(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

i \'V\ OF MANCHESTER. 

1'Ur.LIC DOCUMENT. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

fu'tfiiits and €x\)tn&xiMts, 



FISCAL 




YEAE. 



i:n;')1ng j:>ecember 31, 1863, 



TOGETIIF.U WITH THE 



SCHOOL REPORT, 

AM) OI'liKI! liKPoKTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE AFFAIRS 
OF THE CITY. 



STME UBRARV 



s 



THB 



SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL EEPOET 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



(Sitg d ^mikt^kx, 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING DEC. 31, 



18 6 3. 



TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS 
RELATING TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N.H.: 

AMKEICAN STEAM rRi:;TTING WOUKS OF GAGE & FAKNS WORTH. 

1863. 



\ / 



MAYOR'S ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Council : 

The government of the city for the ensuing year being 
now organized, it becomes my duty to offer you some sug- 
gestions relative to the more important matters which will 
claim attention in the year before us. We are not un- 
mindful of the fact that we are entering upon office at a 
time when the principles of the government are being put 
to a severe test, and the strain is brought to bear at a point 
which had not before been fully tried. The ability of a 
free republican government to achieve its independence 
was shown in the success wiiich attended the Revolution. 
Its adaptcdness to promote the highest good of a people 
has been manifest in the unexampled prosperity of this 
nation for three quarterg of a century, and its ability to 
repel aggressions by other powers was shown in the last 
war with Great Britain as well as by all our diplomatic in- 
tercourse with the old world ; but its power to sustain 
itself amid the throes and convulsions of internal dissen- 
sions and rebellion, is the terrible ordeal through which it 
is now passing. God grant it may be found equal to the 
emergency. If so, a bright and prosperous future is be- 
fore us, and the bow of hope and promise to the down trod- 
den millions of other lands will assume a new and un- 
wonted lustre. But should it fail ! The consequences are 
too appalling to be contemplated. There are those who 
seem to think that though a popular government may prove 
too weak for a nation, it will, nevertheless be found strong 
enough for state and lesser governments. This is an error. 
The same essential principles underlie all free government, 
and if they are not suited for a nation they will be found 



wholly inadequate for all other governments. For what 
obligation or motive ever can bind an individual that will 
not by right bind a community, and if a state can defy the 
authority of a nation at pleasure, why may not an individ- 
ual cut loose from the restraints which lesser governments 
impose, when these happen to conflict with his wishes or 
supposed interests. If the government of the United 
States cannot after a fair and full opportunity, establish its 
authority and maintain its right to control in their national 
character all the states in the Union, then the policy of our 
civil institutions is at an end, and will at no distant day 
give place to some new order of things. A Democratic 
government will come to be looked upon as an exploded 
theory, the offspring of a bewildered fancy, the creation of 
idle dreamers. But the reproachful epithets of our ene- 
mies do not disturb our confidence in a govermnent which 
for three fourths of a century has been the admiration of 
unprejudiced men all over the world. And we are re- 
minded by these reflections that a firm cordial support of 
the national administration is the plain path which duty 
marks out for us in the year to come, no less in our official, 
than in our private capacity. 

FINANCES. 

The Finances will claim special attention. Before en- 
.tering upon the discussion of this topic, it is proper to re- 
mark that recent events with which you are familiar com- 
pel me to examine this subject more in detail than I might 
otherwise have deemed admissible in this address. I shall 
endeavor however to be as brief as a clear and full expla- 
nation of the subject will admit. If some points should 
seem unduly protracted, I trust that the light which will 
be incidentally thrown upon our duties the coming year 
will atone for any seeming digression. The successful 
prosecution of our mutual labors, you will readily perceive, 
demands that the minds of all should be disabused of any 
false impressions which are likely to impair the confidence 
which ought to exist between the different branches of the 
government. 

The permanent loan at the close of 1861 was $134,100, 



and I am not aware that it has been increased or dimin- 
ished during the past year. The unfunded or floating debt 
is quite distinct from this in its history and in its character, 
and is not perhaps generally as well understood as it should 
be. In order to set this subject in as clear a light as I am 
able, 1 shall go back to the year 1855, at which time my 
acquaintance with its history began. It is necessary here 
to observe that up to the year 1856 the municipal year 
ended in March instead of January, and the linaucial year 
ended the last day of February instead of the last day of 
December, as it now docs. By this change the municipal 
year of 1850 was shortened two months, and the financial 
year one month. This shortening of the official year pre- 
vented the government for 185G from accomplishing an 
important matter, namely, the payment of this floating 
debt, with the hope that no subsequent administration 
would allow another to be created. It is perhaps unneces- 
sary for me to point out the evils of such a debt. No well 
regulated private corporation will tolerate one, and all re- 
gard such debts with jealous caution, but their pernicious 
tendencies in a city where the management of affairs is 
liable at each succeeding year to fall into new and some- 
times not overscrupulous hands, and where such a debt is 
liable to be made a kind of financial cesspool into which 
all deficits in the treasury may be easily swept to be occa- 
sionally relieved of its superabundant load by a permanent 
loan, is too apparent to need elucidation. According to 
the annual report for 1854, there was a balance in the 
treasury at the close of that year of $9,880.95, but the un- 
paid bills were in excess of this sum, as appears from the 
fact that the first two drafts for February and March amount 
to $10,684.00. Other bills came in during the year; one 
for 61000 to complete the Amoskeag Falls bridge. This 
contract was made and the material procured in 1854, and 
the government of 1855 had nothing to do with it but to 
pay the bills. There Avas also a note overdue at the com- 
mencement of the year of $640, interest and principal, and 
still another due in the early part of the year 1855 for 
^2,040. The only means left in the treasury to meet these 
demands was $2,896.53, paid into the treasury by the col- 
lector for 1854, leaving a balance of $1,587.12 to be pro- 



vided for bj the administration for 1855. The financial 
committee for 1856 examined this floating debt and de- 
cided that it ought to be paid that year, and that without 
increasing the permanent loan ; and the appropriations for 
the year were made up accordingly. 

The sum of $7,738.11 was paid on the old notes during 
that summer. At the close of the year, December 1st, 
this debt stood as follows : Unpaid bills in the treasurer's 
office, $11,818.46. The amount of the Goffstown claim 
was not then ascertained, but afterwards was found to be 
$1,500. Then there were bills contracted in 1855 and 
1856 wliich had not been passed by the committee on ac- 
counts, which were paid in 1857, amounting to $3,812.26, 
and the unpaid balance of old notes, $1,492.57, amounting 
altogetlier to !^21,623.29. To meet this sum there were 
means as follows : Cash in treasury, January 1st, 1857, 
$4,611.21 ; taxes for 1856 paid in during 1857, $18,875 ; 
collected on notes given for taxes in 1856, 81,848.77 ; 
amounting in all to $25,834.98— 1-3,711. 69 more than 
enough to pay every dollar the city owed at that time ex- 
cept the ])ermanentloan. 

Thus we see this floating debt might have been paid in 
1857, and would have been paid in 1856, had not the of- 
ficial year been shortened as before stated. Was this debt 
paid in 1857 ? I will read from the report for that year, 
see page 82 : " The debt has been decreased this year by the 
payment of $500 on J. G. Evoleth's note." That is all. By 
a careful inspection of the annual reports it will be seen 
that all the expenses incurred in 1855 and 1856, were paid, 
or the means provided for that purpose, and $10,419 of the 
old debt was paid, and $25,334.98 of means were left to be 
disposed of by the administration of 1857. Let us see 
what was done by the administration of those two years, 
that should have increased the expenditures above other 
years. First, the great niimber of fires which occurred 
raised the expenses of the fire department to $27,844.48 ; 
the purchase of engine No. 7 — house and equipments, 
$3,000 ; Pine Grove Cemetery, $5,389 ; three new school 
houses, $13,000 ; repairs of school houses in District No. 
2, in 1855, $3,000 ; survey of the city, maps, &g., $2,000 ; 
digging and stoning well, aqueduct, carrying water to 



house and barn, painting barn, &c., on City Farm, $676 ; 
cost of bringing water from Hanover Square to Elm Street, 
stone troughs, <fec., $1,400 ; horses, carts, harnesses, <fec., 
$1,400 ; City Library — extra on account of loss by fire, 
^500 ; cost of new barn over and above insurance, $2,725 ; 
reservoirs, 1800 ; to complete Amoskeag Falls bridge, 
$1,333 ; planking Granite bridge and bridge over canal, 
^1,200 ; new highways ($4,337 of which were paid for 
land damages)ill,313 ; 7,000 feet of sewerage, 28 brick 
cess pools, $3,117 ; amounting to $78,699.48. It will be 
borne in mind that this amount of work was done and the 
purchases made, in compliance with orders passed by the 
city council, after full and careful reflection upon the pro- 
priety, and in many cases the necessity of each item. 

Six years have passed by, and experience ought to show 
whether the City Council for those years acted wisely or 
not in passing these orders. I think a careful examination 
of them will show that they acted with as much prudence 
and forecast as have marked the proceedings of other years, 
and perhaps a little more. It is at least incumbent on 
those who make so much ado, to point out the particular 
object which ought to have been omitted. This has not 
been done perhaps for the reason that it was not desirable 
to present the objection and show its fallacy at the same 
time. Except the sum for new school houses, over which 
the city government has no control, that for new highways 
is much the largest item. Now do the inhabitants living 
on Beech Amherst, Manchester, Union, Myrtle, Harri- 
son and some other streets in the heart of the city, com- 
plain that their streets were made too soon ? They were 
not built tiil nearly all the houses now standing on them 
were erected. I do not know that the people in Fiscata- 
quog have ever considered that the fire engine purchased 
for that neighborhood was a liseless espense, or that the 
purchase was premature. 

The reasons which induced the city council to order the 
purchase of the grounds for Pine Grove Cemetery, were 
that the lots in the Valley Cemetery were nearly all taken 
up. The grounds appropriated for public use especially, 
were occupied, and in case an epidemic should prevail in 
the city, there would be no place to bury the dead, except 



8 

for those families who have been fortunate enough to have 
secured lots in the old cemetery. 

THE COMMONS. 

The Commons are a part of the valuable donation made 
by the Amoskeag Company to the city^ in the first years of 
its settlement. They were given upon the express terms 
that they should be put in a condition to be not only use- 
ful but ornamental to the city. The selection of the 
ground for these commons, evinces no less the wisdom and 
forecast than the benevolence of the donor. They contain 
natural reservoirs which meet a necessity that could not 
have been supplied by the city without a heavy expendi- 
ture of money. As the management of these commons 
has so often been cited as a proof of mal-admiuistration in 
1855 and 1856, I propose to consider the matter at some 
length. Hanover Square had received less attention than 
some of the others ; probably for the reason that the 
neighborhood had been more recently settled. The water 
coming down Beech and Walnut streets from tlie norths 
had carried large quantities of sand into the reservoir — 
the bank on the north side of which was badly washed, 
giving it a very dilapidated appearance. The south side 
was in a still worse condition ; the water from Hanover 
street, coming in at the southeast corner, had washed deep 
gullies quite across from the reservoir to the street. The 
soil on this common was a light, sandy loam, too poor to 
support vegetation, disturbed by every high wind, and in 
its turn disturbing the neighborhood. There was no way 
to remedy the evil but to create a soil strong enough to 
sward over. To effect this object the usual means were 
employed — manure and deep ploughing. 

A portion of Concord Square was in a similar condition, 
and was treated in a similar way. Both were benefitted 
"by the process. The sand carried into the reservoir formed 
islands which rose above the surface of the water, making 
the water at the east end very shallow, which in warm 
weather became heated, filling the atmosphere with a very 
offensive odor, which might or might not be injurious to 
the health of the neighborhood. Large quantities of this sand 



were removed from the reservoir. In the progress of this work 
I noticed that a large amount of pure water flowed in from 
the south bank. As there was no high ground in that vicinity 
from whicii this water could be supposed to proceed, it was 
difficult to account for the large quantity which the ground 
thereabouts evidently contained. The existence however 
of the pond, more than a hundred feet above the plane of 
the river, suggested the idea that there might be a substra- 
tum which the water could not easily penetrate, extensively 
■undcrljing the surface in that vicinity. Subsequent ex- 
amination confirmed this hypothesis, and showed that this 
stratum laid in the form of a trough, running from north 
to south ; its eastern side extending to the high land on 
the east, and its western edge coming near the suffaco 
about at Pine street, and extending north till it met the 
ledge a little south of Bridge street. This trough is filled 
to an average depth of nine or ten feet, with loose, fine 
sand, and probably contains more than one hundred acres. 
The surface water upon this large tract filters through this 
sand, and hence its great purity, until it meets the hard 
pan alluded to. As it cannot descend through this to the 
level of the river, it flows off partly to the south into the 
cemetery brook, and partly north into the reservoir. These 
facts ascertained, and knowing that this water was suffi- 
ciently elevated to flow freely down to Elm street, the feasi- 
bility of carrying it there was a very natural deduction ; 
and when it is recollected that a project for bringing water 
to the city from a long distance, at a cost of some half a 
million of dollars, was seriously entertained by many of 
our most prominent citizens, the outlay of $1,100 for this 
object need not be regarded as an extravagant outlay. 

THE SURVEY. 

An order was passed in 1855, instructing the Mayor to 
procure a survey of the city, having for its ol)ject a system 
of drainage, and the grade of the streets. This work was 
undertaken in 185G,and James Slade, Esq., of Boston, was 
employed to superintend it. A survey was made of the 
territory east of Elm street to the Mammoth road, and 



10 

from the Cemetery Brook on the south to Brook street on 
the north. A plan was drawn of this territory, showing 
the streets as laid out, the sewers as proposed, its topo- 
graphy, profiles of all the streets, with levels taken at every 
100 feet, the whole accompanied by an elaborate report. 
Mr. Slade lias been for years Chief Engineer of the city of 
Boston. He is a gentleman of long and varied experience 
in this particular branch of Civil Engineering. Perhaps 
no man in the country is so well acquainted with all that 
pertains to the nature and construction of conduits, for 
the conveyance of water, as he is. It was thought that a 
report emanating from such authority would be considered 
a safe guide for future operations in this branch of the 
city 'surface. But instead of this we hear this survey 
spoken of as a wasteful expenditure of money for an ob- 
ject which required only the exercise of a little common- 
sense judgment. But what is this common-sense judg- 
ment when employed to determine heights and grades, and 
the natural flow of water ? Simply guess work ; nothing 
more nor less. Now if common sense is to determine this 
matter, will not its decision be that guessing is a very un- 
satisfactory way of determining questions which require 
the certainty of careful measurement. We have had a 
good deal of this putting down sewers by guess. The ex- 
pense amounts to about $25,000. This sum, had it been 
expended upon a well matured plan, dictated by a careful 
survey, would have given the city an excellent working 
system of drainage ; not all that is required to be sure, but 
useful as far as it went. But instead of such a plan for a 
guide, the following is a tolerable description of the man- 
ner in which our sewers have been brought into existence. 
A petition is presented for a sewer. The committee on 
sewers examine the premises and become satisfied that one 
is needed ; but how is it to be put down ? A sewer must 
have a real, or at least a supposed outlet. It is at length 
ascertained that this sewer may be made to intersect with 
some other one already put down. But what is the ca- 
pacity and the present condition of this old sower ? What 
is its grade, and what is the service already required of it ? 
These are questions buried up eight feet under ground. 
The committee cannot unearth them ; besides they are a 



11 

committee on sewers, not on resurrections ; the best they 
can do is to report in favor of the sewer. The report is 
made, the order passed, and the sewer put down, and what 
are the consequences ? Very likely the old sewer is unequal 
to half the service before required of it, and the res\ilt is 
that the new sewer, having no proper outlet, soon fills up 
with filth ; this generates gases, which find their way to 
the surface in the form of a deadly miasma, and men think 
all is well because they have obtained the sewer. 

I opened some of these sewers in 1856, and found them 
filled with the most loathsome filth. The sewer on Elm 
street, at its southerly end, is about three feet in diameter ; 
a few inches higher than it is wide. It holds the same 
size as far north as Central street, when it is diminished to 
about one foot, eight inches in diameter ; from there it ex- 
tends to Bridge street varying in size, where it ends. It has 
a fall from Bridge to Amherst streets of about ten inches to 
the 100 feet — one inch in ten feet. From Amherst to Mer- 
rimack st. it has a fall of only four inches to the 100 feet. 
Into this sewer, averaging from Bridge to Central street, 
about 22 inches in diameter, lying almost level, all the 
sewers cast of Elm street, except two, empty their con- 
tents, or rather they are supposed to do so. The territory 
supposed to be drained by these sewers is six hundred and 
twenty acres. Here we have a case where common sense 
and common experience are fully competent to decide. It 
is this that the surface water alone upon this large tract 
of land, does not and canhot be made to pass through the 
small sewer, lying as it does almost on a dead level. But 
this territory contains nearly all the buildings in this part 
of the city, except those on the corporations. What is the 
inevitable conclusion but that all the vast amounts of mat- 
ter created by these buildings and out-buildings, except 
what is carried away in carts, remain from year to year 
but little removed from the spot where it originated ? The 
City Council for 1855, in view of these facts, came to the 
conclusion that no more money ought to be spent in this 
way, but that the future expenditures should bear the im- 
press of useful and permanent improvement, and there- 
fore ordered the survey, and from it we learn that the 
ground on which the city is built is well adapted to a per- 



12 

feet system of drainage, and the report contained all the 
needful information required in its construction. We have 
not time to continue the examination of all these subjects. 
Enough has been said to show the frivolous character, to 
use no severer term, of the complaints which have been 
made concerning them. 

THE EXPENSES OP 1855 AND 185G COMPARED WITH 1857. 

By a careful examination of the Treasurer's account I 
find the amount chargeable to the expense for 1855, was 
$84,818.50, and that of 1856 was $105,915.07, to this sum 
should be added $3,812.26 for bills brought in and paid 
in 1857, making the average amount of those two years 
$97,282.91. We will now see how this sum compares 
with the expenses of the following year, 1857. 

From the Treasurer's report we find the amount paid in 
that year was $77,333.23. Then by tlie report for the fol- 
lowing 1858, v^e find that bills to the amount of $10,609.75 
were left unpaid, which added, made the whole amount for 
the year $87,912.98. We have given in the preceding list, a 
class of expenses which are not of annual occurrence, or 
are liable to be largely varied in amount from year to year. 
The average yearly amount of these extra expenditures in 
1855 and 1856 as already shown, was $39,349.74, while 
the amount expended for similar objects in 1857 was 
$28,026.19. Now if we subtract these ditferent amounts 
from the gross expenses of those years respectively, we 
find tliat the ordinary expense for carrying on the govern- 
ment in 1857 exceeded the average expense of the two 
preceding years by $1,993.62. With such a record the 
goverment of those years can well afford to bear a few 
groundless accusations, and though rather an indifferent 
reward for faithful public service, yet conscious of being 
in the riglit they may bear the wrong with patience, or 
treat it with silent contempt. But, the effect of such at- 
tacks upon the character and interests of the city will be 
evil and only evil. 

THE FLOATING DEBT. 

The unfunded debt on the 16th of last month was 



13 

859,800. $25,289.33 of this sum had been expended in 
furnisliing aid to families of the volunteer soldiers, and it 
is expected that that amount will be refunded by the state. 
If so, it will reduce the amount to $34,510.67. Of this 
Bum, $23,585.01 has been paid in bounties to soldiers and 
other expenses on account of the war ; the remainder, 
$10,925.66 is a part of the original floating debt. $12,000 
of this debt was funded in 1861. If to these sums we add 
the balance of means at the close of the year 1856 over 
and above what was required to cancel this debt at that 
time, we find that the expenses of the city have exceeded 
the revenue in five years by $26,638.35. Whether the 
past year has increased or diminished this sum we have at 
present no means of knowing. 

The question which urges itself upon our attention now 
is, what shall be done with this debt ? The state and 
county tax will no doubt be very large the present year. 
The tax of the general government will bear heavily upon 
a portion of the people ; it would therefore seem to be ne- 
cessary that the city tax should be as low as the unavoida- 
ble expenses of the city will allow ; for my own part I see 
no way but to resort to a loan that will postpone the pay- 
ment of this debt for a term of years. 

THE POLICE. 

The city charter originally placed the mayor at the head 
of the police, but subsequent amendments seem to place 
him nearer the foot, so the management of this important 
branch of the government is now substantially in the hands 
of the board of aldermen, and is perhaps as well there as 
anywhere. The value of a well organized effective police 
can hardly be over-estimated. There is a class of persons in 
the community who prefer the largest liberty, and they 
usually congregate in those towns and cities where the po- 
lice is least likely to disturb their assumed right. A weak 
police is therefore an invitation to that class of persons to 
come among us. The principles which govern them are 
precisely the same as those wliich actuate the rebels who 
now seek to overthrow the nation, and if the latter can 
enforce obedience to law, then may the lesser government 



14 

hope to do the same. Very much will depend upon the 
man you select for marshal. I therefore recommend mod- 
eration and caution in the selection. All measures calcu- 
lated to promote order and sobriety in the city will receive 
from me all the support I can give them. 

THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The fire department I believe is in a very satisfactory 
condition. One suggestion, however, may be worth con- 
sidering. The reservoirs on Elm street have their open- 
ings near the centre of the street and are a serious ob- 
structicn to the travel. It has occurred to me that wells 
three or four feet in diameter might be sunk, one on each 
side of the street, connected with the reservoirs by conduits 
at the bottom ; the water could be taken from these wells 
and the openings in the centre of the street closed up. 
The opening of these wells being on the side of the street 
might be somewhat raised and thus lessen the trouble and 
expense of keeping them free from snow and ice. 

REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS. 

The repairs of highways will claim your attention. In 
district No. 2, the material which has been used for a few 
years past, is utterly worthless for top-grading. It renders 
the streets in wet weather a complete mire, and in dry 
weather keeps the city enveloped in a cloud of dust. Some 
three thousand dollars is annually expended in repairing 
these streets, yet they are proverbially bad. This need 
not, and ought not to be. The city has an inexhaustible 
supply of gravel of the very best quality, I know of none 
in the state that will compare with it. That the city should 
avail itself of this important natural resource is obvious, 
and I recommend the subject to your attention. 

THE LIBRARY. 

The reading room connected with the city library has 
been closed for several months past, it is said, on account of 
the inadequacy of the appropriation for that object. It is 



15 

for yon to consider whether it would not be well to increase 
the appropriation so as to enable the Trustees to open that 
favorite resort, the coming year, to the public. 

Some suggestions relating to the city farm, aaid some 
other matters, I must postpone to a future communication. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, I would say that we cannot 
now foresee what may occur to embarrass our official 
course in the year to come, but if we would be true to the 
trust committed to us, and leare behind us a record we are 
willing should be read of all men, we must defer to the in- 
dications of that over-ruling Providence which has so man- 
ifestly taken the destinies of this nation into his own hands. 

THEODORE T. ABBOT. 
January 1, 1863. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board of Common Council. 
AN ORDER authorizing the Printing of the Seventeenth 

Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the 

City of Manchester. 

Ordered, if the Board of Aldermen concur, That the 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they are 
hereby authorized to cause two thousand copies of the 
Seventeenth Annual Report of the Receipts and Expendi- 
tures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports of 
the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, the Over- 
seers of the Poor, the Committee on the City Farm, the 
Trustees, Librarian and Treasurer of the City Library, the 
School Committee and the Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, to be printed for the use of the inhabitants of 
said City, and that the expense thereof be charged to the 
appropriation for Printing and Stationery. 

January 5, 1863, In Board of Common Council, 
Passed, E. G. WOODMAN, President. 

January 5, 1863, In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
Passed, D. A. BUNTON, Mayor. 



ACCOUNT OF 

HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN 

CITY TREASURER, FROM 
JANUARY 1, 1862, TO JANUARY 1, 1863. 



18 

Dr. City of Manchester in account current ivith H. R. ChamherJin, 

To Unpaid Drafts, January 1, 1862, ~- - '- $10,653 47 

City Farm, 2,240 86 

Paupers off the Farm, 1,117 70, County Paupers, 146 86 1,264 56 
Highway District No. 1, - . - - - - 88 47 
Diet. No. 2, $2,931 99 Dist. No. 8, 198 60 3,130 59 

" " 3, 359 50 " " 9, 133 09 492 59 

" " 4, 99 34 " "10,668 16 767 50 

•' " 5, 187 14 " " 11, 618 24 805 38 

" " 6, 399 13 " " 12, 471 53 870 66 

" " 7, 268 79 " " 13, 106 71 375 50 

New Highways, 518 43 

Amoskeag Falls Bridge, 26 58, Granite Bridge, 469 68 496 26 

Piscataquog Bridge, - 3,040 08 

School District No. 1, ...... 24000 

Diet. No. 2, $16,559 00 Dist. No. 7, 225 00 16,784 00 

•' " 3, 275 00 " " 8, 220 00 495 00 

'• " 4, 230 00 " " 9, 240 00 470 00 

•' " 5, 200 00 " " 10, 1,255 00 1455 00 

" " 0, 245 00 " " 11, 600 00 845 00 

City Library, 1,898 11 

Commons, 159 59, Pine Grove Cemetery, 209 54 369 13 

Sewers and Drains, 423 80, Reservoirs, 966 90 1,390 70 

Fire Department, 5,667 80 

Lighting Streets, .._-... 1,818 65 

Militia, 368 51 

City Police, 5,950 78 

City Hall Building, 686 86 

City Officers, 4,535 36 

Printing and Stationery, ..---- 997 36 

Incidental Expenses, _..-._ 1,872 11 

Interest, (Coupons 7,590 00) .... 10,395 94 

City Debt, 22,500 00 

Abatement of Taxes. 386 12 

City Teams, 1,962 50 

Temporary Loan, 16.000 00 

Watering Streets, 211 08, Paving Streets, 1,T40 80 1,351 88 

Discount on Taxes, .-...- 505 50 

Soldiers' Relief Fund, 52,012 58 

Soldiers' Bounty, 17,350 00 

State Tax, - - - 6,149 60 

County Tax, 11,992 96 

Reserved Fund, 500 00 

211,695 80 
Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1863, 5,120 79 

216,816~59 



19 

City Treasurer, (one year, ending December 31, 1862. j Cr. 

By Cash in the Treasury, Januaxy 1, 1862, - - 14,477 21 

City Stock issued July 1, 1862, - _ . . 22,500 00 

Temporary Loan, 40,800 00 

Taxes collected 1862, 69,541 54 

1861, 12,172 21 

" " 1860, 393 23 

" " 1858, 3 18 

" " 1857, - - - - - - 24 50 

Rail Road Dividend, 3,809 57 

Literary Fund, . .---.- 947 43 

County of Hillsborough, .---__ 264 08 
Rent of City Hall and Stores, - . . . 1,400 25 

Police Courc— Cost and Fines, 1,692 46 

City Farm, 1,434 83 

State of New Hampshire— Relief Fund, - - 30,697 74 

Premium on City Stock sold, . - - _ _ 1,125 00 

City Teams, 589 23 

City Scales, .-_.-.._ 167 71 

City Aqueduct. - -117 00 

Other towns for support of Paupers, _ _ _ 393 j[q 

Circus Licenses, - - - - - - - -40 00 

Sewer Licenses, -_..-___ 227 50 

Dog Licenses, 59 00 

Interest on Taxes, -..---, 330 87 

Overdrawn on several appropriations, - - - - 41 16 
Fire Department — Engine sold, ... - - 425 00 

Pine Grove Cemetery, 166 41 

John Campbell — note and interest, . - - - 128 80 

City Teams— Horse sold, 200 00 

Cost on non-resident Taxes, - - - - -71 14 

E. McQueston— Gravel &c., 47 50 

J. O. Adams— Edge Stone, 10 95 

School Committee — Interest, - - - - - 60 00 

Town of Bedford— Bounty and Relief Fund, - - - 62 00 
Commons — for Grass, .__.._ 32 25 

J. Knowlton— from S. Bridge, 3 00 

J. Knowlton — for Gravel, ---... 2 00 

J. Johnson — for Pick , - ,--.--100 



204,458 85 
Unpaid Drafts, January 1, 1863, 12,357 74 



216,816 59 
HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 
Manchester, January 1, 1863. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S EEPOET. 



City of Manchester, January 3, 1863. 

The undersigned Committee on Finance, in pursuance 
of the fourteenth section of Chapter Three of the Revised 
Ordinances, certify that we have examined the foregoing ac- 
count of Henry R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer, and find 
the same correctly cast, and all payments and expenditures 
therein charged against the City properly vouched. 

TVe find that there has been received into the Treasury 
during the year ending December 31, 1862, including the 
balance on hand January 1, 1862, the sum of Two 
Hundred Four Thousand Four Hundred Fifty-Eight 
Dollars Eighty-Five cents, (204,458.85) and that there 
has been paid from the Treasury, during the same time, 
the sum of One Hundred Ninety-Nine Thousand, Three 
Hundred Thirty-Eight Dollars Six cents, (1199,338.06) 
leaving in the Treasury January 1, 1863, Five Thousand 
One Hundred Twenty Dollars, Seventy-Nine cents 
($5,120.79). 

a/a^u'?w^ PTT^^MT^p ) Joint Standing 
NATH'L W. CUMNER, r,^^,,.^,^,^^, 

D.A. BUNTON, nvS™ 

E. G. HAYNES, ^ ^^ ^^^^^^^- 



giproprtatioiis km M^ciiflititrri 



COUNTY PAUPEES. 



By Cash of the County of Hillsboro', $264 08 
" Balance to New Account, - 45 65 



S309 73 



EXPENDITURES. 

Amount from old account, - - - ^96 76 
" " Paupers off the farm acc't 66 11 

Paid N. Hampshire Asylum for the Insane 36 20 
Straw & Prince, - - - - 6 75 
Adams & Andrews, - - - - 1 42 
George W. Adams, - - - - 24 10 

Peter Edwards, 419 

E. Parmenter, 17 82 

Jeremiah Abbott, - - - - 2 00 
J. W. Hoffman, - - - - 2 50 

D. Wilson & Co., - - - - 1 25 

A. N. Clapp & Co., - - - 6 00 
S. S. Moulton, 2 00 

E. G. Woodman, - - - - 10 00 
Calvin Clement, - - - - 1 13 
Bean & Smith, - - - - - 4 00 
W. H. H. Crawford, - - - - 1 50 

J. M. Rowell, 9 00 

Mrs. Martha Morrill, - - - 6 00 

B. P. Runnels, 8 00 

John Lee, 3 00 



8309 73 



22 



PAUPERS OFF THE FAEI. 



By Cash of other Towns - - - 
" Appropriation, - - - - 
" Amount from County Pauper acc't 
entered there by mistake, - 

EXPENDITURES 

Paid M. 0. Farrar for groceries, 
Spencer & Son, " - 

George W. Adams, " 
Beau & Smith, " - 

A. N. Clapp & Co., " 
Wm. M. Phimer, " - 
G. W. Gardner, " 

John S. Folsom, " - 
Ezekiel Jacobs, " - - 

Kidder & Chandler, " - 
Thos. S. Montgomery," 
Willey & Locke, " - 
George H. Hoyt, " - - 
Wm. F. Sleeper, '• - 
J. Rowley & Co., " 
L. W. Hall, " - 

John Bartlett, for wood, 
Isaac Webster, " - 

E. Parmenter, " - - 

Levi Woodman, " - 
J. D. Palmer, " 

H. C. Dickey, " - 

L. ^Y. Hall, " 

Dan'l B. Eastman, " - 
Calvin Clement, " - - 
Harvey & Young, " - 
Solomon Toby, " - - 

Gilman Harvey, " - 
J. Allen Tebbetts, for medicine, 
S. S. Moulton, " 

Amount carried forward, 



$393 


10 


1,000 


00 


66 


11 


$34 


01 


15 


94 


67 


07 


23 


12 


67 


69 


2 


25 


40 


09 


15 


00 


1 50 


4 


20 


20 


00 


8 


92 


2 


64 


- 


£8 


8 


00 


1 


50 


2 


38 


2 


25 


55 


56 


2 


50 


13 


00 


2 


50 


4 


87 


2 


60 


30 


03 


- 4 


75 


2 


00 


2 


08 


- 12 


77 


- 1 


00 



$1,459 21 



440 60 



23 



Amount brought forward, 440 60 

Paid W. H. H. Crawford, boots and shoes, 1 37 
James Mitchell, " " " 85 

George W. Weeks, " " " 1 00 
S. S. Moulton, for assistance, - 2 50 
Jeremiah Abbott, " - - 13 37 

Mrs. F. N. Lougee, " - - 3 00 
Julia Duplissa, " - - 7 00 

W. H. H. Crawford, " - - 2 00 
Charles H. Hurlburt, for railroad 

tickets, 6 55 

Maria Combs, for labor taking 

care of the sick, - - - 17 50 
Mrs. Elizabeth Harvey, for labor 

taking care of the sick, 
S. S. Moulton, for making report, 
Mrs. Elizabeth T. Aiken, for board, 
Aurilla Fairbanks, " 

William Brown, " 

N. H. Asylum for the Insane, " 
House of Reformation, " 

Aaron Young, " 

Mrs. Robinson, " 

Kidder & Chandler, for dry goods. 
Straw & Prince, for coffins and other 

funeral expenses, 
Samuel D. Sherburne, for coach to 

funerals, _ - . 
O. Barton &, Co., for dry goods, 
Jackson & Kimball, " " - 
H. R. Chamberlin, " " 
Eben Ferren, " " - 

S. S. Moulton, for stationery, 
John Kittridge, for house rent, 
Joseph Bean, " " 

David Allen, for milk, - 
J. L. Flint, " 

W. H. H. Crawford, expense to Lon- 
donderry, - 

Amount carried forward, 1,090 77 



26 


50 


5 


25 


, 52 


85 


44 


25 


58 


50 


188 


56 


89 


72 


30 00 


7 


50 


14 


53 


" 27 


00 


3 


00 


6 


44 


5 


04 


- 1 


00 


12 


m 


3 


59 


5 


00 


. 8 


33 


• 2 


31 


1 


50 


1 


50 



24 

Amount brought forward, 1,090 7T 

Paid S. S. Moulton, expense to sundry 

towns, 24 93 

Dodge & James, for use of horse and 

carriage, - - - - 1 50 
Hill & James, use of horse and car- 
riage 50 

Balance to new account, - 341 51 

P,459 21 



CITY FAEM. 



By Balance from old account, - $4,563 18 
" Amount of sales of Produce, <fec., 

from Farm, - - - 1,446 32 

-$6,009 



EXPENDITURES. 


■w^ 


id H. P. Wilson, for medicine. 


50 


A. F. Perry, " 


9 82 


Baron S. Hoyt, for manure, 


6 00 


A. D. Burgess, " 


23 00 


J. S. Little, " 


6 67 


H. J. Dow, " 


8 33 


John Huse, " . . 


16 25 


J. G. Colt, " 


10 00 


Ezra Kimball, boots and shoes, 


28 2T 


Hiram Simpson, " 


55 


J. A. Davis, '' 


1 25 


T. L. Hastings, " 


6 30 



Amount carried forward* 116 M 



116 


94 


1 


32 


2 


50 


32 


87 


19 


40 


1 


43 


169 


83 


7 


78 


143 


18 


13 


83 


4 


00 


5 


50 



5 00 



25 



Amount Broiiglit forward, 
Paid P. K. Chandler, boots and shoes, 
S. G. Hoyt, ;' 

N. W. Cumner, clothing, 
Chas. G. Clement, " 
George A. Barnes, hats, 
Henry C. Merrill, groceries, 
Hiram Simpson, " 

Page & Wilson, " 

Ezekiel Jacobs, " . - 

Kidder & Chandler, " 
T. R. Hubbard, making water box, 
L. A. & H. Drown, repairing car- 
riages, _ . . - 
Chandler Eastman, do., do., - 21 00 
Wm. G. Hoyt & Co., chair, - 1 75 
H. B. Wilson & Co., ashes, - 20 31 
H. S. Whitney, repairing pumps and 

pipe, .... 

Willard P. Stratton, do., do., - 
Adams & Andrews, crockery, 
Robert Gilchrist, " 

Noyes Farmer, exchange of bulls, 
Abraham Dolloif, bull, 
Manchester Scale Works, scales, 
Wm. H. Elliott, spectacles, 
Hiram Simpson, currant bushes, 
Hiram Simpson, blacksmith work, 
Charles Bunton, " " 

C. & L. Gage, " " 

Daniels & Co., hardware, 
Hiram Simpson, " - - 

Hartshorn & Pike, " 
Jeremiah L. Fogg, oxen, 
George Hodgman, " - - 

Abraham Dolloff, " - 
William Mills, pigs, 
J. P. Felt, "... 

Joseph Gate, " ... 

Amount carried forward, 1,116 52 



4 72 


4 


00 


8 


53 


2 


86 


17 50 


18 


00 


12 


80 


1 


50 


2 


25 


1 


35 


10 


19 


46 


80 


50 


43 


3 


00 


5 


95 


110 


00 


120 


00 


110 


00 


6 


00 


8 


00 


6 


00 



26 



Amount brought forward, 
Paid Robert Stevens, pigs, 

Abraham Dolloff, heifers, 

Hiram Simpson, Supt., labor, 

S. S. Moulton, " 

Noyes Farmer, " 

M. L. Morrison, " 

Charles B. Simpson, " 

W. S. Palmer, « 

Benton Bullock, " 

Mary Lovering, " 

William E. Hardy, " 

Mary S. Morrill, " 

James Ramsey, " 

Benjamin Currier, repairing tools, 

H. R. Chamberlin, mittens, 

Jeremiah Abbott & Co., rye meal, 

Jeremiah Abbott & Co., wheat, 

Jeremiah Abbott & Co., flour, 

Jeremiah Abbott & Co., lime, - 

H. & H. R. Pettee, rye meal, 

H. & H. R. Pettee, flour, 

James Eaten, wheat, 

R. Mitchell, rye, 

Eben Ferren, dry goods, 

Kidder & Cliandler, dry goods, 

Barton & Co., " " 

D. M. Lamprey, pie plant, 

Hiram Simpson, board, 

Hiram Simpson, carpenter work, 

Hiram Simpson, cider, 

Hiram Simpson, wagon, - 

J. S. Little, crackers, 

Hartshorn & Pike, stove and pipe, 

D. C. Gould, sawdust, 

Jeremiah L. Fogg, beef, 

William Boyd, " 

Nathan Chandler, pasturing, - 

James Eaton, " - - 

Amount carried forward, 2,210 78 



1,116 


52 


4 


00 


54 


00 


375 


00 


2 


25 


2 


50 


22 


75 


74 


11 


17 


00 


27 


00 


60 


50 


17 


50 


8 


75 


52 


00 


1 


10 


1 


00 


8 


50 


15 


00 


7 


75 




90 


8 


70 


27 


50 


5 


25 


14 


00 


21 


47 


28 


41 


49 


90 


4 


00 


38 


00 




17 


5 


00 


60 


00 


2 


88 


17- 


07 


2 


00 


42 


11 


4 75 


6 


44 


5 


00 



27 



Amount brought forward, 2,210 78 

Paid City Bank, pasturing, - 1 50 

Wm. H. Fisk, books and stationery 4 12 
Alpheus Branch, repairing harnesses, 1 88 
Oilman Clongh, sawing logs, - 1 00 

George Riddle, making cider, - 8 00 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal, - 13 58 

Balance to new account, - 3,768 64 



EECAPITULATIO]^. 



),009 50 



For 1225 weeks board of Paupers and Pris- 
oners, (average 23 1-2 persons,) 
fll 50 per week, - - 1,837 50 

" Clothing for Prisoners and Paupers, 196 83 
" Improvements, . - - . 245 00 
" Excess of Stock on hand over last 

year, 641 86 

" Produce and other sales from Farm, 1,446 32 



!4,367 51 



Contra. 

For Expenditures, - - - 2,240 86 

" Interest on Farm, - - - 1,000 00 

" Balance to profit and loss, - 1,126 65 



1,367 51 



28 



CITY TEAM. 



By balance from old account, - - ^222 01 
" Amount of labor on highways, re- 
servoirs, paving, &c., - - 590 94 
" Amount received for one horse sold, 200 00 
" " of Appropriation, - - 300 00 

" " carried to Fire Department, 981 00 



, EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Joseph A. Weeks, labor, - 
Hugh Ramsey, " 

S. S. Moulton, " 

S. J. Patten, " - 

Alfred Jones, for hay, 
E. P. Johnson, " - 
Franklin Mudgett, " 
S. Hill, " - 

Peter Butterfield, " 
J. Abbott & Co., " - 
H. L. Flanders, " 
T. R. Cochran, « . . . 
City Farm, " 

N. K. Root, " - - . 

Edward Langdell, " 
Jeremiah Abbott, & Co 
Hall & Perkins, 
City Farm, " 

H. & H. R. Pettec, " 

Hall & Eastman, " 

City Farm, straw, - 
Daniels & Company, hardware 

Amount carried forward. 



grain, 



$372 25 
331 80 

1 50 
- 51 25 

7 

1 



-$2,293 95 



40 
71 

10 39 
14 32 

02 

72 



5 
21 



- 6 62 
7 59 

- 138 57 

7 62 

- 22 08 
51 03 
11 60 
58 35 
98 14 
92 82 
32 29 

■ 11 61 



1,355 68 



29 



Amount brought forward, 1,355 68 

Paid John B. Yarick, hardware, - 1 80 

Charles Bunton, blacksmith work 

and shoeing, - - - - 45 76 
J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith work 

and shoeing, - - - - 30 99 
John C, Head, blacksmith work and 
shoeing, - . . 

C. Shannessy, blacksmith work, 
John D. Abbott, blacksmith "vi 

; Z. F. Campbell, Medicine, 
Kidder & Chandler, oil, 
J. Butterfield, doctoring horse, 
Joseph A. Weeks, washing bed clothes, 
Hugh Ramsey, " " 

John Campbell, horse labor, 
Oliver Greeley, repairing harnesses 
P. J. Handley, " " " 
Alpheus Branch, " " 

Ale Winship, horse, 

D. W. Fling, traveling expenses, 
Patrick Dowd, sawing wood, - 
William M. Plumer, salt, - 
William M. Plumer, fluid, 
William M. Plumer, matches, 
William M. Plumer, lard, 
William M. Plumer, soap, - 

E. Branch, blankets. 

Balance to new account. 



- 25 


00 


1 


12 


3rk 1 


88 


19 


21 


1 


40 


- 3 


00 


)thes, 7 


80 


u 4 


80 


- 43 


75 


es, 2T 


97 


9 55 


6 


00 


300 


00 


59 


05 


- 2 


50 


- 


58 


- 


38 


. 


54 


- 


54 


- 


20 


- 13 


00 


- 331 


45 




-S2,293 95 



30 

HIGHWAYS AND BEIDGES. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 

By balance from old account, - - $43 24 
*' Appropriation, . . - - 150 00 



EXPENDITURES. 




Paid Samuel Hall, Surveyor, 


for labor, 


83 96 


Thomas Quimby, 






a 


1 00 


Joseph M. Rowell, 






« 


9 01 


Nehemiah Preston, 






u 


3 25 


George W. Dustin, 






a 


19 00 


George Clarke, 






a 


14 25 


Joseph E. Rowell, 






a 


2 00 


John W. Ray 






u 


5 00 


Peter Kimball, 






a 


1 00 


Balance to new 


account 




104 77 



$193 24 



-$193 24 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 



By balance from old account, - 
" Appropriation, . - - 
*' Gravel sold, . . - 
" TransfeiTcd from reserved fund, 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Edward McQueston, Superinten 
dent, - - - - 
H. C. Merrill, for water pail, 
Daniels & Company, hardware, 

Amount carried forward, 403 87 



S711 


76 






3,300 


00 






49 


50 






250 


00 








^4 


311 


26 


1383 


50 

27 


^tj JlM 


M\J 


20 


10 







31 



Amount brought forward, 
Paid A. G. Fairbanks, hardware 
John B. Varick, " 

Manchester Print Works, lumber, 
Joseph Dunlap, " 

Neal & Holbrook, " 

Neal & Holbrook, scoop handle, 
Charles Bunton, blacksmith work, 
C. & L. Gage " " 

Woodbury & Nicliols," " 

Manchester Gas Light Co., cinders, 
W. W. Hubbard, harrow, - 
City team, team labor, - 
A. Walker & Co., stone for culvert, 
James Nutt, " " " 

C. R. CoUey, painting, - 
Benj. Currier, repairing cart, 

Geo. W. Merriam, " " - - 

James A. Weston, engineering, - 

Robert Castello, labor, 

Charles Roberts, " - - . 

Hugh Ramsey, " - 

Joseph A. Weeks, " - - 

James Carn, " - 

H. C. Merrill, " 

John Larkin, " - 

J. N. Heath, " 

Jacob Ring, " - 

Charles Cutting, " - - 

D. 0. Sullivan, " - - . 
D. W. Clark, " 

Thomas Howe, " - 

John Cole, " 

John Carr, " - 

Thomas Tuck, " 

Michael Howe, " - 

Patrick O'Brien, " 

Solomon Hodgman," ... 

David O'Leary, " 



403 87 



6 


50 


2 


25 




60 


54 


00 


1 


30 


1 


00 


22 


89 




38 


2 


29 


14 


37 


7 


50 


658 


54 


227 


60 




90 


1 


27 


2 75 


4 


75 


19 


50 


4 


75 


2 


50 


63 


50 


84 


25 


294 


00 


251 


25 


136 


26 


6 


00 


1 


60 


1 


00 


7 


75 


5 


75 


24 50 


2 


00 


6 


00 


2 


75 


7 


75 


2 


00 


3 


50 


8 


00 



Amount carried forward, 



2,247 17 



32 



Amount brought forward, 2,247 17 

Paid Peter Scaulin, labor, - - 5 50 

Edward Doiiahoe, " - - 2 50 

John Collins, " - , . 75 

Michael Welch, " - - 1 50 

Thos. Pitz Simmons, labor, - 1 25 

Benjamin Stevens, " - 4 50 

Fuller & Robinson, " - - 76 25 

Lucius Thurber, " - 4 50 

James Marr, " - - 1 00 

John Lougec, " - 2 50 

G. W. Glines, " - - 4 75 

Joseph Lafayette, " . 3 00 

William Conner, " - - 3 92 

James Silk, " - 50 

Luther Campbell, " - - 50 

James Dolan, " - 2 00 

Timothy Bresnehan, " - - 1 50 

Farady Conawy, " - 5 50 

Patrick Sheehan, " - - 4 00 

Lawrence McCartee, " - 10 25 

Kidder & Chandler, " - - 11 75 

Francis Smiley, " - 6 25 

Eustis Cutting, « - - 8 00 

Nathaniel Corning, " - 16 00 

Eben Knowlton, " - - 11 00 

Uriah H. Foss. " - 12 50 

Thomas Spencer, " - - 5 83 

Lyman Raymond, " - 6 67 

Daniel Dowd, " - - 7 29 

Wm. E. Eastman & Son," - 41 50 

G. W. Gardner, " - - 6 88 

Timothy O'Connor, " - 86 04 

John Coughlin, " - - 27 09 

William Chase, " - 16 83 

Michael Scaulin, " - - 20 25 

William Griffin, " - 18 33 

Timothy Sullivan, " - - 72 00 

Lawrence Conner, " - 2 92 

Amount carried forward, 2,760 38 



33 



mnt brought, forward 


I, 


2,760 


47 


John Madden, 


labor. 


1 


67 


John Connell, 


a 


2 


50 


Jeremiah Sullivan, 


u 


- 17 


50 


Daniel Conner, 


(( 




83 


Joseph Nichols, 


(( 


- 42 


75 


T. S. South work, 


(( 


7 


00 


E. W. Laughlin, 


n 


- ^ 21 


75 


Daniel Mahanua, 


n 


47 


75 


Cornelius Hastings, 


u 


1 


75 


Patrick Green, 


a 


1 


00 


John Patten, 


a 


9 


25 


John Scully, 


li 


2 


00 


John Peacock, 


a . 


1 


50 


Henry Bamford, 


u 


3 


00 


E. R. Coburn, culvert stone. 


5 


00 


Hartshorn & Pike, 


water dippers 




chain, &c.. 


. 


6 


27 


Balance to new 


account, 


$1,379 27 








—$4,311 26 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 

By Balance from old account, - 146 39 

" Appropriation, . - - . $250 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Oliver Gould, Surveyor, labor, 
B. F. Mitchell, " 

E. C. Howlett, " 

Frederick Lougee, " 

Amount carried forward, 34 25 

c 



16 


25 


10 


75 


6 


25 


1 


00 



8396 39 



34 

Amount brought forward, 34 25 

John Calef, 
DaTid Webster, 

C. Webster, 
K. Webster, 
Benjamin Mitchell, 
Ebenezer Ross, 

D. F. Miller, 
Groves Brown, 
John Butler, 
James Hall, 2d, 
Leland C. Dow, 
Levi Woodman, 
James Nutt, 
William Chase, 
Albert Simpson, 
C. P. Simpson, 
J. B. Chase, 
Charles N. Baker, 
George Woodman, 
M. Eiley, 

Jeremiah Sulliyan, 
T. 0. Neal, 
W. M. Chase, 
Henry Pollard, 
Samuel Hatch, 
T. Haselton, 
David Young, 
James A. Weston, 
James Nutt, gravel, 
Oliver Gould, powder, 
S. C. Forsaith, blacksmith work, 
J. T. P. Hunt, cinders, 
James Smith, labor, 
C. Haselton, " 
Peter Mitchell, " 

Balance to new account, 



labor, 


4 50 


u 


6 50 


a 


1 00 


11 


50 


(( 


75 


(( 


1 00 


(( 


24 25 


(C 


10 50 


(( 


5 50 


(( 


50 


li 


2 00 


(( 


12 50 


11 


59 


(( 


4 50 


a 


54 25 


u 


22 00 


(( 


65 00 


ii 


18 00 


a 


14 50 


a 


5 00 


u 


4 00 


a 


3 00 


li 


4 00 


(( 


14 00 


li 


1 00 


li 


10 00 


li 


10 00 


li 


1 00 




5 20 




55 


h work, 


2 84 




7 82 




2 00 




2 00 




5 00 




86 89 



396 39 



35 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 



By Balance from old account, 
" Appropriation, ... 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid John P. Moore, labor, 
John Emerson, Jr., " 
Ira W. Moore, " - 

Nathaniel Moore, " 
Isaac Whittemore, " - 
R. P. Whittemore, " 
John Calef, " - 

David Webster, " 

John Emerson, " - 

B. B. Allen, " 

John P. Moore, plank, 

Balance to new account, 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 



By Balance from old account, - $40 78 

" Appropriation, . . . . 150 00 
" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 30 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid James Emerson, Surveyor, labor, 
Jonas Harvey, Jr., labor. 
Oilman Harvey, " 

Ephraim S. Harvey, " - 
John Young, " 

Andrew J. Young, " - 
John Dickey, " 

Amount carried forward, 107 60 



$56 75 




1125 


00 


181 7^ 


40 


75 




7 


00 




5 


25 




3 


00 




1 


00 




2 


00 




6 


00 




4 


50 




4 


50 




2 


00 




23 


34 




■ 82 41 






—$181 75 



21 


00 


24 


35 


15 


75 


9 


00 


14 


95 


1 


00 


11 


55 



$220 78 



36 

Amount brought forward, 107 60 



W. W. Dickey, 


labor. 


3 75 


Kodnia Nutt, 


a 


- 18 00 


F. Kimball, 


li _ 


17 81 


S. B. Hill, 


li 


1 00 


Elbridge Roby, 


a . 


5 50 


William P. Merrill, 


u 


- 27 07 


David Nutt, 


<( . 


3 16 


James McQueston, 


u 


2 00 


James M. Young, 


u _ 


6 00 


Mr. Coburn, 


u 


60 


C. R. Clark, 


n _ 


75 


Balance to new 


account, 


- 33 64 

1220 



78 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 

By balance from old account, - $50 00 

" Appropriation, - - - - 125 00 
" Transferred from Reserved Fund, 250 00 



$425 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Ignatius T. Webster, Surveyor, labor, 29 68 

Amos Webster, labor, - 16 25 

Amos C. Webster, " - - 13 75 

James M. Webster, " - - 34 02 

David Dickey, 1st, " - - 12 12 

Henry C. Dickey, " - - 8 50 

James G. Chase, " - - 4 75 

James Wiley, " - - 2 75 

Moses Tracy, " - - 2 50 

William Hoyt, " - - 2 75 

Nahum Curtis, " - - 6 50 

Samuel Gamble, " - - 44 00 

James P. Mclntire, " - - 5 00 

David Dickey, Jr., " - - 1 50 



Amount carried forward, 184 07 



37 

Amount brought forward, 184 07 

Amos & J.F.Webster, labor, - 7 00 

Horace Hunt, " - - 1 75 

Oilman Clough, " - - 81 00 

John Johnson, " . - 36 75 

Daniel H. Dickey, " - - 7 75 

Abel Cushman, " - - 3 00 

William Griffin, " - - 3 00 
John H. Maynard, " on bridge, 25 73 

Oilman Clough, timber for do., - 99 08 

Balance to new account, - 25 87 



$425 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 



By balance from old account, - 


- 


S16 65 


" Appropriation, 


- 


150 00 


" Paid by John Johnson, 


- 


1 00 


" Transferred from reserved fund, 


125 00 






^^9^ G5 


EXPENDITURES. 




Paid Charles A. Hall, Surveyor, 


labor, 


$42 37 


Nathan Johnson, 


(; 


31 33 


Joseph Marsh, Jr., 


li 


9 50 


Joseph Pierce, 


ct 


1 00 


James Hall, 2d, 


u 


4 25 


J. B. Daniels, 


u 


4 00 


Mr. Balch, 


u 


5 00 


J. B. Eastman, 


(( 


1 00 


Mr. Baker, 


(( 


50 


John Leavitt, 


(( 


1 00 


Oeorge Emerson, 


(( 


4 25 


Charles Hall, 


(( 


1 50 


McGregor Hall, 


a 


23 50 


Isaac Huso, 


(( 


50 00 


Oeorge Porter, 


u 


15 25 



Amount carried forward, 194 45 



38 



Amount brought forward, 



194 45 



L. W. Morse, 


labor, 


5 50 


David Young, 


a 


4 00 


Andrew J. Hall, 


ii. 


5 00 


Jeremiah L. Fogg, 


u 


14 25 


Israel Webster, 


a 


19 00 


George H. Goodhue, 


u 


1 00 


D. W. Reynolds, 


u 


1 00 


James A. Stearns, 


u 


2 75 


Horace Ford, 


li. 


2 50 


S. W. Parsons, 


a 


4 00 


William Fogg, 


(( 


3 00 


S. Tobie, 


u 


4 50 


M. Prout, 


u 


1 00 


Peter 0. Woodman, 


u 


1 00 


John B. Yarick, hardware, 


_ 


2 34 


Joseph Marsh, blacksmith work. 


3 50 


Balance to new account. 


23 86 



$292 65 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 



By balance from old account, - 


- 


$43 14 


^' Appropriation, 


EES. 


175 00 


EXPENDITU 




Paid Freeman Wilson, Surveyor, 


labor. 


$27 63 


John H. Proctor, 


a 


16 50 


Blanchard Young, 


a 


3 00 


Peter Farmer, 


u 


11 88 


James M. Crombie, 


a 


8 75 


Amos Spofford, 


u 


3 50 


Gilman B. Reed, 


u 


1 50 


Noah B. Reed, 


u 


2 12 


Phinehas Haselton, 


u 


1 00 


Proctor Young, 


u 


4 00 


Luther S. Proctor, 


u 


12 63 



$218 14 



Amount carried forward, 



92 51 



89 



lunt Brought forward, 




92 51 


Augustus Proctor, 


labor. 


2 00 


John W. Proctor, 


a 


2 50 


"William Stevens, 


u 


1 50 


Daniel Dolan, 


(( 


1 00 


T. Collins, 


a 


1 00 


Samuel Russel, 


li 


4 00 


Edward Clough, 


a 


^ 2 50 


J. L. Fogg, 


a 


2 50 


John P. Young, 


li 


48 49 


Joseph B. Young, 


a 


2 00 


Reuben Morgan, 


ii 


4 75 


Ephraim S. Young, 


<i 


8 50 


George M. Haselton, 


ii 


2 50 


Daniel McDonald, 


u 


1 00 


"William Young, 


a 


3 50 


John Latuch, 


u 


3 50 


Lyman A. Proctor, 


li 


50 


Marcus Ayers, 


li 


50 


"Wm. T. Fogg, 


a 


. 1 25 


Oilman Clough, 


li 


12 60 


Balance to new account 


J 


19 54 



^218 14 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 



By balance from old account, 
" Appropriation, 



$57 82 
175 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Harrison Corning, Surveyor, for 

labor, - - - - $36 87 

Caleb Haselton, labor, - - 1 00 

Francis Manter, " - - 1 00 

Walter H. Noyes, " - . 11 25 

Albert N. Scott, " - - 3 00 



Amount carried forward, 



53 12 



8232 82 



40 



Amount bronglit forward, 


53 12 


Reuben Haselton, ' 


labor, 


1 50 


David Swett, 


« . 


3 60 


Elijah Goodale, 


u _ _ 


8 00 


Steplien Haselton, 


il . 


2 00 


John Morse, 


u . _ 


2 00 


Sylvester Morse, 


u _ 


3 50 


Nathaniel Corning, 


a _ _ 


5 00 


B. W. Corning, 


u _ 


2 00 


A. P. Colby, 


a _ _ 


9 75 


Isaac H. Webster, 


a _ 


3 00 


E. A. Richards, 


n _ _ 


1 50 


D. 0. Richards, 


a _ 


1 00 


George McQueston, 


a _ _ 


1 00 


James W. Webster, 


c; . 


1 00 


D. L. Corning, 


u _ _ 


1 50 


Charles B. Clark, 


(t _ 


6 00 


J. Y. McQueston, 


£4 _ _ 


2 00 


William Boyce, 


a _ 


1 25 


G. W. Haselton, 


a . _ 


50 


George McQueston, 


ii _ 


2 00 


Gilman Clough, Plank, - 


18 47 


Sherburn Corning 


it _ 


3 50 


Balance to new 


account, 


99 73 

$232 82 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 

By balance from old account, - - $8 63 
" Appropriation, . . . 600 00 

" Transferred from reserved fund, - 100 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid N. R. Tirrell, Surveyor, labor, 
Charles Bartlett, " 
Charles Bowker, " - 
John Brown, " 


$296 29 

63 98 

72 55 

2 45 



$708 63 



Amount carried forward, 435 27 



41 



Amount brought forward, 




435 27 


Mr. Morse, 


labor, 


1 75 


Foster McQueston, 


(( 


1 60 


William M. Harville, 


u 


3 75 


Willard Truel, 


a 


5 50 


Michael Cochran, 


a 


4 00 


Columbus Wyman, 


li 


2 25 


Augustus Wyman, 


li 


1 00 


Robert Warren, 


11 


5 25 


Daniel Barnard, 


a 


4 87 


Charles Flanders, 


a 


2 30 


Daniel J. Worthley, 


" 


17 50 


W. Parker Worthley, 


(( 


1 00 


H. J. Tirrell, 


u 


74 42 


Daniel McKean, 


(( 


2 25 


W. M. Horrible, 


a _ 


4 00 


S. 0. Welch, 


a 


1 70 


H. Fradd, 


11 


1 60 


Zebulon N. Doe, 


u 


4 25 


John Robie, 


a 


40 


Willard Truel, 


u 


40 


John Chapman, 


'' 


6 50 


James Harville, 


(( 


2 52 


Daniel Balch, 


u . 


42 


Sylvanus Johnson, 


li 


1 00 


Patrick Commons, 


44 


12 89 


Patrick Bohan, 


li 


12 50 


James Bohan, 


il _ 


1 00 


Hugh Martin, 


it 


1 00 


Patrick Brannan, 


a _ 


50 


John Morris, 


a 


3 50 


Patrick Leach, 


a 


1 68 


G. S. Groombridge, blacksmith work, 


2 28 


A. N. Clapp & Co., nails, - 


1 14 


W. P. Riddle, 40 loads 


3 marl, - 


5 00 


Haines & Wallace, lumber, - 


5 14 


Lewis Simons, 


a _ 


33 00 


Randlett & Brown, stone chips, - 


1 30 


John B. Varick & Co., 


hardware, - 


1 73 


Balance to new account, 


40 47 



$708 63 



42 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 

By balance from old account, - $37 32 

" Appropriation, . - - - 525 00 
" Transferred from reserved fund, 100 00 



EXPENDITURES. 




Paid Daniel Farmer, Jr., 


labor, - 


|24 12 


Elijah Stearns, 


(( 


3 75 


Thomas C. Stearns, 


u 


36 25 


Amos H. Gerry, 


<c 


75 


George H. Colby, 
Levi D. Heath, 




46 00 
21 75 


Ezra B, Stearns, 


u 


1 25 


Warren Stearns, 


ii 


4 75 


Thomas Frost, 


a 


24 50 


Rodney Hardy, 
Daniel A. Durgin, 


11 


5 75 
1 25 


Daniel Farmer, 


u 


38 05 


Lyman Bachelder, 


u 


50 


John Campbell, 
Joseph Jones, 




4 00 
4 00 


H. H. Fuller, 


« 


46 75 


Fuller & Robinson, 


ii 


79 25 


S. B. Fuller, 


a 


4 50 


Alpheus Bodwell, 


« 


116 12 


Joseph Melviu, 
Nicholas Parker, 


ii 
ii 


1 50 
13 00 


Joseph Hucking, 
George Powers, 


ii 


7 00 
6 00 


Nicholas Carey, 


ii 


7 12 


Timothy Harrigan, 
Owen Parker, 


il 
ii 


2 00 
6 00 


Michael Finn, 


ii 


5 75 


Oilman R. Stearns, 


ii 


5 00 


George Prescott, 


li 


15 00 


F. Kimball, 


ii 


50 



$662 32 



Amount carried forward, 532 16 



43 



Amount brought forward, * 

D. J. Daniels & Co., hardware, 
J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith work, 
Fuller & Robinson, " " 

S. B. Fuller, lumber, 
Asenath Whipple, " - - 
Daniel Farmer, " - 
Haines & Wallace, " 
Boyd, Corey & Co., leather scraps, 
George Clark, use of drills. 
Balance to new account, - 



532 


16 


26 


OT 


3 


66 


9 


32 


3 


09 


17 


21 


6 


98 


" 2 


75 


6 


00 


1 


00 


44 


08 



$662 32 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 



By Balance from old account, 


35 97 


" Appropriation, 


. 


400 00 


" Transferred from ] 


Resrved Fund, 
iPENDITURES. 


75 00 


El 




Paid Robert Stevens, 


for labor, 


$33 00 


Isaac Langley, 


t; . 


4 00 


Newell Tilton, 


" - - 


8 00 


Joseph Cate, 


" - 


14 00 


James Hall, 


« - - 


3 00 


James Eaton, 


" _ 


20 00 


City Farm, 


t< _ . 


301 34 


Charles Stevens, 


a _ 


5 00 


Benton Bullock, 


a . _ 


10 00 


F. C. Lougee, 


" _ 


- 6 00 


S. H. Nutter, 


u _ _ 


8 00 


R. P. Silver, 


« _ 


- 2 00 


Samuel Adams, 


a _ _ 


30 


Wm. Mills, 


(4 _ 


. 11 00 


Aaron Crombie, 


« _ . 


4 00 



$510 9T 



Amount carried forward, 



429 64 



44 



Amount brought forward, • 
Michael Handley, labor, 
Wm. Sage, " 

Alfred Wright, " - 

W. P. Pelch, " 

John V. Gooden, " - 
J. M. & E. R. Coburn," 
C. & L. Gage, blacksmi thing, 
Gilman Clough, sawing lumber, 
Balance to new account. 



429 64 



- 4 


CO 


2 


00 


- 2 


00 


1 


00 


20 


00 


5 


00 




84 


7 


05 


39 


44 



$510 9T 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 



By Balance from old account. 


39 12 


" Appropriation, 


XPENDITURES. 


100 00 


E 




Paid J. D. Jones, 


labor, 


26 69 


I. E. Kimball, 


" _ 


- 24 63 


George Gate, 


u _ . 


2 50 


George Gate, 


a _ 


11 63 


John Holland, 


a _ 


- 2 50 


Wm. Campbell, 


u _ . 


9 63 


J. C. Merrill, 


a _ _ 


18 13 


Mrs. Churchill, 


a _ _ 


1 00 


Jacob Jewell, 


a _ _ 


1 50 


Reuben Kimball, 


li _ _ 


4 00 


Luther Campbell, 


li _ _ 


3 50 


Alonzo Wicom, 


a M - 


1 00 


Balance to new 


account, 


32 41 



$139 12 



$139 12 



45 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



By balance from old account, - 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid A. P. Hall, for team labor, - 
S. D. Sherburne, coach hire, 
Hillsborough County Commission- 
ers, expenses and surveying, 
James A. Weston, engineering, - 
Jacob F. James, " 

Moses D. Stokes, stone posts, 
T. Rundlett, land damages, - 
R. J. Miller, " 

Daniel Mack, " 

B. F. Wallace, " 
Haines & Wallace," 

C. W. Stanley, " 
McQueston's Heirs," 
T. F. Harvell, 
James Harvell, 
W. H. Harvell, 

Balance to new account. 



^875 38 



a 



a 
(( 

u 
u 
a 
a 
u 



$19 83 


4 


00 


81 


60 


27 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


2 


00 


- 8 


00 


83 


00 


1 


00 


196 


00 


8 


00 


15 


00 


8 


00 


66 


00 


96 


00 


356 


95 



$875 38 



46 

RECAPITULATION OF HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICTS. 

No. 1, By balance of old account, $43 24 

" " Appropriation, - - - 150 00 

2, " Balance of old account, - 711 76 
" " Appropriation, - - 3,300 00 
" " Cash received for gravel, - 49 50 
" " From reserved fund, - 250 00 

3, " Balance from old account, - 146 39 
" " Appropriation, - - - 250 00 

4, " Balance of old account, - 56 75 
" " Appropriation, - - - 125 00 

5, " Balance of old account, - 40 78 
" " Appropriation, - - - 150 00 
" " From reserved fund, - 30 00 

6, " Balance of old account, - 50 00 
" " Appropriation, - - 125 00 
" " From reserved fund, - - 250 00 

7, " Balance of old account, 16 65 
" " Appropriation, - - - 150 00 
" " Of John Johnson, - 1 00 
" " From reserved fund, - 125 00 

8, ^' Balance of old account, - 43 14 
" "■ Appropriation, - - - 175 00 

9, " Balance of old account, - 57 82 
" " Appropriation, - - . 175 00 

10, " Balance of old account, - 8 63 

" Appropriation, - - 600 00 

" From reserved fund, - - 100 00 

11," Balance of old account, - 37 32 

" Appropriation, - - 525 00 

" From reserved fund, - - 100 00 

12, " Balance of old account, - 35 97 

' " Appropriation, - - - 400 00 

' " From reserved fund, - - 75 00 

13 " Balance of old account, 39 12 

" " Appropriation, - - - 100 00 



^,493 07 ^ 



47 



EXPENDITURES. 

No. 1, - - - - $88 47 

"2, - - - 2,931 99 

« 3, - - - - 359 50 



u 



4, - - - - 99 34 

5, - - - - 187 14 
"6, - - - - 399 13 
" 7, - - - - 268 79 
" 8, - - - - 198 60 
" 9, - - - - 133 09 
"10, - - - - 668 16 
" 11, - - - - 618 24 
"12, - - - - 471 53 
" 13, - - - - 106 71 

Unexpended, - - - - 1,962 38 



B,493 07 



PISCATAQUOG FLOATING BRIDGE. 

Paid James Walker, labor, 

N. R. Tirrell, " 

Charles Cheney, " 

T. N. Doe, " 

Wm. Houghton, " 

S. D. Morse, " 

John Chapman, " 

Charles H. Bowker, " 

Otis Quimbj, " 

W. H. Young, " 

Charles Flanders, " 

D. A. Quimby, " 

Richard Waycock, " 

David Mitchell, " 

Willard Truell, " 

John Stearns, " 

Amount carried forward, 68 01 



- f 6 


76 


32 


25 


- 1 


00 


2 


25 


- 2 


25 


1 


00 


- 2 


75 


5 


25 


- 2 


00 


2 


25 


- 2 


00 


1 


00 


- 2 


00 


2 


00 


- 1 


50 


1 


75 



48 



Amount brought forward, 

Wm. P. Riddle, labor, 

Win. M. Howell, " 

Daniel Gardner, " 

Geo. W. Riddle, " 

H. J. Tirrell, " 

S. 0. Welch, " 

Jameston & Scoffield, " 

John H. Maynard, " 

James Walker, nails, 

J. B. Varick & Co., nails, - 

Haines & Wallace, timber, 

James Walker, use of land, 

James Walker, surveying lumber, 

James Walker, team labor, 

Haines & Wallace, use of lumber, 

John H. Maynard, use of ropes and 

damage to same, 
A. N. Clapp, & Co., use of ropes &c 



68 


01 


- 7 


50 


5 


00 


- 5 


68 


6 


80 


- 2 


26 


. 


50 


- 13 


00 


- 25 


00 


- 


72 


7 50 


- 49 


05 


20 


00 


1 


00 


5 


87 


40 
,1 


00 


(1 
. 53 


00 


fee, 8 


75 



$319 64 



PISCATAQUOG IRON BRIDGE. 



By transferred from reserved fund, 


$3,000 00 


" Treasurer's receipt, 


>ENDITURES. 


3 00 


EXI 


fl 


Paid Charles H. Bowker, 


for 


labor, 


$21 00 


John Clayton, 




4; 


2 25 


John B. Chapman, 




a 


2 00 


S. 0. Welch, 




a 


5 50 


James Bohan, 




u 


7 75 


Patrick Bohan, 




a 


6 50 


Wm. Houghton, 




u 


3 25 


Hugh Martin, 




u 


3 75 


Patrick Brannan, 




(( 


5 25 


Patrick Commons, 




" 


7 77 



,003 00 



Amount carried forward, 



65 01 



49 



Amount carried forward, 


65 01 


John Morris, labor, - 


8 50 


N. R. Tirrell, " - 


60 70 


H. J. Tirrell, " 


29 00 


Patrick Leach, " - 


4 62 


John H. Maynard, " 


93 25 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., Burn- 




netizing lumber, - - - 


26 39 


C. R. Collej, painting, 


6 60 


A. N. Clapp & Co., powder and fuse 


, 6 74 


H. & H. R. Pettee, cement, 


1 60 


J. S. Kidder & Co., " 


1 50 


G, C. Gilmore, services, - 


13 50 


G. C. Gilmore, traveling expenses, 


4 00 


Lewis Simons, lumber, - 


131 45 


Haines & Wallace, lumber. 


57 25 


Kennard & Campbell, " 


38 09 


Daniels & Company, hardware, - 


15 61 


Charles Bunton, blacksmith work. 


12 50 


J. H. Cole, 


5 49 


Moses D. Stokes, stone work. 


950 00 


Moses D. Stokes^ " " - 


40 00 


James A. Weston, engineering. 


29 75 


M. & L, Railroad, freight, - 


20 26 


Mosely Iron Bridge and Roof Co., 




Iron Bridge, - - - 1,091 62 


T. B. Hubbard, carting lumber, 


8 00 


Balance, - - - - 


282 56 




$3,003 



00 



50 
GRANITE BRIDGE. 

By Balance from old account, $45 97 

" Appropriation, . - - - 500 00 

^545 97 



EXPENDITURES. 




Paid S. S. Moulton, labor, - 


38 


Charles Bartlett, " 


4 75 


Charles Bowker, " 


1 25 


David Worthley, " 
Daniel Barnard, " 


1 50 
1 00 


M. Welch, " 


1 25 


N. R. Terrill, " 


6 50 


Christopher Wyman, " 
Michael Cochran, " 


- 70 
50 


Daniels & Company, nails, 
Neal & Holbrook, nails. 


22 50 
33 


Neal & Holbrook, labor. 


42 25 


Neal & Holbrook, blacksmith work. 


2 00 


David Wells, nine thousand ft. plank. 


121 50 


Haines & Wallace, 19,346 ft. plank. 


263 27 


Balance to new account, 


76 29 



$545 97 



AMOSKEAG FALLS BRIDGE. 

By balance from old account, - - $57 56 
" Appropriation, - - - - 100 00 

EXPENDITURES. 
Paid Daniels & Company, hardware, - 1 08 
E. McQueston, labor, snowing, - 10 50 
T. L. Quimbv, " shoveling snow, 4 00 
James E. Bailey, " " " 6 00 

T. L. Quimby, " on repairs, - 5 00 
Balance to new account, - 130 98 



$157 56 



$157 56 



51 



SEWEES AND DRAINS. 



By balance from old account, - - $609 79 
" Appropriation, . - - 200 00 

" Treasurer's receipts for amount receiv- 
ed for entering sewers, - 227 87 



-$1,037 06 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Daniels & Company, for nails, - 
Alfred Poor, lumber, 
Thomas R. Hubbard, lumber, - 
William McPherson, cement pipe. 
Temple McQueston, " " 
John Houston, blacksmith work, - 
Daniels & Company, hardware, - 
Jacob F. James, engineering, - 
Temple McQueston, mason work, - 
Moses D. Stokes, sesspool stone, 
Edward McQueston, labor, - 
Eben Knowlton, " 

Fuller & Robinson, " 
Timothy Sullivan, " 

Lawrence Conner, " - - 

Henry C. Merrill, " 

John Larkin, '' 

Timothy O'Conner, " 
David Allen, " 

Wm. E. Eastman & Son," 

D. Mahanna, "• 
Joseph Nichols, " 

E. McLaughlin, " 
Dougal Gibbon, " 

Balance to new account. 



$2 09 

46 31 

32 00 

16 50 

161 46 

6 18 

8 65 

- 8 25 

3 85 

13 00 
10 50 
22 00 

3 00 
8 00 
2 50 

18 00 

14 59 
16 17 

1 00 

4 00 
6 00 

5 00 
8 00 

6 75 
613 86 

$1,037 66 



52 
COMMONS. 



By balance from old account, - - $281 55 
" Appropriation, - - - - 200 00 
" Treasurer's receipts for cash receiyed 

for grass, - - - - 82 25 



EXPENDITUKE3. 

Paid William Brown, for labor, - 
H. F. Little, " 

Francis Smiley, " 

Patrick O'Brien, " 

Josiah Perry, " 

John H. Maynard, " 
E. S. Dickerman, " 

E. Parmenter, trees, 
J. B. Varick, nails, - 
J. H. Maynard, lumber, - 
Wm. Craig, posting bills, - 
E. McQueston, team labor, 
Daniels & Company, grass seed, - 
H. C. Merrill, " " 

Haines & Wallace, chestnut posts 
Haines & Wallace, pickets, - 
Haines & Wallace, chestnut rails, 
Haines & Wallace, boards and joist, 
William Kimball, whitewashing, 
Balance to new account, - 



$5 50 


17 


25 


17 


50 


6 


00 


2 


50 


5 


83 


9 


13 


- 2 


00 


5 


20 


- 4 44 




50 


- 12 00 




15 


- 1 


00 


15 40 


- 17 


so 


14 


97 


3t, 9 


07 


- 14 


35 


854 21 



$513 80 



$513 80 



53 

SCHOOLS. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 1. 

By appropriation, - - - $200 00 

Transferred from District No. 2, 40 00 

$240 00 

EXPENDITURES. 
To orders on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, - - - 240 00 

240 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2. 

By appropriations, - - - 14,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 
To orders on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee - - - 13,850 00 
Transferred to other Districts, 150 00 

$14,000 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 3. 

By appropriation, - - - - 275 00 

275 00 

EXPENDITURES. 
To orders on Treasurer in favor School 



Committee, - - - 275 00 



$275 00 



54 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 4. 

By appropriation, _ - - - 200 00 
Transferred from District No. 2, 30 00 

$230 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To orders on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, - - - 230 00 

$230 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 5. 

By appropriation, - - - - 200 00 

1200 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To orders on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, - - - 200 00 

$200 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 6. 

By appropriation, - - - 225 00 

Transferred from District No. 2, 20 00 / 

$245 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To orders on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, - - - 245 00 

$245 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 7. 

By appropriation, - - - - 225 00 

$225 00 

EXPENDITURES. 
To orders on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, - - - 225 00 

$225 00 



55 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 8. 
By appropriation, - - - . 200 00 

$220 00 



Transferred from District No. 2, 20 00 



EXPENDITURES. 
To order on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, - - - 220 00 

$220 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 9. 

By appropriation, - - - . 200 00 
Transferred from District No. 2, 40 00 

$240 00 

EXPENDITURES. 
To orders on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, - - - 240 00 

1240 00 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 10. 

By Appropriation, - - - - 975 00 
Transferred from Reserved Fund, 250 00 

$1,225 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To orders on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, - - - 1,225 CO 

$1,225 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 11. 

By appropriation, - - - - 500 00 

$500 GO 

EXPENDITURES. 

To order on Treasurer in favor School 



Committee, - - - 500 00 



$500 00 



56 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2. 

BUILDING ACCOUNT. 

By balance from old account, - - 115 89 
School Committee's order on the 

Treasurer, - - 60 00 

Amount raised by District, - 2,720 48 

$2,896 37 

EXPENDITURES. 
To orders on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, - - - 2,709 00 
Balance to new account, - - - 187 37 

2,896 37 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 10. 

BUILDING ACCOUNT. 

By balance from old account, - 417 90 

Appropriation on amount raised 

by the District, - - - 205 88 

$623 78 

EXPENDITURES. 

To orders on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, - - - 30 00 

Balance to new account, - - 593 78 

$623 78 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 11. 

BUILDING ACCOUNT. 

By amount appropriated by the District, 104 24 
^ ^^ ^ $104 24 

EXPENDITURES. 

To orders on Treasurer in favor School 

Committee, - - - 100 00 
Balance to new account, - - - 4 24 

$104 24 



67 
INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



By Appropriation, - - - _ $3,000 00 

" Treasurer's receipt for cash paid by- 
weighers of hay and straw, - 169 43 

" Treasurer's receipt for cash paid for 

use of aqueduct water, - - 117 00 

" Treasurer's receipt for cash paid for 

circus license, - - - - 40 00 

" Treasurer's receipt for cash paid for 

dog licenses, - - - - 59 00 

$ 

EXPENDITURES. 

To balance from old account, - - $332 78 
Paid Manchester Locomotive Works, re- 
pairing bell, - - - 8 01 
Joseph Knowlton, making schedule 

of bills and accounts, - 
S. B. Fuller, making bier, 
Manchester Gas Light Co., gas, - 
S. S. Moulton, making repairs at 

city stable, - - - - 
Hartshorn & Pike, making repairs, 
J. P. Brock, " " 

H. M. Glines, " " 

Elbridge G. Haynes, mason work, 
A. W. Sanborn, repairing hearse 

and house, - - - - 
Straw & Prince, repairing hearse, - 
Manchester Ba-nd, services, - 
Manchester Brigade Band, services, 
Pinkerton, Abbott & Pettee, hall for 

ward meeting, - - - 
E. Clement, cleaning hall, 
J. H. Haynes, cleaning ward room. 

Amount carried forward, 471 48 



24 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 


10 


00 


2 


33 


5 


50 


1 


75 


4 


12 


10 


49 


2 


00 


10 


00 


29 


00 


24 00 


1 


50 


3 


00 



5,385 43 



58 



Amount brought forward, 471 48 

Neal & Holbrook, repairing ward 

room, 1 50 

Henry Peacock, repairing ward room, 50 
Oilman B. Fogg, revolvers, - - 11 00 
Daniels & Co., " - - 112 50 
Manchester Post Office, postage, - 19 47 
Joseph Knowlton, " - 1 00 
House of Reformation, board, cloth- 
ing, &c., - - - - 60 00 
John Houston, repairing water aque- 
duct, 1 00 

"William Campbell, watering trough, 3 00 
John Calef, " " 6 00 

James Emerson, " " 3 00 

Oilman H. Kimball, " " 12 00 

John V. Gooden, " " 3 00 

W. H. Noyes, " " 3 00 

Joseph Knowlton, making Annual 

Report, - - - - 100 00 

James & Dodge, horse and carriage 

hire, 3 50 

Hersey & Tilton, school books for 

poor children, - - - 74 28 

Charles W. Colby, labor, copying 

sundry papers, - - - 12 00 
Oilman B. Fogg, keys and repairing 

locks, 

Uriah PI. Foss, burying nuisances, 
Dowd & Carn, " " 

Patrick Doyle, " " 

J. W. Abbott " " 

Francis Smiley, " " 

James Thompson, care and board 
of Mr. Dunham, small pox case, 
Oeorge H. Chandler, advertising sale 

of non-resident land for taxes, 
Cogswell & Wells, boxing trees, - 
S. S. Moulton, repairing tree boxes, 

Amount brought forward, 1,050 93 



2 


32 


12 


01 


9 


50 


1 


00 


3 


00 




75 


39 


00 


10 


00 


69 


39 


5 


73 



15 


00 


24 


30 


6 


00 


5 


00 


5 


67 



59 



Amount brought forward, 1,050 93 

William Brown, whitewashing tree 

boxes, 29 45 

William Doran, loss of clothes at 
'Squog fire, - - - - 
Daniels & Company, powder, - 
Nathan Estabrook, pruning trees, 
Sjlvanus Bunton, medical atten- 
dance in small pox case, - 
G. F. Bosher & Co., bedding, - 
H. R. Chamberlin, expenses to Con- 
cord and Boston, - - - 2 25 
H. R. Chamberlin, expenses to Con- 
cord and Boston, - - - 12 21 
D. R. Prescott, paid for recording 

deed,- 

D. R. Prescott, paid for repairing flag, 
D. R. Prescott, paid for matches, 
Geo. A. French, insurance, - 
Howard Insurance Co., insurance, 
^tna. Insurance Co., " 

Phoenix Isurance Co., " 

Isaac W. Smith, " 

Eagle Insurance Co., " 

Joseph Knowlton revenue stamps, - 
D. R. Prescott, paid for labor, - 
Joseph Knowlton, recording volun- 
teer rolls, - - - - 
Whiton & Brother, flag, 
John C. Young, labor on engine 

house, 

Hill & Co., friction primers, 

Dorr & Hope, ice used about Smith's 

dead body, - - - - 50 

Morrison, Stanley & Clark, legal 

services, - - - - 12 00 

Goodwin, French & Foster, land for 

engine house and stable, - 561 05 





92 


, 2 


25 




■22 


38 


50 


37 


60 


147 


25 


38 


25 


35 


00 


2 47 




25 




75 


10 


00 


12 


25 


2 


68 


2 


63 



Amount carried forward, 2,055 28 



60 



Amount carried forward, 2,055 28 

Joseph Knowlton, recording births, 

deaths and marriages, - - 65 19 
Geo. C. Gilmore, attendance on Com- 
missioner on militia roll, - 5 00 
Charles Hutchinson, repairing hay- 
scales, - - - - - 6 00 
John Houston, repairing aqueduct 

irons, 3 42 

William McPherson, repairing aque- 
duct, 15 78 

Bridget Campbell, washing treasur- 
er's office, - - - - 1 50 
Charles W. Colby, services in treas- 
urer's office, - - - - 2 00 
John Twombly, mason work, - 3 00 
J. M. Coburn, assisting assessors, - 4 00 
Boston Telegraph Co., dispatches 57 
Joseph Knowlton, paid for recording 

deed of land, - - - 50 

Joseph H. Haynes, fitting up ward 

room, - - - - - 1 50 
John G. Colt, trees, - - - 8 00 

Thomas R. Hubbard, lumber for 

boxing trees, - - - 2 40 

Jacob F. James, perambulating lines, 30 75 

Balance to new account, - 1,180 54 



PINE GEOVE CEMETERY. 

By Appropriation, - - - - $200 00 

" Treasurer's receipt for wood, - 166 41 

Balance to new account, - - 32 44 



,385 43 



EXPENDITURES. 
Balance from old account, - - $189 81 
Paid Jas. A. Weston, engineer services, 26 75 
Jas. A. Weston, " " 19 25 

Amount carried forward, 235 31 



$398 85 



61 



Amount brought forward, 

William W. Baker, labor, - 
James F. Smith, " 

Kadmiel Haselton, " - - 
James A. Westou, " - 
John G. Colt, " 

H. Leeds, " - 

James A. Weston, horse hire, 
James A. Weston, breaking roads, 
James A. Weston, making plan. 



235 31 



61 


82 


22 


91 


18 


96 


6 


00 


15 


60 


1 


75 


10 


50 


1 


00 


35 


00 



1398 85 



EESEEVOIES. 




By balance from old account - 


296 17 


" Appropriation, - - - - 
" Transferred from reserved fund, 


500 00 
200 00 


EXPENDITUKES. 




Paid Joseph A. Weeks, for labor, - 
David H. Young " 
Lewis 0. Brien, '* 


- 1 00 
12 50 

- 1 25 


William Finn, " 


2 50 


John Loftis, " - 


83 


Frank Chille, " 


2 50 


Daniel Green, " - 


- 2 60 


Daniel Conner, " - 


. 2 60 


J. W. Preston, " 


27 00 


Hugh McLitire, " - 


- 10 50 


J. Hoadley, " 
J. McMan, *' - 


1 00 
- 10 60 


E.Wheeler, « 


7 28 



$996 17 



Amount carried forward, 



81 86 



62 



Amount brought forward, 81 86 

G. Wyraan, labor, 

T. 0. Conner, " 

E. McLaughlin, " - 

Daniel Mann, " 

J.Holland, " - 

H. Farrell, " 

N. Metcalf, " - 

Michael Quadd, " 

Michael Kane, " - 

Columbus Wjman, " 
H. C. Sullivan, " - 

N. R. Tirrell, " 

Thomas Harvey, " - 
Cornelius Hestan, " 
W. E. Eastman & Son, for labor. 
Fuller & Robinson, " 

Timothy O'Connor, " 

William Spencer, " 

John Kelly, " 

Timothy Sullivan, " 

John Logue, " 

Thomas Howe, '* 

Eben Knowlton, " 

John Larkin, " 

S. S. Moulton, « 

N. R. Tirrell, " 

Patrick Commons, " 

H. J. Tirrell, " 

Charles Bowker, " 

John Morris, " 

S. 0. Welch, " 

Patrick Leach, " 

William P. Riddle, " 

Hugh Martin, " 

t Edwin McQueston, " 

James Carn, " 

William Griffin, labor, - 
Sylvanus Donahoe, " 

Amount carried forward, 364 51 



13 


25 


10 


00 


9 


00 


10 


00 


8 


25 


9 


25 


1 


00 


3 


75 


o 


00 


1 


56 


3 


00 


4 


08 


2 


30 


3 


13 


- 5 


00 


5 


75 


7 


30 


1 


67 


10 


64 


4 15 


4 


00 


1 


00 


13 


00 


16 


68 


3 


25 


35 


12 


4 


62 


8 


50 


3 


00 


12 00 


3 


50 


4 41 




87 




50 


24 00 


15 


00 


11 


05 


6 47 



63 



Amount brought forward, 

Patrick Murphy, labor, - 
Dennis Bonner, " - - 

R. M. Richardson, " 
E. McLaughlin, " - - 

David H. Young, brick, 
David H. Young, cement, 
David H. Young, sand, 
Willard P. Stratton, repairing tanks, 
Moses D. Stokes, stone, - 
Daniel Mack, land, - - - 
City team, team labor, - - - 
N. R. Tirrell, team labor, - 
Daniels & Company, lead pipe, 
H. M. Bailey & Son, picks, 
Daniels & Company, shovels, 
Charles Bunton, blacksmith work. 
Temple McQucston, cement pipe, 
William McFerson, " " 

Daniels <t; Company, hardware, - 
S. S. Moulton, lumber, - - - 
A. N. Clapp & Co., spikes, - 
Balance to new account, - 



364 


51 


5 


63 


3 


97 


3 


13 


8 


55 


6 


00 


9 


60 


' 


6Q 


O 


80 


260 


00 


67 


00 


2 


25 


10 


00 


2 


99 


2 


00 




83 


- 8 


25 


190 


15 


6 


55 


4 


28 


1 


25 


5 


50 


29 


27 



$996 17 



FIEE DEPAETMENT. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

By Appropriation, - - - $5,000 00 

" Treasurers receipt for one hand en-| 

gine sold, - - - - 425 00 

" Treasurer's receipt for cash refunded, 20 43 

Balance to new account, - $1,203 62 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Balance from old account, - ^1,252 26 

Paid Eben Knowlton, labor on reservoirs, 97 25 



46,649 05 



Amount carried forward, 



1,349 51 



64 



Amount brought forward, 1,349 51 


Paid C. P. Simpson, labor, 


1 25 


S. G. Gilmore, "... 


50 


Plumer & Chandler, overalls, . 


44 50 


M. Lyons, jackets, . - . 


4 50 


Amoskeag Manufact'ing Co., repairs, 


95 08 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., hose 




and coupling, - - - 


28 30 


John Q. A. Sargent, repairs, 


38 88 


J. N. Heath, " 


1 00 


Manchester Gas Light Co., gas, 


60 


John Ray, refreshments, - 


7 40 


C. P. Simpson, removing hose. 


1 75 


N. R. Tirrell, " " - 


1 25 


J. Stickney, sole leather. 


1 50 


Israel Dow, watchman at Dickey's 




fire, 


1 50 


C. H. G. Foss, examining stoves, - 


39 00 


D.W. Fling, " ^ " ^ 


39 00 


Joseph A. Weeks, cleaning engines, 


3 00 


Boston Belting Co., hose, - 


495 00 


John Clark, " 


92 00 


C. F Livingston, printing, - 


28 75 


J. B. Bradley, repairing hose, - 


9 00 


H. S. Nichols, use of horse and car- 




riage, 


2 25 


H. M. Glines, repairing pipe, 


• 1 75 


Kidder & Chandler, potash. 


18 


Kidder & Chandler, oil. 


8 30 


John B. Varick, " - 


9 00 


Boston Belting Co., flexible pipe, - 


10 50 


C. R. Colley, setting glass, - 


2 17 


P. I. & W. H. Boyd, cotton cloth. 


1 25 


Israel Dow, salary as engineer. 


25 00 


D. W. FHng, " " " 


90 00 


C. H. G. Foss, " " " 


90 00 


N. S. Bean, " " " 


25 00 


B. Ferren, curtains, ... 


1 76 


John B. Varick, spirits turpentine, 


6 00 



Amount carried forward, 2,556 43 



2,556 43 




16 


981 


25 


§3,537 84 


$142 00 


821 


19 


1,452 


55 


609 


76 


502 


30 


■ 840 


67 




— S7,906 31 



65 

Amount brought forward, 

John B. Varick, tacks, - 
City Team, team account. 



Merrimack Engine Co., - 
Amoskeag Steamer, - 
Fire King Steamer, 
E. ^V. Harrington Steamer, 
Hook and Ladder, - 
Pennacook Hose Co., - 



Correction. The balance to new account under "Miscellaneous," should 
read 2,461.31 ; and the whole amount of approi^riation, balance, &c., 
should be 7.906.31. 



MERRIMACK ENGINE CO. 

To Company's bill for six months' services, $142 00 

STEAM FIRE ENGINE AMOSKEAG. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Manchester Gas Light Co., for gas, 
William Sanborn, wood, - 
Calvin Clement, " - - 

Kidder & Chandler, brooms, 
Amoskeag Manufacur'g Co., repairs, 
John Q. A. Sargent, " 

J. C. Nichols, " 

Alpheus Bodwell, coal, - 
John Saunders, repairs on hose, 
J. B. Bradley, " " " - 
Company's bills, services, - 
John Loftis, sawing wood, - 

Amount carried forward, 752 64 



$36 


74 


5 


50 


10 


50 




45 


317 


98 


1 


28 


2 


58 


7 


71 


4 


50 


11 


65 


350 


00 


3 


75 



66 

Amount brought forward, 

Kidder & Chandler, oil, - 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co., hydrants, 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co., fire grate, - 
Hartshorn & Pike, repairing stove, 
Daniels & Company, spirits turpentine 
Kidder & Chandler, " 
Kidder & Chandler, fluid, - 
Kidder & Chandler, wicking, 
E. P. Johnson, coal, - 



752 64 


6 12 


- 5 00 


75 


4 47 


ine, 2 00 


2 38 


45 


05 


48 33 



FIRE KING STEAMER. 



Paid W. Sanborn for Wood, 
Alpheus Bodwell, " 
Jonathan Young " - - 
Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas, 
Patrick Dowd for sawing wood, - 
John Lofiis for " " 

Daniels & Co. for oil, - 
Kidder & Chandler for oil, 
H. C. Merrill " 

Alpheus Bodwell for coal, 
Edward Johnson " . - 

Kidder & Chandler for brooms, 
Amoskeag M'fg. Co. hose and coup- 
lings, 
Amoskeag M'fg. Co. for repairs, 
M. 0. Pearsons for carting coal, - 
J. W. H. Hill, " " 

Wilbur Fisk, " " - 

Daniels & Co. for rotten stone. 

Amount carried forward, 703 57 



$821 19 



67 

Amount carried forward, 703 57 

John Saunders, repairing hose, 14 50 

J. Colbath & Co. " " - 75 

Alpheus Branch, " " - - 5 75 

H. C. Merrill, spirits turpentine, - 2 50 

Company's bill for services, - 369 00 

C. A. Luce for lanterns, - - 9 00 

P. N. Finn, damage to vegetables, 2 00 

Amoskeag Mfg. Co., for hydrants, 5 00 

J. C. Ricker for hose, - - 18 00 

Amoskeag Mfg. Co. for repairs, 322 48 



$1,452 55 



STEAM FIRE ENGINE «E. W.HARRINGTON." 



Paid Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas, 
Amoskeag M'fg. Co., repairs. 
Hartshorn & Pike, " - - 

John Saunders, " - 

Willard P. Stratton, " 
Darling & Varney, " - 

Company's bill for services, - J 
Badger & Healey, removing coal. 
Hall & Noyes, wood, - - - 
T. R. Hubbard, " 
Edward P. Johnson, coal, - 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co., two years land 

rent, . . - . 
Daniels & Company, spirits turpen- 
tine, - - - - 
Daniels & Company, oil, 
John B. Varick, oil - 

Amount carried forward, 597 98 



11 


14 


76 


75 


5 


87 


8 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


588 


00 


1 


25 


4 


52 


4 


50 


47 


95 


25 


00 


4 


00 


5 


00 


13 


00 



68 



Amount brought forward, 597 98 

Daniels & Company, matches, - 15 

" " brooms, - 50 

" " lamp filler, - 25 

" " water pot, - 80 

Hartshorn &, Pike, stove grate, - 62 

JolmB. Varick & Co., vice, - 7 33 

" fluid, - 80 

" brushes, - 91 

"^ emery cloth, 42 



U il 



|609 76 



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY. 



Paid Company's bills for services, 
James & Dodge for horse labor, 
W. Sanborn for wood, - 
I. N. Heath, " 

I. N. Heath, for repairs, 
John Rogers, for truckage, 



485 


00 


12 


00 


2 


13 




87 


1 


30 


1 


00 



- $502 30 



PENACOOK HOSE COMPANY. 

Paid Kidder k Cliandler, for wicking, 18 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., repair- 
ing hose carriage, - - 43 36 

Neal & Holbrook, repairing do., do., 83 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 1 hose 

carriage, . . . 250 00 

H, T. Nichols, for horse to draw 
hose and carriage, 

John Saunders, repairing hose, 

Companys' bills for services, 

H. C. Merrill, for brooms, 

Kidder & Chandler, for potash, 

John Rogers, for carting hose. 



3 


00 


2 


50 


539 


00 


. 


37 


_ 


18 


1 


25 



$840 67 



69 

CITY POLICE. 



By Appropriation, - - - $4,500 00 

" Treasurer's receipts for fines and 

cost, - - - - 1,692 46 

Balance to new account, - - 374 81 

$6,567 27 

EXPENDITURES. 

To balance from old account, - - $816 49 
Paid Samuel Upton, services as Police 
Justice, - - - - 

A. B. Shattuck, services as Special 
Justice, - - - - 

William B. Patten, services as City 
Marshal, - - - - 

Benjamin C. Haynes, services as As- 
sistant Marshal, - - _ 

Henry Bennett, services as night 
watch, - - - - 

Eben Carr, do., do., - - . 

Uriah H. Foss, do., do., - 

E. P. Whidden, do., do., 

David Alden, do., do., 

H. S. Burns, do., do., - - - 

Greenleaf Ambrose, do., do., - 

Henry Clough, do., do., 

A. L. Wing, do., do., 

James Patten, do., do., 

Patrick Doyle, do., do., - 

N. B. Taplin, do., do., 

Daniel R. Prescott, do., do., - 

L. A. Ward, do., do., - - - 

C. M. Stevens, do. do., 

Joseph Smith, do., do., 

A. G. Fairbanks, do., do.. 

Amount carried forward, 5,505 51 



500 


00 


36 


00 


6C0 


03 


450 


00 


442 


12 


465 


75 


64 


92 


63 


25 


63 


25 


58 


62 




75 


464 


50 


419 


00 


402 


50 


272 


50 


465 


75 


6{j 


62 


17 


49 


8 


50 


12 


50 


15 


00 



70 



Amount brought forward, 

Hugh Ramsey, do., do., - 
Joseph A. Weeks, do., do., - 
Aaron Waldron, do., do., 
G. G. Gordon, do., do., 
Ira A. Abbott, do., do., - 
James Patten, services as day police 
A. T. Wing, do., do., - 
Eben Carr, do., do., 

D. E. Prescott, do., do., 
Henry Clough, do., do., 
Henry Bennett, do., do., - 
Patrick Doyle, do., do., 
Joseph A. Weeks, do., do., 
Elbridge G. Woodman, do., do 
Henry H. Fuller, do., do., 
James Stearns, do., do., 
Charles Stearns, do., do., 
Hugh Ramsey, do., do., 
H. J. Tirrell, do., do., - 
Joseph Carr, do., do., - 
N. B. Taplin, do., do., 
N. Baker, do., do., 
G. G. Gordon, do., do., - 
L. A. Ward, do., 
H. S. Barnes, do., do., - 
Uriah H. Poss, do., do., - 
Greenleaf Ambrose, do., do., 

E. P. Whidden, do., do., 
David Alden, do., do., 
S. B. Hill, do., do., 
A. G. Fairbanks, do., do., - 
Ira S. Abbott, do., do., - 
I. W. Abbott, do., do., 
C. M. Stevens, do., do., 
H. M. Bailey, do., do., 
John D. Bean, bedding, 
E. P. Johnson, coal, 
David Wells, wood, 

Amount carried forward, 5,879 60 



5,505 56 


63 


75 




62 


1 


25 


7 


87 


1 


50 


s, 25 


32 


30 


74 


33 74 


9 


37 


- 16 


24 


21 


12 


5 


99 


1 


25 


- 10 


00 


10 


00 


3 


75 


. 


62 


3 


12 


- 


75 


- 


75 


1 


25 


1 


25 


2 


25 


1 


25 


3 


OQ, 


1 


25^ 


2 


00 


- 4 


00 




50 


- 1 


50 


2 


00 


_ 


75 


1 


00 


- 1 


00 


1 


25 


- 21 


50 


58 


69 


- 21 


90 



71 



Amount brought forward, 5,875 60 

H. J. Tirrell, wood, ... 4 00 

T. J. Wiggin, painting, wood, - 5 00 
William B. Patten, provision for 

prisoners, - - - - 23 35 
Benjamin 0. Haynes, do., do., - 91 29 
Wiliiam B. Patten, postage and tel- , 

egrapli dispatches, - - 84 89 

William B. Patten, conveying per- 
sons to County Farm, - - 3 00 
Hartshorn & Pike, grate, - - 75 

H. C. Merrill, lantern and tube, - 1 00 
C. F. Livingston, blank book, - 6 50 

Gage & Farnsworth, printing blanks, 23 46 
John B. Clarke, advertising, - 3 50 

S. D. Farnsworth, " - - 11 00 
Hersey & Tilton, stationery, - - 3 87 
A. Quimby, " - - 3 00 

William B. Patten, witnesses' fee, 128 18 
Samuel Upton, office rent, - 50 00 

William B. Patten, provision for 

soldiers, - - - - 6 45 

Patten & Haynes, use of horse and 

carriage, - - - - 231 25 
Hubbard & Williams, repairing stoves, 2 00 
John Twombly, whitewashing, - 2 00 
Benjamin Hutchinson, burying dead 

animals, - - - - 2 00 

Hersey & Tilton, Pamphlet Laws, - 1 18 



1,567 27 



72 
CITY OFFICEES. 



By balance from old account, - - $884 13 
" Appropriation, - . . 5,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 
Paid D. A. Bunton, services as Mayor, $700 00 
Joseph Knowlton, " " City Clerk, 500 00 
James 0. Adams, services as Superin- 
tendent of Schools, - - 700 00 
H. R. Chamberlin, services as Col- 
lector, - - - - 600 00 
H. R. Chamberlin, services as Treas- 
urer, 200 00 

Daniel R. Prescott, services as Mes- 
senger, - - - - 300 00 
Sylvanus Bunton, services as. Health 

Officer, - - - - 50 00 

Chas. W. Adams, services as Health 

Officer, - - - - 50 00 

Orren C. Moore, services as Clerk 

of Common Council, - - 75 00 
James 0. Adams, services as Clerk 

pro tern, of Common Council, 6 00 
D. R. Prescott, services as do., of 

Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 2i 00 
Dan'l W. Fling, services as Assessor, 128 00 
Geo. F. Judkins, " " " 60 00 

Geo. S. Neal, " " " 94 00 

Thos. B. Brown, " " " 88 00 

J. Q. A. Sargent, " " " 60 00 

J. Y. McQueston, " " " 69 00 

Jas. Walker, " " " 70 00 

Benj. White, •' " " 61 50 

Joseph E. Bennett," " Clerk of 

Assessors, - - - - 140 00 

Amount carried forward, 3,975 60 



1,884 13 



73 



Amount carried forward, 3,975 50 

Hanson Tasker, services as Overseer 

of Poor, - - - - 20 00 
S. S. Moulton, services as Overseer 

of Poor and Clerk, 2 years, 110 00 
Jeremiah Abbott, services as Over- 
seer of Poor, - - - 35 00 
W. H. H. Crawford, services as Over- 
seer of Poor, - - - 27 65 
Thomas Stack, services as Overseer 

of Poor, - - - - 35 00 
Ira Barr, services as Overseer of Poor, 20 00 
Nahum Baldwin, ser\'^ces as Over- 
seer of Poor, - - - 25 00 
George 0. Clark, services as Over- 
seer of Poor, - - - 50 00 
Joseph B. Sawyer, services assisting 

Assessors, - - - - 3 00 

Geo. 0. Clark, services as Selectman, 2 50 

I. H. Russell, " " " 5 00 

Michael Gillis, " " " 5 00 

J. N. Farnham, " " " 5 00 

Isaac Whittemore," " '. 5 00 

Robert Heath, " " " 5 00 

Isaac D. Palmer, " " " 5 00 

John M. Caswell, " " " 5 00 

A. J. Butterfield, " " " 5 00 

Jeremiah Hayes, " " " 5 00 

Thomas Howe, " " " 5 00 

Aaron Young, " " " 5 00 

Damon Y. Stearns," " " 5 00 

J. H. Haynes, " " " 5 00 

John M. Caswell, " '• " 5 00 

Dan'l Farmer, Jr.," " " 5 00 

C. C. Colby, " " « 5 00 

Sullivan D. Hill, " " " 5 00 

Joseph H. Haynes," " " 5 00 

John Gillis, " " " 5 00 

Chas. W. Colby, " " " 5 00 



Amount carried forward, 4,403 65 



74 



Amount brought forward, 4,403 

Geo. 0. Clarke, services as selectman, 5 
John Field, " " " 

James E. Bailey, " " " 

J. T. Robinson, services as Ward Clerk, 



J. P. Nute, 

Orrin C. Moore, 

Cornelius Healey, 

J. D. Lyford, 

Michael Howe, 

D. K. Mack, 

Wm. H. Hill, 

D. H. Maxfield, 

Cyrus Gile, 

James Gilmore, 

Wm. Reynolds, services as Mode 

Daniel Balch, 

T. S. Montgomery, " 

Isaac Huse, 

John Smith, 

B. F. Wallace, 

Geo. H. Colby, 

Charles W. Colby, services assisting 

Treasurer, - - - - 
John Coughlin, School Committee, 
John Coughlin, Truant Agent 



a 




a 




a 




a 




a 




a 




a 




u 




a 




a 




vic( 


3sas 


a 




a 




u 




u 




a 





ator, 



5 
5 
6 
4 
4 
3 
10 
1 
5 
3 
2 
5 
4 
9 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 



10 
25 



Balance to new account, - 1,348 



65 
00 
00 
00 
00 
11 
00 
00 
50 
00 
50 
00 
60 
50 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 

00 
00 
00 

77 



-$5,884 13 



75 
CITY HALL AND STORES. 



By balance from old account - 4,728 77 

Treasurer's receipts for cash receiv- 
ed for rent of stores, 1,308 00 
Treasurer's receipts for cash receiv- 
ed for rent of city hall, 93 08 
Treasurer's receipts for cash receiv- 
ed for stone, - - 10 95 



$6,140 80 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid D. R. Prescott for matches, - 37 

Wilham M. Plumer, & Co., matches, 13 

H. C. Merrill, matches, &c. - 1 35 

D. R. Prescott, brush and comb, 35 

C. R. Colley, repairing glass, - 14 59 
Colbath & Co., gas fixtures, - 5 09 
Daniels & Co., hard ware, &c. 16 79 
John B. Varick, " " - - 30 
David Wells, wood - - - 78 22 
H. J. Tirrell, " - - - 4 00 

E. P. Johnson, coal, - - - 91 51 
Manchester Gas. Light Co., gas 225 33 
Hartshorn <fe Pike, repairing stoves 

and pipe, - - - 37 32 

D. R. Prescott, charcoal - 11 05 
Manchester Print Works, charcoal, 2 00 
D, R. Prescott, paid for sawing 

wood, &c. - - - 34 85 

D. R. Prescott. fitting Hall for court, 16 78 
H. C. Merrill, crockery, - - 2 08 

E. G. Haynes, mason work, - 50 
Wm. S. Palmer, " " - - 1 75 
J. D. Bean, looking glass, - - 2 00 
E. Branch, enameled cloth for table 

cover, - - - - 2 25 



Amount carried forward, 548 61 



76 



Amount brought forward, 548 61 

F. S. Lynch, work in Treasurer's 
office, - - - - 

Barton & Co., carpet. 

Hartshorn & Pike, stoves, - 

D. R. Prescott, pitchwood, 

Eastman & Son, brooms, 

H. M. Bailey, " 

W. H. Elliott, repairing clock, 

Bridgett Campbell, washing offices, 

Wm. Wilder, set of steps, 

Daniels & Co., feather duster, 

S. S. Moulton, repairs, 

Wm. Rounsfell, painting, 

Neal & Holbrook, repairing stairs, 

Charles W. Adams, paper hanger's 
steps, - - _ 

James H. Stevens, repairing chim- 
ney, - - ' - 

Wm. M. Piumer, fluid. 

Hartshorn & Pike, work on stovepipe, 

J. Q. A. Sargent, repairing gas fit- 
tings. 

Balance to new account. 



3 


75 


65 


19 


5 


47 




60 




42 


- 1 


46 


3 


00 




75 


3 


58 


- 1 


76 


1 


50 


- 8 


25 


37 


00 


L-'S 




- 1 


75 


2 


00 


- 1 


27 


pe, 

n4- 


35 


It- 


25 


5,453 


94 




16,140 80 



INTEREST. 



By balance from old account, - - $388 89 

" Premium on City Stock, - - 1,125 00 

" Interest on taxes, - - - - 344 00 

" Appropriation, - - - - 9,000 00 



EXPENDITUEES. 

Paid sundry persons for interest, - $2,805 94 

Sundry persons, for coupons, - 7,590 00 

Balance to new account, - 461 95 



-$10,857 89 



-ei0,857 89 



77 



CITY LIBRAE!. 



By appropriation, - . . 2,000 00 

12,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To balance from old account, - - 36 72 
F. B Eaton, services as librarian, 375 00 
Samuel N. Bell, rent of rooms, 229 20 

Manchester Gas Light Co., for gas, 65 88 
Manchester Post Office, postage, 2 62 

J. Q. A. Sargent, gas fixtures, - 14 52 
A. Bodwell, coal, - - - 32 46 
E. P. Johnson, coal, - - 19 50 . 

Gage & Farnsworth, printing, - 17 50 

John B. Clark, Daily Mirror, - 75 

A. Quimby, newspapers, - - 29 42 
Samuel N. Bell, " - - 1 00 
D. F. Buckley " - - - 75 
Neal & Holbrook, repairs, - - 1 30 
Haines & Wallace, boxes, - - 13 33 
L. B. Clougli, insurance, - 32 50 
Phoenix Insurance Co., insurance, 18 75 
Dudley & Parker, grate, - - 1 06 
Wm. Parker, Jr., repairing stoves, 1 08 
Trustees for books, - - 1,000 00 
S. N. Bell, freidit, - - - 9 63 

B. H. Thayer, & Co., paper, 31 86 
Balance to new account, - - 65 17 

$2,000 00 



The librarian's bill for three month's salary and other 
bills amounting to $159.86, were not received in season to 
be put into this account. 



18 



MILITIA. 



By balance from old account, - - $122 61 
" Appropriation, - - - - 200 00 
" Transferred from reserved fund, - 75 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Smith & Eichardson, rent of armory, $75 00 

Amoskeag Veterans, " " " 150 00 

Geo. C. Gilmore, enrolling militia, 80 34 

Wm. A. Bunton, " " 43 45 

I. W. Farmer, " " 3 00 

Charles W. Colby, " " 8 72 

Henry C. Merrill, " " 5 00 

Oilman H. Kimball, " " 3 00 

Balance to new account, - 29 10 



1397 61 



$397 61 



WATERING STPiEETS. 



By Appropriation, .... $200 00 
" Transferred from reserved fund, - 11 08 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Willard P. Stratton, repairing water 

tank, 6 80 

John Saunders, repairing water tank, 50 

John H. Maynard, " " " 3 78 

John Campbell, wetting streets, - 200 00 



$211 08 



$211 08 



79 



PAYING STEEETS. 



By Appropriation, $1,500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Moses D. Stokes, blocks of granite, $751 07 
J. F. Cross, paving stones, - - 12 30 
City Team, team labor, - - 54 56 
John Houston, blacksmith work, - 3 46 
Charles Bunton, " " - 50 

Kidder & Chandler, oil, - - - 4 00 
Edward McQueston, labor, - - 49 50 
Hugh Ramsey, " - 13 75 

Joseph A. Weeks, " - - 10 50 
Joseph Nichols, " - - 42 68 

John Larkin, " - - 35 00 

Timothy Sullivan, " - - 34 50 

Wm. E. Eastman & Son, labor, - 69 12 
John Morris, " - 14 50 

Moses D. Stokes, " - 12 69 

Robert Scott, " - 67 

E. McLaughlin, " - 13 50 

Jas. A. Weston, services engineering, 18 50 
Balance to new account, - 359 20 

11,500 00 



80 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

By Appropriation, - - - 11,000 00 

" Transferred from reserved fund, 200 00 



-$1,200 00 



EXPENDITURES. 
To the following Taxes abated, to wit : 
On list of - 1861. 

Francis Murray, " 

Oliver Bailey, " - 

George Hardy, " 

Gustave Von Gerber, " - 

L. 0. Blanchard, " 

Paul Holt, " - 

Ithamer Watson, " 

John Thorn, " - 

Wm. H. Dixon, " 

Wm A. Canfield, " - 

Charles Daniels, " 

Charles Cross, " - 

Michael Griffin, " 

Robert W. Hunton, " - 

John Murphy, " 

Mary Jane Cameron, " - 

Isaac C. Flanders, '" 

Mary Smith, " - 

Perley V. Evans, " 

James M. Colley, " - 

Daniel Paige, " 

Edgar D. Keniston, " - 

Charles J. Flanders, " 

Andrew J. Clough, " - 

Delano Prescott, " 

Michael Hefferen, " - 

Joshua Powers, " 

Michael Gillis, " - 

P. Adams, " 

Amount carried forward, 90 80 



3 


25 


. 2 


52 


2 


52 


- 2 


52 


2 


52 


. 2 


52 


2 


52 


- 2 


52 


2 


52 


- 2 


52 


2 


52 


- 2 


52 


2 


52 


- 3 


04 


2 


52 


- 6 


64 


9 


43 


- 


90 


3 


07 


- 2 


52 


2 


81 


- 2 


40 


3 


07 


- 2 


52 


2 


52 


- 2 


52 


2 


52 


- 3 


07 


7 


76 



81 



Amount brought forward, 




90 80 


Alfred F. Perry, 


1861 - 


10 48 


Bisco & Denny, 


a 


10 00 


Geo. H. Hubbard, 


a 


18 23 


Nancy Poor, 


a 


1 26 


Rhoda Flanders, 


(( 


- 5 00 


John Loftis, 


1862 - 


2 29 


Daniel Gould, 


a 


- 2 29 


Merrimack River Bank, 


a 


10 48 


Eleazer Martin, 


a 


- 2 29 


William Dinsmore, 


1861 - 


2 52 


Nathan Burpee, 


a 


- 2 52 


Edson P. Marshall, 


a 


2 52 


Charles Cummings, 


a 


- 2 52 


Morris HoUehan, 


a 


2 52 


Frank Morgan, 


a 


- 2 52 


William Harrison, 


a 


2 52 


Frederick Edgcrly, 


a 


- 2 50 


John Flanders, 


a 


4 05 


Samuel Hall, 


a 


- 3 14 


John H. Judkins, 


u 


2 52 


Frederick D. Chase, 


a 


- 3 07 


Daniel Davis, 


a 


2 52 


James S. Cheney, 


a 


- 26 


John Aiken, 


a 


2 52 


H. J. Copp, 


a 


- 2 52 


Nath'l H. Morrill, 


a 


2 52 


William Dodge, 


a 


- 2 52 


George Downer, 


a 


2 52 


John Barker, 


u 


- 2 52 


John C. Walton, 


a 


2 52 


William P. Felch, 


a 


- 60 


Calvin Clement, 


a 


6 48 


A. C. Wallace, 


u 


- 9 27 


William Pherson, 


a 


2 52 


Anson C. Coult, 


a 


- 2 52 


James W. Darrah, 


a 


5 83 


Lot No. 35 Hanover St., 


a 


- 1 88 


David Libbey, 


1862 - 


7 73 



Amount carried forward, 243 29 

F 



82 



Amount brought forward, 

Ephraim Hodgman 1862 - 

N. H. Bannister, " 

Charles G. Clark, " - 

Nelson E. Fisk, " 

George W. Johnson, " = 

Moses B. Hill, " 

Alonzo Cutter, " - 

David Page, " 

Edward Goldbraith, " - 

John Thornton, • " 

Hiram Babbitt, " - 

Ira W. Pennock, " 

Henry Johnson, " - 

Dana D. Thresher, " 

Charles Bowers, " - 

Ira Templeton, " 

Wallace N. Young, " - 

John P. Young, " 

J. A. Chamberlin, " - 

T. P. Webber, « 

Charles Shennessy, " - 

Daniel H. Chase, " 

Thomas Lane, " - 
Land on Prospect street adjoins J. 

Dodge on the east, 1862, 

Peter C. Woodman, " - 

Hazen Baker, " 

John W. Lane, " - 

B. Spofford, " 

Henry C. Parker, 1861, 

Balance to new account. 



243 


29 


- 8 


98 


11 


65 


15 


67 


2 


29 


- 2 


29 


2 


25 


2 


29 


2 


29 


2 


29 


2 


29 


2 


29 


12 


60 


2 


29 


2 


29 


2 


29 


2 


29 


5 


82 • 


4 


37 




19 


10 


32 


2 


29 


2 


29 


2 


29 


- 5 


16 


2 16 


2 


25 


2 


25 


1 


50 


25 


60 


813 


88 




—11,200 00 



83 



LIGHTING STREETS. 

By balance from old account, - - $249 86 
" Appropriation, - - - 1,500 00 

" Balance overdrawn to new account, 68 79 



EXPENDITURES. 



$1,818 65 



Paid Manchester Gas Light Co., gas, $1,298 16 
Manchester Gas Light Co., light- 
ing lamps, - - - 380 50 
Manchester Gas Light Co., lamp posts, 82 19 
Chas. R. CoUey, repairing lanterns, 22 21 
Hartshorn & Pike, " " 18 08 
Montgomery & Wilson, fluid, - 22 50 
George W. Adams, " . 8 34 
T. L. Quimby, lighting bridge lamps, 36 67 

$1,818 65 



TAXES EEOM 1859 TO 1862. 

1859, John L. Kelly, Collector. 

Amount uncollected Jan. 1, 1863, - - $9,615 43 

1860, 11, R. Chamberlin, Collector. 

Amount uncollected Jan 1, 1862, - - 2,833 87 

Amount paid into the Treasury and abatements, 393 23 



Balance uncollected, - - - - $2,440 64 

1861, H. R. Chamberlin, Collector. 

Amount uncollected Jan. 1, 1862, - - $19,211 52 
Amount paid into the Treasury and abatements, 12,172 21 



Balance uncollected, - - - - $7,039 31 

1862, H. R. Chamberlin, Collector. 

Amount of tax list, - - - . $84,827 45 

Amount paid into the Treasury and abatements, 69,541 54 



Balance uncollected, - - - $15,285 91 



84 
PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



By Appropriation, - - - - $900 00 
" Transferred from reserved fund, 150 00 

" Amount refunded by sundry persons, 4 63 
" Amount of Treasurer's receipt for 

cost on non-resident taxes, 71 14 



EXPENDITURES. 

To balance from old account, - - $11 60 
Paid S. D. Farnsworth, advertising, - 66 67 
Gage & Farnsworth, printing Annual 

Report, - - - - 435 50 

Gage & Farnswortli, printing School 

Report, - - - - 42 00 

Gage & Farnsworth, printing 

blanks, &c., - - - - 49 50 
Fogg & Hadley, advertising non-resi- 
dent tax, - - - - 31 50 
Campbell & Harriman, advertising 

and printing blanks, - 
C. F. Livingston, printing blanks, 
R. Estabrook, ink and pens, - 
J. D. Watson, " - - - 
Tewksbury & Bro., stationery, 
E. B. Beman & Co., binding books, 
0. C. Moore, stationery, - 
S. S. Moulton, " " - 
Geo. H. Barker, " - - - 
Wm. H. Fisk, books, stationery and 

binding books, - - - 
Hersey&Tilton, books and stationery, 
John B. Clarke, advertising and 

printing blanks, - 
0. Hardy, stationery, 
J). S. Leonard, pens, - - - 
J. Bean, stationery. 

Balance to new account, 



,125 77 



16 


50 


189 


25 


1 


12 




63 


2 


88 


2 


00 


_ 


50 


2 


70 


2 


50 


127 


31 


5 


62 


23 


37 




56 


1 


50 


_ 


75 


116 


81 




—11,125 77 



85 



CITY DEBT. 



Date of Notes. 


To whom payable. 


When payable. 


Int. unpaid 
Jan. 1, 18G.3. 


Principal. 


Feb. 28, 1852 


NehemiahHunt. 


Feb. 28,1872 


108 00 


3,600 00 


July 1, 1847 


Certif. of Stock. 


July 1, 1867 


600 00 


20,000 00 


July 1, 1857 


a a a 


July 1, 1872 


600 00 


20,000 00 


July 1, 1854 


c( (C a 


July 1, 1874 


600 00 


20,000 00 


July 1, 1856 


a a (( 


Jan. 1, 1880 


300 00 


10,000 00 


July 1, 1857 


a n (C 


July 1, 1877 


671 00 


22,500 00 


July 9, 1858 


Neliemiab Hunt. 


July 9, 1878 


68 75 


2,400 00 


July 22, 1858 


Neliemiah Hunt. 


" 22, 1878 


29 15 


1,100 00 


Jan. 1, 186l!Certif. of Stock. 


Jan. 1, 1866 


180 00 


6,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1861 " " " 


Jan. 1, 1871 


180 00 


6,000 00 


July 1, 1862 


(C (( (( 


July 1, 1882 


671 00 


22,500 00 



Temporary Loan, 



Temporary Loan, - 
Interest, - 



5,495 90 134,100 00 
59,800 00 



193,800 00 
6,495 90 



$199,295 90 



86 



VALUATION, TAXES, &C. 



Year. 


Valuation. 




Taxes. 


No. of polls. 


Poll Tax. 


1838 


$555,270 


00 


$2,235 49 


244 


$1 66 


1839 


604,963 


00 


3,029 84 


427 


2 14 


1840 


946,200 


00 


3,986 56 


772 


2 20 


1841 


1,229,054 


00 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


1842 


1,430,524 


00 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


1843 


1,598,826 


00 


13,764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


1844 


1,873,286 


00 


13,584 72 


1,053 


2 25 


1845 


2,544,780 


00 


19,246 27 


1,561 


2 30 


1846 


3,187,726 


00 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


1847 


4,488,550 


00 


24,963 54 


2,056 


1 68 


1848 


4,664,957 


00 


39,712 53 


2,638 


2 58 


1849 


5,500,049 


00 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


1850 


5,832,080 


GO 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


1851 


6,906,462 


00 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


1852 


6,795,682 


00 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


1853 


6,995,528 


00 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


1854 


8,237,617 


00 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


1855 


8,883,248 


00 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


1856 


9,244,062 


00 


114,214 08 


3,760 


2 96 


1857 


9,983,862 


CO 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


1858 


10,259,080 


00 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


1859 


9,853,310 


00 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


1860 


9,644,937 


00 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


1861 


9,343,254 


00 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


1862 


8,891,250 


00 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 



93 



EELIEF TO SOLDIERS' EAMILIES. 



The following sums have been paid to the families of 
volunteers, who have enlisted in the service of the United 
States, from Avigust 1861 to December 31, 1862 : 



Ahern, John, 15 00 

Adams, Ira J. 68 00 

Allen, Robert H. 76 00 
Allen, George 68 00 

Allen, Francis A. 184 00 
Annis, Zebina N. 64 00 
Austin, Joseph A. 62 00 
Annis, A. C. 115 00 

Buckman, C. N. 68 00 
Banfil, H. W. 54 00 

Bowen, Edwin G. 1100 
Blood, Albert 68 00 

Bartels, Jacob 51 00 

Byrns, Matthew 195 00 
Baker, William 195 00 
Booth, John 132 00 

Bickford, Noah 20 00 
Baglej, Jona. R. 40 00 
Batchelder C. L. 55 00 
Barker, Wm.L. 128 00 
Bailey, Jos. W. 164 00 
Bailey, Rufus 184 00 
Burnes, Thos. S. 64 00 
Brown, Amos W. 128 00 
Babbitt, Wm. L. 126 00 
Bundv, Marcus H. 68 00 
Buzzell, Elisha H. 98 00 
Bean, Lyman W. 63 00 
Brown. A. A. 174 00 
Blackburn,W. H. 126 00 
Bonner, Wm. 56 00 

Breshnehan, M. 184 00 
Broderick, P. 64 00 



Allen,, William 12 00 
Abbott, Ira S. 36 00 

Atwood, Chas. W. 32 00 
Allen Wm. H. 48 00 
Allen, Jeremiah C. 32 00 
Amtuda, A. C. 48 00 
Aldrich, Miles, 16 GO 

Burns, Patrick 144 00 
Blake, George G. 147 00 
Bly, Jeremiah W. 147 00 
Burpee, Cyrus S. 63 00 
Brown, Wm. E. 147 00 
Brown, Ira A. 26 00 

Bowman, E. M. 100 00 
Bixby, A. H. 70 00 

Berry, Geo. W. 147 00 
Brennan, Thos. 50 00 
Burke, Patrick 147 00 
Broderick, M. 50 00 

Blake, Thomas, 26 00 
Bohan, Patrick 30 00 
Buckminster, A. E. 46 00 
Brandon, Philip, 88 00 
Bean, Amos L. 28 00 
Brown, Asa 20 00 

Buckminster, A. 36 00 
Bailey, Joseph, 16 00 
Barrett, Wm. A." 16 00 
Barnes, Hiram S. 16 00 
Baker, J. B. T. 48 00 
Baldwin, J. J. 16 00 

Blaine, J. C. 48 00 



94 



Brown, A. 184 00 

Bickford, H. N. 128 00 

Bjnge, Thomas 171 00 

Boyd, Charles W. 63 00 

Beamaii, Eri B. 98 00 

Battles, H. W. 68 00 

Brandon, Philip 52 00 

Blanchard, F. F. 148 00 

Currier, Geo. D. 17 00 

Carr, James W. 120 00 

Colby, Harvey M. 13 00 

Calci; William 71 00 

Chase, B. F. 71 00 

Clark, R. F. 40 00 

Coty, Gideon 195 00 

Cumminivs, H. I. 136 00 

Chellis, R. A. 136 00 

Colby Daniel F. 27 00 

Chase, John N. 68 00 

Copp, H. J. 72 00 

Ciisliing, John 68 00 

Cole, M: S. 44 00 

Connel, A. M. 136 00 

Cole, John S. 36 00 

Cotton, Edward 101 CO 

Connelly, M. J. 185 00 

Casey, Thomas 68 00 

Casey, John 68 00 
Caderath, Eugene 135 00 

Cameron, James 195 00 

Curran, John 44 00 

Connally, Patrick 195 00 

Crosbie, A. 195 00 

Castello, Brion 136 00 

Clayton, Robert 184 00 

Currier, Chas. M. 80 00 

Castles, Patrick 184 00 

Cuddy, Michael 184 00 

Cressy, Amos 184 00 

Cummings, J. M. 64 00 



Bartlett, W. A. 32 00 

Baker, S. M. 48 00 

Burnes, Oliver, 36 00 

Barry, John 16 00 

Butler, Eldad 48 00 

Brvson, John 45 00 

Bruce, John N. 12 00 



Colby, Matthew N. 118 00 

Cram, Geo. T. 31 00 

Chub, John G. 135 00 

Clark Geo. A. 74 00 

Clark, B. F. 94 00 

Gate, Virgil H. 84 00 

Clough, H. M. 126 00 

Cilley, Anthony, 57 00 

Caine, Charles, 72 00 

Cogswell, E. P. 55 00 

Clark, Charles A. 110 00 

Crombie, Robert 164 00 

Clogston, S. 147 00 

Colby, Robert N. 101 00 

Copp, John 53 00 

Clement, Ezra 34 00 

Colby, Abner D. 151 00 

Cole, John 50 00 

Casey, John 100 00 

Conner, Charles 50 00 
Crowley, Cornelius, 50 00 

Collins, John 147 00 

Cressey, Thos. E. 49 00 

Chase, Wm. D. 45 00 

Carney, Michael 32 00 

Currier, Geo. D. 8 00 
Cadereth, Eugene 72 00 

Cole, Micajah 24 00 

Canfield, W. A. 18 00 

Chase, Moses L. 26 00 

Copp, H. J. 29 00 

Clifford, John 16 00 



95 



Condict,Hcm7F. 53 00 
Cutler, Wm. G. 182 00 
Clark, Henry W. 182 00 
Caswell, A. M. 182 00 
Chamberliii,W. N. 126 00 
Carpenter, J. P. 13 00 
Cheney, Thos. C. 182 00 
Campbell, H. A. 63 00 
Crockett, D. S. 63 00 
Cilley, Ezra D. 126 00 
Carr, James 182 00 

Chase, Melvin 126 00 
Cannay, Patrick 64 00 
Chapman, J. B. 64 00 
Cheney, Samuel 165 00 
Cressy, Joseph P. 57 00 
Clark, Geo. E. 118 00 



Cross, Joseph E. 48 00 
Clark, John P. 48 00 
Conner, Geo. W. 32 00 
Currier, H. H. 32 00 

Clark, Geo. A. 16 00 

Cochran, John H. 16 00 
Colby, A. P. 16 00 

Conner, Jeremiah 32 00 
Conner, Stillman P. 16 00 
Carlton, Geo. W. 48 00 
Crosbie, John 16 00 

Cronin, Daniel 8 00 

Cole, John 30 00 

Ccnway, Fred 36 00 

Corcoran, Jeremiah 48 00 
Caffey, Jeremiah L. 12 00 
Cahil, Francis 56 00 



Davis, C. 0. R. 136 00 
Dow, Pt. C. Ill 00 

Davis, John B. 191 00 
Donahoe,Mich'lT. 107 00 
195 00 
112 00 
88 00 
28 00 
64 00 
64 00 
. 47 00 
126 00 
126 00 
126 00 
126 00 
92 00 
40 00 

59 00 

60 00 
108 00 

36 00 
55 00 
35 00 



Dunn, William 
Dignam, Walter 
Dustin, Eliphalet 
Davis, George F. 
Donnelly, Patrick 
Dillon, Edward J. 
Demeritt, Frank E 
Dickey, C. C. 
Dickey, John W. 
Doe, Charles A. 
Day, M. V. B. 
Dakin, Geo. K. 
Dickey, James M. 
Dunham, E. A. 
Dow, Hezekiah 
Downs, Frank F. 
Davis, Henry D. 
Dodge, Hazen G. 
Darrah, James W. 



Darrah, Clinton A. 50 00 
Dowd, Patrick 100 00 
Driscoll, Patrick 147 00 
Driscoll, Jeremiah 50 00 
Dowd, John 147 00 

Doyle, Edward 147 00 
Dockham, 0. S. 147 00 
Darrah, Silas L. 41 00 
Donahoe, Jos. Jr. 8 00 
Dustin, Eliphalet 16 00 
Dickey, James M. 24 00 
Dugan, Peter 20 00 

Davis, Hilas D. 16 00 
Doe, Andrew W. 32 00 
Dubin, Francis 16 00 

Dalton, Michael, 36 00 
Dunn, Andrew 36 00 
Daran, Michael 12 00 
Davis, John W. 32 00 
Daran, William 48 00 
Drew, Chas. W. 48 00 
Dickey, Henry C. 32 00 



96 



Dolierty, James 108 00 
Dolierty, Peter 5(3 00 

Day, Patrick 0. 161 00 
Davenport, C. L. 34 00 
Evans, John M. 143 00 
Egan, John 68 00 

Ely, Joseph 195 00 

Elliott, Thomas P. 136 00 
Edgerly, A. J. 36 00 

EdgelL Frcd'k M. 35 00 
Eagan, Michael 68 00 
Emery, Samuel E. 68 00 

Flanders, H. J. 71 00 
Fo wler, Barnard E. 204 00 
Flanders, W. AY. 68 00 
Foster, W. H. 78 00 

Parry, Barnard 195 00 
Foley, Stephen 68 00 
Farley, Daniel 145 00 
Fitzgerald, David 64 00 
Farnam, James A. 50 00 
Flao-g, Alpheus D. 184 00 
Plyiin, Michael 0. 36 00 
Foley, Maurice 184 00 
Frawley, Terance 184 00 
Field, Edward 64 00 

Foa-g, James M. 44 00 
Parrar, Haward M. 126 00 
French, Charles E. 63 00 
Fallen, John 184 00 

Ferren, Frank 34 00 

Frcshall, Joseph 76 00 
Farnum, Calvin L. 56 00 

Gunnison, E. N. 17 00 

Griffin, W. H. 71 UO 

Gibson, C. 0, 36 GO 

Geoige, Samuel 14 00 

George, Albert 195 00 

Gannun, Cyrus 6S 00 

Gardner, Levi 5 00 

Glanin, James 195 00 

Glanin, Michael OS 00 



Dickey, Daniel H. 48 , 
Duggan, Edmund, 16 Ov. 

Doiierty, John 36 00 

Emerson, E. C. 16 00 

Emery, Ira P. 48 00 

Emerson Orren F. 12 00 

Esmire, Henry 48 00 

Farley, Michael 48 00 

Earley, Patrick 32 00 
Eastman, Frends F. 18 00 

Farrimjton, M. 147 00 

Flemin^g, John 147 00 

Fitzgerald, M. 84 00 

Flaherty, Thomas 147 00 

Fitzgerald, Thos. 100 00 

Fox,' Thomas 57 00 

Finucan Michael 50 00 

Farnham, E. T. 32 00 

Furnald, T. 0. 48 00 

Frye, A. J. 16 00 

Foss, Uriah H. 32 00 

Flynn, John 0. 16 00 

Fish, Nelson C. 16 00 

Foss, Charles W. 32 00 

Finn, Michael P. 48 00 

Fleming James 48 00 

Fenton, Dennis 15 00 

Fowler, Patrick 36 00 

Fenn, James 12 00 

Fox, Patrick 12 00 

Gone, Eben 126 00 

Gracy, David 117 00 

Glover, Noah 116 00 

Glarlden, Jerry E. 63 00 

Greenwood, Frank 54 00 

Garfield, George 17 00 
Gannon. William J. 44 00 

Gibbons, John 100 00 

Gannon, Thomas 50 00 



97 



Gannon, James 192 00 

Giles, Job R. 181 00 

Goggin. John 40 00 

Geunniil, William 156 00 

Gerry, Elbridge 40 00 

Gardner, John 105 00 

Garman, James 28 00 

Goodwin, John W. 126 00 

Glines, George E. 63 00 

Griswold, G W. 182 00 

Gordon, Clark S. 12G 00 

Heath, T. P. 118 00 

Hubbard, J. A. 43 00 

Holmes, William M. 71 00 
Hazewell, E. G. 71 00 

Hanneford, Obid 71 CO 

Hanson, George 71 00 

Hynes, J. R. 80 00 

Holmes, Andrew J. 88 00 
Hogan, John C. 68 00 

Hausman, John 123 00 

Hodgman, W. S. 100 00 
Hopkins, H. F. 105 00 

Hill, W. H. 68 00 

Henderson, James 136 00 
Hubbard, Oliver 195 00 
Hackett, Edmund 159 00 
Hackett, Charles A. 128 00 
Hackett, George W. 64 00 
Hutchins, Melvin F. 64 00 
Hume, Robert 140 00 

Hutchinson, F. B. 64 00 
Hackett, John 184 00 

Hubbard, Cyrus W. 166 00 
Hurd, Charles W. 54 00 
Harvey, Enoch S. 138 00 
Hall, John D. 182 00 

Ha:nb]ett, Albert T. 63 00 
Holt, Wesley; E. 31 00 

Hopkins, Oliver W. 63 00 
Hastings, Greely W. 63 00 
Hopkiiis, Philander 13 00 
Huchins, Moses A. 165 00 
Harris, Hinckley D. 165 00 



Gleason, Patrick 50 00 

Gallahcr, John 34 00 

Gallagher, Bernard 147 00 

Gould, Loami 13 00 

Gilbert, Charles 24 00 

Gould, Luzerne B. 18 00 

Glines, H. M. 48 00 

Graves, George W. 8 00 

Goggins, Thomas 16 00 

Goufd. James P. 12 00 

Galligher, Richard 33 00 

Hobart, John 84 00 

Howe, George E. Ill 00 
Hubbard, W. E. 23 00 

Hadley, George W. 53 00 
Hadley, Rodney 41 00 

Hoines, Dennis 50 00 

Hill, E. 0. 50 00 

Hall, Rufus 154 00 

Harriman, Sylvester 50 00 
Hennessy, James 147 00 
Harwood.John 147 00 

Hartshorn, Jonathan 139 00 
Hagerty, Daniel 139 00 
Healy, Michael 
HaiTington, John 
Hanlehan, Patrick 
Hartwell, John 
Hartley, Curtis B. 
Hoyt, John B. 
Holmes Andrew Jr 
Hall Charles 
Hozenwell, Arthur W. 18 00 
Hutchinson, Alex'r 48 00 
Hutchinson, Justin 
Hartley, Henry 
Hall, George H. 
Hutchins James S, 
Ilunton, Dexter L. 
Hall, R. B. 
Heath, William 0. 
Henry, William 
Hulm, Yv^illiam, 



^d 00 

50 00 
147 (0 
147 00 
40 00 
28 00 
48 00 
36 GO 



48 00 
16 00 
16 00 
48 00 
48 00 
48 00 
32 00 
32 00 
48 00 



Haselton, William W. 16 00 



98 



Hill, Simon B. 


117 00 


Hastings, George Y. 


, 48 00 


Hanckett, George 


171 


00 


Hanley, Michael, 


48 00 


Hart, William H. 


171 


00 


Hogan, John 


48 00 


Hubbard, Henry P. 


160 


00 


Healey Daniel D. 


45 00 


Hanson, Thomas 


192 00 


Henno, Israel 


16 00 


Heath, Charles B. 


144 


00 


Healey, Michael 


4 00 


Healy, Timothyj 


54 


00 


Heron, Lary, 


4 00 


Hatch, John 


160 


00 






Ingham, Ambrose 








59 00 


Johnson, Geo. C. 


68 


00 


Jackson, Oliver 


54 00 


James, Lemuel H. 


92 CO 


Jefts, Henry S. 


36 00 


Johnson James A. 


18 


00 


Juhnson, Chas. F. 


32 00 


Jennison, Chas. 0. 


36 


00 


Johnson, Eleazer A. 


16 00 


Jeuness, Jas. B. 


31 


00 


Jones, Edwin R. 


32 00 


Jones, John A. 


87 


00 


Johnson, Chas., Jr., 


48 00 


Johnson, Moses H. 


33 


00 


Jenkins, Jas. K. 


48 00 


Jones, Calvin A. 


45 


GO 


Jones, Thomas 


15 00 


Jordon, James A. 


44 


00 


Jones, John A. 


4 00 


Johnson, Jona. S. 


80 


00 






Kerran, Patrick 


204 


00 


Keaf, William J. 


50 00 


Keniston, Edwin R. 


136 


00 


Kearin, Timothy 


147 00 


Knowlton, Wm. H. 


117 


00 


Kane, Thomas 


147 00 


Kingsbury, I. H. 


68 


00 


Kenny, Michael 


50 00 


Rating, John 


68 00 


Kane, Charles A. 


48 00 


Kerby, Daniel 


159 


00 


Kelly, Charles J. 


48 00 


Knowlton .Joseph H, 


,148 


00 


Knowlton, B. F. 


12 00 


Kelcher, Jeremiah, 


148 00 


Kelly, Thomas 


36 00 


Kennedy, Cornelius 


40 


00 


Keniston, James 


15 00 


Kelly, Daniel 


98 


00 


Kenny, Wm. B. 


12 00 


Kelly, Charles J. 


80 


00 


Kelly, Albert 


12 00 


Knowlton, Wm. C. 


81 


00 


Kearin, John 


45 00 


Kidder, Hiram D. 


147 


00 


Kering, John 


123 00 


Lord, J. J, 


134 


00 


T^eavitt, Thos. M. 


147 00 


Leaf, Luke 


68 


00 


Lyford, John C. 


100 00 


Libby, A. H. 


40 


CO 


Ladd, Joseph J. 


23 00 


Little, Samuel PL 


68 


00 


Lowell, Henry G. 


46 00 


Langley, J. F. 


80 


00 


Leaf, Joseph 


50 00 


Lamudge, Alex. 


68 


no 


Lattimer, John 


57 00 


Leet, L, H. 


132 


00 


Looney, Patrick 


147 00 


Lee, Patrick, 


195 


CO 


Lane, Dennis 


50 00 


Lougee, Fred. W. 


184 


00 


Lyons, G. F. G. 


147 00 


Lewis, Henry 


100 


00 


Langmaid, J. Israel 


. 50 00 



99 



Leary, Dennis 50 00 

Lynch John L. 184 00 

Livingston, C. C. 64 00 
I;awience, Rich'd A. 59 00 
Langley, O. H. 116 00 

Martin, H. B. 
Marshall, Nath'l 
Mclntire, John 
Moore, T. T. 
McEvin, James 
Maxwell, W. H. 
McQueston, J. B. 
Metcalf, A. E. 
Morgan, Charles, 
Morrison, David 
Mordough, George 
McKinon, Geo. W. 
McCiemons, John 
Mayott, L. H. 
Mahoney. Patrick 
Moore, David 
Mayers, James 
Murphy, James 
Murphy, Henry 
Merrill, Lewis S. 
Mayne, Wm. W. 
Merron, James 
Marsh, Charles 
McClaskey, James 
McQueston, LeRoy 
Morrill, Thos. W. 
Magoon, Chas. D. 
Marshall, H. P. 
Marcus, Sam'l D. 
Morrill, Frank L. 
Miller, Hugh 
Mason, G. P, 
Mulligan, Michael, 
McCarty, Eugene, 
McDonald, Walter 
Miles, James 
Mitchell, John W. 
Mason, Dan'l W. 



Lathe, James W. 18 00 

Lyford, Jere. D. 32 00 

Lewis, George B. 32 00 

Lewis Levi B. 8 00 



204 


00 


Markham, John G. 


55 


00 


130 


00 


McCabe, Geo. F. 


50 


00 


63 


00 


McKeoh, Patrick 


50 


00 


136 


00 


Murphy, Thomas 


50 


00 


95 


00 


McCarty, Timothy 


50 


00 


40 


00 


McDermot, Hugh 


50 


00 


151 


00 


Mullen, John 


100 


00 


68 


00 


Murray, Michael 


100 


00 


68 


00 


Martin, James 


147 


CO 


18 


00 


McMullon, Dan'l 


18 


00 


68 


00 


Murphy, John 


50 


00 


68 


00 


McLitire, Hugh 


26 


00 


159 


00 


McMalley, James 


147 


00 


68 


00 


Moriarty, C, 


147 


00 


112 


00 


Moriarty, B. 


100 


00 


68 


00 


Mullen, Michael 


100 


CO 


135 


00 


McCulIough, Pat. 


60 


00 


136 


00 


Munroe, James S. 


95 


00 


96 


00 


Morrill. J. B. 


48 


00 


54 


00 


Mayne, James 


48 


00 


72 


00 


Moulton, Geo. W. 


32 


00 


64 


00 


Mace, Chas. J. 


20 


00 


64 


00 


Marsh, John B. 


32 


00 


64 


00 


Morrison, C. L. 


82 


00 


35 


00 


Murphy, John 


16 


00 


126 


00 


Mitchell, Sam'l L. 


32 


00 


63 


00 


Mahew, Chas. LI, 


16 


00 


172 


00 


Mara, Michael 


48 


00 


54 


00 


Manning, Rodney, 


16 


00 


136 


00 


Murphy, Hugh 


48 


00 


171 


00 


Mulligan, Patrick 


15 


00 


60 


00 


McCarty, Charles 


30 


00 


160 


00 


McCarty, Patrick, 


SO 


00 


160 


00 


Mahony, Michael, 


15 


00 


164 


00 


McKenny, James 


- 26 


00 


147 


00 


Martin, Chas. H. 


8 


00 


110 


00 


Mulligan, Thomas 


4 


00 


92 


00 









100 



Newell, T. L. 40 00 

Newton, Chas. A. 64 00 
Nelson, S. W. 64 00 

O'Neil, James 136 00 

O'Connell, Patrick 194 00 
O'Brien, Terrence 133 00 
O'Conner, Robert 
O'Brien, John 
O'Brien, Peter 
Ogden, John E. 
Osgood, Henry C. 
O' Conner, Wm. E 

Palmer, C. E. 
PiUsbury, H.M. 
Parrott, C. F. 
Pickup, George 
Piatt, J. H. 
Parker, C. M, 
Perkins, D. M. 
Proudman, James 
Pike, T. H. 
Polkey, Peter 
Parker, PI. H. 
Perkins, Wm. H. 
Pike, F. PI. 
Paige, Fred. T. 
Paige, Harlan E. 
Plumer, C. H. 
piper, John K. 
Parker, Henry C. 
Parrott, Geo. W. 
Perkins, Wra. D. 
Piper, Sam'l S. 
Peoples, Charles, 
Philbrick,Thos. P 
Parker, Frank W. 

Quimby, James M. 
Quinlan, Jeremiah 
Quimby, Benj. F. 
Quinn, Frank 
Quinn, James 
Quimby, Bcnj. K. 



, 03 


00 


50 


00 


64 


00 


34 


00 


. 26 


00 


). 100 


00 


21 


CO 


142 


00 


204 


GO 


71 


00 


86 


00 


71 


00 


71 


00 


D.68 


CO 


10 


00 


136 


00 


128 


00 


160 


00 


142 


00 


50 


on 


64 


00 


100 


00 


55 


00 


03 


GO 


182 


00 


5 


00 


63 


00 


63 


00 


. 128 


00 


. 36 


00 


71 


00 


44 


00 


64 


00 


184 


CO 


120 


00 


128 


00 



28 


00 


4 


00 


147 


00 


87 


00 


144 


00 


42 


00 


54 


00 


32 


00 


48 


00 


16 


00 


30 


00 



Norris, Cyrus B. 
Newton, David H. 



O'Brien, John 
O'Neal, Michael 
O'Neal, Phelix 
O'Grady, Michael 
O'Brien, Edward 
Osgood, Joseph C. 
O'Brien, Daniel 
O'Melie, Joseph 
O'Brien, Patrick 

Philips, Francis H. 118 00 

Paige, JohnG. 131 00 

Powers, Wm. C. 160 00 

Palmer, Wm. H. 171 00 

Putnam, Byron 48 00 

Pierce, Nelson 64 00 

Perry, Geo. F. 62 GO 

Philbrick, Preston 116 00 

Potter, Frank L. 64 00 

Pierce, Nathan H. 63 00 

Philbrick, B. F. 147 00 
Plumer, Thomas A. 56 00 

Potter, Joseph 36 00 

Potter, Lewis 14 00 
Pettengill, Lafayette 48 00 

Prescott, Dcleno 32 GO 

Perkins, Joseph 48 00 

Plunkett. Charles 24 GO 

Provencher, J. C. 12 00 

Powers, Joshua 44 00 
Parker, Geo. A. W., 48 00 

Paine, Patrick 4 00 

Phelps, J. L. 82 00 

Peno, Joseph 48 00 

Quimby, Moody 59 00 

Quimby, Elisha T. 56 00 

Quint, Isaac 16 GO 

Quimby, Daniel A. 16 00 

Quinn, John 82 00 



101 



Eay, Alex. 11. 


12 


00 


Russell, Warren J. 


57 GO 


Robiuson, A. B. 


71 


GO 


Robinson, Geo. W. 


56 00 


Roach, J. S. 


195 


GO 


Rowe, Andrew J. 


55 00 


Robertson, D. M. 


40 


00 


Rollins, Henry T. 


55 GO 


Richardson, M. V. " 


B. 36 


00 


Riley, Michael, 


164 00 


Robinson, Wm, E. 


124 


00 


Roby, Joseph, 


164 00 


Russell, D. S. 


28 


GO 


Rowe, Charles E. 


128 00 


Richardson. H. K. 


184 


00 


Russell', B. B. 


147 00 


Reed, Chas. H. 


64 


00 


Robinson, John 


50 00 


Riordon, Timothy 


64 


00 


Reed, Elbridge 


92 00 


Randlctt, Thomas 


98 


GO 


Rourke, Timothy 


50 00 


Roberts, Wm. W. 


38 


00 


Regan, Patrick 


147 00 


Roberts, Isaac S. 


182 


00 


Ridley, David S. 


32 GO 


Rollins, D. W. 


64 


GO 


Ray, John 


48 00 


Richardson, C. C. 


136 


00 


Riordon, John 


16 GO 


Stark, Wm. G. 


142 


00 


Smith, George E. 


57 GO 


Swett, N. F. 


142 


GO 


Stearns, Hiram 


171 GO 


Simons, A. R. 


67 


00 


Summers, H. H. 


168 GO 


Sturtevant, E. 


8 


00 


Smith, George, 


160 GO 


Shaler, Albert 


95 


GO 


Smith, James 


56 00 


Squires, H. 0. 


195 


00 


Sawtell, E. M. 


56 GO 


Syme, R. S. 


45 


GO 


Shoughra, Timothy 


156 GO 


Summers, Wm. 2d 


195 


00 


Shearer, Chas. L. 


50 GO 


Sargent, Geo. H. 


68 


GO 


Smith, John 


147 GO 


Siiiith, Donald 


195 


GO 


Sullivan, Michael 


60 GO 


Shirlock, Anthony 


104 


00 


Smith, William 


84 GO 


Shechan, Edward 


136 


00 


Shugnee, Philip, 


36 GO 


Shearer, William 


40 


00 


Shea, John 


50 GO 


Stevens, Horatio 


64 


00 


Sage, Thomas 


111 GO 


Sanborn, Wm. H. 


128 


00 


Spear, Roberts 


27 GO 


Spaulding, P. C. 


128 


00 


Senter, Benj. L. 


40 GO 


Stevens, Munroe 


70 


00 


Sargent, Larkin 


48 GO 


Seaver, R. A. 


128 


GO 


Sargent, Henry 0. 


28 00 


Smith, G. H. 


64 


GO 


SuUivaa, Patrick 


20 GO 


Stewart, John 


70 


00 


Sheehan, Jere. D. 


36 GO 


Sargent, Larkin 


88 


GO 


Searlds, Loami 


32 GO 


Snow, Joseph T. 


46 


00 


Smith, Luther M. 


48 00 


Smith, John 


128 


00 


Stevens, Benjamin 


32 GO 


Stanton, Martin J. 


54 


GO 


Sargent, Albert F. 


48 00 


Sullivan, Cornelius 


184 


GO 


Sawyer, Zara 


48 00 


Stewart, Geo. H. 


128 


GO 


Sanders, Henry M. 


16 GO 


Sollingham, F. W. 


61 


33 


Stearns, Wra. K. 


24 GO 


Sheppard, C. H. 


126 


00 


Stokes, Septimus 


32 GO 


Simpson, Alexander 126 


00 


Simons, A. G. 


32 GO 


Stearns, Gilman 


55 


00 


Smith, Edwin 0. 


16 GO 



102 



Sylvester, L. Gr. 
Stearns, Albert C. 
Sargent, James F. 
Soughaasay, Mich'l 
Sargent, Henry W. 
Stevens, Enoch C. 
Todd, Wm. 
Tompkins, Henry D. 
Tehan, Dennis 
Twitchell, Evi P. 
Tilton, Nathan B. 
Thompson, Chas. H. 
Thompson, H. L. 
Untie], Berman 
Vogel, William 
Varnura, Geo. W. 

Wilkins, W. W. 
Weston, Franke 
Woodbury, R. W. 
White, Leander, 
Wallace, J. H. 
Wing, H. B. 
Woodburn, Geo. A. 
Welch, James 
Wright, Charles 
Weed, Harvey M. 
Wyman, George W. 
Wyman, James 
Woods, Henry S. 
Wyman, Woodbury 
"Wyman, Edson 
Wadleigh, John 
W' hittier, Samuel J. 
Wallace, Luther E. 
Worthen, Fred. S. 
Webster, S. F. 
Wyman, Arnold 
Webster, Joshua B. 
Wells, Clinton 
Weaver, James 
Walker, David 
Wallace, Patrick 
Young, Morrill N. 



60 00 


Sullivan, Owen 


23 00 


126 00 


Sargent, Charles E, 


32 00 


116 00 


Shoughree, Philip 


14 00 


64 00 


Sullivan, Michael 


45 00 


64 00 


Sullivan, John, 


16 00 


128 00 


Stearns, Gilman 


24 00 


195 00 


Taffer, Matthew 


147 00 


128 00 


Towne, James R. F. 


44 00 


64 00 


Tester, Napoleon 


56 00 


182 00 


Thornton, John 


6 00 


182 00 


Tufts, Charles H. 


48 00 


13 00 


Towns, Roswell 


24 00 


147 00 


Tool, Martin 


32 00 

48 00 


51 00 


Vose, Thomas S. 


136 00 


88 00 






120 00 


Wallace, Edward 


56 00 


55 00 


Whipple, Clarke B. 


55 00 


136 00 


AVilliams, Edson 


32 00 


68 00 


Welch, John 


26 00 


14 00 


Welch, Patrick 


50 00 


104 00 


Wilson, Ebenezer 


112 00 


136 00 


Williams, Hanson T. 


, 46 00 


t8 00 


Whidden, William 


87 00 


71 00 


Webster, Nath'l 


42 00 


28 00 


Wallace, J. H. 


40 00 


184 00 


Wescott, Augustine 


20 00 


184 00 


Wheeler, Alfred 


82 00 


14 00 


Wasley, Fazer A. 


16 00 


184 00 


Worcester, John C. 


16 00 


128 00 


Wyman, George 


32 00 


70 00 


Wailey, Henry 


32 00 


182 00 


Ward, John 


16 00 


63 00 


White, Barney 


32 00 


182 00 


Welch, Patrick, 


15 00 


182 00 


Williams, Wm. P. 


32 00 


54 00 


Wilson, Stephen M. 


12 00 


64 00 


Welplev, William 


16 00 


57 00 


Wall, William, 


16 00 


160 00 


Welch, John 


8 00 


8 00 


Wallace, Silas R. 


8 00 


96 00 






126 00 


Young, Charles E. 


126 00 




661,451 00 



103 
KEPOET OF COMMITTEE ON CEMETEKIES. 



To his Honor the Mayor and City Council of the City of 
Manchester : 

The committee having in charge the "Valley" and "Pine 
Grove" Cemeteries beg leave to submit their annual report. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

During the past year the City Government have caused 
Pine Street at its crossing of the Cemetery brook to be 
widened, so as to form a side-walk of the usual width en- 
tirely across the valley at this point. Your Committee 
have built a substantial fence here, completely inclosing 
the Cemetery with a durable structure. Two iron gates 
have been erected at the foot entrances on Chestiuit street, 
and wooden ones placed at the other foot walks, enabling 
the Superintendent of the Cemetery to exclude all per- 
sons from the grounds after sundown, or at such other 
times as may be deemed expedient. 

A well has been sunk near the southwest part of the 
Cemetery for the accommodation of proprietors of lots in 
that vicinity. 

Considerable attention has been paid to shaping and 
turfing the banks, where from the effects of rain and other 
causes, they presented an ill shaped and neglected appear- 
ance. In this way considerable improvement can still be 
made at a small outlay. The financial condition of the 
"Valley" is exhibited by the report of the Treasurer. 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

The whole number of interments in this Cemetery to 
the 1st instant is 57. Four lots have been sold the past sea- 
son, and the proceeds passed to the City Treasurer. Sev- 



104 



eral acres of land have been cleared of imderbrusli and 
objectionable trees, and such other improvements made as 
our limited means would allow. We believe the Pine 
Grove Cemetery is gradually receiving the favor of our 
citizens, and ere long will become an attractive resort for 
the living, as well as an appropriate resting place for the 
dead. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 



ELBllIDGE G. HAYNES, 
WATERMAN SMITH, 
EDWARD R. WARREN, 
EPHRAIM S. PEABODY, 

D. J. DANIELS, 
S. N. BELL, 
NATHAN PARKER, 
H. C. MERRILL, 

E. W. HARRINGTON, 
THOMAS STACK, 



Committee 



ON 



Cemeteries. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Committee on the Valley Cemetery : 

The Treasurer of the Committee on the Yalley Ceme- 
tery makes the following report of receipts and expendi- 
tures for the year ending Jan. 1, 18G3. 

The funds of the Valley Cemetery Jan. 1, 1862, were: 
Cosh on hand, - - - - 620 22 

Received for hay, - - - 

Wood, . - - - 

Of J. B. Sawyer, 

For Lots, 

Interest, 



22 


60 






40 


00 






272 


60 






921 


98 






43 


57 








-$1 


,920 


87 



105 



EXPENDITURES. 
The expenditures for the year have been as follows : 

Paid T. P. Clough, labor, - - |12 00 

M. L. Perry, " - - 1 00 

Bcnj. Hutchinson, " - - 1 00 

Wiliiam Doty, " - _- 24 21 

Daniel W. Davis, gates, repairing 

fences, &c., - - - - 20 65 

W. P. Stratton, repairing pump, 87 

Ben]. Stevens, labor, - - - 17 64 

C. S. Annis, " - - - 8 42 
Hibbard Stevens, breaking roads, 31 25 
Hibbard Stevens, team work, - 29 92 
John Jacobs, painting gates, - 1 25 
"W. P. ct T. H. Ford, iron gates, 28 00 
John B. Clarke, printing, - - 3 00 
Hibbard Stevens, labor, - - 130 83 
William McPherson, sinking well, 23 00 

D. W. Davis, building fence, - - 64 12 
Hibbard Stevens,' labor, - - 71 17 
Hibbard Stevens, team work, - - 51 90 
James A. Weston, surveying, 1861, 11 50 
James A. Weston, Treasurer, ^' 20 00 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, 1,369 14 



.,920 87 
Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES A. WESTON, 
Treas. of the Com. on the Yalley Cemetery. 
January 17, 1863. 

We have examined the foregoing report and find tlie same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

WATERMAN SMITH,) Sub-Committee 
H. C. MERRILL, [ on the 

NATHAN PARKER, ) Valley Cemetery. 

Auditor's Office, 
City of Manchester, Jan. 20, 1863. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the several items 
of receipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing re- 



106 

port of the Treasurer of the Yalley Cemetery and find the 
same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Auditor. 

Jan. 20, 1863. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
Read and accepted. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 
Jan. 20, 1863. In Board of Common Council, 
Read by its title and accepted. 

0. C. MOORE, Clerk. 



EESEEVED FUND. 



By Appropriation, $6,632 44 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid J. M. & E. R. Coburn for land on 

Hanover Street, - - ^300 00 

Transferred to Highway Dist. No. 2, 250 00 

Paid C. F. Livingston, printing Library 

Catalogue, - - - 200 00 

Transferred to School District No. 10, 250 00 
" Abatement of taxes, - 200 00 
" Highway District No. 5, SO 00 
" Highway District No. 6, 250 00 
" Highwav District No. 7, 125 00 
" Highway District No. 10, 100 00 
" Highway District No. 11, 100 00 
" Highway District No. 12, 75 00 
" Reservoirs, - - - 200 00 
« Militia, - - - 75 00 

" Printing and stationery, 150 00 
" Watering streets, - - 11 00 
" Piscataquog Bridge, 3,000 00 
Balance to new account, - 1,316 36 



,632 44 



107 
NOTES DUE THE CITY. 

January 1, 1857, Henry G, Lowell and 

others, - - - - 1,450 00 
Endorsement, - - - - 337 91 

$1,112 09 

April 1, 1857, Charles H. Brown, 2 notes, 

$50 each, . - - - 100 CO 

March 29, 1860, James Barrett, due in 

one year, - - - 250 00 

do. do. due in two years, 250 GO 
do. do. due in three years, 250 00 



750 00 



Dec. 18, 1860, Jackson & Kimball, due 

in four months, - - - 260 00 



Endorsement, - - - - 193 47 

6Q 53 



$2,028 62 

CITY PEOPEETY. 

City Hall and Lot at Cost, - - $35,815 00 

City Farm and permanent improve- 
ments, ----- 17,980 00 

Stock, Tools, Furniture and Provis- 
ions at City Farm, - - - 4,387 67 

Engine Houses and Appropriations, 

as per Engineer's Report, - - 31,525 22 

Reservoirs at Cost, _ . - 7,291 70 

Hearses, Horses, Tomb and New Cem- 
etery at Cost, - - - - 4,170 00 

Court House Lot at Cost, - - 9,514 56 

Common Sewers at Cost, - - 24,878 84 

Safe, Furniture and Gas Fixtures 

City Hall, - - - - 1,933 00 

Street Lanterns, Posts, Pipes & Frames, 1,011 00 

Cemetery, 3,580 00 

Water Works, 1,500 00 

Horses, Carts, Ploughs and Tools, 889 00 

$144,375 99 



108 



CITY SOLICITOR'S REPORT. 



Hillsborough, ss. 
City of Manchester. 

To the Hon. Board of Mayor and Aldermen and Common 

Council. 
Report of the Solicitor for the year ending Dec. 31. 1862. 

The City of Manchester has three actions upon the docket 
of the Supreme Judicial Court in said County, viz: Under- 
hill vs. said City ; Lahey vs. said City; and Dow vs. said 
City. All of w^hich, are expected to be tried January 
Term, 1863. 

Upon the session's docket there is one petition, viz ; the 
petition of C. M. Hubbard and others for a new highway 
in said city. Said action has been referred to the County 
Commissioners, and no report has as yet been returned. 

The Police records show the success that has attended 
that branch of the solicitor's business. 

Many questions have arisen in other branches of the 
Government of the City, and have been attended to ac- 
cording to the request of the officers of said city. 

The expense to said City for services under this branch 
of the Government, has been the sum of one hundred 
dollars. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES W. JOHNSON, Solicitor. 

Manchester, Dec. 31, 1862. 

Jan. 20, 1863. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
Read and accepted. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 

Jan. 20, 1863. In Board of Common Council, 
Read and accepted, 

0. C. MOORE, Clerk. 



109 
REPORT OF OVERSEER OF POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council of the City 
of Manchester. 
Ill compliance with the requirements of law the Over- 
seers of the Poor of said City, herewith present their an- 
nual report. 

Whole number of paupers assisted the past year, who 
had a settlement in the State, is 150, of which 104 have a 
settlement in this city, and 16 have a settlement in otlier 
towns in this State. There have died of the above num- 
ber during the past year, 6, 4 belonging to this city, and 
2 belonging to other towns in the State. 

The greatest number of paupers at the City Almshouse 
during tlie past year, 36 ; average number, 17. There 
have been 2 deaths and 1 birth there during the year. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 
D. A. BUNTON, Chairman. 

S. S. MOULTON, \ 

JEREMIAH ABBOTT, Overseers 
GEO. 0. CLARK, ( 

NAHUM BALDWIN, ^^ 

DENNIS CASSIDY, \ The Poor. 
PATRICK SHEHAN, / 

INVENTORY OF PERSONAL PROPERTY AT CITY 
ALMS-HOUSE, DEC. 25, 1862. 



8 working oxen. 


540 00 


10 cows, - _ _ _ 


250 00 


Three two-years old heifers, 


60 00 


1 two-years old bull. 


- 20 00 


1 calf, 7 months old, - 


14 00 


13 shoats, - - . - 


- 125 00 


20 tons No. 1 hay, - 


. 300 00 



Amount carried forward, 1,309 00 



no 



Amount brought forward, 
24 tons No. 2 hay, 
10 tons No. 3 hay, 
12 tons cornfodder and straw, 
450 bushels corn, 



70 

36 

12 

75 

16 

3 

250 

30 

50 

1 

o 



wheat, 
barley, ■ 

rye, - 

oats, 

beans, 

oil nuts, 

potatoes, 

beets, 

carrots, 

onions, 

peas. 



2000 lbs salt pork, 



100 



beef. 



12 barrels cider, 

3 " soap, - 

1 " salt pickles, 

31 " apples, 

10 gals, molasses and cask, 

50 lbs. sausage. 



480 

149 

260 

160 

50 

100 

1 

200 

77 

45 

200 

380 

28 



2 ox carts, 

3 05 sleds, 



cheese, 
butter, 

lard, - - - 
fresh pork, 
" beef, 
soap grease 
tobacco, 
nails, 
poultry, 
sugar, 
salt fish, 
dried apples, 
drills and wedges. 



1,309 00 
336 00 
100 00 
108 00 
450 00 
140 00 
45 00 

- 12 00 
45 00 

- 48 00 

1 00 

- 112 50 

12 00 

- 25 00 

1 00 
- 2 00 

- 200 00 

6 00 

24 00 

9 00 

4 00 
■ 31 00 

5 00 

- 6 00 
48 00 

• 32 78 
28 60 

- 11 20 

3 00 

6 00 
75 

- 6 00 
9 14 

- 5 85 
9 00 

- 19 00 

6 00 

100 00 

45 00 



Amount carried forward, 



3,361 82 



Ill 



imount brought forward, 


3,361 82 


1 hay wagon, . . - 


- 80 00 


2 single wagons, - . - 


75 00 


1 single sleigh, - - - 


- 15 00 


2 buffalo robes, - . . 


5 00 


1 single harness, - - - 


- 6 00 


1 lead harness, . . . 


4 00 


Curry combs, cards and brushes, 


.1 00 


Bridle, halter and blankets. 


2 00 


12 rakes, - - - . 


2 00 


11 hay forks, - - - - 


- 6 00 


6 sickles, - - . . 


2 00 


2 grain cradles, - - . 


4 00 


15 Scythes, . - . 


5 00 


10 scythe snathes, - - - 


5 00 


1 cross cut saw, - - - 


5 00 


1 string of bells, - - . 


1 25 


1 corn sheller, - . . 


6 00 


6 ox yokes and bows. 


18 00 


8 plows, _ . . . 


- 75 00 


49 hens, 


16 00 


18 meal bags, _ _ . 


6 00 


6 bushels ears pop corn, - 


6 00 


2 " salt, - 


1 00 


12 lbs. copperas, - - - 


50 


6 baskets, - - - _ 


2 OO 


2 drags, 


6 00 


2 cultivators, . . . 


6 CO 


2 scalding tubs, - _ - 


- 1 50 


Rope and block, 


3 00 


Beetle and wedges, - 


1 00 


Scales and steelyards. 


- 14 00 


1 winnowing mill. 


- 8 00 


1 hay cutter, 


4 00 


Tie bows and rings, 


- 2 00 


29 tie chains, - - - 


6 00 


2 grind stones, . - - 


3 00 


1 wheelbarrow, 


2 50 


1 hand sled, - - - . 


- 1 00 


Amount carried forward, 


3,767 57 



112 



Amount brouglit forward, 


3,767 57 


5 wrenches, _ _ _ 


1 50 


3 mason trowels, - - - 


- 1 25 


Oak timber, 


- 10 00 


Chest of tools, 


15 00 


2 wood saws, _ _ - 


- 1 00 


2 traps, 


50 


1 shaving horse, - - « 


1 00 


7 axes, . . . _ 


6 00 


Vise and saw set, - - - 


- 2 50 


5 ladders, - - - - 


5 03 


7 shovels, - - - - 


- 5 00 


2 spades, - - - - 


1 00 


6 manure forks, - - - 


3 00 


5 bog hoes, - - - 


- 1 00 


1 bush hook, _ _ _ 


1 00 


Cart spires, _ _ . 


- 8 00 


2 harrows, - - - - 


- 10 00 


1000 ft. pine lumber. 


10 00 


12 chestnut posts, 


1 50 


2 gravel scrapers, 


6 00 


1 set measures. 


1 00 


Set of fetters, 


7 00 


Block and chains, - - - 


- 17 00 


Haud-cuifs, _ - _ 


3 00 


12 meat barrels, _ . - 


- 6 00 


17 cider " - - - 


17 00 


40 lbs. candles. 


- 5 00 


Meat safe, . _ . 


1 00 


Cook and other stoves, - 


- 56 00 


Iron furnace, _ _ _ 


2 00 


12 tables, - - - - 


- 16 00 


1 clock, - - - - 


3 00 


2 rocking chairs, - - - 


- 3 00 


18 dining chairs, 


4 50 


18 common " - . - 


- 3 00 


12 window curtains, 


2 00 


9 boxes, - - - - 


- 75 


6 looking glasses, - 


3 00 


Amount carried forward, 


4,008 07 



113 

Amount brought forward, 

7 wasli tubs, - - - - 
6 stone pots, _ . _ 
20 cartlion pots, 
10 pails, - - - - 
6 butter tubs, - - - - 
Milk cans and measures, 

5 milk pails, - - - - 
48 milk pans, . . _ 

6 sugar buckets, _ _ . 

1 cream pot, . _ - 

2 cheese safes, . . - 
1 pie cupboard, _ - . 
1 churn, . _ - - 
Cheese press, - . - - 
Cheese tub, - - - - 
Cheese hoops, - - - - 
1 curd cutter, . . - 

1 barrel flour, - - - - 

2 bushels corn and rye meal, - 
20 gallons apple sauce and tub. 
Cheese tongs and basket, - 

2 porcelain kettles, 

1 mixing trough, 

1 salt mortar, . . . 

Coffee and tea pots, - 

Caster, pepper box and salt dish, 

20 chambers and bed pans, - 

Flatiron, shovel and tongs, 

Knives, forks, and spoons, - 

Rolling pin aud cake board. 

Dinner bell, _ . . 

4 light stands, . . - 

Window brush. 

Clothes horses, - - - 

1 Union cradle, 

1 bread trough, - - - 

Wash benches and boards, 

25 towels, , - - - 

Amount carried forward. 



4,008 


07 


- 2 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


1 


25 


- 1 


00 




50 


- 1 


50 


G 


00 


1 


00 




75 


- 5 


00 


- 2 


00 


5 


00 


- o 


00 


- 1 


50 


- 1 


50 


1 


25 


- 9 


00 


- 2 


00 


6 


00 


- 


75 


1 


00 


2 


50 


- 


25 


2 


00 


- 


75 


- 3 


00 


- 2 


50 


T 


00 


- 1 


00 




75 


2 


00 




50 


- 2 


00 


- 1 


50 


1 


00 


- 1 


50 


3 


00 


4,097 


32 



114 



lunt brought forward, 


4,097 32 


School and other books, - 


3 00 


New cloth on hand. 


7 00 


Table covers, - - - - 


2 50 


Roller cloths, . - . 


1 50 


23 bedsteads and cords, - 


23 00 


Clothes lines and pins, 


1 00 


Floor and other brushes, - 


- 1 00 


3 Russia iron bake pans. 


2 00 


Butcher and carving knives, - 


- 1 25 


Tea tray and waiter, - 


1 50 


8 jugs, 


- 1 00 


3 dish pans, - - - - 


60 


Knife tray and seive, 


75 


Flesh fork, . . . - 


25 


Copper boiler, - - - 
Candle sticks and snuffers, 


1 50 

50 


Candle molds, - - - 


50 


Lanterns and lamps, 


- 3 00 


Dress table, _ . - 


50 


Reel, swifts, and spinning wheel, 

2 chopping knives, 

1 bureau, . _ . . 


- 1 00 

25 

- 3 00 


2 chests of drawers. 


3 00 


2 trunks, - - - . 


- 2 00 


Dining set and other crockery ware, 15 00 


Tin ware, _ . . . 


- 6 00 


Feather beds and bedding, - 


- 120 00 


2 hay racks, - - - - 


12 00 


1 ton hard coal. 


10 00 


6 bars soap, - - - . - 
4 flails, - - . - 


1 50 
1 00 


4 muzzle baskets, - - - 


75 


Cops and pin. 

Thread, needles and yarn, 


1 00 
- 4 00 


20 bushels ashes. 


3 00 


Meal chest, _ - - - 


- 3 00 


8 feed boxes, 


2 00 


1 mixing box, _ . . 


- 1 50 



Amount carried forward, 4,339 67 



115 

Amount brought forward, 4,339 67 



Cask of lime, . - - 


1 00 


15 hoes, - - - - 


- 5 00 


4 stone hammers. 


10 00 


4 iron bars, - - - 


- 4 00 


2 picks, . . . - 


1 00 


5 large chains. 


- 10 00 


5 stake chains, - - - 


2 50 


1 whiffletree chain, - 


50 


The flag of our country. 


5 00 


50 dry casks, - 


6 00 


4 gal. boiled cider. 


2 00 


I snow scraper, 


- 1 00 


2 Grain cradles. 


4 06 




4,391 73 


Deduct error on first page, 


25 




i4.391 48 



Jan. 20, 1863. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
Read and accepted, 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 

Jan, 20, 1863. In Board of Common Council, 
Read and accepted. 

0, C. MOORE, Clerk. 



PIRE DEPARTMENT. 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 

Engineers' Room, 
Manchester, Jan. 31, 1863. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, 

and the City Council: 

The Annual Report of the Fire Department, which is 
required of the Chief Engineer, is herewith presented. As 
you will perceive, it covers the action of the Department 
for the past year, its present condition and its efficiency in 
every emergency which it has been required to meet. It 
embraces a list of the officers and members of each branch 
of the service, with their ages and residences ; the location 
and condition of the several Houses, Machines and the 
Apparatus ; a record of the reservoirs, cisterns and wells 
from which water may be drawn ; an account of the fires 
within the past year, with the estimated amount of the va- 
rious losses ; and an appraisal of the property in the con- 
trol of the Department. 

The present force consists of a Chief Engineer with four 
assistants ; three steam Engine Companies of 40 men ; a 
Hose Company of 30 men, and a Hook and Ladder Com- 
pany of 25 men, — making a force of only 95 men besides 
the Chief and his Staff of Assistants. This limited force, 
with the powerful aid of steam, does the required work 
more effectually than the seven hundred well organized and 
disciplined men of former years with hand machines, and 
at an economy that the tax-payer knows well how to ap- 
preciate. 

The property belonging to the Department is now in good 
condition. The Engine Houses in actual use are three — 



118 



that on Yine street, arranged for the Fire King and the 
Amoskeag steamers, and the Hose Company — that at Pis- 
cataqiiog, on Main street, used for the E. W. Harrington 
steamer, and that on Manchester street appropriated to the 
use of the Hook and Ladder Company. These being in 
constant occupation are kept in proper repair. The house 
at Amoskeag, now unused except as a Ward Room, re- 
quires no expenditure for the present ; that on Chestnut 
street is only used for the storage of the old hand machine, 
" A. C. Wallace," and until appropriated to some more ac- 
tive service will demand no appropriation for repairs. The 
upper room is occupied temporarily by the School Depart- 
ment for a primary school. The building is not now re- 
quired by the Department and might be sold for a shop or 
tenement, or if the city should so determine, might be eco- 
nomically remoddelled into a Ward Room for use of any 
ward now unprovided with proper rooms for holding ward 
meetings. 

The machines and the entire fire apparatus are in excel- 
lent order, and are more valuable by a thousand dollars 
than at the commencement of the year covered by this re- 
port. A new and beautiful Hose Carriage has been added 
to the Department at a cost of $535, and the hose has been 
increased by the addition of 750 feet, at an expense of 
about $600. 

A new Reservoir has been constructed on Clinton street 
in Ward 7, easy of access, with an abundant supply of 
water for any emergency. The reservoir on Pine street 
between Manchester and Merrimack streets, and that on 
Central street, at its junction with Pine, liave been fur- 
nished with the means of a constant supply, by extending a 
cement pipe from the gate at the corner of Pine and Han- 
over streets through Pine street to Central. 

During the year the Company at Amoskeag has been dis- 
banded, and the machine, the old Merrimack, sold for the 
sum of $425. There is now on hand and for sale the hand 
machine, formerly used in Ward 7, the " A. C. Wallace." 
It is housed on Chestnut street, and receives all proper 
care from the Chief Engineer. It is one of the best ma- 
chines used by the city and an excellent one for any small 
town that may be in need. 



119 



The number of fires during tlie past year has not been 
so great as in many previous years, but several of them 
have been very destructive of property ; consequently the 
loss exceeds the average for several preceding years. There 
have been seven fires and six alarms, as follovs^ : 

1st Fire. On the 31st day of December, 1861, Mr. 
Curtis' Slaughter House in Piscataquog was burned. 
Loss 1300. 

2d. May 19th, occiirred the heavy fire extending from 
Hanover to Manchester streets. Loss $15,000. 

3d. June 2d was the fire an Elm street, contiguous to 
the Elm Street House.. Loss $8,000. 

4th. June 5th, at 6 o'clock, P. M., the fire at Piscata- 
quog was discovered, destroying the Steam Mill and 
Brewery of Messrs. Haines & Wallace. Loss $12,000. 

5th. Aug. 29th, a fire occurred at Piscataquog, in 
the westei'ly part of the village, destroying tlie A. W. 
Dickey house. Loss $1,000. 

6th. Sept. 17th, a slight fire on Central street, in 
stable. Loss trifling. 

7th. Nov. 1st, the buildings of George Porter, at 
Manchester Centre, were burned. Loss 82,500. 

Alarms. On the 29th of February there were two alarms 
given, one from Amherst street, and the other from Merri- 
mack. On the lltli of May an alarm was given in Ward 
7. There were other alarms, on which the Department 
came out, on the 10th and the IGth of Sept. and on the 
11th of November. 

The expenses of the Department have not equalled the 
appropriation for the year. The sum appropriated was 
$5,000 to which if we add an unexpended balance of last 
year, and the receipts for an engine sold, we shall have, ac- 
cording to the City Clerk's report, $7,906.31. We have 
expended $5,450.00, leaving on hand an unexpended bal- 
ance of $2,461.31, But in the bills paid by the Engineers 
this year, is one of $1,703,44 contracted in 1859, and 
one of $20 for rent of land for engine house, which should 
be paid by ^the city from the incidental appropriation. Then 
there is charged one half of the expense of keeping five 
horses when only four have been used by the Department, 
making an additional sum of $125.00. 



120 

The expenditures of the Department are presented as 
follows : 

Appropriations and receipts, - - $7,906 31 

Expended by our order, - 4,226 56 

Old bills, 1859, - - - 1,073 44 
Keeping of fifth horse not used by us, 125 00 
Rent of land, .... 20 00 

15,445 00 



Leaving a balance carried to new account, 82,461 31 

The present condition of the Department is of such a 
satisfactory character as to need but few improvements for the 
year to come. The machines and all the apparatus for extin- 
guishing fires are adequate to the present wants of the city. 
If an additional reservoir could be constructed in the north- 
east section of the city near the corner of Pine and Pros- 
pect streets, it would add to tlie security of property in the 
vicinity. A cement pipe could easily be laid to conduct the 
surplus water from the Company's Reservoir and afford an 
abundant supply for the purpose of extinguishing fires in 
that locality. 

It may not bo out of place here to suggest, that the Po- 
lice could aid the Department more effectually than they 
generally do, by exercising their authority at fires, making 
passage ways among the crowd or holding the ])eople in re- 
straint, when in their anxiety they press in the way of the 
firemen. It is not legitimately within the sphere of their 
dut}", but when their efforts are required for the public ad- 
vantage, they will not be likely to complain if called upon 
for such extra service. 

In many cities there are Relief Associations for a two- 
fold purpose, managed by trustees chosen by the Depart- 
ment and co-operating with it for the benefit of such per- 
sons as may become disabled or injured while engaged in 
the service, and also for the purpose of receiving contribu- 
tions from the public and appropriating them to aid citi- 
zens who have suffered losses by fire. These are both com- 
mendal)le objects, and if the examples of other cities should 
be followed by us, tliere can be no doubt but that a bene- 
ficial result would follow it. 

In the following pages will be found a catalogue of the 
Department, with schedules and appraisals of property. 



121 

BOAED OF ENGINEERS. 



CHIEF. 

DANIEL W. FLING. 

ASSISTANTS. 

CHAS. H. G. FOSS, Clerk. E. W. HARRINGTON, 
ISRAEL DOW, N. S. BEAN. 



COMPANY ORGANIZATIONS, 



AND SCUEDULE OF PROPEETY ArPRCPRIATED TO EACH COMPANY. 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGLNE COMPANY, 
No. 1. 

liOXJSE OJSr -VIXsTE STREET. 
OFFICERS. 

J. C. RICKER. Foreman. 
SIDNEY SMITH, Assistant. 
A. A. BALCH, Clerk. 
J. C. RICKER, Treasurer. 

MEMBERS. 
Nnnios. Ages. Residences. 

J. C. Ricker, 44 9 Prospect St. 

Sidney Smith, 39 138 South Chestnut St. 

Henry Foster, 42 8 Machine Shop Corp. 

Henry Whritner, 40 27 " " 

John G. Durant, 38 19 " " " 

E. B. Edwards, 37 119 Amoskeag Corp. 

N. B. Bickford, 30 57 Machine Shop Corp. 

A. A. Balch, 34 Parsons' Block, Elm St. 

Geo. T. Demary, 27 6 Amoskeag Corp. 



122 



Horace Nichols, 
Samuel S. Young, 
Simon E. Furlong, 
Orin E. Kimball, 
S. J. Patten, 



31 

30 
29 
28 

OS 



5 Machine Shop Corp. 
9 Merrimack St. 
2 Machine Shop. Corp. 
184 Manchester St. 



High St. 



James Einley, 
Erastus Cutting, 
Henry Gardner, 
John Caswell, 



VOLUNTEERS. 

21 2 Machine Shop Corp. 

28 119 Pine St. 

20 2 Machine Shop Corp. 

18 2 " " " 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



N. S. Bean, 
F. Higgins, 
H. Huse, 
H. B. Pierce, 
Fred. G. Robj, 
A. Hollis, 



H. Campbell, 
C. P. Clement, 
Joseph Foss, 
Chas. Durgin, 
Thos. Bond. 



APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY. 



Steamer, 

Hose carriage, - 

600 feet rubber hose, 

1150 feet other hose, 

6 rubber suits, 

14 woolen jackets, 

G torclies, 

2 branch hose pipes, - 

1 " " with 

2 coppei: branches, 

2 blunderbusses, 

6 shoulder straps, belts 

3 stoves and pipe, 
Furniture in liall, 
1 bed complete, - 

4 tons Scotch coal, - 
8 tons hard coal, 

4 cords soft wood, 
1 gallon oil. 



- $3,000 00 

- 250 00 
5C0 00 

- 900 00 

25 00 

- 122 50 

20 00 

24 00 

gate, 15 00 

- 14 00 
20 00 

and spanners, 20 00 

- 40 00 

30 00 

- 35 00 
44 00 

- 30 00 
18 00 

1 50 



Amount carried forward, 



5,109 00 



123 



Amount brought forward, 

1 gallon spirits 

2 gallons sts. oil, 
2 quarts fluid, 

6 lanterns, 

5 oil and fluid cans, 

1 cistern and pipe, 

70 feet small rubber hose, 

1 table, - - - 

1 curtain, _ - - 

2 axes, . _ - 
1 bench vise, 

1 slide wrench, 

1 hammer, wrenches, &c. 

2 Jack screws, 
2 pair blankets, 
1 pair harnesses, 
14 badges, 

1 iron bar, - - - 
1 pump and pipe. 



5,109 


00 




50 


1 


75 


- 


40 


15 


00 


- 7 


50 


11 


00 


5 


00 


- 2 


25 


o 
O 


00 


- 2 


50 


1 


00 


2 


50 


5 


00 


13 


00 


45 


00 


12 


00 




83 


7 


00 



15,249 23 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, 

No. 2. 
liOXJSE onsr -viiste sti?,eet. 

OFFICERS. 

JAMES PHERSON, Foreman. 

D. T. COLLINS, Assistant. 

MOSES 0. PEARSON,*- 67fr^«w^ Treas. 



Namos. 

J. F. Pherson, 
D. T. Collins, 
H. R. Dcmary, 
J. S. Bacheller, 
D. W. Morse, 
M. 0. Pearson, 



MEMBERS. 

Ages. Residences. 

32 44 Stark Corp. 

25 1 Amherst Street. 

25 82 Central, cor. Pine St. 

37 36 Machine Shop. 

26 67 Amherst Street. 

38 21 Stark Corp. 



124 



J. A. Weeks, 


80 Steamer house, Vine st. 


B. T. Rast, 


31 66 Park st. 




A. M. Keniston, 


38 44 Stark Corp. 


F. H. Eaton 


21 9 Chestnut st. 


S. P. Duntley, 


38 7 Machine Shop. 


E. Chandler, 


35 15 " 


u 


W. E. Demarj, 


21 81 Central st. 


S. Thompson, 


29 29 Stark Corp. 


APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY. 




Steamer, 


- $3,000 00 


Hose carriage, - 


250 


00 


450 feet rubber hose. 


- 445 


00 


900 feet other hose. 


675 


00 


14 rubber suits, - 


- 105 


00 


12 woolen jackets 


48 


00 


7 torches, 


- 20 


00 


2 blunderbusses, 


24 


00 


2 lanterns, - 


5 


00 


2 lanterns. 


2 


00 


Shoulder straps, belts and spanners, 40 


00 


2 jack screws. 


- 5 


00 


2 copper branches. 


- 14 


00 


1 " " with gate, - 15 


00 


3 stoves and pipe, 


- 50 


00 


1 sheet iron pan. 


5 


00 


12 badges, 


- 12 


75 


2 two gallon oil cans, 


1 one gal. do. 4 


50 


1 pair harnesses. 


50 


00 


4 pairs blankets, - 


6 


00 


Furniture and fixtur« 


3s in hall, - 50 


00 


1 bed, complete,/* 


- 25 


00 


4 tons Scotch coal, 


- 44 


00 


3 tons hard coal, 


30 


00 


4 cords soft wood, 


- 18 


00 


1 gallon spirits, 




50 


1 bench and vise, - 


5 


00 


1 slide wrench, 


. 1 


00 


1 hammer, - 


- 


83 



Amount carried forward, 4,952 58 



125 

Amount brought forward, 4,952 58 

1 rotary pump, - - - 15 00 

1 clock, 8 00 

1 iron bar, - . . . 83 

2 shovels, 1 50 

2 axes, 3 00 



-$1,980 91 



THE E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE ENGINE 

COMPANY, NO. 3. » 

noxjSE oivr ]vi.A.i3sr st., i>iso.A.a7^A.QXJoa, 

OFFICERS. 

JOHN PATTERSON, Foreman. 
JAMES W. PRESTON, Assistant. 
HORATIO FRADD, Clerk and Treas. 





MEMBERS. 




Karnes. 


Ages. 


Residences, 


J. Patterson, 


31 


Main Street. 


J. W. Preston, 


39 


Pleasant Street, 


A. Waldron, 


40 


Amoskeag Corporation 


A. D. Hatch, 


42 


Granite Street. 


H. Fradd, 


31 


Pleasant Street. 


A. C. Wallace, 


42 


Granite Street. 


H. H. Noyes, 


35 


Bedford Road. 


S. C. Holt, 


35 


Clinton Street. 


F. G. Wyman, 


36 


Summer Street. 


L. C. Trucll, 


35 


Mast Landing. 


C. F. Truell, 


23 


Bedford Road. 


W. Green, 


38 


Mast Road. 


APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY. 


Steamer, - 


... 


$2,750 00 


Hose Carriage, 


- 


150 00 


200 feet rubber 


hose, - 


- 200 00 


900 feet common hose, - 


675 00 


12 hosemen's suits, rubber, - 


- 60 CO 


4 torches, 


- 


- 8 00 



Amount carried forward, 3,843 00 



126 



Amount brought forward, 


3,843 00 


1 stove, - - - - 


- 18 00 


1 branch, with gate, 


- 15 00 


2 jack-screws, . . - 


5 00 


1 vise and bench, - - - 


- 5 00 


1 signal lantern. 


15 00 


6 settees, . . . . 


- 20 00 


7 office chairs, - - - 


- 8 00 


1 chandelier, _ . _ 


- 10 00 


1 pair harnesses. 


40 00 


1 pan- blankets, - - - 
1 sheet iron pan, 


6 00 


5 00 


1 table, 


- 5 00 


1 rotary pump, - - - 
4 tons Scotch coal, - 


15 00 
- 44 00 


2 tons hard coal, 


20 00 


1 lantern, - . . . 


- 2 00 


2 blunderbusses, - - - 


- 15 00 


8 spanner belts and spanners, 
1 shovel, _ . - . 


8 00 

83 


1 iron bar, . . - . 


- 1 00 


12 woolen jackets. 


- 105 00 


1 oil can, - - - - 


2 00 


2 galls, sperm oil, - 

3 wash dishes, - - - 


- 4 00 
1 60 


1 tackle and fall, - - - 


- 5 00 


1 coal hod, 


1 00 


3 trumpets, - - - - 


- 6 00 


3 galls neats oil, 


4 50 


18 feet small rubber hose, 


3 50 



14,253 33 



127 
PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

OFFICERS. 

C. R. COLLEY, Foreman. 
A. J. WOODBURY, Assistant. 
J. E. WALKER, Clerk. 
DAVID THAYER, Treasurer. 



Names. 

C. R. Colley, 
A. J. Woodbury, 
J. E. Walker, 
J. D. Howard, 
Walter Neal, 
David Thayer, 
J. G. Knight, 
George Holbrook, 
W. H. Gilmore, 
Benjamin Spofford, 
S. B. Hope, 
J. H. Fullerton, 
E. M. Holmes, 
G. H. Gerry, 
E. H. Wells, 
Russell Bryant, 
I. W. Pennock, 
A. H. Merrill, 
G. S. Holmes, 
G. A. Ames, 
A. J. Butterfield, 

A. 1. Pollard, 
M. A. Flint, 
Ezra Huntington, 
G. W. Johnson, 

B. W. Robinson, 
J. N. Emerson, 
Leonard Shelters, 
G. W. Gardner, 
Albert Maxfield, 



MEMBERS. 

ASCB. 



Residences. 



36 Upper end Manchester St. 
29 79 Laurel Street. 

33 12 Orange " 

32 77 Amherst " 

37 58 Merrimack " 
43 50 Walnut " 
36 48 Bridge " 

32 84 Merrimack " 

33 84 " " 

36 Upper end Hanover St. 

35 29 Concord, Street, 

26 25 Manchester Corp. 

40 141 Pine Street 

29 24 Birch " 

29 1 Merrimack " 

35 65 Pine " 

30 10 Union Building. 

30 42 Manchester Street, 

36 Upper end Hanover St. 

24 53 Water Street, 

48 Upper end Manchester St. 

33 42 Manchester Street, 

26 1 Print Works Corp. 

34 26 " " " 

33 12 Pine Street. 

38 187 Hanover " 

27 28 Birch " 

25 Chestnut " 

31 75 Merrimack " 
21 25 Stark Corporation. 



128 



APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY. 



1 hose carriage, - - - 


$370 00 


2,850 feet hose, 


2,100 00 


6 hosemeii's suits. 


30 00 . 


9 woolen jackets, - - . 


38 25 


8 pair rubber overalls, - 


- 16 00 


2 rubber jackets, - - - 


- 10 00 


4 torches, - - - 


8 00 


10 spanners and belts, 


- 10 00 


12 spanners, - - . 
2 stoves and pipe, - - - 


4 00 
- 22 00 


20 badges, ... 


20 00 


1 signal lantern, - . - 


- 12 00 


3 trumpets, - - - - 
1 hose washer and fixtures, 


9 00 
- 40 00 


2 axes, . . . . 


3 00 


2 slide wrenches, - - - 


- 2 00 


18 patches, . . . . 
Ijack, .... 
1 shovel, 


8 00 
1 00 

83 


1 four gallon can, 


2 00 


1 hammer, _ - . . 


- 1 00 


1 blunderbuss, - - - 


12 00 


1 breast-plate, ... 


- 3 00 


25 chairs, new, - 


36 00 


14 chairs, .... 


- 6 50 


1 table, .... 


5 00 


1 looking-glass. 


- 8 00 


1 chandelier, - . . 


8 00 




$2,785 58 



129 



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, NO. 1. 

OFFICERS. 

DAVID H. YOUNG, Foreman. 
GEORGE H. DUDLEY, Assistant. 
JOHN L. BRADFORD, Clerk and Treas. 



MEMBERS. 

Names. Ages. 

David H. Young, 29 

George H. Dudley, 32 

John L. Bradford, 42 

C. E. Clough, 27 

M. E. George, 55 

H. W. Savory, 54 

M. L. Hunkins, 50 

Moulton Knowles, 51 

J. N. Heath, 36 

H. L. Drew, 45 

J. R. Paige, 50 

John H, Maynard, 57 

H. Chase, 56 

Chas. Canfield, 42 

F. S. Lynch, 34 

F. A. Senter, 37 

T. E. Dudley, 35 

E. G. Haines, 47 
W. Crescey, 44 

F. D. Chase, 23 
C. D. Rowell, 29 
John K. Wilson, 25 
George W. Taylor, 44 
A.J.Dickey, 34 
J. B. Moore. 



Rosideuces, 

80 Bridge Street. 

97 Laurel 

45 Bridge 

80 " 

167 Manchester 

121 Central 

52 Orange 

97 Union 

36 Manchester 

89 Hanover 

21 Orange 

Manchester 

18 Print Works Corp. 

18 Amoskeag " 

135 Hanover Street. 

39 Pine '' 

59 " " 
Laurel " 

60 Park " 
29 Print Works Corp. 
52 Merrimack Street. 
21 Bridge " 
39 Amoskeag Corp. 
15 " " 



130 

APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY. 



Carriage, - - - - 
525 feet ladders, - 


- $150 00 
- 125 00 


4 large and 3 small hooks, 


40 00 


1 rope, 


- 20 00 


3 chairs, - - - - 


75 


45 badges, - - - . 
1 signal lantern, 


- 9 00 
10 00 


4 torches, 1 trumpet, - 
4 axes, shovel and bar, 


9 00 
5 00 


2 hay forks, 2 buckets, 


6 00 


ISign, - - - 

Ijack, 

^ cord wood, 


12 00 

2 00 
2 00 







1390 75 



MERRIMACK HAND ENGINE COMPANY. 
(Company disbanded, July, 1862.) 

APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY. 

5 hosemen's suits, - - $12 50 

1 signal lantern, - - 5 00 

4 torches, 8 00 

2 trumpets, . - . - 6 00 
1 copper pump, - - 3 50 

5 settees, - - - 13 00 

3 office chairs, - - - 3 00 
1 lantern, .... 1 00 
1 slide wrench, - - - - 1 00 

$53 00 

IPPRAISAfa OF REAL ESTATE BELONGING TO THE DEPARTMENT. 

House and land on Yine street, $7,720 47 
House at Piscataquog, 625 00 

House at Amoskeag, 300 00 

House and land on Manchester st. 950 00 
House and land on Chestnut st. 1,100 00 

$10,G95 47 



131 

APPRAISAL OF MISCELLANEOUS APPARATUS, &C. 

18 settees, ... - $18 00 

2 office chairs, - - - - 2 00 

5 common chairs, - - - 1 75 

1 desk, 1 50 

2 stoves and pipe, - - - - 5 00 
Engine No. 7, - - - - 900 00 
Gas fixtures, ... 5 00 
Copper pump, ... - 3 00 

1936 25 

PROPERTY IN engineers' ROOM.' 

5 rubber coats, - - - |25 00 

7 engineer's hats, - - 39 00 

7 badges, .... 3 50 

$67 50 

CONDITION OF STOVES, FURNACES, &C. 

RECAPITULATION OF COMPANIES. 



Steamer Amoskeag, - 
Steamer Fire King, 
Steamer E. W. Harrington, 
Pennacook Hose Company, 
Hook and Ladder, 
Real estate, . . - 
Miscellaneous, . - - 
In Engineers' room, 
The old Merrimack Co., 



Stoves in good condition, 
Stoves in bad condition. 
Furnaces, - - - 
Fireplaces, 
Cooking ranges, - 
Blacksmith forges, - 
Stationary engines, 



$5,249 23 
4,980 91 
4,253 33 

2,785 58 


390 


75 


10,645 


47 


936 


25 


67 


50 


53 


00 


$29,362 02 


_ 


4837 


. 


261 


. 


56 


_ 


27 


. 


14 


. 


23 


- 


- 7 



132 

CISTERNS AND RESERYOIRS, 
June 31, 1862. 



ISo.l 



Location. 



Distance 
to water. 



Deptli of 

Water. 



Sand.|9P^^^^-|Feed Gates. 



llElm Street, at City Hall, 

2 Elm Street, near Smyth's Block, 

3 Gate, Elm-street House, 

4 Cor. Chestnut and Hanover Sts, 

6 Mitchell's, on Manchester St., 

6|McQueston's on Merrimack St., 

Pine Street, betw'n Manchester 

and Merrimack Streets, 
Junction Hanover and Pine Sts. 

•.Gate, June. Hanover & Fine Sts, 

10 Junction Pine and Central Sts., 

ll'junction Elm and Myrtle Sts. 

12 Lowell Street, at School House 

1.3,Lowell Street, near Nashua, 

14 Amherst and Chester Streets, 

15 June. Chestnut & Amherst Sts. 
lOCentre of Tremont Square, 
17jBridge Street, head of Birch, 
is'junc. Chestnut and Orange Sts., 
19 Hanover Street, (Head.) 

20 Steam Mill, Janesville, 

21 June. Beech and Laurel Streets 

22 June. Walnut and Amherst Sts. 

23 June. Chestnut & Harrison Sts., 

21 Post Office, Hanover Street, 

25: Baker ville, 

25i'Squog, Granite Street, near 

I Walker & Holmes', 
27i'Squog, corner Walnut Street, 

SSj'Squog, near Steam Mill, -Squog 

I River, 
39: 'Squog, Granite Street, 

30'Squog, Amherst Street, near 

Bowman Place, 
.31|'Skeag, Penstock.n.Batting Mill, 
32 'Squog, Clinton St. 



Ft.' In. 
8" 2 

jS\5 

S. 5 2 
1 



1 

N. 8 



5 C 

IS" 6 1 
S. 6 

N. 3 5 

S. 3 2 

8 2 

7 5 

1 10 

2 10 
5 8 

N. G 

S. 6 

5 

5 3 

Level, 

5 

8 3 
2 3 



f) 4 
1 8 



^■.12 
S. 12 



Ft. In. 

5 2 



Good. 
5 

7 4 
7 4 
Good. 



In. 




17 
None 



None. 



None. 
4 

None. 

None 

None. 

3 

15 
10 

21) 

None 
None 

None 
None 

3 
None. 
None. 



20 

None. 



None. 
None. 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
T 

1 

Good. 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



2 
Good. 



Cor. Hanover 
& Chest. Sts. 

Concord sq. 
Feeds No. 1. 

Worthless. 

Han. and Pine 
Streets. 

Feeds No. 6. 



Gate. 



Gate feeds 
Nos. 1 and 5. 



133 



In closing this Report the Chief Engineer takes pleasure 
in bearing testimony to the cordial and constant co-opera- 
tion of his Assistants in the Board of Engineers, and to 
the promptness and energy which the entire Department 
have manifested during the year. There has been perfect 
harmony in every branch of the service, and an entire de- 
votion to the interests of the public, which it is hoped will 
ever characterize the firemen of Manchester. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DANIEL W. FLING, 

Chief Engineer. 
Feb. 3, 1863. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
Read and accepted. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 
Feb. 3, 1863. In Board of Common Council, 
Read and accepted, in concurrence. 

0. C. MOORE, Clerk. 



THE 



SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL EEPORT 



OP THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



OP THE 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



E'Oiv "The; ■x'es.^Si.i*. 



1862. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In School Committee, > 

Jan. 5, 1863. $ 
A Special Committee presented the accompanying Annual lleport, which 
was adopted by the Committee and ordered to be presented to the City 
Council. JAMES B. STRAW, Clerk. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 

Jan. 5, 1863. 

The Annual Report of the School Committee was read, accepted and 
ordered to be printed in connection with the Annual City Reports. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 



In Common Council. } 

Jan. 5, 1863. 5 
The Report of the School Committee, sent down from Board of Mayor 
and Aldermen, was read, accepted and ordered to be printed, in concur- 
rence. O. C. MOORE, Clerk. 



EEPOET. 



To His Honor, the Mayor, 

and the Citjj Council: 

111 preparing our Annual Report for the year just gone 
by, we have adopted the record of our official proceedings 
as the true index of our public acts. They mark our 
course, and show how we have walked the beaten path of 
our predecessors, or how diverged from established ways 
and struck out new passages across the field of our labors. 

We have had but one great object in view, and have so 
directed our efforts as most prudently and successfully to 
accomplish it. It has been our sole aim to elevate the 
character of our public schools, — to employ the best teachers 
and adopt the most valuable text books, — and to throw 
around the school room such attractions and restraints as 
would on the one hand allure our children to its duties, 
and on the other guard them from the evil influences which 
they must daily meet, when removed from the protection 
of the home circle. 

This we have endeavored to do by a judicious expendi- 
ture of the money placed at our disposal, by harmony of 
action in our united capacity, a cordial co-operation with 
teachers in their legitimate labors, encouraging and stim- 
ulating the pupils to a higher standard of moral and intel- 
lectual excellence, and by constant and unsparing efforts, 
to impress the public with the importance of manifesting a 
permanent and controlling interest in the education of the 
young. 



138 

We have not accomplished all that the cause demands. 
We are not wholly devoted to it, nor are we more than 
many others willing to appropriate time and patience and 
effort such as the work requires. Whatever we have ac- 
complished is but the beginning of that yet to be done. 

Every grade of our public schools invites new labor — 
more direct and earnest instruction, broader views of sub- 
jects daily considered, and the exercise of more active 
thought on the part of the pupil. 

Our schools are too large — the labors of a teacher are 
too minutely subdivided in order that each pupil may re- 
ceive a share of attention. The consequence is superficial 
instruction — the partial teaching of great principles — the 
inculcation of half-truths, and " Half-truths are whole 
errors." 

A greater amount of apparatus, of maps, books of refer- 
ence, and in some localities better school rooms and other 
educational facilities should be provided. 

The instruction should embrace the awakening of thought, 
and not consist wholly of an array of words and ex- 
pressions. These ideas should be communicated not as 
theories, abstractions or speculations, but as living princi- 
ples which may be made practical in busmess, in literature, 
in science and in art. 

There is need of moral culture — of a higher degree of 
social refinement — of a general elevation of the pupil in all 
that pertains to him as an immortal being and in all that 
will give him the highest, noblest preparation for useful- 
ness in the future. 

A part of this work can be performed in this age and by 
us. We are commissioned with its execution only in part, 
and in that direction have we labored in the relation which 
we hold to our public schools. 



139 
FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Our journal, as well as the Treasurer's report, shows the 
amount of the expenditures of the Department for the 
year, and the specific items for which disbursements have 
been made. We present a condensed statement of the 
finances in this connection, and invite attention to the 
Treasurer's account, accompanying our Report, for the 
details. 

On the first Tuesday in January, 1862, the amount of 
funds in the Treasury of the School Department was 
$1,041.39, of which $269.07 belonged to District Appropri- 
tion in No. 2, leaving only $772.32 of school money in all 
the Districts to be carried to the new account. The year 
previous the unexpended balance Avas $1,696.48, and the 
year preceding that, the balance remaining in the hands of 
the Treasurer at the expiration of the year was 13,578.28. 
It will be seen that the unexpended balances have been di- 
minishing year by year until at the commencement of 1862 
but a small sum was found to our credit on the Treasurer's 
books. The appropriation was originally the same for the 
past financial year as for the year previous, but subsequently 
it was increased by the appropriation of $250 to meet a de- 
ficiency in District No. 10. The entire amount of funds 
at our disposal for the current year was $18,222.32 — being 
$474.16 less than was allowed us for 1861, and nearly 
$3,000.00 less than the amount for 1860. 

Such being the case the committee were compelled to re- 
duce their expenditures in a corresponding degree. They 
have accordingly curtailed their expenses in every depart- 
ment wherever they could do so without direct injury to 
the interests of the schools. The greatest retrenchment, 
and that which made the only perceptible difference in the 



140 



expenditures, was in the reduction of teachers' salaries. 
These were reduced from ten to twenty per cent., with the 
expectation tliat in most cases it would be only a temporary 
arrangement. 

The accompanying Resolution was adopted by the Board 
at the time the reduction was made : 

Resolved^ That the state of business in our city and the 
diminished incomes of a majority of our citizens render it 
necessary, in our opinion, to reduce temporarily the sala- 
ries of the Teachers ; but at the same time we trust that 
returning prosperity will soon enable us to pay the salaries 
that have been so well earned in the past. 

The accompanying Table shows the condition of the 
Treasury at the commencement of the year, the new ap- 
propriation, and the amount of funds at the disposal of the 
Committee during the year : 



Dist's 


In Treasury, Jan. 1, lSf)2. 


New Appropriation. 


Amount. 


1 


$1 95 


$240 00 


$241 95 


2 


485 27 


13,850 00 


14, '-^35 27 


a 


62 70 


275 00 


337 70 


4 


34 23 


230 00 


264 23 


6 


61 40 


200 00 


261 40 


6 


12 79 


245 00 


257 79 


7 


81 76 


225 00 


306 76 


8 


49 81 


220 00 


269 81 


9 


3 43 


240 00 


243 43 


10 


overdraft, 65 12 


1,225 00 


1,159 88 


11 


44 10 


500 00 


544 10 



Deduct, 



^37 44 
Q'o 12 



$17,450 00 $18,22: 



9 ?>9 



$772 32 
In this statement is not included the District appropria- 
tion in No. 2, of which there was an unexpended balance 
of $269,07 ; $129,41 on repairs, $77,46 repairs of Park 
St. house, and $32,20 on payment of debt. The District 
money drawn by committees during the year was 
$2,683,00. 



141 

DISTEICT EXPENDITURES. 



We present below in a classified manner the expendi- 
tures for the several Districts. 



DISTRICT NO. 1. 


« 


Amount of Funds, . . - - 


$241 95 


Expended for teaching, - - . 


211 99 


Fuel, 


11 50 


Repairs and incidentals, 


12 38 




$235 87 



In Treasury Jan. 1, 1863, - - - $6 08 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Amount of funds, $14,385 27 

Expended for teaching, - - 11,242 18 

Repairs, 518 60 

Fuel, ... - 1,097 47 

Care of rooms, ... 148 40 

Furniture and supplies, - - 109 09 

Books and stationery, - - 221 71 
Incidentals, - - - - 205 36 



-$13,542 81 



In Treasury, Jan. 1, .... |792 46 

In addition there have been in this District 
expenditures on Park street and other school 

houses, amounting to, - - - - $401 31 

Insurance paid, _ . - . - 192 00 

Debt and interest paid, - . - 1,407 88 



$2,001 19 
For which appropriations were made by District vote. 



142 

DISTRICT NO. 3. 

Amount of funds, 1337 70 

Expended for teaching, . . - 286 32 

Repairs, fuel, &c., - - - 23 50 

$309 82 



- 


- 


1264 23 


238 


37 






12 


84 










1251 


21 



In Treasury, Jan. 1, - - - - $27 88 

DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Amount of funds, - - - 
Expended for teaching, 

Repairs, Incidentals, &c., 

In Treasury, Jan. 1, $13 02 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 



Amount of funds, - 
Expended for teaching, 

Repairs, Incidentals, &c., 



In Treasury, Jan. 1, $37 12 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 



- 


- 


$261 40 


211 


99 




12 


29 


$224 28 



Amount of funds, . . . ■ 


$257 79 


Expended for teaching. 

Fuel, 


- 204 24 
14 00 


Repairs, incidentals, &c., 


- 16 41 







In Treasury, Jan. 1, - - - - $23 14 



143 

DISTRICT NO. 7. 

Amount of funds, $306 76 

Expended for teaching, - . - 250 00 
Repairs, incidentals, &c., - 26 48 

Error last year, - - - - 2 00 

$278 48 



In Treasury, Jan. 1, 28 28 

DISTRICT NO. 8. 

Amount of funds, - - - 
Expended for teaching, 

For fuel, two years. 

Repairs, incidentals, <fec., 

In Treasury, Jan. 1, $4 71 

DISTRICT NO. 9. 

Amount of funds, - - - - 
Expended for teaching, 

For fuel, 

Repairs, incidentals, <fec., 



- 




$269 81 


219 49 




29 


33 




16 


28 


$265 10 







- 


- 


$243 43 


202 


99 






15 


00 






11 


90 










$229 


89 






- 


$13 


54 


. 


$1,159 


88 



In Treasury, Jan. 1, - 

DISTRICT NO. 10. 

Amount of funds, - - - - 
Expended for teaching, - - 1,049 13 

For fuel, 76 63 

Repairs, 73 53 

Insurance, .... 31 00 

Incidentals, 1016 

$1,240 45 



Overdrawn, .... $80 57 



144 




DISTRICT NO. 11. 




Amount of funds, - - - - 
Expended for teaching, - . - 

For fuel, 

Mapb, 

Repairs, incidentals, &c.. 


- 1544 10 

494 78 

32 50 

12 00 

12 87 




" f^OOu X'J 



Overdrawn, |8 05 



SCHOOL HOUSES AND REPAIRS. 



The erection of school houses is not in the control of 
School Committees, unless they are authorized by District 
vote and furnished with the requisite appropriations by 
District authority. It matters not how pressing may be 
the demand, how inconvenient and limited the school room, 
or how illy-ventilated and how uncomfortable it may be, it 
must be endured until the legal voters of the District are 
not only convinced of the importance of new buildings or 
essential modifications, but until a majority of them have 
no quarrels with their neighbors, no prejudices against 
modes of instruction, no narrow views of what should be 
taught and of the manner in which children should be 
governed. 

In our city, which above most cities of New England is 
distinguished for excellent schools, which has given to our 



149 



colleges and to the professions superior scholars, which has 
furnished teachers of such merit as to attract attention 
and command liberal salaries in other localities, we are 
sadly deficient in school buildings. 

Our High School demands, without delay, a new house. 
There is an imperative necessity, if we would sustain a 
school of that grade, that we erect during the ensuing sea- 
son a building suitable for its accommodation. The present 
room is about fifty feet long by thirty wide, with low posts, 
small windows, and very inadequate means of ventilation. 
The recitation rooms, besides being located on the lower 
floor, making it necessary for the pupils to go up and down 
stairs at every recitation, are quite too limited for their 
purpose. The stair-ways are narrow and irregular in shape 
and the entries too contracted even for a primary school 
with half the number of pupils. The entire number of 
seats is one hundred and eight, and many of these are too 
small for pupils of the ages that should be admitted to such 
a school. The desks are all of the oldest style within the 
remembrance of the present generation and each one is de- 
signed to afford accommodations for six pupils. There is 
no apparatus room, no hall or lecture room and no dress 
room or closets in the building. The apartments are 
warmed by stoves, and the construction of the main room 
is such as to allow the location of the heating apparatus 
only at one end, which must necessarily heat that part of 
the room to a most uncomfortable degree, while the oppo- 
site side is so cold as to forbid all physical comfort to the 
occupants. 

The number of pupils registered the present term is 
164, or 56 more than can be furnished with desks. Chairs 
are placed in every available section of the room, along 
the aisles, upon the platform and in front of it, and where- 
ever a place can be found unoccupied. At the opening of 
J 



150 



the present term more than twenty pupils were refused 
admission, though as well qualified to enter as many who 
were received, for the reason that they could not be ac- 
commodated in the house. We have taken possession of 
one room in the building which had been occupied by a pri- 
mary school, and wliich is now needed for the accommoda- 
tion of a school of that grade taught in the Engine Hall 
on Chestnut street. 

If the argument is urged, as it has frequently been done, 
that children should not be advanced so rapidly, we answer 
with equal propriety, that so large a number should 
not be born. Our grammar schools have no spare seats, 
our middle grade none, and during the entire year, except 
the coldest period of winter the primary schools have a 
much larger number of pupils than one teacher should be 
required to instruct. 

We need a house sufficiently large for two hundred and 
fifty pupils, so arranged that the entire school can be ac- 
commodated upon the same floor, with recitation, study, and 
lecture rooms contiguous to each other. The District, — 
or rather the City, — should select a large lot in the easterly 
part of the city proper, and erect a house for this school 
the coming season. It should be done for the advance- 
ment of the pupils intellectually. It should be done for 
the moral influence it will have upon them. It should be 
done as an act of sanitary reform, to save the pupils in 
that school from the ill effects of a small, illy-ventilated 
and uncomfortable school room. 

The Committee foresee the objections — or rather the 
objection — for there is but one. It will cost something. 
That is true, but it will not be money squandered. It will 
be an investm^ent more safe and profitable than railway 
stock or money in the banks. A good house would cost 
$20,000. The manufacturing companies usually pay more 



151 



than one half of the taxes. Not more than $10,000 would 
be required of the people. One half of this would be 
paid by smaller manufacturing concerns and by a few of 
the richest men in the city. Another class of men who 
possess a moderate property would be assessed for the larger 
proportion of the remainder. Those who have a large 
amount of property would be obliged to pay eighty or 
ninety per cent, of the sum required, while the assessment 
upon those who have but a small income, or pay only a 
personal tax, but who have as deep an interest in the 
schools as others, would not be burdensome. 

If a house is erected, it will undoubtedly be done by a 
loan for a long term of years. The District is now fast 
getting out of debt, there being outstanding against us 
only three notes ; one of 81,400 payable in December 
1863 ; one of $)l,o00 payable in May 1864, and another of 
$600 payable in July 1864— total $3,500. We have Dis- 
trict property costing over $100,000, and which would at 
any time be valued at $75,000. The money can be easily 
obtained on loan, at six per cent., payable at a day as far 
distant as we may desire. 

There are other houses in District No. 2 which need the 
reforming hand of the mechanic, unless they soon give 
place to new and more convenient structures. The small 
wooden houses on Concord street, and that on Union at the 
corner of Bridge street are among the oldest school build- 
ings in the city and have had the benefit of a change from 
their original position to the location they now occupy. 
The former were originally situated on Park street and the 
latter occupied a lot not far from the residence of the 
Chairman of the School Committee, on the lot now owned 
by the city and designed for a Court House at some future 
day. They are in a failing condition and the ground they 
encumber might be better occupied by new and more 



152 



durable buildings. But they have been repaired and re- 
painted the past summer and will serve a good purpose for 
a few more years. Those at the corner of Concord and 
Beech streets could easily be made to give place to a new 
grammar school building which must before many years be 
erected in that vicinity, or what would be more agreeable 
to the residents of the neighborhood, that elegant edifice 
which we trust will be erected within the coming year for 
the High School. 

In other Districts there are many excellent school build- 
ings, — especially at Piscataquog and Amoskeag, and in 
Nos. 8 and 9. In Nos. 1 and 4, the houses are in good 
condition. But in Nos. 3, 5 and 6 they are mere skeletons 
— unfit for the purpose to which they are appropriated. 
For a description of their present condition, and the argu- 
ments in favor of their removal in order to give place to 
modern buildings which shall be adapted to the wants of 
the Districts, we call attention to suggestions made in the 
report of the Superintendent last year. In relation to No. 
3, he says : " The people of the District will be rewarded 
by the improved character of their school, whenever they 
shall have sufficient harmony of feeling and concert of ac- 
tion to resolve on the construction of a new house. The 
present remnant of a building has been moved about and 
repaired repeatedly since my first acquaintance with it, and 
at that time it was regarded as entirely unfit for use. It 
has uncomfortable seats for forty pupils, but in prosperous 
times in the mechanical interests of that locality, sixty or 
seventy scholars are compressed into the space designed for 
two-thirds of the number." 

Of No. 5, the report says : " The school house in this 
District deserves to be abated as a public — deformity. It 
is a mere skeleton, through which the winds shriek and 
snow-flakes fly, and would be entirely unsuitable, without 



153 

immediate and extensive repairs, even for an ice-Jiouse ! 
If the people of the District do not soon resolve on a better 
house, it will be the duty of the Mayor and Aldermen, as 
an act of humanity to the children, to order the erection 
of a new one, and assess the voters of the District to meet 
the expense." 

And then of No. 6 : " An unfinished and unfinishable 
house stands as a monument in this District. Cold, cheer- 
less and desolate as it is, the boys and girls succeed in ob- 
taining a good knowledge of the text-books beneath its 
roof. They are literally in the ' pursuit of knowledge un- 
der difficulties.' " 

No. 7 must soon be classed with 3, 5 and 6. The house 
is rapidly going to decay. As if ashamed of itself it is 
making a successful effort to sink into the ground. 

The repairs of school houses have not been extensive the 
present year. There have been no changes in the con- 
struction of rooms, and the erection of no new buildings 
of any description. Small wooden houses in tho central 
District have been painted, blinds on the Lowell street house 
have been repaired, fences and out-buildings have been put 
in abetter condition, and some new furniture has been pur- 
chased for the various houses. These constitute the prin- 
cipal repairs and improvements that have been made during 
the year. 

The sum of $200 was appropriated for the shingling of 
the Park street house, which has been done by a Special 
Committee at an expense somewhat below the appropria- 
tion. 

In this connection it may be stated, though the matter 
will be fully reported by the Special Committee at the proper 
time, that in accordance with the District vote the interest 
on all notes has been paid to the current year, the sum of 
$1,000 principal has been paid and the interest paid by the 
city last year on a note of $1,000 has been refunded. 



154 
FUEL AND WARMING HOUSES. 



The amount of fuel consumed by fifty fires makes a 
heavy draft on the Treasury, absorb hig nearly ten per cent, 
of the whole appropriation for schools. This season the 
advance in the price of coal and wood, would have made 
an additional expense of more than $200 had we not con- 
tracted for our fuel at an early period. We purchased a 
fair quality of mixed wood, for $3.00 per cord, delivered 
in the yards of the several houses where it is consumed, 
and for broken and lump Lehigh coal of excellent quality 
we paid $9.00 per ton. We have in the cellar a sufficient 
quantity of coal to last through the year, and more wood 
in the sheds than will be consumed the present season. 

The methods of warming the several school rooms are by 
no means uniform. In a majority of the rooms stoves for 
wood are still used. Only one building is warmed by the 
use of furnaces, all others are furnished with coal stoves. 
The furnaces are becoming worn, and one of them, at least, 
will not be serviceable beyond the present season. 

In many places school rooms have recently been warmed 
by the use of steam, communicated to the various parts of 
the school buildings by iron pipes. Wherever the proper 
apparatus has been employed the result has been very sat- 
isfactory, not only as regards the character of the heat but 
also in the matter of safety and economy. It may be good 
economy for us to introduce steam apparatus. 

ELECTION OF TEACHERS. 



It has been the custom in years past to examine all ap- 
plicants for situations as teachers in the city, and to select 
such as give evidence of being best adapted to the duties 
required. The past year, no general examination of can- 



155 

didates has been held. The Committee had on record a 
large number of applicants who had been examined the 
previous year, or were known to the Superintendent, and 
having but few vacancies to fill, they deemed it inexpedient 
to add to their own labors by extending the roll of applica- 
tions. Teachers have generally been retained in the 
schools until they have voluntarily resigned their places. 
It is seldom that the Committee arc compelled to remove 
them. During the past year we have lost by resignation 
but few instructors of long experience. At the commence- 
ment of the Autumn term, the teacher of the primary 
school in Janesville, who had been faithfully engaged in 
that position for ten years, resigned her place ; and at the 
close of the year, the Principal of the High School, after 
ten years' laborious service, signified his intention to resign. 
No other permanent teacher has voluntarily left the ser- 
vice or failed to receive a re-election. In some instances 
teachers who were employed for a single term did not re- 
ceive a permanent place in the school room. 

The names of all teachers elected during the year, with 
the amount of compensation paid, are given in the follow- 
ing list : 

Names. School. Salary. 

John P. Newell, High, |900 

W. W. Colburn, vice Newell, resigned, " 900 

Harriet R. Baker, " 400 

Ellen F. Odell, « 250 

Marcy Foster, substitute, 1 term, " 250 

Henry C. Bullard, North Grammar, 800 

Mary D. Allison, " " 250 

Ruth A. Porter, " " 250 

Celia N. French, " " 250 

Eliza A. Flanders, 2 terms, " " 175 

Mary S. Caswell, 1 term, " " 175 



156 



Josiah G. Dearborn, South Grammar, 

Nancy A. Durgin, " " 

Hannah A. Slade, " " 

Maria E. Webster, " " 

Joseph G. Edgerly, Intermediate, 

Addie M. Steele, " 

Orren C. Moore, 1 term, " 

Augusta C. Gile, 1 term, " 

Philinda P. Parker, Wilson's Hill, Mixed School, 

Julia A. Brown, Middle, No. 1, 



Mary L. Sleeper, " 


a 


9 


Nancy S. Bunton, " 


a 


3, 


Julia A. Baker, " 


u 


4, 


Rowena L. Hamblett, " 


a 


5, 


Lizzie E. Newell, " 


u 


6, 


Lizzie P. Gove, " 


a 


7, 


Mary E. Ireland, Primary, 


a 


1, 


Martha Eaton, " 


a 


2 
-•> 


M. A. Stevens, vice Eaton, 


u 


2 


Hannah G. Lane, Primary, 


c( 


3, 


Lucretia A. Brown, " 


a 


4, 


Hattie A. Lord, " 


a 


5, 


Anna R. Riddle, " 


li. 


6, 


C. Augusta Abbott, " 


u 


T, 


Annette McDocl, " 


a 


8, 


Mary C. Dinsmore, " 


a 


9, 


Mary A. Richardson, '' 


a 


10, 


Helen M. Morrill, " 


a 


11, 


Araminta C. Edgerly, " 


u 


12, 


Betsey A. Ambrose, " 


ti 


13, 


Ellen B. Rowell, " 


a 


14, 


Frances E. Dean, " 


a 


15, 



Marcia Y. McQueston, 1 term, Ward 7, Gr. School, 
A. Ellen Stanton, Ward 7, Middle School, 



800 
250 

250 
250 
600 
250 
400 
175 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
225 
175 
225 
225 
175 
225 
200 



157 



Sarah D. Lord, Ward 7, Primary School 

Mary A. Parker, " " Mixed " 

Sarah E. Copp, " 8, Grammar School, 

Mary E. Quimby, " " Primary " 

Sarah A. Preston, District No. 1, 

M. Antoinette Stevens, No. 3, two terms. 

Rose T. Kimball, 

Rose T. Kimball, 

Mary A. Doty, 

0. J. Hancock, 

Emma Doland, 

Hattie N. Parmenter 

M. Augusta Currier, 

Asenath McQueston, 

Geo. A. Eastman, 

Mary S. Caswell, 

Joseph E. Bennett, 

Mary A. Doty, 

Rose T. Kimball, 

Henry N. Baker, 

Emily J. Parker, 

Rufus B. Foss, 

Imri S. Whitney, Music 



a 


a 


one term, 


a 


4, 


a a 


a 


a 


u u 


a 


a 


a u 


li 


5, 


u a 


a 


a 


two terms, 


a 


6, 


one term, 


a 


u 


a a 


u 


u 


a a 


a 


IT 


two terms. 


a 


a 


one term, 


a 


8, 


u u 


a 


u 


a a 


a 


(I 


U li 


a 


9, 


two terms. 


a 


(; 


one term, 



225 
225 
225 
225 
175 
220 
220 
200 
175 
360 
175 
175 
175 
175 
360 
175 
575 
175 
200 
360 
175 
360 
400 



TRUANCY, DISCIPLINE AND ATTENDANCE. 



The same course has been pursued with regard to tru- 
ancy the past year as at former times. A member of the 
Board was appointed Truant Agent, and during a large 
portion of the year he devoted more than an ordinary de- 
gree of his time to the duties of the office. He faithfully 
looked after those boys who were in the habit of absenting 
themselves from the school room, and was instrumental in 



158 

inducing many to enter either the Public City Schools, or 
the Catholic Schools on Park street. A few arrests were 
made, and some truant and vagabond children were sent 
to the Reform School or the House of Correction. After 
the departure of Mr. Coughlin for the war, the duties of 
his office were partially but unofficially performed by the 
Superintendent of Schools. 



TEXT BOOKS. 



We can repeat, to a good extent, the words of our for- 
mer reports in regard to change of books. Nearly all the 
books used are acceptable to the Committee, and but few 
of them have afforded grounds of complaint to teachers. 
We are opposed to frequent changes, even though the 
books be furnished without expense. It is sometimes bet- 
ter to make an exchange of teachers than of books. It is 
the living voice, and not the lifeless page which inspires 
the pupil and awakens within him new incentives to study. 
We have made a few clianges in this department, but only 
to produce a greater uniformity, or to adopt a system 
which was unquestionably of more intrinsic value. We 
have long used the Progressive Readers, — a series which 
we regard with much favor. We trust it will not soon 
give place to any other work. In connection with it, we 
had for a long time used Worcester's Speller. As the Rea- 
ders adopt Webster's orthography, there was a diversity of 
spelling in the two works which sometimes occasioned 
great inconvenience to the pupil and teacher. We deem- 
ed it expedient to introduce the Progressive Speller that 
we might have a uniformity of orthography. AVe did not 
discuss the relative merits of the two systems, in which 



159 

men very naturally differ, but made the exchange solely 
on the ground of conformity to the Readers, and from the 
fact that we had a favorable opinion of the arrangement in 
the Progressive. 

We have recently made a change of Geography in the 
classes in the primary schools, substituting Allen's for Col- 
ton and Fitch's. The latter is a book of value-; we would 
not discard it, but it is too difficult for young children to 
study with profit. It requires more mature minds to un- 
derstand itsl definitions and principles fully, and it is by 
no means an easy task for teachers to make it intelligible 
and attractive to the youngest pupils. The new book is 
arranged on the object plan, so far as possible, and if our 
teachers will feel sufficient interest to comprehend, not 
only the exercises they are to teach, but also the manner 
in which it can be communicated naturally to the class of 
young and untrained minds, we shall see an improvement 
in that branch of primary study which will satisfy us tliat 
our opinion of the book is correct. 

We need an essential change in the text book in 
Grammar. It is not often that we see a perfect book of 
any kind, and if such an one has ever been devised by 
man, it is not in the department of which we now speak. 
We have been examining books for several years and have 
yet to find a Grammar that will receive our unqualified 
endorsement. 



There are other topics which we might with propriety 
and profit introduce and discuss in this report, but it is 
not our intention to speculate. We have pursued a 
CGnservative course, and have now no desire to recom- 
mend for the consideration of others what we have not 
had the courage or discretion ourselves to establish. We 
have made a plain statement of our proceedings as a 



160 



Board, and have given the practical operations and the 
successful results of our measures ; and now that we have 
completed our official labors, made this last record of our 
our transactions, and affixed our signatures to it, we trans- 
fer our responsibilities to those who, we hope, will faithful- 
ly guard the sacred trust committed to them. 



JOHN HOSLEY, 
WATERMAN SMITH, 
JAMES B. STRAW, 
HIRAM HILL, 
JOHN COCJGHLIN, 
GEORGE PIERCE, 
SAMUEL WEBBER, 
DANIEL FARMER, Jr, 



School 



Committee. 



TEEASUEEE'S EEPOET. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT IN ACCOUNT WITH 
HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, TREASURER. 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 


, 1. 


AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 




Balance from old account. 


- 1 95 


Cash, 


125 00 


Cash, - - . . 


50 00 


Cash, 


65 00 




$241 95 


DISBURSEMENTS. 




Paid 0. J. Hancock, for teaching. 


108 50 


Sarah A. Preston, " 


103 49 


G. W. Dustin, wood, 


11 50 


James & Dodge, for teams, 1861, 


3 00 


James & Dodge, " 1862, 


4 50 


Geo. Pierce, " - - 


50 


Hersey & Tilton, stationery, 


88 


G. W. Dustin, incidentals, 


3 50 


Balance to new account. 


6 08 



162 
DISTRICT NO. 2. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

Balance from old account, - 754 34 

Cash, - - - - 4,075 00 

Cash, ... - 74 00 

Cash, - - - - 5,775 00 

Cash, .... 2,609 00 

Cash, - - - . 4,000 00 



-Igl7,287 34 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

TEACHING AND CARE OF ROOMS. 

Paid John P. Newell, - - - 996 41 

H. C. Billiard, - - - 860 50 

Josiah G. Dearborn, - - - 863 25 

Joseph G. Edg(5rly, - - 212 50 

Wm. F. Harvey, - - - 144 00 

Orren C. Moore, - - - 93 25 

I. S. Whitney, - - - - 364 00 

Harriet R. Baker, - - 287 00 

Ellen F. Odell, - - - 250 00 

Marcy Foster, - - - - 97 50 

Mary D. Allison, - - - 258 75 

Ruth A. Porter, - - - 258 75 

Celia N. French, - - - 258 75 

Eliza A. Flanders, - - - 112 50 

Nancy A. Durgin, - - 258 75 

Hannah A. Slade, - - - 258 75 

Maria E. Webster, - - 258 75 

Addie M. Steele, - - - - 207 §0 

Asenath McQucston, - - 29 75 

Philinda P. Parker, - - - 240 50 

Julia A. Brown, - - - 222 13 

Mary L. Sleeper, - - - 239 00 



163 



Paid Nancy S. Bunton, - 
Julia A. Baker, - 
Rowena L. Hamblctt, 
Lizzie E. Newell, 
Lizzie P. Gove, 
Mary E. Ireland, 
Martha Eaton, - 
Hannah G, Lane, 
Lucrctia A. Brown, - 
Harriet A. Lord, 
Anna R. Riddle, 
C. Augusta Abbott, 
Annette M. Doel, 
Mary C. Dinsmore, 
Mary A. Richardson, 
Helen M. Morrill, 
Betsey A. Ambrose, 
Ellen B. Rowell, 
Frances E. Dean, 
Aramiuta C. Edgerly, 
Emma Doland, 
Eliza W. Foster, 
Emma A. H. Brown, 



EEPAIRS. 

Paid Hartshorn & Pike, 
Neal & Holbrook, 
Daniels & Company, 
C. R. Colley, 
Manchester Print Works, 
Clough <fc Co., - 
Cogswell & Wells, 
John C. Young, 
John Welch, 



239 


04 


238 


04 


238 


04 


239 


00 


247 


75 


239 


00 


139 


25 


239 


00- 


239 


00 


201 


30 


205 


54 


238 


04 


238 


04 


239 


00 


239 


00 


238 


04 


240 


50 


239 


00 


104 


27 


116 


54 


63 


50 


26 


00 


20 


00 

* 


124 


28 


92 


49 


58 


75 


52 


73 


88 


30 


76 


25 


16 


57 


20 


80 


2 


00 



$11,242 18 



164 



Paid G. B. Fogg, - 
J. 0. Adams, 
Butterfield & Hodge, 
Daniel Farmer, Jr., 
C. & L. Gage, - 
W. S. Hill, - 
Albion Barker, 
William Wilder, - 
F. S. Lynch, 
E. Eoss, 
W. P. Stratton, 
Wm. H. Fisk, - 
Joseph Everett, 
Haines & Wallace, 
E. G. Gorman, - 
Edwin Sleeper, 
A. B. Conant, 
Geo. Hunt, - 
Davis Baker, 



FUEL AND SAWING WOOD. 

E. p. Johnson & Co., - - 948 21 

Daniel Farmer, - - - - 66 76 

John Cole, - - . . 2 00 

Edward Metcalf, - - - 3 50 

C. H. Gate, - . . . 24 00 

Charles Chase, - - = - 62 50 

Joseph Westcott, - - . 10 00 

Timothy Daily, - - - - 50 



20 


96 


21 


00 


6 


50 


10 


00 




17 


3 


25 


8 


75 


2 


50 


8 


12 


6 


00 


6 


64 


4 


45 


29 


35 


31 


25 


10 


60 


21 


33 


8 


84 


1 


12 


1 


00 


. 


$731 90 



-11,097 47 



REPAIRS OF PARK STREET SCHOOL HOUSE. 

Paid Cogswell & Wells, - - 58 00 

Haines & Wallace, - - - 130 00 

$188 00 



165 



CARE OP FURNACES AND ROOMS. 



Paid Joseph Everett, ... 


91 50 


H. C. Billiard, ... - 


39 00 


J. E. Johnson, - - . 


11 00 


H. M. George, - - - - 


4 90 


H. G. Lane, - - - - 


1 00 


M. E. Ireland, - . - - 


1 00 




$148 40 


INSURANCE. 




Paid Herman Foster, . - . 


31^50 


L. B. Clough, > . . - 


31 50 


Geo. A. French, 


37 50 


Joseph B. Clark, - - - . 


■ 30 00 


J. D. Lyford, 


15 75 


B. P. Cilley, .... 


- 45 75 




ii'iao 00 


DEBT AND INTEREST. 


%?i.V^i \J\J 


Paid J. H. Wilkins' Note, 


1000 00 


" " interest, 


144 00 


John Berry " - - 


113 88 


James Leach, " - - 


90 00 


J. H. Wilkins, (1861) interest. 


60 00 




«1 /■107 ft9 




^i jTiV 1 oo 


PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 


Paid Gage & Farnsworth, 


76 37 


S, D. Farnsworth, 


• 13 75 


John B. Clark, - - - - 


7 25 




$97 37 


BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 




Paid Hersey & Tilton, 


68 55 


W. G. Shattuck, - - - . 


6 00 


Tewksbury & Brother, 


5 80 


J. G. Edgcrly, .... 


41 


K 





166 



Paid Gage & Farnsworth, - 
R. L. Davis, 
Oliver Ellsworth, 



24 00 

18 80 
78 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 




Paid R. Gilchrist, - . . . 


50 


David Libbey, . - - 


13 50 


Otis Barton, - - . . 


14 00 


A. 0. Parker & Co., 


2 00 


G. W. Adams, 


3 90 


E. Ferreii, 


40 24 


M. Eaton, . . . . 


4 95 


W. G. Shattiick, ... - 


30 00 



03 
50 



INCIDENTALS. 

Paid George Hunt, - - - 2 00 

H. Stevens, . - . . 9 57 

J. 0. Adams, - - - - 20 10 

H. P. Wilson, - - - - 80 

J. B. Straw, - - - - 35 

Post Office, - . - - 14 

George A. French, - - - 9 00 

Mrs. Clay, . . - . 3 60 

Smith & Richardson, - - - 10 00 

N. Brown, - - - - 10 12 

Nath'l. Corning, - - - - 2 00 

F. S. Lynch, - - - - 5 30 

John Lord, - - - - 2 50 

Joseph Everett, ... 9 00 

John Coughlin, - - - - 2 50 

Hiram Hill .... 75 

J. G. Heywood, ... - 50 

E. Parmenter, - ' - - - 9 00 

H. C. Bullard, - - - - 9 00 



1124 34 



1109 09 



167 

PaidW. H. Elliott, - 
A. B. Shattuck, - 
M. Doyle, 
J. F. James, 
Cheney & Co., 
G. W. Stratton, 
E. P. Whiddcn, 

C, W. Colby, 

D. R. Prescott, 
W. S. Buniham, 
James & Dodge, 

H. R. Chamberlin, Treas. 



Balance carried to new account, 



2 75 






62 






4 00 






2 50 






3 25 






4 00 






1 00 






1 GO 






- 1 00 






5 00 






- 4 00 






25 00 


209 


36 




0\J 


15,547 
1,739 


99 
35 



$17,286 



DISTRICT NO. 3. 




AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 




Balance from old account, 


62 70 


Cash, - - - - 


150 00 


Cash, 


50 00 


Cash, 


75 00 


DISBURSEMENTS. 




Paid S. J. Hill, teaching, 


126 00 


M. A. Stevens, " - - - 


148 26 


I. S. Whitney, " - 


12 06 


W. W. Baker, repairs. 


5 50 


Eben Ross, " - - 


- 7 50 


James & Dodge, teams, 


5 25 


George Pierce, " 


- 1 50 


C. Batchelder, sawing wood, 


3 75 


Balance to new account, 


- 27 88 



$337 70 



$337 70 



168 
DISTRICT NO. 4. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

Balance from old account, - 34 23 

Cash, . - . - 150 00 

Cash, .... 20 00 

Cash, GO 00 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid John F. Chase, teachhig. 
Rose T. Kimball, " 
Mary A. Doty, " 
James & Dodge, teams, 
Geo. Pierce, - - - 

Hersey & Tilton, stationery, 
Daniels & Company, hardware, 
Susan H. Perkins, cleaning. 
Balance to new account, - 



DISTRICT NO. 5 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 



128 


00 


56 37 


54 


00 


7 


00 


I 50 


2 


31 


1 


03 


1 


00 


13 


02 



$264 23 



Balance from old account, 


61 40 


Cash, _ - - . 


125 00 


Cash, - - - . . 


25 00 


Cash, . . . - . 


- 50 00 


DISBURSEMENTS 




Paid George D. Epps, teaching. 


108 50 


EmmaDoland, " 


49 49 


Hattie N. Parmenter, " 


54 00 


James & Dodge, teams. 


7 00 


George Pierce " - - 


- 100 


Hill&Cilley, " - - . 


1 00 



$264 23 



1261 40 



169 



Paid Hersey & Tilton, stationery, - - 2 48 
Daniels & Company, hardware, - 81 
Balance to new account, - 3T 12 



DISTRICT NO. 6. 




AMOUNT OP FUNDS. 




Balance from old account, 


12 79 


Cash, 


125 00 


Cash, - - , - 


25 00 


Cash, - - - . - 


95 00 


DISBURSEMENTS. 




Paid J. D. Gilchrist, teaching, 


100 00 


M. Augusta Currier, " 


49 49 


Asenath McQueston, " - 


54 00 


J. M. Webster, wood. 


14 00 


Hartshorn & Pike, repairs. 


90 


J. T. Webster, " 


1 00 


C. R. Colley, " - - 


34 


Samuel Gamble, " - - 


2 00 


James & Dodge, teams, 


- 6 25 


Hill & James, " 


1 50 


George Pierce, " - - 


- 1 50 


Hersey & Tilton, stationery. 


2 92 


Balance to new account. 


- 23 14 


DISTRICT NO. 7. 


* 


• 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 




Balance from old account. 


79 76 


Cash, 


150 00 


Cash, 


25 00 


Cash, - - . - . 


50 00 



$261 40 



S257 79 



$257 79 



§304 76 



170 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid J. E. Bennett, teaching, 
Mary S. Caswell, " 
Hartshorn & Pike, repairs, - 
J. B. Daniels, " 

Neal & Holbrook, " 
Daniels & Company " - 
John Jacobs, sawing wood, - 
Hersey & Til ton, stationery, 
James & Dodge, teams, 
George Pierce, 
Balance to new account. 



127 


00 


123 


00 


2 


85 


2 


25 


6 


75 


- 


62 


4 


00 


3 


76 


5 


75 


- 


50 


28 


28 



$304 76 



DISTRICT NO. 8. 

AMOUNT OP FUNDS. 

Balance from old account, - 49 81 

Cash, 125 00 

Cash, 25 00 

• Cash, 70 00 



$269 81 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid W. S. Burnham, teaching, - 108 50 

Mary A. Doty, " - 49 49 

Rose T. Kimball, " - - 61 50 

Peter Farmer, wood, - - 20 33 

J. H. Proctor, "... 9 00 

Neal & Holbrook, repairs, - - 6 75 

James & Dodge, teams, - - 7 50 

Hill & Cilley, - - - - 1 50 

Hersey & Tilton, stationery, - 53 

Balance to new account, - - 4 71 



- 1269 81 



171 



DISTRICT NO. 9. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

Balance from old acccunt, 

Cash, 

Cash, 

Cash, 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid C. H. Patterson, teaching, 

Emma J. Parker, - - - 
J, Y. McQiieston, wood, 
James & Dodge, teams, 
George Pierce, " - - 
Hill & James, " . . - 

A. 0. Parker, furniture, 
E. B. Kennison, repairs. 
Balance to new account, - 

DISTRICT NO. 10. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 
Cash, - - - - - 

Cash, 

Cash, 

Over draft, . . - 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid balance from old account, 
J. G. Edgerly, teaching, 
Sarah D. Lord, " 
Mary A. Parker, " - 
A. E. Stanton, " 

Marcia V. McQueston, teaching, 



3 43 

125 00 

30 00 

85 00 



108 


50 


94 


49 


15 


00 


6 


75 


- 1 


00 


1 


50 


- 


90 


1 


75 


^ 13 54 



1243 43 



$243 43 



650 


oo 


325 


00 


250 


00 


80 


57 

i 


65 


12 


182 


00 


233 


25 


237 


25 


200 


13 


161 


00 



f 1,305 57 



172 

Paid I. S. Whitney, teaching, - 45 50 

Daniel Parmer, wood, - - - 69 88 

D. Hefren, sawing wood, - - 5 25 
Haines & Wallace, wood, - - 1 50 

D. B. Eastman, repairs, - - 18 20 
Manchester Print Works, repairs, 34 07 

Hartshorn & Pike, " - 19 53 

J. B. Varick & Co., " - 1 73 

A. 0. Parker & Co., furniture, - 1 80 

James & Dodge, teams, - - 4 75 

Mrs. 0. Day, cleaning, - - 1 75 

W. H. Elliott, repairing clock, 1 00 

H. Foster, insurance, - - 31 00 

Hersey & Til ton, stationery, - 86 



-$1,305 57 



DISTRICT NO. 11. 

AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

Balance from old account, - 44 10 

Cash, 200 00 

Cash, 150 00 

Cash, 150 00 

Overdraft, .... 8 05 



|552 15 



DISBUESEMENTS. 

Paid R. B. Poss, teaching, - - 110 33 

Mary E. Quimby, teaching, - - 205 26 

Sarah E. Copp, " - 149 50 

Marcia V. McQueston, teaching, 6 25 

I. S. Whitney, " 23 44 

Daniel Farmer, wood, - - 32 50 

Henry Peacock, repairs, - - 4 38 

Daniels & Company, repairs, - 57 

Hartshorn & Pike " - - 17 



173 



James & Dodge, teams, 


- 4 75 


Hill&Cilley " - 


1 00 


Hersey & Tilton, maps. 


12 00 


George H. Powers, 


2 00 



RECAPITULATION. 
Balance unexpended in District No. 1, $6 08 







2, ] 


L739 35 






3, 


27 88 






4, 


13 02 






5, 


37 12 






6, 


23 14 






7, 


28 28 






8, 


4 71 






9, 


13 54 



Overdrawn in District No. 10, 
" " 11, 



80 57 
8 05 



$552 15 



.,993 12 



$88 62 



Balance in all the Districts, - - $1,904 50 

H. R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 
In School Committee, read, accepted, and presented to 
City Council as a part of School Committee's Report. 

J. B. STRAW, Clerk. 



THE 



EIGHTH ANNUAL llEPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTEiDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, 



3POI?. Tnaa "srEi-A-n. 



1862. 



In School Committee, } 

Jan. 5, 1863. 5 
Read, accepted and ordered to be presented to the City Council in 
connection with the Report of the School Committee. 

JAMES B. STRAW, Clerk. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, } 

Jan. 5, 1863. ) 
Read, accepted and ordered to be printed. 

JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 



In Common Coltncil. 

Jan. 5, 1863. 
Read, accepted and ordered to be printed, in concurrence. 

O. C. MOORE, Clerk 



REPORT. 



To THE School Committee : 

With eacli passing year, we aim to record some real 
progress in our public schools — to mark a permanent im- 
provement in the deportment and scholarship of pupils, a 
greater degree of fidelity in teachers, and a deeper inter- 
est in parents and all who contribute to support the com- 
mon school system. 

We are not content to compare our schools with them- 
selves, nor to form our estimate of their character or 
measure their usefulness merely by their appearance to our 
unaided judgment. The mountain is majestic, the land- 
scape beautiful, the cataract sublime, only in comparison 
with similar objects that possess characteristics less strik- 
ing. To determine the real condition of our educational 
system, and to estimate its beneficial influence, we must 
look upon those schools of the same grade, in the same 
light — and compare them as a whole and then in detail. 
Taking for a standard whatever is most satisfactory to our 
own minds, we characterize this as good — that as excellent, 
and that as defective. We should do more than this. We 
should look back and mark the contrast which a few 
years of effort have made in the condition not only of one 
school but of many, — of all that can be called up for our 
judgment. 

We must not rest content with such comparison ; for al- 
though schools have changed, it may not be that they 
are improved. Though many have advanced, others 
may have traveled onward and upward with greater rapid- 
ity. 



178 

We should place our own schools in the balances of judg- 
ment with those of other towns and cities, with equal fa- 
cilities with our own and mark which turns the scale. 

This I have endeavored to do in my present estimate of 
our scliools. I look upon them as they stand independent- 
ly of their former history, and, without associating them 
with other institutions similarly constituted, I find the 
pupils generally obedient, attentive and interested. I 
find teachers, in a majority of instances, zealously labor- 
ing for the advancement of their classes, and to establish 
the young mind in ways of virtue and industry. I see the 
public taking an interest in educational movements, erect- 
ing new houses, visiting schools, criticising teachers, con- 
demning or approving the acts of school officers, and I 
conclude, upon this evidence, that these pupils are deserv- 
ing of commendation — that these teachers endure their 
daily trials and perform tlieir daily duties, with as much 
fidelity as can reasonably be expected, and that these pa- 
rents manifest as much anxiety for the welfare of their 
children as I should expect them to do, when I consider 
the influences which govern a majority of the people. 
There are exceptions, it is true, so frequent, sometimes, as 
almost to prevail ; inattentive, disobedient and stu'.>; rn 
pupils ; indolent and even ignorant teachers ; unreasona- 
ble, fault-finding and exacting citizens, whose influence 
can be met only by the most energetic efforts. They do 
not often constitute the controlling element ; therefore, 
I conclude that our schools, taken independently of oth- 
ers, are not only a positive good, in themselves, for the in- 
dividual and virtuous elements within and around them, 
but that as reformatory institutions, as agents for the im- 
provement and elevation of man, though they may be 
proved inferior to other agencies, though they may be ca- 
pable of vastly greater good, yet as they now exist, they 



179 



meet our approbation and command our most liberal sup- 
port. 

In contrasting our present educational facilities with 
those enjoyed in former years, not far removed into the 
past, we road a continued record of improvement. In ma- 
terial growth, our schools have maintained an equal step 
with every city enterprise. In the number of schools, we 
have rapidly increased, and the present returns of pupils 
clearly show that demands are laid upon us for renewed 
contributions. Not many years ago there was but a sin- 
gle well made school building in the city, and not even 
one fully adapted to the purpose. "We have literally build- 
ed monuments to learning, though we have never been in 
advance of the public demand. We have employed more 
interested and well qualified instructors ; we have exacted 
a higher grade of scholarship, in pupil and teacher ; and 
we have instituted system in the place of confusion, dis- 
cipline for disorder, and intelligent study and indepen- 
dence of thought, where once we had but repetition from 
text books and the mere dictation of authors and instruc- 
tors. 

Looking back upon the past, through long years of per- 
sonal acquaintance with our public schools, and aided by 
the judgment of those whose forming hand is still mani- 
fest in this system as well as other enterprises of the city, 
I can assure you, to whom this report is officially address- 
ed, and through you, the public, for whom we devote our 
efforts, that our common schools of to-day stand pre-emi- 
nently above the standard which received high commenda- 
tion at the organization of the city. 

It has been my custom to compare the schools of this 
city with those of other places in our own state, and with 
educational institutions in other New England States, both 
by reports and by actual visit whenever it has been practi- 



180 

cable. There are not many model, or even highly approved 
public schools in the vicinity, of which it has been my mis- 
fortune to be wholly ignorant. While I find, in some of 
them, improvement in the construction of houses, in classi- 
fication of pupils, in text books and apparatus, and superior 
teachers, Ido not often find combined in one school, more ex- 
cellent characteristics than distinguish our best schools. I 
have seen better management, better discipline, more orig- 
inal instruction, and a higher scholarship in individual 
schools, than can bo found in ours. But I have not often 
discovered those which as a whole, excel our own. We 
have our best schools, and our medium schools ; and we 
have also poor ones, those which ought not to be poor 
another year, and will not be if we do our whole duty. 
So have other towns and cities. But the visitor is not often 
conducted to those of inferior character, nor do Com- 
missioners find them in their annual circuit. A gen- 
tleman calling upon us for the best model of a school house 
would not be conducted to that in District No. 5, nor to 
our High School room. So with regard to schools. I would 
not conduct a friend or a stranger, who sought a perfect 
school, to — some that I would not dare name in this con- 
nection. When visiting schools abroad, I have been done 
by as I would do, and have been conducted to those which 
were meritorious in themselves, or were furnished with 
school rooms or apparatus which were commendable, and 
I have not often found even these best schools superior 
to ours. 



It has been our custom for many years, with scarcely an 
exception, to report each school specifically, and to pub- 
lish the excellences and defects of teachers and pupils. 
This is a common practice in all places where the number 
of schools is not too large to admit of such a course. The 



181 

usage has its advantages and its objections. It may stim- 
ulate to earnest effort botli tlie teacher and the pupil. 
Their pride is awakened by it ; they are ambitious for the 
good name they hope to receive, or they dread the mortifi- 
cation which will follow censure, and thus they are pressed 
on in the way of right by the love of praise, and restrained 
from evil by the fear of rebuke. 

This year the schools will be considered by classes, spe- 
cific mention being made only of those which have been 
subject to marked changes. 

Tbe number of ungraded schools is the same as report- 
ed a year since. They are located on the east side of the 
river, out of District No. 2. They do not furnish the mate- 
rial for a very flattering report. They embrace pupils of 
all ages between four years and twenty, and all grades of 
scholarship from ignorance of the alphabet to a fair knowl- 
edge of Mathematics, Grammar and Geography. Hence 
there must of necessity be numerous classes, dividing the 
teacher's time so minutely as to forbid anything like thor- 
ough instruction in those branches which require full illus- 
tration. 

The order cannot be so satisfactory in a mixed school 
as in one which is properly graded. The discipline which 
is demanded for a child is entirely unsuited to an^adult. 
The child, that should be in a primary school, cannot with 
safety endure the restraint which should be imposed upon 
those of maturer years. 

In the ungraded schools there is much irregularity of 
attendance, which cannot well be avoided. There are no 
habits of study such as would be acceptable or even en- 
durable in the graded schools. There are a few good 
scholars, those who learn readily and accurately, but the 
schools taken as a class are far inferior to those in the large r 
districts which are subject to a rigid classification. 

L 



182 

During the first term of the year the schools which were 
marked highest for deportment were those in Districts 
Nos. 1, 4, 8 and 9. In earnestness and close application, 
and consequently in real advancement the school in No. 7 
was conspicuous. The most disorderly was in No. 3. The 
least apparent progress was in No. 6. In the Summer and 
Autumn terms the severest labor was performed in Nos. 3 
and 7. All were very orderly, and if we except No. 6, and 
in the Autumn term No. 4, none gave occasion for special 
complaint. They all needed more mental action, — they 
were too passive, — they were willing to receive instruction, 
but disliked to put forth the requisite effort to acquire it. 

There are now in the city sixteen schools which may be 
classed as distinctively primary. They are the germs of 
the higher grades, and are in most cases managed with 
much discretion by their teachers. 

Those governed chiefly by the law of kindness, as all 
schools composed of mere children should be, are Nos. 2, 
3, 7, 8, 9, 10 and that at Amoskeag. The greatest amount 
of labor is performed in Nos. 1 and 13. Nos. 5 and 11, 
and the one in Ward 7, are mere alphabet schools, and in 
government and instruction are not subject to precisely the 
same law as the other primaries. The only changes of 
teachers in this grade, during the year, are in Nos. 2 and 
12, the former in consequence of a resignation and the 
latter in consequence of a suspension of the school for a 
time, and the choice of a new teacher at its re-opening. 

There were nearly one thousand pupils in these sixteen 
schools during the autumn term, or about sixty to a room. 
The average number belonging to them is not far from 
eight hundred, or fifty to each teacher. This is by far too 
large a number to be properly managed by one person. No 
teacher, whatever may be her talents can have the entire 



183 



direction of so many children without doing injustice to 
them. It is enough to govern so large a number without 
the anxiety of teaching. But we have been so long accus- 
tomed to large schools, we are so economical — parsimon- 
ious, rather, — that we make no effort to remedy an evil 
that a moment's consideration would convince us really 
existed. But we have no rooms for them, — our seats are 
all occupied, and we are therefore compelled to continue 
the course that our judgment condemns. 

Not only are the children of this grade crowded in too 
large numbers into rooms too small for their accommoda- 
tion, but they are "too much restrained— they have not suf. 
ficient physical employment. Their minds are forced and 
developed more readily than their bodies. They need 
more physical expansion, that in due time a corresponding 
mental growth may follow. Six hours daily confinement 
to the school room are so many hours of imprisonment, — 
for with the large number of pupils in our primary schools, 
the teacher must exercise her power arbitrarily to keep 
them under such restraint as will secure good order. They 
are hours of discomfort, restlessness and stupidity to the 
frolicking boy or girl, and create a distaste for the school 
room, if not an utter aversion to everything but play that 
is associated with it. Our children must have more out- 
door exercise and less confinement within the walls of the 
school room, if we would have them attain to the physi- 
cal and intellectual stature of men. But if we must con- 
tinue to hold them six hours a day in their seats, if there 
can be no such arrangement as will permit them to spend 
a part of each half day in the play-grounds, or in inclement 
weather in a hall or basement especially provided, let us at 
least, re-arrange our schools and furnish them with such 
apparatus as will give them constant employment, adapted 
to their capacity. Our children are suffering with indo- 



184 



lence in the primary schools, — not mental inaction, for they 
have labor enough for the mind, but physical inactivity, 
which is sure lo be felt in their future lives. 

There were formerly a large number of partially graded 
schools in the city, but by persevering effort, only a few re- 
main. One at Piscatasquog, usually styled a primary, and 
one on Blodgett street which has been numbered in the mid- 
dle grade, contain pupils of both the primary and middle 
rank. Neither of these are deserving of censure, nor 
could they properly be regarded as deserving high com- 
mendation. They require a great amount of labor, and 
must receive it, or they would soon fail to sustain even an 
ordinary rank. 

It is always a pleasure to report our middle schools, be- 
cause it requires no effort to commend what is manifestly 
worthy of approbation. As a class we have intelligent, 
earnest and faithful instruction through this grade. Dur- 
ing the past year the pupils have been urged forward more 
rapidly than for many previous years, and have entered 
the grammar grade, with higher qualifications than usual, 
and now, in the grammar schools, give evidence of men- 
tal discipline, which, with continued application, will en- 
sure good scholarship. 

Our Grammar Schools, including those on the West side 
of the Merrimack, that at Wilson's Hill, and the two large 
schools of the grammar grade, have afforded just grounds 
for us who know their merits, to speak of them with confi- 
dence and pride. They are making advancement year by 
year. They demand a constant restraining hand, but no 
rod of terror to hold them in submission. They need urg- 
ing onward in their studies. They require exact and 



185 

rigid mental cultivation, which they daily receive. In at- 
tendance these schools show a more gratifying record, in 
deportment a higher standard, and in their examinations, 
give evidence that they have at least taken no step back. 

The Intermediate which is really a grammar school, 
with a little reaching backward into the middle rank and 
forward into the lower ranks of the High School, now 
maintains a higher position than at any time since its or- 
ganization. It is one of the most useful schools in the 
city, and is daily gaining the confidence of the people. It 
has been popular before ; not because it was the best school, 
not because there was more thorough instruction, or bet- 
ter discipline, but for its adaptation to the wishes of the 
people in regard to the branches pursued. Daring a large 
part of the year, the number of pupils has been very 
small, and the teachers have been required to perform but 
a small amount of labor. Recently, in addition to the 
large number of pupils who attend during the winter 
term, it was necessary to admit a class of scholars who 
were excluded from the High School. The influence of 
these scholars who are ambitious to advance, has material- 
ly changed the character of the school. 

The High School has long been the subject of discussion 
among our citizens who have been interested in the cause 
of education. We have yearly given reports of its condi- 
tion, of its discipline, and of its instruction, and we repeat 
now what has often been asserted of it in former reports, 
that no better instruction is desired, no better scholarship 
can be found in similar institutions, nor is a higher litera- 
ry cultivation often reached in the highest grades of pub- 
lic schools, and but for a fault which has existed in the 



186 

school to a considerable extent for years, neitlier the 
school officers nor the public would have desired or suf- 
fered a change in its management. 

After ten years of laborious service, the principal who 
has so long had charge of the school, presented his resig- 
nation. At the opening of the present term a new Teacher 
assumed the government of the school. With no small 
degree of experience in his profession, with superior schol- 
arship, and the strongest testimonials, he has only to prove 
himself a good instructor and exercise a rigid but discrete 
discipline over his pupils to establish himself in the confi- 
dence of the people. 

The principal of the school at the close of the autumn 
term furnished me with the accompanying Table of the 
attendance, deportment and scholarship, for the past year, 
of every member of the school in the Fall term. 

Attendance is indicated in half days, the whole number 
of half days for the year being 396. The deportment and 
scholarship are marl^^ed on a scale in which 8 is the highest 
mark. 

It will be observed that five scholars have not been ab- 
sent during the year. The per cent, attendance for the 
year was 93.6. 



187 
GENTLEMEN. 

Attendance. Deport'nt. Scholar'p. 



John H. R. Abbott, - - - 133 7.98 7.38 

George M. Austin, - - - 128 8. 7.87 

George H. Batchelder, - - 349 7.80 7.62 

William A. Bunton, - - - 372 7.99 7.99 

George W. Bunton, ... 388 8. 7.85 

George H. Charaberlin, - - 355 7.74 7.59 

Greenleaf Clarke, - - - 394 8. 8. 

Henry S. Clark, - - - - 46 7.96 6.80 

Irving A. J. Colby, - -^ - 197 7.92 7.84 

Ezra M. Copp, - - - - 235 7.87 7.85 

Henry J. Eaton, - - - 251 7.96 7.88 

Charles F. Elliot, - - - 395 7.93 7.92 

Wilham Everett, ... 338 7.96 7.88 

Frank W. Favor, - - - 378 7.82 7.84 

George W.Flanders, - - 387 7.90 7.93 

Charles W. Farmer, - - - 257 7.91 7.78 

Hiram M. George, - > - 396 7.98 7.74 

Alvin D. Gooden, - - - 370 7.93 7.48 

George E. Hackett, - - 391 7.92 7.73 

Albert H. Huntress, - - - 378 7.96 7.82 

Edward F. James, ... 337 8. 7.99 

Selwyn J. Kidder - - - - 367 7.70 7.74 

Horace A. Knowlton, - - 374 7.96 7.95 

John A. McCrillis, - - - 356 7.78 7.89 

Charles W. Merrill, ... 396 8. 7.62 

William W. Patterson, - - 377 7.90 7.61 

Frank S. Pushee, ... 25 8. 7.94 

George W. Quimby, - ^ - - 365 7.85 7.77 

David M. Savory, - - - 335 7.92 7.37 

Howard P. Smith, . - - 336 8. 7.84 

Charles H. Thayer, . - - 361 7.81 7.79 

Edward K. White, . - - 243 7.93 8. 

George F. White, ... 384 7.99 7.98 



188 



LADIES. 



Alice A. Abbott, 
Sarah J. Abbott, 
Marianna Abbott, - 
Rosa Abels, 
Mary P. Adams, 
Clara C. Baker, 
Evie A. Baker, 
Mary E. Baldwin, 
Hattie A. Barnes, - 
Mary A. Barrett, 
Sarah C. 0. Boyd, - 
Leslie M. Bradley, 
Stella E. Bradley, - 
Clara M. Brown, 
Pina E. Brugger, 
Ellen Brown, 
Katie L. Chapin, 
Lucinda L. Chase, 
Susan E. Clark, 
Marianna Clough, 
Almira M. Coburn, - 
Zaphira 0. Coburn, 
Emma M. Copp, 
Emma Currier, - 
Carrie I. Custer, 
Fannie E. Daniels, 
Lucia H. Daniels, - 
Mary B. Davis, - 
Marion J. Dodge, - 
Jennie Doland, - 
Lizzie Doland, 
Lizzie Dow, 



Attendance, 


Deport'nt. 


Scpolar'p. 


380 


8. 


7.93 


- 345 


7.96 


7.90 


387 


7.93 


7.85 


- 221 


7.97 


7.78 


368 


8. 


8. 


- 318 


8. 


7.93 


392 


7.98 


7.91 


- 356 


7.99 


7.90 


40 


7.79 


8. 


- 396 


8. 


7.93 


385 


7.96 


7.90 


- 368 


7.99 


7.92 


327 


8. 


7.95 


- 346 


7.82 


7.42 


261 


7.98 


7.84 


- 130 


7.97 


7.64 


225 


7.98 


7.89 


- 283 


8. 


7.95 


237 


7.95 


7.67 


- 361 


7.95 


7.87 


184 


8. 


7.80 


- 213 


8. 


7.95 


381 


8. 


7.68 


- 386 


7.99 


7.88 


223 


8. 


7.86 


- 200 


7.95 


7.80 


318 


7.97 


7.94 


- 389 


7.98 


7.68 


254 


8. 


7.71 


- 299 


8. 


7.93 


390 


7.97 


7.93 


- 105 


8. 


7.46 



189 





Attendance. 


Deport'iit. 


Scholar'p. 


Ella A. Elliott, 


258 


7.99 


7.98 


Adale Felt, 


- 302 


7.99 


7.96 


Mary L. Ferren, 


120 


8. 


8. 


Alma E. Flanders, 


- 384 


7.86 


7.67 


Mary E. Fletcher, - 


165 


8. 


7.98 


Emma A. Fogg, - 


- 248 


7.94 


7.92 


Letitia L. Foster, 


102 


8. 


7.43 


Augusta C. Gile, 


- 396 


8. 


8. 


Abby S. Griffin, 


258 


8. 


7.97 


Carrie M, Goodwin, 


- 340 


7.93 


7.54 


Josie M. Haines, 


360 


7.96 


7.99 


Isabel A. Hastings, 


- 376 


7.69 


7.66 


Addie M. Haynes, - 


298 


7.87 


7.79 


Frances M. Harvey, 


- 371 


8. 


7.90 


Sophronia Harvey, 


372 


8. 


7.69 


Helen M. Hills, 


- 184 


8. 


7.97 


Clara E. Hoyt, 


249 


8. 


7.95 


Addie E. Hutchinson - 


- 391 


8. 


8. 


S. Josephine Joy, 


252 


7.92 


7.76 


Martha R. Kidder, 


- 195 


8. 


7.98 


M. Jennie Knowles, 


378 


7.97 


7.80 


Helen M. Locke, 


- 384 


8. 


7.94 


Martha J. Locke, 


364 


7.86 


7.81 


Mary J. Lord, 


- 300 


7.96 


7.86 


Mary E. Maskey, 


238 


8. 


7.83 


Isabel McCrillis, 


- 272 


8. 


7.99 


Sarah D, McQaeston, 


396 


8, 


7.96 


Zilla L. McQueston, - 


- 378 


7.93 


7.53 


Annie E. Mellen, 


272 


7.96 


7.81 


Laura A. Montgomery, 


- 244 


8. 


7.95 


Louise E. Newell, 


376 


7.98 


7.82 


Orriette Y. Nesmith, - 


- 93 


8. 


7.48 


Mary A. Nutt, 


218 


8. 


7.82 


S. Addie Parker, 


- 358 


7.98 


8. 



190 

Attendance. Dcport'nt. Scholar'p. 



Jennie A. Perry, 
Mattie Pinkerton, 
Katie L. Porter, 
Rosa L. Pratt, ... 
Carrie E. Reed, 
Josie H. Riddle, - - - 
Francena Robinson, 
Orriette E. Sanborn, - 
Clara I. Sargent, 
Mary E. Sleeper, 
Georgietta E. Smith, 
Georgianna E. Smith, 
Lydia A. Smith, / - 
Annie R. Stearns, 
Rebecca P. Stevens, 
Marianna Tasker, 
Fannie M. Taylor, - 
Annie J. Thompson, - 
Lizzie H. White, 
Addie S. Wilson, 
Estella F. Wilson, - 
Helen M. Yeaton, 
Augusta S. Young, 
Emma M. Young, 

Within the past year a regular system of marking at- 
tendance, deportment and scholarship has been adopted in 
other high grades of schools, similar to that of the High 
School. A comparative rank is established for every pu- 
pil in his school, and a record made, monthly, to be exhib- 
ited to school officers, parents and visitors whenever re- 
quired. The record is taken home by the pupil and when 
endorsed by the parent, is again returned to the teacher. 
In this way each pupil becomes a reporter of his own at- 



202 


7.96 


7.31 


- 316 


7.94 


7.70 


361 


7.87 


7.62 


- 310 


7.96 


7.64 


278 


7.98 


7.93 


- 308 


8. 


7.92 


283 


8. 


7.71 


- 383 


7.96 


7.57 


268 


7.99 


7.66 


- 309 


8. ■ 


8. 


348 


8. 


7.92 


- 326 


8. 


8. 


370 


7.91 


7.70 


- 385 


7.96 


7.91 


395 


8. 


7.92 


- 273 


7.96 


7.98 


378 


7.78 


7.62 


- 383 


7.91 


7.83 


360 


8. 


7.90 


- 341 


7.94 


7.75 


142 


7.99 


7.09 


- 354 


8. 


7.84 


388 


8. 


8. 


- 386 


7.88 


7.67 



191 



tendance, conduct and industry, and the parent may learn 
without trouble, whether his child is prompt in the per- 
formance of all requirements, or is neglectful of the priv- 
ileges afforded him. Thus far the plan, though practiced 
only to a limited extent, has proved beneficial, stimulating 
the pupil to greater diligence in study, a higher standard 
of moral deportment, and more constant attendance on 
school. On the other hand it has awakened a new inter- 
est on the part of the parent, and has led him to impress 
more strongly upon the mind of his children, the impor- 
tance of regular attendance and unceasing efforts to gain 
a respectable standing in his school. 



Having referred to the general and relative character of 
our public schools, and expressed the opinion that they 
maintain a high rank when compared with similar institu- 
tions in other localities, having also reviewed as classes 
the several grades in the system, it may be well to refer to 
some of the distinctive features that constitute marked 
excellences or defects, that we may learn in the future to 
adopt what is commendable, and reject whatever has a 
tendency to evil. 

We have in most of our schools faithful, working teach- 
ers. In comparison with others, as I have already said, 
they are generally found to be well qualified for their po- 
sitions. They assume the responsibility of their labors 
with the full knowledge that they have no easy task be- 
fore them. They engage to work, and though they are 
liable to become weary in well doing, or satisfy them 
selves with the self assurance that they do all for which 
they are compensated, they are generally true to their 
trust. I could designate individual teachers in our ser- 
vice, who committed an important mistake when they ap- 



192 



plied for a situation in the teacher's desk, and who, to the 
loss of many an honest boy and girl have been guilty of 
repeated errors wlienever they have entered the school 
room. But they constitute the exceptions which will ev- 
erywhere be found. 

There is in our schools accuracy of instruction, thor- 
oughness, which is especially marked as we advance from 
the primary grade. It is not enough that the lessons be 
so committed as to enable the pupil to get through a re- 
citation, but they must be learned, and the pupil be ready 
for a test whenever required. Our annual examination 
testifies to the character of the instruction. 

Not only is there accuracy in the instruction, but the 
general character of the schools is such as commend them 
to favor. There is moral discipline as well as mental and 
physical. The provisions of the statute to impress upon 
the young mind the principles of piety, and justice ; a 
sacred regard for truth, love of country, humanity and 
benevolence ; sobriety, industry and frugality, and all 
those virtues which are the ornament and support of hu- 
man society, are faithfully enforced. 

One of the most important characteristics in our schools 
is regularity, a system by which every thing is required 
to be done. I do not mean that the system is never neg- 
lected, but that it is enforced by the school authorities, 
and generally exacted by instructors. 

There are, however, defects on the other hand — radi- 
cal deficiencies in some schools, which will continue to ex- 
ist until teachers are removed or receive greater induce- 
ments elsewhere. This class of teachers, if put on exam- 
ination, would do credit neither to themselves nor the city. 
They may do all that our rules require of them, but not 
all that their duty to those who look up to thom,?demands. 
We need, especially in our primary schools, betler in- 



193 



struction, — more elementary, and systematic — that which 
is not chained to rules and formulas, but that which goes 
behind all these and reveals the processes by which they 
arc obtained. The true teacher studies first and most 
closely the minds of pupils, and when he has learned it, 
he has not only the key to the entire control of the pupil, 
but knows what he can accomplish, and in what manner 
he can effect his object most readily. As the sculptor 
viewing the rough, unhewn marble just from the quarry, 
discovers therein the form of beauty, all concealed from 
the common eye, so in the weak and untrained mind of 
the child, will the true teacher discern the future scholar. 

We have, in some schools, too much teaching and too 
little educating-. Our pupils have been permitted to de- 
pend, not upon themselves, but on their teacher. This is 
an evil originating in the primary schools, encouraged in 
the middle grade, suffered in the grammar schools, and 
confirmed irremediably in the High school. It has grown 
upon the pupils until it has become a part of their educa- 
tion. It will abide with them until the stern duties of 
life compel them to trust to themselves. 

The teacher must be the judge in this respect, give aid 
and encouragement just when it is needed, and only to 
such an extent as will lead the scholar onward, throwing 
him upon his own powers the moment he gives indications 
of relying on his teacher. 



There are other topics which might with propriety be 
discussed in this report, but they have in former years 
come before the city council and the public in the annual 
record of our schools, or they may be presented to the 
Board, from time to time in a less formal and more effec- 
tive manner, and therefore claim no mention here. 



194 

111 concluding this report, which though not so extended 
as in former years, covers the entire ground, allow me to 
congratulate the citizens of Manchester on the gratifying 
condition of their public schools. I do not claim that 
they are free from fault, nor that they are accomplishing 
all the good of which they are capable. But they are 
yearly advancing, and although their progress is slow, they 
are productive of permanent and extensive good. That 
they may be liberally sustained, religiously guarded from 
every evil influence, and continue to be the pride of our 
city, should be the desire of every citizen. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES 0. ADAMS, 
Stip't. of Public Instruction. 

Manchester, Dec. 20, 1862. 



SUPPLEIENTAEY EEPORT. 



During the winter term which is now closed in the out 
districts, and which will soon close in the central districts, 
there has been a good degree of interest manifested by the 
pupils and the public in our common schools. 

The few changes in teachers noticed in the annual re- 
port have generally proved satisfactory. 

The High School, under Mr. Colburn, has not yet 
come fully up to the wishes of the Superintendent, nor do 
we think it has yet proved entirely satisfactory to the pub- 
lic. The school has had a larger number of pupils than 
at any previous term since its establishment. The rooms 
have been uncomforta' ly full, and teachers and pupils 
have consequently been subjected to great inconvenience. 
The principal and his assistants have labored faithfully for 
the good of the school. It will require time to accom- 
plish every needed reform, and with the support of the 
public and the co-operation of the school officers, I have 
confidence of entire success. 

Miss Caswell who has acted as substitute in one of the 
rooms in the North Grammar School, during the present 
term, has been severely tried by the conduct of the pupils. 
She has labored diligently and earnestly for the benefit of 
the school, and if she has not been successful it has not 
been for want of effort. 

All other schools in the district have been more than or- 



196 



dinarily full, but have all maintained a good reputation 
and made good progress in their studies. 

The school in District No. 3, has been small, but entire- 
ly unexceptionable in its character. 

No. 4 has had a quiet, orderly school. 

In No. 5, the school is still in session, and has been 
•thus far doing good service. 

In Nos. 1, 6, 7, 8 and 9, we have schools of unusual 
e xcellence. 

In Nos. 10 and 11, the schools have remained imder the 
care of old teachers, and have been entirely satisfactory. 

Manchester, Feb. 20, 1863. 



197 



The following table shows the whole number attending 
during the year. 





6 

1^ . 


6 




XO) 


>>ii 

^ r 


>-. . 


SCHOOLS IN DISTRICT NUMBER TWO. 




O "1 


_; 


.■s S 


00 .S 






%V\ 


.So 


"a 


.2 8 


.2 a, 


*« J2 




is 


^ 


o 


> ° 


^5 


>i 


High School, - . - _ 


02 


115 


177 


10 


20 


374 


North Grammar School, - - - 


119 


136 


255 


11 


23 


317 


South Grammar School, 


106 


127 


233 


14 


19 


297 


Intermediate School, - - - 


112 


119 


231 


8 


24 


363 


Wilson Hill School, 


37 


19 


46 


5 


10 


83 


Middle School No. 1, 


19 


26 


45 


5 


9 


79 


" " No. 2, - - - 


18 


24 


42 


3 


9 


98 


" " No. 3, - - - 


29 


12 


48 


4 


8 


57 


•• " No. 4, - - - 


28 


25 


53 


8 


10 


59 


•• " No. 5, - - - 


19 


27 


46 


9 


10 


96 


«• " No 6, - 


24 


36 


50 


7 


10 


93 


" " No. 7, - - - 


27 


31 


58 


5 


9 


86 


" " No. 8, - - - 


4] 


24 


65 


3 


8 


39 


Primary School No. 1, - - - 


61 


54 


115 


3 


10 


44 


" " No. 2, - - - 


34 


39 


73 


2 


9 


57 


•' '« No. 3, - - - 


43 


38 


81 


5 


10 


75 


" •' No. 4, - - - 


30 


35 


71 


3 


10 


61 


«• " No. 5, - - - 


49 


56 


105 


4 


9 


87 


«• " No. G, - - - 


34 


46 


80 


4 


9 


69 


" " No. 7, - - - 


67 


41 


108 


8 


10 


103 


•« " No. 8, - - . 


27 


58 


85 


8 


11 


117 


•« " No. 9,- 


47 


59 


106 


6 


12 


81 


" " No. 10, - 


59 


56 


105 


7 


11 


52 


" No. 11, - 


53 


37 


90 


4 


10 


64 


•♦ •' No. 12, - 


31 


37 


68 


3 


9 


47 


« " No. 13, - 


47 


41 


88 


2 


9 


79 


" " No. 14, - 


39 


43 


82 


1 


6 


19 


School in District No. 1, 


24 


19 


43 


1 


9 


37 


•' " No. 3, - 


51 


57 


108 


4 


12 


85 


" " No. 4, 


23 


19 


42 


4 


9 


38 


" " No. 5, - 


18 


17 


35 


4 


11 


29 


" '• No. 6, 


22 


19 


41 


3 


10 


19 


" " No. 7, - 


33 


24 


57 


4 


11 


58 


" " No. 8, 


27 


26 


53 


3 


10 


34 


" " No. 9, - 


15 


37 


52 


3 


10 


31 


District No. 10, Grammar School, 


25 


47 


72 


3 


12 


47 


" No. 10, Middle School, - 


41 


24 


65 


3 


9 


29 


" No. 10, Primary " - - 


61 


69 


130 


4 


11 


51 


« No. 10, Mixed " 


41 


38 


79 


2 


9 


59 


«' No. 11, Grammar " - - 


31 


33 


64 


5 


9 


97 


•' No. 11, Primary '« 


54 


51 


105 


5 


9 


81 



198 



The following table shows the attendance for a single 
month, in all our schc ols. 





6 


d 


o 


1. 




SCHOOLS IN DISTRICT NUMBER TWO. ' 


.2 ^ 
o o 


ij-s 


1^ 


OJ CO 

be— 

« i: 


01 a 




.§« 


J5 


«« 


So 


in 3 




^ 


^ 


^ ^ 


<^ 


High School, 


60 


104 


52 


98 


136 


North Grammar School, . - - 


99 


123 


98 


118 


203 


South Grammar School, - - - - 


90 


100 


88 


98 


178 


Intermediate School, - - - - 


76 


56 


59 


46 


96 


Wilson Hill School. ... - 


20 


14 


18 


13 


30 


Middle School, No. 1, - . - - 


9 


22 


9 


22 


29 


No. 2, 


16 


13 


16 


13 


26 


" " No. 3, - - - - 


17 


16 


17 


14 


29 


" " No. 4, . - - . 


18 


19 


17 


17 


32 


No.5, - 


16 


34 


16 


33 


48 


«' " No. 6, 


18 


16 


18 


16 


33 


No.7, - 


23 


20 


21 


18 


37 


«' " No. 8, ... - 


28 


18 


26 


15 


33 


Primary School No. 1, 


19 


16 


18 


15 


26 


No. 2, - - - 


31 


12 


24 


9 


40 


" «' No. 3, - 


20 


20 


19 


18 


34 


«« " No. 4, - - - 


19 


11 


18 


11 


24 


" " No. 5, - 


32 


15 


30 


14 


37 


« " No. 6, - - - 


16 


25 


15 


24 


38 


" «« No. 7, - 


32 


17 


31 


17 


42 


« v No. 8, - - - 


13 


26 


13 


23 


33 


" «' No. 9, - 


26 


27 


22 


23 


41 


" " No. 10, - 


18 


32 


16 


30 


44 


« «' No. 11, . - - 


24 


18 


22 


17 


38 


" " No. 12, - 


15 


24 


15 


21 


34 


No. 13, ... 


23 


21 


29 


18 


46 


" •' No. 14, - 


21 


17 


18 


14 


28 


School in District No. 1, - 


14 


15 


12 


14 


24 


" " No. 3, - - - 


21 


24 


17 


21 


34 


t( n No. 4, - 


14 


13 


13 


13 


22 


" " No. 5, - - - 


11 


8 


9 


7 


14 


" " No. 6, - 


12 


17 


11 


14 


21 


No. 7, - - - 


33 


27 


30 


24 


48 


" " No. 8, - - - - 


17 


15 


15 


14 


26 


« " No. 9, - - - 


22 


8 


20 


7 


23 


District No. 10, Grammar School, 


20 


25 


18 


24 


41 


" No. 10, Middle 


24 


10 


22 


8 


27 


" No. 10, Primary " 


33 


30 


28 


24 


44 


" No. 10, Mixed '< - 


23 


15 


22 


15 


36 


" No. 11, Grammar " - - 


23 


17 


22 


16 


35 


," No. 11, Primary " - - 


29 


26 


23 


23 


47 



eOYEENMENT AND OFFICEES 

OF THE 

CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

1863. 



MAYOR, 



THEODORE T. ABBOT. 



ALDERMEN, 



Ward 1, John Hosley, 
Ward 2, Henry B. Moulton, 
Ward 3, Joseph H. Haynes, 
Ward 4, Geokge Holbrook, 



Ward 5, Thomas Howe, 
Ward 6, Ira W. Moore, 
Ward 7, James W. Preston, 
Ward 8, Thomas S. Montgomery. 



COMMON COUNCIL 
Ward 1, Francis P. Sargent, 



Henry 0. Tilton, 
Ardrew J. Dickey. 

Ward 2, Samuel Clark, 

Isaac H. Russell, 
John T. Robinson. 

Ward 3, Thomas R. Hubbard, 
George W. Quinby, 
William C. Hazelton. 

Ward 4, Robert F. Moore, 

Nathaniel W. Cumner, 
George W. Gardner. 



Ward 5, William Little, 
Thomas Stack, 
Michael Gillis. 

Ward 6, Jeremiah L. Fogg, 

JONA. Y. McQuESTON, 

Ebenezer G. Knight. 

Ward 7, John 0. Parker, 
John O. Head, 
Datid K. Boutelle. 

Ward 8, John E. Stearns. 
Warren Stearns, 
Harmon S. Burns. 



200 

NATHANIEL W. CUMNER, President of Common Council. 
JOSEPH KNOWLTON, City Clerk. 
ORREN C. MOORE, Clerk Common Council. 
•DANIEL R. PRESCOTT, Citi/ Messenger. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Montgomery ; Messrs. 
Hubbard, Little and Head. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Haynes and Holbrook ; Messrs. Hubbard, 
Quinby and Gardner. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Moulton and Moore ; Messrs. 
J. E. Stearns, Clark and Hazelton. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Hosley and Howe ; Messrs. Lit- 
tle, W. Stearns and Tilton. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Holbrook and Moulton ; ^lessrs. Fogg, 
McQueston and Head. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Preston and Haynes ; Messrs 
Fogg, Head and Burns. 

On Commons and Cemetery. — Aldermen Haynes and Hosley ; Messrs. 
Stack, Clark and Gardner. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Moulton and Montgomery ; Messrs. 
Clark, W. Stearns and Sargent. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Montgomery and Haynes ; Messrs. Hub- 
bard, Parker and Robinson. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Howe and Moulton ; Messrs. 
Moore, Stack and Sargent. 

On City Farm. — The Mayor and Alderman Moore ; Messrs. 
McQueston, Quinby and Boutelle. 



JOINT SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 

On State Aid to Families of Volunteers. — The Mayor, Aldermen Hol- 
brook and Moulton ; Messrs. Cumner, Little, Clark and Russell. 

On City Hall. — Aldermen Preston and Holbrook ; Messrs. Cumner, 
Hubbard and McQueston. 



201 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD 01 ALDERMEN. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Holbrook and Hosley, 
On Enrollments. — Aldermen Ilaynes and Howe. 
On Elections. — Aldermen Preston and Howe. 
On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Moulton and Holbrook. 
On Bills in Second Reading. — Aldermen Montgomery and Preston. 
On Market. — Aldermen Howe and Moore. 
On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Holbrook and Hosley. 
On Abatement of Taxes. — Aldermen Haynes and Moore. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL 

On Elections and Returns. — Messrs. Moore, J. E. Stearns and Clllis. 
Bills in Second Reading. — Messrs. Little, Tilton and Robinson. 
Enrollments. — Messrs. Parker, Russell and Dickey. 



SOLICITOR. 
CHARLES W. JOHNSON.— Oj^ce, Smyth's Block. 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR. 
HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN— O^ce in City Hall Building. 



TRUSTEES OF THE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
Hon. Samuel D. Bell, Samuel N. Bell, 

William P. Riddle, Samuel Webber, 

Ezekiel A, Straw, William C. Clark, 

Hon. Daniel Clark, Nathaniel W. Cumner, 

Hon. Theodore T. Abbott. 

F. B. EATON, Librarian. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 
Ward 1, Samuels. Moulton, Ward 5, Patrick Sheehan, 

2, George 0. Clark, 6, Levi H. Sleeper, 

3, Nahum Baldwin, 7, A. G. Fairbanks, 

4, Moses E. George, 8, Dennis Cassidy. 

Samuel S. Moulton, Clerk. 



202 



MODERATORS. 

Ward 1, William H. Hill, Ward 5, John Smith, 

2, William Reynolds, 6, James 0. Adams, 

3, T. T. Abbott, 7, Charles K. Walker, 

4, John D. Patterson, 8, George H. Colby. 



SELECTMEN. 
Ward 1, John GiLLis, Ward 5, Jeremiah Hayes, 

William S. Pearson, Daniel Connor, 

Redben Hills. Edward Eagan. 

2, George 0. Clark, 6, Isaac Whittkmork, 
Christopher C Colby, James M. Nutt, 
Sulliyan D. Hill. Ignatius T. Webster. 

3, William Flanders, 7, John Patterson, 
Cyrus Dunn, S. C. Holt, 
Joseph F. Kennard. C. C. Favor. 

4, Joseph L. Smith, 8, James E, Bailey, 
Isaac D. Palmer, John Field, 
Andrew J. Butterfield. Henry H. Fuller. 



ASSESSORS. 
Ward 1, George F. Judkitis, Ward 5, John Q. A. Sargent, 

2, George S. Neal, 6, John P. Moore, 

3, Daniel W. Fling, 7, James Walker, 

4, Joseph E. Bennett, 8, Benjamin White. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
Ward 1, Seth T. Hill, Ward 5, William Little, 

2, Waterman Smith, 6, George Pierce, 

3, B. F. Bowles, 7, Samuel Webber 

4, Holmes R. Pettee, 8, Daniel Farmer, Jr. 
JAMES 0. ADAMS, Superintendent of Public Instruction, 



WARD CLERKS. 

Ward 1, Daniel Maxfield, Ward 5, Timothy Sullivan, 

2, Horace M. Gillis, 6, Edward Prime, 

3, Charles A. Smith, 7, Daniel K. Mack, 

4, William G. Garmon, 8, Cyrus Gile. 



203 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



SAMUEL VPTON,— Chief Justice, Office Merchants' Exchange. 



CITY MARSHAL. 
JOHN S. YE ATOM,— O^ce, City Hall. 



ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 
DANIEL R. PRESCOTT,— O^ce City Hall. 



CONSTABLES. 
JOHNS. YEATON, D. R. PRESCOTT, EBEN CARR. 

JUSTIN SPEAR. 



WATCHMEN AND NIGHT POLICE. 

No. 1, EBEN CARR, No. 4, EDWARD P. WHIDDEN, 

2, HENRY BENNETT, 5, HUGH RAMSEY, 

3, JAMES PATTEN, 6, JOHN ROURKE, 

No. 7, H. H. NOYES, 
Constables and Police Officers. 



INDEX. 



Address, Mayor's, 

Abatement of Taxes, 

Bridge, Amoskeag Falls, 

Bridge, Granite, 

Bridge, Piscataquog, Floating, 

Bridge, Piscataquog, Iron, 

Commons, 

Cemetery, Valley, 

Cemetery, Pine Grove, 

Cemetery Report of Committee, 

Cemetery, Treasurer, Report of, 

Debt, City, 

Fire Department, Miscellaneous, 

Pennacook Hose, 

Merrimack Engine, 

Hook & Ladder, 

Steamer No. 1, 

Steamer No. 2, 

Steamer No. 3, 
Farm. City, 

Farm, City, Recapitulation, 
Government and Officers, 1863, 



Highway Distr 
Highway Distr 
Highway Distr 
Highway Distr 
Highway Distr 
Highway Distr: 
Highway Distr 
Highway Distr 
Highway Distr 
Highway Distr; 
Highway Distr: 
Highway Distr: 
Highway, New, 
Hall and Stores, 
Interest, 



ct Nos. 1 and 2, 
ct No. 3, 
ct No. 4, 

5, 

6, 

7, 



ct No. 
ct No. 
ct No. 
ct No. 
ct No. 9, 
ct No. 10, 
ct No. 11, 
ctNo. 12, 
ct No. 13, 



3 Incidental Expenses, 57 

80 Lighting Streets, 83 

60 Library, City, 77 

50 Report of Trustees, 87 

47 Report of Librarian, 92 

48 Report of Treasurer, 88 
52 Recapitulation, 91 

104 Militia, 78 

60 Notes Due the City, 107 

103 Officers, City, 72 

104 Paupers, County, 21 
85 Paupers off the Farm, 22 
63 Printing and Stationery, 84 
68 Police, 69 
65 Paving Streets, 79 
68 Propertv, City, 107 

65 Relief Fund, 92 

66 Reservoirs, 61 

67 Report, Treasurer's, 18 
24 Report, Committee on Finance, 20 
27 Report, Chief Engineer's, 117 

199 Relief for Soldiers' Families, 93 

30 Reserved Fund, 106 

33 Report, Solicitor's, 108 

35 Report, Overseers of the Poor, 109 

35 School Districts, 1 to 11, 53 to 56 

36 School House, Build'g Ac't, No 2, 56 
37i School House, Building Account, 
38| No. 10, 56 

39 School House, Building Account, 

40 No, 11, 66 

42 Sewers and Drains, 51 

43 School Report, 135 

44 Team, City, 28 

45 Taxes, 1859, 1860, 1861 and 1862, 83 

75 Valuation, 86 

76 Watering Streets, 78 



\ 



f- 



i?' 



•*