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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"



THE 







SIXTH ANNUAL REl'OM 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



KIS( AT, YKAK l.M>IN(. JANUARY 31, 



1852, 



TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS 
RELATING TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




,1 



MANCHESTER, N. H.: 

PRCNTED BY J. 0. ADAMS, AMERICAN BUILDING. 

1 852. 



%>2D*m^ 



STATE LIBRARY 




SCHOOL HOUSE AT AMOSKEAG FALLS. 

Destroyed 1839. 







? 




MANCHESTER CITY HALL. 

Rrected 1815.— Coal $36,000 



THE 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF TIIE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

FOK THE 
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 

1852, 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS 
RELATING TO THE AFEAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H.: 

PRINTED BY J. O. ADAMS, AMERICAN BUILDING. 

1852. 



Kl 

35ZQ7 

M24& 

\b5Z 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 

In Board of Common Council, / 
Jan. 6th, 1852. \ 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on Finance 
be and hereby are authorized to cause to be printed and dis- 
tributed, for the information of the inhabitants of the City, 
fifteen hundred copies of the Sixth Annual Report of the Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, with such 
other Documents as may be appended thereto. 

In Common Council, Jan. 6th, 1852. 
Read and passed. GEORGE A. FRENCH, Clerk. 

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 6th, 1852. 
Read and passed in concurrence. 

FREDERICK SMYTH, City Clerk. 



ACCOUNT 



OF 



JAMES M. BERRY, CITY TREASURER, 



FKOM 



FEBRUARY 1, 1851, TO MAY 1, 1851. 



Dr. City of Manchesh unt with Ja u V. B 

To paid approved bills remaining unpaid Feb. 1,'51, $483 46 

" " Principal on City Debt, 5,150 00 

" " Interest " " " 108 

" " for support of County Paupers, 236 9 1 

" " " " " Paupers off the Farm, 7912 

" " for Commons, 20 00 

" " for City Farm, 192 "7 

" " for Cemetery, -1 1 

" " for Highways and bridges in Dist. X". 1,- \~ 

" " for do. in Dist. No. ■!.- '.'1 3 

" " for do. in Dist. No. 3,- 13 60 

" " for do. in Dist. No. 5,. 9 15 

" " for do. in Dist. No. 6,- 2 00 

" " for do. in Dist. No. 8,. 14 00 

" " fur new Ilighways, 1 ,053 '.'J 

" " for School Dist. No. 1. 

" " for School Dist. No. 2, 1,738 75 

" " for School Dist. No. 3, 97 50 

" " for School Dist. No. 4, 84 00 

" " f,r School Dist. No. 5, 1" 

" " for School Dist. No. 6, 11-'. 50 

" " for School Dist. No. 7, 122 25 

" " for School Dist. No. 8, 66 00 

" " for School Dist. No. 0, 77 10 

" " for Fire Department, 11 

" " for City Police, 25 

" " for City Hall, 53 40 

" ; ' for Printing and Stationery, 157 

" " for Incidental Expenses, ll'l 49 

" " for City Officers, 80'- 

" " for Common Sewers, 85 14 

" Cash in the Treasury May 1st, 1851, 1 00 

" City Stock on hand,' 18,000 00 

$31,085 92 



City Treasurer, from Feb. 1st, 1851, to May 1st, 1851, Cr. 



By City Stock on hand Feb. 1st, 1851, $24,000 00 

Cash in Treasury Feb. 1st, 1851, 3,170 71 

" received of Thomas McCue for old G. Br. 102 00 
" do. of Town of Bow, for support of 

Paupers, 9 50 

" do. of Town of Henniker, for support 

of Paupers, 8 62 

" do. of F. Smyth, for licenses to enter 

Sewers, 15 00 

" do. of I. C. Flanders for nnney over- 
drawn School Dist. No. 2,- • 212 46 
" do. of D. P. Perkins for Committee 

School Dist. No. 2, 156 05 

" do. of D. Randlett, from City Farm, 120 32 

" do. of F. Smyth, for rent City Hall, 132 00 

" do. of " " " " of Stores, 360 75 
" do. of M. Fellows, from HillsbDro' 

Co., for support of Paupers, 500 00 
" do. of J. M. Rowell, for Taxes for yr. 

1850, 2,032 43 

Approved Bills remained unpaid May 1st, 1851 236 08 



$31,085 92 



JAMES M. BERRY, City Treasurer. 
Manchester, May 1st, 1851. 



City of Manchester, May 1st, 1851. 

The Committee on Finance for the City of Manchester, in 
conformity with the requirements of Sect. 14, Ordinance No. 
2, have examined the foregoing account of James M. Berry, 
late City Treasurer, and find the same correct and sustained 
by proper vouchers. 

There has been received into the Treasury, within the three 
months ending May 1st, 1851, including the balance of Cash 
on hand Feb. 1st, 1851, and exclusive of eighteen thousand 
dollars City Stock unsold May 1st, 1851, the sum of twelve 
thousand eight hundred and forty-nine dollars and eighty-four 
cents ($12,849 84). 

There has been paid from the Treasury, during the same 
period, the sum of twelve thousand eight hundred and forty- 
eight dollars and eighty-four cents ($12,848 84), leaving in 
the Treasury, May 1st, 1851, a balance of one dollar. 

SAMUEL FISH, ) 
MOSES FELLOWS, | Committee 
GEORGE CLARK, \ on 
HENRY CLOUGH, Finance. 
D. C. GOULD, 

In Common Council, February 17, 1852. 
Read and accepted. Sent up. 

GEORGE A. FRENCH, Clerk. 

In Board of Aldermen, February 17, 1852. 
Read and accepted in concurrence. 

FREDERICK SMYTH, City Clerk. 



ACCOUNT 



OF 



HENRY K. CHAMBEBLIN, CITY TREAS'K, 



FROM 



MAY 1st, 1851, TO FEBRUARY 1st, 1852, 



8 

Dr. City of Manchester in acct current from May 1, 1851, 

To Approved Bills unpaid May 1, 1851, $2: 

" paid City Debt, 10,001 

" " Interest on Notes, 1 ,393 92 

" " Interest on City Stock, 3,591 99 

" " County Paupers, i 87 

" " Paupers off the Farm, 

" " City Farm, 940 74 

" " City Hall, 848 09 

" " Fire Department, 2,89< 

" " City Police, 2,500 48 

" " City Officers, 2,630 58 

" " Printing and Stationery, li * "> ♦ ; 27 

" " Incidental Expenses, 570 36 

" " Abatement of Taxes, 809 64 

" " Commons, 256 1 1 

" " "Valley," 1,381 1" 

" " Common Sewers, 883 13 

" " Militia, 209 00 

" " Granite Bridge, 9,928 73 

" " New Cemetery, 1,000 00 

" " New Highways, 3,410 87 

" " Highways and Bridges in several Districts, 4,7 ( .'4 ~>- 

" " School District No. 1, 58 08 

" " do do No. 2, 5,344 78 

" " do do No. 3, 72 62 

" " do do No. 4, 90 

" " do do No. 5, 80 45 

" " do do No. 6, 77 66 

" " do do No. 7, 64 00 

" " do do No. 8, 53 73 

" « do do No. 9, 7:. II 

" " Repairs of School Houses in Dist. No. 2, 2,200 00 

" " Repairs of School House in Dist. No. 4, L26 00 

- >7,< 10 85 

" City Stock on hand Feb. 1, 1852, 10,000 00 

" Cash in the Treasury Feb. 1, 1852, 1,101 28 

$r>s,7i;i 68 



to Feb. 1, 1852, with Henry B. Chamberlin* City Treatfr. Cr. 



By City Stock of J. M. Berry May 1, 1851, • • • • $18,000 00 

Cash of J. M. Berry May 1, 1851, 1 00 

of Robert Whitticr on Loan, 550 00 

of Oliver Bailey do. 1,000 00 

of Robert Chase do. 1,500 00 

of William Murclock do. 200 00 

of D. C. Bent do. 600 00 

of John A. Holmes do. 800 00 

of Robert Means for Taxes, 1848, 664 21 

of " " for Taxes, 1849, 1,505 79 

of J. M. Rowell for Taxes, 1850, 4,850 00 

of D. L. Stevens for Taxes, 1851, 32,020 45 

of F. Smyth for rent City Hall and Stores 1,721 25 

of F. Smyth for Circus Licenses, 120 00 

of F. Smyth for License Barnum's Mu- 
seum, 40 00 

of F. Smyth for License to enter Sewers 06 90 

of Moses Fellows for Dog Licenses, • • • • 12 00 

of Moses Fellows for Interest, 49 40 

of D. Rundlet for Produce City Farm, • 463 07 
of Amasa Waterman for support of Pau- 
pers from other towns, 130 93 

of County for support of Paupers, 650 00 

of Committee on " Valley," 568 00 

of State for Literary Fund, 308 38 

of State for Militia, 195 00 

of State for Rail Road Tax, 2,008 24 

of Committee on Commons for Grass sold 51 92 

of F. P. Smith for rent of Engine House 36 00 

of W. Lane, Police Court, 27 86 

of N. H. Asylum for Insane, overdrawn, 2 68 

of W. E. Eastman, overdrawn, 2 00 

of B. F. Manning for cleansing vault, • • 2 50 

Approved Bills unpaid Feb. 1, 1852, 624 05 



185: 



$68,761 63 



Feb. 1. By City Stock unsold, 10,000 00 

" Cash in the Treasury, 1,101 28 

HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, City Treasurer. 
Manchester, Feb. 1, 1852. 
2 



Cits of M I 

The Committee on Finance for the City of Manchester, in 
conformity with the requiremei ct. L4, Ordinance No. 

2, have examined the foregoing account of II. R. Chamberlin, 
City Treasurer, and find the same correct, and sustained by 
proper vonche 

We find that there has been received into the Treasury, with- 
in the nine months ending dan. 31st, 1852, including the bal- 
ance of Cash on hand May 1 . and exclusive of ten 
thousand dollars City Stock now remaining unsold, the sum of 
fifty-eight thousand one hundred and thirty-seven dollars and 
fifty-eight cents ($58,137 58). 

There has been paid from the Treasury, during the same 
period, the sum of fifty-seven thousand and thirty-six dollars 
and thirty cents (5*3 , ; >: leaving a balance in the Trea 

Jan. 31st, 1852, of eleven hund one dollar- and tv, 

eight cents ($1,101 28). 

We also find bills, amounting to six hundred and twenty-four 
dollars and five cents (D'24 05), remaining unpaid, which have 
been ordered to be paid, and so reckoned in the expenditures. 
which, if paid, would leave in the Treasury four hundred and 
seventy-seven dollars and twenty-three cents (-177 23 ). 

A.MUEL FISH, 
Mo E! FELLOW/. Commit 
GEORGE CLARK, } on 
HENRY CLol Fim 

D. C. GOULD, 

In Common Council, February 17, L852. 
Read and accepted. 

OEORGE A. FRENCH, Clerk. 

In Board of Aldermen, February 17, 1 8 
Read and accepted in concurrence. 

FREDERICK SMYTH, City CI 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

The Joint Standing Committee on Finance, in conformity 
with the requirements of the Ordinance prescribing their duties, 
and "establishing a system of accountability in the expendi- 
tures of the City," submit to the City Council their annual 

REPORT 

of all the RECEIPTS and EXPENDITURES of the Finan- 
cial Year ending January 31st, 1852. 

We have examined the Treasurer's Accounts and Books, and 
those of the City Clerk and Auditor, and find that the ac- 
counts of those Officers have been correctly and faithfully 
kept, and with a system that meets our entire approbation. 

In order to ensure a more thorough and systematic arrange- 
ment of the numerous bills than is practicable by a committee 
composed as this is, Frederick Smyth, Esq., City Clerk, has 
been employed to assist us in this work. 

EXPENDITURES. 

The Expenditures of the year, including the payments of 
City Debt, have been as follows, chargeable to the respective 
Appropriations, in the following proportions,viz : — 

PAYMENT OF CITY DEBT, $15,150 00 

PAYMENT OF INTEREST ON CITY DEBT, 5,741 99 

SCHOOLS.— District No. 1, 148 58 

" « 2, 7,083 48 

" " 3, 170 12 

" « 4, 174 99 

Amount carried forward, $28,469 16 



12 

Amomit brought forward^ $28,469 16 

SCHOOLS.— District No. 5, L84 84 

« " 6, 191 16 

" '• 7, 186 25 

" " 8, 119 73 

" " 9, 150 .".1 

REPAIRS OF SCHOOL HOUSES, Dist. No. 2, 2,200 00 

" " " " Dist. No. !. L26 00 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES, Dist. No. 1, •■ 300 

" a .. u 2, • ■ 2,782 78 

" « « « 249 ••'» 

a u u u 4j .. gif 

" " " " 5, •• T^ 

« « " t: 6, •• 218 17 

« « " « 7, •• 166 B3 

" « « « 8, •• 205 08 

« « a a « (j . . 285 62 

NEW HIGHWAYS, 1,464 79 

COUNTY PAUPERS OFF THE FARM, • • • • 77:: 81 
PAUPERS off the Farm, and belonging to City 

and other towns, 418 94 

CITY FARM, and PAUPERS on the same- • • ■ 1,132 Bl 

COMMONS, 276 41 

- \ ALLEY " CEMETERY, 1,401 10 

NEW CEMETERY, 1,000 00 

(ill VNITE BRIDGE, 9,928 7:'. 

ABATEMENT OF TAXES, 809 64 

COMMON SEWERS, 968 27 

FIRE DEPARTMENT, 3,825 1 9 

INCIDENTAL EXPANSES, 716 85 

CITY POLICE, 2,755 24 

CITY HALL, 901 19 

CITY OFFICERS, 3,431 08 

PRINTING and STATIONERY, 123 95 

MILITIA, 209 00 

OLD DRAFTS, being amounts drawn for and 
charged last year and previous years, but not 

called for till this year, 485 46 

|70,509 19 

Deduct, amounts not vet called for, 624 05 

Total NET PAYMENTS through the Treasury,. $69^885 14 



The REVENUE of the year has been derived 

from the following sources, viz: 



From R. Means for taxes assessed in 1848. 664 21 

R. Means for taxes assessed in 1849, 1,505 79 

J. M. Rowell for taxes assessed in 1850, • • 6,882 43 

D. L. Stevens for taxes assessed in 1851, • 32,020 45 
Loans on promissory notes for new bridge, 

as per City Debt, 4,650 00 

City Stock Loans, as per acc't City Debt, • 14,000 00 

State Treasurer, Literary Fund, 308 38 

" " rail road tax, 2,008 24 

" " military money, 195 00 

County Treasurer, for support Co. paupers, 1,150 00 

sundrv towns for support of paupers, 149 05 

F. Smyth for rent of City Hall Stores, 1,443 00 

" " for rent City Hall, 771 00 

" " for licenses circuses, 120 00 

" " for license Barnum's museum,- • • 40 00 
" " for license to enter drains and 

sewers, 71 90 

M. Fellows for interest, 49 40 

M. Fellows for dog licenses, 12 00 

B. F. Manning for cleaning vault, 2 50 

committee on commons, for grass, 51 92 

committee on " Valley," sale of lots, &c.,- • 568 00 

D. Randlet for produce City Farm, 583 39 

N. H. Asylum, overdrawn, 2 68 

W. E. Eastman, overdrawn, 2 00 

From Smith & Clough for rent of engine house, • 36 00 
Isaac C. Flanders for money overdrawn for 

school house repairs, district No. 2, 242 46 

David P. Perkins for money overdrawn for 

school district No. 2, 156 05 

Thomas McCue for old granite bridge, • • • • 102 00 

W. L. Lane costs and fines Police Court, • • 27 86 



Total REVENUE, $67,815 71 



1 ! 

Reven - $67,815 71 

Balance on hand at the commencement of the year -.1 7" 71 

Total means, $70,986 12 

Deduct, total payments through the Treasury, ■ ■ • • 69,885 14 

Balance as per Tri »unt, $1,101 28 



In addition to the foregoing, the Collector of Taxes for the 
present year has paid from the the City 1 

fcion of the State and Tax, amounting t 2 I 29, 

which sum has not been through the City Treasury — 
Laws of the State and the collector's warrant require hi 
pay the same directly to the State and County Tr 

State Tax, 2,857 20 

County Tax, 6,767 09 

$ . _ 29 

The details of the expenditures mil be found trader the 
eral heads of Appropriations, appended. 

Annexed are also schedules of the of the City and 

School District property, a sta ' ity Debt and 

debts due the City, a Table of Valuation of Property, Tax- 
es, Number of Polls, &c, for each of the last thirteen y< 
also a Table showing the Population of Manchester for the same 
time. 

SAMUEL FISH, ] 
MOSES FELLOWS, Committee 
GEORGE CLARK, [ on 
Hi:xl!V CLOUGH, Finance. 
D. C. GOULD, 



Read and accepted. 



In Common Council, Feb. I .. L852. 
GEORGE A. FRENCH, Clerk. 



In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 17, I 
Read and accepted in concurrence. 

FREDERICK SMYTH, City Clerk. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 



The Appropriations made by the City Council for different 
purposes, for the Financial year ending February 1st, 1852, 
with the unexpended balances of the previous year ; the trans- 
fers from one Appropriation to another; together with the Ex- 
penditures in detail under each Appropriation, and the unex- 
pended balances. 

NEW HIGHWAYS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1851, 1,208 89 

Appropriated and assessed for April, 

1851, 5,000 00 

$6,208 39 



Dec, 1851. Deduct, am't transfer'd to 

appropriation for sewers and drains, 500 00 

Dec, 1851. Deduct, am't transfer'd to 

appropriations for City Officers,- • • 1,000 00 



Expenditures. 

Paid for BUILDING Pine St. exten- 
sion, east. 
To A. & D. A. Bunton, for excavating 

11,557 yards, 1,155 70 
" " 3751-2 perch 

stone work, • • 695 37 
" " 60 3-4 perch 

stone work, • • 281 25 



$1,500 00 
$4,708 39 



Amount carried forivard, $2,132 32 



16 

Amount brought forward, 

To A. & D. A. Bunton, for laying tim- 
ber for foundation, 
" " for building sixty 

rods street, 

" " extra work filling, 

Peter Mitchell for 10^ perch stone, 
Benjamin Mitchell for labor 5 days, 
Elijah Hanson for labor 2. 1 , days, • 
T. McQuestion, whitewashing rails, 
John P. Adriance for spikes, 
David Brigham for 55 posts and 

teaming, 

" " for 1309 ft. lumber 
George W. Wilson for 52 feet tim- 
ber, 3 50 

W. L. Lane for services superin- 
tending building 
Pine street,- • • • 18 50 

Isaac C. Flanders for 10 day's la- 
bor for Pine st,, 20 00 
James A. Weston for engineering, 14 00 



M 


,132 


32 




40 


92 




60 


00 




7 


oo 




43 


00 




• ) 


00 




4 


08 




2 


50 




1 


08 




9 


59 




19 


45 



Paid for BUILDING Lowell st. ex- 
tension. 
To Daniel Rundlet for culverts, as pr. 

contract, 217 94 

" " cash paid for labor 54 70 

D. A. Bunton for labor by Patrick 

McLaughlin, • • • • 15 45 

Eleazer Young for 17 day's labor, 17 00 

W. L. Lane, services as agent to 

March 23d, 1851, 12 00 

J. F. James for surveying, 3 00 



Paid for BUILDING Concord street 

extension. 
To George W. Pinkcrton for land dam 

;vir*, LOO 00 

D. II. Pinkerton, for land damages, 35 00 



$2,410 94 



I 09 



Amount carried forward, $135 00 



IT 

Amounts brought forward, $135 00 $2,761 03 

To Luther B. Bell for land damages,- 32 00 

1 loirs of John Gamble, 150 00 

William Roby for labor, 8 00 

S. Foster, 8 00 

Asa Place, 8 00 

Jonathan Ward, 8 00 

Stephen Smith, 8 00 

J. T. Judkins, 8 00 

H. R. Chamberlin, 8 00 

G. F. Judkins, 16 00 



Taid for BUILDING Union street ex- 
tension, north. 
To Joseph Garland for building 97-|- 

rods highway, • • " 90 00 

Charles Burnett for building 80| 

rods highway, ••• 181 68 

John Kimball for building 39-f rods 

highway, 52 47 

Ira Russell for building 72 rods 

highway, 108 00 

" " for building 65-£ rods 

highway, • • 140 82 

F. H. Watson for building 107 rods 

highway, 93 90 

S* C Hall for building 52 rods 

highway, 100 10 

" " for building 140 rods 

highway, 367 50 

C B. Gleason for services auct'r, 3 75 

George Clark for services as agent, 30 00 

J. F. James for surveying and 

plans, 6 50 



To Ira Drew for land damages for 

Bald Hill Road, • • 1 00 

Noyes Farmer for posts and rails 

for Bald Hill Road 16 50 



$389 00 



,174 72 



$17 50 



Amount carried forward, $4,342 25 

3 



18 

Amounts brought forward, $4,34*2 25 

To James McQuestion for balance due 

on contract for 

building Dickey 

road, $50 00 

To William Mills for work on Chestnut 

street, cast, 

E. Knowlton for work on Chestnut 

street, east, 

H. Stevens for work on Chestnut 

street, east, 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1852, $243 60. 



51 


00 






11 


50 






10 


04 


$72 


54 








$4,464 


79 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 



DISTRICT No. 1. 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, • • • 4 31 

Appropriated April, 1851, 300 00 

Expenditures. 

Paid for LABOR. 

To Nehemiah Preston, Surveyor, 71 00 

Peter Kimball, 40 62 

J. P. Rowell, 7 25 

Charles Stark, 2 00 

Moses Stevens, 12 25 

F. Kimball, 1 50 

John Stark, 13 87 

Edward Hall, 5 00 

Robert Hall, 7 00 

George Cate, 13 75 

Benjamin Stevens, 1 00 

Jonathan Kimball, 15 25 

William Campbell, 18 00 

John Campbell, ' 32 00 

George Clark, 26 00 

Hiram Wilkins, 3 00 

Moses Wells, 3 00 

Robert Stark, 4 00 

Amos Kimball, 9 62 

Reuben Kimball, 7 00 

Calvin Campbell, 1 25 

Paid for STONE. 

To George Clark, 4 50 

George Cate, 2 00 



$304 31 



$294 36 



$6 50 



Balance unexpended Feb. 1, 1852, $3 45. 



$300 8^ 



20 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES -DISTRICT No. 2. 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1851, 9 67 

App-opriated April, 1851, 2,750 00 



Expenditures. 

Paid for LABOR. 

To George F. Judkins, Surveyor, ■ • • • 770 25 

W. L. Lane, 52 50 

John James, 1 00 

John Welch, 50 

N. Chase, 6 50 

J. Regan, 50 

D. Randlet, 2 00 

N. Corning, 38 50 

Dow & Hill, 50 

P. Daisey, 50 

Jonathan Ward, 98 75 

Berry & Co., 54 75 

Asa Place, 120 93 

D. Mahoney, 67 50 

John S. Kidder, 9 25 

D. A. Bunton, 75 

Andrew Bunton, 23 50 

William Roby, 100 50 

Samuel Foster, 119 00 

Joseph T. Judkins, 33 00 

Stephen Smith, 2nd, 79 75 

George W. Adams, 63 78 

William Mills, 153 00 

M. C. Austin, 18 00 

George W. Demick, 6 00 

Emery Currier, 25 75 

William Hoyt, 127 50 

A. Cushman, 8 5< • 

H. Wilkins, 6 00 

Amount carried forward, $1,983 96 



$2,759 67 



21 



Amount brought forward, $1,1*83 96 

To John G. Sanborn, 7 00 

Ira Russell, 2 00 

E. Knowlton, 12 00 

J. S. Green, 3 60 

L. Connor, 10 25 

James McCarty, IB 00 

Andrew Bun ton, Jr., 4 50 

James Clark, 3 50 

II. R. Chamberlin, 14 25 

John H. Maynard for labor on Ca- 
nal bridge, 86 12 

" " for iron work Ca- 
nal bridge, 13 02 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. for 
11,058 ft. timber 
and plank for Ca- 
nal bridge, 153 86 

Brown & Campbell for stone and 
labor for Canal 

bridge, 44 75 

George Hall for lumber for Canal 

bridge, 41 60 

J. B. McCrillis for iron work, 2 91 

J. W. Saunders for labor and nails, 21 95 

Day & Jepson for 424 ft. plank, • 6 36 
George F. Judkins for 1,534 feet 

plank, 16 87 

" " for 4 pick handles 68 

George Clark for Stone, 61 25 

J. D. Emerson for lumber and labor 4 12 

T. McKew for labor, 2 20 

Ayer & Fogg for hard ware,- • • • 18 42 

J. B. McCrillis for iron work, 8 94 

William Adams for sharpening picks 

and iron work, • • 19 68 
C. W. Clement for sharpening picks 

and iron work, • • 11 98 
Caleb Gage for sharpening picks 

and iron work, • • 8 07 

N. Chase for plough, 13 86 

Amount carried forward, $2,590 70 



iM 



Amount brought forward^ §2,590 70 

J. T. P. Hunt for flagging stone and 

setting, L2 M 

Kidders & Co. for shovels, pails, 
lanterns, nails and 
cord, 418 

AmoskcaLr Manufacturing Co. for 

gravel, 17.~> <hi 



$2,782 78 



Amount overdrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, 023 11. 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES-DISTRICT No. 3. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, • • • 1 47 

Appropriated April, 1851, 275 00 



Expenditures. 
Paid for LABOR. 

To B. F. Mitchell, Purveyor, 

W. 8. Baker, 

John Brown, 

Groves Brown, 

Robert Baker, 

J. F. Smith, 

E. C. Howlet, 

J. G. Eveleth, 

Peter Mitchell, 

Kadimiah Hazeltine, 

Benjamin Mitchell, 

Addison Dale, 

Nathaniel Webster, 

Nathaniel Baker, 

G. W, Merriam, 

Benjamin Mitchell for gravel land 

purchased 1849,- 

Nathaniel Baker for 25 posts, • • • 

" " for 12 rails,- • • • 

" for 7 lbs. nails, ■ 

B. F. Mitchell for stone, 

Balance unexpended Feb. 1st, 1851, $27 13. 



40 


12 


6 


00 


5 


50 


26 


00 


18 


00 


4 


00 


15 


50 


3 


00 


34 87 


12 50 


36 


75 


3 


00 


3 


00 


9 50 


1 


63 


28 


00 


1 


75 


4 


00 




35 




87 



$276 -17 



$249 34 



■U 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES-DISTRICT No. 4. 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, • • • 28 6 I 

Appropriated April, 1851, 225 00 



Expenditures. 

Paid for LABOR. 

To Isaac Whittemore, Surveyor, < • • • 32 11 

Jonathan Aikin, 8 00 

Thomas Cheney, 7 00 

Israel Muffins, 9 00 

James Cheney, 13 25 

R. P. Whittemore, 19 06 

Ira W.Moore, is 62 

Ephraim S. Emerson, 9 75 

Nathaniel Moore, 9 00 

John Crosby, 9 06 

Andrew Aikin, 1 00 

John Calif, 16 75 

David Webster, 14 00 

Franklin Webster, 4 00 

John P. Moore, 14 50 

Nathaniel Moore, 2 25 

Alpheus Bodwell, 50 

Peasley Chase, 3 00 

Ayer & Fogg for pick and handle, 1 34 
John P. Moore for 1,738 ft. plank 

and timber, 17 38 

" " for 260 ft. plank, 2 86 
Isaac Whittemore for 350 ft. tim- 
ber, 2 45 



Balance unexpended Feb. 1st, 1852, $37 "(!. 



S- 7 5. 



$215 88 



25 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES-DISTRICT No. 5. 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, • • • 58 15 

Appropriated April, 1851, 275 00 

Expenditures. 

Paid for LABOR. 

To Ephraim S. Harvey, Surveyor, • • 33 36 

Jonas Harvey, Jr., 15 00 

Horace G. Coburn, 4 00 

James Emerson, 20 34 

Elbridge Roby, 3 25 

James McQuestion, Jr., 4 25 

David Dickey, 10 60 

John Dickey, 12 00 

William Dickey, 6 00 

Rodnia Nutt, 27 67 

Amos Weston, 18 17 

Jacob Brown, 50 

James M. Nutt, 3 00 

Harrison Weston, 7 50 

Gilman Harvey, 12 08 

James M. Young, 4 25 

Simon B.Hill, 2 50 

Israel Merrill, 27 49 

John Young, 12 75 

James Nutt, 9 51 

John Dickey, 2nd, 2 50 

Balance unexpended Feb. 1st, 1852, $96 43. 



$333 15 



$236 72 



36 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES- DISTRICT No. 6. 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, • • • 10 44 

Appropriated April, 1851, 225 00 



$235 44 



Expenditures. 

Paid for LABOR. 

To James M. Webster, Surveyor, • • • 37 00 

Henry C.Joy, 15 75 

Edwin R. Lamprey, 3 00 

Ebenezer Webster, 4 00 

Israel Webster, 21 00 

Harrison Corning, 6 00 

Benjamin White, 5 00 

Nathan Johnson, 9 50 

John P. Webster, 18 00 

Amos C. Webster, 16 00 

Amos Webster, 13 50 

David Dickey, 3rd, 4 42 

David Dickey, Jr., 11 50 

Stephen M. Baker, 2 50 

Samuel Gamble, 16 25 

Joshua Corning, 5 00 

Ebenezer Corning, 2 00 

Oliver Hunt, 11 00 

Josiah Perry, 16 00 

Thomas Mead, 75 



$218 17 



Balance unexpended Feb. 1st, 1852, $17 27. 



27 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES-DISTRICT No. 7. 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, • • • 6 96 

Appropriated April, 1851, 475 00 



Expenditures. 

Paid for LABOR. 

To Robert Stevens, Surveyor, 95 50 

James Hall, 17 92 

Richard Young, 19 00 

Peter O. "Woodman, 10 67 

Horace Quimby, 23 75 

Moses Stevens, 4 00 

D. McDonald, ~i 14 75 

Austin George, 8 00 

Archibald Gamble, 28 17 

CA.Hall, 23 67 

Daniel Bartlett, 12 50 

Charles Young, 22 75 

John Leavitt, 5 83 

Isaac Huse, 39 58 

Daniel Randlet, .... 2 17 

Phillip C. Farmer, 6 00 

George Porter, 12 50 

Ira Putney, 5 92 

Cheney & Wilson, 21 00 

Sewall Leavitt, 9 00 

J. R. Barrett, 2 00 

David Young, 22 00 

James Hall, 2nd, 10 83 

Joseph B. Pierce, 9 75 

Silas Russell, 1 00 

James Hall, Jr., 9 08 

Joseph Cross, 8 00 

J. R. Hall, 2 00 

Moses Dame, 3 00 

Jacob Mead, 3 00 

N. Chase for repairing tools, 1 59 

C. Day for 850 ft. hard pine plank 11 90 



$481 96 



Balance unexpended Feb. 1, 1852, $15 13. 



$466 83 



28 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES-DISTRICT No. 8. 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1851,- 
Appropriated April, 1851, 



Expenditures. 

Paid for LABOR. 

To Edward P. Oftutt, Surveyor, 

William H. Coult, 

Calvin Clement, 

John Proctor, 

Horace Stevens, 

John G. Coult, 

Augustus Proctor, 

Ira Litchfield, 

George Drew, 

Joseph Brown, 

Gilman Reed, 

Phineas Hazeltine, 

John Hazelton, 

Brown, 

Edward Proctor, 

John II. Proctor, 

Robinson Young, 

W. S. Dearborn, 

George Young, 

William Bailey, 

Nathan Johnson, 

Farmer k Young for stone and la- 
bor, 



28 

JIM I 



II! i 
mi 



37 41 

42 "7 

10 To 

iv ,,,, 

1 50 

6 00 



1 00 

1 00 
3 40 

2 no 
12 37 

5 J."> 



5 00 
■1 00 
9 33 
23 00 
3 00 
3 00 

4 
o 



00 
00 

(1(1 



$228 00 



I -J Oil 



$205 08 



Balance unexpended Feb. 1st, 1852, $28 "1. 



29 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES-DISTRICT No. 9. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, • • • 10 49 

Appropriated April, L851, 275 00 

$285 49 

Expenditures. 
Paid for LABOR. 

To John G. Webster, Surveyor, 66 50 

Walter H. Noyes, 23 83 

Albert Corning, 3 50 

Warren Corning, 3 20 

Benjamin Corning, 7 00 

James Chase, 5 00 

Johnson Morse, 9 00 

George Corning, 12 25 

Caleb & W. Hazeltine, 14 50 

John Hazeltine, 3 00 

Reuben Hazeltine, 3 00 

Stephen Hazeltine, 6 75 

Moses Griffin, 3 00 

John Huse, 37 39 

George B. McQuestion, 1 50 

Benjamin W. Corning, 2 00 

Ebenezer Corning, 2 75 

Nathaniel Corning, 5 50 

Leonard Hazeltine, 1 50 

John Dickey, 2 75 

William Boyce, 1 00 

Stephen A. Perry, 4 75 

Jesse Cross, 4 50 

Amos Drew, 4 30 

Aaron Drew, 3 50 

James McQuestion, 27 50 

John B. Silver, 2 00 

Enoch Nickerson, 2 50 

John G. Webster for timber and 

rails, 6 00 

" " for 1980 ft. plank 11 76 

" " for 16 lbs. spikes, 64 

Kidders & Co. for 1 cask powder, 2 75 

" " for 100 ft. fuse,-- 50 

P 85 62 

Amount overdrawn Feb. 1, 1852, 13 cents. 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Balance undrawn Feb, 1st, 1851,- • « • 701 44 
Transferred from new highways Dec., 

1851, 500 00 

Expenditures. 

Paid for LABOR. 

To Geo. F. Judkins, Superintendent, • 161 50 

Asa Place, : '4 50 

H. R. Chamberlin, 20 00 

AVilliam Roby, 35 00 

Samuel Foster, 24 00 

Samuel Dame, 22 00 

Ebenezer Knowlton, 1 _ _•"> 

Ira Russell, 5 00 

Stephen Smith, 2nd, 8 00 

George Hunt, 18 00 

Nathaniel Corning, 17 00 

George W. Adams, 9 00 

Jonathan Ward, 31 00 

George W. Foster, 9 00 

Charles Bennett, 12 00 

Andrew Bunton, 4 50 

Augustus Buckler, 2 00 

W. L. Lane, 14 00 

George H. Dorr, 16 00 

Brown & Campbell for stone and 

labor, 49 59 

Hylas Dickey for bricks and ce- 
ment repairing 

sewer, 11 63 

J. Kittredge for repairing sewer,- 3 12 
J. T. P. Hunt for labor and cement 
repairing Elm st. 

sewer, 108 67 

Amount carried forward, $627 76 



§1,201 44 



81 

Amounts brought forward, $627 76 

To J. W. Saunders for labor and lum- 
ber, 8 12 

Joseph Dunlap for 10,286 ft. hem- 
lock plank, 102 86 

" " for 4,144 ft. hem- 
lock plank, 41 44 

" " for 1,011 ft. chest- 
nut plank, 14 15 

J. Abbott & Co. for 4 casks cement 

and 1 cask lime, • 12 37 

R. H. Ayer for 10,925 brick for 

Elm street sewer, 51 03 

Ayer & Fogg for nails and lines, • 6 47 

William Adams for iron work and 

repairing tools, • • 18 93 

Thomas Woods amount due Jesse 
Anderson 1847: — 
suit Thos. Woods 
vs. J. Anderson, 
City Trustee, • • • 85 14 

Balance unexpended Feb. 1st, 1852, $233 17. 



$968 27 



schools. 

SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 1. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851,- • • • ( .'1 88 

Appropriated April, 1851, I"* 1 ' 00 

K.i l» nditures. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

To Henrj E. Stanton, 77 00 

Miss Mary J. Boynton, 56 00 

Paid IT. E. Stanton for building fires, 1 00 
Peter Kimball for repairs and dip- 
per, 2 08 

Nehemiah Preston for 84 cords of 

■wood and sawing, 1 2 50 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $93 30. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 2. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, « • • • -J . 1 7 . > I 1 

Approjn-intcd April, 1<Sf>1, 7,000 00 

Received of School Committee, by D. 
P. Perkins, am't 
overdrawn, L56 05 



$241 *S 



$148 58 



89,332 It. 



38 

Expenditures. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION and care of 
rooms. 

To Amos Hadley, 154 50 

John P. Newell, 431 54 

Moses T. Brown, 480 00 

A. M. Caverly, 485 50 

Miss Sarah J. Tuck, 32 00 

" Betsey B. Shepherd, 164 00 

" Mary E. Nichols, 132 00 

" Julia A. Hall, 167 50 

" Maria T. Woods, 90 50 

" Elisabeth B. Stark, 90 50 

" Susanna Towns, 45 50 

" Sarah Shepherd, 91 60 

" Julia A. French, 157 96 

". Harriet W. Patterson, 168 77 

" A. A. Mannahan, 87 50 

" Hannah G. Lane, 158 39 

" Sarah A. Plummer, 170 50 

" Submit R. Scott, 13 50 

" Malinda Stanton, 92 00 

" Amanda W. Brown, 166 25 

" Caroline C. Johnson, 231 00 

" Margaret J. Allison, 164 00 

" Esther P. Straw, 173 00 

" Hannah J. Bliss, 164 00 

" S. W. Bodwell, 168 25 

" Lucretia A. Brown, 169 35 

" A. C. Eastman, 168 75 

Marshall G. Kimball, 77 75 

George A. Crosby, 67 50 

Miss Clara Straw, 125 50 

" Mary J. Mead, 100 50 

" R. A. Gilbert, 46 50 

" Susanna Stevens, 122 75 

" M.J.Eaton, 19 35 

" D.A.Crosby, 60 50 

Mrs. M. S. Brooks, 34 00 

Miss Eliza Jackson, 77 00 

" O. B. Fowler, 78 00 

Amount carried forward, $5,427 71 
5 



34 



i : 



Amount brought forward, [ $/>,42 

To Miss H. II. Chase, 37 00 

" II. II. K.Chase, 77 00 

" Martha Eaton, 91 50 

" Dolly W. May, 77 00 

" S. Ingalls, 77 7:. 

D. E. Hapgood, 180 39 

Miss Elisabeth J. Wier, 38 00 

" S. P. Brooks, »:; 00 

" Lucretia D. Lane, 32 00 

" Mary Richardson, 6 30 



$6,087 65 



Paid for WASHING and care of 
school room, in addition to am't paid 
teachers for same. 
ToH. N. Cook, 

Mary Monie, 

Lyman Currier, 

Samuel Bartlett, 

William Ayers, 

Charles Wilson, 

Josiah Crosby, 



3 


00 


2 


25 


3 


00 


2 


00 


1 


12 


1 


00 


•1 


00 



86 


32 


40 


77 


170 40 


26 

1 


39 

31 


35 

• > 


78 
38 
50 



$14 37 



Paid for WOOD and SAWING. 

To Samuel Poor for 21 -ffo cords hard 

wood, 

" " for 11 A% cords pine 

wood, 

Albert Hancock for 42 ^ cords 

wood, 

" " for cutting and piling 

same, 

F. Kimball for -] cord wood, 

Benjamin Sweat for sawing, split- 
ting and piling 

wood, 

Samuel Brien for sawing wood,- • • 
John S. Elliott for sawing wood, • 

16 75 

Amount carried forward, $6,4i*>7 77 



36 

Amount brouqlit forward, $6,467 77 

Paid for REPAIRS. 

To J. W. Saunders for carpenter's 

work, 16 59 

S. S. Moulton for carpenter's work 1 25 

J. L. Bradford for carpenter's work 3 01 

Jacob B. Chase for carpenter's work 3 50 

Hibbard Stevens for grading,- • • • 13 11 

John C. Young for slating, 5 53 





12 


09 




15 


14 


B. F. Edmunds for repairing clock, 




50 


John H. Maynard for carpenter's 








3 


12 


L. Wilkinson for carpenter's work, 


1 


41 


Paid for BROOMS, BRUSHES, FUR- 






NITURE, &c. 






To Charles Offutt for brooms and 








14 


15 


C. S. Fisher for brooms and soap, 


o 
O 


81 


Berry & Co. for brooms and chalk, 


2 


97 


L. & A. Jackson for cambric for 








1 


23 


Barton & Co. for cambric for cur- 








1 


00 


S. P. Kingsbury for 2 dozen pails, 


4 


25 


Kidders & Co. for brooms and mats 


2 


19 


J. P. Adriance for shovel and tongs 


1 


13 


Ayer & Fogg for shovel and tongs, 






lock and chalk, • • 


1 


43 


Brown, Dudley & Co. for stoves, 






pipe, zinc, cleaning 






& repairing stoves, 






pipe and furniture, 


69 


24 


Hartshorn & Darling for stoves, 






pipe, zinc, furniture, 






and repairing stoves 








43 


91 


George A. Brown for stoves, pipe, 






and repairing, 


5 


12 




$150 


43 



$75 25 



$6,543 02 



Amounts brought forward, §150 48 $6,543 02 

To Moores & Tibbetts for chairs 7 05 

John P. Adriance for hooks, bells, 
locks, clusters and 

hardware, 16 93 

William Young for 1 doz. black- 
board brushes, • • • 6 00 
W. Adriance for brushes and chalk, 1 50 
George W. Adams for brooms, ... 50 

$182 41 

Paid for PRINTING and ADVER- 
TISING. 
To J. H. Goodale for printing 150 
registers, paper & 

covers, 34 59 

" " for printing thirty 

books and 50 slips 7 50 

" " for printing 200 
cop. reports, noti- 
ces, blanks, slips, 
list of books, &c, 5 08 

J. C. Emerson for printing notices, 2 25 

James O. Adams for printing certif- 
icates & circulars, 3 50 
Gage & Wallace for advertising no- 
tices and printing 
numbers, 12 00 

$65 52 

Paid for BOOKS and STATIONERY 

for children of indigent parents. 
To William Young,- 



• > 



10 



J. B. Johnson, 1 93 

Robert Moore, 5 00 

William II. Fisk, 2 51 

N.F.Merrill, 3 52 

$15 79 

MISCELLANEOl S EXPENSES. 

Paid Joseph Marshall for ruling and 

binding, L £ 

" " for 6 record books, 2 25 

Amounts carried forward, s7 l" S0.^<>''» 74 



37 

Amounts brought forward, $7 10 $6,806 71 

Paid Henry Kimball for binding 500 

school by-laws, • • 1 87 

" " for making 147 

registers, 28 38 

" " for binding 200 re- 
ports, 75 

C. E. Potter for expenses to Han- 
over, 6 90 

" " for postage, 2.~> 

" " for services fitting 

up writing room,- 10 00 

David P. Perkins for services 
fitting up writing 

room, 10 00 

B. F. Eaton for expenses to Bos- 
ton, 3 00 

A. B. Fuller for postage and re- 

pairing registers,- 5 00 

B. F. Ayer for services as clerk 

of school meetings 

and recording, • • 7 88 

Union Benevolent Association 

for stationery, wood 

and light, for free 

evening school, by 

R.Mitchell, 10 56 

Uriah H. Foss for cleansing wa- 
ter closets, 3 00 

J. N. Bruce for painting banners, 22 00 

D. P. Perkins for expenses to 

Pittsfield, 4 00 

$120 G9 

Paid School Committee Feb., 1851, (overdrawn) *156 05 



$7,083 48 
Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1852, $2,248 68.f 

*This amount was drawn to pay teachers, and has since been paid into the Treasury, 
as will be seen in account of receipts. 
tAbout $1 ; 500 of this sum is now due teachers. 



38 



SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 3. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, 110 20 

Appropriated April, 1851, 17") 00 

Expenditures. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

To Francis B. Eaton, '.'7 50 

Miss M. L. Flanders, 64 00 

Paid 11. B. Baker for care of school 

room, 2 00 

Nathaniel Baker for If cords of 

"wood and sawing, 6 62 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1852, $115 08. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 4. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, 100 03 

Appropriated April, 1851, 175 00 

Expenditures. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

ToS. T. Hill, si 00 

Miss Eliza Crane, 72 00 

Paid Brown & Dudley for stove and 

pipe, 7 39 

Moores & Tibbets for 3 chairs, 1 35 
Nathaniel Moore for repairing 

school room, • • • • 1 00 

" " for wood, 7 no 

John Crosby for sawing wood, • 2 25 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $109 04 



$285 20 



$170 12 



$284 03 



$174 99 



59 



SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 5. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, • • • 104 82 

Appropriated April, 1851, 165 00 

Expenditures. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

To D. P. Perkins, 93 50 

M. D. Gregg, 72 00 

Z. C. Perkins, 8 45 

Paid David Dickey for wood and re- 
pairs, 10 39 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $85 48. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 0. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, • • • 124 69 
Appropriated April, 1851, 165 00 

Expenditures. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

To J. E. Bennett, 112 00 

Miss E. T. B. Woodworth, 64 00 

Paid Stephen M. Baker for repairing 

stove, 1 50 

Amos Webster for 2| cords wood 11 50 
" " for sawing and pi- 
ling same, 2 16 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $98 53. 



$269 82 



$184 34 



$289 69 



$191 16 



In 



SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 7. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, • • • 118 21 
Appropriated April, L851, L90 00 

Expenditures. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

To J. Y. McQuestion, L05 00 

Miss Martha A. Haynes, 64 00 

Paid Isaac Huse for 3£ cords wood 

and sawing same, 14 00 

" " for repairs, 50 

J. Y. McQuestion for cleaning 

room, 1 ")<> 

" " for setting glass 

Luther Stevens for cleaning room 75 

" " for setting glass, 25 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $121 96. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 8. 

Balance undrawn Fen. 1, 1851, !■'> 15 

Appropriated April, 1851, 1:1") 00 

Expenditures. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION, 

To John L. Batchclder, 66 00 

Miss Submit Et. Scott, 52 50 

Paid Moores & Tibbetts for 2 chairs, 90 

C. S. Fisher for broom, 88 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st. L852, $90 12. 



- 21 



6 25 



ft210 15 



$1H' 78 



88 16 
145 00 


$233 16 




74 75 

49 00 

4 00 





41 



SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 9. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, • • • 
Appropriated April, 1851, 

Expenditures. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

To Eben Corning, 

E. J. Wier, 

Paid John Gr. Webster for repairs, . . . 
" " for 3 -|- cords wood 

and sawing same 15 75 

" " for |- cord wood 

prepared, 

Eben Corning for repairing house 
Brown k Dudley for stove pipe 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $82 65. 

Note.— The proportion of the State Literary Fund belonging to each District, is 
included in the respective appropriations. 



SCHOOL HOUSES-DISTRICT No. 2. 

Balance undrawn Feb 1st, 1851, . . . 3,382 16 
Received of Isaac C. Flanders amount 
drawn by Commit- 
tee last year, and 
not expended, . . . 242 46 



3 50 




2 35 




1 16 






$150 51 





$3,624 62 
Expenditures. 
Paid to the order of the Committee 
chosen by dist't to expend for repairs 
of houses such part of said appropri- 
ation as they might deem proper. 
To A. M. Chapin ' $2,200 00 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $1,424 62, 

*The bills of expenditure paid from this appropriation are in the hands of the 
School Committee ; consequently the items cannot be given in this place. 

6 



42 
SCHOOL HOUSE REFAIES-DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Approjr iated and assessed as per vote 

of District, A] ril, 1851 . $\2C> CO 

Expenditures. 

Taid J. S. Kidder for labor and mate- 
rials repairing house, by 11. G. 

Farrington, C8 03 

J. S. Kidder for ] ainting house, 

by 11. G. Farrington C9 48 

Alonzo Smith for 1| M. shingles 5 63 

11 " for hOO laths 1 10 

• Gilman Harvey for cCO bricks, . 2 CO 

A. C. Wallace for doors and sash 5 ! 5 

John P. Adriancc for hard ware 2 Uo 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $C0 CO 



£126 CO 



KEW GBAKITE EEIEGE 

Appropriated and assessed Ap '1,1851, « r ,(C0 CO 

Authorized lean. 5,CC0 CO 

5 1 ° ' ° r ° 

JSr^ tnditures. 

Taid for stone PIERS and ABUT- 
MENTS. 
To Hiram Brown for GSP-^ perch 

stono work £G2 C3 

" " for 250^j perch 

stono work 752 25 

« « for 461^3 perch 

6tone work 8,160 00 

" " for extra work,. . 05 45 
Amount carried forward, SM,S76 99 



43 

Amount brought forward, 

Paid for W< OD*and IKON WORK, 

and PAINTING. 
To H. Childs & Co., 

MISCKLLANEOUl 

Paid Thomas McKew for labor, 

" ki for di awing gravel 

George IJant for " stone 
James McGreggor for use of 

boats and boatmen. 

Kidders & Co. for 20 lbs. deep 

sea lino, 

A. M. Chapin for services engi- 
neering 

Aycr & l^ug for wire and nails 
Gage & Wallace for advertising 

notices, 

J. (J. Emerson for advertising no- 
tices, 

Jam. '3 0. Adams for advertising 

notices, 

Jacob F, James for expenses to 
Concord and Lowell, 
" " for cash ] aid for use 
ot boat and boatmen 
" " for services as com- 
mittee, 

Ja:n3S Wallacj for services as 

committee,. . . . 

" " for expenses to 

Lowell, Concord, Nashua and 

llenniker, 4 90 

$425 84 







84,876 


99 






8^,025 


90 


13 
£8 
25 


11 
72 
50 






5 


(0 






3 


GO 






10 


00 
73 


• 




5 


50 









25 






3 


00 






8 


53 






1 


00 






150 


00 






150 


00 







$ 9,928 73 
Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $71 27. 



MILITIA. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, • • • 
Appropriated April, 1851, 



Expenditures. 

Paid City Guards for rent of Armory 
" " for 49 soldiers re- 
turned according to law, 

Charles G. Morse for enrolling 
soldiers in sixth company of In- 
fantry, 

F. A. Moore for enrolling soldiers 
in eleventh comp. of Infantry 

Samuel N. Bell for services enroll- 
ing and returning soldiers of 
eleventh comp'y of Infantry,. 

E. G. Gilford for services enrolling 
and returning soldiers, 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $21G 50. 



25 50 
400 00 


£425 50 




125 00 




49 00 




4 00 




3 00 




3 00 




25 00 


$209 00 





PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, 117 77 

Appropriated April, 1851, 600 00 



Expenditures. 
Paid James 0. Adams, 

for printing check lists and war- 
rants, 10 25 

for advertising ordinances and res- 
olutions, 

for advertising assessor's notice,. 

for printing blanks and bills, . . . 

J. C. Emerson, 

for printing warrants, circulars 
and blanks, 

for advertising ordinances and res- 
olutions, 

William H. Gilmore, 

for printing notice, 

William H. Gilmore & Co., 

for printing check lists,. ........ 

for publishing ordinance and noti- 
ces, 

Campbell & Gilmore, 

for publishing ordinances, resolu- 
tions, notices, and warrant for 
meeting, 15 75 

Gage & Wallace, 

for advertising ordinances, resolu- 
tions and notices, 13 00 

for printing blanks for committee 

on commons, 1 50 

for printing blanks, 12 25 

for printing rules and orders and 

list of city officers, 32 00 



9 

1 

13 


25 
00 
25 


15 


50 


19 


50 


1 


50 


10 00 


8 


25 



8717 77 



Amount carried forward^ $163 00 



40 

Amount brought foricard, $103 00 

Piil John IL Goodale, 

for printing check lists 4 75 

" " 500 cop. School Com- 
mittee's Report, 15 90 

for printing blanks 2 87 

for advertising ordinances an 1 

resolutions, 5 84 

for advertising assessor's notice,. 75 

for paper and printing 1400 cop- 
ies annual reports 1851, 12G 96 

Henry Kimball, 

for binding 1400 annual reports 8 75 

" " revised statutes,. .. . 62 

Joseph Marshall, 

for assessors' blank books, 28 00 

for stationery, 8 85 

J. 13. Johnson for stationery,. . . 

Robert Moore for " 

W. II. Fisk for 

H. S. Thatcher for " 

J. M. Berry for " 

William Young for revised statute 
for Ward No. 1, 

for stationery, 

A. C. Smith for stationerv, .... 

N. C. Connor for " ' for 
Ward No. 1, 

N. F. Merrill for stationery,. . . 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1852, $293 82. 



d 


..) 


o 


83 


15 


01 




56 


o 


00 


2 


25 


1 


41 


9 


02 


1 


32 


18 


51 



$423 ^ 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, 527 20 

Appropriated April, 1861, 1,0U0 00 

Expenditures. 

Taid Manchester P. Office for postage 10 42 

A. Waterman tor services and ex- 
penses collecting pau] er bills 
of towns, preparing and revis- 
ing list of railroad shares, and 
stationery, 1850 and '51,. . . . 41 00 

W. L. Lane for services relating 

to old Granite bridge, 2 00 

Daniel P. Perkins for use of horse 

and carriage visiting schools,. 2 CO 

John S. Elliott for use of horse 

and carriage visiting schools,. 2 50 

Coffin & Co. for use of horse and 

carriage visiting schools 1 25 

J. F. James for engineering servi- 
ces 7 00 

C. B. Gleason for selling old Gran- 
ite bridge, 2 50 

J. \>. Johnsoh for books furnished 

poor children, 5 24 

Nat'ianiel Corning for labor fen- 
cing up Granite street, 2 75 

W. G. Means for use ot horse and 

carriage visiting schools, 1 25 

C. E. Potter for use of horse and 

carriage visiting schools 5 00 

Josiah Crosby tor use of horse 

and carriage visiting schools, . 4 50 

Simjn Fogg for posting bills, ... 25 

Amount carried forward, $87 63 



&1.K27 20 



48 

Amount brought forward, §81 68 

T. T. Abbott for expenses to Bos- 
ton fur Court house 5 00 

W. W. Baker for use of horse 
and carriage, and labor gun 
ing routes for highways, ; - 6 00 

F. Smyth for cash paid tor expen- 
ses and journey to Bundry pla- 
ces, on city business, and t ) 
express and telegraph, as per 

bills ' in 81 

Josiah Quincy for cash due G. 

W. Wilson, City Trustee, 20 17 

Merrimack Manufacturing Co., 
Lowell, for costs in the case 
City of Manchester vs. V. 

1849, 41 21 

II. L. Davis, Lowell, for eofi 

same case, 45 60 

Beard & Gunnison, Lowell, for 

costs same case, 15 84 

J. N. Bruce for painting and let- 
tering 100 street signs 50 00 
" " for lettering sign for 

City Treasurer, 4 00 

" " for lettering sign for 

City Clerk, 1 00 

J. II. Proctor for bounty on crows 2 00 

R. Farmer for " " 40 

J. H. Goodalc for printing 4 16 

William Shepherd for use horse 

and carriage 3 00 

Stillman Fellows for repairing fur- 
niture, 

" " for repairing and 

making ballot boxes 10 84 

A. C. Wallace for 100 street signs 25 00 

Micajah Ingham for watering sts. 21 00 

John Lane for map 10 00 

(I. B. Fogg for repairing locks 1 00 

John N. Brown for painting book 

case, 50 



Amount carried forward, $380 84 



49 

Amount brought forward, $380 84 

Paid Walter Adriance for hard ware, 

1848, 4 56 

F. Smyth for recording 293 mar- 
riages from May 8, 1849, to 
April 1, 1850, agreeably to 

statute law, 17 58 

Joseph M. Rowell for cash paid 
for cleaning vaults 

1850, 115 00 

" "for cash paid for 

remov'g nuisances 2 00 

Gilman Harvey for damage caused 

by defect in highway, 3 00 

J. B. Pierce for damage caused 

by defect in Merrimack street 20 00 

William Adams for damage caused 

by defect in Chestnut street, . . 20 00 

B. F. Manning for eyelet machine 1 75 

Paid for ATTENDANCE at COURT, 
case, City of Manchester vs. Daniel 
Hall, 1849 and '50. 

To Adam Chandler, 7 44 

Harry Leeds, 7 44 

S. F. Mannahan, 7 44 

William P. Farmer, 7 44 

J. F. James, 7 44 

F. Smyth, 4 40 

Paid William Craig for posting notices 4 25 

George P. Prescott for spittoon 1 00 

Henry W. Herrick for engraving 
view of City Hall, Town Hall, 
old Meeting house, and Falls 

School-house, 40 00 

Smith, Ober & Co. for lamp tops 1 25 

James Wallace for expenses to get 

weights and measures sealed 5 60 

P. Mitchell for bounty on crows, . 1 30 

H. R. Chamberlin for expenses 

and postage paid, 2 25 

N. Baldwin and als. for expenses 

repairing back street, 17 91 

Amount carried forward, $679 89 

7 



50 



Amount brought forward, $679 89 

Thomas McKew for labor on old 

bridge, and cutting ice, 8 00 

James C. Holmes for removing 
wood from highway- 

J. C. Tasker for plan Court house 8 00 

R. W. Robinson for crying sale,. 50 

Gale & Merrill for use of Mer- 
rimack Hall 2 day, for Ward 2 11 00 

E. Knowlton for 1 day's attend- 
ance before Road Commission- 
ers, 1849 L 25 

Micajah Ingham for 1 day's ser- 
vice at town meeting, Ward J. 1 25 

Samuel S. Moulton for jury boxes 6 13 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1852, $810 35. 



$716 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851,- 
Appropriated April, 1851, 



1,776 

1,000 00 



Expenditures. 

Paid R. Means, Collector 1848 and 
'40, for TAXES, (on bis lists) of 
the following named persons and 
amounts, abated, viz : 



Amount* carried forward,- 



$2,776 98 



1848 



Blaisdell Hczekiah, taxed in Goifstown,. . . . 

Duncklee Stephen, dead, 

Stark Thos. P. dead - L6 

Stevens Samuel, can't be found, 2 16 

Annis Edwin, not of age, 2 58 

Annan Jno. G., taxed twice, 



I849 

■1 IT 

•J IT 



■1 47 



,; \\w s.i si 



51 



1848 

Amounts brought forward, $6 90 

Amory William, same taxed as nou resident 

Brigham Luther, Dr., very poor, 2 58 

Barney Jadediah, dead, 2 58 

Bunton Charles, 2 58 

Batchelder James S., taxed twice, 2 58 

Bolton John, over 70, 2 58 

Blanchard lloswell, dead, 2 58 

Bamford Warren, 2 58 

Buzzell Wm., taxed twice, 2 58 

Brown Moses T., in Boston April 1, 2 58 

Barnes llartman, not 21, 

Burnett M. X., wrong name, 

Brennan Miss M., dead, 

Cheney Charles, taxed twice, 2 58 

Clark George T., not here April 1, 2 58 

Chase Jotham, moved out west, 2 58 

Cochran Willis, very poor, 2 58 

Chase Stephen, paid in Deerfield, 2 58 

Chandler John, wrong name, 2 58 

Crichit John, not here April 1, 2 84 

Clough James B., dead, 2 58 

Campbell John, taxed in No. 1 same year,. 2 58 

Carlton G. R., paid in Epsom, 

Combs Wm., died at poor farm, 

Caldwell Barnard, very poor, Irish, 

Cosgrove James, " " " 

Curtice Milo, 17 years old, 

Cashing Albert, dead, 

Caughey John, gone, 

Drew Samuel, very poor, 2 58 

Durrell Benj., ran away, 2 58 

Doe Bradstreet, House of Correction,. .... 2 58 

Dignam Walter, not 21 years old, 2 58 

Davis Joseph, 2nd, is taxed to C. Bennet, . 1 00 

Dow Curtis L., dead of consumption, 2 58 

Dorcey Gregory, wrong name, 2 58 

Dodge Thomas, not worth a tax, 

Draper Charles, not 21, 

Edgerly Samuel J., dead, 2 58 

Eastman Wm. E., Jr., not 21, 

Amounts carried forward, $72 Q6 



1849 
^6 81 
4 12 



2 47 
,2 47 
.4 12 



2 47 



47 

47 

47 

47 

,2 47 

,2 47 

2 47 



,2 47 
,2 47 

2 47 
,2 47 

$49 63 



52 



Amou7it8 brought forivard, 

Edgerton Andrew, moved out west, 

Folsora Geo. P., not here April 1, 

Fouler Jas. II., not 21, 

Gatley Wm. H., paid in Bedford, 

Godfrey Simon, over 70, 

Godfrey Jonathan, not 21, 

Green Stephen D., taxed twice, 

Gove Japhet, poor and gone, 

Gates Philemon, 17 years old, 

George Simon, not 21, 

George David, paid in Goffstown, 

Glines Horace, not 21, 

Gould, Joseph A., not 21., 

Goodchild Joseph, boy and dead, 

Boyt Edward, taxed twice, 

Hutchinson Nath'l M., wrong, 

Hunt George, taxed twice, 

Hoyt Saunders, dead, 

Heald Ephraim, taxed twice, 

Hardy Nathan II., wrong, 

Hodge Lewis, 

Haile Alonzo, paid at Franklin, 

Harvey Charles, not 21, 

Haggate Wm., dead, 

Haynes Jonathan, paid at Deerfield, 

Haynes Barnabas, wrong name, 

Jacobs Nath'l W., taxed twice, 

Johnson & Shannon, failed k prop'y at'ch'd 
Johnson Ralph C, protected by Court,. . . . 

Jones S. K. Col., paid in Hooksett, 

Leavitt Charles, not 21, 

Lathrop Samuel, gone to Ohio, 

Labarron Orin, gone for good, 

Lord J. P., not 21, 

Lull Leander, left for parts unknown, 

Mack & Wheeler, paid at Raymond, 



1848 
$72 66 



McKean John, not liable, 

Mills Rodney I., wrong name and Dot 21,.. 
Murray Thomas, dead, 



2 58. 




2 58* 




i 58. 




2 58 




3 01 




2 58 




2 58 




2 58 




2 2:'. 




2 58 




6 02 




2 58 




1 72 




2 58 




2 58 




43 00 




2 oS 




2 58 




2 58 




3 01 




1 00 




2 58 




2 58 




2 58 





1849 
£4'.' 63 
2 47 



Amounts carried forward, $170 51 §110 91 



53 



1848 

Amounts brought forward §176 51 

Mann Sam'] S., not 21, 2 58 

Morgan C, 2nd, not 21, 

Merrill .lacob, dead, 

Perkins Geo. F., dead 2 58 

Perkins Ezra, not 21, 2 58 

Page John, not 21 2 58 

Rowe Capt., pays at Portsmouth, 2 58 

Roberts 0., not 21 2 58 

Randall Thos. (B ) dead, 2 58 

Proudinary S., not 21, 

Roberts 0., very poor, 

Ruadlett J., state prison, 

Raj J. W., paid poll in Auburn, 

Stearns D. T., insane, 2 58 

Saunders T., dead,. 2 58 

Smith H. B., not 21, 2 58 

Sargent , no given name, 

Skelton Christopher, dead, 

Stevens G. A., not 21, 

Stone S. W., dead, 

Sullivan J., not here April 1st, 

Thompson L., poor, 

Tewksbury J. P., not 21, 

Trask A., poll tax twice, 

Trow G., not 21, 

Woodard J. E., run away, 

Wilder D., dead, 

Wentworth 0., paid in Lowell, 

Wadleigh H., not 21, 

Walker II. , poor and sick, 

Page H. C., family at Amoskeag, 

Hawley M., not here April 1, 

Seavey S. Dr., poor, 

Page I., not 21, 

Hayden J., wrong name, 

Vincent A., not 21, his father says so, . . . 

Warrener D., paid in Hooksett, 

Richardson C. D., helped by the city,. . . . 

Phelps J., " " " 

Hutchinson B., " " < ; 



1849 

$110 HI 



2 47 
2 47 

2 47 



2 58 



2 58 

2 58 
2 58 
2 58 



2 58 
2 58 



2 58 
2 58 
2 58 



2 


47 


2 


47 


2 


47 


•1 


47 


■2 


47 


2 


47 


2 


47 


2 47 


2 


47 


2 


47 


2 


47 


2 47 


2 


47 


2 47 



2 47 



2 47 
2 47 
2 47 



47 
47 

47 
47 
47 
47 



Amounts carried forward, $228 11 $177 60 



54 



Amounts brought fonoard $228 1 1 $ i" 

Patrick .T., helped by the city 

Brown \\\, " " •■' 

Stevens I., " " " 

SewallA., " - " 

Ladd A.. " " " 

French B., " " " 

SeaveyA., " " " 

CloughJ. B., " " " 

Foss R., " " " 

Wells \\\, " " " 



1848 


1849 


: 60 




. .2 -17 




•' 47 


. 


. .2 47 


2 58. . 


. .2 -17 


2 • 






. .2 -IT 


2 




2 58. . 




2 


..2 -47 




..2 47 


$243 59 $194 89 


8 


243 -V.' 


438 48 



Paid J. M. Rowell, Collector 1850, for 
TAXES abated on his list. of the 
following named persons ami am'ts, 
viz : 

Brown Hiram, over-taxed 5 

Elliott J. S., ■• 7 

Nichols N., " : ... 6 

Lord E. D., taxed wrong, 2 

"Woodman J. P., heirs of, over-taxed, 7 

Stone J., 2 

Gallup L. 3 2 

McKeanJ., 2 

Gardner W., 2 

.Mansur J., 2 

Baldwin L. F., 2 

Currier J., 2 

Wilson 4. A 2 

Bunton El. S., 2 

Parant J. A., 2 

Rundletl L., over-taxed 4 

Smith X., 2 

PixleyA., 2 

Lewis C, 2 

Page I., 2 



13 

90 

37 
90 



37 

'■'> i 

. > M 

•> I 

37 
37 
87 

• > i 
74 
37 
37 
37 
37 



Amounts carried forward, $07 54 $438 48 



.),) 



Amount brougH forward $67 54 $4:'.8 48 

Mahoney 1)., 2 37 

Sha J., 2 37 

GaultJ 2 37 

Cilley J. G., over-taxed 7 90 



52 55 



Paid D. L. Stevens, Collector 1851, 

for TAXES abated on his list, of 

the following named persons and 

amounts, viz : 

Annis David, taxed wrong, 2 25 

Annis E. Vs., " 2 25 

Blanchard L., " 2 25 

Bradley C, " 2 25 

Bunton G., " 2 25 

Collins J., " 2 25 

Crosby J., « 2 25 

Canlin M., " 2 25 

Fulton J., " 2 25 

Farrington A., " 2 25 

Munson J., " 2 25 

Trumbull T., " 2 25 

Gardner W., " 2 25 

Young J. F., " 2 25 

York H., " 2 25 

Whittier A. 2nd, " 2 25 

Wells J., " 2 25 

Otis \V. B. B., " 2 25 

Plummer John Jr., over-taxed 7 50 

Peabody J. H., " 2 00 

Brennan Mary, " 6 00 

Smith S., " 2 25 

Johnson W.B., •' 54 

Rowe L., paid in Hooksett, 2 25 

Harrington E , over-taxed, 3 75 

Gamble A., " 3 75 

Weller A., taxed wrong, 2 25 

Sha J., « 2 25 

McCane W., « 2 25 

Smith W. A., " 2 25 

Allen R., lives in Bedford, 3 97 

Amount carried forward, $81 51 $521 03 



o6 

t ounti brought forward s s l 51 $521 03 

Allen L. A., lives to Bedford 3 92 

Abbott F., paid at Hooksett, 2 25 

Batchelder W. W., minor -i 25 

Barnard II.. paid at Weare, 2 25 

Brown J., minor, 2 25 

Hall A., " ' 2 25 

Brock R., " 2 25 

Bickford A.," 2 25 

( lhase A., came here April, 2 25 

(lark E. W., minor 2 25 

Cook W., not liable, 2 25 

Connor M., minor, 2 2-"> 

Conant N., over 70 - 25 

Clark B. F., minor, 2 25 

Carpenter 0., " 2 25 

Cole J. P., paid at Litchfield, 2 25 

Colby N. il., paid at Dumbarton, 2 25 

J dearborn 11., minor, 2 25 

Donahue D., dead, 2 2.3 

Edgerly S. J., dead, 2 25 

Fifield S., minor, 2 2-3 

FossE., " 2 25 

Fairbanks G. V., minor, 2 25 

George H., minor, 2 25 

Hodge 0., minor, 2 25 

Hodge D., " 2 25 

Hadley A., " 2 2.". 

Helan P., " 2 25 

Hunt " 2 25 

Jones C, " 2 2:. 

Johnson J. S., paid at Hooksett, 2 25 

Johnson J., minor, 2 25 

Jones H., " 2 25 

Kimball J. K., paid at Pembroke, 2 2") 

Knights D. C, minor, 2 25 

Keyzer J., " 2 25 

Kenard J., paid at Litchfield, 2 25 

Killon J., paid at Washington, 2 25 

Kelley J., poor, 2 25 

Lann J., over 70, 2 25 

Lamonton A., minor, 2 25 

Amounts carried forward, sl~.~> l-'> #'~>21 03 



67 

Amounts brought forward, $175 43 $521 03 

Linton T., minor, 2 25 

Leavitt C. A., minor, 2 25 

McDonough P., poor and sick, 2 25 

McClure &., minor, 2 25 

Merrick A., " 2 25 

McCarty J., poor, 2 25 

Parkhurst W. D., minor, 2 25 

Page I., minor, 2 25 

Proudman W. Jr., paid at Bedford, 4 33 

Perkins E., minor, 2 25 

Parrott G., " 2 25 

Smith G., " 2 25 

Senter I. D., paid at Franklin, 2 25 

Spofford B., not liable for poll tax, 2 25 

Shepherd A. N., minor, 2 25 

Sanford H., " 2 25 

Rundlett T., paid at Bedford, 2 25 

Robertson P. B., minor, 2 25 

Ramsay T. H., paid at GofFstown, 2 25 

Randlet S. H., minor, 2 25 

Rand J. E., " 2 25 

Weeks J., paid at Hooksett, 2 25 

Wafindale J., minor, 2 25 

Whitaker H., " 2 25 

, 4 00 

Williston W., " 2 25 

Woodworth J. C, minor, 2 25 

Woodburn G., " 2 25 

Woodburn R., one arm, 2 25 

Woodburn W., poor, 2 25 

Whitcomb E., paid in Deny, 2 25 

Wilmot D. W. C, minor, 2 25 

Walker J. C, " 2 25 

Walker J., " 2 25 

Wolcot R. E., " 2 25 

$258 01 

Paid Blaisdell I. R., taxed wrong, 1850,.. 2 37 

Phillips C, over-taxed, 1851, 5 13 

Norris D. T., taxed wrong, 1850, 2 37 

Straw M. J., " " " .... 2 37 

Dearborn L., not liable, " .... 2 37 

Amounts carried forward, $14 61 $779 04 



58 



Amounts brought forward, $14 til $779 04 

Paid Boardman L. .).. not liable, " 2 37 

Graves D., over TO, i860 and '51 4 62 

Johnson E., over-taxed, 1851, 9 00 



$30 60 

$80! » ''.1 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1852, $1,007 34. 



CITY FARM AND PAUPERS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851,- • • • 813 05 

Appropriated April, 1851, 2,500 00 

$3,313 95 

City Farm Expenditures. 

Paid C. W. Murch for boots and shoes 9 55 

George W. Merriam for black- 
smithing, 10 73 

S. B. Paige for goods and gro- 
ceries, J J 89 

Chas. S. Fisher for goods and gro- 
ceries, 25 32 

Dennis & Varick for hard ware,. L2 18 

D. A. Barflett for 187| lbs. beef 9 07 

Kidders & Co. for goods and gro- 
ceries, 44 65 

Berry & Co. for goods and gro- 
ceries, 3 1 34 

Zadoc Wright for 6 months' work 7 - 00 

" " for 24 days' work, . 7 64 

" " for 20 days' work 6 93 

Amount carried forward, $255 30 



59 

Amount brought forward^ $255 30 

Paid L. & A. Jackson for goods,' ■ ■ • 8 95 
John P. Adriance for hard ware, 

grass seed, &c, 86 81 

Eleazer Young for 75 days' work 63 28 

P. McLaughlin for 30 days' work 15 00 

D. Randlett for 1 year's salary as 

Superintendent of City 
farm, Nov. 5, 1850, to 

Nov. 5, 1851, 350 00 

" for cash paid for 1 yoke 

of oxen, 70 00 

" for cash paid for 1 cow 23 00 
" for cash paid for 7 bush- 
els of rye, 5 95 

" for cash paid for labor 

and sundries, 59 02 

B. L. Johnston for 2 bags salt, • • 3 16 

Charles Simons for 18 days' work 13 50 

Ayer & Fogg for 1 No. 2 iron 

pump, 3 25 

E. Griffin for blacksmithing,- • • • 4 75 
G. T. Mixer for for 1 harness, 1 

halter, and repairing, 14 25 

Gary Cocklin for 9 days' work, • • 5 40 

J. Dearborn for boots and shoes 8 13 
George A. Brown for 5 cords of 

manure, 15 00 

Col. N. Chase for blacksmithing 4 20 
Nelson D. Stevens for 10 days' 

work, 10 00 

A. Wright for 22 days' work,- • 22 00 
G. W. Adams for 2 bags of salt 3 00 
Daniel W. Fling for difference be- 
tween horses, 50 00 

J. H. Moore for 1400 lbs. plaster 5 60 

D. Young for cradling rye,« • • • 6 33 
J. Abbott & Co. for 3 bags rye 

meal, 4 50 

W. Miller for 6 cords manure, • • 24 00 
S. D. Sherburne for 2|- cords 

manure, 8 50 

Amount carried forward, $1,092 88 



00 

Amount brought forward $1,092 88 

Paid H. R. Chamberlin for hat and cap TO 

Kidders k Co. for goods and gro- 
ceries, 15 23 

D. Hill for insurance, 24 00 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM, 

(not including Co. paupers.) 

Paid E. G. Gilford for carrying A. 

Mead to City farm, 75 

" for services render'd 

S. G. May's child 3 00 
F. Kimball for 4 feet wood deliv- 
ered Mrs. Bacon, • • • • 2 25 
" for 4 feet wood deliv- 
ered Mr. Emery, 2 2"> 

AY. E. Eastman for groceries de- 
livered Mrs. Trobridge 1 11 
" for groceries delivered 

Mrs. Smith, 3 00 

" for groceries delivered 

Zebcdiah Field, 90 

W. Eaton for taking care of Eli- 
za Hancock, 11 42 

J. Mitchell for boarding and nurs- 
ing E. Rowell, 9 00 

" for carrying crazy wo- 
man to Alms house,- • • 1 50 
J. J. Straw for coffin and burial 

of Polly Wright, 5 50 

" for coffin and burial of 

E. E. Rowell, 6 00 

" for coffin and burial of 

J. Minott, 5 50 

John P. Young for wood and ,u r n>- 

cerics delivered J. G. Sanborn 14 44 

D. Randlet for paying A. Wright 

for taking care of Polly " 17 50 



$1,132 81 



Amounts carried forward) $114 12 $1,13*2 M 



61 

Amounts brought forward, $114 12 $1,132 81 

Paid G. Corning for boarding E. Cor- 
ning and C. Griffin to Dec. 26, 
1851, 40 58 

Kidders & Co. for goods fur- 
nished E. Corning, • 3 51 

N. H. Asylum for taking care of 

L. II. Dakin, 36 59 

" for taking care of D. 

Tilton, 35 21 

Wm. H. Martin for attendance on 

J. G. Sanborn 10 00 

A. Hancock for 4 feet wood de- 
livered Margaret Smith, 2 00 

J. M. Rowell for carrying Debo- 
rah Tilton to Concord, 4 75 

N. Herrick for groceries delivered 

Mrs. Gault, 2 60 

" for groceries delivered 

widow C.Webster,... 1 90 

J. P. Webster for carrying Vien- 
na Stevens to Alms house, ... 50 

J. N. Anderson for goods deliv'd 

G. Harvey, 11 00 

S. P. Jackson for 4 feet wood de- 
livered Mrs. Fuller, 1 50 

Paige & Peabody for groceries 

delivered J. Griffin, 5 38 

Robert Stevens for 2 pairs feeting 

del'd E. Corning, 80 

Langley & James for coach for 

funeral, 2 00 

J. R. Hanson for medicine for 

R.Emery, 1 56 

M. L. Hunkins for fare of Rich- 
ard Emery to Andover, 3 05 

Folsom & James for groceries de- 
liv'd Mrs. Bacon, 3 87 

H. Felch for boarding S. G. May's 

child, 1 50 

L. Raymond for groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Trowbridge, 2 81 



Amounts carried forward, $291 23 $1132 81 



62 

Amount* brought forward $291 28 1 1,132 Hi 

Paid Mrs. Choat for boarding S. <i. 

May's child, 62 

.1. T. Sanson for attendance on 

E. E. Rowell, 3 00 

H. Stevens for 5 feet wood del'd 

Mr. Trobridge, 2 50 

D. McDonalds for support of Mrs. 

J. French and three children 

12 weeks, 24 00 

T. W. Little & Co. for groceries 

del'd Sarah Todd, 4 49 

Berry & Co. for groceries del'd 

Mrs. Bacon, 3 00 

Mrs. J. A. May for boarding S. 

a. May's child, 3 50 

L. & A. Jackson for goods del'd 

E. Corning, 60 

D. McDonald for keeping 2 chil- 
dren of J. N. French 81 weeks 15 50 

W. E. Eastman for groceries del'd 

J. Smith, 1 51 

David Brigham for cash paid for 
boarding Mrs.Peabody 

and child, 75 

u for 4 feet wood deliv'd 

Mrs. Trobridge, 2 25 

E. Ferrin for goods delivered. M. 

Smith, 1 00 

N. H. Asylum for boarding Mrs. 

Deborah Tilton, 39 82 

J. J. Straw for coffin, and burial 

of O. B. Hardy, 4 17 

G. Corning for boarding C. Grif- 
fin and E. Corning from Jan. 1 
to March 31, 1851, 18 75 

M. J. & D. F. Straw for grocer- 
ies del'd Mrs. Fuller, 1 50 

F. Smyth for carrying C. Cowen 

to Alms house, 15 

$418 '.'I 

Amount carried forward, $1,55 1 75 



63 



Amount brought forward $1,551 7"> 

COUNTY PAUPERS OFF THE FARM* 

Paid Berry & Co., 24 64 

J. J. Straw 57 93 

S. P. Jackson, 9 23 

J. P. Webster 1 50 

S. D. Sherburne, 9 20 

R. Mitchell, 50 50 

N. Herrick 5 24 

Union Benevolent Association... 65 00 

Daniel Randlet, 25 13 

F; Smyth, 29 33 

O. Jackson, 10 95 

M.J. & D. F. Straw, 7 00 

A. Kimball, 1 66 

Langley & James, 4 75 

E. G. Gilford, 45 79 

Root & Jones, 80 11 

F. Kimball, 40 25 

J. Mitchell, 4 90 

L. Connor, 1 50 

P. Baxter, 5 42 

S. S. Coffin & Co., 1 00 

W. E. Eaton, 2 00 

D. C. Gould, 20 60 

A.B.Smith, 4 62 

G. W. Adams, 2 00 

R. Woods, 5 00 

J. W. Munsure 2 00 

A.V.Perry,..' 2 00 

W. E. Eastman, 12 65 

M. C. Eastman, 6 00 

Mrs. Montgomery, 3 00 

H.Bennett, 2 00 

S.B.Page, 6 85 

Sam'l Gamble, 4 00 

D. L. Stevens, 4 00 

D. Brigham, 5 50 

Amounts carried forivard, $519 25 $1,551 75 

*The County pauper bills being in the hands of the County Judges, the items are 
not here given. 



Amounts brought forward, $519 25 $1,551 75 

Paid D. M. Simonds L5 00 

< !harles Cheney 5 00 

Sam'l Potter,. ." 19 50 

H. Smitl 1 00 

Susan Alden, 1 50 

D.Parker, 3 75 

E. Collins, 3 00 

A. M. Legg, 4 85 

\l. Stevens, '■',!', 

I-:. ]). Sanborn :'. <»ii 

M. Tobie, 2 00 

Dow & Hill, 1 46 

Peter Smith i 5 

Asylum for Insane, 90 73 

A. Harick 6 50 

T. Murphy, 6 00 

W. White* 70 

T. W. Little & Co 14 52 

J. Dean, 1 50 

A Griffin, 1^ 50 

M. Ingham 20 00 

Page & Peabody 2 87 

J. Kittredge, 5 '.'1 

D. Young, 1 t')7 

H. Cornell, 2 00 

E. P. Stearns, 1 00 

Kidders & Co., *J 96 

J. Crosby, 4 00 

C. P. Skelton, 1 89 

Isaac lluse, 4 50 

A. Hancock, 9 7-~> 

$773 81 

S-- : '--"» ;V , 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1852, of ap- 
propriation for City Farm and pau- 
pers, $988 39. 



CITY OFFICERS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, 276 59 

Appropriated April, 1851, 2,500 00 

Transferred from new highways to bal- 
ance amount paid Collector of Taxes 

for 18-18 and 1849, 1,000 00 

$3,776 59 

Expenditures. 

Paid Moses Fellows, Mayor, salary 1 

year, 600 00 

F. Smyth, City Clerk, salary 6 

months to June 20th, 125 00 

W. C. Clarke, City Solicitor, sal- 
ary 6 months, 50 00 

Daniel Clark, City Solicitor, sal- 
ary 6 months, 50 00 

B. F. Ayer, Clerk Common Coun- 
cil, salary 1 year, 100 00 

James M. Berry, City Treasurer, 

salary 1 year, 100 00 

Z. Colburn, City Physician, sala- 
ry 6 months, 100 00 

T. Wheet, City Physician, salary 

6 months, 100 00 

Bobert Means, Collector of Taxes 

1848, 475 00 

" Collector of Taxes '49 525 00 

• $2,225 00 

A. Waterman, Overseer of Poor 
1 year, and services as clerk 
of board & preparing invoices 64 09 

S. D. Sherburne, Overseer of 

Poor 1 year, 45 00 

Dan'l Balch, Overseer of Poor 1 

year, 20 00 

Amounts carried forward, $129 09 $2,225 00 

9 



66 



Amoufdi bfought forward 

PaidSj P. Jackson, Overseer of Poor 

1 year, 

A. <!. I rale, I >verseerof Poor 1 yr. 
J. V. Webster, Overseer of Poor 

^ 1 year, . . . . ; 

S. I). Green, Overseer of Poor 
1 year, 

J. S. Elliott, member of School 
Committee 1 year, 

C. E. Potter, member of School 
Committee 1 year, 

J. Crosby, member of School 
Committee 1 year, 

W. G. Means, member of School 
Committee 1 year, 

D. P. Perkins, member of School 
Committee 1 year, 

J. Y. McQueston, member of Sc'l 
Committee 1 year, 

Amos Abbott, member of School 
Committee 11 months, 1851, 

D. Brigham, Assessor 1 year, 
A. Waterman, " 

. G. T. Mixer, " 

G. W. Converse, 

E. Hanson, " 
J. Hall, 



$129 09 $2,225 00 

45 00 

l."» 00 

26 00 

13 37 

- $257 L6 



35 00 
35 00 
85 00 
35 00 
35 00 
35 oo 



100 00 

100 00 

33 00 

i;i no 

75 00 
60 00 



$:210 00 
$21 87 



$432 00 



J. M. Rowell, Assessor last year 

F. Smyth for preparing report of 

Finance Committee last year, 

as per resolution of City Council 



J.M. Rowell, Health Officer I \ r. 

T. Wheet, 

M. <;. -I. Tukesbury, " 



50 00 



•in 00 



25 


00 


25 


mi 


25 


00 



$90 00 



$75 00 



Amount carried forward, 



$3,311 33 



67 

Amount brougld forward $3,311 33 

WARD OFFICERS. 

PaidN. Marshall, Moderator Ward 1, 3 00 

C. A. Luce, « " 2, 3 00 

J. Jones, " "5, 3 00 

J. A. Weston, " " 6, 3 00 



N. C. Connor, Clerk Ward 1,. . 5 00 

D. E. Hapgood, " 1,.. 2 50 

W. Reynolds, " 2,.. 5 25 

G. P. Prescott, " 3, . . 5 00 

S. N. Bell, « 4,.. 5 00 

D. F. Whittle, « 5,.. 5 00 

J. Y. McQueston, " 6,.. 5 00 



L. Sanborn, Selectman Ward 1,. 5 00 

C.Johnson, " 1,. 5 00 

W. Sage, ' " 1,. 5 00 

L. H. Sleeper, " 2,. 5 00 

M. Corlis, " 2,. 5 00 

W.P.Fogg, " 3,. 5 00 

S. Hall, " 3,. 5 00 

W.Boyd, " 4.. 5 00 

F. Tenney, " 4,. 5 00 

S. W. Parsons, " 4,. 5 00 

J. E. Bennett, " 5,. 5 00 

S.James, " 5,. 5 00 

D. Dickey, 3rd, " 6,. 5 00 

S. B. Paige, " 6,. 5 00 

R. Nutt, " 6,. 5 00 



$12 00 



$32 75 



$75 00 
$3,431 08 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1852, $345 51 



CITY HALL AND REPAIRS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, •■ • 1 04 

Appropriated April, L851, 1,000 00 

$1,001 04 

Expenditures. 
Paid for REPAIRS. 

To S. W. Parsons for labor on P. Office 3 75 

Brown & Colby for glazing in Post 

Office, 2 50 

J. W. Saunders for finishing School 

Committee's room,. ... 27 12 

" for book cases and labor 47 52 

Hall & Horr for blinds, GO 00 

J. C. Wadleigh for glazing and 

painting, 7 06 

C. B. Gleason for 22 yards cloth 

for table coverings, 3 f>7 

Ayer & Fogg for sash fastenings 

and hard ware, 11 50 

W. H. Elliott for repair of clocks 7 05 

Kidders & Co. for booking velvet 

to cover doors and desk, 10 91 

J. B. McCrillis for iron work,. ... 75 

T. McQuestion for repairing side 

walk, I 50 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co., for sold- 
ering roof and repairs, :'.4 45 

S. Fellows for repairs, 45 

Wilson & Weston for binding for 

tables, 1 00 

F. Smyth for fitting hall for court, 
and removing fixtures and saw 
dust, Oct., 1850, and January, 
1851, and repairs as per bill,. 33 42 

$253 25 

Kidders & Co. for 3 -alls, sperm 

oil ' 4 20 

G. \V. Adams for 9^ -alls, sperm 

oil, . . l:l 80 

for 8 galls, fiuid, .. 5 20 

Amount8 carried forward^ $23 26 $258 25 



69 

Amounts brought forward $23 26 $258 25 

Paid G.W.Adams for lamps, wicks and 

potash, 3 49 

Berry & Co. for <"> I. 1 , galls, fluid 43 08 

« for 39 galls, oil,... 47 00 

" for wicking and cl. 

powder, 1 85 

€. S. Fisher for 6 galls, fluid,. . 4 01 

" for 7 galls, oil,. ... 6 30 

" for brush, matches 

and wicking, 1 93 

Walter Adriance for 20 galls, oil 28 00 

€. Offutt for lamps, shades, globes 

and chimnies, 13 58 

J. M. Barnes for lamps, globes, 

wicking and duster, 4 44 

F. Smyth for 13 cords wood from 
April, 1850, to April, 1851, 

as per survey bills, 50 66 

" for cash paid for survey bills 

of same, 64 

S. S. Richardson for sawing and 

putting same in hall, 10 12 

F. Kimball for If cords wood 

sawed, 10 92 

D. Brigham for |- cord wood,. . . 2 37 

G. Hunt for moving saw dust for 

Oct. term court, 1851, 5 25 

B. Griffin for sawing wood, 2 34 

Eastman & Gooden for water for 

cellar 9 months, 9 00 

F. Smith for expenses and servi- 
ces in charge of City hall six 

mos., to April 15, 1851, as pr. 

contract, 99 50 

" expenses and services in charge 

City hall nine months, to Jan. 

15, 1852, as per contract, . . . 130 50 

D. Hill for insurance, 75 00 

H. Foster " 75 00 

$648 24 



$901 49 
Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $99 55. 



CITY POLICE. 



Balance~undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851,- 
Appropriated April, 1851, 



43G 82 
2,500 00 



$2,936 82 



Expenditures. 

Paid for WATCHING. 

To N. Baker, 2nd, 307 75 

E. Ross, 75 50 

S. Aldrich, 59 00 

B. F. Stevens, 31 25 

U. H. Foss, U77 38 

D. Libby, 91 00 

D. L. Stevens, 48 50 

J. H. Dinsmorc, 187 75 

W. llobbins, 62 00 



$1,140 13 



Paid for COMPLAINTS, warrants, 
witness fees, committing prisoners, 
and police service. 

To J. M. Rowell, (last vear,) 90 00 

G. P. Prescott, «~ 152 38 

A. Kimball, " 77 60 

G. H. Kimball, 19 13 

D. L. Stevens, 130 50 

H. G. Lowell, 121 35 

I. E. Herrick, 4 75 

J. C. Young, 5 00 

G.W.Wilson, 12 75 

S. Hall, 166 80 

S. Aldrich, 8 69 

D. M. Robinson, 7 50 

L. Sargent, 6 25 

C. H. Brown, 3 75 

J. C. Philbrick, 6 25 

W.W.Baker, 6 25 

Amounts carried forward, $81 N 95 $1,146 \-> 



71 



Amounts brouqht forward, $818 95 $1,140 13 

To A. G. Fairbanks, 3 75 

J. Wallace, 3 75 

C. Clough, 5 00 

J. Doland, 3 75 

D. Randlet, 3 75 

J. B. Cheswell, 5 00 

T. Cobb, 6 25 

W. McPherson, 3 75 

J. Pcavey, 6 25 

T. Iloyt, 3 75 

E. Harvey, 3 75 

A. Podwell, 5 00 

N. Knowlton, 1 25 

E. G. Woodman, 5 00 

E. Young, 1 25 

D. Richards, 2 25 

F. Reed, 3 75 

H. Foster, 1 50 

R. Hall 2 50 

E. Fairbanks, 5 00 

•J. Lawrence, 3 75 

N. Corning, 2 50 

W. C.Abbott, 2 50 

II. Sanborn, 1 25 

A. Hadley, 3 75 

R. D. Moores, 3 75 

J.W.French, 1 25 

G. W. Adams, 1 25 

J. Thompson, 2 25 

Paid J. M. Rowell 9 months' salary, 

City Marshal, (last year) 187 50 

D. L. Stevens 9 months' salary, 

City Marshal, 187 50 

W. L. Lane for services Justice 

Police Court, 64 00 

J. M. Rowell for dark lantern, 

(last year) 3 25 

" for wood and sawing, 

(last year) 13 94 

F. Smyth for wood and sawing, 

and survey bills, (last year) . 18 33 

Amounts carried forward, • • • $1,391 97 



,140 13 



:///•' forward $1,391 97 $1,140 13 

Paid G. C. Smith for wood, (last year) - 62 
Prescott i!c Warren for fluid and 

oil, (last year) 13 

" for fluid and pitcher, 

(la I year).. 2 .J 

G. P. Prescott for clean'g lobby, 

( Last year) 1 63 

J. M. Stanton for repairs on lob- 
by, (last year) 14 63 

R. Moore for stationery for P. Ct. 11 65 
" " * for Mar- 
shal's office 1 25 

Hartshorn & Darling for repair'g 

stoves, 5 2 

Ayer & Fogg for lamp and fluid 1 51 

B. > rriffin {in- cleaning and 
City Marshal's office, and saw- 

ing wood, 21 32 

II. Kimball for P. Court docket 7 50 

J. <). Adams for printing war'nts 3 7~> 

I). Brigham for wood 6 63 

F. Kimball " 3 62 

E. Hall for 1 cord wood, 5 00 

J. II. Proctor for wood, (last vr.) 3 - 5 

G. W. Adams for fluid and oil, . 4 88 
N. Ilerrick for " . 2 32 

C. B. Gleason for beds for lobby ■". 25 

C. Clough for whitewashing, wt '1 -■'> 
J. W. Saunders for repairs " 8 14 
S. W. Parsons for rep. P. Ct. room 1 7-~> 
I. Kiddle for rent City M.'s office 75 00 

D. L. Stevens for tax bills, .... 10 00 

" for cleaning office 

and police room,. . .". 7."> 

" for notifying officers I 00 

$1,015 11 



SJ.7.V) 24 
Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $181 58 



EIRE DEPARTMENT. 



scs 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, . . . 1,279 75 
Appropriated April, 1851, 3,500 00 



Expenditures. 
Merrimack Engine Co., No. 1. 

iPaid company's bill for services, 
" for wood,. . . 

" for nse of hors 

E. B. Stearns 19 gals, oil, . 
" for 1 oil can, . 

" for plated letters 

L. AY. Cram for repairs and keys 
J. C. Wadleigb. for care of engine 
P. S. Brown for " 

and repairs, 

J. M. Stanton for repairing pipe 
E. A. G. Roulston for 12 fire caps 
G. T. Mixer for repairing hose, . 
Mooers & Tibbets for 2 chairs, . . 
W. A. Brown for care of engine 
A. Branch for repairing hose, . . 
D. Gooden for oil and repairs, 

and care of engine, 

N. Jessup for painting 8 uniforms 
C. E. Rundlet for refreshments 

for company, 

Berry & Co. for lamps, 

Hartshorn & Darling for oil pan 
Hmmeman k, Co. for 150 feet of 

leading hose, 

" for repairs, 

Amount carried forivard, 

'10 



$4,77<> 75 



308 


06 


1 


7:. 


2 


75 


17 


90 


1 


50 


7 


92 


27 


20 


2 


00 


38 


38 


2 


00 


36 


63 


16 


85 


3 


17 


21 


30 


23 


75 


15 


95 


8 


00 


6 


00 


3 


58 


2 


50 


mi 


00 


38 50 



$675 69 



7! 

Amount brought forward $675 69 

Bennington Engine Co., No. 3. 

Taid company's bill for services 28fi 20 

" " for steward's ser- 
vice 1 year, 30 00 

Hunneman & Co. for 807 feet of 

leading hose, L84 20 

" for 6 pr. couplings, ... 18 00 

$518 40 

Massabesic Engine Co., No. 4. 

Paid company's bill for services, .... 380 40 

Hartshorn k Darling for repairs 1 09 

Joel Taylor for care of engine, . . 13 5*3 

" for lock and keys, . . 12 s -~> 

" for oil and bowl, ... - 06 

E. French for repairs, 2 88 

E. A. G. Roulston for badges, 

figures and letters, 11 til 

D. B. Fuller for handles for hose 

cariage, 2 50 

" for repairs and alcohol 4 75 

N. Jessup for painting 8 uniforms 9 00 
Brown, Dudley & Co. for stove 

and pipe, 12^1 

F. Smyth for 2| cords wood,. . . 9 37 
U. H. Foss for sawing wood,. . . 2 75 
Porter & Searle for 7 gals, oil, . 9 62 

" for fluid, pails 

and brooms, • • • • 2 49 

J. B. Chase for 41 gals, neat's 

foot oil, 5 02 

J. M. Wallace for care of engine 

and repairs, 22 85 

G. T. Mixer for repairing hose,. 11 

" for 50 badges, 4 50 

J. P. Adriance for wrench and 

hatchet, 2 06 

C. W. Clement for repairs, J 00 

S. W. Parsons for repairs house s 7'.' 

Amownt* carried forward, $548 56 $1,194 09 



fo 

Amounts brought forward, $548 50 $1,194 09 

Paid Berry & Co. for oil, fluid, wick- 

ing, can and chimneys 8 09 

T. W. Little for refreshments for 

company, 5 93 

A. C. Smith for alcohol and jug 1 80 

E. B. Stearns for 5 gals. oil,. . . 3 75 

" for 1 oil can, 1 50 

$504 63 

Torrent Engine Co. No. 5. 

Paid company's bill for sendees, .... 371 80 
" for 4 cords wood 

and sawing, 22 00 

for 19 gals. oil,.. 23 45 

" for 7gals. alcohol k 

spirits turpentine 4 50 

" for paint' g 8 coats 

and pants, 12 00 

" for 2 lanterns,. . . 1 07 

" for blank book and 

stationery, 2 71 

" for printing bills, 5 25 

" for soap, wicking 

and matches, ... 50 

" for 4 brooms, ... 1 00 

" care engine, stew- 

ard's services, and 
rep's eng. & hose 00 07 

Hunneman & Co. for 250 feet of 

leading hose, 150 00 

" for 2 pieces suction 

hose and couplings, 50 50 

W. H. Shepherd for 1 cord wood 5 00 

" for 9 gals oil,.. 10 55 

E. B. Stearns for 13£ " . . 9 95 

J. P. Adriance for rope, hammer 

and nails, 2 41 

Hartshorn & Darling for oil can 

and discharge pipes, 1 25 

G. T. Mixer for 18 figures and 

17 badges, 4 57 

Amounts carried forward, $739 78 $1,758 72 



re 

Amounts brought forward s7 : '.'.' 78 $1,758 72 

Paid <i. T. Mixer for repairing hose,. 21 1 ( > 

A. Branch for " " 7 00 

" for belts and sockets 9 33 

.--777 21 

Manchester Engine Co., No. 6. 

Paid company's bill for services 310 60 

J. F. Merrill steward's services 

1 year, 30 00 

Manchester print works repairs 

on engine room, 17 7'. • 

G. T. Mixer for repairs of hose 4 50 

Coffin & Co. for use of hose,. . . 8 00 

A. D. Holmes for 80 feet settees 33 60 

" i'nr -7 chairs 2 25 

" for 1 table, 6 50 

E. B. Stearns for 15J gals. oil,. 13 

" 1 oil can, 1 25 

" 1 gallon alcohol,. 80 

Hartshorn & Darling for 1 oil can 1 4 2 

S4::n I'. 

Hook and Ladder Co., No. 1. 

Paid company's bill for services, .... 50 10 

James & Coffin for use of horse. . 4 <>o 

S. S. Coffin " 6 00 

D. Thayer for lamp, 1 00 

S. Wi Parsons for repairs house ~~> 

" for ladders 

\\ . Neal for steward's services, . 20 < 111 

" for repairs, 2 40 

T. Brown " 3 97 

.). D. Wells ibr ladders 18 68 

J. Fogg for steward's services,. . 5 00 

si 1.7 is 

Hose Co., No. 2. 

Paid company's bill for services L93 70 

for I torcher , I" 00 

" lbr 1 sig'l lantern L5 00 

$218 To 

Amount carried forward >,830 -77 



-- 



Amount brought forward BO 51 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid II. Dickey for repairs on engm< 

house Manchester streel 115 00 

Shelton & < Iheever for 7 engin 
badges '..... 8 87 

H. Summers for repairing pump 7") 

P. McLaughlin for labor on res- 
ervoirs, 4 50 

Shebffch & Rich for 3| doz. oil 

clothes, 61 48 

Hunneman & Co. for repairs, . . 65 

for7brasstrumpe 28 00 

J. II. Gooclale for printing engine 

notices, 6 00 

J. F. James for expenses to Rox- 

bury, 5 81 

" for express expenses, . 10 99 

G. H. Brown for watching at fire 2 25 

J. Richards for " 1 50 

Day & Jepson for lumber for res- 
ervoirs, 1 63 

F. P. Smith for hhds. for reser- 
voirs, 3 70 

J. Poor for labor on reservoirs, . . 2 00 

N . Corning for keeping reservoirs 
open, 20 00 

W. B. Austin for labor on reser- 
voirs, 1 33 

F. Smyth for expenses to Boston 1 25 
A. Branch for 7 trumpet holders 6 12 

G. B. Fogg for keys and repairs 3 67 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. for 

repairs, 20 17 

Manchester band, 21 00 

W. L. Lane for services chief en- 
gineer 1 year, 50 00 

C. Baldwin for services asst. en- 
gineer 2 yrs., 20 00 



Amounts carried forward, $405 62 $3,330 57 



- 



Amounts brought forward $405 62 $3,330 57 

Paid J . F. James for services assistant 

engineer 1 year 10 00 

S. W. Parsons for services asst. 

engineer 1 year 10 00 

F. Smyth for services asst. engi- 
neer 1 year, 10 00 

D. L. Stevens for services asst. 

engineer 1 year, 10 00 

C. A. Luce for services asst. en- 

gineer 1 year, 10 00 

" for services as clerk of 
board 1 year, 10 00 

D. Hill for ins. engine houses,. . 29 00 

$404 02 

1,825 19 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1,1852, $954 56. 

Din- tire department February 1, 1852, as follow - 
Merrimack Engine Co., No. 1, . . . . . . . $468 33 

Bennington " 3, ...... . 348 33 

Massabesic " 4, ....... 

Torrent " 5 

Manchester " 6 

Hook & Ladder Co., No. 1 396 50 

Hose Co., No. 2, 221 'J''. 

S2,743 81 
This amount is payable April 1st, in addition to what may then become due. 



COMMONS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, 243 28 

Appropriated April, 1851, 200 00 



8443 28 



Expenditures. 

Paid bills as per order of committee 

on commons, (see their report) 27b' 41 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $106 87. 



i k 



VALLEY" CEMETERY. 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851,- • • • 565 42 

Appropriated April, 1851, 300 00 

Received from committee on cemetery 

for sale of lots, &c, 568 00 



$1,488 42 



Expenditures* 

Paid bills as per order of committee 

on cemetery, (see their report) $1 ,401 10 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $32 32. 



NEW CEMETERY. 

"Loan authorized, $1,000 00 

Expenditures. 
Paid J. C. Lyford for land, $1,000 00 

*This loan has not yet been made ; the amount has been paid from money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated. 



[NTEREST PAID ON CITY DEBT. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1851, •• • 1.1 17 34 
Appropriated April, L851, 5,700 00 

1 7 34 

ll.i res. 

IV„l Sarah Chandler, 30 00 

E. Adams, 140 80 

T. R.Elliott, 131 46 

J. Anderson, 45 39 

L. A. Evens, 40 

Jane Harris, "10 

0. Bailey, 53 00 

J. G. Cillcy, 15 00 

W. Minot, L02 35 

1. Merrill 30 00 

M. Kent, 24 

J.B.Walker, 600 00 

Betsey Brown, 28 92 

Sally Sargent, 120 Oil 

F. <i. Stark, 360 ni) 

E. Adams, 117 45 

$2,090 00 

Paid coupons on City stock, 3,651 99 



$5,741 99 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1852, $1,105 35. 



CITY DEBT PAID. 

Paid E. Adams, 700 00 

T. R. Elliott, 750 00 

J. Anderson, 400 00 

L. A. Evens, 400 00 

Jane Harris, 200 00 

Eliza Adams, 800 00 

0. Bailey, 1,000 00 

W. Minot, 900 00 

M.Kent, 4,000 00 

F. G. Stark, 6,000 00 



•$15,150 00 



Note.— Citv debt paid from Citv stock sold for 

payment of debt, . . 14,000 00 

From cash in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, . * . . . 1.160 00 

S15.150 00 



11 



CITY DEBT, FEB. i, L852. 



Date ol 



April 4. 1*42 
Oct'r 18, Mi 



June 2, 1845, 



Sept. 
Dec. 

Jan. 



Mar. 
.June 
July 



Maj 

June 



July 



30, 1845 
9, L847. 
13, " 

3, 1848. 
18. ■■ 
22 ■■ 

3o! ■■ 

1, 1S49, 



16, « 
l(i. 3850 

'. 1- .1 



4, ' 
14, ■ 

1, 1847 






When pa 



.1. (,. Cilley. 
J. I'.. Walker. 



Sally Sargent. 
N. Hunt. 
.1. (.. Doi 
s. Chandler. 
D. I'.. Stearns. 
I. Merrill. 

Betsey BroM n 
John G. Dodge. 
Hannah P Hoyt. 
Martha Flanders. 

N. Hunt. 
Rboda Whittier. 
< i. Bailey. 
W. M urilock. 
R. Chase. 
!>.<'. Kent. 
.1. A. Holmes. 
Certificates of Stock 



.Tune 

June 
Dec'r 

Jan'y 



April 4. 1*40. 5uo 00 
Qct'r 18,1852. 

1854 
2 - 
2. 1857. 

9. 1852. 

13. " I 
Demand. 
March 80, 1858 

June 1 ! 

July 2. " 



" 16, ■ 
May L6. 1859. 
.June I. L854 

Deniaml. 
June 6, L856 



July 



4. 1852 
14, 1856 
1, 1857 
1. 1862. 
1. 1867. 
1, 1872. 



51 



Deduct indorsments, 



Add interest unpaid Feb. 1st, 1852, 



■j 50 






2 




. 


;;t 00 






. 


SO (><> 


2,000 i 1 ' 


40 1 I 


- 


i 


i 














::l 75 




115 m 


■ 


47 60 


475 1 ' 1 


11 10 


L57 00 


46 l.'. 




45 70 


300 00 


61 12 




21 62 








: E i 


- 






•.2 60 




27 47 




689 21 


22.: 


347 25 






- 




20,000 00 


3,668 36 


98,981 "• 






| 


98,481 00 






8 


102,099 36 






CITY DEBT, 

COMPARED WITH THAT OF LAST YEAR. 

The City debt at the commencement 
of the last financial year, Feb. 1st, 
1851, amounted to. $94,931 00 

It has been increased the past year, 
(as before shown), as follows : 

By City stock sold, 14,000 00 

Loans on promissory notes 4,650 00 

$18,650 00 

$113,581 00 
The debt has been decreased the past 

year by payment of promissory notes $15,150 00 

Actual debt Feb. 1st, 1852, $98,431 00 

Interest due " $3,668 36 

Increase of City debt during last year $3,500 00 



CITY PROPERTY. 

City hall and lot at cost, . 34,115 00 

" farm at cost, and permanent im- 
provements, Id, 801 J9 

Stock, tools, provisions and furniture 

at City farm, 3,522 64 

Engine houses and fire apparatus, . . . 9,241 24 

Reservoirs at cost, 3,820 33 

" Valley " hearses, house and tomb,. . 1,933 00 

Amount carried forward, $68,434 20 



M 

Amount brought forward, $68,434 20 

Old town house, 300 00 

Court house lot at cost, including in- 
terest, 6,326 57 

Common sewers at cost, 13,760 11 

Safe and furniture belonging to City 

hall, 404 00 

$89,224 88 

Cash in the treasury Feb. 1st, 1852, £1,101 2 

DEBTS DUE THE CITY. 

From D. L. Stevens, collector of taxes 

for the year 1847, 1,446 09 

R. Means, collector of taxes for 

the year 1848, 1,885 50 

R. Means, collector of taxes for 

the year 1849, 2,680 09 

J. M. Rowell, collector of taxes 

for the year 1850, 0,2:12 12 

D. L. Stevens, collector of taxes 

for the year 1851, 10,15o 7:'. 

County of Hillsborough for sup- 
port of paupers, 75 4- -> . 

Sundry individuals for license 
granted 1847 to enter drains 
into common sewers, 52 20 

J. S. T. Cushing fees 1848,. ... 4 no 0< I 

$22,925 46 

Total amount of City property and 

debts due the city, $118,251 62 

Deduct amount of City debt, 98,431 00 

" interest on City debt 3,636 61 

" unpaid bills in treasures hands 024 05 

102,691 66 

Balance in favor of the city, $ 10,559 96 

•A committee of the Board of Aldermen oi I860, appointed to examine Id 
yens' tax li-t, reported in favor of abating this amount, and their reporl \\ aa a< i 
but the abatement ims ool yet been made 



Balance in favor of City hrd'tfor'dy 



$10,559 96 



Dist. No. 1 



SCHOOL DISTRICT PROPERTY. 

sch. house and lot, 200 00 

Spring street, 9,800 00 



Bridge 

Lowell 
Concord " 
Manchest'r 
Merrimack 
Park " 
Janes ville,. 



Balance in favor of city, adding scli'l 
district property, 



1.500 00 

6,000 00 

1,325 00 

1,800 00 

1,800 00 

8,000 00 

850 00 



Falls, 200 00 

Coe lot, 1,400 00 

200 00 

300 00 

300 00 

200 00 

300 00 

200 00 

200 00 



534,575 00 



15,134 96 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 

Valuation of Property, Taxes, Number of Polls, and amount of Tax on the 
Poll, for the thirteen years commencing with the year 1838 and ending with 
the year 1851. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. of Polls. 


Poll Tax. 


1838. 


$555,270 00 


$2,235 49 


244 


$1 66 


18.39. 


604.963 00 


3,029 84 


427 


2 14 


1840. 


946.200 00 


3.986 56 


772 


2 20 


184ft 


1.229.054 00 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


1842. 


1. 430.524 00 


12 952 44 


1.053 


2 76 


1843. 


1.598.826 00 


13.764 32 


1,028 


2 60 


1844. 


L.873,286 00 


13.584 72 


1.561 


2 25 


1845. 


2.544.780 00 


19.246 27 


1,808 


2 30 


1840. 


*3.187,726 00 


22.005 95 


2,056 


2 10 


1847. 


4,488,550 00 


24,963 54 


2,638 


1 68 


1848. 


4.664.957 00 


39,712 53 


2,518 


2 58 


1849. 


5,500,049 00 


44.979 92 


2,820 


2 47 


1850. 


5,832,080 00 


48,974 23 


2.910 


2 37 


1851. 


6,906,462 OO 


51,798 47 


2,745 


2 25 



8G 

POPULATION or MANCHESTER, 

• - lPPEAES i ROM ::: I i 



... j__ | «. i^ 

1-40 .". 777:;. _ 

1844 2,625 3,531 6, 

L845 3,595 4,422 

1846 4,591 5,624 10,125 

1847 5,050 7,236 .....12, 

1849 5,028 8,614 14, 

1850 5,337 8,997 14. 

1851 5,813 8,094 

.V.i ;..-Xo record of population in 1841, 1842. 1843 and I 



To the Joint Standing Committee on Finance — 

Gentlemen: Having been engaged by you to prepare and 

arrange the items of Your report of the recei] ts and expendi- 
tures of this city for the last fiscal year, I have attended to the 
dutv and herewith submit the foregoing. 

FRED'K SMYTH. 
Manchester, Feb. 25th, 185 2. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 

Auditor's Office, ) 

.Manchester, Feb. 25, 1852. J 
I have examined minutely all the items of receipts and 
expenditures embraced in the foregoing report of the committee 
on finance, and find that all payments therein named arc duly 
authenticated by appropriate vouchers, and thai all sums due 
the city, so far as I have means of ascertaining, have been 
properly paid and accounted for, and that the several items, 
footings and balances, are correctly cast and stated. 

FREDERICK SMYTH, Cftv Auditor. 



ALMSHOUSE REPORT. 

To his Honor the Mayor and City Council — 

The Overseers of the Poor of the City of Manchester here- 
with present their report for the year ending Feh. 1, 1852. 

The whole number of County paupers 
sent to the County almshouse dur- 
ing the past year, 65 

All other County paupers assisted dur- 
ing the year, 190 

City paupers at City almshouse, 14 

City paupers off farm, 15 

Paupers from other towns, 15 

— 299 

Number of convicts committed to the 
house of correction during the past 

year, 67 

Committed second time, 6 

" third time, 1 

Died, 1 

Sentence commuted, 12 

Ran away, 5 

The remainder staid out the time for which they were com- 
mitted. 

Of this number (67) all were committed for drunkenness. 



Dr. ( 'itj/ Farm in account current with the < 'ity of 

To property on hand Feb. 1, 1851, 4,21] 83 

Expenditures the current year, 1,132 v l 

Interest on ( $13,460) cost of City farm, 807 60 

])uc D. Randlet, Superintendent, L16 66 

Amount due from county Feb. 1, 1852, 57 39 



$6,326 29 



89 
Manchester from Feb 1, 1851, to Feb . 1, 1852, Cu. 

By~PERSONAL PROPERTY on 

hand at City farm, Feb. 1, 1852. 

2horses, goO 00 

2yokeof oxen, 230 00 

6 cows and 2 calves, *W W 

1 bull, 35 00 

20 hens and 5 turkeys, 11 °9 

4swine, 48 00 

60 tons of hay, ™ 0Q 

Corn fodder, oat and rye straw, < ^ vu 

125 bushels of oats, £2 50 

9i i " rve 26 14 

7 « beans, nn 

300 " corn, 2(6 00 

200 " potatoes, .-• 10U uu 

Beef, pork, hams, garden sauce, and other provision 

and groceries of various kinds, 180 00 

2 wagons, 4 carts, 6 plows, 2 harrows, 4 sleds, and 

other farming tools of all kinds, 5- 7r 

1 single sleigh and 3 harnesses, 4 5 75 

14 beds, bedsteads and bedding, and 3 matrasses,. 15y 00 

2 cooking stoves and other stoves, and all other 

household furniture, 250 00 

75 cords wood, ;;••• J£> "" 

Lumber, chloride of lime, and other small articles,. \ll UQ 

$3,522 64 

Permanent improvements on house and farm, 237 75 

Labor, &c, on Lowell street, 501 75 

Cash received of the county of Hillsboro', A A 

Due from the " " ™%\ 

For supporting city paupers, no 9- 

Cash received from other towns, » u -° 

Cash received for produce sold and paid into the 

treasury by D. Randlet, ■.-.;. • • •• 583 ^ 

$5,444 35 

Amount to be added to balance account,. 881 94 



$6,326 29 
12 



90 

The apparent balance against the City farm, of $881 94, as 
appears from the foregoing account current, can be attributed 
to the following causes, viz: 

The present board of overseers were of the opinion that the 
personal property at the farm had in previous years been 
appraised much too high ; they have, therefore, reduced the 
appraisal on much of the same property that was at the faim 
last year, equal in value now that it was at that time, and seme 
of it more valuable. For instance, there were five cows and 
two calves last year, which were appraised al s200 00"; this 
year there are six cows and two calves, and appraised at only 
§100 00. Last year the mattrass beds bedding were 

appraised at 0313 58; this year the same articles, but in a 
better condition, were appraised at only $159 00. The Btoves 
and other household furniture were appraised last year at 
$330 00 ; this year they were appraised at only $250 00, and 
some other articles reduced in the same proportion ; amounting 
in the aggregate to a reduction of $089 19 from the appraisal 
of last y 

One article which was a source of profit to the farm last year, 
was entirely cut off the present. That is the article of apples. 
The amount of cash received for that article last year was 
§200 00 ; this year there have been no apples to sell. 

There is one other item which has been a source of some 
profit to the City farm the past year, as will appear from the 
following. The amount of cash received of and due from tho 
county of Hillsborough, for the support of county paupers, to 
Feb. 1, 1851, $581 13 ; cash received of and due from the 
same source, to Feb. 1, 1852, $149 36 : making a difference 
in the receipts of cash received from the county in the two 
years, to Feb. 1, 1852, of $431 77. This difference is caused 
by having the county paupers removed immediately to tho 
county farm, in all cases where the situation of tho pauper 
would admit of removal. The overseers having boon directed 
by tho county Judges to pursue such a course, it has been tho 
<\iuse of greatly reducing the receipts of the farm, while it has 
not boon p^s?ible < r > reduce the expenses of carrying on the 



©1 

farm in the sams ratio, particularly the interest on tbo cost of 
tb.3 city farm, and ala » bh.3 expeni93 of superintendent. 

The expenses of carrying on the City farm one year, to Feb. 
1, 1S51, amounted to $1,678 70 ; expenses of carrying on tho 
same one year, to Feb. 1, 1852, $1,1 :J2 81 ; making a differ- 
ence in favor of the farm, in these two years, of $545 89. 
Hence it will be perceived that the expenses of carrying on tho 
farm have been reduced instead of having been increased. 

Gross amount of receipts in favor of the farm, including 
improvement on house and farm, and for labor on Lowell street, 
for the support of City paupers, and cash received of and duo 
from the county, and cash received from other towns and for 
produce sold from off the farm, $1,921 TO ; gross amount of 
expenditures against the farm for labor, including the salary 
of superintendent, and for insurance, groceries, farming tools, 
blacksmithing, and all other articles necessary to be used in tho 
house or about the farm, $1,132 81 ; leaving a balance between 
receipts and expenditures in favor of the farm, amounting to 
$545 89. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 



MOSES FELLOWS, 
AMASA WATERMAN, 
DAVID BRIGHAM, 
JOSHUA DEAN, 
LIBERTY RAYMOND, 
E. G. GILFORD. 
ROBERT STEVENS, 



Overseers 

of 

the Poor. 



In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 17th, 1852. 
Road, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

FRED'K SMYTH, City Clerk. 

In Board of Common Council, Feb. 17th, 1862. 
Read, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

GEO. A. FRENCH, Clerk. 



» t 



VALLEY" CEMETERY REPORT. 



To his Honor the Mayor and City Council — 

The Joint Standing Committee on the Valley, beg leave to 
present their annual report : 

This highly valued and consecrated ground, destined by 
nature for the quiet rest of those who there sleep in death, 
speaks for itself, that not only taste and genius arc there mani- 
fest, but the dearest ties of affection are here expressed, and 
the last sad duty performed in memory of the departed. 

Your committee entered upon their duty without experience, 
and found a large amount of work under contract, and unfin- 
ished, and much more necessary to be done, to make more 
complete the design of former committees, — and feeling an 
earnest desire to add to the interest already apparent, for this 
sacred spot, — our labors and care have been incessant. 

Mr. G. W. Adams having been recommended, he was 
appointed to labor and have the care of the cemetery, and we 
believe it is admitted that in no one year have the entire grounds 
appeared better, and the improvements in paths, step, and lots 
been more acceptable to all interested. 

The stone gateway and hearse houses contracted for last year 
were finished and accepted on the 19th and 28th of June. 
Mr. J. T. P. Hunt was employed to procure an iron gate, and 
posts set in stone, so that the entire structure would be substan- 
tially finished. Mr. J. N. Brown was employed to add another 
coat of paint, with ground stone to the hearse houses, making 
them more secure against the storm and knife. 

Your committee are of the opinion that it will be difficult to 
cultivate the hedge so as to make it supply the j lace of a fence, 
as the earth is so very light that moisture does not long remain, 
leaving the ground dry and without nourishment : the soil has 



93 

been dug up and manured, and another year will decide whether 
it will answer the purpose of a fence, if it does not, then anew 
fence will be wanted, which will add much to the appearance of 
the Valley. 

Your committee were surprised to find so large a portion of 
this valuable spot laving waste and useless, owing to the manner 
in which it was originally laid out, and we were satisfied that 
some new plan must be adopted to afford better accommodation 
to our citizens, and more profitably occupy the ground, as the 
number of good shaped and convenient lots were few, and the 
'* public ground " fast becoming peopled with the dead, — very 
soon another public and private burying place must be procured, 
and to do this, the first desire was to make as much of the 
present one as possible, and not injure the beauty and conven- 
ience of the same. To do this the entire "public ground" 
east of the valley, and most of the south end of the cemetery, 
where lots were once laid out, were now thrown into common, 
then again laid out in lots : in doing this a new feature appeared : 
what was a dreary and neglected portion of the ground, has 
now become the ornament and pride of the " Valley." Before 
this alteration there were 156 lots, valued at about fifteen 
hundred dollais ; now including the " public ground," there are 
428 lots valued at about three thousand nine hundred dollars. 
This alteration would enable the city to purchase additional 
ground, which will soon be wanted. Many objections were 
made to having any further addition so near the habitations of 
the living, together with the rapid increase of people in our 
city. It was decided to purchase a piece of ground, (and the 
only suitable one,) of Mr. J. C. Lyford, 1£ miles from the 
" City Hall," containing about twelve acres, for one thousand 
dollars. By this arrangement, the " Valley " cemetery was 
increased in value over fourteen hundred dollars besides pavin^ 
for the new ground, and securing to the city land sufficient for 
many years to come. A portion of this ground is under good 
cultivation, and the use will pay a part of the interest on the 
cost. 

Agreeable to a recommendation in a report of a former 



94 

committee and the advice of many of our citizens, it was thought 
best to build a public " city tomb," to accommodate ihose -who 
were desirous of removing the dead from the city, as well as 

convenience in the winter season, also the income fur deposit, 
and a valuable appendage to a cemetery, making it more 
complete. A contract was made with Mr. J. T. P. Hunt to 
build the tomb for $285 00; additions were afterwards made 
as an improvement ; probably no tomb can be found more 
substantial, convenient, and safe. The paths in front of the 
tomb leading across the valley, have been much improved in 
width, with stone steps, and more straight, and the grounds in 
front and around the structure are finished for convenience, and 
becoming the sacred place, where the dead may quietly rest in. 
the silent tomb. 

Permission has been given to persons owning lots to improve 
them by removing the pine, and replacing them with hard trees, 
and such other additions as appeared proper. 

Your committee have endeavored to keep in view the interest 
of the city, and sustain the character designed by its founders, 
and when our labors shall all be over and we shall be gathered 
with that great congregation, then shall our dust return to dust, 
and our spirit to the God who gave it. 

The wdiole number of deaths as reported by Mr. J. J. Straw, 
for the year ending February 1st 18f>2, has been 228, (being 
nine less than the previous year,) and buried as follows : In the 
cemetery, in lots, 70 ; public ground, SO ; other grounds in the 
city, 11 ; in the Catholic ground in Bedford, 23; carried to 
other places out of the city, 38 ; total 228. 

It will be seen that a much larger pro] ortion have been buried 
in lots the year past, than any previous year. 

Your committee believe that the sale of lots will be sufficient 
to pay all expenses needed the ensuing year, and until a new 
fence shall be found necessary. 



95 

The number of lots sold to Feb. 1st, 

1852, is 04. 
Amount of cash in the treasury Feb. 

1st, 1851, 505 42 

" received from sale of lots to 

Feb. 1, 1852, 5G8 00 

" of appropriation for Valley,.. 800 00 



- $1,433 42 



EXPENDED FOE LAB0E, &c. 

Paid G. W. Adams for labor, 127 04 

A. W, Sanborn for storing hearse 

6 months, 5 00 

D. Balch cash paid for carving 

for gateway, 12 00 

Hunt & Sargent for contract on 

gateway, ' 500 00 

J. R. Paige for part of lot No. 1 5 00 
M. W. Oliver for plans, &c, of 

gateway, 15 00 

J. T. P. Hunt for iron gate, posts 

and fixtures, 123 04 

" part pay on tomb,. . . . 176 00 
A. A. Mixer for putting up noti- 
ces in Valley, 150 

T. G. Judd for labor, 15 00 

J. C. Emerson for blanks, 2 50 

P. W. Folansby for labor, 16 50 

S. Fellows for lumber and labor 

on scats, &c, 4 02 

N. Knowlton for labor, 5 00 

J. F. James for surveying lots 

and making plans, 29 50 

J. N. Brown for painting hearso 

houses and gate, 38 44 

Ayer & Fogg for spade, 1 08 

J. P. Adriance for lead pipe,. . . 48 99 

H. Piper for labor, 3 75 

Gage & Wallace for printing, . . 5 75 

I. Tompkins for labor, 3 00 

G. Clark for stone for steps, ... 32 47 

W. Adriance for 2 casks, 1 25 

Anwunt carried forward, $1 5 173 03 



96 

Amount brought forward, $1,173 03 

W. Mills for labor with team, . . 14 23 

A. Smith fur hearse houses,. . . . 210 00 

P. McMahan, 3 84 

Leaving a balance of cash in treasury 

Amount due for lots sold, about 260 00 

" trees " 18 00 

" old hearse house,... 12 00 



§1,401 10 

§32 32 



§200 00 



"Whole amount of available funds,. . . $322 32 

Due sundry persons for labor, &c, §275 00. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 
Manchester, Feb. 14th, 1852. 

GEO. T. MIXER, 
DAVID BRIG HAM, I Committee 
FRANCIS REED, [ on Valley. 

NATHANIEL SMITH, 

In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 17th, 1852. 
Read, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

FRED'K SMYTH, City Clerk. 

In Board of Common Council, Feb. 17th, 1852. 
Read, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

GEO. A. FRENCH, OUrh. 



, 



COMMITTEE ON COMMONS' REPORT. 

To his Honor the Mayor and City Council — 

The Joint Standing Committee on Commons, having the 
superintendence of the City commons, herewith present their 
annual report : 

In the discharge of the responsible duty assigned the com- 
mittee on commons and cemetery, your committee have ever 
felt that their works would show the motive that controlled them ; 
consequently a faithful discharge would be here made manifest. 
Early in the spring a large quantity of manure was put on the 
commons, the fences repaired, trees trimmed, and all obstructions 
to the growth of the trees and grass removed. Many of the 
trees set out years before had died : Mr. J. G. Coult replaced 
such as he had warranted, and some others were added. 

A small amount of money has been expended on Concord 
and Merrimack squares during the past year, but a much 
greater effort to improve Tremont square appeared necessary, 
and a number of our citizens, more particularly interested in 
this square, requested your committee to permit them to remove 
many of the pine trees, and add hard trees sufficient for the 
good appearance of the square. One hundred dollars was ap- 
propriated for this square, and placed under the direction of a 
judicious committee appointed by and among themselves, and 
we believe they have made good use of the same. 

It is understood that Hanover square is, or soon will be, in 
the care of the City government, and that application will be 
made to fence and otherwise improve it. 

Your committee would remind the City government that an 
iron fence should be placed around Concord square very soon, 
and that the present fence would do much to, if not complete 
a fence on Hanover square, thereby making a saving to the 
city, as it will not be necessary for the city to be at much 
13 



98 

expense on any of the other squares fur other purposes. It is 
hoped that an iron fence around Concord square will be com- 
pleted during the coming season. 
Amount of cash in the treasury Feb. 

1st, 1851, 243 28 

" of appropriations for commons 200 00 



$443 28 



Expenditures. 



20 




3 


75 


42 


37 


\-l 


00 


3 


00 


11 


00 


3 


00 



Paid J. Cochran for care of Concord 

square 2 years 

Y . II. Foss for labor on Con. Bq. 
G. Hunt for labor of men and 
team on Concord square, .... 
J. O'Roukre for labor on Con. sq. 
J. W. Saunders, " 

F. Reed for " 
J. Wallace for 

J. Cair for " 1 00 

J. G. Coult for trees on Concord 

and Merrimack squares, 40 00- 

A. A. Mixer for boards and labor 
on Merrimack square, 

G. B. Fogg for keys to locks,. . . 

A. C. Wallace for lumber. 

(iage k Wallace for printing, . . . 
C. A. Hall for 12 loads manure 
W. Mills for labor of men and 

teams on Merrimack square, . . 

N. Coming for labor Tremont sq. 

A. Place " " " 

A. Bunton " " 2 0O 

\V. Richardson for trees and la- 
bor on Tremont Bquaie, 30 1 i 

R. W. Robertson for trees and 

labor on Tremont square,. . . . 26 <»" 

W. French order tor trees and 
labor Tremont square, L5 00 

K. W. Robertson for crying sale 

of grass, 50 

Total amount expended $276 I I 

Leaving a balance undrawn of $166 v > 



3 


3 




75 


4 


67 


3 


25 


2 


4ii 


24 


50 


6 


t;> 


20 


25 



99 



All of which is respectfully submitted. 
Manchester, Feb. 15th, 1852. 

GEO. T. MIXER, 
DAVID BRIGHAM, 
FRANCIS REED, 
NATHANIEL SMITH, 



Committee 
on Commons. 



In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 17th, 1852. 
Read, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

FRED'K SMYTH, City Clerk. 

In Board of Common Council, Feb. 17th, 1852. 
Read, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

GEO. A. FRENCH, Clerk. 



POLICE COURT REPORT. 



Police Court Room, January 31, 1852. 

To the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester : 

The undersigned, in the performance of his duty, would submit 
to you the following report of the proceedings before the Police 
Court of the City of Manchester, for the year ending with January 
1, 1852 : 

During the year there have been brought before the court, upon 
complaint of the City Marshal and others, 261 persons, upon 245 
complaints. 

Of this number then- were before the court, for crimes beyond 
the jurisdiction of said court to try, 58 persons upon 51 complaints. 

These persons were before the court charged with the following 
misdemeanors and crimes : adultery, 1 ; assault, with intent to 
kill, 1 ; bastardy, 3 ; burglary, 5 ; destroying another's property, 
1 ; forgery, 5 ; highway robbery, 1 ; keeping bowling saloon, 7 ; 
keeping disorderly house, 3; larceny, 10; lascivious behavior, 5; 
murder, 1 ; manslaughter, 1 ; passing counterfeit money, 5; rape, 
1 ; riot, 6 ; selling liquor without license, 1 ; threatening to take 
life, 1. — Whole number, 58, 

These entered pleas thus : guilty, 17; not guilty, 41 ; examined, 
41 ; discharged, 4 ; ordered to recognize, 54. 

There were brought before the court, upon offences within the 
jurisdiction of the court, to try, 203 persons, upon 194 complaints. 

These were before the court charged with the following misde- 
meanors: assault, 26; common drunkards, 11; found drunk, 82; 
gambling, 12 ; disorderly conduct, 10 ; keeping shop open on the 
Sabbath, 3; larceny, 15; making noise, brawl and tumult, 31; 
night walking, 4 ; obstructing street, 1; permitting animals to go 
at large, 2 ; profane swearing, 1; throwing stones, 1; telling for- 
tunes, 1. — Whole nnmber, 203. 

These entered pleas thus : guilty, 94 ; not guilty, 109 ; discharg- 
ed, 15; convicted, 94 5 sentenced, 188. Of this number there 



101 

were sent to the house of correction, 67 ; to the common jail, 9 ; 
fined or discharged on their own recognizance, 112; appealed, 3. 

During the year ending January 1, 1852, there were before the 
court, 228 persons, upon 209 complaints. This shows an increase 
of complaints in the year 1851, over those of 1850, of 36, and an 
increase of persons complained of in the year 1851, over those of 
1850, of 33. 

The civil docket presents a more favorable aspect. Whole num- 
ber of entries during the year ending with January 1, 1852, 81 ; 
number upon the docket unsettled, 14 ; appeals, 00. Number of 
entries during the year 1850, 214. Decrease in 1851, as compar- 
ed with 1850, 133. Amount of fines and costs received by me 
from the Police court, during the year 1851, 306,22. 

In this connection, I would bring to your attention k the [fact that, 
the city is provided with no house of correction, in the proper 
sense of the term. The almshouse is used for a house of correc- 
tion, but it has no conveniences for such purpose. A person 
sentenced to the house of correction, cannot be kept there any 
longer than suits his convenience or pleasure, unless resort is had 
to chains. This alternative is revolting, — a disgrace to our city, — 
and is not resorted to by the superintendent, except in extreme 
cases. Hence the result is, that a sentence to the house of correc- 
tion is desired by offenders in many instances, rather than dreaded 
Some desire it as a home, and many of the most vile offenders 
desire it, because at their pleasure they can be at large, ready to 
practice iniquity in other places, if not in our own city. And it 
has so happened, that one of the most hardened offenders has thus 
escaped, remained in our midst, and bid defiance to the officers of 
justice ! Now this state of things should not be continued. The 
certainty of punishment is as important in the administration of 
justice, as the kind of punishment ; for where there is no certainty 
of punishment, there is little fear of it. Justice, then, to the com- 
munity, on the score of protection to person and property, as well 
as the reformation of offenders, demands a reform in this matter. 

But this state of things is most objectionable in another point of 
view. Poverty, however inconvenient, is no disgrace. The poor 
at our almshouse are those of our own city, and are poor generally 
from misfortune, seldom from crime. It is often the case, that 
among the inmates of our almshouses, are those who have occupied 



L02 

good positions in society, — have contributed their share towards the 
support of the state and its institutions, — while others have contri- 
buted to its wealth by honesl industry, and to its character for good, 
by moral lives; — yet by misfortune, often the result of the oppres- 
sion or chicaner) of others, they have been reduced to the alter- 
native of starvation or the almshouse! Here they are by right. 
Now is it just or proper, thai with these honesl poor people, the 
city shall place drunkards, brawlers, night-walkers, and thieves? 
thus herding together in one and the same room, the honest poor, 

the recipients of the city's alius, and hardened criminals, the 
recipients of the law's penalties? No! Every principle of justice 
demands a reform. Charity, and punishment for crime, should not 

lie dealt out from one and the same place, and in one and the 
same manner. 

But true economy requires reform in this matter. .Most of 
those sent to the house of correction, are -.tout, able-bodied per- 
sons, and if there should be a proper [dace provided for a house of 

correction, where these people could he kept at some profitable 
employment under the immediate superintendence of the overseer, 
the ends of the law might rigidly and certainly he answered, and 
at the same time the pecuniary interests of the city might he sub- 
served. There are very few commitments made to the house of 
correction of persons who are not able to earn much more than 
their board, if they could he confined and kept employed. 

Estimates have been made b) competent individuals, which show 
that the trilling amount of some seven or eighl hundred dollars, 
judiciously expended upon the city farm upon the " Mammoth 
road," or at the farm upon Bridge street, will secure apartments 
for criminals separate from those of the pooi'. provide the refractor) 
with a secure place in which the) can labor, and a bridewell, for 
those who will not labor, or who may he placed in it for punishment 
merely. 

Nor need there he any lack of employment for those thus con- 
fined. If there should be no other work, the) mighl he profitably 
employed in breaking up stone. Our city is located upon a sand) 

plain, and as a consequence sand is a common and great Quise 

m our streets. To ohviate this difficulty, sooner or later our streets 
musl he paved or macadamized. Now if it should he determined 
to furnish a suitable house of correction, ami all Other employment 



should fail, the prisoners might be profitably employed in breaking 
up stone to macadamize our streets. This debris could readily 
be hauled to the desired locality by the city teams, and properly 
applied by pauper or criminal labor, under the direction of the 
superintendent of streets. 

In this manner the city farm mighl be rendered more valuable 
by being cleared of stones and rocks ; our streets made comfortable, 
in good order, and durable ; and those persons sentenced to the 
house of correction, kept at profitable employment. 

And this desirable state of things, as to our streets, might be ac- 
complished in a few years, as a great amount of labor, of necessity, 
would he secured by the plan proposed. For the las! five years, 
the co! in nit n lent s to the house of correction have averaged, annua 11\ . 
more than fifteen hundred days! Now this amount of labor would 
accomplish a great deal if properly applied. It would go far 
towards paying the entire police expenses of the city, if applied in 
any profitable channel. And here let me remark, that the profits 
arising from this kind of labor, whether upon the farm, or in any 
other manner, would seem to arise rather from the police establish- 
ment, than the almshouse establishment, and ought in all fairness 
to be annually credited to the police account rather than that of the 
almshouse, as has hitherto been done. 

I cannot close this report without calling the attention of your 
honorable board to the great amount of vagrancy in our city. I 
had occasion to call the attention of the board to this subject, the 
last year, through the medium of another department of the city 
government, but it is not the less my duty to advert to it on the 
present occasion. Vagrancy is the crying evil of our city. It is 
confied mostly to persons under age. There are hundreds of boys 
and girls prowling about the city, by day and evening, who have 
no employment, and who, if not already disposed to do evil, are 
contracting habits of idleness, dissipation and dissoluteness. But in 
a great many instances, it is to be feared, that these persons live by 
pilfering, as they have no other visible means of support. In fact, 
in many instances it has been made apparent that such persons 
followed a course of petty depredation upon the property of our 
citizens. 

This evil is not confined to boys alone. Girls are to be seen in 
our streets day and evening, whose whole appearance shows any 



[04 

thing but correct moral training. And the records of the Police 
Com!, as will as data at the City Marshal's office, show, that there 
are young girls in our city who are not only without any parental 
restraints at home, hut who care little for those restraints thai usu- 
ally operate upon well disposed females. 

The state is already taking measures that may, in part, cure this 
evil. Bui prevention is what we want. We have what was in- 
tended as a remedy, — a law by which such persons may be pun- 
ished. But this remedy neither prevents vagrancy or reforms the 
vagrant. On the contrary, the remedy provided by the law de- 
stroys character oftener than it reforms the vagrant. The alter- 
native of the law is the house of correction or the common jail, 
and either, in ninety-nine eases oul of an hundred, will produce 
greater degradation, or knowledge of crime, rather than reforma- 
tion. Our efforts should rather he directed towards prevention of 
crime in these juvenile vagrants. They should be put to school. 
The restraints, precepts and knowledge of the school room, would 
work wonders upon this class of our population, many of whom 
never have seen the inside of a school room in their lives. 

The officers of the city have no authority, at present, to do this, 
and I would suggest to your honorable hoard the propriety of having 
the police or school committee clothed with sufficient authority 
from the proper source, to place and keep at school in the different 
wards, all the vagrant children of the city. This once accom- 
plished, and followed up, juvenile vagrancy will be prevented, and 
with it will cease a vast amount of crime in our city. 

All of which is respectfully submitted for your consideration. 

c/e. potter, 

Justice of the Police Court of the City of Manchester. 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



To his Honor the Mayor, and Aldermen 

of the City of Manchester — 

Gentlemen : In compliance with the requirements of City 
ordinance No. 9, Sec. 3, 1 herewith submit to you a statement 
of " the condition of all the fire apparatus belonging to the 
city," together with " the names* of the members of the com- 
panies to which they belong." 

The several companies composing the fire department have 
the full number of members allowed them by ordinances Nos. 
56 and 57. 

The engines and most of the apparatus are in very good 
condition, as the following report will show. 

Engine Co. No. 1.— 50 Members, 

Land and building on Vine st., valued at . 
Engine and hose carriage, ... " 

25 feet suction hose, " 



(new) 



450 feet leading " 
150 " " 

2 sleds, 

1 stove and pipe, 

1 signal lantern, 

4 torch lamps, 

1 glass lantern and 2 lamps, 

3 oil cans and 1 tin boiler, . 
1 hammer, 1 lock, 1 m. safe, 

14 settees, 105 feet, 

60 caps, 

1 box for washing hose, 

1 desk, 

1 pump, 

18 spanners, 

1 screw hammer, 



1000 


00 


900 


00 


50 


00 


191 


00 


96 


00 


10 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


8 


00 


3 


75 


7 


00 


1 


12 


44 


00 


50 


00 


4 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


1 


25 



Amount carried forward, $2,404 12 

* Note.— The names of members of the companies are omitted for want of space. 

14 



Illti 



Amount brought forward, 

1 extra set of brakes, valued at 

9 oil coats and pants, " 

10 fire caps, " 

60 badges, " 

2 office chairs, " 

1 lock and GO keys, " 

1 shovel, " 

1 pail and 1 broom, " 

1 water pot, " 

4 gals. w. oil, " 

2 " n. oil, " 

2 " fluid, 

2 qts. s. oil, 

2 " alcohol, " 

1 cord wood, " 



2,404 12 

lo 00 

1:; 50 

37 50 

6 00 

2 50 

10 00 

. 75 

67 

;:> 

2 68 

■1 66 

i m 

67 

87 

5 25 



$2,498 72 



Engine Co. No. 4.— 50 Members. 



Land and building on Chestnut street,. 900 00 

Engine and hose carriage, 950 00 

575 feet leading hose, 260 00 

25 " suction hose, 70 00 

13 " " 12 0O 

1 signal lantern, 11 00 

4 torch lamps, 8 00 

2 stoves and stove pipe, 22 50 

10 settees and 1 chair, 32 00 

5 office chairs, 3 00 

1 pump, 5oo 

8 hoseman's caps, 1 2 00 

18 spanners and belts, 10 00 

2 screw hammers, 3 00 

1 hatchet and shovel, 1 50 

2 oil cans and 1 lamp filler, 1 25 

1 jug and 2 pails, 75 

1 lock and <!0 keys, 7 00 

9 oil coats and pants, 13 5u 

2 ropes, 1 50 

I water pot, -■> 

5(1 badges, 12 OO 

Amount* carried forward, $2,886 25 $2,498 72 



101 



Amounts brought forward, $2,336 25 $2,498 72 

1 cord wood, 2 75 

2 gals, alcohol, 1 50 

2 sleds, cost $15,00, 10 00 



Engine Co. No. 5.— 50 Members. 

Land and building on Manchester st., 

Engine and hose carriage, 

12 feet suction hose, 

12£" " (new) 

350 " leading hose, 

300 " " consid'd unfit for use 
2 stoves and pipe, 

1 signal lantern, 

4 torch lamps, 

2 glass lanterns, 

2 oil cans, 

1 copper boiler, 

2 water pails, 

24 spanners and belts, 

1 screw hammer, 

9 hoseman's hats, 

9 settees, 

60 badges, 

1 lock and 70 keys 

1 pump, 

1 steel shovel, 

1 vise, 

7 ropes and hooks, 

3 office chairs, 

6 chairs, 

1 extra blunderbuss, 

1 branch pipe, 

1 pair extra brakes, 

9 oil coats and pants, 

-|- cord wood, 

Extra ropes, 

2 leaders, 

1 desk, 

Amount carried forward, 





lJ)i,OUU U\l 


,000 


00 


900 


00 


20 


00 


5 


00 


44 


00 


200 


00 


25 


00 


20 


00 


7 


00 


8 


00 


1 


67 


2 


25 


2 


00 




50 


12 


00 


1 


50 


16 


00 


23 


00 


15. 


00 


8 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


50 


1 


75 


5 


25 


3 


00 


10 


00 


6 


00 


10 


00 


13 


50 


2 


75 


1 


00 


12 


00 


2 


50 




f o qqp -j 7 







$7,235 39 



108 



Amount brought forward, 

Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1— 44 Members. 

Land and building on Manchester st., $1,000 00 

Hook and ladder carriage, 150 00 

400 feet ladders, ' 75 00 

300 " ropes, 16 00 

4 axes, 4 00 

1 trumpet, 5 00 

6 buckets, 5 00 

2 torch lamps, 4 00 

1 signal lamp, 5 00 

1 lantern, 1 50 

4 fire hooks, 31 00 

51 badges, 6 00 

8 spike poles, 7 00 

5 chains, 24 00 

1 shovel, 1 00 

2 brooms and 1 oil can, 75 

2 stoves and pipe, 16 00 

1 centre lamp, 1 00 

9 settees, 20 00 

3 chairs, 150 

1 desk, 3 00 

1 table, 50 

1 old ladder carriage, 10 00 



$7,23:» 39 



$1,387 25 



Engine Co. No. 3.— 50 Members. 

(Engine belongs to Stark corporation.) 

300 feet leading hose, 196 00 

8 oil coats and pants, 1 3 50 



$209 50 

Engine Co. No. 6.— 50 Members. 

(Engine belongs to Manchester corp 1 n.) 
300 feet of leading hose, new last year 170 00 

1 signal lantern, 15 00 

4 torch lamps, 16 00 

6 caps, 14 00 

Amounts carried forward, $215 00 $8,832 14 






109 

Amounts brought forward, $215 00 $8,832 14 

1 trumpet, 6 00 

50 badges, 8 00 

10 belts, 3 75 

Figures and letters, 2 00 

1 iron bar, 1 50 

80 feet settees, 36 60 

5 chairs, 2 25 

1 table, 6 50 

9 oil coats and pants, 13 50 



$295 10 



Hose and Ladder Co. No. 2.— 40 Members. 

1 signal lantern and staff, ■ 15 00 

4 torch lamps, 10 00 



$25 00 



The remainder of the property connect- 
ed with this company belongs to the 
Amoskeag New Mills, as follows : 

2 hose carriages, 1000 ft. leading hose, 
4 spanner belts, 8 spannners, 1 ladder 
carriage, 100 feet ladders, 50 buckets ; 
also, the hose and ladder house, and the 
fixtures. 

All the apparatus and other property 
necessary to place engines Nos. 3 and 6 
on an equal footing with any in the city, 
(which is not included in the foregoing 
report), is owned by the respective cor- 
porations owning said engines, the use of 
which is gratuitously tendered to the city 
in case of fire. The members connected 
with the last named engines, and also the 
hose and ladder company, are all subject 
to the same rules and regulations which 
govern the other companies of the city, 
and are entitled in every respect to the 
privileges by them enjoyed. 



Amount carried forivard, $9,152 24 



L10 

Amount brought forward, $9,152 24 

Incidental Property. 

7 India rubber coats, 

5 sets couplings, 

14 badges, (engineer's), 

7 brass trumpets, 



42 


00 






13 


00 






6 


00 






28 


00 










- $89 


00 




$9,241 


24 



a 



;9,241 24 



RECAPITULATION. 

Engine Co. No. 1, 2,498 72 

" 3, 200 50 

4, 2,350 50 

5, 2,380 17 

6, 295 10 

Hook and ladder company No. 1, . . . . 1,387 25 

Hose and " 2, . . . . 25 00 

Incidental, 89 00 

Reservoirs and other supplies of water. 

1 Elm St., front of City Hall. 

1 Bridge st., north of Birch st. 

1 Lowell st., front of school house. 

1 " near culvert on the south in Towlesville. 

1 Bridge st., Janesville, north of culvert. 

1 Concord st., intersection of Pine st. 

1 Manchester st., front of J. Mitchell's. 

1 Hanover st., intersection of Pine st. 

1 Central st., " " 

1 Chestnut st., intersection of Hanover st. 

1 Amherst st., " Chestnut st. 

1 Merrimack st., 80 feet cast of " 

1 " square 

1 Concord " 

1 Tremont " 

1 Hanover " 

1 Union st., intersection of Hanover Bt. 

1 South ToAvlesville, near brook north of street. 

Total 18. 



Ill 

Amount of property destroyed by fire 
the year ending Jan. 31st, 1852, is es- 
timated as follows, to wit : 
Aug. 5. — J. Wallace and F. Reed's sta- 
ble, 750 00 

Sept. 8. — D. Clark's barn and shed rear 

Hanover and Manchester streets 200 00 
Oct. 27. — Amoskeag co.'s barn east end 

of Elm st., GOO 00 

Nov. 4. — J. H. Maynard's store, Elm st. 700 00 

« 12.— W. Baker's house, 600 00 

" 20. — Stark mill's corporation, picker 

1852. building 4,000 00 

Jan. 12. — Folsom & James' store, Elm 

street, 1,500 00 

" 22. — David Haynes' house, Hanover 

street, 100 00 

" 23. — Amoskeag co.'s building, "with 

contents; 2,000 00 

Other small damages estimated at .... 150 00 

$ 10,600 00 

There have been during the year eleven 

false alarms of fire, occasioned by the 

burning of shavings, window curtains 

and chimneys. 
All of w T hich is respectfully submitted. 

Manchester, Feb. 1st, 1852. 

J. F. JAMES, Chief Engineer. 

In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 17th, 1852. 
Read, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

FRED'K SMYTH, City Clerk. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 

To the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Manchester: 

The time having arrived at which the law of our State requires 
us to submit our Annual Report, together with such recommen- 
dations and remarks as may seem to us advisable, the Superin- 
tending School Committee would respectfully submit the following 

REPORT. 

At the first meeting of your committee for the purpose of 
organization, a need was felt of some definite plan to be observed 
in the discharge of our duties, and some uniform rules for the 
regulation of all the schools for the time being under our charge. 
It was felt at once that every good teacher would be much aided 
by some such system, and that thus a greater degree of regur 
larity and uniformity in the conduct of our schools would be 
secured than were the regulations to be varied according to the 
taste of each member of the committee, or teacher in the school. 
Accordingly a committee of three from our number was ap- 
pointed to draft a system of by-laws for the School Committee, 
and regulations for the schools. This committee found that 
almost every other city, of as large population as our own, had 
already prepared and published in pamphlet form such a system. 
Publications of this nature were procured from Boston, Lowell, 
Salem and several other places, and after adopting whatever 
seemed suited to our own wants as a community, and adding 
whatever our condition or the statutes of the state required, 
the report of the select committee was submitted to the full 
board, was carefully considered at several meetings, in many 
respects amended, and was at length unanimously adopted. 

In our by-laws such a division is now made of the very com- 
plicated and various duties of the committee, that two or three 



113 

have had for their special duty the attending to some particular 
department ; thus to one committee was referred all matters of 
finance, to another all repairs and improvements in our school 
houses, &c, while each school had some one or two persons 
appointed as sub-committee, who should see to the wants and 
condition of that individual school. No committee could act, 
however, in any important matter, without the assent of the 
full board to his suggestion. The finance and school house 
commiitees are permanent ones ; the sub-committees varied from 
month to month, that each school might be in turn under the 
supervision, and have the aid of every member of the commitee. 

We are happy to say that the plan, to the best of our judg- 
ment, has operated well, and that the regulations adopted for 
the schools have met the approbation of every efficient teacher 
and judicious parent, as far as our knowledge extends. We 
trust that the same system will be continued by our successors, 
with only such modifications as may from time to time be re- 
quired. 

Registers have also been prepared by us and placed in the 
teachers' hands, to be kept by them, which secure to us all the 
information demanded by the state ; also as to the conduct, 
attendance, and actual progress of each scholar throughout the 
city. Such a record will be interesting in future years, and 
the knowledge that it is faithfully kept has already produced a 
marked effect in securing orderly conduct and diligent study in 
our schools, and also in suppressing tardiness, truancy and in- 
constant attendance — those foes to all progress in study and all 
good government. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

The school committee of last year, in strong terms — but no 
stronger than truth both justified and required — called attention 
to the school houses in the city. Of the high school building 
they say, " It is fit for no school until it is completely renovated 
and repaired." They also recommended the erection of another 

building for the high school, and spoke of the great need of 
15 



Ill 

repair in our grammar school houses and the school house at 
Moore's village. 

At the annual meeting of District No. 2, in April, the plan 
of erecting a new house for the high school was negatived by 
a majority of the legal voters present, but a rote was passed 
by which funds already raised for the erection of such a house 
were placed at the disposal of the committee of this year, and 
we were instructed to make such repairs and alterations in the 
school houses in the district as, in our judgment, -was desirable. 
In accordance with this vote we have caused the high school 
house to he thoroughly renovated, and it is no longer a disgrai o 
to our city for its uncomfortable and unhealthy arrangement. 
The grammar school houses have also been materially repaired 
and improved in their arrangement, so that the rooms arc now 
in most respects very pleasant and convenient. 

Complying with a vote passed at the same meeting, your 
committee have held the several teachers responsible to them 
for any injury to the rooms or appurtenances under their 
pective charge, and it is but just to say that both teachers and 
pupils have vied Avith one another in care of the buildings so 
improved or remodelled, as will always be the ease when our 
citizens are liberal and generous in providing for tin' wants and 
comfort of the schools. Although the repairs and changes 
made by us have been thus extensive, we are enabled to state 
that we have kept within the limits of the appropriation made 
for this object. 

At Moore's village, also, the inhabitants have, with commend- 
able zeal, entirely renovated their formerly dilapidated house. 
Great improvements ought yet to be made in some of the school 
houses of District No. 2, and few of the other districts have a 
school house at all suitable for the wants of the young, who, at 
that sensitive age, are the inmates. "We hope the good work 
begun in this department will go on until our school houses 
throughout the city are an honor and not a reproach to any 
portion of our community. 

Your committee consider it highly important that the school 
houses which have thus been repaired should be preserved in 



115 

good order, and fur this purpose they strongly recommend the 
discontinuance of the practice of using them for ward meetings 
or elections, at which times the rooms are often much injured. 

SCHOOL BOOKS. 

Among the hindrances to the improvement of the schools 
enumerated by our predecessors, the school committee of last 
year, was a lack of uniformity in the books used in the schools. 
Their language is as follows : " A multiplicity of books in the 
same study is another serious obstacle in the way of improve- 
ment in many of our schools. As many as six or eight different 
arithmetics are found in schools out of No. 2, so many that 
teachers have found it impossible to class their scholars. So 
of geographies and reading books. This fact calls loudly for 
reform — the^pruning knife of the county commissioner. The 
sooner it is effected, the better for our schools." 

This language of our predecessors was found by us to be 
fully justified by facts, and we were ready heartily to endorse 
and carry out their suggestion. As the power of making such 
a change js conferred upon the school committees of the several 
towns, and not upon the county commissioner, we deemed it our 
duty'Jto make the attempt. Certainly few things can be more 
desirable pv essential than a uniformity of class books in a 
school. The science of education, too, is constantly advancing, 
and has made rapid progress in the method of teaching the 
young during the last few years, and the books used in schools 
have undergone corresponding improvement in their arrange- 
ment and system. To say that it makes little or no difference 
what books are used, is certainly not conformable to men's 
experience in any other department of lite. The farmer and 
the carpenter would be great losers in the amount of work 
accomplished, if they used any other than the best tools — and 
so every scholar works at immense disadvantage with any but 
the best books, compiled according to the most improved system. 
Not only these general considerations influenced us, but there 
were several circumstances in addition to the great lack of 



lie; 

uniformity, which, in our own case as a city, seemed to make 
some change of books desirable. 

A change in the grammar class books was requested by the 
principals of our grammar schools, and another recommended 
by them in its place. The facts of geography are constantly 
changing, as new states are added to our union and political 
revolutions take place in the old world. What was true five 
years ago is far from being true in the geography of to-day. 
New discoveries, too, are constantly making in our own country ; 
the changes and discoveries in California and In e\v Mexico, how 
vast they are, and how important that every child should be 
well informed about his own country. There Avas, then, a 
decided call for a change of books in this department, those in 
use not having kept pace with the progress of our country and 
the changes in other lands. 

The reading books in use did not seem to us, or to many of 
the teachers, upon the whole, the best for our scholars. There 
was great variety in all districts other than No. 2, and even in 
that district not one continuous series extending throudi the 
grammar and high schools. There seemed, then, in view of 
all these facts, great need of a somewhat extensive change in 
our school books. 

We knew, however, that there was one serious obstacle to a 
change, and that was the great expense it would probably bring 
upon our citizens. This consideration would have been sufficient 
in itself to have induced us to submit to the evils of a lack of 
uniformity and continue what we believed inferior books then in 
our schools, had not our book committee found it practicable to 
procure nearly every book they deemed it desirable to introduce, 
on even exchange for the old books. In regard to nearly every 
book which they had previously selected because of its superior 
merits, they found it practicable to make such an arrangement, 
and only after careful examination of every book, and ascertain- 
ing this fact from most of the publishers, did they decide to 
make a thorough change. As we were aware that some of our 
pupils in Dist. No. 2 were not in our schools in the summer, but 
attended them in the autumn, we required publishers to make 






t IT 

the gratuitous exchange at the beginning of both those terms, 
and due notice of this fact to be given in the schools, that none 
need lose the advantage of the exchange, unless through their 
own negligence. For the same reason the exchange was made 
at the beginning of both the summer and winter terms in every 
district other than No. 2. Thousands of old and dilapidated 
books almost unfit for service, have been thus exchanged, and 
there can be but few in our whole city, who, during this year 
have been obliged to buy any new books, and those few through 
no lack of effort on our part to shield them from such expendi- 
ture. We believe there has been no year for a long series of 
years when our citizens as a whole have been subjected to so 
little expense in purchasing books, as during the present, the 
new ones bought not equalling in number those which must have 
been purchased to supply the ordinary wear and tear of books 
in school. In a few instances only was any book introduced un- 
less on such exchange, and never unless at greatly reduced 
prices. In some cases the new books do not supercede others 
but are intended for additional studies ; thus the committee have 
adopted the dictionaries prescribed by the New Hampshire 
Board of Education ; no standard having before been established 
by any previous committee, to our knowledge, and some stan- 
dard being greatly needed. General history has been intro- 
duced into our grammar schools where it was not previously 
studied, and a simpler history into the middle schools, not to 
supercede but 'precede that of Goodrich. 

The series of Readers now used by us, has been essentially 
changed by its publishers in its plan and system, all the most 
recent improvements have been adopted in it, and many of the 
best specimens of literature in our language introduced. This 
revised series, differing widely from the former edition once in 
part previously used in our schools, was adopted by us with the 
full concurrence of the teachers. If proof were needed of the 
excellence of these books, and that the change met the wishes 
of both teachers and scholars, it is found in the fact that while 
it was left optional in the high and grammar schools, whether 
to adopt the readers recommended by the committee or to retain 



113 

tlio.se then in use, in each of these schools the change wad made 
voluntarily through preference of the new readers. 

Your committee claim, therefore, in securing uniformity and 
the best hooks, also to have been careful to save our citizens 
from expense, and they believe their efforts in this particular 
give satisfaction to the mass of our fellow citizens. Though 
this change has cost us much labor, and has been by some mis- 
represented or misunderstood, we are well satisfied from care- 
ful observation, that it has been very beneficial in its results. 
A new interest has been felt in most of the departments of 
study by both teachers and scholars. Almost <i perfect 
uniformity in all the school books used throughout our city 
has now been secured. We believe, too, that such adequate 
changes have thus been made that none will be necessary for 
several years to come, and we would recommend to our 
successors a continuance of the present course of study and 
the present books, at least until they have had a thorough and 
fair trial in every case. 

We pass now to a brief review of the schools in the various 
districts during the year, and to such further suggestions as we 
may feel called upon to make. 

DISTRICT NO. 1. 

This school has passed through the year very quietly with no 
disturbance within its limits. At the reopiest of the district. 
Miss Boynton, the teacher of the previous year, was selected 
for this, and the school under her charge and that of Mr. Smith, 
has appeared creditably. Mr. Smith, though young, is full of 
zeal and interest in his work and seems to have been successful 
in it. 

DISTRICT NO. 3. 

The committee regret to say that this school does not appeal 
to be in a very forward condition. The school house is most 
unhappily planned for the health and comfort of its inmates, 
who suffer, especially during the winter, from its low ceiling and 



119 

• 
the hot atmosphere from the funnel being brought directly over 

their heads, and from other inconveniences. This school, too, 

during the winter haa been interrupted by the illness of the 

teacher, and a change rendered necessary by his resignation. 

Mr. Clark, at the time of the present writing, has but recently 

commenced the school, and we trust his labors may meet with 

abundant success. We hope the parents will manifest deep 

interest in the school, and it is only proper to add that during 

the past year they have shown many indications of a suitable 

feeling on the subject. Let them look to their school-house as 

an essential thing to be changed in order to their prosperity. 

DISTRICT No. 4. 

The inhabitants of this district deserve praise for the changes 
made in their school house during the year, and it is now the 
best in any district other than No. 2. Their school has been 
taught during both summer and winter by competent teachers, 
and there has been nothing but harmony iu its affairs. 

DISTRICT No. 5. 

This district has for several years been making good progress. 
The number of pupils is not large, but they seem generally 
, interested in their studies. The teachers in the school have 
been faithful in the performance of their duty. The committee 
observed in their visits that the present teacher, Mr. Preston, 
Avhile firm, was also affectionate in his government. Only 
teachers who love their work, and love children,and are kindly 
and heartily interested in their pupils, can ever succeed. Mild- 
ness and firmness are qualities which are perfectly compatible, 
and are united in every good teacher. 

DISTRICT No. 6. 

The summer school in this district was admirable. Miss 
Woodworth was in an eminent degree " apt to teach ;" could 
impart what she knew to her pupils, and infused energy into 
the whole school. The progress made was consequently great, 



120 

and the -school appeared very favorably at the close of the 
summer term. During the winter, ' to say, there has 

been an unfortunate collision between a portion of the people 
of the district and the teacher. Mr. Roberts, the young 
gentleman employed by the committee, bore excellent recom- 
mendations as to moral character, which he did nothing to injure 
in this place ; he also sustained the rigid examination to which 
all the new teachers were subjected, with credit to himself. A 
.complaint was made by a portion of the district who became 
dissatisfied with hiin during the winter. After a fair hearing 
of both sides by the committee, it was their opinion that the 
charges brought against him were not substantiated to adeg 
to justify his dismission, especially as they had been satisfied 
with his school at their previous visits. But as so much dil 
isfaction existed in the district, Mr. Roberts decided, with the 
concurrence of the committee, to withdraw, though assured 
that he should be sustained by the committee in every reason- 
able thing, should he choose to remain. The committee think 
it right to say that they believe Mr. Roberts fully equal to the 
average of teachers throughout our state, in ability to teach 
and govern. We cannot but recommend to parents the duty 
of sustaining the teacher, unless in some extreme case, and of 
judging a teacher, not by the reports of their children but by 
actual visiting of the schools in person. Let all our teachers, 
especially the young, who need such sympathy, find friendly 
cooperation and reasonable forbearance, with occasionally kind 
advice and suggestions from the parents in the various districts, 
and we apprehend that there will seldom be any difficulties in 
our schools. 

The school house in this district needs thorough renovation ; 
it is now cold, cheerless, and inconvenient. 

DISTRICT No. 7. 

This school has been in a good way both summer and winter. 
under the charge of its teacher:; Miss Haynes and Mr. Merrill. 
There i, : much room for improvement, but the schoo 
steadily advancing. 






121 

DISTRICT No. 8. 

A small school and a wretched school house, but a quiet, 
peaceful district, which has enjoyed most excellent instruction 
both summer and winter. The school during the year has pros- 
pered and steadily advanced. 

DISTRICT No. 9. 

This school is smaller than any other in the city, and has the 
great disadvantage of a badly constructed school house. Indeed 
we may say that with the exception of No. 4, we do not know 
of a district out of No. 2, of which this may not be siid^ 
and the houses of the last named district are susceptible of 
great improvement in the primary and middle school rooms. In 
all the small districts we have felt convinced that a small school 
is not likely to make so much progress as a large one. It is a 
popular fallacy that a few can be better taught than many. 
There is a lack of enthusiasm, of life, and of proper emu. 
lafcion in a small school, of which nothing can supply the 
place. If Nos. 9 and 6 were again united, and could build in 
some convenient location a large and suitable house, we believe 
it would add much to the interests of these districts, as the 
schools would then be much longer and there would then be 
much more of life and energy. The teachers in No. 9 we 
believe to have discharged their duty both summer and winter 
with fidelity. 

DISTRICT No. 2. 

The schools in this district are generally in a flourishing and 
improved condition. Most of the teachers are exemplary for 
their fidelity to duty, their earnestness in their vocation, and 
their aptness to teach. Some few changes have taken place in 
our list of teachers, in some cases they voluntarily resigning 
and in others the public service requiring such a change, 
however unpleasant to your committee to make it. We should 
be glad, did our limits allow, to pass in review each of the 
16 



122 

schools in this district, but space would fail, nor is it needful. 
A specification as to some of the schools towards which public 
attention is generally more particularly directed in the annual 
reports, will, however, be expected from us. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Your committee found Mr. J. P. Newell principal of this 
school, as successor to Mr. Hadley. It was not. at the 
beginning of the year, in precisely that state of dicipline, nor 
did it occupy quite the rank, which the Manchester High 
School should. The teacher had but just entered here upon 
his labors, and the field was therefore new to him. He was also 
under disadvantages from the inconvenience and unpleasantness 
of his school house. But he lias labored steadily on, has grown 
constantly more familiar and at home in his sphere of duty, waa 
encouraged by the thorough renovation of both his school and 
recitation rooms, and it is but justice to say that the school has 
made steady progress. Mr. Newell seems to us working with 
much perseverance and fidelity, and the school to be now on 
the way to excellence. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

We need spend but few words on these schools, as no material 
change has occurred since the last report. The committee of 
past years have ever spoken of them in terms of praise. Their 
motto has been " progress," " excelsior," and they have steadily 
advanced under their faithful teachers. We congratulate the 
community on the condition of these schools, and think a visit 
to them will ever confer great satisfaction. We have felt it 
right to raise the salaries of the principals In these schools, and 
also that of Mr. Newell. We have expected hard, unremitting 
toil, have had a high standard of requirement, and have felt it 
no more than simple justice to raise the amount of compensation 
likewise. It is not now as high as it has been in some past 
years, not as high as we should be glad to sec it. It is poor 
economy inadequately to pay any of the public servants, and 
the community are, in the end, losers when this is done. 



123 
[INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

This school has been but recently established by your 
committee. A want which it supplies has been felt for years 
in this community. The school committee of the year 1848 — 9 
thus speak in their report in recommendation of such a school : 
" Many youth have grown too old in ignorance to enter our 
primary or middle schools without feeling very sensibly their 
deficienc}', so much so as to deter them from making the attempt. 
Many others are anxious to enter the grammar schools who are 
entirely unqualified, and who think themselves too large to 
enter the middle schools. Another class are very desirous of 
attending school, but feel themselves too old to attend the 
grammar schools, and are in no way qualified to enter the high 
school. Another class of almost all ages from twelve to twenty, 
are willing to go to any school during the short time they can 
be spared from their work, but are desirous of attending to 
writing, written arithmetic, &c, while they are not prepared to 
enter the grammar schools and never can be in the short time 
they are permitted to attend school. * * To obviate these 

difficulties, with others of equal importance, we most heartily 
recommend the establishment of a school to be under the 
instruction of a competent male teacher, and open for scholars 
of all ages and qualifications, where all the branches shall be 
taught which are taught in our primary, middle, and grammar 
schools." The committee of the present year found this want 
still unsupplied, and the number of pupils needing such a school 
to be very large. They resolved on its establishment, and 
selected Mr. Charles Aldrich as its teacher, a gentleman of long 
experience, aud admirable competency for his work, who has 
labored with devotion in his arduous duties during the term. 
Though aware that the want was extensively felt, they were not 
prepared to find so large a number desirous of availing them, 
selves of the advantages of the school. Though giving notice 
but a week previous to its commencement, the school has never- 
theless had seventy scholars during this its first term. The 
school has been found a great advantage to the middle and 



124 

grammar schools, taking out those too old for the one, and not 
quite advanced enough for the other, and in addition has 
accommodated a large number who would have felt too old to 
enter any other school. We recommend the continuance of 
the school as a permanent one, and also the appointment of a 
good female assistant, that Mr. Aldrich may have some aid in 
his duties. 

TOWLESVILLE SCHOOL. 

We take great pleasure in referring to the present condition 
of this school, as it has heretofore been one in which some 
difficulties have occurred. Your committee placed Miss Eaton 
in the school as teacher at the beginning of the year, and she 
has, by a firm yet considerate course, above all by great fidelity, 
secured the respect and regard of both parents and scholars, 
so that the school is now under excellent government, and has 
made progress during the year equal to that of any school in 
the city. 

FALLS SCHOOL. 

Here, too, we can speak with much satisfaction of the present 
state of the school. Early in the year the committee selected 
a teacher recommended by a majority of the district, believing 
it right to respect their wishes. On examination, however, the 
lady was not found, in the judgement of any of the members 
of the committee present, qualified in education for the teach- 
ing of the school, especially as it contains some quite advanced 
pupils. They had but one course to pursue in accordance with 
their oath of office and duty to the school, and that was the 
painful one of declining to give a certificate. Miss Ingalls was 
subsequently chosen as its teacher, and the committee regard 
themselves as fortunate in this selection. The school has made 
great progress, and it is but justice to the parents in this part 
of the- district to say, that, though some may have been 
disappointed that the teacher first chosen was not found qualified, 
they have cordially sustained Miss Ingalls, and by judicious 
and friendly cooperation with her, have secured a most excellent 
school. Wo hardly need say under these circumstances, that 
the school has been under admirable discipline, and has made 
great progress. 



125 

WRITING DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. Kimball having left the city, your committee have 
employed Mr. D. E. Hapgood as teacher of penmanship in the 
schools. They have required his whole time as much as that 
of any other teacher. Mr. H. has given us entire satisfaction. 
Amid much ill health he has devoted himself with fidelity to 
his duties, and as he gained more and more acquaintance with 
the pupils, and experience in his duties, has exhibited from time 
to time marked improvement in his instruction. We believe 
him a teacher every way competent, faithful and successful. 
SUGGESTIONS. 

We have in the course of our report embodied some sugges- 
tions which seemed to us to be appiopriate, but several remain 
which it may be well briefly to enumerate. 

A new school house is greatly needed at the south part of 
the city, or centrally located. This house is required for the 
use of the intermediate school, if continued, and we believe its 
utility and importance have been proved by the experiment 
already made. Your committee fitted up a hall on Elm street 
for the use of this school, but such an arrangement is of neces. 
sity transitory in its nature and liable to many disadvantages * 
such as having no play ground attached, and other inconven- 
iences. In addition, another middle school is required in the 
southern part of the city, those already existing being now full 
to overflowing, and without sufficient accommodations for those 
who apply for admission. There is now one less middle school 
at the southern end of the city than at the northern, and great 
inconvenience has been experienced both by teachers and 
parents, and loss also to pupils from the crowded state of the 
middle schools on Park and Merrimack streets. A portion of 
the building erected for an intermediate school might be fitted 
up for the accommodation of this middle school, likewise. 

We would also recommend raising a larger sum for schools 
than that appropriated during the last year. Money appropri- 
ated to our common schools should not be looked upon as given 
away so much as invested to yield a large and noble return in 
the future history of our city. 



126 



In conclusion, your committee have only to say that they 
have found their duties arduous beyond all expectation. One 

of their number resigned at about the middle of his term of 

office, and upon five persons was thus thrown the whole labor 

of the superintendence of the schools, together with the other 

very miscellaneous duties connected with them. Leaving to 

time to test, and to the community to judge of the success of 

our exertions, we simply claim to have labored with fidelity and 

a sincere and single wish to advance the best interests of the 

schools. To most of us the duties of superintending school 

committee were entirely new, and we feel it but justice to 

ourselves that the community should view our efforts in the 

spirit of kindness, and not of fault-finding. The office of school 

committee in this city is both exceedingly laborious and very 

inadequately compensated ; it certainly should not also be 

thankless, or exposed to misrepresentation and harsh judgment. 

It is but just to say that your committee have generally met 

with cordial cooperation, and kind appreciation of their efforts 

for the general good. 

For further information we would refer to the annexed tables. 

JOSIAH CROSBY,] 
A.M. CHAPIN, I r, 
A. B. FULLER. V '' 
J.CTASKER, 
F. B. EATON, 
In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 17, 1852. 
Read, accepted, and ordered to be printed, F. SMYTH. City Clerk. 



School 
< 'ommittee. 



SCHOOLS OUT OF DISTRICT No. 2. 

The following table is as accurate as tin- circumstance (that the winter schools are 
not finished when we are obliged to furnish this table for the press) will admit of Its 
being. 



SCHOOLS. 



IT. AMI I, KS 



Distriot No. 

" No. 

« No. 
No. 

« No. 

" No. 

" No. 

" No. 

" No. 

« No. 

" No 

" No. 

« No. 

" No. 

" No. 

" No. 



Miss M. J. BOTNTON, 
Mr. J. L. Smi in. 

Miss M. L. Flinders, 

Mi .1 \v. Clark, 

Miss Kuz \ C&ANB, 

Mr J. 1.. BATOHELDER, 

\1 1-- \I I > I i I 

M r. Preston, 

Miss 1. B. Woodwortu, 

Mr. E. 1! I.i.u;. 

M Isg M A II ^v.NES, 

Mr. W. P. Miuiui.i., 

\i Ise Si bmii Boot tj 

M r. .) . F 1'atten, 
\l i- - I , .1. Weir, 

\l, U C < ..Illl-RN, 



■ SUMMER. 


WIH I i.i: 


|SOM. Wl.\| 


c 




o 










1 1* 


£ - ' H 


'A 


y. 


~r 


7* 


. . 






I lick- 


c 
— 


< 


£ 


— 
- 


&\&i 


5' 

- 



21 ll 


21 


















21 


16 


8 


18 


16 


35 





40 
















i 


16 




9 


37 


41 


34 


8 


88 




















27 


10 


33 


87 


22 





27 1 


















85 


80 


11 


24 


22 


17 


o 


20 


















:m 


26 


6 


30 


88 


25 





3S 


















66 


43'13 


43 


28 a 


1 


27 
















•j.i 


IS] 6 


11 


23 


16 





22 


20 


iel o 


21 1 



'I.; 1 o 
16 



12! 

14| 

16 

13. 



127 



K^ 







d 
- 



>■ 






r- "/: EC M s 
■ " ■ B ' 



™ X > Sf H C^ r- 



N S> 



B g 



. BE J*. 

p •£- g _- . 4' " ■ * 

2 w 



• J° ° 



tO Cn ,— \ CD C * '. X -1 tT - --T CO il ifc- - 1 X CO 4*- -3 

ov i-> - - co i-i cd i-" to en © 4- cc o> *■ tocoooa*- 
o 

►-• Co — cic^ci:ccrf*^t^^iai*» co en *■ to co en 

COM 3 ©"© OC CC -1 © CO Cn OJ CO CO OWiTWOCO 



OO g 


OOOOOl— OMOOO 


OMcoMtao 


IO Oi Zd 


cc c ~ — x — i en © © oc en 
ColO©^l>3rf-©COCOen>*- 


4» -.T-l tOi£*-l 

~I O -l «£> if- *- 





to © 5 CD o a e-> x :-t. -rra co on en rf- co e^ co 
no j. Qooaoo*ipoo-io ©eo— icncsio 

to.** 



~-i>+-coe^4-4-*.o:i3it- 



co *- co to e-i *. 



Co © en en *- to co Co co en en cd Co - 1 *- co © 



©oocooooooo o to to to to © 



t0O5 j CO O C. C* X CT * -J C X M On Cn*- COO CO 

en © 5 c,xr.co*-occ-i»] © — i on if- ** to 



— 1 © (fc -4 tOl-iCOl->-l tO-1 ©CO tO © I**- lO tO CO CO 



en e~ *- en e-» eo co eo — i en *- ** 4* co tz ~ ~ 

© tO On Co CO .+- © CO CO — 1 — 1 OH*lit»XM 



H->© S O©©©©©©©©©© ©©©©©© 



Ci -1 O) -1 M rf* CT Cn CC X O it- © rf* .*»■ — 1 CO 

— i to to CO 1-1 CO to -1 © CO to © *- to to CO CO 



© X' en — i o~. co it- en © co © ^ on cr. co co -1 



CO to On CO en X © 1-" CO © > 



!*>■ CO © © CO © 



to i*». en en©it-onentococoon©if*. co it- »£■ w — i en 
© © © © © © to © en co en © © © en en © © © co 



©©©©1-1©©©©©© ©©©o©to 



on x en -1 ai co 1**. en co co © rf>. en cs co cc en 

COL'iOiCOi^eOCPI-'vU©*- I** CO © © if» CO 



WholeNo J 

. I TIT »" 

Av'ge In o. | y. 

— r 

Over 14. |2 



Under 14. 



WholeNo] £ 



Av'ge No. I 
Over 14. 



Under 14. 



WholeNo 



Av'ge No. 



Over 14. 



Under 14 



WholeNo 



Av'ge No. 
Over 14. I 
Under 14. 



O 

h- i 

o 

o 
t- 1 

cc 
1— 1 

1— < 

CTJ 

to 

1— 1 

o 

o 



128 



SCHOOLS IN DISTRICT NO. 2. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 









KB .i- ' ' !."• ELL, 

i 




r annum. 

■ r week. 
| r week. 


Assist 
















1 
1 




Ml. 
■H, - 

m, 

4th i ei in. . 


LIS 


91 

63 
68 


16 



SOUTH GRAMMAS SCHOOL. 



Principal,.. 



.MR. '. RLT. 

Straw, 



Salary iu< 00 per annum. 
■' | er week. 

■■ 






2d Term, 
8d Term, 
4th Term, 



1.9! 
117 | 
117 










1 












i 87 




80 





Principal 

Assistants. ! 



NORTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



.Mi:. MOSES T. BROWN. 

Mi-< M irg u;ki .'. '■. 
Miss Kansas I. Blibp, 



-:ilar\ 



1 er annum. 

week. 

DO j er week 




INDEX 



Auditor' Report, . 
Abatement of Taxes, 
A sscj 3 of the < !ity, 
Almshouse Report, 
City Debt, 
City Debt Paid 
City < Officers, 
City polic, . 
City Hall 1. 

( 'ii \ Farm and Paupers, 
County Paupers, 
Commons, . 

Common Sewers 



86 

50 

. 83 

87 

81 

65 
To 
68 

63 

7s 
30 



Committee on Commons' Report, 97 
Engineer's Report, . . 108 

Finance Committeo's Report, 1 1 
Fire Department, . 73 

11 li. II WAYS AND BRIDG EB. 

Dist. No. i, . .10 

l)i-t. No. 2, . . . 20 

Dist. No. 3, . . 23 

Dist. No. 4, . . 24 

Dist. No. "., . . .25 

l)i>t. No 6 . . 26 

I)M No 7, . . .27 



1 > i - r . Xo. 8, 

Dist. NO. 9, 

Interest Paid, 

incidental Expensi 

Militia, 

New Highways, 

Printing and Stationery, 

Police < lourt Repj 

Paupers off the Farm. 

School Dist. NO. l, 

No. 2, 

No 

No 4. 

No. 5, 
« 

No. 7. 

No 8, 
- 
School Hoasi 9, 1 »i>[. No. 
No 
Seliol Committee's Repo 
Taxes, 

Treasurer's Account, . 
■ Valley," . 

Committed 



28 
29 
80 
47 
44 
15 
45 
100 
60 
32 
32 
38 
38 
.".'.• 
39 

40 

40 

41 

2, . 24 

4, 42 

It, . 11-' 

14 

. 4. 9 

79 

Report, 98