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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"



ctC i^ 



CITY DF MANCHESTEPv. 

PUBLIC DOCUMENT. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



HEl^EIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



yon THE 



FISCAL 




YEAK, 



ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1861, 



TOCJETHER MITH THE 



8CH0 0L REPORT, 



AXI) orilKR UEl'OllTS AND PAPERS RELATIN(t IC) THE 
AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 



MEW H/ViVuon ..- 

STATE LIBRARY 



THE 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EEPORT 



OF THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OP THE 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING DEC. 31, 1861, 



togi:ther wittt o'imier annual KEPOUTS AXD FAPEUS RKI.ATIXa 
TO THE AFFAIRS OF TUK CITY. 




MANCHESTER N. H.. 

AMERICAN STEAM TKINXING WOUKS OF GACJE & FARNSWORTIl. 

1862. 



K 



15 2.07 



MAYOE'S ADDEESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Council : 

We meet under somewliat different circumstances 
from that of a similar meeting one year ago. Then 
a large majority of the City Council were new mem- 
bers. Now it is the reverse. A majority of us hav- 
ing had one year's experience, we shall enter upon 
our duties with a better knowledge of the work be- 
fore us. Then comparative peace and prosperity 
spread over our happy country. To be sure, the po- 
litical horizon at the South was dimmed by a slight 
haze, but nothing more than had appeared before, 
passing quietly away. One decided act would have 
averted the gathering storm. But it was permitted 
to gather strength until it burst upon the nation — 
a rebellion, in its savage developments, unparalleled 
in the history of civilized nations. In the language 
of loyal statesmen of the South, it is a rebellion with- 
out a cause — they having been protected in all their 
constitutional rights. But thanks to a kind Provi- 



dence who has given iis men for the emergency ! 
Yes, patriotic hearts rally around the standard of 
our country, ready to sacrifice aiid be sacrificed in 
its defence. Manchester has responded nobly to her 
country's call. Her patriotic sons haTe gone forth 
to meet the enemies of her country's flag, and others 
still are waiting their country's call, ready not only 
to meet foes at home but from abroad. 

The most important subjecst to which your atten- 
tion will be directed, is the financial alTairs of the 
city. The year which has just closed has been at- 
tended with some extraordinary demands upon the 
treasury, in connection with the war, which with 
the ordinary expense will be full}' set forth in detail 
in the yearlj^ report. 

The amount which is paid monthly for the relief 
of soldiers' families is large, and must be provided 
for by temporary loans or otherwise until the mon- 
ey is reimbursed by the State. 

The large amount of uncollected 'taxes for the 
year 1859, will demand the attention of the City 
Council. The method adopted and practiced for 
the last tw^o years for the collection of taxes works 
well for the interests of the city. 

The recommendation of the Ma3^or last 3^ear that 
no bills should be contracted in behalf of the city 
without his knowledge, and that all bills against the 
city should be presented monthl}' for payment, has 
worked satisfiictorily, and should be strictly adhered 
to in the future. 

The Fire Department, under its present efficient 



management, is fully equal to any emergency that 
may be likely to occur. All that is necessary to be 
said in favor of steam over hand engines is simply 
to point to the great saving of expense to the city, 
which will be shown ]jy the 3' early report. 

The supply of water has been krgely increased 
the past year by laying a 12 inch pipe from Chest- 
nut street down Hanover street to the reservoir in 
front of the City Hall ; also, connecting the pipe on 
Hanover street with the reservoir on Manchester 
street, affording an inexhaustible supply of water 
at each of the reservoirs. There has been built the 
past year at the junction of Elm and Myrtle streets, 
a reservoir containing more than 16,000 gallons of 
water. The Chief Engineer, having tested its ca- 
pacity, informs me that it will be sufficient to meet 
nuy demand that will be likely to occur in that part 
of the city. There should be laid a pipe connect- 
ing the supply on Hanover street with the reser- 
voir on Pine street, in the south-easterly part of the 
city. Then the compact part of the city will be 
well supplied with water. There is need of a new 
reservoir in Ward Seven, with a good supply of 
water, which was made apparent by the late fire in 
that section. 

The Public Schools, under the efBcient manage- 
ment of the School Committee and Superintendent 
of Public Instruction, are in a flourishing condition. 
1 have visited all the public schools in the city dur- 
ing the past year, and have been highly gratified 
with the systematic discipline everywhere manifest- 



ed, convincing me that the teachers had been wisely 
selected to govern as well as to teach. 

The repairs of the streets and highways will re- 
quire the ordinary appropriations. Granite Bridge 
will need to be covered with new plank the ensu- 
ing year. The paving of a portion of Elm street 
yearly, I believe is considered as good economy by 
our citizens. The building of new highways, unless 
absolutely necessary, should be dispensed with until 
returning prosperity visits our city. 

The City Farm has been quite productive the 
past year. Those members of the City Council and 
other citizens who have visited the farm have ex- 
pressed themselves as fully satisfied with the man- 
agement. The production of the farm may be 
largel}^ increased by a little extra expense in col- 
lectino- manures. 

The Police Department, in addition to the ordi- 
nary business of that department, have had their 
duties largely increased in consequence of the large 
number of persons temporarily residing in our 
midst, some of whom seem to act as though their 
position placed them without the pale of civil re- 
straint, very much to the annoyance of qiiiet and 
order-loving citizens. It is the duty of all good citi- 
zens to strengthen the hands of the Police, both by 
)recept and example, instead of weakening them 
•y detraction and finding fault in the presence of 
\\e lawless. 

The City Library is an institution creditable to 
lie city, and should receive the fostering care of 



the City Government. I would suggest the inquiry 
whether the ordinary expenses, aside from the ap- 
propriation for books, may not be considerably di- 
minished. 

The existing circumstances by which we are sur- 
rounded, demand of us the strictest economy in 
every department of the city expenditure. 

In entering upon the work before us, may He 
who is the Source of all wisdom direct us in the 
faithful discharge of every duty. 

DAVID A. BUNTON. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board of Common Council. 
/l^V" ORDER authorizing the Printing of the Sixteenth 
Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the 
City of Manchester. 

Ordered, if the Board of Aldermen concur, That the 
Joint Standing- Committee on Finance be, and they are 
liereby authorized to cause two thousand copies of the 
Sixteenth Annual Report of the Receipts and Expend- 
itures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports of 
the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, the Over- 
seers of the Poor, the Committee on City Farm, the Trus- 
tees, Librarian and Treasurer of the City Library, the 
School Committee and the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, to be printed for the use of the inhal)itants of said 
City, and that the expense thereof be charged to the ap- 
propriation for Printing and Stationery. 
In Board of Common Council, Jan. 8, 1862. 

Passed, ELBRIDGE G. WOODMAN, President. 
In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Jan. 8, 1862. 
Passed, D. A. BUNTON, Mayor. 

A true copy, attest, 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S EEPOET. 



City op Manchester, January 1, 1862. 

The undersigned, Committee on Finance, in pursiianco 
of the fourteenth section of Chapter Three of the Revised 
Ordinances, certify that we have examined the following ac- 
count of Henry R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer, and find 
the same correctly cast, and all payments and expenditures 
therein charged against the City properly vouched. 

We find that there has been received into the Treasury 
during the year ending December 31, 1861, including the 
balance on hand January 1, 1861, the sum of One Hund- 
red Thirty-Two Thousand, Five Hundred Fourteen Dollars 
Eighteen Cents, (1132,514 18), and that there has been paid 
from the Treasury, during the same time, the sum of One 
Hundred Eighteen Thousand Thirty-six Dollars Ninety- 
seven Cents, ($118,036 97), leaving in the Treasury Jan- 
uary 1, 1862, Fourteen Thousand Four Hundred Seventy- 
seven Dollars Twenty-one Cents, ('^14,477,21,) of which 
Ten Thousand Six Hundred Fifty-three Dollars and Forty- 
seven Cents, ($10,65347,) will be consumed in cancelling 
unpaid drafts. 

^'^T,? 'f J.^>'^,y^'=^^'' 1 Jo>NT Standing 

n J- 4™^ > t!OMMITTEE 

D. A. BUNTON, f „,. Ffm a vr-n 

J. ALLEN TEBBETTS, J ^^ ^^^nange. 
In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, January 6, 1862. 
Read and accepted, J. Knowlton, CUj/ Clerk. 

In Board of Common Council, January 6, 1862. 
Read and accepted in concurrence. 

S. D. Farnsworth, Clerk. 



ACCOUNT OF 



HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 



CITY TREASURER, FROM 



JANUARY 1, 1861, TO JANUxlRY 1, 1802. | 



12 

Dr. City of Manchester in account turrent ivith H. R. Chamberlin, 

To Unpaid Drafts, January 1, 1^61, - - - $12,758^ 

City Farm, - - " 1,886 95 

Paupers off the Farm, 1 209 f)5 

County Paupers, 1,606 00 

Highway District No. 1, - - - - - 213 98 

Disi. No. 2, $3,448 0.5 Dist. No. 8, $258 87 3,700 92 

" " 3, 2<I8 18 " " 9, 322 45 530 t33 

" " 4, 151 09 " " 10, 63S 98 790 07 

'• " 5, 284 22 " " 11, 5:i') 52 819 74 

" ' G, 198 22 " " 12, 598 0(1 796 28 

" " 7, 205 49 " " 13, 185 SS 391 37 

New Higliways, 324 62 

Amoskeag Falls Bridge, ----- 621 52 

Granite Brid^-e, - - 129 03 

School Dist. No. 1, 350 00 

Dist No. 2, $17,779 33 Dist. No. 7, $225 00 18,004 33 

" " 3, 275 00 " " 8, 20O 00 475 00 

" " 4, 200 00 " " 9, 20» 00 40O 00 

" » 5, 200 00 " '^ 10, 1,0111 20 1,210 2* 

" " 6. 225 00 '• "11, 500 00 725 00 

New School House, District No. 10, - - - 1,519 36 

" •' " '• •• 11. - - 585 12 

City Library, - - - - . . 2,194 90 

Commons, - - - - - - - - 158 27 

Pine Grove Cemetery, ----- 183 45 

Sewers and Drains, 780 41 

Pieservoirs, --.-.-. 830 07 

Fire Department, .--.-. 4,197 13 

Lighting Steetls, ------ 1,67929 

Militia, -------- 180 25 

City Police, - - 7.240 77 

City Hall Building, 2,152 59 

City Officers, - 4,956 41 

Printing and Stationery, 1,059 15 

Incidental Expenses. - . . - . 4,270 01 

Interest, (Coupons, $7,: 20 00) - - - 8,797 95 

j\batfment of Taxes, . - . - . 699 56 

City Teams. - - - - - - - 1,671 69 

Temporary Loan, ------ 18.9.50 0(» 

Watering Streets, - 200 00 

Steam Fire Engine, .... - 2,500 00 

Paving Streets, ------- 1,794 84 

Discount on Taxe.s. -.--.- 292 00 

Soldiers' Relief Fund, ------ 14.25275 

Safe, - - 594 79 



$128,690 44 
Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1862, - - 14,477 21 

$143,167 65 



13 

City Treafurer, (one year, ending Decejnber 31, 1861.J 

Bj Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 18G1, - 

City Stock issued January 1, It^Gl, - - . 
Tompor:iry Loan, - - - - - - 

'- (Relief Fund.) 
Taxes collected 1861 List, - - 77.812 76^ 
State and County T,ix paid, 13,580 yO ^ 
Taxes collected 18^30 List, - - . _ 

'• " 1859 " - - - ' - 

" '» 1858 " 

" « 1S57 ------ 

Rail Road Tax, 

Literar}' Fund, - - -^ - 
County of Ilillsborou;2;li. - - - . - 
Rent of City Hall and Stores, - . . . 
Police Court, Cost and Fines, . - - - 
City Farm, ---..--. 
City Teams, .-.--.. 
City Scales,- ....... 

Other Towns for support of Paupers, 

Circus Licenses, ------- 

Licenses to enter Sewers, - - - - - 

Dog Licenses, ------- 

Use of Aqueduct Water, - - . - - 
Town of (jiroton for Engine, - - - . 

Town of Rochester for Engine, - - - . 
\V. W. iMorris, Notes Collected, - - 
Interest Refunded, ------ 

Cogswell & Wells for Brick, - - - _ 

Commons, for Crass, ----- 

Highway Dist. No. 2, 

Jackson & Kimball, - . - - - 

Interest on Taxes, -..--. 

Cost on Non-Resident Taxes. - - - - 
Overdrawn on several Appropriations. - 

W. P. Stratton for Pipe, 

Valley Cemet'^ry, 

J. Knowlton from Fire Dept., - - _ 

Unpaid Drafts, January 1, 1862, - - - - 

$143,167 05 

HENRY R. CIIAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 
Maxchkster, January 1, 1862. 



$5 873 


84 


12,000 


00 


18,200 


00 


7,500 


00 


$64,2.32 86 


9,770 


11 


1,100 


57 


43 


38 


26 


84 


2,691 


68 


1,011 


60 


2,236 


11 


1.702 00 


1,609 


28 


1,338 


98 


626 


58 


322 


46 


98 


70 


175 


00 


190 


20 


18 


00 


135 


00 


4.50 


00 


500 


00 


43 


94 


17 


51" 


15 


60 


30 


25 


30 


00 


193 


47 


179 


34 


80 


00 


52 


70 


9 


35 


7 


51 


1 


33 


pI32,5l4 


18 


10 65.3 


47 



The foregOHig statement of account is given 
in detail in the following pages, for the pay- 
ment of which sums the vouchers are on file 
in the Treasurer's Office. 



APPEOPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITUEES. 



COUNTY PAUPERS. 

By Cash of County Treasurer, - - $2,236 11 
" " " the Town of New Hampton, 24 00 
" Balance to New Account, - - - 

EXPENDITURES. 
Balance of last year's Account, - 
Paid E. E. Eldridge, - 

Straw & Prince, 

C. H. Hurlburt, - 

J. M. Hawks, - - - . 

N. H. Asylum, 

W. H. H. Crawford, - 

Benjamin Kinsley, 

S. Goss, 

Adams & Andrews, 

E. Parmenter, - - - - 

S. S. Moulton, 

B. P. Runnels, - - - - 

Thomas Boardman, 

L. P. Association, - - - 

George 0. Clark, 

Montgomery & Wilson, 

John S. Folsom, - - - 

Ezra W. Bartlett, 

Samuel D. Sherburne, - 

I. I). Palmer, - - - . 

Amovnt carried forivard, - - 1,508 96 



96 


76 




—12,356 87 


$750 


87 


18 


24 


40 


00 


95 


50 


5 


25 


145 


23 


4 


62 


9 


99 


3 


18 


94 


90 


107 


14 


44 


38 


41 


50 


32 53 


9 


25 


1 


50 


31 


45 


3 


55 


1 


79 


23 


50 


44 


59 



16 

Amount brought forward. 
M. Y. Garland, - 
Loami Gould, - - - 
William Sauboni, 
Ezra Kimball, - - - 
Spencer & Son, - _ - 
M. 0. Farrar, - 
Peter Edwards, - 
D. L. Willej, - 
R. E. Dustin, 
Mary Maley, - - - 

C. S. Fisher, 
George W. Gardner k Co., 

D. B. Eastman, - 
Jeremiah Hayes, 
Rose Gracy, - - - - 
W. P. Felch, - 
Amos Griffin, _ _ . 
White &. Co., - 
P. I. & W. H. Boyd, - 
George H. Hoyt, 
Thomas Stack, _ . - 
Andrew Farrell, 
Sylvanus Bunton. - 
Jackson & Kimball, - 
L. W. Hall, - - - - 
Daniel Connor, - 
John Ryan, - - - - 
Elizabeth Boan, 
Dennis Lane, - . _ 
Foster Kimball, 
Joseph ]\[. Rowell, 
B. C. Hayncs, - 

Ainoant carried foricard, - - 2,241 12 



1,508 


96 


1 


33 


2 


93 


13 


07 


2 


50 


2 


08 


3 


10 


172 


16 


32 


90 


83 


23 


3 


00 




50 


6 


50 


2 


50 


152 


00 


7 


93 


3 


00 


21 


60 


2 


22 


4 


37 


1 


50 


90 


00 


8 


61 


7 


50 


1 


84 


6 


86 


34 


00 


10 


00 


4 


00 


1 


87 


1 


00 


5 


00 


40 


06 



17 



Amount brought forivard, 


2,241 12 


L. H; Sleeper & Co., 


5 g4 


Einily A. Wheeler, - 


7.50 


Jeremiah Connelly, 


18 00 


Pratt & Brigham, ... 


1 00 


Ricker & Godfrey, 


4 00 


Joseph Murray, . . . 


9 00 


J. Abbott & Co., - 


1 50 


Willey & Lock, - - - - 


7 23 


W. S. Baker, 


20 25 


George W. F. Converse, - 


3 00 


E. P. Johnson & Co., 


3 00 


N. S. Clark, - - - . 


1 40 


G. W. Berry, 


1 75 


Cornelius Murphy, - - - 


33 


J. W. Hoffman, - 


32 45 



-12,356 87 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



By amount paid by other Towns, 


74 70 


" Balance, ----- 


2,761 19 




fO QQK CO 






EXPENDITURES. 




To Balance from last year's Account, 


^1,626 24 


To D. L. Willey, for Groceries, 


13 48 


William P. Felch, " 


3 00 


A. N. Clapp &. Co., " - 


49 00 


L. P. Association, " - - 


6 25 


Jeremiah Hayes, " - 


7 00 


Thomas Stack, " 


7 00 



Amount carried forte ard^ - - 1,711 97 

B 



18 



Amount brottg^ht forivard, - - 1,' 
M. 0. Farrar, for groceries, - 
Daniel Conner, " - - 

George H. Hoyt, " - - 
John S. Folsom, " 
William M. Pliimer, " - 
Henry C. Joy, " 

Adams & Andrews, " - 
Spencer & Son, " - - 

Walker & Holmes, " - 
Montgomery d- Wilson, 
Willey & Lock, " - 

E. E. Eldridge, for Wood, - 
R. E. Dustin, " - 

S, Boardman, " - 

Daniel Randlett, " - 

M. V. Garland, " 

I. D. Palmer, " - 

S. Goss, 

D. B. Eastman, " - 

Amos Griffin, " 

William Sanborn, " - 
Elviress Parmenter " - - 
W. H. H. Crawford, " - 
Peter Edwards, " - 

Josiah Goodwin, " - 

D. Wilson & Co., 
J. Allen Tebbetts, Medicine, - 
Nelson P. Clark, Medical Attendance 

for Mrs. Griffin, 
S. S. Moulton, Assistance for Peter 

Hart, 

" " " " Mrs. Bnrbank, 



711 


97 


11 


01 


5 


00 


3 


94 


13 


80 


2 


00 


1 


50 


66 


29 


1 


70 


1 


50 


7 


71 


2 


00 


1 


50 


9 


90 


5 


41 


7 


00 


1 


37 


14 


87 


1 


50 


39 


33 


2 


74 


2 


87 


44 


08 


1 


75 


4 


00 


15 


25 


2 


25 


8 


27 



22 50 



6 
20 



43 



Amoii nt carried forward, 



2,039 82 



19 

Anion id broug-ht forward, - 2,039 82 

S. S. Moulton, for Assistance for Mrs. 
Morrill, 3 00 

N. H. Asylum for the Insane, board 

and expense of T. J. Garvin, 123 41 

N. H. Asylum for the Insane, board 

and expense of E. V, Haselton, 65 67 

N. H. Asylum for the Insane, board 

and expense of S. V. Smith, 43 01 

N. H. Asylum for the Insane, board 

and expense of Michael Gillis, 73 80 

House of Reformation, board and ex- 
pense of John Copp, - 70 00 

House of Reformation, board and ex- 
pense of George Stearns, - 78 86 

House of Reformation, board and ex- 
pense of Charles Cooper, 17 29 

House of Reformation, board and ex- 
pense of Arthur Lane, - 5 15 

W. H. H. Crawford, Assistance for 

Mrs. Ladd, - - - 1 25 

Josiah Goodwin, Assistance for Ginger 

Harvey's Family, - - 31 20 

Jonathan Aiken, Assistance for Mrs. 

Blodgett, - - - - 3 23 

Ann Dustin, Assistance for B. Hall's 

Family, _ . . 1 50 

Mrs. William Brown, Assistance, 

Board, &c., for Mrs. Haselton, 39 00 

Mrs. R. Peabody, Assistance, board, 

&c., for M. C. Brown and Wife, 4 00 

Mrs. L, H. Dakiu, Assistance, board, 

«fec., for L. Dakin, - - 38 50 



Amount carried forward^ 2,638 69 



20 

Amount brought forward, - - 2,638 69 

B. Blodgett, Assistance, board, cfec, 

for Mrs. Blodgett, - - 19 38 

Jesse Gault, Assistance, board, &c., 

for Mrs. Webster and Children, 41 43 

Jeremiah Abbott, Assistance, board, 

&c., for Eobert Young's Family, 2 75 

William Shepherd, coach to Robert 

Young's Funeral, - - 2 00 

S. D. Sherburne, coach to 
Funeral, 

H. R. Chamberlin, Assistance to poor 
person, - - . _ 

D. C. Starrett, board, &c., for Mrs. 
Griffin, - - - - 

James Mitchell, for Shoes, - 

George W. Weeks, " 

Robinson & Parker, " 

Straw &, Prince, for Funeral Expen- 
ses of Mrs. Mclntire, 

Straw & Prince, for Funeral Expen- 
ses of James Caldwell, 

Straw &, Prince, for Funeral Expen- 
ses of Robert Young, 

Straw & Prince, for Funeral Expen- 
ses for Mrs. Griffin, 

Roger Stevens, digging Grave, 

David Dickey, Jr., repairing Wooden 
Leg, - - - - 

S. S. Moulton, paid for Team to Goffs- 
town, 

S. S. Moulton, paid for Team to 
Nashua, - - - - 

Amount carried forward. - - 2,781 84 



1 


50 


1 


50 


33 


00 


1 


80 


1 


87 




92 


8 


25 


5 


25 


8 


75 


5 


50 


1 


00 


3 


25 


1 


00 


4 


00 



21 

Amount brovght forward, - ' - 2,781 84 

S. S. Moulton, paid for Team to Am- 
herst, ----- 4 00 

S. S. Moulton, paid for Team to New 

Boston, - - - - 4 75 

W. H. H. Crawford, paid for Team 

to City Farm, - - - 75 

George 0. Clark, for Dry Goods, 1 00 

E. P. Abbott, for Clothing for John 

Griffin, - - - 4 00 

N. W. Cumner, for Clothing, - 50 

S. S. Moulton, for taking Inventory 

at poor Farm, - - - 9 75 

S. S. Moulton, for Postage Stamps 

and Stationery, - - 5 80 

Town of Candia, for support of 

Joseph H. Shepherd, - 23 50 

$2,835 89 



CITY FARM. 

By Balance from last year's Account, 83,093 55 
" Appropriation, - - - 2,000 00 

" Produce sold from Farm by J. Peavy, 154 70 
" Stock and Produce sold from Farm by 

H. Simpson, - - - 950 38 

" Work on Highway, from Farm by H. 

Simpson, - _ - 251 50 

$6,450 13 

EXPENDITURES. 
To Fisher & Cram, for ©orn, - - 3 37 

Hiram Simpson, paid for 30 lbs. Veal, 1 20 
Merrill & Bailey, 1 gallon Oil, 60 

John S. Folsom, 2 " " " 2 00 
Hiram Simpson, paid for 4 1-2 gal- 
lons Oil, - - - 3 06 
George H. Hoyt, for 100 lbs. 

Fish, . - - - 4 50 

Paige & Wilson, for 200 lbs. 

Fish, - - - - 3 88 

Hiram Simpson, paid for 400 lbs. 

Fish, . - - - 7 55 

John S. Folsom, for 2 1-2 bush. 

Salt, - - - - 1 25 

Merrill & Bailey, for 3 bags Salt, 1 90 
" " for 12 1-2 bush. 

Salt, . . - - 6 10 

John S. Folsom, for 6 lbs. Soda, 42 

Merrill & Bailey, for " 60 

/ " ^' for 1 " Ginger, 12 



Amount carried forward, - - 36 55 



Aniount hroii^hl forward. - - 36 55 

Hiram Simpson, paid for 4 lbs. ginger, 48 

Jolin S. Folsom, 1 lb. Cassia, 38 

Hiram Simpson, paid for 1-2 lb. Cassia, 20 

Merrill & Bailey, 1 " " 38 

Hiram Simpson, paid for Groceries, 22 

John S. Folsom, Spice, - 18 

Merrill & Bailey " 10 

Paige & Wilson, 40 gallons 

Molasses, , - - 10 80 

Hiram Simpson, paid for 40 gal. 
Molasses, - - - - 

J. A. Perry, Nitre, 

Merrill & Bailey, Starch, 

John S. Folsom, 3 bbls. Flour, 

J. Abbott & Co., " " 

John S. Folsom, paid for 13 lbs 
bacco, - > - - 

H. Simpson, paid for 18 lbs. To- 
bacco, - - - - 

Geo. H. Hoyt, " 5 lbs. To- 
bacco, - - -. - 

Paige & Wilson, 10 lbs. To- 
bacco, - - - - 

J. Rowley ct Co., 5 lbs. " To- 
bacco, - - . - 

Catherine Cradock, for Labor, 

Jacob Peavy, " " 

Zadock Wright, " " 

S. S. Moulton, " •' 

Mr. Bullock, " " 

Sarah McGregor, " " 

Mary S. Morrill, " " 

Amount carried forward, - - 593 59 



10 


00 




OlJ 




24 


21 


00 


20 


50 


To- 




2 


86 


4 


74 


1 


25 


2 


20 


1 


45 


55 


00 


187 


50 


190 


00 


3 


50 


30 


00 


6 


00 


8 


00 



593 


59 


281 


25 


5 


00 


28 


00 


14 


87 


4 


00 


15 


25 




78 




37 




40 


1 


50. 




75 



24 

Amount brought forward. 

H. Simpson, paid for labor, 

Maria L. Morrison, " 

H. C. Powers, " Tiiresh- 

ing, .... 
O. H. Clark, Labor, 
Mary Hamon, " 
John A. Perry, for 1 gal. Alcohol, 
H. P. Wilson, " 1-2 gal. " 
Kidder & Chandler, " " " 
John A. Perry, for 1 " Gin, 
H. P. Wilson, " 1-2 " " 
John A. Perry, " 1 quart Bi-andy, 1 00 
Wilson & Campbell, for 1 pint 

Brandy, - - - - 25 

Hiram Simpson, })aid for Medicine, 
Wilson & Campbell, for " 
J. Allen Tebbetts, " " (for 

Paupers off' the Farm,) - 
Kidder & Chandler, for " 

C. & L. Gage, for repairing 

Plows and Harrows, - 
C. & L. Gage, for 1 Plow, 
" " " " " Sharpening 

Plow, - - - - 

Amos Hoyt, for 1 Plow, (I860,) 
Daniels & Co., for Hardware, 
Barton & Co., for 39 3-4 yards 

Calico, - - - - 
Barton & Co., " 14 yards 

Wool Flannel, - 

Amount carried forward, 



1 


42 




17 


)r 
13 


37 




10 


9 


84 


14 


17 





33 


7 


00 


2 


00 


4 


25 


4 


67 


1,004 33 



25 

Amount broug-ht forward. 

Barton & Co., for 2 Hoods, 
" " " " 41 1-2 yards 

Cotton Cloth, 
Jackson ,& Kimball, for 82 1-4 

yds. Denims, - ^ 
Kidder & Chandler, '" 15 yds. 

Denims, 
Paige & Wilson, for 4 Balls 

Twine, - - - - 
Jackson & Kimball, for 104 yds. 

Print, - - - - 
Kidder & Chandler, for 10 1-4 

yds. Print, . . - 
Jackson & Kimball, for 107 3-4 

Cotton Cloth, 
Jackson & Kimball, for Thread, 
Jackson & Kimball, 8 Skeins Sewing 

Silk, 
Barton & Co., Sewing Silk, - 

" " " 8 yds. Linsey Woolsey, 
Jackson & Kimball, Dry Goods, 
Hiram Simpson, " " 
Ezra Kimball, Shoes, - 
Hiram Simpson, " - - 

Robinson & Parker, Shoes, - 
Benjamin Kinsley, " - 
George W. Thayer, " - 
Jackson & Kimball, 46 yds. Sheeting, 4 14 
Kidder & Chandler, 6 *" " 38 

Barton & Co., 8 " Delaine, 1 20 

Milliken & Abbott, 4 prs. Mittens, 2 67 

Hiram Simpson, 2 " " 1 80 

Amount carried forward, - - 1,097 76 



1,004 33 


50 


Is 

4 98 


1141 


2 25 


17 


8 55 


1 03 


11 19 


1 40 


g 


24 


12 


', 160 


8 54 


3 88 


6 85 


3 99 


11 39 


2 00 


3 15 



26 

Amovnt hrovglit forivard^ - - 1,007 76 

Hiram Simpson, 2 Table Covers, 2 33 

" 2 lbs. Waste Yarn, 2 00 
Kidder & Chandler, 14 1-4 lbs. Waste 

Yarn, - . - . 1 14 
Jackson & Kimball, 14 yds. Ticking, 2 10 
" " 3 1-2 " Crash, 30 
Hiram Simpson, 3 lbs. Wool Yarn, 3 00 
Kidder & Chandler, 3 " " " 2 75 
M. Lyons, Clotlies for Rigbyboy, 3 82 
Hiram Simpson, Cloth for Pants, 3 08 
Nathaniel W. Cumner, 2 prs. Draw- 
ers, - - - - 1 34 
I). H. Young, Repairs on House, 1 75 
Albion Barker, " " " 6 00 
JohuH. Maynard," " " 7 60 
Hiram Simpson, Glass and Putty, 50 
Daniels & Co., 8 1-4 lbs. Plow Cast- 
ings, - - . _ 50 
A. C. Wallace, Shingles, - 15 00 
G. W. Rice, 315 Ihs'^ r>eef, - 17 33 
Hiram Simpson, 138 lbs. Beef, 8 44 
2 Beef Cattle, 36 50 
Jolui S. Folsom, 75 lbs. Sugar, 6 83 
Paige & Wilson, 176 " " 14 96 
I'errillifc Bailey, 282" " 17 57 
Hiram Simpson, 24 " " 2 04 
John S. Folsom, 8 " Tea, 4 00 
, :Mcrrill & Bailey, 26 " " 16 34 
Hiram Simpson, 5 " " 3 25 
John S. Folsom, 2 " Raisins, 30 
Hiram Simpson, 11 " " 1 47 
Morrill & Bailfiy, 2 " " 24 

A ivoin/t carried forward, - - 1,280 24 



27 

Am mint hrovglil forvmrd. - - 1,280 24 
John S. Fulsom, 2 lbs. Cream Tartar, 80 
Hiram Simpson, 8 " " " 3 20 

Merrill & Bailey, 1 " " " 40 

John S. Folsom, 6 Boxes Mustard, 90 

Hiram Simpson, G Lemons, - 10 

John S. Folsom, 2 Bottles Pepper 

Sauce, . - - - 34 

Brigham & Pratt, 1 1-2 bbl. Crackers, 4 38 
J. S. Little, 1 u cc 2 88 

Merrill k Bailey, 1 " " 2 88 

George H. Hoyt, Crockery, - 70 

Merrill k Bailey, " - - 25 

Kidder k Chandler, '' - 54 

George H. Hoyt, 1 Oil Can, - 25 

Alpheus Branch, Repairing Harness, 2 75 
Hiram Simpson, " " 62 

Daniels k Co., 2 Bush. Herd's Grass 

Seed, - - - - 7 50 

Merrill k Bailey, 1 " " " 

Seed, . . - . 
Daniels k Co., 50 lbs. Clover Seed, 
Merrill k Bailey, 25 " " " 
Daniels k Co., 2,100 lbs. Plaster, 

" " " 2 Bags Sulphate of 
Lime, - - - - 
Daniels k Co., Garden Seeds, 
Morrill k Bailey, " " - 
Daniels k Co., 12 1-2 lbs. Rope, 

" " " 6 Scythes, 

" " " 1 Rake, 

" " '^ 7 Rifles, - 

" •' " 1 Cheese Hoop, 

Avimuit carried forxv'j.rd, - - 1,345 71 



3 55 


5 00 


3 00 


9 45 


6 00 


98 


102 


159 


4 50 


58 


56 


75 



28 

Amount brought foriLmrd, - - 1,345 71 
Daniels, & Co., Hinges and Screws, 1 63 
Hiram Simpson, 1 Pair Oxen, 150 00 

" " 1 " " 75 00 

" " lor Driving Oxen, 3 00 

" " 5 Bush. Seed Pota- 

toes, - - - . 3 11 

Merrill & Bailey, 3 1-2 Bush. Seed 

Potatoes, - - - - 
Hiram Simpson, 1 Bag Rye Meal, 
J. Abbott & Co., 4 " " " 
W. H. Fisk, School Books, - 
D. W. Davis, Preparing Lumber, 
John C. Head, Shoeing Oxen, - 
J. P. Woodbury, " " 

Charles Bunton, " " - 

Paige & Wilson, 235 lbs. Coffee, 
" " " 2 Clothes Lines, 
" " " 1 bbl. Mackerel, 
Merrill & Bailey, 5 ]3askets, 

" " " 1-4 Bush. Peas, 
J. A. S. Jacobs, 1 Hat, 
George A. Barnes, 5 Hats, 
Jacob Peavy, Grinding Corn, 
" " Repairing Axes, 
J. Rowley & Co., 1-4 (iross Matches, 
Hiram Simpson, 12 Bush. Potatoes, 
" " 1 Hoe, - 

" *' Repairing Churn, 

" " Tin Pans, - 

" " 1 Lamp, - 

Merrill <fe Bailey, 1 Bu?h, Apples, 
" " " 120 lbs. Potash, 

Amount carried forward, - - 1 ,6S3 2J 



2 10 


1 75 


6G5 


65 


1 00 


4 87 


3 29 


11 96 


32 25 


80 


9 50 


2 60 


175 


62 


63 


2 75 


186 


12 


5 40 


62 


10 


1 70 


17 


92 


9 82 



29 

Amovnf. hroug-hf. forirard, - - 1,083 23 
Kidder & Chandler, 1-2 Gallon Spir- 
its Turpentine, - - 50 
H. P. Wiluon, 1-2 Gallon Spirits Tur- 
pentine, - . - . 38 
Kidder & Cliandler, 8 7-8 lbs. Bat- 
ting, - - - - 1 14 
Kidder & Chandler, 1 pint Neat's 

Foot Oil, ... - 20 

Gilman Clough, 549 feet Plank, 8 78 

Hiram Simpson, 10 Brooms, - 2 60 

" " Paid Rail Road Fare 

for Paupers, - - - 2 50 

Jacob Peavy, " " " " 

for Paupers, - - - 9 00 

Hiram Simpson, 1 Dog, - - 1 00 

Ezra Kimball, 1 pair Rubber Boots, 4 00 
Gilman Clough, Sawing 2929 feet 

Lumber, - - . 8 79 

Gilman Clough, Sawing Oak Lumber, 2 00 
Daniels & Co., 1 Copper Pump, 3 75 

Jacob Peavy, 2 Shoats, - 
" ^ " for use of Bull, - 
" ' " 21 Chickens, - 
H. M. Bailey & Son, Tin Ware, 
Kidder & Chandler, 2 Stone Jars, 

" " " 1 Tierce, - 

Hiram Simpson, for Cabbage Plants, 

Buttons and Soap, - 
Hiram Simpson, 10 lbs. Saleratus, 
" " 33 " Rice, - 

" " 1 pair Suspenders, 

Am. lint cairied forward, - - 1,776 57 



18 00 


7 00 


10 00 


6 72 


84 


50 


2 32 


70 


2 37 


25 



30 



Amount broug-ht fonrard, 

Hiram Simpson, Bowls, 
" " 1-2 lb. Snuff, 



1,776 



" " 1 .Alilk Measure, 

" " Making- Cider, 

" " 1 Lantern, - 

" Painting, 

" " Pork Barrels, 

" " Assisting Hadley 

Family, - 
J. P. Eaton, Pasturing Cattle, - 
S. Lcavitt, " " - 

Woodbury & Nichols, Setting Wheel 

Tire, - - - - 

C. R. Colley, Painting, 
Merrill & Bailey, 1 empty Hogshead, 
Ezra Kimball, Shoes, 
S. D. Sherburne, Coach to City Farm, 
Daniels & Co., Pulley Blocks, 
" " " 6 lbs. Rosin, - 
Charles Bunton, Blacksmith Work, 5 
Barton & Co., Pins and Needles, 
Kidder & Chandler, Wicking, 
" " " 1 Knife, - 

" " " Cattle Cards, 

Wilson &, Campbell, Oil of Origanum, 
W. H. Fisk, Stationery and Books, 1 
Edward Shannessy, Repairing Wheels, 8 
Bradley & Co., 1 Coffee Pot, 1 

" " " Exchange of Stoves, 10 
E. S. Peabody, 1 Cow, - 23 

Hiram Simpson, for Sundry Articles, 3 
Balance, - - - . 4,563 



57 
48 
14 
17 
50 

•75 
88 

3 00 



9 

8 
20 

2 
1 

1 

3 
2 



85 
00 
00 

66 

54 

38 

67 

00 

25 

34 

40 

18 

34 

25 

18 

17 

31 

00, 

50 

49 

00 

95 

18 



5.4^0 13 



CITY TEAM. 



By Balance from last year's Account, 222 33 
" Appropriation, - - - - 300 00 
" Treasurer's Receipt for Labor of Team, 626 58 
" Amount transferred to Fire Depart- 
ment, - - - - 753 04 



EXPENDITURES. 




To Oliver Greely, Repairing Harness, 


28 62 


Hugh Ramsey, Washing Bed Clothes. 


, 6 90 


" " Sawing Wood, - 


1 70 


Artcmas Whitney, Straw, 


7 38 


City Farm, for Straw, 8 25 and 




Corn 10 00, - - - 


18 25 


City Farm, for Straw, 


31 62 


Artemas Whitney, Hay, 


15 48 


- City Farm, " 


149 50 


E. P. Johnson, " - 


24 40 


0. M. Keniston, " 


10 80 


D. W. Clark, Labor, - 


28 75 


Hugh Ramsey, " - 


371 55 


Joseph A. Weeks," 


376 75 


L. Campbell, Team Labor, 


43 89 


J. F. Woodbury, Shoeing, 


5 01 


Woodbury & Nichols, " 


24 46 


R. Gilmorc, " - 


22 72 


John C. Head, " - 


7 72 


J. F. Woodbury, Blacksmith Work, 


5 42 


James Boyd & Son, Horse Collars, 


13 50 


Z. F. Campbell, " Medicine, 


16 53 



$1,901 95 



Amount carried fonvard, 



1/210 95 



32 

Amount brought forvmrd^ - - 1,210 95 
Daniels & Co., Chains, - - 5 27 

Benjamin Currier, Horse Cart, 110 00 

G. W. Mcrriam, Ironing Horse Cart, 15 97 
Benjamin Currier, Repairing " 31 00 

u 4; u u 12 89 

Wm. M. Plumer, Lard, Soap and 

Salt, 1 09 

Hall & Perkins, Corn, Oats and Meal, 278 15 
William Plumer, Matches, - 
Daniels & Co., Hardware, 
Andrew McCrillis, Setting Tire, 
Balance to New Account, 



2 33 






8 29 






4 00 






222 01 








$1,901 


9.5 


-^ 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 

By Balance from last year's Account, $107 22 
" Appropriation, - - - - 150 00 



EXPENDITURES. 




To Sam'l Hall, Surveyoi 


, Labor, - 


39 50 


Nehemiah Preston, 


a _ 


12 75 


John Gamble, 


ii 


50 


C. W. Rowell, 


a _ 


1 25 


J. P. Rowell, 


a 


2 25 


G. W. Dustin, 


" _ 


8 50 


John S. Yeaton, 


a 


1 00 


Joseph M. Rowell, 


u _ 


15 00 


Peter Kimball, 


" 


17 38 


' George Clark, 


a _ 


20 50 


Jonathan Hartshor 


1, " - 


2 00 


John W. Ray, 


a _ 


5 00 


Horace Page, 


a 


2 00 


John Stark, 


(( 


2 00 


Charles Rowell, 


<c 


2 00 


Joseph E. Rowell, 


u _ 


2 40 


Nehemiah Preston, 


Team Labor, 


6 75 


G. W. Diistin, 


U ii 


6 00 


Peter Kimball, 


a a 


21 26 



Amount carried forivard, 
c 



168 04 



)7 22 



34 



Amount brought forward., 

George Clark, _Team Labor, 
Joseph M. Rowell, " " 

Samuel Hall, " " 

Nehemiah Preston, use of Plow, 
George Clark, " " 

Nehemiah Preston, use of Cart, 
George W. Diistin, " " - 

Peter Kuuball, " " 

George Clark, " " - 

Joseph M. Rowell, " " 

Samuel Hall, " " 

" " Chestnut Posts, 

" " Iron, Nails & Spikes, 

Ezra Copp, Stone, 
T. R. Hubbard, Plank, - 
Thomas Quimby, Labor, 
Balance to new Account, 



1(38 04 


8 00 


4 40 


1100 


50 


62 


50 


50 


2 25 


2 00 


13 


98 


3 36 


1 63 


5 07 


2 00 


3 00 


43 24 



-S257 22 



OO 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 



By Balance from last year's Account, 429 81 
"• Appropriation for 1861, - 3,700 00 

» Cash of Road A^-ont for Gravel, . 30 00 



K,159 81 



EXPENDITQRES. 

To Edward McQueston, Superintendent 

of Streets, Labor, - - 404 25 

Daniels & Co., Hardware, - 17 43 

John B. Varick, " - - 50 

G. W. Merriam, Repairing Cart, 9 52 

David B. Adams, 240 feet. Plank, 2 88 

Alfred Poor, 2,000 " " 30 00 

Thos. R. Hubbard, 1,100 feet Plank, 22 00 

David Wells, 2,304 feet Plank, 34 58 
Manchester Gas Light Co., 97 Loads 

Cinders, - - - 12 13 
John Houston, Repairing Picks and 

other Tools, - - - 19 48 
C. & L. Gage, Repairing Picks and 

other Tools, - - 4 65 
Andrew McCrillis, Repairing Picks 

and other Tools, - - 14 04 

J. W. French, Carpenter Work, 2 25 
Moses D. Stokes, 194 feet Flagging 

Stones, - - - 40 74 

Moses D. Stokes, 1 Street Stone Post, • 1 50 

Moses D. Stokes, 1 Sesspool Stone, 5 00 
Temple McQueston, Cement, Pipe 

and laying for conveying Water 

to Stable, - - - - 40 49 



Amount carried fonoivd, - - 661 42 



36 

Amount hrovght forward, - - 661 42 

Manches'r Iron Co., Repairing Fence, 1 50 

Benjamin Currier, 1 Wlieelbarrow, 6 00 

" " Wood for Hames, 75 

Hartshorn & Pike, Water Dippers, 2 10 

Francis Smiley, 1 Stone Drag, 1 75 

H. C. Hunton, nse of Sled, -' 1 00 

J, Abbott & Co., 1 Cask Cement, 1 60 

" " " " 1 " Lime, - 95 

Kidder & Chandler, Oil, - 2 72 

" " " 1 Lantern, - 75 

« " " 1 Water Fail, 25 

N. McCrillis, use of Cart, Qd> 

Charles Clough, " . " - 1 25 

Luther Campbell, " - 9 06 

T. P. Clough, " " - 25 

O. W. Glines, " " - 50 

City of Manchester, " - 3 25 

C. & L. Gage, Blacksmith Work, 25 
Temple McQueston, 124 feet Cement 

Pipe, (12 inch, and laying,) 24 80 
Temple McQueston, 19 1-2 feet Ce- 
ment Pipe, (9 inch, and laying,) 3 25 
Temple McQueston, 1 day's Labor, 1 75 
" " 8-4 Cask Cement, 1 25 
" " 550 Bricks, 3 30 
' Neal & Holbrook, Labor and Lumber, 7 82 
Daniels & Co., 1 L-on Bar, - 1 50 
" " " 1 Steel Rake, - 92 
Charles Bunton, Repairing Tools, 4 23 
Hartshorn & Pike, 1 Lantern, 37 
City Team, Team Labor, 577 84 
F. Kimball, " " 7 50 



Amount carried forivard, - - 1,330 56 



37 



Amount hroii<^ht forward, 

George Hunt, Team Labor, 
G. W. Glines, 
N. McCrillis, " 
Charles Clough, " 
Luther Campbell, " 
T. P. Cloiigh, 
D. W. Clark, 
Joseph Carr, Repairing Bridge, 
Hugh Ramsey, Labor, - 
Joseph A. Weeks, " 
D. W. Clark, " 

Michael Welch, " 

Mace Moulton, " 

James Cams, " 

Daniel O'Brien, " 

Francis Smilej, " 

Robert Scott, '• 

R. M. Richardson, " 
Phillip Conner, " 

Peter Scanlin, " 

David Kelly, " 

William Sheener, " 
Barney McGrail, " 
Wm. E. Eastman & Son, Labor, 
Wm. Chase, " 

Thomas Howe, " 

James Crowley, " 

John Newton, " 

Michael Scanlan, " 

T. P. Clough, 

Daniel Mahanna, " 

Nathaniel Corning, " 

Amount carried forte arc! , 



1,330 56 


6 75 


7 50 


2 75 


10 00 


- 70 50 


1 00 


5 06 


3 00 


76 50 


86 25 


172 50 


4 25 


15 00 


220 75 


2 75 


11176 


76 00 


5 75 


8 00 


28 00 


3 00 


9 25 


3 00 


116 17 


122 00 


16 50 


36 00 


29 25 


17 25 


1 00 


30 75 


4 00 



2,627 80 



38 

Amov7it brought foru'ard. 

Jolui Welch, Labor, 

Tliomas Larkiii, " 

W. C. Shannon, " 

G. W. Gardner, " 

Merrill & Bailey, " 

W. H. Perkins, " 

Merrill & Sanborn, " 

Dennis Lane, " 

William Gallicar, " 

Dennis Conner, " 

Edward Finigan, " 

John Loftis, " 

John Fallen, " 

John Sully, " 

Peter Scanlin, " 

Kidder & Chandler, " 

F. Quinley, " 

John Larkin, " 

John Griffin, " 

William Griffin, . " 

Eugene Cudworth, " 

Edward Prindable, " 

Oren Carlton, " 

J. H. Knowlton, " 

Daniel Mahanna, " 

Patrick Dowd, " 

James Stapleton, •' 

Thomas Harvey, " 

Patrick,McDriff, " 

Fardy Conway, " 

W. Searles, " 

Moses D. Stokes, " 

Amoiint carried fonvard, - - 3,280 55 



2,627 80 


4 00 


25 50 


6 00 


2 50 


178 00 


7 75 


12 50 


3 00 


1 00 


7 75 


3 00 


15 00 


7 00 


28 25 


63 50 


9 00 


20 50 


142 50 


1 00 


7 00 


7 50 


2 50 


3 00 


44 75 


27 75 


3 00 


3 25 


3 25 


2 50 


150 


2 50 


6 50 



39 

AmounL hroug^lit foricard, 

Micliael Lane, Labor. 

Patrick Holland, " 

Daniel Dowd, " 

Fearly Conway, " 

Edward Wyman, " 

A. J. Leeds, " 

William Therer, " 

N. McCrillis, " 

Charles Clongli, " 

J.N. Heath, " 

Bruce Patten, " 

William Conner, " 

Lnther Campbell, " 

John Prindable, " 

A. H. Gerry, " 

Eben KnowUon, •■' 

Lawrence McCarty, " 

Morris Shea, " 

Patrick O'Brien, " 

Richard Dawton, '' 

Timothy Bresnehan, " 

John Collins, " 

John Brown, " 

Thomas Brown, " 

Edmund Donahoe, " 

Lawrence Hines, ' " 

John Connell, " 

Law^rence Conner, " 

P. McManahan, " 

S. Hodgman, " 

T. T. Southwick, " 

John Peacock, " 
Balance, - - - - 



3,280 55 


4 50 


2 00 


150 


150 


4 00 


2 75 


10 50 


2 75 


7 50 


12 25 


6 00 


2 50 


36 25 


29 25 


1 00 


7 75 


150 


100 


100 


2 25 


1 00 


75 


4 00 


4 00 


3 00 


2 00 


2 50 


150 


3 00 


4 00 


1 00 


3 00 


711 76 


&A iKq c-i 





40 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 



By 


Balance from last year 


s account. 


$4 57 


a 


Appropriation, 


- 


- 


350 00 










EXPENDITURES. 




To 


William S. Locke, Sur 


veyor 


for 18G0, 






Labor, 


- 


- 


11 87 




Benjamin F. Mitchell, Sur 


v^eyor for 






1861, Labor, - 


- 


- 


2(3 62 




Benjamin Mitchell, 


Labor 


1 


13 25 




E. C. Howlett, 


u 


- 


1140 




Eben Ross, 


li 


- 


2 00 




J. G. Brown, 


u 


- 


3 75 




W. Powers, 


u 


- 


3 80 




N. Baker, 


a 


- 


3 80 




James Smith, 


a 


- 


1 50 




W. W. Baker, 


a 


- 


50 




Benjamin Stevens, 


a 


- 


50 




C. R. Tucker, 


a 


- 


50 




J. B. Eastman, 


a 


- 


2 00 




William Chase, 


a 


- 


75 




Nathaniel Webster, 


a 


- 


30 




Micajah Ingham, 


a 


- 


93 




David Young, 


a 


- 


50 




Charles Barker, 


u 


- 


1 30 




W. S. Walker, 


a 


- 


40 




J. L. Locke, 


a 


- 


150 




John Calef, 


a 


- 


6 00 




Oliver Mitchell, 


a 


- 


50 




Sylvanus Webster, 


li 


- 


150 




Mr. Elliott, 


li 




60 



Amount carried forward., - - 95 77 



41 



Amovnt hrovght forward, 


- 


- 


95 7T 


Levi Woodman, 


Liabor 


? 


12 50 


Kadmial Haselton, 


u 


- 


14 00 


D. F. Miller, 


u 


- 


9 50 


J. B. Chase, 


li 


- 


150 


Michael Fox, 


u 


- 


6 50 


A. C. Ordway, 


u 


- 


2 50 


M. W. Sargent, 


ii. 


- 


6 00 


William Currier, 


ii. 


- 


2 00 


Frederick Lougee, 


a 


- 


150 


James Nutt, 


Team Labor, 


42 


Benjamin F. Mitchell 


u 


i.i 


15 40 


John Calef, 


a 


a 


6 00 


Oliver Mitchell, 


a 


ii 


50 


William S. Locke, 


a 


a 


175 


Charles Barker, 


ii. 


ii 


30 


Mr. Elliott, 


a 


u 


30 


E. D. Hamblett, 


a 


u 


5 00 


John B. Chase, 


a 


ii 


10 00 


William Powers, 


i,i 


a 


6 50 


E. C. Howlett, 


a 


a 


2 50 


Benjamin F. Mitchell, 


Use 


of Cart, 


2 75 


John B. Chase, 


(( 


(( 


1 87 


William Powers, 


a 


ii 


75 


James Nutt, 


li 


a 


68 ■ 


C. & L. Gage, Blacksmith Work, 


64 


Samuel Nutt, Gravel, 




- 


1 05 


Balance, 


" 


- 


146 39 

fffi35-1 57 









42 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 



By Balance from last year's Account, 


57 84 


" Appropriation, . _ _ 


100 00 


" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 


50 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




To R. P. Whittemore, Surveyor in 1860, 




Labor, - _ . _ 


12 00 


John P. Moore, Surveyor in 1861, 




Labor, - - - * - 


22 75 


Isaac Whittemore, Labor, 


5 00 


John Calef, " 


3 00 


I. W. Moore, " 


6 50 


Nathaniel Moore, " 


4 50 


John Emerson, " 


3 50 


Rufus Calef, " 


2 00 


B. B. Allen, " 


150 


John Emerson, Jr., " 


8 50 


R. P. Whittemore, Team Labor, 


7 50 


Isaac Wliittemore, " " 


6 00 


John Calef, " " 


3 00 


Ira W. Moore, " '' 


4 00 


Nathaniel Moore, " '" 


2 00 


John Emerson, " " 


50 


John Emerson, Jr., " " 


4 50 


John P. Moore, " " 


7 00 


Ira W. Moore, 300 feet Plank, 


3 60 


John P. Moore, 3645 " " 


43 74 


Balance, 


56 75 



.'^207 84 



-S207 84 



43 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 



By Appropriation, 


- 


125 00 




" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 


312 82 








$4 


/ o2 


EXPENDITURES. 






To Balance from last year 


s Account, 


112 82 




James M. Nutt, Surveyor for 18G0 






Labor, 


- 


9 00 




James Emerson, Sur^ 


eyor for IS 61 






Labor, - 


- 


26 00 




Amos Cressy, 


Labor, 


5 60 




Jonas Harvey, Jr., 


4; 


34 30 




Oilman Harvey, 


a 


12 50 




William P. Merrill, 


u 


23 80 




D. H. Nutt, 


a 


10 25 




E. Roby, 


a 


2 25 




J. E. Young, 


a 


2 00 




James M. Young, 


a 


4 85 




S. Annis, 


a 


4 30 




John Dickey, 


a 


12 10 




!S. B. Hill, 


a 


6 75 




J. L. Griffin, 


a 


4 75 




Isaac Huse, 


a 


2 00 




Amos Sampson, 


a 


75 




John Young, 


a 


10 10 




A. J. Young, 


a 


1 75 




R. Bailey, 


a 


1 50 




H. K. Richardson, 


u 


50 




Rodnia Nutt, 


u 


20 80 




E. S. Harvey, 




11 25 





Amount carried forivard. - - 310 82 



44 



Amovnt brovglit forward 


> 


319 82 


Samuel Nutt, 


Labor, 


1 30 


D. W. FliDg, 


u 


100 


Alison H. Harlson, 


u 


50 


Amos Cressy, 


Team Labor, 


3 75 


James Emerson, 


u u 


2 50 


Jonas Harvey, Jr., 


u u 


8 50 


Oilman Harvey, 


bC u 


3 00 


William P. Merrill, 


(.<. a 


18 80 


James M. Nutt, 


U (( 


7 50 


James Nutt, 


u a 


50 


Isaac Huse, 


U (( 


2 00 


John Dickey, 


(.(. a 


6 30 


John Young, 


a u 


4 80 


E. S. Harvey, 


a a 


6 25 


I). W. Fling, 


a a 


2 00 


William P. Merrill, 


Stone, 


88 



Cart, 



John Young, 

John Dickey, " 

E. S. Harvey, " 

D. W. Fling, 
William P. Merrill, " 

E. S. Harvey, Plow 
James Emerson, " 
Balance, 



52 
62 
95 

20 

95 

50 

4 90 

40 78 



-$437 82 



45 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 



By Balance from last year's Account, 48 22 

" Appropriation, . - - 100 00 

" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 100 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To David Dickey, 3d, Surveyor for 1860, 

Labor, - - - - 10 00 

Samuel Gamble, Surveyor for 1861, 
Labor, . _ _ 

James M. Webster, Labor, 

William Griffin, 

Gilman Clough, 

James Willey, 

David H. Dickey, 

Amos G. Webster, 

John P. Webster, 

Joseph F. Mclntire, 

James M. Dickey, 

Abiel Cushman, 

John Johnson, 

David Dickey, 

John Davis, 

H. C. Dickey, 

Amos Webster, 

N. W. Curtis, 

Amos C. Webster, 

Horace Hunt, 

William Hoyt, 

Moses Tracy, 

Sylvester Walch, 

Amount carried forward, - - 129 02 



I21S 22 



16 87 


11 00 


3 00 


5 75 


5 50 


3 50 


125 


5 75 


2 00 


4 25 


b oo 


19 55 


6 55 


2 75 


4 50 


6 00 


2 00 


4 50 


100 


4 50 


75 


2 50 



46 

» 

Amount brovg'hf. funvard, - - 129 02 

Thomas Hazard, Labor, 

Isaac Huse, " 

James Wallace, " 

William Fogg, " 

Mr. George, " 

James M. Webster, Team Labor, 
Amos C. Webster, " " 
John Johnson, " " 

David Dickey, " ■ " 

David Dickey, 3d, " " 
H. C. Dickey, « " 

John Davis, " " 

John P. Webster, " " 

Oilman Ciough, " " 

Horace Hunt, " " 

Isaac Huse, * " " 

Samuel Gaml)le, " " 

Samuel Gamble, Use of Plow, 
Samuel Gaml)lc, " Cart, 
Samuel Gamble, " Tools, 
Samuel Gamble, Powder, 
John Johnson, Use of Tools, 
Gilman Ciough, 062 ft. Plank, 
Gilman Ciough, Carpenter Work, 
Balance, . . . . 



30 


1 00 


8 00 


50 


5 00 


4 50 


150 


3 75 


4 75 


15(3 


100 


3 00 


75 


1 75 


50 


1 00 


13 00 


1 25 


1 88 


50 


2 00 


50 


8 61 


2 60 


- 50 00 


.S248 22 



47 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. T. 

By Balance from last years Account, 
" Appropriation, 
" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 

EXPENDITURES. 
To Joseph Marsli, Surveyor for 1860, 
Labor, . . - _ 
Isaac Huse, Surveyor for 1861, Labor, 



Charles A. Hall, 
Nathan Johnson, 
George Emerson, 
J. B. Eastman, 
James Hall, 
Israel Webster, 
R. E. Barrett, 
Lawrence Morse, 
Mr. Burtan, 
Newliall Perry, 
J. L. Fogg, 
Ira Litchfield, 
Josiali Leavitt, 
M. McGinnis, 
Charles A. Hall, 
Isaac Huse, 
George Emerson, 
Charles Hail, 
Isaac Huse, 
Isaac Huse, 
Balance, 



liabor. 



Tear 



1 Labor, 



Use of Cart, 



Plow, 



22 14 


150 00 


50 00 


30 63 


35 62 


23 62 


21 75 


2 25 


2 00 


4 50 


8 00 


25 50 


4 00 


50 


3 00 


4 00 


150 


2 00 


50 


13 25 


16 75 


8 00 


60 


2 00 


62 


16 65 



$222 14 



-S222 14 



48. 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 

By Balance from last year's Account, 27 01 

" Appropriation, - - - . 100 00 
" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 175 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To John H. Proctor, Surveyor for 1860, 

Labor, - - - . 28 75 

John P. Young, Surveyor for 1801, 

Labor, . _ . 

Freeman Wilson, Labor, 

F. S. Proctor, " 

Amos Latush, " 

J. E. Clough, ' " 

Reuben Morgan, " 

Mark Ayers, " 

Phinehas Haselton, " 

Aaron Crombie, " 

Oilman Reed, " 

James T. Haselton, " 

D. P. Haselton, " 
James M. Crombie, " 
Moses Griffin, " 

E. S. Young, " 
William Young, " 
Daniel McDonald, " 
John W. Proctor, " 
Ira Goodrich, " 
William Day, " 
Augustus Proctor, " 
Luther S. Proctor, " 

Amount carried forward, - - 183 87 



24 12 


3 00 


1 00 


2 50 


3 00 


13 00 


12 50 


13 50 


9 00 


4 50 


2 00 


5 00 


6 50 


8 00 


20 00 


8 00 


2 00 


1 00 


2 00 


3 00 


3 50 


8 00 



$302 01 



49 

Amount brovg-htforivard, - - 183 87 

Peter Farmer, Labor, 7 50 

George M. Haselton, " 2 00 

Noah B. Reed, " 2 00 

Joseph B. Young, " 4 75 

Moses Griffin, " ' 2 00 

AVilliam B. Reed, " 3 00 

John H. Proctor, Team Labor, 21 00 

Freeman Wilson, '' " 3 00 

F. S. Proctor, " " 2 00 

AmosLatush, " " "4 00 

J. E. Clough, " " 4 00 

W. B. Reed, " " 1 00 

Luther S. Proctor, " " 4 00 

John P. Young, " " 10 75 

John H. Proctor, Use of Plow, 1 00 

Luther S. Proctor, " " 50 

J. H. Proctor, " Cart, 50 

J, P. Young, " " 1 25 

Noah B. Reed, " " 25 

Peter Farmer, Lumber, - - 50 

Balance, - - - - 43 14 



S302 01 



50 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 



By Balance from last year's Account, 80 27 

" Appropriation, - - - - 150 00 

" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 150 00 



— $380 27 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Daniel Randlett, Surveyor for 18G0, 

Labor, - - - - 23 00 
Harrison Corning, Surveyor for 18(31, 

Labor, - - _ 

Josiah Bartlett, Labor, 

W. H. Noyes, " 

B. W. Corning, " 

Sylvanus Morse, " 

Natiianiel Corning, " 

J. M. Blaisdell, " 

William Boyce, " 

Joseph Cross, " 

David Sweatt, " 

Daniel Banks, " 

Elijah Goodale, " 

Franklin Page, " 

James Currier, " 

Stephen Haselton, " 

Russell Ray, " 

Johnson Morse, " 

Ladd Boyce, " 

John G. Webster, " 
Jonathan Y. McQueston, " 

Isaac H. Webster, " 

E. B. Keniston, " 

Amounl carried forward, - - 195 60 



3186 


6 25 


5 00 


7 75 


6 40 


1140 


6 60 


10 25 


14 75 


8 50 


3 00 


5 00 


5 00 


8 70 


5 00 


1 00 


7 20 


1 00 


11 50 


9 00 


5 50 


3 00 



51 



AmovnL brought forward, 

Charles F. Lambert, Labor, 

I). S, Corning, 

Amos JMorse, 

Orlando Page, 

Isaac H. Colley, 

Benjamin Corning, 

A. P. Colby, 

A. G. Corning, 

E. A Richards, 

Reuben Haselton, 

G. W. Haselton, 

George McQiieston, 

Albert N. Scott, 

Calef Haselton, 

Sherburn Corning, 

G. F. Boyce, 

Josiah Bartlett, Team Labor 

W. H. Noyes, 

Daniel Randlett, 

James Currier, 

Daniel Banks, 

Nathaniel Corning, 

J. Y. McQucston, 

Harrison Corning, 

John G. Webster, 

Isaac H. Webster, 

Harrison Corning, Use of Plow, 

William H. Noyes, Use of Cart, 

Harrison Corning, " " 

J. Y. McQueston, Lumber, 

Daniel Randlett, Powder, 

Balance, - - - - - 



195 66 
5 00 

2 50 
60 
75 

12 00 
10 50 

5 00 

6 00 

3 50 
2 50 
6 50 

4 50 
6 00 

5 00 
200 
2 00 
150 
150 

6 00 
2 30 

1 00 

2 00 
8 00 

17 50 
2 50 

2 50 
75 

3 62 
87 

1 00 

40 

57 82 



-$380 27 



52 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 



By Balance from last year's Account, 

" Appropriation, - . - - 
" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 

EXPENDITUEES. 

To Charles Bartlett, Surveyor for 1860 
and 18(31, Labor, 

Samuel Brown, Labor, 

Adam Dickey, " 

John Brown, '' 

W. M. Harvell, " 
F. C. Truel, 

Alexander Brown, ''• 

Daniel Bixby, " 

William Younsr, " 

Charles R. Walker, " 

Moses Quimby, " 

Peter Turney, " 

Eben Hartshorn, " 

Charles Homer, " 

John McQueston, " 

F. S. Worthen, " 

Moody Quimby, " 
Nathan B. Tilton, 

S. Johnson, " 

Charles Bowker, " 

James Darrah, " 

F. Truel, " 

Leonard Truel, " 

William Jones, " 



12 61 


550 00 


75 00 


116 16 


10 25 


6 00 


4 00 


5 75 


3 75 


75 


1 75 


3 50 


4 50 


50 


2 25 


3 50 


2 50 


100 


6 75 


2 50 


5 50 


1 50 


76 00 


1 00 


1 50 


1 50 


150 



$637 61 



Amount carried foriuard, - 262 91 



53 



Amount, brought forward., 


- 


262 91 


Thomas Dwire, 


Labor, 


5 50 


0. Wymau, 


(( 


2 75 


David Worthley, 


u 


4 75 


Cohimbus W3'maii, 


a 


12 17 


Parker Worthley, 


u 


100 


Samuel Barnard, 


a 


3 25 


Joseph Prescott, 


a 


75 


John Chapman, 


a 


10 00 


AVilliam Blake, 


a 


9 25 


C. B. Heath, 


a 


2 50 


Francis Barnes, 


u 


3 00 


H. C. Sullivan, 


a 


2 50 


A. G. Fairbanks, 


a 


4 75 


L. Blake, 


u 


2 00 


John Collins, 


u 


2 00 


P. S. Chapman, 


li 


8 25 


John O'Brien, 


a 


3 50 


William Ridio, 


a 


3 75 


Benjamin Kaye, 


a 


2 50 


John Harrington, 


u 


1 00 


Patrick Cronan, 


a 


2 00 


James Maguire, 


u 


3 00 


Robert Hume, 


a 


3 00 


Mr. Simmons, 


u 


1 00 


John Stearns, 


a 


9 25 


William Blackburn, 


a 


2 50 


William S. Locke, 


u 


3 00 


J. Hardy, 


a 


1 00 


James Walker, 


iV 


100 


Mr, Morse, 


li 


1 50 


Josiah Hosford, 


a 


8 24 


Henry Palmer, 


u 


100 



Ariioitnt carried forward, - - 384 57 



54 



ount hrovght forivard, 


384 59 


Michael Cochran, 


Labor, 


3 25 


Alfred Wing, 


u 


75 


W. M. Harvell, 


Team Labor, 


5 75 


Peter Turnej, 


a u 


6 00 


John Bartlett, 


a a 


42 00 


Charles Bartlett, 


u u 


100 75 


David Worthlcy, 


;; a 


2 50 


A. G. Fairbanks, ■ 


a <,(. 


50 


Daniel Barnard, 


u u 


3 50 


James Walker, 


u a 


3 50 


Henry Palmer, 


u u 


1 00 


John McQucston, 


u u 


1 00 


Charles Bartlett, 


Use of Cart, 


14 82 


James Walker, 


a a 


37 


Daniel Barnard, 


a u 


50 


Whiteficld Gihiiorc 


1 Plow Beam, 


1 50 


W. Gilmore, Iron W 


'ork for Plow, &c. 


75 


G. S. Groombridge, 


Repairing Tools, 


144 


Moses D. Stokes, 164 feet Flagging 




Stones, 


_ 


34 44 


Lamson & Marden,' 


56 feet Flagging 




Stones, - 


- 


9 33 


A. N. Clapp & Co., 


Powder, 


1 00 


A. N. Clapp & Co., 


Fnse, 


14 


A. N. Clapp & Co., 


Nails, - 


6 92 


C. tfe L. Gage, Repairing Tools, 


1 70 


John McQueston, Stone, 


1 00 


Balance, - 


_ _ _ 


8 63 



4637 Gl 



55 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 

By Balance from last year's Account, 47 84 

•• Appropriation, - - - ■ 525 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To George H. Colby, Surveyor for 1860, 

Labor, - - - - 30 99 

Hiram Stearns, Surveyor for 18(31, 

Labor, - - - - 2 00 

Tliomas C. Stearns, Labor, 6 00 

Eogcr Stevens, " H 50 

Daniel Farmer, " 7 25 

George Prescott, " 1 50 

Alpheus Boclwell, " T 50 

Daniel Butterfield, " 75 

Benjamin Hartshorn, " 1 00 

Gilman Stevens, " 5 00 

John Harwood, " 1 25 

Thomas S. Montgomery, " 98 00 

A. H. Gerry, " 18 00 

M. P. Finn, " 5 00 

J. W. Bailey, " 4 00 

George Powers, " 8 00 

Setli T. Jones, " 15 25 

Owen Parker, " 5 50 

Daniel A. Dnrgin, " 6 00 

George W. Prescott, " 47 00 

Thomas Murphy, " 6 00 

^[ichael Mara, " 5 25 

Cornelius C. Sullivan, " 3 50 



-$572 84 



Amount carried forivard. - - 29G 24 



56 



Amount brovghl fur lu arch 


) 


296 24 


J. Hacking, 


Labor, 


2 50 


Timothy Morgan, 


u 


(3 00 


Nicholas Parker, 


a 


5 00 


Charles G. Clark, . 


a 


5 00 


Robert Miirry, 


u 


50 


Warren Stearns, 


u 


14 00 


0. McDonough, 


u 


3 00 


John Field, 


u 


6 25 


John Horgan, 2d, 


a 


1 25 


J. Melvin, 


a 


4 25 


S. N. Shannon, 


a 


3 50 


G. Mahood, 


a 


1 00 


M. Faley, 


a 


1 00 


George S. Chandler, 


u 


1 00 


Fuller &, Robinson, 


(; 


6 00 


L. D. Heath, 


u 


4 00 


James Carey, 


(C 


1 00 


C. Bean, 


C( 


1 00 


Daniel Ross, 


u 


3 50 


J. E. Bailey, 


a 


5 00 


D. Cassidy, 


a 


3 00 


J. W. McGannctt, 


ii. 


50 


• R. Hardy, 


Li 


4 00 


R. Keating, 


ii 


2 00 


Peter Hart, 


a 


50 


H. Pollard, 


a 


1 00 


Peter Hart, 


a 


75 


David Wells, 


1,800 ft. Plank, 


27 15 


Haines & Wallace, 


1,000 " Boards 


, 11 00 


Daniel Farmer, 


Team Labor, 


8 19 


Alpheus Bodwell, 


(( a 


3 00 


George W. Prescott 




52 00 



Amounl carried forward, 



484 08 



57 

Amount broifg-ht forward, - - 484 08 

Darnel Butterfieltl, Team Labor, 2 00 

Benjamin Hartshorn, " " 2 50 

Thomas S. Montgomery, " " HO 81 

James Gary, " u u j^ 00 
Thomas S. Montgomery, Use of Cart, 6 38 

George W. Prescott, " " 8 50 

Jame^s Gary, " " 25 

Balance, . . - - 37 32 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 



By Balance from last year's Account, 
" Appropriation, - - - - 
" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 

EXPENDITURES. 
To Hiram Simpson, Surveyor, City Farm 



Labor, 


- 


William Mills, 


Labor 


Newell Tilton, 


U 


Luther Stevens, 


a 


D. 0. Furnald, 


a 


Robert Stevens, 


a 


Joseph Gate, 


a 


Isaac Langley, 


a 


David Wright, 


a 


Joseph Cross, 


li 



269 03 


300 00 


75 00 


187 25 


15 50 


22 10 


4 00 


2 00 


40 00 


17 00 


5 00 


20 00 


12 50 



-$■572 84 



$644 03 



Amount carried forioard, - - 3o4 35 



58 

Amount broug-]ii forward, 

Noyes Fanner, Labor, 

S. C. Farrington, " 

James Thompson, " 

John Mulligan, " 

Dennis Bonner, " 

Virgil H. Gate, " 

Thomas Flaherty, " 

Jamos Eaton, " 

Samuel Adams, " 

Michael Handley, •' 

Aaron Crombie, " 

M. D. L. Stevens, " 

Alfred Wright, " 

Bonton Bullock, " 

C. M. Hubbard, " 

E. & J. M. Coburn, " 

Bradford Doe, " 
City Farm, Plank, 

City Farm, Team Labor, 

llobert Stevens, " " 

Joseph Cate, " " 

James Eaton, " " 

Samuel Adams, " " 

WiUiam Mills, " " 
William Mills, use of Plow 
Balance, 



o ( o r; 


4 00 


1 00 


13 00 


9 00 


11 50 


3 25 


5 25 


8 00 


2 00 


8 00 


4 50 


21 50 


4 50 


5 00 


100 


20 00 


10 00 


5 71 


94 00 


28 50 


1 00 


5 00 


2 00 


5 50 


50 


35 97 



-S644 03 



59 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 



By Appropriation, . _ . 
" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 

EXPENDITUilES. 

To Balance from last years' account, 
Luther Campbell, Surveyor, 18G0, 

Labor, _ _ - - 
J. D. Jones, Surveyor, 18(31, Labor, 
William Campbell, Labor, 
J. E. Kimball, 
George Gate, " 

S. D. Gate, " 

A. Wycomb, " 

Andrew Gate, " 

Joseph Morrill, " 

Reuben Kimball, " 

J. Kimball, " 

Walker & Copp, Stone, 
J. D. Jones, Team Labor, 
J. E. Kimball, " " 

George CJate, " " 

William Campbell, " '• 
Joseph Morrill, " " ' 
Luther Campbell, " " 
J. E. Kimball, use of Cart, 
George Gate, " '• 

Wm. Campbell, " " 

Joseph Morris, " " 

Luther Campbell," " 

William Campbell, use of Plow, 
Joseph Morrill, " " 

Balance, 



150 00 

79 10 



4 10 



-$229 10 



38 00 


6 25 


2o 50 


8 00 


8 50 


3 00 


2 50 


50 


3 00 


3 00 


150 


52 00 


4 00 


4 50 


3 00 


7 00 


2 50 


8 00 


1 12 


38 


38 


38 


100 


25 


62 


39 12 



$22.9 10 



60 



RECAPITULATION OP HIGHWAYS. 



Dlst. 



Is p _2 

i ^ i ft 

107 22 

429 81 

4 57 

57 84 



W ^-::. 



6 


48 22 


7 


22 14 


8 


27 01 


9 


80 27 


10 


12 61 


11 


47 84 


12 


269 03 


13 





160 00 




257 22 


213 98 




3,700 00 




4,129 81 


3,44 8 05 




350 00 




354 57 


208 18 




100 00 


50 00 


207 84 


151 09 




125 00 


312 82 


437 82 


284 22 


112 82 


100 00 


100 00 


248 22 


198 22 




150 00 


50 00 


222 14 


205 49 




100 00 


175 00 


302 01 


258 87 




150 00 


150 00 


380 27 


322 45 




550 00 


75 00 


637 61 


628 98 




525 00 




572 84 


535 52 




300 00 


75 00 


044 03 


608 06 




150 00 


79 10 


229 10 


185 88 


4 10 



9 

43 24 
681 76 
146 39 

56 75 
40 78 
50 00 
10 65 
43 14 

57 82 
8 63 

37 32 
35 97 
39 12 



11,106 56 16,450 0011,066 92 18,623 48|7,248 99j 
17,365 911 116 921 



116 9211,257 57 



1,257 5717,365 91 



61 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



By Appropriation, 
"" Reserved Fund, 



1,200 00 
323 71 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Balance from last years' account, 323 71 
John B. Good\yin, for land taken for 

new highways, - - - 10 00 

Liither Aiken, land for new higliways, 5 00 
Jesse M. Coburn, •' 
J. V. Gooden, " 
Samuel H. Walker," 
David Dickey, " 
Samuel Andrews, " 
George W. Cheney, for Team, 
Hiram Brown, for Witness Fees 
J. V. Gooden, for stone for Culvert, 
Clark & Smith, for Attorneys' Fees 
Patrick McLaughlin, for Labor on 

new highway, 
Balance, 



5 00 


' 20 00 


' 80 37 


' 60 00 


5 00 


6 25 


16 00 


rt, 2 00 


)s, 6 00 


100 00 


875 38 



1,523 71 



1,523 71 



62 



GRANITE BRIDGE. 

By Appropriation, - - - - 
" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 

EXPENDITURES. 
To Balance from last year's Account, 
Charles Bartlett, 325 ft. Plank, 
Henry Megilvery, 342 ft. Plank, 
Benjamin Greer, 3,132 ft. " 
Haines and Wallace, 47 ft. Boards, 
C. & L. Gage, 27 1-2 lbs. Iron Forg- 
ing, - - - - 
A. N. Clapp <k Co., 112 lbs. Spikes, 
Charles Bartlett, Labor, 

J, B. Chapman, 
H. C. Sullivan, 
Charles Bowker, 
L. B. Clark, 
Leonard Moore, 
Columbus Wyman, 
Balance, - - - 



100 00 


243 74 


168 74 


6 50 


6 18 


56 37 


60 


3 85 


4 10 


30 48 


2 50 


3 00 


11 00 


2 00 


2 00 


50 


45 97 



$343 74 



S343 74 



63 



AMOSKEAG FALLS BRIDGE. 

Ily Balance from last year's Account, 34 54 

*' Appropriation, - - - 400 00 

" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 284 54 

_ §679 OS 

EXPENDITURES. 
To Jonathan Hartshorn, Labor, removing 

Snow, - - - - 12 00 

John H. Maynard, Labor, Planking- 
Bridge, - - - 40 00 

John H. Maynard, Labor, Repairing 

Bridge, - - - - 41 49 

H. S. Burns, Labor, Repairing \ 

Bridge, ... 4 25 

A. C. Wallace, Labor and Plank, Re- 
pairing Bridge, - - 23 15 

Joseph Dunlap, 12,658 ft. Plank, 202 99 

Daniel Wells, 2,792 ft. Plank, 50 55 

Lewis Simons, 8,007 ft. Plank, 137 89 

Daniels & Co., 980 lbs. Spikes and 

Nails, .... 34 70 

Howard Fire Insurance Co., Insur- 
ance Policy, - - . 75 00 

Balance, 57 56 

S679 08 



64 



LIGHTING STREETS. 

By Balance from last year's account, 329 15 
" Appropriation, - - - 1,600 00 

$1,929 15 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Manchester Gas Light Co., for 425,619 

ft. Gas, at ^2.15 per M., 1,170 38 

Manchester Gas Light Co., for light- 
ing 129 Lanterns, - - 386 00 

Manchester Gas Light Co., for Set- 
ting 1 Lamp Post, - - 12 46 

Manchester Gas Light Co., for 2 

Lamp Posts and Setting, - 40 00 

D. Willey, 10 gals. Fluid, - 6 40 

Montgomery & Wilson, 60 gals. Fluid, 33 20 

Harisliorn &, Pike, Repairing Street 

Lanterns, - . . 12 47 

C. R. CoUey, Repairing Street Lan- 
terns, - - - - 15 78 

S. & T. Wiggin, Repairing Street 

Lanterns, - - - - 1 60 

Montgomery & Wilson, 2 Lamps, 75 

Hartshorn & Pike, 1 Fluid Can, 25 

Balance, -. - - - 249 86 

61,929 15 



65 



EESEEVOIES. 



By Balance from last year's 


Account, 


126 24 


" Appropriation, - 


DITUllES. 


1,000 00, 


EXPEN 




To Edward McQueston, 


Labor, 


30 75 


Wni. E. Eastman & Son, " 


18 84 


Hugh Ramsey, 


u 


3 50 


Robert Scott, 


a 


2 50 


James Cams, 


ii 


12 50 


John Laikin, 


a 


8 00 


Peter Scanlin, 


a 


13 50 


Daniel O'Conner, 


a 


3 00 


Dennis Bronner, 


ii 


4 00 


Thomas Larkin, 


a 


15 00 


John Loftis, 


u 


3 75 


John Ragan, 


11 


2 75 


James Galavan, 


a 


3 00 


Michael Morrissy, 


a 


5 00 


Nathaniel Corning, 


n 


8 87 


Patrick Hal pin. 


li 


3 00 


John Bry&an, 


a 


3 00 


Jeremiah Mabanna, 


u 


3 50 


James Talty, 


ii 


2 50 


John Prindable, 


a 


3 00 


Michael Scanlin, 


ii 


3 00 


Matthew Wbalan, 


a 


3 00 


"\Villia)n Burke, 


(( 


2 50 


Patrick Fowler, 


a 


3 00 


Cornelius Fliun, 


u 


3 00 


Michael Conner, 


a 


2 00 



1,126 24 



Amount carried forward^ 



IGl 46 



66 

Amount brought forward, 

Daniel Farley, Labor, 

James White, "■ 

Cornelius Histan, " 

James Marr, " 

James Murphy, " 

B. Gentry, " 

Jonathan Smith, " 

T. L. Southwick, " 

Thomas McCormick, " 

Joseph Lafayette, " 

Timothy 0' Conner, " 

David Lyons, . " 

Mrs. Laura Clark, '• 

Gibbon L. Dough, " 

James Madden, " 

Thomas Harvey, " 

John Dowd, " 

Daniel O'Lary, " 

Ebeii Knowlton, " 

John Logue, " 

William B. Welch, " 

Patrick Welch, " 

John McDermat, " 

F. G. Bean, " 

Michael Kane, " 

Patrick Spain, " 

James Mulher, " 

Patrick Fox, " 

Jeremiah Sullivan, " 

John Coran, " 

John Connel, " 

Michael Shady, " 

Amomil carried forward, - 2G2 02 



16146 


100 


3 00 


3 00 


2 75 


150 


50 


2 50 


2 50 


2 00 


2 00 


3 00 


2 00 


5 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


30 44 


3 37 


2 00 


5 50 


150 


2 50 


2 00 


150 


2 00 


150 


3 50 


100 


150 


150 



67 

Amount, brought forumnU 

Michael Cuddy, Labor, 

John Carty, " 

D. Mahauna, " 

Patrick McLathran, " 

John Carey, " 

Edward Girreghty, " 

Daniel Logue, " 

Jerry Ragin, " 

C. M. Bailey, " 

Patrick Manning, " 

Joseph Clement, " 

Michael Foley, " 

John Fleming, " 

Patrick Murphy, " 

James Quinn, " 

Patrick Sullivan, " 

Austin D. Meally, " 

John Scully, " 

S. S. Moulton, " 

John Murphy, " 

Joseph A. Weeks. " 

Merrill & Bailey, '* 

Francis Smiley, " 

William Chase, " 

Timothy Brosnehan, " 

J. Flynn, " 

Morris Bradley, " 

Merrill & Sanborn, " 

Edward Danley, " 

William Kimball, " 

James Lyans, " 

Randlett <t Brown, " 

Amount carried forward, - - 344 35 



262 02 


100 


150 


5 00 


100 


.2 00 


25 


125 


125 


100 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


2 00 


100 


2 00 


1 00 


2 50 


1 75 


100 


3 00 


5 00 


4 00 


8 00 


3 00 


5 00 


2 00 


3 00 


9 00 


2 50 


150 


6 33 


50 



68 



Amount broug-ht fori'mrd, 


- 


344 35 


James Silk, 


Labor, 


1 00 


H. M. Bailey, 


a 


6 50 


Richard Dray, 


(.(. 


2 50 


Jerry Conner, 


(.(. 


4 00 


Michael McDermat, 


!.(. 


2 50 


Morris Shea, 


ii 


2 00 


John Worcester, 


iC 


1 50 


Timothy Shine, 


(.'. 


3 00 


Michael Gogin, 


i(. 


2 00 


John Welch, 


u 


2 00 


John Mahanna, 


(( 


1 00 


Urick Shine, 


(( 


150 


E. M. Toplifif, 


(.1. 


5 00 


^lichael Broderick, 


(.i 


3 00 


Moody McCarty, 


u 


3 00 


Horace elohnson, 


u 


1 00 


F. H. Brown, 


ii 


2 75 


Patrick Green, 


u 


, 1 50 


James Fleming, 


(; 


1 50 


John Kelly, 


u 


2 50 


John Morris, 


ii. 


4 00 


Michael Slattery, 


a 


3 00 


Patrick Holmes, 


6i 


2 00 


Daniel Eagan, 


(.; 


100 


T4ichael Donahoe, 


u 


1 00 


Patrick Dray, 


ii 


2 50 


Lawrence McCarty, 


ii 


2 00 


Daniel Sullivan, 


ci; 


2 00 


Lawrence Grogau, 


ii 


2 50 


John Craig, 


a 


3 00 


J. G. Colt,^ 


a 


12 17 


John H. Maynard, 


ii 


2 87 



Amount carried f or ward . - - 432 14 



G9 

AmouiU h ran g-hi forward, - - 432 14 

City Team, Team Labor, - - 26 87 

Daniels & Co., Hardware, - 10 32 

John B. Varick, " - - 38 75 

John H. Maynard, " - .40 

W. P. Stratton, Work and Repairs, 2 67 
Neal & Holbrook, " . ^' 1 75 

J. G. Colt, Powder, - - 3 07 

J. G. Colt, Use of Tools, - - 1 85 

J. G. Colt, teaming and laying stone, 50 71 
J. Abbott ct Co., 5 casks Cement, 8 00 

C. ct L. Gage, Iron Forging, 2 70 

Temple AIcQueston, Cement Pipe and 

laying, . . . . 175 45 
A. Walker & Co., 21-^r^ perch Stone, 42 41 
E. G. Young, 2 Stone Covers, 10 00 

Randlett &■ Brown, 1 Stone Cover, 4 50 
Francis Smiley, 230 leet Boards, 3 00 

John II. Maynard, Plank and Timber, 15 60 
Gilman B. Fogg, Keys, - - 38 

Balance, ". . . . 296 17 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



$1,120 24 



By Appropriation, 

'' Transferred from Reserved Fund, 
" Cash received for entering Sewers, 

EXPENDITURES. 
To Balance from last year's Account, 
E. G, Haynes, LaI)or, 

Francis Sniiley, '' 

Ariiovnt carried foricard, - - 760 59 



1,200 00 
710 99 

190 20 

i 


^2,101 19 


710 99 
32 60 
17 00 



70 

Amount brought fonvard, - - 760 59 

William Chase, Labor, 1 00 

Peter Scanlin, " 18 75 

William Eastman & Son, " 15 50 

James Carnes, " 24 00 

Merrill & Bailey, " 18 50 

Willliam Griffin, "• 12 00 

Eben Knowlton, " 5 25 

Thomas Larkin, " 2 00 

L. Mahamia, " 7 00 

William Gibbons, " 2 50 

Ezekiel Tebbetts, " 2 00 

Nathaniel Corning, " 2 00 

Wm. McPherson, " 1 00 

Ell)ridge G. Haynes, Cement, Pipe, 

1,534 feet, - - - 307 47 

W. McPherson,CenVt Pipe, 1,045 ft., 201 53 
Elbridge G. Hoynes, 4,000 Bricks, 24 00 
Elbridge G. Haynes, Cement, 1 00 

Elbridge G. Haynes, 7 Casks Cement, 13 40 
Elbridge G. Haynes, I'eam Laljor, 2 50 

Temple McQueston, Repairing Cess- 
pool, - - - . 
John Houston, Iron Work, - 
Daniels <fe Co., Grale, 
Andrew McCrillis, Irons, 
W. P. Sti-atton, Repairing Rams 
Hartshorn & Pike, Scoop, 
J. L. Smith, 236 feet Plank, - 
David Wells, 1,100 feet Plank. 
Daniels &c Co., Hardware, 
Daniels & Co., Handsaw, - 
Daniels k Co., 1 Axe, - 
Balance, - - - - . 



2 04 


12 32 


5 29 


5 15 


18 09 


37 


4 25 


16 b^] 


7 92 


142 


1 00 


609 79 


$2,101 19 



I 

SCHOOLS. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 1. 

B}^ Appropriation, . . . 200 00 

EXPENDITURES. 
To Orders in favor School Committee on 

Treasurer, - - - - 200 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 2. 

By Appropriation, - - - 14,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Orders in favor School Committee on 

Treasurer, - - - - 14,000 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 3. 

By Appropriation, - . - 275 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Orders in favor Scliool Committee, 270 00 



72 
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 4. 

By Appropriation, - - - . 200 00 
EXPENDITURES. 

To Orders in favor School Committee on 

Treasurer, - - - 200 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 5. 

Bj Appropriation, - - - 200 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Orders in favor School Committee on 

Treasurer, - - - 200 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 6. 

By Appropriation, - - - _ 225 00 

EXPENDITURES. 
To Orders in favor Scliool Committee on 

Treasurer, ... 200 00 



73 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 7. 

By Appropriation, - - - - 225 00 
expi-:nditures. 

To Orders in favor School Committee on 

Treasurer, - - - 225 00 

% 



- SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 8. 

By Appropriation, - - - - 200 00 
EXPENDITURES. 

To Orders in favor School Committee on 

Treasurer, ' 200 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 9. 

By Appropriation, - - - 200 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Orders in favor School Committee on 

Treasurer, - - - 200 00 



74 
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 10. 

By Appropriation, - - - _ 975 00 

EXPENDITURES. 
To Orders on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, - - - 975 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 11. 

By Appropriation, - - - 500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 
To Orders in favor School Committee on 

Treasurer, - - - 500 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 1. 

BUILDING OR REPAIR ACCOUNT. 

Bv Amount raised by Tax, - - 154 58 

$15 J 58 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Order on Treasurer in favor J. S. 

Yeaton, - - - - 150 00 

Bah^nce, - - - ' - 4 58 

$154 58 



75 
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2. 

BUILDING ACCOUNT. 

By Amount raised by Tax, - - 3,918 70 



EXPENDITURES. 
To Balance from last year's Account, 18 48 

" Order on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee No. 85, - 1,000 00 

" Order on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, No. 86, - - 2,719 33 
" Order on Treasurer in favor School 

Connnittee, No. 98, - - GO 00 

Balance, 115 89 



^913 70 



,913 70 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 10. 

BUILDING ACCOUNT. 

By Amount raised by Tax in 1860, 944 75 

a u u u u u 1861, 1,027 71 

$1,972 46 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Order on Treasurer in favor B. F. 

Wallace, - - - - 600 00 

" Order on Treasurer in favor A. F. 

Carr, - - - - 81 23 

" Order on Treasurer in favor John 

Jolmson, - - - - 30 00 

" Order on Treasurer in favor Hillsbor- 
ough Insurance Co., - 35 20 



Amount carried f or icard, - 746 43 



76 

Amoinil brought forward, - - 746 43 
" Order on Treasurer in favor Robert 

McGaw, - . - - 15 00 

" Order on Treasurer in favor John C. 

Smith, - - - - 135 62 

" Order on Treasurer in favor H. R, 

Chamberlin, Treasurer, - 160 00 

" Order on Treasurer in favor Amosk'g 

Man'fg Co., - - - 497 51 

Balance, .... 417 90 



$1,972 46 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 11. 

BUILDING ACCOUNT. 

ByAmount raised by Tax in 1860, 508 69 

" " " " " 1861, 576 43 

Sl,085 12 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Order on Treasurer in favor J. M. 

Varnum, - - - . 200 00 
" Order on Treasurer in favor J. M. 

Varnum, - - 300 00 

" Order on Treasurer in favor James 0. 

Adams, - - - - 37 50 

" Order on Treasurer in favor J. M. 

Varnum and Geo. H. Colby, 300 00 

" Order on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, District No. 11, 247 62 

$1,085 12 



FEINTING AND STATIONERY. 



By Balance from last year's Account, 55 12 

" Appropi'iation, - - - - 900 00 

" Cash received for Advertising, - 80 00 

'• Cash refunded for error in Bills, 12 48 

Balance, - - - - - 11 GO 

$1,059 20 

EXPENDITURES. 

To J, M. Campbell, for printing Check 

Lists, - - . - 10 00 

Gage & Farnsworth, for printing 

Check Lists, - - - 60 00 

Charles F. Livingston, for printing 

Check Lists, - - 6 00 

Gage & Farnsworth, for printing 

Blanks, - - - - 85 25 

John B, Clarke, for printing do. and 

Advertising, - " - - 83 62 

Charles F. Livingston, for printing 

Blanks and Blank Books, 95 30 

S. D. Farnsworth, for printing and 

Advertising, - - - 89 55 

J. M. Campbell, for printing and Ad- 
vertising, - - - - 5 50 

Wm. H. Fisk, for Blar.k Books, Bind- 
ing and Stationery, - - 97 87 

Hersey & Tilton, for Blank Books, 

and Stationery, - - - 45 70 

L. S. Leonard, for Blank Books, 

and Stationery, - - 4 00 

Ammnit carried forward, - - 582 79 



78 



Amount brought forward^ - - 532 79 

Tewksbury & Brother, Blank Book.s, 

and Stationery, - - - 2 88 

E. Wallace, Steel Pens, - - 1 50 

J. Q. Garfield, Steel Pens, - - 2 00 

Campbell & Harriman, printing Blanks, 2 00 
Gage &. Farnsworth, printing Mayor's 

Inaugural Address, - 14 00 

Gage & Farnsworth, printing 2,000 

Copies Annual Report, - 397 28 
E. B. Bcaman, Binding Books, 10 75 

S. D. Farnsworth, Advertising notice 

Public Meeting, - - 2 00 

S. I). Farnsworth, Advertising notice 

Volunteers Return, - - 1 00 

S. D. Farnsworth, Advertising notice 

War Meeting, - - 1 00 

S. D. Farnsworth, Advertising notice 

Volunteers Families, - 8 50 

S. D. Farnsworth, Advertising notice 

Sanitary Committee, - 5 00 

S. D. Farnsworth, Advertising notice 

Ordinance, . . . 8 00 

John B. Clarke, Advertising notice 

for closing Vaults, - 2 00 

John B. Clarke, Advertising notice of 

Dog License, - - - 1 50 

John B. Clarke, Advertising notice 

Public Meeting, - - 2 00 

Fogg & Hadley, Advertising Non- 

Resident Tax List, - 31 00 

S. D. Farnsworth, Advertising Non- 

Resident Tax List, - - 3-4 00 



$1,059 20 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



By Appropriation, - - - 4,000 00 

" Cash received for Use of Aqueduct 

Water, . . _ . 
" Cash received for Circus License, 
" Cash refunded, . . . - 
" Cash received for Dog License, 
" Cash received for Notes receivable, 
" Transferred from City City Hall ac't, 
" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 
Balance, - - . - 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Balance from last year's account, 1,093 24 
John V. Gooden, Watering 

Trough, 1860 - - 3 00 

John V. Gooden, " Trough, 1861, 3 00 
W. H. Noyes, Watering Trough, 3 00 

W. W. Morris, Expenses of taking 

depositions in Boston, in the 

Firemans' Riot Case, - - 78 38 
Micah Dyer, Jr., Taking depositions 

in Boston in Fireman's Riot Case, 
Clark & Smith, Attorney's Fees, 
Samuel Upton, " " 

Samuel N. Bell, " " 

Ira Ferley, " " 

Ira A. Eastman, • " " 

Am-junt carried forward, - - 1,524 36 



135 00 


175 00 


9 00 


18 00 


193 47 


36 00 


500 00 


332 78 


S5,399 25 



79 00 


78 00 


2 74 


52 00 


110 00 


22 00 



80 



Amount hrcvs^ht forward, - - 1,524 36 
Joseph Mitchell, damage by Fireman's 

Riot, - - - - 126 40 

Horace Bonney, " " Riot, 340 00 ' 

Maiiassa Perkii-is, " " " 233 60 

J. W. Whittier, " " " 300 00 

Smith & Richardson, " " 137 50 

John Ray, damage by highway 

defect, ... - 250 00 

Michael Hurley, damages by falling 

on side walk, - - - 200 00 

E. A. Heath, damages by ninning 

into a woodpile, . . . 200 00 
H. R. French, dnmage to wagon by 

bad highway, - - - - 1 50 
Benjamin Hutchinson, setting trees, 2 00 
T. P. Clough, setting trees, - 5 75 

Timothy McQuinn, carting guns from 

Depot, - - - . - 25 

Concord, Manchester & Lawrence 

Rail Road, freight of Guns, • 1 06 

H. H. Noyes, Labor in Ward Room, 2 00 

F. S. Lynch, " " " " 1 50 
S. S. Moulton, " " City Stable, 75 
All)ion Barker, " '' " " 11 25 
Eben Frcncli, " " Ward Room, 2 50 
Mary E. Ireland, washing Ward Room, 2 00 
Charles W. Colby, distributing As- 
sessor's Notices - - - 3 00 

Francis Smiley, repairing tree boxes, 2 00 
J. E. Bennett, copying Assessors' 

Tax Book, - - - 4 00 

J. 0. Fulsifer, expenses to Franklin, 9 00 

Amoiuii carried forward, - - 3,360 42 



81 

Aiiioitiit brouf^ht forward, - - 3,360 42 

J. S. Smitii, lumber for Park Street, 

School House, - - - 2 60 
JI. R. Chamberlin, Blank Books, Sta- 
tionery, &c., - - - - 6 30 
Ilolt & Noyes, making Box for 

Ward Records, - - - 1 42 
Martin Roach, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, - 1 00 
Michael Fanty, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, - 2 50 

C. M, Bailey, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, - o 00 
Patrick Whalan, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 2 00 

Edmund Welch, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 2 00 
John Finton, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, 2 00 

Patrick Casey, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, 2 50 

Patrick Memsug, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 2 00 
Bryant Conner, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, 2 50 

Noah Glover, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, 2 00 

William Kimball, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 2 00 

James Marr, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, 1 00 

Anthony Bohan, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 1 75 



Ahitonnt carried forward^ - - 3,396 99 



82 

Amount brovgJd forumrd, ■ ' 8,39G 99 

Michael Kane, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, 50 

Charles McCarty, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 1 60 
James Silk, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, 1 50 

Thomas Harvey, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 1 00 

James Flattery, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, 1 00 

John Malianna, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, 1 50 

James Mulholme, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 1 00 

William Brown, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 2 00 
Patrick Holmes, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 1 00 
Jeremiah Regan, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 1 00 
Patrick Murphy, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 2 00 

John McDermot, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 1 00 
J^hn Welch, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, 1 00 

Euric Shane, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, 1 00 

Timothy Shine, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 1 00 
Timothy Bresnehan, Lal)or, excavating 

for pijjC laying to City Stable, 1 00 

Anwvnl carried forinard. - - 3.415 99 



83 

Amount brought forward., - - 3,415 99 
John Fleming, Labor, excavating for 

pipe laying to City Stable, • 1 00 

Michael Shady, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 1 00 

Ebeu Knowlton, Labor, excavating 

tor pipe laying to City Stable, 6 00 
Tenple McQiieston, Labor, excavating 

for pipe laying to City Stable, 3 62 

Colbath & Co., Iron Pipe for convey- 
ing water to Stable, 109 86 
Pinkerton, Abbott & Co., Hall for 

Ward 2, Ward Meeting, 16 00 

Bradley tt Co., Pipe for No. 5 Ward 

Room, - . - . 5 85 

J. L. Qnimby, Carting off dead Horse, 2 00 
John A. Perry, Rent of Hall for Fire 

Police, - - - 30 00 

Peter Edwards, Wood for Ward Room, 3 00 
David Wells, Wood for Ward Room,. 2 25 
D. W. Fiing, Horse and Carriage, 5 62 

Hill & Cilley, " " 11 75 

J. A. Merrill, " " 2 00 

S. L. Fogg, " " 3 00 

S. D. Slierburne, Horse and Carriage, 3 00 
H. H. Ladd, " " 1 75 

Hersey & Tilton, School Books for 

Indigent Children, - - 77 01 
W. H. Elliot, Repairing Clock, 4 00 

Joseph Knowlton, Making Annual 

Report for 1860, - - 100 00 

Joseph Knowlton, Making Schedule 

of Bills and Accounts, - 18 75 

Amount carried forward, - - 3,823 48 



84 

Amount brought f or ivard, - 3,823 48 
Manchester Post Office, for Postage, 21 18 
J. Q. A. Sargent, for repairing Wa- 
ter Pipe and Rams, - - 1 75 
Albion Barker, for repairing Water 

Pipe and Rams, - - - 3 00 

R. M. Yale, 2 Flags, - - 19 00* 

F. S. Manning, Work on Flags, 3 00 

S. G. Keniston, Work on Flags, 1 25 

Torrent Engine Co., Flag Staff, 18 00 

Torrent Engine Co., " '' 15 00 
P. I. & W. H. Boyd, damage to goods 

by Water, - - - - 15 00 
Reuben P. Young, damage to goods 

by Water, . - - 6 00 

Oilman B. Fogg, 1 Revolver, - 18 00 
Daniels & Co., 29 Revolvers, 366 00 
D. A. Bunton, in place of Rubber 
Blankets and Revolvers, — Cash, 
for Cornet Band, - - 400 00 
^5. D. Farnsworth, Advertising Com- 
mittee notice of Abatement of 

Taxes, ... - 7 00 

B. Hutchinson, burying Nuisances, 1 50 

Lawrence Colby, " " 50 
Oilman B. Fogg, 1 pr. Money Scales 

for City Sealer, - - - 2 50 

Cheney, Hill & Co., Express Business, 1 00 
Geo. H. Chamberlin, copying Tax 

Book, - - - - 4 50 
Wm. Craig, posting up Health No- 
tices, - - - 75 
Stephen Jenkins, Clearing Vault, 7 00 

AmuinU carried forward, - 4,735 41 



85 



Ainoitnt brought f or IV ard, - - 4,735 41 
Francis Smiley, Slats for boxing Trees, 3 10 
H. R. Chamberlin, Advertising Non- 

Resident Land Sale, - - 10 00 

Mancliester Gas Light Co, Gas used . 

by Soldiers at No. 5 Engine 

House, - - . - 12 60 

.Tohn Prince, repairing Hearse, 8 75 

John H. Maynard, Work on Target 

Pole and Water Tank, - 17 29 

Gage & Farnswortii, printing Tax 

Bills, (fee, - - - - 
D. R. Prescott, 1 barrel Pitchwood, 
J. Coibath & Co., Gas Pipe and Fifc- 

tir.gs, ----- 
Herman Foster, Lisurance, 
Pbcenix Lisurance Co., Lisurance, 
J. D. Lyford, Insurance, 
Neal & Holbrook, Repairs in Watch 

Room, - - - - 4 50 

Pinkerton, Abbott & Co., Rentof Plall 

for Ward Meeting, - - 8 00 

Charles W. Adams, Hanging Paper, 4 00 
Manchester Gas Light Co., Gas, 2 40 

S. S. Moulton, Repairs at City Stable, 1 33 
Gilman Reed, 1 Load Sand, 321 bush., 5 00 

D. R. Prescott, Saw Dust, - 40 
J. L. Smitli, repairing Wm. Adams' 

House, - - - - 16 68 

Joseph Knowlton, Transcribing In- 
dex to Attachments, - 20 00 

E. B. Bcaman, making Tax Book, 50 



7 75 


50 


15 04 


168 25 


16 25 


30 00 



Amount carried forward, - - 5,087 75 



86 

Amovni broiig-Iit forward^ - ■ - 5,087 75 
Harry Brickett, School Commission- 
er, - - - . 152 80 

Hemeiiway & Walker, Inkstand, 1 00 
Straw & Prince, Funeral Expenses 

of Infant, . - - 2 00 

F. S. Lynch, Repairing Ward Room, 1 50 

iNeal & Holbrook, " " " 2 00 

I>. R. Prescott, Sawing Wood, 3 22 
Wm. Adams, damage to House by 

Mob, - - - - 44 ?>2 
James Price, damage to property by 

Mob, - - - - 15 00 

Barton k Co, Carpeting, 69 yds., 11 50 
Joseph Knowlton, Recording Births, 

Deaths and Marriages, - 51 16 
Henry Bennett, Expense after Bur- 

"lars, - - - - 27 00 



-85,899 'J 5 



CITY OFFICERS. 



r>y Balance from last year's Account, B-tO 54 
'' Appropriation, - - ' - 5,500 00 



$5,840 54 



EXPENDITURES. 

To D. A. Bunton, Mayor, - 1,000 00 

Joseph Know-lion, City Clerk, 500 00 

S. D. Farnsworth, Clerk Common 

Council, - - - 100 00 

James 0. Adams, Clerk pro tem Com- 
mon Coimcil, - - - G 00 

Josepli H. Knovvlton, Clerk pro tem 

Common Couiicil, - 4 00 

L. IL James, Messenger, - 204 00 

Daniel R. Prescott, Messenger, 97 25 

James 0. Adams, Supt. Schools, 

11. It. Chamberlin, Treasurer, 

U. R. Chamberlin, Collector, 

John Hosloy, Sclioul Committee, 

Waterman Sniith, " " 

James B. Straw, " 

Hiram Hill, " 

Joim Coughlin, " 

rlames 0. Adams, " " 

Samuel Webber, " • " 

Dan'l Farmer, Jr., " 

Asa Place, Overseer Poor, 

Hanson Tasker, " " 

Aiiiomif carried forward, 



700 00 


200 00 


600 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


35 00 


20 00 


a,54G 25 



Amount hrovght forward, 

John M. Hawks, Overseer Poor, 

S. S. Moulton, " " Clerk, 

Nahum Baldwin, " " 

Hiram Stearns, " " 

Daniel Hail, Assessor, 

J. Y. McQueston, Assessor, 

George-F. Judkins, " 

George S. Noal, " 

Joseph Mel V in, '• 

Daniel W. Fling, " 

John N. Brown, " 

James Walker, '' 

Joseph E. Bennett, " 

W. D. Buck, City Physician, - 

AVm. W. Morris, City Solicitor, 

Charles W. Johnson, City Solicitor 

Davis Baker, Health Officer, 

James 0. Adams, Truant Police, 

Asa Place, Selectman, - 

Hiram Hill, Selectman, 

James W. Preston, Selectman, 

Samuel D. Lord, " 

Charles K. Walker, " 

T. L. Quimby, 

C. C. Frost, 

Leonard Sanborn, " 

Isaac H. Kussell, " 

Henry W. Randall, " 

H. H. Noyes, 

John Hosley, " 

J. D. Patterson, " 

Isaac Whittemore, " 

Aiiunint carried forward, - 4,798 25 



3,546 25 


35 00 


75 00 


35 00 


20 00 


60 00 


64 00 


60 00 


100 00 


60 00 


134 00 


62 00 


68 00 


144 00 


50 00 


65 00 


•, 100 00 


25 00 


25 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 



89 



Amovnt hrcvg^lit foncord, - - 4/ 


198 25 


Joseph Feireii, Selectman, 


5 00 


Michael Gillis, " 


5 00 


Ira W. Moore, " 


5 00 


E. G. Haynes, " 


10 00 


John Patterson, " 


5 00 


John Hosley, " 


5 00 


Charles W. Colby, " 


5 00 


H. H. Noyes, ^' 


5 00 


James W. Preston, " 


5 00 


John D. Irving, Ward Clerk, 


5 00 


Cyrus Gile, " " 


5 00 


John T. Robinson, Ward Clerk, 


5 00 


Daniel K. Mack, " " 


5 00 


I. W. Webster, 


10 00 


James S. Gilmore, " " 


5 00 


Cyrus Gile, " " 


5 00 


Joseph E. Bennett, •' " 


3 00 


Isaac Fluse, Moderator, 


3 00 


Daniel Balch, " 


3 00 


T. S. Montgomery, " 


3 00 


Jesse F. Angell, " 


3 00 


Jacob G. Cilley, 


9 00 


George Holl)rook, " 


3 00 


Theodore T. Abbott, " 


3 00 


John D. Irving, Stationery, 


4(3 


J. S. Gilmore, '• 


100 


Cyrus Gile, " 


1 00 


John T. Robinson, " 


45 


Daniel K. Mack, " 


50 


Daniel Hall, Use of Horse Sc Carriage 


, 6 00 


J, Y. McQueston, Use of Horse and 




Carriage, . _ - . 


10 00 



Am nut ca. ried forward, 



4,1)37 66 



90 

Amount broug-ht forvmrd. - - 4,937 QQ 
Daniel W, Fling, Use of Horse and 

Carnage, - - - - 14 25 

James Walker, Use of Horse and 

Carriage, - - - - 2 50 
Daniel W. Fling, Expenses, - 2 00 

Balance, 884 13 



15,840 54 



CITY POLICE. 



By Appropriation, . . - 
" Amount paid into the Treasury, 
" Transferred from Reserved Fnnd, 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Samuel Upton, Police Justice, 
A. B. Shattuck, Special Justice, 
William B. Patten, Marshal, 
Benjamin C. Haynes, Assistant 
Marshal, _ . . - 
Henry Bennett, Night Watch, 
Uriah H. Foss, " " 
E. P. Whidden, " " 
Eben Carr, " " 



Amount carried foncard, - - - 3,S0S 50 



5,000 00 


1,624 28 


1,319 05 


*7 ^n "iT 


500 00 


50 50 


700 00 


500 00 


488 25 


477 75 


549 00 


543 00 



91 



imoimt hrov^-hi for ward. 


- 




3,808 50 


Henry Clough, N 


ght W 


ate 


h, 520 00 


David Aldoii. 


u 


u 


88 00 


Daniel R. Pi-escott, 


u 


a 


75 25 


N. E. Taplin, 


a 


a 


547 50 


H. S. Burn?, 


a 


u 


455 25 


C. M. Stevens, 


a 


u 


27 75 


Lemuel 11, James, 


(( 


u 


15 00 


Greenleaf Ambrose, 


u 


a 


6 75 


Charles Uartlett, 


a 


u 


20 25 


G. G. Gordon, 


u 


(( 


12 75 


A. G. Fairl)auks, 


a 


u 


19 50 


John K. Piper, 


a 


u 


4 50 


H. M. Bailey 


u 


a 


75 


Daniel ]\I. Robinson, 


u 


a 


150 


Hiram S. Barnes, 


u 


u 


6 00 


Nathaniel Baker, 2d, 


u 


a 


150 


All)ert T. Wing, 


(( 


a 


26 25 


H. J. Tirrill, 


u 


u 


1 50 


Henry B. Moulton, 


a 


a 


150 


Andrew J. Butterfield, 


a 


a 


1 50 


John Wadleigli, 


u 


ii 


75 


William M. Chamberlin, 


a 


u 


75 


F. S. W\,rthen, 


a 


a 


4 50 


Joseph L. Smith, 


u 


u 


6 75 


I. W. Abbott, 


(( 


a 


75 


Josiah Hackott, 


;( 


a 


2 25 


L. A. W\ard, 


(b 


a 


2 25 


G. S. Holmes, 


a 


a 


75 


T. S. Quimby, 


a 


a 


75 


J. E. Bailey, 


a 


a 


75 


C. S. Burpee, 


a 


a 


75 


Patrick Doyle, 


a 


a 


2 25 


mount carried foricard. 


6,120 75 



92 



Amount brovghi forioard, - - 6,120 75 
J. Wilkiiis, Night Watch, 75 



J. Boyce, 




a a 


75 


C. M. Stevens, 




a a 


1 50 


Henry Bennett, 


Day 


Police, 


20 75 


T. M. Morse, 


a 


u 


3 00 


Stephen Palmer, 


a 


(C 


3 00 


Samuel Foley, 


a 


a 


3 50 


H. M. Bailey, 


a 


u 


2 75 


Cornelius Healey, 


a 


u 


3 00 


p]d\vard Prime, 


a 


a 


3 25 


Patrick Doyle, 


a 


a 


6 00 


Elien Carr, 


a 


a 


27 75 


B. C. Haynes, 


i( 


a 


2 00 


Edward Hackett, 


ii, 


u 


1 50 


Uriah, H. Foss, 


a 


u 


8 50 


Matthew Byrns, 


a 


a 


160 


E. P. Whidden, 


a 


a 


21 50 


Henry Clough, 


u 


a 


12 25 


David Aldcn, 


a 


a 


19 00 


Daniel R. Prescott, 


;( 


ii 


6 25 


John 0. Brien, 


u 


a 


2 00 


Nathaniel B. Tapliji, 


a 


a 


5 75 


II. S. Barnes, 


a 


a 


3 00 


I'Mward Bonner, 


a 


u 


2 00 


C. M. Stevens, 


a 


a 


4 00 


Michael Lavler, 


u 


u 


2 00 


William Brown, 


^( 


a 


1 00 


James Patten, 


a 


a 


5 00 


Cornelius Ilealey, Jr 


a 


u 


50 


James Perry, 


a 


a 


3 00 


1. W. Al.l)o'tt, 


a 


a 


3 00 


Orrison Wel)ber, 


a 


ii 


3 60 



Amonnl carried f one ard^ - - 6,304 00 



93 



Amount broitg-hl forward, 

II. J. Tinili, Day Police, 

John K. Piper, " " 

Charles Bartlett, ^' " 

W. N. Chamberlin, " " 

Nathaniel Baker, 2d, " " \ 

A. P. Wing, " " 

G. S. Holmes, 

G. G. Gordan, '' '' 

A. G. Fairbanks, ^' " 

Greenleaf Ambrose, " " 

Daniel M. Robinson, " " 

T. R. Northrop, " " 

H. G. Lowell, 

Benjamin Hutchinson, '■'' " 

P. S. Worthen, " " 

Josiah Hackett, " " 

J. S. Abbott, " " 

Hugh Ramsey, " " 

H. S. Burns, 

Josheph Carr, " 

S. L. Quimby, " *' 

J. L. Smith, '• " 

Henry B. Moulton, " ^'• 

L. A. Ward, 

John L. Kelly, Expense after 

Burglars, _ . - 
Henry Bennett, Expense after 

Burglars, - - - - 
William Craig, Posting Bills, 
Walker & Young, 6 Matrasses, 
Walker & Young, 8 Comforters, 
John S. Folsom, Crockery, 

Amount carried forward^ 



6,304 00 


1 00 


2 50 


8 75 


1 00 


-2 00 


14 25 


1 00 


2 00 


10 50 


4 50 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


150 


1 00 


2 50 


50 


1 25 


25 


60 


3 00 


1 50 


1 00 


1 00 



Silk 



Silk 



70 34 



27 00 


50 


12 75 


10 00 


38 



6,489 47 



94 

Amount broiig-ht foriuard. - - 6.489 47 
Gage & Faruswortli, Printing, - 49 22 
H. A. Gage, '' 20 00 

Hersey & Tilton, Stationery, - 8 21 

William B. Patten, >' - 4 92 

Samuel Upton, Office Rent, - 50 00 

William B. Patten, provisions fur- 
nished prisoners, - = 98 00 
Benjamin C. Haynes, provisions fur- 
nished travellers, - - 105 24 
Wm. B. Patten, Witness' Fees, paid, 97 26 
Paniel R. Prescott, Repairs in Mar- 
shall's Office, - - - 4 54 
William B. Patten, Office Expenses, 27 10 
William B. Patten, Travelling " 13 75 
Benj. Hutchinson, burying nuisance, 75 
E. P. Johnson, Coal, -" - 19 67 
E. G. Haynes, repairing Lobby, 2 50 
Cross & Toplitf, Attorney's Services, 13 00 
Hartshorn & Pike, repairing Funnel, 5 81 
Daniel Wells, Wood, - - 8 58 
Daniels & Co., Hardware, - - 1 00 
^V. B. Patten, conveying Paupers to 

County Farm, - - - 12 00 
A. G. Fairbanks, damage to wagon, 7 00 
W. B. Patten, Horse & Carriage hire, 30 25 
Patten & Haynes, " " " 167 25 

Hill & Cilley, " " " 5 25 

Balance, - - - - 702 56 



07,943 83 



LIB.EAEY. 



By Balance from last year's Account, 


58,18 


" Appropriation, - . . 


2,100 00 


Balance, 


ao 72 




$2,194 90 


EXPENDITURES. 




To B. F. Stanton, Printing, 


18 00 


Gage & Farnswortli, " 


8 50 


Manchester Gas Light Co., Gas, 


112 80 


Samuel N. Bell, Rent, 


249 98 


Samuel N, Bell, Newspapers, 


30 35 


li. G. Ayers, " 


75 


S. D. Farnsworth, " 


8 50 


F. B. Eaton, " 


3 00 


John B. Clarke, " 


54 


Campbell & Harriman, " 


1 25 


Dudley & Parker, " 


2 42 


F. B. Eaton, " 


600 00 


Manchester Post Office, " 


4 22 


Trtustee's Order on City of Mariches- 


ter, - - - - 


1,000 00 


A. C. Wallace, Boxes for Shelves, 


1100 


Wm. H. Fisk, 6 Blank Books, 


16 50 


D. F. Buckley, Periodicals, 


16 80 


ITersey & Tilton, " 


4 25 


A. Quimby, " 


17 25 


Hersey & Tilton, 


2 25 


E. B. Beaman, Binding Books, 


10 58 


W. A. Holt, Wood, 


2 50 



Av.itn.t caired fcru-aid, [ 2,12144 



96 

Amount brought forward, - - 2,121 4-1 
John Q. A. Sargent, Repairing Oas 

Fittings, 
Neal & Holbrook, Repairs,* 
S. N. Bell, Freight of Books, 
^Etna Insuranee Co., Insurance 
Phoenix Insuranee Co., •• 
E. P. Johnson, Coal, 
Albion Barker, Lumber and Labor, 



3 05 


1 00 


81 


32 50 


18 75 


15 10 


•, 2 25 



$2,104 90 



MILITIA. 

By Balance from last year's Accoxmt, 2 86 

" Appropriation, „ - - . 300 00 



— $302 86 



EXPENDITURES. 
To Smyth & Richardson, Rent of Hall for 

Abbott Guards, - - 66 25 

J. Kimball, Rent of Music Hall three 

Evenings, - - ~ . 6 00 

Howard <fe More, Rent of Hall for 

Phalanx Company, - 50 00 

Jesse Kimball, Rent of Music Hall 

for Donahoc's Company, 18 00 

A moskeag Veterans, Rent of Armory, 50 00 
Balance, ~ - - - "^122 61 



$302 8(3 



SAFE. 



By Appropriation, - - - - 


600 00 




EXPENDITUKES. 






To M. B. Bigelow & Co., 1 Safe, 


550 00 




Concord Railroad, Freight, 


14 79 




John H. Maynard, for fitting up. 


30 00 




Balance, . . - . 


5 21 








$600 00 



PAYING ELM STEEET. 



By Appropriation, - - - - 2,000 GO 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Balance from last year's Account, 109 77 
Moses D. Stokes, 1,2743^0- square 

yds. blocks of Granite, at 1.00, 1,274 51 
Joseph Cross, Paving Stones, 
J. G. Colt, 

D. C. Whittemore, Paving Stones, 
City Team, Team Labor, - 
John Houston, Blacksmith Work, 
Andrew McCrillis, " " 

John B. Leavitt, 1 Spirit Level, 
Harisliorn & Pike, Water Dippers, 
Hartshorn & Pike, Repairing Lantern, 

Amount carried foricard, - - 1,540 07 

G 



41 80 


3 00 


7 50 


83 25 


4 57 


13 50 


1 00 


67 


, 50 



98 



Amovnt hrovghl furward. 


1,540 07 


James A. Weston, Setting Grade 


s, 23 50 


Kidder <fc Chandler, Lantern, Oil, 


&c., 2 00 


Edward McQueston, Labor, 


33 00 


Hugh Ramsey, " 


18 00 


Joseph A. Weeks, " 


19 00 


Wm. E, Eastman k Son, " 


53 34 


Robert Scott, '' 


26 01 - 


Peter Scanlin, " 


37 34 


LeviH. Sleeper, " 


36 68 


John Larkin, " 


32 50 


Merrill k Bailey, 


29 50 


J. N. Heath, " 


9 00 


James Lyons, " 


14 67 


Mark Minton, " 


3 00 


P. W. Clark, 


7 00 


E. G. Tcwksbury, " 


20 00 


Balance, . . - - 


- 95 89 




$2,000 00 



WATEKlNti STEEETS. 



I]y Appropriation, . . . . 200 00 
EXPENDITURES. 

To Joim Campbell, Labor, Watering 



Strcclb 



200 00 



FIRE DEPAETMENT. 

By Appropriation, - - - 5,000 00 

*' Cash paid into Treasury for 2 hand 

Engines, - - - - 950 00 
" " " " " Sundries, 17 55 

" BaU\nce, - . . - 1,252 26 

$7,219 SI 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Balance from last year's Account, 2,269 64 
Merrimack Engine Co., - - 346 88 

Torrent Engine " - - 240 63 

Penacook Hose " - - - 520 01 
Hook & Ladder " - - 544 80 

Steam Fire Engine " ximoskeag," 864 32 
" " " " Fire King," 855 78 
" " "E. W. Harrington," 496 09 

Miscellaneous, . . - 1,081 66 

17,219 81 



MERRIMACK ENGINE CO. NO. 1. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Company's Bills for services, - 342 17 
G. W. Prescott, use of horse to fire, 2 00 
Montgomery & Wilson, Repairs, - 2 71 



!16 88 



100 
TORRENT ENGINE CO. NO. 5. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Company's Bills for services, 

Alplieus Branch, Repairs on liose 

William Chase, sawing wood 

E. P. Johnson, Wood, 

James & Dodge, use of horse to fires, 



221 50 






11 13 






1 00 






6 00 






es, 1 00 








S210 


63 



PENNACOOK HOSE CO. NO. 1. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Company's Bills for services, 459 59 

A. Griffin, Wood, - - - 6 00 

A. Bodvvell, Wood, - - - 5 75 

Alpheus Branch, repairs on Hose, 2 00 

Pennacook Hose Co., '' " - 50 

C. W. Tabor, services as Steward, 10 42 
W. G. Iloyt, 25 Chairs, - - 30-50 

Pennacook Hose Co., sawing wood, 1 25 
A. Hollis, Refreshments, - - 1 50 

Oliver Greeley, Belts, - - 2 50 



101 
HOOK & LADDER CO. NO. 1. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Company's Bills for services, - 511 50 

James & Dodge, Use of Horse to fire, 13 00 
J, L. Bradford, Lights, 

F. S. Lynch, Letters and Figures, 

G. T. Mixer, Badges, - • - 
G. T. Mixer, Straps, - 



300 


10 00 


6 30 


100 



1544 80 



STEAM FIRE fiNGINE CO. AMOSKEAG. 



EXPENDITURES. 

Company's Bills for services, - 
Manchester Gas Light Co., Gas, 
Plumer & Chandler, 1 Hat, 
I. S. Abbott, Teaming, - 
A. C. Wallace, Wood, 
William Sanborn, " - - 

D. W. Clark, Sawing Wood, 
John Loftis, " " 
Oliver Greeley, Repairs on Harnesses 
Peter Scantley, Repairs on Hose, 

E. P. Johnson, Coal, 
Daniels & Co., Spirits Turpentine, 
Daniels <fe Co., Dust Brush, Scissors 

and Nails, - - _ 
Team Expenses, 



369 00 


55 80 


50 


25 


2 50 


5 50 


2 62 


5 00 


;, 3 87 


50 


36 94 


4 00 


j 

132 


376 52 



$864 32 



102 



STEAM FIRE ENGINE CO. FIRE KING. 
EXPENDITURES. 

Company's. Bills for services, - 
Manchester Gas Liglit Co., Gas, 
Hubbard & Williams, Repairs, 
A. Houghton, " 

G. B. Fogg, Keys, 
I. S. Abbott, Teaming, - 
A. C. Wallace, Wood, 
William Sanborn, " 
Haines & Wallace, Wood, - 
Robert Scott, Sawing Wood, 
John Prindable, " " 

Manchester Gas Co., Coal, 
E. F. Johnson, " - 

Team Expenses, - 



384 00 


36(30 


10 00 


2 37 


160 


116 


2 50 


6 12 


2 00 


62 


2 00 


8 25 


22 14 


376 52 



|i855 78 



STEAM FIRE ENGINE CO. E. W. HARRINGTON. 

EXPENDITURES. 
Company's Bills for services, 
Manchester Gas Ligbt Co., Gas, 
E. P. Johnson, Coal, 
John Moulton, Labor, 
W. P. Stratton, " 
A. C. Wallace, Wood, 
Holt & Noyes, " 
H. II. Noyes, Printing, - 



378 00 


15 60 


88 14 


85 


50 


2 00 


6 00 


6 00 



1496 09 



1 



103 

FIRE DEPARTMENT— MISCELLANEOUS. 
EXPENDITURES. 

A. C. Heath, services, Chief Engineer, 50 00 
D. W. FUng, " Asst. " 

and Clerk, - - - 50 00 

Israel Dow, Services, Asst. Engineer, 25 00 

C. II. G. Foss, " " " 25 00 
John C. Young, " " " 25 00 

B. S. Flanders, " " " 25 00 
A. J. Rutterfieid," " ". 25 00 
W. H. Fisk, Tape and Cord, 90 
Temple McQueston, Repairs, 9 18 
William McPlicrson, " 5 67 
H. M. Clines, « 5 00 
Hartshorn & Pike, " 2 29 
John B. Varick " 11 83 
H. H. Summers, " 2 50 
Hartshorn & Pike, " 2 60 
Hartshorn & Pike, Ventilator, 1-^ 00 
Dunlap & Lo\;joy, Repairs, 2 00 
Xeal & Holbrook, " 23 80 

D. W. Fling, Examination of Stoves, 54 00 

C. H. G. Foss, " " " 20 00 

J. A. Weeks, Cleaning Engine No. 1, 2 00 • 

J. A. Weeks, Expeni^e on Hose, 85 

J. A. Weeks, washing Bed Clothes, 8 50 

J. A. Weeks, Driving Engine Team, 10 35 

Alpheus Branch, 14 sets of Letters, 15 75 
Hill & Cillej, Horse hire furnished 

Engineers, - - - - 
Daniels & Co., One Steel Bar, 
Daniels &, Co., Oil, 
Daniels & Co., Spirits Turpentine, 

Amount carried forivard, - 443 03 



1150 


2 30 


12 50 


1 51 



104 

Amount hrovghlforinard, - - 443 03 

Daniels & Co., Matches, 48 
E. P. Johnson, Coal, 155 86 

E. P. Johnson, Wood, 12 00 

A. Bodwell, Coal, 69 97 

A. C. Wallace, Blinds, 12 00 

A. C. Wallace, Windows, 9 60 

C. F. Liviiigston, Printing, 15 00 

S. F. Engine Co., " 2 50 

S. F. Engine Co., Badges, 16 00 

Amoskeag Man'g Co., Wood, 2 00 

Araoskeag Man'g Co., Thread Waste, 20 25 

Foster Kimball, Wood, 3 50 

William- Sanborn, " 14 00 

Geo. T. Mixer, Repairing Hose, 8 00 

John Sannders, " " 67 00 

John B. Yarick, Oil, 6 00 

John B. Chase, " 19 90 

Kidder t Chandler, Oil, 9 75 

Kidder &, Chandler, Sp'ts Tnrpentine, 17 28 

Kidder & Chandler, Flnid t Wicking, 72 

Torrent Engine Co., Cora. Property, 49 75 

E. Kimball, Teaming, 60 
M. J. Kendrick, " 2 00 

C. P. Simpson, " 1 67 
N. R. Tirrell, " 3 00 

D. W. Fling, Sawing Wood, 1 25 
C. R. Colley, Setting Glass, 1 25 
J. P. Parker, Jackets for Members, 106 25 

F. G. Wyman, Watching Fires, 2 00 
Daniel Collins, Cleaning Hose, 1 00 
Ebenezer Knowlton, Labor on Res- 
ervoirs, - - - - 7 25 

M. 0. Pearsons, Lettering Jackets, 1 00 



11.081 m 



ABATEMENT OE TAXES. 



1858. 

George W. Berry, - - - 1 86 



By xVpproprialion, 2,500 00 

EXPENDITURES, 
1859. 

John Clcworth, - - - - 2 87 
George W. Berry, - - - 1 1)5 

U 82 

$1 8(3 

1860. $6 68 

Samuel Hall, . - . . 90 

Josiali P. Wheeler, - - 2 25 

Patrick Conway, . - - - 2 25 

Michael Chronaii, - - - 2 25 

James Powell, 

Charles Wayward, 

George Barr, 

Asa Dolloff, 

Collins y. Foss, - . - 

Heirs of Julni Gamble, 

Lewis S. Gould, - - - 

Jolui P. Lord, ... 

Dudley C. Hubbard, - 

George Picker, . . . 

Deland F. Prescott, 

Yerlulain Pleifer, . . . 

Heirs of Moses Norris, - 

James Gordan, . . _ 

Amount carried forward, - 58 06 



2 16 


2 25 


2 25 


2 25 


2 25 


9 40 


2 25 


2 25 


2 25 


2 25 


2 25 


'^ 25 


14 10 


2 25 



106 

Amount hroiigld forvmrd^ - - 58 00 

Alfred J. Fales, - - - 2 25 

William Whittle, - . . 25 00 

Hoyen G. Davis, - - - 9 66 

David Quimby, ... 2 76 

Michael Campbell, - - - 2 25 

George H. Dickinson, - - 2 25 

Henry Pollard, ... 2 99 

Stephen Haselton, - - - 1 92 

James Crowley, - . . 2 52 

James Brown, - - - - 3 66 

Flanders Walker, - - - 2 87 

Josiah Ci'osljy, - - - - 5 04 

Elisha Richardson, - - - 4 50 

George Hunt, 2d, - - - 1 06 

Orren Prescott, . . . 2 25 

Hiram Roby, - - - - 2 25 

William E. Nesmith, - - 2 25 

Aaron W. Drew, - - - - 2 25 

Andrew Bnnton, - - - 2 25 

Robert G. Dodge, - - - 2 25 

Jeremiah C. Barker, - - 2 97 

Henry Clough, - - - - 1 88 

Marshall Cummings, - - 2 25 

Chailes H. Cross, - - - - 2 25 

Henry Pollard, - - - 2 99 

W. C. Pickersgill, - - - 10 46 

Hamilton Toby, - . . 2 25 

Curtis C. WiUey, - - - - 2 25 

Hollis S. Vincent, - - - . 2 25 

Jose-ph Cate, - - - - 5 40 

Mariah 11. Abbott, - - - 2 82 

William Gilmore, - - - 2 25 

Amount carried forward, - - 181 51 



107 

Amount brovg-ht forward^ - - 181 51 

William K. Baufield, - - 2 25 

Hasket W. Banfield, - " - - 2 25 

John B. Gorden, . - - 4 00 

Stephen Haselton, - - - 1 95 

James Fleming, - - - -2 25 

Elkanah Ward, - - - - 2 25 

Michael Handrahan, - - - 2 25 

Hezekiah Ferren, - - - - 2 25 

Edward Metcalf, - . - 2 25 

Patrick Castler, - - - - 2 25 

Luther Tucker, - - - 2 25 

Benjamin Whipple, - - - 2 25 

Daniel B. Lewib, , - - 2 25 

Jolin McCartj, - - - - 2 25 

Daniel Mix, . - _ - 2 25 

Michael Doyle, - - - - 2 25 

Patrick Mulligan, - - - 2 16 

James W. Wilson, - . - - 8 4G 

A. B. Pcabody, - - - - 9 78 

Giles D. Peabody, - - - 2 25 

Alden D. Peabody, - - - 2 25 

Charles B. Chase, - - - 3 79 

Martha P. Chase, - - - 5 11 

Cintha Chase, - - - - 94 

Mary A. Martin, - - . 3 13 

James W. Forsaith, - - - 3 41 

Mary E. Forsaith, - - - 2 05 

David Knowles, - - - - 8 46 

Hannah Colcord, . . _ 2 02 

James Martin, - - - - 2 25 

Davis & Jones, - - - - 1 80 

Edward Hackett, - - - -• 2 25 

Amount carried forward, - - 279 07 



108 

Amount hrovg-ht forward^ - - 279 07 

Ellon Robertson, - . . 1 52 

Peter McMalian, - - - - 2 25 
Whitefield Craig, - - - 2 25 

Virgil A. Ayors - - - - 2 25 
Daniel W. Heath, - - - 2 43 

George W, Berry, . - - 2 25 

Josiali Morse, - - - - 90 

Thomas Smith, - - - - 2 25 
Natlianicl Webster, - - - 6 36 

Obaciiali Jackson, - - - - 3 00 
S. P. Kidder, (Heirs of) - - 94 

Isaac W. Noyes, - - - - 18 80 
Stephen D. Green, - - - 1 20 

Benjamin T. Rust, - - - 5 65 
James W. Wilson, - - - 3 20 

Moses Fellows, - - - - 4 50 
James T. Haselton, - - - 2 16 

1861. ,^340 98 

James Crowley, - - - 

Charles Gallegan, 

George W. Berry, 

John Bailey, - - _ _ 

Frank Clement, - - - 

William H. Ayers, - - - 

George Pease, - - - 

Thomas F. Harvell, - 

George D. Tufts, - 

Francis A. Alien, . _ - 

Irving R. Gilbert, - - - 

AVilbur F. Martin, - 

James Phelps, . . _ 

John Leek, . - - - 

Amount carried fonoard, - - 36 11 



2 


52 


2 


52 


2 


52 


2 


52 


2 


52 


2 


52 


2 


52 


3 


07 


3 07 


2 


52 


2 


52 


2 


62 


2 


25 


2 


52 



109 

Amovnt hrovght foriuard, 

Jolm R. Page, . - - . 

John Young, - - - - 

James F. Smith, - - - 

Miles Aldrich, _ . . 

James B. Chapman, 

John Loftis, 1860 and '61, 

Marsliall Durrell, - 

James Martin, - - - - 

Wm, Proudman, - - - 

Horatio Fiadd, . . - 

James Davidson, - 

Robert P. Emerson, - - - 

Samuel S. Piper, - - - 

John Larvin, - - - - 

Manchester Bank, 

Myron E. Dow, _ . _ 

Job W.Hill, -~ - 

Charles Bonner, . - . 

Robert Seavy, . . - 

Ira Bliss, . . . _ 

Charles H. Titus, 

Dennis Reardy, _ _ - 

Heirs of Moses Norris, - 

Nathaniel Webster, - - - 

Patrick Sweeney, - - - 

George Whittemore, 

Jacob F. James, - - - 

Luther A. Ward, - - = 

John W. Carr, - 

Henry W. McDowell, 

John Fenton, - . . 

Luther Campbell, - - - 

Amount carried forward, - - 156 50 



36 11 


8 00 


137 


8 00 


2 52 


3 07 


4 87 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


17 82 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


3 07 


2 52 


2 52 


15 09 


2 52 


2 52 


2 40 


73 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


3 05 



110 

Amount brovght foricard., 

Henry Johnson, - - - 

T. D. M. Locke, 

JoiDi P. young, - - - 

Edward Sawtell, 

Z. Foster Campbell, 

Wm. Chase, - - _ _ 

Daniel Farmer, Jr., 

Alpheus Fales, - - - - 

Wm. J. Lewis, _ - _ 

Joseph G. George, - - - 

Jonathan W. Meader, - 

Alonzo Worthen, - - - 

Henry L'. Lancaster, 

Jcdiah Galacar, _ - . 

(:leorge S. Riollins, 

Justin Spaulding, . _ - 

John G. Simpson, - • - 

J. A. Knowles, _ . _ 

George Morfitt, - - - 

Joseph Bell, - - _ . 

Wm. Jones, - ■- 

Tliomas Steele, . _ . 

Benjamin Kimball, 

David Quimby, - - - - 

Sylvauus Johnson, 

Edwin Ray, - _ - . 

Samuel D. Print, - 

J. xi. Haines, - - - - 

Charles Hilton, - - - 

Jolui H. Day, - - - - 

Frederick J. Gardner, - 

John Rowell, - - - - 

Amount carried forward^ - - 292 0-1 



156 50 


2 52 


4 71 


3 20 


2 80 


2 52 


2 52 


4 28 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


50 


2 52 


2 52 


2 52 


3 22 


3 07 


32 


2 52 


52 60 


2 52 


5 40 


2 52 


2 52 



Ill 



Amount brought forivard, 
Wm. Little, 
Zachariah Harvey, - 
Luther Tucker, 
Luther Fitts, 
Stepheu G. Clark, 
Wm. Sage, 
J. A. Weston, 
Charles H. Chase, 
Nancy Poor, 
Isaac Langley, - 
Putney &:. Fearing, 



Discount on Taxes, 
Balance, - 



292 04 




2 52 




2 62 




2 52 




10 02 




157 




180 




9 44 




2 00 




126 




2 52 




9 44 







$337 65 




. T) 68 




340 98 


- 


318 39 


- 


1,501 30 


$2,500 00 



By Balance from last years' Account, 
" Appropriation, 
" Cash Received for Hay, 

EXPENDITURES. 



9 57 

•iOO 00 

30 25 



$439 82 



To Levi Caswell, 


Labor, 




4 75 


E. M. Ellis, 






2 75 


T. P. Clough, 






11 25 


C. Clement, 






150 


Nathaniel Corning, 






2 50 


Smith & Alden, 






5 00 


William Shannon, 






30 00 


Benjamin Swett, 






2 50 


James Ladd, 






1 00 


John McQueen, 






1150 


John H. Maynard, 






33 


John H. Goodale, 






1 70 


Ebenczer Knowlton, 






2 50 


E, G. Haynes, 






3 75 


S. S. Moulton, 






3 95 


George Hunt, 


Tar, 




3 00 


Manchester Print Works, " 




8 00 


Kidder <fe Chandler, 


(; 




10 00 


John H. Maynard, Nails, 




36 


Nathaniel McCrillis, 


Drawing 


Loam, 


3 00 


Gage & Farnsworth, 


Printing 


Posters, 


150 


Joseph L. Smith, Fence Pickets, 


2 50 



Amoimt carried forward, 



113 34 



113 

Amount brought forward, - - 113 34 

Joseph L. Smith, Fence l*osts, 1 00 

Nathaniel Corning, 6 lbs. Nails, 24 

Nathaniel Corning, Hinges, 75 

E, Parmcnter, 15 Trees, 15 00 

David Clement 22 " 11 00 

Jolm II. Maynard, Rails, 1 75 

Henry J. Tirrell, Team, 3 00 

George Hunt, '' 3 00 

George W. Cheney, " 1 50 

Joseph L. Smith, Lumber, 3 94 

John H. Goodale, Railroad Fare, 1 50 
Concord Railroad, Freight of Trees, 2 00 

William Craig, Posting Notices, 25 

Balance, 281 55 



PINE GEOVE CEMETERY. 



By Appropriation, 100 00 

Transferred from Reserved Fund, 71 31 

Balance, 189 31 



EXPENDITURES. 
To Wm. W. Baker, Cutting 572 Cords 

Wood, 143 00 

Wm. W. Baker, Cutting Gl Cords 

4^ feet Wood, 30 78 

Wm. W. Baker, Hauling and Cord- 
ing 2G Cords 5^ ft. Wood, 6 67 
Wm. W. Baker, Sawing off Logs, 3 00 
Balance from Last year's Account, 177 17 



-$439 82 



$3G0 G2 



$300 62 



n 



114 



TAXES, FROM 1859 TO 1861. 



TAXES, 1859, JOHN L. KELLY, COLLECTOR. 
Amount uncollected Jan. 1, 1861, 11,538 89 

Amount Paid into Treasury, and 

Abatements, 1,923 46 

Balance uncollected, 9,615 43 

$11,538 89 



TAXES, IRGO, il. R. CIIAMBERLIN, COLLECTOR. 
Amount Uncollected Jan. 1, 1861, 12,857 51 

Amount Paid into Treasury, and 

Abatements, 9,770 11 

Balance uncollected, 3,087 40 

S12,857 51 



TAXES, 1801, H. R. CIIAMDERLIN, COLLECTOR. 

Amount of Tax List, 99,104 96 

Amount Paid into Treasury, and 

Abatements, 79,893 44 

Balance uncollected, 19,211 52 

.$09,104 96 



115 



INTEREST. 



By Cash of Josiah Carpenter, 7 50 

Cash for Interest on Taxes, 179 34 

Appropriation, 9,000 00 

Transferred from Reserved Fund, 339 90 



EXPENDITURES. 


■«ij 


Paid Amoskeag Bank, 




110 53 


Manchester Bank, 




407 22 


J. H. AVilkins, 




2 33 


C. H. Carpenter, 




3 33 


William White, 




54 00 


Manchester Savings 


Bank, 


402 60 


City Bank, 




116 54 


City Savings Bank, 




240 40 


Josiah Carpenter, 




90 00 


S. E. Foster, 




21 00 


(Coupons to Sundry 


Persons, 


7,320 00 


D. M. Carpenter, 




30 00 


Balance, 




728 79 



,526 74 



$9,526 74 



116 



NOTES DUE THE CITY. 



.January 1, 1857, Henry G. Lowell and 

others,- - . . - 1,450 00 
Endorsement, - - - - 337 91 



April 1, 1857, Charles H. Brown, 2 notes, 

$50 each, - - - - 
March 29, 1860, James Barrett, due in 

one year, - - - 250 00 

do do due in two years, 250 00 

do do due in three years, 250 00 



81,112 09 
100 00 



Dec. 18, 18f30, Jackson & Kimball, due 

in four months, - - - 260 00 
Endorsement, - - - 193 47 



loO 00 



$QQ 



$2,028 62 



EECAPITULATION OE SCHOOLS. 



District 



No. 1. 


A 


pproprii 


.tioii, 200 00 


Expeii 


ditui'es, 


200 00 


2. 






14,000 00 






14,000 00 


3. 






27;3 00 






275 00 


4. 






200 00 






200 00 


6: 






200 00 






200 00 


6. 






22.5 00 






225 00 


7. 






225 00 






225 00 


8. 






200 00 






200 00 


9. 






200 00 






200 00 


iO. 






97,5 00 






975 00 


11. 






500 00 






500 00 



$17,200 00 .|;17,200 00 

CoiiRECTTON. — Page 71, School District No. 3, Expenditures, should 
read $275 00. 
• Pag.? 72, School District No. 6, E.\penditures, should rend f 225 00. 



117 
CITY HALL AIN^D STOEES. 

By BalancG from last year's Account, 4,663 76 

Appropriation, - - - - 500 00 

Rent of Stores, - - - 1, '6 3,7 50 

" " Hall, - - - - 180 10 



$G,881 SG 



EXPENDITURES. 

To William Campbell, for Wood, 6 00 

David Wells, " " 112 24 

11. J. Tirrell, " " 10 00 

Marshall Cummings, sawing wood, 10 28 

L. H. James, ' " " 1 12 

Eldad Butler, " " 2 24 

C. W. Thompson, " " 3 37 
H. J. Tirrell, " " 5 37 

D. R. Prescott, " " 2 38 

E. P. Johnson, 83 busheh Charcoal, 10 75 
D. R. Prescott, 35 '' " 4 17 
L. H. James, 6 barrels Pitch wood, 3 00 

D. R. Prescott, 1 barrel " 50 

E. P. Johnson, 29,330 lbs. hard Coal, 121 07 
E. P. Johnson, 6,500 " " " 

for Treasurer's Office, - 24 87 

John S. Folsom, Salt, - - - 15 

William Plumer, " - - - 80 

Merrill & Bailey, " - - - 2 21 

Oilman B. Fogg, Keys, - - 2 75 

I. S. Abbott, Sawdust, - - 50 

Robert Gilchrist, 1 Lamp, - 75 
P. H. Handley, covering Treasurer's 

Desk, - - - - - 1 60 

Amount carried forward^ - - 326 12 



118 

Amount brought forward. - - 326 12 

Marshall Cummings, Work, Shovel- 
ing Show from Hall Buildhig, 2 00 

L. H. James, paid for Work, Shov- 
eling Snow from Hall Building, 11 50 

Eldad Butler, Work, Shoveling 

Snow from Hall Building, 4 00 

Albion Barker, Labor on Roof of City 

Hall Building, - - - 110 03 

John C. Young, Labor on Roof of 

City Hall Building, - - 6 59 

Lamson & Marden, Labor on Roof of 

City Hall Building, - - 54 63 

Darling & Varncy, Copper Gutters, 

Sheet Lead, Arc., - - 601 25 

Albion Barker, Stock and Labor in 

Hall, 128 38 

Barton & Co., 2 yds. Turkey Red for 

Desk in Hall, - - - 50 

Bridget Campbell, Washing Offices, 5 75 

Neal & Holbrook, Repairing Sash, 87 

Manchester Iron Works, 2 Cast Iron 

Columns, - - - 23 58 

Lemuel 11. James, Labor, fitting up 

Hall for Court, - - - 5 00 

John Twoml»ly, Repairing Plastering, 3 75 

Y. S. Lynch, Work on Repairs, 4 67 

John Houston, Iron Forghig for Re- 
pairs, - - - - 4 08 

George W. Mcrriam, Iron Forging 

for Repairs, ,- ■ - 11^ 

L. H. James, Labor, - - - 3 27 



Amount carried foricard, - - 1,297 14 



119 

Amount brought forward, - - 1,297 11 
Temple McQuoston, Whitcwasliing 

and Repairing Plastering, 13 68 

Elbridge G. Haynes, Whitewashing 

and Repairing Plastering, 27 

Barton <fe Co., 69 yds. Carpeting, 11 50 

Robert Gilchrist, 1 Lantern, - 75 

Manchester Gas Light Co., 112,700 

feet Gas, - - - - 320 01 
Hartshorn, cfe Pike, Shovels, Coal Hod, 

Grate, &c., - - - 11 44 

L. H. James, Horse and Carriage, 2 50 

Hartshorn & Pike, Ventilator, - 3 05 

William M. Plumer, Matches, 49 

Merrill k Bailey, " 49 

Wm. M. Plumer, Brooms, - - 1 50 
Merrill k Bailey, " - - 75 

David Libbey, " - - 1 00 

Wm. M. Plumer, Mop, - - 25 

Wm. M. Plumer, Fluid, - - 2 63 
F. S. Lynch, Fitting up Tables in 

Treasurer's Office, - - 4 17 

Eben French, Lumber, Laying floor 

in Marshal's Office, - - 8 17 

S. W. Hill, Laying floor in Marshal's 

Office, - - 
Daniels & Cor., Hardware, - 
J. L. Kennedy, Painting, - 
A. C. Wallace, 4,227 feet Prepared 

Lumber, _ - - - 
L. A. James, Lumber, - 
Methodist Episcopal Society, Lumber, 3 00 
Joseph L. Smith, 2,734 ft. Lumber, 46 23 

Amount carried forward, - - 1,910 16 



3 


70 


24 63 


51 


30 


90 


51 


2 


00 



120 

Amount brought forward, - - 1,910 16 
J. Q. A. Sargent, Repairing Gas Fit- 
tings, - - - - TO 64 
J. Colbath &Co., Repairing Gas Fit- 

■ tings, 7 39 

Merrill & Bailey, 1 Tub, - - 75 

C. R. Colley, Setting Glass, - - 17 90 
John H. Maynard, Luml)er and La- 
bor, fitting up City Clerk's Office, 22 62 

C. R. Colley, Painting City Clerk's 

Office, - - - - 30 42 

J. L, Cox, Repairing Desk in Hall, 75 

Insurance Co., Policy of Insurance, 24 86 
Hubbard & Williams, 2 Stoves and 

Pipe, &c., - - - 38 57 
Hartshorn & Pike, 1 Stove, and fit- 
ting up others, - - 20 16 
Wm. H. Fisk, Paper Hangings, 7 50 

D. R. Prescott, paid for cleaning 

Vault, - - - - 87 

Balance, - ' - - - 4.728 77 

-^6,881 36 



EELIEF FUND. 



By Appropriation, - - - 10,000 00 
" Balance, - - - 4,253 75 



14,253 75 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Interest on $1000 Six Months and 
Grace, . _ _ _ 

Paid Mrs. Melvin Chase, 

Mrs. Demary, 

Mrs. Samuel Georoe _ _ . 

William May, 

E. McCarty, - - . - 

E. Hutchinson, . - - 

Lucy A. Ilackett, - - - 

H. D. Martin, 

G. S. Goi'don, _ _ - 

Noble Squires, _ _ _ 

C. F. Parrott, 

H. 0. Dudley, 

Mrs. Engine McCarty, 

Martha A. Ringlah, 

Mrs. J. H. James, 

Margaret Conner, - . _ 

Elizabeth Thompson, - 

Harriet Wright, 

Ann G. Rand, - - - 

Maria R. Hanson, - - - 



Amoiint carried furicard, - - - 130 50 



80 50 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


2 00 


4 00 


4 50 


4 50 


7 50 


4 00 


5 00 


2 00 


1 50 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 



122 

Amount brought forward, 

Mrs. Ann Tiltoii, . . . 

Betsey Pony, . _ . 

Caroline Pike, . . _ 

Mary J, Quimby, . _ . 

Emma C. Cole, . _ _ 

Catharine McKennan, 

Mrs. Conant, - - - 

Robinson <fe Parker, for Shoes, - 

Jackson & Kimball, for Cloth, 

Adams & Andrews, Irish Volunteers 
Collation, . . . . 

Gage & Farnsworth, Printing Blanks, 

Gage & Farnsworth, Tickets, Posters 
and Advertising, 

J?. D. Farnsworth, Advertising, 

John B. Clarke, " 

H. C. Merrill, Expense to Ports- 
mouth, - - - - 2 25 

Charles W. Colby, 2 days taking 

Affidavits, - . - 3 00 

Manchester Cornet Band, services 

one day, - - - - 57 00 

John H. Maynard, Lumber and la- 
bor making Tables, - 28 58 

F. M. Edgell, Powder, Keeping 
Horses, and Hire of Driver, 
and Making Cartridges, IG 40 

S. D. Farnsworth, Advertising pro- 
gramme of Soldiers Return, &c. 11 00 

Wm. H. Fisk, 200 Blank Books and 

Printing Labels, - - 8 00 

Mrs. Charles L. Batcliclder, - 15 00 



130 50 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


1 25 


1 00 


6 00 


, 6 00 


13 13 


12 00 


18 25 



Amount carried forward, - - 399 36 



123 

Amount hrovg-ht forward, - 399 3(3 

Mrs. John n! Bruce, - - - 13 50 

David M. Perkins, . - . 19 50 

George D. Currier, - - 18 00 

George W. Putnam, - - - 7 50 

Lucinda Flanders, - - - 1,9 50 

James M. Clougli, - - 45 50 

R. F. Clark, ^ - - - - 7 50 

N. M. Demary, - - - 23 50 

M. A. Hunkin, - - - 58 50 

William Majnc, - - - IG 50 

Orlando Langley, - - 10 00 

Mary L. Pike, - - - 59 00 

Jane E. James, _ . . 13 50 

Eugene McCarty, ... 60 50 

Harriet Wright, - - 4 50 

Maria Giles, - - - 35 00 

Mclvin Ciiase, ... 30 50 

xVnu Goodrich, - - - 4 50 

J. Bagley, ... 45 50 

T. P. Heath, - - - - 32 50 

John McGinness, - - . 38 50 

Robert Hume, - - 25 50 

Willard N. Haradon, - . 32 50 

E. Hutchinson, - - - 12 00 

Richard Wcscott, - - 17 50 

H. M. Pillsbury, - - - 32 50 

William Vogel, - - 15 00 

Charles E. Palmer, - - ■- 15 00 

William 0. Heath, - - 25 50 

Richard Gallagher, ... 10 50 

Hannah Cahill, - . 19 50 

Samuel George, . - - 8 50 

Amount carried forward. - - 1,100 86 



124 

Amoimt b roil g;ht forward, - - 1,166 86 

Mrs. W. L. Pierce, - - . 28 00 

John H. Glidden, - - - 17 00 

H. M. Weed, - - . 25 00 

Edmund T. Reynolds, - - 19 50 

Jolm L. Kelly, - - 6 00 

Charles W. Hard, - - - 32 50 

Lucy A. Hackett, - - 23 00 

Margaret Brown, - - 32 00 

J. H. Bado-cr, - . lo 00 

Clark S. Gordon, - - - 20 50 

E. S. Peacock, - - . 10 00 

Charles F. Parrott, - - - 51 00 

Abiel Cheiiey, - - - 58 50 

E. Xorman Gunnison, - - 19 50 

A. TiUon, - - . 17 00 

Charles D. Dunbar, - - - 17 00 

Joseph A. Hubbard, - - 19 50 

W. II. Griffin, - . - 19 50 

Sarah Pearson, ... 33 50 

ilaiy A. Rowe, - - - 13 OO 

Lydia A. Chase, - - - 14 00 

Albert A. Sholes, - - - 19 50 

James W. Carr, - - 32 50 

Julia Daily, - - - 13 00 

John Hhea, ... jg 00 

Jane Wiiite, - - . 26 00 
S. J. Batchelder for G. W. Cilley, 27 50 

M. D. Martin, - - - " 41 50 

Geo. H. Ilubljard, - - - 12 50 

John Gardner, . . . 32 50 

Barnet E. Fowler, - . - 46 00 

William G. Stark, - - 32 50 

Amount carrier! forward, - - 1,959 36 



12;' 



Amount bro7(gIU forward , - [1,959 8G 




Mrs. Barnard Farley, 


6 00 




Harvey M. Colby, 


14 00 




Benjamin 0. Kimball, 


9 00 




Patrick Kcrran, 


12 00 




P. Bohan, 


27 50 




Richard A. Lawrence, - 


1100 




James J. Lord, . _ . 


28 3a 




George Pickup, 


11 00 




Mary"E. Squires, 


15 00 




F. R. Allen, 


23 82 




Lucinda P. Wilkins, - 


28 00 




A. W. Quint, 


23 75 




William Calef, 


14 00 




Frank Weston, 


16 50 




Eugene G. Hazewell, 


12 50 




J. H. Piatt, 


23 32 




Eliza Ray, - - 


3150 




P. Stevens, . . - 


14 00 




George D. Epps, . . . 


39 67 




Mary E. Parker, 


12 50 




Levi H. Leet, _ . _ 


15 00 




Lucy W. Swett, 


20 00 




Betsey J. Dudley, 


9 00 




Campbell & Simpson for Refresh- 






ments for Soldiers Reception, 


252 00 




A. R. Sargent, . . . 


1100 




J. N. Bruce, 


9 00 




H. M. Bailey, 


10 00 




Officers of Light Battery, Revolvers, 


60 00 




H. T. Nichols, Horse Hire, 


4 50 






S2,723 


75 



126 

Mrs. Ira J. Adams, - _ . 

Robert II. Allen, 
George Allen, - . . 

Francis A, Allen, 
Zebina N. Arlins, - 
Joseph A. Austin, 
C. N. Buckman, 
II. W. Banfil, - 
Edwin G. Bowen, - - - 
Albert Blood, - - - 
Jacob Bartels, . _ _ 

Matthew Byrns, - - - 
Wra. Baker, - - . - 
John Boothe, _ - . 
Noah Bickford, 
Jonathan R. Bagle}^, - 
Charles L. Batchelder, - 
Wm. S. Barker, - 
Joseph W. Bailey, - - - 
Rufus Bailey, 

Thomas Burns, ... 
AmosW. Brown, 
Wm. L. Bahl), 
Marcus II. Bundy, 
Elisha II. Burrill, - - ' - 
Lyman W. Bean, 
Alexander A. Brown, 
Wm. H. Blackburn, - 
Wm. Bonner, - - - . 
Michael Bresnehan, 
Patrick Broderick, - - - 
Alexander Brown, 
Horatio N. Bickford, 

Amount carried forward, - 906 00 



18 00 


36 00 


18 00 


40 00 


14 00 


18 00 


18 00 


36 00 


51 00 


18 00 


61 00 


5100 


51 00 


36 00 


20 00 


40 00 


5 00 


28 00 


40 00 


40 00 


14 00 


28 00 


26 00 


18 00 


38 00 


13 00 


38 00 


26 00 


14 00 


40 00 


14 00 


40 00 


28 00 



127 



Amount hroup;1it forv;ard, 


966 00 


Mrs. Thomas Bynge, - - - - 


27 00 


Charles W. Boyd, - 


13 00 


Eri B. Beaman, - - - - 


24 00 


Henry W. Battels, - 


8 00 


Phillip Brandon, . - - 


16 00 


Franklin F. Blancliard, - ^ 


16 00 


Patrick Burns, - - - - 


12 00 


James W, Carr, 


60 00 


George D. Carrier, - - - 


17 00 


Harvey M. Colby, - - - 


13 00 


Wm. Calef, . . - . 


2100 


B. F. Chase, - - - - 


21 00 


R. F. Clai-k, - - - . 


18 00 


Gideon Coty, - - - - 


51 00 


H. J. Cummings, = - - 


36 00 


R. A. Chellis, - - - 


36 00 


Daniel F. Colby, 


18 00 


John N. Chase, 


18 00 


H, J. Copp, - - - - 


36 00 


John Cusliing, . _ . 


18 00 


M. T. Cole, - - - - 


18 00 


A. M. Connell, - - - 


36 00 


John S. Cole, - - - - 


36 00 


Edward Cotton, - - - 


36 00 


Michael J. Connelly, 


51 00 


Thomas Casey, - - - 


18 00 


John Casey, _ . . . 


18 00 


Eugene Cadirath, - - - 


51 00 


James Cameron, - - . 


51 00 


John Curran, . . , 


19 00 


Patrick Connally, _ . . 


51 00 


Augustine Crosby, 


51 00 



Ainomd carred forward, - - 1,83100 



128 

Amount hrovg-lit forward, - - 1,881 00 

Mrs. .Brioii Costello, - - - 86 00 

Robert Clayton, - - - 40 00 

Charles M. Currier, - - 28 00 

Patrick Castles, - - - 40 00 

Michael Cuddy, - - - 40 00 

Amos Cressy, . _ _ 40 00 

J. M, Cummings, - - 14 00 

Francis Cahil, - - - 14 00 

Henry F. Condit, - - 26 00 

William G. Cutler, - - - 38 00 

Henry W. Clark, - - 38 00 

Alonzo M. Caswell, - - - 38 00 

William N. Chamberlin, - 26 00 

James P. Carpenter, - - 13 00 

Thomas C. Cheney, - - 38 00 

Henry A. Campbell, - - 13 00 

DurrcU S. Crockett, - - 13 00 

Ezra Cilley, - - - 26 00 

James Carr, - - 38 00 

Mclvin Chase, - _ - 26 00 

Patrick Conway, - - 14 00 
Jonathan B. Chapman, - - 14 00 

Samuel Cheney, - - 21 00 

Joseph P. Cressy, - 7 00 

George E. Clark, - - 10 00 

Matthew N. Colby, - - - 18 00 

George T. Cram, - - 9 00 

John G. Chubb, - - - 27 00 

George A. Clarke, - - 14 00 

Benjamin F. Clark, - - - 24 00 

Virgil tl. Cate, - - 24 00 

Harrison M. Clough, - - - 24 00 

Amount carried forward, - - 2,687 UO 



129 



Amount brorig-ht forward, 


2,672 00 


Mrs. Anthony Cillej, 


7 00 


Charles Caine, 


16 00 


E. F. Cogswell, 


5 00 


Charles A. Clark, 


10 00 


Robert Crombie, 


20 00 


C. 0. R. Davis, 


36 00 


R. C. Dow, 


6100 


John B. Davis, 


61 00 


Michael T. Donahoe, 


61 00 


William Dunn, 


61 00 


Walter Dignam, 


40 00 


Eliphalet Dustin, 


28 00 


George F. Davis, 


28 00 


Patrick Donally, 


14 00 


Edward J. Dillan, 


14 00 


Frank E. Demeritt, 


- 13 00 


Chauncy C, Dickey, - 


26 00 


John W. Dickey, 


26 00 


Charles A. Doe, - 


26 00 


Martin V. B. Day, - 


26 00 


George K. Dakin, 


26 00 


James M. Dickey, - 


14 00 


Emerson A. Dunham, 


- • - 9 00 


Hezekiah Dow, 


14 00 


Frank F. Downs, 


24 00 


Henry D. Davis, 


24 00 


Hazen G. Dodge, 


5 00 


James W. Darrah, 


16 00 


James Doherty, 


6 00 


Peter Doherty, 


6 00 


Patrick 0. Day, 


17 00 


JohnM. Evans, 


43 00 


A?nount carried forward, 

I 


3,414 00 



130 

Amount brought forward^ 3,414 00 

Mrs. John Eagan, ... 18 00 

Joseph Ely, - . . 51 OO 

Thomas F. Elliot, - - - 36 OO 

FredGi-ick M. Edgell, - - - 13 00 

A. J. Edgerly, ... 14 00 

Michael Eagan, - - . 18 00 

H. J. Flanders, - - - 21 00 

Barnard E. Fowler, . . 60 01) 

W. W. Flanders, . . . 18 00 

W. H. Foster, . . - 36 00 

Barnard Farry, - - 51 00 

.Stephen Foley, - - - 18 00 

Dani«l Farley, - - - 28 00 

David Fitzgerald, - - 18 00 

James AFarnum, - - - 14 00 

AlpheusD. Flagg, - - 40 00 

Michael 0. Flynn, - - - 14 00 

Maurice Foley, - - 40 00 

Terrence Frawley, - - - 40 00 

Edward Field, - - 14 00 

James M. Fogg, - - - 14 00 

Howard M. Farrar, - - 26 00 

Charles E. French, - - - 13 00 

John Fallen, ... 40 00 

Frank Ferrsn, - - - 4 00 

Joseph Freschell, - - 16 00 

E. N. Gunnison, - - - 17 00 

W. H. Griffin, - - 21 00 

C. 0. Gibson, - - - 18 00 

Samuel George, - - 14 00 

Albert George, - - - 51 00 

Cyrus Gorman, - - 18 00 

Ammuit carried forward^ - - 4,2:i>- 00 



131 

Amount broug-lU fonvard, - - 4,228 00 

Mrs. Levi Gardner, - - - 5 00 

James Galvin, - . 51 qO 

Michael Galvin, - - - 18 00 

James Gannon, - . _ 48 00 

Job R. Giles, - - . 40 00 

John Goggin, - - . 14 OO 

William Grinnell, - - - 28 00 

Elbridge Gerry, - - 40 00 

John Gardner, - - - 25 00 

James Gorman, - - 28 00 

John W. Goodwin, - 26 00 

George E. Glines, - - 13 00 

; George W. Griswold, - 38 00 

Clark S. Gordon, - - 26 00 

Eben Gove, - - 26 00 

David Gracj, ... 54 00 

Noah Glover, - - - . 16 00 

Jerry E. Gladden, - - - 13 00 

Frank Greenwood, - - - 4 oo 

George Garfield, - . 8 00 

T. P. Heath, - . . 42 00 

J. A. Hubbard, - - 21 00 

William M. Holmes, - - - 21 00 

E. G. Hazewell, - - 21 00 

Abiel Hanneford, - - - 21 00 

George Hanson, - - 21 00 

J. R. Hynes - - . 36 00 

Andrew J. Holmes, - - 36 00 

John C. Hogan, - - . 13 oO 

John Housman, - - ' 18 00 

W. S. Hodgman, - - . 18 00 

H. F. Hopkins, - - 51 oo 

Ammnt carried forward, ... 5 qjO 00 



132 

AmomU brought foncard, - - 5,070 00 

Mrs.W. H. Hill, - - - - 18 00 

James Henderson, - - 30 00 

Oliver Hubbard, - - - 6100 

Edmund Hackett, - - 61 00 

Charles A. Hackett, - - - 28 00 

George W. Hackett, - - 14 00 

Melvin F. Hutcbins, - - 14 00 

Robert Hume, - . - 40 00 

Frank B. Hutchinson, - - 14 00 

John Hackett, ... 40 00 

Cyrus W. Hubbard, - - 40 00 

Charles W. Hurd, - - 28 00 

Enoch T. Harvey, - - 36 00 

John D. Hall, - . - 38 00 

Albert T. Hamblett, .. - - 13 00 

Westerlcy E. Holt, - - 13 00 

C. W. Hopkins, - - - 13 00 

Greely W. Hastings, - - 13 00 

Philander Hopkins, - - - 8 00 

Moses A. HuMkins, - - 21 00 

Hinckley D. Harris, - - 21 00 

Simon B. Hill, - - 21 00 

George Hackett, - . - - 27 00 

William H. Hart, - - 27 00 

Henry P. Hubbard, - - - 16 00 

Thomas Hanson, - - 48 00 

Charles B. Heath, - - - 24 00 

Timothy Healy, - - - 4 00 

John Haich, - - - 16 00 

John Hobart, - - - 22 00 

AmbroseTngham, - - - 13 00 

George C. Johnson, - - 18 00 

Anioimt carried forwM-d, - - 5,856 00 



133 



Amount bruug-ht foncard. 


5,856 00 


Mrs, Lemuel 11. James, 


28 00 


James A. Johnson, 


13 00 


Charles 0. Jennison, 


14 00 


James B. Jcnncss, 


9 00 


John A. Jones, 


27 00 


Moses H. Johnson, 


7 00 


Calvhi A. Jonep, 


7 00 


James A. Jordon, - 


7 00 


Patrick Kerran, 


60 00 


Edwin R. Keniston, 


36 00 


Yf illiam H. Knowlton, 


41 00 


Isaac H. Kingsbury, 


18 00 


John Kating, 


18 00 


John Kering, 


5100 


Daniel Kerby, 


51 00 


Joseph H. Knowlton, 


40 00 


Jeremiah Kelcher, 


40 00 


Cornelius Kennedy, 


40 00 


Daniel Kelly, - 


38 00 


Charles J. Keliey, 


28 00 


Wm. C. Knowlton, 


2100 


J, J. Lord, 


42 00 


Luke Leaf, 


18 00 


A. H. Libbey, 


18 00 


Samuel H. Little, 


18 00 


J. F. Langley, - 


36 00 


Alexander Lamudge, 


18 00 


H. H. Leet, 


32 00 


Patrick Lee, 


51 00 


Frederick W. Lougee, 


40 00 


Henry Lewis, 


28 00 


Dennis Leary, 


14 00 



Amount carried forward. - - 6,765 00 



134 

Amount brought fonoard, - - 6,765 00 

Mrs. John L. Lynch, - - - 40 00 

Charles C. Livingston, - - 14 00 

Richard A. Lawrence, - - 9 00 

Orlando H. Langlcy, - - 16 00 

H. D. Martin, . . . 60 00 

Nathaniel Marshall, - - 36 00 

John Mclntjre, - - - 18 00 

T. T. Moore, - - - - 36 00 

James McErin, . . . 3G 00 

W. H. Maxwell, - - - 18 00 

J. B. McQneston, - - - 51 00 

A. E. Metcalf, - - - 18 00 

Charles Morgan, - - 18 00 

David Morrison, - - - 18 00 

George Mordough, - - 18 00 

George W. McKeinon, - - 18 00 

Jolin McCleraons, - " - 51 00 

Patrick Mahoney, . - - 36 00 

David Moore, - - - 18 00 

James Mayers, - - - 51 00 

James Murphy, . - . 36 00 

John Mclntyer, . - . 18 00 

Henry Murphey, - - - 28 00 

Lewis S. Merrill, - - - 14 00 

Wm. W. Mayne, - - - 28 00 

James Merron, . . - 14 00 

Charles Marsh, - - - - 14 00 

James Malarkey, - ^ - - 14 00 

Leroy McQueston, - - - 13 00 

• Thomas W. Morrill, - - 26 00 

Charles D. Magoon, - - - 13 00 

Horace P. Marshall, - - 38 00 

Amount carried forward., - - 7,601 00 



135 



Amount hroug'ht forward, - 


7,601 00 


Mrs. Samuel D. Marcus, 


14 00 


Frank L. Morrill, - 


36 00 


Hugh Mills, 


27 00 


Greiiville P. Mason, 


16 00 


Michael Mulligan, 


16 00 


Eugene McCarty, - 


16 00 


Lafayette Mayott, 


8 00 


Walter McDonald, - 


20 00 


T. L. Newell, - 


88 00 


Charles A. Newton, 


14 00 


Sylvester W. Nelson, - 


4 00 


James 0. Neal, 


36 00 


Patrick O'Connell, 


44 00 


Terence O'Brien, - 


51 00 


Robert O'Connor, 


24 00 


John O'Brien, 


14 00 


Peter O'Brien, - 


14 00 


John E. Ogden, 


8 00 


H. M. Pillsbury, 


42 00 


C. F. Parrott, - 


60 00 


C. E. Palmer, - 


21 00 


George Pickup, 


21 00 


J. H. Piatt, 


42 00 


C. M. Parker, - 


21 00 


D. M. Perkins, - 


21 00 


James Proudman, - 


18 00 


T. H. Pike, 


10 00 


Peter Poulkney, 


36 00 


H. H. Parker, - 


28 00 


Wm. H. Perkins, - 


40 00 


F. H. Pike, 


40 00 


Fred T. Paige, 


14 00 


Araount carried forward, 


8,415 00 



136* 



Amount brought forward^ 


- 8,415 OO 


Mrs. Harland E. Paige, 


14 00 


C. H. Plimimer, 


40 00 


John K. Piper, - 


13 00 


Henry C. Parker, - 


13 00 


George W. Parrott, 


38 00 


Wm. D. Perkins, - 


6 00 


Samuel S. Piper, 


13 00 


Charles Peoples, 


13 00 


Thomas P. Philbrick, - 


28 00 


Frank. W. Parker, - 


14 00 


Francis H. Phillips, - 


18 00 


John G. Paige, 


27 00 


Wm. 0. Powers, - 


16 00 


Wm. H. Palmer, - 


2T 00 


Byron Putnam, - 


14 00 


Nelson Pierce, 


14 00 


George F. Perry, 


24 00 


Preston Philbrick, - 


16 00 


Frank L. Potter, 


4 00 


James M. Quimby, - 


2100 


Jeremiah Quinlan, 


18 00 


Benjamin F. Quimby, 


40 00 


Frank Quinn, 


40 00 


James Quinn, 


40 00 


Benjamin K. Quimby, 


28 00 


Moody Quimby, 


9 00 


Alexander H. Ray, 


12 00 


A. B. Robinson, 


21*00 


J. S. Roach, 


51 00 


Daniel M. Robertson, 


18 00 


M. V. B. Richardson, - 


14 00 


Wm. E. Robinson, - 


40 00 


Amount carried forward^ 


9,118 00 



137 



Amoimt hrov.ght forward. 


9,118 OO 


Mrs. I). S. Russell, - 


28 00 


Henry K. Richardson, 


40 00 


Charles H. Reed, 


14 00 


Timothy Reardon, - 


14 00 


Thomas Raudlett, 


38 00 


Wm. W. Roberts, - 


38 00 


Isaac L. Roberts, 


38 00 


D. W. Rollins, 


14 00 


Carlton C. Richardson, 


36 00 


Warren J. Russell, - 


7 00 


George W. Robinson, - 


14 00 


Andrew J. Rowo, 


6 00 


Henry T. Rollins, 


5 00 


Michael Riley, 


20 00 


Joseph Roby, 


20 00 


Wm. G. Stark, 


42 00 


N. T. Svvett, 


42 00 


A. R. Simons, 


21 00 


E. Sturtevant, . - - 


8 00 


Albert Sholes, 


21 00 


H. C. Squies, 


51 00 


R. S. Syme, - 


18 00 


Wm. Summers, 2d, 


51 00 


George H. Sargent, 


18 00 


Donald Smith, - 


5100 


Anthony Sherlock, - 


36 00 


Edward Sheehan, 


36 00 


Wm. Sliearer, 


40 00 


Horatio Stevens, 


14 00 


Wm. H, Sanborn, - 


28 00 


Fernando C. Spaulding, 


28 00 


Munroe Stevens, 


12 00 



Amount carried forward, - - 9,966 00 



138' 



Amount brought foncard 


9,966 00 


Mrs. R. A. Seaver, 


28 00 


C. H. Smith, . . 


14 00 


John Stewart, . 


20 00 


Larkin Sargent, . . . 


28 00 


Jeseph T. Snow, 


40 00 


John Smith, . 


28 00 


Martin. J. Stanton, 


28 00 


Cornelins Sullivan, 


40 00 


George H. Stewart, . 


28 GO 


Frank W. Sellingham, . 


18 00 


Charles H. Shcpard, . 


26 00 


Alexander Simpson, 


26 OO 


Gilman Sterns, . 


13 00 


Leander G, Sylvester, 


38 00 


Albert C. Sterns, 


26 00 


James F. Sargent, . 


16 00 


Michael Shoughnasay, 


14 OO 


Henry W. Sargent, 


14 00 


Enoch C. Stevens, 


28 00 


George E. Smith, . 


7 00 


Iliram Sterns, . 


27 00 


H. H. Summers, 


24 00 


George Smith, . 


16 00 


James Smith, 


6 00 


Edward M. Sawtell, 


6 00 


Timothy Slioughra, 


12 00 


Wm. Todd, 


51 00 


Henry P. Tompkins, 


28 00 


Dennis Tehan, . 


14 00 


Evi P. Twitchell, . 


38 00 


Nathan B. Tilton, 


38 00 


Charles H. Thompson, . 


13 00 



Amount carried /one ard, 



10,719 00 



139 



Amount brougld foncard, 

Mrs. Wm. Vogel, 

George W. Varniim, 
Thomas S. Vose, 
W. W. Wilkins, . 
Frank Weston, .. 
R. W. Woodbury, . 
Leander White, . 
J. H. Wallace, 
H. B. Wing-, 
George A. Woodbiirn, 
James Welch, . 
Charles Wright, 
Harvey M. Weed, 
George Wyman, 
James Wyman, . 
Henry S. Woods, . 
Woodbury Wyman, 
Edson Wyman, 
John Wadleigh, . 
Samuel J. Whittier, 
Luther E. Wallace, 
Piederick S. Worthen 
Sjdvester F. Webster, 
Arnold Wyman, 
Joshua B. Webster, 
Clinton Wells, 
James Weaver, . 
David Walker, 
Patrick Wallace, 
Edward Wallace, . 
Morrill N. Young, 
Charles E. Young, 

City's Expense, . 



- 


10,719 00 




21 00 




38 00 




16 00 




GO 00 




21 00 




36 00 




18 00 




14 00 




36 00 


> • • 


36 00 




18 00 




2100 




. 28 00 




40 00 




40 00 




14 00 




40 00 




28 00 




26 00 




38 00 




13 00 


5 • • 


38 00 




38 00 




23 00 . 




14 00- 




7 00 


. , 


16 00 




3 00 


. 


12 OO 




6 00 


. 


26 00 




26 00 




$11,530 00 


, 


2,723 75 




$14,253 75 



EEPORT OF THE OYERSEEES OE THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council of the 

City of Manchester : 

In compliance with the requirements of law, the Over- 
seers of the Poor of said City, herewith present their An- 
nual Report. 

Whole number of paupers assisted the last year, who 
had a settlement in the State, is 169 ; of which 128 have a 
settlement in tliis City, and 41 having a settlement in 
some other town in the State. There have died of tlie above 
number, 6 during the year, 4 belonging to this City, and 
2 belonging to other towns in the State. 

The greatest number of paupers at the City Alms 
House, during the year past, is 33, average number 12. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

D. A. BUNTON, Chairman. 

S. S. MOULTON, ^ Overseers 

GEO. 0. CLARK, ! of the Poor, 

JEREMIAH ABBOTT, { City of 
NAHUM BALDWIN, J Manchester. 
February 4, 1862. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
Read and accepted. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 
February 11, 1862. In Board of Common Council, 
Read and accepted. 

0. C. MOORE, Clerk. 



THE EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



lu accordance with the regulations, the Board of Trus- 
tees of the City Library respectfully submit their Eighth 
Annual Report, accompanied by that of the Librarian and 
Treasurer. 

About a decade has passed since the establishment of 
this Institution, so quiet in its operation and so beneficent 
in its effects. The provision your honorable Board has in 
those years so wisely devoted to its wants, has not, we are 
persuaded, been wasted or in the smallest degree misap- 
propriated. 

Tlie increase of books has been constant and of the most 
valuable character, until a selection of above eight thou- 
sand of the best known works in the English Language in 
the departments of Science, Art, Literature, History, Bi- 
ography, Travels, Moral and Political Economy, is now in 
the possession of the City and accessible to all its citizens. 

We call attention to the fact that the number of books 
of an epliemeral character is comparatively small, not a 
twentieth part in cost of the whole. All else, with some 
few unavoidable exceptions, such as will creep into every 
selection not made by actual perusal and deliberate judg- 
ment of tlie works purchased, (which you will see to be 
clearly impossible,) is in the highest degree worthy of 
preservation. 



142 

The chief and urgent want of the Library now, is a com- 
plete Catalogue on some simple and well arranged plan. 
Those at present in use, consist only of geveral indices of 
authors with varying arrangements, got up in the cheap- 
est form and sufficient only for the necessities of the time 
when they were published. Having had in this respect 
the teachings of experience and consulted the methods in 
use in larger libraries, the Trustees will be prepared to 
recommend the publication of a suitable Catalogue, if your 
Honorable Board shall deem it best to make the requisite 
appropriation. 

The care and trouble of the selection and purchase of 
new books, is of course daily increasing, the list already 
in our possession extending in its various departments be- 
yond the personal knowledge of the Committee, and requir- 
ing the watchful atxention of some one familiar with the cur- 
rent literature of the day. Experience and judgment is also 
indispensable to the proper care, preservation and collec- 
tion of books, from time to time, to see that none are lost, 
or that they are not misused. 

We invite the members of the City Council to person- 
ally inspect and judge for themselves of the faithful man- 
ner in which, under the charge of the Treasurer and Li- 
brarian, the aifairs of the Library have been conducted. — 
In regard to this, the several reports herewith presented 
will give you some idea. 

Our thanks are due, in behalf of the City to those gen- 
tlemen who have made donations of books, as appears by 
the Librarian's Report, and especially to his Hon. Ex- 
Mayor Harrington, for the valuable Library Editions of 
Scott and Dickens. 

D. A. BUNTON, Mayor, 

President Ex-Officio. 
Wm. C. Clarke, Clerk. 



143 
LIBEAEIAN'S EEPOET. 



Gentlemen of the BocCrd of Trustees : 

The Librarian respectfully submits his Eighth Annual 
Report. 

The number of persons who, up to this time, have com- 
plied with the regulations for taking books is two thou- 
sand nine hundred and seventy-eight. 

The number of books given out during the forty-two 
weeks which the Library has been open to the public, is 
nearly tliirty thousand, out of which number only eight ap- 
pear to be missing and unaccounted for. 

The number of books in the Library by count is eight 
thousand three hundred and four, an increase over the 
number last annually reported of six hundred and 
seventy-four. 

Since the last annual report I have received for fines and 
catalogues, and paid to the Treasurer, the sum of eleven 
dollars and fourteen cents. 

Donations of Books have been received from the fol- 
lowing persons : 

Hon. Samuel D. Bell, 
Hon. Daniel Clark, U. S. S. 
Hon. E. W. Harrington, 
William F. Goodwin, Esq., Concord, 
Rev. S. S. Hunting, 
Stephen S. Clarke, Esq. 
Jan. 4, 1862. F. B. BATON, Librarian. 



144 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



The Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the City 
Library, makes the following Report of the receipts and 
expenditures by the Board of Trustees, of the funds re- 
ceived by them on account of the City Library : 

1861. " Cr. 

By Cash as per last report, 557,47 
" Cash of City Treasurer, 160,00 
" Cash of City Treasurer, 100,00 
" Cash of City Treasurer, 25,00 

" Qash of City Treasurer, 200,00 
" Cash undrawn, 515,00 



Jan. 


1. 


Nov. 


5. 


Nov. 


7. 


Dec. 


2. 


Dec. 


30. 


Dec. 


30. 


1861 




Jan. 


20. 


a 


20. 


Feb. 


21. 


(i 


21. 


n 


21. 


li 


2L 


Mar. 


22. 


u 


22. 


u 


22. 


u 


22. 


April 


20. 


a 


20. 


May 


21. 


a 


21. 


i( 


21. 



-$1,557 47 
Dr. 



By Cash paid Beaman, 
Beaman, 
Hersey& Tilton, 
John Watson, 
E. B. Beaman, 
A. K. Loring, 
A. K. Loring, 
E. B. Beaman, 
Hersey & Tilton, 



Amownt carried fonoard, 



5,55 
9,82 
8,00 
18,24 
16,92 
45,42 
24,00 
7,00 
9,12 
Tewksbury & Bro. 2,50 



A. K. Loring, 
E. B. Beaman, 
T. W. Reeve, 
W. S. Vaux, 
Beaman, 



10,75 

16,92 
26,28 
56,00 
29,01 

285 53 



145 

Amount brought forward, - - 285 58 

June 21. By Cash paid Horsey & Tilton, 26,36 



(.(. 


21. 


u 


(I. 


Hersey Si Tilton, 


8,25 




July 


19. 


u 


u 


Lippincott & Co., 


, 20,75 




u 


19. 


u 


a 


Quimbycfe Porter, 


, 29,12 




!.(. 


19. 


ii. 


a 


E. B. Beaman, 


4,65 




Aug. 


21. 


li 


a 


A. K. Loring, 


1,70 




Sept. 


21. 


a 


u 


Beaman, 


13,19 




u 


21. 


(( 


u 


A. K. Loring, 


131,71 




Oct. 


19. 


a 


(; 


H. G. Ayer, 


75 




u 


19. 


a 


a 


A Quimby, 


25,50 




Nov. 


22. 


a 


a 


A. K. Loring, 


35,79 




a 


22. 


a 


ii 


A. K. Loring, 


56,55 




u 


22. 


a 


ii 


A. K. Loring, 


6,14 




(( 


22. 


u 


u 


E. C. Eastman, 


12,00 




a 


^. ■ 


a 


(i 


Burnham, 


157,91 




a 


22. 


a 


a 


H. E. Sawyer, 


1,00 




u 


22. 


li 


a 


Beaman & Co., 


15,20 




Dec. 


20. 


a 


ii 


Beaman & Co., 


5,50 




u 


20. 


a 


ii 


A. K. Loring, 


8,25 




i( 


20. 


u 


ii 


Hersey & Tilton, 


26,71 




(( 


20. 


u 


a 


A. Quimby, 


7,96 




(( 


20. 


u 


ii 


Beaman & Co. 


29,87 




(( 


20. 


ii 


ii 


L. G. Drake, 


2,00 




ii 


20. 


ii 


a 


Acad, of Sci. Pa. 


, 4,00 




u 


20. 


a 


(( 


L. A. Sawyer, 


1,00 








Cash to balance, 


640,08 














iSI Fitil 


47 






— ___ — '^pi^^tjfj I 


i 



146 

The expenditures for incidental expenses of the Lihrary 
for the year ending Dec. 31,18G1, the items of which ap- 
pear at large in the Annual Report of the City, are 
Newspapers, (including a bill of last 

year of $27 60,) - - - 75 94 

Bent, • 249 98 

Fosfcage, - - - - - 4 22 

OPuel, 20 10 

Gas, - 112 80 

Insurance, - - - - 51 25 

Librarian's Salary, - - - 600 00 

Incidentals, - - - - 35 11 

Printing Catalogue, - - - 18 00 
Furniture, - - - - 11 00 

Record Books, - - - - 16 50 

$1,194 90 

RECAPITULATION. 

Amount of Appropriation, - - $2,158 18 

Order in favor of Trustees, - 1,000 00 
Incidental Expenses, - - 1,194 90 

$2,194 90 

Balance overdrawn, . - . 36 72 



12,194 90 



Respectfully submitted, 

S.- N. BELL, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 
•Jan. 4, 1862. 

We have examined the al)ovc report, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

D. A. BUNTON, ) Com. on Accounts 

E. G. WOODMAN, I of the 
W. P. NEWELL, ) City Library. 

Jan. 4, 1862. 



147 

Auditor's Office, 
City of Manchester^ Jan. 4, 1862. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the several items 
of receipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing 
report of the Trustees of the City Library, and find the 
same correctly cast, and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Auditor. 
Jan. 6th, 1862. In Board of Mayor and Alderman, 
Read and accepted, 

JOSEPH KNOW.LTON, City Clerk. 
Jan. 6, 1862. In Board of Common Council, 
Read and accepted, 

S. D. FARXSWORTH, Clerk. 



YALLEY CEMETERY. 



To his Honor the Mayor and City Council of the City of 

Manchester : 

The Committee on the Valley Cemetery, in the dis- 
charge of their duties, iiave not deemed any material 
change in the general management of the Valley neces- 
sary. 

Tiiis sacred repose for the Dead is so endeared to most 
of our people that it is visited so frequently and generally 
as to render any extended report from us superfluous. It 
has been our aim to keep the avenues, walks and sur- 
roundings in good condition, imparting to the whole a 
neat and tidy appearance. Nothing beyond this has been 
attempted. 

The proprietors of Lots, with commendal)le liberality, 



148 

have in several instances erected tasty and substantial 
structures, doing mucli to enhance the beauty and loveli- 
ness of this hallowed spot. 

For the financial condition of the Valley we would refer 
to the report of the Treasurer of your Committee. 

To your Committee has also been intrusted the care 
and management of tlie 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 
Tliis Cemetery contains about forty acres, mostly cov- 
ered Avith a growth of wood and timber. 

In the year 1860 a survey of the grounds was made and 
the avenues over the whole were projected, and about 
330 rods built. The remaining portion of them, 572 rods, 
have been constructed the past season, making a total of 
nearly three miles in length of avenues, the cost of which 
is nearly balanced by the sale of wood and timber it was 
found necessary to remove. Still further improvements 
are required to make this an attractive burial place, and 
we would suggest that an appropriation sufficient to in- 
augurate a system of gradual improvements be made. 
All which is respectfully submitted : 
NATHAN PARKER, 
E. G. HAYNES, 
CHARLES W. ADAMS, 
MOODY CURRIER, 
DANIEL CLARK, 

HENRY C. MERRILL, i Committee 

E. W. HARRINGTON, ) on 

WATERMAN SMITH, ( Valley Cemetery. 
JOHN II. GOODALE, 
SAMUEL N. BELL, 
CHARLES W. CLEMENT, 
D. J. DANIELS, 
WILLIAM TODD, /' 

January 28, 1862. In Board of Mayor and Aidernicn, 
Read and accepted, 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 



140 
TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To ike Committee on the Valley Cemetery : 

Tlie Treasurer of the Committee on tlic Valley Ceme- 
tery, makes the following Report of the receipts and ex- 
peiiditures for the year ending Jaw. 1, 1862. 

The funds of the Valley Cemetery Jan. 1, 1861, were : 



Cash on hand, . . . . 


640 30 


Received for lots sold the past year, 


779 61 


" " Leaves, 


21 25 


" " Hay, 


20 00 


" " Wood, 


5 00 


" " Trees, - - -* - 


6 75 




S1.472 81 



The expenditures for the year have been as follows 

Paid Goodale &Farnsworth, for Printing, 7 25 

" Hibbard Stevens, for Labor, 

" Geo. A. Barnes, for Trees, - 

" Geo. A. Barnes, for services as 
" Treasurer, 

" Geo. A. Barnes, " " ' 

" Joseph B. Sawyer, " " " 

" John G. Colt, for Trees, - 

" John Jacobs, for Painting, 

" W. P. Stratton, Repairing Fountain, 

" John B. Clarke, Printing, 

" Benj. Hutchinson, Labor, 

" Hibbard Stevens, Labor, 

" T. P. Clough, Labor, - 

" Hibbard Stevens, Labor, 

" B. Hutcliinson, Labor, 

Amoi(7it carried fryrvjard, - - 328 18 



28 50 


14 50 


30 00 


38 


20 00 


15 00 


13 00 


, 1 75 


5 00 


16 25 


143 00 


19 50 


5 25 


8 80 



150 

Amount brought forward^ 328 18 

Paid J. S. Holt, Ashes, - - - 7 00 

" B. Hutchinson, Labor, - - 1 00 
" Hibbard Stevens, Labor, - 87 25 

" Hibbard Stevens, Labor, &c., - 24 87 
. " Hibbard Stevens, Team Work, 109 54 

" Daniels & Co., Hardware, - - 8 07 
" Neal& Holbrook, Rep'g Bridge, &c. 14 08 
Due from J. B. Sawyer, - - - 272 60 
Balance in the hands of Treasurer, 620 22 

^1'4"2 81 

Respectfully sulunittcd, 

JAMES A. WESTON, 
Treasurer of Committee on Valley Cemetery. 
Jan. 14, 1862. 



We have examined the above report and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

M. CURRIER, ) Committee 

E. W. HARRINGTON, [ on 

C. W. ADAMS, ) Valley Cemetery. 

Auditor's Office, ] 
City of Manchester, Jan. 14, 1862. \ 

I hereby certify that I have examined the several items 
of receipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing 
Report of the Committee on Valley Cemetery, and find 
the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Auditor. 
Jan. 28, 1862. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
Read and accepted, 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 



CITY SOLICITOR'S REPORT. 



Hillsborough, ss. \ 
City of Manchester. \ 

To the Hon. Board of Mayor and Aldermen and Common 

Council. 
Report of the Solicitor for year ending Jan. 1862. 

At the present date there are three actions upon the 
Docket of the Supreme Judicial Court, in said County, 
viz ; Underhill vs. City ; Lahey vs. said City ; and Dow 
vs. said City. The first named case was entered May 
Term, 1860. Judge Perley was retained in said case, but 
his fee was paid and his retainer ceased tlie first of the 
year 1861. 

Upon the sessions Docket of said Court stands two ac- 
tions or petitions, one of C. M. Hubbard and others, who 
Petition for a new highway, in said City. Tlie other is a 
Petition of said City for discontinuance of a highway un- 
answered to ; in all of said actions no counsel appear, ex- 
cept the Solicitor or his partner, and no counsel is retain- 
ed at the expense of said city. A question has arisen in re- 
gard to tax of Concord Railroad, and in accordance with 
said Company's request, the collector has been advised to 
rest -the matter till the Spring tax of said Company is as- 
sessed by Supreme Court, at which time they agree to get 
the written opinion of said Court as to their liability to 
pay said tax. 

Another question has arisen in regard to Arthur L. East- 
man's tax. And the collector lias been advised that he is 



152 

liable to pay said tax, "providing llic same has not been 
abated." I would respectfully refer tlie Hon. Board of 
Mayor and Aldermen and Common Council to the Police 
Record for tbe manner said duties have been performed, 
as it would be impossible to state specifically. 

The expense to said City for legal aid and advice, 
the past year, has been one hundred dollars. And there 
is no claim known to me, or authorized by me, aside from 
that. All of which is respectfully submitted. 

C. W. JOHNSON, Solicitor. 
Jan. 14, 1862. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 

Read and accepted. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 
Jan. 14, 1862. In Board of Common Coimcil, 

Read and accepted, 0. C. MOORE, Clerk. 



CITY FARM. 



Amount of Stock, Hay, Produce, Farming 
Tools, and Household Furniture 
April 1, 1861, was - - 2,736 06 
Balance, - - - - 1,002 58 

$3,738 64 

Amount of Stock, Hay, Produce, Farming 
Tools, and Househould Furniture 

Dec. 31, 1861, is - - 3,738 64 

13,738 64 

Being a gain of $1,002 58, after supporting all the pau- 
pers at the Farm, during 9 months, to January 1, 1862. 
Amount of Expenditures for the year 

1861, is - - - 1,886 95 

Amount of Expenditures from Jan. 1, to 

April 1, 1861, - - - 516 94 

Amount of Expenditures from April 

1, to Dec. 31, is - - $1,370 01 

Amount of Stock and Produce sold from 

Farm, from April 1, to Dec. 31, 950 38 

Amount of Work on Highway, &c., 251 50 

Excess of Stock, Dec. 31, - - 1,002 58 

$2,204 46 

Profit, $834 45 



154 

INVENTORY OF PERSONAL PROPERTY AT THE 
CITY ALMS HOUSE DEC, 1861. 



(3 working oxen, 


325 00 


8 cows, - . - - 


200 00 


1 fat heifer, . _ . - 


20 00 


2 two year old heifers, - 


50 00 


1 one year old bull, - - - 


8 00 


7 shoats, 1,000 lbs., 


80 00 


20 tou'j No. 1 hay, - 


280 00 


28 tons No. 2 hay, 


364 00 


11 tons No. 3 hay. 


100 00 


8 tons corn fodder and straw, 


64 00 


400 bushels of corn, 


400 00 


52 bushels of wheat, - - - 


78 00 


70 bushels of barley, 


56 00 


26 bushels of beans, - 


58 50 


90 bushels of oats, - - - 


45 00 


450 bushels of potatoes. 


157 00 


26 bushels of beets, 


10 00 


95 bushels of carrotts, 


30 00 


1 bushel onions, - 


75 


2,000 lbs. salt pork, - 


240 00 


150 lbs. salt beef, - 


10 00 


1 barrel cider, - - - - 


5 00 


4 barrels soap. 


12 00 


1 barrel salt pickles, - - - 


4 00 


1 barrel apples, - - - 


3 00 


10 gallons molasses and cask, - 


5 00 


650 lbs. clieese, - - - 


62 00 


125 lbs. butter, - - - 


25 00 


180 lbs. lard, - - - - 


20 00 


25 lbs. coffee, 


5 00 



AmouTii carried fonvardy - 2,707 25 



165 

Amount brought forvmrd^ 
120 lbs. fresh pork, - 
50 lbs. fresh beef, 

2 ox carts, . . . . 

1 pair new ox-cart wheels, 

3 ox-sleds, . - - - 

2 single wagons, - 

1 sleigh, - - - - - 

2 buffalo robes, . - . 
1 single harness, _ . _ 

1 lead harness, 

Curry combs, cards and brushes, 
Bridle, halter and blanket, - 
12 rakes, . _ . _ 

li hay forks, . . . 

6 sickles, .... 

2 grain cradles, - . - 
15 scythes, - . . . 
10 scythe snaths, - 
1 cross cut saw, . _ . 
String of bells, . - - 
Corn sheller, . - . . 
Ox yokes and bows, 

Plows, 

46 hens, . . . . 

3 turkeys, . . . . 
300 bushels leached ashes, 
15 meal bags, . . . . 
3 bushels of ears pop corn, 
20 lbs. dried apples, - 
1|- bushels salt, . . . 
200 lbs. salt fish, 
6 new brooms, - . . 

Amount carried forward. - - 3,173 75 



2,707 25 


7 00 


4 00 


100 00 


40 00 


45 00 


75 00 


15 00 


5 00 


6 00 


4 00 


100 


2 00 


2 CO 


6 00 


2 00 


4 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


1 25 


6 00 


8 00 


60 00 


15 00 


3 00 


27 00 


3 00 


2 50 


2 50 


75 


4 00 


1 50 



156 

Amount broug-ht forivard, - - 3,173 75 

60 lbs. sugar, - - - - 6 50 

200 lbs. nails, - . . . 7 00 

12 lbs. copperas, . . - 50 

6 baskets, 3.00, 2 drags, 2.00, 5 00 

2 cultivators, 6.00, scalding tub 1.00, 7 00 

Rope and block, - - - 3 25 

Beetle and wedges, - - - 1 25 

Scales and steelyards, - - 1 00 
Winnowing mill, 8.00, hay cutter, 2.50, 10 50 
Tie bows and rings, 2.00, 2 grind 

stones 2.50, - - . 4 50 

Wheelbarrow, 2.50, hand sled, 1.00, 3 50 
5 wrenches, 1.50, 3 mason trowels, 

1.25, 2 75 

Oak timber, - - - - 15 00 

Chest of tools, - - - - 15 00 

2 wood saws, 1.00, 2 traps, .50, 1 50 

Shaving horse, 1.00, 5 axes, 4.00, 5 00 

Vice and saw set, - - - 2 50 

4 ladders, 4.00, 4 sliovels, 1.75, 5 75 
2 spades, 1.00, 6 manure forks, 3.00 4 00 

5 bog hoes, l.OO, 1 bush hook, .75, 1 75 
10 cart spires, 8.00, 2 harrows, 9.00, 17 00 
1,500 feet pine lumber, - - 18 00 
20 chestnut posts, - - 2 00 

1 gravel scraper, 3.00, set of measures, 

1.00, - - . - 4 00 

2 set of fetters, - - - 7 00 
5 blocks and chains, - - 17 00 
2 pairs hand cuffs, - - 3 00 
12 meat barrels, 6.00, 7 cider barrels, 

5.00, - . . . 1100 

Amount carried forward, - - 3,356 00 



157 

Amount hrov.ght forivard, - - 3,356 00 
50 doz. caudles, 6.00, meat safe, 1.00, 7 00 
Cook and othci- stoves, - 44 00 

Ironing furnace, - - ' - 2 00 

12 tables, 16.00, 1 clock, 3.00, 19 00 

2 rocking chairs, . - - 3 00 

18 dining chairs, - - - 4 50 

18 common chairs, - - - 3 00 

12 window curtains, 2.00, 9 boxes, .75, 2 75 
6 looking glasses, 3.00, 7 wash tubs, 

1.75, - - - - 4 75 

5 stone pots, 3.00, 23 earthen pots, 2.00, 5 00 
8 pails, 1.00, 6 butter tubs, 75, 1 75 

Milk cans and measures, - - 50 

5 milk pails, 1.50, 23 milk pans, 4.00, 5 50 
2 lbs. tea, 1.50, 7 lbs. tobacco, 2.25, 3 75 

6 sugar buckets, .75, 1 cream pot, .75, 1 50 
2 cheese safes, . - . 5 00 
1 pie cupboard, . _ - 2 00 
1 churn, 2.50, 1 cheese press, 3.00, 5 50 
1 cheese tub, 1.50, 2 cheese hoops, 

1.50, - - - - 3 00 

1 curd cutter, 1.25, half barrel flour, 

3.00, 4 25 

"4 bushels corn meal, - - - 4 00 

1 apple sauce tub, - - - 1 00 

Cheese tongues and basket, - - 75 
1 porcelain kettle, - - - 1 00 

1 mixing trough, 2.50, salt mortar, .25, 2 75 
5 coffee and tea pots, - - - 2 00 
Castor, pepper boxes and salt dishes, 75 
10 chambers and bed pans, - - 2 50 
8 flat irons, shovels and tongues, 2 50 

Amount carried forward, - 3,501 00 



158 

Amount brought forward, - 3,501 00 

Knives, forks and spoons, - - 7 00 
Rolling pin, cake board k dinner bell, 1 75 
4 light stands 2.00, white wash 

brushes, .25, - - - 2 25 

Clothes liorses, 2.00, two bread 

troughs, 1.00, - - - 3 00 
Wash bench and boards, 1.50, 25 

towels, 2.50, 
School and other books, - - - 
Cloth on hand, 8.00, 6 table covers, 

2.50, ... - 

4 roller clothes, - . . - 
23 bedsteads and cords, 
Clothes lines and pins, - - - 
Floor and other brushes, 
4 Russia iron bake pans. 
Butcher and carving knives. 
Tea tray and waiter, .75, 8 jugs, 1.00, 

1 wooden bowl, .50, one dish pan, 60, 1 10 
Knife tray and sieve, - - 75 
Flesh fork and spoon, .37, copper 

boiler, 1.50, . - - 

Candle sticks and snuffers. 
Candle moulds, . _ . 

Lanterns and lamps, 1.00, dress 

table, .60, . . - - 
Clothes brushes and mop, 
Reel, swift and spining wheel. 
Chopping knife .25, one bureau, 3.00, 

2 chest of draws, 3.00, trunks, 2.00, 
Dining set and other crockery ware, 
20 tin pans and other tin ware, 

Amount carried forward, - - 3,605 47 



4 00 


3 00 


10 50 


100 


23 00 


100 


1 00 


4 00 


125 


1 75 



1 87 


- 50 


50 


150 


75 


1 00 


, 3 25 


5 00 


17 00 


6 75 



159 

Amount brought forward, - - 3,605 47 
Feather beds, mattrasscs and bedding,! 20 00 
2 hay racks, - - - - 15 00 
1 ton hard coal, - - - - 7 00 

1 cask lime, 1 00 

4 flails, 1.00, muzzle baskets, .75, 1 75 

Cops and pin, - - - - 1 00 
Thread, needles and yarn, - - 2 00 
20 bushels ashes, - - 2 50 



!,755 72 



EECAPITULATIO^. 



Stock on hand Dec. 31, 1861, 


3,755 72 


Expenditures current year, 


1,886 95 


Interest on farm - - 


1,057 60 


Balance, 


290 36 

i^a qon fiQ 




«g)U,i/t7U UO 


Stock on hand Dec. 31, 1860, - 


4,502 50 


Supporting paupers, 640 weeks, 


$1.50, - - . - 


960 00 


Clothing paupers and convicts. 


134 25 


Building 41 rods double wall, 


82 00 


Digging and stoning 25 rods ditch 


, 50 00 


Building 60 rods new fence, 


60 00 


Produce sold from farm, 


- 950 38 


Work on highway &c., 


25150 




6,990 ^yd 



CITY PEOPEETY. 



City Hall and Lot at Cost, - - $35,815 00 
City Farm and permanent improv- 

ments, - . . - 17,980 00 

Stock, Tools, Furniture and provis- 
ions at City Farm, - - 4,502 50 

Engine Houses and Appropriations, 

as per Engineer's Report, - - 31,525 22 

Reservoirs at Cost, - - - 7,291 70 

Hearses, Horses, Tomb and New Cem- 
etery at Cost, ... - 4,170 00 

Court House Lot at Cost, - - 9,514 56 

Common Sewers at Cost, - - - 24,878 84 

Safe, Furniture and Gas Fixtures City 

Hall, 1,933 00 

Street Lanterns, Posts, Pipes and 

Frames, .... 1,011 00 

Cemetery, 3,580 00 

Water Works, ... - 1,500 00 

Horses, Carts, Ploughs and Tools he- 

londno- to City, - - - - 889 00 

144,590 82 



161 



VALUATION, TAXES, &C. 



^ear. | 


Valuation. 




Taxes. 




1 No. of polls. 


Poll Tax'. 


1838j 


$555,270 


00 


$2,235 


49 


244 


$1 QQ 


1839; 


604,963 


00 


3,029 


84 


427 


2 14 


1840 


■ 946,200 


00 


3,986 


56 


772 


2 20 


1841 


1,229,054 


00 


9,563 


74 


892 


3 49 


1842 


1,430,524 


00 


12,952 


44 


1,053 


2 76 


1843; 


1,598,826 


00 


13,764 


32 


1,053 


2 60 


1844 


1,873,286 


00 


13,584 


72 


1,053 


2 25 


1845! 


2,544,780 


00 


19,246 


27 


1,561 


2 30 


184G 


3,187,726 


00 


22,005 


95 


1,808 


2 10 


1847i 


4,488,550 


00 


24,963 


54 


2,056 


1 68 


1848' 


4,664,957 


00 


39,712 


53 


2,638 


2 58 


1849 


5,500,049 


00 


44,979 


92 


2,518 


2 47 


1850 


5,832,080 


00 


48,974 


23 


2,820 


2 37 


18511 


6,906,462 


00 


51,798 


47 


2,910 


2 25 


1852 


6,795,682 


00 


54,379 


45 


2,745 


1 92 


1853 


6,995,528 


00 


61,545 


81 


2,907 


1 82 


1854 


8,237,617 


00 


62,022 


44 


2,814 


1 80 


1855 


8,883,248 


00 


71,952 


09 


3,725 


1 94 


1856 


9,244,062 


00 


114,214 


08 


3,760 


2 96 


1857; 


9,983,862 


00 


84,862 


98 


3,695 


2 04 


1858 


10,259,080 


00 


78,210 


85 


3,695 


1 83 


1859: 


9,853,310 


00 


81,368 


01 


3,495 


1 92 


1860 


9,644,937 


00 


86,804 


87 


3,651 


2 16 


I86II 


9,343,254 


00 


99,104 


98 


3,974 


2 40 



162 



CITY DEBT. 



Date of Notes. To whom payable. 


When payable. 


Int. unpaid 
Jan. 1,1861. 


Principal- 


Feb. 28, 1852. 


NeliCQiuh Hunt. Fob. 28, 1872 


108 00 


3,600 00 


July 1, 1847, 


Certifi. of Stock. 


July 1, 1862 


675 00 


22,500 00 


July], 1847, 


.( n 


July 1, 1867 


600 00 


20,000 00 


Julyl, 1857, 


u a 


July 1, 1872 


600 00 


20,000 00 


July 1, 1854, 


it a 


July 1, 1874 


600 00 


20,000 00 


July 1, 1856, 


li <i 


Jan. 1, 1880 


300 GO 


10,000 00 


July 1, 1807, 


ti (( 


July 1, 1877 


671 00 


22,500 00 


July 9, 1858, 


Nehenilali Hunt. 


July y. 1878 


68 75 


2,400 00 


" 22, 1858, 


tt (' 


July 22, 1878 


29 15 


1,100 00 


Jan. 1, li<in. 


Certifi. of Stock. 


Jan. 1, 1866 




6,000 00 


Jan, 1, 1861, 


t< '< 


Jan. 1, 1871 




6,000 OO 



3,651 90 134,100 00 
3,651 90 



rt^injiorary Loan, 



137,751 90 
31,500 00 

$169,251 9t) 



163 



EESERVED FUND. 



By Balance of last year's account, 2,985 16 
" Appropriation, - - - 12,289 42 



$15,274 58 



EXPENDITURES. 
To Transferred to the following accounts, 



Highway District No. 4, 
Highway District No. 5, 
Highway District No. 6, 
Highway District No. 7, 
Highway District No. 8, 
Higliway District No. 9, 
Highway District No. 10, 
Highway District No. 12, 
Highway District No. 13, 
New Highways, - 
Granite Bridge, 
Araoskeag Falls Bridge, 
Sewers and Drains, - 
City Police, - 
Interest, 

Pine Grove Cemetery, - 
Incidental Expenses, 
Balance, . - - 



50 00 

- 312 82 
100 00 

- 50 00 
175 00 

- 150 00 

75 00 

- 75 00 
79 10 

- 823 71 
243 74 

- 234 54 
710 99 

- 1,319 05 

339 90 

- 71 31 
500 00 

10,464 42 

$15,274 &8 



164 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S EEPORT. 



To His Ho7ior the Mayor and Board of Aldermen : 

Gentlemen: In compliance with the requirements of 
the Revised Ordinances, I herewith transmit to your Hon- 
orable Board a report of the condition of the Fire Depart- 
ment ; also an appraisal of the property belonging to the 
same, the location of the several Engines and apparatus, 
witli the force belonging to them, the location and condi- 
tion of the Reservoirs, and other supplies of water within 
the City. 

At the commencement of the year the Department con- 
sisted of two Hand-Engines, forty-five men each ; two 
Steamers, with fourteen men each ; one steamer, with 
twelve men ; one Hose Company, with twenty men, and 
one Hook and Ladder Company, with twenty-five men ; 
consisting in all of one hundred and seventy men. 

The first of April one Hand-Engine, the Torrent No. 5, 
situated on Manchester street, was discharged from service. 
The force and location of the present Department is as fol- 
lows : Two Steamers, the Amoskeag No. 1, the Fire-King 
No. 2, with fourteen men each, and the Pennacook Hose 
Company, with twenty men, house on Vine street ; the 
Hook and Ladder Company, with twenty-five men, house 
on Manchester street, near Pine ; one steamer, E. W. 
Harrington No. 3, with twelve men, house on Main street 
(Pitscataquog), and one Hand-Engine, with forty-five men, 
house in Amoskeag Village, consisting in all of one hun- 
dred and thirty men. Torrent No. 5 Hand-Engine and 



165 

Hose-Carriage liave been sold to the town of Rochester, 
N". H., for five hundred dollars. The A. C. Wallace No. 
7 remains in the house on Chestnut street, formerly occu- 
pied by No. 4. 

During the past year a twelve-inch cement pipe has been 
laid from the gate at the corner of Hanover and Chestnut 
streets to the reservoir in front of the City Hall ; also a 
nine-inch cement pipe from that down the back street in 
the rear of Merchants' Exchange to the reservoir on Man 
chaster street near the American House, giving a supply 
of water sufficient for any length of time. A reservoir has 
been put in at the junction of Myrtle and Elm streets, 
holding about sixteen thousand gallons, which has by trial 
proved sufficient to supply one Steamer from one and a 
half to two hours, there being a large natural supply of 
water to the reservoir. 

By laying a pipe from the gate at the junction of Hano- 
ver and Pine streets, down Pine street to the reservoir be- 
tween Manchester and Merrimack streets, and from that 
to the reservoir at the junction of Central and Pine streets, 
the City proper would l)e supplied with water sufficient for 
any emergency, and would be available at almost any 
point within its limits. 

At Piscataquog a tank has been put in tlie last year in 
front of the house of Samuel Webber, Esq., on Granite 
street, by running a line of hose from a hydrant at the 
Manchester Print Works across the bridge. It furnishes 
a good supply of water for that part of the village. By put- 
ting in a large reservoir in front of the Steamer's house, 
tiiat part of the City would be well supplied with water. 

At Amoskeag village the only supply, to any extent, is 
at the river and the Pentstock near the Batting Mill. At 
Bakersville, Hunt's Pond furnishes a supply sufficient for 
any emergency. 



166 

Tlie Engines are in good repair, and all the apparatus 
belonging to the Department is in good condition, and the I 
success of the Department the past year is the best evi~ ^ 
dence we can give of its efficiency. 

Too much credit cannot be given to the members of the 
Fire Department for their promptness and the efficient 
manner in which they have discharged their duties as Fire- 
men during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. C. HEATH, 

Chief Engineer. 



167 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE CO., NO. 1. 

r, 0. RiCKER, Foreman ; Sydney Smith, Assistant; A. A. 
Balch, Clerk ; J. C. Ricker, Treasurer. 

HOUSE, VINE STKEET. 

House and Land, - - $7,720 '47 

Steamer, .... 3,000 00 

Hose Carriage, . - - . 250 00 

300 feet Rubber Hose, - - 316 00 

500 feet Boyd's Patent Hose, - 435 00 

650 feet Leather Hose, - 487 50 

10 Rubber Suits, - - - 50 GO 
6 Torches, .... 20 00 
2 Branch Hose Pipes, - - - 24 00 

1 Branch Hose Pipe, with gate, 15 00 

2 Copper Branches, - - 14 00 
2 Blunderbusses, - - - 20 00 
6 Shoulder Straps, Belts and Spanners, 27 50 
2 Stoves and Pipes, - - 42 50 
Furniture in Hall, - - - 31 50 

1 Bed complete, ... 25 00 
4 Tons Scotch Coal, - - - 44 00 

2 Tons Hard Coal, - - - 14 00 
4 Cords Soft Wood, - - - 18 00 

11 Gallons Oil, - - - - 1 50 
1 Gallon Spirits, - - - 2 00 

1 Gallon Strait's Oil, - - - 75 
J- Gallon Fluid, ... - 40 
6 Lanterns, - - - - - 15 00 

2 one-gallon Oil Cans, 1 one-gallon 

Fluid Can, 1 two-gallon Can for 
Spirits, 1 six-gallon Can for Oil, 4 
Woolen Jackets, - - - 7 50 



Amount carried forwardf - - 12,581 62 



168 



Amount brought forward^ - 
1 Bench Vice, 


12,581 62 

- 2 60 


1 Slide Wrench, 


100 


1 Hammer, Wrenches, <fec., 


- 2 60 


2 Jack Screws, - - - 


6 00 


1 pair Blankets, 


- 6 00 


1 pair Harnesses, 

14 Badges, . . _ 


- 45 OO 
12 00 


1 Iron Bar, - . . 


go 

12,655 45 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE CO., NO. 2. 

Batchelder, Foreman ; James Fherson, Assistant ; 
M. 0. Pearsons, Clerk and Treasurer. 

HOUSE, VINE STREET. 



Steamer, - - - - t 


il3,000 00 


Hose Carriage, 


250 00 


200 feet Rubber Hose, 


208 00 


500 " Boyd's Patent, 


435 00 


500 " Leather Hose, - 


875 00 


14 Rubber Suits, 


105 00 


12 Woolen Jackets, - - - 


48 00 


7 Torches, - - - 


20 00 


2 Blunderbusses, - . . 


24 00 


2 Lanterns, _ . . 


5 00 


2 " 


2 00 


Shoulder Straps^ Belts and Spanners, 50 00 


2 Jack Screws, - . . 


5 00 


2 Copper Branches, 


14 00 


1 " " with Gate, 


15 00 


3 Stoves and Pipes, 


50 00 



Amount carried forward^ 4,006 00 



169 



mount brouf^ht fonvard^ - 


- 


4,606 00 


1 Sheet Iron Pan, 


- 


5 00 


12 Badges, 


- 


12 75 


2 2 gallon Oil Cans, 1 1 


gal: do. 


4 50 


1 pair Harnesses. 


- 


50 00 


1 " Blankets, - 


- 


5 00 


Furniture and Fixtures 


in Hall, 


50 00 


1 Bed complete, 


- 


25 00 


4 Tons Scotch Coal, 


- 


44 00 


2 " Hard, " 


- 


14 00 


2.1 Cords Soft Wood, 


- 


9 50 


1 Gallon Spirits, 


- 


2 00 


1 Bench and Vice, 


- 


5 00 


1 Slide Wrench, 


- 


100 


1 Hammer, 


- 


83 


1 Rotary Pump, - 


- 


15 00 


1 Clock, 


- 


8 00 


1 Iron Bar, 


- 


83 


2 Shovels, 


- 


150 


1 Axe, 


- 


100 



E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FHIE ENGINE 

CO., NO. 3. 

A. C. Wallace, Foreman ; John Patterson, Assistant ; 

H. H. NoYES, Clerk and Treasurer. 

HOUSE, MAIN iSTKKET, I'ISCATAQUOG. 

House, <f 825 00 

Steamer, - - . . 2,750 00 

Hose Carriage, - - - 150 00 



Amount carried forward^ 3,525 00 

M 



170 



Amount brought forward^ 


- 


3,525 00 


100 feet Rubber Hose, 


- 


- 104 00 


150 feet Boyd's Hose, 


- 


130 50 


r)00 feet Leather Hose, 


- 


- 375 00 


12 Hosemen's Suits, Rubber, - 


60 00 


4 Torches, - - - 


- 


8 00 


1 Stove, 


- 


18 00 


1 Branch with gate, 


- 


- 15 00 


'2 Jack Screws, 


- 


5 00 


1 Vice and Bench, 


- 


5 00 


1 Signal Lantern, 


- 


15 00 


6 Settees, 


- 


- 20 00 


7 Office Chairs, 


- 


8 00 


1 Chandelier, 


- 


- 10 00 


1 pair Harnesses, 


- 


40 00 


1 pair Blankets, 


- 


6 00 


1 Sheet-Iron Pan, 


- 


- 5 00 


1 Table, - - - 


- 


- 5 0O 


1 Rotary Pump, 


- 


.15 00 


4 Tons Scotcli Coal, 


- 


- 44 00 


^1 Tons Hard Coal, 


# 


14 00 


2 Lanterns, 


- 


2 00 


1 Blunderbuss, 


- 


12 00 


8 Spanner Belts and Spanners, 


8 00 


1 Shovel, 


- 


83 


1 Iron Bar, 


- 


1 00 



4,451 m 



171 



PENNACOOK HOSE CO., 


NO. 1. 


k¥ALTER Neal, Foreman ; Geo. Holbrook, Assistant ; A. 


J. Woodbury, Clerk ; Dayid Thayer, Treasurer. 


. HOUSE, VINE STREET. 




1 Hose Carriage, 


$370 00 


100 feet Boyd's Hose, 


- 87 00 


2550 feet Leather Hose, - 


1,275 00 


6 Hosemen's suits, 


- 30 00 


9 Woolen Jackets, 


38 25 


8 pair Rubber Overalls, 


- 16 00 


2 Rubber Jackets, . - - 


10 00 


4 Torches, . - - - 


- 8 00 


10 Spanners and Belts, 


10 00 


12 Spanners, 


- 4 00 


2 Stoves and Pipes, - - - 


22 00 


24 Badges, 


- 24 00 


1 Signal Lantern, . - - 


12 00 


8 Trumpets, ... 


9 00 


1 Hose Washer and Fixtures, - 


40 00 


2 Axes, _ . . . 


8 00 


2 Slide Wrenches, - - - 


2 00 


18 Patches, 


- 8 00 


1 Jack, 


100 


1 Shovel, - - - - 


83 


1 four-gallon Can, 1 one-gallon Can, 3 00 


1 Hammer, . . _ . 


100 


1 Blunderbuss, . . - 


- 12 00 


1 Breast-Plate, - . - 


3 00 


25 Chairs, new, - . - 


- 36 00 


13 Chairs, .... 


6 50 


1 Table, , - - - 


- 150 


1 Looking-Glass, . . - 


8 00 


1 Chandelier, . - . 


- 5 00 




$2,048 [^ 



172 
HOOK AND LADDER CO., NO. 

HOUSE, MANCHESTER STREET. 



House and Land, 


$950 00 


Carriage, 


150 00 


525 feet Ladders, 


- 125 00 


4 large and 3 small Hooks, 


40 00 


Ropes, - - ' - 


- 20 00 


3 Chairs, 


75 


45 Badges, 


9 00 


1 Signal Lantern, 


10 00 


4 Torches, 1 Trumpet, 


9 00 


4 Axes, Shovel and Bar, 


- 5 00 


2 Hay-Forks, 2 Buckets, 


6 00 


ISign, - - - - 


12 00 


1 Jack, ... 


2 00 


^ cord Wood, 


2 00 




"fl'AjO'lli 1 »» 


MERRIMACK HAND 


ENGINE CO. 


HOUSE, AMOSKEAG 


VILLAGE. 


House, - - - - 


- 300 00 


Engine and Hose Carriage, 


900 00 


550 feet Hose, 


- 500 00 


24 feet Suction Hose, 


75 00 


5 Hosemcn's Suits, . 


- 12 50 


1 Signal Lantern, 


15 00 


4 Torches, 


8 00 


2 Trumpets, 


6 00 


1 Copper Pump, 


3 50 


5 Settees, - _ . 


13 00 


3 Office-Chairs, 


3 00 


1 Lantern, . . . 


100 


1 Slide Wrench, 


- 1 00 


2 Blunderbusses, 


16 00 




$1,854 00 



173 



TORRENT ENGINE HOUSE, MANCHESTER ST. 
15 Settees, - . . . 
2 Office Chairs, - 
5 Coimnon Cliairs, 

1 Desk, ... - 

2 Stoves, - - . - 
1 Sign, ■ - - - - • 



$15 00 


2 00 


175 


150 


-5 00 


20 00 



$45 2,5 



MASSABESIC HOUSE, CHESTNUT ST. 



House and Land, 


$1100 00 


Engine, No. 7, - - - 


900 00 


400 feet Leading Hose, 


- 100 00 


3 Settees, . . . . 


3 00 


4 Gas Fixtures, 


5 00 


1 Copper Pump, ► . - 


- 3 00 


Axes, - - - . 


2 00 


Wliifiletrees and Ropes, - 


ifl 



!2,113 00 



ENGINEERS' OFFICE. 

7 Rubber Coats, ... 35 00 

39 00 
3 50 



7 Engineers' Hats, 
7 Badges, 

Total amount of property. 



- $77 50 
^29,447 77 



174 

EXPENDITURES. 

For Services, . - - - $2,915 76 
Teams, - - - - 766 04 

Supplies, Repairs and Incidentals, 1,278 37 

$4,960 17 



STOVES, GRATES, FIRE-PLACES, &c. 

Number of Stoves in good condition, - - 4699 

Stoves in bad condition, - - - 147 

Grates, - 136 

Fire-Places, 68 

Blacksmiths' Forges, _ . . 26 

Coal Furnaces, . _ . > 61 

Stationary Engines, ... 9 



CITY ORGANIZATION 
1863. 



MAYOR, 

DAYID A. BUNTON. 



ALDERMEN. 
Ward 1, George C. Gilmore, Ward 5, John Cocghlin, 



2, Henry B. Moulton, 

3, Henry 0. Merrill, 

4, John H. Mavnard, 



6, Elbridge G. Haynes. 

7, John 0. Smith, 

8, T. S. Montgomery. 



COMMON 

Ward 1, Jeremiah O. Pulsifer, 
Elbsidge G. Woodman, 
Stephen P. Duntley, 

Ward 2, Josiah Hackett, 

Charles W. Olement, 
Samuel Clare, 

Ward 3, Ephraim S. Peabody, 
Henry P. Wilson, 
Thomas R. Hubbard, 

Ward 4, William S. Palmer, 
Robert S. Moore, 
Nathaniel W. C'umner, 



COUNCIL. 

Ward 5, James Madden, 
William Little, 
Thomas Stack, 

Ward 6, Benjamin C. Kendall, 
Ezra Kimball, 
Jeremiah L. Iogg, 

Ward 7, John 0. Parker, 

James W. Preston, 
Ebenezer Hartshorn, 

Ward 8, Edwin R. Warren, 
John E. Stearns, 
Warren Stearns. 



ELBRIDGE G. WOODMAN, President of Common Council. 
JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 
ORREN C. MOORE, Clerk of Common Cocncu.. 
DANIEL K. PRESCOTT, City Messengeb. 



176 



JOINT STANDING COMmTTEES. 

On Finance — The Mayor and Alderman Ilaynes ; Messrs. Kimball, 
Uackett and Cumner. 

On Accounts — Aldermen Gilmore and Merrill ; Messrs. Peabody, 
Pulsifer and Hubbard. 

On Lands and Buildings — Aldermen Coughlin and Majnard ; 
Messrs. Clement, Preston and J. E. Stearns. 

On Public Instruction — Aldermen Montgomery and Moulton ; 
Messrs. Hackett, Wilson and Little. 

On Streets — Aldermen Merrill and Haynes ; Messrs, Hartshorn, 
Fogg and Wilson. 

On Sewers and Drains — Aldermen Smith and Maynard ; Messrs. 
Palmer, Kendall and Madden. 

On Commons and Cemetery — Aldermen Haynes and Merrill ; 
Messrs. Warren, Peabody and Stack. 

On Fire Department — Aldermen Maynard and Smith ; Messrs. Ken- 
dall, Clark and W. Stearns. 

On Claims — Aldermen Montgomery and Gilmore ; Messrs. Hub- 
bard, Parker and Woodman. 

On House of Correction — Aldermen Coughlin and Moulton ; MesBra. 
Moore, Hartshorn and Palmer. 

On City Farm — The Mayor and Alderman Montgomery ; Messrs. 
Pulsifer, Duntley and Warren. 

Joint Sjjecial Committee on City Hall — Aldermen Moulton and Mer- 
rill ; Messrs. Clement, Cumner and Preston. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Licenses — AIder;nen Maynard and Haynes. 

On Enrollments — Aldermen Gilmore and Coughlin, 

Ore Elections — Aldermen Merrill and Smith. 

On Lighting Streets' — Aldermen Moulton and Maynard. 

On Bills in Seco7id Reading — Aldermen Montgomery and Haynes. 

On Market — Aldermen Smitli and Gilmore. 

Oh Setting Trees — Aldermen Coughlin and Moulton. 

On Abatement of Tares — .\ldermen Haynes and Coughlin, 



177 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Elections and Returns — Messrs. Hackott, Parker and Moore. 
On Bills in Second Reading — Messrs. Pulsil'er, Warren and Little. 
On Enrollments — Messrs. Kimball, Duutlev and Clark. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION. 
JAMES 0. ADAMS, Supkrintendext Public Instkuction. 
SVard 1, John Hoslev, Ward 5, John Covgklin. 

2, Waterman Smith, 6, George Pierce, 

3, James B. Straw, 7, Samuel VVebbek. 

4:, Hiram Hill, 8, Daniel Farmer, Jr. 



SELECTMEN. 
Ward 1, Charles W. Coniy, Ward 5, Thomas Howe 

John M. Caswell, 



John Gillis, 

2, George 0. Clark, 
C. C. Colby, 
Sullivan D. Hill, 

3, Joseph H. Hatnes, 
William Flanders, 
Alonzo p. Gilson, 

4, Joseph L. Smith. 
Isaac D. Palmer, 
Andrew J. Butterfield, 



Jeremiah Haves, 
Patrick Dovle, 

6, Isaac Whittemore, 
Benj. F. Mitchell. 
Robert Hall, 

7, Hezekiah H. Noyes, 
John Patterson, 
Aaron Waldron, 

8, Damon Y. Stearns, 
James E. Bailev, 
John Field. 



ASSESSORS OF TAXES. 
Ward 1, George F. Juokins, AVard 5. John Q. A. Sargent, 

2, George S. Neal, 5. Jona. Y. McQiesto;;, 

3, Daniel W. Fling, 7, James Walker, 

4, Thomas B. Brown, ^, Benjamin White. 



178 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Ward 1, Samuel S. Moulton, 

2, George 0. Ci.akk, 

3, Nahum Baldwin, 

4, W. H. H. Crawford, 



Ward 5, Patrick Shehax, 
6, Jeremiah Abbott, 
7, Ira Baku, 
8, Dennis Cassidy. 



MODERATORS. 



Ward 1, William H. Hill, 

2, William Reynolds, 

3, Theodore T. Abbott, 

4, John G. Lane, 



Ward 5, John Smith, 

6, James O. Adams, 

7, Daniel Balch, 

8, George H. CoLin 



WARD CLERKS. 



Ward 1, James S. Gilmore, 

2, John T. Robinson, 

3, Jeremiah D. Lyfokd, 

4, William G. Garmon, 



Ward 5, Michael Howe, 

6, Edward Prime, 

7, Daniel K. Mack, 

8, Cyrus Gile. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



SAMUEL UPTON, Justice of Police Court. 
A. B. SHATTUCK, Assistant Justice.' 
WILLLAM B. PATTEN, Citv Marshal. 
BENJAMIN C. HAYNES, Assistant Marshal. 



Justin Spear, 



CONSTABLES. 



BnooKS Shattuck, 



Henry W. Moore, 



Daniel R. Prescott, Uriah II. Foss. 

NIGHT WATCH AND POLICE OFFICERS. 



Eben Carr, 
Henry Bennett, 



JosKPH Carr, 

JOSIAH HaCKETT, 

Joseph L. Smith, 
Geo. W. F. Converse, 
Joseph A. Weeks, 
Henry H. Fuller, 

Charles M. Stevens, 
Uriah H. Foss, 
Ira S. Abbott, 

Thomas L. 



Albert T. Wing, 
Patrick Doyle, 
James Patten. 

POLICE OFFICERS. 

Benjamin C. Kendall, 
Charles L. Richardson, 
Gilbert G. Gordon, 
Hiram Simpson, 
Andrew J. Butterfield, 
Luther A. Ward, 
Gilbert D. Roberts, 
John Sanborn, 
George S. Holmes, 
QuiMBY, Hamilton 



Nathan B. Taplin, 
Henry Clough, 



Stephen Palmer, 
George F. Judkins, 
Hugh Ramsey, 
Henry J. Tirrell, 
Alf. G. Fairbanks, 
Hiram S. Barnes, 
Robert Heath, 
JosiAH W. French, 
Greenleaf Ambrose. 
M. Bailey. 



INDEX. 



Address, Mayor's, . 3 

Bridge, Granite, 62 

Bridge, Aiuoskeag Fall!:, 63 

Commons, 112 

Cemetery, Valley, 147 

Cemetery, Pine Grove, 113 

Cemetery, Report of Committee, 147 

Cemetery, Report of Treasurer, 149 

Debt, City, 162 

Pire Department, 99 

Fire, Pennacook Hose Co., 100 

Fire, Torrent Engine, 100 

Fire, Merrimack Engine, 99 

Fire, Hook and Ladder, 101 

Fire, Steamer No. 1, 101 

Fire, Steamer No. 2, 102 

Fire, Steamer No. 3, 102 

Fire, Miscellaneous, 103 

Farm, City Poor, 22 

Farm, Report of Com., 153 

Farm, Recapitulation of Stock, 1.59 

Highway Districts. (1 to 13.) 33 

Highway, Recapitulation of, 60 

Highway, New, 61 

Hall and Stores, 117 

Interest, 115 

Incidental Expenses, 79 

Lighting Streets, 64 

Library, 94 

Library, Report of Trustees, 141 

Library, Report of Librarian, 143 

Library, Pi.eport of Treasurer, 144 



Library, Recapitulation of. 146 

Militia, . 96 

Notes, Due the City, 116 

Officers, City, 87 

Paupers, County, 15 

Paupers off the Farm. 17 

Printing and Stationery, 77 

Police, 90 

Paving Streets, 97 

Property, City. 160 

Poor, Overseer's Report, 140 

Reservoirs, 65 

Report, Treasurer's, 12 
ReiDort, Committee on Finance, 10 

Report, Chief Engineer's, 164 

Relief Fund, 121 

Reserved Fund. 163 
School Districts Nos. 1 to 11. 71 

School House No. 1, 74 

School House No. 2, 75 

School House No. 10. 75 

School House No. 11. 76 

Sewers and Drains, 69 

Safe, 97 

Schools, Recapitulation of, 116 

Solicitor's Report, 151 

Team, 31 

Taxes, 1859—1860—1861, 114 

Taxes, Abatement of, 105 

Valuation, &c., 161 

Watering Streets, 98 



THE 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL EEPOET 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



OF THE 



< MANCHESTER, 



FOR THE YEAR 



1861. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER 



In School Committee, 

Jan. 6, 1862. 

Mr. Adams, Special Committee on the Annual Report, presented the 
accompanying Report, which was adopted by the Committee and ordered 
to be presented to the City Council. 

JAMES B. STRAW, Clerk. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 

Jan. 6, 1862. 

The Annual Report of the School Committee was read, accepted and 
ordered to be printed in connection with the Annual City Reports. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 



In Common Council, } 

Jan. 7, 1862. 5 
The Report of the School Committee, sent down from Board of Mayor 
and Aldermen, was read, accepted and ordered to be printed, in concur- 
rence ■ 

S. D. FARNSWORTH, Clerk. 



REPORT. 



To His Honor the Mayor, 

AND THE City Council: 

At the close of the year, in common with every 
department of the municipal government, the School 
Committee present to yon, gentlemen of the City 
Government, their Annual Report, and through you, 
officially, communicate with the interested public, 
whom you and we represent. 

Our duties have not been onerous nor irksome ; 
most of them have been recreations, mental and 
physical — the profitable and pleasing disposition of 
hours borrowed from the active pursuits of life. 
Our meetings have been frequent, but not tedious ; 
our counsels harmonious, our decisions generally 
unanimous, and never revoked nor materially mod- 
ified. 

We have intended to pursue a conservative course 
and have undertaken few radical reforms. We have 
attempted no revolutions — no ill considered and 
speedy reformations, preferring to bear with trivial 
defects in system, and even tolerate for the time, 
errors not necessarily fatal, rather than risk the loss 
of advancement already made, or peril a labor whicli 
is producing beneficial results. We trust we have 



corrected some abuses, remedied some deficiencies 
in government and instruction, and stimulated and 
encouraged both teacher and pupil to make earnest 
efforts for a higher position than they have before 
attained. 

In financial matters, we have been governed by 
a regard to economy, — have expended little that 
was not demanded for the progress of our schools 
and for the future prosperity of the City. We have 
exchanged no well known teachers for those of lit- 
tle experience ; we have ordered the introduction 
of no new text books, thus unnecessarily taxing the 
public ; we have instituted no new projects and 
commended no new schemes, which will requh-e 
larger appropriations, or increased taxation. 

FINANCE. 



As the finances of the department are the essen- 
tial basis of our public Schools, and the manage- 
ment of the fiscal aflliirs of the several Districts more 
frequently discussed, and the most interesting to a 
large portion of our citizens, that topic shall be first 
presented in the report. 

At the commencement of tlie year, the Commit- 
tee found in the treasury and appropriated to the 
several School Districts the sum of $1,696 48 
being §1,881 80 less than the amount in the treas- 
ury a year previous. This was credited to the sev- 
eral Districts as exhibited in the accompaning ta])le. 



and was increased by the addition of $1 7,000 00, the 
same amount as was appropriated the year preceding. 
This was apportioned to the several Districts, ac- 
cording to the usual practice by the City Council. 
The amount granted each District will be seen in 
the table annexed. 



Uist. 
1~ 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 



In Treasury Jan. 1, 18G1. 


New Appropriation. 


Total. 


140,89 


$200 


$240,89 


959,90 


14,000 


14,959,90 


112,58 


275 


387,58 


103,2(3 


200 


303,26 


88,20 


200 


288,20 


22,04 


225 


247,04 


107,97 


225 


332,97 


36,18 


200 


236,18 


14,09 


200 


214,09 


131,97 


975 


1,106,97 


79,40 


500 


579,40 



^1,696,48 $17,000 $18,696,48 

This, compared with the amount at the disposal 
of the Committee the year preceding, is exhibited 
by the annexed statement. 



Dist. 


1860. 


1 1861. 


Decrease. 


Increase. 


1 


.^228,12 


■^240,89 




112,77 


2 


16,455,77 


14,959,90 


1,495,87 




o 
o 


412,91 


887,58 


25,33 




4 


800.15 


303,26 




,11 


6 


285,08 


288,20 




3,12 


6 


216,85 


247,04 




80,19 


7 


340,62 


332,97 


7,65 




8 


230,79 


236,18 




5,39 


9 


222,82 


214,09 


8,73 




10 


1,245,70 


1,106,97 


138,73 




11 


639,47 


579,40 


60,07 





$20,578,28 $18,696,48 $1,736,38 $51,58 



BISTEICT EXPENDITUKES. 



We will now present in a partially classified man- 
ner, the expenditures for the several districts : 

DISTRICT NO. 1. 

Amount of Funds, . - . . ,$240 89 

Expended for Instruction and care of 

Rooms, - - - - - 200 36 
For Fuel, - - - - - 13 00 

For Repairs, Incidentals, &c., - - 25 58=238 94 



In Treasury, Jan. 1, 1862, - - . 1 95 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Amount of Funds, . . . . $14,959 90 

12,253 22 

411 00 

802 91 

163 8T 

77 99 

" Printing and Stationery, 251 90 

" Incidentals, - - 244 67=14,205 56 



Expen( 


led for Teaching 


(( 


" Repairs, - 


U 


" Fuel, - 


(. 


" Care of Fires, 


(( 


" Supplies, 


li 


" T^riii + in(T f>TirJ 



In Treasury, Jan. 1, - - - - 1754 34 
In addition, there have been expenditures 

on Repairs, to the amount of - - 11,020 57 

Insurance in the sum of ... 216 00 

Notes and Interest paid amounting to - 2,710 20 

$3,946 77 
For which appropriations were made b}^ District vote. 



7 






DISTRICT NO. 3. 






Amount of Funds, _ . - . 




$387 58 


Expended for Instruction, &c., 


288 66 




For Fuel, 


25 50 




Miscellaneous Expenses, Repairs, &c., 


10 72= 


=324 88 



Balance in Treasury, - - - - $62 70 

DISTRICT NO. 4. 



Amount of Funds, - - . - 




$303 26 


Expended for Instruction, &c., 


252 04 




For Fuel, 


8 50 




Miscellaneous Expenses, Repairs, &c., 


8 49. 


=269 03 


Balance in Treasury, - - - 


$34 23 


DISTRICT NO. 5. 






Amount of Funds, - - - - 




$288 20 


Expended for Instruction, &c., - 


204 87 




For Fuel, 


13 00 




Miscellaneous Expenses, Repairs, &c,. 


8 93= 


=226 80 



Balance in Treasury, - - - - $61 40 



DISTRICT NO. 6. 

Amount of Funds, - - . . $247 04 

Expended for Instruction, <S:c., - 193 12 

For Fuel, - 13 00 

Miscellaneous Expenses, Repairs, &c., 28 13=234 25 

Balance in Treasury, ... $12 79 



8 

DISTRICT NO. 7. 

Amount of Funds, - - - |832 97 

Expended for Instruction, &c., - Q02 87 

For Fuel, - - - - ' - - 27 60 

Miscellaneous Expenses, Repairs, &c., 20 74=251 21 

Balance in Treasury, - . . - $81 76 

DISTRICT NO. 8. 

Amount of Funds, . . - - $236 18 

Expended for Instruction, &c., - 178 37 

Miscellaneous Expenses, Repairs, <fec., 8 00=186 37 



Balance in Treasury, - - - - $49 81 



DISTRICT NO. 9. 

Amount of Funds, $214 09 

Expended for Instruction, &c., - - 185 87 
For Fuel, ----- 13 00 

Miscellaneous Expenses, Repairs, &c., 11 70= 210 67 



Balance in Treasury, I - - $3 43 



DISTRICT NO. 10, . 

Amount of Funds, - - - |1,106 97 

Expended for Instruction, <tc., - 1,158 75 
For Stationery, Repairs and Incidentals, 48 54=1,207 29 
Deduct Appropriation, - - 1,106 97 



Overdraft on Treasury, - - - 100 32 



9 

Appropriated by District vote, for Insur- 
ance and Repairs, ... 
Expended for Repairs, ... 



$160 OO 
124 80 



LeavinEi: balance in Treasury, ... $35 20 

[The bill for the Insurance has been approved by the Committee and 
lodged with the Treasurer, but the payment was made by an order given 
by the Mayor, on the District funds in the Treasury. The $3.5,20 ou 
liand, will cancel the. claim, if any is made by the City.] 



DISTRICT NO. 11. 

Amount of Funds, . . . 
Expended for Instruction, &c. ' 
For Repairs and Incidentals, 



S579 40 
511 08 
24 22=535 30 



$4110 



RECAriTULATION. 



Dist. 


Am't of Funds. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


1. 


$24U 89 


$238 94 


SI 95 


') 


14,;)59 90 


14,205 56 


751 34 


3. 


387 58 


224 88 


62 70 


4. 


803 26 


269 03 


34 23 


5. 


288 20 


226 80 


61 40 


6. 


247 04 


234 25 


12 79 


7. 


332 97 


251 21 


81 76 


8. 


236 18 


186 37 


49 81 


9. 


214 09 


200 66 


3 43 


10. 


1,106 97 


1,207 29 


overdraft, 100 32 


11. 


579 40 


535 30 


44 10 




S 18,896 48 


§17,890 29 


SI, 106 51 



Deduct overdraft iii Xo. 10, 



$1,006 19 



10 



There are unpaid bills outstanding, amounting 
to $700 or more, which will materially reduce the 
unexpended balances in the several School Dis- 
tricts, and in some instances more than exhaust the 
appropriations. As nearly as we can estimate, the 
following table will show the claims against each 
district, and indicate, very nearly, in "round num- 
bers," the financial condition of the treasury after 
the payment. 



Dist. 1 Unpaid Bills. | 


Bal. after Payment. 1 


Deficiency. 


1 


$10 00 
500 00 




18 00 


J. • 

2. 


8250 00 


• ?.. 


12 00 


50 00 




4. 


5 00 


30 00 




5. 


10 00 


50 00 




6. 


5 00 


8 00 




7. 


6 00 


75 00 




8. 


18 00 


30 00 




9. 
10 


?> 00 






tJ \J\J 

100 00 




200 OO 


J.V. 

11. 


_L V/ V V V/ 

40 00 


5 00 


$709 00 


$488 00 


$208 00 


Deduct 


deficiencies, 


208 00 





Balance, 



$280 00 



11 

REPAIRS. 



The Repairs for tlie year have not been exten- 
sive, the Committee not feeling authorized to ex- 
pend a dollar not really demanded by the wants of 
the several districts. The school house in District 
No. 1, was thoroughly repaired last year, by vote of 
the District, and has, this season, required no ex- 
penditures beyond the payment of a small bill for 
seats previously ordered. 

In the Central District, one of the heaviest bills 
for repairs and improvement of school rooms, has 
been for the partition in the Manchester street 
house, by which, the main room in that building is 
divided by slides, so as to constitute two distinct, 
apartments. The expense was by contract $200, 
though an additional expense of $75 was rendered 
necessary to furnish new seats for the additional room 
provided by the alterations. The room formerly 
accommodated with seats only 96 pupils. Now 
120 can be seated in the double room, as comfortably 
as could 96 formerly. The advantage of the change 
can be readily seen. 

Another bill of about one hundred dollars was 
incurred for the sinking of vaults at the North 
Grammar School house and the reconstruction of 
the outbuildings. The other expenditures for re- 
pairs in No. 2, are for new stoves and pipes to take 
the place of those which had become unfit for use, 



12 

the painting of the interior of several houses, and 
the ordinary repairs which are constantly required. 

In No. 10, the sum of $160 was raised by District 
vote to make repairs and pay insurance premium, 
which has been appropriated to the purposes desig- 
nated by the vote. About $65 was expended for 
new seats and desks ; $.35 20 reserved for insur- 
ance, as will be seen in the financial statement, and 
the balance employed for other needful repairs. 

In No. 11, an appropriation was made for grading 
the yards about the house, building a fence and sup- 
plying other wants of the district. But the money 
was expended by a Special Committee authorized 
by the district, and does not come before this Board 
for consideration and report 

In No. 2, an appropriation was made for insuring 
school houses, and the sum of $2,500 was raised 
by vote for payment of notes and interest. The 
sum of $216 has been paid for insurance, and 
$2400 for notes and interest, by order of the Su- 
perintendent, who was authorized by the District 
to attend to the business. The amount due for the 
Blodgett street lot, ($400) has been paid, and a note 
over due last year has been taken up by the Treas- 
urer. The Park Street house has been repaired ac- 
cording to instructions of the District at the Annual 
Meeting. But as these matters come especially un- 
der District authority, we only name them here, 
supposing they will be reported to the people at 
the Annual Meeting by the proper committees. 

There is during the year much wanton destruc- 



13 

tion of public property through the recklessness or 
malice of boys,- — even by those of man's growth — 
sometimes by those who are members of the school, 
but generally by those who have never been injur- 
ed by too close confinement in the school room, and 
to whom " a little learnini»: is a dano-erous thinu;;." 
Although a liberal reward has been offered by the 
Mayor for the detection of such offenders, none 
have yet been punished by the rigors of the law. 



DISTRICTS AND SUB-DISTRICTS. 



Frequent inquiry is made regarding the bound- 
aries of the eleven School Districts of the City — • 
and in reg-ard to the divisions of the Central Dis- 
tricts with reference to the various grades of school. 
The former division is in the authority of the City 
Council, the latter is arbitrary with the Committee 
and varies from time to time according to the mu- 
tations of the population. 

Originally, or, at least, long before many of the 
present inhabitants of Manchester were residents 
here, the town was divided into four School Dis- 
tricts, each of which, though embracing a large ex- 
tent of territory, wds small in respect ro the num- 
])er of its scholars, and limited in the means of sup- 
])orting a school. The first was called the "Falls 
District," and included the portion of the town lying 



14 

on the river north of the present location of Gran- 
ite Street. The "Meeting House District," embraced 
Hallsville, Bakersville, and the section of the town 
in the vicinity of the city farm. The present dis- 
tricts, Nos. 6 and 9, constituted the "Calef District," 
and Nos, 4 and 5, and a part of 3, composed the 
"^•'Harvey District." 

In 1819, the Falls District was divided "between 
Mr. Kay's and John Stark, 4th's." Various changes 
were made in the other districts from time to time, 
— of which it is not easy to find a record, — until 
1839, when there appears to have been eight dis- 
tricts in the town, though no official record of their 
creation is accessible, and it is believed none exists. 

In that year a committee was appointed to fix 
the boundaries of the districts, but at the Annual 
Meeting of 1840, the matter was referred to the 
Selectmen, who in November following reported, 
recommend in fj; the orofanization of nine districts. 

The report was accepted and the districts estab- 
lished with the following boundaries : 

DISTRICT NO. 1. 

Beginning at the north angle of the town on the bank of the 
Merrimack river ; thence southerly and bounding by said river 
to the northwest corner of John Ray's farm ; thence easterly by 
the north line of said Ray's farm to the northeast corner of the 
same ; thence on the same course to Chester original town line ; 
thence northerly to the southwest corner of the town of Hook- 
sett ; thence northerly by Hooksett line to the place of begin- 
ning. 



15 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Beginning at the northwest corner of John Ray's farm, being 
the southwest corner of District No. 1 ; thence southerly, bound- 
ing on Merrimack river to the old ferry road near the Samuel 
Hall place ; thence easterly by said ferry road to land owned by 
David Young ; thence easterly and southerly by said Young's 
land to the aforesaid ferry road ; thence easterly by said ;:oad 
to the southeast corner of the Amoskeag Company's land ;' 
thence northerly and easterly by said company's land to Ches- 
ter original town line ; thence northerly by said Chester line 
to the southeast, corner of District No. 1 ; thence easterly 
[westerly?] by said District No. 1, to the place began at. 

DISTRICT NO. 3. 

Beginning at the southwest corner of District No. 2, on the 
bank of Merrimack river ; thence southerly, bounding on said 
river to the northwest corner of William P. Webster's farm, to 
the old river road ; thence on the same course to the line be- 
tween David Webster, Jr.'s and Jonas Harvey's land ; thence 
northerly to the northeast corner of said David Webster's land ; 
thenue on the same course to John Gr. Brown's land ; thence 
easterly by said Brown's land to Chester original town line : 
thence northerly by said town line to David Young's land : 
thence westerly by said Young's land to a point due south of . 
the southeast corner of District No. 2 ; thence north to said 
corner ; thenc3 westerly by said District No. 2, to the place 
began at. 

DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Beginning at the southwest corner of District No. 3, at Mer- 
rimack river ; thence southerly, bounding on the river to Litcli- 
field line ; thence southeasterly by Litchfield line to the line 
of Londonderry ; thence northerly to the northwest corner of 
said Londonderry ; thence easterly on the line of said London- 
derry to the southwest corner of land owned by the heirs of 
Nathaniel 3Ioor, deceased : thence northerly by the east line 



16 

of tlie said heirs' land and David Webster, Junior's land, to the 
southeast corner of District No. 3 ; thence westerly by feaid 
Distiict No. 3 to the place of beginning. 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 

Beginning at the southeast corner of District No. 4, on the 
north line of Londonderry ; tlience easterly by Londonderry 
line to the Mammoth road ; thence northerly .by said road to 
Coburn's brook, and down said brook to great Cohas brook ; 
thence across said last mentioned brook and in a direct line to 
the easterly corner of Israel Merrill's land, being the southwest 
corner of a piece of meadow, owned by Jonas Harvey ; thence 
northerly by the east line of said Merrill's land and James 
McQueston's old farm, to Archibald Gamble, Junior's farm ; 
thence westerly to the southeast corner of Isaac & John Huse's 
wood lot, numbered 8 ; thence northerly by said lot No. 8, 
eighty rods ; thence westerly in a direct line to the northeast 
corner of Amos Weston Jr.'s land, lot No. 7 ; thence westerly 
by said Weston's land to Chester old line ; thence southerly by 
said Chester line to the southwest corner of District No. 3 ; 
thence running westerly by District No. 3, and southerly by 
said Distrif't No. 3, and District No. 4, to the place began at. 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 

Beginning at the southwest corner of the town of Hooksett ;" 
thence southerly and westerly by Districts Nos. 1 and 2, to 
Humphrey's brook ; thence up said brook to the old road lead- 
ing from the town house to Amoskeag village ; thence east to 
Chester original town line; tlience northerly by said Chester 
line to Moses Davis' land : thence easterly and northerly by 
said Davis' land to the Mammoth road; thence northerly by 
said road to the south line of the Jeremiah Johnson place ; 
thence easterly by said Johnson place to the southeast corner 
thereof; thence northerly to the southeast corner of lot No. 30; 
thence northerly by the east line of lots numbered thirty and 
one hundred and two, to Hooksett line ; thence westerly by 
Hooksett line to the place began at. 



DISTRICT NO. 7. 

Beginning at tlie northeast corner of District No. 6, on 
Hooksett line ; thence southerly and westerly and bounding on 
Districts Nos. 6 and 3, to the northwest corner of Amos Wes- 
ton, Jr.'s farm ; thence easterly and southerly by District No. 
5, to the northeast corner of the same ; thence easterly by the 
south line of Archibald Gamble, Jr.'s farm to the Mammoth . 
road ; thence on the same course to Samuel Gamble's land ; 
thence northerly by Samuel Gamble and Thomas Gamble's 
land to the Samuel Brown farm ; thence easterly by said Thom- 
as Gamble's land to the southeast corner of Joshua Coming's 
farm ; thence northerly by said Coming's farm, to the northeast 
corner thereof; thence in a direct line to the southeast corner 
of lot No. 21 ; thence northerly by the east line of lots num- 
bered 21, 35, 37 and 46 to Hooksett line ; thence westerly to 
the place of beginning. 

DISTRICT NO. 8. 

Beginning at the east shore of Massabesic pond, on the line 
between Israel Webster and Nathan Johnson's land ; thence 
westerly on the line between lots to the east line of District 
No. 7 ; thence northerly by said District No. 7, to Hook- 
sett line ; tlience easterly by Hooksett line to the northwest 
corner of Cliuster ; thence southerly by Chester line to Massa- 
besic pond ; thence westerl3f, and southerly by the pond shore 
to the place of beginning. 

DISTRICT NO. 9. 

Bounded northeasterly by Massabesic pond, on the east by 
Chester and Londonderry, on the south by Londonderry, on 
the west by Districts Nos. 4 and 7, and on the north by District 
No. 8. 

In 1841, the following change was made by vote 
of the town : 

Voted to sever from District No. 2 and annex to District 
3 



18 



No. 3, all tliat part of said District No. 2, described and bound- 
,ed as follows : 

Beginning at the northwest corner of the Samuel Hall farm, 
so called, being the southwest corner of the farm formerly own- 
ed by Ezekiel Stevens, on the bank of the Merrimack, thence 
■easterly on the line between said farms, to the east line of the 
Amoskeag Company's land, thence southerly by said compa- 
ny's land to said District No. 3, thence westerly and northerly 
by said District No. 3, to said Merrimack river, thence to the 
bound began at. 

In 1842, it was voted to annex District No. 6 to 
No. 2, — so tliat No. 2 from that date embraced all 
the territory included in No, 6. 

In 1S47, a new District to be called No. 6 was 
formed from Districts 7, 8 and 9, with the following 
boundaries : 

Beginning at the west shore of the Massabesic Pond, on the 
line between Nathan Johnson and Kimball Hall, and running 
westerly on the line of lots to the northwest corner of Samuel 
Gamble's homestead ; thence southerly on the lots between 
Joshua Corning and said Samuel Gamble to the Chester road ; 
thence westerly on the line of lots to the northwest corner of 
Thomas Gamble's homestead ; thence southerly on the line'be- 
tween Thomas Gamble, Jonas Harvey, Jr., Samuel Gamble, 
James McQueston and the heirs of John Gamble to the south 
west corner of Samuel Gamble's homestead ; thence easterly 
by said Gamble's south line to the west line of David Dickey, 
Jr.'s homestead ; thence easterly by said Dickey's south line 
to the southwest coi'ner of the Jonathan Haseiton farm, so call- 
ed ; thence easterly on the south line of said Haselton's farm, 
on the line of lots to the southwest corner ot Israel Webster's 
homestead; thence easterly on the line between said Israel 
Webster and John G. Webster, and on the line of the lots to 
the west side of the town of Auburn : thence northerly by the 



19 

Avosfc line of tlie town of Auburn, to the northeast corner of 
Thomas Goldsmith's homestead ; thence westerly on said Gold- 
smith's homestead ; thence westerly on said Goldsmith's north 
line to Massabesic Pond ; thence westerly to the point first 
mentioned. 

DISTRICT NO. 10 

Embraces all that section of the City which was severed from 
the town of Bedford and annexed to Manchester. The district 
covers the same territory as Ward 7, and was established in 
1854. 

DISTRICT NO. 11 

Embraces al! that section of the City which was severed from 
the town of Gofl'stown and annexed to Manchester, and is now 
included in Ward 8. The district was established in 1854. 

The changes requu^ecl in these Districts, if the 
District system is still to be maintained, are that a 
portion of Wilson's Hill and the territory in the vi- 
cinity of the City Farm, now belonging to No. 7, 
be added to No. 2, and it may be deemed advisable 
to add also that portion of Hallsville, so called, 
which lies nearest to the Central District, as a por- 
tion of its papils can be better accommodated at 
the house on the corner of Manchester and Wilson 
streets, than under the present organization. In 
this case the balance of District No. 7, with sections 
from Districts adjacent could conveniently e or- 
ganized into a new District with the central point 
near the old Meeting House at Manchester Cen- 
ter. 

As various changes of District lines have been 
made wltliin the past tw^enty yerr-^, and man^^ of 



20 

the persons referred to in the description and bounds 
have deceased or removed, it is not easy to deter- 
mine the definite Hmits of Districts. The Commit- 
tee would therefore recommend that the Districts 
be re-organized, with such changes as may appear 
to be demanded by the great increase of population 
in some sections of the City. 

There are no sub-divisions of any Districts except 
Nos. 10 and 2. In No. 10, the division line for pu- 
pils of the primary and middle grades is the Piscata- 
quog River, while the Grammar School is open to 
pupils from the whole District. A few pupils, qual- 
ified to attend the Grammar School, residing at a 
great distance, are permitted to attend the ungraded 
school on the south side of the river. 

The High School District embraces not only Dis- 
trict No. 2, but the whole City, though the expense 
of sustaining the school is met by the Central Dis- 
trict. The same is true in regard to the Intermedi- 
ate School. 

The division line for the Grammar Grade, indi- 
cated on the accompanying plan by dotted lines, 
(•-■••) is through Amherst and Stark streets. All 
pupils north of this boundary attend the Spring 
street School, and all south, the Franklin street 
School, except a few pupils residing near Wilson's 
Hill, who are permitted to attend the partially 
graded school in that vicinity. 

The limits of the Middle School Grade indicated 
by broken lines, ( ) are for No. 1; Lowell street 



21 



on the south and Chestnut street on the west, witli 
no boundary on the north and east, except the out- 
er Hne of residences m these directions. No. 2 re- 
ceives those pupils on the east of Chestnut street, 
between Lowell and Amherst, and those east of 
Pine between Amherst and Hanover. Nos. 3 and 4 
receive all others of the grade east of the Middle 
line of Chestnut street. The three remaining Mid- 
dle schools accommodate the other sections of Dis- 
trict No. 2, Amherst and Stark streets separating 
those at the north from that at the south. When 
more than one school is in session on Blodgett street, 
the pupils on Prospect street and north of it, consti- 
tute Middle School No. 8. 

The limits of the Primary Schools are not so well 
defined, being in some measure regulated by the 
number of pupils in the various localities. A line 

( ) through Vine street, and extending northerly 

and southerly, constitutes one general division ; an- 
other through Pine street to High, then down High, 
half way to Chestnut, and thence midway between 
Pine and Chestnut to Prospect, constitute a second 
division. A third line extends easterly and westerly 
through Stark street, and between Amherst and 
Hanover, to Hanover Square, and another from 
Vine street easterl}^ through Lowell street to Janes- 
ville, and still another through Prospect street. 

In the western section are, at the south end, 
Schools Nos. 7 and 8 on Franklin street, and Nos. 
9 and 10 on Spring street. In the second section, 



22 



are Schools Nos. 11 and 12 at the south part, on 
Manchester street, and No. 1, at the north, located 
on Lowell street, in the High School building. In 
the eastern division, in the southern portion are 
schools Nos. 5 and 6, on Merrimack street, No. 4. on 
Concord street, and at the north end No. 3, on Bridge 
street. The school on Blodgett street. No. 14, ac- 
commodates pujDils north of Prospect street ; No. 
2 is at Janesville, and No. 13 at the corner of Wil- 
son and Manchester streets, in the vicinity of Wil- 
son's Hill. 

The following diagram including all the thickly 
settled section of the City, between Beech street 
and the river, embracing Prospect street on the 
north, and Spruce street on the south, is a correct 
representation of the division lines between the sev- 
eral schools of the district. 



25 
EXAMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS. 



The laws of the State make it the ''duty of the 
School Committee to examine every person propos- 
ing to teach any District School" in the town over 
whose school interests they are to watch. The lan- 
guage of the statute is, " No person shall be em- 
ployed as a school-master unless he is a citizen of 
the United States, and shall produce a certificate 
from the Superintending ScJiool Committee of the town 
where such school is to be kept ; that he is ivell qual- 
ified to instruct youth in the various branches re- 
quired to be taught in an English school in this 
State, and produce satisfactory evidence of his good 
moral character." 

The Committee and Superintendent have exam- 
ined about seventy new candidates for schools, who 
have manifested various degrees of merit, but have 
generally been unsuccessful in securing the object 
of their wishes ; in some instances on account of in- 
adequate qualifications, but generally because the 
supply was much greater than the demand. 

The accompanying list contains the names of the 
teachers employed the past year, with tlie grade of 
schools in their charge, and the rate of compensa- 
tion paid for the school year of forty weeks. 



26 



Teachers. 



Grade of School. 



Salary. 



John P. Newell, High, 

Harriet U. Baker, " 

Mary A. Parker, " 

Ellen F. Odell, vice Miss Parker, resigned, 

Henry C. Bullard, North Grammar, 

Mary D. Allison, " " 

Ruth A. Porter, " « 

Celia N. French, " " 

Josiali G. Dearborn, 

Nancy A. Durgin, 

Hannah A. Slade, 

Maria E. Webster, 

M. Luther Stevens, 

Harriet H. Tasker, " 

Sarah A. Domag, vice Miss Tasker, resigned, 

Lucretia E. Manahan, vice Mr. Stevens, resigned, 

Ada M, Steele, vice Miss Domag, resigned, 

Wm. F. Harvey, vice Miss Manahan, resigned, 

Philinda P. Parker, Wilson's Hill, Mixed School, 

Julia A. Brown, Middle, No. 1, 

Mary L. Sleeper, " " 2, 



South Grammar, 

a a 



Intermediate, 



Nancy S. Bunton, 


' 




u 


3, 


Julia A. Baker, 






a 


4, 


Kowena L. Hamblett, 




u 


5, 


Lizzie E. Newell, 






u 


6, 


Lizzie P. Gove, 






a 




Mary E. Quimby, 






a 


8, 


Mary E. Ireland, 


Pi 


■imary, 


a 


1, 


Martha Eaton, 




a 


a 


9 


Hannah G. Lane, 




li 


a 


3, 


Lucreria A. Brown, 




u 


a 


4, 


Hattie A. Lord, 




u 


a 


5, 



$1100 

450 

*250 

*250 
950 
275 
275 
275 
900 
275 
275 
275 
600 
250 

*200 
275 
275 

*400 
250 
250 
250 
250 
250 
250 
250 
275 

*200 
250 
250 
250 
250 

*200 



27 



Teachers. 



Grade of School. 



Salary. 



Anna R. Riddle, Primary No. 6, 250 

C. Augusta Abbott, " " 7, 250 

Annette McDoel, " " 8, ' 250 

Mary J. Rowell, " " 9, 250 

Mary C. Dinsmore, vice Miss Rowell, resigned, 250 

Mary A. Richardson, Primary No. 10, 250 

Helen M. Morrill, " " 11, 250 

Irene A. Stokes, " " 12, *200 

Betsey A. Ambrose, " " 13, 250 - 

Ellen B. Rowell, " " 14, 250 

Joseph G. Edgerly, Ward 7, Grammar School, 500 

A. Ellen Stanton,' " " " 200 

Sarah D. Lord, " " Primary " 250 

Mary A. Parker, " " Mixed, " 250 
Marcia V. McQueston, Ward 8, Grammar School, 250 

Rufus B. Foss, winter terra, " " 350 

Mary C. Dinsmore, Primary School, 250 

Mary E. Quimby, vice Miss Dinsmore resigned, *200 

Rose T. Kimball, No. 1, two terms, *200 

Oren J. Hancock, winter term, 300 

Sarah E. Copp, No. 3, two terms, 250 

Sylvester J. Hill, No. 3, winter term, 350 

Maria A. Stevens, No. 4, two terms, 250 

John F. Chase, winter term, 350 

Emma A. H. Brown, No. 5, two terms, *200 

George D. Epps, winter term, 300 

Hattie A. Parmenter, No. 6, two terms, *200 

James D. Gilchrist, winter term, 300 

Martha D. Lear, No. 7, two terms, *200 

Joseph E. Bennett, winter term, 350 

Mary A. Locke, No. 8, one term, 240 

Mary A. Dotey, one term, CO 



28 

Teachers. Grade of School. Salary. 

William S. Burnham, winter term, 800 

Araminta C. Edgerlj, No. 9, one term, *200 

Charles H. Patterson, winter term, 300 

I. S. Whitney, Teacher of Vocal Music, 600 



*New Teachers at minimum salary. 



TEXT BOOKS. 



In former years the public has sometimes been 
indignant with committees for the frequent changes 
of books. It has been an evil, not only in our own 
schools, but is one of common occurrence through- 
out the country. Interested publishers send out 
their agents, who are directed to use argument of the 
most convincing kind, and to introduce their books 
at some rate, though they be obliged to give them. 
There is an inducement to change because they 
will cost nothing. Teachers are often anxious for 
a new book — it has novelty in it, and is a relief 
to them from the common monotony of daily re- 
quirements, and they urge its adoption. Commit- 
tees, trusting to their practical judgment, are apt 
to yield. 

No such charge can be laid to us. We have or- 
dered out no book, and suffered no new one to be 



29 

introduced. We have seen agents, have been im- 
portuned, have heard arguments, have had Uberal 
offers for the exchange of books, but have escaped 
annoyance by the proper use of the simple mon- 
osyUable, ''No." 

We are not committed to old books without j^os- 
sibility of change. Change is sometimes demanded, 
but it is better to suffer some inconveniences rather 
than work greater evils. No school book should be 
• adopted as a standard imtil it has been practically 
tested by an intelligent class under the direction of 
a discriminating teacher. This practice will prevent 
the inconsiderate introduction of books and save the 
public needless expense. 

And here we take the liberty of making a sugges- 
tion for the consideration of the people of the State, 
for which we shall be pardoned and even commend- 
ed by those who appreciate the evil we condemn, 
though the subject does not come within the pre- 
scribed limits of our local authority. The Legisla- 
ture should authorize the Board of Education or a 
special committee to examine and select a series of 
text books, for the use of common schools through- 
out the State, which being introduced, should not be 
changed for a term of years. The advantages would 
be a saving of the expense imposed upon families 
by the purchase of new books, except when de- 
manded by the promotion of pupils ; it would re- 
lieve teachers and committees from the annoyance 
of importunate agents, and would secure a unifor- 



30 

mity of books and a better classification in all the 
towns of the State, 

The value of books furnished for poor children 
during the year is much less than was anticipated 
eight or ten months ago. The full amount up to 
the first of December was only about $40. During 
the present month, in consequence of the advance- 
ment of classes to higher grades, there has been a 
large increase over any previous month. The bills 
for the recent supply will be not far from $30. 
They have been furnished under the direction of 
the Superintendent, who has a record of all that he 
has delivered personally, and has the names of 
those who have received orders for them. The 
teachers have been required to investigate all cases 
in which application has first been made to them 
for aid. 



DISCIPLINE, TRUANCY AND TARDINESS. 



During the early part of the year the Committee 
were called on to perform several unpleasant acts 
of duty, in consequence of a disafiection in several 
districts. More complaints were made during two 
months of last winter than often occurs in as many 
years. In one instance a teacher resigned, without 



31 

a contest ; another, acting on the advice of friends, 
after a hearing, offered his resignation, and in anoth- 
er case, after a thorough investigation the teacher 
was sustained and retained in the school room. 
Other comphiints were made but did not receive 
the official action of the Board. 

There has been more than the usual amount of 
out door excitement the past year, and it has been 
difficult to exclude its influence from the school 
room. Boys, and sometimes girls, very naturally 
have been induced by the march of the soldier, and 
the music which adds a charm, to the soldier's life, 
to leave the required round of daily study and join 
the multitudes that have- throns-ed the street; or 
they sought and too often Obtained parental per- 
mission to visit the camp or follow the music. 

The truant officer has made many reprimands 
and a few arrests. The number of truant children 
which, during the year, have been found in the 
streets, is over two hundred, some of whom have 
been frequently reproved. A few have been af- 
forded a permanent school and home in the excel- 
lent institution at the north end of the City, a few 
have been punished by fine, while the greater num- 
ber have been persuaded to return to school. Often 
the fault is at home. Poverty sometimes induces 
the parent to keep the child from school. Pride 
asserts its office and transcends its rightful duty, 
and the child suffers through life the loss of early 
trainins;. 



Tardiness is another evil which requires atten- 
tion. There is but a small number of scholars who 
are always punctual. With some, tardiness becomes 
a habit, as punctuality does with others. Even 
teachers sometimes forget that they are required 
to be in their school rooms before the precise time 
for commencing the school exercises. The delin- 
quencies should be corrected without delay. 



ANNUAL FESTIVAL. 



The School Festival inaugurated last year has 
the present year re-established itself in the confi- 
dence of the public and given strong testimony in 
favor of the continuation of vocal music in our com- 
mon echools. After a year's labor we begin to see 
the beneficial results. It has been demonstrated 
that even our youngest pupils can learn vocal mu- 
sic, and it has been made more evident that nearly 
every pupil in the higher grades of schools can be- 
come a fair singer. The execution of some pieces of 
difficult music by the young ladies of the Grammar 
and High Schools was warmly commended by those 
who appreciate the art of vocal music. 

The advancement of a single year will be per- 
ceived in some degree by a contrast of the charac- 



33 

ter of the singing, the first of this term, with that 
at the close of the hist. The removal to a higher 

o 

grade of a fourth or third of a school leaves a void 
in the musical exercises quite as marked as that in 
any other branch. 

There can be no doubt in regard to the expedi- 
ency of continuing the instruction in this branch in 
our public schools. We must not expect to see 
perfection. We ought to anticipate but little, for 
a teacher cannot accomplish a great work without 
constant practice and ample time. He can now 
give only haJf an hour a week to each school. But 
with a continuation of proficiency as marked as 
that which has characterized the efforts of last year, 
we shall eventually find a class of young singers 
Avhich can be excelled in but few cities in New Eno;- 
land. 

There are other topics which might with propri- 
ety be considered in this report. We might dis- 
charge an important duty in advocating the con- 
struction of more commodious school rooms in many 
localities of the city; we might recommend im- 
provements in the school system, and suggest plans 
for future reforms ; we might advocate a deeper in- 
terest on the part of the people in common school 
education ; we might consider the moral and phys- 
ical, as well as the intellectual training of the young ; 
we might discuss the plans to be adopted to reduce 
the expenditures of the department, and introduce 



34 

other important matters for public consideration, 
had we not already extended our report beyond or- 
dinary limits. 

Inviting the attention of the City Government 
and the public to the report of the Superintendent, 
which is presented in this connection, we close our 
account of the administration of the educational 
affairs of the City, and congratulate ourselves with 
the assurance that our labors have been acceptable, 
inasmuch as the electors of the City have decided 
that the Board for the ensuing year shall consist of 
the members of the old Board, with the single ex- 
ception that a new man takes the place of one of 
our number who holds another responsible and hon- 
orable relation to our public schools. 

JOHN HOSLEY, 

WATERMAN SMITH, 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

HIRAM HILL, 1 School 

JOHN COUGHLIN, / Committee. 

JAMES 0. ADAMS, 

SAMUEL WEBBER, 

DANIEL FARMER, Jii.y 

Manchester, December 31, 1861. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



The Report of the Receipts and Disbursements by the 
Treasurer of the several School Districts, appointed by the 
School Committee, is given in full below, and shows the 
various items of expenditure for the year. 



School Committee in Account with H. R. Chamberlin 



ACCOUNT OF DISTRICT NO. 1. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1861, - . $40 89 

Received of School Com. March, 1861, 50 00 

'* " June, 1861, 75 00 

" *' Nov., 1861, 75 00 



EXPENDITURES. 




Paid Hiram D. Preston, for Teaching, 


S102 99 


Rose T. Kimball, 


97 37 


School District No. 2, - - 


18 00 


James & Dodge, Horse Hire, 


5 50 


F. Preston, Wood, 


3 00 


M. A. Dustin, Cleaning House, 


150 


Daniels & Co., Bell, 


58 


Geo. W. Dustin, for Wood, - 


10 00 


Ca^ in the Treasury, Jan. 1, 1862 


, 195 



1240 89 



|i^40 89 



36 
ACCOUNT OF DISTRICT NO. 2. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

By Balance from old Account, - $959 90 
School Committee, March^ 1861, 3,945 00 
" " June, 1861, 5,000 00 

" " . Aug., 1861, 2,719 33 

" " " 1861, 1,000 00 

" " Nov., 1861, 5,055 00 

Transferred from old appropriations, 149 98 

$18,829 21 

EXPENDITURES. 

TEACHING AND CARE OF ROOMS. 



John P. Newell, - 


$1,14140 


Wm. A. Webster, - 


357 00 


H. C. Bullard, 


979 50 


M. L. Stevens, 


443 62 


J. G. Dearborn, - . - 


591 00 


I. S. Whitney, 


410 00 


H. R. Baker, 


450 00 


L. E. Manahan, 


196 38 


Nancy A. Durgiu, 


275 00 


Mary A. D. Allison, - 


213 12 


Celia N. French, 


275 00 


H.A. Slade, 


26125 


S. W. Bodwell, 


89 00 


Addie M. Steele, 


150, 62 


Ruth A. Porter, 


266 25 


Harriet A. Lord, . . . 


220 50 


Harriet H. Tasker, 


143 75 


Helen M. Morrill, 


254 00 


Julia A. Brown, 


255 25 


Mary L. Sleeper, - - - 


257 50 



Amount carried forward, - - 7,230 14 



37 



Amount brovg-ht forward, 


7,230 14 


Nancy S. Buiiton, 


254 50 


Julia A, Baker, _ . - 


254 50 


Roweiia L. Hamblett 


254 50 


Lizzie E. Newell, 


255 75 


Lizzie P. Gove, 


282 25 


Mary E. Ireland, 


224 50 


Martha Eaton, 


255 25 


Hannah G. Lane, 


255 25 


Lucretia A. Brown, 


255 25 


Anna R. Riddle, 


254 50 


C. Augusta Abbott, 


254 50 


Annette McDoel, . _ - 


254 50 


Mary J. Rowell, 


178 75 


Mary A. Richardson, 


256 75 


Mary J. Eaton, 


89 00 


Betsey A. Ambrose, 


255 25 


Ellen B. Rowell, 


256 25 


Philinda P. Parker, 


255 25 


Marcia Y. McQueston, - 


9 33 


Mary E. Parker, 


8125 


Maria E. Webster, 


178 75 


Mary E. Quimby, 


71 75 


Irene A. Stokes, 


134 00 


Sarah A. Domag, . _ . 


25 00 


Ellen F. Odell, 


75 00 


Emma Doland, 


25 00 


Mary C. Dinsmore, 


76 50 




$12,253 22 



38 



REPAIRS. 




W. P. Stratton, 


6 06 


Henry Peacock, 


60 


A. Houghton, - . . 


3 80 


Cogswell & Wells, 


171 06 


Biitterfield & Hodge, 


219 12 


Freeman Tuttle, 


4 75 


C. M. & L. Rail Road, - 


3 30 


J. M. Sawyer, _ _ ^ 


12 80 


A. B. Conant, . _ . 


8 68 


John Welch, - - . 


7 37 


E. G. Haynes, 


4 00 


E. Roper, 


1 00 


Manchester Print Works, 


48 04 


C. R. Colley, . - 


1 75 


Neal & Holbrook, - 


30 50 


B. K. Hoyt, 


6 28 


Joseph Everett, - . . 


48 07 


G.B.Fogg, - - - 


3 69 


J. L. Kennedy. 


24 80 


S. W. Parsons, 


1 50 


A. Barker, - . _ . 


88 67 


Wm. Wilder, . - _ 


7 87 


Hartsliorn & Pike, 


55 89 


S.N.Hill, 


3 59 


Daniels & Co., . _ . 


18 21 


Charles Clough <fe Co., 


23 OO 


Wilkins & Sylvester, 


10 25 


Davis Baker, - . . 


52 94 


Wm. G. Shattuck, 


64 17 



$931 67 



39 



REPAIRS OF PARK STREET SCHOOL HOUSE. 

J. L. Kennedy, - - - 6 00 

Cogswell & Wells, - - 214 35 

Wm. Rounsefel, - - - 28 25 

Hartshorn & Pike, - - 106 34 

Wm. McDonald, - - - 65 60 

Wm. G. Shattuck, - - 2 00 



FUEL AND SAWING WOOD. 




Amos W. Sargent, 


10 18 


George Hunt, - - 


7 50 


Joseph Everett, - - 


28 00 


J. M. Webster, 


12 00 


E. P. Johnson & Co. 


315 18 


Gilmaii Clough, 


358 80 


Charles Chase, . . . 


7125 


CARE OF FURNACES AND ROOMS. 


George H. Tebbetts, 


21 00 


Joseph Everett, 


104 50 


Irving A. J. Colby, 


28 25 


Charles Cram, 


137 


Mary Clary, . . _ 


3 25 


Margaret Doyle, 


3 50 


P. Boyle, 


2 00 


INSURANCE. 




Geo. A. French, 


46 25 


B. P. Cilley, 


50 GO 


L. B. Clough, . - 


37 50 


Herman Poster, 


37 50 


Joseph B. Clark, 


35 75 


J. D. Lyford, 


9 00 



t22 54 



2 91 



$163 87 



$216 00 



40 



FURNITURE. 

Merrill & Tilton, - - - 92 

Robert Gilchrist, - - 50 

Dunlap & Lovejoy, - - 18 00 

Wm. H. Elliott, - - 25 00 

H. H. Ladd, . _ _ 9 50 

James Whitcher, - - 10 00 

W. G. Hoyt, - - - 1 37 

David Libbey, - - . 9 60 

G. F. Bosher & Co., - - 2 00 

Adams & Andrews, - - 1 10 



BOOKS, STATIONERY AND PRINTING. 


Hinckling, Swan & Brewer, 


36 50 


Hersey & Tilton, 


37 66 


H. A. Gage & Co., 


26 00 


Gage & Parnsworth, - 


103 87 


John B, Clarke, 


19 12 


S. D. Farnsworth, 


28 75 


NOTES AND INTEREST. 




Edmund Adams, 3d, 


2,263 80 


John Dickey, 


272 40 


J. H. Wilkins on Martin N^ote, 


84 00 


James Leach, _ . . 


90 00 

i 



$77 99 



$251 90 



12,710 20 



INCIDENTALS. 

J. D. Watson, Clerk's Salary, 34 76 

D. J. Clark, for Pointers, - 3 10 
Barton & Co., for Curtains, - 3 24 
J. 0. Adams, Repairs and Cash Paid, 85 41 

E. Ferren, Mats, Curtains, &c., 50 58 
H. C. Bullard, . - . 1 24 



AmoufU. carried forvjard, - 128 28 



41 



Arnaunt broug-hl forioard, 


128 28 


T. P. Pierce, Postage, 


4 50 


Hartshorn & Pike, Tin Ware, 


2 50 


H. P. Wilson, Sponges, - 


80 


James Fern, Labor, 


9 50 


Sarali Biickraan, Washing, 


150 • 


Margaret Duggan, " 


125 


J. P. Newell, Chemicals, 


158 


Daniel Farmer, Jr., Labor, 


9 16 


Lawrence Foley, Cleaning Cellar, 


9 50 


John O'Brien, " " 


9 50 


Post Master, Postage, 


3 35 


Joseph Everett, Moving Ashes, 


4 50 


Cheney, Hill & Co., Express, 


2 75 


C. W. Colby, Tending Door, 


100 


A. H. Tasker, Pianist, 


2 00 


G. W. Stratton, Use of Piano, 


4 00 


H. R. Chamberlin, Treasurer, 


25 00 


A. W. Sprague, Repairing Apparatus, 22 00 


James & Dodge, Teams, 


2 00 




iR94.4. fiV 


' . ■ 




SUMMARY. 




Amoiint of Funds, . - - 


$18,829 2.1 


Teaching and care of rooms, - 


12,253 22 


Repairs, 


93157 


Repairs of Park Street School House, 


422 54 


Fuel and Sawing Wood, 


802 91 


Care of Furnaces and Rooms, 


163 87 


Lisurance, .... 


216 00 


Furniture, - . . - 


77 99 


Books, Stationery and Printing, 


251 90 


Notes and interest, 


2,710 20 


Incidentals, - . - . 


244 67 




®i Q 07 1 ,W 




l(PJ.O,V/ tt o < 


Balance to new account, 

6 


754 34 



42 



ACCOUNT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 3. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

Balance from old account, - - $112 58 

School Committee, - March, 1861, 125 00 

" " - - June, 1861, 100 00 

« . « - - Nov., 1861, 50 00 



EXPENDITURES. 
Rufus B. Foss, Teaching, 
Sarah E. Copp, " 

EmmaDoland, " - - 

I. S. Whitney, " - 

Oilman Clough, Wood, 
John G. Haywood, Sawing Wood, 
W. W. Baker, Repairs, 
Hartshorn & Pike, " 
James & Dodge, Horse Hire, 
School District No. 2, for Registers, 
Balance lo new account, % - 



120 16 


134 50 


23 00 


9 00 


2100 


4 50 


4 38 


1 25 


3 25 


1 84 


62 70 



8387 o« 



$887 68 



ACCOUNT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 4. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

Balance from old account, - - $103 26 

School Committee, - March, 1861, 90 00 

" " - ^ June, 1861, 75 00 

*V " - ' Nov., 1861, 35 00 



$303 2« 



43 

EXPENDITURES. 

John F. Chase, Teaching, - 109 17 

M. A. Stevens, " - - 142 87 

John P. Moore, Wood, - - 8 50 

John Emerson, Rej^airs, - 160 

James & Dodge, Horse Hire, - G 00 

District No. 2, Incidentals, - 74 

Daniels & Forsaith, Bell, - - 25 

Balance to new account, - - 84 23 



$303 23 



ACCOUNT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT NO 5. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

Balance from old account, - - $88 20 

School Committee, - March, 1861, 75 00 

" ' - - June, 1861, 65 00 

" « - - Nov., 1861, 60 00 



EXPENDITURES. 
A. R. Holbrook, Teaching, 
Emma A, H, Brown, " 
Wm. P. Merrill, Wood, 
James & Dodge, Horse Hire, 
Gilman Harvej, Repairs, 
Daniels <fe Company, Repairs, 
Horsey & Tilton, Stationery, 
Balance to new account. 



87 00 


117 87 


13 00 


6 00 


2 00 


.60 


33 


6140 



$288 20 



S288 20 



44 
ACCOUNT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 6. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

Balance from old account, - - $22 04 

School Committee, - March, 1861, 75 00 

" " - - June, 1861, 65 00 

« « - - Nov., 1861, 85 00 



$247 04 



EXPENDITURES. 

E. E. P. Abbott, Teaching, - 52 50 

Sylvester J. Hill, " - - 41 75 

Hattie Parmenter, " - - 98 87 

J. M. Webster, Repairs, - 4 25 

Charles Clough & Co., Repairs, 6 33 

Samuel Gamble, Repairs, - - 6 75 

Hartshorn & Pike, " - 2 63 
Hubbard, Williams & Locke, Repairs, 17 

J. M. Webster, Wood, - - 13 00 
James & Dodge, Teams, - - 7 50 

Hersej & Tilton, Stationery, - 50 

Balance to new account. - 12 79 



$247 04 



ACCOUNT OP SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 7. 
AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 
Balance frorp old account, - - $107 97 
School Committee, - March, 1861, 90 OO 



June, 1861, 75 00 
Nov., 1861, 60 00 



$332 9T 



45 

EXPENDITURES. 

Geo. K. Dakin, Teaching, 
Mrs. E. B. Lear, " - - 
Thomas Emerson, Repairs, 
A. Houghton, " 

J. Everett, . « . - 

Daniels & Co., - " - 
Oilman Clough, Wood, 
Nathan Johnson, " - - 
Charles Chase, Sawing Wood, 
James & Dodge, Horse Hire, - 
Horsey & Tilton, Stationery, 
Israel Webster, Setting Glass, 
Balance to new account, - 



87 00 


117 87 


8 27 


. 135 


2 25 


62 


2110 


2 00 


4 50 


6 50 


100 


75 


81 76 



532 9T 



ACCOUNT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 8. 



AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 




Balance from old account, 


$36 88 


School Committee, - March, 1861, 


80 00 


« « - - June, 1861, 


70 00 


" . " - Nov., 1861, 


50 00 




$236 18 


EXPENDITURES. 




Byron Ambrose, Teaching, 


65 00 


Mary A. Locke, " - - 


61 87 


Mary A. Doty, " 


6150 


James & Dodge, Teams, 


6 60 


Peter Farmer, Repairs, 


150 


Balance to new account, 


49 81 

ao^r. 1ft 



46 
ACCOUNT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

Balance from old account, - - $14 09 

School Committee, - March, 1861, 90 00 

"• - - June, 1861, 65 00 

" - Nov., 1861, 45 00 



EXPENDITURES. 
Charles H. Patterson, Teachmg, 
A. C. Edgcrly, - " 

Charles Clough & Co. Repairs, 
J. M. Wel)ster, Wood, 
James & Dodge, Teams, 
Hersey & Tilton, Stationery, 
Balance to new account. 



87 00 


98 87 


4 50 


13 00 


5 00 


2 29 


3 43 



1861, 


160 00 


1861, 


245 00 


- 


65 12 



$214 09 



$214 09 



ACCOUNT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 10. 
AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 
Balance from old account, - - $131 97 
School Committee, - March, 1861, 230 00 
« " - - June, 1861, 500 00 

« " - . Aug., 

« " - . Nov., 

Overdrawn, . - - 



$1,332 09 



47 

EXPENDITURES. 
J. G. Edgerly, Teaching, 
Mary A. Parker, " 
Sarah D. Lord, " 

A. Ellen Stanton, " 
I.S.Whitney, " 

Manchester Print Works, Repairs, 
District No. 2, - - " 
W. G. Shattuck, - " - 

D. B. Eastman, - - " 
Jason White, - " - 

A. Houghton, - - " 

Walker & Holmes, - " - 

Swan, Brewer & Tileston, Books, 
Tewksbury & Brother, Stationery, 
James & Dodge, Teams, 



[A discrepancy of f 35,20 exists between the accounts 
of the Treasurer and the School Committee, the insurance 
bill to that amount having been approved by the board, 
but has not been paid by the Treasurer from district 
funds.] 



453 75 


244 00 


242 60 


190 50 


28 00 


66 15 


18 08 


64 50 


10 85 


175 


3 38 


25 


5 50 


1 38 


150 


$1,332 09 



ACCOUNT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 11. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

Balance from old account, - - $79 40 

School Committee, - March, 1861, 150 00 

« « - June, 1861, 250 00 

« « . . Nov,, 1861, 100 00 

— $579 40 



48 

EXPENDITURES. 
Charles H. Woodbury, Teaching, 
Mary C. Dinsmore, " 

Marcia V, McQueston, " 
Mary E; Quimby, " 

I. S. Whitney, 
Bradley & Co., Furniture, 
W. H. Fisk, Curtains, 
Daniel Farmer, Jr., Repairs, 
Henry Peacock, " 

District No. 2, Stationery, 
A. B. Conant, " 

P. Doyle, Cleaning Rooms, 
James & Dodge, Teams, 
Balance to new account. 



110 08 


178 75 


153 00 


5125 


18 00 


2 88 


5 50 


7 91 


175 


183 


85 


2 00 


150 


44 10 



$579 40 



H. R. CHAM BERLIN, Treasurer. 
Manchester, Dec. 31, 1861. 



SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, 



FOR THE YEAR 18B1. 



In School Cdmmittke, „ } 
Jan. 6, 1862. ) 

Read, accepted a-nd ordered to be presented to the City Council, in con- 
nection with the Ileport of this Board. 

JAMES B. STllAW, Clkrk. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldkrmk.v, ) 

Jan. 6, 1862. > 
Read, accepted end ordered to be printed. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 



In Common Council, } 

Jan. 7, 1862. 5 
Head, accepted and ordered to be printed iti concurrence. 

S. D. FARNSWORTH, Clerk'Common Council. 



EEPOET. 



To THE School CoMxMittee : 

It is now ten years since my first official con- 
nection with the public schools of Manchester. 
Within that period I have marked the frequent 
changes in the educational department of the city, 
and the constant onward progress which has been 
measured, from time to time, in our published re- 
ports and in our annual examinations. I have seen 
the number of schools increase from thirty-one with 
thirty-six teachers to thirty-nine with over fifty 
teachers. The pupils, then numbering twenty-three 
hundred, have increased to nearly four thousand. 
Instead of thirty-six school and recitation rooms 
with eighteen hundred seats, Ave now have about 
sixty rooms with seats for three thousand pupils. 

Within the period named we have built ten new 
school houses containing thirty rooms, and over 
twelve hundred seats. No systematic and effectual 
ventilation existed at that date, vvhile now all 
our new and large houses and many of the old 
and small ones are provided with ample means of 
ventilation. Many of our school houses have been 
reconstructed, made more conrenient for occupa- 
tion, provided with superior furniture, and supplied 



52 

with apparatus, maps, charts, and biackboarcis to a 
very hberal extent. The amount of money appro- 
priated for the year 1852, was but a fraction over 
$8000, — now our expenditures, aside from those or- 
dered by district vote for the purchase of lands and 
the construction and repair of houses, are more than 
double that amount. 

These statistics afibrd convincing evidence of our 
material growth and prosperity ; we have been ad- 
ding to our resources and extending our educational 
facilities ; we have enlarged our field of action and 
brought an increased degree of energy into ser- 
vice ; we have adorned our city with beautiful edi- 
fices and constituted them durable monuments to 
commemorate the love of our people for the Com- 
mon School System. We have made intellectual ad- 
vancement, no less marked and gratifying than our 
physical and material growth. Our schools have 
slowly but constantly progressed from year to year; 
our people have manifested renewed interest in 
them, which has exerted a beneficial influence on 
the pupils ; our teachers have become more rigid 
and systematic in their discipline, and far more 
thorouQ'h and critical in their instruction. An influ- 
ence has originated in our schools and their official 
management, which hos been felt in other commu- 
nities and given our school department an honor- 
able name beyond the limits of our own state. The 
liberal compensation paid to teachers induces those 
who are well . qualified to seek employment here, 
and the determination on the part of the school au- 



53 

tliorities to employ none Lnt competent instructors 
is a ecood recommendation of those who are retained 
through the changes of years. 

Manchester teachers are sought for higher and 
more hicrative places and are often taken on the 
mere commendation of those who have had the su- 
perintendence of our public schools. To-day, many 
teachers, both gentlemen and ladies, who have la- 
bored faithfully and whom we unwillingly gave up, 
are doing valuable service in the highest positions 
of educational labor. 

Although we have -been compelled to accept the 
resignations of many valuable instructors in* our 
public schools for the various positions which have 
laid claim to them, we believe there has never been 
a time when all the teachers were so well qualified 
for their positions — when all were so faithful in the 
discharge of their duties and were so acceptable to 
the people, as during the past feiv terms. With the 
exception of several cases in the rural sections of 
the city during the past winter, and an occasional 
instance in the central districts, which will be no- 
ticed in the proper place, there has been but little 
expressed dissatisfaction and but little occasion for 
fault finding, except to such as prefer to speak evil 
rather than good. 

That I may present to you and the public a more 
definite knowledge of the character and condition 
of the several schools under my official supervision, 
I choose to consider each by itself and to judge it 
by its merits. I shall endea\or to give all a proper 



54 

consideration, keeping in view the facilities which 
all have possessed and the influences which have 
operated upon them. I do not design to condemn 
them merely because they are not in all respects 
what we should be glad to see them, but to present 
them as they are, with the circumstances that influ- 
ence their character, and let them stand or fall, in 
public estimation as they deserve. 



UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

The number of schools which from their location 
cannot well be graded is eight — located in the eight 
suburban districts on the east side of the Merri- 
mack. But two or three of these are ever large ; 
some being too small in respect to numbers to 
possess that interest, that ambitious rivalry which 
should exist between pupils, in order to lead them 
to industrious and persevering habits of study. This 
class of schools is difficult of management ; not that 
the members are of themselves incorrigible or par- 
ticularly impatient of restraint, — nor that the teach- 
ers are wholl}^ in fault, but the circumstances which 
surround them produce almost inevitably and 
without the possibility of prevention, difficulties 
which can not be overcome. The best schools are 
not always where the best teacher instructs nor 
where the best pupils learn, but where there is 
union of feeling among the people — where there 
are no sectional animosities and no local feuds. 



55 

NuMRER I. In this District, the reports for years 
past show that the people have been very unfortu- 
nate in the selection of teachers made for them by 
the School Committee, or that the teachers have 
been unfortunate in being placed in such a commu- 
nity. There has been little else than complaints 
from a portion of the District, summer and winter, 
with rare exceptions for several years past. It has 
made but little difference whether the teacher had 
a good professional reputation or none, whether he 
had long years of experience or was fresh from 
academic studies, the result was too often the same 
— a failure to please, and eventually a failure to be 
useful. There was a mutual disaffection. The pa- 
rents disliked the teacher and the teacher soon be- 
came unpopular with the pupils, and naturally 
entertained no very friendly regard for either. A 
year ago, however, the people fortunately dis- 
covered that the fault was attributable to the 
wretched old school-house which for a series of years 
they had compelled their children to occupy. Like 
honest men they resolved to remedy the evil. They 
called a school meeting, raised $150, thoroughly re- 
paired and refurnished the house, entirely trans- 
forming its interior appearance, and making it re- 
spectable and comfortable. Since the accomplish- 
ment of that commendable act, no District has been 
more successful in the assignment of teachers or bet- 
ter satisfied with the progress of the children in 
their various studies. Under the direction of the 
teachers of the past year, the school though small. 



56 

and wanting in that animation which should char- 
acterize it, has made good progress and sustained 
good order and merited a good name. 

Number III. The same difficulty as formerly ex- 
isted in No. 1, meets us at the threshhokl in No. 3, 
and the people of the District will be rewai'ded by 
the improved character of their school, whenever 
they shall have sufficient harmony of feeling and 
concert of action to resolve on the construction of a 
new house. The present remnant of a building has 
been moved about and repaired repeatedly since my 
first acquaintance with it, and at that time it was re- 
garded as entirely unfit for use. It has uncomfort- 
able seats for forty pupils, but in prosperous times 
in the mechanical interests of that locality, sixty or 
seventy scholars are compressed into the space de- 
signed for two-thirds of the number. 

During the winter the teacher was acceptable to 
a majority of the District, though a few citizens 
complained of too great severity, while others ac- 
cused him of too much leniency. The school al- 
w^ays maintained good order, and gave evidence of 
as much advancement as it has under other well ap- 
proved and popular teachers. 

In the summer and autumn the school was very 
large, requiring a great amount of mental and phys- 
ical labor, which the teacher had no inclination to 
withhold. We have but few more accurate or faith- 
ful teachers. 



57 

Number IV. Here we have had no difficulty in 
the school for several years. If the teacher is not 
perfect, the people have the good sense to make the 
best of it, and as a consequence we see one of the 
pleasantest schools in the city, and meet the most 
cheerful faees that ever gladdened a school room. 

The winter school was of a superior character, 
taught by a plain, unpretending man, whose whole 
aim and interest were to benefit his pupils. 
The summer and autumn school was generally re- 
garded with satisfaction. The teacher was not very 
rigid in her discipline, but gave good instruction, 
and most of the pupils afforded evidence of proper 
attention to their duty. 

Number V. As I had occasion to remark last 
year, the school in this District was favorably re- 
garded by the people. The only deficiency observ- 
able was a want of strict discipline. The teacher 
was too merciful. He instructed well and merited 
the respect of his pupils. 

The school for the two succeeding terms was 
small and destitute of that earnestness which we 
find in the best institutions. The teacher labored 
with a devotion worthy of a larger field of in- 
struction. 

The school-house in this District deserves to be 
abated as a public — deformity. It is a mere skele- 
ton, through which the winds shriek and snow-flakes 
Hy, and would be entirely unsuitable, without imme- 
diate and extensive repairs, even for an ice-house ! 



58 

If the people of the District do not soon resolve on 
a better house, it will be the duty of the Mayor and 
Aldermen, as an act of humanity to the children, to 
order the erection of a new one, and assess the vot- 
ers of the District to meet the expense. 

Number VL An unfinished and unfinishable 
house stands as a monument in this District. Cold, 
cheerless and desolate as it is, the boys and girls 
succeed in obtaining a good knowledge of the text- 
books beneath its roof. They literally are in the 
" pursuit of knowledge under difficulties." The 
winter school was commenced by a young man of 
no experience as an instructor, — a scholar of high 
standing, a gentleman of manly and courteous bear- 
ing, but wanting in the faculty of governing, and 
not sufficiently familiar with the art of teaching to 
impart instruction with facility. At the expiration 
,of seven weeks he resigned, and was succeeded by 
a teacher of practical experience, wdiose influence 
on the school was at once perceptible, and whose 
instructions proved satisfactory. 

The summer term was taught by a young lady 
who had taught but little previously, who by her 
kind yet dignified manner won the esteem of the 
pupils, and though not always sufficiently exacting 
in her demands, was regarded with favor by most of 
the parents in the District. 

Number VII. The dissatisfaction originating in 
No. 6, seemed to be contagious and was soon com- 
municated to No. 7. There was evidently some 



59 

cause for complaint prior to the publicity of the op- 
position to the teacher in the former District, but 
when that was settled by resignation, hostilities 
were openly commenced in No. 7. A petition was 
presented for the removal of the teacher, on the 
charge of severity in punishments. The whole mat- 
ter was carefully investigated, and the committee 
came to the conclusion that the teacher had been 
imprudent and even severe in his corrections of 
some pupils, but that the interests of the school re- 
quired that he should be retained through the 
term. 

His successor was a teacher selected by the voters 
of the District, and elected by the School Commit- 
tee on the general and almost unanimous petition 
of the District. The teacher labored diligently and 
with a great desire to benefit the children, but she 
lacked order and disciplinary power and failed to 
''exert a beneficial influence on the school. 

Number YIII. Here ao-ain was a failure in the 

o 

winter school. A teacher of fine education and a 
genial disposition, willing to make any sacrifice to 
gain a success, utterly failed in his ability to govern, 
and after eight weeks of ineffectual effort, though 
aided and encouraged by the committee, he deter- 
mined to leave the school. 

For the next term, a 3^oung lady of superior ed- 
ucation, strong mind and of much physical energy 
was selected. But through want of adaptation to 
her position, she failed to satisfy the people, or the 



60 

committee, and her place was filled in the aiitmnn 
term by a recent graduate of the High School, who, 
though inexperienced, succeeded well, giving good 
instruction and maintainino; excellent order. 

Number IX. For several years, since the com- 
pletion of a new house in this District, the school 
has been advancing. Winter and summer the chil- 
dren have had excellent instruction and have made 
excellent improvement of the facilities aftbrded them. 
No teachers succeeded better than those employed 
in No. 9. 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

There are sixteen schools of the primary grade 
in the city, which contain about 800 pupils, and en- 
roll during the year not far from 1500 names. It 
is understood that children may be admitted to 
these schools at the age of four years, though many 
parents, more prudent than Legislatures, withhold 
their children from the restraints of the school room 
until they can better endure the confinement de- 
manded of them, and are better prepared by age 
and strength to commence a course of instruction. 

Number One. This school, located in the High 
School building, has been entirely changed in its 
character within a few years. It has a more tidy 



61 

class of pupils and those more nearly of the same 
age and size. Formerly there was a number of 
girls and boys, who were advanced in years beyond 
the age of primary pupils, attending this school a 
portion of the time, but who were compelled to la- 
bor in the mills, or spend a large portion of the year 
in some kind of toil to aid their parents in obtain- 
ing a daily support. These have now advanced to 
higher grades, or sought instruction in private 
schools, or have completed all the education they 
will be likely to obtain from printed books. 

The deportment of the pupils is correct and the 
efforts of the teacher for their advancement worthy 
of commendation. 

Number Two. This school has usually been re- 
garded as ungraded, having pupils of the primary 
and middle grades. A year ago it had so changed 
from time to time, as to become distinctively pri- 
mary. Since that time it has been classified with 
that grade, though it has usually one class of middle 
grade pupils. It is discreetly managed, subject to 
no eccentricities in government or instruction, and, 
making no pretence to superiority, is one of the best 
of its grade. It has been under the direction of the 
present teacher for about ten years. 

Number Three. This is a large school, composed 
of small pupils.* The stranger, accustomed to per- 
fect system and mechanical exactness, might criti- 
cise the deportment of the pupils and condemn the 
practice of the teacher. But to us Avho know the 



62 

genial influence she throws about the young flock 
that gathers around her; to us who know how 
watchful she is of every child placed under her care, 
and how cautious that no evil find a lodgment in 
the heart, that school room seems a home, where all 
a mother's kindness and solicitude, patience and 
calmness, are united to control the young mind and 
direct it aright. There may not be such perfect 
discipline, such arbitrary government as in other 
school rooms. There may not possibly be so much 
study — there may be, through excessive charity, too 
much prompting before the mind can be called into 
action, but if so, these defects are counterbalanced 
by the perfect example and the manifold lessans of 
goodness which are daily and always placed before 
the school. 

Number Four. This school is marked by no pe- 
culiarities. It is not large nor difficult of manage- 
ment, yet the teacher finds sufficient employment 
in conducting it in a manner to give satisfaction to 
the parents who are immediately interested. 

Number Five. At the expiration of the winter 
term, the teacher of this school closed a long and 
useful connection with the public schools of this city, 
and since the commencement of the present term 
has closed her labors on earth. She^was for nearly 
twenty years a faithful instructor in our city, and 
had previously had years of practical knowledge of 
her professional duties in other places. She yet 



63 

lives in the grateful remembrance of hundreds now 
in active hfe, and her name will be honored while the 
children of the present generation shall remain. 

The school is composed of alphabet and primer 
classes, is generally very large and requires inex- 
haustible patience, and more wisdom and prudence 
than are often found even in learned heads. The 
present teacher has sufficient perseverance and en- 
ergy, and I trust adequate judgment, to train the pu- 
pils in her charge judiciously. She maybe wanting 
now in some of those excellent qualifications which 
a few years'experience will give her, and which she 
will not be slow to learn. 

Nu]\iBER Six. This school is the counterpart of 
No. 5, and is composed of a class of scholars slightly 
advanced, but not prepared for admission to the 
middle school It is un^Jer the direction of one of 
our best teachers, accurate, faithful and ready to do 
whatever is required of her by the school au- 
thorities. 

Numbers Seven and Eight. Two good schools that 
require but little improvement. The children are 
well trained at home and consequently are easily 
managed in the school room. The teachers have 
had several ^^ears' experience in their profession and 
have not been neglectful of opportunities to learn, 
nor indolent in making a right application of their 
knowledge. 



64 

Number Nine. The teacher of this school resio;ned 
at the close of the summer term, much to the regret 
of the pupils and all who felt a special interest in 
behalf of its prosperity. She had been in it for 
about two years and had managed with prudence. 
Her successor was appointed to the place because 
she had labored faithfully and successfully in another 
school, and if industry and entire devotion to the 
good of her pupils will accomplish her object, she 
will be successful. The school is large, and somewhat 
irregular in its attendance ; but, with watchfulness 
on the part of the teacher, it is not difficult to be 
controlled. 

Nuj^iBER Ten. This school and No. 3 have some- 
times unconsciously been rivals. They have often 
reported equ'al numbers, promoted to higher grades 
classes equally large, and in the general manage- 
ment are not very different. Here is the same kind 
influence as in the former, and the same easy, home- 
like manner of controlling the pupil. Yet there is 
a difference in the teachers — almost an opposition ; 
at least a strong contrast. Both are superior — each 
in her own way. 

Number Eleven. This school is formed on the 
same basis as No. 5, — is' in fjict an infant school, and 
generally has the proper number of children on its 
register to render it easy of government and pleas- 
ant in respect to its classes. During the winter terms, 
this and its complement, No. 12, have usually been 
placed under the direction of one teacher. 



65 

Number Twelve has not been for some years a 
school of marked characteristics. It has been slug- 
gish, and oftentimes has seemed to be making but 
little progress. This has not been attributable whol- 
ly to the teachers, but partly to the disposition of 
the pupils. Possibly, the frequent changes occasion- 
ed by suspensions and transfers of teachers have had 
an influence. A new teacher took charge of it two 
terms ago — one who had succeeded in other places, 
but through her own fault, or that of the pupils, she 
was not entirely successful. The school was united 
with No. 11, for th-e winter term, to be re-organized 
whenever there shall be a demand for it. 

Number Thirteen has increased year by year, un- 
til it ranks among the largest of the primary grade. 
The pupils are obedient, attentive and intelligent, 
and the teacher's highest ambition is to prepare 
them for promotion, and to maintain good order. 

Number Fourteen. This school, a portion of this 
year, has had two classes of middle school pupils. It 
requires constant action and unceasing watchfulness, 
to be kept in a satisfactory condition. The teacher 
is unsparing in her labors for success, never neglects 
a duty because it requires effort, and is doing a good 
work with her classes. 

Number Fifteen. The primary school in District 
No. 10 is composed of very young children, who 
are restless, and almost unrestrainable. They have 
been allowed liberties which they will not willingly 



66 

surrender. They whisper, move about, and some- 
times speak aloud, and give the teacher unlimited 
trouble in controlling them. The school has seldom, 
if ever, been brought under rigid discipline, and as 
the pupils pass up to higher grades, they are com- 
pelled to suffer shame or punishment for acts which 
should have been corrected in the primary school. 
The present teacher expends energy and words 
enough to command obedience. She is anxious that 
the pupils learn, desirous of success — but she fails 
to maintain that order which should be established 
in every school before advancement is made in the 
studies. 

Number Sixteen. The Amoskeag primary, after 
entering the new room provided for its accommoda- 
tion, made marked improvement. It became more 
cjuiet and orderly, and began to manifest more men- 
tal activity. A new teacher was placed in the school 
at the opening of the autumn term, who found it 
more difficult to preserve order, and the j)npils, dur- 
ing the twelve weeks which the school continued^ 
made but little advancement. The present term, 
however, it is smaller, the teacher more decided, and 
order is re-established. 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

When all the middle schools are in session, nine 
teachers are employed, and as a class, they occupy a 
very commendable position in their profession. 



67 

Though not perfect in their qualifications, nor mod- 
els in all respects, they possess aptness to teach, en- 
ergy to govern, and discretion in the general manage- 
ment of their schools. While it is possible that in 
some instances, the schools might be benefited by a 
change of instructors,- the danger would be that they 
might be injured by the adoption of new plans and 
the introduction of new methods of instruction, 
which will, for the time, retard rather than promote 
the pi"ogress of the schools. In referring to them 
specilicall}', I cannot well avoid the use of language 
which has already been applied to them in other 
reports. 

Number One is under the continued care of one 
of the most faithful of our teachers, and is worthy of 
the commendation which every visitor gives it. 

Number Two is a small, but good school, with at- 
tentive and obedient pupils, and a teacher of great 
energy and resolution. She has no disposition to 
avoid the responsibility which rests on her, and 
never complains of having too much to do. 

Numbers Three and Four are pleasantly located, 
with teachers of long expeidence, and pupils gen- 
erally disposed to learn. There have been a few 
scholars connected with them the past year, who 
would not be injured by more rigid .restraint, while 
the general character of the schools would be im- 
proved by their reformation. 

Number Five, as usual, ranks among the best of 
its clasj<, and sends up to the Grammar schools 



68 

a greater proportion of pupils well prepared, in all 
the required studies, for admission, than any other. 

Number. Six. Here is generally more oral in- 
■struction — more general information communicated 
than in many other schools, while the pupils in the 
prescribed course do not fliU behind their classes 
Avhen advanced to higher grades. 

Number Seven has been taught by the same teach- 
er for about eight years, and in deportment and 
habits of study has always merited especial com- 
mendation. In its order and scholarship it has no 
superior, and, indeed, no equal. 

Number Eight has been in session only one term 
during the year. It was then under the charge of 
the present teacher of the Amoskeag primary. It 
made good progress, and was always in good condi- 
tion. On account of the small number of pupils, it 
was discontinued, temporarily, aiid the pupils trans- 
ferred to the primary in the same building. 

Number Nine. In Piscataquog, a middle school 
was instituted late in the autumn term, to relieve 
the primary of its surplus pupils, and to accommo- 
date the younger pupils in the grammar depart- 
ment. It has not been in operation long enough 
for us to judge accurately of its usefulness. 

PISCATAQUOG MIDDLE AND PRIMARY SCHOOL. 
On the South side of the River, in District No. 10, 
the partially graded school, embracing primary and 



69 

niiddle, and sometimes a few grammar pupils, has 
been large, requiring great industry and energy to 
discharge properly all the duties demanded of the 
position of teacher. There are man}^ classes, and 
there cannot well be less. In most of the studies, 
particularly in geography and reading, the school 
has given evidence of unusual advancement. 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 



PISCATAQUOG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 
The higher grade school in Ward seven has now 
attained a position which entitles it legitimately 
to be classed in the grammar grade. There is not a 
school in the city, which, within the space of two or 
three years, has made better progress, or given bet- 
ter evidence of having been diligent in study on the 
part of the pupils or of having received better care 
on the part of the teachers. 

AMOSKEAG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 
This Grammar School is very similar to that of 
the same grade at Piscataquog. Making all due al- 
lowance for the frequent change of teachers, this 
school has rapidly advanced and now numbers 
among its members some superior scholars. All the 
pupils, however, have not acquired habits of study, 
nor, indeed, have all learned that order is the first 
law of the school room. The teacher during the 
winter term was manly, firm and faithful. He 



70 

trained the pupils rigidly in deportment and in 
study, and his successor labored to maintain the po- 
sition which the school had already gained. 

WILSON'S HILL SCHOOL. 
The school at Wilson's Hill is really a Grammar 
School, though usually registering a class of middle 
grade pupils. It is open to little complaint. In 
most of the branches the pupils do well, make re- 
spectable progress, and are always ambitious. Some- 
times the deportment is not entirely acceptable, yet 
the teacher desires regularity in her pupils, and 
usually succeeds in enforcing discipline. 

THE INTERMEDIATE. 
This school never enrolled so large a number of 
pupils as during the first term of the present year. 
The rooms, designed only for ninety-six pupils, were 
crowded with one hundred and twenty. A new 
room was temporarily occupied and a third teacher 
employed. The elements which composed the school 
were varied, and were reduced to order only by the 
stern commands of the teachers and the school au- 
thorities. Many who had not attended school for 
months before, deprived of labor, sought the oppor- 
tunity to review their studies. Others, who had 
been troublesome in middle and ungraded schools, 
were placed here for the severer discipline which 
they would receive, while not a few disaffected with 
the Grammar schools gained admission. The result 
was injurious to good order and almost fatal to real 
progress. 



71 

The next term the character of the school was en- 
tirely changed. The teachers were relieved from 
their anxiety, the pupils were quiet and obedient, and 
the course of instruction moved on prosperously. 

On the opening of the Autumn term new instruc- 
tors — both females — were elected to the school, the 
principal and assistant having both resigned — the 
former for a more lucrative position in another State. 
This term was characterized by good order, and 
the progress of the school was quite as marked as 
during previous sessions. 

The present term, a teacher of long experience 
and of former success is the principal, and time will be 
required to show whether we have gained or lost by 
the changes of the year. 

NORTH AND SOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 
These Grammar Schools have suffered but little 
general change during the year. The North School 
for two years has been improving in its deportment 
and now sustains a high position, both in respect to 
the order and the character of the instruction. We 
seldom see more devoted or correct instructors than 
in this school. The principal is exacting in his de- 
mands upon the pupils at the hour of recitation, and 
seldom fails to require the most critical accuracy of 
his classes. I have sometimes feared that he was 
too nice in his definitions, and too particular in his 
methods of explanation. But when the tendency of 
the pupil is to fall short of the ordinary require- 
ments, his deficiencies may be counterbalanced by 
the extra demands of the teacher. 



72 

In the South School a new principal took charge 
at the commencement of the Spring term, and 
though preceded by a superior disciplinarian and a 
successful instructor, he fully sustains the character 
of the school, and devotes his energies to its- pros- 
perity. The number of pupils the present term is 
somewhat greater than in the corresponding season 
of last 3^ear. 

In both schools the assistant teachers are well 
qualified to give the instruction required, and most 
of them discharge their duties faithfully. There is 
an inclination sometimes manifested in assistant 
teachers to avoid responsibility — to feel that they 
have done all that is expected of them, when they 
have completed the prescribed round of duties. 
They seldom consult with the principal, they never 
ofler assistance to pupils out of their own division, 
their interest in the school is limited to their own 
classes, and does not always extend to every pupil 
placed under their instruction. I should be glad to 
say that there is not one of this description now em- 
ployed in our public schools* 



HIGH SCHOOL. 
The High School has received modifications year 
by year, until we are satisfied that the general sys- 
tem or arrangement will not be much improved un- 
der the present facilities. New influences — diflerent 
agencies, might produce new and more gratifying 



73 

results. A new and more commodious house would 
facilitate the management of the school — would al- 
low better classification, and materially aid in pro- 
moting; o-ood order. 

Now we have an average attendance of one hun- 
dred and twenty pupils, with a regular attendance 
during some terms of one hundred and forty. This 
winter we have one hundred and fifty-four members, 
forty-six of whom are compelled to occupy chairs, 
or seats without desks, and to study as they best 
can, be,cause the whole number of seats in the school 
room is but one hundred and eight. A portion are 
deprived of instruction in penmanship and labor 
under great difficulties in respect to their other 
studies. 

Although there are defects in this school, imper- 
fections in teachers, and delinquencies on the part 
of pupils, we cannot condemn without qualifica- 
tion, indeed we hesitate even to reprove, while the 
school is struggling against so many obstacles to suc- 
cess. Yet notwithstanding all these hindrances, 
and the inexcusable negligence of some pupils, we 
find in the High School a good degree of merit, ex- 
cellent scholars, in the languages, in mathematics, in 
the natural sciences and in every branch of study. 
We find talent here, which is manifested at every 
examination and on every public occasion in which 
members of the school are called upon to act a part. 

There has been a change of one assistant, in con- 
sequence of a resignation. The substitute is with- 
out much experience in the instruction of advanced 



74 

classes, but possesses adequate scliolarsliip and has 
sufficient energy to become successful. 

The first assistant, during the two years of her 
connection with the school, has been unceasing in 
her efforts, and has commanded the highest respect of 
her pupils, and the fullest confidence of the public. 



PROGRESS IN THE STUDIES. 

Reading is of primary importance, not only to 
public men, but even to ordinary business people, 
and the daily laborer. It is the basis of all other 
knowledge, for without it no progress can be made 
in art or science, no accurate information can be ob- 
tained of passing events beyond our own immediate 
field of observation. 

It is essential that the basis of good reading be 
laid in the primary school. A good reader in the 
primary will read correctly elsewhere. Knowing 
well the sentence or paragraph he is to read, he will 
understand its meaning, and when called on to per- 
form any task in other branches, will readily com- 
prehend its bearing and consequently be prepared to 
master the work more readily and with less labor. 

Compared with the pupils of ordinary public 
schools, our scholars are good readers — they have 
been trained with reference to enunciation, proper 
articulation, accentuation and naturalness of tone 
and style. Yet there are not many 'perfect readers. 
There is too much monotony in many schools, too 



75 

much mechanical action, too great formality, and 
no Hving agency, no effective, working spirit. 

There is apt to be too little care in the prepara- 
tion of a reading exercise. The difficult words are 
not studied — their meaning, and consequently the 
import of sentences in which they perform an essen- 
tial office, is not comprehended. Pupils are too often 
hurried over the lesson without explanation or anal- 
ysis. They are told but not shoiun how to read. 
They are conscious of defects, but are troubled to 
learn how to remedy them, and sometimes teachers 
are too indolent or too ignorant to teach them. 

In Spelling we notice great deficiency — espe- 
cially when the pupils are called upon to write sen- 
tences. They may spell an assigned lesson from the 
book, but when they are required to write, they 
show their deficiency. Common words are more 
frequently spelled incorrectly than those which 
are more difficult, from the fact that they are less 
carefully studied. The rules of orthography, so far 
as practicable, should be explained and illustrated 
by our teachers. Spelling is made a daily exercise 
in all our schools, and is generally so conducted as 
to be beneficial to the pupils. Yet the results are 
not satisfactory when a practical exercise of their 
knowledge is required. The only proper method 
of making improvement in spelling is to assign to 
the pupil definite lessons daily in the Speller or Dic- 
tionary, and require them to be made as much a 
matter of careful study as any other text book. 



76 

The slate or blank book should be used by all pu- 
pils who can write, and the written exercises should 
be examined by the teacher or by pupils whom he 
may appoint. It is a good practice for the teacher 
to pronounce words from the reading lesson. It 
will test the pupils habit of attention — their power 
of perception, and lead to a more careful observation 
of the formation of words, and the correct impression 
made on the mind will be permanently retained. 

Mathematics receive a greater amount of the pu- 
pils' attention than other studies. Oral arithmetic 
is taught to the child when he first enters the pri- 
mary school, and this is followed by the intellectual 
and written work through the whole course to the 
High School, where arithmetic is reviewed and the 
higher mathematics substituted in its place. We 
have good mathematical scholars — they are taught 
thoroughly and accurately, are required to go behind 
rules and formulas and give the reason of processes 
— the basis on which rest the great principles of 
mathematical demonstration. We find it almost 
universally the case that pupils coming into the city 
•from other j^laces are proportionately more advanc- 
. ed in geography and other branches of study than 
in arithmetic. It is so in most of our private 
schools. Every comparison with other schools show^s 
that we are affording our children superior facilities 
for a mathematical education. 

Geography and History should, so far as practica- 
ble, be taught in connection. The history, as well 



77 . 

as topography, of a country, a river, a mountain, 
should bo learned by the pupil. In our schools we 
find a fjxir knowledge of the former, but great 
deficiencies in respect to the latter. There has been 
a disposition to > undervalue the study of history, 
probably without design or even a knowledge of 
the fact. The Committee interdicted the study in 
the middle schools two years ago, and teachers in 
the grammar schools have felt too little interest in 
its study, or have found sufficient employment for 
their pupils in the other studies of the prescribed 
course. They complain of the text-book, children 
catch the infection, and complain more loudly, and 
the result is, though they go over the required 
course, they do it without a love for it — merely be- 
cause they are required to do it. 

Grammar has been receiving more than usual at- 
tention for a few years past. There has been an 
improvement in this department. We have better 
scholars and better instruction, notwithstanding the 
prominent fact that we have really no satisfactory 
text-book for a guide to advanced pupils, or even to 
those who have proceeded beyond the elements. 

In the Grammar Schools, and in a few of the 
mixed schools, proper attention is given daily by the 
teachers to the art of Writing. But in others it is 
treated too much as reading is, in a careless way, 
the exercises being hurried over and the time de- 
voted to that branch worse than wasted. The at- 
tention of teachers is often called to the matter, but 



78 

in those schools where frequent changes occur it is 
difficult to enforce the requirements, in every par- 
ticular, in season to be useful. 

In the Middle Schools writing is excluded, or 
rather it is not required by the rules of the Board. 
I would suggest a change in this regard and require 
that it be made at least an occasional exercise for 
the higher class of pupils. 

Music. In this branch there has been an onward 
progress in every department of the public schools, 
and no where more marked than in the middle 
grade. 

These pupils haye had systematic training week 
by week, and in addition to the lessons given by the 
teacher of music, have had some practice under the 
direction of their respective teachers. They began 
to exercise the voice at the right age for perfect 
development, and the result is already perceptible. 
When a few more years have added to their prac- 
tice and experience, these pupils then in the gram- 
mar and high schools will show the real benefit re- 
sulting from the course of musical instruction. 

The following argument in favor of vocal music 
in our primary and middle schools, is furnished by a 
gentleman who has made the instruction of children 
a study, and is worthy of a place in this connection : 

The earliest period oi life is the best for the cultivation of 
the musical faculties. The musical organs' are then easily de- 
veloped. The age of six or seven is the best for learning to 
sing. Voice and ear, so obedient to external impressions, are 
rapidly developed and improved. 



79 

Some children, who at first show but few signs of musical 
gifts, some sooner than others, develop the best voices. 

Children by being brought together in classes stimulate each 
other to activity, thus the influence of singing upon the voice 
and ear, and on the health and morals of the pupils, will be in- 
creased tenfold when aided by the participation of numbers in 
this pleasurable exercise. And so we find that children inter- 
ested in their singing lessons at school will carry its influence 
into their habits and dispositions, and to their moral characters. 

No one can expect to be great as a vocalist or a musician 
unless educated while young. The great masters were trained 
in childhood. 

It is found in our lower grades of school that ninety-flve per 
cent, of the children can sing, in the higher grades the per cent, 
is not so large. The reasons are obvious, the difiiculties to be 
avercome are greater than with the younger pupils, so that in 
many cases it is almost impossible to succeed. 



DISCIPLINE AND DEPORTMENT. • 

The first great requisits in a teacher is ability to 
govern, A pupil knows at a glance whether he is 
to rule or to obey. He knows the weakest points 
in his teacher's qualifications, and he will attack 
him there as readily as a military commander will 
seek, and direct his forces upon, the weakest part of 
a fortress or the wing of an army most feebly sup- 
ported. The teacher should have similar shrevrd- 
ness and gain access to the fortress of his pupil's 
heart by the easiest approach. He must not appl}^ 
the same rule to all, though he must bring all under 
the same authority. He may reduce one to sub- 



80 

mission by a word, another by a process of reason- 
ing, and all it may be without resort to force, and 
certainly without the least mental excitement — the 
first indication of anger. But when necessity re- 
quires, he must break down all obstinacy, though it 
be with the terrible power of physical force. The 
pupil must yield wholly and unreservedly, but in 
the moment of submission, the smile of reconciliation 
should beam from the face and words of kindness 
fall from the lips. 

Most of our teachers succeed without resort to cor- 
poral punishment, though some — too man}^ — adopt 
it as the prevailing mode, and apply the rod when 
a milder application of words will produce the more 
speedy effect. As in the old fable, words first and 
stones last, and onlj^ in the event of a failure of 
milder methods. 



PUBLIC INTEREST IN SCHOOLS. 

Though our schools receive during the year — 
particularly at examinations — a large number of 
visitors, there is but comparatively a small propor- 
tion of our citizens who ever go inside the school 
room. Not one tax-payer in tiftj" has given the 
teacher occasion to register his name. There .have 
been periods when for a whole year, and even a 
succession of years, the mayor of the city, mem- 
bars of the board of aldermen and council, have 
not visited a school, and we have had members of 



81 

tlie school committee who have followed their exam- 
ple. During the past year the maj'or has visited 
every school in town, and set an example for other 
citizens to follow, and members of the school com- 
mittee have made more regular visits tlian any of 
their predecessors 

It is not enough to make appropriations and 
build houses, provide books and elect officers. It 
is not all that is demanded, to preach to children 
of the importance of learning, nor to talk earnestly 
of popular education. The presence of the pa- 
rent in the school is desired, not on examination 
days only, when the boldest and perhaps poorest 
scholars appear the best, bnt when the school is in 
its natural condition. Such visits are more import- 
ant than those of committees and superintendents ; 
more valuable even than any agency bej^ond the 
appropriation of pecuniary means and the employ- 
ment of well tried teacher.s. 

From this report j^ou will perceive that our 
schools are in a comparatively prosperous condition 
— that they are generally under the direction of 
earnest, faithful, competent teachers ; that they are 
composed of intelligent, obedient and happy pu- 
pils, and that they maintain an honorable name in 
comparison with other schools, and constitute one 
of the most valuable blessings afforded our city. 
Let us regard them as our pride and cherish them 
with paternal care. They are tlie true indices of 



82 

our moral and inteliectual progress, and should re- 
<3eive our constant encouragement. They coii- 
tribute to our municipal growth and prosperity, 
and claim our most liberal support. 

JAMES 0. ADAMS, 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
Dec. 31, 1861. 



TEACHERS ELECTED FOR 1862. 



District No. 1, Sarah A. Preston. ^ 

" " 2, J. G. Edgerlj,. Principal of Intermediate. 
No election of teacher for Primary No. 12. 
All other teachers in the District remain as last year. See 
School Committees' Report, page 26. 
District No. 3, Helen I. Stanley, 
" " 4, Rose T. Kimball, 
" " 5, Emma Doland, 
" " 6, M. Augusta Currier, 
" " 7, Mary A. Caswell, 
" " 8, Mary A. Doty, 
" "8, Araminta C. Edgerly, 
" " 10, Marcia V. McQueston, Grammar School, 
A. Ellen Stanton, Middle School, 
Sarah D. Lord, Primary School, 
Mary A. Parker, Mixed School, 
" " 11, Sarah E. Copp, Grammar School, 
Mary E. Quiraby, Primary, 



83 



Statistics of Attendance for the year 1861. 





VVhol 


V No. 






<ll 


i *^ 




Schools. 


belonging 
to the school. 




-1-1 tn 
1^- 


CM O 


o g 


■jj 3 




Boys. 


1 Girls. 


o 






'7. 'i^ 


"til ?s 


Schools in Dist. No. 2. 




1 


j 


< 








High School 


58 


96 


154 


92 


17 


12 


250 


North Grammar School 


111 


145 


^256 


"188 


20 


15 


295 


i'oulh Grammar School 


98 


133 


!23l 


139 


22 


21 


2;u 


Intermediate School 


132 


103 


j237 


71 


16 


21 


156 


Wilson Hill School 


2i 


26 


1 50 


36 


4 


10 


97 


Middle 6'chool No. 1 


20 


32 


i 52 


31 


4 


9 


81 


<i (1 <> 2 


25 


23 


48 


33 


4 


8 


123 


" 3 


26 


21 


48 


33 


6 


8 


55 


" - "4 


25 


27 


52 


32 


9 


8 


64 


" 5 


21 


26 


47 


34 


15 


12 


103 


... ..6 


32 


34 


66 


37 


19 


9 


102 


" 7 


34 


33 


69 


37 


12 


9 


108 


•' 8 


14 


11 


25 


16 


2 


3 


19 


Primary School No. 1 


49 


52 


101 


39 


8 


9 


41 


" " 


2 


39 


40 


79 


43 


2 


10 


58 


.. .. - 


' 3 


38 


44 


92 


50 


4 


7 


77 


i< 11 


" 4 


30 


27 


57 


39 


4 


10 


47 


41 It _ 


« 5 


52 


65 


117 


57 


8 


9 


83 


.1 t( 


' 6 


44 


30 


74 


36 


8 


9 


72 


It l< . 


' 7 


61 


40 


101 


47 


15 


12 


154 


" " 


' 8 


■ 25 


46 


71 


41 


20 


10 


104 


1) tt _ 


• 9 


53 


61 


104 


49 


12 


11 


63 


It 11 


' 10 


59 


54 


106 


53 


12 


12 


78 


«1 II 


' 11 


43 


49 


92 


41 


9 


11 


101 


" " 


« 12 


27 


34 


61 


27 




9 


94 


II II . 


' 13 


46 


41 


87 


46 


4 


11 


96 


V " " 14 


31 


27 


58 


29 


6 


9 


52 


School in District No. 1 


19 


13 


32 


20 


5 


8 


26 


•3 


42 


53 


95 


55 


6 


10 


95 


4 


20 


17 


37 


23 


6: 


8 


31 


5 


19 


16 


34 


19 


4} 


8 


27 


.. .. 11 6 


21 


15 


36 


21 


3 


9 


17 


"7 


27 


21 


48 


31 


21 


9 


29 


.1 8 


24 


27 


51 


29 I 


3 


9 


24 


9 


10 


25 


35 


22 ! 


1 

4 1 


g 


33 


School Dist. No. 10, Grammar 


53 


35 


88 


46 1 


7 ' 


11 


60 


.. II II Primary 


48 


52 


100 


42 


2i 


10 


49 


" " " Ungraded 


46 


33 


79 


37 


4! 


8 


66 


" " " 11, Grammar 


27 


29 


66 


35 


10 < 


9 


114 


" " " Primary 


40 ( 


43 


83 


41 


T 


9 


41 



84 
WINTER SCHOOLS. 



A brief statement of the condition of the various Schools, 
under the charge of teachers not noticed in the foregoing- 
report, is herewitli submitted. District No. 1, has had a 
quiet, orderly and profitable school. In No 2, the teacher 
of the Intermediate School has labored with great fidelity, 
but has failed to maintain such order as the interest of the 
pupils has demanded. This is the most difiicult School in 
the city, and it matters little how good a scliolar the teach- 
er may be, nor how successful have been his former labors, 
he must possess unusual tact to manage this school. Other 
schools in No. 2 have remained unchanged during tlie term. 

In No. 3, the School has been entirely unsatisfactory to 
the Superintendent and those members of the Committee 
who have visited it. The teaching has been good, but the 
deportment exceedingly bad. Much to our surprise, the 
people of the District have appeared to be satisfied. 

In No. 4, the School is imder the same teacher as last 
Winter, with similar success. • 

No. 6 has a new teacher, who has labored with diligence 
and afforded satisfactory evidence of his faithfulness. 

The School in No. G has been marked by no special fea- 
tures. Although it has been the subject of but little com- 
plaint, it has not deserved a very favorable consideration. 

In No. 7, there has been a superior School, though it 
has not always manifested superior order.. 

No. 8 has an excellent School, quiet, orderly and studi- 
ous. The teacher in No. 9, has pursued the same course 
adopted last winter, with equally good results. 

In No. 10, the new Middle School has attained to a res- 
pectable condition, and with perseverence, the teacher will 
accomplish a good work. 

At Amoskeag, the Primary School has greatly improved 
during the term. The Grammar School has been gener- 
erally very orderly and made fair progress in the required 
studies. 

March 7, 1862. 



i