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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

^ U St. O ' M * g 'w p »j 






Annual Reports 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



ruB xax 



^ E A R 18 6 7. 




MANCHESTER: 

JOHN B. CLARKK, BOOK AND JOB PHINTKl-: 
1868. 



NEW.HAMPSH:.:. 
STATE' LIBRARY 



TWENTY-SECOND 



ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 

18 6 7. 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS 
RELATING TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




ma:nchestee, N. H.: 

JOHN B. CLARICE'S BOOK A^TD JOB PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT. 
1868. 



N 
552.67 

\8^7 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



HON. JAMES A. WESTON 



MAYOR, 



THE CITY COUNCIL OF MA:N'CHESTER, 



DELIVERED 



BEFORE THE TWO BRANCHES IN CONVENTION, JANUARY 7, 1868. 



ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Council : 

Having l)een called by the suffrages of my fellow-citizens 
to the position I have just assumed, I enter upon the dis- 
charge of the du.ties of the office with a firm reliance upon 
Him whose blessing we have invoked. As we take ui)on 
ourselves the labors and responsibilities of our several 
offices, let us not forget our dependence upon the Divine 
Being for that wisdom which shall enable us to act so as to 
secure the welfare of our city and the people -snIiosc inte- 
rests have been entrusted to our care. 

While it will not be expected that I should be familiar 
with the details of the several departments of our city af- 
fairs, so as to be able at this time to make specific recom- 
mendations for your consideration, I will advert to some of 
the more important sulyects that will claim your attention 
and official action. Should occasion require, I will make 
further communications of a more definite character. 

FINANCE. 

It is a matter of regret that we are called upon to com- 
mence the labors of a new year before a detailed statement 
of the doings of our predecessors can be furnished. In 
the absence of such a statement, we must content ourselves 
with such information as circumstances have placed within 
our reach. 



The following statement, furnished by our faithful Treas- 
urer, is believed to exhibit the present financial condition 
of the city : — 

Amt. of funded debt Jan. 1, 1867, 8371,900.00 
Deduct amt. paid during the year, 
(being $10,000 more than the amt. 

appropriated for this object), 20,000.00 
Present amount of funded debt, 1351,900.00 

Amt. temporary loan, Jan. 1, 1867, 23,022.50 
Add for increase dm-ing the year, 12,208.00 

Present amt. of temporary loan, $35,230.50 

Balance of appropriation for Court 

House, 12,500.00 

Amt. due for steam fire engine, 4,450.00 

Amt. of interest now due, about, 10,000.00 
Unpaid bills now due, about, 14,000.00 

40,950.00 



Total debt and interest, Jan 1, 1868, 428,080.50 

Deduct cash on hand, 34,000.00 

Note due on Barrett place, 275.00 

34,275.00 



Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1868, 8393,805.50 

From this amount may properly be deducted such sum 
as shall be realized from taxes now due, over and above 
any outstanding claims not enumerated above. There has 
l^een paid during the year 821,000 towards the coiirt house, 
leaving unpaid the sum of 812,500 from the amount set 
apart for that object. This it is thought will cover the 
cost of the building ; but a further sum will be requii'ed 
for furniture and fixtures, and also for a fence to enclose 
the lot. 



The valuation as returned l)y the assessors for the past 
year is 810,101,556, showing an increase of $51,536 over 
the vahiation of 1866. The amount assessed by tax last 
year was $207,457.39, including school house tax. Eate of 
taxation $19.20 on $1,000, besides school house tax. The 
amount paid for state and county tax during the past year 
was $63, 638.34. 

The subject of the city debt should receive our most 
serious attention and care, and every proper effort should 
be made to guard against its enlargement. While circum- 
stances may sometimes justify an increase of the debt for 
the purpose of developing our material resources, I am 
fully convinced that true policy requires that all ordinary 
expenditures should be promptly met by annual taxation ; 
and also that such reasonable sum as can be applied with- 
out too great burden upon tax-payers, should annually be 
appropriated for the gradual extinguishment of the city 
debt. 

Too much care and consideration cannot be bestowed 
upon the subject of the appropriations. Each department 
should be carefully examined, and, as far as can be fore- 
seen, should* receive such sum as a judicious and econom- 
ical administration of its affairs shall demand ; and no fur- 
ther sum should be expended until provision for its i)ay- 
ment has been made by the City Council. 

As many of you who arc familiar with our financial 
affairs arc aware, parties having in charge the disbursement 
of the })ublic funds have heretofore too frequently over- 
drawn the appropriations of some of the departments, the 
result being that at the end of the year we find ourselves 
unexpectedly involved in debt. In such a contingency, 
either a transfer of funds appropriated for other uses must 
be made, or a temporary loan must be effected to meet the 
deficiency, and our debt thus become unwarrantably in- 
creased. If parties contracting for the city were always 



/ 



8 

held personally responsible for all sums expended beyond 
the amonnt appropriated (as they legally are), a better sys- 
tem of accountability would be instituted. 

SCHOOLS. 

Our schools have always been the object of much soli- 
citude on the part of our citizens. The future welfare of 
our institutions is too intimately connected with the char- 
acter and intelligence of the people, to permit any pecuni- 
ary considerations to abridge their usefulness. The appro- 
priations heretofore have been liberal, and the disburse- 
ments have been made under the direction of a committee 
who had the confidence of their fellow citizens. Although 
the expenditures in this department the past year were 
large, considerably exceeding the appropriations for previ- 
ous years, we are likely to be called upon for a still larger 
sum the coming year. 

For this large annual outlay, about one-fifth of our whole 
tax, the people have a right to expect much in return. 
While they so cheerfully l)ear the burdens of increased 
taxation, that the youth of our city may become more and 
more useful to themselves and the community, the}^ have 
good reason to claim that their liberality in this respect 
shall be rewarded by the real elevation and intellectual de- 
velopment of the pupils in our public schools in a corres- 
ponding degree. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

The city library has been so long established, its bene- 
fits are so fully appreciated, and its salutary influence is so 
apparent, that no arguments are needed to commend it to 
your favorable consideration. 

In consequence of the steady increase of important ac- 
quisitions, the demand for more and better accommoda- 
tions, with greater security against fire, is becoming daily 



more urgent. The destruction of this library, containing 
works of great value, some of which it would be impossible 
to replace, would be a serious misfortune. It is very desir- 
able, too, that the reading room should be re-established 
and conveniences provided for the depository of works of art. 
In the inaugural address of my predecessor, allusion was 
made to a suggestion of the Hon. B. A. Straw, Ijy which a 
munificent donation was proposed to aid in the construction 
of such a building as the present and prospective wants of 
the library may require. To secure the 1;)enefit of this lib- 
erality, I earnestly recommend that proper and effective 
action be taken without delay. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

The preservation of peace and good order so essential to 
our security and comfort as well as the good name of our 
city abroad, requires a vigilant and energetic police depart- 
ment. The safety of a community is dependent not only 
upon the promptness with which offenders against tlic laws 
are brought to justice, but also to a large extent upon those 
precautionary measures which most effectually restrain the 
viciously inclined, and thus prevent the actual commission 
of crime. To secure the highest success of this depart- 
ment, it is, therefore, of the utmost importance that those 
who are placed in authority should be discreet, intelligent, 
efUcicnt and upright men. If, in addition to these qualities, 
a candidate for a place has had the benefit of experience, 
and has proved himself worthy of the position in all re- 
spects, it is manifest that he has a still higher claim to 
consideration. That you will exercise due care and dis- 
crimination in the selection of these officers, I cannot allow 
myself to doubt. 

I would call your attention to the urgent necessity which 
exists for better accommodations for those persons who are 



10 

temporarily held under arrest for suspected offences against 
the laws. The apartment in the basement of the city hall 
building, known as the lobl^y, which is used for this pur- 
pose, has long been regarded as not only unhealthy, but 
also as entirely unfit in other respects for the abode of hu- 
man beings, even for a very brief period. Justice and the 
dictates of humanity alike require that this class of persons 
should be treated with as much kindness as the nature of 
the case will allow. I would therefore recommend that 
some measures be taken to provide better quarters for those 
who are held in custody while awaiting the action of the 
court. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

It has been said by intelligent observers, that there is no 
more infallible sign of the civilization of a country, or of 
the advancement, elevation and good tastes of any people, 
than the common roads. It surely does not require a great 
amount of experience to confirm the truth of this state- 
ment. A community rising in real prosperity and sound 
intelligence, at once shoAvs its characteristics in the conve- 
nient, agreeable, and easy means of social and commercial 
intercourse. 

On an examination of former reports of the city, it will 
be observed that in most of the rural districts, the appro- 
priations have not been increased to meet the advance in 
price of labor. While wages have increased at least fifty 
per cent, the appropriations for these districts are actually 
less than they were ten or twelve years ago. Although it 
is a[)parent that more money should in some instances be 
allowed for repairs, much depends upon the manner in 
which it is expended by the several surveyors, and there- 
fore great care should be exercised in the selection of these 
officers. I trust you will accord to this subject such an in- 
vestigation as its importance deserves. 



11 

A committee of the late city government has recom- 
mended tlie purchase of the necessary machinery to l)reak 
or crush stone to a suitable size for macadamizing some of 
. the principal streets. This plan has been adopted in sev- 
eral New England cities where it is well spoken of. Should 
this recommendation be carried into effect, I would still 
suggest that the practice of paving a portion of Elm street 
each year, which has been so generally approved by our 
citizens, be continued. 

While that part of the street used by teams and carriages 
is being considered, I would direct your attention to the 
condition of our sidewalks. Although great improvements 
have been made the past year by the introduction of the 
concrete pavement to a large extent, which has Ijecn laid 
at the expense of the abuttors, much more needs to be dolie. 
In aid of this object I trust that all proper encouragement 
will be extended on the part of the city. 

Proper grades arc so essential to the convenience and 
safety of pedestrians- as to demand that more attention 
should be given to the subject, and if necessary, the exer- 
cise of more authority. As one of the city ordinances pro- 
vides that all sidewalks shall be laid under the direction of 
the superintendent of streets, that officer should be held as 
strictly accountable for their proper construction, as for any 
other part of the highway. No walk should be permitted 
to be raised or lowered except under his direction ; and 
such existing walks as are unsafe or inconvenient should bo 
so regulated as to relieve the city from all danger of liabil- 
ity on account of accidents. 

For the past few years very little has been done in the 
way of opening new highways. The boundaries of the city 
proper, however, have been constantly enlarging, and as a 
consequence, new avenues of communication are required, 
Many applications for new streets will undoubtedly be made, 
and the- most careful discrimination should be exercised in 



12 

deciding as to which are absohitely demanded for the public 
good. Only such should be constructed. 

Considerable improvement was made last year in the 
means of watering Elm street. A new water wagon w^as 
provided, and the tanks on Merrimack square rebuilt at a 
total cost of about $1500. No unusual expense will be re- 
quired the coming year. The Amoskeag Falls bridge has 
been replanked the past year, and so improved that a very 
"Small outlay Avill be required to keep it in good condition 
for some time to come. The great amount of travel over 
the Granite bridge has occasioned a large annual outlay for 
its maintenance. Although the planking was renewed two 
and a half years ago, I am informed that a new set will be 
required the coming year. I am also informed that some 
of the tloor timbers are considerably decayed, and may need 
replacing. I would suggest an early examination of this 
matter so that the necessary timber may be contracted for 
this winter. I have no doubt that the use of oak plank, of 
more than the ordinary thickness, would prove good econ- 
omy, and would avoid inconvenience to the puldic, occa- 
sioned hj interruption of travel by so frequent repairs. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

The frequent flooding of streets and cellars has called 
the attention of our citizens to our system, or rather want 
of system, of sewerage. That something needs to be done 
is admitted on all hands ; but exactly what is required is 
not so easily determined. The City Council pas^^cd an or- 
der in 1855, instructing the Mayor to procure such surveys 
as were necessary, in order to adopt some definite system 
with a full knowledge of our present and future require- 
ments. 

The necessary surveys, plans and estimates were accord- 
ingly made with great care and elaboration, by a civil en- 



13 

giiiecr of such standing and varied experienco in this par- 
ticular branch, as to chiini most earnest attention to his 
suggestions. Instead of this, the report was allowed to 
slumber in manuscript form till 1863, when it was pub- 
lished ; but I am not aware that it has ever received the at- 
tention the importance of the subject demands. I earnestly 
commend this report to your consideration, trusting that at 
least some system may be adopted whereby each sewer and 
drain hereafter laid, shall be a part of an harmonious whole. 

It will be for you to determine whether the time has ar- 
rived to make an appropriation sufficient to remedy the ex- 
isting defects in the Elm-street sewer. 

To enable the committee on sewers and drains, and those 
who are to come after them, to perform their duties intelli- 
gently, a plan should be prepared, upon which all the pres- 
ent sewers should be accurately located — their capacity 
noted, and other useful information preserved. Such a j)lan 
would save much annoyance and needless expense. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The fire department, so justly the pride of our citizens, 
continues to maintain its well-earned reputation. Among 
both the present and past memljcrs of the department are 
enrolled the names of some of our most worthy and es- 
teemed townsmen, who, by their good management, vigil- 
ance and promptness, have gained the confidence of the 
people in regard to their fitness for the positions they ac- 
cepted. I can safely say that our fire department is no- 
where excelled, either for efficiency or the economy with 
wliicli it is managed. 

There are now four steam fire engines belonging to the 
department, one having been added during the past season. 
The terms of the purchase of the latter require that it 
shall be paid for during the ensuing year. It may be ad- 



14 

visable to construct one or more reservoirs in sections of 
the city now destitute of a supply of water for the extin- 
guishment of fires. 

"While upon this subject I cannot refrain from referring 
to the great advantage that woukl result from the introduc- 
tion of an abundant supply of pure water into the city. 
This project has been frequently discussed, and the neces- 
sary legislation has been obtained. In my judgment, it 
would not be advisable for the city to engage in such an 
enterprise ; but much encouragement might be extended to 
an undertaking of this kind by an agreement to take water 
for protection from fires, and for sanitary purposes, at stip- 
ulated prices. There can be but little question that an 
investment for this ol>jcct, properly made, would prove re- 
munerative ; and whenever the sulvject is brought l^efore 
our capitalists in proper form, and at a favorable time, its 
success cannot be doubtful. 

COMMONS AND CEMETERIES. 

The health and comfort of our citizens require that con- 
stant care and attention should be bestowed upon the pub- 
lic grounds. ■No unclean or unsightly object should be 
permitted to remain in the ponds or elsewhere, nor should 
the improvements already commenced be suffered to lan- 
guish for want of encouragement. Concrete walks across 
some of the principal squares would add to their beauty, 
and promote public convenience. 

In this connection I would ask you to consider whether 
the obligations of the city are not such as to call for some 
action relative to an iron fence around the commons, in 
accordance with the condition of the deeds under which 
the same are held. The expense of suitable inclosures 
would necessaril}» be large, and could not reasonably be met 
in any one year ; consequently a portion only of the work 



15 

need be done at any one time. A substantial iron fence 
along Elm street, on the Avcstern border of Merrimack 
square, would greatly improve the appearance of our prin- 
cipal business thoroughfare. 

The proceeds from the sale of lots in the Valley ceme- 
tery will be sufficient to meet its present requirements, 
although the funds have been nearly exhausted by the large 
outlay occasioned by building the new carriage road. It is 
tliought that the revenue from the sale of lots made availa- 
ble by this improvement will be sufficient to cover its cost. 

A small annual appropriation has usually been made for 
the Pine Grove cemetery. I trust this will not be required 
hereafter, unless some improvement of a more important 
character should be undertaken. 

MILITARY. 

We have in our city at the present time eight or nine 
military companies, which form a portion of the state mi- 
litia. The members of these organizations, many of whom 
have served on the battlefield in defence of the government 
and the constitution established by their ancestors, by their 
public spirit and true soldierly Ijearing, are an honor to the 
city, and have won a high })lace in public esteem. Our 
citizens will, I have no doubt, cheerfully extend to them 
such aid and encouragement as may be just and reasonable. 

CITY FARM. 

I have not been able to make myself acquainted with the 
details of the management of the city farm at the present 
time. The number of paupers at the farm for several 
years past, has averaged from twelve to fifteen only. Of 
this number less than half have been adult males, most of 
whom were aged, or otherwise incapacitated for labor. 



16 

The landed property of the institution consists of t\ro con- 
necting farms, ^Yhich embrace in all an area of more than 
'two hundred and fifty acres. 

Every person who is at all conversant with farming oper- 
ations is aware that to conduct a farm of this size in a 
proper manner requires on the part of the owner a large 
outlay for stock, tools, labor, <fec., which is almost certain ' 
to prove an unprofitable investment when the management 
is confided to another party. Hence, our intelligent farm- 
ers in this part of the country, where the land is rugged 
and the soil comparatively poor, have found it to their 
advantage to cultivate a much smaller quantity of land 
than was formerly the practice. It cannot be doubted that 
if the labor and money which are now expended upon our 
large domain of two hundred and fifty acres, were concen- 
trated upon a farm of one hundred acres at most, the 
interests of the city and all concerned would be greatly 
promoted thereby, even should the number of inmates be 
ten times larger than have been accommodated at any one 
time for many years. 

In view of these considerations, I would recommend that 
the westerly portion of the farm, from which there is no 
income at present, be divided into lots of suitable size Avith 
the necessary streets, reserving such of the lots as may 
possibly be needed for public uses ; and that this land be 
sold as opportunity offers. This being accomplisli^d, our 
treasury, as w'ell as our taxable property, will be increased 
and the city improved. 

conclusion. 

Gentlemen of the City Council: 

I have thus referred to some of the principal subjects 
which will require the exercise of your most careful and 
deliberate judgment. Relying upon your wisdom and ex- 



17 

perience, I shall at all times look to you for counsel to aid 
me in performing the duties of the office which I have now 
assumed, in a manner which shall tend to promote the 
general welfare. I am cheered by tlie reflection that our 
relations will always be harmonious ; and, that whatever 
differences of opinion may arise, we shall always cherish 
mutual sentiments of respect and good will. 

Let us remember that we are the servants of the people, 
and have taken a solemn obligation to protect the interests 
which they have confided to our keeping. Let no consid- 
erations of friendship, or private interest, deter us from 
discharging our duties in accordance with our highest con- 
victions of truth and justice ; that when we surrender our 
trust, we may have the reward of an approving conscience. 

JAMES A. WESTOX. 

January 7, 1868. 
2 



GOVERNMENT AND OEFICERS 

OF THE 

CITY OF MANCHESTER 

1867. 



MAYOR, 

JOSEPH. B. CLARK. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1, William G, Perry, Ward 5, Daniel Connor, 

Ward 2, Ezra Huntington, Ward 6, Isaac WhittemorCj 

Ward 3, Samuel Hall, Ward 7, John Patterson, 

Ward 4, John C. Young, Ward 8, Daniel K. White. 



Joseph E. Bennett, City Clerk. 

Henry R. Chamberlin, Treasurer and Collector. 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



Ward 1, Henry A. Campbell, Ward 2, Joseph W. Bean, 

H. C. Sanderson, Granville P. Mason, 

John Plummer. John Pattec. 



20 



Ward 3, Wm. P. Newell, Ward 6, Joseph Rowley, 

Seth J. Sanborn, A. M. Corning, 

John Brngger. Wm. F. Sleeper, 

Ward 4, Charles E. Balch, Ward 7, Charles S. Fisher, 

George S. Holmes, Isaac Lewis, 

Arthur L. Walker. Joseph H. Brooks, 

Ward 5, Geo. W. Hunkins, Ward 8, John Field, 

George Fox, George H. Gerry, 

Andrew Farrel, David A. Messer. 



Henry C. Sanderson, President Common Council. 
Horace M, Gillis, Clerk Common Council. 
Harrison D. Lord, City Messenger. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Perry ; Messrs. 
Newell, Balch and Brugger. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Whittemoro and Hmitington ; 
Messrs. Holmes, Mason and Sanborn. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Young and White j 
Messrs. Rowley, Plummer and Pattee. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Patterson and Hall; 
Messrs. Balch, Corning and Brooks. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Hall and Young ; Messrs. New- 
ell, Sleeper and Corning. 

On City Farm. — The Mayor and Alderman Whittemore ; 
Messrs. Walker, Field and Plummer. 

On Sewers and Brains. — Aldermen White and Connor ; 
Messrs. Bean, Hunkins and Sleeper. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Perry and Pat- 
terson ; Messrs. Fisher, Campbell and Brugger. 



21 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Huntington and Pat- 
terson ; Messrs. Campbell, Newell and Gerry. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Perry and Hall ; Messrs. Fisher, 
Holmes and Pattee. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Connor and Whit- 
temore ; Messrs. "Walker, Lewis and Fox. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen White and Huntington ; 
Messrs. Field, Mason and Farrel. • 

On Citij Hall Building. — Aldermen Young and Connor; 
Messrs. Campbell, Mason and Gerry. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OP ALDERMEN. 

On Licenses. — Messrs. Whittemore and Connor. 
On Enrollment. — Messrs. Patterson and White. 
On Lighting Streets. — Messrs. Young and Perry. 
On Bills in Second Reading. — Messrs. Perry and Whit- 
temore. 

On Marlcet. — Messrs. Connor and Patterson. 

On Setting' Trees. — Messrs. Huntington and White. 

On MarshaTs Account. — Messrs. Hall and Young. 

On Abatement of Taxes. — Messrs. Hall and Huntington. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Elections and Relurns. — Messrs. Brugger, Brooks and 
Mason. 

On Bills in Second Beading. — Messrs. Bean, Sanborn 
and Mcsser. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. Balcli, Holmes and Field. 



ACCOUNT 



HENRY R. CHAMBERLIX, 



CITY TREASURER, 



JANUARY 1, 1SG7, TO JANUARY 1, 18G8 



24 



Dr. City of Mcaicliester in Acc't Current ivith Henry B. Cham- 



To Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1867, 




. $11,343 44 


Paupers off the Farm, 


... 


2,522 91 


City Farm, .... 


... 


2,896 98 


City Teams, .... 




2,544 33 


Highway District No. 1, . 




465 69 


Dist. No'. 2, $4,940 35 ; Dist. No. 


8,' $499 85, ' 


. 5,440 20 


" " 3, 412 03; " " 


9, 525 04, 


937 07 


" " 4, 853 91; " " 


10, 1,473 84, 


. 1,827 75 


" " 5, 232 35; " " 


11, 699 70, 


932 05 


" " 6, 213 79; '' " 


12, 802 51, 


1,016 30 


" " 7, 414 90; " " 


13, 162 46, 


577 36 


New Highways, 


... 


224 45 


Granite Bi-idge, ... 


. . • 


459 82 


Amoskeag Falls Bridge, . 


... 


. 1,729 70 


Piscataquog- Bridge, . 


. . . 


214 75 


Commons, 


. . 


. 1,095 84 


Sewers and Drains, $3,273.49; Eeseii-oirs, $102.05 


, 3,375 54 


Pine Grove Cemetery, 




470 92 


Fire Department, 




. 5.780 48 


Printing and Stationery, . 




1,549 36 


City Police, . . ' . 




10,156 71 


Lighting Streets, 




2,746 02 


Incidental Expenses, 




3,590 16 


City Hall, §2,654.51; Citv Library, $2,369.54, 


5,024 05 


CityOlficers, $7,516.13; Militia, $347.23, 


7,863 36 


Temporary Loan, 


. . . 


10,402 60 


Interest, ^ (Coupons, $21 ,720.00) 


. 


22,798 39 


City Debt, $20,000.00; Pepairs of BuikVgs, $195.44 


20,195 44 


PaAing Streets, .... 




3,338 14 


AVatcring Streets, 




2,183 75 


New High School House, 




17,143 43 


New School House, District No. £ 


, . . . . 


1,135 00 


New School House, District No. c 


, . . . . 


6 00 


New School House, District No. 7 




GOO 00 


Repairs of School House, District No. 6, 


83 06 


Repairs of School House, District No. 10, 


81 34 


Repairs and Insurance, District N 


'o. 2, . 


2,550 00 


Schools, $38,000.00; Court House 


$21,003.28, 


69,003 28 


Ab"m't of Taxes, $5031.68 ; Dis. on Taxes, $4,227.43 


9.259 11 


State Tax, $48,987.50 ; County 


Tax, $14650.84, 


63,638 34 


Liquor Agency, $737.78; Dog i 


ax, $18.00, 


755 78 




$287,958 70 . 


Cash in the Treasuiy, January 1, 


1868, . 


34,109 91 



$322,068 61 



25 



berlin, City Treasurer, (one year ending December 31, 1867). Cr. 



Bv Cash iu the Treasury Januarj^ 1, 1867, . 
' Taxes 1859, $1,211.21 ; Taxes 1861, $16.13, 



1863, $44.66, 
1865, $3,124.«1, 
1867, $172,219.24 



1,922.25, 



1862, $19.56; 
" 1864, $346.78; 
" 1866, $34,860.24; 

Doo- Tax, 1867, .... 

Temporary Loan, 

Savings Bank Tax, . 

Kailroad Tax, 

United States Bounties, . 

Literary Fund, .... 

City Hall, $1,933.53; City Fami, 

Police Court, 

City Scales, $228.72; Water Eent, $57.00, 

Paupers from other Towns, 

Pine Grove Cemetery, .... 

County of Hillsborough, .... 

Interest on Taxes, 

City Teams, $898.22; Amounts Ov'erdrawn, $19.25, 

Circus and Exhibition Licenses, 

Dog Licenses, $102.00; Sewer Licenses, $690 

City Liquor Agency, .... 

Refunded by County Treasurer, 

Moses Polfe on Note, .... 

Cost on Non-Resident Taxes, . 

Rent of Tenements on Vine Sti*eet, 

J. E. Bennett, Labor of men and teams, 
'' " Old Paper, Lumljer, &c., sold 

" " Rent of Ward Room, . 

Charles Canfield, Sand, .... 
" " Pipe, Gravel, &c., . 

Joseph B. Clark, From J. Stanton, 

A. W. Sanborn, Hook and Ladder Cai'riagc 

H. M. Bailey & Son, Old Brass, . 

S. S. Moulton, House of Reformation, . 

City Farm, Grass from Commons, 



Old Bills marked " C," . 
Unpaid Bills January 1, 1868, 



97, 



$35,406 74 
1,227 34 

64 22 
3,471 59 

207.079 48 

143 00 

22,610 00 

12.394 47 

10,416 91 

2,975 00 

679 50 

3,855 78 

2,527 42 

285 77 

190 98 

340 57 

880 15 

854 43 

917 47 

359 00 

792 97 

183 84 

72 itO 

225 (JO 

67 00 

lOS (M) 

20 n:| 

62 (17 

1(» so 

l:)0 (11) 

37 00 

50 00 

50 00 

2 40 

5 14 

65 (M) 

$308,621 04 

154 00 

. 13,293 57 

« 



$322,068 61 

HENRY R. CHAMBERLLN^, Treasurer. 
Manchester, January 1, 1868. 



FIISTANCE COMMITTEE'S KEPOKT. 



The undersigned, Committee on Finance, certify that we 
have examined the foregoing account of Henry R, Cham- 
herlin. City Treasurer, and find the same correctly cast and 
properly vouched. 

During the year ending December 31, 1867, there has 
hecn received into the Treasury, including the balance on 
hand January 1, 1867, the sum of three hundred eight 
thousand six hundred twenty-one dollars and four cents, 
(1308,621,04,) and there has been paid from the Treasury, 
during the same time, the sum of two hundred seventy-four 
thousand five hundred eleven dollars thirteen cents, (274,- 
511.13,) leaving in the Treasury, January 1, 1868, thirty- 
four thousand one hundred nine dollars ninety-one cents, 
(34,109.91). 

Ten thousand dollars have been paid on the permanent 
debt, above the appropriation, and eight thousand seven 
hundred ninety-five dollars have been paid out on the Court 
House, above what has been hired by temporary loan. 

WM. P. NEWELL, 
WILLIAM G. PERRY, 
, JOSEPH B. CLARK, 

JOHN BRUGGER, 
CHAS. E. BALCH, 
Committee on Finance. 



APPEOPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



By balance from old account, 


$57 


22 


Appropriation, . 


. 


2,400 


00 


Transferred from resen 


red fund, 


100 


00 

(3J9 ^^7 00 






^P'iijOO t ^_ 


EXPENDITURES. 






To paid Patrick Haley, groceries. 


896 


00 


G. W. Adams, 




136 


03 


W. F. Sleeper, 




214 49 


Baker & Fradd, 




75 


31 


G. AV. Gardner & Co., 




1 


00 


Poor «fc Stearns, 




80 


86 


Moore & White, 




12 


23 


H. B. Putnam, 




17 


00 • 


Eastman &, Son, 




4 


00 


A. M. Eastman, 




7 


95 


Andrew FarrcU, 




2 


27 


N. H. Asylum, board and nursing, . 


329 


15 


House of Reformation, 


board and 






nursing, . 


. 


991 


39 


Martha Pearborn, b'd and nursing. 


80 


00 ■ 


Wm. C. Gage, 


a 


64 


25 


W. C. Richardson, wood. 


58 


03 


L. W. Hall, wood. 


. 


137 


88 


Poor Sc Stearns, wood, , 


. • . 


7 


50 


D. B. Eastman, wood, , 


. 


45 


00 



28 



To paid Thomas Wheat, professional 
services, .... 

L. French, professional services, 

Woodard & Wethcrbee, medicine, 

J. R. Hanson, " 

S. S. Monlton, labor at Alms 

house, .... 

■ S. S. Moulton, making report, 
" " expenses to GoffS' 

town, .... 

S. S. Moulton, money paid out, 
" " journey to Nashua, 

M. E. George, appraising property 
at farm, .... 

Edward Prime, money paid out, 

" " horse hire, 

" " services rendered 

Doty Family, . . . . 

Michael Linnen, lodging and break- 
fast, ...... 

Hill & James, teams, 

Wm. C. "Walker, teams, 

Jackson Sc Co., 10 y'ds dress goods, 

Plumer & Chandler, goods deliv- 
ered Mrs. Dickey, 

A. H, Weston, goods delivered Mrs. 
Dickey, . . . . . 

Waite Brothers, goods delivered 
Mrs. Dickey, . . . . 

C. F. Livingston, printing 200 cir- 
culars, . . . . . 



. 84 00 


. 10 


00 


10 


43 


1 


34 


1- 

4 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


. 52 


30 


, 3 


75 


5^ 

2 


00 


. 18 


00 


. 14 


00 



5 00 



1 


00 


6 


50 


3 


00 


3 


75 


2 


25 


6 


00 


6. 


00 


3 


25 



Balance to new account, 



82,522 91 
. 34 31 



^2,557 22 



29 



CITY FARM. 




By balance from old account, 


81 3o 33 


Appropriation, 


3,600 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




To paid Kidder & Chandler, groceries 


5, 847 Q6 


G. W. Gardner & Co., 


125 66 


H. B. Putnam, " 


65 15 


G. W. Adams, " 


2 75 


Cyrus Dunn, " 


76 50 


Barker & Coburn, " 


10 50 


Johnson & Stevens, " 


35 U 


Kimball & Dow, boots and shoes, 


10 40 


F. C. Dow, " " 


9 75 


Geo. W. Weeks, " 


22 05 


S. G. Hoyt, repairing boots and 


shoes, .... 


12 80 


Charles Bunton, blacksmith work, 


24 85 


J. F. Woodbury, " " 


29 93 


J. S. Davis, " " 


30 29 


Daniels & Co., hardware. 


. 145 78 


W. H. Fisk, paper hangings, 


1 21 


T. R, Hubbard, lumber, 


3 75 


Gilman Clough, sawing lumber. 


19 06 


R. M, Rollins, repairs, . 


2 60 


J. H. Maynard, "... 


25 03 


Hiram Forsaith, " 


1 87 


Joseph Cross, services nine months, 


375 00 


" " cash paid to county 




of Hillsborough, 


34 21 



83,735 33 



80 



To paid A. Ferren & Co., cotton cloth, $3 GS 

White & Farnsworth, dry goods, . 14 32 

Fearing &, Co., dry goods, . . 22 79 

Weston Brothers, dry goods, . 18 35 

Folsom & Son, clothing, . . W 00 
J. D. Bean, clothing, . . .13 00 
Geo. S. Holmes, needles, thread, 

etc., 5 17 

John Davis, Jr., use of horse 8 1-2 

days, 8 50 

Hill & James, team, . . . 1 50 
S. S. Monlton, making schedule of 

property, 6 00 

Joseph Gate, one sheep, . . 4 00 

Sylvanus Morse, one p'r of oxen, . 227 50 

C. B. Heath, one pair of steers, . 105 00 

H. W, Herrick, one pig, . . 6 00 

S. and J. Leavitt, pasturing cattle, 17 50 

Joseph Marsh, Jr., pasturing cattle, 36 00 
H. and H. R. Pettee, wheat, corn 

and meal, ..... 54 15 

French, Hall & Co., flour, meal, etc., 60 38 

Moses Clark, wheat and oats, . 11 69 

J. A. Stearns, use of boar, . . 4 00 

Sewoll Leavitt, killing cow, . . 1 00 
Amoskeag Axe Co., new steeling 

axes, . . . . . 3 75 

John Bixbee, filing saws, . . 1 40 

W. P. Richardson, making cider, . 1 10 

J. L. Fogg, beef, .... 42 16 

A. McNabb, beef, . . . . 9 43 
Frost & Higgins, beef, . . .111 28 

Cook (t Miilcr, beef and fish, . 5 01 

Woodard & Wetherbcc, medicine, . 6 39 

' A. F. Perry, medicine, . . 14 00 



31 



To paid John Prince, coffins and burials, 81T 00 
John B. Clarke, Daily Mirror, six 

months .... 
H. C. Tilton, ink and book, . 
^Etna Insurance Co., insurance, 
H. M. Bailey & Son, crockery and 

wooden ware, . 
H. H. Ladd, spoons, 
S. D. Green, one sled, . 
E. Branch, whip, brush, &c., 
Wm. Eeed & sons, 3 pair leg irons, 
Commons, grass, . 
Weare Woolen Mill, 6 pounds wool, 
Hanson's Express, carding wool, etc. 
James Ramsey, labor, 
Joseph Cate, " . 

Mary Ramsey, " . 

Charles G, Sherrer, " . 
R. Morgan, " . 

J. L. Beedc, " . 

Albert Sherrer, " . 
Edward Miller, " . 
J. B. Henry, " . 

;^loses Lull, " . 

H. A. Dow, " . 

Garrett Murrey, " . . . 7 50 
Colley & Brown, repairs, . . 2 50 



Balance to new account, 



2 


50 


1 


42 


43 


75 


28 


50 




00 


4 


00 


5 


27 


10 


90 


65 


00 


3 


00 


1 


40 


360 


56 


4 


00 


134 


25 


135 


38 


33 


00 


17 


75 


22 


49 


4 


12 


2 


62 


13 


87 


22 


25 



2,896 98 
838 35 



13,785 33 



32 



CITY TEAMS. 



By balance from old account, . . 8208 18 
Appropriation, . . . 3,500 00 

Work of teams on streets, . . 898 22 



$4, GOG 40 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Charles Bunton, blacksmith 
work, ..... 

Fellows & Co., blacksmith work, 
J. F. AVoodbury & Co., blacksmith 
work, ..... 
Geo. W. Merriam, blacksmith work, 
J. S. Davis, blacksmith work, 
Geo. W. Butterfield, labor, 
James Patten, labor, 
James Kearn, labor, 
Haines & Wallace, lumber 
Geo. W. Varnum, drawing straw, 
Cyrus Baldwin, cart-box pattern, 
D. B. Buck, 2 whiffletree woods, 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 4 

sled shoes, .... 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., labor 

on sled shoes, 
S. S. Moulton, repairs on stable, etc 
Z. F, Campbell, alcohol, etc., 
Hall, French & Co., grain, 
H. & H. R. Pettee, " 
J. Abbott & Co., " 

J. S. Kidder & Co., " 
R. W. French, hay and straw, 
W. A. Pmgree, " 



$12 25 
21 15 

50 36 

26 77 

4 25 

470 00 

471 50 
11 67 

4 
2 

7 
. 1 



50 
00 
50 



12 10 



. 81 


00 


, 18 


12 


1 


97 


. 18 


22 


. 35 


70 


. 69 


35 


. 155 


15 


. 47 


46 


. 18 


28 



33 



To paid City Farm, hay and stra 


w, . 197 38 


John Ordway, " 


.• 20 


70 


T. W. Hammond, " 


. 20 


72 


Daniel George, " 


. 18 


15 


Zoe Flanders, •' 


. 23 


79 


E. Langdell, " 


. 23 


06 


H. Richards, " 


. 21 


64 


J. F. James, " 


. 38 


58 


D. W. Fling, " 


9 


75 


Clark Wilson, " 


. 36 


70 


S. M. M'Duffee, " 


6 


27 


Samuel Burnham, " 


. 84 


33 


Seth Campbell, 


. 18 


12 


R. M. Rollins, " 


. 19 


89 


E. M. Shattuck, " 


. 13 


39 


J. F. James, gear. 


. 55 


13 


Peter Kimball, wood-work foi 


sled, 42 


75 


Daniels & Co., hardware, &c. 


. 13 


00 


Edwin Branch, 2 blankets. 


. 18 


00 


Edwin Branch, repairing harn 


esses, 39 


74 


P. J, Handley, repairing harn 


esses, 15 


15 


F. M'Laren, repairing harnes 


ses, . 4 


27 


Geo. H. Dudley, making grain 


bins, 15 


25 


Benj. Currier, repairing carts, 


. 36 


25 


Benj. Currier, 1 horse cart, . 


. 300 


00 


G. B. Fogg, locks and keys, . 


1 


16 


Kidder & Chandler, cards, oil 


, &c., 11 


06 


Hill & James, board of horse 


5, . 3 


53 


M. C. Derby, medical serviccF 


, . 12 


50 


Hartford Live Stock Ins. Co., 


. 56 


20 


J. C. Ricker, carrots, . 


6 


60 




$2,544 33 


Transferred to watering stre 


ets, 1,000 


00 


Balance to new account, 


1,062 


07 

— 14,606 40 



3^ 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 



HiGHAVAY — District No. 1. 



By balance from old account, 
Appropriation, 
Beservcd fund. 



24 
180 00 
200 00 



S468 24 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Peter Kimball, Supt., 
Geo. W. Dustin, " 

R. C. Dustin, labor, 
Burke F. Stark, " 
Chas. W. Rowell, " 
N. Preston, " 

Samuel Hall, " 
John Campbell, " 
I. H. Jones, " 

"\Ym. Cope, " 

John Kelley, " 
Alonzo Wicom, " 
Oliver Blanchard," 
Patrick Dowd, " 
John Campbell, drawing sand, 
T. R. Hubbard, lumber, 
T. R. Hubbard, making spout, 

Balance to new account, 



. $37 


26 


. 81 


62 


1 


87 


5 


12 


2 


25 


. 31 


12 


2 


25 


. 34 


35 


. 12 


00 


1 


13 


4 


12 


9 


25 


3 


00 


5 


25 


. 227 


00 


6 


30 


1 


70 







8465 59 
2 65 



$468 24 



35 



Highway — District No. 2. 



By balance from old account, 



8159 76 



Appropriation, 


. 


4500 


00 




Eeserved fund, . . 


. 


140 


00 




Supt. for sand, gravel, 


&c., . 


145 


75 

— 14,945 


51 






EXPENDITURES. 








To paid D. W. Fling, Supe 


rintendent, 


^233 50 




Charles Canfield, 


u 


291 


50 




George W. Batterfield, 


labor, 


159 


50 




James Patten, 


a 


158 


00 




James Kearn, 


a 


434 


57 




John Larkin, 


a 


297 


73 




Patrick Dowd, 


u 


247 


87 




Patrick Finn, 


a 


220 


16 




Peter Scanlan, 


a 


4 50 




Dennis Dowd, 


li 


106 


12 




* John P. Fling, 


a 


4 


50 




Timothy Kennedy, 


a 


151 


80 




Sylvester Donahoe, 


a 


150 


36 




Michael O'Cannigan, 


a 


2 


00 




John Welch, 


a 




75 




Michael Ilandley, 


a 


15 


50 




Alexis Shine, 


a 




75 




Philip Riley, 


a 


2 


62 




Edward Bresnehan, 


a 


182 


83 




Wm. Chase, 


a 


192 


53 




S. S. Moulton, 


u 


8 


75 




Nathaniel Corning, 


a 


9 


75 




Daniel Mahanna, 


a 


184 


78 




City Teams, 


a 


737 


99 




James Victory, 


a 


71 


00 




Joseph Tuck, 


u 


8 


62 




George Hunt, 


a 


o 

O 


25 ' 





36 



To }3aicl Michael Scanlan, 


labor. 


8144 67 


Michael Sullivan, 


i(. 


3 00 


Wm. Leonard, 


ti 


66 08 


Eli Perry, 


ii 


13 87 


G. AUard, 


a 


128 61 


Michael 0. Kerrigan, 


a 


2 66 


Mr. Moriarty, 


a 


2 25 


Michael O'Brien, 


a 


1 50 


Edward Cotter, 


a 


33 75 


John Campbell, 


li 


82 50 


Levi Woodman, 


ti 


6 50 


John Dooley, 


(( 


23 25 


Michael Galagher, 


a 


18 75 


Eugene Sullivan, 


a 


21 75 


Richard Stark, 


u 


47 24 


Henry Sneiling, 


a 


2 25 


H. J. Tirrell, 


a 


20 00 


William Dunn,. 


11 


3 00 


Patrick CoUaty, 


a 


3 75 


Hill & James, teams, . 


. 


7 75 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


? 


133 59 


J. B. Varrick, & Co., hardware, . 


19 45 


Geo. W. Merriam, blacksmith work 


50 67 


E. A. Smith, concrete, 


, , 


83 89 


Daniel Farmer, lumber, 


, . 


92 18 


H. C. Merrill, 7 lanterns 


■, 


13 00 


H. C. Merrill, oil. 


, . 


1 96 


Lamson & Mar den, stove, 


chips, etc., 


12 00 


Chandler & Morgan, rubber over- 




coat, 


, 


11 00 


Johnson & Stevens, oil. 


. 


2 00 


J. N. Bruce, lettering str 


eet signs, 

m 


6 25 




:,940 35 


Balance to new account 


■y 


5 16 



84,945 51 



37 



Highway — District .No. 3. 



By balance from old account, 


. 


. 863 GQ 


Appropriation, .... 300 00 


Reserved fund, . . . . 60 00 


EXPENDITUEES. 


To paid B. F. Mitchell, Supt., . $126 14 


J. F. Smith, labor . 


20 25 


J. A. Poor, * " 






20 87 


Granville Heselton," 






. 21 93 


K. Heselton, " 






12 37 


Charles Moore, " 






1 50 


E. C. Hewlett, " 






. 42 37 


. Win. C. Chase, " 






2 25 


R. K. Heselton, " 






5 25 


Wm. S. Locke, " 






49 62 


A. M. Corning, " 






2 25 


Wm. Bailey, " 






3 00 


Peter Mitchell, " 






75 


• Charles Baker, " 






5 25 


Chadbourn George," 






2 25 


A. B. Chase, " 






6 00 


D. F. Smith, " 






3 37 


John Calef, " 






18 75 


Hugh Farrell, " 






2 25 


Peter McMahan, " 






6 00 


CD. Thompson " 






6 75 


Plummer Webster, " 






12 00 


Moses Rolfe, " . 






1 50 


Geo. S. Webster " 






4 50 


, Franklin Webster, " 






1 50 


D. H. Nutt, gravel, 






1 00 



8426 66 



38 



To paid heirs of B. Mitchell, gravel, 
J. & E. S. Harvey, lumber, . 
"Will. Whittle and others, 20 load; 
oravel, .... 



Balance to new account. 



$5 00 


24 


96 


5 




40 


$412 


03 


14 


63 



8426 G6 



Highway — District No. 4. 

By balance from old account, . . $113 16 
Appropriation, .... 180 00 
Keserved fund, . . . . 100 00 





EXPENDITURES. 




To paid John Emerson, Supt., . 


$£6 67 


John P. Moore, 


labor . 


44 00 


Eodney Whittemore, " 


55 50 


Isaac Whittemore, 


li 


28 50 


John Emerson, Jr. 




6 75 


J. Mead, 


a 


3 75 


Ira W. Moore, 


a 


36 25 


Charles Moore, 


a 


29 00 


John Calef, 


u 


68 75 


Caius Webster, 


u 


75 


Henry White, 


(.<. 


2 25 


Augustus Fellows, 


li 


12 75 


David Webster, 


a 


7 50 


Eranklin Webster, 


li 


7 50 


M. Colby, 


a 


8 25 


J. & E. S. Harvey 


lumber, . 


13 74 


AYaterman Smith, 


lumber, . 


2 00 




8353 91 


Balance to new account. 


39 25 



8393 16 



8393 16 



39 



Highway — District Xo. 5. 



By balance from old account, 


. $19 71 


Appropriation, 


. 


. 180 00 


Reserved fund. 


, 


. 40 00 




EXPENDITURES. 




To paid James Emerson, Supt., . 


. 840 15 


Wm. P. Merrill, labor, . 


. 32 85 


Oilman Harvey, 


u 




. 39 80 


Jonas Harvey, 


a 




7 50 


E. S. Harvey, 


ii, 




15 50 


C. M. Harvey, 


a 




3 00 


W. W. Dickey, 


a 




4 95 


John Dickey, 


a 




15 75 


Elbridge Robey, 


u 




9 15 


Cleves N. Harvey 


a 




75 


James E. Young, 


a 




17 75 


A. H. Hartshorn, 


a 




16 GO 


Wm, Crosbie, 


a 




6 00 


James M. Young, 


a 




10 00 


W. C. Blodgett, 


a 




3 00 


Rodnia Nutt, 


a 




5 60 


J. & E. S. Harve) 


, lum 


jer, . 


4 00 



Balance to new account. 



8232 35 
7 36 



.$239 71 



1239 71 



By 


Highway — District No 

balance from old account, 
Appropriation, .... 
Reserved fund, .... 


. 6. 

145 

150 

30 


59 
00 
00 



8225 od 



40 



EXPENDITURES. 




To paid David Dickey, 3d, Supt., . 836 89 


John Johnson, labor, . 


9 62 


Charles Huse, " 






1 00 


I. T. Webster, " 






12 62 


H. C. Dickey, " 






6 37 


John Dickey, " 






5 62 


Amos C. Webster," 






7 49 


David Dickey, " 






16 25 


Oilman Cloiigh, " 






. 11 00 


James Wiley, " 






9 75 


N. W. Cm-tis, 






. 11 60 


Wm. Curtis, " 






1 75 


Geo. Whittemore, " 






2 62 


♦James Breen, " 






3 75 


D. H. Dickey, " 






12 37 


E. M. Leavitt, " 






3 50 


Geo. B. Emerson, " 






4 00 


Jas. M. Webster, " 






. 19 59 


John Hosley, " 






8 00 


Samuel Gamble, " 






2 00 


Lyford Hmit, " 






1 50 


Wm. Craig, " 


, 


. 


2 25 


Amos Webster, " 






1 50 


John Swett, " 






1 50 


J. M. Dickey, Supt., 






21 25 




$213 79 


Balance to new accour 


't, 




. 11 80 



8225 59 



Highway — District, Xo. 7 



By balance from old account, 
Appropriation, 



8214 39 
250 00 



8164 39 



/ 



41 





EXPENDITURES. 




]3aid Israel Webster, Supt., . 


. 840 00 


Nathan Johnson, 


Supt., 


.64 37 


Geo. Porter, 


labor. 


6 75 


Geo. Piper, 


u 


3 75 


Solomon Tobie, 


a 




3 37 


J. B. Pierce, 


a 




10 75 


Isaac Huse, 


a 




. 63 12 


McGregor Hall, 


a 




24 62 


Wm. Dotey, 


a 




. 14 62 


James Hall, 2d, 


ii. 




8 25 


H. H. Young, 


(.<. 




22 75 


J. B. Eastman, 


a 




6 75 


Henry Haywood, 


u 




3 75 


Mr. Swett, 


a 




1 87 


D. W. Reynolds, 


a 




3 00 


Charles Colburn, 


. (; 




2 00 


Robert Barrett, 


a 




22 80 


N. Corning, 


a 




4 50 


L. Morse, 


a 




16 50 


B. McGimiess, 


a 




. 18 00 


Ed. Jenkins, 


a 




6 75 


Charles A. Hall, 


a 




4 75 


James Howe, 


li 




4 50 


J. Marsh, Jr., 


a 




40 00 


J. A. Stearns, 


a 




3 00 


George Pierce, 


a 




11 38 


Tom Makin, 


u 




3 00 






$414 90 


Balance to new 


accoui] 


d, . . 


49 49 



$464 39 



Highway — District No. 8. 



By Balance from old account, . 


849 38 


Appropriation, 


. 


300 00 


Reserved fund. 


EXPENDITURES. 


200 00 






To paid James P. Eaton, Supt., . 


842 00 


Wm. Mills, Supt., 


. 


124 12 


H. S. Stevens, 


labor. 


2 25 


L. S. Proctor, 


u 


41 87 


J. P. Young, 


i. 




16 62 


J. H. Proctor, 


a 




$23 25 


Jeremiah Garvin, 


a 




6 00 


Zadoc Wright, 


a 




1 50 


Paschal Preston, 


a 




1 50 


Daniel Doland, 


a 




3 37 


James Hall, 


a 




3 00 


J. B. Young, 


u 




4 50 


George Young, 


a 




18 00 


TVm. Parsly, 


a 




b to 


Ephraim Young, 


a 




3 50 


Lewis Gear, 


ii. 




11 25 


E. Hall, 


a 




1 12 


Levi Woodman, 


a 




13 50 


Peter Farmer, 


a 




9 00 


Gilman Eeed, 


a 




. 41 00 


Frank Brown, 


a 




8 20 


Patrick Dowd, 


a 




2 25 


Robert Stevens, 


a 




. 15 25 


J. M. Crombie, 


a 




. 19 50 


J. P. Young, Jr., 


a 




9 25 


Augustus Proctor 






9 00 


H. D. Noyes, 


a. 




3 00 



8549 38 



43 



To paid J. W. Proctor, 


labor, . 


83 00 


Phinelias Heselton, 




8 25 


'C. M. Hubbard, 




1 50 


James Stockdale, 




20 25 


Dennis Dowd, 




7 50 


Wm. Cogswell, 




3 00 


Gilman Clough, lumber, 


12 50 


Daniels & Company 


, hardware, 


4 30 



Balance to new account, 



8499 85 
49 53 



Highway — District Xo. 9. 
By balance from old account, . . 848 32 
Appropriation, .... 250 00 
Reserve fund, .... 245 00 



EXPENDITURES. 




paid William Boyce 


, Supt., . 


8141 28 


George B. Emerson, 


labor, . 


5 25 


I. H. Webster, 


u 


21 75 


James Currier, 2d, 


ii 


7 50 


G. Washington George," 


13 75 


David Swett, 




14 50 


A. N. Scott, 




15 00 


B. W. Corning, 




17 00 


Stephen Heselton, 




. 14 25 


William Griffin, 




9 00 


James Currier, 




2 62 


John Silver, 




7 12 


J. Y. McQueston, 




75 


Sherburn Corning, 




7 50 


A. Thomas, 




4 50 


B. F. Page, 




1 11 



8549 38^ 



8543 32 



44 



To paid John Hatch, labor, . 


$2 00 


Orlando Page, " 


5 25 


Harrison Corning, " 


24 00 


Chas. 0. Huse, " 


1 00 


Harrison Dow, " 


3 00 


Henry C. Joy, " 


81 50 


C. T. Boyce, " 


4 50 


Alonzo Roby, " 


1 50 


Oilman Clough, lumber. 


. 169 41 




8525 04 


Balance to new account, . 


18 28 



Highway — District No. 10. 
By appropriation, .... $750 00 
Reserved fund, . . . . 730 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Z. N. Doe, Superintendent, 
John Jameson, labor, 
Charles Danforth, " 
Louis Gorathier, " 
John Dallas, " 

Albert Thompson, " 
Wm. Dallas, " 

E. Hartshorn, " 
Mr. Eaton, " 

Mr. Wilkins, " 

George Mack, " 
N. B. Tilton, " 

Wm. H. Young, " 
E. G. Hastings, " 
G. W. Doe, " 

Geo. F. Doe, „" 



1406 


24 


64 


93 


12 


00 


3 


75 


4 


50 


3 


00 


4 


50 


33 


50 




75 


9 


68 


2 


25 




75 


2 


25 


4 


50 


31 


00 


34 


50 



8543 32 



81480 00 



45 



To paid D. Wortbley, labor, 
H. N. Ingalls, labor, 
Wm. Young, " 

John Stearns, " 
A. Wyman, " 

C. Wyman, " 

Tom L. Elliott, " 
Patrick Yeaton, " 
James Lindsey, " 
Horatio Fradd, " 
H. J. Tirrell, " 

Z. Harvey, " 

S. Goodhue, " 

Barr & Clapp, " 
John Collins, " 

William Parsons, " 
Frank Fairbanks, " 
James Dowd, " 

Mr. Horton, " 

Adam Go wing, " 
H. J. Plumer, labor, 
A. G. Robie, " 
A. D. Hatch, " 
John Toomey, " 
Hugh Farrell, " 
City Teams, " 
James Kearn, " 
James Patten, " 
Joseph Osgood, " 
John Larkin, " 
Michael Scanlan, labor 
Mr. Helper, " 

H. H. Noyes, " 

Frank Hemphill, " 
Daniels & Co., hardware, 



U 50 


3 


00 


27 


73 


17 


25 


1 


50 


81 


50 


1 


50 


6 


25 


4 


50 


9 


00 


11 


50 


28 


75 


19 


87 


25 


50 


8 


25 


3 


00 


24 


75 


22 


87 


5 


25 


7 


50 


18 00 


7 


00 


31 


12 


9 


00 


5 


25 


3 


37 


1 


25 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


12 


1 


12 


1 


50 




75 


17 


25 


5 


62 



46 



To paid J. B. Yarick & Co., liard\Yarc, $^6 10 
M. D. Stokes, stone, 
Haines & Wallace, lumber, . 
H. C. Sullivan, snow plow, &c., 
Wm. P. Riddle, 57 loads clay, 
E. Mansnr, blacksmith work, 
J. S. Davis, " " . 



Balance from last year. 
Balance to new account. 



. 373 99 




5 31 




7 00 




7 12 




7 00 




90 




81,473 84 




4 84 




1 32 






81,480 00 



Highway — District No. 11. 



By balance from old account. 
Appropriation, 

EXPENDITUEES. 

To paid Joseph Melvin, Supt., 
G. R. Stevens, labor, 
L. D. Heath, " 

John Harwood, " 
John Field, " 

Elijah Stearns, " 

Thomas ^. Stearns, " 
Geo. S. Chandler, " 
W. H. B. Newhall, " 
Wm. Forsaith, " 

Morris Foley, " 

Michael Foley, " 
Michael Mara, " 

John E. Stearns, " 
A. H. Gerry, " 

George Harwood, " 



8135 


85 


600 


00 


8288 00 


79 


85 


3 


00 


4 


50 


o 
O 


00 


5 


01 


51 


25 


3 


00 


13 


50 


12 


00 


9 


75 


1 


56 


12 


81 


GO 


00 


89 


59 


10 


00 



8735 85 



47 



To paid E. B. Stearns, labor, 
David Ross, " 

"Wm. M. Hardy, blacksmith work, 
David Wells, lumber, . 



Balance to new account, 



815 


75 


7 


50 


1 


25 


28 


38 


$699 


70 


36 


15 



8735 85 



Highway — District No, 12. 



By balance from old account. 


$238 38 


Appropriation, 


. 


250 00 


Reserved fund, 


. 


350 00 




EXPENDITURES. 




To paid City Farm for 


labor. 


$553 28 


Robert Stevens, 


u 


31 87 


Charles G. Sherrer 


u 
J 


3 00 


Rufus Lund, 


u 


1 50 


Addison Hodgman, 


ii 


75 


John H. Wales, 


ii 


6 75 


Asa Libljcy, 


a 


32 25 


Charles E. Clough, 


a 


12 00 


R. Morgan, 


a 


32 25 


J. L. Beede, 


a 


. 20 25 


J. P. Eaton, 


(,(. 


1 75 


Ebenezer Wilson, 


a 


3 00 


Levi Woodman, 


a 


3 00 


Jonathan Wilson, 


a 


3 00 


A. Sherrer, 


a 


3 00 


Zadoc Wright, stone work, . 


. 81 00 


J. S. Davis, blacksmith work, 


7 00 


Gilman Clough, lumber, 


2 40 



$838 38 



48 



To paid J. L. Smith, lumber, 
Balance to new account, 



II 46 



$802 51 
35 87 



HiCxHWAY — District No. 13. 



By balance from old account, 
Appropriation, 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid J. D. Jones, Superintendent 
William Campbell, " 

George D. Gate, labor, 
Alonzo Wicom, " 

J. E. Kimball, " 

J. Golbv, " 

J. Sargent, " 

Reuben Kimball, " 

Luther Campbell, " 

L. D. Seagel, " 

Geo. W. Gate, " 

John Campbell, " 



$49 


19 


. 150 


00 


87 00 


57 


61 


6 


87 


1 


87 


8 


50 


5 


74 


1 


25 


5 


00 


1 


50 


19 


75 



Balance to new account. 

New Highways. 

By balance from old account, . 

Appropriation, . . . . 



44 37 
3 00 



8102 46 
36 73 



8276 98 
500 00 



expenditures. 
To paid John G. Colt, blasting stone, 811 60 
J. F. James, engineering, . . 20 00 



8838 38 



8199 19 



8199 19 



8776 98 



49 



To paid Jonas Harvey, building road, 
F. S. Worthen, land damage, 
Anioskeag Manufacturing Co., 



Transferred to reserve fund, 
Balance to new account, 



840 


00 


95 


00 


57 


85 


$224 


45 


500 


00 


52 


53 



j^nO 



Amoskeag Falls Bridge. 
By balance from old account, . . 8341 97 



Appropriation, 


. 


1,000 00 


Reserved fund, . 


PENDITURES. 


390 00 


EX 




To paid Charles Canficld, 


lal)or. 


84 00 


Edward Cotter, 


a 


4 50 


Timothy Kennedy, 


u 


9 00 


Sylvester Donahoe, 


a 


9 00 


Ed. Bresnahan, 


a 


3 75 


Geo. W. Butterfield, 


a 


4 00 


James Patten, 


a 


1 00 


City Teams, 


(( 


7 50 


Joseph Melvin, 


(( 


6 00 


James Victory, 


a 


2 67 


Patrick Finn, 


a 


3 34 


G. AUard, 


a 


3 75 


D. W. Fling, 


a 


4 50 


James Kearn, 


a 


1 67 


T. L. Quimby, lightin 


g bridge. 


60 00 


C. A. Smith, lamps. 


. 


1 84 


H. W. Weeks, plank, 


. 


595 30 


G. W. Adams, oil. 


. 


28 39 


C. M. & L. Railroad, 


freight. 


213 70 


J. H. Maynard, plank 
•i 


ing bridge, 


. 423 27 



81,731 97 



50 



To paid Haines & Wallace, lumber, . 8110 00 
J. B. Varick & Co., hardware, . 155 42 
Home Insurance Co., insurance, . 37 50 
-^tna " " " . 37 50 

H. M. Bailey & Son, burners and 

chimneys, . . . . 2 10 







$1,729 70 


Balance to new a( 


3count, 
xRANiTE Bridge 


2 27 


( 




By balance from old account. 


. $151 31 


Appropriation, 


. 


. 200 00 


Reserved fund. 


EXPENDITURES. 


. 110 00 






To paid Z. N. Doe, 


labor, . 


. 847 00 


S. S. Moulton, 


ii 


. 27 07 


F. Fairbanks, 


il 


3 00 


John Jameson, 


u 


7 50 


Richard Stark, 


ii 


1 50 


Timothy Kennedy, 


ii 


3 00 


J. H. Maynard, 


(i 


18 00 


Colley & Brown, 


ii 


11 57 


Shoe & Leather Dealers' Insurance 




Company, 


. 


30 00 


Howard Insurance Co., 


. 30 00 


J. B. Varick & Co 


, hardware. 


9 56 


Daniels & Company, hardware. 


2 49 


Haines & Wallace, 


lumber, . 


269 13 




8459 82 


Balance to new account, 


1 49 



81,731 97 



8161 31 



8461 31 



51 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



By balance from old account, 
Appropriation, 
Superintendent for work &c., 



15 

3,300 00 
15 12 



$3,373 27 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid D. W. Fling, Supt., 
Charles Ganfield, Supt., 
Patrick Finn, labor, 

Patrick Dowd, " 

John Larkin, " 

Edward Bresnahan, " 
William Chase, " 

Sylvester Donahoc, '* 
Dennis Dowd, " 

Nathaniel Corning, " 
Daniel Mahanna, " 
Michael Scanlan, " 
Michael Sullivan, " 
Z. N. Doe, " 

Geo. W. Doe, " 

Tom Elliott, " 

Albert Thompson, " 
James Linsey, " 

Patrick Yeaton, " 
James Victory, " 

William Dunn, " 

Morris Horan, " 

Eli Perry, " 

G. Allard, " 

W. McDonald, " 

Geo. W. Butterfield, " 
James Patten, " 



124 50 
54 50 
80 58 
06 74 
35 62 
54 00 

30 17 
86 61 

27 37 
16 50 

31 66 

28 08 
12 00 
38 62 



3 


00 


7 


50 


3 


00 


3 


75 


4 


88 


18 


00 


11 


25 


o 
o 


00 


18 


75 


60 


62 


1 


50 


6 


00 


7 


66 



52 



To paid James Kearn, labor, 
Wm. Learned, " 

Michael O'Kerrigan, " 
Michael Handlej, " 
Timothy Kennedy, " 
City Teams, " 

Patrick Austin, " 

Edward Cotter, " 

J. B. Blanchard, " 
Erastus Cutting, " 
John Jameson, " 

Levi Woodman, " 
Patrick Collaty, " 
J. B. Clough, " 

Richard Stark, " 

Daniel Greene, " 

S. D. Greene, 800 brick, 
M. D. Stokes, stone-work, 
David Perkins, cess-pool cover. 
Temple McQueston, cement pipe 
Wm. McPherson, cement pipe, 
T. L. Hastings, 2 prs. rubber boots, 
Daniels & Company, hardware 
H. & H. P. Pettee, cement, 
D. H. Young, 550 brick, 
J. S. Kidder & Co., cement, . 
Gilman Clough, lumber, 
J. F. James, engineering, 
Geo. W. Tliaycr, 3 prs. rub. boots, 



Balance to new account. 



. $27 


09 


. 15 


67 


4 


67 


. 30 


50 


. 37 


49 


. 37 


13 


. 11 


25 


8 


62 


5 


00 


5 


00 


4 


75 


. 11 


83 


7 


17 


6 


33 


. 23 


24 


1 


87 


2 


40 


. 192 


90 


4 


50 


. 911 


33 


. 1,008 


08 


s, 10 


00 


. 34 


04 


. 28 


25 


2 


75 


. 10 


70 


. 49 


07 


. 31 


00 


, 15 


00 


$3,273 39 


. 99 


88 



$3,373 2' 



53 



RESERVOIRS. 

By balance from old account, . . $14 78 
Appropriation, .... 1,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 




To paid, Cliarles Canfield, labor, 


. $2 00 


Patrick Finn, " . 


2 50 


John Larkin, " . 


1 50 


Timothy Kennedy, " . 


2 25 


R. Stark, "^ " . 


1 50 


Sylvester Donahoe, " . 


4 50 


James Kearn, " . 


1 67 


L. H. Sleeper, care of reservoirs, . 


52 50 


Daniels & Co., rope, nails and bolts 


3 76 


Steamer No. 1, p'm'g out reservoirs 


9 00 


Wm. McPherson, labor and stock, 


7 87 


John Patterson, repairs. 


8 50 


S. S. Moulton, repairing reservoirs 


4 50 




^105 52 


Transferred to reserved fund, . 


700 00 


Transferred to county tax, 


142 84 


Balance to new account, . 


66 44 


COMMONS. 




By appropriation, . . . ' 


H,000 00 


Reserved fund, . . . . 


100 00 


Grass sold, . . . . . 


65 00 


Wood sold, 


3 50 



$1,014 78 



$1,014 78 



$1,168 50 



54 



EXPENDITURES. 




To paid Charles' Canfield, Supt., . $29 50 


Patrick Finn, labor, . . 


30 58 


Patrick Dowd, " 






. 15 74 


John Larkin, " 






. 14 99 


Ed. Bresnahan, " 






. 24 00 


Wm. Chase, " 






. 10 42 


Sylvester Donahoc," 






18 74 


Dennis Dowd, " 






9 62 


Nathaniel Corning," 






2 25 


Ed. Cotter, " 






5 62 


Timothy Kennedy," 






22 50 


James Kearn, " 






15 83 


City Teams, " 






34 49 


G. W. Butterfield," 






6 00 


James Patten, " 






7 50 


Daniel Mahanna, " 






9 16 


Wm. Learned, " 






2 00 


James Victory, " 






1 33 


G. Allard, " 






23 25 


Z. Wright " 






63 00 


Michael Scanlan-, " 






5 33 


E. Perry, " . 






14 25 


Oliver Gould, " 






10 00 


G. P. Boynton, " 






29 37 


H. B. Heath, " . 






3 00 


Geo. Hunt, " 






2 50 


Michael Handley, " 






5 33 


Ricliard Stark, " 






6 00 


John Dooley, " 






3 75 


D. Greene, " 






37 


T. P.'Clough, " . 






13 50 


Daniels & Co., hardware. 




42 85 


Hiram Forsaith, stock a 


nd lal 


)or, . 


5 82 



55 



To paid J. G, Colt, trees, . 
T. R. Hubbard, lumber, 
Amoskeag Mf'g Co., " 
Haiues & Wallace, " 
Gilman Clougli, " 

S. S. Moulton, repairing fences, 
F. S. Worthcn, wlutewasliing, 
Wm. Kimball, " 

M. D. Stokes, stone. 



Balance to new account. 



. $75 


00 




. 30 


00 




9 


40 




. 163 


72 




. 15 


00 




. 117 


17 




. 80 


00 




2 


16 




. 114 


80 




$1,095 


84 




72 


6Q 


.$1,168 50 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



By balance from old account. 
Appropriation, 
Lots and wood sold. 



EXPENDITUKES. 



$136 86 
200 00 
340 57 



$677 43 



To paid Wm. C. Chase, labor, 
K. Hesclton, " 

A. B. Chase, " 

Chadbourn George, " 
Granville Hesclton, " 
. J. E. Stearns, " 

Coleman Devine, " 

Wm. C. Chase, chopping wood, 
K. Hesclton, " " 

Wm. H. Fisk, drawing paper, 
John G, Colt, 100 arbor vita) trees, 



$10 49 
85 50 
96 00 
30 00 
40 50 
26 00 
36 75 
52 00 
26 50 
4 85 
16 67 



56 



To. paid J. A. Weston, engineering, , 
J, L. Smith & Co., lumber, . 
J. D. Bean, selling wood, 
Campbell & Hanscom, advertis- 
ing, 

John B. Clarke, advertising, 



Balance to new account. 



817 


00 


16 


84 


2 


00 


2 


50 


7 


32 


$470 


92 


206 


51 



;77 43 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

By balance from old account, . . $135 01 
Appropriation, .... 6,500 00 
A. W. Sanljorn, for hook and lad- 
der carriage, . . . . 50 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



),685 01 



Steamer Amoskeag No. 1. 

To paid salaries of men, . * . 
Manchester Gas-light Co., for gas, 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., re- 
pairs, .... 
Zoe Ann Flanders, wood, 
L. W. Hall, 
J. C. Young, 
David Webster, " 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal, . 
L. Dowd, sawing wood, 
Timothy Kennedy, sawing wood. 
Palmer & Gale, repairing pipe, 



. $467 


00 


29 


40 


. 70 


99 


7 


13 


5 


29 


7 


50 


. 40 


08 


. 59 


54 


5 


20 


8 


75 


2 


50 



57 



Hartshorn & Pike, repairs, . 
M. Y. B. Kiiine, " 

John W. AVhittier, " 
Plumer & Chandler, 14 pair 

overalls, .... 
Fellows & Co., repairs, 
G. H. Dudley, " 
H. M. Bailey & Son, repairs, 
J. B. Varick & Co., blocks and 

rope, .... 

A. H. Barker, 6 badges, 
G. B. Fogg, 26 keys, . 
Daniels & Co., 1 gallon spirits tur 

pentine, .... 
J. B. Clarke, advertising cards, 
Edwin Branch, hoods, . 
Charles Chase & Co., coal, . 



. $6 


90 


3 


00 


. 11 


25 


8 


75 


1 


50 


4 


06 


. 12 


93 


4 


88 


9 


00 


G 


50 


1 


00 


1 


50 


7 


00 


. 39 


31 



20 96 



Steamer Fire King No. 2. 



To paid salaries of men. 


$457 00 


Manchester Gas-light Co., gas. 


7 98 


Zoe Ann Flanders, wood. 


7 12 


L. W. Hall, 


5 28 


J. C. Young, " 


7 50 


David "Webster, " 


. 40 08 


Charles Chase & Co., coal, . 


37 32 


E. P. Johnson & Co., " . 


59 55 


Daniels & Co., oil, lard, &c., 


. 10 96 


L. Dowd, sawing wood. 


5 19 


Timothy Kennedy, sawing wood. 


8 75 


Palmer & Gale, repairing pump, . 


1 50 


G. R. Simmons, one day's labor, . 


2 00 



58 



To paid II. M. Bailey & Son, repairs, . $7 IT 
Plumer & Chandler, 14 pairs 

overalls, . . . . . 8 75 

Hartshorn & Pike, repairs, . . 2 70 

H. M. Bailey & Son, repairs, . 3 31 

G. H. Dudley, . " . . 4 06 



SG7C 22 



Steamer E. W. Harrington No. 3. 



To paid salaries of men, . 

Manchester Gas-light Co., gas, 
Charles Chase & Co., coal, . 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal, . 
Plumer & Chandler, 14 prs. over 
Baker & Fradd, matches, 
J. W. Whittier, repairs, 
D. J. Warren, repairs, . 
H. M. Bailey & Son, 1 burner, 
H. C. Merrill, oil and lard, . 
Hartshorn & Pike, repairs, etc., 
C. A. Smith, 4 spittoons, 
J. B. Varick & Co., oil, etc., 
Haines & Wallace, lumber, . 
Haines & Wallace, drawing engine, 



. $432 


00 


. 10 


50 


90 


85 


'. 5? 


50 


alls, 8 


75 




60 


. 16 


75 


6 


00 




38 


2 


70 


6 


95 


5 


00 


9 


32 


9 


22 


e, 50 


00 



$632 52 



Pennacook Hose Company. 



To paid salaries of men, 
Company's premium, . 
H. C. Merrill, oil, matches, etc., 
T. P. Heath, drawing carriage, 
anchestcr Gasdight Co., gas, 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, 
repairs, . , . . . 



. 1837 


00 


. 40 


00 


3 


01 


. 13 


00 


6 


48 



20 94 



59 



To paid John W. Whittier, repairs 
Albert Maxfield, repairs, 
J. B. Clarke, printing blanks, 
Thomas W. Lane, pail. 
Page Brothers, 52 feet of hose, 
Colley & Brown, lettering lanterns. 



. $15 


20 


2 


46 


6 


00 




75 


93 


00 




50 



$1,038 U 



Hook and Ladder Company, 



To paid salaries of men, 
H. C. Merrill, oil, etc., . 
Manchester Gas-light Co., gas, 
Amoskeag Manufactnring Co., re 

pairs, .... 
James Kearn, services one year, 
C. F. Livingston, printing notices 
C. A. Smith, 7 spittoons, 
Greeley & Son, 30 badges, . 
S. Hovey & Co., 2 1-2 doz. badges, 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., axe, 



$700 79 
5 01 



::: oz 



47 

12 

3 

8 

5 

20 
o 



96 
00 
25 
75 
25 
25 
25 



Engineers. 




To paid Israel Dow, Chief, salary. 


. $50 00 


E. P. Richardson, Clerk, " ^ 


. 50 00 


B. C. Kendall, " 


. 25 00 


Elijah Chandler, " 


. 25 00 


G.' li. Kimball, " 


. 25 00 



$808 03 



$175 00 



60 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



To paid C. F. Livingston, printing re 

gulations, 
H. D. Lord, 6 days exam'g stoves, 
J. Q. A. Sargent, gas-fixtures, 
Gregg & Dodge, gas-fixtures, 
H. C. Merrill, matches and soap, 
C. R. Colley, repairs, 
J. C. Young, " 

Hartshorn & Pike, " 
W. Ireland, " 

S. S. Moulton, " 
Daniels & Co., " 
Colley & Brown, " 
G. H. Dudley, 
J. W. Whittier, hose, . 
Daniels & Co., carriage bolts, 
E. P. Richardson, refreshments, 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Company 

lumber, .... 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Company 

50 yards duck, . 
Stark ]\Iills, 50 yards waste, . 
Plumer & Chandler, 3 rubber 

coats, .... 
H. M. Bailey & Son, matches, 
H. M. Bailey & Son, stoves, etc., 
S. Hovey, cleaning clock, 
C. F. Livingston, printing notes, etc 
C. F. Livingston, 3000 regulators, 
^tna Lisurance Co., insurance. 
Hook and Ladder Co., premium at 

fire, ..... 
G. F. Bosher & Co., 12 chairs, 



$16 50 
12 00 
8 76 
12 13 
4 91 
4 63 
4 9T 

3 25 
6 75 

4 53 
6 07 



00 
00 



2 
3 

L,225 00 
64 

3 75 

12 05 

30 00 

4 80 

33 00 

60 

63*80 

1 25 

., 5 00 

15 00 

18 00 

5 00 
14 40 



61 



To paid Ed. Branch, blankets, etc., . 814 37 
D. W. Morse, 2 force pumps, . 60 00 



81,596 16 



Steamer N. S. Bean, No. 4. 

To paid Edwin Branch, blankets, &c., 827 00 
H. M. Bailey & Son, sink, &c., . 6 25 



833 25 



85,780 48 



RECAPITULATION. 



By IjalancG from old account, 


. 8135 01 


Appropriation, 


. 6,500 00 


A. W. Sanborn, hook & ladder car., 50 00 


EXPENDITURES, 


To Steamer Amoskeag, 


. 8820 96 


" Fire King, 


. 676 22 


" E. W. Harrington, 


. 632 52 


" N. S. Bean, . 


. 33 25 


Pennacook Hose Co., . 


. 1038 34 


Hook & Ladder Co., 


. 808 03 


Engineers' services, 


. 175 00 


Miscellaneous, 


. 1596 16 


Balance to new account. 


. 904 53 







mfi8s 01 



^G,QS5 01 



CITY POLICE. 

By balance from old account, . . 8260 09 
Appropriation, .... 9,300 00 
Reserved fund, . . . . 600 00 



810,160 09 



62 





EXPENDITURES. 




To paid Wm. B. Patten, Marshal, 


. $786 85 


Henry Clougli, 


a 


. IT 22 


Eben Carr, Assistant " 


. 639 30 


D. n. Prescott, ' 


i u 


. 10 00 


L. A. Ward, night watch, . 


. 32 00 


J. H. Johnson, 


a 


. 3^ 00 


R. A. Lawrence, 


a 


. 29 00 


J. D. Howard, 


a 


. 730 00 


, T. L. Quimby, 


a 


, 730 00 


Patrick Doyle, 


u 


730 00 


A. F. Quimby, 


a 


730 00 


Henry Bennett, 


a 


696 00 


James Duffee, 


a 


696 00 


H. H. Noyes, 


a 


696 00 


H. W. Longa, 


a 


698 00 


F. S. Worthen, 


a 


32 00 


B. Sleeper, 


a 


1 00 


J. G. Knight 


a 


1 00 


P. S. Griffin, 


a 


2 00 


C. Canfield, 


a 


6 00 


S. B. Putnam, 


ki 


2 00 


John T. Chase, 


a 


2 00 


A. H. Merrill, 


a 


5 00 


G. G. Gordon, 


a 


4 00 


W. H. Newhall, 


u 


238 '00 


H. C. Hunton, 


a 


1 00 


A. J. Dickey, 


a 


1 00 


Henry Colby, 


u 


2 00 


John Smith, 


li 


2 00 


J. L. Smith, 


a 


2 00 


Wm. T. Fogg, 


a 


150 00 


L. A. Ward, day 


police. 


2 00 


R. A. Lawrence, 


iL 


2 00 



63 



To paid J. H. Johnson 


, day police. 


m 00 


C. Canfield, day police, . 


8 00 


U. A. Carswell, 


a 


3 00 


E. P. Cogswell, 


a 


1 00 


G. G. Gordon, 


a 


2 00 


A. H. Merrill, 


a 


18 00 


B. W. Flanders, 


u 


7 00 


D. H. Nutt, 


a 


1 50 


Patrick Doyle, 


a 


87 00 


J. D. Howard, 


a 


90 00 


Henry Bennett, 


u 


65 00 


H. W. Longa, 


u 


56 00 


T. L. Quimby, 


a 


59 00 


A. F. Quimby, 


a 


66 00 


James Duffee, 


u 


59 00 


W. P. Gage, 


a 


1 00 


N. B. Tilton, 


ti 


5 00 


H. H. Noyes, 


a 


7 00 


H. C. Hunton, 


(( 


2 00 


C. M. Stevens, 


li 


5 00 


J. L. Smith, 


u 


11 00 


J. T. Chase, 


li 


20 00 


Albert Dinsmore, 


u 


8 50 


H. J. Tirrcll, . 


a 


2 75 


E. G. Woodman, 


a 


3 50 


J. B. Fellows, 


a 


1 00 


W. H. Newhall, 


a 


23 00 


H. Fradd, 


n 


3 00 


F. H. Webster, 


a 


5 00 


Warren Eaton, 


a 


9 00 


N. C. Barker, 


u 


7 00 


Leonard Shelters, 


a 


7 00 


A. J. Dickey, 


11 


7 00 


H. W. Powell, 


u 


7 00 


H. C. Hunton, 


a 


9 00 



64 



To paid J. C. Graham, day police, . 82 00 
P. S. Griffin, " 

J. P. Fellows, " 

H. B. Martin, " 

J. W. Dickey, " 

C. Clough, " 
L. Andrews, " 
E. Garner, " 
G. E. Gline, " 

A. H. Barker, " 
H. P. Marshall, " 
E. G. Hastings, " 
W. N. Chamberlin, " 
Joseph Melvin, " 
J. E. Bailey, " 
James Patten, " 
G. W. Nichols, " 
H. J. Tirrell, " 
J. P. Currier, " 
John Smith, " 

B. W. Rohinson, " 
J. D. Edgerly, " 
Wm. T. Fogg, " 
N. Baker, " 
Henry Clough, paid witness, 

D. P. Prescott, horse hire, 
Eben Carr, horse hire, 

C. R. CoUey, setting glass, 
Julia Finnegan, washing, 
J. B. Clarke, printing blanks, etc. 
Campbell & Hanscom, advertising 
H. C. Tilton, stationery, 
W. H. Fisk, printing court blanks 
Bailey <fe Son, mattress, 
Hartshorn & Pike, grate. 



12 


00 


14 


50 


4 


00 


1 


00 


7 


00 


7 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 


2 


50 


1 


00 


7 


00 


7 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 



6 00 
4 00 
9 00 



1 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


10 


92 


4 


00 


141 


50 


2 


25 


7 


82 


33 


50 


5 


25 


12 


11 


42 


30 


10 


25 




75 



65 



To paid J. D, Bean, 1 pair blankets, 
Stevens & Tilton, provisions, 
A. Brigham, crackers, . 
David Wells, wood, 
John Fallen, sawing wood, . 
E. P. Johnson & Co., wood and 

coal, . • . . 

L. B. Bodwell, wood and coal 
Z. N. Doe, coal, . 
Hill & James, teams, . 
J. Q. A. Sargent, gas-fitting, 
Daniels & Co., oil and hard ware 
C. A. Smith, feather duster 
G. B. Fogg, repairs, 
S. S. Moulton, bucket, . 
Hartshorn & Pike, repairs, 
Abbott & Kelly, " 

John Twombly, " 

Colley & Brown, " 

Neal & Holbrook, repairs on lol)by 
Samuel Upton, salary, . 
Samuel Upton, office-rent, 
Wm. B. Patten, cash paid out, 
Wm. B. Patten, horse-hire, 
Eben Carr, provisions, 



84 00 
5 20 
4 50 

18 56 
8 50 

31 49 
25 52 



10 


50 


3 


50 


2 


23 


3 


55 


9 


75 


11 


60 


. 2 


00 


6 


67 


2 


90 


8 


88 


5 


20 


4 


42 


763 


70 


50 


00 


231 


00 


116 


05 


81 


32 



Balance to new account, 



810,156 71 
3 38 



•S10,160 09 



LIGHTING STREETS. 

By balance from old account, . . $405 42 
Appropriation, . . . 3,000 00 



$3,405 42 



66 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Manchester Gas-light Co., $2,636 48 

C. E. Colley, setting, lett'g, glass, 22 8-4 

G. W. Adams, oil, . . . 17 01 

Daniels & Co., 4 lights of glass, . 84 

Hartshorn & Pike, rep'g lanterns, 6 73 

H. M. Bailey <fe Son, oil-can, . 1 25 

T. L. Quimbj, lighting bridge, . 15 00 

Barr & Clapp, oil, globes, wicks, . 15 87 

H. H. Noyes, lighting lantern, . 30 00 



Balance to new account, 



$2,746 02 
. 659 40 



,405 42 



CITY HALL. 






By balance from old account, 


'fo 


76 


Appropriation, 


1,500 


00 


Beserved fund. 


1,180 


00 

82,685 76 


EXPENDITURES. 






To paid Manchester Gas-light Co., 


$532 


53 


J. Hodge, repairs, . 


40 


26 


J. L. Kennedy, '' 




39 


57 


John Twombly, " 




1 


50 


Amkg. Mfg. Co., " 




9 


09 


C. B. Colley, 




4 


80 


Colley & Brown, " 




20 


88 


G. B. Fogg, " . 




2 


00 


Wm. H. Fisk, " 




64 


39 


S. S. Moulton, " 




7 


75 



67 



To paid Neal & Holbrook, repairs, 
J. C. Young, repairs, 
Hartshorn &Pike," 
Geo. H. Dudley, " 
F. J. Manning, " 

D. H. Young, " 

E. Roper, " 
Wm. S. Palmer, " 
J. L. Smith, " 
Abbott & Kelley, " 
S. F. Brown, " 
T. R. Hubbard, " 
Daniels <fc Co., hardware, 
J. B. Varick & Co., tacks, 
B. F. Locke & Co., hat-rack, 
Cor. Sullivan, car'g coal, sa'gwood 
Thomas Steele, " " 
Elbridge Reed, " " 
John Fallen, " " 
John Barker, " " 
Brackly Rose, " " 
Timothy Kennedy, " " 
James Collins, pitch-wood, 

H. J. Tirrell, M^ood and coal, 
Howard Hazen, wood and coal, 
Charles Chase & Co., wood and 

coal, 
David Wells, wood and coal 
E. P. Johnson & Co., wood and 

coal, 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood and 

coal, 
Z. N. Doe, charcoal, 
Mary Hefrcn, washing,. 
Anna Craig, " 



$ 


37 


38 


36 


15 


13 


374 


46 


8 


75 


2 


00 


95 


85 




25 


1 


50 


162 


81 


51 


92 


10 


40 


18 


61 




48 


15 


00 


20 


05 


4 


12 


4 


75 


29 


92 


2 


44 


1 


50 


3 


50 


15 


00 


4 


25 


9 


62 


10 


53 


143 


61 



85 15 

79 00 

25 00 

1 20 

4 00 



68 



To paid Mrs. Hodgman, washing, . 8 75 
Julia Fiiincgan, " . .16 15 

Bridget Riley, " . . 1 50 

Mary McCarty, " . . 6 60 

Hartshorn & Pike, repairing and 

blacking stoves,- . . . 12 26 
S. E. Forsaith, iron frame for aim- 
ing, 179 61 

Boyd ct Hopkins, 71 1-2 yards of 

cloth, and making, ... 21 67 
C. Williams, stove and pipe, . 20 20 

J. P. Brock, stove and pipe, . . 69 92 
Kellcy tt Barnes, repairs, . . 13 75 
Coburn & Barker, gas-light reflec- 
tors, . . . . " . . 1 00 
Goldthwait, Snow <t Knight, 5 yds. 

matting, 7 80 

Margaret Cavernongh, cleaning, . 5 25 
Margaret Moran, " . 3 75 

Mary Daley, " . 3 75 

David Libbey, brooms and seating 

chairs, . . . . . 3 65 

Barton k Co., oil-cloth and mat- 
ting, ...... 

C. A. Smith, spittoons, &c., . 

J. Q. A Sargent, repairing gas- 

pipe, 

W. F. Sleeper, 21 gallons soap, 
Wiggin tt Goodwin, one set of 
steps, ..... 
Oilman Reed, 2 tons sand, . 
Morss & Whyte, guard for desk, . 
J. H. Maynard, moving safe, etc., . 
Frost & Higgins, one bar soap, 
H. C. Merrm, 2 pails, . 



26 


80 


15 


92 


53 


80 


4 


20 


3 


50 


4 


00 


33 


73 


15 


00 




15 


1 


50 



G9 



To paid A. Forreu & Co., 11 yards 

bocking, fr^20 90 

Equitable Insurance Co., insurance, 35 00 
^Etna Insurance Co., " . 73 00 

Springfield Insurance Co., " .35 00 



$2,654 51 
Balance to new account, . . 31 25 

.$2,085 76 



CITY LIBRARY. 



Bj balance from old account, . . $60 23 
Appropriation, . . . 2,200 00 

Reserved fund, . . . .125 00 



82,385 23 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Manchester Gas-light Co., . 8146 12 
S. N. Bell, rent of rooms, . . 250 00 
" " lamp and postage, . 91 
Chas. H. Marshall, salary, . . 577 50 
" " express paid on 
books, &G., . . . . 23 49 
Daniels & Co., hammer and screw- 
driver, 1 50 

AV. H. Fisk, blank books and book 

covers, ..... 141 57 
C. F. Livingston, sup|)lement to 

catalogue, . . . . 84 00 

Campbell & Hanscom, Daily L^nion, 10 00 

T. R. Hubbard, wood, . . . 6 75 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal, . . 32 00 



70 



To paid Will. Parker, coal-liods, 
Neal & Holbrook, repairs, 
J. Q. A. Sargent, gas-fixtures, 
Clias. A. Smith, duster, 
Colley & Brown, setting glass, 
Trustees, .... 
^tna Insurance Co., insurance. 
Phoenix Insurance Co., " 



Amount carried forward. 



. 82 


50 




9 


75 




. 21 


95 




3 


00 




1 


00 




1,000 


00 




. 32 


50 




. 25 


00 




82,3G9 


54 




. 15 


69 


.S2.385 23 



CITY OFFICERS. 

By balance from old account, . $^1,026 24 

Appropriation, .... 6,000 00 
Reserved fund, .... 600 00 



87,626 24 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Joseph B. Clark, Mayor, 81,000 00 
Joseph E. Bennett, City Clerk, 1,000 00 
H. R. Chamberlin, Treasurer and 

Collector, .... 
E. S. Cutter, Solicitor, 
J. 0. Adams, Superintendent, 
J. G. Edgerly, Superintendent, 
H, I). Lord, Messenger, 
Leonard French, Physician, . 
J. L. Kelley, Collector, 1859, 
^Ym. Little, Truant-agent, 



1,091 


67 


. 50 


00 


. 525 


00 


. 416 


66 


. 600 


00 


. 50 


00 


. 759 


68 


50 


00 



71 



Assessors and Inspectors. 

To paid T. B. Brown,. 
Isaac Huse, . 
A. C. Wallace, 
Allen Partridge, 
Chas. Currier, 
Jeremiah Hayes, 
G. W. Thayer, 
J. G. Cilley, 
Joseph E. Bennett, Assistant Clerk, 



8294 


50 


120 


00 


127 


50 


78 


00 


124 


50 


67 


5<i 


171 


00 


215 


62 



190 50 



Overseers of the Poor. 



Timothy Sullivan, 2 years. 


$50 00 


S. J. Young, 2 years. 


. 50 00 


S. S. Moulton, Clerk, 


. 75 00 


Geo. S. Chandler, . 


20 00 


N. Baldwin, 


25 00 


John Plumnier, . . . , 


25 00 


H. Fradd, .... 


20 00 


Edward Prime, 


25 00 


Health- Officers. 




Henry Clough, .... 


825 00 


John S. Elliott, .... 


25 00 


Daniel Baleh, .... 


25 00 


Stephen Palmer, .... 


25 00 


Selectmen. 




B. K. Parker, 2 years, . 


810 00 


Andrew Farrell, 2 years. 


10 00 


Samuel Brooks, .... 


5 00 


W. H. Gilmore, .... 


5 00 



72 



To paid Henry Clougli, 2 years, 
Jonas Harvey, 
Charles Brown, 
J. B. Hartwell, 
S. F. Stanton, 
S. L. Fogg, 
William Reardon, 
Timothy Sullivan, 
Charles Canfield, . 
U. A Cars well, 
Isaac Whittemore, 
Henry ^Y. Powell, 
John Burke, 
William Mills, 
John W. Dickey, 
A. J. Tebbetts, 
Oilman Stearns, 



LO 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 



3Ioderators. 



Geo,. W. Weeks, 
William Little, 2 years, 
Geo. A. French, 
Daniel Farmer, 2 years. 
G. H. Colby, 
M. W. Oliver, 
S. T. Hill, . 
John T. Robinson, 
Levi H. Sleeper, . 



Geo. L. Woods, . 
Roswell H. Hassam; 
F. L. Porter, 



. 




$3 00 


ars, 




6 00 
3 00 


?ars, 




6 00 
3 00 
3 00 
3 00 
3 00 


• 


3 00 


Ward Clerks. 






. $5 00 


, , 


5 00 


, 


. 


5 00 



73 



To paid Daniel Conner, 
J. W. Lathe, 
M. P. Hall, . 
L. E. Wallace, . ' . 

Balance to new account, 



. 


85 


00 








, 


2 


00 








• 


5 
5 


00 
00 








87 


,516 


13 






110 


11 














8T 


,626 


24 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

By balance from old account, . . 8119 72 
Appropriation, . . . 5,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Enoch C. Stevens, bounty and 

costs, 8267 07 

Jeremiah Connor, bounty and costs, 202 64 

Wm. E. Robinson, " " 247 18 

S. S. Moulton, labor at stable, . 1 00 

T. T. Abbott, attendance at court, 1 25 

J. P. Hubbard, teams, . . . 3 00 

Manchester Post-office, postage, . 28 00 

S. R. Davidson, use of hall, . . 20 00 

J. N. Bruce, painting guide-boards, 24 75 
Western L'nion Telegraph Co., 

messages, . . . . 13 70 
T, B. Brown, copying tax-book, 

1859, 9 00 

J. Stickney, one punch, . . 75 

H. D. Lord, fees on summons, . 1 62 
John Jameson, labor on private 

way, 26 70 



85,449 72 



74 



To paid H. D. Lord, making tax record 

for overseers of poor, . . 895 00 

Palmer & Gale, labor on water- 
works, . . . . . 4 50 
J. E. Bennett, preparing report for 

press, 100 00 

T. R. Hubbard, lumber for ward- 
room, . . . . . 5 60 
H. C. Tilton, books for poor chil- 
dren, 43 45 

Brewer tt Tileston, books for poor 
children, ..... 
John Smith, soldier's bounty, 
H. C. Joy, sheep killed by dogs, . 
S. S. Moulton, fitting up ward-room 
Amoskeaii' Manufacturing Co., deed 

of land for ward-room, 
H. D. Lord, paid for moving set- 
tees, ..... 
Tliomas Howe, paid for washing 
ward-room, .... 
Hill ct James, horse-hire, 
Robert Fulton, recording deed, 
J, G. Colt, cleaning vault, 
Follensbee & Cross, repairs on wa- 
ter-works, . . . . 13 20 
AVm. Smith, work on road, . . 5 95 
Follensbee & Preston, repairs on 

water-works, . . . . 4 60 
Daniels & Co., lantern, hooks, &c. 1 88 
Rodnia Nutt, damage to sleigh, etc. 12 12 
Alonzo Tarbell, damage to team, . 12 00 
Chandler & Morgan, oil-suit, . 5 00 

C. R. CoUey, setting glass, . . 92 

William Campbell, Avatcr-trongh, , 3 00 



17 


97 


150 


00 


6 


00 


2 


25 


360 


00 




50 


4 


00 


61 


25 




50 


17 


50 



75 



To paid J. T. Cliasc, Ijiirying hogs and 

dogs, >$3 00 

D. F. Miller, bed, pillows and bol- 
ster, 15 00 

Daniels & Co., powder, &c., . . 15 37 
J. G. Colt, trees, . . . .191 00 
T. R. Hubljard, lumber, . . 00 

Phoenix Insurance Co., premium 

on policy, . . . . 2G 25 

^Etna Insurance Co., premium on 

policy, 22 50 

Wm. Kimball, whitewashing tree- 
boxes, 35 00 

H. D. Lord, teams, . . . 1 50 
S. S. Moulton, labor on tree-boxes, 32 00 
D. M. Riley, posting notices, . 3 00 

J. L. Smith, lumber, . . . 9 OG 
J. S. Daggett, detector and glass, 3 50 
Hartshorn & Pike, ladles and chairs, 2 37 
Quint & Jenkins, damage to team, 30 00 
C. E. Clough,& Co., building vault, 174 12 
H. & H. R. Pettec, one cask ce- 
ment, . . , . . 2 85 
J. L. Kennedy, painting and set- 
ting guide-boards, 
Geo. F. King, 2 gross pens, . 
G. B. Fogg, key for Ward Eight, . 
J. II. Johnson, teaming, 
J. E. Bennett, recording births, 

deaths, and marriages, 
Chas. H. Marshall, damage to team, 
J. G. Colt, 5 days' work, 
J. E. Bennett, fare to Concord and 
return, ..... 
Cyrus Baldwin, jury-box^ 



2 


50 


2 


00 




75 


2 


05 


40 


00 


44 


00 


7 


50 


1 


50 


4 


50 



76 



To paid Daniels & Co., 7 lbs. nails, 
S. S. Moulton, repairing tree-boxes 
Manchester Gas-light Co., gas for 

ward-room, 
Patrick Dowd, additional bounty. 
Hartshorn <fe Pike, sheet lead, etc. 
Horace Gordon, repairs on scales 
S. S. Moulton, repairs on city hall 
D. M. Riley, posting bills, 
James Lewis, i)0unty, . 
Azni Lamarchc, bounty, 
N. W. Gove, copy of non-resident 

taxes, .... 
Gilman Clough, plank for scales, 
G. W. Merriam, . 
J. Q. A. Sargent, pipes water-works 
Jas. E. Young, water-trough, 2 yrs. 
J. Y. Gordon, " " 

J.Q. A. Sargent, labor on aqueduct 
S. S. Moulton, " " 

G. ^Y. Cheney, horse-hire, 
• T. P. Clough, trimming trees, 
S. L. Fogg, horse-hire, . 
J. B. Yarick & Co., measuring-tape 
John Calef, water-trough, 5 years 
J. E. Bennett, expense to Concord 
Isaac Whittemore, use of team, 
Northern Tel. Co., messages, 
D. W, Reynolds, work on highway 

1866, .... 

John Fallen, labor in hall, 
Isaac Huse, team, 
J. Q. A. Sargent, gas-fixtures, &c. 
J. C. Young, expenses to Lowcl 

and Boston, 



$ 49 

2 25 

84 

80 26 

10 31 

4 47 

6 88 

3 80 
300 00 
300 00 

12 00 
8 95 
2 50 

2 20 
6 00 

3 00 
2 m 



6 50 
25 50 

14 00 

13 50 
6 00 

15 00 
2 50 

15 50 
2 16 

5 91 

75 

14 00 
1 55 

13 05 



To paid \Ym. P. Newell, expenses to 
Lowell and Boston, . 
Thos. Howe, making voting-bencli, 
■ D. K. White, expenses to Lowell, . 
Hartshorn & Pike, drinking-cup, . 
D. M. Riley, distributing bills, 
J. B. Sawyer, surveying, 
M. D. Stokes, water-trough, blocks, 
S. S, Moulton, fitting ward-room, 
C. G. Jenncss, was'g school-room, 
G. H. Dudley, lumber, etc., . 
Ncal & Holbrook, lal:»or on scales, 
S. S. James & Co., horse-hire, 
Daniels & Co., powder, primers, &c 
A. J. Mayhew, use of hall, . 
Jeremiah Hayes, cleaning vault. 
Hill & Co., exprcssage, 
Cheney & C©., exprcssage, . 
G. W. Cheney, horse-hire, 
G. W. Thayer, horse-hire, 
J. S. Davis, irons for trough, 
R. H. Hassam, post., station., &c 



Transferred to reserved fund, 
Balance to new account. 



813 05 

13 05 

5 20 

1 00 

2 00 
2 00 

90 00 
2 50 

2 78 
7 92 

3 50 

2 50 
85 59 
12 00 
10 00 

3 25 
00 
50 
50 
73 
88 



83,590 16 
. 900 00 
. 959 50 



85,419 72 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

By balance from old account, . . 8345 48 
Appropriation, .... 1800 00 



82,145 48 



78 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid John B. Clarke, printing and 

advertising, . . . . 
Campbell & Hanscom, printing and 

advertising, 
S. S. Colt, advertising, . 
C. F. Livingston, printing notices 
C. F. Livingston, check-lists, 
C. F. Livingston, organiz. city gov, 
C. F. Livingston, tax-bills, 
C. F. Livingston, posters, 
C. F. Livingston, license-blanks, 
Lidependent Press, Association ad 

vertising non-resident taxes, 
A. Quimby, stationery, . 
Wm. H. Fisk, books and stationery 
H. C. Tilton, stationery, 
Geo. F. King, pens, 
Tewksbury & Bro., stationery, 
F. L. Porter, " 

H. R. Chamberlin, " 

J. W. Lathe, " 

George L. Woods, " 

AVm. Carter & Bro., 2 gallons ink 
Wm. H. Fisk, printing and binding 

annual report, . 
David Wilder, erasable tablets, 
N. P. Greene, mort. record-book, 
Cheney & Co., 1 drawing-pen, 
L. S. Learned, tax-books, 



$453 
85 

•J 

73 
X 20 

7 

23 

2 

2 

30 

10 

158 

16 

1 

5 

1 

3 

1 

2 

6 

552 

1 

17 

2 

70 



(38 

24 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 
75 

00 
21 
83 
50 
50 
00 
15 
09 
41 
00 
25 

00 
60 
00 
65 
00 



Balance to new accoimt, 



$1,549 

. 596 



36 
12 



^2,145 48 



79 



TEMPORARY LOAN, 



By amount of loan, Jan. 1,1867 
Amount of loan for 1867, 



823,022 50 
22,610 00 



§15,632 50 



EXPENDITURES, 



To paid Charles H. Carpcntei', 
Geo. B. Jackman, 
Wm. P. Merrill, . 
Wm. Man ah an, 
James H. Johnson, 
Milton McCoy, 
Jesse Gibson, 
Jacob Bennett, 
Joseph Ej Bennett, 
Salome Battles, . 
S. J. Young, 
Rebecca W. Smith, 



$f 1,000 00 
. 400 00 
. 700 00 

2,000 -00 
. 400 00 
. 800 00 

2,000 00 
. 157 50 
. 600 00 
. 145 00 
. 100 00 

2,100 00 



$10,402 50 
Temporary loan, Jan. 1, 1868, 35,230 00 





.^45,632 50 


INTEREST. 




By appropriation, .... 


$25,000 00 


EXPENDITUKES, 




To paid Charles H. Carpenter, . 


860 00 


Geo. B. Jackman, 


24 00 


Rebecca W. Smith 


143 50 


Jesse Gibson, Derry, . 


24 00 



80 



To paid Wm. P. Merrill, 






. 8-13 


17 


Wm. Maiiliau, 






. 122 


67 


James H. Johnson, 






24 


00 


Milton McCoy, 






. 58 


17 


Jesse Gibson, Pelliam, 






120 


00 


John Ordway, 






. 252 


00 


Jacob Bennett, 






10 


87 


Joseph E. Bennett, 






79 


40 


Salome Battles, . 






8 


61 


S. J. Young, 






. 78 


00 


Sarah W. Ayer, . 






. 30 


00 


Coupons, 






21,720 


00 


$ 


22,798 


39 


Balance to new account, . 2,201 


61 






125,000 00 



PAYING STREETS. 

By balance from old account. 
Appropriation, 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Erastus Cutting, paving, 
Z. N. Doe, labor, 

Mitchell Surrell, 
J. C. Larky, 
John Larky, 
A. Carrigan, 
Michael Carrigan, 
James Livrey, 
H. D. Lord, 
Augustus WymaUj 
John Jameson, 



. 814 07 


3,500 


00 


. 8528 


5G 


. 51 


75 


7 


50 


. 31 


50 


. 28 


50 


3 


75 


3 


75 


9 


00 


. 15 


00 


. 812 


00 


. 43 


25 



83,514 06 



81 



To paid Jno. Stearns, labor, 

Geo. F. Doe, " . 

H. J. Tirrell, " . 

C. Townsend, " . 

John Twombly, " . 

J. B. Blanchard, " . 

Mr. Wilkins, " . 

Charles Canfield, " . 

G. W. Butterheld, " . 

James Patten, " . 

James Kearn, " . 

Patrick Finn, " . 

Patrick Dowd, " . 

John Larkin, " . 

E. Bresnahan, " . 

Daniel Mahanna, " . 

Michael Scanlan, " . 

B. H. Piper, maul, 

M. D. Stokes, stone, 

H. <fe C. Townsend, stone, 
. John Campbell, 89 loads of 

Haines & Wallace, stakes, 

J. A. Weston, engineering, 

Wm. C. Chase, labor, 

Sylvester Donahoe, " 

G. Allard, 

Timothy Kennedy, 

R. Stark, 

City Teams, 

Levi Woodman, 

Nathaniel Corning, 



labor. 



san 



cl, 



816 50 

7 50 



16 


50 


81 


50 


3 


12 


37 50 


4 


00 


36 


00 


18 


50 


18 


50 


16 


25 


6 


67 


8 


62 


9 


00 


18 


00 


10 


00 


12 


67 


1 


00 


1,996 


81 


39 


00 


22 


25 


1 


50 


58 


75 


6 


34 


7 


87 


22 


12 


16 


87 


18 


00 


73 


87 


7 


87 


7 


50 



Balance to new account, . 
6 



$3,338 14 
. 175 93 



,514 07 



82 



WATERING STREETS. 



By transferred from city teams, $^1,000 00 

Transferred from reserved fund, 1,185 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Geo. W. Buss, water wagon, 
T. R. Hubbard, water tanks, 
D. W. Fling, watering streets, 
S; S. Moulton, stock and labor, 
S. F. Brown, painting tanks, 
Gregg <t Dodge, pipe and labor, 
J. H. INIaynard, labor on tanks, 
.J. B, Yarick & Co., hardware, 
Manchester Locomotive Wks, pipe 
Haines & Wallace, lumber, . 
W. P. Stratton, repairs on pipe, 
Kimball & Dow, 1 brush, 
J. W. Whittier, hose and couplings 
Hartshorn & Pike, lead and solder 

i»g, 

John Rogers, teaming, . 

Neal <fe Holbrook, lumber and labor 

Patrick Finn, labor, 

Timothy Kennedy, labor, 

Edward Cotter, labor, . 



82,185 0.0 



Balance to new account, 



8550 00 

353 20 

600 00 

9 83 

39 14 

127 70 

70 00 

5 29 

228 69 

93 09 

34 01 

50 

15 21 

14 06 

2 00 
27 20 

3 33 
9 00 
1 60 

82,183 75 
1 25 



82,185 00 



83 



MILITIA. 

By balance from old account, 


8267 33 


Appropriation, . . . . 


500 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




To paid Smyth Rifles, 


150 00 


National Guards, . 


50 00 


First Company of Cavalry, . 


50 00 


Head Guards, 


50 00 


Manchester ^Yar Veterans, . 


47 23 


Amoskeag Veterans, . 


. 100 00 



Balance to new account. 



$347 23 
420 10 



$767 33 



LIQUOR AGENCY. 



By transferred from reserved fund, $500 00 
E. M. Kellogg, . . . . 182 84 
Overdrawn, . . . . . 53 94 



1737 78 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid John I. Baker, for liquor, $488 53 

E. M. Kellogg, for liquor, . . 113 00 

E. M. Kellogg, salary, . . . 125 00 

C. F. Livingston, printing, . . 5 00 

Campbell & Hanscom, printing, . 6 25 



i727 78 



84 



COURT HOUSE. 



By appropriation, 



P3,500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Alplieus Gay, on contracts, $7,500 00 
M. D. Stokes, stone, stone-work, . 3,500 00 
M. W. Oliver, architect, 
Baldwin & Emerson, sills. 
Holt & Elliott, brick, . 
Con. Man. & Law. Railroad, freight 
Haines & Wallace, lumber, 
John H. Reed, lumber, 
W. W. Hubbard, lumber and labor 
Daniels & Co., iron, 
T. R. Hubbard, window and door 

frames, 
D. & D. Grregg, sash, . 
Charles H. Hodgman, teaming 
John Rogers, teaming, . 
H. C. Hunton, teaming, 
S. L. Fogg, horse hire, . 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co., castings, 
J. Q. A. Sargent, gas-fixtures 
John Pettengill, chimney cap 
John Campbell, teaming, 
James Kearn, labor, . 
Patrick Finn, " . 

Patrick Dowd, " . 

John Lark in, " 

Edward Bresnahan," 
Daniel Mahanna, '' 
Michael Scanlan, " 
Wm. Chase, " . 



1,000 


00 


285 


11 


4,163 


17 


770 


60 


924 


23 


913 


76 


80 


50 


4 


06 


721 


16 


205 


55 


2 


50 


1 


50 


o 
O 


00 


6 


00 


627 


53 


121 


70 


85 


80 


5 


00 


3 


75 


5 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


5 


33 



85 



To paid City Teams, labor, . . 83 37 
Neal Sc Ilolbrook, work and lumber, 41 GQ 



Balance to new account. 



121,003 28 
12,496 72 



.^33,500 00 



SCHOOLS. 



By appropriation, 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid school committee as per order, 



■$38,000 00 



838,000 00 



School District No. 2 — Repairs and Insurance. 
By appropriation by tax, ..... $2,550 00 



expenditures. 
To paid school committee as per order, . 

New High-School House. 
By balance from old account, . $10,002 35 
Appropriation by tax, . . 8,000 00 



12,550 00 



$18,002 35 



expenditures. 



To paid M. W. Oliver, 

Amoskeag Savings Bank, 
Manchester " " 

City " " 

First " " 



Balance to new account, 



$10,002 35 
1,785 27 ' 
1,785 27 
1,785 27 

1,785 27 



^17,143 43 

. 858 92 



$18,002 35 



86 

New School House, Dist. No. 3. 

By appropriation by tax, 1866, . . $675 00 
" " 1867, . . 460 00 

81,135 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid building committee as per or- 
der, 81,135 00 

New School House, Dist. No. 5. 
By ]jalance from old account, . . . . 87 75 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid C. R. Colley, setting glass and 

varnishing, . . . . $6 00 
Balance to new account, . . 1 75 

17 75 



Repairs op School House, Hist. No. 6. 
By appropriation by tax, ..... $83 06 

expenditures. 
To paid committee, 883 06 

Repairs of School House, Dist. No. 7. 
By appropriation by tax, ..... 8600 00 

expenditures. 

To paid committee as per order No. . 

54, 8575 30 

Merrimack River Savings Bank, in- 
terest, 24 70 

8600 00 



87 

Repairs op School House, Dist. No. 10. 
By appropriation by tax, ..... $200 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid committee as per order No. 

53, 881 31 

Balance to new account, . . 118 QG 

8200 00 

Repairs of School House, Dist. No. 11. 
By amount raised by tax, ' . . , . 8100 00 

Repairs of Buildings. 
By transferred from reserved fund, . . . 8550 00 

expenditures 

To paid Haines & Wallace, lumber, . 804 12 
John H. Maynard, labor and lum- 
ber, 131 32 



8195 44 
Balance to new account, . . 354 50 • 

8550 00 



DOG TAX. 

By dog tax collected, 8143 00 

expenditures. 

To paid Ira W. Moore, slieep killed by 

dogs, 818 00 

Balance to new account, . . 125 00 

8143 00 



88 

PISCATAQUOG BRIDGE. 

By transferred from reserved fund, . . . 8275 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Daniels & Co., 2 casks nails, |12 50 

Haines & Wallace, lumber, . . 154 56 

John H. Maynard, labor, . . 47 69 



8214 75 
Balance to new account, ... 60 25 



8275 00 



REDUCTION OF CITY DEBT. 

Bj appropriation, . . . 810,000 00 
Increase of temporary loan, . 12,207 50 



'5 

EXPENDITURES. 



822,207 50 



To paid city bonds, . . . |20,000 00 
Net increase of debt, . . 2,207 50 

822,207 50 



RESERVED FUND. 



By appropriation, .... 


85,000 00 


Transf d from Reservoirs, . 


700 00 


New Highways, . 


500 00 


Tenem't on Vine st. 


27 54 


Abatem't of taxes, 


530 00 


Discount on taxes, 


700 00 


Incidental expen's, 


900 00 


Revenue account. 


13,800 00 



822,157 54 



89 



EXPENDITURES. 




To traiisfd to paupers off farm, 




aioo 00 


Highway, Dist. Nc 


..1, 


200 00 


a a 


2, 


140 00 


a u 


3, 


60 00 


a a 


4, 


100 00 


r '' " 


5, 


40 00 


a a 


6, 


30 00 


a a 


8, 


200 00 


a (; 


9, 


245 00 


a u 


10, 


730 00 


a a 


12, 


350 00 


Granite Bridge, 




110 00 


Am. Falls Bridge 




390 00 


Commons, . 




. 100 00 


Schools, 




6,000 00 


City Officers, 




. 600 00 


City Hall, . 




1,180 00 


City Library, 




. 125 00 


City Police, . 




. 600 00 


Watering Streets 




1,185 00 


Piscataqiiog Bridge, 


275 Od 


Repairs of Buildi 


ngs. 


. 550 00 


Liquor Agency, 


^ 


. 500' 00 




13,810 00 


Balance to new account, 




8,347 54 




'-P-^'^yJ-O i tjTt 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 



By appropriation. 



$5,000 00 



90 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid sundry persons as per order 

No. 55, 84,227 43 

Transferred to reserved fund, . 700 00 
Balance to new account, . . 72 57 



85,000 00 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

By balance from old account, . . $858 44 
Appropriation, . . . 12,000 00 



$12,858 44 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid lot 61 Prospect St., and 55 

Central St., 1864, 
James M. Young, 1865 
Esther C. Stevens, 
Concord Eailroad, 
Geo. W. Barry, 
D. Clifford, 
J. B. Davis, 
Geo. H. Hubbard, 
Thomas Tuck, 
Thomas T. Welch, 
Lyman Raymond, 
Michael Mara, 
Adam Chandler, National Bank 

Stock, 1865, 
Edson Hill, National Bank Stock 

1865, .... 
John Ordway, National Bank Stock 

1865 



83 


10 


4 


57 


11 


75 


10 


80 


1 


90 


5 


22 


5 


22 


5 


22 


5 


22 


5 


22 


5 


22 


5 


41 



65 32 

87 08 
21 78 



91 



To paid Henry Putney, National Bank 

Stock, 1865, . . . . 

Moses Sawyer, National Bank 

Stock, 1865, 
Gustavus Sanborn, 1865, 
Wm. Sage, " 

Alonzo Smith, " 

Freeman N. Thnrber, " 
Geo. Vi. Yarnum, " 
James & Roclnia Niitt, 1865, 
James S. Batclielder, " 
Harland Langioy, " 

Wm. G. Hoyt, " 

Susan Woods, " 

Cyrus S. Burpee, " 

H. H. Currier, " 

L. & B. North Universalist Church 

1865, .... 
Moses Rolfe, 1865, . 
Joseph Bell, " . 

William Elvin, " . 
James Boyle, " 

Jonathan B. Moore, 1865, 
Fredcrich Theilscher, " 
Sarah F. McQueston, " 
Thos. Berry, Nat. B'k Stock, 1866, 
Mason Boyd, " " 

Calvin Boyd, " " 

Adam Chandler, " " 

Sarah J. Coffin, " " 

H. A. Dearborn, " « 

Ira Gove, " " 

Joseph T. Goss, " " 

Sarah G. Hancock," " 

Wm. C. Heselton, " " 



$65 32 



. 43 


54 


5 


22 


5 


22 


5 


22 


5 


22 


5 


22 


1 


30 


7 


78 


5 


18 


5 


41 


8 


71 


6 


22 


5 


61 


7 


64 


8 


28 


3 


89 


5 


61 


5 


22 


5 


22 


5 


61 


8 


64 


, 14 


59 


24 


32 


24 


32 


97 


28 


12 16 


7 


30 


24 


32 


24 


32 


12 


16 


36 


48 



92 



To paid E. Hill, Nat. B'k Stock, 1866, $128 90 


Charles H. Hill, 


77 82 


Elizabeth Hughes, 


' " 121 60 


Samuel W. Jones, 


9 73 


John Kennard, * 


" 48 64 


Robert Kenned}^, 


" 31 61 


Lot Knowles, 


48 64 


Simeon D. Leach, 


43 78 


David R. Leach, 


" " 97 28 


J. D. Lovering, 


" 14 59 


Luther P. JNIartin, 


" 4 86 


Jona. McAlister, 


' a 24 32 


Daniel McQueston, 


48 64 


N. V. Morrill, 


12 16 


Moor, Cyrus, 


' " 19 46 


Joseph Mitchell, 


" " 65 66 


Geo. S. Neal, 


" 12 16 


John Ordwaj, 


' " 72 96 


James Parker, 


' ■ " 60 80 


AVard Parker, 


" 29 18 


D. H. Parker, 


" 36 48 


Geo. C. Prescott, 


" " 48 64 


Henry Putney, 


" 145 92 


Ellen M. Riddle, 


' " 12 16 


Eliza A. Sanborn, 


•' " 14 59 


John Shirley, 


' " 48 64 


Moses Sawyer, 


" 97 28 


Henry Stevens, 


•' « 24 32 


Onslow Stearns, ' 


" 121 60 


A. B. Storey, 


' " 48 64 


Win son Stone, 


" 24 32 


Hanson Tasker, 


24 32 


Andrew G. Tucker, 


" 36 48 


John West, 


121 60 


Robert Wilson, 


" " 24 32 



93 

To paid A. Aldrich, Xat. B'k St'k, 1 866 
Cyrus Ai,lams, " 

Susan G. Annis, " 
Lawrence Barnes, " 
J. P. Bancroft, " 
Eliza J. Bingham, " 
Thomas Chandler, " 
Hiram 1*. Clark, " 
S. S. C )l!in, " 

Jesse Chase, " 

Mary C ,' titer, " 

Isaac P. Clifford, " 
ElizahcfU Clark, " 
Charles B. Dodge, " 
Jackson Freese, " 
Philip Fife, " 

Winthr^)!) Fowler, " 
John L. Fowler, " 
Nancy Fowler, " 
Samuel Fowler, " 
Frank A. Fowler, " 
Est. of J. Goodwin, " 
Daniel G;-egg, " 

John H. George, " 
S. S. N. Greeley, " 
E. Geor,-e, ' " 
C. E. Gc-Drge, 
Clarissi Griffin, " 
Jane Gc )rge, " 

S. Otis Hanson, " 
Hiram Hutchinson, 
Samuel rones, " 
Estate ()!' W. Knox, " 
Betsey Mimball, " 
Albert 3[uKean, " 



,1866, 


$72 96 


u 


19 46 


(i 


7 30 


(( 


7 30 


u 


7 30 


a 


12 16 


a 


29 18 


a 


24 32 


a 


24 32 


a 


77 82 


a 


12 11 


a 


12 11 


a 


4 86 


a 


36 48 


a 


14 59 


a 


34 05 


(.1. 


973 


a 


9 73 


u 


4 86 


a 


00 80 


a 


12 10 


a 


48 64 


a 


19 46 


u 


48 64 


(( 


12 16 


u 


7 30 


a 


21 89 


a 


34 05 


a 


2 43 


a 


36 48 


a 


14 59 


a 


21 89 


u 


12 16 


a 


7 30 


a 


60 80 



94 



To paid A. Melvin, Nat. B'k St'k 
Eobert McGaw, " 
John H. Moore, " 
Maiy A. Moore, " 
Francis B. Martin, " 
Luther P. Martin, " 
Ann G. Merrill, " 
Daniel Nichols, " 
Sir. M. D. Perkins, " 
John C. Perkins, " 
Asenath Perkins, " 
Stephen Perkins, " 
John B. Perkins, " 
Washington Perkins, 
Josephine Parker, " 
Samuel Patten, " 
Charles Quimby, " 
John Robie, " 

Judith S. Reed, " 
John S. Reed, " 

N. Snell, guardian, " 
Solomon Searle, " 
Cyrus Sargent, " 
A. Tuttle, trustee, " 
Wm. P. Wheeler, " 
John White, " 

Sarah A. Woodman, 
Mary A. Woodman, 
N. Woodman, gd'n, 
Wm. A. Wood, " 
Eliza Wood, " 

Rebecca N. Wood, " 
Edward Wood, " 
John P. Young, " 
John Ilosley, 1866, 



1866, 



824 


36 


63 


23 


14 


59 


7 


30 


12 


16 


12 


16 


12 


16 


17 


02 


46 


21 


2 


43 


17 


02 


48 


64 


24 


32 


4 


86 


7 


80 


4 


86 


24 


32 


2 


43 


24 


32 


12 


16 


36 


48 


24 


32 


12 


16 


9 


73 


36 


48 


17 


02 


2 


43 


4 


86 


24 


32 


24 


32 


12 


16 


12 


16 


12 


16 


36 


48 


4 


75 



95 



To paid H'j K. Tilton, 1866, 

John II. Brown, " 

H. Peabody, " 

Deny Bank, " 

Geo. T. Sheldon, " 

A. H. Gerry, " 

Wm. White, " 

Levi W. Fisher, " 

John Williams, " 

Daniel Riley, " 

Charles J. Smith, " 

Sylvester Fitch, " 

Obed J. Swain, " 

Lyman Raymond, " 

C. R. Huni, " 

Oscar F. Perkins, " 

Frank P. Colby, " 

Moses Clement, " 

Marshall Ilutchins, " 

John Harrington, " 

Isaac W. Garland, " 

Manchester Bank, " 

Charles Cheney, " 

Leonard Cortis, " 

Oscar Titus, " 

Louis Lawrence, " 

James Nesmith, " 

Geo. H. Hubbard, " 

Martin Towle, " 

Adolphus Greene, " 

Amos Sanborn, " 

John Mclntire, " 
Wm. Gaskcll, 

Geo. A. Pillsbury, " 

Isaac Langley, " 



$-10 00 


5 


84 


13 


38 


9 


47 


19 


83 


3 


00 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


1 


00 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


6 


05 


3 


99 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 




84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 



5 84 
5 84 
5 84 
9 73 
12 64 



96 



To paid Aklaiio Neal, 


1866, . 


. 85 84 


Concord R. R. 


u 


. IT 18 


F. MeKinlcy, 


a' 


5 84 


Owen McKay, 


a 


5 50 


Geo. W. Weils, 


a 


5 50 


John Langin, 


u 


5 84 


Wm. Collins, 


a 


5 84 


Isaac Currier, 


ii 


5 84 


Newell Tilton, 


u 


. 25 30 


Chas. H. Farnham, 


a 


5 84 


Wm. George, 


u 


6 84 


Daniel Gilo, 


a 


5 84 


Sylvester Gould, 


a 


5 84 


Wm. Henry, 


a 


5 84 


Ed. L. Ilolton, 


a 


5 84 


Morris A. Houghton 


• 


5 84 


Part of Reny Land, 


a 


3 89 


Jesse Kimball, 


a 


5 84 


D. K. Little, 


a 


5 84 


G. H. Kimball, 


a 


2 43 


Walter McDonald, 


a 


5 84 


Henry W. Moore, 


a 


5 84 


John P. Newell, 


a 


5 84 


Thos. P. Philbrick, 


u 


5 84 


S. B. Hadley, 


a 


12 58 


John G. Haywood, 


a 


•6 38 


Jonathan Wood, 


a 


3 44 


L. B. Blake, 


a 


5 84 


P. G. Wyman, 


a 


8 30 


J. A. Chamberlain, 


ii. 


25 


Wm. H. Gilraore, 


a 


2 43 


Chas. A. Luce, 


a 


5 84 


James T. j\Iorrison, 


a 


5 84 


Ira Bryant, 


a 


5 84 


Wm. Weir, 


u 


5 84 



97 



To paid David M. True, 1866, 

Robert E. Williams, " 

Jesse Cross, " 

Augustus Wagner, " 

Michael Sherry, " 

Ezra Gove, " 

Henry Whittcmore, " 
Heirs of Rufus Baker," 

Chas. L. Bailey, " 

G. W. F. Convers, " 

James G. Furnald, " 

Henry T. Hatch, " 

J. D. Warren, " 

Wm. Doran, " 

Geo. B. Shattuck, " 

Charles H. Shaw, " 

Alfred Wright, " 

John Dealey, " 

Frank L. Prince, " 

Thomas J. Whittle, " 

Samuel Brensford, " 

Michael Connor, " 

James Collins, " 

Wm. Dutemple, " 

• C. S. Baker, " 

George T. Perry, " 

George W. Young, " 

Charles L. Hubbard, " 

Lorenzo D. Gladden, " 

Amos Leteste, " 

James Thompson, " 

• John P. Lord, " 
James P. Dickey, 1867, 

John McCarty, " 

Ed. Bresnahan, " 

7 



$5 


84 


5 


84 


5 50 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


36 


48 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


50 


18 


77 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


50 


5 


50 


5 


50 


1 


00 


6 


50 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


6 


87 


5 


84 




73 


5 


84 


5 


84 


5 


84 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 



98 



To paid Thomas Cane, 1867, 

Lewis E. Taplin, " 

Chas. Hosford, " 

James H. Ford, " 

Chas. D. Dmiham, " 

Clarence C. ^Yearc, " 

William R. Stark, " 

Michael Dunham, " 

Chas, 0. Barnard, " 

Joseph Harvey, " 

Murty O'Brien, " 

T. M. Curtis, " 

Loren Durrill, " 
Michael McLanghlin, " 

Daniel McKay, " 

Eoswell Harris, " 

John Huskie, " 

Z. Harvey, " 

C. W. Piilsljury, " 

AVilliam Reynolds, " 

^Vm. B. Clark, " 

Josiah N. Heath, " 

Mary Conway, " 

James Collins, " 

Myron B. McAlister, " 
Obed Swain, 

Archibald Cameron, " 

Chas. H. Buswell, " 

John T. Phelps, " 

Isaac Holt, " 

James B. Clongh, " 

James G. Burnes, " 

William Wilson, " 
William H. Gilmorc, " 
Wilson & Peabody, " 



84 91 



4 


76 


4 


76 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


76 


4 


91 


4 


76 


4 


76 


4 70 


1 


00 



6 33 

1 00 

2 04 



4 


76 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


76 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


1 


85 


4 


76 



6 95 

7 56 



99 



To paid Wm. Dutemple, 186T, . 


$4 91 


Charles Townsencl, " 


4 


91 


H. Townsencl, " 


4 


91 


Daniel Swett, " 


4 


91 


A. P. Gilson, " 


4 


09 


Horace A. Knowlton, " 


4 


91 


Wm. A. Canfield, " 


4 


91 


Charles P. Liscomb, " 


1 


00 


Seymond Hastings, " 


4 


91 


Lorenzo D. Seagel, " 


4 


91 


William Y. Prescott, " 


. 10 


22 


John AV. Bay, " 


. 16 


35 


Chas. L. Richardson, " 


12 


26 


Amos Wriglit, " 


4 


91 


E. D. L. Parker, " 


1 


59 


Geo. E. Gault, " 


4 


91 


Edson 0. Sullivan, " 


4 


76 


Bernard Bannigan, " 


4 


76 


Wm. Harrington, " 


4 


91 


Franklin C. Fletcher, " 


5 


96 


G. L. McAlister, " 


4 


91 


Lewis Rice, " 


4 


91 


Francis A. Eaton, " 


4 


76 


John S. Wheeler, " 


4 


91 


Gilman D. Moore, " 


4 


91 




^5,031 


68 


Transferred to reserve fund. 


530 


00 


•Balance to new acaount, 


7,296 


76 

ai2,858 44 



EEPORT OF OVERSEERS OF POOR. 



To the Mayor ^ Aldermen^ and Common Council of the City 
of Manchester. 

In compliance with the requirements of law, the Over- 
seers of the Poor of said city, herewith present their an- 
nual report. 

Whole number of Paupers assisted the year past, who 
had a settlement in the State, is ninety-three, of whicli 
seventy-four have a settlement in this city, and nineteen 
have a settlement in other towns in the State. There have 
died of the above number during the past year, four ; — 
three belonging to this city, and one from another town in 
the State. 

The whole number of Paupers at the Almshouse during 
the past year is eleven, average number, eight and one half. 
There have been two deaths there during the year. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH B. CLARK, Chairman. 
SAMUEL S. MOULTOX, 
SAYWARD J. YOUNG, 
NAHUM BALDWIN, 
JOHN PLUMER, 
TIMOTHY SULLIVAN, 
HORATIO FRADD, 
GEO. S. CHANDLER. 

Overseers of the Poor. 

December 24, 1867. 



102 



Inventory of Personal Property at the City Farm Decenv- 
ber 21, 1867. 

3 pairs working oxen, 
10 milch cows, . 
2 beef cows, 
1 beef steer, 
Ibull, 

1 pair two years old steers 
1 pair three years old steer 
1 horse, . 

1 calf, 
15 shoats, . 

2 breeding sows, 

29 bushels wheat, 
175 bushels corn, 
60 bushels oats, 
1 1-2 bushels barley, 
23 bushels beans, 

1 bushel peas, . 
175 bushels potatoes, 

30 bushels beets, 
110 bushels carrots, 
6 bushels onions, 

4 bushels pop corn, 
50 bushels turnips, 

20 tons No. 1 hay, 

21 tons No. 2 hay, 
4 tons No. 3 hay, 
8 tons corn fodder, 

2 tons straw, 
2 barrels cider, . 
4 barrels soap, . 
1 barrel salt cucumbers, 
13 barrels apples. 



$730 


00 


500 


00 


110 


00 


60 


00 


65 


00 


110 


00 


115 


00 


175 


00 


10 


00 


105 


00 


30 


00 


72 


00 


262 


50 


51 


00 


1 


87 


74 


75 


1 


50 


137 


00 


15 


00 


55 


00 


10 


50 


6 


00 


12 


00 


560 


00 


420 


00 


52 


00 


75 


00 


30 


00 


12 


00 


20 


00 


5 


00 


50 


00 



103 



6 1-2 barrels salt pork, 

375 pounds salt beef, 

180 pounds fresh meat, 

110 pounds sausage, 

157 pounds cheese, . 

110 pounds butter, 

97 pounds lard, 

124 pounds sugar, 

106 pounds salt fish, . 

52 pounds dried apples, 

21 pounds tobacco, . 

75 pounds nails, 

50 pounds drills and wedges, 

Molasses barrel and faucet, 

2 gallons molasses, .... 
6 gallons preserved tomatoes, . 

3 dozen candles, . . . . 
2 ox carts, ..... 
.) ox sleds, ..... 
J hay cart, ..... 

1 hay wagon, 

2 single wagons, . . . . 

1 single sleigh, 

2 buffalo robes, 

2 single harnesses, $27; one lead har- 
ness, $4, . . .* . 

Cirry-com1)s and brushes, . 
Bridle, halter, and blankets, 

1 crag rake, $1.50; 8 hand rakes, 82, 
11 hay forks, $Q ; 4 sickles, fl, . 

2 grain cradles, . . . . 
20 scythes, $7.50; 10 scythe snaths, $3, 
1 Q'oss-cut saw, . . . . 
1 string of bells, . . . . 
1 right cart, . « # . . 



$150 


00 


37 


50 


18 


00 


18 


00 


25 


12 


44 


00 


14 


55 


16 


75 


9 


00 


7 


44 


12 


25 


4 


50 


15 


00 


2 


00 


1 


30 


1 


50 




50 


75 


00 


40 


00 


30 


00 


90 


00 


125 


00 


12 


00 


8 


00 


31 


00 





00 


8 


00 


3 


50 


7 


00 


4 


00 


10 


50 


4 


00 


2 


00 


20 


00 



104 



Ox yokes and bows, 

9 plows, $90; 1 corn-sbeller, |6, 

34 fowls, ^25 ; 20 meal bags, $5.50, 

5 busbels salt, $4.50 ; 9 baskets, $4.50 

2 drags, $7 ;. 2 cultivators, $5, 

3 scalding tubs, 
1 rope and block. 
Scales and steelyards, 
1 winnowing mill, 

1 bay cutter, $4 ; 1 hay knife, $ 
Tie-bows and rings, . 
Tie cliains, ... 

2 grindstones, . 
1 wheelbarrow, . 
1 hand sled, 

1 horse rake, 

2 set of fetters, . 

2 mason trowels, 
Chest of tools, . 

3 wood saws, 
1 shaving horse, 
Yise and saw set, 

6 axes, $6 ; 4 ladders, $2.50, 

9 shovels and spades, 

7 manure forks, 
3 harrows, $12 ; 3 bog hoes, $2.-50 

1 bush hook 

2 gravel scrapers, 
Set of measures, 
Block and chain, 
2 handcuffs, 
12 meat barrels, 

10 cider barrels, 
9 cook, and other stoves, . 
12 tables, $15 : 2 clocks, $5, 



$25 


00 


96 


00 


30 


50 


9 


00 


12 


00 


1 


50 


o 


00 


14 


00 


8 


00 


6 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


O 


00 


1 


00 


7 


00 


7 


00 


1 


00 


17 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


6 


00 


8 


50 


7 


00 


5 


00 


14 


50 


1 


00 


9 


00 


1 


00 


17 


00 


3 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


GO 


00 


20 


00 



105 



2 rocking chairs, 
31 (lining-chairs, 

8 looking-glasses, 
18 window curtains, . 

9 boxes, '$1 ; 4 stone pots, $4, . 
20 earthen pots, 82.25 ; 10 water 

pails, §1.50, 
6 wash tu]js, 8o ; 4 butter tubs, $1, 
Milk cans and measures, . 

10 milk pails, <$2.50 ; 51 milk pans, Bo 
6 sugar buckets, $1.50 ; 1 churn, 84 
1 cream pot, .... 
1 pie cupboard, .... 
1 cheese press, .... 

1 cheese tongs, 50c ; 3 cheese hoops, 

2 cheese safes, .... 
Cheese tub and basket, 

1 curd-cuttter, .... 
Cheese cloth and strainer, 

11 gallons apple-sauce and Ijarrel, 
Coffee and tea pots, . 
Tinware, 811 ; 12 fiat-irons, 83, 

2 porcelain kettles, . 
Mixing trough, .... 
Salt mortar, and coffee mill. 
Castor, pepper boxes, and salt-dishes 
14 chambers, and bed pan, 
Shovels and tongs. 
Knives, forks, and spoons, . 
4 lightstands and dinner bell, 
Rolling pin and cake-board. 
Window brush and clothes horses. 
Bread trough, .... 
"Wash boards and benches, 

chool and other books. 



. 84 00 


9 


00 


r 

o 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


3 


75 


4 


00 


2 


50 


.50, 8 


00 


5 


50 


1 


00 


2 


00 


3 


50 


82, 2 


50 


5 


00 


2 


50 


1 


25 


1 


00 


9 


25 


2 


50 


. 14 


00 


1 


00 


2 


50 


1 


00 


, 1 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


. 12 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


rr 
i 


50 



106 



14 roller cloths, 87 ; S8 towels, 86 
11 table cloths and 1 table cover 
20 bedsteads and cords, 

15 feather beds and bedding, 
Floor brashes and brooms. 
Clothes lines and pins, 
G Russia-iron Ijake pans, . 

7 butcher and carving knives, 
Tea tray and waiter, 

8 jugs and dish pan, . 
14 candle sticks and snufTers, 
4 flails cops, and pin, 

4 muzzle baskets and free stone 
Thread and needles, . 
New boots and shoes on hand, 
8 squares of glass, 
8 pounds dried pumpkin, . 
20 bushels ashes, 
1 meat chest. 
Peed and mixing-boxes 
10 hoes, $2 ; 5 stone-hammers, 812, 
3 iron bars, $4.25 ; 2 picks, 83, 

5 large chains, . 
8 stake, spread, and whiffletree chains 
Snow scraper, . 
Flag of our country, . 
"Watering pot and oil can, . 
20 bushels cob meal, . 
1 bushel corn meal, . 
1 1-2 bushels rye meal. 
Candle-moulds, sieves, and knife tray 
Copper boiler, . 
Chopping-knife and skimmer. 
Lanterns and lamps, . 
Dress-table and bureau. 



813 


00 


8 


00 


20 


00 


165 


00 


1 


25 


2 


75 


3 


00 


o 


00 


1 


00 


o 
o 


25 


2 


00 


2 


25 




75 


2 


00 


10 


00 




50 




50 


3 


33 


2 


75 


5 


00 


14 


00 


7 


25 


10 


00 


4 


50 


1 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


20 


00 


1 


50 


2 


62 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 



107 



Reel, swifts, and spinning wheel, 

2 chests of draws and 2 trunks 
Dining set and crockery-ware, 
1 1-2 barrels of vinegar, 

1 lb. of coffee, 20c ; 2 lbs. hops, oOc 

3 lbs. tea, $3 ; 10 lbs. sage, 83, 
Medicines on hand, . 

2 lbs. woolen yarn, . 

1 garden rake, 

2 stub scythes, 
1 mowing machine, . 

1 meat bench, $1.25 ; cask of lime 

$1.75, 
50 dry casks, $r> ; 4 cart spires, $4, 
Pine lumber and shingles. 
Oak lumber, 

2 traps and 5 wrenches, 
1 1-2 bushels cranberries, . 

3 clothes baskets, 

4 new axe handles and cant-hooks, 
16 lbs. bar soap, 
♦ suction copper pump, 
1 beetle and wedges, 
New clothing on hand, 
3 prs. new boots on hand, . 
12 yds. cotton cloth, . 
3 3-4 yds. new woolen cloth, 
8 lbs. gunpowder, 



The iiaiu-u^j. >ji peic..ut> maRiiig use ui me j^.,ji.<x.j, «.-. 
well as the number of volumes taken out, is constantly in- 
creasing, and this increase may fairly be accepted as evi- 
dence of the wisdom and good judgment of the City Coun- 
cil, by which the Library was originally established, and 
by which it has since been maintained. 



^1 (0 




5 00 




20 00 




18 00 




70 




6 00 




2 50 




2 50 




1 50 




3 50 




90 00 




3 00 




9 00 




9 00 




12 00 




2 00 




6 00 




2 00 




1 67 




2 25 




5 00 




1 25 




15 75 




12 50 




1 80 




4 69 




2 00 






85.911 54 



108 



City of Manchester in account ivith City Poor Farm, Dr. 



To stock on hand Dec. 25, 1866, 86,076 81 
Expenditures the current year, 2,896 98 
Interest on the farm, . . 1,000 00 

Contra. 

By stock on hand Dec. 21, 1867, $5,911 34 
Stock and produce sold from the 

farm, .... 1,922 25 

447 weeks' board of paupers at 82 

per week, 894 00 

226 weeks' board of prisoners, at 82 

per week, 452 00 

Clothing for paupers . . . 95 21 
Clothing for prisoners, . . . 11 25 
Making 28 rods new ditch, . . 28 00 
Building 40 " fence, . . 40 00 
Permanent repairs on buildings, . 15 00 



Amount to balance, 



89,973 79 



89,369 05 
604 7* 

89,973 79 



X jL-_- iju^i.cis rye luvrai, . . . . j_j 

Candle-moulds, sieves, and knife tray, 1 00 

Copper boiler, . . . . . 2 00 

Chopping-knife and skimmer, . . 1 00 

Lanterns and lamps, . . . . 4 00 

Dress-table and bureau, . . . 4 00 



FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OP THE TRUS- 
TEES OP THE CITY LIBRARY. 



The Trustees of the City Library respectfully sul)mit their 
Fourteenth Annual Report of the condition of the Library, 
as required by the regulations under which it was estab- 
lished. 

It is with pleasure that the Trustees feel able to report the 
uniform success that has marked this institution from its 
commencement, and that the interest of the public in its 
welfare continues unabated. 

During the past year there has been no circumstance con- 
nected with it, indicating that an}- s[x;cial action will be 
required by the City Council in relation to the conduct of 
its ordinary affairs. 

The selection of books purchased, has been made with a 
view to preserve as near as may be, a proportionate increase 
in all departments, and at the same time to procure, as far 
as might be practicable, a large proportion of works of jjer- 
manent value, but nevertheless to give to the public such a 
reasonable number of works of a more temporary character 
as the immediate demand from those using the Library 
seemed to require. 

The number of persons making use of the Library, as 
well as the number of volumes taken out, is constantly in- 
creasing, and this increase may fairly be accepted as evi- 
dence of the wisdom and good judgment of the City Coun- 
cil, by which the Library was originally established, and 
by which it has since been maintained. 



110 

The rooms now used by the Library were first occupied 
by them more than ten years ago, and the additional space 
required for shelves, call forcibly to mind the suggestions 
that have been made from time to time by the Trustees to 
the City Council upon the sul)jcct of the erection of a per- 
manent fire-proof buildiug for the use of the Library. 

Tliese rooms were at that time ample, but are now getting 
crowded, and an imperative necessity will before many years 
exist for larger accommodations, and the Trustees can see 
no better way to meet this necessity tlian hj the erection of 
a building for the purpose. 

This matter was alluded to in the report of the board at 
the close of the last year, and a hope was then expressed, 
that in view of the liberal offer that it was understood would 
be made to aid in such an undertaking, that something would 
be accomplished towards this object during the present 
year. 

The Trustees have been informed that a committee of the 
City Council were appointed during the year to examine in 
relation to this subject, but so far as they are aware, no defi- 
nite action has )3cen had by the committee. The board, 
therefore, desire to call again the attention of the City Coun- 
cil to the recommendations contained in that report, that a 
committee should be appointed to confer with the Amos- 
keag Co., in relation to a lot of land, and that they be in- 
structed to report as early as practicable such plans and 
estimates as they may think expedient, and if the plans and 
estimates meet with the approbation of the City Council, 
that they be authorized to put the same in execution. To 
such a committee the Trustees woidd be pleased to give any 
assistance in their power in reference to the location of a 
building or its arrangements, and upon any other matter in 
connection with it wherein their assistance might be desired. 

The report of the Librarian shows that at the date of the 
last report the Library contained twelve thousand four hun- 



Ill 

clred and eiglity-two volumes — tliat during the year there 
have been added six hundred and ten. Of this number, 
three hundred and forty have been purchased. One hun- 
dred and seventy-four have been presented, and ninety-six 
volumes of periodicals have been bound, — making the whole 
number, thirteen thousand and ninety-seven now in the 
Library. Fifty-one different periodicals have been taken 
during the year and placed on its files. 

The Library has been open for the delivery of books two 
hundred sixty-six days, and there have been taken out thir- 
ty-seven thousand nine hundred thirteen volumes. The 
largest number in any one month was four tliousand six 
hundred and seventy-two, in March. 

The number of guarantees taken since the Library went 
into operation, is five thousand seven hundred and twenty- 
nine, of which five hundred and seventeen were added dur- 
ing the year. The amount of fines received for detaining 
books beyond the time allowed by the regulations, is nine- 
teen dollars ninety-eight cents, which has been expended 
by the Librarian in the payment of express charges, postage, 
stationery, and other minor incidental expenses, and leaves 
a balance of sixty-one cents in his hands. Of the total 
number of books in the Library only one is unaccounted for. 

A list of donations received during the year is appended 
to this Report, and to the donors the thanks of the city are 
due. 

There is also appended a list of all the books and pam- 
phlets received during the year, numbered in the order of 
their reception, with the number of the shelf and place on 
the shelf where they are to be found. 

A supplementary catalogue alphabetically arranged in 
form similar to those published since 1863, has been pre- 
pared, and a limited number of copies will be printed at an 
early day. 

The report of the treasurer of the board shows the ex- 



112 

penditure for books and periodicals, and will "we think sat- 
isfy the City Council that the funds entrusted to the board 
have been carefully and judiciously expended. 

The board have endeavored to keep the expenses for in- 
cidental and miscellaneous charges reduced to as low a 
point as seemed compatible with the due care and preserva- 
tion of the property, and with the convenience of the persons 
who had occasion to use its advantages. 

The appropriation for the past year was originally a little 
smaller than that of the preceding year, and was not suffi- 
cient to discharge the expenses necessarily incurred, and 
the deficiency was made up by an additional approi^riation 
at the close of the year. A small increase of the appropria- 
tion over that of the last year will be required for the en- 
suing year, but it will not probably exceed the amount 
appropriated in 1866. 

The Trustees have always had entire confidence in the 
desire of the City Council to make the Library successful, 
and take the liberty to express their gratification at the lib- 
erality with which their suggestions have always been met, 
and should it not be deemed useful to erect a library build- 
ing the ensuing year, they hope such steps will be taken as 
will ensure its completion whenever the finances of the city, 
will admit. 

The Trustees submit this matter to the careful considera- 
tion of the City Council, believing that such course Avill be 
adopted as the best interests of the city will require. 

In board of Trustees, Jan. 4, 1868. 
Read and approved : 

JOSEPH B. CLAEK, 

Maijor, and President ex-officio. 

S. N. Bell, Clerk pro tan. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 18G7. 

3kLrV2s[CHESTER X. H. 

ISRAEL DOW, CHIEF EXGIXEER 



Engineers' Office, Jan. 1st, 1868. 
To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermenj 

Gentlemen, — In conformity with tlic city ordinances, I 
herewith respectfully submit my annual report of the con- 
dition and location of property and apparatus belonging to 
the Fire Department, the names and residences of its mem- 
bers, the condition of reservoirs and other water supplies, 
and the expenditures for the past year. 



APPARATUS AND PROPERTY OF DEPARTMENT. 

Amoskeag, Steam Fire Engine No. 1. 

1 first-class rotary engine, located on Yine st. $3,000 00 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, .... 250 00 

350 feet rubber hose, good, .... 437 50 

5*^0 feet leather hose, good, .... 577 50 



13^ 



600 feet leather hose, ordinary, 
70 feet small rubber hose, 

13 woolen jackets, 

14 pairs overalls, 
5 fire hats, 
2 stoves and pipe, 
1 force pump, . 
1 pairg blankets and. hoods, 
1 iron pan, 

1 wash basin, . 
9 spanners and belts 
T life ropes, 

2 axes, . 
2 iron bars, 
1 vise and bench, 
1 coal hod, 
1 coal shovel, . 
1 slide wrench, 
1 hammer, 

5 oil and fluid cans, 
1 gallon sperm oil, 

1 bed and bedstead, 

2 blunderbusses, 

2 brass pipes, . 
1 branch-piece with gate, 

1 jack screw, . 

6 lanterns. 
Hall and house furniture 

3 tons cannel coal, . 
5 1-2 tons hard coal, 

2 cords hard wood, prepared, 
1 1-2 cords soft wood, prepared 
10 lbs. cotton waste, 

1 pail, 

2 torches. 



$800 


00 


14 


00 


104 


00 


23 


75 


5 


00 


33 


00 


12 


00 


11 


00 


8 


00 


1 


00 


15 


00 


5 


25 


3 


00 


2 


00 


5 


50 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 




83 


7 


50 


o 
O 


00 


35 


00 


24 


00 


24 


00 


15 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 


30 


00 


66 


00 


47 


50 


18 


00 


8 


00 


2 


00 




50 


4 


00 



135 



1 tackle and fall, 


. 




$2 25 


1 rope, . . • . 


. 




2 63 


1 box soap. 


. , 




4 31 


7 hose patches, 


. 




2 00 


1 stove and pipe in hall, . 


. 




7 00 


1 sink, .... 


. 




3 00 


6 badges, . . . . 


. 




9 00 


26 keys, 


• 




3 50 



$5,454 52 / 

Names' and 7'esidences of memhers of Amosheag Co. Ko. 1. 

Orrin Kimball, Foreman, 154 Manchester St. 

George R. Simmons, Assistant Foreman, 13 Lincoln Block, 

Elm St. 
Horace Nichols, Engineer, 27 Machine Sliop Corp. 
A. A. Balch, Clerk, 20 Amoskcag Corp. 
Samuel C. Lowell, 5S Machine Shop Corp. 
Erastus Cutting, 105 Hanover St. 
George Butterfield, Engine House, Vine St. 
James R. Carr, 26 Machine Shop Corp. 
Perkins C. Lane, 97 Amlierst St. 
John Dodge, 53 Machine Sliop Corp. 
Daniel Spofford, 73 Amoskeag Corp. 
Henry W. Campbell, 58 Machine Sliop Corp. 
Edward F. Caswell, 37 Machine Sliop Corp. 
H. T. Foss, 10 Lincoln Block, Elm Street, 



FiRE-KiNG, Steam Fiee Engine No. 2. 

1 first-class double-plunger engine, located on 

Vine St 83,000 00 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, .... 250 00 

250 feet rubber hose, ordinary, . . . 200 00 



136 



400 feet leather hose, new, 
850 feet leather hose, ordinary, 
50 feet rubber hose, 1 inch, 
10 belts and spanner 

4 life ropes, 
14 fire hats, . 
10 woolen jackets. 
14 pairs overalls, 

5 torches, 
3 lanterns, 

2 blunderbusses, 
1 branch-piece, 
1 branch-piece with gate, 
1 reducing piece, 
1 sheet iron pan, 

6 badges, 

3 stoves and pipe, 
1 jack screw, . 
1 pair harnesses, 

1 pair lilankcts with hood 
16 office chairs, 

2 tables, . 
1 chandelier, . 
1 bed and bedstead, 
1 vise and bench, 
1 slide wrench, 
1 hammer, 
1 iron bar, 

1 coal hod, 

2 coal shovels, 

2 axes, . 

3 pails, . 
3 oil and fluid cans, 

2 gallons sperm oil, 

3 tons cannel coal, 



$660 00 


850 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


14 


00 


40 


00 


23 


75 


18 


00 


15 


00 


24 


00 


5 


00 


15 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


50 


00 


5 


00 


50 


00 


12 


00 


20 


00 


6 


00 


12 


00 


35 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 




83 




83 


1 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 


4 


50 


6 


00 


66 


00 



137 



817 


00 


18 


00 


8 


00 


3 


00 


8 


00 


30 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 


7 


87 



5 1-2 tons hard coal, 

2 cords hard wood, prepared, 

1 cord pine wood, prepared, 

15 lbs. cotton waste, 

1 clock, . 

1 force pump, 

1 coal shovel, large, 

1 sink, ... 

1 water sprinkler, . 

2 fly covers, . 



$5,557 28 

Names and residences of Memhers of Engine Co. No. 2. 

James F. Pherson, Foreman, 25 Machine Shop Corp. 
Henry C. Briggs, Assistant Foreman, 2 Bartlett Block, 

Chestnut St. 
W. D. Perkins, Foreman of Hose, 35 Stark Corp. 
D. W. Morse, Engineer, 67 Amherst St. 
D. T. Collins, 271 Elm St. 
A. M. Kenniston, Clerk, 41 Stark Corp. 
Benjamin T. Bust, cor of Central and Beech St. 
James Patten, Engine House, Vine St. 
Hazen Davis, 6 Stark Corp. 
C. M. Stevens, 36 Pearl St. 
T. AV. McKinley, 92 Amoskeag Corp. 
Geo. H. Piper, 2 High St. 
S. W. Nelson, 26 Machine Shop Corp. 
C. F. Truell, 56 Machine Shop Corp. 



E. W. Harrington, Steam Fire Engine No. 3 



1 second class plunger engine, U. tank, 
1 two-wheeled hose carriage, . 



12,650 00 
250 00 



138 



275 feet rubber hose, good, 
250 feet leather hose, new, 
779 feet leather hose, good ordinary 

11 hosemen's suits, 

12 pairs overalls, 
14 belts and spanners, 

12 woolen jackets, . 
18 feet small rubber hose 
4 torches, 
1 pair harnesses, 
1 pair blankets, 
3 trumpets, 

1 bench and vise, . 

2 stoves, . 

1 branch-piece with gate, 
1 signal lantern, 
1 jack screw, . 
6 settees, 

13 oJSice chairs. 
Small chairs, . 
1 coal hod, 
1 tackle and fall, 

3 wash basins, 
1 chandelier, . 
1 sheet iron pan, 

1 table, . 

2 1-2 tons cannel coal 
2 1-2 tons hard coal, 
1 cord hard wood, 

1 cord pine wood, 

2 blunderbusses, 
1 coal shovel, . 
1 iron bar, 
1 oil can, 
1 fluid can, 



1365 75 

400 00 

467 40 

50 00 

20 40 

20 00 

105 00 

3 50 

8 00 

40 00 

6 00 

6 00 

5 00 

22 00 

15 00 

15 00 

5 00 

20 00 



17 
4 
1 
5 
1 



00 
50 
00 
00 

80 



10 00 
5 00 
5 00 

55 00 

23 50 
7 50 
5 00 

24 00 
83 

1 00 

2 00 
50 



139 



1 sink, 
1 pump, 



$3 00 
10 00 

84,655,08 



Names and residences of Members of Engine Co. No. 3. 
John Patterson, Foreman, cor. of Granite and Main Sts. 
H. Fradd, Assistant Foreman, Pleasant St. Squog. 
A. D. Hatcli, Foreman of Hose, Granite St., " 
J. M. Wallace, Engineer, " " 

W. Wlielpley, Walnut St., Squog. 
E. Sturtivent, Bedford road, " 
H. Crandall, Mast road, " 
Wm. Doran, Summer St., " 
Ternandid Seclig, Walnut St., Squog. 
A. C. Wallace, Granite St., " 

D. J. Warren, " " 

D. 0. Webster, Main St., " 



N. S. Bean, Steam Fire Engine No 

1 second-class double-plunger engine 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, 

1 force pump, 

1 link, 

1 stove and pipe, 

1 oil can, 

2 coal hods, 

1 shovel, 

2 blankets and hoods, 



Pennacook, Hose No. 1. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage, . 

1 " " " spare, 



4,^ 


^iNE St. 


. $4,250 00 




225 00 




30 00 




3 25 




G2 70 




50 




2 50 




25 




27 00 



^4,601 20 

. $800 00 
200 00 



140 



200 feet leather hose, good, 
1800 " " ordinary 

8 hosemens' jackets, 



8 2^airs rubber pants, 
16 spanners and belts 

1 signal lantern, 
4 torches, 

2 axes, . 
1 street shovel, 

3 oil cans, 
25 chairs, 
12 office chairs, 
1 hose-washer and fixtures 
1 table, . 
1 mirror, 
1 chandelier, . 

3 trumpets, 
1 blunderbuss, 
1 breast plate, 

1 jack screw, . 
28 patches, 

4 lanterns, 

2 cords hard wood, prepared, 
1 sink, . 
1 copper pump. 



1330 


00 


1800 


00 


40 


00 


6 


00 


3 


00 


12 


00 


16 


00 


12 


00 


8 


00 


o 
O 


00 




83 


2 


50 


36 


00 


12 


00 


40 


00 


5 


00 


8 


00 


8 


00 


9 


00 


12 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


7 


00 


16 


00 


18 


00 


o 
O 


00 


3 


00 



83,414 33 



jVames and Residences of Memlcrs of Pennacooh Hose Co. 

No. 1. 

Daniel H. Maxfield, Foreman, 17 Stark Corporation. 
Amos I. Pollard, Asst. Foreman, French's block, 2 Pearl St. 
Thos. W. Lane, Clerk, 28 Birch St. 



141 

Alljert Maxfield, Foreman of Hose, and Steward, 14 Amos- 

keag Corp. 
Joseph E. Merrill, asst. foreman of hose, 45 Orange St. 
David Thayer, treasurer, cor. Bridge and Walnut Sts. 
George Holbrook, 84 Merrimack St. 
W. H Gilmore, 84 " 

Chas. R. Colley, 152 Manchester St. 
James G. Knight, 116 Amoskcag Corp. 
John D. Howard, 107 Lowell St. ' 
Benj. Spofford, 242 Hanover St. 
Samuel B. Hope, 106 Lowell St. 
Ira W. Pennock, 148 Manchester Corp. 
A. H Merrill, 148 Manchester St. 
Benj. W. Robinson, 187 Hanover St. 
A. J. Butterfield, Elm St. 
W. J. Hickok, 48 Amoskcag Corp. 
T. P. Heath, 44 Bridge St. 
R. 0. Burleigh, 96 Amoskeag Corp. 
J. M, Gilmore, cor. of Elm and Harrison Sts. 
J. C. Colburn, 30 Orange St. 
I. Emerson, 19 Bridge St. 
D. M. Perkins, 73 Amoskeag Corp. 
Geo. AV. Witham, 3 Knowles' block. 
Wm. H. Yickerj, 108 Central St. 
H. W. Fisher, Machine-Shop block. 
Henry French, 3 Bartlett's block. 
Henry S. Brown, 14 Land and Water Power block. 
L. J. Boardman, 140 Amoskeag Corp. 



.Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1., Yine 


Street. 


1 truck with hooks and ladders. 


. 81,100 00 


500 feet old ladders, .... 


125 00 


1 signal lantern, 


10 00 


4 torches, 


8 00 



142 



1 trumpet, 
4 large hooks, 

3 small hooks, 
1 sign, . 
30 office chairs 

1 table, . 

2 stoves, 
1 jack screw, 

4 axes, . 
1 shovel, 

1 iron bar, 

2 hay forks, 
2 buckets, 
1 rope, . 
45 badges, 
1 iron sink, 

1 co])])er pump, 

2 cords wood, prepa 



ed. 



81 50 


35 


00 


5 


00 


12 


00 


45 


00 


14 


00 


25 


00 


2 


00 


7 


00 


1 


00 




75 


3 


00 


3 


00 


20 


00 


30 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


18 


00 



11,471 25 



Names and Residences of Memhers of Hook a7id liadder Co. 

No. 1. 

J. K. Wilson, Foreman, 21 Bridge St. 

E. T. Rand, Asst. Foreman, cor. of Chestnut and Pearl Sts. 

C. H. Bradford, Clerk, 45 Bridge St. 

E. G. Haynes, Treasurer, 83 Laurel St. 

Charles Canfield Steward, 18 Amoskeag Corp. 

W. Ireland, cor. of Pine and Amherst Sts. 

G. H. Dudley, cor. Beech and Laurel Sts. 

M. Knowles, cor. Concord and L'nion " 

M. L. Hunkins, 52 Orange St. 

C. E. Clough, 80 Bridge St. 
H. A. Senter, 39 Pine St. 

D. II. Young, 80 Bridge St. 



143 

J. L. Bradford, 45 Bridge St. 

H. L. Drew, 89 Hanover St. 

J. M. Heath, 1 house above bake-house. 

G. E. Riddle, 2 Manchester Corp. 

H. P. Young, 115 Pine St. 

J. N. Chase, Janesville. 

Frank Hutchinson, 85 Laurel St. 

C. B. Chapman, Bridge St. 

H. Pike, Lincoln block, 1 Elm St. 

G, E. Glines, 57 Pine St. 

J. Daniels, 103 Central St. 

George Merrick, 26 Birch St. 

Charles Cross^ Burgess block, 2 Elm St. 

engineer's department. 
Real estate, and 1 spare two-wheeled hose carriage. 

Names and Residences of the Board of Engineers. 
Israel Dow, Chief Engineer, Walnut St., Squog. 
Benjamin C. Randall, Asst. Engineer, Central St. 
Edwin P. Richardson, " " 172 Manchester St. 

Elijah Chandler, " " 15 Machine Shop Corp. 

Gilman H. Kimball, " " Pearl St. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Amoskeag Steamer No. 1, 
Fire King " 2, , . 

E. W. Harrington, Steamer No. 3, 
N. S. Bean, " 4, 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1, 
Hook and Ladder " 
Engineer's Department, . 
Miscellaneous and real estate, . 
One two-wheeled spare hose carriage, 



85,464 52 
5,557 28 
4,655 68 
4,601 20 
3,414 33 
1,471 25 
83 00 
1,100 00 
150 00 



144 



300 feet condemned leather hose, 

G pair couplings, 

300 feet condemned rubber hose, 

6 pair large couplings, 

1 rotary pump, 

1 piece ordinary suction hose, 

800 feet condemned leather hose, ai 

16 pair couplings, . 



^36 00 


21 


00 


27 


00 


15 


00 


15 


00 


96 


00 


$2,6747 


26 



EXPENDITURES FOR THE YEAR, INCLUDING 
UNPAID BILLS OF 1866. 



Amoskeag Steamer, No. 1. 

To paid salaries of members, . 

Manchester Gas-light Co., for gas, 
Edwin Branch for two hoods for horses, 
H. M. Bailey & Son, 1-4 gross matches 
" " 1 match safe. 



" " 1 broom, 

" " soldering pipe, 

" " 1 stable broom, 

" " 1 damper, . 

" " labor, 

" " lining stove, 

" " 1 grate, 

" " 4 lbs. galvanized iron, 

" " chair rivets, bolts, 

knees, and repairs, . . . . 
Amoskeag Mf'g Co., lagging steamer, 

'• "25 yds. duck, a 60c . 

" " stock and labor, paint- 

ing engine, . 



8467 00 
28 98 
7 00 
60 
25 
75 
75 
75 
00 
75 
00 
00 
33 



1 75 

4 83 
15 00 

15 06 



145 



To paid Amos. M'fg Co., Hartshorn & Pike's bill 

" " 4 bbls. shavings, 

" " 20 lbs. waste," . 

" " repairing hose car'g 

Daniels & Co., 2 gallons sperm oil, 

" . "3 1-2 feet rubber hose, 

A. H. Barker, 6 badges, 

George H. Dudley, repairing floor, 

C. Chase & Co., for 7,463 lbs. broken coal, 

Timothy Kennedy, sawing wood. 

Hartshorn & Pike, 1 stove grate, 

" " repairs on sink pipe, 

" " " pump and 

packing, 

" " 1 shaker, 

Henry C. Merrill, 1 box of soap, 

Daniel Webster, 3 cords hard wood, . 

" " survey bill, 

John C. Young, 2 cords hard wood, . 

L. Dowd, sawing wood, 

E. P. Johnson & Co., 12,171 lbs. coal, 

J. W. Whittier, 250 feet leather hose, 

" " 9 spanner straps, 

" " putting on two couplings, 

" " repairing hose, . 

" " 1 coupling, 

" " 6 lbs. leather, . 

J. Q. A. Sargent, 9 feet of pipe, 

M. V. B. Kenney, labor on engine, 

" " stock, . 

George R. Simmons, 1 day's labor, 

Fellows <fe Co., stock and labor, . 

John B. Varick & Co. , 10 1-2 lbs. manilla rope 

" " 1 set of blocks, . 

Gilman B. Fogg, 2G keys, . » .. . 
10 ^ 



.^12 85 

67 

6 00 

32 25 

6 50 
88 

9 00 

4 06 

37 31 

7 00 
75 
50 



6 


25 




15 


4 


31 


23 


25 




30 


13 


00 


5 


13 


70 


99 


412 


50 


11 


25 


2 


00 


9 


50 


1 


00 


2 


70 


1 


62 


2 


10 




90 


2 


00 


1 


50 


2 


63 


2 


25 


6 


50 



U6 



Plumer & Chandler, making 14 prs. over- 
alls, ....... 

Palmer & Co., repairs, .... 



Fire King, Steamer No. 2. 

To paid salaries of members, . 

Manchester Gas-light Co.^ for gas, 
E. P. Johnson & Co., 12,171 lbs. coal, 
Pluraer «fe Chandler, making 14 prs. over 
alls, ...... 

Amoskeag M'fg Co., 25 yds. duck. 
Hartshorn & Pike, 28 fire brick, 
" " 2 rods, . 

" " repairs, . 

Gregg & Dodge, stock and labor, 
H. M. Bailey & Son, repairing 2 coal hods 
" " 1-4 gross matches, 

" " labor on stove pipe, 

" '' 1 grate, 

" " soldering pipe, . 

" " 1 damper and labor 

" " 1 broom, . 

" " 67 lbs. pipe, 

" " labor putting up same 

" " 2 elbows, . 

Daniel W. Morse, 1 force pump, . . 
John C. Young, 2 cords wood, 
L. Dowd, sawing wood, 
Daniels & Co., 1-2 gal. spirits turpentine, 
" " 2 gallons sperm oil, 

" " 1-2 gal. lard oil, . 

" " 4 lbs. rotten stone, 

" " 1 water sprinkler, 



^8 75 
2 50 



$1,2G1 74 



. 1457 00 


8 


40 


71 


00 


8 


75 


15 


00 


1 


40 




30 


1 


00 


1 


88 




66 




60 




70 


1 


10 




25 


2 


75 




92 


5 


55 




37 




33 


30 


00 


13 


00 


5 


13 


1 


25 


6 


00 




75 




50 


1 


50 



147 

To paid Daniels & Co., repairs on lantern, 
S. Hovey, cleaning clock, . 
G. H. Dudley, repairing floor, 
John W. Whittier, 250 feet leather hose, 
Daniel Webster, 3 cords wood, . 

" " survey bill, 

Timothy Kennedy, sawing wood, 
Edwin Branch, 2 fly covers, 

" " altering covers, . 

" " 2 hoods, . 

C. Chase & Co., 7,463 lbs. coal, . 



$ 10 

1 25 

4 06 

412 50 

25 91 

30 

4 50 

6 50 
87 

7 00 
37 32 

$1,149 60 



E. W. Harrington, Steamer No. 3. 

To paid salaries of members, . 

Manchester Gas-light Co., for gas, 

Plumer & Chandler, making 12 prs. over 

alls, 

Hartshorn & Pike, 1 stove leg, . 

" repairing torches, 

" 1 two qt, can, 

" 28 fire brick, 

" labor, . 

" blacking stove and pack 

ing, 
" 1 damper, . 
" 2 1-4 lbs Russia pipe. 
Baker & Fradd, 1-4 gross matches, 
J. B. Yarick & Co., 2 gallons sperm oil, 
" " 2 qts. benzine, 

" " 3 7-8 lbs. zinc, . 

*' " 1 broom, 

" " 4 lbs. rotten stone, 



a 

n 
u 
« 

<( 



. 8457 00 


10 5Q 


8 75 


15 


1 50 


50 


1 40 


1 25 


1 00 


25 


90 


60 


7 00 


25 


47 


50 


60 



148 



To paid J. B. Yarick & Co., 4 sheets emery cloth, $ 50 
Charles Smith, 4 large spittoons, . . 5 00 
John Patterson, labor on reservoirs and re- 
pairs, . 8 50 

John W. Whittier, 6 spanner straps, . . 12 00 

" " repairing hose, . . 2 00 

J. W. Whittier, 250 feet leather hose, . 400 00 

E. P. Johnson & Co., 6000 lbs. coal, . . 28 50 

C. Chase & Co., 4570 lbs coal, ... 22 85 

D. J. Warren, repairs on house, ... 6 00 
H. M. Bailey & Son, 1 burner, ... 38 
G. F. Bosher, 12 chairs, .... 14 40 
Haines & Wallace, lumber, ... 7 22 

" " 1 load wood, ... 2 00 

" " use of horses one year, . 50 00 

$1,053 97 



N. S. Bean, Steamer No. 4. 

To paid H. M. Bailey, & Son, for 1 oil can, 

" " " 1-4 gro. matches, 

" " " 1 thimble, . 

" " " cutting brick w'k, 

" " " 1 large stove, 

" " " 54 lbs. pipe, 

" " " 1 extra T, 

" 4« " 12 lbs. zinc, 

" " " 1 stopper, . 

" " " 2 yds. chain, 

" " " riveting pipe, 

" " " putting up pipe, 

" " " 1 p's zinc, extra, 

" " " 13 1-2 feet sink, 

" " " 2 coal hods, 

" " " 1 shovel, . 



1 50 
60 
17 
50 

48 00 

8 10 

15 

2 00 
14 
34 
80 

2 00 
50 

3 25 
2 50 

25 



149 



To paid Edwin Branch, 2 blanlvets and hoods, 
Daniel W. Morse, 1 force pump, 



Pennacook, Hose Company Xo. 1 

To paid salaries of members, . 

Manchester Gas Co., for gas, 
Amoskeag M'fg. Co., for painting hose 

carriage, .... 

Amoskeag Mf g Co., repairing carriage 
" " 4 brass lanterns, 

" " 10 lbs, waste, 

Henrj C. Merrill, 2 quarts sperm oil, 
T. P Heath, drawing hose carriage, 
L. Dowd, sawing wood, 
John B. Clarke, printing, . 
John C. Young, 1 cord wood, 
H. M. Bailey & Son, 1-4 gross matches 
Thos. W. Lane, 1 water pail aiid cover 
Albert Maxfield, repairing pump, 

" " 2 gallons soap, . 

" " 1 strap for signal, 

" " 2 quarts benzine, 

Daniel Webster, 2 cords wood, . 
Timothy Kennedy, sawing wood, . 



Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1. 

To paid salaries of members, . 

Manchester Gas Co., for gas, 
Amoskeag Mfg Co., 2 axes, 

" " labor on repairs, 

" " setting tires. 



$27 00 
30 00 

$126 80 



1877 00 
5 45 



07 
37 



16 00 

2 50 
1 75 

13 00 

3 88 
1 50 
6 50 

60 

75 

1 50 

36 

30 

30 

15 50 

3 00 

8952 33 



. $705 


79 


2 


52 


4 


25 




69 


1 


50 



150 

To paid Amoskeag MfgCo., 13 ft. bl'k walnut, 
Amoskeag Mfg Co , 3 p's Norway iron, 

1 piece refined iron, labor and coal, 
Amoskeag Mfg Co., 49 feet cherry, 
" " hardware, . 

" " labor on box, 

" " painting, 

" " 1 3-4 lbs. brass, 

" " rep's on carriage 

Henry C. Merrill, 1-4 gross matches, 
" " 2 quarts s})erm oil, 

Timothy Kennedy, sawing wood, 
James E,ean, services as teamster, 
Daniel Webster, 2 cords woods, . 



$1 30 



6 


GO 


4 


41 


3 


48 


18 


00 


3 


21 




96 


IT 


19 




60 


1 


75 


3 


00 


12 


00 


15 


50 



1802 75 



Engineer's Department. 

Israel Dow, salary as Chief Engineer, 
Benjamin C. Kendall, salary as Ass't Engineer, 
Edwin P. Richardson, salary as Ass't Engineer 

and Clerk, . . . . . 
Elijah Chandler, salary as Ass't Engineer, 
Oilman H. Kimball, salary as Ass't Engineer, . 



150 00 
25 00 

50 00 
25 00 
25 00 

$175 00 



MISCELLANEOUS BILLS. 

To paid salaries of Board of Engineers, . 

C. F. Livingston, for printing regulations of 
Board, ...... 

Palmer & Co., repairs on pump, . 

" " repairs on pump and pipes, 
Daniels & Co., 16 bolts, reservoir, 
Harrison D. Lord, dist'ng notices 6 days, 



$175 00 



16 


50 


1 


50 


8 


00 




14 


12 


00 



151 

To paid T. P. Heath, drawing hose to Mechan- 
ic's row, ... . . 

J. Q. A. Sargent, stock and labor on pipe, 
driver's house, ..... 

Levi H. Sleeper, care of reservoirs and oil, 

Plumer & Chandler, 3 rubber coats for en- 
gineers, ....... 

C. F. Livingston, printing, .... 

Hartshorn & Pike, stock and labor, repairs, 
house on Vine st, 10 feet new conductors, 

Page, Bros. Franklin, N. H. 52 feet hose, 

J. W. Whittier, repairing couplings, . 

E. P. Richardson, refreshments for member! 
of fire department, .... 

Zoe Ann Flanders, 14 1-4 feet wood, . 

C. R. CoUey, setting glass, house on Vine st 
and papering, ..... 

Herman Foster, insurance, . 

S. S. Moulton, repairs, 

Colley & Brown, repairs, . 

J. C. Young, ..... 



8 50 

7 24 
57 00 

33 00 
5 00 

2 50 
93 60 

2 75 

3 75 
14 25 

4 63 
71 25 

4 53 

2 50 
4 97 



$520 61 



RECAPITULATION. 



Engine Co. No. 1, 



u a. u 1 

Hose Co. No. 1, . 
Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1, 
Miscellaneous, 



11,261 


74 


1,149 


60 


1,053 


97 


126 


80 


952 


33 


802 


75 


520 


61 


(i>5267 


80 



152 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 

The effective force of the department consists of 1 Chief 
and 4 Assistant Engineers, 
Engine Co. No. 1, . 
Engine Co. No. 2, . 
Engine Co. No. 3, . 
Engine Co. No. 4, manned by 
Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1, 
Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1, 

Total men, 



. . . . 




5 


. . . . 




14 


. 




14 


. 




12 


Co's. No. 1 and 


2. 


30 
25 


• • • • 




100 



The apparatus consists of — 
1 first class rotarj steam engine, Amoskeag No. 1. 
1 first class double-plunger engine. Fire King No. 2. 
1 second class single-plunder engine, E. W. Harrington No. 8. 
1 sccDiid class double-plunger engine, N. S. Bean No. 4. 
1 four wheeled hose carriage, Pennacook No. 1. 
1 four wheeled hose carriage, spare, Pennacook No. 1. 
4 two wdieeled hose carriage with engines No. 1, 2, 3, &; 4. 
1 two wheeled hose carriage, spare. 
1 hook and ladder truck, with hooks, ladders, and apparatus 

complete. 
500 feet old ladders, extra, 
4 large and 3 small fire hooks, extra. 
Rubber hose, ....... 875 feet. 

Leather hose, new or nearly so, . . . 1400 " 
Ordinary leather hose, . . . . . ■ 4029 " 



Total number of feet leading hose, 



6304 



I herewith submit a tabular statement of the location of 
reservoirs and other water supplies. Without exception, I 
believe all the above named apparatus, buildings, and res- 
ervoirs are in their usual a'ood condition. 



153 

The regulations of the department have been amended 
and revised during the past year, witli a view to greater effi- 
ciency, and I am happy to state tlie change has proved very 
beneficial. I enclose a copy herewith. 

There is need of a better water supply in several locali- 
ties. I will mention a few that should receive particular 
attention at once, viz : — 

That part of the city known as Janesville and Tollsville. 
Also that part of the city lying north of Bridge and cast of 
Elm street, and also the southeast part of the city near the 
junction of Maple and Merrimack or Laurel streets. These 
sections are already thickly built up, and under unfavorable 
circumstances, the water supply would not be adequate to 
the demand. I believe a small outlay would remedy the evil 
effectually. The attention of the city government was called 
to some of the above localities by my predecessor but with 
the exception of examining the same, nothing has as yet 
been done to remedy the evil. 

The department has been called out for duty as follows 
during the past year : 

Jan. 8th, 9 1-2 o'clock A. M., — slight fire on Elm street, 
loss trifling. 

Jan. 14th, 5 1-2 o'clock A. M., — alarm. 

Jan. 18th, 7 3-4 o'clock P. M., — alarm on Manchester St. 

Feb. 21st, 9 1-2 o'clock P. M., — alarm. 

Mar. 1st, 3 o'clock A. M., — fire at Amoskeag, loss 
$25,000 00. 

Mar. 1st,- 3 o'clock A. M., — alarm on Manchester St. 

Mar. 6th, — alarm. 

Mar. 15th, 5 o'clock A. M., — slight fire in Smyth's Block, 
loss trifling. 

Mar. 20th, 8 1-4 o'clock P. M., — alarm. 

Mar. 21st, 10 1-2 o'clock P. M.— slight fire. 

Apr. Ttli, 10 3-4 o'clock A. M., — alarm on Amherst St. 

Apr. 7th, — alarm at Piscataquog. 



154: 

Apr. 24th, 11 o'clock P. M., — alarm on Hanover St. 

June 15th, 11, o'clock P. M.,— fire, loss 81,500 00. 

June 24th, 5 1-2 o'clock A. M., — alarm. 

Aug. 7th, 11 1-2 o'clock P. M., — fire Amoskeag Laundry. 
Loss, 8700.00. 

Aug. 28th, 12 1-2 o'clock P. M., — alarm on Park street. 

Sept. 13th, 9 o'clock A. M., — alarm on Park street. 

Oct. 23d, 10 o'clock P. M., — alarm at Paper Mill. 

Nov. 13th, 5 o'clock P. M., — fire at Amoskeag Mill, No. 
5. Loss, 8300.00. 

Nov. 30th, 5 o'clock P. M., — slight Fire, rear of Amherst 
street. Loss, trifling. 

Dec. 15th, 7 1-4 o'clock P. M., — fire on River Road. 
Loss, 8300.00. 

Dec. 27th, 5 1-4 o'clock P. M., — alarm on Elm street. 

Involving a loss in city proper, of 83000 ; or a loss in- 
cluding fires out of city proper of 822,000. 

The efficiency of the department has been augmented 
during the past year, by the purchase of one new second- 
class double-plunger engine, with hose carriage, also eight 
hundred feet of new leather hose. I believe that with the 
exception of hose, the present apparatus is sufficient for any 
emergency that may present itself. 

Li concluding my report, I desire to express my grati- 
tude to the officers and members of the entire department 
for their uniform promptness and efficiency when on duty, 
and their kindness and courtesy on all other occasions. 

It is needless to particularize, where all have labored so 
efficiently for the welfare of both the citj'^ and department. 

ISRAEL DOW, Chief Engineer. 



155 



Condition of Cisterns and Reservoirs, Manchester, N. H. 
June 21, 1862. 



No. 


LOCATION. 


Dis. to 
Water. 


Depth of 
Water. 


Sand. 


Openings. 


Feed Gates. 


1 


Elm street, at City Hall, . . 


Ft. In. 

..8.. 2.. 


Ft. In. 
...5. .2... 


Ft. In. 
6.. 


1 




2 


Elm St. n-r Smyth's blk. | ^- 


..5 

..5. .2.. 
..1 


...5.10... 
...6.10... 
...3 


....17.. 

None 

None 
10.. 


1 


Chest, sts. 
Concord Sq. 


4 




..1..4.. 


...2..C... 


1 

2 








..S 


...4 




5 


Mitchell's, Maiich. st. •' u' 










C 

7 
8 


( s. 
Knowles, ]Merrimack at. . . 

Pine St.. between Manchester 
and Merimack sts. . . . 


..4.10.. 
..8.13.. 


...5.11... 
...9 


8.. 

8.. 


1 

1 


Worthless 

Hanover & 
Pine sts.. . 


q 




..5. .6.. 


...2. .6... 


5.. 


1 


Feeds No. 6 


10 


June. Pine & Cent. sts. \ ''r.' 


..0..1.. 


...6.11... 








1 i^- 


..3. .5.. 


...7 


None 
4.. 


, 




11 


June. Elm & Myrtle sts. | c' 








1^ 


Lowell St., at School House, 


.-8. .2.. 


...5. .7... 


1 




n 


..7-. 5.. 


...5..1... 


None 

None 

None 

3.. 


1 




14 


Amherst and Chester sts. 
June. Chest. & Amherst sts. 
Center of Tremont S(iuare, . 


..1.10.. 
..2.10.. 
..5. .8.. 


...3. .8... 
...5.. 8... 


1 




15 

1(> 


1 

1 


Gate 


17 


Bridge st. head of Birch [ ^' 


..0 


...5.10... 


..1..3.. 






18 


June. Chest. & Orange sts. . 


..6. .5.. 


..4 5.. 


..1..8.. 


1 




19 




..5. .3.. 


...3. .3... 


None 
None 
None 
None 
3.. 


1 




SO 


Steam Mill, Janesville, . . 
June. Beech & Laurel sts. . 


Level 
..5. .7.. 


...2. .6... 
...6..1... 


Good 
1 




?I 




2'> 




..8. .3.. 


...2. .5... 


1 




?3 




..2. .3.. 


...7. .6... 


1 




24 








None 

None 

..1..8.. 


1 

1 


Gate feeds 
Nos. 1 & 5. . 


?,5 


Bakersville, 

'.Squop;. Granite St., n. Baker 

& Fnidd's 

Squog, cor. Walnut st. . . 


.14. .6.. 
..6. .4.. 


...4.. 8... 
...C..2... 


T) 


1 




'>T 


..1..8.. 




None 
None 
None 
None 


1 




?8 


Squog, n. Steam Mill, 'S. riv. 




Good 

...5 

...7. .4... 
...7. .4... 

Good 






?9 


Squog, Granite st 

Squog, Am. n. Bow. pi. | g' 
Skeag, Penstock n. Bat. mill, 


..6..6.. 

..12.... 
..12.... 


1 




30 






31 


Good 









156 

Engineer's Office, } 
Manchester, May 21, 1867. \ 

With a view to the more efficient cooperation of the 
various companies of the fire department, the following 
regulations are hereby adopted : 

Article 1. The members of the hook and ladder com- 
pany on their arrival at a fire, shall remain by their carriage, 
unless otherwise ordered, until dismissed from duty. 

Art. 2. The members of any hose company on their 
arrival at a fire, shall remain near their carriage and hold 
themselves in readiness at all times to furnish and assist in 
laying or replacing burst or imperfect hose, on any line, at 
the request of the commanding officer of any engine com- 
pany on duty. 

Art. 3. At an alarm of fire, the drivers, engineers, and 
fireman of each engine company in the department, not on 
actual duty, shall repair to their respective engine houses 
and await orders, until in their judgment their immediate 
services may not be required. 

Art.^4. Each engine or hose company on their arrival 
at a fire, shall proceed at once to lay a line of hose from 
the most available supply of water to the fire, unless other- 
wise ordered. 

Art. 5. The commanding officer of any engine com- 
pany shall have control of all hose attached to his engine, 
when on duty, subject to the order of the engineers. 

Art. 6. All members of the fire departii^cnt shall wear 
their badges in a conspicuous place when on duty. 

Art. 7. Any former regulation of the fire department 
conflicting with the above, is hereby abolished. 

ISRAEL DOW, CJiief Engineer. 

BENJ. C. KENDALL, 
E. P. RICHARDSON, 
ELIJAH CHANDLER, 
OILMAN H. KIMBALL, 

Assistants. 



INDEX TO ENGINEER'S EEPOET. 



Appraisal of property of Engine Co. No. 1 13:? 

iXames and residences of Members of Co. No. 1 135 

Appraisal of i:)roperty of Engine Co. No, 2 135 

Names and residences of Members of Co. No. 2 137 

Appraisal of property of Engine Co. No, 3 137 

Names and residences of Members of Co. No. 3 131) 

Appraisal of property of Engine Co. No, 4 13!) 

Names and residences of Members of Co. No. 4 152 

Hose Co. No. 1 140 

Appraisal of property of Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 141 

Names and residences of Members of Co. No. 1 142 

Recapitulation 143 

Expenditures of Engine Co. No. 1 144 

Co. No. 2 146 

Co. No. 3 147 

Co. No. 4 148 

Hose Co. No. 1 149 

Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 149 

Engineers Department 150 

Miscellaneous 150 

Rccapitnlatiou 151 

General Summary 152-157 

xie watei uiiaer tuo avenue, and two substan- 
appropriate bridges span the stream. The expen- 
dituivis for these and other improvements, have been large, 
nearly exhausting the funds in our hands ; but it is thought 
that the proceeds from the sale of lots along the new 
avenue, will be sufficient to meet the reduced expense re- 
quired for the coming year. 

Many proprietors have exhibited good taste and becoming 



Aet. 6. All members of the fire departmc. . 
their badges in a conspicuous place when on duty. 

Art. 7. Any former regulation of the fire department 
conflicting with the above, is hereby abolished. 

ISRAEL DOW, Chief Engineer. 

BENJ. C. KENDALL, 
E. P. RICHARDSON, 
ELIJAH CHANDLER, 
OILMAN H. KIMBALL, 

Assistants. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES 



To his Honor the Mai/or, and City Council, of the City of 
Manchester. 

The annual report of the Committee on Cemeteries, is most 
respectfully offered for your consideration, as follows : 

THE VALLEY. 

Tlie most important work which has received the atten- 
tion of your committee, was the completion of the new 
carriage road, which was partially constructed in previous 
years. The great rains of the summer, coming on as the 
work was nearly finished, caused considerable damage and 
extra expense, but the required repairs were made, and the 
road is now in good condition. The necessary drains are 
laid to carry the water under the avenue, and two substan- 
tial and appropriate bridges span the stream. The expen- 
ditures for these and other improvements, have been large, 
nearly exhausting the funds in our hands ; but it is thought 
that the proceeds from the sale of lots along the new 
avenue, will be sufficient to meet the reduced expense re- 
quired for the coming year. 

Many proprietors have exhibited good taste and becoming 



160 

liberality in beautifying their lots, and erecting chaste and 
lasting mementos to their departed friends. Several tombs 
have also been placed in the grounds within a few years, 
reflecting much credit upon the owners. These, with other 
improvements made during the year, have added to the 
beauty and attractiveness of this endeared spot. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

There have been cut and disposed of, sixty-nine and a 
half cords of hard pine wood during the past year, and one 
hundred arbor-vitee trees have been transplanted into the 
grounds. The sale of lots has so much increased that the 
revenue arising from this source, with the proceeds from 
the wood already sold, will be sufficient, we trust, to meet 
the requirements of the coming year. 

WM. G. PERRY, 
JOHN PATTERSON, 
S. N. BELL, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
NATHAN PARKER, 
CHAS. S. FISHER, 
JOHN BRUGGER, 
HENRY A. CAMPBELL, 

Committee on Cemeteries. 
Manchester, January 1, 1868. 



161 



TO THE COMMITTEE ON THE YALLEY. 



The Treasurer of the Committee on the Yalley, makes 
the following report of receipts and expenditures for the 
year ending January 1, 1868 : 



Cash on hand. 


Jan. 1, 1867, 


. 1823 98 


received for tomb fees, 


. 133 01 


u 


" hay. 


. 35 00 


ii 


" wood. 


. 26 00 


a 


" leaves. 


3 00 


u 


" lots sold, . 


. 668 71 


a 


" interest, 


. 54 84 



$1,744 54 



The expenses for the year have Ijcen as follows ; 

Paid H. C. Baldwin, labor, 

W. C. Chase, labor, <fec., . 
Geo. E. Evans, making plan, 
J. S. Furbcr, pump, . 
Charles Townsend, grading, 
W. S. James, signs, . 
J. E. Stearns, labor, . 
Kadmiel Hazeltine, labor, . 
C. F. Livingston, printing, 

A. B. Chase, labor, . 
L. H. Sleeper, damages, &c., 
Michael Foley, labor, 
Peter McMahan, labor, 
C. S. Annis, labor, 

B. K. Hoit, painting, 

Wm. McPherson, sewers, . 

Wm. H. Fisk, printing, 

J. L. Smith & Co., lumber, 

Warren Harvey, labor, 
11 



. 81 


00 


. 303 


43 


. 96 


75 


. 15 


00 


. 23 


76 


. 50 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


5 


50 


. 19 


50 


9 


50 


. 30 


75 


1 


50 


. 61 


50 


. 31 


22 


. 127 


24 


. 10 


00 


. 14 


82 


. 36 


50 



162 

Paid W. Ireland, bridges, 
John Prince, grading, 
Daniel Connor, grading, . 
A. J. Young, moving stone, 
J. A. Weston, surveying, . 
J. A. Weston, clerk and treas.. 
Balance in hands of treas.. 



. 47 


50 


. 609 


08 


4 


50 


. 47 


30 


. 25 


00 


48 


54 



$1,744 54 



Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES A. WESTON, 

Treasurer of Committee on Valley. 
Manchester, N. H., Jan. 1, 1868. 

We have examined the foregoing report, which we find 
correct and properly vouched. 

JOHN PATTERSON, 
NATHAN PARKER, 

Sub. Committee on the Valley/. 
Manchester, Jan. 1868. 

Auditor's Office, ) 

City of Manchester, Jan. 6, 1868. \ 

I hereby certifj^, that I have examined the several items 
of receipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing 
report of the Treasurer of the Committee on the Valley, 
and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

CitT/ Auditor. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON COURT HOUSE 



To the City Council of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The undersigned, to whom was entrusted 
the building of the court house on the lot belonging to the 
city, herewith submit the following report : 

Immediately after entering upon the duties assigned us, 
we engaged an architect, Moses W. Oliver, to make in- 
vestigations and draw a plan, which was submitted to you 
on the 30th day of April last and approved. An appropri- 
ation was then made and we at once commenced the work. 

The dimensions of the building are as follows : 

The v/holc length is ninety-two feet, and the width varies 
in the different parts from forty to fifty-six feet. 

The first floor is designed for county offices, a room for 
the United States Court, with an extra room which can be 
used either in connection with the office of register of deeds 
or by the sherriff, as may be required. 

Each of the connty officers has a fire proof room, con- 
nected with the business room. There is also a fire proof 
room connected with the room for the United States Court. 

On the second floor is the court room, forty-six feet eight 
inches by fifty feet, a room for the judges, eleven by fifteen 
feet, a consultation room about the same size, a room for 
witnesses, nine by seventeen feet, a room for the county 
commissioners, fifteen by twenty feet. 



164 

On the tliird floor in the wings of the building are the 
Grand Jiuy rooms, fifteen feet by thirty, a room for wit- 
nesses, ten by eighteen feet, two petit jury rooms, fifteen by 
twenty-two feet each. 

The appropriation of thirty-three thousand five hundred 
dollars is thought by the architect to be sufficient to com- 
plete the entire building except the county offices, which 
were not intended to be finished at the present time. 

It was our intention to have the court room, with the 
other rooms for the convenience of the court ready for use 
by the first of January, but on account of the unusual 
amount of wet weather during the summer, they cannot be 
iinished till about the first of March. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH B. CLARK, 
HERMON FOSTER, 
WM. P. NEWELL, 
SAMUEL HALL, 
E. A. STRAW, 
GEO. W. MORRISON, 
Committee to Build Court House. 



165 



To the Hon. Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Statement of the Business of the Manchester City Liquor 
Agency from September 2, to December 28, inclusive. 



Sales. 



Galls. Qts. Pts. Gills. Cost, 



EetaU 



I Profits. 



Rum 

Whiskey 

Holland Gin 

Alcohol 

Brandy 

London Poiicr, 4 bot's 
Bay Rum 

<' " 3 bottles.... 
Port Wine 

" " California. 

Grape Wine 

Blackb'y Wine, 1 bot. 

American Gin 

B. Whiskey, 3 bottles 



U 
9 
4 
5 
1 






$36 59 
38 31 
18 91 
21 73 
13 23 
1 20 
. 72 
. 75 
. C3 
. 50 
. 12 
. 67 
1 08 
3 00 



$137 44 



$183 84 



$46 40 



Amount of purchases $598 84 

Expenses. 

Salary of Agent, i year $100 00 

Government License 1 year 25 00 

Incidental expenses 22 12 

Printing 11 25 

$158 37 



E. M. KELLOGG, Citi/ Liquor Agent. 



166 



CITY PROPERTY 



City Hall and lot, at cost, 

City farm and permanent improvements, . 

Stock, tools, furniture, provisions, at city farm. 

Engine house and apparatus, . 

New engine house on Vine street, 

Reservoirs at cost, . 

Hearses, houses, tomb, new cemetery, at cost. 

Court house lot, at cost, . 

Court house, unfinished, . 

Common sewers, at cost, . 

Safe, furniture, and gas fixtures at city hall, 

Street lanterns, posts, pipes, and frames. . 

Water works, ...... 

Horses, carts, plows, and tools, 



$35,815 00 

17,980 00 

9,973 79 

26,196 90 

15,415 00 

8,291 00 

4,170 00 

9,514 56 

21,000 00 

'31,152 33 

1,933 00 

1,071 00 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

$185,512 58 



167 



City Debt. 



Date of Notes. 


To whom payable. 


When payable. 


Principal. 


Feb. 28, 1852 


Neliemiah Hunt. 


Feb. 28, 


1872 


$3,600 


July 1, 1847 


a 




July 1, 


1872 


20,000 


July 1, 1854 


a 




July 1, 


1874 


20,000 


Jan. 1,,1856 


{{ 




Jan. 1, 


1880 


10,000 


July 1, 1857 


li 




July 1, 


1877 


22,500 


July 9, 1858 


a 




July 9, 


1878 


2,400 


July 22, 1858 


a 




July 22, 


1878 


1,100 


Jan. 1, 18G1 


City 


Bonds. 


Jan. 1, 


1871 


6,000 


July 1, 18G2 


a 




July 1, 


1882 


22,500 


Jan. 1, 18G3 


a 




Jan. 1, 


1888 


35,000 


Oct. 31, 18G3 


a 




Xov. 1, 


1893 


70,000 


April 1, 1864 


n 




April 1, 


1884 


70,000 


July 1, 18G4 


i( 




July 1, 


1894 


50,000 


April 1, 1865 


a 




April 1, 


1870 


8,800 


April 1, 1865 


a 




April 1. 


1885 


10,000 



$351,900 00 
Temporary loan 3o,230 00 



$387,130 00 
Interest to January 1, 1868 10,000 00 



$397,130 00 
Outstanding bills, January 1, 1868 13,293 57 



Total debt and interest, January 1, 1868 $410,423 57 

Cash in Treasury, Jan. 1, 1868 $34,109 91 

Note for bal. due on Barrett place 275 00 

34,384 91 



Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1868 $376,038 66 



168 



Yaluatiox, Taxes, &c. 



Year. 



Valuation. 



Taxes. 



No. PoUs. Poll tax. 



1838. 

1839. 
1840. 
1841. 
1842. 
1843. 
1844. 
1845. 
1846. 
1847. 
1848. 
1849. 
1850. 
1851. 
1852. 
1853. 
1854. 
1855. 
1856. 
1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 
1861. 
1862. 
1863. 
1864. 
1865- 
1866. 
1867. 



$555,270 
604,963 
946,200 
1,229,054 
1,430,524 
1,598,826 
1,873,286 
2,544,780 
3,187,726 
4,488,550 
4,664,957 
5,500,049 
5,832,080 
6,906,462 
6,795,682 
6,995.528 
8,237,617 
8,833,248 
9,244,062 
9,983,862 
10,259,080 
9,853,310 
9,644.937 
9,343.254 
8,891,250 
9,597,786 
9,517,512 
9,478,368 
10,050,020 
10,101,556 



$2,235 49 
3,029 84 
3,986 56 
9,563 74 

12.952 44 
13,764 32 
13,584 72 
19,246 27 
22,005 95 

24.953 54 
39,712 53 
44,979 92 
48,974 23 
51,798 47 
54,379 45 
61,545 81 
62,022 44 
71,952 09 

114,214 08 

84,862 98 

78,210 85 

81,368 01 

86,804 87 

99,104 96 

84,827 45 

96,238 86 

142,815 98 

209,696 20 

245,567 19 

207,457 39 



244 
427 
772 
892 
1,053 
1,053 
1,053 
1,561 
1.808 
2,056 
2,688 
2,518 
2,820 
2,910 
2,745 
2,907 
2.814 
3,725 
3,760 
3,695 
3,695 
3,495 
3,651 
3,974 
3,071 
2,995 
3,168 
3.176 
4^114 
4,170 



14 
20 
49 
76 

60 
2 25 
2 30 



2 
1 
2 
2 

2 37 
2 25 



10 

m 

58 
47 



92 
82 
80 
94 
96 
04 
83 
92 
16 
40 
2 21 

2 40 

3 50 
5 18 
5 50 

4 61 



State tax for 1867.. 
County tax for 1867 



.$48,987 50 
. . 14,650 84 



169 



UNCOLLECTED TAXES. 



1859 — John L. Kclley, Collector. 
Amount uncollected January 1, 1868, . . $8,245 00 

1865 — H, R. Chamberlin, Collector, 
Amount uncollected January 1, 1868, . . 4,818 52 

1866— H. R. Chamberlin, Collector. 
Amount uncollected January 1, 186S, . . 10,602 67 

1867— H. R. Chamberlin, Collector. 

Amount of list, 207,457 31> 

Amount collected and abated, .... 172,362 24 



Balance uncollected, .... $35,095 15 



GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS 

OF THE 

CITY OF MANCHESTER. 

1868. 



MAYOR, 

JAMES A. AYESTON, 



ALDERMEN, 



Ward 1, "William G. Perry. W^ard 5, Daniel Connor. 
Ward 2, Ezra Huntington. Ward 6, Joseph Rowley. 
Ward 3, William P. Newell. Ward 7, Chaunccy C. Favor. 
Ward 4, Horace B. Putnam. Ward 8, George H. Gerry. 



COMMON COUNCIL, 

Ward 1, Henry C. Sanderson, Ward 5, George Fox, 

John Plummer, Andrew Farrell, 

William Bursiel. Michael Keely. 

Ward 2, John Pattee, Ward 6, Wm. F. Sleeper, 

Henry A. Farrington, Alex. M. Corning, 

Henry Lewis. Geo. H. Hubbard. 

Ward 3, Setli J. Sanborn, Ward 7, Joseph H. Brooks, 
Peter K. Chandler, Isaac Lewas, 

Reed P. Silver. Samuel Brooks. 

Ward 4, A. M. Eastman, Ward 8, David A. Messer, 

Benj. W. Robinson, A. A. Partridge, 



Jonathan B. Moore. Hiram Stearns. 



172 



Joseph E. Bennett, City Clerk. 
Henry C. Sanderson, President of Common Council. 
Horace M. Gillis, Clerk of Common Council. 
Harrison D. Lord, City Messenger. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — Messrs. Chandler, Corning and Farrington ; 
the Mayor and Aklerman Perry. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Huntington and Rowley; 
Messrs. Sanborn, Lewis of Ward 7, and Chandler. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Connor and Put- 
nam; Messrs. Plummer, Pattec and Bursiel. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Gerry and Hunting- 
ton ; Messrs. J. A. Brooks, Lewis of Ward 2, and Eastman. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Newell and Rowley*; Messrs. 
Corning, Sleeper and Silver. 

On City Farm. — The Mayor and Alderman Favor ; 
Messrs. Robinson, Plummer and Stearns. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Newell and Connor ; 
Messrs. Silver, Robinson and Eastman. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Perry and Ger- 
ry ; Messrs. Hubbard, J. H. Brooks and Partridge. 

On Fire Department — Aldermen Huntington and Gerry ; 
Messrs. Farrington, Plummer and Samuel Brooks. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Perry and Putnam ; Messrs. Pat- 
tee, Lewis of Ward 7, and Eastman. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Connor and Favor; 
Messrs. Messer, Fox and Samuel Brooks. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Putnam and Favor ; 
Messrs. Hubbard, Bursiel and Farrell. 

On City Hall Building. — Aldermen Rowley and Newell ; 
Messrs. Moore, Sanborn, and Lewis of Ward 2. 



173 

STAXDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

0)1 Licenses. — Aldermen Gerry and Connor. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Rowley and Gerry. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Favor and Rowley. 

On Bills in Second Heading-. — Aldermen Perry and Put- 
nam. 

On Market. — Aldermen Connor and Favor. 

On /Setting- Trees. — Aldermen Putnam and Newell, 

On 31'irsluirs Account. — Aldermen Xewell and Hunting- 
ton. • 

On Abatement of Taxes. — Aldermen Huntington and Perry, 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL, 

On Elections and Returns. — Messrs. Sleeper, Partridge 
and Samuel Brooks. 

On Bills 171 Second Beading-. — Messrs. Corning, Messer 
and Moore. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. Chandler, Eastman, and Lewis 
of Ward 7. 



ASSESSORS, 



George W, Thayer, Thomas Howe. 

Charles Currier, Isaac Whittemore. 

J, G, Cilley. A. C, Wallace. 

Isaac D. Palmer. Allen Partrida-e. 



174 

OVERSEERS OP POOR. 



S. S. Moulton. 
S. J. Young. 
Nahum Baldwin. 
Moses E. George. 



Timothy Sullivan. 
Hiram W. Savory. 
John C. Smith. 
John Field. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Henry T. Mowatt. 
Marshall P. Hall. 
Moody Currier. 
Geo. W. Weeks. 



William Little. 
D. C* Gould, Jr. 
James P. Walker. 
Thos. S. Montgomery. 



SUPT. OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Joseph G. Edgerly. 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



Israel Dow, Chief. 
Benj. C. Kendall. Elijah Chandler. 

Edwin P. Richardson. Wilberforce Ireland. 



SOLICITOR. 

Charles H. Bartlett, — Office, Eiddle's Building. 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 

Henry R. Chambcrlin, — Office, City Hall Building. 



175 

DEPUTY COLLECTOR. 

Harrison D. Lord, — Office, City Hall Building. 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 

Hon. Samuel D. Bell. Hon. Wm. C. Clarke. 

Hon. E. A. Straw. Phineas Adams. 

Hon. Daniel Clark. Samuel N. Bell. 

Wm. P. Newell, Henry C. Sanderson. 

Hon. James A. Weston. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Charles H. Marshall. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 



Ward 1, Seth T. Hill. Ward 5, Cornelius Healey. 
" 2, John T. Robinson. " 6, Holmes R. Pettee. 
" 3, Henry C. Tilton. " 7, Andrew C. Wallace. 

" 4, Daniel L. Stevens. " 8, Geo. H. Colby. 

Clerics. 

Ward 1, F. T. E. Richardson. Ward 5, James Hayes, 
" 2, Leonard Shelters. " 6, James W- Lathe. 

" 3, Geo. F. Moore, " 7, Luther E.Wallace. 

" 4, Roswell H. Hassam. " 8, Charles W. Farmer. 



176 

Selectmen. 

Ward 1, Gilmaii Stearns, Ward 5, Win. Riordan, 
Wm, McPherson, John Burke, 

Geula A. Craig. Patrick Riordan. 

Ward 2, Uriah A. Carswell, Ward 6, Joel Daniels, 

Henry W. Powell, Henry H. White, 

John W. Dickey. Ezra Kimball. 

Ward 3, Simon F. Stanton, Ward T, John C. Head, 
ThorndikeP.Heath, Geo. C. Baker, 

Nath'l E. Morrill. Joseph Freschl. 

Ward 4, Henry Clongh, Ward 8, Richard W. Lang, 

Wm. H. Gilmore, Damon Y. Stearns, 

J. B. Hartwell. Parker F. Emerson. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF BURIALS. 

John Prince. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Justice. 
Samuel Upton. — Office, Merchant's Exchange. 

Assistant Justice. 
Elijah M. Toplifif. — Office, Patten's Building. 

City 3Iarshal. 
William B. Patten. — Office, City Hall. 

Assistant Marshal. 
Eben Carr. — Office, City Hall. 



177 

Night Watch. 

John D, Howard. Hezekiah H. Xoyes. 

Thomas L. Quimby. Horatio W. Longa. 

Albert F. Quimby. James Duflfy. 

Patrick Doyle. . ^Xm. T. Fogg. 

Heiirv Benjiett. W. H. B. Newhall. 



Constables. 



Wm. B. Patten. 
Eben Carr. 
John D. Howard. 
Thomas L. Quimby. 
'Albert F. Quimby."^ 



Patrick Doyle. 
Henry Bennett. 
Horatio TV. Longa. 
Harrison D. Lord. 
Nathaniel E. Morrill. 



Wm. B. Patten. 
Eben Carr. 
John D. Howard. 
Thomas L, Quimby. 
Albert F. Quimljy. 
Patrick Doyle. 
Henry Bennett. 
Horatio W. Longa. 
James Duffy. 
Wm. T. Fogg. 
Hezekiah H. Noyes. 
W. H. B. Newhall. 
Harrison D. Lord. 
Orin D. Carpenter. 
Leonard Shelters. 
Henry W. Powell. 
Andrew J. Dickey. 
Hollis C. Hunton. 
12 



Police Officers. 

E. G. Woodman. 
Alljcrt Dinsmore. 
E. G. Haynes. 
Joseph W. Bean. 
Joseph Melvin. 
Geo. H. Colby. 
James E. Bailey. 
James G. Knight. 
Charles Candeld. 
Charles M. Stevens. 
Joseph P. Fellows. 
John T. Chase. 
Erastus Cutting. 
Wm. N. Chamberlin. 
James M. Howe. 
Benjamin Sleeper. 
Joel Daniels. 
W. D. Perkins. 



178 



All)crt H. Merrill. Horatio Fradd. 

Levi Andrews. John K. McQueston. 

Benj. W. Robinson. John C. Head. 

Edward Garner. Geo. W. Yarniim. 

John E. Stearns. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

George A. Crosby. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board op School Committee, ) 
January 6, 1868. \ 

The Superintendent presented his xVnnual Report, which 
Avas read and accepted. 

WILLIAM LITTLE, Cleric. 



Ix Board op Mayor and Aldermen, ) 
January 6, 1868. j 

Read and accepted and ordered to be printed. 

J. E. BENNETT, Citt/ Clerk. 



Ix Board op Common Council, } 
January 6, 1868. ] 

In concurrence, read, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

H. M. GILLIS, Cleric. 



SCHOOL KEPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Scliool Committee : 

In accordance with your regulations I submit to you uiy 
Report of the Public Schools of this city. 

Having so recently assumed the daities of this office 1 
cannot be expected to speak of the different schools or re- 
port the progress in each. Hence I shall confine myself to 
the discussion of tliose questions which affect our schools 
as a body. 

The Treasurer presents the following as the Financial 
Report of the past year : 

SCHOOL DEPART^MENT IX ACCOUNT WITH H. R. 
CHAM BERLIN, TREASURER. 

Amount of Funds. 



Balance from old account, . 


8214 Q^Q 


Appropriation by city, 


38,000 00 


" for rejtairs, . 


2,550 00 


Old bills, .... 


20 64 


School district No. 10, 


21 00 


J. 0. Adams, . 


7 50 




■140.813 80 



182 



Expenditures. 
School District No. 2 



TEACHING 



Wm. W. Colbiirn, 
Harriet R. Baker, 
C. Augusta Gile, 
Emeline R. Brooks, 
Mary E. C lough, 
Charles R. Treat, 
J. G. Edgerly, . 
F. W. Parker, . 
Sarah E. Copp, . 
Emma A. H. Brown, 
Betsey A. Ambrose, 
Issac L. Heath, 
L. E. Manahan, 
H. A. Slade, 
Rebecca !>. Gove, 
Wm. R. Patten, 
Thomas Corcoran, 
Mary Scholastica, 
A. C. Osgood, . 
Ella F. Muiot, . 
Nettie E. Dunbar, 
Sarah J. Greene, 
Mary L. Sleeper, 
Nancy S. Bunton, 
Julia A. Baker, 
Lottie R. Adams, 
Annie E. Smith, 
Lizzie P. Gove, . 
Ellen B. RowcU, 
Elbridge D. Hadley, 
Mary Agatha, . 



$1,498 00 


. 87 


50 


. 533 


75 


. 157 


50 


. 260 


00 


. 70 


20 


. 180 


00 


. 1,100 


00 


. 235 


00 


. 373 


75 


. 373 


75 


. 1,100 


00 


. 400 


00 


. 373 


75 


. 373 


75 


7 


50 


.^1,282 


42 


. 390 


00 


. 34 


50 


. 27 


00 


. 116 


75 


. 358 


00 


. 356 


00 


. 352 


50 


. 352 


50 


. 350 


00 


. 107 


00 


. 356 


00 


. 357 


00 


. 248 


00 


. 230 


00 



183 



Annie N. Bernard, 








$341 00 


Catharine M. Sebastian, . 






341 25 


C. Augusta Abbott, . 






.350 00 


Mary E. Ireland, 






354 00 


Emily J. Parker, 






356 00 


Georgianna Doav, 






358 00 


Anstricc G. Flanders, 






356 00 


Addie L. Hutchinson, 






352 00 


Julia A. Clay, . ^ . 
Carrie E. Reed, 








348 00 
313 00 


Martha B. Dinsmore, 








360 00 


Mattie R. Kidder, 








344 00 


Mary A. Richardson, 








358 00 


Helen M. Morrill, . 








352 00 


Mintie C. Edgerly, 








232 00 


Abbie E. Abl)ott, 








356 00 


Emma A. McCoy, 








354 00 


Mary Camillus, . 
Mary Ligouri, . 
Mary Louis, 








350 00 
350 00 
341 25 


Sarah Clifford, . 








341 25 


Mary Xavier, 








. 341 25 


Helen M. Hills, 








345 25 


Annie Murphy, . 
1. S. Whitney, 








341 25 

783 00 


Hattie G. Flanders, 








. 85 00 


Rebecca Hall, . 








. 30 90 


Hattie L. Jones, 








. 253 50 


Nellie J. Sanderson, 








. 249 00 


Marianna Clough, 








. 230 00 


Flora Campbell, 
Lucy Wheeler, . 








. 230 00 
. 210 00 


S. W. Clark, . 








. 216 00 


Mary O'Brien, . 
Clcora E. Bailey, 








. 120 00 
. 122 00 



184 



Mintie C. Edgerly, . 






. 8110 00 




Mary J. Fifef / . . . . 14 00 




H. E. Burnbam, . . . . 15 00 




822,895 


12 


REPAIRS. 




Luther Flint, 813 00 




C. R. Colley, . 






58 35 




Geo. H. Dudley, 






. 317 05 




Haines & Wallace, . 






. 187 98 




G. B. Fogg, . 






. 37 36 




Daniels & Company, . 






. 319 92 




T. R-. Huljbard, . 






. 142 51 




C. Clougli & Co., 






328 68 




Wm. Wilder, . 






38 49 




^Y. H. Elliott, . 






1 25 




W. 0. Haskell, . . . 






18 76 




Hartshorn & Pike, . 






254 36 




L. M. Greene, . 






. 76 17 




P. A. Devine, . 






. 23 65 




Charles Williams, 






8 89 




T. P. Clough, . 






4 00 




John Jacobs, 






. 30 00 




John Griffin, 






14 50 




Wm. C. Blodgett, . 






. 100 84 




Manchester Print Works, 






56 30. 




D. H. Young, 1865, . 






3 25 




G. W. Merriam, 






1 75 




John Fallen, 






. 47 00 




Haskell & Son, 






63 00 




Mitchell Chapell, 






6 00 




Abbott & Kelly, 






185 29 




True E. Dudley, 






. 58 12 




P. Devine, 






. 10 61 




Wm. H. Fisk, . 






. 18 68 





185 



Hilas Dickey, . 


. 199 07 




J. 0. Adams, 


. GO 00 




J. G. Colt, 


. 74 00 




Wm. W. Hubljard, . 


. IG 00 




Charles Buiitiii, 


. 14 70 




E. Roper, .... 


. 18 00 • 




John Logiie, 


. 22 00 




Charles Canfield, 


. 28 00 




C. E. W. Clough, . 


. 2G 88 




Thomas Steele, . 


8 25 




Manchester Print Works, . 


. 199 43 




E. S. Ritchie & Son, . 


. IG 80 




John C. Yonng, 


. 27 92 




Temple McQueston, for ^vell. 


. 40 84 




E. A. Smith, concrete walk. 


. 121 00 






'^^ 108 


55 






INX'IDENT. 


lLS. 




H. D. Lord, . . . . 


. 84 75 




H. R. Chamberlin, treasurer. 


. 50 00 




Wm. Little, . . . . 


8 75 




F. W. Adams, . . . . 


. IG 00 




J. 0. Adams, cash paid, etc., 


. 94 20 




Hill & Co., expressage, 


5 21 




Cheney & Co. " 


1 00 




M. K. Davis, . . . , 


5 00 




J. E. Bennett, clerk, 


5 00 ■ 




E. G. Richardson, tuning pianos 


9 00 




W. Shepherd, boarding commissi 


oner, G 00 




Asa D. Smith, address and expei 


Lses, 20 00 




M. J. Kendrick, teaming. 


75 




Chas. H. Ilodgman, " . , 


2 25 




Geo. W. Weeks, " . 


4 83 




Geo. Hunt, " 


3 00 




Johnson & Ward, " 


85 





186 



J. G. Colt, trees and teaming, 






$125 00 


Julia Finnegan, for cleaning. 






32 80 


Clement Devine, " 






7 00 


H. T. Mowatt, " 






2 00 


Mrs. Fleming, " 






6 88 


Mrs. Durbin, " 






19 00 


]M. W. Oliver, care of Iligli 


School 




House, .... 






70 00 


Wm. Little, minerals, 






5 00 


Timothy Clark, labor, 






1 00 


J. G. Edgerly, cash paid, . 






6 81 


E. S.. Ritchie & Son, apparatus 


for 




High School, 


. 




329 95 


Z. Harvey, cleaning vault, . 


• 




1 50 



8813 56 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



H. C. Tilton, . 

Wm. H. risk, . 

Brewer & Tileston, 

I. S. Whitney, . 

H. D. Smith,"^ . 

L. S. Learned, . 

L. B. Peck, 

J. H. Thurber, atlases, 

E. P. Button & Co., maps, 





$391 17 




16 32 




16 08 




62 00 




11 60 




5 00 




35 28 




. 70 00 




. 30 00 



•$670 15 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 

C. F. Livingston, .... $106 00 

Campbell & Hanscom, . . . 15 00 

John B. Clarke, . . . . 91 06 

Wm. H. Fisk, 76 82 



$288 88 



187 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



F. W. Parker, . 

L. M. Greene, . 

C. F. Bo.sher, . 

B. F. Lock, 

David Libby, 

J. Stickney, table cloths, . 

H. II, Ladd, clocks, . 

W. 0. Haskell, . 

J. P. Brock, stoves, . 

Chas. A. Smith, bells, 

Geo. H. Dudley, 

A. Ferreii & Co., 

Geo. W. Adams, 

I. S. Whitney, piano cloth, 

J. Stickney, 

J. B. Yarick & Co., . 

Thomas Corcoran, maps, &c.. 

Barton & Co., . 



. $25 00 


12 


50 


41 


64 


4 


75 


33 


85 


8 


75 


27 


00 


113 


50 


87 


16 


1 


08 


8 


50 


7 


43 


15 


23 


9 


00 


7 


20 




88 


37 


00 


42 


78 



$483 25 



FUEL AND SAWING WOOD. 



Gilman Clough, 


, 




, 


. $520 75 


Manchester Print Works, 






. 2,303 51 


Chas. Chase & Co., . 






. 78 28 


J. Straw, . 








. 21 50 


Lewis Durbin, . 








. 21 25 


Chas. Clough & Co., 








12 00 


Anthony Hill, . 








12 00 


Thomas Bonning, 








3 00 


John Grihin, 








31 75 


Asa Richardson, 








9 00 


Moses Lull, 








2 25 


H. D. Lord, . 








60 75 



188 



W. C. Ricliardson, 
Burpee & Co., . 



14 7o 
10 50 



CARE OF ROOMS AX 



T. P. Cloilgll, . 

Thomas Howe, . 
Thomas E. Cressey, 
John Farrar, 
James McColley, 
n. &. Rowell, . 
Joseph T. Snow, 



D FU 



RXACES. 

$114 26 

255 50 

226 25 

124 25 

40 42 

7 00 

9 00 



§^3,091 29 



8806 68 



TEAMS 



Eaton & Jobert, 
S. & S. S. James, 
Commons, teammg, 
H. D. Lord, " . 

M. J. Kendrick, " . 



$3 00 

35 50 

7 90 

6 00 

1 00 



40 



INSURANCE. 



Wm. Little, 
H. Foster, 
L. B. Clough, 
I. W. Smith, 
B. P. Cilley, 
E. T. Stevens, 
Geo. A. French, 



District No. 

Sarah A. Preston, teaching, 
J. D. Jones, " 



$44 25 
71 50 

71 50 

72 75 
50 25 
19 55 
32 50 



8382 75 
45 50 



8362 30 



189 



Hartshorn & Pike, dipper, . 


. 8 20 


Mrs. G. W. Dustin, cleaning. 


2 50 


Dustin & Co., wood, . 


. 14 00 


Miss Kimball, care of room. 


3 00 


H. C. Tilton, Looks and stationary, 


9 05 


L. B. Peck, 


85 


Brewer & Tileston, " 


1 25 


L. W. Mason, " 


7 00 


R. C. Dustin, repairs, 


4 50 


Levi M. Greene, " . . 


1 00 


G. H. Dudley, " 


1 38 


H. D. Lord, teams, . 


1 50 


Eaton & Jobert, teams, 


2 00 


S. & S. S. James, " 


. 12 25 


District Xo. 3. 




E. D. Hadlcy, teaching, . 


$217 00 


Clara Clougii, " 


. 28 00 


Katie L. Porter, " 


. 250 00 


J. D. Jones, " 


45 00 


E. C. Howlett, repairs, 


2 00 


Daniels & Co., " 


1 25 


L. M. Greene, " 


•1 00 


G. H. Dudley, " 


2 05 


Frank Guilford, care of room, . 


3 60 


H. C. Tilton, books and stationery, 


5 11 


L. W. Mason, " " 


7 00 


Mason & Hamlin, " 


8 00 


Brewer & Tileston, " 


1 25 


J. H. Thurber, atlas. 


3 00 


L. B. Peck, books and stationery, 


70 


H. D. Lord, posting warrant, 


1 00 


C. Clough & Co., wood. 


15 00 


Gilman Clough, " 


33 00 



190 



Chas. A. Guilford, sawing wood, 




88 50 


S. & S. S. James, teams, . 




10 00 


District No. 


4. 




Mary J. Reed, teaching, . 




$244 25 


Rosa L. Pratt, " 




106 50 


EllaMellen, 




12 00 


J. D. Jones, " 




. 45 50 


S. &. S. S. James, teams, . 




. 12 50 


I. T. Webster, 




2 50 


I. W. Moore, wood and repairs. 




. 35 00 


Hartshorn & Pike, pipe, . 




68 


Brewer & Tileston, books & stationery 


1 25 


L. W. Mason, " " 




7 00 


L. B. Peck, " " 




70 


M. J. Reed, cleaning, 




1 25 


L. M. Greene, repairs, 




1 00 



1642 96 



8470 13 



District No. 5 
H. T. Rand, teaching, 
Fannie Smith, •" 
J. D. Jones, " 
S. & S. S, James, teams, 
I. T. Webster, " 

Gilman Clough, wood and sawing, 
J. M. Young, 

Frank Robie, " " 

.Josiah Harvey, " " 

H. C. Tilton, books and stationery. 
Brewer & Tileston," " 

L. W. Mason, " " 

L. B. Peck, " " 



. 1132 


00 


. 249 


50 


• 45 


50 


. 13 


50 


4 


00 


. 30 


00 


. 20 


25 


1 


00 


1 


00 


4 


49 


1 


25 


7 


00 




70 



191 



Daniels & Co., bell, . 

" " glass, 

C. R. Colley, repairs, 
John Jacoljs, " 
L. M. Greene, " 



$1 2 



o 
to 
59 
00 
00 



District Xo. G, 




Hattie L. Jones, teaching, 


8118 75 


Lorenda Webster, " 


127 00 


Mary J. Reed, " 


122 50 


J. D. Jones, " 


45 50 


Hartshorn & Pike, stoves, . 


25 84 


S. & S. S. James, teams, . 


13 50 


I, T. Wel)stcr, repairs. 


2 00 


H. C. Dickey, wood, . . • . 


20 00 


Brewer & Tileston, books, stationery. 


1 25 


L. W. Mason, " " 


7 00 


L. B. Peck, 


70 


James Wiley, cleaning vault. 


4 00 



8519 78 



8494 04 



District No. 

Maria H. Hildreth, teaching, 

J. D. Jones, teaching, 

Mary B. Lane, teaching, 

I. T. Webster, teams, 

S. & S. S. James, teams, 

H. D. Lord, teams, . 

H. C. Tilton, books and stationery. 

Brewer & Tileston, books, stationery. 

L. B, Peck, books and stationery, 

Nathan Johnson, wood, and sawing 

Gilman Clough, wood, and sawing, 



8389 25 

45 50 

320 00 

2 50 

14 00 
1 75 

22 91 
1 75 
1 75 
7 00 

11 00 



192 



n. J. Marsh, wood, and sawing, 
H. D. Lord, posting warrant, 
L. W. Mason, mnsic chart, 
J. H. Thurber, atlas, . 
G. H. Dudley, repairs, 
Daniels & Co., repairs. 



81 50 



1 


50 




00 


o 
■J 


00 


8 


24 




45 



88J2 10 



District Xo. 8. 

Lucy J. Priest, teaching, . 

Josie E. George, teaching, . 

J. D. Jones, teaching, 

Gilman Clough, wood, and sawing, 

S. & S. S. James, teams, . 

H. D. Lord, teams, . 

G, H. Dudley, repairs, 

Daniels & Co., repairs. 

Brewer c% Tileston, books, stationery, 

L. W. Mason, books and stationery 

L. B. Peck, books and stationery, 



District No. 9 

C. J. Darrah, teaching, 

Cleora E. Bailey, teaching, 

Annie E. Mellen, teaching, 

J. D. Jones, teaching, 

I. T. Webster, teams, 

S. & S. S. James, teams, . 

IL C. Tilton, books and stationery. 

Brewer ct Tileston, books, stationery, 

L. W, Mason, books and stationery, 

L. B. Peck, books and stationery, 

Charles Clough & Co., rei)airs, . 



. 8119 


75 


. 249 


50 


. 45 


50 


. 24 


75 


. 13 


75 


1 


50 


3 


50 


1 


10 


, 1 


25 


7 


00 




70 


. 8172 


50 


. 130 


00 


. 118 


50 


. 45 


50 


4 


60 


. 14 


00 


5 


28 


1 


25 


7 


00 




70 


. 12 


50 



1468 30 



193 



John Jacobs, re}3airs, 


$5 00 


G. F. Bosher & Co., chairs. 


2 25 


H. C. Dickey, wood, and sawing, 


. 26 00 


District No. 10 




P. P. Parker, teaching, . 


$260 75 


C. J. Darrah, 


168 00 


Lucia Cutler, " 


. 373 75 


M. A. Stevens, " 


. 354 00 


Sarah D. Lord, " 


354 00 


Laura J. Hamblett, " 


. 356 50 


Alice G. Lord, " 


. 180 00 


I. S. Whitney, " 


. 80 00 


Gilman Clough, wood, and sawing. 


. 132 00 


Haines & Wallace, " " 


9 75 


J. Straw, " " 


8 50 


W. H. Young, " " 


3 00 


J. 0. Adarns, " " 


4 50 


H. H. Ladd, clock, " " 


9 00 


Z. Harvey, care of rooms, . 


. 175 14 


S. & S. S. James, teams, . 


9 00 


J. P. Brock, stoves, . 


. 17 00 


H. C. Tilton, books and stationery, 


7 53 


Brewer & Tileston, " " 


3 75 


I. S. Whitney, " " 


1 50 


L. B. Peck, " " 


1 90 


J. H. Thurber, atlas. 


. 15 50 


H. D. Lord, posting warrant, 


1 00 


G. B. Fogg, repairs, . 


38 


H. H. Xoyes, "... 


. 10 25 


L. M. Greene, "... 


3 00 


W. H. Young, cleaning vault, . 


. 10 00 


E. P. Richardson, insurance, 


. 21 00 



8545 00 



13 



1,570 70 



194 



District No. 11 



Amos Wriglit, teaching, 


. JLX 


8511 00 


Nellie J. Sanderson, " 




107 


00 


Fannie E. Porter. " 




249 


00 


I. S. Whitney, 




40 


00 


S. & S. S. James, teams, 




9 


00 


Eaton <fc Jobert, teams. 




1 


00 


H. D. Lord, .... 






50 


Daniels & Co., hardware, . 




1 


71 


Elijah Stearns, wood and repairs, 




14 


49 


H. K. Tilton, " " 




45 


19 


C. Clongh & Co., " " 




6 


00 


H. C. Tilton, books and stationery. 


3 


08 


L. B. Peck, " " 




1 


15 


Brewer &Tileston," " 




1 


75 


I. S. Whitney, " •' 






50 


Mason ct Hamlin, " " 




9 


00 


J. H. Thnrber, atlas. 




15 


50 


A. K. Emery, repairs, 




3 


05 


Ct. H. DudleV, " . . 




4 


12 


J. G. Edgerly, paid for cleaning 


hon 


se. 


85 

fti 0"'>^ so 






<pJL,UZiO Oo 




840,759 19 


Balance to new account, . 


• 


• 


54 61 

840,813 80 



H. E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Treasurer. 
Manchester, Dec. 20, 1867. 



The amonnt appropriated for schools the past year was 
832,000.00, but at the close of the Fall Term 86,000.00 
were added, making the entire appropriation for the year 
838,000.00. Of this amount 83,500.00 was expended for 



195 

bills previously incuiTCcl, making the current expenses of 
the year $34,500.00. 

Tlie appropriation for the coming year will need to be 
larger, in order to sustain the schools already in operation 
and provide for others that must necessarily be formed. 

The amount expended for schools in this city is much 
larger than it was a few years since, but still our schools arc 
not so expensive as those in other places of the same size, 
as will be seen by the tables which are appended to this 
report. 

We shall lie obliged to employ during the coming year 
seventy teachers, and it may l^e seventy-five. 

To pay these teachers the salaries they have had the past 
year, which have not been as high as in most places, and to 
meet the expenses ordinarily incurred will require an ap- 
propriation not much less than !5540,000. 

This amount would make the rate per scholar less than 
110.00 on the number attending our schools. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE OX PRIZES. 

At a late day in the Fall Term of our city schools, the 
undersigned were appointed by the Board of School Com- 
mittee, to award the " Currier Prizes," to scholars in the 
High School, and having attended to the duties assigned 
us, would submit the following 

Report. 

For the highest average in scholarship and deportment — 
by the girls. 

1st prize to Nora R. Blood. 
2d prize to Mary A. Buzzell. 
3d prize to Maria F. Kidder. 



196 

By the boys. 

1st prize to Charles A. Carpenter. 
2d prize to James H. Pettee. 
3cl prize to John M. Knowles. 
For the b'est reading by the girls. 
1st prize to Mattie P. Pinkerton. 
2d prize to Mary A. Verity. 
3d prize to Ida Knowles. 
Mr. Currier made provision for only two prizes for excel- 
lence in reading ; but the Committee were so highly pleased 
with the performance of Miss Ida Knowles, that they 
awarded her a " gratuity " from funds furnished by them- 
selves. 

For the best declamation by the boys. 
1st prize to Charles L. Frost. 
2d ^rize to Melville L. French. 
The Committe were so favorably impressed with the effort 
of Charles A. Carpenter, that they make honorable men- 
tion of his name in this connection. Perhaps, in justice to 
Melville L. French, we ought to state in his behalf, that 
owing to his indisposition we did not hear him under so 
favorable circumstances as we did the rest of the contest- 
ants for the prizes in declamation. 
For the best composition. 

1st prize to Charles Kimball. 
3d prize to Martin Kellogg. 
The Committee very much regret that so few composi- 
tions were submitted to their inspection. Preparing com- 
positions we regard as a very important branch in the High 
School, as it tends to exhibit the real ability or proficiency 
of the scholar, more fully than any other exercise. The 
limited number of compositions may be accounted for by 
the lateness in the term when the subjects were given out, 
and the pressure of duties incident to the near approach of 
the Annual Examination. 



19T 

For the best specimens of penmanship. 

1st prize to Martha J. Boyd. 
2d prize to Joseph Batchelder. 

From the seventy-one specimens of penmanship presented, 
more than fifty were rejected on the slightest examination. 
This fact impressed the Committee witli the importance of 
bestowing more attention to writing in the grammar schools, 
or else giving it a place among the other branches in the 
High School. Eight or ten of the specimens before the 
committee were highly creditalile. "We would make favor- 
able mention of the specimens exhibited by Charles Haines, 
Belle Mack, Mattic Pinkerton and Hattie Child. In this 
list we should also include one or two other names, but have 
no means of determining to whom the specimens belonged. 

For best spelling. 

1st prize to Xora Blood. 

The prizes awarded for the highest average in deport- 
ment and scholarship, were determined by the dailv records 
kept in the school, and not upon the jutlgmcnt of the com- 
mittee. The rank of some, beside those receiving the prizes, 
was praiseworthy. Of those entitled to honorable mention, 
we would name Martha J. Boyd and Emma Cross. Several 
others had an excellent record. 

Your Committee have reason to believe that their decis- 
ions were generally satisfactory to pupils and parents. 

If the Hon. Moody Currier proposes to make the distri- 
bution of jn-izes a permanent matter, we would respectfully 
suggest that the awards be bestowed on the deserving par- 
ties in the form of medals, they being, in our estimation, 
more appropriate and useful, than specific sums of money. 
As keepsakes, medals are far preferable to currency or 



198 

" greenbacks." Judging from the results of the past two 
years, we think we may safely say, the " prize system" has 
been productive of a healthy competition, and merits ap- 
proval and continuance. 

JOSEPH KIDDER, 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 
L. B. CLOUGH, 

Com7mttee. 
Manchester, December 26, 1867. 



PRIZES 



The prizes offered by the Business College, were awarded 
as follows : — 

FOR FULL SCHOLARSHIPS: 

To Charles A. Carpenter, of the High School ; 
George I. Aldrich, of the North Grammar ; 
Frank Cutchins, of the South Grammar ; 
Michael Morrissey, of the Park st. Grammar. 

FOR SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE WRITING DEPARTMENT: 

To Martha J. Boyd, of the High School ; 
Ina Avery, of the North Grammar ; 
Maggie Chase, of the South Grammar ; 
Pliilip Clifford, of the Park st. Grammar ; 
Jennie Graham, of the Piscataquog Grammar ; 
Nettie F. Stevens, of the Amoskeag Grammar ; 
B. F. Stark, of District No. 1 ; 
Charles A. Guilford, of District No. 3 ; 
Francena Moore, of District No. 4 ; 
Ida M. Hartshorn, of District No. 5 ; 
Ella Webster, of District No, G ; 
Fred. F. Hall, of District No. 7 ; 
Henry C. Young, of District No. 8 ; 
Rebecca George, of District No. 9. 



199 

The number of pupils who graduated from the High 
School at the close of the Fall Term was 15, viz. : 

FULL COURSE. 

Nora R. Blood, Mattie P. Pinkerton, 

M. Theora Flanders, Charles A. Carpenter, 

James H. Pettee. 

LATIN AND ENGLISH. 

Emma F. Bean, Isabelle L. Hall. 

FRENCH AND ENGLISH. 

Mattie S. Miller, ' Lizzie H. Patterson, 

Ella M. Mitchell, M. J. Annie Stevens. 

ENGLISH. 

Emma F. Soule, Melville L. French, 

J. Edward Currier, Poland C. Powell. 

The following list contains the names of those teachers 
who have served in the different schools of the city within 
the past year : — 

HIGH SCHOOL. 
Principal — William "W. Colburn ; 
Assistant — C. Augusta Gile ; 

" Mary E. Clough, 2 terms ; 

" Emeline R, Brooks, 1 term. 

NORTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — Frank W. Parker ; 
Assistant — Emma A. H. Brown ; 

" Betsey A. Ambrose ; 

" Sarah E. Copp, 2 terms ; 

" Martha B. Dinsmoor, 2 terms ; 

" Hattie G. Flanders, 1 term; 

" Mattie R. Kidder, 1 term. 



200 

SOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — Isaac L. Heath ; 
Assistant — Lucretia E. Manahan ; 

" Hannah A. Slade ; 

" Rebecca B. Gove. 

PARK STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — Thomas Corcoran ; 
Assistant — ^^lary Scholastica. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

Principal — Joseph G. Edgerly, 1 term ; 

" Elbridge D. Hadley, 1 term ; 

" Samuel W. Clark, 1 term ; 

Assistant — ^Ella F. Minot, 1 term ; 

" Rebecca Hall, 1 term. 

Wilson's hill grammar school. 
Nettie E. Dunbar, 1 term ; 
Hattie L. Jones, 2 terms. 

middle schools? 

No. 1. Sarah J. Green ; 

2. Mary L. Sleeper ; 

3. Nancy S. Bunton ; 

4. Julia A. Baker ; 

5. Lottie R. Adams ; 

6. Annie E. Smith, 1 term ; 
Nellie J. Sanderson, 2 terms ; 

7. Lizzie P. Gove ; 

8. Ellen B. Rowell ; 

9. Mary Agatha, 2 terms ; 
Mary O'Brien, 1 term ; 

10. Annie M. Bernard ; 

11. Catharine M. Sebastian, 2 terms ; 
Mary Vincent, 1 term ; 

12. C. Auousta Abbott. 



201 



No. 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 
6. 

7. 
8. 

9. 

10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16, 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

Mary E. Ireland ; 

Emily J. Parker ; 

Georgianna Dow ; 

Anstrice G. Flanders ; 

Addie L. Hutcliinson ; 

Julia A. Clay ; 

Carrie E. Reed ; 

Ma^ianna Clougli, 2 terms ; 

Martha B. Dinsmoor, 1 term ; 

Mattie R. Kidder, 2 terms ; 

Cleora E. Bailey, 1 term; 

Mary A. Richardson ; 

Helen M. Morrill ; 

Mintie C. Edgerly ; 

Abbie E. Abbott ; 

Enuna A. McCoy ; 

Mary Camillus ; 

Mary Liguori ; 

Mary Louis ; 

Sarah Clifford ; 

Mary Xavier ; 

Flora Campbell ; 

Helen M. Hills ; 

Annie Murphy ; 

Lucy Wheeler. 



WARD SEVEN. 

Grammar School. 

Principal — Charles J. Darrah, 1 term ; 

" Philinda P. Parker, 2 terms ; 

Assistant — Lucia Cutler. 



East Primary. 

Sarah G. Lord ; 

Alice G. Lord, Assistant 2 terms. 



202 

West Primary, or Middle. 
M. Antoinette Stevens. 

South Primary, or Ungraded. 
Laura J, Hamblet. 

WARD EIGHT. 

Grammar School. 

Master Amos Wright. 

Primary School. 

Nellie J. Sanderson, 1 term ; 
Fannie E. Porter, 2 terms. 

RURAL DISTRICTS. 

No. 1. Sarah A. Preston ; 

" 3. Elbridge D. Hadley, 1 term; 

" Katie L. Porter, 2 terms ; 

" 4. Mary J. Reid, 2 terms ; 

" Rosa L. Pratt, 1 term ; 

" 5. Henry T. Rand, 1 term ; 

" Fannie M. Smith, 2 terms ; 

. " 6. Hattie L. Jones, 1 term; 

" Lorenda Webster, 1 term ; 

" Mary J. Reid, 1 term ; 

" 7. Maria H. Hildreth; 

" Mary B. Lane, Assistant ; 

" 8. Mary J. Priest, 1 term ; 

" Josephine George, 2 terms ; 

" 9. Charles J. Darrah, 1 term ; 

" Cleora E. Bailey, 1 term ; 

" Annie E. Mcllen, 1 term. 

MUSIC TEACHERS. 

Districts Nos. 2, 10 and 11, I. S. Whitney; 

" " 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, J. D. Jones. 



203 

I clesii-G to call attention to some of the studies pursued 
in our schools, and to make some suggestions that may not 
be deemed inappropriate. 

WRITING. 

A great deal more attention has been paid to this branch 
the past year than at any previous time. The instruction 
has been systematic, and the result has been that in many 
schools, especially in the North and South Grammar, the 
progress has been truly surprising compared with former 
years. 

A]i examination of the books written in these two schools, 
the past year will satisfy any one upon this point. I am 
confident that but few schools in any place can boast of 
greater improvement in this branch than can some of ours. 
It is to be hoped that in all our schools in which writing is 
taught more attention will be given to it, and the system as 
taught in the Grammar Schools introduced into all the 
others. 

I know the system is condenmed by many, yet results 
show that it is successful, and I know of no better criterion 
by which to judge. 

Much of the labor in this department that has been per- 
formed by the principals in the first divisions, the past year, 
should have been done in the third and fourth divisions, 
allowing those in charge of the higher divisions time to 
devote to other branches. 

EEADING. 

During the Winter Term Prof. Charles E. Treat was em- 
ployed by the Committee to give lessons to the teachers in 
elocution. These exercises were punctually attended by 
most of the teachers ; a considerable degree of interest 
beino- manifested. 



204 

Sometime in the Spring Term Prof. Mark Bailey delivered 
a few lectures to the teachers upon this subject. These 
lectures were also of great benefit to the teachers who 
availed themselves of the privilege of attending. 

The benefit of these exercises has been felt in our 
schools for the past two terms, and I would recommend 
that during the coming year some provision be made for 
lectures in this department, feeling assured that the greater 
number of our teachers would gladly avail themselves of 
any opportunity to attend. 

It should be obligatory upon all teachers, from the lowest 
grade of the Primary to the master of the High School, to 
attend all these exercises, and introduce them into their 
respective schools. Not enough importance is attached to 
this study notwithstanding all the efforts that have been 
made. There is not enough enthusiasm in this department. 
We have altogether too many poor readers in our schools. 
In too many instances the lessons are hurried, the words 
are repeated, and the scholars take their seats, the main 
object being, to see how much can be read at a time, or how 
quickly a book can be finished. Too often do we hear the 
remark from teachers, that the pupils have read one ]30ok 
of the series, and desire to take another. If we should 
allow them this privilege, and permit one book to be taken 
as soon as they have been through with the preceding 
one, I fear some of our teachers would complete Hillard's 
whole series in two terms, and that too, before pupils could 
spell correctly words of two syllables. 

In the rural districts especially, pupils each term desire 
to take a new reader, thinking they have made wonderful 
progress if they can read in a larger book. Something 
must be done to correct this fault ; and it is my earnest de- 
sire that when our course of study is revised this subject 
will receive consideration, and a stop put to this incessant 
clamor for higher reading books. Let teachers, especially 



205 

those in the lower grade, practice their pupils more upon 
the elements. Let the pupils have more practice in artic- 
ulation and pronunciation, even if no reading lesson in the 
hook is assigned for a number of days. Then when they 
read pieces from the book they will be able to spend more 
time upon the " expression." 

I know there is danger of going to the other extreme and 
giving too much attention merely to the sounds, etc., but 
judicious teachers will avoid either extreme. 

Reading lessons should be short and tlioroughly studied. 

In the examination of teachers we should make rcadino; 
more prominent, thereby giving it more prominence in the 
schools. 

More attention should be given to it in the High School, 
even if some other studies arc neglected, or taken entirely 
out of the course. 

Hillard's Readers, which were introduced last spring, are 
giving good satisfaction, and I trust the subject of changing 
readers will not soon be revived in this city. 

SPELLING. 

This branch has received in many schools considerable 
attention for the past year, and good results have been ob- 
tained. 

A thorough examination of the classes in the Iligli and 
Grammar schools will convince any one of the necessity of 
a more rigid drill in this branch. 

This deficiency can be traced back to the Middle and even 
to the Primary Schools. 

Teachers in these schools have not been to blame in this 
matter, but the blame lies with us wlio have required them 
to he teaching arithmetic and geography, when the pupils 
should have been reading and spelling. 

It seems to me nonsense to compel a child to spell and 



206 

define a number of words of Tvliose real meaning he has no 
more idea than of Radii veetores. 

Because words are defined in tlie speller it is not neces- 
sary that the pupils commit those definitions to memory, 
unless they have some idea of the meaning of the words 
contained in the definition. 

If the meaning of some of these definitions were ex- 
plained, in language comprehended by the pupils, by far 
better results could be obtained. 

All of us are well aware that the spelling exercise, if con- 
ducted orally, is oftentimes a mere matter of guessing, pu- 
pils being allowed to try the words until they have guessed 
correctly. 

Words should be pronounced to the classes as they are 
generally pronounced, and not in such a manner as to in- 
dicate to the pupils the correct method of spelling. 

AEITHMETIC. 

In past years the complaint has been that this study has 
occupied too prominent a place, but at present I think it is 
receiving no more than its due share of attention. 

In written arithmetic the classes have generally appeared 
well, the examples have been readily solved and satisfac- 
torily explained. 

Possibly in some instances the reasons have not always 
been given, the question ivhy not asked often enough, but 
the progress in this branch has been commendable. 

In mental arithmetic, in my opinion, the instruction has 
been good. 

I may disagree with many on this point, but it seems to 
me that a practical knowledge of the subject can be obtained 
without obliging pupils to commit to memory long examples 
and solve them in a particular way. 

I question the propriety of drilling a class, for half an 



207 

hour on four or five questions, which every member of the 
class knew perfectly well before the recitation ; if, as it has 
been expressed, this can be called a recitation. 

It may be a good exercise for the memory, but I very 
much doubt, if the pupils acquire Ijy this exercise much 
useful knowledge, of the nature and relations of numbers. 

The examples may be repeated with fluency after a long 
drill, and if they ivere properly learned and correctly under- 
stood would prove of great benefit, but let us not compel pupils 
to repeat sounds which to them have no meaning. 

Original examples should frequently be given, and ac- 
curacy and rapidity combined. 

Examples similar to those of the book should be given, 
and in this, as in all studies, pupils should be tauglit to de- 
pend upon themselves, not thinking the only object of the 
recitation is to repeat the words of the text-book verbatim. 

The phraseology of the examples can be changed, as well 
as the numbers, until the pu})il can readily solve difficult 
(questions, even if they liave not been drilled upon them for* 
days. 

Both in written and mental arithmetic tlie reasons may 
]je repeated so often that some pupils who do not under- 
stand them can learn them by rote. 

But I think that arithmetic, as taught in our schools, is 
well understood by the scholars, wlu3 are led to reason for 
themselves. 

"Walton's Tables are proving of great value in our schools, 
and I trust they will be used in every school above the 
primary grade. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

In this branch there has been during the past year con- 
siderable enthusiasm manifested. 

The results in this department in many instances have 
been very satisfactory, but still teachers must bring them- 



208 

selves out of the old beaten track, thereby creating more of 
an interest in the study. The time has passsd when a pu- 
pil was tliought to know enough of geography if he could 
give the boundaries of several states, repeat the names of 
the capitals twice in a sing-song tone, name the islands in 
the Pacific ocean, and tell the direction of Pompanoosuc 
from Mink Brook. 

Scholars must understand something of the physical 
features of the country, the character and occupations of its 
inha])itants, and exert their reasoning powers to account for 
the diversities in different localities. 

The memory should not 1)0 burdened with dry details, but 
the more prominent facts should be set before the pupils, 
and these facts combined with other important facts by 
which method a fair knowledge of the subject may be ob- 
tained. 

In the higher grades, physical geography has been suc- 
cessfully taught. 

In the Primary Schools, I have discouraged as much as 
possil)le the use of the text-book, feeling satisfied that better 
results could be obtained from oral instruction than by con- 
fining pupils to the book. 

I have found that those teacher? of the Primary Schools 
who have in a measure discarded the use of the text-book 
have been most successful. 

I think it would be better not to require a text-book on 
geography in the Primary Schools, but allow the teachers to 
give oral instruction, thus familiarizing the pupils with such 
topics as will interest them. 

This w^ould be preferable to the plan of compelling chil- 
dren at an early age, to commit to memory a mass of — to 
them — unintelligible facts, the failure to do which, causes 
them to be reprimanded, whereby they become discouraged, 
and acquire a strong dislike for the study, which it will take 
years to eradicate. 



209 

Mitcliell's Geographies were introduced into all our 
scliools early in the fall, but a large body of teachers having 
petitioned for Guyot's, some schools have' been allowed to 
use Guyot's Intermediate, as an additional text-book. The 
book has not been in use long enough yet, for mc to speak 
of its merits or demerits. 

The subject of map drawing, is at the present time re- 
ceiving special attention, and the efforts of the teachers in 
this direction are deserving of commendation. I am confi- 
dent that a good degree of success is attending their labors. 
We must supply our schools better with maps and charts, if 
we desire to have geography successfully taught. 

HISTORY. 

This study has not been made so prominent in the course 
as it deserves to be. Especially is the study of the history 
of our country important at this time, when we consider 
the rapidity with which for the past few years it has been 
written. 

It is not sufficient that pupils read a portion of tlic history 
of our country, or that a few of the most prominent facts 
are impressed upon their minds — they should be familiarized 
with the different periods of our history, understand the 
causes of the events which have transpired in our country, 
and be conversant with those events, and those issues, that 
have convulsed our nation, threatening to overthrow our 
blood-bought institutions. 

I would have the children in our schools feel that this 
age is not inferior to tljc past; but that " We are living, we 
are dwelling in a grand, a glorious time." 

A scholar entering one of our Primary schools, and pass- 
ing through the various grades to the High School, pursues 
the study of geography from seven to eight years, while 
less than two years is allotted to history. 
14 



210 

Hence, I would suggest that the course of study be so 
arranged that at least one year in the Grammar school, now 
devoted to geography, be given to this study. 

Let the classes have a few reading lessons from the his- 
tory, if there is no other way to study it. 

GRAMMAR. 

In this branch, I am compelled to say, there is great defi- 
ciency. I fear too little attention has been given to it, from 
the fact that it has been regarded as a dry study, and that 
teachers have crowded their pupils in other studies where 
more of a display might be made, to the neglect of this 
branch ; besides, in our course of study, too little time is 
allotted to it. 

I was connected with the public schools of Manchester, 
between six and seven years, and, during that time, I no- 
ticed that nearly every branch of study, excepting grammar, 
at some time was made a hobby by some teacher or 
teachers ; but I am not aware that ever this study has been 
deemed of sufficient importance to have become a hobby of 
any one. 

Analysis and parsing, especially the latter, have been too 
much neglected. This may be owing, in part, to the fact 
that such a short time is devoted to it, according to the 
present arrangement of our course of study, rendering it 
necessary to slight this branch. 

As I have suggested with regard to history, let more time 
be devoted to it, either in the Grammar or High School. I 
would not say that the technical rules of grammar need 
another year's study, but that more time should be given 
to the study of the English language in some form. 

Let teachers carefully observe the use of language while 
pupils are reciting, tiius making the correct use of the 
English language a matter of habit. Incorrect exjjressious 



211 

should be carefully noticed and corrected at the time, the 
pupils understanding the reason of the correction. Teach- 
ers in the lower divisions, mav do a great deal in this 
department, by paying a little attention to these matters 
while pupils are repeating long definitions in geography, or 
solving examples in mental arithmetic. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

This is studied, I am informed, in the spring, and conse- 
quently I have had no opportunity to judge of the manner 
in which it is taught. 

I have heard nothing said with regard to it, and indeed 
if I had not noticed it in the list of studies I should hardly 
have known it was a study in any of our schools. I call 
the attention of the Board to this subject, as some action 
may be deemed necessary with regard to it. 

VOCAL ML^IC. 

This question has received so much attention in former 
reports that little need be said with regard to it at this time. 
I think but few will question the benefit arising from the 
practice of singing in our schools. Besides the benefit de- 
rived from a knowledge of music, it certainly is of great 
value as a means of discipline. In some places such impor- 
tance is attached to it that candidates for admission to the 
High School are examined in this branch as much as in 
arithmetic or grammar. 

At our last annual examinations the schools with one or 
two exceptions appeared as well in this department as in 
any, reflecting great credit upon the music teachers. 
More instruction was given in this branch during the Fall 
Term than in previous years, in consequence of there being 
no festival at the close of the term. By this arrangement 
the music teacher in District No. 2 ffave his attention to all 



212 

the schools instead of preparing afeiv for an exhibition ; and 
what was lost in display was made up to the pupils of the 
different schools. I leave it for others to decide which plan 
is more in accordance with the interest of the schools. 

The number of schools in Districts Nos. 2, 10, and 11, is 
now so large that one instructor cannot visit each of them 
weekly. An additional instructor must be employed, or 
some of these schools must be omitted. I make the sug- 
gestion for the consideration of the Board. 

PHYSICAL EXERCISES. 

These exercises have been introduced in some form into 
nearly every school in the city. In some schools a certain 
amount of time is devoted each day to these exercises, while 
in others they are taken up as inclination or circumstances 
permit. There has been complaint that in some schools 
the practice has been carried to excess, much of the time 
that should be devoted to study and recitation having been 
occupied with these exercises. 

"While I would advise and even insist upon some physical 
exercises daily in each school, •! would have them so con- 
ducted as not to interfere with the regular school duties. 
Anything, no matter how important, can be so overdone as 
to bring disrepute upon what is in reality for the good of 
the schools, and defeat the object at which we aim. But I 
am strongly convinced that there is need of more physical 
exercise in our schools, especially in the lower grades. 

It is of incalculable value when rightly managed, as re- 
gards the discipline of the schools, in addition to the ben- 
efit to the health of the pupils. A great part of the ill 
health and disordered nerves which is ascribed to over 
study, is more properly chargeable to a neglect of physical 
exercise, and poor ventilation both at home and at school. 



213 



SCHOOL DISCIPLINE. 

As this subject is attracting so much attention in other 
places it may not be deemed inappropriate to speak of it at 
this time. Tliere are schools in our city into which I should 
be pleased to introduce strangers, feeling satisfied that the 
order and discipline of these schools would always be such 
as to reflect credit upon our educational system. 

On the other hand, there are schools into which I should 
not be so anxious to invite every one, fearful that if they 
were of a nervous temperament their nerves would become 
disordered. 

There are many obstacles to the success of a school with 
which teachers are obliged to contend. The l)lamc lies 
partially with parents, too many of whom are indifferent 
with regard to the school, allowing the most trivial excuse 
to keep children from school, and often encouraging in 
them a rebellious spirit which too often manifests it'sclf in 
the school-room. 

Many appear to have no just appreciation of the value of 
education excepting as it can be weighed in scales, or meas- 
ured with tape, regarding all the efforts to cultivate the fac- 
ulties of the young, and train them for the higher duties of 
life, as so much time squandered. Because some have 
risen to positions of usefulness with but little education, it 
is argued that all that is needed for success is a little ele- 
mentary instruction. 

Scholars surrounded by such influences cannot 1)C ex- 
pected to progress rapidly, hence parents should take 
especial pains to sec that their children are at school unless 
extraordinary circumstances prevent, and that they are 
taught at home to rightly appreciate the advantages and 
the blessings of education. 

I am happy to say that many parents in our city have a 
just view of this matter, many whose early education was 



214 

extremely limited but who are desirous that their children 
should have the benefit of our schools. Such parents ex- 
tend to teachers their hearty sympathy and cooperation, and 
endeavor to encourage and sustain them. 

But notwithstanding all that has been said with regard to 
the sentiment of community, or the influences surrounding 
scholars, the discipline and character of a school depend 
upon the teacher. An enthusiastic, faithful teacher will 
overcome many of these obstacles. Such teachers will labor 
to gain the confidence of their pupils, without whicli, they 
cannot hope for success. No one can be expected to be free 
from errors, or to bear at all times an unrufHed temper ; and 
certainly in a school compounded of restless, mischievous 
boys and girls, we must not expect a teacher to be free from 
the common errors of humanity. Yet, there are mistakes 
liable to be made in the school room, and against which it 
may be well to caution teachers, especially those lacking 
experience. 

I think all will admit, that one of the most important 
things for teachers, is to be able to govern themselves before 
attempting to govern others. Annoying circumstances will 
constantly arise in the school-room, demanding instant 
thought and instant action, and teachers should be careful 
that a hasty decision is not made, which, upon reflection, 
will appear unwise and injudicious, and which may tend to 
injure their influence in the school. 

Again there is great danger of governing too much, and 
too much caution cannot be used in this respect. "That is 
the best government which governs least," is as true in the 
school as in the state. 

In some schools there is altogetlier too much machinery, 
too many regulations for the good of the schools. The rules 
and regulations of such schools, if published in one volume, 
would compare favorably in size with the Revised Statutes 
of New Hampshire. 



215 

Nearly every conceivable offence is enumerated, and a 
special penalty attached. If pupils should commit to mem- 
ory all tliese regulations, no doubt it would lie a good 
exercise for their memories, and if printed, these rules 
would take the place of a reading book. 

Whenever one of the petty, foolish rules is broken, a 
check or a scolding follows, according to the degree of 
wickedness attached to the violation. In this way, the 
school is in a constant irritation, the pupils fearing that 
some regulation may be violated, and they subjected to the 
wrath of the law-maker. 

So much machinery is not needed ; there should be but 
few regulations, with no specific penalties. Those teachers 
who talk much, do not always talk wisely, and whenever 
there is much threatening or much reference to punishment, 
there is not generally the best discipline. Scholars will 
soon learn how much liberty they can take, and that, too, 
without being reminded every half hour of a future pun- 
ishment. Promising a child that after he has received a 
certain number of checks, or demerits, no matter for what 
offences, he shall be punished, is about the same as " knock- 
ing a chip off the shoulder," in order to " commence a fight." 

If a scholar disobeys, and the disobedience deserves 
punishment, either punish him or let it pass, and not ask 
him to repeat the offence four or five times, with the prom- 
ise of a chastisement. 

The peculiar character of each pupil should be studied, 
that the discipline may be to individuals, as there is great 
diversity even in the same school, and the same course will 
not answer for all, any more than the same medicine will 
for every disease. 

Corporal punishment should not be expressly forbidden ; 
but it is no indication of a good disciplinarian to be obliged 
to frequently resort to the rod, after one has taught for 
some time in the same school. It will answer when a 



216 

teacher first enters a school ^Yhe^e pupils are disposed to be 
rebellious ; but he should punish at first, so that tlie offenders 
"will not care to repeat the offence, thus avoiding a continual 
use of the rod. AVhile speaking of school discipline, I 
would say, that although I regard " order as Heaven's first 
laAv," yet there is a degree of stillness which is not at all 
desirable in the school room, but on the other hand, is de- 
serving of condemnation. 

A certain amount of motion and of noise cannot be pre- 
vented in school, because, to prevent it, would be to 
disregard the laws of nature, and place upon pupils a pain- 
ful, and unnatural restraint. The noise of a school which 
is uncontrolled, where there is no system whatever, is quite 
different from the motion in a school where pupils are ear- 
nestly at work. 

Perfect quiet for a long time, in a Primary school, for 
instance, is something which should not be tolerated, unless 
the children are idiots. 

This whole subject is one upon which much might be 
said, but I leave it for the consideration of others. 

It seems to me that the proper method is to have but very 
feiv rules, but require a prompt obedience to those. The 
teacher can then decide whether or not punishment is needed, 
and can discriminate between those who wilfully disobey, 
and those who with no evil intention commit an error. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

As a general thing, pupils in our schools arc pursuing 
studies which are in advance of the maturity of their minds, 
and hence many of their studies are not thoroughly under- 
stood. In the first place, they enter the Primary schools at 
too early an age, and are crowded through the other grades 
before they really understand the subjects taught. If we 
notice the course of study, as at present arranged, it will be 
found that in too many of the schools, more especially in the 



217 

Grammar, too many studies are pursued at the same time. 
A pupil in the Grammar school, if he wishes to complete 
the course in four years, must have daily exercises in writ- 
ten and mental arithmetic, geography, penmanship, reading, 
spelling, and music. 

In the higher divisions, physiology, grammar, and history 
are added, and declamations and compositions are required 
during a part of the course. Thus six years' labor is re- 
quired to be performed in four. With all these studies there 
is not sufficient time to prepare each recitation, and I do 
not think it strange that many scholars become disheartened 
in the attempt. 

Of course teachers feel that they must go over the pre- 
scribed course, assigning lessons in such a manner that the 
studies will be completed in the allotted time. The conse- 
quence is that many comj^leto the Grammar-school course 
and enter the High School very poorly prepared. In some 
cases I have advised teachers to omit for a few weeks alto- 
gether some of the studies, that sufficient attention might 
be given to the others ; at other times to have one study 
one day and another the next, thus alternating between the 
two. Neither course will remedy the difficulty where so 
much work is laid out, and some revision of the course of 
study will be necessary in this respect. 

Another trouble is that there is nothing definite as to 
what teachers of certain grades are expected to teach. In 
spelling, for instance, the same book is used in the Primary, 
Middle, and Grammar schools, and nothing is said as to 
what portion of the book scholars in the different grades 
shall be expected to study. One Middle school may adopt 
one course, taking a certain part of the book, a second an- 
other course, and a third a course different from the other two. 
Scholars from these three different schools enter at the same 
time the same division of a Grammar school, and any one 
can easily understand that the teacher in the Grammar 



218 

school must labor a long time to harmonize the conflicting 
elements. 

The same is true of music. We require teachers to 
spend at least ten minutes a clay practicing upon the chart; 
but the Primary schools may under this rule practice upon, 
just the same exercises as the High School. Each grade 
should hare a definite amount of lal)or to perform in that 
department, not leaving it optional with the teachers as to 
what the pupils shall do. If at the examination of schools 
the pupils are deficient in what is expected of pupils of that 
grade, hold the teachers responsible for it and there will 
not be any necessity for continually pdssing votes requiring 
so much time to be spent each day on the music chart. 
Then I think no teachers will say that they are not em- 
ployed to teach music or that they have not the time to 
spare for this exercise. This subject I refer to the Com- 
mittee on Music, hoping that they will report some definite 
plan. 

The same remarks as regards something definite for each 
grade will apply to all studies. There certainly will be 
those in every class who will progress more rapidly than 
the class according to the programme of study, while there 
always will be those who will lag behind. Our course of 
study must be so arranged that it will be adapted to the 
capacities of the average, yet, if there are those who can 
outstrip in some department, let them have extra time and 
advance even if they are not fully up to the standard in 
some one particular branch. As much as I advocate a reg- 
ular programme of studies, I cannot believe in that system 
which will not allow a pupil to go outside of a Ijeaten track ; 
which refuses assistance to inquiring minds through fear 
that the regularity of a school will be disarranged. Teach- 
ers should ascertain the peculiar difficulties with which pu- 
pils have to contend, and assist in removing them. 

Certainly most of the instruction must be given in classes, 



219 

but there are times when individual pupils need assistance. 
Pupils should be encouraged to seek assistance, to ask 
questions on all suitable occasions, and not answered in 
such a manner as to chill their life-blood, or repress their 
ambition. 

Allow me, at this time, to express my disapprobation of 
the practice of forbidding pupils to ask only a certain num- 
ber of questions within a limited time, as there may be 
many suljjccts upon which they desire information, and it 
is the duty of every instructor to render all the aid possible. 

There are subjects connected with the recitation upon 
which more light is needed ; sulijects not fully explained in 
the text-book, and pupils sliouhl be encouraged to go out- 
side of the accustomed routine and think for themselves. 
Many a pupil who might have made a fair scholar if he had 
been encouraged to pursue his investigations, has been 
chilled by the reply of an unfeeling teacher. It oftentimes 
happens that a pupil in the class does not fully understand 
the explanation, ))ut a few words from a teacher at another 
time will set the matter right. 

What I think is needed is a course of study arranged so 
that teachers of all grades will know definitely wliat is 
expected of them ; also arranged so that pupils will not 
be compelled to study so many branches at the same time, 
giving teachers opportunity to render assistance to indi- 
vidual pupils. I would not have the course so arranged 
that pupils will not be obliged to study but little, for I be- 
lieve in the old maxim, " There is no royal road to learn- 
ing." Scholars should not be helped over difficulties which 
they can overcome themselves. But there is a vast difference 
between the efforts of a scholar who is struggling with 
something that can be mastered l)y patient and persevering 
labor, and the vexations incident to striving to encounter 
something beyond his capacity. Scholars must labor, must 
meet with difficulties and overcome them, if they would be 



220 

scholars ; but let their studies be so arranged that there 
will be some time for them in the higher grades to devote 
to miscellaneous reading. If they have not this time for 
other studies, but are compelled to spend all their time on 
the text-books, they will become mere machines, and not 
the vigorous men and women that our country needs. 

But after all that I have said with regard to crowding 
pupils in our schools, I would not have parents think that 
all the sufferings of their children are occasioned by severe 
study, or close confinement in the school-room. I know it 
is quite common at the present day to attribute everything 
in the shape of disease that exists in community, to exces- 
sive study in our schools. Has any child a pale face ! it 
was caused by hard study. Is there a consumptive in our 
midst ! she pursued too many studies while at school. Is 
there a fever flush upon the cheek of any pupil ! long les- 
sons in grammar and algebra caused it. 

Children spend less than one-seventh of their time in the 
school-room. Hence, some of the physical debility among 
pupils may be traced to other causes. I can express my- 
self no better upon this subject than by quoting the follow- 
ing : " There are many things in the household discipline 
and culture of our community which seriously affect the 
welfare and condition of the child at school. The habit of 
late hours — the frequenting of places of amusement — the 
participation in scenes of excitement — the dance, or fash- 
ionable soiree — the habitual reading of works of fiction, or 
the popular light literature of the day — the inconsiderate 
indulgence of the appetite — the exposure, and insufiicien- 
cies of dress, particularly of the neck and feet — these, and 
many kindred enormities of the social and family life, are 
among the prolific causes of juvenile debility, resulting in 
mental sluggishness and indifference, if not prostration. 

Have we any reason to say that the ague, the fever flush, 



221 

or the consumption, that seems to hang upon these 3'oung 
faces, are tlie result of unthinking teachers remorselessly 
and wickedly crowding their ability in study ? On the 
other hand, the free and pure air of the school-room, the 
care and sympathy of the teacher, the knowledge she com- 
municates of the laws of health, the sacrifices which her 
own hand makes for their neatness, are transmitted from 
the school-room to improve the home." 

These remarks are as applicable in Manchester as else- 
where, and parents should be careful that our school system 
receives no more blame than it deserves. I trust that the 
subject of revising the course of study will receive the at- 
tention of the Board at the earliest possible moment. 

I would repeat what I have before suggested, that geog- 
raphy, as a study, be discontinued in the Primary schools; 
and that more time be given to the study of the English 
language in the High and Grammar schools. 

All the other points I have suggested I shall mention 
again at the proper time, but these two I regard as of spe- 
cial importance. 

The rules and regulations of the School Committee also 
need a thorough revision, and jiot only a revision, but the 
attention of teachers should be called to them, if need be, 
more forcibly than heretofore. I find that many teachers 
do not understand that the rules of the Board are to be 
carried into effect, but think they are merely printed be- 
cause it is customary. It is time to dispel this delusion, 
and insist that each teacher should understand these rules, 
and carry them into effect. It has sometimes surprised me 
to hear the remark from teachers that they were not aware 
that certain things were required, or prohibited, although 
expressly mentioned in the regulations. 

There is a rule requiring teachers to be in their school- 
rooms at least ten minutes before school commences ; 
another requiring teachers to notice carefully the injury 



009 

done to the school buildings, and the appurtenances, in- 
cluding trees, fences, and yards. 

It would seem that bo'th of the above regulations are like 
the liquor law in this and several other States, good enough 
in theory, but somewhat dead as regards their practical 
operation. 

Another regulation says : " Teachers must at all seasons 
of the year make the ventilation and tempei^ature of their 
school-rooms an essential object of attention." 

If this regulation has been adhered to, allow me to say 
that ventilation and temperature are imperfectly understood 
in some localities. 

After the rules and regulations are revised, it may be 
well for us to comply with the law of the State as expressed 
in the Revised Statutes of New Hampshire, chapter 81, 
section 10, which reads as follows: 

" Section 10. The school committee may prescribe suit- 
able rules and regulations for the management, studies, 
classification, and discipline of the schools, whenever they 
deem the same necessary ; and the same being recorded by 
the town clerk, and a copy thereof given to the teachers 
and read in the schools, shall be binding upon scholars and 
teachers." 

PRIZE SYSTEM, AND RANKING SYSTEM. 

These matters deserve careful attention, and I fear that 
I may not make myself fully understood with regard to 
them. Boston, by a vote of the School Board, has abol- 
ished the system of medals for girls, and is contemplating 
the same disposition of the medals for boys. 

It is a question for us now to consider, whether we shall 
adopt a similar system in our schools. 

John D. Philbrick, Superintendent of Boston Schools, 
while giving his hearty approval to the vote abolishing the 
medals for the girls, adds : " It is my earnest desire that 
the Franklin Medals may share the same fate." 



223 

I have no desire that ray views on this subject should be 
endorsed by this Board, or by any one else, unless they 
appear reasonable and conclusive. Neither do I desire to 
enter upon a protracted discussion of the subject, viewed 
from my own stand-point ; but, will say at the outset, that 
the objections which I shall urg'e, are not entirely my own, 
although I fully endorse them. 

The principle of emulation is somewhat too freely re- 
sorted to as a motive for exertion. It certainly is not pos- 
sible to exclude this principle entirely from a school, and it 
may not be desirable. But a too frequent appeal to it is so 
liable to overstimulate the ambition of pupils, and excite 
unpleasant and envious feelings in their minds, that I should 
wish to see it very seldom employed. 

A laudable desire to make (lie greatest possible attain- 
ment in study, and to im})rovc every advantage offered, 
should be approved and encouraged, l)ut it should never be 
allowed to degenerate into a mere personal ambition to 
excel from a love of distinction, or for the sake of reward. 
No a])parcnt temporary advantage ought, for a moment, to 
be compared with the injury done to the moral sentiment by 
an appeal to an unworthy motive, or by anything tending to 
interrupt the harmony and good feeling which should always 
prevail among the fellow pupils in a school. 

The merits and claims of candidates for the honors, arc 
often so nearly balanced, that a very slight and hardly 
appreciable difference may turn the scale, and the decision 
often causes a feeling of disappointment on the one side, 
and of imaginary superiority on the other, equally without 
just foundation in either case. 

The prize system might Ijc taken out of our system of 
common school education, and yet leave the principle of 
emulation in every way in which the most ambitious parent 
would desire it. 

The acquisition of a medal or a prize, does not depend 



224 

so mucli upon Ike ahsolute attainments of a piqyil, as ujyon the 
chance of there heing; no one in advance of the successful com- 
petitor. It does not always presume upon merit in a pupil ; 
a lack of it in others will be equally to liis advantage. 
Hence, the medal may be awarded not necessarily because 
there is any great amount of ability in a school, but be- 
cause one does not laclz as much as the others. 

In awarding the prizes for improvement in writing in the 
schools of this city for the past year, the writing books sent 
us from some schools showed no signs of improvement. In- 
deed it was a question with myself, as well as with others, 
whether the prize should not be awarded to the one who had 
retrograded the least. 

Still a prize was to l)e awarded in such schools as well as 
in the North and South Clrammar schools, where the im- 
provement of many scholars really deserved the highest 
commendation, and where it Avas difficult to determine, who, 
out of ten scholars, had made the most improvement. 

There may be schools where every pupil deserves a prize, 
and others, whfere not a single pupil deserves any sort of a 
prize, but according to the system, the leading pupil of each 
one is to have the honor. 

Another forciljle o])jcction to this system appears, when 
we regard it as a source of motive to study. It is limited 
at the outset to a very small fraction of those to whom the 
competition is open ; hence, its benefits or its influence is 
limited to this small numl)er. To the remainder of the so- 
called competitors, it must be a positive discouragement 
rather than a spur to effort. Being a fictitious and arbi- 
trary influence to study, and l)cing surrounded by circum- 
stances which render even that influence narrow and partial, 
it cannot but be hostile to the natural motives which may 
come equally near to all. 

If the medal system is relied upon to encourage study, 
these natural motives must be left in the back-ground, and 



225 

the motive employed is confined chiefly to the brightest, — 
who need it least, — while the dull ones who need the most 
encouragement, are left to plod on by themselves. If it is 
said that " wise teachers make little reference to the motives 
which the medal furnishes," the reply is — depending upon 
the same premises for judgment — wiser ones make still 
less, and the wisest, none at all. 

Then why tempt teachers in this respect? It may be 
argued that while the quicker pupils alone, are chiefly 
prompted jjy the hope of a prize, there yet remain suffi- 
cient inducements in the natural rewards of study, to meet 
the needs of the duller. 

If these inducements are sufficient for the duller, cer- 
tainly they will be for the abler. The natural rewards of 
study should be the chief motive to exertion, not fictitious 
and arbitrary considerations. "We cannot improve on these 
awards by thrusting them in a great measure out of sight, 
and substituting for them partial and unequal awards. 

Everywhere in human life, effort, qualified by the elements 
of capacity and fidelity, l^rings its just reward. Success is 
not limited to one in twenty, but is attainable by twenty in 
twenty. To be sure, success with its consequent honors is 
attained in unequal measures, but it is not complete suc- 
cess, as the winner of a medal might imagine, nor total 
failure, as the lowest in the class might be compelled to be- 
lieve. There are various degrees of success, presented in 
no invidious form, but each standing equitably on its own 
basis. 

A prize or a medal is bestowed either as a reward, a rec- 
ord of success, or as a motive to exertion. As a positive 
reward I question whether many will defend the system. 
As a record of success it fails, as it is simply the record of 
a personal triumph in a particular case. The one who wins 
a medal in one school might in another school, competing 

with other pupils, with the same effort, rank the lowest. 
15 



226 

Hence I confess my inability to see liow it can be a recor 
of success. As a motive to exertion it is confined to a few 
while the others are positively discouraged. The natural 
motives that might equally reach all are thrust out of sight. 

Did space permit I would say more upon this subject, and 
express my views more fully and I trust with more force. 
But I leave this part of the question to discuss the ranking 
system, which is intimately connected with the foregoing. 

This includes the check and credit system, and alto- 
gether is a question so broad that I hardly know how to 
approach it. I do not wish to have the Board, or any one 
interested in our schools, accept my views on this subject, 
and lest what I might say might be misinterpreted by those 
who think I am too strongly prejudiced against the system, 
I will quote from others, that the question may be discussed 
somewhat independently. 

I will however state that my chief objection to the system 
is that scholarship and deportment are combined in making 
up the average. Supt. Philbrick, of Boston, in his last re- 
port, says : " In our High schools and in most of our 
Grammar schools, the rank of each pupil is kept by means 
of checks and credits, or marks for conduct and recitations ; 
and in estimating rank it is usual to combine the marks for 
scholarship with the marks for deportment. There are 
several objections to the system as at present managed. 

1st, To mark for each recitation is a great tax on the 
time and attention of the teacher, and diminishes to a con- 
siderable extent his direct power of teaching. So far as 
the teacher becomes a mere hearer of recitations, so far 
this objection ceases to hold good. 

2nd. The difficulty of discriminating with sufficient ac- 
curacy to do justice to the pupils. 

8d. The tendency of the system to make scholars super- 
ficial, as the reward of rank is bestowed for passing the 
recitation and not for what is treasured up and retained. 



227 

4tli. It is a perpetual temptation to practice deception, 
and it is probable that a very large proportion of pupils 
yield to the temptation sooner or later. 

5th. Conduct and scholarship are things totally unlike, 
and to add together the marks indicating these two distinct 
classes of merit, to determine the sum total of the merit of 
a pupil is a proceeding as irrational as that of adding the 
numbers. representing the weight and height of a pupil to 
ascertain the cubical measure of his corporeal figure. If 
marks for scholarship were kept distinct from marks for 
deportment, we should not have so many cases where pu- 
pils who have ranked very high in Grammar schools, make 
a surprising descent when put to the examination for the 
High school. I have no serious objection to the ranking of 
pupils in a school according to their conduct alone, if the 
merits and demerits are estimated with justice. Nor do I 
object to ranking classes according to their scholarship 
alone, but it seems to me impossible to combine these two 
totally dissimilar elements so as to do justice." 

To take the case of a higher institution of learning. 

William Everett, in speaking of the discipline at the 
University of Cambridge, in England, says : " It is the 
grand principle that discipline has nothing to do with 
college rank. A young man was so notoriously irregular in 
his attendance at chapel that the whole Faculty of the col- 
lege were determined to send him away for a term ; but as 
he was expected to take very high rank in an approaching 
examination, they allowed him, in consideration of that, to 
remain till examination, and then forced him to " go down 
at once." 

With reference to tho check and credit system, the fol- 
lowing, copied from the Report of the School Committee of 
Boston, for 1865, 1 deem appropriate to this discussion : 

" It is to be regretted that the attention of the committee 
was not called to what has, in some measure, become a 



228 

substitute for the Ijirch and ferule," the effort to insure 
order, punctuality and study, by giving checks and misde- 
meanors. This evil, there is reason to believe, has grown 
to alarming dimensions, and it is surprising that any intel- 
ligent, discriminating teacher could have been beguiled into 
its adoption. It is an inequitable method of discipline. It 
makes no distinction between moral obliquities and acci- 
dents. It appeals neither to the reason, nor to the affections, 
but only to the basest and most venial motives. It neither 
subdues nor convinces, but simply enforces. It neither 
guides nor allures, but fetters. It has none of the virtues 
of the old historic birch. That inflicted but physical pain ; 
this wounds the spirit. That was a conflict of a moment, 
in which the victory was of an authority asserted and main- 
tained ; this is a continuing conflict, irritating the spirit 
and growing into moral gangrene. That was a manly hear- 
ing and defence, an open discussion of a defined issue ; this 
a one-sided edict of condemnation. That was a punishment 
inflicted and ended ; this a punishment not only inflicted, 
but continued to modify the rank, and standing, and repu- 
tation of a scholar for the entire course of his education. 
That was demonstrative, patent, easily cognizable in its 
utmost extent ; this is seductive, treacherous, by tlie fre- 
quency of its appliance and the bitterness of its effect, 
eluding, or apt to elude, the vigilance of the most careful 
teacher ; better a thousand fold that the flesh should bear 
for an hour or two the wales of a rattan, than that the tis- 
sues of these young, tender, susceptible spirits should be 
thus swollen with a sense of injury, mortification and 
injustice." 

I might quote still further upon this subject, or might 
discuss the matter from my own stand-point, but I choose 
to leave it with you. If what has already been said, does 
not convince you of the evil results of the system, examine 
still further and I will furnish additional proof. 



229 

The business of the school is to fit pupils for active life, 
and it is for us to consider if the prize system and the 
ranking system develop those traits of character which will 
assist them when they come to meet the stern realities of 
the world. If it can be shown that they are beneficial in 
this respect, then I will be the last person to object to them, 
no matter how completely I must revolutionize my own 
views in this respect. There must be some system of mark- 
ing, but let it be such that the means will not appear of 
more consequence than the ends. 

As regards recitations, it seems to me that what is 
clearly in the minds of pupils, previous to reciting, need not 
be dwelt upon, but that the difficult points should be taken 
up and made clear. This certainly cannot be done, if, 
every time a scholar fails, another is to supersede him, as 
pupils will have more regard to rank than to the subject 
under consideration. The practice of requiring pupils to 
report themselves, I think must be injurious in its tendency, 
as it is too much of a temptation to deception ; if deception 
is not practiced, faithful pupils will obtain alow rank, while 
the unscrupulous will carry away the honors. I think the 
plan adopted in our Higli School commends itself for its 
simplicity and fairness, provided the teachers do the mark- 
ing not asking the pupils to report their own misdemeanors. 

I leave the subject, confident that you will agree that 
almost any plan is preferable to that of continually giving 
checks and credits, or changing pupils seats whenever ques- 
tions are not correctly answered. 

EXAMINATIONS AND PROMOTIONS. 

At the close of the Fall Term, upon the recommendation 
of the Primary and JMiddle school teachers, I promoted the 
first classes of these schools to the next higher grade. I 
promoted upon the recommendation of the teachers, as I 
had not been in charge of the schools long enough to know 



230 

jjrccisely wlio were qualified for promotion. I do not feel 
myself competent to tell, at one examination, who, of four 
hundred pupils, are qualified for promotion. I object to 
the plan of promoting only once a year, and then by classes. 
I do not regard it sufficient that pupils have been a certain 
time going over a prescribed course, as this gives the indo- 
lent an equal chance with the industrious. If the studies 
of the preceding grade are so well understood that the 
pupils will be able to thoroughly understand the studies of 
the next grade, it would seem that they should be advanced. 
If I am satisfied of this, I care not whether they have been 
three months or three years in the Primary or Middle 
schools. I think a class, or a portion of a class, should be 
promoted Avhenever the pupils deserve promotion, no mat- 
ter at what season of the year it may be. I do not at all 
favor the plan of crowding pupils, but would keep them 
back until they are thoroughly qualified. The tendency, 
both among teachers and parents, is to push the scholars 
along too rapidly, which tendency, I think, should be dis- 
couraged. It will be my endeavor to correct this evil as 
much as possible. 

The masters of the Grammar schools have cooperated 
with me, and have rendered me much assistance in pre- 
v^enting this wholesale promotion for which parents so 
loudly clamor. I do not wish to be understood as not 
favoring some particular time when there should be a gen- 
eral promotion. There should be a time each year, or 
twice a year, when promotions should be made ; teachers 
understanding that at those times they will receive acces- 
sions from other schools, and send out from theirs. But I 
would also have it understood that if a class, or a portion 
of a class, were nearly qualified at the time the promotions 
were made, they should not be obliged to remain a whole 
year before entering the next grade. I think that twice a 
year — once at the close of the Summer Term, and again 



231 

sometime in the Winter Term — general promotions should 
be made. 

As I have already intimated, if we promote by classes, 
it will give the negligent, idle pupils, those who are absent 
from one-fourth to one-half the time, the same advantage 
as the faithful ones, those who attend regularly, and strive 
to make the school as pleasant as possible. Where we de- 
mand qualification, we shall be more likely to have more 
study on the part of some who will shirk if it is possible to 
do so. Often, pupils who, from " indisijosition," or " too 
severe study," or " close confinement in the heated air of 
a crowded school-room," or " some of the thousand ills that 
flesh is heir to," find themselves on account of their " pros- 
tration," unable to " pursue their studies," and " obliged 
to be under the physician's care," are very suddenly restored 
at the thought that each member of the class must be qual- 
ified before advancing. Their strength of body and mind 
is restored, their step is firm and elastic, the physician's 
fee is saved. 

A very few were admitted to the High School at the 
close of the Fall Term. The masters of the Grammar 
schools recommended but a few, and of the numljer re- 
commended, only a few ])rescnted themselves for examina- 
tion. It was evident that the studies of the Grammar 
schools needed another year's attention. The result is, 
that the High School for the coming year will be quite 
small. It is thought by many of our citizens that it is the 
intention to keep the standard of admission to this school 
so high that the school will be, unnecessarily, small ; thus 
depriving many of the children of this city of its benefits. 
The complaint is made that a school-building, which will 
accommodate three hundred pupils, contains only ninety. 

I have examined the course of study in many other 
places, as well as the questions pro{)osed for the examina- 
tion of candidates for admission to Hio'h schools, and I find 



232 

that the standard of admission to our High School is lower 
than in most places. 

I am aware that the number of pupils in our High 
School is quite small, and it will remain so with the present 
course of study. If we lower the standard, it will be a 
High School only in name, as it is not now up to the aver- 
age. We must either keep the school small, or lower the 
standard. The question may arise : " Why cannot this 
city have as large a High School as other places?" The 
character of our population is such that most of the chil- 
dren leave school even before reaching the higher divisions 
of the Grammar schools. 

In District No. 2, there were last term 1200 pupils in the 
Primary schools, 600 in the Middle schools, 500 in the 
Grammar schools, while in the High School there were less 
than 100. Of those who enter this school, not more than 
one-fifth complete the course. Many enter and attend one 
or two terms, merely to say that they have been members 
of the High School. In all our schools last term there 
were upwards of three thousand scholars, and the small 
number of fifteen graduated at the High School. 

I call attention to these facts simply because there is so 
much feeling in regard to the small number admitted to 
this school. We can change the course of study, and allow 
those branches which are studied the last year in the 
Grammar schools, to be taken the first year in the High 
School, but this only brings the studies in a different place. 
The pupil will not complete the course any sooner, and the 
difficulty Avill be that more would leave school before reach- 
ing the second year of the High School course. I am 
unable to see why it is better to have a three year's course 
in one school, and five in another, than to have four years 
in each ; and I do not suppose that those who object to 
keeping the High School so small, would advocate the plan 
of leaving out entirely Avhat is now the last year's course 



233 

in the High School. The only method of avoiding the 
difficulty — if it is absolutely necessary that the seats in this 
building should all be occupied — is to omit the studies of 
the last year entirely, and admit from the Grammar schools 
one year sooner. 

It is a question to be considered, and I trust the studies 
of the different schools will be so arranged that the schools 
will meet the wants of our people, without reference to the 
grading of schools iu other places. 

I feel compelled to devote some space to the considera- 
tion of the subject of examinations. I must say that I 
regard as decidedly objectionable, the practice of having 
appointed times for so-called examinations ; occasions for 
which pupils are drilled sometimes for weeks. 

As far as the superintendent is concerned, if he has ap- 
pointed times for examination he will be likely to examine 
only at those times, whereas, he should make an examination, 
frequently without any previous notice. There will be 
much formality connected with these appointed examina- 
tions which will lead to the bringing forward of the best 
classes — as he cannot examine all — and he will gain only a 
superficial knowledge of the attainments of the pupils. In 
short his duties in this respect are summed up in your reg- 
ulations, viz : " ho shall visit each school as often as his 
other duties will reasonably permit, and carefully examine 
into its progress and condition." My interpretation of this 
regulation is that he shall have his examinations oftener 
than once a term. Certainly he can be more thorough 
when he is intending to make his promotions, but there v/ill 
be no more formal ceremony than at any other time. 

As regards examinations at which parents and others arc 
invited to be present, there is a great liability that they will 
be more for the purpose of display than to indicate how 
much progress the school has made. Any one well versed 
in these matters knows how much time is often spent by a 



2U 

single class upon a few pages previous to the great day of 
examination. The beneficial tendency of public examina- 
tions is seriously questioned by many ; indeed it seems there 
are decided objections to them. Tliere is much loss of 
time, and interruption to the regular course of study occa- 
sioned by practicing certain classes for such occasions. 
There is a tendency to put forward the brightest scholars, 
upon whom an unusual amount of labor has been bestowed. 
Those of inferior capacity or of less attainments, those who 
most need the assistance of the teacher, are thereby neg- 
lected, because everi/thing- must be made secondary to ex- 
amination. No one can fail to see the injustice and crimi- 
nality of such a course. JEvery scholar, according to our 
school system, has an equal right to the advantages of the 
school, to the full benefit of all the means of instruction 
provided by the puhlic money ; and it is contrary to the 
spirit of our common school system that the duller ones 
must be neglected for a number of weeks, in order that the 
more brilliant ones may make a " grand show " upon some 
" grand occasion." Communities are more to blame for this 
than teachers. The reputation of teachers oftentimes de- 
pends more upon the display their scholars make than upon 
the real merit of the school. Hence teachers are strongly 
tempted, even against their better judgment, to conform their 
teaching to the kind of examination expected. Some of 
our best teachers have told me they were obliged to do it, 
as it Avas expected, and their reputation depended upon it, 
l}ut they prayed for the time when their schools should not 
be judged so much by the number of set questions their 
pupils could answer upon some subjects with which they 
had been familiar for weeks. Many parents have said to 
me that their children were drilled for weeks upon some 
particular lesson, but this being a part of the routine they 
were ngt disposed to find fault. 

While it is the custom to have these days for shows ; 



235 

while our teachers understand that tlicir schools will not 
generally be visited except on these " show " days ; while 
their efficiency will be judged according to the perform- 
ances of these occasions, instead of by the labor performed 
for the good of the pupils, so long will teachers continue the 
practice of drilling scholars for special occasions instead of 
endeavoring to fit them for life's duties. 

Teachers, like others, are expected to give satisfaction to 
their employers and supervisors, and so long as committees 
desire these things and are satisfied with them, teachers 
know what to prepare for examination. The following il- 
lustrates this point very lucidly. " How did your examin- 
ation pass off?" a teacher was asked. "Finely; I knew 
very well what my committee-man would be pleased with, 
and was prepared for him." This clap-trap cannot deceive 
sensible men and women, and Ave should manage these af- 
fairs so as not to excite the derision of those who arc ca- 
pable judges in the matter. 

I would, did space permit, like to write pages upon this 
subject, as I feel that there is no more important swl>jcct 
connected with our school system. I would sj)eak of the 
object to be gained by examinations, the manner in which 
they should be conducted, the results of these examina- 
tions, and kindred topics, but I defer those for another time. 

The question will arise, " Will you have no appointed 
times for examinations? Must teachers go over the same 
old beaten track week after week and month after month, 
the year round, with no variation? " I answer, no ; let the 
exercises be varied, but let them be so conducted that our 
schools will appear as schools, the pupils in them appear as 
boys and girls fitting themselves for careers of usefulness, 
and not as puppets prepared for exhibitioii. 

Let parents and all citizens understand that our schools 
are at all times open to them ; that teachers at all times 
will be pleased to receive them ; that we do not have par- 



236 

ticular classes drilled for public occasions, and I think it 
will not be necessary to prepare an extraordinary entertain- 
ment to delight an assembled multitude. 

I think parents will be better pleased with the regular 
school exercises, and induced to visit schools oftcner. Many 
who now visit our schools but 07ice a year, and then on these 
public days, many who think they must visit no oftener, 
will be more interested with the regular routine of the 
school. It may be objected that many parents feel a delicacy 
with regard to visiting schools, and will not do so unless 
there are appointed times. Let the teachers assign some 
half day in each term, or if need be, in each month, if 
thought desirable, at which time the friends of the school 
can be invited to visit the schools, understanding that it is 
not a prepared exhibition, but the common, every-day life 
of the scliool. This I think will interest the parents as 
much as the sJiotvs, and will avoid the preliminary arrange- 
ments. 

Our school year will hereafter, — a very wise change in my 
opinion, — close with the Summer Term. This will occur 
at a season of the year when the classes will be reviewing, 
when not so much labor can be expected from the pupils. 

The last week of the Summer Term might be devoted to 
exhibitions of the various schools. This need not occupy 
a great deal of time, and would be an agreeable manner of 
closing the school year. After the long vacation scholars 
would return to their schools ready to resume their duties 
in earnest. I merely suggest that these might be the an- 
nual exhibitions, — not because I am much in favor of them, 
hut for the benefit of some who would insist on something 
of the kind. They would not be very objectionable at that 
season of the year, although there are objections in my 
mind to any thing that will give our schools the appearance 
of display rather than* of performing their legitimate work. 

I wQjild have it understood that the close of the Summer 



237 

Term will be the time for the exhibitions of the various 
schools, but that examinations — in the true sense of the 
word — will occur frequently. 

I had intended to devote considerable space to the sub- 
ject of annual festivals, but after what I have already said 
my views will probably be anticipated. The festivals have 
occurred at the wrong season of the year, many of the 
pieces requiring pupils to dress in a manner not at all 
suitable for November, thus rendering the scholars liable 
to sickness. To prepare for such an occasion consumes too 
much time, and as only a certain number of schools can 
participate in the exercises, the fnusic teacher must neces- 
sarily slight a portion of the schools, whereas he is em- 
ployed to instruct all. In those schools that participate, 
only a portion of the pupils are expected to have anything 
to do, and hence the time of teachers, that should be de- 
voted to all the pupils, is spent in preparing a few for this 
special occasion. Such an exercise requires an expenditure 
on the part of some ])arents who are unable to bear the 
expense, yet who will do it in order that their children may 
appear to advantage with tlie rest of the school. Tliere 
would be no objection to having such a festival occasionally, 
if too much time was not spent in preparing for it ; but 
there are serious objections to having them at stated times, 
and devoting from four to eight weeks to the preparation. 
Generally, those who do not participate in the exercises are 
the very ones that most need the attention of the teachers, 
and hence teachers are employed to neglect those that 
should be taught. 

These are my views, in brief, on this subject ; not ex- 
pressed as fully as I would like to express them, fearing 
that altogether too much space would be required. I hope 
at no distant day to express myself more clearly upon the 
subject of examinations, as well as of exhibitions and fes- 
tivals. 



238 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

This subject has been repeatedly urged in the reports of 
my predecessor, but no definite action has been taken with 
regard to it. These schools have worked satisfactorily in 
many places. Superintendents Randall of New York, 
Buckley of Brooklyn, Divoll of St. Louis, Rickard of Chi- 
cago, Philbrick of Boston, and many others, speak favorably 
of them. 

It seems to me no more than just that some measures be 
taken to provide for those who are unable to pursue even a 
limited course in our day schools. Many in our city, having 
nothing in particular with which to occupy their evenings, 
with no one to urge or advise them as to a special line of 
study, would avail themselves of the benefit of such a 
school. I would recommend that some action be taken 
upon this subject the coming season. 

TRUANCY. 

The whole number of different pupils whose names were 
registered at the various schools last year, was upwards of 
4,500, while the average daily attendance was less than 
2,600. Many attend but a few days in succession, thus 
making the whole number quite iarge, but bringing the 
average down very low. Certainly there are many instances 
where pupils are obliged to be absent ; but I am confident 
there is no necessity for so much irregularity in the at- 
tendance at many of our schools, and something needs to 
be done to check it. A great many who should be in 
school are spending much of their time in the street, or in 
places where they are forming habits which will disastrously 
affect their future course. 

I speak not now of those who pretend to come regularly, 
but are absent whenever they or their parents desire ; those 
whom the most trivial excuse detains at home ; but of those 



239 

who either are not enrolled as members of any school, or 
who refuse to attend but little ; whose education is obtained 
principally upon the street. In most large places there are 
one or more truant officers who devote their whole time to 
looking up those who refuse to attend school, compelling 
them to attend. The law upon this subject is explicit, and 
all that is needed is to enforce it. N. H. R. S., Chap. 83. 

Section 6. Any town may make by-laws concerning 
habitual truants and children not attending school, without 
any regular and lawful occupation, between the ages of six 
and sixteen years, and to comi)el the attendance of such 
children at school, not repugnant to law ; and may annex 
penalties for the breach thereof not exceeding ten dollars 
for each offence. 

Sec. 7. Such town may appoint three or more officers to 
enforce such laws, either of wbom, and no other, may make 
complaint for such offences, and sliall be authorized to scrA'e 
any process relating thereto. 

Sec. 8. Any offender against such by-lav\'S, upon convic- 
tion, may, instead of such hue, be sentenced to the reform * 
school for a term not exceeding one year. 

I recommend that this subject be laid before the City 
Council, that such officers may l)e appointed. 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

There may be no need of calling special attention to the 
fact, that some of our school l)uildings arc not suitable for 
the purposes for which they are used. 

In District No. 2, the two houses on Concord street, to- 
gether with the one on Bridge street, remain as relics of a 
former age. The district, before many years, will be obliged 
to do something in the way of providing school accommo- 
dations in this section of the city. I know the people of 
this district have been liberal with regard to the erection 
of school liouscs, but would it not bo economy to replace 
these Ijuildings with ones like the Blodgett-street house, or 



240 

the one at Amoskeag. I think it is now very generally ad- 
mitted, that it is not good policy to erect large school build- 
ings, especially for lower grade schools. 

There is need of a new Grammar school, to accommodate 
pupils residing in the eastern part of the city. 

The lower divisions of the North and South Grammar 
schools, for a number of years, have been so excessively 
crowded, that temporary divisions have been established to 
accommodate them. After a careful consideration of the 
matter, I am convinced that three Grammar schools of two 
hundred each, will very well accommodate the pupils of 
that grade. If another Grammar school is to be organized, 
it should be located in the eastern part of the city. 

Either a portion of the new High School building should 
be used for that purpose, or a new building erected in that 
vicinity. I should desire that the High School building be 
used exclusively for a High School, but the room is needed 
for other schools, and, at a time when our people are bur- 
dened with taxes, I think the true policy is, to use all the 
available room we have, before asking for more. 

That more school-room is needed, is evident from the 
crowded condition of many of our schools, especiall)^ the 
the lower grades. The Primary schools, on Merrimack 
street, Manchester street, Park street. Spring street, Lowell 
street, and Concord street, have as many pupils as they can 
well accommodate. The Primary school, at Wilson Hill, 
has some terms been so crowded that an extra teacher has 
been employed. The Middle schools, on Franklin street, 
and Spring street, can accommodate but few more. Under 
these circumstances, it is evident that some provision must 
soon be made for new Primary, and Middle schools. 

The seats in the old High School house, as well as those 
in the Middle, and Primary rooms on Spring street, the two 
Primaries on Manchester street, together with those in one 
of the Middle, and one of the Primaries on Franklin street, 



2-11 

slioiild soon be replaced with more comfortable ones. The 
seats in some of these rooms might very forcibly remind 
one of the days of the Inquisition. 

Some arrangement should be made, whereby some of our 
school rooms can 1)C better ventilated. The first and sec- 
ond divisions of the North Grammar school, for instance, 
have no other means of ventilation than by opening their win- 
dows, which are directly behind the scholars, thus exposing 
them to a draft of air upon their backs and necks, from 
v.diich there is great danger. I think too much importance 
cannot be attached to this subject. Many pupils in our 
scliools have taken cold in the winter time, or have con- 
tracted diseases caused by poor ventilation, which have 
deprived them of the benefit of the schools for months, it 
may be for years. 

Again, many of our school rooms are so arranged that 
not sufficient light is enabled to enter the rooms ; and, in 
addition to this, great care has been taken to surround many 
of our school buildings with Avood-yards, sheds, and any- 
thing that might exclude from them some of the light of 
Heaven, which God intended for the benefit of the iiriiabi- 
tants of this earth. I liave been in one of the rooms in tlie 
Spring-street building some days, an hour l)efore the time 
for closing school in the afternoon, and it was not light 
enough for pupils to see to read. Any one who doubts this, 
and thinks I am exaggerating, is requested to visit this room 
some stormy afternoon between three and four o'clock, and 
satisfy himself upon this point. 

It may be thought that this is a small matter, the discus- 
sion of which, should not occupy any space in this report, 
but I deem it of vital importance and desire to impress it 
upon the mind of every person in this city. Let us have 
our school rooms supplied with light and air, even if we are 
obliged to build much poorer houses, and if we cannot or- 
nament any of our school buildings ; let ns have space 
16 



242 

around them so that unsightly buildings may not exclude 
from the school rooms, that which Providence intended for 
the pupils of the schools. 

I repeat it, let us have light and air for the benefit of the 
pupils. I know of nothing that can be done which will be 
of more benefit to the educational interests of this city, 
than by arranging the Sj)ring-strect building so that the 
pupils there can have a full supply of clear, fresh air with- 
out being exposed to the cold air in such a manner as to 
bring disease upon them ; than by removing some of the 
surroundings so that scholars can study vmtil near the close 
af school without destroying their visual organs. I hope 
the District will not neglect this matter much longer. 

The lower rooms in the Park-street building are consid- 
erably crowded, and I would suggest that the large room in 
the second story be so arranged that it will accommodate 
some of the lower grade schools. I think the objection to 
Ijringing together scholars of different grades will be more 
than counterbalanced by the better accommodations afforded 
tiie younger pupils. 
- In Ward 8 there is an imperative necessity for establish- 
ing a new school. The Primary school in that Ward last 
term numbered nearly seventy, a much larger number than 
should be placed under the care of one teacher. This Ward 
contains a building which in many respects I regard as su- 
perior to any other school building in this city, — but it is 
not large enough to accommodate all the pupils in the Ward. 
I trust the people in that District will furnish another room 
the coming season. 

In Ward 7, also, there is need of another school. During 
a portion of the year an assistant has been employed in the 
East Primary school. This has been a very inconvenient 
arrangement, as two teachers were obliged to hear recita- 
tions in one room. Either the unoccupied room in the 
lower building should be fitted up, or another room on the 



243 

north side of the Piscataquog River should he ohtained to 
accommodate the pupils now cro^vded into the two Prima- 
ries in the north building. 

The school at Bakersville is -generallj too large for one 
teacher. I understand it was the intention at the time the 
house was erected to divide it into two rooms. I hope the 
District will conclude to do this the coming season, that 
whenever the school is, so large as to require the services of 
two teachers there will be sufficient accommodations. 

The house in District No. 7 Avill not accommodate all the 
pupils of that District^. I have caused extra desks to be 
placed in that building, but still the house does not contain 
room or rooms enough to provide for all pupils who wish to 
attend. I have no suggestion to make to the people of that 
District, either as regards the propriety of enlarging the 
building now in use or erecting another one. All I can say 
is that the interests of the children in the District impcr- 
itively demand that more school room be supplied immcdi- 
ately. 

In District No. 8 there is the same difhculty, too little 
school room for the pupils. This is a very convenient 
house, but the large numl)er of })upils in the District re- 
quires either another building or the enlargement of the 
one now in use. I think that a few feet might be added to 
the south end of the building, which would greatly improve 
it as far as the comfort of the children is concerned. The 
house will accommodate twenty-five pupils very well, but 
most of the time there are upwards of forty iii attendance. 
I leave it for the people of the District to consider. If the 
inhaljitants of the District will not think that I am presum- 
ing too much I would suggest that the ground around the 
building might ha g-reatly improved by a little labor. I trust 
they will conclude that it Avill be a good investment to en- 
large the school house, and at the same time give a little 
attention to its surroundings. 



244 

In District No. o there is one of the finest buildings to be 
found in an}^ rural district in the State. I would like to 
make the same suggestion to tliis District that I have to 
District No. 8, viz : that the grounds around the building 
might be improved so that buildings, yards, and everything 
connected with the house would not be excelled in many 
places in New England. 

Of the hoiise in District No. 4 no mention need be made. 
As Webster tin his reply to Hayne said of Massachusetts, 
" There it is, behold it and judge for yourselves." But un- 
like the historic places of that Commonwealth, there is 
danger that the elements will not suffer it to remain as long 
as the great statesman predicted of those battle fields. 

The buildings in the other districts need no special men- 
tion, they at present affording good accommodations for 
those who attend. 

The subject of heating our school-rooms is of no little 
consequence ; the fuel bill, together with the amount paid 
for the care of rooms, amounting the past year to more 
than four thousand dollars ; and, even with this expense, it 
is impossible to keep some of the seliool-rooms properly 
heated. It is for the districts to consider what shall be 
done, and not subject the people to any unnecessary ex- 
pense. Many advocate the heating of school-ljuildings with 
steam, claiming that it is more economical and better for 
the health of the pupils. 

I would recommend that this subject be referred to a spe- 
cial committee, who could ascertain the probable expense 
of heating some of" our school-buildings by this method. It 
would be well to make inquiries concerning this method in 
those places where the plan has been tried, that we might 
have the benefit of the experience of those places. 

We certainly should do something in this respect, and if 
it is found that we can heat our buildings with steam at less 



245 

expense, and with more comfort to the pupils, than with 
our present arrangement, it shoukl be done immcdiatelj. 

GENERAL MATTERS. 

There arc a great many other topics which I had designed 
to discuss in this report, but want of space forbids. I am 
obliged to pass over some of them entirely, and of otliere 
simply make mention of them in the hope that at some 
future time I can say more with regard to them. 

The maximum number of scholars that should be placed 
in the charge of one teacher, is a question deserving con- 
sideration. I feel convinced that 45 are as man}' as should 
be in one school division. 

The question of a Normal School has been somewliat 
agitated in this State. I see no reason why a Xormal De- 
partment in our High School would not l;e advantageous. 
A third assistant could be employed, and those pupils who 
are intending to teach in this city could, the last year of 
their course, have the benefit of this instruction. They 
could also, during the latter part of their course, spend a 
portion of the time in some of the schools, hearing recita- 
tions under the direction of teachers, and might act as 
substitutes whenever any of our regular teachers were 
obliged to be absent. 

The age at which scholars should ]je admitted into the 
Primary schools is a subject to which I would call attention. 
In many places five, and in others, six years, is the mini- 
mum age for admission to the public schools. The age is 
not stated in the laws of this State. I think the subject 
should be brought before the legislature at its next session, 
that we may have some standard. I think it will be ques- 
tioned by but few that scholars are sent to school at too 
early an age, and that scholars who are sent to school at 
five, are not better scholars at ten than if they were kept 



246 

out till they were six. Tlio admission of them at an earlier 
age exposes them to serious dangers, mentally and pb.ysi- 
cally. 

It may be a question "whether we have not, in a measure, 
neglected the Primary schools, in our endeavor to do jus- 
tice to the higher grades. It is important that all the 
schools receive their due share of attention, hut let us bear 
in mind that the older pupils, and higher grades, can care 
for, themselves better than the Primaries. 

It is of especial importance that we should regard the 
interest of that class of pupils who, from various causes, 
are not enabled to attend school regularly, and cannot class 
well in our graded schools. For this class was the Inter- 
mediate School designed, but the change of teachers has 
been so frequent, and so little attention paid to this school 
by the Board, that it has not been of so great service to 
our city as it might. I do not understand how we can ob- 
tain the services of a competent teacher in this school 
unless we pay as much as is paid in the Grammar schools, 
if not more, so as to retain a teacher who is really compe- 
tent for the position. 

I think this matter has been over-looked, and the school 
allowed to suffer thereby. The school at present is doing a 
good work, and I trust that two faithful, competent instruc- 
tors will be continued in the school through the year. 

With regard to the rural districts, I should wish that 
some means might be adopted to prevent the constant 
change of teachers in these schools. I would favor paying- 
more in these schools than in the city schools, if th.at would 
remedy it. I hope this matter will receive the attention of 
the Board in years to come. It is almost impossible to 
estimate the importance of this. There is no doubt in my 
mind, that the schools in Districts Nos. 1 and 7, are of 
much greater value to-day, than if, for the past year, the 
teachers had been changed each term. 



247 

Thus, gentlemen, I have endeavored to present to von, 
imperfectly, it may Ije, my views with regard to our schools, 
and have made such suggestions as I deemed advisable. It 
may be that my views are unsound, and my suggestions 
unwise and impracticable, Init they are such as I tliiuk 
proper, after carefully weighing the subject. If the views 
which I have set forth are found to be incorrect, if my plans 
with regard to the schools, in any particular, arc unwise, 
then I will most cheerfully change them, and do what is 
shown to be for the welfare of our educational system. 

I do not deem it necessary to enter upon any eulogium of 
our schools, or to arouse the community to a sense of an ap- 
preciation of their benefits. I am satisfied that our schools 
are doing a good work, such as will be of lasting benefit to 
our city. That defects exist in thcin, I have attempted to 
show, thinking it better to admit that these defects do exist, 
than to enter upon any extravagant praising of our schools, 
stating that they are as perfect as can b.e. 

I have been cautious with regard to adopting any radical 
change, feeling that every change is not reform, nor every 
new notion, an improvement. It is one thing to observe a 
fault, but quite another to suggest the proper remedy. 

I have not spoken of individual schools their excel- 
lencies or their failings, for I do not feel that I have held 
the position long enough to be able to do justice to each, 
and I do not desire to speak at random, or criticise without 
good reason for so doing, hence I leave those criticisms until 
I can become botter acquainted with the different schools. 

I know that all would not view things from the same 
stand-point, and what one might condemn or praise, others 
might not. It requires no great tact or talent to find fault, 
and censure nearly everything, but it docs require much 
talent and tact, certainly more than that to which I lay claim, 
to say the right thing at the right time without wounding too 
much the feelings, and defeating the very object desired. 



248 

However, I should be unjust to to tlie great body of 
teachers did I fail to speak of their faithfulness and enthu- 
siasm ; the zeal manifested in their daily labor and the in- 
terest they have in the immortal minds committed to their 
charge. It would be useless to say, that all of our teachers 
are fitted for their positions, or that all should be retained. 
We have in our city, as in every place, teachers who made 
the great mistake of their lives when they entered the ser- 
vice ; those who lack the enthusiasm needed for a success- 
ful teacher. But these are the exceptions, not the rule. I 
should be unfaithful and unjust did I close these remarks 
without speaking of the hearty cooperation and assistance 
which I have received from the teachers in your employ. 
With but very few excej^tions, the requests which I have 
made of them have been cheerfully complied with, even 
when they have been requested to adopt plans and methods 
not in accordance with their own views. I believe that 
with the assistance of such teachers, who are devoted to 
their work, we can elevate the standard of the schools of 
this city so that in the future as in the past, our citizens 
shall regard them with feelings of pride. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, let me express to you my 
hearty thanks for the honor conferred upon me in calling 
me to this responsible position. It is for you to determine 
whether I have been faithful to the trust committed to me. 
I promised you at the time of my election that whatever 
ability and experience I possessed should l)e devoted to the 
labors of this office. How well that promise has been kept 
is for you to determine. For the coming year I shall en- 
deavor to perform the duties of the office to the best of my 
ability, sparing no pains to improve our school system. 

I shall rely upon you for assistance, hoping that you will 
aid me in the future as you have in the past ; and in return 
I shall cheerfully endeavor to perform all the labor you 
think proper to impose u})on me. 



249 

With a firm reliance on Him who careth for all, let us 
enter upon the duties of another year, hoping that success 
may attend our labors. 

JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Manchester, N. H., Dec. 18, 1867. 



250 



Table sitoavixg the number of Pl'pils engaged in the vari- 
ous BIIANCHE.S OF STUDY AT THE BEGINNING OF "NYlNTER TerM, 

December 2, 18G7. 



Schools. 






3 
S 

- o 


g 

o 


3 


3 


District So. 2. 

High Seliool 

North Granimnr School 


1 

1 


'<i 184 
•;7 187 
^9 89 
18 20 
28 
30 
45 
42 
27 
tl 39 
43 
59 59 
27 
.'0 55 
L4 35 
40 
40 
55 
14 
11 
26 
10 
34 
13 
17 
15 
32 
12 
41 
17 
35 
30 
20 
28 
28 
10 
27 
13 
20 

7 21 

17 29 
S G 
C. G 

8 11 
32 51 
13 19 
20 14 
53 7G 

34 
37 
45 
^3 40 
22 


88 
94 
30 


141 
139 
80 
12 
29 
30 
45 
42 
27 
39 
43 
59 
20 
55 
35 
42 
40 
55 
9 
6 
14 

2!) 

11 

7 

15 

41 
10 
34 
30 
20 
16 
17 
10 
2G 
5 

16 

15 
it 

G 
45 
IG 
13 
55 

37 
39 
13 


43 
94 
20 

'4 

3 

10 

i 

9 


184 
187 




8a 


Iiiteruiediate School 

Wilson Hill School 

Miildle School No. 1 

" " No. 2 




28 


G 


5 


No. 3 

" " No. 4 

" " No. .5 

" " No. G 

" " No. 7 

" No. 8 

" " No. 9 




" " No. 10 

" " No. 11 

" " No. 12 


35 
25 


Prim'y School No. 1 


i 

4 




" " No. 3 

" •' No. 4 

" " No. 5 

" " No. G 

" " No. 7 




No. 8 

" " No. 9 

No. 10 

" " No. 11 

" '< No. 1-^ 




" " No. 13 




" " No. 14 

" " No. 1.5 




" No. IG 

" " No. 17 

" " No. 18 




" " No. 10 

No. 20 

" " No "1 




" " Xo. ''■' 




School in Dist. No. 1 

•' " No. 2 


io 




" '• No 3 


5 


No. 4 


G 
10 


" " No. C 

" " No. 7 


13 

55 


No. 8 

" '< No. 9 


35 
17 




G5 


" " No. 10, Primary 

" " Ko 10, IMidiUe 




" " No. 10, I'ntrrailed 


48 


" " No. 11, Primary 






8 


36 1909 


335 


1554 


186 


SS 


3 



251 



Table siiowixa the attexdaxce at the various Schools fok 

THE PAST YEAR, TOGETHER WITH THE NUMBER OF VISITORS. 

[The average number belonging to the scliools cannot be definitely ascertained.] 



Schools. 



c o 






District JVo. 2. 

High School 

North Grammar School 

South Grammar School 

Park St. Grammar School 

Intermediate School. 

Wilsoii Hill School 

Middle School No. 1 

" " No. 2 

" " No. 3 

" " No. 4 

'■' " No. 5 

" " No. G 

" " No. 7 

" " No. 8 

" " No. 9 

" " No. 10 

" " Na. 11 

" " No. 12 

Prim'y School No. 1 

.< " No. 2 

. " " No. 3 

'< " No. 4 

" " No. 5 

" " No. 6 

" " No. 7 

" " No. 8 

" " No. 9 

" " No. 10 

" " No. 11 

" " No. 12 

" " No. 13 

" " No. 14 

" • " No. 15 

" ." No. 10 

" " No. 17 

" " No. IS 

" " No. 19 

" " No. 20 

" " No. 21... 

" " No. 22 

School in Dist. No. 1 

No. 2 

" No. 3 

No. 4 

" " No. 5 

" " No. 6 ..• 

" " No. 7 

" " No. 8 

" . " No. !) 

Schools district No. 10, Grammar 

" " No. 10, Priiiiurv. 

" " No. 10, ]\liddle.'.. 

" " No. 10, Ungraded 

" " No. 11, (i-raiiunar 

" " No. 11, Primary. . 



4S 
124 
117 
198 
87 
24 
18 
IG 
22 
20 
21 
21 
27 



22 
20 
23 
22 
44 
40 
38 
40 
39 
50 
42 
30 
34 
iry 
100 
125 
175 



131 
127 

40 
18 
17 
29 
27 
25 
20 
20 
32 
10 



71 

88 

120 
57 

120 
15 

44 
15 
7 
13 
41 
27 
18 
41 
59 
30 
35 
39 
45 



1.30 
255 
244 
198 
127 
42 
35 
45 
49 
45 
47 
44 
59 
38 
120 
72 
77 
47 
65 
48 
53 
77 
82 
73 
97 
80 
85 
120 



89 
180 
125 
175 

71 

88 
125 
120 

91 
120 

35 

83 
38 
18 
25 
93 
52 
35 
96 
125 
60 
75 
65 
80 



87 
210 
178 
77 
42 
23 
27 
33 
31 
27 
35 
27 
36 
21 
49 
46 
48 
33 
28 
31 
25 
37 
44 
41 
47 
42 
54 
45 
35 
30 
45 
59 



2411 2244 4055 2510 | 403 I 789 0012 



659 

449 

450 

144 

65 

79 

1.33 

139 

104 

90 

1.50 

71 

182 

54 

43 

■ 00 

46 

189 

185 

113 

71 

51 

102 

146 

150 

45 

92 

130 

107 

48 

120 

273 

55 

00 

05 

00 

67 

35 

80 

52 

25 

67 

27 
48 
58 
127 
100 
60 
79 
51 

49 
11 



252 



CO^rPARATIYE TABLE OF STATISTICS OF rVBLIC SCHOOLS IN S0:MF, OF TRE 
PIIINCII'AL CITIES (IF THE CMTED STATES, COIII'ILED FROM OFFICIAL EK- 
ruUTS. SOME OF THE KEFORIS AKE FOR IStiT, OTHERS FOR 1866. 

[Only tlif- mnximuin salariC' of Te;jcliprs arc Kivfii.] 







^1 




9? 03 


d 


5' 2 


%- to 

§2 
















t- Ti 




XA^tEs OF Cities. 


ct 


ij 










fig 




^ 


.'^ 


£■— 




^'o 


x'o 


>."o 






c ^ 


S 




•^ 2 


p 2 


b ° 




IH 




< 


c5 


^1 


|.s 




Boston, JNIass 




27.723 


.«;577.821.38 


.$20.77 


§4,000 


§3,000 


$050 


Lowell, Mass 


40.on6 




75,500.00 




2,000 


'1,500 


450 


Siiringtield.Mass.. 


2.3. ono 


3.e66 


00.000 00 


lO.GO 


2,000 


1,500 


4.50 


"NVorcester, Mass. . 


38.(100 


5, ,500 


70,000.00 


13.80 


2,.500 


1,700 


500 


N. Dt'iUiml.Mass. . 


2li.0(l0 


3.500 


58.000.00 


16.57 


1,800 


1.500 


450 


Fall Kiver, Mass. . 


]9,noo 


2,070 


27,000.00 


13.00 


],.500 


1,400 


400 


1 >orchL'ster. Mass. . 


11.000 




44,500.00 


22.23 


2,250 


1,500 


600 


Lynn, Mass 


2.3,000 


3.8.10 


45.000.00 


11.40 


2,000 


1,.500 


450 


Salem, Mass 


24,000 


3.075 


47.000.00 


12.79 


2,000 


1,500 


525 


Newbury port, Mass 


13.000 


2.275 


25,744.00 


11.30 


1,200 


900 


350 


Gliincest'er, Mass. . 


12.000 


3.780 




7.40 


1,500 


1,500 


300 


Lawronce, INlass. . . 


2.s.0(l0 


3,000 


46,boo'.66 


13.33 


2,000 


1,600 


450 


Cambridge, Mass. . 


30,000 


5.784 


78,474.00 


13.38 


2,500 


1,800 


550 


Providence. R.I. . . 


60.000 


7..350 






1,8.50 


1.800 


550 


Newport, K.I 


13,000 


1,320 


27,660.66 


20.66 


1,300 


1.000 


375 


New Haven, Ct. . . . 


45.000 


4,500 


79,000.00 


17 50 


2,250 


1.750 


500 


New London, Ct. . . 


10.000 


1,600 




12.00 


1,.500 


1,200 


$4 per week 


Stonington, Ct . . . . 


0,000 


1,000 


12.800.66 


8.00 


1,000 


600 


275 


New Britain. Ct... 


7,000 


1.000 


5,000.00 


5.00 


1,.500 




300 


Middleton, Ct 




1.000 


11.000.00 


11.00 


2,000 




300 


Bangor, Me 


I's'.ooo 


3,000 


24.000 00 


6.91 


1.800 


'966 


272 


Belfast, Me 


7,000 


1,1.50 


0,000.00 


5.20 


1,000 


.... 




Brunswick, Me. . . . 


4,700 


875 


7,200.00 


8.22 


900 




$7 per week 


Bath, Me 


8,000 


1.8U 


15,811.00 


8.02 


1,800 




240 


Saco, Me 


7.000 


1,100 


7,500.00 


6.80 


1,000 


'886 


240 


Kastport, Me 


4,200 


1.000 


4,800.00 


4.88 


1,000 


. 650 


240 


Lewiston,Me 


12,000 


2.000 


20.000.(0 


10.00 


1,500 


1,600 


300 


Portland, Me 


30,000 


4,715 


• 58,000.00 


12..30 


, 2..500 


1,400 


400 


Burlington, Vt. . . . 


10.000 


1,100 


10,300.00 


9.25 


1,200 




$1 per week 


Poughkeepsie, N.Y 


20,000 


1.400 


14.000.00 


10.70 


1,200 




400 


Roclie-ster, N. Y 


00,000 


5.755 


04,2.50.00 


11.16 


1.800 


1.666 


325 


Syracuse. N.Y 


35,000 


7.000 


58,000.00 


8.30 


1..500 


1,200 


450 


(_)s\vego, N.Y 


21,000 


5,490 


48,090.00 


9 04 


1,000 


1,400 


500 


Albany, N.Y 


70,000 


8.8S0 


56,500.00 


*12.16 




1,500 


4^)0 


Chicago, 111 


200,000 


10,390 


296,672.00 


18.10 


2,400 


2,000 


700 


Springlield, 111. . . . 
















I_>nVniiiue, Iowa. . . 


22.000 


2.9!'l0 


.50,660,66 


I'o'.cs 


l',566 


1.266 


300 


Milwaukee, Wis. . . 


75,000 


9,429 


00.8.30.00 


tl2.03 


1,800 


1,200 


500 


]\Iadison, Wis 


10,000 


1,100 


12.430.00 


11.30 


1,500 




400 


Topelva, Kan 


3,500 


470 


10. .500.00 


22.00 




1,266 


000 


Lea\e7iworth, Kan 


20,000 


2.900 


2(5. 000. 00 


9.00 


1,566 


1,400 


700 


Fort Wayne, Ind. . 


25,000 


2,300 


20.0(i0.00 


11.30 


1,400 


900 


GOO 


Detroit, Mich 


90,000 


0,000 


70,000.00 


11.06 


1..500 


1,400 


400 


Ann Arbor, Mich. . 


8,000 


1.0.50 


lO.OSO.OO 


6.47 


1,000 


750 


300 


Newark, N.J 


f)5,000 


12,700 


84,183.00 


$12.35 


2,000 


1 ..500 


500 


Harrisburg, Penn. 


25,000 


3,500 


44,000.00 


12.50 


1.000 


000 


375 


Philadelphia, Penn 










1,050 


1,500 


400 


Reading, Penn. . . . 


40,000 


4.766 


42.060.66 


9.66 


1,000 


450 


300 


St. Paul, Minn 


16,000 


1,200 


20,000.00 


16.66 


1,100 


1,000 


400 


Louisville, Ky 






142.000.00 


17,95 


2,000 


1,.500 


600 


Cincinnati, Ohio. . 


225,000 


20,666 


404,000.00 


23.00 


2,420 


1,900 


700 


Sandusky, Ohio. . . 


12,000 


1.800 


10,000 00 


8.90 


1,200 


1,000 


300 


Portsmouth, N.H. 




2,.350 


18,350.00 


7.96 








Dover, N.H 


10,000 


1,7.50 


5,984.00 


5.78 


1,666 


'756 


360 


Keene, N.H 


4,500 


1,2.50 


■ 6,440.00 


5.10 








Exeter, N.H 


3,500 


7.50 


5,017.00 


6.70 


1 ,006 


'726 


226 


Concord, N.H 


12,000 


2,000 


10,000.00 


6.81 


1,500 


500 


350 


Nashua, N.H 




1,900 


7,404.00 


4.62 


, . . . . 






Mancliester, N.H. . 


25,666 


4.655 


38,000.00 


8.16 


1,500 


1,166 


466 



♦On avcr.'jb'e attendance. tOu average attendance— whole number §6.07. jineluding books. 



I X D E X . 



Address, Mayor's, 
Abatement of Taxes, . 



Bridge, Amoskcag Falls, 
Granite, . 
Piscataquog, . 



Commons, .... 

Cemetery, Pine GroA^e, 

IkCport of Committee, 
lieport of Treasurer, 

City Hall and Stores, 

Court House, 

Report of Committ 



Debt, City, 

lleduction of. 
Discount on Taxes, . 
Dou' Tax, . 



Fire Department, 

Steamer Amoskeag, . 
Fire King, . 
E. AV. Harrington 
3r. S. Bean, . 

Pennacook Hose Company 

Hook and Ladder Comi^ai 

Engineers, . 

Miscellaneous, . 

Recapitulation, . 



o 

90 

49 
50 
88 

53 

oo 

159 

IGl 

G6 

84 

Wo 

167 
88 
89 
87 

56 
56 
57 
58 
61 
58 
59 
59 
60 
61 



254 

Farm, City, 29 

Government and Officers, 1SG7, 19 

Government and Officers, 18G8, 172 

lliglnvays and Bridges. 

District Xo. 1, .34 

1^0. 2, 35 

No. 3, 37 

No. 4, . . 38 

No. 5, 39 

No. 6, . 39 

No. 7, 40 

. No. 8, ....... . . . .42 

No. 9, . . . . 43 

No. 10, 44 

No. 11, . ■ 46 

No. 12, . . . ... . . .47 

No. 13, . . • .-.■.. . . 48 

Highways, New, 48 

Incidenta} Exxienses, 73 

Invoice of City Farm Property, 102 

Interest, • . • . . 79 

Lighting- Streets, . . .Go 

Loan, Temporary, ■ . • 79 

Library, City, 09 

Eeport, of Trnstees, 109 

Eeport of Treasurer, 113 

Donations, IIG 

New Boolvs, .... . . . . , 122 

Liquor Agency, 83 

Militia, 83 

Officers, City, . 70 

Paupers ofl' the Farm, 27 

Police, City, 61 

Paving Streets, ■ . . .80 

Printing and Stationery, 77 

Property, City, 166 



'^DD 



Uoservecl Fund, . 

ricservoirs. .... 

lleport of Treasurer, . 

Finance Committee, 
Chief Engineer, 
Overseers of Poor, 
Liquor Agent, . 

Repairs of Buildings, 

Sewers and Drains, . 
Scliools, .... 
School District No. 2, repairs, 
House, New, No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
Repairs, No. G, 

No. 10, 

No. 11, 
School Report, . 

Teams, City, 
Taxes Uncollected, 

Valuation, Taxes, &c., 

Watering Streets, 



88 

53 

24 

2G 

133 

101 

105 

87 

51 
85 
85 
85 
8G 
86 
8G 
86 
87 
87 
179 

32 

169 

1G8 
82 



NCTV J30u. 

Liquor Ag-cncy, . ' . 

Militia, ' ©o 

Officers, City, . . - r-Q 

Panpprs oft" the Farm, ... 07 

roli(/e, City, '.'.'.'.'. 61 

Paving- Streets, , ^ ^ on 

Printing- and Stationery, 77 

Property, City, . . [ * ^gg