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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"



-**Qr 



THE 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OF THE 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



FOR TUK 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING JAN. 



i, 



1859. 






TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS ANN PAPERS RELATING TO 
THE AFFAIRS OF HIE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. : 
STEAM POWER PRESS OF GOODALE & FARNSWoRTIl 

No. 71 MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE. 
1859. 



. -. 



. _ 



qt&TF UBS 



THE 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THB 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OF THE 



^J>< 



iUO 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING JAN. 1, 



J ©J) 



TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS 
RELATING TO IHE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. : 
STEAM POWER PRESS OF GOOD ALE & FARNSWORTH, 

No. 71 MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE. 

1859. 



M 
352.67 

859 



CITY OF MANCHESTER 

,Ordered, if the Board of Aldermen concur, That the Joint 
Standing Committee on Finance be, and they are hereby authorized 
to cause fifteen hundred copies of the Thirteenth Annual Report of 
the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, includ- 
ing the Report of the School Committee, of the Chief Engineer of 
the Fire Department, of the Ooverseers of the Poor, be printed for 
the use of the inhabitants of said City, and that the expense there- 
of be charged to the appropriation for Printing and Stationery. 
In Common Council, Jan. 3d, 1859. 

Read a first time — rules suspended — read a second time and 

passed. 

E. M. TOPLIFF, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen read a first time — rules sus- 
pended — read a second time and passed. 

Jan. 3, 1859. ALONZO SMITH, Mayor 



G-O^EIRJSr IMiEltfT 



OF THE 



1858. 



MAYOR, 

ALOJNZO SMITH. 



ALDERMEN, 
Ward 1.— JONATHAN MORSE. 
" 2.— THOMAS S. SARGENT. 
« 3.— WILLIAM C. CLARKE. 
« 4.— SAMUEL W. PARSONS. 
« 5.— WILLIAM E. EASTMAN. 
" 6.— DANIEL C. GOULD. 
" 7.— A. C. WALLACE. 
« 8.— DANIEL FARMER, Jr. 



COMMON COUNCIL, 
E. M. TOPLIFF, President. 
Ward One. 
Benjamin Kinsley, Moses 0. Pearson, 

Charles Canfield. -"" 

Ward Two. 
Otis P. Warner, A. B. Soule, 

David M'Colley. 
Ward Three. 
B. F. Martin, Wm. Richardson, 

Stephen D. Green. 



4 

Ward Fotjr. 
E. H. Davis, Moulton Knowles. 

Ward Fivb. 
James A. Brigham, Ruel Walker, 

Geo. W. Merriam. 
Ward Six. 
Nathan Johnson, John B. Fish, 

8. A. Hackett. 
Ward Seven. 
B, F. Wallace, Leonard Moore, 

Joseph Prescott. 
Ward Eight. 
George S. Chandler, W. H. B. Newhall, 

Damon Y. Stearns. 



CITY CLERK AND CLERK OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 
JOSEPH KNOWLTON. 

Office City Hall Building. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL, 
A. B. SHATTUCK. 



CITY MESSENGER, 
CHARLES W. COLBY. 

$oinf ^tanMng €omm\tkts. 

On Finance — The Mayor, Alderman Parsons ; Common Coun- 
cil, Martin, Richardson, Merriam. 

On Accounts — Aldermen Clarke, Sargent ; Common Council, 
Knowles, Kinsley, Davis. 

On Lands and Buildings — Aldermen Wallace, Morse; Com- 
77io7i Council, Walker, Brigham, Moore. 

On Public Instruction — Aldermen Gould, Farmer ; Co7nmon 
Council, Newhall, M'Colley, Hackett. 

On Streets — Aldermen Morse, Parsons; Common Council, 
Wallace, Richardson, Soule. 

On Sewers and Drains — Aldermen Parsons, Wallace ; Com- 
mon Council, Green, Pearson, Warner. 



On Commons and Cemetiry — Aldermen Eastman, Clarke; 
Common Council, Fish, Prescott, Canfield. 

On Fire Department — Aldermen Farmer, Parsons; Common 
Council, Green, Martin, Stearns. 

On Claims — Aldermen Sargent, Clarke; Common Council, Mer- 
riam, Richardson, Wallace. 

On House op Correction — Aldermen Gould, Sargent ; Com- 
mon Council, Walker, Davis, Chandler. 



foint Jspxrial Committee on Citg Pall. 

Aldermen Clarke, Eastman; Common Council, Davis, Johnson, 
McColley. 



Sisnbwg Committees of ibe §5oarb of ^Ibrrmen. 

On Licences — Eastman and Gould. 

On Enrollments — Wallace and Morse. 

On Elections — Sargent and Parsons. 

On Lighting Streets — Clarke and Wallace. 

On Bills in Second Reading — Morse and Farmer. 

On Market — Gould and Eastman. 

On Setting Trees — Parsons and Clarke. 

On Abatement of Taxes — Clarke and Eastman. 



Slabbing Committees of tire Common Council. 

On Elections and Returns — Newhall, McColley and Fish. 
On Bills in Second Reading — Walker, Prescott and Hackett. 
On Enrollment* — Pearson, Davis and Sonle. 



CITY SOLICITOR, 
JOSEPH B. CLARK. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 
HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 
JOHN L. KELLY, Collector. 



ASSESSORS, 

Ward 1 — JOSEPH B. CLARK. 

« 2.— JONATHAN HORN. 

« 3.— DANIEL W. FLING. 

« 4.__g. W. F. CONVERSE. 

« 5.— JAMES S. COGSWELL. 

« 6.— JOHN H. MOORE. 

'« 7.— A. C. WALLACE. 

" 8.— ALLEN PARTRIDGE. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 

OVERSEERS, 

Wakd 1.— WILLIAM H. WILSON. 

« 2.— JONA. HORN. 

•« 3.— JACOB PEAVEY. 

« 4.— S. S. MOULTON. 

« 5.— CHARLES H. BROWN. 

» 6.— AMHERST KIMBALL. 

« 7.— F. MOULTON. 

» 8.— ALPHEUS BODWELL. 



SURVEYORS OF HIGHWAYS, 

Dist. No. 1.— GEORGE CLARK. 

2.— WILBER GAY. 

3.— BENJAMIN MITCHELL. 

4.— IRA W. MOORE. 

5._W. W. DICKEY. 

6.— JAMES M. WEBSTER. 

7.— ISAAC HUSB. 

8.— LUTHER PROCTOR. 

9.— J. Y, McQUESTON. 
10.— TIMON M. MORSE. 
11.— ALPHEUS BODWELL. 
12.— JOSEPH CATE. 
13.— LUTHER CAMPBELL. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
PETER S. BROWN, Chief Engineer. 
ENGINEERS, 
JOHN L. KELLY, ALPHEUS GAY, Jr , 

CHARLES H. BROWN, E. W. HARRINGTON, 

PHINEAS ADAMS, SIDNEY SMITH, 

SAMUEL G. LANGLEY, EBEN FRFNCH. 

S. G. LANGLEY, Clerk. 
FOREMEN , 
No. 1.— C. H. G. FOSS. 
« 2.— G. F. JUDKINS. 
" 3.— A. M. KENISTON. 
" 4.— HENRY FOSTER. 
" 5.— 0. E. KIMBALL. 
" 6.— B. S. FLANDERS. 
" 7.— A. C. WALLACE. 
Hose Co., Pennacook— 0. HARDY. 
Hook & Ladder Co.— M. KNOWLES. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 
HENRY G LOWELL, City Marshal. 
WILLIAM B. PATTEN, Assistant Marshal. 
CONSTABLES. 
Henry G. Lowell, Marshal and Constable. 
William B. Patten, Amherst Kimball, 

Josiah P. Wheeler, Jonathan Horn, 

R. N. Batchelder, Alfred G. Fairbanks, 

Henry Bennett, Charles W. Colby, 

Jacob B. Daniels, Nathaniel Baker, 2d. 

NIGHT WATCH AND POLICE. 

Henry Bennett, Edward P. Whidden, 

Uriah H. Foss, Hollis 0. Dudley, 

Elias B. Pike, Eben'r Carr. 

POLICE OFFICERS. 

Charles W. Colby. Henry B. Moulton. 

Stephen Palmer, Nathan B. Taplin, 

Henry T. Mowatt, Henry H. Fuller, 

E. G. Woodman, E. G. W. Bartlett, 

David Crowell, T. L. Quimby, 



James Wallace, 
Horace Pettee, 

A. G. Fairbanks, 
Reuben S. Harlow, 
Francis Munroe, 
Benjamin W. Hardy, 
Edward W. Clougb, 
Josiab P. Wheeler, 
H. H. Summers, 
Joseph Carr, 

B. P. Runnels, 
Abraham Burton, 
Jacob B. Daniels, 
F. G. Worthen, 
John C. Young, 
Joseph D. Emerson, 
George Shattuck, 
Abram J. Twiss, 
George W. Hancock, 
David H. Nutt. 
James M. Webber, 
John R. Piper, 



Samuel G. Langley, 
Gilbert G. Gordon, 
R. N. Batchelder, 
William Wheeler, 
Charles Clough, 
Nathaniel Baker 2d, 
James W. Preston, 
D. O. Furnald, 
B. F. Coursser, 
Charles H. Brown, 
Adin N. Stevens, 
True 0. Furnald, 
John Houston, 
Isaac W, Farmer, 
George W. F. Converse, 
Brooks Shattuck, 
Levi H. Sleeper, 
John R. Percy, 
Jonathan Horn, 
Jona. Y. McQueston, 
Luther Stevens, 
Luther S. Proctor. 



SPECIAL POLICE, 



William Dutemple, 
Edward Prime, 
Ira W. Moore, 
Charles Hutchinson, 
James H. Piatt. 



Sidney Smith, 
John P. Mcore, 
Justin Spear, 
Gilman H. Whitney, 



FIRE POLICE AND PROTECTION COMPANY 



Charles Abrams, 
E. W. Blake, 
John C. Young, 
H. A. Campbell, 
J. Q. A. Sargent, 
Charles A. Putney, 
Hiram Forsaith, 
A. Hollis, 
P. K. Chandler, 
Samuel B. Burnham, 
L. W. Eastman, 
Charles J. Shed, 
John Hosley, 
Flanders Walker, 
Abram J. Twiss, 



Horace P. Simpson, 
William H. Hill, 
C. M. Putney, 
J. A. Gilbreth, 
Thomas Morgan, 
Daniel W. Fling, 
G. R. Moore, 
Nathaniel Smith, 
Marshall Morgan, 
Dwight A. Lord, 
M. N. Young, 
E. S. Cumer, 
James S. Cogswell, 
Moses Eastman, 
Frank F. Downs. 



WARD OFFICERS 



SELECTMEN. 



Ward 1. — Edwin Swasey, 
H. A. Campbell, 
Stephen J. Batchclder 

" 2.— George O. Clark, 
John M. Harvey, 
Pascal B. Simons. 

« 3.— John F. Parker, 
Aaron Young, 
Joel Taylor. 

" 4. — Warren L. Lane, 
John B. Goodwin, 
Elihu T. Stevens, 



Ward 5.— Geo. W. Holbrook, 
Jona. S. Keniston, 
Geo. W. Pinkerton. 

6. — Isaac Whittemore, 
James Hall, 
Israel Webster. 

7. — Ezra Clement, 
John Moulton, 
Charles K. Walker. 

8. — Thomas L. Quimby, 
Geo. H. Gerry, 
Joseph P. Leland. 



WARD CLERKS 



Ward 1. — George W. Brown. 
" 2.— Otis P. Warner. 
" 3. — Joseph H. Haynes. 
" 4. — Joseph H. Smith. 



Ward 5. — E. Hartshorn. 

6.— J. Y. McQueston. 
" 7.— D. K. Mack. 
" 8.— W. H. B. Newhall. 



MODERATORS 



Ward 1. — Jesse F. Angell. 
" 2.— Daniel Pulsifer. 
" 3.— Wm. G. Means. 
" 4.— Isaac W. Smith. 



Ward 5.— John M. Hill. 
" 6. — Ebenezer Ross. 
" 7.— B. F. Wallace. 
" 8.— T. S. Montgomery. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF BURIALS. 
JOHN PRINCE. 



ACCOUNT 

OF 

H, R. CHAMBERLIN, CITY TREASURER. 

FROM 

JANUAKY 1st, 185S, TO JANUARY 1st. 1859. 



12 



Dr. City of Manchester in account current, with H. R. Chamberlin, 



To unpaid drafts, Jan. 1, 1858, 
City Farm, 

Paupers off the Farm, 
County Paupers, 
Highways and Bridges, Dist. No. 1, 



Dist. No 



2, 
3, 
4, 

5, 
G, 

7, 



2647 19 
319 07 
121 48 
165 67 
199 04 
260 61 



Dist. No. 



New Highways, 
Am. Falls Bridge, 
Granite Bridge, 
School Dist. No. 1, 
Diet. No. 2, 



8, 
9, 
10, 

11, 
12, 
13, 



Dist. No. 7, 



3, 
4, 
5, 



9, 

10, 

11, 



14752 70 

359 96 

238 93 

243 05 " 

192 50 
New School House, Dist. No. 2, 
New School House, Dist. No. 9, 
New School House, Dist. No. 10 
School House Lot, Dist. No. 2, 
Repairs of School Houses, Dist. No. 2, 
City Library, 
Commons, 
Valley Cemetery, 
Pine Grove Cemetery, 
Sewers and Drains, 
Reservoir?, 
Fire Department, 
Lighting Streets, 
Militia, 
City Police, 
City Hall Building, 
City Officers, 
Printing and Stationery, 
Incidental Expenses, 
Interest paid, (coupons 6840 00,) 
City Debt paid, 
Abatement of Taxes, 
City Liquor Agency, 
City Teams, 
Temporary Loan, 
Reserved Fund, 



Cash, in the Treasury, Jan. 1, 1859, 



156 61 
J 70 25 
562 11 

565 35 

230 38 

88 80 



363 79 
234 00 
221 00 
954 14 
517 67 



$6581 11 

3151 68 

1279 18 

2449 56 

552 52 

2803 80 

489 32 

683 59 

731 02 

429 42 

349 47 

1641 11 
42 10 

231 56 
220 64 
15116 49 
593 96 
459 93 
1197 19 
710 17 
588 75 
399 47 

1642 50 
767 39 
570 09 

2151 42 

195 10 
1099 59 

217 21 
1696 99 

325 00 

10511 2(3. 

1399 23 

150 00 
5613 84 

947 16 
4745 09 

658 79 
3100 29 
8407 31 
3500 00 

104 28 

200 00 

688 89 
16500 00 

200 00 

106093 47 
1743 36 

$107 836 83 



13 



City Treasurer, (one year, ending December 31, 1858.,) Cr. 



By Cash in the Treasury, Jan. 1, 1858, 
Temporary Loan, 
J. L. Kelly, Taxes 1858, 
R. N. Batchelder, Taxes 1857, 
State Treasurer, Literary Fund, 
State Treasurer, Railroad Tax, 1858, 
County of Hillsborough, Support of Paupers, 
Rent of City Hall and Stores, 
City Marshal, from Police Court, 
Twenty years loan, 
R. N. Batchelder, Taxes 1856, 
B. W. Hendy, from City Farm, 
City Teams, 

Other Towns, support of Paupers, 
J. B. Sawyer, from Valley Cemetery, 
South City Scales, 
H. G. Lowell, on note, 

State Treasurer, balance of Railroad Tax, 1857, 
City Aqueduct, for use of "Water, 
Chas. Clough, Grass from Commons, 
Chas. Clough, Grass from Valley and P. Field, 
Joseph Knowlton, Grass from Commons, 
J. F. James, Grass from P. G. Cem., 
John Campbell, for Horse, 
North City Scales, 

A. B. Shattuck, amount overdrawn on city offices, 
M. N. Young, " « " " 

Circus Licences, 
Licenses to enter Sewers, 
J. Knowlton, Plank sold, 
S. S. Moulton, amount overdrawn on Sewers and 

Drains, 
J. B. Clark, amount overdrawn on New S. House 

No. 2, 
W. B. Patten, fine of Prisoner, 



$6363 76 


22000 00 


41791 04 


17800 00 


1129 52 


1939 95 


2639 41 


2111 09 


1488 57 


3500 00 


307 00 


588 80 


784 86 


261 35 


426 14 


151 46 


222 00 


27 99 


90 00 


13 62 


14 75 


30 37 


15 00 


87 50 


18 58 


36 00 


25 00 


60 00 


73 53 


6 19 


7 75 


2 00 


2 00 



Unpaid Drafts, Jan. 1, 1859, 



104015 23 
3821 60 

$107,836 83 



HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 
Manchester, Jan. 1, 1859. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



Jamuary 1, 1859. 

The undersigned, Committee on Finance, in pursuance of the 
fourteenth section of chapter three, of the Revised Ordinances, 
certify that we have examined the within account of Henry R. 
Chamberlin, City Treasurer, and find the same correctly cast, and 
all payments and expenditures therein charged against the City, 
properly vouched. 

We find that there has been received into the Treasury during 
the year ending January 1st, 1S59, including the balance on hand 
January 1st, 1858, the sum of $104 015 23, and that there has 
been paid from the Treasury during the same time the sum of 
$102 271 87, leaving in the Treasury January 1st, 1859, the bal- 
ance of $1 743 36 in cash. 

B. F. MARTIN,' ) n 
ALONZO SMITH, Committee 

S. W. PARSONS, 
W. RICHARDSON,) 

In Board of Common Council. 
Read, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

A. B. Shattuck, Clerk 
In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Jan'y 3, 1859. 
Read, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

J. Knowlton, City Clerk. 



on 

Finance. 



REPORT 

OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 



The Joint Standing Committee on Finance, in conformity with 
the provisions of the City Charter and Kevised Ordinances, submit 
to the City Council their Annual Report of the Receipts and Ex- 
penditures of the year ending January 1st, 1859, with a particular 
account of each Appropriation, and a statement in detail of the 
expenditures of each Department, accompanied by a schedule of 
the City Property, real and personal belonging to the City, and 
valuation thereof and amount of City Debt. 

ALONZO SxMITH, ) Committee 
S. W. PARSONS, } on 

W. RICHARDSON, ) Finance. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES, 



COUNTY PAUPERS. 



By amount paid by County Treasurer, 2,624 41 

" F. N. Poor for D. Lawrence, 3 90 
" S. S. Moulton, 12 00 







2,639 41 


Ballance to new acc't., 




256 57 




$2,895 98 


EXPENDITURES. 






To paid Straw & Currier, 
A. Fairbanks, 


42 
11 


00 
00 


Nancy Putney, 
Charles Clough, 
S. N. Gould, 


3 
3 
3 


00 
00 
53 


A. A. Perry, 
Kidder & Dunklee, 


1 
1 


55 

00 


C. W. Adams, 


5 


71 


Charles W. Colby, 
Geo. Chamberlin, 


12 


47 

75 


E. Y. Farrar, 


3 


00 


George H. True, 


5 


50 


Doctor Provencher, 


5 


00 


William Shepherd, 
1). L. Willey & Co., 
Alfred F. Perry, 
City Liquor Agency, 
Jacob F. James, 


2 00 
14 70 

3 12 
2 25 
7 65 


Weeks & Brown, 


9 


05 


J . Rowley & Co., 
H. S. Whitney, 


2 


19 
00 


F. R. Ellsworth, 


1 


75 


Daniels, Forsaith & Co., 


1 


17 


Lyman W. Eastman, 




66 


Hill & Swain, 


7 


50 



Amount carried forward, $149 75 



17 

Amount broquht forward, $149 75 

Francis Day. 2 00 

Baldwin & Co., 4 50 

E. Parm nter, 141 89 

Deniel T. Norris, - 50 

Samuel S. Moulton, 38 45 

B. P. Runnels, 103 47 
JohnS. Folsom, 106 49 
Alonzo Smith, 88 83 

C. H. Hurltburt, 63 85 
H. Ramsey, 166 49 
S. S. Richardson, 29 36 
City Team, 37 24 
I. T. Bond, 89 10 
Wm. Eastman & Son, 157 39 

D. C. Smith, 41 50 
P. Conlan, 85 75 
Tewksbury & Wilson, 66 81 
C. C. Huntoon, 3 44 
Jacob Peavey, 15 22 
S. A. and J. A. Lane, 42 59 
T. S. Montgomery, 109 54 
Charles H. Brown, 93 25 
Straw & Pierce, 62 62 
Ricker & Godfrey, 109 95 
Garland & Hall, 37 79 
Fisher & Cram, 12 00 
I. S. Morrill, 56 36 
J. R. Hanson, 54 27 

E. McQueston, 33 03 
W. E Carew, 1 00 
A. D. Holmes, 4 00 
J. H. Moore, 83 68 
Randlett & Howard, 24 60 
J. Nelson, 6 75 
Sam'l C. Morrill, 5 00 
Clark & Dugan, 1 50 
W. B. Dana, 10 00 
W. A. Putney, 2 00 
A. G. Tucker, 70 
S. D. Farrar, 83 53 
M. Gannan, 28 50 
M. Gillis, 5 50 
A. Bodwell, 132 59 

Amount carried forward, $2452 71 



18 

Amount brought forward, $2452 71 

J. P. Eaton, 13 00 

G. W. Thayer, 13 09 

S. D. Sherburn, 2 00 

John A. Perry, 42 90 

Michael Dalton, 2 00 

John L, Kelly, 1 50 

D. W. Bowman, 7 54 
W. D. Buck, 15 00 
I. W. Parmer, 32 79 
H. G. Lowell, 21 05 
C. S. Fisher, 3 00 
Worcester & Bowman, 3 68 
M. Gilray, 1 24 
T. R. Flint, 25 00 
Edward P. Offutt, 1 00 
L. Thurber, 1 25 
A. B. Smith, 18 15 

E. B. Pike, 4 50 
L. Lawrence, 12 00 
J. C. Whitton, 1 00 
Jonathan Horn, 32 50 
Adams & Andrews, 2 00 
Bailey & Plumer, 2 87 

C. LeBrun, 26 05 
Wm. White, 74 
Hoyt & Robinson, 2 40 
Ira Barr, 45 35 
J. J. Straw, 6 00 
T. F. Moulton, 5 96 
J. W. Moore, 1 50 
O. N. Elsworth, 1 50 
Wm. Plumer, 9 00 
E. Hall, 1 25 
J. B. Daniels, 1 50 
M. Hackett, 5 00 
China Tea Co., 2 00 
Sylvanus Bunton, 44 87 
L. W. Crockett, 17 75 
T. L. Hastings, 2 30 
J. D. Bean, 2 50 
John C. Young, 1 50 

D. W. Clement, 2 00 
T. O'Brien, 1 00 
Eben Ferren, 1 10 
C. P. Allen, 3 00 



$2895 98 



19 



CITY FARM. 




By Appropriation for 1857 undrawn, 


$807 58 


« 1858, 


2000 00 


Produce sold, 


435 15 


Stock sold, 


215 00 


Labor of Team, 


15 73 




$3473 ±R 


CONTRA. 




T® Paid the following Bills, to wit, 




Kidder & Duncklee Groceries, 


$117 79 


Wm. E. Eastman & Son " 


210 48 


B. W. Hardy, 


45 14 


Small & Cook, 


1 10 


Fisk & Stearns, Paper Hanging, 


7 26 


B. W. Hardy, Potatoes, 


23 00 


" « « Use of Cider Mill, 


1 50 


Charles Bunton & Co. Blacksmith work, 


37 37 


Gilman & Stratton, " " 


2 25 


A. McCrillis, " 


1 38 


D. B. Eastman, Ladder, 


4 50 


Hartshorn & Tufts, Stoves and Pipe, 


86 56 


S. Chandler, Oats, 


10 40 


B. W. Hardy, labor, 


333 70 


S. S. Moulton, " 


4 50 


L. 0. Conner, " 


25 50 


S. P. Dunoklee, " 


250 00 


Mary E. Stevens, " 


16 50 


H. S. Barnes, " 


2 00 


James & Dodge, horse hire, 


1 00 


J. B. Clarke, advertising, 


1 50 


Goodale & Farnsworth, advertising, 


1 50 


Samuel Barnes, Clothing, 


4 50 


B.W.Hardy, 


8 14 


S. D. Bean, 


9 81 


Henry Wilson, meat, 


175 15 


B. W. Hardy, « 


26 00 


Jacob Peavey, rye, 


5 60 


H. R. Chamberlin, boy's cap, 


1 13 


Straw & Prince, funeral expenses, 


8 75 


L. Marshall ' ; " 


2 00 


Hartshorn & Tufts, tin ware, 


15 12 


G. H. Dorr, use of sled and wagon, 


12 50 


B. W. Hardy, woolen yarn, 


4 00 



Amount carried forward, $1457 63 



20 



Tewksbnry & Wilson, medicine, 

B. W. Hardy, 

Bunton & Co. shoeing horses and oxen, 

J. B. Ireland, 

Robert Gilrnore, " " " 

Robert Gilchrist, crockery, 

W. D. Buck, truss, 

Tewksbury & Wilson, truss, 

J. Abbott & Co. flour and meal, 

R. Stevens, shoats, 

S. C. Hackett, whitewashing, 

J. Warner, bull, 

B. W. Hardy, oxen, 

J. H. Pike, steers, 

Seth Cass, steers and heifers, 

P. W. Follensbee, hay, 

B. W. Hardy, chain, 

Charles Clough, mason work, 

Joseph L. Smith, lumber, 

Baldwin & Co., 

B. W. Hardy, 

Fisk & Stearns, school-books, 

B. W. Hardy, drills, hammers and 

wedges, 
J. C. Farrington, repairs on buildings, 
Gr. W. Thayer, boots and shoes, 

A. Branch, repairing harnesses, 

B. W. Hardy, putty, 

" " " chestnut posts, 
0. Barton & Co. dry goods, 
W. A. Putney, " " 
F. H. Ellsworth, « " 

D. 0. Hadley, repairing clock, 
B. W. Hardy, axes, 

J. D. Bean, furniture, 
Granite State Farmer, 
H R. Chamberlin, mittens, 

E. P. Johnson, hard coal, 
Daniels, Forsaith & Co. hardware, 
E. Hartshorn, crackers, 

Kelley & Colley, painting, 

D. & D. B. Wilson, soap. 

Gilrnore & Stratton, soldering pipe, 



Balance undrawn, 



$1457 63 


15 96 


4 62 


2 24 


3 50 


24 94 


1 92 


5 00 


2 50 


323 69 


10 00 


15 25 


50 00 


289 00 


165 00 


53 00 


10 63 


3 00 


10 42 


29 88 


37 63 } 


1 50 


5 19 


5 50 


171 10 


54 70 


8 92 


24 


4 36 


67 41 


19 60 


4 58 


3 25 


2 25 


74 82 


1 50 


3 61 


7 25 


133 84 


13 49 


29 89 


21 00 


1 87 


$3151 68 


321 78 


$3473 46 



21 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 

By balance of appropriation 1857 unex- 
pended, $1371 34 
Amount received for Paupers belonging 

to other towns, 261 35 



CONTRA. 

To paid the following bills, viz, 

Ricker & Godfrey for groceries, 

Ira Barr " " 

G. W. Adams «« " 

John S. Folsom " " 

S. D. Farrar 

T. A. & A. J. Lane 

D. C. Smith 

D. L. Willey 

T. S. Montgomery " 

Adams & Andrews " 

Wm. E. Eastman & Son " 

I. T. Bond 

Patrick Conlan, " 

C. S. Fisher, 

Alonzo Smith, " 

G. B. McQueston " 

Jacob F. James " 

Edson Bond " 

George Rowell " 

S. S. Moulton, railroad tickets and pro- 
visions, 

C. H. Hurlburt, railroad tickets, 

Eliphalet Davis, support of paupers, 

Town of Candia, " " 

S. S. Moulton, preparing Report, 

S. S. Moulton, expense to Weare, New 
Boston and Hooksett, 

H. T. Wilson, expense after Paupers, 

Jonathan Horn, " " - 4 

Charles H. Brown, " " " 

David McColley, school books, 

Locke & Simons, " " 

Hersey & Tilton, " " 

John H. Moore, wood, 

E. Parmenter, " 



Amount brought forward, $673 19 



40 46 


56 53 


16 91 


24 94 


19 00 


14 15 


2 00 


21 00 


85 21 


50 00 


11 00 


3 00 


6 50 


2 00 


1 00 


24 75 


1 50 


4 17 


4 26 


58 56 


3 25 


58 50 


18 93 


6 00 


18 27 


5 50 


75 


1 00 


31 11 


18 70 


25 36 


11 38 


27 50 



$1632 69 



22 



Amount bkouc.ht forward, 

J. M. Webster, " 

Alpheus Bodwell, " 

Hugh Ramsey, " 

Garland £ Hall, 

T. F. Moulton, " 

City Team, 

Alonzo Smith, " 

S. S. Richardson, sawing wood, 

T. McCanliffe, 

New Hampshire Asylum, board of in- 
sane persons, 

Alonzo Smith, expense of insane per- 
sons, 

Mary J. Ames, board of insane persons, 

Mrs. L. H. Dakin, " " «' 

R. B. Hall, board of paupers 

A. Smith, 

Horace Bonney, " " 

Thos. F. Moulton, " " 

Tewksbury & Wilson, Medicine, 

Sylvanus Bunton, " 

J. R. Hanson, " 

J. A. Perry, " 

Weeks & Brown, boots and shoes, 

Hoyt & Robinson, " " 

S. S. Moulton, postage and stationery, 

Straw & Prince, burial expenses, 

Chas. H. Brown, «• " 

Wm. A. Putney, dry goods, 

William H. Hill, horse hire, 

S. W. Parsons, house rent, 

E. P. Offutt, moving Griffin family, 

J. Abbott & Co., flour, 

County of Hillsborough, board of S. 

Mooney, 
J. D. Bean, stove, 
Jacob Peavey, provision, 

B. M. Moulton, assistance for Mary 
Jane Fuller, 

Mary Nelson, nursing and board, 



Balance undrawn, 



$673 19 




24 40 




76 96 




51 75 




10 90 




14 00 




5 25 




8 50 




6 87 




1 25 




100 61 




24 25 




45 00 




39 00 




6 50 




3 00 




1 00 




59 06 




1 54 




50 




1 12 




41 




6 94 




3 37 




12 82 




41 00 




4 00 




4 83 




9 25 




6 0U 




4 50 




2 94 




3 05 




2 25 




50 




5 00 




19 00 




$1280 46 




352 23 




$1632 


69 



23 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 



DISTRICT NO. 1. 




By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 




pended, 


$88 69 


Amount of Aproppriation for 1858, 


250 00 


" from reserved fund, 


230 00 




JKfiQ (\f\ 




JiuvO Uif 


CONTRA. 




To paid the following bills, viz, 




G. W. Dustin, Labor, 


37 62 


William Campbell, " 


4 50 


A. J. Cate, " 


1 75 


L. Cate, " 


75 


George Clark. " 


117 00 


P. Kimball, 


4 80 


J. Stark, 


6 00 


C. Keniston, " 


3 25 


A. Towns, " 


12 94 


C. Rowell, 


1 00 


J. P. Rowell, 


4 00 


J. Campbell, " 


12 37 


J. S. Yeaton, " 


2 00 


N. Preston, " 


2 75 


A. Walker & Co., laying etone, 


75 00 


George Clark, stone, 


206 20 


J. P. Rowell, team labor, 


3 00 


' " " " " and cart, 


10 50 


N. Preston, " " 


7 00 


G. W. Dustin. " " 


3 20 


Colbath & Co. gas pipe for bridge rail- 




ing, 


36 89 



$552 52 
Balance unexpended to new acc't, 16 17 

$568 69 



24 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES DISTRICT NO. 2. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $154 06 
Amount Appropriated for 1858, 2000 00 
" from reserved fund, 500 00 



$2654 OS 



CONTRA. 

To paid the following bills, viz, 
W. S. Lock for chestnut posts, 
R. Gilchrist lanterns, 
J. Twombly, brick and cement, 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. castings, 
Daniels, Forsaith & Co. hardware, 
J. B. Varick, " 

J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith work, 
Levi Houston. " " 

Geo. W. Merriam, " " 

C. Bunton & Co. " 

Kennard & Brock, " " 

John Houston, " " 

Joseph L. Smith, lumber, 
Baldwin & Co. " 

Geo. W. Glines, " 

City of Manchester, team labor, 
Foster Kimball, " " 

Nathaniel Herrick, " " 

John Campbell, " " 

N. McCrillis, " " 

Hiram Brown, " " 

Thomas McKew, " " 

George Hunt, " " 

E. Hodgman, " " 
Nathaniel Herrick, Superintendent labor, 
James Kearn, " 
H. Ramsey, " 
O. Pixley, " 
T. Clough, 

S.H.I avis, " 

G. Chamberlin, » 

Benjamin Currier, " 

F. Kimball, . " 
J. N. Heath, 

Amount carried forward, 





60 


1 


00 


15 53 


33 


12 


47 


68 




50 


5 


77 


8 


12 


5 


56 


5 


12 


5 


36 


1 


34 


15 


12 


29 


49 




68 


260 


83 


6 


IS 


42 


37 


22 75 


26 


12 


60 25 


50 


50 


4 


75 


9 


00 


167 


12 


135 


13 


131 


02 


2 50 




50 




50 


19 


25 




50 


1 


00 


37 25 



1132 46 



25 



Amount brought forward, 
P. Sullivan, 
J. Baldwin, 
James Rourke, 
Andrew Bunton, 
S. Powers, 
A. S. Barnes, 
W. Fullerton, 
Robert Scott, 
Samsun & Marden, 
Wilber Gay, Superintendent 
H. S. Barnes, 
J. E. Walker, 
Ira Bliss, 
Mr. Clement, 
P. O'Connell, 
David Perkins, 
R. Richardson, 
Asa Place, 
L. Garland, 
Aaron Waldron, 
J. Campbell, 
Kidder & Hope, 
N. McCrillis, 
A. S. Annis, 
O. Nurse, 
John Newton, 
D. Mahonney, 
A. Fairbanks, 
D. O'Brien, 
P. Stanton, 
W. Eastman, 
L. O'Brien, 
M. D. L. Stevens, 
S. S. Moulton, 
Pat. O'Brien, 
J. McCorliffe, 
Z. Perry, 
Clough & Young, 
Eben Knowlton, 
T. L. Southwick, 
John Laftis, 
A. J. Ormsby, 
J. C. Whitton. 

Amount carried forward, 



1132 46 



1 00 


7 12 


44 25 


18 74 


107 25 


7 75 


1 75 


5 75 


20 33 


223 25 


78 75 


35 25 


39 00 


5 50 


3 50 


50 


4 50 


24 25 


3 00 


1 00 


16 19 


4 87 


26 12 


7 75 


21 50 


68 50 


63 25 


2 00 


11 50 


19 50 


12 25 


71 75 


2 50 


58 13 


12 00 


5 50 


1 50 


4 00 


2 50 


3 00 


17 00 


14 00 


5 00 



$2215 21 



26 

Amount brought forward, 

J. O'Brien, " 

J. Murphy, 

Z. Harvey, 

A. L. Hutchinson, stone chips, 

E. R. Coburn, stone, 

Moses D. Stokes, flagging stone, 

F. S. Lynch, paving maul, 

J. H. Maynard, repairing Canal Bridge, 

S. L. Fogg, horse hire, 

Joseph B. Sawyer, surveying coal, 



Balance undrawn, 



$2215 21 




1 00 




2 00 




50 




9 87 




14 97 




26 46 




1 00 




370 18 




5 00 




1 00 




$2647 19 




6 87 




— 


$2654 06 



27 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES DISTRICT NO. 3. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1S57 unex- 
pended, 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 



CONTRA. 

To paid the following bills, viz, 

Benjamin Mitchell for labor (Surveyor,) 

E. Foss, " 

W. W. Baker, 

S. A. Hackett. " 

W. C. Powers, " 

B. Brown, li 

G. W. Baker, 

Peter Mitchell, " 

J. 0. Adams, «« 

Groves Brown, " 

J. W. Mitchell, 

G. B. Campbell, 

W. S. Lock, 

E. Baker, " 

J. Spear, " 

B. F. Mitchell, 

W. H. Adams, " 
E. C. Howlett, 
R. N. Batchelder, 

Charles K. Tucker, " 

C. C. Haselton, " 
James Smith, " 



Balance undrawn, 



$91 76 


300 00 


53 


50 


10 


25 


11 


00 


36 


38 


18 50 


7 


25 


9 


25 


36 


31 


4 


50 


20 00 


45 


13 


5 


62 


32 


25 


1 


00 


1 


25 


5 37 


3 


00 


9 


50 


4 


50 


2 


18 


1 


OS 


1 


25 


$319 07 


72 69 



$391 76 



$391 76 



28 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES DISTRICT NO. 4. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $86 81 
Amount of Appropriation for 1S58, 100 00 





CONTRA. 




To paid the followings bills, 


to wit, 




Ira W. Moore, Surveyor for 


Labor, 


35 74 


' John Emerson, 




<< 


13 00 


B. B. Allen, 




<( 


6 25 


L. P Moore, 




ii 


8 00 


H. H. Peteis, 




<( 


1 50 


Nathaniel Moore, 




K 


9 50 


J. Emerson Jr., 




u 


1 87 


J. W. Whittemore, 




K 


10 62 


Jonathan Aikin, 




«{ 


4 50 


R. P. Whittemore, 




II 


26 00 


J. P. Moore, 




II 


1 50 


J. W. Allen, 




II 


3 00 




$121 48 


Balance undrawn, 






65 33 



$186 81 



$186 81 



29 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES DISTRICT NO. 5. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $9 48 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 125 00 
" transferee! from reserved fund, 50 00 





CONTRA. 




To paid the following bills 


viz, 






W. W. Dickey, Surveyor for Labor, 


23 12 


James Nutt, 




K 


21 93 


D. H. Nutt, 




<i 


5 25 


B. S. Hill, 




ii 


1 00 


S. M. Nutt, 




IC 


1 00 


Geo. Fling, 




(C 


1 00 


John Dickey, 




II 


12 28 


John Young, 




II 


5 25 


James Cressy, 




II 


9 75 


Gilman Harvey, 




II 


6 75 


Israel M. Young, 




<( 


3 00 


Jonathaa Harvey, jr.. 




II 


11 00 


Moses Hodge, 




II 


5 50 


Rodney Nutt, 




<< 


5 00 


E. S. Harvey, 




<< 


4 00 


J. S. McQueston, 




(< 


5 00 


James Emerson, 




•• 


7 56 


E. Roby, 




(I 


3 00 


Wm. Boyce, 




<< 


7 50 


I. Davis, 




II 


4 50 


T. B. Hill, 




11 


2 00 


J. M. Young, 




II 


2 00 


James Nutt, gravel, 






1 28 


G. Harvey, " 






1 00 


John Dickey, team 


labor, 




3 25 


Amos Cressy, " 


<( 




2 25 


E. T. Harvey, " 


<( 




2 00 


Wm. Boyce, " 


<( 




1 00 


J. Harvey, jr. " 


<( 




2 00 


J. M. Young, " 


K 




5 50 


$165 67 


Balance unexpended, 




18 81 



$184 48 



$184 48 



30 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES DISTRICT NO. 6. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 
" transfered from reserved fund, 



CONTRA. 

To paid the following bills, viz, 

James M. Webster, Surveyor Labor, 

William Hoyt, " 

J. Johnson, " 

J. G. Chase, " 

D. Dickey, " 

S. Gamble, " 

J. Wiley, " 
J. P. Webster, 

A. C. Webster, " 
Amos Webster, " 
G. Clough, 

Geo. Corning, " 

D. H. Dickey, 

H. Corning, " 

B. Corning, " 
H. Dickey, 

D. Dickey, jr., " 

Geo. Whittemore, " 

D. Dickey 3d, Team Labor, 
J. Johnson, •' " 

J. M. Webster, " " 
G. Clough, Lumber, 



$31 


43 


150 00 


35 


00 


$37 


50 


1 


50 


2 


00 


3 


00 


37 


75 


13 


00 


12 


92 


8 


58 


7 25 


15 00 


13 


65 


5 


00 


5 


50 


3 


00 


3 


00 


7 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


10 50 


2 


89 



$199 04 
17 39 



$216 43 



$216 43 



31 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES DISTRICT NO. 7. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $7 93 
Amount of Appropriation for 185S, 250 00 
" transferred from reserved fund, 20 00 





CONTRA. 




paid the following bills, viz, 




Isaac Huse, Surveyor for Labor, 


113 25 


Israel Webster, 


cc 


19 12 


M. Felch, 


it 


4 00 


J. Marsh, 


«l 


6 50 


R. Stevens, 


« 


20 75 


L. M. Morse, 


H 


10 00 


N. Johnson, 


it 


16 00 


R. Young, 


a 


3 50 


C. Young, 


u 


16 25 


C. Hall, 


a 


24 24 


J. Hall jr. 


(S 


9 50 


T. Emerson, 


(c 


2 50 


J. Leavitt, 


(( 


50 


John Huse, 


«( 


5 00 


James Hall, 


(I 


5 50 


Eastman, 


CI 


4 00 




$260 61 


Balance unexpended, 




17 32 



$277 93 



$277 93 



32 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES DISTRICT NO. 8. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1S57 unex- 
pended, $86 03 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 125 00 





CONTRA. 




To paid the following bills, viz, 






Luther S. Proctor, 


Surveyor 


Labor, 


16 87 


J. H. Proctor, 




li 


27 75 


L. A. Proctor, 




4< 


3 00 


John Proctor, 




<i 


28 9i 


A. Proctor, 




l< 


9 50 


Edward Proctor, 




t( 


4 00 


J. W. Proctor, 




(« 


2 25 


A. P. Young, 




<> 


21 75 


Geo. Young, 




II 


5 00 


Peter Farmer, 




l< 


6 25 


A. E. Farley, 




.( 


7 75 


S. Gault, 




U 


50 


E. A. Stevens, 




u 


3 38 


H. Stevens, 




t« 


2 50 


P. Haselton, 




X 


3 00 


J. A. Lougee, 




u 


3 00 


Smith, 




•1 


1 00 


G. M. Haselton, 




u 


3 20 


Gilman Reed, 




t< 


5 50 


True E. Reed, 




(1 


50 


William Stevens, 




u 


1 00 




$156 61 


Balance unexpended, 




54 42 



$211 03 



$211 03 



33 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES DISTRICT NO. 9. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $10 68 
Amount Appropriated for 1858, 150 00 
" from reserved fund, 25 00 



CONTRA. 




To paid the following bills, viz, 






Jona. Y. McQueston, Surveyor, 


for Labor 


35 50 


J. Cross, 


c« 


3 25 


E. Young, 


(i 


1 00 


S. Haselton, 


it 


8 00 


G. W. Haselton, 


«. 


6 SS 


R. Haselton, 


(< 


2 00 


C. W. Haselton, 


(i 


4 50 


B. W. Corning, 


u 


4 00 


N. Corning, 


a 


8 00 


G. B. McQueston, 


41 


7 00 


James Currier, 


(C 


5 75 


J. Morse, 


II 


6 00 


L. Haselton, 


<< 


6 00 


Charles Lambert, 


(( 


2 00 


C. C. McQueston, 


l« 


16 38 


M. Rolfe, 


(I 


] 25 


A. G. Corning, 


(( 


2 00 


J. M. Blaisdell, 


(( 


2 00 


J. G. Webster, 


<< 


15 00 


David Swett, 


(( 


3 00 


Walter H. Noyes, 


(( 


1 00 


J. Y. McQueston, team labor, 




25 50 


Gilman Clough, lumber, 




4 24 




$170 25 


Balance unexpended, 




15 43 



$185 fiw 



$185 6$ 



34 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES DISTRICT NO. 10. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 




pended, 




$8 29 


Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 


500 00 


" from reserved fund, 


ITRA. 


100 00 


cor 




To paid the following bills, viz, 






Timon M. Morse Surveyor, 


for Labor 


85 62 


W. J. Fisher, 


« 


10 25 


L. B. Blake, 


.< 


12 50 


C. Wyman, 


u 


1 CO 


D. H. Mack, 


K 


1 12 


John Brown, 


(< 


8 50 


Wm, Kenny, 


it 


2 00 


Levi Dodge, 


u 


63 00 


D. Barnard, 


a 


43 75 


J. Morse, 


u 


117 25 


R. Young, 


it 


1 00 


D. Morrill, 


it 


13 75 


James "Walker, 


ii 


25 87 


Samuel Brown, 


ti 


4 50 


F. Munroe, 


• i 


3 00 


D. Quimby, 


(< 


10 00 


J. Freshell, 


• ( 


8 00 


Wm. Kenney, 


K 


1 50 


D. J. Worthley, 


(i 


8 12 


J. Prescott, 


t« 


3 00 


P. Wyman, 


tt 


2 50 


G. L. Wyman, 


(i 


8 00 


T. J. Hardy, 


n 


4 00 


W. P. Riddle, 


u 


8 12 


T. H. Morse, 


it 


3 75 


A. W. Dickey, 


it 


1 00 


T. S. Frost, 


(i 


13 50 


John Dycer, 


ii 


13 50 


E. Hartshorn, 


ii 


5 00 


L. Dodge, team labor, 




6 00 


J. Morse, " " 




35 00 


J. L. Smith, lumber, 




21 82 



$608 29 



Amount carried forward, 



$545 92 



35 

Amount broqcht forward, $545 92 

A. C. Wallace, " 3 jg 

Varick, Martin & Co. spikes, 6 36 

I. Barr & Co. " j 55 

C. & L. Gage, blacksmith work, 3 70 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. castings, 1 40 

$562 11 

.Balance unexpended, 46 18 



$608 29 



36 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES DISTRICT NO. 11. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $7 50 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 400 00 
" transferee! from reserved fund, 200 00 





CONTRA. 






To paid the following bills, viz, 






Alpheus Bodwell, Surveyor for Labor, 
Daniel Farmer, jr. 


67 50 
1 58 


William Nelson, 




(( 


24 12 


G. Gerry, 

G. R. Stevens, 






1 00 

2 00 


R. Stevens, 




CC 


50 50 


N. H. Martin, 




CC 


1 50 


Allen Partridge, 
D. Butterfield, 




CC 

(C 


5 50 
4 00 


S. Austin, 




(C 


19 84 


J. Jones, 




c< 


1 75 


Mr. Keaton, 




a 


2 50 


J. Hartshorn, 




CC 


42 00 


G. S. Chandler, 
James Collins, 




c< 
sc 


24 75 
30 50 


B. Hartshorn, 




(C 


159 25 


E. Reed, 




<( 


1 0Q 


N. Crosby, 
S. Jones, 




u 


1 00 
20 25 


T. S. Montgomery, 
T. C. Stearns, 




(! 
CC 


2 50 

13 00 


S. T. Jones, 




<( 


1 00 


M. Quimby, 
J. Melvin, 




CC 

CC 


8 50 
8 50 


M. Keating, 
J. Harwood, 




CC 

cc 


3 00 
11 50 


J. E. Bailey, 
Boyd, Corey & Co. 
F. Kimball, 




CC 
CC 

cc 


21 25 

3 00 

4 00 


Daniel Farmer, lumber, 






22 79 


Daniels, Forsaith & Co. 


hardware 


> 


5 77 


Balance unexpended, 


$565 35 
42 15 



$607 50 



$607 50 



37 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES DISTRICT NO. 12. 



Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 
" transferee! from reserved fund, 



CONTRA. 

To paid the followings bills, to wit, 
Joseph Cate, Surveyor for Labor, 
W. Kelly, 
V. H. Cate. 
M. T. Leighton, 
A. Crombie, 
J. Crombie, 
Joseph Judkins, 
Wm. Mills, 
M. D L. Stevens, 
Daniels. Forsaith & Co. hardware, 
J. E. Herrick, use of stone tools, 



Balance unexpended 



$100 
150 



00 
00 



$250 00 



90 63 


24 50 


5 50 


14 00 


20 00 


1 00 


15 50 


44 00 


11 50 


1 25 


2 50 


$230 38 


19 62 



$250 00 



38 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES DISTRICT NO. 13. 
By amount of Appropriation for 1858, $100 00 



CONTRA. 




To paid the following bills viz, 




Luther Campbell, Surveyor for Labor, 


47 12 


Jonathan Kimball, •* 


7 25 


J. H. Johnson, " 


3 25 


George Gate, " 


7 25 


Alama Wicomb, " 


2 50 


Wni. Campbell, . " 


13 62 


Luther Campbell, team labor and cart, 


7 87 




$88 86 


Balance unexpended, 


11 14 



$100 00 



$100 00 



39 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1S57 unex- 
pended, $12 77 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 500 00 
" transferee! from reserved fund, 1128 34 



CONTKA. 




To paid the following bills viz, 




Nathaniel Herrick for Labor, 


21 75 


Hugh Ramsey, " 


112 17 


J. N. Heath, 


41 75 


A. S. Anhis, " 


5 25 


J. Baldwin, " 


11 25 


0. Nurse, " 


33 75 


S. Putney, " 


50 


P. McLaughlin, " 


100 00 


A. Bunton, " 


10 75 


J. A. Powera, " 


10 25 


John Newton, " 


72 50 


Wilber Gay, Surveyor, Superintendent 




Labor. 


25 25 


R. F. Sheperd for Labor, 


6 00 


H. S. Barnes, " 


71 75 


J. E. Walker, 


60 75 


Ira Bliss, " 


32 00 


N. Clement, " 


50 


Asa Place, " 


2 00 


L. Garland, " 


7 25 


N. G. Smith, 


115 00 


R. Gilmore & Son, " 


7 12 


F. Kimball, 


48 75 


L. O'Brien, 


15 50 


P. Stanton, " 


15 00 


P. Rourke, " 


7 50 


D. O'Brien, 


7 50 


J. C. Whittier, 


1 00 


S. S. Moulton, " 


3 00 


J. Kidder, 


6 00 


•J. T. P. Hunt, horse hire, 


5 00 



$1641 11 



Amocmt carried forward, 



$856 79 



40 

Amount brought forward, $856 79 

City Team, team labor, 

John Campbell, " " 

Daniels, Forsaith & Co hardware, 

Harry Leeds, referee, 

J. L. Smith, lumber, 

J. F. James, surveying, 

J. S. Harrington, award for land dam- 
age, 

J. Thompson, do. do. 

Charles W. Barker, do. do. 

Manchester & Lawrence R. Road, do. 

Moore & Caleff, do. do. 

J. M. K. Wilkins' heirs, do. 

D. C. Gould, do. do. 

J. F. Woodbury, award blacksmith 
work, 

$1641 11 



219 


97 


97 


91 


2 


00 


6 


00 


20 


90 


5 


25 


15 00 


181 


43 


15 


00 


50 


00 


66 50 


66 


50 


28 


00 


9 


86 



41 



GRANITE BRIDGE. 



B j balance of Appropriation for 1 856 unex- 
pended, $19 03 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 200 00 
" overdrawn, 11 93 



CONTRA. 




To paid the following bills, 




A. Smith for Labor, 


2 00 


S. S. Moulton, " 


45 37 


T. McCaulife, 


16 50 


Alonzo Smith, lumber, 


64 


Jos. L. Smith, " 


7 86 


Benj. Hall " 


52 62 


A. C. Wallace, " 


102 20 


Daniel Farmer, teaming, 


4 00 


Daniels, Forsaith & Co. hardware, 


27 



§231 56 



$231 56 



AMOSKEAG FALLS BRIDGE. 
By amount of Appropriation lor 1858, 100 00 





CONTRA. 




To paid the following bills, 






Amount overdrawn for 1857, 


8 69 


B. S. Kidder for Labor, 




1 50 


B. Hartshorn, " 




3 00 


J. Hartshorn, " 




1 00 


F. Kimball, 




7 50 


D. Crowell, " 




14 50 


D. C. Smith, fluid, 




6 20 


J. S. Folsom, " 




8 40 




$50 79 


^Balance unexpended, 




49 21 

$100 00 



42 



Recapitulation of Highways and Bridges, 

APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 





Appropriations. 


Expenditures. 


Undrawn. 


Overdrawn 


District No. 1, 


$568 09 


$552 52 


$16 17 




2, 


2654 00 


2647 19 


6 87 




3, 


391 76 


319 07 


72 69 




4, 


J86 81 


121 48 


65 33 




5, 


184 48 


165 67 


18 81 




6, 


216 43 


199 04 


17 39 




7, 


277 93 


260 61 


17 32 




8, 


211 03 


156 61 


54 42 




9, 


185 68 


170 25 


15 43 




10, 


608 29 


562 11 


46 18 




11, 


607 50 


565 35 


42 15 




12, 


250 00 


230 38 


19 62 




13 > 


100 00 


88 86 


11 14 




New Highways, 


1641 11 


1641 11 


00 




Granite Bridge. 


219 63 


231 56 


00 


$11 93 


Am. Falls Bridge, 


100 00 


50 79 


49 21 





5,403 40 $7,962 60 $4f2 73 $11 93 



SCHOOLS. 



DISTRICT NO. 1. 

By Balance of Appropriation for 1857 un- 
drawn, $90 64 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 175 00 



CONTRA. 



To paid Ordrs of School Committee, 220 64 

Balance undrawn, 45 00 



CONTRA. 



$265 64 



$265 64 



DISTRICT NO. 2. 

By balance of appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $1828 91 
Amount " " 1858, 14325 00 



-$16153 91 



To paid the following Bills — 

Jerry Bly, care of Furnace, 17 00 

J. Whittem, making fires, 5 00 

G. B. Fogg, locks and keys, 2 92 

J. Everett, cleaning privy, 50 

E. G. Haynes, mason work, 4 50 

Wm. Wilder, repairing, 2 25 

J. Everett, «« 2 00 

Stark Mills, « 1 87 

S. T. Hill, stationery, 50 

A. G. Tucker; sponge, 50 

Orders of School Committee, 14688 16 

Miss E. Patten, teaching, 27 50 

Balance unexpended, 1401 21 



$16153 91 



44 



DISTRICT NO. 3. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 

CONTRA. 

To amount of School Committees' orders, 
Balance unexpended, 



$149 96 
300 00 



359 96 
90 00 



$449 98 



$449 96 



DISTRICT NO. 4. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $98 93 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 225 00 



CONTRA. 



To paid School Committees' Orders, 
Balance unexpended, 



238 93 

85 00 



$323 93 



$323 93 



DISTRICT NO. 5. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended. $113 05 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 200 00 



contra. 



To paid School Committees' Orders, 
Balance unexpended, 



243 05 
70 00 



$313 05 



$313 05 



45 



DISTRICT NO. 6. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 

CONTRA. 

To paid School Committees' Orders, 
Balance unexpended, 



$53 85 
160 00 



192 50 
21 35 



$213 85 



$213 85 



DISTRICT NO. 7. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $140 50 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 225 00 
" raised by vote of District, 52 39 

CONTRA. 

To paid Orders of the School Committee, 363 79 

Balance unexpended, 54 10 



$417 89 



$417 89 



DISTRICT NO. 8. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $104 00 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 175 00 



CONTRA. 

To paid Orders of the School Committee, 234 00 

Balance unexpended, 45 00 



$279 00 



$279 00 



46 



DISTRICT NO. 9. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $90 61 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 165 00 



CONTRA. 



To paid Orders of School Committee, 221 00 

Balance unexpended, 34 61 



$255 61 



$255 61 



DISTRICT NO. 10. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 un- 
drawn, $379 14 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 850 00 



$1229 14 



CONTRA. 

To paid Orders of School Committee, 954 14 

Balance unexpended, 275 00 



$1229 14 



DISTRICT NO. 11. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $142 67 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 500 00 



CONTRA. 



To paid Orders of School Committee, 517 67 

Amount of balance unexpended, 125 00 



$642 67 



$642 67 



47 



Recapitulation of Schools. 





/^appropriated. 


Expended. 


Undrawn. 


District No. 1 


265 64 


220 64 


45 00 


2 


16153 91 


14752 70 


1401 21 


3 


449 96 


359 96 


90 00 


4 


323 93 


238 93 


85 00 


5 


313 05 


243 05 


70 00 


6 


213 85 


192 50 


21 35 


7 


417 89 


363 79 


54 10 


8 


279 00 


234 00 


45 00 


9 


255 61 


221 00 


34 61 


10 


1229 14 


954 14 


275 00 


11 


642 67 


517 67 


125 00 




$20,544 65 


$18,298 38 


$2,246 27 



SCHOOL HOUSES. 



DISTRICT NO. 2. 

By balance of appripriation for 1857, unex- 



pended, 

Cash, refunded by J. B. Clarke, 
Amount raised by District, 
" transferred to repairs, 


$144 42 
2 00 

1218 10 
2 12 


CONTRA. 




To paid Merrimack River Bank, per order 
Committee, 

Frederick Smyth, per order Committee, 
J. H. Wilkins, 

Amoskeag Bank, " " 
Amoskeag Man'f 'g Co. on School House 
Lot 


$265 50 

125 18 

59 00 

139 07 

777 89 

$1366 64 



DISTRICT NO. 9. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $330 00 
Amount raised by the District, 69 47 



CONTRA. 

To paid Orders of the School Committee, 399 47 



$399 47 



$399 47 



49 



DISTRICT NO. 10. 

By balance of Appropriation for 1857 uuex- 

pemled, $580 00 

Amount raised by District 1858, 1308 06 



CONTRA. 

To paid Orders of School Committee, 1 642 50 

Balance undrawn, 245 56 



06 



$1888 06 



DISTRICT 'NO. 2. 



REPAIRS. 



Bv balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $944 60 



CONTRA. 




To paid J. II. Maynard's bill for labor, 


50 00 


Hartshorn «fc Tufts' bill for stoves,^fun- 




nel, &c. 


506 25 


Railroad bill for freight, 


1 84 


D. L. Willey's bill, 


12 00 


Transfered to building account, 


2 12 




$572 21 


Balance unexpended, 


372 39 



$944 60 



$944 60 



50 



COMMONS. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $364 50 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 200 00 
Cash received for hay, 43 99 



CONTRA. 




To paid the following bills, to wit, 




James Rourke for Labor, 


4 00 


John Newton, " 


1 00 


Lyman Raymond " 


20 00 


J. Heath, " 


1 00 


Robert Foss, " 


3 00 


James Carnes, " 


1 00 


Thomas McKcw, " 


8 00 


Lewis O'Brien, *' 


50 


Hugh Ramsey, *' 


1 56 


Eben'r Knowlton, " 


2 00 


J. E. Walker, 


1 25 


F. Smiley, " 


18 40 


H. S. Barnes, «' 


1 25 


Alonzo Smith, " 


3 00 


O. Nurse, " 


1 25 


Andrew Bunton, " 


1 25 


S. S. Moulton, " 


12 37 


J. G. Coult, 


1 81 


W. C. Eastman, " 


2 50 


R. Gilmore & Son, blacksmith work, 


91 


J. L. Smith, lumber, 


15 04 


Baldwin & Co. " 


13 19 


City Team, team labor, 


3 81 


John Campbell, do. 


7 31 


John Gr. Coult, trees and setting, 


61 00 


Moody Currier, " " 


4 00 


Daniel Stevens, " " 


2 00 


Varick, Martin & Co. hardware, 


] 60 


J. Abbott & Co. lime, 


1 10 




$195 10 


Balance unexpended, 


413 39 



$608 49 



- $608 49 



51 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 



pended, 




$1030 08 


Amount of Appropi 


iation for 1858, 


800 00 


Cash received for er 


tering sewers, 

CONTRA. 


87 47 






To paid the following bill 


s, to wit, 




Wilber Gay for Labor, 


79 50 


0. Nurse, 


ii 


11 75 


John Newton, 


«< 


4 75 


D. Mahanna, 


u 


40 50 


J. Rourke, 


i« 


57 75 


J. Richie, 


i; 


10 50 


S. S. Moulton, 


K 


27 68 


Peter Smith, 


li 


9 33 


L. O'Brien, 


il 


56 29 


J. Clement, 


(i 


9 91 


Eben Knowlton, 


il 


11 88 


Sullivan & Stevens, 


u 


8 75 


P. Edwards, 


K 


7 50 


D. Hagarty, 


" 


50 


Patrick Maloney, 


il 


1 50 


T. Sullivan, 


ti 


7 00 


J. O'Brien, 


14 


9 00 


Michael Horan, 


" 


4 00 


J. Senter, 


11 


4 00 


P. Riley, 


11 


2 00 


D. Corning, 


11 


2 00 


J. Morrissy, 


11 


2 00 



< 00 



Amount carried forward. 



$368 04 



52 



Amount brought forward, 


$368 04 


D. O'Brien, 


(C 


25 96 


J. Brown, 


« 


1 25 


P. O'Brien, 


(( 


15 46 


P. Hagarty, 


(( 


11 00 


J. Lane, 


(( 


1 00 


P. Stanton, 


(C 


17 25 


J. Loftes, 


(< 


10 00 


G. Haley, 


K 


3 50 


J. Haley, 


<< 


3 50 


S. McCowley, 


<( 


2 25 


E. Cleworth, 


(( 


2 00 


J. Whitton, 


(c 


3 00 


T. McCauliffe, 


(( 


3 75 


J. McCarter, 


« 


1 00 


M. Harrington, 


K 


2 00 


J. Carnes, 


(( 


10 50 


Lyman Raymond, 


(( 


3 00 


S. Powers, 


K 


10 50 


J. Edwards, 


(C 


3 50 


J. Langdon, 


(( 


4 25 


James Welsh, 


(( 


5 25 


M. Stanton, 


(C 


9 75 


Wm. Daley, 


l( 


2 00 


W. Leavitt, 


« 


1 50 


Andrew Bunton, 


(( 


5 25 


Robert Scott, 


(( 


6 00 


Asa Place, 


II 


7 00 


A. Fairbanks, 


(( 


9 75 


D. Riley, 


K 


4 50 


Wm. Fitts, 


u 


4 00 


Patrick O'Connell, 


« 


3 50 


J. Ragland, 


(( 


11 00 


J. Lovewell, 


(i 


1 75 


Joseph L. Smith, lumber, 


266 43 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. castings, 


38 74 


Wm. McPherson, cement sewerage, 


806 98 


R. Gilmore & Son, 


blacksmith work, 


63 


James Wallace, stone cover, 


6 00 


J. Twombly, brick and cement, 


2 25 


J. B. Sawyer, surv 


^ing. 


2 00 




$1696 99 


Balance unexpended, 


220 56 



$1917 55 



53 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



EXPENDITURES. 




MERRIMACK EMGINE CO., 


NO. 1. 


Paid Company's bills for services, 


$837 40 


" " " printing, 


15 00 


E. Y. Decatur, steward's service, 


16 67 


James & Dodge, horse hire, 


17 00 


Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas, 


23 10 


S. C. Merrill & Co. for oil, fluid, &c. 


18 29 


Hartshorn & Tufts, repairing and black- 




ing stove, 


84 


City Liquor Agent, 2 qts. alcohol. 


50 


A. Bodwell, for wood, 


9 25 


J. Plumer, jr., & Co. 8 pr. oil jackets. 


10 00 


Varick, Martin & Co. hardware, pack- 




ing, &c, 


8 45 


William Perkins, sawing wood, 


1 00 


Fben French, repairing engine house 


9 85 


Daniels, Forsaith & Co. 2 lbs. nails, 


10 


John Thurston, sawing 1 cord wood, 


1 00 


Oliver Greely for repairs, 


37 22 


E. Y. Decatur, leather, oil, &e. 


2 40 


J. F. Woodbury, blacksmithing, 


16 70 


John IT. Moor, 2 ft. wood, 


1 50 


Amoskeag Man'f'g Co., 2 lbs. hemp 




packing, 


50 


Bailey & Plumer, 2 oil jackets, 


2 50 


" "6 pr. oil pants, 


4 50 


F S. Lynch, repairs, 


1 79 


H. T. Nichols, horse hire, 


20 00 


J. M. & S. F. Stanton, repairs on hose 




carriage, 


34 44 


Jacob Sawyer, 1 1-4 cords wood, 


5 63 


" " surveyor's bill, 


06 


Colley & Kelly, setting glass, &c. 


1 10 


City Team, 1 cord wood, 


3 50 



$1100 29 



54 



NIAGARA ENGINE CO., 


NO. 2. 




Paid Company's bill for services, 


$711 70 




" " " rent, 


(52 50 




" " " stewards services, 


50 00 




Cc " " printing, 


24 00 




« " " gas, 


12 60 




Wm. Parker, refreshments at steam mill 






fire, 


6 75 




Daniels, JForsaith fy Co., tacks and 1 






set castors, 


37 




E. Y. Farrar 3 1-2 yds. velvet, 


1 40 




H. G. Wilson, brush broom, 


1 00 




Wm. B. Dana, for wood, 


2 00 




S. G. Langley, for horse hire, 


40 01 




A. W. Sanborn, repairing wheel, &c. 


6 75 




Alpheus Branch, repairing hose. 


2 00 




" " 37 badges and figures, 


14 32 




S. C. Merrill, oil, soap, &c. 


10 56 




Dudley & Parker, 1 fluid can, 


25 




" " repairing lantern, 


13 




Bailey & Plumer, 8 oil jackets, 


10 00 




" " 8 pr. oiled pants, 


6 00 




Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas, 


35 




Jona. Horn, refreshments for Co. 


2 00 




Colley & Kelly, 1 gallon sphits, 


65 




" " 2 " alcohol, 


1 80 




Amoskeag Man'f'g Co. hose to fires 11 






times, 


20 00 




Jacob Sawyer, 1 cord wood, 


4 50 




" " surveyor's bill, 


06 




J. A. Tebbetts, 7 ox. sponge, 


1 75 




Kennard & Brock, stove, funnel, &c. 


17 03 




Oliver Greeley, 1 coupling and rivet, 


1 50 






$1011 


98 









Amount carried forward, 



$2112 27 



55 



Amount brought forward, $2112 27 

STARK ENGINE CO., NO. 3. 

Paid Company's bill for services, $778 30 

" « rent, 100 00 

" « gas, 30 60 

" •« " steward's services, 50 00 

" " " printing, 15 00 

S. C. Merrill & Co. for oil, 7 14 

A. Bodwell for 1 cord wood, 5 50 

S. S. Richardson for sawing wood, 1 50 

D. W. Fling for horse hire, 3 00 

A. M. Keniston for 2 1-2 gallons fluid, 2 02 

A. Branch for 25 badges, 8 25 

" " " spanners, letters and 

badges, 9 78 

Bailey & Pluraer, 8 prs. oiled ovcrhalls, 6 00 

»' 22 black jackets, 3 50 

" " putting on figures, 25 

T. A. & A. J. Lane for 1 gallon fluid, 60 

H. T Nichols for horse hire, 20 00 

Colley & Kelly for 1 load wood, 5 00 

$1046 44 



56 



MASSABESIC ENGINE CO., NO. 4. 

Paid Company's bill for services, 

" " " steward's services, 

Manchester Gas Light Co.'s bill for gas, 

City Liquor Agent for 1 gallon alcohol, 

S. C Merrill & Co., for oil, fluid &c. 

George W. Sargent for horse hire, 

Charles Bunton for 1 bolt, 
" " " 1 set brakes, 

E. A. G. Roulstonefor 9 hosemcns' caps 

City Teams for 2 cords wood, 

J. M. & S. F. Stanton for repairs on 
engine, 

Eben French for repairs on engine house, 

J. F. Currier for sawing 1 cord wood, 

Daniels, Forsaith & Co., for 1 lock and 
48 keys, 

A. Branch for letters, 

0. Greeley for repairs, 

Darling & Varney for castings for en- 
gine, 

Larkin Sargent for masonry, 

Colley & Kelly for setting glass, &c. 
" " " 2 gallons alcohol, 

M. D. L. Stevens for printing bills, 

Jacob Sawjer for 1 cord wood, 
'• " " surveyors bill, 

H. S. Barnes for sawing wood, 

A.* Waldron for repairing pump, 



Amount carried forward, $4162 84 



$782 30 


25 00 


33 15 


1 00 


14 45 


3 00 


50 


14 00 


40 50 


9 00 


20 05 


8 21 


1 00 


13 00 


15 


12 50 


5 00 


2 87 


1 59 


1 80 


7 50 


4 50 


06 


. 2 00 


1 00 


$1004 13 



57 



TORRENT ENGINE CO., NO. 5. 

Amount brought forward, $4162 84 

Paid Company's bill for services, 

0. E. Kimball for steward's services, 
" " " " labor and cash paid 

for labor, 

do. do. sawing wood, 

James & Dodge for horse hire, 
S. S. James for horse hire, 
S. Seavey for making couplings and hose, 
Hartshorn & Tufts for repairing oil can, 

" " '• " copper 

boiler, 
City Liquor Agent for 1 gallon alcohol, 
S. C. Merrill & Co. for fluid, soap, &c. 
Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas, 

E. A. G. Roulstone for 9 hoseman's caps 
City Teams for 3 cords wood, 
A. Bodwell for wood, 
0. Greeley for repairs, 
John Plumer, jr., & Co. for 3 pr. oiled 

overalls, 

Amoskeag Man'f'g Co., for 2 3-4 days 
repairing engine, 

Blodgett Edge Tool Co., for 2 fire axes, 

Currier & Sylvester for repairs on en- 
gine, 

Larkin & Fisk for painting engine, 

F. S. Lynch for repairs, 
Darling & Varney for brass castings, 
J. M. &. S. F. Stanton, for labor on en- 
gine, 

C. Bunton for blacksmithing, 

Jacob Sawyer for 1 cord wood, 
'' " " surveyor's bill, 

H. T. Foss for sawing wood, 

Locke & Simonds for 1-2 ream paper, 

Hunneman & Co., for 4 fire buckets, 15 00 

" " "2 brass fire axe- 

tips, 1 50 



$789 


20 


50 00 


19 


86 




75 


30 


00 


10 


00 


3 


12 




50 


2 


50 


1 


00 


1 


55 


10 15 


40 50 


12 


50 


3 


00 


5 


00 


2 


25 


6 


87 


5 


50 


3 


50 


100 


00 


2 


75 


13 


65 


4 


50 


1 


00 


4 50 




06 


1 


25 


1 


25 



$1143 21 



Amount carried forward, $5306 05 



58 



MANCHESTER ENGINE CO., NO. 6. 

Amount brought forward, 



$5306 05 



aid Company's bill for services, 


$743 00 


" " " rent, 


ion 00 


" " " steward's service, 


50 00 


" " " printing. 


10 00 


" " " books, 


5 00 


" " " gas, 


12 00 


S. C. Merrill & Co., for 2 brooms, 


84 


S. S, Richardson for sawing wood, 


1 50 


John Plumer, jr. & Co. for 4 oiled jackets 


5 00 


" " " " 4 pr. oiled 




overalls, 


3 00 


do. do. do. 6 Union 




cloth jackets, 


21 00 


do. do. do. putting fig- 




ures on same, 


1 50 


do. do. do. repairing 




jackets- 


50 


City Team for 1 cord wood, 


5 50 


A. C. Watson for repairs, 


5 00 


R. Or. Campbell f6r horse hire, 


33 00 


A. Rranch for 50 badges, 


16 50 


" " " letters 


16 


0. Greeley for repairs, 


54 32 


L. H. Whitney for 2 1-8 rubber packing. 


1 38 


Houghton & Smith for 8 settees, 


11 66 


" " "15 offiee chairs, 


4 20 


" " " 3 com. chairs, 


63 


Jacob Sawyer for 1 cord wood, 


4 50 


" " " purveyor's bill, 


06 



$1090 25 



59 



* PISCATAQUOG ENGINE CO., No. 7. 

Paid Company's bill for services, 

" " " steward's services, 

" •' " printing, 

Manchester Gas Light Co. tor gas, 

S. C. Merrill & Co. for oil, 

C. A. Hackett for 30 badges, 

A. W. Sanborn for wedging boxes, 
" " " " whiffle-tree, &c. 

John Moultonfor 1 box, 

" " " sawing 2 loads wood, 

" " " setting glass, 

" " " labor, 

City Team for 1 cord wood, 

B. G. Campbell for horse hire, 
J. M. & S. F. Stanton for repairing 

hose carriage, 
Daniels, Forsaith & Co. for 10 ft. hose, 
Hartshorn Sc Tufts for 1 oil can, 
0. Greeley for repairs, 
Bailey & Plumer for 8 pr. oiled overalls, 

" " " 8 oiled jackets, 

A. Branch for 8 belts, 
Darling & Varney for labor on engine, 
Colley & Kelly for 1 sign board 

" " " painting sign, 

" " " 3 gallons alcohol, 

A. C. Wallace for refreshments, 
E. G. W. Bartlett for repairing plunges, 
J. H. Moor for 1 cord sawed wood, 
A. Simpson for moving wood from No. 5 
Clarke & Kimball for sole leather, 
Ira Barr & Co. for matches, broom &c. 



Amount carried forward, $7345 71 



$691 00 




50 00 




15 00 




26 25 




16 10 




10 00 




1 00 




2 00 




8 12 




2 25 




53 




1 65 




5 50 




34 00 




2 87 




2 30 




1 25 




6 90 




6 00 




10 00 




7 00 




62 




8 00 




25 00 




2 70 




2 00 




1 50 




6 00 




62 




1 00 




2 25 






$949 41 



60 



Amount brought forward, $7345 71 

HOOK & LADDER CO., NO. 1. 

Paid Company's bill for services, 

Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas, 
James Richard for horse hire, 
C. Bunton & Co. for blacksmithing, 
S, C. Merrill for fluid, 
Daniels, Forsaith & Co. for 1 wrench, 
" " " " 1 hammer, 

E. Ferren for 2 yds. of green baze, 

F. S. Lynch for repairs on hall, 
" «• " " cupboard and lock, 
Darling & Varney for torchlights, caps 

and handles, 
J. B. Varney for printing 100 bills, 
Jacob Sawyer for 1 cord wood, 

" " " surveyor's bill, 
James & Dodge for horse hire, 

$597 27 



$553 00 


2 10 


2 25 


6 75 


2 61 


1 25 


92 


1 00 


2 50 


1 92 


11 42 


2 00 


4 50 


05 


5 00 



61 



HOSE & HYDRANT CO., NO. 1, 



Paid Company's 


bill for services, 


$293 20 


« 


" " rent, 


43 25 


(< 


" " horse hire, 


8 00 


it 


" " printing and station- 




ery, 




7 50 


(< 


" " steward's services, 


15 00 


<« 


« « gas, 


2 80 


Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas, 


35 



$370 10 
Amount carried forward, $8313 08 



62 



PENNACOOK HOSE CO., NO. 1. 



Amount brought forward, 


$8413 


08 


id Company's bill for services, 


$156 30 




" " " steward's services, 


20 00 




Darling & Varney for 4 torch lights, 


2 00 




J. M. & S. F. Stanton for 1 hose car- 






riage, 


300 00 




do. do. do. shafts and 






rolls, 


7 55 




Varick, Martin & Co. for 11 lbs. rope, 


1 38 




" " " " sponge and 






duster, 


1 00 




do. do. do. 1 chamois 






skin. 


1 50 




J. G. Cilley for rent of room, 


20 00 




Jacob Sawyer for 1 cord wood, 


4 50 




" " " surveyor's bill, 


05 




Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas, 


1 05 




Hunneman & Co. for 4 fire buckets, 


15 00 




" " " 1 suction hose cap, 


4 50 




" 8I " 2 brasses for axe 






tips, 


1 50 




L. G. Sylvester for work on house, 


1 50 




S. C. Merrill for oil and fluid, 


6 89 




J. J. Straw for rent of room. 


40 00 




Dudley & Parker for pail, broom,"&c. 


2 56 




*' " " 1 measure, 


16 




0. Greeley for badges and letters, 


23 34 




" " " couplings and rivets, 


11 50 




A. W. Sanborn for 1 whiffle-tree, 


2 25 




" " " " use of wheels, 


5 00 




F. S. Lynch for work in carriage room, 


1 75 




Larkin & Fisk for painting buckets, 


20 00 




J. E. Walker for sawing wood, 


1 50 




Kennard & Brock for stove and fixtures, 


12 88 




C. Bunton & Co. for wheels, boxes, &c, 






for carriage, 


18 67 




S. Wiggin for use of shop, 


10 00 




" " " 1 sink, 


1 00 




S. Smith for moving hose, 


2 50 




Daniel Balch for horse at fire. 


1 00 





Amount carried forward, $698 83 



63 

Amount brought forward, $698 83 

P. S. Brown for expenses to Boston and 

Lynn. 
A Branch for 10 spanners and belts, 
Daniels, Forsaith & Co. for 1 lock with 

25 keys, 
Tcwksbury & Brother for books and sta- 
tionery, 
Eben French for expenses to Boston 

and Lynn, 
Eben French for labor and material on 
house, 



10 


37 


8 


75 


8 00 


6 


25 


10 


37 


13 68 



$750 25 
$9069 33 



64 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Amoumt carried forward, 
Paid P. S. Brown, Chief Engineer, 

C. H. Brown, Assistant Engineer, 
A. Gay, jr. " " 

Orison Hardy " " 

Eben French " •< 

S. W. Parsons " « 

J. T. P. Hunt 

A. G. Fairbanks « " 

Fhineas Adams " - " 

J. L. Kelly " " 

J. L. Kelly, clerk of Board, 
Hunneman & Co., 15 pieces leading 
hose, 

do. do. 15 pairs couplings, 

do. do. 11 lbs. hemp pack- 

ing, 
Blake & Caldwell for medicine, 
C. H. Brown, cash paid for express on 

hose, 
J. L. Kelly for notifying, 
Eben French " " 

" " repairs on hose house, 
" J< '• 12 1-2 days examining 
stoves, 

do. do. stationery, 
E. Knowlton for care of reservoirs, 
J. Plumer, jr. & Co. fori rubber jacket 
C. F. Livingston for printing 200 no- 
tices, 

do do. do. 50 copies of 

condition of cisterns, 
do. do. do. 25 copies of 

organization of Board, 
Hersey & Tilton for books and station- 
ery, 
H. K. Richardson for watching at fire 

on Wilson's Hill, 
Gr. B. Fogg for making stamps, 
Daniels, Forsaith & Co. 1 sponge, 
" " " 1 lock and 2 

keys, 
do. do. do. 37 3-4 lbs. rope, 



$9169 33 



50 00 


25 00 


25 00 


25 00 


25 00 


25 00 


25 00 


25 00 


25 00 


25 00 


25 00 


744*80 


44 "50 


4 43 


44 


37 


1 00 


4 00 


14 51 


25 00 


37 


41 50 


6 00 


2 50 


6 00 


3 50 


2 45 


1 50 


1 50 


1 00 


75 


6 86 



Amount carried forward, 



$1212 9S 



65 

Amount brought forward, $1212 98 

P. S. Brown, paid freight on hose, 1 40 

" " " for 6 prs. oil pants, 3 75 

" " " " 6 oiled suits (single,) 9 00 

" " « " " " " (double,) 12 00 
" " " " 9 days examining 

stoves, 18 00 

A. Branch for 4 officers badges, 4 00 

Hartshorn & Tufts for 1 fluid can, 75 

" " " repairing lantern, 50 

C. F. Syfferman for 100 ft. hemp hose, 39 00 

'• " " " 2 sets couplings, 8 00 

E. W. Harrington, paid for labor at tire 8 00 
H. D. Corlis for refreshments for Nos. 

1 and 6, 13 00 

John Houston for blacksmithing, 2 17 
Gage, Warner & Whitney for 100 ft. 

hemp hose, GO 00 

do. do. do. 3 prs. 

couplings, 9 75 

O. Greeley for repairs on harness, 7 11 

Hill & Langley for horse hire, 2 25 

Colbath, Richardson & Co., for 103 ft. 

pipe, 14 42 
do. do. do. 3 pendant 
cocks, 1 35 
do. do. do. 1 meter con- 
nection, 2 00 
Bailey & Plumer for 1 pr. overalls, 50 
" " " 2 rubber coats, 12 00 



$1441 93 
$10511 26 



66 



RECAPITULATION. 

Total amount undrawn and appropriated for 



1858, 






$10603 84 


CONTRA. 






)f Engine Company 


No. 


1, 


1100 29 


« If <; 


ii 


2, 


1011 98 


(( (( «( 


it 


3, 


1046 44 


(( <( (( 


it 


4, 


1004 13 


a k a 


i< 


5, 


1143 21 


(( (c il 


u 


6, 


1090 25 


(( l( u 


(i 


7, 


0949 41 


" Hose & Hydrant 


« 


1, 


370 10 


" Hook & Ladder 


t( 




597 27 


" Miscellaneous 


i< 




1441 93 


" Pennacook 


u 




756 25 




$10511 26 








092 58 



$10603 84 



67 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $31 71 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 1700 00 
" transferedj from City Teams 
account, 500 00 



$2231 71 



CONTRA. 

To paid the following bills viz, 

Gas Light Co., for moving and setting 

lamp posts, 17 75 

do. do, lighting and extin- 

guishing lamps, 
do. do. gas, 

CoUey & Kelly setting glass in lanterns, 

D. C. Smith, fluid, 

T. S. Montgomery, fluid, 

John S. Folsom, " 

David Crowell, lighting lamps on Falls 
Bridge, 

L. F. Elliot, repairing lantern, 

Gilman & Stratton, do. do. 

A. Gr. Tucker, white-washing, 



Balance unexpended, 



248 50 


1048 


25 


10 


38 


8 


75 


1 


40 


15 


20 


41 


00 


4 


00 


1 


00 


3 


50 


$1399 


23 


832 48 




$2231 71 



68 



MILITIA. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $28 36 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 200 00 



| $228 86 



CONTRA. 



To paid the following bills viz, 

Howard & Moore for rent of room, 50 00 

B. P. Cilley, « " " « 100 00 



$150 00 
Balance unexpended, 78 36 



$228 36 



69 



RESERVOIRS. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 




pended, 


CONTKA. 


$440 01 






ro paid the following bills viz, 




T. M. Morse for Labor, 


27 00 


J. Morse, 


K 


13 12 


Levi Dodge, 


II 


13 25 


John Dycer, 


II 


14 25 


Samuel Brown, 


II 


3 00 


T. S. Frost, 


ll 


10 50 


Joseph Freshell, 


II 


8 75 


Moody Quimby, 


M 


6 00 


Joseph Prescott, 


II 


6 00 


A. Hatch, 


II 


2 50 


Wm. Young, 


II 


2 50 


J. Hardy, 


II 


5 00 


John Harris, 


II 


3 00 


L. B. Blake, 


<l 


5 00 


F. Munroe, 


l( 


3 00 


E. Hartshorn, 


II 


1 00 


Wm. Blackburn, 


II 


3 00 


Wm. Kenny, 


II 


2 00 


D. J. Worthley, 


II 


5 00 


Henry Parker, 


«( 


1 00 


Clough & Young, 


II 


6 88 


Eben Knowlton, 


II 


3 75 


M. D. Stokes,'stones prepared for cess- 




pools, 




83 50 


Hylas Dickey, brick and labor, 


1 35 


Clough & Young, 


do. do. 


12 82 


<( ii 


cement, 


5 15 


it it 


sand, 


75 


ii ii 


moving tools, 


75 


Ira Barr & Co., £ 


pikes, » 


4 36 



$440 01 



Amount carried forward, 



$254 18 



70 

Amount brought forward, $254 18 

John B. Chase, pump leather, 6 00 

Amoskeag Man'f'g Co., brick, 10 00 

J. Morse, use of horse cart, 1 25 

Varick, Martin & Co., hardware, 4 00 

Joseph L. Smith, lumber, 5 07 

A. C. Wallace, « 38 50 

Eben Knowlton, making repairs, 6 00 

$325 00 
Balance unexpended, 115 01 

$440 01 



71 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 
" received for costs and fines, 



CONTRA. 

To paid the following bills to wit : 

H. G. Lowell, Marshal for services, 
Isaac W. Farmer, Assistant Marshal, 

for services, 
Wm. B. Patten, Ass't Marshal services 
H. 0. Dudley, Night Watch, « 
Jonathan Horn, 
Henry Clough, 
Henry Bennett, 
Uriah H. Foss, 
E. W. Clough, 
R. S. Harlow, 
N. B. Taplin, 
A. G-. Fairbanks, 
E P. Whidden, 
Eben'r Carr, 
E. B. Pike, 

E. W. Clough, Police service, 
R. S. Harlow, 
U. H. Foss, 
J. P. Wheeler, 
N. Taplin, 
James Wallace, 
E. B. Pike, 
J. B. Daniels, 
E. P. Whidden, 
E. G. Haynes, 
J. K. Piper, 
H. O. Dudley, 
Wm. Dutcmple, 

Amotjmt carried forward, 



$720 73 
5000 00 
1490 57 



$7211 30 



700 00 



50 


00 


450 


00 


387 50 


64 50 


58 50 


526 


00 


532 50 


310 


50 


78 00 


58 50 


23 00 


435 


00 


159 


00 


440 


00 


36 


75 


44 00 


15 


50 


19 


50 


18 50 


19 50 


15 


00 


10 


00 


3 


50 


4 


00 


13 


00 





50 


1 


50 


$4474 25 



72 



Amount brought forward, $4474 25 

F. S. Worthen, « " 18 00 
T. 0. Furnald, " " 7 00 
I. W. Farmer, " M 
Edward Prince, " «• 
A. G. Fairbanks, " " 
Henry Bennett, " " 
T. L. Quimby, " « 
J. C. Young, " " 
H. H. Fuller, 

G. Ambrose, " " 
K. N. Batchelder, « " 
H. B. Moulton, " " 
Wm. Wheeler, " " 
Jonathan Horn, " " 
Eben Carr, " " 
N. Baker 2d, " " 
S. P. Duncklee, " " 
H. H. Summers, " •' 
W. D, Ferson, " " 
G. Gorden, " " 
G. H. Whitney, « « 
J. P. Watson, «' «' 
Groves Brown, " " 
Daniel M. Robinson, " " 
S. Seavey, stringing billeys, 
J. D. Bean, comforters for lobby, 
Goodale & Farnsworth, printing, 
John B. Clarke, printing, 
Hersey & Tilton, stationery, 
H. G. Lowell, expense of prisoners. 
W. B. Patten, " 
Isaac Riddle, repairs of Police Court 

Room, 

H. G. Lowell, witnesses' fees and ex- 
penses 

I. W. Farmer, do. do. 

Isaac Riddle, do. do. 

Samuel N. Bell, professional services, 

E. G. W. Bartlett, repairing lobby, 

Hartshorn & Tufts, " stoves, 

A. Marshall, damage to Show Co., 

J. B. Watson, lumber, 

Alonzo Smith, " 

Amount carried forward, $5205 26 



5 50 


13 00 


9 50 


45 75 


50 


14 00 


3 00 


2 00 


17 02 


4 50 


19 00 


41 50 


2 00 


8 50 


2 00 


11 00 


1 00 


1 00 


2 50 


50 


2 50 


2 50 


3 00 


3 50 


96 90 


22 50 


7 07 


51 27 


28 84 


47 25 


28 12 


9 61 


5 00 


126 00 


55 35 


58 


5 00 


4 00 


7 25 



73 



Amount brought forward, 

Charles W. Colby paid for labor, 

John Houston, " 

A. Bodwell, wood, 

Hugh Ramsey, " 

William H. Hill, horse hire, 

G. Cheney, " 

Hill & Langley, " 

K. N. Batchelder, « 

Hill & Swan, 

H. GL Lowell, 

James & Dodge, " 

A. B. Shattuck, Police Justice, 

Varick & Martin, hardware, 

Daniels, Forsaith & Co., hardware, 

E. P. Johnson, coal, 

R. Woodburn, posting bills, 

W. D. Buck, medicine and services, 

J. E. Holt, police badges, 

Peak & Co. " 

Samuel Upton, salary as Police Justice, 
" " for rent of office, &c. 

A. B. Shattuck, salary as Special Jus- 
tice of- Police Court, 



Balance unexpended, 



$5209 26 

3 25 
2 50 

14 63 

13 25 

129 50 

4 50 
64 00 

2 50 
13 75 

8 00 

4 25 
86 00 

7 60 

2 25 

7 35 
62 

2 00 
30 25 

8 38 
500 00 

53 00 

22 00 

$6188 84 
1022 46 
$7211 30 



74 



CITY HALL AND STORES. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $151 03 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 1000 00 
" received for rent of stores 9 
months, 153S 61 
Amount recevied for rent of Hall, 388 25 



CONTEA. 




To paid the following bills, viz, 




W. Dickinson for charcoal, 


1 25 


J. H. Moore for wood, 


2 75 


Hugh Rams, •' 


41 50 


A. Bodwell " 


27 50 


Wm. Eastman for brooms, matches, &c. 


97 


S. S. Richardson for sawing wood, 


2 34 


H. S. Barnes, " " 


4 92 


George Chamberlin, " " 


3 50 


John Languin, " " 


2 25 


Gilman B. Fogg, making keys. 


9 41 


Manchester Gas Light Co., gas, 


258 68 


Ricker, Godfrey & Co., water pails, 


75 


O. Barton & Co., cloth, 


5 63 


J. A. Haines, " 


1 00 


E. Ferren, oil cloth, 


20 27 


G. K. Goodwin for labor, 


25 00 


C. W. Colby, 


1 25 


Jonathan Horn, " 


1 00 


James McCarty, " 


1 50 


Jacob B. Daniels, repairs, 


1 87 


S. S. Moulton, « 


1 75 


Colbath & Richardson, " 


9 13 


T. R. Hubbard, 


1 25 


Dudley & Parker, " 


4 50 


F. S. Lynch, " 


41 91 



$3077 89 



Amount carried forward, 



171 88 



75 

Amount brought torward, $471 

Harrison D. Lord, inkstands, 

E. P. Johnson & Co., hard coal, 

Colley & Kelly, painting, 

John Welch, " 

E. G. W. Bartlett, repairing bell, 

J. Q. A. Sargent, " gas fixtures, 

Robert Gilchrist, spittoons, 

Houghton & Smith, sink, 
" " chairs, 

A. 0. Parker, " 

" " « table, 

Wm. E. Eastman & Son, fluid and 
matches, 

Alonzo Smith & Son, timber, 

A. C. Wallace, 

Gay & Parker, repairing stove, 

Neal & Holbrook, " " 

Daniels & Forsaith, hardware, 

John Twombly, mason work, 

Hilas Dickey, " " 

A. G. Tucker, rent of back store, 

Levi Sargent, appraising damage by fire, 

Colley & Kelly for setting glass, 

C. F. Livingston, printing, 

Dudley & Parker, ventillator, 

T. Dunlop, clock for Court Room, 

Hartshorn & Tufts, repairing stoves, 
&c, 

James Wallace, repairing lobby, 

John Houston, " " 

Dudley & Parker, wash basin and 
pitcher, 

A. G. Tucker, chloride of lime, 

T. McQueston, whitewashing, 

E. Ferren, mat and saoking, 

John S. Folsom, soap, 

C. W. Colby, washing and cleaning offi- 
ces, 

P. J. & W. H. Boyd, table counter, 



Balance, 



9 00 


99 96 


3 08 


26 22 


16 74 


3 62 


3 36 


3 92 


30 00 


43 69 


75 


1 46 


3 00 


46 26 


34 90 


19 32 


16 62 


]3 50 


2 25 


9 00 


5 00 


3 96 


1 25 


14 42 * ' 


8 00 


34 36 


75 


4 93 


70 


2 50 


1 50 


1 33 


80 


3 13 


6 00 


$947 16 


2130 73 


£3077 89 



76 



CITY OFFICERS. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $1332 44 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 4000 00 



CONTKA. 

To paid the following bills, 

Alonzo Smith, salary as Mayor, 
Joseph Knowlton " " City Clerk, 
H. R. Chamberlin " " Treasurer, 
A. B. Shattuck " " Clerk C. Coun- 
cil, 
Charles W. Colby, salary as Messenger 
" « Cleik P. T. C. Council, 

J. B. Sawyer, " " " 

James 0. Adams, Supt. Public Instruc- 
tion, 
Herman Foster, City Solicitor 1857, 
Joseph B. Clark, " « 
Wm. D. Buck, " Physician 1857, 
Sylvanus Bunton, " " 
F. H. Lyford, City Clerk 1857, 



$5332 44 



1000 00 


500 00 


200 00 


100 00 


300 00 


4 00 


2 00 


500 00 


50 00 


50 00 


12 50 


25 00 


10 42 


$2753 92 



77 



ASSESSORS. 

George W. F. Converse, 146 20 

Jonathan Horn, 86 00 

James S. Cogswell, 70 00 

Joseph B. Clark, 67 00 

Daniel W. Fling, 79 75 

John H. Moore, 70 00 

Allen Partridge, 57 50 

A. C. Wallace, 40 00 



$616 45 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Samuel S. Moulton, Clerk. 


88 37 


Charles H. Brown, 


35 00 


Alpheus Bodwell, 


20 00 


John L. Kelly, 


35 00 


M. N. Young, 


25 00 


Jacob Peavey, 


35 00 


Amherst Kimball, 


35 00 



$273 37 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Jeremiah B. Hoit, for the Board, $280 00 

MODERATORS. 

Gr. C. Gilman, 2 years, 
B. F. Wallace, « " 
Daniel Pulsifer, 
T. S. Montgomery, 
Wm. Gr. Means, 4 years, 

$30 00 



6 00 


6 00 


3 00 


3 00 


12 00 



78 

SELECTMEN. 

D. L. Willey, 2 years, 10 00 
J. P. Parker, 
W. S. Pearson, 
Joseph H. Haines, 

" " stationery, 

Israel Webster, 
A. Newman, 
" " stationery, 
W. L. Lane, 
C. CanBeld, 
Geo. 0. Clarke, 
Edward Swasey, 
David Alden, 
W. B. Roys, 
I. Whittemore, 
G. W. Thayer, 2 years, 
W. E. Eastman, 
S. J. Young, 

E. Clement, 
L. W. Eastman, 
C. H. Sargent, 
A. W. Thompson, 
Orison Hardy, 
H. C. Merrill, 



J. L. Smith, 
James Hall, 
Joel Taylor, 



stationery, 



WARD CLERKS. 



G. W. Brown, 2 years, 

" " " stationery, 

Jacob B. Daniels, 

J. H. Haynes, 

« « " stationery, 

Joseph L. Smith, 

E. W. Brigham, 

'« " " stationery, 



Balance unexpended, 



5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


50 


5 00 


5 00 


1 09 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


10 00 


5 0) 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


1 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


^137 r )0 




10 00 


35 


2 50 


5 00 


50 


5 00 


5 00 


50 


$28 85 


4120 09 


1212 35 


$5332 44 



79 






PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 




pended, 


$81 42 


Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 


1000 00 


CONTRA. 




To paid the following bills, viz, 




Hersey & Tilton, 


30 83 


Tewksbury & Brothers, 


3 06 


Joseph Knowlton, 


12 00 


Joseph Marshall, 


6 37 


F. L. Porter, 


7 64 


Locke & Simons, 


2 99 


David McColley, 


7 40 


Joseph Marshall, 


24 75 


Goodale & Farnsworth, 


411 81 


C. F. Livingston, 


24 00 


Fisk & Stearns, 


69 69 


John B. Clarke, 


58 25 




$658 79 


Balance unexpended, 


422 63 



$1081 42 



$1081 42 



80 



INTEREST PAID. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 un- 
drawn, $298 15 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 8000 00 





$8298 15 


Overdrawn, 


247 05 




<ftOC/|C Of) 






CONTRA. 




To paid the following bills, viz, 




The Town of Bedford, 


207 56 


Temporary Loan, 


533 11 


Cyrus Moore, 


332 93 


Jesse Gibson, 


160 10 


Nehemiah Hunt, 


216 00 


J. A. Holmes, 


255 50 


Cupons, 


6810 00 




$8545 20 



81 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES, 



By amount of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 
Cash for Circus Licenses, 
" " City Aqueduct water, 

CONTRA. 

T. R. Humphrey, rent of room, 



$1248 65 

4000 00 

60 00 

90 00 



for Police Court, 
" Ward meetings, 
" Fire Police, 
of room, 






Isaac Riddle, 

Thos. Corcoran, 

W. H. Barron, 

Cornet Band, 

1). B. Emerson " " '• 

Advent Society, " " " 

H. Peacock, making Cemetery gate, 

Geo. W. Adams, salt, pail and fluid, 

Hartshorn & Tufts, repairing street lan- 
terns, 

Smith, Mason & Co. map of Hillsbor- 
ough County, 

Alonzo Smith, map of United States, 

Advent Society, damaging settees at 
Ward meeting, 

Joseph Knowl ton, recording births, deaths 
and marriages, 

F. H. Lyford, do. do. 

John Leavitt, damage for injuries, 

Jeremiah D. Lyford, copying tax list, 

J. B. Sawyer, Clerk of Assessors ser- 
vices, 

E. G. W. Bartlett, repairing bell, 

E. B. Merrill, school books for poor 
children, 

Locke & Simons, do. do. do. 

Hersey & Tilton, do. do. do. 

S. P. Austin, drawing saw dust, 

H. C. Hunton, " " " 



Amount carried forward, 



$5398 65 



f2 00 

75 00 

23 00 

50 00 

100 00 

10 00 

IS 00 

3 05 

8 23 

2 42 

5 00 
2 50 

40 00 

80 38 

5 81 

35 00 

12 00 

77 33 
10 29 



46 

68 
47 
00 
00 



$577 62 



82 



Amount brought forward, 


$577 62 


H. R. Chamberlin, printing and station- 




ery, 


2 00 


Goodale & Farnsworth, do. do. 


144 90 


Fisk & Gage, do. do. 


120 00 


Tewksbury & Brother, do. do. 


25 


C. F. Livingston, do. do. 


1 50 


B. F. Wallace, expense to Goffstown, 


4 25 


Alonzo Smith, " " Worcester, 


4 50 


A. W. Sanborn, repairing and painting 




hearse, 


11 25 


J. Houston, iron bars, 


7 50 


Herman Foster, insurance, 


208 75 


B. P. Cilley, 


37 50 


E. T. Stevens, " 


35 00 


J. D. Lyford, 


36 00 


Manchester Gas Light Co., gas for Fire 




Police, 


3 85 


Bunton & Reynolds, repairing lobby, 


1 88 


Robert Gilchrist, spittoons, bowl and 




pitcher, 


2 48 


E. G. Haynes, brick and labor, 


16 45 


Gilman Reed, sand, 


3 00 


P. J. & W. H. Boyd, box for sand, 


25 


S. S. Richardson, drawing wood, 


2 17 


C W. Colby, 


50 


Collcy & Kelly, painting, 


2 25 


Dudley & Parker, stove, 


4 48 


Gilman B. Fogg, making keys, 


40 


Alpheus Bodwell, wood, 


17 53 


William H. Hill, horse hire, 


10 50 


Joseph L. Smith, " " 


100 00 


James & Dodge, " " 


24 50 


W. F. Sleeper, " " 


6 00 


Hill & Langley, " " 


1 00 


E. G. Fairbanks, " " 


12 50 


Manchester Iron Co., repairing hay 




scales, 


220 19 


Wm. W. Brown, post mortem examina- 




tion, 


10 00 


Geo. H. Hubbard, do. do. 


10 00 


J. Marshall, tax and other blank books, 


40 00 


Houghton & Smith, furniture for Fire 




Police Room, 


66 63 



Amount carried forward, 



$1747 58 



83 



Amount brought forward, 



$1747 58 



Robert Gilchrist, spittoons for Fire Po- 
lice Room, 
S. S. Moulton, boxing trees, 
J. B. Sawyer, surveying, 
Manchester Post Office, postage, 
Alonzo Smith, " 

S. S. Moulton, 

Oliver Greeley, badges for Fire Police, 
J. E. Holt, 

J. Knowlton, copying and revising or- 
dinances, 
A. B. Shattuck, do. do. 

E. P. Offutt, selling grass at auction, 
E. P. Johnson, coal, 
J. H. Goodale, Teachers' Institute, 
Isaac W. Smith, professional services, 
Clark & Smith, « " 

Herman Foster, " " 

L. B. Clough, " " 

S. N. Bell, 

H. R. Ohamberlin, express business, 
H. C. Housto.:, labor, 
J. H. Knowlton, " 
Joseph Knowlton, " 
Eben Knowlton, " 
Daniels, Forsaith & Co., hardware, 
Lyford & Chamberlin, making Annual 

Report, 
A. S. Rundlett, claim for injuries of 

her daughter, 
Joseph B. Clark, expenses to Bristol to 

settle with Mrs. Rundlett, 
Smith & Son, lumber, 
Jos. L. Smith, " 

J. B. Daniels, repairing Ward room, 
D. W. Robinson, " " " 
J. B. Hoyt, " " " 

Mrs. Doyle, washing " " 

Neal & Holbrook, repairing " 

J. Webster, " " 

J. Mayher, washing " 



1 75 

7 45 
6 50 

31 04 
3 00 
3 49 
5 00 

30 25 

16 00 
15 00 

5 00 

6 26 
152 80 

54 95 

94 31 

3 S3 

22 50 

7 00 
93 
00 
25 
50 
50 



1 

8 
4 
2 
38 91 



100 00 
500 00 



36 


10 


2 


50 


18 31 


4 


00 


3 


75 


2 


50 


2 


50 


4 


00 


6 


00 


1 


00 



Amount carried forward, 



$2949 96 



84 

Amount brought forward, $2949 96 

H. R. Chamberlin, balance of notes un- 
collected, 77 33 

F. H. Lyford, making indexes and ar- 
ranging papers, 73 00 

$3100 29 
Balance unexpended, 2298 36 

$5398 65 



85 



CITY LIBRARY. 



By Balance of Appropriation for 1857 
expended. 
Amount of " " 1858, 



CONTRA. 

To paid the following Bills, viz : — 

JEtna Insurance Co. for Insurance, 

Phoenix 4< " " 

John B. Clarke, for Newspapers, 

E. Bartholomew, " 
Goodale & Farnsworth, " 

D. F. Buckley, 

J. M. Campbell, " 

F. Worthington, " 

E. P. Johnson, coal, 
C. W. Uffutt, wood, 
Manchester Gas Light Co., gas, 

F. B. Eaton, salary as Librarian, 
Samuel N. Bell, rent, 

Goodale & Farnsworth, printing, 

Samuel N. Bell, freight, 

F. B. Eaton, varnishing desk, 

J. Q. A. Sargent, repairing gas fittings, 

Manchester Post Office, postage, 

Dudley & Parker, stove fixtures, 

Trustees for Library as per contract, 

John B. Clarke, advertising, 

A. C. Wallace, boxes, 

Hall & Hubbard, « 

Hersey & Tilton, stationery, 



* 1 42 

2200 00 



$2201 42 



Balance unexpended, 



32 50 
13 £0 

3 00 

2 00 

4 50 
38 23 

1 37 

8 25 

35 26 

3 00 
74 20 

600 00 

250 00 

24 25 

3 77 
34 
50 

12 58 

4 11 
1000 00 

1 50 
17 50 
15 50 

5 56 

$2151 42 
50 00 



$2201 42 



8G 



CITY DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1859, 













Date of Notes. 


To whom Payable. 


When Payable. J°* 


unpaid ' 
1,1859. 
108 00 


Principal. 


February 28, 1852. 


Nehemiah Hunt. | 


February 28, 1872. | 


3eoo 00 


July 1, 1847, 


Certificate of Stock. 


July 1, 1862, 


675 00 


22500 00 


July 1,1847, 


« 


July 1,1867, 


600 CO 


20000 (0 


July 1, 1847, 


" 


July 1, 1872, 


600 00 


20000 00 


July 1, 1854, 


It cc 


July 1, 1874, 


600 00 


20000 00 


January 1, 1856, 


[( u 


January 1 1880, 


300 00 


10000 00 


July 1,1857, 


It «« 


July 1,1577, 


671 00 


2250O 00 


July 9, 1858, 


Nehemiah Hunt. 


July 9, 1878, 


68 75 


2400 00 


July 22, 1858, 




July 22, 1878, 


29 15 


1100 00 




3655 90 


$122,100 00 


Add Interest un 


Said, 






3.655 90 


Total debt and i 


iterest, January 1, 1859 






$126,755 ©0 



87 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 



By amount borrowed as per Treasurer's re- 
ceipts, $23500 00 

$23500 00 

CONTRA. 

To paid sundry notes for borrowed money to 

the several Banks, amounting to 16500 00 

The following notes are now due viz, 

To the Town of Goffstown, due March 

1, 1859, 1500 00 

Manchester Bank, due Feb. 22, 1S59, 3000 00 
City Bank, due Feb. 3, « 1250 00 

Merrimack It. Bank, due Jan. 6, " 1250 00 



-$23500 00 



88 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, 



CONTRA. 

To the following Taxes abated, viz, 
Enoch Johnson for 1858, 
Frederick Smyth, " 
Amoskeag Savings Bank, 1858, 
Charles R. Simons, " 

Obadiah Jackson, " 



11985 86 



Lewis Simons, 
Isaac Mitchell, 
Waterman Webster, 

Stephen Smith, 
William Kimball, 
Plumer, Crowell & Co., 
Isaac W. Farmer, 
L. F. Harris, 
Wm. B. Johnson, 
John McCabe, 
Edward P. Offutt, 
James Hall, 
J. M. & E. Coburn, 
Joseph Bailey, 
Joseph Sanborn, 
Francis Manter, 
John S. Elliot, 
Jeremiah Hodge, 
Sherburn Fogg, 



Balance unexpended, 



1857, 

1858, 

1857, 
«( 

1858, 

1S57, 
1858, 



3 


26 


5 


13 


137 


39 


7 76 


6 80 




97 




35 


3 


10 


2 


31 


4 85 


6 


98 


1 


86 


2 


31 


12 


42 


1 


99 


1 


86 


22 82 


1 


86 


10 09 


15 


78 


4 08 


6 


21 


6 


36 


6 


54 


o 


54 


3 


18 


15 


20 


$294 


00 


1691 


86 



$1985 86 



$1985 86 



89 






CITY LIQUOR AGENCY. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, $973 15 



CONTRA. 



To paid Herman Foster, $200 00 

Balance unexpended, 773 15 

$973 15 



90 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



By balance of Appropriation for 1857 unex- 




pended, 


$1133 02 


Amount received for lots and grass, 


341 04 




$1474 06 


CONTEA. 




To paid the following bills. 




A. W. Sanborn for repairing hearse, 


19 50 


Straw & Prince, " '• 


75 


Levi H. Sleeper, labor, 


255 28 


John Sargent, " 


8 33 


J. B. Daniels, " 


2 30 


J. B. Sawyer, services as Treasurer, 


12 00 


Goodale & Farnsworth, printing, 


9 88 


John B. Clarke, " 


1 00 


John G. Coult, trees, 


35 52 


B. Hutchinson, reward, 


20 00 


E. G. Haynes, mason work } 


1 00 


Hylas Dickey, " " 


12 63 


Colley & Kelly, painting, 


12 28 


J. M. Sawyer, " 


2 25 


Hartshorn & Tufts, repairing fountain, 


6 04 


Eben Ross, building fence, 


654 11 


Geo. B. Chandler, keeping records, 


10 00 


J. B. Sawyer, blank book, 


1 97 


" " " revising plan, 


8 00 


Joseph L. Smith, lumber. 


3 75 


John C. Young, covering hearse house, 


20 00 


Gas Light Co., cinders, 


3 00 




$1099 59 


Balance unexpended, 


374 47 




$1474 06 



yi 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



By wood sold, 


$125 40 


Grass " 


14 75 




$140 15 


Overdrawn, 


77 06 




$217 21 


CONTRA. 




To paid the following bills, viz, 




R. Haselton for labor, 


65 22 


J. Everett, " 


47 92 


John Sargent, " 


20 00 


Joseph Prescott, " 


8 34 


Eben Ross, " 


4 00 


J. B. Fish, 


8 00 


J. B. Sawyer, " 


3 68 


Daniels, Forsaith & Co., hardware, 


6 25 


Wm. H. Hill, horse hire, 


1 00 


Wm. S. Locke, lumber, 


21 14 


J. L. Smith, " 


31 61 



$217 21 
$217 21 



92 



CITY TEAM. 



By balance of appropriation for 1857 unex- 
pended, 

Amount " •« 1858, 

" received for labor of team, 



CONTRA. 



To paid the following bills, viz, 
Hugh Ramsey, for labor, 
J. F. Woodbury, shoeing, 
R. Gilmore & son, " 
B. Currier, painting, 
J. Abbott & Co., meal and grain, 
Locomotive Works, wood, 
Pine Grove Cemetery, 
George W. Dorr, use of Wagon, 
Daniels, Forsaith & Co., Hardware, 
Oliver Greely, repairing harnesses, 
Nathan Roberts, hay, 

A. C. Wilson, 

B. W. Hardy, " 
George Brown, " 
P. W. Follensbee, « 
City Farm, " 
Jacob Peavey, " 
Joseph L. Smith, Lumber, 

Amount transferred to Lighting Streets 
account, 



Balance unexpended, 



468 00 


500 00 


784 86 


#17^0 qfi 




134 07 


41 28 


3 19 


7 00 


238 21 


177 10 


125 40 


9 00 


2 00 


4 75 


9 65 


6 63 


9 28 


4 33 


10 63 


61 90 


6 25 


25 46 


500 00 


81376 19 


376 67 


$1752 86 



93 



RESERVED FUND. 



By balance of Appropriation of 1857 unex- 
pended, $375 00 
Amount of Appropriation for 1858, 3248 00 

$3623 00 



CONTRA. 



To paid A. C. Wallace for M. Ingham for 

watering streets, $200 00 

Transferred to several Highway Dis- 
tricts, 2638 34 



$2838 34 
Balance unexpended, 784 66 

$3623 00 



94 



CITY FARM AND ALMS HOUSE REPORT. 



To the City Council of Manchester : 

Gentlemen: The undersigned to whom was entrusted the 
charge of the City Farm the past year, herewith submit the fol- 
lowing Report : 

It will be seen that the expenditures are quite large $675,95 ; of 
which was for permanent improvement on tbe buildings, which are 
much more convenient than heretofore. Another large item in the 
expenditures is for stock to replace what had been sold from the 
Farm the year before ; as it was fo;ind there was not stock enough, 
of the proper class, to consume the cheap and unsaleable forage 
raised upon the Farm, it was deemed advisable to purchase young 
cattle, that the same might be consumed and expended for the ben- 
efit of said Farm ; for a more particular account, and for items in 
detail, see Appropriations and Expenditures for City Farm. 

By reference to former Reports, it will be seen that many items 
are appraised lower this year than heretofore ; as for instance in 
the credit side, we have allowed for boarding paupers SI. 25 per 
week against $1.7"> formerly — for drawing street manure 80 cts. 
against §3,00 per load — for preparing wood $2,00 against $3,00 
heretofore. 

The annexed account shows a balance in favor of the Farm of 
$990,37 ; if the above items in the credit account had been ap- 
praised as high as formerly, the balance in favor of the farm would 
be $1,617,97. We are of the opinion, however, that said items 
are appraised high enough ; we are of the opinion, also, that some 
of the items accredited to the Farm do not properly belong to such 
credit, as they do not lead to a correct understanding of the cost of 
maintaining the establishment. 

ALONZO SMITH, ) Committee 
\ on 
) City Farm. 



95 



10 
2 
3 
9 



INVENTORY OF PERSONAL PROPERTY AT 
ALMS HOUSE DEC. 10, 1858. 

1 horse, 

1 pair fat oxen, 
1 " work oxen, 
1 « 

3 " two years old steers, 

1 " one " •« 

2 one year old heifers, 

4 cows, 
1 bull, 
15 hens, 

25 tons English hay, No. 1, 
7 " " " No. 2, 

" meadow hay, 

" oat straw, 

" wheat and Barley straw, 

" rye straw, 

" corn fodder, 

4 bushels beans, 

1 " peas 81 00 ; 200 bushels oats $100 00, 
350 bushels corn $350 00 ; 4 bushels barley, 

$4 00, 

25 bush, rye $25 00 ; 31 bush, wheat $54 25, 

300 bush, potatoes, 

25 bush, turnips $6 00 ; 10 bush, carrots $3 50, 

15 bush, beets $6 00 ; 400 heads of cab- 
bage $16 00, 

2 1-2 bbls. cider, and 17 cider bbls. 
1 1-2 bbls. vinegar and 5 vinegar bbls. 
7 « apples $14 00 ; 7 bbls. pork $147 00, 

5 " salt beef $70 00 ; 4 bbls. soap and 
bbls. $16 00, 

360 lbs. fresh meat, 

135 lbs. lard $16 20 ; 10 lbs. tallow and can- 
dles, $1 25, 
60 lbs. rough tallow, 

10 meat barrels $5 00 ; 21 bush, ashes $2 50, 
70 lbs. soap grease, 

25 pumpkins $1.50 ; 5 gal. pickles $1.25, 
12 gal. apple sauce, 

Amodmt carried forward, 



THE CITY 


$200 00 


100 


00 


135 


00 


125 00 


175 


00 


35 00 


28 


00 


130 00 


50 


00 


7 


00 


325 00 


70 00 


42 


00 


70 00 


10 


00 


18 


00 


54 


00 


6 50 


101 


00 


354 00 


79 


25 


135 


00 


9 


50 


22 


00 


22 


00 


10 


00 


161 


00 


86 


00 


25 


00 


17 


45 


4 


20 


7 50 


2 


SO 


o 


75 


3 


00 


$2622 95 



96 

Amount brought forward, $2622 95 

1-2 bbl. boiled cider, 4 00 

108 lbs. butter $22.6S < 21 lbs. cheese $1.89, 24 57 

1 breeding sow, 20 00 

5 store pigs $15.00 ; 4 shoats $36.00, 51 00 

2 ox carts. 1 ox wagon, 230 00 

3 cart bodies $33.00 ; 2 hay racks $22 00, 55 00 
8 cart and sled spires, 6 00 

1 sleigh $16.00 ; 1 wagon $40.00, 56 00 

6 ox sleds $75.00 ; 7 plows $50.00, • 125 00 

2 harrows $16.00 ; 2 cultivators $6 00, 22 00 
2 grind stones $6 00 ; 1 whiffletree $1.00, 7 00 
1 shave horse, 1 beetle, 1 50 
20 feed boxes $5.00 ; 1 mixing box, 3 00, 8 00 
1 meal box $2.00 ; 5 large chains $11.00, 13 00 

1 spread chain $1.25; 5 stake chains, $1.50, 2 75 
29 tie chains $6.50, 1 string bells $1.50, 8 00 
26 tie bows and rings, 6 50 

2 buffalo robes, 15 00 
1 bridle and martingil, 1 25 
1 single harness, 12 00 
1 cart harness $15.00, 1 lead harness $10.00, 25 00 

1 new collar and 1 whip, 4 00 

2 set hay poles $0.75, chest of tools $15.00, 15 75 

1 grain ctadle $3.50 ; 1 new vice $4.25, 7 75 

2 Tons old iron, 40 00 
1 meat hook and 7 wrenches, 4 37 
1 sledge hammer, 1 50 

4 ox yokes and irons, 15 00 
ox bows and pins, 3 00 

4 cards and brushc3 and 7 axes, 7 65 
16 hay and manure forks, 8 00 
1 claw fork $0.50; 3 crow bars $5.00, 5 50 
Hay rakes, frails and sickles, 9 00 
1 hay cutter $8.00; 1 hay knife $1.25, 9 25 
1 winnowing mill and corn sheller, 20 00 
1 horse rake and wheel barrow, 7 00 
1 cant hook and wood horses, 2 50 

5 grub hoes $2.00, and 12 baskets $3.00, 5 00 
1 set measures, and 2 scalding tubs, 1 50 
4 pick axes and padlocks, 7 50 
1 tree scraper, and 3 bush scythes. 3 50 
1 work bench $4.00 ; ladders $12.00, 16 00 
Curry comb and brush, 1 50 

Amount carried forward, 83411 79 



97 

Amount brought forward, 
1 drag $2.25; 4 muzzle baskets $1.25, 
Halter, blanket and sercingle, 
12 hoes $4.80 ; 8 shovels $6.52, 
1 copps and pin, and brand iron, 

1 wheel jack $1.00 ; 2 axles $8.00, 

2 watering troughs and other troughs, 
300 lbs. nails, 

3 wood saws $2.50 ; 1 crosscut saw $5.50, 

4 carpenters horses, 

Jugs, cans, and paint dishes, 

1 bush hook $1 .25 ; 2 set fetters $7.00, 

5 blocks and chains, 
1 pair handcuffs, 

1 suction pump $2.00 ; grass seed $4.33, 

14 feather beds, mattresses and bedding 

2 cook and 6 other stoves, 

3 rocking chairs $5.80 ; window curtains $3.50, 
20 common chairs $3.50 ; 18 dining chairs 

$6.00, 

15 tables $12.00 ; 1 clock $2.50, 

10 looking glasses $5.00 ; 12 boxes $1.00, 
8 wash tubs $3.50; 16 earthern pots $1.75, 
7 stone pots $5.25 ; 18 pails $1.75, 

6 milk cans and measures, 

41 milk pans $7.50 ; 5 milk pails $2.00, 

6 other tin pails, 2 coffee pots, 3 tea pots, 
Castor, pepper box and salt, dishes, 

7 Flats, fire dogs, shovel and tongs, 
7 chambers and bed pan, 

1 meal chest $4.00, 28 meal bags $2.50, 
6 sets kaives and forks, and spoons, 

4 light stands $1.75; cake-board and pin $0.50, 

1 bed wrench and 2 cupboards, 

2 clothes horses and 1 coffee mill, 
1 wash bench and 4 wash boards, 

3 white wash brushes $4.00 ; 3 bread troughs 

$4.00, 
1 ton hard coal $7.25 ; school books $3.25, 
Bibles and testaments, 
New cloth on hand, 
Ready made clothing on hand, 
Batting and waste yarn, 
46 towels $6.50 ; 6 table covers $3.40, 

Amount carried forward, 



$3411 


79 


3 


50 


3 


00 


11 


62 


1 


25 


9 


00 


12 


00 


13 


50 


8 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


8 25 


17 


00 


1 


50 


6 


33 


206 


00 


80 


00 


8 


50 


9 


50 


14 


50 


6 


00 


5 


25 


7 00 


1 


75 


9 


50 


<> 


25 


1 


00 


5 


50 


4 50 


6 


50 


8 


00 


2 


25 


2 


10 


1 


75 


1 


75 


8 00 


10 50 


4 


00 


20 


00 


50 


00 


3 


50 


9 


90 


$4100 


24 



98 

Amount brought forward, $4100 24 

24 bedsteads and cords, 30 00 

2 12-16 lbs. woolen yarn $3.00 ; thread and 

needles $2.50, 5 50 

Clothes pins and lines. 2 25 

Stone tools and hammer, 9 00 

3 trowels $1.63 ; 6 lbs. powder $1.25, 2 88 
70 lbs. bar soap $5.00 ; 12 brooms $1.00, 6 00 

1 1-2 bushels fine salt $1.00 ; 50 lbs. codfish 

$2.00, 3 00 

53 lbs. dried apples $3.71 ; 1 pr. scales $2.00, 5 71 

2 pair steelyards $2.50 ; 8 lights glass $0.40, 2 90 
28 gallons molasses, barrel and fasset, 11 50 
Half barrel crackers $1.75; 50 pounds sugar 

$4.62, 6 37 

10 lbs. tea $4.20 ; 15 lbs. coffee $1.80, 6 00 

4 lbs. rice 25 cts.; 5 lbs. saleratus 35 cts., 60 

1 1-2 bbl. flour $8.00 ; 1 1-2 bushels of rye 

meal, $1.50, 9 50 

2 bush, corn meal $2.00 ; 5 bush, cobb meal 

$2.50, 4 50 

Spices, starch and preserves, 4 96 

9 Kussia bake pans $6.50 ; 8 jugs $1,00, 7 50 

Medicine $5.25; door mat 25 cts., 5 50 

Butcher and carving knives, 2 33 

3 soap dishes, 1 sheet zinc, 1 33 
6 tea trays and waiters 75 cts.; Quilt frames 

$1.00, 1 75 

1 cream pot $1.25 ; 3 dish pans $1.50, 2 75 

Knife tray and sieves, 1 00 

1 flesh fork and mixing spoon, 50 

Meat pounder and brass skimmer, 75 

Candle sticks, snuffers and tray, 75 

Cask of lime $1.00 ; oak lumber $10.00, 11 00 

Bricks, shingles and laths, 5 75 

2000 feet boards and timber, 20 00 

1 copper tea kettle boiler, 4 86 

275 lbs. old lead pipe, 16 50 

1 meat and 1 cheese safe, 4 00 

2 lanterns, 6 lamps and dinner bell, 3 00 

3 cloths baskets, veal, mop handle, swift and 

spinning wheel, 3 S5 

2 chop knives and mortar. 1 00 

Amount carried forward, $4310 53 



99 

Amount brought forward, 

4 chest of draws and 4 trunks, 

1 bureau $3,00 ; 1 dress table 50 cts., 

2 wash stands, bowls and pitchers, 
1 floor brush 75 cts., 1 dry sink $1.00, 

5 butter tubs, 1 sauce and 1 pickle tub, 
45 plates $2.25, 1 dining set of ware $25.00, 
16 tumblers, 8 dishes and 1 churn, cups and 

saucers, 
Tin ware of all kinds, 
Sugar boxes and buckets, 
30 lbs. paper rags, 
50 dry casks and flour barrel, 
16 chestnut post, 

$4394 68 

RECAPITULATION. 

Dr. 

To stock on hand Dec. 16, 1857, 3198 77 

Expenditures the current year, 3151 68 

Interest on Farm, 1057 60 
Amount due Superintendent to Jan. 1, 

1859, 270 00 
Amount due Stevens to Jan. 1, 1859, 135 00 
Amount in favor of the Farm to bal- 
ance, 990 42 



$4310 53 


S 00 


3 50 


3 00 


1 75 


1 50 


27 25 


S 53 


18 50 


2 25 


1 20 


6 00 


2 67 



$8793 47 



Cr. 

By stock on hand as per Inventory, Dec. 16, 

1858, $4394 68 

Paid outstanding bill contracted prior 

to Jan. 6, 1858, 
Supporting 19 paupers 988 weeks, 
Paid clothing for paupers and convicts, 
Paid boarding convicts unable to work, 
Building 18 rods face wall, 

" 15 " bank " 

12 " thick double wall, 

" 31 " common wall, 

Amount carried forward, $6621 67 



753 


99 


1235 


00 


150 


00 


58 


00 


45 


00 


30 


00 


24 


00 


31 


00 



100 

Amount brought forward, $6621 67 

Digging and stoning 53 rods blind ditch, 

" 72 rods of common ditch, 
Making land, 
Clearing 5 acres of land, 
Cutting bushes, 
Drawing 38 loads street manure, 

" 100 loads leaves and muck into 

the barn cellar, 
Making 200 loads compost manure, 
Laying over lead pipe, 
Digging and stoning well pump and 

pipe, 
Building 16 rods picket fence, 
30 logs ready for the mill, 
Preparing and drawing 50 cords wood, 
Permanent improvements on the build- 
ings, 
Digging out and stoning up the barn 

cellar, 
Produce sold from the farm, 
Bills unpaid — due the farm, 



Jan'y 3, 1859, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 
Bead, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

J. KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 

In Common Council Jan'y 3, 1859. 
Read, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

A. B. SHATTUCK, Clerk. 



39 


75 


36 


00 


35 


00 


40 


00 


28 


00 


30 


40 


100 


00 


200 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


40 00 


35 00 


100 


00 


513 45 


162 


50 


650 


70 


11 


00 


$8793 47 



101 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER, 



To his Honor the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Manchester : 

Gentlemen : In compliance with the duty imposed upon me by 
the Revised Ordinances, I herewith submit to your Honorable 
Board the following report of the condition of the Fire Department, 
with an appraisal of all the property belonging to the same ; to- 
gether with the number of fires and alarms for the past year ; the 
amount of loss and insurance, as far as could be ascertained ; also, 
the number and condition of the reservoirs and other supplies of 
water within the city. 

MERRIMACK ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

HOUSE ON VINE STREET. FIFTY MEN. 

C. H. G. Foss, Foreman, J. F. Woodbury, Assistant, L. J. Board- 
man, Clerk, N. D. Tilton, Treasurer. 

House and land, 3125 00 

Engine and hose carriage, 1050 00 

100 feet leading hose, (new), 107 00 

250 " " (good), 175 00 

275 " « (ordinary), 135 00 

4 lengths suction hose, 75 00 

20 spanners and belts, 20 00 

8 hosemen's suits, 50 00 

2 pipes and nozzles, 35 00 

3 trumpets, 13 50 
2 stoves and pipes, 24 00 
1 hammer, saw and bar, 2 25 
6 torches, 15 00 

4 spanners, 2 wrenches, 4 00 
1 signal, 12 00 

Amount carried forward, $2842 75 



102 
Amount brought forward, $2842 75 



Whiffletree, tin cans and pails, 


6 00 


1 boiler $3, one pump $2, 


5 00 


1 jack screw, $4, shovel, 50 cents, 


4 50 


Life ropes, 


1 50 


50 badges, 


12 00 


1 tackle and rope, 


5 75 


14 settees, 


35 00 


Table and cbairs, 


9 00 


Clock. 


4 00 


Sign, 


20 00 


Oil, 


1 50 


Alcohol, 


1 00 


Wood, 


12 37 


Gas fixtures, 


57 78 


Vise,, 


4 50 




$3022 65 



NIAGARA ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

HOUSE ON CANAL STREET. SIXTY MEN. 

Geo. F. Judkins, Foreman, J. R. Bagley, Assistant, Jonathan 
Horn, Clerk and Treasurer. 

600 feet leading hose, 400 00 

100 " grenoble " 47 00 

11 hosemen's caps, 40 00 
8 " suits, 30 00 
60 badges, 12 00 
5 torches, 17 50 

12 hosemen's belts, 8 00 

1 bar, 1 00 

2 trumpets, 10 00 
4 life ropes, 1 25 
2 stoves and pipes, 30 00 
10 settees, 38 00 
Chairs, 4 00 
4 office chairs, 5 00 

1 table, 5 00 

2 whiffletrees, 3 00 
Wood, 8 50 

$658 25 



103 
STARK ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. 

HOUSE IN STARK YARD. FIFTY MEN. 

A. M. Kenniston, Foreman, Samuel Thompson, Assistant, J. L. 
Dow, Clerk, M. 0. Pearson, Treasurer. 

200 feet leading hose, (good), $225 00 

225 " " " (ordinary), 112 00 

8 fire caps, 24 00 

1 signal, 12 00 

2 trumpets, 10 00 
1 stove and pipe, 20 00 
S hosemen's suits, 27 00 
1 table, 3 50 

3 chairs, 1 50 
12 office chairs, 12 00 
7 settees, 26 00 
7 gals, straits oil, »■ 6 44 
Wood, 6 00 

$485 44 



MASSABESIC ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 

HOUSE ON N. CHESTNUT STREET. FIFTY MEN. 

Henry Foster, Foreman, \V. N. Fisher, Assistant, M. D. L. 
Stevens, Clerk, Henry Foster, Treasurer. 



House and land, 




1100 00 


Engine and hose carriage, 


1060 00 


100 feet leading hose, 
800 «« 


(new), 
(good), 


107 00 
250 00 


225 " " " 
25 " suction hose 


(ordinary), 


125 00 
75 00 


Extra pipes and nozzl 


es, 


20 00 


Oil cans and vise, 




7 00 


Pump, 

50 badges, 

9 hosemen's suits, 




3 00 

10 00 
60 00 


1 signal, 




14 00 


4 trumpet?, 

Belts and spanners, 

1 shovel, 




16 00 

14 00 

75 


2 stoves and pipe, 




20 00 


5 torches, 




13 00 


7 life ropes, 
10 settees, 




3 00 

26 00 



Amount carried forward, $2923 75 



104 

Amount brought forward, $2923 75 

1 whiffletree, 1 25 
Gas fixtures, 41 55 
Jack screw, 
Duster, brooms, &c. 
Lock and keys, 
Tackle and rope, 
Table, 
3 office chairs, 

2 extra pieces suction hose, 
Sign, 

Jugs and oil, 
Alcohol, 
Wood, 

TORRENT ENGINE COMPANY NO. 5. 

HOUSE ON MANCHESTER ST. FIFTY MEN. 



4 50 


1 50 


13 00 


5 00 


5 00 


3 00 


25 00 


15 00 


3 75 


2 00 


12 37 



$3056 (37 



Orin E. Kimball, Foreman ; D. R Prescott, Assistant ; Henry 
Sargent, Clerk ; Ezra Kimball, Treasurer. 

House and land, 

Engine and hose carriage, 

100 ft. leading hose (new), 

400 ft, " « (good), 

125 ft. " " (ordinary), 

25 ft. suction hose, 

2 stoves and pipe, 

6 torches, 

1 signal, 

1 boiler, oil cans, jugs and pails, 
24 spanners and belts, 

8 hosemen's suits, 
50 badges, 

2 locks, 60 keys, 
2 shovels $1.25, iron bar $1, 

1 desk and nine chairs, 
Branch pipe and extra brakes, 

2 pairs coupling, 
Fixtures in hall, 

9 settees, 

1 clock, 
4 trumpets, 

2 wrenches, &c, 

Amoumt carried forward, 



61200 00 


1060 00 


107 00 


300 00 


75 00 


75 00 


25 00 


15 00 


12 00 


7 00 


14 00 


50 00 


12 00 


12 00 


2 25 


10 00 


10 00 


6 00 


30 00 


22 00 


10 00 


16 00 


5 00 


$3065 25 



105 
Amount brought forward, $3065 25 



Vise and hammers, 


6 00 


1 pump, 


2 00 


1 tackle and rope, 


6 00 


Waterpot, wash dishes and dippers, 


2 00 


1 pair cylinders, 


25 00 


Lot of rope, 


14 00 


3 double windows, 


5 00 


Sign, 


20 00 


Oil, 


5 00 


Alcohol, 


1 50 


Wood, 


12 25 


4 buckets, 


6 00 


Gas fixtures, 


41 37 



$3221 37 



MANCHESTER ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 6. 

HOUSE ON CANAL ST. FOOT OF PLEASANT ST. FIFTY MEN. 

B. S. Flanders, Foreman ; John Towns, Assistant ; W. A. Bart- 
lett, Clerk ; John Bagley, Treasurer. 

200 ft. leading hose (good), $200 00 

200 " " " (ordinary), 125 00 

14 office chairs, 16 00 

1 signal, 12 00 

7 settees, 25 00 
3 chairs, 2 50 
1 table, 4 00 
1 trumpet, 4 00 

1 stove and pipe, 20 00 

8 hosemen's suits, 48 00 

2 whiffletrecs, 3 50 
1 lantern, 50 
Oil, 3 00 
Wood, 6 00 

$469 50 



10G 
PI3CATAQUOG ENGINE COMPANY NO. 7. 

HOUSE ON MAIN ST., PlSCATAQUDG. FIFTY MEN. 

A. C. Wallace, Foreman ; E. McCoy, Assistant ; James Holmes, 
Clerk ; A. C. Wallace, Treasurer. 

House, 1025 00 

Engine and hose carriage, 1200 00 

600 ft. leading hose (good), 450 00 

25 ft. suction hose, 75 00 

4 torches $15 ; 2 trumpets $8, 23 00 

1 signal, 15 00 
8 hosemen's suits, 50 00 

2 stoves and pipes, 20 00 
1 boiler and pail, 1 50 
1 jug and oil can, 2 25 
1 watering pot, 1 duster, 1 00 
1 shovel and dippers, 2 00 
14 spanners and belts, 10 00 
1 wrench and hammer, 2 00 

6 life ropes, 2 50 
1 rope, 2 00 
1 tackle and rope, 4 00 

1 table, 8 00 

7 office chairs, 10 00 
6 settees, 24 00 
Lock and keys, 9 00 

2 whiffietrees, 3 50 
60 badges, 12 00 
Vise and bench, 5 00 
Wood,> 6 00 
Sign, 35 00 
Gas fixtures, 41 00 

$3038 75 

HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

HOUSE ON MANCHESTER ST. FORTY-FIVE MEN. 

Moulton Knowles, Foreman; Henry L. Drew, Assistant; John 
L. Bradford, Clerk and Treasurer. 

House and land, 950 00 

Carriage, 160 00 

Signal, 10 00 

Torches and trumpet, 10 00 

45 badges. 9 00 

525 ft. ladders, 125 00 

Amount carried forward, $1264 00 



107 



Amount 


BROUGHT FORWARD, 


$1264 00 


4 large, 3 small hooks, 


40 0O 


Axes, shovels and bars, 


5 00 


2 hay forks, 


2 buckets, 


5 00 


2 stoves and 


pipes, * 


15 00 


9 settees, 




24 00 


Ropes, 




25 00 


Chains, 




25 00 


1 jack, 




2 00 


Sign, 




15 00 


Oil cans, 




83 


Oil, 




1 50 


Wood, 




5 00 


Gas fixtures, 




20 00 


Fluid, 




38 



$1447 71 
PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

HOUSE ON HANOVER ST. TWENTY MEN. 

O. Hardy, Foreman ; Walter Neal, Assistant ; A. J. Wood- 
bury, Clerk ; David Thayer, Treasurer. 



Hose carriage, 


370 00 


100 ft. hose (new), 


107 00 


400 «• " 


300 00 


800 " " 


400 00 


150 " grenoble hose. 


69 00 


8 hosemens suits, 


50 00 


12 spanners, 


4 44 


10 spanner belts and socketa, 


8 75 


Signal, 


12 00 


Trumpet, 


3 00 


Pail, wash-cish and broom, 


70 


Oil can, dust pan and duster, 


1 63 


Sponge and 2 chamois skins, 


2 00 


Rope, 


1 38 


1 sink, 1 measure, 


2 00 


4 torches, 


12 00 


1 table, 


10 00 


6 office chairs, 


8 50 


2 stoves and pipes, 


22 00 


9 settees, 


36 00 


2 axes, 1 blunderbuss, 


7 00 


Lock and 25 keys, 


8 00 


2 galls, straits oil, 


1 84 


Gas fixtures, 


17 77 


Wood, 


8 25 



$1463 26 



108 
ENGINEERS OFFICE. 



15 badges, 

1 trumpet, 
10 coats, 

2 pairs couplings, 

I suction hose cap, 



RECAPITULATION. 



15 00 




4 00 




50 00 




6 00 




4 50 







$79 50 


$3022 65 




658 25 




485 44 




3056 67 




3221 37 




469 50 




3038 75 




1447 71 




1463 26 




79 50 




$16943 10 



Engine Company No. 1, 

>> (I <( o 

" 3,' 

« 4j 

«< << << E) 

" 6, 

u a u 7 

Hook and Ladder, 
Pennacook Hose Company, 
Engineers, 



The Department has been called out by fires and alarms the 
past year 28 times, viz : 

Jan'y, 3 times, April, 2 times, July, 3 times. 

Feb'y, 3 " May, 2 " Aug. 2 " 

March, 5 " June, 2 " Sept. 1 " 

Dec. 5 " 

Jan'y 1, Alarm, caused by a burning chimney in Church St. 

Jan'y 7, Alarm, caused by a burning chimney in Merrimack St. 

Jan'y 14, Fire at 51 Elm St. Loss $7 100.00. Insured 
$4200.00. 

Feb. 4, Fire in Elm St, House. Loss $1200.00. Insured 
$725,00 ; cause, ineendiary. 

Feb. 16, Fire in W. H. Farnum's block, Elm St. Loss $200.00. 
Fully insured ; caused by a defective chimney. 

Feb. 18, slight Fire in Smyth's Block. Caupe, caught from a 
stove. 

March 4, Alarm, caused by a slight fire at Quimby's Hotel, 
Piscataquog. 

March 6, slight Fire at Parson's block, Concord St., caused by 
fire from a burning chimney. 

March 6, Alarm, caused by a burning chimney in Church St. 

March 6, False Alarm. 

March 23, Fire on Wilson's Hill, destroyed an unoceupied house 
owned by F. H. Ellsworth. Loss $2000.00. Insured $1400.00. 
Cause, incendiary. 



109 



March 28, Fire, destroyed a shop belonging to J. C. Young, Elm 
St. Loss $500.00. No insurance. Incendiary. 

April 15, Fire in Kennard's block, Elm St. Damage slight. 

April 25, Alarm, caused by burning bushes on the west side of 
the river. 

May 1, Fire on Chestnut St., in a wood she! owned by Charles 
McCarty. Damage slight. 

May 5, Alarm, caused by the burning of shavings in the boiler 
house of Martin's Paper Mill. 

June 2, Fire in Stark Yard. Loss $1200.00. 

June 10, Alarm from Central St., caused by the burning of a 
window curtain. 

July 2, Alarm, caused by the burning of a barn in Goffstown. 

July 8, Alarm from the burning of a house in Bedford. 

July 28, Fire in a pile of old railroad sleepers near the depot ; 
caught from a locomotive. Loss nominal. 

Aug. 5, False Alarm. 

Aug. 6, Fire in Hill's stable Hanover St. Loss $4500.00. No 
insurance. Supposed incendiary. 

Sept. 7, Alarm, caused by a Fire in Goffstown. 

Dec. 10, Fire on Lowell St., in a house owned by D. & D. B. 
Wilson. Damage $50.00 ; insured ; caught from a stove. 

Dec. 11, Alarm, caused by a slight Fire in a house owned by B. 
F. Locke on Merrimack St. Caught from the oven. 

Dec. 19, Fire at Amoskeag. Destroyed a house owned by E. 
Rider. Loss $300.00; insured; caught from the stove. 

Dec. 20, Fire on the Manchester Corporation. Damage slight. 

Dec. 29, Fire in a building belonging to the Amoskeag Co , on 
the west side of the river. Caught from a stove. Loss $75.00. 

Location and condition of Reservoirs and other supplies of water 
within the City as reported by the Board of Engineers at the an- 
nual examination in May, 185S. 



5. 
6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 



Elm St. City Hall. 

Elm St. Smyth's Block. 

Cor. Chestnut and Hanover 

Streets. 

Manchester St. in front of the 

Franklin House. 

Merrimack St. near Chestnut. 

Pine St. between Manchester 

and Merrimaok. 

Cor. Hanover and Pine. 

Gate " " " 

Cor. Central and Pine Sts. 

Cor. Concord " " " 

Lowell St. at High School 



15. Tremont Square. 

16. Bridge, head of Birch St. 

17. Cor. Orange and Chestnut 
Sts. 

18. Cor. Hanover and Union Sts. 
(Head.) 

19. Steam Mill, (Janesville.) 

20. Cor. Laurel and Beech Sts. 

21. Amherst foot of Walnut St. 

22. Cor. of Chestnut and Hano- 
ver Streets. 

23. Bakersville. 

24. Granite St.; near Main, 

(Squog.) 



110 

House. . 1 25. Cor. of Walnut St. (Squog.) 

12. Lowell near Nashua St. 26. Piscataquog river, near S team 

13. Chester, near Amherst St. I Mill. 
(Towlesville.) J 27. Granite St., (Squog.) 

14 Cor. Amherst and Chestnut 28. Pent Stock, near Batting 
Sts. Mill, (Amoskeag.) 

A reservoir has been built the past season in Amherst St., Pis- 
cataquog, near the meeting house. 

All of the above were found to be in good condition. 

GENERAL CONDITION OF THE APPARATUS BELONG- 
ING TO THE DEPARTMENT. 

Merrimack No. 1. Built by W. C. Hunneman in 1810 ; 5 1-2 
inch cylinders ; 16 inch stroke. Apparatus in good condition. 

Niagara No. 2. Engine built in 1852 by Hunneman & Co.; 6 
1-2 inch cylinders ; 15 inch stroke. The engine is owned by the 
Amoskeag Co., the use of which is given to the city in case of fire. 
Condition good. 

Stark No. 3. Hunneman engine; built in 1854; 5 1-2 inch 
cylinders; 15 inch stroke; is owned by the Stark Mills, and at the 
service of the department in case of fires. Condition good. 

Massabesic No. 4. Hunneman engine ; built in 1849 ; 6 inch 
cylinders; 15 inch stroke. All the Apparatus in good condition. 
House needs painting very much, and should be done early next 
season. 

Torrent No. 5. Engine bnilt by Hunneman in 1S44; 5 3-4 
inch cylinders ; 15 inch stroke. This engine has been thoroughly 
repaired and painted during the past season, and all the apparatus 
is in good condition. 

Manchester No. 6. Hunneman engine ; built in 1850 ; 6 inch 
cylinders ; 15 inch stroke, and is owned by the Manchester Print 
Works. Condition good. 

Piscataquog No. 7. Hunneman engine ; built in 1855 ; 6 inch 
cylinders ; 15 inch stroke. The apparatus in use by this company 
is in good repair. 

Hook & Ladder No. 1. Condition good. 

Penna^ook Hose No. 1. Carriage built by J. M. & S. F. Stan- 
ton in 1858, has four wheels, and is of the most approved style. 
Every thing in use by this company is in good condition. 

Owing to the change in the locotion of Engine No. 2 from the 
Machine Shop yard to Canal street, it was decided to disband the 
Hose Co. in the Amoskeag yard and organize a new company on the 
street. This change has made a reduction in the expense of the 
Department of at least six hundred dollars per annum. The appa- 
ratus used by the former company was owned entirely by the Amos- 
keag Manufacturing Co., while that used by the new company is 



Ill 

owned by the City, the whole expenses of which was but a small 
sum over the saving effected thereby in one year. The change in 
the location of the Hose Go. and Engine Co. No. 2, Has since led 
to the removal of Engine No. 6 from the Print Works yard to 
Canal street, foot of Pleasant street — changes which have long been 
desired — thereby giving to the Department that degree of efficiency 
to which it has never before attained. 

The annual examination of stoves, furnaces and other places 
where fires are kept was made with the following result : 
Whole number of stoves examined, 4686 
" " furnaces, 49 

•' " steam engines in use, 8 

Of the whole number of stoves examined, only 164 were consid- 
ered to be in an unsafe condition. The committee, in making their 
examinations, saw fit to make a record of the number of families, 
and although it does not legitimately belong to a report of this kind 
yet I have taken the liberty to insert it here. 
Whole number of families, exclusive of the Corporations, 21262 
" on Amoskeag Corporation, 145 

Stark « 83 

" Manchester " 80 

PrintWorks « 39 

" Machine Shop, " 63 

Nunber of fires and alarms for six years ending Dec. 81 1858 : 

1853, 15 times, 

1854, 8 " 

1855, 24 " 

1856, 31 " 

1857, 17 " 

1858, 28 » 

The utmost harmony has prevailed throughout the entire depart- 
ment during the year, and nothing has transpired to affect its effic- 
iency in the least. If the system of paying the firemen could be 
changed so as to pay them by the year at a fair compensation, in- 
stead of by the hour as at present, I think it would be quite as well 
for the city and give as good satisfaction to the department as the 
present system. The system of paying by Ihe }*ear has obtained in 
all other places of size, except ours, and has been found to be pref- 
erable to any other. 

The introduction of the steam fire engine over the hand engine, 
as a more economical and effectual method of extinguishing fires in 
many large cities, is no longer a doubtful experiment, but a fixed 
fact ; and believing as I do lhat steam power should be substituted 
instead of manual labor in all places where it can be to advantage ; 
yet I do not believe the steam fire engine has been brought to that 



112 

degree of perfection and simplicity that would warrant its introduc- 
tion into cities of the size of this. 

I can see but one way by which the duties or expenses of the de- 
partment can be lessened materially, and that is by a supply of 
water from some other source than that from which it is now ob- 
tained — an object of the utmost importance and one which we all 
hope to see accomplished. 

My associate Engineers as heretofore, have been untiring in their 
efforts for the benefit of the department. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 
P. S. BROWN, Chief Engineer, Pine Street. 

Assistants. 

PHINEAS ADAMS, Water Street. 
CHARLES H. BROWN, Manchester Street. 
EBEN FRENCH, Hanover Street. 
ALPHEUS GAY, Jr., Pearl Street. 
E. W. HARRINGTON, Hanover Street. 
SIDNEY SMITH, Spring Street. 
J. L. KELLY, Central Street. 
S. G. LANGLEY, Hanover Street. 

S. G. LANGLEY, Clerk. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

P. S. BROWN, Chief Engineer, 

Manchester Fire Department. 
Jan. 3d, 1859, in Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 
Read and accepted. 

J. KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 

In Board of Common Council Jan. 8, 1859. 
Read, accepted and ordered to be printed in concurrence. 

A. B. SHATTUCK, Clerk. 



113 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 






To the City Council of the City of Manchester : 

In accordance with the Rules and Regulations of the Library, 
the Trustees ask leave to make their Fifth Annual Report, in con- 
nection with which is presented that of the Librarian and Treas- 
urer. 

We are happy to announce to you the continued prosperity of 
this Institution. Its affairs are plainly placed before you in the 
accompanying reports, and appear to have been prudently and satis- 
factorily managed. We see new evidence as time passes of the wis- 
dom of the city government in affording the means of so much 
instruction, improvement and wholesome recreation as is to be found 
in the volumes offered to the public. In this respect our city oc- 
cupies an honorable position. Boston has the reputation of being 
the most cultivated and refined city in the country ; in one thing 
at least we are not behind Boston ; our Library is to us what hers 
is to her, and although lacking those magnificent donations 
and splendid bequests, and the wealth which has made that insti- 
tution the just pride of the modern Athens, it is still a step in the 
true direction. 

The readers at the Library continue steadily to increase from 
month to month, and its books circulate through a very large pro- 
portion of the families of the city. Our aim has been that every 
individual who has the desire should have access to the books with 
only such restrictions as experience has led us to adopt for the pres- 
ervation and safe return of the property of the city. We are glad 
to learn that the amount of fines is but small, and the percentage of 
books lost, when compared with the numbers in circulation, of 
trifling value. It is to be hoped indeed that every citizen will have 
pride and self-respect enough in this matter to exercise due care in 
the observance of the rules. 

Wc are under obligations to the gentlemen members of the city 
government, for the courtesy and consideration with which our past 
suggestions have been entertained, and we consider it a special 
matter for congratulation that the Library has received the increas- 
ing favor and attention of every city government since its estab- 
lishment. For this tnere is just cause, and we have reason to know 
that men of intelligence and of wealth who have visited us from 
abroad have derived from the Library most favorable impressions of 
8 



114 

the place. Such impressions it is the wisdom of every good citizen 
and every wise government to foster. The attractions to a residence 
among us cannot be too much increased. 

It will be seen that care is taken to increase the amount of in- 
surance with tbe increasing value of the Library, so that the risk of 
loss from fire may be as little as possible. 

We hope at no distant day to see a disposition evinced to build a 
good, but not extravagant, fire proof building. It is very likely 
that should the city evince a desire so to do that a gift of land 
from some source might be had. Our manufacturing corporations 
have always been exceedingly liberal in all that concerned the 
beauty and prosperity of the city, and there is no reason to suppose 
that they would not in this adhere to their accustomed policy. 

We invite the members of the incoming city government to an 
inspection of the Library Rooms that they may judge intelligently 
in regard to the needed appropriations. 

Our thanks are particularly due to those gentlemen whose names 
appear in the Librarian's Report, as having made donations of books 
to the Library. Many of them are of value, and especially are 
we under obligations to the Hon. Daniel Clark for the interest he 
has manifested in procuring us the most important Congressional 
publications. 

Jan'y 1st, 1859. In meeting of Board of Trustees of City 
Library, read and approved. 

ALONZO SMITH, President. 
WILLIAM C. CLARKE, Clerk. 



115 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT, 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

The Librarian in accordance with jour requirements presents his 
Fifth Annual Report on the condition of the Library. 

The whole number of persons who up to this date have complied 
with the necessary requirements for taking books, is two thousand 
and fifty-two. 

Twenty-nine thousand and twelve volumes have been given out 
during the two hundred and seventy-two days of the year in which 
the rooms have been open for the delivery of books. 

Of this number thirteen appear to be missing and are not ac- 
counted for. 

The number of books in the Library by count is six thousand and 
sixty-two, an increase over the number last reported of eight hun- 
dred and seventy-one. 

I have received for fines and the sale of catalogues thirty-one 
dollars and ninety-one cents ; of which sum twenty-one dollars and 
sixty-two cents has been paid to the Treasurer, and the balance 
remains in my hands. 

Donations of books have been made by : 



Hon. Daniel Clark, U. S. S 

Hon. S. D. Bell, 

Henry E. Sawyer, Esq., 
I. N. Haynes, Esq. 
Library Rooms, Jan. 1st, 1859 



Hon. A. D. Bache, U. S. C. 
Hon. Moody Currier, 

B. F. Wallace, Esq., 



F. B. EATON, Librarian. 



116 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the City Library 
make the following Report of the receipts and expenditures by the 
Board of the funds received by them on account of the City 
Library for the past year : — 

1858. DR. 

Jan 'y 1, To Balance on hand, 571 82 

Jan 'y 6, To Cash received of F. B. Eaton, 

Librarian, 13 68 

Jan 'y 14, do. do. do. 7 94 

July 19, To Cash received of H. R. Cham- 

berlin, 500 00 

Sept. 20, do. do do. 500 00 

$1592 94 
1858. Cr. 

Jan 'y 7, By Cash paid Burnham Bros., 
Jan 'y 15, By Cash paid A. Kenney," 
Jan 'y 19, By Cash paid Burnham Bros., 
Feb. 16, By cash " " " 

Feb. 16, By cash paid F. B. Eaton, 
Feb. 16, By cash paid B. Millet, 
Mar. 22, By cash paid C. B. Richardson, 
May 10, By Cash paid Smith, Mason & Co. 
May 17, By cash paid J. Marshall, 
June 4, By cash paid T. O. H. P. Burn- 

ham, 
June 10, By cash paid L. Burnham, 
June 18, By cash paid D. F. Buckley, 
June 22, By cash paid Hersey & Tilton, 
June 26, By cash paid Fisk & Stearns, 
June 26, By cash paid J. Marshall, 
June 26, By cash paid J. Marshall, 
July 8, By cash paid J. Lovering, 
July 10, By cash paid D. Burnham, 
July 14, By cash paid F. B. Eaton, 
July 14, By cash paid D. C. Colesworthy, 
July 19, By cash paidF. B. Eaton, 

Amount carried jorward, $561 69 



8136 30 


2 50 


9 25 


38 52 


5 92 


3 00 


2 00 


20 00 


44 90 


43 06 


80 61 


12 50 


31 28 


5 30 


59 34 


18 04 


16 50 


12 31 


9 18 


8 68 


2 50 



117 

Amount brought forward, 
Aug. 13, By cash paid L. B. Bettis, 
Aug. 13, By cash paid W. Readio, 
Sept. 9, By cash paid F. B. Eaton, 
Sept. 20, By cash paid L. Burnham,., 
Oct. 9, By cash paid L. Burnham, 
Oct. 9, By cash paid L. Burnham, 
Oct, 9, By cash paid L. Burnham, 

By cash paid Smith, Mason & Co., 
Nov. 21, By cash paid L. Burnham, 
By cash paid F. B. Eaton, 
By cash paid L. Burnham, 
By cash paid L. Burnham, 
Dec. 20, By cash paid Hersey & Tilton, 
By cash paid D. F. Buckley, 
By cash paid Jones & Cogswell, 
By cash paid Geo. H. Hubbard, 
By cash paid J. Marshall, 
By cash total amount, 



$561 69 


17 50 


11 25 


19 75 


391 36 


20 01 


2 44 


77 63 


5 00 


19 26 


12 02 


65 78 


12 87 


29 92 


8 20 


1 00 


1 00 


45 96 


290 10 



$1592 94 



The expenditures for incidental expenses of the Library for the 
year ending Dec. 81, 1858, the items of which appear at large ia 
the Annual Report of the City, are as follows : 
Amount of Appropriation, $2201 42 
Newspapers, 57 35 
Rent, 250 00 


Postage, 
Fine, 






12 58 
38 26 


Gas, 






74 20 


Insurance, 






46 00 


Librarian's 6alary, 
Books of account, 






600 00 
7 50 


Furniture, 






17 50 


Printing, 






15 25 


Incidentals, 






17 23 


Fitting rooms, 






15 50 


Balance of appropriati 


on undrawn, 
ustees, 




50 00 


Orders in favor of Tr 


$1000 00 








$2201 42 



118 

The liabilities chargeable to the City Library are, 

Gas, 8 75 

Librarian's salary, 125 00 

Periodicals, 4 00 

$137 75 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. N. BELL, Treasurer 

of Trustees to City Library. 

January 1, 1859 
We have examined the above Report and find the same correctly 
east and properly vouched. 

ALONZO SMITFT, ) Com. on Accounts 
E. M. TOPLIFF, \ of City Library. 

Auditor's Office, 
City of Manchester, Jan. 1st, 1859. 

I [hereby eertify that I have examined the several items of Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures embraced in the foregoing Report of the 
Trustees cf the City Library, and find the same correctly cast and 
properly vouched. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Auditor. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Jan. 3, 1 859. 
Read and accepted, and ordered to be printed with Annual Report. 

J. KNOWLTON, Clerk. 

In Common Council, Jan'y 3, 1859. 
Read, accepted and ordered to be printed in concurrence. 

A. B. SHATTUCK, Clerk. 



119 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To tht Mayor and Aldermen and Common Council of the City of 
Manchester : 
In compliance with the requirements of Law, the Overseers of 
the Poor of said City, herewith present their annual report. 

Whole number of paupers assisted the last year is 954 ; of which 
804 have no settlement in this State ; 78 having a settlement in 
this City, and 72 having settlements in some other towns in the 
State. 

Whole number of deaths during the year are 52 ; of which 40 
were County paupers, 5 City paupers and 7 from other towns in 
this State. Two deaths occurred at the City Alms House during 
the past year. 

We have been favorably impressed with the improvements made 
at the Alms House the past year, and with the system and order 
that prevails in and about the premises. 

We have sent to the County Alms House the past year 101 per- 
sons having no settlement in the State of New Hampshire. Of 
which number 73 were from Ireland, 7 from Canada, 6 from Eng- 
land, 2 from Scotland, 4 from France, 1 colored person, and 8 Amer- 
icans. 

The greatest number of puapers at the City Alms House during 
the year past is 24 ; average number, 19. 

The whole number of travelers who have been accommodated 
with lodgings in the city watch room in this city the past year is 
240. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

ALONZO SMITH, Chairman. 
S. S. MOULTON, \ 

C. H. BROWN, J Overseers 

JONA. HORN, ( of the Poor, 

JACOB PEAVY, ( City of 

ALPHEUS BOD WELL, \ Manchester. 
W. H. WILSON, / 



120 

REPORT OF LIQUOR AGENT, 



To his Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen : 

Gentlemen, — The following Keport of the Liquor Agency is re- 
spectfully submitted. 

CASH ACCOUNT. 
Dr. 
Dec. 20, 1858. To cash on hand as per last 

Keport, $ 78 08 

Cash received for Liquors sold, 1259 52 

$1337 60 

Cr. 

By cash paid for Liquors, $955 12 

" " Insurance, Books, Advertising 

&c, G5 32 

Cash paid on bills of former agency. 153 12 

" on account of agent's salary, 150 00 

Balance of cash, 14 04 



$1337 60 



LIQUOR ACCOUNT. 

1857 Dr. 

Dec. 20. To am't of Liquors on hand, $865 73 

bought to Dec. 20, 1858, 729 09 

" paid for Insurance, &c, 65 32 
Balance of agent's salary to Dec. 

20, 1858, 321 42 

of profit, 60 78 



$2042 34 



Cr. 
By am't rece'd for Liquor to Dec. 20, 1858, $1337 60 
of Stock en hand, 704 74 

$2042 34 

The bills outstanding against the present agency for Liquors, is 
SI 66 37. The amount due agent to Dec. 20. 1858, is $321 42. 
The average amount of sales per day, is $3 45. 
The number of sales to Dec. 20, 1858, is 7963. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

M. G. J. TEWKSBURY, Agent. 



121 



REPORT OP THE COMMITTEE ON THE 

VALLEY AND PINE GROVE CEMETERIES. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council : 

The great, and constantly increasing interest of the people of 
our city in the places of burial for the dead, seems to render it ex- 
pedient that the practice of submitting to you an annual report, 
neglected since 1853, should be again resumed. 

THE VALLEY. 

The fund of the Valley, January 1st, 1858, were : — 
Cash in the hands of the City Treasurer, 1 133 02 

During the year there has been received : — 

For Lots sold, 550 86 

Hay sold, 20 00 

Old Fence, 12 00 

Tomb rent, 20 98 

Making in all, 1736 86 

The expenditures of the year, all of which have been paid by 
orders on the City Treasurer, have been as follows : — 

L. H. Sleeper, 287 days labor, 237 00 

L. H. Sleeper assistance and teaming, 42 64 

L. H. Sleeper, tools, &c, 4 56 

Wm. F. Sleeper, labor, 3 33 

J. B. Clarke, advertising, 1 00 

J. Gr. Coult, trees and shrubs, 35 52 

Hartshorn and Tufts, repairing Fountain, 6 04 

John Sargent, labor, 8 33 

J. B. Daniels, repairing bridges, 2 30 

J. M. Sawyer, painting notice boards, &c, 2 25 

J. C. Young, roofing hearse houses, 20 00 

J. L. Smith, lumber for bridges, 3 75 

E. Gr. Haynes, repairs on gateway, 1 00 
Colley & Kelley, painting bridges and 

fountain, 12 20 

B. Hutchinson, reward, 20 00 

Gr. B. Chandler, recording, &c, 10 00 

E. Ross, new fence, 654 11 



Amoumt carried forward, $1064 03 



12 00 


8 00 


1 97 


. * 



122 

Amount brought forward, $1064 03 

Hilas Dickey, mason work and mate- 
rials, 12 63 

Man. Gas Light Co., cinders, 3 00 

Goodale & Farnsworth, advertising and 

printing, 9 88 

Straw & Prince, repair of hearse house, 75 

J B. Sawyer, services as clerk and 
treasurer, 

B. Sawyer, revising plans, 
" '* Cash paid out, 

112 34 

Leaving a balance of cash on hand, Dec. 31, 1858, of $624,52, 
of which sum $446.82 is in the hands of the city treasurer, and 
$177.70 in the hands of J. B. Sawyer, treasurer of the VaUey 
Committee. 

It will be noticed that by far the largest item of expense has 
been for new fence. A substantial wooden fence, with stone posts has 
during the past summer been built on the north and west sides of 
the lot. The south and east sides were fenced in the same manner 
in 1855, so that the whole lot is now well and durably fenced. 

The work of adorning and improving this beautful place has gone 
on as usual during the year. In addition to the operations of your 
committee, much has been done on private account. Lots have 
been improved and fenced, monuments erected, and trees and plants 
cultivated. Your committee have been gratified by the good taste 
displayed in most of these arrangements, as well as by the consid- 
erate conduct and respect for the sacred associations of the place so 
generally manifested by the visitors and laborers in the grounds. 
It is, of course, impossible for those having charge of the grounds 
to keep watch over the whole twenty acres in such a way as to pre- 
vent or discover every possible breach of the rules and proprieties 
of the place. However vigilant the keepers may be, our chief re- 
liance for the safety of the trees, flowers, monuments and other 
property must be on that sense of what is right and proper which 
should ever characterize a Christian community. It is gratifying to 
know that rudeness of conduct, theft, thoughtless and malicious 
mischief have been of so infrequent occurrence. 

The practice indulged in by some persons, of plucking flowers 
from their own lots, ought to be abandoned. It is not in good 

*On page 90 it will be seen that the amount of the City Clerk's account 
against the Valley is $1099.59. If to this amount we add one bill of 
$32.25 due L. H. Sleeper for labor, which was approved by me in November, 
but by some accident has not yet passed the committee on accounts, and subtract 
$19.50, the amount of two bills for repairs on a hearse, approved by other par- 
ties, and by mistake charged to the Valley, the two accounts will be found to 
agree. Trkas. of Valley Com. 



123 

taste to make a flower garden of a cemetery lot. Such lots are set 
apart for the burial of the dead, and if flowers are there cultivated, 
it should be as a means of ornamenting a burial-place, and not as 
in themselves an end. Besides, it cannot be expected that the 
keeper of the ground can always, or even generally, be able to dis- 
criminate between owners of a lot and trespassers whom he may see 
plucking flowers or carrying them in the grounds. For this reason 
if for no other, the practice ought to cease. 

Frequent applications are made to the committee by owners of 
lots, for permission to destroy trees. There are sometimes, undoubt- 
edly valid reasons for granting such permission, still a due regard 
for the general good appearance of the Valley will ever constrain 
the committee to grant it sparingly. The reasons most frequently 
alleged for the removal of trees, are : that they are detrimental to 
plants and monuments ; that the trees are pine ; that they are 
crooked and unsytnmetrical, or that there are more trees in some 
particular lot than in the adjoining ones, all of which may be true, 
and yet not sufficient as reasons for their destruction. It is obvi- 
ous that the Valley can never be successfully reduced to a regular 
geometrical plantation. Even if that were desirable the natural 
characteristics of the place would be found incompatible with such 
a plan. The best results will be obtained by introducing art, not 
to obliterate the traces of the hand of nature, but to bring them, 
or at least the best of them, into stronger and more picturesque 
relief. There must be sunny nooks, and dark groves of evergreen, 
groups of trees crowded together as well as symmetrical ones stand- 
ing apart, thick shades as well as broad expanses of sunshine. If 
purchasers of lots would make their selections with these consider- 
ations in view, they would often save themselves and the committee 
much subsequent needless trouble and vexatioD. Let us hope that 
the time may come when all our people shall regard trees as at 
once the cheapest, the grandest, and the most appropriate ornaments 
of a rural cemetery ; seeing in them an expression of elevated 
character, and a memorial of respect for the dead, which, unlike 
artificial structures, the elements shall rather feed than waste, and 
which shall gather something of beauty and venerable strength from 
each revolving year. 



124 

The number of interments in lota and in public ground for each 
year since the cemetery was openeil, is given in the following 
tabic : — 



Years. 



Totals. 



In Public 
Ground. 



Remarks. 



1S41 


27 


40 


67 I 




1842 


8 


45 


53 




1843 


22 


35 


57 




1844 


7 


68 


75 




1845 


35 


58 


93 




1846 


53 


99 


152 




1847 


61 


91 


152 




1848 


77 


119 


196 


Including Jan. 1849. 


1849 


102 


118 


220 


Year ending Jan.31,1850. 


1850 


62 


116 


178 


" « •< 1851. 


1851 


76 


80 


156 


u u » 1852. 


1852 


106 


52 


158 


11 months. 


1853 


178 


62 


240 




1854 


184 


64 


248 




1855 


94 


59 


153 




1856 


111 


54 


165 




1857 


136 


77 


213 




1858 


103 


54 


157 





1442 1291 



2733 



PINE GROVE. 

This lot. laying about two miles from the City Hall, was pur- 
chased by the city in 1855, and by a resolution of the city council . 
was subsequently put under the care of the committee on the 
Valley. In 1857 one hundred dollars was put at the disposal of 
the committee to be expended on this lot, but no work was done 
until the past season. Last spring your committee examined the 
lot and were agreeably surprised at its character and capabilities. 
A sub-committee was chosen with instructions to proceed at once to 
prepare a part of the ground for cemetery purposes. Accordingly 
the brush and undesirable trees were cut on several acres of the 
lot, and a plat containing two and one half acres was fenced and 
made ready for burials. It is the design of the committee to sell 
lots in this ground at a rate so low as to bring them within the 
means of all. 

Only one interment has thus far been made at Pine Grove. 



$100 00 


125 


40 


14 75 


$56 


26 


63 90 


20 


00 


2 


95 


3 


30 


21 


19 


1 


00 


4 


00 


31 


61 


8 


00 


22 


94 



125 

The Pine Grove account stands as follows : 

1857. DR. 
*To amount of appropriation, 

1858, To cash for wood sold to city, 
To cash for grass sold, 

$240 15 

358. Cr. 

By cash paid J. Everett & Co. labor, 
By cash K. Hazelton, " 

By cash John Sargent, " 

By cash paid Daniels & Forsaith, tools, 
" " nails, 

By cash paid Wm, S. Locke, posts, 
By cash paid Wm. H. Hill, horse hire, 
By cash paid E. Ross for gates, 
By cash paid J. L. Smith, fencing stuff, 
By cash paid J. B. Fish, extinguishing 

fire, 
By cash to balance in City Treasury, 

$240 15 

WM. E. EASTMAN, 

WM. C. CLARKE, 

JOHN B FISH, 

JOSEPH PRESCOTT, 

CHARLES CANFIELD, f Committee on the 

DANIEL CLARK, I Valley and 

WATERMAN SMITH, / Pine Grove 

MOODY CURRIER, [ Cemetery. 

A. G. GALE, 

DAVID GILLIS, 

J. B. SAWYER, 

S. N. BELL, 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 
Read, accepted, and ordered printed. 

J. KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 



♦Since this report was made it has been ascertained frcm the 3ity records that 
although a resolution directing a transfer of this amount from the appropriation 
for commons appears to have been passed by the city council, yet the resolution 
is not on record and the transfer was never made on the City Clerk's books. Tie 
committee supposed this sum to bo at their disposal, and consequently have over- 
drawn the account, a true statement of which would show a deficit of $77.06, 
instead of a balance in the city treasury as above. 

Treas, of Valley Com. 



126 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



School Committees' Room, Dec. 13, 1858. 
To the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Council : 

The "Board of School Committee, in accordance with the laws of 
this State, ask leave to present their annual Report. 

They ask your attention to the following account of the disposi- 
tion made of the funds appropriated to the use of Schools, after 
which are given such suggestions as the condition of our schools 
seemed to require. 

At the commencement of the year, the Committee who are alone 
responsible for the expenditure of the school money, appointed 
Henry R. Chamberlin their Treasurer and have accordingly drawn 
and paid out such sums as were required, without the intervention 
of the City Council. 
Amount of money belonging to the several 

Districts, in the Treasury, Jan. 1, 1858, $3169 70 
Appropriated in 1858, 17300 00 

$20469 70 



District No. 1. 
Balance undrawn, $90 64 

Appropriated, 1858, 175 00 



Amonnt, $265 64 

Dist. No. 2. 

Balance undrawn, $1828 91 

Appropriated 1858, 14325 00 



$16153 91 
Dist. No. 3. 
Balance undrawn, $149 96 

Appropriated 1858, 300 00 



Amount, $449 96 

Dist. No. 4, 
Balance undrawn, $98 93 

Appropriated, 225 00 



Amount; 



$323 93 



Dist. No. 
Balance undrawn. 
Appropriated, 

Amount, 

Dist. No. 
Balance undrawn, 
Appropriated, 

Amount, 

Dist. No. 
Balance undrawn, 
Appropriated, 

Amount, 

Dist. No. 

Balance undrawn, 

Appropriation, 

Amount, 



7. 



8. 



10. 



$140 50 
225 00 

$365 50 

$104 00 
175 00 

$279 00 

$ 90 61 
165 00 

$255 61 

$356 58 
850 00 



$1206 58 



127 



Dist. No. 5. 
Balance undrawn, 
Appropriated, 

Amount, 

Dist. No. 6. 
Balance undrawn, 
Appropriated, 



113 05 
200 00 


$313 05 

$ 53 85 
160 67 


$213 85 



Dist. No. 
Balance undrawn, 
Appropriated, 

Amount, 



11. 



$142 67 
500 00 

$642 00 



Amount, 

Of these several sums, according to the Treasurer's Report, por- 
tions have been expended as follows : 





la the hands 1 


Undrawn 1 


Expended. 


Remaining. 




of the Treas.l 


from City. 1 


1 




In School Dist. No. 1, 


32 64 


45 00 


188 00 


77 64 




" 2, 


849 78 


1401 21 


13902 92 


2250 99 




« 3, 


63 89 


90 00 


296 07 


153 89 




" 4, 


3 45 


85 00 


235 48 


88 45 




« 5, 


28 36 


70 00 


214 69 


98 36 




« 6, 


26 24 


21 35 


166 26 


47 59 




«< 7, 


63 41 


60 00 


242 09 


123 41 




" 8, 


22 60 


45 00 


211 40 


67 60 




« 9, 


12 00 


34 61 


209 00 


46 61 




" 10, 


112 91 


112 91 


841 23 


365 35 




" 11. 


77 25 


125 00 


440 42 


202 25 




$1287 53 


$2090 08 


$16947 56 


$3522 14 



City of Manchester, Dec. 14, 1858. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing Report, and 
find it correctly cast. 

(Signed.) JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Auditor. 

The account of the Treasurer in full will be found at the end of 
this Report. 

Our public schools are the children of the city, and we presume 
on a parent's affection in recalling attention to them. Yet it must 
be confessed, that on the part of our citizens there is a want of ac- 
quaintance with their plans and modes of operation much to be 
deplored. 

The schools are too seldom visited, and the personal acquaintance 
of teachers rarely sought, except by some parent who has a griev- 
ance to redress, while the only judgment passed on the acts of a 
Committee is based on the amount of money they expend, without 
considering what manner of return there may be for it. 

The existence of this seeming want of interest, (for we cannot 
persuade ourselves that it is all real,) leads to discouraging evils. — 



12R 

Notwithstanding, tho average progress during the past year has been 
creditable, the course of instruction in many respects satisfactory, 
and the teachers as a body compare most favorably with those of 
any city of like resources. 

Distinctively and honorably our schools are common, for the 
study of the common tongue, primarily for the spelling and reading 
of our own language, and it is rarely understood how much of men- 
tal dicipline is involved when these things are rightly taught with 
a liberal and generous view of what they imply, and not often is the 
toil of the schoool-mistress who opens to the quickening perceptions 
of our many hundred children the way to the knowledge, intelligence 
and light of the world, sufficiently appreciated. 

Spelling should be taught from both the spelling and reading 
books, and should be discontinued at no stage of the child's progress. 
The history and origin of words in connection with their meaning sho'd 
be made known, as far as possible, at an early period, and when the 
child advances from pictures to synonyms he will come in youth and 
manhood to comprehend the vital power and the appropriate use of 
words. Grammar when reached should not be treated as a catalogue 
of abstractions, but its offices and relations to language should be 
fully understood, and the whole system used as an inclined plane, 
up which the scholar ascends to tne pleasant heights of English 
literature. Especially in the High School Bhould some idea of what 
the best writers have said, be imparted. "Cleveland's compendium," 
or some similar work, will show the way, and the scholar may walk 
in it and not tire, through life. 

There is perhaps no defect oftener found in teachers than want of 
ability to read well, which is almost as bad as inability to read at 
all in other men. We need not elocutionists, but readers — not the 
sounding forms of words, but heart expression, alive with meaning ; 
not an obtrusive manner, but the best conveyance of the matter in 
what is read. 

Ability to instruct is not always combined with good executive 
or governing faculties. This we can only learn by trial. Discipline 
should be rather by firmness and decision than by force ; but force 
there must be as the ultimate resort In language, most particular- 
ly, should the teacher be guarded ; there is a world-wide difference 
between the proper language of rebuke, strong though it be, and 
the hasty and ill-considered tirade of the scold. In our schools 
above all other places, do we need true gentlemen and ladies — true 
christian men and women, refined but not fastidious — christian, but 
not narrow-minded. 

The scholar should be taught that the first lesson of the school is 
order and submission, the lesson he ought to have learned at home, 
and the thorough learning of which will mark his whole social and 
moral career. That teacher is best who is alive to the work in 



129 

which he is engaged, and any one who cannot in his own heart keep 
down a ieeling of disgust, of half shame, of utter want of interest 
in his vocation, may well despair eommuuicating anything else to 
his pupils. Never confess, even to yourself, that you are "tired to 
death of teaching," unless prepared to act in accordance with your 
feeling. We do not expect to make this report a manual for teach- 
ers, but desire to mention in this connection the great difference of 
"faculty" in preserving and using the furniture of a room. Some 
teachers require less than half the expenditure for brooms, mats, 
dippers and pails, unhinged doors and broken glass, than others, and 
yet appear in better plight. They should consider that for the care 
of their rooms, furniture and yards, they are to be held responsible. 
The District places them in charge, pays them for tbeir services, and 
requires this care at their hands. They must see to it that no use- 
less or needless expenditure for which the people of the city may 
justly complain is caused by them. As to the manner in which 
this care is to be exercised, it is a part of the teachers requisite 
qualifications to know it. On the other hand, while we hold the 
teacher to the strictest performance of duty, we are prepared to 
assert the necessity of liberal appropriations for school purposes. — 
The houses in several of the out districts where the people are am- 
ply able to build new and convenient ones, is a positive disgrace to 
them, while the state of the yards, fences and some of the rooms in 
this District is no more creditable to us. This is not from lack of 
means nor altogether from want of appropriations. It is partly 
owing to that lax morality which allows a man to charge double the 
amount and do half the work for the public, that he would for an 
individual, partly to the neglect of this district last year to appoint 
suitable persons to make repairs and pay them for their labor, part- 
ly to want of ca?e in regard to gates and doors on the part of 
teachers, much to unavoidable wear in District property which can 
only be met by necessary expenditure and close supervision. As 
belonging to the general policy to be considered in school affairs we 
desire to speak of the importance of a superintendent, and will 
briefly state what there is for such a person to do. 

Some one must be familiar with the progress and standing of 
scholars from term to term and week to week, and must judge when 
they are qualified to be transferred from one school to another in 
the system of grades, which is established here as in every city in 
New England. Some one must be accessible at every term and at 
all times during the terms, to admit by suitable examination schol- 
ars into all the schools but the High, to see that the various district 
lines are not over-run, that one teacher is not crowded with schol- 
ars and another left with none. Some person should be at hand 
each day to be consulted by some one of fifty tedchers on question* 
naturally arising in the discharge of their duties, and should be 
9 



130 

able to report at each meeting of the committee from personal ob- 
servation, what ought, and what ought not to be done. Some one 
ought to be familiar with the best text books and studies and modes 
of teaching, and to pronounce an opinion independent of agents or 
book publishers, so that in the frequent changes of committees, 
books and modes of school administration may not be too often 
changed also. Neither is it too much to expect at the hands of a 
Superintendent that he should look sharply into the nature and ne- 
cesssity of the innumerable petty contracts made for the schools, 
and have actual knowledge that they have been performed. We 
believe the city could well afford to pay such a man the full value 
of his labors and be pecuniarily the gainer. It is seldom the case 
that in any of the business departments of active life so considera- 
ble a sum is expended unless it be through the handg of a compe- 
tent overseer. Can we afford to neglect the practical lesson which 
is thus given us, and expect a committee each one of whose mem- 
bers is occupied with other cares, to do all this for a consideration 
oftentimes rather worse than nothing ? 

Truancy is an increasing evil which ought to be resolutely met 
and grappled with, and we suggest the expediency of a special act 
by which the Superintendent may also be made truant agent. Be- 
tween the newly established Catholic schools and our own scores of 
idle boys infest the streets in training for the police court and the 
prisons. Owing to the opening of the Catholic schools we have 
found it expedient to discontinue two schools in the Park St., House, 
and to transfer one to the new room in the Franklin St., thus avoid- 
ing the expense of warming the former during this term at least. 
Meanwhile until we can tell how long the distinctive Irish schools 
are to be maintained, we can recommend no decided action in the 
premises. 

The Intermediate School on Manchester St., has been until the 
summer of '58 under the charge of Mr. Chas. Aldrich. It was 
originally designed for such scholars as could not attend more than 
one or two terms in a year and for such as could not be controled 
in the middle schools or fitly classed anywhere else. This design 
was carried out for several terms until lost sight of, and the school 
became a sort of intermediate between Grammar and High, with 
scholars belonging to one or the other. The necessity for it thus 
ceased for the time. After a vacation through the spring and sum- 
mer terms it has again been opened with the original design. 

The committee do not question the fidelity or underrate the val- 
ue of the services of Mr. Aldrich, they are simply of opinion that 
the class of scholars for which this school was established, required 
a teacher of different qualifications. Such a one they believe is 
secured in the person of Mr. Josiah G. Dearborn, who evinced much 
tact while teaching at Piscataquog, and who has recently graduated 



131 

at the State Normal School of Connecticut. Wo regret to observe 
in certain quarters a disposition to consider the schools as subjects 
of needless expenditure. In the State Report of 1858, over four 
thousand different scholars are reported as attending our public- 
schools. The amount raised by tax for their education was less 
than four dollars for each one, less than is appropriated by any city 
in New England out of New Hampshire, and very much less than 
is raised in any other city in this State with a single exception. — 
Now we do not fear intelligent criticism, but rather invite it on 
our educational system ; nor do we object to rigorous economy in 
expense, but we do regret to see a prejudice not founded on actual 
knowledge by which our schools may suffer serious injury. As for 
those who argue for a return to the old wages of the school master, 
who '"boarded round" and got out of the business as soon as he 
could for a better, we think words are wasted in argument with 
them. The good teacher is not to be found who cannot get some- 
thing like adequate compensation for his labor, in the pursuit for 
which he has qualified himself. Said Martin Luther : "Beloved, 
count it one of the highest virtues upon earth to educate faithfully 
the children of others, which so few and scarcely any do by their 
own. For I know that this work, next to the office of preacher, is 
the most profitable, the greatest and best." 

The far seeing wisdom of the State has fixed a point below which 
the school appropriation cannot be reduced. Our own is nearly 
down to that mark, should it thus be diminished we shall occupy 
before the people of New Hampshire the doubtful honor of being 
the only place of any considerable size, raising only what the law 
compels. We hope that those who think our school system too ex- 
pensive will visit the school rooms and take pains to form a judge- 
ment on facts. Far from us be that day, when the interests of 
education shall be made the football of contending aspirants for 
office, or when the moral and mental training of four thousand chil- 
dren is to be let to the lowest bidder. 

Other matters proper to be discussed in a School Report will be 
found in that of the Superintendent. 

Ward 1, SETH F. HILL, 

" 2, E. B. MERRILL, 

•' 3, F. B. EATON, 

« 4, M. T. BROWN, 

" 5, 

•' 6, J. Y. McQUESTON, 

" 7, G. A. BOWMAN, 

" 8, T. S. MONTGOMERY, 



132 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



SCHOOL 


DISTRICT 


NO. 


1, 


In Account vjith H. R. Chamberlin, 


Treasurer. 




Paid J. F. H. Sawyer, teach 


ing, 






$84 75 


Mary E. Ireland, " 








35 75 


M. V. McQueston, " 








51 25 


W. H. Hill, 








2 00 


G. W. Adams, 








25 


A. Austin, 








1 50 


R. Kimball, 








11 00 


S. Bunton, 








1 50 



Dr. 



$188 00 
Balance in the Treasury, Dec. 13, 1858, 32 64 



$220 64 



Cr. 



Cash, 


90 64 


Cash, 


70 00 


Cash, 


60 00 




$220 64 




H. R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 


Dec. 13, 1858. 




SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2, 


In Account with H. R. Chamberlin, Treasurer. Dr. 


Received of School Committee, Feb. 23, 1858, $4803 16 


(1 u u 


June 21, 1858, 5015 00 


a k i< 


Nov. 11, 1858, 4870 00 




$14688 16 


Paid O. Barton & Co., 


2 37 


J. A. Perry, 


2 00 


Hartshorn & Tufts, 


9 53 


W. A. Webster, 


49 T5 


Hersey and Til ton, 


32 07 


J. H. Moor, 


3 75 


Carrier & Sylvester, 


1 02 


D. McColley, 


8 49 



Amount carried porwarh, $108 98 



133 



Amount brought forward, 


$108 98 


P. H. Pike, 


50 


W. B. Dana, 


3 50 


Jerry Bjy, 


99 50 


C. F. Livingston, 


26 00 


Pay Roll for March, 


4195 37 


Daniels, Forsaith & Co., 


6 13 


J. 0. Adams, 


19 27 


E. P. Johnson & Co., 


553 15 


J. Y. McQuestion, 


57 00 


Lucius Thurber, 


46 72 


J. B. & A. McCrillis, 


43 63 


J. B. Clarke, 


6 00 


A. Gr. Tucker, 


2 50 


A. 0. Parker, 


1 75 


F. Kimball, 


2 50 


B. F. Wallace, 


12 50 


E. B. Cutler, 


3 88 


W. H. Hill, 


1 50 


Pay Roll for June, 


3875 98 


Tewksbury & Brother, 


6 15 


W. G. Hoyt, 


6 25 


J. P. & E. Young, 


96 25 


H. C. Bullard, 


3 33 


C. W. James, 


252 50 


B. F. Mitchell, 


12 50 


Robert Gilchrist, 


1 83 


James & Dodge, 


1 50 


E. Ferren, 


5 35 


William White, 


1 25 


T. McQueston, 


4 50 


Locke & Simons, 


1 25 


F. B. Eaton, 


50 


S. Bunton, 


2 25 


H. Dennison & Co., 


8 25 


James Ray, 


4 00 


E. Hunt, 


1 40 


E. B. Merrill, 


1 73 


J. S. Folsom 


2 70 


Geo. Hunt, 


50 


Goodale (£■ Farnsworth, 


16 60 


Colley & Kelly, 


50 


Pay Roll for November, 


3883 87 


D. L. Stevens, 


84 25 


Amoumt carried forward, 


9 13,465 57 



134 



Amount brought forward, 


$13465 57 


A. F. Perry, 


75 


Dudley & Parker, 


2 62 


Thos. Dunlap, 


75 


L. G. Sylvester, 


16 27 




aio/iqe; (\a 


SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2, 


(REPAIRS.) 


Paid L. G. Sylvester, 


26 01 


Dudley & Parker, 


2 34 


Wm. Wilder. 


5 91 


Colley & Kelly, 


24 72 


Temple McQueston, 


2 00 


H. D. Cutting, 


1 18 


Gr. A. French, 


18 00 


G. H. Dudley, 


6 50 


0. Barton & Co., 


3S 51 


Joseph Everett, 


7 00 


Daniels, Forsaith & Co., 


12 28 


G. B. Fogg, 


5 53 


Hartshorn & Tufts, 


11 29 


Currier & Sylvester, 


10 55 


Locke & Simons, 


12 


Coggswell & Wells, 


6 90 


F. Tuttle, 


53 57 


S. G. Rollins, 


3 00 


J. H. Maynard, 


90 52 


H. Peacock, 


2 00 


W. S. Palmer, 


8 50 


D. Mack, 


2 00 


Thos. Dunlap, 


4 75 


A. Waldron, 


7 87 


J. C. Farrington, 


1 37 




*$352 42 




$13838 38 


Balance in the Treasury Dec, 13, 1858, 


849 78 




$14688 16 


H. R. CHAMI 


December 13, 1858. 




Paid previous to Feb. 1, 1858, 


64 54 



* $101.08 of this sum was paid for repairs completed previous to the District 
Meeting in March, for which account was made at that time, which with the 
District Clerk's salary of $9 since paid, should be deducted, leaving a balaooe 
of $242.5d chargeable to the 5 per cent, allowed by law for repairs. 



135 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 3, 

In Account with H. R. Ckamberlin, Treasurer. Dr. 



aid Robert Clark, 
L. E. Newell, 
C. N. French, 
Peter Mitchell, 
Joseph Everett, repairs, 
J. Y. McQueston, 


Dec. 
Cr 


13,185S, 


$115 95 

82 75 

83 00 
2 00 
1 12 

11 25 




Balance in the Treasury, 


$296 07 
63 89 


$359 96 
$359 96 


Cash, 
Cash, 
Cash, 


149 96 

90 00 

120 00 



H. R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer, 
Dec. 13, 185S. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 4, 

In Account with H. R. Chamberli?i, Treasurer. Dr. 

Paid J. W.Locke, $100 00 

Annette McDoel, 61 50 

E. P. Webster, 56 50 

I. W. Moore. 16 50 

J. S. Folsom, 60 

Hersey & Tilton, 38 



Balance in the Treasury, Dec. 13, 1858, 


$235 48 
3 45 


Cr. 
Cash, $93 93 
Cash, 60 00 
Cash. 80 00 

. $238 93 

H. R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 
Dec. 13, 1858. 



13*5 

SCHOOL DISTRICT. NO. 5. 
In Account with H. R. Chamberlin, Treasurer. Dk. 

Received from School Committee, $243 05 



Paid J. S. Harriman, 


$105 83 




Sarah A. McShane, 


51 50 




E. J. Calef, 


41 00 




G. W. Adams, 


61 




R. A. Brown, 


2 50 




J. 0. Adams, 


1 00 




Hersey & Til ton, 


38 




W. P. Merrill, 


11 87 






$214 69 




Balance in the Treasury, Dec. 13, 1858, 


28 36 


$243 05 



H. R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 
Dec. 13, 1858. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 6, 
hi Account with H. R. Chamberlin, Treasurer. 
Received of School Committee, June 2], 1858. $60 00 

Nov. 11, 70 00 













fcltJU vU 


id E. P. Webster, 
S. A. Moore, 
Hersey & Til ton, 
W. H. Hill, 
J. M. Webster, 
Hartshorn & Tufts, 


Dec. 


13, 


1858, 


51 00 

40 00 

38 

75 

11 00 

63 




Balance in the Treasury, 


$103 76 
26 24 


$130 00 



H. R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 
Dec. 13, 1858. 
Paid previous to Feb. 1, 1858, $62 50 



137 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 7, 
In Account loith H. R. Chamberlin, Treasurer. Ck„ 

Received of School Committee, Feb. 23, 1858, $140 50 

June 21, 1858, 80 00 
Nov. 11, 1858, 85 00 



id W. L. Gage, 




75 00 




L. H Gordon, jr., 




30 62 




Lucilla Kimball, 




56 25 




Annette McDoel, 




56 50 




J. A. Stearns, 




2 84 




J. O. Adams, 




50 




Hersey & Til ton, 




38 




W. H. Hill, 




75 




Isaac Huse, 




19 25 






$242 09 




Balance in the Treasury, Dee. 13, 


1858, 


63 41 


$305 50 



H. R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 
Dec. 13, 1858. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 8, 

In Account with H. R. Chamberlin, Treasurer, 
Received of School Committee, Feb. 23, 1858, $11 51 
'• " '• June 21, 1858, 55 00 

Novell, 1858, 75 00 

$141 51 



id E. A. Howard, 




51 20 


H. M. Eastman, 




51 00 


G. W. Adams, 




58 


J. B. Hoitt, 




1 00 


W. H. Hill, 




75 


H. T. Nichols, 




1 50 


Peter Farmer, 




12 50 


Hersey & Tilton, 




38 




$118 91 


Balance in the Treasury, Dec. 13, 


1858, 


22 60 



$141 51 

H. R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 
Dec. 13, 1858. 
Paid Previous to Feb. 1, 1858, 92 49 



138 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 9, 

In Account with H. R. Chamberlin, Treasurer. 

Received of School Committee, Feb. 23, 1858, $91 00 

June 21, 1858, 60 00 
Nov. 11, 1858, 70 00 



Paid B. A. Ambrose, 




91 00 


M. E. Brown, 




51 00 


M. E. Brown, 




51 00 


Hersey & Tilton, 
Mrs. N. Corning, 
W. H. Hill, 




50 
1 25 

75 


J. Y. McQueston, 
S. Haselton, 


13, 1858, 


5 25 
8 25 


Balance in the Treasury, Dec. 


$209 00 
12 00 



$221 00 



$221 00 

Dec. 13, 1858. H. R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 10. 
In Account with H. R. Chamberlin, Treasurer. 
Received of School Committee, Feb. 23, 1858, $358 58 

June 21, 1858, 275 00 
Nov. 11, 1858, 300 00 



Paid J. Gr. Dearborn, 
H. H. Tasker, 
M. C. Wallace, 
M. A. Parker, 
J. W. Locke, 
L. Thurber, 
Hersey & Tilton, 
D. B. Eastman, 

D. K. Mack, 
J. Morse, 

E. B. Merrill, 
B. F. Fletcher, 
I. Barr & Co., 



122 00 


239 55 


74 15 


165 75 


182 99 


2 50 


1 00 


58 


13 52 


13 50 


37 


3 75 


1 01 



$933 58 



$820 67 
Balance in the Treasury, Dec. 13, 1858, 112 91 



$933 58 



H. R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer 
Dec. 13, 1858. 

Paid previous to Feb. 1, 1858, 20 56 



139 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 11. 
In Account with H. R. Chamberlin, Treasurer. 
Received of School Committee, Feb. 23, 1858, $142 67 

June 21, 1858, 175 00 
Nov. 11, 1858, 200 00 

Paid E. B. Lear, 

M. C. Dinsmore, 

Ruth A. Porter, 

L. B. Bod well, 

Henry Peacock, 

Hersey & Tilton, 

T. S. Montgomery & Co., 

Mrs. Doyle, 



100 00 


165 ^5 


165 75 


2 00 


2 75 


1 14 


1 03 


2 00 



$517 67 



$440 42 
Balance in the Treasury, Dec. 13, 1858, 77 25 



$517 67 



H. R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 
Dec. 13, 1858. 



City of Manchester, December 14, 1858. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing Report, and 
find all the accounts correctly cast. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Auditor. 



141 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee : 

The Statutes of the Commonwealth require an Annual Report 
of the progress which has been made by the pupils in our Public 
Schools, in the several departments of study to which they have 
attended during the year. 

The State is the great foster-parent of Common Schools, and 
assumes to exercise a maternal care over them. She rightfully ex- 
pects that year by year they will occupy more exalted ground, and 
constitute the true basis which shall uphold and sustain every other 
public interest. 

The city claims a close relationship to these institutions, and 
watches with constant anxiety their management and prosperity. 
She not only desires, but demands that they make sure progress as 
the return for the support she gives them. 

Lessening the circle, we strengthen the union, and find that each 
individual citizen maintains an inseparable connection with the 
system of public instruction, and should contribute to the utmost 
possible advancement of every pupil. 

Progress is the potent word in the school-room and at the fire- 
side, — and real progress the essential good for which we labor. 
Each step is designed to be one in advance, each eye is turned up- 
ward to a more elevated eminence, and every effort tends to a more 
perfect success. 

Forty-three schools have been maintained in the city the past 
year. The number of teachers regularly employed is fifty-one, and 
the whole number of pupils thirty-eight hundred and twenty-three 

The accompanying statistical tables are designed to show the 
whole number of pupils, and the average number in each of the 
city schools for the year and for each term ; the names of the. 
teachers, and the number of visits made by the committee, the 
superintendent, an d by citizens and others. 



142 



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147 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

According to the laws of the State, children enter the primary 
school at the age of four years, though ordinarily they do not at- 
tend very constantly until they are live or six years old. In this 
grade but little study is expected. The pupils learn the Primer, 
and read in the first and second books of the Reading Series. They 
are taught the sounds of the Letters, the Abbreviations, the Nu- 
merals, and the Punctuation Marks. They are required to study 
Mental Arithmetic as far as the Multiplication Table and Primary 
Geography to the division of North America. Much of the in- 
struction given is oral, and is usually illustrated by maps, globes 
and a free use of the blackboard. 

In my lust Annual Report, I suggested the propriety of grading 
anew our Primary Schools, so as to give a sufficient number of the 
youngest pupils to one teacher, and those of a greater age and better 
scholarship to another. By vote of the Board such a classification 
was adopted in the Primary schools on Manchester and Merrimack 
streets — Nos. 11 and 12, and 5 and 14. 

The teachers for the lower grade were selected for their apparent 
qualifications to manage small children, and for the willingness 
which they manifested to try the experiment. The arrangement 
was not designed to be permanent, unless, upon trial, it should prove 
to be of sufficient importance to warrant its continuance. 

I have watched their management and progress with more than 
ordinary anxiety — have noted the attendance, the order and the 
earnest interest which has marked them, and I am convinced that 
the experiment will prove entirely successful. The order has been 
unexceptionable, and the advancement of the children in whatever 
they have been required to learn, has been quite as rapid as we 
anticipated. As the teachers have had more time to devote to the 
several classes, each pupil has received more direct instruction, and 
has had the means of learning more rapidly as well as more ac- 
curately. The children in the lower grade enjoy greater freedom 
and receive better care than they possibly can in a school with older 
pupils. Their mental exercises are better adapted to their ability 
and their physical recreation is not interrupted by the presence of 
those whose age and strength lead them to desire different amuse- 
ments. 

These two schools have been managed prudently, yet very differ- 
ently. Each teacher has been eminently successful. The Manchester 
street school — Number Eleven — has been characterized by perfect 
order and exactness in every exercise. The other — Number Five 
— 'has manifested more enthusiasm in the various exercises, and has 
not been required to submit to very rigid discipline. But when 
both have done all that was expected of them, it is neither easy nor 
nocessajry to institute comparisons. 



148 
/ 

The new arrangements constituted two other schools which rank 
above the Primary and below the Middle grade. These are Nos. 
12 and 14, and are located by the side of those just named. They 
are composed of the higher classes of the Primaries, which remained 
after the removal of the Alphabet and Primer classes. They have 
received more instruction since the change, and have consequently 
made more rapid progress. The teacher in No. 12 resigned at the 
close of the summer term, having been very popular and useful in 
that position for more than five years. As a teacher who had been 
successful in another school was selected to fill the vacancy, no 
injury resulted from the change. The school remains in its former 
excellent condition. 

The other school of similar grade — No. 14 — is considerably 
larger than this, and requires more labor to govern it, and greater 
effort to give the classes the instruction which they need. It is a 
well regulated school and is constantly improving. 

The two Primary schools on Lowell street have each changed 
teachers during the year. The teacher in No. One was transferred 
to another school, and her place in this supplied by the election of 
one who had proved herself faithful in another district, and is doing 
well in her present position. A vacancy occurred in No. Two, at 
the close of the winter term, and was filled by the choice of a lady 
who had formerly been employed in the city schools, and who is 
now managing very prudently. The school has improved in its 
order and in the general appearance of its pupils within the past 
year. 

The Bridge street school — Number Three — continues to be large, 
though the number is at present smaller than at any former time 
during the year. The pupils are not remarkably quiet in the 
school-room, yet they learn well and always appear cheerful and 
happy, and are obedient to every command. The teacher under- 
stands how to manage them and continues to be popular with the 
parents. 

School Number Four — Concord street — has been increasing in 
number during the year, and now contains nearly as many pupils as 
ouo-ht to be placed under the care of one teacher. It is a pleasant 
school, is in a favorable location and receives the approbation of the 
public. 

The two schools of the Primary grade on Park street, have been 
well managed. They have been so constituted as to require the 
most earnest efforts of the teachers to maintain proper order and 
give adequate instruction. The discipline in Number Six has been 
very rigid. It has sometimes seemed that too great severity was 
exercised towards the pupils, though the disposition of a large por- 
tion of the school was such as to demand it. The condition of No. 



149 

Seven has been greatly improved, and the teacher whose manage- 
ment was not highly commended last year now maintains a higher 
rank. 

In consequence of the withdrawal of a large number of pupils 
from the schools of this locality to attend those of a private and 
charitable character, the number has been so much reduced, that 
the remaining pupils have been accommodated in a new school 
opened on Franklin street, and in the schools on Manchester and 
Merrimack streets. 

The Primary schools on Franklin street — Numbers Eight and 
Fifteen — have been well managed. In each the order has been 
unexceptionable, and the interest in the studies unusually gratify- 
ing. The teacher in Number Eight, at the close of the last term, 
resigned the situation which she has held for about five years, and 
the teacher of school Number Seven, which was discontinued, was 
appointed to succeed her. 

The Spring street schools are now the largest in the city. They 
are both well managed and are in a good condition. The teachers 
have been in their present places for a long time, have labored ear- 
nestly and have accomplished as much good a„H any others in a cor- 
responding grade of schools. 

Number Thirteen, on Wilson's Hill, has improved since the elec- 
tion of the present teacher, and is now very orderly. 

The Primary in District Number Ten — north side of the riscat- 
aquog river — has been large and difficult to be managed. The 
children have been irregular in their attendance, and have required 
an unusual amount of attention in the school-room. The present 
teacher has labored very faithfully and possesses the full confidence 
of the parents, but we cannot commend the school as a model. 

In District No. Eleven, the Primary school has been in session 
two-thirds of the year. On account of a deficiency in the appro- 
priation, it was united with the higher grade school during the 
winter. It has been well attended, and the children have made 
good proficiency. The district has seldom had a more acceptable 
teacher. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

The Middle schools receive, once a year, the pupils of the Pri- 
mary grade, who have completed the prescribed course. Here 
the same studies are continued. The small mental Arithmetic 
is completed — the Primary Geography is finished and a higher 
grade of Reading Book is used. Pupils are required to continue 
the use of the Speller, to learn the fundamental principles of 
written Arithmetic, study an elementary History of the United 
States and to write. 



150 

The number of pupils admitted to this grade from the primary 
at the late Examination was about 150 ; and at different dates dur- 
ing the year probably about 50 others have been received. 

The eight schools which compose the grade ar« all in a satisfac- 
tory condition. Though not perfect, they occupy a high position 
and are accomplishing all that we ought to expect of them. 

Number One — Bridge street — has been larger Ihe past year 
than at any former time. Better accommodations are much need- 
ed. The teacher is discreet and decided in her government and 
faithful in her instruction. 

Number Two — Concord street — is smaller than usual. It is in 
a good condition and yearly qualifies some excellent scholars for 
the Grammar Schools. 

Number Three — Merrimack street — has usually been large, but 
the transfer of two classes to the Grammar School has reduced the 
number of its pupils below the average attendance in the Middle 
schools. 

Number Four — Park street — was formerly large and very 
difficult to be managed. In consequence of the "withdrawal of a 
number of children to attend the Catholic school, this was so 
much reduced as to warrant its discontinuance at the close of the 
last term, provision having been made for its pupils in other rooms. 
The teacher who had charge of it for nearly five years, and was 
always faithful to her trust, was elected to a more desirable position 
at the opening of the fall term, and the vacancy filled for one term 
by an earnest and thorough instructor, who was transferred from 
District No. Three. 

Number, Five — Franklin street — is large but always in good 
condition. The children are earnest, attentive, and obedient. 

Number Six — Spring street — has been improving during the 
year, and on the occasion of the public examination, showed by the 
deportment and the character of the recitations.that it had been under 
excellent management and superior instruction. The teacher en- 
deavored to do her best, as it was her last, in the capacity of 
teacher. 

Number Seven — Spring street — has usually ranked high and 
through a large portion of the year maintained its reputation. 
During the last term the regular teacher was absent, and a substi- 
tute had the care of the school. As the new teacher was employed 
temporarily and did not expect to occupy the place many weeks, 
she did not feel the interest in the school which is necessary to en- 
sure success, and did not accomplish the good that would have been 
expected in other circumstances. 

Number Eight — Merrimack street — continues to sustain the 
reputation which it had gained last year. The instruction is very 
accurate and the order nearly perfect. 



151 

PARTIAL GRADES AND MIXED SCHOOLS. 

In these schools pupils are admitted with less regard to mental 
qualifications. The studies are the same as those authorized in the 
graded schools, though they are not pursued with the same system 
or accuracy as when the pupils are more rigidly classified. 

District No. I. — The school in this district has been better the 
past year than at any time previous for at least three years. The 
Winter school was not large, and considering the condition of the 
house and the mental advancement of the pupils was very pleasant. 
The teacher was well qualified to instruct, and if the pupils had de- 
sired to learn, they might have made good progress. Greater 
severity in discipline would have improved the school. 

The Summer school was taught by a lady who was employed 
the previous summer. She gave satisfaction, both in government 
and instruction. The teacher employed in the fall term was unex- 
perienced in the duties of the school-room, though abundantly qual 
ified to instruct the school. She labored diligently to accomplish 
all the good in her power. 

Number II. In this district the Towlesville school embraces 
pupils of the Middle and Primary grades. It is now, as it has 
been for several years, a pleasant and profitable school. It is 
more easily managed than formerly, as the pupils are younger and 
more readily classed. It might be considered as a Primary school, 
as it really is for a large portion of the year. 

The Falls School is not as large as that at Towlesville, but has 
more advanced pupils and requires greater effort to govern it and 
render proper instruction to all the classes. The teacher having 
charge of it for the past year, has been very thorough in her in. 
struction, and has insisted on the most exact order. She is a su- 
perior teacher. On account of ill health she has leave of absence 
for the present term, but intends to return at the opening of the 
Spring session. 

Wilson's Hill. The higher grade school in this locality has 
for many terms been exceedingly pleasant and useful. It is order- 
ly and well governed, and is taught by an earnest and successful 
teacher, who is justly regarded as one of the most faithful instruc- 
tors in the city. 

The Intermediate School. This school has been in session only 
one term in the year. It was fully attended, and most of the 
pupils made commendable advancement in their studies. But as 
the number designing to attend during subsequent terms was small, 
and ample provision for their instruction existed in the Grammar 
schools, it was determined to suspend the Intermediate for the 
Spring and Summer months. It was re-opened at the commence- 
ment -of the present term, and is now one of the most valuable 
schools in the city. 



152 

District No. III. The Winter school, in this district, was not 
very profitable. The teacher was a fine scholar and possessed the 
faculty to teach, but utterly failed in discipline. The pupils con- 
trolled the school. Several of the older scholars were heedless 
and disorderly. They knew nothing about study, and their knowl- 
edge of common civility was exceedingly limited. Their influence 
on the school, especially during the early part of the term, was 
fatal to mental improvement, good order, and morality. 

The teacher selected for the Summer term was judiciously strict, 
requiring thorough recitations and perfect order. The Fall term 
also was one of profit, and the examination manifested to those 
present the importance of regular attendance and close application. 

District No. IV. This school was taught during the Winter 
by a young man of excellent scholarship and exemplary moral 
character. He controlled the school by mild measures, and was 
quite acceptable to the people. 

A teacher who was known to every parent and child in the dis- 
trict, was employed for the Summer term, and kept an excellent 
school. Declining to be returned for the Autumn, an instructor of 
much experience and superior qualifications was elected. She 
taught well and still continues in the school. 

District No. V. This school, in the Winter term, was under 
the care of an old teacher, who occupied the same place the pre- 
ceding Winter, and maintained good order. His successor for the 
Summer term evidently labored faithfully to give her pupils proper 
instruction. But the school lost much of its usefulness in conse- 
quence of a division among the parents in relation to the teacher's 
management. A short Autumn term was sustained, under the in- 
struction of a lady who had previously taught in the District. 
But the school was small and destitute of that earnest interest 
which will command success. 

District No. VI. There have been three terms in this district, 
under the instruction of three teachers. The first and second 
terms the school was taught by persons of experience, who govern- 
ed well and instructed in the right way. A teacher was chosen for 
the Fall who had never before undertaken *to teach. She kept a 
very quiet school for eight weeks, but it did not appear that the 
pupils made much progress. 

District No. VII. This school had a living teacher in it dur- 
ing a twelve weeks' Winter term — a man who knew how to do the 
work which he undertook. A short Spring term of four weeks was 
kept by a young man whose calling was evidently in a different 
direction. The Summer school was taught by a young lady who 
failed in her knowledge of children rather than of books, who had 
less tact than education. The teacher employed in the Fall term 
had been successful during several terms in another district, and 



. 



153 

adopting here a firm but quiet manner, seldom scolding or punish- 
ing, but always insisting on order and study, she of course had a 
profitable school. 

District No, VIII. Here during the Winter term, and indeed 
throughout the year, has been more punctual and constant attend- 
ance than is often found in sparsely settled districts. The order of 
the school is generally good, but the pupils have not yet learned to 
study, and we have not been so fortunate as to select an instructor 
who can teach them that important lesson. The three teachers 
who have been in the school the past year have failed in this par- 
ticular. They have been too kind. The teachers for the first and 
third terms lacked the power, — they did not compel their pupils to 
do nor to suffer. Their improvement consequently was not marked. 
The teacher in the Summer term was a thorough tactician, — she 
possessed more skill than knowledge, — and made herself popular 
among the children. Indeed she kept a good school — much better 
than many whose examination was more satisfactory than hers. Her 
successor gained the approbation of the parents, though she was not 
sufficiently exacting in her requirements of the pupils. More 
severity would produce more beneficial results. 

District No. IX. This district has been very fortunate in the 
choice of teachers for two years past, and as a consequence no 
school in the suburban districts has made more rapid progress than 
this. The number of pupils has increased from an average of ten 
or twelve to nearly thirty, and the scholarship has advanced in a 
much greater ratio. The causes which have produced this improve- 
ment evidently are — a new house, an increased interest among the 
people, and the selection of good teachers. 

District No. X. The South school in this district now em- 
braces scholars of the Primary, Middle, and Grammar school 
grades, which renders a large number of classes indispensable, and 
imposes a severe labor on the teacher. If it were not for the dis- 
tance which some of the pupils would be obliged to travel, it would 
be much better for all pupils that are qualified, to enter the Gram- 
mar School in that district. 

A new teacher was selected at the commencement of the Spring 
term, who has conducted the school in a very satisfactory manner. 
Though she does not appear to excel her predecessor in her govern- 
ment and instruction, it is evident that the school has not suffered 
in consequence of the change of teachers. 

The Higher grade school in this district is usually styled a 
Grammar school, though it receives pupils directly from the Pri- 
mary, and is in fact only partially graded. 

The Winter term was commenced in a small room designed and 
furnished for a Primary school, which was in no respect suitable for 
the accommodation of so large a number of scholars. Through the 



154 

personal efforts of a few gentlemen, new seats and desks were 
obtained, and the large room in the second story of the building was 
put in preparation for the school, and immediately occupied. 

The school was in a state of disorder when the teacher entered 
upon his duties. The pupils had seldom been compelled to submit 
to wholesome restraint. While there were a few obedient and in- 
dustrious scholars, the majority had no fixed habits of study, and 
very loose ones in relation to attendance and deportment. They 
made as much progress as could be expected under such circumstan- 
ces in a single term. They improved in their deportment and 
began to learn how to apply their miDds to study. But the term 
was too brief to accomplish much, especially when one half of the 
time was spent before the school was placed in a position to learo. 
The master showed himself to be a supeiior disciplinarian and an 
excellent instructor. Had the district been able to retain him, the 
school would now have manifested the results of his management. 

In the Spring a new teacher was elected, who for two terms 
labored with an earnest desire to benefit the pupils, and had corres- 
ponding efforts been made by the school it would have maintained 
an honorable position. His talents and education are superior to 
those of many teachers who are more successful. He needs to be 
more rigid in his requirements, and to exercise more authority over 
his pupils. Children, whether at home or in the school-room, must 
obey at once when the command is given. It will not always do to 
allow them to take their own time and to have their own way, when 
they receive the order. A reluctant, hesitating half-obedient spirit 
is but little better than outright and wilful disobedience. 

District No. XI. The higher grade school at Amoskeag is not unlike 
that at Piscataquog, except that it is smaller and scarcely as far ad- 
vanced in the principal studies. During the Winter term, the Primary 
school was united with the higher school, and both departments 
placed under the direction of a teacher who has for a long time been 
employed in some of the Winter schools. He found work to be 
done, and labored earnestly and faithfully to accomplish it. His 
instruction is not so definite and critical as that of our Grammar 
masters generally. His pupils advance more rapidly, but not so 
thoroughly, the result in a great measure of the circumstances 
which have attended his instruction in country schools of brief du- 
ration, rather than in permanent schools where a systematic course 
is pursued. 

The teacher for the two succeeding terms was admirably qualified 
for her work. Thorough and clear in her instructions and strict in 
her government, the school always appeared well, and most of the 
classes made excellent progress. 



155 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

The two Grammar Schools in District Number Two — the only 
real and distinctive schools of that grade in the city — receive pupils 
from the Middle schools once a year. The prescribed studies are 
— Written and Intellectual Arithmetic, complete ; History of the 
United States and Geography, complete; Physiology; Grammar 
including Analysis and Parsing; Map Drawing; Reading; Spell- 
ing and Rhetorical Exercises. 

Each of the schools is divided into eight classes, two of which 
are assigned to the Principal and a like number to each Assistant. 
Whenever admissions are made from the lower schools, the classes 
are partially re-organized, and as many pupils advanced to- a higher 
rank as the teachers deem prudent. Promotions are made at inter- 
vals during the year, so that a good scholar is not often required to 
delay in consequence of the dulness of the others, but may proceed 
from class to class as rapidly as his mental acquirements will allow. 
Pupils ordinarily complete the Grammar School course in about five 
years. 

The North School, on account of its size, the construction of the 
school room, and the disposition of many of the pupils, is usually 
the most difficult of management. The frequent change of teachers 
has unquestionably had an influence in the same direction. There 
has been an essential improvement in the deportment of the school 
within the year. There is now greater industry on the part of the 
pupils, more constant attendance, and a more ready compliance 
with the requirements of the teachers. As an instructor, the pres- 
ent Principal has but few equals. It would not be easy to find 
more thorough and accurate instruction in any of the common 
branches than the higher classes in this school receive. 

At the close of the Winter term the first Assistant who had been 
connected with the school for a long time, presented a letter of 
resignation. She was succeeded by a young lady of fine scholar- 
ship, great energy of character and engaging manners, but she 
failed to secure the good will of her pupils, and consequently did 
not succeed in rendering herself useful. Being elected for one 
term only, at the expiration of that term the second and third 
Assistants were promoted, and a teacher was transferred from a 
Middle school to the place of third Assistant. In consequence of 
illness, she was unable to discharge the duties required, and at the 
close of the term resigned. 

The Assistants are all deeply interested in their work, and give 
no just occasion for censure. 



156 

The South Grammar School has been now in the new house, and 
under the present arrangements a full year, and when we compare 
its present condition with (he past, we cannot fail to perceive the 
influence which a properly constructed house has upon teachers and 
pupils. This school is one of the best, if not the very best Gram- 
mar school in the State. It would be difficult to find 
another which for discipline and instruction will surpass it. To be 
fully appreciated it must be seen. The Principal has been connect- 
ed with the school for about six years, and one of the Assistants 
for nearly an equal length of time. The third Assistant was elected 
to the place she holds a year since, and has been doing excellent 
service every day since. At the close of the Winter term the first 
Assistant resigned to accept a higher position in Boston. The place 
was filled by the election of an energetic and faithful teacher, 
whose labors have been very acceptable. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL. 



To gain admission to the High School, candidates must be pre- 
pared to pass an examination in all the studies of the Grammar 
Sih io's. It takes the pupil where the Grammar school 
leaves him in his studies, and carries him onward through a thor- 
ough and extended course of Mathematics, Natural and Mental 
Science, English Literature, and, if desired, the classics required for 
admission to any New England College. The standard of admission 
is high and the character of the school is intended to be correspond- 
ingly elevated during the three years' course. We require constant 
attendance, correct deportment and the most accurate and critical 
instruction. There has been no change in the Board of Instruction 
within the year. Neither the Principal nor the Assistants have 
been wanting in an interest in their work, nor have they made their 
connection with the school of secondary importance. The number 
of pupils has been greater during the past year than usual, the 
average attendance has been much increased and the attention to 
the various studies has, with lew exceptions, been exceedingly grat- 
ifying. 



I have obtained from the Principal the accompanying schedule 
of the pupils, with a scale of the deportment, attendance, and 
scholarship of each during the year. The figures 8.00 indicate the 
highest degree of merit, both in deportment and scholarship. The 
number of school days in the first term is 69 ; in the second 64 ; 
and in the third 63 ; making a total of 198 days in the ordinary 
schojl year. The past year there were but 196 days. 



157 



LADIES 



Names. 




Abby E. Abbott, 

Lizzie Adams, 

Frances A. Adams, 

Maria C. Adams, 

Harriet A. Barnes, 
Harriet L. Bond, . . , . . 

Alice S. Brown, 

S.J. 0. Bayley, 

Emily A. Brigham, 

Anna L. Bunker, 

Mary S. Caswell 

Phebe B. Clock, 

Sarah Colby, 

Sarah E. Copp, 

Marietta B. Currier,. .. 

Celia Cutter, 

Emma A. Daniels, .... 

Flora A. Daniels, 

Lizzie H. Dean, 

Emma Doland, 

Mary A. Dctey,. .. . . . 

Eliza J. Eaton, 

Araminta C. Edgerly. . , 
Anstress G. Flanders, . . 

Eliza A. Flanders, 

Martha A. Forsaith, . . . 

Charlotte B. Frye, 

Josephine W. French, . 
Martha A. Galacar, . . . 
Helen F. Goodwin, 

Zephiah Gould, 

Maria Hartshorn, 

Ella M. Hill, 

I. Augusta Hunt 

Augusta A. Jackson,. . . 
Georgianna A. Jackson, 
Adelaide M, Johnson,. . 



92 


8. 


1034 


7.95 


63 


7.96 


196 


8. 


1054 


7.66 


31 


8. 


69 


8. 


304 


7.61 


1124 


7.95 


194 


8. 


192 


8. 


1034 


7.94 


62* 


8. 


1S3 


8. 


132 


7.89 


434 


8. 


146 


7.86 


1774 


7.74 


1744 


8. 


1654 


8. 


184 


8. 


1714 


8. 


1294 


7.65 


151 


8. 


1514 


8. 


57 


8. 


1064 


7.87 


196 


8. 


110 


7.89 


118 


7.89 


121 


8. 


195 


7.95 


122 


7.38 


67 


7.73 


50 


8. 


63 


8. 


178 


7.92 



158 







2> a 








m 


■a a 


a 


a 


Names. 


E 


3 t 


a 






H 


% g 


*w 


a 






S ti 


c 








1 < 








fc 


p 


S 



Lurena Johnson, 

Elsie A. Johnson, , 

Harriet L. Jones, , 

Charlotte A. Locke, 

Mary A. Locke, 

Harriet A. Lord, 

Carrie A. Lowell, 

Emma A. Libbey, y. 

Asenath P. McQueston, 

Marcia V. McQueston, 

Myra J. Moore, 

Mary F. Montgomery, , 

Orietta V. Nesmith, 

Caroline 0. Norris, 

Fanny E. Norris, .... 

Ellen F. Odell, 

Sarah R. Page, 

Harriet N. Parmenter, 

Fanny E. Parker, 

Augusta M. Peabody, 

Helen F. Perry, 

Mary E. Quimby, 

Betsey A. Ranlett, 

Ellen B. Kowell, 

Augusta Sanborn, - 

E. C. Sanborn, 

Z. A. Scott,, 

Katie E. Sheperd, 

Sarah F. Shepherd 

Mary F. Stark, 

Amanda L. Stevens, 

Martha M. Stevens, 

Sarah F. Stone, 

Irene A. Stokes, 

Josephine L. Taggart. 

Georgianna Tilton, 

Emily J. Tucker, 

Florence Wilson, 

Helen M. Wilson, 

Lucy B. White, 

Augusta Wolcott, 

Emma J. York, 



'6 


176 


7.93 


1 


58 


8. 


2 


132 


7.70 


O 


189 


7.54 


1 


56 


8. 


2 


131 


7.48 


3 


140 


8. 


1 


58 


8. 


3 


182 


7.98 


2 


130 


7.57 


2 


120 


8. 


3 


196 


7.81 


3 


141 


8. 


2 


72 


7 51 


1 


62 


7.41 


2 


123 


8. 


1 


69 


8. 


3 


1S1 


8. 


1 


23 


7.43 


1 


57 


7.86 


1 


61 


8. 


3 


130 


7.71 


3 


181 


7.98 


2 


108 


7.67 


1 


19 


8. 


1 


112 


8. 


2 


126 


7.75 


1 


21 


8. 


2 


116 


7.59 


2 


106 


7.62 


3 


1S7 


7.53 


1 


34 


8. 


3 


162 


7.96 


1 


59 


7.43 


3 


190 


7.59 


1 


63 


7.96 


3 


183 


7.63 


1 


24 


8. 


2 


90 


7.60 


3 


168 


8. 


2 


130 


7.68 


3 


123 


7.69 



159 
GENTLEMEN. 



Names. 




E. E. P. Abbott, 

Milton Abbott, 

John A. Adams, 

J. S. Adams, 

William H. Adams,. . . 
John H. Andrews,. . . . 
Edward L. Bailey,. . . . 

Ezra S. Bartlett, 

William C. Brown 

George H. Colby, 

B. F. Currier, 

W. H. D. Cochrane,... 
Charles H. Daniels, . . . 
George A. Eaton, . . 
Arthur M. Eastman,.. 

George H. Elliot, 

Joseph G. Edgerly, . . . 

William C. Gage, 

Alonzo R. Guppy, 

Osborne B. Gordon, . . . 

Linus Gould, 

James A. Folsom, 

David L. Harriman, . . . 
Martin A. Haynes,. . . . 
Charles H. Hodgman,. . 
William C. Hodgman, , . 
Alvin 0. Houghton, . . . 
George A. Houghton,. . 

N. Parker Hunt, 

Francis E. Hurd, 

N. Parker Kidder,. . . . 
Rodolphus M. Locke, . . 
Joseph L. Locke, 
James G. McAllaster, , 

Aldanno Neal, , 

Charles E. Page, 
Charles- H. Patterson,. 
Irvin Proctor, ....... 

Isaac K. Proctor, .... 

George W. Rogers,.. 



192 

184 

178 

62 

69 

68 

68 

113 

175 

196 

64 

62 

68 

129 

69 

126 

125 

60 

53 

127 

127 

47 

121 

90 

111 

195 

187 

175 

193 

59 

174 

64 

53 

69 

110 

69 

12 

111 

51 

62 



7.71 
7.51 
7.57 

7.80 

7.83 

7.S2 

7.50 

7.72 

7.79 

7.75 

7.92 

7.72 

7.48 

7.52 

7.49 

6.60 

8. 

7.66 

7.69 



7.72 
7.65 
7.84 
7.79 
7.90 
7.83 
7.74 
7.76 
7.58 



7.92 
7.79 



7.88 



160 



Names. 



Joseph E. Rowell,. . , 
Frank T. Richardson,, 
Richard H. Rust, 
Edson W. Sanborn,.. 
John B. Sargent, 

Job R. Smith, 

John F. Stokes, ... . 

H. G. Smith, 

Charles H. Tilton,.., 
Charles E. Towns, 
William H. Whitney,. 
S. S. Woodbury,. ... 
R. W. Woodbury,.., 



1 < 

181 

133 

91 

93 
189 
187 
150 

64 
171 

54 
179 

59 
127 



7.64 

8. 

6.89 

7.73 

7.12 

7.32 

7.53 

7.86 

7.46 

7.55 

7.93 

8. 

7.98 



7.09 
7.71 
6.54 
7.46 
7.04 
7.35 
7.54 
7.48 
7.37 
7.40 
7.59 
7.44 
7.S1 



ENGLISH COURSE OF STUDY IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. 



FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

Algebra — Day. I Algebra, Analysis, &c. lEng. Comp'n. — Quackenbos. 

Analysis & Parsing — Fowler. Book Keeping — Hanaford k\ History — Weber. 
Gov. Instruotor — Shuttles'. Payson. IPbys. Geography — Warr«n. 



Geometry — Davies. 

Nat. Philosophy. — Silliman. 

History — Continued. 



SECOND YEAR. 

Geometry. 
Natuial Philosophy. 
Botany — Gray. 

THIRD YEAR. 



Mental Philosophy. — Haven. [Mental Philosophy, 
Logic — Whately Chemistry — Youmans. 

Geology — Loomu. 

Composition and Declamation through the course. 



Trigonometry — Davies. 
A stronomy — Sm ith . 
Rhetoric— Whately. 



[Zoology — Agassiz & Gould. 
Chemistry. 
| Political Economy — Way land. 



161 

While our schools are generally in an excellent condition, — under 
rigid discipline and exact instruction, — many of them are marked 
by defects which should be remedied, either by the direct action of 
the teachers, or indirectly by the agency of the Board of School 
Committee, or by legislation. To some of these defects, as well as 
to many excellencies, I wish to call the attention of the citizens of 
Manchester. 

THE STUDIES PURSUED. 

Reading is of primary importance, not only to the scholar and 
the man of a profession, but to the business man and even to the 
daily laborer. Correct reading leads to a correct understanding of 
whatever is presented for investigation. With this view it is insisted 
that particular attention shall be given to this branch of instruc- 
tion ; and this requirement is generally regarded by the teachers. 
In most of our schools we have some good readers. It is not ex- 
pected that all will read equally well, any more than that all can 
learn Arithmetic or Grammar with the same facility. A difference 
in mental organization will produce a marked difference in the 
results of mental application. Consequently we have poor readers in 
the same schools or the same class with those who read well, and 
the best instruction will not wholly correct the evil. 

With some teachers there is a disposition to advance pupils too 
rapidly — to put them into a Reader of hard words and unintelligi- 
ble sentences before they have learned the Primer — to urge them 
on to a higher and more difficult book before they have become 
familiar with those of an elementary character. 

It is sometimes the case, in classes somewhat advanced, that pupils 
are hurried over an exercise without the least comprehension of the 
meaning. They do not study the lesson ; it is not explained to 
them ; no example of correct reading is given them. Children learn 
more from example than precept, and if teachers are unable to 
show the pupils what is correct and what is incorrect, as well as tell 
them, it would be an advantage for them to know that there are 
excellent institutions designed expressly to furnish the necessary 
instruction. 

I have often thought, and sometimes said, that pupils may be 
kept too long on a single reading lesson. They may be taught too 
much as well as tco little. They find so many errors to correct 
that in avoiding one they very naturally fall into another. 

The reading in some classes in the higher grades of schools is too 
formal. It conveys no meaning. The pupils obey the rules with- 
out entering into the spirit of the article read — the result of exces- 
sive effort to read well. It is the mechanical over-doing of the 
work. The teachers assume an imposing style — teach oratory rather 
plain, intelligible reading. 

11 



162 

There is not always sufficient attention paid to correct enuncia- 
tion — to the full sound of the final letters of a syllable or word. 
On the other hand some teachers are over anxious to give a full 
atterance to every letter, and in their efforts at precision, commit 
an error of an opposite character — giving a reduplicated or pro- 
longed sound to the final letter, in imitation of a certain style of 
pulpit oratory. 

In the High and Grammar Schools much attention is given to 
declamation and composition, and in each of these schools may be 
found young ladies and young gentlemen whose efforts are indica- 
tive of future success. The rhetorical exercises at the High School 
are always interesting in their character, and often indicate an 
eminent degree of talent. 

Spelling is made a daily exercise in all of our schools, and is 
generally so conducted as to be of substantial benefit to the pupils. 
In all of the regularly graded schools, a proper share of the teach- 
ers' time is given to this exercise. But in many of the Mixed 
Schools there is a serious deficiency. The only proper method of 
making improvement in spelling is to assign to the pupil definite 
lessons daily in the Speller or Dictionary, and require them to be 
made as much a matter of careful study as any other text book. 
The slate or blank book should be used by all pupils who can write, 
and the written exercises should be examined by the teacher or by 
pupils whom he may appoint. 

Our scholars are usually well drilled in the study of Arithmetic. 
They begin the study early in the Primary schools and do not com- 
plete it until! they enter the High School. They arc taught to give 
explanations of their work, and to state the grounds on which the 
various rules and processes are based. In the High School, the 
higher Mathematics, — Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, and Sur- 
veying — are pursued in a thorough and practical manner. 

In Grammar, there is an almost universal deficiency. In the 
ungraded schools and those which are partially graded, the pupils 
know but little even of the general principles. The deficiency is 
less marked in the Grammar and High Schools. And in this con- 
jnection I must repeat what I have frequently had occasion to say, 
that when a suitable text book on the subject is put icto the schools, 
or when no text book is used, and the pupils depend on the oral 
instruction of a well qualified teacher, we shall have better scholars 
in this department of study. 

In Geography and History the pupils excel. They devote much 
of the time in the Primary and Middle Schools, and even in the 
Grammar Schools, to the study, and have every reasonable advan- 
tage for obtaining a correct knowledge of those branches. Map 
Drawing is made a study in the Grammar Schools and is carried to 
a high degree of perfection. 



163 

TEXT BOOKS. 

Notwithstanding the care which has been taken to introduce the 
best books into our schools, we often fail to make a proper selection, 
and discover our mistake when it is too late to remedy it, without 
serious inconvenience and considerable loss to the scholar. Books 
are too often adopted without a thorough and practical test in the 
school-room. A book "looks well" — it is recommended by distin- 
guished names — it is offered at a cheap rate, or in exchange for an 
old one. But an examination shows that its beauty is only exter- 
nal — that the recommendations it bears were given to get rid of a 
troublesome agent, and that its introduction at any price is expen- 
sive. It was in this way that some of our most objectionable text 
books came into use. Greene's Grammar, — the worst within my 
knowledge for pupils not pursuing a regular and extended course of 
study — a work on United States History introduced a year ago, 
and others which it is unnecessary to name, found their way into the 
schools without passing the ordeal of practical experiment, and 
have been daily condemned as page after page has been studied. 

The Superintendent has no legal authority in regard to the use of 
text books — his opinion may sometimes have an influence for their 
introduction or against it. That is the limit of his power. 

The change of books is often an evil — it is not always a benefit 
even if the new book is superior to the one thrown aside Conse- 
quently Committees should be slow to involve the public in the 
necessary expense of purchasing new books. The entire change of 
a single series of books in our city would incur an expense of more 
than a thousand dollars. It would be but trifling when divided 
among the many purchasers — scarcely more than the cost of a pound 
of tea or a dozen " Ilavanas " — but it is compulsory and that makes 
it a burden. We want the best books as well as the b^t teachers. 
We take the latter upon trial, after a thorough examination. Let 
us examine a new text book by putting it into the hand of an in- 
telligent class and a competent instructor for trial, before it shall be 
adopted as a standard. 

The books brought into use the past year have not been numer- 
ous — the introduction of new works to the exclusion and displace- 
ment of others, none. In no case have classes been compelled to 
lay aside one author and purchase another. Town & Holbrook's 
Readers — the Progressive Series — have been ordered in such classes 
as have advanced to a higher grade of studies, and Worcester's Speller 
takes the place of Tower's under the same circumstances. To be 
sure, parents have been required to purchase other books, especially 
if their children have made any progress. But the changes have 
been few — less even than the real interests of the schools seemed to 
demand. There is evidently a defect in the plan of many of our 
school books. In the desire to simplify the various studies, there 



164 

has been no end to making books. Not only have many authors 
appeared, but each author has issued a series in various departments, 
— a series of Readers numbering five or six books — of Arithmetics, 
four in number — of Grammars including three or more books — of 
Geography, Physiology and History, in two or three parts. The 
authors and publishers are the gainers, and the public the great 
loser by this plan. 

Nearly all the school rooms are supplied with Maps, and those in 
District No. 2 have Globes, Geometrical solids and other apparatus 
for the explanation of the various studies pursued, but the schools 
in Districts 10 and 11 are wholly destitute of such aids to the 
pupil, and some of the other districts are but partially supplied. 
MORAL DEPORTMENT. 

The pupils in our schools are like children in all large manufac- 
turing towns. We have the good and the bud — the obedient and 
the obstinate — those who are governed by a word, and those who 
eannot be controlled by the rod. They are the representatives of 
all grades of society, and have learned their lessons of morality 
from unnumbered sources of instruction. They come up to the 
school-room, bearing with them the impressions they h vc received 
at the fireside and from the world without. They are to submit to 
the impartial discipline of the teacher. They are to be moulded 
morally as well as intellectually into the] image of true men and 
women. 

There is an inclination among boys at the present day, to adopt 
the errors and vices of men rather thin to imitate their virtues 
They learn the lessons which are daily taught in the street much 
more readily than the required tasks of the school-ioom. Girls of 
a dozen summers assume to bo young ladies, and become impatient 
of the proper restraints of the school. Though most of the mem- 
bers of the higher grades of schools have been taught, at home and 
in the school-room, the common courtesies of society, they too often 
disregard them. There is a rudeness in their deportment, often- 
times, which indicates a wide departure from olden time customs. 
There is a want of respect shown to age and superiority which once 
would not have been tolerated. Teachers are not sufficiently exact- 
ing in regard to the observance of these ''little things" which affect 
the whole moral character. 

There is a disposition on the part of some pupils to deceive, to 
misrepresent — in reality to falsify — in order to avoid the immediate 
consequence of some other error. Profane and vulgar words are 
too often uttered by mere children, in our streets and in the play 
ground. These vices are more open if not more common in the 
country districts than in the city. 

If every parent and teacher would listen to the evidence that 
might be produced of the delinquences, how would the record sur- 



165 

pass belief. It is even worse than I have represented. Young lads, 
members of our schools, have learned the ways of dissipation. I 
have reason to believe that some of them not only visit drinking 
saloons and scenes of revelry, but that they are the patrons ot the 
one and participators in the oth r. 

PARENTAL INTEREST. 

But comparatively a small proportion of our citizens ever visit a 
school. Not one tax-payer in fifty has ever given the teacher 
occasion to record his name iti the Register. During the past year 
not a single school in the city was visited by the Mayor, and scarce- 
ly one by a member of the City Government. Even our profes- 
sional men seem studiously to avoid the school-room. 

The parent should see the pupils in their every-day working 
order, when neither scholar nor teacher is especia'ly prepared fur a 
visit. To the parent the school-room should be the dearest place 
outside of the home circle — for all on earth that he loves with the 
strongest affection is gathered within its walls. Yet how sadly is it 
neglected. 

ABSENCES AND TARDINESS. 

Year after year, we have had occasion to complain of irregular 
attendance, of tardiness and of truancy, — evils which may be traced 
dhectly to want of parental influence. The teacher may require 
the regular and constant attendance of the pupil — may chide or 
punish for absences, but if the parent sympathizes w:th the child, 
sends trivial excuses and complains of the teacher's requirements 
— if the parent permits the child to leave the school and spend the 
time in running after fire companies and military displays, there ig 
no remedy. The schuol must suffer to accommodate the dilatory or 
absent pupil, who has parental authority for his delinquences. 

Gentlemen op tiie Committee : 

In concluding my Report allow me to congratulate you and the 
citizens of Manchester on the prosperous condition of our publie 
schools. Though they are not yet perfect, nor accomplishing all 
the good of which they are capable, they are yearly advancing in 
merit and in usefulness. That they may be generously sustained 
by the public, be under the management of earnest, thorough, con- 
scientious teachers and receive the watchful care of those whose 
<!uty it is to guard and direct them aright, should be the wish of 
every citizen. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES 0. ADAMS, 

Supt. of Public Instruction. 
Manchester, Dee. 29, 1858. 



166 



VALUATION, TAXES, &c. 



Year. 


Valuation. | 


Taxes. | 


No. of polls. 


Poll Tax. 


1838 


$555,270 00 


$2,235 49 


244 


$160 


3839 


604.963 00 


3,029 84 


427 


2 14 


18-10 


U46.200 00 


3,980 56 


772 


2 20 


1841 


1,229,054 00 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


1842 


1,430,524 00 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


1843 


1,598,820 00 


13,764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


1844 


1,873.286 00 


13,584 72 


1,053 


2 25 


1845 


2.544.780 00 


19,246 27 


1,561 


2 30 


1846 


3,187,726 00 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


1847 


4.488,550 00 


24,963 54 


2,056 


1 68 


1848 


4,604.957 00 


39.712 53 


2,638 


2 58 


1849 


5.500,049 00 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


1850 


5,832,080 00 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


1851 


0,906,462 00 


51,798 47 


2.910 


2 25 


1852 


6.795,682 00 


54.379 45 


2.745 


1 92 


1853 


6,995,5215 00 


61.545 81 


2,907 


1 80 


1854 


8,237,617 00 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 82 


1855 


8,-^83,248 00 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


1856 


9,244,062 00 


114,214 08 


3,760 


2 96 


1857 


9.983,862 00 


81,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


1858 


10,257,080 00 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 



107 



DEBTS DUE THE CITY. 



Notes. When payable. 

Jan'y 31, 1853, James McColley, on demand, balance, $ 50 00 
Sept. 26, 1855, Isaac Tompkins, " ■« 27 33 

Jan'y 1, 1857, H. G.Lowell & others, Jan. 1, 1858, bal., 1,112 09 



April 1, 1857, Charles H. Brown, April 1, 1858, 
Charles H. Brown, " <• 1859, 
Charles II. Brown, " "1860, 



50 00 
50 00 
50 00 



$1,339 42 



Collectors. R. N. Batcheldcr, 
" John L. Kelley, 



1857, 
1858, 



8,352 07 
21,418 94 

$29,771 01 



Account. F. H. Lyford, Rent of City Hall 
Stores, collected and not paid, 
F. H. Lyford, entering Sewers, col- 
lected and not paid, 



238 64 

82 50 

$321 14 

$30,092 15 



168 



THE CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



Dr. 



To amount paid for, and expended on, the following 

Bills of 1857. 

$497 81 

23 62 

165 43 



City Farm, 

Paupers off the Farm, 

County Paupers, 

Highways and Bridges, Dist. No. 1 , 

2, 
3, 
4, 
5, 
6, 
7, 
8, 
9, 
10, 

11, 

12, 
13, 

New Highways, 
Amoskeag Falls Bridge, 
Granite Bridge, 
School District No. 1, 

2, 

3, 

4, 

5, 

6, 

7, 

8, 

9, 
10, 

11, 

New School House District No. 2, 
" " " 9, 

" " " 10, 

School House Lot, " " 2, 

Amount carried forward, 



4 45 



667 14 
4 00 

24 06 
1,640 00 
39 34 
26 11 
26 58 
83 56 
39 78 

118 08 
24 09 

104 30 
56 59 

330 00 

587 50 



Accounts, viz : 

Bills of 1858. 

$2,653 87 

1,245 56 

2,284 13 

552 52 

2,642 74 

319 07 
121 48 
165 67 
199 04 
260 61 
156 61 
170 25 
562 11 
565 35 

230 38 
88 86 

973 97 
38 10 

231 56 
196 58 

13,112 70 

320 62 
212 82 
216 47 
108 94 
324 01 
115 92 
196 91 
849 84 
461 08 
767 39 

69 47 

1,055 00 

588 78 



1,462 44 $32,058 41 



109 



Amount drought forward, 


$4462 44 


32058 41 


Repairs of School Houses, " 2, 


556 25 


13 84 


City Library, 
Commons, 


162 11 

50 


1,989 31 
194 60 


Valley Cemetery, 
Pine Grove Cemetery, 
Sewers and Drains, 




1,099 59 

217 21 

1,696 99 


Reservoirs, 




325 00 


Fire Department, 
Lighting Streets, 
Militia, 


1,918 87 
150 16 


8,592 39 

1,249 07 

150 00 


City Police, 


130 16 


5,483 68 


City Hall Building, 


99 67 


847 49 


City Officers, 

Printing and Stationery, 


956 68 
44 92 


3,788 41 
613 87 


Incidental Expenses, 


1131 41 


1,968 88 


Interest (Coupons $6840,) 
Abatement of Taxes. 


700 49 


7,706 82 
104 28 


City Liquor Agency, 
City Teams, 


200 00 
96 09 


00 
592 80 


Temporary Loan, 
Reserved Fund, 




16,500 00 
200 00 


Discount on Taxes, 




2,594 26 


State Tax, 




5.34S 00 


County Tax, 




9,445 45 




$10,609 75 


$102,780 35 
$10,609 75 




$113,390 10 


CONTRA, 





By cash received from the following sources, viz : — 

Temporary Loan, $22,000 00 

John L. Kelly to Treasurer, 41,791 04 

State Tax, 5,348 00 

" " County Tax, 9,445 45 

R. N. Batchelder, Taxes for 1857, 17,800 00 

State Treasury Literary Fund, 1,129 52 

Railroad Tax, 1958, 1,939 95 

County of Hillsborough, support of Paupers, 2,639 41 

Rent of City Hall and Stores, 2,111 09 

City Marshal, from Police Court, 1.488 57 

Amount carried forward, $105,693 03 



170 

Amount brought forward, 
R. N. Batchelder, Taxes for 1856, 
B. W. Hardy, Produce, &c. from City Farm, 
City Teams, 

Sundry Towns, support of Paupers, 
J. B. Sawyer, from Valley Cemetery, 
South City Scales, 
North " " 
H. G. Lowell, on Note, 
State Treasurer, balance of R. R. Tax 1857, 
City Aqueduct, water, 
Charles Clough, Grass from Commons, 

« " « " Valley and Field, 

Jo?eph Knowlton, " " Commons, 
Jacob F. James, " " Pine Grove Cemetery, 
John Campbell, for Horse, 
A. B. Shuttuck, amount overdrawn, 
M N. Young, 
Circus Licenses, 
License to enter Sewers, 

J. Knowlton. Plank sold from Sewers and Drains, 
S. S. Moulton, amount overdrawn on Sewers and Drains, 
J. B. Clark, overdrawn on New School House No. 2, 
W. B. Patten, fine of Prisoner, 



Balance, 



$105,693 03 


307 00 


58S 80 


784 86 


261 35 


426 14 


151 46 


18 58 


222 00 


27 99 


90 00 


13 62 


14 75 


30 37 


15 00 


87 50 


36 00 


25 00 


60 00 


73 53 


6 19 


'rains, 7 75 


2, 2 00 


2 00 


$108,944 92 


$4,445 18 


$113,390 10 



GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS 



OF THE 



CITY OF MANCHESTER 

1 S 5 9. 



MAl'OR, 

EDWARD W. HARRINGTON. 

Aldermen, 



Ward 1, REUBEN DODGE. 

2, THOMAS S. SARGENT, 

3, FRANK A. BROWN, 

4, GEORGE A. BARNES, 



Ward 5, GEORGE H. HUBBARD 

6, SAMUEL D. FARRAR, 

7, IRA BARR, 

8, DANIEL FARMER, Jr. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk, 

And Clerk of Board of Aldermen. 
(Office in Citj Hall Building.) 

Common Council. 
HORACE PATTEE, President. 
SIMEON D. FARNSWORTH, Clerk. 



Ward 1, Moses O. Pearson, 
Charles Cantield, 
George W. Thayer. 

" 2, D. K. White, 
George S. Neal, 
J A. Chamberlin. 

" 3, William Richardson, 
Stephen D. Green, 
John B. Chase. 

" 4, Moulton Know les, 
James A. Brigham, 
John H. Maynard. 



Ward 5, Thomas Baxter, 
Elijah Perry, 
Horace Bonney. 

" 6, John B. Fish, 
Horace Pettee, 
Levi II Sleeper. 

" 7, Leonard Moore, 

Joseph N. Prescott, 
John Bartlett. 

" 8, George S. Chandler, 
Wm. C. Haynes, 
Nathaniel H. Martin. 



Cily Messenger, 
LYMAN W. EASTMAN. 



172 

w 

Joint Standing Committees. 

On Finance — The Mayor and Alderman Barnes ; Messrs. Richard- 
son, Neal and White. 

On Accounts — Aid. Sargent and Barr ; Messrs. Knowles, Maynard 
and Chase. 

On Lands and Buildings — Aid. Farrar, and Messrs. Pearson, 
Brigham and Moore. 

On Public Instruction — Aid. Hubbard and Dodge ; Messrs. Pres- 
cott, Canfield and Richardson. 

On Streets — Aid. Barr, and Messrs. Sleeper, Chase and Moore. 

On Sewers and Drains — Aid. Farrar and Brown ; Messrs. Mayn- 
ard, Knowles and Perry. 

On Commons and Cemetery — Aid. Barnes and Farmer ; Messrs. 
Chamberlin, Sleerer and Tha\er. 

On Fire Department — Aid. Dodge and Sargent ; Messrs. Neal, 
Knowles and Bjnney. 

On Claims — Aid. Farmer and Hubbard ; Messrs. Fish, Sleeper and 
Baxter. 

On House of Correction — Aid. Sargent and Farmer ; Messrs. Brig- 
ham, Thayer and Green. 

Joint Special Committee on City Hall — Aid. Barnes and Hubbard ; 
Messrs. Green, Fish and Chandler. 

Standing Committ.es of the Board of Aldei men. 

On Licences — Aid. Farmer and Hubbard. 

On Enrollments — Aid. Sargent and Dodge. 

On Elections — Aid. Farrar and Dodge. 

On Liguting Streets — Aid. Farmer and Barnes. 

On Bills in Second Reading — Aid. Sargent and Brown. 

On Market — Aid. Hubbard and Farmer. 

On Setting Trees — Aid. Barnes and Dodgn. 

On Abatement of Taxes — Aid. Barr and Barnes. 

Standing Committees of the Common Council. 

On Elections and Returns — Messrs. Chamberlin, Hayneaand Bart- 
lett. 

On Bills in Second Reading — Messrs. White, Canfield and Thayer. 

On Enrollments — Messrs. Pearson, Chase and Martin. 

City Solicitor, 

JOSEPH B. CLARK. 

Office, Smyth s Block. 

Treasurer, 

HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

JAMES 0. ADAMS. 



173 



Ward 1 

2 
3 
4 

Ward 1 
2 

3 
4 

Ward 1 
2 
3 
4 



Ward 



Ward 



Ward 1 

2 

3 
4 



School 
Seth T. Hill. 
Edwin B. Merrill. 
Justin D. Watson. 



Committee. 

Ward 5, George II. Hubbard. 

G, Jona Y. McQueston. 

7, James P. Walker. 

8, Thos. S. Montgomery. 
Assessors. 



Geo; W. F. Converse. 
Jonathan Horn. 
Daniel W. Fling. 
Jomes S. Cogswell. 



Ward 5, Daniel Hall. 

0, Ephraim ;S. Harvey, 

7, A. C. Wallace. 

8, Allen Partridge. 



Overseers of the Poor. 
Samuel S. Moulton. Ward 5, Daniel Hall. 

Jonathan Hum. 6, Jacob B. Daniels. 

Nahum Baldwin. 7, T. F. Moulton. 

John M. Hawks. 8, Allen Partridge. 

Selectmen. 
Henry A. Campbell, Stephen J. Batcheldcr, Thcinas Adams. 
John M. Harvey, Paschal B. Simons, Isaac Russell. 
Leonard San'iorn, Joseph Ferren, Daniel O. Furnald. 
Charles C. Frost, Samuel D. Lord, John D. Patterson. 
John L. Fitch, Thomas J. Smith, Asa Place. 
Isaac Whittemore, Elbridge G. Haynes, Ira W. Moore. 
John Moulton, Charles K. Walker, James W. Piveton, 
Thomas L. Quimhy, Harmon S. Bums, Amos U. Geny. 

Ward Clerks. 



James C. Wing, 
J A. Tebbetts, 
Henry C. Til ton, 
Edward Hartshorn, 



Ward 5, Bernard Kirwan, 

6, Ignatius S. Webster, 

7, Daniel K Mack, 

8, Cyrus Gile. 
Moderators. 

Joseph B. Clark, Ward 5, John Q. A. Sargent, 

Daniel Pulsifer, 6, Eben Boss, 

Jacob G. Cilley, 7, B. F. Wallace, 

Isaac W. Smith, 8, Thos. S. Montgomery. 

City Physician, 
SYLVANUS BUNTON. 



Superintendent of Burials, 

JOHN PB1NCE. 

Superintendent of City Farm and House of Correction, 

BENJAMIN W. HARDY. 

Committee on Valley and Pine Grove Cemeteries, 

George A. Barnes. Moody Currier, Daniel Farmer, Jr., Daniel Clark, 

Josiah A. Chandler, Waterman Smith, Levi II. Sleeper, Amos G. Gale, 

George W. Thayer, SamT N. Bell, William C. Clarke, Joseph B. 

Sawder. 

Fire Department. 
JONATHAN T. P. HUNT, Chief Engineer. 



174 

Assistant Engineers. 
Phineas Adams, John Moulton, Samuel W. Parsons, John L. Kelly, 
IS. F. Martin, Samuel G. Langley, Eben French, Win. T. Evans, Albe 
C. Heath, Daniel W. Fling. 

Corders and Measurers of Wood, Baric and Manure. 
Henry B. Moulton,Stephen Palmer, H. R, Pattee,E. P. Whidden, John 
P. Moore, James M. Webster, Isaac Fitts, L. H. James, Peter Turney, 
David Wilson, William W. Baker, John H. Moor, Wm. B. Dana. 

Weighers of Hay and Straw. 
H .It. Pettee,Peter Turney, Daniel Farmer,Jeremiah Abbott,T. A. Lane. 

Surveyors of Lumber. 
Warren Page, Stephen Palmer. Geo. W. Riddle, I. W. Webster, [I. B. 
Moulton, A. C Wallace, Isaac Fitts, Israel Dow, Charles Hutchinson, 
Joseph L. Smith, Thomas Emerson, W m. B. Baker, Jacob B. Daniels, 
Charles H. Brown. 

Fence Viewers. 

Bradbr.rj P. Cilley, George Porter, Geo. W. Riddle. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, 

Gil man B. Fogg. 

Field Drivers, 

Hollis 0. Dudley. 

Pound Keeper, 

Benjamin W. Hardy. 

Cullers of Brick, 

G. F. Judkins, Temple McQueston. 

Measuiers of Stone, 

Edward McQueston, Andrew Bunton, jr. 

Measurers of Brick and Plastering, 

Joseph E. Bennett, Edward McQueston, Charles Clough. 

Measurers of Painting, 

John L. Kelly, Stephen Wiggin, John N. Brown. 

Measurers of Coal, 

H. B Moulton, Stephen Palmer, Isaac Fitts, 

Hoffreeres, 

D. F. BUCKLEY. 



175 



INDEX, 



Amoskcag Falls Bridge, 41|Repairs of School House Dist. 

Abatement of Taxes, 88 No. 2, 49 

Almshouse Report, 94 Reservoirs, 69 

City Farm and Paupers, 19iReserved Fund, 93 

County Paupers, 16 Recapitulation of Highways 

Commons, 50 and Bridges, 42 

City Police, 71 Recapitulation of Fire Depart- 



Hall, Offices and Stores,.. 74 

Officers, 70 

Debt 86 

Library, 85 

Liquor Agency, 89 

Team 92 

Government, 1858, 3 

Government, 1859,. ...171 

Debts due the City, 167 

Engineer's Report, 101 

Finance Committee's Report,.. 15 

Fire Department, 53 

Granite Bridge ; ... .41 

Highways and Bridges 23 

Highways New, 39 

Incidental Expenses, 84 

Interest Paid, 80 

Lighting Streets, 67 

Militia, 68 

Paupers off the Farm, 21 

Printing and Stationery, 79 

Pine Grove Cemetery 91 



ment, < 66 

Recapitulation of Schools,. . . .47 
Report of Overseers of Poor,.I19 
Liquor Agent, . . . 120 
Com. on Valley & 
Pine Grove Cem- 
eteries, 121 

Treasurer of School 

Committee, 132 

Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, 141 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Report of Trustees, . . 113 

Librarian, 115 

Treasurer, 116 

Sewers and Drains, 51 

School Committee's Report,.. 126 
Summary of Receipts and ex- 
penditures 168 

Treasurer's Report 11 

Valley Cemetery, 90 

Valuation, Taxes, &c, 166