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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

REPORTS 

OF 

THE SELECTMEN, 
THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE ALMS-HOUSE, 

THE BOARD OF FIRE-WARDS, 

AND THE 

SUPERINTENDING SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

OF 
THE TOWIV OF M AlVCHESTER , 

FOR THE YEAR. 

1845-6. 



MANCHESTER, N. H.: 

PRINTED AT THE AMERICAN OFFICE S. F. WETMORE. 

1846, 



N 



Report of the Selectmen, 

EXPENDITURES. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 



Paid James M. Gregg, 
Thomas Ordway, 
T. G. Young, 
J. E. Kimball, 
Jeremiah Fellows 
D. K. Perkins, 
Walter H. Noyes, 
Gilman C. Smith, 
David Dickey, 
William Coult, 
Grandison Morse, 
William W. Baker, 
George Clark, 
David Young, 
I. C. Flanders, 
William Bunton, 
Andrew Bunton, 
Stephen Tilton 
Jeremiah Fellows, 
Walter H. Noyes, 
Jabez L. Manter, 
Samuel Bartlett, 
David Dickey, 
Gilman Harvey, 



5 21 


1 00 


4 81 


1 50 


27 59 


4 42 


3 00 


3 50 


5 20 


3 62 


6 00 


75 


2 58 


6 00 


5 75 


8 16 


1 73 


20 59 


8 00 


3 80 


1 00 


1 25 


2 00 


1 00 



Carried forward, $128 46 



Highways and Bridges bro't for'd, 128 46 



Paid David Dickey, 


11 00 


James M. Gregg, 


20 37 


Robert Baker, 


16 00 


Robert Stevens, 


2 00 


Jonathan E. Wallace, 


36 50 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Com., 


143 12 


True Norris, 


16 44 


Jonas Harvey, Jr., 


7 64 


David Child, 


22 50 


Hoi lis Dorr, 


12 25 


J. M. Noyes, Highway tax bills, 


2,383 80 




$2,780 08 


SCHOOLS. 




Paid School District No. 1, 


116 86 


55 55 5) O 


2,560 72 


55 55 3) Q 


156 75 


55 55 53 A 


104 75 


33 5> 


50 00 


33 35 33 7 


163 54 


33 33 „ g' 


79 00 


33 35 33 C) 


167 96 




$3,399 58 


SCHOOL HOUSES. 




Paid School District No. 7, 


73 00 


33 35 55 2 


1,950 59 



$2,023 59 

POOR OFF THE FARM. 

Paid Porter & Smyth, 5 75 

Sam'l Mfclrin, for relief J. Griffin's family, 18 00 
Hazen Davis, (paid by Moses Davis,) 7 50 

Abel P. Corning, 6 00 

Thomas Brown, for doctoring town and 

county paupers, 15 00 

Thomas Brown, 2 34 

Eben Perry, for Almira Wiggin, 4 75 

Enoch Bodwell, for support of J. Hasel- 

ton, Jr.'s children, 26 00 

John Haselton, for support of J. Haselton, 

Jr.'s children, 28 17 

Carried forward, $ 113 51 



Poor off the Farm, bro't forward, 113 51 
Paid Ebenezer Clark, (paid by Gilmanton,) 49 25 
Abel P. Corning, 2 00 

Francis Manter, for E. Corning, and Grif- 
fin child, 16 00 
Reuben G. Sawyer, for support of R. Saw- 
yer and wife, 18 75 
Reuben White, for J. Griffin, 2 86 
William Patterson, for relief N. Palmer, 7 25 
Reuben G. Sawyer, for support of R. Saw- 
yer and wife, 18 75 
S. L. Wilson, for Haselton children, 8 00 
George Corning, for E. Corning, and Grif- 
fin child, 30 00 
Enoch Bodwell, for support of Haselton 

children, 24 00 

Reuben G. Sawyer, for support of R. Saw- 
yer ,and wife, 18 75 
Josiah Perry, 4 29 
Reuben White, for J. Griffin, 8 30 
George Corning, for E. Corning, and Grif- 
fin child, 15 00 
Hill & Berry, for J. Griffin, 3 12 

$339 83 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid Eben C. Foster, W. C. Hunneman's bill, 18 37 
Isaac Sanborn, repairing and cleaning 

engines, 20 44 

J. E. Davis, Jr., for wood, oil, &c, 23 02 
Ebenezer Ross, for reparing hooks and 

ladders, 4 00 

Albert Lane, 1 12 
Richard G. Smith, for labor and materials 

on reservoirs in Merrimack square, 18 30 
Joseph Marshall, for blank books, 1 75 
Aretas Knights, for oil and labor on en- 
gine No. 4, 10 00 
J. C. Wadleigh, for painting, &c, 9 25 
Amos B. Morrill, for iron work, 6 45 
Engine Co. No. 5, oil, fixtures and repairs, 30 38 
Parker & McCrillis, for repairs, 1 28 
A. S. Trask, rent of land for engine house, 11 67 

Carried forward, $156 03 



Fire Department, bro't forward, 156 03 

Paid Kidder, Farley & Co., oil, lanterns, &c, 5 34 
James Boyd & Sons, for badges, 15 75 

Stillman Fellows, 1 75 

H. Tufts & Co., 1 25 

J. G. Cilley, engineer and secretary, 30 25 
R. G. Smith, engineer, 10 00 

R. G. Smith, work on reservoirs and keep- 
ing them open in the winter, 13 75 
R. G. Smith, examining houses as to buck- 
ets, ladders, &c, 20 00 
David Gillis, engineer, 10 00 
William C. Clarke, engineer, 10 00 



COUNTY PAUPERS. 




Paid N. Chase, 


2 75 


Thomas Brown, 


5 00 


Franklin Page, 


6 67 


Israel Mullins, 


22 00 


Allen Goss, 


6 00 


Josiah Allen, 


7 25 


Sarah Elliott, 


6 50 


Hill & Berry, 


4 25 


Til ton & Sweetser 


12 82 


Richard W. Cooper, 


8 50 


Nathan Parker, 


1 50 


Thomas M. Bacon, 


10 00 


Franklin Page, 


10 00 


Keziah Evans, 


30 00 


Timothy B. Edgerton, 


25 00 


Timothy B. Edgerton. 


20 00 


Horace Porter, 


5 00 


J. G. Sanborn, 


9 43 


Hazen Webster, 


7 50 


Lucy Aiusworth, 


10 00 


Timothy B. Edgerton. 


20 00 


Israel Mullins, 


33 00 


Franklin Page, 


13 08 


W. Boyd & Co., 


1 93 


Eliza Edgerton, 


13 71 


J. J. Straw, 


36 34 


Carried forward, 


328 22 



J74 12 



County paupers, bro't forward, 


328 22 


Paid Thomas McKew, 


9 25 


Amos Tilton, 


35 62 


Eliza Edgerton, 


15 00 


J. W. Worthen, 


3 79 


M. G. J. Tewksbury, 


3 00 


Nathaniel Wheet, 


46 00 


Amos Tilton, 


38 15 


Amos Carr, 


30 00 


Eveline Farnum, 


2 00 


Abigail Montgomery, 


2 00 


Eliza Edgerton, 


18 00 


Americus Gates, 


5 00 


William McQueston, 


10 00 


Amos Tilton, 


14 72 


Nathan Parker, 


1 00 



$541 76 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid Potter & Davis, advertising notice, 1844, 1 00 
S. F. Wetmore, reports of selectmen, 

check list, &c, 68 00 

Potter & Davis, advertising notices, 4 75 

S. F. Wetmore, blanks, police, and fire- 
ward regulations, 39 75 
J. C. Emerson, printing notices for health 

officers and school committee, 5 50 

Joseph Marshall,! n voice and blank books 

and stationery, 24 56 

S. F. Wetmore, printing check list and 

notices, 13 75 

S. F. Wetmore, printing check list and 

warrants, 18 00 

Robert Moore, record book 3 00 

S. F. Wetmore, advertising notices, 8 00 

C. E. Potter, advertising notices, 7 50 



$ 193 81 



TOWN DEBT PAID. 

Paid D. A. Bunton, 

INTEREST PAID. 

Paid sundry individuals, 



1,000 00 



1,951 24 



NUTT ROAD. 

Paid John Young, for land, 185 00 

John P. Young, » 20 00 

Edward & J. P. Young, " 100 00 

David Dickey, " 145 00 

Jonathan E. Wallace, for labor, 43 00 

B. S. Crockett " 90 16 

Jacob Mead, " 75 88 

Amos Webster, " 56 25 

Francis H. Watson, " 65 00 

David Dickey, " 105 96 

Isaac Riddle, for surveying, 1 50 

Jonas Harvey, for land, 2 00 



NIGHT WATCH. 




Paid 1. B. Chesley, 


28 00 


Eben Knowlton, 


28 00 


I. B. Chesley, 


31 00 


Eben Knowlton, 


31 00 


I. B. Chesley, 


30 00 


James Chesley, 


14 00 


Eben Knowlton, 


30 00 


Eben Knowlton, 


92 00 


Eben Knowlton, 


31 00 


Aretas Knights, 


18 00 


John Doland, 


3 00 


Aretas Knights, 


20 34 


Eben Knowlton, 


30 00 


Eben Knowlton, 


31 00 


Aretas Knights, 


50 00 


Eben Knowlton, 


27 50 


Eben Knowlton, 


26 00 


Aretas Knights 


26 00 


William Bursiel, 


4 00 


Aretas Knights, 


26 00 


Eben Knowlton, 


26 00 



$889 75 



$ 602 84 



INCIDENTALS. 

Paid J. L. Fitch, 1 50 

Albert Lane, 42 

James & Sherburne, 1 71 

John Piatt, ringing bell for schools, 15 00 
Dana Sargent, Methodist Church for 

town meeting, 60 00 

Albert Lane, fitting up Methodist Chh. 

for town meeting, 19 79 

Joseph M. Rowell, expense in conse- 
quence of Parker's murder, 19 00 
Edwin A. Bodwell, 50 
Richard G. Smith, for extra night watch 

after Parker's murder, 44 75 

Daniel M. Robertson, expense in conse- 
quence of Parker's murder, 62 30 
L. D. Montgomery, 1 00 
Joseph M. Rowell, expense in conse- 
quence of Parker's murder, 27 39 
A. Sanborn, 1 50 
D. M. Robertson, 3 83 
George Hamblet, 2 00 
Abraham Thompson, damage done his 

horse, 1844, on account of bad road, 13 50 
George H. Brown, 2 25 

D. M. Robertson, chain, ball and lock, 

for house of correction, 8 57 

T. G. Young, ringing bell for schools, 15 00 
Nehemiah Chase, expense in conse- 
quence of Parker's murder, 41 17 
P. Craein, Jr., postage, 1 79 
Danief Wheeler, 2 00 
Samuel Batchelder, cleaning streets by 

order of health officers, 10 67 

D. M. Robinson, expense in consequence 

of Parker's murder, 9 92 

J. M. Rowell, expense in consequence of 

Parker's murder, 12 80 

Albert Lane, fitting up Methodist Chh. 

for town meeting, 5 62 

Methodist Soc, Chh. for town meeting, 45 00 



Carried forward, 424 68 



10 

Incidentals, bro't forward, 424 68 

Paid George Hamblet, 2 00 

Mace Moulton, expense in consequence 

of Parker's murder, 18 00 

T. G. Young, ringing bell for schools, 13 75 
Ezekiel Blake, 21 00 

Seth K. Jones, office rent for selectmen, 55 00 
W. Shepherd, liorse hire for selectmen, 16 87 
W. Shepherd, horse hire for superint'g 

school committee, 12 50 

Warren L. Lane, 1 37 

James S. Cheney, 1 50 

Amos Weston, 1 00 

Wm. Bunton, damage done sled, 5 00 

S. S. Carter, expense in consequence of 

Parker's murder, 8 25 

J. G. Cilley, expense in consequence of 

Parker's murder, 7 87 

Hollis Dorr, expense in consequence of 

Parker's murder, 12 00 

Wilson &. Bodwell, horse hire for super- 
intending school committee, 3 75 
Nathan Parker, journey to Amherst and 

Boston, 9 90 

Charles Chase, expenses to Grafton, Ex- 
eter, and Boston, 17 40 

$6SQ 14 

NEW TOWN HOUSE. 



.id Alpheus K. Brown, stone 


work, 


40 00 


Bailey & Flanders, 




500 00 


Bailey & Flanders, 




200 00 


Elijah Hanson, agent, 




50 00 


Bailey & Flanders, 




1000 00 


Bailey & Flanders, 




500 00 


Benjamin Somes, mason 


work, 


36 53 


Bailey & Flanders, 




1000 00 


Bailey & Flanders, 




500 00 


Bailey & Flanders, 




1650 00 


Bailey & Flanders, 




350 00 


John R. Leonard, labor, 




7 00 


Joseph Sawyer, lime, 


ard, 


12 67 


Carried forw 


5846 20 



11 

New Town House, bro't forward, 5846 20 
Paid Bailey & Flanders, 3750 00 
Thomas McKew, labor, 3 00 
William C. Hale, 1 67 
Elijah Hanson, agent, 50 00 
Bailey & Flanders, 2000 00 
Samuel Locke, labor, 1 64 
Amos B. Morrill, iron work, 4 75 
Bailey & Flanders, 500 00 
Benjamin Somes, mason work, 75 00 
John Folsom, for lumber, 99 55 
Samuel Poor, for lumber, 17 50 
Bailey & Flanders, 2500 00 
Parker & French, furniture, 18 00 
Elijah Hanson, agent, 100 00 
Timothy S. Parker, labor, 2 50 
Daniel Farmer, for laths, 20 00 
Stark Co., castings, 6 85 
Lyman Woodbury, for lumber, 24 85 
Z. Colby, for lumber, 10 17 
Thomas McKew, labor, 6 00 
Nehemiah Preston, lumber, 7 20 
Jonas B. Bowman, lumber, 114 50 
Henry N. Hooper & Co., bell, 529 03 
Alpheus K. Brown, stone work, 109 74 
Bailey & Flanders, 2000 00 
Abraham Cochran, lumber, ( 55 35 
Packard & Co., doors and sash, 50 74 
lchabod Hayes, labor, 1 50 
Hiram Bailey, labor, 300 00 
Jeremiah Fellows, labor, 7 86 
E. P. OfFutt, settees, 100 00 
Packard & Co., window frames, 38 50 
John C. Farnum, labor, ' 10 00 
D. Safford & Co., safe, doors, locks, 106 00 
William F. Shaw, repairing chande- 
lier lamps, 18 25 
Joseph Breck & Co., chandelier chain, 5 00 
Lows, Ball & Co., chandelier rods, 13 50 
Charles Clough & Co., mason work, 73 00 
Concord R. R. Co., freight bill, 8 29 
George H. Brown, trucking, 4 75 

Carried Forward, 18,390 89 



12 

New Town House, bro't for'd, 18390 89 
Paid E. P. Offutt, settees, ' 250 00 

W. A. Putney, carpet and curtains, 65 61 
Aretas Knights, labor, 9 50 

N.Baldwin & Co lumber and planing, 78 99 
T. P. Pierce, painting, 10 00 

Ed ward McQueston, mason work, 

bricks, lime, &c, 273 00 

Bailey & Flanders, 344 55 

John Craig, labor, 36 67 

Parker & McCrillis, iron work, 52 09 

Jos. W. Saunders, lumber and labor, 182 06 
H. Tufts & Co., stoves, pipe, &c, 200 00 
Stillman Fellows, lumber, and labor, 90 00 
William Mills, drawing lumber, 8 00 

Packard & Co., doors and sash, 7 00 

Stillman Fellows, lumber and labor, 64 08 
Charles Bean, labor, 2 25 

Steam Mill Co., planing, 14 16 

Hiram Bailey, labor, 103 92 

David Hamblet, laths, 4 58 

E. P. Offutt, settees, 100 00 

Fred. Wallace, painting and glazing, 233 12 
E. P. Offutt, settees, 53 74 

W. Wallace, cloth for table,desk, &c.*23 46 
Francis Low, taking down and putting 

up bell, 21 44 

John B. Goodwin, court furniture, 109 81 
Eben Know! ton, labor, 7 10 

James Wallace, labor, 
H. C. Denison, hard ware, 
G. W. Parker, iron work, 
Willis P. Fogg, hard ware, 
H. Tufts & Co., stove pipe, &c, 
J. W. Saunders, labor, 
Albert Lane, lumber and labor, 
Concord R. R. Co., freight bill, 
J. M. Noyes, knobs and screws, 

OLD TOWN HOUSE EXPENSES. 

Paid Child & Hyland, $3 82 

Francis H. Watson, 1 00 

P. Cragin, Jr., rent refunded, 6 90 

$11 72 



233 21 


82 37 


14 16 


8 91 


14 50 


2 83 


95 53 


10 82 


3 42 


$21,19177 



$233 36 



13 

TOWN HOUSE EXPENSES. 

Paid iEtna Insurance Company, $51 00 

John Parker, sawing wood, 1 12 

Protection Insurance Company, 51 50 

Gilman C. Smith, wood, 5 90 

Leonard Rundlett, 5 12 

John L. Stinson, wood, 12 00 

John C. Wadleigh, painting, 8 31 

George Marsh, curtains, 2 98 

J. H. Moore & Co., oil, ' 20 16 

Daniel Farmer, Jr., wood, 14 12 

Albert Lane, sexton, 32 99 

Amos Tilton, oil and fixtures, 15 71 

Porter, Pinkerton & Co., oil, 12 47 

CALEF ROAD. 

Paid John G. Eveleth, for land, 165 00 

Benjamin Mitchell, for land, 100 00 

Robert and Nathaniel Baker, for land, 69 00 
Amoskeag Manufactur'g Co., for land, 25 00 
Moore, Calef & Brown, for land, 
Asa Reed, for labor, 
Benjamin Mitchell, for labor, 
F. H. Watson, for labor, 
John G. Eveleth, for labor, 
Stephen Richardson, for labor, 
James U. Parker, 
Frederick G. Stark, for surveying, 



Paid E. K. Rowell, 
John Edwards, 
Stilman Simonds, 
Ephraim S. Harvey, 
Charles Chase, to pay soldiers' rations 

muster day, 146 00 

Stark Guards, 33 00 

John M. Noyes, for soldiers, 125 00 

$308 00 

LAW EXPENSES. 

Paid Brad. Beals 15 86, J. Cochran, Jr. 8 02 23 88 

$23 88 



10 00 


135 96 


161 14 


199 82 


85 40 


73 42 


18 25 


3 50 


ftlOlfi \ ( ) 




1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 



14 

POOR FARM EXPENSES. 

Paid Porter, Piukerton & Co., goods, 43 28 

H. Tufts & Co., cooking stoves and 

apparatus, 
Hill & Berry, goods, 
Smyth & Child, goods, 
Leonard Jackson, superintendent, 
John Morrill, labor, 

TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid Daniel Clark, auditor, 1844, 5 00 

H. Foster, auditor, 1844, 5 00 

VV. H. Moore, superin'ing schools, '44, 26 50 
T. G. Young, services town meet'g, '44, 2 50 
R. V. Greeley, services constable, 1844, 2 00 
John M. Noyes, town clerk, 1844, 35 00 
Eben'r Knowlton, police officer, 1844, 5 00 
S. S. Carter, services constable, 1844, 6 00 
Nathan Parker, selectman, 1844, 28 00 

George Clark, selectman, 1844, 15 75 

Warren L. Lane, selectman, 1844, 28 00 
Wm. Mace, services at town meeting, 5 00 
David Hill, services at town meeting, 6 00 
Alvah Sweetser, assessor, 28 00 

Ira Bliss, services town meeting, Nov. 

1844 and March 1845, 8 00 

N.Parker, selectman & overseer poor, 110 25 
George Clark, do. do. do. 105 00 

Charles Chase, do do. do. 278 00 

Amos Weston, assessor, 38 50 

Ezekiel Blake, police officer, 26 60 

Daniel L. Stevens, do. 12 00 

Richard G. Smith, do. 23 50 

George Marsh, do. 20 00 

Wm. Bursiel, do. 24 00 

Hollis Dorr, do. 20 00 

S. S. Carter, do. 19 75 

John M. Noyes, town clerk, 35 00 

J. S. Kidder, services town meeting, 5 00 
Thomas Hoyt, Treasurer, 150 00 



28 93 


48 99 


86 95 


260 00 


1 00 


$469 15 



$ 1073 35 



15 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES, ON J. M. NOTES S LIST. 





NOT LIABLE. 




Asa Perkins, 


2 30, 


John L. Spaulding, 


230 


A. S. Sanborn, 


2 30, 


H. J. Gil man, 


230 


Hibbard Merrill, 


2 30, 


Moses Bigelow, 


230 


J. R. Adams, 


2 30, 


W. A. Burke, 


230 


Isaac Boyd, 


2 30, 


Frederic Clay, 


230 


C. W. Barker, 


2 30, 


Otis Chase, 


230 


Alpheus Collins 


2 30, 


Eaton Emery, 


2 30 


A. G. Gale, 


2 30, 


Ira Harvey, 


230 


J. B. Hall, 


2 30, 


A. J. Ternpleton, 


230 


John Hayden, 


2 30, 


J. H. Linsey, 


35 


J. L. Leach, 


2 30, 


Nicholas Perno, 


230 


Samuel Pike, 


2 30, 


S. A. Richards, 


230 


Joseph Thompson, 


2 30, 


John Turner, 


2 30 


J. F. Williams, 


2 30, 


Hazeu Webster, 


2 30 


Matthew Worthen, 


2 30, 








DEAD. 




Josiah Allen, 


2 30, 


W. M. Adams, 


230 


Win. Blaisdell, 


2 30, 


George Cheney, 


230 


James Russell, 


2 30, 








MINORS. 




Daniel White, 


2 30, 


Hiram Verrill, 


230 


Jeremiah Gillingham, 


2 30, 


E. P. Wheeler, 


2 30 


Thomas Wells, 


2 30, 


Henry Thompson, 


2 30 


John Mack, 


2 30, 


John Moody, 


230 


Marshall Wyman, 


2 30, 


Win. Crockett, 


2 30 


James Cogswell, 


2 30, 


Win. Clark, 


2 30 


Eben Edwards, 


2 30, 


Hiram Gillingham, 


230 


Ira Lock, 


2 30, 


John Lewis, 


230 


Henry Straw, 


2 30, 


B. W. Sargent, 


2 30 


James Young, 


2 17, 


Lucian Wilkins, 


2 30 




TAXED 


TWICE. 




Joshua Lane, 


2 30, 


David Cilley, 


230 


Robert Foss, 


2 30, 


Joseph Hoyt, 


2 30 




OVER ' 


rAXED. 




Joseph M. Smith, 


3 82, 


S. Jermess, 


230 


W. J. Gil man, 


36, 


J. C, Ricker, 


190 


William Thayer 


150. 




66 65 


Carried forward, 


74 55 


Bro't forward, 


74 55 



141 20 



16 

ABATEMENT OF TAXES, J. L. PARKER'S LIST. 

John D. Riddle, 1 50 

James Hall, 2d, and others, 6 56 

VV. D. James, 4 15 

Joseph H. Cross, 2 25 

$ 14 46 

MONEY BORROWED. 

Joseph B. Walker, 4 000 00 

Hannah T. Adams, 600 00 

Manchester Bank, 5 000 00 

Moody Kent, 3 000 00 

Ephraim Weston, 1 000 00 

Sally Sargent, 2 000 00 

$15 600 00 

STATE TAX. 

Paid State Treasurer, $ 1,320 00 

COUNTY TAX. 

Paid County Treasurer, $ 1,670 57 

TAXES OUTSTANDING FEB. 1, 1846. 

J. L. Parker's list, 1,407 91 

J. M. Noyes's list, 2,455 32 

$3,863 23 

CASH IN THE TREASURY, 

February 1, 1846, $3,918 18 

ORDERS OUTSTANDING. 

Unpaid January 31, 1846, $ 82 23 






RECAPITULATION. 



The Selectmen of Manchester in account with said Town. 



1845. Dr. 

To Cash in Treasury Feb. 

1st, 1845, $5 929 77 

Outstanding taxes on Jonas 

L. Parker's list, 1 407 91 

Cash rec'd of Moses Davis for 

support of pauper, 30 00 

Cash rec'd of Franconia for 

support of pauper, 15 71 

Cash rec'd of County of Hills- 
borough, 954 73 
Cash rec'd for license for Cir- 
cus, 30 00 
Money borrowed, 15 600 00 
Cash rec'd of Gilmanton, 52 51 
Taxes assessed 1845, 19 246 32 
Cash rec'd of the Amoskeag 

M. Fire Ins. Company, 1 742 37 
Cash rec'd of Joseph Coch- 
ran, Jr., for fines, 12 00 
Cash rec'd of Literary Fund, 150 54 
Cash rec'd of Rockingham F. 

Insurance Company, 4 123 34 
Cash rec'd of Flanders & Bai- 
ley, for stone, &c, 35 62 
Cash rec'd Rail Road Tax, 354 34 
Cash rec'd of Leonard Jackson, 166 73 
Cash rec'd of Amos Tilton, 7 00 
Cash rec'd of N. Parker, 2 00 
Orders outstanding, 82 23 



$49 943 12 



February 17, 1846. 



Cr. 1845. 

By paid Highways & Bridges,$2 780 08 
Schools in District No. 2, 2 560 72 
Other School Districts, 838 8G 

School Houses Dist. No. 2& 7, 2 023 59 
339 83 
274 12 
54176 
193 81 
889 75 
1000 00 
1 951 24 
602 84 
636 14 
21 191 77 
1 046 49 
1172 
233 38 
308 00 
469 15 
1073 35 
155 66 
23 28 
1320 00 
1 670 57 
25 00 



Poor off" the Farm, 

Fire Department, 

County paupers. 

Printing & Stationery, 

Nutt Road, 

Town Debt paid, 

Interest paid, 

Night Watch, 

Incidentals, 

New Town House, 

Calef Road, 

Old Town House Expenses, 

Town House Expenses, 

Militia, 

Poor Farm Expenses, 

Town Officers, 

Abatement of Taxes, 

Law Expenses, 

State Tax, 

County Tax, 

Orders outst'ing Feb. 1, 1845. 

Taxes outstanding Jan'y 3J, 

1846, J. L. Parker's list, 1 407 91 

do. do. J. M. Noyes' list, 2 455 32 

Cash in Treas'y, Jan. 31, 1846, 3 918 18 



$49 943 12 
NATHAN PARKER, ) Selectmen 
GEORGE CLARK, } of 

CHARLES CHASE, ) Manchester. 



We have examined the foregoing account, find the same cor- 
rectly cast and supported bj" proper vouchers, and recommend 
the approval of the same. 

E. T. STEVENS, } Auditors 

Geo. W. PINKERTON, < 3845-6, 
February 17, 1846. 



/ 



Alms-House Report 



RECEIPTS. 

Estimated value of stock, tools, provisions, 

&c, on hand February 1st, 1845, 917 02 
Received of the County of Hillsborough, 395 13 
Due from the County, Feb. 1st, 1846, 177 56 

1845. 

Feb. Rec'd for hay, 

oats, 

cabbage, 

onions, 
Mar. Rec'd for hay, 

vegetables, 

labor off the farm, 
April. Rec'd for hay, oats and straw, 

vegetables, 

calf, 
Ma}'. Rec'd for hay, oats and straw, 

vegetables, 
June. Rec'd for vegetables, 

hay and pork 

labor off' the farm, 
July. Rec'd for vegetables, 
Aug. Rec'd for vegetables, 

veal, 
Sept. Rec'd for vegetables, 
Oct. Rec'd for vegetables and straw, 

labor off the farm, 
Nov. Rec'd for vegetables and straw, 

labor off the farm, 
Dec. Rec'd for hay, oats, and pasturing, 
of Londonderry, 
for vegetables, 

labor done off the farm, 

Carried forward, 304 98 



22 3G 


147 


3 82 


2 61 


17 64 


4 34 


250 


15 89 


100 


3 48 


26 76 


2 58 


16 16 


18 35 


6 67 


35 35 


35 22 


3 25 


12 43 


10 65 


6 00 


33 63 


2 75 


10 50 


2 42 


4 15 


3 00 



$148971 



19 



1845. 

Receipts bro't forward, 
Jan. Rec'd lor hay, oats and straw, 
vegetables, 

cow's hide and boards, 
labor off the farm, 


$ 1489 71 

304 98 

2173 

56 56 

6 44 

44 75 








$ 1924 17 



EXPENDITURES. 

Estimated value of stock, tools, provisions, &c, on hand at 

the town farm, February 1st, 1846. 

14 tons of hay, 208 00 

Corn fodder and straw, 12 00 

4 cows, 68 00, 1 pair of oxen, 80 00, 148 00 

1 horse, 45 00 

45 bu. corn, 45 00, 18 bu. buckweat, 18 00, 63 00 

60 bu. oats, 30 00 

1 cart, 30 00, 7 ploughs, 20 00, 50 00 

1 harrow, 3 50, 1 lumber waggon, 6 50, 10 00 

1 gig waggon, 25 00, 1 sleigh, 7 50, 32 50 

4 scythes and snaths, 4 00 
Shovels, chains, forks, rakes, &c, 14 00 . 

5 shoats, 20 00, 3 iron bars, 3 00, 23 00 

2 harnesses, 10 00, 1 grain cradle, 1 50 11 50 
1000 feet lumber, 8 00, 2 wood saws, 1 00, 9 00 
4 axes, 3 00, 2 buffalo robes, 3 00, 6 00 
1 ox sled, 3 50, 1 calf-skin, ,65 4 15 
1 bu. peas and beans, 1 50, 2 1-2 bu. meal, 2 50, 4 00 
1-2 bbl. flour, 3 00, 40 lbs. lard, 3 60, 6 60 
4 stoves and fixtures, 48 00 
1 3-4 bbls. pork, 28 00 
1-2 bbl. beef 4 00, 225 lbs. ham, 18 00, 22 00 
10 lbs. butter, 1 67, 10 lbs. candles, 1 00 2 67 
200 bu. potatoes, 100 00 
Lot of vegetables, 30 00 
1-2 bbl. soap, 2 00, 7 galls, molasses, 2 00, 4 00 
28 galls, vinegar, 4 50, 25 lbs. beef, 1 50, 6 00 
20 lbs. dry fish, 75 
Lot of manure bought, 15 00 

$937 17 



20 



1845. 

Feb. Pa 
Mar. 
Apr. 
May. 

June. 
July. 



Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 



1846. 

Jan. 





$937 


17 


r store goods, 


4 30 ' 




" " 


2 32 




" and sundries, 


6 38 




plaster, potatoes, &c, 


10 09 




store goods, 


4 21 




potatoes, fish &c, 


3 73 




labor in haying, 


9 50 




potatoes, 

Jacob Sawyer's bill, 


170 




100 




Hannah Jackson's bill, 


10 40 




Hamblet's bill of meal, 


7 35 




Fellows's bill of goods, 


2 00 




Boyd's bill of meat, 


1 42 




bill of meat, &c, 


3 13 




Harris Colby's bill, 


2 00 




James Baker's bill, 


3 89 




for meal, 


3 02 




bbl. mackerel, 


7 13 




Sawyer & Abbott's bill of meal, 1 60 




mending waggon, vinegar &c 


., 3 05 




Brooks's bill of beef, 


4 06 




H. N. Porter's bill, 


2 50 




J B. Goodwin's bill, 


2 50 




Tilton's bill of flour, 


7 25 




wool, rolls and sled runners, 


3 58 




school books, 


1 57 




axes, 


3 00 




Preston, for cow, 


20 00 




J. Sanborn, ior cow, 


12 00 




fish, crackers &c, 


3 74 




harness, 


3 00 




J. C. Wadleigh's bill, 


8 79 




G. W. Merriam's bill, 


5 44 




S. P. Greeley's bill, 


399 




D. A. Bartlett's bill, 


5 43 




E. McQueston's bill, 


2 42 




Reuben White's bill, 


2 35 




E. T. Stevens's bill, 


2 01 




Trask & Mitchell's bill, 


15 48 




James Walker's bill, 


2 42 





Carried forward, 198 75 



21 



1846. 

Jan. Paid Liberty Raymond's bill, 
Caleb Gage's bill, 
Adams girl's bill, 
Kidder & Farley's bill, 
Folsom & Hoitt's bill, 
A. McCrillis's bill, 
Jacob Sawyer's bill, 
for manure, 
for pew rent &c., 



4 34 

5 35 
128 

18 87 

6 52 
14 23 

2 62 

10 50 

4 27 



$198 75 



Porter, Pinkerton & Co. for goods, 43 28 
H. Tufts & Co., stoves &c., 28 93 

Hill & Berry, for goods, 48 99 

Smyth & Child, for goods, 86 95 

Leonard Jackson, (sup't.), 260 00 

John Morrill, 1 00 



$469 15 



RECAPITULATION. 



Dr. Town of Manchester in acct. with the Town Farm. Cr. 



Estimated value of stock, tools, 
provisions, &c. Feb. 1, 1845, $917 02 

Cash received of Hillsborough 
County, 395 13 

Due from Hillsborough County, 177 56 

Produce, &c, sold from the 
farm, 434 46 



$1 924 17 



Estimated value of stock, tools, 

provisions, &x. Feb. 1, 1846, $937 17 
Bills paid by Superintendent, 267 73 
Bills paid by the Town, 469 15 

Interest on $4 000 00, cost of 

the farm,(one year,) 240 00 

Balance in favor of the Farm, 10 12 

$1 924 17 



NATHAN PARKER, > Overseers 
GEORGE CLARK, \ of 
CHARLES CHASE, > The Poor. 



General Information, 



TOWN DEBTS. 



Money borrowed, unpaid, 53,564 23 

Interest due, 1,947 27 

Orders unpaid, 82 23 



DEBTS DUE THE TOWN. 



Due from J. L. Parker, Collector, 1,407 91 

J. M. Noyes, " 2,455 32 

Hillsborough County, 177 56 

S. D. Bell, for stone, 20 00 



4,060 79 

TOWN PROPERTY ESTIMATED. 

Town House lot, at cost, 2,500 00 

Paid towards Town House, about 26,000 00 

Town farm including permanent repairs, 4,405 23 
Stock, tools, provisions, &c, estimated, 937 17 
Fire apparatus and reservoirs, 5,550 00 

Valley, hearse, and hearse house, at cost, 758 31 
Old Town House, at cost of repairs of 1838, 670 12 
Cash in treasury, Jan 3J, 1846, 3,918 18 



55,593 73 



$48799 80 



Balance against the town, Feb. 1st, 1846, $ 6793 93 



Report of the Engineers of the Fire Department, 



To the Selectmen of the town of Manchester Jor the political 
year ending March) 1846. 

The Engineers of said town respectfully submit the fol- 
lowing account of the expenditures for the year. 

They have drawn from the Treasury the sum of $274 12, 
which has been expended for repairs of Engines, Engine 
Houses, Badges for firemen, services of Engineers, and for 
keeping open the reservoirs during the winter season 

Of the three Engines belonging to the town, Nos. 1, and 
5, have companies attached to them, and are in perfect order. 
No. 4, has no company, — it having disbanded on account of 
their inability to work the Engine, with the present amount 
of room on the breaks to admit of a sufficient number of men 
to work her, The Engine is now undergoing an alteration 
which, it is hoped, will remedy the evil and again place 
the Engine on equal footing with the other Engines. 
O. W. BAYLEY, 

Chairman of the Board of Engineers. 



Report of the Superintending School Committee, 



The Superintending School Committee of Manches- 
ter beg leave to submit their Sixth Annual Report, 
agreeably to law. 

I. EXAMINATION OF TEACHERS. 

When your Committee commenced the duties of 
the year, they fixed in their own minds the average 
of attainments in a teacher, which was absolutely in- 
dispensable to the prosperity of the. Schools of the 
Town, and it has since been their endeavor to see that 
every individual who received their approbation to 
teach should possess, at least a respectable minority of 
those attainments. It is absurd to waste the public 
funds in the support of Schools which are taught, by 
those who themselves never learned. To communi- 
cate knowledge, it must first be possessed. Nor is it 
sufficient that a Teacher possess that half-knowledge 
which is expressed by the child, when he so often says 
"he knows, but cannot think." It is not enough 
that the Teacher have the true idea floating some 
where in his brain, so that when called for, it is " on 
a journey — or peradventure sleeping, and must be 
awaked." It must be at his tongue's end, where he 
can always find it when wanted, and always be sure 
that it is right. Children quickly lose all confidence 
in an instructor, who never knows certainly whether a 
word is an adverb or an adjective, or whether a sum is 
done right, or wrong. They do not respect the Teach- 
er who has to go and look before he can answer their 
continual questionings, or who is obliged to use a text 



26 

book in hearing their recitations. Here your Com- 
mittee have found the greatest defect in those who 
have come before them as applicants to teach. Accu- 
racy of scholarship is lamentably wanting in those who 
think themselves abundantly qualified to teach our 
Common Schools. Your Committee supposed them- 
selves truly democratic in the opinion that our Com- 
mon Schools ought to be our best Schools — that the 
money which goes out of the public treasury to sup- 
port them should be so judiciously expended that the 
son of the poorest citizen, should find in them advan- 
tages of education, every way equal to those which the 
richest man can purchase for his child. To bring this 
about, they supposed it the dictate of common sense 
that no incompetent and ignorant teacher, of whatev- 
er pretension, should he allowed to preside over them. 
The stream never rises higher than its fountain, and if 
we wonld have thorough Scholars we must have intel- 
ligent, and accurate Teachers. Besides this, it is not 
enough that knowledge, in however rich abundance, 
be possessed, there must exist also the faculty of com- 
municating it, before its possessor can be of the slight- 
est use to other minds. A reservoir sealed up air- 
tight, may be entirely full of water, but it will never 
refresh the thirsty earth around it, until an orifice be 
opened, for a stream to issue forth. Some of the best 
Scholars the world has ever seen, have been the poor- 
est Teachers, because they had not the tact of trans- 
ferring their knowledge to other minds. Still further, 
it is necessary not only that a good fund of knowledge, 
united with the faculty of communication, be possess- 
ed ; but a good Teacher must have the additional 
power of governing his School, of keeping the chil- 
dren in good order, and of winning their affection. 
Quietness and the kindest, but at the same time strict- 
est obedience, are the first requisites in a School Room, 
for without these preliminaries, no study can be ad- 
vantageously pursued. 



27 

It was then the opinion of your Committee that their 
oath of office could not faithfully be kept, if they gave 
their certificate of approbation to any individual who 
did not possess in some tolerable degree, at least, an 
accurate knowledge of the branches to be taught, 
ability to communicate that knowledge, and correct 
views of the government of a school. While it was 
painful to them to refuse an applicant, they remem- 
bered that the good of the whole community was of 
vastly more importance, than the momentary mortifi- 
cation of an individual, and they have, therefore, nev- 
er hesitated to pursue the course which their duty to 
the town in each case seemed to demand, being con- 
tent to bear the indignation of a few, for the good of 
the many. 

It seemed obvious to your Committee also, that the 
cursory examination, which has been common, is ne- 
cessarily, in a great measure, unsatisfactory; since it 
is utterly impossible in a half-hour spent in general 
questions, to decide upon the fitness of a candidate, 
to teach some eight or ten different and important 
branches. They have, therefore, in each case, regard- 
less of their own personal convenience, endeavored 
to spend time enough to determine the qualifications 
of the candidate, as fully as it can ever be done by a sys- 
tem of examination faulty at the best. They have 
spent, during the year, more than thirteen whole days 
in the examination of applicants to teach ; at one time, 
devoting more than eight hours to the case of a single 
individual. During the year, they have examined in 
all 36 applicants ; of whom 27 have received certifi- 
cates, and 9, (one of them more than once) have been 
rejected. 

As our course in this matter has been deemed un- 
reasonable by some of our fellow citizens, who could 
not know the facts in our possession, we feel inclined 
to insert notes of some of those facts, taken at the 
time, in order to show what kind of persons have, in 



28 

some cases, been presented us by Prudential Commit- 
tees, as properly qualified to teach their children. 
And before doing so, we must solemnly affirm that we 
do not exaggerate in the least, but in every case give 
the exact words of the answer, as written down at the 
time, the minutes of which are open to the inspection 
of any to whom they may seem too supremely ridicu- 
lous to be true. 

In one case, (and what renders it more inexcusable, 
that of an applicant for our Grammar School,) when 
51 words were given out to be spelt, words, too, of 
frequent occurrence in the books required to be taught; 
30 out of the 51, were spelt wrong, and of 16, no defi- 
nition could be given, while 14 of the definitions 
given, were incorrect ; some of them ludicrously so. 
Some of the questions to this applicant, and the an- 
swers given, were the following : 

Question. Where are the Alps ? 

Answer. In the north of Russia. 

Q. Of what race are the Tartars 1 

A. The Monhegan. 

Q. Of what race are the Indians ? 

A. The African. 

Q. Who were some of the most distinguished 
New England Patriots of the Revolution 1 

A. Patrick Henry and William Pitt. 

Q. Who were some of the most distinguished 
American Generals ? 

A. Washington, Greene and Cornwallis. 

Some of the answers of another applicant, (for one 
of the middle class of schools,) were, if possible, 
still more absurd. 

Q. Where was the first settlement of this country ? 

A. At Raleigh, in Virginia. 

Q. When and where was the first settlement of 
New England? 

A. At Little Harbor, in New Hampshire, in 1787. 



29 

Q. Who was the most distinguished British Gen- 
eral of the Revolution ? 

A. John Brewer ! 

Q. When and where was the battle of Bunker 
Hill? 

A. In 1792, in Canada. 

Q. Where is the District of Columbia, and what 
is its size ? 

A. It is in Richmond, and is ten acres square. 

Q. What is the capital of Vermont ? 

A. Indiana. 

Q. What is the western boundary and capital of 
Rhode Island ? 

A. Its western boundary is Virginia, its capital is 
Hartford. 

Q. What is the difference between simple, and 
compound addition ? 

A. Simple addition is adding two numbers, com- 
pound is adding more than two. 

Q. What is the Government of England ? 

A. Patriarchal ! 

Q. How would you go from Manchester to New 
York? 

A. / should go east to Long Island Sound, and then 
go up the Connecticut River, and take the canal ! 

Of however much new and original information in 
the various branches of human knowledge, we may 
have deprived the children of our schools by the rejec- 
tion of such candidates as these, we feel assured that 
in the light of these facts, and multitudes of others 
similar to these, our course will be approved by every 
honest citizen. Before leaving this branch of our 
subject, there is one additional particular to which we 
feel compelled to allude. It has been currently report- 
ed that the first mentioned individual, afterwards asser- 
ted as an excuse for the gross blunders which led us to 
withold a certificate in the case, that the answers were 
given wrong intentionally. We can only say, if ap- 



30 

pearances did not greatly deceive us, this person was 
at the time exceedingly anxious to pass the examina- 
tion ; but if the answers were given deceitfully, the 
gross and ungentlemanly insult thus offered to the 
Committee would have destroyed all possible claim 
for a certificate, even if the Revised Statutes did not 
forbid that any person should be employed as a Teach- 
er, jWho does not possess a good moral character. 

II. CHANGE OF SCHOOL EOOKS. 

It had for a long time been a subject of complaint 
from Teachers, and of regret to your Committee, that 
the Reading Books in use were so imperfectly adapt- 
ed to the improvement of the schools. There was no 
system of progression from the lowest to the most ad- 
vanced, so that much which a little child had learned 
at his Primary School, was to be unlearned when in 
the Middle School he came to use a book founded on 
entirely different principles — all of which perhaps be- 
came afterwards essentially modified in the Grammar 
School. Besides this, the more advanced text books 
(especially the Rhetorical Reader,) were entirely too 
dry and difficult for the use to which they were put, 
since no child can read well that which he does not 
understand, and in which he is not interested. Still 
further, there was nothing in these books to direct nat- 
urally the attention of Teacher and Pupil to the 
importance, and method, of distinctness in utterance. 
As a natural consequence, the children in nearly all the 
schools, failed on an average, to pronounce more than 
two-thirds of the syllables in the words they read. 

Various new Reading Books were, at great expense 
of time, examined by your Committee, to see if any- 
thing was in the market, which would remedy some, or 
all of these deficiencies. They at last became satisfi- 
ed that Swan's Series, consisting of " Primary School 
Reader," Parts I. II. and III., the " Grammar School 
Reader," and "District School Reader," came near- 



31 

est to the standard, they had in their own minds estab- 
lished, of any which they had seen. It is founded up- 
on a philosophical gradation of advancement, from the 
simplest, to the most difficult exercises. Each of these 
exercises, is preceded by a lesson in enunciation, and 
these are so admirably arranged that by the time the 
pupil has been carefully conveyed by a faithful Teach- 
er through the whole Series, he has mastered every 
hard sound in the English language, and cannot help 
being a good reader. Your Committee were, there- 
fore, unanimous in the opinion that this Series would 
be of the utmost usefulness to the Schools of the Town- 
Knowing, however, that it is to all parents inconveni- 
ent, and to many almost impossible, to furnish their 
children with new books at short intervals, they shrunk 
from imposing a burden upon the Town, which though 
small in each individual case, when applied to more 
than twelve hundred children, becomes a matter of im- 
portance. And though they felt that this change if 
made, would so commend itself to the good sense of 
Parents, and of Committees after us, as to leave little 
to desire in the way of improvement — and of course 
would be in a measure permanent — they had almost 
decided to leave things as they were, when they re- 
ceived a proposal from Messrs. Little & Brown, Pub- 
lishers of the Series aforementioned, which, in their 
opinion offered advantages to the Town, which it could 
not afford to lose. Those gentlemen offered togiveto- 
every child in Town who desired it, a copy of " Pri- 
mary School Reader," Parts I. and II. and to exchange 
without any pecuniary equivalent, Part III for the Young 
Reader, the " Grammar School Reader," for the Mon- 
itorial Reader, and the "District School Reader" for 
Porter's Rhetorical Reader, thus putting every Schol- 
ar in Town, in possession of a new reading book, in 
many cases twenty-five per cent better than his own 
was when new, without receiving any money in return, 
and without making anv deduction for the tattered. 



32 

^nd shattered, and pitiable condition, of many of the 
old books thus received in exchange. This was done 
by those gentlemen, in the expectation, that in the 
course of time they should make themselves whole, 
by the sale (not at an advanced price on this account, 
however,) of the books which will be needed by the 
thousands of children who will be here, when a few 
years have greatly enlarged our Village. 

The books thus obtained have been, with one or two 
exceptions, cheerfully received, and are beginning to 
show their value in the very marked advancement of 
the Scholars in this most important branch of knowl- 
edge. 

A similar change was also made in the beginning of 
the year, in the substitution of Fowle's " Common 
School Speller" for the National Spelling Book, and 
the result has proved similarly beneficial. 

III. SCHOOL REGULATIONS. 

With the design of conveying clearly and fully their 
views and wishes on School matters to the Teachers, 
your Committee early prepared a Schedule of Regu- 
lations, and Recommendations, a copy of which was 
placed in the hands of every Teacher, and to which, 
they have been expected to conform. A copy of this, 
with the accompanying List of Books, now directed 
to be in use in the Schools of the Town, is here ap- 
pended. 



Rales adopted by the Superintending School 
Committee, Manchester, N. II., 1845. 

OP THE EXAMINATION OF TEACHERS. 

1. In our examination of applicants to teach, we 
shall require (agreeably to law,) satisfactory evidence 
that they possess an accurate knowledge of the branch- 
es to be taught, ability to communicate that knowledge, 
and correct views of the government of a School. 

2. Public notice shall be given of the time and place 
selected for the examination of Teachers — and no 
such examination shall be had at any other time or 
place, nor at any time, unless two members of the 
Committee be present. 

OF THE EXAMINATION OF SCHOOLS. 

1. We will endeavor to visit each School in town, 
within two weeks after the commencement of each 
term, and within one week before its close. 

2. Each member of the Committee shall take one 
third of the Schools in District No. 2, under his par- 
ticular supervision, and shall endeavor to visit one of 
the same, in each week of term time. 

OF THE DUTIES OF TEACHERS. 

1. Each Saturday morning shall be appropriated to 
a general and thorough review of the studies of the 
week. 

2. Each Teacher shall weekly fill up the blanks of 
the schedule furnished by the Superintending School 
Committee, and shall always have the same in readi- 
ness for inspection. 

3. Each Teacher shall make a classification of the 
School at the commencement of each term, and shall 
decide upon the number of classes, and appropriate 
the time to be devoted to each recitation, and other 

3 



34 

necessary duties. One copy of the said plan of clas- 
sification shall be placed in a conspicuous position, in 
the school-room, and another copy of the same shall 
be transmitted to the Superintending School Com- 
mittee, within ten days after the commencement of the 
term. 

4. No Teacher shall allow a scholar to be absent 
from School, unless producing a written excuse or 
request from his or her parents or guardian — which 
excuses or requests shall be kept on file by the Teacher. 

5. Each Teacher shall daily record the standing of 
every scholar — in conduct — attendance — and the 
several branches of study — in the following manner; 

1. Very Good. 2. Good. 3. Bad. 4 Very Bad. 

6. The moral instruction enjoined by the Law, ought 
to occupy a portion of every day, in connexion with 
the reading of a portion of the Bible by the School, 
and, if possible, with brief devotional exercises. 

HINTS FOR THE ASSISTANCE OF TEACHERS. 

1. It is recommended that particular attention be 
given to the following points, viz : — that no lesson be 
proceeded in, until the Teacher has become assured 
that the previous lesson has been thoroughly under- 
stood. That every opportunity be seized, to convey 
general information concerning the subject of the sev- 
eral studies — and that the mere teaching of Text 
Book be not considered sufficient — that every scholar 
be kept occupied during school hours. 

2. It is recommended that each Teacher make def- 
inite and permanent assignment of school time to the 
following matter. Recitations — Moral Exercises — 
Recess — Singing — Conveying General Information 
— School Discipline. 

3. It is recommended that all classes in Geography 
be exercised in drawing maps upon the slate or black- 
board, and reciting from such drawings. 

4. It is recommended that all the classes in History 
be instructed especially in the History of New Hamp- 



35 

shire — and that in addition to the prescribed Text 
Book, information, to be drawn from the Manuals of 
Belknap and Barstow, be commnnicated by the 
Teacher. 

5. It is recommended that classes be thoroughly 
•drilled in the proper enunciation of vowels and conso- 
nants, and the use of stops — and in all the Tables, 
and in Abbreviations and signs used in the same. 

6. It is recommended that Writing be taught in the 
Primary Schools every day— the scholars making 
use of slates, and in the other Schools, three times 
a week, on slates or in books. 

7. It is recommended that scholars move in order, 
into, out of, and around the school room — with the 
same propriety which will afterwards be demanded of 
them in the drawing room, and the public assembly. 

8. It is recommended that all garments be left out- 
side the school room, and that that room be kept neat 
and attractive. 

The foregoing Regulations and Recommendations 
contain our interpretation of the duties demanded of 
us by the Revised Statutes of New Hampshire, and 
are hereby unanimously adopted for the current year. 
W. H. MOORE, ) Superintending 
B. BRIERLY, > School Committee 
H. M. DEXTER, > of Manchester. 
Manchester, April, 14, 1845. 

LIST OP SCHOOL BOOKS. 

In obedience to the requirement of the Revised 
Statutes of New Hampshire, (chap. 73, sec. 11.) the 
Committee directed the use of the following Text Books 
in the different departments as specified below, and 
Teachers were required to allow the use of no other. 

I. PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

The Bible. 

FowWs Common School Speller. 

Emerson's North American Arithmetic, Part I* 

Primary School Reader, Parts I, and IT. 



II. MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 



The Bible. 

Prim. School Reader, Pt. 3. 
Grammar School Reader. 
Common School Speller. 
Colburn's Int. Arithmetic. 
Smith's Prac. Arithmetic. 



Mitchell's Prim. Geography. 
Smith's Geography. 
Goodrich's History U. S. 
New Hampshire Book. 
Smith's Grammar. 



III. GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 



The Bible. 

District School Reader. 
Common School Speller. 
Colburn's 1st Lessons. 
Smith's Arithmetic. 
Smith's Geography. 



Smith's Grammar. 
Goodrich's History U. S. 
Wayland's Moral Science. 
Natural Philosophy. 
Day's Algebra. 
Book Keeping. 



IV. DISTRICT NUMBER NINE. 

Your Committee regret the necessity of reporting, 
that, during the present winter, there has occurred a 
case of trouble, resulting in the dismission of a Teach- 
er under the law passed at the last session of the Le- 
gislature. 

Mr. D. W. Ladd was engaged to teach the school in 
District No. 9, by its Prudential Committee, and after 
examination received a certificate from us. About 
the first of December, we received a petition, signed 
by a majority of the legal voters of that District, to 
dismiss the said Teacher, for alleged incompetency. 
In accordance with the provisions of law, a hearing 
was granted the petitioners on Dec. 4th, and 5th, 1845, 
in which the District by its Counsel, attempted to es- 
tablish five charges ; asserting Mr. Ladd's laxity of 
government, and his unpopularity in the District. 
This, it was testified, was so great that there could 
not be the slightest prospect that his school, if con- 
tinued, would do any good. Mr. Ladd, on the other 
hand, by his Counsel, attempted to prove that these 
charges were in the main false, and alleged that his 



37 

unpopularity resulted solely from his obedience to the 
instructions of the Committee, in introducing the new 
books into his school. After a long and patient hear- 
ing, your Committee decided that, although the Dis- 
trict had failed to prove satisfactorily Mr. Ladd's in- 
competency as a Teacher, and had acted unlawfully 
and unreasonably, in resisting the lawful and salutary 
regulations of the Committee, in which all the rest of 
the town had acquiesced ; still, as it was in evidence 
that the District were in so excited a state, as to ren- 
der it absolutely impossible for the school to go on 
profitably, under his instruction; it became their duty 
to dismiss him. And he was accordingly dismissed. 
This was done in obedience to their interpretation of 
the new law, by which, when trouble of this sort aris- 
es, they are obliged to decide, not upon the equity of 
the case, but upon what shall seem to be best, on the 
whole, for the District. 

V. TARDINESS AND ABSENCES. 

Loss of time and waste of money, caused by the 
tardiness of scholars, is a serious evil, demanding the 
attention of parents, and all others interested in the 
prosperity of our Common Schools. The attention 
of your Committee was early called to this subject, 
nor have they, during their term of service, allowed 
themselves to loose sight of it. 

On presenting a certificate to each successful can- 
didate, for a place as a Teacher in one of the schools 
in town, your Committee personally requested said 
Teacher to keep a full and accurate memorandum of 
the number of absences, and the amount of tardiness, 
of each scholar. In the schedule furnished each 
Teacher, were columns in which to insert the report 
of each week. With this reasonable and very neces- 
sary request, some of the Teachers have complied, 
others have not. Had the returns been as full as were 
desired, we would have furnished, a tabular view of 
these reports ; as it is, we will only give the returns 



38 

of one or two schools. In one school of about 30 
scholars, over 300 absences are reported. In another 
of only 10 weeks continuance, (consisting of about 
60 scholars,) the loss of time by absences alone, equals 
1364 entire days, or more than 3 1-2 years. Without 
further particulars, we will only add, that, judging as 
accurately as we can from the returns in our posses- 
sion, the loss of time, caused by tardiness and absence, 
amounts to from 1-4 to 1-3 of the entire time of each 
school. 

CONSEQUENCES RESULTING. 

1. If viewed only in a pecuniary light, the evil is of 
such a magnitude as to demand attention. An annual 
waste of $1000, or $1500 out of the $4150,44, appro- 
priated by the town for Common School education, 
should not be allowed, if good regulations, promptly 
enforced, can prevent it. But the waste of money is 
the least part of the evil. There is the loss, 

2. To the School at large. No School can prosper 
withont a good classification of the scholars ; but such 
a classification cannot exist with such irregularity of 
attendance. Suppose the classes to be well arranged 
to-day, to-morrow one-fourth of the scholars are ab- 
sent, and so, the next day, and perhaps, for several 
<lays. It must be evident to all, that, by such a pro- 
cess, the classes will be either entirely broken up, or 
greatly injured. 

3. There will be much additional labor thrown upon the 
'Teacher. All the explanations and information given 
to a class, must be repeated the next day to those who 
were absent, when it was first imparted. Suppose the 
class to be one in Arithmetic, and just entering upon 
the Rule of Three, or the Cube Root. The Teacher 
enters into a minute and lucid explanation of the prin- 
ciples involved in those Rules, but one-third of the 
class is absent and loses the explanation ; the day 
after, the class must be detained, that the explanations 
may be given to those who were absent the previous 



39 

day. And so it must be, day after day. This must 
necessarily check the progress of the Teacher, and 
throw upon him, or her, an additional amount of la- 
bor and care. 

4. In addition to all this, the scholar who is thus ir- 
regular, in his attendance, suffers seriously himself. 
If he be a dull scholar, besides hanging as a dead 
weight upon his class, he falls so far into the back- 
ground, and finds it so difficult to keep up with his class, 
that he becomes discouraged, and, perhaps, careless; 
so that the school room soon becomes to him a place 
of indolence and mischief, instead of a place for study. 
If, on the other hand, he be an industrious and intel- 
ligent lad, for a while he may surmount the impedi- 
ments thrown in his way by frequent absences, and in 
spite of them, will work his way to the head of his 
class, only, however, to find himself absent the next 
day, and, as a consequence, placed again at the foot 
of his class. This cannot long continue. The child 
will, sooner or later, throw down his books, perhaps 
with tears, and say, " it's of no use trying — I am kept 
away from school so much — I de not have so good a 
chance as the rest." Many a child, with a spirit thirst- 
ing for knowledge, is thus discouraged, and sinks be- 
low mediocrity, instead of rising to the eminence it 
would otherwise have obtained. 

THE RIGHTS OF THE TOWN. 

The citizens of Manchester have no right to say to 
any parent, ■ your child shall be at school every term 
of the School, and every day and hour of each term,* 
but they certainly have a right to expect, that every 
parent, whose child enjoys the advantages of the mu- 
nificent appropriations of the town for the promotion 
of education, shall see to it that his child does not in- 
vade the rights of others, by being absent from school, 
and thus lessening its benefit to all ; without good and 
sufficient reason. 



40 

CAUSES OF THESE INEQUALITIES. 

These are numerous. For convenience we will 
-class them under three heads. 

1. Cases of absolute necessity, caused by sickness, 
need of help at home, &c. 

2. Carelessness and indifference of parents and 
guardians, leading them frequently to keep their chil- 
dren at home for trivial causes, and sometimes for no 
particular cause at all. 

3. The 3d cause is in the children themselves, such 
as playing truant, playing on their way to school, &c. 

Your Committee have been acquainted with cases 
where a scholar has played truant for three weeks at 
a time, without the fact coming to the knowledge of 
the child's parents. One Teacher, in her reports, 
writes against the name of one of her scholars, " nine 
weeks at play " Here was an extreme case, but there 
are hundreds of cases somewhat similar in our town. 
We have no means of knowing the exact amount of 
time lost by the last two causes, but are of the opinion 
that it amounts to at least two-thirds of the whole. 

VIEWS OF THE COMMITTEE. 

Your Committee early felt that they could not keep 
their oaths of office, or discharge their duty to the 
schools, without endeavoring to remedy this evil. 

Accordingly, 

1. In all their intercourse with the Teachers, they 
urged them to use their utmost endeavors, in all suit- 
able ways, to secure punctual and regular attendance 
on the part of every scholar. 

2. In their visits to the Schools, they urged upon the 
children the duty of such attendance, and endeavored 
to explain to them the evils of an opposite course. 

3. As they were fully satisfied that the evil to be re- 
moved was caused, to a great extent, by the children 
playing truant, or loitering on the way to school, they 
very cordially gave their countenance to an arrange- 



41 

merit, which they had not the honor of originating, in- 
tended to check this evil. At a previous period, the 
evil complained of, had arrested the attention of the 
Prudential School Committee for District No. 2, and 
at the suggestion of the whole, or a part of that Com- 
mittee, the Teachers in District No. 2 were requested 
to close their doors at something like 25 or 30 min- 
utes after the ringing of the town bell for school, 
and also, to demand of each scholar a written excuse, 
from his or her parents, for every case of absence or 
tardiness.* The Prudential Committee, in suggesting 
this arrangement, did not assume the position that no 
parent had a right to keep his child at home without 
sending an excuse ; but, unquestionably, suggested this 
as an arrangement well adapted to check, if not entire- 
ly put a stop to playing truant, &c. With this ar- 
rangement, faithfully carried out, no child could be 
absent, or tardy, without the fact coming to the knowl- 
edge of the parents. The Teachers and the Superin- 
tending School Committee looked upon this arrange- 
ment in the same light, and promptly gave their con- 
currence to the measure. It has been no small 
source of solicitude and regret to them, that many pa- 
rents, whose co-operation would otherwise have been 
cheerfully afforded, owing to a misapprehension of the 
matter, have, with great pertinacity, and in some cases 
with much bitterness and ill-temper, set themselves in 
direct opposition to this salutary measure. 

As a consequence, neither the Teachers, the Pruden- 
tial Committee, nor ourselves, have been able to check 
the evil complained of, to such an extent as the inter- 



* " We would suggest whether it might not be advisable for the Districts to 
adopt some code of regulations^which should require the scholar to bring a writ- 
Jen excuse for non-attendance. As it now is, it is impossible for the Teacher to 
determine whether the scholar be absent by permission or not." 

The above extract is made from the Report of the Superintending School. 
Committee of Manchester for 1840-41, — the Committee then consisting of the 
Rev. Messrs. C. W. Wallace, E. K. Bailey, J. L. Sinclair and N. Gunnison*. 
If the necessity begun to be felt then, how much more now ! If a reasonable 
regulation then — an imperative one now. 

4 



42 

est of all concerned demands. A beginning, 'however, 
has been made, and we would earnestly invite the at- 
tention of parents, and of the Committee who may 
follow us, to this subject. In the present state of our 
Schools, there is no one evil existing among us, which 
operates more injuriously than this. If no remedy 
can be devised, then will every endeavor to advance 
the interests of education among us be weakened, and 
much of the money expended for the support of our 
Common Schools be worse than lost. 

VI. CONDITION OF OUR SCHOOLS. 

♦ We are not able to say that any marked advance- 
ment has taken place in the condition of the Schools, 
out of the village of Manchester. It has been the 
case of most of them, that they were better under one 
Teacher, and then worse under another Teacher, — 
keeping their average condition very nearly where it 
was last year, and the year previous. Nothing better 
than this, perhaps, ought to be expected while the cus- 
tom continues of changing Teachers merely because 
the season has changed. In compliance with this un- 
reasonable custom, Districts have in several cases ex- 
changed a good Teacher, with whom the whole Dis- 
trict were satisfied, for one who pleased nobody and 
hurt the School. But this matter has been spoken of 
at length in former reports, and we forbear to extend 
remarks upon it. If Districts do not invariably select 
the most intelligent man among them to be their Pru- 
dential Committee, or the person chosen has not inde- 
pendence enough to do what his best judgment dic- 
tates, no suggestions or arguments will alter the pres- 
ent custom. Some of the Teachers have exerted 
themselves to interest, and be interested by, their 
schools, and have proceeded in their daily duties with 
sprightliness. Others have fallen into the usual hum- 
drum way of doing and speaking, which inevitably 
acts upon the scholars as a soporific, and their idle gaze 



43 

and sleepy intonations at recitation, and vacant stare 
when questioned, show that the anodyne. has been ef- 
fective. 

Of the condition of the Schools in District No. 2, 
your Committee can, for the most part, give a favor- 
ble report. Most of the Teachers have shown them- 
selves worthy of all confidence, and their Schools have 
made good progress. We might mention the names 
of three female Teachers, who have won golden opin- 
ions from ourselves, and 'of whose excellence their 
own success is the best certificate. Your Committee 
cannot refrain also from expressing their satisfaction 
with the management of the Grammar School, No. i, 
by Mr. Ray ; and they cannot too strongly recom- 
mend his continuance in a position which he has filled 
with so much pleasure to his pupils, profit to the Dis- 
trict, and credit to himself. 

One truth has been forced upon our attention by va- 
rious circumstances. We notice that it is becoming 
more and more difficult to make the same rules and 
arrangements applicable to the Schools in the village, 
(District No. 2,) and those out of it. The state of feel- 
ings, expectations and wishes, of the inhabitants of the 
latter, are very different from those of the former. In 
District No. 2, the scholars are subject to more temp- 
tations, and this, with the fact of the largeness of the 
Schools, and other circumstances, render absolutely 
necessary sundry regulations which are out of place 
in all the other Districts. We have seen this diversity 
growing greater and more apparent each year, since 
the village began to grow up. It must continue thus, 
perhaps even increase, rendering the duties of the Su- 
perintending Committee more and more arduous, and 
exciting many unpleasant incidents, until District No. 
2 is put under municipal laws, and its Schools are de- 
tached from the others — have but one Committee to 
regulate them, and have rules adapted to their own ex- 
igencies. Until this is done, the inhabitants of the 



44 

town must endeavor to feel and act in the spirit of for- 
bearance towards each other, and give the actions of 
their Committee the most charitable construction. 
The difficulty of which we now speak, has been much 
increased by the arrangement made Ln the Schools of 
the village the past year. The system of operations 
is now very different. Yet each is adapted to the con- 
dition of things, and the necessities of the scholars- 
The Schools in District No. 2, could no longer exist 
and do any good under the arrangement of the other 
Districts; neither can these Districts adopt the ar- 
rangement which has been made for schools in Dis- 
trict No. 2. 

NEW CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOOLS IN DISTRICT NO. TWO. 

The arrangement, above adverted to, is this. At 
the annual meeting of District No. 2, in March last, 
it was resolved, that, agreeably with section 6, chap- 
ter 73, of the Revised Statutes, a division be made of 
the scholars " into two or more divisions, according to 
age, or acquirements, or both" And the Prudential 
Committee were directed to make this classification, 
on the basis of the plan suggested in the Report of 
Superintending Committee of last year. This they 
did. They instituted three grades of Schools. The 
first, or Primary Schools, are for children under 8 
years of age ; the second, or Middle or Intermediate 
Schools, for scholars between 8 and 12 years ; the 
third, or Grammar Schools, for scholars over 12 years 
of age. Besides the age of scholars, however, their 
position is regulated by their advancement in their 
studies, so that, no matter what their age, when they 
are prepared to go on with the studies of the higher 
grade of Schools, they are promoted ; until then, what- 
ever their age, they are continued in the Schools for 
which they are fitted. 

This arrangement has already begun to tell favora- 
bly upon the Schools. It has brought together chil- 
dren of like ages and acquirements. It has reduced 



45 

the number of branches to which each of the Teach- 
ers must devote their attention, and thus enabled them 
to be more thorough in their instruction. It has secur- 
ed more order and regularity in conducting the Schools, 
and it has provided for due attention to the elementa- 
ty education of the youngest scholars, and the highest 
studies of the most advanced. 

We believe that this system will prove to be invalua- 
ble. We are not aware that any material change will be 
required in it, however large the number of scholars 
may become. When the necessity shall come, it will 
be very easy to add another grade of Schools, in which 
the Classics may be studied. A little attention from 
Committees and Teachers will preserve the system in 
its simplicity and efficiency. 

Among the Primary Schools, the Prudential Com- 
mittee opened an Infant School, at the beginning of 
the year, agreeably with a suggestion made in the Re- 
port of the Superintending School Committee. In 
this School, little ones of 4 years of age, and under, 
are gathered, and instructed in such things as are 
adapted to their age. Books are little used. Cards and 
pictures, and sensible objects, are used in their stead, 
and the memory is cultivated. Much of the time is 
given to singing, marching and recreation. The Pru- 
dential Committee very judiciously provided, among 
other articles for the School, two cheap rocking horses, 
which have served an excellent purpose. We think 
the District cannot do better than to continue the 
School, and make a small appropriation for additional 
instruction, cards, block-letters, &c. 

VII. FURNITURE FOR SCHOOL ROOMS. 

There are a variety of articles, of little cost, well 
fitted to interest and instruct scholars, respecting mat- 
ters of importance in daily life, which might with 
great advantage be provided for each school room. 
At least, should the Grammar Schools of District No. 
2 be provided with a terrestrial globc^ and a set of 



46 

weights and measures, and of Pelton's Outline Maps* 
It would also be a matter of convenience, if there 
should be two or three extra chairs provided for each 
room, for visitors, and also a small closet, where the 
water pails and brooms may be deposited, and thus 
leave the school room and entry, to their appropriate 
uses. 

VIII. ADDITIONAL SCHOOL HOUSES AND APPROPRIATIONS. 

There are now fourteen Schools in operation in 
District No. 2. These are already insufficient to ac- 
commodate all the scholars of the District, and not 
give any Teacher more than 50 scholars, which is the 
largest number to which they can do justice. 

It is now time for the District to consider whether 
it is good policy, to be expending any more money on 
temporary school houses. The school lots which the 
District now own are well situated. Another, howev- 
er, should be secured, for the schools now located on 
the west side of Elm street, and south of Merrimack. 
With these lots and spacious brick school houses on 
each, there will be accommodation for 2000 scholars. 
We would suggest whether it would not be well to 
erect one of these school houses the present year ; 
superseding some of the temporary wooden ones now 
in use, and affording on one lot of land, school-room 
for at least 300 children. By beginning the erection 
this year, the burden of expense will be distributed, 
otherwise we may have to erect two in the same year. 

Whenever such erection may be determined on, one 
of the most important matters which will demand our 
attention, will be the plan on which it will be built. 
Attention to school house plans has recently been giv- 
en by able architects, and the result of their efforts 
shows, that at the same cost, a commodious and excel- 
lent school house may be erected, or one, showy but 
every way inconvenient and worthless. The school 
house on Lowell street might be very much improved 
upon, and yet cost no more. 



"\ 



47 

The appropriation for the past year was very liber- 
al, even more than your Committee had ventured to 
propose. The rule for dividing the appropriation still 
acts to the satisfaction of all parties. We recommend 
its being continued. We would also recommend that 
$4500 be raised for the schools of the town, the ensu- 
ing" year ; and that of this amount, $3800 be appropri- 
ated to the schools in District No. 2, and the remain- 
der to the other Districts. This appropriation will 
give the same amount to the other Districts, which 
they had last year, and afford enough to No. 2, to open 
another school during the year, and at the same time 
do what we cannot but think would be simple jus- 
tice, in adding to the wages of teachers. We say, 
without hesitation, that most, if not all the Teachers 
in District No. 2, deserve more compensation than 
they now get. They are, almost without exception, 
faithful, laborious and capable, and well worthy of be- 
ing continued in their positions. But the wages of the 
female Teachers especially, are less than they deserve. 
It is good policy to pay our teachers well ; then we 
can get and keep good teachers, and with less hesita- 
tion remove those who are unfit. Several of these 
Teachers have now been employed for some years, 
and are far better than any strangers. 

IX. GENERAL SUGGESTIONS. 

There is a continual advance made in the prepara- 
tion of books fitted for public Schools. Your Com- 
mittee would have been glad to have yielded to the so- 
licitations of Parents and Teachers, and substituted or 
admitted the books they have often urged. But man- 
ifold reasons determined them to make fewer changes 
than were called for, rather than as many. But they 
cannot refrain from speaking in the highest terms of 
commendation of one work, which they think ought to 
be in the hands of every Teacher, at least. The work 
is, " Parker's Aid to English Composition." The ti- 
tle gives one very little idea of the comprehensiveness 



48 

of the work. It might better be called, "A Work to 
teach Teachers what, and how to teach." Every 
Teacher should be familiar with the work. It offers 
them many practical suggestions, which will help them 
to carry out reforms they may have long resolved on. 
So much good might it do to a school, that it would 
be excellent policy to purchase a copy for each school- 
room, and require each Teacher to account for its 
safety and good keeping, as for that of any other ar- 
ticle of the property of the District. 

It is with no small pleasure that we have seen some 
of the Teachers manifesting so decided an interest in 
their Scholars, as to engage them in gathering cabinets 
of minerals, woods, leaves, insects, and a variety of 
other natural objects. With scarcely any expense, by 
devoting but a little time to the subject, children may, 
in this way, be made interested in their Teacher and 
studies, and their powers of observation be greatly 
cultivated. And, besides, that there is no pursuit more 
innocent than the study of our Maker's works, there 
is no taste which in after life can be turned to greater 
profit. And what may commend this plan to the adop- 
tion of other Teachers, is the fact, that in any locality, 
and under any circumstances, this source of enjoy- 
ment and interest may be opened to Scholars. We 
should be glad to see each school-room provided with 
two or three shelves, where the results of the chil- 
dren's researches might be placed. 

x. CONCLUSION. 

Your Committee have found their duties more ar- 
duous and difficult than any can know, excepting those 
who have been, or shall hereafter be, required to per- 
form them. We have had to meet the objections of 
many unreasonable and obstinate men, who, having 
never known any other schools than those in country 
places, where there is but one school in a District, 
have snpposed that a District with twenty schools and 
a thousand scholars, could be conducted by the same 



49 

rules. They have no comprehension of an enlarged 
and accurate system, whose aim is progression and per- 
fection. While we have been troubled by such, wo 
feel grateful to be able to state, on the other hand, 
that our efforts have had the ready co-operation of the 
Teachers, almost without exception, and that we have 
had frequent assurances from the great body of our 
most considerate and intelligent fellow citizens, of all 
parties, of their confidence and approbation. Feel- 
ing that what we have done, has been with the single 
and sincere desire to discharge laithfully the duties to 
which we were appointed — having the good of the 
schools very much at heart — endeavoring to lay the 
foundations for future, as well as immediate benefits, 
and that our acquaintance with the condition of the 
schools should entitle us to the confidence of Parents 

— we have a calm consciousness, that we have acted 
with a purpose of honesty and good. We make but 
a common admission of fallible judgment, in saying 
that we may sometimes have erred. But we cherish 
the persuasion, that if the present methods are contin- 
ued, and the present rules are strictly enforced, our 
schools will be more and more fit to be the seminaries 

— the free — the public seminaries for the education 
of all our children. Duty to those who may succeed 
us, requires us to say, that every citizen must hold 
their Committee right, until they are palpably proved 
to be wrong; they must be encouraged, rather than 
carped at — every hand must be raised to help them 
in their work, rather than to attempt to pull down 
what they build, with patient thought and much effort. 
Unless this is done, none who are fit to discharge the 
duties of the office of Superintending School Com- 
mittee will be found willing to accept it. 

All of which, the following Tables included, is re- 
spectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MOORE, ) Superintending 
BENJAMIN BRIERLY, [ Sctool 
Manchester, Feb. 19th, 1845. HENRY M. DEXTER, ) Committee. 





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Recapitulation. 





No. of 
Schools. 


No. bet'n 
4 and 21. 


Whole No- at- 
tend'g School. 


Average 
No. 


Money 
expended. 


but of Dis. No. 2. 
In District No. 2. 

Summary, 


7 

14 

21 


404 
1214 

1687 


284 
1003 

1287 


212 
693 

908 


$98163 
3168 81 

$4150 44 



TABLE NO. III. 



Shewing the present condition of the Schools in District 
No. '4, the branches studied in each, with the number of 
Scholars in each branch, February 21st, 1846. 



No; 

00 



w 3 





TJX 

£. 
5' 


p 

Er 
5" 


3" 
<p 


o 
g 

o 

3 

CO 


n 
o 

c 
E 


p 
o 

5" 

> 


CD 

o 

ere 

•5 
tr 
•< 


s 

~. 

o 

■< 

S 
y 
3 
•p 


8 
SS° 
o 
"< 

C 

p 
to 


o 

p 
3 

3 
p 




ts 

•< 


> 

3 


= 

FT 

a 
o 

"9. 
3' 

33 


o 

o 
3 

"O 

c 

S' 
a 


w 
3" 

5* 

(TO 



5 ? 
I? 

p p 

•o a. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

& 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

Total. 



68 


68 


50 


40 


68 


50 


36 




10 


32 


in 


3 


15 


29 


34 


36 


53 


53 




18 


53 


47 


23 




12 


40 


6 


1 




5.1 


53 


23 


92 


92 


























92 




81 


81 


58 


81 


81 


10 


76 




18 


11 










81 


81 


63 


63 


63 




53 






6 














63 




38 


38 


























38 




56 


56 


30 


56 


56 


5 


48 


56 


12 












40 


40 


78 


78 


35 


30 


20 






a 














78 


s 


49 


49 


25 


20 


20 


5 


25 


4 














25 


5 


80 


80 


12 




4 


14 


20 




4 


1 










80 


20 


59 


59 


32 




59 


11 


49 




11 












59 


30 


69 


69 






09 




















69 




60 


60 


25 


60 


10 


30 


20 




8 


9 














68 


68 


13 


68 


66 


8 


42 




25 


13 








12 


68 


4* 


914 


914 


343 


373 


559 


180 ; 


339 


71 


100 


106 


1C 


4 


K 


75 


780 


282 



Note. There being no returns from Nos. 9 and 10 for the current Term, 
the Schedule for the last Term has been, given, as being sufficiently accural.