(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

e-HS: TWENTY-FIRST 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

FOR THE 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 

1866. 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANJV' UAL REPORTS AND PAPERS 
RELATING TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. 

FROM THE PRESS OF WILLIAM II. FISK, 85 MERCHAJSTS' EXCHANGE. 

1867. 






.n 



STME • ' 






■J9~ 


■ « 

> 


^ 


/. 


fy?-, 


ufc 


4J - 




So,-y 








^9- 





INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



OF THE 



HON. JOSEPH B. CLARK, Mayor, 

TO THE 

CITY COUNCIL OF MANCHESTER, 

DELIVERED BEFORE THE TWO BRANCHES IN CONVENTION, 

JANUARY 1, 1867. 






CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board op Mayor and Aldermen, ) 
January 1,1867. \ 
Ordered, That three hundred copies of the Address of 
His Honor the Mayor, delivered before the two branches 
of the City Council in Convention this day, be printed for 
the use of the City Council. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, City Clerk. 

In Common Council, I 
January 1, 1867. J 
Read and passed in concurrence. 

H. M. GILLIS, Clerk. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Council, 

AND Officers of the City of Manchester : 

I appear before you at this time to assume the trusts 
committed to me by the suffrages of my fellow-citi- 
zens, fully realizing the responsibilities which they 
involve. 

When I consider, however, how great and import- 
ant those responsibilities are, and my inexperience in 
such matters, when I reflect that the condition of 
every citizen may be affected by my official action, 1 
freely acknowledge that I have many misgi\dngs as t(^ 
my ability to perform the work assigned me. 

But with the assistance of your counsel, and by 
constant personal attention, I hope I may be enabled 
to so transact the business of the city as to merit the 
confidence of those who placed me in this important 
position. 

In the first place, gentlemen, permit me to congrat- 
ulate you upon the favorable circumstances under 
which we commence the present municipal year. 

We are now m the noon-tide of prosperity. No 
direful conflagration, nor sweeping pestilence have 
visited our city the past year, to lay waste our dwellings, 
or render our homes desolate, entailing upon us the 
woe, the suffering and misery attending such calamities. 



6 

Though burdened with a heavy debt, incurred prin- 
cipally in the late struggle to sustain the life of the 
nation, we have been able, to meet all our liabilities 
with promptness, and the pecuniary credit of the city 
now stands high. Our- corporations are running all 
their works to their utmost capacity, and individual 
enterprise is flourishing in every part of the city. 
For this general prosperity, we should be profoundly 
grateful to Him from whom all such blessings flow. 

I must now invite yoiu: attention to some of those 
subjects which will claim your future consideration. 
The first, and one that deeply interests us all, as well 
as every one of our citizens, is that of 

FINANCE. 

The information which I now have on this subject 
is derived principally from our esteemed City Treas- 
urer. From him, I learn that the financial affairs of 
the cit}^ this day are as follows : 

Bonds due July 1, 18G7 T $20 000 

'• April 1,1870 20 000 

" January 1, 1871, 6 000 

Notes " Feb. 28, 1872, 3 600 

Bonds " July 1, 1872, 20 000 . 

" July 1, 1874 20 000 

" July 1, 1877, 22 oOO 

Notes ' ' July 9, 1878 2 400 

" " July 22, 1878, 1100 

Bonds " Jan. ], 1880 10 000 

'• July 1, 1880 22 500 

" April 1, 1884, 70 000 

" April 1, 1885 30 000 

" Jan. 1, 1888, 35 000 

' Nov. 1,1893, •. 70000 

*■ July 1, 1894, 50000 

Making in all the sum of $403 100 



7- 

From this sum must be deducted $31 200 

Of unsold bonds which have been can' elled the 

last year, leaving the entire funded debt, ;J7l 900 

To this must be added temporary loan 25 722 

Interest to Jan 1, 1867 10 000 

Outstanding bills 12 000 

Total indebtedness, $419 622 

There is now in the Treasury, together with the 
amount which will probably be received on uncol- 
lected taxes, about $53,000. As to the amount of 
outstanding bills, and the amount which may be real- 
ized from unpaid taxes, it is impossible to state with 
accuracy. Should the above statement prove correct, 
the entire indebtedness will be f 366,622. 

From the foregomg it will be seen tliat of the funded 
debt the sum of $20,000 becomes duo on the first day 
of July of the ensuing year. I am informed by the 
Treasurer, that the whole of the temporary loan wdl 
also become due, on or before, the first day of Sep- 
tember next. Your attention is called thus early to 
the subject in order that you may ma]«Le proper pro- 
vision for the pa}Tnent of those sums as they become 
due. It is for you to determine, gentlemen, whether 
this amount shall be paid by taxation the present year, 
or othermse. 

In a time of prosperity like the present it seems to 
me that our debt should be gradually diminished, or 
at least should not be permitted to increase. I am 
not aware that any extra appropriation of a great 
amount will be necessary the ensuing year except as 
above stated. 

In making the usual appropriations, I would re- 



commend that they be made sufficiently large to an- 
swer the purposes for which they are intended. By 
this I do not wish to be understood that we should be 
lavish or extravagant in our expenditures. Every 
dollar of the pubhc money should be laid out as care- 
fully and judiciously as we would do in the manage- 
ment of our owa business. What I wish to be un- 
derstood to mean is, that in the management of the 
business of the city, we may not be embarrassed, or 
under the necessity of over-drawing the several ap- 
propriations so as to create a debt to be thrown upon 
others. Every administration should be held respon- 
sible for its own acts. It should never undertake any 
entei-prise without finishing it, or at least furnishing 
the means by which it can be completed. By this 
rule may you be governed, gentlemen, in all your un- 
dertakings the coming year. 

The annual report of the City Treasurer, exhibit- 
ing the receipts and expenditures of the last year, and 
the exact condition of our financial affau's, will soon 
be laid before you, which will enable you to deter- 
mine more accurately what the necessities and wants 
of the city demand. 

THE POLICE. 

The quiet and good order of our city, the safety 
of our lives and property depend, in some measure, 
upon the vigilance and activity of our Police force. 
A weak and inefficient organization of this depart- 
ment of the City Government will offer a great in- 
ducement to the wicked and vicious to come and dwell 



among us, while a strong and effective one will have 
a tendency to keep them away. I cannot, therefore, 
gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen, urge upon you 
too strongly the importance of taking the utmost care 
in making a judicious selection of Police officers. 
One officer, firm and decided, capable of commanding 
obedience and respect, cool and deliberate in forming 
his plans, quick of apprehension to know what is 
needed in case of emergency, prompt and ready in 
execution, determined in his purpose, free from preju- 
dice, malice or vindictiveness, carefully scrutinizing 
how far he should go in the discharge of his duties, 
will do more to prevent crime and bring the criminal 
to justice, than a large number of men who do not 
possess these necessary qualifications. Such men, and 
such only, may you select for this important position. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Our Fire Department, under its present able board 
of managers, still retains its well earned reputation. 
I am inforrned by the Chief Engineer that it has been 
called out but a few times at the alarm of fire the last 
year. In each instance the ffi'es have been extin- 
guished ])romptly, domg comparatively but little dam- 
age. "Tliis sparing work of the flames should not 
allow us to lull into a state of negligence and inactiv- 
ity. All proper means should still be used, as they 
have been heretofore, to keep this department in the 
highest degree of perfection possible. The reservoirs, 
engines, and entire apparatus, should be frequently 
examined, as I have no doubt they are, to see that they 



10 

are ready for use at any moment. It has been thought 
by some of our citizens, that the rapid mcrease of 
business and population has ah'eady created the ne- 
cessity for another steam fire engine. Whether that 
necessity now exists is for you to determine. The ex- 
pense, m comparison with the amount of property it 
might save, m case of a widespread conflagration, like 
that which swept over Portland last summer, would 
be a mere trifle. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

I would respectfully recommend the continuance of 
the same hberal policy which has hitherto been pur- 
sued in respect to repairing highways and building 
new ones, wherever the interests of the city demand. 
Poor roads and broken bridoes offer but little induce- 
ment to men of business to visit our city. Besides, 
the public safety requires that all our streets be kept 
in a good and passable condition at all seasons of the 
year. By throwing a little gravel upon the sidewalks 
when they are covered with ice, or filling up a ditch 
in the carriage-way, after some sudden and copious 
shower, or replacing a decayed plank by a sound one 
in some bridge at the proper time, we may save the 
traveller much pain and suffering, and the city- much 
vexatious and expensive litigation. 

I am informed by my predecessor that the bridge 
at Amoskeag Falls is very much out of repair, and 
that in his judgment it sliould be planked the coming 
year. This will claim your immediate attention, as 
the lumberand other material should be contracted 



11 

for at once, should you coincide with his views, which 
I have no doubt you will find correct. The numerous 
calls for building new streets, the constant increase of 
business upon those now in use, together ^\^th the 
greatly increased price of labor and materials of con- 
struction of all kinds, will of course require an increase 
of appropriation. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

About six thousand feet of- the old wooden sew- 
ers in several of the streets extending east from Elm 
street, have been taken up, and their places supplied 
with cement tubes, during the past year. Several 
of those in other streets are defective and need 
attention. 

COMMONS AND CE31ETERIES. 

The work of adorning and beautifying our public 
grounds which has been an object of so much care 
and attention, I would cheerfully recommend to be 
continued. The growing trees should be properly 
pruned, those which are decaying and dead should 
give place to live and thrifty ones, and the walks 
and fences should be kept in suitable repair. The 
ponds should not be the receptacle of filth, nor the 
grass plots a place for the accumulation of nuisances. 
These grounds, if properly cared for, give an air of 
beauty to ihe city, and are a great source of health 
and pleasure. 

The old burying ground at the " Centre" has been 
enclosed by a good and substantial wall tlie past 



12 

jear, reflecting credit on those who took the work 
in hand. 

The appropriation of two hundred dollars, togeth- 
er with the funds arisinsf from the sale of wood and 
other sources, amount in all, to the sum of six hun- 
dred seventy-eight dollars and two cents, has been 
nearly all expended the past year in fitting up the 
"Pine Grove Cemetery." An appropriation of an 
equal, or a larger amount, will be necessary the 
coming year in order to complete the work there 
contemplated. The revenue arising from the sale 
of lots in the " Valley .Cemetery" will, I apprehend, 
as usual, be sufficient to do what may be thought 
necessary. 

I am informed by the Superintendent of burials 
that the hearse we now have has been in use sever- 
al years, and is much out of repair. I would re- 
spectfully submit to you the propriety of supplying 
its place with a new one, more in accordance with 
the improvements of the present time. 

SCHOOLS. 

We have now fifty-three different schools, in- 
structed by sixty-six teachers, at an annual expense 
of about $30,000. Three of these have been organ- 
ized the past year. I learn from the Superinten- 
dent of public instruction, that five or six more pri- 
mary schools are already needed. A new school 
house has been erected in Hallsville the past year^ 
and that in District No. 6, has been rebuilt. A new 
building has also been erected in the central portion 



of the city for the accommodation of the High 
School. It contains six large school rooms, with 
proper entrances, halls, and ante-rooms for each, and 
is capable of accommodating three hundred pupils. 
I am informed by the architect that the entire ex- 
pense, when completed, will probably not exceed 
the sum of forty thousand dollars. In point of 
beauty and convenience, this building supasses any- 
thing of the kind in the State. The old school 
house on Lowell street, now occupied by the High 
school, should be remodeled and fitted up for the 
accommodation of the schools of the lower grade, 
which at present occupy private rooms entirely un- 
suitable. 

Six teachers have left us the last year to take 
charge of, or assist in, the public schools of Boston 
and other places of equal notoriety, where much 
larger salaries are paid than they could receive 
here. As many more now have opportunities for 
leaving with similar inducements. This shows con- 
clusively that our public schools still maintain that 
high rank which has always been a matter of pride 
to all our citizens. 

By a resolution passed at the last session of the 
Legislature, His Excellency the Governor and the 
Honorable Council were authorized to appoint a 
commissioner whose duty it should be to advertise 
for, and receive proposals for, the donation of 
grounds and buildings for the use of a State Normal 
School. 



14 

Such a commissioner was appointed shortly after 
the close of the session, who at once commenced the 
work of advertising and receiving proposals for do- 
nations agreeably to that resolution. Such an insti- 
tution established here would raise the standard of 
our schools, and exert a very beneficial influence 
throughout the entire city. 1 trust that our enter- 
prising citizens, who are always alive in matters of 
public interest, will be so liberal in this direction as 
to secure its location here. 

THE CITY LIBRARY, 

which was established about twelve years ago, has 
been gradually increasing till it now contains twelve 
thousand four hundred and forty-five well-selected 
volumes, of which number over six hundred have 
been added the last year. This increase has been 
made in part by the usual appropriation, and in part 
by valuable donations from our esteemed fellow-citi- 
zens. His Honor Mayor Hosley, Hon. Daniel Clark, 
Hon. E. A. Straw,- Hon. Moody Currier, S. N. Bell, 
Esq., and others. The large number of books taken 
from the Library daily is a sufficient guaranty of its 
importance and value. Our courteous Librarian in- 
forms me that since the first day of January last, the 
Library has been open for the delivery of books two 
hundred and eighty-three days, and that the aver- 
age daily delivery during that time has been one 
hundred and forty-seven volumes, making in all dur- 
ing the year, forty-one thousand six hundred and 
one. 



15 

It was suggested by my predecessor in his Inau- 
gural Address last year, that the advantages of the 
Library would be much increased, if a good Reading 
Room could be connected therewith. With his sug- 
gestion I fully concur, and now ask you if the time 
has not come when the Reading Room formerly con- 
nected with the Library, which was a source of very 
much pleasure and profit, should not be opened to 
the public. 

MILITARY. 

Under the laws of the State there are now estab- 
lished in our city seven volunteer military compa- 
nies. Of these several organizations, the " Amoskeag 
Veterans," composed of some of our most patriotic cit- 
izens, is the oldest, and is well known for its venerable 
and soldier-like appearance. The "Head Guards," 
the "Smyth Rifles," the "Sheridan Guards," the 
" Manchester Cavalry," the " War Veterans," and the 
" National Guards," are formed of enterprising young 
men, " many of whom have seen service, and receiv- 
ed honorable wounds in the national cause." Many 
of these soldiers I have seen leaping over ramparts 
and ditches, mounting breast-works, and facing the 
cannon's mouth with that degree of coolness and 
bravery that would have done honor to the Roman 
Legions. 

I am proud to know that so many of them return- 
ing from the war, have associated themselves with 
the patriotic young men of our city, to keep alive 
that martial fire, kindled amid the din and clash of 



16 

arms, on the fields of " Fair Oaks," Gettysburg," and 
a hundred others of like renown. I commend them 
to your special care for encouragement and support. 

CITY FARM. 

Of the condition and wants of the City Farm I 
cannot now speak with any degree of accuracy. The 
short time allowed me since my election, has pre- 
cluded me from investigating the subject so as to 
give you any definite information. The poor, con- 
cerning whom the Scriptures say, " Whensoever ye 
will, ye may do them good," will, I have no doubt 
receive your kind care. 

This class of unfortunate persons I trust you will 
search out, and not permit to be overlooked or neg- 
lected. The feelings of humanity, the civil and Di- 
vine law, all strongly urge this upon you. Their 
calls will be many and frequent, but no private bus- 
iness, or selfish motive should suffer you to disre- 
gard them. Listen to their story, and assist such as 
actually stand in need of help. You should make a 
wide distinction between the several classes of per- 
sons who will call on you for the bestowal of charity. 
One may be out of employment, though ready and 
willing to labor, another may be sick, helpless 
and infirm, a third may be idle and la zy. The first 
you should furnish with work suited to their years 
and capacity. With the second, you will have to 
share your warmest sympathy, your food and your 
clothing. To the third, I think you will be discharg- 
ing your whole duty if you strictly enforce the rule 



laid down by one of the Apostles, that " If any would 
not work neither should he eat." 

In conversation with Hon. E. A. Straw, Agent of 
the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, since pre- 
paring my address, I learn, that in his opinion that 
company which has contributed so freely in support 
of all. our public institutions, would probably give a 
suitable lot of land for a public Library building, and 
that the sum of twelve thousand and five hundred 
dollars could, probably, be raised for the same pur- 
pose outside of the city of Manchester, provided its 
citizens should see fit to raise a like sum. A dona- 
tion so liberal and for such an object, I hope you will 
take the proper steps to secure. 

Such are some of the principal business matters 
which will demand your consideration the coming 
year. Others, more or less important, more or less 
difficult and perplexing, will naturally arise, on all 
of which you will be called upon to express your 
views, form your opinions, and make your decisions. 
In all these deliberations, I can but cherish the hope 
that we may be governed by the spirit of candor and 
fraternal love, and that all our official intercourse 
may be harmonious and profitable. 



GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS 



OF THB 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

18 6 6. 



MAYOR: 

JOHN HOSJ.EY 



ALDERMEN, 
Ward 1, John Gillis, Ward 5, Daniel Connor, 

Ward 2, Isaac H. Russell, Ward 6, Isaac Whittemore, 
Ward 3, Samuel Hall, Ward 7, John Patterson, 

Ward 4, John C. Young, Ward 8, T. S. Montgomery. 



COMMON COUNCIL, 

Ward 1, Dan'l H. Maxfield, Ward 3, Hiram Forsaith, 
Harvey Huse, Cyrus Dunn, 

Henry A. Campbell. Wm. P. Newell. 

Ward 2, C. C. Colby, Ward 4, Charles E. Balch, 

William W. Wade, George S. Holmes, 

Joseph W. Bean. Arthur L. Walker. 



20 

Wahd 5, Geo. W. Hunkiris, Ward 7, Rob't M. Shirley, 
Jolin Ryan, C. C. Favor, 

John White. Chas. S. Fisher. 

Ward 6, Eiios C. Hewlett, Ward 8, James K. Stevens, 
Joseph Rowley, John Field, 

Thomas Emerson, Alonzo L. Day. 

Joseph E. Bennett, City Clerk. 
iliram Forsaith, President of Common Council. 
Horace M. Gillis, Clerk of Common Council. 
llarrihou D. Lord, City Messenger. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Montgomery; 
Messrs. Dunn Wade and Newell. 

On Accounts^. — Aldermen Gillis and Whittemore ; 
Messrs. Balch, Holmes and Fisher. 

On Lands and Buildings . — Aldermen Russell and Gillis; 
Messrs. Hovvlett, Favor and Stevens. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Patterson and Con- 
nor ; Messrs. Huso, Hunkins and Emerson. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Hall and Connor ; Messrs. New- 
ell, Rowley and White. 

On City Farm. — The Mayor and Alderman Whitte- 
more ; ]\Iessrs. Wade, Walker and Field. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Young and Connor ; 
Messrs. Shirley, Bean and Hunkins. 

On Conitiions and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Russell and 
Patterson ; Messrs. Maxfield, Campbell and Fisher. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Whittemore and Pat- 
terson ; Messrs. Maxfield, Huse and Newell. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Montgomery and Gillis ; Messrs. 
Holmes, Coll-y and Shirley. 



21 



On House of Correction. — Aldermen Connor and Whit- 
temore ; Messrs. Walker, Stevens and Ryan. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Russell and Hall ; 
Messrs. Colby, Campbell and Huse. 



JOINT SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 

On State Aid to Families of Volunteers. — The Mayor 
and Aldermen Patterson and Young ; Messrs. Bean, How 
lett and Rowley. 

On City Hall Buildiufj;-. — Aldermen Young and Rus- 
sell ; Messrs. Emerson, Muxfield and Dunn. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Whittcmorc and Connor. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Russell and Patterson. 

On Elections. — Aldermen Gillis and Hall. 

On Lighting' Streets. — Aldermen Young and Gillis. 

On Bills in 2d Reading. — Aldermen Montgomery and 
Russell. 

On Market. — Aldermen Connor and Patterson. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Hall and Russell. 

On Marshall's Accounts. — Aldermen Hall, Young syad 
Montgomery. 

On Abatement of Taxes. — Aldermen Montgomery and 
Young. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON 

COUNCIL. 
On Elections and Returns. — Messrs. Fisher, Colby and 
Newell. 

On Bills in '2.d Reading. — Messrs. Favor, Bean and Day. 
Oh Enrollment. — Messrs. Wade, Balch and Holmes. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board of Common Council. 
AN ORDER authorizing the Printing of the Twenty- 
First Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures 
of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, if the Mayor and Aldermen concur, That the 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance, be, and they are 
hereby authorized to cause fourteen hundred copies of the 
Twenty-First Annual Report of the Receipts and Expen- 
ditures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports 
of the Chief Engineer of the Fire'Department, the Over- 
seers of the Poor, the Committee on the City Farm, the 
Trustees, Librarian and Treasurer of the City Library, 
the School Committee and the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction — to be printed for the use of the inhabitants 
of said City, and that the expense thereof be charged to the 
appropriation for Printing and Stationery. 

Dec. 20, 1866, In Board of Common Council. 
Passed. HIRAM FORSAITH, President. 



Dec, 29, 1866, In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 
Passed, JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor. 

A true copy of Record. 

Attest: JOSEPH E. BENNETT, City Gerk. 



ACCOUNT 



OF 



HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, 

CITY TREASURER, 



FROM 



JANUARY 1. 1866, TO JANUARY 1, 1867. 



24 

Dr. City of Manchtster in Account Current vrith Henry R. Cham- 



To Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1866,... $13,120 87 

City Farm, :j,50o 52 

Paupers off the Farm 2,238 34 

City Teams, 2,932 30 

Highway District No. 1 128 46 

Dist. No. 2 $4,515 15 Dist. No. 8,. . .374 60. ... 4,889 75 

" " 3 260 92 *' " 9,. ..31152.... 572 44 

" " 4,..., 126 85 *' "10,. .807 05.... 933 90 

" " 5,.... 22101 " " 11, ...51448.... 735 49 

" " 6 144 16 " " 12,. ..212 00.... 356 16 

" "7 250 62 " " 13,... 126 40.... 377 02 

New Hio^hways, 179 30 

GraniteBridge, 157 29 

Amoslceag Falls Bridge, 251 55 

Commons, 566 53 

Pine Grove Cemetery, 541 16 

Sewers and Drains, 3,160 63 

Reservoirs, 615 14 

City Library, 2,358 71 

Fire Department, 5,977 98 

City Police, 9,287 85 

Lighting Streets, .... 2,649 25 

City Hall 2,218 86 

City Officers, 6,473 50 

Printing and Stationery, 1,799 02 

Incidental Expenses, 2,447 1 7 

Temporary Loan, 81,400 00 

City Debt, 0,000 00 

Interest, (Coupons $21,505 17,) 28,119 24 

Watering Streets , 534 30 

Paving Streets 2,630 48 

Discount on Taxes 4 ,022 03 

State Aid. 67 23 ; Militia, 242,42 309 65 

Soldiers' Bounty, 129 72 

State Tax .• 58,785 00 

County Tax 14,580 00 

New Engine House, 4 00 

Abatement of Taxes 1,113 76 

Schools , -. 32, 100 00 

New School House, Dist. No. 2, 13 75 

New School House Dist. No. 5, 1 092 25 

New School House, No. 7, $500 ; No. 11, 400, 900 00 

Repairs of .School House, No. 6, 300 00 

Tenement on Vine Street, 468 46 

Cemetery at the Centre 200 00 

City Bonds Cancelled 81,20000 

$332,974 89 

Cash in the Treasury January 1, 1867, 3.5,466 74 

$308,441 63 ■ 



25 

berlin, City 'Ib-easurer, (one year ending December 31, 1866.) Cr. 

By Cashhilhe^TreasuryJanuai-y 1, 1866, $12,022 22 

City Bonds uns6ldJaniiary 1, 186G, 46,100 00 

Taxes collected 1866, $200,104 28, in 1865, 24,970 08. 225,074 96 

" " 1864, 1,385 58, in 1863, 206 25, 1,59183 

1862, 18 21, in 1861, 168 00, 186 21 

State of New Hampshire, 26.086 23 

United States Government 7,778 00 

Temporary Loan, 26,327 60 

County of Hillsborough 417 54 

Rent of City Hall and Stores 1,872 25 

Police Court, $2,638 06 ; City Farm, 1,817 85 4,455 91 

City Teams, for labor 810 12 

'' " "horses 620 00 

City Hay Scales, 258 15 

City Aqueduct, 57 00 

Other towns for support of Paupers, (540 11 

Circus and Exhibition Licenses, 358 75 

Sewer Licenses 405 75 

Dog Licenses, 225 00 

Interest on Taxes, 549 14 

Amounts overdrawn, 91 12 

Cost on non-resident Taxes, 43 00. 

Pine Grove Cemetery, 384 82 

Interest on Bonds, 9 67 

Lumber sold, 13 6G 

W. M. llolfe, on Barrett Place 500 00 

Rent of Tenement, CO 00 

W. Richardson, from estate' of N. Prime, 70 80 

J. A. Weston, Treasurer — Stone, 38 00 

D. W. Fling, Stone, Loam, &c., 22 25 

1). W. Fling, 11 bushels Corn 13 20 

W. W. Wade, use of P. C. Room, 5 00 

Grass from Barrett Place 5 00 

J. E. Bennett— Curtains sold 3 00 

" " '• Door 1 00 

Basket 100 

$357,098 19 

Unpaid Bills January 1, 1867 11,343 44 

$368,441 63 
J1P:NRY R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasureb. 

Manchester, January 1, 1867. ^ 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S KEPORT. 



The undersigned, Committee on Finance, certify that 
we have examined the foregoing account of Henry R. 
Charaberlin, City Treasurer, and find the same correctly 
cast and properly vouched. 

During the year ending December 81, 1866, there has 
been received into the Treasury, including the balance on 
hand January 1, 1866, the sum of Three Hundred Fifty 
Seven Thousand Ninety-Eight Dollars and Nineteen Cents, 
($357,098 19,) and there has been paid from the Treasu- 
ry, during the same time, including the bonds cancelled, 
the sum of Three Hundred Twenty-One Thousand Six 
Hundred Thirty-One Dollars and Forty-Five Cents, 
(321,631 45,) leaving in the Treasury January 1, 1867, 
Thirty-Five Thousand, Four Hundred Sixty-Six Dollars^ 
Seventy-Four Cents, (835,466 74). 

Your Committee find that tlie actual liabilities of the 
City have been lessened Forty-Six Thousand Dollars the 
present year, (1866,) leaving in the Treasury more than 
Thirty-Five Thousand Dollars cash. 

CYRUS DUNN, ^ Committfe 

T. S. MONTGOMERY, [ Committee 

WM. P. NEWELL, { ^ ^^ 
JOHN HOSLEY. j ^^^^^^^- 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 
By Balance from old account, - $395 56 

Appropriation, ... 1,500 00 

Transferred from Reserved Fund, 400 00 

$2,295 56 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Paid Wra. F. Sleeper for Groceries, $177 04 

Baker & Fradd, " " 68 33 

Geo. W. Gardner & Co., " 11 00 

H. B. Putnam, '' " 8 50 

Geo. W. Adams, " *' 67 69 

D. Y. Stearns, *' " 7 00 

Jeremiah Hayes, '* " 5 00 

L. J. Stearns, " " 14 00 

Patrick Healey, " " 72 00 

Poor & Stearns, " '' 63 00 

D. K. White, " " 32 93 

L. S. Proctor, " " 9 80 

G. n. Hoyt, u . u ^ 50 

Moore & White, " " 40 64 

Jas. Mitchell, Jr., for Boots and Shoes, 2 35 

G. W. Weeks, " " " 7 92 

Jonathan Pressy, for Hats, - - 4 25 

J. A. Tebbetts, for Medicine, - 17 74 

David Dickey, 2d, repair'g artificial leg, 10 00 

White & Farnsworth, for Dry Goods, 7 54 

Jackson & Co., 8 yards Cotton Cloth, 1 76 
Reform School, Board of Children, 725 18 

S. S. Moulton, Making Annual Report, 4 00 



28 

To paid S. S. Moulton, day at Alms House, 2 00 

" " " Assistance to 'Poor, 17 63 

" " " Priiit'g and Stationery, 2 50 
County of Hillsboro', Board of Insane 

Persons at Asylum, - - 48 33 

N. H. Asylum, Board and Nursing, 134 80 

E. F. Hastings, " " " 9 00 

Marcus Ayer, " " " 11 35 

W. H. Hall, " " " 10 50 

Sarah Lewis, '• " " ' 10 00 

Thos. Wheat, Professional Services, 5 00 
Town of Sutton, Aid to Rufus Bailey's 

Family, 79 73 

S. T. Crosby, for Nursing, - - 11 00 

A. J. Mayhew, " Boarding, - 20 OJ 

Edward Prime, for Team, - - 15 50 

Wilson & Co., for Wood, - - 58 00 

L. W. Hall, " « . . 139 20 

D. B. Eastman, " - . - 31 00 

Geo. H. Colby, for " - - 2 50 

Wm. C. Richardson, " . - - - 13 77 
M. E. George, Time and Expenses to 

Goffsto wn, &c., - - - 6 50 
D. Pulsifer, Time and Expenses to 

Concord, 9 25 

Leonard French, Professional Services, 23 00 
Justin Spear, Services notify'g Lynd- 

borougli, 5 31 

Wm. D, Buck, Professional Services, 2 00 

John Prince, for Coffins and Burials, 73 75 

Wm. Shepherd, for Teams, - - 3 00 

Wm. C. Walker, " " - - 3 00 

Hill & James, " " - - - 4 50 

Cheney & Co., " Freight, - - 4 00 

Dennis Cassidy, " R. R. Ticket, - 80 



29 



To paid Martha Dearborn, for Boarding, 63 00 

Mrs. Griffin, " - - 5 00 

E. Gerry, - 4 Oj 

C. H. Chase, Assistance to Mrs. Marsh, 8 00 

Mrs. G. Morse, for Nursing, - - 21 00 

J. N. Heath, 2 25 

Mrs. Moody Carter, for Boarding Child, 5 00 

M. A. Wallace, Aid to Mrs. Lew, - 6 00 

J. C. Whitten, for Board, - - 3 00 

M. E. George, for Team to Farm, 1 50 

Hill & James, » " - - - 3 50 



Balance to new account, 



$2,238 3i 
57 22 



82,295 56 



CITY FARM. 

By Balance from old account, - $138 85 
Appropriation, . . . . 4,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Paid H. C. Merrill, for Groceries, $101 86 

G. E. Wilson & Co., " " - 20 66 

J. Paige, - - " " - - 2 93 

Geo. W. Adams, " " - 28 69 

Cyrus Dunn, - " " - 189 94 

Johnson & Stevens, " " - 30 81 

Lock & Demick, " " - - 8 31 

Kidder & Chandler, " " - 18 39 
H. & H. R. Pettee, for Meal & grind'g 125 72 

French, Hall & Co., Corn and Meal, 11 42 

A. Pratt, for Crackers, - - - 5 50 



-$4,138 85 



30 



To paid R. C. French, for 9 lbs. Rolls, 
H. C. Tilton, Stationery & Town Officer, 
Estate of J. A. Tebbetts, for Medicine, 
A. F. Perry, for Medicine, 
Geo. Pearson, for R. R. Ticket, 
H. Simpson, for Salary, 
" " " 10 busli. Barley, - 

Joseph Cross, for Salary 9 mos, 
J. M. Robinson, for Boots & Shoes, 
G. W. Weeks, " " " " 
S. G. Hoyt, for Repairing Boots, - 
J. Stickney, for Leather, 
True Dennis, for Blacksmith Work, 
Chas.Bunton, " " '• 

C. Patterson, " " '• 

Sewall Leavitt, for killing cows & hogs, 
Joseph Cross, for Labor, 
Levi Woodman, " . . . 
Clara D. Simpson, " - 
Mary Ramsay, for " - - - 

Alpheus Stetson, " - 
Orlando Page, for Labor, - 
James Brown, " " - 
Hugh Ramsay, " " - 
Irving Page, " " . 
James Ramsay," "... 
Noah Glover, " « . 
A. Bodwell, " " . . . 
N. W. Cumner," Clothing, 
Folsom & Son, " " - - 

White & Farnsworth, for Dry Goods, 
Stevens & Patterson, " " " - 
John Truesdale, for Hats, 
A. Ferren & Co., for Dry Goods, - 
Waite Brothers, '= " " - 



6 75 

2 90 

13 12 

14 68 
5 30 

150 00 

10 GO 
375 00 

19 97 
12 10 

1 85 
22 11 

11 23 
5143 

3 60 
3 00 

75 00 
7 50 

10 00 
111 00 

2 25 
14 75 

11 35 
83 54 
83 25 

124 32 
5154 
7 50 
41 12 
34 81 
1164 
13 97 

3 00 
10 19 
18 32 



To paid Geo. S. Holmes, for Thread, <fec. 
D. P. Hadley, for Repairing Clock, 
John Campbell " use of Wagon, 
Bailey & Frost, for Fish, 
Daniels & Co., for Hardware, - 
J. B. Varick & Co., " and su- 
perphosphate, - . . - 
J. S. Folsom & Son, for Meat, 
J. B. Stowell & Co., " 
Pennock & Colburn, " 
C. C. Frost & Co., " - - - 
G. L. Stearns, for " 
Chas. B. Hatch, for 2 prs. Oxen, 

" " " " 1 Heifer, 
Isaac Langley, " 1 " - - 

Wm. A. Hatch, " 1 Cow, - 
Man. Gas- Light Co., for Lime, 
Wm. P. Ford & Co., " Fire Brick, 
John B. Clarke, for Mirror, 
iEtna Ins. Co., for Insurance 
H. S. Whitney, Repair'g Pumps and 
Pipes, - - . . - 

Edwin Branch, for Repair'g Harness, 
J. C. Smith, for use of Horse, 
H. M. Bailey & Son, brooms & tin ware, 
Jos. Marsh, Jr., for pasturing cattle, 
Joseph Cross, for Manure and Ashes, 
Nelson Bush, for Labor, 
Chas. D. Sherrer, " - 
W. H. Ayer, - « - . - 
W. A. Williams, 

Chas. F. Shepherd, " - . - 
P. M. Stevens, " 

Wm. Ayer, . " . . . 
Newell TQton, " 



3 35 


2 25 


2 00 


2 56 


42 39 


58 11 


8 40 


8 29 


20 79 


4 49 


120 


282 50 


38 00 


45 00 


50 00 


2 00 


75 


1 87 


21 00 


16 15 


18 39 


6 00 


13 32 


13 00 


16 00 


6 00 


35 00 


7 12 


3 12 


10 50 


19 50 


8 62 


4 12 



To paid R. Morgan, for labor, - - 103 87 
Patrick Roach, " - - 12 00 

Moses Quitnby, " - - - 1 25 

J, N. Tuck, - " -^ - 6 75 

Ira Bryant, - - " - " - - 9 37 
David Wilkinson, " - - 15 92 

Rufus Lund, - " - - - 43 07 
Sidney Smith, for Horse and Harness, 199 00 
I. T. Webster, for Bull, - - - 65 00 
Jonas Harvey, Yoke of Oxen, - 225 00 

C. E. Ciough & Co., for Sow and Pigs, 50 00 
Alanson Walker, for laying Stone, - 50 00 
Dorr, Parker & Co., for Sugar, 
J. C. Melvin, Pasturing Cattle, - 
Hill & Co., Plow point, 
W. P. Richardson, making Cider, 



Transferred to reserved fund, 
Balance to new account. 



. 33 53 

- 12 00 

1 37 

- 2 22 


3,503 52 

■ 500 00 

- 135 33 

^4,138 85 



OITY TEAMS, 

By appropriation, - . . 
Work on streets, Dist. No. 2, 
'* " new Highways, 
'* " paving Streets, 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Paid F. N. McLaren, for repair- 
ing harness, ... 
Ed. Branch, for repairing harness, 
P. J. Handley " " - 



$2 


',500 00 
700 75 

6 00 , 
103 37 






S3; 


,310 12 


- 


$20 24 

10 96 

4 52 





33 

To paid J. C. Clark, for repairing harnesses, 5 29 
A. W. Sanborn & Co., repairing 

wagon, - - - - - 4 00 

Benj. Currier, for repairing cart, 2 70 

J. Abbott & Co., corn, meal & shorts, 78 54 

French, Hall & Co., " " - 19 60 

' H. & H. R. Pettee, " " 85 51 

J. S. Kidder & Co., corn and oats, 419 69 

Z. F. Campbell, turpentine, &c., - 5 00 

J. U. Prince, for straw, - - 7 40 

G. W. Cate, "• " - - .6 40 

City Farm, " " . - 5 97 

J. P. Eaton, " " - - - 5 86 

G. Harvell, " " . . 5 01 

Wm. P. Merrill, «' - - - 7 41 

R. N. Whittemore, " - - - 21 05 

L. S. Hartshorn, " - - - 3 57 

City Farm, for " . . - 33 51 

Estate of D. Farmer, for hay, - 2i0 63 

R. W. French, " "' - - 47 34 

E. Langdell, . » i' . 46 23 
Kidder & Chandler, for matches, &c. 14 56 
H. M. Bailey & Son, for brooms, &c. 3 50 
R. B. & 0. A. R. Coburn,hay, oats,&c. 105 02 
C. W. Fhng, for labor, - - 360 50 
Jas. Patten, " " - - 457 00 
<^. W. Butterfield," - - - 109 00 
J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith work, 35 9) 
Fellows & Co., " " - 6 10 
Pierce & Reynolds, " '' 3 25 
Charles Bunton, " " - 30 23 
Geo. W. Merriam, " " 19 85 
J. C. Young, labor ifec, on stable, - 9 25 
Daniels & Co., hardware, oil, &c., 13 02 

F. W. Dickey, for pair horses, - 625 00 



84 

To paid D. W. Fling, buying horses, 
Cyrus Baldwin, for feed trough, - 
S. S. Moulton, for repairs, 



Balance from last year, 
" to new account, 



43 75 




5 00 




5 00 




2,932 36 




- 169 58 




208 18 




^u, 


,310 12 



HIGHWAYS AFD BEIDGES. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 



By balance from old account,- 


S36 70 


Appropriation, 


180 00 




ffl!''16 70 






EXPENDITURES. 




To paid Samuel Hall, Superintendent, 


$b 61 


Peter Kimball, " 


36 07 


Nathan Sleeper, for labor, 


4 50 


R. 0. Dustin, .... 


22 92 


C. W. Rowell, . . . . 


67 


G. W. Dustin, - - . . 


17 05 


Frederick Kimball, 


6 75 


N. Preston, _ . , . 


13 77 


Wm. Campbell, . /. . . 


3 40 


Jchn P. Rowell, 


- 3 32 


P>. F. Stark, .... 


3 00 



35 



To paid Geo. Clark, Gravel, 
J. ¥. Kennard, 16 posts, 



Balance to new account, 



5 00 
- 6 40 




128 40 
88 24 


• 
8216 70 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 

By Balance from old account, - $36 91 

Appropriation, . - . 3.600 00 

Valley Cemetery for stone, - 38 00 

Reserved Fund, . - - ' 1.000 00 



-^4.674 91 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid D. W. Fling, Superintendent, $408 00 

C. W. Fling, for labor, - - 90 00 

James Patten, - - - - 130 00 

James Kearin, . . .. . 394 00 

John Larkin, - - - - 284 25 

Patrick Dowd, - - - - 234 60 

S. S. Moulton, - , - - 29 00 

Timothy Kennedy, - - - 146 62 

Peter Scanlan, ... 162 75 

John P. Fling, - - - 40 99 

City Teams, 700 75 

Michael Scanlan, - - - 68 12 

Nath'l Corning, - - - - 1 50 

Charles Clough & Co., - - 1 50 
Levi Woodman, . . . . 32 37 

Daniel Mahanna, - - - 206 61 

^ William Chase, - - - - 144 98 

' Michael Handley, . - - 18 12 

Jack Moulton, ... - 25 25 



36 

To paid John Collins, - - - 20 62 

Patrick Finn, .... 86 25 

Jere. E. Breshnahan, - - - 4 12 
James Victory, .... 106 12 

James Mullen, - - - - 6 00 

S. Donohoe, - - - * - 67 87 

James Brown, - - - - 18 75 

Dennis Dowd, . - - - 75 75 

Patrick O'Brien, - - . 12 75 

Daniel Cronin, .... 1 60 

Edward Bresnahan, - - . 78 00 

Erastus Cutting, - . - - 16 25 

A. Blake, . . _ . 33 oO 

Jere. Sullivan, - - - . 15 00 

Patrick Ryan, . - - - 6 00 

George W. Butterfield, - - 31 00 

D. H. Young, • - - - 1 , - 2 75 

J. A. Weston, - - -' - 15 25 

Catting & Blake, ... H 25 

Langdon Manf g Co., labor and gravel, 71 71 

Benjamin Greer, lumber, - 30 38 

G. W. Merriam, Blacksmith work, 58 01 

J. L. Kennedy, Painting Canal Bridge, 23 28 
M. D. Stokes, Flagging stone and Cess 

Pool covers, . . - 357 50 

Daniels & Co., Hardware, - - 60 65 

John B. Varick & Co., Hardware, 30 63 

Kidder & Chandler, Hardware and Oil, 6 87 
Gilman Clough, Lumber, 
R. M. Bailey & Son, Dipper and Pail, 
Haines & Wallace, Lumber, 

Balanpe to new account. 



- 80 64 




il, 79 




67 05 




4.515 15 




159 76 






4.674 91 



3T 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 



By balance from old account, 


27 58 




Appropriation, . - - - 


300 00 


$327 58 


EXPENDITURES. 






To paid William Chase, Superintendent, 


$12 25 




B. F. Mitche\l, 


65 80 




William S. Lock for labor, 


65 49 




E. C. Howlett, - - - . 


45 75 




Peter Mitchell, ... - 


16 00 




James A. Poor, . . - . 


15 75 




S. F. Webster, .... 


75 




Chadbourne George, 


150 




Kadmiel Haseltine, 


17 25 




Granville Haseltine, . - - - 


9 75 




A. G. Fairbanks, 


63 




Man. Gas-Light Co., for cinders, 


10 00 


• 




260 92 




Balance to new account, 


66 66 


$327 i8 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 

By Balance from old account, - $60 01 

Appropriation, .... 180 00 



$240 01 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid Isaac Whittemore, Supt., - $14 60 

James Emerson, Supt., - - 15 00 

D. Webster &;C. Moore, for labor, - 2 50 

. John Calef, " . , . 25 00 



38 



To paid N. If oore, for labor, 


- 30 00 


I. W. Moore, 


12 00 


D.Webster. 


- 18 00 


F. Webster, 


4 50 


Augustus Fellows, 


- 4 50 


M. Ingham, . . . 


75 



126 85 
Balance, to new account, - - / 13 16 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 


By Balance fronoi old account. 


$10 72 


Appropriation, 


. 


180 00 


Reserved fund, 


EXPENDITURES. 


50 00 






To paiil Oilman Harvey, Supt, - 


$40 13 


James Emerson, Si 


upt., 


60 68 


' B. S. Harvey, for labor. 


6 00 


Wm. Crosbie, 


- 


13 19 


James E. Young, 


. 


17 44 


S. M. Nutt, 


- 


2 25 


Rodnia Nutt, 


- 


8 12 


S. B. Hill, 


- 


75 


John Dickey, 


- 


29 75 


Jonas Harvey, 


. 


10 20 


A. H. Hartshorn, 


- 


3 75 


David Nutt, 


. 


6 00 


Wm. P. Merrill, 


. 


14 00 


A. J. Young, 


. 


5 25 


W. W. Dickey, 


. 


6 00 


James M. Young, 


* " 


7 50 




221 01 


Balance to new 


account, - 


19 71 



$240 01 



.$240,72 



$240 72 



39 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. P.. 

By Balance from old account, - - 839 75 
Appropriation, - - - 150 OO 





EXPENDITURES. 




To paid David Dickey, 3d, Supt., 


829 30 


John JohnsoSi, for 


labor. 


8 25 


I. T. Webster, 


- 


12 75 


David Dickey, 


. 


15 62 


H. C. Dickey, 


. 


7 50 


J. M. Dickey, 


- 


8 50 


A. C. Webster, 


- 


5 25 


Daniel Clough, 


. 


8 75 


J. M. Webster, 


. 


10 25 


N.W.Curtis, - 


. 


8 75 


0. R. Dickey, 


. 


2 50 


John Huse, 


- 


2 25 


Samuel Hall, 


- 


2 25 


D. H. Dickey, - 


- 


3 75 


James Wiley, 


. 


2 25 


Geo. Whittemore, 


- 


2 25 


Gilman Clough, 


. 


7 04 


J. B. Varick & Co 


., for spikes, 


75 




144 16 


Balance to new 


account, 


45 59 



8189 75 



$189 75 



40 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 



By Balance from old account, - 


- $115 01 


Appropriation, 


- • — 

EXPENDITURES. 


350 00 






To paid Israel Webster, Supt,, - 


- S30 50 


Isaac Huse, for labor, 


50 00 


J. B. Eastman, 


. 


- • 9 00 


S. Tobie, 


- 


24 75 


A. Tobie, 


- 


- 12 75 


C. A. Hall, 


. 


- 22 25 


McGregor Hall, 


. 


10 50 


Nathan Johnson, 


, 


- 11 25 


Robert Stevens, 


- 


5 62 


Reuben Morgan, 


. 


- 1125 


R. E. Barrett, 


- 


11 25 


Geo. Porter, 


- 


2125 


R. F. Shepherd 


. 


150 


B. McGinniss, 


- 


9 75 


H. H. Young, 


. 


- 8 25 


David Young 


. 


4 50 


L. W. Moore, - 


. 


- 3 00 


Addison Tobie, 


. 


150 


J. Marsh Jr., 


. 


75 


Charles Bunton, 


Blacksmithing, 


100 


/ 


250 62 


Balance to new account. 


- 214 39 



$465 01 



$465 01 



41 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 



By balance from old account, 


- S123 98 


Appropriation, 


300 00 

S423 98 


EXPENDITURES. 




To paid J. H. Proctor, Supt., 
J. P. Eaton, " 


$5Q 00 
- 112 61 


Fred Stevens, for labor, 


- 3 50 


Luther S. Proctor, 


- 32 50 


E. S. Young, 


- 17 25 


Wm. Smith, - . . . 


- 16 00 


Geo. Young, 
Jerry Garvin, 


22 25 
- 12 25 


Amos Spofford, 
Phinehas Haselton, 


3 25 
150 


J. B. Young, .... 


- 12 75 


Augustus Proctor, 
EzekielHall, .... 


6 00 
8 25 


J. M. Crombie, 


- 7 50 


J. B. Cleugh, 


3 00 


Horace Stevens, 


150 


Gilman Reed, 


4 50 


Zadock Wright, 
Philip P. Farmer, 
Alfred Wright, 


- 8 00 

. 8 00 

10 00 


Gilman Clough, lumber, 


21 24 


J P. Young, 


6 75 


Balance to new account. 


374 60 
49 38 

$423 98 



42 



HIGHWAY DISTRKJr NO. 9. 



By balance from old account, 


. $89 84 


Appropriation, . . . . 


240 00 


Reserved fund, 


. 50 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




To paid G. W. George, Supt., 


. $24 63 


Wm. Boyce, • " . . 


100 74 


Nath'l Corning, for labor. 


8 00 


Elijah Goodale, 


. 4 75 


J. Y. McQueston, 


20 00 


Stephen Haselton, , . 


7 60 


H. C. Joy, .... 


8 00 


Charles Wiley, 


3 0j 


James Currier, 


. 7 50 


C. W. Haselton, . . . . 


3 00 


B. W. Corning, 


. 13 38 


David Swett, .... 


6^0 


A. N. Scott, .... 


150 


Alonzo Robie, 


. 2 12 


O.Page, . . . - . 


. 150 


Leonard Page, .... 


150 


Charles T. Boyce, 


3 00 


Alonzo Robie, 


. 150 


C. F. Boyce, .... 


. 4 50 


S. Currier, . . . . 


3 00 


G. W. Merriam, Blacksmithing, 


75 


William Griffin, labor, 


150 


James Silver, .... 


. 3C0 


John Hatch, . . . . 


. 160 


I. H. Webster, 


9 00 


W. H. Noyes, 


. 5 75 



$369 81 



43 

To paid Gilraan Clough, for lumber, . $34 65 
J. & B. S. Harvey, " " . 35 25 



311 52 
Balance to new account, . 48 32 



1359 84' 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 

By balance from old account, 
Appropriation, 
Reserved Fund, 
Overdrawn, 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Joseph Carr, Supt., 
Z. N. Doe, 
Ira Barr, for labor, 
H. J. Plumer, 
Nathan Taplin, 
William Young, 
Ed. McLaughlin, 
Horace Qniraby, 
Benjamin Ledu, 
John Jameson, 
Joseph Gladden, 
Charles Danforth, 
Mr. Hastings, 
Baker & Pradd, 
L. McKean, gravel, 
Wm. P. Riddle, gravel, 
Henry Stocks, labor, 
Barr & Clapp, 
N. R. Tirrell, 
Frank Glidden, 
Thomas Mack, . ' . 



2 21 


600 00 


. 200 00 


4 84 


$69 75 


291 12 


3 00 


12 00 


6 75 


. 38 25 


2 25 


150 


. 5 25 


15 75 


. 49 34 


'66 00 


4 00 


. 4 00 


6 00 


3 00 


. 2 67 


. 23 50 


40 75 


2 00 


. 2 25 



7 05 



44 



fo paid J. H. Maynard, for labor, 


7 00 


Alvin Clement, 


133 


Mr. Mead, .... 


. 3 33 


Ira Ferson, 


13 00 


Albert Thompson, 


5150 


C. Wymau, 


. 14 00 


Haloes & Wallace, lumber, 


. 62 81 


J. B. Varick & Co., hardware, 


4 95 



$807 05 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 



By Balance from old account, 


i50 33 


Appropriation, 


f;XPENDITURE3. 


600 00 


f 




To paid Joseph Melvii: 


I, Supt., - 


$234 00 


Gilman R. Stevens, 


for labor, 


23 16 


John E. Stearns, - 


- 


87 20 


Elijah Stearns, 


1 


63 76 


Michael Mara, 


- 


10 00 


D. Y, Stearns, 


- 


7 50 


A. G. Gerry, 


- 


7 50 


Wm. Stearns, 


. 


4 00 


Charles Bean, 


. 


63 


Elbridge Gerry, 


. 


63 


Rodney Hardy, Jr., 


- 


63 


John Farrell, 


- 


63 


Daniel N. Hoyt, - 


* 


16 25 


Geo. Haywood, 


. 


3126 


Daniel Butterfield, 


- 


6 65 


Abner Collins, - 


- 


3 75 


Sam'l Kincaid, 


. ■ . 


75 



$650 33 



45 

To paid Thomas Stearns, for labor, 93 

D. Wells, for lumber, - - - 15 25 



514 48 
Balance to new account, - - 135 85 



$650 33 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 

By Balance from old account, - - $150 38 
Appropriation, - - . - 303 00 

$450 3^ 



EXPENDITURES. 




To paid City Farm, for labor, - 


$172 00 


Robt. Stevens, . . . 


18 75 


C. M. Hubbard, - - - - 


100 


Wm. Mills, . - - - 


11 25 


Joshua Miller, . . . . 


9 00 




212 00 


Balance to new account, 


- 238 38 

< 



$ 450 38 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 

By Balance from old account, - - $25 59 
Appropriation, - - - 150 00 



$175 59 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid J. D. Jones, Supt., - - $30 63 

J. E. Kimball, for labor, - - 20 01 

Alonzo Wicom, - - - - 2 51 

Geo. W. Gate, . - . 19 50 

L. D. Gate, 25 00 

Wm. Campbell, - - - - 6 75 



46 



To paid Eben Carr, for labor, - - 5 50 

Jolin S. Gamble, - - - - 3 75 

J. A. Sargent, _ . _ _ 50 

John Holland, - - - - 1 25 

R. Kimball, ----- 8 00 

Wm. Campbell, for watering trough, 3 00 



* 


126 40 


Balance to new account, 


49 19 


NEW HIGHWAYS. 




By appropriation, - - - - 




EXPENDITURES. 




To paid D. W. Fling, Supt., 


$38 00 


C. W. Fling, for labor. 


18 00 


James Patten, - _ _ . 


14 00 


James Kearin, - - - - 


27 00 


James Victory, . . . - 


24 00 


John P. Fling, . - - - 


2 00 


John Larkin, - . - - - 


3 00 


Peter Scanlan, . - - - 


3 00 


Daniel Mahanna, - . - - 


3 75 


Ed. Breshnahan, 


3 00 


Syl. Donohoe, . . - . 


3 00 


J. G. Coult, - - - 


20 30 


Dennis Dowd, . . . - 


3 00 


Pat'k Dowd, - - - - 


3 00 


Wm. Chase, 


3 75 


Timothy Kennedy, 


4 50 


City Teams, 


6 00 




179 30 


Overdrawn on old account, 


43 72 


Balance to new account, 


276 98 



$175 59 



$500 00 



^500 00 



47 

GRANITE BRIDGE. 
By balance from old account, . . $8 60 
Appropriation, .... 300 00 



$308 60 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Z. N. Doe, for labor, . . 1 00 
John H. Maynard, labor and lumber, 47 00 
Thomas R. Hubbard, lumber, . 49 29 

Howard Insurance Co., insurance, . 30 00 
Shoe & Leather Dealers Ins. Co., ins. 30 00 

157 29 
Balance to new account, . 151 31 



$308 60 



AMOSKEAG FALLS BRIDGE. 



By appropriation, 


600 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




To paid Joseph Melvin, for labor, 
A. H. Gerry, .... 


48 00 
6 00 


Elijah Stearns, ... 
Daniels & Co., glass. 


16 50 

75 


J. B. Varick & Co., spikes and nails. 


17 38 


Gilman Clough, lumber, 


92 63 


Howard Insurance Co., insurance. 


37 50 


G. W. Adams, oil. 


16 54 


T. L. Quimby, lighting bridge lamps, 
C. A. Smith, street lamp, 


15 00 
125 


Overdrawn last year, . 


25155 
6 48 


Balance to new account, . 


34197 

$600 00 



48 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



By balance fronx old account, 
Appropriation, . . • . 

Reserved fund, 

EXPENDITURES. 
To paid William Collins, for labor, 
Thomas Gallaghan, 
Jere. Connor, 

C. W. Clough, 
Jolm Larkin, 
Jack Moulton, 
Patrick Finn, 
Patrick Dowd, 
Peter Scanlan, 
Michael Scanlan, 
James Kearin, 

D. W. Fling, Supt., 
John Collins, for labor, 
WilliamC base, 
Daniel Mahanna, 
Timothy Kennedy, 

S. Donohoe, . 

Edward McLaughlin, 

Lawrence Connor, 

Dennis Dowd, 

James Victory, 

J. E. B^'Bsnahan, 

Dennis Sullivan, . ' . 

John Baxter, 

James Brown, 

Edward Bresnahan, 



1118 78 


3,000 00 


100 00 


fft'l ''18 78 


6 00 


6 00 


. 18 75 


150 


. 39 75 


. 3 00 


49 87 


.97 87 


66 00 


. 15 00 


12 00 


. 104 00 


10 62 


33 50 


13 75 


. 47 25 


5100 


6 00 


6 00 


. 58 87 


72 00 


13 50 


7 18 


. 6 00 


. 9 00 


43 06 



49 

To paid John P. Fling, for labor, . 23 25 
Barr & Clapp, .... 51 

Eben Knowlton, . . . . 3 00 

S. S. Moulton, . . . . 5 00 

Patrick Mahern, .... 6 67 

Daniel Cronan, . . . . 9 00 

J. F. James, for engineering, - - 28 25 
D. Wells, for lumber, - - - 32 64 
Natt & W. F. Head, for brick, - - 27 00 
Jesse Gaiilt, u a . . 12I 19 

H. J. Tirrell, " " - 11 40 

M. D. Stokes ,for stone cess-pool covers, 43 00 
T. McQueston, furnishing and laying 

cement tube, .... 1,208 42 
Wm. McPherson, furnishing & laying 



cement tube, - - " - 


- 712 63 


Daniels & Co., for grates. 


- 23 53 


Haines & Wallace, for lumber. 


- 14 68 


Edmund Burke, for labor, - 


. 5 62 


Michael Handley, - 


- 10 75 


Z. N. Doe, . . . . 


- 30 50 


Benj. Ladu, 


- 1125 


Albert Thompson, 


- lb 50 


John Jameson, 


- 11 25 


Pat Ryan, . . . . 


- 7 50 


Levi Woodman, 


5 62 




3,160 63 


Balance to new account, - 


- $58 15 


^ 


$3,218 78 



60 




EESEEVOIRS. 




By Balance from old account, - 


$74 91 


Amosk'g Man'f g Co., refunded, - 


55 01 


Appropriation, _ . . . 


400 00 


Reserved fund, - - - - 


100 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




To paid D. W. Fling, Supt., 


$14 00 


John Larkin, for labor, 


150 


Patrick Dowd, . . . - 


7 50 


Peter Scanlan, . - - - 


9 75 


J. E. Bresnahan, . - - - 


3 00 


Dennis Dowd, . - - - 


7 50 


S. Donohoe, - - 


4 50 


Wm. Chase, . _ - - 


3 75 


Michael Scanlan, . - - - 


3 75 


Amoskeag Man'f 'g Co., 


62 45 


H. H. Noyes, for building fence. 


18 69 


C. E. W. Clough & Co., labor & mater'l. 


21127 


S. S. Moulton, for labor, 


8 67 


F. Smiley, 


3 50 


John Logue, 


75 


Haines & Wallace, for lumber. 


122 56 


Daniels & Co., for hardware. 


150 


Hartshorn & Pike, for copper elbows. 


7 00 


L. H. Sleeper, care of reservoirs, 


68 77 


Patrick Finn, for labor. 


6 75 


Timothy Kennedy, - - - - 


7 50 


James Victory, 


4 50 


Daniel Mahanna, - - - - 


2 50 


Erastus Cutting, 


2 50 


Barr & Clapp, - ^ - 


3 23 



$629 92 



51 

To paid John Horan, for labor, - 2 25 

Pat Rjan, 2 25 

Jerry Murry, - . - . 2 25 

James Brown, - - - - 4 60 

John P. Fling, ... - 3 00 

Edward Bresnahan, - - - 2 25 

Charles Danforth, - . . 6 00 

John Harrington, - - - - 5 25 



COMMONS. 



615 14 
Balance to new account, - 14 78 



$629 92 



By balance from old account, - $325 61 

Appropriation, - - - 1.000 00 

Overdrawn, . - - - 40 92 



-11.366 53 



• EXPENDITURES. 

To Paid City Teams, for labor, . . $9 75 
J. H. Maynard, . . . . 24 00 
D. W. Fling, .... 2 00 

Wm. Chase, 1 25 

Patrick Dowd, . . . . 1 60 

Eben Knowlton, . . . . 8 00 

S. S. Moulton, for labor on tree boxes, 26 00 
J. T. Snow, " " 10 00 

J. G. Coult, for 60 trees, . . 60 00 

Wilson & Co., for 230 trees, . 230 00 

Wm. Kimball, for whitewashing fence, 45 00 
AmoskeagMan'g Co., castings for signs, 88 96 
J. B. Variek & Co., hardware, 28 41 

T. R. Hubbard, lumber, . . . 8 25 



52 

To paid Haines & Wallace, lumber, . 21 56 
Cyrus Dunn, lime, . . . 1 85 





566 53 


Transferred to reserved fund. 


80OO0 




nCI Qft« P.9. 


PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 


Bj balance from old account, 


. ^93 20 


Appropriation, 


200 00 


Transferred from revenue account. 


105 54 


Lots sold, .... 


104 03 


Hay and rye sold, 


20 00 


Wood sold, .... 


155 25 



, EXPENDITURES. 

To paid M. C. Eastman & Co., for leached 

ashes, . . . . $5 66 

John Chapelle, for chopping 58 cords 

wood, ... 58 50 

John G. Coult,for 100 arbor vitae trees, 18 GO 



William C. Chase, for labor. 


217 19 


K. Haseltine, .... 


67 87 


T. P. Kingsley, 


2 50 


Geo. E. Evans, . ^ . 


8 50 


J. E. Stearns, . . . • 


2 00 


A. B. Chase, . " . 


69 00 


John Calef, .... 


8 00 


Granville Mason, . . . . 


4 75 


J. D. Bean, for selling wood. 


2 00 


Daniels & Co., for grass seed, . 


13 69 


J. A. Weston, engineer'g & horse hire, 


63 50 




54116 


Balance to new account. 


136 86 




$678 02 



53 



FIKE DEPARTMENT. 



By Balance from old account, - - $112 99 
Appropriation, - - - - 6,000 00 



),112 99 



EXPENDITURES. 

STEAMER AMOSKEAG NO. 1. 



To paid salaries of firemen, - - $418 00 
Man. Gas-Light Co., for gas, - 63 00 

H. M. Bailey & Son, for broom and 

repairing lantern, - - - 1 80 

John Larkin,for sawing wood, - 5 00 

J. Y. Furlong, " " - - 1 83 

Amosk'g Man'f 'g Co., wood & rope, 20 37 
" " " for repairs, - 588 94 

Pierce & Reynolds, for iron for stove, 75 

A. P. Fling, for labor, - - - 2 50 

Daniels & Co., for locks and oil, - 18 50 

11,120 19 

STEAMER FIRE KING NO. 2. 

To paid salaries of men, - . - 
Man. Gas- Light Co., for gas, 
John Larkin, for sawing wood, 
J. Y. Furlong, " " 

Amosk'g Man'g Co., wood <fe repairs, 
Warren Harvey, " " 

$600 47 



$403 00 


19 74 


9 50 


182 


15141 


15 00 



54 
STEAMER E. W. HARRINGTON NO. 3. 



To paid salaries of men, - - - $415 00 
Baker & Fradd, for wood, 
Haines & Wallace, " - - 

" " drawing engine 1 

year, 

Amosk'g Man'g Co., for repairs, 
Baker & Fradd, for oil, - - - 
E. P. Johnson & Co , for coal, - 
Man. Gas-Light Co., for gas. 



7 25 


57 55 


50 00 


14 00 


4 04 


20 40 


84 



PENNACOOK HOSE CO. 

To paid salaries of men, - - - $752 00 

Amosk'g Man'g Co., for repairs, 7 62 

T. P. Heath, for drawing carriage, 14 50 

Ezra Kimball, for oil, - - 17 60 



HOOK AND LADDER CO. 

To paid salaries of men, - - - $608 00 

Man. Gas-Light Co., for gas, - 18 92 

Wilson & Co., for wood, - - -.12 44 

Amosk'g Man'g Co., for repairs, - 2 00 

Hartshorn & Pike, " " - - 1 79 

W. L-eland, for repairs, - - 1 25 
John L. Taylor & Co., for painting, 13 25 



$569 08 



$791 62 



$657 65 



66 



ENGINEERS. 




To paid N. S. Bean, Chief, salary, 
Ezra Huntington, Clerk, " 
Freeman Higgins, " - 
B. C. Kendall, " 


- $50 00 

50 00 

- 25 00 
25 00 


D. W. Fling, " - 
Israel Dow, " 


- 25 00 
25 00 



$200 00 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

To paid Peter Scanlan, sawing wood, 
Patrick Dowd, for " " 

Patrick Colerty, for " " 

Burpee & Co., for wood, 
Daniels <fe Co., for grease, rotten 

stone, benzine and brush, - 
Amosk'g Man'g Co., labor & lumber, 
" " " 74 yds. duck, - 

Freeman Higgins, 1 day examining 

stoves, 

D. W. Fling, 7 d'ys examini'g stoves, 

Palmer & Gale, for repairs, - 

H. M. Bailey & Son, " 

Kidder & Chandler, for oil, - 

L. W. Hall, for wood, 

J. Q. A. Sargent, for repairs, 

Fearing & Co., for cotton cloth, 

H. G. Connor, for chamois skin, 

N. S. Bean, for wood, 

C. M. & L. R. R., frieght on coal, - 

Fitz & Winslow, for coal, 

H. J. Tirrell, for wood, - - - 

Warren Harvey, " - - 



14 50 


4 50 


7 50 


10 50 


3 50 


28 40 


44 40 


2 00 


14 00 


7 75 


10 26 


1 H2 


9 50 


2 87 


7 66 


75 


24 37 


26 00 


264 00 


4 25 


10 46 



66 

To paid C. R. Colley, for repairs, - 3 21 

Neal & Holbrook, " " - " 3 68 

J. W. Whittier, for hose & repairs, 1,502 23 

J. C. Young, for wood, - - 29 46 

D. A. Worthley, " - - - 4 50 

J. B. Varick & Co., for oil, - 7 10 



-12,038 97 



RECAPITULATION. 



By Balance from old account, - 


$112 99 


Appropriation, - - . - 


6,000 00 


EXPENDITURES. ■ 


'} 


To Sieamer Araoskeag, 


$1,120 19 


" Fire King, 


600 47 


« E. W. Harrington, 


669 08 


Pennacook Hose Co., 


79162 


Hook & Ladder Co., 


657 65 


Engineers' services, 


2(0 00 


Miscellaneous, - - - - 


2,038 97 


Balance to new account, - 


135 01 



,112 99 



},112 99 



57 



CHIEF ENGINEEE'S REPORT. 



Engineers' Office, Jan. 1st, 1867. 
To His Honor, the Mayor and Board of Aldermen. 

Gentlemen : In compliance with tlie ordinances of the 
city, I herewith submit my second Annual Report of the 
condition of the Department, with an appraisal of all the 
property belonging to the same, the location of the En- 
gines and apparatus, with a list of the names and resi- 
dence of each member of the several companies. Also, 
the condition of reservoirs and otlier supplies of water 
within tJie city. 

The apparatus consists of two first, and one second 
class Engines ; also, three two wheeled, and two four 
wheeled hose carriages, and two hook and ladder trucks, 
all in first rate condition. 

With the exception of the house on Clinton street, Pis- 
cataquog, occupied by steam fire engine, E. W. Harring- 
ton, the whole apparatus used by the Department, is kept 
in the building on Vine street. 

The drivers of the Amoskeag and Fire King Steamers 
are required to remain in their engine houses nights, 
sleeping apartments having been fitted up for that pur- 
pose. The arrangements of working alternately, three 
days in the week, with their horses on the street, under 
the direction of the Superintendent of streets, still con- 
tinues. 

When not employed on the streets, both drivers are re- 



58 

quired to be in readiness at all times, to start at an alarm 
of fire. 

The Reservoirs are in good condition. I would recom- 
mend that the old reservoir at Janesvillo, be enlarged, or 
a new one put in, as the facilities for water in that part of 
the city are very poor, and in case of a large fire, would 
be very insufficient. 

The Department has been called out to six fires and 
eleven alarms, making seventeen times, and those, with 
the exception of Chase's tannery, were very slight, and in 
view of the many large fires which have happened through- 
out the different parts of the country, I would recom- 
mend that a second class engine be added to the Depart- 
ment. 

In closing this report, I return my sincere thanks to the 
Assistant Engineers, and to the officers and members of 
the several companies for their promptness in the dis- 
charge of duty, and their support in all measures connect- 
ed with the interests of the Department. 

N. S. BEAN, Chief Engineer. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, January 1, 1867. 
Read and accepted. JOSEPH B. BENNETT, City Clerk. 



APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY BELONGING TO 
STEAMER AMOSKEAG NO. 1. 

Steamer and hose carriage, - $3,250 OO 

400 feet rubber hose, - - - 500 00 

1050 feet common hose, - - -1.012 00 

13 woolen Jackets, - - - 104 00 

3 stoves and pipe, - - - 40 00 

1 force pump, - - - - 12 00 



59 



1 pair harnesses, . . . 


45 00 


1 pair blankets, . _ - . 


400 


1 sheet iron pan, 


8 00 


1 wash dish, . _ . - 


1 00 


3 1-2 tons cannel coal, - - • - 


98 00 


3 cords wood, . . . . 


27 00 


20 spanners and belts, 


20 00 


7 life ropes, ----- 


5 25 


1 1-2 tons hard coal, 


18 00 


1 1-2 cords hard wood, 


13 50 


2 axes, 


3 00 


2 iron bars, 


2 00 


1 Vise, 


2 50 


1 coal hod, 


100 


1 shovel, . - . - . 


100 


7 patches for hose, 


2 00 


1 slide wrench, . - - - 


100 


1 hammer, 


83 


Furniture in hall, - - - - 


30 00 


5 oil and fluid cans. 


7 50 


1-2 gallon sperm oil. 


150 


70 feet 3-4 in. rubber hose, 


14 OJ 


1 bed complete. 


35 00 


2 blunderbusses, 


24 00 


2 brass pipes, 


24 00 


1 brancli pipe with gate, 


15 00 


1 Jack screw, . . . . 


5 00 


5 lanterns for engines. 


20 00 




^5.347 08 



60 

Names and Residence of Members of Amoskeag Steamer 

No. 1. 
J. C. Ricker, foreman and treas'r, No. 18 Prospect st. 
Orrin Kimball, assistant foreman, 154 Manchester st. 
Horace Nichols, engineer, 5 Machine shop Corp. 
Samuel 0. Scwell, ass't engineer, 53 Machine shop Cor. 
A. A. Balch, clerk, 20 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Geo. Butterfteld, driver and steward, Engine House, 

Vine st. 
Erastus Cutting, Fireman, 105 Hanover st. 
Henry Campbell, " 58 Machine shop (]orp. 
Geo. R. Simmons, " 13 Lincoln Block, Elm.st. 
Henry T. Foss, " 10 " " " 

Alonzo Wells, " 

James R. Carr, " 28 Amoskeag Corp. 
Perkins C. Lane, " 92 Amherst st. 
Daniel SpofTord, " 93 Amoskeag Corp. 

APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY BELONGING TO 
STEAMER FIRE KING NO. 2. 

1 Steamer and hose carriage, - ^3.250 00 
250 feet 3 in. rubber hose, - 250 00 
250 feet 2 1-2 in. rubber hose, - 200 00 
850 feet common hose, - - 837 00 
10 belts and spanners, - - - 10 00 
10 woolen Jackets, - - - 40 00 
5 torches, ... - 18 00 

2 blunderbusses, - - - - 24 00 

3 lanterns, 15 00 

1 Jack screw, - - - - 5 00 

2 copper branches, - - - 14 00 
1 copper branch with gate, - 15 00 

3 stoves and pipe, - - - 50 00 



61 



1 sheet iron pan, 


6 00' 


6 badges, _ . . . 


6 00 


3 oil cans, . _ _ . . 


4 60 


1 pair harnesses, 


50 00 


1 pair blankets, . . . . 


5 00 


16 office chairs, _ . _ 


20 00 


2 tables, - - . - 


6 00 


1 chandelier, 


12 00 


1 bed complete. 


- 35 00 


8 1-2 tons English coal, 


98 00 


1 1-2 tons hard coal, 


- 16 00 


16 feet soft wood, 


16 00 


1 bench and vise, 


- 5 00 


1 side wrench, _ _ _ 


100 


1 hammer, . _ . . 


83 


1 rotary pump, - _ _ _ 


15 00 


1 1-2 cords wood, 


13 50 


1 clock, / - 


8 00 


1 coal hod, 


- 100 


2 axes, 


3 00 


1 iron bar, . - - . 


83 


2 coal shovels, * - - 


- 2 00 


50 feet 1 in. ri|bber hose, 


10 00 


14 fire hats, .... 


14 00 


3 pails, 


150 


40 lbs. waste, 


- 8 00 


4 life ropes, . . . . 


2 00 



).088 1& 



62 

Names and Residence of Blemhers of Steamer Fire 
Kiriff No. 2. 

James F. Pherson, Foreman, No, 25 Machine shop Cor. 
Elijah Chandler, assis'^ Foreman, 15 *' " " 

Henry C. Briggs, foreman hose, 2 Bartlett's block, Chest- 
nut street. 

Daniel W. Morse, engineer, 67 Amherst st. 

David C. Collins, assis't engineer, 274 Elm st. 

A. M. Kenniston, clerk and treasurer, 44 Stark Cor. 

Benjamin T. Rust, corner Central and Beach st. 

Jas. Patten, driver and steward. Engine house, Vine st. 

Hazen Davis, 6 Stark Corporation. 

C. M. Stevens, 36 Pearl st. 

W. D. Perkins, 112 Merrimack st. 

George H. Piper, 1 French's block. Pearl st. ^ 

F. W. McKinley, 92 Amoskeag Corp. 

S. W. Nelson, 38 Amoskeag Corp. 

APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY BELONGING TO 



1 Steamer and hose carriage, 


- 12.900 00 


150 feet rubber hose. 


- 5 00 00 


900 feet common hose, 


-520 00 


11 hosemen's suits. 


50 00 


4 torches, . . . - 


- 8 00 


2 stoves, . . - - 


- 22 00 


1 branch pipe with gates, 


- 15 00 


1 Jack screw, . . . 


5 00 


1 bench and vise, 


5 00 


1 signal lantern, 


- 15 00 


6 settees, - - . 


20 00 


7 office chairs, . - . 


- 8 00 


1 chandelier. 


- 10 00 


1 pair harnesses, 


40 00 



6a 

1 sheet iron pan, - - • - 5 00 

1 table, 5 00 

2 1-2 tons cannel coal, - - 70 00 
3-4 ton hard coal, - - - 12 00 

2 blunderbusses, . - - 24 00 
8 belts and spanners, . . . 8 GO 
1 shovel, ..... 83 
1 iron bar, . . . . . 1 00 
12 woolen jackets, . . . 105 00 

1 oil can, 2 00 

1-2 gallon oil, .... 1 50 

3 wash dishes, . . . . 1 80 
1 tackle and fall, ... 5 00 

1 coal hod, 1 00 

3 trumpets, . . . . . 6 00 

18 feet small rubber hose, . . 3 50 

3 kerosene lamps, . . . 3 50 

1 pair blankets, . . . . 6 00 



$4,083 83 



Names and Residence of Members of E. W. Harrington 
Steamer No. 3. 

John Patterson, Foreman, Granite and Maine St., Squog. 

H. Fradd, assis't " and clerk. Pleasant st. 

H. H. Noyes, foreman hose, Bedford st. 

J. M. Wallace, engineer. Granite st. 

Fred. Seelig, assis't. engineer, Granite st. 

W. Whelpley, Pleasant st. 

Wm. Doran, Pleasant st. 

A. D. Hatch, Granite st. 

E. D. Sullivan, Maine st. 

L. C. Truel, Mast Landing. 

Horace Grandall, Mast road. 

D. J. Warren, Granite st. 



64 

APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY BELONGING TO PEN- 
NACOOK HOSE COMPANY. 



2 hose carriages, 


. $1,000 00 


800 feet good hose, 


800 OO 


1200 feet ordinary hose, 


900 00 


8 hoscmeu's jackets, 


40 00 


3 " " . . . 


6 00 


1 " " rubber, 


. 3 00 


8 pairs rubber pants. 


12 00 


16 spanners with belts. 


16 00 


1 signal lantern, 


12 00 


4 torches. 


. 8 00 


2 axes, .... 


3 00 


1 steel shovel, . . . 


83 


8 oil cans. 


.2 50 


25 cane seat chairs, 


. .36 00 


12 office chairs. 


12 00 


1 hose washer and fixture. 


. 40 00 


1 table, .... 


5 00 


1 looking glass. 


. 8 00 


1 chandelier, 


8 00 


3 trumpets. 


. 9 00 


1 blunderbuss, 


12 00 


1 breast plate, 


3 00 


1 jack screw, 


100 


28 patches. 


7 00 


4 lanterns, 


16 00 




S2.960 33 



65 



Names and Residence of Members of Pennacook Hose 
Company. 
Daniel H. Maxfield, Foreman, 17 Stark Corp. 
A. I. Pollard, Asst. Foreman, 2 French's Block, P.earl St. 
Thos. W. Lane, Clerk, 28 Birch St. 
Albert Maxfield, Foreman of Hose, 14 A. C. 
J. E. Merrill, Asst. Foreman of Hose, 152 Manchester St. 
David Thayer, Treasurer, Bridge St., Janesville. 
Chas. R. Collej, 152 Manchester St. 
James G. Knight, 116 Amoskeag Corp. 
Geo. Holbrook, 84 Merrimack St. 
W. H. Gilmore, 84 Merrimack St. 
John D. Howard, 107 Lowell St. 
Benj. Spofiford, 242 Hanover St. 
Sam'l B. Hope, 106 Lowell St. 
Ira W. Fennock, 54 Manchester Corp. 

A. H, Merrill, Lowell, corner Nashua St. 

B. W. Robinson, 187 Hanover St. 
B. F. Currier, 74 Merrimack St. 

A. J. Butterfield, Merrimack, corner Beech St. 

W. J. Hickok, 48 Amoskeag Corp. 

John C. Pennock, 54 Manchester Corp. 

A. J. Martin, 80 Birch St. 

T. P. Heath, 44 Bridge St. 

R. O. Burleigh, 96 Amoskeag Corp. 

John M. Gilmore, 3 Bartlett's Block. 

John C. Colburn, 30 Orange St. 

J. Emerson, 19 Bridge St. 

D. M. Perkins, 73 Amoskeag Corp. 

Eugene C. Chase, 14 " " 

Geo. W. Witham, 3 Knowles' Block. 

W. H. Vickery, 113 Amoskeag Corp. 



66 

APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY BELONGING TO HOOK 
AND LADDER COMPANY. 



1 New Truck with Ladders, - 


- $1,100 00 


1 Old " 


150 00 


525 Feet Ladders, 


125 00 


1 Signal Lantern, 


10 00 


.4 Torches, . . . . 


8 00 


1 Trumpet, - _ . - 


150 


4 Large Hooks and 3 Small ones, 


40 00 


1 Sign, 


12 00 


oO Chairs, ... - 


45 00 


1 Table, .... 


14 00 


1 Stove, . . . . . 


20 00 


1 Jack Screw, . . . 


2 00 


4 Axes, Shovel and Bar, 


5 00 


2 Hay Forks and 2 Buckets, 


6 00 


1 Rope, . - . . . 


20 00 


45 Badges, .... 


9 00 




$1,667 50 



Names and Residence of Members of Hook and Ladder 

Company. 

W. Ireland, Foreman, 79 Amherst St. 

J. K. Wilson, Ass't Foreman, 21 Bridge St. 

T. E. Dudley, Clerk, 59 Pine St. 

fj. L. Drew, 89 Hanover St. 

E. G. Haynes, 83 Laurel St. 

Chas. Canfield, 18 Amoskeag Corp. 

M. L. Hunkins, 52 Orange St. 

Moulton Knowles, 97 Union St. 

C. Harvey, 95 Manchester St. 

H. P. Young, 115 Pine St. 

Frank Hutchinson, 85 Laurel St. 



67 

C. E. W. Clougb, 80 Bridge St. 

D. H. Young, 80 " 

F. A. Senter, 39 Pine St. 

M. E. George, 167 Manchester St. 

G. H. Dudley, corner Beech and Laurel Sts. 
J. L. Bradford, 54 Bridge St. 

E. T. Hardy, 230 Chestnut St. 

J. N. Heath, East of Bake House, Hanover St. 

G. E. Riddle, 263 Chestnut St. 

J. N. Chase, 59 Machine Shop Corp. 

C. B. Norris, 68 Merrimack St. 

G. W. Taylor, 89 Manchester St. 

G. T. Carter, 220 Chestnut St. 



RECAPITULATIOX. 

Steamer No. 1, Amoskeag, - - i5;5,347 08 

" " 2, Fire King, - 5 088 16 

" " 8, E. W. Harrington, 4 083 83 

Pennacook Hose Company, - 2 060 33 

Hook and Ladder " - - 1,567 50 

Real Estate, - - . - 1.100 00 

Engineers' Department, - - 50 00 



■$31,196 90 



68 



OITT POLICE. 



Bj Appropriation, 


. 


$8,000 00 


H. C. Tilton overdrawn, 


3 36 


Daniels & Co., 


• 


25 


Reserved fund, 


• 


1.80O 00 




EXPENDITURES. 


1 


To paid B. C. Haines, 


Marshal, 


$50 37 


Henry Clough, 


a 


. 750 86 


Daniel R. Prescott, 


Assistant Marshal, 650 00 


L. A. Ward, night watch, 


755 00 


J. H. Johnson, 


, 


. 778 00 


Jonas Paige, . 


. 


76 00 


J. D. Howard, 


. 


716 00 


Daniel Stevens, 


. 


76 00 


T. L. Quiraby, 




. 716 00 


F. S. Worthen, 


. 


744 00 


Patrick Doyle, 


. 


. 715 00 


A. P. Quimby, 


. 


663 00 


James H. Edwards, 




2Q0 00 


R. A. Lawrence, 


. 


403 00 


W. H. Newhall, 


• . . 


. 4150 


James G, Knight, 


. 


50 00 


E. G. Woodman, 


. 


100 


Page S. Griffin, 


. 


48 00 


Charles Canfield, 


, , 


. 52 00 


F. H. Webster, . 


• 


33 00 


H. D. Lord, Police, 


> 


. 5 00 


U. A. Carswell, 


• • • 


85 00 


N. B. Tilton, 


• . 


3 00 


G. S. Holmes, 


. 


10 00 



$9,803 61 



69 



To paid G. G. Gordon, police, 


3100 


Hugh Conroy, 


3 00 


J. L. Smith, 


. 10 OO 


E. Garner, 


6 00 


B. W. Robinson, 


•• 4 00 


G. A. Craig, 


6 00 


John T. Chase, 


15 00 


H. J. Tirrell, 


4 00 


S. B. Putnam, 


. 4 00 


N. Baker, 2d, . . . 


6 00 


Warren Eaton, 


10 00 


W. D. Perkins, . . , 


. 29 00 


L. J. Young, 


9 00 


J, D. Edgerly, 


. 2 00 


E. P,xCoggswell, 


100 


H. Fradd, 


. 2 00 


N. C. Barker, 


100 


Isaac Quint, 


. 100 


D. H. Nutt, 


2 00 


Wm. W. Baker, 


3 00 


A. G. Fairbanks, 


. 3 00 



B. C. Haines, for money paid witnesses, 25 35 
B. C. Haines, provisions for prisoners, 10 39 

B. C. Haines, for horse hire, . 36 50 
H. A. Gage, printing blanks, . 5 00 
H. C.Tilton, paper, diaries & envelopes, 25 72 
Darling & Varney, brass castings, . 61 
H. M-. Bailey & Son, zinc, matches and 

repairing stove, . . . . 11 19 

C. A. Buckley, labor in police court room, 3 75 
John V. Sullivan, paper hangings, 6 20 
G. F. Bosher & Co., 2 comforters, 8 50 
Kidder & Chandler, oil, . . 3 24 
S. Upton, salary, ... 500 00 

" rent of office, . . 50 00 



70 

To paid E. P. Johnson & Co., coal, 

C. Chase & Co., coal, 
Z. N. Doe, charcoal, 
H. Clough, cash paid out, 

D. R, Prescott, cash paid out, 
" " provisions for prisoners, 
" " horse liire, 

J. B. Clarke, printing and advertis'g, 
S. S. Moulton, work on lobby and court 

room, . . 

Hill & James, horse hire, 
H. A. Gage, printing blanks, 
C. F. Livingston, printing blanks, 
W. H. Fisk, printing blanks, 

E. M. Topliff, special justice, 
T. H. Stevens, hanging paper, 
David Wells, wood, 
John Logue, repairing lobby, 
Charles Bunton, repairing lobby door, 
Julia Finnegan, cleaning, 
Bridget Rahaly, cleaning, 
J. B. Jones, mattresses, 
J. D. Bean, bedspreads and counterpane, 5 77 
Barr & Clapp, oil, 

Stevens & Tilton, provisions for pris's, 
Daniels & Co., hardware, 
C. R. Colley, glass and setting, 
J. Q. A. Sargent, repairs, 
Wm. C. Richardson, wood, . 
John C. Young, wood, . 
S. Upton, paid for repairing seal, 
J. B. Varick & Co., oil, 
John Barker, sawing wood, 
Israel Brash, carrying in coal, 
A. Pratt, 1-2 bbl. crackers, 



3116 


12 08 


10 00 


86 74 


27 00 


23 34 


190 19 


34 80 
1. 


10 00 


12 00 


15 50 


25 75 


29 25 


44 0JO 


3 86 


2147 


4 75 


3 00 


5 90 


2 00 


. 3 37 


e, 5 77 


150 


3197 


4 29 


17 80 


13 14 


6 50 


15 99 


4 50 


175 


7 00 


175 


3 00 



71 

To paid Hartshorn & Pike, rep'ing stoves, 12 30 



S. C. Austin. & Co., dampers, 


100 


Samuel Upton, new seal. 


. 80 00 


Morrison, Stanley & Clark, services 


in 


police court. 


10 00 


J. W. Abbott, police. 


2 25 




9.287 85 


Overdrawn last year. 


255 67 


Balance to new account, . 


260 09 




i9.803 61 



LIGHTING STREETS, 



By Balance from old account. 

Appropriation. - - - - 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Man. Gas-Light Co., for gas 
and lighting, - . . 
Barr & Clapp, for oil, - - - 

F. S. Worthen, for lighting, 

C. R. Colley, for glass and sotting, 
Hartshorn & Pike, rep'g lanterns, 

G. W. Adams, oil and chimneys - 
T. L. Quiraby, for lighting, 
Daniels & Co., for glass. 



Balance to new account, 



$54 67 
3,000 00 



^2,511 53 
17 91 
31 6Q 
12 01 

7 37 

38 38 

30 00 

39 

2.649 25 
405 42 



-$3,504 67 



-13 504 67 



72 
MILITIA. 



By Balance from old account, - $9 75 

Appropriation, - - - - 500 00 



$509 75 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Chs. Wells for rent of armory, $73 67 

Smith & Richardson, rent ot armory, 118 75 

Sheridan Guards, rent of armory, - 50 00 



Balance to new account, - - 267 33 

242 42 



$509 75 



FEINTING AND STATIONERY. 



By Balance from old account, - - 1144 51 
Appropriation, - - - - 2,000 00 

$2,144 51 

EPENDITURES. 

To paid H. A. Gage, print'g letter heads, $6 00 

H. A. Gage, printing check lists, - 10 00 
" " " " Annual Report 

for 1865, ----- 47700 

H. A. Gage, printing tax receipts, - 18 00 

*' " " " circulars, - 4 50 

" «' " " . - - - 23 50 

John B. Clarke, advertising non-resi- 

*■ ident taxes, - - - - 24 00 



To paid J. B. Clarke, printing check lists, 26 00 
" " " advertising health no- 
tice, 205 99 

John B. Clarke, print'g & advertising, 314 98 
Fogg & Hadley, advertising non-resi- 
dent taxes, 24 00 

Henry C. Tilton for stationery, - 16 17 
Campbell & Hanscom, for printing & 

advertising, 367 74 

C. F. Livingston, for printing circnlars 

and tax books, - - - - 71 25 
C. F. Livingston, printing check lists, 

duplicate notes and blanks, - - 48 75 
. Houghton Brothers, advertising, - 36 00 
A. Quimby, stationery for assessors, - 10 25 
" " for pens and pencils, - 2 95 
H. C. Tilton, for books and paper, - 12 68 
W. H. Fisk, print'g,bind'g & stationery, 68 86 
T. B. Brown, for 2 tax books, - 3 00 
A. Quimby, for envelopes, • - - 1 20 
Tewksbury & Bro., for paper, - 3 00 
Wm. Carter & Bro., for 2 gals, ink, - 6 25 
L. S. Learned, for paper and pencils, 8 00 
H. R. Chamberlin, cash paid for station- 
ery, - - - - - 1 90 
W. G. Garmon, cash p'd for stationery, 1 47 
Thos. Howe, cash paid for stationery, 2 54 
Geo. L. Woods, cash paid for stationery, 1 80 
A. J. Lane, cash paid for stationery, - 1 25 



1,799 08 
Balance to new account, - - 345 48 



J,144 51 



74 



IFOIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



By Balance from old account, - - ^1,026 61 
Appropriation, - - - - 6,000 00 

$7,026 61 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid T. Howe, labor on ward room, - $1 00 

Geo. H, Barker, bank note detector, 1 50 

Manchester Post Office, postage, - - 8 00 

Kate Doyle, washing ward room, - 5 00 

J. F. James, engineer'g for sett'g trees, 5 00 
J. E. Bennett, extra work in Clerk's of- 
fice, completing unfinished work 

when first elected, - - - - 30 00 
S. S. Moulton, for making schedule of 

property at Alms House, - - 5 00 
H. M. Bailey, & Son, for 4 tin trunks 

for Treasurer, - - - - 5 00 
Stevens & Patterson, for flannel for car- 
tridges, ... - - 5 76 
John Hosley, for horse hire, - - 78 00 
E. S. Cutter, expenses to Concord, and 

paid witnesses and postage, - - 85 01 
H. C. Tilton, books for poor children, 144 79 
E. C. Bryant, for right of way, - - 10 00 
Cornelius Foley, for personal damage, 200 00 
Reuben Hills, for refunded on non-resi- 
dent taxes, - - - - 12 00 
John Steele, for witness's fees, - - 4 83 
John Knox, for State aid, 1864, - 44 00 



75 

To paid S. N. Bell, on acc't of survey of 

Keene Railroad, .... 200 00 
N. E. Morrill, for expenses to Nashua, 
to collect tax, . . . . 
Wm. Devan, State aid, - - - 
Manchester Post Office, postage, 
H. R. Charaberlin, for preparing An- 
nual Report for 1865, 
E. S. Weeks, labor on scales, 
Hill <fe James, for horse hire, 
G. W. Adams, brooms, matches, &c., 
Pinkerton, Abbott & Pettee, for use of 

hall for ward room, 
S. S. Moulton, fitting up ward room, 
John Gillis, expenses to Concord on 

acc't of City Farm, 
Julia Finnegan, clean'g 3d ward room, 
Benj. A. Moody, for State aid, - 
H. C. Tilton, 40 Man. Directories, - 
M. J. Connor, for cleaning ward room, 
Amosk'g Man. Co., labor and castings 

on water pipe, - . - - 
W. A. Wilde, books for poor children, 
John Hosley, expenses to Concord, - 
J. B. Varick & Co., for grass seed for 

court house lot, and chloride lime, 14 40 
Wm. Kimball, for whitewashing court 

house lot fence, - - - - 20 00 
Palmer & Gale, for labor on pipe at pest 

house, 9 90 

Lafayette Tebbetts, for cleaning vault, 5 00 
J. G. Coult, for 142 trees, - - 238 00 
Jerry Hays, for cleaning vault, - - 5 00 
S. S. Moulton, for repair'g tree boxes, 28 00 
Haines & Wallace, lumber for fence, 101 87 



1 80 


8 00 


12 00 


150 00 


100 


16 50 


4 95 


16 00 


2 00 


4 00 


2 00 


8 GO 


36 80 


2 00 


8 89 


38 28 


4 00 



76 

To paid J. D. Bean, for comforters, mat- 
tress, <fec., - - - - 14 00 

Daniels & Co., - - - - - 2 45 

J. Baker & Co., for U. S. Flag, - . 20 25 

J. H. Maynard, labor on court house 

lot fence, ----- 38 00 

-/Etna Insurance Co., for insurance on 

Engine house and A. F. bridge, - 83 25 

Phcenix Insurance Co., insurance on 

Engine house, - - - - 20 00 

J. E. Bennett, recording and return- 
ing births, deaths and marriages al- 
lowed by statute, - - - - 65 35 

H, R. Chamberlin, preparing report of 

State aid, 20 00 

H. C. Tilton,Town Officer for .Mayor's 

room, - - - - - -2 50 

Wm. Kimball, whitewash'g tree boxe§, 30 00 

D. A. Simons, damage to show case, 10 00 
R. S. True, map for Marshal's office, - 2 50 
Wm. Craig, for posting bills, - 1 37 
Cheney & Co., for express, - - 15 
A. Quimby, for revenue stamp, - 1 00 

E. Branch, for covering ramrod, - 1 00 
J. D. Bean, for selling Barrett place, 6 00 
Daniels & Co. ,3 casks powder for salute, 24 00 
I. H, Russell, for expense on Com. on 

Commons, - - - - - 8 00 
S. T. Hill, for serviced firing salute, for 

Gen. Sherman, - - - - 2 50 
White & Farnsworth, 6 yards flannel 

for cartridges, - - - - 3 00 

Patrick Dowd, bounty, - - 100 00 

W. W. Dickey, ward fund for enlist- 
ment refunded, ... 14 86 



3160 


52 


52 00 


1 70 


8 00 


6 00 


15 


4 45 


15 00 


28 72 


100 


5 00 



77 

To paid Oilman Clough, for lumber, 
Robert Fulton, recording deed, 
N. E. Morrill, notifying tax payers, 
J. Stickney, eyeletts and set, 
Manchester Post Office, postage; 
J. M. & E. R. Coburn, watering trough, 

for 1865 and 1866, 
Cheney & Co., express, 
J. Q. A. Sargent, repairing gas fixtures, 
H. D. Lord, notifying tax payers, 
E. R. Coburn, ward fund for enlistment 

refunded, . . _ . 
J. A. Jordan, work on water rams, 
D. R. Prescott, horse hire, 
Benjamin Hutchinson, burying nuisances, 7 75 
N'. W. Gove, copying non-resi't tax list, 12 00 
Pat. Dowd, costs on suit for bounty, 81 86 
John Holland, ringing bell 4th July 

1865 and 1866, - - - 4 00 

Geo. W. Cheney, horse hire to Wilbur 

Gay, 

D. M. Riley, posting notices, 

S. S. Moulton, repairing hay scales, 

J. E. Bennett, expense to Concord, on 

account of State aid. 
Hartshorn & Pike, water ladles, 
H. D. Lord, horse hire to notify jurors, 
Daniels & Co., 10 lbs. nails, - 
J. F. James, running line between Dis- 
tricts No. 5 and 3, - - 5 00 
To paid E. O. Knight, expenses and time 

twice to Conc'd on acc't of State aid, 10 00 
Oilman Clough, lumber for hay scales, 7 07 
N. C. Haseltine, cleaning vault, - 3 00 
T. R. Hubbard, three days at Court at 

Nashua, - - - - 15 00 



[0 00 


100 


4 50 


2 15 


137 


6 50 


80 



78 

To paid John Hosley, for attendance at 

Court at Nashua, . - . 9 32 
T. T. Abbot, attendance at Court at 

Nahsua, . . . - IG 50 

T. R. Hubbard, sawing plank, - 2 50 

Nath'l Perkins, on execution, - 43 50 

Daniels & Co., hooks and butts, - 18 

J. Spear, witness fees, - - ," 3 99 

L. W. Hall, wood for ward room, 2 00 

S. L. Fogg, team to Reform school fire, 1 50 

H. R. Chamberlin, cash for express, 4 75 
E. S. Cutter, cash paid for expenses at 

Court, .... 46 20 

G. Y. Sawyer, services, in Dowd case, 25 00 

S. & S. S. James, horse hire, - 6 75 

Timothy Sullivan, cleaning ward room, 5 00 

John Y. Gooden, watering trough, 3 00 

J. A. Tebbetts, 304 lbs. copperas, 15 20 

S. S. Moulton, fitting up ward room, 3 00 

D. W. Fling, use of team, - - 6 00 

J. F. Wiley, repairing clock, - 1 50 
Steamer Fire King Co., services at fire, 

at County farm, - - 3G 00 

Albert Maxfield, carting hose, - 75 

Jere. Hodge, making 26 guide boards, 10 40 

2.576 89 
Transferred to reserved fund, - 4.000 00 

Balance to new account, - - 449 72 

i$7.026 61 



79 



CITY HALL. 



By Appropriation, - - - $L000 00 

Transferred from New Engine house, 1.000 00 
Reserved fund, - - - - 225 00 



$2,225 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid I. P. Dimond for labor, - - $1 38 
Z. N. Doe, for charcoal, - - 29 00 

C. R. CoUey, glass and setting, - 11 05 

S. J. Titus, labor, . - . 2 75 

H. M. Bailey & Son, letter box and mov- 
ing stoves, - - - - - 3 37 
Geo. W. Baker, labor, - - - 3 62 

J. N. Bruce, signs, - - - 10 GO 

Charles Clougli repairing plastering, 4 00 

Daniels & Co., hardware, - - 18 47 
J. B. Varick & Co., hardware, - 12 60 

Daniels & Co., hardware, - - 88 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal, - 234 43 

Equitable Ins. Co., insurance, - 35 00 

Barton & Co., matting, - - 12 94 

G. P. Bosher, 1 chair, - - - 1 50 
C. P. Lord, comb and brush for Mayor's 

room, - - - - . 1 25 

Wm. P. Sleeper, 1 gal. soap, - 80 

Hartshorn & Pike, coal hod and black- 
ing stoves, - - - - 9 75 
G. B. Fogg, repairing locks, - 6 65 
Cyrus Dunn, 28 gas burners, - - 9 80 
Wm. H. Pisk, paper for Mayor's room, 38 83 
J. Colhns, pitch wood, - • - 10 00 



80 

To paid Daniel Galagher, sawing wood, - 4 79 
Bridget Riley, washing, - - - 3 50 
Julia Finnegan, washing, - - 15 98 
David Wells, wood, - - - 77 00 

E. Reed, sawing wood, - - 9 42 

Peter Shillen, sawing wood, - - 112 
John Barker, carrying coal, - 16 61 

Manchester Gas Light Co., for gas, 464 61 

0. E. W. Clough & Co., plastering the 

ceiling of Mayor's room, - 21 87 

J. L. Kennedy, stock and labor paint- 
ing city hall building, - 873 74 
S. C. Austin & Co., 2 dampers, - 2 00 
C. A. Buckley, labor, - - - 2 25 
W. C. Bryant, repairing clock, - 11 00 
Thomas Dunlap, clock for Mayor's room, 45 00 
G. A. Wiggin ladder, - - - 5 40 
H. D. Lord, cash paid for labor, - 6 87 
J. Q. A. Sargent, rep. gas pipe fixtures, 53 99 
W. C. Richardson, wood, - - 4 25 
John C. Young, wood, - - 15 30 
C. A. Smith, duster, - - - 3 00 
^tna Ins. Co., insurance, ' - - 73 00 
Abbott & Kelly, painting, - - 3 00 
John C. Young, repairing roof, - 3 97 
David Libby, brooms & repairing chairs, 4 75 
Neal & Holbrook, repairs, - - 87 
David H. Young, " - - - 1 25 

1. W. Smith, insurance, - - 35 00 
Timo. Clark, moving settees, - 1 25 



2.218 86 
Overdrawn last year, - - 38 

Balance to new account, - - 5 76 



$2,225 00 



81 



CITY LIBRARY. 



By Balance from old account, - - $218 94 
Appropriation, - - * - - 2,200 00 



42,418 94 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Man. Gas-Light Co., for gas, - 1102 06 

S. N. Bell, for rent, - - - 250 00 

C. R. CoUey, for glass and setting, 8 11 

W. H. Fisk, for stationery, - - 17 19 
B. F. Stanton, (Librarian,) salary 3 

months, 131 25 

Chas. G. Marshall, (Librarian,) sal- 
ary 9 months, . . . 405 00 
Daniels k Co., for hardware, - - 17 46 
E. P. Johnson & Co., for coal, - 80 60 
. C. F. Livingston, printing circulars, 5 50 
" " " " supplemen- 
tal catalogues, - - - - 84 00 
John B. Clarke, Daily Mirror 3 1-2 

years, 15 50 

John B. Clarke, Weekly Mirror 3 

years, 4 GO 

John B. Clarke, for advertising, - 1 50 

H. A. Gage, for printing catalogues, 38 00 

S. N. Bell, cash p'd Stanton, express, 13 48 

H. M. Bailey & Son, brush & duster, 1 83 

^tna Insurance Co., for insurance, 32 50 

A. H. Marshall, for washing room, 3 25 
T. R. Hubbard, for wood, - - 2 25 

B. H. Thayer, for 1 ream manilla, 16 40 



82 

To paid J. Q. A. Sargent, for repairs. 
Hartshorn & Pike, for clean'g pipe. 
Phoenix Insurance Co., insurance, 
Neal & Holbrook, boxes for books, 

" " " work on windows, 

H. C. Merrill, for water pail, - 
Trustees of Library, - 



Balance to new account. 



150 




1 00 




25 00 




97 25 




3 75 




33 




1,000 00 




2,358 71 




60 23 




S2, 


,418 94 



83 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OP THE TRUS- 
TEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 
To the .City Council of the City of Manchester : 

The Trustees of the City Library in making their Thir- 
teenth Annual Report of its affairs and condition, beg 
leave to submit that the operations of the Library for the 
past year have developed no new circumstances especially 
requiring the action of the City Council in relation to the 
conduct of its affairs, while the continued interest mani- 
fested in its prosperity and its increased use by all classes 
of our citizens, clearly demonstrate that the opinion as to 
its utility which was entertained by those who were instru- 
mental in its establishment, was well founded. 

The number of persons seeking its use during the past 
year is greater than it has been at any time since the Li- 
brary was opened for public use, and the number of vol- 
umes taken out has exceeded that of any former year. 

The scoures of information and amusement thus placed 
at the command of the inhabitants of the city, although 
in a small degree of an ephemeral character, are mainly 
composed of the works of the best authors and those which 
have a permanent value ; and in making the selection of 
books the Trustees have constantly kept in view the object 
of increasing the permanent value, rather than the addi- 
tion of works which have but a temporary interest. And 
although it is not possible for them to have made a per- 
sonal examination in all cases before the volumes were 
received, they have confidence that the selection made will 
compare favorably with the additions made to similar in- 
stitutions. 

The annual increase in the number of books, amounting 
to an average of more than six hundred volumes — besides 



84 

pamphlets — involves the use of a constantly increasing 
space for shelves, for which provision must be made. 

The rooms now occupied by the Library are sufficient 
for the present, and will be for a few years ; but the ne- 
cessity at a future period for additional room reminds us 
that at no distant date, more spacious accommodation 
must be provided than tlie present rooms will admit. 

The collection of books and pamphlets has now become 
so numerous and valuable that it is evidently the interest 
of the city that a suitable fireproof building should be 
erected for the preservation of the Library. The atten- 
tion of the Trustees has been called to this subject from 
time to time ; and some conference has been had with the 
Agent of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company in ref- 
erence to the selection of a lot of land for such a purpose, 
and to the assistance, that they in common with the other 
corporations in the city, were disposed to afford in the 
erection of such a building. 

Under these circumstances, the Trustees feel it import- 
ant to renew the recommendation made in their last Re- 
port, that a c(Jmmittee of the City Council should be ap- 
pointed, who, in connection with the Trustees, should 
confer with the Agents of the manufacturing corporations 
on this subject. Their marked liberality heretofore leads 
to a confident belief that such a conference would lead to 
a favorable result. Should such a committee be appointed, 
they should be authorized to procure for the use of the 
Oity Council, such plans and estimates for a building as 
may be required. 

In accordance with the plan adopted a few years since, 
the Trustees have caused to be prepared a supplementary 
catalogue containing an alphabetical arrangement of the 
books, periodicals and pamphlets added to the Library 
during the year, in the same form as the catalogue of 1863, 
and the annual supplements issued since that time, — of 



85 

which they propose to procure the printing of a small num- 
ber of copies. They have also appended to the Report of 
the Librarian, a list of such books and pamphlets, — ar- 
ranged in the numerical order of their reception, — which 
will give to those using the Library more immediate infor- 
mation of such additions than to await the publication of 
the alphabetical catalogue. 

The cost of books and periodicals still remain compara- 
tively high, but an examination of the amounts paid for 
this purpose will satisfactorily show that the expenditures 
on the amount have been judiciously and economically 
made. The details of this expense will be found in the 
Report of the Treasurer of the Board, which is herewith 
presented. 

Mr. Stanton, who had performed the duties of Librarian 
during a part of the years 1865 and 1866, resigned his po- 
sition about the first of April, and since that time the du- 
ties have been performed by Mr. Charles H. Marshall, who 
has assiduously devoted his time thereto, and will make 
an acceptable Librarian. To his report of the doings of 
the past year, we refer for the details of the operations of 
the Library. 

A number of donations have been made during the 
year, and the Trustees are gratified to observe a commend- 
able spirit of liberality in this respect among our citizens 
and others to whom the value and permanent character 
of the Library have become known. 

A list of the volumes so presented will be found in the 
Report of the Librarian, and to the donors, the Trustees, 
in behalf of the city, tender their thanks. 

The Trustees have during the year endeavored to keep 
the expenses necessarily incurred in the maintenance of 
the Libi:ary reduced to as low a point tis seemed compati- 
ble with the due care of the property entrusted to them, 
and they take this opportunity to thank the members of 



86 

the City Council and the officers of the City Government 
for the interest the 7 have manifested in the success of the 
Library, and the courtesy with which the suggestions of 
the Trustees have been met. 

There appears no reason to suppose that the expendi- 
tures of the Library for the ensuing year will exceed that 
of the past year, and but a small increase of the appropri- 
ation will be needed to meet the claims chargeable to this 
account, and the Trustees confidently believe that in the 
hands of the City Council the usefulness of this institu- 
tion will not be suffered to be impaired for want of the 
means necessary to promote its successful operation. 

Li Board of Trustees, December 29, 1866. 
Read and approved : 

JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor. 
Wm. C. Clarke, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Tlie Treasurer of the Board makes the following Report 
of the receipts and expenditures by the Board, of the 
funds received by them on account of the City Library : 



1866. 








Dr. 


Jan. 1. 


To Balance 


as per last Report, 


-f631 97 




July 28. 


Cash of 


City Treasurer, 


50 00 




Aug. 18. 




a a 


50 00 




22. 




a ic 


100 00 




Dec. 25. 




a u 


200 00 




25. 




a a 


600 00 




25. 




Mr. Fulton, 


1 40 










11,633 37 



87 

1866. Or. 

Jan. 6. By paid A. Williams & Co., Pe- 
riodicals, ^19 02 
Feb. 5. A. Williams & Co., Periodicals, 13 06 
5. H. R. Styles, Periodicals, 3 00 

17. S. N. Bell, Periodicals, 50 
28. G. W. Ellison, Books, 6 00 

Mar. 1. S. N. Bell, Periodicals, 50 

2. A. Williams & Co., Periodicals, 19 06 
26. E. Holcomb, Books, 3 00 

26. Lee & Shepard, Books, 133 18 

28. J. H. Johnson, Books, " 6 50 
Apr. 3. A. Williams & Co., Periodicals, 20 50 

'6. Sampson,Davenport & Co., Books, 100 

7. W. E. Woodward, Books, . 6 00 

14. Lee & Shepard, -Books, 108 60 

May 1. A. Williams & Co., Periodicals, 17 29 

June4. " " " '' 14 71 

30. W. H. Fisk, Binding, 63 15 

July 4. A. Williams & Co., Periodicals, 18 02 

24. W. E. Woodward, Books, 14 00 

25. Geo. W. Childs, Periodicals, 2 GO 

25. Conn. Acad. Science, Books, 3 50 

29. Lee & Shepard, Books, 160 67 
Aug.4. Boston Society of Natural Histo- 
ry, Books, 24 75 

13. A. Williams & Co., Periodicals, 16 99 

18. N. Y. Lyceum of Natural Histo- 
ry, Books, 29 75 

22. Lee & Shepard, Books, 67 93 

Sept.lO. A. Williams & Co., Periodicals, 15 09 

26. Boston Society of Natural Histo- 
ry, Periodicals, 4 00 

Oct. 3. A. Williams & Co., Periodicals, ' 15 46 
26. W. E. Woodward, Books, 15 00 



Nov. 5. A. Williams & Co., Periodicals, 


16 56 


27. Boston Society of Natural Histo- 


ry, Periodicals, 


4 00 


Dec. 1. A. Williams & Co., Periodicals, 


1-4 61 


10. N. Y. Lyceum of Natural Histo 


1- 


ry. Periodicals, 


2 00 


10. Lee & Shepard, Books, 


164 93 


20. M. Moulton, Books, 


9 50 


25. W. H. Fisk, Binding, 


125 25 


25. Lee & Shepard, Books, 


45 34 


25. Wiggin & Lunt, Periodicals, 


3 00 


Revenue Stamps, 


32 


Balance, 


415 03 




$1,633 37 



The expenditures for Incidental Expenses of the Libra- 
ry for the year ending December 31, 1866, the items of 
which appear at large in the Annual Report of the City, 
are as follows : 

Newspapers, - -, - - 

Catalogue^ 

Rent, - - - - 

Printing, ----- 

Fuel, ------ 

Furniture, 

Gas, 

Incidentals, - - . - 

Librarian's Salary, - - - . 

Insurance, ----- 

RECAPITULATION 

Balance, 

Appropriation, - - - - 



84 00 




250 00 




38 00 




82 85 




10100 




102 06 




87 55 




536 25 




57 50 




$1; 


,358 71 


$218 94 




2,200 00^ 




$2, 


,418 94 



89 

Order in favor of Trustees, - - $1,000 00 
Incidental Expenses, - - 1,358 71 

Balance, 60 23 



,418 94 



Respectfully submitted, 

S. N. BELL, Treasurer 

of Trustees of City Library. 
December 81, 1866. 

We have examined the above Report and find the same 

correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOHN HOSLEY, } Committee on Accounts 
WM. P. NEWELL, \ of City Library. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures embraced in the foregoing Report 
of the Trustees of the City Library, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, City Auditor. 



90 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

The following report of affairs at the Library for the 
jear 1866 is respectfully submitted. 

The number of volumes in the Library at the last re- 
port was eleven thousand, eight hundred and forty-five. 
During the year there has been an increase of six hundred 
and thirty-seven volumes. The whole number at present, 
including bound volumes, pamphlets and maps, is twelve 
thousand, four hundred and eighty-two. Of this increase 
five hundred and sixty-nine volumes were by purchase ; 
the remainder were donations, a list of which, with the 
donors' names, is appended to this report. Fifty different 
periodicals have been regularly received for use at the Li- 
brary rooms, and placed on the files. 

The number of volumes delivered for the past year is 
forty-one thousand, four hundred and seventy-two. Num- 
ber of days open for delivery, two hundred and eighty- 
three ; average number per day being one hundred and 
forty-seven. Of these but eight are unaccounted for. 
The largest number delivered in any one month was four 
thousand, seven hundred and thirty-two in March; the 
smallest number, two thousand, four hundred and thirty, 
in .!ruly. The month of December is not included in this 
comparison, as no books were taken out after the fifteenth. 

The whole number of persons who have furnished vouch- 
ers, thereby Entitling them to the use of the Library, is 
five thousand, two hundred and twelve. Of these, five 
hundred and twelve have been added during the year. 
Twenty-six persons have borrowed books on deposit. 

The amount received for fines is eighteen dollars and 



91 

ei^Tcy-one cents. For book lost,* two dollars and fifty- 
four cents. Paid for stationery, postage, express charges, 
etc., sixteen dollars and ninety-three cents ; leaving a bal- 
ance of four dollars and forty-two cents. 

C. H. MARSHALL, 
^ Librarian. 

December.31, 1866. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY IN 1866. 
By Rev. Wm. McDonald, Manchester. • 

The Antiquities of the Anglo-Saxon Church. 8vo. 
By Hon. Daniel Clark, Manchester. 

Manufactures of the United States in 1866. Census 
■ Report. 4to. 
An Act to Reduce Internal Taxation, etc. 1st Sess. 

39th Congress. 4to. 
Monthly Report of Department of Agriculture. 1866. 

Pamphlet. 
By Hon. John Hosley, Manchester. 

Municipal Registers of the City of Lawrence, Mass. 

1853, 1856 and 1857. 8vo. 
Municipal Registers of the City of Concord. 1854-5. 

8vo. 
Ordinances of the City of Cambridge, Mass. 1856. 

8vo. 
Ordinances of the City of Nashua. 1854.* 8vo. 
Charter and By-Laws of the City of New Haven, Conn. 

1857. 8vo. 
Annual Report of the City of Manchester. 1865. 

Pamphlet. 



92 

By Joseph IE. Bennett, Esq., Manchester. 
Annual Report of the Hillsboro' County Commissioners. 

1865. Pamphlet. 

By Librarian op Congress. 

Writings of James Madison. 4 vols. 8vo. 
By Hon. E. W. Harrington, Manchester. 

Annual Report of the Directors of the Manchester & 
Lawrence Railroad. 1865. Pamphlet. 
By Capt. Wm. R. Patten, Asst. Clerk of House of Re- 
presentatives, June Session, 1866. Manchester. 
Report of the State Treasurer. June, 1866. Pamp. 
" " " Auditor of Acc'ts. June, 1866. Pamp. 
u u u Warden of State Prison. June, 1866. 
Pamphlet. 
Report of Visitors, Trustees, Treasurer and Superin- 
tendent of the Asylum for the Insane. June, 1866. 
Pamphlet. ' 

Report of the Commissioners upon War Expenditures 
of the Towns and Cities in New Hampshire. June? 

1866. Pamphlet. 

Report of the Trustees of the House of Reformation, 

June, 1866. Pamphlet. ^ 

Report of the Commissioners on Fisheries made to the 

New Hampshire Legislature. June, 1866. Pamp. 
By Hon. S. D. Bell, Manchester. 
Report of the Prison Association of New York. 1866. 

Pamphlet 
By S. N. Bell, Esq., Manchester. 

Political Manual of New Hampshire. Pamphlet. 
Collections of the New Hampshire Historical Society. 

1866. ?vo. 
Report of the Directors of the Portland & Rochester 

Railroad. 1866. Pamphlet. 
By M. E. Jones, Esq., Manchester. 

Life and Exploits of Don Quixiote. 32mo. 



113 

To paid Lot 192, Belmont St., - 1864, 2 50 

Wm. E. Thayer, - - " 2 98 

Eben T. James, - - - " 1 00 

Lot 67, Manchester St^ * " 2 00 

Fred. Dow, - - . . « 3 57 

Josiah Crosby, ... " 3 57 

16 acres land adj. J. P. Eaton's, " 4 60 

R. M. Richardson, - - " 3 57 

Wm. Wilder, - - . . " 3 57 

B. K. Hoyt, - . . 1865, 13 06 
J. S. Kidder, - - - " 29 62 
F. W. McKenly, ... " 5 22 
James Currier, - - - " 5 18 
John M. Howe, ... " 5 22 
S. F. Brown, - - - " 5 22 
Melville Ames, - . - a 5 22 
John P. Wilson, - - . «' 5 22 
Wm. Chase, ... « 5 22 
Leonard Colby, • - - - " 5 22 
Barnes & Cilley, - - " 7 13 
Peter Corning, - , . . " 52 
Oeo. A. Searle, - - " 5 22 
Sophronia Dow, - - - " 10 80 
Patrick Finn, . . _ " 5 22 
Wm. Blanchard, - - - " 11 28 

C. D. Thompson, - - " 5 61 
Wm. McDonald, - . . " 8 71 
John Golding, ... « 5 22 

'John Colburn, - - - " 5 22 

John Young, . . . « 1 89 

Geo. W. Witham, - - - " 5 22 

Samuel Cheney, - - " 5 22 

Sidney B. Chase, - - - « 5 22 

Jason Underhill, - - " 5 22 

Robt. Livingston, - - - " 5 22 



114 



To paid John C. Austin, 
Timo. Connor, 
O'Brien Bradley, 
Levi L. Bailey, 
Abner D. Colby, 
J. P. Caldwell,"^ 
Wm. Henry, 
G. H. Stearns, 
H. Malander, 
Frank Herman, 
S. N. Shannon, 
Elbridge Reed, 
Bernard Untiet, 
H. A. Stone, - 
Wm. Gleason, 
Eben Holmes, 
Samuel Gray, 
Josiah Philbrick, - 
Josiah Crosby, 
Wm. Fhelps, - 
Daniel Silk, 
W. H. Ramsay, 
Ingoold Risvold, 
Orin Tabor, 
Betsey Moore, 
Albert Caswell, 
Wm. Wilder, 
Aaron C. Elliott, - 
R. M. Richardson, 
John Barr, 
W. H. Barron, 
Augustine Crosby, - 
I. W. Smith, 
L. H. Sleeper, 
James Lyons, 



.866^ 


, 5 22 


a 


5 22 


li 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


it. 


5 22 


u 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


ii, 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


a 


5 22 

5 22 


u 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


li 


5 22 


(( 


5 22 


a 


5 61 


u 


18 72 


a 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


a 


5 22 


li 


5 22 


u 


5 22 


ii 


5 22 


L866 


, 9 73 


ei 


4 48 


li 


5 84 



115 



paid Henry Jefts, - . - 


1866, 


5 50 


Charles Train, - 


a 


5 84 


Allen Partridge, 


a 


24 32 


S. B. Putnam, - - - • 


a 


5 84 


Edward Wyman, - - - 


a 


8 30 


Wm. Adams, . . - 


cc 


6 38 


Henry Barrett, . - - 


a 


24 32 


John Caswell, 


a 


5 84 


Geo. W. Piper, 


ii 


5 84 


Aroma Johnson, - - - 


u 


5 84 


James H. Peasley, - - - 


u 


5 84 


John Newell, 


a 


6 34 


Fred. T. Page, 


(( ' 


8 51 


Aaron' Crombie, 


a 


12 3T 


Enoch Johnson, . . . 


a 


4 86 


John Gillispie, - - - 


a 


5 84 


James Fulton, 


a 


5 84 


Silas Wallace, 


a 


5 84 


Charles A. Swain, - 


a 


5 84 


Lyman W. Colby, 


a 


5 84 


Horace Toby, 


u 


5 84 


Levi Dexter, 


a 


5 84 


John Huntress, _ . . 


a 


5 84 


D. L. Macey, _ - . 


u 


5 84 


James Morris, . . . 


li 


5 84 


R. S. Fellows, - 


a 


5 84 


Charles Severance, 


u 


5 84 


F. L. Rundlett, - 


(i 


5 84 


Parker & Simons, - 


a 


4 58 


Oliver F. Turner, 


u 


5 84 


Edward Clement, - 


a 


5 84 


Horace B. Stevens, 


a 


5 84 


Leroy Lane, - - - - 


a 


5 84 


John Barr, . - - 


n 


5 84 


H. A. Currier, - - . 


ii 


5 84 



116 

To paid I). W. Smith, - - 1866, 5 84 

Wm. B. Enos, - - - " 

Thomas Cassidy, - - " 

C. W. Ambrose, - . _ '^ 

Wm. H. Byrns, - . " 

George H. Minor, - - - ^ 

Thomas Garviii, . . " 

John Carr, - - . . « 

John W. Joy, . . , u 

Nicholas Bartlett, - . . " 

Gihnan Langmaid, - - " 

E. W. Dakin, - . . u 

Abel Janes, - - _ " 

Riiel Walker, - - . < 

Ed. Bresnahan, - - - " 

WyattKelley, . . . u 

Matthew Forsaith, - - " 
E. K. White, --..«. 

Thos. E. Fisher, - - " 

R. I. Cleaveland, - - '< 

Charles E. Paiffe, - - « 
John S. Elliott, ..." 

Charles Marshall, - - " 

Jos, Stone, - . _ . " 

Chas. H. Bradford, - - '< 

N. LeBuff, .... a 

Geo. F. Messer, - - - « 

^Lewis Hyatt, - - - . " 

M. W. Wallace, - - . " 

Henry J. Haseltine, . . " 

R. C. French, ... " 
Lyman Wyman, ..." 

Edward Maynard, - . " 

J. M. Melvin, - . . " 

Wm. J. Wallace, - . " 



5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


33 20 


5 84 


5 84 


5 50 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 50 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


8 51 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


73 


5 84 


5 84 


1 00 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


6 05 


5 84 



117 



To paid Geo. Boutelie, 
F. W. Fitts, 
Michael Reagan, 
F. B. Enos, 
John Caswell, 
John Kelley, 
Wm. P. Merrill, 
Samuel Adams, . 
Wm. McAlister, 
T. C. Trescillian, 
Chas. E. Sargent, 
Wm. B. Abbott, 
Michael Coleman, 
John Mullen, 
John Mahoney, 
Wm. McDonald, 
Rufus Baker, 
Charles Scott, 
John Crowley, 
Jere. D. Sullivan, 
James O'Brien, 
Edward Welch, . 
N. W. Cumner, 
R. M. Richardson, 
John Connelly, 
E. H. Fletcher, . 
Robert French, 
Horace Gorden, 
Natt. S. Durgin, 



Transferred to Reserved Fund, 
Balance to New Account, 



1866 


, 5 81 


u 


5 84 


(( 


5 84 


u 


5 84 


u 


5 84 


u 


5 84 


u 


1 00 


a 


5 50 


a 


3 41 


li 


5 84 


a 


4135 


(( 


5 84 


a 


1 00 


(( 


5 84 


u 


100 


a 


24 32 


a 


5 84 


a 


5 84 


a 


5 84 


a 


5 84 


li 


1 OO 


a 


1 00 


a 


1 94 


a 


5 84 


a 


5 84 


ii 


5 84 


a 


5 84 


a 


7 78 


li 


5 84 


1.113 76 


11.000 00 




858 44 




$12.972 20 



118 



WATERING STREETS. 



By Balance from old account, 
Appropriation, 
Reserved Fund, 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Palmer & Gale for labor on 
pipe and rams, 
Wm. Campbell for watering streets, 



129 80 

500 00 

4 50 


116 92 
517 38 



$534 30 



PAVING STREETS. 



$534 30 



By Balance from old account, 
Appropriation, 
Reserved Fund, - - - - 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Paid Cutting & Blake, for paving, 
D. W. Fling, for labor, 
C. W. Fling, ... - 
James Patten, - - - - 
James Kearin, ... 



144 55 




2.500 00 




100 00 




ftO 


644 55 


$340 05 




5100 




12 00 




23 00 




35 25 





119 



To paid Patrick Dowd, for labor, - 


27 00 


Michael Scanlan, - - - - 


15 00 


James Victory, - - . - 


16 60 


S. Donahoe, 


26 25 


Wm. Chase, . . . . 


26 87 


Daniel Mahanna, - - - ^ - 


7 50 


Dennis Dowd, - - - -. 


32 25 


Ed. Bresnahan, . - - _ 


36 00 


Tim. Kennedy, - - - . 


35 25 


John Larkin, 


35 25 


-Pat. O'Brien, ... - 


3 00 


Pat. Finn, - - - ^- 


7 50 


Rodnia Nutt, 45 loads cobblestone. 


80 00 


H. J. Plumer, cobblestone deliv'd, 


34 00 


Wm. Campbell, '• " 


5 00 


Taylor & Colby, " " 


120 50 


H. J. Tirrell, " " 


12 25 


W. S. Lock, for drawing stone, 


5 00 


Thomas R. Hubbard, lumber. 


10 95 


Moses D. Stokes, paving blocks. 


1.439 37 


James Brown, for labor. 


4 50 


Patrick Ryan, . . . . 


6 00 


John Horan, . . - . 


4 50 


Peter Scanlan, .... 


3 75 


John P. Fling, ... - 


2 50 


City Teams, 


103 37 


E. Cutting, - - - . 


15 00 


A. Blake, - ... - 


7 50 


C. E. W. Clough, 


17 87 


J. A. Weston, for engineering, 


28 75 


1 


2.630 48 


Balance to new account, 


14 07 




S2.644 55 



120 



TENEMENT ON VINE STKEET.. 



By Transferred from Reserved Fund, $500 OO 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid H. M. Bailey & Son, for 
stock and labor, - - - 
J. B. Yarick & Co., for hardware, 
S. W. Parsons, lumber and labor, - 
T. R. Hubbard, " 
J. Q. A. Sargent, gas fixtures, 
S. S. Moulton, stock and labor. 



Balance to new account, 



4 00 


43 74 


246 11 


112 31 


63 80' 


2 50 


472 46 


27 54 



S500 00 



CEMETERY AT THE CENTER. 



By Appropriation, , $200 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid J. A. Weston, for engineering 

and specifications, - - 3 00 

City Farm, for building bank wall, 197 00 

$200 00- 



121 



CITY OFFICERS. 



By balance from old account, 


-11.499 74 


Appropriation, 


6.000 00 




Sft? '199 74 


EXPENDITURES. 


tJP • .rr-»7C 1 rr 


To paid John Hosley^ Mayor, 


1.000 00 


Joseph E. Bennett, City Clerk, 


l.OOO 00 


H. R. Chamberlin, Treas. and Colt'r, 


, 1.000 00 


E. S. Cutter, Solicitor, 


150 00 


J. 0. Adams, Sup't of .Public Ins'n, 


700 00 


H. M. Gillis, Clerk of Com. Council, 


, 100 oo 


H. D. Lord, Messenger, 


. 600 00 


Leonard French, Physician, 


50 00 


William Little, Truant Officer, 


. 25 00 


ASSESSORS. 




T. B. Brown, Assessor, 


219 00 


Geo. W. Thayer, " 


. 139 50 


Jere. Hays, " 


85 50 


Charles Currier, " 


. 85 50 


A. G. Fairbanks, " 


. 80 00 


Isaac Huse, " 


. 79 00 


J. G. Cilley, " 


141 00 


Geo. H. Colby, " 


. 87 50 


J. B. Bennett, Ass't Clerk, . 


180 OO 



122 



OVERSEERS OF POOR. 

Edward Egan, . . . . ' 25 00 

Edward Prime, 2 years, . . 50 00 

S. J. Young, . . . . 25 00 

Nahum Baldwin, 2 years, . . 50 00 

Geo. S. Chandler, 1865, . . 20 00 

S. S. Moiilton, . . . . 25 00 

S. S. Moulton, Clerk, • . . 50 00 

H. Fradd, .... 20 00 

M. E. George, . . . . 25 00 

Dennis Cassidy, . . . . 20 00 

School Committee, 2 years, 160 00 

HEALTH OFFICERS. 

Daniel Balch, . . . . 25 00 

Leonard French, ... 25 00 

SELECTMEN. 

Thomas Howe, 2 years, . . 10 00 

Dennis Cassidy, 5 00 

Isaac Whittemore, 2 years, . . 10 00 

H. A. Farrington, . ' . . 5 00 

Henry T. Newell, . . . . 5 00 

C. C. Favor, 5 00 

Wm. H. Gilmore, . . . . 5 ^0 

H. B. Putnam, 5 00 

Daniel Connor, 2 years, . . 10 00 

L. J. Young, ^ . . - . . 5 00 

Timothy Sullivan, . • . . 5 00 

S. L. Fogg, .... 5 00 

Joseph L. Sanborn, 2 years, . . 10 00 

Jonas Harvey, « . . 10 00 

Wm. Mills, " . . 10 00 

D. B. Varney, « . . 10 00 
U. A. Carswell, . . . . 5 00 



123 



A- J. Tebbetts, 
Charles Brown, 
Charles Canfield, 
E. G. Woodman, 



MODERATORS. 



J. 0. Adams, 
John Smith, 2 years, 
Geo. A. French, " 
Henry T. Newell, 
L. H. Sleeper, 
H. T. Mowatt, 
George H. Colby, 
J. T. Robinson, 
W. H. Newhall, 

WARD CLERKS. 

Daniel Connor, 3 years, 
Henry H. Scribner, 2 years, - 
A. J. Lane, " - - 

Geo. L. Woods, . - - 
W. G. Garmon, - - - - 
H. D. Lord, - . - - 
L. E. Wallace, - - . - 
D. K. White, 



Balance to new account, 



. 5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


. 5 00. 


3 00 


.6 00 


6 00 


150 


3 00 


. 3 00 


3 00 


. 3 00 


. 3 00 


- 15 00 


10 OO 


- 10 OO 


5 00 


- 5 00 


5 00 


- 5 00 


5 00 


6.473 50 . 


1.026 2i 


—$7.499 74 



124 





INTEEEST. 




By Balance from old account, 


$6,496 02 


Appropriation, 




30.000 00 


Overdrawn, 


EXPENDITURES. 


1.623 22 

$38,119 24 


To paid City Bank, 


- 


203 33 


Manchester Bank, 


- 


1.144 47 


Amoskeag Bank, 


. 


437 33 


D. F. G. Lyons, 


. 


18 27 


Mary A. Tewsbury, 


. 


180 00 


C. H. Carpenter, 


_ 


20 00 


John Ordway, 


. 


225 00 


John P. Newell, 


. 


40 73 


Mary P. Harris, 


- 


440 00 


J. L. Bradford, 


. - - 


50 00 


M. McCoy, - 


. 


59 82 


Sarah J. Wilson, 


_ 


28 95 


Geo. B. Jackman, 


_ - _ 


28 00 


Jesse Gibson, - 


- 


351 93 


Jona. Dodge, 


. 


9 00 


Wm. P. Merrill, 


_ 


157 90 


S. J. Young, 


. 


• 3 50 


J. E. Bennett, - 


- . - 


49 00 


G. S. Neal, - 


. 


107 33 


J. F. James, 


. 


47 93 


Wm. Mannahan, - 


. 


30 00 


N. Southard, 


. 


7 00 



125 

To paid I. W. Pennock, - . . 41 oO 

E. F. Staples, - - . . is 60 

J. M. Bean, - - . . 27 42 

Benj. Page, - - -• . 37 81 

Joseph Gardner, - - - . 89 33 

^ H. Johnson, .... 154 65 

' J. H. Johnson, - - - . 4 00 

T. G. Emerson, - - - 25 10 

R. E. Brown, - - . . 195 53 

Betsey Brown, ... 2 qO 

T. T. Abbott, .... 9 75 

Edmund Adams, 2d, - - 203 93 

Jacob Bennett, - - . . 13 60 

James Emerson, - . . 3 qo 

E. A. Greenough, - - - 16 50 

Caroline B. Peterson, - - 30 00 

Calvin Vickery, - - . . 90 00 

Estate of D. Farmer, . . g 75 

Mary A. Colburn, >• - . . 43 -[4 

Cyrus Sargent, ... 30O 60 

J. P. Brock, .... 5450 

Sarah E. Patten, - - - 123 41 

^- Hunt, 426 00 

D. H. Young, . - . _ 33 71 
R. W. Smith, - - . -* 144 16 
Sarah W. Moulton, ... 30 00 

E. B. Edwards, . - . _ 113 oO 
A. H. Downs, - - . . 17 15 
Ira Wilkins, - . . . 351 80 
Dorothy H. Hosley, ... 20 36 
Patrick Dowd, .... 14 75 
W. J. Foss, - - . . 19 18 
Wm. Craig, . - . . 43 47 
C. F. Warren, - . . 113 06 
Wm. Knox, .... 88 62 



126 

To paid Philena Moore, - • - 66 70 

Coupons, ----- 21.505 17 



28.119 24 
Transferred to reserved fund, 10.000 GO 



-138.119 24 



TEMPORAEY LOAN. 



By amount of loan, 


January 1 


, 1866, 


78.095 OO 


u 


a a 


for 1866, 




26.327 50 

SRI 01 ^^'^ 50 






EXPENDITURES^ 




To paid 


the banks. 


- 


- 


44.000 00 


D. F. 


G. Lyons, 


. - 


- 


400 00 


Jona. 


Dodge, 


- 


- 


300 00 


J. E. 


Bennett, - 


- 


- 


200 00 


I. W. 


Pennock, 


- 


- 


. 500 00 


J. M. 


Bean, 


» m 


- 


300 00 


T. G. 


Emerson, 


- 


- 


400 OO 


Hiram Johnson, 


- 


- 


1.500 00 


Mary 


A. Colburn, 


» 


- 


500 00 


N. Southard, 


- 


- 


300 00 


J. P. 


Brock, 


- 


- 


1.000 00 


J. F. 


James, 


~ 


- 


1.400 00 


D. H. 


, Young, 


- 


- 


700 00 


B. A. 


Greenough, 


, 


- 


300 00 


R.W 


. Smith, 


, 


- 


2.000 OO 


J. P. 


Newell, 


- 


- 


900 00 



127 



To paid G. S. Neal, - 
E. B. Edwards, 

A. H. Downs, 

I. W. Wilkins, - 
Calvin Vickery, - 
Sarah J. Wilson, 

B. F. Staples, 

T. T. Abbott, - 
Sarah E, Patten, - 
D. H. Hosley, - 
Wm. Craig, - 
Edmund Adams, 2d, 
W. J. Foss, - 
R. Elisabeth Brown, 
Jacob Bennett, 
J. L. Bradford, 

C. F. Warren, 
Joseph Gardner, 
Wm. P. Merrill, - 
Wm. Knox, 
Jesse Gibson, 
Benj. Page, 

Mary P. Harris, - 
Milton McCoy, 
Philena Moore, 
M. A. Tewksbury, 



Temporary loan, January 1, 1867. 



- 2.000 00 


1.200 00 


300 00 


1.200 00 ' 


- 1.200 00 


300 00 


200 00 


300 00 


8O0 00 


350 00 


800 00 


2.300 00 


200 00 


2.000 00 


100 00 


500 00 


- 1.600 00 


1.200 00 


600 00 


1.000 oo 


- 1.000 00 


350 00 


- 4.000 00 


500 00 


700 00 


2.000 00 


81.400 00 


, 23.022 50 


$104,422 50 



128 



SCHOOLS. 



By Appropriation, 180.000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid School Committee, $30,000 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2, REPAIRS & INS. 
By Appropriation by tax, :I2.100 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Order on Treasurer, No. 49, 600 00 

" " '• " " 50, 1.500 00 

12.100 00 

NEW HIGH SCHOOL HOUSE. 

By Balance from old account, 16 10 

Appropriation to be raised by tax, 10.000 00 

).016 10 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Order on Treasurer in favor 

of M. W. Oliver, - - - ' 13 75 
Balance to new account, - - 10,002 35 

$10,016 10 



129 

NEW SCHOOL HOUSE, DISTRICT NO. 5. 
By Balance from old account, $1,100 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid A. 0. Parker, for 3 chairs, 5 25 

Samuel Clark, serv's on build'g com. 15 50 

Wilson & Co., teaming, - - - 8 00 

J. F. James, laying out building, - 5 00 

C. M. & L. R. R., freight on furniture, 5 00 
Pinkerton, Abbott & Pettee, 40 feet 

settees, 16 GO 

J. D. Wells, for labor, - - - 9 00 

D. H. Young, build'g as pr. contract, 1.000 00 
" « " extra work, - - 28 50 



1,092 25 
Balance to new account, . 7 75 

11.10000 

NEW SCHOOL HOUSE, DISTRICT NO. 7. 
By Appropriation, $500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Zadoc Wright, for stone work, 86 00 
Wm. P. Felch, on acc't of building, 414 00 

$500 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 3. 
By amount raised by tax to pay note 

and interest, — $675 00 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 6, REPAIRS. 
By amount raised by tax, $300 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Paschal Preston, - - $300 00 



130 

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 11. 
By amount raised by tax, $400 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Lydia Atwood on note, $400 GO 



EEDUOTION OF CITY DEBT. 



By Balance from old account, $10,000 00 

Appropriation, 10.000 00 

Overdrawn, " 26.172 50 

146.172 60 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid City Bonds due Jan. 1, 1866, 6.000 00 
Reduction of Temporary Loan, - 55.072 50 



61.072 50 
Less by City Stock sold, 14.900 00 

146.172 60 



131 



CITY DEBT. 



Date of Notes. 


To whom Payable. 


When Payable. 


Principal. 


Feb. 28, 


1852 


Neheraiali Hunt. 


Feb. 28, 


1872 


$3,600 


July 1, 


1847 


City Bonds. 


July 1, 


1867 


20.000 


July 1, 


1847 


a u 


July 1, 


1872 


20.000 


July 1, 


1854 


u a 


July 1, 


1874 


20.000 


Jan. 1, 


1856 


i: u 


Jan. 1, 


1880 


10.000 


July 1, 


1857 


U it 


July 1, 


1877 


22.500 


July 9, 


1858 


Neliemiah Hunt. 


July 9, 


1878 


2.400 


Julv 22, 


1858 


Nehemiah Hunt. 


July 22, 


1878 


1.100 


Jan. 1, 


1861 


City Bonds. 


Jan. 1, 


1871 


6.000 


July 1, 


1862 


a a 


July 1, 


1882 


22.500 


Jan. 1, 


1863 


u a 


Jan. 1, 


1888 


35.000 


Oct. 31, 


1863 


u u 


Nov. 1, 


1893 


70.000 


April 1, 


1864 


a a 


April 1, 


1884 


70.000 


July 1, 


1864 


a u 


Julv 1, 


1894 


50.000 


April 1, 


1865 


u u 


April 1, 


1870 


8.800 


April 1, 


1865 


u u 


April 1, 


.1885 


10.000 



Temporary Loan, 



Interest to January 1, 1867, 



$371,900 00 
23.022 50 

394.922 50 
10.500 00 



Outstanding bills, January 1, 1867, 

Total debt and int. " " " 
Cash in Treasury Jan. 1, 1867, 
Note for bal. due on. Barrett place. 



Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1867, 



405.422 50 
11.343 44 



$35,466 74 
500 00 


416.765 94 
35.966 74 




$380.799 20 



132 



EESEKVED FUND. 



By Balance from old account, 
Appropriation, ... 

Trans'd from New Engine House, 
" " Revenue Account, 

" " Commons, 

" " City Fpm, - 

" " Incidental Expenses, 

" " Abatement of Taxes, 

" "• Interest, 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Trans'd to Paupers off the Farm, 
, " " Higluvay Dist. No. 2, 

(( (( u u a g 

u 4c u a u g 

ii u a a a "[Q 

" "' Sewers and Drains, 

" " Reservoirs, 

" " Paving Streets, 

'•' Watering Streets, 
" City Hall and Stores, 
•' Discount on Taxes, 
" Citv Police, - 



Balance to new account, 



$6,967 40 


5.605 00 


3.000 00 


58.572 43 


800 00 


500 00 


4.000 00 


11.000 00 


10.000 00 


<it100 'H'1 ft^ 


$400 00 


1.000 00 


50 00 


50 00 


200 00 . 


100 oo 


100 00 


100 00 


4 50 


225 00 


- 3.92150 


1.800 00 


7.951 00 


92.493 83 


$100,444 83 



133 



UNCOLLECTED TAXES FEOM 1859 TO 1866. 



1859— John L. Kelley, Collector. 
Amount uncollected January 1, 1867, $9,456 97 

1861— H. R. Chamberlin, Collector. 
Amount uncollected January 1, 1867, 4.509 56 

1862— H. R. Chamberlin, Collector. 
Amount uncollected January 1, 1867, 2.469 93 

1863— H. R. Chamberlin, Collector. 
Amount uncollected January 1, 1867, 2.767 24 

1864— H. R. Chamberlin, Collector. 
Amount uncollected January 1, 1867, 4.552 99 

1865— H. R. Chamberlin, Collector. 
Amount uncollected January 1, 1867, 7.943 33 

1866— H. R. Chamberlin, Collector. 
Amount of List, 245.567 19 

Amount collected and abated, 200.104 28 



Balance uncollected, $45,462 91 



13^ 



VALUATION, TAXES, &c. 



Year. | 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. of Polls. 


Poll tax. 


1838 


$555,270 


$2,235 49 • 


244 


$166 


1839 


604.963 


3.029 84 


427 


2 14 


1840 


946.200 


3.986 56 


772 


2 20 


1841 


1.229.054 


9.563 74 


892 


3 49 


1842 


1.430.524 


12.952 44 


1.053 


2 76 


1843 


1.598.826 


13.764 32 


1.053 


2 60 


1844 


1.873.286 g 
2.544.780 • 


13.584 72 


1.053 


2 25 


1845 


19.246 27 


1.561 


2 30 


1846 


3.187.726 


22.005 95 


1.808 


2 10 


1847 


4.488.550 


24.963 54 


2.056 


1 68 


1848 


4.664.957 


39.712 53 


2.688 


2 68 


1849 


5.500.049 


44.979 92 


2.518 


2 47 


1850 


5.832.080 


48.974 23 


2.820 


2 37 


1851 


6.906.462 


51.798 47 


2.910 


2 25 


1852 


6.795.682 


54.379 45 


2.745 


1 92 


1853 


6.99*5.528 


61.545 81 


2.907 


1 82 


1854 


8.237.617 . 


62.022 44 


2.814 


180 


1855 


8.833.248 


71.952 09 


3.725 


1 94 


1856 


9.244.062 . 


114.214 08 


3.760 


2 96 


1857 


9.983.862 


84.862 98 


3.69-5 


2 04 


1858 


10.259.080 


78.210 85 


3.695 


183 


1859 


9.853.310 


81.368 01 


3.495 


1 92 


1860 


. 9.644.937 


86.804 87 


3.651 


2 16 


1861 


9.343.254 


99.104 96 


3.974 


2 40 


1862 


■ 8.891.250 


84.827 45 


3.071 


2 21 


1863 


9.597.786 


96.233 86 


2.995 


2 40 


1864 


9.517.512 


142.815 98 


3.168 


.3 50 


1865 


9.478.368. 


2J9.696 20 


3.176 


5 18 


1866 


10.050.020 


245.567 19 


4.114 


5 50 



State tax for 1866, 
County tax for 1866, 



$58,785 00 
14.508 00 



135 



KEPOET OF OVERSEERS OF POOR. 



To the Mayor ^ Aldermen and Common Council of the City 
of Manchester. 
In compliance with tlie requirements of law, the Over- 
seers of the Poor of said City, herewith present their annual 
report. 

Whole number of Paupers assisted the year past, who 
had a settlement in the state, is 114, of which 65 have a 
settlement in this city, and 49 have a settlement in other 
towns in the state. There have died of the above number 
during the past year 7 ; — 5 belonging to this city, and 1 
from another town in the state. 

The whole number of paupers at the Almshouse during 
the past year is 15 ; average number 9. There* has been 
110 death there during the year and but very little sickness. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN HOSLEY, Chairman. 
S. S. MOULTON, \ 

M. E. GEORGE, 

EDWARD PRIME, /Overseers 
NAHUM BALDWIN, ) of 
HORATIO FRADD, (the Poor. 
« S. J. YOUNG, ) 

TIMOTHY SULIYAN,/ 



136 



Inventory of Personal Property at the City Farm 




6er25 


, 1866. 






4 Working Oxen, 


- 


- 


$550 00 


IBull 


> " 


. 




65 00 


7 Cows, - . - - 


- 


- 


367 50 


1 Fat Cow, - 


. 




60 00 


3 one 


year old Heifers, 


- 


- 


75 00 


2 two 


u a u 


- 




60 00 


5 « 


" " Steers, 


. 


- 


175 00 


1 Horse, ... 


. 




200 00 


1 Sheep, - - - . 


- 


- 


2 50 


7 Shoats, 


- 




70 00 


1 Breeding Sow, 


- 


- 


20 00 


35 Bushels Wheat; 


- 




87 50 


275 * 


" Corn, 


- 


- 


412 50 


7 ' 


Rye, - 


- 




10 50 


40 ' 


' Oats, 


- 


- 


30 00 


40 ' 


' Barley, 


- 




50 GO 


22 ' 


' Beans, 


- 


- 


60 50 


1 


' Peas, 


- 




150 


450 ' 


' Potatoes, - 


- 


- 


225 00 


65 ' 


' Beets, - 


- 




32 50 


40 ' 


' Carrots, - 


- 


- 


20 00 


36 ' 


' Onions, 


- 




32 40 


3 ' 


' ■ Sweet Corn, 


- 


- 


2 00 


7 


' Pop " 


- 




10 00 


125 ' 


' Turnips, 


- 


- 


3125 


150 Cj 


ibbage Heads, - ' 


- 




7 50 


16 Tor 


IS No. 1 Hay, - 


- 


- 


480 00 


23 « 


« 2 " 


- 




575 00 


10 « 


" 3 " 


- 


- 


140 00 


5 " 


Corn Fodder, 


. 




50 00 


3 " 


Straw, - 


- 


. 


37 50 


2iBbl 


s. Cider, 


', - 




15 00 


6 « 


Soap, 


- 


- 


25 00 



137 



1 Bbl. Salt Cucumbers, - 


5 00 


12 Bbls: Apples, , - - - - 


45 00 


6^ " Salt Pork, - - - - 


169 OO 


2 Dozen Eggs, - - - - - 


70 


20 Gallons Molasses, . - - 


10 00 


Molasses Barrel and Faucet, 


2 00 


1 Hay Cart, 


30 00 


150 Lbs. Salt Beef, - - - - 


18 00 


297 " Fresh Pork, - 


29 70 


160 " Cheese, . . - - 


27 20 


130 " Butter, . - - - 


52 OO 


145 " Lard, . - - - - 


2175 


2 " Snuff, . . - - 


175 


7 * " Tobacco, - - - - 


6 00 


100 " Nails, - . . - 


7 00 


135 " Sugar, - - - 


16 87 


90 " Salt Fish, 


6 30 


85 " Dried Apples, 


10 26 


50 " Drills and Wedges, - 


15 00 


50 Dozen Candles, - - - - 


9 00 


2 Ox Carts, 


90 00 


4 " Sleds, 


40 00 


1 Hay Wagon, . . - - 


90 00 


2 Single Wagons, . . - - 


150 00 


1 " Sleigh, .... 


15 00 


2 Buffalo Robes, . - . - 


8 00 


1 Single Harness, _ . - 


7 00 


1 Lead " ... - 


4 00 


Curry Combs and Brushes, 


2 00 


Bridle, Halter and Blankets, 


2 00 


1 Drag Rake, ... - 


150 


9 Rakes, 


2 25 


11 Hay Forks, .... 


6 00 


4 Sickles, 


100 


2 Grain Cradles, - . - - 


5 00 



138 

15 Scythes, , 7 50 

12 " Snaths, ■ - . . o 00 

1 Cross Cut Saw, . . . . 5 qo 

1 String of Bells, - - - - 2 00 

1 Corn Shelter, .... g oo 

6 Ox Yokes a'nd Bows, - - 20 00 

9 Plows, 81 00 

42 Fowls, 26 00 

17 Meal Bags, - - - . . 5 50 

1 Bag of Salt, - . - . 2 90 

9 Baskets, _ 4 50 

8 Drags, - . . . . 10 00 

2 Cultivators, 6 00 

5 Scalding Tubs, .... 2 50 
1 Rope and Block, - . . . 3 00 
Scales and Steelyards, - . . 14 00 
1 Winnowing Mill, - - . . 8 00 
1 Hay Cutter, - . . - • 4 00 

1 " Knife, 2 00 

10 Tie Bows and Rings, - - 2 00 
Tie Chains, - - - . - 6 00 

2 Grind Stones, - - - - 7 00 
1 Wheelbarrow, - - - - 2 00 
1 Hand Sled, . . . _ 1 OO 

1 Horse Rake, 11 00 

Night Cart, - - - - 25 00 

2 Mason's Trowels, - - - - 1 00 
Chest of Tools, - - . . 15 00 

3 Wood Saws, 3 OO 

Shaving Horse, . . _ . 1 00 

6 Axes, - 6 00 

Vise and Saw Set, ... 00 

4 Ladders, - - . . . 2 50 

7 Shovels and Spades, - - - 6 00 
6 Manure Forks, . . - . 4 50 



139 

3 Bog Hoes, .... 2 50 

Bush Hook, 1 00 

3 Harrows, - . - . , . 15 00 

2 Gravel Scrapers, - - - - 12 00 

1 Set Measures, .... i qO 

2 Sets Fetters, 7 00 

Block and Chain, - - - . 17 00 

2 Hand Cuffs, 3 00 

12 Meat Barrels, - - - . o 00 

10 Cider " - - . . o OO 

9 Cook and other Stoves, - - 60 00 

12 Tables, - - _ - . 16 00 

2 Clocks, 6 00 

2 Rocking Chairs, .... 3 50 

18 Dining " - . . _ 4 50 

18 Common " - - . _ 3 OO 

12 Window Curtains, ... 2 00 

9 Boxes, - - • . . . . 100 
8 Looking Glasses, . _ . 5 oO 
6 Wash Tubs, - - - . _ 3 oO 
6 Stone Pots, .... 4 50 
20 Earthern Pots, 2 50 

10 Water Pails, . . - . 1 60 
4 Butter Tubs, - - - . . l 00 
Milk Cans and Measures, - - * 2 25 
10 Milk Pails, - - - . . 3 00 
52 " Pans, .... o 00 
6 Sugar Buckets, - - . . l oO 

1 Cream Pot, - - - - 75 

2 Cheese Safes, - - - • . . 5 00 
1 Pie Cupboard, - - . . 2 00 

1 Churn, 4 00 

Cheese Tub and Basket, - - 3 00 

3 Cheese Hoops, - - . - 1 50 
1 Curd Cutter, .... \ o'* 



140 

17 Gallons Apple Sauce and Barrel, - 13 75 

Cheese Tongs, .... 50 

Coffee and Tea Pots, - - - - 2 00 

Other Tin Ware, - - - - 10-00 

2 Porcelain Kettles, ... - 1 00 
Mixing Trough, . _ . . 2 50 
Salt Morter and Coffee Mill, - - 1 25 
Castor and Pepper Boxes, - - 50 

Salt Dishes, 30 

16 Chambers, .... 3 OO 

Bed Pan, 50 

12 Flat Irons, - - - - 3 00 

Shovel and Tongs, .... 2 00 

Knives, Forks and Spoons, - - 9 00 

Dinner Bell, 1 00 

Rolling Pin and Cake Board, - 1 00 

4 Light Stands, - - - . - 2 00 

Window Brush, .... 30 

3 Clothes Horses, - - - - 2 00' 
Bread Trough, .... 1 00 
Wash Boards and Benches, - -■ 2 50 

40 Towels, 5 Oa 

School and other Books, - • - 7 50 

8 Table Cloths, . - - - 6 00 

10 Roller Cloths, .... 6 00 

24 Bedsteads and Cords, - - 24 00 

Floor and other Brushes, - - - 1 00 

Clothes Lines and Pins, - - 1 00 

6 Russia Iron Bake Pans, - - . - 3 00 

Butcher and Carving Knives, - 1 75 

Tea Tray and Waiter, ... 1 00 

8 Jugs and Dish Pan, . - - 3 50- 

Candle Sticks and Snuffers, - - 2 00 

4 Flails, 1 50, Caps and Pin 1 00, - 2 50 
4 Muzzle Baskets, .... 50> 



141 

Thread and Needles, . - - 3 87 

New Boots and Shoes, - - - 15 00 

19 Squares Glass - - - . - 1 90 

7 Gallons Preserves, - - - - 3 00 

50 Pumpkins, - - - - 2 00 

15 Pounds Dried Pumpkins, - - 1 00 

16 Bushels Ashes, - - - . - 2 6T 
Meal Chest, - - - - - 3 00 
12 Feed Boxes, ... - 3 00 

Mixing Box, 2 00 

10 Hoes, - . • - ' - - 4 00 

5 Stone Hammers, - - - - 12 00 

3 Iron Bars, .... 4 50 

3 Picks, 4 50 

5 Large Chains, - - - - 10 00 

4 Stake " - - - - - 2 00 
1 Spread " .... 1 75 • 
1 Whiffletree Chain, ... - 75 
1 Snow Scraper, - - - - 1 00 
Flag of Our Country, - - - 5 00 

1 Watering Pot, - - - - 75 
Free Stone, 25 

6 Bushels Cob Meal, . - - 6 00 

2 " Corn " - - - - 3 00 
2 " Rye " . • - - 3 00 
Oil Can, 1 50, Garden Seeds, 10 00, - 11 50 
Knife Tray and Sieves, , - - 75 
Copper Boiler, .... 200 
Meat Fork and Skimmer, - - 60 
Lanterns and Lamps, - - - 4 00 
Candle Moulds, .... 75 
Dress Table, 1 00, Bureau, 3 00, - 4 00 
Reel and Swifts, ... 75 
Spinning Wheel, .... 75 
2 Chopping Knives, . - - 75 



142 

2 Chest Drawers, ... - 2 00 

2 Trunks, 2 60 

Dining Set and Crockery Ware, - 20 00 

16 Feather Beds and Bedding, - 160 00 

1 Barrel Vinegar, - - - - 12 00 

2 Garden Rakes, ... - 1 00- 
2-1 Pounds Hops, ... - 75 
3" " Tea, - - - - 4 00 
7|- " Sage, - . - - 25a 

4 " Coffee, - - - • 1 33 

2 Quarts Rum, 1 37 

2 Stub Scythes, - - - - • 3 50 

1 Mowing Machine, - - - - 90 00 

1 Meat Bench, .... 1 25 

-|- Barrel Crackers, - - - - 1 37 

5 New Woolen Blank'ets, - - 12 50 

45 Dry. Casks, 5 00 

1 Cask Lime, . . . . 75 

l-l Pounds Woolen Yarn, - - 2 25 

1 M Shingles, . . - . 3 00 

8 Cart Spires, 7 00 

10 Chestnut Posts, - - - 1 67 

600 Feet Pine Lumber, - - . 8 00 

Lot Oak Lumber, - - . - 10 00 

2 Traps, - - - - ■ - - 75 

5 Wrenches, 1 50 

12 Vine Boxes, .... 2 00 

5 Yards Cotton Drilling, - - 2 50 
1 Peck Cranberries, - - - 1 00 

3 Clothes Baskets, - - - • 2 00 

6 Ax Handles, . - . . 1 00 

1 Cant Hook, 1 00 

40 Pounds Bar Soap, ... 5 60 

1 Copper Suction Pump, . . 5 00 

1 New Horse Blanket, ... 6 00 



143 

1 New Single Harness, . .. 20 00 

75 Pounds Sausage, . . . 12 50 

1 Beetle and Wedges, . . 1 00 



.076 81 



City of Manchester to City Poor Farm, Dr. 

To 649 weeks board of Paupers and 

Prisoners at |2. per week, . $1,298 00 
Clothing for Paupers, . . 106 36 

" " Prisoners, . . 7 50 

Making 20 rods new ditch, . 20 00 

Ekcoss of stock over last year, 9 30 

1 yoke of working oxen sold 

Dec. 30, 1865, . . . 350 00 

Produce and other sales from the 

farm, . - . . . 1.817 85 
Balance to the Cr. of Profit k Loss, 994 51 

$4,603 52 

CONTRA. 

By Amount of expenditure, . . $3,603 52 
Interest on Farm, . . • . 1.000 00 

$4,603 52 



144 



KEPOET OF COMMITTEE ON CEMETEKIES. 



To his Honor, the Mai/or, and City Council of the City 
of Manchester : 
The Committee on the Valley, having in charge the 
Valley and Pine Grove Cemeteries beg. leave to present 
their Annual Report. 

THE VALLEY. 

It was expected that the New Avetiue, a portion of 
which was built last season, would be fully completed this 
year. But the work of grading was unavoidably delayed 
so long, that it was deemed prudent to suspend work until 
Spring. The Avenue is nearly built, however, and the 
Brook is spanned by two substantial bridges. The unex- 
pended balance of the original estimate is sufficient to cover 
the expense of completing this improvement. 

In consequence of the many changes in the grounds, and 
the inaccuracy of the present plans of the Valley, your Com- 
mittee deemed it important to have a re-survey, and anew 
and accurate plan made, embracing all past improvements, 
and contemplated ones so far as possible. Such a plan is 
now in preparation, and will soon be completed. 

The financial condition of the Valley, showing the 
amount expended on the new Avenue, and the usual ex- 
penses, is exhibited in the accompanying report of the 
Treasurer of the Committee. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

The sale of Lots has steadily increased since the opening 
of this Cemetery — the total number sold up to the present 



145 

time, being 44. Superfluous and objectionable trees to the 
amount of 54 cords, have been cut and sold the past season ; 
and 220 hardwood and evergreen trees transplanted into 
the grounds. Other improvements have been made upon 
the land, and the whole has been kept in a condition 
creditable to the Superintendent in charge. 

JOHN PATTERSON, \ 
E. W. HARRINGTON, 
WATERMAN SMITH,/ Committee 
NATHAN PARKER, ( 
S. N. BELL, ) on 

JAMES A. WESTON, 
J.F.JAMES, \ the Valley. 

CHAS. S. FISHER, 
H. A. CAMPBELL, 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

To the Committee on the Valley : 
The Treasurer of the Committee on the Valley makes the 

following report of Receipts and Expenditures for the year 

ending January 1, 1867: — 

Cash on hand January I', 1866, . $1,556 14 
" received for Tomb Fees, . . 84 68 
« " " Hay, ... 2750 

« " " Wood, ... 9 00 

" " " Leaves, . . 6 45 

" " " Lots sold, . . 795 57 

« " " Interest, -. . 24 87 

$2,504 21 



The expenses for the year have been as follows : 
Paid on account of new avenue, 

J. L. House, stonework, . . $68 63 

P. M. Stevens, " . . 5 69 

W. S. Locke, stone, . . . . 131 50 

Oilman Clough, lumber, . . 62 04 
J 



146 

To paid A. Walker, labor, ' 

City of Manchester, stone, 

J. A. Weston, engineering, &c., 

Patrick Trinity, labor, 

Geo. E. Evans, " 

Daniel Connor, grading, 

C. S. Annis, labor. 
Amount expended on new avenue. 

The ordinary expenses have been as follows 
Paid Temple McQueston, sewer, 

J. L. Smith & Co., lumber, 

Benj. Hutchinson, labor, 

William Kimball, coloring fence, 

C. S. Annis, labor, 

C. F, Livingston, printing, 

C. H. Hodgman & Co., teaming, 
Enos C. Page, labor, 
John Jacobs, repairing tomb, . 
M. E. George, labor, 
Daniels & Co., hardware, 

D. H. Young, repairing tomb, 
M. J. Whipple, stationery, 
J. A. Weston, br'k'g roads & postage, 
'* " " surveying, &c., 
J. E. Stearns, labor, 
Geo. E. Evans, " 
J. A. Weston, clerk and treasurer. 



4110 


38 00 


85 50 


4 50 


20 00 


630 67 


. 18 75 


$1 106 


follows : 


fl9 00 


5 45 


15 75 


16 75 


107 00 


7 00 


8 00 


50 


10 75 


205 50 


2 65 


12 00 


• 10 OO 


e, 5 50 


26 00 


10 00 


87 00 


25 00 



— $573 85 

Balance in the hands of the treasurer, 823 98 



$2,504 21 



Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES A. WESTON, Treasurer 
of Committee on the Valley. 
Manchester, January 1, 1867. 



147 

We have examined the foregoing Report, and find the 
same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOHN PATTERSON, ) Sub. Com. 
WATERMAN SMITH, } on 
NATHAN PARKER, ) the Valley. 

Manchester, January 5, 1867. 



Auditor's Office, 
City of Manchester, Jan. 6, 1867. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the several items" 
of Receipts and Expenditures embraced in the foregoing 
Report of the Treasurer of the Committee on the Valley, 
and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, City Auditor. 



148 



CITY PKOPEETT. 



City Hall and Lot at Cost, - - $35,815 00 
City Farm and permanent improve- 
ments, . . - . 17.990 00 
Stock, Tools, Furniture and Provis- 
ions at City Farm, - - 6.076 81 
Engine House and Apparatus, - 26.196 90 
New Engine House on Yine Street, - 15.415 00 
Keservoirs at Cost, - - - 8.291 CO 
Hearses, Houses, Tomb and New 

Cemetery, at Cost, - - 4.170 00 

Court House Lot at Cost, - - 9.514 56 

Common Sewers at Cost, - - 27.878 84 
Safe, Furniture and Gas Fixtures at 

City Hall, - - - 1.933 00 
Street Lanterns, Posts, Pipes and 

Frames, - . - - 1.071 00 

Water Works, . - . . 1.500 GO 

Horses, Carts, Plows and Tools, - 1.500 00 



-$157,342 11 



149 



GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS 



OF THE 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 
1867. 



MAYOR : 

JOSEPH B. CLARK. 



ALDERMEN. 

Ward 1, William 6. Perry, Ward 5, Daniel Connor, 
" 2, Ezra Huntington, " 6, Isaac Whittemore, 

" 3, Samuel Hall, " 7, John Patterson, 

" 4, John C. Young, " 8, Daniel K. White. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 
Ward 1, Henry A. Campbell.WARD 2, Joseph W, Bean, 

Henry C. Sanderson, Granville P. Mason, 

John Plumer. John Pattee. 



150 

Ward 3, Wm. P. Newell, Ward 6, Joseph Rowley, 

Seth J. Sanborn, Alex. M. Corning, 

John Brugger. William F. Sleeper. 

Ward 4, Charles E. Balch, Ward 7, Charles S. Fisher, 
George S. Holmes, Isaac Lewis, 

Arthur L. Walker. Joseph H. Brooks. 

Ward 5, Geo. W. Hunkins, Ward 8, John Field, 

George Fox, George H. Gerry, 

Andrew Farrel. David A. Messer. 



Joseph E. Bennett, City Clerk. 
Henry C. Sanderson, President of Common Council. 
Horace M. Gillis, Clerk of Common Council. 
Harrison D. Lord, City Messenger. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — Messrs. Newell, Balch and Brugger ; The 
Mayor and Alderman Perry. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Whittemore and Huntington ; 
Messrs. Holmes, Mason and Sanborn. 

Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Young and White ; 
Messrs. Rowley, Plumer and Pattee. 

Public Instruction. — Aldermen Patterson and Hall ; 
Messrs. Balch, Corning and Brooks. 

Streets. — Aldermen Hall and Young ; Messrs. Newell, 
Sleeper and Corning. 

City Farm,. — The Mayor and Alderman Whittemore ; 
Messrs. Walker, Field and Plumer. 

Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen White and Connor ; 
Messrs. Bean, Hunkins and Sleeper. 

Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Perry and Pat- 
terson ; Messrs. Fisher, Campbell and Brugger. 



151 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Huntington and Patter- 
sou ; Messrs. Campbell, Newell and Gerry. 

Claims. — Aldermen Perry and Hall ; Messrs. Fisher, 
Holmes and Pattee. 

House of Correction. — Aldermen Connor and Whitte- 
more ; Messrs. Walker, Lewis and Fox. 

Military Affairs. — Aldermen White and Huntington ; 
Messrs. Field, Mason and Farrel. 

City Hall Building. — Aldermen Young and Connor ; 
Messrs. Campbell, Mason and Gerry. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OP THE BOARD OF AL- 
DERMEN. 

Licenses. — Messrs. Whittemore and Connor. 
Enrollment. — Messrs. Patterson and White. 
Lighting Streets. — Messrs. Young and Perry. 
Bills in Second Reading. — Messrs. Perry and Whitte- 
more. 

Market. — Messrs. Connor and Patterson. 
Setting Trees. — Messrs. Huntington and White. 
Marshals Account. — Messrs. Hall and Young. 
Abatement of Taxes. — Messrs. Hall and Huntington. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUN- 
CIL. 

Elections and Returns. — Messrs. Brugger, Brooks and 
Mason. 

Bills in Second Reading. — Messrs, Bean, Sanborn and 
Messer. 

Enrollment. — Messrs. Balch, Holmes and Field. 



152 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 
Henry T. Mowatt, William Little,. 

Waterman Smith, Jon a. Y. McQuestoQ^ 

Moody Currier, James P. Walker, 

George W. Weeks, Thomas L. Thorpe. 

James 0. Adams, Supt. of Public Instruction. 



ASSESSORS. 
George W. Thayer, Jerry Hayes, 

Charles Currier, Isaac Huse, 

J. G. Cilley, Andrew C. Wallace, 

Thomas B. Brown, Allen Partridge. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 
Nahum Baldwin, Timothy Sullivan, 

Sayward J. Young, ' Edward Prime, 

Samuel S, Moulton, Horatio Fradd, 

John Plumer, George S. Chandler. 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 
Israel Dow, Chief, Elijah Chandler, 

Benj. C. Kendall, Oilman H. Kimball^ 

Edwin P. Richardson. 



SOLICITOR. 
* Charles H. Bartlett.— Office, Riddle's Building, 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR. 
Henry R. Chamberlin. — Office, City Hall Building. 



153 

DEPUTY COLLECTOR. 
Nathaniel E. Morrill, 185 Merchants' Exchange. 



TRUSTEES OP THE CITY LIBRARY. 
Hon. Samuel D. Bell, Samuel N. Bell, 

William P. Newell, Phinehas Adams, 

Hon. Ezekiel A. Straw, Hon. William C. Clarke, 

Hon. Daniel Clark, Henry C. Sanderson, 

Hon. Joseph B. Clark. 

Charles H. Marshall, Librarian, 



WARD OFFICERS. 

MODERATORS. 
Ward 1, Henry T. Mo watt, Ward 5, William Little, 
" 2, John T. Robinson, " 6, Levi H. Sleeper, 
" 3, Moses W. Oliver, . " 7, A. C. Wallace, 
" 4, Daniel L. Stevens, " 8, George H. Colby. 



CLERKS. 
Ward 1, Geo. L. Woods, Ward 5, Daniel Connor, 
" 2, Marshall P. Hall, " 6, James W. Lathe, 
" 3, F. L. Porter, " 7, Luther E. Wallace, 

" 4, Roswell H. Hassam, " 8, Daniel K. White. 



SELECTMEN. 

Ward 1, Charles Canfield, Ward 3, Sewell L. Fogg, 

Charles Brown, Joseph S. Sanborn, 

Gilman Stearns. Simon F. Stanton. 

Ward 2, Uriah A. Carswell, Ward 4, Henry Clough, 

Henry W. Powell, Wm. H. Gilmore, 

John W. Dickey. Jacob B. Hartwell. 



154 

Ward 5, William Reardon, Ward 7, Benj. K. Parker, 

John Burke, Daniel B. Eastman, 

Timo. Sullivan, 2d. John C. Head. 

Ward 6, Isaac Whittemore, Ward 8, Daniel Gile, 

Jonas Harvey, Rodney Hardy, Jr., 

William Mills. Richard W. Lansr. 



SUPERINTENDENT OP BURIALS. 

John Prince. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

JUSTICE. 
Samuel Upton. — Office, Merchants' Exchange. 



ASSISTANT JUSTICE. 
Elijah M. Topliff.— Office, Patten's Building. 



CITY MARSHAL. 

William B. Patten.— Office, City Hall. 



ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 
Eben Carr.— Office, City Hall. 



NIGHT WATCH. 

John D. Howard, Henry Bennett, 

Thomas L. Quimby, Hezekiah H. Noyes, 

Albert F. Quimby, Horatio W. Longa, 

Patrick Doyle, James Duffy. 



155 
CONSTABLES. 



William B. Patten, 
Eben Carr, 
John D. Howard, 
Thomas L. Quimby, 
Albert F. Quimby, 



Patrick Doyle, 
Henry Bennett, 
Nathaniel E. Morrill, 
Harrison D. Lord, 
Nathaniel Baker, 2d. 



POLICE OFFICERS. 



William B. Patten, 
Eben Carr, 
John D. Howard, 
Thomas L. Quimby, 
Albert F. Quimby, 
Patrick Doyle, 
Henry Bennett, 
Hezekiah H. Noyes, 
Horatio W. Longa, 
James Duffy, 
James A. H. Grout, 
Gilbert G. Gordon, 
Nathaniel E. Morrill, 
Henry B. Moulton, 
Nathaniel Baker, 2d, 
George F. Judkins, 
Henry Colby, 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, 
Harrison D. Lord, 
William T. Evans, 
Wm. H. B. Newhall, 
Horatio Fradd, 
John E. Stearns, 



John T. Chase, 
Benjamin W. Robinson, 
Albert Dinsmore, 
Charles Canfield, 
John Smith, 
Hugh Conroy, 
Charles L. Richardson, 
Hollis C. Hunton, 
David Thayer, 
Edward Garner, 
William H. Griffin, . 
Henry J. Tirrell, 
Charles Clough, 
Leonard Shelters, 
Moses 0. Pearson, 
William P. Gage, 
Jacob S. York, 
William N. Chamberlin, 
EphrairoG. Hastings, 
Joseph L. Smith, 
John W. Dickey, 
George E. Glines, 
Uriah A. Carswell, 



166 

Elbridge G. Woodman, Joseph Bean, 

Horace P. Marshall, Levi Sargent, 

Nathaniel C. Barker, William T. Fogg^ 

Charles M. Stevens, Albert H. Merrilly. 

Elwin Sturtevant. 



HEALTH OFFICERS. 

William B. Patten, Stephen Palmer, 

Richard J. P. Goodwin. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 
Leonard French. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Boakd of School Committee, 
December 28, 1866. 
The Superintendent presented his Annual Report, which was 
read and accepted. 
Reports of Sub-Committees were also read and accepted. 

WILLIA^I LITTLE, Clerk. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
December 29, 1866. 
Read and accepted and ordered to be printed. 

J. E. BENNI;TT, City Clerk. 



In Board of Common Council, 7 

December 29, 1866. S 

In concurrence, read, accepted and ordered to be printed. 

H. M. GILLIS, Clerk. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



The history of our public schools shows, that, for a period 
of forty years after the incorporation of the town, there 
was not a school house within its limits, nor was there 
during this time a school maintained by a public tax. For 
almost a century, we find the record only of parsimonious 
appropriations, poorly compensated instruction, meagre 
attendance of pupils and exceedingly limited school ac- 
commodations. 

But with the inauguration of manufacturing operations, 
began a new era in the educational interests of Manches- 
ter. Appropriations were largely increased, new school 
buildings erected, well qualified teachers employed and 
the schools regarded with an interest never before recog- 
nized. 

From that time to the present, ovir schools have been 
the most important public interest — the one great agent of 
moral and intellectual progress. 

To sustain them and render them more efficient, liberal 
expenditures are yearly made. To ensure a vigorous ex- 
ercise of their powers, commodious and well furnished 
school structures are projected and built. For their pro- 
tection and guidance, statutes are enacted and officers pro- 
vided to execute them. They claim tribute of every in- 
dustrial and professional calling and of every social rank. 
They are linked to all homes and all hearts by the strong- 
est bonds of affection. 



160 

ORGANIZATION OP THE BOARD OP EDUCATION. 

In preparing his report for the past year, the Superin- 
tendent reviews not only his own official acts, but considers 
the action of the Board of School Committee, and discusses 
briefly such measures as have been determined since the 
presentation of thq last annual report. 

The Board having been constituted the same as it was 
during the preceding year, with the change of a single 
member, its action was rather the continuation of a line of 
policy already commenced, than the institution of new 
measures. The officers of the Board were unchanged, and 
the sub-committees and standing committees remained 
essentially the same. Near the close of the year, Mr. 
Ordway, the member from Ward 7, and Mr. Bowles, from 
Ward 3, resigned their places on the Board, leaving both 
Wards unrepresented. The latter gentleman, having been 
clerk of the Board, resigned that position and was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Little of Ward 5. 

REDUCTION OP SCHOOL HOURS. 

The first important action of the Board was that of 
reducing* the afternoon sessions of primary schools to two 
hours. This measure, introduced at first for a single term , 
experimentally, was so well received by the public, and 
proved so successful in its practical working, as to warrant 
the Board in adopting it as an established rule ; and now, 
after a year's experience, I should recommend a similar 
reduction in the middle grade, rather than restore the 
primary schools to their former practice. 

NEW PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

During the year, three new primary schools have been 
instituted ; — one in the Engine house, north of Concord 
square, to reduce the number of pupils in the Spring street 
primaries ; one on Union street, near Laurel, to relieve 



161 

the pressure on the schools in that vicinity ; and one, tem- 
porarily, near Wilson's Hill, to accommodate the surplus 
pupils in primary No. 13. 

Extra assistants have been employed for some portion 
of the year in both of the large grammar schools, and 
likewise in the mixed and ungraded schools in Districts 
Nos. 3 and 7. 

ANNUAL ELECTION OP TEACHERS. 

At the annual election of teachers in the month of March, 
very few changes were made. At various times during the 
year, in consequence of resignations or to meet the de- 
mands of increased numbers of pupils, new teachers have 
been selected. The names of all teachers who have served 
within the year, will be found in the following list : — 

High School. 

Master — William W. Colburn. 

Assistants — Harriet R. Baker, resigned Dec. 5. 

" Emeline R. Brooks. 

" C. Augusta Gile, vice Miss Baker. 

North Grammar School. 
Master — Frank W. Parker. 
Assistant — Sarah E. Copp. 

" Emma A. H. Brown. 

" C. Augusta Gile, resigned April 6. 

" Betsey A. Ambrose, vice Miss Gile. 

South Grammar School. 
Master — Josiah G. Dearborn, resigned March 30. 

" Isaac L. Heath, vice Mr. Dearborn. 
Assistant — Lucretia E. Manahan. 

" Hannah A. Slade. 

" Rebecca B. Gove. 



162 

Park Street Grammar School. 
Master — Thomas Corcoran. 
Assistant — Mary Scholastica. 

Intermediate School. 

Master — Isaac L. Heath, resigned March 30. 
Mary E, Clough, resigned June 30. 
Maria H. Hildreth, resigned Sept. 25. 
Master — A.. B. Baldwin, resigned Nov. 16. 
" Joseph G. Edgerly. 

Wilson's Hill Grammar School. 

Betsey A. Ambrose, resigned April 9. 
Nettie E. Dunbar. 

Middle Schools. 

No. 1. Sarah J. Green. 

" 2. Mary L. Sleeper. 

" 3. Nancy S. Bunton. 

" 4. Julia A. Baker. 

" 5. Lottie R. Adams. 

" 6. Georgie E. Smith. 

•' 7. Lizzie P. Gove, had leave of absence and 

Carrie E. Reid substituted two terms. 

" 8. Ellen B. Rowell. 

" 9. Mary Agatha. 

" 10. Annie M. Bernard. 

" 11. Catharine M. Sebastian. 

Primary Schools. 

No. 1. Mary E. Ireland. 
" 2. Emily J. Parker. 
" 3. Georgianna Dow. 
" 4. Anstrice G. Flanders, 



163 

No. 5. Julia A. Clay, resigned June 30. 

Addie L. Hutchinson. 
" 0. Hattie A. Lord, resigned June 30. 

Julia A. Clay. 
" 7. C. Augusta Abbott. 
" 8. Martha B. Dinsmo<5r. 
" 9. Mattie R. Kidder. 
*' 10. Mary A. Richardson. 
" 11. Helen M. Morrill. 
" 12. Araminta C. Edggrly, 
" 13. Abbie E. Abbott. 
" 14. Addie L. Hutchinson, resigned June 30. 

Emma A. McCoy. 
" 15. Mary Camillus. 
" 16. Mary Liguori. 
" 17. Mary Louis. 
" 18. Sarah Clifford. 
" 19. Mary Xavier. 
" 20. Hattie A. Barnes. 
'• 21. Helen M. Hills. 
" 22. Annie Murphy. 

Ward Seven — Grammar School. 
Philinda P. Parker. 
A. Ellen Stanton, resigned June 30. 
Lucia Cutler. 

East Primary. 
Sarah D. Lord. 

West Primary — or Middle, 
M. Antoinette Stevens. 

South Primary — or Ungraded. 
Laura J. Hamblett. 



164 

Ward Eight — Grammar ischool. 

Henry M. Putney, resigned June 80. 
Orren J. Hancock, resigned Nov. 16. 
A. Wright. 

Primary School. 

Frances E. Dean, leave of absence Nov. 16. 
Nellie J. Sanderson. 

Rural Districts. > 

No. 1. Sarah A. Preston. 
" 3. Mary E. Clough, declined. 

Nellie J. Sanderson, resigned Nov. 16. 

Elbridge D. Hadley. 

Clara Clough, assistant. 
" 4. Emma F. Whittemore, resigned June 30. 

Mary J. Reid. 
" 5. Vilana S. George, resigned Nov. 16. 

Henry T. Rand. 
*' 6. Hattie L. Jones. 
" 7. Joseph P. Pressey, declined. 

Maria H. Hildreth. 

Mary B. Lane, assistant. 
» 8. Lucy J. Priest. 
" 9. Lucy A. Putnam, resigned June 30. 

Arianna H. Pulsifer, resigned Nov. 16. 

C. A, Darrah. 

Music Teachers. 

Districts Nos. 2, 10 and 11, I. S. Whitney. 

" " 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, J. D. Jones. 

PRIZES. 

Early in the year, a proposition was made to the Board, 
hj Hon. Moody Currier, to give prizes to members of the 



165 

High School, for excellence in various departments of 
study and for correct deportment. 

At a meeting of the Board, held May 18, Mr. Currier 
being present, the proposition to award prizes was discuss- 
ed and the following resolution unanimously passed : 

Resolved, That the Committee consider it desirable to 
distribute prizes for excellence in scholcirship and deport- 
ment in our public schools ; and tliat the Board will 
thankfully receive such moneys as may be donated for this 
purpose, and will faithfully appropriate the same accord- 
ing to the wishes of the donors. 

Messrs. I. AV. Smith, Ordway and Bowles, the sub-com- 
mittee of the High School, were appointed a committee to 
confer with Mr. Currier and any other gentlemen of simi- 
lar inclination concerning the matter and mature a plan. 

The sum of fifteen dollars was donated by Mr. Currier 
which was awarded at tlie close of the Autumn term, by 
a committee, consisting of the High School Master, Mr. 
Currier and Mr. I. W. Smith. 

The following report was made by the Committee : 

The Committee appointed by the'Board of School Com- 
mittee of the City of Manchester to award the prizes offered 
by Hon. Moody Currier to scholars in the High School, 
have attended to tliat duty and submit the following 

REPORT. 

For the highest average in scholarship and deportment. 
1st prize to Hattie C Flanders, 
2d " " Eliza J. Young, \ of the Girls. 
3d " " Isabella G. Mack. 

1st prize to Walter M. Parker, 

2d " " James H. Pettee, J. of the Boys. 

3d " " John Knowles, 

For the best reading by the girls. 
1st prize to Ella F. Minot. 
2d prize to Mary A. Verity. 



166 

For the best declamation by tlie boys. 
1st prize to Melville L. French. 
2d prize to Walter M. Parker. 
3d prize to Charles L. Frost. 
There was no provision made by Mr. Currier for more 
than two prizes for excellence in declamation, but the 
Committee were so strongly impressed with the perform 
ance of Charles L. Frost in this department that they 
awarded him a third prize from funds furnished by the 
members of the Committee. 

For the best Composition. 
1st prize to Mattie S. Miller. 
2d prize to Mary F. Barnes. 
The second prize for composition would have been 
awarded to Walter M. Parker, had not the Committee con- 
sidered the fact that he was older and farther advanced 
in scholarship than Miss Barnes and that there had been 
awarded to him two prizes in other departments. 

For best penmanship. 

1st prize to Walter S. Holt. 
2d prize to Hattie A. Mack. 

For best spelling. 

1st prize to Nora Blood. 

The Committee arrived at their decisions with remarka- 
ble unanimity in all cases, and the result has been received 
with apparent satisfaction by all the pupils. 

The number of the prizes was limited to fifteen by Mr. 
Currier, and were bestowed in money, being one dollar 
each. The departments in which the prizes were offered 
by Mr. Currier were also selected by him. ' 

Your Committee are of the opinion that the result upon 
the school has been beneficial in awakening interest and 
creating a laudable competition. 



167 

There are several other scholars whose performances in 
the respective departments are deserving of special men- 
tion, and whose names the committee would be glad to fur- 
nish, if it is deemed advisable by the Board of School Com- 
mittee, to preserve a record of the prizes awarded in a 
more permanent form. 

W. W. COLBURN, ) 
MOODY CURRIER, } Committee. 
ISAAC W. SMITH, ) 
Manchester, Dec. 14, 1866. 

The report was accepted and the Clerk 'ordered to ob- 
tain a book for the permanent record of the prizes awarded 
and for future record of similar awards. 

In the month of October, Messrs Bryant, Stratton & Co., 
of the Manchester Business College, made a proposition to 
the Board which was accepted, December 14. The nature 
of the proposal and the full action in relation to it, will be 
seen by the following extracts from the journal. 

" Voted to accept the proposition of Messrs. Bryant, 
Stratton & Co., to give scholarships in their school, to pu- 
pils in the public schools of the city on the conditions 
named by them as follows : 

" To give and donate a full life scholarship or member- 
ship in our College in this city, at the close of each school 
year, for the term of five years from the acceptance hereof, 
to the most deserving scholar in scholarship, deportment 
and attendance in each of the Grammar Schools of the 
city, and to the most deserving of the graduates of the 
High School. 

" We also propose to donate an unlimited scholarship in 
the writing department of our College to the pupil in each 
of the public schools, who has during the year made the 
most improvement in writing. 



168 

" The recipient of sucii scholarship to be determined by 
your Board in such a manner as they shall direct." 

BRYANT, STRATTON & CO. 

An explanation of the donors made to the Superinten- 
dent of Public Instruction, shows that they intend to in- 
clude in their first offer, the High School, the North 
Grammar School, the South Grammar School, and the 
Park Street Grammar School, one in each from the gradu- 
ating class. 

And in the second offer, one from each school in which 
penmanship is taught by the order of the committee, which 
includes the schools above named, the Intermediate, Wil- 
son's Hill Grammar School, the Grammar School in Dis- 
tricts Nos. 10 and 11 and the ungraded schools in Districts 
Nos. 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9. 

" Voted that the Superintendent, the teachers, and sub- 
committees be the special committee for determining 
the awards." 

On this subject, the Superintendent made the following 
announcement of awards : 

That the full scholarships be awarded as follows : — 

To Miss Hattie G. Flanders, of the High School. 

To Miss Josie Page, of the North Grammar School. 

To Charles H. Pettee, of the South Grammar School. 

To Walter J. Corcoran of the Park st. Grammar School. 

That the scholarships in the writing department be gjiv- 
en as follows : 

To Joseph H. Batchelder, of the High School. 

To Louis C. Merrill, of the North Grammar School. 

To Andrew J. White, of the South Grammar School. 

To Thomas Baxter, of the Park st, Grammer School. 

To Samuel L. Blood, of the Intermediate School. 

To Myraette Hamblett, of the Wilson Hill Grammar 
School. 



169 

To Katie Darrali, of the Piscataquog Grammar School, 
To Clara Robinson, of the Amoskeag Grammar School. 
■ To Helen G. Kimball, of District No. 1. 
To Mary Gilford, of District No. 3. 
To Charles E. Moore, of District No. 4. 
To Lilla D. Hartshorn, of District No. 5. 
To Orren R. Dickey, of District No. 6. 
To Charles N. Hardy, of District No. 7. 
To John P. Young, of District No. 8. 
To Imogene Joy, of District No. 9. 

THE RANKING SYSTEM. 

I will, in this connection, refer to a practice which has 
been permitted in the Grammar Schools, known as the 
ranking system. It will be readily understood, when I 
state that the position or rank which every pupil holds in 
his class, depends entirely on his attendance, deportment 
and scholarship ; the pupil maintaining the best record, 
holding the highest rank or head of his class ; the second 
occupying the next place. By negligence, or any misde- 
meanor, unnecessary absence or tardiness, or by failure in 
recitation, the rank it forfeited, and tjie pupil next below, 
or the first in order who maintains a better record, or can 
correctly answer the question on which those above him 
have failed, becomes the happy occupant of the head posi- 
tion, and so on, through the class and through the several 
grades in the school. 

This system, like any other that embraces awards, is 
open to objections. But I have approved it, and the Com- 
mittee have sanctioned it, as they have adopted the con- 
ferring of prizes in the High School, and indeed in all our 
schools to a certain extent, on the ground that the benefits 
arising from it exceed the disadvantages which it occa- 
sions. It is to be hoped that this system of ranking will 
be continued with such modifications as are from time to 



170 

time demanded, until it is introduced into all our higher 
grades of schools. 

EQUALIZING 'SCHOOL PRIVILEGES, 

It lias been the purpose of the School Committee for 
some years past, acting on the suggestions of the Super- 
intendent, to afford, so far as possible, equal school privi- 
leges to every section of the city. They have intended at 
least, to give, the country districts teachers as competent 
as those in the city proper, and to continue the schools an 
equal length of time. This has been fully accomplished 
only during the two years just past, for the reason that 
the appropriations were formerly made specifically for dis- 
tricts. Recently the entire annual appropriation has been 
given to the committee with .the understanding that it 
should be used according to the necessities of the* several 
sections of the city. This plan gives to the suburban 
districts, sometimes, a larger proportion of the school 
money than a strict construction of the statute would 
warrant, but no injury is done thereby to the larger and 
more wealtliy districts for the reason that the draft on them 
is so small as to be i^carcely noticeable. Besides, they have 
all tlie facilities which they would be likely to receive un- 
der any ordinary division of the school money. 

The expenditures of each district are kept in separate 
accounts, so that the exact amount assigned to each may 
be determined at the close of each year, as will be seen by 
the Treasurer's 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 
AMOUNT OF FUNDS. 

Balance from old account, - - '1791 21 

Appropriation by City, - - .30.000 00 

" 'for Maps, &c.. No. L', - 600 00 

" " Reps, and Ins., " 1.500 00 

$32,891 21 



171 



EXPENDITURES. 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 

TEACHING. 



Wm. W. Colburn, - 
Harriet R. Baker, 
Emeline R. Brooks, 
F. W. Parker, 
Sarah E. Copp, 
Emma A. H. Brown, 
Augusta C, Gile, 
Josiah G. Dearborn, 
Lucretia A. Manahan, 
Hannah A. Slade, 
Rebecca B. Gove, 
Thomas Corcoran, 
Mary Scholastica, 
Isaac L. Heath, - 
Martha B. Dinsmoor, 
Betsey A. Ambrose, 
Sarah J. Green, 
Mary L. Sleeper, - 
Mary E. Brooks, 
Nancy S. Bunton, 
Juha A. Baker, 
Lottie R. Adams, 
Lizzie P. Gove, 
Carrie E. Reid, 
Ellen B. Rowell, - 
Mary Agatha, 
Annie M. Bernard, - 
Catharine M. Sebastian, 
Mary E. L-eland, 
Emily J. Parker, - 
Georgiaima Dow, 
Anstrice G. Flanders, ■ 



$1,376 40 
565 00 
415 00 
l.()47 60 
334 38 
325 00 
130 00 
430 00 
325 00 
317 00 

307 50 
1.246 00 

300 00 
930 00 

308 75 
328 00 
306 75 
205 75 

86 25 
303 25 

303 25 
300 00 
106 25 

304 50 

306 75 
300 00 
257 50 
257 50 

305 75 
308 25 

307 75 
305 75 



172 

Julia A. Clay, - - - - 285 75 

Hattie A. Lord, - - - - 214 00 

C. Augusta Abbott, . - - 300 00 

Eose T. Kimball, ... 105 00 

Nellie Dinsmore, ... - 88 75 

Mary A. Richardson, - - - 289 50 

Helen M. Morrill, - - - - 304 00 
Hattie A. Barnes, - - . 169 25 

Araminta C. Edgerly, - - - 303 25 
Abbie E. Abbott, - - - 306 25 

Addie L. Hutchinson, - - - 287 75 

Mary Camillus, - - - . - . 291 25 

Mary Liguori, 291 25 

Mary Louis, ... - 257 60 

Mary Xavier, 257 50 

Sarah E. Perkins, - - - 75 00 

L S. Whitney, - - - - 824 00 

Catharine M. Rose, - - - 78 75 

Mary E. Clough, - - - 105 75 

Ehza A. Elliott, ... 12 50 

Nettie E. Dunbar, - - - - 19125* 
Georgie E. Smith, . - - 198 25 

Martha R. Kidder, - - - - 198 25 
Sarah Clifford, .... 178 75 

Helen Hills, - -• • - - - 148 00 
Annie Murphy, - . - . 151 25 

A. B. Baldwin, - - - - 115 60 

Maria H. Hildreth, - . - 36 56 

Emma A. McCoy, - - - - 91 50 

119.107 09 

REPAIRS. 

Thomas Dunlap, - - - 8 50 

Haines & Wallace, ... 89 14 

P. A. Devine, - - - - 39 02 

J. A. Jordan, - - - - 4 00 * 

H. D. Lord, 7 37 



173 



Otis Barton <fe Co., 

T. R. Hubbard, 

Daniels & Company, 

J. K. Wilson, 

John C. Young, 

Mitchell Chapelle, 

J. E. Livingston, 

Charles Clough & Co., 

Neal & Holbrook, 

Joseph Everett, 

J. 0. Adams, 

John Jacobs, 

John Twombly, 

JBuzzell & Sawyer, 

W. D. White, 

Hartshorn & Pike, 

J. T. Baker, 

J. M. Rowell, 

Geo. W. Baker, 

C. R. Colley, 

Wilson & Co., 

S^C. Forsaith & Co., 

Temple McQueston, 

Daniel Farmer, 

E. Roper, 

A. D. Peasley, 

J. L. Smith, 

S. L. Corning, 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., 

G. B. Fogg, 

Geo. T. Hastings, 

A. J. Reed, 

Wm. Wilder, 

S. C. Austin, 

J. G. Colt, 



- 3 53 


5135 


227 82 


10 00 


32 28 


17 00 


281 26 


146 92 


38 00 


93 37 


29 75 


20 00 


2175 


75 00 


7100 


290 21 


21 25 


3 00 


14 00 


12 33 


18 26 


150 


9 27 


34 25 


7 00 


46 37 


1100 


32 75 


3 50 


14 20 


13 75 


84 74 


24 89 


14 00 


20 00 


-11.942 33 



174 

FUEL AND SAWING WOOD. 



Eleazer Hoyt, - - 


7 50 


E. S. Campbell, . . ^ 


- 60 16 


Wilson & Co., - - 


- 100 71 


J. 0. Adams, . . - . 


88 00 


Manchester Print Works, 


- 1307 00 


Jacob Buzzell, - - - - 


- 8 75 


A. J. Reed, - . - 


25 35 


David Jones, "i _ - _ 


40 00 


Asa Richardson, . . . 


- 10 00 


Moses Lull, - - . . 


- 10 00 


Charles Clough, - . . . 


30 00 


Greenleaf Jenness, 


- 29 00 


H. B. Putnam, . . - . 


16 00 


Z. Harvey, - . - - . 


17 00 


Mitchell Chapelle, 


- 9 50 


Oilman Clough, - . _ - 


600 00 

< 


CARE OP FURNACES AND 


ROOMS. 


Joseph Everett, 


- 95 25 


Thomas Howe, . _ . 


86 00 


John Farrer, - - . . 


149 22 


F. B. Robinson, - - - ■ 


14 00 


Samuel L. Blood, - - - 


90 00 


Thomas E. Cressey, 


28 50 


J. W. Bridge, . - - . 


2100 


INSURANCE. 




William Little, .... 


33 75 


I. W. Smith, 


- 33 25 


B. P. Cilley, . . - - 


45 75 


H. Foster, . . . . 


78 OO 


E. T. Stevens, - . - . 


- 11 25 



i.358 97 



1483 97 



$202 00 



175 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 




G. P. Bosher & Co., ... 124 00 




David Libby, - - - • - - 61 70 




B. F. Locke, .... 19 25 




Charles Williams, '- - - - 22 00 




Geo. W. Adams, - - - 14 50 




J. P. Brock, 13 50 




Barton & Co., - - - ' - - 85 87 




A. Ferren & Co., - - - - 24 62 






$365 44 




BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 




Snow, Boyden & Knight, - - 202 00 




R. S. True, . . - . 52 50 




J. G. Dearborn, - - - - 60 00 




H. C. Tilton, - - . - 274 34 




Wilson & Kimball, - . - 12 50 




Oliver Ellsworth, - - - - 36 00 




D. Tilton, 81.00 




Tewksbury & Brothers, - - - 2 90 




L. W. Mason, - - - . 140 00 




Wm. H. Fisk, - - - - 36 26 






$897 50 


PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 


John B. Clarke, .... 130 75 




Charles F. Livingston, - - - 67 50 




Henry A. Gage, . - - 130 25 




Campbell & Hanscom, - - - 28 GO 




Traders' Advertiser, ... 8 00 






$364 50 


HORSE HIRE. 




S. & S. S. James, - . - . 6 50 






$6 50 




INCIDENTALS. 




C. F. Lord, 21 20 




R. White, 4 00 





176 

C. A. Smith, 7 68 

J. 0. Adams, - -. - " ^^ "^^ 

H. R. Chamberlin, _ - - 25 00 

George Hunt, _ . - . 75 
H. M. Bailey & Son, - - - - ' 50 

David Cross, 20 00 

Wm. Little, - - - - - 10 00 

Seth T.Hill, ... - 300 

Geo. A. French, - - - - 9 00 

Hill & Co., - - - - - 1 15 

J. H. Harvey, . . - - 5 00 

S. & S. S. James, - - - - 13 50 

Pinkerton, Abbott & Pettee, - 40 00 

M. C. Young, .... 6 50 

H. H. Ford, - - - - - 12 00 

B. F. Bowles, .... 68 75 

M- J. Kendrick, - - - - 1 75 

Wilson & Co.- - . - - 10 00 

Bridget Riley, ... - 6 00 

L. Durbin, 69 00 

Stephen F. Brown, . - - 2 25 

J. M. & E. R. Coburn, - - - 28 12 

Heselton & Dow, - - - - 60 00 

Thomas P. Clough, ... 6 25 

W. E. Haskell, - - - - 17 50 

Cheney & Co., - - - ' - 2 75 



1490 44 



^26.218 74 



DISTRICT NO. 1. 

George H. Chamberlin, teaching, - 40 00 

Sarah A. Preston, - - - - 293 OO 

N. Preston, wood, ... 24 00 

G. W. Dustin, wood, - - - 18 50 

Charles Williams, repairs, - - 31 75 

N. Preston, " - - - 12 81 



177 

A. Wicom, repairs, - - - 6 86 

S. & S. S. James, teams, - - 10 00 

Daniels & Company, bell, - - - 1 10 

A. Dustin, washing room, • - - 2 50 

J. 0. Adams, cash paid, - - - 1 60 

Snow, Boyden & Knight, maps, - - 15 60 

H. C. Tilton, stationery, - - 4 44 

G. F. Bosher & Co., mats, - - - 2 60 

J. D. Jones, singing, - - - 8 00 



DISTRICT NO. 3. 




John F. Chase, teaching. 


- $180 60 


Helen A. Clough, " 


24 00 


Nellie J. Sanderson, teaching. 


- 217 00 


J. D. Jones, " 


8 GO 


E. C. llowlett, repairs, 


- 1134 


E. Roper, " .- - 


12 00 


J. P. Brock, " 


- 22 17 


Wm. H. Fisk, " 


47 99 


Daniels & Co., " • - - 


60 


Wilson & Co., wood, 


20 60 


S. & S. S. James, teams. 


8 76 


H. C. Tilton, stationery. 


3 78 


Snow, Boyden & Knight, maps, - 


- 15 50 


G. F. Bosher & Co., mats. 


2 50 


L. Durbin, teaming, - . - . - 


100 


H. D. Lord, posting warrant, - 


130 



$472 55 



$576 93 



DISTRICT NO. 4. 

A. C. Osgood, teaching, - - - $145 60 

Emma F. Whittemore, teaching, - 106 75 

M. J. Reid, teaching, - - - - 100 25 

J. D. Jones, " . " . . 8 00 

A. Ferren & Co., repairs, - - - 2 50 

L. A. Cross, washing, . - - 3 00 



178 

Snow, Boyden & Knight, maps, - - 15 60 

H. C. Tilton, stationery, - - 1 85 

James Cheney, wood, - - - - 18 00 

John P. Moore, " ... 27 00 

5. & S. S. James, teams, - - - 10 00 
I. T. Webster, *' . . - 4 00 

6. F. Bosher, mats, - - - - 2 60 



DISTRICT XO. 6. 




B. D. Hadley, teaching. 


149 50 


Vilana S. George, teaching, 


199 75 


J. D. Jones, " - - 


8 00 


James Emerson, repairs, 


6 85 


Jonas Harvey, wood. 


- 23 25 


Oilman Cloiigh, wood, - - - 


- 6 25 


A. J. Wilson & Co., wood, 


9 00 


Frank Robie, sawing wood, 


- 4 50 


Snow, Boyden & Knight, maps. 


15 50 


H. C. Tilton, stationery. 


- 13 54 


S. & S. S. James, teams. 


11 25 


I. T. Webster, teams, 


2 50 


G. F. Bosher & Co., furniture. 


- 5 91 



DISTRICT KG. 6, 

J. y. McQueston, teaching, - - IFO 60 

Hattie L. Jones, "... 198 75 

J. D. Jones, " - - - 8 00 

J. M. Webster, repairs, - - - 4 00 

Daniels & Company, repairs, - - 1 13 

A. C. Webster, " - - 3 00 

6. Clough, " - - 92 

I. T. Webster, « - - - 12 00 

I. T. Webster, wood, - - - 28 50 

J. Wiley, sawing wood, - - - 2 00 

Snow, Boyden & Knight, maps, - 15 50 



$444 95 



$455 80 



179 

H. C. Tilton, stationery, 
S. & S. S. James, teams, 
Pinkerton, Abbott k Pettee, settee, 
G. F. Bosher & Co., mats, 
H. D. Lord, posting warrants, 

DISTRICT KO, 7. 

John B. Sanborn, teaching, 

E. F. James " 

Maria H. Hildreth, " 

Mary B. Lane, " - - 

J. D. Jones, " 

J. B. Eastman, repairs, 

Hartshorn & Pike, repairs, 

Daniels & Company, repairs, 

H. Marsh, " 

J. 0. Adams, " 

J. E. Livingston, " 

Oilman Clough, wood, 

I. T. Webster, " - . . 

Snow, Boyden &, Knight, maps, 

H. C. Tilton, stationery, 

S. & S. S. James, teams, 

B. F. Locke, chairs, 

G. F. Bosher & Co., mats, 

DISTRICT KG. 8, 

J. p. Pressey, teaching, 

Lucy J. Priest, " - - 

J. D. Jones, " - - 

Gilman (Plough, wood, 

Amos Spofford, repairs, 

P. Preston, repairs, , . - 

Snow, Boyden <fe Knight, maps, 

H. C. Tilton, stationery. 



15 90 


10 00 


4 0O 


2 50 


2 05 


99 00 


28 25 


lf)5 75 


37 50 


8 00 


3 00 


3 70 


6 41 


62 


150 


- 3 29 


8 75 


3176 


15 50 


21 32 


9 50 


4 17 


2 50 


159 60 


199 75 


8 00 


6 25 


150 


80 


15 50 


2 68 



$488 85 



$450 52 



180 



G. F. Bosher & Co., furniture, 
S. & S. S. James, teams, 
I. T. Webster, teams, 

DISTRICT KO. 9. 

Emma F. Wliittemore, teaching, 
Lucy A. Putnam, " 

Arianna Pulsifer, " 

J. D. Jones, " 

I. T. Webster, wood &c., 
A. C. Webster, " 
John Huse, "... 

Hartshorn & Pike, stove, 
Snow, Boyden & Knight, maps, 
H. C. Tilton, stationery, 
S. & S. S. James, teams, 
G. F. Bosher & Co., mats, 

DISTRICT KG. 10. 

Philinda P. Parker, teaching, 
A. Ellen Stanton, » 

Sarah D. Lord, " 

Maria A. Stevens, " 

Laura J. Hamblett, " 
Lucia Cutler, " 

I. S. Whitney, " 

Haines & Wallace, repairs, 
Daniels & Company, " - - 
J. E. Livingston, " 

Wilson & Co., wood, -, - - 
Z. Harvey, sawing wood, - 
Snow, Boyden & Knight, maps, - 
R. S. True, maps, 
D. Tilton, books, . . . 

H. C, Tilton, stationery, - 



. 7 66 


10 00 


3 50 


■ 117 60 


106 75 


85 25 


8 00 


. 41 00 


3 00 


5 62 


. 20 25 


•15 50 


4 55 


10 00 


2 50 


$337 50 


210 00 


305 75 


305 75 


297 50 


97 50 


75 00 


17 22 


72 


175 


29 00 


16 50 


15 50 


7 50 


9 00 


10 23 



1415 24 



1420 02 



181 

L. W. Mason, charts, - 

S. & S. S. James, teams, 

G. F. Bosher & Co., chairs and mats, 

J. C. Whidden, labor, 

DISTRICT NO. 11. 

H. M. Putney, teaching, 

Frances E. Dean, " _ . . 

0. J. Hancock, " - - 

1. S. Whitney, « . . - 
Elijah Stearns, sawing wood, 

Geo. H. Colby, wood, - . - 

B. R. Smith, repairs, - - - 
D. Y. Stearns, " . . . . 

C. W. Bryant, "... 

J. L. Kennedy, " . . . 

J. E. Stearns, " ... 

T. L. Thorpe, " . - - 

S. & S. S. James, teams, 

L. W. Mason, charts, 

H. C. Tilton, stationery, 

R. S. True, maps. . . . - 

Snow, Boyden & Knight, maps, - 

G. F. Bosher & Co., mats, 

Mrs. T. C. Stearns, washing, 

B. F. Locke, chair, - - - - 



Balance to new account. 



2100 




6 50 




15 48 




3 00 




jfljl 7QO An 


$355 00 


X • 1 \JlH ^v 


306 00 




153 00 




3100 




10 62 




23 04 




15 00 




2 00 




4 15 




5 00 




4 00 




50 




6 60 




7 00 




2 90 




2 50 




15 50 




5 00 




1 GO 




84 






$950 55 




32.676 55 




214 66 


$32,891 21 



FINANCIAL SUGGESTIONS. 

It will be seen that the sum expended by the Board the 
past year, including the special appropriations by District 



182 



No. 2, was ^32.686 55, or exclusive of the appropriation 
in District No. 2, $30,586 55, being $586 55 more than 
the sum appropriated. As is generally the case, at the close 
of the year, tliere are some outstanding bills against the 
department, including the entire bill for coal and a por- 
tion of the bills for wood purchased but not delivered. 
The entire liabilities of the school department are not 
much less than -12.000. In estimating the expenses of the 
schools for the year to come, we give the items as follows : 



One High School, at expense of 
Two Grammar Schools, . 
One " " 



Twelve Middle " 
Twenty-five Primary Schools, 
Eight Ungraded " 

New Schools, 
Music, two teachers. 

Old Bills, 

Building fires and care of rooms, 
Fuel, 



Repairs, . 
Incidentals, 

Total required, 



. 12.500 

4.300 

, 1.400 

800 

650 

500 

325 

3.600 

. 7.500 

8.750 

. 1.000 

1.200 

2.000 

1.000 

. 2.000 

1.000 

475 

$34,000 



SCHOOL HOUSES. 



Within comparatively few years there has been a great 
improvement in school buildings. Districts Nos. 3, 5, 7, 
8, 9, 10 and 11 have now all good houses in the places of 
those dilapidated structures of no very remote period. 
Nos. 1 and 6 have essentially remodeled and improved 



183 

their houses so that none of the districts named are 
wanting in respectable buildings for school purposes. 
No. 4 has now the poorest house in the suburban sections 
of the city. 

No. 2 has four large brick houses accommodating 26 
teachers and the pupils under their care. It has also three 
smaller brick houses affording room for 10 teachers and 
their pupils. In addition to these there is one wooden 
house for two schools, which is in excellent condition ; and 
four wooden school buildings which are in such a stage of 
decomposition as will soon render them, unfit for use. 

The improvements on the house in District No. 6, ren- 
der it now a much more comfortable place for the instruc- 
tion of the children of that district than they have occu- 
pied for many years. The expense of the repairs was 
about $100. It would have been a good investment, had 
the district expended some $200 more and provided a 
bettor class of desks and chairs. 

In District No. 7, a house has been erected the past 
season, designed for the accommodation of about 60 pu- 
pils. It is about 54 by 30 ft., and contains one large 
school room and a convenient recitation room. It is a 
very respectable building, costing not far from $2,600. 
But it is evident that the people of the district made a 
mistake in not erecting a house for two schools instead of 
one, and using brick instead of wood as the constructing 
material. 

Notwithstanding District No. 2 has twelve school houses 
affording school rooms for more than three thousand pu- 
pils and over forty teachers, the district has been obliged 
to sustain pui)lic schools in private buildings, or leave a 
large number of children without the means of enjoying 
proper educational advantages. There are at the present 
time, seven public schools in the district, maintained in 
buildings not belonging to the district. 



184 

The present High School building was erected in 1841, 
and was designed to accommodate a Grammar School, and 
from its opening until 1846, a Grammar School was main- 
tained in it, there being, prior to that date, no High 
School in town. When by vote of the district in 1846, 
the High School was established, it was located in this 
building, which, from that day to the present, has been 
the object of frequent, if not perpetual, condemnation by 
the school and by the public. Frequent efforts have been 
made to build a more convenient house for the High 
School. A lot was at one time purchased by district vote 
for that purpose, but was subsequently sold, and the 
school compelled to remain in the old building with all its 
imperfections. 

In the Spring of 1864 a vote was passed to purchase a 
lot and erect a High School House, and the sum of 
$20,000 was appropriated to purchase a lot and erect a 
building. At subsequent meetings the sum was increased 
to $40,000. The committee purchased a lot and began the 
work in 1865. The house is now nearly completed, and 
will be ready for occupation at the commencement of the 
Spring Term. 

The following full description of the house and lot has 
been furnished by Mr. M. W. Oliver, the architect : 

DESCRIPTION OP THE NEW HIGH SCHOOL HOUSE. 

The school house lot embraces the whole square be- 
tween Lowell and Concord streets, on the east side of 
Beech street, being 270 ft. front on Beech street, fronting 
the west, and 200 ft. in depth on Lowell and Concord 
streets, with a 20 ft. back street in the rear, on the east 
side. 

The extreme length of the building on Beech street is 
94 ft., and the depth of the main building is 80 ft. The 
central body of the building, which contains the school 



186 ♦ 

rooms, is 66 ft. front on Beech street, by 80 ft. deep. On 
the north and south sides of this central part is a wing, 
projecting 19 ft. by 60 ft. in width, in some irregularity of 
form. There are two entrance porches, one at each wing, 
making separate entrances for boys and girls. 

Tiie whole building is two stories in height, above the 
basement, and has a roof in the French style. 

The basement is unfinished, and is used for the furna- 
ces, fuel, and play room ; being divided by a brick wall 
through the centre, making separate apartments for boys 
and girls. 

Tlie floor of the basement is only three feet below the 
level of the yard, while the balance of the height, the 
whole being about 10 ft. in the clear, is above ground, 
thus making the basement, not a cellar, but a well lighted, 
wholesome and cheerful play room ; and if found necessa- 
ry, suitable rooms could be finished off in it for a chemi- 
cal laboratory, or for otber purposes. 

The walls of the building are built of brick with gran- 
ite stone trimmings. 

The basement story is built in rustic style, with every 
seventh course of brick recessed, so as to resemble courses 
of stone, and a dressed granite stone belt extending en- 
tirely around the building, at the bottom of the first reg- 
ular story windows. Above this belt the wall is plain? 
except projecting window arches and dentils, and a very 
plain entablature. 

The rustic style of the basement being extended 
above the first floor to the bottom of the windows, gives 
the appearance of a higher basement room than there 
really is, and at first thought, the appearance of a waste- 
ful use of room for the basement ; but such is not the 
case ; the basement is no higher than in some of the other 
school houses of the city. But by this arrangement of 
heights and style of basement story, there is an appear- 



186 

ance of three stories, and a more decided architectural 
characteristic and effect is given to the whole building 
than it otherwise would have had, besides a number of 
practical advantages and conveniences, while the cost is 
no more, for the brick portion of the basement story that 
is above ground, costs no more than it would to have ex- 
cavated the cellar deeper, and have had so much the more 
height of stone foundation wall to build. 

Tiic walls are built hollow ; that is, a double wall with 
air spaces, and the inside is plastered directly on to the 
wall. The inside corners of the window jambs are round- 
ed with brick moulded for the purpose, and all plastered 
round smooth, thereby dispensing with furring, lathing, 
and window casings. 

The entrance porches are so arranged as to furnish a 
shelter to the steps and door, and also make a vestibule 
before entering the main building. 

The outside doors and vestibule doors, and also all 
school room and clothes room doors open outward in order 
to facilitate egress in case of a panic, 

Tlic accommodations of the first floor are two school 
rooms 26 x 'Zl ft. each, which will accommodate about 50 
scholars each, with a clothes room attached to each, 5x 20 
ft., through which scholars may pass in going too or from 
the school room ; also a lecture hall, 38 x 53 ft., with 
two apparatus rooms attached, 10 x 15 ft. each ; also 
four other clothes rooms for the accommodation of the 
schools on the second floor. The first story being divided 
in height through these clothes rooms, makes two rooms 
in height within the first story, the upper one being en- 
tered from the half way landing of the stairs. The first 
story is 14 ft. high in the clear. 

The second floor furnishes the following rooms : The 
High School Room proper embraces the whole of the cen- 
tral part of the building between the wings, which is 



187 

53^ X 76 ft. inside, and 16 ft. high in the clear. This 
room is divided into four equal rooms by a partition each 
way across the middle of the building ; but these partitions 
are not solid partitions, but are solid only for a height of 
about 2^ ft. above the floor, and then it consists of largo 
glazed casements of window sash, which are hung with 
cords and weights, similar to an ordinary window, and 
these casements can be opened or closed at pleasure, so 
that the four rooms can be all thrown into one, or used as 
four separate school rooms with an assistant teacher in 
each room, with 50 scholars each, but under the charge 
and observation of one principal teacher. 

There are also on the second floor, in the wings, besides 
spacious passage ways, four rooms for apparatus, cabinets, 
library and teachers' accommodations, <fec. Three of these 
rooms are 10 x 15 ft. each, and one of tliera about 19 ft. 
square. The whole house will accommodate 300 scholars, 
to say nothing of using the hall for a scliool room. 

The house is heated by five of Pond's hot air portable 
furnaces, of the largest size. 

Ventilation is amply provided for ; the ventilating flues 
being made in the hollow wall, and four flues about 12 
inches square, for each school room, and eight flues for 
the lecture room, and a separate ventilator of Robinson's 
patent, for each school room, and two for the lecture 
room, making eight ventilators for the building, the sec- 
ond floor being considered as four school rooms, with four 
flues and a separate ventilator for each room. 

The steep and curved part of the roof is slated, and 
the large " flat " on top, is covered with Warren's roofing 
material. 

All the rooms of the first and second stories are 
sheathed with chestnut lumber as high as the windows, 
and above the sheathing it is plastered and finished with 
a " skim coat." 



188 

All the finishing lumber is of chestnut, oiled but not 
varnished. 

The doors, and inside Venitian blinds to the windows, 
are made of best white pine, and varnished. The floors 
are of northern hard pine. 

The privy building, built of brick, is directly in the 
rear of the main building, on the. line of the back street. 
It is divided into two separate apartments by a brick wall, 
and is entered by an enclosed passage way from the base- 
ment of the main building, and also directly from the 
yard. 

The several school rooms, lecture rooms, clothes rooms, 
&c., are furnished with the best and most modern style of 
school furniture and fixtures. 

The whole lot, which contains about an acre and a quar- 
ter of land, is graded up to a gradual slope from the 
building to the several surrounding streets, and fenced 
with a substantial wooden fence with stone posts. 
. The entire cost of the building, including the lot of 
land, also the grading, fencing and school furniture, all 
complete and ready for occupation, is forty thousand dol- 
lars, (MO.OOO.) being just the amount estimated by the 
architect as requisite for the purpose, and appropriated by 
the district therefor. 

The lot selected was one recommended by the Superin- 
tendent of Schools, and the general interior arrangement 
of the building, especially the construction of the school 
rooms, was suggested by him. 

The building committee consisted of Messrs. Waterman 
Smith, Jacob F. James, Nathan Parker, John S. Kidder, 
Seth T. Hill and M. W. Oliver, the latter gentleman being 
the architect, and having the superintendance of the 
work. The contract for building was given to Messrs. 
Alpheus Gay and Hilas Dickey, well known builders, of 
this city. 



189 



SCHOOL STATISTICS. 



The accompanying table shows the number of pupils in 
the several schools of the city, together with statistics of 
popular and official visits, and the number of pupils en- 
gaged in the various branches of study : 











^ 


M 


60 ifcO 


m 




a 


a 




V . 


0) 


•2 


.■S 


a . 


a .la 


It 


SCHOOLS. 




5 "5 


a 




v'cz 


!> 


"to 


'2 I' 




to g 


ii 




d 


•03 

6 


H 




<'^ 


'3 




1 




.2 c 


-n a 

an 




High School, District No. 2, - 


r,{) 


80 


130 


103 


9i; 


~20 


380 




4i 




North Grammar School, 


100 


115 


215 


18B 


17; 


19 


453 


215 


120 


95 


215 


South Grammar School, 


139 


141 


280 


197 


178 


15 


109 


28C 


181 


134 


280 


Park St. Grammar School, - 


151 




l.il 


75 


70 


15 


130 


15 


141 


.32 


98 


Intermediate School, 


62 


44 


106 


43 


31 


17 


90 


ion 


49 


21 


94 


Wilson Hill School, 


29 


25 


51 


27 


25 


IH 


100 


51 


54 


11 


54 


Middle School No. 1, 


13 


19 


32 


20 


20 


13 


70 


32 


32 






•' " " 2, - 


26 


21 


47 


29 


26 


9 


121 


47 


47 






" «« "3, - - 


22 


31 


5!; 


33 


31 


9 


93 


5'; 


5fJ 






•• " " 4, . 


2.-) 


25 


50 


35 


33 


15 


130 


.50 


50 






" "5, - - 


20 


54 


80 


01 


49 


16 


125 


80 


80 






<• " 6, - • 


25 


31 


.56 


41 


34 


11 


1«'6 


50 


56 






" "7, - . 


37 


49 


8(; 


39 


37 


10 


14) 


86 


86 






8, - - 


;« 


20 


5i; 


35 


3( 


11 


43 


41 


24 






" « 9, . . 


91 




91 


44 


4C 


23 


48 


91 


87 






« <« '< 10, - • 




90 


90 


5t 


3C 


14 


.IS 


!.0 


!« 






11 II II 11^ . . 




67 


07 


38 


3' 


14 


27 


67 


67 






Primary School No. 1, - 


24 


41 


65 


34 


2! 


8 


7f 


27 


27 






.< u 11 2, - - 


28 


30 


58 


37 


35 


15 


63 


19 


9 






'« " « 3, - - 


22 


32 


51 


30 


2f 


9 


60 


37 


28 






<( <i II 4 . . 


37 


3i 


71 


38 


33 


10 


70 


43 


22 






' 5, - - 


67 


55 


12-.' 


51 


45 


10 


in 


15 








« II II 6 


48 


46 


94 


61 


4'- 


10 


111 


t2 


17 






« " 11 7 . . 


33 


53 


86 


60 


48 


10 


174 


41 


34 






i< II "8* 


45 


40 


a5 


63 


4^- 


If 


81 


42 


40 






•1 11 n 9* , 


59 


7e 


135 


50 


47 


12 


45 


30 


21 






" " " 10, 


45 


80 


125 


5( 


49 


10 


40 


30 


25 






•« " « 11, . . 


38 


30 


68 


5( 


34 


12 


no 










«• " << 12, . - 


32 


28 


60 


28 


24 


10 


2fi 


67 


34 






" " " 13, - - 


5(. 


(i3 


119 


.52 


48 


11 


12f 


60 


46 






11 .1 14 , . 


78 


67 


145 


53 


46 


21 


16 


14 


10 






" " 15, - . 


132 




132 


57 


53 


9 


40 


65 


55 






" ", •' IB, 


130 




130 


5' 


54 


9 


38 


50 


45 






uf 1. 17 . . 




120 


120 


5: 


48 


14 


49 


28 


28 






" " •' 18, • - 




llt- 


IK 


4t- 


42 


17 


2! 


no 


69 






" " " 19, - . 


85 




85 


4! 


48 


10 


3S 


35 


30 






" " 20, - - 


11 


13 


21 


2( 


17 


5 


7 


! 


8 






" " " 21, - - 


18 


32 


50 


31 


28 


6 


15 


14 


12 






II II II 23, 




78 


78 


52 


50 


7 


30 


25 


15 






School in District No . 1 , 


IS 


11 


30 


17 


10 


9 


37 


30 


24 


8 


21 


«' 3 . - 


41 


45 


8b 


51 


45 


9 


47 


63 


41 


8 


31 


.1 II 4 


20 


12 


32 


27 


24 


9 


24 


23 


11 


7 


17 


" 5 . . 


8 




15 




2 


12 


31 


9 


5 


1 


10 


<i II <i 6 


17 


1; 


32 


2( 


21 


10 


19 


13 


10 


4 


H 


1. " 7, - • 


37 


4- 


a 


61 


56 


u 


63 


68 


47 


17 


69 


.< II 1. 8 


29 


3 


62 


3i 


36 


12 


49 


53 


31 


14 


3* 


• 9, - - 


30 


21 


51 


32 


30 


11 


4! 


44 


29 


11 


37 


Schools Dlst. No. 10, Grammar, 


47 


4- 


90 


5( 


47 


10 


90 


90 


90 


12 


90 


" " " Primary, 


48 


4( 


88 


51* 


45 


14 


23 


25 








" Middle, - 


32 


.32 


64 


37 


33 


13 


38 


64 


64 






" " " Ungraded, 


33 


24 


57 


37 


33 


12 


26 


46 


21 






" " No. 11, Grammar, 


27 


30 


57 


43 


38 


13 


43 


57 


67 


14 


61 


" « «' Primary, 


60 


47 


97 


51 


44 


16 


37 


16 


16 






Total, .... 


228i!2347 4.525l2628!4070 


6554242 2896224 1I 4301121 



190 

Besides the branches of study given in the table, there 
are in the Grammar Schools, 80 pupils in Physiology, and 
229 in History. In the High School are studies and the 
number of pupils pursuing them as follows: Latin, 72; 
French. 22 ; Greek, 5 ; Trigonometry, 10 ; Geometry, 48 ; 
Algebra, 79 ; Botany, 15 ; English Literature, 15 ; Men- 
tal Pllilol^ophy, 19 ; Geology, 29 ; Rhetoric, 8 ; Chem- 
istry, 17 ; Natural Philosophy, 50 ; Astronomy, 24 ; Phys- 
ical Geography, 40 ; Governmental Listructor, 60. In 
ungraded schools there arc occasionally pupils in Algebra 
or other high branches not here reported. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

Our High School continues to be what we have endeav- 
ored to make it, an institution of most thorough instruc- 
tion and excellent discipline. It does not number among 
its pupils so many as we desire, who pursue a systematic 
and complete course of English studies, nor so many who 
are preparing for a more thorough course of instruction 
in colleges and other institutions of learning. But in 
scholarship we have reason to be satis6ed ; for in all the 
branches of study — in the natural sciences, in the ordina- 
ry mathematics and sometimes in the higher mathematics, 
in the department of rhetoric, and especially in the lan- 
guages, though but few are engaged in the study of the 
classics, — we find most excellent scholars. 

We have great confidence in the management of the 
school, — in the firmness and prudence of the Master, and 
in the fidelity and ability of the assistants; and though 
we have just accepted the resignation of a superior teach- 
er, we assure the citizens of Manchester that the School 
Board will not fail to furnish competent instructors, nor to 
do all the public means allow to render the school worthy 
of the fullest confidence. 



191 

The number of pupils registered the past year is not so 
great as at some previous times. Indeed, the number of 
pupils attending the High School is not in just proportion 
to those in the lower grades. Not more than one half the 
boys in the city advance higher than the lowest grade in 
the Grammar Schools ; and so far as my observation ex- 
tends, about one-fourth of those entering the Grammar 
Schools ever enter the High School, and only a very small 
percentage of these continue through the entire course. 
Seldom more than three or four boys graduate fronf the 
High School in any one year. The number of girls in at- 
tendance is always much larger ; consequently a much 
larger number yearly receive diplomas for having com- 
pleted the prescribed course. 

There is another serious evil existing in the school, 
which is seen in the low percentage of attendance. While 
our Grammar Schools, and some of the lower grades occa- 
sionally report an attendance of -j^^^, and frequently show 
a record ranging above ^^q-, the High School seldom 
reports so good a degree of punctuality. The average at. 
tendance for the past year has been but 89 pupils ; the per- 
centage being but about ^^^'^. 

This evil should be remedied either by the persevering 
effort of the teachers or by the official action of the 
school officers. 

The attendance, conduct and scholarship of the mem- 
bers of the school is given in the following schedule : 



BOYS. 



Number Average Average 
days present, conduct, scholarship. 



Milton H. Barton, - - - 192 7.55 7.72 

Joseph H. Batchelder, - - 181 7.43 7.73 

Charles A. Carpenter, - - 130 8. 8. 

B. Frank Clark, ... 91 7.51 7.82 

Greenleaf Clarke, - - - 107 8. 8. 



192 



John M. Crawford, 
John S. Cressey, 
James E. Currier, 
Arthur W. Doland, - 
J. Edwin Everett, 
Charles G. Fogg, 
Charles R. Folsom, 
Frank M. Forsaith, - 
Melville L. French, 
Charles S. Frost, 
Samuel G. Fulton, 
George E. Hall, 
Frank 0. Hall, - 
Charles M. Harrington, 
Charles F. Haynes, 
Geo. F. Heald, 
Walter B. Heath, 
Walter S. Holt, 
Chas. F. Howe, 
H. Martin Kellogg, - 
Chas. H. Kimball, 
Chas. H. Kimball, - 
John M. Knowles, 
Orrin L. Page, 
Clarence D. Palmer, 
Walter M. Parker, - 
Wm. A. Perry, 
Jas. H. Pettee, 
Fred. A. Robinson, 
Roland C. Rowell, - 
Thomas Savage, - 
Willie M. Sawin, 
Edward M. Slayton, 
Edward F. Stevens, 



Number Average Average 
days preaent. conduct, scholarship. 



54 


7.51 


7.77 


68 


8. 


7.84 


182 


7.76 


7.45 


60 


7.55 


7.89 


94 


7.30 


7.55 


133 


7.83 


7.88 


32 


7.28 


7.85 


195 


8. 


7.94 


185 


8. 


7.89 


194 


7.93 


7.94 


62 


8. 


8. 


164 


7.78 


7.77 


40 


7.50 


8. 


65 


7.55 


7.73 


194 


7.60 


7.99 


62 


7.91 


7.96 


196 


7.81 


7.73 


188 


7.93 


7.99 


130 


7.93 


7.9.6 


118 


7.98 


7.88 


150 


7.93 


7.34 


164 


7.98 


7.96 


198 


8. 


7.98 


136 


7.81 


7.87 


188 


7.62 


7.87 


196 


8. 


8. 


179 


7.51 


7.76 


198 


7.99 


7.99 


29 


8. 


8. 


188 


7.81 


7.97 


74 


7.79 


7.73 


53 


8. 


7.98 


129 


7.57 


7.85 


187 


7.99 


7.38 



193 



Geo. A. Stokes, - 
Geo. H. Swain, 
Augustus B. Shute, 
William Shannon, 
Edgar A. Thayer, 
Wm. E. Wiggin, 
Henry R. Williams, 
Frank P. Worthley, 
Frank L. Willey, - 
Chas. S. Young, 



Floretta A. Ames, - 
Jennie S. Baker, - 
Mary P. Barnes, 
Emma F. Bean, - 
Nora Blood, 
Lucy M. Boyd, 
Helen S. Brown, 
Mary H. Brown, - 
Mary A. Buzzell, 
Maggie H. Campbell, 
Addie M. Chase, 
Josie M. Colburn, 
Mary F. Connor, 
Martha A. Connor, 
Arabel Corey, 
Mary C. Corning, 
Emma A. Cross, 
Louise E. Cutting, 
Mary S. Danforth, - 
Isabella Daniels, 
Ellen C. Fairbanks, - 
EstellaM. Fish, - 



GIRLS. 



Number 
ys present 


Average 
. conduct. 


Average 
scholaibhip. 


133 


7.76 


7.83 


69 


7.60 


7.89 


23 


7.48 


7.70 


15 


8. 


7.95 


61 


7.46 


7.44 


67 


7.64 


7.82 


37 


8. 


7.47 


47 


8. 


7.98 


69 


■ 7.97 


7.46 


178 


7.75 


7.89 


65 


8. 


7.88 


190 


7.96 


7.94 


127 


8. 


8. 


139 


7.99 


8. 


188 


8. 


8. 


47 


8. 


8. 


55 


8. 


7.93 


75 


8. 


8. 


185 


8. 


7.99 


53 


7.82 


. 7.90 


196 


7.88 


7.94 


52 


7.S0 


7.82 


187 


7.94 


7.99 


174 


8. 


7.99 


19 


8. 


7.33 


168 


8. 


7.96 


109 


8. 


8. 


20 


8. 


7.8'8 


62 


8. 


7.92 


127 


8. 


8. 


158 


7.97 


7.94 


111 


7.84 


7.94 



194 

Number Arerago Average 

days present, conduct, scholarship 

Hattie G. Flanders, - - - 156 8. 8. 

Marj T. Flanders, - - 142 8. 8. 

Fannie S. Gibson, ... 99 8. 7.94 

Emma J. Goodwin, - - 146 7.78 7.84 

Sarah i5. Hadley, - - - 55 8. 7.95 

Isabella L. Hall, - - 116 8. 8. 

Charlotte Hall, ... 92 7.99 7.82 

Eva C. Heath, - - - 98 7.96 7.83 

Henrietta C. Hollis, - - 115 7.83 7.62 

Marietta Howe, - - - 158 7.99 7.97 

Emma R. Hnbbard, - - - 92 7.58 7.85 

Martha W. Hubbard, - - 11 8. 8. 

Mary J. Huntress, - - . 94 7.90 7,76 

Ida J. Knowles, - . 129 8. 7.96 

Ida M. Ladd, - - - . . 113 7.75 7.71 

Emma G. Locke, - - - 119 7.85 7.89 

Alice G. Lord, - - - 140 8. 8. 

Harriet A. Mack, - - 183 8. 8. 

Isabella G. Mack, - • - - 194 8. 8. 

Addie C. Marshall, - - 196 7.52 7.89 

Ella F. Minot, - - . - 184 8. 8. 

Abby L. Morrill, - - - 119 7.85 7.90 

Mattie S. Miller, - - - 103 8. 7.99 

Annie M. Offutt, - - - 155 8. 7.99 

Clara A. Parker, - - - 98 7.70 7.75 

Harriet E. Parker, - - 105 7.96 8. 

Mary E. Page, - - - 29 7.50 7.94 

Julia E. Parsons, - - - 183 8. 7.85 

Lucy A. Parsons, - - - 189 8. 7.98 

Lizzie H. Patterson, • - 162 7.87 7.96 

Ella F. Peacock, ... 96 7.38 7.25 

Nellie Pearson, - - - 89 7.98 7.87 

Mattie P. Pinkerton, - - 129 8. 8. 

Alma Porter, - - - 184 7.87 7.87 



195 





Number 
days present, 


ATCrage 
, conduct. 


Average 
scholarship, 


Ella M. Piishee, 


- 174 


7.85 


7.76 


Sarah L. Plummer, 


60 


8. 


7.9T 


Lizzie R. Roper, 


- 97 


8. 


7.81 


Flora T. Sanderson, 


110 


7.67 


7.78 


Flora Savage, - 


- - 49 


8. 


7.99 


Lura S. Sawin, 


49 


8. 


7.96 


Augusta G. Smith, - 


- 105 


7.93 


7.79 


Hattie N. Smith, 


61 


8. 


7.61 


Ella A. Snow, 


- 188 


7.99 


7.89 


Frances E. Snow, 


124 


7.95 


7.36 


Emma P. Soule, 


- 119 


7.8.1 


7.91 


M. Annie Stevens, 


188 


7.93 


8. 


Clara Straw, - 


- 181 


7.80 


7.76 


Abbie A. Swain, - 


62 


7.95 


7.86 


Nancy E. Sweatt, 


- 06 


8. 


7.94 


Abbie P. Twombly, 


60 


8. 


7.03 


Alfarctta Tyler, 


- 46 


8. 


7.93 


Annie M. Varney, 


96 


7.84 


7.77 


Emma S. Varney, - 


- 96 


8. 


7.83 


Mary S. Verity, - 


1S8 


8. 


8. 


Eliza A. Young, 


- 145 


7.95 


8. 


Jennie S. Young, 


168 


7.98 


8. 


Mattie J. York, 


- 104 


7.72 


7.72 



The number of pupils who graduated at the close of 
the Autumn terra was 9, viz : 

Masters Prank M. Porsaith and Charles H. Kimball ; 
Misses Hattie G. Flanders, Alice G. Lord, Hattie A. Mack, 
Ella P. Minot, Anna M. OiFutt, Lucy A. Parsons, and Eliza 
I. Young. 

The number admitted at the opening of the present 
term was 38. 

By request of the Superintendent, Mr. Colburn, Princi- 
pal of the school, presents the accompanying suggestions, 



196 

which are worthy of the attention of the Board of School 
Committee and the public. 

" To the Superintendent of Public Instruction : 

Agreeably to your request I subjoin a few remarks upon 
the state of the High School, having reference mainly to 
its deficiencies and their causes, suggesting, also, in some 
instances, the appropriate remedies. 

The greatest hindrance to the good order and favorable 
appearance of the school, has been the inadequate school- 
room. Especially has this been the case during the win- 
ter months ; but fortunately this difficulty will soon be 
removed. 

Another difficulty in attaining proficiency and thor- 
oughness in the course of study pursued, results from de- 
ficient preparation. Only a very few of those who annu- 
ally enter the school, have the thoroughness of scholarship 
requisite for the successful prosecution of a strictly High 
School course of study. This deficiency is most apparent 
in arithmetic and grammar, and in the former, can in 
some degree be supplemented by algebra, and in the lat- 
ter by English composition, rhetoric and Latin ; but time 
is lost and the result is unsatisfactory. 

Though the general principles of algebra and arithme- 
tic are the same, yet, as the symbols, formula and lan- 
guage of the former are not those of business, it cannot be 
made a practical substitute for the latter. The foundation 
of a practical knowledge of .mathematics should be laid in 
arithmetic. If a pupil is well grounded in that, his diffi- 
culties in algebra are chiefly those of expression, and he 
Boon overcomes them. 

Knowledge of English grammar is greatly increased by 
a judicious study of Latin, but the idioms of one lan- 
guage can never be learned by studying another. The 
vernacular should not be slighted for a smattering of any 



197 

foreign tongue. In conducting recitations in the classics, 
it has been my aim to illustrate as much as possible, the 
general principles of language, and the origin and struc- 
ture of the English. Though this method is favorable in 
its results, it cannot take the place of instruction in En- 
glish grammar, and it would be much better appreciated 
and attended with better results, if the preparation in En- 
glisli were thorough and complete. 

To remedy this difficulty it will be necessary to raise 
the standard of admission or to add another year to the 
course and devote it principally to these studies. 

The condition of the school is much impaired by irreg- 
ular and inconstant attendance. If this can be remedied, 
as it doubtless can be by adopting more rigorous measures 
relating thereto, the prosperity of the school will be great- 
ly promoted, and I might unselfishly add, the labor and 
perplexities of the teachers proportionally diminished. 

During a part of the year special attention was given to 
spelling. Our weekly exercises in composition show the 
necessity of a more thorough drill in this important 
branch, either in this school or in the lower grades. 

A proposition has already been made to you, which, if 
adopted, will greatly enhance the efficiency of the instruc- 
tion given in the department of elocution. And here I 
take the opportunity to mention the imperative demand 
for .a change of Readers. You may deem it expedient, 
also, to change the text books on Natural Philosophy and 
Astronomy before next fall, when another class will h& 
formed in these studies. 

In order to meet the demands of the age, a large por- 
tion of time must be devoted to the so-called natural sci- 
ences, and, for their proper illustration, a more modern 
and complete apparatus, both philosophical and chemical, 
will be necessary. 



198 

Corporal punishment has been inflicted in a few in- 
etances during the past year ; but wlien the school diall 
be transferred to a* convenient room, which will allow a 
wider separation of scats, much of the temptation to dis- 
orderly conduct will be removed, and a resort to this spe- 
cies of punishment will seldom bo needed. 

From the proceeds of an exhibition by the school at the 
close of the winter term, the library was increased by the 
purchase of books of reference to the value of over a hun- 
dred dollars, including the New American Cyclopaedia. 

Now, I submit whetber the school shall g'.ve another ex- 
hibition during the ensuing year, and tbe proceeds be ap- 
plied to the purchase of such books and apparatus as are 
most needed. 

Of the prizes offered to meritorious pupils in thisscliool 
by tlio Hon. Moody Currier, 1 need not here speak, as fa- 
vorable mention of their trial has already been made in 
the report of the committee appointed to award them. 

For whatever success the school has attained during the 
year, I am largely indebted to the ability and efficiency of 
the teachers associated with me in its management and 
instruction." 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Our Grammar Schools have always maintained an hon- 
orable rank when compared with those of the same grade 
in other places of equal privileges with those we possess. 
In discipline, in exactness of scholarship, in habits of in- 
dustry, it is not often that schools or classes can be found 
that excel the pupils in our Grammar Schools in the cen- 
tral district of the city. In the South School there has 
been a change in the Mastership of the school, which it 
was at first feared might prove injurious to its prosperity. 
Mr. Def^rborn, avIio, for six years, had had the charge of 
the school, was so identified with its name and usefulness, 
that his separation from it seemed impossible. But after 



199 

his resignation, and the election of his successor, it was 
evident that the school would not be seriously interrupted 
by the change. The assistant teachers were familiar with 
the wants of the school — they were faithful in tiic per- 
formance of tiie duties i-equired in their several divisions, 
and were by no means indifferent to the general demands 
of the school. Their co-operation was cordially rendered 
to the Master, who in a little lime proved to be quite as 
gerviceable in his new position as he had been in another 
place. The school has not only maintained well its rank 
in our school system, but is, term by term, taking still 
higher ground. 

By request of the Superintendent, the Master, Mr. 
Heath, lias given a few suggestions in relation to the 
present condition of the school and its future prosperity, 
which are here copied. 
"To the Superiatendent and C)inmiUec of Minchester. 

Gentlemen : In accordance with the request of the Su* 
perintendcut, I submit the following suggestions and re- 
marks in regard to the iSouth Grammar School. 

Of the condition of the school when placed in my chai'go 
I shall say nothing ; it is enough to say that it was upon 
the resignation of a highly successful and popular teacher. 
The character of the schcol had long been established, and 
it has been my constant endeavor to maintain for it the 
reputation which it then had. In this endeavor I have 
been at all times aided by assistants willing to perform all 
that was requested of them. It has not been possible in 
every division to perform all the work laid out in the reg- 
ulations of the Committee ; of course, if that division 
where there is too much work, should be near the com- 
mep.cement of the scholar's course, it must destroy the 
arrangement all the way through. 

In regard to the course of study laid down for the first 
year, nothing need be said ; it can readily be accom- 



200 

plished, provided the scholars come in well qualified from 
the middle schools. In the second year the scholars are 
required to complete the Intellectual Arithmetic ; and in 
the course marked out for the third and fourtli years, they 
are considered to have done this. On the contrary, the 
work is so difficult that it is, not completed until the fourth 
year; so much time is taken upon this, and its necessity is 
obvious in the last two years, that not enough remains for 
the regular course. While the 2d Division or third year 
is, on this account, somewhat crowded, the 1st is pushed 
to its utmost capacity ; for it must be remembered that in 
addition to what is studied in the 2d, physiology, the whole 
of it, and geography are taken up. To be sure it is a re- 
view of the geography, but I leave it for you to say how 
much can be remembered when the scholars have not seen 
it for a year and a half. 

To complete the whole, an exhibition and festival must 
be forthcoming at tlie close of the fall term. Custom de- 
mands the former and the Committee the latter. The re- 
sult is evident; all the scholars cannot remain a second 
year in the 1st Division, — only the quicker and more ma- 
ture ones leave the school prepared to go on with the higher 
branches. About one-half are not prepared, and could 
not pass the rigid examination to which they ought to be 
subjected before entering the High School. 

^ This being the true state of affairs the question arises, 
how can it be avoided ? I know of no better suggestions 
than those of I. W. Smith, Esq., presented in his remarks 
at the last examination of the school. Nothing can be 
omitted. What we need, then, is scholars capable of do 
ing more work. They must be older and better prepared 
when they enter the school. If, however, we must con- 
tinue to find scholars in the middle schools who ought to 
be in the primary, and in the grammar school who should 



201 

remain another year in the middle, the same results will 
continue to follow. 

Now it is admitted, or ouglit to be, that the Master of 
the school is responsible for the standard in scholarship 
which his school maintains. Would it then be inappro- 
priate for him to ask that, in connection with the Super- 
intendent, he might examine all those who propose to en- 
ter from the middle schools, and that none should be ad- 
mitted who are not thoroughly prepared and of suitable 
age? I.i the same manner the Principal of the High School 
might examine all those proposing to enter that school 
from the grammar schools. I do not speak of this with 
reference to the benefit which would follow to the High 
School ; with that I have nothing to do, but because I be- 
lieve that by some such a course ihe standard of scholar- 
ship in the grammar schools would be elevated, and we 
should hoar no more of a " high pressure system." 

I am happy to say that the prizes offered by the Busi- 
ness College are having a good effect ; but as there is only 
one prize for general scholarship, the struggle for it will 
be confined to four or five of the best scholars. For the 
encouragement of others I would suggest that an effort be 
made to have two or three smaller prizes offered, cither by 
the Committee or individuals interested in the school. ,^1 
think that one or two small prizes for improvement in pen- 
manship would still further increase the interest now man- 
ifested by the scholars in that branch of their studies. If 
scholarships and other prizes are offered in almost every 
college to stimulate men to greater intellectual effort, I 
can see no reason why the same plan may not be tried with 
younger students. 

The need of a change in the text book in reading has 
long been seriously felt ; but as the subject is already be- 
fore the Committee, I will only say that my hope is that 
we shall soon have a book in which the scholars will take 



202 

an interest, and the reading of the school be placed on a 
level with its position in other studies in the estimation of 
the Committee and its friends." 



The North Grammar School maintains a rank very 
much llice that just reported. The number of teachers is 
the same, the grades the same, and the course of instruc- 
tion the same, while the number of pupils is generally 
greater than in the South Grammar School. It has usu- 
ally been under good instruction in all its departments, 
and the pupils who have passed through the entire course 
and been admitted to the High School or engaged in busi- 
ness, have given evidence of good mental discipline. 

At present the school presents a record of attendance 
and deportment which was never before attained. In tlio 
several departments of the school, there is great enthusi- 
asm in all the exercises required. I have never seen more 
exactness in the performance of physical exercises than in 
this school. The discipline, if not perfect, falls but little 
below perfection. It partakes of the order which charac- 
terizes the military, and though it may in individual cases 
be too severe, yet as a whole, it ehows a system which 
commends itself to universal approbation. The only dan- 
ger that I foresee is that it be made so prominent as to 
render proper mental discipline entirely a subordinate re- 
quirement. 

Two of the assistants in this school have held their 
places for several years. They have been fully tried, and 
whatever emergency arises, they are prepared to meet it. 
The third assistant has had much experience as a teacher, 
though but little in a position like that she now occupies. 
Her division requires more labor than any other depart- 
ment of the school, and she never fails to meet its de- 
mands. 



203 

The Master, Mr. Parker, in his report to the Superin- 
tendent, makes some suggestions regarding the school, or 
rather in regard to the school system of the city, which I 
incorporate into this report without admitting their cor- 
rectness. Indeed, I am compelled in justice to the school 
committee as well as to myself, to deny that the evils 
which he names have any existence ; and furtlier, if they 
did exist, the remedy is provided so far as it is practicable 
for any Board of Education to provide, under the statutes 
of the state. 

The following is from Mr. Parker's report: 

" In suggesting improvements, we shall place luck of 
proper s//slem foremost upon the list, and bog leave to 
illustrate the point by taking a little of the wisdom which 
builds the best fire engine in the world, and brings plenty 
to the doors of thousands of thriving artizans in our city. 
Each workman in our large machine shop has one and 
only one particular part of a complex machine to make, 
to which he bends his genius and energy, for if the mas- 
ter workman detects the slightest flaw, he throws it aside 
as useless, because flaws spoil the entire structure. A bad 
boiler, wheel, or cog, is likely to be attended with serious 
consequences. We judge by the working of a machine, of 
its merits and defects, so if you please let us apply the 
same rule to our school system. Eleven pupils out of 
twelve enter the High School without a decent hand writ- 
ing. For four years they are supposed to write in the 
Grammar Schools. Dividing the time equally with other 
studies laid down in the regulations, and making all due 
allowances, there is given to this branch alone, more than 
thirteen hundred lessons of half an hour each. Not one 
in a thousand should leave the school without an excellent 
handwriting. 

The pupils that graduate from the High School will 
average, at a low estimate, ten years in the school room. 



204 

Dividing the time as before, giving only one-tenth of the 
time to spelling in the High School, and we have over 
three thousand half hour lessons, twenty-two and a half 
lessons to each page in the speUing book, or four words to 
a lesson, from b-e be, the first, to zoology, the last word, 
yet there are very few who can write a common letter 
without resorting to the dictionary. 

The same calculations can be made with most of the 
other branches, proving conclusively that a real thorough 
knowledge of any common branch is not obtained by those 
who pass through our schools, and suggesting to our 

minds the idea of a serious defect in the machinery. 

* ***** 

Each Grammar and all schools leading ta it, (middle 
and primary,) should have one Master upon whom the re- 
sponsibility and care of all the schools should tqs}. 

At present the Grammar Master has little control be- 
yond his own division. This you say is enough. More 
than enough, we reply, if he tries to remedy the defects 
of the want of system. The previous teaching may have 
been done well, (let this bo understood,) in many cases 
far better than he can do it. The fault is not in the in- 
struction but in the utter disregard of system. To illus- 
trate, a teacher has brought a class, by persistent, untiring 
labor, to a certain point in arithmetic, laying a firm foun- 
dation. The next teacher starts off on a new plan or 
basis, ignoring the previous work, which will soon sink out 
of sight, the ruins of many hours of severe application. 
The same can be said of a class in writing which has ar- 
rived at a well defined position by indefatigable drilling. 
The succeeding teacher should take them just where they 
are, that being plainly discernible by the books, and move 
on, correcting all errors, but still carrying on the original 
plan. This is not often done, as the vast number of mis- 
erable penmen plainly shows. 



205 

As has been seen, eight words learned each day will en- 
able every graduate to spell all the words in the spelling 
book. Yet the teachers, for want of a director, are apt to 
teach just where it suits their fancy, instead of doing a 
stated amount of work well^ — giving the next teacher a 
word to commence with, — and the assurance that the class 
can spell to that word. Seven-eighths of all the dull 
scholars of whom it is said : " They never can learn any- 
thing — push them through, and get rid of them," are the 
victims of this lack of uniformity in teaching. They have 
not the tact or talent to adapt themselves to the various 
methods and manners of the teachers under whom they are 
doomed to pass, and they give up the task in disgust. A 
master could correct these alarming and costly evils, and 
harmonize the discordant elements, making them a unit 
in action. He, like the master machinist, could give to 
each teacher a task and know tliat it is done well. He 
could see that no minds were stultified by cramming or 
early promotion. Would it not bs wise, we repeat, to ap- 
ply a little of this wisdom which shapes for use the hard 
iron and steel — to the education of immortal minds — so 
malleable that a blow light as breath will leave a mark for 
eternity ?" 

The other schools which will come under the head of 
Grammar Schools are five in number, viz : The Park St. 
school, that on Manchester St., mis-named Intermediate, 
the Wilson Hill school, and those at Piscataquog and 
Amoskeag. None of these sustain the same rank as the 
two largo Grammar schools which we have just considered. 
They are so fully reported by the several sub-committees 
as to require no extended notice from the Superintendent. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

In most cities the schools included under this head are 



206 

styled Intermediate, being the intermediate step from the 
primary to the grammar grade. The term middle schools 
was adopted by our city at its organization, and has been 
continued without question. There are in this class 
. twelve schools, though tliey vary somewhat in tlieir char, 
acter. Those numbered from one to seven inclusive, and 
number eleven, maintain tlie highest rank. Number 
twelve, just established, is on an equal grade with number 
five — the pupils having been taken from that school. No. 
eight was formerly of the same standing, but bei-ng located 
in the suburbs, was allowed to receive some primary schol- 
ars, thus reducing its standard of scholirship. Nos. 9 and 
10 are not so far advanced as the majority of these schools, 
in consequence of tlie short time which the pupils in them 
attend school. The middle school in ward 7 is in reality 
but a primary of the first class, and is often so considered. 
The teachers in all the middle schools are doing well the 
work assigned them, while the children under their in- 
struction are generally active, ambitious and desirous of 
performing faithfully the tasks required of them, that they 
may sooner gain admission to the higher grades of schools. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

We have in the city twenty five-primary schools. A 
portion of these have received a sub-division, the young- 
est pupils being given to one teacher and those who are 
more advanced to another. 

« By this arrangement, we have several primary schools 
that may properly be designated as alphabet schools. In' 
them but little instruction is given beyond reading, spell- 
ing and singing. Of this class is the East primary at Pis- 
cataquog, one on Manchester street, one on Merrimack 
street, two on Paik street, and two on Union street at the 
corner of Laurel. In the »ame locality may be found 
schools, classed as primary, which number among their 



207 

pupils, no children who have not learned to read. They 
are the schools from which the alphabet classes have been 
taken to form a sub division. In these arc taught arithme- 
tic and geography, in addition to reading, spelling and vocal^ 
music. A third class of primary schools are those which 
eml)race children of all ages, who are not yet qualified to 
enter the middle grade. 

In our primary schools the instruction is more varied 
than in any other grade. No definite method can be pre- 
scribed fur imparting primary instruction. Each teacher 
must act according to her own judgment. If she succeeds 
she is worthy of all praise ; if she fails, let not her con- 
demnation be too severe. It requires no small degree of 
skill to manage a primary school of fifty or, as is some- 
times required, eighty, restless boys and girls. Most pri- 
mary teachers in our city have by far too many pupils un- 
der their charge. Few teachers are adequate to the de- 
mand made upon their mental or physical capacity. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

There are in the city, in the rural sections, eight district 
schools, wholly ungraded. As a class, these schools, both 
summer and winter, have maintained a good standing and 
deserve a favorable report, which they severally receive at 
the hands of their respective sub-committees. During the 
winter term there were instances of just complaints, but 
the deficiencies were sooa remedied and the pupils made 
good improvement of their time and appeared well on ex- 
aminations. The best schools during the winter term were 
in Districts 3 and 8. Entire failures were made in Dis- 
tricts 1 and 7. The others maintained a fair standing. 

In the other terms of the year, there were excellent 
schools in Districts Nos. 1, 4, 6 and 7, and in the fall term 
in No. 9. In the other Districts the schools were good, 
though not characterized by any unusual merit. 



108 

VOCAL MUSIC. 

The records of the School Committee show that in 1847, 
vocal music was introduced into a few of our public 
schools ; Mr. Cram, of Deerfield, a popular teacher, being 
permitted to give instruction gratuitously to the Grammar 
schools. Mr. Cram gave one lesson each week for several 
months, with the hope that public sentiment would sustain 
the Committee in employing a teacher permanently. But 
so much opposition was manifested that the subject was 
dismissed, to be revived at a later period. For a few 
terms, about the year 1853, Mr. John H. Willard was em- 
ployed to give instruction in music to the schools of Dis- 
trict No. 2. Thougli the pupils made good improvement 
of the advantages offered tliem,it was not deemed advisa- 
ble to employ a professional teacher. 

In the year 1860, the subject of vocal music in public 
schools was again considered and the Committee elected 
Mr. I. S. Wliitney to give instruction in the schools in 
District Nos. 2, 3, 10 and 11. Though much opposition 
to the measure was at first manifested, the practice was 
continued year by year, until it is considered an established 
branch of common school instruction. We need not 
speak of it benefit?. They are known not only to those 
who have the direction of our public schools, but to mem- 
bers of every family represented in the schools of the city. 

Hundreds of visitors of our schools bear testimony to 
its success. Hundreds of our citizens who attend the pub- 
lic examinations are gratified by the musical exercises 
which they witness, while thousands of youthful voices 
are day by day convincing those who are yet doubtful, of 
its beneficial influences. 

At the commencement of the autumn term, music was 
introduced into the several rural District schools^ and 
Mr. J. D. Jones was employed as teacher. His efforts have 
proved very satisfactory. 



209 

SCHOOL FESTIVAL AND EXAMINATION. 

The annual Festival at the close of the autumn term 
was, m many respects, more gratifying than any previous 
one. The musical exercises were of a much higher order 
than usual, while the literary performances fully met the 
public expectation. 

These annual exhibitions have been constantly increas- 
ing in interest, until they are now regarded as one of the 
most pleasing entertainments that our citizens enjoy. 
They require no small degree of labor, and arc attended 
with considerable expense. But the public funds are not 
used to meet the expenditures. They are self sustaining 
and for several years past have yielded a very liberal sum 
which has been expended in the purchase of useful arti- 
cles for school rooms. Two of Miller's best pianos are 
the purchase of the receipts of these exhibitions, besides 
an unexpended sum of about $250, which will probably 
be used for the benefit of the High School when it shall 
be removed to the new house. 

It has been said that too much labor is required of pu- 
pils during the autumn term. If, as has been the custom, 
we continue to demand an examination, an exhibition in 
the school and a public Festival, all at the expiration of 
one term, the charge must be admitted. It is necessary 
that the general examination for promotion of scholars be 
held in the autumn term, as the school year closes at that 
time. The number of visitors present on such occasions 
induces teachers to produce such rhetorical exercises as 
will afford the greatest pleasure. Hence additional labor 
is expected of the pupils. Many of the exercises prepared 
for the school exhibition are appropriate for the Festival, 
and are repeated on that occasion. The fact that the pu- 
pils are in their highest degree of advancement at the close 
of the autumn term, is the chief reason that the three 
public exercises are given at that time. It might relieve 

N 



210 

the pupils of a good share of the extra labor, if the exam- 
ination should be held in the autumn term as is the pres- 
ent custom, and the exhibitions take place at the close of 
the summer term. 

STUDIES PURSUED. 

In certain branches of studies our schools have excelled, 
while in others there has been a continued deficiency. In 
mathematics our course is sufficiently extended and thor- 
oughly pursued in all grades. We begin early in the pri- 
mary schools, and close only with the last year in the High 
School. Our pupils, it is admitted, excel in this particu- 
lar. In geography, they are not deficient, and in history 
accomplish quite as much as is required of pupils in other 
cities. But in grammar, we make no claim to superiority. 
Even in our grammar schools, this branch has not been 
pursued with that interest which has marked the recita- 
tions in her departments. 

There has been a neglect in many schools of due atten- 
tion to the art of reading. The teachers are beginning to 
realize the necessity of a more rigid drill in reading, and 
have presented a petition to the School Board to employ a 
competent instructor to givg a course of lessons in elocu- 
tion and reading. I am confident that a man well quali- 
fied to instruct our teachers how to teach their pupils, even 
in the lowest grade of schools, would, in a few weeks, con- 
tribute greatly to the improvement of our schools in this 
respect. More than usual attention has been given to or- 
thography during the past year, and the results begin to 
appear in the written exercises of the more advanced 
pupils. 

A new interest is manifested in the teaching of penman- 
ship. Many of the teachers have given considerable at- 
tention to this branch. They have studied the system ap- 
proved by the^Committee, and for the first time in their 



211 

professional life, have they been able to teach it accord- 
ing to the intention of the author. There is no better 
system than that we have adopted, and no better method 
of teaching it than that which is so clearly explained in 
the work. A few lessons by a thoroughly qualified teacher 
of penmanship would give new interest to the instruction 
in this department, and enable our teachers to follow more 
accurately the requirements of the system. 

A NORMAL SCHOOL. 

It is well known that the state has in contemplation the 
institution of a Normal School, and that propositions from 
towns and cities desiring its location are invited by the 
Legislature. Manchester is a convenient locality for its 
establishment. It is near the centre of the population of 
the state ; it is easy of access ; it can furnish many facili- 
ties for the accommodation of those connected with the 
school. The subject of its location here has been discussed 
by the Board, and unanimously favored. They recom- 
mend to the citizens that such measures be adopted as will 
secure its location here. 

There are other subjects which might very properly be 
brought before the people in this report, some of which 
have been considered in former years, while others have 
not been officially mentioned. But these may be named 
in future reports, or be brought before the Committee and 
the people in a less formal manner. 

In closing this report of the official acts of the Super- 
intendent and the Board for the year 1866, let us make 
directly to the people of this city an earnest appeal in be- 
half of our schools. 

We have well furnished school rooms, intelligent and 
accomplished teachers. We have talented and ambitious 
pupils ; we have school officers who give their time and 
efforts to the cause. But not one of these agencies, nor 



all combined can ensure success, while home influence is 
not right. As the family, so will be the school, so far as 
any influence is exerted. As believes the father or mother, 
so acts the boy or girl, when they come with the impress 
of home upon them, into the school room. 

Let us urge then, upon the parents of our school child- 
ren, the importance, the absolute necessity of encourag- 
ing both teacher and pupil. Do not condemn — do not 
even criticise the school you have never seen. Teach 
your children obedience at school as well as at home. 
Let them understand that for a just reproof or chastise- 
ment at school, they shall have no false sympathy. 

Aid your children at home ; speak of the school as a 
pleasant thing — allow no trivial object to keep your child- 
ren from the school room. Sympathize with them in their 
trials and their efforts for improvement. Do this and you 
will contribute to the success of the teacher — to the pro- 
gress of your own children and to the permanent good of 
the schools of the city. 

JAMES 0. ADAMS, 
SuPT. OF Public Instruction. 

December 28, 1866. 



213 



EEPOETS OF SUB-OOMMITTEES. 



FIRST SUB-DIVISION. 

To the School Committee. 

Gentlemen : I beg leave to submit the following brief 
report of the schools under my charge. 

I would say that there has been a good degree of pro- 
gress in all of the divisions. 

The primary department under the charge of the Misses 
Richardson and Kidder, is very interesting, and shows the 
great labor bestowed by each teacher. 

At the commencement of the Spring term, the increase 
of pupils in these schools was so large that it was deemed 
expedient to form another school. The engine house up- 
on Chestnut street was obtained for this purpose, and Miss 
Hills was appointed as teacher. Between thirty and forty 
pupils were transferred from schools Nos. 9 and 10. This 
pleasant school is getting along very nicely. 

The average attendance of schools Nos. 9 and 10 is 55 
and 54 respectively. 

The middle schools, under the care of the Misses Gove 
and Smith, are also well trained, — both teachers and pu- 
pils having a perfect understanding with each other, makes 
order and scholarship exceedingly good. 

Miss Gove, a superior teacher, being out of health, asked 
for a vacation of two terms, which was granted, and Miss 
Carrie Reed was appointed to her place, which duties she 
performed with much credit until the beginning of the 
present term, when Miss Gove resumed her labors. The 



214 

average attendance of Miss Gove's school has been 40 ; 
Miss Smith's 40. 

The North Grammar School is under Col. F. W. Parker, 
Principal, the Misses Copp, Brown and Ambrose, assist- 
ants, each very proficient in their departments. The aver- 
age attendance of the four divisions for the past year has 
been 200. Of this number Col. Parker has 88 ; Miss Copp 
40 ; Miss Brown 57, and Miss Ambrose 65. These divi- 
sions at the examination showed a remarkable degree of 
progress in all branches, and both teachers and scholars 
are determined that no school shall surpass the North 
Grammar School, and no means will be loft untried to 
have this school rank No. 1. The gymnastic and military 
drill is really very fine, and shows the training of an ex- 
perienced, man. 

At the commencement of the present term the promo- 
tions were quite large, so many entering from the middle 
schools into the fourth Division of the Grammar, that the 
seats were found inadequate to accommodate them all, 
and settees were placed around the room. This Division 
at the present time numbers some seventy-five pupils. 

The schools in the North Grammar building, taken as 
a whole, have been conducted in a most harmonious man- 
ner, and I can assure any parent he would be amply repaid 
to give them a visit and see how rapidly his children have 
progressed during the year. 

The teachers would cheerfully extend an invitation to 
both parents and friends to visit them at any time. 

Allow me, gentlemen, to make one suggestion, that is, 
the school committee will be obliged to take some active 
measure to prevent the increase of pupils in our schools, 
or they will be under the necessity of asking the citizens 
of Manchester to make a large appropriation to defray ex- 
penses for the erection of two or three more school houses, 
and that very soon. 



215 

In conclusion I beg leave to say that I have fulfilled my 
duties in connection witli these schools, for the past two 
years, very pleasantly, and would thank the teachers for 
their kind and willing co operation. 

Yours very respectfully, 

WM. G. PERRY. 



SECOND SUBDIVISION. 

Gentlemen of the School Committee : 

As your representative from Ward Two, agreeably to 
the vote passed, by the suggestion of our worthy Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, that each sub-coramittee 
should make a report of the schools assigned to him, I 
present this to your consideration, as brief as possible. 

My division consists of the schools in the South Gram- 
mar building, and that at Bakersville. The South Gram- 
mar house has been built nine years. I have had the hon- 
or of serving this ward as committee during' this period, 
and no small interest have I felt for these as well as our 
other schools. The teachers seem like a part of my own 
ftimily, and the children are really in part mine. For the 
progress of all I have felt the same parental care and anx- 
iety. The schools have been happy and successful ones 
from the commencement, and have been surpassed by none 
of the same grades in the city. 

We have lost a number of good teachers, who have 
found more lucrative positions elsewhere, but have been 
fortunate in filling their places, and I am happy to say the 
several departments were never in a more prosperous con- 
dition than at the present time, with thorough teachers, 
and all competent for the duties devolving upon them. 
In short, the schools show for themselves, and the classes 
that graduate from them. 



216 

The same remarks will apply to the Bakersville school. 
But gentlemen, who compose the City Government, it is 
to you we appeal, to make such appropriations for the 
schools, that your cliildren, and those of your neighbors, 
shall not endure the necessity of parting with the teachers 
that so nobly and patiently have toiled to educate them, 
because a^sister state can pay them a fair compensation, 
when your committee know they are worthy of the re- 
ward, but have not the means assigned them to so do. 1 
would not recommend extravagance, but it is poor en- 
couragement for teachers to educate themselves for that 
noble and most honorable occupation which should be 
paid equal to, if not above, any other, when really it is 
not upon the average of common employment, consider- 
ing the capital invested in the education required. Should 
not your children be regarded of more value than your 
money ? Who would take care of your money for the 
compensation paid to the public teachers and the Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction. You pay one-half of 
one per cent, to the savings institution to have your money 
cared for, which gives, at the least, a good salary. I 
should be glad that teachers might be paid in proportion 
to the property intrusted to their charge, at the same rate,' 
and allow each parent to set the value upon his own child- 
ren. 

Gentlemen, there is nothing so dear to us as our child- 
ren, and this will apply to all true parents, and nothing 
that we can give them to insure success and happiness like 
education, which should be as free as the air they breathe. 
With this there would be no more rebellion, no sectarian 
prejudices ; and to accomplish this we must have good 
teachers, and the parents must sympathize with them and 
assist them at home. 

In order to elevate the schools, those persons who are 
qualified to attend to them should do so. The Commit- 



217 

tee are elected annually, and often a Board almost en- 
tirely new come in charge of the schools ; and a great 
part of the year may elapse before they fairly understand 
what is required. They serve without compensation, ex- 
cept ten dollars a year, and are generally gentlemen in 
active life and already have work enough of their own. 
They are entitled certainly to the consideration and char- 
ity of the public if they are not always at their post, even 
not enough to transact business, as is often the case. It 
is not always easy to elect such men as should look after 
the schools, as they are unable or unwilling to make the 
sacrifice required by a vigilant guardianship. 

In Conclusion, it appears to me that the true policy is to 
pay a Superintendent enough so that he can aiford to de- 
vote his whole time to the schools. This he cannot do for 
the present salary of seven hundred dollars a year. 

WITERMIN SMITH. 



• THIRD SUB-DIYISION. 

This division, including middle schools Nos. 1 and 2, 
and primaries Nos. 2, 3 and 4, was assigned to Rev. Mr. 
Bowles, He was also one of the sub-committee on the 
High School. In consequence of his resignation, near the 
close of the year, the report of the division is made by 
others. The High School is reported by Mr. Smith, a 
member of the sub-committee, while the other schools are 
noticed briefly bj the Superintendent. 

The five low grade schools in the sub-division, though 
in old and inconvenient wooden buildings, arc among the 
best of their grades. The two middle schools taught by 
Miss Green and Miss Sleeper, have furnished thoroughly 
qualified classes for the grammar schools, and in most of 
the studies pursued, have maintained an excellent stand. 



218 

ing. No. 2 has neglected the music exercises, but in all 
other branches ranks as one of the best middle schools. 

The three primary schools are taught by Misses Parker, 
Dow and Flanders. These schools are never very small, 
nor are they so large as to prevent the raaintaiaance of 
good order, or the instruction necessary to make good 
scholars. 

If the Concord street schools are not transferred to 
rooms in the new High School house, it will be necessary 
to provide for their better accommodation in their present 
location. The two houses in which the three other schools 
are maintained, will soon require considerable modifica- 
tion and repairing, or be rendered entirely unfit for oc- 
cupancy. 



FOURTH SUB-DIVISION. 

To the School Commiltee of the City of Manchester : 

Nothing has occurred during the year now drawing to 
a close in the schools assigned to me, out of the usual 
course of events. The schools have generally been under 
the charge of competent and experienced teachers, and 
the result of their labors is satisfactory. 

In September last, my associates upon the sub-commit- 
tee of the High School, removed from the State to fields 
of greater usefulness. While I have in common with 
you missed their presence from the regular meetings of 
the Board, I have also felt the loss of their assistance and 
counsel upon the sub-committee. Mr. Bowles, from his 
long connection with the Board and familiar acquaintance 
with the school, as well as from his sound education, well 
balanced judgment and dignity of character, was admira- 
bly qualified for the position ; while Mr. Ordway, from his 
ripe scholarship in every branch of learning particu- 



219 

larly in chemistry and philosophy, and from his large ex- 
perience as a teacher, was an invaluable member of the 
sub-committee. 

The High School, in my opinion, was never in a more 
flourishing condition than at the present time. It labors 
under disadvantages from lack of suitable conveniences 
in the present building, which will disappear, when, in 
a few weeks, it shall be removed to the new and more 
commodious house now so nearly completed. The new 
house will be an ornament to our city as well as a credit 
to the enterprise and liberality of our people. It will af- 
ford us the privilege that cannot be too highly prized, of 
educating our children at home, at a great saving in ex- 
pense, and under our own supervision. 

Miss Baker, who has for several years been connected 
with the school as first assistant, recently resigned to accept 
a similar position in a neighboring State. The Committee 
were reluctant to part with her valuable services, and made 
an effort to induce hor to remain, but it was not in their 
power to compete successfully with our more opulent sis- 
ter State of Massachusetts. She has left the impress of 
her character, energy and intellect upon the minds of those 
of our children who have been so fortunate as to have been 
among her pupils, and she leaves with the regret, respect 
and best wishes alike of scholars and parents. 

A former pupil. Miss Gile, succeeded her. She is one 
of our citizens, a graduate of the High School with its 
highest honors, a successful teacher in the North Grammar 
School, and recently a teacher in the schools in Boston. 
The Committee have the highest confidence that she will 
not disappoint our expectations of her in her new position. 

The other teachers in the school, Mr. Colburn and Miss 
Brooks, have labored diligently, with zeal, unabated inter- 
est, and entirely to the satisfaction of the sub-committee, 
and, as is believed, to the satisfaction of the public. 



220 

Daring the past year, Hon. Moody Currier placed at the 
disposal of the Board a sum of money to be distributed in 
prizes for excellence in several departments of study in 
the High School. A list of the prizes and the names of 
the successful competitors will appear in the general report 
of the Board. 

The effect upon the school of the distribution of these 
prizes has undoubtedly been beneficial. We feel gratified 
at the announcement from Mr. Currier that he contem- 
plates the establishment of a fund, the increase of which 
will be annually expended for this purpose. 

The sub-committeeship was also assigned to me during 
the year of the following schools : 

Grammar school, at Wilson Hill, Miss Ambrose and 
Miss Dunbar. 

Middle school No. 3, Miss Bunton. 
" " " 4, Miss Baker. 

" " " 11, Miss Sebastian. 

Primary school No. 5, Miss Clay and Miss Hutchinson. 
" " " 6, Miss Lord'and Miss Clay. 

" " " 13, Miss Abbott. 

" « " 18, Miss Clifford. 

" " " 21, Miss Barnes. 

" " " 22, Miss Murphy. 

The Wilson Hill Grammar school is really a middle 
school and Grammar school combined, the scholars in that 
part of tlie District remaining in the school from one to 
three years after they are prepared to enter the Grammar 
schools. The number of scholars is not large — averaging 
about 30, and no disadvantage probably results from this 
mixed constitution of the school. 

In the spring Miss Ambrose, who had for so many years 
been the efficient teacher of the school, was transferred to 
the North Grammar school, and Miss Dunbar was elected 
to take her place. As frequently happens, a change in 



221 

teachers works no advantage to the school. The time con 
sumed in effecting the requisite acquaintance between pii 
pil and teacher is often so much time lost. Miss Dunbar 
came highly recommended by some of our own citizens 
and bringing a good record of her experience as a teacher 
in other places. She has labored with great zeal and ear- 
nestness to maintain the high character which the school 
had acquired under her predecessor ; and it is not surpris 
ing that she has found it difficult to satisfy, at once, those 
parents whose children attend the school. The difficulty 
is principally owing to the fact that a change in teachers 
was made, and not to any want of qualifications or of ef- 
fort on the part of the present teacher. 

Middle schools Nos. 3 and 4 rank among our best schools 
The teachers are every way qualified, from experience, ed- 
ucation and gentleness tempered with firmness, to fill their 
positions.- I never heard better recitations in arithmetic 
and geography, nor listened to better reading from schol- 
ars so young. The city will be fortunate if it shall be able 
to retain these teachers. They have labored, during the 
two years these schools have been under my care, in the 
conscientious effort to do tlieir whole duty, and have suc- 
ceeded to the entire satisfaction of parents and scholars, 
without exception. 

Middle school No. 11 also appeared to great advantage 
at the annual examination. Many of the pupils belong to 
those families of our Irish population where both parents 
are obliged to leave home to labor for a support for them- 
selves and children during a large part of the week. The 
attendance of the children at school is necessarily less con- 
stant, and less interest is taken in their progress by parents. 
Under such disadvantages, the progress made in this school 
has been rapid and satisfactory. The teacher has been 
faithful, and is competent for the place. 

Primary schools Nos. 5 and 6 have been under the care 



222 

of' good teachers, Miss Clay having been transferred from 
No. 6 to No. 5 to take the place of Miss Lord resigned ; 
and Miss Hutchinson having been transferred from Chest- 
nut street to No. 6, to take the place of Miss Clay. These 
schools have each had more scholars than could well be ac- 
commodated. The schools appeared remarkably well at 
the examinations. The teachers are faithful and zealous, 
as well as competent, and their labors are consequently 
successful. 

Primary No. 13, at Wilson Hill, is fortunate in being 
under the teaching of Miss Abbott. Although running 
over with scholars, it has been managed successfully. 
Her gentle disposition admirably qualifies her to have the 
charge of such "little folks." It affords me great pleas- 
ure thus to testify to her competency and success. 

During the summer it was thought best to divide the 
school, and a portion of the scholars were placed under 
the charge of Miss Barnes, in rooms hired for the purpose 
on Laurel street, near Hallsville. At the close of the 
term Miss Barnes resigned, and the schools were reunited. 

Primary schools Nos. 18 and 22 are composed of schol- 
ars, like those in middle school No. 11, and, of course, of 
less mature age. The teachers appear to have made the 
most of their opportunities, and the schools appeared as 
well as could have been expected at the annual examina- 
tion, particularly No. 18. 

I have endeavored to visit all these schools at least twice 
each term, but during a portion of the year was obliged 
by reason of ill health and pressure of engagements, to 
visit them less frequently. I need hardly add that these 
visits have been to me a source of pleasure and satisfaction. 

The demand for labor and the high prices it has com- 
manded have operated in a manufacturing place like this, 
to draw scholars from the higher grades of schools to the 
mills. This evil has affected less the schools under my 



223 

charge than some others, the scholars being fortunately of 
too tender years to be sent into the mills to labor. It is 
probably an evil inseparable from the occupation and ne- 
cessities of our population. 

It is to be4eeply regretted that our citizens do not avail 
themselves more generally of the advantages presented by 
our High School of giving their children a thorough edu. 
cation in the languages and higher branches of learning. 
It presents facilities and advantages unsurpassed by any 
school or academy in the State. It is a short-sighted pol- 
icy that induces parents to withhold such advantages from 
their children, literally offered " without money and with, 
out price." The advantage, particularly to boys, who re- 
main in the school through the prescribed course, over 
those who leave through the inducements arising from the 
prospect of sooner getting into business, must be apparent, 
and any influences that will arouse parents to a realiza- 
tion of the error of such a practice, will be welcomed by 
every friend of popular education. 

It gives me pleasure to acknowledge the cordial co-ope- 
ration of the Superintendent, and to bear testimony to his 
faithful attention to the duties devolved upon him in re* 
gard to the schools under my charge ; also to acknowledge 
the courtesy of the Board, and the confidence reposed in 
me, in so uniformly adopting the recommendations I have 
from time to time made in relation to the schools placed 
iinder my care, and in the success of w.ucli we all have a 
common interest. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ISAAC W. SMITH. 

Manchester, December 28, 1866. 



224 

FIFTH SUB-DIYISION. 
To the Board of Education : 

The schools assigned to the immediate supervision of 
your sub-committee are the Park St. Grammar School, 
Intermediate School, Middle Schools Nos. 9 and 10, and 
Primary Schools Nos. 11, 12, 15, 16, 17 and 19. 

The Park St. Grammar School. This school has en- 
joyed a good degree of prosperity during the present year. 
The average attendance has been good, and the efforts of 
the teachers, two in number, untiring. The scholars are 
mostly young, but have made excellent progress for their 
age, and show a decided aptitude to learn. We were 
more than gratified at the closing fall examination, — we 
were highly pleased. The recitations in geography, arith- 
metic, and the elementary rules, were decidedly satisfac- 
tory. The reading compared well with other schools in 
the city, but there is a large margin for improvement in 
them all. It seems to your committee that from the Pri- 
mary School to the High School inclusive, reading is 
taught the poorest of any branch. There should be a rad- 
ical reform. 

At the several times which we visited the school, the 
pupils seemed to be wide awake and imbued with the life, 
spirit and energy which characterize their teachers. If 
the scholars could be allowed to continue at the school a 
reasonable length of time and not taken out and put to 
work, as many of them are, by their parents, at a very 
early age, no better could be found, and none farther ad- 
vanced. 

The Intermediate School. Six different teachers have 
been employed in this school during the year. Most of 
them have been first-class, energetic and ambitious. But 
few of the pupils have attended regularly all the terms, 
but while at school have made commendable progress. 
Good order was maintained, and during the winter and 



225 

fall terms no whispering was observed. We consider the 
school a necessity in the city, for without it many young 
ladies and gentlemen would not attend at all. 

Middle School No. 9, on Park St. There has been a 
gradual improvement in this school during the year, and 
it ranks much higher than formerly. The order is good, 
no whispering was observed, the studies seemed well at- 
tended to and the recitations excellent. The teacher is 
faithful and diligent and does all in her power for the 
good of her pupils. 

Middle School No. 10, on Union St. An excellent 
school with an average attendance of about forty. The 
best of order is always maintained, and the scholars 
seemed to apply themselves diligently to their studies. 
There was a good improvement in this school, and the lady- 
like deportment of the teacher had an excellent influence 
upon the scholars. 

Primary School No. 11, on Manchester St. This is 
literally a primary school. The average number of schol- 
ars attending is about fifty. The teacher is exceedingly 
well adapted to her position, and gives good satisfaction. 

Primary School No. 12, on Manchester St. This is 
also an excellent school, and though a primary, ranks a 
grade higher than No. 11. The teacher has had much 
experience and teaches with good success. The average 
attendance is about thirty-fis^e. 

Primary School No. 15, on Park St. The average at- 
tendance in this school has been about fifty. The school 
is a good one, having improved greatly from what it was 
when your committee first became acquainted with it. 
The recitations were good, the pupils showed that they 
had studied, and there was a general interest apparent. 
, Primary School No. 16, on Park St. This has always 
been a model school so far as respects order. The teach- 
er exhibits a firmness and energy well calculated to gov- 



226 

ern. No whispering, no talking out loud, no unnecessary 
noise, a good attention, quiet and order in going and com- 
ing at recess ; these are some of the characteristics of 
this school which are worthy of imitation by other teach- 
ers. We would recommend that more attention be paid 
to reading well. The scholars are young, but the atten- 
dance during the year has been good. 

Primary School No. 17, on Union St. This is a pri- 
mary school of high rank, and no one can visit it without 
being pleased with its appearance. There is a thorough- 
ness in the paanner of teaching which is certainly com- 
mendable. The pupils are orderly and studious, and the 
teacher energetic and much interested in her labor. 

Primary School No. 19, on Park St. This is a de- 
lightful school and we record its excellence with pleasure. 
The teacher is energetic and full of life, and the scholars 
seemed quick to learn, were quiet and orderly and desir- 
ous to please. The singing was also excellent, and al- 
though they are among the youngest scholars in the city, 
they did as well as any we have seen. 

In conclusion we would say that the present year has 
been one of progress in the several schools particularly as- 
signed to your sub-committee. Nothing has occurred to 
disturb the even course that usually characterizes them. 
The Intermediate school, though often compelled to change 
its teachers, has been particularly fortunate in being able 
to secure those among the very best. 

There has been a good general attendance in all, but 
not so good as it might have been. The parents, many of 
them, seem to take too little interest in the education of 
their children ; allowing them to be absent from school on 
frivolous pretences ; not having a sufficient care to see 
that they do not play truant, and what is worse than all 
the rest, too often take them from school at the tender 
age of eight or ten years and put them to work for a 



22T 

small pittance, when in many instances the parents them- 
selves spend, every month, on useless and injurious luxu- 
ries, more than the child earns. A little self denial on 
the part of some parents would give their now uneducated 
children a tolerable education and greatly promote the 
welfare of the schools. 

Fewer cases of truancy have been reported this season 
than heretofore. This is owing to various causes, one of 
the principal of which is the tendency of the parent to 
shield the child however much he may do wrong. 

A more successful method, in our opinion, of prevent- 
ing truancy would be the appointing of a truant officer, 
outside of the Board of School Committee, who should 
give his whole time and attention to the matter, and be 
adequately paid for his services. Until this is done the 
evil cannot be wholly broken up. 

WILLIAM LITTLE, 

Sub-Committee. 



SIXTH SUB-DIVISION. 
To the Board of School Committee : 

Your sub-committee for the Sixth Ward would respect- 
fully submit the following report of the schools under his 
charge for the past year, consisting of those in Districts 
Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9. 

District No. 4. During the year this school has been 
under the charge of three different teachers, and has made 
fair progress. The first or winter term was taught by Mr. 
A. C. Osgood, a student from Dartmouth College. He 
was a young man of gentlemanly bearing, and manifested 
an interest in the school, but failed to get the good will 
of either the parents or scholars, and consequently was 
not as successful as was expected. 



228 

The second or spring term was under the management 
of Miss Emma F. Whittemore, a resident of the District. 
At her own request she was transferred to this school from 
District No. 9, where she had taught the two previous 
terms. In this school, as elsewhere, she proved to be an 
efficient teacher and good governess, and the school made 
fair progress. At the close of this term she resigned, and 
Miss Mary E. Roid, of Litchfield, was elected to fill the 
vacancy. She has managed the school admirably, and it 
is prospering better than for some time previous. 

District No. 5. The school in this District is quite 
small, numbering from six to ten pupils, and consequently 
possesses less interest and enthusiasm than is manifested 
in some of our larger schools. The winter term was taught 
by Mr. Elbridge D. Hadley >»' Deering. He managed the 
school well, and it made commendable progress. The two 
succeeding terms were taught by Miss Lana S. George. 
She labored faithfully and taught correctly ; and in some 
schools would be a good disciplinarian, but with stubborn 
scholars she was most too lenient. The school showed fair 
progress while she conducted it. 

District No. 6. The first term of this school was man- 
aged by Mr. J. Y. McQueston, on old resident of the town, 
and an experienced teacher. He managed acceptably to 
scholars and parents. 

The two terms succeeding were under the direction of 
Miss Hattie L. Jones, of Hooksett. She an energetic 
teacher, and governs well. In her hands the school has 
made good advancement in scholarship, and also .i disci- 
pline. 

District No. 7. The winter term of this school was a 
failure. Mr. John P. Sanborn, a student from the College 
at Hanover, was elected teacher for the first term ; and al- 
though he possessed* sufficient ability to teach, he signally 
failed in government, and left the school when the term 



229 

was about half expired. Mr. Edward F. James, of this 
city, was then put into the school. He was young and in- 
experienced in teaching, and was not equal to the position. 
His health failing him after about two weeks, he retired 
from the school, and it was discontinued for the remainder 
of the term. Mr. J. P. Pressey, who had taught the win- 
ter term in District No. 8, was elected teacher for the 
spring term, but resigned to accept a more lucrative posi- 
tion. Subsequently, Miss Maria H. Hildreth, of Deerfield, 
was elected to fill the vacancy thus occasioned, and taught 
the school during the remainder of the year with great ac- 
ceptance and success. We regard her as one of our 
strongest teachers. The increased number of scholars in 
this school made it necessary to give Miss Hildreth an as- 
sistant during the autumn term, and Miss Mary B. Lane, 
of Candia, was elected to that position. She has given 
general satisfaction. 

District No. 8. Mr. J. P. Pressey had charge of this 
school during the winter term, and managed it well. He 
taught with ability and governed with tact. The two fol- 
lowing terms were taught by Miss Lucy J. Priest, of Derry. 
She is an amiable young lady, and has met with good suc- 
cess in the school, governing by love more than most 
teachers. During the year the school has prospered well. 

District No. 9. The winter term of this school was taught 
by Miss Emma F. Whittemore. She had taught the pre- 
ceding term, and was quite successful in each. She was a 
faithful worker in tlie school room and governed well. 
The spring term was conducted by Miss Lucy A.. Putnam. 
She taught correctly and labored faithfully, but was, per- 
haps, a little lax in discipline, yet gave general satisfaction. 
Before the commencement of the fall term she resigned, 
and Miss Arianna H. Pulsifer, of Lake Village, was elected 
for the fall term. She was a vigorous teacher and quite 
strict and impartial in discipline. Some of the scholars 



230 

were allowed by their parents to leave the school on the 
plea that she was too severe ; but those who remained im- 
proved rapidly, and it is our opinion that it would have 
been more to the credit and advantage of those who left, 
if they had also remained. 

Music. During the past season, the people of the rural 
Districts began to agitate the subject of having music 
taught in the schools of those Districts, and the matter 
was brought before the Board, who referred it to the Su- 
perintendent and sub-committees of those Districts. They, 
favoring the project, procured the services of Mr. Jeremiah 
D. Jones as teacher of that department, and were sus- 
tained by the Board. He has proved to be the right man 
for the place. The children have made remarkable pro- 
gress in this branch of study for the time they have been 
practicing it. It meets with general approbation and 
would not now be willingly surrendered. 

IGNATIUS T. WEBSTER, 
Sub- Committee. 



SEVENTH SUB-DIYISION. 

The schools of Ward 7 were under the immediate su- 
pervision of Mr. Ordway, the member of the committee 
from that ward, who served until his resignation, the first 
of October. As no report was furnished by him, the defi- 
ciency is in part supplied by the Superintendent. 

The Grammar School in this ward is managed in a most 
admirable manner. It is characterized by excellent order, 
accurate scholarship, and much enthusiasm in the per- 
formance of every exercise. The teachers in charge ol the 
school are Miss Philinda P. Parker, who has had many 
years of successful experience in our public schools, — and 
Miss Lucia Cutler, who was elected as the successor of 



281 

Miss Stanton at the commencement of the fall term, and 
is giving perfect satisfaction. 

In the Middle School, or as it is sometimes styled, the 
West Primary, there are interesting scholars who need 
the mental and physical discipline which a good teacher 
can give. Miss Stevens is a faithful teacher, and exercises 
an excellent influence over her pupils. 

The East Primary, in the same building, under the in- 
struction of Miss Lord, is composed of a large number of 
very small children. They are restless and difficult to be 
controlled. But we do not expect small children to be 
kept under the same restraint as is exercised over those 
in the higher grades, and though some objections have 
been urged against the management of the school, the 
committee have considered the great care which the teach- 
er exercises over the children of more consequence than 
rigid government. 

The South Primary or partially graded school in this 
section of the city, alGfords a field of unceasing labor on 
the part of the teacher. It is usually fully attended and 
in consequence of not being fully graded, has many more 
classes than ordinary primary schools. Miss Hamblett, 
the teacher, is firm and prudent in her management, and 
teaches in a way which commends her to the approbation 
of the parents and the committee. 



EIGHTH SUB-DIYISION. 
To the School Committee of Manchester. 

Gentlemen : I respectfully submit the following report 
of the schools for which I am sub-committee. 

District No. 11 (Amoskeag) Grammar School, winter 
and spring terms, Henry M. Putney, teacher. This 
has made good progress under the instruction of Mr. Put- 



232 

ney. In reading, spelling and mathematics, the improve- 
ment was very marked. In writing but little improve- 
ment was made. This I consider was in a great degree 
owing to the neglect of parents in not providing their 
children with books, pens and ink. The pupils themselves 
however, manifested but little interest in this branch of 
their studies. In all the other branches they made about 
the usual advancement. 

Autumn term, Mr. Orrin J. Hancock, teacher. Much im- 
provement was made this term under the instruction of 
Mr. Hancock, whose labors were very satisfactory to both 
parents and pupils. In grammar, great advancement was 
made. In all the other branches the improvement was as 
rapid as could be expected by the most ardent friends of 
the school. 

District No. 1 (Rural District) Mixed School, Miss Sa- 
rah A. Preston, teacher. This school has been under the 
instruction of Miss Preston during the entire year, and 
has been conducted by her in a highly creditable manner, 
giving universal satisfaction to all concerned. I consider 
Miss Preston an excellent teacher, and the district has 
been fortunate in having secured her services. Consider- 
able improvement has been made in the different studies 
in this school during the year. This being a mixed school 
and the diversification in the ages of the scholars being 
very great, the improvement which has been made must 
be gratifying to both parents and scholars. 

District No. 2 (Blodgett St.) Middle School, Miss Ellen 
B. Rowell, teacher. This school has been under the in- 
struction of Miss Rowell during the year. Miss Rowell 
has conducted the school in a very successful manner, has 
maintained good order, without being severe in discipline, 
and has made much improvement in many respects. The 
scholars under her care and instruction have made rapid 
progress in their studies. 



233 

Primary school No. 1, (High School building,) Miss 
Mary E. Ireland teacher. Miss Ireland has been the 
teacher in this school during the past year. The satisfac- 
tion given by Miss Ireland as a teacher since her connection 
with this school has been so complete that nothing farther 
need be said in its favor. 

Primary school No. 14, Engine house, Chestnut street, 
Miss Emma A. McCoy, teacher. This school has been ad- 
mirably conducted by Miss McCoy during the spring and 
summer terms. The school is one of the most difficult 
of any of its grade in the city, notwithstanding which Miss 
McCoy, by her labors, has succeeded in having a good 
school, and the progress made has far exceeded the ex- 
pectations of both parents and committee. 

Primary school No. 20, Engine house. Chestnut street, 
Miss Helen M. Hills, teacher. This school is fortunate in 
having a good teacher. The improvement has been rapid, 
not only in the studies, but in the order and deportment 
of the pupils. 

District No. 11, (Amoskeag) primary school. This 
school has been conducted in such a manner as to give 
general satisfaction. There has been a visible improve- 
ment in the school during the past year. Much progress 
has been made in the studies, particularly in the singing. 
Miss Frances E. Dean taught the school during the year. 

In the discharge of my duties I have received the cor- 
dial support and co-operation of the able teachers of the 
schools, for which I am sub-committee, of the value of 
whose services it gives me pleasure to express publicly my 
appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS L. THORPE. 



234 

Note. By an error in the returns made by teachers in 
the schools on Union street, corner of Laurel, No. 10 mid- 
dle school is designated as No. 11, and primary No. 17, as 
No. 18, in some parts of the report. 

The records of the Board show that the schools in the 
house on Union street, shall be known by numbers as 
follows : 

That on the 2d floor, south side, middle school No. 10. 

That on the 2d floor, north side, middle school No. 11. 

That on the 1st floor, south side, primary school No. 17. 

That on the 1st floor, north side, primary school No. 18. 



235 



STATE AID EENDERED TO FAMILIES OF VOL- 
UNTEERS. 



Jeremiah Connor, - 


$6 00 


James Collins, Jr., - 


6 50 


Patrick Houlehan, 


3 73 


Michael Sullivan, 


8 00 


OwenTully, 


6 00 


Fred'k Paine, 


38 00 



$67 23 



236 



INDEX. 



Address, Maj'or's, 5 

Abatement of Taxes, 112 

Bridge, Amoskeag Falls 47 

Granite 47 

Commons, 51 

Cemetery, Pine Grove 62 

at the Center, 120 

Report of Com., 144 

Report of Treas., 145 

City Hall and Stores, 79 

Debt, City 131 

Reduction of, 130 

Discount on Taxes, 112 

Fire Department, 63 

Steamer Amoskeag, 53 

Fire King, 63 

E. W. Harrington, 64 

Pennacook HoseCo., 64 

Hook & Ladder Co., 64 

Engineers, 55 

Miscellaneous, 55 

Recapitulation, 66 

Farm, City 29 

Government and Officers, 

1866, 19 
Government and Officers, 

1867, 149 
Highways and Bridges : 

District No. 1, 34 

No. 2, 35 

No. 3, 37 

No. 4, 37 

No. 5, 38 

No. 6, 39 

No. 7, 40 

No. 8, 41 

No. 9, 42 

No. 10, 43 

No. 11, 44 

No. 12, 45 

No. 13, 45 

Highways, New 46 



Incidental Expenses, 74 

Interest, 124 

Invoice City Farm Property, 136 

Lighting Streets, 71 

Loan, Temporary 126 

Library, City 81 

Report of Trustees, 83 

Report of Librarian, 90 

Report of Treasurer, 86 

Donations, 91 

New Books, 94 

Militia, 72 

Officers, City 121 

Order for Printing Report, 22 

Paupers off the Farm, 27 

Police, 68 

Paving Streets, 118 

Printing and Stationery, 72 

Property, City 148 

Reserved Fund, 132 

Reservoirs, 60 

Report of Treasurer, 24 

Finance Committee, 26 

Chief Engineer, 57 

Overseers of Poor, 135 

Sewers and Drains, 48 

Schools, 128 

School House, New, No. 2, 128 

Repairs, No. 2, 128 

No. 3, 129 

No. 6, 129 

No. 6, 129 

No. 7, 129 

No. 11, 130 

School Report, 159 

State Aid, 235 

Teams, City 32 

Tenement on Vine Street. 120 

Taxes, uncollected 133 

Valuation, Taxes, &c., 134 

Watering Streets, 118