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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

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Crr^r 



T II R 



KIGHTH ANNUAL KEPOKT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING JAN. 31, 



1854, 



TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS 
RELATING TO THE AFFAlM OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. : 

STEAM POWER PRESS OF ABBOTT, JENKS & CO. 
1854. 



flflm&MESli ' 



STATE LIBRARY 



THE 



EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING JAN. 31, 

1854, 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS 
RELATING TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY, 




MANCHESTER, N. H. : 

STEAM POWER PRESS OF ABBOTT, JENKS & CO. 

1854. 



N 
352.61 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board of Common Council, 
Feb. 7, 1854. 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on Finance be and here- 
by are authorized to cause to be printed and distributed, for the infor- 
mation of the inhabitants of the City, twenty-five hundred copies of the 
Eighth Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of 
Manchester, with such other Documents as may be appended thereto. 
In Common Council, Feb. 7th, 1854. 
Read a first time — rules suspended — read a second time and passed. 

ISAAC AV. SMITH, Clerk. 
In Board of Mayor and Alderman, Feb. 7th, 1854. 
Read a first time — rules suspended — read a second time and passed 
in concurrence. GEORGE A. FRENCH, City Clekk. 



ACCOUNT 



OP 



H. K. CHAMBERLIN, CITY TREASURER, 



FROM 



JANUARY 31st, 1853, TO FEBRUARY 1st, 1854, 



Dr. City of Manchester, in account current, from Jan. 31, 18 

To cash paid at BUndry times on Mayor's Drafts and • hrdera, 
and charged to the following appropriations, viz : 

Old Drafts $626 7 1 

City Debt, 3900 "ii 

Interest on Promissory Notes, 

Interest on City Stock, 4729 B \ 

School District"; No. 1, 185*22 

No. 2, 9027 89 

No. 3, 180 89 

No. 4 233 92 

No. 5, 198 59 

No. 6, 127 33 

No. 7, 192 15 

No. 8, L56 26 

No. 9, 17<i 49 

Repairs of School Houses, Dist. No. 2 1784 07 

New School House, 0500 00 

Highways and Bridges, Dist. No. 1 , 210 48 

" * " " No. 1> 2104 50 

" No. 3, 257 7"> 

" " No. 4, L58 17 

» " No. 5 205 29 

" " " No. 6 165 75 

" " No. 7, 299 64 

" No. 8, 135 63 

" " No. 9 186 ."4 

Amoskeag Falls Bridge 295 28 

Granite Bridge, 52 5 1 

New Highways L820 |i) 

County Paupers 502 80 

Pa upers off the Farm, 370 31 

City Turin L'117-l 67 

Commons 649 65 

" The Valley," 379 46 

Abatemenl of Taxes, 812 64 

Sewers and Drains 750 -7 

Reservoirs 771 65 

Pure Department 5740 21 

Lighting Streets 438 16 

City Police 2911 II 

City Hall Building 966 78 

< 'it V ( Ulieers ; 2316 0" 

Printing ami Stationery '.'H7 el 

Militia L57 64 

Incidental Expenses 274! 

$57,193 40 

OityBtookoD hand Feb. I, L854 2,000 00 

Gain in the Treasury Feb. 1,1854 9,661 08 

354 i^ 



to Feb. 1st, 1854, with Henri/ R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer. Ca. 

By City Stock on hand Feb. 1, 1853, $5000 00 

" Cash in Treasury Feb. 1, 1853, 5342 36 

By cash received at sundry times as follows : 

of J. M. Rowell — Taxes, 1850, 387 SO 

" D. L. Stevens,— Taxes, 1851, 133 25 

" Wm. Richardson,— Taxes, 1852, 2371 83 

" Henry G. Lowell,— Taxes, 1853, 44,470 61 

" A. Waterman, — support of Paupers from other 

Towns, 180 08 

" G. W. Stuart,— Produce from City Farm, 867 00 

" Committee on the " Valley," 1001 92 

" W. L. Lane, — Fines and Costs from Police Court, 47 93 

" W. II. Hill,— Officers' Fees, &c, 611 64 

" Hall & Smith, — Rent of Engine House, 36 00 

" F. Smyth, — from county for support of Paupers, 602 80 

" F. Smyth,— from State for Railroad Tax, 2214 64 

" French, Craig and others, — Rent of City Hall, 

Stores, and Offices, 2742 08 

" F. Smyth,— from State— Literary Fund, 539 75 

" Kidder & Duncklee,— License, 200 00 

" Geo. A. French, — Circus Licenses, 120 00 

" Geo. A. French, — Licenses to enter Sewers, 197 50 

" Geo. W. Merriam, — overdrawn, 85 

" F. Smyth,— for Engine Lot, 482 GO 

" Committee on Commons, — Grass and Wood, 82 00 

" Geo. Porter,— Right in " Old Town House," 107 50 

" S. Bunton,— Manure, 2 00 

" J. P. Sanborn,— 28 Perch Stone, 14 00 

" M. Ingham, — Manure, 6 00 

" F. Smyth,— Discount on J. Gove & Co.'s Bill,. . . 2 87 

" F. Smyth,— Chestnut Lumber, 1 12 

Unpaid Drafts, of the last and previous years, 1088 29 



$68,854 48 



HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, City Treasurer. 
Manchester, Feb. 1, 1854. 



ClTT OF MaNCTTRSTER, FEBRUARY 1ST, 1854. 

The undersigned being the Committee on Finance, in pursuance of the 
fourteenth Section of Ordinance No. 2, certify that we have examined 
the within account of Henry R. Chainberlin, City Treasurer, and find 
the same correctly cast, and all payments and expenditures therein 
charged against the City, properly vouched. 

We find that there has been received into the Treasury, at sundry 
times, within the year ending January 31st, 1854, Including the balance 
on hand February 1st, 1853, the sum of sixty-five thousand seven hun- 
dred and sixty-six dollars and nineteen cents, ($65,700.10.) (not in- 
cluding two thousand dollars City Stock on hand.) and that then' has 
been paid from the Treasury during the same time, the sum of 6fty-au 
thousand one hundred and five dollars and eleven cents, (56,105.11,) 
leaving in the Treasury, January 31st, 1K54, a balance of nine thou- 
sand six hundred and sixty-one dollars and eight cents. 

WILLIAM PAT TEN, "| 
FREDERICK SMYTH. Committee 
DANIEL W. FLING, } on 
BORACE JOHNSON, Finance. 
GEO. W. MERRIAM,. 

In Common Council, Feb. 7, 1854 
Read, accepted — sent up, — 

ISAAC w. SMITH, Cube. 
In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Feb. 7. 1854. 
Read and accepted in concurrence 

GEO. A. FRENCH, Cut Clerk. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

In compliance with the provisions of the 13th Section of "An Ordi- 
nance establishing a system of accountability in the expenditures of the 
City," the Committee on Finance present for the consideration of the 
City Council, the annexed statement of the Receipts and Expenditures 
of the year ending January 31st, 1854, " giving in detail the amount of 
appropriations and expenditures of each department, accompanied with 
a schedule of the property, real and personal, belonging to the City, and 
the valuation thereof, and amount of the City Debt," — from which it will 
be seen that the expenditures of the City have been less than of any year 
since 1849, and that the City Debt has been decreased, and there is still 
in the Treasury a larger balance than there has been at the close of any 
previous Financial year since the organization of our City Government. 
Taking into consideration the permanent improvements which have been 
made by the City during the last year, — such as the building of a new 
School House in Dist. No. 2, (included in the City expenses,) the con- 
struction of New Highways, Sewers, Reservoirs, &c, it is evident to 
your Committee that the several Departments of Expenditures have been 
managed with prudence and economy. 



KXIT.NDITI BBS. 

The expenditures for the year (including payments on the City I' 
charged to the Beveral appropriations, have been as follows, \iz : 

PAYM ENT OF CITY DEBT $3900 on 

« INTEREST <i\ PRn.MISSOKY NOTES,.. 

" CITY STOCK 47. 

SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 1, 

<i ii " 2, 9027 89 

" 3, 180 89 

» 4 2:;:: 92 

" 5, 198 v.i 

" (3, 127 33 

« 7, L92 IS 

ii " ii s L56 26 

ii " " 9 176 49 

REPAIRS OF SCHOOL HOUSES, Dist. No. 2, L784 <»7 

NEW SCHOOL HOUSE 6500 00 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES, Dist. No. 1 210 48 

« 'I " ii "2, 2164 50 

" " " "3, 257 75 

" " » " 4, L58 17 

ii i« ii " «5, 205 29 

» » « »6, L65 75 

i* ii " ii "7, 299 64 

" << »8 135 63 

" ii " " »9 186 34 

AMOSK EAG FALLS BRIDGE, 295 28 

GRANITE BRIDGE, 52 54 

NEW HIGHWAYS 1*20 10 

COUNTY PAUPERS OFF THE FARM 562 80 

PAUPERS OFF THE FARM 376 31 

CITY FARM AND PAUPERS on the same 2074 67 

COMMONS, 64 

"VALLEY" CEMETERY, 379 46 

ARATK.M ENT OF T A X ES 812 64 

SEWERS AND DRAINS, 750 27 

RESERVOIRS 77 1 65 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 5740 21 

UGHTIN< i STREETS 438 16 

CITY POLICE 2911 II 

CITY HALL. Offices and Stores 966 78 

CITY OFFICERS, 2316 00 

PRINTING AND STATIONER! 907 01 

MILITIA 157 64 

INCIDENTAL EXPENSES 2749 65 

OLD DRAFTS, being amounts drawn for and charged lasl 
year and previous years, bul nol called for until this 

year * 626 71 

$57,193 L0 

Deduct amount of unpaid Bills,'Feb. 1,1854 1,088 29 

Total NET PAT MENTS through the Treasury $56,105 11 



9 

The REVENUE for the year has been derived as follows, 

viz : 

From Joseph M. Rowell for Taxes assessed ls.">0, $387 80 

1 >aniel L. Stevens " " 185 1 , 1 33 25 

Wm. Richardson " " 1852,.. 237183 

Henry G. Lowell " " 1853, 44,470 01 

City Stock Loans 3000 00 

State Literary Fund, 539 75 

" Rail Road Tux 2214 64 

County Treasurer, Support of county paupers, 002 80 

Amasa Waterman and others, Support of " 180 08 

" " " " Rent of City Hall Stores, 1773 04 

Geo. A. French, > " " " " (JG o 04 

Wm. Craig \ " " " " J0J U 

Geo. A. French for Licenses to Circuses, 120 00 

" " " " " " enter Sewers, 197 50 

Committee on Commons for Grass, 82 00 

" " "Valley" Cemetery (sale of Lots,).. 963 42 

Levi H. Sleeper for work in " Valley" Cemetery,. ... 38 50 

Geo. W. Stewart for Produce from City Farm, 8G7 60 

Smith & Hall rent of Engine House, 36 00 

Kidder and Du'ncklee for License, 200 00 

F. Smyth discount on J. Gove & Co.'s bill, 2 87 

" " for Chestnut Lumber, 1 12 

" " Engine Lot on Merrimack St., sold, 482 00 

Warren L. Lane Police Court Fines, 47 93 

W.H.Hill " " Fees, Fines and Costs,. 61164 

Geo. W. Merriam, 85 

S. Bunton for Manure, 2 00 

M.Ingham" " 6 00 

Jeremiah P. Sanborn for 28 perch stone, 14 00 

Geo. Porter for city's right in Old Town Houge,. . . . 107 50 

Total Revenue, $60,423 83 

Balance on hand at the commencement of the year, 5,342 36 

65,766 19 
Deduct Total payments through the Treasury, 56,105 11 

Leaving a Balance as per Treasurer's account of $9,661 08 

In addition to the above, the Collector of Taxes for the past year, has 
paid from the Taxes assessed, the County and State Tax of the City, 
amounting to $11,341 17, which sum has not passed through the 
Treasury. 

State Tax, $4,328 10 

County Tax, 7,013 07 

$11,341 17 

The details of the expenditures will be found under the several heads 
of appropriations hereto annexed. 
Annexed are also schedules of the property of the City and School 



10 



District Property, a statement of the City Debt and debts due the City, 
11 Table of Valuation of Property, Taxes, Number of Polls, &<•., for 
each of the last fifteen years, also a Table, showing the population of 
the City for the same period. 

• WILLIAM PAT TEN, 1 

FREDERICK SMYTH, Committee 
DANIEL W. FLING, } on 
HORACE JOHNSON, Finance. 
GEO. W. MERRIAMJ 
In Common Council, Feb. 7, 1854. 
Read, accepted and sent up : 

ISAAC W. SMITH, Clerk. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Feb. 7, 1854. 
Read and accepted in concui-rence : 

GEO. A. FRE.NXTI, City Clerk. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 



The appropriations made by the City Council for the Financial year, 
ending February 1st, 1854, with the unexpended balance of the previ- 
ous year ; the transfers from one appropriation to another ; together 
with the expenditures in detail under each appropriation ; and the un- 
expended balances. 

CITY FARM AND PAUPERS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853 $848 44 

Appropriated April, 1853, 2800 00 



-£3,648 44 



CITY FARM EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Hartshorn, Darling & Co. for 16 four quart milk 

cans, $9 84 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co. for milk quarts and 

tunnels, 1 72 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co. for cook stove and ap- 
paratus, 17 59 

Caleb Gage for blacksmi thing, 17 68 

D. B. Nelson for teams visiting Farm, 1 00 

Geo. TV. Stuart for salary one year, ending 

March 4, 1853, 326 03 

Geo. TV. Stuart, for salary to Sept. 4, 1853,. . 162 50 
" " " Cash paid R. Gallager, labor, 4 00 
Geo. W. Stuart for cash paid P. O. Woodman, 

labor, 2 00 

Geo. TV. Stuart for cash paid Orlando H.Young, 

labor, 131 03 

Geo. W. Stuart for cash paid for lumber, nails, 

paints &c, 49 66 

Geo. TV. Stuart for labor of son 19 nights,.. 14 25 
" " " " " of self 48 nights.... 48 00 
" " " " " of sundry persons, . . 18 56 
" " " " "of Chas. Hazard 21 

days, 12 54 

Amoijnt carried forward, 816 40 



12 

AMOUNT brought FORWARD $816 40 

fHud Raymond d Walker for boots and shoes 7 80 

l>. B. Nelson d Oo. for oastor oil and flax seed, 60 

Juliii B. MoCrillis for one pair cart wheels, .. . 32 25 

do. blacksmithing 1 90 

Geo, W. Adams for goods and groceries 46 7 s 

Geo. T. Mixer for team harness IT oo 

<l". repairing harnesses 4 L5 

John Plumer, Jr., for mittens, oloth, &o. for 

Shepherd boy 2 08 

E. Ferren for dry goods L3 06 

I). Randletl for expenses 5 00 

W. G. Brown for bibles and testaments 1 oil 

Charles S. Fisher for goods and groceries 74 7'.' 

Daniel W. Fling for one yoke of oxen 1l'"> 00 

do. time and expenses buying 

the same 5 00 

Wilson A Fogg for meats 19 11 

Freeman Wilson for meats 23 94 

Nbyes Farmer for seven bushels of rye 6 44 

babel Wells for 21 weeks' work,... 21 00 

Dennis d Variok for hardware and grass seed, . . 49 88 

E. Griffin for blacksmithing 28 68 

Hiram Sanborn for 5 days' labor 3 33 

B. l>. Steams for goods ami groceries 13 69 

Orlando H. Young for 96 days and ~~ nights' 

labor 177 36 

.1 Lbbott & Co. for meal, flour &c., as per bills, 233 L5 

Plumer & Bailee for cap for Shepherd boy 42 

Enooh Clough for I U days' labor 10 25 

F. Kimball for ten bags of meal L5 96 

Hill \ Chenej for carrying paupers t" (arm,.. 1 00 

Walter Adrianoe for * • i 1 93 

Rioker d Godfrej for goods and groceries 44 B2 

1'ina Fire Ins. Co. for insurance 24 oo 

Moore, Sargeni & Hall for 3 barrels flour 18 00 

do. 6 bags meal 9 90 

Philip Farmer for one calf 6 50 

William I!. Eastman for goods and groceries, . . 60 60 
Jonathan J. Strati for coffin and burial of D. 

Boyea 

Amu s i CARRIRD rORWARO $1930 89 



18 

AlIOCNT BROUGHT FORWARD, 1030 89 

Paid Stephen Smitli hone to farm ; >" 

Israel E. Herrick for 6 days, haying 6 "i* 

Fanner, Merrill & Co., forgoods ami groceries, LS 88 

A. »s. Trash for boots and ahoes 2 32 

Brown & Oolley for 12 lights, sasli and ^lass,. 1 44 

Kidder & Duncklee for g Is and groceries,. . . 8 77 

Mary J. Carroll for 15 weeks' work, 18 75 

J. 0. Davis for glass, puttyand work, 8 70 

Baldwin & Co. for sawing, Lumber and joist,.. 49 68 

E. G. Guilford for medicine 2 53 

A. B. Smith for medicine, 1 37 

Fling & Haines for baiting two horses 40 days, 10 50 

do. use of horse six weeks, GOO 

D. & 1). B. Wilson for soap and ashes, 1 S I 

do. one pig, 3 00 $2074 67 



PAUPERS OFF FARM, 

(not INCLUDING county paupers.) 



Paid Dcnnison, Hardy & Co. for goods del'd Mrs. P. 

B. Brooks $16 00 

Joshua Dean for cash paid Wm. C. Weeks,... 75 
Nancy Putney for hoard and nursing Mrs. Ry- 

ley 8 weeks, 24 00 

Clough & Johnston for goods and groceries dcl'd 

Mrs. Weeks 2 00 

T). C. Gould for R. R. ticket to Bristol, I 35 

do. do. Boston, 4 55 

F. Kimball for \ cord wood and sawing dcl'd 

W. 0. Weeks, 2 M) 

N. II. Asylum for hoard and care of Deborah 

Tilton, 2 93 

do. do. L. 11. Daiken, 89 45 

do. do. T. J. Garvin, 71 05 

John G. Webster for goods del'd IJenj. Griffin, G 39 

Amount carried forward, 223 97 



14 

Amount brought forward, $223 97 

Paid John <i. Webster for moving James Arwin and 

wife from Salem, N. II., to Farm, 8 00 

Ebcne/.er Corning for board and clothes for Ez- 
ra Coming 1 year, 57 87 

J. Mitchell for board of Barnard Iloyt, 11 50 

J. J. .Straw for coffin and burial of Geo. Childs, 3 59 
do. do. box for D. C. Stark, 4 50 
do. do. burial of E. M. Kim- 
ball, 5 50 

Dennison & Stevens for groceries delivered Mrs. 

J. Griffin, 2 00 

Elizabeth Lord for board and care of Mrs. Ord- 

way 2 days, 1 50 

David Allen for board of Lucy Hardy and child 

4 weeks, 6 22 

D. Brigham & Co. for 2 ft. wood del'd Mclntyre, 1 34 

Stephen Palmer for expenses and time in ascer- 
taining residence of Jona. Boyes, 5 95 

Isaac Shepherd for clothes for Ezra Corning, . . 8 12 

A. M. Babb for board of Shepherd girl 1 week, 1 25 

Ellen T. Wales for board and nursing E. M. 

Kimball, 35 00 $376 31 



COUNTY PAUPERS.* 



Paid D. 0. Gould, 33 53 

John Plumer, Jr . , 3 63 

Farmer, Merrill & Co., 4 65 

William E. Eastman, 8 75 

Polsom A: -lames, 1 00 

Joshua Dean, 2 85 

D. Bicker 3 79 

William Beard 70 

I). Brigham 10 92 

Amount CABRIED forward, $69 s '- 

•The county pauper bills being iu the bandi of tbe County Justice*, tbe Heme 

OAllUOt bo ^l. 'li 



15 

Amount brought forward, 69 82 

PaidD. B. Nelson, 12 00 

Charles Cheney, 2 00 

Daniel W. Fling, 3 00 

A. Hancock, 11 25 

Daniel Randlett, 8 05 

Thomas McKew, 1 00 

Hoyt & Robinson, 3 50 

Bryant & Jenness, 4 05 

Fling &, Haynes, 7 25 

T. P. Webber, 1 39 

Clough & Johnston, 1 50 

Noah Clark, 3 00 

A. Griffin, 3 36 

Kennard & Hurd, 3 88 

F. Kimball, 10 13 

Josiah Crosby, 8 00 

Dennison, Hardy & Co., 4 08 

Raymond & Walker, 2 50 

Benjamin Mitchell, 1 25 

A. Waterman, 18 46 

Joseph Mitchell, 1 21 

Frederick Smyth, 7 00 

Geo. W. Adams, 4 01 

E. G. Guilford, 9 32 

Mary Granshaw, 1 55 

Noyes Farmer, 10 00 

H. Green, 5 00 

Jonathan J. Straw, 29 84 

Sam'l H. Weeks, 2 00 

Coffin & Sherburne, 8 00 

Charles B. Smith, 1 25 

J. Goodrich, 30 75 

E. Underdunk, 16 13 

Hill & Cheney, 11 25 

Hannah Kenniston, 4 00 

Robert Moore, 6 25 

Sarah Pervier, 3 00 

Dennison & Stevens, 3 62 

Robert Woodburn, 3 00 

Coffin & Co. , 2 50 

Amount carried forward, 339 15 



10 

Amount brought forward, £339 15 

Paid John Kittrcdge, 2 75 

E. B. Steams, 11 50 

( !harlee S. Fisher 2 81 

L. Prescott, 1 25 

D. Brighton & Co., 19 90 

Mitchell & Questran, 4 00 

I). M. Howard, 9 50 

J. R. Hanson, 3 22 

John Clary, 20 00 

Daniel Haines, 7 50 

.Mi. had Foley, 40 47 

/,. Harvey, 3 60 

William D. Buck, 30 00 

Philip Smith, 52 50 

E. W. Bartlett, 2 00 

D. Marshall, 3 02 

Rieker & Godfrey, 8 57 

Cheney & Burnhain 1 00 



.- " _' - 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1st, 1854, $034 06. 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 



DISTRICT N0 1. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 22 34 

Amount appropriated April, 1853 250 00 $272 34 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

William Campbell, surveyor, 103 36 

Joseph W. Saunders for plank, 2 00 

J. E. Young, 6 50 

Nehemiah Preston, 22 00 

John Stark, 2 00 

Rodney Strong, 9 12 

Moses Stevens, 11 00 

Andrew Cate, 2 00 

Jonathan E. Kimball, 11 00 

Geo. Cate, 9 50 

John Campbell, 14 25 

Jonathan Merrick, 1 00 

Andrew Cate, 2 00 

Peter Kimball, 4 00 

Moses Wells, 2 00 

Amos Kimball, 8 75 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $61 86. 



$210 48 



18 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES— DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Balance undrawn Eeb. 1, 1853, 494 38 

Appropriated April, 1853, 2375 00 

$2809 38 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

Frederick Smyth, surveyor, 101 25 

William Patten, surveyor last year, 128 00 

Paul Chase, 42 

John Andrews, 1 50 

Sam'l S. Weston, 40 

Alanson Walker, 50 

A. S. Sanborn, 31 50 

Nathaniel Knowlton, 92 00 

Andrew Bunton, 40 00 

Abel Cushman, 1 00 

Thomas S. Frost, 23 7 ■"> 

Osman Pixley, 33 50 

David Allen, 134 00 

L. Raymond, 1 7'J 25 

Charlee dough, 11 94 

R. Crichet 47 50 

Jeremiah P. Sanborn, 32 50 

Zadoc Wright, 120 39 

M. Junkins, 10 67 

O. Hunton, I'.' 25 

E. Young, 3 00 

E. Parmenter, 3 00 

R. 0. Dustin, 2 75 

Robert Moore, L9 37 

Daniel Mahanney 42 50 

K. Knowlton 21 50 

,1. 8. Clark 99 50 

ferae] E. Herriok 7 83 

John W.Joy, 17 50 

0. 'V Ti ipsoD 2 00 

r . t MoOan 2 00 

Ajiotnn i - 1; ki i.i) pobwabo $ L29S 27 



19 

Amount brought forward, $1295 27 

Paid II. R. Chainberlin, 1 00 

John Bartlett, 15 00 

Thomas McKew, 31 50 

Isaac Langley, 7 50 

Bcnj. P. Runnells, 2 87 

John Wiley, 9 33 

JacoTJ Ordway 32 50 

John Houston, 14 50 

John Cleaveland, 4 38 

Josiah Stark, 5 50 

Eugene O'Neal, 14 00 

James Carry, 13 50 

Robert Stevens, 50 

Geo. H. Dorr, 5 25 

James C. Holmes, 5 50 

William Aldrich, 9 00 

Luke Morse, 6 00 

Enoch Clough, 75 

Geo. Stevens, 2 75 

R. Porter, 75 

F. W. Howe, 25 

Gilman Riddle, 1 00 

Geo. Clark, 2 00 

do. for 11 loads stone chips, 29 33 

do. for 669 ft. flagging stone, 87 93 

John B. McCrillis for blacksmithing, 8 73 

Jacob F. James for surveying, 2 50 

Walker & Copp for 156 ft. covering stone,. ... 19 50 

Geo. W. Merriam for blacksmithing, 22 98 

Win. Mills for teams, 195 50 

J. C. Hill for teaming, 37 19 

Chas. F. Stanton for teaming, 30 50 

Geo. Hunt for teaming, 44 12 

E. Griffin for blacksmithing, 8 55 

Wm. G. Hoyt for use of team, 7 88 

Dennis & Varick for hardware, 21 41 

Charles S. Fisher for lanterns and pitchers,. ... 2 18 
Gilmore & Bunton for 144i lbs. iron for cross- 
ings, 17 38 

Gilmore & Bunton for blacksmithing, 3 04 

Amount carried forward, $2019 32 



20 

Amount brought forward, $2019 32 

Paid Moor, Sargent & Hall for eij;lit casks cement, 14 25 

James Wallace for Labor, 34 50 

1 teo. W. Converse for flagging, 4 00 

Dennison it Stevens for covered pail, 60 

J. Eastman for teaming 3 00 

Joseph W. Lampson for 58 ft. flagging, 11 GO 

Coffin & Sherburne forhoise to scrape snow,. . . 4 00 

Jacob S. York for labor, 42 25 

Kidder & Duncklee for G lbs- powder, 1 00 

B. Currier for mending wheelbarrows, picks &c. , 7 47 

Ira Russell for laying flagging, 5 33 

Alonzo Smith for 820 ft. timber, 9 02 

do. 488 ft. plank, 5 41 

Lampson & Mar den for stone chips and stone,. ~ 75 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $704 88. 



$2164 50 



21 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES— DISTRICT NO 3. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 4 40 

Appropriated April, 1853, 200 00 

Transferred Jan. 20, 1854, 75 00 $279 46 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

Henry F. Little, surveyor, 31 37 

Robert Baker, last year, 1 80 

David Libby, " " 5 90 

Henry F. Little," " 75 

Hiram Brown, " " 2 26 

Thos. McKew, " " 2 87 

(Jhas. Smith, " " 54 

Geo. W. Baker," " 100 

Robert Baker, 23 41 

Geo. Baker, .* 19 75 

Bradford Baker, 26 00 

Benjamin Brown, 5 92 

Thomas McKew, 46 45 

Addison Dale, 8 75 

Cademiah Hazelton, 16 50 

Benjamin Batchelder, 26 05 

Rodnia Nutt, 4 00 

James Nutt, 5 58 

C. Howlett, 1 00 

Chas. F. Stanton, 9 50 

Geo. Stearns, 2 00 

W. S. Locke, 9 00 

Joseph Foss, 1 00 

James Smith, 1 50 

Benjamin Smith, 1 50 

Gilman Smith, 1 50 

Henry Howlett, 1 00 

Geo. W. Merriam for blacksmithing, 85 



$257 75 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $21 71. 



oo 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES— DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 3 58 

Appropriate! April. L853 150 00 

Transferred January 2G, 1854, 10 00 $163 58 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

John Emerson, surveyor, 18 75 

Isaac Whittemore, last year, 4 33 

R. P. Whittemore, " " 75 

JohnCalcf, " " 1 50 

Ira W. Moore, 17 50 

N. Moore, 2 50 

E. S. Emerson, 23 50 

Eben Colby, 4 00 

Caleb Page, 1 00 

John Emerson, Jr., 2 50 

Isaac Whittemore, 10 87 

Franklin Webster, 3 00 

Jonathan Aiken, 5 7 5 

R. P. Whittemore, 15 00 

Israel Mullen, 4 50 

Moses Fellows, 5 00 

John Oalef 4 25 

Daniel Webster, 11 87 

Cyrus Truell, 60 

F. Webster 2 00 

John P. Moore, 5 00 

do. for plank, 12 00 

James Darrah, 2 00 

$158 17 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1S54, $"> 41. 



23 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES— DISTRICT NO. 5. 

Appropriated April, 1853, $225 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

Jonas Harvey, Jr., surveyor, 25 50 

Gilnion Harvey, last year, 4 2G 

William Dickey, " " 75 

John Dickey, " " 85 

John Young, " " 2 00 

Ephraim S. Harvey, 22 50 

Gilman Harvey, 10 50 

Israel Merrill, 14 24 

Rodnia Nutt, 13 33 

James Nutt, 8 50 

David Nutt, 1 50 

Amos Weston, 4 00 

Blanchard Hill, 3 00 

Harrison Weston, 3 50 

Elbridge Roby, 3 00 

James Emerson, 21 00 

Jacob Brown, 3 50 

John Young, 16 00 

John Dickey, 20 50 

David Dickey, 2 00 

William Dickey, 4 50 

James M. Young, 5 25 

Wallace N. Young, 50 

Reuben Morgan, 2 00 

Jonas & E. S. Harvey for 925 feet plank, 11 10 

S. D. Hill for breaking road, 1 50 

$205 29 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $9 71. 



24 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES— DISTRICT NO. 6. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853 8 28 

Appropriated April, 1853, 175 00 $11 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

Nathan Johnson, surveyor. 47 20 

David Dickey, Jr., last year, 24 00 

Wm. Hoitt, " " 3 25 

Sam'l Gamble, « " 75 

J. M. Gregg, " '• 50 

J M. Webster, " " 50 

Wm. Morey, " " 150 

Sam'l Woodman, I 87 

Harrison Morey, 1 25 

Israel Webster, 9 25 

David Dickey, 3d, 1 30 

Ebenezer Webster, 3 30 

James Wiley, 3 30 

James M. Webster, 12 20 

Amos C. Webster r > 57 

John P. Webster, 5 70 

Joseph Brown , 8 60 

Joshua Corning, 10 87 

David Dickey, 2d, 1 62 

Samuel Gamble, 1 00 

William Hoyt 6 50 

Amos Webster, 10 62 

John Proctor, 75 

Oliver Hunt, 4 35 

$165 75 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, IS54. £17 53 



25 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES— DISTRICT NO. 7. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1 , 1853, 27 88 

Appropriated April, 1853, 300 00 $327 8S 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

Israel E. Herrick, surveyor, 113 09 

James Hall, 2d, last year, surveyor, 5 00 

Sanrl Woodman, " " 2 75 

James Hall. " " 50 

David Young, " " 1 00 

Chas. A. Hall, " " 2 00 

J. F. Cilley, 29 50 

Horace Bartlett, 5 00 

Peter Farmer, 7 02 

Robert Stevens, 12 00 

Edmund Stevens, 20 45 

John Newell, 8 00 

Philip Farmer, 11 50 

Albert Keys, 10 00 

Sam '1 Woodman, 8 00 

Sam'l N. Evans, 3 00 

W. S. Dearborn, ... 14 50 

Geo. Porter, 1 08 

Simeon Farmer, 1 50 

James Hall, 5 83 

John Leavitt, 17 

W. Leavitt, 4 83 

Luther Stevens, 2 00 

J. Perry, 4 00 

John R. Barrett, 1 00 

Stephen M. Bennett, 1 00 

Chas. Hall, 2 67 

Elisha Smith, 1 00 

M. N. Perry, Jr., 2 00 

S. C. Parsons, 75 

John Proctor, 81 

Hall & Stevens for 500 ft. pine poles, 5 00 

$299 64 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $28 24. 



■y> 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES— DISTRICT NO. 8. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 1 5G 

Appropriate! April, 1853, 150 00 $151 56 

J X1KNDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

Charles Offutt, surveyor, 17 88 

J. G. Coult, last year, G 50 

Aaron Cromby, " 3 50 

Edward Proctor, 2 00 

Lyman Proctor, 1 00 

John Proctor, 1 00 

Phinehas Hazelton, 4 50 

George Young, 1 00 

Gilman Reed, 9 00 

Reed, 2 00 

William Stevens, 2 00 

John Procter, 2 00 

Luther Proctor, 1 00 

Charles W. Offutt, 13 75 

Edward P. Offutt, ■ 0G 25 

Frederick Goss, 50 

David Hazelton, 1 75 

$135 03 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 185 1. $15 93. 



27 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES— DISTRICT NO. 9. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 13 06 

Appropriated April, 1853, 175 00 $188 66 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

Ebenezer Corning, surveyor, 37 33 

Benjamin Corning, 6 75 

Harrison Corning, 6 00 

Stephen Hazelton, 7 00 

James Currier, 3 50 

G. W. Hazelton, 6 12 

Nathaniel Corning, 6 50 

J. P. Corning, 2 00 

William Boyce, 2 00 

Caleb Hazelton, 5 00 

James McQueston , 9 20 

James McQueston, Jr. , 1 00 

George Corning, 6 68 

Jesse Cross, 3 50 

Aaron Drew, 3 00 

S. A. Perry, 3 00 

Johnson Morse, 8 00 

Walter H. Noyes, 19 12 

B. W. Corning, 4 00 

James Harvey, 4 18 

John G. Webster, 12 62 

Albert Corning, 4 00 

Reuben Hazelton, 2 00 

Moses Griffin, 2 00 

Amos Drew, 3 00 

Geo. B. McQueston, 2 00 

Alonzo Smith for 180 feet plank, 2 16 

Jonas Harvey for 1248 feet plank, 14 68 

$186 34 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, £2 33. 



L>> 



AMOSKEAG FALLS BRIDGE. 

Amount transferred from New Highways, $300 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

J. N.. Bruce for 2 signs for bridge, 2 00 

Stokes & James for 631' perch stone, and sur- 
veying, 193 28 

Itufus Pickering & Co. on account, for cutting 

3440 feet stone, 100 00 

$295 28 

i ~ 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $204 72. 



GRANITE BRIDGE. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, $68 1 5 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

Paul Chase 14 00 

Stephen Palmer 7 50 

Dudley & Parker for 05 hours Boldering lii 25 

do. L8 lbs. soldei 6 00 

do. . v lbs. sheel Lead 04 

Smith ami Wallace for 549 feet plank, 8 15 

g' VJ ■"'' 

.• undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $5 61. 



29 
NEW HIGHWAYS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 2119 93 

Appropriated April, 1853, 2000 00 $4] I 

Deduct amount transferred to Highways and Bridges 

District No. 3, 75 00 

Deduct amount transferred to Highways and Bridges 

District No. 4, 10 00 

Deduct amount transferred to printing and stationery, 250 00 

" " " " Amoskeag Bridge, 500 00 

" "Reservoirs, 300 00 $1135 00 

$2984 93 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

Samuel Gamble, 7 00 

L. Raymond, 3 25 

David Allen, 4 15 

Robert Foss, 3 10 

Win. G. Hoyt, 1G 40 

Nathaniel Knowlton, 4 15 

Zadoc Wright, 11 00 

Luke Morse, 9 33 

Samuel H. AVeeks for horses and carriages to 

lay out road, 4 00 

Hoyt & Hurd for teaming, 15 46 

Hill & Cheney for horses and carriages to sun- 
dry routes, 2 25 

James Gregg for land, 3 00 

do. for surveying, 1 50 

Wm. Fisk for land, 250 00 

Win. Craig, for posting bills, " road letting," 1 00 

J. F. James for surveying, 9 50 

Israel Webster on account for building Webster 

road, 900 00 

John Campbell for laud, 70 89 

Amos Kimball " 9174 

Calvin C. Campbell " 72 89 

Geo. Clark " 82 89 

John P. Rowcll " 70 89 

Israel Webster and others for land, 133 71 

Road Commissioners for fees, 52 00 

$1820 10 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $1164 83. 



30 



SCHOOLS. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 1. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1 , 1853, 75 73 

Appropriated April, 1853, 140 00 $215 78 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Cor INSTRUCTION. 

Julia A. Baker, 57 50 

William A. "White, 28 00 

John G. Lane, 75 00 

Dudley & Parker for dipper, 1G 

Hill & Cheney for horse hire to visit schools,. . 2 00 
S. Bunton do. do. 2 00 
D. H. Tufts for painting black-boards and clean- 
ing school-house, 4 06 

Nehemiah Preston for 3 cords wood, 12 00 

Reuben Kimball for repairs, 2 50 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co. for repairs on stove, 2 00 

$185 22 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $30 5G. 



31 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 1290 5G 

Appropriated " 9200 00 $10,490 56 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION and care of rooms. 

John P. Newell, $396 28 

E. T. Shattuck, 246 00 

Abby H. Dennett, 240 00 

A. M. Caverly, 141 00 

B. B. Shepherd, 88 00 

Clara J. Straw, 30 00 

Olive B. Hill, 36 00 

Moses T. Brown, 178 00 

M. J. Allison, 128 00 

A. M. Hunt, 124 00 

Chas. Aldrich, 460 40 

Matilda Abbott, 70 50 

Martha Eaton, 220 25 

S. Ingalls, 199 62 

L. A. Brown, 172 00 

S. P. Brooks, 171 25 

S. W. Bodwell, 172 00 

H. W. Patterson, 171 50 

Julia A. Brown, 120 25 

E. P. Webster, 79 00 

M. J. Eaton, 169 25 

H. G. Lane, 172 00 

Julia A. Baker, 83 00 

Mary E. Young, 171 00 

E. T. B. Woodworth, 173 50 

Nancy S. Bunton, 171 75 

E. J.Vier, 92 50 

S. Stevens, 172 00 

Amanda W. Brown, 172 75 

E. J. Ayer, 172 00 

L. D. Lane, 172 00 

AllOCNT CARRIED FORWARD, $5105 80 



32 

Amount brought foswabd, £5165 80 

Paid M. R. Scott, 174 85 

Paul F. Gerriflh, 360 13 

John II. Willard, 60 00 

Joseph E. Bennett, 113 72 

W. A. Webster, 437 00 

Mrs. II. Mill, 44 00 

M. M. Ladd, 91 50 

II. A. Eaton, 46 25 

Jonathan Tenney. 458 00 

W.n. H. Ward, 310 24 

II. A. Slade, 01 00 

Catharine White, 30 00 

E. P. Bowman, 70 00 

Julia A. Lull, 79 25 

Phebe Green, 06 00 

Lucy Hinckley, 06 00 

Mary Flanders, 55 00 7733 74 

Paid for COAL, WOOD and sawing. 

Edward Metcalf for sawing 91 cords and 2k ft. 

wood, 73 05 

Edward Metcalf for splitting and moving lot 

of wood, 2 05 

Ghas. Aldrich for drawing and getting in wood, 1 78 

Geo. Hunt for drawing wood 3 2\ 

Moor, Sargent & Hall for 11.597 tons. opal.. 126 51 

W. C. Abbott for moving and putting in w 1, 5 00 

D. Brigham for 60 cords hard wood, 234 SO 

do. 9 cords pine wood, 30 78 

Cheney it Burnham for lour ft. wood 2 87 

1). Brigham & Co. for 25{ cords wood 96 07 

James O. Adams for L$ bushels charcoal, .. . 1 50 ">7- 

Paid for II RNITURE, &c. 

A. I'. Ilol s for 8 chairs, 10 

do. Ill) It. Bettees 49 50 

do. 3 tables 4 7-1 

do. 2 bro 'ins, ">!» 

do. 21 ft. rope mats 3 50 

do. repairs on desk, 2 00 

do. varnishing 13 desks 5 00 

<lo. covering 5 desks 3 50 

Allot \ :t i ai;i;ii:d FORWARD $74 84 



33 

Amount brought forward, 74 84 

Paid Clough & Johnston for 1 dozen brooms,. ... 2 75 
Dudley & Parker for stove pipe, cleaning 

stoves, See. , G 82 

Bryant & Jenness for book case, 11 00 

do. 13 chairs, 4 07 

Ayer & Fogg for. locks, chalk, shovels, &c.,. 1 50 
.Tames Whitcher for G dozen brooms, 1 dozen 

brushes, 1£ dozen pails, 23 7 •"> 

A. G. Tucker for brooms, lock, sponge, &c, 2 57 

Dennis & Varick for hardware, Oil 

G. B. Fogg for keys and repairing locks,. ... 1 42 

Bartlett & Draper for 1 dozen brooms, 2 25 

T. L. Newton for cloth, 1 45 L39 I! 

For PRINTING and advertising. 

Abbott, Jenks & Co. for advertising commit- 
tee notices, 7 7"> 

James 0. Adams for printing notices and 

blanks, 22 02 

James O. Adams for 1000 bills Truant Law, 3 25 

do. printing rules, 14 00 

John B. Clarke for printing notices, 10 75 

Campbell & Gilmore for advertising for 

teachers, &c. , 2 75 61 L2 

Paid for BOOKS and Stationery for children of in- 
digent parents. • 

Wm. Young, 117 03 

T. Ramney, 7 00 

Wm. H. Fisk, 5 87 

T. J. Huntington, 10 50 

Paid for miscellaneous expenses. 

J. C. Tasker for washing rooms, crayons &c., 11 17 

J. C. Davis for setting glass and painting- 
blackboards, 11 92 

Chas. "Wells for rent of school-room, 34 30 

Wm. Grey for time and expenses to Franklin 

on account of district, 4 50 

Wm. Grey for cash paid cleaning rooms, &c, 10 00 
do. time and expenses procuring 

teachers, 2 47 

Amount carried forward, .-s74 30 

3 



34 

AmOI .N'T BROUGHT FORWARD - 74 3t> 

Wm. Craig for distributing bills, 3 57 

Geo. A. French for serviees as clerk of dist. 

1 year, 9 OO 

David Hill for services as clerk of district tl 

years as per vote of district April 9, L853, 54 00 

S. Bunton for time and expenses to Dunbar- • 

ton to procure teachers, 3 00 

S. Bunton for time and expenses to Weare by 

order of committee, 5 00 

S. Bunton for time and expen.se.s to Gofistown 

to procure teachers, 4 00 

S. Bunton for cash paid for washing school- 

rooms, &c, 10 00 

B. Bunton for time and labor fitting up new 

school-room and distributing books,.. .. 13 00 
Isaac W. Smith for services as clerk pro tern 

1850, 4 50 

Bailey & Cross for rent of school-room. 90 20 

John N. Bruce for painting 19 signs, 9 50 

N. F. .Merrill for use of 14 settees, 2 1 7 

A. II. llurd for teams visiting schools, I 00 

Wm. Dinsmore for washing, sweeping &c 12 50 

Geo. Hunt for labor on school-house yards,. . 9 00 

John Mooar for cleaning clock, I 00 

B. F. Edmunds for repairing clock, 1 00 

J. O. Adams cash paid for cleaning rboms,&c., !<• 07 

J. S. Clark for cleaning off snow 2 00 

C. il. Eastman for services in moving school- 

house from Manchester to Franklin st.,. 1*J 00 

('.11. Eastman for use of horse 4j days,.... .". 00 

Wm. Mills for drawing gravel 9 00 

J. L. Bradford for labor, 3 06 

E.French for labor, 1 87 

Osman Pixley for cleaning sno^ fromsidewalk, - 50 

David Allen do. 2 50 

L. Raymond do. 2 00 

•J. ( '. Hill for trucking settees 4 20 

French & Uobbs for labor > s 73 

K. W I lite it Co. for teaming two loads set! 50 



J 9027 89 



Balance androwp Feb. I, 1854, si 162 67 



35 
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 3. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853 108 77 

Appropriated April, 1853, 175 00 283 77 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

< ;. W. J. Carpenter, 98 34 

M. G. Pickering, 65 50 

I). Brigham for li cord sawed wood, 8 25 

Amos Griffin for 4 ft. wood, 2 25 

"Win. W. Baker for cleaning room, 1 50 

do. pail and dipper, 02 

do. repairs, &c. , 1 08 

do. sawing wood, &c, 1 00 

S. Bunton for time and. expenses furnishing out- 
line maps and patting up same, 1 00 

S. Bunton for horse hire visiting schools, 75 



$180 89 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $102 88. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 11171 

Appropriated April, 1853, 170 00 $281 71 

EXPENDITURES. 

Taid for INSTRUCTION. 

J. W. Clark, 107 00 

Sophia M. Merrill, G5 5ft 

Frank Lord, 25 00 

Hill & Cheney horse hire for visiting schools,. . 2 2", 
Ira W. Moore for 2£ cords wood, sawing and 

splitting, 50 < 

Ira W. Moore for washing room, 7," 

do. repairs of room, 2 5ft 

do. broom and chalk, 37 

Chas. H.Eastman for horse hire visiting schools,, 5 75 
S. Bunton for time and expenses patting up 

outline maps, ........ 1 50' 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co., for stove and WUH if . 13 80 



$233 92 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $47 39. 



:;.; 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 5. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 115 36 

Appropriated April, 1853, 170 00 285 36 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

Wm. P. Merrill 99 00 

Eunice P. Webster, 01 50 

"Wm. P. Merrill for set maps, 4 00 

do. books, 1 09 

Rodnia Nutt for making and hanging door and 

curtains 1852, 2 50 

Rodnia Nutt for plastering, washing, repair- 
ing &c. , 3 50 

Jonas and Ephraim Harvey for 2 cords wood and 

sawing, 8 25 

John 0. Tasker for horse hire visiting schools, . 1 00 

Chas. II. Eastman do. do. 5 50 

Wm. Grey do. do. 1 25 

S. Bunton do. do. 1 00 

Sam'l M. Nutt for whitewashing school-house,. 50 

David Brigham for 2 cords wood, 7 50 

Edward Metcalf for sawing 2 cords wood, 2 00 

$19S r.'j 

(Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $80 77. 



37 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. G. 

Balance undrawn Fob. 1 , 1853, 50 80 

Appropriated April, 1853, 165 00 $215 80 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

James H. Fowler, 35 00 

M. L. Baker, 01 50 

James M. Webster for 3 cords wood, 11 25 

do. cleaning and repairing, 5 50 

Chas. H. Eastman for horse hire visiting schools, 

&c, 4 08 

Hill & Cheney for horse hire visiting schools, . . 2 00 

Wm. Grey do. do. 1 00 

S. Bunton for time and expenses putting up out- 
line maps, 3 00 

Hartshorn & Darling for stove, 4 00 

$127 33 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $88 47. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 7. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1 , 1853, 107 % 

Appropriated April, 1853, 190 00 297 DO 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

J. E. Bennett, 51 50 

C. W. Sevings, 50 27 

M. E. Rogers, G5 50 

Chas. H. Eastman for repairs and cleaning 

house, 8 25 

Chas. H. Eastman for cleaning room, 1 50 

do. brooms, pail and dipper,. 75 

do. horse hire visiting schools, 2 00 

do. 18 feet wood, sawed,. ... 10 13 

Wm. Grey for horse hire visiting schools, 75» 

S. Bunton for time and expenses putting up out- 
line maps, 1 50 

$192 I.') 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $105 81. 



38 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 8. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 47 67 

Appropriated April, 1853, 145 00 192 67 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION. 

Wm. E. Moore, 71 00 

Mary J. Rowell, 57 50 

' 'ha-. EI. Eastman for horde hire visiting schools, 4 50 

do. 2 cords wood, 7 00 

Susan Stevens for cleaning room 2 oo 

James (). Adams for hor.se lure visiting schools, 1 1)1) 
S. Bunton time and expenses putting up out- 
line maps, 2 00 

John W. Proctor for sawing 3| cords wood,. .. 3 50 

D. Brigham for 1$ cord wood, 4 70 



$156 2G 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $30 41. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 9. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 89 58 

Appropriated April, 1853, 145 00 234 58 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for [NSTRUCTION. 

Samuel < dies, 7 s -■"> 

Letticia Gregg 01 50 

S. A. Perry for lumber, glass, nails and labor,. 3 40 
Benjamin Brown lor sawing and splitting 2 

cords wood, 2 00 

John G. Webster for 3J cords wood 14 00 

do. > Leaning, repairs, &c 9 53 

James (). Adams for horse hire visiting schools, 2 50 

Chas. U. Eastman do. do. 3 00 

< lias. II. Eastman, cleaning vault 1 00 

do. broom, pail and dipper 7 5 

1 1 ill .v Cheney for horse hire bo visil Bchools,.. '_' 50 
s. Bunton for time and expenses putting up out- 
line maps 2 00 



sl 70 49 



Balance undrawn Feb. I . L854, $58 09. 



39 



NEW SCHOOL HOUSE, DISTRICT NO. 

Amount raised by the district 1853, 6500 CO 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid ALPHEUS GAY for building New School- 
House as per contract, 4950 00 

Alpheus Gay for building ventilators, fence, and 

out-houses 487 8H 

John B. Clarke for advertising for "proposals," 2 00 
Abbott, Jenks & Co., for advertising for " pro- 
posals," 1 25 

Moses W. Oliver for drawing plans and specifi- 
cations, 40 00 

Wm. Mills drawing gravel i&c, 38 00 

James O. Adams for printing notices, 1 50 

do. services as member of com- 
mittee, 50 00 

James O. Adams for expenses to Boston for fur- 
niture, .- — 6 00 

James O. Adams cash paid Henry Bragg for 

labor, 4 00 

< reo. Hunt for drawing stone, 1 50 

Wm. Riehardson for digging well, . . . . 1 00 

L. Raymond for labor on yards, &c, 23 00 

J. S. Clark do. 4 00 

Dan'l Mahanney do. 00 

D. Allen do. 21 50 

Osman Pixley do. 14 09 

Reuben Critchet, do. 22 50 

Charles F. Stanton for teaming, 27 00 

Luke Morse fer stone work, . . . 1 7 00 

( has. Bunton do. . . •• 9 00 

M. Junkins, do. 9 00 

Andrew Bunton do. 27 75 

F. Smyth for services as member of committee, 50 00 

do. expenses to Boston for furniture,. C> 00 

Warren Langmaid for stone work, 1 40 

James Richards for drawing stone, 5 00 

Josiah N. Heath for drawing stone and lumber, 1 17 

Lampson & Marden for 4 rough posts, 4 00 

I NT CARRIED FORWARD, $5834 45 



40 

i ' BROUGHT EOSWAKD, .5834 45 

Paid Lampson & Marden for 15£ feet of 2 in. onder- 

ining 4 G5 

Sampson & Marden for 8 cubic ft. stone, 1 GO 

do. 5 pieces edge-stone,.. 2 00 

do. stone chips, 1 83 

J. B. Campbell for 1 piece free-stone lettered 

••1853," 10 00 

y\ . Currier for services as member of committee, 25 00 
Hartshorn, Darling & Co. for ventilators, fur- 
nace and furniture for same, 438 20 

0. Baldwin & Co. for gas post 14 56 

Francis Blake for whitewashing, 2 2"> 

.1 . R. Dudley for 13 gallons oil, 75 

do. oiling building, 4 50 

do. brick and work on sidewalk,. 80 99 

Jacob F. James for surveying, 5 00 

Moulton Knowles for 180 ft. edge-stone, 32 47 

Wdi. Rounsefell for painting and graining,. . . 10 00 

John N. Bruce for painting and gilding signs,. 22 00 

1 1 White & Co. for teaming seats, 75 

$6500 00 



41 



REPAIRS— SCHOOL HOUSES DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 424 C2 

Amount raised by district 1853, 1500 00 $1924 62 

EXPENDITURES. 
Paid fur LABOR. 

John C. Tasker <>n order of school committee last 

year, 200 00 

James O. Adams for money paid for trees, set- 
ting same and fixing yards, 44 00 

Hylas Dickey for mending plastering, 1 50 

Nathaniel Knowlton for lahor on yards, 31 05 

David Allen for lahor on yards, 3 00 

S. W. Parsons for boards, nails, lumber and 

work, 17 19 

Joseph W. Saunders for 21 days' work and ma- 
terials last year, 35 23 

Joseph W. Saunders for 1953 feet boards, 25 92 

do. glass, painting &c.,. . . 11 98 

do. 54 days' work, 85 85 

do. boards, nails, &c 7 77 

do. 5000 shingles, 17 50 

Thomas MeKew for work on Franklin st. school- 
house, 6 50 

R. Critchet for lahor on yards, 3 00 

Dennis & Varick for hardware, 43 80 

do. for pumps and pipe for schools, 21 51 

J. C. Wadleigh for glass, setting, painting &c, 19 23 

"William Grey for cash paid cleaning yards &c, 3 00 
" "for services moving school-house 

to Franklin street, 12 00 

"Walter Neal for making fence and screen on 

Lowell st. school-house, 8 70 

A. S. Sanborn for work on yards, 2 75 

J. C. Davis for painting sheds and fence on Spring 

st 12 33 

J. C. Davis for painting fence and sheds on 

High st., 11 00 

Amocnt carried forward, $025 -14 



4-2 

AiiOCXT BROUGHT IOBWARD $625 44 

Paid J. C. Davis for setting glass 2 3G 

do. Lettering hooks &c. to hang 

clothes, 13 58 

Osmon Pixley for labor on yards 8 00 

Wm. Richardson for digging wells &c. for schools, 18 34 

"W. C. Abbott for moving and now setting wood 

shed, 2") 00 

Wm. C. Abbott putting in two vaults &c...... 15 95 

It. P. Huso for keys and repairing locks 5 '.'2 

J. Eastman for 44 yards hard finished black- 
boards, 20 73 

J. Eastman for 18 days' work, 30 81 

do. glass, boards &c 9 77 

■-. Clough for stock and mason work 220 

Joseph Kelley for laying 111 rolls paper, 13 87 

do. sizing 3 rooms 1 13 

Wm. Mills for work of teams 25 00 

s. Saunders for l'.'.l days* work and stock, 54 37 

Brown & ( lolley for setting glass, 2 92 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co. for stoves, pipe clean- 
ing &c., 172 74 

J. <!. t'oult for trees and setting same 17 13 

L. Raymond for labor on yards, &c 3 00 

J. C. Hill for trucking settees and paying freight 

on same, 12 Go 

French & Hobbs for repairs 9 s 7 

Alpheus Gay, Jr., for 154 days' labor, 26 90 

do. boards, nails, &o IS 19 

W. <■'. Shattuck for 48 double desks (Grammar 

School) and 96 chairs 253 92 

\v. Q. Shattuck for lour teacher's desks 28 00 

do. ' s chairs, 6 L0 

do. 100 primary school ohairs, L02 00 

.!... 80 settees 36 00 

do. expenses to Manchester in 

relation to same 4 oo 

* 1784 ° 7 

Balance undrawn I vi,. I. is:, I. ft] lit 55. 



43 



COMMONS. 

Balance undrawn Fell. 1, 1853, 141 39 

Appropriated April, 1853, 700 00 

Amount received for sale of grass, 82 00 $920 39" 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

L. Raymond, 27 75 

J. C.Holmes. 4 00 

Josiah Small , 7 75 

Nathaniel Knowlton, 14 50 

John Clement, G 00 

E. Knowlton, 29 00 

David Allen, 17 10 

Zadoc "Wright, 6 75 

A. S. Sanborn, 18 50 

Hibbard Stevens, 10 00 

O. B. Robinson, 5 00 

Stephen Smith, 1 50 

Jona. Wyman, 25 

J. S. Clark, 33 25 

Paul Chase, 8 17 

Benj. P. Runnells, 2 75 

< Jeo. W. Wilson, 1 00 

John W. Joy, 14 50 

Reuben Critchet, 5 50 

Samuel Seavey, 18 50 

Abraham Hall, 18 25 

Daniel Mahanny, 17 50 

Wm, Hoyt,, 26 25 

Thomas S, Frost, . , , 3 25 

Osman Pixley 4 00 

John Ray on account for trees, , 48 75 

D. Randlett, fur rare of Merrimack square,, . . 10 00 

Win. Mills for teaming, , , 129 00 

Dennis & Yarick, for hardware, 2 98 

Amount cariued forward, $491 75 



44 

Amount bbouoht forward, $491 75 

Paid J. (i. Coult on account for trees 30 17 

Samuel AndrewB for 40 chestnut posts, 12 42 

J. S. York for Lumber and repairing fences,. . . 9 78 
Amoskeag Manf. Co. for iron Bhaft, wrench and 

labor, 1 16 

]']. G. Bajnes for whitewashing fence Merrimack 

square, 12 00 

1']. G. Haynes fur gate, ami draining pond Con- 
cord square, 8 00 

Abbott, Jenks & Co. for 50 bills "grass for sale," 1 50 
J. R. Dudley for whitewashing fence Concord 

square 8 00 

James Wallace can' of Concord square 1852,. . 8 00 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co. for zinc and labor,.. 2 83 

< '. (.'lough whitewashing fence Hanover square, 10 00 

William Craig for posting bills, 50 

do. care of Concord sq'r, 1853,. 8 00 

'1'. McKew for removing loam Hanover square, 10 00 

J. Abbott & Co. for £ bushel oats, 37 

Kidder & Duncklee for trees 28 87 



1649 65 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $270 74. 



45 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 72 03 

Amount received for sale of lots, 9G3 42 

Amount received of L. H. Sleeper for work, 38 50 $1073 95 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Levi H. Sleeper for 207 days' work, from May 

1,1853, 258 75 

Levi H. Sleeper for axe, hoe, rake &c, 3 79 

D. Brigham for recording deaths for the years 

1850, 1851 and 1852, 15 60 

D. Brigham for services as sec'y and treasurer, 10 00 

Hibbard Stevens for labor (last year,) 5 00 

G. W. Adams for 25£ days' labor, ending Apr. 

30, 1853, 31 87 

Dennis & Varick for hardware, 5 50 

James O. Adams for work filling up avenue, . . 2 00 

do. printing 12 quires deeds, . 6 00 

do. do. circulars, 1 25 

Stephen Palmer for cash paid for record book & 

branding iron, 1 50 

Stephen Palmer for varnish, and posting and 

varnishing notices, 3 00 

J. S. Clark for scraping manure for cemetery,. 2 00 

A. W. Sanborn for iron work & painting hearse, 10 50 

W. C. Abbott for 1 ten ft. ladder, 1 40 

Smith & Wallace for 438 pieces chestnut boards, 21 90 

$379 46 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $G94 49. 



46 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1 , 1853, 3650 3 5 

Appropriated April, 1853, 1000 00 $4650 35 



KXPKNWTl 

Paid Wm. Richardson, collector of taxes for 1852, 
abated on his list of the following earned persons 
and amounts, \ Lz : 

Jerome B. McQueston error in land, 

Phinehas P. Davis, non-resident, 

Osborn Emily, not here, 

Olding Amos, not here, 

Oliver Chas., minor 

Parker I 'has. F., was at Lowell, 

Persnay I >erby, no Mich person 

Prindle Edward, dead, 

Page Lucinda, not here, 

Prescott Martha J., not hero, 

Peasley Cynthia S., not here, 

Racy George, not here, 

Ricker Beteej . not lure 

Robinson Daniel M., paid in X. Y., 

Robb Andrew, not here 

Ryan Frances Jane, not here 

Sargent Rhoda M . not here 

Savage Adalme, not here, 

Sevy Ahnira S., not licrc, 

at I>a\ id 6., < lalifornia 

i Patrick, Lowell 

Seavej Sarah, not here 

Shell Gregor, qo1 found 

Sley Patrick, uot found 

Smith Ebenezer I !., at Portsmouth 

Small Eorace, minor, 

John, minor 

v Absalom , dead 

Starkman Catharine, ool Imp.' 

Stearns Biram, taxed twice 

Shannon v*errena . uot here 



• > 


00 


- 


00 


3 


41 


1 


92 


1 


92 


1 


92 


1 


2 


1 


92 


3 


07 


3 




• > 


40 


1 


92 


3 


00 


1 


92 


1 


92 


1 


27 


1 


84 


1 


n 


1 


i.-. 


1 


'.'L 1 


1 


2 


3 


1211 


1 


92 


1 


92 


1 


92 


1 


,,_» 


1 


92 




80 


1 


'.»ii 




80 



47 

Stxmson Sarah E., not hero, 8df 

Tarr Edward II., nut here, 1 92 

Tewksbury John P., minor, 1 92 

Tenney Silas, lived in Amoskeag, ] 92 

Teahan Patrick, not here, 1 92 

Buffell Ashhury, not hear ,", ]'.) 

Blanchard Mary A. , not here, 2 14 

Cracker Ellen, old, poor woman-, 83 

Colcord Jlannah, Boston, 95- 

Carnes James, poor and sick, 1 92 

Carney Lawrence, cannot he found, 1 92 

Caswell Uriah, run away, 1 92 

Chew James, no such man found, 1 92 

Chew David, no such man found J 92 

Chase Lorenda, not here, 1 00 

Coach Matthew, poor, 1 92 

Corlis Jerry, poor, 1 92 

( 'ranon Michael, wrong name, 1 92 

Darrah Rufus, paid in Mass., 1 92 

Dally Patrick, taxed twice, 1 92 

Dean Sam'l D., Concord, 1 92 

Dow Belinda P. , not hero, 1 82 

Davis Sarah C. , not found, 2 40 

Dewey George, miserahly poor, 1 92 

Drew Israel S., lives in Pittsfield, 1 92 

Dunafan David, not here, 1 92 

Duane Morris, dead, 1 92 

Elliott Chas. C, dead, 1 92 

Eastman Mary, Bradford, 2 06 

Epps C. L., minor, 1 92 

Fisk Betsey, not found, 2 40 

Fitzgerald Rufus, not here, 1 92 

Fox Patrick, 2d, dead, 1 92 

Ford Patrick, not here, 1 92 

Fowler Patrick, wrong name. 1 92 

Foss Paul P., poor, 1 92 

Fulton John A. , Nashua, 1 92 

Flagg Martha S., not here, 80 

Gault James, run away, 1 92 

Gallop George, poor, 1 92 

< ialvin James, at poor farm , 1 92 

Gee "Win., not fonnd; 1 92 

Gildas Charles, minor, 1 92 



48 



Gleason Joseph, minor, 

Gould Franklin, Bristol, 

' Hover Lucinda, not bere, 

CJould Elbridge ('<., lives in Lawrence 

Hall Margaret, not hero, 

Hartwel] Helen M., not found, 

Raggett Mary E., non-resident, 

Harris Josephine, non-resident, 

Healev Benjamin W., gone, 

Holt Benjamin, gone, 

Hill Moses, dead, 

Hoge Timan, not found, , 

Holt "Win. F., poor and sick, 

Hood Samuel, minor, 

How Philander D., not found, 

Holt Horace, not here, 

Hughes Win., poor and gone, , 

Hunt Clarissa, not here, , 

Hook Charlotte A., not here, 

How Mary Jane, not here, 

James W . S., not in town when taxed,. . . 

Jaquith John, , 

Jasper John, out of town, 

Jcwett Plummer, non-resident, 

Johnson Charles, gone to jail, , 

Jones A. D., non-resident, 

Kenniston Nathaniel, 

Dennis Karens, not here, 

Kimball Henry, California before taxing,. 

Harvey Frank E., not here , 

Kerney James, taxed twice 

King James, out of town, 

Kimball Newton S. . not here, 

Lakin Geo. W., minor, 

Lampkin Ahijah, gone 

Lemoulin F. A., non-resident, 

Leavitl Sylvanus L., non-resident, 

Leaviti Job I!., taxed at Piscataquog 

Lynn Michael , noi bere 

Lurten Thomas, non-resident, 

Long Joseph, minor, 

Miles Sally, QOt here, 

Marshall Mary A., not here 



1 


'.'2 


5 


20 




so 


3 


25 


1 


GO 


2 


G'J 




83 


1 


92 


1 


92 


1 


92 


1 


•.'2 


1 


92 


1 


'.'2 


1 


92 


3 


55 




86 


1 


92 


.i 


10 




95 


1 


27 


1 


'.'2 


1 


92 




192 


1 


92 


1 


92 


'.'• 


52 


1 


92 


1 


'J 2 


1 


92 


1 


92 


1 


'.'2 


1 


92 


1 


92 


1 


92 


1 


92 


1 


92 


1 


92 


4 




1 


92 


. . 


85 


1 


92 


1 


89 


1 


78 



49 

Allen Annie, out place, 4 15 

Adams tJfsula, out place, 1 19 

Bean Moses IT., out place, G 72 

Bennett Charles, out place, G 32 

Colcord Hannah C, out place, 95 

Parley & Lyon, should be Farley & Hersey, 4 80 

Hapgood David E., dead 1 92 

Howard John A., overtaxed, 11 92 

Heald Chas. , Used twice 4 00 

Kimball Jedediah, non-resident, 3 84 

Morgan & Thing, wrongly taxed, 3 20 

Sanborn Cyrus, out place, 40 

Stokes Henry P., had no property, 3 52 

McCabe Owen, poor, 3 52 

Sawyer Joseph, wounded at Print Works, 9 60 

Smith Cilman, sold before taxed, 1 20 

Watts Freeman, non-resident, 1 92 

Pierce Simon, out place, 1 92 

Bojmton Rufus N. , dead, 1 92 

Badger Nathaniel, poor, 1 92 

Baker Hannah G. , out place, 1 07 

Barnes Wm., minor, 1 92 

Barr Robert, out place, 1 92 

Becker Martin, out place, 1 92 

Bartlett Hiram, dead and poor, 1 92 

Banker Chas. F. , wrong name, 1 92 

Baggy Patrick, no such man, 1 92 

Baggy James, no such man, 1 92 

Boulton Geo., non-resident, 1 92 

Boulton Edward, non-resident, 1 92 

Bryna Patrick, no such person, 1 92 

McKay Julia, not here, 86 

Macy Alfred, minor, 1 92 

Mahanncy Patrick, not here, 1 92 

McCort Job, non-resident, 1 92 

McGachy Frank, 1 92 

McCarty Tenney, gone, 1 92 

McLane Chas. , gone, 1 92 

McRabc Mariah , not here, 1 01 

Moulton David C, gone before taxing, 1 92 

Mowatt Commodore, non-resident, 1 92 

Mocklin Richard, sick, 1 92 

Mubverlind John, no such person, 1 92 



50 

Malhena Ann, not here, 1 20 

Mead H. 0., not here 2 72 

Nurse Lysandei W., taxed twice, 1 92 

James & Tompkins, 1 58 

John Brown, 3 20 

Moses Stevens, heirs of, 4 00 

Underhill Bozea, taxed twice, 4 32 

Viekcry Daniel C, county farm, I 92 

Varick John B. , minor, 1 92 

Wade Lorenzo, not here, 1 92 

Whitney Elijah, nun-resident, 1 92 

Baker Chas. W., should he Barker, 1 92 

Brown Ezra, minor 1 92 

Blanchard David P. , minor, 1 92 

Carr Chas. , not here, 1 92 

Califf Rufus, nut here, 1 92 

Cochran Patrick, not here, 1 92 

McDufi'ee John, not here, 1 92 

Quimhy Horace, not here, 01 

Muris Downing, no such person, 1 92 

McCahe Owen, poor, paid $1.50, 2 02 

Webster Israel, heirs of (wrong) 7 20 

Currier Kimball, no such person, 80 

Chase Thomas, over 70, 1 92 



Paid Henry (I. Lowell, Collector, 1S53, Taxes on his 
list, abated, viz : 

Horace Stearns, non-resident, 2 13 

Obediah Jackson, over taxed, 44 

Geo. Hasflom, minor, 2 13 

Wm. Mbulton, in Ohio, 1 82 

Nathaniel Whitticr, minor, I s - 

Miss II. It. Adams, out place, 1 04 

Bliss I'. 0. Adams, out place, 2 2.") 

John Aigen, aothere, 2 L3 

William 11. A lien, taxed Warner 2 C3 

Miss Olive Bailey, out place, I 18 

Miss Betsy Batchelder, out place 1 55 

Miss Hannah (i. I laker, out place, 121 

Hiram Bailey, non-resident 2 I'. 

Miss Elvira W. Batohelder, out plaoe 1 32 

llial Bartlett, dead 2 3] 

E. Bartlett, should he middle letter i' 13 

Mifl Eliza Kerry, out plaoe 1 78 



S418 



51 

William Bonder, no such man. . . v 2 13 

( lharlee Bennett, run away, .... 2 13 

Emily Blaiedell, out place, 1 00 

Margaret Boyle, " 1 95 

Mrs. L. Bean, «.« 4 00 

L. J. Buttcrfield, " 116 

Mary A . Breman, " 89 

Mary Brasnehan, " 89 

Elizabeth Burns, " 100 

Ash'iury Buswell " 3 74 

Try Cary , no such man, 2 13 

Elias T. Caswell, run away, 2 13 

Nancy Stevens, out place, 89 

Susan Swain, out place, 1 07 

Almira S. Seavey, out place, 1 33 

Maria Wall, out place, 80 

Lucy Walker, out place, 3 50 

Susan Washburn, out place, 1 33 

Sarah White, out place, 4 90 

Martha A. Young, out place, 3 90 

John B. Varick, minor, 2 19 

R. J. U. Hale, error on tax, 44 50 

Herman Foster, error on tax, 27 99 

John Callahan, not here, 2 13 

Lorenda Chase, not here, 93 

Stedman Chub, not here, 2 13 

Edwin Chedsey, not here, 2 13 

Lora G. Chase, out place, 3 32 

Tardy Conway, out place, 2 13 

Squire Colby, out place, 2 13 

John Conery, gone, 2 13 

Betsy Cook, out place, 1 33 

Lydia A. Congdon, out place, 90 

Warren Comeford, non-resident, 2 V6 

Wm. Cooley, no such man, 2 13 

Charlott Corwin, out place, 1 93 

J. C. E. Crawford, out place, 1 52 

Mannus Crown, no such man, ... 2 13 

Kliza Currier, out place, 2 67 

Sarah C. Davis, out place, 4 40 

Laura Eastman, out place, 1 63 

Chas. Epps, minor, 2 13 

Betsy Fisk, out place, 2 67 



52 

• 

Abigail Fisk, out place, 89 

Angelina Ford, out place, 5 34 

Jaue E. Forsaith, out place, 92 

James Gulliver, out place 2 13 

Duggy Gibbens, out place, 2 13 

Michael Gillis, insane, 2 13 

Mary E. Jones, out place, 89 

Joseph Long, minor, 2 13 

Mary A. Marshall, out place, 1 81 

Patrick Mahanney, out place, 2 13 

Margaret Martin, out place-, 4 Gl 

Morgan Mahaling, out place, 2 13 

James .Milican, sick man, 2 13 

Sally Miles, out place, 1 51 

Commodore Mowatt, non-resident, 2 13 

Andrew Mclntire, poor, 2 L3 

Warren Mclntire, in jail, 2 13 

Patrick McDonnell, not to be found, 2 13 

John McQuadc, paid in Lowell, 2 13 

John McClusky, no such man, 2 13 

Ann Mulhenan, out place, 2 22 

Michael Murry, out place 2 13 

Margaret Murry, out place, 89 

Sarah I!. Nason, out place, 4 11 

Almira T. Nichols, out place, 89 

Emily C. Osburn, out place, 3 92 

Lucinda Page, out place, ... 4 2G 

C. and M. Reardon, out place, 1 78 

Hannah Heed, out place 4 89 

Adaline Savage, out place, 3 5G 

Sarah Seavey, out place 2 22 

Minerva Shannon, out place 89 

Kmil\ K. Stevens, out place, 1 18 

Mil hael llinry, no such man, 2 l.i 

S. V,. Kimball 2 13 

Chas. Olough 35 

Whittle & Osgood 4 46 

Rev. I. G. Huhhard 4 15 

atine P. Basset! 6 22 

c. B. Tucker 

MaryBailej 8 78 

II. G. Parker 

Abby S. Kingsbury G 47 



53 

Lyman Stone, 9 55 

D. P. Iladley, 4 80 

James Crowley, 2 13 

James Bagley, 44 

Sumner Fifield, 2 13 

Rev. Wm. McDonald, 4 45 

Luther Hubbard, 2 13 

Rufus Blodgett, 2 13 

S. G. Webber, 1 70 

C. L. Foss, 2 13 

E. T. Quimby, 2 13 

Richard Woo'lfindall, 4 27 

John N. Brown, 39 95 

G. M. Taylor, 2 13 

E. K. Rowell, 2 25 

S. D. Bell, 5 34 

Lot 314, owner unknown, 2 58 

Archable Gamble, 3 42 393 93 



5812 64 



Balance undrawn Feb. ], 1854, $3838 21. 



54 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 7 1 93 

Appropriated April, 1853, 800 00 874 93 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

William Eastman, '. 175 

M. Ingham, 3 00 

John Merrill, 2 00 

E. Knowlton, 81 93 

J. S. York, 2 63 

A. S.Sanborn, 15 10 

Nathaniel Knowlton, 35 25 

•John Clement. 24 75 

Daniel Mahanney, 10 00 

Reuben Critchet, 26 00 

J.S. Clark, 2 00 

0. S. Fisher, 3 00 

Thomas S. Frost. 15 75 

Robert Moore, 28 12 

. Harvey Ward 31 25 

Barnard Stratton. 7 50 

Cyrus Ford, 9 50 

P. Philbrick 5 63 

Samuel Dame, 48 00 

John W. Joy, IS 50 

Jerry Regan , 1 00 

Patrick Murphy 3 00 

J. Rogers, 1 50 

Abraham Ball, 3 50 

Ayer & Fogg, for hardware 4 74 

J. Dunlap, for 4582 ft. chestnut plank 82 37 

Josiah Heath, for drawing plank 75 

M. L. Ilunkins, for putting in Bewei Oil Laurel 

ha.k Btreel 30 50 

Lamson & Mar den, for two cesspool stones, cut- 
ting and teaming 10 00 

Lamson & Marden, for cutting and teaming one, 2 50 

Aumi \ :■ CARRJ1 D FORWARD $51 1 52 



55 

\ MOUNT BROUGHT FORWARD, 511 52 

J. Abbott & Co. for one cask cement, 2 00 

Dennis & Varick for hardware, 13 05 

Frederick Smyth for services building 3684 ft. 

sewers, 36 84 

Alonzo Smith for 9538 ft. chestnut plank, 170 44 

Stephen Smith for keeping cesspool open, 5 00 

II. L. Hutchinson for stone chips, 6 42 

J. F. James for surveying, 5 00 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $124 65. 



750 27 



.V, 



aESERVOlRS. 

Appropriated April, 1653, 500 00 

Transferred from New Highways, 300 00 800 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for LABOR. 

Thomas Council, 1 75 

John Henry, 1 75 

Edimind Burke, 50 

Daniel Mahanney, 50 

Patrick Fling,. . 2 00 

Stephen Palmer, 3 00 

John McCowen, 75 

John Hull, 2 00 

John Griffin, 2 00 

Elijah Goodall, 2 50 

Daniel Sullivan, 2"> 

lleuhen Critchet, 13 00 

Nathaniel Knowlton, IS 00 

B. P. Runnells, 2 50 

E. Knowlton, G 2."> 

E. (i. Haines for building 1900 ft. brick water 

pipe, 390 84 

E. G. Haines for 1850 brick 10 23 

" " " gates, iron -work and building 

chimneys, 50 50 

" " »« extra digging 10 00 

" " " work and cement 19 83 

Alonzo Smith for 14."..") it. Lumber^ and dressing 

and jointing 30 05 

Neal iV Bolbrook for materials and building res- 

ervoirs Ill '.'l 

Lamson A. Marden For 6 reservoir and 

cutting and teaming same 25 00 

Joseph Dunlap for 2376 ft. chestnut timber,. . . 40 39 

A. MoCrillis for blacksmithing 1 - 63 

J. P. James for surveying i 50 

$771 65 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $28 35. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Balance undrawn Fob. 1 , 1853, 849 80 

Appropriated April, 1853, 6500 00 7349 80 

EXPENDITURES. 

MERRIMACK ENGINE Co., No. 1. 

Paid Company's bill for services, 382 29 

Alphcus Branch for splicing hose, 3 50 

" " " caps and couplings, 50 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co., for repairs, 2 18 

E. B. Stearns for cash paid O. Kimball for stew- 
ard services from Oct. 1, 1853, to 

Jan'y 1, 1854, 7 50 

" " for repairs, 5 00 

" " "1 gallon alcohol, 90 

" " " 2i gallons whale oil 2 50 

" " "5 gallons fluid and turpentine 3 68 

" " " 3i " sperm oil 5 63 

" " " cash paid J. N. Bruce for 

sign, 20 00 

" " " 1 cord of wood and sawing,. 7 25 

" " " wicking, brooms, soap, &c, 52 

Hill & Cheney for horses to fires, 17 00 

J. M. & S. F. Stanton for repairs to engine,. . . 07 67 

James Boyd & Son for 3084 ft. hose, 192 81 

" " " 4 setts Lowell screws, 14 00 

" " " 2 connecting screws, 7 00 

Geo. T. Mixer for 7 spanner belts, 3 15 

" " for mending hose, washers, coup- 
lings, &c, 15 75 

E. G. Woodman for steward services 4£ mos.,. 11 25 

" " for extra services, oiling hose &c.,. 2 03 

Geo. C. Kidder for posters, 10 90 

Neal & Holbrook for materials and building 35 

ft. fence, 17 48 

AlIOCNT CARRIED FORWARD, $807 09 



$909 8G 



58 

A M'ilnt BROUGHT FORWARD, 807 09 

Paid John C. Wadleigh for Betting glass and painting 1 1 83 
Geo. Bartlett for lettering and ornamenting en- 
gine, 40 00 

1*. S. Brown for materials and labor repairing 

engine and hose carriage, 30 34 

1 \ S. Brown for sign board, 5 00 

E. Griffin for 90 lbs. iron, and work on hose 

carriage, 8 30 

K. ( Jriffin for 14 spanners, 4 00 

" " iron work, 3 00 

Orrin Kimball for 7£ mos. steward services,... l v 7" 

" " for repairing hose, pump, &c.,. . 13 -i> 

William II. Fro.st for locks, keys and screws,. . 1 75 

Hardy & Currier for brooms, oil and fluid,. ... 1 65 

F. Pierce & Co., for 131 ft. settees 51 47 

Ajnoskeag Manfc'g Co. for 4 life ropes, 2 48 

E. (i. llaynes for repairing plastering, 1 00 

NIAGARA ENGINE Co., No. 2. 

Paid Company's bill for services, 643 00 

" " for G mos. steward services.... 15 00 

E. I>. Stearns for 3 oil suits, 5. 25 

Hill & Cheney for horses to fires, 8 00 

Coffin A Sherburne for horses to fires, L3 00 

Geo. T. Mixer for mending hose, washers, &0., 2 50 

11. White & Co., for trucking settees, 25 

$ 687 00 

STARK ENGINE Co., No. 3. 

Paid Company's hill for services, 407 80 

" " horses to fires 7 00 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co. for stove, pipe and 

chain 30 26 

K. B. Stearns for table 6 00 

Hunneman & Co. for] pair trumpets s 00 

James Boyd & Son for '.' fire caps, 36 00 

Goo. T. Mixer for mending hose, washers. &c., 10 00 
J. X. Bruce for painting and gilding 8 hose- 
men's caps 6 00 

Amount carried forward 510 56 I6t 



59 

A Mnl NT DROUGHT FORWARD, 510 5G 1080 8G 

Paid P. Pierce & ( b., for 38 feet settees,. . ., 15 96 

It. "White & Co., for trucking settees, 75 

$ 527 27 

MASSABESIC ENGINE Co., No. 4. 

Paid Company's bill for services, 414 45 

" " for printing notices, 5 00 

John II. Maynard for repairs, 5 38 

E. B. Stearns for 10£ gallons straits oil, 9 48 

" " 3 gallons sperm oil, 4 50 

" " sponge, brooms and brush,. . 4 08 

" " 2 gallons alcohol, 170 

" " " 8$ feet wood and sawing, .. . 7 94 

" " 1 gallon whale oil, 80 

" " " 1 " fluid, 60 

•' " " cash paid Bruce for lettering 

caps,. 4 50 

" " " side W. leather, 50 

llunneman & Co. for copper torch, 5 50 

J. M. & S. F. Stanton for hose pipe, 10 00 

James Boyd & Sons for 9 fire hats, 49 50 

Geo. T. Mixer for repairing hose, washers, 

couplings &C:, 17 30 

1 tennis & Varick for vise, 4 75 

" " lantern, screw wrench,. . . 2 37 
J. N. Bruce for cash paid for drawing engine 

to machine shop, 75 

Berry & Co. for lantern, soap and fluid, , 1 21 

£. T. Summers for steward services 3 mos.,.. . . 7 50 

J. AY. B. Johnson for steward services 3 mos.,. 7 50 

Caleb Gage for spikes and spanners, 3 50 

L. Cage for steward services 6 mos., repairs,. . 19 47 

Hardy & Currier for wicking, oil and fluid,. . . 2 21 

Amoskeag Manf. Co., for 8 life ropes, 4 96 

' ; " " << stock and labor pack- 
ing cylinders, 5 58 

" " " " handles for hose car- 
riage, 1 50 

Kendall & Preston for altering windlass, 1 50 

J. B. Chase for 2 gallons oil, 2 50 

$ GOO 59 

Amount carried forward, 2820 7g 



GO 

Amount brought forward 2820 72 

TORRENT ENGINE Co., No. 5. 

Paid Company's I ills for services 472 50 

do. lor braes pipe and patterns,. . 5 22 

do. 4 pieces brass castings,. ... 4 31 

do. work on hose pipe, &c.,... 25 

do. hose to an alarm, 1 00 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Company for 2 pack- 
ing rings, 2 00 

John 11. Maynard for repairs, 9 95 

Ilunnoman &, Co. for two copper torches, 9 25 

Alpheus Branch for 4 belts and repairs, 4 00 

do. splicing hose, 14 50 

do. caps and couplings, 17 50 

do. 8 badges, 1 80 

do. 8 rivets, 4 00 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co. lor repairs and cast- 
ings, 2 30 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co. for brass hose pipe 

and castings, 9 53 

E. B. Stearns for 3£ gallons sperm oil, 5 25 

do. 8 gallons straits oil, 7 20 

do. 7 gallons fluid, 5 14 

do. 8 gallons whale oil, 7 36 

do. 7 gallons alcohol, 5 90 

do. cash paid for repairs, 1 L2 

do. matches, snap, brooms, &c., 5 51 

do. 3 cords wood and sawing,.... 20 25 

do. 25 badges, 38 

do. cash paid E. French for whip- 

pletree, 75 

J. M. and S. P. Stanton for repairs of engine,. ."> 25 

do. hosepipe, 00 

Geo. T. Mixer for mending hose, washers, coup- 
lings, &c 8 50 

S. S. Coffin & Co. for horses to fires 1 "<' 

Dennis & Varick for two heavy blown lanterns, 1 84 
\V. JI. Shepherd for services as Bteward for bu 

months, 15 00 

Allot. \T CARRIED FORWARD 664 56 2820 72 



61 

Amount brought forward, 0G4 50 2920 72 

Paid W. 11. Shepherd for repairs on hose, 4 50 

Neal & Holbrook for repairs on platform, 50 

K. W. Martin for varnishing engine, 10 00 

S. H. Bowman for packing and repairing, 8 30 

do. refreshments Dec. 9, 1853,. 7 50 

do. 4 locks, 3 00 

John C. TTadleigh for setting glass, painting &c, 6 17 

Joseph W. Saunders for repairs on house, 145 69 

Abbott, Jenks & Co. for posters, 13 75 

G. B. Fogg for 80 keys, 13 33 

E. French for fixing locks, doors &c, 4 51 

Alfred Currier for steward services G months,. . 15 00 

do. lamps and chimney, 50 



$897 31 



MANCHESTER ENGINE Co., No. 6. 

Paid Company's bill for services, 398 30 

Alpheus Branch for caps and couplings, 5 00 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co. for pipe, hooks, chain 

&c 23 14 

E. B. Stearns for 9 gallons straits oil, 8 1G 

do. 1 gallon fluid, 80 

do. 3 gallons sperm oil, 4 50 

do. wicking, brooms &c, 1 28 

do. paid Bruce for lettering caps, 3 50 

Coffin & Sherburne for horses to fires, 11 00 

James Boyd & Sons for 7 fire caps, 28 00 

Geo. T. Miser for mending hose, washers, and 

couplings, 16 50 

S. S. Coffin & Co. for horses to fires, 12 00 

M. W. Hall for 6 months steward services,. ... 15 00 



$527 18 



HOOK AND LADDER Co., No. 1 



5 

Paid Company's bill for services, 372 47 

E. B. Stearns for 30 badges, 12 65 

S. S. Coffin & Co. for horses to fires, 10 00 

J. B. Eastman for steward services 1 year, 12 00 

do. extra services, oil &c., 6 94 

Amount carried forward ; 414 06 4245 21 



G2 

AH01 .NT BROUGHT 10RWARD, 414 00 .f 12 15 2J 

Paid John 0. Wadleigh for betting glass 40 

John B. McCrillifl for repairs to carriage, 2 31 



HOSE Co., No. 2. 

Paid Company's bill for services, 310 40 

Hill it Cheney for horses to fires, 10 00 



$416 83 



2 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

John B. Clarke for printing notices, regulations, 

and cards of reservoirs, 24 50 

John B. Clarke for 500 books and 50 large cards, 

rules and regulations for the department,. 18 00 

E. B. Stearns for cash paid expressage, 7 -"> 

do. Bruce for painting,. J 

do. reservoir covers,... 2 25 

Hunneman & Co. for 1 signal lantern and statf, 12 00 

do. do do. 11 00 

Skelton & Chccver for G engineer badges, G 00 

John Gove & Co. for8 oilsuits, 18 oil pants and 

18 reef jackets, 86 25 

James Boyd A: Suns for discharge pipe, 7 00 

do. copper pipe and cover- 
ing, 5 00 

Jas. Boyd & Sons for 307 ft. double riveted hose, 217 '.'7 

do. G setts connecting screws, 21 00 

do. 5 caps with cases 30 00 

Ceo. T. Mixer for cash paid carting hose 50 

B. Knowlton for keeping reservoirs open 14 69 

E. G. Haynee for watching fircon Laurel st... . 1 00 

Plumer & Bailey for 7 overaacks for engineers,. 31 50 

Win. < 'raig for posting bills 5 00 

Win. II. Fisk for frames for regulations ■"• 00 

B. P. Runnells for repairing Ere screws 2 00 

.Etna Fire [ns. Co. for insurance on bouses,. . . 26 25 

(J. B. Fog- lor CO keys 9 00 

B. Griffin for ironing reservoir covers LQ 00 

\\ alter Axlriance for Bponge &o 1 86 

f569 7' 



Amount caiikikd iouu aki>, 5558 -I 



63 
Amount brought forward, 5558 21 

ENGINEERS. 

Paid D. Clark £ year's salary as chief engineer,. . . 25 00 

John II. Maynard ass't engineer last year,. ... 15 00 

" " for services examining stoves,. 5 00 

Caleb Duxbury uss't engineer last year, 15 00 

" for services as clerk of board, 10 00 
" " " services examining stoves, . 5 00 

Harry Leeds ass't engineer last year, 15 00 

" for services examining stoves, 5 00 

James A. Stearns ass't engineer last year, 15 00 

" "for services examining stoves, 5 00 

Charles H. Brown for " " "1854, 52 00 

J. T. P. Hunt ass't engineer last year, 15 00 $ 182 00 

.$5740 21 
Balance undrawn Feb. 1,1854, $1009 59. 



LIGHTING STREETS. 

Appropriated April, 1853, $500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Hartshorn, Darling & Co. for 12 street lanterns, 81 75 

C. Baldwin & Co. for 13 gas posts and brackets, 182 07 

Manchester gas light Co. for labor, pipe and 

fitting, 58 55 

do. do. gas, 97 57 

James G. Davis for painting posts, 1 87 

J. M. & S. F. Stanton for 12 lantern frames and 

labor, 15 75 



$438 1G 



Balance uudrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $01 84. 



MILITIA. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 144 00 

Appropriated April, 1853, 200 00 344 00 

EXrENDITTRES. 

Paid J. S. York for enrolling and registering the 7th 

and 10th companies N. II. militia, 25 00 

Isabel Balcb for enrolling 11th company N. 11. 

militia 6 00 

City Guards rent of armory, 125 00 

< I'M. Hunt fur trucking 3 boxes of" guns 37 

Concord railroad freight on 3 boxes guns L 27 



$157 64 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $180 30. 



CITY POLICE. 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1 , 1853,. 164 67 

Appropriated April, 1853, 2500 00 

Received of Win. II. Hill, officers' fees and costs,. . 611 64 

$327fi 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for WATCHING— Complaints, Warrants, Wit- 
ness' fees, committing prisoners, and Police 

service :......... 

John H. Dinsmoor, 99 00 

Simon Aldrich, 388 73 

Uriah H. Foss, 367 23 

James Wallace, 4 12 

Leonard Taggart, 70 53 

M. Ingham, 289 10 

Joseph C. Davis, 33 35 

William Robbins, police service, 7 75 

Stephen H. Randlett, " 25 99 

D. Randlett, " " 122 94 

JohnDoland, " " 5 39 

William Mills, " " 100 

Levi Sargent, " " last year, 5 75 

A. C. Heath, " " 4 00 

Henry G. Lowell, " " 57 00 

AmosHadley, " " 10 12 

William H. Hill, for complaints last year, ... . 76 10 

" " " marshal's badge, 1 38 

" " " cash paid for gas, 16 10 

" " " " " cleaning lobby, 3 25 

" " " " " 3 blankets " 1 00 

" M " " " stationery, &c, 1 13 
" " " services as ass't marshal 

to March 24, 1853,... 42 00 
" " " 9 mos. salary as marshal, 525 00 
W. L. Lane for 17 days' services as special jus- 
tice, 34 00 

AXOUNT CARRIED FORWARD, , $2,191 36 

6 



66 

Amount brought forward, 2,191 96 

Paid D. L. Stevens for marshal's services to March 

1, 1853, 108 25 

Ira Godfrey for removing nuisances, 3 25 

M. Ingham for police services on Merrimack 

square, 00 

Samuel B. Paige for removing nuisances, 6 62 

Isaac Tompkins, salary as ass't marshal to Sept. 

24,1853, 196 38 

" for carrying prisoners to farm, 
notifying officers, cleaning 

lobby, &c, 15 29 

A. Hancock for 2 cords wood and sawing, 10 00 

J. M. & S. F. Stanton, iron work on lobby 33 08 

G. W. Adams for brooms, pitcher, matches &c., 1 58 

" " " 1$ gallon sperm oil, 1 04 

" " 5| " fluid, 3 74 

D. Brigham for £ cord wood, 2 25 

). Brigham & Co., for 1 cord wood, 5 25 

Frederick Smyth for 2\ cords wood, 10 18 

N". Prime for setting glass, &c. , 4 50 

William Craig posting " health regulations,". 1 50 
Hartshorn, Darling & Co., for zinc and work 

last year, 1 52 

" " ■• CQalstove, zinc, &c.,. 8 48 
Gilmore and Bunton for iron work on lobby,. . 
Hill & Cheney for horse hire carrying prisoners 

to farm , 18 75 

J. C. Hill for filling 5 beds for Lobby 3 00 

Dudley & Parker for water can 45 

Brown & Colh-y for setting glass 1 92 

Kidder &. Duncklee for 3£ yds. velveteen to cover 

table, 2 19 

John B. McCrillis for iron work on lobby,. ... 1 66 
Isaac Kiddle for rent of police court room and 

marshal's office 1 year, 17S 1 2 

James ( I . I >a\ is for setting glass 1 00 

!'\ Kimball for i cord wood, 1 25 

Manchester Gas Light Co., tor gas, 8 65 

I r caurjkk louvYAHn $2,838 1 I 



67 

\ kodni isuorcnr forward, 2,838 11 

Paid for SPECIAL Police services during State Fail : 

James Wallace 3 00 

Stephen H. Randlett 3 00 

Charles II. Brown, 1 00 

A. O. Heath, 1 50 

Charles Clough, 3 00 

Joseph C. Davis, 2 50 

[sraelM Herrick, 3 00 

Benjamin F. Locke, 3 50 

Robert Dow, 3 50 

Amos Hadley, 4 00 

J. C. Young, 3 00 

Leonard Taggart, 3 00 

Nathaniel Baker, Jr., 3 00 

E. C. Stevens. 3 00 

Joshua Taylor, 3 00 

Eben Knowlton , 3 00 

Henry Clough, 3 00 

Andrew C. Wallace. 2 00 

Samuel Russell, 4 00 

Darius Robinson 3 00 

Wallace W. Baker, 4 00 

Uriah H. Foss, 1 00 

Henry G. Lowell, 3 00 

Samuel B. Paige, 4 00 

Eleazer Young, 3 00 

,__. $20) | 

Balance undrawn Feb. I, 1854, $305 20. 



CITY HALL, OFFICES AND STORES. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 140 31 

Appropriated April, 1853, 1000 00 

$1140 31 

EXPENDITURES. 

I'aid Kendall & Preston for repairs of post office,. . 1 50 

Joseph W. Lamson for setting posts, 2 75 

Isaac Shepherd for cloth to cover table, 7 32 

Hartshorn, Darling & Co., for materials and 

work on gutter, . . 19 GG 

" " " blacking stoves, &c. 1 54 

John II. Maynard for repairs, 16 87 

William Craig for care of hall and repairs,. . . 150 09 

" " " sawing and carrying in wood, 8 37 

Kennard & Hurd for 1$ cords wood, 5 95 

Robert Woodburn for sawing wood, 4c, 3 25 

Geo. W. Adams for 3} gallons fluid, 2 35 

" " "4 gallons oil, 4 92 

" " " lantern, matches, &c.,. .. . 1 66 

Stilman Fellows for repairs, 3 34 

Brainan & Ferham for fixing chandalier, 3 00 

" " " gas fixtures, cellar No. 1, 12 03 
John C. "Wadleigh for paint, painting, setting 

glass, &c. , 10 00 

Temple McQueston for mason work, 8 40 

Jacob S. York for repairs to bell deck, 22 50 

" " desk for city hall, and wood box, 13 88 

" " book case for city clerk's office,. 49 83 

S. S. Richardson for sawing Gi| cords wood,. ... 4 50 

John 1». McCrillis for repairs, 2 82 

-" " " 135 ft. iron railing for 

post office, 12 50 

Frederick Smyth for 34 cords wood 19 37 

Aycr & Fogg for hardware 24 

Dennis *v. Varick for hardware, 23 89 

Manchester Gas Light Co., for gas, 210 35 

Amount CABBSBD forward, G12 89 



69 

Amovht brought forward, G12 88 

Paid Barton & Co., for 18 yds. booking; 26J yds. 

oil cloth, 22 17 

A. P. Holmes for 2G chair cushions, 29 25 

Wilkins & Legg for painting and varnishing 

post office 18 00 

K. Case for furnishing and putting up 250 ft. 

lightning rod, 34 00 

Geo. B. Fogg for 2 keys, 32 

J. M. & S. F. Stanton, 11 79 

D. Brigham & Co., for 3| cords wood, 19 13 

JEtna. Fire Ins. Co., for insurance, 75 00 

Walter Adriance for 12 gallons oil, 1G 80 

" " " 2 " spirits, 1 12 

" " " glue and brush, 80 

Charles S. Fisher for lamp and fluid, 1 13 

Brown & Colley for painting, graining and var- 
nishing book case, 10 28 

Kidder & Duncklee for 2 lanterns, 2 00 

Hamilton Fire Ins. Co., for insurance, 61 00 

J. C. Davis for setting glass, G7 

E. Ferren for cloth to cover desk, 4 25 

E. French for repairs, 16 35 

Charles Clough for repairing plastering, 5 82 

H. H. Ladd for care of clock on city hall, 10 00 

Hardy & Currier for one peck oats, 14 

E. P. Offutt for glass pitcher, duster, &c.,. ... 3 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $173 53. 



$ 96G 7^ 



CITY OFFICERS. 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1 , 1853, 527 50 

Appropriated April. L853 2500 00 

. $3027 50 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid F. Smyth salary 9 mos. as mayor, 300 00 

Geo. A. French salary as city clerk mos., at 

$ 350 per year, 202 50 

Geo. A. French salary as city clerk G mos., at 

$500 per year, . '. ' 250 00 

Enoch N. Abbott Balary as clerk of common 

council 18 months, 155 00 

Henry R. Chamherlin salary as city treasurer 

1 year, 100 00 

David Cross salary as city solicitor 1 year,. . . . 100 00 

W. 1). Buck G mos. salary as city physician,. . 25 00 

Thomas Wheot G mos. " " last year, 25 00 

$1217 50 

WARD OFFICERS— MODERATORS. 

Paid Eben C. Foster, moderator, ward 1. 3 00 

O. P. Warren, " " 2, 3 00 

[saac Wbittemore, " " G, 3 00 

$ 9 00 

SELECTMEN. 

Paid Samuel Burnham, selectman, ward 1. 5 (•<• 

Davis Baker, " " 1 5 00 

\V. II. Farnum, " " 1 5 00 

Charles II. Brown, •• " 2 5 00 

Jonathan Hum, •• •• 2, 5 00 

J. T. Spofford, " •• 3 5 00 

Daniel M. Pari! tl, " " 3, 5 00 

Samuel Hall, » •• 3 5 00 

P. I'. Looke, »« •• ! 5 (ii) 

George Hunt, » » -1 5 00 

Amount CARRTKD rORWARD . r ><> 00 1 ,226 50 



71 

Amount brought forward, 50 00 1,220 50 

Paid George T. Mixer, « " 5, 5 00 

Cyrus Chase, " " 5, 5 00 

Henry F. Little, " " 6, 5 00 

John II. Proctor, " " G, 5 00 

$ 70 00 

CLERKS. 

Paid Caleb Duxbury, clerk ward 1, 5 00 

J. H. Ilaynes, «« " 3, 5 00 

" " for stationery, 50 

Samuel T. Jones, clerk ward 5, 5 00 

Samuel B. Paige, " " 6, 5 00 

$20 50 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Paid John C. Tasker, 35 00 

F. B. Eaton, 35 00 

James O . Adams, 35 00 

J. E. Bennett, 35 00 

Charles H. Eastman, 35 00 

D. C. Bent, 35 00 

$210 00 

HEALTH OFFICERS. 

Paid J. Allen Tebbetts, 25 00 

S. Bunton, 25 00 

Daniel L. Stevens, 25 00 

$ 75 00 

OVERSEERS OF POOR. 

Paid Joshua Dean, overseer of poor one year, 45 00 

D.Brigham, " " " 20 00 

D. B. Nelson, " " " 45 00 

Liberty Raymond, " " " 45 00 

D. llandlett, " " " 25 00 

Amaua Waterman, " " 45 00 

" " clerk of the board 1 year,. . 25 00 

$250 00 

Amount carried forward, 1,852 00 



72 



AMOUNT DROUGHT TORVfARD,. 



ASSESSORS. 



>2 00 



I 'aid Ira W. Moore, assessor 1 year, 70 00 



►Stephen Palmer. 
Joel Page, 
Mou 1 ton Knowles, 
Samuel Dame, 
Amasa Waterman, 



84 00 

45 00 

55 00 

55 00 

100 00 

making and returning list of 

railroad stock, 5 00 

D. Brigham, services as clerk of the board,. . . 50 00 



$464 00 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $711 50 



$2310 00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 52 62 

Appropriated April, 1853, 800 00 

Transferred from new highways, 250 00 

$1102 G2 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for advertising Ordinances, Resolutions, Noti- 
ces, printing Blanks, Warrants, Check 

Lists, Petitions, &c. , 

John B. Clarke, 192 55 

James O. Adams, 37 00 

Abbott, Jenks & Co., 105 96 

John H. Goodale, 48 28 

Campbell & Gilmore, 51 62 

James O. Adams for printing extra copies of 

School Committee Report, 42 00 

Abbott, Jenks & Co., for paper, printing and 
binding 1800 copies 7th 

Annual Report, 296 00 

•' " "for 500 copies Mayor's 

Address, 27 00 

" " " for 4000 tax bills, 24 00 

" "300 Municipal registers, 23 55 
" " "for paper, printing and 

binding mortgage book, 14 00 
Geo. A. French for cash paid for stationery &c, 1 50 
II. R. Chamberlin for stationery used in treas- 
urer's office, 1852, 1 50 

William Young for stationery, ink and sand,. 13 44 

William H. Fisk for " " " .. 26 36 

B. F. Edmunds for pens, 2 25 

$907 01 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $ 195 61. 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES, 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1,1853, 214G 72 

Appropriated April, 1853, 3000 00 

$3140 72 

EXPENDIT1 RES. 

Paid A. W. Sanborn for use of room for ward G,. . 5 00 
.M. [ngbam for watering streets for the season 
ending Oct. 1852, as per vote of city coun- 
cil,... 100 00 

William Craig for fixing court room, posting 

bills, &c, 15 53 

E. G. Haynes for whitewashing tree frames,... 5 40 
W. G. Iloyt for use of horses ami carriages ex- 
amining roads, bridges, routes for new 

highways, &c, 31 35 

A. P. Holmes for one cane seat chair, 2 50 

E. Perren for 70 yds. black cambric, 4 20 

Wilson ct Cheney for use of horses ami carria- 
ges by assessors, school committee, &c 26 00 

John B. Goodale for examining account for 

printing annual report, 1 00 

Joel Taylor for do 1 00 

Rodnia Xutt fox witness' fees 2 75 

Curtis Willey for burj ing dogs 1 00 

G. A. French for preparing 7th annual report, " n 00 
" " for cash paid physicians for 260 

returns of births and deaths,. 13 00 
'« for recording 260 births and 
deaths and 309 marriages, as 

per statute .34 14 

" " ' copying invoice I dd 

Qale & Merrill for rent of room fa- ward I,... li) (id 
Stilman Fellows for fixing room for ward 5,... S 25 
\niasa Waterman for taking inventory and 

preparing city farm report 10 00 

Jacob S. JTork for time and expense to Law- 
rence on « i t y business 2 Id 

C CARBIXD FORWARD 319 '-'2 



75 

Amount brought forward, 319 22 

PaidJ. D. Norton Tor Hayward's I . S. Gazetteer,. 3 00 
Hill & Cheney for use of horses and carriages 
examining roads, bridges, new highways, 

notifying officers, &c, 43 25 

Manchester post office, 33 62 

E. Know lton lor witness" fees, 3 00 

Mrs. Lucy for cleaning ward room, 1 50 

S. F. Manahan for attendance at 1J. II. hearing, 3 00 
William Patten for use of hall and preparing 

same for court, 114 00 

F. Smyth for cash paid expensrs to sundry pla- 

ces on city business, as per bill. 92 21 

J. G. Coult for trees, 14 25 

J. Eastman & Co., for whitewashing trees,. ... X 50 
Mace Moulton for services from March, 1852, 

to December, 1852, 40 84 

W. P. Stratton for use of room for ward 6, . . . 10 00 
Silas Tenney for damages to horse, &c, by de- 
fect in highway, 10 00 

A. II. Ilurd for use of horses and carriages ex- 

amining roads, brid ges , new h ighways , &c. , 11 00 

Fred'k G. Stark for running line to city farm,. 2 00 

G. L. Mathews for cutting stamp, 2 33 

Isaac Langley for repairing and keeping pound, 2 00 
J. L. Hadley for copies of acts of amendments 

to city charter, &c, 4 00 

Dennis & Varick for lantern, 75 

J. G. Eaton for horse hire on city business, 16 50 

J. W. Joy for attendance at R. R. hearing.. . . 2 00 
Iloyt & Ilurd for horse hire examining roads, 

bridges and new highways, 7 50 

P. Dodge for copy laying out Webster road.. .. 1 00 

Harvey Ward for witness' fees, 2 62 

John Shepherd, " " 2 62 

Ira Russell, " " 2 62 

Kleuzer Young, " " 1 37 

Warren Langmaid for burying dog, 50 

J. W. Boody for damago to horse by defect in 

highway, 10 00 

Amount carried forward, 765 20 



TO 

Amount brought forward, 705 20 

Paid Thomas S. Frost for witness' fees, 1 25 

Morrison & Fitch for professional services from 

July 1852, to February 1853, 35 00 

l>. & I). J. Clark for professional services from 

Dec. 1851, to Dec. 1853, 177 00 

Coffin & Sherburne for use of horse and carriage 

by assessors, school committee, &c, 1 75 

John N. Bruce for 3 signs for wood surveyors, 3 75 
S. II. & B. F. Ayer for professional services 

from Dec. 1852, to Jan. 1854, 50 00 

II. 11. Chamberlin, cash paid express, I 84 

C. B. Gleason & Co., for selling old town house, 

and cooperage, 5 00 

Oliver W. Hunt for witness' fees, 2 25 

J. B. Daniels for chest for ward 6, 6 00 

" " " fitting up ward room,- 3 00 

James Horsey on execution for services, school 

committee, 1849, 144 21 

William W. Morris on execution for damages 

by defect in highway, 1851 , 389 49 

Nathaniel Perkins, on execution for damages by 

sewer on Hanover street, Feb. 1852, 240 02 

Mary H. Jackson on execution for same, 448 68 

John S. Howell, " " ■' 474 31 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $2397 07. 



$274'.) 65 



INTEREST PAT]). 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1853, 250 32 

Appropriated April, 1853, 6000 00 

$0256 aa 

KXrENDITURES. 

Paid Joseph B. Walker, 480 71 

Sally Sargent, 120 00 

William Murdock, 12 00 

J. G. Cilley, 13 75 

Daniel B. Stearns, 26 60 

Henry R. Chamberlin, 5 50 

$658 56 

Paid coupons on city stock, 4729 84 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1854, $867 92. 



$5388 4«i 



CITY DEBT PAID 

Paid Joseph B. Walker, 3000 00 

J. G. Cilley, 500 00 

D. B, Stearns, , 400 00 

— — $390d <»<» 



CITY DEBT, FEB. 1, 1854. 













lii.-t uiipU 




Date of notes. 


low bom payable. 


When 


payable. 




Feb. 1. 54 


Am't. 


Oct. 18. 1844 


J. B. \\ alker. 


oct'r 


18, 1854. 




34 00 


2,000 00 


Jane 2, L846 


,. .( 


.Jun<^ 


2, 1857 




80 00 


2,000 00 
2.000 00 


Sept. 30, 1845. 


Sally Sargent. 


,; 


80, 186;',. 






2,000 00 


J«nu 4, 1851. 


Rhoda Wliittiur. 


" 


■!. 1 M 






550 00 


■• 6, " 


W. M unlock. 


« 


6, 18! 




: - 1 


200 00 


•■ 7. " 


R. Chaae. 


ii 


7, " 






1,500 00 


•July 14, 1851. 


J. A. Holmes. 


Julv 


14, " 




76 IT 


800 00 


Feb'y 26, 1852. 


N. Hunt. 


Feb'y 


28. 1872 






3,600 00 


July 1, 1847. 


Certifi'ts of Stock. 


July 


1, 1857. 
1. 1862. 
1, 1867. 
1, 1872. 


1000 


TOO 00 

1 


22 

2 

90,000 00 

20,000 00 

97.650 00 



Deduct indorsements, 

Actual debt Feb'y 1, 1854, - 

•■ret unpaid : b'y I 1854, 



1,000 00 

660 00 
8,918 48 

568 4C 



CITY DEBT. 



COMPARED WITH THAT OF LAST TEAK. 



I'he City debt at the commencement of the last finan- 
cial year, Feb'y L853, amounted to J? 07,550 0(j 

U has been increased the past year, by city stock sold,. 3,000 00 

| 100,550 00 
h in decreased the past year bj payi 

■;i' promissory aotes, 3,900 00 

del l b'y 1, L854, $96,650 00 

i due 3,913,43 



CITY PROPERTY. 

City Hall and lot, at cost, 34,115 00 

City Farms, (200 acres,) at cost, and permanent im- 
provements, 17,301 99 

Stock, tools, provisions and furniture at city farm, 3,673 55 
Engine houses and apparatus as per engineer's re- 
port, 10,000 17 

Reservoirs at cost, 4,601 98 

Hearses, house, tomb and new cemetery, at cost,. . 2,933 00 

Court house lot, at cost, including interest, 7,129 72 

( lommon sewers, at cost, 15,510 38 

Safe, furniture and gas fixtures at city hall, 808 14 

12 Street lanterns, posts, pipe and frames, 320 72 

4 Lantern frames on hand, 5 00 

96,549 65 

i^as'a in Treasury, Feb'y 1, 1854. 9,661 08 



DEBTS DUE THE CITY. 

n list of R. Means, collector of taxes for the 

year 1849, 2,600 47 

from J. M. Rowell, collector of taxes for the 

year 1850, 5,744 62 

• ; D. L. Stevens, " " 1851,. .3,266 75 

•• Wm. Richardson, " " 1852,. .2,798 39 

" H.G.Lowell, " " 1853,.. 7,075 20 

;i County of Hillsborough for support of 

paupers, 47 85 

•• Sundry persons to city farm, 15 00 

'• Other towns for support of paupers, 12 50 

• ; Daniel Marsh rent of store 2 quarters,. . . 158 15 

21,718 93 

Total amount of city property and debts due the city, $127,929 66 



SCHOOL DISTRICT PROPERTY. 



Dist. 



No. 1, ho 
o 



use and lot, 200 00 

" " Spring street, 9,800 00 

" " Bridge " 1,500 00 

" " Lowell " 0,400 00 

Concord " 1,325 00 

Granite " 500 00 

Merrimack 1,800 00 

" Park " 8,000 00 

" " Janesville H50 00 

2, •• " Falls, 200 00 

2, due on " Coe lot," noteB, &c, 1,450 00 

2, new house and lut, Manchester st.,. 8,000 00. 

3, house and lot, 200 00 

4, 
5, 
G, 
7, 



9, 



Total, $41,725 00 



400 00 


200 00 


200 00 


300 00 


200 00 


200 00 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



Valuation of Property, Taxes, number of Polls, and amount of Tax on 
the Poll for the sixteen years, commencing with the year 1838, and 
ending with the year 1853. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


| No. of polls. 


| Poll tax 


1838. 


.§555,270 00 


$2,235 49 


244 


$1 66 


1839. 


604,903 00 


3,029 84 


427 


2 14 


1840. 


946,200 00 


3.986 56 


772 


2 20 


1841. 


1,229,054 00 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


1842. 


1,430.524 00 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


1843. 


1,598,826 00 


13,764 32 


1 ,028 


2 60 


1844. 


1,873,286 00 


13,584 72 


1,561 


2 25 


1845. 


2,544,780 00 


19,246 27 


1 ,808 


2 30 


1846. 


3,187,720 00 


22,005 95 


2,056 


2 10 


1847. 


4,488,550 00 


24,963 54 


2,638 


1 68 


1848. 


4,604,957 00 


39,712 53 


2,518 


2 68 


1849. 


5,500,049 00 


44,979 92 


2,820 


2 47 


1850. 


5,832,080 00 


48,974 23 


2,910 


2 ?7 


1851. 


6,906.462 00 


51,798 47 


2,745 


2 25 


1852. 


6,795,682 00 


54,379 45 


2,907 


1 92 


1853. 


6,995,528 00 


61,545 81 


2,814 


1 82 



POPULATION OF MANCHESTER, 

AS APPEARS FROM RECORDS. 



Year. | No. of Males. No. of Females. Totat. 

1840 :;..-..., .7^775 ^3 5 

1844 



1850. 
1851. 
1852. 
1853. 



2,625 3,531 6,156 

1845 3,595 4,422 8,917 

1846 4,591 5,624 10,125 

1847 5,050 7,230 12,286 

1849 5,928 8,614 14,542 



5,337 8,997 14,334 

5,813 8,094 13,007 

5,844 9,106 14,030 

6,689 10,311 17,000 



* Notb.— No record of population in 1841, 1842, 1843 and 1846. 

6 



To the Joint Standing Committee on Finance : 

Gkntlemen : — Having been engaged by you to prepare and arrange 
the several items of your Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of 
the City for the last fiscal year, I have the pleasure to 6ubmit the fore- 
going. 

GEO. A. FRENCH. 

Manchester, Feb. 25, 1854. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 

Auditor's Oeftce, ) 
City of Manchester, Feb. 25, 185*. J 
t hereby certify that I have examined the several items of Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures embraced in tho foregoing Report of the 
"Joint Standing Committee on Finance," and find the same correctly 
^aat and properly vouched. 

GEO. A. FRENCH, City Auditor 



CITY FARM, AND ALMSHOUSE REPORT. 

To Ills Honor the Mayor, and City Council : 

Gextlemkn : — The Overseers of the Foor of the City of Manchester 
herewith present their Report, ending Feb'y 1, 1854 : 

Aid lias been rendered to two hundred and one persons in the course 
■of the year. 

Of these, one hundred and seventy-seven were county paupers, ono 
hundred and twenty of which have been sent to the county farm. Six 
of the number belonged to other town3 and the remainder to this city ; 
although but seven of this last number have been placed at the farm, as 
most of them have required but little assistance. 

Seventeen of the number to whom assistance has been rendered have 
died during the year — three at the city farm. Five of the number de- 
ceased belonged to this city. 

Sixty-four persons have been sent to the House of Correction during 
the year. 

The overseers have endeavored to encourage self-reliance in those re- 
quiring aid. by procuring employment for them in all cases where it 
could be done, rather than assisting them in idleness. By this means 
Beveral persons who have been paupers for years at the farm, are now 
making a comfortable living by their own exertions. 

The expenses of the pauper department will be found under the ap- 
propriate heads elsewhere, which will be seen to be considerably less 
than of some former years, notwithstanding the rapid increase of 
our population. After deducting what has been received back from the 
county and other towns, but a very small amount has been expended by 
the city on our pauper account. 

The whole amount expended by the city for county pan pers and for • 
paupers from other towns, has been promptly paid, ■ far a i presented,. 
and consequently the city has suffered no loss in this respect, as in for- 
mer years. 

The improvements of the Farm iced last year, such as clearing 

of unproductive lands, and procuring of t be manure from the streetsr 
and vaults of the city — have been continued the present year, the bener- 
ticial results of which, are beginning to ,! i smselves ia the in- 

creased productiveness of the farm. 

If the expenses of keepiug the sixty-four persons sent to the House 
of Correction dining the past y< c • ha tafeir labor 

has been worth, were credited to the farm, (which should h>, could the 
amount be ascertained) it would show a handsome income from tho. 
same, beside paying the interest on the cost of it. 



84 

Dr. City Farm in account current with fh' City qf 

To personal property on hand Feb'y 1, 1853, 3,020 75 

Expenditures the current year, 1 ,749 67 

Interest on City Farm, 850 78 

Amount due from County, Feb'y 1, 1853 24 74 

Six months' salary of Superintendent, du± March 4, 

1854, 162 50 



$6,414 44 



85 

Manchester from Feb. 1, 1853, to Feb. 1, 1854. Cr. 

Personal Property on hand at City Farm, Feb. 1, 1854 : 

By 1 yoke of oxen, and six cows , 375 00 

10 calves and 1 Durham bull 170 00 

2 horses, $350, and 7 swine, $105, 455 00 

25 hens and 6 turkeys, 12 00 

33 tons hay, 336 00 

l.J tons corn stalks and li do. of straw, 46 50 

140 bushels of oats, 70 00 

400 bushels of corn, 90 do. potatoes, 13 do. rye, 547 62 

6 bushels beans, 5 do. beets, 14 00 

4 bbls. clear pork, 3 do. hams and should :rs 148 00 

U bbls. beef, and 100 lbs. fresh meat. 23 75 

180 lbs. lard, and 75 lbs. tallow, 40 00 

3 bbls. vinegar, 1 do. cider, garden sauce, and other pro- 

visions and groceries, 58 88 

Beds and bedsteads, and all other household furniture of 

every kind in the house, 438 55 

65 corJ.-t of wood, prepared, 195 00 

3 wagons, 4 carts, 7 plows, 5 sleds, 2 harrows, 2 hay 

racks, cultivator, corn sheller, winnowing mill, and 

farming tools of all kinds, 562 50 

Grain chests, work bench, casks, lumber, old iron, lime, 180 75 

Amount of personal property, $3,673 55 

Supporting city paupers, 455 00 

" paupers from other towns, 12 50 

Due from county of Hillsborough, 47 85 

Cash received for produce, &c, sold from City Farm, and 

paid into treasury, by G. VV. Stuart, to Feb. 1, 1854, 867 66 

lxibor done on streets, and permanent improvements of farm : 

Labor of teams on streets, and drawing manure to city farm, 608 75 

Clearing 7 acres of land, 70 00 

Building "1 rods stone wall, 124 25 

Lumber, and finishing corn chamber, and stalls in barn,. 160 00 

42 loads night manure, 210 00 

5 new gates and irons, watering trough, and other im- 

provements, 35 00 

Due from sundry persons, 15 00 

Amount to balance, 134 88 



$6,414 44 



86 

The PRODUCE OP THE FARM during the year is aa follows : 

50 tons of hay, valued at $1,000 00 

1000 bushels ears of corn, " " 500 00 

300 " potatoes, " " 180 00 

328 . " oats, " " 104 00 

20 » peas, •« « 30 00 

10 " beans, " " 20 00 

10 " parsnips, " " : 2W 

3 barrels apples, " " 9 00 

5 cart loads pumpkins, " " 15 00 

800 cabbages, " " 40 00 

15 bushels onions, " " 12 00 

40 M turnips, " " 14 00 

8 " beets, " " 4 00 

2 " peaches, " " 2 0t» 

Oshoats, " " W 80 

2000 lbs. pork and lard, " " 200 50 

250 " butter, « " • 50 00 

300 n squashes, " " 3 00 

36 turkeys, " " 27 00 

25 chickens, " " 8 00 

15 calves (10 raised,) " " 150 00 

10 bushels carrots, " " 4 00 

25 " rye, " " 29 00 

6 tons straw, " " 60 00 

7176 quarts milk, " " 287 00 

$2,011 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

FREDERK K SMYTH, Mnjor, 

( 'hairman cx-ojficio. 
AM ASA V, ATERMAN, "| 
STEPHEN PA1 MKII, I 
DAM ML W. FLING, 
ROBERT MOORE, f 

(.. G. Gl [LFORD, Poo*. 

DANIEL i l \ ! J 

In Board and Aldermen, February 14, 1854 

Read, accepted, and ord r I to I ) rinted ; 

I EO. A. FRENCH, CUy Oert. 

In Coi i i toil, February 20, ' ' 

Read, and accepted in concur] I ordered to be printed ; 

IS A At' W. SMITH, < 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S OFFICE. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and Aldermen of the City of Man- 
chester : 

Gentlemen : — Annexed hereto please find schedule of property, and 
other items connected with the Fire Department of this city, in con- 
formity to City Ordinance, No. 9, Section 3. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 

HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 
PETER S. BROWN, Foreman. 

50 MEN. 

House and land, $1,100 00 

Engine and hose carriage, 1,000 00 

650 feet leading hose, 250 00 

20 spanners and belts, 10 00 

8 hosemen's suits, 28 00 

9 " hats, 27 00 

1 trumpet, 5 00 

4 lengths suction, 50 00 

4 suction spanners, 1 33 

1 wrench, 1 00 

5 life ropes, 1 25 

Spare rope, 15 00 

1 signal, 10 00 

4 torches, 6 00 

Tin cans, pails and boiler, 10 50 

3 stoves and pipe, 25 00 

Pump, shovel, bar and screw, 10 00 

14 settees, 40 00 

Chairs, table and lamps, 13 75 

Sign, 25 00 

Amount carried forward, $2,628 8? 



88 

Ajkount BRoccnT FoawAno, $2,028 83 

KNGINE Co., No. 2, AND HOSE Co. ATTACHED. 

HOUSE IN MACHINE SHOP YARD. 

AAKON WALDRON, Foreman. 
knows co. 50 wen. hokk co. 26 men. 

300 feet leading hose $150 00 

% fire hats, 15 00 

10 hosemen's caps, 40 00 

9 Oil cloth suits 22 50 

80 badges, 20 00 

20 ' ' leading hose, 5 00 

1 crow bar, 1 00 

!2 hosemen's belts, 6 00 

4 life ropes, 1 00 

'4 speaking trumpets, 10 00 

I Htove and pipe, 25 00 

1 1 settees, 44 00 

12 chairs, 4 00 

4 office chairs, 5 00 

1 table, 5 00 

1 lantern 1 50 

$355 00 

The engine and balance of hose is owned by the 

Amoskeag Company, and the uso of the Bame i.-< 
given gratis to the city at tires. 

ENGINE Co., No. 3. 

nOUSE IN STARK MILLS YA1U-. 
M. N. YOUNG, Foreman. 

50 MK.N. 

I '. settees, $52 00 

3 chairs and table 6 00 

I stove and pipe, 30 00 

1 signal, 15 00 

2 trumpets, 1 < » 00 

8 oil suits, 10 00 

8 hro caps, 32 00 

250 Feet leading hose 125 00 

$280 00 

The engine and balance of hose is owned by the 

Ml Mills, and the use of the nume iH given gratis 

to i he city at lir.H. 

Amount carried roR\r a»d | 



89 

Amount brought forward, $3,263 83 

ENGINE Co., No. 4. 

HOUSE ON CHESTNUT STREET. 
C. N. HAINES, Foreman. 

50 MEN'. 

House and land $900 00 

Engine and hose carriage, 900 00 

300 feet new loading hose, 210 00 

340 " " " 102 00 

125 " " " 12 50 

Extra pipe and nozzles 20 00 

Oil cans, vice and wrench, 4 00 

50 badges and keys, 10 00 

I lantern and 3 lamps, 4 50 

9 hats and caps, 45 00 

9 hosemen's suits, 31 50 

1 signal, 15 00 

4 lengths of suction, 50 00 

2 trumpets, 10 00 

Belts and spanners, 11 00 

7 life ropes, 1 75 

Stoves and pipe, 20 00 

5 torches, 7 50 

10 settees and desk, 27 00 

Pump and shovel, 4 00 

Couplings on old hose, 5 00 

$2,390 75 

ENGINE Co., No. 5. 

IIOUSE ON MANCHESTER STREET. 
E. P. RICHARDSON, Foreman. 

50 MEN. 

House and land, $1,200 00 

Engine and hose carriage, 900 0O 

25 feet suction, 75 00 

550 " leading hose, 200 00 

2 stoves and pipe, 20 00 

I signal, 7 00 

5 torches and 2 lanterns, 3 50 

Amount carried forward, 2,405 50 $5,654 58 



90 

Amount BROUGHT forward, $2,405 50 $5,654 5S 

Oil cans, boiler and paiis, 4 34 

24 spanners and belts, 12 00 

8 hosemen'e hats, 36 00 

8 " oil pants and jackets, 28 00 

9 settees, 20 00 

60 badges, 15 00 

2 locks and 70 keys, 15 00 

Shovels, vice and bar, 4 50 

7 life ropes, 1 75 

9 chairs and desk, 10 00 

Branch pipe and extra brakes, 14 00 

2 patent couplings, 10 00 

2 trumpets 10 00 



$2,596 09 



ENGINE Co., No. 0. 

HOUSE IN MANCHESTER MILLS YARD. 
M. C. LANG, Foreman. 

50 MEN. 

1 signal, $10 00 

13 settees, 52 00 

3 office chairs, 4 50 

5 small " 3 00 

1 table, 3 00 

Stove and pipe, 23 00 

1 trumpet, 5 00 

8 hosemen's hats, 30 00 

8 jackets 24 00 

300 feet Leading bose 150 00 



$310 50 

The engine and balance of hose is owned by the 
Manchester Mills, aud the use of tlio same is . 
gratis to the city at fires. 
Amount carried i-orward, $8,561 17 



91 



Amount brought forward,. 



(,5G1 17 



AMOSKEAG HOSE AND HYDRANT Co., No. I. 

HOUSE IN YARD OF AMOSKEAG MILLS. 
II. B. MOULTON, Foreman. 

40 MEN. 

Signal, $12 00 



4 torches,. 



The hose carriages, ladders, huckets, and 1000 
feet of leading hose is owned by the Amoskeag Co., 
and the use of the same is given gratis to the city 
at fires. 



8 00 



— $20 00 



HOOK AND LADDER Co., No. 1. 

HOUSE ON MANCHESTER STREET. 
II. DICKEY, Foreman. 

44 MEN. 

House and land, $1,000 00 

Carriage, 150 00 

Signal, torches, trump :t, 11 00 

32 badges, 5 00 

528 feet ladders, 100 00 

4 large and 3 small hooks, 40 00 

Stoves and pipe, 12 00 

Axes, shovel?, hay forks and buckets, 9 50 

Pike poles and chain, 25 00 

Lamps, chairs, desk and table, 4 50 

9 settees, 18 00 

Rope 30 00 

ENGINEERS. 

18 badges, 12 00 

trumpets, 25 00 

10 coats, 25 00 

Signal.. • 12 00 



$1,405 00 



$74 00 



$io,oco i; 



92 

Tlie Tarious RESERVOIRS and CISTERNS are sit- 
uated as follows, viz : 

tfo. 1, City Hall, Elm street. 

•' 2, Corner of Chestnut and Hanover 

•' 3, Mitchell's, on Man 

•• 4, MeQueston's on Merrimack 

• • "> Pino street, near Manchester 

" G, Corner of Hanover and I'ino 

• 7, " " Central and " 

" 8, " "Concord " " 

'• 9, School house on Lowell 

" 10, Tremont square. 

" 11, Bridge, on corner of Birch 

•' 12, Union street, head of Hanover 

• ' 13 , Steam Mill at Janesville. 

•* 14, Near Wells' building on Elm " 

Pond on Merrimack Square. 



.ill of which, are in jrood condition. 



" Concord 
11 Hanover 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 

JOHN H. MAYNARD, Chief Engineer. 
0. Doxburt, Clerk. 

J.A.Stearns, ") f*C. DuXBUBT, 

John 15. CLARKE, ( , . ... I W. 15. WEBSTER, 

,,,.>, > Assistants. < T r» ... 

It. D. Mooers, [ ] d. (.,». A. Sargent, 

('has. H. Brown, J |_ Harry Leeds, 

J. L. Kkli.kv. 



Committees of the Board have examined the various buildings used 
For Stores, Dwellings, and Workshops, with a view to their g n iral safe- 
ty. The examination extended to wards 7 and S, on the west side of 
I ■ : iver. 

Whole number stoves, &o.j 4162, of whioh number 661 oonsid- 

ured in an ansafe condition, and the occupants duly notifl d of th*> 



narno, 



Tho DEPARTMENT has been called out 15 times by alarms and fin* 
Tho amount of property destroyed is as follows : 

Damage. 

July 6th, house on Hanover street, 100 00 

" 13th, Offutt's building, 2,930 20 

Sept. 22d, Manchester Print Works,.... 204,223 96 
Oct. 4th, North Picker— Stark Mills,... 857 23 
Oct. 13th, " " Amoskeag, 4th, 596 12 
Dec. 9th, Hubbard's and others, Elm Rt., 2,425 00 



Insurance . 


160 00 


1,980 20 


150,000 00 


857 23 


596 VI 


1,062 92 



These amounts were obtained from the £ $271,192 51 $154,656 4', 
parties themselves. 



The various companies have the requisite number of members. I have 
frequently visited them in their meetings, and cannot refrain from bear- 
ing my testimony to the promptness and regularity with which they 
despatch business, and the alacrity and energy which has always char- 
acterized them at fires. 

My Assistants I have always found prompt in the discharge of their 
duty. 

The whole Department is in as efficient condition as heretofore. 
All which is respectfully submitted, 

JOHN 11. MAYNARD, Chief Engineer 

February 13, 1854. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Feb. 14, 1853 : 
Read, accepted, and ordered to be printed : 

GEO. A. FRENCH, City Clerk. 



KEPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

2"'> the lion. Mayor, and Aldermen of the City of Manchester : 

In rendering an account of our for the past 

year, we do it the more cheerfully, in the belief that our la- 
bors have not been altogether in vain. To any one con- 
versant with our duties, it need not be said that the office of 
School Committee is no sinecure. Should there be any who 
think differently, we would most cordially invite them to take 
our places, for only one year, and we predict they would need 
no further proof. 

One of our Board, Rev. Mr. Spaulding, early in the year, 
wa3 taken from us, by being removed to another field of labor, 
in a neighboring city. Although we did not long enjoy hia 
able and highly valued cooperation, still he was with us long 
enough to endear himself I i each of a moral worth, 

his urbanity of manner and his wise a ioua counsel. 

We take great pleasure in being able to make this public re- 
cord of our sincere regard for him, as a high-mi ailed, honor- 
able gentleman, a ripe and accomp 1 ' . , a pure phil- 
anthropist and an exemplary chri itian. 

Although our duti been arduous, maki ig heavy drafts 

upon our time, still they have b rformed, and 

even increased upon oui Is, 1 the belief that the ''read 

now cast upon the in in due time. 

One subject upon which • • hav< B] i ime than any 

preceding committee, y, more than 

necessity required, has bo< a tl 1 selection of 

teachers. 

For various reasons, m ist of them beyond our control, there 
has been a much gr< ater- hers tl d in any pre- 

ceding year in the history chools. In the early part 

of the year, we adopted a rule, giving all applicants an oppor* 



95 

tunity to be examined, with the understanding that they should 
be regarded according to their merits, whenever any choice of 
teachers should be made. It was also decided that no selec- 
tion for any situation as teacher would be made, until the com- 
mittee were satisfied, either by personal examination or other- 
wise, of the applicant's entire fitness for the place. Conse- 
quently we have examined over one hundred applicants, includ- 
ing our old teachers, during the year. Among these there are 
many from whom we can make selections to fill any vacancies 
which may hereafter occur. 

The liberality manifested by District No. 2, in authorizing 
us to give such salaries as might secure the best instruction, 
has enabled us to procure teachers of talent, as well as much 
practical experience for most of the situations we have had to 
fill. And we fully believe that as a whole, Manchester can, at 
the present time, boast of as talented and efficient a corps of 
teachers, as any town or city of the same means in the country. 

Last year's report commenced with a history of the origin 
and progress of the Old District regime. This year the ques- 
tion of consolidating the districts has been suggested, and may 
be of sufficient importance as to claim further attention. We 
do not propose to enter into any extended argument on the 
subject, but will merely allude to a few of the advantages 
which might accrue from the one district system. The schools 
could be arranged with much more uniformity and system. 
There would be a more equal distribution of the privileges, 
which the Common School System was designed to furnish. 
It would render powerless those factions which now stand 
in the way of all improvement, in furnishing suitable school- 
houses. More regular gradations could be established, and all 
could avail themselves of the privileges afforded by our High 
and Grammar Schools, without any jealousy arising, as now, 
from district limits. The superintendence and regulation of 
the schools would be far less perplexing and arduous than at 
present. 

We think it particularly desirable that the annexed portions 



96 



of Bedford and Goffstown, together with the growing villa 
of Hallsville and Bakersville, should be united with District 
No 2, on account of the absolute necessity which w. 11 soon 
exist of grading the schools there. As things now are, it ffi 
only hy courtesy that any scholar out of the limits of Dis- 
trict No. 2, can enjoy the privileges of our High or Grammar 
Schools. We earnestly hope that some plan may be devised, 
by which these defects in our system may be remedied. 

Something was said in the last report in regard to the pro- 
priety of employing a general Superintendent to look after the 
interests of our schools, and a law was passed at the last ses- 
sion of the legislature, authorizing it to be done. But this, to- 
gether with the district question, went " by the board," m con- 
sequence of being found in bad company. And we would now 
Buggest, as a remedy, that the School Committee be authorised 
toTppoint one of their number to perform this duty, to the ex- 
tent needed, and that the city council appropriate sufficient 
money for this object, to pay him a fair compensation for his 
services. We believe that an interest of as high importance 
as that of our schools, the disbursement of the amount of 
money necessary to keep them in successful operation, togeth- 
er with multitudinous difficulties of daily occurrence to In- 
looked into and settled, need more the guiding hand and vigi- 
lant eye of an intelligent and judicious Superintendent, than 
that of our streets, or any other interest in our city. 



NUMBER ONE. 

The school in flns district, though small during ihe sunu,< r 
term, manifested a good degree of interest, and energy. We 
were so fortunate as to secure the services of Miss Julia A. 
Baker, a well known and tried teacher. She succeeded fully 
in maintaining her former reputation, and discharged her du- 
ties to the entire satisfaction of the Committee and the district 



97 

Miss Baker possesses both energy of character, and devotion 
to her calling, which with some slight improvement in manner, 
will render her one of our most acceptable teachers. 

Mr. White, who commenced the winter school, was a worthy 
and self-reliant young man, with very respectable acquirements, 
but failed of success for want of experience, knowledge of hu- 
man nature, a just discrimination of the wants of his pupils, 
and a right appreciation of what was required of him in the 
school-room. Finding that we were spending the money to no 
purpose, the school was suspended at the end of four weeks. 
It has but just commenced again under the instruction of Mr. 
Mitchell, of whose success we have favorable anticipations. 
The necessity of changing a teacher is always to be deplored. 
However fortunate we may be in procuring a successor, we 
believe that the retention even of an inferior teacher would 
sometimes be preferable to a change. 



NUMBER THREE. 

This is a populous and growing district, and is so situated in 
regard to District No. 2, that a portion of its scholars now 
attend the schools in that district, and as we have already sug- 
gested, should become a part of it, and enjoy the same grada- 
tions. Instead thereof, the numerous scholars which remain 
are obliged to bo cooped into a little old " seven by nine" 
house, the plastering falling off, the floors flooded every time 
the rain descends, and the stove funnel almost in contact with 
the scholars' heads. Yet, with all these inconveniences wc 
can report a very commendable progress in this school, both in 
the summer and winter terms. Miss Pickering, a young lady 
possessing a good degree of dignity, and decision of character, 
and very fair attainments, was selected for the summer term. 
Although she had not very extensive experience in teaching, 
she succeeded to the entire satisfaction of the committee 
7 



98 



Mr Harriman, who was selected for the winter term, is well 
known an, and, though not maldng teaching Ins regular 

business, I large experience in .t - is well ,ualmed to 

give insta ad te manage a difficult school, and has, thm 

ftr, man* the interest and vigor of ha more youthful 

teaching. Some might consider his notions *4£"£ » 
we most say, with all due deference to such critics, UiM we 
Xd, on looking into his school, some old-fashioned tags 
Uich we like to see -one of the, I ™*W 

„„ entering and leaving the school-room, and "<"?«"> 
and closing a recitation, &c. The school is evidently doing 
Z\. We wish we could provoke the district < budd a bette. 
house, with such other accommodations as arc needed. llus 
•„ „„e of the reasons, as we have before suggested, why we 
should desire the consoUdation of our school distncte. We 
understand that the lot, upon which the house now stands, >s 
claimed as private property, and that ,t wdl soon have to be 
moved. Wo shall not very much regret tins, providing .1 Will 
end in improving the present house ami appurtenances. 



NUMBER FOUR. 

This school has a very comfortable schoolroom : indeed tin- 
best out of Number Two, and should rank as one ol .he best 
and most advanced schools. Still it falls behmd many others 
hrtb! city. We attribute it in pari to the want .1 harmony 
^cheLm the elemento of which the ^composed. 

The useful,,, of the .-! is has 1 a very much prevent- 
ed the past venr, from the i.npessibilh, one having 

eoyU.L away; • ^ ^'^T^J 

eienftl -ay be, so long as the pres entfeeh e 

Could w — plastic paatenals; i -.: ■'« ■■ 

,„, ,i ■■ members of to district, we should not de 



99 



occupy. Still there arc a few scholars who have made com- 
mendable improvement and deserve favorable notice. Some 
of the classes in Geography and Arithmetic showed good pro- 
gress, but were wanting in that energy and force which we like 
to see in recitations. We observed a tendency to read too 
rapidly ; consequently there was a great want of distinctness 
We think this is often the fault of teachers. Where they speak 
with force and energy, showing perfect confidence in their own 
abilities, children are likely to follow in the same path. 

Miss Merrill, the summer teacher, is very amiable, and so 
far as scholarship is concerned, a lady well qualified for the 
situation ; but from feeble health, she seemed to be wanting i n 
that energy which renders itself contagious, and diffuses itself 
into every fibre and tissue of the school. 

Mr. Lord, the winter teacher, a member of Dartmouth Col- 
lege, is a young man of good natural and acquired ability, of 
great decision of character, possessing a good degree of prac- 
tical wisdom, but wanting in that experience which alone can 
perfect a teacher. He has labored under the disadvantage of 
a want of cooperation on the part of some of the parents but 
has discharged his duties to the satisfaction of the committee 
and a good proportion of the district. 



NUMBER FIVE. 



This school was small during the summer, and from a want 
of punctuality in attendance, did not make that marked ad- 
vancement which it might otherwise have done. The teacher. 
Miss Webster, says in her report : 

"A single glance at the 'Record of Attendance,' contained 
m this Register, will plainly exhibit to the candid eye, the rea- 
son why more improvement was not made in some of the 
branches taught. An ordinarily sized class in History was 
obliged to be abandoned on account of the absence of its mem- 



100 

bers. In Arithmetic, Grammar, and advanced Geography, 
there was but an occasional recitation for the same reason. In 
the primary classes great improvement was made. In punctu- 
ation these classes were perfect. These pupils were constant 
m their attendance. In the first two classes particular atten- 
tion was paid to enunciation. Absence did not so much affect 
this. Those little items comprising rules of spelling, punctua- 
tion, use of the capital letters, and all those in which daily 
practice is necessary to perfect the pupil's knowledge of them, 
were learned and forgotten. A great part of the time t 
two classes were absent, and these were the principal classes ex- 
amined at the close of the term. The teacher tried almost in 
vain to excite ambition and interest in her pupils. After a few 
days' attendance, when new interest had been awakened, some 
one or two of a class must remain at home, to gather berries, 
to make or receive visits ; or because of their own inclination. 
Then on their return, the class had advanced beyond them. 
This discourages, and produces several poor lessons, again to 
be interrupted by another continued absence. The teacher has 
not been assured of the willingness of parents to acquiesce in 
her system of management. They have not feared to express 
their opinion of the school and teacher in the presence of their 
children, and marked effects have been produced by it. By 
many of the pupils, however, so great a degree of imi 
merit has been made, that she does not feel that the sum; 
labor has been lost." 

Miss W. is a very worthy and accomplished lady, a daugh- 
ter of one of our old citizens, ami has that interest and love 
for the calling, which we predict, under favorable circumstan- 
ces, will render her eminently successful as a teacher. K 
of her classes, particularly in reading and enunciation' 
remarkably well. 

The winter school, under the tuition of Mr. Wallace, has 
been much larger, a class of older scholars attending, — some 
of them very good. The < ; arithmetic on examination 

appeared to very good advantage. There was. however, a 



101 

certain uncoutlmess manifested in the deportment of some 
of the larger boys, which, if corrected, would greatly improve 
the appearance of the school. Mr. W. is a gentleman of ma- 
ture age, of ripe scholarship, having been long engaged in the 
business of teaching, and still manifests all the interest of a 
" first love" for his calling. The house in this district, like 
most of the others out of No. 2, is inconvenient, and entirely 
inadequate to the wants and comfort of the number of scholars 
who have attended this winter. 



DISTRICT NUMBER SIX, 

Known as the Webster District, has a small school, which 
will take rank as one of the best in the city. We have been 
particularly fortunate in the selection of our teachers for this 
year, and can report a good degree of progress. The scholars 
were young, and few in number, during the summer term, and 
of course could not be very far advanced. But their teacher, 
Miss Baker, who has had much experience in teaching, was inde- 
fatigable in her exertions, manifesting an energy and persever- 
ance much beyond her physical strength. She says in her re- 
port, " marked improvement has been made in geography — con- 
siderable attention has been given to enunciation." 

The winter school has had an addition of an older and more 
advanced class of scholars. They have enjoyed the instruc- 
tion of one of the most systematic and thorough teachers we 
have among us, and for variety and advancement of studies, 
this school may well compare in some of its departments, with 
our High School. Mr. Upton is a man of few words, stands 
erect, with a dignity of manner which commands love as well 
as respect. Every word has a meaning which is perfectly un- 
derstood and appreciated. He is clear and concise in his 
teachings ; consequently, there being no occasion for moral 
lectures, much has been accomplished. We commend his ex- 



102 

ample, in this respect, to all moralizing teachers. Although 
Mr. U. has his attention turned towards another profession, -we 
can but express our individual wishes that he might be in- 
duced to remain in his present occupation. 



DISTRICT NUMBER SEVEN. 

The school is situated at Hallsville, contiguous to No. 2, and 
as avc have before hinted, should be made a part of it. The 
school is large, the variety of studies extensive, and, as 
now arranged, it is beyond the power of any one teacher to 
do justice to the scholars. We have, however, been fortunate 
both summer and winter, in securing the services of teachers 
possessing a good degree of energy, both intellectually and 
physically ; and what could be done by a single teacher, has 
been done during the summer and winter terms, by Miss Rog- 
ers and Mr. Lear. This school has some scholars as good as 
can be found in any of our schools, not excepting No. -. We 
find a good degree of general intelligence, showing that the 
instructions have not been of a superficial character, nor con- 
fined to text books alone. 



DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT. 

This school is small, both summer and winter, and cannot 
occupy much space in our report. Though few in number, 
there are some interesting children. Under the instruction of 
x ' M. J. Rowell, in the Bummer, and Mr. Cummings in the 
winter term, the school maintained a very respectable tank. 
The schnnl-roomitf very contracted, and improperly constructed. 



103 

DISTRICT NUMBER NINE. 

This school, under the instruction of Miss Gregg during the 
summer term, nude very commendable progress. The classes 
in geography in particular, appeared remarkably \ ell, showing 
by their ready and confident answers, that they had been well 
instructed, and had imbibed something from the life and energy 
shown by their teacher. They fully redeemed the pledge 
given when they were furnished with " outline maps," that 
they would try and make good use of them. Mr. Corning 
also appears to have done good service. In looking into his 
school, early in the term, the classes in arithmetic, though not 
far advanced, seemed to be on the right road. The school 
house is open., cold and uncomely, and is a monument of dis- 
grace to the district. The school is small, and we have no 
doubt that this, with the schools in Districts No. 1 and 8, could 
be as well taught and managed by an energetic female, as by 
a male teacher, thereby saving expense, and lengthening out 
the school. 



DISTRICT NUMBER TWO. 

This district embraces all the schools within the limits of 
what is now called the city proper. These are the only schools 
which continue through the year. They are twenty-five in 
number ; twelve Primary, seven Middle, two Miscellaneous, 
one Intermediate, two Grammar, and a High School. In these 
are employed thirty-three teachers — five male and twenty-eight 
female. Included in these is the teacher of Writing, Mr. Ger- 
rish, who divides his time between the High and Grammar 
schools, much the same as last year. During the last term he 
has also devoted some time to the Intermediate school, substi- 
tuting for writing in the High school, a practical exercise in 
Book-keeping. The school year in this district is divided into 
four terms, three of eleven weeks each, and one of ten. 



104 

These schools remain much the same as last year, with the 
exception of an additional Middle school and the pcrmanei. 
tablishment of the Primary school, which was temporarily 
taught in a hired room at the time of last year's report. 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

These schools have been appropriately numbered during the 
present year, and Ave will now speak of each in its order. 

Number One, on Lowell Street, continues, as last year, un- 
der the judicious management of Miss Mary J. Eaton. Her 
school is orderly and systematic, and is, itself, the best com- 
ment upon her usefulness as a teacher. 

Number Two, in the same building, was kept by Mi- 
nice P. Webster till near the close of the spring term. At her 
own request she was then transferred to the school in District 
No. 5, Miss Marion M. Ladd taking her place for the remain- 
ing two weeks. At the commencement of the summer term. 
Miss Susanna Stevens, well known among us as a primary 
teacher on Manchester Street, was placed in charge, and 
continued till the present time, faithfully and successfully dis- 
charging the duties of teacher in this school. 

The two schools above spoken of have not been <piite so fully 
attended as some others of the same grade, the pupils being 
mostly the children of foreigners, and somewhat irregular in 
their attendance. There arc some very bright, orderly 
interesting scholars among them. 

NUMBER THREE, on Bridge Street, is still kept by Miss Han- 
nah (!. Lane ; and perhaps it is enough to say that her p: 
is in the mouths of all ] an ots, as well ai of all the little 
and -ills who attend her school. She has a remarkably happy 
faculty of interesting an. I keeping employed her little charge. 
Her school is always full. 

Numbeb Four, on Concord Street, continues under the sue- 



105 

cessful charge of Miss Mary E. Young, arid though not the 
largest, is one of the prettiest primary schools in the city. 
The committee and citizens speak unanimously in her praise. 

Number Five, on Merrimack Street, was taught during the 
spring term by Miss E. J. Weir. Since then it has been under 
the care of Miss Julia A. Lull. The school has always been 
very fall, and it would be difficult for any one, however expe- 
rienced, to bring order and harmony out of so chaotic a mass. 
Still we think it has been improving, and that Miss L. will, in 
time, make a good and orderly school of it. 

Number Six, on Park Street, continued under the success- 
ful instruction of Miss Lucre tia D. Lane up to the close of the 
fall term, when upon the urgent solicitations of an ex-commit- 
tee man she was induced to enter upon a new field of labor, and 
her place was supplied by Miss Mary A. Richardson. The 
school appears well under her charge. 

Number Seven, in the same house, is still taught by Miss 
M. R. Scott. This school is mostly composed of the children 
of foreigners, having among them some very smart and inter- 
esting scholars. The school is well managed and does credit 
to its teacher. 

Number Eight, on the corner of Granite and Franklin 
Streets, is an old school-room in a new location. Miss Amanda 
"W. Brown, who had for a long time occupied the same room on 
Manchester Street, moved with the school-room and continued 
in charge till the close of the fall term, when she resigned. 
Her place has been filled by Miss S. S. Putney, who is an ex- 
perienced teacher, and gives good indications of success in her 
present position. 

Number Nine, on Spring Street, has been for some years 
under the successful teaching and care of Miss H. W. Patter- 
son, and still maintains its high rank for system and activity. 
Miss P. is one of our most faithful and earnest teachers, and 
deserves well of the community whom she is serving. 

Number Ten, in the same house, is still kept by Miss S. W. 
Bodwell. This is a very large school and has many very pret- 



106 

ty and sprightly children in it, but there is a looseness in its 
arrangement, a disregarding of prescribed rules and a disposi- 
tion to follow the whims of parents, which if carried out in all 
our schools, would entirely subvert our whole system of grada- 
tions. 

Number Eleven, on Manchester Street, occupies a new 
and beautifully furnished room under the Intermediate school- 
room. The school in its present form has been in operation 
only about eight weeks, and is under the care of Miss Helen 
M. Morrill. Miss M. is a young lady of great sprightliness, 
ready scholarship, with a love for children, which we predict 
may render her successful as a teacher when she acquires ex- 
perience. A little more system would improve her school. 

Number Twelve, in the same building, has a room of the 
same beautiful finish. Miss Marion M. Ladd, who now occu- 
pies the room, for the summer and fall terms and three weeks 
of the winter term, occupied the hall of the engine house near 
by, whilst the new house was in process of completion. In the 
hall. Miss Ladd's charge was literally a host. But in a very 
quiet way she managed to have " a place for every thing and 
every thing in its place." And now in her new room every 
thing moves on like clock-work. 

The Primary school on Elm Street, was taught during the 
spring term by Miss Harriet A. Eaton, when its pupils were 
distributed between the two schools on Lowell Street. So sat- 
isfactory were the services of Miss E. that she was promoted 
to a Middle school, which she declined in consequence of her 
parents leaving town. 

Something like one hundred and thirty pupils will be promot- 
ed from tlic Primary to the Middle BChools at the commence- 
ment of Dext term. 



107 
.MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

This grade of schools, which now numbers seven, takes the 
pupils from the Primary and prepares them for the Grammar 
schools. This is an important period in the education of our 
children, and much for the future depends upon the direction 
here given, and the habits of study here formed. Consequent- 
ly we should be very particular in the selection of those whom 
we set over them as guides and exemplars. They should be 
" watchmen," or watchwomen, " thoroughly furnished, full of 
good works, and apt to teach." To secure such has been the 
especial design of the committee. 

Number One, on Bridge Street, was, for a part of the 
spring term, under the instruction of Miss Julia A. Baker, who, 
from an earnest wish of the people in District No. l,was trans- 
ferred to that school. Miss Julia A. Brown was selected to fill 
her place, and has continued successfully and acceptably per- 
forming the duties of teacher there since. This school has 
made very marked improvement in its deportment during the 
past year, and sends up twelve to the Grammar school at the 
commencement of the next term. 

Number Two, on Concord Street, continues under the care 
of Miss E. T. B. Woodworth, who is thorough and systematic 
in her instruction and discipline. Her school always appears 
well, and renders a good report of her faithfulness as an in- 
structress by sending up about fifteen, well fitted, to the Gram- 
mar School. 

Number Three, on Merrimack Street, is still taught by 
Miss N. S. Bunton. This is one of the largest schools of this 
class in the district, and always appears well. It has been 
frequently remarked by the committee that Miss B. keeps a 
good school and is constantly improving, being ever ready to 
receive and act upon any suggestions made to her by them. 
This school sends eighteen to the Grammar Schools. 

Number Four, on Park Street, continues under the judi- 
cious and successful management of Miss E.J. Ayer. Though 



108 

the location is unpleasant, the school appears well, and has 
some very smart and energetic scholars. Nineteen are pre- 
pared to enter the Grammar school. 

Nl MBER Five is a new school in an old room, on the cor- 
ner of Granite and Franklin Streets. This is the same build- 
ing and room which ran away from Miss Stevens on Manches- 
ter Street, wheeled into line here, and took a step in advance 
at the beginning of the summer term. This change, as well as 
the location of a Primary school here, seemed to be demanded 
in order to relieve the plethora of the Spring Street schools of 
the same grade. This school commenced under the instruction 
of Mrs. Bowman, and continued for two terms, when she re- 
signed and Miss Rowena Hamblett was selected to take her 
place. Mrs. Bowman was an old teacher, and labored hard to 
benefit the school ; but it being new, and made up of very di- 
verse elements, and there being a necessity for managing pa- 
rents to a certain extent, as well as children, she found it a 
hard task, and gave it up. Miss Hamblett has labored very 
hard, and during the first of the term was almost on the point 
of giving up in despair ; but we think now she is on the road 
to victory, if not entirely victorious ; and if she can have the 
full sympathy and cooperation of parents, she will make it one 
of the best schools in the city. They send up to the Grammar 
School fourteen members. 

Number Six, on Spring Street, still continues under the 
instruction of Miss Lucretia Brown. She is an old teacher, 
having been long known here, both as a Primary and Middle 
school teacher, and still maintains her former reputation. The 
school has appeared well in its examinations, particularly in Col- 
burn's Arithmetic. She sends up to the Grammar School about 
twenty. 

Number Seven is in the Bame building, and continuedTor 
the first three terms of the year under the successful charge 
of Mrs. Brooks, who resigned and was succeeded by Miss 
Gove. '!'' i committee as well as pupils regretted the loss of 
Mrs. B. fro a our corps of teachers ; but we feel that in Miss 



109 

Gove, we have secured a very energetic and thorough teacher, 
and we predict when the scholars become accustomed to her 
manner, they Avill appreciate her services, and become as much 
attached to her as they were to their former teacher. This 
school furnishes nearly twenty pupils for the Grammar school. 



MISCELLANEOUS SCHOOLS. 

There arc two schools of this character, which from location 
are obliged to receive scholars both of the Primary and Middle 
school classes, and sometimes even of the Grammar school. 

The one at Towlesville has been so full that it was found 
necessary to send from it all who were qualified to go into the 
Grammar school. 

A Primary and Middle school are needed to accommodate 
the children of this neighborhood, together with some on Wil- 
son Hill who come within the limits of District No. 7. Some 
of the people, wito cannot be well accommodated, cither here 
or in No. 7, are at present sustaining a private school. Could 
No. 7 be united with No. 2, these schools might be much bet- 
ter arranged than they can be at present. The committee are 
about to arrange a school for the accommodation of those now 
obliged to send to the private school. 

Miss Martha Eaton remains the teacher at Towlesville, and 
fully sustains her former reputation as a successful manager of 
a large and difficult school. She has some very fine scholars 
and will send ten to the Grammar school next term. 

The school at the Falls has been larger this year than last, 
and will probably continue to increase as business increases in 
that direction. It is, however, sufficient for their wants at 
present. 

Miss Ingalls, who has been favorably known as its teacher 
for two or three years past, continued her labors till within a 
few weeks, when she resigned to engage in a more eligible sit- 



110 

nation in a neighboring State. Miss Sarah E. Yeaton was 
selected to rake Miss Ingalls' place, and though inexperienced, 
gives good indications of success. This school has some good 
scholars. They appear well in reading and enunciation, but are 
deficient in a knowledge of the " stops and marks." 
Their school-room alwavs looks neat and tidy. 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 

The origin and object of this school was mentioned in last 
year's report, but time and experience alone develope its im- 
portance and usefulness. Up to the present term the school 
has been kept in a hired room, being obliged to move once, and 
in neither place having any of those accommodations which 
are necessary to the comfort and convenience of either teacher 
or pupils ; consequently many were deterred from availing 
themselves of its privileges, and its usefulness was very much 
retarded, out through the liberality of our appreciating citi- 
zens, who have felt in the right place, it has now attractions 
and conveniences second to none in our city, if to any in the 
State. 

That this was the true policy is now fully demonstrated by 
the numbe -a ready to fill, to the brim, the B] dry, well 

furnished rooms prepared for them. 

The greatest difficulty which the committee hav< experienced 
during the present term has been to keep down the numb 
the capacity of the rooms. 

Not two years since a meeting of the district was called b 
take into consideration the propriety of discontinuing this school. 
Should another meeting be called, at the present time, in refer 
ence to the subject, the discussion would necessarily take , 
;v different turn. It would naturally and wisely be on the propri- 
ii continuing this, but of providing another house of 
j or even greater capacity for another similar Bchool. 



Ill 

Mr. Aid rich contiuues to preside over this school, assisted by 
Miss Jones. In consequence of a delay in procuring the fur- 
niture for the new house, the school did not commence the 
present term till three weeks of it had passed. This, to - 
gether with the difficulties of organizing, reducing the numbers, 
&c, has very much interfered with the studies of the present 
term. There are some very good scholars in this school. They 
send ten to the Grammar schools next term. 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

These schools, the next in succession to the Middle schools, 
have had a complete change in their teachers during the pres- 
ent school year. Although necessity has compelled us to re- 
gret the loss of such teachers as Messrs. Caverly and Brown, 
Misses Shepard, Allison, Hunt, and Mrs. Hill, yet we have 
occasion to rejoice in the acquisition of such substitutes as 
Messrs. "Webster and Ward, Misses Slade, Greene, Flanders 
and Ward. Much labor has been performed, both by teachers 
and committee, for the elevation of these schools. Early in 
the year, it was found that an inequality existed in the two 
schools a3 to their numbers. In order to obviate this, it was 
necessary to draw some definite line of division. This was ac- 
cordingly done and necessarily involved a change of several 
scholars from one school to the other. Some opposition to 
this arrangement was at first manifested, which soon gave 
way, and the result we believe is now entirely satisfactory. A 
much greater degree of uniformity both in numbers and attain- 
ments now exists. A new plan of advancement from these to 
the High school has been adopted. This will result in keeping 
back some who have expected promotion, and give to the am- 
bitious scholar an opportunity to take a step in advance of his 
class. Scholarship will be the only standard for advancement 
Candidates for promotion will be required to answer certain 



112 

questions -which will be given them, within the limits of the 
studies required, in order to be recommended for the High 
school. An examination v, ill be held for thi ••, by the 

committee, near the commencement of the spring term. 

Another change, which we have already taken measures to 
carry partially into effect, is the enlargement of our Grammar 
schools, until their numbers shall be equal to the capacity of 
the large rooms where the schools assemble in their general 
exercises. This plan will take in a younger class of scholars, 
and thereby relieve the fulness of our Middle schools. It will 
also preclude the necessity of increasing the number of Gram- 
mar schools and employing more male teachers. Consequently 
it is desirable as a matter of economy. A larger number of 
pupils will be brought under the supervision and disci} line <>f a 
male principal, wliilst the number of female assistants may be 
increased according to the wants of the school. 

Nortii Grammar School. This school, situated on Spring 
Street, has, in some measure, been injured in its usefulness 
during the present year, in consequence of those interruptions 
and other inconveniences which usually follow an unexpected 
change of teachers. Mr. Moses T. Brown, who had been con- 
nected with the school as its principal from its commencement, 
and was greatly beloved and deservedly popular, both with pu- 
pils and parents, very suddenly made up his mind to accept the 
offer of the charge of the model department of the State Nor- 
mal school at New Britain, Conn. Mr. J. E. 1' . an ac- 
complished scholar, and well kn i and su< 
ful teacher, was induced to take charge of the school for the 
remainder of the term. 

Mr. Bennei notions of discipline v, r more 

severe and than those of his predecessor, found 

a portion of the school a little restive and rebellious, but with 
an < \. l.e exacted e\ i and a strict obe 

. that at the close of the term t' 

appeared remarkably well in fheir examin I dally do 

i ■ -lasses in Mi Arithme ling, 



118 

Spelling and Defining. These all exhibited proofs of thorough 
training. The school appeared in excellent order. By the 
unanimous vote of the committee Mr. Bennett was elected to 
continue as Principal of the school, but could not be induced to 
accept. 

At the commencement of the summer term we were fortu- 
nate in securing the services of Wm. H. Ward, of Newton, 
Mass., a graduate of Bridgewater Normal school. Mr. W. 
still continues successfully and satisfactorily to discharge the 
duties of Principal of this school. He was assisted during the 
summer term, as were Mr. Brown and Mr. Bennett during the 
spring term, by Misses Allison and Hunt. These young ladies, 
who were well and favorably known among us as two of our 
most approved teachers, resigned at the close of the summer 
term. Their places were filled by Miss Mary Flanders, of 
Goffstown, well known in this vicinity as a popular teacher, and 
Miss Phebe Greene, of R. I., a graduate of Bridgewater Nor- 
mal school. They still continue in the successful discharge of 
their duties. At the examination at the close of the fall term, 
the deportment of the school was excellent, and the recitations 
such as to reflect credit both upon scholars and teachers. The 
number to be promoted to the High school will depend upon 
the examination yet to take place. 



SOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Wm. A. Webster, a graduate of the Bridgewater Normal 
school, succeeded to Mr. Caverly, at the commencement of the 
spring term. He is an energetic, thorough teacher, a good 
disciplinarian, and since the children have become accustomed 
to his peculiarities, they appear much attached to him, and to 
the school. He was assisted during the spring term by Miss 
Betsey Shepard, and Mrs. Hill, who resigned at the close of 
that term. At the commencement of the summer term, Miss 



114 

Slade, of Vt., and Miss White, of Franklin, both graduates of 
the Academy at Thetford, Vt., •were elected to fill their places. 
Miss Slade proved to be a valuable teacher, and continues to 
discharge her duties faithfully and to the entire satisfaction of 
the committee. Miss W. resigned her place at the close of the 
summer term, and Miss Lucy Hinckly, of Barnstable, Mass., 
was elected to take her place. Miss H. was a graduate of the 
Bridgewatcr Normal school, a thorough and conscientious teach- 
er, but her health being poor, and having a constitutional dis- 
trust of her own ability and usefulness as a teacher, she felt it 
her duty to resign at the close of the term. Miss Emily Ward, 
a teacher of much experience, and a graduate of West Newton 
Normal school, was elected to take her place. Miss W. fully 
answers our high anticipations, and we predict a brilliant future 
to this, as also to the North Grammar school, if fortunate 
enough to retain without interruption their present faithful and 
efficient board of teachers. 

The examinations have uniformly been credit able during the 
year, notwithstanding the frecpient changes of teachers. 

Like the North Grammar school, we cannot now predict how 
many may be advanced to the High school. 

As before suggested, scholars will be admitted to these 
schools at an earlier age, some of the studies of the Middle 
schools being brought in here. For the future the course of 
study will be in Arithmetic, Colburn's Mental completed from 
the Gth section, Written Arithmetic to Involution : Mitchell's 
Intermediate Geography commenced and completed; Good- 
rich's History of the United States commenced and complet- 
ed; Grammar, Greene's First Lessons ; Cutter's Physiology; 
together with Rhetorical Exercises, Redding, Spelling and De 
fining. 



115 
HIGH SCHOOL. 

This school, the highest grade in our common school system, 
takes the scholars from the Grammar, or any other schools, 
furnishing the required amount of preparation, and affords to 
them all the facilities for an accomplished, thorough and prac- 
tical education. Also, to any "who may wish it, the means of 
thorough preparation for entering any College. 

Mr. Newell, the Principal for two or three years past, con- 
tinued in charge of the school during the spring term. The 
examination at its close showed very conclusively that much 
effectual labor had been performed both by teachers and pupils 
during the term. "We particularly remember the elegance and 
accuracy of certain translations from Ovid and Virgil, by some 
of the young ladies. Also, the good appearance of some of 
the classes in English Grammar, Algebra and Geometry. 

At the close of this term, Mr. N., in accordance with a pre- 
viously expressed wish, resigned for the purpose of entering 
upon the duties of another profession, to which he had long 
been looking forward. 

He was succeeded by Jonathan Tenney, A. M., a graduate 
of Dartmouth College, well known as the popular Preceptor of 
Pembroke Academy for a number of years ; later as Principal 
of a Grammar school in Lawrence, and the High schoo- in 
Pittsfield, Mass. 

Mr. T. was personally known to a part of the committee, as 
a man well furnished for his profession, of much experience, 
and possessing, in a high degree, those qualities of heart and 
mind which are calculated to win the love and confidence of 
his pupils, as .veil as to command their respect and obedience. 
In securing the services of Mr. T., we also felt assured that 
we were doing good service to our High school by obtaining a 
professional teacher. A want of permanence and system in 
the arrangement of the school in its course of study, and a 
strong barrier to its usefulness must necessarily exist so long as 
we depend upon temporary teachers. With our present Prin- 



116 

cipal, we indulge sanguine anticipations of seeing our B 
school assume a higher position and placed on a more per- 
manent basis than it has ever yet been. Mr. T. gives plain, 
thorough and systematic instruction, is judicious in his disci- 
pline, and by turning his attention a little to the subject of 
punctuality and the strict observance of our rules, we think 
he might be called a model teacher. 

Misses Shattuck and Dennett continued successfully dis- 
charging their duties as assistants up to the close of the fall 
term, when much to our regret, as well as that of her pupils, 
Mis3 D. resigned. During the winter term Mr. Tcnney has 
managed to get along with the assistance of Miss Shattuck. 
and a gentleman to take the class in Arithmetic. J. P. 
Clement, A. B., has had the care of this class which gives good 
evidence of the value of his instructions. 

In the examinations at the close of the fall term there were 
evident indications of an excelsior spirit pervading every de- 
partment. A great improvement is observable in the deport- 
ment of the school. 

We have in view for the commencement of the next term, 
which also commences a new year, a permanent course of study. 
This, together with some rules in regard to membership, &c, 
we consider very important to be cherished and carried out by 
our succssors in office. 



FREE SCHOOL. 

"We have now to allude to a new feature in the educational 
facilities of the City ; one which has never been hinted at 
in any former report; one which, even a lew months since, was 
considered by many as altogether chimerical, and by its warm- 
eat advocates, as an experiment of doubtful results. When the 
committee, by the liberality of our city council, not three 
months since, concluded to establish a free evening school and 



117 

were making preparation and giving notice to that effect, it was 
with many misgivings for the result. The question frequently 
came, " How many do you expect to get in ? We do not believe 
you can get a dozen." The first evening came, and there also 
came with it such a host of scholars, eager to avail themselves 
of the privileges thus offered, that we found our accommoda- 
tions, which we supposed more than ample, to be entirely inad- 
equate to our wants. The next and several succeeding eve- 
nings, there was a steady increase, both in numbers and inter- 
est, and with this increase we were obliged to enlarge our ac- 
commodations to meet it. Instruction has been given every 
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday evening by teachers 
as thorough and every way as competent as. any to be found in 
the city,— Mr. Adams acting as Principal, and giving instruc- 
tion m Heading and Spelling, and in Geography ; Mr. Clement 
in Arithmetic ; Mr. Eaton in Grammar, and Dr. Grey in Phy- 
siology. Miss Emily Porter, a very worthy young lady, has 
given instruction to a primary class in reading and spelling. 
Text books are used and lessons are given out — but the in- 
struction, of course, has to be in a great measure oral. 

A good degree of interest has been kept up and very evi- 
dent improvement has been made in the branches of study pur- 
sued, and we earnestly hope that arrangements may be perma- 
nently made to keep in operation something of a similar nature 
during a certain portion of each year. We cannot estimate 
the amount of good such a simple agency as this may accom- 
plish ; not in the mere amount of knowledge gained, which is 
by no means small, but in the impulses given in the right di- 
rection — thus anticipating the necessity of more extended po- 
lice regulations. 

We have no time to go into any extended argumonts upon 
this subject ; neither do we think they are needed whilst tlie 
facts, afforded by our present experiment, are so vividly before 
us. The school is now in operation in Pattens' Building, and 
will continue some two or three weeks longer under the present 
arrangement. 



118 

There has been some falling off in numbers lately of such as 
catnc in more from curiosity than a desire of improvement — 
also from sickness, and inclement weather ; but perhaps no 
more than we often find in our regular schools, where there is 
greater responsibility. 

There has been nearly two hundred different scholars during 
the present term, and probably an average attendance of more 
than one hundred. There are among them some as go< d minds 
as can be found in our city — and it is the universal testimony 
>{ the teachers employed, and they all have had large experi- 
ence, that they have never given instruction with more interest 
nor has it in any case been better appreciated and received. 

None have been admitted who could conveniently avail them- 
selves of the privileges of our other schools. 



OUTLINE MAPS AND TEXT BOOKS. 

Sets of Fowle's Outline Maps have been furnished for all 
the school rooms out of District No. 2. There has evi- 
dently appeared, as the result, a new interest in this important 
branch of study. 

The Teachers' desks, in District No. 2. have all been sup- 
plied with the text books needed in giving instruction to the 
classes. Also a copy of Webster's Academic Dictionary ha 3 
bi en placed on each desk, excepting the High, Grammar and 
Intermediate Schools, which have been supplied with Webster's 
Quarto. 

No chango has been made in our school books, with the ex- 
ception of tho reading books in District No. 2. Tower and 
Walker's Scries taking the place of Swan's. We thinl a better 
Arithmetic than [.each and Swan's might be introduced, but as 
yet we have taken no measures to that effect 



119 
PHONETICS. 

By request of some of the young gentlemen connected with 
the High School, Mr. Ranney, of Boston, was permitted to go 
Into the High, Grammar, and some of the other lower schools 
to give instruction upon this subject, chiefly as an elocutionary 
exercise. Mr. R. appears to be a very worthy, unassuming 
man, an enthusiast upon this theme, and is certainly deserving 
of our warmest approbation and commendation for his gratu- 
itous services in our schools. A new interest has evidently 
been awakened, both on the part of teachers and pupils, in re- 
gard to the subject of enunciation, and the analyzing of words 
into their proper elementary sounds. 



SCHOOL HOUSES. 

We have already spoken of the ill condition of most of the 
school houses in the " out districts." We cannot forbear again 
expressing the desire that the attention of the several districts 
may be directed towards those places where the first precepts 
of order, harmony, adaptation, neatness and taste should be 
cultivated, and then decide whether their present school-rooms 
are suited to that purpose, setting aside health and convenience. 

In District No. 2, the schools are at present very well ac- 
commodated so far as school room is concerned, and we take 
pleasure in not feeling obliged to recommend the raising of 
money for this purpose the coming year. The building recent- 
ly completed for the Intermediate and two Primary schools, on 
Manchester Street, is indeed a noble one, and reflects credit 
alike upon the liberality of our citizens and the taste of the 
committee who had it in charge. 

We wish that our citizens would just look in upon the com- 
forts and conveniences of these rooms, and we venture to pre- 
dict they will feel impatient to see some others of our tempo- 
rary school-houses giving place to similar permanent and con- 
venient structures. 



120 
APPROPRIATIONS. 

An increase upon the appropriation of last year will be ab- 
solutely needed in order to keep our schools in operation as 
they are now arranged. We found, at the commencement of 
the year an arrearage of several hundred dollars to be met by 
the new appropriation ; and although a larger appropriation 
was made, we are obliged to leave to our successors a similar 
debt to be provided for in the next appropriation. An increase 
of salary has been found necessary in order to secure and re- 
tain the services of the best teachers. We think that our Pri- 
mary and Middle school teachers are not receiving, at present, 
an adequate compensation for their services, and it will be nec- 
essary to increase their pay in order that they may meet their 
increasing expenses. 



TRUANCY. 

Early in the year, Dr. Grey was chosen, on the part of (he 
committee, to see that the provisions of the law relating to 
Truancy were carried into effect. Notice being given that the 
law would be strictly enforced, as a result many children who 
were not attending any school or having any stated employ- 
ment, soon found their way into some of the schools. A few 
arrests have been made, but in every case after a suitable re- 
proof from the Judge, they have been placed in some school 
and quietly submitted to the rules thereof. No severer means 
have as yet been thought necessary. There has probably been 
less truancy during the past, than any former year. Still strict 
vigilance is needed, and the law should be held up as a terror 
to all offenders, whether already connected with the schools or 
not. 



121 
SCHOOLS IN DISTRICT No. 2. 



TABLE I. 

Embracing statistics of the higher order of Schools in the District. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

John P. Newell, a. m., Principal lnt term, . . . .Salary $800,00 per an. 
Jonathan Tennbt, a. m., Principal 2d, 3d & 4th terms, 1000,00 " 
Miss Emily T. Shattuck, Assistant through the year, $6,00 per week. 
Miss Abba II. Dennett, " 1st, 2d, & 3d terms, $6,00 " 
John P. Clement, a. b., Teacher in Arithmetic 4th term, 
Paul F. Gerrish, Teacher of Writing & Book-Keeping, $400,00 per an. 



Whole Number of Pupils in the Year 150. 


Av 


erage 


63| . 


Per cent. 


" " 1st term 117. 




(< 


95. 


» 81 


" 2d " 39. 




i< 


29. 


.< 74 


" " " 3d " 74. 




(c 


62. 


" 84 


4th " 77. 




<( 


67. 


" 86 



NORTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Moses T. Brown, Principal part of 1st term,.. .Salary $550,00 per an. 

J. E. Bennett, a. m., " " " " $550.00 

W. H. Ward, Principal 2d, 3d & 4th terms, " $600,00 

Miss Margaret J. Allison, Assistant 1st & 2d terms, $5,00 per week. 

Miss Ann M. Hunt, " " " $4,50 

Miss Mary Flanders, " 3d & 4th terms, $5,00 

Miss Phebe Greene, " " " $6,00 

PauIi F. Gerrish, Teacher of Writing, $400,00 per annum. 



Whole Number of Pupils in the Year 223. 


Average 98. 


" " " 1st term 180. 


" 138. 


" 2d term 103. 


84. 


" " ". 3d term 110. 


83. 


" 4th term 100. 


87. 


SOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 






Miss B. B. Shepard, Assistant 1st term, 


" $4,00 per week. 


Mrs. O. B. Hill, 


" $4,00 


Miss Hannah Slade, " 2d, 3d & 4th terms, " $5,00 " 


Miss Catherine White, " 2d term, 


" $4,50 


Miss Lucy Hinckley, " 3d " 


" $6,00 


Miss Emily J. Ward, " 4th " 


" $6,00 


Paul F. Gerrish, Teacher in Writing, 


" $400,00 per an. 


Whole Number of Pupils in the Year 210. 


Average 77! . 


1st term 131. 


93. 


u << 2d " 91. 


58. 


3d " 98. 


" 71. 


4th " 106. 


87. 



122 

I NT HUM EDI ATE SCIIOOL. 

( 11 \rles AXDRICH, Principal, Salary $500,00 per an 

Miss Matilda Abbott, Assistant 1st term, " $4,00 per we«k. 

Miss L. H. Jones, " 4th " " $5,00 

Whole Numhcr of Pupils in the Year 255. Average 52$. 

" " 1st term 115. " 50. 

" " " 2d " 68. " 30. 

3d " 86. " 41. 

" " " 4th " 120. " 88. 



FREE EVENING SCHOOL. 

.James O. Adams, Principal. 

John P. Clement, Assistant in Arithmetic. 

P. B. Eaton, " " Grammar. 

Miss Emily Porter, Primary Class in Reading and Spelling. 

Wm. Grey, m. d., Lecturer on Physiology. 

Whole number of pupils, 200. Average 125. 



Thia school has been in operation only one term. 



123 



SCHOOLS IN DISTRICT No. 2— Continued. 



TABLE II. 

Presenting statistic of the Primary, Middle and Miscellaneous Schools 







a 








i 




g 






= 








at 


6 


1 





— 

71 


6 


■g 


s 


£ 

5 


6 






o 


A 


6 


y. 





A 


6 


A 





A 






.a 


4) 


A 


- 


A 


* 


A 


a> 


y, 










61 

a 






k 


-1 


_v 


SI. 

a 


* 


-a 















- 


L- 





Ut 







SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 




> 









a* 




> 


a 


ai 






A 


< 


" 


< 


> 


< 


£ 


< 


► 


< 


Middle. 






No. One, > 
No. One, ) 


Julia A. Baker, 


72 


26 


35 


22 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


— 





Julia A. Brown, 





— 


— 


— 


1! 


81 


37 


'27 


3.5 


27 


No. Two, 


E. T. B. Woodworth, 

Nancy S, Bunton, 


80 
94 


28 

44 


45 
54 


35 


3t 


26 


30 
60 


24 
42 


85 

68 


38 


No. Three, 


54 


41) 


46 


No. Four, 


E. J. Ayer, 


118 


37 


74 


47 


3- 


24 


16 


31 


57 


40 


No. Five, ) 
No. Five, ) 


('. 1'. Bowman, 2d & 3d terms, 


62 


30 


— 




32 


24 


12 


30 


— 




Koweua L. H-nnblett, 



















46 


35 


No. Six, 


Lucretia A. Brown, 


91 


39 


67 


43 


to 


37 


45 


84 


51 


41 


No. Seven, 1 
No. Seven, J 


S. P. Brooks. 


79 35 


60 


47 


43 


28 


41 


32 


— 




L. P. Gov e, 


1 — 


— 


— 


— 


-- 


— 




51 


3! 


Primary. 




1 


















No. One, 


M. J. Eaton, 


131J33 


62 


28 


65 


31 


67 


40 


57 


30 


No. Two. ) 
No. Two, J 


E. P. Webster, 1st term. 


123 36 


60 


28 


— 


_ 


— 


— 


— 




Susanna Stevens, 2d, 8d *c 4th terms, 


— 


— 


_ 


i'.i; 


43 


60 


10 


54 


35 


N>. Three, 


Hannah G. Lane, 


10145 


62 


42 


68 


43 


71 


50 


67 


15 


No. Four, 


Mary E. Young, 


87 '42 


62 


14 


6C 


42 


58 


44 


52 


36 


No. Five. 1 
No. Five, J 


E. J. Weir, 1st term, 


1q8;50 


59 


33 


— 


_ 





— 







Julia A. Lull, 2d, 3d & 4th terms, 


1 — 


— 


_ 


78 


51 


84 


58 


87 


58 


No. Six, I 
No. Six, J 


Lucretia D. Lane, 1st, 2d & 3d terms, 


14249 


72 


55 


64 


51 


66 


46 


_ 




Mary A. Richardson, 4th term, 


1— 










-; 




69 


44 


No. Seven, 


M. K. Scott, 


142157 


<7 


;,') 


87 


57 


82 


55 


74 


40 


No. Eight, ) 


A. W. Brown, 2d & 3d terms, 


82 32 




16 


29 


55 


36 


__ 





No. Eight, J 


8. S- Putney. 4th term, 
















58 


30 


No. Nine, 


H. W. Patterson, 


14158 


SO 53 


7S 


58 


85 


52 


SI 


59 


No. Ten, 


S. W. liodwell, 


125!58 


82 65, 


7.; 


57 


SI 


58 


34 


55 


No. Eleven, 


Susanna Stevens, 1st term. 


109 45 


65. 


A- 


— 


_ 


— 


_ 


1 




No. Eleven, 


H. M. Morrill, 4th term, 


■ — 


— 





— 


— 


— | 




54 


12 


No. Twelve, ) 
No. Twelve, ) 


Marion M. Ladd, 2d, 3d & 4th terms, 


150J50 


I 


— ! 


70 


53 


79 


59 


18 


» 


A. W. Brown, 1st term, 


— h 


12 


15 














Miscellaneous. 




1 


















Towlesville. 


Martha Eaton. 


11748 


38 61| 


SI 


43 


6245:62] 


12 


Falls. 1 
Falls, )' 


Sarah Ingalls, 1st, 2d & 3d tonus, 


75J29 


15,301461311 


49 28! — 1 




Sarah E. Yeaton, 4th term. 


1- 




— 1 


-! 


-1 


— 1 


— 1 




13 


2'. 



The pay of these teachers is $4 00 per week. 



124 



TABLE III. 



Including statistics in relation to all the Districts. 







o 




9 . 


o 

J3 C 




at 




DISTRICT. 


TEACHERS. 


ad 

a a 


QJ 
- 

< 


S 2 - 8 «? 1 

II Hil 

"S '* • i 5 „ 

.= = • .s. a 


■ 
-c 
- 
u 

a 

< 


t 
a 

z 


WAGES. 




,\i ise Julia A. Baker, 


33 


18 


is'" 

22 1 


1 




s. 




No. One. i 


7 — 


- 14 


$4,00 per week. 


ii ■> ( 


Mr. Wm. A. White, 


— 


— 


— - 


- 


18 


4 


£96,00 per month 


ii •; ) 


Mr. John W. Mitchell, 





— 


— - 


- 21 


16 


- 


i. 


No. Two. 


See preceding tables. 


— 


— 


— - 


- — 


— 


41 


See preceding tabl«s 
$4,00 per week. 


No. Three. ) 

" 1 


Miss M. (i. Pickering, 


60 


27 


26 20 - 


— 


L6 


Mr. J. 8. Uarriman, 





— 


— - 


- 45 35 


It 


$28.00 per month. 


No. Four. \ 


Miss 8. M. Merrill, 


48 


2- 


o5 25 - 


V 


14,00 per week. 


.1 , 


Mr. Prank B. Lord. 





— 


— - 


- 42 ,30 


12 


$30,00 per month. 


No. Five. I 


Miss B. P. Webster, 


50 


26 


•20 14 


1' 


-M.i 10 per week. 


" J 


Mr. B. F. Wallace, 





— 


— - 


-! 45 32 


i: 


' per in jiitU. 


No. Six. \ 


Miss HI. L. Baker, 


33 


20 


15 1 


- — 


1' 


24.00 per week. 


ii .. , 


Mr. Samuel Upton, 


— 


— 


— - 


-! 31 25 


14 


00 per month. 


No. Seven. 1 


Miss M. B. Uogers, 


75 


11 


50 86| ■ 


! $4.00 per week 


,i .. } 


Mr. K. B. Lear, 





— 


— - 


- 60 |48 !14 


$30.00 per month 


No. Eight. I 


Miss M.J. Bowell, 


a 


15 


22 


4 - 


l 


t4.00 per week. 


Mr. W. 11. Cummings, 


— 


— 


— - 


-; 28 


1 ;,12 S26.00per month. 


No. Nine. \ 

.. ., , 


Miss Letitia Gregg, 


45 


22 


30 1 




1 


$4,00 per week 


Mr. Kben'r i 'orninc, 


— 


— 


- L 


-1 22 13 r. 


pet month 



All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JAMES O. ADAMS. 
CHARLES II. EASTMAN, 
ANDREW <!. TUCKER, 
WILLIAM GREY, 
SYLVAN IS BUNTON, 



School 



Committer. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, February 21st, 1S54 : 
Read, accepted, aud ordered to be printed : 

GEO. A. FRENCH, City Clerk. 




INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL HOUSE, MANCHESTER STREET 

Erected 1853. 



126 



I N 1) E X 



Amoskeag Falls Bridge, 

Abatement of Taxes, 

Assets of tho City 79 

Almshouse Report, 

Auditor's Report S2 

City Farm and Paupers 11 

< lounty Paupers 14 

Commons, 

City Police, 65 

City Hall, Offices and Stores,. . 

City Officers, 70 

City debt paid, 77 

City Debt, 78 

City Property, (see Assets.) 

Engineer's Report 87 

Finance Committee's Report, ... 7 
Fire Department 

HIGHWAYS AND IIRIl". 

Granite Bridge 28 

District No. I, 17 

" " 2 IS 

" " 3, 

" " 4, 

" " 5, 

" " 6 

" »« 7 

" " 8 



District No. 9, 8 

Bigbways, new 29 

Incidental Expene ; 76 

Interest Paid, 77 

Lighting Streets 64 

Militia 64 

Paupers off the Fan 13 

Printing and Stationery, 

Population, 81 

irs school houses,Dis. No. 2, 41 

Reservoirs, 56 

School District No. 1 30 

•• 2 31 

•• :: 35 

" 4 35 

" 5 36 

6 37 

' 7 37 

8 38- 

38 

School house, new, Dist. No. 2,. .39 
•• Dist. N Lepaira. 

Sewers and Drains 54 

1 Commit < art 04 

Tn iisur r - Rep rl 4 

• \ alley" Cemetery 4. r > 

Valuation of property, taxes, i 



R R K , I 



Page 64 —3d I a< . read 12 gas posts, ' 13. 

Page 74 ine ad of Gale and Merrill rent of rooin Ward ' 
Ward 2