATENTS EXPIRED. 

Letters patent withheld for non-payment of final fee 3,403 

Letters patent expired 11,885 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

Receipts from all sources < $1,347,203.21 

Expenditures (including printing and binding, stationery, and contin- 
gent expenses) 1,081,173.56 

Surplus 266,029.65 

3 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT. 



June 30, 1886 
June 30, 1887 
June 30, 1888 
June 30, 1889 
June 30, 1890 



Keceipte. 



$1,206,167.80 
1,150,046.05 
1, 122, 994. 83 
1, 186, 557. 22 
1, 347, 203. 21 



Expenditures. 



$991,829.4 

981, 644. 01 

953, 730. 1- 

999, 697. 2- 

1, 081, 173. 5' 



INCREASE IN THE NUMBER OF APPLICATIONS FOR PATENTS, INCLUDING REISSUES 
DESIGNS, TRADE-MARKS, AND LABELS. 

June 30, 1886 38,67* 

Juue30,1887 38,40$ 

June 30, 1888 37,761 

June 30, 1889 39,70i 

June 30, 1890 43, 8K 

NUMBER OF APPLICATIONS AWAITING ACTION ON THE PART OF THE OFFICE. 

July 1,1886 6,77',', 

July 1,1887 7, 601 i 

July 1,1888 7,2271 

July 1,1889 7,07[- 

July 1, 1890 . , 6,58: 

BALANCE IN THE TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES ON ACCOUNT OF THE PATENI 

FUND. 

June 30, 1889 $3,524,526. 63 

June 30, 1890 26<5,029.65 

Total 3,790,556.28 

From the foregoing it will be seen that the total number of applica- 
tions received, including designs, reissues, etc., was 46,140 5 that the 
number of patents, etc., granted was 27,493 ; that the total receipts 
were $1,347,203.21; that the total expenditures were $1,081,173.50, 
leaving a surplus of $266,029.65 to be turned into the Treasury of the 
United States to the credit of the patent fund, and making a total bal- 
ance in the Treasury on account of the patent fund of $3,790,556.28. 

CONDITION OF BUSINESS. 



It is not without some satisfaction that I direct attention to the fact 
that, despite the great increase in the number of applications, the num- 
ber on hand in condition for action at the end of the last fiscal year 
was less than at the corresponding period in either of the four previous 
years. At the end of that year, too, the examinations of applications 
for patents in twenty-five of the examining divisions had been brought 
up to within two months of date, and all the, remaining divisions were 
less than three months in arrears. In my last report I expressed the 
belief that arrears in all of the examining divisions would be practically 
done away with at an early date. The very heavy increase in the 
amount of business, to which attention has been directed, is, in my 
opinion, the only reason why that belief has not been wholly vindicated. 
Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made and the work of the 
office is more nearly up to date than it has been in many years. This 
result is due not to any increase in the number of employes or to any 
additional facilities whatever, but is to be ascribed to the unflagging 
industry and well-directed skill of the entire force under my control. 



PATENTS. 6 

ACCOUNTING TO THE TREASURY. 

During the last fiscal year a better system of accounting to the Treas- 
ury Department has been adopted with the approval of the honorable 
Secretary. Under the present practice a full statement of moneys re- 
ceived from every source is furnished to the Treasury Department at 
he end of each month. When this statement is received, two officers 
ire deputed, one by the Fifth Auditor of the Treasury and the other 
>v the First Comptroller, who carefully examine the accounts in the 
Patent Office, and having ascertained that the report is correct so cer- 
iify upon its face. In addition, a quarterly account current is rendered 
;o the Treasury Department. This system has worked well, and is be- 
ieved to be an important improvement in the method of transacting 
ihe business in the office. 

PHOTOLITHOGRAPHIC WORK. 

The photolithographic work of the Patent Office has been done for 
nany years by Mr. Norris Peters, whose death during the last year is 
leeply lamented. After his death, which occurred July 15, 1889, the 
msiness was carried on by his administrator in fulfillment of the con- 
ract made with Mr. Peters covering the fiscal year. 1 do not think it 
nappropriate in this connection to refer to the fact that during the 
oany years Mr. Peters did the photolithograhic work for the Patent 
)ffice he was as solicitous to maintain a high standard of excellence as 
yere the officers of this bureau. The photolithographic drawings of 
he Official Gazette and of other publications of the Patent Office, un- 
iurpassed in excellence, constitute a monument to his memory. 

ADDITIONAL FORCE. 

The present force of the Patent Office is inadequate. I have no 
■eason to believe that the great increase in the amount of work done 
luring the past year has been accompanied by any deterioration in its 
iuality. On the contrary, I believe that such is not the fact. At the 
>ame time it must be admitted that the pace kept up in the Patent 
Office now, as during all recent years, is inconsistent with that high 
legree of care in conducting examinations which the patent system 
jails for. The Government undertakes on behalf of the inventor not 
mly to give him a patent if his improvement is new and useful, but to 
jonduct a painstaking examination in order to ascertain what the fact 
s in that regard. The fees paid by the inventors for that purpose are 
imple, as is abundantly proved by the surplus over and above all ex- 
cuses, which, increasing yearly, is paid into the Treasury by this Office 
mder the present system. There can be no excuse, excepting inade- 
piacy of force, for failure to make the examinations thorough and ex- 
laustive, and inadequacy of force, though it may excuse the Patent 
3ffice, is no excuse for the Government. The search for anticipating 
levices and processes should continue until a moral certainty is reached 
hat further search would be unavailing. 

A patent should evidence such painstaking care in examination that 
ipon its face it should warrant a preliminary injunction, and there can 
>e little doubt that the permanence of the American " examination sys- 
em " depends upon so conducting the examinations into the novelty of 
lleged inventions as to make the seal of the Patent Office create a pow- 
rful if not a conclusive presumption that the patent is valid. I am 



6 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

aware that after the most exhaustive examination there still will re- 
main a margin of possibility that the result of the examination is not to 
be relied upon. No examiner can possibly be aware of all that has been 
done which has not found a place in patents or in printed publications ; 
but in this age of printing and publicity there is no reason why an ex- 
amination sufficiently painstaking and exhaustive should not aiford a 
practical guaranty that the patented thing was original with the pat- 
entee. Because, then, of the large increase in the number of applica- 
tions for patents, and because of the necessity of more deliberate and 
exhaustive examination, and because of the fact that American inven- 
tors are already paying the necessary expenses, I recommend a substan- 
tial increase in the examining corps of the Patent Office. Of course 
such an increase would necessitate a corresponding increase in the cler- 
ical and laboring force of the bureau. There are now thirty examining 
divisions. They should be increased to thirty-two, at least, and the 
additional force of examiners should include two principal examiners 
and at least fifteen assistant examiners of various grades. 

ADDITIONAL ROOM. 

I beg to refer to what I said upon this subject in my last annual re- 
port to the honorable Secretary. The same situation continues to ex- 
ist, excepting that the imperative need of a larger force increases the 
necessity for additional room. 

COMPENSATION OF EXAMINERS. 

The salary of the Principal Examiners is $2,500. This salary was 
fixed by Congress in 1848. It has never been increased. For a num- 
ber of years past only $2,400 has been appropriated. I am pleased to 
report that the appropriation for the current year covers the full sum 
provided by the statute; but a salary which was just in 1848 is not just 
in 1890. Aside from the fact that all salaries have been increased, on 
account of the increased cost of living, the present examiners of the 
Patent Office do far more and better work than was done by their pre- 
decessors forty years ago. Owing to the wonderful progress in every 
art, they are required to be much more learned. They are now experts 
of the highest order; they have legal ability aud executive capacity. 
And what is true of the Principal Examiners is true in a proportionate 
degree of the Assistant Examiners, whose salaries ought also to be aug- 
mented. The Patent Office can not expect to maintain an examining 
corps of the highest order of ability unless the salaries are made com- 
mensurate with services rendered, and no one who has ever considered 
the subject has ever maintained that salaries established forty years 
ago are now just or reasonable. 

LEGISLATION. 

It is proper that I should call attention to needed legislation. Addi- 
tional legislation affecting this Bureau is needed in two directions. The 
internal machinery of administration should be somewhat altered, and 
the statutes regulating the granting and terms of patents need amend- 
ment. 

Examiners ■ in-chief. 

The Board of Examiners-in-Chief, consisting of three members, was 
created by act of Congress, approved March 2, 1801. One purpose as- 
signed by the statute creating the Board was " for the purpose of secur- 



PATENTS. 7 

ing greater uniformity of action in the grant and refusal of letters 
patent.'- The Examiners-in-Chief have jurisdiction over appeals from 
the decisions of the Primary Examiners and the Examiner of Interfer- 
ences. From all decisions of the Examiners-in-Chief further appeal lies 
to the Commissioner. 1 am satisfied that this latter appeal should be 
done away with. The term of office of the Examiners-in-Chief is per- 
manent, and the highest appellate tribunal of the office should, like 
other judicial bodies, possess a permanent tenure. Another reason is 
found in the fact that with the growth of the business in the Patent 
Office it has become impossible for the Commissioner to discharge prop- 
erly his appellate judicial powers as now devolved upon him by law. 

The number of written decisions rendered by the Commissioner and 
Assistant Commissioner in appellate proceedings during the last fiscal 
year was eight hundred and twenty-five. Those decisions were made in 
two classes of cases — appeals directly from the decisions of the Princi- 
pal Examiners, including the Examiner of Interferences, and appeals from 
the decisions of the Board of Examiners-in-Chief. The first class of 
cases relates to administrative functions, and may be called u executive 
appeals." The second class presents questions for decision essentially 
judicial in their character, and may be called "judicial appeals." Ot 
the eight hundred and twenty-five decisions referred to about two 
hundred were rendered in cases that came up on appeal from the Exam- 
iners-in-Chief. Some of these cases presented important questions 
involving the patentability of inventions, and others involved the 
determination between rival claimants of the question which was the 
original first inventor. I am satisfied that no appeals should come to the 
Commissioner from the Examiners-in-Chief, and that his judicial juris- 
diction over that body should go no farther than to grant new trials 
and rehearings in proper cases, according to the principles regulating 
such proceedings. I therefore recommend that proper steps be taken 
to secure an amendment to the law, having the effect to cut oft" all 
appeals from the Board of Examiners-in-Chief to the Commissioner, and 
at the same time affording the Commissioner the rjower to grant new 
trials or rehearings. 

The appeal which now lies in ex parte cases from the Commissioner to 
the supreme court of the District of Columbia should be made to lie 
direct from the Board of Examiners-in-Chief to that court. Such a 
change in the organization of the Patent Office would relieve the Com- 
missioner of a portion of that burden which is now too great to be prop- 
erly discharged. It would save litigants the expense, annoyance, and 
delay of two appeals, where one should be sufficient, and it would 
secure that uniformity in decisions which the original act creating the 
board contemplated. The members of the board should receive the 
same compensation as the judges of the United States district courts, 
and be required to possess the same qualifications for the discharge of 
judicial duty. I think, too, they should be five in number. 

Limitation of patents. 

It is provided by section 4887 of the Revised Statutes that every 
patent granted for an invention that has been previously patented in a 
foreign country shall be so limited as to expire at the same time with 
the foreign patent, or, if there be more than one, at the same time with 
the one having the shortest term. It is believed that this section was 
intended to prevent foreign applicants from obtaining patents in the 
United States of longer duration than the home patents previously 
taken out by them. Owing, however, to the unfortunate language em- 



8 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

ployed in the statute, the courts have not been able to limit its con- 
struction to its intended scope and purpose. Its practical effect at the 
present time is to impose a penalty upon American inventors who patent 
their inventions abroad before their domestic patents are granted. 
There can be no sound reason for thus discriminating against the Ameri- 
can iuventors who patents his invention abroad. All persons competent 
to judge in the matter agree in the conclusion that section 4887 of the 
Revised Statutes should be modified so as to prevent a foreign patent 
previously obtained from affecting the duration of the American grant 
to the same inventor for the same invention. 

It should be added that by no method can the Patent Office always 
satisfy itself whether a foreign patent has been obtained or not. An 
application, for instance, may be pending in the British patent office 
six months and may become a patent two days in advance of the date 
of the American grant to the same inventor for the same invention. 
In such a case the American patent should, according to the provisions 
of the statute referred to, expire at the end of fourteen years from the 
date of the foreign application, that being the date on which the foreign 
patent would expire. But this Office can have no legal evidence tbat 
such a patent has been granted, nor can it ordinarily obtain any infor- 
mation, hearsay or otherwise, upon the subject. Indeed, the foreign 
patent may be granted after the American patent has been printed and 
before its signature, and even in that case the American grant is limited 
by the duration of the foreign term. 

Again, the change proposed should be made, in order that the Ameri- 
can inventors may have the benefit of the provisions of the International 
Union for the Protection of Industrial Property, of which union the 
United States is a member. By the terms of that union persons who 
have made application for patents in one of the States constituting the 
union may within a definite period apply for a patent upon the same in- 
vention in the other countries belonging to the union without being 
prejudiced by intermediate acts, such as the publication or use of the 
patented article. The period now fixed for that purpose is six months, 
an additional month being allowed to countries beyond the sea, thus 
giving the citizens of the United States seven months from the filing 
date of their domestic applications within which to apply abroad with- 
out the loss of any rights existing at the date of the American applica- 
tion ; but it is by no means an unusual thing for the American appli- 
cation to be much more than seven months in maturing into a patent. 
In a great many cases interference proceedings arise with other ap- 
plications or prior patents. Sometimes several parties are involved in a 
contest for priority and a complicated trial results, extending over an 
unfortunately long period of time. In all such cases the American in- 
ventor must be deprived of the benefits designed to result from the Union 
for the Protection of Industrial Property, or he must apply for a foreign 
patent within the treaty period of seven months. In case he elects to 
accept the latter alternative, his foreign application is likely to mature 
into a patent before the obstacles to the granting of the American patent 
are removed, in which case section 4887 applies and limits the duration 
of the American patent, besides making it almost impossible to tell 
when the shortened term will expire. 

Interstate trade-marls. 

According to the present law only such trade-marks as are used in 
connection with foreign commerce or with commerce with the Indian 
tribes are registered in the Patent Office. It is believed that there is 



PATENTS. 9 

no sound reason for leaving trade-marks used in interstate commerce 
unprotected by registration. This question is presented in a new aspect 
by the adhesion of the United States to the Union for the protection of 
Industrial Property. Article VI of the convention acceded to provides : 

Every trade or commercial mark regularly deposited iu the country of origin shall 
be admitted to deposit and so protected in all the other countries of the Union. 

Additional legislation would seem to be required to enable citizens 
of the United States to lay a basis for registration abroad by first effect- 
ing domestic registration when these trade-marks are used in commerce 
among the States, and also to euable aliens to secure by appropriate 
Congressional action the benefit of the treaty stipulations. 

Payment of patent fees. 

Section 4885 of the Revised Statutes provides that every patent shall 
bear date as of a day not later than six months from the time at which 
it was passed and allowed and notice thereof was sent to the applicant 
or his agent, and that if the final fee is not paid within that period the 
patent shall be withheld. Section 4935 provides that patent fees may 
be paid to the Commissioner of Patents, or to the Treasurer, or any of 
the assistant treasurers of the United States, or to any of the desig- 
nated depositaries, national banks, or receivers of public money desig- 
nated by the Secretary of the Treasury. No method is provided by law 
for enabling the Patent Office to know that payment has been made to 
any of the officers designated in the latter section of the statute. The 
practice at present is for the officer receiving money for patent fees to 
deliver a certificate of deposit to the depositor, to be by him furnished 
to the Patent Office. It results in many cases that the fee is paid 
within the six months provided for by section 4885, while the Office re- 
mains in ignorance of the payment until after the expiration of that 
period. Of course the patent can not bear date within six months from 
the time of its allowance. Hence the Office resorts to the practice of 
re-allowing the application, in order to comply with the terms of the 
statute. Clearly the law should be amended so as to require the officer 
receiving the money to forward the certificate of deposit, or a duplicate 
thereof, to the Commissioner of Patents, and this certificate should not 
only state what sum was paid, but also on account of what application 
or service the payment was made. Perhaps the same object could be 
secured by a Treasury regulation. Either by an amendment to the 
law or by the method last suggested a remedy should certainly be found 
for the evil pointed out. 

Charge for certified copies of printed matter. 

My attention has frequently been called to the hardship which the 
present law imposes in its charge for certified copies of printed matter. 
Section 4934 of the Revised Statutes provides that for a certified printed 
copy of a patent a charge of 10 cents per hundred words shall be made. 
The price of the same printed patent if uncertified is 25 cents per copy. 
The charge for the official certificate to any paper is 25 cents, and it 
would seem but just that the Commissioner should be authorized to 
furnish printed copies of patents at the present rate with the additional 
charge of the certificate, I would respectfully suggest that the law 
might be amended to read as follows : 

For certified copies of patents and other papers, when written copies are required,, 
ten cents per hundred words ; hut when certified printed copies of pateuts are required, 
twenty-five cents for the printed copy and twenty-five cents for the certificate thereof. 



10 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 
SALARY OF COPYISTS. 

In this Bureau there are seventy- six copyists, receiving the salary of 
$720 per annum. If I am correctly informed, in all other bureaus of 
the Department of the Interior the lowest salary paid to copyists is 
$900 per year, and I recommend that steps be taken to secure the same 
salary for the seventy-six copyists referred to. As the matter now 
stands, there is a disposition on the part of copyists receiving the salary 
of $720 per annum to seek a transfer to other bureaus, in which for the 
same services they will receive $900. This discrimination against the 
Patent Office is both unwise and, I think, unintended, and has the 
effect to cause the loss from time to time of trained employes, who 
would prefer to remain in the Patent Office if they could receive the 
salary paid elsewhere in the same Department. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

C. E. Mitchell, 

Commissioner. 

The Secretary of the Interior. 



REPORT 



OF 



THE COMMISSIONER OF PENSIONS. 



Department of the Interior, 

Bureau of Pensions, 
Washington, D. C, October 4, 1890. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following statement of the 
business of this Bureau for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1890, also 
information to September 30, 1890, concerning the operations of the 
office for the enforcement of the pension act of June 27, 1890, and the 
act increasing the clerical force of the Bureau and the arrangements 
for the enforcement of said Pension act. I also submit herewith certain 
tables setting forth fully the business of the office. 

There were on June 30, 1890, 537,944 pensioners borne upon the rolls, 
and classified as follows : 

Army invalid pensioners 392,809 

Army widows, minor children and dependent relatives 104, 456 

Navy invalid pensioners 5, 274 

Navy widows, minor children and dependent relatives 2, 460 

Survivors of the war of 1812 - 413 

Widows of soldiers of the war of 1812 8,610 

Survivors of the Mexican war 17, 158 

Widows of soldiers of the Mexican war 6,764 

Total 537,944 

There were 66,637 original claims allowed during the year, being 
14,716 more original claims than were allowed during the fiscal year 
1889, and 6,385 more than were allowed during the fiscal year 1888. 

Tbe amount of the first pay ments in these 66,637 original cases amounted 
to $32,478,841.18, being $11,036,492.05 more than the first payments on 
the original claims allowed during the fiscal year 1889, and $10,179,- 
225.72 more than the first payments on the original claims allowed dur- 
ing the fiscal year 1888. 

The average value of the first payments on these original claims for 

1890 was $485.71. 

11 



12 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

The average annual value of each pension at the close of the fiscal 
year was $133.94. 

At the close of the fiscal year there remained in the hands of pension 
agents the sum of $580,283.87 of the pension fund which had not been 
disbursed for want of time, and which has been returned to the Treas- 
ury; and there were 20,638 pensioners unpaid at the close of the fiscal 
year who were entitled to receive $4,357,347.30, which has since been 
paid from the appropriation for pensions for the fiscal year 1891. 

These facts are fully set forth in table No. 5. 

The total amount disbursed on account of pensions, expenses, etc., 
was $106,493,890.19. 

CHANGES IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE OFFICE. 

Upon taking charge of the Bureau of Pensions in October, 1889, I 
examined into the organization of the office and the methods of trans- 
acting the business. I soon decided that a number of important 
changes were necessary to secure satisfactory results , and although I 
brought these matters to your attention at the time I think it proper to 
make a record of them in this report. I found — 

(1) That there was no satisfactory specified duties provided for the 
Deputy Commissioners or the Chief Clerk, either bylaw or by regula- 
tions. 

(2) That several thousand letters were daily received from claimants 
and their attorneys, making complaints of delay and inquiries as to the 
condition of pension claims, to which no acknowledgment or reply was 
made. 

(3) That the accounts of the Bureau were assigned to three different 
divisions. 

(4) That the Medical Division was divided into sections for the con- 
sideration of certain classified diseases. 

(5) That the power of re-opening claims was exercised by heads of 
divisions and examiners without submitting the cases to the Commis- 
sioner or Deputy Commissioners. 

(6) That claims were drawn from the files, from day to day, for ad- 
judication at the discretion of the file clerks, claimants having no power 
to cause the settlement of their claims when complete. 

(7) That about 18 per cent, of the official force was assigned to duty 
in the field for the special examination of cases, and that there were 
14,335 cases in the Special Examination Division. 

(8) That a division had been created called the Board of Re-review, 
composed of about forty persons, for the re-examination of cases passed 
upon by the Board of Review. 

(9) That matters relating to the appointment and promotion of the 
official force of the Pension Office and of Boards of Medical Examiners 
were under the direction of two divisions. 



PENSIONS. 13 

For the purpose of effecting, what I conceived to be necessary chauges 
in the administration of the affairs of the Bureau, I issued the following 
orders : 

Department op the Interior, Bureau of Pensions, 

Washington, D. C, November 4, 1889. 
Order No. 145.] 

For the convenient transaction of the business of the Bureau the following assign- 
ment of duties is made : 

(1) The First Deputy Commissioner will supervise the business arising in the 
following-named divisions: Eastern Division, Southern Division, and Army and 
Navy Survivors' Division. 

(2) The Second Deputy Commissioner will supervise the business arising in the 
following-named divisions: Middle Division, Western Division, and Old War and 
Navy Division. 

(3) All cases involving intricate questions of law or fact will be brought to the 
personal attention of the Commissioner for his action by the proper Deputy Commis- 
sioner. 

(4) All claims involving a large first payment, and all claims involving monthly 
payments of more than $12, shall be brought to the personal attention of the Com- 
missioner, by the proper Deputy Commissioner, in conjunction with the proper heads 
of divisions. 

(5) The Chief Clerk will have the supervision of the following-named divisions: 
Record Division, Stationery and Accounts Division, Mail Division ; also the force of 
messengers, laborers, etc. 

The Chief Clerk will also have the general supervision of the business of the Bu- 
reau and take care that proper discipline is maintained and that the business is con- 
ducted in an orderly and business-like manner, reporting immediately to the Com- 
missioner any neglect, misconduct, or inefficiency of the clerical force. 

He will see that a proper and prompt acknowledgment is made of all letters and 
documents received. 

He will also see that claims are taken from the files for consideration in their proper 
order as to precedence. 

He will see that the Pension Bureau building and grounds are put in perfect order 
and so kept, and to this end he will carefully inspect the force of messengers, labor- 
ers, and messenger boys as to their fitness for the work required of them. 

(6) The following-named divisions will be under the immediate supervision of the 
Commissioner: Medical Division, Law Division, Board of Review, Board of Re- 
review, Special Examination Division, Certificate Division, and Finance Division. 

(7) The pending claims now T on file in this Bureau constitute so great a mass that 
it is a physical impossibility to give them all immediate consideration. 

I am anxious that the Bureau shall meet the just expectations of claimants and the 
public in the amount of business transacted and the manner in which the duties are 
performed. To this end I enjoin upon the entire official force — those on duty here in 
Washington, those assigned to duty as special examiners, and the boards of medical 
examiners — promptness, diligence, and fidelity in the performance of every duty. 

Recommendations for promotion will be made upon merit. The inefficient will be 
recommended for retirement. 

Green B. Raum, 

Commissioner. 

An order was also issued conferring upon the Finance Division the 
authority to adjust all the accounts of the Bureau. 

I gave verbal directions to the Medical Referee on November 15 for 
the re-organization of the Medical Division, with a view to having the 



14 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

examiners and reviewers consider all classes of cases as they were pre- 
sen ted to them. 
On November 25, 1889, I issued the following order: 

Washington, D. C, November 25, 1889. 

Order No. 148.] 

(1) Great care must be exercised in the rejection of applications for pension. No 
case should be rejected until every available source of information has been exam- 
ined, unless the rejection be clearly upon legal points. 

All letters rejecting claims shall be brought to the desk of the Commissioner for 
signature. 

(2) No rejected claims will be re-opened, except upon new and material evidence 
going to the cause of rejection. 

The Deputy Commissioners will have jurisdiction to re-open claims in the divisions 
respectively assigned to their charge. 

In all cases where evidence is filed for the re-opening of cases, the heads of adjudi- 
cating divisions will, at the proper time, cause to be prepared a brief statement of 
the facts on slips for the action of the Deputy Commissioner, who shall note his 
action thereon, whereupon the claimant shall be immediately informed by lettor of 
the action of the Office. 

Green 13. Raum, 

Commissioner. 

The following orders were issued to change the system of drawing 
cases from the files and for establishing the system of " Completed 

Files:" 

Department of the Interior, 

Bureau of Pensions, 
Washington, D. C, December 23, 1889. 
Order No. 149.] 

The files of pending claims in each division shall at once be examined, counted, 
and proper account taken of the same. 

Where a claim, upon inspection of the jacket and testimony strapped to the case, 
seems to be complete, a proper record shall be made of the claim on a card prepared 
for that purpose, and the case shall be kept upon a list known as the " Completed 
Files," and these cases shall be considered in the order of the filing of the last piece 
of evidence. 

Upon examination of these cases, if it is found that another call for evidence is re- 
quired, such call shall be made, and the case returned to the files of pending cases to 
await the reply to the call. When the evidence in response to that call is furnished, 
the claim shall at once be restored to the list of " Completed Files" and the claimant 
notified. 

Placing a claim on the list of "Completed Files" shall not be considered as a favor- 
able adjudication of the claim. This arrangement is intended simply to secure the 
consideration of the claims which are apparently completed, at the earliest possible 
date. The " Completed Files "shall also be arranged so as to separate the original 
cases from the increase cases. 

Hereafter all calls for evidence shall be made upon blanks which shall indicate by 
number the nature of the call, and a record of such call shall be made upon a card, 
opposite the number on the card corresponding with the number of the call in the 
blank. 

Claimants and their attorneys are urgently requested to prepare their evidence in 
response to these calls according to the number, and to indorse on the back of the 
evidence " Reply to call No. , , 18—." 



PENSIONS. 15 

These " calls for evidence" cards shall he strapped to the case, and as the evidence 
in reply to the call is received the file clerk shall immediately record the dato of the 
receipt of the evidence at the proper nuinher of the call, and this new evidence shall 
he strapped to the case. 

When the last evidence called for is received and a record thereof raado on the card, 
the case shall at once he entered on the list of " Completed Files" in its proper order 
and the claimant notified. 

All answers to applications for status of cases on the list of " Completed Files" 
shall he upon a blank informing the applicant that the case is pending in the " Com- 
pleted Files." 

Hereafter the order of procedure in original cases shall be as follows : 

(1) The Mail Division shall deliver all applications for pension to the Record Divis- 
ion on the day received. 

(2) The Record Division shall promptly make a record of the case, give it a number, 
and acknowledge the receipt of it, and refer it to the proper division. 

(3) A call shall be made upon the Secretary of War for a report of the military 
service and hospital record of the claimant. 

(4) An order for the medical examination of the claimant shall be made, and a call 
shall be made upon the claimant for such evidence as seems necessary to complete 
the case upon blanks which shall habitually use the same number for the same call. 
A proper record card shall be made for the case and the case put upon the files of 
pending claims. When the last piece of evidence called for has been received and a 
record made of the same upon the card, the case shall be placed upon the list of 
" Completed Files" to be considered in its order. 

Chiefs of divisions shall require examiners to devote their entire time during five 
days of the week to the consideration of cases borne upon the list of " Completed 
Files." 

On Saturday of each week the entire force of examiners shall devote themselves to 
the examination of cases borne upon the pending files and in the preparation of the 
necessary calls for evidence in those cases. On Friday afternoon of each week the 
file clerks shall withdraw from the pending files fifteen cases for each examiner, and 
have themnlaced upon the desks of the examiners before 4 o'clock on Friday afternoon. 

Green B. Raum, 

Commissioner. 



Department op the Interior, 

Bureau of Pensions, 
Washington. D. C, January 6, 1890. 
Order No. 151.] 

Claimants are hereby authorized to apply to the Commissiorer of Pensions to have 
their claims placed upon the list of " Completed Files" for immediate consideration. 
Such applications may be made by the claimants or their attorneys of record, and 
shall set forth : 

(1) That the declaration has been made in due form, stating the proper service of 
the soldier and the facts as to incurrence of his disability in, and his discharge from, 
the service. 

(2) That the proof establishes that the disability alleged in the declaration was 
incurred in the service and line of duty. 

(3) That the proof connects the present disability for which pension is claimed 
with wounds or diseases incurred in the service, and establishes the fact of disa- 
bility during any past pensionable period. 

(4) That the claimant has, with the authority of the Bureau of Pensions, had a 
regular medical examination in respect to the disability described and claimed for 
in the declaration. 



16 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

(5) That, in the opinion of the claimant, the claim is fully made out and coin- 
In the claims of widows it must be alleged that proof has been made showing 
that the soldier died of an injury or disease contracted iu the service, and that 
claimant is the soldier's widow. 

In the case of dependent relatives it must be stated that the proper proof of depend- 
ence has been filed in the claim and that the soldier left no widow or minor children. 
If the application is made by the attorney of record, in addition to the other state- 
ments required he shall certify upon honor that, after a careful consideration of the 
case, he is of the opinion that the case is complete. 

Claims placed upon the list of " Completed Files " under this order will be consid- 
ered in the order of the date they are so placed. 
This order does not apply to rejected cases.. 

Green B. Raum, 

Commissioner. 

About forty persons were recalled from duty in the field as special 
examiners and assigned to duty in the adjudicating divisions of the 
Bureau. 

On December 21, 1889, an order was issued abolishing the Board of 
Re-review and distributing the force employed there amongst other 
divisions. 

On November 22, 1889, an order was issued creating an Appointment 
Division in the Pension Office, which division has charge of the appoint- 
ments and promotions of the official force of the office and also of the 
establishment of the different medical boards throughout the country. 

These orders have had the effect of putting the office upon a thorough 
business basis. The Deputy Commissioners and Chief Clerk have as- 
signed to them important and well-defined duties. Letters of inquiry 
from claimants are acknowledged on the day of their receipt. All 
accounts of the Bureau are adjusted by the Finance Division. The 
Medical Division has been reorganized. Rejected claims are now re- 
opened upon the order of a Deputy Commissioner. And all claims carry- 
ing a large first payment receive the consideration of a Deputy Com- 
missioner and the Commissioner before final allowance. 

THE " COMPLETED FILES. n 

The "Completed Files," or trial docket, I regard as of great impor- 
tance in securing the prompt adjudication of completed cases upon the 
motion of the claimant or his attorney. 

Prior to the establishment of this system, the complaint was almost 
universal that thousands of claims were pending in the Office, the con- 
sideration of which had been neglected for years, and that the claimants 
were powerless to secure their consideration. A soldier had a right 
to file an application for a pension and to present all the evidence nec- 
essary to prove his claim, but he had no power to bring that claim 
before an adjudicating division by any action on his part, the drawing 
of his claim from the files for that purpose being in the discretion of a 
file clerk. 

Under the system of the "Completed Piles" the claimant has a right, 
upon a proper certification that his claim is complete, to have it imine- 



PENSIONS. 17 

(1 lately placed upon the " Completed Files" and taken up in its order for 
adjudication. Claims placed upon the u Completed Files" are taken up 
within a week for action, and if found complete are immediately allowed. 
If proofs are lacking a call is immediately made upon the claimant to 
supply the deficiency, and upon the receipt of the required evidence the 
claim is again taken up for consideration. The soldier who is entitled 
to a pension and promptly furnishes the required evidence to establish 
his claim should have his case disposed of without delay. He should 
have the right to notify the office that he is ready for trial, and not be 
compelled to await the action of a file clerk in drawing his claim ; for 
however diligent the file clerks may be, it is impossible for them, when 
there are a million claims pending, as is now the case, to have such 
knowledge of their condition as to enable them daily to select the cases 
which should have precedence in adjudication because of their priority 
of completion. 

The " Completed Files " system is an orderly method of procedure. 
It gives the claimant the right, upon completing his case, to give notice 
and have it adjudicated. 

To June 30, 99,761 claims had been placed upon the " Completed 
Files " upon requests made on behalf of claimants. 

This system has had the effect of enabling many thousand claimants 
whoso claims have been pending from five to twenty years to bring their 
claims to the attention of the Bureau for adjudication and allowance. 

From December 1, 1889, to June 30, 1890, there were allowed and 
paid 5,273 claims with first payments of $1,000 and upwards. 

The complaint of delay has been reduced to a minimum. This sys- 
tem throws the responsibility upon the claimant and his attorney of 
having the claim adjudicated, and has proved to be more satis factory 
than the old system of leaving the selection of claims for adjudication 
to the discretion of the file clerks. 

.As a result of these changes in the business methods of the Office, more 
work has been accomplished in a given time than was ever performed 
before. On the 21st of October, 1889, when I took charge of the Office, 
the work of adjudicating claims and issuing certificates had, during the 
period from July 1, 1889, fallen far behind the same period for the pre- 
vious fiscal year; while from October 20, 1889, to June 30, 1890, there 
was an increase in the adjudication of claims and the issuing of certifi- 
cates greatly in excess of the same period of the preceding fiscal year. 
This will be clearly seen from the following figures : 

Total number of certificates issued from July 1 to October 19, 1888 46, 904 

Total number of certificates issued from July 1 to October 19, 1889 30, 664 

Falling off in the issues for the period in 1889 16, 664 

Total number of certificates issued from October 20, 1889, to June 30, 1890.. 121,418 
Total number of certificates issued from October 20, 1888, to June 30, 1889.. 98,338 

Increase in the work for 1890 23,080 

INT 90— VOL III 2 



18 KEPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Total number of certificates issued, year ending Juno 30, 1890 151 , 658 

Total number of certificates issued, year ending June 30, 1889 145, 292 

Total number of certificates issued, year ending June 30, 1888 113, 081 

Increase in 1890 over 1889 6,366 

Increase in 1890 over 1888 - 38,577 

Total of original certificates issued, year ending June 30, 1890 66, 637 

Total of original certificates issued, year ending June 30, 1889 51, 896 

Increase in 1890 over 1889 14,741 

This great amount of work was accomplished by distributing the 
clerks who composed the Board of Re-review amongst other divisions 
and calling in forty special examiners from the field, thus adding eighty 
persons to the force engaged in the adjudication of claims ; and particu- 
larly by concentrating the work of the Office for live days in the week, 
upon the adjudication of claims as provided for in Order No. 149, creat- 
ing the system of u Completed Files." 

SPECIAL EXAMINATION OF CLAIMS. 

The number of claims which had been ordered for special examination 
was so great that it seemed to me important to make a special effort to 
have the work of that division brought into reasonable bounds. I urged 
upon the examiners great diligence in the performance of their duties, 
and in June last I detailed 11G persons as an additional force for this 
work, making in all 333 on duty in the field. I am glad to be able to 
report as a result of these efforts that the number of cases now in the 
hands of the Special Examination Division has been reduced from 14,225 
to 7,824 ; of these only about 5,000 are in the hands of special examiners, 
the others being in transitu to and from the Office. 

IN RELATION TO ACT OF APRIL 4, 1890. 

The act of Congress approved April 4, 1890, providing for a defi- 
ciency of $21,598,834 for the payment of pensions during the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1890, directed that, as far as practicable, the Commis- 
sioner of Pensions should, in his annual report, state the amount paid 
for pensions during the fiscal year for which the report was made in 
such a manner as will show separately the number of pensioners, and 
the aggregate payments for pensions on account of each of the wars 
for which pensions have been authorized, and on account of military 
and naval services since the close of the late war. 

After a very careful consideration of the vast amount of work neces- 
sarily incident to the preparation of the statistical information called 
for in this law, and of the amount of other work which was necessary 
to be done in order to keep up the adjudication of the pension claims in 
the Office, I reached the conclusion that it was not practicable to furnish 
the information called for in said act, for the reason that such informa- 
tion could be given only after an examination of each of the 775,310 
cases upon the admitted files of this Bureau. 



PENSIONS. 19 

OPERATIONS OF THE LAW DIVISION. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890, there were received — 

Motions for reconsideration of former departmental decisions 676 

Appeals on questions of title 3,901 

Total appeals received. 4,577 

Reports to the Secretary on pending appeals 2,913 

Cases in which the action of the Commissioner was affirmed by the Secretary.. 827 

Cases in which the action of the Commissioner was reversed by the Secretary .. 194 
Cases in which former departmental decisions were reversed by the Secretary 

on motion for reconsideration 47 

Appeals now pending awaiting report - 1,664 

Money recovered by refundment (illegally obtained) and covered into the 
Treasury $14,017.57 

Money recovered (where illegally withheld) and turned over to pensioner 78. 00 

Total amount recovered 14,095.57 

TOTAL OFFICIAL FORCE. 

The official force of the Bureau of Pensions — 

Now authorized by law - 2,009 

There are 18 Pension Agents and 419 persons employed at said Agencies, in all 437 
There are 1,028 Boards of Medical Examiners, of three persons each, and 383 sin- 
gle Surgeon Examiners, in all 3, 467 

Total number of persons employed in connection with the Bureau of Pen- 
sions , 5,913 

STATEMENT OF MAILS RECEIVED AND SENT FOR THREE MONTHS. 

That the public may have a proper understanding of the immense 
amount of business that is now being transacted in this Bureau, I lay 
before you the following statement of mail matter received and sent 
out during the months of July, August, and September, just passed : 

Amount of mail received in — 

July, 1890 341,451 

August, 1890 601,657 

September, 1890 333,621 

Total 1,276,729 

Amount of mail sent out in — 

July, 1890 226,076 

August, 1890 181,325 

September, 1890 188,061 

Total 485,462 

THANKS TO THE OFFICIAL FORCE. 

I take pleasure in stating that I have found the official force of 
the Office prompt and diligent in the performance of every duty, and I 
extend to them my sincere thanks for the large amount of work that 
has been accomplished during the few months that I have been con- 
nected with the Office. 



20 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE ACTS OF MARCH 3, 1883, AND MARCH 4, 1890. 

I respectfully invite your attention to the great difference in amount 
between the rate of $30 per month granted by the act of March 3, 1883, 
to pensioners who are so disabled as to be incapacitated for performing 
any manual labor, and the rate of $72 per month granted by the act of 
March 4, 1890, to pensioners who require the regular aid and attend- 
ance of another person. There are many claimants who are entirely 
incapacitated for performing manual labor and who periodically require 
the aid and attendance of other persons, but who are unable to establish 
the fact of the requirement of constant aid and attendance. 

It occurs to me that it would be a just provision to create a higher 
rate than $30 per month for cases of this description, and I respect- 
fully recommend that a rate of $50 per month be created for them. 

SURVIVORS OF THE WAR FOR THE UNION. 

During the consideration of the various pension bills at the late ses- 
sion of Congress, the question as to the number of soldiers who are now 
survivors of the late war of the rebellion was carefully considered at the 
request of the Committee on Invalid Pensions. The following is the 
result : 

Upon a careful examination of the subject, I came to the conclusion that more than 
one-third of the men who were discharged in L865, were subject, by reason of wounds 
and other disabilities, to a higher rate of mortality than ordinary citizens in private 
life. The rate of mortality of soldiers on the pension rolls has been far greater than 
the rate of death upon which the American tables are constructed. I fixed upon the 
number of 586,000 discharged from the army as constituting tho number who were 
probably subject to this higher rate of mortality, and I came to the conclusion that 
the expectation of life with this body of men, by reason of thoir disabilities, had 
been shortened about twelve years. 

Number of soldiers enlisted during the war for the Union, ex- 
cluding re-enlistments 2, 213, 365 

Number killed in battle and by other casualties and who died of 

disease to July 1, 1865 364,116 

Estimated number of deaths of soldiers discharged during the 

War to July 1, 1865 25,284 

Number of desertions 121, 896 511. 296 

Number of survivors of the War July 1, 1865, less deaths and 

desertions 1, 702, 069 

Number of survivors July 1, 1865, less deaths and desertions, who 

were subject to the usual laws of mortality 1, 116,069 

Number of survivors July 1, 1865, who because of wounds and 
other disabilities were subject to a higher rate of mortality 
equal to 12 years shortening of the expectation of life 586, 000 

Number surviving July 1, 1890, who are probably subject to the 

ordinary life tables 831, 089 

Number surviving July 1, 1890, who are subject to a greater death 

rate 415,000 

Total number of survivors July 1, 1890 „, 1 246 089 



PENSIONS. 21 

Of the foregoing number of survivors about 144,000 are now 62 years 
of age and upwards. 

ACT OF JUNE 27, 1890. 

There have been received in the Pension Office 460,282 claims to Sep- 
tember 30, 1890, under the disability pension act of June 27, 1890. 
About 50 per cent, of these claims have been filed by persons who 
already have claims on file in the office. It will be readily understood 
that the care of such an enormous number of claims received in so short 
a time necessarily taxed the resources of the Office to its fullest extent. 
The work of the Mail Division ran up to more than 32,000 pieces of 
mail per day, to be opened, classified, and properly disposed of. The 
work in the Record Division was correspondingly increased, and a 
very large additional force was detailed to assist in the work of examin- 
ing, jacketing, and receipting for these new claims. At this writing 
(October 1) the division is handling 10,000 claims a day. 

To secure the adjudication of these claims as promptly as possible, 
Congress has authorized the employment of an additional force of 438 
medical examiners, clerks, and other employes. In addition to this 
force, I have just ordered 175 persons from the field where they have 
been employed in the special examination of cases. This will add 613 
persons to the force employed in the Office on September 1. 

I have arranged the work of the Office so that claims under the old 
laws shall be adjudicated as rapidly as they are comjneted without 
interfering with the adjudication of completed claims under the new 
law. And if, upon the assembling of Congress in December, it is 
found that the present force is insufficient for the adjudication of these 
new claims as rapidly as they are completed, I will not hesitate to ask 
that you recommend to Congress an increase of the official force of the 
Pension Bureau, so as to secure the prompt settlement of these claims. 
It was obviously the intention of Congress in the passage of this act to 
afford speedy relief to thousands of disabled soldiers of the late war 
who have been unable to establish by proof that their preseut disabili- 
ties are the result of Army service. With the view of giving claimants 
the benefit of all proofs which may have been filed in claims made by 
them under other laws the following regulation has been approved by 
you: 

Department of the Interior, 

Bureau of Pensions, 
Washington, D. C, September 26, 1890. 
Order No. 162.] 

For the purpose of securing the prompt adjudication of claims filed under the act of 
June 27, 1890, it is ordered as follows : 

(1) That in all original invalid claims where the claimant, under the act of Juno 
27, 1890, has a claim under previous laws granting pensions for service in the Army 
or Navy of the United States during the late War of the Rebellion, whether upon the 
pending or rejected files, the proofs in that claim shall he considered in connection 
with the new claim ; and where the proofs in the old claim and a medical examina- 



22 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

tion had within two years previous to the filing of the new claim, establish the facts 
of an honorable discharge after ninety days' service, and of the existence of a disa- 
bility of a permanent character not the result of vicious habits, and which incapaci- 
tates the claimant from the performance of manual labor in such a degree as to ren- 
der him unable to earn a support, the new claim shall be adjudicated upon the proofs 
on file. But in all cases where the new declaration claims for disabilities which are 
not set forth in the original claim a medical examination shall be ordered where the 
interests of the claimant seem to require it, or where such examination is requested 
"by the claimant. 

(2) That in all original widows' cases when the claimant, under the act of June 
27, 1890, has a claim filed under previous laws, whether upon the pending or rejected 
files, the proof in that claim shall be considered in connection with the now appli- 
cation. The points necessary to establish are the following : 

First. An honorable discharge of a soldier after ninety days' service. 

Second. The death of the soldier. 

Third. The marriage of the claimant with the deceased soldier prior to June 27, 
1890. 

Fourth. The names and dates of the births of any surviving children of the soldier 
under sixteen years of age. 

Fifth. That the claimant has not remarried. 

Sixth. That the claimant is without other means of support than her daily labor. 

Upon consideration of the claim, if the evidence is found to be insufficient, a call 
will be made upon the claimant for all the evidence necessary to complete the claim. 
Claimants should supply such evidence as they may know to be wanting in advance 
of any call for the same. 

(3) In claims under the act of June 27, 1890, where a claimant applies for a pen- 
sion under said act for a disability of a permanent character, for which he is already 
pensioned at a rate less than $12 per month, under the laws granting pensions to 
soldiers or sailors of the United States who served during the War of the Rebellion, 
and it shall appear from the proofs on file that he served for ninety days and was 
honorably discharged, a medical examination shall be ordered to determine to 
what degree his disabilities incapacitate the claimant from earning a. support by 
manual labor, and the claim shall be adjudicated thereupon. 

(4) In the claims filed under the act of Juno 27, 1890, where it appears that the 
claimant is a pensioner at a less rate than $12 per month under previous laws grant- 
ing pensions to soldiers or sailors of the United States who served during the war 
of the rebellion, the evidence filed in his admitted claim shall be considered in con- 
nection with his new claim, and if it shall appear from the declaration and proofs on 
file and a medical examination had within two years previous to the filing of the new 
claim, that the soldier is suffering from disabilities for which he is not pensioned, and 
that his disabilities are of a permanent character which incapacitate him from earn- 
ing a support by manual labor, and are not the result of his own vicious habits, the 
claim shall be adjudicated upon the proofs on file unless a new medical examination 
shall be deemed necessary or is requested by the claimant. 

(5) In claims filed under the act of June 27, 1890, where the claimant has not ap- 
plied for a pension under any other act, the proof required to establish a claim will 
be: 

First. Proof of service for ninety days or more in the military or naval service of 
the United States during the late war of the rebellion, and an honorable discharge 
therefrom. 

Second. Proof that the claimant is suffering from a mental or a physical disability 
of a permanent character, not the result of his own vicious habits, which incapaci- 
tates him from the performance of manual labor in such a degree as to render him 
unable to earn a support. 

Medical evidence and the sworn statements of neighbors will be considered upon 
the question of disability, but a medical examination will be required to determine 



PENSIONS. 23 

the degree of disability of the claimant. An order for examination in such cases 
will be made as soon as the claim is reached in its order. 

The facts of service and honorable discharge in all claims under the act of June 
27, 1890, must be shown by reports from the records of the War Department, which 
will be called for by the Bureau of Pensions. 

(6) The cases of dependent parents under the act of June 27, 1890, require proof 
that the soldier's death was due to his service without reference to the length of 
such service, that he left no widow or minor children, and that such parent or 
parents are without other present means of support than their own manual labor or 
the contributions of others not legally bound for their support. 

(7) Claims filed under the act of June 27, 1890, shall be taken up for adjudication 
in their regular order, and all necessary action had, so that they shall be disposed of 
without delay. 

Green B. Raum, 

Commissioner. 
Approved : 

John W. Noble, 
Secretary of the Interior. 

It is believed that there are probably one hundred thousand claims 
in this Office which can be properly allowed under the provisions of these 
regulations. 

The act of June 27, 1890, is the first disability pension law in the his- 
tory of the world which grants to soldiers and sailors pensions for dis- 
abilities which are not proven to have been incurred in the service and 
in line of duty. This law recognizes a higher obligation of the people 
to their disabled veterans than was ever formulated into law before. 

Nothing shall be left undone by this Bureau to give effect to this 
latest expression of the gratitude of the American people to the soldiers 
who saved the Republic. 

Green B. Raum, 

Commissioner. 

The Secretary of the Interior. 



24 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OP THE INTERIOR. 



SUMMARY OF TABLES. 

Table No. 1 shows that there were at the close of the year 537,944 
pensioners, classified as follows: 392,809 Army invalids; 104,456 Army 
widows, minor children, and dependent relatives; 5,274 Navy invalids; 
2,460 Navy widows, iniuor children and dependent relatives; 413 sur- 
vivors of the war of 1812 ; 8,610 widows of those who served in that war; 
17,158 survivors of the war with Mexico, and 6,764 widows of those who 
served in said war. 

There were added to the rolls during the year the names of 66,637 new 
pensioners, and the names of 1,901 whose pensions had been previously 
dropped were restored, making an aggregate of 68,538 pensioners added 
during the year. 

During the same period the names of 20,319 pensioners were dropped 
for various causes, leaving a net increase to the rolls of 48,219 names. 

The average annual value of each pension at the close of the year is 
shown to have been $133.94. The aggregate annual value of pensions is 
$72,052,143.49. 

The amount paid for pensions during the year was $105,528,180.38, an 
increase in amount over the previous year of $17,253,067.10. 

The total amount disbursed by the agents for all purposes was $106,- 
493,890.19. 

Table No. 2 shows thatduriugtheyear20,319pensionca\s were dropped 
from the rolls. The 7,752 widows, minor children, and dependent rela- 
tives, whose names have been dropped, are so classified as to show the 
number of widows with and those without minor children, the number 
of minor children who were pensioned in their own right, and the num- 
ber of dependent mothers and fathers ; and this table also shows the 
whole number of pensioners on the rolls with a like subdivision of the 
widows' class. 

Table No. 3 exhibits the amount of appropriations and the balances 
available for the payment of pensions for the fiscal year, 1890. 

Table No. 4 exhibits the amount paid out on account of pensions by 
each agent, under each item of appropriation, as shown by their accounts 
current. This table also shows a disbursement of $16,220.63 for the 
payment of arrears of pensions in cases where the original pension was 
granted prior to January 25, 1879, and the date of commencement of 
pension was subsequent to discharge or death. 

Table No. 5 is a new one this year. It is intended to supply informa- 
tion not heretofore furnished. It shows the number and amount of first 
payments made at the pension agencies during the year in each class 
of cases, as well as the number of cases in which first payments were 
due but not made, with the amounts thereof, in the hands of the agents, 
June 30, 1890. 

This information has been furnished in original cases only, in Table 



PENSIONS. 25 

No. 1 of former reports. It will be seen that 130,514 first payments 
were made during the year, amounting to $38,721,866.03, and that 
20,638 cases remained in the hands of the agents June 30, 1890, in 
which the first payments due amounted to $4,357,347.30. 

It will also be seen that $2,056,700.45 were paid by the pension 
agents as fees to attorneys during the year. 

Table No. 6 shows the amount paid for pensions each year since 1871 
to the survivors and widows of the war of 1812, and since 1887 to the 
survivors and widows of the war with Mexico. 

Table No. 7 shows the number of pensioners on the rolls of each 
ageucy by the several classes, and compares the aggregate number 
with that of the previous year, showing in each class the net increase 
or net decrease. It also shows the net increase to the rolls during the 
year, which, as before stated, was 48,219. 

Table No. 8 shows the different monthly rates of pension paid to 
army and navy invalids, and to army and navy widows, minor chil- 
dren, and dependent relatives, together with the number of pensioners 
of these classes and of each of them. 

Table No. 9 gives the location and geographical limit of each pension 
agency, the name of each agent, and the balance of funds remaining to 
his official credit at the close of the year. These balances, except ar- 
rears, are immediately covered into the Treasury at the close of the 
fiscal year. 

Table No. 10 shows the number of original pension claims filed each 
year since 1861, the number allowed, and the number of pensioners on 
the rolls at the close of each year. Since 1861 804,374 claims have 
been filed on account of disability, and 437,096 claims on account of 
death alleged to be due to causes originating in the service. The 
claims of the latter class have been filed by widows, minor children, 
and dependent relatives. Of the invalid claims 490,492 have been al- 
lowed ; and of the widows, minors, and dependents, 278,004 — a total 
of 768,496. 

Since 1871, 79,789 claims for pension on account of service during the 
war of 1812, which pension was provided for by the acts of 1871 and 
1878, have been filed. Of this number 34,917 have been filed by the 
surviving soldiers and sailors, and 44,872 by the widows of those who 
served in that war. Only 166 claims have been filed during the past 
fiscal year by survivors of that war, and 16 by widows. 

It thus appears that in the aggregate 1,353,190 pension claims have 
been filed since 1861, and that in the same period 855,758 have been 
allowed. The number of pensioners on the rolls at the close of each 
year is stated. The amount disbursed on account of pensions since 1861 
has been $1,158,712,303.36. 

Table No. 11 shows the number of army invalid claims allowed each 
year since 1861, classified and arranged so that in each year's allowance 
it is shown in what vears the claims were filed. The whole number of 



26 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

invalid claims filed each year since 1861 is given, and it is shown what 
percentage of the number of claims filed each year has been allowed. 

Table No. 12 shows the number of each class of claims on the files of 
the Bureau at the commencement of the year, the number filed during 
the year, and the number admitted and rejected during the same period. 
It also shows the number of each class pending, and on the rejected files 
at the close of the year. A statement is also given as to the number 
of bounty land claims filed, allowed, rejected, and remaining on file. 

Table No. 13 is a comparative statement of the pension claims of all 
classes, settled by allowance and rejection each year since 1881. 

Table No. 14 shows the issue of certificates from this Bureau during 
the fiscal year, a grand total of 151,658. This table also shows that 
during the year 66,637 original certificates were issued. 

Table No. 15 shows in brief the operations of the special examination 
division during the year. It sets forth the number of claims acted 
upon by said division, the amount recovered and saved, and the expendi- 
ture on account thereof, except salaries. 

Table No. 16 shows the number of names and addresses furnished to 
different divisions of this Bureau and to claimants in the consideration 
of pending claims during the year j a total of 290,176. 

Table No. 17 shows the work done by the mail division of this Bureau 
during the year. It shows that $17,842.19 were received in money, 
and that 9,896 postage stamps were received. It further shows that 
3,552,350 pieces of mail-matter were received, examined, and distrib- 
uted to the proper divisions of the Bureau, after being recorded, of which 
916,835 were letters of inquiry. It also appears from said table that 
2,211,273 letters were sent out during the year. 

Table No. 18 shows the number of pensioners in each county of each 
State and Territory of the United States and in each foreign country on 
the pension rolls June 30, 1890. 

The summary of this table shows the number of pensioners in each 
State and Territory of the United States and in foreign countries on 
the pension rolls June 30, 1890. 

Table No. 19 presents what is regarded as an interesting state- 
ment of the names, ages, and post-office addresses of persons still 
remaining on the rolls who are pensioned as the widows or children of 
soldiers of the Revolutionary war. It will be seen that there are 23 
widows and 2 children. 



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32 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Table No. 6.— Statement of amounts paid for pensions to the survivors of the War of 1812 
and to the widows of those who served in that war since 1871, and to the survivors of 
the ivar with Mexico and to the widows of those who served in that war since 1887. 



Fiscal year of— 


War of 1812. 


War with Mexico. 


Survivors. 


"Widows. 


Total dis- 
bursements. 


Survivors. 


Widows. 


Total dis- 
bursements. 


1871 (from Feb. 14, 

1871) 


$2, 555. 05 
1, 977, 415. 84 
2, 078, 606. 98 
1, 588, 832. 95 
1, 355, 599. 86 
1, 089, 037. 18 
934, 657. 82 

768, 918. 47 

1, 014, 525. 66 

790, T10. 39 

621, 612. 80 

478, 274. 85 

357, 334. 81 

278, 888. 85 

207, 782. 80 

144, 389. 59 

105, 837. 01 

73, 659. 48 

52, 800. 27 

38, 847. 09 


$511.00 
335, 993. 63 
689, 303. 59 
616,026.40 
533, 000. 21 
445, 772. !):> 
361,548 91 

294, 572. 05 
2, 192, 699. 54 
2, 658, 058. 14 
2, 381, 800. 95 
2, 024, 207. 63 
1,882,512. 11 
1,686,302.09 
1, 518, 202. 39 
1, 458, 896. 44 
1,765,582.36 
1, 596, 004. 96 
1, 397, 487. 09 
1, 263, 239. 37 


$3, 066. 05 
2, 313. 409. 47 
2, 767, 910. 57 

2, 204, 849. 35 
1,888,600.07 
1,534,810.13 
1, 296, 206. 73 

1, 063, 490. 52 

3, 207, 225. 20 
3, 448, 70S. 53 
3, 003, 413. 75 

2, 502, 482. 48 
2, 239, 877. 22 
1, 965, 190. 94 
1,725,985.19 
1, 603, 286. 03 
















1873 








1874 








1875 








1876 








1877 








1878 (from Mar. 9, 
1878) 
















1880 
















1882 








1883 









1884 




1885 








1886 








1887 


1,871,419. :;7 
1, 670, 264. 14 
1, 450, 287. 36 
1,302,086.46 


$53, 148. 68 
1, 861, 756. 07 


$2, 458. (18 
583. 056. 28 


$55, 606. 76 


1888 


2.444.812.35 


1889 


1, 796, 899. 30 693, 572. 15 2, 490, 471. 75 


1890 


1 , 728, 027. 54 695, 054. 90 2, 423, 082. 44 






Total 


13, 960, 287. 75 


25, 102, 342. 11 


39, 062, 629. 86 


5,439,831.59 1,974,141.71 


7,413,973.30 



Table No. 7. — A classified statement of the number of pensioners on the rolls of each 
agency compared with the number on the rolls June 30, 1889. 



Location 

of 
agency. 


Army. 


Navy. 


W.irofl812. 


War with 
Mexico. 


Num- 
ber of 

P<'?1- 

sioners 

on tho 
rolls 

June 
30, 1890. 


Num. 
her of 
pen- 
sioners 


Inva- 
lids. 


Wid- 
ows, 

etc. 


Inva- 
lids. 


Wid- 
ows, 
etc. 


Sur- 
viv- 
ors. 


Wid- 
ows. 


Sur- 
vivors. 


Wid- 
ows. 


on the 

10] Is 

June 

30, 1889. 




43, 478 
40, 052 
32, 904 
34, 332 


11, 179 
8,715 
8,322 
6,437 
4,806 
4,395 
8,487 
7, 273 
7,342 
4,780 






33 
12 
16 
21 


644 


«S7 


262 
326 
519 
755 
487 
180 
114 

54 
246 
107 

87 

233 

2,464 

89 
384 

23 

23 
411 


56, 233 
50, 196 


49, 591 

44 nm; 








331 760 
372 1, 139 

:!8!) 9 148 




1,049 
'"954 


321 

""537 


44 042 41 f)f\i 




44, 082 
32, 916 
32, 261 

31 021 


38 570 




23, 362 
26, 847 
19, 368 


60 1 07fi 


1, 634 
621 
234 
157 
435 


30 330 




13 
17 
72 

4 
10 
15 
25 
46 
11 
13 
11 
29 

5 


202 
591 

703 
:;:;«» 
139 


29, 256 
98 T.3K 




1,484 

""799 



726 
""463 


Buffalo 


22, 350 
19, 738 
23, 648 
22, 130 
16, 517 
11, 586 
18, 985 
10, 757 
11,512 
10, 435 
4,808 


30 609 *>«' fifi" 


Philadelphia 


2:1, 306 
29, 053 
27, 143 
25, 927 
25, 230 
24, 892 
16, 023 
15, 427 
14,565 
8,418 


27, til 5 
26, 384 
24 183 




4,415 






240 1 256 
499 515 

1,599 4,784 
273 229 
374 810 
255 61 
518 70 
66 9 oqa 




6,883 
4,751 
5,305 
3,685 
3,565 
3,490 
626 


815 


440 


24, 316 
23,111 
23, 306 
13, 997 
14, 709 
13, 913 
7, 538 






























173 


33 






' 


Total number of 
pensioners 


392, 809 


104, 456 


5,274 


2,460 


413 


8,610 


17, 158 


6,764 


537, 944 


489, 725 


Increase during year . . 


41, 325 


6,866 


727 


194 






93 


558 


48, 219 




Decrease during year. . 


190 


1,354 

























PENSIONS. 



33 



Table No. 8.— Statement showing the different monthly rates of pension, and the number 
2)ensioned at each rate, of the Army and Navy invalids, and of the Army and Navy 
widows, minors, and dependents (war 0/'1861) on the rolls, June 30, 1890. 





Invalids. 


Widows and others. 


Eates. 


Invalids. 


W idows and others. 


Rates. 


Army. 


Navy. 


Total. 


Army. 


Navy. 


Total. 


Army. 


Navy. 


Total. 


1 
Army. Navy. 


Total. 


$1.00 
2 00 


25 

21,001 

1 

7 

1,247 

1 

210 

70, 885 

243 

942 

2 

10 

4 

11 

53, 586 

57 

3 

2 

135 

"599' 

11 

77, 835 

15 

769 

1 

5 

514 

16 

18 

6 

30, 709 

1 

6 

18 

1 

1 

1 

60 

296 

4 


1 

231 

'""32' 
...... 

904 

"68 

"l 

"525' 
3 

..... 

2 

12 

2 

1,092 

..... 

...... 

4 
..... 

4 
402 
..... 

10 

ii" 

7 
12 


2C 
21, 232 








$17. 25 
17.50 
17.75 
18. 00 
18.25 
18.50 
18.75 
19.00 
19.25 
19.50 
20. 00 

20. 75 

21. 00 
21.25 
21.50 
22.00 
22.50 

23. 00 
23.25 
23.50 
23.75 

24. 00 
24.50 

25. 00 
25.25 
25. 75 
26.00 
26.25 
26.75 
27.00 
27.50 
28. 00 
29.00 
29.50 
30.00 
30.75 
31.00 
31.25 
32.00 
32. 50 
33.00 
33.50 
35.00 
35. 50 
36.00 
37.00 
37. $0 
38.50 
40. 00 
40.25 
45.00 
46.00 
49.00 
50.00 
53.00 
57.00 
60.00 
72.00 
75.00 

100. 00 
166. 66| 
208. 33 5 
416. 663 


1 

16 
3 

4, 212 

" "lb' 

114 

14 

9 

"4,293" 

I 

65 

1 

2,595 

99 

4 

2 

I 

1 

17, 055 

2 

2,569 

1 

..... 

G 

1 

816 

11 

1 
1 

13,193 

"'hh' 

3 
..... 

"3" 
'"3,'i9l' 


2 
5 

"Vi 

4 
1 
4 
3 
..... 

95 
2 
1 

"'58' 
4 


3 

21 

3 

4,259 

4 

17 

118 

17 

9 

1 

4,388 

4 

4 

65 

1 

2,653 

103 

4 

2 

1 




















2.25 


1 














2 665 


7 

1,279 

1 

219 

71, 789 

243 

1,010 

2 

11 

4 

11 

54, 111 

60 

3 

2 

138 

2 

611 

13 

78, 927 

15 

770 

1 

7 

518 

16 

25 

10 

31,111 

1 

8 

28 

1 

1 

15 

87 

308 

4 

25 

12 

3G, 232 

13 

208 

449 

483 

16 

4 

29 

10 

12,864 

18 

5 

6 

1 

2,894 

1 

7 

7 

15, 975 

11 

14 

14 

11, 102 








44 




44 


3.00 










3 25 














3 75 














4.00 














4.25 














5.00 














5.25 








2,370 


144 


2, 514 


5.33s 








5. 66§ 
5.75 


























6 00 














6.25 














6 374 




























7 00 














7.25 














7.50 

















7.75 








256 

1 

68 

"*3 

"*2* 

23 

..... 

210 

2 

1 

5 

2 
1 

3 

39 

1 


17, 311 

3 

2, 637 

1 

3 

1 

6 

3 

839 

11 

1 

1 

1 

13, 403 

2 

1 

56 

7 

3 
1 
5 

3,230 
1 


4 




4 


8.00 


575 


19 


594 




3.25 


641 


127 


768 


8 50 










8.665 














8.75 














9.00 














9.25 














9. 50 














9.75 














10.00 


2 


1 


3 








10. 20 






» 


10. 25 














10.50 








610 


209 


819 


10.62 










10. 663 














10.75 














11.00 














11.25 














11.33i 














11.50 


20 5 














11.75 


9 

35, 825 

13 

187 

448 

475 

7 

4 

24 

9 

12, 753 

15 

3 

6 

1 

2,801 

"'I' 

i5,813' 
9 
9 
14 

10, 981 


3 

407 

"21 
1 
8 
9 

..... 

1 

111 

3 

2 

""93' 
1 
3 

7 

162 

2 

5 

"*i2i" 








2 




2 


12.00 


96, 590 


1,792 


98, 382 




.:.25 






12. 50 


1 




1 








12. 75 


1 




1 


13.00 








38" 

"2," 568" 

1 

2 

843 

\ 

1 
2,258 


1 
...... 

23 
"9" 

""66* 


1 

38 

1 

2,591 
1 
2 
852 
1 
1 
1 

2,324 




13.25 








8 


3 


H 


13. 33 3 
13.50 
















2 




2 


13.75 










14.00 


1 




1 








14.25 


55 


47 


102 


14.50 










14.75 














14. 87| 
15.00 














1,329 


110 


1,439 








15.25 


4 
7 
3 
1 
3 


...... 


4 


15.50 








26 


3 


29 


9 


15.75 








3 


16.00 














1 


16.25 














3 


16.50 
16.75 








Total 
















392, 809 


5,274 


398, 083 


104,456 


2,460 


106, 916 


17.00 


2,203 


4 


2,207 





INT 90— VOL III- 



34 



EEPOET OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



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36 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Table No. 11. — Army invalid claims allowed each year since July 1, 1861, showing i» 
report years, giving also the whole number filed each year and 



Years in 
which the 

claims 
were filed. 


The several years in which the claims were allowed and the numher allowed each year. 




1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 

16 
129 
107 
100 
211 
149 
172 
182 
441 
438 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


1862 

1863 


305 


258 
3,657 


131 
9,331 
7,303 


27 

1,138 

3,459 

10, 045 


19, 20 

5171 395 

844! 562 

7,819 1.863 


12 

235 

253 

685 

2.511 


11 

185 

166 

417 

1,150 

1, 132 

1, 692 

2, 238 


12 
143 
114 
223 
529 
525 
421 
2, 208 
1,040 


20 
293 
239 
382 
732 
724 
502 
1, 281 
3,094 
342 


6 
15ti 
139 
198 
440 
349 
218 
493 
1,639 
1, 946 
434 


6 
110 
96 
132 
251 
356 
196 
300 
799 
1,055 


4 
159 
101 

92 
185 
153 

89 
142 
273 
348 
371 
674 
1,869 
937 


5 

121 

84 

96 

145 

88 

56 

124 

167 

214 

278 

342 

606 

2, 243 

624 


139 
126 
113 

187 

154 

62 

97 

197 

149 

276 

461 

593 

1, 169 

2, 595 

777 


1864 




1865 






1866 








12, 724 


9, 292 


1867 . 










3, 586 3. 626 


1868 . 














1,641 


1869 
















1870 
















1871 


















1872 




















l,638il.018 


1873 






















1,322 


1,762 
794 


1874... 
























1875 . 


, 
























1876 




























1877 






























1878 
































1879 


































1880 


































1881 .. 


































1882 


































1883 . . . 


































1884 ... 


































1885 


































1886 


































1887 


































1888 


































1889 


































1890 
































































5,193 


7, 102 


Total.. 


305 


3,915 


16, 765 


14, 669 


21, 923 


15, 718 


8,963 


6,991 


5,215 


7,612 


6.0M 


6,261 


5,519 


5, 397 



Note.— The number (71,318) of invalid claims filod in 1890, as reported in this table, excludes 252 old 



PENSIONS. 



37 



each year's allowance the number of those which were filed each year and alloived in the 
the percentage of the number allowed out of those filed each year. 























tiA 


2^ 






















3 9 
> *> 


3 g 

-a 3 


The several jears in which the claims were allowed and the numher allowed each year. 


u m 

2*S 


'go.S 

ll-g 


1878. 


1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


1883. 


1884. 


1885. 


1886. 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


Total. 


S3 « to 


4 


5 


24 


78 


38 


18 


9 


16 


15 


17 


9 


10 


7 


1,109 


1,362 


81.4 


147 


135 


281 


415 


392 


384 


263 


280 


269 


248 


230 


191 


195 


19, 538 


26, 380 


74.0 


109 


100 


228 


395 


328 


305 


240 


264 


220 


226 


194 


142 


138 


16, 482 


20, 263 


81.3 


122 


92 


172 


335 


234 


284 


189 


204 


168 


160 


110 


125 


121 


24, 481 


27, 299 


89.6 


202 


158 


257 


477 


368 


335 


255 


236 


219 


208 


177 


136 


130 


31,515 


35, 799 


88.0 


139 


104 


190 


339 


281 


262 


202 


263 


187 


184 


131 


107 


97 


13, 328 


15,905 


83.8 


59 


49 


109 


177 


99 


124 


93 


190 


80 


92 


61 


52 


51 


6, 285 


7, 292 


86.2 


102 


54 


143 


312 


267 


208 


180 


282 


141 


141 


115 


92 


90 


9,195 


11,035 


83.3 


132 


121 


220 


451 


379 


319 


243 


363 


233 


234 


164 


138 


115 


10, 762 


12, 991 


82.8 


125 


100 


228 


368 


293 


243 


218 


241 


211 


165 


125 


116 


116 


7,041 


8, 837 


79.7 


214 


153 


251 


404 


328 


288 


231 


314 


226 


193 


144 


116 


110 


6,987 


8,857 


78.9 


253 


123 


257 


454 


330 


274 


209 


221 


197 


186 


161 


103 


136 


7,465 


8, 728 


85.5 


243 


188 


328 


497 


384 


312 


213 


385 


254 


213 


169 


117 


128 


7,293 


9, 302 


78. 1 


483 


273 
608 


455 


756 


559 


478 


349 


461 


323 


277 


239 


158 


176 


9,336 11,926 


78.3 


1,844 


758 


1,219 


905 


773 


578 


630 


570 


565 


413 


316 


338 


12,736 17,030 


74.8 


2,217 


1,464 


1,063 


1,570 


1,050 


1,006 


709 


740 


698 


618 


444 


331 


340 


13,027 16,532 


78.8 


908 


2,568 


1,806 


2,385 


1,400 


986 


888 


879 


816 


773 


559 


413 


475 


14,856 18,812 


78.9 




778 


2, 685 


7,767 


4,865 


4,116 


2,298 


2,045 


1,819 


1,618 


1,065 


836 


870 


30,762 36,835 


83.5 







263 


2,358 


9,825 


17, 626 


12, 277 


9,706 


9,529 


7,880 


5,613 


3,895 


4,159 


83,131110,673 


75. 1 








155 


157 


1,350 

1,485 

582 


1, 651 


1,499 


1, 555 


1,463 
2,526 
3,188 


1, 109 


909 


1,030 


10,878 18,455 
16,641 29,004 
19,258 35,039 
15,305 28,962 
15.070 1 27,959 
19,711 35,202 


58 9 










133 


2,326 
2,579 


2,245 


2,667 


2,038 
2,720 


1,512 


1,709 


57.4 












2,517 


3,279 

3,092 

3,901 

883 


2,090 


2, 303 


51.9 














917 


2, 434 


2,736 
3,443 
5,842 
1,506 


2,363 
2,696 


1,834 


1,929 
2, 182 


52 8 
















810 


2,038 


53.9 


















5,423 
6,383 
2. 234 


3,849 


3,714 


55.9 




















5,317 
9,499 
1,557 


4,967 


18, 173 36, 204 

20,973 47,349 

13,737 51,919 

2,407 ( 71,318 


50. 2 






















9,240 


44.3 
























12, 180 


26.5 


























2,407 


3.3 


7,303 
























7,073 


9,718 


20, 912.22, 615 


31, 758 


27, 117 


27, 225 


31, 552 


34, 702 


35,089 


35, 999 49, 453 


477, 482 ( 787, 269 





war invalid claims, which are included in the number (71,570) of such claims as reported in table No. 10. 



38 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Table No. 12. — Number of claims of each class filed, admitted, and rejected during the 




Under the head of "Widows, etc.," in the Army and Navy classes are included minor children and 
dependent relatives. 

There were received daring the year 220 applications for bounty-land warrants; 91 were issued, and 
104 applications were rejected ; at the close ot the year 867 applications were pending, and 93,734 were 
on the rejected files. 

There were allowed during the year 37 claims for arrears of pension in the case of those who wen: 
in receipt of a pension January 25,' 1879, and granted arrears by the act of that date. 



PENSIONS. 



39 



year, and the comparative condition of the files at the beginning and close of the year. 



Navy. 


to 

CD 
S-i 

>i 

5 2 

a 


> 
at 

3 

a 

H 


War of 1812. 


Mexican war, 

act of Jan- 
uary 29, 1887. 


[5S 

"C 

o 

a a 
"3 

"© 
• H 


CO 

a 

'3 


Widows, etc. 


Survivors. 


Widows. 


"3 

O 


| 

"So 

o 


CO 

es 

CO 

u 
a 

a 


o 
H 


"3 

.9 

To 

5 


co 

CJ 
CD 
U 

O 

a 

H 


"3 
.9 

M 

o 


CD 

3 

CD 
O 


> 9 

'> at 


«i-5 
£1 


CD 
OS 

t« 

CD 

So 

bO 
«4 


3, 270 

788 


17 
23 


3,293 
811 




665, 382 

277, 391 


9, 267 
16 


2 

2 


9,738 
166 


3 


3,449 
1,009 


1,756 
968 


454, 509 
105, 044 


689, 597 
279, 552 


4,064 


40 


4, 104 




942, 773 


9,283 


4 


9,904 


3 


4,458 


2,724 


559, 553 


969, 149 


335 
126 


7 
3 


342 

129 


*1, 896 


142, 592 
114, 072 


4 
5 


2 
1 


108 
75 


1 


794 
177 


678 
106 


66, 637 
14, 793 


144, 179 
1114,436 


461 


10 


471 




256, 664 


9 


3 


183 


1 


971 


784 


81,430 


258, 615 


1,715 
2,014 


30 


1,745 
2,014 




497, 172 
202, 966 


106 
9,173 


1 


309 
9,487 


2 


826 
2,838 


1,129 
917 


267, 535 
225, 381 


499, 545 
225, 381 


3,729 


30 


3,759 




700, 138 


9,279 


1 


9,796 


2 


3,664 


2,046 


492, 916 


724, 926 



Under the act of August 4, 1886, there were allowed 307 supplemental certificates. 

*In addition to the above there were 4 widows, war of 1812, and 1 widow, Mexican war, restored dur- 
ing the year. 

tThis'includes a large number of claims which have been found by actual count to be duplicates; 
also claims which were rejected, and after such action they were returned to the admitted files. 

During the year there were 21 increase Mexican survivors allowed by special act. 



40 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Table No. 13. — Comparative statement of pension claims of all classes 





Claims admitted 
and rejected. 


Army. 




.N'livy. 




Year. 


Invalid. 


"Widows, etc. 


1 □ valid. 




Origi- 
nal. 


In- 
crease. 


Total. 


Origi- 
nal. 


In- 
crease. 


Total. 


Origi- 
nal. 


In- 
crease. 


Total. 


1881 
1881 


Admitted 

Rejected 

Total 


21, 143 
2,625 


12,353 

8, 875 


33, 496 
11, 500 


3,717 
1.137 


200 
30 


3,917 
1,167 


251 
55 


154 
65 


405 
120 




23, 768 


21, 228 


44, 096 


4,854 


230 


5,084 


306 

262~ 

128 


219 


525 

350 

277 


1882 


22, <;si 

4,030 


9,435 12,119 
15, lilt) 19,229 


3,910 
1,512 


48 
26 


3,958 
1, 538 


88 
149 


1882 






Total 




26, 714 


24, 634 51, 348 


5, 422 


74 


5, 406 


390 


237 


627 




Admitted 

Rejected 

Totil 


1883 

1883 


31, 801 
16, 901 


22, r.r.J 54.355 
10, 978 36,879 


5, 216 
4,512 


67 

28 


:.. 283 
4, 540 


213 

530 


112 

141 


325 

671 




48, 702 

27,17:: 
17, 587 


42, 532 

22, L90 
19,887 


91,234 j 9.728 


95 j 9, 823 


743 

211 
347 


253 


996 




Admitted 


1884 

1884 


40. 363 
37, I7t 


0, 260 
4, 983 


56 

I.". 


6,816 

4,998 


270~ 
139 


511 

486 




Total 

Admitted 

Rejected 

Total 




41,760 

27, 286 
9,028 


42, 077 
19, 281 


86, 387 


11,243 


71 


11,314 


588 


409 

182 

80 


007 

476~ 

278 


1885 
1885 


60, 934 
28, 309 


7. 632 
3,058 


144 

28 


7,776 
3, 086 


294 
189 




36,314 

::i,f,i'.i 
15, 018 


52, 929 

33, 008 
41, 956 


80,24:: 


10, 600 


172 


10, 862 


483 


271 


754 




Admitted 


1886* 
1886 


64, 627 

.".7, S74 


8,501 

3. 72S 


'65. 31 3 
50 


73, 814 

8. 77* 


318 

277 


271 

279 


589 
556 




Total 




1 




47, 537 

34, 758 
7,657 


74, 964 

~3l7791 
32, 024 


122,501 12,220 


65, 363 


77, 592 


595 


550 


1, 145 






1887 


66, 549 
39, 681 


11, 034 
3.481 


83 

70 


11, 117 
3,55] 


525 
321 


223 
247 


74 S 
568 


1887 






Total 




42,415 


63, 815 


106, 230 


14,515 


153 


14, 668 


846 

75T 
740 


470 

449 

326 


1,316 

1,203 
1,066 






1888 


35, 089 
32, 213 


44, 785 
30, 739 


79, 874 
62, 952 


10,611 

11,060 


341 

50 


10, 952 
11,110 


1888 






Total 




67, 302 

35, 999 
11,122 


75, 524 

^707l94~ 
37, 049 


142, 826 


21,671 


391 

~ii6 

41 


22, 062 


1,494 


775 

74T 
442 


2,269 

1,576 
1,602 






1889 


106,193 11.6 44 
48, 171 5. 689 


11,760 
;->, 730 


831 

1, 160 


1889 






Total 




47, 121 

7M53 
8,120 


107, 243 

76,~5lT 
99, 013 


154,364 17,333 

125,064 T4~323 
107, 133 5, 791 


157 

120~ 
50 


17, 490 

147443~ 
5, 841 


1,991 

942~ 
392 


1,186 

901 

977 


3,177 

1,843~ 
969 


1890 




1890 


Rejected 

Total 




57, 573 


175, 524 


233 097 1 on 111 


170 


20,284 


1,334 


1,878 


3,212 











* Under act of March 19, 1886, there were 79,989 widows' pensions increased (included in the ahove), 
tor whioh no applications were required- 



PENSIONS. 



41 



settled by allowance and rejection each year since 1881, except 



Navy. 


Array 
and 
Navy 
resto- 
ra- 
tions. 


Total 

Array 

and 

Navy. 


War of 1812. 


Mexican War (act 
of January 29, 1887). 


Total 

number 
of orig- 
inal 
claims. 




Widows, etc. 


Survivors. 


Widows. 


Sur- 
vivors, 
original. 


Widows, 
original. 


Aggre- 
gate 
of all 


Orig- 
inal. 


In- 
crease. 


Total 


Orig- 
inal. 


In- 
crease. 


Orig- 
inal. 


In- 
crease. 


classes. 


203 
83 


10 


213 
83 


1,344 

20 


39, 375 
12, 890 


115 
391 





1,965 

1,605 










41, 455 










14, 886 










286 


10 


296 


1,364 


52, 265 


506 




3, 570 










56. 341 














89 
59 


11 


100 
59 


649 


37, 176 
21, 103 


26 
49 




693 










37, 895 


143 










21, 295 












148 


11 


159 


649 


58, 279 


75 




836 










59, 190 















87 
346 


13 


100 
346 


796 


fif) 859 


23 
51 




822 
200 








38, 162 
22, 540 


61, 704 


42, 436 









42, 687 












433 


13 


446 


796 


103, 295 


74 




1,022 








60, 702 


104, 391 










106 
112 


1 
1 


107 
113 


1,221 


57, 518 
43,071 


24 

50 




388 

262 








34, 192 
23, 341 


57, 930 








43, 383 










218 


2 


220 


1,221 


100, 589 


74 j 


C50 








57, 533 

357767" 
12, 537 


101,313 


111 
57 


11 


122 

57 


1,835 


71,143 
31, 730 


18 
38 




426 

167 








71, 587 








31,935 










168 


11 


179 


1,835 


102, 873 


56 




593 








48, 304 

40, 857 
20, 443 


103, 522 










109 
385 


*1, 280 
2 


1,389 
387 


2,229 '"142,648 
62,595 


5 3 


305 
113 


*13, 396 

2 






*156, 357 


22 








62, 732 








494 


1,282 


1,776 


2,229 205,243 


27 3 


418 


13,398 






61, 300 


219, 089 








183 
91 


8 

1 


191 
92 


2,707 


81,312 
43, 892 


8 j 2 
18 


231 
59 





7, 552 

251 


903 
14 


55, 194 
11, 892 


90, 008 
44, 234 


274 


9 


283 


2,707 


125, 204 


26 2 


290 




7,803 


917 67,086 


134,242 


205 
235 


11 


216 
235 


2,028 


92, 245 
75, 363 


2 
11 




251 
56 




9,018 
2,062 


4,292 00,252 
588 1 46, 965 


105, 838 
78, 080 


440 


11 


451 


2,028 


167, 608 


13 




307 




11, 110 


4,880 


107,227 


183,918 


280 
341 


11 


291 
341 


1,754 


119,819 
55, 844 


8 
10 


8 


181 
268 


7 


1,772 
348 


1,206 
209 


51, 921 

19,147 


123, 001 
56, 679 


621 


11 


632 


1,754 
1,896 


175, 663 


18 


8 


449 


7 


2,120 


1, 415 


71, 068 


179, 680 


335 
126 


7 
3 


342 
129 


142, 592 
114, 072 


4 
5 


2 
1 


108 
75 


1 


794 
177 


678 
106 


66, 637 
14, 793 


144, 179 
1114,436 


461 


10 


471 


• 


256, 664 


9 


3 


183 


1 


971 


784 


81, 430 


258, 615 



i This includes a large number of claims wliich nave been found, by actual count, to have been thus 
disposed of. 



42 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 







O 

H 


9,410 

8, 520 
10, 565 
10, 186 
14, 189 
10, 640 

9,965 

13, 482 
16, 374 

14, 562 

15, 711 
18, 054 


oo 

m 

CO 

lO 
rH 


'SXB9XJ.Y 


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co 


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in co t^ oo m -<* os <o cm in os cm 

co t-- oo m © co mooi-iiooiO) 
COCMCMCOOOCM eo co m -<* oo ■** 


00 


•B|B^u9 inapddng 


<omo>t-HO) m ■* © co co (o 


to 

© 

CM 


•ea^BoiidnQ 


© n m t- © co cm oo co m co 
in co co co as cm oo co os m 




tr- 
ifS 


'0681 'f ip-iBJl jo !py 










t- CO © CN 

CO CM CO «£ 

rH t"- 


> 

> 


© 

a 


'8881 'i 9UUp JO 'JOB 8JB9J j y 


NOOflOJO 00 CO >-f L- ■<*« O 1 
NNHW H r^ rH 


'9881 '* »sugny jo !py 


COOH 




CO 














CO 


•f88I '8 U-idy jo aopao 


lOOO ' 


















oo 


•8881 '8 qo i«K jo ;oy 


■*n«OH^N ■«# © co m ■<# m 


a 


•uorjBiojsoy; 


oo m co —i rH <» © io c- © * co 

C5 CM T* CO Ci OO •» CO CO c>i a CO 
rH rH r- rH HnMMHH 


o 

© 


•onesx-ejj 


■«* OO T* © r^ 00 CC?IO^O'* 
OWCOIIftO OOCSrtCH 


CO 

m 

rH 


H 

3,274 
3,118 
4,588 
4,056 
7,040 
4,914 

3,151 
7,161 
6,464 
5,631 

5, 412 
10, 137 


CO 

CO 
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3 


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July 

August 

September 


3 

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December 

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PENSIONS. 



43 



Table No. 15. — Operations of the special examination service of the office, showing investi- 
gations made, etc., during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890. 





Number of 
investiga- 
tions made, 
1889. 


Expenses 
in 1889. 


Number of 
investiga- 
tions made, 
1890. 

t 


Expenses 
in 1890. 


Number of cases returned by special examiners in 
the field 


38, 801 




32, 598 






$- , 7:;, 447. 00 


$250, 578. 21 
138, 833. G9 


Expenses of special examiners' travel, etc. (iuclud- 




138, 927. 32 










Total 


38, 801 


412,374.32 


32, 598 


389, 411. 90 





Statement showing a comparison of work performed by special examiners, with cost of same, 
during fiscal years ending June 30, 1889 and 1890. 



Average number of examiners per month 

Number of reports made 

Average number of reports per examiner per month 

Number of depositions taken 

Average number of depositions per examiner per mouth 

Amount of expenses exclusive of salary 

Average cost of each report 

Average cost of each deposition 



254 

38, 801 

12| 

177, 743 

58£ 

$412,374.32 

10. 62 

2.32 



1890. 



2:;o 
32, 598 

"H 

162, 875 

58| 

),411.90 

11.95 

2.39 



Work accomplished by review section, established July 20, 1889. 



Iteviewers employed, averago number of 8 

Number of days employed 2, 418 

Number of cases submitted for admission ] , 673 

Number of cases submitted for rejection 233 

Number of cases submitted for further examination 22, 904 

Number of cases otherwise disposed of 1, 242 

Number of cases reviewed 26, 052 

Number of circulars, calls, and letters to special examiners 1, 906 

Number of cases in division Julv 1, 1889 15,806 

Number of cases received from July 1, 1889, to J une 30, 1890 13, 832 

29,738 

Number of cases submitted to board of review 16,048 

Number of cases sent to admitted files 186 

Number of cases sent to other divisions 2,970 

19,204 

Total number of cases in division July 1, 1890 10,534 

Number of cases detailed to special examiners in field : 

Original examination 16, 250 

Further examination 28, 705 

Criminal examination 435 

45,390 

Number of reports made by special examiners upon cases returned from the field 43, 676 



44 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Tabltc No. 16. — Detailed report of ivork completed in the Army and Navy Survivors' Di- 
vision from July 1, 1889, to June 30, 1890, inclusive, showing number of names with post- 
office addresses supplied to the Adjudicating Divisions, the Special Examination Division, 
and to claimants or their attorneys. 



t 


Commis- 
sioned 
officers. 


Non- 
commis- 
sioned 
officers. 


Privates. 


Total of 
names. 


Total of 
cases. 


Special 
names. 




6,577 
6,368 
4,766 
4,111 

4,114 

2, 777 

33, 257 


9,254 
8,839 
5,076 
4,415 
3,551 
3,114 
28, 278 


28, 309 
19, 464 

15, 290 

16, 229 
13, 288 

8,669 
64, 430 


44, 140 
34, 671 
25, 132 
24,755 
20, 953 
14, 560 
125, 965 


6,730 
4,4*1 
3,141 
3, 393 
3,009 
1,948 
25, 707 


3, 406 




2,894 




2,417 
1, 390 






3,699 




1,400 
29, 112 








Total.. 


61, 970 


62, 527 


165, 679 


290, 176 


48, 369 


44, 318 





Total number of names Avith post-office addresses furnished in 48,369 cases. 

Addresses supplied to specified names 

Circular lists oi officers and comrades... 

Letters and circular letters 

Circular cards, including prisoners of war and naval cards 

Calls on Adjutant-General, U. S. Army 

Calls on Surgeon-General, U. S. Army 

Calls on Navy Department 

Calls on Treasury Department :... 

Post-office addresses of surgeons furnished during the year 



290, 176 

44, 318 

25, 707 

34,416 

47, 900 

2, 371 

615 

936 

120 

8,893 



PENSIONS. 



45 



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46 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Table No. 18. — Showing the number of pensioners in each county of each State and Ter- 
ritory of the United Stales and in each foreign country on the rolls June 30, 1890. 



County. 



Alabama. 

Autauga 

Baldwin 

Barbour 

Bibb 

Blount 

Bullock 

Butler 

Calhoun 

Chambers 

Cherokee 

Chilton 

Choctaw 

Clarke 

Clay 

Cleburne 

Coffee 

Colbert 

Conecuh 

Coosa 

Covington 

Crenshaw 

Cullman 

Dab- 

Dallas 

De Kail) 

Elmore 

Escambia 

Ktowah 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Geneva 

Greene 

Hale 

Henry 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Limestone 

Lowndes 

Macon 

Madison 

Marengo . 

Marion 

Marshall 

Mobile 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Perry 

Pickens 

Pike 

Randolph 

Russell 

Saint Clair 

Shelby 

Sumpter 

Talladega 

Tallapoosa 

Tuscaloosa 

Walker 

Washington 

Wilcox 

Winston 

Total 

Alaska. 
The Territory 

Total 

Arizona Territory, 

Apache 

Cochise 



No. 



10 



11 

7 

15 

80 

•_•] 

17 

102 

13 

9 

24 

lii 

8 

4 

11 

28 

7'.' 
98 
18 
32 
48 
13 
60 

5 
11 
09 

3 



9 
20 
23 

4 
27 
26 
11 
23 
15 
24 
34 

6 
12 
24 

1,645 

9 
9 



County. 



Arizona — Continued. 



Gila 

Graham 

Killianoo 

Maricopa 

Mohave 

Navajo Indian Reser- 
vation 

Pima 

Pinal 

Yavapai 

Yuma 



Total 

Arkansas. 



Arkansas 

Ashley 

Baxter 

Benton 

Boone 

Bradley 

Calhoun 

Carroll 

Chicot 

Clark 

Clay 

Cleburne 

Cleveland 

Columbia 

Conway 

Craiglinad 

Crawford 

Crittendon 

Cross 

Dallas 

Desha 

Drew 

Faulkner 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Garland 

Grant 

Greene 

Hempstead ... 

Hot Spring ... 

Howard 

Independence. 

Izard 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

•Join, son 

La Fayette ... 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Lincoln 

Little Piver... 

Logan 

Lonoke 

Madison 

Marion 

Miller 

Mississippi ... 

Monroe 

Montgomery.. 

Nevada 

Newton 

Ouachita 

Perry 

Phillips 

Pike 

Poinsett 

Polk 

Pope 

Prairie 

Pulaski 

Randolph 

St. Francis ... 



No. 



233 



59 

2 

31 

265 

112 
4 
4 

218 
3 

56 
66 
28 
15 
26 
69 
'SI 
42 
11 
7 
13 
13 
8 
38 

124 
62 

102 
9 
54 
14 
42 
20 
86 
48 
37 
63 
95 
4 
52 
2:. 
10 
15 

128 
58 

189 
41 
25 
13 
12 
52 
22 
74 
17 
22 
53 
26 
12 
34 
72 
36 

176 
55 
14 



County. 



A rkansas— Continued. 



Saline 

Scott 

Searcy 

Sebastian ... 

Sevier 

Sharp 

Stone 

Union 

Van Buren. . 
Washington 

White 

Woodruff... 
Yell 



Total 



California. 

Alameda 

Alpine 

Amador 

Butte 

Calaveras 

( atalina Island . . 

Colusa 

Contra Costa 

Del Norte 

El Dorado 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Kern 

Lake 

Lassen 

Los A ogeles 

Marin 

Mariposa ... 

Mendocino 

Merced 

Modoc 

Mono 

Monterey 

Napa 



Nevada 

Orange 

Placer 

Plumas 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino. 

San Diego 

San Francisco. - . 
San Joaquin ... 
San Luis Obispo 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara . . 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 

Yuba 



Total 



Colorado. 



Arapahoe. 
Archuleta 



PENSIONS. 



47 



Table No. 18. 



■Showing the number of pensioners in each State and Territory and in each 
foreign country — Continued. 



County. 



Colorado -Continued. 

Baca 

Bent : 

Boulder 

Cbaffee 

Cheyenne 

Clear Creek 

Conejos 

Costilla 

Custer 

Delta 

Dolores 

Douglas 

Eagle 

Elbert 

El Paso 

Eremont 

Garfield 

Gilpin 

Grand 

Gunnison 

Haralson 

Hinsdale 

Huerfano 

Jefferson. 

Kiowa 

Kit Carson 

Lake 

La Platte 

Larimer 

Las Animas 

Lincoln 

Logan 

M esa 

Montezuma 

Montrose 

Morgan 

Otero 

Ouray 

Park 

Phillips 

Pitkin 

Prowers 

Pueblo , 

Kio Blanco 

Rio Grande 

Routt 

Saguache 

San Juan 

San Miguel 

Sedgwick 

Sum m it 

Weld 

Washington 

Tuma 

Total 

Connecticut. 

Fairfield 

Hartford 

Litchfield 

Middlesex 

New Haven 

New London 

Tolland 

Windham 

Total 

Delaware. 

Kent 

New Castle 

Sussex 

Total 



No. 



28 

34 

107 

61 

1 
47 
29 

7 
47 
28 

6 
19 
13 
14 
152 
57 
53 
10 

6 
31 

1 

6 
23 
38 
16 
21 
71 
31 
78 
102 

6 
43 
37 
14 
42 

6 
22 
30 
21 
21 
31 
34 
176 

8 
27 
16 
30 
14 

9 

8 

17 
84 
38 
31 

2,745 



County. 



1,513 
1,131 
610 
301 
1,482 
939 
261 
570 



6,807 



242 
588 
277 



District of Cohimbia. 


4,548 


Total 


4,548 


Florida. 

Alachua 

Baker 


59 

2 

17 

19 

8 

7 

24 

6 

3 

21 

89 

39 

8 

5 

5 

12 

67 

4 

11 

8 

28 

13 

8 

9 

12 

2 

12 

16 

76 

21 

20 

99 

14 

32 
61 
46 
13 
16 
10 
15 
57 
3 
16 
26 

1,044 








Citrus 


Clav 












Franklin 














Jefferson 




















Nassau 






Polk 




St. John's 












Wakulla , 


Walton 




Total 


Georgia. 


3 
1 
3 
1 

28 
4 

28 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
5 
3 
6 

26 
8 

68 
6 

15 

22 
7 
5 
7 












Bibb 




Bryan 

Bulloch 




Butts 








Carroll 












Clarke 


Clay 


Clayton 



No. 



County. 



Georgia — Continued 

Clinch 

Cobb 

Coffee 

Colquitt 

Columbia 

Coweta 

Crawford 

Dade 

Dawson 

Decatur 

DeKalb 

Dodge 

Dooly 

Dougherty 

Douglas .' 

Early 

Echols 

Elbert 

Emanuel 

Fannin 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gilmer 

Glascock 

Glynn 

Cordon 

Greene 

Gwinnett 

Habersham 

Hall 

Hancock 

Haralson 

Harris 

Hart 

Heard 

Henry 

Houston 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jefferson 

Johuson 

Laurens 

Liberty 

Lincoln 

Lowndes... 

Lumpkin 

McDuflfie 

Mcintosh 

Macon 

Madison 

Marion 

Meriwether 

Miller 

Milton 

Mitchell 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Murray 

Muscogee 

Newton 

Oconee 

Oglethorpe 

Paulding 

Pickens 

Pierce 

Pike 

Polk 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Rabun 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Rockdale 

Schley 

Screven 



48 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Table No. 18. — Shotting the number of pensioners in each State and Territory and in each 
foreign country — Continued. 



County. 


No. 


County. 


No. 


County. 


No. 


Georgia— Continued. 


15 
7 
11 
17 

2 

4 
13 

18 
12 

2 

::»; 
4 

26 
3 
3 
2 
G 

I 

14 

58 

2 

4 

1,347 

59 
19 
11 
36 
19 

9 
14 

7 
20 
31 
22 
14 

9 

3 l 

13 
27 
30 

392 

1,111 
163 
240 
112 
217 
344 
76 
196 
268 
708 
404 
538 
540 
122 
437 

4,147 
498 
306 
216 
353 
238 
116 
541 
164 
419 
405 
134 


T llinois — Continued. 
Franklin 


476 

680 

295 

285 ! 

131 

152 

527 

206 

] 22 

256 

431 

589 

379 

423 

137 

241 

368 

496 

240 

L32 

447 

212 

628 

389 

292 

283 

273 

455 

2411 

734 

486 

307 

KM 

alia 

139 

22S 

299 

183 

297 

89 
4(U 
408 
190 
397 
660 
313 
265 
470 
387 
188 

58 
52li 
377 
395 
459 
499 
680 
281 
193 
505 > 
llil 
298 I 
258 
360 
836 
183 
269 l 
273 j 
578 
552 
338 
408 
476 
327 
195 


Indiana. 


293 




Fulton 


Allen 


644 




Gallatin 




735 


Talbot 






175 








181 


Tattnall 


Hamilton 




679 


Terrell 




329 




Hardin 




360 




Cass 


593 






Clark 


601 






Clay 


730 








667 








604 


Walker 


Jefferson 




603 


Walton 




589 


Ware 






651 






1),' Kalb 


443 








574 








397 




Ki ndall 


Elkhart 


617 


White 




Fayette 


244 


Whitfield 


Lake 


Floyd 


492 


Wilkes 


La Salle 




476 


Worth 




Franklin 


411 








267 


Total 




Gibson 


484 








740 








848 




McHenry 




644 








444 








531 








G10 






II. Ill A 


491 








561 




Marelial] 




508 








821 




Massac, 




239 




.lav 


556 


Latah 




Jefferson 


713 


Lemhi 




531 


Logan 


Montgomery 




500 




560 








527 




Ogle 




281 








236 








320 




Piatt 




717 


Total 


Pike 




681 








2, 706 


Illinois. 






444 








462 








474 


Alexander 






611 


Bond 






747 




St. Clair 




666 








164 






Noble 


454 






Ohio 


166 


Carroll 


Scott 




479 








600 




Stark 




369 






412 


Clark 




Piko 


574 


Clay 






230 






Posey 


392 


Coles 




274 


Cook 






507 








682 








G18 


De Kalb 


White 


llush* 


341 


De Witt 




St. Joseph 

Scott 


444 




Will 


247 






Shelby .. 


551 








654 




Woodford 




139 




Total 




456 




39, 943 




671 


Ford 




Switzerland 


416 



PENSIONS. 



49 



Table No. 18. — Showing the number of pensioners in each State and Territory and in each 
foreign country — Continued. 



County. 



Indiana— Continued. 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburg 

Verm illiou 

Vigo 

"Wabash ■ 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington 

"Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 

Total 



Indian Territory. 



Cherokee Nation 

Cherokee Outlet 

Cheyenne and Arapa- 
hoe Nation 

Chickasaw Nation 

Choctaw Nation 

Creek Nation 

Kansas Nation 

Kiowa and Comanche 
Nation 

Osage Nation 

Otoe and Missouria Na- 
tion 

Pawnee Nation 

Ponca Nation 

Pottawatomie Nation .. 

Public Land Strip 

Sac and Fox Nation 

Seminole Nation 

Wyandotte Nation 



No. 



941 
433 
111 
557 
324 
1, 183 
499 
253 
440 
534 
683 
315 
400 
271 

47, 798 



292 
6 



Total 



Iowa. 



Adair 

Adams 

Allamakee 

Appanoose 

Audubon 

Benton 

Black Hawk 

Boone 

Bremer 

Buchanan 

Buena Vista 

Butler 

Calhoun 

Carroll 

Cass 

Cedar 

Cerro Gordo 

Cherokee 

Chickasaw 

Clarke 

Clay 

Clayton 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Dallas 

Davis 

Decatur 

Delaware 

Des Moines 

Dickinson 

Dubuque 

Emmet 

Fayette 

INT 90- 



3 

131 

92 

70 

1 

1 

7 

2 
3 
4 
4 

18 
1 

37 
2 

574 



147 
218 
177 
425 
108 
282 
259 
256 
171 
289 
110 
203 
127 
138 
237 
131 
199 
113 
129 
236 

76 
276 
264 

86 
281 
245 
387 
178 
339 

62 
271 

37 
308 



County. 



-VOL III- 



Jowa— Continued. 

Floyd 

Franklin 

Fremont 

Greene 

Grundy 

Guthrie 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Harrison 

Henry 

Howard 

Humboldt 

Ida 

Iowa 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Jones 

Keokuk 

Kossuth 

Lee 

Linn 

Louisa 

Lucas 

Lyon 

Madison 

Mahaska 

Marion 

Marshall 

Mills 

Mitchell 

Monona 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Muscatine 

O'Brien 

Osceola 

Page 

Pala Alto 

Plymouth 

Pocahontas 

Polk 

Pottawattamie 

Poweshiek 

Ringgold 

Sac 

Scott .- 

Shelby 

Sioux 

Story 

Tama 

Taylor 

Union 

Van Buren 

Wapello 

Warren 

Washington 

Wayne 

Webster 

Winnebago 

Winneshiek 

Woodbury 

Worth 

Wright 

Total 

Kansas. 

Allen 

Anderson 

Atchison 

Barber 

Barton 

Bourbon 

Brown 

4 



No. 



127 
238 
192 

54 
235 
150 

54 
286 
309 
344 
164 



194 
315 
450 
332 
207 
296 
439 
120 
616 
622 
299 
284 

60 
260 
407 
475 
417 
142 
139 
130 
215 
219 
315 
144 

92 
315 

88 
110 

75 
775 
354 
242 
270 
120 
245 
123 
108 
244 
201 
288 
255 
428 
590 
272 
324 
373 
192 

57 
218 
315 

47 
130 



23, 189 



252 
337 
256 
123 
190 
413 
230 



County. 



Kansas— Continued. 

Butler 

Chase 

Chautauqua 

Cherokee 

Chevenne 

Clark 

Clay 

Cloud 

Coffey 

Comanche 

Cowley 

Crawford 

Davis 

Decatur 

Dickinson 

Doniphan 

Douglas 

Edwards 

Elk 

Ellis 

Ellsworth 

Finnev 

Ford." 

Franklin 

Garfield 

Geary... 

Gove 

Graham 

Grant 

Gray 

Greeley 

Greenwood 

Hamilton 

Harper 

Harvev 

Haskell 

Hodgeman 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Jewel 

Johnson 

Kearney 

Kingman 

Kiowa 

Labette 

Lane 

Leavenworth 

Lincoln 

Linn 

Logan 

Lyon 

McPherson 

Marion 

Marshall 

Meade , 

Miami 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Morris 

Morton 

Nemaha 

Neosho 

Ness 

Norton 

Osago . 

Osborne 

Ottawa 

Pawnee 

Phillips 

Pottawatomie 

Pratt 

Rawlins 

Reno 

Republic 

Rice 

Riley 

Rooks 

Rush 



No. 



427 
143 
286 
396 

42 

60 
229 
330 
319 

36 
603 
412 
3 
123 
286 
224 
396 

78 
276 

84 
143 

90 
108 
318 

18 
118 

55 

72 

38 

50 

37 
302 

49 
177 
291 

34 

54 
181 
211 
274 
244 

23 
164 

54 
583 

34 

1,132 

127 

304 

60 
346 
225 
184 



241 
274 
684 
207 

31 
282 
299 

91 
165 
312 
246 
197 
154 
210 
252 
135 

82 
458 
204 
289 
2154 
150 

81 



50 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Table No. 18. — Showing the number of pensioners in each State and Territory and in each 
foreign country — Continued. 



County. 


No. 


County. 


No. 


County. 


No. 


Kansas— C ontinued. 


163 

3 

189 

22 
554 

33 
609 

51 

73 
192 
149 

16 

19 
431 

65 

59 
118 

36 
296 

46 
329 
172 
438 


Kentucky— Continued. 
Henderson 


Ill 

111 

25 

111 

166 

1, 399 

58 

106 

329 

5 

127 

128 

175 

212 

71 

32 

14 

276 

185 

79 

160 

51 

82 

74 

186 

79 

194 

49 

76 

192 

61 

24 

143 

191 

304 

101 

32 

246 

101 

93 

292 

34 

76 

142 

189 

44 

109 

36 

381 

23 

117 

51 

152 

48 

74 

52 

29 

197 

81 

24 

34 

54 

326 

177 

124 

63 

138 

40 

51 

15, 909 

21 

28 
9 


Louisiana— C on ti nucd . 


6 




Bienville 


5 






8 








19 








50 






Caldwell 


8 






o 








22 








19 








18 






De Sota 


15 




La Rue 


East Baton Rouge 

EastCurroll 


85 






22 








38 






Franklin 


4 






Grant 


9 








12 




Lewis 


Iberville 


28 






6 


Wichita 




Jefferson 


23 


Wilson . . 


t >1 "*' ^ " w 












17 






Lincoln 


4 




McLean 




24 


Total 


22,321 




11 








4 


Kentucky. 


332 

194 

83 

17 

173 

77 

65 

59 

68 

194 

113 

96 

53 

174 

55 

209 

64 

40 

338 

20 

86 

226 

207 

129 

76 

213 

163 

121 

197 

211 

117 

29 

166 

163 

168 

38 

144 

22 

57 

85 

114 

37 

293 

245 

145 

68 

221 

49 

111 

267 




Natchitoches 


18 






687 








8 


Allen 






5 








6 


Ballard . . 


Menifee 




33 






7 


Bath 






3 


Bell 






16 








16 








8 


Boyd 




St. John Baptist 


8 






14 


Bracken 






4 


Breathitt 


Ohio .. 




18 


1 ircckinridge 


| Oldham 




23 


Bullitt 






30 


Butler 






20 


Caldwell 






4 


Calloway 






2 


Campbell 


Pike . . 




5 


Carlisle 


Powell .. 




4 


Carroll 


Pulaski 




10 




W.st Baton Rouge 

West Carroll 


9 




Rockcastle 

Rowan 

Russell 

Scott .. 


3 


Christian 

Clark 


West Feliciana 


5 

22 


Clay 


Total 




Clinton 


Shelby 


1,510 






Maine. 




Cumberland 






Daviess 








Todd .. 




Elliott 




875 


Estill 


Trimble... 




740 


Fayette 






1,252 


Fleming 






528 


Floyd 






771 


Franklin 






2 638 


Fulton 






838 


Gallatin 


Whitlev 




565 


Garrard 


Wolfe.'. 

Woodford . . . 




870 






2, 201 
444 


Graves 


Total 




Grayson 




376 




Louisiana. 




818 




Waldo 

Washington 

York 

Total 


1 144 




1, 075 
789 


Hardin 








Ascension 

Assumption 


15, 924 


Hart 



PENSIONS. 



51 



Table No. IS.— Showing the number of pensioners in each State and Territory and in each. 
foreign country— Continued. 



County. 


No. 


County. 


No. 


County. 


No. 


Maryland. 


220 

103 

2, 726 

14 

86 

179 

251 

34 

108 

238 

86 

138 

43 

82 

62 

71" 

83 

45 

55 

97 

261 

82 

95 


Michigan— Continued. 


845 

74 

16 
278 
865 
529 
126 
1, 200 
9 

94 
419 

70 

851 

373 

3 

27 

373 

107 

5 

63 
178 
206 

60 
142 

28 
529 
587 

20 
347 
248 
581 
240 

57 

8 

214 

39 

41 
293 

13 

24 
710 
465 
524 
162 

34 
553 
450 
793 
594 
2,207 
201 

26, 853 

32 

163 

72 

9 

53 

73 

300 

105 

23 

163 

15 

41 

90 

51 

16 

54 

55 

95 

134 

101 

232 

308 


-Minnesota—Continued. 


185 








148 








80 


Calvert 






1,203 








95 








29 


Cecil 






22 




Kent 


Itasca 


10 




Kewoenaw 


49 






12 








61 








7 








32 


Kent 






26 








244 


Prince George's 






53 






146 








165 








27 


Talbot 






84 








129 








62 








79 








201 


Total 


5,159 






36 








77 




309 

729 

1,409 

39 

3, 578 

552 

893 

521 

3,913 

69 

1,162 

1,454 

3, 863 

3,406 

21, 897 

17 

23 
561 

65 
130 

45 

6 

512 

241 

64 
1,006 
758 
1,080 
405 
122 
130 

30 
117 
577 

51 

27 
791 
185 
798 

17 
178 
643 
711 

26 
135 
788 






69 








20 




Muskegon 


Olmsted .. 


206 




! Otter Tail . 


194 


Bristol 




Pine 


25 








86 






Polk 


70 








73 


Hampden .. 






726 






60 








81 








227 


Norfolk 






58 








65 


Suffolk .... ... 




Scott 


137 




St. Clair 




50 








133 


Total . . . 






177 






Steele 


136 






Stevens 

Swift . . 


48 




51 




Van Buren 


Todd 


88 






26 








199 








92 




Total 




39 






136 




Minnesota. 




38 




"Wilkin . 


20 


Bay 




239 




Wright 


190 






Yellow Medicine 

Total 


53 












9,259 






Mississippi. 










Cheboygan 


Blue Earth 








144 


Clare 






14 








12 








16 


Delta 






6 


Eaton 






14 


Enimett 


Clay 




12 








16 








10 


Grand Traverse . . 








Gratiot 






16 








13 


Houghton 




Clay 


Hi 


Huron 






10 


Ingham .„ 


Fillmore 


Copiah 


32 



52 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF TITE INTERIOR. 



Table No. 18. — Showing the number of pensioners in each State and Territory and in each • 

foreign country — Continued. 



County. 



Mississippi— Continued 



Covington ... 

De Soto 

Franklin 

Greene 

Grenada 

Hancock 

Harrison — 

Hinds 

Holmes 

Issaquena ... 
Itawamba . . . 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jefferson 

Jones 

Kemper 

La Fayette . . 
Lauderdale . . 

Lawrence 

Leake 

Leo 

Le Flore 

Lincoln 

Lowndes 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 

Neshoba 

Newton 

Noxubee 

Oktibbeha... 

Panola 

Perry 

Pike 

Pontotoc 

Prentiss 

Quitman 

Rankin 

Seott 

Sharkey 

Simpson 

Sun Flower .. 
Tallahatchie . 

Tate 

Tippah 

Tishomingo.. 

Union 

Warren 

Washington . 

Wayne 

Webster 

Wilkinson ... 

"Winston 

Yalobusha ... 
Yazoo 



Total 



Missouri. 



Adair 

Andrew 

Atchison 

Audrain 

Barry 

Barton 

Bates 

Benton 

Bollinger 

Boone 

Buchanan 

Butler 

Caldwell 

Callaway 

Camden 

Ca'pe Girardeau. 



No. 



24 
ii 
1 

11 

13 

21 

15 

11 

9 

11 

16 

5 

36 

12 

9 

36 

26 

S 

6 

10 

7 

16 

9 

24 

12 

17 

18 

12 

8 

7 

4 

11 

15 

8 

I- 

in 

8 

■2 

12 

9 

15 

4 

16 
15 
15 

15 

7 

143 

39 

1 

11 

41 

17 

11 

14 



376 
180 
133 
104 
216 
229 
324 
149 
126 
145 
418 

87 
236 

85 
135 
303 



County. 



M issouri- Continued. 



Carroll 

Carter 

Cass 

Cedar 

Chariton 

Christian 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Cole 

Cooper 

Crawford 

Dade 

Dallas 

Daviess 

DeKalb 

Dent 

Douglas 

Dunklin 

Franklin 

< rasoonade . . . 

Gentry 

Greene 

Grundy 

Han ismi . . . 

Henry 

Eickory 

Holt 

Eoward 

Bowel! 

Iron 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Knox 

Lacled< 

La Payette.. 
Law rence ... 

Lew is 

Lincoln 

Linn 

Livingston .. 
McDonald ... 

Ma< on 

Madison 

Maries 

Marion 

Mercer 

Miller 

Mississippi .. 

Monitean 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 

Morgan 

New Madrid. 

Newton 

Nodaway 

Oregon 

Osage 

Ozark 

Pemiscot 

Perry 

Pettis 

Phelps 

Tike 

Platte 

Polk. 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Ralls 

Randolph 

Bay 

Reynolds 

Ripley 

St. Charles . . 

St. Clair 

St. Francois . 



No. 



286 

21 

279 

169 

227 

172 

199 

118 

157 

118 

126 

121 

178 

211 

234 

137 

131 

117 

62 

220 

61 

276 

482 

397 

367 

227 

121 

224 

92 

232 

95 

,073 

668 

154 

241 

148 

252 

135 

261 

170 

91 

414 

280 

H5 

493 

72 

57 

291 

267 

192 

37 

117 

98 

134 

ill 

20 

227 

398 

80 

92 

93 

24 

92 

225 

155 

212 

86 

262 

103 

394 

72 

201 

189 

19 

76 

76 

177 

126 



County 



Missouri— Continued. 



St. Genevieve 

St. Louis 

Salino 

Schuyler 

Scotland 

Scott 

Shannon 

Shelby 

Stoddard 

Stone 

Sullivan 

Taney 

Texas 

Vei mm 

Warren 

Washington . . 

\Va\ in' 

Webster 

Worth 

Wright 



Montana. 



Beaver Head 

Cascade 

Choteau 

Custer 

Dawson 

Deer Lodge 

Fergus 

Gallatin 

Jefferson 

Lewis and Clarke 

.Madison 

Meagher 

Missoula 

Talk 

Silvi r P.ow 

Yellowstone 



Total 



Nebraska. 



Adams . . . 
Antelope . 
Banner - - - 

Blaine 

Boone 

Box Butte 
Brown .... 
Buffalo ... 

Burt 

Butler 

Cass 

Cedar 

Chase 

Cherry 

Cheyenne: 

Clay 

Colfax .... 
Cuming... 

Custer 

Dakota ... 

Dawes 

Dawson . . . 

Deuel 

Dixon 

Dodge 

Douglas . . 

Dundy 

Fillmore .. 
Franklin.. 
Frontier .. 
Furnas . . . 



Total 23 



PENSIONS. 



53 



Table No. 18.- 



■ Showing the number of pensioners in each State and Territory and in each 
foreign country — Continued. 



County. 



Nebraska— Continued. 



Gago 

Garfield 

Gosper 

Grant 

Greeley 

Hall 

Hamilton 

Harlan 

Hayes 

Hitchcock . . . 

Holt 

Howard 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Kearney 

Keith 

KeyaPaha .. 

Kimhall 

Knox 

Lancaster ... 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Loup 

McPherson . . 

Madison 

Merrick 

Nance 

Nemaha 

Nuckolls 

Otoe 

Pawnee 

Perkins 

Phelps 

Pierce 

Platte 

Polk 

Eed Willow . 
Richardson . . 

Pock 

Saline 

Sarky 

Saunders 

Scott's Bluff . 

Seward 

Sheridan 

Sherman 

Sioux 

Stanton 

Thayer 

Thomas 

Thurston 

Valley 

Washington . 

Wayne 

Webster 

Wheeler 

York 



Total 



No. 



Nevada. 

Douglas 

Eiko 

Esmeralda 

Eureka 

Humboldt 

Lander 

Lincoln 

Lyon 

Nye 

Ormsby 

Storey 

Washoe 

White Pine.... 

Total...- 



269 
19 
30 

o 

41 

162 

114 

108 

40 

83 

220 

61 

144 

136 

87 

40 

51 

7 

92 

450 

110 

15 

36 

1 

112 

141 

44 

142 

111 

145 

128 

45 

62 

51 

101 

81 

160 

223 

32 

252 

39 

153 

17 

168 

97 

71 

15 

21 

168 

13 

8 

115 

110 

37 

174 

30 

209 

9,531 



Countj\ 



New Hampshire 

Belknap 

Carroll 

Cheshire 

Coos 

Grafton 

Hillsborough 

Merrimack 

Rockingham 

Stafford 

Sullivan 

Total 



New Jersey. 



Atlantic 

I Bergen 

Burlington . 

Camden 

Cape May .. 
Cumberland 

Essex 

Gloucester.. 

Hudson 

Hunterdon.. 

Mercer 

Middlesex . . 
Monmouth . 

Morris 

Oct;an 

Passaic 

Salem 

Somerset ... 

Sussex 

Union 

Warren 



140 



Total 

New Mexico Territory. 



Bernalillo.. 

Colfax 

Dona Aiia.. 

Grant 

Lincoln 

Mora 

Rio Arriba. 
San Juan . . 
San Miguel 
Santa Fe . . . 
Sierra...... 

Socorro 

Taos 

Valencia — 



Total 

New York. 



Albany 

Allegany — 

Broome 

Cattaraugus. 

Cayuga 

Chautauqua . 

Chemung 

Chenango — 

Clinton 

Columbia 

Cortland 

Delaware 

Dutchess 

Erie 

Essex 

Franklin 

Fulton 



No. 



493 
396 
506 
376 
876 
1,489 
975 
902 
587 
435 

7.035 



233 
127 
718 
784 
123 
524 
, 433 
324 
942 
321 
845 
393 
675 
338 
260 
491 
271 
175 
197 
427 
293 



45 
34 
20 
34 
29 
15 
2 
12 
51 
62 
25 

:m 

10 
8 

381 



1,028 
899 
955 

1,094 
955 

1,141 
759 
796 
744 
371 
441 
635 
670 

1,785 
768 
686 
622 



County. 



New York— Continued. 



Genessee 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Herkimer 

Jefferson 

Kings 

Lewis 

Livingston .., 

Madison 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 

New York 

Niagara ... 

Oneida 

Onondaga 

Ontario 

Orange 

Orleans ...... 

Oswego 

Otsego 

Putnam 

Queens 

Rensselaer . . 
Richmond ... 

Rockland 

St. Lawrence 
Saratoga 
Schenectady. 
Schoharie.... 

Schuyler 

Seneca 

Steuben 

Suffolk 

Sullivan 

Tioga 

Tompkins ... 

Ulster 

Warren 

Washington . 

Wayne 

Westchester. 
Wyoming ... 
Yates 



Total , 



North Carolina. 



Alamance... 
Alexander.. 
Alleghany . . 

Anson 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick . 
Buncombe . 

Burke 

Cabarrus . . . 
Caldwell.... 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham ... 
Cherokee ... 

Chowan 

Clay - 

Cleveland... 
Columbus .. 

Craven 

Cumberland 
Currituck .. 

Dare 

Davidson . . . 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham — 



No. 



435 
267 
141 
773 

1,290 

3, 391 
395 
568 
713 

1, 414 
549 

4,736 
641 

1,554 

1,507 
584 
961 
367 

1,380 
754 
58 
541 
963 
323 
138 

1,108 
795 
238 
295 
318 
378 

1, 939 
370 
577 
658 
541 
802 
576 
669 
704 
678 
468 
301 



50, 206 



150 
24 
14 
28 
9 
3 
10 



54 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Table No. 18. — Showing the number of pensioners in each State and Territory and in each 
foreign country —Continued. 



County. 



No. 



North Carolina.— Cont'd. 


14 




17 




5 




4 




8 




8 




6 




4 




19 




6 


Harnett 


8 




33 




17 


Hyde 


9 




11 




9 




13 




5 




11 




11 




17 




20 




76 




12 




25 


Mitchell 


124 




:; 




G 




8 




30 




12 




G 




10 




17 




30 


Perquimans 


34 
3 


Pitt 


13 


Polk 


U 




10 




6 




9 




20 ' 




8 




3 




G 


Stanly 


3 


Stokes 


9 




22 




14 




17 




5 




7 




5 


Wake 


30 




10 




35 


Watauga 


23 
18 


Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 


48 

16 

7 

44 


Total 


1,772 






North Dakota. 


92 




29 




8 




n 




18 


Buford 


17 




73 


Cass 


95 
18 


Dickey 


79 



County. 



North Dakota — Cont'd. 



Eddy 

Emmons 

Foster 

Garfield 

Grand Forks 

Griggs 

Kidder 

La Mo are 

Logan 

McHenry — 

Mcintosh 

McLean 

Mercer 

Morton 

Nelson 

Oliver 

Pembina 

Ramsey 

Ransom 

Richland .... 

Rolette 

Sargent 

Stanton 

Stark 

Steele 

Stevens 

Stutsman 

Towner 

Traill 

Walsh 

Ward 

Wells 



Total 



Ohio. 



Adams 

Allen 

Ashland — 
Ashtabula . . 

Athens 

Auglaize ... 

Belmont 

Brown 

Butler 

Carroll 

Champaign . 
Clarke...... 

Oil rumiit ... 

Clinton 

Columbiana 
Coshocton . . 
Crawford . . . 
Cuyahoga .. 

Darke 

Defiance 

Delaware . . . 

Erie 

Fail field 

Fayette 

Franklin ... 

Fulton 

Gallia 

Geauga 

Greene 

Guernsey... 
Hamilton ... 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Harrison ... 

Henry 

Highland . . . 

Hocking 

Holmes 

Huron 

Jackson . ... 

Jen'erson ... 

I Knox , 



No. 



1,234 



847 
571 
459 
81)7 
8G4 
38!) 
768 
726 
517 
194 
543 
677 
894 
621 
it:: l 
449 
329 



445 
483 
583 
532 
407 

1,859 
463 
722 
278 
608 
585 

3,004 
522 
724 
200 
453 
G55 
464 
278 
565 
509 
468 
702 



County. 



Ohio— Continued. 



Lake 

Lawrence. .. 

Licking 

Logan 

Lorain 

Lucas 

Madison 

Mahoning . . 

Marion 

Medina 

Meigs 

Mercer 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan . 

Morrow 
Muskingum 

Noble 

Ottawa 

Paulding .. . 
Perry... — 
Pickaway .. 

Tike, 

Portage 

Preble 

Putnam . ... 
Richland ... 

Ross 

Sandusky... 

Sciota .'. 

Seneca 

Shelby 

Stark 



Summit 

Trumbull... 
Tuscarawas 

Union 

Van Wert .. 

Vinton 

Warren 

Washington 

Wa\ lie 

Williams - . 

Wood 

Wyandot ... 



Total 



No. 



Oklahoma Territory. 

First 

Second 

Third : 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Not reported by divis- 
ions 



Total 



Oregon. 



Baker 

Benton 

Clackamas. 
Clatsop — 
Columbia . . 

Coos. 

Crook 

Curry 

Douglas ... 

Gilliam 

Grant 

Harney 

Jackson ... 
Josephine . 
Klamath .. 
Lake 



314 
943 
749 
487 
453 
990 
340 
538 
330 
258 
865 
333 
(532 
509 

3,348 
473 
415 

1,119 
408 
241 
554 
507 
388 
424 
368 
344 
429 
845 
817 
406 
730 
895 
297 
8S2 
551 
808 
531 
599 
55G 
319 
411 
992 
6:5!) 
580 
923 
414 

57, 087 



152 
125 
38 
48 
121 
79 

425 

988 

58 
75 

102 
37 
40 
61 
10 
14 
66 
22 
27 
3 

105 
58 
14 
13 



PENSIONS. 



55 



Table No. 18. — Showing the number of pensioners in each State and Territory and in each 
foreign country — Continued. 



County. 



Oregon— Continued 

Lane 

Linn 

Malheur 

Marion 

Morrow 

Mnltnomah 

Polk.... 

Sherman 

Tillamook 

Umatilla 

Union 

Wallowa 

Wasco 

Washington 

Yam Hill 

Total 

Pennsylvania. 

Adams 

Allegheny 

Armstrong 

Beaver 

Bedford 

Berks 

Blair 

Bradford 

Bucks 

Butler 

Cambria 

Cameron 

Carbon 

Centre 

Chester 

Clarion 

Clearfield 

Clinton 

Columbia 

Crawford 

Cumberland 

Dauphin 

Delaware 

Elk 

Erie 

Fayette 

Forest , 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Greene 

Huntingdon 

Indiana 

Jefferson 

Juniata 

Lackawanna 

Lancaster 

Lawrence 

Lebanon 

Lehigh 

Luzerne 

Lycoming 

McKean 

Mercer 

Mifflin 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Montour...'. 

Northampton 

Northumberland 

Perry 

Philadelphia 

Pike 

Potter 

Schuylkill 

Snyder 

Somerset 

Sullivan 

Susquehanna 

Tioga 



No. 



141 

93 

6 

162 
27 

307 
34 
3 
22 
70 
66 
37 
49 
81 
81 



295 

2,509 
759 
(565 
754 
916 
915 

1, 582 
541 
907 
495 
119 
297 
828 
742 
704 
598 
141 
307 
875 
365 
933 
450 
115 

1,184 
744 
29 
489 
171 
420 
679 
658 
618 
292 
697 

1,372 
477 
502 
392 

1,032 
716 
406 
667 
338 
190 
741 
193 
640 
504 
458 

9,797 
65 
510 
823 
261 
775 
88 
736 

1,243 



County. 



Pennsylvania— Cont'd 

Union 

Venango 

Warren 

Washington 

Wayne 

Westmoreland 

Wyoming 

York 

Total 

Rhode Islan d. 

Bristol 

Kent 

Newport 

Providence 

Washington 

Total 

South Carolina. 

Abbeville 

Aiken 

Anderson 

Barnwell 

Beaufort 

Berkeley 

Charleston 

Chester 

Chesterfield 

Clarendon 

Colleton 

Darlington 

Edgefield 

Fairfield 

Florence 

Georgetown 

Greenville 

Hampton 

Horry 

Kershaw 

Lancaster 

Laurens 

Lexington 

Marion 

Marlborough 

Newberry 

Oconee 

Orangeburgh 

Pickens 

Richland 

Spartanburgh 

Sumter 

Union 

Williamsburgh 

York 

Total 

South Dakota. 

Aurora 

Baedle 

Bon Homme 

Brookings 

Brown 

Brule 

Buffalo 

Butte 

Campbell 

Charles Mix 

Clark 

Clay 

Codington 

Custer 

Davison 

Day 

Deuel 



No. 



199 
462 
417 
531 

300 
878 
324 
748 

49, 578 



205 

156 

1,583 

295 

2, 298 



563 



107 

237 

53 

119 

162 

106 

17 

36 

21 

52 

61 

71 

98 

64 

115 

63 

66 



County. 



South Dakota— Cont'd. 



Douglas 

Edmunds... 
Fall River.. 

Faulk 

Grant 

Hamlin 

Hand 

Hanson 

Harding 

Hughes 

Hutchinson. 

Hyde 

Jerauld 

Kingsbury.. 

Lake 

Lawrence... 

Lincoln 

McCook 

McPherson . 

Marshall 

Meade 

Meyer 

Miner. 

Minnehaha . 

Moody 

Pennington . 

Potter 

Roberts 

Sanborn 

Shannon 

Spink 

Stanley 

Sully : 

Todd 

Turner 

Union 

Walworth .. 
Yankton 



No. 



Total 



Tennessee. 



Anderson . . . 

Bedford 

Benton 

Bledsoe 

Blount 

Bradley 

Campbell . . . 

Cannon 

Carroll 

Carter 

Cheatham .. 

Chester 

Claiborne... 

Clay 

Cocke 

Coffee 

Crockett 

Cumberland 

Davidson 

Decatur 

De Kalb 

Dickson 

Dyer 

Fayette 

Fentress 

Franklin ... 

Gibson 

Giles 

Grainger ... 

Greene 

Grundy 

Hamblen — 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Hardeman... 
Harden , 



29 
78 
48 
63 
84 
35 

103 
60 
35 
64 
43 
35 
57 

124 
82 
85 
70 
96 
33 
57 
4 
8 
67 

127 
65 
84 
32 
26 
31 
11 

152 



20 



3,617 



278 



33 

252 

169 

138 

32 

111 

267 

19 

11 

157 

63 

133 

68 

16 

34 

332 

18 

146 

35 

23 

26 

51 

44 

37 

114 

181 

479 

16 

147 

273 

124 

13 

54 



56 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Table No. 18. — Showing the number of pensioners in each State and Territory and in each 
foreign country — Continued. 



County. 



Tennessee— C ontinued. 

Hawkins 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Henry 

Hickman 

Houston 

Humphreys 

Jackson 

James 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Knox 

Lake 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Lewis 

Lincoln 

London 

McMinn 

McNairy 

Macon 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Maury 

Meigs 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Morgan 

Obion 

Overton 

Perry 

Pickett 

Polk 

Putnam 

Rhea 

Roane 

Robertson 

Ruth erford 

Scott 

Sequatchie 

Sevier 

Shelby , 

Smith 

Stewart 

Sullivan 

Sumner 

Tipton 

Trousdale 

Unicoi 

Union 

Van Buren 

Warren 

Washington 

Wayne 

Weakley 

White 

Williamson 

Wilson 

Total 

Texas. 

Anderson 

Angelina 

Aransas 

Archer 

Atacosa 

Austin 

Bandera 

Bastrop 

Baylor 

Bee 

Bell 

Bexar 

Blanco 

Boaque 



No. 



268 

17 

77 

28 

55 

12 

18 

60 

60 

270 

194 

686 

21 

19 

45 

11 

31 

146 

193 

91 

121 

50 

68 

49 

81 

82 



50 

62 

22 

76 

63 

78 

110 

285 

25 

58 

61 

8 

287 

203 

168 

21 

137 

67 

36 

18 

81 

159 

6 

39 
366 
61 
72 
34 
45 



9,680 



27 
8 
1 
7 

13 
13 
14 
34 
6 
14 
72 
211 
19 
34 



County. 



Texas— Continued. 

Bowie 

Brazoria 

Brazos 

Brown 

Burleson 

Burnet 

Caldwell 

Calhoun 

Callahan 

Cameron 

Camp 

Carson 

Cass 

Chambers 

Cherokee 

Childress 

Clay 

Coleman 

Collins 

Colorado 

Comal 

Comanche 

Concho 

Cook 

Coryell 

Cottle 

Crockett 

Crosby 

Pallas 

Deaf Smith 

Helta 

Denton 

Do Witt 

Dickens 

Dimmit 

Donley 

Duval 

Eastland 

Ector 

Edwards 

Ellis 

El Paso 

Erath 

Palls 

Fannin 

Fayette 

Fisher 

Floyd 

Fort Bend 

Franklin 

Freestone 

Frio 

Galveston 

Gillespie 

Goliad 

Gonzales 

Gray 

Grayson 

Gregg 

Grimes 

Guadalupe 

Hale 

Hall 

Hamilton 

Hardeman 

Hardin 

Harris 

Harrison 

Haskell 

Hays 

Hemphill 

Henderson 

Hidalgo 

Hill. 

Hood 

Hopkins 

Houston 

Howard 

Hunt 



No. 



31 
18 
22 
26 

9 
41 
44 

6 
11 
25 

5 

2 
20 

4 
19 

5 
32 
13 
101 
29 
18 
27 

1 
74 
32 

2 
12 

2 
170 

1 

17 
68 
28 

o 

7 
4 
4 
30 
1 

11 

44 

37 

36 

26 

107 

35 

4 

3 

8 

9 

22 

18 

57 

24 

12 

33 

2 

216 

22 

14 

26 

2 

2 

24 

8 

5 

78 

27 

3 

21 

2 

9 

2 

45 

21 

34 

32 

6 

79 



County. 



Texas— Continued. 

Jack 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jefferson 

JeffDavis 

Johnson 

Jones 

Karnes 

Kaufman 

Kendall 

Kent 

Kerr 

Kimble 

Kinney 

Knox 

Lamar 

Lampasas 

La Salle 

Lavaca 

Lee 

Leon 

Liberty 

Limestone 

Lipscomb 

Live Oak 

Llano 

McCulloch 

McLennan 

McMulleu 

Madison 

Marion 

Mason 

Maverick 

Medina 

Menard 

Midland 

Milan 

Mills 

Mitchell 

Montague 

Montgomery 

Morris ' 

Na.( ogdoches 

Navarro 

Newton 

Nolan 

Nueces 

Ochiltree 

Oldham 

Orange 

Palo Pinto 

Panola 

Parker 

Pecos 

Polk 

Potter 

Presidio 

Rains 

Red River 

Refugio 

Roberts 

Robertson 

Rockwell 

Runnels 

Rusk 

Sabine 

San Augustine 

San Jacinto 

San Patricio 

San Saba 

Scurry 

Shackelford 

Shelby 

Smith 

Somervell 

Starr 

Stephens 

Stonewall 

Sutton 



PENSIONS. 



57 



Table No. 18. — Showing the number of pensioners in each State and Territory and in each 
foreign country — Continued. 



County. 



Texas— Continued. 

Tarrant 

Taylor 

Throckmorton 

Titus 

Tom Green 

Travis 

Trinity 

Tyler 

Upshur 

Uvalde 

Val Vorde 

Van Zandt 

Victoria 

Walker 

Waller 

Washington 

Webb 

"Wharton 

Wheeler 

Wichita 

Wilbarger 

Williamson 

Wilson 

"Wise 

Wood 

Young 

Zapata 

Total 



Utah Territory 

Beaver 

Box Elder 

Cache 

Davis 

Emory 

Garfield 

Iron 

Juab 

Kane 

Millard 

Morgan 

PiUte 

Salt Lake.. 

San Juan 

San Pete 

Sevier 

Summit 

Tooele 

Unitah 

Utah 

Wasatch 

Washington 

Weber.. 

Total 



Vermont. 

Addison 

Bennington 

Caledonia 

Chittenden 

Essex 

Franklin 

Grand Isle 

Lamoille 

Orange 

Orleans 

'Rutland 

Washington 

Windham 

Windsor 



Total 



No. 



154 
17 

2 

9 
11 
102 
18 
26 
14 
23 

4 
40 
12 
14 

5 
28 
26 

4 

8 
24 
31 
70 
18 
66 
17 
19 

3 



IK 
6 
IS 

]() 

9 

8 

6 

11 

G 

8 

2 

7 

136 

1 

17 

8 

11 

12 

15 

41 

3 

18 



438 



County. 



521 
362 
646 
553 
161 
585 
46 
427 
560 
674 
760 
926 
531 
789 

7,541 



Virginia. 

Accomack 

Albemarle 

Alexandria 

Alleghany 

Amelia 

Amherst 

Appomattox 

Augusta 

Bath 

Bedford 

Bland 

Botetourt 

Brunswiciv 

Buchanan 

Buckingham. ... 

Campbell 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Charles City... . 

Charlotte 

Chesterfield 

Clarke 

Craig 

Culpeper 

Cumberland 

Dickenson 

Dinwiddie 

Elizabeth City. . 

Essex 

Fairfax 

Fauquier 

Floyd 

Fluvanna 

Franklin 

Frederick 

Giles 

Gloucester 

Goochland 

Grayson 

Greene 

Greenville 

Halifax 

Hanover 

Henrico 

Henry 

Highland 

Isle of Wight . . 

James City 

King and Queen 

King George 

King William . . . 

Lancaster 

Lee 

Loudoun 

Louisa 

Lunenburgh 

Madison 

Matthews 

Mecklenburgh. . 

Middlesex 

Montgomery 

Nansemond 

Nelson 

New Kent 

Norfolk 

Northampton . . . 
Northumberland 

Nottoway 

Orange 

Page 

Patrick 

Pittsylvania 

Powhatan , 

Prince Edward . 
Prince George . . 
Princess Anne.. 
Prince William , 
Pulaski „ 

Rappahannock . 



No. 



85 

35 

81 

7 

12 

28 

12 

58 

4 

20 

2 

10 

14 

8 

16 

35 

20 

12 

5 

11 

34 

8 

3 

15 

16 

5 

65 

603 



G2 

26 

16 

9 

23 

34 

6 

11 

8 

8 

1 

5 

21 

17 

152 

11 

7 

9 

3 

5 

4 

4 

2 

23 

51 

21 

10 

8 

15 

16 

13 

36 

12 

14 

3 

435 

43 

6 

6 

23 

13 

15 

28 

3 

14 

7 

16 

25 

1" 

8 



County. 



Virginia — Continued 

Richmond 

Roanoke 

Rockbridge 

Rockingham 

Russel 

Scott 

Shenandoah 

Smyth 

Southampton 

Spottsylvania 

Stafford 

Surry. 

Sussex 

Tazewell 

Warren 

Warwick 

Washington . 

Westmoreland 

Wise 

Wythe 

York 

Total 

Washington. 

Adams 

Asotin 

Chehalis... 

Clallam 

Clarke 

Columbia 

Cowlitz 

Douglas 

Franklin 

Garfield 

Island 

Jefferson 

King 

Kitsap 

Kittitass 

Klickitat 

Lewis 

Lincoln 

Mason 

Okanogan 

Pacific 

Pierce 

San Juan 

Skagit 

Skamania 

Snohomish 

Spokane 

Stevens 

Thurston 

Wahkiakum 

Walla Walla 

Whatcom 

Whitman 

Yakima 

Total . . 

West Virginia. 

Barbour 

Berkeley 

Boone 

Braxton 

Brooke 

Cabell ... 

Calhoun 

Clay 

Doddridge 

Fayette 

Gilmer 

Grant 

Greenbrier 

Hampshire .... 





No. 



10 
11 
76 
15 

129 
41 
40 
17 
1 
41 
7 
56 

333 
27 
48 
32 

120 

68 

13 

9 

22 

247 
17 
42 
10 
61 

202 
20 
63 
10 
96 
96 

120 
43 

2, 155 



L'9 
113 

52 

210 
87 
'SI 

188 
47 

104 

2B 



58 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Table No. 18. — Showing the number of pensioners in each State and Territory and in each 
foreign country — Continued. 



County. 



West Virginia— Cont'd. 



Hardy 

Harrison ... 

Jackson 

Jefferson ... 
Kanawha . . . 

Lewis 

Lincoln 

Logan 

McDowell . . 

Marion 

Marshall 

Mason 

Mercer 

Mineral 

Monongalia . 

Monroe 

Morgan 

Nichols 

Ohio 

Pendleton .. 
Pleasants... 
Pocahontas . 

Preston 

Putnam 

Raleigh 

Randolph . . . 

Ritchie 

Roane 

Summers ... 

Taylor 

Tucker 

Tyler 

Opshur 

Wayne 

Webster — 
Wetzell 



Wirt 

Wood 

Wyoming.. 

Total 



Wisconsin. 



Adams 

Ashland 

Barron 

Bayfield 

Brown 

Buffalo 

Burnett 

Calumet 

Chippewa 

Clark 

Columbia — 

C raw ford 

Dane 

Dodge 

Door 

Douglas 

Dunn 

Eau Claire.. 

Floivnce 

Fond du Lac. 

Forest 

Grant 

Green 

( i reen Lake . . 

Iowa 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Juneau 

Kenosha 

Kewaunee . . . 

La Crosse 

La Fayette .. 

Langlade 

Lincoln 

Manitowoc .. 



No. 



4 

253 

285 

61 

454 

152 

47 

10 

27 

332 

292 

476 

10 

69 

254 

12 

47 

23 

304 

24 

L25 

21 

432 

157 

41 

27 

304 

145 

25 

158 

35 

233 

204 

140 

21 

234 

111 

529 

11 



7,207 



160 
124 
185 

37 
323 
164 

28 
168 
316 
280 
351 
280 
557 
311 

84 

36 
280 
345 

19 
404 

22 
689 
359 
188 
187 
241 
284 
378 
101 

88 
310 
191 

89 

88 
186 



County. 



Wisconsin— Cont'd. 

Marathon 

Marinette 

Marquette 

Milwaukee 

Monroe 

Oconto 

Oneida 

Outagamie 

Ozaukee 

Pepin 

Pierce , 

Polk 

Portage 

Price 

Racine 

Richland 

Rock 

St. Croix 

Sauk 

Sawyer 

Shawano 

Sheboygan 

Taylor 

Trempealeau 

Vernon 

Walworth 

Washburn 

Washington 

Waukesha 

Waupaca 

Waushara 

Winnebago 

Wood.... 

Total 

Wyoming. 

Albany 

Carbon 

Converse 

Crook 

Fremont 

Johnson 

Laramie 

National Turk Kesei 

vation 

Natrona 

Sheridan 

Sweetwater 

Uinta 

Total 

Foreign countries. 

Australia 

Austria-Hungary 

Belgium .' 

Bermudas . 

Brazil 

British Columbia 

Canada 

Canary Islands 

Cape Colony 

Chili 

China 

Cuba 

Denmark 

Ecuador 

Fiji Islands 

France 

Germany 

Great Britain 

Guatemala 

Hawaiian Kingdom. . . 

Holland 

India 

Italy 



No. 



158 

64 

170 

1,846 

513 

113 

24 
299 

69 
109 
207 
120 
346 

54 
195 
527 
409 
200 
560 

33 

98 
272 

48 
185 
324 
329 

38 
103 
222 
376 
301 
447 
176 

16, 788 



281 



2 

26 
1,209 
1 
1 
5 
8 
5 

15 
2 
1 

46 

491 

498 

2 

10 
9 
2 

17 



County. 



Foreign countries — Con. 

Japan 

Liberia 

Mexico 

Netherlands 

New Zealand 

Nicaragua ... 

Norway 

Peru 

Portugal 

Russia 

Spain 

South African Repub- 
lic. 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

U. S. oi' Colombia 

Uruguay 

Unknown 

Total 

Political divisions. 

Alabama 

Alaska Territory 

A rizona Territory 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia . . . 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Indian Territory 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland. 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana — 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

Now Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico Territory . 

Now York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah Territory 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Foreign countries 

Grand total 



PENSIONS. 



59 



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a a. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF CENSUS. 



Department gf the Interior, 
Census Office, 
Washington, D. <7., June 30, 1890. 
Sir : I have the honor to report as follows relative to the operations 
of this office since the date of my last report, November 6, 1889. 

the count of the people. 

Under the provisions of the act entitled " An act to provide for taking 
the Eleventh and subsequent censuses," approved March 1, 1889, the 
Eleventh Census of the United States should have been completed to- 
day so far as the enumeration is concerned. With the exception of a 
few cities, where the work of enumeration has been delayed in conse- 
quence of the failure of enumerators to start promptly June 2 or of 
supervisors to make sufficient subdivisions of their districts, the count 
of the population has been completed in all cities and towns through- 
out the United States. In the rural districts the enumeration is prac- 
tically complete, though it is not unlikely that in some sparsely-settled 
parts of the country it may be necessary to extend the time for enumera- 
tion a few days into the month of July. 

The first completed returns were received from supervisors during 
the week ending June 14, and four days later the Census Office began 
the machine tabulation in the Inter-Ocean Building. During the mouth 
of June completed returns were received from 4,437 districts, over 
3,500 of which have been counted. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE OFFICE. 

Since my last report the work of organizing the office has been con- 
tinued, and involved not only the preparation necessary to supply mil- 
lions of schedules and blanks of all kinds to the army of enumerators 
which was placed in the field and began work June 2, but the examina- 
tion of the credentials of the numerous applicants for supervisors 7 posi- 
tions and the scrutiny of the formal applications of nearly 43,000 
enumerators. While every provision was made for the prompt and 
thorough count of the people this month, the special work of the census 
has been in no way neglected, and the special agents, experts, and 
chiefs of divisions have been supplied witli suitable quarters and 
sufficient clerical help to enable them to continue the separate inquiries 
which formed part of the plan of the Eleventh Census, already laid 

61 



G2 KEPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

before you. While this special work has been strengthened in several 
respects, the scope of the census has not been broadened in any par- 
ticular except to the extent called for by the act of February 27, 1890. 
The endeavor of the Superintendent has been to rigidly hold the 
responsible heads of the various divisions to the plans and specifica- 
tions discussed and agreed upon during the spring and summer of 
1889. The work of each of these divisions will be referred to subse- 
quently in detail. 

Upon the passage of the act of February 27, 1890, entitled "An act 
to require the Superintendent of the Census to ascertain the number of 
people who own farms and homes and the amount of the mortgage in- 
debtedness thereon," it became necessary to incorporate into the popu- 
lation schedules the following questions : 

26. Is the home you live in hired, or is it owned by the head or by a member of the 
family » 

27. If owned hy head or member of family, is fche homo free from mortgage incum- 
brance ? 

28. If the head of family is a farmer, is the farm which he cultivates hired, or is it 
owned by him or by a member of his family ? 

29. If owned by head or member of family, is the farm free from mortgage incum- 
brance? 

30. If the home or farm is owned by head or member of family and mortgaged, give 
the post-office address of owner. 

As already reported to you in a letter dated May 6, 1890, in answer 
to a resolution introduced by Senator P. M. Oockrell in the Senate of 
the United States and adopted April 22, 1890, it was decided that the 
enumerators should simply be called upon to secure the above informa- 
tion, which will enable the Census Office ultimately, by correspondence, 
by special agents, and in many cases by searching the records, to obtain 
with almost absolute accuracy and final completeness the facts required. 
By this method I hope to be able to tabulate and give to the country 
at a comparatively early date the number of persons in each county 
who own the homes the\ occupy and the farms they cultivate, the 
number of people who are tenants of homes and farms, the number of 
owned and tenanted farms, and the number of homes that are mort- 
gaged and free from mortgage incumbrance. In consequence of the fact 
that these questions, and also certain questions relating to chronic dis- 
eases, were inserted in the population schedule, it was feared that 
many persons would refuse to answer the enumerators. It is gratifying 
to be able to report that the reverse has proved true, and that the 
questions, especially those relating to farms, homes, and mortgages, 
have been almost universally answered. In the few cases where re- 
fusals were made the matter was placed in the hands of United States 
district attorneys and answers secured without any further trouble 
either to the Census Office or to the Department of Justice. On June 
12, 1890, the following telegram was sent to each supervisor: 

Questions regarding mortgages, much more important than those regarding chronic 
diseases, and post-office addresses of all persons owning mortgaged farms or homes, 
must, if possible, be secured. Wire me not later than Saturday night how far, ac- 
cording to your information, the mortgage questions are being properly answered. 

In answer to this telegram 110 supervisors reported that the mort- 
gage questions were being freely answered, and that they had heard of 
no refusals. In the remaining districts there were but few refusals re- 
ported, and in most of them only one or two. 

By April 15 the President, by and with the advice and consent of the 
Senate, had appointed the supervisors for each of the 175 districts into 
which the country had been divided for purposes of enumeration. 



CENSUS. 63 

The following are the Dames and addresses of the supervisors : 

ALABAMA. 

First district: Andrew J. Ingle, Double Springs, Winston County. 

Second district : Thomas P. Ivy, Attalla, Etowah County. 

Third district: James L. Watkius, Birmingham, Jefferson County. 

Fourth district: Jack R. Wilson, Grove Hill, Clarke County. 

Fifth district : Willett T. Brightman, Hayneville, Lowndes County. 

ARIZONA. 

One district : Elias S. Clark, Prescott, Yavapai County. 

ARKANSAS. 

First district : Jacob Triebcr, Helena, Phillips County. 

Second district : Otis E. Gulley, Springdale, Washington County. 

Third district : John W. Howell, box 148, Hot Springs, Garland County. 

CALIFORNIA. 

First district : John F. Sheehan, room 7, Appraiser's Building, San Francisco. 
Second district : William A. Anderson, 209 J street, Sacramento. 
Third district: Allen B. Lemmon, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County. 
Fourth district: Hamilton Wallace, box B, Tulare, Tulare County. 
Fifth district : Leroy E. Mosher, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County. 

COLORADO. 

First district : George L. Sopris, 1209 Fourteenth street, Denver. 

Second district: Willard B. Feiton, lock-box 515, Cauon City, Fremont County. 

CONNECTICUT. 

First district: John McCarthy, feox 1153, New Haven. 

Second district: James McLaughlin, Stafford Springs, Tolland County. 

DELAWARE. 

One district: Stansbury J. Willey, 1010 King street, Wilmington. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

One district: Harrison Dingman, room 36, Atlantic Building, Washington. 

FLORIDA. 

First district : Charles S. Partridge, Sauford, Orange County. 
Second district : John W. Tompkins, Lake City, Columbia County. 

GEORGIA. 

First district: Christopher C. Haley, Jasper, Pickens County. 
Second district : William F. Bowers, Bowersville, Hart County. 
Third district : Joseph H. Thibadeau, Atlanta. 
Fourth district : Marion Bethnne, Talbotton, Talbot County. 
Fifth district : Isaac Beckett, 135 Congress street, Savannah. 
Sixth district : William A. Harris, Isabella, Worth County. 



One district : Adoniram J. Pinkham, Ketchum, Alturas County. 



64 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

ILLINOIS. 

First district : Frank Gilbert, custom-house, Chicago. 

Second district: Cash C.Jones, Rockford, Winnebago County. 

Third district : John W. Bailey, Princeton, Bureau County. 

Fourth district : Oscar F. Avery, Pontiac, Livingston County. 

Fifth district : John W.Fisher, Paris, Edgar County. 

Sixth district : Jacob Wheeler, Springfield. 

Seventh district: Emil Schmidt, Nashville, Washington County. 

Eighth district : Norman H. Moss, Mount Vernon, Jefferson County. 

INDIANA. 

First district : Frederick J. Scholz, custom-house, Evansville. 

Second district : Ambrose E. Nowlin, Lawrenceburgh, Dearborn County. 

Third district : Sidney Conger, Flat Rock, Shelby County. 

Fourth district: Wilson II. Soale, Terre Haute, Vigo County. 

Fifth district : Charles Hurley, Delphi, Carroll County. 

Sixth district : Samuel B. Beshore, Marion, Grant County. 

IOWA. 

First district : John W. Rowley, Keosauqua, Van Buren County. 
Second district: I)a\ id W. Reed, lock-box 417, Waukon, Allamakee County. 
Third district: Bradbury W. 1 light, Council Bluffs, Pottawatamie County. 
Fourth district: John W. Near, Madrid, Boone County. 

KANSAS. 

First district: Littleton S. Crum, Oswego, Labette County. 
Second district : Sylvester R, Hindi, Olathe, .Johnson County. 
Third district: William E. Case, Norton, Norton County. 
Fourth district : Thomas A. Hubbard, Wellington, Sumner County. 

KENTUCKY. 

First district : Napoleon B. Chambers, Hawesville, Hancock County. 
Second district : Alfred Allen, Hardinsburgh, Breckinridge County. 
Third district,: William 11. Spencer, Lebanon, Marion County, 
Fourth district : John Woodnead, box 824, Falmouth, Pendleton County. 
Fifth district : Edward C. O'rear, Mount Sterling, Montgomery County. 
Sixth district: Richard L. Evvell, Loudon, Laurel County. 

LOUISIANA. 

First district: George Baldey, custom-house, New Orleans. 

Second district: Bartholomew C. White, Shreveport. 

Third district: James C. Weaks, 10 North Grande street, Monroe, Ouachita Parish. 

Fourth district: Bowman H. Peterson, Plaquemine, Iberville Parish. 

MAINE. 

First district : James S. Wright, Paris, Oxford County. 
Second district: Frank Oilman, Bangor, Penobscot County. 

MARYLAND. 

First district : John C. Rose, 301 N. Charles street, Baltimore. 
Second district: John P. Owens, Salisbury, Wicomico County. 
Third district : William If. Perkins, Hancock, Washington County. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

One district: Horace G. Wadlin, 20 Beacon street, Boston. 



CENSUS. 65 



.MICHIGAN. 

First district: John C. Sharp, Jackson, Jackson County. 
Second district: Charles II. Wiener, Flint, Genesee County. 
Third district : James N. McBride, Owosso, Shiawassee County. 
Fourth district: Donald C. Henderson, Allegan, Allegan County. 
Fifth district: James Watson, Roscommon, Roscommon County. 
Sixth district : George A. Newett, Ishpeming, Marquette County. 

MINNESOTA. 

First district : Herbert J. Miller, Luverue, Rock County. 

Second district: Edward J.Davenport, Minneapolis. 

Third district: Theophilus F. Smith, 22 Chamber of Commerce, St. Paul. 

Fourth district : Elmer E.Adams, Fergus Falls, Otter Tail County. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

First district: Edward Aldrich, Olive Branch, De Soto County. 
Second district: John W. Chandler, Cliftonville, Noxubee County. 
Third district : Joseph E. Ousley, Rosedale, Bolivar County. 
Fourth district: Garfield S. McMillan, Brookhaven, Lincoln County. 

MISSOURI. 

First district : Eugene F. Weigel, old custom-house, Saiut Louis. 
Second district : Eugene C. Baugher, Richwoods, Washington County. 
Third district: Walbridge J. Powell, Rolla, Phelps County. 
Fourth district: William N. Davis, Mount Vernon, Lawrence County. 
Fifth district : John M. McCall, Kirksville, Adair County. 
Sixth district: Arthur P. Morey, 410 Ohio street, Sedalia. 
Seventh district: Hobart G. Orton, Priuceton, Mercer County. 
Eighth district: William H. Miller, (>13 Delaware street, Kansas City. 

K MONTANA. 

One district : William O. Speer, Butte City. 

NEBRASKA. 

First district : William S. Randall, Fairfield, Clay County. 
Second district: Benjamin F. Stouffer, Fremont, Dodge County. 
Third district: Thomas M. Cooke, box 431, Lincoln. 

NEVADA. 

One district: George I. Lamnion, Virginia City. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

One district: Everett B. Huse, Enfield, Grafton County. 

NEW JERSEY. 

First district : Arthur B. Pearce, P. O. box 807, Paterson. 
Second district : John Bumstead, 99 Clinton avenue, Jersey City. 
Third district: Richard T. Starr, Salem, Salem County. 

NEW MEXICO. 

One district : Pedro Sanchez, Santa Fe\ 

NEW YORK. 

First district : Charles H. Murray, 135 Eighth street, New York. 
Second district: Robert B. Sedgwick, 44 Court street, Brooklyn. 
Third district : William C. Daley, Chatham, Columbia County, 

INT 90— VOL III 5 



66 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Fourth district : Benjamin B. Odell, jr., 14 Water street, Newburgh, Orange County. 
Fifth district : Richard A. Derrick, corner Congress and Second streets, Troy. 
Sixth district : Benjamin S. Robinson, Greenfield Centre, Saratoga County. 
Seventh district : Willard S. Augsbury, Antwerp, Jefferson County. 
Eighth district: Myron W. Van Auken, Mann Building, Utica. 
Ninth district: Joseph Schnell, 8 Main street, Binghamton, Broome County. 
Tenth district : Edwin L. Wage, Albion, Orleans County. 
Eleventh district: Silas J. Douglass, 50 Niagara street, Buffalo. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

First district: George W. Cobb, Elizabeth City, Pasquotank County. 
Second district: Madison Hawkins, box 382, Henderson, Vance County. 
Third district: Caleb P. Lockey, Wilmington. 
Fourth district: William E. Webb, Roxborough, Person County. 
Fifth district: Henry Hardwicke, Asheville, Buncombe County. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

One district: David S. Dodds, Lakota, Nelson County. 

OHIO. 

First district : Isaac M. Kirby, Upper Sandusky, Wyandot County. 
Second district: John Devor, Greenville, Darke County. 
Third district: Lot Wright, custom-house, Cincinnati. 
Fourth district : Mark Sternberger, Jackson. Jackson County. 
Fifth district : Samuel H. Petermau, Mount Vernon, Knox County. 
Sixth district: Thomas M. Beer, Ashland, Ashland County. 
Seventh district : James P. Wood, Athens, Athens County. 

Eighth district : William Grinnell, South Walnut street, Ravenna, Portage 
County. 

OKLAHOMA. 

One district : Harry P. Clark, Guthrie. 

OREGON. 

First district: John Kelly, Eugene, Lane County. 

Second district : John W. Strange, La Grande, Union County. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

First district : Robert B. Beath, Room 8, P. O. Building, Philadelphia. 

Second district: John H. Landis, Windom, Lancaster County. 

Third district: .John H. White, Norristown, Montgomery County. 

Fourth district: J. Henry Miller, Lebanon, Lebanon County. 

Filth district: George K. Ashley, Montrose, Susquehanna County. 

Sixth district: Peter D. Bricker, Jersey Shore, Lycoming County. 

Seventh district: David G. Alter, Port Royal, Juniata County. 

Eighth district: George W. Hood, Indiana, Indiana County.' 

Ninth district : George T. Oliver, Pittsburgh. 

Tenth district : James B. Mates, Butler, Butler County. 

Eleventh district : William Denney, Claysville, Washington County. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

One district: Alonzo Williams, 10 dishing street, Providence. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

First district : Samuel T. Poinier, Spartanburg, Spartanburg County. 

Second district: Delevan Yates, Aiken, Aiken County. 

Third district: Randall D. George, 159 Spring street, Charleston. 

Fourth district : Francis W. Macusker, Georgetown, Georgetown County. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

First district : James A. Wakefield, Huron, Beadle County. 
Second district : Charles W. Mather, Deadwood, Lawrence County. 



CENSUS. 67 



TENNESSEE. 

First district: William C. Hunt, 120 Hill street, Knoxville, Knox County. 

Second district : James G. Parks, Chattanooga. 

Third district: Peyton C. Smithson, Lewisburgh, Marshall County. 

Fourth district: Henry R. Hinkle, Savannah, Hardin County. 

Fifth district : John R. Walker, Trenton, Gibson County. 

TEXAS 

First district : Hiram A. David, Greenville, Hunt County. 
Second district : Joseph F. Pells, Palestine, Anderson County. 
Third district: John Nevins, Denison, Grayson County. 
Fourth district : Thomas A. Pope, Cameron, Milam County. 

Fifth district : James P. Newcomb, 250 W. Commerce street, San Antonio, Bexar 
County. 
Sixth district : David Eedfield, Cisco, Eastland County. 
Seventh district : Joseph E. Ryus, Graham, Young County. 
Eighth district : Edward T. Terrell, Colorado, Mitchell County. 

UTAH. 

One district : Amasa S. Condon, Ogden, Weber County. 

VERMONT. 

One district : Marshall O. Howe, Newfane, Windham County. 

VIRGINIA. 

First district : Benjamin Upton, jr., Norfolk, Norfolk County. 

Second district : Richard A. Young, Petersburg, Dinwiddie County. 

Third district: Joseph A. Wingfield, Hanover Court House, Hanover County. 

Fourth district: George A. Revercomb, Warm Springs, Bath County. 

Fifth district : Campbell Slemp, Turkey Cove, Lee County. 

WASHINGTON. 



First district: Will D. Jenkins, Whatcom, Whatcom County. 
Second district : John M. Hill, Pullman, Whitman County. 



WEST VIRGINIA. 



First district : George M. Bowers, Martinsburg, Berkeley County. 
Second district : Thomas G. Mann, Hinton, Summers County. 

WISCONSIN. 

First district : William T. Rambusch, Juneau, Dodge County. 
Second district: John C. Metcalf, Janesville, Rock County. 
Third district: Andrew J. Turner, Portage, Columbia County. 
Fourth district: Luther B. Noyes, Marinette, Marinette County. 
Fifth district: James L. Linderman, Osseo, Trempealeau County. 

WYOMING. 

One district : Homer Merrell, Rawlins, Carbon County. 

After the promulgation of the original list only one change was made, 
in consequence of the resignation of Mr. John F. Sheehan, supervisor of 
the first district of California. His place was immediately tilled by Mr. 
William H. Davis, who was appointed and confirmed on the same day, 
and whose commission was received in San Francisco on the morning 
of the day for the commencement of the enumeration. With this ex- 
ception every supervisor proceeded promptly and intelligently to sub- 
divide his district, and on May 31 reported to this office that everything 
was ready for the enumeration on the following Monday, 



68 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF TILE INTERIOR. 

FINANCIAL REPORT. 

While I have not deemed it necessary to go over the same ground 
covered in my report of November 6, 1889, so far as relates to the 
organization and development of the general work of the Census Office, 
yet the financial report herewith submitted comprises a complete state- 
ment of the expenditures of the office from its organization to the Year 
ending June 30, 1890. 

Dishttrsejnents on account of the Eleventh Census of the United States from the commence- 
ment of operations to the close of business June 30, 1890. 

ADMINISTRATION/ 

For salaries - $410,347.20 

Furniture and fittings 37,840.12 

Misceli aueouS 266, 586. 50 

Total 714,773.82 

SPECIAL AGENTS. 

For per diem $158, 804. 50 

Traveling expenses 75,114. 91 

Miscellaneous 21,021.68 

Total 254,941.09 

SUPERVISORS. 

For compensation $1, 000. 00 

Clerk hire 5,857.95 

Miscellaneous 625. 16 

Total 7,483.11 

Grand total 977,198.02 

Under the head of administration " miscellaneous " covers rent, sta- 
tionery, printipg, and miscellaneous supplies and services, together with 
traveling expenses of employes other than special agents. 

Under the head of special agents " miscellaneous" covers the pur- 
chase of supplies, the hire of temporary clerical and other assistance, 
and all expenses of special agents except per diem and traveling ex- 
penses. 

The foregoing grand total is chargeable to the following branches of 
investigation : 

Census proper .; $159,481.88 

Printing and stationery 234, 170.61 

Supervisors 8,495.77 

Population and social statistics 47,073. 69 

Manufactures 48,721.71 

Agriculture 5,432. 97 

Vital statistics and special classes 48,741.58 

Wealth, debt, and taxation 7:5, 195.65 

Farms, homes, and mortgages 223,058.0 

Mines and mining 49,022, 30 

Fish and fisheries 28,043.62 

Transportation ... 23,616.61 

Insurance 16, 032. 37 

Churches „ 6,396.92 

Pauperism and crime 5, 714. 28 

Total 977,198.02 



CENSUS, 6*9 

"Census proper" includes the Divisions of Appointments, Disburse- 
ments and Accounts, Geography, and Educational Statistics ; u Popula- 
tion and Social Statistics " tne Divisions of Population, Statistics of 
Alaska, Statistics of Indians, and Social Statistics of Cities ; " Wealth, 
Debt, and Taxation" the Divisions of Wealth, Debt, and Taxation, 
and National and State Finances ; and " Supervisors " the Division of 
Supervisors' Correspondence, and compensation, clerk hire, and mis- 
cellaneous expenses of supervisors. The Division of Educational Sta- 
tistics is included as part of the Census proper for the reason that it 
took charge of the examination of applicants for employment as well 
as the regular work of the division. It was difficult to separate the two, 
and therefore it is included as part of the administration. 

The amount expended was paid from the following appropriations : 

Expenses of Eleventh Census $608, 201. 40 

Farins, homes, and mortgages 196, 967. 28 

Printing, engraving, and binding 172, 029. 34 

Total 977,198.02 

Disbursements for year ending June 30, 1890 _ 967, 232.53 

Disbursements per report of J une 30, 18^9 9, 965. 49 

Total 977,198.02 

The apparent discrepancy in the amount chargeable to the farms, 
homes, and mortgages division, and the amount expended from the appro- 
priation for that special investigation's due to the fact that $26,090.78 
was expended from the general appropriation for the expenses of the 
Eleventh Census in the collection of statistics relating to mortgage in- 
debtedness prior to the passage of the act of February 22, 1890. 

PAY OF ENUMERATORS. 

Since the subdivision of the country into 175 supervisors' districts for 
administrative purposes of the census was completed the work of estab- 
lishing the pay of enumerators for their services was begun, and as ex- 
tensive and careful a study as possible, based on the earnings in various 
parts of the country ten years ago, was made of the subject. 

The density of population, the natural and artificial difficulties pre- 
sented by the country, and the various experiences obtained during 
the Tenth Census, were taken into consideration. The rates were 
finally established and promulgated in accordance with the census 
law. From the commencement of the enumeration complaints were 
made by supervisors that it was difficult to secure enumerators for the 
compensation allowed by the act. The Census Office can not very well 
be held responsible for this, as the per capita range is from 2 to 3 cents. 
This presupposes that under normal conditions the 2-cent rate should 
be paid and in sparsely-settled regions the 3-cent rate allowed. In 
some parts of the country the office has been compelled to pay as 
high as $6 per day for enumerators. The objection to the per diem 
rate is that with no iucentive to secure names, and a certainty of thirty 
days' pay, the enumerators are not energetic, and are liable to omit 
persons who are entitled to enumeration. At the best, per capita rates 
are not likely to yield a very bountiful harvest to enumerators, though 
this office and the honorable Secretary of the Interior can in no way be 
beld responsible for their meager pay. 



70 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

EMPLOYES AND EXAMINATIONS. 

The total number of employes at the present time, including special 
agents and clerks not stationed in Washington, is 3,170. These em- 
ployes have been appointed from time to time, as the requirements of 
the office have increased, by the honorable Secretary of the Interior on 
the recommendation of the Superintendent. The appointments in every 
case have been made in accordance with the rules governing appoint- 
ments in the Census Office, approved by the Secretary and promulgated 
August 3,1889. As stated in my former report, the examinations required 
by those rules are not competitive, but simply a test of the qualifications 
of such candidates only as may be designated for examination by the 
Superintendent of Census. Viewed from the four standpoints of effi- 
ciency, practicability, rapidity of appointment, and lack of permanency 
of employment, this system has worked well. In recommending ap- 
pointments I have endeavored as far as possible, especially in the 
earlier appointments, to distribute the employes fairly and equitably 
among the several states of the Union. In the more recent recommen- 
dations, where the chance of employment will not be for more than 
ninety days, or at the outside six months, the clerks have been more 
largely drawn from this city and the surrounding states. A glance 
at the subjoined table, giving the total number of clerks on the pay- 
roll and the total amount paid out each month in salary, shows the ra- 
pidity with which appointments have been made, and a similar table in 
the report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1801, will probably show 
almost as rapid a decline in the office force. 

It has therefore seemed to me that for the purposes of this office the 
system of examination adopted has worked even more satisfactorily 
than could have possibly been expected. I know that the average pro- 
ficiency of the force at the present time is equal to that of any similar 
body of clerks employed in the other departments of the Government, 
and I am as well satisfied now as when the matter of Tracing the Census 
Office under the Civil Service Commission was first broacin d that to 
have done so would have been a mistake, and would have more or less 
impeded the operations of this office. The examinations which have 
been conducted have been uniformly lair and satisfactory, not a single 
complaint having reached the Superintendent in relation to the work- 
ings of the division having charge of the examinations. 

Prior to the appointment of the board of examiners of this office 73 
appointments, including that of the Superintendent, had been made. 
Of this number 30 were chiefs of divisions, statistical experts, watchmen, 
assistant messengers, and laborers, who were exempt from examination 
under the law and the ruling of the department. Of the remaining 43 
appointments .16 passed a civil-service examination and 5 served in the 
Tenth Census, leaving 22 who were appointed without examination. 

The total number of persons examined to date has been 1,641, of whom 
1,228 passed and 413 failed. 

As considerable interest has been manifested and many inquiries 
made as to the character of the Census Office examinations, including 
a request for the Superintendent to lay the facts before the Committee 
on Eeform in the Civil Service of the House of Eepresentatives, I have 
thought it expedient to allude to the character of these examinations. 

There seemed to be reasons for permitting re-examinations. For 
these at first no definite rule was laid down. The opportunity of re- 
examination was soon abused, the original examination being used as a 
means of learning the character of the questions as a preparation to pass 
on a second trial. An endeavor was made to check this abuse by 



CENSUS. 71 

requiring the interval of a month before reexamination. It was evident, 
however, that this was not sufficient. A rule was therefore approved, 
which took effect May 1, 1890, allowing no re-examination in less than 
three months from the first, and requiring a minimum attainment of 75 
per cent on re-examination. 

The good effect resulting from the adopted rule will be found in this 
brief statement: Re-examined. to May 1, 1890, 44; passed, 29; failed, 
15. Re-examined since May 1, 1890, 38; passed, 9; tailed, 29. 

When no advance in standing was required, there was a very evident 
advantage to one who tried a re-examination immediately after failure 
to pass compared with those who tried the work for the first time. 
This advantage is certainly not more than offset under the present rule 
with the additional minimum of attainment required. 

Orthography and penmanship have been determined from the writ- 
ten work, without any special exercise in spelling or in penmanship. 
The candidate has an exercise in copying, an exercise in writing from 
dictation, and a letter to write, each containing about one hundred and 
twenty words. It has been the aim to assign for letters subjects of which 
the applicants might fairly be supposed to know enough for the subject- 
matter, that all might be on as even terms as practicable wheu their 
methods of work are estimated. The residence claimed, however, has 
proved a poor guide in judging what would be familiar topics, espe- 
cially as multitudes have a legal residence in places which they never 
saw or come upon the quota of such localities. 

The questions in arithmetic are, in general, of a form that will occur 
in the census work. They are intended to test the ability of the candi- 
date to set down and add long columns of figures, or to add across the 
page numbers set in parallel columns; to determine whether the candi- 
date has a ready knowledge of fractions, common and decimal, necessary 
in making comparisons between the facts of one census year and those 
of another, or between the separate items of any group in the current 
census ; to determine whether the candidate can compute averages, and 
to demonstrate whether the candidate can give the number of deaths to 
each one thousand births, the latter requirement being essential in the 
division of vital statistics. 

In geography and history and under the title general questions care 
has been taken to avoid questions regarding insignificant details. No 
small city, no river not shown on general maps, no person not of national 
repute, has been named in the questions. No fact not of general value 
or even of specific value in the Census Office has been called for. 

All of these questions are confined to the United States. The principal 
stress is laid upon arithmetic, and the least upon geography and history 
and the general questions. The examination questions were deliberately 
framed with the intent that no one who could write well, spell well, and 
calculate correctly should fail in examination for want of a knowl- 
edge of other matters, valuable as the questions might prove as a test 
of general information. Any one reaching 75 per cent in orthography 
and penmanship, in letter- writing, and in arithmetic would require but 
25 per cent in geography, history, and in general questions to pass 
the examination. A very considerable number, not less than 190, wiio 
did not exceed 65 per cent in arithmetic, made an equal or higher record 
in these latter subjects, and reached the required general average of 
65 per cent. 

The examinations, at first on certain specified days, have been held 
every business day since December 1, 1889. Notwithstanding the gen- 
eral uniformity and the opportunity given for learning their character 
from candidates who had been examined, the examinations have aided 



72 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



in distinguishing those who could solve every question in arithmetic 
accurately from those who did not even acid or subtract correctly, and 



those who wrote neatly and correctly 
and used scores of misspelled words. 



from those who wrote illegibly 



PAY-ROLL. 

One of the best illustrations of the growth of the Census Office is the 
following table, showing the total number of clerks, etc., on the pay- 
roll and the total amount paid to date : 



Month. 



April, 1889 

May, 1889 

June, 1889 

July, 1889 

August, 1889 - - - 
September, 1889 
October, 1889. 
November, 1889 
December, 1889. 
January, 1890 . . . 
February, 1890 . 

March, 1890 

April, 1890 

May, 1890 

June, 1890 



Total No. 


Total 


on paj - 
rolls. 


amount of 


pay-rolls. 


G 


$302. 75 


33 


2, 368. 05 


54 


4,511.05 


69 


5, 466. 75 


97 


7, 492. 95 


129 


8, 831. 75 


176 


11, 810. 75 


232 


15,613.70 


302 


19, 706. 10 


432 


27, 680. 90 


629 


35, 494. 05 


831 


52, 460. 75 


987 


62, 294. 85 


1,122 


73,771.90 


1, 291 


82,135.85 


409.942.15 



PRINTING, ENGRAVING, AND BINDING. 

The act to provide for taking the Eleventh and subsequent censuses 
makes the appropriation which is available under it exclusive of print- 
ing, engraving, and binding. Under the ruling of the Treasury De- 
partment these expenses could not be paid out of the general appro- 
priation. The matter was brought before the Appropriations Commit- 
tee on the assembling of Congress, and a deficiency bill was passed en- 
titled "An act making appropriations to supply a deficiency in the 
appropriation for public printing and binding for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1890, and for other purposes," which was approved December 
19, 1889. 

As will be seen, of this amount but $172,029.34 has been paid out, 
although the outstanding obligations at the present time will require 
the total amount appropriated for printing, engraving, and binding 
prior to the enumeration. 

The printing of over 80,000,000 blanks, circulars, schedules, etc., 
necessary for the enumeration, necessitated a large amount of work in 
the way of preparation of copy, proof-reading, etc. The bulk of this 
work, of course, has been done at the Government Printing Office, as 
will be seen by the following statement : 

Printing. 



Work done at Government Printing Office 
Work done at Census Printing Office 

Total 



Number of Number of 
requisi- copies 

tions. printed. 



950 
794 



1,744 



74, 294, 545 
5,911,805 



80, 206, 350 



CENSUS 13 

CENSUS PRINTING OF KICK. 

On September 4, 1889, you authorized the expenditure of $2,600, and 
subsequently, on January 22, 1890, the expenditure of $5,000 additional, 
under a section of the census law authorizing the Secretary of the In- 
terior to purchase printing' material. There has been established at the 
Third and G street building a thoroughly equipped printing office out 
of this amount, in compliance with section 24, act of Oougress approved 
March 1, 1889, "for printing small blanks, tally sheets, circulars, etc." 

It would be impossible for me to state in words the inestimable 
value of this printing office in the work of the census. The work has 
been of the best character and executed so promptly that the cen- 
sus investigations are much farther advanced than they would have 
been without the superior advantages afforded by having this out- 
fit. On several occasions the Census Printing Office has been called 
upon to perform on short notice work that could not possibly have been 
done in time by any printing office not under the immediate control of 
the Superintendent of Census — work that required the attendance 
of printers and pressmen until midnight, and upon some occasions all 
night. 

If the Census Office could be allowed the same control of the printing 
of the final reports under your direction, the volumes of the Eleventh 
Census could be published more expeditiously than by any other plan. 
I take this occasion to call attention to my recommendation relative to 
the necessity for prompt publication, made in the report of Novem- 
ber 6, 1889, and to emphasize what was said at that time. 

PREPARATION OF THE FINAL VOLUMES. 

Every effort has been made to prepare in advance such maps and 
tables showing the geographical distribution of the mean annual tem- 
perature and the mean annual rainfall over the United States as will 
be used in the final volumes. Many of these maps have been compiled 
and are now ready for the engravers. 

Lists of counties have been prepared and districted in accordance 
with latitude, longitude, mean annual temperature, mean annual rain- 
fall, and drainage basins, in readiness for the distribution of the popu- 
lation by agricultural products and other data as shall be found neces- 
sary or desirable. The areas of the counties of the United States have 
also been measured by the geographical division of the Census Office 
for use in computing the density ot population and other classes of data 
which depend upon area. The areas of drainage basins have also been 
measured. Also, for the division of mortality, areas by wards and sani- 
tary districts of cities have been measured and outlined. Maps of all 
large cities have been prepared, and are ready for the official returns. 
In this connection I wish to call attention to the necessity of securing 
for the Census Office the best engraving that can be done in this coun- 
try. Some of the maps published in the volumes of the Tenth Census 
were regarded as models of workmanship and skill, competent European 
authorities declaring that they were the best of the kind ever published 
in Government reports. On the other hand, there were some maps which 
appeared in the volumes of those reports which were alike discreditable 
to the reports and to the Government. In my opinion, it is better to 
have no maps at all than to publish maps that are cheap, badly en- 
graved, and misleading in every particular. 

With your approval it is my intention to publish in connection with 



74 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

the census volumes a new statistical atlas of the United States, which 
shall show by maps and diagrams not only the wonderful progress of 
this country for the last decade, but for the century during which the 
decennial censuses have been taken. The groundwork for this at las is 
already under consideration, and the detail work for it can be carried 
on simultaneously with the other work of the Census Office, so that it 
may be published immediately after the last volume, and thus be use- 
ful from a decennial as well as a centennial standpoint. 

INSTITUTIONS. 

In consequence of the many blunders, duplications, and omissions 
incident upon intrusting the enumeration of institutions to the regu- 
lar enumerators, it was decided, for the purpose of enumerating the 
various institutions of the country, comprising the insane, idiotic and 
feeble-minded, blind, deaf and dumb, and physically defective, to ap- 
point special enumerators, who should be named by the representatives 
of the institutions themselves. It is believed that this plan will work 
admirably. As a basis it was necessary to secure lists of these insti- 
tutions. These lists were carefully verified and added to from every 
available record, including city directories, state reports, and similar 
publications. After these lists were completed and verified as far as 
possible from printed reports and otlier available 'data, a circular let- 
ter was mailed to each institution, calling for its character, name, 
and address, and the estimated population June 1, 1890, and for the 
designation of some suitable person to act as enumerator for said 
institution. This circular letter was mailed to 7,640 institutions and 
4,258 private schools, colleges, etc. It will thus be seen that outside 
of the 43,000 enumeration districts the Census Office was called upon 
to deal with nearly 12,000 institutions, a large proportion of which were 
of sufficient importance to have appointed for each of them a special 
enumerator. 

VETERANS. 

Section 17 of the census act provides that the Superintendent of 
Census shall, under the authority of the Secretary of the Interior, cause 
to be taken on a special schedule of inquiry, according to such form as 
he may prescribe, the names, organizations, and length of service of 
those who had served in the army, navy, or marine corps of the United 
States in the war of the rebellion, and who are survivors at the time of 
said inquiry, and the widows of soldiers, sailors, or marines. 

It was feared in the beginning (and so far as can be learned from the 
returns already received in the office these fears were well founded) 
that the enumerators would have great difficulty in securing the data 
required by the above section. While it was easy enough to find out 
from the wife, daughter, or housekeeper whether the head of the house- 
hold did or did not serve in the war of the rebellion, yet it was almost 
impossible, without an interview with the person himself, to ascertain 
the facts called for by law. I deemed it expedient, therefore, to secure 
all possible information on this point elsewhere in advance, to act as a 
check upon the enumerator and to aid the office in carrying on the enor- 
mous amount of correspondence which, in all probability, will be neces- 
sary to make this inquiry as complete as it should be, in order to be of 
any value to Congress in basing future pension legislation thereon. 

The preliminary list of surviving soldiers was obtained from the 






CENSUS. 75 

records of the Pension Office. This work was commenced December 
9, 1889, and nine clerks were engaged during the balance of that 
month in culling duplicates and in otherwise preparing the Pension 
Office records for type-written transcripts, which was begun January 
28, 1890, and completed during the month of March. The whole num- 
ber of names transcribed was 458,677, while the whole number of dupli- 
cates culled was 140,477. 

In addition to this work, requests were made for copies of the rosters 
of Grand Army posts throughout the country, calling for the names 
of members and data as to the organizations in which they served and 
the length of service in each organization. Ax>plication was also made 
for the state rosters and adjutant-generals' reports covering the war 
period, and for such other publications as were likely to be of value in the 
work of verification necessary to the completion of the special census 
of surviving soldiers, sailors, and marines who were mustered into the 
service of the United States during the late war, and of the widows of 
such as have died, as provided for by the census act. Whatever may 
be the result of the enumeration of the veterans of the war, the Census 
Office will have the satisfaction of knowing that it has taken every pre- 
caution *o secure the data as promptly and accurately as possible. 

METHODS OF TABULATION. 

A committee appointed to test the various methods of tabulation, re- 
ferred to in my report of November last, having reported in favor of Mr. 
Hollerith's method as being equally as accurate as either of the others 
and requiring much less time for transcribing and less time for tabulat- 
ing the returns when transcribed, a contract was entered into with Mr. 
Hollerith to supply fifty-six machines for one year, with the under- 
standing that these machines could be worked day and night, if neces- 
sary. 

Six of these machines are now being used in the division of vital 
statistics for tabulating the returns of deaths which have been tran- 
scribed from the records in the offices of the boards of health of the 
various large cities. The remaining machines are being used by the 
population division in making the rough count of the population, and, 
although they have only been in use since June 14, the indications are 
that the count will be more rapidly completed thau heretofore. 

VITAL STATISTICS. 

The report on vital statistics of the Eleventh Census bids fair to be 
of more value to the country and to scientific inquiry than any hereto- 
fore prepared. The elaborate preparation for this work, and the several 
new features of census inquiry introduced into it, have been carried on, 
and the whole is now well advanced and ready for the returns of deaths 
made by the enumerators and the official count of the population. The 
first work performed in this division since the publication of my last 
report was in certain cities of which a special study is intended, namely : 
Allegheny, Baltimore, Boston, Brooklyn, Buffalo, Chicago, Cincinnati, 
Cleveland, Jersey City, Kansas City (Mo.), Minneapolis, Nashville, 
Newark, New Orleans, New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Saint Louis, 
Saint Paul, San Francisco, and the District of Columbia. These 
places were visited by expert agents and subdivided into sanitary dis- 
tricts possessing similar characteristics of population, topography, soil, 
drainage, houses, etc., in order that the effect of such characteristics in 



76 REPORT QV THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

each area upou the mortality among its inhabitants might be analyzed 
and compared. 

The returns of the census enumerators have been supplemented in 
some instances and supplanted in others by copies of the registra 
tion records of boards of health, where the same were found to be com- 
plete and sufficiently accurate upon the points covered in the census 
inquiries. Copies of such records have been procured from the states 
of New York and New Jersey and partially from New Hampshire and 
Vermont, including the cities therein, and also from some 170 of the 
larger cities in other states. 

These board of health returns, made upon the regular census sched- 
ule, aggregate about 400,000 deaths, and have all been examined, edited, 
and numbered, preparatory to punching. This number probably covers 
something over one-third of the whole number of deaths which will be 
reported for the census year, and it may therefore be said that over one- 
third of the necessary editing is completed. 

The editing consists in settling all questions concerning the classifi- 
cation of causes of death, occupation, nativity, etc., and supplying the 
designations used in transferring the data to cards; and as nothing is 
left open for further construing, the work of the punch operators will 
be greatly facilitated. 

Cards have also been numbered to correspond with the deaths re- 
ported from each locality, in order to identify each card with the case it 
represents. Of the registers sent to physicians and clergymen about 
14,000 have been returned, and these have been separated and arranged 
by counties and districts for comparison with the enumerators' sched- 
ules. 

The methods to be pursued in compiling the mortality returns have all 
been settled, and all the necessary forms of tables drafted and printed, 
ready for the insertion of the final figures. 

By far the greater portion of the work of the division of vital statistics 
has been upon special inquiries outside of the census year, but of the high- 
est importance and value, consisting in part of the collection of data from 
the records of the local boards of health in certain places concerning the 
deaths during the five years immediately preceding the census year. 
This information was obtained by detailing clerks from this office to the 
places selected, who copied the deaths directly from the physicians' cer- 
tificates upon cards by means of the Hollerith punch, at the same time lo- 
cating each death in the proper sanitary district (referred to on page 17), 
for comparison with the returns for the same areas during the census 
year. The places selected for this inquiry were the cities of Baltimore, 
Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago, Cincinnati, New York, Philadelphia, and 
Saint Louis, the District of Columbia, and the whole state of New Jersey, 
and the deaths so copied aggregate about 675,000, which is within 80,000 
of the number of deaths reported from the whole of the United States 
at the Tenth Census. The compilation, in connection with those for 
the census year, will afford a continuous record for six years, which will 
largely increase the value of the deductions to be made. It is probable 
that the work expended upon these five-year returns will exceed the 
whole w r ork of compiling the mortality returns for the Tenth Census. 
The cards have been received, examined, and gang-punched, and a por- 
tion of the tables already compiled. 

Another special inquiry consists of the distribution of family sched- 
ules to several thousand Hebrew families throughout the United States, 
resulting in the return of overl0,000 schedules, from which some very 
interesting and valuable statistical matters concerning age and sex, 



CENSUS. 77 

occupation, marriages, births, and deaths of over 50,000 Hebrews have 
been compiled. This inquiry has been entirely completed and the final 
tables prepared. 

The present condition of the work of this division is very satisfactory. 
All plans and methods have been settled, the greater portion of the 
printing done, the preliminary work of collecting data finished, and the 
compilation of the five-year returns well under way, while the present 
efficient force of clerks, with the experience already gained, will be able 
to make rapid progress in completing the work. 

STATISTICS OF SPECIAL CLASSES. 

The work of this division of the census is also well under way. Sched- 
ules have been prepared for the insane, feeble-minded, deaf, blind, and 
sick, known as Supplemental Schedules Nos. 1 to 5, covering such ques- 
tions as were deemed best in order to obtain data for making the reports 
valuable for these classes of the population. The schedules were sup- 
plied to institutions and enumerators in the latter part of May. Cards, 
result sheets, and tables have been prepared for transcribing, dis- 
tributing, and tabulating the facts to be obtained by this means. In 
addition, 1 " schedules were sent to a number of reliable deaf persons in 
different parts of the country for the purpose of obtaining full informa- 
tion as to the condition of the deaf in their neighborhood. These 
schedules have been returned with much valuable information which 
would have been difficult for an enumerator to have obtained. Cards 
have also been prepared and sent to the deaf schools of the country 
for similar information relating to former pupils in those institutions. 
Some 30,000 of these cards have been received, and will be of great as- 
sistance in supplying unfurnished data in the enumerators' returns. 

Schedules have been sent to the insane asylums aud deaf and blind 
schools of the country for information as to the number of inmates or 
pupils therein during the past ten years. Nearly all of these institutions 
have returned their schedules with the desired data, and the facts thus 
obtained will shortly be ready for publication. 

To assist in obtaining a correct and full return of the defective classes 
in the United States circulars and blanks were sent to all the physicians 
of the country about the middle of May, requesting information relating 
to special classes. 

It is impossible at this date to state with any degree of certainty the 
success of these circulars, though something like 17,000 have already 
been returned. 

SOCIAL STATISTICS OF CITIES. 

The plan first decided upon, as set forth in my report of November 
last, for the procuring of social statistics of all cities in the United 
States having a population of 10,000 and upward in the Eleventh Cen- 
sus at the least expense consistent with accuracy has been carried out. 
Twelve schedules, covering altitude, cemeteries, drainage, fire depart- 
ments, government, licenses, parks, police, public buildings, streets, 
street lighting, aud water- works were sent December 15, 1889, to the 
chief executives of the cities and towns in the country, 393 in number, 
with a letter showing the object of the work and the necessity of hearty 
co-operation from city officials to insure perfect reports. There were 
106 questions contained in these twelve schedules. 

At the same time schedules were sent to 402 railroad companies for 
the purpose of obtaining the daily movement of trains and suburban 



78 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

travel to and from the 393 cities and towns. Up to June 1, 1890, 302 
cities, nearly 77 per cent of the whole, had responded, 127 being com- 
pleted, and the remainder promising co operation and the sending in of 
the schedules as fast as the desired information could be obtained. A 
special agent was then put in the field to look after those'cities, 91 in 
number, from which nothing had been heard. In order to insure cor- 
rectness as the schedules came in each branch of tbe inquiry was 
tabulated and letters written for all omissions or discrepancies. The 
plan worked well, and all schedules now in are correct. City maps 
were procured, nearly all without cost, and city and ward areas have 
been determined in almost every case. Final tabulation has begun 
with the schedules for water-works, streets, and drainage, and the 
schedules for fire, police, cemeteries, etc., will follow. 

Tbe report on social statistics of cities will be ready as soon as the 
details of population, schools, rapid transit, animals, and manufactures 
are received from the divisions having charge of those inquiries. 

While this report may not be as extensive as that prepared for the 
Tenth Census, it will be practically exhaustive, and include every city 
of 10,000 fhhabitants, as stated above. The aim has been to make this 
work statistically complete, and to omit the historical and technological 
features given in the two valuable volumes published on the social 
statistics of cities in the last census. 

EDUCATION. 

A statement of the work of the division of education at this date must 
give more of plan than of execution. The census enumerators have 
just completed their collection of facts, and no beginning has been made 
in collating the materials they have gathered regarding education. 

It is proposed to make the enumerators' returns the basis of a more 
exhaustive treatmeut of education and its opposite, illiteracy, than has 
heretofore been practicable. Among occupations required in the popu- 
lation schedule was school attendance. The people have reported to 
the enumerators the individuals who attended school and for what 
length of time each has attended. An attempt has been made to dis- 
tinguish between attendance at public schools and attendance at private 
schools. It is not certain at this date whether the replies are suf- 
ficiently complete on this point to justify the labor of tabulating them. 
Tables may be prepared by states, counties, and cities, showing the 
number of teachers and pupils, classified by their nationalities, and the 
number who have attended school for any designated number of months. 

A series of analytical tables is also contemplated for illiteracy. It 
is believed that these tables upon education and illiteracy will 1 e of 
great value for a proper estimate of the interest of the people in school 
education and for a more accurate measure of the benefits and the ills 
connected with immigration. While greater results are expected from 
the en 1111161^0^ inquiries at the houses of the people than from the 
inquiries sent to school officers and teachers, there are more tangible 
results in view at this date from tin 1 latter line of inquiry. 

It was intended to give for public schools balance-sheets showing cash 
on hand at the beginning of the school year, receipts and expenditures, 
subdivided under leading items, ami cash on hand at the close of the 
year, but the inquiries for the division of wealth, debt, and taxation 
reach public school administration, and to save duplication of inquiries 
and tables the financial relations of the public schools will be shown 
by that division. 



CENSUS. 79 

Experience is confirming the anticipation expressed in the report to 
yon, submitted November 6, 1889, that the most serious difficulties in 
securing complete returns would occur with private schools of more 
temporary and isolated character than with chartered institutions, 
parochial schools, and public schools, which latter make the closest 
approach to systematic records. A public statement of difficulties en- 
countered thus far may tend to lessen their effect as the work advances. 

It was the intention to keep inquiries down to the simplest essential 
points. Schedules have therefore been sent out to secure the number of 
teachers and pupils, distinguished by sex and color, enrolled in any school 
or system of schools. While every teacher can readily give these par- 
ticulars for the school under his charge for the day on which the 
inquiry reaches him, the records filed for the term or for the year and 
the summaries of county and state officers in various states omit the 
distinction of sex and color. 

The co-operation of school officers has generally been very cordial, 
and in at least four states whose reports for previous years have not 
shown these particulars the state officials have now arranged to gather 
them. In other states some progress has been made in securing the 
desired particulars. In states with a very scanty colored population 
the omission of a separate record of the colored pupils has no serious 
effect on the accuracy of the returns. Private schools generally report 
sex and color readily. 

The chief authorities of religious bodies that maintain parochial 
schools have given most hearty aid in gathering the desired particulars 
regarding such schools. Though there are hindrances in reaching single 
private and parochial schools, the material already in hand is valuable. 

Education is to be treated from two points of view : First, from the 
home whence the child goes to school ; second, from the school where 
the instruction is given. As already indicated, the most important ad- 
ditions to previous knowledge are anticipated from the first line of 
inquiry. 

CHURCH STATISTICS. 

The work of the division of church statistics has progressed satis- 
factorily during the period between November, 1889, and June 30, 1890. 

Schedules which had been sent out to eighteen religious denomina- 
tions are being returned in a manner that promises a successful gather- 
ing of the statistics of churches. Those received were from such organ- 
izations as the Russian Orthodox Church, the Old Catholics, the Roman 
Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church, and the Salvation 
Army denominations, whom it was feared would not co-operate so kindly 
as others, but they have responded in a most cordial manner. Many 
of those referred to have completed their returns. 

Schedules are being sent to other denominations and are in process 
of preparation for gathering the returns of the vast array of Sunday 
schools. In addition to the preparation and transmission of schedules 
and a heavy general correspondence, many thousands of letters have 
been written for the use of officials of the various ecclesiastical sub- 
divisions in their correspondence with pastors. 

CRIME, PAUPERISM, AND BENEVOLENCE. 

The work of this division of the Census Office has been classified un- 
der three heads : Crime, pauperism, and benevolence. Under the head 



80 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

of crime are embraced 215 prisons, penitentiaries, workhouses, and re- 
formatories, 2,808 jails, and a large number of police stations and lock- 
ups. 

In December last- schedules were sent to the 215 prisons for the pur- 
pose of ascertaining- their population on January 1, 1890; 109 have 
Responded, 40 of which show an increase of about 25 per cent in the 
number of inmates as compared with the census returns of June 1, 
1880, from the same institutions. 

Of the 2,808 jails, 2,801 have reported the number of their inmates on 
January 1, 1890, which in the aggregate shows an increase of the jail 
population on that date of 100 per cent over the census returns of June 
1, 1880. 

In making these comparisons, however, it should be borne in mind 
that, as a rule, the winter population of jails is much larger than the 
summer population, and that, therefore, the census report of June 1, 
1890, is likely to show a considerable decrease in this percentage. 

Kesponses have been received to the special schedule from 09 1 police 
stations and lock-ups, and the same have been classified, ready to be 
tabulated when the tables for this special class are prepared. 

Upon the recommendation of several wardens, superintendents, and 
keepers, special enumerators have been appointed for 181 prisons and 

81 jails, to whom schedules have been sent. 

One hundred thousand cards lor the prisons anil jails have been num- 
bered and fully prepared for punching as soon as the schedules are 
returned. 

The attorney-generals of the respective states have been communi- 
cated with respecting any changes in procedure of courts of criminal 
jurisdiction since June 1, 1880, and replies have been received from all 
but eight. The provisions of the various state constitutions relative 
to reprieves and pardons and in relation to the various state institu- 
tions have also been compiled from the respective statutes. 

Under the head of pauperism reports have been received from 2,2(38 
almshouses, showing an aggregate of 77,885 inmates, as against 00,203 
in the same institutions in 18S0. 

An effort to obtain information respecting the outdoor poor who re- 
ceive relief from other sources than almshouses is being made, but as 
yet the returns are too incomplete to form an estimate or comparison. 
One hundred thousand cards have been numbered and prepared for the 
almshouses and outdoor poor. 

Under the head of benevolence printed lists of the benevolent insti- 
tutions for 1880 have been revised, and the information concerning them 
obtained by the population division has been copied. This information 
covers 2,195 institutions, and shows a population of 140,977 in those 
which give the number of inmates. Many did not state the number. 
One hundred and fifty thousand cards have been numbered and pre- 
pared for these institutions. 

While this division of the census was one of the last to complete its 
work in the Tenth Census, it bids fair to be among the first to complete 
it for the present census. 

FOREIGN, NATIONAL, AND STATE FINANCES. 

As stated in my former report, the general subject of foreign, national, 
state, and local finance has been divided into two divisions. The work 
is sufficiently advanced in both of these important divisions of the 
Census Office to enable me to make an absolute statement that the 



CENSUS. 81 

results obtained by these two inquiries will be of a more extensive and 
satisfactory character than has ever before been seemed by the gov- 
ernment of any country. As the present Superintendent conducted 
these inquiries ten years ago, the aim has naturally been to strengthen 
the reports in those parts which fell so far short in 1880 of the ideal 
the compiler had hoped to obtain. When completed, the division of 
the work embracing foreign, national, and stale finances will show 
not only the financial condition of all the countries in the world, but 
will continue the history of our own national debt from 1880 to the 
present time, and give the country the most accurate exhibit of state 
budgets ever attempted. From the foreign countries of which the hon- 
orable Secretary of State was in July last asked to obtain respectively a 
statement of the financial condition and the changes in their debts 
since 1880 sixty reports have been received, each written in the lan- 
guage of the country making it. 

Some of the countries give very full information of their financial 
condition, one reporting full details of 141 loans outstanding, and in 
most cases the information has been very satisfactory. From several 
governments no reports have yet been received, and the Secretary of 
State has again renewed his request for the information. Excepting 
Spain, Portugal, and Brazil, the states not reporting are, however, of 
minor importance. The reports received in foreign languages have 
been translated into English, the moneys reduced to the currency of 
this country, and the information obtained is now in process of tabula- 
tion. As an illustration of the character of the work attempted in this 
direction, and which from the large proportion of returns already re- 
ceived is now an assured success, I append herewith a statement of the 
outstanding debt of the kingdom of Saxony in 1880 and 1889, and of re- 
ceipts and expenditures each year from 1880 to 1889, substantially as it 
will be printed in the final report, in order to show the classification 
and arrangement as proposed in this investigation, (a) 

The debt of the United States has been compiled for each year 
from 1880 to 1890, and, excepting a sketch of transactions during the 
decade, the full report is ready for the printer. The same can be said 
of the receipts and expenditures of the Government for the same period. 
Of the states, the work on ten of them has been approved by the proper 
officers of the several states and is nearly ready for the printer. The 
work on eleven more states is in the hands of state officers for approval. 
Of the remaining states some work has been done on all of them, and 
in some cases the work is nearly completed. Lack of official reports 
and delays of state officers in making needed explanations retard the 
completion of the work, but there is constant progress in some direction. 

I likewise submit herewith, as samples of work done, a detailed bal- 
ance-sheet of receipts and expenditures and a statement of the debt and 
assets of the state of Maryland for the last ten years, with a recapitu- 
lation in proposed form of the receipts of ten states, the work of which 
has been approved by the state authorities. As in the case of the ex- 
hibit from Saxony, these are submitted herewith merely to show the 
scope of the work contemplated, (b) A preliminary bulletin will soon 
be issued, showing the debts of the several states by geographical divis- 
ions in 1880 and 1890. 



INT 


90- 


-VOL 


III- 


a See Appendix, 
b See Appendix, 

6 


Exhibit B. 
Exhibit C. 



82 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

LOCAL FINANCE. 

Few persons have any conception of the magnitude of the work in- 
volved in collecting' financial returns for the census year, and in some 
cases for the ten years between 1880 and 1890, of the 150,000 minor 
civil divisions of the country. At least this number of civil divisions 
have taxing and debt creating powers, and must be dealt with sepa- 
rately and individually from the Census Office. From the time of my 
last report to the present date the outgoing mail of this one division 
aggregated 875,000 letters and schedules, and the incoming mail for 
the same period was over 700,000. The subdivisions in this division 
include county and city finance, town, township, and village finance, 
school district finance, valuation and taxation, colored holdings, list 
of minor civil divisions, and the collection of material for the prep- 
aration of a report on local government. Reports of the financial con- 
dition of 2,650 counties for the years 1880 and 1890 have been tabu- 
lated. The tabulation shows the bonded, floating, gross, and net 
debts, and annual interest charge by counties, geographical groups, and 
separate tables for each of the items. 

Besides this work of tabulation a very extensive correspondence 
with county and other officials was necessary, in order to ascertain such 
details as were omitted in the original returns. 

A preliminary tabulation for ten years, 1880 to 1890, has been made 
of the indebtedness of 858 municipalities with a population of 2,500 and 
over. Besides this there were tabulated 334 municipalities simply for 
the fiscal years 1880 and 1890. As in the case of the counties, an immense 
amount of correspondence was necessary before the requisite figures 
for the forthcoming bulletin on the financial condition of municipalities 
could be secured. There have also been tabulated for the ten years, 
1880 to 1890, from the printed annual reports of municipal financial 
officers the receipts and expenditures of 234 cities and towns; ;:lso re- 
turns from 500 cities and large towns, giving date and purpose of issue 
of bonds, date of maturity, and rate of interest. 

Twenty thousand returns, in most cases only partially complete, 
have been received from towns, townships, and villages of under 2,500 
population up to June 30, 1890, relative to their indebtedness. Of these 
returns the preliminary tabulation of about half, or 10,000, are com- 
pleted. The work of mailing schedules, special circulars, etc., to school 
district officers was begun during the period covered by this report. 
Besides preparing schedules, envelopes, and return envelopes to the 
number of 100,000, a vast number of typewritten letters were neces- 
sarily sent to state and county superintendents of public instruction 
and other school officers. 

The work of mailing schedules to the proper officers for information 
on the subject of valuation and taxation is in progress, 20,000 having 
been mailed. The 2,500 returns received have been promptly classified 
and receipt acknowledged. 

Schedules seeking information relative to the assessed valuation of 
colored holdings in the several states have been prepared and mailed 
to the proper officials to the number of 22,000. Of this number 0,000 
returns have been received to date. A correct list of all the minor 
civil divisions in the several states and territories being an absolute 
necessity for the purposes of the work of this division, 07,000 suitable 
blanks were mailed to postmasters and county officials. As a result, re- 
turns from 52.000 of these subdivisions have been received and classified 
by states and counties, and work has begun on the x>reparation of the list. 



CENSUS. 83 

The work of examining the statutes of the several states and terri- 
tories for the purpose of securing a brief synopsis of the laws relatiug 
to taxation and other important questions concerning the local govern- 
ment of states and minor civil subdivisions has progressed very satis- 
factorily. 

STATISTICS OF FARMS, HOMES, AND MORTGAGES. 

In the opening of this report reference was made to the act of Feb- 
ruary 22, 1S90, and also to the report made to the honorable Secretary of 
the Interior in response to the Senate resolution of inquiry which was 
adopted on motion of Senator Cockrell. As the importance of this in- 
vestigation is second only to the count of the population, and as a great 
deal of public interest is centered on the outcome, I beg leave to submit 
as an appendix to this report a copy of the letter to you on this subject, 
dated May 6, 1890. (a) 

Since my former report many difficulties have been encountered in 
the collection of statistics of real estate mortgage indebtedness. At 
that time preparations were making for beginning the held- work, and 
these were completed in December. Abstracting from real estate rec- 
ords began in that month, and special agents were set to work in all 
parts of the United States as soon as they could be appointed, until, 
at the close of the fiscal year, about five hundred and twenty-five special 
agents had been on duty for a greater or less length of time. Most of 
these special agents were lawyers and law students, real estate agents, 
and men who had been employed in the offices of recorders of deeds. 
As it was impossible to arrange the pay of these special agents on a 
piece-work basis, it was therefore decided to make the rate of pay 
$3 per day and $3 for subsistence. This naturally added largely to 
the cost of the work, as there was no incentive to copy a large 
number of mortgages. Upon the whole, the class of agents secured 
has been satisfactory ; and although the cost of the work will be in ex- 
cess of what I hoped it would be originally, it must be borne in mind 
that this is an entirely new field of investigation, and that I have dis- 
tinctly stated, both in hearings before the committee of Congress and 
otherwise, that it was impossible to make any definite estimate as to 
cost. My aim has been throughout to have the work done as thoroughly 
as possible, irrespective of the expense. 

Before beginning the field-work, recorders of deeds had, in response 
-to circulars, sent to this office reports in regard to their records, and 
the instructions that were formulated were principally based upon 
them. It was subsequently found, however, that these reports were 
often incorrect, and represented the character of the records and meth- 
ods of keeping them to be much more favorable than they really were, 
and this frequently called for the amendment of instructions and a 
longer time for doing the abstracting than was supposed would be 
required. 

The worst real estate records in the United States are in the South, 
where it is generally the custom of public officers to record convey- 
ances in manuscript without any headings to indicate their character. 
Deeds, mortgages, deeds of trust, deeds in trust, trustees' deeds, ven- 
dors' liens, crop liens, bonds for deeds, chattel mortgages, releases, 
quitclaim deeds, and all the many kinds of instruments, are generally 
recorded without descriptive headings, without classification, and in the 
same books, so that it has been necessary to send a special agent through- 
out almost the entire South to examine the records of all instruments 
in order to find those that represent indebtedness. The number of daily 

a See Appendix, Exhibit A. 



84 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

abstracts has therefore been small in that region of country. Yet, 
fortunately for the expense of the labor, the number of incumbrances 
has been small, and this has kept down the per capita expense in some 
of the southern states in comparison with what it has been in other 
parts of the country. In New England and the middle states the rec- 
ords have been kept somewhat better than in the South, but the large 
number of incumbrances to be abstracted has called for a correspond- 
ingly large expenditure of money. In the West the records have been 
well kept, but throughout that region a difficulty of great proportions 
was encountered. It is there the custom, upon the borrowing of money, 
to give a second mortgage to secure a portion of the interest, and this 
has doubled the work of the abstracters to secure the same net amount 
of abstracting that has been done in other parts of the country. 

Unlooked-for difficulties have appeared in every state and territory, 
delaying the progress of abstracting and increasing its expense. Cus- 
toms known only to persons living in the regions in which they exist 
have been constantly coning to light, demanding supplementary in- 
structions and an addition to tin 1 labor beyond what there was any 
previous reason to expect would be required. 4 

The most difficult fact of all to ascertain has been the rate of interest, 
and in many states it has been impossible to obtain this information 
from the records. To evade usury laws, perhaps to conceal the true rate 
from the borrower, and to give the loaning agent a commission out of 
the rate of interest, contracts are so worded and contrived that they do 
not reveal the true rate: indeed, in many counties of the South mort- 
gages state that the loans that they secure bear no interest at all, 
although as a matter of fact the rate of interest that is actually paid is 
from 10 to 25 per cent. 

Kather than give up the attempt to ascertain statistics of interest 
special agents were directed to ascertain, by inquiry at county seats, 
what the customary rates of interest were and to report these rates in 
their abstracts, instead of reporting the evidence of the records. This 
lias delayed the abstracting, and has added much to the expense, and in 
the West and South necessarily limits the statistics of interest rates to 
those of customary rates. 

Soon after the field-work was commenced wild-cat mortgages came 
to light hereand there. These mortgages wereoften tor large amounts, 
and served only to delay and increase expense 1 . Another class of mort- 
gages productive of the same results have been those that covered per- 
sonal property as well as real estate, especially ranch property in the 
far West. Everywhere this division has had to distinguish between 
questions of law and questions of fact. The facts were wanted, and 
these were often concealed in the legal construction of instruments of 
incumbrance. 

Still another source of expense ami delay has been the want of accom- 
modations for travel to county seats not situated upon railroads, and 
special agents have lost much time in being compelled to wait for con- 
veyance to and from such towns ana for floods to subside. 

Iu the 106 counties in the United States that have been selected for 
special investigation the expense has been large relative to the number 
of mortgages, and the experience in these counties has sustained the re- 
ports heretofore made by the Superintendent of Census to the commit- 
tees of both Houses of Congress that several millions of dollars would be 
required to ascertain the existing mortgage indebtedness in this way in 
all the counties of the United States. It does not now appear that the 
plan of investigation in these counties, which have been denominated 



CENSUS. 85 

"inquiry " couuties, will prod ace complete results everywhere. The suc- 
cess has been substantially complete in the North and West, where there 
is more migration than in the South, and where there are many non-resi- 
dent real-estate owners. 

The plan that has been adopted for determining the amount of exist- 
ing recorded real estate indebtedness, which has previously been ex- 
plained, still seems to be the best, and to be more generally adapted to 
all the various conditions of the 2,781 counties of the United States 
than any other that has been discussed. While investigation by inquiry 
has produced results that are sufficiently conclusive in a few counties, 
yet there is still uncertainty that it will do so everywhere, and particu- 
larly in the counties containing the denser populations and the greater 
amount of indebtedness. 

The equated life method, on the other hand, is shown by experi- 
mental application to be more especially adapted to these more popu- 
lous and wealthy counties than to the sparsely inhabited and poorer 
counties, and in the latter the percentage of error in results will be 
larger than in the former. The aggregate amount of the error, however, 
will probably be small when expressed in dollars. It is yet too early 
to make any further statement as to the accuracy or inaccuracy of the 
indirect method of establishing the amount of existing indebtedness 
upon real estate, but it is expected that at least something may be 
known in regard to the size of this amount. The scope of this investi- 
gation is not confined to establishing the amount of existing indebted- 
ness upon real estate, but includes the gathering of a great variety of 
information about indebtedness which will contribute much to the 
understanding of the mortgage question. While it is not unreasonable 
that there should be failures in some respects, still in others reasonable 
success will be achieved, and even a failure may be productive of nega- 
tive information, which is often as significant as that of a positive kind. 

A prominent contribution to our knowledge of the mortgage question 
is coming from the "inquiry" counties in the form of explanations as to 
why indebtedness has been incurred. Whether these shall be made for 
all uncanceled mortgages or not the explanations that are received will 
be practically as sufficient to establish conclusions as if they were made 
for all uncanceled mortgages. 

The average period of employment of special agents who are doing 
this field-work appears to be about three months, and those who began 
work in the winter are already surrendering their commissions. In the 
last of the states where field-work began it will not be completed until 
August. 

In such a unique and extensive investigation as this it would be 
unwise and premature to premise what the results will be, or even to 
vouch for the fullness and accuracy of the statistical data, without res- 
ervations, before they have been tabulated, closely examined, and com- 
pared. It is not unreasonable to expect that the many difficulties that 
have been encountered will lead to corresponding failures in the results, 
but it does not now appear that any different plan of work would be 
more promising of success, unless special enumerators were to be sent 
over every street, highway, and by-way in the United States, at an 
expense of several millions of dollars. 

That branch of this inquiry which deals directly through enumer- 
ators with the owners of farms and homes throughout the country 
has already been referred to in the opening paragraphs of this report, 
and the work as arranged for up to May described in the letter to 
you, published as an appendix hereto. 



8G REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

AGRICULTURE. 

r 

The endeavor of the Census Office lias been to make the collection of 
the statistics of agriculture more thorough than in any previous census. 
The general schedule used at the late enumeration contained two hun- 
dred and fifty-six questions, and included many more branches of agri- 
culture than have ever heretofore been embraced in a census investi- 
gation. 

The census law provides for an examination of u live stock on the 
ranges." A schedule was prepared and printed, together with the 
necessary circulars, for the prosecution of this work. The range ter- 
ritory, which comprises about two-fifths of the territory of the United 
States, was divided into ten districts, to each of which a suitable per- 
son has been assigned as special agent in the field, with one special 
agent in charge, with headquarters located at Wichita, Kans. Tins 
work is now in progress. 

It has been decided to make several special investigations, mainly in 
the line of horticulture, as this great industry had but little attention 
in former censuses. The first of these special investigations pro- 
vided for was viticulture. A full and complete set of schedules and cir- 
culars was provided, and the work has progressed with entire satis- 
faction. A directory of several thousand vineyaidists has been pre- 
pared, to each of whom circulars and schedules are being sent. The 
special agent has visited the Pacific coast, and has made -a, thorough 
investigation of its extensive vineyards, wineries, and the rapidly- 
growing raisin industry. 

Five other special investigations were planned for. viz : Nurseries, 
florists, seed farms, truck farms, and semi- tropic fruits. For each of 
these investigations schedules, with questions aggregating upward 
of 2,000 directory books and circulars, have been prepared and printed, 
and this work is proceeding in a highly satisfactory manner. It will 
probably prove one of the most popular and valuable results of census 
work in the interests of a more diversified agriculture. Another 
branch of special inquiry undertaken in this division has been to obtain 
a census of the various farmers' organizations of the country, which in- 
cludes agricultural societies, farmers' clubs, poultry, bees, horticulture, 
florists, county boards of agriculture, granges, alliances, protective, 
and horse societies. For this special schedule circulars were prepared, 
and already some fifteen thousand organizations have been located, 
with their name, number of members, officers' names and addresses, all 
entered in directory books. It is thought that this enumeration will 
account for at least twenty-five thousand organizations when completed. 

The great work of this division will be the compilation and tabulation 
of the statistics of agriculture as found upon the#general agricultural 
schedule, and to this end preparations have been made for receiving, 
arranging, and filing these schedules as they come in. 

MANUFACTURES. 

Xo branch of the census investigation exceeds in importance the in- 
quiry relating to the industrial condition and pursuits of the people. 

The general conduct of this work has been assigned to the division 
of manufactures. My last report covered the preliminary work and 
outlined the organization of the division. Since that report the scope 
of the investigation has been finally determined upon, and a decision 
reached as to the character of the questions to be propounded in each 



CENSUS. 



87 



of the schedules, based upon extensive correspondence and personal 
conferences with representative manufacturers and their associations, 
political economists, and prominent statisticians. The scope of the in- 
vestigation has been outlined as follows: 

By the provisions of the census law the Superintendent of Census 
has authority, whenever he may deem it expedient, to withdraw the 
manufacturing schedules from the enumerators and charge the collec- 
tion of the requisite data upon experts and special agents, to be ap- 
pointed without regard to locality. Under the authority thus conferred 
the collection of the statistics of manufactures in one thousand and forty 
cities and towns, without regard to population, was withdrawn from 
the general enumeration, and the duty assigned to special agents, who 
will be appointed immediately after the completion of the count of the 
people, In a 1 ! localities where these statistics were not withdrawn as 
above noted thereturns have been collected by the enumerators, and they 
are now undergoing a critical examination for the purpose of securing 
completeness and accuracy by having the necessary corrections made 
in the schedules. From the interest manifested and co-operation gen- 
erally promised by manufacturers I am led to believe that the forth- 
coming report will show more completely and accurately than ever 
before the industrial progress of the country. 

In the case of the following industries special reports will be made 
by expert special agents charged with this duty as noted in each case : 

Chemicnl industry, Henry Bower, of Philadelphia, Pa. 

Clay and pottery products, Henry T. Cook, of Trenton, N.J. 

Coke aud glass, Joseph D. Weeks, of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Cotton goods, Edward Stanwood, of Boston, Mass. 

Distilled spirits used in tne arts, manufactures, and in medicine, Henry Bower, 

of Philadelphia, Pa. 
Electrical apparatus and appliances, their manufacture and uses, Allen R. 

Foote, of Washington, D. C. 
Manufactured gas, George W. Graeff, jr., of Philadelphia, Pa. 
Iron aud steel, William M. Sweet, of Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mixed textiles, Peter T. Wood, of Newark, N.J. 

Printing, publishing, and periodical press, S. N. D. North, of Boston, Mass. 
Salt, Henry Bower, of Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ship-building, Charles E. Taft, of Little Rock, Ark. 
Silk and silk goods, Byron Rose, of New York City. 
Wool and worsted, S. N. D. North, of Boston, Mass. 

Special schedules have been prepared for each of the following in- 
dustries, covering the general and technical details relating to each, 
which manufacturers engaged therein regarded as best adapted to elicit 
accurate information as to existing conditions : 



No. 1. Agricultural implements. 

2. Paper mills. 

3. Boots and shoes. 

4. Leather, tanned and curried, in- 

cluding morocco leather. 

5. Lumber mills and saw mills. 
5a. Timber products. 

6. Brick yards. 

7. Flour and grist mills. 

8. Cheese, butter, and condensed 

milk factories. 

9. Slaughtering and meat-packing. 

10. Chemical manufactures. 

11. Clay and pottery products. 

12. Coke. 

13. Cotton manufactures. 



No. 14. Dyeing and finishing of textiles. 

15. Electrical industry. 

16. Glass. 

17. Manufactured gas. 

18. Iron and steel. 

19. Printing, publishing, and the peri- 

odical press. 

20. Ship-building. 

21. Silk and silk goods. 

22. Wool manufactures. 

23. Hosiery and knit goods. 

24. Carriages and wagons. 

25. Salt works. 

26. Leather, patent and enameled. 
Supplemental. Distilled spirits used in 

the arts, manufactures, and medicine. 



88 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Iii the case of all industries for which special schedules have not been 
provided, as above set forth, a general schedule of questions lias been 
prepared, with a view to collecting data which will clearly show the 
general characteristics of each branch of manufacture to be reported on 
the general schedule. 

The inquiry relating to the quantity of distilled spirits used in the 
arts, in manufactures, and in medicine has so far progressed as to jus- 
tify the prediction that this office will be able to present a complete 
report in relation thereto not later than the close of the present year. 

This inquiry has involved a vast amount of labor, and is one of great 
importance to the country. Schedules have been sent to about 350,000 
establishments, and returns have been received from about 85 per cent 
of this number. The special agent in charge is now busily engaged in 
an analysis of the results so far compiled. 

It is intended to publish from time to time, beginning at the earliest 
practicable date, bulletins in relation to such important industries as 
can be tabulated without delaying the final report. The first of these 
bulletins will be upon the production of pig-iron in the United States, 
and it is expected that it will be published between the 15th of July 
and 1st day of August next. The second, relating to the production 
of steel, will be published in October. 

AW the tabulations and compilations will be pushed forward with the 
utmost rapidity consistent with accuracy and completeness, and it is 
my desire that the final report in relation to this branch of the census 
work shall be published not later than the 1st day of January, 1892. 

MINERAL RESOURCES OF THE UNITED STATES. 

The investigation into the products of the mines of the United States, 
as mapped out in my former report, has been thoroughly carried out by 
the special agents in charge with ability and promptitude, and it is hoped 
that by the close of the present year this important volume will be ready 
for the printer. As before slated, this report will show the total prod- 
uct of the minerals meutioned in the following list, and the principal 
features involved in producing them, during the calendar year 1889, viz, 
the capital which the mining industry requires, the number of persons 
employed, the total amount paid to them as wages, the usual rate of 
wages to each class in different parts of the country, and the social con- 
dition of the miners. In considering the outfit necessary for mining 
operations the amount of machinery, power, animals used, etc., will be 
taken into account. 

List of subjects under investigation. 



Iron ore. 

Gold and silver. 

Copper, lead, and zinc. 

Quicksilver. 

Platinum. 

Iridium. 

Nickel. 

Cobalt. 

Manganese. 

Chromium. 

Aluminium. 

Tin. 

Antimony. 

Coal. 

Mineral waters. 



Natural gas. 

Asphaltum. 

Ozocerite. 

Building stone. 

Precious stones. 

Clays. 

Sodium salts. 

Infusorial earth. 

Corundum. 

Whetstones. 

Grindstones. 

Buhrstones. 

Phosphate rock. 

Marl. 

Gypsum. 



Sulphur. 

Sulphur ores (pyrites). 

Mica. 

Graphite. 

Asbestos. 

Soapstone. 

Barytes. 

Ocher. 

Umber. 

Sienna. 

Flint. 

Feldspar. 

Fluorspar. 

Lithographic stone. 



CENSUS. 



89 



In arranging; this work the statistics of each important subject was 
put in charge of one individual for the entire United States, as follows: 



Iron ore, John Birkinbine. 
Gold and silver, K. P. Roth well. 
Copper, lead, and /.inc., C. Kirchhoff, jr. 
Quicksilver, J. B. Randol. 
Manganese, petroleum, and natural gas, 
Joseph D. Weeks. 



Coal, John H. Jones. 
Building stone, William C. Day. 
Precious stones, George F, Kunz. 
Phosphate rock, E. Willis. 
Mineral waters, Dr. A. C. Peale. 
All other subjects, E. W. Parker. 



The system of carrying out this investigation was advisedly a very 
elastic one, in order that it might suit the varied conditions encountered 
in summarizing so many different subjects in so wide a territory. Fol- 
lowing the most successful precedents, the effort was made to obtain as 
large a percentage of returns as possible from producers by means of 
correspondence, based upon a directory of the mines of the United 
States, which formed the preliminary part of the investigation. By 
this means the producers were made aware of the scope of the informa- 
tion asked of them, and were given a chance to use the time most con- 
venient to them in sending in a statement of their products. A large 
percentage of the information required was obtained with the least 
possible inconvenience to the producers and without the expenditure 
of unnecessary money. 

Arrangements were made early in the year for the appointment of 
local agents to secure the returns from tardy correspondents and to 
insure the office against possible omissions of names in the directory. 
In May this supplementary canvass was begun by means of these agents 
in the Kocky Mountain region, and early in this month the same work 
was started in the Pacific Coast region, it being anticipated that these 
regions would prove especially difficult, as the producers there were 
not supposed to be well drilled in the matter of statistical returns. 
Other regions were similarly treated, so that at this date the direct- 
ories have been completed, the correspondence reduced to a small 
amount, and the apportionment of the territory for visitation by special 
agents nearly finished. These agents are now actively engaged in the 
completion of their work, so that the difficult regions are being rapidly 
finished and summed up for the final report. Indeed, for two subjects, 
the production of slate and quicksilver, the final reports have been 
made, ami the information will be published in the form of bulletins iu 
advance of the complete report. 

The following statement is intended to show briefly the condition of 
the investigations at the present time: 

Iron ores. — Beginning in October, 1889, with a moderately complete 
directory of the larger producers of iron ores, the special agent in charge 
has added the names of every producer in the United States, except 
small " tributers," who do bench mining for a small part of the year 
and sell their ore in small quantities to various blast furnaces. As 
the latter can not receive complete statistical treatment, inasmuch as 
they have no capital invested and do not give regular employment to 
labor, they are not dealt with in the same way as the larger producers, 
but statistics relating to them are being collected by local agents. The 
entire work has now resolved itself into the gathering of returns from 
a few tardy producers, and will soon be complete. In order that the 
iron-ore producing sections least known to the general public might 
receive due attention special agents have visited these sections, which 
are principally in the western states, so that the special agent in charge 
can compare their returns with the results of his own observation and 



90 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

also secure accurate data in regard to the consumption of iron ore in 
other industries, particularly as a flux in the smelting of lead ores. 

Gold and silver. — This investigation was pioneer work in so far as 
census statistics are concerned, as the annual statistics collected by the 
Bureau of the Mint only consider the total product and its value but 
take no account of the capital and labor involved, nor of the exact loca- 
tion of the mines which produce these metals. The task of securing a 
fairly accurate directory of the gold and silver mines of the United 
States has been found one of enormous difficulty, particularly as the 
recorded mines would more than double the number which can actually 
be called producing mines. The investigation has shown many locali- 
ties recorded as placer gold mines, in order that they might under this 
name be opened to settlement; that is, in a region reserved by the Gov- 
ernment as mineral lands, and only open to occupation as a placer mine, 
ditching, with other useless work, has been done in obviously barren 
ground, in order that the person who became the proprietor might use 
the claim for farming purposes. With the aid of a number of local 
assistants the special agent has obtained most excellent results, and the 
statistics of production are now being returned with great rapidity. 
The great number of mines and the awkwardness of producers in making 
out returns have made the task even more difficult than was antici- 
pated, and the fact that a satisfactory result is well assured reflects 
great credit upon the special agent for his energy. Schedules for the 
following states have all been received at the central office and are un- 
dergoing examination: Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Vir- 
ginia, Colorado, Montana, South Dakota, and Texas. The greatest 
difficulty is now being encountered in California and Oregon, where an 
energetic staff of local assistants is rapidly completing the work. 

Copper, lead, and zinc. — In the collection, revision, and tabulation of 
returns the investigation covering the lead, zinc, and copper mines 
and the refining and reduction works has progressed so far that in the 
majority of the lines covered a very huge percentage of the figures are 
now available. In nearly every department, however, some individual 
reports are missing. 

In lead and zinc mining in Wisconsin the industry is carried on by 
small groupsof miners, who report only after personal visits of the special 
agent. The returns are practically complete for some townships, but 
are still deficient for others. The same is true of the important district 
of southwestern Missouri and southeastern Kansas. 

In the copper mining industry the principal data are now available 
for the Lake Superior district, which, in 1889, produced 87,451.101 
pounds of ingot copper. There were employed by the mining compa- 
nies, exclusive of men in the stamp-mills and refining works, 1,774 men 
and boys above ground and 3,78G men below ground, to whom there 
was paid in wages the total sum of $3,175,444. With the exception 
of a few tributers and the men at some of the smaller mines the whole 
force was employed steadily during the whole year, Sundays and legal 
holidays excepted. 

jM«)i<;«nese. — The statistics for this subject have all been received 
with the exception of one producer, and are being rapidly tabulated. 
The fact that the condition of this industry has completely changed 
with the introduction of the Bessemer steel process and the manufac- 
ture of ferro-manganese and spiegeleisen in the United States makes 
this report particularly significant. At the census of 1880 ferro-man- 
ganese and spiegeleisen were largely imported, and manganese ores 
were of small importance, being chiefly used in such chemical processes 



CENSUS. 01 

as the production of bromine and the manufacture, in England, of 
bleaching powder, for which purpose our small product was exported. 

Quicksilver. — The canvass of this subject has shown that the pro- 
duction of quicksilver was limited to California. The investigation into 
the product and the principal expenses involved is complete and in the 
hands of the printer, as before stated. The complete report on this 
subject will include information as to the product in former years, the 
amount of this material imported, and the principal uses to which it 
is put. 

Aluminium. — This substance was not produced during 1880 The in- 
vestigation made by the Census Ofiice shows that during 1889 this 
new industry involved the production of 42, 4G8 pounds of metallic alu- 
minium, worth $87,335, and gave employment to thirty-five men. The 
capital employed in its production was $150,000. It should be stated 
in addition that the aluminium-i^roducing capacity of the plants of the 
United States will certainly increase more than threefold within twelve 
months. 

Coal. — The canvass of this subject has thus far been eminently suc- 
cessful. A complete list of the mines of the United States, except of 
such small mines as were opened and abandoned after a few weeks' 
operation, was practically complete early in the year. The work is now 
directed to securing statistics by means of personal visitation from these 
small mines and so-called strippings, where outcroppings of coal are 
worked to a limited extent, and to obtaining by similar visitation the 
statistics from the more important coal mines, a few of which for various 
reasons have failed to furnish the required information. It should be 
noted that in this industry the scattered character of the very small 
mines in eastern Keutucky and West Virginia made it seem advisable 
that the work of collecting the information should be given to enumer- 
ators engaged in collecting the statistics of population. The returns 
from these enumerators are now being compiled, and the experiment of 
collecting information by this means was moderately successful. Under 
the peculiar conditions existing in eastern Kentucky and West Virginia 
the problem became one of solution by this means only, the mines being 
so scattered and so difficult of access that information could not be 
obtained at a reasonable cost in any other way. 

Petroleum. — The collection of the statistics of production of petroleum 
by the census method was not attempted in 1$80 ; that is to say, the 
product of petroleum was calculated from the best obtainable commer- 
cial statements of the shipments of prominent companies. This method 
has many advantages, and, while not extremely accurate, is fairly close 
to the true amount. It fails, however, in several essential features when 
used for census purposes ; that is, by not stating the product and in- 
formation in regard to capital and wages involved, and a statement as 
to the exact regions in the country which produced petroleum. The 
investigation now in progress is extended to every individual producer 
of petroleum in the United States, and in this regard the investigation 
is a new one. The number of producers reaches into the thousands, 
but the collection and tabulation of the returns from all of them is pro- 
ceeding with accuracy and fair speed. 

Natural gas. — The inquiry into the total amount of natural gas pro- 
duced, with its fuel importance and the commercial interests to which it 
has given rise, all new features since the Tenth Census, is rapidly ap- 
proaching completion. 

Building stone. — The fact that building stone of good quality is said 
to exist iu nearly every section of the United States indicates that the 



92 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

sources from which it is now obtained can be varied to an unlimited ex- 
tent in a short time. This fairly represents the actual condition, ami 
suggests the innumerable difficulties which may arise in determining 
which of the infinite number of suitable localities for furnishing building 
stone were actually availed of during the calendar year 1889. The lo- 
cation of quarries changes so rapidly as to render search for the actual 
producers one of great difficulty. The compilation of a directory was, 
therefore, a complete problem in itself, requiring many expedients for 
its successful solution. It is safe to say that no directory of stone 
producers approaching in completeness that now possessed by the spe- 
cial agent in charge of this branch was ever before compiled, and it in- 
cludes not only every stone producer recognized as a commercial factor in 
this trade, but all the local stone quarries yielding stone for any consider- 
able building enterprise during tbeyear under consideration. In spite of 
the fact that practically every producer in the United States must be 
taken iuto consideration in this inquiry, results for complete branches of 
the work are now being printed and will be published in the form of a 
bulletin, giving the entire slate product of the country, as before stated. 

The other branches are nearly complete, and bulletins concerning 
marble, limestone, granite, and sandstone will soon be issued. The 
last returns are now being obtaiueel by the visits of special agents at 
the principal localities. 

Precious stones. — Systematic mining in this industry is exceptional. 
Many occasional discoveries are made of gems which prove valuable 
for ornamental purposes, and gradually the localities favorable for such 
discoveries are becoming known and industrial developments taking 
place. The growing importance of this industry can best be appreciated 
by the large amount of so-called Mexican onyx now found in California 
and Arizona, the extensive operations for cutting and polishing the 
agatized wood occurring in enormous quantities in Arizona, ami the 
regularly-equipped establishments for cutting and polishing various 
precious stones, which are continually increasing in number and ca- 
pacity, principally in Philadelphia, New York, Boston, and San Fran- 
cisco. 

Phosphate rock. — The data relating to the production of phosphate 
rock in South Carolina and Florida will soon be given in the form of a 
bulletin. 

A statement of the production of mineral waters of the United States 
is nearly complete. The schedules for all other subjects are practically 
in hand and undergoing final examination and revision. 

Summarizing the condition of the mining investigation at the present 
time, it is apparently as far advanced as it was expected to be at this 
date. In nearly every instance the returns point to a satisfactory con- 
dition of the miuing industry, and the total product will evidently be 
larger for the census year than for any previous year. This is due to two 
causes: more complete returns than have ever been published before, 
and, in most instances, a particularly prosperous year. 

TRANSPORTATION. 

The work assigned to the division of transportation may properly be 
divided into four separate branches : Rapid-transit facilities, steam i ail- 
ways, transportation by water, and transportation under the direction 
of express companies. It will be noticed that the investigation into 
both the telephone and telegraph business is not included in the above. 

The statistics of rapid-transit facilities will present a statement of the 



CENSUS. 93 

growth of street railways from 1880 to 1890, inclusive, showing for 1890 
tbe mileage which is operated by the four motive powers, animal 
power, electric power, stationary engines, and steam dummy-engines. 
Further, these statistics will show the- financial and physical condition 
of street railways as they exist in 1890. 

The work on the decennial schedule for rapid- transit facilities is prac- 
tically complete. Out of 794 schedules sent out, 752 have been re- 
turned and marked correct after examination and turned over to the 
chief of the division for compilation. Not more than 2 per cent of the 
total street mileage in the country fails to be represented in the 752 
schedules. 

The investigation into steam railways is divided into two parts, 
covered by a decennial and an annual schedule. It is proposed to 
include in the statistics gathered by the decennial schedule the princi- 
pal facts pertaining to operation, changes in contractual relations, em- 
ployment, and equipment by years for the decade ending 1890. It 
will be recognized by those who will appreciate the many changes that 
have taken place in the process of railway consolidation that this is a 
very difficult task. About two months ago a special agent was sent 
through the southern states for the purpose of personal interview with 
the managers of railways in that district. He has now about com- 
pleted this trip, and when he returns will have facts for all the South- 
ern Atlantic and Gulf states as complete as it is possible to get them. 
A special agent was sent also into the New England states for the pur- 
pose of getting such information as could not be obtained by schedules. 
In a few weeks, therefore, it is expected that the Southern Atlantic, 
the Southern Gulf, and the New England states will be completed, and 
a bulletin of railway growth in these districts since 1880 may be issued. 
This investigation is succeeding beyond expectation. 

With regard to the schedules calling for statistics for the year ending 
June 30, 1890, no difficulty whatever is contemplated. 

The chief difficulty encountered in this inquiry has been in connection 
with water transportation. The investigation began with an imperfect 
list of the names of vessels. The mailing list had practically been com- 
pleted at the date of my last report. Two schedules were prepared, one 
for steam vessels and one for sailing vessels. No schedule was prepared 
for unrigged vessels, it being believed that the work done by barges 
and similar craft should be assigned to vessels furnishing motive power. 
After eliminating schedules for fishing vessels, which were handed over 
to the fishery division, 5,960 steam schedules and 9,141 sail schedules 
were issued from this office. Of these, 4,320 steam schedules and 6,140 
sail schedules have been returned. 

Without making a statement of the difficulties encountered, the pres- 
ent position of the investigation into water transportation is as follows : 

Having obtained all the information which could be obtained by cor- 
respondence T it was decided to send agents and clerks from this office 
to vessel owners. The Atlantic sea-coast, including the Gulf coast, is 
under the immediate direction of this office, and at present there are 
eight clerks and agents covering this coast line. The office has also suc- 
ceeded in enlisting the interest of the Coastwise Steamship Association, 
which association has appointed a committee, called the census com- 
mittee, of which Mr. D. D. O. Mink, of Philadelphia, is chairman, and 
to this committee is intrusted the investigation respecting certain classes 
of boats. 

The Pacific slope is intrusted to a special agent in San Francisco, who 
is authorized to employ six clerks. His instructions are to comx>lete 



94 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



this work by December 31. There is, however, no basis for calculating 
whether this is possible. 

The interior waters are covered by four agents. The Lower Missis- 
sippi has been assigned to Mr. William H. Belt, of New Orleans, La., who 
writes that his work will be completed in three months, and the Upper 
Mississippi to Mr. Nathan D. Patterson, of Clintou, Iowa. Mr. T. C. 
Purdy has charge of the Ohio river above Cinciunati and its tribu- 
taries. Mr. Purdy's work is practically completed, and he has obtained 
information respecting the coal movement by barges which will make 
a most interesting bulletin. The investigation on the Great Lakes is 
under the direction of Mr. Charles H. Keep, of Buffalo, N. Y. It was 
found necessary to modify somewhat the claims of the schedule for 
these lake carriers. Mr. Keep has completed his list of description of 
floating equipment on the lakes, aud also his statement of the tonnage 
moved. Mr. Keep is secretary of the Lake Carriers' Association. 

I am fairly well satisfied with the condition of this work. The inves- 
tigation is absolutely new, and the request for information is strange to 
vessel owners. Moreover, the law, in iny opinion, is defective, and I 
have been obliged to rely largely upon persuasiou. I see no reason 
why all the facts which we are capable of obtaining can not be gathered 
by December 31, and if so, there is no reason why they can not be pre- 
pared for publication by June, 1891. There is nothing to be said with 
regard to the investigation into the business of express companies. 
The special agent has made a study of the mileage of the various 
express companies for the ten years ending 1890. These companies, 
however, have uniformly refused information. At present a law is 
before Congress which, if passed, will at least bring matters to a point. 
To be prepared for this I have drawn up a schedule, which is now in 
the hands of the printer. 



FISH AND FISHERIES. 

There being no directory of the fishermen of the United States, it was 
found neeessary to make a canvass by circular of the entire country, for 
the purpose of ascertaining in what regions fishermen lived, to what 
extent they engaged in fishing, and their names and addresses. This 
work has been accomplished, and the office now contains information 
from every locality in the United States where fishermen reside. 

A second directory of about 70,000 names has been prepared, show- 
ing the addresses of persons engaged in carp culture. A schedule call- 
ing for information concerning their success in raising carp was sent to 
each address, and up to date replies have been received from about 30 
per cent, of them. 

During the months of April and May schedules were prepared for 
the various kinds of fishing in the United States for which statistics 
were to be obtained, as follows : 



1. The whale fisheries. 

2. The cod and ground fisheries. 

3. The mackerel fisheries. 

4. The menhaden fisheries. 

5. The sea herring fisheries. 

6. The shad and alewife fisheries. 

7. The lobster fisheries. 
o. The oyster fisheries. 



9. The sponge fisheries. 

10. The alligator fisheries. 

11. The Atlantic and Gulf boat fisheries. 

12. The Gulf fisheries. 

13. The fisheries of the Great Lakes. 

14. The Pacific coast fisheries. 

15. The small inland fisheries. 

16. The carp industry. 



There has also been prepared a book of instructions of 78 pages, 
which includes as an appendix the terms in use among the fishermen, 



CENSUS. 95 

with the names and a description of the principal food-fishes, illustrated 
with cuts. 

During May and June a Held force of about 18 men was sent to the 
states of Maryland, Virginia, and New Jersey for the purpose of till- 
ing schedules relative to the oyster industry, and up to date about 
13,(500 schedules have been received. Everything is in readiness to 
undertake the canvass of the entire country for statistics of all the 
important fisheries. 

INSURANCE. 

With the view of obtaining a complete list of all companies and 
associations in the United States doing either a life, fire, inland and 
marine, hail, tornado, livestock, accident, or any other kind of insur- 
ance during the decade ending December 3L, 1889, a careful examina- 
tion was made of 300 state insurance reports, 1,000 insurance journals, 
and other insurance and beneficiary publications. An extensive cor- 
respondence with all the state insurance departments was also con- 
ducted, and 60,000 circulars were sent to postmasters. This resulted 
in securing the names and locations of 5,31 j} associations, which was the 
foundation of this branch of the work of the office. 

To these associations schedules have been sent, and nearly all have 
been returned. Such of them as refer to companies doing a fire, inland, 
marine, tornado, or hail business have been divided into five classes. 
To these companies have been sent schedules calling for the business 
transacted in each state for each year since January 1, 1880. Seventy- 
five percent of these last reports have been returned, examined, and 
passed, and are being compiled as rapidly as received. 

Schedules which will report the business of classes one, two, three, 
and four for the ten years and the year 1889 are ready to be sent to the 
companies for their approval. 

Instead of sending the schedules in blank to the companies, so far as 
it can be done they are completed in this office by transcribing the fig- 
ures from the printed reports and then sent to the companies for recti- 
fication, correction, and certification. This has been found to be the 
more expeditious way of obtaining the data required. 

In connection with the foregoing work, that relating to co-operative 
insurance and beneficiary societies was commenced and has been vigor- 
ously pushed. The work of obtaining statistics of these organizations 
has been peculiarly difficult. No systematic effort on a national scale, 
resulting in anything at all adequate for the use of this office had ever 
been made to collect even the names of these associations in the United 
States. The largest list found in print contained not exceeding 500, 
and pretended to cover only part of the field. It was found necessary, 
therefore, to begin at the very foundation and construct a list. To this 
end correspondence was opened with all known compilers and publishers 
f.'f works bearing upon the subject, all the state departments, boards of 
trade, and like organizations. The directories of all the cities and vil- 
lages were gleaned. Circular letters were sent to newspapers, to mer- 
cantile and manufacturing establishments, and to postmasters for 
reports of any associations having insurance, sick, or funeral benefits 
among their employes. The result of these efforts has been gratifying, 
and this office now has a list of thousands of these associations whose indi- 
vidual business amounts yearly tolarge proportions, ranging from nearly 
$4,000,000, as in the case of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, to a 
few hundred dollars, as in the smallest of the beneficiary societies, which 



06 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OP THE INTERIOR. 

afford necessary relief to but few members. Their business embraces 
all the different kinds of assessment, life insurance, sick, burial, and 
relief benefit, one merging into the other so closely that it is with diffi- 
culty that the line is drawn between the direct insurance and the bene- 
ficiary features. 

The yielding of the work has thus far given 2,500 fire, marine, inland 
tornado, and live-stock companies and 5.100 life and accident insurance 
companies and distinct beneficiary associations. 

Of the beneficiary associatiousa great number are working under the 
lodge system, each one of which has subordinate or local organizations 
numbering from thirty-five thousand in one association to those having 
but a few. To each of these local organizations other schedules have 
been sent. 

Lists have been made of all cities and towns in the United States 
having over four hundred inhabitants, and to these a schedule has been 
sent asking information as to the fire protection and water supply. Ee- 
ports have been received from nearly 5,000 of these cities and towns, 
and this branch of the work is being rapidly advanced. 

The general condition of this division is excellent. The clerks have 
become familiar with their work and are doing satisfactory service. The 
preliminary work is nearly finished, the different schedules are being 
sent to the companies, and the data required from them is being returned 
in a very satisfactory condition, which will allow the w T ork of compila- 
tion to be pushed more rapidly. 

ALASKA. 

At the time of my last report it was the intention of this office to 
enumerate the inhabitants of Alaska and to collect the statistics of its 
agriculture, mines, manufactures, fisheries, etc.. by means of the regu- 
lar enumerators, and Alaska had been made a supervisor's district. It 
was, however, in consequence of the great distances to be covered, the 
difficulty of obtaining transportation, etc., deemed advisable to putthe 
census of Alaska in charge of a special agent, and this was done by 
the appointment of Mr. Ivan Petroff, a gentleman who resided for many 
years in Alaska and is thoroughly acquainted with its history and re- 
sources. Mr. Petroff prepared the report on Alaska for the Tenth Cen- 
sus, and was peculiarly well qualified for undertaking the work of the 
Eleventh Census. 

On February 11, 1890, Mr. Petroff submitted a plan for census work 
in Alaska, which was adopted. Under this plan the territory was di- 
vided into seven divisions, namely : First, the Southeastern or Sitka 
division; second, the Kodiak division : 1 bird, the Oonalaska division; 
fourth, the ISushegak division ; fifth, the Kuskokvim division ; sixth, the 
Yukon division; seventh, the Arctic division. Each division was 
placed in charge of a special agent, a resident of the division. The 
duty of each special agent is to collect such statistics as are desira- 
ble and obtainable and transmit the same to a shipping point nearest 
his division. On account of the difficulties encountered by special 
agents in traveling through Alaska, and the impossibility of obtaining 
proper vouchers, etc., the Secretary of the Interior recommended to Con- 
gress that these special agents should be allowed the sum of $7 per day 
in lieu of subsistence, which should also cover traveling expenses. 
Congress thereupon passed an act granting this authority. 

To facilitate the work the co-operation of the captains of the naval 



CENSUS. 97 

and revenue marine vessels in Alaskan waters was requested from the 
proper authorities. Letters were also addressed to the heads of the 
various religious denominations represented in Alaska by teachers and 
missionaries, requesting the assistance of the latter in supplying such 
statistics as were at hand. 

Mr. Petroff and the special agents in charge of the seven divisions of 
Alaska are now in that territory. The special agents have been fully 
instructed as to their duties, and the necessary blanks for use in their 
work reached them in good time ; and there can be no reason, except 
that of unavoidable accident, for incomplete work, as they all seem to 
be competent men. Communication with Alaskan ports is only occa- 
sional, and, with the exception of a few places in southeastern Alaska, 
there is no regular mail, it is therefore impossible to say at this time 
when reports will be received as to this work. Everything has been 
done, however, that would increase the facilities for securing early 
reports. 

INDIANS. 

This division is now fully organized and the entire plan of the Indian 
census has been agreed upon. To this end fifteen kinds of blanks have 
been prepared and printed and 57 Indian agents selected as enumer- 
ators for the several reservations or agencies, while 38 special agents, 
to report on the condition of the Indians, and 54 Indian enumerators for 
the five civilized tribes in the Indian territory, have been designated. 
In fact, the entire machinery necessary to a complete and exhaustive 
census and report on the condition of the Indians is ready to be put in 
operation. 

GENERAL, REMARKS. 

In the rapid review of the work now under way in the Census Office 
it would be impossible for me to conclude this report without reference 
to the personnel of the office. The present advanced condition of the 
work is in no small degree due to the untiring zeal and ability of those 
who have been called to assist in its several branches. The following 
list shows the organization of the office on November 1, 1890 : 

Albert F. Childs, chief clerk. James H. Wardle, assistant chief clerk. 

First Division. — Appointments: In charge of assistant chief clerk. 

Second Division. — Disbursements and accounts: Josiah C. Stoddard, disbursing 

clerk; Herman A. Seligson, chief of division. 
Third Division. — Geography : Henry Gannett, expert special agent ; George B. 

Chittenden, chief of division. 
Fourth Division. — Population : William C. Hunt, expert special agent ; Howard 

Sutherland, assistant. 
Fifth Division. — Vital statistics: Dr. John S. Billings, expert special agent; Will- 
iam A. King, chief of division. 
Sixth Division. — Church statistics: Dr. Henry K. Carroll, Plainfield, N. J., special 

agent ; Charles E. Buell, assistant. 
Seventh Division. — Educational statistics : Prof. James H. Blodgett, special agent ; 

John W. Porter, chief of division. 
Eighth Division. — Pauperism and crime : Rev. Fred. H. Wines, special agent ; G. W. 

Sweezy, assistant. 
Ninth Division, — Wealth, debt, and taxation : T. Campbell-Copcland, special agent; 

Alonzo Weeks, assistant. 
Tenth Division. — National and State finance : J. K. Upton, special agent. 
Eleventh Division, — Farms, homes, and mortgages : George K. Holmes, John S. Lord, 

and John D. Leland, special agents. 
Twelfth Division. — Agriculture: John Hyde and Mortimer Whitehead, special 

agents. 
Thirteenth Division.— Manufactures : Frank R. Williams, expert special agent; 

George S. Boudinot, chief of division. 

INT 90— VOL III 7 



98 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Fourteenth Division. — Mines and mining: Dr. David T. Day, special agent; E. W. 

Parker, assistant. 
Fifteenth Division. — Fish and fisheries : Charles W. Smiley, special agent. 
Sixteenth Division.— Transportation : Prof. Henry C. Adams, special agent ; A. E. 

Shuman, chief of division. 
Seventeenth JDivision. — Insurance : : Charles A. Jenney, special agent ; Mrs. LauraR. 

Anderson, acting chief of division. 
Eighteenth Division. — Printing and stationery : Dr. Orlando C. Ketcham, chief of 

division ; Charles F. Warren and Louis C. Schuckers, assistants. 
Nineteenth Division. — Statistics of special classes: Dr. John S. Billings, expert 

special agent; W. H. Olcott, acting chief of division. 
Twentieth Division. — Supervisors' correspondence : John Hyde, special agent, in 

charge ; Daniel A. Ray and John W. Rusk, assistants. 
Twenty-first Division. — Alaska : Ivan Petroff, special agent. 

Twenty- Second Division. — Statistics of Indians: Thomas Donaldson, special agent. 
Twenty-third Division. — Social statistics of cities: Harry Tiffany, special agent in 

charge; Henry T. Lyle, assistant. 
Twenty- fourth Division. — Accounts for farms, homes, and mortgages: Charles L. 

Curtiss, chief of division. 

To each and every one of the above-named gentlemen my thanks and 
appreciation are due, and the success of the great work of this office 
will, in no small degree, depend upon the continued interest and energy 
of these capable and experienced special agents and chiefs. 

The enormous supervisors' correspondence during the months of May 
and June was carried on by Mr. John Hyde, a special agent, who de- 
serves great credit for the dispatch, ability, and judgment exercised in 
this work, and I take this occasion to express my appreciation of his 
great energy. During the few weeks allotted to the organization of 
tbe supervisors and enumerators there were transmitted from this 
single division of the census 8,928 letters and 6,037 telegrams. 

I have endeavored to give a statement of the condition of the work 
of this office at the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890. I 
am aware that in some respects this report goes into the subject in 
more detail than the reports of previous Superintendents. This is in- 
tentional on my part. Taken in conjunction with my report of Novem- 
ber, 1889, it will form a complete statement, not only of the original 
plans as laid out for every branch of the census work, but of the many 
difficulties and obstacles which have been encountered, and I believe 
will not only be of current interest to statisticians throughout the country, 
but of inestimable value as an additional guide to those who may under- 
take this task hereafter. 

ROBERT P. PORTER, 
Superintendent of Census. 

The Secretary of the Interior. 



APPENDIX. 



Exhibit A. 

Department of the Interior, Census Office, 

Washington, D. £?., May 6, 1890. 
Sir: On the 22d ultimo I had the honor to receive direct from the Senate of the 
United States a resolution introduced by Senator F. M. Cockrell, and adopted by that 
honorable body on that day, of which resolution the following is a copy : 

" Resolved, That the Superintendent of Census be directed to communicate to the 
Senate the instructions, rules, and regulations formulated by him for the purpose 
of ascertaining the facts required by the act approved February 27, 1890, entitled i An 
act to require the Superintendent of the Census to ascertain the number of people 
who own farms and homes, and the amount of the mortgage indebtedness thereon.'" 
I have the honor to submit to you my reply to said resolution for transmission to 
the Senate. 

the basis of the inquiry. 

The above resolution specifically calls upon the Superintendent of Census to furnish 
the instructions, rules, and regulations formulated by this office for the purpose of 
ascertaining the facts required by the act approved February 27, 1890. 

The basis of the above inquiry will be the five questions numbered 26, 27, 28, 29, 
and 30 on the population schedule, as follows: 

26. Is the home you live in hired, or is it owned by the head or by a member of the 
family ? 

27. If owned by head or member of family, is the home free from mortgage incum- 
brance ? 

28. If the head of family is a farmer, is the farm which he cultivates hired, or is it 
owned by him or by a member of his family ? 

29. If owned by head or member of family, is the farm free from mortgage incum- 
brance? 

30. If the home or farm is owned by head or member of family, and mortgaged, give 
the post-office address of owner. 

The Census Office has not as yet formulated any instructions, rules, or regulations 
excepting those hereinafter given, which apply exclusively to enumerators. 

It is not the intention t© place in the hands of special agents the work of gathering 
these statistics until the other methods of the Census Office have been exhausted. 

obstacles encountered. 

Experience has shown that it is impossible to secure reliable data in relation to 
the value and ownership of property or the amount of private indebtedness of indi- 
viduals directly through the medium of enumerators. In 1879, when the act entitled 
"An act to provide for taking the Tenth and subsequent censuses" provided specif- 
ically for certain inquiries to be incorporated in the enumerators' schedule in relation 
to the ownership of the public debt of the United States, by whom owned, and the 
respective amounts, the matter came up in Congress inconsequence of a report made 
by my predecessor, General Francis A. Walker, giving reasons why the law should 
be repealed. The particular points touching the impracticability of securing or expect- 
ing to secure from the women of the household accurate information concerning the 
ownership of property were emphasized at that time. In the report referred to, urg- 
ing the abandonment of the interrogatory relating to the ownership of the public 
debt, General Walker called attention to the fact that the questions on the population 
schedule would often have to be answered by the women of I lie family in the tempo- 
rary or protracted absence of the head thereof, and that if is difficult to ob1 aiii accurate 
information, excepting from the head of the family, respecting the investment of the 
family property. 



100 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Even when the head of the family is present the direct inquiry of an enumerator 
respecting how much the head of the family owes is likely to engender distrust, and 
in the end only secure partial returns. 

THE METHOD ADOPTED. 

It was therefore decided when the act of February 27, 1890, relating to farms, homes, 
and mortgages, was passed by Congress that the enumerators should simply be called 
upon to secure information which will enable the Census Office, by correspondence, 
and ultimately by special agents, and probably in many cases by searching the rec- 
ords, to obtain with almost absolute accuracy and final completeness the tacts re- 
quired. There are several advantages in this method. The office will be able to 
tabulate and give to the country in a comparatively short time the number of persons 
in each county who own the homes they occupy and the farms they cultivate, the 
number of people who are tenants of their homes and farms, the number of all owned 
and tenanted farms and homes which are mortgaged, and the number free from 
mortgage incumbrance. 

If the enumerator performs his duty in accordance with the instructions heiein- 
after appended the post-office address of every person owning and occupying a 
mortgaged home or farm will be in the possession of the Census Office, together with 
the addresses of all owners of farms and homes in cases where a doubt exists as to 
whether said farms and homes are mortgaged or not. It should be borne in mind 
that these addresses, unlike those obtained from the real estate records by abstractors 
in search of mortgaged indebtedness and referred to hereafter, will not be subject to 
any considerable change in the short time elapsing between their collection and the 
forwarding from the Census Office of the circular of inquiry. As the law provides a 
penalty of $100 for a refusal to answer these questions, it is believed thata very large 
percentage of the circulars which will be sent from this office as soon as the popula- 
tion schedules are returned will be answered forthwith. It is not likely that these 
circulars will be required before July, so they have not as yet been formulated. 

It is the intention, however, to include such questions as will elicit the amount of 
mortgaged indebtedness due upou every mortgaged home and farm occupied by the 
owner, the value of the mortgaged property, the rate of interest borne by the debt, 
the causes and purposes of the indebtedness, and such other information as may be 
obtainable and will aid in making this inquiry as complete as possible. 

ADVANTAGES OF THE PROPOSED PLAN. 

It should also be borne in mind that the enumerator is a local man, and in many 
cases known to the persons to whom the inquiry is directed. It was therefore fair to 
assume that persons called upon to make returns relating to such a delicate matter 
as debt will more cheerfully fill out a blank addressed to the Superintendent of 
Census, to be mailed directly to Washington, there to lose its identity among millions 
of other returns, than give information as to the amount of their indebtedness to the 
enumerator. In any event, the Census Office will secure, and by the aid of special 
agents will ultimately be able to work up the list of delinquents, until by one method 
or another practically every return is obtained. It is not likely, with the liability of 
a fine staring them in the face, that people will refuse to reply to the census circular, 
and should they finally refuse to give the information to a special agent of the office 
the opportunity of searching the records is still open as a last resort. Having care- 
fully considered all the obstacles to be overcome in order to make this report thorough 
and complete, the iirst step in the inquiry, as we have seen, has been taken by the in- 
sertion in the population schedule of the five questions given above and the framing 
of the subjoined instructions to enumerators. 

INSTRUCTIONS TO ENUMERATORS. 

26. Is the home you live in hired, or is it owned by the head or by a member of the 
family ? 

If hired, say hired; if owned, say owned, and indicate whether owned by head, 
wife, son, daughter, or other member of family, as owned — head; owned — wife; owned — 
son, etc. If there is more than one son or daughter in the family, and the home is 
owned by one of them, indicate which one by using the figure at the head of the 
column in which the name, etc., of the person is entered, as owned — son (4). 

27. If owned by head or member of family, is the home free from mortgage incum- 
brance ? 

If free from incumbrance, say free; if mortgaged, say mortgaged. 

28. If the head of family is a farmer, is the farm which he cultivates hired, or is it 
owned by him or by a member of his family ? 

To be answered in the same manner as for inquiry 26. 

29. If owned by head or member of family, is the farm free from mortgage incum- 
brance f 



CENSUS. 101 

To be answered in the same manner as for inquiry 27. 

30. tfthehomi or farm is owned by head or member of family, and mortgaged, 
give the post-office address of owner? 

In answer, to this inquiry the post-office address of the owner of a mortgaged home 
or farm must be correctly staled : that is, the post office at which the owner (whether 
head of family, wife, sou, daughter, etc.) usually receives his or her mail. 

In all cases where it can not be definitely ascertained whether the home or farm 
is mortgaged or not, return the post-office address of the owner, so that this office 
can communicate with such persons. 

In connection with the definition of mortgage incumbrance, it should be stated that 
judgment notes or confessions of judgment, asin Pennsylvania and Virginia, the deeds 
of trust of many states, deeds with vendor's lien clause, bonds or contracts for title 
that are virtually mortgages, crop liens or mortgages upon crops, and all other legal 
instruments that partake of the nature of mortgages upon real estate, are to be 
regarded as such ; but mechanics' liens are not to be regarded as mortgage incum- 
brances upon homes or farms. 

The enumerator should be careful to use the local name for the mortgage incum- 
brance when making the inquiries, and should not confine himself to the word 
"mortgage" when it will be misunderstood. 

Some of the difficulties which will arise in connection with the prosecution of the 
inquiries concerning homes and farms and how they are to be treated may be men- 
tioned as follows: 

1. A house is not necessarily to be considered as identical with a home and to be 
counted only once as a home. If it is occupied as a home by one or more tenants, 
or by owner and one or more tenants, it is to be regarded as a home to each family. 

2. If a person owns and cultivates what has been tw r o or more farms and lives on 
one, they are not to be taken as more than one farm. 

3. If a person owns and cultivates what has been two or more farms, and all are 
not mortgaged, the several farms are to be counted as one farm and as mortgaged. 

4. If a person hires both the farm he cultivates and the home he lives in, or owns 
both, the home is to be considered as a part of the farm. 

5. If a person owns the home he lives in and hires the farm he cultivates, or owns 
the farm he cultivates and hires the home he lives in, both farm and home are to be 
entered upon the schedule, and separately. 

6. If the tenant of a farm and its owner live upon it, either in the same house or 
in different houses, the owner is to be regarded as owning the home he lives in and 
the tenant as hiring the farm he cultivates. If the owner simply boards with the 
tenant, no account is to be made of the owner. 

7. If the same person owns and cultivates one farm and hires and cultivates 
another farm, he is to be entered upon the schedule as owning the farm he cultivates. 

8. The head of a family may own and cultivate a farm and his wife may own another 
farm which is let to tenant, perhaps to her husband. In such case only the farm 
which is owned by the head of the family is to be considered, but the rented farm is 
to be taken account of when its tenant's family is visited. 

9. A person who cultivates a farm is not to be regarded as hiring it if he works for 
a definite and fixed compensation in money or fixed quantity of produce, but he is 
to be regarded as hiring it if he pays a rental for it or is to receive a share of the 
produce, even though he may be subject to some direction and control by the owner. 

THE RESULTS TO BE CONNECTED WITH OTHER IMPORTANT FACTS. 

Having in this manner and by the several methods herewith presented obtained the 
facts required by the act of February 27 concerning farm and home ownership and ten- 
ancy, it is the intention of this office to connect the results with some of the important 
facts obtained through the population schedule. The division of farm and home owner- 
ship between the sexes, and the extent to which wives are owners, will be ascertained. 
It will be known whether farm and home owning is associated more with middle age 
than with youth or with old age, and the general beginning of th^ home-owning 
period of a man's life may be determined; that it is or is not principally the married 
who are owners may possibly be established ; whether those of foreign birth are gen- 
erally tenants or demonstrate an ability to own will be shown. The happy effects of 
American life, or the contrary, may be disclosed by the number of years during which 
persons live in the United States before they become owners, and it will be discovered 
whether foreign born are disposed to be merely tenants. Probably the most impor- 
tant connection that can be made will be between farm and home owning and tenancy 
and the occupations of owners and tenants. This relationship may be looked upon 
as deciding what a man's prospects are of becoming the proprietor of his home in the 
various occupations of industry and professional life. In short, the opportunity is 
here afforded to present information of a varied character regarding a popular sub- 
ject, and perhaps the only opportunity for many years to come will be taken advan- 



102 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

tage of to present a large variety of results, showing the causes and associations of 
farm and home ownership and tenancy. 

WORK PLANNED PRIOR TO ACT OF FEBRUARY 27, 1890. 

In view of the fact that considerable public 'interest is felt in this inquiry, in con- 
sequence of its important bearing upon the progress and prosperity of the people and 
of the novelty of the investigation itself, nothing of so extensive and far-reaching a 
character having ever been attempted by any government before, I feel justified in 
taking this opportunity to lay before the Senate a full statement of the work relating 
to mortgage indebtedness planned and in course of completion by the Census Office 
prior to the passage of the act entitled "An act to require the Superintendent of Cen- 
sus to ascertain the number of people who own farms and homes, and the amount of the 
mortgage indebtedness thereon," together with a brief summary of what the office 
hopes to accomplish in this almost totally unexplored field of statistics. 

THE INQUIRY NOW BEING PROSECUTED. 

The work referred to above as having been planned before the passage of the act of 
February 27, and now in course of completion, relates exclusively to the recorded 
indebtedness of private corporations and individuals. It was begun early last sum- 
mer, at which time three trained statisticians were put in the field for the purpose of 
examining the records indifferent sections of the country and making what may be 
termed experimental inquiries to aid in formulating a plan of operations. 

The method to be adopted in collecting statistics of recorded indebtedness could not 
be determined upon without experimental investigation. Little was known about 
the character of the real estate records and their trustworthiness as sources of statis- 
tical investigation, and in order that the Census Office might proceed intelligently 
three special agents were appointed to conduct experimental investigations. Special 
Agent John S. Lord, of Illinois, selected Sangamon County, in that State, and Scott 
County, Iowa; Special Agent Frederick W. Kruse, of New York, selected Cattaraugus 
County, in that State ; and Special Agent George K. Holmes, of Massachusetts, selected 
Hampden County, in that State. 

THREE SPECIAL METHODS SUGGESTED. 

Three special methods were in mind before these investigations were undertaken* 
viz: 

First. Reliance upon the records. 

Second. Direct application by letter and circulars of inquiry. 

Third. The personal visitation of agents or enumerators, who should make inquiry 
concerning the recorded incumbrances on property or persons enumerated. 

It was evident at the beginning that, whatever plan might be adopted, the expense 
that must be incurred if it should be adopted in every county in the United States, 
unless reduced by information derived from the records, would be enormous, and prob- 
ably greater than the appropriation for census purposes would warrant. Hence the 
endeavors of these special agents were directed toward discovering the cheapest plan 
that could be depended upon to establish with a fair degree of accuracy the recorded 
indebtedness in existence at a given date. Each special agent confin-d his experi- 
ment to real estate mortgages as the most important form of recorded security, and as 
the one affording the best opportunities for an investigation which must necessarily 
depend to such a great extent upon the public records. 

THE DIRECT METHOD. 

The direct method of establishing by inquiry the net debt due upon every mort- 
gage in force and of eliminating the mortgages uncanceled of record, but paid in fact 
and in full, and the amounts of partial payments, commended itself in the abstract 
as the one to be most relied upon. This was the sole method employed in Cattarau- 
gus County, N. Y., and was one of the methods employed in Scott and Sanga- 
mon Counties. In Cattaraugus County a complete abstract was made of all mort- 
gages remaining uncanceled of record on the 1st of June, 1889. This involved search- 
ing the records subsequent to 1818, and including many mortgages, which, although 
uncanceled, it might reasonably be assumed were not in force. It seemed advisable, 
however, to ascertain definitely to what extent mortgages of earlier date were still 
in force, so as to limit and define the scope of investigation. From this examination 
it appeared that the total number of mortgages remaining uncanceled was 14,266, of 
which 3,731 were recorded prior to 1869, 3,257 from 1869 to 1879, and 7,278 from 1879 
to June 1, 1889. 

UTILIZING SAVINGS BANKS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS. 

After this abstract had been completed, the mortgages made to each of the savings 
banks and other loan associations were scheduled, and this list sent to each of them, 
with a letter requesting a statement of the amount unpaid upon each mortgage, to- 
gether with the terms of payment and rate of interest, and in all cases the informa- 



CENSUS. 1 03 

lion was furnished. The mortgages of nine towns wore scheduled, grouping together 
all mortgages relating to a particular town, and a circular letter mailed to both par- 
ties to the mortgage, requesting replies to a series of questions designed to ascer- 
tain the amount unpaid upon the mortgage and the motive or cause for making it. 
The difficulties which were encountered were less than had heen expected, and replies 
were received to the larger portion of these circular letters, hut could nor be obtained 
for the remainder of them owing to the neglect and refusal of the people to answer, 
to the inahility of the special agents to get post-office addresses, to change of resi- 
dence, and to the death of some of the persons whose names were upon record. These 
difficulties were to a large extent insurmountable in cases of the older mortgages, 
especially since these mortgages were presumably mostly paid in full, but were lei I 
uncanceled in the times when the business habits of the people were not as exact as 
they have been in recent years. Under this procedure absolutely complete statis- 
tics could not he obtained, and if sole dependence were to be placed upon it the in- 
vestigation would he interminable, and would probably entail an expense that would 
consume the whole appropriation for census purposes. In spite of all the efforts made, 
about 20 percent of the persons addressed failed to respond, but an estimate was 
made of the indebtedness in the cases of these persons upun the basis ol* the debt as 
shown by the replies which were received, and the total mortgage debt of seven of the 
nine towns was shown to be $1,366,289, and the total assessed valuation of the real 
estate of these towns was $3,883,534, as corrected and equalized by the board of su- 
pervisors of the county. 

AN IMPORTANT FACT ESTABLISHED. 

It is believed that two important facts in this line of inquiry were established by 
the Cattaraugus County investigation. First, it was shown' with a fair degree of 
accuracy that only eight-tenths of 1 per cent of the total debt represented by mort- 
gages recorded prior to 1669 remain unpaid. Thus it would not be necessary, under 
any circumstances, in localities where the conditions are the same as in Cattaraugus 
County, to extend the scope of the investigation beyond twenty years next preceding 
the investigation. Indeed, Mr. Kruse, who conducted this inquiry, gave it as his 
opinion that in some instances less than twenty years would answer, as it was shown 
that less than 8 per cent of the mortgage debt in force is represented by mortgages 
recorded prior to 1879. The other experimental inquiries made by the Census Office 
fully corroborate the fact brought out in Cattaraugus County. It was ascertained, 
for example, that only 3 per cent of the mortgage debt of the people of Hampden 
County, Mass., was created before 1870 ; that only 4 per cent of the recorded debt of 
Sangamon County, 111., was created prior to 1880 ; and that only 5 per cent of the 
debt in Scott County, Iowa, was created before 1880. These three conclusions, all 
pointing in the same direction, would indicate, in the western states certainly, and 
to a considerable extent in the eastern states, that a comparatively small percent- 
age of the existing recorded indebtedness of the present time was created previous 
to 1880. 

THE MOTIVE FOR MORTGAGING PROPERTY. 

The importance of ascertaining the motive or cause for making the mortgage has 
not been underestimated by the Census Office, and in the inquiry conducted by Mr. 
Kruse it was made a prominent feature, with the following curious and interesting 
results, showing by percentages the causes for making real estate mortgages, as re- 
ported and ascertained in the preliminary investigation made in nine towns of Cat- 
taraugus County, N. Y. : 

Percentage. 

For purchase money 54.55 

For improvements 17. 30 

To pay previous mortgage 1. 81 

To pay debts 1.38 

To use in business 1. 68 

To secure indorsements 1.40 

To raise money for investment 0.60 

To sink oil wells 0.29 

To secure annuities 0. 25 

To pay off heirs . . . „ 0. 16 

For support and family expenses 0. 14 

Sickness 0. 16 

Extravagance 0. 14 

Speculation 0.08 

Miscellaneous 0. 30 

Total' 80.24 

No motive ascertained 19. 76 

100. 00 



104 EEPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Miscellaneous causes reported for making mortgages : To secure payment for C>75 
gallons rectified whisky ; for traveling in the West ; for trip to Sweden ; to raise money 
for son ; to secure estate of sister ; to settle with wife ; to prove that a girl graduate 
can use an education to advantage ; to pay suhscription for preacher. 

THE ILLINOIS, IOWA, AND MASSACHUSETTS INQUIRIES. 

The experimental inquiries conducted in Hampden County, Mass., Sangamon 
County, 111., and Scott County, Iowa, hy special agents George K. Holmes and John 
S. Lord differed largely from the investigations made by Mr. Kruse in Cattaraugus 
County, N. Y. The experiments of the two former special agents pointed to the de- 
sirability of ascertaining, if possible, the average duration of mortgage indebtedness ; 
that is, to establish with a fair degree of probability the average life of a mortgage 
in respective localities. 

In an inquiry made by John S. Lord for the State of Illinois he clearly demon- 
strated that it was unsafe to depend wholly upon w r hat might be called the average 
contract time of mortgages, for tbe reason that a large percentage of error might 
enter the calculation iu consequence of the non-payment of mortgages when due. 
His method, however, was suggestive, and gave direction to the Census Office inves- 
tigations iu Sangamon County, Scott and Hampden Counties, with the object of ex- 
amining every feature of the method of establishing existing indebtedness by meaus 
of applying the average time of its duration. The data thus collected in these three 
counties agreed in showing that the amount of indebtedness placed upon record 
within a period of time previous to the 1st of June, 1889, corresponding to the aver- 
age duration of such indebtedness as determined for each locality, represents, with a 
small percentage of error, the indebtedness which was actually in force upon said 
1st of June, making allowance for partial payments that had been made upon the 
original amount of the debt. This was demonstrated in Scott and Sangamon Counties 
by ascertaining what amount of real estate mortgage indebtedness was actually un- 
paid, which was done by means of inquiries addressed to the holders of mortgages 
and the owners of mortgaged real estate, and this was true, notwithstanding the 
diverse conditions exist tug iu these counties. The amount of error in the result ob- 
tained by this method of determining the debt in force ranged from 3 to 5 per cent. 

AVERAGE DURATION OF MORTGAGES. 

In arriving at the amount of mortgages in force at a given date the common method 
of equating the time of several debts of different amounts and with different times 
of payment which is employed by bookkeepers was adopted. For example, if the 
mortgages placed upon record in a given locality in 1887 amounted to $2,000, in 1888 to 
$3,000, and in 1889 bo $2,500, and the average duration or life of a mortgage in said lo- 
cality was found to be three years, then the debt really in force upon the 1st of January, 
1800, would he $7,500 minus the partial payments, determined as hereafter explained. 
In such a case it would be found that the amount of mortgages now in force but made 
previous to 1887 is fairly balanced by the fully paid mortgages made in 1887-'89 and 
included in the above sum of $7,500 as the recorded indebtedness of that locality 
January 1, 1890. This method practically overcomes the chief error which would 
arise from using the real estate records without correction, namely, the amount of 
uncanceled mortgages that have been really paid in full. 

PARTIAL PAYMENTS. 

The method adopted for obtaining the percentage to be deducted for partial pay- 
ments in each locality is to secure information from mortgagees as to the amount of 
their loans that have been partially paid. In the experimental tests there was obtained 
at very trifling cost a basis of about $6,000,000 of loans in Sangamon County, of over 
$3,000,000 in Scott County, and of about $5,000,000 in Hampden County, and the per- 
centages of these amounts represented by partial payments made within the average 
duration or life period of mortgages in these places varied from 7 to 9 per cent only. 

These experimental inquiries have shown how valuable results for comparisons of 
indebtedness in different localities can be obtained, but nothing short of a costly resort 
to all the three methods already referred to in each individual county would accom- 
plish the work with exactitude, if, indeed, it is possible that statistical accuracy can 
be obtained by any method whatever. The method that has been adopted will un- 
doubtedly give approximately the amount of recorded indebtedness, and taken iu con- 
nection with the results of the subsequent inquiry in regard to the ownership of homes 
and farms a great deal of light will be thrown upon the whole question. 

INQUIRY COUNTIES. 

Dependence upon enumerators would be out of the question, as has been already 
shown. Nor would it do to rely solely upon circulars of inquiry sent through the 



J 



CENSUS. 105 

mails and addressed to the parties to mortgages whose names shall he ohtained from 
records. This latter form of investigation is now being conducted by the Census 
Office in a large number of counties in the United States, termed in the office " in- 
quiry" counties, with partially satisfactory results, but with the prospect of not get- 
ting replies for a considerable percentage of the mortgages uncanceled of record. 
Greater success may be expected in this direction with the names and post-office ad- 
dresses that will be obtained by enumerators. There was really no alternative left 
to the Census Office, the only course open being the method adopted, which does not 
rely entirely upon the records, but finds in those records the principal sources of in- 
formation under proper interpretation, to which the results obtained in the " inquiry" 
counties will contribute. 

RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED. 

Under the plan of investigation adopted by the Census Office to ascertain the re- 
corded indebtedness the results that will be obtained are substantially as follows : 

The financial transactions of the people, as far as indicated by recorded mortgages, 
will be ascertained for the ten years from 1880 to 1889 ; the number of acres of agri- 
cultural land, and the number of real estate holdings by States and minor civil divis- 
ions which have been mortgaged in each year, and the amount of mortgage debt placed 
upon these two classes of real estate by years and by counties, will be ascertained. 

The amount of mortgage debt existing January 1, 1890, upon agricultural land and 
upon village and city real estate will be obtained for each county. 

The rates of interest paid upon debts secured by real estate will be ascertained for 
each county, and the total interest charged will be computed, together with the 
average annual rates of interest. 

Private corporations as mortgagors, and all corporations as mortgagees, will, so far 
as practicable, be kept distinct from individuals in these statistics, and such corpora- 
tions will be classified according to the character of their business. The growth 
of the business of building and loan associations will be disclosed. 

As already explained, a special feature of the investigation will be the discovery of 
the average duration of mortage debt and the rate of payment and proportion paid. 

The causes and purposes of mortgage indebtedness will be sought and obtained, so 
far as people are willing to disclose them. This will throw light upon the char- 
acter of mortgage indebtedness, and reveal to what extent it is an evidence of mis- 
fortune or enterprise. 

Chattel mortgages are not included in this investigation of recorded indebtedness, 
partly because the expense would be too great, and partly because of the difficulties 
iu the way of showing the amount of indebtedness in force upon chattels. 

INSTRUCTIONS RELATING TO RECORDED INDEBTEDNESS. 

The resolution asks that the instructions, rules, and regulations formulated by the 
Superintendent of Census for the purpose of ascertaining the facts required by the 
act approved February 27, 1890, be communicated by him to the Senate. As already 
stated, the rules directly relating to the inquiry provided for in the act of February 
27, 1890, have not yet been formulated so far as they relate to the work of special 
agents. I have the honor, however, to inclose copies of the instructions to such 
special agents as are now employed in abstracting mortgages from the records of 
every State and Territory for the past ten years. These are general instructions, 
but in addition it has been found necessary to issue supplementary instructions ap- 
plicable to special cases, to particular regions, and to perplexing problems which 
have constantly arisen. There is great lack of uniformity in the laws of the several 
States concerning mortgages and public records, and this has entailed an immense 
amount of labor in formulating instructions applicable to the different States, and 
not infrequently to different counties within the same State. 

It has been found that although in certain States the rate of interest is commonly 
stated in mortgages, in many other States the reverse is true, and rather than entirely 
abandon the endeavor to discover what rates of interest are paid upon real estate 
mortgages the Census Office has deemed it advisable to instruct its special agents to 
assume the customary rates of interest where mortgages do not disclose the rate. 
This work is being rapidly advanced in every State and Territory in the Union 
except Nevada. In some States the Avork is nearly completed, and before many 
months it is hoped that results will be reached. 

The reply to the resolution might and perhaps ought, in strictness, to have been 
confined to a transmittal of the printed " instructions, rules, and regulations," but 
this would have fallen far short of putting the Senate in possession of the full scope 
of the plan adopted thus far, and of the tests and experiments by which it has 
seemed preferable to the other plans considered. 

The whole subject is one of great importance and of obvious complexity, difficulty, 
and delicacy. It is the purpose of this office to make the investigation thorough and 



106 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

as nearly accurate as may be, to the end that Uh> Eleventh Census may show the ac- 
tual situation of our people in respect of financial prosperity, and may furnish founda- 
tion for comparison with the results of censuses to he taken in the future. 

The Superintendent is glad of the opportunity afforded hy the resolution to lay 
before Congress the plan adopted, in order that it may have criticism and give rise to 
suggestion, and in so doing trusts he shall not be deemed to have gone beyond the 
spirit or substantial purpose of the inquiry of the Senate. 
Very respectfully, 

Robert P. Porter, 

Superintendent of Census. 
The Secretary of the Interior. 



CENSUS. 



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108 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



EXHIBIT C. 

Statement of the debt of the state of Maryland outstanding 



For what purpose 


Date of 
authori- 
zation 
act. 


.9 

o a 

oj ■— 

*-> - 

et ■** 


Date of 

maturity. 


Tear ending September 30— 


issued. 


1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


Total debt . . . 








$11,259,607.35 


$11,277,110.69 


$11,257,560.69 


$11,269,031.78 












1827 
1837 

1838 
1838 
1839 
1839 
1839 

1847 

1868 

1870 

18"0-1874 

1872-1876 

1872 
1878 

1882 
1886 


5 
3 

5 
5 
5 
6 
6 

5 

6 
6 

6 

6 

6 
6 

3 
3 


1880 
1890 

1889 
1890 
1890 
1890 
1890 

1890 

1883 

1885 

1885-1889 

1887-1891 

1887 
1893 

1899 
1900 


24, 000. 00 
269, 000. 00 

4, 432, 222. 24 

26, 6(19. 74 

31,069.38 

298, 435. 42 

62, 605. 05 

105, 005. 76 

3, 326, 750. 66 

528, 355. 00 

225, 000. 00 

465, 000. 00 

965,554.10 
500, 000. 00 


24, 000. 00 
269, 000. 00 

4, 235, 555. 58 

26, 609. 74 

31, 069. 38 

298, 435. 42 

62, 605. 05 

245, 365. 76 

3, 326, 750. 66 

528, 355. 00 

225, 000. 00 

465, 000. 00 

1, 039, 364. 10 
500, 000. 00 






Do 

To aid railroads 

and canals 

To aid railroads 

Do 


269, 000. 00 

4,185,555.58 

26, 609. 74 

31, 069. 38 

298, 435. 42 

62, 605. 05 

282, 875. 76 

3, 326, 750. 66 

528, 355. 00 

225, 000. 00 

465, 000. 00 

1, 056, 304. 10 
500, 000. 00 


269, 000. 00 

4, 056, 666. 67 

26, 609. 74 

31,069.38 

298, 435 42 

62, 605. 05 

282, 875. 76 

3, 326, 750. 66 

528, 355. 00 

225, 000. 00 

465, 000. 00 

1,196, 664.' 10 
500, 000. 00 


Do 


Do 


To aid railroads and 

canals . 

Bounty to volun- 


To aid canal com- 
pany 

Construction of 
deaf and dumb 


Construction of 
Maryland hos- 


Redemption and 
exchange of state 
debt 


Relief of treasury. 
Redemption de- 


Redemption of 
canal and deaf 
and dumb asy- 










Unknown debt on 
which interest 


















_J 



CENSUS. 



109 



EXHIBIT C. 

at the close of each fiscal year from 1879 to 1889, inclusive. 



Year ending September 30 — 


1883. 


1884. 


1885. 


1886. 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


$11,269,822.89 


$10,965,9.4.45 


$10,970,363.34 


$10,972,835.56 


$11,094,064.56 


$10,373,736.56 


$10,370,530.56 
















269, 000. 00 

4, 047, 777. 78 

26, 609. 74 

31, 061). 38 

298, 435. 42 

62, 605. 05 

282, 875. 76 

3, 326, 750. 66 

528, 355. 00 

225, 000. 00 

465, 000. 00 

1, 206, 344. 10 
500, 000. 00 


269, 000. 00 

4, 050, 000. 00 

26, 609. 74 

31, 069. 38 

298, 435. 42 

62, 605. 05 

282, 875. 76 


269, 000. 00 

4, 028, 888. 89 

26, 609. 74 

31, 069. 38 

298, 435. 42 

62, 605. 05 

282, 875. 76 


269, 000. 00 

4,001,111.11 

26, 609, 74 

31, 069. 38 

298, 435. 42 

62, 605. 05 

282, 875. 76 


269, 000. 00 

4,001,111.11 

26, 609. 74 

31, 069. 38 

298, 435. 42 

62, 605. 05 

282. 875. 76 


269, 000. 00 

4,001,111.11 

26, 609. 74 

31, 069. 38 

298, 435. 42 

62, 605. 05 

282, 875. 76 


269, 000. 00 

4,001,111.11 

26, 609. 74 

31, 069. 38 

298,435.42 

62, 605. 05 

282, 875. 76 


528, 355. 00 
225, 000. 00 
465, 000. 00 

1, 217, 234. 10 
500, 000. 00 

2, 992, 450. 00 


528, 355. 00 

225,000.00 

465, 000. 00 

1, 240, 224. 10 
500, 000. 00 

3, 000, 000. 00 










125, 000. 00 

465, 000. 00 

1, 270, 474. 10 
500, 000. 00 

3, 000, 000. 00 

628, 355. 00 
12, 300. 00 


125, 000. 00 

465, 000. 00 

1, 270, 474. 10 • 
500, 000. 00 

3, 000, 000. 00 

628, 355. 00 
133, 529. 00 










1,270,474.10 
500, 000. 00 

3, 000, 000. 00 

628,355.00 
3, 201. 00 


1, 270, 474. 10 
500, 000. 00 

3, 000, 000. 00 
628, 355. 00 




17, 300. 00 


12, 300. 00 


1.00 









110 



KEPOET OF THE SECEETAEY OF TIIE INTEEIOE. 



Statement of the productive assets o 


/ the State < 


jf Maryland 


Character of assets. 


Tear ending September 30 — 




1879. 1 1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


Grand total 


$4, 449, 466. 30 $4, 474, 039. 54 $4, 763, 096. 72 


$4, 822, 287. 22 


In general fund : 


46, 470. 00 

11,000.00 
2, 500. 00 

550, 000. 00 

968, 615. 70 

366, 000. 00 

1, 500, 000. 00 


46,470.00 

11,000.00 
2, 500. 00 

550, 000. 00 

968, 615. 70 

366, 000. 00 

1, 500, 000. 00 


46, 470. 00 


40, 470. 00 


Baltimore and Fredericktown Turnpike 


Baltimore and Yorktown Turnpike stock. 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad stock 






550, 000. 00 

968,615.70 

366, 000. 00 

1, 500, 000. 00 

30, 000. 00 


550, 000. 00 

968, 615. 70 

366, 000. 00 

1, 500, 000. 00 

30, 000. 00 


Baltimore and Ohio Railroad stock 

Baltimore aud Ohio Railroad bonds 

Northern Central Railroad mortgages. . - 


Cincinnati, Washington and Baltimore 
















Columbia and Port Deposit Railroad stock 






































Susquehanna and Tide-Water Canal 










West Virginia Central and Pittsburgh 












556, 208. 99 


513, 026. 36 


752, 198. 29 


638, 506, 63 




Total in general fund 


4,000,794.69 3,957,612.06 


4, 213, 283. 99 


4, 099, 592. 33 


In sinking fund: 


i 
140,415.84 195.300.00 


213, 240. 00 


401,529.18 


















Cincinnati, Washington and Baltimore 








































West Virginia Central and Pittsburgh 












325.63 


9, 557. 23 


20, 838. 08 


495. 46 






140,741.47 


204, 857. 23 


234. 078. 08 


4C2, 024. 64 




In school fund: 


8,836.10 8,836.10 
57,818.68 57,818.68 


8, 836. 10 
57, 818. 68 

22, 800. 00 
26, 350. 00 

6, 525. 00 
6, 090. 00 
8, 100. 00 
28,100.00 
13, 950. 00 
13,584.87 


8, 836. 10 
57,818.68 

22, 800. 00 
26, 350. 00 

6, 525. 00 

6, 090. 00 

8,100.00 

28, 100. 00 

13, 950. 00 

18,520.47 




Baltimore and Ohio Railroad stock (pre- 


Central Bank of Frederick stock 

Easton Bank, of Easton, stock 

Farmers' and Merchants' Rank of Balti- 


22, 800. 00 
26, 350. 00 

6, 525. 00 

6, 090. 00 

8, 100. CO 

28, 100. 00 

13, 950. 00 

5, 780. 36 


22, 800. 00 
26, 350. 00 

5, 480. 00 

6, 525. 00 
6, 090. 00 

8. 100. 00 
28,100.00 
13, 950. 00 

9, 420. 47 




Merchants' Bank of Baltimore stock 

Bank of Baltimore stock 


Commercial and Farmers' Bank stock .. 

Farmers' Bank of Maryland stock 

Cash balance 








311,570.25 








RECAPITULATION OF PRODUCTIVE 




163, 865. 00 

13, 500. 00 

1,636, 7ir,. 70 

366, 000. 00 

149,251.94 

1, 500, 000 00 

57, 818. 68 


163, 865. 00 

13, 500. 00 

1,636,715.70 

366, 000. 00 

204, 136. 10 

1, 500, 000. 00 

57, 818. 68 


163, 865. 00 


163, 865. 00 




Railroad stock 


1, 636, 715. 70 

366, 000. 00 

222, 076. 10 

1, 500, 000. 00 

57,818.68 

30, 000. 00 


1,636,715.70 

366, 000. 00 

410, 365. 28 

1, 500, 000. 00 

57, 818. 68 

30, 000. 00 


State of Maryland bonds 






Water company stock 








Canal bonds 










Cash 


562, 314. 98 


532, 004. 06 


786,621.24 


657, 522. 56 




Total productive assets 


4, 449, 466. 30 


4, 474, 039. 54 


4, 763, 096. 72 


4, 822, 287. 22 


Total debt 

Cash and productive assets on hand 


11,259,607.35 
4,449,466.30 


11,277,110.69 

4, 474, 039. 54 


11,257,560.69 
4, 763, 096. 72 


11,269,031.78 
4, 822, 287. 22 




Debt less cash audproductiveassets ... 


6,810,141.05 6,803,071.15 


6, 494. 463. 97 


6, 446, 744. 56 



CENSUS. 



Ill 



on hand at the close of each fiscal year from 1879 to 1889, inclusive. 




Year ending September 30— 


1883. 


1884. 


1885. 


1886. 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


$5, 186, 207. 31 


$5, 503, 560. 20 


$6, 113, 566. 95 


$6, 323, 362. 13 


$6, 899, 511. 39 


$6, 026, 599. 05 


$7, 616, 413. 00 


46, 470. 00 
11,000.00 


46, 470. 00 


46, 470. 00 


46, 470. 00 


46, 470. 00 


46,470.00 


46, 470. 00 

11, 000. 00 
2, 500. 00 

550, 000. 00 
908, 615. 70 












550, 000. 00 

968,615. 70 

366, 000. 00 

1, 500, 000. 00 

30, 000. 00 


550, 000. 00 

968, 615. 70 

366, 000. 00 

1, 500, 000. 00 

30, 000. 00 


550, 000. 00 

968,615.70 

366, 0l>0. 00 

1, 500, 000. 00 

30, 000. 00 

72, 000. 00 
100, 000. 00 


550, 000. 00 

968,615.70 

366, 000. J 

1, 500, 000. 00 

30, 000. 00 

72, 000. 00 
169, 200. 00 


550, 000. 00 

DCS, (i 15. 70 

366, 000. 00 

1, 500, 000. 00 

30, 000. 00 

72,0)0.00 
169, 200. 00 
60, 000. 00 


550, 000. 00 
968, 615. 70 


1, 500, 000. 00 
30, 000. 00 

72, 000. 00 
165, 581. 32 


1, 500, 000. 00 
30, 000. 00 






265,581.32 
60, 000. 00 














128, 000. 00 
100, 000. 00 


133 000 00 












140, 000. 00 












100, 000. 00 

1, 000, 000, 00 

100, 000. 00 
490,727.01 


























982, 183. 52 


837, 088. 39 


747, 407. 33 


616, 576. 34 


682, 023. 20 


532, 069. 46 


4, 454. 269. 22 


4, 298, 174. 09 


4. 380, 493. 03 


4, 318, 862. 04 


4, 444, 308. 90 


4, 092, 736. 48 


5, 397, 894. 03 


411, 209. 18 


411, 209. 18 
a66, 000. 00 


885, 524. 18 
366, 000. 00 


1, 145, 090. 18 
366, 000. 00 


1,437,015.90 
366, 000. 00 


921, 834. 58 


1, 187, 484. 58 




128,000.00 

72, 000. 00 
265, 581. 32 
100, 000. 00 


133, 000. 00 




72, 000. 00 


72, 000. 00 
100, 000. 00 


72, 000. 00 
169, 200. 00 


72, 000. 00 
269, 200. 00 




265, 581. 32 






140, 000. 00 












100, 000. 00 
100, 000. 00 














13, 858. 66 


48, 556. 58 


1 79. 49 






132, 679. 74 


10, 103. 44 








425, 067. 84 


897, 765. 76 


1, 423, 703. 67 


1,752,290.18 


2, 144, 215. 90 


1, 620, 095. 64 


1, 936, 169. 34 


57, 818. 68 
118,100.00 

26, 350. 00 

5, 480. 00 

- 6,090.00 

28, 100. 00 
13, 950. 00 
4, 720. 47 


57, 818. 68 
118, 100. 00 
26, 350. 00 

5, 480. 00 

6, 090. 00 

28, 100.00 

13, 950. 00 

5, 470. 47 


8, 836. 10 
57, 818. 68 

118, 100. 00 
22, 800. 00 
26, 350. 00 

5, 480. 00 
6, 525. 00 

6, 090. 00 
8, 100. 00 

28, 100. 00 
13, 950. 0C 

7, 220. 47 


8, 836. 10 

118, 100. 00 

26, 350. 00 

5, 480. 00 

6, 090. 00 

28, 100. 00 
13, 950. 00 

7, 878. 81 


8, 836. 10 
57, 818. 68 

118, 100. 00 
22, 800. 00 
26, 350. 00 

5, 480. 00 

6, 090. 00 

28, 100. 00 

13,950.00 

8, 836. 81 


8, 836. 10 
57, 818. 68 

118, 100. 00 
22, 800. 00 
26, 350. 00 

5, 480. 00 

6, 525. 00 
6, 090. 00 

28, 100. 00 
13, 950. 00 
11,617.15 


8, 836. 10 
57, 818. 68 

118,100.00 
22, 800. 00 
26, 350. 00 

5, 480. 00 

6, 525. 00 
6, 090. 00 
8, 100. 00 

28,100.00 
13, 950. 00 
10, 199. 85 


306, 870. 25 


307, 620. 25 


309, 370. 25 


252, 209. 91 


310, 986. 59 


313, 766. 93 


312, 348. 63 



ASSETS BY CHARACTER. 



163, 865. 00 

11, 000. 00 

1, 636, 715. 70 

366, 000. 00 

420, 045. 28 

1, 500, 000. 00 

57,818.68 

30, 000. 00 


163, 865. 00 


163, 865. 00 


163, 865. 00 


163, 865. 00 


163, 865. 00 


163, 865. 00 
13,500.00 


1, 636, 715. 7» 

804, 000. 00 

420, 045. 28 

1, 500, 000. 00 

57, 818. 68 

30, 000. 00 


1, 636, 715. 70 
876, 000. 00 
894, 360. 28 

1, 500, 000. dO 

257,818.68 

30, 000. 00 


1,636,715.70 

876, 000. 00 

1, 153, 926. 28 

1, 500, 000. (JO 

338,400.00 

30, 000. 00 


1,696,715.70 

876, 000. 00 

1,445,852.00 

1, 500, 000. 00 

496,218.68 

30, 000. 00 


1, 636, 715. 70 
144,000.00 
930, 670. 68 

1, 500, 000. 00 

744,981.32 

30, 000. 00 

200, 000. 00 


1, 696, 715. 70 

400, 000. 00 

1, 196, 320. 68 

1, 500, 000. 00 

854, 981. 32 

30,000.00 

280, 000. 00 












1, 000, 000. 00 


1, 000, 762. 65 


891, 115. 54 


754, 807. 29 


624, 455. 15 


690, 860. 01 


676, 366. 35 


511,030.30 


5,186,207.31 


5, 503, 560. 20 


6, 113, 566. 95 


6, 323, 362. 13 


6, 899, 511. 39 


6, 026, 599. 05 


7, 646, 413. 00 


11, 269, 822. 89 
5, 186, 207. 31 


10, 965, 934. 45 
5, 503, 560. 20 


10, 970, 363. 34 
6, 113, 566. 95 


10, 972, 835. 56 
6, 32.'i, 362. 13 


11, 094, 064. 56 
6,899,511.39 


. 736. 56 
6,026,599.05 


10, 370, 536. 56 
7, 646, 413. 00 


6, 083, 615. 58 i 5, 462, 1574. 25 4, 856, 796. 39 


4, 549. 473. 43 


4, 194, 553. 17 


4, 347, 137. 51 


2, 724, 123. 56 



112 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Statement of the unproductive assets of the State of Maryland on 



Character of unproductive assets. 



Grand total. 



$25,308,206.86 



Stock in Bohemian Bridge Co 

Stock in Chesapeake and Delaware Canal Co 

Bonds of Columbia and Port Deposit R. R. .. 

Bonds of Susquehanna and Tide- Water 
Canal Co 

Stock of Annapolis "Water Company 

Bonds of Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Co 

Stock of Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Co - . . 

Stock of Annapolis and Elk Ridge R. R. Co. 

Stock of Baltimore and Potomac R. R.Co... 

Stock of Baltimore and Drum Point R. R.Co 

Stock of Dorchester and Delaware R. R. Co. 

Stock of Eastern Shore R. R. Co 

Stock of Kent and Queen Anne's R. R 

Stock of Kent County Railroad Co 

Stock of Delaware and Maryland R. R. Co.. 

Stock of Philadelphia and Baltimore Cen- 
tral R. R.Co 

Stock of Southern Maryland R. R. Co 

Stock in the Worcester and Somerset 
R. R.Co 

Stock in the Worcester R. R. Co 

Stock in the Wicomico and PocomokeR.R.Co. 

Stock in Potomac Company 

Loan to the president and directors of the 
Potomac Co 

Nanticoke Bridge Co 

Chesapeake Steam Towing Co 

Stock of Elkton Bank 

Dividend bond No. 58, Baltimore and Ohio R. 
R.Co 

Stock in Baltimore andFredericktownTurn- 
pike 

Stock in Baltimore and Yorktown Turnpike 



Co. 



Bonds installed and not installed 

Interest past due from Chesapeake and Ohio 

Canal Co 

Interest on loan to president and directors 

Potomac Co 



Year ending September 30- 



1879. 



15, 876. 99 
81, 250. 00 
60, 000. 00 



1, 000, 

30, 

2, 000, 
5, 000, 

299, 
175, 
14, 
101, 
112, 
110, 
101, 
153, 



000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
378. 41 
000. 00 
520. 00 
175. 00 
700. 00 
450. 00 
531. 00 
350. 00 



35, 0.10. 00 
163, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 
25, 000. 00 
64, 101. 00 
120, 444. 44 

30, 000. 00 
4, 333. 33 
25, 000. 00 
10, 000. 00 

80.00 



$25,710,953.98 



15, 876. 99 
81, 250. 00 
60, 000. 00 

1, 000, 000. 00 

30, 000. 00 

2, 000, 000. 00 
5, 000, 000. 00 

299, 378. 41 
175, 000. 00 
14,520.00 
101, 175. 00 
112, 700. 00 
110,450.00 
101, 531. 00 
153, 350. 00 

35, 000. 00 
163, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 

25, 000. 00 

64,101.00 

120, 444. 44 

30, 000. 00 

4, 333. 33 

25, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 

80.00 



15,552,736.69 
13, 280. 00 



15, 955, 483. 81 
13, 280. 00 



1881. 



$26,107,201.10 



15, 876. 99 
81, 250. 00 
60, 000. 00 

1, 000, 000. 00 



2, 000, 
5, 000, 
299, 
175, 
14, 
101, 
112, 
110, 
101, 
153, 



000. 00 
000. 00 
378 41 
000.' 00 
520. 00 
175. 00 
700. 00 
450. 00 
531. 00 
350. 00 



35, 000. 00 
163, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 
25, 000. 00 
64, 101. 00 
120, 444. 44 

30, 000. 00 

4, 333. 33 

25, 000. 00 

10. 000. 00 

80.00 

11,000.00 

2, 500. 00 
10, 000. 00 

16, 358, 230. 93 

13, 280. 00 



1882. 



$26,509,948.22 



15, 876. 99 
81, 250. 00 
60, 000. 00 

1, 000, 000. 00 



000, 
000, 
299, 
175, 
14, 
101, 
112, 
110, 
101, 
153, 



000. 00 
000. 00 
378. 41 
000. 00 
520. 00 
175. 00 
700. 00 
450. 00 
531.00 
350. 00 



35, 000. 00 
163, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 
25, 000. 00 
64, 101. 00 

120, 444. 44 

30, 000. 00 

4, 333. 33 

25, 000. 00 

.10, 000. 00 

80.00 

11, 000. 00 

2, 500. 00 
10, 000. 00 

16, 760, 978. 05 

13, 280. 00 



RECAPITULATION OP 



Bridge stock . . . 

Canal stock 

Railroad bonds. 
Canal bonds. ... 
Water Company stock 



$20,210.32 
5,081,250.00 

60, 080. 00 
3, 000, 000. 00 

30, 000. 00 



Railroad stock 1.365,205.41 

Potomac Company stock 120, 444. 44 

Potomac Company loan j 30,000.00 

Chesapeake Steam Towing Company stock.. 25, 000. 00 

Bank stock ! 10,000.00 

Interest past dne 15, 5(36, 016. 69 

Turnpike stock . . j 

Miscellaneous bonds 



$20, 210. 32 

5, 081, 250. 00 

60, 080. 00 

3, 000, 000. 00 

30, 000. 00 

1,365,205.41 

120, 444. 44 

30, 000. 00 

25, 000. 00 

10. 000. 00 

15, 968, 763. 81 



Total unproductive assets 25, 308, 206. 86 25, 710, 953. 98 



$20, 210. 32 

5, 081, 250. 00 

60, OHO. 00 

3, 000, 000. 00 



1, 365, 205. 41 
120, 444. 44 
30, 000. 00 
25, 000. 00 
10, 000. 00 
16, 371, 510. 93 
13, 500. 00 
10, 000. 00 



26, 107, 201. 10 



$20, 210. 32 

5, 081, 250. 00 

60, 080. 00 

3, 000, 000. 00 



1,365,205.41 
120, 444. 44 
30, 000. 00 
25, 000. 00 
10, 000. 00 
16, 774, 258. 05 
13, 500. 00 
10, 000. 00 



26, 509, 948. 22 



CENSUS. 
hand at the close of each fiscal year from 1879 to 1889, inclusive. 



113 



1 Year ending September 30 — 


1883. 


1884. 


1885. 


1886. 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


$26,901,695.34 


$27,315,442.46 


$27,718,189.58 


$28,120,936.70 


$28,263,683.82 


$28,858,737.61 


$28,258,284.73 


15, 876. 99 
81, 250. 00 
60, 000. 00 

1, 000, 000. 00 


15, 876. 99 
81, 250. 00 
60, 000. t') 

1, 000, 000. 00 


15, 876. 99 
81, 250. 00 
60, 000. 00 

1. 000.000.00 


15, 876. 99 
81,250.00 
60, 000. 00 

1, 000, 000. 00 


15, 876. 99 
81, 250. 00 

1, 000, 000. 00 


15, 876. 99 
81,250.00 
60, 000. 00 

1, 000, 000. 00 


15,876.99 
81, 250. 00 


1 




2, 000, 000. 00 
5, 000, 000. 00 
299, 378. 41 
175, 000. 00 
14, 520. 00 
101, 175. 00 
112, 700. 00 
110, 450. 00 
101, 531. 00 
153, 350. 00 

35, 000. 00 
163, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 
25, 000. 00 
64,101.00 
120, 444. 44 

30, 000. 00 
4, 333. 33 
25, 000. 00 
10, 000. 00 

80.00 


2, 000, 000. 00 
5, 000, 000. 00 
299, 378. 41 
175, 000. 00 
14, 520. 00 
101,175.00 
112, 700. 00 
110,450.00 
101,531.00 
153, 350. 00 

35, 000. 00 
163, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 

25, 000. 00 

64, 101. 00 

120, 444. 44 

30, 000. 00 

4, 333. 33 

25, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 

80.00 

11,000.00 

2, 500. 00 
10, 000. 00 

17,566,472.29 

13, 280. 00 


2, 000, 000. 00 
5, 000, 000. 00 
299,378.41 
175, 000. 00 
14, 520. 00 
101, 175. 00 
112, 700 00 
110, 450. 00 
101, 531. 00 
153, 350. 00 

35, 000. 00 
163, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 

25, 000. 00 

64, iOl. 00 

120, 444. 44 

30, 000. 00 

4, 333. 33 

25, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 

80.00 

11, 000. 00 

2, 500. 00 
10, 000. 00 

17,969,219.41 

13, 280. 00 


2, 000, 000. 00 
5, 000, 000. 00 
299, 378. 41 
175, 000. 00 
14, 520. 00 
101,175.00 
112 700. 00 
110,450.00 
101, 531. 00 
153, 350. 00 

35, 000. 00 
163.000.00 

10,000.00 
25,000.00 
64, 101. 00 
120,444.44 

30, 000. 00 

4, 333. 33 

25, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 

80.00 

11, 000. 00 

2, 500. 00 
10, 000. 00 


2, 000, 000. 00 
5. 000, 000. 00 
299, 378. 41 
175, 000. 00 
14, 520. 00 
101, 175. 00 
112, 700. 00 
110, 450. 00 
101,531.00 
153, 350. 00 

35, 000. 00 
163, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 
25, 000. 00 
64,101.00 
120, 444. 44 

30, 000. 00 
4, 333. 33 
25, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 

80.00 

11, 000. 00 

2, 500. 00 
10. 000.00 


2, 000, 000. 00 
5, 000, 000. 00 
299, 378. 41 
175, 000. 00 
39, 520. 00 
101,175.00 
112, 700. 00 
110. 450. 00 
101,531.00 
153, 350. 00 

35, 000. 00 
163, 000. 00 

. 10,000.00 
25, 000. 00 
64, 101.00 

120, 444. 44 


2, 000, 000. 00 

5, 000, 000. 00 

299, 378. 41 

175, 000. 00 

109, 820. 00 
101,175.00 
112, 700. 00 

110, 450. 00 
101,531.00 
153, 350. 00 

35, 000. 00 
163, O00. 00 

10, 000. 00 

25, 000. 00 

64,101.00 

120,444.44 














11, 000. 00 
2, 500. 00 




2, 500. 00 
10, 000. 00 

17, 163, 725. 17 

13, 280. 00 






18, 371, 966. 53 18, 574, 713. 65 
13,280.00 13.280.00 


19,177,460.77 


19, 580, 207. 89 











UXPEODUCTIVE ASSETS. 



20,210.32 
5, 081 , 250. 00 

60, 080. 00 
3, 000, 000. 00 



20, 210. 32 
5, 081, 250. 00 

60, 080. 00 
3, 000, 000. 00 



20, 210. 32 
5,081,250.00 

60, 08o. 00 
3, 000, 000. 00 



20, 210. 32 
5, 081, 250. 00 

60, 080. 00 
3, 000, 000. 00 



20, 210. 32 

5, 081, 250. 00 

80.00 

3, 000, 000. 00 



15, 876. 99 
5, 081. 250. 00 

60,000.00 
3, 000, 000. 00 



15, 876. 99 
5,081,250.00 

2,000,000.66 



1, 365, 205. 41 

120, 444. 44 

30, 000. 00 

25, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 

17, 177, 005. 17 

2, 500. 00 

10, 000. 00 



1, 365, 
120, 
30, 
25, 
10, 
17, 579, 
13, 
10, 



205. 41 
444. 44 
000. 00 
000. 00 
000. 00 
752. 29 
500. 00 
000.00 



1, 365, 205. 41 
120,444.44 
30, 000. 00 
25, 000. 00 
10,000.00 
17, 982, 499. 41 
13, 500. 00 
10, 000. 00 



1, 385, 205. 41 
120,44 4.44 
30, 000. 00 
25, 000. 00 
10,000.00 
18, 385, 246. 53 
13, 500. 00 
10. 000. 00 



1, 365, 205. 41 

120,444.44 
30, 000. 00 
25, 000. 00 
10,000.00 
18, 587, 993. 65 
13,5(10.00 
10, 000. 00 



1, 390, 205. 41 
120, 444. 44 



1, 460, 505. 41 
120, 444. 44 



19, 1 77, 460. 77 
13, 500. 00 



19, 580, 207. 89 



25, 901, 695. 34 



27, 315, 442. 46 27, 718, 189. 58 28, 120, 936. 70 



28, 2G3, 



28, 858, 737. 61 j 28, 258, 284. 73 



INT 00— VOL III- 



114 



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REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMISSIONER OF RAILROADS 



Department of the Interior, 
Office Commissioner of Railroads, 

Washington, D. C, November 1, 1890. 
Sir : In compliance with the statutory requirements of the act cre- 
ating this Bureau (20 Stats., 169, sec. 3), I have the honor to submit 
the following report in regard to the Bureau and its operations, and 
of the condition of the property, business, and accounts of the several 
railroad companies coming under its supervision, which have made such 
reports as have been called for under the law. 

reports. 

In my report under date of November 1, 1889, I called attention to 
the fact that several of the railroad companies which have received 
grants of public lauds to aid in the construction of their roads declined 
to report to this Bureau, for the reason that such grants were made by 
the respective States in which the roads are located and not by the 
United States, and it was claimed that, therefore, they do not come 
within the language of the act of Congress creating this Bureau and 
defining its powers. The point raised was that a grant to a State to 
aid in the construction of a railroad was not a grant to the railroad. As 
I could not agree with the position taken by certain railroad companies, 
I referred the subject to the Honorable Secretary of the Interior for in- 
structions. 

The matter was referred by the Secretary to the Assistant Attorney- 
General of the Department, who, after considering arguments both 
oral and written, submitted by attorneys of the railroad companies, 
held that under the law companies receiving subsidies of lands through 
the States, originally granted by the United States Government, were 
required to report to this Bureau. 

The Secretary, in transmitting the opinion of the Assistant Attorney- 
General, said : 

I herewith inclose to you a copy of the opinion of the Assistant Attorney-General 
in regard to the railroads receiving subsidies through the States originally granted 

119 



120 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

by the United State* Government, from which you will perceive that he holds that 
they are required to report to you, as you yourself have heretofore concluded. There 
has been a subseqent argument, made before the Assistant Attorney-General, but he 
adheres to his original opinion, which I approve and request you to act on officially. 

Pursuant to the decision referred to and the quoted instructions from 
the Secretary, I called upon all the railroad companies coming within 
the scope of the instructions to make reports, and T am able to state 
that they have, with one or two exceptions, all cheerfully complied 
with the request. 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

During the past year, in company with the engineer of this Bureau, 
I have traveled over nearly all the so-called "bonded" roads and many 
of the Pacific land-grant lines. I am able to report that many improve- 
ments, such as replacing iron rails with steel, putting in stone and iron 
culverts and bridges in place of wooden ones, reducing grades, ballast- 
ing, enlarging machine shops, building new station houses, adding to 
terminal facilities, increasing rolling stock, etc., have recently been 
and are continually being made. These improvements, where they are 
made upon the bonded roads, are of especial value to the Government, 
as they not only increase the earning capacity of the roads, and thereby 
the amount of net earnings to be paid in liquidation of the Govern- 
ment debt, but they add largely to the value of the property and so 
increase the Government security and render full final payment of the 
claims of the United States more certain. 

Detailed mention of these improvements will be found in the report 
of the engineer, published herewith as Appendix No. 1. 

RAILROAD OPERATIONS. 

The operations of the railroads in the country at large for the past 
year show an improvement over the preceding year, although they 
have shared the general business depression that has prevailed, 
especially in the west. The net earnings of the bonded roads, in which 
the Government has a direct pecuniary interest, and to which earnings 
the Government looks, under existing laws, for reimbursement of sub- 
sidies granted in aid of the construction of the roads, show a slight 
falling oft' from the preceding year. Had it not been for unusual ex- 
penditures for new equipment, notably in the purchase of Pullman 
sleeping, dining, and tourist cars by the Union Pacific, there would 
have been an increase in the net earnings of the bonded roads, and 
therefore the amouut received by the Government this year would have 
been slightly in excess of the amount received last year. 

The same unfortunate condition of things, as to the financial rela- 
tions between the Government and the bonded roads, exists now that 
has always existed since the bonds granted in aid of their construction 
were issued, viz, that the amounts annually received from the roads 
fall largely below the amounts of interest annually accruing upon the 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 121 

subsidy bonds. The debts, therefore, due the Government from these 
roads, instead of being reduced, as it was the evident expectation of 
Congress that they would be, are rapidly increasing year by year. 
This increase, however, is not due to any failure of the railway com 
panies to comply with the provisions of existing laws. The fault rests 
in the laws themselves. The per cent, of net earnings required by law 
to be paid in discharge of the Government obligations is not great 
enough to meet the interest which annually accrues upon the bonds 
issued to aid in the construction of the roads. 

DECREASE OF BUSINESS. 

Several causes have contributed toward this state of things, the most 
conspicuous ones being the building of numerous competing lines and 
the consequent reduction in both the volume and rates of traffic. No 
sane man at the time of the enactment of the legislation in aid of the 
bonded roads would have predicted that so many rival lines would be 
constructed at so early a day. As late as the date of the passage of the 
Thurman act (May 7, 1878) it was thought (and the estimates were made 
on the business of the roads at that time) that the 25 per cent, of the net 
earnings of the Union and Central Pacific roads required by that act to 
be paid to the United States would meet the annually accruing interest 
and provide a sinking fund that woul d extinguish the principal of the 
debt at the maturity of the bonds. A shrinkage instead of an increase 
in the net earnings of the roads, however, has shown how faulty were 
these estimates. Take the Union Pacific, for example. In 1879 the net 
earnings were $5,769,635.40, while in 1889 they were only $3,939,861.73, 
a shrinkage of nearly $2,000,000, making the amount payable to the 
Government for the year 1889 nearly half a million dollars less than for 
the year 1879. Such a state of affairs was wholly unlooked for. Cer- 
taiuly no reasonable man could have expected it. The same situation 
exists with reference to the Central Pacific — a heavy reduction rather 
than the expected increase in their net revenues. 

This is a rather bad showing for both the railroads and the Govern- 
ment; but it can not be fairly expected that this unfortunate state of 
affairs will long continue. There has been a general business depres- 
sion. Values have shrunk ; profits decreased ; the products of the farm 
and the factory cheapened ; the merchant realized less margins and the 
banker lower interest; money has been scarce and trade stagnant. 
No business is more seriously embarrassed by dull times than the trans- 
portation business. 

But these causes have not alone operated to reduce the earnings of 
the bonded roads. Competition, and the reduced rates resulting from 
it, is what has crippled these as well as many other railroads. It is 
notoriously true that in many sections west of the Mississippi Eiver and 
on the Pacific slope the mileage of railroads is greatly in excess of the 
legitimate needs of the carrying trade. 



122 REPORT OF THE . SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

The last few years has seen a craze of railroad building in the West 
and many investments in railroad properties have failed to yield even 
the smallest dividends. It is safe to predict that the miles of railroad 
built in the next decade will fall far short of the miles built in the pres- 
ent one. Existing railroad properties will thus become more valuable 
as the country develops and trade increases. That the country will 
continue to grow there can be no doubt. Eoads that now run for long 
distances through sparsely settled sections, depending almost wholly 
upon through traffic, will soon find thrifty settlements all along their 
lines, yielding a large and profitable local trade. The country will catch 
up with the railroads. Then the transportation business will be on a 
safe and paying basis, the speculative period of railroad construction 
will be ended, and the operations of traffic found to be increasing and 
profitable. When that time arrives, and its approach is certaiu and not 
distant, the bonded roads will show, as they ought to show, state- 
ments of largely increased net earnings, which will enable them to meet 
within a reasonable period their obligations to the Government and 
yield a fair return upon the investments of their stockholders. 

DELAY IN SETTLEMENTS. 

The strongest argument in favor of postponing, until nearer the ma- 
turity of the debts, a settlement with the bonded roads is in the fact 
that they will in all probability be in a much better financial condition 
in a few years from now than they are to-day. The reasons for expect- 
ing an improvement are suggested in the preceding paragraph. It is 
to be hoped that before 1807, when the principal and interest of the 
subsidy bonds become due, the roads in whose aid they were issued 
will be better able to arrange for their payment than they now appear 
to be. The Government hazards nothing by delay so long as the value 
of the properties on which it holds liens is being increased by the ad. 
dition of valuable improvements. 

FUNDING THE DEBTS. 

The question of funding the debts of the bonded roads is one that has 
been widely discussed. Two of my predecessors in this office, succes- 
sive Secretaries of the Interior and Treasury, and committees of Con- 
gress in reports and President Cleveland in a message to Congress 
have approved of this plan of settlement. The plan proposed is to fund 
the entire debt, principal and interest, of the Union and Central Pacific 
roads in obligations of fixed amounts and maturity. Funding bills were 
introduced in both Houses of Congress during the recent session similar 
in character to bills that had been introduced in previous sessions. The 
Senate Committee on railroads, through Mr. Frye, its chairman, reported 
unanimously in favor of the passage of the Senate bill, but no action 
was taken upon the report. 

The provisions of the bill, briefly stated, are that the time of pay- 
ment of the Union Pacific indebtedness shall be extended through a 






RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 123 

period of fifty years at 3 per cent, interest, and the indebtedness of 
the Central Pacific extended through a period of seventy-five years at 
2 per cent, interest. Under the terms of this bill the present worth of 
the company's debts can be ascertained exactly. The payments pro- 
vided for will be of fixed dates and amounts, represented by bonds 
maturing each six months for the periods named. Section 2 of the bill 
provides for additional security in the case of the Union Pacific as 
follows : 

That the said Union Pacific Railway Company, successor to the Union Pacific 
Railroad Company and the Kansas Pacific Railway Company and the said Central 
Branch Union Pacific Railroad Company, be, and they hereby are, authorized to 
make, issue, and deliver to the Secretary of the Treasury, who is hereby authorized 
and directed to receive the same, each its certain indenture of mortgage, which shall 
bear date the first of July, eighteen hundred and ninety, covering and embracing 
the entire property of such company, real, personal, and mixed, including all the 
rights, title, and interest of such company in any stocks, bonds, or securities, or 
lands of any branch lines or auxiliary companies in which such company now has 
any interest, and all railroads now owned or hereafter acquired or constructed by 
such company, and all their branches, telegraph lines, rolling stock, fixtures, and 
property of every kind and description, as well as that which it, its successors, or 
assigns may hereafter acquire, subject to any bona fide legal, prior, and paramount 
lien, claim, or mortgage upon any railroad now owned by such company or upon 
any railroad which such company may acquire. 

The bill also provides that the Central Pacific give additional security 
for the payment of the bonds proposed to be issued in settlement of its 
indebtedness to the Government. 

The House committee was divided in its report, the majority favor- 
ing, but a large minority, through the chairman of the committee, re- 
porting against the passage of the bill. The report of the minority 
stated that while those dissenting from the majority report had different 
reasons for so doing, they all agreed that as there are seven years before 
the subsidy bonds become due it is inexpedient to push a settlement 
at this time. 

EXTENSION OF TIME. 

It is very clear to my judgment that at some time previous to 1897, 
at which date the subsidy bonds become due, legislation will be neces- 
sary in making new adjustments in regard to the debts of the bonded 
roads to the United States. It can not be expected that the roads can 
discharge their debts at their maturity. It certainly would not be an 
act of wisdom on the part of the Government to pursue its legal and 
equitable rights as a second mortgagee and redeem the property by 
paying off the first-mortgage bonds and foreclosing its own mortgage 
in case the companies make default in 1897. It would be a great calam- 
ity should the Government be compelled to acquire the ownership and 
engage in the operating of these railroads. Time is of little importance 
to the Government. It is security that should be looked after in the 
adjustment of these matters. An extension of time at a fair rate of in- 
terest, conditioned upon the putting up by the companies of additional 



124 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

security, ought to be granted. This would strengthen the companies 
and, to the extent of the new securities acquired, make more certain 
the fiual payment of the Government claims. 

As to whether or not the funding bills now pending sufficiently guard 
the interests of the Government is for the wisdom of Congress to deter- 
mine. I am constrained to make the suggestion that in any law grant- 
ing an extension of time the interest should be fixed at a rate not lower 
than the rate the Government is compelled to pay upon its obligations. 
The Government should not be a loser by granting an extension. I am 
sure the people of the country would not approve a policy that would 
involve the Government in loss. It ought to receive back all it pays 
out in behalf of these roads. It has been liberal in the past and may 
well consent to be lenient in the future. Ample time in which to pay 
shouid be given, but the interest received by the Government should 
be equal to that paid out by reason of tbe extension. 

I do not share the apprehensions, sometimes expressed, that the prin- 
cipal bonded roads will never be able to pay their debts and that the 
Government will thereby lose, in whole or in part, the advances it has 
made in aid of their construction. As I have before suggested, I be- 
lieve the worst is over. Most of the territory tributary to these roods 
has already secured all the competing lines that are likely to be built 
for years to come. Heretofore, through the building of lines not war- 
ranted by the business of the sections through which they run, compe- 
tition has been carried beyond healthy and legitimate bounds. Here- 
after the volume of traffic is likely to increase much more rapidly than 
are the facilities for carrying it on, and, as a necessary result, the roads 
now in operation will secure a larger trade and realize increased profits. 
The Government has been extremely liberal, and wisely so, to these 
companies. Its loans of money and donations of land have been mu- 
nificent indeed. In view of this the companies seeking an extension 
of their debt to the Government ought to be willing to pay such a rate 
of interest as will indemnify the Government from loss. 

SIOUX CITY AND PACIFIC. 

The funding bills to which I have referred, now pending in Congress, 
include all the bonded roads except the Sioux City and Pacific. A bill 
has passed the Senate authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury, by 
and with the consent of the President, to negotiate with this road for 
a settlement of its indebtedness to the United States and to make such 
settlement as in the judgment of the Secretary shall be for the best in- 
terests of the Government. 

The Sioux City and Pacific is a short road, a trifle over 100 miles in 
length, running from Sioux City, Iowa, to Fremont, Kebr. The road 
is owned and operated by the Chicago and Northwestern Railway Com- 
pany. The United States loaned to this road $1,628,320 in bonds to 
aid in its construction. The interest paid on these bonds by the United 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 125 

States to June 30, 1890, amounts to $2,148,191, and there has been re- 
turned to the United States, in transportation services rendered the 
Government, the sum of $165,047.10. The excess of interest paid over 
all credits amounts to $1,983,144.73. This leaves now due the Govern- 
ment $3,611,404.73. Under existing laws the amount required to be 
paid annually, viz, 5 per cent, of net earnings and half the Government 
transportation, amounts on an average to less than $1!0,000 per annum. 
The Government is certain to sustain a heavy loss on its claim against 
the Sioux City and Pacific. There are first- mortgage bonds taking 
precedence over the Government lien of $1,628,000. 

UNION PACIFIC GUARANTIES. 

Certain criticisms, allegations, and complaints have come to this 
Bureau through the public press and in communications, both oral and 
written, from individuals, touching the management of the Union 
Pacific Kailway Company in the matter of guaranteeing the bonds or 
stocks of other railway corporations whose lines of road are operated 
in connection with the Union Pacific system. It has been urged that 
these guaranties were made in violation of law and that they would have 
the effect, and were made with the purpose, of defrauding the Govern- 
ment. The Commissioner of Eailroads, the Secretary of the Interior, 
and the President of the United States were urged to institute legal 
proceedings against the Union Pacific for its violation of law, and 
Senators and members of Congress have been importuned to take action 
in the matter. 

On July 3 the following resolution was adopted by the United States 
Senate: 

Resolved, That the Secretary of the Interior be directed to inform the Senate whether 
he has knowledge of the guaranty, actual or proposed, by the Union Paciric Railway 
Company of the bonds or stock of any other corporation, more especially those of the 
Oregon Kailway and Navigation Company and of the Denver and South Park Rail- 
road Company; whether said Union Pacific Railroad Company has paid out of its 
surplus earnings or otherwise the indebtedness, or any part thereof, of said or other 
companies, and if so whether such guaranty or such payment, or both, are in accord- 
ance with law and consistent with the obligations of said Union Pacific Railroad 
Company to the United States; and that the Secretary of the Interior be directed to 
communicate to the Senate all information in possession of his Department on the 
subject. 

The resolution was referred by the Honorable Secretary to this office 
for reply. On July 17 a letter from this office was delivered to the Sec- 
retary giving a complete list of the companies whose bonds or stocks, 
or both, had been guaranteed by the Union Pacific Kailway Company, 
together with a statement of the manner, form, and amounts specified 
under the name of each corporation. The letter further stated : 

No part of the earnings of the Union Pacific Railway Company Avhich are required 
under the law to be paid to the Government have been used for any other purpose 
than in liquidation of the Government debt. It is the uniform practice of this ol'iic" 
to ascertain, as provided by law, the net earnings of the railway company upon 



126 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OP THE INTERIOR. 

which the Government has a claim, to wit, the net earnings from the aided portions 
of its road. When this amount is ascertained, 25 per cent, of the sum has been de- 
manded, as provided by the Thurman act, and has been paid into the Treasury of the 
United States, either directly in cash or through the allowance, for transportation 
services rendered by the company for the Government. This is ir. strict compliance 
with the provisions of the Thurman act, that 25 per cent, of the net earnings of such 
portions of the line as have been aided by the issue of Government bonds be paid 
annually into the Treasury. What the railway company may have done with the 
other 75 per cent, of its surplus earnings 1 have not deemed it the province of this 
office to inquire. 

The Secretary fully answered the inquiries of the Seuate and trans- 
mitted the correspondence with his report. His report concluded as 
follows : 

Inasmuch as, according to the report of the Commissioner of Railroads, herewith 
sent, said company has complied with and continues to comply with all the require- 
ments of Congress as to the payments to be made to the United States, and has made 
the investments referred to out of its own proper share of earnings, I do not see how 
its action in the premises can be fairly regarded as endangering or injuring the inter- 
ests of the United States as creditor of said company, or be considered as otherwise 
than as legitimate and proper in the prosecution of its business. It has given no lien 
or mortgage on, or made any pledge ot, its assets on which the United States have a 
lieu, but seems to have simply used its credit and its share of income, as it had a right 
to do, in promotion of its proper purposes. 

The legal aspects of the inquiry made by your body were referred to the Assistant 
Attorney-General for this Department. His opinion, which I herewith also send you, 
is to the effect that, on the facts as shown by the Railroad Commissioner, there has 
been no violation of the United States statutes governing this corporation by the 
company in these matters, or of its obligations to the Government. In these views I 
concur. 

LEGISLATION NEEDED. 

I earnestly renew the recommendations made in my previous report, 
that the act creating this Bureau be further amended by providing 
that the so-called bonded roads transmit all accounts for transportation 
services rendered the Government, including the carrying of the mails, 
through this Bureau to the proper accounting officers of the Treasury ; 
and that all disallowances or differences in said accounts found by the 
accounting officers upon settlement be reported to this Bureau before 
final payment or allowance of the same; and that this Bureau report to 
the Treasury Department what changes, if any, are required in the 
payment or disposal of the moneys so found to be due the said com- 
panies. 

It is important that there be some bureau of the Government in which 
can be found full information as to the accounts between the bonded 
railroads and the United States. Up to the present time there has 
been no such bureau. Out of the numerous acts affecting the roads in 
question there has grown much confusion. The Post Office, War, 
Treasury, and Interior Departments each have extensive dealings with 
these roads. Bills for services rendered are sent for adjustment to many 
different accounting officers, each acting independently of the others. 









KAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 127 

There are now millions of dollars of unsettled bills awaiting final action 
in the Treasury Department. It is due to the railroad companies that 
all these accounts for services be promptly adjusted and that such 
sums as are legally their due be credited or paid to them. 

It is to the interest of the Government to know the exact condition 
of its accounts with the railroad companies it has aided and whose ob- 
ligations it holds. As accounts are rendered at present it would be a 
vexatious and almost impossible task to secure such information. Were 
all accounts rendered through this Bureau by the railroad companies, 
and the action taken by the accounting officers reported here, all of 
which might be done with no increased expense, the records of this 
Bureau would at all times give easy access to any information that 
might be desired by Congress or any of the Departments of the Govern- 
ment in regard to the accounts and indebtedness of the bonded roads. 

The Secretary strongly indorsed this recommendation in his last an- 
nual report. A bill providing for the amendment suggested was intro- 
duced in the Senate at its last session and, with trifling amendments, 
was unanimously passed. 

The bookkeepers of this Bureau have fully investigated the books 
and accounts of the bonded roads, and statements are submitted here- 
with showing in detail their earnings and expenses and general finan- 
cial condition, including the amounts due the Government on their net 
earnings for the year ending with this report, as well as the balances 
due on previous years. As a rule the accounts of the roads are kept in 
a thoroughly business-like manner. The officers of the roads have 
cheerfully given free access to their *books when requested, furnished 
all information asked for, and submitted all vouchers it was desired to 
examine. 

UNION PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY. 

The Union Pacific Railway Company was formed January 26, 1880, 
by the consolidation of the Union Pacific Railroad Company, the Den- 
ver Pacific Railway and Telegraph Company, and the Kansas Pacific 
Railway Company, formerly the " Union Pacific Railroad Company, 
Eastern Division," which was the successor of the Leavenworth, Pawnee 
and Western Railroad Company. The road, as at present constituted, 
is 1,S21.27 miles in length. The company also controls and operates 
eighteen branch lines, 3,358.79 miles in length, which makes an aggre- 
gate for the entire system of 5,180.06 miles. There are also seven rail- 
road companies, whose lines aggregate 1,055.03 miles in length, in which 
the Union Pacific Railway Company has a proprietary interest, but the 
railroads belonging to which are not included in the system. 

The portions of the road which were constructed by the aid of a sub- 
sidy in bonds and are subject to the requirements of law with respect 
to the annual payment of a percentage of earnings to the Government 
are as follows : Bridge Junction, Omaha, Nebr., to Ogden Station, Utah, 



128 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

1,029.4840 miles ; Ogden Station, Utah, to junction with Central Pacific 
Railroad (leased and operated by the Central Pacific Eailroad Company), 
5 miles; Kansas City, Mo., to a point near Boaz, Kans., 393.9425 miles. 

The subsidy bonds issued to this company amount to $33,539,512, the 
Union Division having received $27,236,512 and the Kansas Division 
$6,303,000. The United States had paid in interest thereon the sum of 
$45,173,778.54, and there had been repaid by the company in transpor- 
tation services and cash, as shown by the books of the Treasury Depart- 
ment, $26,995,727.97, which made its liability to the Government June 
30, 1890, amount to $51,717,562.57. The excess of interest paid by the 
United States over all credits amounted to $18,178,050.57. The amount 
found due from this company under the acts of 1862, 1864, and 1878, for 
the year ending December 31, 1889, was $1,076,139.35, whilst the United 
States paid during the corresponding period the sum of $2,012,370.72 
interest on the bonds issued to this company. 

During the year 20,265 tons of steel rails were laid at a cost of $627,- 
155.13, and 971 tons of iron rails at a cost of $46,719.21, and there were 
placed in the track 511,627 cross-ties at a cost of $262,034.09. The 
total expenditures for additions and betterments to railway, charged to 
construction account, amounted to $1,011,520.93 during the year. 

There are 10.10 miles of double track and 481.37 miles of sidings. 
Steel rails are laid upon 1,809.23 miles of track and iron rails upon 
504.10 miles. The ballast consists of 22.89 miles of stone, 18.01 miles 
of gravel, 4.86 miles of burnt clay, 28.53 miles of cinders, and the re- 
mainder of earth. There are 643 miles of fencing of all kinds. 

The equipment consists of 487 locomotives, 467 of which are equipped 
with Westinghouse brakes ; 69 Pullman sleeping and 11 dining cars, in 
which the company owns a three-fourths interest; 23 chair, 144 pas- 
senger, 70 emigrant, 105 baggage, mail, and express, and 13 officers* 
cars, making a total of 435 cars in the passenger department, all of 
which are equipped with Westinghouse brakes and Miller platforms. 
There are 5,616 box, 1,081 stock, 1,943 coal, 472 flat, 125 combination 
stock, 83 fruit, 427 refrigerator, 700 furniture, and 204 caboose cars, 
making a total of 10,651 cars in the freight department, 8,695 of which 
are equipped with Westinghouse automatic brakes. There are 270 cars 
used in road repair service. Included in the above are 115 locomotives, 
88 passenger, 2,980 freight, and 100 dump cars, held in trust by the 
American Loan and Trust Company, of Boston, Mass., as trustee. The 
company has placed dining cars upon all of its through trains between 
Omaha, Nebr., and Portland, Oregon. 

The company reports that it had disposed of 13,357,720.85 acres of 
land to June 30, 1890, the total cash receipts from all sales amounting 
to $32,412;259.65. There remained outstanding on account of time 
sales the sum of $10,306,280.22. The average price per acre for all sales 
was $2.53 for the Union division, $3.79 for the Kansas division, and 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 129 

$4.42 for the Denver division. The company's estimate of unsold lands 
December 31, 1889, was 6,283,000 acres, valued at $12,567,500. 

The roadbed, track, bridges, buildings, and equipment of the main 
line between Omaha, Nebr., and Ogden, Utah, were inspected by the 
engineer of this Bureau in March, and of the Kansas division, between 
Kansas City, Mo., and Denver, Colo., in July of the present year. The 
entire line was found to have been maintained in excellent condition, 
and numerous important additions and improvements were made dur- 
ing the past year, the details of which will be found in Appendix No. 1. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the com- 
pany June 30, 1890, the amounts found due under the acts of 1862, 
1864, and 1878, and other statistics pertaining to the road. 
INT 90— VOL III 9 



130 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



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KAILROAD ACCOUNTS. L31 

Ueveriue and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1890. 

REVENUE. 

Earnings $20,711,031.79 

Dividends on stocks of other companies 367, 

Interest on bonds of this and other companies 1,769, 117. 13 

Interest and income from miscellaneous investments 203,612.31 

Receipts of the land department and (rust income 1,628,325.85 

Equipment sold 69,071.24 

Miscellaneous land receipts 18,520. 01 

Total 24,767,213.33 

EXPENDITUKES. 

Operating expenses and taxes $12,310,834.03 

In terest on funded debt 4, 970, 641. 49 

Interest on other debt 387,376. 68 

Sinking-fund requirement, company . .' 758, 506. 25 

New construction 975,665.72 

Expenses of the land department, taxes, etc 295, 556. 26 

United States requirement „ 1,076,139.35 

Premium on bonds bought and held in trust 1,047,853.97 

Profit and loss 560,834.27 

Premium on bonds redeemed, etc. 131. 633.34 

Total 22,515,041.36 

Surplus ..;.' 2,252,171.97 

Iii the following comparative statement of the financial condition of 
the company June 30, 1S90-1889, the decrease of $10,403,269.02 in the 
cost of " road, fixtures, and equipment," is accounted for by the com- 
pany by reason of the fact that the expenditures for new construction, 
betterments, and new equipment, from February 1, 1880, the date of 
the consolidation of the Union Pacific, Kansas Pacific, and Denver 
Pacific companies, to December 31, 1889, which had, prior to the last- 
pamed date, been included under the head of cost of road, fixtures, 
and equipment, were, on December 31, 1889, written oil' or transferred 
to the debit of the company's general-income account. 

The company also states that in closing the accounts for last year 
it seemed advisable to take advantage of the various consolidations 
and reorganizations which had been effected during it, in order to 
Simplify the company's balance sheet by charging off various book 
accounts. The balance credited general-income account represented 
accumulated surplus earnings since the organization of the company, 
as well as the undivided items of revenue from whatever source de- 
rived. On the other hand it was purely a book account, and did not 
represent cash, the sums entering into it having been long since in- 
vested in the company's road or its rolling stock, or in securities in the 
treasury. In so far as it did not represent cash or any available asset, 
the general-income account was therefore, to a certain extent, deceptive. 



132 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Iii like manner there were other accounts equally deceptive on the 
debit side of the company's books, representing investments made 
many years ago which had resulted in an apparent loss, or balances which 
could not be collected but which were still carried in account current, 
even though, as in the case of the Denver, South Park and Pacific 
Company, a reorganization had been effected. The increase in the 
company's liabilities, compared with the apparent decrease in its assets, 
is due mainly to the charges and transfers incident to the above- 
mentioned transactions. 

Comparative statement of the financial condition of the Union Pacific Railway Company, 

June 30, 1890-1889. 



LIABILITIES. 

First -niort gage bonds 

Interest on same, due and accrued 

Interest on same, accrued, not due 

United States subsidy bonds 

Interest on same paid by United States. 

Other funded debt 

Interest on same, due and unpaid 

1 iiti rest on same, accrued, not due 

Dividends unpaid 

Bills payable 

A ccounts payable 

Pay rolls and vouchers 

Cailed bonds 

Total debt 

Capital stock 

Total stock and debt 

ASSETS. 

Itoad, fixtures, and equipment 

Land contracts, land cash, etc 

Fuel, material, and stores on hand 

Cash on hand 

Company's stocks and bouds owned by 
company 

Other stocks and bonds 

Other stocks and bonds held in trust... 

Miscellaneous investments 

Advances payable in stocks and bonds. 

Sinking fundsin hands of trustees— com- 
pany 

lulls receivable 

Accounts receivable 

Due from other companies on account 
of traffic 

Repaid the United States in transpor- 
tation and cash 

Total assets 

Surplus 



Year ending- 



June 30, 1890. Juno 30, 1889 



$42, 782, 
369, 

1, 002, 
33, 539, 
45, 173, 
38, 758, 

93, 

538, 

18, 

9, 135, 

2, 731, 
4, 539, 

166, 



000. 00 
365. 00 
177. 50 
512.00 
778. 54 
585. 00 
539. 24 
220. 01 
709. 27 
000. 00 
437. 69 
705. 42 
000. 00 



178, 848, 029. 67 
60, 868, 500. 00 



239, 716. 529. 67 



$155,685,070.61 

13, 481, 555. 52 

1,967,156.73 

2, 492, 237. 40 

683, 323. 20 

32,060,163.71 

13, 674, 694, 01 

1.372,400.83 

2, 743, 286. 43 

8, 679, 818. 25 

1, 312, 183. 84 

11,734,574.33 

390, 233. 30 

28, 066, 743. 41 



274,343,441.57 



34, 626, 911. 90 



$43, 224, 

1, 155, 

189, 

33, 539, 

43, 161, 

37, 142, 

225, 

532, 

23, 

3, 459, 

1,156, 

1, 818, 

29, 



000. 00 
380. 00 
560. 83 
512. 00 
407. 82 
655. 00 
659. 24 
359. 17 
117.27 
834. 18 
245. 07 
928. 96 
000. 00 



165, 657, 659. 54 
60, 868, 500. 00 



226, 526, 159. 54 



$166, 178, 339. 63 

17, 759, 388. 33 

1,551,333,45 

882, 570. 78 

574, 088. 31 

40, 395, 635. 56 

3, 217, 250. 00 

875, 636. 24 
3, 555, 568. 10 

4,186,811.21 

391, 233. 84 

9, 294, 996. 43 

584, 302. 09 

25, 857, 569. 60 



275, 304, 723. 57 



48, 778, 564. 03 



Difference. 



Increase. Decrease 



$812,616.67 



2,012,370.72 
1. 615. 930. 00 



5, 870. 84 



5. 675, 165. 82 

1, 575, 192. 62 

2, 720, 776. 46 
137, 000. 00 



13, 190, 370. 13 



13,190,370.13 



$415, 823. 28 
1, 609, 666. 62 



109, 234. 89 



10, 457, 444. 01 
496, 764. 59 



4, 493, 007. 04 

920, 950. 00 

2, 439, 577. 90 



2,209,173.81 



$442, 000. 00 
786, 015. 00 



132, 120. 00 

" 4*408." 00 



$10, 493, 269. 02 
4, 277, 832. 81 



8,335,471.85 
""*8i2,"28i."67 



194, 068. 79 



961,282.00 



14, 151, 652. 13 



In its general balance sheet the company claims credit for reimburse- 
ments to the Government, by transportation services and cash payments, 
amounting to $28,066,743.41 ; but the following statement, compiled 
from reports furnished this office by the Treasury Department, of settled 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 133 

accounts and moneys paid into the Treasury to June 30, 1890, shows a 
difference of $1,071,015.14, as follows : 

Transportation applied to interest account $16, 143,450.59 

Cash payments applied to interest account 438,409.58 

Total interest account $10, 581 , 8G0. 17 

Transportation applied to sinking-fund account 7, 385, 265. 22 

Cash payments applied to sinking-fund account 1,421,714.46 

Accumulated interest on sinking-fund investments. .. 1, 606, 888. 12 

Total sinking-fund account 10, 413, 867. 80 

Total credits to June 30, 1890 26,995,7-27.97 

Amounts of credits claimed by the company 28, 066, 743. 41 

Difference ' 1,071,015.44 

As stated in my report for last year, a controversy has existed since 
188G between this Bureau and the Union Pacific Railway Company as 
to the amount rightfully due the Government under the acts of 1802, 
18G4, and 1878, the company claiming that the earnings of the Omaha 
Bridge and the income derived from the operation of Pullman sleeping 
cars (a three-fourths interest in which is held by the company) should 
be excluded before determining the net earnings upon which a percent- 
age is due the Government. As the subject is now before the Court of 
Claims for a judicial determination of matters in controversy, the 
account for the year ending December 31, 1889, has been stated in ac- 
cordance with the view heretofore taken by this Bureau, and the items 
above referred to have been included in the following statements : 

Statement of amounts due the United States by the Union Pacific Railway Company for the 
year ending December 31, 1839, under act of May 7, 1878. 

UNION DIVISION. 

EARNINGS. 

United States : 

Passenger $66,181.87 

Extra baggage 48. 40 

Freight 87,697.98 

Mail '. 479,682.86 

Express 597.41 

T.elegraph 1,192.94 . 

SR635 401 4P> 

Commercial : 

Passenger 2,799,831.95 

Sleeping cars * 97, 882. 54 

Extra baggage 56, 263. 07 

Freight 10,035,637.38 

Company freight 242,425.76 

Express 348.077.09 

Telegraph 38, 990. 91 

Miscellaneous 164,340.02 

- 13, 783, 448. 72 

Total earnings 14,418,850.18 

* Apportioned on the basis of sleeping-car mileage, being 53.56 per cent, of 
$182,753.07, income from sleeping ears. 



134 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Statement of the amounts due the United States, etc. — Continued. 

EXPENSES. 

Conducting transportation $3, 768, 823. 32 

Maintenance of way and structures 1,119,409.23 

Maintenance of equipment 1,628,429. 79 

General expenses and taxes 1, 354, 280. 65 

Total operating expenses 7, 780, 942. 99 

Interest on first-mortgage bonds 1, 633, 740. 00 

New construction ...... '. 588, 328. 81 

New equipment* 475,976.65 

Total expenses under act May 7, 1878 $10,478,988.45 

Net earnings ' 3,939,861.73 

Twenty-five per cent, of net earnings 984,965. 43 

DUE THE UNITED STATES. 

One-half Government transportation, as above 317,700.73 

Five per cent, of net earnings 196,993. 09 

To credit of bond and interest account 51 1, 693. 82 

One-half Government transportation, as above 317,700.73 

Casli payment nnder section 4, act May 7, 1878 152,570.88 

To credit sinking-fund account 470,271. 61 

Total for the year 984,965. 43 

KANSAS DIVISION — AIDED LINE. 

EARNINGS. 

• ; States: 

Passenger $8,755.55 

Extra baggage 3. 33 

Freight 14,070.14 

Mail.... 79,652.89 

Express 181.45 

Telegraph 349.87 

$103,013.23 

Commercial : 

Passenger 800,653.94 

Sleeping cars t 24,982.34 

Extra baggage 13,097.42 

Fr< ight. 1,866,650.25 

Company freight 80,981.83 

Express 5(5,259.40 

Telegraph 5,623.93 

Miscellaneous , 129,664.55 

2, 977, 913. 60 

Total earnings 3,080,926.89 

* The company is credited with §120,562.50, interest paid during the year on out- 
standing trust-equipment bonds, and $282,000.00 trust-equipment bonds redeemed 
during same period, making a total of $402,562.50 expended, distributed on the basis 
of revenue train mileage, the proportion for this division being 70.425 per cent., 
amounting to $283,504.64. Also the sum of §359,357.75 expended for Pullman Associ- 
ation ears, distributed on the basis of sleeping-car mileage, the proportion for this 
division being 53.56 per cent., amounting to $192,472.01, making a total of $475,976.65 
credited on account of new equipment. 

t Apportioned on basis of sleeping-car mileage, being 13.67 per cent, of $182,753.07, 
income from sleeping cars. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 



135 



Statement of the amounts due the United States, etc. — Continued. 

EXPENSES. 

Conducting transportation $817, 754. 7:! 

Maintenance of way and structures 465,319.49 

Maintenance of equipment 410, 062. 75 

General expenses and taxes 303, 646. 88 



Total operating expenses 1, 996, 783. 85 

New construction 17G, 030. 98 

New equipment* * 114,706. 04 



Total expenses under act July 2, 1804 $2, 287, 580. 87 

Net earnings 793, 340. 02 

Five per cent, of net earnings 



DUE Till'. UNITED STATES. 

One-half Government transportation, as above 

Five per cent, of net earnings 



Total for the year. 



DUE FROM THE UNION PACIFIC UAH/WAY COMPANY. 



On account of the Union Division . 
On account of the Kansas Division 



39,007.30 

51,506.62 

39, 667. 3,0 

91,173.92 



984, 965. 43 
91, 173. 92 



Total for the year 1 , 070, 139. 35 

Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the Union Pacific Railway 

Company. 





Year ending — 


Diffe 


ence. 




June 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


In crease. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$4, 325, 891. 26 

14, 575, 124. 24 

913, 037. 28 

445, 073. 77 

451, 905. 24 


$4, 400, 812. 30 

12, 849, 982. 96 

622, 968. 59 

481, 367. 75 

528, 140. 79 




$74, 921. 04 


Frei ght 


$1,725,141.28 
290, 068. 69 


Mail 






36, 293. 98 






76, 235. 55 






Total 


20, 711, 031. 79 


18, 883, 272. 39 


1, 827, 759. 40 








EXPENSES. 

Maintenance of way and structures 


2, 056, 863. 93 
2, 685, 521. 16 
5, 625, 620. 43 
1, 942, 828. 51 


1, 923, 063. 45 

2, 129, 890. 79 
5, 055, 538. 72 
2, 162, 893. 75 


133,800.48 
555, 630. 37 
570, 081. 71 












220, 065. 24 






Total 


12, 31U, 834. 03 


11,271,386.71 


1, 039, 447. 32 










8, 400, 197. 76 


7,611,885.68 


788, 312. 08 










1,821.27 


1,822.12 




.85 










$11,371.75 
6, 759. 49 


$10, 363. 35 
6, 185. 86 


$1, 008. 40 
573. 63 














4, 612. 26 


4, 177. 49 


434. 77 








Percentage of expenses to earnings 


59.44 


59.69 




.25 







* The sum of $402,502.50 expended on account of interest paid and trust-equipment 
bonds redeemed, is apportioned on the basis of revenue train mileage, the proportion 
for this division being 16.306 per cent., amounting to $65,641.84. Also 13.67 per cent. 
of $359,357.75 expended for Pullman Association cars, amounting to $49,124.20, ap- 
portioned on the basis of sleeping; car mileage, making a total of $114,700.04 credited 
thisaccount for the year. (See note to statement for Union Division.) 



136 EEPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 
CENTRAL PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. 

This road is operated by the Southern Pacific Company, under lease 
of February 17, 1885, and the modification thereof, dated January 1, 
1888, the terms of which are stated in detail on page 25 of the report of 
this office for the year 1889, 

The total length of road owned and operated June 30, 1890, was 
1,360,28 miles, no change having been made during the past year. The 
main line extends from Oakland wharf, California, to Ogden, Utah, with 
branches from Roseville Junction to the Oregon State line, Lathrop to 
Goshen, and from Niles northward to Oakland and southward to San 
Jose, California. That portion of the line extending from Ogden, Utah, 
to Sacramento, thence via Mies to San Jose, California, a distance of 
860.60 miles, was aided by the United States with bonds and lands, and 
is subject to the requirements of law with respect to the payment of a 
percentage of its net earnings to the Government. 

The subsidy bonds issued to aid in its construction amounted to 
$27,855,680, and the United States had paid as interest thereon the sum 
of $36,820,189.81. There had been repaid by the company, in transpor- 
tation services and cash, the sum of $11,349,104.42, making a net lia- 
bility on June 30, 1890, of $53,326,765.39. The excess of interest paid 
by the United States over all credits amounted to $25,471,085.39. The 
amount found due under the act of May 7, 1878, for the year ending 
December 31, 1889, was $458,242.89, whilst the United States paid dur- 
ing the corresponding period the sum of $1,671,340.80 interest on the 
bonds issued to this company. 

The roadbed, track, bridges, buildings, shops, and equipment were 
inspected by the engineer of this Bureau and found to be in good con- 
dition. The details of improvements made during the year will be 
found in his report, Appendix No. 1. 

Owing to the unprecedented fall of rain and snow during the past 
year, in the section of country traversed by this line, causing serious 
washouts and landslides, and a consequent interruption of traffic, the 
earnings of the road were considerably reduced and the company sub- 
jected to great expense to repair damages to track, bridges, and snow- 
sheds. At Alta, a station on the Sierra Nevada Mountains, about 
3,600 feet above the sea level, the snowfall, between November, 1889, 
and March, 1890, measured 400 inches, whilst at Cisco, 23 miles east 
and near the summit, at an altitude of about 6,800 feet, it measured 628 
inches. The rainfall in the valleys was also excessive during the same 
period, 40 inches having been registered at San Francisco, 103 inches 
at Delta, on the Oregon division, and 111 inches at Boulder Creek, 
north of Santa Cruz, particular reference to which will be found in the 
report of the engineer. 

During the year the company laid 6740.82 tons of steel rails, at a 
cost of $223,555,51, and 391,142 cross-ties, at a cost of $152,403.68, all 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 137 

of which was charged to income account. The expenditures for new 
construction amounted to $295,528.29. The repairs of bridges and cul- 
verts cost $57,911.02, buildings, $77,809.14, and snowsheds $4,555.35. 
Then* are 684 miles of track ballasted with stone and gravel and 665 
miles with earth. There are 846.90 miles of fencing and 32.54 miles of 
snowsheds. 

The equipment consists of 245 locomotives, all of which are equip- 
ped with Westiughouse brakes; 18 sleeping, 168 first-class, 72 emigrant 
and tourist, 10 mail, 43 baggage, 10 express, and 7 officers' cars, making 
a total of 334 cars in the passenger department, all of which are equip- 
ped with Westinghouse brakes and Miller platforms. In the freight 
service there are 2,587 box, 1,700 flat, and 102 caboose cars, making a 
total of 4,449 cars in this department, all of which are equipped with 
Westinghou.se brakes. There are 173 cars used iu road-repair service. 
In order to provide additional conveniences to travelers, the company 
has ordered the construction of several dining cars, and expects to have 
them in service at an early date. 

The company reports that there had been patented 2,402,384.34 acres 
of land, 1,039,710.59 being on account of the Central Pacific and 
1,302,073.75 on account of the California and Oregon. There had 
been sold 2,558,499.72 acres and the total receipts from all sources to 
date amounted to $8,804,154.90. There remained outstanding, on 
account of time sales, the sum of $1,072,858.35. The records of the 
General Land Office show that to June 30, 1890, there had been patented 
2,852,578.92 acres, the Central Pacific having received 1,040,210.59, the 
Western Pacific 449,934.72, and the California and Oregon 1,302,433.01 
acres. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the company 
June 30, 1890, the amount found due under the act of May 7, 1878, 
and other statistics pertaining to the road. 



138 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



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140 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Revenue and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1890. 

REVENUES. 

Earnings (guarantied rental, 1889) $1,360,000.00 

Land department (sales, etc., 1889) 002,179.80 

Interest on sinking-fund of company 1, 044,881. 0G 

Sinking-fund requirement, paid by Southern Pacific Company, 1889.. 275,000.00 

United Statesrequiremenopaid by the Southern Pacific Company, 1889. 458,242.89 

Miscellaneous, dividends on stocks owned 14, 400. 00 

3, 754, 70IJ. 75 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses (*) 

Interest on first-mortgage bonds (*) 

Interest on other funded debt (*) 

Interest on other debt (*) 

New construction (*) 

New equipment (*) 

Expenses of the land department (*) 

Sinking-fund requirements of company $1,274, 137. 55 

United States sinking-fund requirement 458,242.89 

Land receipts paid to trustees of land mortgage 602,179.80 

Dividends Nos. 21 and 22, August 1, 1889, and February 1, 1890 1, 345, 510. 00 

Excess earnings of sinking funds over requirements, 18«7-'89, paid by 

and now returned to Southern Pacific Company 379, 833. 55 

Expenses for operations prior to lease 598. 77 

Total 4,060,502.56 

Deficit 305,798.81 

Note. — The revenue and expenditures include lease settlements to December 31, 
1889, only. As the settlements under lease are made annually for the year ending 
December 31, the actual revenue can not be stated for year ending June 30, 1890. 

Comparative statement of the financial condition of the Central Pacific Railroad Company, 

June 30, 1890 and 1889. 



LIABILITIES. 

First-mortgage bonds 

United States subsidy bonds 

Interest on same paid by United States. 

Otber funded debt 

Dividends unpaid 

Accounts payable, pay -rolls and vouchers 

Trustees land-grant mortgages 

Sinking funds uninvested 

Total debt 

Capital stock 

Total stock and debt 



June 30, 1890. 



$27, 853, 000. 00 

27, 855, 680. 00 

36, 820, 189. 81 

33, 007, 000. 00 

62, 395. 00 

262, 346. 29 

2, 591, 170. 59 

613, 531. 22 



129,065,312.91 
68, 000, 000. 00 



197, 065, 312. 91 



June 30, 1889. 



$27, 
27, 
35, 
31, 



000. 00 
680. 00 
849. 01 
000. 00 
592. 00 
355.69 
940. 04 
748. 36 



Difference. 



Increase o 

decrease. 



Amount. 



Increase . . 

....do 

Decrease . . 

...do 

Increase . . 
...do 



125, 



165. 10 
000. 00 



193, 296, 165. 10 



.do 



Increase . . 



$1, 671. 340. 80 

1. 101, 000. 00 

2,197.00 

1,009.40 

484, 230. 55 

515, 782. 86 



), 147. 81 



), 147. 81 



Payable by lessee and charged in income account. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 



141 



Comparative statement of the financial condition <>( ///<■ Central Pacific Railroad Company, 
June SO, 1890 and 1889- Continued. 





Juno 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


Diffei 


ence. 




Increase or 
decrease. 


A mount. 


ASSETS. 

Cost of road, fixtures, and equipment — 
Land contracts— deferred payments on 
time sales. 

Cash on hand 

Company's slock owned by company — 


.$168, 766, 916. 27 
1, 067, 009. 12 

104, 678. 30 
724, 500. 00 
832, 615. 09 

19, 787. 73 

11), 393, 965. 56 

1, 500, 000. 00 

1.891,731.06 

10, 967, 182. 57 

1,068,161.67 
7, 750, 000. 00 

*21, 250, 000. 00 


$167,655,169.16 

996, 442. 23 

128, 749. 38 

71-1,5011.00 
832, 615. 09 

19, 692. 18 

8, 640, 597. 46 

1,500,000.00 

1,182,495.34 

10, 508, 939. 68 

1.068,161.67 
7, 750, 000. 00 

21, 750, 000. 00 


Increase 

....do 

Decrease 


$1,111,747.11 
70, 566. 89 

24, 071. 08 


Other stocks and bonds owned by 'com- 
pany. 






Increase 

....do 


95.55 


Sinking funds in bands of trustees 

Collateral land trust 


1, 753, 368. 10 


Bills and accounts receivable 

United States transportation and sinking- 
fund accounts. 

Due from the United States in cash 

Water front in San Francisco, Oakland, 


Increase 

....do 


709, 236. 62 
458, 242. 89 


and Sacramento. 
Farming lands unsold— estimated value . 


Decreese 

Increase 

Decrease 


500, 000. 00 




226, 336, 548. 27 


222, 757, 362. 19 


3, 579, 186. 08 






29,271,235.36 


29, 461, 197. 09 


189, 961. 73 





* On account of conflicting and overlapping grants, adverse claims, desert lands, etc., the quantity of 
1 hese lands to accrue, and their value, can not be closely estimated. The value above stated is derived 
from an estimate of the acres earned and to which the company would be entitled under the several 
acts of Congress, and applying the rate per acre fixed by the Government for adjoining lands, viz, 
$2.50 per acre. 

In its general balance sheet the company claims credit for reimburse- 
ments to the Government by transportation services and cash pay- 
ments amounting to $12,035,344.24, but the following statement 
compiled from reports furnished this office by the Treasury Department 
of settled accounts and moneys paid into the Treasury to June 30, 1890, 
shows a difference of $680,239.82, as follows: 

Transportation applied to interest account $6, 075, 668. 54 

Cash payments applied to interest account 658,283.26 

Total interest account 6,733,951.80 

Transportation applied to sinking-fund account 13,125,983.42 

Cash payments applied to sinking-fund account 633, 992. 48 

Accumulated interest on sinking-fund investments 855, 176. 72 

Total sinking-fund account.. 4,615, 152.62 

Total credits to June-30, 1890.... 11,349,104.42 

Amount of credits claimed by the company .' 12, 035, 344. 24 

Difference 686,239.82 



142 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Statement of amount due from the Central Pacific Railroad Company for the year ending 
December 31, 1889, under the act of May 7, 1878. 

EARNINGS. 

United States : 

Passenger $13,455.22 

Freight 32,006.62 

Mail 347,324.92 

$392,786.76 

Commercial : 

Passenger 2,385,927.45 

Sleeping cars 46, 240. 39 

Extra baggage 33,935.20 

Freight 5,831,915.61 

Express 101,588.85 

Telegraph 30,120.00 

Miscellaneous 149, 100. 19 

8, 578, 827. 69 

Total earnings 8,971,614.45 

EXPENSES. 

Maintenance of way and structures $1, 117,720.29 

Maintenance of equipment 841,587. 39 

Conducting transportation 2,962,265.67 

General expenses and taxes 908, 613. 50 

New construction 161, 124.99 

Interest on first-mortgage bonds ; 1,671, 180. 00 

Total expenses 7,662,491.84 

Net earnings 1,309,122.61 

Twenty-five per cent, of net earnings 327,280. 6.", 

DUE THE UNITED STATES. 

One-half transportation, as above $196,393.38 

Five pei cent, of net, earnings, act 1864 65,456. 13 

Total to credit interest account $261,849. 51 

One hall' transportation, as above 19(5, 393. 38 

Total to i- r.i lit sinking-fund account ■. 196, 393. 38 



Total for the year 458,242.89 






RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 



143 



Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the Central Pacific Rail/road 

Company. 





Year ending- 


Difference. 




June 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


I acreage. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$1,636, L18.62 

9,497.053.71 

448,554.10 

118,487.16 

523, 299. 05 


$4, 982, 136. 31 
9, 660, 454. 81 

451,757,51! 
199,038.13 
403, 214. 14 




$346,017.09 


Freight 




163 '101 10 


Mail 




3, 203. 40 






10 550 i>7 




$1'J0, 084. 91 








Total 


15,293,512.64 


15, 696, 600. 95 




403, 088. 31 






KXTENSES. 

Maintenance of way and structures 

Maintenance of equipment 


2, 245, 159. 17 
1, 192, 764. 00 
5, 335, 297. 70 
1, 570, 775. 00 


2, 079, 496. 91 
1,410,309.92 
5,400,391.78 
1, 471. 200. 30 


165, 662. 26 


217, 545.32 




65, 094. 08 




99, 574. 70 








Total 


10,313,996.47 


10, 361, 39S. 91 




17, 402. 44 








4, 949, 516. 17 


5, 335, 202. 04 




385, 685. 87 








1,360.28 


1, 360. 40 




12 










$11, 242. 92 
7, 604. 31 


$11,538.22 
7,616.43 




$295. 30 






12.12 










3, 638. 61 


3, 921. 79 




283. 18 








percentage of expenses to earnings 


67.64 


66.01 


1.63 







CONDITION OF SINKING FUNDS. 

The sinking funds of the Union and Central Pacific Companies 
held by the Secretary of the Treasury June 30, 1890, amounted to 
$15,029,020.42, the Union Pacific having to its credit $10,413,867.80 
and the Central Pacific $4,015,152.62. 

The premium paid on bonds for the sinking fund of the Union Pacific 
to June 30, 1890, amounted to $1,789,056.35, and the interest received 
from investments to $1,606,888.12. For the Central Pacific the pre- 
mium amounted to $1,055,223.18 and the interest on investments to 
$855,176.72. 

The Secretary of the Treasury has made the following investments 
during the period from the creation of this fund in 1878 to June 30, 
1890 : 



Character of bonds. 



Funded loan of 1881, 5 per cent, extended at 3 per 

cent 

funded loan of July 12, 1882, at 3 percent 

Funded loan of 1907. 4 per cent 

■urrencj sixes, United States subsidy bonds 

First mortgage bonds, of prior lien to United States 

Principal 

Less bonds redeemed and sold 

Present principal 

Premium paid 

Total cost 



Union Pacific. Central Pacific. 



$256, 450. 00 
1,620,000.00 

4, 478, 650. 00 
1,043,000.00 
4, 666, 300. 00 



12,064,400.00 
3, 446, 650. 00 



8,017,750.00 
1, 789, 056. 35 



10, 406, 806. 35 



$736, 700. 00 

1,220, ()i mi 00 

190, 100.00 

2, 548, 000. 00 

1, 009, 000. 00 



5.712,800.00 
2,155,800.00 



3, 557, 000. 00 
1,055,223.18 



612, 223. 18 



Total. 



$993, 1 50. 00 
2,840,000.00 

4, 677, 750. 00 
3,591,000.00 

5, 075, 300. 00 



17, 777, 200. 00 
5, 602, 450. 00 



12, 174, 750. 00 
2, 844, 279. 53 



15, 019, 029. 53 



144 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Since December 31, 1887, the following investments have been made 
in the first-mortgage bonds of the Union and Central Pacific Com- 
panies: For the Union Pacific, $3,839,300, at a premium of $580,79-}. 71, 
and for the Central Pacific, $814,000, at a premium of $132,374.53. 

There remained in the Treasury of the United States uninvested 
June 30, 1890, the following amounts : 

To the credit of the Union Pacific $7,001.44 

To the credit of the Central Pacific 2, 897. 90 

Total 9,959. :54 

SIOUX CITY AND PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. 

This road extends from Sioux City, Iowa, to Fremont, Nebr., a dis- 
tance of 107.42 miles. The entire line is laid with steel rails, and there 
are 26.35 miles of sidings and 217.69 miles of fencing. The road is 
operated by the Chicago and Northwestern Railway Company and 
forms a part of the latter's through line from Omaha to St. Paul. 

The United States issued to the Sioux City and Pacific Railroad 
Company the sum of $1,628,320 in bonds, to aid in the construction of 
101.58 miles of road, that portion of the line between California Junc- 
tion and Missouri Valley, Iowa, 5.84 miles, not being subsidized. The 
interest paid on these bonds by the United States to June 30, 1890, 
amounted to $2,148,191.89, and there had been retained by the Treasury 
Department on account of transportation services rendered the Govern- 
ment the sum of $165,047.16, leaving an aggregate due on that date of 
$3,611,464.73. The excess of interest paid by the United States on all 
credits amounted to $1,983,144.73. Under the acts of 1862 and 1864 
the Government is entitled to receive from this company a sum equal 
to 5 per cent, of its net earnings and to retain one-half of the amounts 
due for transportation service rendered. These two amounts will not 
average $20,000 per annum, whilst the interest paid annually by the 
Uuited States on account of the bonds issued to aid in the construction 
of this road amounts to $97,699.20. 

The engineer of this Bureau inspected the road-bed, track, build- 
ings, and equipment in July and found them in good condition. A 
number of improvements were made during the year, the details of 
which will be found in Appendix No. 1. 

The equipment consists of 12 locomotives, 8 of which are equipped 
with Westinghouse brakes; 14 passenger cars, all of which are equipped 
with Westinghouse brakes and Miller platforms ; and 90 box, 20 stock, 
46 flat, and 12 caboose cars, making a total of 182 cars in service. 

During the year 1,313.16 tons of steel rails were laid at a cost of 
$49,456.26, and 2,970 cross-ties placed in the track at a cost of $2,508.73. 
The expenditure for new construction amounted to $3,108.15. 

A grant of 41,398.23 acres of land was made to this company, all of 
which was sold April 15, 1875, to the Missouri Valley Land Company 
for $200,000. 



KAILROAD. ACCOUNTS. 145 

The following statements show the financial condition of the com- 
pany June 30, 1890 : 

Financial condition of the Sioux City and Pacific Railroad Company June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

First-mortgage bonds $1,028,000.00 

Interest on first-mortgage bonds 50, 595. 00 

United States subsidy bonds % 1,628,320. 00 

Interest on same paid by United States 2, 148, 191. 89 

Interest on preferred stock, accrued, not due 2, 957. 51 

Pay rolls and vouchers , r >2, 12"). 71 

Total debt 5,510,190.11 

Capital stock 2,008,400.00 

Total stock and debt 7,578,590.11 

ASSETS. 

Road, fixtures, and equipment $5,600,074.93 

Fuel, material, aud stores on hand 70, 943. 99 

Cash on hand 174,125.26 

Accounts receivable 57, 086. 63 

Due from other companies on account of traffic 8, 860. 09 

Withheld by United States for transportation services, etc 165,047. 16 

Due from the United States 61,198.74 

Total assets 6,137,936.80 

Deficit 1,440,653.31 

Statement of revenue and expenditures for year ending June 30, 1890. 

REVENUE. 

Earnings $535, 036. 59 

Profit and loss 3,740 89 

Total ,.„„, 538,777.48 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses $325, 372. 46 

Interest on first-mortgage bonds 97, 680. 00 

Interest on other funded debt . 97, 699. 21) 

Interest on other debt 2,477. 18 

New construction 3, 108. 15 

New equipment 100. 00 

Interest on preferred stock 11, 830. 00 

Total. 538,2G6.99 

Surplus 510.49 

INT 00— VOL III 10 



146 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OP THE INTERIOR. 



Statement of amount due from the Sioux City and Pacific Railroad Company for the year 

ending December 31, 1889. 

EARNINGS. 

United States : 

Passenger $1,273.52 

Freight 676.60 

Mail 21,594.72 



Commercial : 

Passenger 221,927.42 

Extra baggage 4, 795. 86 

Freight 234,277.17 

Express 9,860.87 

Miscellaneous 14,364.91 



H23, 544. 84 



485, 236. 23 



Total earnings 508,771.07 

EXPENSES. 

Maintenance of way and structures 71,845.96 

Maintenance of equipment 28, 093. 17 

Conducting transportation 146, 851. 36 

General expenses and taxes 48, 988. 38 



Total operating expenses 295, 778. 87 

New construction 7, 186.03 



302, 9(54. 90 



Net earnings 205,806.17 

Five per cent, of net earnings 10,290.31 



DUE THE UNITED STATES. 



One-half Government transportation, as above 
Five per cent, of net earnings, act July 1, 1862 

Total 



11,772.42 
10, 290. 31 



22, 062. 73 



Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the Sioux City and Pacific Railroad 

Company. 





Tear ending — 


Difference. 




June 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$228, 478. 25 

254, 398. 46 

23, 027. 88 

1(1,731.36 

18, 400.-64 


$255, 364. 64 

266, 654. 63 

23,028.12 

10,125.42 

18, 784. 62 




$26,886.39 

12, 256. 17 

.24 


Freight 




Mail 






$605. 94 






383. 98 








Total 


535, 036. 59 


573,957.43 




38, 920. 84 








EXPEN8ES. 


68, 819. 71 

32,141.69 

173, 941. 68 

50, 469. 38 








































Total 


325, 372. 46 


347,984.43 




22, 611. 97 








RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 



147 



Comparative statement of the <(iri)i>i</s and expenses of the Sioux City <ai<l Pacific Railroad 

Company— Coni timed. 





Year ending- 


Diffei 


ence. 




June 30, 1890. 


-111 Mr. "JO, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 




$209, 6G4. 13 


$225,973.00 




$16,308.87 








107. 42 


107. 42 






i 




$4, 980. 79 
3, 028. 97 


$5, 343. 1 1 
3,239.47 




$362.32 

210.50 














1,951.82 


2, 103. 64 




151.82 








Percentage of expenses to earnings 


60.81 


Go. C2 


$0.19 



CENTRAL BRANCH UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. 



The subsidized portion of this road extends from Atchison to Water- 
ville, Kans., a distance of 100 miles. The company also leases the 
Atchison, Colorado and Pacific Railroad, 254.03 miles, and the Atchi- 
son, Jewell County and Western Railroad, 31 miles, making a total of 
388.03 miles. The Union Pacific Railway Company owns $858,800 of 
the capital stock of the company, but the road and its branches were 
leased to the Missouri Pacific Railway Company September 30, 1885, 
for a period of twenty- five years. 

The subsidy bonds issued to aid in the construction of this road 
amounted to $1,600,000. The interest paid on these bonds by the 
United States amounted to $2,221,808.26, aud there had been repaid by 
the company in transportation services and cash, the sum of $433,704.68, 
leaving a liability to the Government on June 30, 1890, of $3,388,103.58. 
The excess of interest paid over all credits amounted to $1,788,103.58. 

During the year 29,400 new cross- ties were placed in the track at a 
cost of $11,822.85. The equipment consists of 35 locomotives, 11 of 
which are equipped with Westinghouse air and 5 with steam brakes, 
23 cars in the passenger service, all equipped with Westinghouse brakes 
and Miller platforms, and 524 cars in the freight service. 

The records of the General Land Office show that to June 30, 1890, 
there had been patented to this company 218,250.08 acres of land. The 
report of the company states that the receipts of the land department 
during the year amounted to $7,567.99, and that there were outstand- 
ing on account of time sales $25,367.52. 

The bonded portion of the road was inspected by the engineer of this 
Bureau in June and found to be in very good condition. Ilis report 
thereon will be found in Appendix No. 1. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the company 
June 30, 1890 : 



148 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Financial condition of the Central Branch Union Pacific Railroad Company June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

First-inortgago bonds $2, 230, 000. 00 

Interest on same, duo and accrued , 2, 19J>. 00 

United States subsidy bonds 1,(500,000.00 

Interest on same paid by United States 2, '221, 808. 26 

Dividends unpaid 25. 00 

Accounts payable 039,020.03 

Total debt 0,093,048.29 

Capital stock 1,000,000.00 

Total stock and debt 7,093,048.29 

ASSETS. 

Road, fixtures, and equipment $4,001, L63. 51 

Land contracts, laud cash, etc 25, 307. 52 

Company's stocks and bonds owned by company 15,400.00 

Other stocks and bonds 112,837,70 

Accounts recei vable 47, 887. 84 

Repaid the United States in transportation and casli 444,405.25 

Total assets 4,047, 121. 88 

Deficit 3,045,920.41 

Revenue and expenditures for year ending June 30, 1890. 

REVENUE. 

Earnings $502,440.41 

Interest on bonds of other com panics 225. 00 

Interest and income from miscellaneous investments 7,382.04 

Receipts of t he land department 1, 702. 01 

Total 571,809.46 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses and taxes $347,347. 36 

Interest on first mortgage bonds 140, 100. 00 

Losses on leased 1 i nes 468, 276. 6a 

Expenses of the land department 102. 54 

United States requirement 14,028. 19 

Profit and loss 5,900. 49 

Total 976, 355. o| 

Deficit 404,540.23 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 



149 



Comparative statement of the earnings and expense* of the Central Branch Union Pacific 

Railroad Company. 





Tear ending — 


Difference. 




Jane 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$73,100.24 

463, 041. 81 

14,401.32 

4, 824, 91) 
7, 072. 05 


$81,388.12 

296, 175. 34 

14,401.32 

5, 276. 90 

8, 832. 69 




$8, 287. 88 




$166, 866. 47 




Jiail 








451.91 






1, 760. 64 








Total 


562,440.41 


406, 074. 37 


156, 366. 04 








EXPENSES. 

Maintenance <>r way and structures 


65, 966. 79 
45, 786. 76 
178, 765. 25 
31, 213. 14 


53, 742. 36 
45, 016. 88 
129, 902. 92 
26, 749. 70 


12,224.43 

769. 88 

48, 862. 33 

4, 463. 44 





Conducting transportation 










Total 


321,731.94 


255, 411. 86 


66, 320. 08 










240, 708. 47 


150,662.51 


90. 045. 96 










100 


100 












$5, 624. 40 
3, 217. 32 


$4, 060. 74 
2, 554. 12 


$1, 563. 66 
663. 20 




Expenses per mile 








2, 407. 08 


1,506.62 


900. 46 









Percentage of expenses to earnings 


57.20 


62.89 




5.69 







Statement of amount found due for year ending December 31, 1889. 

EARNINGS. 



United States: 
Passenger 
freight... 
Mail 



Commercial: 

Passenger $70,111.94 

Freight 336,462.85 

Express 4,761.73 

Miscellaneous 7,301.88 



Total earn in its. 



EXPENSES. 

Conducting transportation 83, 688. 61 

iMotive power 84,784.66 

Maintenance of way 52,251. 13 

Maintenance of cars 26,640.85 

General expenses and taxes 159, 736. 76 



$222. 70 

10.23 

14,401.32 

14,634.25 



418,698.40 
433, 3:52. 65 



Total expenses 287,102.01 




DUE THE UNITED STATES. 

One-half Government transportation, as above 

Five per cent, of net earnings 



7, 317. 12 

7,: :u. 5:5 



Total. 



14,628.65 



150 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



The following statements show the number of miles which have been 
aided, the date of issue of bonds, date of commencement of interest, 
date of maturity of bonds, amount of principal which the several Pacific 
railroads have received from the United States, and the amount of in- 
terest to maturity : 

UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. 





Date of 


Date of 


1 >ate of 




Mil.>s. 


issue 
of bonds. 


commence- 
ment of 
interest. 


maturity of 
bonds. 


Amount of 
principal. 


40 


Feb. 1, 1866 


Fob. 1, 1866 


Feb. 1,1896 


$640, 000. 00 


25 


May 7, 1866 


May 7, 1866 




400, 000. 00 


40 


June 26, 1866 


June 26, 1866 




610,000.00 


20 


July 13,1866 


July 13,1866 




320, 000. 00 


::r. 


Aug. 9,1866 


Aug. 9,1866 




560, 000. 00 


45 


Sept. 11, 1866 


Sept. 11, 1866 




72C, 000. 00 


35 


Oct. 15,1866 


Oct. 13, 1866 




560, 000. 00 


30 


Nov. 8,1866 


Nov. 7,1866 




480,000.00 


35 


Jan. 9,1867 


Jan. 8,1867 


Jan. 1, 1897 


560, 000. 00 


40 


June 11, L8,G7 


June 10,1867 




640,000.00 


40 


July 6,1867 


July 6,1867 




640,000.00 


35 


Aug. 29, 1867 


Aim. 29,1867 




560,000.00 


35 


Oct. 2,1867 


Oct. 2,1867 




560,000.00 


35 


Nov. 5,1867 


Nov. 5, 1867 




560, 000. CO 


20 


Dec. 13,1867 


Dec. 13, 1867 




320,000.00 


30 


Jan. 28,1868 


Tan. 27, 1868 


Jan. 1,1898 


957, 000. 00 


20 


May 18,1868 


May 16, 1868 




960, 000. 00 


20 


May 1!), 1868 


May 18, 1868 




960, 000. 00 


20 


June 12, 1868 


Juno 12, 1868 




960, 000. 00 


20 


June 17. 1868 


June 18, 1868 




960, 000. 00 


20 


-July 23,1868 


July 22, 1868 




960, 000. 00 


40 


July 25,1868 


July 24, 1868 




1, 841, 000. 00 


20 


An- 12, 1868 


Aug. 11,1868 




640,000.00 


20 


Aug.29,J868 


Aug. 28,1868 




640, 000. 00 


40 


Sept. 7,1868 


Sept. 7,1868 




1, 280, 000. 00 


20 


Sept. 23, 1868 


Sept. 23, 1868 




640, ooo, 00 


20 


Oct. 22, 1868 


Oct. 21,1868 




640, 000. 00 


20 


Nov. 20, 1868 


Nov. 19, 1868 




640,000.00 


40 


Dec. 7, 1868 


Dec. 7, 1868 




1,280,000.00 


20 


Dec. 15,1868 


Dec. 14, 1868 




640, 000. 00 


20 


Dec. 17, 1868 


Dec. 16,1868 


• 


640, 000. 00 


20 


Dec. 24,1868 


Dec-. 23,1868 




640, 000. 00 


20 5 


Dec. 24,1868 


Dec. 24,1868 




640, 000. 00 


July 15,1870 


Nov. 21, 1868 




1,512.00 


20 


Jan. 29,1869 


Jan. 29,1869 


Jan. 1, 1899 


640, 000. 00 


40 


Feb. 10, 186!) 


Feb. 10, 1869 




1,280,000.00 


20 


July 22, 1869 


July 16, 1869 




610,000.00 


13. 68 


Nov. 1(1,1869 


July 16, 1869 




437, 000. 00 


5 


July 14, 1870 


July 16, 1869 




160, 000. 00 


1038. G8 


Total 


27, 236, 512. 00 
48, 115, 835. 85 


Interest to maturity at 6 per cent 


Total pi 


incipal and in 


tereat ., 


75, 352, 347. 85 





KANSAS PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY. 


40 


Nov. 1, 1865 


Nov. 1,1865 


Nov. 1,1895 


$640, 000. 00 


22 


Jan. 1,1806 


Jan. 1,1866 


Jan. 1, 1896 


352,000.60 


23 


May 8,1866 


May 8,1866 




368, 000. 00 


20 


July 9,1866 


July 9,1866 




320, 000. 00 


25 


Oct. 16,1866 


Oct. 15,1866 




400, 000. 00 


25 


Jan. 23,1867 


Jan. 23, 1867 


Jan. 1, 1897 


400, 000. 00 


30 


May 6,1867 


May 6,1867 




480, 000. 00 


25 


June 11,1867 


June 10, 1867 




400, 000. 00 


24 


Aug. 13, 1867 


Aug. 13, 1867 




384, 000. 00 


25 


Sept. 20, 1867 


Sept. 20, 1867 




400, 000. 00 


26 


Oct. 26,1867 


Oct. 26,1867 




416,000.00 


20 


Dec. 3,1867 


Dec. 3, 1867 




320, 000. 00 


30 


Jan. 14,1868 


Jan. 14,1868 


Jan. 1,1898 


480, 000. 00 


25 


Apr. 28,1868 


Apr. 28, 1868 




400, 000. 00 


20 


June 6,1868 


June 6,1868 




320, 000. 00 


13. 9425 


Nov. 5,1868 
Total . . 


Nov. 2,1868 




223, 000. 00 

0, 303, 000. 00 
11, 188, 943. 09 


393 9425 




Interest to maturity at 6 per cent 


Total pr 


incipal and in1 


.erest 


17, 491, 943. 09 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 
CENTRAL BRANCH UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. 



151 



Miles. 



100 



Date of 

issue 
of bonds. 



July 27, 18GG 
1 >ec. 7, 186G 
May 2,1867 
1 )(■('•. 4, 1867 
Jan. 'J 1,1868 



Date of 
oommence 

Ult'llt Of 

interest. 



Date of 

maturity of 

bonds. 



July 19, 1866 
Dec. 6,1866 
Mas 1,1867 
Dec. 3,1867 
Jan. 20, 1868 



Jan. 1, L896 
Jan. 1,181)7 



Jan. 1,18118 



Total 

Interest to maturity at (i per cent. 

Total principal and interest. 



Amount of 
principal. 



$320, 000. 00 
320,000.00 
320, 000. (Ill 
320,000 00 
320, 000. 00 



1, GOO, 000. 00 

2, 826, 608, 26 



4. 426, G08. 'JO 



CENTRAL PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. 



3! | 


May 12,1865 


Jan. 16, 1865 


Jan. 16,1895 


$1,258,000.00 


Nov. 8,1865 


Aug. 11, 18G5 




384, 000. 00 


23 5 


Nov. 9, 1865 


Oct. 16,1865 




256, 000. 00 


Dec 11,1865 


Nov. 29, 1865 




464, 000. 00 


20 


Mar. 6,1866 


Mar. 6,1866 


dan. 1,1896 


640, 000. 00 


20 


July 10, 1866 


July 10, 186G 




640, 000. 00 




Oct. 31,1866 


Oct. 29, 1866 




320,000,00 


20 | 


dan. 15,1807 


dan. 14,1867 


dan. 1, 1897 


640. 000. 00 


Oct. 25,1867 


Oct. 25, 1867 




320, 000. 00 


24 


Dec. 12, 18G7 


Dec. 11,1867 




1, 152, 000. 00 


20 f 


June 10, 1868 


June 9,1868 


dan. 1, 1898 


946, 000. 00 


duly 11,1868 


July 10, 1868 




320, 000. 00 


20 


Aug. 5,1868 


Aug. 4,1868 




640, 000. 00 


37 


Aug. 14,1868 


Aua;. 13, 1868 




1,184,000.00 


40 


Sept. 12, 1868 


Sept. 11,1868 




1, 280, 000. 00 


35 


Sept. 21, 1868 


Sept. 19, 1868 




1. 120, 000. 00 


40 


Oct. 13,1868 


Oct. 12,1868 




1, 280, 000. 00 


20 


Oct, 28,1868 


Oct, 26,1868 




640, 000. 00 


20 


Nov. 5.1868 


Nov. 3,1868 




640, 000. 00 


20 


Nov. 12, 1868 


Nov. 11, 1868 




640, 000. 00 


20 


Dec. 5, 1868 


Dec. 5, 1868 




640, 000. 00 


20 


Dec. 7, 1868 


Dec. 7, 1868 




640, 000. 00 


20 £ 


Dec. 30, 1868 


Dec. 29, 1868 




640, 000. 00 


dan. 2,1872 


Nov. 28, 1868 




4, 120. 00 


20 


Jan. 15,1869 


dan. 13,1869 


Jan. 1, 1899 


640, 000. 00 


20 


Jan. 29, 1869 


Jan. 28,1869 




640, 000. 00 


20 


Feb. 17, 1869 


Feb. 17.1869 




640, 000. 00 


20 


Mar. 2,1869 


Feb. 17, 1869 




1,066,000.00 


20 


Mar. 2,1869 


Mar. 2,1869 




1, 333, 000. 00 


20 


May 28, 1869 


May 27, 1869 




1, 786, 000. 00 


100 


July 15, 1869 


May 27, 1869 




1, 314, 000. 00 


20. 30 


July 16. 1869 


July 15, 1869 




268, 000. 00 


47.20 


Dec. 13, 1869 


July 16, 1869 




1, 510, 000. 00 
25, 885. 120. 00 


737. 50 


Total 




Interest to maturity at G per cent 


45, 786, 454. 07 


Total pr 


incipal and in 


merest 


71,671.574.67 



WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. 




Jan. 


24, 1867 


Sept 


3, 1869 


Oct. 


29,1869 


Jan. 


27, 1870 


dan. 


8, 1872 



Jan. 


26, 1867 


Sept 


. 3,1869 


Oct. 


28. 1869 


dan. 


22, 1870 


Jan. 


22, 1870 



Jan. 
Jan. 



1, 1897 
1, 1899 



Total 
Interest to maturity at 6 percent. 

Total principal and interest . 



$320, 000. 00 

320, 000. 00 

1, 008, 000. 00 

322, 000. 00 

560. 00 

1,970,560.00 
3, 462, 469. 74 



5, 433, 029. 74 



SIOUX CITY AND PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. 



49.50 
20 
32. 27 


101.77 



Mar. 16,1868 
Mar. 30, 1868 
Mar. 3,1869 



Mar. 10. 1868 
Mar 30,1868 
Mar. 3,1869 



Jan. 1, 



Total 
Interest to maturity at 6 per cent 

Total principal and interest 



$792, 000. 00 
320,000.00 
516,320.00 



1, 628, 320. 00 
2,880,935.89 



4, 509, 255. 89 



152 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Amount of bonds issued in aid of Pacific Railroads, the interest paid thereon by the 
United States, and the amounts repaid by the several companies to June 'SO, 1890. 





Union Pacific, 

including 
Kansas Pa- 
cific. 


Central Paci- 
fic, including 
Western Pa- 
cific. 


Sioux City 
and Pacific. 


Cen tral 

Branch 

Union Pacific. 


Total. 


Principal of bonds issued by 
the United States 

Interest paid thereon by tbe 
United States 


$33, 539, 512. 00 
45, 173, 778. 54 


$27, 855, 680. 00 
36, 820, 189. 81 


$1, 628, 320. 00 
2, 148, 191. 89 


$1, 600, 000. 00 
2, 221, 808. 26 


$61, 623, 512. 00 
86, 363, 968. 50 


Total debt 


78, 713, 290. 54 


64, 675, 869. 81 


3, 776, 511. 89 


3,821,808.26 


150, 987, 480. 50 




CREDITS. 

A pplied to bond and interest 
account: 
Transportation 


16,143,450.59 
438, 409. 58 

7, 385, 265. 22 
1, 421, 714. 46 

1, 606, 888. 12 


6, 075, 668. 54 
658, 283. 26 

3, 125, 983. 42 
633, 992. 48 

855, 176. 72 


165, 047. 16 


426, 777. 77 
6,926.91 


22, 810, 944. 06 
1, 103,619.75 


Applied to sinking-fund ac- 
count : 




10,511,248.64 








2, 055, 700. 94 


Interest on sinking-fund 






2, 464, 064. 84 








Total credits 


26, 995, 727. 97 


11,349,104.42 


165, 047. 16 


433, 704. 68 38, 943, 584. 23 


Balance of debl 


51,717,562.57 


53, 326, 765. 39 


3, 611, 464. 73 


3, 388, 103. 58 


112,(14'.:, 896.27 


Excess of interest paid by 
the United States over all 
credits 


18, 178, 050. 57 


25, 471, 085. 39 


1, 983, 144. 73 


1, 788, 103. 58 


47, 420, 384. 27 



ATCHISON, TOPEKA AND SANTA ¥± RAILROAD COMPANY. 

This company has failed to submit any report of its operations for 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890. 

ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. 

The road operated by this company June 30, 1890, was as follows: 

Western Division: Miles. 

Albuquerque, N. Mex., to Mojave, Cal 815.49 

Branch, Gallup to coal mines 3. 30 

Total 818.71) 

The central division, from Seneca, Mo., to Supulpa, Ind. T., 112.05 
miles in length, is owned by this company, but is operated by the St. 
Louis and Sau Francisco Eailway Company. The entire line is laid 
with steel rails. The ballast consists of 31 miles of gravel, S9.G0 miles 
of cinder, and the remainder of earth. There were placed in the track 
during the year 230,495 cross-ties, at a cost of $121,469.91. The sum of 
$40,220.83 was expended during the same period for additions and bet- 
terments to railway, and $109,715.59 for new equipment. 

The equipment consists of 49 locomotives, all equipped with West- 
inghouse brakes; 21 cars in passenger service, all equipped with West- 
inghouse brakes and Miller platforms; 1,24G cars in freight service, 09 
of which have Westinghouse brakes ; and 193 cars in road-repair serv- 
ice, including hand and push cars. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 153 

The records of the General L;ui<l Office show that there had been 
patented to this company to June 30, 1890, iu Missouri, 728,949.36 acres 
of land, and in California, Arizona, and ISTew Mexico, 959,240.87 acres, 
making a total of 1,688,196.23 acres. The report of the company states 
that since the reorganization the total cash receipts from all sales of 
land to date amounted to $3,744,076.65, and that there are outstanding, 
on account of time sales, $430,945.83. The total number of acres dis- 
posed of is not stated. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the company 
June 30, 1890 : 

Financial condition of the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company, June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIKS. 

^irst-mortgage bonds $18,793,905.00 

Interest on same, due and accrued 362,230.00 

Interest on same accrued^ not due 11,895.00 

Other funded debt 20,219,(529.00 

Interest on same due and unpaid 450. 00 

Interest on same and rental accrued, not due 221,006.50 

Bills payable 7,308,819.25 

Accounts payable 121,762.63 

P;iy rolls and vouchers 331,374.31 

Due other companies on account of traffic 36,203. 83 

Sinking funds uninvested 33,333. 33 

Interest on unfunded debt, accrued 1,315,948.41 

Total debt 48, 756, 617. 26 

Capital stock 79,760,300.00 

Total stock and debt 128,516,917.26 

ASSETS. 

Eoad, fixtures, and equipment $119,993,378.30 

Land contracts, land cash, etc 562,989. 15 

Fuel, material, and stores on hand 170, 232. 35 

Cash on hand 407,252.42 

Bills receivable 28,449.63 

Accounts receivable 468,360.64 

Due from other companies on account of traffic 127,227.54 

Due from the United States 41, 098. 10 

Suspense accounts 83, 077. 92 

Total assets 121, 882, 066. 05 

Deficit 6, 634, 851. 21 

Revenue and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1890. 

REVENUE. 

Earnings $2,816,401.35 

Interest on miscellaneous investments 108. 80 

Receipts of the land department *-. - 3, :'.30, 222. 98 

Total 6,146,733.13 



154 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Revenue and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1890 — Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses $2, 697, 



Interest on first-mortgage bonds 

Interest on other funded debt 

Interest on other debt 

Sinking fund requirements, company 

New construction 

New equipment 

Expenses of the land department 



775, 
330, 

33, 

40, 

109, 

221, 



837. 53 
530.00 
000. 00 
223. 67 
333. 33 
220. 83 
715. 59 
725. 40 



Total 



6, 190, 580. 3f 



Deficit. 



49,8f>3.22 

Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad 

Company. 





Year ending — 


Difference. 




June 30, 1890. 


June 30,1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$576, 929. 17 

1, 932, 300. 81 

'83, 062. 08 

128, 415. 96 

9, 436. 50 


$809, 324. 87 

1, 944. 859. 62 

85,958.10 

169, 661. 04 

9, 289. 73 




$232, 395. 70 

12, 558. 61 

2, 896. 02 

41, 245. 98 


Freight 




Mail 










$146. 77 








Total „ 


2, 730, 144. 52 


3, 019, 094. 26 




288, 949. 74 








EXPENSES. 

Maintenance of way and structures 


524, 894. 56 

349, 833. 72 

1,344,133.54 

87, 686. 86 


1, 060, 999. 06 

351,251.44 

1, 337, 585. 65 

90, 469. 76 




536, 104.50 




1,417.72 




6, 547. 89 






2, 782. 00 






Total 


2, 306, 548. 68 


2, 840, 305. 91 




533, 757. 23 








423, 595. 84 


178, 788. 35 


244, 807. 49 










815. 00 


815. 00 














$3, 349. 86 
2, 830. 12 


$3, 704. 40 
3, 485. 03 




$354. 54 






654. 91 










519. 74 


219.37 


300. 37 








Percentage of expenses to earnings 


84.48 


94.07 




9.59 







CHICAGO, BURLINGTON AND QUINCY RAILROAD COMPANY. 

The number of miles of road owned and leased by this company 
December 31, 1889, including all branches, was 4,969.53. It also leases 
and operates jointly with other companies and roads, for which a yearly 
rental is paid, 171.28 miles, making a total of 5,140.81 miles operated 
There were added during the year 223.54 miles of road. There are 
294 miles of second track and 23.70 miles of third track. The main 
line extends from Chicago. 111., via Pacific Junction to Denver, Colo., 
a distance of 1,024.20 miles. 

The properties controlled by this company, but whose operations are 
not included in its report, consist of 1,115 miles of standard -gauge and 
169 miles of narrow-gauge railroad owned, and 95 miles of standard- 
gauge railroad leased and operated jointly with other companies. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 155 

The expenditures for construction during the year amounted to 
$3,128,834.00, and for new equipment to $796,911.98. 

The equipment consisted of 709 locomotives; 357 passenger and com- 
bination, 134 baggage, mail, and express, 7 dining, 11 officers', 352 way, 
15 boarding, 8 wrecking, 21,018 box and cattle, 5,711 platform and 
coal, 5 pile driving, 1,444 hand, 1,064 rubble and iron cars, making a 
total of 30,126 cars of all descriptions. There were added during the 
year 20 locomotives: 3 passenger and combination, 888 box and cattle, 
112 platform and coal, 15 hand, and 55 rubble and iron cars. 

The records of the General Laud Office show that there had been 
patented to the Burlingtou and Missouri River Railroad companies in 
Iowa and Nebraska, 2,762,304.85 acres of land, but the report of the 
company does not show what disposition has been made of it nor the 
amount realized thereon. The company reports the operations of its 
land department for the year as follows: Cash received during the year, 
$448,646.59, and outstanding on account of time sales, $997,234.70. It 
still owns 69,360 acres of land at an estimated value of $315,100.00. 

The engineer of this Bureau inspected that portion of the Burling- 
ton and Missouri River Railroad in Nebraska between Plattsmouth and 
Hastings, and found it in very good condition. His report thereon will 
be found in Appendix No. 1. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the com- 
pany, June 30, 1890 : 

Financial condition of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad Company, June 

30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

Funded debt $101,767,486.86 

Contingent liabilities of branch roads 6,330,780. 84 

Coupon interest unpaid 1, 190,274.00 

Pay rolls and vouchers 946,710. 78 

Sundry current accounts 1, 709, 321. 35 

Proat and loss 6,443,678.35 

Renewal fund 9,000,000.00 

Sinking funds, company 16, 792, 168. 60 

Total debt 144,180,420.78 

Capital stock 76,394,505.00 

Total stock and debt 220, 574,925. 78 

♦ ASSETS. 

Road and equipment ,$180,838,136.46 

Investments in branch securities 28,965, 142.99 

Sundry investments 962,358. 12 

MaTcrials and stores on hand 1,45(5, 906. 14 

Sinking funds in hands of trustees „ 13, 042, 689. 02 

Sundry available securities 629,900. 0() 

Accounts and bills receivable 3,636, 394. 09 

Cash on hand 1,132,037.24 

Total assets 230,663,564.06 

Surplus 10,088,638.28 



156 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Statement of earnings and expenses for the year ending June 30, 1890. 

EARNINGS. 

Passenger $6,155,219.72 

Freight 19,698,601.91 

Mail, express, and miscellaneous 2,384,597. 22 

Total 28,238,424.92 

EXPENSES. 

Operating expenses, not including taxes $*.7, 306, 244. 80 

Surplus 10,962,180.12 

CHICAGO AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY COMPAN \ . 

The lines of railway which make up the system of this company are 
as follows : 

Miles. 

Chicago and Northwestern Railway 2,676. 72 

Dakota, Central Railway 723. 93 

Toledo and Northwestern Railway 385. 19 

Tri iicct on and Western Railway 10. 06 

Winona and St. Peter Railroad 448.48 

Total , 4,250.38 

In addition to the above, there are 137.71 miles of double track, and 
1,023 miles of sidings. There are 4,520.18 miles of track laid with steel 
rails, and 880.77 miles laid with iron rails. The ballast consists ef 126.57 
miles of stone and slag, L,336.55 miles of gravel, 91 miles of cinder, and 
3,852.83 miles of earth. There are 3,434.88 miles of fencing-. 

During the year there were laid 18,585 tons of steel rails at a cost of 
$503,884.00, and 1,308,571 cross-ties were placed in the track at a cost 
of $500,131.17. 

Numerous improvements and additions were made during the year, 
the principal one being the completion of a large and well arranged pas- 
senger station at Milwaukee, Wis. The construction of a second main 
track on the Galena division was continued during the year, the sum of 
$473,018.96 being the expended on this work. It is expected that the 
remainder of the second track between Chicago and the Mississippi Ri vcr 
will be completed during the ensuing fall. New side tracks aggregating 
77.88 miles were constructed at various places upon the several divisions 
of the road, at a cost of $420,590.23. The total* expenditure for ad- 
ditions and betterments to the railway amounted to $1,810,279.10. 

The equipment consists of 800 locomotives equipped with Westing- 
house brakes ; 11 parlor, 9 dining, chair, 8 officers', 302 first-class and 
28 second-class passenger, 28 mail, 117 baggage and express, and 49 
combination cars, making a total of 558 cars in the passenger service, 
all of which are equipped with Westinghouse brakes and patent plat- 
forms. In the freight service there are 14,949 box, 1.801 stock, 1,950 
coal, 2,197 flat, 4,651 ore, 156 refrigerator, 29 milk, and 451 caboose 
cars, making a total of 26,244 cars in this department. In the road- 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 157 

repair service there are 25 dump, 82 ditching, 29 pile-driving and 
wrecking cars, and 2 rotary steam plows. There were added during 
the year 20 locomotives, 6 chair, 5 milk, 2 mail, 16 refrigerator, 501 
box, and 500 ore cars, at a total cost of $891,188.08. 

The company reports that the total number of acres of land acquired 
under the several grants was 2,959,105.20, of which 1,804,892.20 had 
been sold and conveyed by deed and 241,456.46 were under contract, 
leaving 912,756.47 acres still owned by the company. The total cash 
receipts from all sales to June 30, 1890, amounted to $5,873,719.5:3, and 
there remained outstanding on account of time sales the sum of 
$771,100.77. 

The main line of the road between Chicago and Omaha was inspected 
by the engineer of this Bureau in August and found to be in excellent 
condition His report thereon will be found in Appendix No. 1. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the company 
on June 30, 1890: 

Financial condition of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway Company, June30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

First-mortgage bonds $78, 880, 500. 00 

Interest on same, due and unpaid 144, 200. 50 

Interest on same, accrued, not duo 1, 200, 323. 18 

Other funded debt 26,105,000.00 

Interest on same, due and unpaid 73, 377. 52 

Interest on same, accrued, not due 187,279. 14 

Dividends unpaid , 81), 508. 75 

Pay-rolls and vouchers 2,081,875.35 

Due other companies on account of traffic 265, 272. 61 

Due other companies on account of leases (5, 000. 00 

Sinking funds paid 4,747,070.00 

Land notes due in 1891 125, 000. 00 

Fremont, Elkhorn and Missouri Valley R, R. Co - 1,038,775.00 

Total debt 114,945,148.05 

Subscription account, stock of Paint River Railway Company 375. 00 

Capital stock 66, 532, 820. 53 

Total stock and debt 181, 478, 343. 58 

ASSETS. 

Cost of road, fixtures, and equipment $155,328,489.99 

Cost of real estate, other than road 552, 178. 40 

Land contracts, land cash, etc 422, 7 ( .K'>. 75 

Fuel, materials, and stores on hand 2,071,297.20 

Cash on hand 636,820.57 

Company's stocks and bonds owned by company 268, 875. 00 

Other stocks and bonds 23, 102, 552. 39 

Sinking fund in hands of trustees, company 4, 747,970. 00 

Bills receivable 26,736.80 

Accounts receivable 1,833,767. 83 

Total assets 188,991,781.93 

Surplus 7,513,438.35 



158 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Revenue and expenditures. 

REVENUE. 

Earnings $27, 421, 193. 40 

Dividends on stocks of other companies 285, 243. 00 

Interest on bonds of other companies 458. 34 

Interest on. miscellaneous investments 124, 178. 36 

Receipts of the land department 509, 563. 32 

Total 28,340,636.48 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses $17,801,911.89 

Interest on first-mortgage bonds 4,256,338.38 

Interest on other funded debt 1,547,350.00 

Sinking-fund requirements, company 202, 570. 00 

New construction 1,816,279. 10 

New equipment 891,188.68 

Dividends 62, 63, 64, 65, preferred; 31, 32, common 3,444,979.00 

Expenses of the land department 139, 028. 94 

Total 30,099,645.99 

Deficit 1,759,009.51 

CHICAGO, ROCK ISLAND AND PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY. 

This company has not submitted its report for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1890, on the form prescribed by this office, monthly statements 
of earnings and expenses being all that have been furnished. 

The following information is compiled from the printed annual report 
of the company to its stockholders for the year ending March 31, 1890 : 

The main line of the road extends from Chicago, 111., to Council 
Bluffs, Iowa, a distance of 499.20 miles. The Kansas branch extends 
from Davenport, Iowa, to Atchison, Kans., 342.40 miles, and the Leav- 
enworth branch from Atchison Junction to Leavenworth, Kans., 
21.50 miles. It also has various other branches, aggregating 322.70 
miles in length, which makes a total of road owned of 1,185.80 miles. 
The company also leases 1,823.44 miles of road and has trackage rights 
over 330.30 miles, making a total of 3,339.54 miles of road over which 
trains are operated. 

The amount charged to construction and equipment account for the 
year was $1,013,133.96. 

The equipment consists of 521 locomotives, 36 sleeping. 236 passen- 
ger, 74 baggage, mail, and express, 9 postal, 11 dining, and 5 officers' 
cars, making a total of 371 cars in passenger service. In freight serv- 
ice there are 9,585 box, 1,852 stock, 2,429 rjlatform and coal, and 390 dro- 
vers, caboose, and other cars, making a total of 14,256 cars in this 
service. There are 1,327 gravel, hand, and other cars used in road-repair 
service. Additional equipment had been purchased as follows: Ten 
locomotives, 650 box, 35 furniture, 3 dining, and 2 caboose cars. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 159 

The records of the General Land Office show that to June 30, 1890, 
there had been patented by the Government 1,212,569.45 acres of land, 
643,147.17 being on account of the grant to the Chicago, Rock Island 
and Pacific Kail way and 569,422.28 on account of the Des Moines Val- 
ley Railroad, but the company has failed to report what disposition has 
been made of the same and the amouut realized thereon. The land 
commissioner of the company reports that for the year ending Mareh 
31, 1890, there had been sold 3,039.10 acres for $34,187.30. The bills 
receivable outstanding at the close of the year amounted to $221,951.32, 
and the interest and rental collected to $19,310.36. The number of 
acres remaining unsold was 6,029.80, besides many lots in the town of 
Audubon. 

The following statement shows the liabilities and assets of the com- 
pany April 1, 1890: 

Financial condition of the Chicago, Bock Island and Pacific Railway Company, April 1, 

1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

Six per cent, mortgage bonds $12, 500, 000. 00 

Five per cent, extension bonds 32, 387. 000. 00 

Chicago and Southwestern Railway bonds, guarantied 5,000,000.00 

Addition and improvement account 8,213,000.00 

Accounts payable 1, 163,255.(54 

Total debt 59,163,255.64 

Capital stock 46,156,000.00 

Total stock and debt 105 : 319,255.64 



ASSETS. 

Eoad, fixtures, and equipment $65, 485, 393. 13 

Railroad bridge at Rock Island 758, 526. 10 

Stocks and bonds of connecting roads 8,714,022. 45 

Company's stock owned by company 12,100.00 

Company's 6 per cent, bonds owned by company 400,000. 00 

Advances to Chicago, Kansas and Nebraska Railway Company 28, 134, 396. 81 

Loans and other investments 595, 644. 18 

Fuel, materials, and stores on hand 806, 544. 90 

Accounts receivable 760, 723. 85 

Cash aud loans (payable on demand) 169, 200. 79 

Total assets , 105,836,552.21 

Surplus 517,296.57 



160 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the Chicago, Rook Island and Pacifio 

Railway Company. 





Year ending — 


Difference. 




June 30, 1890. 


Juno 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$4, 525, 901. 58 

12, 293, 175. 70 

372, (102. 87 

313, 906. 59 

537, 931. 11 


$3, 668, 566. 33 

8, 773, 828. 38 

251,113.52 

250, 524. 27 

561,648.32 


$857, 335. 25 






3, 519,347.32 


Mail 


121,489.35 
03, 382. 32 










$23 717.21 








Total 


18, 043, 517. 85 


13, 505, 680. 82 


4, 537, 837. 03 








EXPENSES. 


2, 572, 106. 21 
2, 107, 847. 57 
5, 848, 799. 56 

2,217,779.14 


1,892,119.61 

2, 004, 728. 63 
4, 206, 122. 87 
1, 494, 186. 05 


679, 986. 60 

1(13.118.94 

1, 642, 676. 69 

723,593.09 




















Total 


12,746,533.48 


9, 597, 157. 16 1 3, 149, 376. 32 










5, 29*5, 984. 37 


3, 908, 523. 66 


1, 388, 460. 71 










3, 257. 00 


1, 976. 13 


1, 280. 87 










$5, 539. 92 
3, 913. 58 


$6, 834. 40 
4, 856. 54 




$1,294.48 
942. 96 














1,626.34 


1, 977. 86 




.'551. 52 








Percentage of expenses to earnings 


70.60 


71.06 




.46 









DUBUQUE AND SIOUX CITY RAILROAD COMPANY. 

The main line of this road extends from Dubuque to SiouxCity, Iowa, 
a distance of 326.58 miles. The company also owns 273.01 miles of 
branch lines, making a total of 509.59 miles operated, of which 520 miles 
are laid with steel rails. 

The Dubuque and Pacific Railroad Company was chartered Novem- 
ber 21, 185G, for the purpose of constructing a line between Dubuque 
and Iowa Falls, Iowa, a distance of 142.89 miles. After the comple- 
tion of 80 miles of road it was sold under foreclosure August 21, 1800, 
and the company reorganized under the name of the Dubuque and Sioux 
City Railroad Company. 

The Iowa Falls and Sioux City Railroad Company was organized 
October 1, 1807, for the purpose of constructing a road from Iowa Falls 
to Sioux City, Iowa, a distance of 183.69 miles. Both companies re- 
ceived grauts of land from the United States to aid in their construe 
tion. 

On October 3, 1889, the following-named roads were conveyed to the 
Dubuque and Sioux City Railroad Company : 

Miles # 

Dubuque and Sioux City Railroad, Dubuque to Iowa Falls 142.89 

Iowa Falls and Sioux City Railroad, Iowa Falls to Sioux City 183. 09 

Cedar Rapids and Chicago Railroad, Manchester to Cedar Rapids 41. 85 

Cherokee and Dakota Railroad : 

Cherokee to Sioux Falls 96.48 

Cherokee to Ouawa 59. 10 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 161 

The capital stock was increased to $8,000,000, all of which is out- 
standing except the sum of $ 100. 

The entire road is operated by the Illinois Central Railroad Company. 

The equipment consists of 55 locomotives, 21 of which are equipped 
with VVestinghouse brakes; 26 first-class and 19 combination cars 
equipped with Westinghouse brakes and Miller platforms ; 137 box, 24 
stock, 14 coal, 24 flat, and 7 caboose cars, making a total of 251 cars in 
service. 

The expenditures during the year ending Juue 30, 1890, for additions 
and betterments to railway amounted to $116,007.67, all of which was 
charged to construction account. 

The records of the General Land Office show that to June 30, 1890, 
there had been patented by the Government to aid in the construction 
of a railroad between Dubuque and Sioux City, Iowa, 1,233,491.75 
acres of land, the Dubuque and Sioux City Railroad Company having 
received 550,467.95 acres, and the Iowa Falls and Sioux City Railroad 
Company 683,023.80 acres. 

In its report to this office the transactions of the land department 
are given by the company only for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890, 
the total receipts being stated as $6,957.73, and the expenses $1,695.80, 
whilst there remained outstanding on account of time sales the sum of 
$7,710. The report fails to show the total number of acres which 
have been disposed of from the grant, and the amount received there- 
for. 

The following statements are compiled from the company's report to 
this office : 

Financial condition of the Dubuque and Sioux City Railroad Company June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

First-mortgage bonds $8,611,000.00 

Interest on same, due and accrued 29,312.50 

Interest on same, accrued, not due 70,770.83 

Dividends unpaid 499,23 

Bills payable 320,000.00 

Pay rolls, vouchers, and accounts 713.49 

Due other companies on account of traffic 257.071.03 

Total debt 9,289,367.08 

Capital stock 7,999,600.00 

Total stock and debt 17,286,967.08 

ASSETS. 

Cost of road and fixtures $16,703,501.07 

Cost of real estate, other than road 24,616.88 

Land contracts 7,710.00 

Company's stocks and bonds owned by company 541,493.13 

Oilier stocks and bonds 300.00 

Accounts receivable. 9,943.82 

Total assets 17,287,564.90 

DeCcit „ 1,402.18 

INT 90 — VOL TIT 11 



162 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Revenue and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1890. 

REVENUE. 

Earnings $1,733,522.17 

Dividends on stocks of other companies 24. 00 

Interest on bonds of other companies 23, 025. 00 

Receipts of the land department 6, 957. 73 



Total 1,763,528.90 



EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses fil.203, 3G5. 32 

Interest on first-mortgage bonds 498, 270. 00 

Interest on other debt 14,5(58.90 

Expenses of the land department 1, 095. 80 

Rental leased road, paid into court to abide decision of court, July 1, 

1889, to June 30, 1890 113,370.00 




Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the Dubuque and Sioux City Bail- 
road Company. 





Tear ending — 


Difference. 




June 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


l)ecr»-a.sn 


EARNINGS. 


$446,741.59 

1,171,768.62 

40, 099. 97 

25, 650. 62 

49, 261. 37 


$426, 622. 30 
1,055,033.95 

39, 532. 30 
25, 432. 55 
35, 756. 25 


$20,119.29 

116,734.67 

5(i7. 67 

2 is. 07 

13, 505. 12 








Mail 
















Total 


1, 733, 522. 17 


1, 582, 377. 35 


151,144.82 








EXTENSES. 

Maintenance of way and structures 


405, 801. 31 
179, 328. 44 
548, 095. 34 
186,147.90 


360, 292. 37 
159.818.11 
519. 350. 14 
188, 878. 61 


45, 508. 94 
19,510.33 
28, 745. 20 














$2,730.71 






Total 


1, 319, 372. 99 


1, 228, 339. 23 


91, 033. 76 










414, 149. 18 


354,038.12 


60, 111. 06 










326.58 

$5, 308. 10 
4, 039. 68 


326. 58 














$4, 845. 29 
3, 761. 22 


$462. 81 
278. 46 














1, 268. 42 


1, 084, 07 


184. 35 








Percentage of expenses to earnings 


76. 01 


79.01 




3.00 







HANNIBAL AND ST. JOSEPH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

The main Hue of this road extends from Hannibal, Mo., to St. Joseph, 
Mo., a distance of 206.41 miles. It also operates 88.83 miles of branch 
lines, making a total of 295.24 miles operated. The roadbed, track, 
bridges, buildings, and equipment were inspected by the engineer of 
this Bureau in June last and found to be in excellent condition, many 
improvements having been made during the past year, the details of 
which will be found in Appendix No. 1 of this report. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 163 

A controlling' interest in this road was acquired by the Chicago, Bur- 
lington and Quincy Railroad Company in L882. 

The equipment consists of 78 locomotives, 35 passenger, mail, and ex- 
press, 1,477 freight, and 53 caboose cars, making a total of 1,581 cars. 
There are also 161 cars used in road-repair service. 

The records of the General Land Office show that there had been pat- 
ented to this company to June 30, 1890, 603,186.34 acres of land, but 
the company fails to report what disposition has been made of the same 
and the amount realized thereon. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the com- 
pany June 30, 1890 : 

Financial condition of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad Company, June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

Consolidated mortgage, 6 per cent, bonds $6, 760, 000. 00 

Quincy and Palmyra Railroad bonds, 8 per cent 433, 000. 00 

Kansas City and Cameron Railroad bonds, 10 pet- cent 1, 200, 000. CO 

Accounts and bills payable 520, 983. 85 

Land department 11,019. 18 

Total debt 8, 934, 603. 03 

Capital stock : 

Common $9, 168, 700. 00 

Preferred 5,083,024.00 

14,251,724.00 

Total stock and debt 23, 186, 327. 03 

ASSETS. 

Construction $17, 846, 484. 75 

Equipment 3,442,615.07 

Farmers' Loan and Trust Compauy 393, 000. 00 

Investments 406, 385. 0;; 

Sundry advances 120. 00 

Accounts and bills receivable 715, 605. 38 

Accounts of doubtful value 3, 465. 56 

Prolit and loss 586, 687. 31 

Materials on hand 104, 204. 58 

Balance of cash accounts 257,717.00 

Total assets 23,756,284.68 

Surplus 569,957.65 

Earnings and operating expenses for year ending June WO, 1890. 

EARNINGS. 

Passenger $602,250.12 

Freight 1, 872,555. .V2 

Mail, express, ami miscellaneous : 443, 356. 79 

Total earnings $2,918,162.23 

EXPENSES. 

Operating expenses, not including taxes - $2,073,949.49 

Surplus 844.212.74 



164 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 
LITTLE ROCK AND FORT SMITH RAILWAY COMPANY. 

The maiu line of this road extends from Argenta to Little Rock, Ark., 
a distance of 165 miles, all of which is owned except 1.40 miles between 
Van Buren Junction and St. Louis and San Francisco Junction. There 
are 16 miles of sidings ; 89.26 miles of the road are laid with steel rails 
and 80.74 miles with iron rails. 

Since January 1, 1890, this road has been leased and operated by the 
St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern Railway Company, and the 
earnings and expenses for the last six months of the fiscal year have 
been merged with those of the lessee company. 

During the first half of the year 1,003.84 tons of steel rails were laid 
at a cost of $32,660.72, and 15,056 cross-ties placed in the track at a 
cost of $5,072.19. 

The equipment consists of 16 locomotives, 8 of which are equipped 
with Westinghouse brakes, 13 passenger cars equipped with Westing- 
house brakes and Miller platforms, and 397 freight cars. 

The operations of the land department will be found in the report of 
the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern Railway Company. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the company: 

Financial condition of the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railway Company, June 30 ; 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

Funded debt $2,699,237.25 

Interest on same, due and unpaid 9,878.02 

Interest on same, accrued, not due 81,987.50 

Accounts payable 210,841.39 

Total debt 3,001,944.16 

Capital stock 4,505,308.58 

Total stock and debt 7,507,252.74 

ASSETS. 

Koad, fixtures, aud equipment $6, 054, 083. 73 

Real estate other than road 913. 82 

Land contracts, land cash, etc < 1, 635, 998. 56 

Cash on hand 25,117.59 

Stocks and bonds owned by company 135,317.58 

Accounts receivable 512, 215. 87 

Total assets ^ 8,363,647. 15 

Surplus 856,394.41 

Revenue and expenditures for six months ending December 31, 1889. 

REVENUE. 

Earnings...- $438,624.49 

Discount and premium 888. 45 

Rentals 87,974.07 

Sundry accounts 26,219.90 

Total - 553,706.91 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 165 

Revenue, and expenditure* fox six months ending December 31j 1889 — Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses aud taxes $299,08:$. 13 

Interest on first-mortgage bouds 10*3,975. 00 

Sundry accounts 40, 072. 89 

Due from the United States 725.37 

Total 503,850.39 

Surplus ~ 49,850.52 

LITTLE ROCK AND MEMPHIS RAILROAD COMPANY. 

This company owns and operates 132 miles of road extending from 
Memphis, Tenn., to Argenta, Ark. 

The road and equipment was inspected by the engineer of this Bureau 
in June last, whose report thereon will be found in Appendix No. 1. 

The equipment June 30, 1890, consisted of 16 locomotives, 10 of which 
are equipped with train brakes ; 13 passenger, 5 mail, express, and bag- 
age, and 2 combination cars, all of which are equipped with air brakes ; 
123 box, 17 stock, 40 coal, 84 flat, 2 refrigerator, and 7 caboose cars, 
making a total of 293 cars in the passenger and freight service. There 
are also 114 cars in road-repair service. The company also owns one 
transfer boat, one wharf boat with steam elevator, and one steam shovel. 

The records of the General Land Office show there had been patented 
to this company 142,295.51 acres of land to June 30, 1890, but the re- 
port of the company to this Bureau only gives the transactions of the 
land department for the last fiscal year, during which 2,185.16 acres 
were sold, and the receipts from all sources amounted to $8,038.91. The 
average price per acre from sales during the year was $3.60. There 
were outstanding on account of time sales $7,989.18, and 51,687.79 acres 
remained unsold. 

The following statements were compiled from the company's report : 

Financial condition of the Little Bock and Memphis Railroad Company June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

First-mortgage bonds : $3,250,000.00 

Pay rolls and vouchers 46, 946, 41 

Due other companies on account of traffic 12, 374. 82 

Land department 34, 990. 97 

Total debt 3,344,312.20 

Capi tal stock 3 , 250, 000. 00 

Total stock and debt 6,594,312.20 

ASSETS. 

Road, fixtures, and equipment $6,429,817.29 

Land contracts, cash, etc 7, 989. 18 

FueJ, material, and stores on hand 28, 792. 25 

Cash on hand 80,305.79 

Accounts receivable 49,443.02 

Central Trust Company, New York, for interest 1889 and 1890 289, 000. 00 

Total assets 6,885,347.53 

Surplus 291 , 035. 33 



166 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Revenue and expenditures for the near ending June 30, 1890 

REVENUE. 

Earnings „ $582,535.28 

Receipts of the laud department 8,0:58.91 



Total. 



590, 574. 19 



EXPENDITURES. 



Operating expenses $431,759.19 

New construction and equipment 1,040. 82 

Expenses of the laud department 1,995. 17 



Total. 

Surplus 



434, 795. 18 
155, 779. 01 



Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the Little Rock and Memphis 

Railroad Company. 





Year ending — 


Diil'erence. 




June 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889t 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$233,134.21 

311,062.10 

15, 205. 23 

20,772.99 


$278, 260. 00 

313, 884. 57 

15, 552. 68 

19,966.97 

3,409.5-2 




$45 131.79 


Freight • 




2, 822. 47 
347. 45 


Mail 


$806.' 02' 
3, 360. 54 














Total 


580, 125. 55 


624, 260. 70 




44, 135.15 








EXPENSES. 

Maintenance of way and structures 


96,315.63 

37. 383. 99 

205,511.41) 

74. 322. 06 


144, 386. 99 
42,114.4!) 

203, 812. 21 
75, 346. 09 





48,071.36 
4, 730. 50 




1, 699. 19 




Gtoueral expenses and taxes 


1,023.43 






Total 


413, 533. 68 


405, (159. 78 




52, 126. 10 








166, 591. 87 


158, 600. 92 


7, 990. 95 










133 


133. 














$4, 361. 85 
3, 109. 28 


$4, 693. 69 
3, 501. 20 




$331.84 






391. 92 










1, 252. 57 


1,192.49 


60.08 








Percentage of expenses to earnings 


71. 21 


74.59 




3.38 







MISSOURI, KANSAS AND TEXAS RAILWAY COMPANY. 

This road is still operated by the receivers appointed November 1, 
1888, by the circuit court of the United States for the District of Kansas. 

The mileage of the road owned and operated June 30, 1890, was as 
follows : 

Miles. 

Hannibal, Mo., to Boggy Tank, Tex., mainline 853.61 

Braucli lines 724. 67 

Leased line from Paola to Cofi'eyville, Kans 125. 00 

Operated jointly with Texas and Pacific Pail way 71. 18 

Total operated 1,774.46 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 167 

There are 150.66 miles of sidings on the main line and 69.75 miles on 
the branch lines. Steel rails are laid upon 1,473.73 miles and iron rails 
upon the remainder. The ballast consists of 159.55 miles of stone, 
1332.48 miles of gravel, 44.16 miles of cinders, 237.69 of sand, and the 
remainder of earth. There are 680.58 miles of barbed-wire and 95.86 
miles of board fencing. 

The expenditures for the year for additions and betterments to the 
railway amounted to $1, 239,425.61 and for equipment to $095,462.84. 

The equipment consists of 212 locomotives, 65 of which are equipped 
with airbrakes and 118 with steam brakes; 3 chair, 54 passenger, 6 
mail, 25 baggage, 27 combination, and 3 officers' cars, making a total of 
118 cars in the passenger service, all of which are equipped with air 
brakes and Miller platforms. In the freight service there are 2,364 box, 
1,015 stock, 1,542 coal, 344 flat, 168 refrigerator, 20 fruit, and 115 
caboose cars, making a total of 5,569 cars in this service. There are 
20 cars used in road-repair service. 

The records of the General Land Office show that there had been 
patented to this company 983,825.96 acres of land. The Receivers' re. 
port the total cash receipts for the year ending June 30, 1890, as 
$1,592.35, and that there remained outstanding on account of time 
sales the sum of $6,715.50. 

That portion of the road between Oswego and Junction City, Kans., 
was inspected by the engineer of this Bureau in June and found to be 
in fair coudition. Some improvements had been made during the year 
between Parsons and Junction City by substituting steel for iron rails; 
but there still remains a large quantity of badly worn iron rails, which 
should be removed as soon as possible. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the com- 
pany June 30, 1890, as reported by the receivers : 

Financial condition of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company, June 30, 1890. 

(Receivers' statement.) » 

LIABILITIES. 

Pay-rolls and vouchers $919,766.51 

Due other companies on account of traffic 49,477.97 

Other liabilities 20,319.43 

Total 989,563.91 

ASSETS. 

Coat of construction of new line $307, 401. 12 

Cost of new equipment 625,577.97 

Betterments to road-bed and track 1, 303, 022. 31 

Fuel, materials, and stores on hand 300,634. 67 

Cash on hand 83,018.56 

Accounts receivable 374,833. 19 

Due from other companies on account of traffic 114,540.22 

Due from the United States 62,864.28 

Total 3,171,892.32 

Surplus 2,182,328.41 



168 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY CF THE INTERIOR. 

Revenue and expenditures for the year ending Jane 30, 181)0. (Receiver* 7 statement.) 

REVENUE. 

Earnings $8,491,910.18 

Rentals 34,791.68 

Other sources. 29,094.57 

Total 8, 555,. 796. 43 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses $6,583,149.84 

Taxes 164,654.27 

Interest on bonds 105, 426. 84 

Expenses of the land department 4. .326. 30 

Total 6,857,557.25 

Surplus 1,689,239.18 

Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Rail" 

way Company. 





Year ending. 


Difference. 




June 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


BAKN1NG8. 
Passenger 


$1,757,065.63 

6, 182,490.31 

234,481.60 

142,019.79 

175, 252. 85 


$1,446,749.55 

4,707,251.92 

251,118.01 

136, 495. 87 

138, 863. 38 


$310, 916. 08 
1, 475, 238. 39 






Mail 


$16, 636. 41 




5, 523. 92 
36, 389. 47 








Total 

EXPEX8ES. 
Maintenance of way and Bt ructures 




8,491,910.18 


6, 680, 478. 73 


1,811,431.45 






1. 756, 053. 00 

920, 937. 53 

3, 558, 555. 83 






( 
















General expenses and taxes 

ffotal 


512, 257. 75 
















6,747,804.11 


5, 748, 234. 91 


999, 569. 20 










1,744,106.07 


932, 243. 82 


811, 862. 65 










1, 703. 97 


1, 616. 00 


87.97 










$4, 983. 60 
3, 960. 04 


$4, 133. 96 
3. 557. 08 


$849. 64 
402. 96 




Expenses per mile 










1, 023. 56 576. 88 


446. 68 








Percentage of expenses to earnings 


79.46 


86.19 




6.73 







MISSOURI PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY. 

On June 30, 1890, this company owned and operated 1,422 miles of 
road, as follows : 

Miles. 

Main line, St. Louis, Mo., to Omaha, Nebr., owned 496 

Branches in Missouri, Kansas, and Nebraska, owned 672 

Branches in Missouri and Kansas, leased 254 

Total 1,422 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 169 

In addition to the above there were 30 miles of double track, 222 miles 
of sidings on main line, and L31 miles of sidings on branch lines. Steel 
rails are laid upon L,349 miles of the road. The ballast consists of 124 
miles of stone, 175 miles of gravel, 70 miles of cinder, and 1,053 miles of 
earth. There are 1,591 miles of barbed-wire fencing and 9 miles of 
board fencing. During the year 2,475 tons of steel rails were laid at a 
cost of $83,309.25, and 307,726 cross-ties were placed in the track at a 
cost of $140,737.12. 

The rolling stock consists of 300 locomotives, 72 of which are equipped 
with Westinghouse brakes; 290 cars in the passenger service, all of 
which are equipped with Westing house brakes and Miller platforms; 
10,390 cars in freight service ; 40 in road repair service, and 725 hand 
and 630 push cars. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the company 
June 30, 1890: 

Financial condition of the Jfissouri Pacific Railway Company June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

Funded ilebt $44,376,000.00 

Interest on same, due and unpaid 95, 172. 50 

Interest on same, accrued, not due 694, 338. 32 

Bills and accounts payable 2, 364, 224. 40 

Pay-rolls and vouchers 2,275, 159. 38 

Total debt 49,804,894.60 

Capital stock 44,974,850.00 

Total stock and debt 94,779,744.60 

ASSETS. 

Cost of road and fixtures $49, 065, 335. 00 

Cost of real estate, other than road 739, 152. 18 

Fuel, material, and stores on hand 373, 906. [YA 

Stocks and bonds owned by company 47, 176, 281. 38 

Total assets 98,837 041.31 

Surplus 4 , 057, 296. 71 

Revenue and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1890. 

REVENUE. 

Earnings $10,091,543.01 

Profits on stocks and bonds of other companies 1,489,585. 28 

Terminal facilities 193, 810. 21 

Sundry amounts 501,687.26 

Surplus branch-line earnings 407,933.20 

Total 12,684,588.96 



170 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Revemie and expenditures for the year ending June 30, J890 — Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses and taxes $7,334,466.69 

Interest on funded debt 2,457,535.00 

Interest on other debt 400, 176. 11 

Expense account, Traffic Association 22 659. 15 

Dividends No. 36 to 39, inclusive 1,778,994.00 

Discount and premium 110. 753.50 

Sundry expenses 189,102.87 

Due from t&e United States 207.38 

Total -. 12,293,894.70 

Surplus 390,694.26 



Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the Missouri Pacific Railway Com- 
pany. 





Year ending — 


Difference. 




June 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 
Passenger 


$2. 077, 694. 96 

(J, 622, 320. 89 

334, 198. 07 

192,836.87 

864, 492. 22 


$2, 175, 842. 69 

6,019,014.06 

328, 328. 71 

233, 280. 38 

936, 369. 34 


""$603," 306." 83 
5, 869. 36 


.$98, 147. 73 


Mail 






40, 443 51 
71, 877. 12 












Total 


10,091,543.01 


9, 692, 835. 18 


398, 707. 83 








EXPENSES. 

Maintenance of way and etrnctnres 


1, 347, 520. 36 
1,353,409.12 
3,328,281.70 

1, 305, 255. 51 


1,631,415.99 
1, 196, 200. 04 
3,112,208.48 
1,215,144.62 


i57,'209.*08' 

216, 073. 22 

90, 110. 89 


283, 895. 63 






General expenses, taxes, aiid rentals 





Total 


7, 334, 466. 69 


7,154,969.13 


179, 497. 56 










2, 757, 076. 32 


2, 537, 866. 05 


219, 210. 27 










1,422.00 


1, 422. 00 














$7,096.72 
5, 157. 85 


$6, 816. 33 
5, 031. 62 


$280, 39 
126, 23 












Net earnings per mile 


1, 938, 87 


1, 784. 71 


154. 16 






Percentage of expenses to earnings 


72.68 


73.81 




1.13 







NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. 



This company owns 2,628.60 miles of road and leases 1,413.80 miles of 
branch lines, making a total of 4,042.40 miles operated. The main line 
extends from Ashland, Wis., to Portland, Oregon, a distance of 2,117.60 
miles. 

There are 64.20 miles of double track, 388.40 miles of sidings on the 
main line, and 235.80 miles of sidings on the branch lines. Steel rails 
are laid on 4,160.40 miles and iron rails on 569.40 miles. There are 
744.3 miles of fencing in addition to 179.3 miles of snow fences. The 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 171 

ballast consists of 38.40 miles of stone, 1,100.90 miles of gravel and 
2,506.40 miles of earth. 

Branch lines aggregating 574.10 miles in length were constructed 
during the past year. The expenditures for additions and betterments 
to the railway during the same period amounted to $14,117,700.1 (J, and 
for new equipment to $1,833,904.07. The renewals of steel rails 
amounted to 17,004 tons, at a cost of $523,731.20, and 1,849,656 new 
cross-ties were placed in the track at a cost of $G62,872.64. 

The equipment consists of 407 locomotives, 389 of which are equipped 
with air brakes, 24 dining, 45 sleeping, 1 chair, 52 first-class, 41 second- 
class, 48 emigrant, 9 mail, 43 baggage., 18 express, 51 combination, and 
15 officers' cars, making a total of 347 cars in the passenger service, all 
of which are equipped with air brakes and patent platforms. In the 
freight department there are 5,245 box, 272 oil, 856 stock, 1,290 coal, 
3,332 flat, 15 fruit, 224 ferry, tank, and logging, 170 refrigerator, and 
300 caboose cars, making a total of 11,704 cars in this service, 5,406 of 
which are equipped with air brakes. In the road-repair service there 
are 138 cars in addition to 783 hand and velocipede, 554 push cars, and 
5 snowplows. There were added during the year 7 locomotives, 11 first- 
class, 2 emigrant sleeping, 11 dining, 10 baggage, 2 express, 4 mail, 12 
sleeping, 100 refrigerator, 645 box, 1,014 flat, 300 coal, 180 logging, and 
34 caboose cars, and 5 steam shovels. 

The company reports the operations of the land department to June 
30, 1890, as follows: 

Number of acres of land received from the Government by patent, 
1,292,804.78; certification of United States laud officials, 20,109,290.17; 
total, 21,462,094.95 acres. There had been sold 7,387,285.01 acres, and 
the total receipts from all sources amounted to $26,481,139.41. There 
remained outstanding on account of time sales the sum of $5,581,459.00. 
The average price per acre received during the year was $4.76, and the 
average price received from all sales to that date was $3.95. 

The engineer of this Bureau inspected the road in August, and found 
it to be in excellent condition. Extensive and important additions and 
improvements were made during the past year, the details of which 
will be found in his report thereon in Appendix No. 1. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the com- 
pany June 30, 1890: 

Financial condition of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

First-mortgage bonds $46, 943, 000. 00 

Other funded debt 62,276,778.72 

Interest on same, due and unpaid 130', 959. 86 

Interest on same, accrued, not due 1,943, 17(i. 96 

Dividends unpaid 376,713. 00 



172 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Financial condition of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, June 30, 181)0 — Cont'd. 

liabilities— continued. 

Bills payable . $475,000.00 

Accounts payable 1,579,611.59 

Pay rolls and vouchers 4, 092, 031. 56 

Due other companies on account of traffic 13, 314. 71 

Rentals, accrued, not due 178, 879. 23 

Guarantee to branch lines 417, 609. 18 

Suspense accounts, balance 3, 424. 13 

Land sales, applicable to sinking fund 2,505, 671. 03 

Revenue invested in sinking- funds 3, 420, 513. 65 

Total debt .' 124,956,683.62 

Capital stock 85,983,323.80 



Total stock and debt 210, 940, 007. 4^ 



ASSETS. 

Road and fixtures $165,978,860.44 

Equipment 14, 505, 489. 61 

Invested in branch lines, owned in part 4,680,285. 10 

Laud contracts, land casb, etc 5, 581 , 459. 60 

Fuel, material, and stores on hand 2,360,961. 92 

Cash on hand 5,321,556.02 

Stocks and bonds owned by company 4,976,251.91 

Cash in hands of trustee for cancellation of* bonds 197,687.53 

Sinking fund in hands of trustee, company r 3, 420, 513. 65 

Bills receivable 140,931.61 

Accounts receivable 5,013,521. 14 

Due from other companies on account of traffic 339, -187. 61 

Total assets 212, 517, 006. 14 

Surplus , • 1,576,998.72 



Revenue and expenditures for year ending June 30, 1890. 

REVEXUK. 

Earnings $22, 610, 502. 78 

Rentals — tracks, buildings, and grounds 3L8, 288. 39 

Sundry accounts, miscellaneous and adjusted 22,273.41 

Dividends on stocks of other companies 461, 925. 39 

Interest on bonds 16,018.66 

Proceeds, town property 510,370.94 

Interest on miscellaneous investments 12, 295. 45 

Receipts of the land department 1, 660, 629. 44 

Interest on company sinking fund, uninvested 6, 504,86 

Increase in funded debt 25,781,278.72 

Total 51,400,088.04 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 



173 



Revenue and expenditures for year ending .June 30, 1890 — Continued. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses $13, 463, 746. 37 

Interest on first-mortgage bonds 2, 722, 860. 00 

Interest on other funded debt 2. 392. 891. 84 

Rentals 2,757,029.06 

Other charges^ 253,337.94 

Sinking fund requirements, company 827, 741. 67 

New construction 14, 117,760. 16 

New equipment 1,883,904.07 

Other property, branch roads 3,452,553.74 

Dividends 1,112,732.00 

Expenses of the land department 536, 417. 35 

Preferred stock canceled 189, 254. 11 

Surplus set aside 2,844,429.63 

Increase in supplies 154, 316. 25 

Land receipts, credited property account 570,421.18 

Increase in securities owned 1,744,870. 01 

Total 49,024,265.38 

Surplus 2,375,822.66 

Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the Northern Pacific Railroad Com- 

pany. 





Tear ending- 


Difference. 


, 


June 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$6,148,729.02 

15,447,855.46 

451,781.32 

330, 822. 47 

231,284.51 


$5, 736, 390. 37 

12, 671, 094. 59 

443, 637. 77 

298, 170. 18 

63, 971. 18 


$412, 338. 65 

2, 776, 790. 87 

8, 143. 55 

32, 652. 29 

167, 313. 33 








Mail 
















Total 


22,610,502.78 


19, 213, 264. 09 


3, 397, 238. 69 






. .. 


EXPENSES. 

Maintenance of way and structures 


3, 574, 308. 73 
2,032,646.43 
6, 132,393.63 
1, 784, 397. 58 


3, 153, 500. 68 
1, 891, 625. 65 
5,461,454.81 
1,414,754.75 


360, 808. 05 
141,020.78 
670, 938. 82 
369. 642. 83 
















Total 


13,463,746.37 


11,921,335.89 


1, 542, 410. 48 










9, 146, 756. 41 


7, 291, 928. 20 


1, 854, 828. 21 










3, 578. 41 


3, 441. 42 


136. 99 










$6, 318. 58 
3, 762. 49 


$5, 582. 94 
3, 464. 07 


$735. 64 
298. 42 














2, 556. 09 


2, 118. 87 


437. 22 








Percentage of expenses 1 o eai nings 


59.54 


62.04 




2.50 








OREGON AND CALIFORNIA RAILROAD COMPANY. 



This road forms a part of the through line of the Southern Pacific 
Company between San Francisco, Oal., and Portland, Oregon. The 



174 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

main line extends from Portland to the California State line, a distance 
of 367.10 miles. It has also a branch from Portland to Corvallis, 96.80 
miles, and another from Albany Junction to Lebanon, 11.50 miles in 
length, making a total of 475.40 miles owned and operated. 

There are 34.71 miles of sidings on the main line and 0.63 miles on 
the branches. Steel rails are laid upon 437.82 miles and iron rails upon 
81.94 miles, 3,469 tons of new rails having been laid during the past 
year. The renewals of cross-ties amounted to 227,289, at a cost of 
$51,746.53. There are 449 miles of the track ballasted with gravel, 
the remainder being of earth. The fencing aggregates 38.68 miles in 
length. 

The equipment consists of 49 locomotives, 44 of which are equipped 
with Westinghouse brakes ; 6 sleeping, 29 first-class passenger, 11 bag. 
page, 10 express, mail, and baggage, and 1 officer's car, making a total 
of 57 cars in the passenger service, all of which are equipped with 
Westinghouse brakes and Miller platforms. In the freight service 
there are 442 box, 241 flat, 24 fruit, and 10 caboose cars, making a total 
of 717 cars in this service, 165 of which are equipped with Westing- 
house brakes. In road-repair service there are 33 dump and 3 wrecking 
cars and 1 pile driver. 

The company reports that to June 30, 1890, there had been patented 
to it by the United States 323,068.68 acres of land, and that 225,170.57 
acres had been sold, the total cash receipts from all sales amounting 
to $626,520.03. There remained outstanding on account of time sales 
the sum of $516,287.66. The average price per acre for all sales during 
the year was $6.32. 

The roadbed, track, bridges, and buildings were inspected by the 
engineer of this Bureau in August last and found to be in very good 
condition, although seriously damaged by the flood of last spring, which 
necessitated many changes in the line in order to place the track upon 
higher ground and thus avoid similar damage in the future. 

An enormous landslide occurred in Cow Creek Caiion, which mov< 
a portion of the mountain across the canon, so that the crest of tin 
slide was about 127 feet above the bed of the creek, the base having 
length of about 1,000 feet, thus causing the water in the creek to back 
up behind this wall for a distance of about three miles and submerging 
the roadbed to that extent, the water at the slide being about 87 feet ii 
depth. After the water had broken over this dam it cut its way through 
the mass of debris, carrying large quantities of rocks and broken ma- 
terials down the stream for a distance of 2£ miles, rapidly filling up the 
bed of the creek and forming a new bed at an elevation of about 20 
feet above the old track, thus rendering it necessary to change the loca- 
tion and build a new track for that distance. The details of damage 
done at various points and of improvements made during the year will 
be found in the report of the engineer, Appendix No. 1. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 175 

The following statements show the financial condition of the company 
J line 30, 1890: 

Financial condition of the Oregon and California Railroad Company, June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

first-mortgage bonds $14,245,000.00 

Interest on same unpaid 1, 170. 00 

Dividends unpaid 2,570.73 

Accounts payable 194, 17(i. 29 

Income for redemption of bonds 295, 608. 90 

Total debt 14,7:58,525.92 

Capital stock 19, 000, 000. 00 

Total stock and debt 33,738,52."). 92 

ASSETS. 

Road, fixtures, and equipment $31, 318, 750. 00 

Real estate, other than road 40, 004. 32 

Land contracts, time sales 383, 040. 60 

Sinking funds in hands of trustees 185, 942. 74 

Bills receivable 1,250.00 

Accounts receivable 1 , 885, 493. 31 

Cash on hand 15,498.74 

Total 33,830,579.71 

Surplus 92,053.79 

Comparatire statement of the earnings and expenses of the Oregon and California Railroad 

Company . 





Year ending — 


Diffei 


ence. 




June 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$1,011,550.90 

728,117.12 

08, 293. 20 

34, 720. 45 

47, 712. 45 


$911, 609. 66 

643, 013. 41 

61, 944. 41 

27, 023. 34 

43, 038. 27 


$99, 941. 24 
84,503.71 

6, 348. 79 

7, 703. 11 
4, 674. 18 




Freight 




Mail 
















Total 


1, 890, 400. 12 


1, 687, 229. 09 


203, 171. 03 








EXPENSES. 

Maintenance ofwav and structures 


475, 231. 46 
llti, 342. 04 
530, 120. 74 
175, 633. 09 


337,229.19 
101, 094. 42 
424, 757. 33 
154, 274. 74 


138, 002. 27 
15, 248. 22 

105,303.41 
21, 358. 35 




















Total 


1,297,327.93 


1, 017, 355. 68 


279, 972. 25 










593, 072. 19 
474. 80 


669,873.41 




$76, 801. 22 


K 






474. 80 












Earnings per mile 


$3,981.47 
2, 732. 37 


$3, 553. 56 
2, 142. 70 


$427. 91 
589. 07 












1,249.10 


1, 410. 86 




$161.76 






1 Percentage of expenses to earnings 


68.63 


60.29 


8.34 







176 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

ST. JOSEPH AND GRAND ISLAND RAILROAD COMPANY. 

The main line of this road extends from St. Joseph, Mo., to Grand 
Island, Nebr., a distance of 252.515 miles. The company also controls 
and operates the Kansas City and Omaha railroad, 193. GO miles in 
length, making a total of 446.12 miles operated, all of which is laid 
with steel rails. 

The Union Pacific Kail way Company has a proprietary interest in 
this road by virtue of the ownership of a majority of its capital stock. 

The equipment consists of 26 locomotives, all of which are equipped 
with Westinghouse automatic brakes; 11 passenger, 2 express, 3 bag- 
gage, mail, and express, and 1 officer's car, making a total of 17 cars in 
the passenger service, all of which are equipped with Westinghouse 
brakes and Miller platforms. In the freight service there are 452 box, 
97 stock, 40 coal, 47 flat, and 12 caboose cars, making a total of 648 cars 
in this service, 490 of which are equipped with Westinghouse automatic 
brakes. 

The records of the General Land Office show T that there had been 
patented to this company 462,573.24 acres of land, but the company 
fails to report what disposition has been made of the same and the 
amount realized thereon. 

The main line of the road between St. Joseph and Grand Island Avas 
inspected by the engineer of this Bureau in July, and found to be in 
fair condition. He reports that the road bed and equipment had been 
somewhat improved during the year, and that some of the station 
buildings had been put in order and repainted, and some additional 
fencing built. 

The following statements show the condition of the company June 
30, 1890: 
Financial condition of the St. Joseph and Grand Island Railroad Company, June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

First-mortgage bonds $6, 998, 000. 00 

Certificates for first-mortgage bonds, etc , '21, 126. 57 

Interest on first-mortgage bonds, accrued, not due 70,000.00 

Other funded debt 1 , 079, 0( >( >. 00 

Certificates for second-mortgage bonds '2:5, 279. 17 

Accounts payable 502, 404. 76 

Kansas City and Omaha Railroad, construction 6, 79*. 88 

Total debt 9, 360, 669. M 

Capital stock 4, 600, 000. 00 

Total stock and debt 13, 960, 00:>. 38 

ASSKTS. 

Road, fixtures, and equipment $13, 234, 102. 84 

Stocks and bonds owned by company 408,500. 00 

Accounts receivable 244,019. 60 

Equipment improvement fund 23, 039.03 

Total assets 13, 970, 862. 07 

Surplus , 10,192.69 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 177 

Revenue and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1890. 
REVENUE. 

Earnings $1,273,850.62 

Discount and interest 1,576.92 

Miscellaneous 14,003. 61 

Total 1,289,431.15 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses and taxes $772, 474. 69 

Interest on first- mortgage bonds 420, 000. 00 

He w construction 5, 454. 26 

Kansas City and Omaha guarauty 39, 965. 30 

Old construction adj listed 48. 01 

Total 1,237,942.26 

Surplus 51,488.89 

Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the St. Joseph and Grand Island 

Railroad Company. 





Year ending- 


Difference. 




June 30, 1800. 


June 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$188, 620. 68 

] , 005, 363. 98 

19, 854. 22 

17, 702. OK 

42, 309. 66 


$200, 729. 41 

779, 594. 54 

19,851.72 

18, 950. 34 

38, 956. 64 




$12, 108. 73 


Freight 

Mail 


$225, 768. 44 
2.50 






1, 254. 26 




3, 343, 02 








Total 


1, 273, 850. 62 


1, 058, 099. 65 


215, 750. 97 








EXPENSES. 

Maintenance of way and structures 


147, 906. 25 
106,217.13 
379,601.93 
138, 749. 38 


192, 389. 25 

98, 770. 65 

349, 689. 26 

122, 306. 79 




44, 483. 00 


7,446.48 
29,912.67 
16, 442. 59 


Conducting transportation 





-Total 




772, 474. 69 


763, 155. 95 


9, 318. 74 








501,375.93 


294, 943. 70 


206, 432. 23 








252. 52 


252. 52 












m, 044. 55 
3, 059. 06 


$4, 190. 16 
3, 022. 16 


$854. 39 
36.90 












1, 985. 49 


1,168.00 


817. 49 




'■ Percentage of expenses to earnings 




60.64 


72.12 




$11.48 







ST. LOUIS, IRON MOUNTAIN AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY. 

The main line of this road extends from St. Louis, Mo., to Texar- 
kana, Ark., a distance of 490 miles. The company also owns 715 miles 
of branch lines in Missouri, Arkansas, and Tennessee, and leases 340 
miles in Arkansas and Kansas, making- a total of 1,545 miles owned 
did operated. There are 9.70 miles of double track, 187. 26 miles of 
sidings on main line, and 108.5:5 miles on branch lines. Steel rails are 
iNT oo— yol m \2l 



178 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

laid upon 1,175.3 miles and iron rails upon 369.7 miles. There are 784.24 
miles of barbed- wire fencing and 95.77 miles of board fencing. The 
ballast consists of 35.16 miles of stone, 297.80 miles of gravel, 46.64 
miles of cinder, and 1,165.40 miles of earth. 

On January 1, 1890, this company leased the Little Rock and Fort 
Smith Railway, 170 miles, and the Kansas and Arkansas Valley Rail- 
way, 165 miles in length, since which date the earnings and expenses 
have been merged with those of the lessee com pan y. 

During the year 5,903 tons of steel rails were laid at a cost of 
$199,674.42, and 409,472 cross-ties placed in the track at a cost of 
$140,315.58. 

The rolling stock consists of 213 locomotives, 63 of which are equipped 
with Westingliouse brakes; 132 cars in passenger service, 122 of which 
are equipped with Westingliouse brakes and Miller platforms; 6,473 
cars in freight service ; 41 cars in road-repair service ; and 255 hand and 
241 push cars. The additions made during the year were 25 locomotives 
and 1,908 cars, the total expenditures for new equipment amounting to 
$1,184,997.80. 

This company received from the Government a grant of 63,293.46 
acres of land in Missouri, 41,571.87 acres of which had been sold for 
$208,211.79, and there remained outstanding on account of time sales 
the sum of $33,045.59. In Arkansas there had been patented to the 
company 1,327,704.86 acres of land, 1,327,704.86 acres of which had 
been sold for $1,986,804.30, and there remained outstanding on account 
of time sales the sum of $517,511.56. The Little Rock and Fort Smith 
Railway received a grant of 1,057,762.79 acres of land, and had sold 
517,591.13 acres for $1,554, 042. 63, and there remained outstanding on 
account of time sales the sum of $395,900.64. 

The road-bed, track, buildings, and equipment were inspected by the 
eugineer of this Bureau in June last, and found to be in very fair con- 
dition. His report thereon will be found in Appendix No. 1. The 
following statements show the financial condition of the company June 
30, 1890: 

Financial condition of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern Railway Company! 

June \W, L890. 

LIABILITIES. 

Funded debt ,:V.), 7. r >r>, Gi)0. 71 

Interest on same, due and unpaid 40, 690. 23 

Interest on same, accrued— not due 698, 000. 31 

Accounts payable 2, 604, 496. 97 

Due other companies on account of leases 188, 199.07 

Car-trust certificates 1,043,000.00 

Total debt 44,3:50,077.32 

Capital stock 25,763,950.00 

Total stock and debt.. , 70,094,027.32 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 



179 



Financial condition of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern Railway Company, 

June. 30, L890— Continued. 

ASSETS. 

Road, fixtures, and equipment $60,706,316.08 

Real estate other than road 521,420.72 

Land contracts, land cash, etc % 259, 526. 92 

Cash on hand 296,938.96 

Stocks and bonds owned by company 8, 540, 382. 21 

Advances on account ox surveys 33,753.89 

Accounts receivable 1, 398, 906. 89 



Total assets 73, 757, 245. 67 

Surplus 3,663,218.35 

Revenue and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1890. 

REVENUE. 

Earnings $9,811,034.65 

Profit on stocks and bonds of other companies 209,772.47 

Sundry accounts 81,834.49 



Total 10,102,641.61 



EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses and taxes . $6, 196,539.68 

Interest on funded debt 2,412,472.19 

188,199.07 

3,419.52 

1,030,248.00 

14,984.80 

1,466.58 

157,283.26 



Rentals 

Expenses of traffic association 

Dividend No. 2, December 31, 1889. 

Due from the United States , 

Discount and premium 

Sundry accounts 



Total 10,004,613.10 



Surplus 



98, 028. 51 



Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and 
Southern Railway Company. 





Tear ending- 


Difference. 




June 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$1, 891, 174. 76 

7, 218, 136. 69 

207, 375. 43 

209, 404. 19 

284, 143. 58 


$1,694,183.71 

6,052,100.62 

195, 900. <!7 

196,696.85 

251, 395. 78 


$196, 991. 05 

1, 166, 036. 07 

11, 474. 76 

12, 707. 34 

32, 747. 80 




1 Freight 




Mail 
















Total 


9, 810, 234. 65 


8, 390, 277. 63 


1, 419, 957. 02 








EXPENSES. 


1. 468, 683. 73 
987, 472. 54 

3,021,733.12 
463, 485. 37 


1, 208, 984. 95 
851, 052. 03 

2, 790, 714. 22 
402, 560. 19 


259, 698. 78 
136, 420. 51 
231,018.90 
60, 925. 18 




















Total 


5, 941, 374. 76 


5, 253, 311. 39 


688, 063. 37 










3, 869, 659. 89 


3, 136, 966. 24 


732, 693. 65 










1, 545. 00 


1, 196. 00 


349.00 










$6, 350. 19 
3, 845. 55 


$7,015.28 
4, 392. 40 




$665. 09 






546. 85 










2, 504. 64 


2, 622. 88 




118. 24 








Percentage of expenses to earnings 


60.55 


62. (il 




2.06 







180 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

ST. LOUIS AND SAN FRANCISCO RAILWAY COMPANY. 

The main line of this road extends from St. Louis to Seneca, Mis 
onri, a distance of 326.28 miles. It also operates fifteen branch lines, 
aggregating* 1003.19 miles, making a total of 1329.47 owned and operated. 
The entire line is controlled by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe 
Railroad Company. 

Daring the year ending June 30, 1890, the company laid 2,271 tons 
of steel rails, at a cost of $72,376.77, and 376,469 cross-ties were placed 
in the track at a cost of $96,890.51. There were expended during the 
same period $202,794.61 for new construction and $135,312.60 for new 
equipment. 

The rolling stock consists of 170 locomotives; 6 parlor cars, a one-half 
interest in 8 sleeping cars, 37 first-class, 14 second-class, 33 baggage, 
mail, and express, 25 combination and 3 officers' cars, making a total of 
126 cars in passenger service. In the freight service there are 2,265 
box, 1,014 stock, 1,588 coal, 37 flat, 50 refrigerator, 60 short mining and 
94 caboose cars, making a total of 5,108 cars in this service. There are 
170 cars used in road-repair service. 

The records of the General Land Office show that 728,949.36 acres of 
land had been patented under the act of June 10, 1852, to aid in the 
construction of the Southwest Branch of the Pacific railroad of Mis- 
souri, which was purchased by the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany in 1870. The Saint Louis and San Francisco Railway Company 
purchased the property of the Atlantic and Pacific Company sold under 
foreclosure September 8, 1876, but failed to report what disposition was 
made of these lands and the amount realized thereon. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the com- 
pany June 30, 1890 : 

Financial condition of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company, June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

First mortgage bonds $31,59:5,500.00 

Interest on same, due and accrued 608, 263. 00 

Interest on same, accrued not due 213, 261. 6G 

Bills payable 1,377,209.00 

Accounts payable 432, 878. 82 

Pay-rolls and vouchers 541 , 739. 92 

Due other companies on account of traffic 33, 041. 14 

Total debt 34.799,893.54 

Capital stock 30, 000, 000. 00 

Total stock and debt 64,799,893.54 

ASSETS. 

Road fixtures, and equipment $57,719,226.51 

Fuel, material, and stores on hand 196, 770. 44 

Cash on hand 214,777.09 

Stocks and bonds owued by company 6,044, 172. 73 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 181 

Financial condition of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company, etc.— Cont'd. 

assets — Continued. 

Sinking-fund in hands of trustees, company... $'28, 400. 79 

Bills receivable 2,287,079.43 

Accounts receivable 1,641,510. '38 

Due from other companies on account of traffic 37,209. 42 

Total assets G8, 1G9, 140. 79 

Surplus 3,309,253.25 

Revenue and expenditures. 

REVENUE. 

Earnings $0,394,068.74 

Interest and profits on investments 100, 932. 76 

Total 6,495,001.50 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses and taxes $3,646,449.52 

Interest and rentals 2,404,937.24 

Dividends Nos. 6 and 19 190,000.00 

Total 6,241,386.76 

Surplus 253,614.74 

Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the St. Louis and San Francisco 

Railway Company. 





Tear ending — 


Difference. 


June 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$1, 290, 044. 05 

4, 655, 183. 89 

138, 503. 25 

134, 258. 78 

176, 078. 77 


$1, 269, 947, 84 

4, 029, 284, 06 

139, 073. 57 

135, 960. 05 

232, 910. 23 


$20, 096. 21 
625, 899. 83 




'reigh t 




fail 


$570. 32 






1 701 27 






56,831.46 


Total 




6, 394, 068. 74 


5, 807, 175. 75 


586, 892. 99 








EXPENSES. 

laintenance of way and structures 


796, 935, 75 

569, 880. 88 

1,715,440.85 

564, 192. 04 


837, 706. 14 

530, 178. 83 

1,557,371.44 

607, 672. 01 




40, 770. 39 


39, 702. 05 
158, 069. 41 








41,479.97 


Total 






3, 646, 449. 52 


3, 532, 928. 42 


113, 521. 10 




- et earnings 




2, 747, 619. 22 


2,274,247.33 


473,371.89 




J verage miles operated 




1, 329. 47 


1, 329. 47 




P arningsper mile 






$4, 809. 48 
2, 742. 78 


$4, 368. 03 
2, 657. 39 


$441.45 
85.39 




p xpenses per mile 




Net earnings per in ile 




2, 066. 70 


1, 710. 64 


356. 06 




jl jrcentage of expenses to earnings 




57.03 


60.83 




13.80 







182 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 
ST. PAUL AND DULUTH RAILROAD COMPANY. 

The main line of this road extends from St. Paul to Duluth, Minn., a 
distance of 155 miles. The company also owns 28.50 miles and leases 
64.25 miles of branch lines, making a total of 247.75 miles operated. 

During the year ending June 30, 1890, there were laid 1,363 Jfff tons 
of new steel rails, at a cost of $47,435.49, and 68,050 new cross-ties, at 
a cost of $16,338.71. 

There was expended during the year, for additions and betterments, 
charged to new construction, the sum of $141,503.79. 

The rolling stock consists of 66 locomotives, 24 of which are equipped 
with Westinghouse brakes: 71 cars in the passenger service, 61 of 
which are equipped with Westinghouse brakes and Miller couplers and 
platforms, and 2,387 cars in the freight service. There were added to 
the rolling stock during the year 10 new iirst-class passenger cars, at 
a cost of $30,325.61. 

The number of acres of land received by patent from the Government 
to June 30, 1890, was 815,482.75, and from the State of Minnesota 
665,506.05, making a total of 1,480,988.80 acres. There, had been sold 
412,133.55 acres, the total receipts from all sales amounting to $1,840,- 
061.44, and there were outstanding on account of time sales, $95,397.26. 

The following statement shows the financial condition of the com- 
pany on June 30, 1890 : 

Financial condition of the St. Paul and Duluth Railroad Comffany, June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

First-mortal «••(> bonds $1,000,000.00 

Interest ou same, due and accrued 1,225.00 

Interest on same, accrued, not due 60, 4(50. 66 

Other funded debt 2,710,000.00 

Dividends unpaid 4,058.75 

Pay rolls and vouchers 147,514.55 

Sinking funds 89,448.79 

Taxes accrued but not due 18,283. 11 

Deferred land and stunipage receipts - 212, 710.72 

Accounts payable 103,778.90 

Land and stumpage income expended prior to July 1, 18-8, on improve- 
ments, construction, and equipment 788,560.40 

Total debt 5,130,058.88 

Capital stock 10,037,118.11 

Total stock and debt 15,173,170.99 

ASSETS. 

Roan, fixtures, and equipment $12,908,333.05 

Land contracts, land cash, etc 212,716.72 

Fuel, material, and stores on hand 62, 131. 16 

Cash on band 447,765.47 






RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 183 

Financial condition of the St. Paul and Duluth Railroad Company, June 30, 1890 — 

Continued. 

ASSETS — continued. 

Other stocks and bonds $1,272,193.22 

Miscellaneous investments 160,062.74 

Bills receivable 4,611.31 

Accounts receivable 160,541. 18 

Due from other companies on account of traffic 25, 281. 80 

Cash applied to interest account 5, 283. 75 

Cash applied to company's sinking fund 89, 448. 79 

Suspense accounts 36,571.68 

Insurance fund 3,542. 06 

Total assets 15, 388, 482. 93 

Surplus 215,305.94 

Uevenue and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1890. 

REVENUE. 

Earnings $1,410,527.23 

Dividends on stocks of other companies 4,200. 00 

Interest on bonds of other companies 200. 55 

Receipts of the land department 218,474.01 

Interest and exchange 5, 088. 43 

Track rentals 13,008.95 

Total 1,651,499.17 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses, including taxes and rentals $1,099,462.21 

Interest on first-mortgage bonds 50, 000. 00 

Interest on other funded debt 100,000.00 

Dividend, No. 16, payable July 16, 1890 134,117.50 

I Expenses of the- land department 25, 625. 45 

Other expenditures 26,912.31 

Total 1,436,117.47 

Surplus 215,381.70 



This company has submitted its report for the year ending June 30, 
1890. On February 1, 1890, the Great Northern Railway Company took 
possession of all the railways, rolling stock, and equipment owned, 
leased, or controlled by this company, under lease for a term of nine 
hundred and ninety-nine years. The lessee company agrees to pay a 
rental sufficient to provide for yearly dividends of 6 per cent, on the 
entire capital stock of the lessor company, for interest on bonds, taxes, 
assessments, and all other current obligations. 

The main line of the road extends from St. Paul to St. Vincent aud 
Neche, Minn., connecting with lines running into Wiuuepeg, Manitoba, 



184 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

and westerly from Grand Forks, Dak., to Great Falls, Mont, with con- 
nections to Helena and Butfce, Mont. There are 2,770.40 miles of single 
track, 26.92 miles of second track, 8.10 miles of third track, 8.10 miles of 
fourth track, and 3(31.02 miles of sidings. Steel rails are laid upon 
2,498.00 miles, and iron rails upon 676.48 miles of the track. 

The equipment consists of 259 locomotives, 82 of which are equipped 
with Westinghouse brakes ; 6 dining, 38 sleeping, 100 passenger, 55 
baggage, mail, and express, 22 combination, and 3 other cars, making 
a total of 224 cars in passenger service, all of which are equipped with 
Westinghouse brakes and Miller platforms. In freight service there 
are 5,839 box, 478 stock, 1,553 flat, 57 refrigerator, 171 caboose, and 16 
fruit and other cars, making a total of 8,114 cars in this service. There 
are 139 cars used in road-repair service. 

The company reports that it had received by patent 3,199,498.37 acres 
of land, and that it had disposed of 1,737,007.70 acres, the total cash re- 
ceipts from all sales to June 30, 1890, amounting to $5,504,870.21. 
There remained outstanding on account of time sales the sum of 
$704,583.74. The average price per acre for all sales to this date was 
about $0.50, the average for the year being $7.09 per acre. 

The following statement shows the financial condition of the company 
June 30, 1890: 

Financial condition of the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railway Company, June 

30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

Funded debt $52,785,000.00 

Accounts payable and pay-rolls and vouchers 336,(524. 86 

Taxes not ye1 due 7,998.19 

Sinking fund, first mortgage bonds 3,791,801.87 

Sinking fund, consolidated-mortgage bonds 8,029. 11 

Total debt 56, 929, 454. 03 

Capital stock 20, 000, 000. 00 

Total stock and debt 76, 929, 454. 03 



ASSETS. 

Road and fixtures .$70,850,142.64 

Equipment 7,705,326.85 

Cash on hand 87,031.45 

Miscellaneous investments 198,990.87 

Bills receivable 121,603.58 

Accounts receivable * 240,150.71 

Total assets 79,203,246.10 

Surplus 27273,792.07 

As this road has been operated by the Great Northern Railway Com- 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 185 

pany since February 1, 1890, the following statentenl shows the earn- 
ings and expenses for only the seven months ending January 31, 1890: 

EARNINGS. 

Passeuger $1,147,070.54 

Freight 4,538,691. 10 

Mail 132,186.94 

Express 84, 729. 78 

Miscellaneous 251, 693. 10 

Total , 6, 154,371.46 

EXPENSES. 

Maintenance of way and structures $420,096. 03 

Maintenance of equipment 515, 760. 45 

Conducting transportation 1,451,877. 14 

General expenses and taxes 637, 521 . 54 

Total 3,025,255.16 

Net earnings 3,129,116.30 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

The mileage of this road June 30, 1890, was as follows : 

Southern division : 

Miles. 

Alcalde to Yuma 549.29 

Los Angeles to San Pedro 24. 24 

Saugus to Elwood 91.50 

Los Angeles to Santa Monica 16. 83 

Florence to Santa Ana 27. CO 

Berenda to Raymond 21. 00 

Stockton to Milton and Oakdale 49.00 

Martinez to Tracy 46.51 

Tracy to Los Banos 58. 53 

Miraflores to Tustin „.. 10.80 

Fresno to Porterville 69. 30 

Studebaker to Whittier 5.90 

Thenard to Long Beach 3. 80 

974.30 

Coast division: 

San Francisco to TresPinos 100. 49 

Carnadero to Santa Margarita 153. 10 

Castro ville to Lake Majella 20. 32 

Pajaro to Santa Cruz . 21. 20 

Aptos to Mod te Vista 7. 00 

Hillsdale to Almaden 7. 80 

309.91 

Total 1,284.21 

Both divisions were inspected by the engineer of this Bureau in 
March last and found to be in very good condition, many improve- 
ments having been made during the year, the details of which will be 
found in Appendix No. 1. 



186 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Steel rails are laid upon 1,209.02 miles of the road and iron rails upon 
the remainder. During, the year 2,7GG.85 tons of steel rails were laid, 
at a cost of $121, 888. G2, and 307,263 cross-ties placed in the track, at a 
cost of $133,036.68. 

The sum of $1,850,369.94 were expended on account of additions and 
betterments to railway, $1,291,450 of which was for the construction of 
25.829 miles of new road. The expenditures for new equipment 
amounted to $1,175,733.17, the company having purchased during the 
year 51 locomotives, 30 passenger, 2 baggage, mail, and express, 601 
box, 226 flat, 48 fruit, 3 caboose, and 6 station cars. 

The equipment consists of 242 locomotives, all of which are equipped 
with Westinghouse brakes ; 3 parlor, 50 sleeping, 170 passenger, 26 
emigrant and tourist, 3 mail, 26 baggage, 29 express, baggage, and 
mail, and 2 officers 7 cars, making a total of 309 cars in the passenger 
service, all of which are equipped with Westinghouse brakes and Miller 
platforms. In the freight service there are 3,563 box, 1,098 flat, 363 
fruit, and 85 caboose cars, making a total of 5,109 cars in this service, 
4,148 of which are equipped with Westinghouse brakes. There are 65 
cars used in road-repair service. 

The company reports that to June 30, 1890, it had received by patent 
from the Government 1.230,235.38 acres of land, and that it had disposed 
of 2,792,201.38 acres, the total cash receipts from all sales to date amount- 
ing to $6,907,458.25. There remained outstanding on account of time 
sales the sum of $2,981,572.03. The average price received from all 
sales was $3.03 per acre. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the company 
June 30, 1890 : 

Financial condition of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company of California, June 30, 1890. 

LIABILITIES. 

First-mortgage bonds $43,736,500.00 

Accounts payable 3,075,859.34 

Trustees land-grant mortgage 394,510. 13 

Sinking funds uninvested 14,547.50 

Total debt 47,221,42^.97 

Capital stock 60,501,900.00 

Total stock and debt 107,723,322.97 

ASSETS. 

Road, fixtures, and equipment $1 14, 615, 873. 62 

Land contracts, laud casb, etc 2,822,637. 19 

Cash on band 149,6-6.41 

Sinking funds in bands of trustees 841, 091. 13 

Bills and accounts receivable 4,529.97 

Total assets 118,433,818.32 

Surplus 10,710,495.35 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 



187 



Comparative statement of the earnings and expenses of the Southern Pacific Railroad 

Company of California, 





Year ending — 


Difife 


once. 




June 30,1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EARNINGS. 


$2, 799, 319. 67 

4, 739, 689. 95 

124, 228. 52 

92, 504. 94 

560, 782. 23 


$3,129,824.19 

4, 717, 976. Si 

120,810.04 

93,823.83 

460, 546. 17 




$330, 504. 5 


Freight 


$21,713.14 

3,418.48 

'*"l66,~236.~()6 


Mail 




Express 


1, 318. 89 






Total 


8, 316, 525. 31 


8,522,981.04 




206, 455. 73 







EXPENSES. 
Maintenance of way and structures 


1,494,279.82 
716,630.87 

2, 751, 745. 79 
772,079.21 


1,669,975,80 
836, 992. 37 

3,021,591.44 
634, 578. 23 





175, 695. 98 
120,355.50 
269, 845. 65 








137, 500. 98 








Total 


5,734,741.69 


6, 163, 137. 84 




428 396.15 








Net earnings 


2, 581, 783. 62 


2, 359, 843. 20 


221,940.42 






Average miles operated 


1, 275. 96 


1, 240. 82 


35.14 




Earnings per mile 

Expenses per mile 


$6,517.86 
4,494.45 


$6, 868. 32 
4, 966. 98 




$350. 96 




472. 53 






Net earnings per mile 


2, 023. 41 


1,901.84 


121.57 






Percentage of expenses to earnings 


68.96 


72. 31 




3.35 








TEXAS AND PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY. 

The president of this company has submitted a report for the year 
ending June 30, 1890, as required by section 13 of the act of March 3, 
1871 (16 Stat, 573). 

The mileage of the road on that date was as follows: 

Eastern division : Miles. 

Texarkana to Fort Worth, via Marshall 253 

. Texarkana Junction to Fort Worth, via Wbitesboro 239 

Marshall to Shre veport 40 

532 
Rio Grande division : 

Fort Worth to Sierra Blanca 522 

Joint track, Sierra Blanca to El Paso 93 

Branch to Gordon coal mines (i 

621 

New Orleans division : 

Shreveport to New Orleans 327 

Baton Rouge to Junction to West Baton Rouge 8 

Westwego branch 1 

Port Allen extension 3 

Plaquemine branch T ... 7 

34G 

Total 1,499 

The New Orleans division was inspected by the engineer of this Bu- 
reau in June last, and found to be in fair condition, considering the 



188 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

great damage done to the roadbed and bridges by the great flood of 
last spring. His report thereon will be found in Appendix No. 1. 

The equipment consists of 192 locomotives; 48 passenger, 10 combi- 
nation, 19 excuraiou, 26 baggage, express, and mail, 1 pay, and 4 special 
cars, making a total of 108 cars in passenger service. In the freight 
service there are 1,916 box, 818 flat, 578 stock, 507 coal, 39 tank, 39 
fruit, and 99 caboose cars, making a total of 3,996 cars in this service. 
There are 39 cars used in road-repair service. 

Steel rails are laid upon 1,213 miles of the road. During the calen- 
dar year 1889, the sum of $321,211.97 was expended by the company in 
additions and betterments to the railway, $134,842.85 being on accouut of 
the Eastern division, $20,704.16 on account of the Rio Grande division, 
and $165,664.96 on account of the New Orleans division. During the 
same period the sum of $177,415.52 was expended for new equipment. 

The New Orleans Pacific Railway Company was consolidated with 
the Texas and Pacific Railway Company June 21, 1881. The records 
of the General Land Office show that to June 30, 1890, there had been 
patented by the Government 756,500.27 acres of laud to aid in the con- 
struction of the New Orleans Pacific Railway, but the company fails to 
report what disposition has been made of the same and the amount 
realized thereon. 

The following statements show the financial condition of the company 

June 30, 1890 : 

Liabilities and assets. 

LIABILITIES. 

Funded debt $53,778,602.06 

Interest due and accrued 217,479. 17 

Texas school-fund loan 148, 595. 43 

Interest, scrip, income, and land bonds 323, 762. 00 

Other scrip 18, 453. 45 

Pay rolls and vouchers 717, 530. 44 

Due other companies 82, 125. 61 

Bills payable „_. 415, 721. 47 

Estimated taxes 81,935. 41 

Unadjusted accounts, Gould-Huntington contract.... 174,296.29 

Other unadjusted accounts 82,929. 03 

Total liabilities 56,041,630.36 

Capital stock 38,710,900.00 

Total stock and debt 94,752,530.36 

ASSETS. 

Road and equipment $80, 481 , 968.31 

New second- mortgage bonds in treasury 1, 763,000. 00 

In hands of trustees to retire first-mortgage bonds, E. D 3,951, 000.00 

Other bonds and scrip 43, 132. 00 

Gordon coal mines 135,974. 82 

Capital stock, New Orleans Pacific Ra il way Company 6, 712, 500. 00 

Capital stock, California and Texas Railway Construction Company 615.00 

Real estate at El Paso and New Orleans 86,600.00 

Texas and Pacific car trust 262, 000. 00 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 



189 



Liabilities and assets— Continued. 

\ ssi. is -continued. 

Cash on hand $93,577.81 

Due from agents and foreign roads 536,529.50 

Advances to agents 21, 036. 68 

Unclaimed wages 17, 815. 28 

Bills receivable, land notes 160,308.54 

Fuel, material, and stores on Land 285, 252. 69 

Total assets 94,552,210.13 

Deficit . 200,320.23 

Revenue and expenditures for the year ending June 30, 1890. 

K 10 VEX 17 K. 

Earnings $7, 212, 692. 53 

Equipment sold 19,039.26 

Coupons and interest 4, 810. 04 

Joint track earnings 5,996. 83 

Rentals.. - -• 52,681.50 

Sundry amounts 58, 007. 38 

Bonds 3,304.00 

Total 7,356,531.54 

EXPENDITURES. 

Operating expenses and taxes $5, 756, 284. 80 

Interest on funded debt 1,279,490.00 

Interest and discount, etc 23,988.73 

Traffic association expenses 522. 40 

Rentals : 68,904.00 

Investments 42,215.00 

Car-trust debentures paid 33, 452. 76 

Reorganization account, settlement of prior suits 1C, 012. 86 

New equipment 166, 315. 73 

New boats and barges 46, 564. 32 

New hospital building 14,599.98 

Sundry accounts 13, 469. 14 

Total 7,461,819.72 

Deficit 105, 288. 18* 

Comparative, statement of the earnings and expenses of the Texas and Pacific Railway 

Company. 





Tear ending — 


Difference. 




June 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1S89. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EABNINGS. 


$1,757,389.22 

5, 005, 557. 23 

197,137.56 

146,687.05 

45,921.47 


$1,613,099.33 

4,309,921.80 

194,824. 12 

108,000.00 

42, 980. 87 


$144,289.89 

6J5, 035. 37 

2,313.44 




Freight" . 




Mail 




Express 


$21,312.95 




2, 940. 60 






Total 


7, 212, 092. 53 


6, 388, 826. 18 


823, 800. 35 









190 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Comparative statement of ike earnings and expenses of the Texas and Pacific Railway 

Company—. Continued. 





Year ending- 


Difference. 




Juno 30, 1890. 


June 30, 1889. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


EXPENSES. 


$2, OGO, 151. 91 

1,358,671.59 

1,633,277.68 

295,448.80 

408,734.82 


$1, 721, 765. 53 1 $338, 386. 38 
1, 043, 452. 10 315 219. 49 










1, 559, 565. 27 
281,477.85 

305. 826. 58 


73,712.41 
13, 970. 95 
12, 908. 24 




Maintenance of cars 

General expenses and taxes 





Total 


5, 756, 284. 80 


5, 002, 087. 33 


754, 197. 47 










1, 456, 407. 73 


1, 386, 738. 85 


69, 668. 88 








Average miles operated 


1,499 


1,487 


12 












$4,811.66 
3, 840. 08 


$4, 296. 45 
3, 363. 88 


$515.21 
476. 20 














971.58 


932. 57 


39.01 








Percentage of expenses to earnings 


78. 42 


78.29 


.13 







PERSONNEL OF THE BUREAU NOVEMBER 1, 1890. 

The employes of this office, with their respective positions and sala- 
ries, on the above date were as iollows: 

Horace A. Taylor, Commissioner $4,500 

William M. Thompson, bookkeeper 2,400 

Francis E. Storm, assistant bookkeeper 1,800 

Thomas Hassanl, railroad engineer 2, 500 

John S. Martin, jr., clerk ],(500 

Miss Kate Schmidt, copyist 900 

William J). Nelson, assistant messenger 720 

The jurisdiction of this office, under the act of June 19, 1878, extends 
over forty-nine original companies which, by consolidation and lease, 
are now represented and operated by twenty-three companies, with an 
aggregate of about 46,500 miles of road. It affords me pleasure to 
commend the general efficiency of the employes of this office, w r ho have 
made accurate and comprehensive inspections of the property and 
accounts of these companies, as required by law. 

CONCLUSION. 

The report of the railroad engineer gives full information in regard 
to the physical condition of the several railroads inspected by him, 
and is submitted herewith as Appendix No. 1. 

I have deemed it advisable to republish the principal acts of Con- 
gress relating to the several bonded and land-grant railroads coming 
under the jurisdiction of this office, which will be found in Appendix 
No. 2. 

1 have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. A. Taylor, 

Hon. John W. Noble, Commissioner. 

Secretary of the Inferior. 



Appendix No. 1. 



REPORT OF RAILROAD ENGINEER. 

Department of the Interior, 
Office of the Commissioner of Railroads, 

Washington, November 1, 1890. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the inspection of railroads 
coming under the supervision of this Bureau, made during the months of March, 
June, July, and August of the present year, and embracing the Union Pacific, Central 
Pacific, Sionx City and Pacific, Central Branch Union Pacific, Northern Pacific, 
Oregon and California, St. Paul and Duluth, Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and 
Omaha, Chicago and Northwestern, Burlington and Missouri River in Nebraska, 
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, St. Joseph and Grand Island, Hannibal and St. 
Joseph, St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern, St. Louis and San Francisco, Texas 
and Pacific, Little Rock and Memphis, Missouri, Kansas and Texas, and the 
Southern Pacific of California: 

UNION PACIFIC RAILWAY. 

The inspection of the main line from Omaha, Nebr., to Ogden, Utah, was made in 
March, in company with the division officers, who gave full opportunities for the ex- 
amination. 

The mileage operated December 31, 1889, was — 

Miles. 

Union division 1,042. 34 

Kansas division 042. 94 

Cheyenne division 104. 06 

Leavenworth branch 31. 93 

Total Union Pacific 1, 821 . 27 

Auxiliary lines operated and controlled 3,358.79 

Total mileage of Union Pacific system 5, 180. 06 

This shows an increase of auxiliary lines amounting to 284.79 miles. 
The renewals of rails and ties have been sufficient to keep the track in good condi- 
tion. Upon the Union division, from July 1, 1889, to May 31, 1890, about 80 miles of 
75-pound steel rails have been laid, besides large additions to side tracks and spurs, 
amounting to 125,835 lineal feet, or very nearly 24 miles, the .greater part being 
placed at the coal mines, and in the yards at Omaha, Columbus, North Platte, and 
Green River. The addition to ballast for the year is only about 2 miles. 

New fencing of five wires upon substantial posts has been built to the extent of very 
nearly 67 miles. Nearly 70 per cent, of the ties used in renewals during the year were 
of oak and cedar. The bridging has been kept in good order. New piers have been 
put under the Loup River bridge, near Columbus, and many pile bridges have been 
rebuilt. New depots have been putup at Mercer, West Kearney, Cozad, ilershey, and 
Dana. At Omaha there have been put up a new lumber shed, addition to iron house, 

191 



102 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

aud new track scales. New turntables have been put in at North Platte ami Laramie. 
New stock yards and additions have been made at Schuyler, Brady Island, and AJmy. 
New w r ater tanks and windmills at Pine Bluffs aud Egbert, and now track scales at 
Kearney. 

At Cheyenne t lie Col lowing buildings are now completed and in use : Freight-car 
repair shop, large coal chute, water tank, sand house, machine shop, smith shop, 
boiler and engine house, transfer table, freight platform aud enlarged stock yards. 
The following buildings are now in progress at Cheyenne: Large brick round 
house, oil house, storehouse, office building, paint shop, car erecting shop, wood- 
working shop, with boiler and engine room and ash pits. When these are com- 
pleted this station will be remarkably well furnished with buildings and modern 
machinery for turning out work with economy. 

Wyoming has a new pipe line bo Laramie River, and a new coal house. At Rock 
Springs great improvements have been made by the completion of work that was in 
progress last year, viz: At No. I mine, trestle, scale bouse, boiler and engine house, 
electric-light building and dump building ; at No. 8 mine, new dump building ; at 
No. 3 mine, new boiler and engine house, dump building, and house for offices. The 
hotel at Green River has been remodeled inside and uew plat Conns built. At Ogden 
the following buildings are completed and in use: Union passenger bouse, union 
freight house, roundhouse, coal chute, sand house, turntable, ash pits, and ico 
house; au oil house will soon be finished. At Rawlins a new oil house and ashpit 
have been built, aud at several stations improvements have been made. 

There were many new heavy steel rails and ties distributed along the road for use 
during the summer, which will make a further improvement in the track. The adop- 
tion of 75-pound steel rails by this company is a wise move, both for safety and for 
economical reasons, and it might be good policy to adopt that pattern for general use 
upon the main line, transferring gradually all lighter rails to branch lines, where 
smaller locomotives are used and heavy trains are not run at such high speed as upon 
the main line. 

The roadbed, rolling stock, and buildings compare very favorably with othe 
prominent railways. The addil ion made during the year of 13 new sleeping ears, 5 
tourist, and 8 dining cars enables the company to give its patrons excellent first 
class accommodations upon all its principal lines, fully equal to any of the roads wea 
of Chicago. The improvements completed and under way at Denver will greatly ad 
to the conveniences of that station : new tracks have been laid in the yard, a 50-sta 
brick engine house-, and elevated coal track built, and arrangements made for addin 
200 feet to the length of the present union depot, which has been found too small for 
the great amount of business now brought to it. 

KANSAS DIVISION. 

The inspection was made in July, in company with the superintendent and other 
officers of the division. 

The mileage operated is the same as last year, 1,048 miles. The roadbed, track, 
and buildings, as well as bridges, are kept iu very good condition throughout the 
line, and some new buildings have been put up and improvements made generally. 
The new passenger house at Lawrence is now in use and makes a very creditable ad- 
dition to the station. At Ellis the buildings and yard are in very good order ; a new 
slotter and lathe have been added to machinery in the shop. The improvements at 
Cheyenne Wells consist of a brick Ill-stall engine house, iron turntable, elevated coal 
track with 32 chutes, two wells of 257 feet depth, tank, steam pump, superintendent's 
house, ice house, and other buildings required for a terminal station. The new sid- 
ings are now 17.20o feet in length. 

Changes are being made in location between Lawrence and Kansas City that will 
reduce the curvature considerably and make a better line to operate. During the 






RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 193 

year the renewal of ties was suflficieut to keep the track in good order, being at the 
rate of over 300 per mile. 

New combination depots have been built at Page City, Clifton, Broughton, and 
Milfbrd, costing $5,575; an addition to the Kansas City freight house, .$0,042. Perry- 
ville has a now water tank, $1,600. Lawrence : New turntable-, iron fence around the 
park, and freight house remodeled, $3,050. Topeka : Ice house enlarged and new 
turntable put in, $2,181). Junction City: New sand house, oil house, new water 
tank, carpenter's office and shop moved from Wamego and set up, ice-house enlarged, 
$3,815. Abileno : Enlarged stock yards and 10-ton stock scales, $1,110. At Solomon : 
A new ice house, $975. Salina : New ice house and stock scales, $1,325. Walker : New 
8 tock yards, $350. Mirage: New pump-house, $370. Milford: Ten-ton stock scales, 
$350. Glasco : Stock yards rebuilt and enlarged, $450. At Verdi, Lindsay, and Hilton : 
new stock yards, $1,150. Minneapolis : New 10-ton stock scales. 

Bridge No. 205 has been removed and an 8-foot span arch put in place of it; bridge 
326 — 138 feet of cast-iron pipe 4 feet in diameter and earth filling replace this. At 
nineteen other places trestles have been rebuilt and truss bridges changed. New 
sidings, spurs, and extensions of sidings have been made at 24 stations, amounting to 
38,930 feet, or considerably more than 7 miles, the greater part being located at 
Kansas City, Armstrong, Armourdale, Lawrence, and Topeka; at Bismarck 5,189 feet 
of second track have been put down. The location and cost of other track improve- 
ments are as follows : 

Kansas City : Five thousand feet of siding relaid with second-hand steel rails, $800; 
riprap at Kansas City bridge, $350 ; grading and changing line of track between Law- 
rence and Topeka, $2,535 ; split switches put in place of stubs between Kansas City and 
Ellis, $2,000 ; relaying 67 miles of main track between Kansas City and Junction 
City with 75-pound rails, $62,500; cost of replacing worn steel rails with heavier 
second-hand rails, $3,825 ; upon the Junction City and Fort Kearney district iron 
rails were replaced with good second-hand 52-pound steel, $11,820 ; there were also 
built upon the Kansas division 59 miles of fencing, $14,150. 

The following improvements, w T ith their estimated cost, are now under way : Head- 
quarters building at Kansas City, $30,000; large ash pit at Armstrong, $1,000 ; Junc- 
tion City, moving and remodeling freight house, $2,500 ; additions and changes at 
Buffalo Park, Byers, Bennett, Sharon Springs, Brittsville. and Asherville, $5,400; 
combination depots, 20 by 48 feet each, at Loring, Gorham, McAllaster, Weskan, 
River Bend, Deer Trail, and Alida, $11,550; 3 new coal sheds, each 18 by 150 feet, 
at Topeka, Salina, and Oakley, $7,500 ; at Beloit, a new tank, $1,800 ; bridge 34 is 
to be renewed with 64.5 iron span and pile trestle approach, $6,200 ; bridge 52 to be 
rebuilt, $650 ; side tracks to be laid at various places, $2,000 ; ballasting on the main 
line between Kansas City and Topeka, $25,000. 

CENTRAL PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

The inspection was made in March of the main line between Ogden, Sacramento, 
San Jose", and Goshen, also from Roseville toDunsmuir, in company with the officers 
of the line, who very courteously gave every facility required for the examination. 
In consequence of the great snow-fall and breaks in the track north from Dunsmuir, 
the inspection of the remainder of the Oregon division was deferred till summer. 

The total length of lines belonging to this company and operated by the Southern 
Pacific Company remains the same as last year, 1,360.28 miles. 

The principal improvements reported during the year ending June 30, 1890, are: 
Carlin: 3,720 feet of 6-inch pipes laid in the yard as additional lire protection and a 
building put up for the Employes Library Association. Cascade: The bridge and 
5,123 feet of snow-sheds and track wore burned in September, 1889. The. snow-sheds 
have been rebuilt and an iron bridge is now being put up to replace the wooden one 
two spur-tracks also were laid, equaling 715 feet. Cisco: A spur-track was laid here 
575 feet long. Copeland: This station was moved in November 1.5 miles soqtb, the, 

int 90— yol in 13 



194 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. . 

old spur taken up, and new siding put in 997 feet long. Colfax : An abundant sup- 
ply of water lias been obtaiued by laying 58,000 feet of pipe from a point near 
Dutch Flat. Deeoto: The old spur was taken up and a new one laid 992 feet long. 
Essex: Two spurs were laid near this station of 1,876 feet length. Elko: The 
water supply was improved by laying 742 feet of 2-inch and 68 feet of 1-iuch pipes, 
connecting the tanks with the pipes of the Elko Water Company. Fresno: The 
improvements under way at the previous inspection are now completed ; a hand- 
some brick passenger house lias been constructed, the freight house moved and en- 
larged, and 5,703 feet of side-track laid. Golconda : The water supply has been im- 
proved by extending the pipe line 2,710 feet. Gregory : 777 feet of spur-track laid. 
Herndon: The siding has been extended 400 feet. Humboldt: 2,900 feet of 2 and 3 
inch pipe laid for increasing the water supply. Kelton : The water supply has been 
improved by laying 4,005 feet of 3-inch gas-pipe and 1,287 feet same size cast-iron, to 
replace the smaller pipe, which was worn out ; the engine house at Blue Creek and 
turntable at Montello were moved to this place and the siding extended 313 feet. 
Lathrop: The additional tracks laid amount to 2,816 feet. Long Ravine: An iron 
bridge was built to replace the wooden structure. Lodi : Spur track extended 260 
feet. Looinis: 700 feet of spur-track laid. Marysville : New track scales have been 
put in. Niles: A coal bin 21 by 100 feet was built and 100 feet of track laid in con- 
nection with it. Newcastle: 438 feet of siding laid. Ogden : The new buildings for 
the union depot were completed and the old buildings removed. Oakland : The yard 
tracks were extended 2,816 feet. Penryn : 182 feet of spur-track were laid. Palisade : 
700 feet of 2-inch pipe were added to extend the water supply. Pleasanton : A siding 
1,268 feet long was laid. Reno: A brick depot has been built in place of that which 
was burned in May, 1889. Redding: A small engine-house has been built. Scott: 
The spur was extended 204 feet. Suuol : Siding was extended 200 feet and 452 feet 
of spur-track laid. Sacramento: 1,300 feet side tracks laid. Stockton: Spur-track 
laid 418 feet loug and water column put in. Shady Run : A large bunk-house was 
built for use of men during snow blockades. San Josd: 304 feet of spur-track laid. 
Truckee: Spur-track laid 1,200 feet loug. Tracy: Spur-track laid 654 feet long. 
Wadsworlh : The bridge over Truckee River, burned November 22, 1889, has been re- 
placed by a substantial iron structure. Warm Springs: Depot building was erected. 

Sacramento division : The snow-sheds are now being thoroughly overhauled and a 
very large portion of them entirely rebuilt. Salt Lake division : Several pieces of 
snow-sheds which have been maintained for soveral years have recently been re- 
moved and the track protected by substantial snow-fences. It is thought likely that 
with the use of machine snow-plows and the present arrangement of sheds and snow- 
fences there will be in future but very little delay on that portion of the road. 

Upon the main line about 5 miles of 76-pouud steel rails have been laid in place of 
60-pouud; also 66.6 miles of 60 and 61.5 pounds steel upon main line aud branches, 
replacing iron and lighter steel. Three hundred and fifty- three thousand live hun- 
dred and ninety-six ties have been used in ordinary repairs and removals; 45,084 feet 
of fencing have been built at different points along the line. The bridges and station 
buildings are in excellent condition; the track and road-bed well kept up. The 
machinery of the shops and the rolling stock are well cared for along the lino, and 
kept in capital working condition. 

During the past winter there have been serious snow blockades upon the main line 
in the Sierra Nevada Mountains and upon the Oregon division, which stopped the 
trains a number of days and caused a very great expense in finally opening the 
road. At Alta, 3,600 feet above the sea, the measured snow-fall between November, 
1889, and March, 1890, was 400 inches, or nearly six times tho average of the previous 
twenty years; also at Cisco, about 5,900 feet above the sea, the quantity measured 
628 inches, while the average for twenty years was only 259 inches ; not only show- 
ing an enormous snow-fall at and near the summit, but also by the records at Alta 
that the snow-fall bad extended much below the usual snow line. The rain-fall was 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 195 

excessive in the valleys, the quantity registered from November, 1889, to March, 1890, 
being as follows : At San Francisco, 40 inches; at Delta, on the Oregon division, 103 
inches, and at Boulder Creek, a few miles north from Santa Cruz, 111 inches. 

Upon the Oregon division serious delays were caused by the frequent snow storms 
and heavy rains; near tunnel 19, an earth slide of several thousand yards covered a 
large part of the track and nearly filled the tunnel. This was removed after some 
delay by preparing a temporary hydraulic apparatus made by setting up such pumps 
as could readily be obtained, coupling their discharge pipes into a main, and work- 
ing the pumps by steam supplied by locomotives placed alongside the track. This 
was a very successful and ingeniously arranged hydraulic machine that performed 
its work admirably and removed the obstructions in very much less time than 
could have been done by hand labor. 

SIOUX CITY AM) PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

The examination was made in July in company with the general superintendent 
and the master mechanic. The road-bed, track, buildings, and equipment are in very 
good condition. 

The length of the road is the same as last year. 107.42 miles of main line, with 26.3.") 
miles of sidings. The main track is now laid with 60-pouud steel rails, except less 
than 1 mile, where there is 56-pound iron. 

At Sioux City the passenger house will be extended to give more room for baggage 
and express matter. The old wooden freight house will bo removed and a brick 
building put up. 40 by 260 feet, with two stories at the south end for the freight of- 
fices. The Missouri Valley shops are in good condition, one new planer having been 
put in last year. 

An excellent improvement is under way from the Blair bridge westward to Kennard. 
A steam shovel and trains are employed cutting down the summit to reduce the gra- 
dient from 53 to 26 feet per mile, the earth being hauled to fill the trestle at west end 
of Blair bridge, to raise low places, and to wideu embankments. When this is com- 
pleted there will be no gradient exceeding 26 feet per mile upon any part of the road 
and the expense of hauling freight upon this portion of the road will be very much 
reduced. 

One thousand three hundred and thirteen and thirty-seven hundredths tons of steel 
rails and 2,970 new ties were laid during the year and the condition of the track 
much improved over what it was in the previous year. 

CENTRAL BRANCH UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

This road was inspected in June, in company with the superintendent, and found 
to be in better condition than at any previous inspection. 

The mileage on Juue 30, 1890, was: 

Miles. 

Atchison to Waterville, Kans., owned 100 

Waterville to Lenora, Kans., leased 193 

Greeuleaf to Washington, Kans., leased 7 

Yuma to Warwick, Kans., leased 31 

Downs to Alton, Kans., leased 23 

Jamestown to Burr Oak, Kans., leased 34 

Total 388 

The union depot in Atchison has been completed and put in use and is much more 
convenient than the former building. Considerable damage had been done by heavy 
rains in tho vicinity of Atchison, washing out culverts and bridges and some of the 
roadbed, but the repairs had been nearly finished at date of inspection. Some repairs 
and improvements have been made in tho station buildings along the line, as well as 
at the Atchison shops. The equipment appears to be in fair condition. 



196 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

BURLINfiTON AND MISSOURI RIVER RAILROAD IN NEBRASKA. 

The inspection of the land-grant portion of this road was made in July, extending 
from Pacific Junction, Iowa, via Piattsmouth, to Kearney, Nebr., a distance of 11)5.47 
miles. 

The total length of lines now operated by this company is 3,005.4 miles, located in 
Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, and South Dakota. Extensions are being 
made into Wyoruiug northwest from New Castle; also from the crossing of the 
Cheyenne River in South Dakota, northward to Dead wood in the Black Hills country 
about 105 miles, which may be in use near the close of this year. Of the Wyoming 
extension probably not more than 40 or 50 miles may be completed in 1800. 

The track is in quite good condition, having a considerable length ballasted with 
broken stone of medium quality, some cinder, and also burnt clay which seems to 
make a good ballast. Improved switch fixtures and spring-rail frogs are being used 
to some extent. Only a small amount of gravel has been used. Preparations are 
now being made for putting in several miles of second track west from Lincoln. New 
steel rails are on hand at Piattsmouth and other points for use this year, and about 
15 miles have been laid bet ween Harvard and Hastings making a good track. The 
roadbed is generally of full width and the drainage very good. The equipment is 
excellent. 

CHICAGO AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY. 

The line between Council Bluffs and Chicago was inspected in August, passing over 
the road in the regular train a distance of 191 miles, of which the land-grant portion, 
extending from Cedar Rapids, low a, to Council Bluffs, is 271.6 miles. 

The lines of railway which compose the system of this company June '.10, 1890, are 
reported to be : 

Miles. 

Chicago and Northwestern Railway 2,076.72 

Dakota Central Railway 72:5.03 

Toledo and Northwestern Kail way ,'585. 19 

Princeton and Western Kail way 1(5. 00 

Winona and St. Peter Railroad 448. 48 

Total 4,250.38 

There have been many excellent improvements made" in the roadbed and track 
during the past year, more than $460,000 having been expended on account of the 
second track between Chicago and Fulton, beside tilling trestles and building stone 
arches in place of wooden structures, widening embankments, putting up new build- 
ings at several stations, and putting in more heavy steel rails of a pattern weighing 
73 pounds per yard, which appears to be of excellent section. 

Upon the whole system there are now 4,526.18 miles laid with steel and 880.77 
miles with iron rails. The renewals of rails during the past year were 18,5^5.13 
tons; the number of tics used was l,3G8,571. 

There were many renewals and additions made to the fencing. The equipment is 
very well kept up and seems to bo sufficient for present business. The condition of 
the roadbed, track, and buildings is excellent. 

CHICAGO, BURLINGTON AND QUINCY RAILROAD, 

The inspection was made in July of the division from Burlington, Iowa, to Pacific 
Junction, a distance of 276.86 miles. 

At Burlington there is a line brick passenger house, with stone trimmings, having 
well-arranged division otlices in the second story, and large rooms below for passen- 
gers and express. The yard is of good size with a large amount of siding. The 
shops at West Burlington are very extensive and well built, having abundance of 
excellent tools and fixtures for every description of railway repairs. Chariton sta- 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 197 

tion has a large two-story brick building, containing the division offices, dining- 
room, and rooms for tho usual business of the station. Between Burlington and 
Chariton considerable second track is laid in addition to abundant sidings. 

The whole track is well ballasted and kept in good order, and having many split 
switches and spring-rail frogs is an easy-riding track and free from much of the noise 
made by passing over stub switches and rigid frogs. Tho buildings and bridges are 
in good repair, and the roadbed quite well drained and of good width. The rolling 
stock seems to bo abundant, and is kept in excellent condition. 

Thfc mileage reported as operated by this company Jnne 30, 1890, is 2,080.3 miles, 
which includes all its lines in Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri. 

CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS AND OMAHA RAILWAY. 

Inspection was made in July of the portion of this road between St. Paul, Minn., 
and Ashland, Wis., 188 miles. 

The total mileage operated by this company June 30, 1890, was 1,418.83 miles, an 
increase of 24 miles having been made in the branch lines. 

The track was well ballasted with gravel, the rails and ties quite good. Sev- 
eral miles of new rails are now distributed between Cumberland and Turtle Lake 
for renewals this summer. There are a few split switches in use, but generally the 
stnb pattern seems the standard. The latest style of angle plate is 34 inches long 
with 4 holes, which seems to make a very firm joint. 

The bridges and buildings are kept in good condition and tho track, as well as the 
equipment, will bear favorable comparison with any of the Western railways. Tho 
new freight office of this company at Duluth is well built and well located. 

During the year ending June 30, 1890, 5,600 tons of 65-pound steel rails were laid 
in the track in place of iron. The sidings were lengthened 29,528 feet, and in new 
construction 23,409 ties were used. An additional track was laid between Spooner 
and Chicago Junction, a distance of 1.2 miles; several stone culverts and one iron 
bridge were put in place of wooden structures, and considerable work was done 
towards changing the line between Baldwin and Woodville, a distance of 7 miles. 

HANNIBAL AND ST. JOSEPH RAILROAD. 

The inspection was made in June. The mileage of the road June 30, 1890, was: 

Miles. 

Quincy, 111., to Palmyra Junction, Mo., owned 12.7? 

Quincy to West Quincy, 111., leased I. 98 

Hannibal to St. Joseph, Mo., owned 206. 41 

Cameron to Kansas City, Mo., owned 54. 13 

St. Joseph to Winthrop, Mo., owned 19.47 

Winthrop, Mo., to Atchison, Kaus., leased 48 

Total „.. 295.24 

The track is laid with steel weighing 55 to C)C> pounds per yard and is now in quite 
good condition. The drainage is good and the roadbed generally of sufficient width. 
More ties seem to be needed in several portions of the road. Burnt-clay ballast has 
been used upon about 80 miles of tho track, and is considered superior to other ma- 
terials, as it sheds water well, is very elastic, and causes less jarring and wear to the 
rolling stock. Broken stone, cinder, and gravel are still used in small quantities each 
year. The buildings and bridges are in good order, many renewals of trestles having 
been recently made. 

At the Hannibal engine house 4 brick stalls have been added. There is now much 
work being done at these shops in repairing and rebuilding cars and locomotives 
Everything seems in good order, but apparently more crowded than is economical 
for the company. A new water station has been put up at Palmyra, costing $15,000 

t 



198 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

New passing tracks have beou laid at four stations, 1,500 to 2,000 feet each. Nearly 
40 miles of 66-pound steel rail were laid. There have been built 5 iron truss bridges 
upon masonry supports, 3 new iron spans have been put into the Kansas City bridge, 
and 3 stone arch culverts built. The equipment has been increased by 8 new 55-ton 
locomotives, and a large number of stock and box cars have been equipped with air 
brakes and Januey couplers. 

LITTLE ROCK AND MEMPHIS RAILROAD. 

This road was inspected in June and found to be in tolerably fair condition, although 

much of the line had been considerably damaged by the flood of last spring. 

The length of line operated is — 

M ilea. 

Memphis, Tenn., to Argenta, Ark., owned 132 

Argenta to Little Rock, Ark., leased 2 

Total 134 

The business of the road being rather small, it can not be expected that the com- 
pany can keep up a really first-cldss railway. The rails are quite good, ties generally 
sound and of good size, bridges and trestles in fair condition, but the embankments 
in many places are rather narrow. A new passenger house has been put up at Brinks- 
ley, hut the oilier station buildings are in poor condition; but perhaps as good as 
could be expected considering the small amount that could be allowed for repairs. 

The transfer boat and inclines at the Mississippi River appear to be in fair condition, 
the time occupied in the transfer of a passenger train from the Louisville and Nash- 
\ i lit* depot in Memphis to Hopefield station being about thirty minutes. 

There were twenty coal cars added to the equipment in the past year. 

MISSOURI, KANSAS AND TEXAS RAILWAY. 

The inspection was made in June of that portion of the road between Oswego and 
Junction City, Kans. 

The mileage operated by the receivers for this company is: 

Miles. 

Haunibal, Mo., to Dcnison, Tex., owned 576.74 

Parsons to Junction City, Kans., owned ; 157.51 

Denison to Miueola, Tex., owned 102. 59 

Jefferson to McKinney, Tex. (narrow gauge), owned 153.11 

Denison to Whitesborough, Tex., owned 25. 01 

Whitesborough to Henrietta, Tex., owned 87. 08 

Denton to Dallas, Tex., owned 37. 62 

Fort Worth to Taylor, Tex., owned 162. 11 

Taylor to Boggy Creek, Tex., owned 89. 75 

San Marcos to Lockhart, Tex., owned 16. 14 

Echo to Belton, Tex., owned : 7. 12 

Dallas to Greenville, Tex., owned 52.4:3 

Dallas to Waxahatehie, Tex., owned 31. 18 

Trinity to Sabine, Tex., owned 60. 55 

Atoka, Ind. T., to Lehigh coal mines, owned 8. 73 

McAllister, Ind. T., to coal mines, owned 4. 61 

Paola to Coffey ville, Kans., operated under traffic agreement 125.00 

Fort Worth to Whitesborough, Tex., joint use with Texas andP aeilie 71. 18 

Total of operated lines 1,774.46 

Holdeu, Mo., to Paola, Kans. (leased t<> Missouri Pacific Railway) 54.00 

Total owned and operated lines .. *. 1,828. 46 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 199 

There are 1,473.73 miles laid with 52 to G3 pound steel rails. The track between 
Oswego and Parsons was in lair condition; some improvement had been made !><■- 
tween Parsons and Junction City by putting in some steel rails and removing the old 
chairs, but there still remains too much of the badly worn old rails. 

NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

The inspection was made in July and August. The length of main lino and 

branches is now : 

Miles, 

Ashland, Wis., to Portland, Oregon, owned 2,117.6 

Pasco to Wallula, Oregon, owned 16. 5 

Main line 2, 134. 1 

Branch lines, owned 494. 5 

Branch lines, leased 1,413.8 

Total main lino and branches 4,042.4 

The length of second track upon the owned lines is 10.8 miles, and upon leased lines 
is 53.4 miles ; length of sidings upon the owned lines is 463.9 and upon leased lines 
160.3, making a total of main lines and sidings of 4,730.8 miles, of which 509.4 were laid 
with iron from 35 to 56 pounds per yard ; 4,157.5 miles with American steel of 30 to 
60 pounds, and 3.9 miles of 35 to 80 pounds. The renewal of steel rails amounted to 
17,004.3 tons. The number of new ties laid was 1,849,656. 

The division extending from Ashland, Wis., to Brainard, Minn., 181 miles, is in fair 
condition ; the track not particularly smooth, and in many places the embankments 
have settled considerably. Stub switches and rigid frogs aro still used; the ties are 
generally of pine and large. The road is tolerably well ballasted, gravel being quite 
abundant along the liue. Trestles are being repaired, and in several places arch cul- 
verts of stone are being built where trestles are to be filled up. 

The shops at Braiuerd are well built and of good size, and the machinery seems to 
be good, though some of it is not quite modern enough to please a progressive me- 
chanic. The principal buildings are of brick, viz : Forty-two-stall engine house, full 
circle wrought-iron turntable, largo machine shop, transfer table moved by steam, 
smith shop, foundry, car shops, large oil room, paint shop, two-story building for 
master mechanic's office and supply room. The yard is large, and kept tolerably 
clean. There is also a large three-story house for passengers and division offices. 
The bridge over the Mississippi River near the station has four spans of combination 
truss and two end spans of pile trestle. The piers aro of wooden cribs filled with 
stone. 

The new cut-off has been opened from Little Falls to Staples, a station about 30 
miles west from Braiuerd; the road is very well built, track quite smooth, and the 
station buildings are good. The length of this line is 33.(1 miles, thus saving more 
than 20 miles haul on through business. West from Mandau much earth has been 
plaeed along the embankments for widening and raising them. A large quantity 
has also been put in at the western trestle of the Missouri River bridge, near Man- 
dan. In a number of places stone culverts and earth Idling have replaced woodeu 
trestles. A lunch room has been built at Maudan. The buildings at Dickinson seem 
to be in good condition ; they consist of a brick engine house, machine shop and oil 
house, freight and passenger houses of liberal sizo, two elevated coal sheds, and tank. 

West from Dickinson new steel rails are distributed at several places as far as the 
Montana State lino. There aro many narrow embankments upou this part of the 
roail that should be widened ; much of that kind of work has already been done and 
trains are still employed upon it. Glendivo has brick engine house aud machine 
shop with wooden passenger house ami offices for a terminal station. Some new rails 
are laid from here west and many more distributed. The track is quite smooth 
between Glendivo aud Fort Iveogh. 



200 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Livingston has a 15-stall brick engine house, good smith shop, oil house, and 
machine shop, with a moderate quantity of good tools, elevated coal sheds, and car 
shop with some new tools. The bridge and road repair departments seem to have a 
large quantity of supplies stored here. There is a very small force working here and 
consequently the yard is not kept clean. The freight house has recently been en- 
larged; passenger house is of brick, with offices in the second story. The track is 
in good order from here to Logan. 

Cinnabar branch is in tolerably fair condition ; a little change has been made by 
putting up a few small station buildings and some short spur tracks. 

Bozeman station has a 10-stall brick engine house, large passenger house, freight 
building, coal shed with derrick. The yard is in good order. Logan, 25 miles from 
Bozeman, has a C-stall brick engine house, iron turntable, tank, oil house, combina- 
tion passenger house and ice house, all newly built; the sidings are small. The new 
line from here to Butte is 70.5 miles long, and is very well built. Missoula has a brick 
enginehouse with covered table, small brick machine-shop with a few good tools, 
brick store room, oil house, and freight building, high tank, two-story passenger 
house, large ice house, and large yard for storage of bridge and track materials. 
From Missoula to Spokane Falls part of the track was quite smooth, but some of that 
laid with broken joints was very rough, where the surface had not been kept up. 

Spokane Falls: The fire of last August destroyed the passenger houso and other 
buildings at this station. The temporary structures are still in use. A new passen- 
ger house of briek and stone is now partly built and work of enlargiug the yard well 
under way. 

Sprague : The buildings all seem to bo in good condition, but are built too closely 
for safety against tire Ellensburgh: New shops are now being built here. Cascade 
Tunnel: A large quantity of brick and cement are ;it the east end for lining this 
tunnel, and the work seems to proceed quite steadily. The tunnel is well lighted by 
electricity. 

There has been some improvement at Tacoma, but more will be made when the 
shops now under way are completed and the tilling made for the increase of track 
room. The buildings at Seattle are about the same as last year, but arrangements 
are made for enlarging the yard and providing for business of that enterprising city. 
At Kalama new inclines have been started for the Columbia River ferry. The track 
from Seattle to Portland is in tolerably fair condition, but hardly smooth enough for 
fast trains. The Portland terminal work has been pushed along considerably since 
last inspection, more filling has been put into the slough, and a few more tracks laid. 
The new freight houso is in use, but the union passenger house has not been com- 
menced. 

Steel rails of 66 pounds per yard are now used to replace the lighter rails, and at 
the date of inspection many of these had been laid, and large quantities distributed. 
The rolling stock seems to be of good design, and kept in excellent condition. The 
heavy ten-wheel freight engines are fine specimens of machinery, and appear able 
to haul heavy trains economically. There has been a large increase of equipment, 
more than '2,000 cars of all kinds having been added during the year. The general 
condition of the main line has been very greatly improved during the year, a great 
deal of attention having been given to the roadbed, fencing, and buildings of all 
kinds; the bridges and trestles also have been quite well kept up, and the condition 
of the track also is better than it was last year. 

The branch lines completed during the fiscal year were : 

Miles. 

Little Falls to Staples, Minn 33.6 

Fertile to Crookston, Minn 22. 6 

Minnesvaukon to Leeds, N. Dak 18.0 

Logan to Butte, Mont 70.5 

Sappington to Norris, Mont 20.9 

Harrison to Pony, Mont 7. 1 

Boulder to Elkhoru, Mont 20.5 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 201 

Miles. 

Davenport to Almira, Wash 46.0 

Durham to Kangley Mine, Wash 1.5 

Burnett Spur, Wash 2.2 

Hunters to Goble, Wash 1. 3 

Total 244.2 

The following linos are now under construction : 

Missoula, Mont., to Idaho boundary (39 miles built) 109. 30 

Mullan, Idaho, to Idaho boundary 11. 10 

Pullman, Wash., to Assotin and up Tammany Gulch 73. GO 

Almira, Wash., to Grand Coulee (13.7 miles built) 29.00 

Durham, Wash., to Niblock's coal mine 17. 84 

Black River Junction, Wash., along east shore of Lake Washington to con- 
nection with Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway 18. 00 

Centralia to Ocosta, Wash 60. 07 

Lake View, Wash., to month of Black River 43. 40 

Chehalis to South Bend, Wash 50.00 

Total 412.91 

OREGON AND CALIFORNIA RAILROAD. 

The inspection was made in August in company with the manager and superintend- 
ent passing over the line from Portland to Ashland and return. 

The mileage owned and operated is the same as last year, viz, 475.4 miles. 

The track has been put into quite good condition, although seriously damaged by 
last winter's tloods that caused many changes of line to be made in order to place the 
road upon better ground away from the streams where so much damage had occurred. 
Many of the washes have been repaired permanently and others made safe, but the 
line at the great avalanche in Cow Creek Canon was tar from complete, tne trains 
still passing over the temporary track that had been laid directly after the avalauche 
occurred. 

The Glendale engine-house roof that had been crushed by the great snowfall last 
winter has not been rebuilt, as the house is not much needed. The Ashland passen- 
ger house is a large two-story building with hotel, dining room, and office rooms for 
the division. The engine house is of brick, with 10 stalls; the yard is of good size 
and nicely kept. The grade at East Portland Station was raised in some places 
nearly 3 feet to get above last winter's Hood that made so much of the road impass- 
able for a time. 

There are now laid upon main line and branches, including sidings, 81.94 miles of 
iron rails from 35 to 56 pounds per yard, and 437.82 miles of steel of 56 and 61.5 
pounds, all of the main line beiug laid with steel. The switches generally are of stub 
pattern, the frogs upon the main line being of steel rails. The line is well ballasted 
with gravel and stone. 

The track, roadbed, bridges, and buildings are in good condition, many renewals 
having been made. A new bridge span of 200 feet has been put across the Sautiam 
River at Jefferson, two spans of 210 feet across the Willamette River at Harrisburgh, 
and one of 150 feet across Cow Creek. Many new rails and ties have been put into 
the track, and there is now distributed a large number to be used before winter. 
The rolling stock seems to bo in excellent condition. The trains now pass over the 
Willamette River bridge into Portland, an agreement having been made with the 
Terminal Company. 

The following statement by the manager gives a brief history of the great land 
slide in the Cow Creek Canon that caused so much damage and blocked the road for 
many days: 

After an unusually dry fall in 1889, western and southern Oregon, as well as Cali- 
fornia, experienced a very severe hard winter and unprecedented amount of snow- 



202 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

fall and immediately thereafter heavy rains, culminating in floods all over the country, 
between the Pacific Ocean and the Cascade and Sierra Nevada ranges, and extending 
from the Columbia River southward into southern California. In the Umpqua country 
the rain was at its height on the 4th day of February, after the ground had been 
thoroughly soaked with moisture, owing to this heavy snowfall, without any frost 
jn the ground to allow the water to run off. 

In the evening of the 4th an enormous mountain slide occurred about 2 miles 
south of West Fork Station, where the railway is in the Cow Creek Canon and on 
the west bank. It moved a portion of the mountain across the canon, so that the 
crest of the slide was about 127 feet above the bed of the creek, all across the canon, 
the base of the slide up and down the creek having a length of about 1,000 feet. This 
caused the water in the creek to back up behind this wall for a distance of about 3 
miles, submerging to that extent our roadbed, the water at the slide being about 
87 feet deep. A Howe truss bridge of 150 feet span, nearly a mile south of the slide, 
was lifted up by the water and carried down stream to the slide, where it lodged and 
was afterward saved. 

In the afternoon of the 5th the water broke over the dam, cutting its way through 
the mass of debris, consisting of rocks and decomposed and broken material, large 
quantities of which were 'carried down stream, rapidly filling up the bed of the 
creek until a gorge was formed at the slide, forming substantially a new bed of the 
creek at an elevation of about 20 feet over the old railroad track, and burying the 
track below the slide for a distance of about one-half mile, and changing the height 
of the bed of the creek for a distance of 2A miles. 

It took considerable time before construction forces from the north and south could 
reach the point of slide, owing to the great devastation caused b} r the Hoods all 
along the line, and especially by the breaking of the dammed- up water on that por- 
tion of the road running through Cow Creek Canon situated below the slide. A 
temporary track which is still in opera! ion, was built by grading a new roadbed on 
the opposite side of the creek for a distance of about 1.5 miles, connecting with the 
old track above and below the slide; above by a temporary bridge across the new 
lake, and below the slide by crossing the creek on a temporary trestle. This tem- 
porary roadbed is only partially adapted for use during the high-water season. It 
will be necessary to build, before the beginning of the next high-water season, an 
additional stretch of new road to lake the place of the old one buried or made un- 
suitable because of being too near the, raised bed of the creek; the new work will 
extend about 3.5 miles. 

This work is very heavy, and includes the construction of an iron bridge of 180 feet 
span, on masonry abutments, two tunnels of about 400 feet each, and some very 
heavy thorough cuts, but it is now well advanced. It is estimated that the cost of 
constructing this new portion of the road will be at least $300,000. The loss on the 
Oregon and California road was enormous, and can hardly be stated in figures at the 
present time. 

ST. JOSEPH AND GRAND ISLAND RAILROAD. 

The inspection was made in .July of the main line between Grand Island and St. 
Joseph. 

The mileage operated by this company during the past year was: 

Miles. 

St. Joseph, Mo., to Grand Island, Nebr., owned 252.52 

Fairfield to Stromsburg, Nebr. , leased (54. 80 

Fairbury Junction to McCool Junction, Nebr., leased 43.60 

Alma Junction to Alma, Nebr., leased 85.20 

Total 446.12 

The roadbed has been somewhat improved, and a little fine gravel ballast and cinder 
put into the track at several points. The rails seem to have worn quite well and the 
track is in fair condition. The etp^ipment is greatly improved since the last inspec- 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 203 

tion. Some of the station buildings have been put in order and repainted, and some 
additional fencing lias been built. The track is laid with steel rails weighing from 
52 to 60 pounds per yard. Stub switches and rigid-rail frogs are in general use upon 
the road. 

ST. LOUJS AND SAX FRANCISCO RAILWAY. 

The inspection was made in June of the main lino from St. Louis as far as Monett, 

Mo., a distance of 282 miles. 

The mileage operated June 30, 1H90, was: 

M'les. 

St. Louis, Mo., to Sapulpa, I ml. T 437.8 

Cuba to Salem, Mo 40.0 

Sligo to Sligo Furnace, Mo 5.0 

Howes to Plant's Bank, Mo 5. 

Springfield to Chadwick, Mo 35.3 

Springfield to Bolivar, Mo - 39. 1 

Granby City to Granby, Mo 2.0 

Monett, Mo., to Paris, Tex 301.5 

Fayette Junction to St. Paul, Ark 33.3 

Jeuson to Mansfield, Ark 17.9 

Pierce City, Mo., to EUsworth, Kans 321.4 

Orouogo, Mo., to Galena, Kans 18.4 

Joplin, Mo., to Girard, Kans 38.7 

Litchfield Junction, Kans., to coal mines 3.0 

Pittsburgh to Weir, Kans ". 10.0 

Beaumont to Antbony, Kaus 116.7 

Arkansas City to Cale, Kans 5.0 

Huunewell Junction to Hiume well, Kans , 2.0 

Total 1,432.1 

The total length of sidings is 197.07 miles. Steel rails of 52 to 67 pounds per yard 
are laid upon 1,220 miles of track. The road and buildings have been kept in very 
good condition, renewals of rails aud ties being promptly made; ballast of broken 
stone and gravel quite freely used, and recently the refuse from the zinc mines has 
been used to some extent; near Springfield, which seems to give good satisfaction. 

The rolling stock has been slightly increased during the year and is in quite good 
condition. The principal improvements made between St. Louis and Seneca. Mo., 
are as follows: Reducing grade between Spriugfield and Republic, $3,386; new sid- 
ings, $9,1 r>49 ; section houses, $1,8(51 ; station houses, $018; water stations, $6,733; air 
brakes and new machinery for shops, $5,475; new iron bridges between Pierce City 
and Seneca, $11,061. There were also 17.71 miles of track relaid with 67-pound steel 
in place of 56-pound rails. 

ST. LOUIS, IRON MOUNTAIN AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY. 
The inspection of the main line between St. Louis and Texaikaua was made in 
June. 

The mileage operated by the company is — 

Miles. 

St. Louis, Mo., to Texarkaua, Tex., owned 490 

Mineral Point to Potosi, Mo., owned 4 

Bismarck to Belmont, Mo., owned..... 120 

Allenville to Jackson, Mo., owned 16 

Poplar Bluff to Bird's Point, Mo., owned 71 

Neelyvilleto Doniphan, Mo., owned 20 

Knobel to Helena, Ark., owned 140 

Diaz to Cushman, Ark., owned 40 

Bald Knob, Ark., to Memphis, Tetin. (except 3 miles), owned 93 

Little Pock to Arkansas City, Ark., owned 113 



204 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Miles. 

Trippe Junction to Warren, Ark., owned 49 

Fort Smith to Greenwood, Ark. , owned 18 

Gurdon to Camden, Ark., owned 34 

Argentato Fort Smith, Ark., leased 165 

Little Rock to Argenta, Ark., leased 2 

Coal branches, leased 5 

Van Buren, Ark., to Coffeyville, Kans., leased 165 

Total 1,545 

There are 9.7 miles of second track and 295.79 miles of sidings. There are 370 miles 
laid with iron rails weighing from 35 to 70 pounds per yard, and 1,175 miles with 
steel rails of 52 to 76 pounds per yard. Five thousand nine hundred and three and 
one-half tons of steel rails were laid in the track last year, costing $199,674; also 
409,472 new ties at an expense of $140,315. The fencing along the road now com- 
prises 784 miles of barbed wire and 96 miles of board. There was but little ballasting 
done during the year. Stone ballast is now 35.16 miles, gravel ballast 297.8, and 
cinder 46.4 miles. Preparations have been made for putting in more ballast before 
winter and laying about 30 miles of 63-pound steel rails. 

The most prominent improvement in the station buildings has been made at Tex- 
arkana by removing the remnants of the old house and putting up a very commodious 
brick hotel and passenger building with excellent offices and dining room and wide, 
covered platform. A frame combination depot has been put up at Noble Lake, Ark. 
At Baring Cross a brrck 25-stall engine house is being built that probably will be in 
use this autumn, but no other changes have been made. At Poplar Bluff a 00-foot 
wrought-iron table has been put in place of the wooden one. The passenger house 
at Little Rock is in good order and convenient, but the yard is very much cramped. 
Considerable additions have been made to the rolling stock, which has been kept in 
good order. 

The track appears to be in very fair, but not quite first-class condition* yet is 
likely to be much improved when the ties and rails are laid that are now on hand. 
The buildings are in good condition throughout the line, except the old shops at Bar- 
ing Cross, which look very much dilapidated. Pile trestles have been extended and 
constructed to tho extent of 1,588 Linear feet.' There has also been considerable 
improvement made in the bridges, two Bowe trusses being replaced by iron spans, 
one by an iron plate girder, and five by rectangular combination spans, the com- 
bined length being 954 feet. 

ST. PAUL AM) DULUTH RAILROAD. 

The inspection was made in July, passing over the main line. The length of road 

operated by tho company is 247.75 miles. 

Miles. 

St. Paul and Duluth Railroad, owned 155.00 

Knife Falls branch, owned 6. 50 

Grantsburg, Rush City, and St. Cloud, owne 1 5.00 

St. Cloud, Grantsburg, and Ashland, owned 12.00 

Kettle River Railroad, owned 5,00 

Taylors Falls and Lake Superior Railroad, leased 20.50 

Stillwater and St. Paul Railroad, leased 12. 50 

Minneapolis and Duluth Railroad, leased 13.50 

Duluth and Short-Line Railway, leased 17. 75 

Length of main line and branches 247.75 

Second track 10.50 

Sidings 87.00 

Total length of all tracks 351.25 






RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 205 

of which 2:20.25 miles are laid with American steel rails weighing 56 to 70 pounds pei 
yard, the remainder being of American iron 50 to 56 pounds. Cross-ties are of oak, 
pine, and tamarack, averaging 2,750 per mile. There are 135 miles ballasted with 

gravel, an increase of 4 miles during the year; 1,363.6 tons of new rails and 68,050 
cross-ties have been laid during the year. The track and buildings are in better con- 
dition than they were at the Last year's inspection, and the passenger equipment has 
been considerably improved. Ten second-class passenger cars have been added to 
the equipment, and the roadbed and trestles put into good condition. Some filling 
has been done at Duluth and a new freight house put up. The reduction of grades 
and completion of second track between St. Paul and White Bear are excellent im- 
provements. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD OF CALIFORNIA. 

The inspection of this road was made in March, in company with the division 
officers, who courteously extended all the facilities required. 

The mileage of this road Juno 30, L890, was : 

Miles. 

Alcalde, Cal., to Yuma, Ariz 540.20 

Los Angeles to San Pedro, Cal 24. 24 

Saugus to Elwood, Cal 91.50 

Los Angeles to Santa Monicn, Cal 16. 83 

Florence to Santa Ana, Cal 27. 60 

Keren da to Raymond, Cal - 21.00 

Stockton to Milton and Qakdale, Cal 49. 00 

Near Mart i nez to Tracy, Cal 46. 51 

Tracy to Los Bafios, Cal 58. 53 

Miraflores to Tustiu, Cal 1 10. 80 

Fresno to Porterville, Cal . ... 69.30 

Studebaker to Whittier, Cal 5.90 

Thenard to Long Beach, Cal 3. 80 

Total 974.30 

The principal improvements made during the year are: Anaheim, 420 feet of spur- 
track laid. Colton : Tracks extended 702 feet. Cameron: A spur-track laid 500 feet. 
Crow's Lauding : Stock corral built. Coalinga: Two hundred and five feet of spur- 
track laid. DosPalmas: New section houses built to rejdace those burned. Han- 
ford : Depot extended 20 feet. Ivy : A new depot built. Los Angeles : Twelve kun- 
feet of track was laid, and a new connection made between the Santa Monica and 
the Wilmington divisions, groatly^facilitating the exchange of business. Mojave: 
The stock corral was extended. 

Pomona: Six hundred and nine feet of sidiug was laid. Pueute: Spur extended 
487 feet and made into a siding. Pilot Knob : Stock corral built. Sanger Junction : 
Three thousand three hundred and sixty-nine feet of track laid. Saugus: Spur-track 
laid 650 feet long. Salton : Spur-track laid 372 feet. Tehachapi: Spur-track laid 
450 feet. Tulare: Five hundred and forty-six feet of spur-track laid. Walters, 
Fifty thousand-gallon water tank built to replace old tank. Yuma: Track scales 
put iu and spur-track extended 834 feet. On the Yosemite division, at Knowles 
Station, a spur-track with branches amounting to 14,624 feet was laid into the stone 
quarries. 

The high water last winter caused a great deal of damage to the road iu the Solo- 
dad Canon, washing out the road in many places and stopping the traffic. In order 
to avoid such trouble in future, the location was changed to the side of the hills, and 
a new road built between Saugus and Acton, making the distance 21.20 miles. The 
new stations are Ravenna, Russ, and Humphrey. Ravenna has 5,543 t'cet of sidings, 
Rnss has 2,177 feet, and at Humphrey 1,781 feet were laid. The old stations, South- 
side and Kent, were abandoned. 



206 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Upon the Tebachapi grade 3. 1 miles of 76-pound steel rails were laid. Upon tho 
other parts of tho main line and branches iron rails were replaced by 4.6 miles of . r ><)_ 
pouud steel, and 10.3 miles of 61.5-pound steel used to replace rails of less weight. 
There have been used in repairs and renewals 100.147 new tics. Mew fences have been 
put up amounting to 30,424 feet. 

The whole property has been kept in good order and is evidently improving con- 
siderably. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC OF CALIFORNIA., COAST DIVISION. 

The inspection was made in March, in company with the superintendent, passing 
over the line between San Francisco and Lake Majel la near the shore of Monterey 
Bay. 

The mileage of this division is now : 

Miles. 

San Francisco to Tres Finos, Cal 100. 49 

Carnadero to Santa Margarita. Cal 153. 10 

Castrovillo to Lake Majella, Cal. 20.32 

Pajaro to Santa Cruz, Cal 21.20 

Aptos to beyond Monte Vista, Cal 7. 00 

Hillsdale to Almadem Cal- , 7.80 

Total • 309.91 

The track, buildings, bridges, roadbed, and equipment are kept in excellent con- 
dition, and tho improvements made at several stations, as well as at Montery, Pacific 
Grove, aud Lake Majella, show that the officers of the, company well understand how 
to keep up a good road, making it attractive to travelers as well as popular and con- 
venient to the residents along their line. 

TEXAS AND PACIFIC, NEW ORLEANS DIVISION. 

The inspection was made in June, in company with the superintendent and resident 
engineer. 

The mileage reported dune :!'», 1890, is: 

Miles. 

New Orleans to Shreveport, La 327 

Baton Rouge Junctiou to West Baton Ronge, La 8 

Westwego branch 1 

Port Allen extension 3 

Plaquemine branch 7 

Total \ 346 

There has been a large increase of storage facilities at, New Orleans. The inclines 
at Gouldsboro and New Orleans are in good condition, and both transfer boats kept 
in good order. 

During the last great flood about 65 miles of the road was seriously damaged. 
The embankments are now being raised ami strengthened, and a few more openings 
made to pass the flood water promptly. About 1.5 miles of trestle in the Choctaw 
swamp have been filled. The track where it was not overflowed is in quite fair con- 
dition, though in some places very grassy. There has been a large quantity of sand 
ballast put into the track. 

The buildings generally are in good order and some new stations have been built. 
Wheelock has telegraph office, new platform, coal chutes, pump house and tank, 
costing §2,214 ; depots at Pelican, Rapides, and White Castle cost $2,737; platforms 
at Shreveport and other stations, $1,300 ; at Gouldsboro steel wharf, inclines, and 
sand house, .$5,907; coal bins and platforms at Oxford, Melville, and Shreveport 
Junction, $2,216 ; pump houses at Melville and Shreveport Junction, $533 ; artesian 
well at Shreveport Junction, $4,469 ; tanks at Plaquemine, St. James, Melville, and 
Shreveport Junction, 11,947, and about $370 expended upon bridges, 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 207 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

The use of heavier locomotives and cars has been extending rapidly upon nearly all 
the railways of the United States, so that the companies have been obliged to increase 
the strength of all structures used in support of the track, as well as that of the rails; 
and it is gratifying to notice that the subsidized railways are being kept well up to 
the advanced improvements used by the most progressive of the older and well-estab- 
lished lines, and that while, rates may be reduced considerably, yet the patrons of 
the roads get better facilities and more attention than was the ease only a few years 
ago. 

The length of main track of the railways in the United States reported to Decern 
her 31, 1889, was 161,397 miles, showing an increase for the year of more than 5,300 
miles. 

I take pleasure in acknowledging the invariably courteous treatment shown me by 
the officers of these railways. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Thos. Hassakd, 
llailroad Enyinecr. 

Hon. H. A. Taylor, 

Commissioner of Railroads, 



AprENDix No. 2. 



LAWS OP THE UNITED STATES AFFECTING PACIFIC RAILROADS. 

ACT OF JULY 1, 1862. 

AN ACT to aid in the construction of a railroad and telegraph line from the Mis- 12 Stat. 489. 
souri River to the Pacific Ocean, and to secure to the Government the use of the 
same for postal, military, and other purposes. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That Walter S. Burgess, Will- 
iam P. Blodgett, Benjamin H. Cheever, Charles Fosdick Fletcher, of 
Rhode Island ; * * * together with live commissioners to be ap- 
pointed by the Secretary of the Interior, and all persons who shall or 
may be associated with them, and their successors, are hereby created 
and erected into a body corporate and politic in deed and in law, by 
the name, style, and title of "The Union Pacific Railroad Company ; " Name and title, 
and by that name shall have perpetual succession, and shall be able to 
sue and to be sued, plead and be impleaded, defend and be defended, 
in all courts of law and equity within the United States, and may make 
and have a common seal; and the said corporation is hereby authorized 
and empowered to lay out, locate, construct, furnish, maintain, and 
enjoy a continuous railroad and telegraph, with the appurtenances, 
from a point on the one hundredth meridian of longitude west from T ocat : *, c 
Greenwich, between the south margin of the Valley of the Republican 
River and the north margin of the Valley of the Platte River, in the 
Territory of Nebraska, to the western boundary of Nevada Territory, 
upon the route and terms hereinafter provided, and is hereby vested 
with all the powers, privileges, and immunities necessary to carry 
into effect the purposes of this act as herein set forth. The capital Amt. andnum- 
stock of said company shall consist of one hundred thousand shares her of sliares of 
of one thousand dollars each, which shall be subscribed for and held 8tock alt t °Vg!. 1 4 In 
in not more than two hundred shares by any one person, and shall be 8ec " ' ac 
transferable in such manner as the by-laws of said corporation shall 
provide. The persons hereinbefore named, together w T ith those to be 
appointed by the Secretary of the Interior, are hereby constituted and ComraVs, how 
appointed commissioners, and such body shall be called the Board of appointed and to 
Commissioners of the Union Pacific Railroad and Telegraph Company, hold meeting, 
and twenty-five shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of busi- 
aess. The first meeting of said Board shall be held at Chicago at such 
time as the commissioners from Illinois herein named shall appoint, 
oot more than three nor less than one month after the passage of this 
let, notice of which shall be given by them to the other commissioners 
jy depositing a call thereof in the post-office at Chicago, post-paid, to 
;heir address at least forty days before said meeting, and also by pub- 
ishing said notice in one daily newspaper in each of the cities of 
Chicago and Saint Louis. Said Board shall organize by the choice 
rom its number of a president, secretary, and treasurer, and they shall 
equire from said treasurer such bonds as may be deemed proper, and Treasurer to 
aay from time to time increase the amount thereof as they may deem give bond, <fcc. 
•roper. It shall be the duty of said Board of Commissioners to open 
•ooks, or cause books to be opened, at such times and in such principal Books to be 
ities in the United States as they or a quorum of them shall deter- ke])t, op .c!h See 
line, to receive subscriptions to the capital stock of said corporation, 8ec * w * 
ud a cash payment of ten per centum on all subscriptions, and to 

INT DO— VOL 111- 14 SOU 



210 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

receipt therefor. So soon as two thousand shares shall be in good 
faith subscribed for, and ten dollars per share actually paid into the 
Comm'rstocall treasury of the company, the said president and secretary of said Board 
holders' ° °* Commissioners shall appoint a time and place for the first meeting 
of the subscribers to the stock of said company, and shall give notice 
thereof in at least one newspaper in each State in which subscription 
books have been opened at least thirty days previous to the day of 
meeting, and such subscribers as shall attend the meeting so called, 
org See mil' e ^ er * n P erson °* 0v P rox Y> shall then and there elect by ballot not 
act of 1864. ' less than thirteen directors for said corporation; and in such election 
each share of said capital shall entitle the owner thereof to one vote. 
The president and secretary of the Board of Commissioners shall act 
as inspectors of said election, and shall certify under their hands the 
Eooks and names of the directors elected at said meeting; and the said corn- 
property to be de-missioner, treasurer, and secretary shall then deliver over to said 
hvered to direct- ( ii rec tors all the properties, subscription books, and other books in 
their possession, and thereupon the duties of said commissioners and 
the officers previously appointed by them shall cease and determine 
forever, and thereafter the stockholders shall constitute said body 
Two directors politic and corporate. At the time of the first and each triennial 
|°, {? p >po *dent * > l° c t' on of directors by the stockholders two additional directors shall 
of the U.S. ' be appointed by the President of the United States, who shall act with 
r>> act of 1864 the body of directors, and to be denominated directors on the part of 
altered t<> five, the Government ; any vacancy happening in the Government directors 
See .sec. 13,1864. at any time may bo Qn e & 1>y ' t 1)(1 p res ident of the United States. The 
directors to be appointed by the President shall not be stockholders in 
the Union Pacific Railroad Company. The directors so chosen shall, 
as soon as may be after their election, elect from their own number a 
president and vice-president, and shall also electa treasurer and secre- 
poc TTbf.t tary. No person shall be a director in said company unless he shall be 

a bona fide owner of at least five shares of stock in the said company, 
except the two directors to be appointed by the President as aforesaid. 
Company make gaid company, at any regular meeting of the stockholders called for 
by-laws. t j^ p ur j )0se lS ] ia ]l have power to make by-laws, rules, and regulations 

as they shall deem needful and proper, touching the disposition of the 
stock, property, estate, and effects of the company, not inconsistent 
herewith, the transfer of shares, the term of ofiice, duties and conduct 
of their officers and servants, and all matters whatsoever which may 
Directors to ap- appertain to the concerns of said company; and the said board of di- 
point agents, &c. rectors shall have power to appoint such engineers, agents, and sub- 
ordinates as may from time to time be necessary to carry into effect the 
objects of this act, .and to do all acts and things touching the location 



rs , t0 . and construction of said road and telegraph. Said din-dors may require 
lions, payments ol subscription to the capital stock, after due notice, at such 



require p 



s.c.j, act of!864. times and in such proportions as they shall deem necessary to complete 
Officers to hold the railroad and telegraph within the time in this act prescribed. Said 

U \u- -V 'n '-' •'•• 1 ■'* P res ident, vice-president, and directors shall hold their ofiice for three 

lfcG4.° l ' years, and until their successors are duly elected and qualified, or for 

such less time as the by-laws of the corporation may prescribe ; and a 
majority of said directors shall constitute a quorum for the transaction 
of business. The secretary ami treasurer shall give such bonds, with 
such security, as the said board shall from time to time require, and 
shall hold their ofiice at the will and pleasure of the directors. An- 
nual meetings of the stockholders of the said corporation, for the choice 
of officers (when they are to be chosen) and for the transaction of an- 
nual business, shall be holden at such time and place and upon such 
notice as may be prescribed in the by-laws. 
Uieht of way Sec. 2. Avd be it further enacted. That the right of way through the 

grauted. public lands be, and the same is hereby, granted to said company for 

the construction of said railroad and telegraph line; and the right, 
See see 3,ieG4. power, and authority is hereby given to said company to take from the 
public lands adjacent to the line of said road, earth, stone, timber, and 
other materials for the construction thereof; said rightof way is granted 
to said railroad to the extent of two hundred feet in width on each 
side of said railroad where it may pass over the public lands, including 
all necessary grounds for stations, buildings, workshops, and depots, 
machine shops, switches, side tracks, turntables, and water stations. 
^• s - to ,. extin ' The United States shall extinguish as rapidly as may bo the Indian 

ties! Sec!l8 a i864. titles TO a ^ lands falling under the operation of this act and required 
' for the said right of way and grants hereinafter made. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 211 

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, Thai there be, and is hereby, granted I*and erants— 
to the said company, for the purpose of aiding in the construction of J£*| rBate bC0 * 
said railroad and telegraph line, and to sccmc the safe and speedy 
transportation of the mails, troops, munitions of war, and public Stores 
thereon, every alternate section of public land, designated by odd Cbangedto-rBK 
numbers, to the amount of Jive alternate sections per mile on each side 1,> ( / < j i ' ( ' l Jl^j'v 
of said railroad, on the line thereof, and within the limits of ten miles twenty. Sec. 4 
on each side of said road, not sold, reserved, or otherwise disposed of L8C4. 
by the United States, and to which a preemption or homestead claim 
may not have been attached, at the time the line of said road is defi- 
nitely fixed: Provided, That all mineral lands shall bo excepted from Minerals and 
the operation of this act; but where the same shall contain timber, the ll"', 1 ' 01 " ^ oc ' *• 
timber thereon is hereby granted to said company. And all such lands 
so granted by this section, which shall not be sold or disposed of by 
said company within three years after the entire road shall have been 
completed, shall be subject to settlement and preemption, like other 
lands, at a price not exceeding one dollar and twenty-live cents per 
acre, to be paid to said company. 

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That whenever said company shall On completion 
have completed forty consecutive miles of any portion of said railroad o( ,nlt .v mil os 
and telegraph line, ready for the service contemplated by this act, and ^enti^d 3 v ae els 
supplied with all necessary drains, culverts, viaducts, crossings, sidings, i h 8 1 J U. S. com- 
bridges, turnouts, watering places, depots, equipment furniture, and m'rs to examine, 
all other appurtenances of a first-class railroad, the rails and all the 18 , 64 ! *J S. com- 
other iron used in the construction and equipment of said road to ue m rs to oxamino. 
American manufacture of the best quality, the President of the United 
States shall appoint three commissioners to examine the same and re- 
port to him in relation thereto; and if it shall appear to him that forty 
consecutive miles of said railroad and telegraph line have been com- 
pleted and equipped in all respects as required by this act, then, upon 
certificate of said commissioners to that effect, patents shall issue con- And patents of 
veying the right and title to said lauds to said company, ou each side laud to issue, 
of the road as far as the same is completed, to the amount aforesaid; 
and patents shall iu like manner issue as each forty miles of said rail- 
road and telegraph line are completed, upon certificate of said com- 
missioners. Any vacancies occurring in said board of commissioners 
by death, resignation, or otherwise, shall be filled by the President of Vacancies in 
the United States: Provided, however, That no such commissioners com m'rs. See 
shall be appointed by the President of the United States unless there sec - 8 ' act Of 1884. 
shall be presented to him a statement, verified on oath by the president 
of said company, that such forty miles have been completed, in the 
manner required by this act, and setting forth with certainty the points 
where such forty miles begin and where the same end ; which oath 
shall be taken before a judge of a court of record. 

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That for the purposes herein men- Government 
tioned the Secretary of the Treasury shall, upon the certificate in writ- jbonds. \\ IV s ' r - 
ing of said commissioners of the completion and equipment of forty ^fio ' a S0 
consecutive miles of said railroad and telegraph, in accordance with nW 20 miles, 
the provisions of this act, issue to said company bonds of the United Sec. 10, 1804. 
States of one thousand dollars each, payable in thirty years afterdate, See sec. 11 of 
bearing six per centum per annum interest (said interest payable semi- this act, for 32,- 
annually), which interest may be paid in United States treasury notes 000 a . nrl $48,000 
or any other money or currency which the United States have or shall permi e ' 
declare lawful money and a legal tender, to the amount of sixteen of 
said bonds por mile for such section of forty miles ; and to secure the Lien of u. S. 
repayment to the United States, as hereinafter provided, of the amount bonds made sub- 
of said bonds so issued and delivered to said company, together with °5 ' 1 JV 1 1 *' t ®f 
all interest thereon which shall have been paid by the United States, ^4. ' 
the issue of said bonds and delivery to the company shall ipso facto 
constitute a first mortgage on the whole line of the railroad and tele- 
graph, together with the rolling stock, fixtures and property of every 
kind and description, and in consideration of which said bonds may be 
issued; and on the refusal or failure of said company to redeem said 
bonds, or any part of them, when required so to do by the Secretary of 
the Treasury, in accordance with the provisions of this act, the said 
road, with all the rights, functions, immunities, and appurtenances See sec. 1.0. act 
thereunto belonging, and also all lands granted to the said company 1804. 
by the United States, which, at the time of said default, shall remain 
in the ownership of the said company, may be taken possession of by 
the Secretary of the Treasury, for the use and benefit of the United 



212 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

States: Provided, This section shall not apply to that part of any road 
now constructed. 
M Vfi d S ^ KC ' ®' in( ^ ^'' Mf ur ti ier waded, That the grants aforesaid are made 
gec.5 act of 18&L upon condition that said company shall pay said bonds at maturity, 
Bonds, wlitu and shall keep said railroad and telegraph line in repair and use, and 
and bow paid, shall at all times transmit dispatches over said telegraph line, and 
transport, mails, troops, and munitions of war, supplies, and public 
stores upon said railroad for the Government, whenever required to do 
so by any department thereof, and that the Government shall at all 
times have the preference in the use of the same for all the purposes 
sonaMerates^of aforesaid, (affair and reasonable rates'of compensation, not to exceed 
compensation. the amounts paid by private parties for the same kind of service ;) and 
all compensation for services rendered for the Government shall be ap- 
plied to the payment of said bonds and interest until the whole amount 
Governniont is fully paid. Said company may also pay the United States, wholly or 
transportation— j n part, in the same or other bonds, treasury notes, or other evidences 
cash* See sec 6* of (lt ' bt a S ainst the United States, to be allowed at par ; and after said 
act of 1864. ' road is completed, until said bonds and interest are paid, at least five 
Five per rout, per centum of the net earnings of said road shall also be annually ap- 
net earnings. plied to the payment hereof. 

Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, That said company shall file their 
Assent of com- assent to this act, under the seal of said company, in the Department 
pany to bo tiled, of the Interior, within one year after the passage of this act, and shall 
&°- complete said railroad and telegraph from the point of beginning as 

herein provided, to the western boundary of Nevada territory before 
„. f the first day of July, one thousand eight hundred and seventy-four: 

pletionextended. Provided, That within two years alter the passage of this act said com- 
Seesee.G, 18U4. pany shall designate the general route of said road, as near as may be, 
Seo sec 4 act a,1( * sna " nle {l niap of the same in the Department of the Interior, 
1864. Mapr&c, whereupon the Secretary of tin; Interior shall cause the lands within 
designating route fifteen miles of said designated route or routes to be withdrawn from 
tobe filed, &c. pre-emption, private entry, and sale; and when any portion of said 
ted&o!! Da " route sha11 be linall . v located, the Secretary of the Interior shall cause 

the said lan;!s hereinbefore granted to be surveyed and set off as fast as 
may be necessary for the purposes herein named: Provided, That iD 
fixing the point of connection of the main trunk with the eastern con- 
nections, it shall be fixed at the most practicable point for the con- 
struction of the Iowa and Missouri branches, as hereinafter provided. 
From 100th me- Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, That the line of said railroad and 
ridian to Nevada, telegraph shall commence at a point on the one hundredth meridian of 
longitude west from Greenwich, between the south margin of the val- 
ley of the Republican River and the north margin of the valley of the 
Platte River, in the territory of Nebraska, at a point to be fixed by the 
See sec. 10 of President of the United States, after actual surveys; thence running 
tbis act. westerly upon the most direct, central, and practicable route, through 

the territories 6f the United States, to the western boundary of the 
territory of Nevt r la, there to meet and connect with the lino of the 
Central Pacific E ilroad Company of California. 
Kansas >in. to Sec. 9. And be u farther enacted, That the Leavenworth, Pawnee and 
construct voad, Western Railroad Company of Kansas are hereby authorized to con- 
&*• struct a railroad and telegraph line, from the Missouri River, at the 

mouth of the Kansas River, on the south side thereof, so as to co-meet 
with the Pacific Railroad of Missouri, the aforesaid point, on tho one 
hundredth meridian of longitude west frpm Greenwich, as herein pro- 
vided, upon the same terms and conditions in all respects as are pro- 
vided iu this act for the construction of the railroad and telegraph line 
first mentioned, and to meet and connect with the same at the meridian 
of longitude aforesaid; and iu case the general route or line of road 
from the Missouri River to the Rocky Mountains should be so located 
as to require a departure northwardly from the proposed line of said 
Kansas Railroad before it reaches the meridian of longitude aforesaid, 
the location of said Kansas road shall be made so as to conform thereto ; 
and said railroad through Kansas shall be so located between the mouth 
of the Kansas River, as aforesaid, and the aforesaid point, on the one 
hundredth meridian of longitude, that the several railroads from Mis- 
souri and Iowa, heroin authorized to connect with the same, can make 
connection within the limits prescribed in this act, provided the same 
can be done without deviating from the general direction of the whole 
line to the Pacific coast. The route in Kansas, west of the meridian of 
Fort Riley, to the aforesaid point, on the one hundredth meridian of \ 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS 213 

longitude, to be subject to the approval of the President of the United 
States, and to be determined by him on actual survey. And said Kan- 
sas company may proceed to build said railroad to the aforesaid point, 
on the one' hundredth meridian of longitude west- from Greenwich, in CrntrnlPaciflo 
the territory of Nebraska. The Central Pacific Railroad Company of R.R.Co.,of Cali- 

Calilbrnia, a corporation existing under the laws of the State of Cali- foraia i author- 
... ', , • ,v • j x ° , i i . i ii izea to construct 

iornia, are hereby authorized to construct a railroad and telegraph lino ro;ul on 8ame 

from the Pacific coast, at or near San Francisco, or the navigable waters ter'ma and condi- 
of the Sacramento River to the eastern boundary of California, upon tious. 
the same, terms and conditions, in all respects, as are contained in this 
act for the construction of said railroad and telegraph line first men- 
tioned, and to meet and connect with the first-mentioned railroad and 
telegraph line on the eastern boundary of California. Each of said 
companies shall file their acceptance of the condit ions of this act in the 
Department of the Interior withiu six months after the passage of this 
act. 

Sec. 10. And be it further enacted, That the said company chartered Time of doing 
by the State of Kansas shall complete one hundred miles of their said W0I ' k . &c - 
road, commencing at the mouth of the Kansas River aforesaid, within 
two years alter tiling their assent to the conditions of this act, as herein 
provided, and one hundred miles per year thereafter until the whole is 
completed ; and the said Central Pacific Railroad Company of California chano-M to 25 
shall complete fifty miles of their said road within two years after filing miles. See sec. 
their assent to the provisions of this act, as herein provided, and fifty 5, act 1864. 
miles per year thereafter until the whole is completed ; and after com- Companies mnv 
pitting their roads respectively, said Companies, or either of them, may unite in building 
unite upon equal terms with the first-named company in constructing on equal terms, 
so much of said railroad and telegraph line and branch railroads and Seo. 15, 1864, also 
telegraph lines in this act hereinafter mentioned, through the territo- 8CC - 1Go1 tins act. 
ries from the State of California to the Missouri River, as shall then 
remain to be constructed, on the same terms and conditions as provided 
in this act in relation to the said Union Pacific Railroad Company. And 
the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad, the Pacific Railroad Company 
of Missouri, and the first-named company, or either of them, on filing 
their assent to this act, as aforesaid, may unite upon equal terms, un- 
der this act, with the said Kansas company, in constructing said rail- 
road and telegraph, to said meridian of longitude, with the consent of 
the said State of Kansas; and in case said first-named company shall 
complete their line to the eastern boundary of California before it is 
completed across said State by the Central Pacific Railroad Company 
of California, said first-named company is hereby authorized to con- 
tinue in constructing the same through California, with the consent of 
said State, upon the terms mentioned in this act, until said roads shall 
meet and connect, and the whole line of said railroad and telegraph is 
completed; and the Central Pacific Railroad Company of California, Central Pacific 
after completing its road across said State, is authorized to continue R - &■ Co. may 

i the construction of said railroad aud telegraph through the Territories mee^other^road 
of the United States* to the Missouri River, including the branch roads 

i specified in this act, upon the routes hereinbefore and hereinafter indi- Authority con- 
cated, on the terms and conditions provided in this act in relation to?jF med ; ^iQRi" 
the said Union Pacific Railway Company, until said roads shall meet i a gt clause. Also 
and connect, and the whole line of said railroad and branches and tele- sec. 2, i860, 
graph is completed. 

Sec. 11. And be it further enacted, That for three hundred miles of said Subsidy bonds 
road most mountainous and difficult of construction, to wit : one bun- treble over t ho 

, dred and fifty miles west wardly from the eastern base of the Rocky Kookyaml sierra 
Mountains, and one hundred and fifty miles eastwardly from the west- ain g* a uU " 
ern base of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, said points to be fixed by the 
President of tin; United States, the bonds to be issued to aid in the con- 
struction thereof shall be treble the number per mile hereinbefore pro- 
vided, and the same shall be issued, and the lands herein granted be sot 
apart, upon the construction of every twenty miles thereof, upon the 
certificate of the commission's as aforesaid that twenty consecutive 

j miles of the same are completed; and between the sections last named '<, 1>s ., T ho , 
of one hundred and fifty miles each, the bonds to bo issued to aid in double between 
the construction thereof shall be double the nuraberpermile first men- the mountains. 

' tioned, and the same shall be issued, and the lands herein granted" ho 
set apart, upon the construction of every twenty miles thereof, upon 

* See section 6, act of July 2, 1864. The words l, and Status intervening" inserted. 



214 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

the certificate of the commissioners as aforesaid that twenty consecu- 
tive miles of the same are completed : Provided, That no more than 
fifty thousand of said bonds shall be issued under this act to aid in con- 
structing the main line of said railroad and telegraph. 
Location at Sec. ^- ^ n ^ ^ e it further enacted, That whenever the route of said rail- 
State lines and road shall cross the boundary of any State or Territory, or said merid- 
100 meridian. iau of longitude, the two companies meeting or uniting there shall agree 
upon its location at that point, with reference to the most direct and 
practicable through route, and in case of difference between them as to 
said location the President of the United States shall determine the said 
location ; the companies named in each State and Territory to locate 
the road across the same # between the points so agreed upon, except as 
Track to be of herein provided. The track upon the entire line of railroad and branches 
uniform wultll > shall be of uniform width, to be determined by the President of the 
United States, so that, when completed, cars can be run from the Mis- 
souri River to the Pacific Coast; the grades and curves shall not ex- 
ceed the maximum grades and curves of the Baltimore and Ohio Rail- 
road ; the whole line of said railroad and branches and telegraph shall 
be operated and used for all purposes of communication, travel, and 
To be used as transportation, so far as the public and Government are concerned, as 
continuous hue, ' , , ,. ,.* ■> .-i ■ i_ ■ j • 

&0e 'one connected, continuous line; and the companies herein named in 

Missouri, Kansas, and California, filing their assent to the provisions of 
this act, shall receive and transport all iron rails, chairs, spikes, ties, 
timber, and all materials required for constructing and furnishing said 
first-mentioned line between the aforesaid point, on the one hundredth 
meridian of longitude and western boundary of Nevada territory, when- 
ever the same is required by said first-named company, at cost, over 
that portion of the roads of said companies constructed under the pro- 
visions of this act. 
H. &. S t. J. Sec. 13. And be it further enacted, That the Hannibal and Saint 
road may be ex- Joseph Railroad Company of Missouri may extend its roads from Saint 
tended etc. Joseph via Atchison, to connect and unite with the road through Kan- 
sas, upon tiling its assent to the provisions of this act, upon i,he same 
terms and conditions, in all respects, for one hundred miles in length 
next to the Missouri River, as are provided in this act for the con- 
struction of the railroad and telegraph line first mentioned, and may 
for this purpose use any railroad charter which has been or may bo 
granted by the legislature of Kansas: Provided, That if actual survey 
shall render it desirable, the said company may construct their road, 
with the consent of the Kansas legislature, on the most direct and 
practicable route west from Saint Joseph, Missouri, so as to connect 
and unite with the road leading from the western boundary of Iowa 
at any point east of the one hundredth meridian of w r est longitude, 
or with the main trunk road at said point; but in no event shall 
lands or bonds be given to said company, as herein directed, to aid in 
the construction of their said road for a greater distance than one 
hundred miles. And the Leavenworth, Pawnee, and Western Rail- 
road Company of Kansas may construct their road from Leavenworth 
to unite, with the road through Kansas. 
Iowa road from Sec. 14. And he it farther enacted, That the said Union Pacific Rail- 
weatern bound- 1()a( i Company is hereby authorized and required to construct a single 
line of railroad and telegraph from a point on the western boundary 
of the State of Iowa, to be fixed by the President of the United States, 
upon the most direct and practicable route, to be subject to his ap- 
proval, so as to form a connection with the lines of said company at 
some point on the one hundredth meridian of longitude aforesaid, from 
the point of commencement on the western boundary of the State of 
Iowa, upon the same terms and conditions, in all respects, as are con- 
tained in this act for the construction of the said railroad and tele- 
graph first mentioned ; and the said Union Pacific Railroad Company 
shall complete one hundred miles of the road and telegraph in this 
section provided for, in two years after filing their assent to the con- 
• ditions of this act, as by the terms of this act required, and at tbe rate 
of one hundred miles per year thereafter, until the whole is completed : 
Provided, That a failure upon the part of said company to make said 
connection in the time aforesaid, and to perform the obligations im- 
posed on said company by this section and to operate said road in the 
same manner as the main line shall be operated, shall forfeit to the 
Government of the United States all the rights, privileges, and fran- 
hcises granted to and conferred upon said company by this act. And 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS, 215 

whenever there shall bo a line of railroad completed through Minne- 
sota or Iowa to Sioux City, then the said Pacific Railroad Company u. P. Tilt. Co. 
is hereby authorized and required to construct a railroad and tele- required to con- 
graph from said Sioux City upon the most direct and practicable struct Sioux City 
route to a point on, and so as to connect with, the branch railroad and J? MuX°' 1G » act 
telegraph in this section hereinbefore mentioned, or with the said 
Union Pacific Railroad, said point of junction to be fixed by the Presi- 
dent of the United States, not further west than the one hundredth 
meridian of longitude aforesaid, and on the same terms and conditions 
as provided in this act for the construction of the Union Pacific Rail- 
road as aforesaid, and to complete the same at the rate of one hundred 
miles per year: and should said company fail to comply with the re- 
quirements or this act in relation to the said Sioux City railroad and 
telegraph, the said company shall suffer the same forfeitures pre- 
scribed in relation to the Iowa branch railroad and telegraph hereiu- 
before mentioned. 

Sec. 15. And be it further enacted, That any other railroad company Otlior compa^ 
now incorporated, or hereafter to be incorporated, shall have the right ni(H Illil .v con- 
to connect their road with the road and branches provided for by this n ' <kC- 
act, at such places and upon such just and equitable terms as the Presi- 
dent of the United States may prescribe. Wherever the word company Word company 
is used in this act it shall be construed to embrace the words their explained, 
associates, successors, and assigns the same as if the words had been 
properly added thereto. 

Sec. i6. And be it further enacted, That at any time after the passage Companies an- 
of this act all of the railroad companies named herein, and assenting thorized to con- 
hereto, or any two or more of them, are authorized to form themselves l°}\o at t e ' f fJl? 
into one consolidated company ; notice of such consolidation,in writing. Also sec. 10 or 
shall be tiled in the Department of the Interior, and such consolidated this act. 
company shall thereafter proceed to construct said railroad and 
branches and telegraph line upon the terms and conditions provided in 
this act. 

Sec. 17. And be it further encted, That in case said company or com- Congress may 
panies shall fail to comply with the»*ernis and conditions of this act, compel speedy 
by not completing said road and telegraph and branches within a rea- £"",' l } letiou of 
sonable time, or by not keeping the same in repair and use, but shall 
permit the same, for an unreasonable time, to remain unfinished, or out 
of repair and unfit for use, Congress may pass any act to insure the 
speedy completion of said road and branches, or put the same in repair 
and use, and may direct the income of said railroad and telegraph line 
to be thereafter devoted to the use of the United States, to repay all such 
expenditures caused by the default and neglect of such company or 
conpanies: Provided, That if said roads are not completed, so as to 
form a continuous line of railroad, ready for use, from the Missouri 
River to the navigable waters of the Sacramento River, in California, 
by the first day of July, eighteen hundred and seventy-six, the whole Mainlinostnl.e 
of all of said railroads before mentioned and to be constructed under the finished in 1870. 
provisions of this act, together with all their f urniture,fixtures, rolling a C "Tof I804. a "*' 
stock, machine shops, lands, tenements, and hereditaments, and prop- 
erty of every kind and character, shall be forfeited to and be taken 
possession of by the United States: Provided, That of the bonds of the 
United States in this act provided to be delivered for any and all parts 
of the roads to be constructed east of the one hundredth meridian of 
west longitude from Greenwich, and for any part of the road west of 
the west foot of the Sierra Nevada Mountain [s], there shall be reserved 
of each part and instalment, twenty-five per centum, to be and remain rtepealpn*. Feo 
in the United States Treasury, undelivered, until said road and all parts sec. 7, act of 1864. 
thereof provided for in this act are entirely completed ; and of all the 
bonds provided to be delivered for the said road, between the two points 
aforesaid, there shall be reserved out of each instalment fifteen per 
centum, to be and remain in the Treasury until the whole of the road 
provided for in this act is fully completed ; and if the said road or any 
part thereof shall fail of completion at the time limited therefor in this 
act, then and in that case the said part of said bonds so reserved shall 
be forfeited to the United States. 

Sec. 18. And be it further enacted, That whenever it appears that 
the net earning of the entire road and telegraph, including 1 he amount 
allowed for services rendered for the United States, after deducting all 
expenditures, including repairs, and the furnishing, running, and man- 
aging of said road, shall exceed ten per centum upon its cost, exclusive 



216 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE 1NTEIUOR. 

Under certain of the five per centum to be paid to the United States, Congress may 
Circumsta nces re( i UC e the rates of fare thereon, if unreasonable in amount, and may fix 
du^^raTes^f am l establish the same by law. And the better to accomplish the ob- 
fare. ject of this act, namely, to promote the public interest and welfare by 

the construction of said railroad and telegraph line, and keeping the 
same in working order, and to secure to the Government at all times 
(but particularly in time of war) the use and benefits of the same for 
postal, military, and other purposes, Congress, may at any time, having 
due regard for the rights of said companies named herein, add to, alter, 
amend, or repeal this act. 
May arrange Sec. 19. Andbeit further enacted, That the several railroad companies 
w i t h telegraph hgreiu named are authorized to enter into an arrangement with the 
exiting. 68 ' P ac '^ c Telegraph Company, t he Overland Telegraph Company, and the 
California State Telegraph Company, so that the present line of tele- 
graph between the Missouri River and San Francisco may be moved 
upon or along the line of said railroad and branches as fast as said 
oU864 SeC 15 ' aCt roa< ^ 8 an( * branches are built ; and if said arrangement be entered into, 
and the transfer of said telegraph line bo made in accordance there- 
with to the line of said railroad and branches, such transfer shall, for 
all purpose of this act, be held and considered a fulfilment on the 
part of said railroad companies of the provisions of this act in regard 
to the construction of said linesof telegraph. And, in case of disagree- 
ment, said telegraph companies are authorized to remove their line of 
telegraph along and upon the line of railroad herein contemplated with- 
out prejudice to the rights of said railroad companies named herein. 
Companies to Sec. 20. And be it further enacted, That tho corporation hereby cre- 
make annual re- a t et i am | the roads connected therewith, under the provisions of this 
P °This section ac *> 8u all make to the Secretary of the Treasury an annual report 
repealed(20Stat., wherein shall bo set forth — 

109). First. The names of the stockholders and their places of residence, 

so far as the same can bo ascertained ; 

Second. The names aud residences of tho directors, and all other 
officers of the company ; 

Third. The amount of stock subscribed, and the amount thereof act- 
ually paid in ; 

Fourth. A description of the lines of road surveyed, of the lines 
thereof fixed upon for the construction of the road, and the cost of such 
survey. 

Fifth. The amount received from passengers on the road ; 
Sixth. The amount received for freight thereon ; 
Seveuth. A statement of the expense of said road and its fixtures ; 
Eighth. A statement of tho indebtedness of said company, setting 
forth the various kinds thereof. Which report shall be sworn to by the 
president of the said company, and shall be presented to the Secretary 
of the Treasury on or before the first day of July in each year. 



ACT OF JULY 12, 1862. 

12 Stat., 538. AN ACT to amend an act entitled "An act to aid in tho construction of a railroad 
and telegraph line from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean, and to secure to 
the Government tho use of the same lor postal, military, aud other purposes," ap- 
proved, July 1, 1862. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Reptesenlaiives of the United 
First meeting States of America in Congress assembled, That the first meeting of the 
of commissioners commissioners named in the act entitled "An act to aid in the cou- 
roatl and Tele- struction of a railroad and telegraph line from the Missouri River to 
graph to he held the Pacific Ocean, aud to secure to the Government the use of same 
at Chicago. for postal, military, and other purposes," approved July iirst, eighteen 

hundred aud sixty-two, aud of the five commissioners directed by said 
act to be appointed by the Secretary of the Interior, shall be held at 
Bryan Hall, in the city of Chicago, in the State of Illinois, on the first 
Tuesday in September next, at twelve o'clock, at noon. A notice of 
Notice. &&U\ meeting, to be signed by at least ten of the commissioners named 

in said act, shall be published at least once a week during the six suc- 
cessive weeks commencing on the twentieth of July, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-two, in one daily newspaper in each of the 
cities of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, Chicago, and St. 
Louis, and no other notice of said meeting shall be requisite. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 217 

AMENDMENT OF JULY 2, 1864. 

AN ACT to amend an act entitled " An act to aid in the construction of a railroad 13 Stat., 358L 
and telegraph line from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean, and to secure to 
tbo Government the use of the same for postal, military, and other purposes," ap- 
proved Jnly 1, 18G2. 



company entitled tlie Union Pacific Railroad Company, authorized by Pacific 
the act of which this act is amendatory, shall bo in shares of one bun- ^'"'v/, 1 , 



Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That the capital stock of the Shnresnf Fnion 

Pacific Kail road 
any chang- 

dred dollars, instead of one thousand dollars, each ; that the number of $i\)(j. 
shares shall be ono million, instead of one hundred thousand ; and that 
the number of shares which any person shall hold to entitle him to serve 
as a director in said company (except the five directors to be appointed 
by the Government) shall bo fifty shares instead of five shares ; and that 
every subscriber to said capital stock for each share of one thousand 
dollars, heretofore subscribed, shall bo entitled to a certificate for ten 
shares for one hundred dollars each ; and that the following words in 
section first of said act, " which shall be subscribed lor and held in not 
more than two hundred shares by any one person," be, and the same 
are hereby, repealed. 

Sec. 2. Ana be it further enacted, That the Union Pacific Railroad Books to be 
Company shall cause books to be kept open to receive subscriptions to kept open in s<v- 
the capital stock of said company, (until tho enl ire capital of one bun- sec!l C l8C2! 
dred millions of dollars shall be subscribed), at the general office of said 
company in the city of New York, and in each of the cities of Boston, 
Philadelphia, Baltimore, Chicago, Cincinnati, and Saint Louis, at such 
places as may be designated by the President of the United States, and 
in such other localities as maybe directed by him. No subscription p er cont to |, 
for said stock shall be deemed valid unless the subscriber therefor shall, paid, 
at the time of subscribing, pay or remit to the treasurer of the company 
an amount per share subscribed by him equal to the amount per share 
previously paid by the then existing stockholders. The said company 
shall make assessments upon its stockholders of not less than fiVe dol- Assessments of 
Jars per share, and at intervals of not exceeding six months from and c ' er ' 
after the passage of this act, until the par m alue of all shares subscribed How paid, 
shall bo fully paid ; and money only shall be receivable for any such 
assessment, or as an equivalent for any portion of the capital stock here- 
inbefore authorized. The capital stock of said company shall not be Amount of cap- 
increased beyond the actual cost of said road. And the stock of the i^al. 
company shall be deemed personal property, and shall be transferable stock personal 
on the books of tho company, at the general office of said company in property, 
the city of New York, or at such other transfer office as the company 
may establish. 

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the Union Pacific Railroad Additional 
Company, and all other companies provided for in this act and the act g^^ted !>ee 
to which this is an amendment, be, and hereby are empowered to enter | ec jj j8G2. 
upon, purchase, take, and hold any lands or premises that may be 
necessary and proper for the construction and working of said road, 
not exceeding in width one hundred feet on each side of its center line, 
unless a greater width be required for the purpose of excavation or 
embankment ; and also any lands or premises that may be necessary and 
proper for turnouts, standing places for cars, depots, station-house[s], 
or any other structures required in the construction and operating of 
said road. And each of said companies shall have the right to cut and 
remove trees or other materials that might by falling encumber its 
road-bed, though standing or being more than one hundred feet there- Assessment of 
from. And in case tho owner or claimant of such lauds or premises and (j anu i<r e s. 
such company can not agree as to the damages, the amount shall be 
determined by the appraisal of three disinterested commissioners, who 
may be appointed upon application by any party to any judge of a 
court of record in any of the territories in which the lands or premises 
to be taken lie; and said commissioners, in their assessments of dam- 
ages, shall appraise such premises at what would have been the value 
thereof if the road had not been built; and upon return into court of ravraont an j 
such appraisement, and upon the payment to the clerk thereof of the ^y^; 
amount so awarded by the commissioners for the use and benefit of the 
owner thereof, said premises shall be deemed to be taken by said com- 
pany, which shall thereby acquire full title to the same for the purposes 



218 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Appeal. aforesaid. And either party feeling aggrieved by said assessment may, 

within thirty days, file an appeal therefrom, and demand a jury of 
twelve men to estimate the damage sustained; bat such appeal shall 
Bonds on ap- no ^ interfere with the rights of said company to enter upon the preni- 
p( ' a ' ises taken, or to do any act necessary in the construction of its road. 

Costs of appeal. And said party appealing shall give bonds with sufficient surety or 
sureties, for the payment of any costs that may arise upon such appeal. 
And in case the party appealing does not obtain a more favorable ver- 
dict, such party shall pay the whole cost incurred by the appellee, as 
Title after ap- well as its own. And the payment into court for the use of the owner 
P eal - or claimant, of a sum equal to that finally awarded shall be held to 

vest in said company the title of said land, and the right to use and 
Absentees and occupy the same for the construction, maintaining, and operating of 
infants. the road of said company. And in case any of the lands to be taken as 

aforesaid shall be held by any person residing without the territory, or 
subject to any legal disability, the court may appoint a proper person 
who shall give bonds with sufficient surety or sureties, for the faithful 
execution of his trust, and who may represent in court the person dis- 
qualified or absent as aforesaid, when the same proceedings shall be 
had in refereuce to the appraisement of the premises to be taken, and 
with the same effect as have been already described. And the title of 
the company to the land takeu by virtue of this act shall not be 
affected nor impaired by reason of any failure by any guardian to dis- 
TJn occupied charge faithfully his trust. And in case it shall be uecessary for either 
lands, how ac- of the said companies to enter upon lands which are unoccupied, and 
quired. of which there is no apparent owner or claimant, it may proceed to 

take and use the same for the purpose of its said railroad, and may in- 
stitute proceedings in manner described for the purpose of ascertain- 
ing the value of, and acquiring a title to, the same, and the court may 
determine the kind of notice to be served on such owner or owners, 
and may in its discretion appoint an agent or guardian to represent 
such owner or owners in case of his or their incapacity or non-appear- 
ance. But in case no claimant shall appear within six years from the 
time of the opening of said road across any land, all claim to damages 
Damages, how against said company shall be barred. It shall be competent for the 
dispo&ed ot. legal guardian of any infant, or any other person under guardianship, 

to agree with the proper company as to damages sustained by reasou 
of the taking of any lands of any such person under disability, as 
aforesaid, for the use as aforesaid ; and upon such agreement being 
made, and approved by the court having supervision. of the official 
acts of said guardian, the said guardian shall have full power to make 
and execute a conveyance thereof to the said company which shall vest 
the title thereto in the said company. 
Sec. 3, 1862, Skc. 4. And be it further enacted, That section three of said act be 
amended, doub hereby amended by striking out the word "five," where the same oc- 
l'nd graut ot curs in said section, and by inserting in lieu thereof the word "ten ; " 
and by striking out the word "ten," where the same occurs in said 
section, and by inserting in lien thereof the word "twenty." And sec- 
Sec. 7, 1862, fj on seven f 8a jd ac t; is hereby amended by striking out the word 
drawing ^laud " fifteen," where the same occurs in said section, and inserting in lieu 
from sale. thereof the word "twenty-five." And the term "mineral land," wher- 

Coal and iron ever the same occurs in this act, and the act to which this is an amend- 
not minerals, ment, shall not be construed to include coal and iron land. And any 
nottobe granted! l an< ^ 8 granted by this act, or the act to which this is an amendment, 
' shall not defeat or impair any pre-emption, homestead, swamp land, 
or other lawful claim, nor include any government reservation or min- 
eral lands, or the improvements of any bona fide settler, or any lands 
returned and denominated as mineral lands, and the timber necessary 
to support his said improvement as a miner or agriculturist, to be as- 
certained under such rules as have been or may be established by the 
Commissioner of the General Land Office, in conformity with the pro- 
160 acres only v * 8 * on8 °f ^he pre-emption laws: Provided, That the quantity thus 
exempted. exempted by the operation of this act, and the act to which this act is 

an amendment, shall not exceed one hundred and sixty acres for each 
settler who claims as an agriculturist, and such quantity for each set- 
tler who claims as a miner, as the said Commissioner may establish by 
Timber to be general regulation: Provided, also, That the phrase, "but where the 
company's. Sec. same shall contaiu timber, the timber thereon is hereby granted to 
^ 18G2 - said company," in the proviso to said section three, shall not apply to 

the timber growing or being on any land farther than ten miles from 






RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 219 

the center line of any one of said roads or branches mentioned in said 
act, or in this act. And all lands .shall he excluded from the operation "I tl ' d eX * 

of this act, and of the act to which this act is an amendment, which 
were located, or selected to be located, under the provisions of an act 
entitled "An act donating lands to the several States and Territories 
which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the me- 
chanic arts," approved duly second, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, 
and notioe thereof given at the proper laud office. 

Sec. 5. And he it further enacted, Thai the time for designating the Time extended 
general route of said railroad, and of filing the map of the same, and °ne year. Sec. 
the time for the completion of that part of the railroads required by ^' myi < amen a- 
the terms of said act of each company, !>>•, and the same, is hereby, ex- 
tended one year from the time in said act designated ; and that t he Cen- 
tral Pacific Railroad Company of California shall be required to com- 25 miles per 
plete twenty-five miles of their said road in each year thereafter, and year. Fouryeara 
the whole to the State line within four years, and that only one-half of to State lino, 
the compensation for services rendered for the Government by said com- Government to 
panics shall be required to be applied to the payment of the bonds is- pa y one-half for 
sued by the Government in aid of the construction of said roads. .services. 

Sec. 6. And beit further enacted, That the proviso to section four of Spc. 4, isg2, 
said act is hereby modified as follows, viz: And the President of the modified, three 
United States is hereby authorized, at any time after the passage of this commissioners, 
act, to appoint for each and every of said roads three commissioners, 
as provided for in the act to which this is amendatory; and the veri- 
fied statement of the president of the California compauy, required 
by said section four, shall be filed in the office of the United States OJ «?pg^ A ^ 
surveyor-general for the State of California, instead of being presented to be filed in Cat 
to the President of the United States ; and the said surveyor-general ifomia. 
shall thereupon notify the said commissioners of the filing of such state- 
ment, and the said commissioners shall thereupon proceed to examine 
the portion of said railroad and telegraph line so completed, and make 
their report thereon to the President of the United States, as provided 
by the act to which this is amendatory. And such statement may be 
filed, and such railroad and telegraph line be examine*! and reported 
on by the said commissioners, and the requisite amountof bonds may be 
issued and the lands appertaining thereto may be set apart, located, T , . . 
entered, and patented, as provided in this act and the act to which e( p g ee g ec . 4 
this is amendatory, upon the construction by said railroad company of 1862. Also sec. 
California of any portion of not less than twenty consecutive miles of 8, this act. 
their said railroad and telegraph line, upon the certilicate of said com- 
missioners that such portion is completed as required by the act to 
which this is amendatory. And section ten of the act of which this is goc 10 ]g C2 
amendatory is hereby amended by inserting after the words " United amended.' 
States," in the last clause, the words " and States intervening." 

Sec 7. And be itfnriltvr enacted, That so much of section seventeen of Reservation of 
said act as provides for a reservation by the government of a portion t )0 »^ s by sec. 17, 
of the bonds to be issued to aid in the construction of the said railroads ' repea e( • 
is hereby repealed. And the failure of any one company to comply Failure of one 
fully with the conditions and requirements of this act, and the act to company not to 
which this is amendatory, shall not work a forfeiture of the rights, j^ 80 * ,^., eif i' 
privileges, or franchises of any other company or companies that shall tenia. ' ' ' ' 
have complied with the same. 

Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, That for the purpose of facilitating Partial issue of 
the work on said railroad, and of enabling the said company as early as bonds on uncom- 
practicable to commence the grading of said railroad in the region of 1 ' g^ "n, 18G2 
the mountains, between the eastern base of the Kocky Mountains and modified, 
the western base of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, so that the same may 
be finally completed within the time required by law, it is hereby pro- 
vided that whenever the chief engineer of the said company, and said 
commissioners, shall certify that a certain pioportion of the work re- 
quired to prepare the road forthe superstructure on any such section of 
twenty miles is done (which said certilicate shall be duly verified), the 
Secretary of the Treasury is hereby authorized and required, upon the 
delivery of such certilicate, to issue to said company a proportion of 
said bonds, not exceeding two-thirds of the amountof bonds authorized 
to be issued under the provisions of the act, to aid in the construction 
of such section of twenty miles, nor in any case exceeding two-thirds of Two-thirds on 
the value of the work done, the remaining one-third to remain until £ n ( h ^' . ''• ol 'j-"lV. s " 
the said section is fully completed and certified by the commissioners ac £ 86C ' ° 18 
appointed by the President, according to the terms and provisions of 



220 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OP THE INTERIOR. 

IT. P. R. RCo. the said act ; and no such bonds shall issue to the Union Pacific Rail- 
can not receive roa( j Company for work done west of Salt Lake City under this sec- 
tor more than 300 ,. r ,,' ,• v i j -i • i r- ^^ i ^ i 
miles in advance tion, more than three hundred miles m advance of the completed con- 
west of SaltLake tiuuous line of said railroad from the point of beginning on the oue 
Q.ty. hundredth meridian of longitude. 

Ferries and Sec. 9. And be it further enacted, That to enable any one of said cor- 
bridgea. porations to make convenient and necessary connections with other 

roads, it is hereby authorized to establish and maintain all necessary 
ferries upon and across the Missouri River and other rivers which its 
road may pass in its course; and authority is hereby given said corpo- 
ration to construct bridges over said Missouri River and all other riv- 
ers for the convenience of said road : Provided, That any bridge or 
bridges it may construct over the Missouri River, or any other naviga- 
ble river on the liue of said road, shall be constructed with suitable 
and proper draws for the passage of steamboats, and shall be built, 
kept, and maintained, at the expense of said company, in such man- 
ner as not to impair the usefulness of said rivers for navigation to any 
greater extent than such structures of the most approved character 
Roads mny con- necessarily do: And provided, further, That any company authorized 
nect west of ini- by this act to construct its road and telegraph line from the Missouri 
tial point. River to the initial point aforesaid, may construct its road and tele- 

graph line so as to connect with the Union Pacific Railroad at any 
point westwardly of such initial point, in case such company shall 
deem such westward connection more practicable or desirable; and in 
aid of the construction of so much of its road and telegraph line as shall 
be a departure from the route hereinbefore provided for its road, such 
company shall be entitled to all the benefits, and be subject to all the 
No increased conditions and restrictions, of this act : Provided, further, however, That 
arnountof bonds, the bonds of the United States shall not be issued lo such company 
&c - for a greater amount than is hereinbefore provided, if the same had 

united with the Union Pacific Railroad on the 100th degree of longi- 
tude ; nor shall such company be entitled to receive any greater amount 
of alternate sections of public lands than are also herein provided. 
First-mortage Sec. 10. And be it further enacted, That section five of wsaid act he so 
bonds may have modified and amended that the Union Pacific Railroad Company, the 
ernment!' l ° S ° V Central Pacific Railroad Company, and any other company authorized 
to participate iu the construction of said road, may, on the completion 
of each section of said road, as provided in this act and the act to 
Sec. 5 1862, which this act is an amendment, issue their first- mortgage bonds on 
modified. their respective railroad and telegraph lines to ail amount not exceed- 

ing the amount of the bonds of the United States, and of even tenor 
See soc. 1, act and date, time of maturity, rate and character of interest with the 
of 18G5. bonds authorized to be issued to said railroad companies respectively. 

Lien of U. S. And the li*' n of the United States bonds shall be subordinate to that 
bonds to be sub- of the bonds of any or either of said companies hereby authorized to 
ordinate, &c. be issued on their respective roads, property, and equipments, except 
as to the provisions of the sixth section of the act to which this act is 
an amendment, relating to the transmission of dispatches and the trans- 
20milosinstoad portation of mails, troops, munitions of war, supplies, and public stores 
of 40 miles, as in for the Government of the United States. And said section is further 
sec. 5, act of 1862. amended by striking out the word "forty," and inserting in lieu thereof 
the word "on each and every section of not less than twenty." 
Provision for Sec. 11. And be it further enacted, That if any of the railroad compa- 
bonds already is- n j e8 entitled to bonds of the United States, or to issue their first-mort- 
pauies? anj ' com " gage bonds herein provided for, has, at the time of the approval of this 
act, issued, or shall thereafter issue, any of "its own bonds or securities 
in such form or manner as in law or equity to entitle the same to 
priority or preference of payment to the said guaranteed bonds, or said 
first-mortgage bonds, the amount of such corporate bonds outstanding 
and unsatisfied, or uncancelled, shall be deducted from the amount of 
such government and first-mortgage bonds which the company may be 
entitled to receive and issue; and such an amount only of such govern- 
ment bonds and such first-mortgage bonds shall be granted or permitted, 
as added to snch outstanding, unsatisfied, or uncancelled bonds of the 
Affidavit of company shall make up the whole amount per mile to which the com- 
aniount of out- pany would otherwise have been entitled : And provided, further, That 
standing com- before any bonds shall be so given by the United States, the company 
pau> bonds. claiming them shall present to the Secretary of the Treasury an affidavit 
of the president and secretary of the company, to be sworn to before the 
judge of a court of record, setting forth whether said company has 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 221 

issnod any snch bonds or securities, and, if so, particularly describing 
the same, and such other evidence as the secretary may require, so as 
to enable him to make the deduction herein required ; and such affida- 
vit shall then he filed and deposited in t ho officeof the Secretary of the 
Interior. And any person swearing falsely to any such affidavit, shall 
be deemed guilty of perjury, and, on conviction thereof, shall be pun- 
ished as aforesaid: Provided, also, That no land granted by this act #fo land or 
shall he conveyed to any party or parties, and no bonds shall be issued bunds to go to 
to any company or companies, party or parties, on acconntof any road ar > co - on road 
or part thereof, made prior to the passage of the act to which this act f ij^]! 110 * ua ° 
is an amendment, or made subsequent thereto under the provisions of 
any act or acts other than this act, and the act amended by this act. 

Sec. 12. And be it further enacted, That the Leavenworth, Pawnee, Leavenworth 
and Western Railroad Company, now known as the Union Pacific au<l Lawrence 
Railroad Company, eastern division, shall build the railroad from the rolM 3 ' no ou s * 
mouth of Kansas River, by the way of Leavenworth, or, if that he not 
deemed the best route, then the said company shall, within two years, 
build a railroad from the city of Leavenworth to unite with the main 
stem at or near the city of Lawrence; but to aid in the construc- 
tion of said branch the said company shall not be entitled to any bonds. 
And if the Union Pacific Railroad Company shall not he proceeding in Inbuilt to 100th 
good faith to build the said railroad through the Territories when the merid ian, may 
Leavenworth, Pawnee, and Western Railroad Company, now known J?™^'! "\, *'V" 
as the Union Pacific Railroad Company, eastern division, shall have jr£ H 
completed their road to the hundredth degree of longitude, then the 
last named company may proceed to make said road westward until it 
meets and connects with the Central Pacific Railroad Company on the 
same lino. And the said railroad from the mouth of Kansas River, to By way of Law- 
one hundredth meridian of longitude shall be made by the way of Law- rence and Tope- 
rence and Topeka, or on the bank of the Kansas River, opposite said 3^\h ro n ierid^iu 
towns: Provided, That no bonds shall be issued or lands certified by wost of that line 
the United States to any person or company for the construction of any ii« bonds «hall be 
part of the main trunk line of said railroad west of the one hundredth issued, &c. 
meridian of longitude and east of the Rocky Mountains, until said 
road shall be completed from or near Omaha, on the Missouri River, to 
the said one hundredth meridian of longitude. 

Sec. 13. And be it further enacted, That at aud after the next election Directors, 15; 
of directors, the number of directors to be elected by the stockholders Government di- 
shall be fifteen ; aud the number of directors to be appointed by the ™ c tors, 5 " r £ e V" 
President shall be five; and the President shall appoint three additional ' ' mo e " 
directors to serve until the next regular election, and thereafter five 
directors. At least one of said Government directors shall be placed on One Govern- 
each of the standing committees of said company and at least one on meat director on 
every special committee that may be appointed. The Government eomimttees. 
directors shall, from time to time, report to the Secretary of the Interior, recto^to^cnort" 
in answer to any inquiries he may make of them, touching the condi- &o. 
tion, management, and progress of the work, and shall communicate 
to the Secretary of the Interior, at any time, such information as should 
bo in the possession of the Department. They shall, as often as may t> visit road, 
be necessary to a full knowledge of the condition and management of &c. 
the line, visit all portions of the line of road, whether built or sur- 
veyed ; and, while absent from, home, attending to their duties as 
directors, shall be paid their actual traveling expenses, and be allowed 
and paid such reasonable compensation for their time actually employed 
as the board of directors may decide. 

Sec. 14. And be it further enacted, That the next election for directors D » p e c t o rn, 
of said railroad shall be held on the first Wednesday of October next when elected and 
at the office of said company in the city of New York, between the ^o'nVo? o ne 
hours of 10 o'clock a. m. and four o'clock p. m. of said day; and all year.' 
subsequent regular elections shall be held annually thereafter at the 
same place ; and the directors shall hold their office for one year, and 
until their successors qualified. 

Sec. 15. And be it further enacted, That the several companies author- Roatitobe 
ized to construct the aforesaid roads are hereby required to operate and need a^ *w crm- 
uso said roads and telegraph for all purposes of communication, travel, tinuour line s.o 
and transportation, so far as the public and the Government are con- ^^ 1 *» * ct> 
cerned, as one continuous line; and, in such operation and use, to 
afford and secure to each equal advantages and facilities as to rates, 
time, and transportation, without any discrimination of any kind in 
favor of the road or business of any or either of said companies, or 



222 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Must telegraph adverse to the road or business of any or either of the others, and it 
See «ec lu act oi sl,a11 llot 1)e lawlul for tM0 proprietors of any line of telegraph, author- 
ises. ' lze & by t^is act, or the act amended hy this act, to refuse or fail to 
convey for all persons requiring the transmission of news and messages 
of like character, on pain of forfeiting to the person injured for each 
offense, the sum of one hundred dollars, and such other damage as ho 
may have suiferod on account of said refusal or failure, to he sued for 
and recovered in any court of the United States, or of any State or 
Territory of competent jurisdiction. 
Companies may Sec. 16. And be it further enacted, That any two or more of the com- 
eonsofldate. 5eepanie8 authorized to participate in the benefits of this act, are hereby 

sec. lb. act ol r , , . , ,. * , '.. , ... - , ,. "... J 

1802 ; alsosec. 10, authorized at any time to unite and consolidate thoir organizations, as 
lb02.' ' the same may or shall be, upou such terms and conditions, and in such 

manner as they may agree upon, and as shall not be incompatible with 
this act, or the laws of the State or States in which the road of such 
companies may be, and to assume and adopt such corporate name and 
style as they may agree upon, with a capital stock not to exceed the 
actual cost of the roads, so to be consolidated, and shall filo a copy of 
such consolidation in the Department of the Interior; and thereupon 
such organization, so formed and consolidated, shall succeed to, possess, 
and be entitled to receive from the Government of the United States, all 
and singular the grants, benefits, immunities, guaranties, acts, and 
things to be done and performed and be subject to the same terms, con- 
ditions, restrictions, and requirements which said companies, respect- 
ively, at the time of such consolidation, are or may be entitled or subject 
to under this act, in place and substitution of said companies so consoli- 
dated respectively. And ail other provisions of this act, so far as appli- 
cable, relating or in any manner appertaining to the companies so con- 
solidated, or either thereof, shall apply and be of force as to such con- 
solidated organization. And in ease upon the completion by such con- 
solidated organization of the roads, or either of them, of the companies 
so consolidated, any other of the road or roads of either of the other 
companies authorized as aforesaid (and forming, and intended or neces- 
sary to form, a portion of a continuous line from each of the several 
points on the Missouri River, hereinbefore designated, to the Pacific 
r I'd tod coas O> shall not have constructed the number of miles of its said road 

companies in a y within the time herein required, such consolidated organization ishero- 
buiM portion of by authorized to continue the construction of its road and telegraph in 
the line left an- \\ H) general direction and route upon which such incomplete or uncou- 
completedbyanv S ( r , lc ( ( .j IO ad is hereinbefore authorized to be built, until such continua- 
tion of the road of such consolidated organization shall reach the con- 
structed read and telegraph of said other company, and at such point 
to connect and unite therewith ; and for and in aid thereof the said con- 
sol idated organization may do and perform, in reference to such portion 
of load and telegraph as shall so be in continuation of its constructed 
road and telegraph, and to the construction and equipment thereof, all 
and singular, the several acts ami things hereinbefore provided, author- 
ized, or granted to be done by the company Hereinbefore authorized to 
construct and equip the same, and shall be entitled to similar and like 
grants, benefits, immunities, guarantees, acts, and things to be done and 
performed by the Government of the United States, by the President of 
the United States, by the Secretaries of the Treasury and Interior and 
by commissioners in reference to sucli company, and to such portion of 
the road hereinbefore authorized to be constructed by it, and upon the 
like and similar terms and conditions, so far as the same are applicable 
tiesof^nMlida^ thereto. And said consolidated company shall pay to said defaulting 
ted organization, company the value to be estimated by competent engineers of all the 
work done and material furnished by said defaulting company, which 
may be adopted and used by said consolidated company in the progress 
of the work under the provisions of this section : Provided, rievertheless, 
That said defaulting company may at any time before receiving pay for 
its said work and material, as hereinbefore provided, on its own election, 
pay said consolidated company the value of the work done and material 
furnished by said consolidated company, to be estimated by competent 
engineers, necessary for, and used in, the construction of the road of 
said defaulting company, and resume the control of its said road; and 
all the rights, benefits, and privileges which shall be acquired, pos- 
sessed, or exercised, pursuant to this section, shall be to that extent an 
abatement of the rights, benefits, and privileges hereinbefore granted 
to such other company. And in case any company authorized thereto, 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 223 

shall not enter into such consolidated organization, such company, upon 
the completion of its road as hereinbefore provided, shall be entitled to 
and is hereby authorized to, continue and extend the same under the 
circumstances, and in accordance with the provisions of this section, 
and to have all the benefits thereof, as fully and completely as are 
herein provided, touching such consolidated organization. And in case 
more than one such consolidated organization shall be made, pursuant 
to this act, the terms and conditions of this act, hereinbefore recited as 
to one, shall apply in like manner, force, and effect to the other: Pro- 
vided, however, That rights and interests at any time acquired by one 
such consolidated organization, shall not bo impaired by another thereof. Wh&a Central 
It is further provided that should the Central Pacific Railroad Com- Pacific Ron a 
pany of California complete their line to the eastern line of the State a,,al l reach east- 
of California, before the line of the Union Pacific Railroad Company g™teinav coon 
shall have been extended westward so as to meet the line of said first- 150 miles 'if road 
named company, said first named company may extend their line of road not met. See. LO, 
eastward one hundred and fifty miles, on the established route, so as to \V ]2} ani, '" ,ll,, l- 
meet and connect with the line of the Union Pacific Road, complying ^j.™ 8ee sec> 2 » 
in all respects with the provisions and restrictions of this act as to said 
Union Pacific Road, and upon doing so, shall enjoy all the rights, priv- 
ileges, and benefits conferred by this act on said Union Pacific Railroad 
Company. 

Sec. 17. And he it further enacted, That so much of section fourteen Sec 14, 1802, 
of said act as relates to a branch from Sioux City be, and the same is g™ ®ui x cl tv 
hereby, amended so as to read a 1 * follows: That whenever a line of Branch Road, 
railroad shall be completed through the States of Iowa, or Minnesota, 
to Sioux City, such company, now organized or may hereafter be organ- 
ized under the laws of Iowa, Minnesota, Dakota, or Nebraska, as the 
President of the United States, by its request, may designate or approve 
for than purpose, shall construct and operate a line of railroad and tel- 
egraph from Sioux City, upon the most direct and practicable route to 
such a point on, and so as to connect with, the Iowa branch of the Union 
Pacific Railroad from Omaha, or the Union Pacific Railroad, as such 
company may select, and on the same terms and conditions as are pro- 
vided in this act and the act to which this is an amendment, for the con- 
struction of the said Union and Pacific Railroad and telegraph line and 
branches ; and said company shall complete the same at the rate of fifty 
miles per year; Provided, That said Union Pacific Railroad Company 
shall be, and is hereby, released from the construction of said branch. 
And said company constructing said branch shall not be entitled to re- 
ceive in bonds an amount larger than the said Union Pacific Railroad 
Company would be entitled to receive if it had constructed the branch 
under this act and the act to which this is an amendment; but said 
company shall be entitled to receive alternate sections of land for ten, 
miles in width on each side of the same along the whole length of said 
branch : And provided furl her, That if a railroad should not be completed 
to Sioux City, across Iowa or Minnesota, within eighteen months from 
the date of this act, then said company designated by the President, as 
aforesaid, may commence, continue, and complete the construction of 
said branch as contemplated by the provisions of this act: Provided, 
however, That if the said company so designated by the President as 
aforesaid shnll not complete the said branch from Sioux City to the 
Pacific Railroad within ten years from the passage of this act, then, 
and in that case, all the railroad which shall have been constructed by 
said company shall be forfeited to, and become the property of, the 
United States. 

Srcc. 18. And be it further enacted, That the Burlington and Missouri Burlington and 
River Railroad Company, a corporation organized under and by virtue Mt* u d t '.^°d "^ • 
of the laws of the State of Iowa, be and hereby is, authorized to extend 
i[t]s road through the Territory of Nebraska from the point where it 
strikes the Missouri River south of the mouth of the Platte River, to 
some point not further west than the one hundredth meridian of west 
longitude, so as to connect, by the most practicable route, with the main 
trunk of the Union Pacific Railroad, or that part of it which runs from 
Omaha to the said one hundredth meridian of west longitude. And Right of way, 
for the purpose of enabling said Burlington and Missouri River Railroad &c * 
Company to construct that portion of their road herein authorized, the 
right of way through the public lands is hereby granted to said com- 
pany for the construction of said road. And the right, power, and au- 
thority is hereby given to said company to take from the public lands 



224 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

adjacent to the line of said road, earth, stone, timber, and other mate- 
rials for the construction thereof. Said right of way is granted to said 
company to the extent of two hundred feet where it may pass over the 
public lands, including all necessary grounds for stations, buildings, 
work- shops, depots, machine-shops, switches, side-tracks, turn-tables, 
eirish rndian ii- an< * water-stations. And the United States shall extinguish, as rapidly 
tlea. Sec. 2, 1866. as maybe consistent with public policy and the welfare of the said 
Indians, the Indian titles to all lands falling under the operation of 
this section and required for the said right of way and grant of land 
herein made. 
Land prrant to Sec. 19. And be it further enacted. That for the purpose of aiding in 
M^JLl^c' 1 and tue COU8tructmQ °f 8a '^ load, there be, and hereby is, granted to the 
said Vurliugton and Missouri River Railroad Company, every alternate 
section of public land (excepting mineral lands as provided in this act) 
designated by odd numbers, to the amount of ten alternate sections 
per mile on each side of said road, on the line thereof, and not sold, 
reserved, or otherwise disposed of by the United States, and to which 
a pre-emption or homestead claim may not have attached at the time 
the line of said road is definitely fixed: Provided, That said company 
6hall accept this grant within one year from the passage of this act, 
by filing such acceptance with the Secretary of the Interior, and shall 
also establish the line of said road, and tile a map thereof with the 
Secretary of the Interior within one year of the date of said accept- 
ance, when the said Secretary shall withdraw the lands embraced in 
this grant from market. 
Bnrlinjrton and Sice. 20. And be it further enacted, That whenever said Burlington 
M. K. K. Co. and Missouri River Railroad Company shall have completed twenty 
.lauds, &c consecutive miles of the road mentioned in the foregoing section, in 

the manner provided for other roads mentioned in this act, and the act 
to which this is an amendment, the President of the United States 
shall appoint three commissioners to examine and report to him in re- 
lation thereto; and if it shall appear to him that twenty miles of said 
road have been completed as required by this act, then, upon certifi- 
cate of said commissioners] to that effect, patents shall issue convey- 
ing the right and title to said lands to said company on each side of 
said road, as far as the samo is completed, to the amount aforesaid ; 
and such examination, report, and conveyance, by pateuts, shall con- 
tinue, from time to tune, in like manner, until said roads .shall have 
been completed. And the President shall appoint said commissioners, to 
till vacancies in said commission, as provided in relation to other roads 
mentioned in the act to which this is an amendment. And the said 
company shall be entitled to all the privileges and immunities granted 
to the Hannibal and Saint Joseph's Railroad Company by the said 
last-mentioned act, so far as the same may be applicable: Provided, 
Bonds. That no Government bonds shall be issued to the said Burlington and 

Missouri River Railroad Company to aid in the construction of said 
extension of its road ; and provided, further, that said extension shall 
be completed within the period of ten years from the passage of thisact. 
Lnndanottobe Sec. 21. And be it further enacted, That before any land granted by 
conveyed to any this act shall bo conveyed to any company or party entitled thereto 
company u nt » j. under this act, there shall first be paid into' the Treasury of the United 
mil 'vpv, a &c COS 8eo.. States the cost of surveying, selecting, and conveying the samo, by the 
4. 1862! See. 6, said company or party in interest, as the titles shall be required by 
1861. said company, which amount shall, without any further appropriation, 

stand to the credit of the proper account, to be used by the Commis- 
sioner of the General Land Office for the prosecution of the survey of 
the public lands along the line of said road, and so from year to year 
until the whole shall be completed, as provided under the provisions 
of this act. 
Soc.l8,18Gk Sec. 22. And be it further enacted f That Congress may, at any time, 

alter, amend, or roj>eal this act. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 225 

AMENDMENT OF MARCH 3, 1865. 

AN ACT to amend an act entitled "An act to aid in the construction of a railroad j 3 gt a t_ t 504. 
and telegraph line from the Missouri River to the Paoiflc Ocean, and to secure to 
the Government the use of the same for postal, military, and other purposes," ap- 
proved July first, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, and to amend an act amenda- 
tory thereof, approved July second, eighteu hundred and sixty-lour. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That section ten of said act of 
July second, eighteen hundred and sixty (our, be so modified and May issuebnnd* 
amended as to allow the Central Pacific Railroad Company, and the ^nc?ofc©mplet' 
Western Pacific Railroad Company, of California, the Union Pacific^ une> interest 
Railroad Company, the Union Pacific Railroad Company, eastern divis- payable in any 
ion. and all other companies provided for in the said acts of the second L a 7f ft n ler* 011 ^' 
of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-four, to issue their six per centum bec# 10, 
thirty years' bonds, interest payable in any lawful money of the United 
States, upon their separate roads. And the said companies are hereby 
authorized to issue, respectively, their bonds to the extent of one hun- 
dred miles in advance of a continuous completed line of construction. 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the assignment made bv the Assignment 
Central Pacilic Railroad Company of California to the Western Pacific j 0n f rm n e (l d g° a S r £ 
Railroad Company of said State, of the right to construct all that por- m ° e nto a Road. aCI * 
tion of said railroad and telegraph from the city of San Jose* to the city 
of Sacramento, is hereby ratified and confirmed to the said Western 
Pacific Railroad Company, with all the privileges and benefits of the 
several acts of Congress relating thereto, and subject to all the condi- 
tions thereof: Provided, That the time within which the said Western 
Pacific Railroad Company shall be required to construct the first twenty 
miles of their said road, shall be one year from the first day of July, 
eighteen hundred and sixty-five, and that the entire road shall be com- 
pleted from San Jos6 to Sacramento, connecting at the latter point with 
the said Central Pacific Railroad, within four years thereafter. 



AMENDMENT OF JULY 3, 1866. 

AN ACT to amend an act entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to aid 1* Stat., 79. 
in the construction of a railroad and telegraph line from the Missouri River to the 
Pacific Ocean, and to secure to the Government the use of the same for postal, mil- 
itary, and other purposes,' approved Jnly first, eighteen hundred and sixty-two," 
approved July second, eighteen hundred and sixty-four. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That the Union Pacific Railway 
Company, eastern division, is hereby authorized to designate the gen- 
eral route of their said road and to tile a map thereof, as now required XT. P. R. R. Co., 
by law, at any time before the first day of December, eighteen hundred *?• D -i time {oT 
and sixty-six; and upon the filing of the said map, showing the gen- ^jf.j map ex " 
eral route of said road, the lands along the entire line thereof, so far as 
the same may be designated, shall bo reserved from sale by order of the 
Secretary of the Interior: Provided, That said company shall be entitled 
to only the same amount of the bonds of the United States to aid in the 
construction of their line of railroad and telegraph as they would have 
been entitled to if they had connected their said line with the Union 
Pacific Railroad on the one hundredth degree of longitude as now re- 
quired by law: And provided further, That said company shall connect 
their lino of railroad and telegraph with the Union Pacific Railroad, 
but not at a point more than fifty miles westwardly from the meridian 
of Denver in Colorado, 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the Union Pacific Railroad Jjr \^ u n '\° 
Company, with the consent and approval of the Secretary of the Into- proceed till meet. 
rior, are hereby authorized to locate, construct, and continue their road 
from Omaha, in Nebraska Territory, westward, according to the best 
and most practicable route, and without reference to the initial point 
on the one hundredth meridian of west longitude, as now provided by 
law, in a continuous completed line, until they shall meet and connect 
with the Central Pacific Railroad Company of California ; and the Cen- m ^ en c t a n [jjj 
tral Pacific Railroad Company of California, with the consent and ap- u^n- °road "ast- 
proval of the Secretary of the Interior, are hereby authorized to locate, ward with con- 

INT 90— VOL III 15 



226 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

sent of Secretary construct, and continue their road eastward, in a continuous completed 
t'U th< t b n rr n p r ^ ne ' un *^ they shall meet and connect with the Union Pacific Rail- 
it. R. Co. Sec! ioi roa d: Provided, That each of the above named companies shall have 
18G2, and Sec. 16J the right, when the nature of the work to be done, by reason of deep 
1864, amended, cuts and tunnels, shall for the expeditious construction of the Pacific 
Railroad require it, to work for an extent of not to exceed three hun- 
dred miles in advance of their continuous completed line. 



ACT OF JUNE 25, 1868. 

16 Stat., 79- *AN ACT relative to filing reports of railroad companies. 

Reports of cer- Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
tain railroads to States of America in Congress assembled, That tbe reports required to be 
be ma do on or be- rnado to the Secretary of the Treasury on or before the first day of July 
eack year to SeS OI eacn y ear > D 7 the corporations created by or entitled to subsidies 
retary of Inte- under the provisions of an act entitled "An act to aid in the construc- 
tor, tion of a railroad and telegraph line from the Missouri River to the 
Pacific Ocean, and to secure to the Government the use of the same 
for postal, military, and other purposes," approved July first, eighteen 
hundred and sixty -two, and the acts supplemental t& and amendatory 
thereof, shall hereafter be made to the Secretary of the Interior, on or 
To contain before the first day of October of each year. Said reports shall furnish 
what, full and specific information upon the several points mentioned in the 
twentieth section of the said act of eighteen hundred and sixty-two, 
and shall be verified as therein prescribed, and on failure to make the 
same as herein required, the issue of bonds or patents to the company 
in default shall be suspended until the requirements of this act shall be 
Former reports, complied with by such company. And the reports hitherto made to the 
Secretary of the Treasury under the said act of July first, eighteen hun- 
dred and sixty-two, shall be transferred and delivered by him to the 
Secretary of the Interior to be filed by him. 

Reports of com- Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the reports required from the 
missioners to be commissioners appointed to examine and report in relation to the road 
mentoanterior. °^ an y OI * * ne corporations whereto reference is made in this act, shall 
be addressed to and filed in the Department of the Interior ; and all 
such reports heretofore made shall be transferred to and filed in said 
Repealing Department of the Interior; and so much of any and all acts as requires 
any reports from such companies, or any officers thereof, to be made to 
the Secretary of the Treasury, is hereby repealed. 
Reports of en- Sec. 4. A nd be it further enacted, That, in addition to the eight subjects 
gineers and other referred to in section twenty of the act of July,- eighteen hundred and 
officers who s j x ty-two, to be reported upon, there shall also be furnished annually 
be' 1 fui nfahed? ° t° the Secretary of the Interior all reports of engineers, superintendents, 
or other officers who make annual reports to any of said railroad com- 
panies. 



AN ACT RELATING TO THE DENVER PACIFIC. MARCH 3. 1869. 

15 Stat. 324. AN ACT to authorize the transfer of lands granted to the Union Pacific Railway 
Company, Eastern Division, between Denver and the point of its connection with 
tbe Union Pacific Railway, to the Denver Pacific Railway and Telegraph Com- 
pany, and to expedite the completion of railroads to Denver, in the Territory of 
Colorado. 



Union 



Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
id Compa^ a * es °f ^ merica * n Congress assembled, That the Union Pacific Rail- 
nv may contract way Company, Eastern Division, be, and it hereby is, authorized to 
with Denver Pa- contract with the Denver Pacific Railway and Telegraph Company, a 
cl fie Railway and cor poration existing under the laws of the Territory of Colorado, for 
v -irnf forth e icon- ^ ne obstruction, operation, and maintenance of that part of its line of 
BtYuction, &c, of railroad and telegraph between Denver City and its point of connec- 
ts road and tele- tion with the Union Pacific Railroad, which point shall be at Chey- 
graph between e nne, and to adopt the road-bed already graded by said Denver Pacific 
Cheyenne &.c Railway and Telegraph Company as said line, and to grant to said 

* Repealed by act of June 19. 1878. 



RAILROAD ACGOUNTS. 227 

Denver Pacific Railway and Telegraph Company the perpetual use of 
its right of way and depot grounds, and to transfer to it all the rights 
and privileges, subject to all the obligations pertaining to said part of 
its line. 

Skc. 2. And be it further enacted, That the said Union Pacific Rail- Shall extend its 
way Company, Eastern Division, shall extend its railroad and tele- SmhtJ&e.tso 
graph to a connection at the city of Denver, so as to form with that ^ to form contin- 
part of its lino herein authorized to be constructed, operated, and nous line from 
maintained by the Denver Pacific Railway and Telegraph Company, a Kansas City to 
continuous line of railroad and telegraph from Kansas City, by way f Cheyenne, &c - 
Denver 10 tin venue. And all the provisions of law for tho operation Laws to apply, 
of the Union Pacific Railroad, its branches and connections, as a con- 
tinous line, without disci imination, shall apply the same as if the road 
from Denver to Cheyenne had been constructed by the said Union Pa- 
cific Railway Company, Eastern Division; but nothing herein shall ro 2i P and%ates of 
authorize the said Eastern Division Company to operate the road or tariff not affected. 
fix the rates of tariff for the Denver Pacific Railway and Telegraph 
Company. 

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That said companies are hereby The companies 
authorized to mortgage their respective portions of said road, as herein "^elr roads S * g6 
defined, for an amount not exceeding thirty-two thousand dollars per 
mile, to enable*theni respectively to borrow money to construct the 
same; and that each of said companies shall receive patents to tho To receive pat- 
alternate sections of land along their respective lines of road, as herein ggclions oMand* 
defined, in like maimer and within the same limits as is provided by 
law in the case of lands granted to the Union Pacific Railway Com- But nofc ._ 
pany, Eastern Division: Provided, That neither of the companies t i et i to subsidy in 
hereinbefore mentioned shall be entitled to subsidy in United States United States 
bonds under the provisions of this act. bonds. 



JOINT RESOLUTION OF MARCH 3, 1869. 

JOINT RESOLUTION authorizing tho Union Pacific Railway Company, Eastern 15 Stat., 348. 
Division, to change its name to the "Kansas Pacific Railway Company." 

Beit resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United Union Paciflo 
States of America in Congress assembled, That the Union Pacific Railway Railway Compa- 
Company, Eastern Division, is hereby authorized by resolution of its ^'ion to change 
board of directors, which shall be filed in the office of the Secretary of jt 8 name to Kan- 
the Interior, to change its name to the " Kansas Pacific Railway Com- sas Pacific Rail- 
pany." wav Company. 



JOINT RESOLUTION OF APRIL 10, 1869. 

JOINT RESOLUTION for the protection of the interests of the United States in the 16 Stat., 56. 
Union Pacific Railroad Company, the Central Pacific Railroad Company, and for 
other purposes. 

Be it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That the stockholders of the S* 00 ^ 01 ^™ °.f 
Union Pacific Railroad Company, at a meeting to be held on the twenty- J{ n c o n tneiect a 
second day of April, eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, at the city of board of direct- 
Boston (with power to adjourn from day to day), shall elect a board of ors. 
directors for the ensuing year ; and said stockholders are hereby author- .. 

ized to establish their general office at such place in the United States tbe "£. general o£ 
as they may select at said meeting: Provided, That the passage of this rice, 
resolution shall not confer any other right.upon said Union Pacific Rail- No other right 
road Company than to hold such election, or be held in any manner to c °P fe i I j red b or 
relinquish or wave any rights of the United States to take advantage waive ' eie ?• 
of any act or neglect of said Union Pacific Railroad Company hereto- 
fore done or omitted whereby the rights of the General Government ., . 
have been or may be prejudiced: And provided, further, That the com- n ,^"Hi" Union 
mon terminus of the Union Pacific and the Central Pacific Railroads Pacific and Con- 
shall be at or near Ogden ; and the Union Pacific Railroad Company tral Pacific Rail- 
shall build, and the Central Pacific Railroad Company pay for and own ™* d q„£* a ^ or 
the railroad from the terminus aforesaid to Promontory Summit, at s e ' 
which point the rails shall meet and connect and form one continuous 
line* 



228 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

The President Sec. 2. And be it further resolved, That to ascertain the condition of 
mSn^o exam- the UDion Pacific Railroad and the Central Pacific Railroad, the Presi- 
ine 81 and° report d en t of the United States is authorized to appoint a board of einiuent 
upon the roads, citizens, not exceeding five in number, and who shall not be interested 
in either road, to examine and report upon the condition of, and what 
sum or sums, if any, will be required to complete each of said roads, 
for the entire length thereof, to the said terminus as a first-class rail- 
Expenses and r °ad, in compliance with the several acts relating to said roads ; and 
pay of commis- the expense of such board, including au allowance of ten dollars to 
sioners. each for their services for each day employed in such examination or 

report, to be paid equally by said companies. 
Subsidy bonds Sec. 3. And be it further resolved, That the President is hereby author- 
to be withheld izecl and required to withhold from each of said companies au amount 
curethofullcom- of sub8ia \ v bonds authorized to be issued by the United States under 
pletion, asa first- said acts sufficient to secure the full completion as a first-class road of 
class road, of all all sections of such road upon which bonds have already been issued, 
sections of such or j n ii eu f RU cli bonds ho may receive as such security an equal anion nt 
r °Tf \\ ° of the first mortgage bonds of such compauy ; and if it shall appear to 

to be issued ?s U £- the President tna t the amount of subsidy bonds yet to be issued to either 
sufficient, <fcc. °* sa id companies is sufficient to insure the full completion of such 
road, he may make requisition upon such company for a sufficient 
amount of bonds already issued to said company, or in his discretion of 
their first mortgage bonds, to secure the full completion of the same. 
Attorney-Gen- ^mi in default of obtaining such security as [is] in this section pro- 
necessary'suits. 6 v ^ed, the President may authorize and direct the Attorney-General to 
institute such suits and proceedings on behalf and in the name of the 
United States, in any court of the United States having jurisdiction, as 
shall be necessary or proper to compel the giving of such security, and 
thereby, or in any manner othorwise, to protect the interests of Ibe 
United States in said road, and to insure the full completion thereof as 
Attomev-Gen- a first-class road, as required by law and the statutes in that case made, 
eral to investi- Sec. 4. And be it further resolved, That the Attorney- General of the 
gate whetherthe United States be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to investi- 
Union 1 " Pacific £ ato whether or not the charter and all the franchises of the Union 
and Central Pa- Pacific Railroad Company and of the Central Pacific Railroad Company 
cific Railroads have not been forfeited, and to institute all necessary and proper legal 
have not been for- proceedings ; alsoto investigate whether or not said companies have or 
feited, &.c. have not made any illegal dividends upon their stock, and if so to in- 

To institute ^i^ute the necessary proceedings to have the same reimbursed; and 
criminal proceed- also to investigate whether any of the directors or any other agents or 
hags, if, <fcc. employe's of said companies have or not violated any penal law, and 

if so to institute the proper criminal proceedings against all persons 
who have violated such laws. 



ACT OF MAT 6, 1870. 

16 Stat. 121. -A-N ACT to fix the point of junction of the Union Pacific Railroad Company and the 

Central Pacific Railroad Company. 



Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
Point of junc- States of America in Congress assembled, That the common terminus and 
tion ot tl'.o Lnion . J „ . ,. „., *v T . t» •*• -n -i -i ^ i xi r\ 

Pacific Pvailroud point of junction of the Union Pacific Railroad Company and the Cen- 
and the Central tral Pacific Railroad Company shall be definitely fixed and established 
P Kr fi £ "^ R ' f?" on tne ^ ne °* ia ilroad as now located and constructed, northwest of the 
west ot " thesta^ station at Ogden, and within the limits of the sections of laud hercin- 
tionatOgden,&c. after mentioned, viz: Section thirty-six of township seveu, of range two, 
situated north and west of the principal meridian and base line in the 
territory of Utah, and sections twenty-five, twenty-six, and thirty-five 
of township seven, of range two, and section six of township six, and 
sections thirty and thirty-one of township seven, of range one, and sec- 
tions one and two of township six, of range two, all situate north and 
west of said principal meridian and base line; and said companies are 
hereby authorized to enter upon, use, and possess said sections, which 
tectums 6rtain are nerelL) y granted to them in equal shares, with the same rights, privi- 
leges, and obligations now bylaw provided with reference to other lands 
granted to said railroads : Provided, however. That the Secretary of the 
Reserve f or Interior shall designate a section of land in said township seven, of 
pchools. range two, belonging to said companies, and reserve the same for the 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 229 

benefit of schools in said territory, in accordance with the act of Feb- 
ruary twenty-one, eighteen hundred and fifty-five, establishing the Price of land. 
office of surveyor-general of Utah, and to grant land lor school and Private rights, 
university purposes : Provided a/so. That said companies shall pay for 
any additional lands acquired by this ad at the rate of two dollars and 
fifty cents an acre: And provided further, That no rights of private per- 
sons shall be affected by this act. « 



ACT OF FEBRUARY 24, 1871. 16 Stat., 430. 

AN ACT to authorize the Union Pacific Railroad Company to issne its bonds to con- 
struct a bridge across thu Missouri River at Omaha, Nebraska, and Council Bluffs, _. . — .„ 
Iowa. Union Pacific 

Railroad Co. may 
issuo bonds, &c, 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United toconsiruc^&c, 
States of America in Congress assembled, That for the more perfect con- a bridge across 
nectiou of any railroads t ha t are or shall be constructed to the Missouri e *\ t Omaha. 
River, at or near Council Binds, Iowa, and Omaha, Nebraska, the Union 
Pacific Railroad Company be, and it is hereby, authorized to issue such ^ . .. f 
bonds, and secure the same by mortgage on the bridge and approaches bridge, tolls 10 &c. 
and appurtenances, as it may deem needful to construct and maintain 
its bridge over said river, and the tracks and depots required to per- 
fect the same, as now authorized by law of Congress; and said bridge 
may be so constructed as to provide for the passage of ordinary vehicles 
and travel, and said company may levy and collect tolls and charges for 
the use of the same ; and for the use and protection of said bridge and 
property, the Union Pacific Railway Company shall be empowered, 
governed, and limited by the provisions of the act entitled "An act to Eastern tor- 
authorize the construction of certain bridges, and to establish them as minus of ra i 1- 
post-roads," approved July twenty-five, eighteen hundred and sixty-six, ™ 1 a l ^ (r " d Jt t0 
so far as the same is applicable thereto : And provided, That nothing in b 
this act shall be so construed as to change the eastern terminus of the 
Union Pacific Railroad from the place where it is now fixed under ex- 
isting laws, nor to release said Union Pacific Railroad Company, or its Congress may 
successors, from its obligation as established by existing laws : Provided fares ate t0 u 
also, That Congress shall at all times have power to regulate said Amount of 
bridge, and the rates for the transportation of freight and passengers bonds. 
over the same, and the local travel hereinbefore provided for. And the Draws, 
amount of bouds herein authorized shall not exceed two and a half 
millions of dollars: Provided, That if said bridge shall be constructed 
as a draw-bridge, the same shall be constructed with spans of not less 
than two hundred feet in length in the clear on each side of the central 
or pivot pier of the draw. 



ACT OF MARCH 3, 1871. 

AN ACT making appropriations for the support of the Army for the year ending Stat., 225. 
Juno 30, 1872, &c. 



Sec. 9. That, in accordance with the fifth section of the act approved Secretary of 
July two, eighteen hundred and sixty-four, entitled "An act to amend Treasury to pay 
an act entitled 'An act to aid in the construction of a railroad and tel- oyer to Pacific 
egraph line from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean, and to secure niea onehalf PU f 
to the Government the use of the same for postal, military, and other compensation. 
purposes/ approved July first, eighteen hundred and sixty-two," the &e. 
Secretary of the Treasury is hereby directed to pay over in money to 
the Pacific Railroad companies mentioned in said act, and performing 
services for the United States, one-half of the compensation at the rate 
provided by law for such services, heretofore or hereafter rendered: 
Provided, That this section shall not be construed to affect the legal Le „. a j r j,T U t^ of 
rights of the Government or the cbligations of tlie companies, except part ie H nofotber- 
&s herein specifically provided. wwe affected. 



230 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF T11F INTERIOR. 

ACT OF MAKCH 3, 1873. 

'• * An act making appropriations for the legislative, executive, and judicial expenses 
of the Government for the year ending June 30, 1874. and for other purposes. 

Seer e t ar y of Sec. 2. That the Secretary of the Treasury is directed to withhold all 
tll °th '[fold' r>av° P a y m entsto an y railroad company audits assigns, on account of freights 
ments to certain or transportation, over their respective roads, of any kind, to the amount 
railroad compa- of payments made by the United States for interest upon bonds of the 
nies for freight, United States issued to any such company, and which shall not have 
&c# been reimbursed together with the five per cent, of net earnings due 

Companiesmay au d unapplied as provided by law; and any such company may bring 

bring suit in suit in the Court of Claims to recover the price of such freight and 

Court of Claims, transportation ; and in such suit the right of such company to recover 

the same upon 1 he law and the facts of the case shall be determined and 

Appeal to Su- also the rights of the United States upon the merits of all the points 
pr em eCourt. presented by it in answer thereto by them and either party to such suit 
precedence. ° may appeal to the Supreme Court ; and both said courts shall give such 
cause or causes precedence of all other business. 

*•»■#* # # * 

Attorney-Gen- g EC 4 That the Attorney-General shall cause a suit in equity to be 
fnenuity'agai'nst instituted in the name of the United States against the Union Pacific 
the Union Pacific Railroad Company, and against all persons who may, in their own 
Railroad Com- names or through any agents, have subscribed for or received capital 
pauy and all per- s tock in said road, which stock has not been paid for in full in money, 
sons w o, e c. Qr w j jq mav ] iave receive^ a8 dividends or otherwise, portions of the 
capital stock of said road, or the proceeds or avails thereof, or other prop- 
erty of said road, unlawfully and contrary to equity, or who may have 
received as profits or proceeds of contracts for construction, or equip- 
ments of said road, or other contracts therewith, moneys or other prop- 
erty which ought, in equity, to belong to said railroad corporation, or 
who may, under pretense of having complied with the acts to which 
this is an addition, have wrongfully and unlawfully received from the 
United States bonds, moneys, or lands which ought, in equity, to be 
accounted for and paid to said railroad company or to the United States, 
and to compel payment for said stock, and the collection and payment 
of such moneys, and the restoration of such property, or its value, either 
to said railroad corporation or to the United States, whichever shall in 
Suit to be equity be held entitled thereto. Said suit may bo brought in the cir- 
brought in any cuit court in any circuit, and all said parties may be made defendants 
C1 Decrees Urt * n one lSU ' t * Decrees may ue entered and enforced against any one or 
more parties defendant without awaiting the final determination of the 
cause against other parties. The court where said cause is pending 
may make such orders and decrees and issue such process as it shall 
New parties, deem necessary to bring in new parties or tho representatives of par- 
etc. ' ties deceased, or to carry into effect the purposes of this act. On filing 

Writs of sub- the bill writs of subpoena may be issued by said court against any par- 
SnTdisSt 1 'and tiea defendant, which writ shall run into any district, and shall be 
how served.' served, as other like process, by the marshal of such district. The 
Books of the books, records, correspondence, and all other documents of the Union 
railroad company p ac ific Railroad Company, shall at all times be open to*inspection by the 
ejection? 11 m " Secretary of the Treasury, or such persons as he may delegate for that 
Bankrupt laws purpose. The laws of the United States providing for proceedings in 
not to apply. bankruptcy shall not be held to apply to said corporation. No dividend 
Dividends.new 8 hall hereafter be made by said company but from the actual net earn- 
stoc ,mor gages, j U g 8 ^q^^ . arj( j no new 8 tock shall be issued, or mortgages or pledges 
made on the property or future earnings of the company, without leave 
of Congress, except for the purpose of funding and securing debt now 
No director to existing, or the renewal thereof. No director or officer of said road 
be interested in shall hereafer be interested, directly or indirectly, in any contract there- 
ceD^etcf* *' 6X w ^ n , except for his lawful compensation as such officer. Any director 
or officer who shall pay or declare, or aid in paying or declaring any div- 
idend, or creating any mortgage or pledge prohibited by this act, shall 
Penalty. be punished by imprisonment not exceeding two years, and by fine not 

Jurisdiction of exceeding five thousand dollars. The proper circuit court of the 
circuit, court to United States shall have jurisdiction to hear and determine all cases of 
issue mandamus, ma ndainus to compel said Union Pacific Railroad Company to operate 
its road as required by law. 






KWLROAD ACCOUNTS. 231 

ACT OF JUNE 20, 1874. 

AN ACT making additions to the fifteenth section of the act approved July 2, 1864, 18 Stat., 111. 
entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An aot to aid in the construction of a 
railroad and telegraph line from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean, and to se- 
cure to the government the use of the same for postal, military, and other pur- 
poses,' approved Jnly 1, 1802." 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of America in Congress assembled. That there shall be, and is hereby, Certain roads to 
added to the fifteenth section of t he act approved July second, eighteen De t - op ^ m^S 
hundred and sixty-four, entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An with equal facili- 
act to aid in the construction of a railroad and telegraph line from tbe ties. 
Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean, and to secure to the government 
the use of the same for postal, military, and other purposes,' approved 
July iirst,eighteen hundred and sixty-two, "the folio wing words,namely: 
"And any officer or agent of the companies authorized to construct the Agents or offi- 
aforesaid roads, or of any company engaged in operating either of said cera to he fined 
roads, who shall refuse to operate and use the road or telegraph under in case of refusal, 
his control, or which he is engaged iu operating for all purposes of com- 
munication, travel, and transportation, so far as the public and the gov- 
ernment are concerned, as one continuous line, or shall refuse, in such 
operation and use, to afford and secure to each of said roads equal ad- 
vantages and facilities as to rates, time, or transportation, without any 
discrimination of any kind in favor of, or adverse to, the road or busi- 
ness of any or either of said companies, shall he deemed guilty of a 
misdemeanor, and, upon conviction thereof, shall be fined in any sum 
not exceeding one thousand dollars, and may be imprisoned not less 
than six months. In case of failure or refusal of the Union Pacific Union Pacifio 
Railroad Company, or either of said branches, to comply with the re- Company to be 
quirements of this act and the acts to which this act is amendatory, the sued in case of 
party injured or the company aggrieved may bring an action inthedis- retusaL 
trict or circuit court of the the United States in the territory, district, or 
circuit in which any portion of the road of the defendant may be situ- 
ated, for damages on account of such failure or refusal ; and, upon re- 
covery, the plaintiff shall be entitled to judgment for treble the amouut Penalty fixed, 
of all excess of freight and fares collected by the defendant, and for 
treble the amount of damages sustained by the plaintiff by such failure 
or refusal ; and for each and every violation of or failure to comply with 
the requirements of this act, a new cause of action shall arise; and in 
case of suit in any such territory, district, or circuit, process may be 
served upon any agent of the defendant found in the territory, district, 
or circuit in which such suit may be brought, and such service shall be 
by the court held to he good and sufficient ; and it is hereby provided 
that for all the purposes of said act, and of the acts amendatory thereof, 
the railway of the Denver Pacific Railway and Telegraph Company 
shall be deemed and taken to be a part and extension of the road of the 
Kansas Pacific Railroad, to the point of junction thereof with the road 
of the Union Pacific Railroad at Cheyenne, as provided in the act of 
March third, eighteen hundred and sixty-nine. 



ACT OF JUNE 22, 1874. 

AN ACT providing for the collection of moneys due the United States from the Pa 18 Stat., 200. 
cific Eailroad Companies. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Treasury be, Secretary of 
and hereby is, directed to require payment of the railroad companies, the Treasury to 
their successors and assigns, or the successors or assigns of any or either demand five per 
of said companies, of all sums of money due or to become due, the ^ earn " 

United States for the five per centum of the net earnings provided for 
by the act entitled "Au act to aid in the construction of a railroad and 
telegraph line from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean, and to se- 
cure to the government the use of the same for postal, military, and 
other purposes" approved July first, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, 
'or by any other act or acts in relation to the companies therein named, 
or any other such company or companies, and in case either of said 
railroad companies shall neglect or refuse to pay the same within sixty 



232 REPORT OF THE .SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Attorney- Gen. 



days after demand therefor made upon the treasurer of such railroad 
company, the Secretary of the Treasury shall certify that fact to the 
erulVo brfn^urt. A * torney -General, who shall thereupon institute the necessary suits and 
proceedings to collect and otherwise ohtain redress in respect of the 
same in the proper circuit courts of the United States, and prosecute 
the same, with all convenient dispatch to a final determination. 



ACT OF MAECH 3, 1875. 

18 Stat., 453. AN ACT making apppropriations for the support of the Army for the fiscal year 
ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and seventy-six, and for other purposes. 

No payraentfor Provided, That no money shall hereafter he paid to any railroad com- 
transportationot'p any f or Tne transportation of any property or troops of the United 
railroads reeeiv^ States over any railroad which, in whole or in part, was constructed by 
ing land grants, the aid of a grant of public land, on the condition that such railroad 
fcc v should be a public highway for the use of the Government of the United 

fo N ° t al,owan t ce States, free from toll or other charge, or upon any other conditions for 
tion of officers on tne U8e °^ 8Ucn road, for such transportation ; nor shall any allowance 
duty. be made for the transportation of officers of the Army over any such road 

when on duty and uuder orders as military officers of the United States. 

Right of com- But nothing herein contained shall be construed as preventing any such 

pames to sue in ra ji r0 ad from bringing a suit in the Court of Claims for the charges for 

Court of Claims. . , ,. & ° , f ,, .„ ~ 1 & i.- A i i 

such transportation, and recovering for the same it found entitled 

thereto, by virtue of the laws in force prior to the passage of this act ; 
Statute of linii- provided that the claim for such charges shall not have been barred by 
tations. the statute of limitations at the time of bringing the suit, and either 

Appeal. party shall have the right of appeal to the Supreme Court of the United 

Proviso. States: And provided further, That the foregoing provision shall not 

apply for the current fiscal year, nor thereafter, to roads where the sole 
condition of transportation is that the company shall not charge the 
Government higher rate than they do individuals for like transporta- 
tion, and when the Quartermaster-General shall be satisfied that this 
condition has been faithfully complied with. 



20 Stat, 44. ACT OF ArEIL 30, 1878. 

AN ACT to provide for deficiencies in the appropriations for the service of "the gov- 
ernment for the fiscal year ending Juno thirtieth, eighteen hundred and seventy- 
eight ; ami lor prior years, for suhsistenceof the Army, and for other purposes. 

«♦***•* 

WAR DEPARTMENT. 

Transportation Transportation. — To enable the Secretary of War to pay for trans- 
ot Army. puliation of the Army, including baggage of the troops when moving 

either by laud or water: of clothing and camp and garrison equipage 
from the depots of Philadelphia and Jefferson villo to the several posts 
and Army depots, and from those depots to the troops in the field ; of 
horse-equipments and of subsistence stores from the places of purchase 
and from the places of delivery, under contract, to such places as the 
circumstances of the service may have required them to be sent ; of 
ordnance, ordnance stores, and small-arms from the founderies and 
armories to the arsenals, fortifications, frontier posts, and Army depots ; 
freights, wharfage, tolls, and ferriages; the purchase and hire of horses, 
mules, oxen, and harness, and the purchase and repair ot wagons, carts, 
and drays, and of ships, and other sea-going vessels and boats required 
for the Transportation of supplies and for garrison purposes; for dray- 
age and cartage at the several posts ; hire of teamsters ; transportation 
of funds for the pay and other disbursing departments ; the expense of 
sailing public transports on the various rivers, the Gulf of Mexico, and 
the Atlantic and Pacific ; for procuring water at such posts as, from 
their situation, require it to be brought from a distance ; and for clear- 
ing roads, and for removing obstructions from roads, harbors, and riv- 
ers, to the extent which has been required for the actual operations of 
the troops in the field, one million two hundred thousand dollars, be- 



RAH ROAD ACCOUNTS. 233 

ing a deficiency for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hun- 
dred and seventy-seven : Provided, hoivever, That no part of this sum R <ai i way com . 
shall be paid to any railroad company or to its assigns on account ofpanies. 
freights or transportation over their respective roads unless there be an I u I eres t on 
excess due such company after chargingthe amonntof payments made bonds to bo do- 
by the United States for interest upon bonds of the United States is- auctea « 
sued to any such company; but the same shall be paid to the Secretary 
of the Treasury, to be by him withheld, as directed by existing law. 



ACT OF MAY 7, 1878. 

AN ACT to alter and amend the act entitled "An act to aid in the construction of 20 Stat., 50. 
a railroad and telegraph line from the .Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean, and bo 
secure u» the government the use of the same for postal, military, and for other 
purposes,'' approved July first, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, and also to alter 
and amend the act of Congress approved July second, eighteen hundred and sixty- 
four, in amendment of said first-named act. 

Whereas, on the first day of July, anno Domini eighteen hundred Preamhle. 
and sixty-two, Congress passed an act entitled "An act to aid in the 
construction of a railroad and telegraph line from the Missouri River 
to the Pacific Ocean, and to secure to the government the use of the 
same for postal; military, and other purposes; and 

Whereas afterward, on the second day of July, anno Domini eighteen 
hundred and sixty-four, Congress passed an act in amendment of said 
first-mentioned act; and 

Whereas, the Union Pacific Railroad Company, named in said acts, 
and under the authority thereof, undertook to construct a railway, 
after the passage thereof, over some part of the line mentioned in said 
acts; and 

Whereas, under the authority of the said two acts, the Central Pa- 
cific Railroad Company of California, a corporation existing under the 
laws of the State of California, undertook to construct a railway, after 
the passage of said acts, over some part of the line mentioned in said 
acts ; and 

Whereas the United States, upon demand of said Central Pacific 
Railroad Company, have heretofore issued, by way of loan, and as 
provided in said aets, to and for the benefit of said company, in aid of 
the purposes named in said acts, the bonds of the United States, pay- 
able in thirty years from the date thereof, with interest at six per 
centum per annum, payable half-yearly, to the amount of twenty-five 
million eight hundred and eighty-five thousand one hundred and twenty 
dollars, which said bonds have been sold in the market or otherwise 
disposed of by said company ; and 

Whereas the said Central Pacific Company has issued and disposed 
of .an amount of its own bonds equal to the amount so issued by the 
United States, and secured the same by mortgage, and which are, if 
lawfully issued and disposed of, a prior and paramount lien, in the re- 
spect mentioned in said acts, to that of the United States, as stated, 
and secured thereby; and 

Whereas, after the passage of said acts, the Western Pacific Railroad 
Company, a corporation then existing under the laws of California, did, 
under the authority of Congress, become the assignee of the rights, 
duties, and obligations of the said Central Paciiie Railroad Company, 
as provided in the act of Congress passed on the third of March, anno 
Domini eighteen hundred and" sixty-five, and did, under the authority 
of the said act and of the acts aforesaid, construct a railroad from the 
city of San Jose", to the city of Sacramento, in California, and did de- 
mand aud receive from the United States the sum of one million nine 
hundred and seventy thousand five hundred and sixty dollars of the 
bonds of the United States, of the description before mentioned as 
issued to the Central Pacific Company, and in the same manner and 
under the provisions of said acts ; and upon and in respect, of the bonds 
so issued to both said companies, the United States have paid interest 
to the sum of more than thirteen and a half million dollars, which has 
not been reimbursed; aud 

Whereas said Western Pacific Railroad Company has issued and dis- 
posed of an amount of its owu bonds equal to the amount so issued by 



234 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

the United States to it, and secured the same by mortgage, which are, 
if lawfully issued and disposed of, a prior and paramount lien to that 
of the United States, as stated and secured thereby ; and 

Whereas said Western Pacific Railroad Company has since become 
merged in, and consolidated with, said Central Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany, under the name of the Central Pacific Railroad Company, where- 
by the said Central Pacific Railroad Company has become liable to all 
the burdens, duties, and obligations before resting upon said Western 
Pacific Railroad Company ; and divers other railroad companies have 
been merged in and consolidated with said Central Pacific Railroad 
Company ; and 

Whereas the United States, upon the demand of the said Union Pacific 
Railroad Company, have heretofore issued by way of loan to it and as 
provided in said acts, the bonds of the United States, payable in thirty 
years from the date thereof, with interest at six per centum per annum, 
payable half-yearly, the principal sums of which amount to twenty- 
seven million two hundred and thirty-six thousand five hundred and 
twelve dollars ; on which the United States have paid over ten million 
dollars interest over and above all reimbursements; which said bonds 
have been sold in the market or otherwise disposed of by said corpora- 
tion ; and 

Whereas said corporation has issued and disposed of an amount of its 
own bonds equal to the amounts so issued to it by the United States as 
aforesaid, and secured the same by mortgage, and which are, if law- 
fully issued and disposed of, a prior and paramount lien, in the respect 
mentioned in said acts, to that of the United States, as stated, and 
secured thereby ; and 

Whereas the total liabilities (exclusive of interest to accrue) to all 
creditors, including the United States, of the said Central Pacific Com- 
pany, amount in the aggregate to more than ninety-six million dollars, 
and those of the said Union Pacific Railroad Company to more than 
eighty-eight million dollars; and 

Whereas the United States, in view of the indebtedness and opera- 
tions of said several railroad companies respectively, and of the dispo- 
sition of their respective incomes, are not and cannot, without further 
legislation, be secure in their interests in and concerning said respect- 
ive railroads and corporations, either as mentioned in said acts or other- 
wise. ; and 

Whereas a due regard to the rights of said several companies respect- 
ively, as mentioned in said act of eighteen hundred and sixty-two, a3 
well as just security to the United States in the premises, and in respect 
of all the matters set forth in said act, require that the said act of 
eighteen hundred and sixty-two be altered and amended as hereinafter 
enacted ; and 

Whereas, by reason of the premises also, as well as for other causes 
of public good and justice, the powers provided and reserved in said 
act of eighteen hundred and sixty-four for the amendment and altera- 
tion thereof ought also to be exercised as hereinafter enacted : There- 
fore, 

Beit enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
Stateaof America in Congress assembled, That the net earnings mentioned 
Net earnings. j n 8a j ( ] ac ^ f eighteen hundred and sixty-two, of said railroad com- 
panies respectively, shall be ascertained by deducting from the gross 
How to be as- amount of their earnings, respectively, the necessary expenses actually 
certaincd. paid within the year in operating the same and keeping the same in a 

state of repair, and also the sum paid by them respectively within the 
year in discharge of interest on their first-mortgage bonds, whose, lien 
has priority over the lien of the United States, and excluding from con- 
sideration all sums owing or paid by said companies respectively for 
interest upon any other portion of their indebtedness; and the foregoing 
provision shall be deemed and taken as an amendment of said act of 
eighteen hundred and sixty-four, as well as of said act of eighteen 
hundred and sixty-two. This section shall take effect on the thirtieth 
Date of effect, day of June next, and be applicable to all computations of net earn- 
ings thereafter; but it shall not affect any right of the United States 
or of either of said railroad companies existing prior thereto. 
Compensation Sec. 2. That the whole amount of compensation which may, from 
retained; bowap- n me to tj mej oe ^ ue to said several railroad companies respectively for 
p e * services rendered for the Government shall be retained by the United 

States, one-half thereof to bo presently applied to the liquidation of 



KAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 235 

the interest paid and to be paid by the United States upon the bonds 
so issued by it as aforesaid, to each of said corporations severally, and 
the other half thereof to be turned into the sinking fund hereinafter 
provided, for the uses therein mentioned. 

Sec. 3. That there shall be established in the Treasury of the United s ' ,,k ( in f, f ? n {] • 
States a sinking-fund, which shall be invested by the Secretary of the 8e ctiou 5 of actof 
Treasury in bonds of the United States ; and the semi-annual income March 3, 1887. \ 
thereof shall be in like manner from time to time invested, and the same 
shall accumulate and be disposed of as hereinafter mentioned. And in 
making such investments the Secretary shall prefer the five per centum 
bonds of the United States, unless for good reasons appearing to him, 
and which he shall report to Congress, he shall at anytime deem it ad- 
visable to invest in other bonds of the United States. All the bonds 
belonging to said fund shall, as fast as they shall be obtained, be so 
stamped as to show that they belong to said fund, and that they are 
not good in the hands of other holders than the Secretary of the 
Treasury until they shall have been indorsed by him, and publicly dis- 
posed of pursuant to this act. 

Sec. 4. That there shall be carried to the credit of the said fund on Credits and 
the first day of February in each year, the one-half of the compensa- P. a J. m ®. Ilt , 8 to 
tion for services hereinbefore named, rendered for the Government by Slu mg uu * 
said Central Pacific Railroad Company, not applied in liquidation of 
interest ; and, in addition thereto, the said company, shall, on said day 
in each year, pay into the Treasury, to the credit of said sinking-fund, 
the sum of one million two hundred thousand dollars, or so much 
thereof as shall be necessary to make the five per centum of the net 
earnings of said road payable to the United States under said act of 
eighteen hundred and sixty-two, and the whole sum earned by it as 
compensation for services rendered for the United States, together with 
the sum by this section required to be paid, amount in the aggregate 
to twenty-five per centum of the whole net earnings of said railroad 
company, ascertained and defined as hereinbefore provided, for the 
year ending on the thirty-first day of December next preceding. That 
there shall be carried to the credit of the said fund, on the first day of 
February in each year, the one-half of the compensation for services 
hereinbefore named, rendered for the Government by said Union Pacific 
Railroad Company, not applied in liquidation of interest; and, in ad- 
dition thereto, the said company sha 1, on said day in each year, pay 
into the Treasury, to the credit of said sinking-fund, the sum of eight 
hundred and fifty-thousand dollars, or so much thereof as shall be 
necessary to make the five per centum of the net earnings of its said 
road payable to the United States under said act of eighteen hundred 
and sixty-two, and the whole sum earned by it as compensation for 
services rendered for the United States, together with the sum by this 
section required to be paid, amount in the aggregate to twenty-five per 
centum of the whole net earnings of said railroad company, ascertained 
and defined as hereinbefore provided, for the year ending on the thirty- 
first day of December next preceding. 

Sec. 5. That whenever it shall made satisfactorily to appear to 
the Secretary of the Treasury, by either of said companies, that sev- 
enty-five per centum of its net earnings as hereinbefore defined, for 
any current year are or were insufficient to pay the interest for such 
year upon the obligation of such company, in respect of which obliga- 
tions there may exist a lien paramount to that of the United States, 
and that such interest has been paid out of such net earnings, said Sec- 
retary is hereby authorized, and it is made his duty, to remit for such 
current year so much of the twenty-five per centum of net earnings re- 
quired to be paid into the sinking-fund, as aforesaid, as may have been 
thus applied and used in the payment of interest as aforesaid. 

Sec. 6. That no dividend shall be voted, made, or paid for or to any Dividends pro- 
stockholder or stockholders in either of said companies respectively at lnblteu . when, 
any time when the said company shall be in default in respect of the 
payment either of the suras required as aforesaid to be paid into said 
sinking-fund, or in respect of the payment of the said five per centum 
of the net earnings, or in respect of interest upon any debt the lien of 
which, or of the debt on which it may accrue, is paramount to that of 
the United States; and any officer or person who shall vote, declare, 
make, or pay, and any stockholder of any of said companies who shall 
receive any such dividend contrary to the provisions of this act, shall 
be liable to the United States for the amount thereof, which, when re- 



236 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Penaltise. covered, shall be paid into said sinking-fund. And every such officer, 
person, or stockholder who shall knowingly vote, declare, make, or pay 
any such dividend, contrary to the provisions of this act, shall be 
deemed guilty of a misdemeanor; and, on conviction thereof, shall be 
punished by a fine not exceeding ten thousand dollars, and by impris- 
onment not exceeding one year. 

Sec. 7. That the said sinking-fund so established and accum[ul]ated 
shall at the maturity of such bonds so respectively issued by the United 
States, be applied to the payment and satisfaction thereof, according 
to the interest and proportion of each of said companies in said fund, 
and of all interest paid by the United States thereon, and not reim- 
bursed, subject to the provisions of the next section. 
Application of Sec. 8. Thar, said sinking-fund so established and accumulated shall, 
sinking fiuid. according to the interest and proportion of said companies respectively 
therein, be held for the protection, security, and benefit of the lawful 
and just holders of any mortgage or lien debts of such companies re- 
spectively, lawfully paramount to the rights of the United States, and 
for the claims of other creditors, if any, lawfully chargeable upon the 
funds so required to be paid into said sinking-fund, according to their 
respective lawful priorities, as well as for the United States, according 
to the principles of equity, to the end that all persons having any claim 
upon said sinking-fund may be entitled thereto in due order; but the 
provisions of this section shall not operate or be held to impair any ex- 
isting legal right, except in the manner in this act provided, of any 
mortgage, lien, or other creditor of any of said companies respectively, 
nor to excuse any of said companies respectively from the duty of dis- 
charging, out of other funds, its debts to any creditor except the United 
States. 
United states Sec. 9. That all sums due to the United States from any of said coni- 
Lrfrv of till PR P an * es respectively, whether payable presently or not, and all sums re- 
companies. ' quired to be paid to the United States or into the Treasury, or into said 
sinking-fund under this act, or under the acts hereinbefore referred to, 
or otherwise, are hereby declared to be a lien upon all the property, es- 
tate, rights, and franchises of every description granted or conveyed 
by the United States to any of said companies respectively or jointly, 
and also upon all the estate and property, real, personal, and mixed, 
assets, and income of the said several railroad companies respectively, 
from whatever source derived, subject to any lawfully prior and par- 
amount mortgage, lien, or claim thereon. But this section shall not be 
construed to prevent said companies respectively from using and dis- 
posing of any of their property or assets in the ordinary, proper, and 
lawful course of their current business, in good faith and for valuable 
consideration. 
Pro eeedings Sec. 10. That it is hereby made the duty of the Attorney-General of 
aeainst the coin- t Lie United States to enforce, by proper proceedings against the several 
pumes. railroad companies respectively or jointly, or against either of them, 

and others, all the rights of the United States under this act and under 
the acts hereinbefore mentioned, and under any other act of Congress 
or right of the United States ; and in any suit or proceedings already 
commenced, or that may be hereafter commenced, against any of said 
companies, cither alone or with other parties, in respect of matters 
arising under this act, or under the acts or rights hereinbefore men- 
tioned or referred to, it shall be the duty of the court to determine the 
very right of the matter without regard to matters of form, joinder of 
parties, multifariousness, or other matters not affecting the substantial 
rights and duties arising out of the matters and acts hereinbefore stated 
and referred to. 

Sec. 11. That if either of said railroad companies shall fail to per- 
form all and singular the requirements of this act and of the acts here- 
inbefore mentioned, and of any other act relating to said company, to 
be by it performed, for the period of six months next after such per- 
Forfeiture. formance may be due, such failure shall operate as a forfeiture of all 
the rights, privileges, grants, and franchises derived or obtained by it 
from the United States; and it shall be the duty of the Attorney-Gen- 
eral to cause such forfeiture to be judicially enforced. 
Right of Con- Sec. 12. That nothing in this act shall be construed or taken in any 
press to further wise to affect or impair the right of Congress at any time hereafter 
amend. further to alter, amend, or repeal the said acts hereinbefore mentioned ; 

and this act shall be subject to alteration, amendment, or repeal, as in 
the opinion of Congress, justice or the public welfare may require. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 237 

And nothing heroin contained shall beheld to deny, exclude, or impair 
any right or remedy in the premises now existing in favor of the United 
States. 

Si c. 13. That each and every of the j>rovisions in this act contained 
shall severally and respectively be deemed, taken, and held as in alter- 
ation and amendment of said act of eighteen hundred and sixty-two 
and of said act of eighteen hundred and sixty-four respectively, and of 
both said acts. 



ACT OF JUNE 19, 1878. 
AN ACT to create an Auditor of Railroad Accounts, and for other purposes.* 20 Stat., 169. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
Slate* of America in Congress assembled, That section twenty of the act Repeal of prior 
entitled "An act to aid in the construction of a railroad and telegraph laws, 
lino from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean, and to secure to the 
Government the use of the same for postal, military, and other pur- 
poses," approved July first, anno Domini eighteen hundred and sixty- 
two, and the act entitled "An act relative to tiling reports of railroad 
companies" approved June twenty-fifth, anno Donnui eighteen hun- 
dred and sixty-eight, be, and the same are hereby, repealed. 

Sec. 2. That the office of Auditor of Railroad Accounts is hereby Organization of 
established as a bureau of the Interior Department. The said Auditor bureau, 
shall be appointed by the President of the United States, by and with 
the advice and consent of the Senate. The annual salary of the said 
Auditor shall be, and is hereby, fixed at the sum of five thousand dol- 
lars. To assist the said Auditor to perform the duties of said office, the 
Secretary of the Interior shall appoint one book-keeper at an annual 
salary of two thousand four hundred dollars, one assistant bookkeeper 
at an annual salary of two thousand dollars, one clerk at an annual 
salary of one thousand four hundred dollars, and one copyist at an an- 
nual salary of nine hundred dollars. Actual and necessary traveling 
and other expenses incurred in visiting the offices of the railroad com 
panies hereinafter described, and for which vouchers shall be rendered, 
are hereby allowed, not to exceed the sum of two thousand dollars per 
annum ; and it is hereby specially provided that each of said railroad 
companies shall famish transportation over its own road, without ex- 
pense to the United States, for the said Auditor, or any person acting 
under his direction. Incidental expenses for books, stationery, and 
other material necessary for the use of said bureau are hereby allowed, 
not to exceed the sum of seven hundred dollars per annum. And the 
sum of twelve thousand dollars is hereby appropriated for the uses and 
purposes of this act for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, anno 
Domini, eighteen hundred and seventy-nine. 

Sec. 3. That the duties of the said Auditor under and subject to the Duties of An* 
direction of the Secretary of the Interior shall be, to prescribe a sys- ditor. 
tem of reports to be rendered to him by the railroad companies whose 
roads are in whole or in part west, north, or south of the Missouri River, 
and to which the United States have grauted any loan or credit or sub- 
sidy in bonds or lands; to examine the books and accounts of each of 
said railroad companies once in each fiscal year, and at such other times 
as may be deemed by him necessary to determine the correctness of 
any report received from them ; to assist the Government directors of 
any of said railway companies in all matters which come under their 
cognizance whenever they may officially request such assistance ; to see 
that the laws relating to said companies are enforced ; to furnish such 
information to the several departments of the Government in regard to 
tariffs for freight and passengers and in regard to the accounts of said 
railroad companies as may be by them required, or, in the absence of 
any request therefor, as lie may deem expedient for the interest of the 
Government; and to make an annual report to the Secretary of the 
Interior, on the first day of November, on the condition of each of said 
railroad companies, their road, accounts, and affairs, for the fiscal year 
ending June thirtieth immediately preceding. 

Sec. 4. That each and every railroad company aforesaid which has r r. compa- 
received from the United States any bonds of the said United States, nies to report, etc. 

*Title changed to Commissioner of Railroads. Act March 3, 1881 (21 Stat., 409), 



238 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

issued by way of loan to aid in constructing or furnishing its road, or 
■winch has received from the United States any lands, granted to it for 
a similar purpose, shall make to the said Auditor any and all such re- 
ports as he may require from time to time and shall submit its books 
and records to the inspection of said Auditor or any person acting in 
his place and stead, at any time that the said Auditor may request, in 
the cilice where said books and records are usually kept ; aud the said 
Auditor, or his authorized representative, shall make such transcripts 
from the said books and records as he may desire. 
Penalty for Sec. 5. That if any railroad company aforesaid shall neglect or refuse 

oeglec tor refusal, to make such reports as may be called for, or refuse to submit its books 
and records to inspection, as provided in section four of this act, such 
neglect or refusal shall operate as a forfeiture, in each case of such 
neglect or refusal, of a sum not less than one thousand nor more than 
five thousand dollars, to be recovered by the Attorney-General of the 
United States, in the name and for the use and benefit of the United 
States; and it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Interior, in all 
such cases of neglect or refusal as aforesaid, to inform the Attorney- 
General of the facts, to the end that such forfeiture or forfeitures may 
be judicially enforced. 
Application of Sec. 6. This act shall apply to any and all persons or corporations 

act. into whose hands either of said railroads may lawfully come, as well 

as to the original companies. 
Date of effect. Sec. 7. This act shall take effect on and after the first day of July, 
anno Domini eighteen hundred and seventy-eight. 



ACT OF MARCH 3. 1879. 

20 Stat., 420. AN ACT ?raking appropriations to supply deficiencies' in the appropriations for the 
fiscal year ending Juu.- thirtieth, eighteen hundred and seventy-nine and for prior 
years, and for those heretofore treated as permanent, and for other purposes. 

POST-OFFICE DEPARTMENT. 

******* 

That for the proper adjustment of the accounts of the Union Pacific, 

Settlement of Central Pacific, Kansas Pacific, Western Pacific, and Sioux City and 

account* of Pa- i acific Railroad Companies, respectively, for services which have been 

cific Railways, or may hereafter be performed for the Government for transportation 

of the Army and transportation of the mails, the Secretary of the 

Treasury is hereby authorized to make such entries upon the books of 

the Department as will carry to the credit of said companies the 

amount so earned or to be earned by them during each fiscal year and 

withheld under the provisions of section fifty-two hundred and sixty 

R. S., 5200. of the Revised Statutes and of the act of Congress approved May 

1878. ' ch. 75, seventh, eighteen hundred and seventy-eight: Provided, That this 

nte, 44. shall not authorize the expenditure of any money from the Treasury 

nor change the method now provided by law for the auditing of such 

claims against the Government : Provided further, That this paragraph 

shall not be so construed as to be a disposition of any moneys due to 

or to become due to or from said companies respectively, or to, in any 

Proviso. way, affect their rights or duties or the rights of the United States, 

No change of under existing laws, it being only intended hereby to enable the proper 

rights, <fcc. accounting officers to state on the books of the Treasury the accounts 

between the the Government and said companies respectively. 



ACT OF MARCH 1, 1881. 

21 Stat., 375. A^N ACT making appropriations for the service of the Post-Office Department for 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1882, and for other purposes. 

Railway post- For railway post-office car service, one million four hundred and 
office car service twenty-six thousand dollars. And hereafter when any railroad corn- 
Penalty fornot pany fail or refuse to provide railway post-office cars when required 
way poat-offioe ^ tne P° st -Office Department, or shall fail or refuse to provide suita- 
paVs. ble safety-heaters and safety-lamps therefor, with such number of 






RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 239 

• 

Baw6 and axes to each ear for use iu case of accident as may be required 
by the Post-Office Department, said company shall have its pay re- R g 4002 ]g76 
duceii ten per centum on the rates fixed in section lour thousand and h.l79j 10 Stat.l 
two of the Revised Statutes, as amended by act of July twelfth, eigh- 78. 
teen hundred and seventy-six, entitled "An act making appropria- 
tions for the service of the Post-Office Department for the fiscal year 
ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and seventy-seven, and for 
other purposes, " and as further amended by the act of June seven- 
teen, eighteen hundred and seventy-eight, entitled "An act making 
appropriations for the service of the Post-Office Department for tho 
fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and seventy-nine, 
and for other purposes. " 



ACT OF MARCH 3, 1881. 

AN ACT making appropriations for the legislative, executive, and judicial expenses 21 Stat., 409. 
of the Government for the liacal year ending Juno 30, 1882, and for other purposes. 

Office of Auditor of Railroad Accounts. — For Auditor, who 
shall hereafter be styled Commissioner of Railroads, four thousand five 
hundred dollars, &c. 



ACT OF JUNE 30, 1882. 

AN ACT making appropriations for the support of the Army for the fiscal year 22 Stat., 120. 
ending June 30. 1883, and for other purposes. 

For the payment for Army transportation lawfully due such land- Payment to 
grant railroads as have not received aid in Government bonds, to be land-grant rail- 
adjusted by the proper accounting officers in accordance with the de- Station trnna " 
cisions of the Supreme Court in cases decided under such land-grant por 
acts, but in no case shall more than fifty per centum of the full amount 
of the service be paid, one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars: 
Provided, That such compensation shall be computed upon the basis of 
the tariff rates for like transportation performed for the public at 
large, and shall be accepted as in full for all demands for said services: 
And provided farther , That any such land-grant roads as shall file with 
the Secretary of the Treasury their written acceptance of this provis- 
ion shall hereafter be paid for like service as herein provided; and all 
accounts of such railroads for services heretofore rendered shall be au- 
dited and paid as herein provided upon application of such roads and 
their acceptance of such sum in full of all claims for such services j and 
all laws inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed. 



ACT OF MARCH 3, 1887. 

AN ACT authorizing an investigation of the books, accounts, and methods of rail- 24 Stat., 488. 
roads which have received aid from the United States, and for other purposes. 

#*♦«►### 

Sec 5. That the sinking-funds which are ormaybeheldin the Treas- Investment of 
ury for the security of the indebtedness of either or all of said railroad sinking funds, 
companies may, in addition to the investments now authorized by law, 
be invested in any bonds of the United States heretofore issued for 
the benefit of either or all of said companies, or in any of the first- 
mortgage bonds of either of said companies which have been issued un- 
der the authority of any law of the United States and secured by mort- 
gages of their roads and franchises, which by any law of the United 
States have been made prior and paramount to the mortgage, lien, or 
other security of the United States in respect of its advances to eithey 
of said companies as provided by law. 



240 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

LAWS RELATING TO THE NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

ACT OF JULY 2, 1864. 

13 Stat 365 -^-^ -^-CT granting lands to aid in the construction of a railroad and telegraph line 
from Lake Superior to Puget's Sound, on the Pacific coast, by the northern route. 

Northern Paci- Be it enacted by the Senate and Home of Representatives of the United 
fie Railroad Com- States of America in Congress assembled, That Richard D. Rice, John A. 
pany incorporat- p 00 re, Samuel P. Strickland, Samuel C. Fessenden, * * * and all 
such other persons who shall or may be associated with them, and their 
successors, are hereby created and erected into a body corporate and pol- 
Name. itic, in deed and in law, by the name, style, and title of the " Northern 

Pacific Railroad Company," and by that name shall have perpetual suc- 
cession, and shall be able to sue and be sued,plead and be impleaded, de- 
fend and be defended, in all courts of law and equity within the United 
States, and may make find have a common seal. And said corporation 
Empowered to is hereby authorized and empowered to lay out, locate, construct, fur- 
lay out, con- uish, maintain, and enjoy a continuous railroad and telegraph line, with 
struct, and enjoy the appurtenances, namely, beginning at a point on Lake Superior, in 
road and^tele- tlie > State ot * Minnesota or Wisconsin ; thence westerly by the mosteligi- 
graph line. ble railroad route, as shall be determined by said company, within the 

From Lake Su- territory of the United States on a line north of the forty- lifth degree of 
^rthofthe 45th latitude to some point on Puget's Sound, with a branch, via the val- 
deWee of lati-l ev °f the Columbia River, to a point at or near Portland, in the State 
tude, to Puget's of Oregon, leaving the main trunk line at the most suitable place, 
Sound. not more than three hundred miles from its western termiuus; and is 

struct a branch nere k v ve sted with all the powers, privileges, and immunities neces- 
to Portland, sary to carry into effect the purposes of this&ct as herein set forth. 
Oreg. The capital stock of* said company shall' consist of one million shares 

Capital stock f oue hundred dollars each, which shall in all respects be deemed 
$100,000,000. personal property, and shall be transferable in such manner as the 

by-laws of said corporation shall provide. The persons herein before 
named are hereby appointed commissioners, and shall be called the 
Board of Com- Board of Commissioners of the "Northern Pacific Railroad Company," 
missioners ap- and fifteen shall constitu[t]e a quorum for the transaction of business. 
pointed. ff T ue urst meeting of said board of commissioners shall be held at the 

of commissioner! Melodion Hall, in the city of Boston, at such time as any five com- 
to he held iu lios- missioners herein named from Massachusetts shall appoint, not more 
ton, Mass, than three months after the passage of this act, notice of which shall 

be given by them to the other commissioners by publishing said notice 
in at least one daily newspaper in the cities of Boston, New York, Phil- 
adelphia, Cincinnati, Milwaukee, and Chicago, once a week at least four 
weeks previous to the day of meeting. Said board shall organize by 
Officers to be the choice from its number of a president, vice-president, secretary, and 
l •!• Tiof IOn ' ^ 6 * rea8Iirer > an< l they shall require from said treasurer such bonds as may 
sinners! comm18 ' be deemed proper, and may from time to time increase the amount 
thereof as they may deem proper. The secretary shall be sworn to the 
faithful performance of his duties, and such oath shall be entered upon 
the records of the company, signed by him, and the oath verified there- 
on. The president and secretary of said board shall in like manner call 
all other meetings naming the time and place thereof. It shall bo the 
Looks of sub- duty OI 8a id board of commissioners to open books, or cause books to be 
scriptions to be opened, at such times, and in such principal cities or other places in the 
opened in such United States, as they, or a quorum of them, shall determine, within 
cities as the s j x ra0 nths after the passage of this act, to receive subscriptions to the 
mine. "^ *" capital stock of said corporation, and a cash payment of ten per centum 
on all subscriptions and to receipt therefor. So soon as twenty thou- 
sand shares shall in good faith bo subscribed for, and ten dollars per share 
actually paid into the treasury of the company, the said president and 
First meeting secretary of said board of commissioners shall appoint a time and place 
of subscribers to for the first meeting of the subscribers to the stock of said company, 
capital stock. and shall give notice thereof in at least one newspaper in each State 
in which subscription books have been opened, at least fifteen days pre- 
vious to to the day of meeting, and such subscribers as shall attend the 
meeting so called, either in person or by lawful proxy, then and there 
Thirteen direc- shall elect by ballot thirteen directors for said corporation ; and in such 
tors to be elected election each share of said capital stoek shall entitle the owner thereof 
by s tockholders. to one y0 ^ e The president and secretary of the board of commission- 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 241 

era, and, in case of their absence or inability, any two of the officers 

of said board, shall act as inspectors of said election, and shall certify 

under then- hands the names of the directors elected at said meeting; 

and the said commissioners, the treasurer, a:id secretary, shall then de- Commissioners 

liver over to said directors all the properties, subscription books, and to deliver to di- 

other hooks in their possession, and thereupon the duties of said com- ™t[os H &c Pr ° P " 

missi oners and the officers previously appointed by them, shall cease 

and determine forever, and thereafter the stockholders shall constitute 

said body politic and corporate. Annual meetings of the stockholders Annual meet- 

of the said corporation for the choice of officers (when they are to be in e s to belx-ldas 

chosen) and for the transaction of business, shall be holden at such time J!™ m y * 

ami place and upon such notice as may be prescribed in the by-laws. 

SEC. 'J. And be it further enacted, That the right of way through the Grant of right 
public lands be, and the same is hereby, granted to said "Northern Pa- of way. 
cilic Railroad Company, "its successors and assigns, for the construction 
of a railroad and telegraph as proposed; and the right, power, and an- Authority to 
thority is hereby given to said corporation to take Iron the public lands, take from ad.ja- 
adjacent to the line of said road, material of earth, stone, timber, and cent lands mate- 
so forth, for the construction thereof. Said way is granted to said rail- JJjJJ,. or co,,8truc - 
road to the extent of two hundred feet in width on each side of said Right of way 
railroad where it may pass through the public domain, including all 200 feet in width 
necessary ground for station building, workshops, depots, machine- <m .. eac ^ ' 8 j j4 e °^ 
shops, switches, side tracks, turn-tables, and water-stations; and the ^j^ ! ° j ' way 
right of way shall be exempt from taxation within the Territories of exempt from tax- 
the United States. The United states shall extinguish, as rapidly as ation. 
may be consistent with public policy and the welfare of the said In-. Indian titles to 
dians, the Indian titles to all lauds falling under the operation of this Dy e *he°^Uuited 
act. and acquired in the donation to the [road] named in this bill. States. 

Sec. 3. A nd be it further enacted, That there be, and hereby is, granted Grant of land. 
to the "Northern Pacific Railroad Company," its successors and assigns, 
for the purpose of aiding in the construction of said railroad and tele- 
graph line to the Pacific coast, and to secure the safe and speedy trans- 
portation of the mails, troops, munitions of war, and public stores, over 
the route of said line of railway, every alternate section of public land, 
not mineral, designated by odd numbers, to the amount of twenty alter- 
bate sections per mile, on each side of said railroad line, as said com- permi^T'the 
pnny may adopt, through the Territories of the United States, and ten Territories" 
alternate sections of land per mile on each side of said railroad when- 
ever it passes through any State, and whenever on the line thereof, the Twenty seo- 
United States have full title, not reserved, sold, granted, or otherwise Estates- "* 
appropriated, and free from pre-emption, or other claims orrights, at the 
time the line of said road is definitely fixed, and plat thereof filed in the 
office of the Commissioner of the General Land Office; and whenever, 
prior to said time, any of said sections or parts of sections shall have been 
granted, sold, reserved, occupied by homestead settlers, or pre-empted, 
or otherwise disposed of, other lands shall be selected by said company 
in lieu thereof, under the direction of the Secretary of the Interior, in other lands in 
alternate sections, and designated by odd numbers, not more than ten ii eu of those re- 
miles beyond the limits of said alternate sections : Provided, That if said served, <fee. 
route shall be found upon the line of any otherrailroad route to aid in the Land limits. 

construction of which lands have been heretofore granted by the United +y{ i£Ji te 'f "J™U 
. „ ,. ,, => ,. ,,•' ptne line ot any 

States, as far as the routes are upon the same general line, the amount of other aided road 
land heretofore granted shall be deducted from the amount granted by former grant 
this act: Provided further, That the railroad company receiving the pre- 8 ^ a11 De deduct- 
vious grant of land may assign their interest to said " Northern Pacific jj oa< i having 
Railroad Company," or may consolidate, confederate, and associate with previous grant 
said company upon the terms named in the first sec tiou of this act : Pro- may assign. 
vided further, That all mineral lands be,and the same are hereby, excluded . "Mineral" 
from the operations of this act, and in lieu thereof a like quantity of J*, grant " 

unoccupied and unappropriated agricultural lands, in odd-numbered Agricultural 
sections, nearest to the line of said road may be selected as above pro- lands may be se- 
vided : And provided further, That the word "mineral," when it occurs Ie ? ted ftJJk 
in this act, shall not be held to include iron or coal: And provided "Mineral"doei 
further, That no money shall be drawn from the Treasury of the United not include iron 
States to aid in the construction of the said "Northern Pacific Railroad." or coal. 

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That whenever said " Northern Pa- 
cific Railroad Company " shall have twenty-five oonsecutivo miles of 
my portion of said railroad aud telegraph line ready for the service Tne Preaulcnt 
sontemplated the President of the United States shall appoint three com^Enerlto 
iommissioners to examine the same, and if itshall appear that twenty- examine road. 

INT 90— VOL III 10 



242 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

live consecutive miles of Raid road and telegraph line have been com* 
pleted in a good, substantial, and workmanlike manner, as in all other 
Commissioners respects required in this act, the commissioners shall so report to the 
P ™S ort t t0 fche presideilt of the United Stales, and patents of lands as aforesaid shall 
be issued to said company, confirming to said company the right and 
title to said lands, situated opposite to, and conterminous with, said com- 
pleted section of said road ; and, from time to time, whenever twenty- 
rive additional consecutive miles shall have been constructed, completed, 
and in readiness as aforesaid, and verified by said commissioners to the 
President of the United States, then patents shall be issued tosaid com- 
pany conveying the additional sections of land as aforesaid, andsb on as 
Proviso as to * :Ksr asrver .v twenty-five miles of said road is completed as aforesaid: Pro- 
lanris in Minne- ruled. That no more than ten sections of land per mile, as uaid road shall 
sota. be completed, shall he conveyed to said company for all that part of said 

railroad lying east of the western boundary of the State of Minnesota, 
until the whole of said railroad shall be finished and in good running 
order, as a first-class railroad, from the place of beginning on Take Supo- 
Provisp as toriorto the western boundary or Minnesota: Provided also, That lands 
road previously shall not be granted under the provisions of this act on account of any 
" ax ^- railroad, or part thereof, constructed at the date of the passage of this act. 

Road to be con- Sice. 5. And be it farther enacted, That said Northern Pacific Railroad 
f* ruc * e ^„ as * shall be constructed in a substantial and workmanlike manner, with 
road SS I!l al * ' m ' neces Sary draws, culverts, bridges, viaducts, crossings, turnouts, 
stations, and watering places, and all other appurtenances, including 
Rails of Aweri- furnitnre, and rolling stock, equal in all respects to railroads of the 
cau o'i'l't ifg't *' rst clasSj when prepared for business, with rails of the best quality, 
W 6auee to be manufactured from American iron. And a uniform gauge shall be es- 
uniform. tablished throughout the entire length of the road. And there shall bo 

Telegraph line, constructed a telegraph line, of the most substantial and approved de- 
ConditioD as to SC ription, to be operated along the entire line: Provided, That the said 
ernmenl "ti 'ins' company shall not charge the Government higher rates than they do 
portation and te}- individuals for like transportation and telegraphic service. And it 
egraphic service, shall be the duly of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company to permit 
Other roads aQ y (! ;j u . r railroad which shall be authorized to be built by the United 
ning connections States, or by the legislature of any Territory or State in which the 
on equitable same may be situated, to form running connections with it, on fair and 
terms. equitable terms. 

Landrt to he Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That the President of the United 
surveyed as fast States shall cause the lands to be surveyed for forty miles in width on 
a a construction both sides of the entire line of said road, after the general route shall 
quire' U :nii T& ^ ,e l' X(,( '< :H,< 1 ;ls f as * ;,s may be required by the construction of s;iid 
railroad ; and the odd sections of hind hereby granted shall not be liable 
to sale, or entry, or pre-emption before or after they are surveyed, ex- 
cept by said company, as provided in this act; but the provisions of 
the act of September, eighteen hundred and forty-one, granting pre- 
emption rights, and the acts amendatory thereof, and of the act en- 
tit led k> A7i act to secure homesteads to actual settlers on the public 
domain." approved May twenty, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, shall 
be, and the same is hereby, extended to all other lands on the line of 
Government 8 ' 1 '^ road, when surveyed, excepting those hereby granted tosaid com*; 
lands not to bo P an y- And the reserved alternate sections shall not be sold by the Gov* 
Fold lor less than eminent at a price less than two dollars and fifty cents per acre, when 
$i;.50 per acre. offered for sale. 

Authorizes Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, That the said "Northern Pacific 
company to take Railroad Company" be, and is hereby, authorized and empowered to 
Barv for construe- eQ ter upon, purchase, take, and hold any lands or premises that may be 
tion of its road, necess iry and proper for the construction and workingof said road, not 
200 feet on each exceeding in width two hundred feet on each side of the line of its rail- 
Bide - road, unless a greater width be required for the purpose of excavation 

or embankment ; and also any lands or premises that may be necessary 
posits etc° r an ^ P ro P er l° r turnouts, standing places for cars, depots, station-houses, 
or any other structures required in the construction and working of said 
road. And the said company shall have the right to cut and remove 
trees and other material that might, by falling, encumber its road-bed, 
though standing or being more than two hundred feet from the line of 
said road. And in case the owner of such lands or premises and the 
said company cannot agree as to the value of the premises taken, or to 
d jP t ama!rPS }? y°: be taken for the use of said road, the value thereof shall be determined 
commfsrions. 5 uv * ne appraisal of three disinterested commissioners, who may be ap- 
pointed, upon application by either party, to any court of record in 



RAILROAD ACCOUN1 243 

any of the Territories in which the lands or premises to he taken He; 
and said commissions, in their assessment, of damages, shall appraise Frocedura 
mich premises at what would have been the value thereof if the road 
had not been built. And upon return into court of such appraisement, 
and upon the payment into the same of the estimated value of the 
premises taken tor the use and benefit of (he owner thereof, said prem- 
iers shall be deemed to be taken by said company, which shall thereby 
acquire full title to the same for the purpose aforesaid. And either 
party feeling aggrieved at said appraisment may, within thirty days 
after the same has been returned into court, file an appeal therefrom, 
and demand a jury of twelve men to estimate the damage sustained; 
hut such appeal shall not interfere with the rights of said company to 
enter upon the premises taken, or to do any act necessary and proper 
in the construction of its road. And said party appealing shall give 
ponds, with sufficient surety or sureties, for the paymeut of any cost 
that may arise upon such appeal ; and iu case the party appealing does 
not obtain a verdict, increasing or diminishing, as the case may he, the 
award of the commissioners, such party shall pay the whole cost in- 
curred by the appellee, as well as his own, and the payment into court, 
for the use of the owner of said premises taken, of a sum equal to that 
finally awarded, shall bo held to vest in said company the title of said 
land, and of the right to use and occupy the same for the construction, 
maintenance, and operation of said road. And in case any of the lands 
to ho taken, as aforesaid, shall be held hy any infant, femme covert, . Whatproceed- 
non compos, insane person, or person's residing without the Territory jandsheld^by any 
within which the lands to betaken lie, or person subjected to any legal infant or person 
disability, the court may appoint a guardian for any party under any subject to any le- 
disqualifi cation, to appear in proper person, who shall give bonds, S al disability, 
with sufficient surety or sureties, for the proper and faithful execution 
of his trust, and who may represent in court the person disqualified, 
as aforesaid, from appearing, wTien the same proceedings shall be had 
in reference to the appraisement of the premises to he taken for the use 
of said company, and with the same effect as has been already described; 
and the title of the company to the lands taken by virtue of this act 
shall not be affected or impaired by reason of any failure hy any guard- 
ian to discharge faithfully his trust. And in case any party shall have q^ 6T procee( i. 
a right or claim to any land for a term of years, or any interest therein, ings. 
in possession, reversion, or remainder, the value of any such estate, 
less than a fee simple, shall he estimated and determined in the man- 
ner hereinbefore set forth. And in case it shall be necessary for the 
company to enter upon any lands which are unoccupied, and of which 
there is no apparent owner or claimant, it may proceed to take and Proceedings 
use the same for the purposes of said railroad, and may institute pro- WQen lands are 
ceedings, in manner described, for the purpose of ascertaining the value unoccup 
of, and acquiring title to, the same ; butthejudge of the court hearing 
said suit shall determine the kind of notice to bo served on such owner 
or owners, and he may in its discretion appoint an agent or guardian 
to represent such owner or owners in case of his or their incapacity or C j a { m8 bar d 
non-appearance. But in case no claimant shall appear within six years if not made with- 
from the time of the opening of said road across any land, all claims to in six years, 
damages against said company shall bo barred. 

Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, That each and every grant, right, Grants made 
and privilege herein are so made and given to, and accepted hy said subject to certain 
Northern Pacific Railroad Company, upon and subject to the following conditions, 
sonditions, namely: that the said company shall commence the work be completed by 
)n said road within two years from the approval of this act by the July 4, i87C. 
President, and shall complete not less than fifty miles per year after Joint res. May 7, 
;he second year, and shall construct, equip, furnish, and complete !ihe 1866, time extend- 
vhole road by the fourth day of July, anno Domini eighteen hundred -^mt ires July™' 
tnd seventy-six. 1868, sec. 8'; 

Sec. 9. And be it further enacted, That the United States make the sev- amended. 
>ral conditioned grants herein, and that the said Northern Pacific Rail- 
oad Company accept the same, upon the further condition that if the 
aid company make any breach of the conditions hereof, and allow the 
ame to continue for upwards of one year, then, in such case, at any Congress m^y 
iine hereafter, the United btates, by its Congress, may do any and all do anything nec- 
cts and things which may ho needful and necessary to insure a speedy ^speldy^compl™ 
ompletion of the said road. tion of the road! 

Sec. 10. And be it further enacted, That all people of the United States All people of 
1 hall have the right to subscribe to the stock of the Northern Pacific the United States 



244 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF Till: INTERIOR. 

may subscribe to Railroad Company until the whole capital named in this act of incor- 
the stock, until poration is taken up, by complying with the terms of subscription' ; and 
taken ufn° Unt 1S no mortgage or construction bonds shall ever be issued by said eom- 
No bonds to be pany on said road, or mortgage, or lien made in any way, except by the 
issued without consent of the Congress of the United States. 

consent of Con- gEC> u And fc u further enacted, That said Northern Pacific Railroad, 
ST To be a post- or an y P art thereof, shall be a post-route and a military road, subject 
route and milita- to the use of the United States, for postal, military, naval, and all other 
it road. Government service, and also subject to such regulations as Congress 

re^rka ie charffel ma y i m P 080 restricting the charges for such Government transporta- 

for Government tlOU. 

transportation. Sec, 12. And be it further enacted, That the acceptance of the terms, 

Company to ac- conditions, and impositions of this act by the said Northern Pacific 

dldomf&^'with- Railroad Company shall be signified in writing under the corporate seal 

in two years. of said company, duly executed pursuant to the directions of its board 

of directors first had and obtained, which acceptance shall be made 

within two years after the passage of this act, and not afterwards, and 

shall be served on the President of the United States. 

Annual report Sec. 13. And be it further enacted, That the directors of said company 

to be verified by shall make an annual report of their proceedings and expenditures, ver- 

fdent V and 8ix r di^ ified h ? the affidavits of the president and at least six of the directors, 

rectors of com- an d they shall, from time to time, fix, determine, and regulate the fares, 

pany. tolls, and charges to be received and paid for transportation of persons 

and property on said road, or any part thereof. 
Election of pros- Sec. 14. And be it further enacted, That the directors chosen in pursu- 
ident and vice- ance of the first section of this act shall, as soon as may be after their 
president trom election, elect from their own number a president and vice-president ; 
orsf ° UeC and sa ^ d hoard of directors shall, from time to time, and as soon as may 
bo after their election, choose a treasurer and secretary, who shall hold 
their offices at the will and pleasure of the board of directors. The 
Treasurer and treasurer and secretary shall give such bonds, with such security as 
secretary. the said board from time to time may require. The secretary shall, 

before eutering upon his duty, be sworn to the faithful discharge there- 
of, and said oath shall be made a matter of record upon the books of 
said corporation. No person shall be a director of said company unless 
he shall be a stockholder, and qualified to vote for directors at the elec- 
tion at which he shall be chosen. 
Term of office of Sec. 15. And be it further enacted, That the president, vice-president, 
president, vice- and directors shall hold their offices for the period indicated in the by- 
president.and di- j aw8 f sa id company, not exceeding three years, respectively, and un- 
ceed three years", til others are chosen in their place, and qualified. In case it shall so 
happen that an election of directors shall not be made on any day ap- 
pointed by the by-laws of said company, the corporation shall not for 
that excuse be deemed to be dissolved, but such election may be holden 
Directors em- on any day which shall be appointed by the directors. The directors, 
powered to make of whom seven, including the president/shall be a quorum for the trans- 
bydaws rules, ac ti n of business, shall have full power to make and prescribe such 
reg ' l8 ' by-laws, rules, and regulations as they shall deem needful and proper 
touching the disposition and management of the stock, property, estate, 
and effects of the company, the transfer of shares, the duties and con- 
duct of their officers and servants touching the election and meeting of 
Directors may the directors, and all matters whatsoever which may appertain to the 
fill vacancies in concerns of said company ; and the said board of directors may have 
full power to fill any vacaucy or vacancies that may occur from any 
cause or causes from time to time in their said board. And the said 
Directors em- board of directors shall have power to appoint such engineers, agents, 
powered to ap- and subordinates as may from time to time be necessary to carry into 
agents 6 Ac 11661 *' effect the °°J ect of the company, and to do all acts and things touching 
° ' ' the location and construction of said road. 

ouiiTpaySen/of Sec - 16 ' A . nd he u father enacted, That it shall be lawful for the di- 
ten per' centum rec tors of said company to require payment of the sum often per cen- 
cash assessment, turn cash assessment upon all subscriptions received of all subscribers, 
and balance <>f and the balance thereof at such times and in such proportions and on 
wnen S needed L ° D such couclitio118 as they shall deem to be necessary to complete the said 
road and telegraph line within the time in this act prescribed. Sixty 
days' previous notice shall be given of the payments required, and of 
the time and place of payment, by publishing a notice once a week in 
one daily newspaper in each of the cities of Boston, New York, Phila- 
delphia, and Chicago ; and in case any stockholder shall neglect or re- 
fuse to pay, in pursuance of such notice, the stock held by such person 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 245 

shall be forfeited absolutely to the use of the company, and also any Forfeited stock 
payment or payments thut shall have been made on account thereof, sub- JJf^ terms pro- 
ject to the condition that the board of directors may allow the redemp- scribed by direct" 
tion on such terms as they may prescribe. ors. 

Sec. 17. And he it further enacted, That the said company is author Company au- 
ized to accept to its own use any grant, donation, loan, power, fran- cep^othergrante" 
chise, aid, or assistance which may be granted to, or conferred upon, franchises, &c. 
said company by the Congress of the United States, by the legislature 
of any State, or by any corporation, person, or persons; and said cor- 
poration is authorized to hold and enjoy any such grant, donation, 
loan, power, franchise, aid, or assistance, to its own use for the purpose 
aforesaid. 

Sec. 18. And be it further enacted, That said Northern Pacific Railroad Consent of 
Company shall obtain the consent of the legislature of any State through State legislatures 
which any portion of said railroad line may pass previous to commenc- ° e ° aine 
ing the construction thereof; but said company may have the right to 
put on engineers aud survey the route before obtaining the consent of 
the legislature. 

Sec. 19. And be it further enacted, That unless said Northern Pacific n 4 c * jjj ^eM 
Railroad Company shall obtain bona fide subscriptions to the stock of J l ". ( (( \unij,"" ' ot' 
said company to the amount of two millions of dollars, with ten per dollars of stock 
centum paid within two years after the passage and approval of this act, are subscribed 
it shall be null and void'. for within two 

Sec. 20. And be it further enacted, That the better to accomplish the ye con<rress may 
object of this act, namely, to promote the public interest and welfare add *to, alter, 
by the construction of said railroad and telegraph line, and keeping amend, or repeal 
the same in working order, and to secure to the Government at all times , 5,i ^ reeard^for 
(but particularly in time of war) the use and benefits of the same for t0 " e rights of the 
postal, military, and other purposes, Congress may, at any time, having company, 
due regard for the rights of said Northern Pacific Railroad Company, 
add to, alter, amend, or repeal this act. 



JOINT RESOLUTION OF MAY 7, 18G6. 

No. 34.— A RESOLUTION extending the time for the completion of the Union Pa- 14 Stat,, 355. 
cific Railway, eastern division. 

Sec. 2. And be it further resolved, That the time for commencing, and ^°[[^ rn Pa * 
completing the Northern Pacific Railroad, aud all its several sections, CI c - klil loa ' 
i» extended for the term of two years. 



ACT OF JUNE 25, 1868. (Repealed.) 

AN ACT relative to filing reports of railroad companies. 15 Stat. 79. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That the reports required to bo Reports to the 
made to the Secretary of the Treasury on or before the first day of Secretary of the 
July of each year, by the corporations created by or entitled to sub- madron or before 
sidies under the provisions of an act entitled "An act to aid in the con- the first day ot 
Btrnction of a railroad and telegraph line from the Missouri River to October «>t each 
the Pacific Ocean, and to secure to the Government the use of the same v ^'ap'Viiirrai- 
for postal, military, and other purposes," approved July first, eighteen r *|a companies." 
hundred and sixty-two, and the acts supplemental to and amendatory 
thereof, shall hereafter be made to the Secretary of the Interior, on or 
before the first day of October of each year. Said reports shall furnish 
full and specific information upon the several points mentioned in the 
twentieth section of the said act of eighteen hundred and sixty-two, 
and shall be verified as therein prescribed, and on failure to make the 
same as herein required, the issue of bonds or patents to the company 
in default shall be suspended until the requirements of this act shall be 
complied with by such company. And the reports hitherto made to 
the Secretary of the Treasury under the said act of July first, eighteen 
hundred and sixty-two, shall be transferred and delivered by him to 
the Secretary of the Interior to be filed by him. 



246 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Northern Pa- Sec. 2. And be it fur.'her enacted, That the corporations created by the 
Ci ^ C 'p A^f 11 * 1 ^ provisions of the acts of Congress approved July second, eighteen hundred 
Southern Pacific: an ^ sixty-four, and July twenty-seventh, eighteen hundred and sixty- 
Railroad Compa- six, and known as the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, the Atlantic 
nies to report at and Pacific Railroad Company, and the Southern Pacific Railroad Corn- 
same time as the pany, shall make reports to the Secretary of the Interior on or before the 
KaUioad Compa^ nrst of October of each year, as are required to be made by the Union Pa- 
ny. cific Railroad and branches, under the provisions of the first section of 
this act, and on failure so to do, shall be subject to the like suspension. 
Reports of ex- g EC> 3 j w6 j ^ ^ further enacted, That the reports required from the 
8i™n"i"~toX"a<l- commissioners appointed to examine and report in relation to the road 
dressed 10 ami of any of the corporations whereto reference is made in this act, shall 
filed in the Da- he addressed to and filed in the Department of the Interior; and all 
partment of the 8Ucn re ports heretofore made shall be transferred to and filed in said 
Department of the Interior ; and so much of any and all acts as requires 
any reports from such companies, or any officers thereof, to be made to 
the Secretary of the Treasury, is hereby repealed. 
Annual reports Skc 4. And belt further enacted, That, in addition to the eight sub- 
of officers to Rejects referred to in section twenty of the act of July, eighteen hundred 
al"?to the SeciS* aua sixty- 1. wo, to be reported upon, there shall also be furnished an- 
tary of the Inte- nually to the Secretary of the Interior all reports of engineers, super- 
ior, intendents, or other officers who make annual reports to any of said 
railroad companies. 

(The foregoing act was repealed by act of Congress, approved June 
19, 1878, 20 U.S. Stat., 169.) 



JOINT RESOLUTION OF JULY 1, 18G8. 

15 Stat., p. 255. No. 47. -JOINT RESOLUTION extending the time for the completion of the North- 
ern Pacific Railroad. 

Be it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 

Sections, chap. States of America in Conejress assembled, That section eight of an act en- 

217,13 Stat., 370, titled "An act granting lands to aid in the construction of a railroad 

and telegraph line from Lake Superior to Pfiget Sound, on the Pacific 

Time extended coas V ™ hereby so amended as to read as follows : That each and every 

to July 4, 1879. grant, right, and privilege herein, are so made and given to and ac- 

(Se<> res. of May cepted by said Northern Pacific Railroad Company upon and subject 



7, 180G, 14 Stat 
355.) 



to the following conditions, namely: That the said company shall com- 
mence the work on said road within two years from and after the sec- 
ond day of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-eight, and shall complete 
not less than one huudred miles per year after the second year there- 
after, and shall construct, equip, furnish, and complete the; whole road 
by the fourth day of July, anno Domini eighteen hundred and seventy - 
eeven. 



JOINT RESOLUTION OF MARCH 1, 18G9. 

15 Stat., 346. No. 15.— JOINT RESOLUTION gra[n ]ting the Consent of Congress provided for in 
13Stat.,37u. section ten of tbe Act incorporating the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, ap 

proved July second, eighteen hundred and sixty-four. 

Be it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
Consentof Con- States of America in Congress assembled, That the consent of the Congress 
fs^ue morT«-a^e of the United States is hereby given to the Northern Pacific Railroad 
bonds ™or "con- Company to issue its bonds, and to secure the same by mortgage upon 
struction pur- its railroad and its telegraph line, for the purpose of raising funds with 
poses. which to construct said railroad and telegraph line between Lake Su- 

perior and Puget Sound, and also upon its branch to a point at or near 
Meaning of Portland, Oregon; and the term "Puget Sound," as used here and in 
term yPuget the act incorporating said company, is hereby construed to mean all 
bound. t j ie wa ters connected with the Straits of Juan de Fuca within the ter- 

ritory of the United States. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 247 

JOINT RESOLUTION OF APRIL 10, 1?69. 

Ho. on.— JOINT RESOLUTION granting Right of "Way for the Construction of a 
Railroad from a Point at or near Portland, Oregon, to a Point west of the Cascade 10 Stat., 57. 
Mountains, in Washington Territory. 

Be it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That the Northern Pacific Rail- Company an- 
road Company be, and hereby is, authorized to extend its branch line™o™zed ™^?* 
from a point at or near Portland, Oregon, to some suitable point on njj e f rom port- 
Puget Sound, to be determined by said company, and also to connect laud to Puget 
the same with its main line west of the Cascade mountains, in the Ter- Sound, 
ritory of Washington; said extension being subject to all the conditions 
and provisions, and said company in respect thereto being entitled to 
all the rights and privileges conferred by the act incorporating said 
company, and all acts additional to and amendatory thereof: Provided, 
That said company shall not bo entitled to any subsidy in money, bonds, Not entitled 
or additional lands of the United States, in respect to said extension of hereby to any 
its branch line as aforesaid, except such lands as may be included in fj^Ji j^nda? " 
the right of way on the line of such extension as it may be located : And 
provided further, That at least twenty-five miles of said extension shall 
be constructed before the second day of July, eighteen hundred and 
seventy-one, and forty miles per year thereafter until the whole of said 
extension shall be completed. 



RESOLUTION OF MAT 31, 1870. 

No. 67.— A RESOLUTION authorizing the Northern Pacific Railroad Company to 1G Stat., 378. 
issue its Bonds for the Construction of its road and to secure the same by Mortgage, 
and for other Purposes. 

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of America in Congress assembled, That the Northern Pacific Railroad . Authorized to 
Company be, and hereby is, authorized to issue its bonds to aid in the ]^as ToT^ore* 
construction and equipment of its road, and to secure the same by struct ion and 
mortgage on its property and rights of property of all kinds and do- equipment of 
scriptions, real, personal, and mixed, including its franchises as a corpo- roa( b 
ration; and, as proof and notice of its legal execution and effectual 
delivery, said mortgage shall be tiled and recorded in the office of the Mortgage to 
Secretary of the Interior; and also to locate and construct, under the he filed and re- 
provisions and with the privileges, grants, and duties provided for in c ° rdeu in * ne 
its act of incorporation, its main road to some point on Puget Sound, retary°of the la- 
via the valley of the Columbia River, with the right to locate and con- terior. 
struct its branch from some convenient point on its main trunk line Authorized to 
across the Cascade Mountains to Puget Sound; and in the event of locat0 . its main 
there not being in any State or Territory in which said main line or btaRiver. witlfa 
branch may be located, at the time of the final location thereof, the branch across the 
amount of lands per mile granted by Congress to said company, within Cascade Mount- 
the limits prescribed by its charter, then said company shall be entitled, ains , to ^g 6 * 
under the directions of the Secretary of the Interior, to receive so many Limits within 
sections of land belonging to the United States, and designated by odd which indemnity 
numbers, in such State or Territory, within ten miles on each side of lands may be oh- 
said road, beyond the limits prescribed in said charter, as will make up tained increased 
such deficiency, on said main line or branch, except mineral and other sfxty^niUes 01 on 
lands as exempted in the charter of said company of eighteen hundred each side of the 
ami sixty-four, to the amount of the lauds that have been granted, road, 
sold, reserved, occupied by homestead settlers, pre-empted, or other- 
wise disposed of subsequent to the passage of the act of July two, 
eighteen hundred and sixty-four, and that twenty-five miles of said 
main line between its western terminus and the city of Portland, in the 
State of Oregon, shall be completed by the first day of January, anno 
Domini eighteen hundred and seventy-two, and forty miles of the re- 
maining portion thereof each year thereafter until the whole, shall be 
completed between said points: Provided, That all lands hereby granted c ° ra P^y's 
to said company which shall not be sold or disposed of or remain sub- u a jJ ( t s mortgaged 
ject to the mortgage by this act authorized, at the expiration of fivesubjectto 
years after the completion of the entire road, shall be subject to settle- menl at not, over 
ment and preemption like other lands, at a price to be paid to 8aid* 250 P ei lfJf refive 
company not exceeding two dollars and fifty cents per acre; and if the pfetion*ofThe < eii« 
mortgage hereby authorized shall at any time be enforced by loreclos- tire road. 



248 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

ure or other legal proceeding, or the mortgaged lands hereby granted, 

or any of them, be sold by the trustees to whom such mortgage may 

be executed, either at its maturity or lor any failure or default of said 

company under the terms thereof, such lands shall be sold at public 

sale, at places within the States and Territories in which they shall be 

American iron situate, after not less than sixty days previous notice, in single sections 

or steel, inanu- or subdivisions thereof, to the highest and best bidder: Provided further, 

factured fromrphat in the construction of the said railroad, American iron or steel 

exclusfvely^shaU onl . y shall be used, the same to be manufactured from American ores 

only be used. exclusively. 

Congress re- Sec. 2. And be it further resolved, That Congress may at any time alter 
serves tbe right ,, aniem i this joint resolution, having due regard to the rights of said 
to alter or amend. , '' ., ,. ' ° to rt 

company and any other parties. 



LAWS RELATING TO THE ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC RAIL- 
ED AD. 

ACT OF JULY 27, 1866. 

14 Stat. 292. Ay ACT granting Lands to aid in the Construction of a Railroad and Telegraph 

Line from the States of Missouri and Arkansas to the Pacific Coast. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
Atlantic and States of America in Congress assembled, That John B. Brown, Anson P. 
Pacific Railroad Morrill, Samuel F. Hersey, William G. Crosby, Samuel E. Spring, Sam- 
porated? 1IJC ° r * uel p - Dinsmore, of Maine ; * * * and all such other persons who 
shall or may be associated with them, and their successors, are hereby 
created and erected into a body corporate and politic, in deed and in 
Name. law, by the name, style, and title of the "Atlantic and Pacific Railroad 

Empowered to Company." and by that name shall have perpetual succession, and shall 
lay out, con- be able to sue and be sued, plead and bo impleaded, defend and be de- 
struct, and enjoy fended, in all courts of law and equity within the United States, and 
road ^nd^ tele- m:lv Ina ^ e anc * nave a common seal. And said corporation is hereby 
graph line. e " authorized and empowered to lay out, locate, and construct, furnish, 
maintain, and enjoy, a continuous railroad and telegraph line, with the 
appurtenances,namely : Beginning at or near the town of Springfield, in 
the State of Missouri, thence to the western boundary line of said 
From Spring- State, and thence by the most eligible railroad route as shall be deter- 
field, Mo., via mined by said company to a point on the Canadian Ri ver,thence to the 
Albuquerque, N". town of Albuquerque^ on the River Del Norte, and thence by way of 
35th 'parallel of ^ ie Agua Frio, or other suitable pass, to the head waters of the Colorado 
latitude, to theChiquito, and thence, along the thirty-fifth parallel of latitude as near 
Pacific' as maybe found most suitable for a railway route, to the Colorado 

River, at such point as may be be selected by said company for crossing ; 
thence, by the most practicable and eligible route, to the Pacitic. The 
Right to con- sa ^ company shall have the right to contract a branch from the point 
struct a branch at which the road strikes the Canadian River eastwardly, along the 
from Canadian most suitable route as selected, to a point in the western boundary line 
River to a point f Arkansas, at or near the town of Van Buren. And the said corn- 
Ark. aU UIeD ' P anv i s hereby vested with all the powers, privileges, and immunities 
necessary to carry into effect the purposes of this act, as herein set 
Canitai stock ^ ortn - The capital stock of said company shall consist of one million 
$100,000, uoo. ' shares of one hundred dollars each, which shall in all respects be 
deemed personal property, and shall be transferable in such manner 
as the laws of said corporation shall provide. The persons herein- 
Board of com- DeIore named are hereby appointed commissioners, and shall be called 
missioners ap- the board of commissioners of the "Atlantic and Pacific Railroad 
pointed. Company," and fifteen shall constitute a quorum for the transaction 

First meeting of business. The first meeting of said board of commissioners shall 
of commissionera be held at the Turner Hall, in the city of Saint Louis, on the first 
Louis Mo m bt " da y of Octooer > anno Domini eighteen 'hundred and sixty-six, or at 
such time within three months thereafter as any ten commissioners 
herein named from Missouri shall appoint, notice of which shall be 
given by them to the other commissioners by publishing said notice 
in at least one daily newspaper in the cities of Boston, New York, Cin- 
cinnati, Saint Louis, Memphis, and Nashville, once a week for at least 
four weeks previous to the day of rueeting. Said board shall organize 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 249 

by the choice from its number of a president, vice-president, secretary. Organization of 
and treasurer, and they shall require from said treasurer such bonds board. 

an may be deemed proper, and may from time to time increase the 
amount thereof, as they may deem proper. The secretary shall bo 
sworn to the faithful performance of his duties, and such oath shall be 
entered upon the records of the company, 8,igned by him, and the oatli p res i ( i en * an( i 
verified thereon. The president and secretary <>!' said boards shall, in secretary to call 
like manner, call other meetings, paming the time and place thereof, other meetings. 
It shall he the duty of* said board of commissioners to open hooks, or , Duty of the 
cause hooks to he opened, at such times and in such principal cities or gion^ra toonen 
other places in the United States as they or a quorum of them shall de- books" for snb- 
t ermine, within twelve months after the passage of this act, to receive scri p tions to 
subscriptions to the capital stock of said corporation, and a cash pay- stock. 
ment of ten per centum on all subscriptions, and to receipt therefor, 
So soon as ten thousand shares shall in good faith be subscribed for, 
and ten dollars per share actually paid into the treasury of the com- 
pany, the said president and secretary of said board of commissioners 
shall appoint a time and place for the first meeting of the subscribers ofsntecrftersto 
to the stock of said company, and shall give notice thereof in at least stock. 
one newspaper in each State in which subscription books have been 
opened, at least fifteen days previous to the day of meeting, and such 
subscribers as shall attend the meeting so called, either in person or 
by lawful proxy, then and there shall elect, by ballot, thirteen direct- Thirteen f -' 
ors for said corporation ; and in such election each share of said capital j^j ° T ^ y ° stock*-" 
stock shall entitle the owner thereof to one vote. The president and holders. 
secretary of the board of commissioners, and in case of their absence or 
inability any two of the officers of said board, shall act as inspectors 
of said election, and shall certify, under their hands, filenames of the 
directors elected at said meeting. And the said commissioners, treas- Commissioners 

urer, and secretary shall then deliver over to said directors all the J'? (le |' vei ' over ^ 
' . . • , ... , , j ii i i • -i • the directors all 

moueys, properties, subscription books, and other books m their pos- tlienioneys,prop- 
session, and thereupon the duties of said commissioners and the offi- erties, book's, &c. 
cers previously appointed by them shall cease and determine forever, 
and thereafter the stockholders shall constitute said body politic and 
corporate. Annual meetings of the stockholders of the said corpora- Annual meet- 
tiou for the choice of officers (when they are to be chosen), and for the * n ^ ot stock- 
transaction of business, shall be holden at such time and place and upon boI(leis - 
such notice as may be prescribed in the by-laws. 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the right of way through the Grant of right 
public lands be, and the same is hereby, granted to the said Atlantic of way. 
and Pacific Railroad Company, itssuccessors and assigns, for the con- 
struction of a railroad and telegraph as proposed; and the right, 
power, and authority is hereby given to said corporation to take from tak" from^adia'- 
the public lands adjacent to the line of said road material of earth, cent lands mate- 
stone, timber, and so forth, for the construction thereof. Said way is rials for con- 
granted to said railroad to the extent of one hundred feet in width on struction. 
each side of said railroad where it may pass through the public do- ioo feet in° width 
main, including all necessary grounds for station-buildings, work- on each side of 
shops, depots, machine-shops, switches, side-tracks, turn-tables, and said railroad. 
water-stations; and the right of way shall be exempt from taxation Right of way 
within the Territories of the United States. The United States shall San? m 
extinguish, as rapidly as may be consistent with public policy and the Indiantitles to 
welfare of the Indians, and only by their voluntary cession, the Indian he extinguished 
title to all lands falling under the operation of this act and- acquired i! y tne 1,uUh1 
m the donation to the road named in the act. 

Sec. )5. And be it further enacted, That there be, and hereby is, granted Grant of lands, 
to the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company, its successors and as- 
signs, for the purpose of aiding in the construction of said railroad and 
telegraph line to the Pacific Coast, and to secure the safe and Speedy 
transportation of tho mails, troops, munitions of war, and public 
stores, over the route of said line of railway and its branches, every 
alternate section of public land, not mineral, designated by odd num- 
bers, to the amount of twenty alternate sections per mile, on each side Forty sectiona 
of said railroad line, as said company may adopt, through the Territo- E, er ?? ile , '" tho 
ries of the United States, and ten alternate sections of land per mile 'fwa'tT'sec- 
on each side of said railroad whenever it passes through any State, tions per mile in 
and whenever, on the line thereof, the United States have full title, the States. 
not reserved, sold, granted, or otherwise appropriated, and free from 
pre-emption or other claims or rigbls, at the time the liueofsaid road 
is designated by a plat thereof, filed in the office of the commissioner 



250 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

of the General Land-Office ; and whenever, prior to said time, any of 

said sections orparts of sections shall have been granted, sold, reserved, 

occupied by homestead settlers, or pre-empted, or otherwise disposed 

of, other lands shall he selected by said company in lieu thereof, under 

Oth er lands the direct ion of the Secretary of the Interior, in alternate sections, and 

may be selected designated by odd numbers, not more than ten miles beyond the limits 

iU li * u { i of those of said alternate sections, and not including the reserved numbers: 

re ^iad limits. Provided, That if said route shall he found upon the line of any other 

If route is upon railroad route, to aid in the construction of which lands have been 

the line i of any heretofore granted by the United States, as far as the routes are upon 

f theT er grant tne same general line, the amount of land heretofore granted shall be 

shall" be deduct- deducted from the amount granted by this act: Provided further, That 

ed. the railroad company receiving the previous grant of land may assign 

Road having their interest to said "Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company, " or may 

nfav as" i o-n F a U * consolidate, confederate, and associate with said company upon the 

'"'Mineral" terms named in the first and seventeenth sections of this act: Provided 

lands not grant- further, That all mineral lands be, and the same are hereby, excluded 

ea - . . from the operations of this act, and in lieu thereof a like quantity of 

lands fnlfieuof unoccupied and unappropriated agricultural lands in odd-numbered 

mineral lands. sections nearest to the line of said road, and within twenty miles 

thereof, maybe selected as above provided: And provided further, That 

„__. .,, , the word " mineral," when it occurs in this act, shall not be held to in- 

not include 'iron elude iron or coal : And provided further, That no money shall be drawn 

or coal. from the Treasury of the United States to aid in the construction of the 

said "Atlantic and Pacific Railroad." 

Sec. 4. And he it further enacted, That whenever said Atlantic and 
Pacific Railroad Company shall have twenty-live consecutive miles of 
any portion of said railroad and telegraph line ready for the service 
The President contemplated, the President of the United Statesshall appoint three com- 
to appoint three missioners to examine the same, who shall be paid a reasonable com- 
Commissioners pensation for their services by the company, to be determined by the 
to examine road. Secretary of the Interior; and if it shall appear that twenty-five con- 
secutive miles of said road and telegraph line have been completed in 
a good, substantial and workman-like manner, as in all other respects 
required by this act, the commissioners shall so report under oath, to 
Commissioners ^\ )e President of the United States, and patents of lands, as aforesaid, 
oa^to'theVres 7 - 8na ^ lje issued to said company, confirming to said company the right 
ident. an d title to said lands situated opposite to and coterminous with said 

completed section of said road. And from time to time, whenever 
twenty-five additional consecutive miles shall have been constructed, 
completed, and in readiness as aforesaid, and verified by said commis- 
sioners to the President of the United States, then patents shall be 
issued to said company conveying the additional sections of land as 
aforesaid, and so on as fast as every twenty-live miles of said road is 
completed as aforesaid. 
Road tobecon- Sec. 5. And he it further enacted, That said Atlantic and Pacific Rail- 
Btructed as aroad shall be constructed in a substantial and workman-like manner, 
4 ' first -class "rail- with, all the necessary draws, culverts, bridges, viaducts, crossings, 
r °Rails to be of turn-outs, stations and watering-places, and all other appurtenances, 
American iron, including furniture and rolling-stock, equal i. all respects to railroads 
Gauge to be of the first-class when prepared for business, with rails of the best qual- 
uniform. jj^ manufactured from American iron. And a uniform gauge shall bo 

ComfitfonYs^o established throughout the entire length of the road. And there shall 
charges forGov- be constructed a telegraph line, of the most substantial and approved 
ernment trans- description, to be operated along the entire liue : Provided, That the said 
^V&^hKc'mryit' cora P an y shall not charge the Government higher rates than they do 
C ^0ther roaTs individuals for like transportation and telegraphic service. And it 
may form run- shall be the duty of the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company to per- 
ning connections mit any other railroad which shall be authorized to be built by the 
terms q " ltab United States, or by the legislature of any Territory or State in which 
the same may be situated, to form running connections with it, on fair 
and equitable terms. 
Landstobesur- Sec. 6. And he it further enacted, That the President of the United 
veyed as fast as states shall cause the lands to be surveyed for forty miles in width 
roadmavrequire totn sides of tlie eiltire lin e of said road after the general route 
' shall be fixed, and as fast as may be required by the construction of 
said railroad; and the odd sections of land hereby granted shall not be 
liable to sale or entry, or pre-emption, before or after they are surveyed, 
except by said company, as provided in this act ; but the provision of 
the act of September, eighteen hundred and forty-one, granting p re- 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 251 

emption rights, and the act amendatory there6f, and of the act entitled 
" An act to secure homesteads to actual settlers on the public domain, " 
approved May twenty, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, shall be, and 
the same are hereby, extended to all other hinds on the line of said road 
when surveyed, excepting those hereby granted to said company. 

Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, That the said Atlantic and Pacific Authorises 
Railroad Company be, and is hereby, authorized and empowered to company to take 
enter upon, purchase, take, and hold any lands or premises that may sa ry for construe^ 
be necessary and proper for the construction and working of said road, tioii af its road, 
not exceeding in width one hundred feet on each side of the line of its .100 feet on each 
railroad, unless a greater width be requ red for the purposes of excava- 6 e * 
tion or embankment; and also any lauds or premises that may be nec- 
essary and proper for turn-outs, standing places for cars, depots, sta- Lauds for turn, 
tion-houses, or auy other structures required in the construction and outs > depots, &e. 
working of said road. And the said company shall have the right to 
cut andremove trees and other material that might, by falling, incum- 
ber its road-bed, though standing or being more than two hundred feet 
from the line of said road. And in case the owner of such lands or 
premises and the said company cannot agree as to the value of the 
premises taken, or to be taken, for the use of said road, the value 
thereof shall be determined by the appraisal of three disinterested com- . Damages to be 
missioners, who may be appointed upon application by either party to coniuitesioners. ^ 
any court of record in any of the Territories in which the lands or prem- 
ises to be taken lie; and said commissioners, in their assessmeat of 
damages, shall appraise such premises at what would have been the Prooodure. 
value thereof if the road had not been built. And upon return into 
court of such appraisement, and upon the payment into the same of 
the estimated value of the premises taken for the use and benefit of 
the owner thereof, said premises shall be deemed to be taken by said 
company, which shall thereby acquire full title to the same for the 
purposes aforesaid. And either party feeling aggrieved at said ap- 
praisement may, within thirty days alter the same has been returned 
into court, file an appeal therefrom, and demand a jury of twelve men 
to estimate the damage sustained ; but such appeal shall not interfere 
with the rights of said company to enter upon the premises taken, or 
to do any act necessary and proper in the construction of its road. And 
said party appealing shall give bonds, with sufficient surety or sureties, 
for the payment of any cost that may arise upon such appeal ; and in 
case the party appealing doesnot obtain a verdict more favorable, such 
party shall pay the whole cost incurred by the appellee, as well as his 
own, and the payment into court, for the use of theownerofsaid premises 
taken, at a sum equal to that finally awarded, shall be held to vest in 
said compauy the title of said land, and the right to use and occupy the 
same for the construction, maintenance, and operation of said road. 
And in case any of the lands to be ta-ken as aforesaid shall be held by 
an infant, fernme covert, non compos, insane person, or persons resid . "^hat proceed- 
ing without the territory within which the lands to be taken lie, or i£Ssh e i<Kv* a i? v' 
persons subjected to any legal disability, the court may appoint ap er80 ns subject 
guardian, for any party under any disqualification, to appear iu proper to auy legal <iisa- 
person, who shall give bonds, with sufficient surety or sureties, for the bility. 
proper and faithful execution of his trust, and who may represent 
in court the person disqualified, as aforesaid, from appearing when 
the same proceedings shall be had in reference to the appraise- 
ment of the premises to be taken for the use of said company, and 
with the same effect as has been already described; and the title of the other proceed- 
company to the lands taken by virtue of this act shall uot be affected i"g*- 
or impaired by reason of any failure by any guardian to discharge faith- 
fully his trust. And in case any party shall have a right or claim to proceed in gs 
any land for a term of years, or any interest therein, in possession, re- when lands aro 
version, or remainder, the value of any such estate, less than a fee sim- unoccupied, 
pie, shall be estimated and determined in the manner hereinbefore set 
forth. And in case it shall be necessary for the company to enter upon 
any lauds which are unoccupied, and of which there is no apparent 
owner or claimant, it may proceed to take and use the same for the 
purposes of said railroad, and may institute proceedings, in manner 
described, for the purpose of ascertaining the value of, and of acquiring 
a title to, the same; but the judge of the court hearing said suit shall 
determine the kinds of notice to be served on such owner or owners, 
and he may in his discretion appoint an agent or guardian to represent 
•uch owner or owners in case of his or their incapacity or uon-appear- 



252 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Claims barred ance. But in case no claimant shall appear within six years from the 
if not made with- time of the opening of said road across any land, all claims to damages 
in six years. a g a i ns t 8a id company shall he harred. 

Grants made g EC 8_ And be it further enacted, That each and every grant, right, 

comUtions Celtam aucl privilege herein are so made and given to and accepted hy said 

AVliole ioad to Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company, upon and subject to the follow- 

be completed by ing conditions, namely : That the said company shall commence the 

July 4, 1878. work on said road within two years from the approval of this act hy 

the President, and shall complete not less than fifty miles per year after 

the second year, and shall construct, equip, furnish, and complete the 

mainline of the whole road by the fourth day of July, anno Domini 

eighteen hundred and seventy-eight. 

Congress may Skc. 9. And be it further enacted, That the United States make the 

essary ^o^niure several conditional grants herein, and that the said Atlantic and Pacific 

a^speedy comple- Railroad Company accept the same, upon the further condition that if 

tiou of the road, the said company make any breach of the conditions hereof, and allow 

the same to continue for upwards of one year, then, in such case, at any 

time hereafter, the United States may do any and all acts and things 

which may be needful and necessary to insure a speedy completion of 

the said road. 

All people of Sec. 10. And be it further enacted, That all people of the United States 

ma ^subscSbeto slia11 nave tuc 1 ' i » nt ' to subscribe to the stock of the Atlantic and Pacific 

the* stoc^uutu Railroad Company until the whole capital named in this act of incorpo- 

whole amount is ration is taken up by complying with the terms of subscription. 

taken up. Sec. 11. Andbeit further enacted, That said Atlantic and Pacific Rail- 

r ute b aud mUi- roat b or anv P ar * thereof,shall be a post-route and military road, subject 

tary road. t° the use of the United States for postal, military, naval, and all other 

Congress may Government service, and also subject to such regulations as Congress 

restrict charges may impose restricting the charges for such Government transporta- 

for Government tw ^ ' ° & 

Company to ac- Sec. 12. And be it further enacted, That the acceptance of the terms, 
cept terms, comli- conditions, and impositions of this act by the said Atlantic and Pacific 
tions, &c, within Railroad Company shall be signified in writing under the corporate seal 
Ammaf report °^ sa ^ corn P an .y> duly executed pursuant to the direction of its board 
to he verified by of directors first had and obtained, which acceptance shall be made 
affidavits of pres- within two years after the passage of this act, and not afterwards, and 
ident and six di- sna ]i |) deposited in the office of the Secretary of the Interior. 
pwiy!' 8 C ° m ' Sec - l3 - And be it further enacted, That the directors of said company 
shall make and publish an annual report of their proceedings and ex- 
penditures, verified by the affidavits of the president and at least six of 
the directors, a copy of which shall bo deposited in the office of said 
Secretary of the Interior, and they shall, from time to time, fix, deter- 
mine, and regulate the fares, tolls, and charges to be received and paid 
for transportation of persons and property on said road, or any part 
thereof. 
Election of prea- Sec. 14. And be it further enacted, That the directors chosen in pursu- 
preshlerit .from auce of tne nrst 8ection of this act'shall so soon as may be after their 
board of direct- election, elect from their own number a president and vice-president ; 
ors. and said board of directors shall, from time to time, and so soon as may 

Treasurer and ue after their election, choose a treasurer and eecretary, who shall hold 
secretary. their offices at the will and pleasure of the board of directors. The 

treasurer and secretary shall give such bonds, with such security as the 
said board from time to time may require. The secretary shall, before 
entering upon his duty, be sworn to the faithful discharge thereof, and 
said oath shall be made a matter of record upon the books of said cor- 
poration. No person shall be a director of said company unless he shall 
be a stockholder, and qualified to vote for directors at the election at 
which he shall be chosen. 
Term of office Sec. 15. And be it further enacted, That the president, vice-president, 
of president, and directors shall hold their offices for the period indicated in the by- 
and direct .orsnot * aws ot 8ai(1 company, not exceeding three years, respectively, and un- 
to exceed three til others are chosen in their place, and qualified. In case it shall so 
years, happen that an election of directors shall not be made on any day ap- 

pointed by the by-laws of said company, the corporation shall not for 
Directors em- taafc excuse oe deemed to be dissolved, but such election may be holden 
powered to make on any day which shall be appointed by the directors. The directors, 
by-laws, r u 1 e s, of whom seven, including the president, shall be a quorum for the traus- 
aud regulations. ac tjon of business, shall have full power to make and prescribe such 
by-laws, rules, and regulations as they shall deem needful and proper 
touching the disposition and management of stock, property, estate, 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 253 

and effects of tbe eompany, the transfer of shares, tlio duties and con- 
duct of their officers and Servants touching the election and meeting of 
the directors, and all matters whatsoever which may appertain to the 
concerns of said company : and the said hoard of directors may have Directors* mav 
full power to fill any vacancy or vacancies that may occur from any fill vacancies in 
cause or causes from time To time in their said hoard. And the said hoard. 
board of directors shall have power to appoint such engineers, agents, po ^ ( i°" ^!!J* 
and subordinates as may from time to time be necessary to carry into point engineers 
effect the object of the company, and to do all acts and things touch- agents, &Tc. 
ing the location and construct ion of said road. 

Sec. 16. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the direct- Directors to re- 
ors of said company to require payment of the sum of ten per centum qi ir © payment of 
cash assessment upon all subscriptions received of all subscribers, and cashassessment! 
the balance thereof at such times and in such proportion and on such and balance of 
conditions as they shall deem to be necessary to complete the said road subscriptions 
and telegraph lines within the time in this act prescribed. Sixty days' wh - en needed. 
previous notice shall be given of the payments required, and of the time 
and place of payment, by publishing a notice once a week in one daily 
newspaper in each of the cities of Boston, New York, Cincinnati, St. 
Louis, Memphis, and Nashville, and in case any stockholder shall neg- -F 0r f e it e d stock 
lect or refuse to pay, in pursuance of such notice, the stock held by such may boredeemed 
person shall bo forfeited absolutely to the use of the company, and also on terms pre- 
any payment or payments that shall have been made on account thereof, scribed by di- 
subject to the condition that the board of directors may allow the re- rectors - 
demption on such terms as they may prescribe. 

Sec. 17. And be it further enacted, That the said company is authorized Company an* 
to accept to its own use any grant, donation, loan, power, franchise, aid, thorized to accept 
or assistance which may be granted to or conferred on said company by franchises a &c 8 ' 
the Congress of the United States, by the legislature of any State. Or 
by any corporation, person, or persons, or by any Indian tribe or nation 
through whose reservation the road herein provided for may pass; and 
said corporation is authorized to hold and enjoy any such grant, dona- 
tion, loan, power, franchise, aid, or assistance, to its own use, for the Grantfromany 
purpose aforesaid : Provided, That any such grant or donation, power, Indian tribe to be 
aid, or assistance from any Indian tribe or nation shall be subject to the p"^^! 1 of the 
approval of the President of the United States. President. 

Sec. 18. And beit further enhcted, That the Southern Pacific Railroad, Southern Pari. 
a companv incorporated under the laws of the State of California, is fi ^ 11 ra f ?, y P " 1 nn ^? fc 
hereby authorized to connect with the said Atlantic and Pacific Rail- Jnd Pacific Road! 
road, formed under this act, at such point, near the boundary line of the Poi t of con- 
State of California, as they shall deem most suitable for arailroad line nectiontobenear 
to San Francisco, and shall have a uniform gauge and rate of freight or the boundary line 
fare with said road ; and in consideration thereof, to aid in its construe- Tjnil'orrn^auee 
tion, shall have similar grants of land, subject to all the conditions and and rate of 
limitations herein provided, aud shall be required to construct its road freight and fare, 
on the like regulations, as to time and manner, with the Atlantic and .,^} x „ ua ^ e 8im * 
Pacific Railroad herein provided for. la n l ,h &™ n 8 ° 

Sec. 19. And be it further enacted, That unless the said Atlantic and This act to be 
Pacific Railroad Company shall obtain bona fide subscriptions to the nnlland void, nn- 

stock of said companv to the amount of one million of dollars, with ten les * one "" mo " °." 

., 1 .-J. r ,, ~ , ' , ..dollars of stock 

per centum paid, within two years after the passage of and approval oi are subscribed for 

this act, it shall be null and void. . within two yearn 

Sec. 20. And be it further enacted, That tbe better to accomplish the Congress may 
object of this act, namely, to promote the public interest and welfare aanena^or repeal 
by the construction of said railroad and telegraph line, and keeping this act, having 
the same in working order, and to secure to the Government at all duo regard for 
times, but part icularl v in time of w T ar, the use and benefits of the same tho r b-'ht8 of the 
for postal, military, and other purposes, Congress may, at any time, cotupany * 
having due regard for the rights of said Atlantic and Pacific Railroad 
Company, add to, alter, amend, or repeal this act. 

Sec. 21.* And be it further enacted, That whenever in any grantof land Compensation 
or other subsidies, made or hereafter to bo made, to railroads or other ° r f directors en- 
corporations, the United States has reserved the right, or shall reserve sioners,' &c™tobe 
it, to appoint directors, engineers, commissioners, or other agents to paid by railroad 
examine said roads, or act in conjunction with other officers of said companies, 
company or companies, all the costs, charges, and pay of said direct- 
ors, engineers, commissioners, or agents, shall be paid by the respect- 
ive companies. Said directors, engineers, commissioners, or agents 

* This section has been incorporated in the Eevised Statutes as section 5259. 



254 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR, 

Ten dollars per shall be paid for said services the sum of ten dollars per day, for each 
day and ten cents an( ] every day actually and necessarily employed, and ten cents per 
permile. m j., e £ QJ , ( \ a( .j,' an( { every mile- actually and necessarily traveled, in dis- 

charging the duties required of them, which per diem and mileage 

If company ne- shall be in full compensation for said services. And in case any com- 
plects to make pany shall refuse or neglect, to make such payments, no more patents 
such payments, f or j anc i or t, U er subsidies shall be issued to said company until these 
E &££ requirements are complied with. 



ACT OF APRIL 20, 1871. 

17 Stat., 19. AN ACT to enable the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company to mortgage its 

road. 

Beit enacted by theSenate and House of Representatives of the United States 

The Atlantic of America in Congress assembled, That the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad 
and Pacific Rail Company, organized under act of Congress of July twenty-seven, 
road Company e j<r Q t<. e n bundled and sixty-six, is hereby authorized to make and is- 
sue itsbonds! 1S 8ue * fcs bonds in such form and manner, and for such sums, payable at 
such times, and bearing such rate of interest, and to dispose of them 

Road, equip- on such terms as its directors may deem advisable; and to secure said 
ment, lands, Iran- bonds, 1 he said company may mortgage its road, equipment, lands, 
clnses, &c., may |- raucn j ses ^ privileges, and other rights and property, subject to such 
secureuf^bouds. terms, conditions, and limitations as its directors may prescribe. As 

Mortgage to be proof and notice of the legal execution and effectual delivery of any 
filed and record- mortgage hereafter made by said company, it shall be filed and re- 
thV D Sec?eSy e of cor,1(Ml in the office of thc Secretary of the Interior: Provided, That if 
the Interior. the company shall hereafter suffer any breach of the conditions of the 

Breach of con- act above referred to, under -which it is organized, the rights of those 
ditionsof organic claiming under any mortgage made by the company to the lands 
So se claiming granted to it by said act shall extend only to so much thereof as shall 
under any fore- be coterminous with or appertaining to that part of said road which 
closures of the shall have been constructed at the time of thc foreclosure of said niort- 
mortgage. g a e . 



ACT OF JULY 6, 1886. 

24 Stat., 123. AN ACT to forfeit the lands granted to the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company 
to aid in the construction of a railroad and telegraph line from the States of Mis- 
souri and Arkansas to the Pacific coast, and to restore the same to settlement and 
for other purposes. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
Atlantic and States of America in Congress assembled, That all the lands, excepting 
Pacific Railroad t ne right of way and the right, power, and authority given to said 
Forfeiture of corporation to take from the public lands adjacent to the line of said 
graut of lands road material of earth, stone, timber, and so forth, for the construction 
adjacent to un- thereof, including all necessary grounds for station buildings, work- 
completed P or- shops, depots, machine-shops, switches, side-tracks, turn-tables, and 
ce^trightofway, water- stations, heretofore granted to the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad 
etc. Company by an act entitled ' ; An act granting lands to aid in the con- 

VoL 14, p. 292. struction of a railroad and telegraph line from the States of Missouri 
and Arkansas to the Pacific coast," approved July twenty-seventh, 
eighteen hundred and sixty-six, and subsequent acts and joint resolu- 
tions of Congress, which are adjacent to and coterminous with the un- 
completed portions of the main line of said road, embraced within both 
the granted and indemnity limits, as contemplated to be constructed 
under and by the provisions of the said act of July twenty seventh, 
eighteen hundred and sixty-six, and acts and joint resolutions subse- 
quent thereto and relating to the construction of said road and tele- 
graph, be and the same are hereby, declared forfeited and restored to 
the public domain. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS 255 



LA TVS EEl I TING TO Til E < ' / 1 1 FORN ft AND OH EG ON, AND 
TRE OREGON IND CALIFORNIA RAILROADS. 

ACT OF JULY 25, 1866. 

AN ACT granting lands to aid in the construction of a railroad and telegrapli line 14 Stat., 239. 
from the Central Pacific Railroad, in California, to Portland, in Oregon. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That the " California and Ore- and q,.,™'^™ 11 
iron Railroad Company, " organized under an act of the State of Cali- <jo. <>f California 
fornia, to protect certain parties in and to a railroad survey, "to con- and an Oregon 
nect Portland, in Oregon, with Marysville, in California," approved ^mpaay empow- 
April sixth, eighteen hundred and sixty-three, and such company or- 1™ Jtnic? a rail! 
ganized under the laws of Oregon as the legislature of said State shall road and tele- 
hereafter designate, be, and they are hereby, authorized and einpow- graph line be- 
ered to lay out, locate, construct, finish, and maintain a railroad and t' W( ^ n P'^tland, 
telegraph line between the city of Portland, in Oregon, and the Cen- Cenfral* 11 Pacific 
tral Pacific Railroad, in California, in the manner following, to wit : Railroad in Cali- 
The said California and Oregon Railroad Company, to construct that fornia. 
part of the said railroad and telegraph within the State of California, Tlie California 
beginning at sonic point (to be selected by said company) on the Cen- a tract road C °to 
tral Pacific Railroad in the Sacramento Valley, in the State of Califor- northern bound- 
nia, and running thence northerly, through the Sacramento and Shasta ary of State. 
Valleys, to the northern boundary of the State of California ; and the com k e ^ re ^ on 
said Oregon company to construct that part of the said railroad and struct the road 
telegraph line within the State of Oregon, beginning at the city of to the southern 
Portland, in Oregon, and running thence southerly through the Wil- boundary of Ore- 
lamette, Urnpqua, and Rogue River valleys to the southern boundary gon " 
of Oregon, where the same shall couuect with the part aforesaid to be 
made by the first-named company : Provided, That the company com- The company 
pleting its respective part of the said railroad and telegraph from either ? rst completing 
of the termini herein named to the line between California and Oregon JjiJe ite* rwK 
before the other company shall have likewise arrived at the same line, -with consent of 
shall have the right, and the said company is hereby authorized, to State, 
continue in constructing the same beyond the line aforesaid, with the 
consent of the State in which the unfinished part may lie, upon the 
terms mentioned in this act, until the said parts shall meet and con- 
nect, and the whole line of said railroad and telegraph shall be com- 
pleted. 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That there be, and hereby is, granted Grant of land, 
to the said companies, their successors and assigns, for the purpose of 
aiding in the construction of said railroad and telegraph line, and to 
secure the safe and speedy transportation of the mails, troops, muni- 
tions of war, and public stores over the line of said railroad, every 
alternate section of public land, not mineral, designated by odd num- 
bers, to the amount of twenty alternate sections per mile (ten on each Twen *J ^ ec ' 
side) of said railroad line; and when any of said alternate sections or ^fany* sections 
parts of sections shall be found to have been granted, sold, reserved, of land have been 
occupied by homestead settlers, pre-empted, or otherwise disposed of, sol( l- orareoccu- 
other lands, designated as aforesaid, shall be selected by said companies J^ ( !' fo ,he Veted 
in lieu thereof, under the direction of the Secretary of the Interior, in in lieu thereof. 
alternate sections designated by odd numbers as aforesaid, nearest to 
and not more than ten miles beyond the limits of said first-named al- Limits, 10 miles 
ternate sections : and as soon as the said companies, or either of them, beyond grant, 
shall file in the office of the Secretary of the Interior a map of the sur- When maps of 
vey of said railroad, or any portion thereof, not less than sixty con- surveys are filed 
tinuous miles from either terminus, the Secretary of the Interior shall dra^rafromlalei 
withdraw from sale public lands herein granted on each side of said 
railroad, so far as located and within the limits before specified. The Lan( j a sran ted 
lands herein granted shall be applied to the building of said road to be applied to 
within the States, respectively, wherein they are situated. And the building road in 
sections and parts of sections of land which shall remain in the United tho States where 
States within the limits of the aforesaid grant shall not be sold for less Remain i n g 
than double the minimum price of public lauds when sold: Provided, lands to be sold. 
That bona tide and actual settlers under the pre-emption laws of t lie for what price. 
United States may, after due proof of settlement, improvement, and Settlers under 
occupation, as now provided by law, purchase the same at the price nTaypm-chaselt 
fixed for said lands at the date of such settlement, improvement, and what price, <fcc. 



256 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OE THE INTERIOR. 

IT le 1 .occupation: Arid provided, also, That, settlors under the provisions of 

stead* ^aet °m\ky the homestead act, who comply with the terms and requirements of said 
have not over 80 act, shall he entitled, within the limits of said grant, to patents for an 
acres. amount not exceeding eighty acres of the land so reserved hy the 

United States, anything in this act to the contrary notwithstanding. 
Grant of right Sta:. :'>. And be it further enacted, That the right of way through the 
of way. pnhlie hinds be, and the same is hereby, granted to said companies for 

the construction of said railroad and telegraph line; and the right, 
power, and authority are hereby given to said companies to take from 
Materials for t i ie , public lands adjacent to the line of said road, earth, stone, timber, 
fro ra * ^lacent wa ter, and other materials for tin- construction thereof. Said right of 
lands. ' way is granted to said railroad to the extent of one hundred feet in 

Rights of way width on each side of said railroad where it may pass over the public 
lOo leet on each ] ;UH ^ including all necessary grounds for stations, buildings, work- 
n'a',1 ° 8a " K1 shops, depots, machine-shops,, switches, side-tracks turn-tables, water- 
Lands for sta- stations, or any other structures required in the construction and oper- 
tions.&c. atingofsaid road. 

Tho President Sec. 4. And be it further evaded, That whenever the said companies, 
toappoint 3 com- or either of them, shall have twenty or more consecutive miles of any 
amine road. t0£X " portion of said railroad and telegraph line ready for the service con- 
templated l»y this act, the President of the United States shall appoint 
three commissioners, whose compensation shall be paid by said com- 
pany, to examine the same, and if it shall appear that twenty consecu- 
tive miles of railroad and telegraph shall have been completed and 
Commissioners equipped in all respects as required hy this act, the said commissioners 
to report iii><t»r shall so report under oath to the President of the United States, and 
oathtotne.Presi- t < H , nM1 j )on patents shall issue to said companies, or either of them, as 
Patents to be is- the case may he, for the lands hereinbefore granted, to the extent of 
sued for lands co- and coterminous with the completed section of said railroad and tele- 
terrainous with graph line as aforesaid J and from time to time, whenever twenty or 
road! C C I<U more consecutive miles of the said road and telegraph shall be com- 
pleted and equipped as aforesaid, patents shall in like manner issue 
upon the report of t lie said commissioners, and soon until the entire 
railroad and telegraph authorized by this act, shall have been con- 
structed, and the patents of the lands herein granted shall have been 
issued. 
Condition of Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the grants aforesaid are made 
grant. upon the condition that the said companies shall keep said railroad and 

telegraph in repair and use, and shall at all times transport the mails 
F.-nr and rea- n pon sa j ( ] railroad, and transmit dispatches by said telegraph line for 
compensation. the Government of the United States, when required so to do by any 
Railroad to be Department thereof, and that the Government shall at all times have 
apnblichighway the preference in the use of said railroad and telegraph therefor at fair 
U 'Vd States*** 6 an<1 ' rea80na ^l e rates of compensation, not to exceed the rates paid by 
Property 'and Private parties for the same kind of service. And said railroad shall ho 
troops of tie' and remain a public highway for the use of the Government of the 
United States to United States, free of all toll or other charges upon the transportation 
be ^transported at f the property or troops of the United States; and the same shall be 

the cost or the , i • -, L -, , ■, i ' -, r- ^^ 

companies when transported over said road at the cost, charge, and expense of the cor- 

so required by porations or companies owning or operating the same, when so required 

the Government, by the Government of the United States. 

Companies to Sec. 6. And be it farther enacted, That the said companies shall tile 

file assent to this their assent to this act in the Department of the Interior within one 

actwithinlyear. year after the passage hereof and shall complete the first section of 

pleted by July l twen ty miles of said railroad and telegraph within two years, and at 

1875. least, twenty miles in each year thereafter, and the whole on or before 

the iirst day of July, one thousand eight hundred and seventy-five; 

Gauge to be am i the said railroad shall he of the; same gauge as the "Central Pa- 

ra n o7hV S Uentral cino Railroad" of California, and be connected therewith. 

Companies to Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, That the said companies named in 

nse and operate this act are hereby required to operate and use the portions or parts of 

tfnuousline COn said railroa 4 and telegraph mentioned in section one of this act for all 

purposes of transportation, travel, and communication, so far as tho 

Government and public are concerned, as one connected and conl in nous 

No discrimina- line ; and in such operation and use to afford and secure to each other 

tion whatever, equal advantages and facilities as to rates, time, and transportation, 

without any discrimination whatever, on pain of forfeiting the full 

amount of damage sustained on account of such discrimination, to he 

sued for and recovered in any court of the United States, or of any 

State, of competent jurisdiction. 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 257 

Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, That incase the said companies shall If companies 
fail to comply with the terms and conditions required, namely, by not withcertanicp2 
filing their assent thereto, as provided in section six of this act, or by ditions, this act 
not completing the same as provided in said section, this act shall be to bo void, and 
null and void, and all the lands not conveyed by patent to said com- ttte lands not 
pauy or companies, as the case may be, at the date of any such failure, verttotheUnited 
shall revert to the United Stales. And in case the said railroad and states. 
telegraph line shall not be kept in repair and lit for use, after the same If road and tele- 
shall have been completed, Congress may pass an act to put the same graph line are not 
in repair and use, and may direct the income of said railroad and tele- congress may 1, 
graph line to be thereafter devoted to the United Slates, to repay all &c.° 
expenditures caused by the default and neglect of said companies or 
either of them, as the case may be, or may fix pecuniary responsibility, 
not exceeding the value of the lands granted by this act. 

Sec. 9. Andbe it further enacted, Thatthesaid " California and Oregon The companies 
Railroad Company " and the said " Oregon Compauy" shall be governed to be goyerned 
by the provisions of the general railroad and telegraph laws of their \^ % ^ resT^'tiYe 
respective States, as to the construction and management of the said s t - a [ 68> r 8pec ue 
railroad and telegraph line hereinbefore authorized, in all matters not 
provided for in this act. Wherever the word " company" or u compa- Theword"com- 
nies" is used in this act it shall be construed to embrace the words ? ( a^sociates^smf- 
" their associates, successors, and assigns,' 7 the same as if the words ceskors, and as- 
had been inserted, or thereto annexed. signs."' 

Sec. 10. And be it further enacted. That all mineral lands shall be ex- Mineral lands 
cepted from the operations of this act ; but where the same shall contain excepted from 
timber, so much of the timber thereon as shall be required to construct tllis g ianfc - 
said road over such mineral land is hereby granted to said companies: 
Provided, That the term " mineral lands" shall not include lands con- " Mineral" not 
taining coal and iron. coal aml "-on. 

Sec. 11. And be it further enacted, That the said companies named in Companies to 
this act shall obtain the consent of the legislatures of their respective obtain the con- 
States, and be governed by the statutory regulations thereof in all seu * of states, 
matters pertaining to the right of way, wherever the said road and tele- telegraph line do 
graph line shall not pass over or through the public lands of the United not pass through 
States public lands. 

Sec. 12. Andbe it further enacted, That Congress may at anytime, Act m , 
having due regard for the rights of said California and Oregon railroad amended, &c. 
companies, add to, alter, amend, or repeal this act. 



ACT OF APRIL 10, 1869. 

AK ACT to amend an Act entitled "An act granting Lands to aid in the construe- 16 Stat., 47. 
tiou of a Railroad and Telegraph Lino from tho Central Pacific Railroad, in ('alitor- 1806, ch. 242, 
ma, to Portland, in Oregon," approved July twenty-five, eighteen hundred and vol. xiv, p. 239. 
sixty-six. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and Uouse of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That section six of an act entitled Assent of rail- 
"Au act granting lands to aid in the construction of a railroad and road com P auy t( > 
telegraph line from the Central Pacific Railroad, in California, to Port- witlKne year 
land, inOregon, "approved July twenty-five,eighteen hundred andsixty- from date of this 
six, be, and the same is hereby, amended so as to allow any railroad act. 
company heretofore designated by the legislature of the State of Oregon, 
in accordance with the first section of said act, to file its assent to such 
act in the Department of the Interior within one year from the date of 
the passage of this act ; and such filing of its assent, if done within one 
year from the passage hereof, shall have the same force and effect to all 
intents and purposes as if such assent had been filed within one year 
after the passage of said act : Provided, That nothing herein shall impair, Acquired righta 
any rights heretofore acquired by any railroad company under said act, n °xoi ^fore than 
nor shall said act or this amendment be construed to entitle more than one company en- 
one company to a grant of land : And provided further, That the lands titled to a grant 
granted by the act aforesaid shall be sold to actual settlers only, in °j j lan ^' n wam i 
quantities not greater than one-quarter section to one purchaser, and to 'whom^to'^be 
for a price not exceeding two dollars and fifty cents per acre. sold. 

INT 90— VOL III 17 



258 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

LAW BEL A TING TO THE OREGON SHORT-LINE RAILWAY, 

ACT OF AUGUST 2, 1882. 

22 Stat, 185. AN ACT creating the Oregon Short-Lint' Railway Company a corporation inthe 
Territories of Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming, and for other purposes. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representative;} of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That the Oregon Short-Lino 
Oregon _ Shojt j^ a jj way Company, a corporation of that name duly incorporated and 
Com pony created organized under the laws of the Territory of Wyoming, the amended 
a railway corpo- articles of incorporation of which were duly filed in the office of t.lio 
ration in Territo- secretary of the said Territory on the twelfth day of July, anno Domini 
Tj e8 » ot „Ji w..' eighteen hundred and eighty-one, be, and the same is herein- made a 

Idalio, anil >».>-*?, . • , ," ,"■-, • .•,-., i , , i «r 

oming, with railway corporation in t ho Territories oi Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming, 
rights, <tc. uudorthe same conditions and limitations and with the same rights 

and privileges that iu now has and enjoys under said articles of incor- 
poration within the said Territory of Wyoming, and with all the rights 
and privileges within Haul Territories of Wyoming, Utah, and Idaho, 
which are Becured to railway companies by Iho act of Congress ap- 
proved the third day of March, anno Domini eighteen hundred and 
seventy-five, entitled "An act granting to railroads the right of way 
Proviso 482 ' through the public lands of the United States": Provided, That the 
said corporation shall at all times hereafter be subject to all the laws 
and regulations of the United States in relation to railroads, or of any 
Territory or State through which its line of road may pass. And suits 
against said corporation may he instituted in the courts of said Terri- 
tories, or either of them having jurisdiction by the laws of such Ter- 
ritory. 
Right to alter, Sec. 2. That Congress may at an\ time add to, alter, or repeal this act- 
amend, &c. 



LAW RELATING TO ST. LOUIS, IRON MOUNTAIN AND SOUTH- 
ERN RAILROAD. 

ACT OF JUNE 28, 1884. 

23 Stat., 61. AN" ACT to repeal section one of tlm act ( ntitled "An act making a grant of lands 
in alternate sections to aid in the construction and extension ofthe Iron Mountain 
Railroad, from Pilot Knob, in the State ol Missouri, t<> Helena, in Arkansas," ap- 
proved July fourth, eighteen hundred and sixty-six, and lor other purposes. 

14 Stat., 83. Whereas by the first section of an act of Congress approved July 

Preamble. the fourth, eighteen hundred and sixty-six, there was granted to the 

State of Missouri, for the purpose of aiding in the construction and ex- 
tension ofthe Iron Mountain Railroad, from its terminus at Pilot Knob 
to a point on the southern boundary-line ofthe State, every alternate 
section of land designated by odd numbers, for ten seetions in width 
on each side of said road; and 

Whereas said Iron Mountain Railroad Company, or its successor, did 
not comply with the terms of said act either in tint e «r by the construc- 
tion of its line in accordance with the location of its line as shown on 
its maps tiled in the Department of the Interior or otherwise, and 
never became entitled to or received any of said lands: Therefore 
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
_ . . States of America in Congress assembled, That section one of the act of 

tion^ne of 8 aet Congress entitled "An act making a grant of lauds in alternate seetions 
granting laudato to aid in the construction and extension of the Iron Mountain Railroad, 
aid in construe- from Pilot Knob, in the State of Missouri, to Helena, in Arkansas," ap- 
w°Rau>oad OUn " proved July fourtb > Eighteen hundred and sixty-six, be and hereby is 
repealed ; and upon the acceptance by the said Iron Mountain Railroad 
Company, its successors or assigns, in writing, under corporate seal, 
within six months from the passage of this act, and upon the produc- 
tion to the Secretary ofthe Interior by said company, its successors or 
assigns, of satisfactory proof that said lands have not been sold or en- 
cumbered by said company, the said Iron Mountain Railroad Company, 
Releaaeof com- its successors or assigns, shall be forever released from any and all ob- 
pany; conditions, ligations imposed by said act of July fourth, eighteen hundred and 
sixty-six ; and all of the lands granted by said section one be and they 
Lands restored are nere0 F restored to the public domain for disposition under the pub- 
tothe public do- lic l au< * laws of the United States: Provided, That all pre-emption and 
main ; proviso, homestead entries heretofore allowed upon any of said lands, not iu ex- 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 259 

cess of the legal quantity, be, and they are hereby, confirmed : And 
provided further, That all persons residing on any of said lands at the 
date of the passage of this act shall have a prior right to acquire the 
same, not exceeding one hundred and sixty acres, by the usual methods 
and under the usual restrictions : Provided, That there shall be ex- 
cluded from the operation of the release of the obligations as a land 
grant road herein provided, lhat part of the railroad between Poplar 
Bluff, Missouri, and the Arkansas State line. 



LAWS RELATING TO THE TEXAS AND PACIFIC RAILWAY. 

ACT OF MARCH 3, 1871. 

AN ACT to incorporate the Texas Pacific Railroad Company, and to aid in the Con- 16 Stat., 573. 
struction of its Road, and for other purposes. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That John C. Fremont, James Texas Pacifio 
L. Alcorn, G. M. Dodge, O. C. French, John D. Caldwell, * * Railroad Com- 

and all such persons as shall or may be associated with them, and their ^°j v lucor P° r - 
successors, are hereby created a body politic and corporate iu fact and 
in law, by the name, style, and title of the Texas Pacific Railroad Com- Name, 
pany, and by that name shall have perpetual succession, and shall be 
able to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, defend and be defended, 
in all courts of law and equity within the United States, and may make 
and use a common seal; and the said corporation is hereby authorized 
and empowered to lay out, locate, construct, furnish, maintain, and en- 
joy a continuous railroad and telegraph line, with the appurtenances, 
from a point at or near Marshall, county of Harrison, State of Texas ; Empowered to 
thence by the most direct and eligible route, to be determined by said la y ou t> con- 
company, near the thirty-second parallel of north latitude, to a point Jcontinli^usrS 
at or near El Paso; thence by the most direct and eligible route, to be roa( i anc [ t ^j e l 
selected by said company, through New Mexico and Arizona, to a point graph line from 
on the Rio Colorado, at or near the southeastern boundary of the State Marshall, Tex., 
of California ; thence by the most direct and eligible route to San Diego Jjj^ ^d^paraflel 
California, to ship's channel, in the Bay of San Diego, in the State of f north latitude 
California, pursuing in the location thereof, as near as may be, the via El Paso! 
thirty-second parallel of north latitude, and is hereby vested with all through New 
the powers, privileges, and immunities necessary to carry into effect ^n^^sanl)!- 
the pur[po]ses of this act. eg0i Cal. 

Sec. 2. That the persons named in the first section of this act shall Board of com- 
constitute a board of commissioners (twenty of whom shall constitute missioners con- 
a quorum for the transaction of business), to be known as the Texas stltuteo -- 
Pacific Railroad commissioners, who shall meet in the city of New York To meet in the 
within ninety days after the passage of this act, at a time to be desig- ^ f y of Noyr 
nated in a notice to be signed by the person first named in the list of ° 
corporators and six of his associates, and to be published for two weeks 
in, at least, one daily newspaper in New York, New Orleans, and Wash- 
ington ; and, when so met, they may cause books to be opened for the Subs crintion 
subscription of the capital stock of said company, and when twenty books for capi- 
thousand shares, amounting to two millions of dollars, shall have been tal stock to bo 
subscribed, and ten per centum actually paid theron, in money, to the°P enetl - 
treasurer, to be elected by said commissioners, who shall give bond for 
its safe keeping and payment to the treasurer of the company when 
organized, then it shall be lawful for such subscribers or stockholders, Stockholders to 
or a majority thereof, to organize said company in accordance with the organize coin- 
provisions of this act, and to elect not less than seven nor more than lottos? ' than 
seventeen directors, a majority of whom shall be necessary to the trans- 8e ven nor more 
action of business, and who shall hold their offices for one year and than seventeen 
until their successors shall be elected and qualified ; and the said di- directors, 
rectors shall immediately proceed to elect a president, vice-president, OIie e ™ ° ° ce 
secretary, and treasurer; the president and vice-president shall be di- Directors to 
rectors. At all elections for directors, each share of stock shall be en- elect officers. 
titled to one vote, which may be given by the holder in person, or by « T I ena J ot !'' tu '° 
proxy, who shall also be a shareholder. The directors shall hold their o* electors three 
offices for any term not exceeding three years, as may be provided in Annual meet- 
the by-laws ; and the annual meeting of stockholders "shall take place ing of stock- 
as provided for in said by-laws. holders. 



260 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Capital stock, Sec. 3. That the capital stock of the Texas Pacific Railroad Company 
$50,000,000. shall he fixed by the board of directory, at a sum not exceeding fifty mill- 

Stock not to be i° ns of dollars, in shares of one hundred dollars ; and when the amount 
increased with- is so fixed it shall never be increased except by consent of Congress, 
out consent of Assessments upon said stork shall only be made by a majority vote of 
Congress. ^he w hole number of directors at a regular meeting, which said assess- 

ment shall be paid at the expiration of thirty days after a given notice 
in one newspaper in each of the cities of Washington, Philadelphia, 
New York, and New Orleans. 
Authority to Sec. 4. That the said Texas Pacific Railroad Company shall have 
ertv 'ot^and^to P ower and lawful authority to purchase the stock, land grants, fran- 
consolidate with chises. and appurtenances of, and consolidate on such terms as maybe 
any railroad com- agreed upon between the parties, with any railroad company oroompa- 
pany not hav- n j es heretofore chartered by Congressional, State, or Territorial author- 
th.fou^h°hne. S * tv > on t ^ H ' rou * e prescribed in the first sect ion of this act ; but no such 
consolidation shall be with any competing through line of railroads to 
the Pacific Ocean. 
Authorized to Skc. 5. That the said company shall have power and authority to 
raiXni'''t 1 s\vin ,na ^ e running arrangements with any railroad company or companies 
other companies, heretofore chartered, or that may hereafter be chartered by Congres- 
sional, State, or Territorial authority ; also to purchase lands, or to ac- 
cept donations, or grant of lauds, or other property, from States or indi- 
viduals, for the purpose of aiding in carrying out the object of this com- 
pany. 
Ttights, fran- Sec. 6. That the rights, lands, land grants, franchises, privileges, 
chises, &c, ;»f an) ] appurtenances, and property of every description, belonging to 
roads to vest in eac11 of the consolidated or purchased railroad company or companies, 
the Texas Pacif- as herein provided, shall vest in and become absolutely the property 
ic Railroad Com- f the Texas Pacific Railroad Company : Provided, That in all contracts 
Pa Obiieation8 of m e an< * erj tered into by said company with any and all other rail- 
the other com- road company or companies, to perfect such aforesaid consolidation or 
panies to be as- purchase, the indebtedness -or other legal obligations of said company 
sunied. r companies shall be assumed by the said Texas Pacific Railroad Com- 

impaired 6 ^ 8 P an y M ma y k© agreed upon, and no such consolidation or purchase 
shall impair any lien which may exist on any of the railroads so con- 
Not to assume solidated or purchased ; but said company shall not assume the debts 
debts to a greater or obligations of any company with which it may consolidate or pur- 
caTh U value(?f as- cnase as aforesaid, to an amount greater than the cash value of the 
sets received. assets received from the same. 

Sec. 7. That the said Texas Pacific Railroad Company shall have 
Authority to power to make and enforce rules and by-laws for the election of itsoffi- 
ru^es^and 1 °by^ cers an( ^ ^ ie government and management of the business of the corn- 
laws. P an Y> and to do and perform all needful and proper things to be done 
and performed to promote the objects of the company hereby incorpo- 
rated, not inconsistent with the laws of the United States and the pro- 
visions of this charter. 
Grant of right Sec. 8. That the right of way through the public lands be, and the 
°^AuJtn " l t 8ame * 8 hereby, granted to the said company for the construction of the 
take materials sa ^ railroad and telegraph line, and the right, power, and authority is 
from adjacent hereby given to said company to take, from the public hinds adjacent 
lands. to the line of said road, earth, stone, timber, and other materials for 
200 feet in* width t ^ ie constrnct i° n thereof. Said right of way is granted to said company 
on each side of to the extent of two hundred feet in width on each side of said railroad 
said railroad. where it may passover the public lands; and there is also hereby granted 
Grant of to said company grounds for stations, buildings, work-shops, wharves, 
twmj&c notex- 8Wlt; che8, side-tracks, turn-tables, water-stations, and such other struct- 
ceeding 40 acres nres as may be necessary for said railroad, not exceeding forty acres 
In any one point, of land at any one point. 
Grant of land. Sec. 9. That for the purpose of aiding in the construction of the 
40 section^ per railroad and telegraph line herein provided for, there is hereby granted 
terfes 1 th€> TeiT1 to the said Texas Pacific Railroad Company, its successors and assigns, 
20 sections per every alternate section of public lands, not mineral, designated by odd 
mile in Caliior- numbers, to the amount of twenty alternate sections per mile on each 
Di Tf f ti 8 ^ e °* 8a *^ ra il roacl1 line, as such line may be adopted b\ said compauy, 
land^liave been through the Territories of the United States, and ten alternate sections 
disposed of other of land per mile on each side of* said railroad in California, where the 
lands may be se- same shall not have not have been sold, reserved, or otherwise disposed 
lcttd - of by the United States, and to which a pre-emption or homestead claim 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 261 

may not have attached at the time the line of said road is definitely Limits, 10 miles 
fixed. In case any of said lands shall have been sold, reserved, occu- J| Jheianderan? 
pied, or pre-empted, or otherwise disposed of, other lands shall be Provision as to 
selected in lieu thereof by said company, under the direction of the lands not ob- 
Becretary of the Interior, in alternate sections, and designated by oddtainedby reason 
numbers, not more than ten miles beyond the limits of said alternate ^oach oftbe rail- 
sections first above named, and not including the reserved numbers. If, road totheMexi- 
in the too near approach of the said railroad line to the boundary of can boundary. 
Mexico, the number of sections of land to which the company is enti- "Mineral" not 
tied cannot be selected immediately on the line of said railroad, or in to mclude iron or 
lieu of mineral lands excluded from this grant, a like quantity of unoc- Lands granted 
cupied and unappropriated agricultural lands, in odd-numbered sec- in California not 
tions nearest the line of said railroad may be selected as above provided ; tnrtlier than 20 
and the word "mineral," where it occurs in this act, shall not be held "iiitoad "except 
to include iron or coal: Provided, however, That no public lands are &C 
hereby granted within the State of California further than twenty miles 
on each side of said road, except to make up deficiencies as aforesaid, 
and then not to exceed twenty miles from the lands originally granted. <« Ship's chan- 
The term " ship's channel," as used in this bill, shall not be construed nor"' not to be 
as conveying any greater right to said company to the water front of construed as con- 
San Diego Bay than it may acquire by gift, grant, purchase, or other- veying special 
wise, except the right of way, as herein granted : And provided further, fi-out i^San^Db 
That all such lands, so granted by this section to said company, which ego Bay. 
shall not be sold or otherwise disposed of, as provided in this act within Lands granted 
three years after the completion of the entire road, shall be subject to jJPAj 10 ? soU ,. or 
settlement and pre-emption like other lands, at a price to be fixed by p OS ed"onn three 
and paid to said company, not exceeding an average of two dollars and years to be sub- 
fifty cents per acre for all the lands herein granted. ject to settle- 

Sec. 10. That when the route of said railroad audtelegraph line shall ment ' &c « 
pass rhrough the lands of private persons, or where it maybe necessary j. h Kig ^ i° f rf Wa "f 
for said railroad comp'any to take any lands belonging to private per- pr [vat^ persons 
sons for any of the purposes herein mentioned necessary to said road, to be secured in 
such right of way through or title to such lands shall be secured in accordance with 
accordance with the laws of the State or Territory in which they may law# 
be situated. 

Sec. 11. That the Texas Pacific Railroad Company shall have power Corporation an 
and authority to issue two kinds of bonds, secured by mortgage, namely : * ^ "g t r u c tfon 
First, construction bonds; second, land bonds. Construction bonds bonds and land 
shall be secured by mortgage, first, on all or any portion of the fran- bonds, secured by 
chises, road-bed, or track of said railroad, and all the appurtenances mortgage, 
thereto belonging, when constructed or in the course of construction, Mortgage of 
from a point at or near Marshall, to ship's channel, in the Bay of San road and fran- 
Diego, in the State of California, as aforesaid. Land bonds shall be chises to secure 
secured by mortgage, first, on all or any portion of the lands hereby ,' cons truction 
granted in aid of the construction of said railroad as is provided for in °" 1 8- 
this act; second, on lands acquired by any arrangement or purchase or ^nts * ^and °ac- 
terms of consolidation with any railroad company or companies to whom quired lands to 
grants of land may have been made, or may hereafter be made, by any secure " land 
Congressional, State, or Territorial authority, or who may have pur- bonds." 
chased the same previous to any such arrangement or consolidation : 
Provided, That all the mortgages made and executed by said railroad All mortises 
company shall be filed and recorded in the Department of the Interior, to be filed and re- 
which shall be a sufficient evidence of their legal execution, and shall SJKnJ of° {he" 
confer all the rights and property of said company as therein expressed : interior. 
And provided also, That the proceeds of the sales of the aforesaid con- Proceeds of 
struction and laud bonds shall be applied only in the construction, 8ales °t uonda to 
operation, and equipment of the contemplated railroad line: And pro- £ construction^ 
vided further, That said mortgage shall in no wise impair or affect any operation, and 
lien existing on the property of said company or companies at or before equipment of 
the time of such consolidation. railroad. 

Sec. 12. That whenever the said company shall complete the first and . 2 n n e seo- 
eaeh succeeding section of twenty consecutive miles of said railroad tions of road are 
and put it in running order as a first-class road in all its appointments, completed, pat- 
it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Interior to cause patents to ents for cotermi- 
be issued conveying to said company the number of sections of land "issued 18 
opposite to and coterminous with said completed road to which it shall 
be entitled for each section so completed. Said company, within two n. enera i ront 
years after the passage of this act, shall designate the general route of t be designated 
its said road, as near as may be. and shall file a map of the same in the within two yearay 
Department of the Interior ; and when the map is so tiled, the Secretary aIld ma P fil ed. 



262 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Lands to be of the Interior, immediately thereafter, shall cause the lands within 
withdrawn from f or £y miles on each side of said designated route within the Territories, 
^Provisions of ano ^ twenty miles within the State of California, to be withdrawn from 
pre-emption and pre-emption, private entry, and sale : Provided, however, That the pro- 
homestead acts visions of the act of September, eighteen hundred and forty-one, grant- 
extended toother ^ n g pre-emption rights, and the acts amendatory thereof, and of the act 
entitled, "An act to secure homesteads to actual settlers on the public 
domain," approved May twenty, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, and 
the amendments thereto, shall be, and the same are hereby, extended 
to all other lands of the United States on the line of said road when 
surveyed, except those hereby granted to said company. 
wn^and whSe Sec - 13 - That the president of the company shall annually, by the 
to he made, and first day of July, make a report and file it with the Secretary of the 
to state what. Interior, which report shall be under oath, exhibiting the financial 
situation of the company, the amount of money received and expended, 
and the number of miles of road constructed each year ; and further, 
the names and residences of the stockholders, of the directors, and of 
all other officers of the compauy, the amount of stock subscribed, and 
the amount thereof actually paid in, a description of the lines of road 
surveyed and fixed upon for construction, the amount received from 
passengers and for freight, respectively, on the road, a statement of the 
expenses of said road and its fixtures, and a true statement of the in- 
debtedness of said company and the various kinds thereof. 
Certificates of g EC# i4 # That the certificates of the capital stock must be signed by 
tougned by the * ne president and secretary, and attested by the seal of the company, 
pre si dent and and shall contain an extract from the proceedings of the board of di- 
secrctary. rectors fixing the amount thereof, as well as from this act, authorizing 

r,()n ds a n d such issue. All the bonds and mortgages issued by said company must 
m Bondf e and in- De signed by the president and secretary, and attested by the seal of 
terest payable in said company, and shall contain an extract from the law authorizing 
gold. them to be issued. The face value of said bonds' shall be one thousand 

Limitation as ( ] n ars j n gold, and shall be redeemable at such times, and to bear such 
bomts^Vooo pe° rate of interest, payable semi-annually in gold, as may be determined 
mile. " by the directors. The total value of the construction bonds to be issued 

Land bonds not shall not exceed thirty thousand dollars per mile of said railroad, and 
ner^cre forafi tne tofcal ^ ace value of the land bonds shall not exceed two dollars and 
kinds mortgaged. ni V cents per acre for all lands mortgaged ; the total amount of each 
to be determined by the board of directors. 
Other railroad s E c. 15. That all railroads constructed, or that may be hereafter con- 
m No C discr?mina- str ucted, to intersect said Texas Pacific Railroad, shall have a right to 
tion against any connect with that line ; that no discrimination as regards charges for 
conuectingroads. freight or passengers, or in any other matter, shall be made by said 
Texas Pacific Railroad Company against any of the said connecting 
roads ; but that the same charges per mile as to passengers, and per 
ton per mile as to freight, passing from the said Texas Pacific Railroad 
over any of said connecting roads, or passing from any of said connect- 
ing roads over any part of said Texas Pacific Railroad, shall be made 
by said company as they make for freight and passengers over their own 
road ; Provided also, That said connecting roads shall reciprocate said 
•p f rightof connection andequality of charges with said Texas Pacific Rail- 

e^c. a < (Uh^prices load J And provided further, That the rates charged for carrying pas- 
fixed by Congress sengers and freight, per mile, shall not exceed the prices which maybe 
on tin- 'Union and fixed by Congress for carrying passengers and freight on the Union 
Central 1'acific. p ac if ic an d Central Pacific Railroads. 

Iron or steel Sec. 16. That said road shall be constructed of iron or steel rails 

rails from Amer- manufactured from American ore, except such as may have heretofore 

icon ore. ■ \y een contracted for by any railroad company which may be purchased 

or consolidated with by the company hereby incorporated, as provided 

by this act. 

Corporation to *Sec. 17. That the said Texas Pacific Railroad Company shall com- 

stractionVroad raence tno construction of its road simultaneously at San Diego, in the 

simultaneously State of California, and from a point at or near Marshall, Texas, as 

at San Diego and hereinbefore described, and so prosecute the same as to have at least 

Marshall. fifty consecutive miles of railroad from each of said points complete 

be built 1 withm au( * * n running order within two years after the passage of this act; 

two years and to so continue to construct each year thereafter a sufficient number 

To incompleted of miles to secure the completion of the whole line from the aforesaid 

in ten years. point on the eastern boundary of the State of Texas to the Bay of San 

Confess may Diego, in the State of California, as aforesaid, within ten years after 

adopt measure's the passage of this act ; and upon failure to so complete it, Congress 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 263 

may adopt such measures as it may doom necessary and proper to se- necessary to se- 
cure its speedy completion. Son y C ° m * 

Sec. 18. That the President of the United States, upon the comple- p President to 
tionof the first section of twenty mi Irs, shall appoint one commissioner, appoint one com- 
whose duty it shall be to examine the various sections of twenty miles missioner to ex- 
as they shall be completed, and report thereon to him in writing; and 55renty mifes 8 aa 
if, from such report, he be satisfied that said company has fully com- completed, 
pleted each section of its road, as in this act provided, he shall direct the 
Secretary of the Interior to issue patents to said company for the lauds 
it is entitled to under this act, as fast as each section of said road is 
completed. 

Sec 19. That the Texas Pacific Railroad Company shall be, and it is Railroad de- 
hereby, declared to be a military and post-road ; and for the purpose of claredtobeamili- 
insuring the carrying of the mails, troops, munitions of war, supplies, tary post-road, 
and stores of the United States, no act of the company nor any law of 
any State or Territory shall impede, delay, or prevent the said company 
from performing its obligations to the United States in that regard: f or 'the^tTnited 
Provided, That said road shall be subject to the use of the United States states not to be 
for postal, military, and all other Governmental services, at fair and impeded, 
reasonable rates of compensation, not to exceed the price paid by pri- ra ."J ^e^oi 
vate parties for the same kind of service, and the Government shall at compensation, 
all times have the preference in the use of the same for the purpose afore- 
said. 

Sec. 20. That it shall not be lawful for any of the directors, either ^o directors to 
in their individual capacity or as members of an incorporated or joint contract for con- 
stock company, to make any contracts or agreements with the said structing, &c -i 
Texas Pacific Railroad Company for the construction, equipment, o r road. Par 
running of its road, or to have any interest therein ; and all such con- 
tracts or agreements are hereby declared null and void ; and all money 
or property received under such contracts or agreements may be recov- 
ered back for the benefit of the company by any stockholder. 

Sec. 21. That any railroad company whose route lies across the route Railroad com . 
of the Texas Pacific Railroad may cross the same, and for the purpose panies may cross 
of crossing shall have the right to acquire at the double minimum price this road. 
all lands, whether of the United States or granted by this act, which Mayhavelands, 
shall be needed for a right of way two hundred feet wide through said and^or depots at 
lands, and for depots, stations, side-tracks, and other needful purposes, a certain price, 
not exceeding for such purposes forty acres at any one station. 

Sec. 22. That the New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Vicksburg Rail- ^©^ Orleans, 
road Company, chartered by the State of Louisiana, shall have the vicksbu™ g Rail- 
right to connect by the most eligible route to be selected by said com- roa a Company 
pany with the said Texas Pacific Railroad at its eastern terminus, and may connect with 
shall have the right of way through the public land to the same extent th ™ road, 
granted hereby to the said Texas Pacific Railroad Company; and in ot ^av! 
aid of its construction from New Orleans to Baton Rouge, thence by the Grant of lands, 
way of Alexandria, in said State, to connect with the said Texas Pacific to aid in its con- 
Railroad Company at its eastern terminus, there is hereby granted to str A lcfcion .- 
said company, its successors and assigns, the same number of alternate mUelntluT State 
sections of public lands per mile, in the State of Louisiana, as are by of Louisiana, 
this act granted in the State of California, to said Texas Pacific Rail- Lands to be 
road Company; and said lands shall be withdrawn from the market, withdrawn from 
selected, and patents issued therefor, and opened for settlement and pre- market ' etc * 
eruption, upon the same terms and in the same manner, and time as is Roadstobecom- 
provided for and required from said Texas Pacilic Railroad Company, pleted within five 
within said State of California : Provided, That said company shall com- years, 
plete the whole of said road within five years from the passage of this 
act. 

Sec. 23. That, for the purpose of connecting the Texas Pacific Rail- - Southern Paci- 
road with the city of San Francisco, the Southern Pacific Railroad j^ [nay c ° "' 
Company of California is hereby authorized (subject to the laws of Cal- struct a road to 
ifornia) to construct aline of railroad from a point at or near Tehachapa connect the Tex- 
Pass by way of Los Angeles, to the Texas Paeilie Railroad at or near JJad^'^witi^ K San 
the Colorado River, with the same rights, grants, and privileges, and Francisco, 
subject to the same limitations, restrictions, and conditions as were Proviso that 
granted to said Southern Pacific Railroad Company of California, bv right of Atlantic 
the Act of July twenty-seven, eighteen hundred and sixty-six: Provided, ^id ei shaUbe 
however, That this section shall in no way affect or impair the rights, j n no way im- 
present or prospective, of the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company, paired. 
or any other railroad company. 



264 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



ACT OF MAT 2. 1872. 



17 Stat., 59. AK ACT supplementary to an art entitled "An act tc incorporate the Texas Pacifio 
1871, ch. 122, Railroad Company, and to aid in the Construction of its Road, and for other pur- 
vol. xvi. p. 573. poses," approved March third, eighteen hundred and seventy-one. 

Name changed Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
f V™" "T. e * a8 p P: *; States of America in Congress assembled, That the name, style, and title 
to-Texasandi'a- of the Texas Pacific Railroad Company shall hereafter be'" The Texas 
eificRail'y Co." and Pacific Railway Company ; " and the said The Texas and Pacific 

The right s Railway Company shall have, possess, and enjoy all the rights, privi- 
pnvihges, and] e „ es alH i franchises heretofore conferred upon the said Texas Pacific 

lianeluses con-,-,^, ' , ., L 

ferre( j Railroad Company. 

May issue con- Sec. 2. That the said The Texas and Pacific Railway Company shall 
st ruction and have power and authority to issue the construction and land bonds 

land bonds. authorized by the eleventh section of said act of incorporation, for such 

Construction * ,. » , , , „ ", - .\ , - 

bonds not to ex- amounts, not exceeding torty thousand dollars per mile or said road, of 
ceed $40,000 per construction bonds, as said company may deem needful to provide for 
mile. (See sec. 14 the construction and equipment of its line, and to include in the mort- 
° f <?ranted lands £ a S e or mortgages to secure said construction bonds all or any portion 
may be included of the lands granted in aid of the construction of said railroad; and in 
in the mortgage the mortgage or mortgages to secure said land bonds, any portion of said 
to secure Baidcon- lands not so used to secure the constiuction bonds aforesaid ; and all or 
81 ilami' bonds ■*»">' portion of the lands acquired by the terms of consolidation law- 
bow secured, 'fully authorized by the fourth section of said act of March third, 
eighteen hundred and seventy-one, with any railroad company or com- 
panies to whom grants of laud may have been made, or may hereafter 
bo made, by any Congressional, State, or Territorial authority, or who 
may have purchased the same previous to any such arrangement or 
consolidation, and within the lime limited for the completion of the 
road, and all such lands of every description shall be subject to all lim- 
itations and conditions now by law existing in relation thereto, and as 
No land grant modified by this acl ; and this act shall not be construed to revive, en- 
revived, enlarg- large, extend, or create any land grant whatever, beyond that hereto- 
CTeated^bv tbis^ ore ■ i A T;,Ilt, ' ( l byCohgress, and which shall duly inure to said company 
act# upon compliance with the terms of this act in relation to the times 

fixed lor completion of said railway, and all such mortgages shall be 
subject to all tlm conditions and limitations by law existing under this 
act and the nets to which it is supplementary in respect to such lands, 
and shall not be held to vest any title in the mortgage or create any lien 
on such lands, other than such company is or may become lawfully en- 
bondls^uW^o^x- titled to vest or create thereunder; but the amount of said land bonds 
ceed,' «fec. shall not exceed two and a half dollars per acre for all lands covered 

by the mortgage or mortgages securing the same. 
Mortgages to Sec. 3. That all the mortgages made and executed by said railroad 
^•ofd'"' thMTJ 6 " com P an y shall heliled and recorded in the Department of the Interior, 
partment of the Wll ' c ^ shall be a sufficient evidence of their legal execution : Provided, 
Interior. That the aforesaid bonds and the authorized capital stock, or the pro- 

Pro c e e ds of ceeds thereof, shall be applied only for the purpose of securing the con- 
bonds and stock, 8 truction, operation, and equipment of the contemplated railroad Hue, 
now only to be , , %', . ,, ' ' , ,. . ' , . , j.' 

applied. under lawful contracts with such parties, and on such terms and condi- 

tions as said company may deemed needful, and for the further purpose 
of purchase, consolidation, completion, equipment, and operating of 
the other roads, as contemplated by said act and specified therein, 
s * an ^ arf l of being a part of the aforesaid railroad line, and for the expenses neces- 
ment to became 8ar y an( ^ incident to the works authorized thereby : Provided, however, 
as required of That said road and its equipment shall be of the standard heretofore 
the existing Pa- required by the United States Government for the existing Pacific 
"prior Hens not Railwa . v lines; And provided further, That said mortgage or mortgages 
affected. shall in no wise impair or affect any lien existing on the property of 

said company or companies at or before the rime of such consolidation. 
The iron or Sec. 4. That said road shall be constructed of iron or steel rails 
mad? from manufactured from American ore, except such as may have been con- 
American ore tracted for before consolidation by any railroad company which may 
except, &c. ' be purchased by or consolidated with this company. 

Construction of Sec. 5. That the said Texas and Pacific Railway Company shall 
menced b where commence the construction of its road at or near Marshall, Texas, and 
and to be contin'- proceed with its construction, under the original act and this supple- 
tied in what di- ment, or in pursuance of the authority derived from any consolidation 
rection. as aforesaid, westerly from a point near Marshall, and towards San 

Diego, in the State of California, on the line authorized by the orig- 



RAILROAD ACCOUNTS. 265 

inal act, and so prosecute the same as to have at least one hundred 100 consecutive 
consecutive miles of railroad from said point complete and in running. miles to be in 
order within two years after the passage of this act; and so continue lun . n . in ^ order 
to construct, each year thereafter, a sufficient; number of miles, not less ^loo^niTeVeach 
than one hundred, to secure the completion*of the whole lino from the year thereafter, 
aforesaid point on the eastern boundary of the State of Texas to the 
hay of San Diego, in the State of California, as aforesaid, within ten „,. . 

years after the passage of this act; and said road from Marshall, p] e tkm 10 ye'ars 
Texas, throughout the length thereof, shall be of uniform gauge: Pro- from May 2, 1872. 
vided, ItoictTer, That the said company shall commence the construe- Uniform gauge. 
tion of said road from San Diego eastward within one year from the^P ^ ! n i in S ! d n 
passage of this act, and construct not less than ten miles before the when and^wto 
expiration of the second year, aud, after the second year, not less than be built, 
twenty-five miles per annum in continuous line thereafter between 
San Diego and the Colorado River, until the junction is formed with 
the line from the east at the latter poiut or east thereof; and upon Tjpon failnre 
failure to so complete it, Congress may adopt such measures as it may Congress may 
deem necessary and proper to secure its speedy completion; and it adopt measures 
shall also be lawful for said company to commence and prosecute the c^s^eedvc S °- 
constrnction of its line from any other point or points on its line ; but pinion. 664 3 ° m * 
nothing in this act, contained shall be so construed as to authorize the 
grant of any additional lands or subsidy, of any nature or kind what- 
soever, on the part of the Government of the United States : Provided, 
That said Texas and Pacific Railway Company shall be, and it is here- 
by, authorized aud required to construct, maintain, control, and oper- 
ate a road between Marshall, Texas, and Shreveport, Louisiana, or 
control and operate any existing road between said points, of the same Mars hall and 
gauge as the said Texas and Pacific Railroad ; and that all roads ter- shreveport to be 
urinating at Shreveport shall have the right to make the same running controlled and 
connections, and shall be entitled to the same privileges, for the trans- operated by Tex- 
action of business in connection with the said Texas and Pacific Rail- as acific. 

way, as are granted to roads intersecting therewith: Provided further, 
That nothing herein shall be construed as changing the terminus of 
said Texas and Pacific Railway from Marshall as provided in the orig- 
inal act. 

Sec. 6. That all acts or parts of acts inconsistent with this supple- R p ea ii nK 
ment be, and the same are hereby, repealed. clause. 



ACT OP MARCH 3, 1873. 

AX ACT supplemental to an Act entitled 'An Act to incorporate the Texas Pacific 17 Stat., 598. 
Railroad Company, and to aid in the Construction of its Road, and for other Pur- 1871, ch. 122, 
poses," approved March third, eighteen hundred and seventy-one. vol. XVI, p. 573. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United Fac © value of 
States of A merica in Congress assembled, That the face value of all bonds P ond ^ h ^Tex^T 
hereafter issued by the Texas and Pacific Railroad [Railway] Company, arTd Pacific Rail- 
under the provisions of an act approved March third, eighteen hundred way Company 
and seventv-one, shall, at the option of the company, be either in gold, mav be in gold 
or other lawful money of the United States, bearing interest, at like op- JJf on ° ther 
tion of the company, either in gold or other lawful money of the United m ° ney ' ^ 

States ; and any mortgage heretofore executed by said company, secur- ga^eT" legalized 
ing bonds payable in any lawful money of the United States other than if other require- 
gold, and the bonds recited thcrei n, and to secure which, said mortgage ments of law 
was given, are hereby legalized, and said mortgage and bonds shall h ft v ^ b V^" com * 
have the same effect as though they had been authorized by the act to p 10( W1 ' 
which this is a supplement. Provided, That in all respects the require- 
ments of that law in regard to such mortgage and bonds have been 
fully complied with. 



ACT OF JUNE 22, 1874. 

A £4, CT supplementary to an act entitled "An act to incorporate the Texas Pacific 13 Stat., 197. 
Railroad Company, and to aid in the construction of its road, and for other pur- ]871,ch.l22,vol. 
Poses." XVI, pp. 573, 579. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United „ , v 

States of America in Congress assembled, That the Texas and Pacific Rail- C ific B a Tl way 
way Company is hereby empowered to secure, by one or more rnortga- Company author 



266 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

ized to secure ges upon the whole or any portion of its line, the construction-bonds 
construction heretofore authorized to be issued, and to cancel the mortgage now on 
mort^os n6W recor( l with the Secretary of the Interior so far as the same can be done 

Tocancelmort- without prejudice to existing rights, and to substitute therefor the 
gage on record mortgage or mortgages hereby authorized, which substituted mortga- 
W f+? T S !: cr ? taiy ges shall expressly reserve all rights which may have been acquired 
° To 6 substitute under the existing mortgage : Provided, That the aggregate of the said 
mortgages au- bonds to be issued under and secured by said mortgage or mortgages 
tborized by tbis shall not exceed the limits heretofore fixed by Congress ; and said 
aC L* "t b to- mort g a g es ^ or tue division east of Fort Worth shall embrace the roads 
fore iixe<l not to ari( i property of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company and of the 
be exceeded. Southern Trans-continental Railway Company, heretofore merged in 
What new mort- all( i consolidated with the said Texas and Pacific Railway Company, 
? agea sh:l11 em " under the authority and requirements of the laws of the State of Texas ; 

Consolidate d aud which roads so merged as aforesaid shall for that and all other 
roads, how to be purposes be deemed and taken to be a part of the said Texas and Pacific 
deemed. Railway, and shall hereafter be subject to all the provisions and limi- 

tations of the act of Congress incorporating said company and of the 
supplements thereto: And provided further, That nothing in this act 

__ . shall be construed or have the effect to entitle said corporation to any 

further° rf"-bta °t uer or further rights to public lands, or in any other respect as against 
granted. the United States, than such as by law it is now entitled to. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF VISITORS OF THE GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL 
FOR THE INSANE. 



OFFICERS OF THE HOSPITAL, JUNE 30, 1890. 
VISITORS : 



JOSEPH M. TONER, M. D., 

President of the Board. 
JAMES C. WELLING, LL. D. 
Mrs. A. M. GANGEWER. 
Mrs. AMELIA J. ROWLAND. 
Hon. WILLIAM A. MAURY. 



JOHN MOORE, M. D.. 

Surgeon- General, U. S. A. 
F. M. GUNNELL, M. D., U. S. N. 
Rev. BYRON SUNDERLAND, D. D. 
JOHN B. HAMILTON, M. D., 

Surgeon-General, M. H. S. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD: 



CHAPLAINS : 



Rev. JOHN CHESTER, D. D. 
Rev. A. FLORIDUS STEELE. 
Rev. WILLIAM E. PARSON, D. D. 



Rev. THOMAS B. HUGHES. 

Rev. E. HERBERT RICHARDSON. 



MEDICAL OFFICERS: 

W. W. GODDING, M. D., Superintendent and ex-officio Secretary of the Board of Visitors. 

A. II. WITMER, M. D., First Assistant Physician, in charge of Female Department. 

M. J. STACK, M. D., Seeond Assistant Physician, in charge of' Male Department. 

A. C. PATTERSON, M. D., Third Assistant Physician and Chief Cleric. 

J. C. SIMPSON, M. D., Fourth Assistant Physician. 

SAMUEL R. MEANS, M. D., Fifth Assistant Physician. 

I. \V. BLACKBURN, M. D., Special Pathologist. 

C. H. LATIMER, M. D., Niqht Medical Inspector. 

J. V. CALVER, D. D. S., Dentist. 

207 



RE PORT 



THE BOARD OF VISITORS. 



Government Hospital for the Insane, 

Washington, D. C, August 29, 1890. 
Sir : The Board of Visitors, in accordance with the requirements <>f 
the statutes, have the honor to submit their thirty-fifth annual report, 
that for the fiscal year 1890. 

The tables given below present a condensed statement of the changes 
in population during the year, and the results. 

SUMMARY. 





Males. 


Females. 


Total. 




1, 075 
274 


322 
71 


1,397 




345 








1,349 


393 


1,742 






DISCHARGED. 


39 

4:; 


6 
6 
3 

28 


45 




49 




3 


Died 


112 


140 








194 


43 


237 








1,155 


350 


1,505 







Admissions and discharges. 



Males. 



Females. 



Totals. 



REMAINING JUNE 30, 1889. 

^y !S::;„: 

*»* {»: 

Marine Hospital Service 5 Co^rt " 

Civil Ufa $ White . 

UviUlte } Colored. 



638 
10 



249 

100 



C48 
62 
16 

349 



1,075 



227 
02 



322 



651 

62 

16 

668 

269 



1,397 



270 REPORT OF TEE SECRETARY OF T&E INTERIOR. 

Admissions and discharges — Continued. 



ADMITTED DURING THE YEAK 1889-'90. 



Ariny 

Navy. 



(White ... 
I Colored . . 



S White ... 
> Colored . . 



Marino Hospital Service j Colored" 

Civil life 



C White ... 

) Colored . . 



UN DICK TREATMENT DUBING THE YEAK. 



Army. 
Navy . 



C White... 
I Colored.. 

S White... 
I Colored.. 



Marine-hos pi tal service < Colored 

,,. .. ... C White - .. 

Clvllllie ] Colored.. 



DISCHARGED DURING THE YEAR— RECOVERED 

Army 

Navy 

Marine-hospital service 

Civil life , 



( White-. 

I Colored. 

«; White.. 

\ Colored. 

C White.. 

I Colored. 



$ White.. 
> Colored. 



DISCHARGED DURING THE YEAR— IMPROVED 

Army 

Navy 



< White . . 
i Colored. 



C Wliite . . 
) Colored . 



Marine-hospital service j Colored 

«*■» {IESSl 



Males. 



155 
2 



793 
12 



294 
138 



'20 



DISCHARGED DURING THE YEAK— UNIMPROVED 

Army , 



(White . 
\ Colored. 



Navy 

Marine-hospital service. 
Civil life 



White . . 
Colored. 



White . . 
Colored. 



$ White . . 
I Colored. 



157 

28 

6 

83 



805 
90 



432 



20 



274 



1,349 



38 



Femalos. 



273 
117 



71 



43 



390 



393 



Total. 



157 

28 

6 

154 



343 



90 

22 

822 

20 
8 
2 

1. 

29 



1,742 



45 



49 



GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 

Admissions and discharges — Continued. 



271 



DECEASED DURING THE YEAR. 



Army 

Navy 

Marine Hospital Service 

Civil life 



C White.. 

I Colored. 

S White 
\ Colored. 

S White . . 
) Colored . . 



White . . 
Colored.. 



REMAINING JUNE 30,1890. 

. < White . . . 

Arill -> r ' J Colored.. 

-r (White... 

Nav y - I Colored.. 

Marine Hospital Service J Colored '. '. 

r,. ., ,.,. S White ... 

Clvl!lli0 {Colored.. 



Males. 



679 

10 



266 

113 



18 
379 



1, 155 



Fomalos. 



240 
107 



347 



28 



350 



Total. 



692 

69 

18 
726 



140 



1,505 



The patients from civil life remaining June 30, 1890, are classified as 
follows : 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 




44 

274 

57 

4 

379 


22 

318 

4 

3 


66 




592 




61 




7 






Total 


347 


726 







Monthly changes of population. 





Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Date. 


3 


o5 

2 
o 


o 
H 


03 

o 


m 
s> 

9 

© 


7s 
"3 
H 


Died. 


of 00 

©.a 




03 

8 


1 
R 


13 
o 
H 


Is 

H.2 


Julv, 1889 


16 
20 
29 
12 
53 
13 
It 
16 
16 
30 
48 
10 


6 
5 
6 

9 
6 
4 

8 
5 

fi 
6 
3 


22 
25 
35 
21 
59 
17 
19 
21 
23 
36 
54 
13 


1 

15 

4 

6 

..... 

3 


18 

6 
16 


6 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
..... 


7 

16 

5 

7 

2 

4 

3 

6 

6 

19 

6 

16 


9 

3 
8 
12 

6 
7 
15 

17 
12 

7 
12 

4 


1 

4 
3 

2 
2 
1 
2 
4 
3 
3 
1 


10 

7 

11 

14 

8 

9 

16 

19 

16 

10 

15 

5 


17 
23 


August, 1889 , 


September, 1889 


16 
21 
10 


October, 1889 


November, 188G 


December, 1889 


13 
19 
25 
22 
29 
21 
21 


January, 1890 

February, 1890 


March, 1890 


April, 1890 


May, 1890 


June, 1890 




Total 


274 


71 


345 


82 


15 


97 


112 


28 


140 


237 





272 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Cause of death. 



Aneurism, rupture of aortic 1 

Apoplexy, hemorrhagic 3 

Bright's disease, acute, with anasarca 1 

Bright's disease, chronic 1 

Bright's disease, chronic, with* car- 
diac valvular disease 2 

Bright's disease, chronic, with diar- 
rhoea 1 

Bright's disease, chrouic, with hemor- 
rhagic apoplexy 1 

Bright's disease, chronic, av i 1 1 i ursB- 

mic convulsions 2 

Carcinoma 2 

Cardial- valvular disease 4 

Cardiac valvular disease with pleu- 
risy 

Chorea and exhaustion irom diar- 
rhoea 1 

Colitis with dysenteric diarrhoea 1 

Cystitis with peritonitis 1 

Diarrhoea 1 

Diarrhoea, dysenteric 1 

Dysentery 5 

Epileptic convulsions 6 

Epileptiform convulsions 4 

Erysipelas 1 

Erysipelas with pneumonia 1 

Exhaustion from abscess 1 

Exhaustion from acute mania 1 

Exhaustion and diarrhoea 3 

Exhaust ion and inanition 5 

General paralysis, with apoplexy, 

hemorrhagic 1 

General paralysis, with apoplexy, se- 
rous 1 

General paralysis with bulbar paral- 
ysis 3 

General paralysis with cholesteramiia 1 

General paralysis with diarrhoea 2 

General paralysis with epileptiform 

convulsions 4 

General paralysis with exhaustion.. - 1 

General paralysis with lwart clot 1 

General paralysis with (edema of brain 1 

General paralysis with pneumonia.. . 4 

Heart, fatty degeneration of 1 

Ischio-rectal abscess and exhaust ion . 1 



Meningoencephalitis and pulmon- 
ary gangrene 

(Edema of brain 

Organic disease of brain 

Organic disease of brain with apo- 
plexy 

Organic disease of brain with bron- 
chitis 

Organic disease of brain with bulbar 
paralysis 

Organic disease of brain with inter-. 
stit ial nephritis 

Organic disease of brain with convul- 
sions 

Organic disease of brain with convul- 
sions and apoplexy 

Organic, disease of brain with (edema 

Organic disease of brain with pneu- 
monia 

Pachymeningitis hemorrhagica 

Pericarditis 

Peritonitis from perforation of gall- 
bladder 

Pernicious an a- mi a 

Phthisis 

Phthisiswith carcinoma of liver and 
intestines 

Pulmonary congestion 

Pulmonary congestion with hemor- 
rhage 

Senectus 

Senectns with apoplexy 

Senectus with cardiac valvular dis- 
ease 

Senectus with diarrhoea 

Senectus will) exhaustion 

Senectus with interstitial nephritis. 

Senecl us with oedema of brain 

Senectus with organic disease of brain 

Senectus with pulmonary congestion 

Septicemia from trophic degenera- 
tion of wrist- joint 

Suicide (hanging) 

Typhoid fever 

Total 140 



Duration of the mental disease on admission of those who recovered. 



Under 10 days 

Between 10 and 20 days . . 
Between 20 and 30 days . . 
Between 1 and 2 months . 
Between 2 and :> months . 
Between 3 and 4 months 
Between 4 and ."> mouths. 
Between 6 and 8 months , 



Pet ween 8 and 10 months. 
Between 1 and 2 years . 



1 

4 

Between 3 and 4 years 2 



Between 4 and o years .. 
Between 12 and 13 years 
Not insane 



Total 45 



Duration of mental disease of those who died. 



One month 3 

Three mouths 2 

Four months 1 

Six months 2 

Nine months 1 

One year 18 

Twoyears « 26 



Three years 17 

Four years 9 

Five years 6 

Six years 5 

Seven years 4 

Eight years 3 

Nine years 5 



GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 



273 



Duration of mental disease of those who died — Continued. 



Ten years I 

Eleven years I 

Twelve years 1 



Thirteen years... 
Fourteen years . 
Fifteen years... 
Sixteen years. .. 
Seventeen years 
Eighteen years . 

Twenty-one years . . 1 

Twenty-two years 2 



Twenty-three years 1 

Twenty-four years 2 

T wen fcy-six years 2 

Twenty-seven years 1 

Thirty-two years 1 

Thirty-three years 1 

Thirty-eight years 1 

Unknown IJ 

Total 140 



Duration of disease on admission. 



LESS THAN SIX MONTHS. 



Army. 
Navy . 



White . . 
Colored. 



C White . . 
> Colored 



Marino Hospital Servico 1 Colored 

«villife {**&; 



LESS THAN ONE YEAK. 



Army 

Navy 

Marino Hospital Service. 
Civil life 



Army 

Navy 

Marine Hospital Service 
Civil life 



OVEK, TWO YEAIIS. 



Army , 

Havy 

Marine Hospital Servico. 
Civil life 



INT 90— VOL III- 



C White.. 
I Colored 

S White . . 
\ Colored. 

C White .. 
\ Colored . 



ONE TO TWO YEAKS. 



White.. 

Colored. 



White.. 
Colored. 



White 

Colored. 



Whits . 
Colored. 



<; White.. 
\ Colored. 



< White.. 
) Colored. 



White\. 

Colored . 



White -• 
Colored. 



While .. 
Colored. 



■18 



37 



L5 



94 



56 



52 



Females. 



29 



29 



Totals. 



22 
4 



26 



274 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Duration of disease on admission — Continued. 



Males. 



Females. 



Totals. 



OVER THREE YEAKS. 



Army 

Navy 

Marine Hospital Service. 
Civil life 



C White.. 

\ Colored. 



White . . 
Colored. 



White.. 
Colored 



OVER FOUR YEARS. 

Army 

Navy 

Marine Hospital Service 

Civil life 



White... 
Colored.. 



White... 
Colored.. 



White . 
Colored. 



White.. 

Colored. 



I'lVJ: TO TEN ^ E \i.s. 



White.. 
Colored. 



Army 

Navy 

Marine Hospital Service 
Civil life 



\ While . 

I ( lolored. 

S White . 
I Colored. 

C White.. 
I Colored. 



TEN TO TWENTY YEARS. 



Army 

Navy 

Marine Hospital Service. 
Civil life 



<, White.. 
> Colored.. 



White... 

Colored.. 



OVER TWENTY YEARS. 

Army 

Navy 

Marine Hospital Service 

Civil life 



( White . . 
\ Colored. 

y White.. 
I Colored. 

$ White.. 
I Colored. 



C White . . 
) Colored. 



C White . . 
I Colored. 



(White.. 
\ Colored. 

< White . . 
I Colored.. 



22 



15 



GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 

Duration of disease on admission — Continued. 



275 



UNKNOWN. 

Army 

Navy 

Marine Eospital Service 

Civil life , 



White -. 
Colored. 



White.. 

Colored . 



White.. 
Colored . 



White . . 
Colored. 



Males. 



Females. 



Totals. 



Table showing the nativity as far as could be ascertained of the 7,856 cases treated. 



Native horn. 



District of Columbia. 

New York.. 

Maryland 

Virginia 

Pennsylvania 

Ohio 

Massachusetts 

Maine 

Illinois 

Connecticut 

New Hampshire 

Indiana 

Kentucky 

Michigan 

New Jersey 

Tennessee 

Wisconsin 

Vermont 

Missouri 

Rhode Island 

Delaware 

North Carolina 

Alabama 

South Carolina 

Iowa 

Georgia 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

West Virginia 

Kansas 

Florida 

Texas 

California 

Indian Territory. . . . 

Colorado 

Arkansas 

Montana 

Oregon 

Minnesota 



Total 



Number. 



943 

545 

590 

669 

418 

246 

176 

85 

77 

61 

64 

71 

59 

43 

70 

33 

28 

37 

40 

25 

16 

29 

13 

16 

7 

20 

20 

10 

15 

3 

4 

10 

6 

5 

1 

4 

1 

1 

2 



4,472 



Foreign born. 



Ireland 

Germany . . . 

England 

France 

Canada 

Scotland 

Switzerland 

Italy 

Denmark . . . 

Norway 

Sweden 

Poland 

Prussia 

Panama 

Russia 

Austria 

Nova Scotia 



ft:; 



olland 

Wales 

Portugal 

Hungary 

Mexico 

Saxony 

Malta 

Belgium 

Buenos Ayres 

Costa Rica 

Bavaria 

Sicily 

British Columbia 

British Possessions. . . 
East Indies (British) . . 
West Indies (British) . 

New Brunswick 

Cuba 

China 

Sandwich Islands 

Coast of Africa 

Cyprus 

Turkey 

Greece 

New Granada 

West Indies (Hay ti) . . 



Total 



Number. 



476 
986 
180 
65 
65 

m 

31 
30 
23 
19 
28 
14 
2 
1 

13 
15 
10 
6 
10 
7, 
4 
5 
5 
6 
3 
4 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 
1 



2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

3,109 



Native born . 
Foreign born 
"Unknown 



4,472 

3, 10'J 

275 



Total 



7,856 



276 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Form of disease in those admit ted. 





t.\ 


z 






fi 


u 






o 


t) . 






<o 






Disease. 


CO 


<n s 


Total. 


Disease. 




S3 


Total. 






t= C/J 








s -f 






a 


3-= 






a 


=.: 






































H 

2, 356 
1,276 


< 






H 


< 






55 


2, 411 

1. ::" 


I Opsomania 


436 


2 


438 




26 


4 




4 


Melancholia 


i, it;. 


131 


1.27G 


.\'\ mpbomania 


4 




4 




1,784 


c:; 


1,847 




95 


13 


108 




186 


34 


220 




19 




19 




191 


19 


210 


[diocv 


1 
11 


1 
1 


2 


Typhomania (Bell's dis- 




12 


D 




2 










Diffuse suppurative men- 








Tot;a] 


7,511 


345 


7, 856 




1 




1 















Tabular statement of the time of life at which the 7,856 cases treated since the opening 
of tin institution became insane. 



A.ge. 



Under 10 years 

Between in and 15 years 
Between ir> an/l 20 
Between "JO and 25 years 
Between 25 ami 30 years 
Bel ween ■';<> ami 35 years 
Between :;•"> and 40 years 
I Jet ween 40 and 45 years 
Bel « een -t."> and 50 years 
Between 50 and 6 I 
Between 60 and 7(1 years 
Between 70 and 8ll years 

Between 80 and 90 years 

Over 90 years .' 

Unknown 

.Not insane 

Total 



1889. 



79 

hi; 

l, 199 

1,350 



160 

637 

487 
536 
309 
114 

15 

2 

Ifif. 

11 



7, 511 



345 



Total. 



181 
81 

127 
1,231 
1,384 
1,184 

*97 

cm 

519 
601 
350 
133 

18 

2 

170 

12 



7,856 



/'/ ivate i>ati< nts. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 




4 



3 




7 

















' 


3 


7 














Remaining at end of year 


4 


3 


7 



GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 



277 






to 2 



R< maining of 
each year's ad- 
missions June 
30, 1890. 


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GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 
Summary of total admissions. 



279 



Male. 



Female. 



Both 



Percentages of eases recovered . . . 
Percentages of cases improved- . . 
Percentages of cases unimproved 

Percentages of cases died 

Percentages of cases remaining . . 



38.68 
14. 70 
2. 1!) 
26. 09 
18.34 



26.40 

18.50 

4.62 

28.00 

22.48 



36. 20 
15.45 

2.67 
26.46 
19. 16 



100.00 



IOC. 00 



100. 00 



The uumber of patients remaining June 30, 1890, 1,505, is more than 
one hundred in excess of any previous year. The number of admis- 
sions has been 345, a number exceeded only once since the war, viz, 
in 1884, when the law was passed to admit the insane from the Home 
for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers ; a prolific source from which 115 have 
been received during the past year, or just one-third of the whole num-» 
ber admitted. In view of this large proportion of aged men where the 
type of insanity is essentially chronic from the start, it is not surpris- 
ing that the per cent, of recoveries is low and that the mortality is 
high, it being 9f per cent, of the average number, and a little above 8 
per cent, on the whole number under treatment. The hospital, while 
still receiving and caring for a limited number of acute and curable 
cases, is becoming more and more a residence for the insane of the dis- 
abled classes from the public service for whom it is the intention of 
the Government to provide a home where they may be cared for in 
their helpless infirmity. 

Of those admitted during the first six months after the hospital was 
opened, viz, before June 30, 1855, there are still 5 remaining, illustrat- 
ing the somewhat permanent character of the population. Year by 
year, as the hospital extends and develops in its varied departments, a 
better classification of the inmates is possible, and but for the over- 
crowding, which persists despite the frequent additions, we should feel 
that we could claim for it something of the completemess of a home and 
the comfort for its inmates that goes with that name. The appropria- 
tions of the past year have enabled us to open the Toner Building as a 
distinct hospital for the sick, with abundant air space, trained nurses, and 
all the appliances for the comfort and care of the inmates; and, removed 
to a distance from the disturbing cries of the more excited classes, the 
conditions are certainly most favorable for a cure. The appropriation 
has also been made for an infirmary annex which is the natural outlet to 
the wards for the sick. This, it is confidently expected, will be a part of 
the work of the present year, and when completed it is believed that our 
feeble ones will have that comfort and care which such enlarged and 
liberal provision renders possible and which will go far to aid in the 
successful administration of the whole. The appropriation for a fire 
steamer and house has been expended on the objects for which it was 
made. The steamer, a No. 5 Clapp & Jones engine of the latest and 
most approved pattern, was thoroughly tested by the fire department of 
the District of Columbia, whose chief kindly directed the test. It proves 
a most efficient steamer, so light that it can easily be taken by hand to 
any part of the grounds, but of a capacity to deliver 400 gallons per 
minute and power to throw one or more solid streams of water over the 
highest point of the building. A fire brigade has been organized out 
of the hospital force and, with frequent opportunities for practice, it is 
thought will render efficient aid in the unfortunate event of their serv- 
ices being required. The engine-house lias been constructed of a suit- 



280 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

able size to provide for the steamer and hose carriage, also a ladder 
truck within the same room. There is a tower for the hose, which also 
requires a clock and bell to complete it. The chief engineer will have 
his room in the second story, where is also room for a hall that when 
finished will afford a reading-room for the hospital employes, which is 
much needed. With some slight changes in the hydrant system, rec- 
ommended by the chief engineer of the District lire department, 
whicli can be readily made, and the construction of two additional res- 
ervoirs, for which appropriation is asked, it is thought that we shall be 
well provided against the most terrible calamity that can befall a hos- 
pital for the insane. 

Appropriations have also been made for continuing the changes in 
tin' heating apparatus of the main building and the lodges, also for ex- 
tending the kitchen accommodations. It is con Men tly expected that 
these very necessary improvements can be completed (lining the pres- 
ent fiscal year, affording a degree of relief out of all proportion to the 
moderate outlay involved. 

A wet summer, which proved most disastrous to the farming interests 
in this vicinity, did not spare us, as is seen in the diminished products as 
shown by the following table: 



Table of farm and garden products, 



Apples, 150§ bushels at no cents $75. 37 

Asparagus, 2,393 bunches at 6 cents 143.58 

Beans (lima), 2963 bushels at $1.30 385.45 

Beans (string), 7 1 g barrels at 75 cents f»:i. HI 

Beets, 985 bunches at 2 cents L9. 70 

Cabbage, 18,740 heads at 8 cents. 1,499.20 

Cabbage sprouts. 314 barrels at $1 :'>14. 00 

Cantaloupes, 6,130 at 8 cents ... - 490.40 

Corn (gre< n ears), 703| dozen a! 15 cents 105. 56 

Carrots, 2,480 bunches at 2 cents 41). 60 

('arrots, 50 bushels at 50 cents "25. 00 

Celery, 23,830 stalks at 5 cents I, L91.50 

Qhickens, l^, 1 dozen at s:>,.50 63/58 

Cucumbers, 192 dozen at 10 cents ,. i'.>. 20 

Ducks, 392 pounds at 12 cents 17. 04 

Eggs, "-'.Oil, 1 , dozen at 20 cents 402.83 

Egg-plants, 254 at cents 15.24 

Figs, 40 quarts at 25 cents ■. . 10. 00 

Grapes, 1 ,004 pounds at 5 cents 50. 20 

Kale, 108 barrels at $2 216.00 

Lettucb, 10,301 heads at 3 cents 309.03 

Milk, 66,547 gallons a1 25 cents 16,636,75 

Onions, 127. 1 bushels at 65 cents 82.87 

Onions, 14,750 bunches at 2 cents 295.00 

Onion (sets), 37 bushels at $4 148.00 

Oyster plant, 5,050 bunches at 3 cents 151.50 

Parsley, 6,210 bunches at 2 cents.... 124. 20 

Parsnips, 'M0 bushels at 75 cents 277. 50 

Peaches, 143£ bushels at $2 286.50 

Peas, 821 bushels at $1 821.00 

Peppers, 20 bushels at $1 20.00 

Pork, 8,570 pounds at 7 cents 599.90 

Potatoes (Irish), 141 bushels at 70 cents 98. 70 

Pears, 18 bushels at $1.50 27.00 

Quinces, 30 bushels at $2.50 75.00 

Rhubarb, 3,000 bunches at 2 cents 60.00 

Radishes, 6,962 bunches at 2 cents 139.24 

Squash, summer, 25500 at 1 cent 23. 06 

Tomatoes, 724.1 bushels at HO cents 362. 25 

Turnips, 1,404.1 bushels at 45 cents 632.02 

Sale of stock 1 201.50 

Total 26,638.28 



GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 281 

The following products, consumed on the farm, can not be considered 
a part of the profits : 

Corn fodder (green), ( ) acres a I $35 $315. 00 

Corn fodder (dry), 75 tons at $15 1, 125.00 

Grass (green), 15 acres at $35 525.00 

Hay, 350 tons at $13 4,550.00 

Rye (d.v). SO tons at $13 L, 040. 00 

Rye (green), 10 acres at $35 350.00 

Oats (gree i), 6 acres at $35. 210.00 

Kale, -JIM barrels at $2 408.00 

Turnips, 524 bushels at 45 cents 235. 80 

Parsnips, 72 bushels at 50 cents 3G. 00 

Total 8,794.80 

Potatoes, Irish and sweet, grapes, cabbage, and many other things 
wherein the hospital hasconie to depend ina great measure on its farm, 
were a failure and had to be purchased elsewhere. Still there is much 
to prevent discouragement. The pork product, at a low ebb last year 
by reason of the ravages of the swine plague or hog cholera, was never 
looking better than now, and if no disease appears in the herd this 
fall, we shall again produce most, if not all, of our pork. The herd of 
milch cows are doing well, and the milk product of the year has been 
quite satisfactory. We have added some pure blood Holstein cows at 
moderate cost by purchase, and with the acquisition of additional land, 
for which appropriation has been made, it is hoped that the increase in 
the milk product will at least keep pace with the increase in the number 
of the inmates. 

Many of the male patients have been employed in farm work with 
satisfaction to themselves and economy to the institution. The excava- 
tion for the new buildings is, in a great measure, the work of their hands. 
In regard to the bench t to be derived from occupation in a majority of 
cases there can be no question. Taking one year with another, there is 
no doubt that the farm is a source of a small income to the hospital, is 
of great benefit to the inmates, and will be of increasing value as the 
years move on. 

ESTIMATES FOU THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1892. 

The estimates for the coming year arc as follows : 

For current expenses $324, 500 

For general repairs and improvements 15, 000 

For additional accommodations for the insane, viz: 

Extension of Howard Hall, including heating aud furnishing 57,200 

For special improvements, viz: 

Porter's lodge at south entrance ,$2,000 

Rebuilding carpenter and machine shop ; 4,000 

Propagating house ., 2, ?.">() 

Clock and hell for tower 1,500 

Two additional reservoirs Cor protection against lire 5,000 

Electric plant for incandescent light 18,500 

The estimate for current expenses is for support, clothing, and treat- 
ment in the hospital of an estimated average number of 1,475 indigent 
insane persons who are by law entitled to treatment, viz, the insane of 
the Army and Navy, Marine Corps, Revenue-Cutter Service, persons 
charged with or convicted of crimes against the United States who 
have become insane, inmates of the National Home lor Disabled Vol- 
unteer Soldiers, and all persons who have become insane since their 
entry into the military or naval service of the United States who have 



282 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

been admitted to the hospital, and who are indigent ; also the indigent 
insane of the District of Columbia, as provided in sections 4844 and 4850 
of the Revised Statutes of the United States. Patients whose expenses 
are defrayed from other sources who are also by law entitled to admis- 
sion to the hospital are not included in this enumeration. The basis of 
estimate is a per capita annual cost of $220. Congress has for some 
years provided for a part of this expenditure in the District bill. As- 
suming the ratio to be the same as that of the present fiscal year, the 
amount in that bill will be $90,570, leaving the sum of $233,930 to be 
appropriated in the sundry civil bill, of which sum it is asked that the 
usual amount, $1,500, may be available to defray the expenses of the 
return of patients to their friends. 

The sum of $15,000 is needed for the proper care of the grounds and 
to keep in good repair the already extensive and yearly increasing num- 
ber of buildings which are occupied by the insane, and are needed for 
their care and treatment. The area covered by, these buildings is almost 
as extensive as that occupied by the United States Capitol, and the class 
of tenants renders somewhat frequent renewals and repairs necessary. 

As stated in the last report, the steady increase in the number of the 
insane, who, under the law, are entitled to care and treatment in the hos- 
pital, renders it necessary each year to provide additional accommoda- 
tions for not less than fifty beds. For the past ten years the annual in- 
crease has been somewhat in excess of that; for the year 1890 it being 
sixty-two. It is important that each addition shall be such as to afford 
the best classification of the inmates and the consequent greatest relief 
to the whole number. The latest addition, that of an infirmary wing to 
the Toner building, makes suitable provision for the sick and infirm in 
distinct structures especially fitted for their care. The extension here 
asked will admit of the completion of Howard Hall according to the origi- 
nal plan, thus affording a secure, distinct, and liberal provision in single 
rooms for one hundred and twenty of the convict, criminal and homici- 
dal insane, greatly to the relief of the harmless groups left in the main 
hospital building. 

The gate-keeper's lodge, for which $2,000 is asked, is essential to the 
proper custody of the place, as the south entrance is of necessity kept 
open during the day, and there should be some one permanently on 
duty there. A small, durable stone cottage in keeping with the sur- 
roundings is all that is needed, and it can be built for the sum named. 

The carpenter and machine shop, in daily use since its erection in 
185G, being on ground which did not afford a stable foundation, now, 
with the jar of machinery and gradual settling of the walls, shows 
dangerous cracks in the masonry, and it will be necessary to rebuild it 
on an enlarged plan and a secure site, and for this the sum of $4,000 is 
asked. 

The propagating house, which, though small and homely, has for 
many years afforded us the early tomato and eggplants, with hundreds 
of bedders for our lawns, is now, after frequent partial renewals, crumb- 
ling to its fall and will require to be entirely rebuilt. It ought to be 
somewhat extended to provide a few winter flowers for our invalid wards 
and diuiug-rooms. There is perhaps, no good reason why it should 
not be a building something like the green-houses of our State institu- 
tions for the insane and be used for the same purposes. 

The hose tower on the steamer-house, central in position and visible 
from almost every portion of the hospital buildings, requires a clock 
and bell for its completion. The need for a central time-keeper regula- 
ting the movements of all, is apparent, and the companionship to the 



GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 283 

inmates, of a bell striking the hours, is of value out of proportion to 
this very moderate expenditure. 

For the most effective service of our steamer in the event of fire and 
as a further protection in that direction, two additional reservoirs for 
the storage of water are required. The position is such that with stone 
retaining- walls properly constructed and buttressed, considerable bod- 
ies of water can be stored, which, in addition to their immediate pur- 
pose as reservoirs for fire service, can be made available as ponds for 
the growth of carp for the inmates, a first step in the direction of wa- 
ter gardening or farming. 

If the present system of lighting the buildings and grounds by gas 
is to be continued, the time has come when the second of the old gas- 
holders must be renewed, it having by reason of leaks become unfit for 
further use. It would seem, however, judging by the experience of 
other hospitals, that the time had come to abandon the old method of 
lighting by gas, which with its multiplicity of jets more or less accessi- 
ble to the insane, is always to some extent a source of danger, and is also 
objectionable by its heat in summer, and at all times by its tendency to 
smoke, its inevitable leaks and consequent disagreeable smell, and to 
substitute therefor the incandescent electric light. This form of illu- 
mination seems to have passed beyond the age of experiment and is 
now recognized as the most satisfactory method of lighting buildings of 
this class. The sum of $18,500 is asked for an electric plant to place 
the incandescent lights throughout the establishment, together with such 
other electric appliances as may be needed in the treatment of the insane. 

Dr. Charles H. Nichols, who was the first superintendent of the hos- 
pital, died at Bloomingdale Asylum, New York City, December 16, 1889. 
This is no common loss. Dr. Nichols was the superintendent of the 
Government Hospital from its inception in 1852 until September, 1877, 
when he left it to resume the charge of the Bloomingdale Asylum at 
New York, to take up again his work there, a work that had been inter- 
rupted for twenty-five years, while he was laying the foundations, 
developing the plans, organizing and perfecting the methods for the care 
and treatment of the insane in a national hospital that he had designed 
and carried on, and that he left, where it stands to-day, among the fore- 
most in the land. The resolutions passed by the Board of Visitors at 
that time are here introduced as showing how the man and his work 
were regarded then. 

The Board of Visitors of the Government Hospital for the Insane in the District of 
Columbia desire hereby to testify and record their high sense of the rare intelligence, 
the executive ability, and the personal as well as official integrity of Dr. Charles H. 
Nichols, who for nearly twenty-five years discharged with entire acceptance the 
duties devolved upon him as superintendent of the institution. 

Called to the management in October of the year 1852, Dr. Nichols selected the 
site which the hospital occupies and planned and supervised the construction of its 
original buildings, as also their successive enlargements until tljey have reached, in 
the year 1877, the commanding proportions which will ever envivle them to stand as 
a stately monument to the professional sagacity and untiring zeal of their enlightened 
projector. Drawing on the best resources of science and experience for the benefi- 
cent appointments and remedial methods devised for the relief of the insane, Dr. 
Nichols combined, during the entire period of his superintendency, a. scrupulous regard 
for the dictates of humanity in the treatment of his patients, and a conscientious de- 
votion to the interests of the Government which he so long and faithfully served by 
the prudent, economical, and upright administration of his great public trust. 

Placed under the pressure of official duties which increased from year to year not 
only in magnitude, but also in complexity, he rose to the height of every emergency 
which came to tax his skill, his patience, and his industry. 

Resigning his office to enter upon another field of honorable labor in his profession 
he leaves the Hospital firmly established and in the highest state of efficiency. 

"Wishing as we do to give this tribute the solemn official sanction which is justified 



284 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

no less by the distinguished usefulness thau by the long duration of Dr. Nichols's 
services in counection with the institution, we hereby direct that a copy of this 
record be hung in the public hall of the Hospital at St. Elizabeth in perpetual mem- 
ory of the first Superintendent, as also in recognition of the relations which have so 
long and so pleasantly existed between him and the Board of Visitors. 

Done by order of the board at a meeting held in the city of Washington on the 
14th day of June, 1877. 

With the termination of his labors here, a quarter of a century's 
service among the insane, there was no cessation in his work. At the 
institution to which he was called, he went on enlarging its buildings 
and liberalizing its provision, doing, with the earnestness of purpose 
which always characterized him, the ever-extending labor that he felt 
was a duty laid upon him to perforin. So with enlarged experience and 
unsparing devotion to his work he went forward, his usefulness and his 
life only broadening to its close. 

At the meeting of the Board of Visitors in April, 1890, the following 
resolutions of respect to his memory were placed upon the record: 

Whereas the death of Dr. Charles H. Nichols, M. D., LL.D., the distinguished 
superintendent of Bloomingdale Asylum, in New York, occurred in that city on the 
i(Uli of December, L889, and 

Whereas Dr. Nichols was especially endeared to the members of this board, alike 
for the private virtues which adorned his character and for the public services which 
connect his name and fame with the Government Hospital for the Insane, of which 
he was the rounder and of which, for the long term of nearly twenty-five years, he 
was the honored superintendent: Therefore, 

lie it resolved, That, standing as we do almost in sight of the new-made grave which 
has closed over the noble form of one who was distinguished among men by the 
dignity of his commanding presence and by the gracious benignity of his sedate and 
thought fnl demeanor, we can but mingle natural tears with our tender and admiring 
recollections, as we hereby testify and record the exalted esteem in which wo held 
our beloved friend while he was living and the pious homage we cherish for his 
memory now th:tt he is no more. 

Horn in the year L820, in Maine, carefully nurttjredin the best academic disciplines 
in his native State and in Rhode Island, trained to the science and art of the medical 
profession in the universities of New York and Philadelphia, Dr. Nichols was early 
drawn by his sense of duty and by his favorite studies to the special labors of the 
alienist; and. after serving a brief novitiate in this vocation at the State Asylum of 
Qtica, X. Y., he was appointed resident physician of Bloomingdale Asylum, in New 
York City, in the year 1849. Selected by President Fillmore in 1852 to preside over 
the construction, in this city, of a Government Hospital for the iusane of the Army 
and Navy of the United States, as also for the insane of the District of Columbia, and 
selected for this onerous task because of the distinction he had already gained in his 
difficult walk, Dr. Nichols addressed himself to the work with all that high intelli- 
gence, unfaltering perseverence, and extraordinary executive skill which, through his 
whole life, ho brought to the discharge of every duty, and by which he ever com- 
mended himself to our admiration and regard in the conduct of this institution. 
Choosing the site and superintending the erection of the magnificent series of build- 
ings which, as well by the originality of their design as by the harmony of their pro- 
portions, will here forever stand as a, monument to his genius, he planned their 
arrangement with a forecast which has made them susceptdde of successive enlarge- 
ments without impairing the unity of their design and without barring their doors 
against the reception of those increased facilities for the scientific care of the insane, 
to the advent of which he looked with hope in the near future. Keeping himself 
abreast with every step of progress that was made in his specialty and enlarging his 
intellectual resources by constant study and by careful observations in this country 
and in Europe, he was held in highest honor by his professional brethren throughout 
the world. 

Appointed in the year 1877 to the superintcndeucy of the Bloomingdale Asylum, 
which he had formerly served with so much usefulness to it and with so much credit 
to himself, and feeling as he did that the Government Hospital was then securely es- 
tablished on the broad basis he had projected, he returned in the full vigor of his in- 
tellectual powers to the service of that opulent institution, though he well foresaw 
that his engagements there would lay fresh exactions on his constructive ingenuity, 
his scientific attainments, and his administrative skill. Called to these new and 
complicated duties in the heart of a- great metropolis, and therefore called to act in 
the " fierce light*' which beats on every public service in such a center, he won 



GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 285 

golden opinions from all sorts of people, because it was seen of all men that he could 
rise to the height of every emergency when novel demands were made on his science 
and industry in remodeling the Bloomingdale Asylum or on his sagacity and patience 
in dealing with men. And so it came to pass that in the midst of abundant labors, 
in the fullness of his years and yet with his natural force unabated until the end came, 
he was able to lay down the burden of life in the full sight of his finished work, and, 
[preserving his soul in a meek serenity, under a calm sense of duty faithfully per- 
formed, he rested in peace from his incessant labors, while his works still follow him 
with thai; perpetual benediction which sets its crowning seal to his useful career. 

In Dr. Nichols the manifold and even the divergent traits of human excellence 
were all blended into a consistent unity. In learning he was ample, without a trace 
of pedantry; in conception and plan he was original and far-seeing, without being 
rash or fantastic ; in execution he wrought with the sincerity and promptitude of an 
imperial intellect, without being imperious ; in action, as in speech and purpose, he 
was deliberate, without the shadow of vacillation ; in manners he was grave, but 
yet remarkable for his affability ; in sympathy he was acute, yet without sentiment- 
ality as without pretension ; in moral conviction he was tenacious and in moral 
principle he was inflexible, without being censorious: in religion he kept undetilod 
"the hidden man of the heart," and therefore was always as much without guile as 
without ostentation. In a word, his well rounded and manly character was no less 
remarkable for the symmetry of its constituent parts than for the strength of its 
separate elements. 

Dr. Samuel R. Means died at the hospital, after a brief illness, on the 
1st of August, 1890. He had been a member of the medical staff but a 
little more than a year, but in that brief period he had endeared him- 
self to all who knew him. A young man of high professional attain- 
ments and marked ability, enthusiastic in his chosen field of labor, he 
gave promise of a brilliant future. The hospital and the profession 
have reason to lament his untimely death. 

Dr. 0. A. Drew, who comes to us highly recommended from the State 
Hospital at Taunton, Mass., where he has had several years experience, 
has recently entered upon his service at the Toner building with pains- 
taking care that gives promise of satisfactory results. There have been 
no other changes in the medical staff. Its members continue to dis- 
charge their varied duties with the faithfulness which their long service 
would lead us to expect, each in his respective department contributing 
by his distinctive work to the success of the whole. Especial attention 
is called to the pathological supplement by the special pathologist, Dr. 
Blackburn, accompanying this report. 

To all who, by faithful service or in any way by gifts or kindly 
works have contributed to the year's success, our acknowledgments are 
hereby tendered. 

The year has been crowded with the important work that is daily 
being performed in so many hospitals throughout the civilized world, 
of patiently and kindly caring for this dependent class, a work for 
humanity on which the annals of history are silent, but which is, per- 
haps, not unrecorded elsewhere. 

In our efforts to make the hospital worthy of its high position among 
its kindred institutions in America, we have been most efficiently aided 
by the judiciously^ liberal appropriations of Congress hitherto given, to 
which body, in th'e continuance of our work, we again confidently ap- 
peal. 

We are, very respectfully, your obedient servants, 

J. M. Toneu, 

I 'resident. 
W. W. Godding, 
Superintendent. 

Hon. John W. Noble, 

Secretary of the Interior, 



286 KEPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Government Hospital for the Insane, 

Washington, D. C 7 ., August 29, 1890. 
Sir : In accordance with the act of Congress approved June 4, 1880, 
requiring the superintendent of the Government Hospital for the Insane 
to make a report to Congress annually of the detailed expenditures of 
the hospital for the preceding fiscal year, I have the honor to submit 
the following statement. 

I am, sir, very respectfully your obedient servant, 

W. W. Godding, 

Superintendent. 
Hon. John W. Noble, 

Secretary of the Interior, 



GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 



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320 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Classified expenditures, Government Hospital for the Insane, for fiscal year ending June 

30, 1889 {supplementary). 







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Supplementary to June 30, 1889. 



On hand, deficiency 

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$27. 92 
25.86 



EXPENDITURES. 



Plants and seeds. 
Plastering 



53.78 



$4.25 
12.75 



Total 

Covered into United States Treasury- 

On deficiency 

On buildings and grounds 



17.00 

23.67 
13. 11 



53. 78 
Detailed statement of receipts and expenditures for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890. 

receipts. 

Appropriation for support $217, 500. 00 

Appropriation for District of Columbia 85,000.00 

Appropriation for buildings and grounds 28,900.00 

On hand, buildings and grounds 27,391.29 

Miscellaneous receipts 24,637.76 

Total 383,429.05 



expenditures. 
Subsistence : 

Flour, meal, and crackers $14, 296. 07 

Ice 4,279.78 

Butter, cheese, and eggs 16, 484. 22 

Fresh meat 20,619.99 

Salt and smoked meats 12, 142. 63 

Fish and poultry 7, 040. 87 

Tea and coffee 8, 509. 31 

Sugar and molasses 11, 459. 43 

Lard 367.83 

Fruits and vegetables 6, 793. 15 

Other groceries 9, 384. 30 



111,377.58 



lights, etc. : 

Furniture, fixtures, etc 2,713. 07 

Bedding 6,673.82 

Table and towel linen 666. 66 

Utensils, crockery, etc 2, 638. 44 

Kitchen fittings 299.89 

Laundry supplies 2, 719. 94 

Carpets r? . r . T ., r ,, ? . 50}. 29 



GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 321 

House furnishing, fuel, lights, etc. — Continued. 

Hard coal - $1,125,30 

Soft coal 9, 903. 48 

Wood 360.74 

Lights, oils, etc 1,617.24 

Making brooms ., 61.80 

$29, 281. 67 

Dry goods and clothing, hooks, stationery, and miscellaneous: 

Boots, shoes, and slippers :*, 385. 11 

New clothing 5,098.13 

Clothing material 6, 841. 52 

Hats 290.38 

Notions 1,264.27 

Books and periodicals 576. 09 

Stationery and postage 750. 11 

Freight and hauling 388.44 

Incidental work, etc 89. 19 

Advertising 120. 93 

Electrical instruments 197.20 

Photographic instruments, etc 66. 18 

19, 067. 55 

Medical supplies, expended for amusement of patients, etc : 

Drugs, medicines, etc 1,832.83 

Alcoholic stimulants 1,247. 05 

Instruments, etc - 192. 65 

Returning eloped patients 155. 00 

Amusement of patients 4,618. 11 

Sending to their homes 277. 71 

Pathological supplies - 241.35 

Dental supplies 53.20 

8,617.90 

Farm, garden, and stahle : 

Feed 9,296.86 

Implements, horse-shoes, etc 1,260.61 

Plants and seeds 597.80 

Manures 471.25 

Live-stock 2, 239. 26 

Harness and repairs 672.37 

Vehicles and repairs » 2,120.95 

Hay and straw 2,051.73 

Incidental expenses 327.22 

19,038.05 

Repairs and improvements : 

Lumber, doors, etc 4,825.77 

Hardware, etc 2, 250. 18 

Engineers' and plumbers' supplies 3, 657. 73 

Paints, oils, glass, etc 2, 116.09 

Roofing 250.90 

Iron-work, etc ". 1, 185. 84 

Plastering, etc 1,376. 79 

Sundry small repairs, etc 961. 47 

Fire and other apparatus 3, 969. 91 

Masons' supplies 3, 914. 77 

Buildings 21,255.50 

45, 764. 95 

Salaries and wages : 

Superintendent, physicians, and general office 19, 485. 31 

Ward service 50, 155. 02 

Inside domestic department 15, 461151 

Engineers' department 7, ^94. 13 

Farm and garden, hauling coal, dri vers, etc 23, 756. 72 

Mechanics and helpers 19,292.77 

Making clothing 2, 253. 12 

Laundry „ .. 5, 679. 8] 

Sunday service 500. 00 

144,480.39 

On hand, support .63 

On hand, buildiugs and grounds , 5,800.33 

Total , 383,429.05 

INT 90— VOL III 21 



322 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Itemized receipts. 

1889. 

July 8. Cash received for board of E. A. Bradley $30. 0C 

20. Cash received for board of Chu-e-rah-rah he-kah 91.00 

25. Cash received for board of John Weidman 91.00 

29. Cash received for board of Martha Herman 12 00 

31. Cash received for board of Emily B. Wadsworth 28.00 

31. Cash received for sale of stock, etc 22. 20 

Aug. 9. Cash received for board of Jos. P. Hutchins 576.00 

24. Cash received for board of Martha Herman 20.00 

24. Cash received for board of the Misses Selden 45.00 

31. Cash received for sale of stock 110.35 

Ser>t. 7. Cash received for board of Esau Gresham • 130.00 

12. Cash received for board of W. H. Hindes 65.00 

18. Cash received for board of Emily B Wadsworth 28.00 

21. Cash received for board of J. M. Lowell 91. 00 

24. Cash received for board of Jos. Archambeau 65. 00 

25. Cash received for board of Martha Herman 20. 00 

27. Cash received for board of E. A. Bradley 60. 00 

28. Cash received for board of Adolph Berger 130. 00 

30. Cash received for board of Warren Webster 361.00 

30. Cash received for board and special attendance on Edw. Burchell . 211. 00 

30. Cash received for hoard of Win. Moffatt 249.97 

30. Cash received for board of Sarah E. ( 'ox 6f>. 00 

30. Cash received for board of Soldiers' Home patients 791.43 

30. Cash received for board of Anion Woodward 15. 00 

30. Cash received for sale of stock, etc 175.64 

Oct. 5. Cash received for board of Wm. Griffith 65. 00 

5. Cash received for board of M. A. Gilleland- 65.00 

7. Cash received for special attendance on Rollin Perkins 75.00 

7. Cash received for board of Herman Buchlers 1 30. 00 

8. Cash reoeived for board of Frank B. Hayes 130. 00 

9. Cash received for board of Joseph P. Hutchins 72. 00 

12. Cash received for board of William Moffat 140. 03 

12. Cash received for board of Emily B. Wadsworth 28. 00 

14. Cash received for board of Martha Herman 20. 00 

16. Cash received for board of Christian Potter 65. 00 

19. Cash received for hoard of Richard Nichlas 14.28 

19. Cash received for board of John Weidman 91. 00 

19. Cash received for board of C. K. Yancy 91. 00 

21. Cash received for board of Marine Hospital Service 1,042.07 

25. Cash received for board of M. E. Cazenove 156.00 

28. Cash received for hoard of S. C. Borrows 130.00 

29. Cash received for board of E. A. Bradley 25. 00 

31. Cash received for sale of stock, etc 131.73 

Nov. 5. Cash received for board of Anion Woodward 20. 00 

8. Cash received for board of Emily B. Wadsworth 28. 00 

14. Cash received for board of Bryan Hall 65. 00 

10. Cash received for board of Martha Herman 20. 00 

22. Cash received for board of W. H. Zepp 91.00 

30. Cash received for board of J. V. Lewis 65. 00 

30. Cash received for board of J. M. Lowell 91. 00 

30. Cash received for board of Amon Woodward 20. 00 

30. Cash received for board of Esau Gresham 65.00 

30. Cash received for board of Wm. H. Hindes 65. 00 

30. Cash received for sale of strock etc 156. 47 

Dec. 12. Cash received for board of Rufus Wilcox 195. 00 

12. Cash received for board of Emily Wadsworth 28.00 

17. Cash received for board of Joseph P. Hutchins 72. 00 

31. Cash received for board of Sarah R. Cox 65.00 

31. Cash received for board of Adolph Berger 65.00 

31. Cash received for board of Thomas Hynes 1,722.14 

31. Cash received for board of Amon Woodward 25. 00 

31. Cash received for board and special attendance on Edw. Burchell 211. 00 

31. Cash received for board of M. A.Gilleland 65. 00 

31. Cash received for board and special attendance on Rollin Perkins 75. 00 

31. Cash received for board of United States Soldiers' Home patients 707. 86 

31. Cash received for board of Bryan Hall 65. 00 

31. Cash received for sale of stock, etc 54.58 

31. Cash received for board of W. H. Zepp 91. 00 



GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 



323 



1890. 
Jan. 8. 

8. 

. 10. 
11. 
11. 

15. 

16. 

16. 

17. 

18. 

20. 

20. 

21. 

23. 

25. 

27. 

29. 

31. 

31. 
Feb. 6. 

10. 

15. 

24. 

28. 
Feb. 28. 

28. 

28. 

28. 

28. 

28. 
Mar. 8. 

13. 

14. 

15. 

21. 

24. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 
Apr. 17. 

17. 

18. 

21. 

22. 

21. 

24. 

25. 

26. 

30. 

30. 

30. 

30. 
5. 
6. 
9. 

12. 



May 



Cash received for board of Christian Potter $65. 00 

Cash receiv ed for board of Frank B. Hayes 65. 00 

( 'ash received for board of Herman Buchlers 130. 00 

Cash received for board of Chn-e-rah-rah-ho-kah 91. 00 

Cash received for board of Earl, S. Stone 130. 00 

Cash received for board of Martha Herman 20. 00 

Cash received for board of Francis M. Cook , 90. 00 

Cash received for board of D. L. Craft 112. 30 

Cash received for board of George Allen 50. 00 

Cash received for hoard of George Golkell 1, 47 1. 27 

Cash received for hoard of S. C. Borrows 130. 00 

Cash received for board of Marine Hospital Service 1, 087. 71 

Cash received for board of D. L. Craft 56. 70 

Cash received for board of John Weidman 91. 00 

Cash received for board of C. K. Yancey 91. 00 

Cash received for board of Wm. Moffatt 40. 00 

Cash received for board of Emily B. Wadsworth 28. 00 

Cash received for hoard of E. A Bradley 25. 00 

Cash received for board of Amon Woodward 20. 00 

Cash received for sale of stock, etc 277. 52 

Cash received for board of Chu-e-rah-rah-he-kah 91. 00 

Cash received for board of Martha Herman 20. 00 

Cash received for board of Martha Herman 20. 00 

Cash received for board of Wm. Moffatt 45. 77 

Cash received for hoard of M. E. Cazenove 156, 00 

Cash received for board of J. V. Lewis 65. 00 

Cash received for board of Emily B. Wadsworth 28. 00 

Cash received for board of W. H. Hindes 65. 00 

Cash received for board of Anion Woodward 20. 00 

Cash received for board of E. Gresham 65. 00 

Cash received for sale of stock, etc 39. 56 

Cash received for board of Jennie M. Lowell 91. 00 

Cash received for board of Joseph P. Hutchins 72. 00 

Cash received for board of Rnfns Wilcox 65. 00 

Cash received for board of Geo. Welch 195. 00 

Cash received for board of Frank B. Hayes 65. 00 

Cash received for board of Martha Herman 20. 00 

Cash received for board of E. A. Bradley 25. 00 

Cash received for board of Adolph Berger 65. 00 

Cash received for board and special attendance on Ewd. Bnrchell. 211. 00 

Cash received for board of Thos. Hynes 65. 00 

Cash received for board of Juo. N. Cunningham 90. 00 

Cash received for board of Amon Woodward 25. 00 

Cash received for board of E. B. Wadsworth 28. 00 

Cash received for board of S. R. Cox 65. 00 

Cash received for board of Christian Potter 65. 00 

Cash received for board and special attendance on Rollin Perkins. 75. 00 

Cash received for board of W. H. Zepp 91. 00 

Cash received for board of M. A. Gilleland 65. 00 

Cash received for board of Herman Buchlers 130. 00 

Cash received for board of Bryan Hall 65.00 

Cash received for sale of stock, etc 306. 23 

Cash received for board of S. C. Borrows 130. 00 

Cash received for board of Emily B. Wadsworth 28. 00 

Cash received for board of Marine Hospital Service 1, 090. 71 

Cash received for board of Charles K. Yancey 91. 00 

Cash received for board of John Weidman {)]. 00 

Cash received for board of Capt. Frederick L. Dodge 113. 00 

Cash received for board of U. S. Soldiers' Home 707. 14 

Cash received for board of George Golkell 0). 43 

Cash received for board of Chu-e-rah-rah-he-kah 91.00 

Cash received for board of M. E. Cazenove 156. 00 

Cash received for board of Francis M. Cook 65. 00 

Cash received for board of Earl S. Stone 65.00 

Cash received for sale of stock, etc 136. 73 

Cash received for board of Anion Woodward 20.00 

Cash received for board of Joseph Archambeau 130. 00 

Cash received for board of William Moffatt 30.23 

Cash received for board of J. V. Lewis.,,. ....... .„,., 45.00 



324 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



1890. 

May 21. Cask received for board of Martha Herman $ 10. 00 

23. Cash received for board of Ann McConvey 5. 00 

24. Cash received for board of Agnes James 57. 0G 

27. Cash received for board of E. B. Wadsworth 28. 00 

31. Cash received for board of Anion Woodward 20. 00 

31. Cash received for board of M. E.Cazenove 156. 00 

31. Cash received for sale of stock, etc 294. 16 

June 4. Cash received for board of David D. Cone 130. 00 

6. Cash received for board of W. II. Hindes 65. 00 

0. Cash received for board of E. A. Bradley 25. 00 

13. Cash received for board of Rufus E. Wilcox 65. 00 

14 . Cash received for board of Joseph P. Hutchins 72. 00 

16. Cash received for board of John N. Berryman 20. 00 

20. Cash received for board of Esau Gresham 05. 00 

21. Cash received for board of E. B. Wadsworth 28. 00 

24. Cash received for board of Martha Herman 20. 00 

27. Cash received for board of Christian Potter 65. 00 

27. Cash recei ved for board of John N. Berryman 40. 00 

27. Cash received for board of Adolph Berber 65. 00 

27. Cash received for board of E. A. Bradley 50. 00 

30. Cash received for board and special attendance on Edward Bur- 

chell 211.00 

30. Cash received for board of Sarah E. Cox 65. 00 

30. Cash received for board of II. M. Roach 91. 00 

30. Cash received for board of M. A. Gilleland 65. 00 

30. Cash received for board of United States Soldiers' Home patients. 791. 43 

30. Cash received for board of Fred L. Dodge 63. 00 

30. Cash received for board of Herman Buchlers 130. 00 

30. Cash received for board of W. H. Zepp 91.00 

30. Cash received for special attendance on Rollin Perkins. 75. 00 

30. Cash received for board of Amon Woodward 25. 00 

30. Cash received for board of Francis M. Cook 65. 00 

30. Cash received for board of S. C. Borrows 130. 00 

30. Cash received for board of Bryan Hall 65.00 

30. Cash received for board of Jennie M. Lowell 91. 00 

30. Cash received for board of Marine Hospital Service 1 , 053. 00 

30. Cash received for board of Chas. K. Yancey 91. 00 

30. Cash received for board ofWin. Griffith.... 195.00 

30. Cash received for sale of stock, etc 32 1 . 12 

Total 24,637.76 



REPORT 

OF 

THE FREEDMEN'S HOSPITAL. 



Freedmen's Hospital, 
Washington, I). C, August 19, 1890. 

Sra : I respectfully submit the anuual report of this hospital for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1890. 

During the year there have been admitted and treated in the hos- 
pital 2,589 patients. 

In the dispensary attached there were 5,962 prescriptions com- 
pounded for outside patients. Of those in the hospital 996 were col- 
ored males ; 1,016 colored females ; 488 white males, and 89 white 
females. 

The surgical operations performed number 354, as follows : 

Amputation of leg, 1 ; amputation of arm, 1 ; amputation of hand, 1 ; 
amputation of fingers, 10 ; excision of keloid turner of ear, 2 ; paracen- 
tesis abdominis, 2 ; phimosis, 25 ; paraphimosis, 1 : stricture of urethra, 
7; hydrocele, Ij fistula in ano, 7; abscesses, 60; reduction of disloca- 
tion of hip, 4 ; of dislocation of shoulder, 1 ; of dislocation of elbow, 2 ; 
of dislocation of wrist, 2 ; setting of fracture of nasal bones, 2 ; of com- 
pound fracture of nasal bones, 1 ; of fracture of inferior maxillary, 1 ; 
of compound frature of inferior maxillary, 1 ; of fracture of humerus, 
2; of compound fracture of humerus, 1; of fracture of clavicle 1; of 
scapula, 1; of fracture of radius and ulna, 4; of femur, 4; of patella, 
2; of tibia, 5; of tibia and fibula, 2 ; of compound fracture of tibia and 
fibula, 2; of fracture of rib, 1; of compound comminuted fracture of 
phalanges, 1; gunshot wounds, 33; incised wounds, 69; lacerated 
wounds, 54; contused wounds, 22 ; punctured wounds, 18. 

I have arranged a series of tables marked A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and 
H. They give a full and comprehensive statement of all that has been 
done during the year. Tables A and B show the causes of death and 
the number of deaths occurring within ten days after admission. I in- 
vite special attention to them, as they mention the condition of the 
patients at the time they were received in the hospital, and that 
many came in a dying condition. Table O contains a full list of the 
injuries, surgical cases and diseases; D, the occupation of each person 
admitted ; E, their nativity ; F, the number admitted each month ; G, 
the number admitted for a period of sixteen years; from this table the 
growth of the hospital can be ascertained. The table H shows the num- 
ber admitted, born, discharged and died during the year, and the num- 
ber remaining June 30, 1890. 

There were 94 cases of alcoholism, including delirium tremens; of 

325 



326 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

this number 12 were colored. It may be interesting to note that dur- 
ing the past six years 549 persons have been treated for alcoholism; 
of this number only 80 were colored. My experience is that the nerv- 
ous systems of colored men are not as readily affected by intoxicants 
as the whites. I am constrained to believe they are disposed to indulge 
as freely. 

From the tables submitted it will be seen there were 198 cases of 
confinement, an increase over previous years. Of this number 5 were 
white, 193 colored; only 46 claimed to be married. I make mention 
of these statistics with some hesitation, as I have no desire to call un- 
due attention to the misfortunes of any class, but the only way to cure 
an evil is to bring it to light. The cause is readily discovered in the 
ignorance of the victims, who should be dealt with gently. By no 
means do I think they are wholly responsible. In most cases it is a 
heritage, a transmission from master to slave. 

The records also show that 228 cases of venereal diseases were treated 
in the hospital, a fraction over 10 per cent, of the admissions ; in the 
dispensary there were 541 cases, making a total of 769. While these 
numbers indicate a bad condition of morals among the poorer classes, 
I believe a great improvement can be made by changing the environ- 
ments of these people, and by education. Upon the recommendation 
of the Commissioner of Pensions 128 ex-soldiers were admitted and 
treated. In addition, upon the recommendation of the Board of Man- 
agers of the National Soldiers' Homes, 13 ex soldiers were cared for 
while waiting transportation. The appropriation of $1,000 for fire- 
escapes enabled me to erect four; two upon the main building and one 
upon each of the female wards. I have been successful in securing 
from the District government two arc electric lights, which are of great 
advantage. 

I expect also to be able to erect a new two-story building with four 
rooms for the accommodation of contagious diseases. For this purpose 
Congress has appropriated the sum of $2,500. The hospital has been 
kept in a good sanitary condition. The year has been an unusually 
busy one, the number of patients greater than ever before. Though 
admitting persons of every class, the order in the main has been good; 
the attendants have faithfully discharged the duties required of them. 
Religious services have been conducted by theological students of 
Howard University, who reside upon the grounds; by the Society of 
St. Vincent de Paul, a Catholic society, and by the members of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church. In addition, ministers from the city 
make frequent visits to the sick. Kev. Fathers William J. Hooman and 
Richard O'Neill, and Rev. Mr. Pine and Moore are regular iu attend- 
ance. Mrs. Ada E. Spurgeon continues her labors ; for nine years she 
has been doing missionary work at the hospital. She has given special 
attention to the inmates of the maternity ward, and provides places for 
them to go after leaving the hospital. 

The rule requiring those who are able to perform some light work has 
been continued. The following articles have been made: Bedsacks, 
19; pillow-cases, 110; sheets, 215; towels, 68^ drawers, 10; chemises, 
51; dresses, 102; aprons, 75; handkerchiefs, 11 ; skirts, 10; night- 
gowns, 34 ; curtains, 3. 
Very respectfully, 

C. B. Purvis, M. D., 

Surgeon-in Chief. 

Hon. John W. Noble, 

Secretary of the Interior, Washington, D. C. 



FREEDNEN'S HOSPITAL. 
Takle A. — Causes of dent It. 



327 



Disease, etc. 



Phthisis pulmonalis 

Valvular disease of heart... 

Cardiac dropsy 

Hypertrophy of heart 

Typhoid fever 

Typho malarial fever 

Malarial fever 

Pneumonia 

Pleuropneumonia 

Typhoid-pneumonia 

Congestion of lungs 

Gangrene of lungs 

La grippe 

Senile debility 

Congenital debility 

Blight's disease 

Chronic diarrhoea 

Chronic diarrhoea; tertiary 
syphilis 

Chronic dysentery 

Apoplexy 

Softening of brain 

Congestion of brain 

Meningitis 

Tubercular meningitis 

Concussion of brain 

Concussion of spine 

Paralysis, general 

Paralysis agitans 

Peritonitis 

Cancer of face 

Cancer of throat 

Cancer of axilla 

Cancer of uterus 

Fibroid tumor of uterus 

Senile gangrene 

Gangrene of legs and scro- 
tum 

Gangrene of leg and foot . . . 

Gangrene of penis and scro- 
tum 



AVliil* 



Colored. 



Disease, etc 



While. 



I lolored. 



Trismus nascentium 

Premature birth 

Hepatic dropsy 

Pyaemia 

Tetanus, traumatic 

Puerperal mania 

Acute mania 

Fracture of leg ; contusions; 
congestion of brain 

Fracture of leg and skull .. 

Fracture of skull 

Compound comminuted 
fracture of arm 

Loaded wagon passed over 
body ; shock ; internal 
hemorrhage 

Gunshot wound through 
pleural cavity and stom- 
ach 

Gunshot wound of eye 

Gunshot wound of lungs. .. 

Convulsions 

Epileptic convulsions 

Burns; epileptic convulsions 

Exhaustion 

Purpura hemorrhagica 

Enteritis 

Erysipelas, phlegmonous. . . 

Sclerous tumor of throat ; 
asphyxia 

Oedema of glottis 

Caries of knee joint 

Marasmus 

Cystitis 

Hypertrophy of liver 

Abscess of liver 

Confinement (malforma- 
tion of pelvis) 

Phlegmatia dolens 



Total 



20 



94 



283 



Table B. 



■Number of deaths occurring within ten days after admission, and the time each 
case was in the hospital prior to death. 



2 died 

Idled 

2 died 

1 died 

2 died 
2 died 
2 (lied 

1 died 
1 died 

1 died 

2 died 

2 died 

2 died 

3 died 
1 died 
1 died 
Gdied 
1 died 



5 minutes after admission. 

1 hour after admission. 
1| hours after admission. 

2 hours after admission. 

3 hours after admission. 

4 hours after admission. 
(5 hours after admission. 

7 hours after admission. 

8 hours after admission. 
8£ hours after admission. 

9 hours after admission. 

10 hours after admission. 
12 hours after admission. 
15 hours after admission. 
20 hours after admission. 

23 hours after admission. 

24 hours after admission. 
28 hours after admission. 



1 died in 30 hours after admission. 
3 died in 40 hours alter admission. 

1 died in 46 hours after admission. 
12 died in 2 days after admission. 

2 died in 2j days after admission. 

7 died in 3 days after admission. 

3 died in 3$ days after admission. 
6 died in 4 days after admission. 

4 died in 4.V days after admission. 
10 died in 5 days after admission. 

died in days after admission. 

5 died in 7 days alter admission. 
G died in s days alter admission. 

1 died in 8J days after admission. 
3 died in 9 days after admission. 

8 died in 10 days after admission 

Total, 111: over one-third of all the deaths 00 
curring during the year. 



328 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Table C. — Hie diseases and conditions for which patients were admitted to hospital and 

treated in dispensary. 





Treated in hos- 
pital. 


a 

2 

'S . 

| 


Diseases, etc. 


Treated in hos- 
pital. 


a 
p. 

80 


Diseases, etc 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Colored. 






M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


OS 
V 
h 

H 








5 

1 






Psoas abscess 


2 
12 




3 

1 

14 


"2 

11 
3 

8 
4 


2 


Compound fracture of 










67 




14 










2 






Compound (Vat tare of na- 






1 

1 
1 


... 


Abscesses 


3 
2 


.... 


10 
3 


49 






















1 
2 




Compound fracture of Ln- 




































1 










2 


1 




Fracture of scapula 


1 
















1 
1 




1 












Compound fracture of hu- 








2 














1 
.... 














4 






1 


2 




Compound comminuted 






1 


1 
1 












1 


10 






















4 
1 
5 










1 
2 
2 








































2 
2 












Compound comminuted 




























1 












2 

1 
2 












-?, 


Loaded wagon passed over 
body, shock, internal 












4 


.... 


2 




4 


Hernia, strangulated in- 


2 
















1 
















2 
2 
2 

20 

57 

42 

2 

10 

42 

20 

..... 

6 
3 


A neuriam of thoracic aorta. 
Aneurism of innominate 


1 


1 


























1 








13 
7 
9 

14 
6 

23 
4 
1 
3 


3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
1 
1 
.... 

1 










1 






2 

1 
3 


.... 










4 










2 
2 
17 
14 
1 
2 














~U 
17 
1 
5 
1 
1 
11 


10 






7 
1 
1 
1 


1 
2 
2 


118 




'l3 
2 

o 




Syphilis, secondary 


44 




34 


Coxalgia 


Syphilitic condylomata 


4 
6 






9 

7 
4 
3 


1 


34 
29 
24 
14 
4 
6 


lfH 










Bubo 


106 








1 




39 


Ingrowing toe-nail 


1 
1 

1 
1 




1 


3 




23 








3 












Stricture of urethra 


4 




12 






1 


.... 


3 
3 


4 




Hypertrophy of penis and 






1 
3 
2 

3 

1 
1 

1 








.... 


.... 


3 

1 


.... 














fl 










2 










Caries of superior maxillary 

( u r. sof iKlt'ii.rniaxillai', 


1 








Gangrene of penis and 


1 


.... 








1 
1 

1 

2 
1 

1 
















Abscess of penis and scro- 


















Necrosis of metacarpal 


1 


.... 






































1 




Necrosis of phalanges 


1 


.... 












2 




1 


:::;: 




1 




2 


6 


Necrosis of pelvis and hip 


1 


.... 


2 
1 
1 






4 


4 








3 














? 






















4 








.... 


7 

4 

5 




3 


.... 


3 
1 


6 


4, r > 
























2 






1 














1 


3 


:: 


3 


Cur\ ature of spine 






1 
4 


1 
1 






5 










1 
1 




Gaugi ene oi' t'uot and leg . . 


1 





Vesico vaginal lisiula 


■ - - - 




.... 





freedmen's hospital. 



329 



Table C. 



■The diseases and conditions for which patients were admitted to hospital and 
treated in dispensary — Continued. 



Diseases, etc. 



Haemorrhoids 

Prolapsus ani 

Diabetes nielli*. us 

Blight's disease 

Ascites 

General dropsy 

Acute rheumatism 

Chrouic rheumatism 

Lumbago 

Sciatica 

Neuralgia 

Myalgia 

Pleurodynia 

Torticollis 

Alcoholism . , 

Delirium tremens 

Amaurosis 

Cataract 

Conjunctivitis 

Granular conjunctivitis 

Ophthalmia, scrofulous 

Ophthalmia, gonorrheal . . . 
Ophthalmia, neonatorum. . . 

Iritis 

Iritis, syphilitic 

Keratitis 

Ulcer of cornea 

Opacity of cornea 

Staphyloma 

Pterygium 

Tinea capitis 

Tinea corporis 

Scabies 

Acne 

Herpes zoster 

Pruritis 

Eczema 

Rupia 

Urticaria 

Lupus 

Elephantiasis 1 

Enlarged glands 

Goitre 

Scrofula 

Otorrhcea 

Otitis 

Otalgia 

Intermittent fever (qaoti- 

dian) 

Intermittent fever (tertian) 

Remittent lever 

T\ phoid fever 

Typho-malarial fever 

Malaria] fever 

Congestive chill 

Erysipelas 

Erysipelas, phlegmonous. . . 

Ru beola 

Anaemia 

Nostalgia 

Pyaemia 

Septicaemia 

A cute bronchitis 

Chronic bronchitis 

Capillary bronchitis 

La grippe 

Influenza 

Nasal catarrh 

Nasal polypus 

Tonsillitis 

Ulceration of lips 

Ulceration of throat 

Diphtheria 



Treated in hos- 
pital. 



White. 



M. F 



Colored 



M. F 



18 



13 



5 3 



259 

71 
57 

11 



10 
3 

70 
3 
7 
4 

78 
21 
25 
12 
5 
L66 



20 



Treated in hos- 
pital. 



Diseases, etc. 



White. 



Asthma 

Pertussis 

Pleurisy 

Phthisis pulmonalis 

Haemoptysis 

Laryngeal phthisis 

Pneumonia 

Congestion of lungs 

Pleuro-pnemonuia 

Typhoid-pneumonia 

Gangrene of lungs 

Acute laryngitis 

Chronic laryngitis 

Tuberculosis 

Valvular disease of heart. . 

Cardiac dropsy 

Hypertrophy of heart 

Angina pectoris 

Functional disorder of 

heart 

Fatty degeneration of heart 

Pericarditis 

Endocarditis 

AphthaB 

Stomatitis 

Ptyalism 

Pharyngitis 

Oedema of glottis 

Parotitis 

Gastralgia 

Gastritis 

Pyrosis. 

Dyspepsia 

Constipation 

Enteritis 

Gastroenteritis . . „ 

Dysentery 

Marasmus 

Cholera-morbus 

Colic 

Acute diarrhoea 

Chronic diarrhoea 

Hypertrophy of liver 

A bscess of liver 

Icterus 

Peri tonitis 

Hysteria 

Insomnia 

Cephalalgia 

Neurasthenia 

Morphine habit 

Dementia 

Acute mania 

Hypochondriasis 

Convulsions 

Vertigo 

Epileptic convulsions 

Epilepsy 

Bystero-epilepsy 

Chorea „ 

Catalepsy 

Paralysis agitans 

Paralysis, general 

Hemiplegia 

Paraplegia 

Congestion of brain 

Concussion of brain 

Concussion of spine 

Softening of brain 

Acute meningitis 

Tubercular meningitis 

Apoplexy 

Sun-st roke „ 



Colored. 



M. F 



5 
15 



1 I.. 



330 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Table C. — The diseases and conditions for which patients were admitted to hospital and 
treated in dispensary — Continued. 





Treated in hos- 
pital. 


a 

4) 

H 


Diseases, etc. 


Treated in hos- 
pital. 


a 
a. 

05 


Diseases, etc. 


White. 


Colored 


White. 


Colored. 


■fit 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 
2 


H 




1 










Rupture of peringeum and 










Pregnane} 


5 


"2 


201 
4 

27 
1 

21 
2 

10 
1 
1 


78 

"'l3 
10 

"16* 












3 
















4 
2 


6 




































23 














1 
1 


.... 


1 
8 

1 

3 

88 

3 


7 














1? 














12 










Menopause 


... 


1 
1 


83' 
8 


4 






1 




9ft 








2 
10 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 


""'5' 
3 




4 






























13 


















1 




















18 




















3 












2 
23 


"2 

1 


1 
20 

1 










1 






8 


15 








5 

2 


2 

1 

1 

13 










1 


.... 




1 
50 














3 


2 












5 
3 




315 

































Table D. — Occupation of patients. 



Occupation. 



Servant 

Laborer 

Ex-soldier 

Driver 

Waiter 

Cook 

Barber 

Hostler 

"Washer-woman 

Painter 

Carpenter 

Shoemaker 

Blacksmith 

Sailor . -. 

Housekeeper . . . 

Clerk 

Nurse 

Chambermaid .. 

Baker 

Huckster 

Seamstress 

Watchman 

Gardener 

Porter 

Hodcarrier 

Stone-cutter.*... 

Farmer 

Lawyer 



No. 



574 

454 

128 

58 

35 

23 

23 

20 

19 

18 

14 

12 

9 

9 

9 

9 

7 

7 

6 



Occupation. 



Ex -IT. S. Navy . 
Plasterer...... 

Printer 

Engineer 

Brick-maker. . . 
Boiler-maker . . 
Cabinet-maker 

Shoe-black 

Boatman 

Machinist 

Messenger 

liivu er 

Bricklayer 

Batcher 

Teacher 

()\ sterman 

Sexton 

Midwife 

Student 

Ragman 

Moulder 

Plumber 

Wood-sawyer . 
Expressman... 

Coachman 

Clock-mender . 

Peddler 

Newsboy 



No. 



Occupation. 



Minister 

Hatter 

Florist 

Physician 

Editor 

Brakeman 

Planter 

Decorator 

Iceman 

Caterer 

Miller 

Lumberman. ... 
Broom-maker .. 

Chair-cant r 

Carriage-maker 
Confectioner ... 

Tailor 

Policeman 

Showman 

Agent 

Reporter 

Potter 

Bartender 

Foreman 

Salesman 

Carrige-painter 
No occupation.. 
Unknown 



No. 



74 
535 



FREEDMEN'S HOSPITAL. 
Table E. — Nativity of patients. 



331 



Where born. 



Virginia 

District of Columbia 

Man land 

Ireland 

Now York... 

Pennsylvania 

Germany 

North Carolina 

England 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Massachusetts 

Mississippi 

Kentucky 

New Jersey 

West Virginia 

Delaware , 



795 
539 

188 
108 
68 

55 
40 
32 
15 
14 
12 
II 
11 
10 
'7 
G 
5 
5 



Where born. 



Ohio 

Rhode Island 
Louisiana . . . 
Connecticut. 

Italy 

France 

West Indies. 

Canada 

Scotland 

Vermont 

Belgium . 

Austria 

Russia 

Michigan 

Indiana 

Alabama 

Missouri 

Illinois 



No. 



Whore born. 



M innesota 

Prussia 

Denmark 

Algiers 

Holland 

China 

Australia 

Wales 

Persia . 

At sea 

Flordia 

Wisconsin 

Indian Territory 

Texas 

Iowa 

Jamaica 

Unknown 



No. 





Table 


F.— 


Showing the number admitted each, month. 




Month. 


No. 


Month. 


No. 


Month. 


No. 


1889. 


239 

201 
189 
197 

180 


1889— Continued. 


222 

200 
163 

205 


1890— Continued. 

April 

May 


157 




1890. 


206 






233 






Total 








2,392 











Table G. — Showing the number admitted each year for the past sixteen years. 



During year ended June — 


No. 


During year ended June— 


No. 

892 
1,102 
1, 373 

1,509 


During year ended June — 


No. 


1875 


190 
319 
50D 
519 
642 
819 


1881 .. 


1887 


2,017 


1876 


1882 .. 


1888 .. 


1,997 


1X77 


1883 

1884 


1889 


2,074 


1878 


1890 


2, 392 


1S7S) 


1885 


1,794 
1,923 






1880 


1886 











Table H. 





White. 


Colored. 


Grand 




Males. 


Females 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Total. 


Remaining June 30, 1889 


29 


9 


38 


85 


74 


159 


197 






455 
4 


79 
1 


534 
5 


819 
91 


841 
102 


1,600 
193 


2,194 

198 






Total 


459 


80 


539 


910 


943 
1,017 


1,853 
2,012 


2, 392 




Total in hospital 


488 

444~ 
20 


89 


577 


995 


2,589 




Discharged 


75 

4 


519 
24 


730 

165 

11 


803 
94 
11 


1, 533 

259 

22 


2, 052 

283 

22 


Died.... ..:::........... 

Still-born 












Total 


464 


79 


543 


906 


908 


1,814 


2, 357 




Remaining June 30, 1890 


24 


10 


34 


89 


109 


198 


232 







COLUMBIA INSTITUTION FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB. 



OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTION. 



A^ron.-BENJAMIN HARRISON, President 

of the United States. 
/Votot-EDWARD MINER GALLAUDET, 

Ph. D., LL. D. 
Secretary.— ROBERT C. FOX, LL. D. 
Treasurer.— LEWIS J. DAVIS, Esq. 



Directors.— Hon. JOSEPH R. HAWLEY, Sena- 
tor from Conn.; Hon. JOHN J. HEMPHILL, 
M. C. from S. C; Hon. R. R. HITT, M. C. from 
HI., representing the Congress of the United 
States; HON. HENRY L. DAWES, of Mass.; 
Hon. WILLIAM E. NIBL ACK, LL. D.. of 1 nd., 
Rev. BYRON SUNDERLAND, D. D. ; Hon. 
JOHN W. FOSTER; Hon. J. RANDOLPH 
TUCKER; JAMES C. WELLING, LL.D. 



COLLEGE FACULTY. 



President, and Professor of Moral and Political Sci- 
ence.- EDWARD M. GALLAUDET, Ph. D., 
LL. D. 

Vice-President and Professor of History and Lan- 
guages. -EDWARD A. FAY, M. A., Ph. D. 

Emeritus Professor of Mental Science and English 
Philology.— SAMUEL PORTER, M. A. 

Professor of Natural Science.— Rev. JOHN W. 
CHICK EKING, M. A. 



Professor of Mathematics and Chemistry. — JO- 
SEPH C. GORDON, M. A. 

Assistant Professor of History and English. — J. 
BURTON HOTCHK1SS, M'. A . 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Latin. — 
AMOS G. DRAPER, M. A. 

Instructor in Gymnastics.— FRANK A. LEIT- 
NER. 

Instructor in Drawing.— ARTHUR D. BRYANT, 
B.Ph. 



FACULTY OF THE KENDALL SCHOOL. 



President— EDWARD M. GALLAUDET, Ph. 
I)., LL. D. 

Instructors.— JAMES DENISON, M. A., Princi- 
pal ; MELVILLE BALLARD, M. S.; THEO- 
DORE A. KIESEL, B. Ph.; SARAH H. POR- 
TER. 



Instructor in Articulation.— MARY T. G. GOR- 
DON. 



DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 



Supervisor.— WALLACE G. FOWLER. 
Attending Physician.— U. K. SHUTE, M. I). 
Consulting Physician.— H. S. LINCOLN, M. D. 
Matron.— Ml&s ELLEN GORDON. 



Assistant Matron.— Mis* MARGARET ALLEN. 
Master oj Shop.— ALMON LKYANT. 
Farmer and Head Gardener.— EDWARD MAN- 
GUM. 

333 



REPOET 



OP THE 



COLUMBIA INSTITUTION FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB. 



Columbia Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, 
Kendall Green, near Washington, D. (7., October 4, 1890. 
Sir : In compliance with the acts of Congress making provision for 
the support of this institution, we have the honor to report its progress 
during the year ended June 30, 1890. 

The pupils remaiuing in this institution on the 1st of July, 1889, numbered 7(> 

Admitted during the year 23 

Since admitted ". 30 

Total 129 

Under instruction since July 1, 1889, males, 100 ; females, 29. Of 
these 71 have been in the collegiate department, representing twenty 
States, the District of Columbia, and Canada, and 58 in the primary 
department. 

A list of the names of the pupils connected with the institution since 
July 1, 1889, will be found appended to this report. 

DEATH OF WALTER ARGO. 

The general health of the pupils during the year has been excellent. 
An isolated case of typhoid fever, however, resulted fatally. 

A careful examination of the premises disclosed no cause for the oc- 
currence of this particular disease in the institution. 

The pupil who died was Walter Argo, a beneficiary of the State of 
Delaware. He was a boy of good promise and excellent character. 
He had nearly completed his course in the Kendall school, and there is 
reason to believe that he would, had his life been spared, have become 
a self-supporting and God-fearing member of society. 

His afflicted parents have the sympathy of the many friends to whom 
he had endeared himself by his gentle manners and modest demeanor 
as a pupil. 

CHANGES IN CORPS OF OFFICERS. 

In February last Mr. John B. Wight, who had filled the office of su- 
pervisor for more than twelve years, resigned his position to engage in 
business in Washington. His resignation was very reluctantly accepted, 
for the success of his work here had been marked, and he commanded 

335 



336 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

tbe respect, confidence, and esteem of his associates as well as of the 
students and pupils, for all of whom he was untiring in his kind offices 
tar beyond what his official duty demanded. 

The best wishes of his many friends in the institution follow him. 

Mr. Wallace G. Fowler, of Connecticut, has been appointed to suc- 
ceed Mr. Wight, and in the few months he has been connected with the 
institution, has given ample proof of his fitness for the place assigned 
him. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION AND LECTURES. 

No essential change has taken place in the general course of instruc- 
tion since 1887, when in our thirtieth report a detailed statement of the 
branches taught in both school and college was published. 

During the past year special lectures have been given as follows : 

IN THE COLLEGE. 

The Gospel of Thrift. By President Gallaudet. 
Our North Eastern Boundary. By Professor Chickering. 
Imagination as a Factor of Civilization. By Professor Gordon. 
Impressions of Art in Europe. By Professor Draper. 

IN THE KENDALL SCHOOL. 

Explorations in Africa. By Mr. Denison. 

Wars of the Roses. By Mr. Ballard. 

Capture of Louisburg in 1745. By Mr. Kiesel. 

Assassination of Lincoln. By Mr. Bryanl . 

Personal Experiences in Europe. By Mr. Regensburg. 

Life of David Crockett. By Mr. Shuey. 

Cannibals of Australia. By Mr. Tracy. 

Robert Bruce. By Mr. Hagerty. 

Insect Life. By Mr. Washburn. 

Alfred the Great. By Mr. Zorn. 

Labors of Hercules. By Mr. Leitner. 

The last seven lectures were given without compensation by the 
members of the graduating class of the college. 

At the close of the academic year in June certificates of honorable 
dismission from the Kendall School were given to Maurice T. Fell, 
Edward W. Lane, John H. Lay, Henry H. Rohrer, and William Argo. 

PUBLIC EXERCISES OF PRESENTATION DAY. 

The annual public exercises of the college took place on the 7th of 
May, and were presided over by Hon. W. D. Washburn, United 
States Senator from Minnesota, who made an earnest and eloquent 
address to the graduating class. The interest of Senator Washburn's 
speech was much heightened by the fact that one of his sons was a 
member of the class. 

The orations and dissertations of the candidates for degrees were as 
follows: 

Oration: The Almighty Dollar. William Henry Zorn, Ohio. 

Dissertation : The Turks in Europe. Frank Abraham Leitner, Mary- 
land. 

Dissertation: Poverty and the Remedy. Hobart Lorraine Tracy, 
Iow T a. 



COLUMBIA INSTITUTION FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB. 337 

Oration: Origin of Kome. Stephen Shney, Missouri. 

Oration : The Mind of the Spider. Cadwallader Lincoln Washburn, 
Minnesota. 

Oration : Agriculture. Thomas Hagerty, Wisconsin. 

Oration : The Race Problem. Oscar Henry Regensburg, Illinois. 

A telegram was received from the honorable Secretary of the In- 
terior, expressing regret that he could not return from St. Louis in 
time to be present at the exercises, and giving assurance of his warm 
interest in the work of the college. 

At the close of the academic year, in accordance with the recommen- 
dations of presentation day, the degree of bachelor of arts was conferred 
on William Henry Zorn, of Ohio, Hobart Lorraine Tracy, of Iowa, 
Stephen Shuey, of Missouri, Cadwallader Lincoln Washburn, of Min- 
nesota, Thomas Hagerty, of Wisconsin, and Oscar Henry Regensberg, 
of Illinois. 

The degree of bachelor of science was conferred on Frank Abraham 
Leitner, of Maryland. 

FAVORABLE ACTION OF CONGRESS. 

In our last report mention was made of certain restrictive legislation 
had at the previous session of Congress, the effect of which on the use- 
fulness of the institution was thought by the directors to be very un- 
favorable. 

They therefore directed attention to the disastrous consequences likely 
to follow the enforcement of this legislation, and advised that it be re- 
pealed or amended. 

Congress at its recent session gave careful consideration to these mat- 
ters, and acted favorably on the recommendation of the directors. 

The most important point involved concerned the basis on which 
students without means might be admitted to the college, and the fol- 
lowing liberal provision was adopted in the Sundry Civil appropriation 
bill approved August 30, viz : 

Provided, That deaf mutes, not exceeding sixty in number, admitted to this insti- 
tution from the several States and Territories under section forty-eight hundred and 
sixty-five of the Revised Statutes, shall have the expenses of their instruction in the 
collegiate department paid from this appropriation, together with so much of the 
expense ot their support when indigent, and while in the institution, as may be au- 
thorized by the board of trustees, with the approval of the Secretary of the Interior; 
and hereafter there shall not be admitted to said institution under section forty-eight 
hundred and sixty-five of Revised Statutes, nor shall these be maintained after such 
admission, at any one time from any State or Territory exceeding three deaf mutes 
while there are applications pending from deaf mutes, citizens of States or Territories 
having less than three pupils in said institution. 

WHAT THE GRADUATES OF THE COLLEGE HAVE DONE. 

There have been found those in former years who have doubted as 
to the practical value of college training to deaf mutes. 

All such persons and the multitude of others friendly to the higher 
education of the deaf will be interested in a paper which will be found 
in the appendix by Professor Draper, of our college faculty, and a grad- 
uate of the college, read at the recent convention of instructors of the 
deaf, held in New Fork August 23-27. 

THE NEW YORK CONVENTION. 

The meeting at New York was one of great interest and value to all 
who are in any way connected with the education of the deaf, 

INT 90— VOL III 22 



338 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 

Fifty schools ifi the United States and Canada were represented by 
three hundred and forty-six delegates. 

The authorities of the New York institution extended bounteous 
hospitality to this great number of persons, and to others not strictly 
entitled to be entertained. 

Many valuable papers were read and interesting discussions had. 

This institution was represented by its president, Professors Fay and 
Draper of the college faculty, and by Mr. Denison, the principal of the 
Kendall school. 

GALEATJDET MEMORIAL ART FUND. 

The National Association of Deaf Mutes, by whom the statue of 
Thomas Hopkins Gallaudct, the founder of deaf-mute education in 
America, was erected on the grounds of this institution in June, 1880, 
offered to our directors some months since, through their treasurer, a 
balance of $479.54, asking that this money be used in caring for, pre- 
serving, and repairing, if necessary, the statue and its pedestal. The 
directors present at the meeting of May 6 expressed the opinion that 
having accepted the statue as a gift from the association the institution 
was naturally bound to meet the expense of keeping it in repair, and 
they passed a vote to this effect. They then accepted the money of- 
fered, and by personal gifts raised the amount to $500, and directed 
that this sum be held and invested by the treasurer as a permanent 
fund to be called the Gallaudet Memorial Art Fund, the income to be 
devoted to tin* purchase of engravings or such other works of art as 
might promote the development of art instruction in the institution. 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

The* receipts and expenditures for the year under review will appear 
from the following detailed statements: 

Support of the Institutiox. 

receipts. 

Balance from old account $495. 59 

Received from Treasury of the United States 57,531. 99 

Received for board and tuition 6, 420.90 

Received for work done in shop 232. 25 

Received for work done in printing office ■ 86. 60 

Received for old metal 43. 09 

Received lor old carpet - 17. 22 

Received for witness tees 2. 50 

64, 830. 14 

EXPKXDITURKS. 

Expended for salaries and wages , 30,625. 71 

Expended for gmeeries 3, 372. 04 

Expended for ordinary repairs 3, 106. 85 

Expended for special repairs in steam-fitting and plumbing 2,421.41 

Expended for painting outside wood-work of buildings 916.00 

Expended for concrete pavement and repairs 629.09 

Expended for household expenses, marketing, etc 2,962.65 

Expended for meats 3,635. 85 

Expended lor bread t 935. 70 

Expended for butter 1,852.96 

Expended for medical and surgical attendance , 591.85 

Expended for rent of telephone 100.00 



COLUMBIA INSTITUTION FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB. 339 

Expended for furniture $1, 123. 64 

Expended for dry- goods, etc 675. 66 

Expended for lumber 914. 32 

Expended for gas 998.50 

Expended for paints 389. 85 

Expended for feed, flour, etc '. 796. 22 

Expeuded for printing 253.20 

Expended for medicine and chemicals 301.42 

Expended for books, paper, etc , w . 507. 02 

Expended for hardware 781. 24 

Expended for fuel 1,988.95 

Expended for plants and flowers 110. 25 

Expended for blacksmithing _ 113. 40 

Expended for wagon and repairs 400.50 

Expended for auditing accounts of the institution 300. 00 

Expended for land lying between the eastern boundary and Baltimore and 

Ohio Railroad 500.00 

Expended for ice 348. 83 

Expended for manure 370. 00 

Expended for live-stock 429.50 

Expended for harness and repairs 58. 65 

Expended for garden-seeds, etc 88. 91 

Expended for entertainment of pupils 80.00 

Expended for china, glass and wooden ware 431. 95 

Expended for stamped envelopes 21.80 

Expended for potatoes 99. 10 

Expended for illustrative apparatus 191 86 

Expended for investment thiough L. J. Davis, treasurer 495.59 

Expended for funeral expenses of pupil '_. 50. 00 

Balance 859.67 

64, 830. 14 
INVESTED FUNDS. 

The condition of the invested funds of the institution is shown by the 
following report of the treasurer, Lewis J. Davis, esq.: 

Washington, October 3, 1890. 
Dear Sir: In compliance with the request of the directors, I have to report the 
condition of the various funds under my charge and belonging to the Columbia In- 
stitution for the Deaf and Dumb : 

v 
Belonging to the " general account : " 

Real estate notes at 6 per cent . $750. 00 

Cash on hand 1,5:59.83 

2,289.83 
Belonging to the " manual-labor fund : " 

Alexandria, Va., bonds |300.00 

Alexandria, Va., scrip 51. 00 

Winchester and Potomac Railroad bonds 250. 00 

Real estate notes at 6 per cent 3, 200. 00 

Part of real estate notes at 6 per cent, held jointly with Gal- 

laudet Memorial Art Fund 1,500.00 

Cash on hand 1535.43 

5, 636. 43 
Belonging to "Gallaudet Memorial Art Fund : " 

Part of real estate note held as above 500. 00 

Respectfully, jours, 

Lewis J. Davis, 

Treasurer. 

Dr. E. M. Gallaudet, 

President, etc. 



340 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 
ESTIMATES FOR NEXT YEAR. 

The following estimates for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, have 
already been submitted: 

For the support of the institution, including salaries and in