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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

Kesz>ects of J. E. BBNWET T, City Clerk, 



JP u blic Document, 



ttiitii! Btftft 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



KOK THE 



YEAR 1 868 . 




MANCHESTER, N.H.,1868. 



TWENTY-THIRD 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Eeceipts and Expenditures 



OF THE 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1868, 



TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING 
TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H.: 

PRESS OF THE MANCHESTER DAILY NEWS,— HENRT A. GAGE, PRINTER. 

1869. 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESS 



OF THE 



Hon. James A. Weston, 



MAYOR, 



TO THE 



CITY COUNCIL OF MANCHESTER, 



DELIVERED 



BEFORE THE TWO BRANCHES IN CONVENTION, JANUARY 5, 1869. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

In Convention of the City Council, 

Ordered, That three hundred copies of the Valedictory Ad- 
dress of Hon. James A. Weston, Mayor, delivered this day, before 
the two branches of the City Council in Convention, be printed for 
the use of the City Council, and that his Honor, the Mayor, be re- 
quested to furnish a copy to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Read and passed. 

January 5, 1869. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, City Clerk. 



• 



ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Council: 

The period for which we assumed the trusts imposed upon us 
one year ago, being - about to close, it seems eminently proper, and 
not without precedent, that I should present a brief review of our 
official acts, setting forth what has been accomplished within the 
year, with a statement of the condition of the City affairs, as the 
management thereof is relinquished to others. Our successors, who 
are to carry forward the "enterprises and improvements now in 
progress, are fairly entitled to this information ; and it is a matter 
of justice to us, as well as to our fellow citizens generally, that 
such a statement should be made. 

The propriety and even importance of this course cannot fail to 
commend it to every business man ; and I can but hope that it will 
be considered the duty of each succeeding City Council to transmit 
to its successors, an explicit account of the condition of affairs at 
the expiration of its term of office. 

.FINANCE. 

On the first day of January 1868 the net indebtedness of the City 
as stated in my inaugural address, from information furnished by 
the City Treasurer, was .... $393,805 50 

The following statement obtained from the same 

source, and made up on the same basis, shows 

the net indebtedness of the City, January 1, 18G9, 369,112 24 

Being a decrease or reduction of the debt during 
the year, of . . . . • . $24,693 26 



6 

The statement from the Treasurer's books, is as follows : 

Amount of funded debt, January 1, 1868, . . $351,900 00 

Amount of temporary loan January 1, 1868, $35,230 00 

Amount of increase during the year, . 2,07100 

Present amount of temporary loan, . . 37,301 00 

Estimated amount of interest now due, $10,000 00 

Unpaid bills now due . . . 15,156 08 

25,156 08 

Total debt and interest January 1, 1869, . $414,357 08 

Deduct amount of cash on hand, . $42,794 85 

Deduct note due on Barrett place . 75 00 
Deduct notes due for lots sold from 

City Farm, 2,375 49 

Amounting to $45,245 34 



Leaving the net indebtedness January 1, 1869, $369,111 74 

Included in the foregoing statement is the sum of $5,468 43, paid 
for furnishing and fitting up the Court House and lot, which was 
authorized to be met by loan ; but was taken from the tax receipts. 
In all, the sum of $15,994 16 has been paid from the receipts, on 
account of the Court House, above the sum raised by loan, rather 
than hire money, while sufficient funds were remaining in the 
Treasury. And notwithstanding this, there is now in the City 
Treasury, the sum of $42,794 85, which is a larger cash balance 
than was ever before on hand at the close of any municipal year. 

NO bills have been contracted for our successors to provide for, 
and efforts having been made by advertising in the daily papers 
and otherwise, to have every outstanding claim presented for pay- 
ment at the close of the, year, it is confidently believed that the 
demands against the City are adjusted as fully as it is practicable 
to do, at any given time. 

The report of the Joint Standing Committee on finance, will re- 
veal the gratifying fact that there is not a single account overdrawn, 
while many of them will show large unexpended balances. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

As a part of a systematic plan of sewerage recommended' in 
Slade's report, the proposed new sewer in Elm Street has been 



commenced, and extended from Central to Merrimack Street, a 
distance of about five hundred feet. This sewer is of brick, three 
feet high by two feet wide in the clear, and laid at such a grade as 
will, in connection with the old sewer, furnish ample means of 
drainage for the surface water, as well as for sink drains and 
cellars. 

A cement sewer has also been laid, which discharges into this 
new sewer, and extends from Merrimack to Spring Street, through 
the back street west of Elm Street, a distance of about sixteen hun- 
dred feet. Several other sewers of less magnitude have been con- 
structed in various parts of the City. The claims which were 
found hanging over the City for damage to property in consequence 
of alleged defects and obstructions in the stone culvert leading from 
Hanover to Merrimack Squai*es induced a thorough examination 
into the case. 

The result was a compromise between the parties by which those 
who were damaged, relinquished one third part of their claims on 
the condition that the City would enlarge and repair the culvert 
agreeably to certain stipulations. 

This has been accomplished to the satisfaction of all concerned. 
The claims have all been adjusted and paid, and any liability of the 
City on account of any further damage arising from a like cause, 
has ceased beyond question. 

Much inconvenience having arisen, and unnecessary expense in- 
curred from a want of knowledge as to the location, capacity, &c, 
of existing sewers, a survey has been made, and a plan is in pro- 
gress which is designed to furnish all the desired information. 



HIGHWAYS. 

The new highways constructed during the current year are as 
follows : — The extension of Union Street, north — the extension of 
Merrimack Street from Hall Street to its intersection with Hano- 
ver Street — Willow and Young Streets near the jail — Granite Street 
from Canal to Elm Street and Bridge Street, from Hall Street 
through the City Farm to the Mammoth road. In consequence of 
the unfavorable weather in the fall, the work on Nashua, Ash, and 
Walnut Streets was not quite completed. Some additional work 
will also be necessary on Bridge Street the coming season. 

The sidewalk on the north side of Hanover Street has been wid- 



8 

ened four feet, from Elm east back street to Union Street and a 
walk of concrete or brick laid the entire distance at the expense of 
the city. The sidewalk on the south side of Hanover Square, has 
also been widened and a concrete pavement laid to make it corres- 
pond with that below ; one half the expense of the last named walk, 
exclusive of grading, was contributed by residents in that vicinity^ 
The total expense incurred in the construction of the streets, and 
walks above named, is about $4,000. The plan of laying concrete 
walks in the commons, has been inaugurated by the construction 
of two walks on Concord Square. Early in the season Granite 
Bridge was thoroughly replanked and otherwise repaired and 
painted. The plank used were of oak, four and a half inches 
thick; and although the first cost of this material was considerably 
more than that of other kinds would have been, it is believed the 
line of true economy was adopted. 



CITY FARM. 

A complete survey and plan of the City Farm has been made, 
and the westerly portion of the same divided into house lots, by 
projecting the necessary streets. Seven of these lots have already 
been sold and conveyed, at prices fixed by your Committee, 
amounting to the sum of $3,167 34. About seventeen acres in all 
have been offered for sale, which, at the prices agreed upon, will 
amount to about $11,000. The opening of Bridge Street was inaia<- 
Jy for the purpose of bringing these lands into the market. 



RESERVOIRS. 

The construction of two Reservoirs in sections of the city, des- 
titute of these facilities for the extinguishment of fires, has con- 
tributed much to the safety of the property in the neighborhood of 
their location. Both of them are built entirely of stone, in 
the most durable manner. The one on Wilson Street, in Janes- 
ville, is 27 x 6x6 feet, in the clear, and being situated on a never 
failing brook is always full of water. The other situated on Mer- 
rimack Street, near Hall Street, is in the clear 40 x 6 x 6 feet, which, 
it is thought, will furnish a supply of water adequate to any de- 
mand likely to occur in that locality. 



9 



LIBRARY BUILDING. 

The City Council having made an appropriation towards the 
erection of a Library Building, a committee was appointed some- 
time in the summer months, with authority to procure plans, spe- 
cifications and estimates of such a building as in their judgment 
would meet the present and prospective requirements of the City, 
and report to the City Council. Subsequently, the committee were 
authorized to adopt such a plan as they deemed advisable, and to 
proceed with the work so far as to lay the foundation. After a 
careful consideration of the whole matter, a plan was agreed upon 
with much unanimity. The building proposed is in the gothic 
style of architecture, 49 x 90 feet, with a tower at the southwest 
corner. It has a high posted basement, to be used for miscellane- 
ous purposes, and one principal story, containing a waiting room, 
Librarian's rooms and a library room of sufficient size to accom- 
modate 44,000 volumes. It is proposed to locate the building on 
the lot of land immediately south of Franklin Street church, hav- 
ing a frontage on Franklin of 145 feet. The south side of the lot is 
to be on a line with the passageway south of the Methodist Church, 
the intention being to make a public avenue from Elm Street to 
Franklin Street, for foot passengers through this walk. 

This lot is generously donated by the Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company, and the deed is ready to be delivered as soon as the 
aforesaid avenue can be laid out as a public way. Owing to una- 
voidable delays arising from various causes, the Committee were 
unable to make any progress with the foundations, but the prelim- 
inaries are so far advanced that the work may be commenced early 
the coming season. 



POLICE STATION. 

Agreeably to the recommendation contained in my inaugural ad- 
dress, some progress has been made with a view to procure better 
accommodations for the Police Department. An architect, Mr. G. 
W. Stevens, has been employed, who has presented a plan for an 
addition to, or an extension of the City Hall Building at the south 



10 

■west corner. It is proposed to make the structure 34x40 feet, one 
story high with a basement, all finished in the same style of archi- 
tecture as the main building, and of the same kind of materials. 
It is to contain rooms for the Marshal, and a watch room, with the 
necessaiy conveniences, also twenty cells, ten in the basement and 
ten in the principal story. 

I have thus adverted to some of the principal topics relating to 
our public affairs which have been the subject of our deliberations 
during the past year. Whatever success has resulted from our 
labors has in a large degree been owing to your wisdom, fidelity 
and cheerful co-operation. As a reward for your services, you 
have the approbation of your fellow citizens, and that which is 
higher and better than all, the consciousness of having honestly 
endeavored to perform your duty. 

The prosperity which has marked the progress of our city 
throughout the year, may well awaken our wannest gratitude to 
an ever kind and watchful Providence. Peace and public order 
have been maintained to a high degree : no pestilence which walk- 
eth in darkness has been suffered to come within our borders ; the 
Republic has made rapid progress in recovering from the effects of 
the dreadful calamities incident to the long and bloody war ; pub- 
lic confidence has been greatly restored, the spirit of enterprise in 
our people has been stimulated, the busy hum of industry has been 
heard, labor has been rewarded, and our city is once more enter- 
ing upon a career of prosperity with renewed vigor. 

Gentlemen : Before we separate, allow me to extend to you in- 
dividually, my sincere and heartfelt thanks for the courtesy and 
kindness which has ever characterized your conduct in all relations 
with me. Let me assure you that I shall never cease to retain 
pleasing and grateful recollections of the many manifestations of 
your generosity and personal regard ; and that wherever your lot 
may be cast, I shall always cherish an ardent wish for your future 
success and happiness. 



GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS 

OF THE 

CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

1868. 



MAYOR, 

JAMES A. WESTON. 



ALDERMEN, 

"Ward 1, William G. Perry. "Ward 5, Daniel Connor. 

Ward 2, Ezra Huntington. Ward 6, Joseph Rowley. 

Ward 3, William P. Newell, Ward 7, Chauneey C. Favor, 

Ward 4, Horace B. Putnam. Ward 8, George H. Gerry. 



COMMON COUNCDL. 

Ward 1, Henry C. Sanderson, Ward 4, A. M. Eastman, 

John Plummer, Benj. W. Robinson, 

William Bursiel. Jonathan B. Moore. 

Ward 2, John Pattee, Ward 5, George Fox, 

Henry A. Farrington, Andrew Farrell, 

Hemy Lewis. Michael Keeley, 

Ward 3, Seth J. Sanborn, Ward 6, William F. Sleeper, 
Peter K. Chandler, Alex. M. Corning, 

Reed P. Silver, George H. Hubbard. 



12 

Ward 7, Joseph H. Brooks, "Ward 8, David A. Messer, 
Isaac Lewis, A. A. Partridge, 

Samuel Brooks, . Hiram Stearns, 



Joseph E. Bennett, City Clerk. 
Henry C. Sanderson, President of Common Council. 
Horace M. Gillis, Clerk of Common Council. 
Harrison D. Lord, City Messenger. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance.— -Messrs. Chandler, Corning and Farrington; the 
Mayor and Alderman Perry. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Huntington and Rowley; Messrs. 
Sanborn, Lewis of Ward 7, and Chandler. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Connor and Putnam; 
Messrs. Plummer, Pattee and Bursiel. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Gerry and Huntington; 
Messrs. J. H. Brooks, Lewis of Ward 2, and Eastman. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Newell and Rowley; Messrs. Corning, 
Sleeper and Silver. 

On City Farm. — The Mayor and Aldermen Favor; Messrs. 
Robinson, Plummer and Stearns. 

On Sewers and Drains. — AldermenNewell and Connor; Messrs. 
Silver, Robinson and Eastman. 

On Commons and Cemetaries. — Aldermen Perry and Gerry; 
Messrs. Hubbard, J. H. Brooks and Partridge. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Huntington and Gerry; 
Messrs. Farrington, Plummer and Samuel Brooks. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Perry and Putnam; Messrs. Pattee, 
Lewis of Ward 7, and Eastman. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Connor and Favor ; Messrs. 
Messer, Fox and Samuel Brooks. 



13 



On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Putnam and Favor; Messrs. 
Hubbard, Bursiel and Farrell. 

On City Hall Building. — Aldermen Rowley and Newell; 
Messrs. Moore, Sanborn and Lewis of Ward 2. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Gerry and Connor. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Rowley and Gerry. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Favor and Rowley. 

On Bills in Second Reading. — Aldermen Perry and Putnam. 

On Market. — Aldermen Connor and Favor. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Putnam and Newell. 

On Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Newell and Huntington. 

On Abatement of Taxes. — Aldermen Huntington and Perry. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Elections and Returns. — Messrs. Sleeper, Partridge and 
Samuel Brooks. 

On Bills in Second Reading. — Messrs. Coming, Messer and 
Moore. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. Chandler, Eastman, and Lewis of 
Ward 7. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



OF THE 



Hon. Isaac W. Smith 



MAYOR, 

TO THE 
CITY COUNCIL OF MANCHESTER, 
DELIVERED 

BEFORE THE TWO BRANCHES LN CONVENTION, 

JANUARY 5, 1869. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



AN ORDER TO PRINT THE MAYOR'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur, That the 
City Clerk be hereby authorized to procure the printing of three 
hundred copies of the Inaugural Address of the Hon. Isaac "W. 
Smith, delivered this day before the several branches of the City 
Government, for the use of the City Council. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, January 5, 1869. 

Read and passed. 

J. E. BENNETT, City Clerk. 

In Board of Common Council, Jannary 5, 1869. 

Read and passed. s 

H. M. GILLIS, Clerk. 
f 



ADDKESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Council: 

While the oath of office is still fresh upon our lips, let us ac- 
knowledge our profound gratitude to God, that, during the year 
that has just closed, peace and good order have been maintained in 
our midst; that pestilence has not desolated our homes, nor con- 
flagration laid waste our dwellings ; that prosperity has smiled 
upon our efforts, and success attended the various individual and 
corporate enterprises of our beloved city. And .let us humbly in- 
voke His continuance of these blessings during the year upon which 
we have entered. 

Called by the suffrages of our fellow-citizens to the discharge of 
the several trusts committed to us, we are all fully sensible, I have 
no doubt, of the responsibilities we have assumed. 

In conformity to the requirements of the statute, as well as in 
accordance with the custom of my predecessors, I shall attempt to 
bring to your attention at this time, some of the more important 
matters that will require consideration at your hands. I can only 
do so, however, on this occasion, in a general way. When I shall 
have had sufficient opportunity to become more familiar in detail 
with the condition and wants of the city, such further suggestions 
will be made, from time to time, as may be of sufficient importance 
to be made the subject of special communications. 

FINANCES. 
Through the courtesy of the City Treasurer, I have been furnish- 

A 



18 



ed with the following exhibit of our financial 
day of January, 1869 : 

Bonds due April 1, 1870 

" " Jan. 1, 1871 

Notes " Feb. 28, 1872 

Bonds " July 1, 1872 

" " July 1, 1874 

" " July 1, 1877 

Notes " July 9, 1878 

" " July 22, 1878 

Bonds " Jan. 1, 1880 

" " July 1, 1882 

" " April 1, 1884 

" " April 1, 1885 

" " Jan. 1, 1888 

" " Nov. 1, 1893 

" " July 1, 1894 

Total funded debt 

Temporary loan . ■ . 

Estimated interest to Jan. 1, 1869 
Outstanding bills Jan. 1, 1869 



condition on the first 



$8,800 00 

6,000 00 

3,600 00 

20,000 00 

20,000 00 

22,500 00 

2,400 00 

1,100 00 

10,000 00 

22,500 00 

70,000 00 

10,000 00 

35,000 00 

70,000 00 

50,000 00 



$351,900 00 

37,301 00 

• 10,000 00 

15,156 08 

$114,357 08 



Total debt and interest 

Cash in Treasury, Jan. 1, 1869 . . $12,794 85 

Note due on Barrett place and notes for City 

Farm lots sold 2,450 49 

Estimated interest on same ... 47 00 

$45,292 34 

Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1869 . . . $369,064 74 

which is $6,973 92 less than one year ago, as per statement of the 
city debt on page 167 of the Annual Beports of the city for 1867: 
or $23,923 92 less than one year ago as per statement of my prede- 
cessor in his inaugural address, which seems to be correct, he hav- 
ing included as a debt against the city, the sum of $16,950, due for 
steam fire engine and the Court House, — two items not included 
in the statement of the city debt in the Annual Reports. 



19 

The amount of taxes for 1868, uncollected, is about $28,000, of 
which $20,000 is deemed collectible. The amount uncollected is 
about $7,000 less than remained uncollected one year ago on the 
list for 1867. 

By an act of the last Legislature, which took effect in September, 
the several school districts of this city were abolished, the property 
of the school districts becoming the property of the city, and their 
liabilities being assumed by the city. 

The debt of School District No. 2 amounts to $17,200, the inter- 
est upon which is paid to June 1, 1869, and is due in equal amounts 
to the four savings banks of the city. 

The debt of School District No. 7 is $742 70, with interest since 
October 15, 1868. 

No debt, as I am informed, existed against the other nine school 
districts of the city. "With the addition of the debts of these two 
school districts, our net indebtedness is $387,007 44. 

The accounts kept by the City Clerk show that the sum of 
$278,139 64 was paid for bounties to soldiers enlisted from this city 
in the late war, including bounties advanced for the general gov- 
ernment, and the sum of $7,391 63 was paid for " State Aid" to 
families of soldiers, making a total of $285,531 27 (in addition to 
the amounts hitherto refunded), or about seventy-five per cent, of 
our indebtedness, created in consequence of the demands made 
upon us for soldiers to suppress the late rebellion, but little, if any, 
of which will ever be refunded. 

How to rid the city of this great indebtedness, the annual interest 
upon which ($24,000) is a heavy burden, and a serious obstacle to 
our forwarding any of the many important enterprises for advanc- 
ing the interests of our city awaiting our action, is a problem de- 
manding our serious consideration. This item of interest is con- 
stantly undermining our means for enterprise and usefulness. It 
is continually accumulating, day and night, in sunshine and storm, 
on the Sabbath as well as on week days, while we sleep and 
while we labor, silently, yet with unmistakable certainty. 

Some of our wealthiest citizens and heaviest tax-payers, with 
whom I have conversed, favor raising a sufficient amount to pay 
off the whole debt within a very short period, arguing that the 
property of every tax-payer will thereby be immediately advanced 



20 

in value, and that our city will by reason thereof attract wealth for 
investment within our limits, and a large increase in the number 
of people who take up their abode with us. 

Others are in favor of paying little or nothing of the principal at 
present, but would leave it for posterity, arguing that the present 
generation has done its full share in furnishing men and money to 
suppress the late rebellion. 

I cannot agree with either of these classes in their views. While 
it is true that posterity should bear its due proportion of expendi- 
tures for improvements in which it will be equally benefited with 
us, yet it is equally true that posterity will have its duties to per- 
form, and extraordinary emergencies to meet. Besides, it is a 
little difficult to fix the exact point of time when any generation is 
willing to admit itself the posterity looked forward to by any pre- 
ceding generation to liquidate such claims upon it. 

Nor does there seem to be any such urgent necessity as that we 
should in a very short period clear away so large an amount of in- 
debtedness as exists against us to-day. I think, however, Ave 
should be derelict in our duty to ourselves if we fail to take ad- 
vantage of the present general success and prosperity that prevails, 
to remove a portion of the load of debt that is upon us. Our mills 
are generally doing a satisfactory business, individual enterprise 
is flourishing, money is abundant, and labor is in demand and re- 
ceiving adequate reward. We can raise and pay this year twenty- 
five thousand, and probably fifty thousand, dollars of our debt, 
with greater ease than even one thousand dollars a few years hence, 
should a financial revulsion sweep over the land, as many intelli- 
gent men suppose inevitably must. 

I think we should raise the present year, for this purpose, at 
least twenty thousand dollars, perhaps twenty-five thousand. This 
amount would not be burdensome, and at that rate our debt would 
be extinguished in from sixteen to twenty years, the interest, of 
course, growing less with each payment of the principal. When- 
ever it shall occur that none of the debt shall fall due in any given 
year, still this amount should be raised and invested as a sinking 
fund, to be applied to the payment of the debt when due. 

But no effort to remove the load of our debt will fully avail, un- 
less we pay our usual and ordinary expenses in full from year to 



21 

year. If they are suffered to fall behind a few thousand dollars 
each year, any progress made in paying the debt is counterbal- 
anced to the same extent. Let us, therefore, consider carefully 
before we make our appropriations, and as accurately as possible, 
the amount necessary to be raised for meeting the wants of the 
city for the year, reducing our expenses to the lowest point com- 
patible with our necesities and consistent with true economy, 
making all due allowance for contingencies that must inevitably 
occur; and, having made the appropriations, let us adhere inflexi- 
bly to the idea that the expenditures shall not exceed the same. 

We should not lose sight, however, of the fact that extraordinary 
emergencies may occur, to two of which I shall presently ask your 
attention, when it may not only be the part of wisdom, but also 
be true economy in us to incur further debts ; but this should only 
be for objects permanent in themselves and of a character remuner- 
ative, either directly in themselves or indirectly in their results 
upon the community. And when such an occasion shall arise, I 
would advise that the bonds of the city be issued payable in a given 
number of equal annual installments according to the magnitude 
of the debt incurred ; for example, a debt of $30,000 should be paid 
in, say, ten years, in equal annual installments of $3,000, and the 
bonds should have designated upon their margin the object for 
which the debt was incurred, such as "Snncook Valley R. E. 
Loan," " City Aqueduct Loan," &c. The debt would thus be 
paid in easy installments without being perceptibly felt as a bur- 
den, and would be in sure process of liquidation. 



SCHOOLS AKD SCHOOL HOUSES. 

By the change in the law above referred to abolishing the school 
districts of the city, the building and repairing of school-houses 
will hereafter devolve upon the city. During the past year the 
houses in the central part of the city, with the exception of the 
second story of the Spring-street house, were put in thorough re- 
pair, at an expense of about $10,000. For the condition of the 
several school-houses and the repairs necessary to be made during 
the present year, I refer you to the Eeport of the Superintendent 



22 

of Schools. It is economy to keep these houses at all times in 
good repair, as well as indispensable to the health and comfort of 
pupils and teachers. 

Three divisions of a new Grammar school have recently been es- 
tablished in the new High-school house, to relieve the crowded 
condition of the other Grammar schools and to accommodate the 
growth of that section of the city. The fourth division would al- 
so have been established before this time, thus making it a full 
Grammar school, had there been suitable rooms for the same in the 
house. Some immediate action should be taken to provide suita- 
ble accommodation for this school, either by providing temporary 
accommodations in the High-school house or by the erection of 
a new building in that section of the city. 

The High-school building was not constructed for the use of a 
High and Grammar school, and although it is larger than the pres- 
ent wants of the High school require, it is nevertheless badly ar- 
ranged for the two schools, and if so occupied, neither would be 
properly accommodated. Should you come to the conclusion that 
it would be better to erect a new Grammar-school house in that 
section of the city, the three lots now used at Towlesville, at the 
corner of .Bridge and Union streets, and at the corner of Concord 
and Beech streets, should be sold, and the proceeds of the sale 
be applied towards defraying the expense of a new house and lot. 

The money to defray the expense of supporting our public 
schools is raised and appropriated by the City < louncil by taxation, 
while the Board of School Committee alone has charge of its ex- 
penditure. It has frequently happened that the money thus appro- 
priated has been all expended by the School Committee some time 
prior to the expiration of the financial year, and the schools sup- 
ported for the balance of the year out of the appropriation for 
the next succeeding year. I am informed that the appropriation 
of last year was all expended, and that there are outstanding bills 
amounting to $2,000, in addition to the salaries of the teachers for 
December, amounting to about $3,000 more, and the bill for wood 
and coal consumed prior to the lstinst., the amount of which I am 
unable to furnish. From this divided responsibility, it is not sur- 
prising that this result should occur, the City Council feeling that 
its duty is ended by appropriating the amount asked for by the 



23 

School Committee, and the latter board, being' elected rather with 
a view to qualifications for the management of the schools than for 
financial reasons, not naturally feeling that degree of responsibil- 
ity as if charged with the appropriation as well as the expendi- 
tures of the funds. In many cities the Mayor is by law made a 
member ex officio of the School Committee, as the representative of 
the City Council by whom the money is appropriated. The re- 
sponsibilty for its expenditures by the Board of School Committee 
thus constituted would undoubtedly be more fully realized. My 
experience as a member of that committee a few years since in- 
duces me to suggest that the Board might profitably be enlarged to 
double its present number, each ward electing annually one mem- 
ber for the term of two years. The Board would thus always 
have at least one-half of its number members of experience. 
Should these suggestions meet with approval, the legislature at its 
next session would undoubtedly amend our charter accordingly. 

Before dismissing this subject I trust I shall be pardoned for 
making a suggestion which may almost seem unnecessary. Our 
schools should be upon a footing of perfect equality, — without i li -- 
tinction in the rank, circumstances, or color ol the pupils,— with- 
out discrimination for or against any seel, party, or denomination, 
— open alike to the children of native, and foreign born who take 
up their homes in our midst, — and with the best teachers that can 
be secured, with regard only to character and qualifications.' 

The General Statutes of the State take the appointment of tru- 
ant officers from the Board of School Committee, where it was 
formerly vested, and place it in the hands of the City Council. 
The Superintendent of Schools, in his Annual Reports of last and 
this year, has called attention to the subject of truancy, as being a 
growing and serious evil and requiring some action at your hands. 
It is cheaper as well as better, to educate a child and thus prevent 
his going astray, than to support him in confinement and attempt 
to reform lum later in life. I commend the Report of the Super- 
intendent upon this subject to your favorable consideration. 



24 



CITY LIBRARY. 

Both of my immediate predecessors, in their inaugural messa- 
ges, called attention to the subject of erecting a City Library 
building. Encouragement was given two years ago that the lot 
on Franklin street, south of the Franklin-Street Church, would be 
conveyed to the city for that purpose without expense, and that 
one-half the expense of the building would be contributed by gen- 
tlemen residing without our limits . The building of the Court House 
that year necessarily delayed action upon the subject till late in the 
season, when, owing to the then depressed condition of manufac- 
tures, and to some other causes, the same encouragement of dona- 
tions from abroad could not be held out. The City Council of last 
year appropriated the sum of $5,000 towards the erection of a 
building, and appointed a committee of the City Council, together 
with Hon. Frederick Smyth, Hon. E. A. Straw, and Samuel ]ST. 
Bell, Esq., with power to procure and adopt a plan for a building 
and to commence the«work. I learn from my predecessor, that the 
committee adopted a plan from several which were submitted to 
them, and intended to put in the foundation last Fall. But several 
unforseen and unavoidable causes operated to delay the action of 
the committee, and operations were therefore, necessarily delayed 
till the opening of the coming Spring. The estimated expense of 
the building is $25,000, which can be diminished or increased ac- 
cording to the style and expense of finish adopted. Strong encour- 
agement has been given to me that at least one-half, and perhaps 
more, of the expense of the building will be donated by gentlemen 
residing without our limits, interested in the success and prosperi- 
ty of our city. If our anticipations in this particular are realized, 
there would remain the sum of $12,500 only, to be paid by the city, 
of which sum $5,000 appropriated by the last City Council remains 
unexpended in the City Treasury. I would recommend that you 
appropriate the sum of $7,500 for this purpose, and that the work 
be proceeded with the coming Spring, as soon as the condition of 
the ground and weather will permit. The Amoskeag Manufactur- 
ing Company, with its accustomed liberality, will convey the lot, 
free of expense, to the trustees, as soon as the avenue known as 



25 



Methodist Court shall be extended to Franklin street, and laid out 
by the city as a public avenue, for which a petition has been pre- 
sented to the Board of Aldermen, and in regard to the desirable- 
ness and expediency of which there can be no question. 

Our City Library contains at the present time 13,500 volumes. 
It was almost totally destroyed by fire in 1856, and is now neces- 
sarily located in a building- used for other purposes. It should not 
be exposed to the hazard of a second destruction by fire. A proper 
regard for its safety, as well as for the accommodation of our citi- 
zens, requires that it should be located in a building occupied for 
that, and no other purpose, as near fire-proof as possible, at the 
earliest practicable moment. 

The reports of the Librarian and officers of the Library have 
been made, and will soon be before you in print. They show its 
affairs to be well managed and in competent hands. It needs no 
words of mine to convince you of its usefulness. It is realizing 
the hopes that were entertained when it was established, and I 
commend it to your careful and favorable consideration. 



WATER. 

The introduction of pure water into the city has been for many 
years a subject much discussed, and generally considered ascertain 
of being accomplished. Of the different plans proposed, that of 
bringing it from Massabesic Pond, a distance of about four miles, 
seems to be the most feasible, and by means of a corporation for 
that purpose, the most practicable. Such a corporation was or- 
ganized last year under a charter from the Legislature, and is in 
the hands of men in whose integrity and capacity for good man- 
agement the community has confidence. It is not improbable that 
this undertaking may be commenced the present year. By the 
terms of the charter, the city has the power to subscribe to its cap- 
ital stock to an amount not exceeding one-half thereof. The stock 
could probably be taken up without the aid of the city. But in 
an enterprise of such magnitude and importance, and affecting so 
largely the health and comfort of our citizens, and affording such 
additional security against fire, it would be advisable that the city 



26 

should be interested to an amount sufficient to give it a leading 
voice in its management. 

The sum of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars would prob- 
ably be sufficient to put the works into operation, further expendi- 
tures being required as the works are extended. I have no hesi- 
tation in advising that the city should subscribe to at least $00,000 
of the stock, both on the ground of promoting the health and com- 
fort of its inhabitants and as additional security against fire, as 
well as because there can hardly be a doubt that the investment 
will be remunerative. 

RAILROADS. 

During the past year the City Council, agreeably to a petition 
signed by a large number of the prominent men of this city, many 
of them our heaviest tax-payers, and representing all the different 
interest- of the city, voted the sum of $50,000 to aidin the building of 
the Suucook Valley Railroad. Tbis sum, with that voted by other 
towns, and raised from other sources, will ensure the building of 
this road during the coming season. That the opening of this new 
avenue of travel to that flourishing section of the State, will attract 
much of its trade and business to this city, to the mutual advan- 
tage of the people of both sections, and that this outlay of the city 
will be received back many times by its citizens, cannot be ques- 
tioned. 

Your attention will probably be called at an early day to the sub- 
ject of extending similar aid to the Manchester and Keene Railway . 
ISTo other railway leading to this city would probably add so much 
to the business and trade of the city as this. Very much of the 
travel over the road would Tbe that of people coming to this city 
upon business and not merely passing through it. 

There seems to be no reasonable doubt that with our aid, and 
the amount that would be raised in Xew Boston and Francestown, 
this road would be built from Parker's Station in Goflstown to 
Francestown, near the line of Greenfield, and when opened to that 
point its extension to Peterborough can hardly be said to be a ques- 
tion of time. I need not detain you to recite the advantages that 



27 

"would result from the opening of this line of travel and freight. 
The wishes and opinions of our constituents upon this subject will 
no doubt be publicly made known to us as soon as the movements 
of those who have this enterprise in charge shall seem to warrant 
the commencement of operations. 



FIEE DEPARTYLENT. 

I doubt whether any city of the size of ours has a better or more 
efficient Fire Department. Fortunately its services have been but 
seldom required for the past year, yet its reputation for good man- 
agement and vigilance is in no manner diminished. 

We have been particularly fortunate for the past few years in 
our exemption from the ravages of lire. No large or destructive 
conflagration has swept away our dwellings, stores and workshops 
as in many of our sister cities. Our exemption in this respect, al- 
though owing in great measure to the efficiency of our Fire De- 
partment and the abundant caution we have exercised in guarding 
against fire, nevertheless seems almost miraculous. Like exemp- 
tion in future can only be secured by the exercise of equal vigi- 
in maintaining the efficiency of the department. The city is 
generally well supplied with reservoirs. But thai section ea 
Union street, except so murh as can be reached from Hanover 
Square, from the nature of the ground cannot be supplied with 
reservoirs, and it is, therefore, peculiarly exposed to the ravages 
of fire. There does not seem to be any way of remedying this 
evil, until the city is supplied with water from the Aqueduct Com- 
pany. 

If there is further security within our reach, it is certainly our 
duty to provide it without delay. 

HIGHWAYS AND STREETS. 

It is too apparent that there has been a great lack of system in 
the construction of our sidewalks and the repairs of our streets. 
The sidwalks have generally been constructed by the abutters and 



28 

often without regard to grade, while much of the money expended 
in the repairs of the streets has been wholly thrown away. Gravel, 
or some poorer substitute, has been drawn upon many of the streets 
by successive surveyors, till the streets have been raised higher 
than the sidewalks, and often the greensward between the side- 
walk and traveled path, seemingly placed there by nature as a 
protection against dust and drouth, has been dug up and drawn 
away. 

I would suggest whether it is not highly important that there be 
some further legislation by the city in regard to establishing the 
grade of the streets and sidewalks, a public record of the same being 
preserved, and that adb.eran.ee to the grade thus established be en- 
forced. The grade should be established by a competent civil en- 
gineer, and not be left to the caprice of every successive highway 
surveyor. 

Great improvement has recently been made in our sidewalks. 
By the widening of Hanover street last year, a sidewalk was se- 
cured of ample width to accommodate the travel of that frequented 
avenue. I would recommend that suitable encouragement be ex- 
tended by the city, as heretofore, to all abutters who will improve 
sidewalks adjoining their premises. 

The paving of Elm street, which has been extended during the 
past year, has proved a complete success. It should be continued 
from year to year till completed. The repairs upon the principal 
streets leading from Elm street, as far east at least as Union street, 
should be made with a view to the streets being ultimately paved. 
Although costing more in the first instance, yet when completed 
the work is permanently done, and no further outlay for repairs 
will be needed for many years to come. 

The two bridges across Merrimack river are believed to be in 
good repair, and will not require any extraordinary outlay the 
present year. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

A large sum of money has been expended for the drainage of 
the city, much of which was of a temporary character merely. 



29 

Many of the sewers were constructed of plank, which in time de- 
cayed, and were replaced by cement tubes. The main sewer upon 
Elm Street was not laid deep enough, nor constructed large enough 
to drain the cellars upon Elm street, many of winch in time of 
freshets have been flooded, to the great damage and inconvenience 
of their occupants. 

During the past season, the laying of a new sewer of size and 
depth sufficient to remedy the defects in the old sewer, was com- 
menced at Central street and completed as far as Merrimack street. 
I would recommend that its construction be continued the present 
year as far as Hanover street, and even farther, if the condition of 
our finances will allow. It is urgently demanded by the necessi- 
ties of the people. It will probably never require to be relaid or 
repaired. A plan for the sewerage of the city was made in 1855 
by a civil engineer competent for that purpose. Probably no bet- 
ter plan can be devised. It is of the highest importance that some 
system be adopted and adhered to, so that successive city govern- 
ments may act in harmony upon this subject. 

Most of the section of the city lying east of Union street and 
north of Hanover street is without any sewerage. It will deserve 
your serious attention to devise proper accommodation for that 
growing section of the city in this respect. 



POLICE. 

Our Police was never more efficient, or its affairs better manag- 
ed. Very much depends upon the firm and prompt discharge of 
their duties, for the maintenance of good order, and for the pre- 
vention of crime. 

Too many arrests were made in former years for petty offences. 
The flue and costs imposed were often paid when urgently needed 
for the support of the family of the prisoner, and which frequently 
suffered in consequence for the necessaries of life. From the frequen- 
cy of such arrests the city acquired a reputation for disorder which 
it did not deserve. These remarks do not of course apply to fla- 
grant cases, nor frequent offenders, but to petty offences against 



30 

the laws. And I am happy to learn that the police have more re- 
cently brought fewer cases of this character before the Police Court. 

My attention has been called to the matter of establishing a day 
police in addition to our night police force. It is urged that two 
officers would be sufficient for that purpose, and that they could 
also act as truant officers without additional expense to the city. I 
have not, however, sufficient information upon the subject to make 
any recommendation in regard to it. 

My predecessor, in his annual message of last year, called atten- 
tion to the condition of the lobby under the City Hall. Persons 
held in temporary confinement, for suspected crimes or offences, 
should have all reasonable accommodations afforded them. I have 
no hesitation in pronouncing the lobby totally unfit for the purpose 
of confinement of prisoners, and a disgrace to the city, and, unless 
it can be put into decent condition, should be permitted to be no 
longer used for such purposes. 

COURT HOUSE. 

The Court House, commenced in 1867, was completed in 1868, 
with the exception of the offices in the lower story for county offi- 
cers, and has been occupied by the Courts since June last. A con- 
crete walk has been laid down upon the three sides bordering upon 
streets, and the lot has been surrounded by a handsome and sub- 
stantial iron fence. The building is an ornament and a credit to 
the city, and answers perfectly the purposes for which it is intend- 
ed. There is not a house in this State, and probably not in this 
section of the land, that is more convenient in every respect, and 
better adapted for the holding of Courts. The committee who have 
had it in charge are deserving of great credit for the success that 
has attended their efforts. 

A NEW COUNTY. 

According to the natural course of things, the western towns in 
Rockingham county and northern and eastern towns in Hillsbor- 
ough county will, at an early day, be constituted a new county. 
"Whenever the matter is taken hold of by the business men of this 



31 

city, with their usual energy and activity, and unitedly, this desir- 
able event will be accomplished, — even this present year. I sug- 
gest to you whether the advantages that would follow such an 
event should not induce us to strive for its accomplishment without 
further delay. 

COMMONS. 

Our Commons are an ornament to the city and a means of pro- 
moting the health of our citizens. They have generally been kept 
in clean condition and been properly cared for. Last year, con- 
crete walks were laid across the upper portion of Concord Square, 
much to the improvement of its appearance and the convenience of 
people crossing it. The same improvement should be extended to 
the other Commons as fast as our finances will allow. I renew the 
recommendation of my predecessor, that a commencement be made 
of placing iron fences around our Commons as required by the 
terms of the deeds conveying the same to the city, and that the 
western border of Merrimack Square be so fenced tins year. 



CEMETERIES. 

The Valley and Pine Grove Cemeteries are nearly or quite kept 
in repair from the proceeds of the sale of lots. Although they 
will not require of us any great outlay the coming year, yet we 
should see that they are not suffered to deteriorate in beauty or in 
other respects from lack of suitable care and attention. 



MILITARY. 

The 3filitary of the city has recently been diminished in num- 
bers by the disbanding of some of the companies. Those that re- 
main are composed mainly of men who aided in suppressing the 
rebellion, and who are entitled to our gratitude and esteem. I am 
not aware that they make any claims upon us except for defraying 



32 

the expense of rent of armories, a reasonable sum for which pur- 
pose I have no doubt you will cheerfully appropriate. 



CONCLUSION. 

I have thus, fellow-citizens, endeavored to call your attention to 
some of the questions that will engage our attention. Other ques- 
tions will probably arise that will call for our deliberation and 
action. 

Let us, one and all, strive to discharge the duties we have just 
assumed, so as to promote the highest interests of the city, — and I 
assure you of my cordial co-operation with your efforts in that be- 
half. 

"When I consider that we are a city of nearly 30,000 souls, having 
a valuation of from ten to fifteen millions of property, with varied 
and, to some extent, conflicting interests, I cannot expect to meet 
the responsibilities imposed upon me without disappointing the 
expectations that some may entertain. But, relying with confi- 
dence for assistance upon your counsel and experience, I pledge 
you that whatever of ability or strength I may possess shall be de- 
voted to the faithful discharge of the duties of the office I have 
accepted. 

ISAAC W. SMITH. 

January 5, 1869. 



GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS 



OF THE 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 
1869. 



MAYOR, 

ISAAC W. SMITH. 



CITY CLERK, 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 



ALDERMEN, 



"Ward 1, Daniel H. Maxfield, "Ward 5, Daniel Connor, 

"Ward 2, Henry A. Farrington, "Ward 6, George H. Hubbard, 

"Ward 3, "William P. Newell, "Ward 7, Chauncey C. Favor. 

"Ward 4, Horace B. Putnam. "Ward 8, George H. Gerry. 



PRESDDENT COMMON COUNCIL, 

Peter K. Chandler. 



34 

CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL, 

Horace M. Gillis, 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

"Ward 1, William Bursiel. Ward 5, Cornelius Healey, 
William H. Maxwell, Patrick Devine, 

John P. Currier, John McKeon, 

Ward 2, Henry Lewis, Ward 6, Dustin L. Jenkins, 
Thomas E. Northrup, John W. Johnson, 

William B. Underhill, George E. Glines. 

Ward '3, Peter K. Chandler, Ward 7, Samuel Brooks, 

Reed P. Silver, David O. Webster, 

Simeon F. Stanton. John K. McQueston. 

Ward 4, A. M. Eastman, Ward 8, A. A. Partridge, 
Beuj. W. Robinson, Hiram Stearns, 

Jonathan B. Moore, William G. Everett. 



Messenger^ David Thayer. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — Messrs. Silver, Brooks and Johnson ; the Mayor and 
Alderman Newell. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Farrington and Maxfield; Messrs. Max- 
well, Underhill and Currier. 

Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Putnam and Newell ; Messrs. 
Brooks, Robinson and Johnson. 

Public Instruction. — Aldermen Gerry and Farrington ; Messrs. 
McQueston, Everett and Jenkins. 

Streets. — Aldermen Newell and Putnam: Messrs. Lewis, Silver 
and Stanton. 

City Farm- The Mayor and Alderman Favor ; Messrs. Stearns, 
Partridge, and Moore. 



35 

Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Newell and Connor; Messrs. 
Robinson, Eastman and Bursiel. 

Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Maxfield and^ Gerry ; 
Messrs. Partridge, Webster and Moore. 

Fire De})artment. — Aldermen Gerry and Hubbard; Messrs. 
Brooks, Glines and McKeon. 

Claims. — Aldermen Putnam and Hubbard; Messrs. Eastman, 
Northrup and Currier. 

House of Correction. — Aldermen Connor and Farrington; 
Messrs. Moore, Devine and Lewis. 

Military Affairs. — Alderman Hubbard and Favor ; Messrs. Hea- 
ley, Glines and Maxwell. 

City Hall Buildings. — Aldermen Hubbard and Maxfield; 
Messrs. Underbill, Lewis and Stanton. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF AEDERMEN. 

Licenses. — Aldermen Favor and Connor. 

Enrollment.— Aldermen Maxfield and Farrington. 

Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Farrington and Gerry. 

Bills in Second Beading. — Aldermen Putnam and Maxfield. 

Market. — Aldermen Connor and Gerry. 

Setting Trees. — Alderme*n Newell and Putnam. 

Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Favor and Connor. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elections and Returns. — Messrs. Everett, Northrup and Un- 
derbill. 
Bills in Second Beading. — Messrs. Currier, Webster and Glines. 
Enrollment. — Messrs. Eastman, McQueston and Stearns. 



ASSESSORS. 



George W.. Thayer, J. G. Cilley, Timothy Sullivan, 

Horace P. Simpson, Isaac D. Palmer, Isaac Whittemore, 
Joseph N. Prescott, Allen Partridge. 



36 

COMMITTEE ON ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

George W. Thayer, Jacob G. Cilley, Isaac D. Palmer. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



S. S. Moulton, Nahum Baldwin, John Sweeney, Horatio Fradd, 
S. J. Young, Moses E. George, H. W. Savory, John Field. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Henry T. Mowatt, Daniel Clark, William Little, 

Marshall P. Hall, Samuel Upton, Elhridge D. Hadley 

James Dean, T. S. Montgomery. 



SUPT. OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Joseph G. Edgerly. 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 

Israel Dow, Chief. 
Benjamin C. Kendall. Elijah Chandler, 

Edwin P. Richardson. Wilherforce Ireland 



SOLICITOR. 

Cyrus A. Sulloway, — Office, Union Building. 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR, 

Henry R. Chamberlain, — Office, City Hall Building. 



37 



DEPUTY COLLECTOR. 

Harrison D. Lord. City Hall Building. 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY. 



Hon. Daniel Clark, 
William P. Newell, 
Hon. Wm. C. Clark. 



Phinehas Adams, 
Samuel N. Bell, 
Waterman Smith, 



Hon. E. A. Straw, 
Peter K. Chandler, 
Hon. Isaac W. Smith. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Charles H. Marshall. 



WARD OFFICERS. 



Moderators. 



Ward 1, P. Currier, 

" 2, Timothy W. Challis, 
" 3, Henry C. Tilton, 
" 4, George Holbrook, 



Ward 5, William Little, 
" 6, Holmes E. Pettee, 
" 7, Andrew C. Wallace, 
" 8, George H. Colby. 



Clerks. 



Ward 1, James M. House, Ward 5, James Hayes, 

" 2, Leonard Shelters, " 6, Charles L. Bailey, 

" 3, Richard J. P. Goodwin, " 7, Luther E. Wallace, 
" 4, Jasper P. George, " 8, Charles W. Farmer, 



38 



Selectmen. 

Ward 1, ¥m. McPherson, "Ward 5, William Eiordan, 
Edward Garner, John Burke, 

Edward L. Carpenter, George Fox, 

Ward 2, John W. Dickey, Ward 6, Ezra Kimball, 

Elbridge G. Woodman, James W. Lathe, 

Joseph Simonds, Thomas C. Cheney, 

Ward 3, Thorndike P. Heath, Ward 7, Geo. C. Baker, 
Nathaniel E. Morrill, Joseph Freschel, 

George W. Vickery, Hosea E. Sturtevant, 

Ward 4, Henry French, Ward 8, Parker F. Emerson, 
Roswell H. Hassam, Damon Y. Stearns, 

Moses Eastman, James Richardson. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF BURIALS. 

Charles S. Fisher. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Justice. 
Samuel Upton. — Office, Merchant's Exchange. 

Assistant Justice. 

Elijah M. Topliff— Office, Patten's Building. 

City Marshal. 

William B. Patten,— Office, City Hall. 

Assistant Marshal. 

Eben Carr— Office, City Hall. 

Night Watch. 

John D. Howard, Hezekiah H. Noyes, 

Thomas L. Quimby, Horatio W. Longa, 



39 



Albert F. Quimby, 
Patrick Doyle, 
Henry Bennett, 



William B. Patten, 
Eben Carr, 
John D. Howard, 
Thomas L. Quimby. 
Albert F. Quimby, 
Heziekiah H. Noyes^ 



James Duffy, 
William T. Fogg, 
W. H. B. Newhall. 



Constables. 



Patrick Doyle, 
Henry Bennett, 
Horatio W. Longa, 
James Duffy, 
William T. Fogg, 
William H. B. Newhall. 



Police Officers. 



William B. Patten, 
John D. Howard, 
Albert F. Quimby, 
Henry Bennett, * 
James Duffy, 
William H. B. Newhall, 



Eben Carr, 
Thomas L. Qmimby, 
Pairick Doyle, 
Horatio W. Longa, 
William T. Fogg, 
Hezekiah H. Noyes. 



Special Police. 



James Patten, 
George W. Butterfield, 
Henry B. Moulton, 
John W. Dickey, 
Benjamin Sleeper, 
Elbridge G. Woodman, 
John T. Chase, 
Charles L. Richardson, 
John D. Edgerly, 
William P. Gage, 
Jonathan Y. McQueston, 
Stephen Palmer, 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, 
Austin Jenkins, 



Charles H. Hurlburt, 
William N. Chamberlin, 
Ephraim G. Hastings, 
Charles Canfield, 
Henry Colby, 
George H. Colby, 
Uriah A. Carswell, 
Peter W. Haselton, 
George W. McConnell, 
David Thayer, 
Nathaniel Baker, 2d, 
Horatio Fradd, 
John C. Head, 
John E. Stearns, 



40 



Joseph Milvin, 
James E. Bailey, 
John Smith, 
Hugh Conroy, 
George F. Judkins, 
Andrew J. Dickey, 
Henry W. Powell, 
Leonard Shelters, 
George W. Mchols, 
Hollis C. Hunton, 
Albert H. Merrill, 
Benjamin W. Robinson, 
William D. Perkins, 
Edward Garner, 
Joel Daniels, 
Nathaniel C. Barker, 
Orrin D. Carpenter, 
* Charles M. Stevens, 
Reuben S. Harlow, 

Milo W. Harvey, 



Page S. Griffin, 
Erastus Cutting, 
Joseph L. Smith, 
John F. Woodbury, 
Guy W. Latham, 
Franklin Goss, 
John Sanborn, 
Thomas C. Cheney, 
E. B. Edwards, 
Israel Doble, 
Joseph Marsh, 
Henry J. Young, 
Ira P. Fellows, 
Chase T. Hackett, 
Alexander M. Corning, 
William Short, 
Levi H. Sleeper, 
Harrison D. Lord, 
Alonzo Avery, 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

William B. Patten, Eben Carr, 



Geo. A. Crosby 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



In Board of Common Council. 

An Order authorizing the Printing of the Twenty-Third Annu- 
al Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of 
Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance, be, and they are hereby 
authorized to cause sixteen hundred copies of the Twenty-Third 
Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of 
Manchester, including the Reports of the Chief Engineer of the 
Fire Department; the Overseers of the Poor; the Committee on 
the City Farm; the Trustees, Librarian, and Treasurer of the City 
Library; the City Liquor Agent ; the School Committee and the 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, to be printed for the use of 
the inhabitants of said city. 

January 4, 1869. In Board of Common Council. 

Passed. 

II. C. SANDERSON, President. 

January 4, 1869. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 
Passed in concurrence, 

JAMES A. WESTON, Mayor. 

A true copy of Record, 

Attest: JOSEPH E. BENNETT, City Clerk. 



ACCOUNT 



OF 



HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, 



City Treasurer, 



FROM 



DECEMBER 31, 1867, TO DECEMBER 31, 1868. 



4A 



Dr. City of Manchester in Account with Henry B. Chamberlin, 



To Unpaid Bills, January 1. 1868, 
Paupers off the Farm, 
City Farm, .... 

City Teams, .... 

Highway District No. 1, . 
Dist. No. 2, $5,132 22; Dist. No. 8, $473 48 



Q 


403 29 ; 


4, 


188 62 ; 


5, 


325 03 ; 


6, 


223 24 ; 


7, 


526 46 ; 



9, 


237 54 


10, 


785 58 


11, 


697 02 


12, 


223 87 


13, 


120 75 



New Highway 
Granite Bridge, $2,089 04; Am. Falls Bridge, 210 36, 
Sewers and Drains, $5,818 89; Reservoirs, 614 55, 
Commons, $1,341 '26 ; Pine Grove Cemetery, 358 45, 
Fire Department .... 

City Police 

Lighting Streets .... 

Printing and Stationery 
Incidental Expenses 

City Hall 

City Library, $2,302 ; Militia, $537 94 

Land sold from City Farm 

Paving Streets, $3,262 34; Watering Streets, 411 04, 

New School House, District No. 3 

a a a it a n 

a a cc u "11 



13,293 57 

3,628 65 

3,384 33 

2.446 20 

243 87 

5.6U5 70 

640 83 

974 20 

1,022 05 

447 11 

647 21 

4,155 62 

2,299 40 

6,433 44 

1,699 71 

11,173 22 

11,771 87 

2,485 78 

1,797 57 

3,375 20 

2,065 99 

2,840 63 

.1?:; 09 

3,673 38 

111.-) (10 

765 (>0 
300 00 



Schools, $38,000,00; Peps. School House No. 6, $6 00, 38,006 00 

Repairs and Insurance School District, No. 10 . 57 00 

Ab'm't of Taxes, $2,082 02 ; Dis. on Taxes, 4,213 70, 6,295 72 

State Tax, $48,987 50; County Tax, $16,740 40 . 65,727 90 

Interest, $2,755 69; Coupon, $20,610 00 . . . 23,365 69 

Temporary Loan 9,325 00 

Court House 18,065 16 

Liquor Agencv, $329 98 ; Repairs of Buildings,$538 29, 868 27 

Dog Tax, 20 00; New Hearse, 747 30 767 30 

Repairs and Insurance, School District No. 2 . . 10,932 46 

Debt and Interest 6,032 00 

Reps. School House, 806 16 ; Reps. S. H .Dis. No. 4, 70 63. 876 79 

Evening School, 200 16 ; City Officers, 8,015 00 . 8,215 16 



Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1869 



$27(1.243 07 
42,794 85 

$319,037 92 



45 

City Treasurer, {one year ending December 31, 1868). Cr. 

By Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1868 . . . 34,109 91 

Taxes 1862, $2 29 ; Taxes 1864, $27 49 . 29 78 

" 1865, $529 15; " 1866, $2,233 08 . 2,762 23 

" 1867, $26,141 31; " 1868, $180,993 53, 207,134 84 

Temporary Loan, 11,396 00 

Dog- Tax i867, $75 00 ; Dog Tax 1868, 134 00 . . 209 00 

Savings Bank Tax 16,090 15 

Rail Road Tax 10,996 56 

United States Bounties 2,960 00 

Literary Fund 837 90 

City Hall, $1,890 50; City Farm, 2,946 52 . . 4,837 02 

Police Court 3,267 70 

City Scales, 276 81 ; Water Rent, 57 00. . . . 333 81 

Paupers from other Towns 296 38 

Pine Grove Cemetery 670 56 

County of Hillsboro' $1,299 20; Ints't on Taxes, 628 18, 1,927 98 
City Teams, $S20 24; Overdrawn, 82 80 . . . 903 04 

Circus and Exhibition Licenses .... 596 00 

Dog Licenses, $334; Sewer Licenses, $493 85 . s-27 «s5 

Liquor Agency, $650 57 ; Cost non-resident Taxes, $45 00, 695 57 
Tenm't Vine St., $100 00; W. M. Rolfe on Note, $200 00, 300 00 
Commons for Grass, $100 00; National Bank Tax, $58 36, 158 36 
Charles Williams and G. W. Riddle for Engine House, 1,060 00 

Land sold from City Farm 791 83 

Sand and Moving, $23 00 ; Plank Sold, $72 89 . 95 89 

Rent of P. C. Room, $67 ; Use of Com. C. Room, $58 00, 125 00 
Rent of Hearse, $66 67 ; Moodv Carter, $13 00 . 79 67 

J. P. Dickey, $5 00 ; J. Doty, $3 00 ... 8 00 

Gas burned by College, $33 39 ; Old Water Pipe, $31 68, 65 07 
Stone from Dist No. 2, $10 00 ; Work on Sewers, $5 00, 15 00 
E. P. Pearson, board at Reform School ... 39 00 

Margarett McLane, board at Reform School . 20 28 

J. G. Edgerly, Overdrawn School District No. 2 51 33 

William Little, " " " « " . 10 72 

Insurance on contents of Alms House ... 26 75 

Use of No 6 Ward Room, $4 00 ; Wood, $2 00 6 00 

Copper, Lead and Rags, $3 69 ; Damage to Lamp Post, 12 00, 15 69 
Amoskeag Manf g Co., Labor and Material Dist. No. 10, 130 97 

$303,881 84 
Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1869 .... 15,156 08 

$319 037 92 
HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, Treasurer. 
Manchester, January 1, 1869. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



The undersigned, Joint Standing Committee on Finance, certify 
that we have examined the foregoing account of Henry R. Chain- 
berlin, City Treasurer, and find the same correctly cast and prop- 
erly vouched. 

During the year ending December 31, 1868, there has been re- 
ceived in the Treasury, including the balance January 1, 1868, the 
sum of three hundred three thousand eight hundred eighty-one 
dollars and eighty four cents, ($303,881 84) and there has been 
paid from the Treasury during the same time, the sum of two 
hundred sixty one thousand eighty-six dollars and ninety nine 
cents, (261,086 99), leaving in the Treasuary, January 1, 1869, forty 
two thousand seven hundred ninety- four dollars and eighty five 
cents, (42,794 85). 

The sum of fifteen thousand nine hundred ninety-four and six- 
teen one hundredths dollars,,(15, 99416) has been paid on account of 
the Court House, above what has been hired by temporary loan. 

P. K. CHANDLER, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
WILLIAM G. PERRY, 
H. A. FARRINGTON, 
A. M, CORNING. 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance. 



BEVENUE ACCOUNT. 



By Taxes 1868 Collected. 
" " Abated 


$176,406 67 
373 16 






" " Discounted 


4,213 70 


180,993 53 




" 1867 Collected 


. 25,189 78 




" " Abated . 


951 53 


26,141 31 




" 1866 Collected 


. 1,671 27 




" " Abated . 


561 81 


2,233 08 




" 1865 Collected 


384 50 




" " Abated . 


144 65 


529 15 




" 1864 Collected 




27 49 




" 1862 " 


. 


2 29 


209,926 85 
11,396 00 

16,090 15 


Temporary Loan 
Savings Bank Tax . 




Railroad Tax 


. 




10,996 56 


Soldiers bounties refunded by Gen. Gov't. 
Literary Fund .... 




2,960 00 
837 90 


Frost & Higgins rent of 


City Hall Store 


$138 00 




S. F. Murry & Co. . 


. . . 


350 00 




Folsom & Son 


... 


400 00 




Boyd & Hopkins 
Geo. W. Adams 


. 


400 00 
400 00 


1,688 00 


Elon F. Brown 


$200 00 


0. Giles 


. 


2 50 




Amoskeag Veterans 


• 


25 00 


997 Art 



48 



By Rent of Police Court Room by Sundry per- 
sons ..... $38 00 
Rent of Police Court Room by Grace Church 4 00 
" " Common Council" for Courts . 58 00 



E. F. Brown for gas burned 
Hartshorn & Pike overdraft on account 

of City Hall 
Police Courts costs and fines 
H. & H. R. Pettee, fees at South 

Scales $148 41 

J. Abbott fees at South Scales 60 00 



H. B. Putnam fees at North . 




. 


Scales 


$12 80 




L. Bodwell fees at North 


. 




Scales . 


. 55 60 


68 40 






J. J. Straw l'ent of water 


$10 00 


Hill & James " " . . 


. 


5 00 


James & Fogg " " . 


. 


30 00 


Wm. B. Johnson " . 


* 


12 00 



Town of Newport for aid to Mrs. Haven $87 89 

" Washington, aid to Mrs. Barrett 17 00 

" Weare, aid to Moses L. Lull 7 00 

" Guilford, aid to Mrs. S.M.Wiley 33 96 
" Bradford, aid to Mrs. W. H. Bonner 19 25 
" Hillsborough, for board of C. W. 

Connor, at Reform School, . 91 00 



S. S. Moulton for board of John Wallace at R. S. 
E. P. Pearson for board of Eugene Pearson at R. S. 
Margaret McLane for board of James McLane at R. S. 
Franklin Tenney for aid to Moody Carter 
D.F. Miller for aid to Jackson Doty 
J. P. Dickey for payment of abated tax. 



49 



By County of Hillsborough, suppoi*t of In- 
mates at Eeform School . . . 883 08 
County of Hillsborough, support of In- 
mates at N. H. Asylum . . .304 58 
County of Hillsborough, support of Pau- 
pers off Farm . . . . Ill 54 

Pine Grove Cemetery, wood sold 
" " lots sold 

Interest on taxes 

Costs on non-resident taxes 

City teams, work on streets, District No. 2 471 49 

" " " new highways 203 25 

" " " Commons 66 75 

" " " Court House 21 00 

" " " sewers and drains 10 50 

" " " paving streets 47 25 

" " " Fire Depart'nt 1,200 00 



345 56 


(px,i,i/^ i>\> 


325 00 






$670 56 




. 


628 78 


, # 


45 00 



Lent's New York Circus, for license . 40 00 

Howe's Circus, for license . . 40 00 

Stone & Murray's Circus, for license . 40 00 

Van Amburg's Menagerie, for license . 40 00 

Sundry persons, for exhibitions . . 436 00 



2,020 24 



./Etna Insm*ance Co., overdraft on account 

of Fire Department . . . $22 50 

Phoenix Insurance Co. overdraft on account 

of Fire Department . . - 11 25 

33 75 

Geo. "W. Merriam, overdraft on acc't of City Farm 15 05 

A. J. Tebbetts, overdraft on account of officers . 5 00 

John Larkin, overdraft on account of Commons . 9 00 

J. G. Edgerly, overdraft on account of School Dis- 
trict No. 2 . . . . 51 33 

Wm. Little, overdraft on account of School 
District No. 2 . . . .10 72 

62 05 



596 00 



50 



By Sundry persons for dog licenses 

" " for licenses io enter common sewers . 

" " for sales by Liquor Agent 

W. M. Rolfe, on note for BaiTett place 
James Patten, for rent of tenement . . 60 00 

Geo. W. Butterfield, for rent of tenement .40 00 



City Farm, for grass from Commons . 
Collector of Francestown for tax on bank 

stock . 
Collector of Milford, for tax on bank stock 
Collector of Peterborough, for tax on bank 

stock ..... 



26 37 
10 10 

21 89 



Williams & Riddle, for old Engine House 

and lot, Chestnut Street 
C.Williams, 1st pay't on land from city farm $137 61 
Charles Canfield " <■ 

Sarah H. Bradley " " 

S. H. Bachelder " " 

Benj. Farnum " " 

DorsitP. Beattie " " 

A. A. Bunton " " 



D. R. Leach for grading lot 
Connor & Co., for grading lot 
Charles Canfield, for hauling gravel 



99 62 

117 37 

117 37 

202 50 

58 68 

58 68 

12 00 

3 00 
8 00 



Sundry persons, for old plank from G. Bridge 

C S. Fisher, for rent of hearse 

Man. Agri'l and Mec. Association for old pipe 

J. G. Coult, for stone 

Charles Canfield, for labor entering drains 

Charles Canfield, wood sold 

iEtna Ins. Co. for insurance at Alms House 

L. H. Sleeper, rentpf No. 6 Ward Room lot 

Old copper sold 



334 00 
493 85 
650 57 

200 00 



100 00 
100 00 



58 36 
1,060 00 



79183 



23 00 

72 89 

66 67 

3168 

10 00 

500 

200 

26 75 

400 

3 69 



51 



By James Corning, for damage to lamp post 

Amoskeag Manf'g Co. for building bank wall at 

west end of Granite Bridge 

City Farm, for labor . . 846 99 

City Farm, for live stock sold . 744 53" 

City Farm, for stone . 15 00 

City Farm, for hay . 112 32 

City Farm, for produce . 1,190 28 

City Farm, for board of paupers . 37 40 



Dog tax for 1867 
Dog tax for 1868 



75 00 
134 00 



12 00 



130 97 



2,946 52 



209 00 



$270,971 93 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



Paupers off farm, appropriated 



City Farm 


appropriated 


City teams 


. 


. 


Highway District No. 1 


a 


<< 


" 2 


a 


tt 


" 3 


<« 


a 


tt 4 


«< 


tt 


" 5 


<< 


tt 


" 6 


a 


tt 


u 7 


it 


t. 


" 8 


tt 


a 


" 9 


it 


tt 


" 10 


tt 


tt 


" 11 


a 


tt 


" 12 


tt 


tt 


" 13 



3,170 86 
423 48 



250 00 
5,127 06 
400 00 
250 00 
317 67 
250 00 
476 97 
450 00 
350 00 
900 00 
700 00 
250 00 
150 00 



3,594 34 
3,529 07 
2,819 74 



,871 70 



52 



New highways .... 


4,103 09 


Granite Bridge .... 


2,065 39 


Amoekeag Falls Bridge 


300 00 


Sewers and drains 


6,501 85 


Reservoirs .... 


1,000 00 


Commons .... 


1,609 00 


Pine Grove cemetery . 


670 56 


Fire department 


11,511 44 


City Police ' 


11,763 49 


Lighting streets 


2,512 00 


Printing and stationery 


1,500 00 


Incidental expenses 


6000 00 


City Hall building 


3,068 89 


City Library . . . . 


2,282 00 


Militia ..... 


200 00 


Land sold from farm . 


791 83 


Paving streets .... 


3,086 41 


"Watering streets 


409 79 


New school house District No. 8 


165 00 


n it it a it j 


765 00 


U it it u it ] j 


300 00 


Schools ..... 


38,000 00 


Repairs school house District No. 6 


10 00 


Repairs and Insurance " 10 


350 00 


State tax ..... 


48,987 50 


County tax .... 


16,740 40 


Interest ..... 


22,787 30 


Temporary Loan 


9,325 00 


Court House ; 


6,500 00 


Liquor Agency .... 


650 57 


Repairs of buildings 


183 73 


Dog tax ..... 


209 00 


New hearse .... 


747 30 


Repairs and Insurance District No. 2 


11,160 00 


Debt and Interest " " 2 


6,000 00 


Repairs school house " "4 


150 00 


Evening schools 


300 00 


City officers .... 


8,005 00 



53 

By Shade trees and fitting up yard District No. 5 , 100 00 

City Library building ..... 5,000 00 

School District No. 8 . . . . 200 00 

Discount on taxes ..... 4,500 00 



$260,331 39 
Balance to reserved fund .... 10,640 54 



$270,971 93 

EXPENDITURES AND APPROPRIATIONS. 



PAUPERS OFF TILE FARM. 

By balance from old account . . . $34 31 

Appropriation .... 1,500 00 

Town of Newport for support of Mrs. 

Haven . . . . .87 89 

Town of Hillsborough, board of C. W. 

Connor at Reform School . . 91 00 

Town of Washington for support of Mrs. 

Barrett . . . . . 17 00 

Town of Weare for support of Moses L. 

Lull 7 00 

Town of Guilford for support of S. M. Wiley 33 96 
Town of Bradford for support of Mrs. 

Wm. H. Bonnor . . . 19 25 

S. S. Moulton for board of John Wallace 

at Reform School . . . 40 28 

Mrs. E. P. Pearson for board of Eugene 

Pearson . . . . . 39 00 

Margaret McLane for board of James Mc- 

Lane . . . . . 20 28 

County of Hillsboro' for board at R. S. 883 08 

County of Hillsborough for board of in- 
mates at N. H. Asylum . . . 304 58 



54 



By County of Hillsborough for support of 

paupers off farm . . . . Ill 54 

Franklin Tenney for aid to Moody Carter 13 00 

D. F. Miller for aid to Jackson Doty . 3 00 

Transferred from revenue account . 423 48 



$3,628 65 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid State Reform School for board of in 

mates . . 
N. H. Asylum for Insane for board of M 

Gillis .... 

N. H. Asylum for Insane for board of H 

A. Vincent 
N. H. Asylum for Insane for board of E 

V. Hazeltine 
Boyd & Hopkins for Dry Goods. 
Cayzer & Co. for shoes 
H. B. Putnam for groceries 
"W. F. Sleeper for groceries 
"W. F. Sleeper & Co. for groceries 
Geo. W. Adams for groceries 
Poor & Stearns for groceries and wood 
Geo. W. Gai'dner & Co. for groceries 
Patrick Haley for groceries 
Barr & Clapp for groceries 
A. M. Eastman for groceries 
Jerry Hayes for groceries . 
Sawyer & Green for groceries 
Timothy Sullivan for wood 
D. B. Eastman for wood 
L. W. Hall for wood 
Michael Linen for wood 
Wm, C. Richardson for wood 
Jacob Chase for wood . , 

Alpheus Boodwell for wood 
T. R. Hubbard for wood . 



1,443 56 

87 56 

215 44 

144 77 
28 31 
1158 

5 35 
67 49 

58 56 
159 04 

65 63 
8 00 
8 00 

74 71 
2 79 

88 00 
25 83 
27 50 

59 25 
112 00 

6 62 
35 70 

7 18 
80 16 

2 25 



55 



To Angeline Carter for board of Moody Car- 
ter . . , . . . 48 00 
Moses E. George for cash paid -Moody 

Carter . . ' . . 4 00 
E. Jane Wilson for board of Mrs. Gardner 59 00 
Putnam A Colby for board of Mrs. Dick- 
ey and children . . . . 82 00 
Martha Dearborn for boai-d of W. S. Dear- 
born . . . . . 69 87 
C. G. Sherer boarding and nursing small 

pox patients .... 233 15 
Caroline Wyman boarding Wyman family 124 75 
James Wiley for boarding Bertha Webster 80 00 
M. E. George for cash paid W. S. Dear- 
born . . . . . 5 13 
M. E. George for expense to Hooksett . 1 50 
Julia A. Hall for board of Mrs. Bonner . 15 00 
James Mitchell for boots to Eben C. Web- 
ster . ■ . , . . 5 00 
Kidder & Chandler for groceries . . 7 80 
E. P. Johnson & Co. for wood . . 3 00 
Parker Buttei-ncld . . . .15 00 
Chas. A. Bailey for sawing wood . 3 00 
M. Linnen for breakfast and lodging to 

pauper . . . . . 1 00 

J. 11. Hanson for medicine . . . 6 50 

B. B. Weeks for medicine . . . 29 11 

Edwin Branch for Pest carriage - . 40 00 

J. P. Hubbard team to Pest house . 11 00 
Hill & James team to farm and to Goffs- 

town . . . . . 3 50 

Eben Carr for team in small pox case . 4 00 
A. G. Fairbanks for board and care of M. 

Gillis 5 00 

Tow r n clerk of Loudon for searching Kec- 

ords . . . . .. 1 06 

Town clerk of Franklin for searching Rec- 
ords . .' . . 100 



56 



To Town clerk of Bradford for searching 

Records .... 
H. D. Lord storing T. McQuinn's goods 
John Prince coach and burial of AVm. E 

Robinson .... 
S. S. Moulton expense to Londonderry 

and Concord 
S. S. Moulton expense to Goffstown 
S. S. Moulton expense to Bedford 
S. S. Moulton paid for sawing wood 
C. S. Fisher coffin and burial of child of 

W. H. Bonner 
C. S. Fisher coffin and burial of T. S 

Frost .... 

Hiram W. Savory for team to Bedford 
Hiram W. Savoty for team to Londonderry 
Hiram "W. Savory for team to Webster's 

Mills 

Hiram W. Savory for team to lower part 

of City 



75 
2 25 

8 00 

5 50 
150 
150 

2 00 

4 50 



13 00 


1 25 


2 00 


150 


125 



5,628 Q5 



CITY FARM. 



By Balance from old account, . . 838 35 

Appropriation . . 500 00 

Highway District No. 12 for labor . 168 37 
New highways, building Merrimack street 

extension, . 94 12 
New highways, building Bridge st. extension 212 75 

Labor 371 25 

Live Stock and Beef sold . . . 744 53 

Stone sold . . . . • . . 15 00 

Hay 112 32 



57 



By Produce sold 1,190 28 

County of Hillsborough for board of pauper 37 40 
George W. Merriam for overdraft . . 15 05 
JEtna Ins. Co., fi»damage to furniture by fire 26 75 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Joseph Cross, Superintendent, Salary 1868, 
U a u a 18 67, 

James A. Stearns, butchering 
H. S. Whitney, repairing pumps and pipe 
J. S. Davis, blacksmith work 
Brigham & Pratt, 3 barrels crackers 
James Ramsay for labor 
f Mary Ramsay " 

Charles G. She re r " 
James Stoliker " 

John Larkin " 

B. P. Kimball " 

A. T. Convers " 

Grant Morse " 

Francis Smiley " 

J. Mclutire " 

William Smith " 

Anthony Hill " 

Owen Duffy " 

Alex. Greenwood " 
G.W. Gardner & Co. " 
Levi Woodman " 

Eleazer Hoyt " 

Ellen Noland • " 
Maria Wilkinson " 
Emma A. Cross " 

Daniels & Company for tallow 

" " hardware 

" " seed 

" " baskets, tape &c. 

" " glass and scythes 



500 00 

125 00 

8 00 

10 00 

3 95 

18 00 

225 31 

100 75 

70 69 

3 50 

8 00 
133 08 

36 00 

20 50 

150 

9 00 
55 00 
11 25 

7 00 
5 25 

21 75 

8 62 
3 00 
3 00 

10 00 

10 00 

1 45 
15 67 

111 39 

2 44 
6 02 



$4,326 17 



58 



To Frost & Higgins for meat 
William Boyd for meat 
Cook & Miller for meat 
Joseph Rowley for groceries 
H. B. Putnam " 

A. M Eastman " 
Geo. W. Adams " 
Cyrus Dunn " 
Kidder & Chandler " 
Johnson & Stevens " 
Houston & White for dry goods 
Fearing & Co. " 
N. S. Clark " 
Waite Brothers " 
J. D. Bean two blouses 
S. G. Hoyt repairing shoes 
James Mitchell Jr. boots and shoes 
Chandler & Morgan clothes and caps 
8. S. Moulton appraising property and mak- 
ing schedule 

S. L. Fogg doctoring horse 
Josiah Clark receipt for composting 
Charles Bunton for blacksmith work 
George H. Colby for Jersey Bull 
J. H. Wales for repairing building 
H. C. Tilton for books and stationery 
J. Abbot corn, shorts and meal 
H. & H. It. Pettee grain and meal 
Hall, Watts & Co. grain and plaster 
George W. Riddle horse rake &c. 
Benjamin Currier building and repairing car 
H. M. Bailey & Son tin ware 

Barker & Co., for onion seed and tea 
John Bixbee for filing saws 

B. F. Martin for calf 
Estate of Robert Gilchrist for crockery 
Gilrnan Clough for sawing lumber 



2 48 


37 05 


2 95 


62 13 


63 06 


73 09 


49 77 


84 65 


24 01 


81 35 


44 43 


2 09 


5 92 


2171 


3 50 


4 30 


40 45 


37 00 


12 00 


2 50 


10 00 


38 15 


50 00 


7 50 


4 30 


158 66 


128 06 


36 00 


27 75 


carts 65 56 


7 74 


10 18 


16 88 


1 80 


5 00 


8 22 


23 91 



59 



To Edwin Branch for repairing harness 
George W. Merriam for blacksmithing 
JEtna Insurance Co. for insurance 
J. P. Newell for flour 
H. N. Howe repairing pipe 
Charles B. Heath for two heifers 
Colby Clark for threshing grain 
Joseph Marsh for pasturing cows 
Commons for grass 
Hill & James for team to farm 
S. F. Murry & Co. for medicine 
B. B. Weeks for medicine 
A. F. Perry for medicine 
E. P. Offutt for cow 
David Dickey for cow 
Win. P. Richardson for making cider 
William T. Fogg for butchering 
W. P. Duncklee, for stone and stump digger 

Balance to new account 



17 70 


83 90 


43 75 


36 00 


3 25 


82 00 


. . 26 00 


36 25 


100 00 


1 50 


2 00 


11 92 


6 14 


55 00 


43 00 


6 65 


5 00 


ger 25 00 


3,384 33 


941 84 $4,326 17 





CITY 


TEAMS. 




y balance from old account 




$177 05 


Appropriation 


. 


. 


800 06 


Highway District No 


. 2, for work 


47149 


New highways 




<e 


203 25 


Commons 




(i 


66 75 


Court House 




« 


21 00 


Sewers and Drains 




it 


10 50 


Paving Streets 




i( 


47 25 


Fire Department 




It 


1,200 00 



$2,997 29 



60 



EXENDITURES. 



To paid George W. Butterfield teamster $491 00 

James Patten " 494 00 

F. N. McLaren repairing harness ■ 21 83 

F. P. Hutchinson blacksmithing . 10 15 

Z. Foster Campbell medicine . 12 55 

J. F. Woodbury & Co. shoeing horses 43 88 

Lewis Rice " " 26 70 

J. H. Johnson, job teaming . 1 15 

H. & H. R. Pettee grain and grinding 231 69 

Daniels & Co., fork, combs, oil and brush 5 84 

J. S. Kidder & Co. corn and oats . 168 25 

T. R. Hubbard lumber . . 5 59 

H. C. Smith for straw . . 3 18 

A. G. Fairbanks " . . 7 72 

Horace H. Young for straw . 6 74 

Z. A. Flanders " . . 12 49 

E. P. Johnson & Co., " . 7 68 

S. D. Smith " 14 78 

George W. Dustin " . . 5 23 

Joseph Foss for hay . . 26 57 

Johu Hosley " . . 171 37 

A. J. Bennett " . . 16 48 

H. R. Nichols " . . 11 77 

R. M. Rollins " . 23 38 

J. B. Pattee " 14 35 

Samuel Burnham for hay . . 36 91 

Horace Richards " . . 135 64 

J. Rowell " . . 15 25 

Cyrus Sanborn " 17 77 

S. S. Moulton repairs at stable . 6 50 

J. Abbott shorts and meal . 19 41 

Hall, Watts & Co., grain . 183 45 

Benjamin Currier making spreaders 2 00 

Locke & Demick salt, lard and sulphur 5 46 

Hill & Co., set of horse covers . 13 50 

George W. Cheney for team • 4 50 



61 



To Kidder & Chandler oil and salt 
H. M. Bailey tin spout and broom 
Edwin Branch for harnesses 

" " repairing harness 

Perkins C. Young- clipping horse 
C. Gage blacksniithing 
M. C. Derby doctoring horse 

Balance to new account 



2137 


150 


95 36 


19 12 


10 00 


100 


23 00 


$2,446 20 


55109 



$2,997 29 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid Geo. W. Dustin, Supt. 
Nehemiah Preston, Supt. 
Alonzo Wicom for labor 
John Campbell for labor 
W. S. Whipple for labor 
Peter Kimball for labor 
Isaac H. Jones for labor 
G. H. Tufts for labor 
James O. Clark for labor 
Burke Stark for labor 



Balance to new account 



2 65 


250 00 


94 87 


106 88 


3 00 


12 70 


75 


14 42 


4 50 


150 


75 


4 50 


$243 87 


8 78 



S252 65 



$252 65 



62 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 
^D R. Leach for filling lot 
Connor & Co. for filling lot 
John G. Coult for stone 
Charles Canfield for wood sold 
Revenue account transferee! 



5 16 

5,000 00 

12 00 

3 00 

10 00 

2 00 

100 06 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Chas. Canfield 105 1-2 days at $2 00 211 00 

" " 111 1-4 " $3 00 333 75 

James Patten Teamster . 85 00 

George W. Butterfield Teamster . 94 00 

James Kearin " .' 451 25 

Patrick Finn Laborer . 149 55 

Edward Busnahan " . 199 11 

John Larkin " .227 97 

Michael Scanlan " . 10 25 

Sylvester Donohoe " . 138 74 

Timothy Kennedy " . 91 48 

Peter Scanlan " . 27 75 

Single Team . 212 74 

Double " No. 1 . 132 00 

" " " 2 '. 126 75 

Warren Hai-vey self and team . 208 75 

James Emerson " " . 92 50 

E. Cutting relaying flagging . 16 57 

E. A. Smith for concrete street crossings 337 85 

H. M. Bailey matches, pails &c. . 2 72 

Neal & Holbrook planking canal bridge 74 75 

George W. Cheney for team . 4 50 

Johnson & Stevens for oil . 1 00 

S. S. Moulton making snow plow 10 50 



63 



To S, S. Moulton repairing canal bridge 

" " " " street crossings 

Daniels & Co., nails and spikes 

" " shovels picks and pick handles 

•' " cess-pool grates and barrows 

"William Chase laborer 

John Sutter " 

Jeremiah Driscoll " 

George W. Merriam sharpening tools &c. 

Haines & Wallace lumber for canal bridge 

John B. Varich & Co., for rakes 

Kidder & Chandler for oil 

Charles Bunton blacksmith work 

David H. Young mason work 

George W. Riddle plank 

Michael Handley laborer 

Guilaume Alard " 



Thomas Fox 
Joseph Gradian 
Thomas Kellcy 
Michael Sullivan 
Daniel Mahanna 
James Kelley 
Mar Lomond 
Daniel Galagher 
M. McCabe 
F. Bills 
M. Shea 
E. Garrant 
Grant Morse 
Louis Gardner 
T. Donohoe 
J. Burns 

Garnet 
Patrick Broderick 
John Murphy 
John Connor 



laborer 



35 99 
1150 

33 86 
35 50 
99 40 

136 37 

7 12 
30 75 

114 26 

34 00 
3 50 
6 08 

12 65 
10 60 
63 78 
53 48 
48 81 
91 48 

26 99 

3 00 
28 12 

164 13 
25 12 
6187 
10 67 
55 87 
18 75 
47 99 
18 38 
6 75 
6 75 

4 50 
9 75 

8 00 

27 16 
16 12 

4 67 



64: 



To Edwin Meanhen for labor 


12 00 


Joseph Goodno 


it 


3 75 


J. Hayes 




17 62 


J. Muldoon 


tt 


36 74 


John Foney 


a 


2 87 


J. McCartee 


a 


12 00 


J. Birde 


a 


150 


P. Lahey 


ii 


23 00 


D. Harrington 


n 


26 62 


J. 0. Hunt 


n 


2138 


Alfred Ceharl 


n 


6 00 


N. Le Rose 


a 


15 00 


J. Ferris 


a 


11 24 


Levi Woodman 


a 


3 00 


P. Nervin 


a 


8 62 


T Brunei- 


« 


3 00 


Reuben S. Harlow 


u 


4 50 


Zeb. Caouette 


n 


5 62 


Joseph Ruer 


a 


2 62 


L. Summers 


a 


3 00 


George Connell 


« 


13 87 


Eugene Collety 


(i 


9 75 


P. Cargen 


a 


75 


Daniel Doherty 


a 


15 37 


Francis Bean 


a 


1 12 


Joseph L. Smith posts 


and joists 


2 25 


Clough & Foster, plank for canal bridge 


254 83 



$5,132 22 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 



$14 63 
400 00 



$414 63 



65 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid E. C. Howlett, Superintendent 


$93 75 


B. F. Mitchell, Superintendent . 


87 17 


William S. Locke labor 


64 71 


Peter Mitchell " 


26 62 


J. Poor " 


54 12 


Charles N. Baker " 


6 75 


J. F. James, running out Calef road 


12 60 


Ephraim Dow labor 


9 00 


Chadbourne George labor 


75 


William M. Rolfe " 


8 25 


Granite Bridge for old plank 


2 50 


Calvin Patterson sharpening picks 


80 


K. K. Haselton labor 


1 50 


J. F. Smith " 


4 50'^ 


A. M. Corning " 


1 5<T 1C 


Nathaniel Baker " 


1 87 


Plummer C Webster 


9 75 


A. C Stevens, 


8 25 


Tucker & Co., 


6 00 


R. W. Flanders blacksmith work 


2 90 




403 29 


Balance to new account 


11 34 



$414 63 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 



By balance from last year 

Appropriation • 


$39 25 
250 00 


EXPENDITURES , 

To paid John Emerson, Superintendent 
Ira W. Moore " 
John Emerson, Jr., labor 


$15 75 
81 30 
22 12 



$289 25. 



66 



To John P. Moore for labor 
Charles C. Moore " 
Isaac Whittemore " 
John A. Corning " 
Augustus Fellows " 
J. C. Whittemore " 
David Webster " 
John Calef " 

Jonathan Aiken " 
R. P. Whittemore " 
John Berry " 

Balance to new account 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 

By balance from old account 
Appropriation 
Revenue account transferred 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid James Emerson Supt. 
W. W. Dickey Supt. 
Cleaves M. Harvey labor 
John Dickey " 

William P. Merrill " 
Andrew J. Young " 
James E. Young " 

Gilman Harvey " 

Jerry Hayes " 

E. S. Harvey « 

William Crosby " 

James M. Young " 

Jonas Harvey f * 

Rodnia Nutt " 

Jonas & E. S. Harvey labor 
" " " " lumber 

" u " gravel 
Edward Young labor 



10 75 


7 50 


75 


75 


9 75 


4 50 


9 00 


4 45 


9 00 


10 00 


3 00 


188 62 


100 63 


5. 


$7 36 


300 00 


17 67 


$32 73 


51 90 


39 00 


29 00 


17 81 


4 65 


29 55 


2 03 


5 00 


43 12 


5 25 


2 62 


17 75 


6 75 


8 68 


19 80 


1 54 


7 85 

< 



$289 25 



$325 03 



$325 03 



67 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 



$11 80 
250 00 



-$261 80 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid James M. Dickey Supt. , 


16 00 


Henry C. Dickey Sup! 




23 75 


J. P. Webster for labor 


2 25 


John Hosley 


a 


950 


John Johnson 


i. 


13 56 


Amos C. "Webster 


a 


8 62 


James "Wiley 


(( 


9 37 


Daniel H. Dickey 


u 


16 50 


"William Craig 


M 


7 12 


David Dickey 


«< 


15 37 


Gilman Clough 


it 


3 00 


David Dickey 2nd. 


ti 


20 30 


Ignatius T. "Webster 


u 


27 74 


John Larkin 


tt 


6 93 


Oscar Craig 


It 


75 


James Craig 


a 


75 


George "Whittemore 


n 


5 25 


James M. "Webster 


a 


15 12 


Nahum "Webster 


a 


4 12 


Oscar "Webster 


ti 


4 12 


John Dickey 


<« 


9 37 


James'J. W. Hills 


a 


150 


Amos "Webster 


(< 


2 25 




$223 24 


Balance to new account 


38 56 



$261 80 



68 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 
Revenue account, transferred 



EXPENDITURES 



$49 49 

400 00 

76 97 



$526 46 



To paid Nathan Johnson, Supt. 
Peter O. Woodman, Supt. 
Joseph Marsh for labor 

William Doty " 

Israel Webster " 

Edward L. Jenkins " 
McGregor Hall 

Geo. Piper " 

Joseph B. Pierce " 

Solomon Tobie " 

Lawrence Morse " 

Bernard McGinness " 

John B. Huse " 

James Hall 2nd " 

J. B. Eastman " 

Henry Haywood " 

Nathan Sleeper " 

Ira Swett " 

James Howe " 

Horace H Young " 

James G. Adams " 

Edward Lynch " 

James S. Washburn " 

Edward Strain " 

Lawrence Lyons " 

Thomas Steele " 

Rodney Place " 

Charles Drew " 

Daniel Devine " 



$31 60 
77 86 
13 65 

6 78 

17 13 

1 35 
4 25 

90 

2 33 

4 95 
150 

3 37 
150 

7 87 

2 25 

1 50 

3 60 

2 80 
15 

18 12 
17 50 

3 00 
15 37 

5 25 
75 

1 25 
11 62 
21 37 
37 62 



69 



To Charles Holland for labor 


9 37 


Charles Tebbetts 


it 


3 87 


Collins Tebbetts 


it 


6 00 


Jeremiah L. Fogg 


tt 


19 50 


William Kauffer 


it 


2 00 


James A. Stearns 


a 


23 43 


Collins Sweeney 


a 


12 00 


Henry Sweeney 


tt 


13 50 


Joseph Sweeney 


a 


13 50 


Alex. Sweeney 


a 


6 75 


William Place 


a 


5 25 


Joseph H. Holland 


it 


1 50 


Sewall Leavitt 


a 


7 87 


Orin Fracheur 


tt 


34 25 


James Gunner 


a 


3 00 


Jonathan Woodman 


a 


20 43 


Alonzo Avery 


a 


150 


Milton Kendall 


a 


1 50 


Julius Sweeney 


tt 


150 


Cummings Aunis 


a 


4 50 


Robert Stevens 


tt 


3 15 


John B. Varrick for shovels 


4 90 


D. L. Jenkins for labor 


10 00 



8526 46 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 



By balance from old account 


$49 53 


Appropriation 


450 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




To paid William Mills Supt. 


58 50 


Jeremiah Garvin Supt. 


39 00 


James M. Crombie for labor 


150 


James Stockdale " 


15 75 


E. S. Young " 


20 85 


John P. Young " 


15 67 



8499 53 



70 



To Day & Robberts painting guide boards 

George B. YouDg for labor 

Luther S. Proctor " 

Robert Stevens " 

"William Parsley " 

H. D. Noyes " 

Gilman Reed " 

Phinehas Haselton " 

Eugene "Wilson " 

George Young " 

John H. Proctor " 

H. M. Clough " 

J. P. Eaton " 

I. W. Hammond " 

John Grimes " 

Peter Farmer " 

Augustus Proctor " 

John W. Proctor " 

Pillsbury " 

W. Whittemore " 

J. J. Farrington " 

Zadok Wright " 

Owen McCabe " 

Milton Preston " 

Paschal Preston " 

Balance to new account 



7 00 


3180 


26 70 


33 15 


7 50 


4 00 


22 00 


150 


2 25 


3 00 


4125 


3 00 


78 80 


3 00 


17 10 


4 02 


9 35 


5 75 


2 60 


5 75 


150 


100 


150 


150 


7 19 


473 48 


26 05 



$499 53 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 



$18 28 
350 00 



$368 28 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid William Boyce, Superintendent . $97 49 
George W. George for labor . 16 50 



71 



Jonas & E. S. Harvey 


for plank 


12 48 


Orlando Page for labor 


5 00 


John Silver 


it 


12 75 


James Currier 


tt 


150 


B. W. Corning 


a 


12 50 


¥m. Griffin 


a 


4 50 


Isaac H. Webster 


tt 


6 50 


David Swett 


tt 


5 25 


N. Alexander 


tt 


5 00 


G. L. Boyce 


tt 


14 62 


Alphonzo Boyce 


it 


3 25 


Elijah Goodale 


a 


4 50 


N. Corning 


tt 


8 25 


Estate of H. C. Joy 


tt 


6 25 


Edward R. Young 


it 


1 95 


Harrison Corning 


n 


3 00 


A. Scott 


it 


6 00 


ohn Hatch 


it 


150 


Caleb Haselton 


it 


150 


A. Thomas 


tt 


2 00 


Stephen Haselton 


tt 


5 25 




$237 54 


Balance to new account 


130 74 



$368 28 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Z. N. Doe, Supt. 
John C. Head, Supt. 
Barr & Clapp for shovel and spikes 
Barr & Clapp for labor 
Albert Thompson for labor 
G. W. Riddle for 45 loads clay 
Adam Dickey for labor 



$2 32 


900 00 


. $115 62 


367 35 


3 09 


9 00 


19 50 


5 50 


4 50 



$902 32 



72 



To George Leavitt for labor 
John Stearns " 

C. N. Ingalls " 

Joseph Glidden " 

Henry Bragg " 

James Walker " 

A. Hatch " 

Isaac Roberts " 

John Murphy " 

Columbus Wyman " 
James Gibbons " 

Patrick Conway " 

John Collins " 

William P. Riddle for clay 
Daniels & Co. for lantern and pick 
Hartshorn & Pike for scoop 
James Collins for labor 
James Do wd " 

Mitchell Labo " 
Stephen Yarrer " 
Joseph Denio " 

Samuel Brown " 



Balance to new account 



9 75 


58 12 


1 12 


7 50 


13 87 


14 62 


4 50 


10 50 


36 75 


33 75 


1 50 


1 25 


19 00 


1 50 


2 12 


1 12 


13 06 


6 00 


9 37 


6 00 


6 62 


3 00 


$785 58 


116 74 



$902 32 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 



By balance from old account 


$36 15 


Appropriation 


700 00 


EXPENDITURES 




To paid Joseph Melvin, Supt. 


. $314 50 


Amos H. Gerry for labor 


6 75 


Gilman R Stevens " 


77 01 


Thomas C. Stearns ' 


79 63 



$736 15 



73 



To Wm. H. B. New 


liall labor 


54 50 


John E. Stearns 




a 


45 40 


Francis Munroe 




u 


5 63 


Thomas Frost 




a 


1 50 


Hiram Stearns 




a 


8 13 


Michael Mara 




a 


3 12 


Eleazer Rose 




.< 


150 


William Stearns 




« 


6 25 


Frank B. Fuller 




a 


12 50 


James Collins 




ic 


28 50 


John Collins 




o 


10 50 


David Ross 




te 


3 00 


Elijah Stearns 




a 


150 


C. Warner for plank 




4 42 


David Wells for plank 




20 68 


David Wells for 


chestnut posts 


5 00 


Henry K. Tilton for plank 


4 00 


John B. Varrick 


&Co 


. for nails 


3 00 




$697 02 


Balance to new account 


39 13 



$736 15 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 



$41 87 
250 00 



EXPENDITURES. 




To paid city farm for labor 


. $168 37 


Robert Neal " 


6 00 


Wm. Mills " 


15 75 


Noyes Farmer " 


24 37 


A. Sherer " 


4 69 


D. C. Varnum " 


4 69 




$223 87 


Balance to new account 


68 00 



$291 87 



$291 87 



74 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Win. Campbell, Supt. 

Alonzo D. Scagel for labor 

Joseph Colby " 

O. M. Winegar " 

Lorenzo D. Cate " 

Geo. W. Cate " 

Geo. Chatman " 

John Gamble " 

Luther Campbell •* 

George Clark " 

Balance to new account 



$28 73 


150 00 


70 74 


16 75 


6 75 


2 63 


50 


14 38 


3 75 


2 25 


150 


150 


$120 75 


57 58 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 

By balance from old account . $52 53 

Appropriation . 4,000 00 

Cash for filling lot for L. B. Bodwell . 8 00 

Revenue account . 95 09 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Charles Canfield, Supt. 

Concord Railroad freight on roller 
Concord Railroad freight on brick 
Geo. W. Butterfield teamster 
James Patten teamster 
City team No. 1 
City team No. 2 



$147 75 
24 00 
24 20 
59 00 
62 50 
88 50 
93 75 



75 



To City team single 




2100 


Edward Bresnahaii for labor 


25 50 


John Larkin 


it 


69 00 


Timothy Kennedy 


it 


9 75 


¥m, Lahey 


it 


9 17 


Michael Handley 


ti 


18 42 


Thomas Fox 


a 


6186 


James Kelley 


a 


7 50 


M. Sullivan 


it 


9 00 


Guillaume Allard 


tt 


48 67 


Mar Lomond 


a 


70 00 


Daniel Galagher 


a 


4 67 


J. McCabe 


a 


22 24 


F. Bills 


a 


9 75 


M. Shea 


a 


73 87 


E. Gar rant 


tt 


58 50 


"Warren Harvey self and team 


323 75 


J. Burns for labor 




11 25 


Patrick Finn for labor 




18 33 


City Farm for stone for Granite street 


9 00 


" " building extension of Merrimac 


k St. 94 12 


J. E. Stearns engineering 


36 00 


J. F. James setting grades 


9 00 


Daniels & Co. Scythes 


, hoes and rope 


6 56 


John B. Varick tools 




43 58 


J. Kerrin teamster 




2167 


Sylvester Donohoe 




18 75 


Laborer 




6 37 


E. Garnet for laboi 




12 83 


J. Muldoon " 




57 50 


Clement Devine " 




9 75 


Edward Meanhen " 




3 75 


John Murphy " 




30 74 


E. P. Cogswell " 




53 00 


Michael Scanlan " 




6 83 


Patrick Broderick '* 




2121 


J. Fournier " 




6 75 


Francis Bean " 




4 50 



76 



To McLaughlin labor 
William Chase " 
D. Mahanna " 

Joseph Ruer " 

James Sullivan " 
J. Hayes " 

Zeb Caouette " 

Joseph Hood " 

Scott " 

John Hood " 

R. S. Harlow " 

P. Ferris " 

T. Brennen " 

Joseph Mellonner " 
T. Cargen « 

W. L. Rose " 

John Foney " 

Peter Scanlan " 

John McCarty " 

Malfer . " 

Daniel Harrington for labor 
J. O. Hunt " 

John Birde " 

R. Burnham " 

L. Cars well " 

D. Currier '< 
George Miner " 
McKaffe " 
Alfred Ceharl " 
Pat. Harrington " 
Thomas Birde " 
L. "NYoodman " 
James Emerson self and team 
Nervine for labor 

E. A. Smith for concrete walk 
Neal & Holbrook resetting the 

side of Hanover street 



20 50 

2 67 
10 67 

4 50 

1 50 
15 00 
10 87 
10 87 
30 00 
13 12 

9 75 
35 62 
15 37 

7 87 

23 25 

75 

7 50 
92 87 
30 00 
13 50 

38 99 
43 87 

6 00 

3 00 

4 50 

5 00 

39 17 
10 50 

7 50 
7 50 

22 50 

7 50 

80 00 

25 50 

on Hanover st. 531 62 
fences on north 

113 97 



77 



To E. G. Haynes paving walk north side Hano- 
ver street . 163 00 

E. Cutting setting- edgestone north side of 

Hanover street . 105 23 

Zadok Wright for blasting . 17 50 

John Campbell self and team . 47 50 

Luther Campbell self and team . 72 50 

A. M. Corning use of team on committee 20 00 

Wm. C. Chase building Willow St., and 

Young street . 84 87 

Nat & W. F. Head brick for walk on north 

side of Hanover street . 220 00 

John K. McQueston land damage River road 
Ward No. 7 

James U. Parker land damage on Hanover st. 

Charles Wells " " 

William D. Buck " " 

John S. Elliott " " 

Nathan Parker " " 

E. W. Harrington " " 

J. S. Cheney " " 

John Plumer " " 

Mary P. Harris " " 

Heirs of S. BeU ' " " 

D. R. Leach '" " 
1st Congregational society land damage on 

Hanover street 
James U. Parker for bricks 
Nathan Parker " 

E. W. Harrington " 
Mary P. Harris " 



27 75 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


26 00 


1 00 


100 


100 


100 


1 00 


100 


23 25 


28 69 


22 42 


58 27 



$4,155 12 
Balance to new account 50 



1,155 62 



78 

GRANITE BRIDGE. 

By balance from old account . 1 49 

Appropriation \ 2,000 00 

Sundry persons for old plank . 65 39 

Transferred from account from Squog bridge 70 25 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Daniels & Co., spikes, paints and oil 68 72 

Z. K Doe for labor . 1 00 

John B. Varick & Co., nails ? 108 90 

Charles Canfield Supt. . 7 50 

Patrick Finn for labor . 10 00 

G. Allard " . 18 83 

J. Gradean " . 4 50 

Thomas Fox " . 5 25 

Timothy Kennedy " . 10 50 

G. Morse " . 12 75 

S. S. Moulton " . 76 63 

Neal & Holbrook replanking bridge . 246 51 

H. M. Bailey tinning partition . 34 76 

Gilman Clough plank . 1 ; 319 35 

Haines & "Wallace plank . , 57 93 

John L. Kennedy painting . 45 91 
Shoe & Leather Dealers Ins. Co., for Premium 30 00 

Howard Ins. Co. . . 30 00 



Balance to new account 



$2,089 04 
48 09 



79 

AMOSKEAG FALLS BKIDGE. 



By balance from old account 


$2 27 




Appropriation 


300 00 


$302 27 


EXPENDITURES. 




To paid T. L. Quimby, for lighting lamps 


$60 00 




Geo. "W. Adams, oil and chimneys 


29 82 




H. M. Bailey, repairing tinning 


10 71 




John L. Kennedy, painting . 


34 83 




Home Insurance Co., annual premium . 


37 50 




iEtna Insurance Co., annual pi'emium . 


37 50 






210 36 




Balance to new account . 


91 91 


$302 27 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

By balance from old account . $99 78 

Appropriation . 6,000 00 

Sundry persons for license entering sewers 493 85 

Cash for entering drains . 8 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid J. B. Varick & Co., for cess-pool grates $14 67 

M. D. Stokes for cess-pool covers . 114 00 

Temple McQueston drain pipe . 331 79 

Wm . McPherson drain pipe . 937 69 

Daniels & Co., cess-pool grates and shovels 84 65 

John Shirley for bricks . 555 00 

S. S. Moulton making patterns . 29 77 

H. & H. R. Pettee for cement . 58 15 



5,601 63 



80 



To J. S. Kidder & Co., cement 
H. K. Tilton stone and labor 
David H. Young laying brick 
Eeed & Frye " " 

Reed P. Silver castings for cess-pools 
David H. Nutt laying brick 
Charles K. Walker engineering 
Lamson & Harden work on cess-pools 
J. L. Smith & Co., for lumber 
Geo. TV. Eiddle for plank 
J. F. James Engineering 

A. H. Lowell grates 

J. E. Stearns engineering 

Geo. TV. Cheney team 

Eeed P. Silver team 

T. L. Hastings for rubber boots 

J. Emerson self and team 

Charles Canfield, superintendent 

John Stearns for labor 

Z. N. Doe " 

"Warren Harvey " 

Timothy Kennedy " 

S. Donohoe " 

G. Allard " 

J. Kelley " 

P.Finn 

E. G. Haynes " 

M. Hanly " 

Thomas Fox " 

M. Lomond " 

M. McCabe " 

M. Shea " 

E. Garnett " 

B. Burnham " 
J. Murphy " 
J. Goodno " 



340 60 


839 51 


470 61 


150 00 


25 45 


33 00 


56 00 


11 67 


30 38 


15 30 


9 00 


4 95 


61 25 


4 50 


8 00 


9 75 


36 25 


93 00 


1 12 


150 


6 25 


18 75 


82 87 


53 04 


24 37 


87 09 


10 50 


15 59 


16 50 


39 65 


30 37 


50 80 


3183 


6 75 


150 


3 75 



81 



To J. Bault for labor 


2 62 


J. Fournier 


it 


7 50 


J. Connor 


it 


133 


M. Scanlan 


tt 


12 42 


John Muldoon 


tt 


45 37 


John Larkin 


tt 


17 62 


J. Hayes 


11 


10 87 


D. Kiley 


tt 


38 25 


M. Lull 


it 


1100 


M. L. Lull 


it 


8 25 


M. Lahey 


tt 


73 20 


M. McLaughlin 


tt 


8 00 


P. Broderick 


At 


69 27 


A. Ceharl 


li 


57 75 


J. McCarty 


tt / 


2175 


Daniel Wheeler 


it 


8 25 


John King 


li 


6 75 


P. Walker 


it 


46 50 


F. Smiley 


u 


16 49 


J. Birde 


it 


27 00 


Geo. W. Butterfield teamster 


3 00 


James Patten teamster 


4 00 


City Team No 1 




3 00 


City Team No. 2 




7 50 


Thomas Bride for labor 


12 00 


P. Ferris 


u 


5175 


Wm. Chase 


(1 


75 


G. Damur 


tt 


10 12 


Luther Campbell 


a 


5 00 


T. Flaherty 


a 


37 


J. Brood 


a 


100- 


N. L. Rose 


it 


23 62 


D. Harrington 


tt 


40 12 


P. Scanlan 


M 


22 50 


J. 0. Hunt 


(4 


49 75 


£ 







82 



To George Miner for labor 


20 25 


Thos. Brennen " 


11 25 


Bloss " 


10 12 


P. Trinity " 


14 25 


John Connor " 


9 00 


E. Hoyt " 


1125 


J. Rowley for pails 


100 


L. "Woodman for labor 


48 37 


John Devine " 


5 25 


P. Nevins " 


40 12 


Chandler & Morgan for overalls , 


2 00 


M. Sullivan for labor 


12 75 


Z. Caouette " 


18 37 


Francis Bean " 


17 25 


J. Kerrin " 


1 67 


J. Ruer " 


19 50 


S. Brunen " 


13 50 


Than. Cargan " 


31 12 


R. S. Harlow " 


15 00 


Ed. Breshnehan " 


34 98 




5,818 89 


Balance to new account 


782 74 


COMMONS. 




By balance from old account 


$31 74 


Appropriation 


. 1,500 00 


City farm for grass 


100 00 


John Larkin over draft refunded 


9 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid Dana D. Thrasher for watching Mer- 
rimack Square, 1867 



18 00 



83 



To Amoskeag Mfg. Go. for iron work on Mer- 
rimack Square . 13 39 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co. for plank on Merri- 
mack Square . 9 40 
Haines & Wallace for lumber . 31 57 
E. A. Smith for concrete walks on Con- 
cord Square . 572 39 
E. A. Smith for- concrete walks on Hano- 
ver Square . 67 20 
S. S. Moulton for repairing fences . 61 99 
Daniels & Co. nails and cess-pool grates . 27 65 
J. E. Stearns surveying for sewer . 14 00 
Eben Knowlton for trimming trees . 79 00 
E. P. Cogswell for trimming trees . 9 00 
Temple McQueston for laying sewer on 

Merrimack Square . 72 00 
John Logue for laying cess-pool on Merri- 
mack Square . 4 87 
T. K. Hubbard lumber . 13 69 
"Warren Harvey for self and team . 17 50 
City team No. 1 . 24 75 
City team No. 2 24 00 
City team single . 18 00 
Chas. Canfield, Supt. . 19 00 
Geo. W. Butterfield teamster . 16 50 
James Patten teamster . 16 00 
James Kerrin teamster . 20 00 
Patrick Finn for labor . 15 00 
Ed. Breshnahan « 19 87 
JohnLarkin " . 18 37 
S.Donohoe " . 17 25 
Timothy Kennedy " . 10 50 
William Chase " .4 00 
D. Mahanna " 4 67 
J. Driscol " 4 50 
George W. Riddle for plank . 15 00 
P. Riley for labor . 1 50 



84: 



To M. Handley for labor 
Thomas Fox " 

J. Gradian M 

T. Kelley « 

M. Sullivan " 

G. Morse " 

M. Lomond " 

G. Allard " 

T. Shea •< 

Balance to new account 



10 63 


24 37 


6 75 


16 12 


3 75 


150 


8 25 


6 33 


3 00 


1,341 26 


299 48 



RESERVOIRS. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 



$69 89 
1,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid John Patterson for cash paid for cleaning 

Reservoir . $15 00 

Daniels & Co., nails . 2 18 

8. S. Moulton for repairs of covers . 7 50 
Fire King Co. No. 2 cleaning out reservoir on 

Manchester Street . 6 00 

Z. N. Doe for labor . 1 50 

George Hunt teaming . 1 00 

James Kerrin teamster . 11 24 

Chas. Canfield for care of reservoirs .. 52 66 
Daniel W. Garland for stone for reservoir at 

Janesville . 49 28 
Daniel W. Garland for stone for reservoir on 

Merrimack street near Hall street 94 50 



85 



To John P. Young work on reservoir, Merrimack 



street 


. 




162 00 


Amoskeag Co. No. 1 pumping out reservoir 


5 00 


J. M. Kobinson for two 


pairs rubber boots 


900 


Wm. McPherson mason 


work 


12 54 


Daniel Mahanna labor 






2 33 


James Emerson self and team 




3125 


"Warren Harvey " 


it 




10 00 


E. S. Harlow labor 






12 75 


E. Garnett " 






8 25 


A. Ceharl " 






6 75 


J. O. Hunt " 






8 25 


P. Lahey " 






18 33 


Than Cargen " 






1 50 


Francis Bean " 






150 


Zadok "Wright for masonry 




33 75 


A. Wright " 






34 50 


M. Lomond for labor 






1 00 


D. Harrington " 






100 


N. L. Rose " 






100 


G. Allard " 






100 


L. "Woodman •' 






9 37 


P. Nevine " 






2 62 






$614 55 


Balance to new account 






455 34 



$1,069 89 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



By balance from old account 

Received of J. A. Weston for wood sold 
Received of J. B. Sawyer for lots sold 

To paid C. F. Livingston for printing deeds 
Frank Preston putting in pump . 

Abbott & Kelly for painting • 



196 51 


345 56 


325 00 


7 50 


57 67 


150 



$867 07 



86 



To Abbott & Kelly 


for painting 


150 


Kadmiel Haselton for labor 


225 00 


G. A. Haselton 


a 


9 00 


Albert Chase 


u 


17 75 


James F. Smith 


a 


33 00 


B. F. Mitchell 


• 


7 03 




$358 45 


Balance to new ; 


iccount 


508 62 



$867 07 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 

JEtna Insurance Co., overdraft 
Phoenix " " " 

Transferred from Revenue Account 

EXPENDITURES 



86178 


10,000 00 


22 50 


1125 


1,478 10 

*io 070 CO 


tp i- — jO i O UJ 


$12,373 63 



For detail of Expenditures, see Engineer's Report. 



87 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



By balance from old account 


$3 38 


Appropriation 


. 8,000 00 


Cash for costs and fines 


. 3,267 70 


Revenue account transferred 


500 79 



$11,771 87 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid J. D. Howard 


night watch 


. $732 00 


T. L. Quimby 


a 


732 00 


Patrick Doyle 


a 


732 00 


Henry Bennett 


a 


732 00 


H. ~W. Longa 


tt 


732 00 


James Duffy 


a 


732 00 


Wm. T. Fogg 


a 


732 00 


H. H. Noyes 


a 


732 00 


W. H. B. Newhall 


a 


732 00 


P. S. GriflSn 


it 


2 00 


H. J. Tirrell 


tt 


2 00 


A. H. Merrill 


a 


5 00 


H. C Hunton 


tt 


6 00 


O. D. Carpenter 


it 


2 00 


John Smith 


a 


6 00 


Hugh Conroy 


tt 


2 00 


W. D. Perkins 


it 


6 00 


N. C. Barker 


a 


6 00 


A. H. Dinsmore 


tt 


5 00 


L. Andrews 


a 


300 


J. Melvin 


a , 


4 00 


E. Cutting 


a 


7 00 


A. J. Dickey 


i. 


3 00 


H. W. Powell 


ti 


3 00 


E. Garner 


ti 


3 00 


L. Shelters 


ti 


1 00 



$7,386 00 





DAY FOLICE. 




Toy. D. Howard day police 


80 00 


T. L. Quimby 


tt 


46 50 


A. F. Quimby 


tt 


65 50 


Patrick Doyle 


tt 


75 50 


Henry Bennett 


tt 


62 50 


J. P. Fellows 


tt 


8 00 


H. W. Longa 


tt 


58 50 


James Duffy 


tt 


6150 


William T. Fogg 


tt 


30 00 


W. H. B. Newhall 


tt 


21 00 


H. Colby 


a • 


1 00 


H. H. Noyes 


tt 


10 00 


G. W. McConnell 


a 


100 


W. N. Chamberlin 


a 


7 00 


E. G. Hastings 


«« 


9 00 


A. H. Merrill 


« 


27 00 


H. C. Hunton 


it 


25 00 


N. Baker 


a 


2 00 


B. Sleeper 


a 


1 00 


O. D. Carpenter 


tt 


11 00 


E. G. Woodman 


tt 


13 00 


John Smith 


a 


4 00 


Hugh Conroy 


a 


9 00 


W. D. Perkins 


a 


14 00 


N. C. Barker 


tt 


19 00 


J. T. Chase 


it 


18 00 


James E. Bailey 


tt 


8 00 


A. H. Dinsmore 


it 


9 50 


Franklin Goss 


tt 


4 00 


L. Andrews 


tt 


6 00 


G. W. Nichols 


tt 


1100 


G. E. Allen 


tt 


4 00 


F. D. Heath 


tt 


4 00 


John E. Stearns 


tt 


2 00 


B. W. Robinson 


it 


3 00 


L. Shelters 


tt 


12 00 



89 



To E. Garner day police 

H.W.Powell " 

Austin Jenkins " 

H. J. Tirrell " 

E. Cutting " 

G. W. Varnum " 

H. Fradd " 

J. D. Edgerly " 
John K. McQueston " 

J. P. Wilson " 

A. J. Dickey " 

P. S. Griffin " 

W. Eaton " 

Joel Daniels " 

J. C. Head " 

O. Dodge " 

John Smith " 

A. Jenkins " 



9 00 
11 00 
8 00 
2 00 
37 00 
8 00 
100 
100 
2 00 
14 00 
6 00 
8 00 
2 00 
8 00 
4 00 
8 00 
2 00 
100 



-$875 50 



Samuel Upton, salary Police Justice 
Samuel Upton office rent 
E. M. Topliff, Special Justice 
Wm. B. Patten, City Marshal (salary) 
Wm. B. Patten cash paid, witness fees 
Wm. B. Patten cash paid for postage, ex- 
press &c. 
Eben Carr, Assistant Marshal, salary 
Eben Carr use of team 
Food for prisoners 
JohnD. Howard killing and burying dogs 
H. C. Tilton for envelopes 
C. F. Livingston for printing Posters 
John B. Clarke " " " 

H. A. Gage " " " 

H. M. Bailey for stove for Court Room 
H. D. Lord for washing Lobby 
L. B. Bodwell & Co. for wood 



1,000 00 

50 00 

122 00 

800 00 

19198 

11 35 

650 00 

197 50 

88 88 

44 25 

2 00 
4 50 

63 20 

3 00 
17 00 
15 40 
44 90 



90 



To "William Craigue carrying wood and coal 
E. P. Johnson & Co. for coal 
Timothy Kennedy, sawing and carrying in 

wood 
James Collins for pitch wood 
Gilman B. Fogg for repairing lock to Lobby 
H. M. Bailey & Son for second stove for 

Lobby 
Wm. H. Fisk for books and blanks 
Julia Finnegan for washing 
Mary Russell for washing 
Hartshorn & Pike for repairing stove 
Campbell & Han scorn printing 
Daniels & Co. for oil 



ll 


3 77 


• 


92 61 


a 


4 75 


. 


3 00 




10 00 




5 60 




52 00 




10 00 




3 00 




7 88 




9 80 




3 00 



$11,771 87 



LIGHTING STREETS. 

By balance from old account . $659 40 

Appropriation . 2,500 00 

Cash of James Corning for damage to 

lamp post . 12 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



$3,171 40 



To paid Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas . $1,675 67 
Manchester Gas Light Co, for lighting 

lamps . 623 35 

Manchester Gas Light Co. for repairs . 46 00 

Colley & Brown for repairing lanterns . 25 51 
Brown & Potter repairing and lettering 

lanterns . 20 25 

Hartshorn & Pike for repairing lanterns 29 63 

Geo. W. Adams for oil . 6 00 

Barr & Clapp for oil, wicking and chimnies 20 82 



91 



To H. H. Noyes lighting street lamps 
H. M. Bailey for lamps 

Balance to new account 



30 00 
8 55 



2,485 78 
685 62 



5,171 40 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



By balance from old account 


$596 12 


Appropriation 


1,500 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




To paid John B. Clarke printing Report, 1867 $578 25 


Advertising proposals for lumber 


10 50 


" assessors notice 


5 63 


" non-resident taxes 


28 50 


" soldiers bounties 


100 58 


" engine house for sale 


2 00 


" bills against the city 


4 50 


" removal of snow and ice 


3 00 


" abatement of taxes 


4 50 


" ordinance upon inventory 


14 63 


Printing Roll-calls for 1868 


17 38 


" for inspectors 


9 95 


" Sundry notices 


52 91 


" Check-lists 


380 00 


Campbell & Hanscom advertising propos; 


ds 


for lumber 


8 75 


Advertising assessors' notice 


7 00 


" soldiers' bounties 


93 12 


. " ordinance on inventory 


10 25 


Printing sundry notices 


24 87 



$2,096 12 



$1,212 33 



$143 99 



92 



To Arcade Printing Press *500 dog licenses 6 50 

" " •' 500 notices to jurors 8 50 

" " " 300 notices 3 00 

To H. A. Gage printing tax bills 
Printing receipts 

C. F. Livingston printing notices overseers 

of poor 
Printing placards for treasurer 

" tax bills " 

" : notices " 

" Mayor's address 

" notices of committees 

11 notices of elections 

" circulars on death of Judge Bell 

" envelopes 

,, bill-heads 

" Health notice 

" bill-heads 

" record of deeds 

Wm. H. Fisk pencils for assessors 
Books and papers 

Paper, stamps, &c, overseers of poor 
Blank book 

Win. G. Everett paper, pencils and penholders 9 82 
L. S. Learned " " " 9 75 

L. S. Learned rep. records for "Ward 8 5 00 

L. S. Learned books for assessors . 70 00 

B. W. Sanborn 100 copies Laws for Cities 20 00 

H. C. Tilton, paper, pens, ink and penholders 15 95 
H. R. Chamberlin cash paid for stationery 4 46 

McFarland & Jenks advertising non-res. taxes 28 50 
Geo. F. King S doz. pencils for treasurer 1 00 





22 50 


• 


3 00 


rs 


175 




150 




9 50 




5 00 




30 00 




10 75 




2 50 




2 25 




3 12 




3 75 




13 25 




5 75 




16 50 




1 75 




75 31 




7 49 




18 63 



$18 00 



$25 50 



$105 52 



18 



93 

To C. TV. Farmer cash paid for stationery "Ward 8 1 25 
A. Quimby stationery . 23 22 

1,797 57 
Balance to new account . 298 55 



$2,096 12 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

By balance from old account . $959 56 

Appropriation . 6,000 00 



$6,959 56 



EXPENDITURES 

To paid Manchester Gas Light Co., gas No. 4 

Ward room . $14 60 

H. Clough wood for No. 4 "Ward room . 1 00 

Mrs. Landrigan washing No. 5 "Ward room 2 50 

Mrs. Donovan " "5 " 5 00 

Eben Knowlton tiimming trees . 5 00 

Lee & Sleeper books for indigent children 20 00 

H. C. Tilton " " " 81 58 

H. C. Tilton statutes for assessors 5 00 

Manchester Post Office for postage 15 00 

H. R. Chamberlin making annual report 1867 125 00 
Joseph E. Bennett making general index to 

mortgages . 100 00 
J. E. Bennett making up record of deeds to 

and from the city . 30 00 

J. E. Bennett cash paid for express . 2 55 

Geo. H. Colby wood for No. 8 Ward room 1 87 

G. W. Varnum washing No. 3 Ward room 3 00 

G. W. Varnum " " 3 " " 4 00 

G. W. Varnum burying nuisance . 5 00 



94 



To Mrs. Connell washing No. 5 Ward room 
A. Bodwell wood for No. 4 Ward room 
A. J. Mayhew rent of hall for Ward 2 
S. S. Moulton for fitting up ward room No. 3 
" " " repairing watering trough 

" " " making tree boxes 

Daniels & Co., for nails for tree boxes 
Daniels & Co., brush for copying press 

" " nails for pump on Hanover st. 

M. G. J. Tewksbnry, return of deaths and births 3 31 
S. B. Howe for return of deaths and births 
W. W. Brown " " " 

Leonard French " " " 

William Campbell for maintaining watering 

trough 
T. P. Heath for damage to sleigh at fire 
Isaac Huse team 1867 while assessor 
Allen Partridge team " " 
Geo. W. Thayer " " " 

A. C. Wallace " " " 

Isaac Whittemore team " " 
P. B. Putney lot small flags July 4, 1867 
J. M. Gillis damage to potato crop by over- 
flow of common sewer 
John Twombly for repairing sidewalk 
Ezra Kimball team to notify jurors 

A. Quiinby for books to children of S. Folsom 
Miner & Coburn repairing water pipe 
J. Q. A. Sargent " " 
James T. Haselton setting trees 
J. G. Coult " " 
Daniel W. Reynolds for work on privateway 
Robert Woodburn for posting notices 
Haines & Wallace lumber for tree boxes 
Abbott & Kelly painting tree box 

B. K. Hoyt " " boxes 
William Kimball white washing tree boxes 



2 50 


100 


24 00 


12 50 


2 70 


176 24 


16 52 


62 


t. 60 


is 3 31 


175 


3 40 


2 45 


3 00 


5 50 


28 00 


15 00 


15 00 


15 00 


29 00 


6 75 


10 00 


6 12 


2 00 


3 12 


5 65 


7 40 


43 50 


46 50 


3150 


2 25 


84 79 


88 


68 66 


40 00 



95 



To John B. McCrillis iron bands for tree boxes 188 00 
Joseph L. Smith & Co. lumber " " 1175 

David Wells " " " 60 00 

T.R.Hubbard " " " 168 

John B. Varrick & Co. nails 38 

E. P. Cogswell for trimming trees 3 00 

L. B. Bodwell wood for court house . 10 99 

"Wm. McPherson repairing plastering on En- 
gine house Manchester st. 9 25 
J. E. Clough for cleaning out vault, 1866 4 00 
Augustus Fisher assistance surveying City Farm 27 00 
Leon De Foushan " " " " 4 50 
J. E. Stearns " " " " 44 00 
Geo. Hunt teaming water pipe 5 12 
E. S. Cutter services in case of E. C. Stevens 27 40 
"Walter Neal damage by overflow of old culvert 200 00 
Oilman Bean damage by overflow of culvert 20 00 
Rebecca P. Young " " " 92 33 
Lot Knowles " " " 27 00 
David R. Leach " " " 113 00 
Manchester Cornet Band gratuity 200 00 
J. B. Clark expenses to Lowell, stone crusher 2 30 
S. Squires steel box for treasurer's safe 450 00 
( H. C. Reynolds for damage to team by defect 

in highway . 20 00 

John P. Newell abatement of tax on bank 

stock 1866 . 36 45 

Moses Lull damage to wagon by defect in 

highway . 3 00 

-ZEtna Ins.. Co. premium on old engine house 9 00 
E. C. Bryant for right of way across his land 6 67 
Abbott & Kelley setting glass Ward room No. 4 6 66 
Fairbanks, Brown & Co., balance in exchang- 
ing platform scales 175 00 
Geo. W. Riddle for plank . 19 40 
Jos. Brown ribbon for stamp . 1 00 



96 



To Hartshorn & Pike repairing stoves for old En- 
gine house 
N. TV. Gove copying non-resident tax -list 
Win. McPherson work on platform scales 
Hartshorn & Pike pump on Hanover street 
E. A. Smith laying concrete sidewalk on 

south side Hanover square 
Clough & Foster lumber for scales 
Daniel W. Fling showing location of sewers 
S. S. James & Co., teams 
J. F. James running line of City Farm . 
J. A. "Weston for use of team 
Hill & Co. express on money packages 
Cheney & Co. express on money packages 
S. N. Bell Counsel to City Solicitor 
Gilman Reed for pond sand 
Palmer & Co. putting in rings to posts 
G. F. Bosher & Co. selling old Engine 

House 
J. F. James measuring for mile stones 

C. N. Fitts damage to horse by defect in 

road . 5 00 

R. J. P. Goodwin postage stamps and 

paper . 1 25 

F. T. E. Richardson postage stamps and 

paper . 30 

R. H. Hassam for postage stamps and paper 88 

James Hayes postage stamps and paper . 42 

Bay State Ins. Co. premium on hearse . 16 00 

T. R. Hubbard lumber for scales . 13 00 

D. H. Young mason work on foundation 

for scales . 3 00 

H. D. Lord for care of Court House . 55 00 

James "W. Lathe postage stamps and paper 76 

$3,375 20 
Balance to new acount 3,584 36 



7 87 


8 00 


2 00. 


2129 


L25 00 


43 44 


4 00 


8 25 


4 00 


65 00 


180 


55 


10 00 


4 00 


2 00 


2120 


34 00 



$6,959 56 



97 



CITY HALL AND STORES. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 
Rent of City Hall 
Rent of City Hall stores 
Rent of Police Court room 
Rent of Common Council room 
E. F. Brown for gas burned 
Hartshorn & Pike for overdraft 



$31 25 

1,000 00 

227 50 

1,688 00' 

42 00 

58 00 

33 39 

20 00 



3,100 14 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid Timothy Kennedy for sawing - and 

carrying in wood . 10 25 
Ed. Bresnahan for sawing and carrying 

in wood . 1 75 
John Hayes for sawing and carrying in 

wood . 5 37 
John Joint for sawing and carrying in 

wood . 1 75 

Z. N. Doe for charcoal . 28 00 

E. P. Johnson & Co. for coal . 108 21 

E. P. Johnson & Co. for wood . 4 55 

Caleb C. Haselton for wood . 15 50 

William Parsons for pitch wood . 4 00 

James Collins " 3 00 
Wm. McPhcrson for plastering Common 

Council room . 55 53 

Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas . 453 18 

S. F. Murry & Co. for sponge . 30 

Isaac W. Smith Ins. premium . 35 00 

Equitable Ins. Co. premium . 35 00 

JEtna Ins. Co. premium . 73 00 

Daniels & Co. for locks and hard ware for 

Assessors' room . 27 18 
p 



98 



To Daniels & Co. for oil . 2 76 
Dauiels & Co. for ink wells . 2 50 
Daniels & Co. for locks for Common Coun- 
cil room . 2 10 
Daniels & Co. for coal-hods, nails &c. . 6 53 
T. R. Hubbard, sash, doors and lumber 

for Assessors' room . 106 78 
Abbott & Kelly painting Assessors' room, 

Common Council room and Treas. office 146 89 

Geo. H. Dudley repairing desks . 28 42 

Mary O'Neii for washing . 70 

Julia Finnegan " 6 50 
Mary Russell " .19 95 
W. F. Sleeper for soap 

David Libby for brooms . 2 95 

A. J. Young for wood . 8 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co. for wood . 7 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co. for coal . 42 74 

E. F. Brown for coal . 25 00 

Ira Rowe for wood . 13 50 

A. B. Corliss for wood . 25 50 

Geo. W. Adams for friction matches . 1 05 
H. D. Lord sawing wood and carrying 

in fuel . 6 75 
H. D. Lord, cash paid for taking up carpet 1 20 
H. I>. Lord, cash paid for washing . 2 00 
C. A. Smith for spittoons . 6 25 
Hoyt & Cox, furniture for Mayor's room 117 25 
Barton & Co. carpet for Mayor's and Com- 
mon Council rooms . 322 16 
Wm. H. Fisk, paper for Treas. office . 56 23 
Oilman B. Fogg repairing keys and locks 3 40 
Neal & Holbrook fitting up Assessors' 

room 82 40 
J. Q. A. Sargent, piping Assessors' room 

and School Committee room . 20 90 
J. Stickney, enameled cloth for Assessors' 

room . 8 78 



99 



To Hartshorn & Pike, stove for Assessors' 
room 
Hartshorn & Pike Rep. stove 
S. S. Moulton " chairs 

A. G. Fairbanks " " 

D. F. Straw " clock 

J. F. Wiley " " 

F. Williams rep. roof to City Hall 
Boyd & Hopkins cloth for awning 
Charles Bunton for hitch rings 
Brown & Flanders for ice 

To balance to new account 



55 73 


, 2120 


1 68 


85 


6 50 


150 


27 33 


1 65 


150 


7 81 


$2,065 99 


1,034 15 



$3,100 14 



CITY OFFICERS. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 
A. J. Tebbets overdraft 



$110 11 

8,000 00 

5 00 



$8,115 11 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid James A. Weston Mayor . $1,000 00 
Joseph E. Bennett City Clerk . 1,000 00 
H. R. Chamberlin, Treasurer 400 00 
H. R. Chamberlin Collector 700 00 1,100 00 
H. D. Lord, Messenger . 600 00 
C. H. Bartlett, solicitor to March 17, 1868 120 00 
Geo. A. Crosby, city physician . 50 00 
Geo. A. Crosby, " extra on ac- 
count of small pox patients • 50 00 
Richard J. P. Goodwin, health officer . 25 00 



100 





WARD CLERKS. 




) Charles W. Farmer 


1867 


2 50 


«< it 


1868 


5 00 


Daniel K. White 


1867 


2 50 


James Hayes 


1868 


5 00 


E. J. P. Goodwin 


it 


5 00 


James W. Lathe 


a 


5 00 


Frank T. E. Richardson " 


5 00 


Leonard Shelters 


k" 


5 00 


Eos well H. Hassam 


a 


5 00 


L. E. Wallace 


a 
MODERATORS 


5 00 


Seth T. Hill 


1868 


3 00 


John T. Eobinson 


a 


3 00 


D. L. Stevens 


1867 


3 00 


D. L. Stevens 


1868 


3 00 


William Little 


a 


3 00 


Holmes E. Pettee 


a 
SELECTMEN 


3 00 


Eodney J. Hardy 


1867 


5 00 


tt u a ' 


1868 


5 00 


I>. B. Eastman 


1867 


5 00 


Ebenezer Hartshorn 


1866 


5 00 


Joseph S. Sanborn 


1867 


5 00 


John C. Head 


a 


5 00 


a ft a 


1868 


500 


R. W. Lang 


u 


5 00 


John Burke 


a 


5 00 


William Riordan 


a 


5 00 


Gilman Stearns 


a 


500 


G. A. Craig 


a 


5 00 


Wm McPherson 


a 


500 



101 



To Henry W. Powell 
Uriah A. Cars well 
Henry II. White 
Ezra Kimball 
Joel Daniels 
John W. Dickey 
Damon Y. Stearns 
Patrick Keher Jr. 
T. P. Heath 
"Win. H. Gihnore 
Henry Clongh 
S. F. Stanton 
N. E. Morrill 
P. F. Emerson 
J. B. Hart well 
George C. Baker 



T. B. Brown 

Allen Partridge 

Jerry Hayes 

Thomas Howe 

Isaac D. Palmer 

Isaac Whittcmore 

Andrew C. Wallace 

George W. Thayer 

Charles Currier 

J. G. Cilley 

J. E. Bennett, Assistant Clerk 



l 


5 00 


( 


500 


c 


5 00 


t 


5 00 


I 


5 00 


I 


5 00 


I 


5 00 


i 


5 00 


i 


5 00 


I 


5 00 


< 


5 00 


u 


5 00 


i 


5 00 


i 


5 00 


it 


5 00 


tl 


5 00 


ASSESSOUS. 






70 50 




177 00 




63 00 




121 50 




139 50 




132 00 




105 00 




208 50 




129 00 




258 00 


Clerk 


198 00 



OVEKSEERS OF POOR 



S. S. Moulton 
S. J. Young 
M. E. George 
Hiram W. Savory 
Timothy Sullivan 



50 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 



To J. C. Smith 
John Field 



102 



20 00 
20 00 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



H. T. Mowatt 


1867 and 1868 




20 00 


"Waterman Smith 


1867 




10 00 


Moody Currier 


1867 and 1868 




20 00 


Geo. W. Weeks 


1867 and 1868 




20 00 


William Little 


1867 and 1868 




20 00 


J. Y. McQueston 


1867 




10 00 


James P. Walker 


1867 and 1868 




20 00 


T. L. Thorpe 


1867 




iooo 


M. P. Hall 


1868 




10 00 


T. S. Montgomery 


1868 




10 00 


William Little, Clerk 




35 00 


D. C Gould jr. 






10 00 


E. M. Kellogg, Liquor Agt. 




225 00 


J. G. Edgerly, Supt. Public Instruction 


1,200 00 


H. M. Gillis, Clerk of Common Council 


2 yrs 200 00 


Liquor Agency foi 


ten months' sal. 


of ao 


'ent 250 00 




$8,015 00 


Balance to new account 


• 


100 11 



CITY LIBKARY. 

By balance from old account 
Appropriation 
Transferred from revenue account 

EXPENDITURES. 



$15 69 

$2,200 00 

82 00 



To paid Manchester Gas Light Co., for gas $119 20 

C. H. Marshall, Librarian, salary . 600 00 

C. H. Marshall cash paid . 23 98 

S. N. Bell rent of rooms . 250 00 



103 



To S. N. Bell cash paid 
M. O. Pearson painting 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
Trustees 

C. F. Livingston printing catalogue 
.iSStna Insurance Co., premium 
J. Q A. Sargent putting in gas pipe 
Wm. H. Fisk printing cards 
Daniels & Co., brush 
Hartshorn & Pike for stove-pipe 
Campbell & Hanscom for "Daily Union" 
Phoenix Insurance Co., premium 
T. K. Hubbard wood 
P. C. Cheney & Co., matting 



3 50 


3 25 


72 63 


. 1,000 00 


98 00 


32 50 


7 34 


28 40 


175 


2 32 


6 25 


25 00 


2 25 


21 32 



$2,297 69 



PAVING STREETS. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 
Transferred from revenue account 



$175 93 

3,000 00 

86 41 



$3,262 34 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid Daniel W. Garland for paving stones 
" " " " edge stone 

" " " " flagging stone 

Moses D. Stokes for paving stones 

H. J. Tirrill for cobble stones 

D. C. Currier " " 

J. O'Brien " " 

Rodney Hayden " " 

T. R. Hubbard for stakes 

J. L. Smith & Co. for stakes 

Erastus Cutting for paving 

J. E. Stearns for setting grades 



1,384 25 

41 60 

44 40 

442 50 

3 00 

1 50 
3 75 

89 50 
13 40 

2 50 
617 83 

54 00 



104 



To City team No. 1 




2100 


it a 9 




26 25 


"Warren Harvey self and team 


51 2'j 


James Emerson " 


it a 


18 75 


Charles Canfield, Supt. 


16 50 


Geo. W. Butterfield teamster . 


14 50 


James Patten 


a 


17 50 


James Kerrin 


it 


2 50 


Ed. Bresnahan 


laborer 


2 25 


Patrick Finn 


.( 


1 67 


J. Larkin 


ii 


1 12 


S. Donohoe 


a 


10 12 


Thomas Fox 


a 


16 49 


G. Allard 


it 


12 67 


M. Lomond 


a 


16 23 


McCabe 


a 


4 12 


M. Shea 


<< 


16 87 


E. Garnet 


u 


15 37 


J. Muldoon 


it 


3 00 


P. Broderick 


a 


5 29 


J. McCarty 


it 


3 00 


Zeb. Caouette 


a 


75 


D. Harrington 


a 


19 87 


Alfred Ceharl 


a 


11 62 


J. Meloncn 


a 


10 50 


J. C. Head 


a 


133 43 


John Murphy 


a 


24 75 


John Stcurns 


a 


26 62 


J. Dowd 


a 


75 


J. Walker 


a 


2 63 


Samuel Brown Jr. 


a 


17 50 


E. Mansur sharpening tools 


3 05 


Wells labore 


r 


4 87 


P. Nevin ". 




3 75 


P. Ferris " 




7 87 


F. Cantlin " 




7 12 


Haines & Wallace, 


stakes 


1158 



105 



COURT HOUSE. 



By balance from last year 
Appropriation 



$12,496 72 
. 6,500 00 



$18 996 72 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid J. B. Varick & Co's bill for glass 
Ford & Kimball's bill for iron fence 
M. D. Stokes, bal. on stone and stone worl 
M. W. Oliver, architect, bal. account 
O. D. Carpenter, mason for extra work 
Alpbens Gay, balance of account 
Daniel W. Garland for edge stone 
Lamson & Marden, posts for fence 
E. Cutting, setting edge stone and posts 

E. A. Smith for concrete walks 
Abbott & Kelly for painting and setting 

glass 

F. P. Hutchinson for iron work 
D. & D. Gregg for sash 

J. Q. A. Sargent for gas piping and fix. 

tures 
Haines & Wallace for lumber 
J. A. Weston, expense to Boston 
Joseph B. Clark, expense to Boston, Lo~w 

ell and Cambridge 
Wm. P. Newell expense on committee 
P. K. Chandler " " " 

Hoyt & Cox for furniture 
Barton & Co. for carpets 
Neal & Holbrook for table for Comr's room 
Geo. H. Dudley for making coal bin 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co. stock and labor on 

locks 



$385 59 

1,534 50 

822 74 

230 00 

30 00 

9,144 80 

92 00 

341 50 

133 35 

409 05 

lil 74 
45 01 

20 20 

335 90 

21 18 
1 [5 

15 03 

8 30 

7 45 

1,309 97 

852 11 

14 00 

34 50 

25 95 



106 



To W. H. Hubbard for posts 

Orrin Carlton for teaming sash 

Manchester Print Works, making 1 pattern 

J. E. Stearns, making plan of fence 

Chas. A. Smith for spittoons 

Gilman B. Fogg for extra keys 

Geo. H. Dudley, rep. door and putting in 

ink wells 
C. H. Hodgman, teaming 
T. R. Hubbard for parting beads and plank 
E. P. Richardson, insurance premium 
Phoenix Ins. Co. premium 
Charles Williams for stoves 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co. work on window 

frames 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co. shutters, door and 

lock 
Wm. Hall & Co. for lock 
Hartshorn & Pike stoves and furnaces 
Daniels &. Co. oil, brushes etc. 



C. N. Annis 
Charles Canfield 
James Kerr in 
Patrick Finn 
Ed. Bresnahan 
John Larkin 
S. Donohoe 
Timothy Kennedy 
Geo. W. Butterfield 

F. Smiley 
James Patten 
City team No. 1 
City team No. 2 
J. Driscoll 

G. Allard 
Thomas Fox 
Single team 



laborer 



6 75 


2 00 


3 00 


16 25 


4125 


6 00 


5 75 


2 50 


50 47 


39 50 


38 50 


216 58 



51 22 

265 74 

25 00 

1,196 37 

41 94 

2 62 

5 00 

8 33 

7 50 

9 75 
4 50 

6 75 
9 00 
700 

4 50 

5 00 
9 75 

6 75 
4 50 
4 50 

8 62 
4 50 



107 



To Mary Ann Russell cleaning 
Julia Finnegan " 



Balance to new account 



9 45 

8 00 



5,065 16 
931 56 



$18 996 72 



INTEREST. 




balance from old account 


$578 39 


Appropriation 


. 22,000 00 


Revenue account transferred 


787 50 



$23,365 69 



EXPENDITUKES. 



To paid Coupons on Bonds 


$20,610 00 


Josiah Fitts jr. 


30 00 


D. Austin 


157 50 


A. F. Carr 


150 00 


Rhoda Flanders 


30 00 


Fred H. Gerry 


30 00 


Ira B. Osgood 


30 00 


H. D. Lord 


6 60 


Jesse Gibson 


48 00 


Wm. P. Merrill 


42 00 


Manchester National Bank 


58 12 


Amoskeag National Bank 


58 12 


Rebecca W. Smith 


90 00 


Alvin Pratt . 


91 00 


John Ordway , 


300 00 


Calvin Vickery 


138 00 


Cyrus Hazen 


24 00 


N. Hunt 


877 56 


J. E. Bennett 


60 00 


Mary P. Harris 


240 00 


Rose Ann Lane 


6 00 


Solomon Whitehouse 


30 00 



108 

To Walter H. Noyes . 30 00 

Elijah P. Parkhurst . 125 04 

S. S. Moulton . 30 00 

S. J. Young . 73 75 



$23,366 65 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 



By amount of Loan Jau. 1, 1868 


$32,230 00 


" " for 1868 


11,396 00 

f-16 6°6 on 




<Jpr*U,U*rfU \J\J 


EXPENDITURES. 




To paid Elijah P. Parkhurst 


625 00 


Walter H. Noyes 


. 1,000 00 


Alvin Pratt 


500 00 


Wm. P. Merrill 


700 00 


Manchester National Bank 


. 3.000 00 


Amoskeag National Bank 


. 3,000 00 


D. Austin 


500 00 




9,325 00 


Amount Tern. Loan Jan. 1, 1869 


$37,301 00 

$16,626 00 


MILITIA. 




By balance from old account 


. $420 10 


Appropriation 


200 00 
$620 10 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Sheridan Guards to April 17, 1868 81 95 

National Guards . 77 08 

Smyth Riffles . 77 08 

Head Guards to April 17, 1868 . 50 00 

Amoskeag Veterans to April 17, 1868 . 50 00 



109 



To War Veterans 
1st Co. Cavalry 
Section B. Light Batteiy 
Clark Guards 



83 08 
70 83 
33 34 
14 58 





$537 94 


Balance to new account, 


82 16 


NEW HE APSE. 




By Special Appropriation 




EXPENDITURES. 




To paid George Kcnney for hearse 


742 00 


Win. G. Perry, Com. expenses to Nashua 


5 30 



$620 10 



747 30 



$747 30 



LIQUOR AGENCY. 



By E. M. Kellogg for liquors sold . $650 57 

Acct. of officers' salary for salary of agent 25< > 00 



$900 57 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid I. P. Baker for liquors . 131 76 

E. M. Kellogg, salary 3 months . 75 00 

" " cash paid . 43 18 

A. F. Lauten for liquors . 305 12 

John B. Clarke for advertising . 6 42 

Joseph B. Clark, expense to Boston 1867 4 00 

J. N. Bruce, painting sign . 14 50 

$579 98 

Overdrawn on old account . 73 94 

Balance to new account . 246 65 



$900 57 



110 

REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 



By balance from old account . $354 56 

Transferred from revenue account . 183 73 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Neal & Holbrook rep. city stables . $173 94 

" " " No. 4 Ward 

room . 40 40 

Gilman Clough for lumber . 14 68 

D. H. Young, brick work on city stables 87 07 

Daniels & Co. hooks lead and zinc . 4 65 

John C. Young, slating roof . 188 55 

T. R. Hubbard for blinds . 9 00 

Wm. McPherson, repairing plastering in 

Ward room No. 4 14 00 
Chas. Clough, white- washing engine house 

Manchester st. 6 00 



WATERING STREETS. 



By balance from old account . $1 25 

Transferred from revenue account . 409 79 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid John Campbell for watering streets . 386 00 

Joseph B. Clark expense to Boston 1867 . 6 75 

Daniels & Co. for screws . 32 

Hartshorn & Pike for repairing rams . 9 97 
F. P. Hutchinson, blacksmith work on 

rams . 8 00 



$538 29 



$538 29 



$41104 



$41104 



Ill 

DOG TAX. 



Amt. collected on tax of 1867 . $75 00 

" " " " 1868 . 134 00 



$209 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid O. M. Winegar for sheep killed and 

injured . $20 00 

Balance to new account . 189 00 



$209 00 



COUNTY TAX. 



By amount appropriated . $16,740 40 

To amt. paid II. B. Atherton, County Treas. $16,740 49 



STATE TAX. 

By appropriation . $48,987 50 

To paid Peter Sanborn, State Treasurer .$48,987 50 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES 

By balance from old account . $7,296 76 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Samuel Gamble, overtaxed 1865 . 43 20 

G. B. Hamblett " " 5 18 

HughFarrell " " . 5 22 

Andrew G. Tucker " " 21 77 

Henry Stevens, lived in Pembroke " 43 05 

Thomas Kelley, poor " 5 22 

Cornelius W. Strain, in the army " 5 22 



112 



To Edward Strain, over 70 1865 

A. W. Channery, could not find " 

Newell Tilton, insane " 

John Kelley, no dog " 
Moody Currier, tax on property of heirs 
Walter French, 1865 

John Adams no dog 1866 

Nathaniel Corning in Boston " 

Samuel Corning jr. in Boston " 
James P. Caldwell 21, May 17, 1867 " 

A. A. Rust no carriage " 
W. M. Kendrick lived in Lawrence " 

L. M. Cox was down South " 

Geo. W. Kidder in the army " 

John R. Hynes in the army " 

John M. Crystal " 

Ann M. Long did not own " 
Heirs of Daniel Farmer illegal tax 1866 

Allen Partridge " " " 

George Taylor taxed twice " 

Horace Weeks lived in Vermont " 

Nathan B. Clement dead " 

Thomas Baxter " " 

John Young over taxed " 

Lucius Fanner " 

John Murphey " 

M. T.Donohoe " 

Josiah Philbrick " 

John Griffin " 

Joseph Archambault jr. " 

G. B. Hamblett " 

Horatio AY. Longa " 

G. W. Hartford " 

Patrick Keher " 

Patrick Hamilton no dog or horse " 
A. J. Wilson & Co. 



5 22 


4 35 


5 22 


100 


34 18 


1 00 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


2 18 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


2 43 


375 00 


25 00 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


2 06 


6 34 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


5 84 


6 38 


5 84 


5 84 


11 71 


173 


17 02 



113 

To J. A. Chamberlin did not own 1867 

David E. Belcher paid in Lowell " 

Levi II. Sleeper taxed twice " 

Willard Colburn paid in Chester " 

Alfred J. Harriman paid in Lowell " 

F. L. Prince no dog " 
Edward Strain over 70 " 
John Peacock pauper " 
John A\ r . Roby paid in Methuen " 
John Griffin pauper " 
Abram Smith no dog - " 
Lyman Roby paid in Warner " 
Caleb Hutchins over 70 " 
Frank Morey, 20 Sept. 1867 " 
Rufus Calef, did not own " 
Ira W. Pennock, lived in Goffstown " 

G. M. Lane, paid in Hooksett " 
A. C. Blanchard, minor " 
J. W. Clark, minor " 
John Adams, minor " 
Horace Tobie paid out of town 
John A. Osgood, minor " 
G. W. Hayden, minor " 
S. Searles, minor '•' 
Geo. W. Kidder, in the army " 
Richard Allen, deceased 

John R. Hynes, in the army " 

Franklin McKenley, p'd in Auburn " 
Charles Theilscher lives in Gofistown " 

Ceo. W. Richards, minor " 

James P. Caldwell, minor " 

John Martin, minor " 

John Vaughan, minor " 

Charles Brock, minor " 

Samuel Gould, taxed twice " 
Lot No. 50 Hanover St. taxed twice " 

Geo W. McConnel, taxed twice " 

G 



25 


4 91 


4 91 


4 76 


1 00 


4 91 


91 


,*:i 


4 91 


1 00 


4 91 


4 91 


4 91 


13 41 


4 91 


4 91 


4 91 


4 9] 


1 91 


491 


4 91 


1 91 


4 91 


1 91 


4 91 


191 


1 91 


16 67 


4 91 


4 91 


4 91 


4 91 


4 91 


4 76 


2 45 


4 91 



To George Carlton, sick 1867 4 91 

John Holland, did not own " 1 5-4 

John C. WMtten, p'd in Holderness " 4 91 

M. W. Kendrick lived in Lawrence " 4 91 

John C. Hard}' , taxed twice " 4 91 

Geo. W. Rowell, deceased " 4 91 

F. L. Wallace lived in Bedford " 4 91 

Parker & Simons taxed twice 6 46 

Thomas Doland, poor " 4 91 

John A. V. Smith p'd in Ilillsboro' " 4 91 

A. W. Chanery, could not find " 4 09 

Ann M. Long, taxed wrong " 2 04 

Lyman W. Colby p'd in Dnnbarton " 4 91 

Collins L. Foes, deceased " 4 91 

John C. French p'd in Pittsfield " 4 91 

Sylvester Gould paid inJWeare " 4 91 

Charles Cartarat taxed twice " 4 91 

Solon Dinsmore, minor " 4 91 

Geo. II . Doe, paid in Pembroke " 6 63' 

Charles H. Marshal lives in Bedforcf " 4 91 

Heirs of Danl. Farmer, illegal tax " 375 00 

Allen Partridge, illegal tax " 25 00 

Simon E. Stearns taxed in Goffstown " 4 91 

Samuel Proudman did not own " 13 29 

William Penniman, dead " 4 91 

John Kittridge, taxed in Mass. " 4 91 

Patrick O'Day, taxed twice " 4 91 

Barnard Phelps, name wrong " 4 91 

Michael Connor, no dog " 1 00 

Frank Rogers, taxed twice " 5 12 

William Griffin, poor " 4 91 

Robert French " 4 91 

Thomas Kelty, poor " 4 91 

J. R. Barrett & Co. taxed twice " 10 22 

G. B. Hamblett " 5 63 

Hugh Farrell " 4 91 

John Murphy " 



115 



To Dugald Mitchell 1867 4 91 

Geo. M. Gilnmn " 4 91 

Joseph T. Durgin " 4 91 

John Carter " 1 00 

Horace P. Watts " 7 39 

George Quimby, Jr. " 4 91 

Lyman Lamprey " 4 91 

- Oscar Titus " 3 67 

David Dickey " 4 80 

John Griffin " 4 91 

James H. Peasley " 4 91 

Henry W. Moore, taxed twice " 4 91 

Arthur St. C. Smith, out of town " 4 91 

Geo. F. Shelden, overtaxed " 21 44 

D. M. Goodwin, taxed twice " 4 76 

Moses Colby paid in Dunbarton " 4 91 

Edwin Fortier, nearly blind " 4 91 

Chase & Kimball, did not own " 5 32 

John Valley, no dog " 1 00 

Patrick Hamilton, no slut " 2 00 

Wm. C. Knowlton, p'd in Hooksett " 4 76 

Joseph Foss, paid in Bedford " 4 91 

Brackett B. Weeks, minor " 4 91 

John Young, overtaxed " 1 73 

Edward Welch, old, poor and sick " 4 91 

James Lyons, over 70 " 4 91 

Joseph Goitt, minor " 4 76 

Oscar F. Bartlett, paid in Bath " 4 91 

John C. Merrill p'd in Londonderry " 4 91 

Eli Fifty, minor " 4 91 

George Aldrich paid in Deerfield " 4 91 

William Hogan, paid in Biddeford " 4 91 

D. A. Page, paid in Goffstown " 4 91 

Wm. S. Whipple paid in Goffstown " 4 61 

Alouzo Clogston paid in Canada " 4 91 

Isaac L. Roberts over 70 " 4 76 

George W. Patterson " 4 91 



116 

To Edward Strain over 70 1867 4 91 

Jacob Peavy over 70 " 4 91 $963 01 

Patrick Cash died July 3, 1868 3 15 

William Clark paid in Allenstown " 3 15 

Patrick O'Day, taxed twice " 3 02 

John Young, overtaxed, " 1 71 

Samuel Burnham p'd in Dunharton " 3 15 

J. E. Strong paid in Londonderry " 3 15 

Lawrence McCarty, over 70 " 3 15 

Joseph Kidder, no dog " 1 00 

Nathan B. Clement, dead " 3 15 

Eugene Lunt, dead " 3 15 

C. F. Humphrey lost a hand " 3 15 

Frank Chandler paid in Concord " 3 15 

Thomas Bonyng, dead " 3 15 

Aiphonzo Hoyt, minor " ' 3 15 

Wm. Foster paid in Cambridge " 3 15 

Patrick W. Brown, no dogs " 2 00 

Silas Mclntire no horse and carriage " 4 20 

Barnard Phelps, dead " 3 15 

John Murphy, lost an arm " 3 15 

Benj. J. Robinson p'd in Guilford " 3 15 

Timothy Foley, 210 dog " 2 00 

F. W. Batchelder p'd in Pclham " 3 15 

Patrick Bohan, no dog " 1 00 

Daniel Clark, one dog " 1 00 

Thomas Keltey, poor " 4 27 

II. B. Gould, dog killed ■" 1 00 

Geo. L. Lane paid in Hooksett " 3 15 

Lorenzo D. Colby p'd in Franklin u 3 15 

Patrick Constantine, cow died " 1 10 

J. M. & E. P. Coburn, did not own " 1 10 

fm. Griffin, poor and sick " 3 15 

Geo. Esmii-e, no dog '• 1 00 

Geo. AV. Hartford " 3 15 

Betsy F. Eaton i: 2 45 

William Richardson, overtaxed " 12 60 ' 



117 

To Edson Hill 1868 6 30 

Harris Hall " 3 03 

Heirs of Chas. Morrill, poor " 11 55 

Geo. F. Rumerill, no horse " 18!) 

J. E. Marden, minor " 3 15 

K. L. Hale, minor " 3 15 

C. II. Marshall paid in Bedford " 3 15 

Donovan Bennett, taxed twice " 3 15 

Enoch H. Holt, paid in Allenstown " 3 15 

¥m. Kimball, over 70 " 3 15 

A. T. Barr, minor " 3 15 

Isaac Norris, over 70 " 3 04 

Geo. Burbank, minor " 3 15 

Frederick Sanborn, minor " 3 15 

S. F. Murry paid in Auburn " 3 L5 

John Slaughton, minor " 3 15 

Charles W. Thompson, over 70 " 3 15 

John P. Curlier, taxed twice " 3 15 

Daniel Swett, over 70 " 3 15 

James Cash " 3 L5 

Joseph Knowles " 3 15 

Charles A. Swain, minor " 3 15 

James Gilroy, lost use of arm " 3 15 

Frank W. Boynton, minor " 3 15 

John A. Adams, no dog- " L 00 

Leonard X. George, p'd in Goffstown " 2 85 

Patrick Philips, minor " 3 15 

George Houghton, minor " 3 L5 

B.F.Martin 2 houses he did not own " 3G 75 

Wm. E. Eastman, over 70 " 3 15 

R. C. Foss, minor " 3 15 

Geo. W. Fisher p'd in Merrimack " 3 15 

Isaac L. Roberts, over 70 " 3 02 

Alex. Sweeney, aot here Apr. 1 " 3 15 

Julius Sweeney, not here Apr. 1 " 3 1" 

John Flemingj^over 70 " 3 15 

Sewall Goodhue, overtaxed " 99 73 



118 



To Anthony Bohan 

Wm. Shanahan, over 70 



Balance to new account 



1868 



18 90 
3 15 



$378 31 

$2,082 02 
5,214 74 

$7,296 76 



LAND SOLD FROM CITY FARM. 



By Chas. "Williams 1st pay't on land from Farm 137 61 
Charles Canfield " 

Sarah H.Bradley" " 

S. H. Batchelder " " 

Benj. Farnum " " 

DorsitP.Beattie" " 

A. A. Bunton " " 



99 62 


117 37 


117 37 


202 50 


58 68 


58 68 



$791 83 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid City Farm for building extension of 

Bridge st. 
D. C. Varnum work on Bridge street 
Albert Sherer " " •< 

Noyes Farmer " " " 

Michael Sullivan " « " 

Reuben Morgan " " " 

Luther Stevens " " '■ 

J. E. Stearns laying out Bridge st. and 

running out lots 
"W. W. Patterson, Chainman 
Dana W. King recording deeds 

Balance to new account 

Amount due on Mortgage notes for land sold 
Amount of sales of land from City Farm 



212 75 


3 50 


11 00 


34 00 


9 00 


34 12 


16 32 


42 25 


4 00 


6 15 



273 09 
418 74 



$791 83 
2,375 49 
3,167 32 



119 
SCHOOLS. 

By Appropriation 

To Order in favor of School Committee 



38,000 00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 2. 

pNSURAUCE AND CLERK'S SALARY. 



$38,000 00 



By Appropriation 



$460 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid J. G. Edgerly, 


Com. 


. 


Paid out as follows: 




To Herman Foster for Insurance 


09 00 


L. B. Clough 


a 


G9 00 


I. W. Smith 


ti 


69 25 


E. P. Richardson 


a 


77 75 


George A. French 


a 


30 00 


B. P. Cilley 


it 


39 75 


Parker & Bartlett 


a 


36 50 


E. T. Stevens 


isurer 


18 75 


Re-paid to City Tre; 


40 00 



450 00 



450 00 

Balance to account for repairs of School Houses 10 00 

Repairs of Blodgett St. and High School House. 



$160 00 



By Appropriation 



$800 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

4 

To paid Joseph L. Ross for Furniture . 152 75 

A. H. Lowell " . 377 81 

G. II. Dudley for labor . o0 35 
Hartshorn & Pike for stoves and repairing 42 23 

Joseph L. Ross for teachers' desks . 40 00 

Barton & Co. for carpets . 38 32 



120 



To Straw & Lovejoy for clocks 
Daniels & Co. for hardware 
John B. Varick & Co. for hardware 
Joseph "W. Ross for ink wells 
Joseph G. Edgerly for cash paid 
Concord Railroad for freight on furniture 

Balance re-paid City Treasurer 



Maps and Charts. 



By Appropriation 



28 25 


20 72 


17 13 


8 40 


8 11 


4 GO 


788 (17 


1 1 33 



EXPENDITURES. 




To paid Woodman & Hammett 


1G5 75 


E. P. Button & Co. 


136 83 


H. C. Tilton 


45 50 


Taggard & Thompson 


20 40 


"William Ilenshaw 


7 50 


J. G. EdgeiSy 


7 G5 


I. S. Whitney 


10 75 


Brewer & Tileston 


5 62 



$800 00 



$400 00 



$400 00 



Repairs of New High School House. 
By appropriation 



$3,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid J. Q. A. Sargent for steam healing- 
apparatus . $2 57G 00 
E. A. Smith for concrete floor in basement 308 GO 
Balance to account for repairs of school 

houses. . 25 40 

[ $3,000 00 



121 

GENERAL REPAIRS. 



By Appropriation 



$1.500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid A. II. Lowell for furniture 
G. II. Dudley for labor 
"William O. Haskell for furniture 

" " "■ blackboard \ i 

William G. Shattuck for furniture 
Joseph L. Roi s for furniture 
Joseph W. Ross for ink wells 
Abbott & Kelly for painting 
L. M. Greene " 

Hartshorn & Pike for stoves and repairs 
John B. Varick S: Co., Hardware 
Daniels & Co., " 

G. F. Bosher & Co. for chairs 
Concord Railroad for freight on furniture 
J. G. Edgerly for cash paid 
Hill & Co. for express 
J. G. Coult for setting trees 
Mrs. Vatter for cleaning houses 
E.G. Haines for mason work 
Hasclton & Proctor for trees 



$386 71 


268 57 


132 00 


16 00 


132 54 


: 


71 00 


120 40 


22 00 




22 35 


18 50 


19 00 


5 28 


5 75 


3 00 


23 00 


L0 00 


40 62 


GOO 



$1,500 00 



Pake Street School House. 



By cash for old furniture and boartS sold 

Appropriation 

Joseph L. Ross for furniture 

A. II. Lowell for posts 

J. B. Jones auctioneer 

Fahey & Dillon for carpenter work 

Concord Railroad for freight 

C. II. Hodgman for teaming 



■• : -iS50 


2,500 00 


1,100 00 


26 08 


100 


1,200 00 


25 20 


5 50 



$2,518 50 



122 

ToL. B. Clough for insurance . 5 00 

John L. Kennedy for painting . 85 00 



$2,507 78 
Refunded to Treasurer . 10 72 



-2,518 50 



Spring Street School House. 
By appropriation . $2,500 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To order in favor of Abbott & Kelly for painting $G07 20 
" "of Ncal & Holbrook for car- 
penter work . 1,11148 
order in favor of A. II. Lowell for seat cast- 
ings . 579 18 
Thomas E. Cresscy for cleaning . 10 00 
Balance to acct. for repairs of school houses 192 14 



-$2,500 00 



PAYMENT OF DEBT AND INTEREST. 

By balance from old account . $858 92 

Appropriation . G,000 00 



-6,858 92 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid City Savings Bank, principal . $1,200 00 

" " " interest to June 

1, 1869 . 308 00 

Manchester Savings Bank, principal . 1,200 00 
" " " interest to June 

1, 1869 . 308 00 

Amoskeag Savings Bank, principal . 1,200 00 
" " '" interest to June 

I, 1869 . 308 00 



123 

Merrimack River Savings Bank, principal 1, 200 00 
" " " " interest 

to June 1, 1869 . 308 00 



$6,032 00 
Balance to account of New School houses 826 92 



School District No. 3. 



School District No. 5. 

By balance from old account . $1 75 

Appropriation for shade trees . 100 00 



1,858 92 



By Appropriation . $165 00 

To order in favor of W. W. Baker and 

others, Committee . $165 00 

School District No. 4. 
By Appropriation . $150 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid W. II. Fisk for paper . $2 00 

George II. Dudley for carpenter work L9 85 

A. M. Corning for use of team and labor 14 07 

John B. Varick & Co. for nails &c . 3 58 

Haines & Wallace for lumber . 23 98 

Edward Prime, plastering and hanging paper 7 15 

Balance to account for reps, of school houses 7!> 37 

$150 00 



$101 75 
Carried to account of reps, of school houses $101 75 

School District No. 6 

By Appropriation $10 00 

EXPENDITURES . 

To order in favor of James M. Webster . $6 00 



124 

Balance to account for repair of school 

houses . 4 00 



$10 00 



School District Xo. 7. 

By Appropriation $765 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Wm. McPherson for repairing plas- 
tering . $5 50 
Order in favor of Robert Hall, committee 769 50 



$765 00 



School District Xo. 8. 



By Appropriation (raised by tax) . $200 00 

To account for repairs of school houses . $200 00 

X. B. Since the 1st of January, the taxes raising this last sum 
have been abated. 

School District No. 10. 

By balance from old account . $118 66 

Appropriation (raised by tax) . 350 00 

$4 68 66 

EXPENDITURES. 

To order in favor of J. P. Walker, committee $57 00 

Balance to account for repairs of school 

houses . 411 66 

$4G8 66 



hool District Xo. 11. 

By balance from old account . $100 00 

Appropriation . 200 00 



$300 00 



To order in favor of T. S. Montgomery, Com. $300 00 



125 

Repairs of School Houses. 



By balance from insurance and clerks' salary 
account 
J. G. Edgerly overdraft on insurance acct 
J. G. Edgerly, overdraft on Blodgett St 

on High School house account 
Balance from High School house accoun 

" " Spring Street " " 

Win. Little overdraft on Park St. house 

account 
Balance from School District No. 4 

it a a a a 5 

it a it a it a 



10 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Elbridgc Robie for mulching trees 
W. W. Dickey for labor 
¥m. Crosbie ' ; 
A. H. Hartshorn " " 
James Emerson " " 
17m. P. Richardson foi .ices 

McGuinness for 1 re 
Oilman Harvey for work 
Win. P. Merrill for work 
Hartshorn & Pike, stove and pipe for 

house at Golf's Falls 
J. Q. A. Sargent, piping Park St. house 
John Ryan, storing furniture 
John B. Clarke, adv. school meeting, 

and statement of repairs 

John L. Kennedy, painting Park St. house 

D. II. Young for plastering Park St. house 

" <• " " house in ward 7 



10 00 

40 00 

11 33 
25 40 

192 14 

10 72 

79 .".7 

101 75 

4 00 

200 00 

411 66 



3 00 

4 65 

75 

7 95 
23 05 

2 88 

3 50 
9 L5 

34 o.) 

25 18 

8 6G 

5 00 

28 17 

1G9 85 

149 2G 

10 00 



$1,086 37 



126 

To Geo. H. Dudley, work on houses, Ward 7 

D. H. Tufts, painting " " " 
Z. Harvey, cleaning " " " 

E. P. Richardson, ins. on " ** « 
" " " " " Ward 8 

J. E. Bennett for Dist. Clerk's salary 
L. B. Clough " " " " 

H. T. Mowatt, cash paid for cleaning 
Barr & Clapp for glass, putty, nails, oil, 

lead and labor for houses in ward 7 
A. M. Corning for repairs on house at 

Goff s Falls 
W. H. Elliott for clock for house at Goff 's 

Falls 
Joseph "W. Ross for ink wells 
Campbell & Hansconi, notice of meeting, 

and " to gas fitters " 
Hill & Co. express on bundles 
Haines & Wallace, lumber for Spring St. 

house . 6 65 

Fahey & Dillon, balance of bill on Park 

St. house . 49 37 



21 00 


59 55 


8 25 


12 00 


46 00 


4 00 


6 00 


150 


62 07 


3 00 


6 00 


8 40 


22 90 


4 15 



$806 16 
Balance to new account 280 21 



127 

NEW SCHOOL HOUSES. 



By Balance from "Debt and Interest" acc't 



$826 92 



By Appropriation 



Evening Schools. 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid E. D. Hadley for Instruction 
Mary A. Doty " 

L. H. Dutton 
Fera Gagnon " 

J. C. Walker " 

E. P. Cogswell for care of room 
H. C. Tilton for Books 
II. M. Bailey for lamps and fixtures 
G. II. Dudley for fitting up rooms 
Campbell & Hanscom for advertising 

Balance to new account 



45 00 

6 75 
40 25 
30 00 

4 50 
16 00 

7 02 
30 64 
13 75 

6 25 

200 16 

90 84 



$300 00 



$300 00 



RESERVED FUND. 



By Appropriation 
Revenue account 



7,122 10 

3,518 44 
$10,640 54 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 



By balance from old account 
Appropriation 



$72 57 
4,500 00 



$4,572 57 



128 



EXrEKDITUKES. 

To paid sundry persons . 4,213 70 

Balance to new account . 358 87 

$-1,572 57 

OUTSTANDING TAXES. 

List of 1859, John L. Kelly, Collector. 

Amount Jan. 1, 1868 . $8,245 76 

" Jan. 1, 1809 . $8,245 70 

List of 1801, Henry R. Chamberlin, Collector. 
Amount Jan. 'l, 1868 . 4,493 43 

" Jan. 1, 1809 . 4,493 43 

List of 1802. 

Amount Jan. 1, 1808 . 2,450 37 

Collected . 2 29 

Balance Jan. 1, 1809 . 2,448 08 

List of 1863. 

Amount Jan. 1, 1868 . 2,722 58 

" Jan. 1, 1869 . 2,722 58 

List of 1864. 

Amount Jan. 1, 186 . 4,200 21 

" collected . 27 49 

Balance outstanding Jan. 1, 1869. 4,178 72 

List of 1865. 

Amount, January 1, 1SGS . 4,818 52 

" collected . 384 50 

" abated . 144 05 

$529 15 

Balance outstanding:, January 1, 1809 4,289 37 

List of 1806 
Amount, January 1, 1808 . 10,002 91 

collected . 1,071 27 

" abated . 501 81 

2,233 08 

Balance outstanding January 1, 1869 8,309 83 



129 



List of 1867 




Amount January 1, 1868 


$35,095 15 


" collected 


$25,189 78 


" abated 


951 53 


Dog tax collected 


75 00 



26,216 31 
Balance uncollected January 1, 1869 $8,878 84 

List of 1868 
Amount committed for collection 
" collected 
" discounted 
" abated 
Dog tax collected 



Balance uncollected January 1, 1869 

Amount of outstanding taxes January 1, 1869 $71,282 15 



208, 


783 07 




76,406 67 






4,213 70 






373 16 






134 00 






$181,127 53 


$27,655 54 



130 



Valuation, Taxes, &c. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll Tax. 


1838 

1839 

1840 

1841 

1842 

1843 

1844 

1845 

1846 

1847 

1848 

1849 ..'... 

1850 

1851 

1852 

1853 

1855 

1856 

1857 

1858 

1859 

1860 

1861 

1863 

1864 ...... 

1866 

1867 

1868 


$555,270 
604,963 
946,200 
1,229,054 
1,430,524 
1,598,826 
1,873,286 
2,544,780 
3,187,726 
4,488,550 
4,664,957 
5,500,049 
5,832,080 
6,906,462 
6,795,682 
6,995,528 
8,237,617 
8,833,248 
9,244,062 
9,983,862 
10,259,080 
9,853,310 
9,644,937 
9,343,254 
8,891,250 
9,597,786 
9,517,512 
9,478,368 
10,050,020 
10,101,556 
9,929,072 


$2,235 49 
3,029 84 
3,986 56 
9,563 74 

12.952 44 
13,764 32 
13,584 72 
19,246 27 
22,005 95 

24.953 54 
39,712 53 
44,979 92 
48,974 23 
51,798 47 
54,379 45 
61,545 81 
62,022 44 
71,952 09 

114,214 08 

84,862 98 

78,210 85 

81,368 01 

86,804 87 

99,104 96 

84,827 45 

96,233 86 

142,815 98 

209,696 20 

245,567 19 

207,457 39 

208,783 07 


244 
427 
772 
892 
1,053 
1,053 
1,053 
1,561 
1,808 
2,056 
2,688 
2,518 
2,820 
2,910 
2,745 
2,907 
2,814 
3,725 
3,760 
3,695 
3,695 
3,495 
3,651 
3,974 
3,071 
2,995 
3,168 
3.176 
4,114 
4,170 
4,583 


$1 66 
2 14 

2 20 

3 49 
2 76 
2 60 
2 25 
2 30 
2 10 

1 68 

2 58 
2 47 
2 37 
2 25 
1 92 
1 82 
1 80 

1 94 

2 96 
2 04 
1 83 

1 92 

2 16 
2 40 
2 21 

2 40 

3 50 
5 18 
5 50 

4 61 
2 85 



131 

CITY DEBT. 



Date of Notes. 



To whom payable. 



When payable. 



Principal. 



July 1, 


1847 


Feb. 28, 


1852 


July 1, 


1854 


Jan. 1, 


1856 


July 1, 


1857 


July 9, 


1858 


July 22, 


1858 


Jan. 1, 


1861 


July 1, 


1862 


Jan. 1, 


1863 


Oct. 81, 


1863 


April 1, 


1864 


July 1, 


1864 


April 1, 


1865 


April 1, 


1865 



City Bonds. 

Nekemiah Hunt. 

City Bonds. 



a << 



Nehemiah Hunt. 



ti a 



City Bonds. 



a a 



<< a 



a it 



a u 



tt a 



a a 



July 1, 


1872 


$20,000 


Feb. 28, 


1872 


3,600 


July 1, 


1874 


20,000 


Jan. 1, 


1880 


10,000 


July 1, 


1877 


22,500 


July 9, 


1878 


2,400 


July 22, 


1878 


1,100 


Jan. 1, 


1871 


6,000 


July 1, 


1882 


22,500 


Jan. 1 , 


1888 


35,000 


Nov. 1, 


1893 


70,000 


April 1, 


1884 


70,000 


July 1, 


1894 


50.000 


April 1, 


1870 


8,800 


April 1, 


1885 


10,000 



Temporary Loan 
Interest to January 1, 1869 
Outstanding Bills January 1, 1869 
Add debt of late School District No. 2 

" « « u ^O. 7 

Total debt and Interest January 1, 1869 



$351,900 00 
37,301 00 

$389,201 00 
9,000 00 

$398,201 00 
15,156 08 

$413,857 08 

17,200 00 

742 70 

$431,299 78 



132 



Cash in Treasury January 1, 1869 
Note due on Barrett place 
Notes due on City Farm lots sold 
Interest on above Notes 



Net indebtedness January 1, 1869 



42,794 85 




75 00 




2,375 49 




47 00 






45,292 34 




£386,007 44 



CITY PEOPERTY. 



City Hall and lot, at cost, 

City farm at cost, and permanent improvements, 

Stock, tools, furniture and provisions at city farm, 

Engines, hose and apparatus, 

New engine house and stable on Vine St. 

Reservoirs, at cost, 

Hearses, houses, tomb, new cemetery, at cost, 

Court House lot, at cost, 

Court House, 

Common sewers, at cost, 

Safe, furniture and gas fixtures at City Hall, 

Street lanterns, posts, pipes and frames 

Water works, 

Horses, carts, plows and tools, 

Engine house and ward room on Manchester St. 

Ward room and lot on Park St. 

Engine house and lot in ward 7, 

Water wagon and apparatus for watering streets 



$35,815 00 

17,980 00 

5,582 85 

28,440 44 

15,900 00 

8,700 00 

4,900 00 

9,500 00 

39,000 00 

35,000 00 

2,500 00 

1,070 00 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

1,000 00 

600 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 



SCHOOL PROPERTY. 

Blodgett street school house and lot, . $3,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, charts, &c. . 150 00 
Bridge St. house and lot, 

Old High school house and lot, . 5,000 00 



3,150 00 
500 00 



133 



Movable furniture, maps &c, 

New High school house, 

Movable furniture, books, maps, charts and 

apparatus, 
Concord St. house and lot, 
Towlesville house and lot, 
Movable furniture, maps, &c, 
"Wilson hill house and lot, 
Movable furniture, maps &c, 
Merrimack St. house and lot, 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 
Manchester St. House and lot, 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 
Park St. house and lot, 
Movable furniture, maps &c, 
Franklin St. house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 
Spring St. house and lot, 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 
House and lot suburban District No. 1, 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 
House and lot, Bakersville, 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 
House and lot at Goflfs Falls, 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 
House and lot near Harvey's 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 
House and lot near Webster Mills 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 
Hallsville house and lot, 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 
Massabesic house and lot, 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 
Mosquito Pond house and lot, 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 
North house and lot, Piscataquog, 
Movable furniture, maps &c. 



200 00 


5,200 00 


. 45,000 00 
I 




i 

. 2,000 00 


47,000 00 




1,000 00 


800 00 




30 00 


830 00 


. 3,000 00 




125 00 


3,125 00 


. 15,000 00 




350 00 


15,350 00 


. 8,000 00 




300 00 


8,300 00 


. 8,000 00 




400 00 


8,400 00 


. 15,000 00 




400 00 


15,400 00 


. 10,000 00 




400 00 


10,400 00 


200 00 




35 00 


235 00 


. 2,300 00 




75 00 


2,375 00 


150 00 




50 00 


200 00 


. 2,500 00 




50 00 


2,550 00 


500 00 




50 00 


550 00 


. 2,300 00 




75 00 


2,375 00 


500 00 




40 00 


540 00 


800 00 




50 00 


850 00 


. 3,000 00 




125 00 


3,125 00 



134: 

South house and lot, Piscataquog, . 2,500 00 

Movable furniture, maps &c. . 60 00 2,560 00 

Amoskeag house and lot, . 3,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps &c. . 125 00 3,125 00 

$348,128 29 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Jan. 1, 18G9. 
Head, approved, and ordered to be printed in the Annual 
Report. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

City Clerk. 



In Board of Common Council, Jan. 1, 1869 
Read, accepted, and ordered to be printed in the Annual 
Report. 

H. M. GILLIS, Clerk. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 81, 1868, 

MANCHESTER, N. H. 

ISRAEL DOW, . . . Chief Engineer. 



Engineers' Office, Jan. 1, 1869. 
To his Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen, — In conformity with the city ordinances, I here- 
with respectfully submit, my annual report of the condition and 
location of property and apparatus belonging to the Fire Depart- 
ment, the names and residences of its members, the condition of 
reservoirs and other water supplies, and an account of expendi- 
tures with other matters pertaining to the Department. 



Amoskeag, Steam Fire Engine No. 1, Located on 

1 first-class rotary Steam Fire Engine, 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, 

350 feet rubber hose, good, 

50 feet linen hose, 

500 feet leather hose, good, 

600 feet leather hose, ordinary, 

70 feet small rubber hose, 

13 woolen jackets, 



Vine St. 

$3,000 00 
250 00 
437 50 

43 50 
577 50 
600 00 

14 00 
104 00 



137 



14 pairs overalls, 

5 fire hats, 

2 stoves and pipe, 

1 force pump, 

1 pair blankets and hoods, 

1 iron pan, 

1 wash basin, 

9 spanners and belts, 
7 life ropes, 

2 axes, 

2 iron bars, 

1 vise and bench, 

1 coal hod, 

1 shovel, 

1 slide wrench, 

1 hammer, 

5 oil and fluid cans, 

1 bed and bedstead, 

2 blunderbusses, 
2 brass pipes, 

1 branch-piece with gate, 
1 jack screw, 

5 lanterns 

Hall and house furniture 

1 pail, 

2 torches, 

1 tackle and fall, 

1 rope, 

1 box soap, 

7 hose patches, 

1 stove and pipe in hall, 

1 sink, 

6 badges, 
26 keys, 

6 tons hard coal, 

2 tons cannel coal, 

2 1-2 cords hard wood, 



23 75 
500 
33 00 
12 00 
1100 
8 00 

1 00 
15 00 

5 25 

300 

200 

5 50 

100 

100 

150 

83 

7 50 

35 00 

24 00 

24 00 

15 00 

5 00 

20 00 

30 00 

50 

4 00 

2 25 

2 63 
4 31 

2 00 
7 00 

3 00 
9 00 
3 50 

72 00 
44 00 
12 50 

$5,482 50 



138 



Names and residences of Amoskeag Co. JSfo. 1. 

Orrin E. Kimball, Foreman, City Hotel. 

George 11. Simmons, Assistant Foreman, 13 Lincoln Block. 

Horace Nichols, Engineer, 27 Machine Shop Block. 

A. A. Balch, Clerk, 20 Amoskeag Corp. 

S. C. Lowell, Fireman, 53 Machine Shop Block. 

George Butterlield, Driver, Engine House, Vine St. 

Erastus Cutting, 105 Hanover St. 

James 11. Carr, 3 Machine Shop Block. 

P. C. Lane, 04 Merrimack St. 

E. F. Caswell, 37 Machine Shop Block. 

A. K. Wells, 139 Elm St. 

I. M. Curtis, 95 Hanover St. 

John Dodge, 53 Machine Shop Block. 

A. D. Scovell, Comoro!* Pine and Concord St. 



Fire King, Steam Fire Engine No. 2. Located on Vine Street. 



1 first-class double-plunger engine, 


. $3,000 00 


1 two-wheeled hose carriage, 


250 00 


100 feet rubber hose, 


248 56 


400 feet leather hose, new, 


660 00 


850 feet leather hose, ordinary, 


850 00 


50 feet rubber hose, 1 inch, 


10 00 


10 belts and spanners . , 


10 00 


4 life ropes, 


2 00 


14 fire hats 


14 00 


14 woolen jackets, 


84 00 


14 pairs overalls, 


23 75 


5 torches 


18 00 


3 lanterns, 


15 00 


2 blunderbusses, 


24 00 


1 branch-piece, 


5 00 


1 branch-piece with gate, 


15 00 



139 



1 reducing piece 

1 sheet iron pan, 

6 badges, 

3 stoves and pipe, 

1 jack screw, 

1 pair harnesses, 

1 pair blankets with hoods, 

1 bed and bedstead, 

1 vise and bench, 

1 slide wrench, 

1 hammer, 

1 iron bar, 

1 coal hod, 

2 shovels, 

2 axes, 

3 pails, 

3 oil and fluid cans, 

1 clock, 

1 force pump, 

1 large coal shovel, 

1 sink, 

1 water sprinkler, 

2 fly covers, 

6 tons hard coal, 
2 tons caunel coal, 
2 1-2 cords hard wood, 
1-2 cord pine wood, 





$8 00 




6 00 




6 00 




50 00 




5 00 




50 00 




12 00 




35 00 




5 00 




1 00 




83 




83 




1 00 




2 00 




3 00 




1 50 




4 50 




8 00 




30 00 




1 00 




3 00 




1 50 




7 37 




72 00 




44 00 




12 AO 




2 00 



$5,(502 34 



Names and residences of members of Fire King Engine Co. No. 2. 



James F. Pkerson, Foreman, 25 Machine Shop Block. 

William D. Perkins, Assistant Foreman, 35 Stark Corp. 

Hazen Davis, Foreman of Hose, 64 Stark Corp. 

D. W. Morse, Engineer, 67 Amherst St. 

Frank Truell, Fireman, 56 Machine Shop Block. 

A. M. Keniston, clerk, 44 Stark Corp. 



140 

Benjamin T. Rust, near corner of Central and Beech Sts. 
James Patten, Driver, Engine House, Vine St. 
F. "W. McKenley, 92 Amoskeag Corp. 
Geo. H. Piper, 2 High St. 
S. W. Nelson, 26 Machine Shop Block. 
J. G. George, 4 Stark Corp. 
W. E. Demaiy, 95 Central St. 
Alfred Hall, 45 Machine Shop.Block. 

• 

E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine No. 3, 
Located at Piscataquog. 



1 second class single U tank engine 

I two wheeled- hose carriage 
275 feet rubber hose, good 
250 " leather " new 

780 " " " fair, ordinary 

18 " small rubber hose 

II hosemens' suits 
12 pairs overalls 

14 belts and spanners 

12 woolen jackets 
4 torches 

1 pair harnesses 
1 pair blankets 
3 trumpets 

1 bench and vise 

2 stoves 

1 branch piece with gate 
1 signal lantern 
1 jack screw 
6 settees 

13 office chairs 
6 small " 

1 coal hod 

1 tackle and fall 

3 wash basins 



141 



1 chandelier 
1 sheet iron pan 

1 table 

3 tons hard coal 

2 " cannel coal 
2 cords hard wood 
2 blunderbusses 

1 coal shovel 
1 iron bar 
1 oil can 
1 fluid can 
1 sink 
1 force pump 

Total amount Engine Co., No. 3 



$10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


36 00 


44 00 


12 00 


24 00 


100 


1 00 


2 00 


50 


3 00 


26 75 



$4,672 05 



Names and residences of members of E. W. Harrington Engine 
Company No. 3. 

John Patterson, Foreman, cor. of Granite and Main St. 

H. Fradd, Assistant Foreman, Pleasant St., Piscataquog. 

J. M. Wallace, Engineer, Granite St. 

M. AVhelpley, Fireman, Walunt St. 

A. D. Hatch, Steward, Granite St. 

H. Crandall, Teamster, Mast Road. 

"William Dorans, Summer St. 

A. C. Wallace, Granite St. 

B. K. Parker, Main St. 

J. D. Warren, Pleasant St. 

D. O. Webster, Merrimack House. 

E. Sturtevaut, Bedford Road. 

N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine No. 4, Located on Vine St. 



1 second class double plunger engine 
1 two-wheeled hose carriage 
1 force pump 
1 sink 



$4,250 00 

200 00 

30 00 

3 25 



142 



1 stove and pipe 

1 oil can 

2 coal hods 

1 shovel 

2 blankets and hoods 
6 tons hard coal 

2 blunderbusses and nozzels 
2 axes 

1 vise 

2 pole straps 

1 leather bucket 

21 keys 

1 lot of gas pipe and fixtures 

1 lot of lead pipe or force pump 
506 feet new hose 

2 1-2 cords of wood 

Total amount Engine Company No. 4 



$62 70 

50 

2 50 

25 

27 00 

72 00 

29 50 

7 00 

8 00 
4 00 

10 50 
10 50 
35 00 
10 12 
834 90 
12 50 

$5,609 97 



Pexxacook Hose Co. No. 1, Located ox Vixe St. 



1 four-wheeled hose carriage 


$800 00 


1 four-wheeled hose carriage, spare, . . 


200 00 


631 feet leather hose, new, 


1041 15 


1150 feet leather hose, good, 


1725 00 


8 hosemens' jackets (woolen), 


40 00 


3 hosemens' jackets (woolen), 


6 00 


1 hosemens' jacket, (rubber), 


3 00 


8 pairs rubber pants, 


12 00 


24 spanners and belts, , 


25 00 


1 signal lantern, 


12 00 


4 torches, 


8 00 


2 axes, 


3 00 


1 steel shovel, 


83 


3 oil cans, 


2 50 


25 chairs, 


36 00 


12 office chairs, 


12 00 


1 hose washer and fixtures, . « 


40 00 



143 



1 table, 
1 mirror, 
1 chandelier, 
8 trumpets, 
1 blunderbuss 
1 breast plate, 

1 jack screw, 
28 hose patches, 
4 lanterns 
1 sink, 

1 copper pump, 
8 pairs overalls, 
35 badges, 

1 doz. holsters, 

2 1-2 cords wood, 



$5 00 
8 00 

8 00 

9 00 
12 00 

3 00 
100 
7 00 

16 00 
3 00 

3 00 

17 00 
45 00 

4 50 
12 50 

$4,120 48 



Names and residences of Pennacook Hose Co. 

Wm. H. Gilmore, Foreman, 84 Merrimack St. 

James G. Knight, Assistant Foreman, 15 Lincoln Block. 

Thomas W. Lane, Clerk, 19 Blodgett St. 

David Thayer, Treasurer, corner Bridge and Walnut St. 

Albert Maxfield, Steward, 14 Amoskeag Corp. 

J. E Merrill, 45 Orange St. 

Chas. 11. Colley, 152 Manchester St. 

George Holbrook, 84 Merrimack St. 

John D. Howard, 107 Lowell St. 

Benj. Spofford, 242 Hanover St. 

Samuel B. Hope, 106 Lowell St. 

Ira W. Pennock, 54 Manchester Corp. 

A. H. Merrill, 148 Manchester St. 

A. J. Butterfleld, corner Orange and Walnut. 

A. I. Pollard, 2 French's Block. 

Benj. W. Robinson, 187 Hanover St. 

Daniel H. Maxfield, 17 Stark Corp. 

Wm. J. Hickok, 48 Amoskeag Corp. 



144 

T. P. Heath, 34 Bridge St. 

R. O. Burleigh, 96 Amoskeag Corp. 

J. C. Colburn, 30 Orange St. 

David M. Perkins, 73 Amoskeag Cor}). 

Geo. W. Witham, 3 Knowles' Block. 

W. H. Vickery, 108 Central St. 

Henry W. Fisher, 51 Machine Shop Block. 

Henry French, 3 Bartlett Block. 

Henry S. Brown, 14 Land and Water Power Block. 

¥m.E. Porter, Nashua St. 

Thomas C. Cheney, 57 Pine St. 

Oliver B. Elliott, 53 Stark Corp. 



Hook and Ladder Co., No. 1, Located on Vine St. 



1 truck with hooks and ladders 

500 feet old ladders 

1 signal lantern 

4 torches 

1 trumpet 

4 large hooks 

3 small hooks 
1 sign 

30 office chairs 

1 table 

2 stoves 

1 jack screw 

4 axes 

1 shovel 

1 iron bar 

2 hay forks 
2 buckets 

1 rope, 
45 badges, 
1 iron sink, 
1 copper pump, 
12 pair overalls, 
12 jackets, 



$1,100 00 


125 00 


10 00 


800 


150 


35 00 


500 


12 00 


45 00 


14 00 


25 00 


2 00 


7 00 


100 


75 


3 00 


3 00 


20 00 


30 00 


300 


3 00 


35 10 


57 00 



145 



15 lbs. cotton waste, . 3 00 

1 broom, . 50 

2 1-2 cords of wood, 12 50 



$1,561 35 
Names and residences of members of Hook and Ladder Co. N~o. 1. 

J. K. Wilson, Foreman, 21 Bridge St. 

E. T. Hardy, Assistant Foreman, Janesville. 
C. H. Bradford, Clerk, 45 Bridge St. 

Clias. Canfield, Steward, 18 Amoskeag Corp. 

G. E. Riddle, Treasurer, Manchester Corp. 

G. H. Dudley, corner of Beach and Laurell Sts. 

Monlton Knowles, corner of Union and Concord Sts. 

M. L. Hunkins, 68 Orange St. 

C. E. Clongh, Janesville. 

F. A. Senter, 39 Pine St. 

D. H. Young, 72 Bridge St. 
J. L. Bradford, 45 Bridge St. 
Henry L. Drew, 89 Hanover St. 
J. N. Heath, 135 Hanover St. 
II. P. Yonng, 115 Pine St. 

J. N. Chase, Janesville, Bridge St. 

H. Pike, 1 Lincoln Block. 

G.E. Glines, 57 Pine St. 

J. Daniels, 161 Merrimack St. 

George My rick, 36 Water St. 

L. Flint, 33 Amherst St. 

C. Cross, Burgess' Block, Elm St. 

George Bacon, 4 Lincoln Block, Elm St. 

Edward Holmes, 102 Manchester St. 

F. Hartshorn, 85 Laurel St. 

Engineer's Department. 
Real Estate, . 1,100 00 

two-wheeled hose carriage, . 150 00' 

ii 



146 



1 tape measure, 

1 piece suction hose, ordinary, 

1 lot old couplings and hose, 



$175 
15 00 

125 00 



$1,391 75 

Names and residences of the Board of Engineers. 

Israel Dow, Chief Engineer, "Water St. 

B. C. Kendall, Assistant Engineer, cor. Maple and Central St. 

E. P. Richardson, Asst. Engineer, 172 Manchester St. 

Elijah Chandler, Asst. Engineer, 15 Machine Shop Corp. 

"YVilberforce Ireland, Asst. Engineer, cor. Amherst and Pine Sts. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Amoskeag Steamer No. 1, 
Fire King, Steamer No. 2, 
E. W. Harrington, Steamer No. 3, 
N. S. Bean, Steamer No. 4, 
Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1, 
Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1, 
Engineers' Department, 



EXPENDITURES FOR THE YEAR. 



Anoskeag Steamer No. 1. 



To paid salaries of members, 

Amoskeag Mfg. Co. for 42 lbs. waste, 
H. M. Bailey & Son, for 1 stove grate, 
" " •' repairing lantern, 

" " " labor and solder, 

" " " repairing lead pipe, 

" " " 1-4 gross matches, 

j, " " 1-2 gross matches, 



$5,482 50 
5,602 34 
4,672 05 
5,609 97 
4,120 48 
1,561 35 
1,391 75 

528,440 44 



$447 00 


8 40 


1 25 


35 


1 15 


50 


60 


120 



147 

To Daniels & Co. for 11 feet rubber tube, 
" " 1 gal. sperm oil, 

" " 1-2 gal. spirits turpentine, 

" " 2 lbs. rotten stone, 

" " 1 gal. spirits turpentine, 

" " 1 gal. sperm oil, 

" " 3 3-4 lbs. rotten stone, 

Manchester Gas Co., gas for year 1868, 
Freeman Higgins, 2 gas burners, 
Hartshorn & Pike, 1 No. 3 stove grate, 
" " repairs on pipe, 

" " repairs on pump, 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal, 
Kimball Bros., 10 1-4 lbs. tallow, 
on & Co., 1 pair steps, 
" " 1 12-feet ladder, 

Palmer & Co., repairing pump, 
J. Q. A. Sargent, sundries, 
G. C. Smith for wood, 
J. W. Whittier, 50 feet linen hose, 
" " 1 pair couplings, 

Kimball & Hall, 2 1-2 cords wood, 
Expense of team, 



Fire King. Steamer No. 2. 



1,148 69 



To paid Amoskeag Mfg. Co. for 1 piece suction hose, 
" " combination hose, 

" " 50 lbs. cotton waste, 

Edward Bresnahan, sawing 1-2 cord wood, 
H. M. Bailey & Son, 1-2 gross matches, 
Daniels & Co., 12 sheets emery cloth, 
Services of members, 
Manchester Gas Co., gas for year, 
Freeman Higgins, gas burners, 



$126 00 


240 00 


, 10 00 


1 00 


1 20 


96 


447 00 


9 66 


3 00 



148 

To Hartshorn & Pike, 38 lbs. Eng. iron pipe, 
" " 2 elbows, 

" " Cleaning pipe, 

" " 7 1-2 pounds lead, 

" " labor soldering, 

" " soldering brass work, 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal, 
S. Monlton for 15-feet ladder, 
J. W. C. Pickering, 4 firemen's jackets, 
" " bill painting same, 

Wm. G. Hoyt & Co., 6 office chairs, 
Kimball & Hall, 2 1-2 cords wood, 
Expense of team, 



E. "W. Harrington, Steamer No. 3. 





5 25 




30 




50 




94 




75 




50 




97 00 




150 




42 00 




2 00 




9 00 


• 


12 50 


• 


480 00 



1,491 06 



To paid salaries of members for year 1868, 
Baker & Fradd, for soap, 

" " " 2 lbs. soda, 
C. P. Clement, 1 rotary pump, 

" " labor setting pump, 

Manchester Gas Co., gas for year 1808, 
Haines & "Wallace, 1-2 cord of wood, 
" 1 cord wood, 

" 1-2 cord wood, 

" 1 load wood, 
" drawing engine 1 year, 

" 1 load wood, 
Freeman Higgins, 1 gas burner, 
Hartshorn & Pike, for 14 1-2 lbs. zinc, 
" " 9.1bs. Eng. pipe, 

" 28 fire brick, 

" " 12 bolts, 

" " lining stove, 

" 1 regulator damper, 



$457 00 


106 


14 


25 00 


175 


9 32 


1 00 


2 50 


100 


2 00 


50 60 


2 00 


153 


2 32 


144 


168 


36 


50 


50 



149 



To "W. Ireland 


, for 2 gross screws, 


172 


tt 


it 


4 carriage bolts, 


10 


tt 


ti 


2 1-2 doz. screws, 


30 


it 


a 


8 7-8 lbs. hinges, 


1 15 


a 


a 


G lbs. nails, 


40 


tt 


a 


3 1-2 days labor, 


10 50 


E. P. 


John. 


5on & Co., for coal, 


84 00 


Kimball & Hall, 9 1-2 feet wood, 


8 93 


J. B. 


Variek, 8 sheets emery cloth, 


80 


tt 


tt 


8 lbs. bolts, 


96 


a 


a 


1 3-4 lbs. screws, 


35 


a 


a 


1-2 lb. washers and screws, 


57 


tt 


tt 


4 bolts, 


40 


tt 


a 


10 1-2 lbs. rope, 


2 52 


it 


a 


1 block, 


1 15 


, a 


a 


2 lbs. nails, 


12 


tt 


a 


1 floor brush, 


50 


a 


a 


sundries, 


24 


tt 


tt 


1 gal. turpentine, 


75 


it 


tt 


7 sheets emery cloth, 


84 


J. w 


AVhil 


tier, repairing hose, 


3 50 


Kimball & Hall, 2 1-2 cords wood, 


12 50 



§692 11 



N. S. Bean, Steamer No. 4. 



To paid Amoskeag Mfg. Co. 2 leather blunderbusses, 

" " " " 2 nozzles, 

" " " " repairing hose carriage, 

" " " " 2 pieces iron, 2 pieces 

Norway iron, labor and coal, 

Amoskeag Mfg. Co. 2 fire axes, 

" " " 1 swivel vsie, 

" " "1 eye bolt, 

" " " 2 pole straps, 

11 " " 4 3-8 bolt, 

" " "5 pieces refined iron, labor 

and coal on same, 



$24 00 

5 40 

82 

7 48 

7 00 

8 00 
1 00 
4 00 
1 00 

94 



150 

To Amoskeag Mfg. Co., 1 leather fire bucket, 
' ; " " Engine No. 4, 

" " " hose carriage, 

Oilman Fogg, making and altering keys, 

" "3 brass keys, 

Manchester Gas Co., gas for year, 
Gregg and Dodge, piping Engine house, 
Freeman Higgins, 1 gas burner, 
E. P. Johnson, coal, 
H. C. Merrill, 1 gal. sperm oil, 
D. W. Morse, 2 3-4 lbs. copper and labor, 
Palmer & Co., 75 lbs. lead pipe, 

" " 1 day's labor, 
J. B. Varick & Co., sundries, 
Geo. W. Witham, 3 1-4 days' labor, 
J. "W. "Whittier, 506 feet leather hose, 

" " repairing coupling, 

T. P. Hubbard, lumber and labor, 
Kimball & Hall, 2 1-2 cords wood, 



Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1. 



To paid salaries of members for year 1868, 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co., for 20 yards duck, 
John B. Clarke, printing, 
Daniels & Co., 1 gal. lard oil, 
Manchester Gas Co., gas for year 1868, 
Greely & Co., 1 doz. holsters, 
T. P. Heath, drawing hose carriage, 
J. B. McCrillis, irons and bolts for carriage, 

{; " painting carriage, 

H. C. Merrill, broom, 

" " 1 qt. sperm oil, 

Plummer & Chandler, making 8 pairs overalls, 
David Thayer, 30 badges, 
Daniel "Webster, wood, 



151 

To J. "NY. Whittier, 631 feet leather hose, 
Anioskeag Mfg. Co., stock and labor, 
Kimball & Hall, 2 1-2 cords wood, 



Hook and Ladder Co. Xo. 1. 

To paid salaries of members for year 1868, 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co., 46 yards duck, 
" " " 50 yards duck, 

" " " 20 lbs. waste, 

L. B. Bodwell, 8 feet wood, 
Chas. Canfield, 60 chair bolts, 
Daniels & Co., 60 washers, 

" " 1 doz. wardrobe hooks, 

" " 1 8-inch bolt and screws, 

L. Flint, for repairs, 

" " making ladder, 
Manchester Gas Co., gas for 1868, 
C. F. Livingston, printing, 
EL C. Merrill, 1 broom, 

Plummcr & Chandler, making 12 pair overall.- 
Pike & Williams, making 12 jackets, 
Kimball & Hall, 2 1-2 cords wood, 
Expense of team, 



Miscellaneous Bills. 



$1,041 15 

7 81 

12 50 

1,996 06 



$697 01 


27 60 


30 00 


4 00 


6 50 


4 80 


15 


60 


50 


4 50 


8 36 


2 75 


55 


7 50 


27 00 


12 50 


240 00 



1,075 82 



To paid G. B. Ammedon for watching fire, 

C. S. Annis, for watching fire, 

Boston Belt & Leather Stufiing Co., 1-2 bbl. hose 
stuffing, 

H. M. Bailey & Son, 49 1-2 pounds galvanized iron 
" " " 13-4 days' labor, 

'* " " 1 1-2 lbs. solder, 



$2 00 
2 00 

35 00 

8 91 

4 37 

63 



152 

To George Cheney, horse hire, 

" " horse hire in year 1865, 

S. L. Fogg, horse hire, 
Henry French, stock and labor, 
T. R. Hubbard, 1 set blinds, 
T. P. Heath, cartage, 
B. C. Kendall, examining buildings, 
L. S. Learned, blank book, 
Neal & Holbrook, labor and blind trimming, 
Phoenix Fire Ins. Co., insurance, 

U U (( u 

Plummer & Chandler, 2 rubber coats, 

E. P. Richardson, examining buildings, 

W. F. Sleeper, refreshments at Central St. fire, 

H. C. Tilton, stationery, 

J. L. Taylor, stock and labor, 

H. C. Tilton, stationery, 

J. B. Varick & Co., 1 tape measure, 

S. S. James & Co. horse hire, 

Salaries of Board of Engineers, for 1868, 

^tna Fire Ins. Co. for insurance, 



RECAPITULATION. 



$1 50 


4 50 


1 50 


3 45 


9 00 


50 


16 25 


2 00 


5 62 


11 25 


15 00 


20 00 


. • 15 00 


8 00 


4 50 


20 00 


70 


175 


100 


175 00 


22 50 



&391 93 



Engine Co. No. 1, 

a a it 2 

it a it 3j 

it a it 4 

Hose Co. No. 1, 

Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1, 

Miscellaneous, 



$1,148 69 
1,491 06 
692 27 
5*577 80 
1,996 06 
1,075 82 
391 93 



$12,373 63 



153 



EXPENSES. 

For Engine No. 4, and equipments, . $5,577 80 

For new hose, . 1,215 05 

For running expenses, . 5,580 78 

12,373 63 

The effective force of the Department consists of 1 Chief and 4 

5 
14 
14 
12 



Assistant Engineers, 
Engine Co. No. 1, 

« " 2, 

" " 3, 

" " 4, manned by Cos. 1 and 2, 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1, 
Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1, 



30 
25 



Total men, 100 

The apparatus consists of — 
1 first' class rotary steam engine, No. 1, Amoskeag. 
1 first class double plunger engine No. 2, Fire King. 
1 second class single plunger engine No. 3, E. W. Harrington. 
1 second class double plunger engine No. 4, N. S. Bean. 
1 four-wheeled hose carriage, No. 1, Pennacook. 
1 four-wheeled hose carriage, spare, No. 1, Pennacook. 
4 two-wheeled hose carriage with engine, No. 1, 2, 3, 4. 
1 two-wheeled hose carriage, spare. 

1 Hook and Ladder truck, No. 1, withhooks, ladders, &c. complete. 
500 feet old ladders, extra. • 

4 large fire hooks, extra. 
3 small fire hooks, extra. 

Rubber hose, . 725 feet 

Leather hose, new or nearly so, . 3437 " 

Leather hose, ordinary, • 2230 " 

Linen hose, new, . 50 " 

Total njimber feet leading hose, 6442 



154 



"With the exception of the addition of two new reservoirs, one 
at Janesville, at the brook crossing near McCrillis' shop, and the 
other on the corner of Merrimack and Hall Sts, near the house of 
E. S. Peabody, the water BUpply remains essentially the same as 
reported last year. 



155 



Condition of Cisterns and Eeservoirs, Manchester, ISL H., 
June 21, 18G8. 



Location. 



Dis. to 

Water. 



Depth of 

Water. 



Sand. 



Openings. 



Feed Gates 



Elm Street, at City Hall, . . 

Elm St. n'r Smth's blk j g " 

Gate, Mercantile Block, 

Cor. Chestnut and Han. sts. 

Mitchell's, Manch. st. j g 

Knowles, Merrimack street 

Pine st. between Manchestei 

and Merrimack sts . . . 

Junction Han. and Fine sts 



Ft. In. 



Ft. In. 
. 5 . . 2 



1 . 4 



2 . 6 



.4 .10, 



5 . 11 



Gate, June. Han. & Pine sts 
June. Pine & Cent. sts. ! g 
June. Elm& Myrtle sts. J g 
Lowell St., at School House. 
Lowell st. near Nashua, . . 
Amherst and Chestnut sts. 
June. Chest. & Amherst sts. 
Center of Tremont Square, 
Bridge st. head of Birch j c ' 
June. Chest. & Orange sts. 
Hanover st., cor. Union, . 
Steam Mill, Janesville, 
June. Beech & Laurel sts. 
Tunc. Walnut & Amherst sts, 
June. Chest. & Harrison sts. 
Post Ollice, Hanover street, 
Bakersville, 



5 . .6. 

.6 . 1 . 
.6 . . . 
3.5. 



6 . 11 
G . 9 



3.2 

8.2 

7.5 

1 .10 

2 .10 

5.8 



J . 7 
5.1, 



3 . 8 



. 6 . . . 

.6.5. 

.5.3. 
Level 
. 5 . 7 . 
8 . . 3 . 
.2.3. 



3 . 
6 . 
1 . 

5 . 

6 . 



'Squog, Granite st.,n. Baker 

& Fradd's, 
'Squog, corner Walnut st. . 

'Squog, n. Steam Mill, 'S riv. 

'Squog, Granite street. 

'Squog, Am. n. Bow.pl I ? 

'Skeag, Penstock n. Bat, mill 



G . 4 
1 . 8 



6. 6 

12 . . 
12 . . 



.4.8. 
. G . 2 . 
. 7 . . . 
Good 
. 5 . . . 

.7.4. 

.7.4. 

Good. 



Ft. In, 
. . 6 



. . 17 

None 

None 

. . 10 
. . 3 



. . 8 
. . 5 
. . 7 
None 
. . 4 
None 
None 
None 



. . 3 

. 1 3 
. 1 4 

. 1 8 

None 

None 

None 

None 

. . 3 

None 

None 

. 1 8 

None 

None 

None 

None 



— 1 — 

— 1 — 

— 1 — 

— 1 — 

— 1 — 
2 

— 1 — 

— 1 — 
Good 

— 1 — 

— I — 

— 1 — 

— 1 — 

— 1 — 

— 1 — 

— 1 — 



Good 



Cor Han.& 

I lli-.-t. sts. 

Concord Sq 



Feeds No. 1 



Worthless 



H:ii',over > & 
I Pine sts. 



Feeds No. 6 



Gate feeds 
Nos. laud 5 



156 

There is still pressing need for the building of more Reservoirs 
in the North part of the City, above Bridge Street, and also, 
in the North-east part of the City, east of Union Street, and in the 
South-east part of the City, especially near the junction of Merri-- 
mack or Laurel and Maple Streets. There is absolutely no water 
supply South of Hanover and East of Pine Streets, and in no sec- 
tion of the City are the buildings more closely connected than in 
that locality, and should a fire occur there under unfavorable cir- 
cumstances, the loss would be necessarily severe. The attention 
of former Administrations have been respectfully called to these 
sections, but, as yet nothing has been done to remedy the evil. I 
am satisfied that with little expense, that these sections could 
be made secure for all present needs, and would most respect- 
fully urge upon your notice the necessity of early action in this 
matter. 

The Department has been called out for duty during the past 
year nineteen times, viz: 
Alarm January 14. 
" February 9. 
Fire March 9. on Central Street. Loss $1000 00 

Alarm March 11, on Amherst Street. 

Fire L " 20, on Elm Street. Loss 857 00 

" April 30, on Mechanic Street. Loss 100 00 

Alarm May 17, cor. of Elm and Hanover Streets. 

" " 29, on Beach Street. 

" " 30, on Lowell Street. 

Fire August 11, on Lowell Street. Loss 325 00 

" October 27, cor. of Hanover and Beech Sts. Loss 100 00 
" " 31, old Passenger Depot. Loss 1, 900 00 

" Nov. 4, on Merrimack Back St. Loss 150 00 

Alarm " 7, on Park Street. 

" " 8, on Manchester Street. 

" " 21, on Elm Street. 

Still Alarm Nov. 24, David Collins' Shop Elm St. Loss 64 00 
Fire Nov. 26, on Spruce St. Loss on building trifliing 

Alarm Dec. 7, on Central Street. 

" " 15, in Stark Block, Boarding House. 

" " 18, on Merrimack Back Street. 



157 

Making a total loss in the City during the year 1868 of $4,496. 

No better evidence of the efficiency of the Department can be 
given than is contained in the above statement. To the prompt- 
ness and vigilance of all its members, without distinction, I attrib- 
ute our succces for the year. Harmony and friendship has pre- 
vailed among them on all occasions. Their deportment at all 
times has been orderly. There has been no strife among them ex- 
cept that generous spirit of emulation, to see how each may best 
serve the public good. 

I desire in conclusion, to return my sincere thanks to the mem- 
bers of the department for the kindness and courtesy shown me 
during the time I have been connected with it, and also for their 
prompt support when on duty. May the same spirit of good fel- 
lowship continue in the future. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

ISRAEL DOW, 

( 'kief Engineer. 



158 



REPORT OF THE LIQUOR AGENT. 



To the Hon. Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The undersigned, City Liquor Agent, reports the following as 
the business, and the expenses of the Agency for 1868: 



Cost of Liquors sold 


$575 58 




Expenses 


8 65 




Corks, wrapping paper and envelops 


2 67 




Printing placards 


75 




Stamps and gauging by Assessor 


1 29 




Expenses of agent to Boston 


3 65 




Making and painting sign . 


14 50 




Government tax 


25 00 




Salary of agent 


300 00 




Whole amount of expenses 




$932 09 


Cash received from sales 




691 97 


Expenses over receipts 


$210 12 



The Agent has in his hands the Stock as follows, belonging to 
the Citv: 



Liquors on hand 

Jugs 

Kegs 

Faucets 

Demijohns 

Sign 



. 




$265 64 


• 




6 39 
5 10 


. 




1 75 


. 




7 20 


• 




14 50 


$3 
E. M. KELLOGG, 


Ct 


ty 


Liquor Agent 



$300 58 



EEPORT OF OVERSEERS OF POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 
Manchester. 

In compliance with the requirements of law, the Overseers of 
the Poor of said city, herewith present their annual report. 

Whole number of Paupers assisted the past year, who had a set- 
tlement in the State, is eighty-nine, of which seventy-two have a 
settlement in this city, and seventeen have a settlement in other 
towns in the State. There have died of the above number during 
the past year, three ; — two belonging to this city, and one from 
another town in the State. 

The whole number of Paupei^s at the Almshouse during the past 
year is twenty, average number for the year, eleven and one half. 
There has been but one death at the Almshouse during the past 
year. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JAMES A. WESTON, Chairman 
SAMUEL S. MOULTON, 
S. J. YOUNG, 
M. E. GEORGE, 
II. W. SAVORY, 
JOHN FIELD, 
JOHN C. SMITH, 
TIMOTHY SULLIVAN, 
NAHUM BALDWIN. 

Overseers of the Poor, 



160 



Inventory and appraisal of Personal Property at the City Farm, 
December 24, 1868, by the Joint Standing Committee on City 
Farm. 

2 pairs working oxen, 
12 milch cows, 
1 yearling- heifer, 

4 calves, 
1 bull, 

1 pair three years old steers, 
1 horse, 
7 shoats, 

1 breeding - sow, 
34 bushels wheat, 
100 bushels corn, 
125 bushels oats, 
24 bushels beans, 
125 bushels potatoes, 
30 bushels mangel wurtzels, 
10 bushels beets, 

7 bushels carrots, 
9 bushels pop corn, 
30 bushels turnips, 

8 doz. cabbages, 
27 tons No. 1 hay, 
19 tons No. 2 hay, 

5 tons No. 3 hay, 

4 tons corn fodder, 

2 tons straw, 
8 barrels cider, 

5 barrels soap, 
3-4 barrel salted cucumbers, 
15 barrels apples, 
4 3-4 barrels salt pork, 
100 pounds salt beef, 
114 pounds fresh pork, 
139 pounds cheese, ' 



$450 00 


700 00 


30 00 


60 00 


65 00 


175 00 


175 00 


80 00 


30 00 


85 00 


150 00 


106 00 


96 00 


112 50 


15 00 


5 00 


3 50 


13 50 


7 00 


8 00 


594 00 


342 00 


60 00 


30 00 


30 00 


28 00 


25 00 


3 75 


45 00 


152 00 


12 00 


14 00 


23 00 



161 



17 pounds butter, 

181 pounds lard, 

97 pounds sugar, 

Salt fish and mackerel, 

52 pounds dried apple, 

2 pounds tobacco, 

Molasses barrel and faucet, 

27 gallons molasses, 

6 gallons preserved tomatoes, 

8 gallons boiled cider, 

6 gallons of apple sauce and barrel, 
16 doz. (25 pounds) candles, 
70 pounds nails, 

45 pounds drills and wedges, 

1 meat saw, 

2 ox carts, 

5 ox sleds, 
1 hay cart, 

1 hay wagon, 

1 one-horse tip cart, 

2 single wagons, 

1 single sleigh, 

2 single harnesses, 
1 lead harness, 

Curry combs and brushes, 
Bridle, halter and blankets, 

1 drag rake, $1 50; 8 hand rakes, $2 00; 
11 hay forks, $0 00; 4 sickles, $1 00; 

2 grain cradles, 

20 scythes, $7 50; 10 scythe snaths, S3 00, 
1 cross-cut saw, 
1 string of bells, 
1 stone digger, 

6 ox yokes and bows, 

9 plows, $80 ; 1 corn sheller, $6, 

46 fowls, $37 ; 20 meal bags, $5.50, 

8 bushels salt, $7.20; 9 baskets, $4.50, 



$8 00 


29 00 


14 00 


5 00 


7 44 


3 50 


2 00 


15 66 


1 50 


5 00 


5 50 


4 00 


4 20 


13 50 


2 50 


140 Hi) 


4000 


25 00 


si ) 00 


110 00 


10000 


12 00 


25 00 


4 00 


2 00 


10 00 


3 50 


7 00 


4 00 


10 50 


4 00 


2 00 


25 00 


30 00 


86 00 


42 50 


1170 



162 



1 drag, $4; 2 cultivators, $5, 

3 scalding tubs, $1.50; 1 rope and block, $3 

Scales and steelyards, 

1 winnowing mill, 

1 hay cutter, $4; 1 bay knife, $2, 
25 tie chains, 

2 grindstones, 

1 wheelbarrow, 

1 hand sled, 

2 horse rakes, 

2 mason trowels, 

1 chest tools, 

2 wood saws, 

1 shaving horse, 

1 vise and saw set, 

7 axes, $8; 4 ladders, $2.50, 

10 shovels and spades, 

7 manure foi'ks, 

3 harrows $12 ; 3 bog hoes, $2.50, 

1 bush hook, $1 00; set measures, $1 00, 

2 gravel scrapers, 
Balls and chains, 

2 set fetters, $7 ; 2 pair handcuffs, $3, 

10 meat barrels, $5 ; 10 cider barrels, $10, 

9 cook, and other stoves, 

12 tables, $15; 2 clocks, $5 00, 

2 rocking chairs, $3; 31 common chairs, $9 

8 looking glasses, $5; 18 window curtains $ 

9 boxes, $1 ; 3 stone pots, $3, 

20 earthen pots, $2.25; 8 water pails, $1.75 

7 wash tubs, $3; 4 butter tubs, $1, 
Milk cans and measures, 

8 milk pails, $2 ; 48 milk pans, $5, 

G sugar buckets, $1.50; 1 churn, $3.50, 
1 cream pot, $1 ; 1 pie cupboard, $2, 
1 cheese press, $3; 2 cheese safes, $5, 
1 pair cheese tongs, $50 ; 3 cheese hoops, $2, 



$9 00 

4 50 
14 00 

8 00 
6 00 
6 00 

5 00 
2 00 

1 00 
25 00 

100 
17 00 

2 50 
100 

6 00 
10 50 

5 00 
5 00 

14 50 
2 00 
8 00 

17 00 
10 00 

15 00 
60 00 
20 00 
12 00 
10 00 

4 00 
4 00 

4 00 

2 50 

7 00 

5 00 

3 00 

8 00 
2 50 



163 



Cheese tub and. basket, 

1 curd cutter, 

Cheese cloth and strainer, 

Coffee and tea pots, 

Tin ware, $8 ; 12 flat irons, $3, 

Mixing trough' $2.50; 1 bread trough, $1, 

Salt mortar and coffee mill, 

Castor, pepper boxes, and salt dishes, 

15 chambers, and bed pan, 

Shovels and tongs, 

Knives, forks and spoons, 

4 lightstands and dinner bell, 

Boiling pin and cake board, 

2 clothes horses, 

Wash boards and benches, 

School and other books, 

1 tape measure, 

8 roller towels, $4; 30 common towels, 48 

12 table cloths and 1 table cover, 

20 bedsteads and cords, 

15 feather beds and bedding, 

Thread and needles, 

Floor brushes and brooms, 

Clothes lines and pins, 

9 bake pans, 

7 butcher and carving knives, 
Tea tray and waiter, 

8 jugs and dish pan, 
12 candle sticks, 

4 flails, cops and pin, 

4 muzzle baskets and free stone, 

New boots on hand, 

Window glass, 

10 pounds dried pumpkin, 

20 bushels ashes, 



$2 00 

1 25 
100 

2 00 

11 00 

3 50 
100 
100 
3 00 

2 00 

12 00 

3 00 

1 00 

2 00 
2 00 

7 50 
75 

8 00 
8 00 

20 00 

165 00 

2 00 

2 50 

2 00 
4 00 
1 50 
100 

3 00 
1 50 
200 

75 
12 00 

50 
100 
400 



164 



1 meat chest, 

1 clothes wringer, 

Feed and mixing boxes, 

10 hoes, $5; 5 stone hammers, $12, 

3 iron bars, $4.25 ; 3 picks, $3, 
6 large chains 

4 stake, spread and whiffletree chains 
1 snow scraper 

1 flag of our country 
"Watering pot and oil can 
8 bushels cob meal 

2 " corn meal 
2 " rye meal 
Lot grass seed 

Candle moulds, seives and knife tray 
Copper boiler 

Chopping knife and skimmers 
Lanterns and lamps 
Dress table and bureau 
Reel, swifts and spinning wheel 
2 chests of draws and 2 trunks 
Dining set and crockery ware 

1 1-2 barrels vinegar 

2 pounds hops 

12 1-2 pounds tea, $13 00; 7 pounds sage $ 
Medicines 

2 garden rakes, $1 50 ; 2 stub scythes, $3 50 
1 mowing machine 
1 meat bench 

(30 dry casks $6 00 ; 4 cart spires $4 00, 
Fine lumber and shingles 
Oak lumber 

5 wrenches $2 00 ; 3 clothes baskets $ 1 50, 
1-4 bushel cranberries 
Cant hook 
10 lbs. bar soap 



$2 75 


10 00 


5 00 


17 00 


7 25 


15 00 


4 50 


100 


2 00 


2 00 


8 00 


3 00 


3 00 


8 00 


1 00 


2 00 


100 


4 00 


4 00 


1 75 


5 00 


20 00 


18 00 


50 


2 00, 15 00 


2 50 


), 5 00 


85 00 


125 


10 00 


30 00 


12 00 


3 50 


100 


100 


1 20 



165 

1 suction copper pump 
1 beetle and 5 wedges 
New clothing on hand 
13 yards cotton cloth ' 
G " " flannel 

8 lbs. gun powder 

City of Manchester in account with City Poor Farm, 

To stock on hand December 21, 18G7 
Expenditures the current year 
Interest on the farm 



Contra. 

By stock on hand December 24, 1868 . $5,582 85 

Stock and produce sold from farm . 2, OK) 52 

Clothing for paupers . 117 75 

Clothing for prisoners . 1125 

201 weeks board of pi-isoncrs ) , 

576 « - paupers ^t average cost 

per week- of $2 10 560-777 . 1,637 30 

$10,295 07 



85 00 




2 25 




7 00 




2 00 




140 




2 00 


$5,582 85 


oor Farm, 


Dr. 


. $5,911 34 




3,384 33 




1,000 00 


295 67 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OX CEMETERIES. 



To his Honor the Mayor, and City Council, of the City of 
Manchester. 

The Committee on Cemeteries ask leave to submit their annual 
report : — 

The operations at the cemeteries in charge of your committee 
during- the past year, have mainly been confined to the ordinary 
care of the grounds and fixtures. For this purpose about the cus- 
tomary amount of labor has been expended, Mr. AVm. C. Chase 
having been employed at the Valley, and Mr. K. Haseltine at the 
Pine Grove, with such temporary assistants as seemed to be re- 
quired. 

During the dry weather of last summer, a great necessity was 
felt at Pine Grove for a well, and Mr. Frank Preston was accord- 
ingly employed to sink one of his tubular wells, which has since 
supplied us unfailingly with most excellent water. 

A structure containing a tool house and a. shelter for persons 
and teams overtaken in the grounds by a shower of rain, should 
be built the coming season. 

We transmit the report of our treasurer — 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wl. G. PERRY, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
S. N. BELL, 
GEO. H. HUBBARD, 
E. W. HARRINGTON, 
J. H. BROOKS, 
W. D. BUCK. 
WATERMAN SMITH, 
J. F. JAMES, 
JOS. B. SAWYER, 

Committee on the Valley. 



167 

TO THE COMMITTEE OX CEMETERIES. 

The Treasurer of the Committee submits the following report : 

The Valley. 

Cash ou hand, Jan. 1, 18G8, . $48 54 

received for hay, . 35 00 

" for lots sold, . 304 00 

" for tomb rent, . 57 00 

" of W. C. Chase for work done 

by him for sundry owners of lots, . 68 55 

received for interest, . 16 52 

Balance overdrawn, . 6146 

$591 07 



The payments for the year have been as follows: the bills being 
approved by Hon. J. A. Weston, who by vote of the sub-com- 
mittee, has had charge of the grounds: 
Neal & Holbrook, repairing bridge, 
Daniels & Co., hardware, 
James A Weston, Clerk and Treasurer, 1867, 
Wiggins & Goodwin, ladder, 
Moses E. George, labor, 
Coleman Devinc, " 
Henry Richards, " 
J. L. Taggart, 
Wm. C. Chase, " 

" " money paid out, 

C. S. Fisher, whitewashing tomb. &c, 

Hartshorn & Tike, repairs of fountain, 

$591 07 

This certifies that I have examined the foregoing account of the 
Treasurer of the Committee on Cemeteries, and find the same cor- 
rect and properly vouched for. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

City Auditor. 



32 00 


1 1 27 


25 00 


4 17 


3 00 


7 50 


66 62 


3 00 


3112 :!7 


27 13 


1100 


.-, 01 



168 



Pine Grove. 

The moneys of this cemetery are collected and paid over to the 
City Treasurer, and he pays them out on bills approved by your 
Treasurer, consequently the account will appear in the City 
Treasurer's report. 

The receipts have been as follows : 
For 45 lots sold, . $478 65 

For interest, . 1 60 

$480 25 



Of this amount, there has been paid into the City Treasnry 

$325, and there remains in the hands of your Treasurer, $155,25 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 

Treasurer. 
Manchester, Dec. 31, 18G8. 



We have examined the foregoing report of the Treasurer of the 
Committee on the Valley, and find the same correct, and supported 
by proper vouchers. 

JAMES A. WESTOX. Committee. 

Manchester, X. II., Jan. 2, 18G'J. 



Jan. 4, 1869. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Read, ac- 
cepted, and ordered to be printed. 

Attest, 

JOSEPH E. BEXXETT, 

( 'Uy Clerk. 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF TIIE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIB EARY. 

The Trustees of the City Library respectfully submit to the City 
Council their fifteenth Annual Report of the condition of the 
Library. 

During the year past, no marked change in the mode of admin- 
istring the affairs of the Library has been found necessary. The 
number of volumes added to its shelves has been equal to the av- 
erage increase for a number of years, and they have been selected 
so far as the imfonnation at the command of the Trustees would 
allow, with reference to the supply of (lie immediate wants of the 
public, and with the design of making it as complete a- practica- 
ble, in all departments of literature, a- the means to be expended for 
such an object would admit. 

The Number of persons making use of the facilities afforded by 
theLibraryhas steadily increased, from the time of the commence- 
ment of its operations, and the advantages arising from its estab- 
lishment, are more clearly developed with each succeeding year. 
and the necessity is daily made more "manifest, that a more -nit- 
able and convenient location for the Library is required. 

For several years past the Trustees have in their annual reports, 
called the attention of the City„Council to the necessity, at an early 
day, of providing a building for the deposit of the Library, such, 
that it would insure its preservation from accidental lo* s. 

At the commencement of the present year an appropriation, was 
made for the purpose of procuring plans and estimates, and for 
putting in the foundation, and soon after a committee was appoint- 
ed by the City Council, to procure such plans and estimates as 
were required, and to submit them to the City Council. At a sub- 
sequent date, authority was given to the Committee to adopt such 
a plan as seemed to them expedient. 



170 

Owing" to various circumstances not under the control of that 
Committee, but little progress was made. Various plans were 
presented and under the authority which had been given the Com- 
mittee, they selected one which seemed to be best adapted to the 
requirements of the City, and which might be completed for an 
estimated expense of $25,000. 

Hope w T as entertained that such progress would be made, that the 
foundation for the building might have been laid before winter. 
Delays occurred in obtaining a satisfactory lot of land, which 
finally resulted in a postponement of the commencement of the 
construction of the building until another spring. The prelimi- 
nary preparation being thus made, it will only require the necessa- 
ry apropriation to enable the Committee to bring this matter to a 
successful completion during the ensuing year. 

The Hon. Samuel D. Bell, who has been a member of the board 
since the Library went into operation, died in July last. By his 
decease the board have been deprived of the aid and of his knowl- 
edge and careful discrimination in the selection of books, and the 
Library has lost one of its earliest friends and firmest supporters. 

The vacancy thus occasioned in the board was tilled by the elcc- 
of Waterman Smith, Esq. 

The report of the Librarian shows that at the date of the last 
report the Library contained thirteen thousand ninety-seven vol- 
umes — that during the year there have been added live hundred and 
sixty — of this number four hundred and fifty seven have been 
purchased; one hundred and three have been presented, and sixty 
three volumes of Periodicals have been bound — making the whole 
number of volumes now in the Library thirteen thousand five 
hundred and fifty seven. Sixty Periodicals have been regularly 
taken and placed on the files. 

The Library has been open for the delivery of books, two hun- 
dred and eighty days, — Hie total circulation, exclusive of books 
taken to be used at the Library Booms, has been thirty five thous- 
and one hundred and thirty one. The largest number taken in 
any one month was in March. 

The number of guarantees taken since the Library went into op- 



171 

e ration has been six thousand one hundred ninety-five, of which 
four hundred and sixty-six have been added the past year. 

The amount received for fines, on account of books detained be- 
yond the time permitted by the regulations, has been nineteen 
dollars and twenty cents, which has been expended by the Libra- 
rian in payment of express charges, postage, stationery and oilier 
minor expenses, leaving in his hands, a balance of one dollar 
ninety-seven cents. Only fourteen volumes are unaccounted for 
and will undoubtedly be l'eturned during the year. 

The thanks of the city are due to those persons who have pre- 
sented books to the Library and a list of such donations i< here- 
with presented, and also a list of all books, periodicals and pamph- 
lets received during the year, numbered in the order of their 
reception. 

A Supplementary Alphabetical Catalogue of the additions made 
during the year is in process of preparation and will be published 
as soon as it is completed. 

The Treasurer's report shows the expenditures for books and 
periodicals and a brief statement of the expenses incurcd in the 
operations of the Library. 

The incidental expenses which necessarily increase a little from 
year to year, have somewhat exceeded the original appropriation 
and the deficiency has been met by an appropriation for thai pur- 
pose at the close of the year. 

Unless an unusual expense should be required by reason of the 
erection of a Library Building, it is not anticipated that the ex- 
pense for the next year will exceed, in any considerable degree, 
the amount expended during the current year. 

In closing this report, the trustees desire to express their gratifi- 
cation with the manner in which their suggestions in reference to 
the wants of the Library have been met by the City Council, and 
we hope that the same spirit of liberality may continue, so that in a 
short time this city will possess the largest as well as the best se- 
lected Library in the State. 

In Board of Trustees, — Eead and Approved, Jan. 2, 18G9. 
JAMES A. WESTON, Mayor and President Ex -Officio. 
JOSEPH E. BENNETT, Clerk pro tern. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees: 



The following - Report of the workings of the Library for the 
year 1868, and of its present condition, is respectfully submitted : 

At the last report the number of volumes contained in the Li- 
brary was thirteen thousand and ninety-seven. The increase 
during the year is five hundred and sixty-one, a decrease from 
last year of a little more than fifty, making the whole number at 
present, thirteen thousand six hundred and sixty-one volumes. 
Of the number added, four hundred and sixty-one were by pur- 
chase, including sixty-three volumes of periodicals, bound and 
placed on the shelves; the remainder are donations, of which a 
list is appended to this report. Sixty different periodicals are 
regularly received and filed. Of these there are thirteen weeklies, 
thirty-six monthlies, one semi-monthly, one bi-monthly and nine 
quarterlies. 

The Library has been opened for delivery of books, two hun- 
dred and sixty days. The number loaned during this time, is 
thirty-five thousand, one hundred and thirty-one. an average per 
day of one hundred and thirty-five, seven less than the average 
last year. The number delivered in March is usually larger than 
in any one of the other months in the year. Of those not returned 
and unaccounted for, there are fourteen ; these are not considered 
lost, and will, undoubtedly, yet be returned. 

The whole number of guarantees taken since the Library was or- 
ganized, is six thousand one hundred and ninety-five. Four hun- 
dred and sixty-six were received the past year, an average of 
forty per month. Eleven persons have deposited money, thereby 
entitling them to the use of the Library. 

The amount of money on hand January 1, 1868, was sixty-one 
cents. Amount collected the past year on books detained beyond 
the time allowed, is nineteen dollars and twenty-five cents, — for 



173 



damage of books, fifty cents. Have paid express charges, post- 
age, stationery and minor incidental expenses to the amount of 
seventeen dollars and twenty-eight cents, leaving a balance of three 
dollars and eight cents. 

C. H. MARSHALL, 
31st December, 1868. Librarian. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of City Library. 



The Treasurer of the Board makes the following Report of the 
receipts and expenditures by the Board, of the fluids received 
by them on account of the City Library : 



1868. 



Dk. 



Jan. 6. 


To balan 


•e as per last Report, 


1284 88 


6. 


• cash of Librarian, 


1 75 


Feb. 5. 


a 


•< 


2 00 


10. 


et 


a 


25 


Mar. 6. 


ct 


a 


1 13 


May 2. 


a 


a 


3 60 


June 29. 


a 


« 


1 12 


July 11. 


u 


City Treasurer, 


100 00 


14. 


(C 


(( a 


150 00 


20. 


(I 


a u 


50 00 


Nov. 19. 


(( 


Librarian, 


1 25 


24. 


a 


City Treasurer, 


300 00 


Dec. 3. 


a 


Librarian, 


1 88 


o. 


a 


City Treasurer, 


400 00 



$1,297 86 



174 



J.OUO. 

Jan. 8. 


By paid A. Williams & Co., 


25 39 


27. 


Wiggin & Lunt, 


3 00 


Feb. 5. 


A. Williams & Co., 


25 67 


Mar. 4. 


H. W. Herrick, 


10 00 


4. 


A. Williams & Co., 


32 33 


14. 


Lyceum of Natural History, 


2 00 


Apr. 6. 


A. Williams & Co., 


18 01 


May 4. 


A. Williams & Co., 


23 35 


14. 


J. V. Sullivan, 


15 17 


14. 


A. L. Luyster, 


18 90 


30. 


Boston Society of Nat. History 


4 00 


June 2. 


II. B. Dawson, 


5 00 


2. 


A. Williams & Co., 


20 67 


13. 


C. H. Marshall, 


8 00 


July 4. 


N. E. News Co., 


15 14 


11. 


Lee & Sliepard, 


79 36 


14. 


W. H. Fisk, 


155 57 


20. 


A. Williams & Co., 


61 50 


27. 


Lee & Sheparcl, 


19 80 


Aug - . 4. 


N. E. News Co., 


2< > 38 


Sept. 1. 


a et n 


15 39 


Oct. 3. 


a a a 


17 00 


12. 


Lee & Shepard, 


6 05 


29. 


a a 


6 50 


Nov. 3. 


A. Williams & Co., 


17 62 


3. 


N. E. News Co., 


19 84 


24. 


A. Williams & Co., 


264 48 


Dec. 3. 


N. E. News Co., 


16 17 


10. 


A. Williams & Co., 


14 00 


10. 


C. II. Marshall, 


4 75 


10. 


W. H. Fisk, 


82 r,G 




By Balance, 


320 26 



Cr. 



The expenditures for incidental expenses of the Library for the 
year ending Dec. 31, 1868, the items of which appear at large in 
the Annual Report of the city are as follows : 



175 



Newspapers, 

Catalogues. 

Rent. 

Fuel, 

Gas, 

Incidentals, 

Librarian's salary, 

Insurance, 



EEC APITUL ATION 



Balance of last year, 
Appropriation, 
Transfer, Jan, 1869, 

Paid Trustees, 

Paid incidental expenses, 

Eespectfully submitted, 



$6 25 


98 00 


250 00 


7 i 88 


119 20 


91 96 


600 00 


57 50 


815 69 


2,200 00 


82 00 


. $1,000 00 


. 1,297 69 



81.297 69 



12,297 69 



82.297 69 



S. X. BELL, 

Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 

"We have examined the above Report and find the same correctly 
cast and properly vouched. 

WM. P. NEWELL, 
JAMES A. WESTON. 
Committee of Accounts of City Library. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of receipts and 

expenditures embraced in the foregoing- Report of the Trustees of 

the City Library, and find the same correctly cast and properly 

vouched. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

City Auditor. 

Jan. 1, 1869. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Read, accepted 

aiad ordered to be printed. 

Attest, 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

City Clerk. 



176 



DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY IX 1868. 

By Hon. A. H. Cragin. 

Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institute, 

"Washington. 1866. 8 vo. 
Report of the Secretary of the Treasury. 1866. 8 vo. 
Report of the Superintendent of the Coast Survey. 1865. 4to. 
Documents relating to Foreign Affairs. 1867. 3 vols. 8vo. 
Report on Mineral Resources of United States. 1868. 8vo. 
By Hon. J. W. Patterson. 

Report on Mineral Resources of United States. 1868. 8vo. 
By Gen. O. O. Howard. 

Annual Report of Superintendent of Schools for Freedmen. 

1868. Phmphlet- 
Annunl Report of Superintendent of Schools for Freedmen. 
1868. Pamphlet. 
By Gen. Natt Head, Hooksett. 

Adjutant General's Report. N. H. 1868. 8vo. 
By Thos. Emerson, Esq., Chicago, 111. 
Universal Geography. 1812. 8vo. 
The Hundred Wonders of the World. 1821. Svo. 
By Hon. Horace Chase, Hopkinton. 

Proceedings of the Grand Commandery of New Hampshire. 
1868. Pamphlet. 
By John J. Bell, Exeter. 

Account of the Destruction of the Bastille. 1800. Pamphlet. 
By the Librarian. 

Catalogue of the Public Library, Nashua. 1868. Pamphlet, 
By the Librarian. 

Annual Report of the City Library Association, Springfield, 
Mass. 1868. Pamphlet. 
By the Trustees. 

Annual Report of the Hartford (Conn.) Young Men's Insti- 
tute. 1868. Pamphlet. 
By S. N. Bell, Esq., Manchester. 



177 

Abstracts of Title. 1868. 16mo. 

Annual Report of the Directors of the Manchester and Law- 
rence Railroad. 18G8. Pamphlet. 
By Nathan Parker, Esq., Manchester. 

Annual Report of the Directors of the Concord Railroad Cor- 
poration. 1868. Pamphlet. 
By Rev. A. M. Haskell, Manchester. 

Orthodoxy— its Truths and Errors. 1866. 12mo. 
By John A. Riddle, Esq. Manchester. 

New System of Agriculture. 1868. Pamphlet. 2 copies. 
By G. R. Vance, Esq. Manchester. 

Acts and Laws of His Majesty's Province of New Hampshire 

in New England. 1771. 4to. 
Laws of the State of New Hampshire. 1792. 8vo. 
By H. R. Chamberlin, Esq.. Manchester. 

Animal Report of the County Commissioners of Hillsboro' Co. 
1867. Pamphlet. 
By J. E. Bennett, Esq., Manchester. 

Record of the Class of '43, Vale College. 8vo. 
Annual Report of the City of Manchester. LS67. Pamphlet. 
Army Paymaster's Manual. 1864. Pamphlet. 
Journal of the American Unitarian Association! Boston. 1865. 
Pamphlet. 
One Man Power vs. Congress. Boston, 1866. Pamphlet 
Report of Celebration in Dover. July 4th, 1st;."). Pamphlet. 
Annual report of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Troy, 

N. Y., 1866. Pamphlet. 
Memorial of Albert J. Myer, Signal Officer in the U. S. A. 

L868. Pamphlet. 
Speech of Hon. Leonard Myers of Pennsylvania, in the House 

of Representatives, March. 1866. Pamphlet. 
Eulogy on Hon. James A. Pierce, U. S. S., by A. D. Bache. 

1863. Pamphlet. 
Report of the Agricultural Department for November, 1866. 

Pamphlet. 
Report of the Corn Exchange Association, Philadelphia, 1866. 
Pamphlet. j 



178 

Monthly Religious Magazine, Boston, I860. Pamphlet. 

Hall's Journal of Health. 1864. Pamphlet. 

Premium List of the 14th Annual Fair of the N. H. Agricul- 
tural Society, Manchester 1866. Pamphlet. 

Congressional Directory, 1st session, 38th Congress. 1864. 
Pamphlet. 

Appeal for a National Armory. Rock Island, 111, 1861. Pamph. 

Charter, etc. of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, 1865. 
Pamphlet. 

Report of the Boston Board of Trade. 1868. Pamphlet. 

Memorial of the Chamber of Commerce of New York to the 
House of Representatives. 1864. Pamphlet. 

Testimonials of H. II. Day, on Ship Canals with Inclined 
Planes. New York, 1866. Pamphlet. 

Defence of the Merchants of Boston, against Hon. John Good- 
rich, ex-Collector of Customs. 1866. Pamphlet. 

Names of Soldiers interred in the National Cemeteries at For- 
tress Monroe and Hampton, Va. 1866. Pamphlet. 

Names of Soldiers who died in defence of the Union, and in- 
terred in the District of Texas. 1866. Pamphlet. 

Opinion on the Constitutional Power of the Military, to Try 
and Execute the Assassins of the President. 1865. Pamph. 

"War Powers of the President, and Legislative Powers of 
Congress, in relation to Rebellion, Treason and Slavery. 
1862. Pamphlet. 

Military Government of Hostile Territory in time of War. 
1864. Pamphlet. 

Hovey's Guide to the Flower and Vegetable Garden. 1867. 
Pamphlet. 
By Hon. James A. Weston, Manchester. 

Tributes of the Nations to Abraham Lincoln. 4to. 
By Capt. ¥m. R. Patten, Manchester. 

Message of Gov. Walter Ilarriman to N. H. Legislature, June, 
1868. Pamphlet. 

Report of State Treasurer. June, 1868. Pamphlet. 

Report of the Warden and Inspectors of the State Prison. Jnne, 
1868. Pamphlet. 



179 

Report of the Board of Trustees of the State Reform School 

June, 1868. Pamphlet. 
Report of the Board of Visitors, Trustees, Treasurer and Su- 
perintendent of the Asylum for the Insane. June, 1808. Pam. 
Report of the Bank Commissioners. June, 1868. Pamphlet. 
By H. M. George, Manchester. 

Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of State of 
New York. 1868. Pamphlet. 
By Henry M. French, Manchester. 

Burnham's Arithmetic. 1867. 12mo. 
Annual Report of Town of Bedford. 1866-7. Pamphlet. 
The Rocky Mountain Gem. 1868. Pamphlet. 
By George I. Aldrich, Manchester. 

CovelPs English Grammar. 1855. 12mo. 
New Orleans Riots. 1866. Pamphlet. * 

By-Laws and Catalogue of the Spring-field (Vt.) Central Li- 
brary. Pamphlet. 
By Smithsonian Institution. 

Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge, Vol. 15. 1867. 4to. 
Report of the Board of Regents. 1867. 8vo. 
By Congress. 

Executive Documents, 2nd Session, 39th Congress. 1866-7. 
32 vols. 



180 



BOOKS, PAMPHLETS, AND BOUND VOLUMES, ADDED TO THE MAN- 
CHESTER CITY LIBRARY FROM JANUARY 18GS TO JANUARY 1869. 



Gen. No. No. Shelf. 

L3,099 Inaugural Address of Hon. Alonzo Smith, 

Mayor, Manchester, 1858. Pamp. 1-15 351 

l;;.lo0 Inaugural Address of Hon. Jacob F. James, 

Mayor, Manchester, 1857. 2-15 351 

13.101 Inaugural Address of Hon David A. Buntou, 

Mayor, Manchester, 1861 Pamp. 3-15 351 

13.102 Rules and Regulations of City Library, Man- 

chester. Pamp. 4-15 351 

13.103 A Sermon on Slavery by Dr. C. W. Wallace, 

Manchester, 1857. Pamp. 5-15 351 

13,104-5 Report Board of Trustees, Visitors, Building 
Committee, and Supt. of N. II Insane Asy- 
, lum, 1850-7. Pamp. 6-15 351 

{.3,106 Receipts and Expenditures of City of Ports- 
mouth, N. H., 1855. Pamp. 8-15 351 

13.107 Report of Boston Fire Department, 1856. Pam. 9-15 351 

13.108 Report of Cochituate Water Board, Boston, 

1857. Pamp. 10-15 351 

13.109 First State Exhibition, Mass. Board of Agri- 

culture, Boston, 1857. Pamp. 11-15 351 

13.110 Inaugural Address of F. TV. Lincoln, Mayor, 

Boston. 1858. Pamp. 12-15 351 

13.1 1 1 Address of Elisha Huntington, Mayor, Lowell, 

1850. Pamp. 13-15 351 

13.112-4 Auditor's Annual Report, Lowell, 1857, '63, 

'66. Pamp. 14-15 351 

, 13,115-6 Annual Reports of City of Lawrence, 1857-66 

Pamp. 17-15 351 

13.117 Address of Nathaniel Silsbee, Mayor, Salem, 

1858. Pamp. 1-16 351 

13.118 Address of Isaac C. Tabor. Mayor, New Bed- 

ford, 1861. Pamp. 2 16 351 

13,1 L9 Address of Geo. H. Dunbar, Mayor, New Bed- 
ford, 1858. Pamp. 3-16 351 

13.1 20 Annual Report of School Committee, Danvers, 

Mass., 1854. Pamp. 4-16 351 

13.121 Report of Water Commissioners, Plvmouth, 

Mass., 1856. Pamp. 5-16 351 

13.122 Municipal Register of Citv of Springfield, 

Mass , 1866. Pamp. 6-16 351 

13.123 Inaugural Address of Hon. Roland G. Usher, 

Mayor, Lynn, 1866. Pamp. 7-16 351 

13,12 i Inaugural Address of A. G. Wakefield, Mayor, 

Bangor, 1866. Pamp. 8-16 351 



181 

13,125-6 Organization of Municipal Government, Prov. 

R. I., 1851-.55. Pamp. 9-16 351 

13,127 Annual Report on Births, Marriages and 

Deaths, Providence, 1860, Pamp. 1-17 351 

13,128-9 Reports ou Gondii ion of Fire Department, 

Providence, 1858-61. Pamp. . 2-17 351 

13.130 Annual Report of Prov. Reform School, 1831. 

Pain p. 4-17 :~;51 

13.131 Reports of Trustees and Supt -of Butler In- 

sane Hospital, Prov., 1856. Pamp. 5-17 351 

13.132 Annual Report of School Committee, Prov. 

L357. Pamp. 6-17 351 

13.133 Annual Report on Births, Marriages, and 

Deaths, Prov., 1856. Pamp. 7-17 351 

13.134 Report onconditon of Fire Department. Prov- 

idence, 1857. Pamph, 8-17 351 

13.135 OrganizationV)f Municipal Government. Prov- 

denee, 1858. Pamp. 9-17 351 

13.136 Annual Report of Providence Reform School 

1856. Pamph. 10-17 351 

13.137 Annual Report of Supt. of Health. Provi. 

deuce, 1857. Pamph. 11-17 351 

13.138 Auditor's Reporl of Receiptftmd Expenditures 

Providence, 1858. Pamph. 12.17 351 

13.139 Circular of Patent Water and Gas Pipe Comp. 

Jersey City, N. J., 1867. Painph. 13.17 35] 

13.140 Address of Hon. T. E. Wales, Mayor. Bur- 

lington Vt., 1857. Pamph. 1 1,17351 

13.141 Reporl on Chicago Sewerage 1856. Pamph. 15-17 351 

13.142 Laws of New-Hampshire, 1830, 8vo. 9 324 

13.143 Boston Directory, 1870. 8vo. 43 336 
13,144-5 Reporl of Board of Edueati m, V Y. 1856. 8vo. 11 336 

13.146 Corporation Laws of City of Wash. 1853. 8vo. 46 336 

13.147 Report of Secretary of Treas. "Wash 1858. 8vo. 47 336 
13,148-9 Transactions of N. 11. Stale A.g. So. 1856. 7vo. 4g 

13.150 London Punch, Vol 50. 1866.. 4to. 20 82 

13.151 Reporl of Trus. of Boston Puh.Lib. 1857. Pham.6-21 351 

13.152 Commercial Relations of U. S 1864. 8vo. 17 365 
13,153-4 Municipal Register of City of Concord, 1857-9. 8vo. 15 265 

13.155 Charter and Ordinances of City of Nashua, 

1862, 8vo. 47 265 

13.156 Ordinances of City of New Bedford, 1860. 8vo. 18 265 

13.157 Proceedings on Laying Corner-Stone of Li- 

brary Edifice, New Bedford, 1856. 8vo. 49 2G5 

13 158-9 Charter and Ordinance- of City of Lowell, 

1854-63. 8vo. 50 265 

13,160-1 Annual Reports of Citv of Newport, 1856-66. 

8vo 52 265 

13,102-4 Charter and Ordinances of City of Lynn, 

1853-60-65. 51 265 



182 

13.1 65 Charter and Ordinances of City of Salem, 1853, 

8vo. . 57 265 

13,166-8 Municipal Register of Citv of Lawrence, 1854- 

5-62. 8vo. . 58 265 

13.169-70 Municipal Register of City of Cambridge, 1855- 

7. 8vo. 61 265 

13.171 Municipal Reg. of Citv of Boston, I860. 8vo. 63 265 
13,172-6 Auditor's Report of City of Boston, 1857-60-61- 

62-64. 8vo. 64 265 

13.177 Annual Report of City of New Haven, 18G5. 8vo. 69 265 

13.178 Charter and Bv-Laws of City of New Haven, 

1865. 8vo. " 70 265 

13.179 Municipal Register of City of Charlestown, 

1864. 8vo. 71 265 

13.180 Charter and Ordinances of City of Lewiston, 

1863 8vo. 72 265 

13.181 Municipal llQg. of City of Newburvport, 1863. 

8vo. 73 265 

13.182 Charter and Ordinances of Citv of Bath, 1860. 

8vo. 74 265 

13.183 Charter and Ordinances of City of Dover, 1857. 

8vo. 75 265 

13.184 Charter and Ordinances of City of Burlington, 

1866. 8vo. 76 265 

13.185 Charter and Ordinances of City of Cincinnati, 

O., 1854. 8vo. 77 265 

13.186 Proceedings Common Council of City of Prov. 

1856." 8vo. 78 265 

13.187 Statutes and Ordinances of Citv of Columbus, 

O., 1858. 8vo. 22 313 

13.188 Life of Josiah Quincy. E. Quincy. 12mo. 34 305 

13.189 Inaugural Address of Hon. James A. Weston, 

Mayor, Manchester, 1868. Pamp. 5-24-351 

13.190 Report of Supt. of Coast Survey, 1865. 4to. 28 322 

13.191 Report of Trustees of City Library, New Bed- 

ford, 1868. Pamp. 7-21 351 

13.192 Report on Interoceanic Canals and Railroads be- 

tween Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, 1867. 8vo. 15 369 

13.193 New System of Arithmetic. C. G. Burnham. 

16mo. 40 360 

13.194 Mental Arithmetic. C. G. Burnham. lGmo. 41 360 

13.195 Woman's Rights. John Todd. 16mo. 20 320 

13.196 Woman's Wrongs Gail Hamilton. 60 105 

13.197 Waiting for the Verdict. Mrs. R. 14. Davis. 42 84 

13.198 The Red Cross. Oliver Optic. 83 178 
13,199. _ After Years. Glance Gaylord. 84 178 

13.200 A Journey in Brazil Prof. Agassiz. 8vo. 40 76 

13.201 Annual Report of Citv of Manchester, 1867. 

8vo. 6-24 351 

13,202-3 Cassell's Natural History. 2 vols. 4to. 43 171 



183 



13,204 Financial Economy of U.S. J. A. Ferris. lGmo. 

13,20.-) Abstracts of Title. M. E. Cnrwen. 16mo. 23 8 

13,206-7 Origin of the Material Universe, Pamp. 1-26 351 

13,208-11 Reports of Trustees of Ilolton Library, Brigh- 
ton (Mass .), 1865-65-67-68. Pamp. 7-21351 

13,212 Catalogue of Holton Library, Brighton. Pamp. 11-21351 
' 13,213 Report of Supt U. S. Coast Survey, 1865. 4to. 3 372 

13,214-8 Patent Office Report, 1st Sess., 39th Congress, 

1865-9. 3 vols. 2( 375 

13,217 Miscellaneous Reports, 2nd Sess., 39th Cong.. 

1866-7. 29 374 

13,218-21 Miscellaneous Reports, 2d Sess., 39th Cong., 

1866-7. 4 vols. 30 374 

13.222 Miscellaneous Reports House, 2d Sess., 39th 

Congress. 3 1 37 i 

13.223 Report Secretary of the Treasury, 1866. 23 374 

13.224 Report of Com.,' Senate. 2d Sess., 39th Cong. 24 374 

13.225 Journal of Senate, 2d Sess , 39th Congress, 25 374 

13.226 Miscellaneous Reports, Senate, 2d Session, 39th 

Congress, 26 374 

13,227-8 Miscellaneous Reports, Senate, 2d Sess. 39th 

Cmgress. 2 vols 27 374 

13,229-31 Diplomatic Correspondence, 2d Session, 39th 

Congress. 3 vols. 

13.232 Report Sec. of the Interior. 2d Sess., 39th Cong. 

13.233 Report Secretary of War, 2d Sess., 39th Cong. 

13.234 Report Sec. of the Navy, 2d So-.. 39th Cong. 
13,235-41 Miscellaneous Reports, 2d Sess. 39th Congress. 

7 vols. 

13.242 Mexican Affairs. 2d Session, 39th Congress. 

13.243 Commercial Relations of U. S., 2d Session, 

39th Congress, 

13.244 Report Commissioner of Agriculture, 1866, 

13.245 Orthodoxy. J. F. Glark. l2mo. 
13, 246 Report Board Regents, Smithsonian Institution, 

1866. 8vo. 

13.247 An Address on Agriculture. J. A. Riddle. Pam. 

13.248 Illustrated History of the Bible. JohnKitto. 8vo. 

13.249 Universal Geography. .I.Moore 8yo. 
13,2.30 Hundred Wonders of the World. C. C.Clarke. 

12mo. 

13.251 Leslie's Magazine. Vol.21. 1867, 

13.252 Godey's Lady's Book. Vol. 75, 1867, 

13.253 Peterson's Magazine. Vol. 52, 1867, 

13.254 Arthur's Home Magazine, Vol. 30, 1167, 
1:1.255 *Townsend'8 Parisian Costumes, Vol. 43, 1867, 
13,256-7 Littell's Living Age, 1867. 2 vols. 

13.258 Student and Schoolmate, Vols. 19-20, 1867. 

13.259 London Lancet, 1867, 

13.260 North America Review. Vol. 105, 1867, 



2 1 376 


27" 376 


28 376 


29 376 


30-376 


37 376 


38 376 


39 376 


58 38 


-2 1 351 


18 32 


9 318 


Hi 318 


30 161 


69 17:! 


34 194 


to 193 


19 C 


64 165 


■~rj 164 


38 171 


47 177 



184 






13.261 National Quarterly Review. Vol. 15, 1767, 

13.262 North British Review. Vol. 47, 1867, 
L3,263 Westminister Review. Vol.88, 1867, 

15.264 Edinburgh Review. Vol. 126, 1867, 

13.265 London Quarterly Review. Vol. 123, 1857, 
13^66 Popular Science Review. Vol. 6, 1867, 

13.267 Historical Magazine. A r ol. 1, 1867, 

13.268 Hist, and General Register. Vol. 21, 1867, 
13,269-70 Intellectual Observer. Vol. 12 and 12, 1807, 

13.271 Merchants' Magazine. Vol.57, 1867, 

13.272 Silliman's Journal. Vol. 44, 1857, 

13.273 Jour, of Franklin Institute. Vol.44, 1867 

13.274 Good Words, 1767, 

13.275 Once-a-Week Vol. 4, 1867, 

13.276 Blackwood's Magazine. Vol. lOi 867, 

13.277 Temple Bar. Vol. 21, 1867, 

13.278 Cornhill Magazine. Vol. 16, 1857, 

13.279 Sixpenuv Magazine. Vol. 19, 1867 

13.280 Magazine of Horticulture. Vol.33, 1867, 

13.281 Horticulturist. Vol. 22.1867, 

13.282 Publishers - Circular. 1867, 

13.283 Eclectic Magazine. Vol. 6, 1867 

13,584 Harpers'Monthly Magazine. Vol. 35,1865, 

13,^85 Atlantic Monthly. Vol. 20, 1867, 

13,286 Harpers' Monthlv Magazine. Vol. 30, 1865, 
13,287-8 Mechanics' Magazine. Vols. 16 and 18 1866-7, 

13.290 Practical Mechanics' Journal. Vol.3. 1867, 

13.291 * Art Journal. Vol. 6, 1867, 

13.292 Scientific American. Vol. 17, 1807, 

13.293 "-Harpers' Weekly. Vol. 11, 1867, 

13.294 Report of Directors Public Library, Worces- 

ter, 1867, Paniph. 1 

13.29:. Starry Flag. Oliver Optic, 12mo, 

13.296 Report of Secretary of Treas. 1866, 8vo, 

13.297 Norwood — Henry Ward Beecher, 12mo, 

13.298 Elements of History. J. E Worcester, 12mo, 

13.299 History of 1 he V. S. E. Guernsev, 12mo, 

13.300 Pictorial Hist, of the U. S. B. j! Lossing, 12mo, 

13.301 Outlines of Physical Geography. G. W. Fitch, 

12 mo, 

13.302 Geography of the Heavens. E.H Burritt, 16mo, 

13.303 Primary American History. M. Willson 12mo, 

13.304 Poems." J. G. Whittier, 16 mo, 

13.305 Elements of Agriculture. Geo. E. Waring, Jr, 

16 mo, 

13.306 Mary Barton. Mrs. Gaskell, 12mo, 

13.307 Humorous Speaker. Oliver Oldham, 12mo, 

13.308 The Second Advent. Alpheiis Crosby, 16mo, 

13.309 The Path of Life. H. A. Rouland, 18mo, 

13.310 Christian Memorials of the War. II B. Hack- 

ett, 12mo, 



75 190 


45 173 


46 172 


58 173 


59 172 


40 164 


45 244 


28 265 


38 198 


23 84 


44 166 


46 163 


2:5 162 


47 174 


48 17.". 


44 197 


16 85 


36 136 


51 187 


47 204 


42 167 


53 183 


46 153 


44 186 


41 153 


43 192 


12 323 


11 A 


22 J 


16 G 


-26 3 1 


57 197 


51 336 


61 105 


25 247 


26 247 


27 247 


28 247 


29 247 


58 169 


63 106 


8 1 227 


32 136 


37 103 


55 39 


42 4o 



59 38 



185 

13.311 Children of the New Testament. Rev. Theo. 

Stork. 16mo, CI 38 

13.312 Girls of the Bible. P. C Headley, 16mo, 61 38 

13.313 Boys of the Bible. H. L. Williams, l6mo, 62 38 

13.314 Hand-book of Dining. Brillat— Savaiin, 16mo, 65 258 

13.315 Lectures to Young Men. Win.G. Eliot, 16mo, 44 160 

13.316 Peter Drakes Dream. Mary Howitt, 12mo, 44 160 

13.317 Men Who Have Risen, 16mo, 45 160 

13.318 Travellers' Adventures in All Countries. 

Theo. Deility, 16mo, 46 160 

13.319 Old .Moll and Little Agues. M. Leslie, 16mo, 47 160 

13.320 St- Petersburg. E Jerrmann, 16mo, 48 160 

13.321 Rollo the Rhine. Jacob Abbott, 16mo, 49 160 

13.322 Polio in Geneva. Jacob Abbott, 16mo, 50 160 
13,^23 Polio in Holland. Jacob Abbott, 16mo, 51160 

13.324 Rollo in Naples. Jacob Abbott, 16mo, 52 160 

13.325 Report of Directors of Concord Railroad Cor- 

poration, 1867, Pamph, 12-21 351 

13 326 Norwood. Henry Ward Beecher, 12mo, 62 105 

13.327 Report. of Directors of Manchester and Law- 

rence Railroad, 1867, Pamph, 13«-21 351 

13.328 English Grammar. L T. Covell, 16mo, 12 360 

13.329 Laws of New Hampshire, 1771, 4to, 12,331 

13.330 Laws of NewHampshire, L792, 8vo, LO 324 

13.331 Report of Hillsboro' Co. Commissioners, l ^ '• ^ . 

Pamph, 14-22 351 

13.332 New Orleans Riots. 1866, Pamph, 24-6 351 

13.333 Report of town of Bedford, 1866-7, Pamph, 3-24 351 

13.334 Proceedings of the Grand Commandery of 

Knights Templar. 1866, Pamph, 2-25 351 

13.335 Colorado in L868, Pamph, 3-25 351 

13.336 Report of Supt. on Schools for Freedmen, 1868, 

Pamph, 9-24 351 

13.337 What is your name? Sophy Moody, 12mo, 70 L89 

13.338 Encyclopedia of Arts, Manufactures, and Ma- 

chinery. Peter Barlow, 4to, 19 301 

13.339 Enclvclopedia of the Useful Arts, 4to, 20 301 

13.340 Les Cartes a Jouer. P. Boiteau D'Ambly, 16mo, 1310 
13,341-2 Dictionnaire des Arts et Manufactures. Deux 

Parties, 4to, 21 301 
13,343-5 La Science De L'lugenieur. Trois Tormes, tto, 23,301 

13.346 American Naturalist, Vol. 1, 1868, 61 187 

13.347 Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge. Vol. 

15, 1867. 4to, • 15 321 

13.348 Andreas Hofer. "L. Muhlbach," 8vo, 43 84 

13.349 * American Stud-book. J. H. Wallace, 8vo, 50 205 

13.350 *Art of Illuminating, 8vo, 26 314 

13.351 History of Lace. Mrs B. Palliser, 8vo, 27 314 

13.352 Trees of Old England. Leo. H. Grindon, 8vo, 23 200 
l:j.:j53 Modern Practice of Photography. R. W. 

Thomas, 8vo, 21 320 



186 



13.354 Poems. John G. Saxe, 12mo, 

L3,355 Railroads of the United State-. IT. M. Flint, 12mo, 

13.356 *The American Cyclops, 12mo, 

13.357 Myths of the New World. D. G. Brinton, 12mo, 

13.358 The College, Market and Court. Caroline 11. 

DaUo, 8vo, 

13.359 History of Philosophy. Albert Schewgler, 12mo, 
13,360-1 Animals and 1'Jants under domestication. 

Chas Darwin, 12nio, 2vols, 
13,369-3 Economy of the Animal Kingdom. E. Sweden- 
bo rg, 2 vols, 8vo, 

13.364 Impeachment and Trial of Andrew Johnson. 

8vo. 

13.365 Annual of Scientific Discovery. 12mo. 

13.366 Nature, Properties, and Relationship of Gold. 

Pamph 

13.367 * Alumni of Dartmouth College. Geo. T. Chap- 

man. 8vo. 

13.368 Ekkoes from Kentucky. P. V. Nasby. 12mo. 

13.369 Brakespeare. G. A. Lawrence, 8vo, 
13,370i Cruise of the Dasua way. MayMannering. K'.mo. 

13.371 Report of Adj. Gen. of N. U.. 1868. 8vo, 

13.372 Report of the Odd Fellows' Library Associa- 

tion, San Francisco, Cal., 1868. Pamp. 

13.373 ReportofSupt of'U.S. Coast Survey, 1865. 4to. 

13.374 American Grape Growers' Guide. \Vm. Chorl- 

ton, 16 mo, 

13.375 Religious Poems. Harriet B. Stowe, lOmo, 
13,376-8 Foreign Relations of U. S. 3 vols. 

13.379 Mineral Resources of U. S. 

13.380 Dora. Julia Kavanagh, ' s vo, 

13.381 Played Out. Annie Thomas, 8vo, 

13.382 Bernthal. L. Muhlbach, 8vo, 

13.383 Dr. Wilmer's Love. Margaret Lee, 12mo, 

13.384 Dawn. 12mo, 

13.385 Wind and Whirlwind. Thos. White, 

13.386 Mozart. II. Ran. 

13.387 Opportunity. Annie M. Crane. 12mo, 

13.388 Adventures of Verdant Green. C. Bede, 12mo, 

13.389 Cameron Pride. Mary 3. Holme.-. L2mo, 

13.390 Soldier's Daughter. Mrs. P. A. Hanaford, 12mo, 

13.391 Alice and her Friends, Mrs. P. A. Hanaford, 

12 mo, 

13.392 Mignonette. Mrs.. P. A. Hanaford, 12mo, 

13.393 Guardian Angel. O.W.Holmes, 12mo, 

13.394 Macaria. Augusta J. Evans. L2mo, 

13.395 DraytQus and Davenants. Mr- Charles, 12mo, 

13.396 On Both Sides of the Sea. Mrs. Charles, 12mo, 

13.397 Martyrs of Spain. Mrs. Charles. L6mo, 

13.398 Cripple of Antioch Mrs. Charles, liimo, 

13.399 On the Heights. B. Auerbaeh, 12mo, 



G4 106 

33 309 

34 309 
60 189 

83,188 
73 189 

71 189 

34 354 

45 24 6 
39 279 

11-24 351 



33 f,9 
25 133 
62 179 
52 336 

10-24 351 

21) 322 



44 229 


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37 [367 


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27 133 


26 133 


45 84 


28 134 


29 13,4 


30 134 


31 134 


32 L34 


33 131 


34 134 


35 131 


36 134 


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39 134 


40 134 


41 134 


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43 134 


44 134 



187 

5.400 Six Hundred Dollars a Year, 1G mo, 

3.401 Four Years among Spanish Americans. F. 
Hassaurek, l2mo, 

$,402 Nile Tributaries of Abyssinia. S. W. Baker, 

12mo, 
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The Spanish Gipsy, Poem. Geo. Eliot, lGmo, 
Lucile, Poem. Owen Meredith, lGmo, 
The Old Sergeant. F. Wilson, lGmo, 
Treatise on Memory, O. S. Fowler. 12mo. 
Queen Victoria's Journal. 12mo. 
Religion and Chemistry, J. P. Cooke, Jr. 

12mo. 
Perpetual Motion. Henry Dircks, 12mo, 
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lGino. 
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K'uno, 
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Foster. 16mo, 68 179 

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lGino, 
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Hand-book of Archeology. IE M. Westropp, 

8vo, 

13.429 Arcadian Geologv. J. W. Dawson. 8vo, 

13.430 Historv of Woburn, Mass. Sam'] Small. 8vo, 
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voix, 8vo, 3 vols. 

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Sulphuretes. Wm. Barstow, lGmo, 

The Adamic Race. Pamp. 

Napoleon and Blucher. " L. Muhlbach," 8vo, 
,438-9 Littell's Living Age, 1868, Vols, 9G-7, 
.440 Temple Bar, Vol. 22, 1868, 
.411 Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 21, 1868, 
,442 American Naturalist, Vol. 1, 1868, 



38 


108 


43 


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44 


77 


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38 109 


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44 84 


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72 172 


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59 176 


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31 264 


48 177 


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48 174 



188 

13.443 Every Saturday, Vol. 5, 1868, 

13.444 London .Society, Vol. 13, 1868, 

13.445 Historical Magizine, Vol. 2, 1867, 

13.446 Arthur's Borne Magazine, Vol. 31, 1868, 

13.447 Peterson's Magazine, Vol. 53, 1868, 

13.448 Godey's Lady's Book. Vol. 76, 1868, 

13.449 Galaxy, Vol. 5, 1868, 

13.450 National Quarterly Review, Vol. 16, 1868, 
13, 1 )1 Hours at Home, Vol. 6, 1868, 

13.452 Boston Society of Natural History, Vol. 11, 

1866-8, 

13.453 North American Review, Vol. 106, 1866, 

13.454 Merchants' Magazine, Vol. 58, 1*68, 
13,485 Eclectic Magazine, Vol. 63, 1868, 

13.456 Putnam's Magazine, Vol. 1, 1868, 

13.457 Once a Week, Vol. 5. 1868, 
14,458-9 Army Paymaster's Manuel and Supplement, 

1865, Pain. 5-25 351 

13,469 Journal of American Unitarian Association, 

1865, Pam. 7-25 351 

13.461 One Man Power vs. Congress, 1866, Pain. 3-26 351 

13.462 Report of Celebration in Dover, N. H. July 

4th, 1865, Pamph. 

13.463 Register of Rensselaer Polytechnics Institute, 

Troy, N. Y. 1866, Pamph. ' 

23.464 Momorial of Albert Myer, Signal Officer in 

U. S. Army, 1865, Pamph. 

13.465 Speech of Hon Loon Myers, in House of Rep- 

resentatives, 1866, Pamph. 

13.466 Eulogy on Hon. James A. Pearce, U. S. S. 

1863, Pamph. 

13.467 Report of Agricultural Department, Nov. 

1865, Pamph. 

13.468 Report of Corn Exchange Association, Phil- 

adelphia. 1866, Pam. 

13.469 Religion- Magazine, Boston, 1865, Pam. 

13.470 Hall's Journal of Health, 1864, Pam. 

13.471 Premium List of 14th Annual Fair of N. II. 

Agricultural Society Manchester, 1866 Pam. 

13.472 Congressional Directory, 1st Sess. 38th Cong. 

1864 Pam. 

13.473 Appeal for a National Armory, Rock Island, 

111. 1861, Pam. 

13.474 Charter, etc. of Northern Pacific R. R. Com- 

pany, 1865, Pam. 

13.475 Memorial of the Chamber of Commerce of 

New York, on Steam Navigation, 1864, Pam. 

13.476 Testimonials of H. II. Day on Ship Canals, 

with Inclined Planes, 1866, Pam. 

13.477 Prosecution of F. W. Smith by U. S. Navy 

Depart. 1865, Pamph. 



189 



Defence of Merchants of Boston against Hon. 
John Goodrich, ex-Collector of Customs, 
I860, Tain. 5-28 351 

Names of Soldiers interred in the National 
Cemeteries at Fortres Monroe, and Hamp- 
ton A'a. Pamph, 6-28 351 

Names of Soldiers who died in defence of the 
Union and interred in the Dis. of Texas, Pam, 7-28 351 

Opinion on the Constitutional power of the 
Military to Try and Execute the Assassins of 
the President, 1865, Pamph, 8-28 351 

"War Powers of the President and Legislative 
Powers of Congrels in relation to Rebellion, 
Treason and Slavery 5 1862. Pamph, 9-28 351 

Military Government of Hostile Territories in 
time of war, 1864. Pamph, 10-28 351 

Hovey's Guide to the Flower and Vegetable 
Garden, 1867. Pamph, 

Record of the Class of '43, Yale College. 8vo, 

Catalogue of Public Library, Nashua, 8vo, 

Manchester Directory, 1869, 8vo. 

Voyages of the Slavers. St. John and Arms of 
Amsterdam, 1659-63, Svo, 

Ncn of Our Times. Harriett Beecher Stow, 8vo, 

Stratmore " Ouida,"12mo, 

Idalia. '' Ouida," L2mo, 

Claudia. Amanda M. Douglas, 12mo, 

Sydnie Adriance. Amanda M. Douglas, 12mo, 

Foul Play. Chas Rsade, 8vo, 

Where is the City? 16mo, 

If, Yes and Perhaps. E. E. Hale,12mo, 

What Answer? Anne F. Dickinson, L2mo, 

Is it [? II. B. Storer, L6mo, 

Our Standard Bearer ■•Oliver Optic," l2mo. 

Digest of Reports of United Slates Courts, 
Vol. 3, 8vo. 

Address before X. II Farmers' Club, Bedford, 
Feb. 1868, J. A. Fiddle, Pamp., 

Report of City Library Association, Spring- 
held, Mass , 1868 Pamp., 

Report of Executive Committee, Hartford 
Young Men's Institute, L868. Pamp. 

Message of Gov. Walter Harriman to N. II. 
Legislature, 1868. Pamp. 

Report of State Treasurer, 1868. Pamp.. 

Report of Warden and Inspector of State 

Prison, 1868. Pamp. 3-29 351 

Report Boai;d of Trustees of State Reform 

School, 1868. Pamp. 4-29 351 

Reports Roard of Visitors, Trus., Treas. and 

Supt. of N. II. Insane Asylum, 1868. Pam. 5.29 351 



11-28 


351 


23 


307 


23 


320 


86 


20 


37 


300 


, :;:» 


333 


50 l.".f 


51 134 


52 


134 




1 ,1 


28 133 


64 


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1 1 15 


64 105 


21 


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£1 146 



12- 


24 


351 


9. 


-27 


35i 


3- 


27 


351 


1- 

2 


29 
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351 
351 



190 

13.510 Report Bank Commissioners, 1868. Pamp. C-29 351 

13.511 Frank on the Prairie. II. Castlemon, lGmo, 82 179 

13.512 Scientific American, Vol, 18, 1868, 23 J 

13.513 Lecture to Young Men. H. W. Beccher, 16mo, G5 38 

13.514 Plain Talk on Familiar Subjects. J. G. Hol- 

land, lGmo, GO 38 

13)515 Plain Thoughts on the Art of Living. W. 

Gladden, lGmo, G7 38 

13.516 Philosophy of Domestic Life. W. H. Byford, 

lGmo, 68 038 

13.517 Mental and Social Culture. L.C. Loomis, 12mo, 69 38 

13.518 Household Beading, 8vo, 26 35 

13.519 Looking towards Sunset. L. Maria Child, 

12mo, 29 34 
13,520-2 History of Methodism. A. Stevens. 3 vols. 

12mo, 32 36 

13.523 Thanksgiving. Win. Adams, 12mo, 38 37 

13.524 Sermons. Horace Bushnell, 12mo, 39 37 
13,525-6 The Great Preparation. J. dimming, 12mo, 

2 series, 40 37 

13.527 Men and things in Europe. Bev. IN". Murray, 

12mo, 46 37 

13.528 Letters to Rev. John Hughes. Bev. N. Murray, 

l2ino, 47 37 

13.529 Romanism at Home. Bev. X. Murray. 12mo, 48 37 

13.530 Origin, Rise, and Progress of Mormanism. 

Pomroy Tucker, 12mo, 56 39 

13.531 Foregleams of Immortality. E. H. Sears, 

12mo, 57 39 

13.532 Origin of the Four Gospels. C. Tischendorf, 

lGmo. 58 39 

13.533 Annals of a Quiet Neighborhood. George 

Macdonald, 12mo, 45 134 

13.534 Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secession to 

Loyalty. J. W. De Forest, 12mo, 4G 134 

13,635 A Summer in Leslie Goldth wait's Life. Mrs. 

A. D T. Whitney, 12mo, 47 134 

13.536 The Chimney-Corner. Mrs. H. B. Stowe, 12mo, 48 134 

13.537 Dr. Howell's Family. Mrs. H. B. Goodwin. 

12mo, 
13,438 Edmond Dantes. A. Dumas, 8vo, 
13,639 A Stormy Life. Lady Fullerton, 8vo, 
13,550 Old Fritz and the New Era. L. Muhlbach, 

8vo, 
13,641 Rural Studies. D. Mitchell. 12mo 
13,442 Wet Days at Edgewood. D. G. Mitchell, 12mo, 

13.543 Seven Stories. D. Mitchell, 12mo, 

13.544 Folly as it flics. "Fanny Fern/' 12mo, 

13.545 Life in the West N. C. Meeker, 12mo, 
13,516 Earthly Paradise, Poem. Wm. Morris, 12mo, 

2vols, 



191 

1.0,547-8 Poetical Works. J. G. Whittier, 16mo, 2vols. 42 109 

13.549 Tent on the Beach. J. G. Whittier, 16mo, 44 109 

13.550 Snow-Bound. J. G. Whittier, 16mo, 45 109 

13.551 N. E. Tragedies, Poem. Ii. W. Longfellow, 

16mo, 46 109 

13.552 Poems of Faith, Hope, and Love. Phoebe Ca- 

rey, Kihio, 

13.553 Four Years in Secessia. J. IT. Browm, 8vo. 

13.554 Sunshine and Shadow in New York. Matt. 

Hale Smith, 8vo, 

13.555 Women of the War. Frank Moore, 8vo, 
13,550 Recollections of a Busy Lite. Horace Greeley, 

8vo, 

13,557 War between the States. Alexander H. Ste- 
phens, "Vol. 1, 8vo, 

13,558-9 History oi United Netherlands. J.L.Motley 
Vols. 3-4, 8vo, 

13.500 Pioneers of France. F. Farkinan, 8vo, 

13.501 Jesuits of North America. F. Parkman, 8vo, 
13,562 The Huguenots. Sam'l Smiles, 8vo, 
13,503 The Vegetable World. L. Figuier, 8vo, 

13.564 The'Ocean World. L. Figuier, 8vo, 

13.565 Household Physician. Ira Warren. 8vo. 
13,506 N. E. Business Directory, L868, 8vo, 

13.567 Plain Dealings. Thos. Lechford, 8vo, 

13.568 Life and Letters of Wilder Dwight, 8vo, 

13.569 Garden Vegetables. F. Burr, Jr. L2mo, 

13.570 Invasion of the Crimea, Vol. 2, A. W. King- 

lake. 12mo, 
13,571-2 Glory and Shame of "England. C. E. Lester, 
2 vols. 12mo, 

13.573 Condition and Education of the the People of 

England. Joseph Kay, 12mo, 

13.574 Letters from Europe. John Forney. I2mo, 

13.575 Land of Thor. J. Rose Browne, 12mo, 

13.576 The Pampas and Andes. N. II. Bishop, l2mo 

13.577 Two Thousand miles on Horseback. J. I". 

Meline, 12mo, 

13.578 An Arctic Boat Journey. T. T. Haves, 12mo 

13.579 The Holy Land. Wm. II. Dixon, 12mo, 

13.580 The Turk and Greek. S. G. W. Benjamin, 
13,5#1 Harper's Hand-book for Travellers in Europe 

W. P Fetridge, 12mo, 
13,582 Comic Speeches. A. J. Spencer, 16mo, 
13,583-4 Salem Witchcraft. Chas. W. Upham, 2 vols. 

1 2mo, 

13.585 Lives of the Queens of England. Agnes Strick- 

land, 12mo, * 

13.586 Queens of American Society. Mrs. Ellet, 12mo, 
18,587^8 Life and Letters of F. W. Robinson. 2 vols. 

12mo, 37 305 



47 


109 


32 


75 


33 


75 


30 304 


37 304 


51 


254 


22 


249 


51 


20S 


52 


268 


24 307 


36 


228 


36 


228 


26 354 


27 


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00 


229 


71 


258 


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48 


77 


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77 


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77 


51 


77 


52 


77 


53 


77 


54 


77 


11 


70 


1 


79 


69 169 


28 269 


85 305 


30 305 



75 189 


ill 258 


67 258 


67 258 


68 258 


69 258 


37 309 


38 309 



192 

13.589 Culture Demanded by Modern Life, 12mo, 74 189 

13.590 Language and the Study of Language. Wm. 

D. Whitney. 12mo, 

13.591 How to Do Business, 16mo, 

13.592 Servants of the Stomach. Jean Mace, 12mo, 

13.593 History of a Mouthful of Bread. Jean Mace, 

12mo, 

13.594 Good English. E. S Gould, 12mo, 

13.595 Oratory. Win. Pettinger, 12mo, 

13.596 Paris in '67. Henry Morford, 12mo, 

13.597 Smoking and Drinking. J. Parton, 16mo, 

13.598 Man — Where, Whence and Whither. David 

Page, 16mo, 39 309 

13.599 The Friendships of Women. W. R. Alger, 

lGmo, 

13.600 Plutarch. H. B. Hackett, 12mo, 

13.601 Manual of Social Science. II. C. Carey, 12mo, 

13.602 Biblical Reason Why. 12mo, 

13.603 The Reason Why. Nat. History, 12mo, 
13 60-1 That's it, or Plain Teaching, 12mo, 

13.605 The Sociable, 12mo, 

13.606 Historical Pictures Retouched. Caroline II. 

Dall. 12mo. 

13.607 Sexual Physiology. R T. Trail, 12mo, 

13.608 Elocution. Prof. Bronson,8vo, 
L3,609 Human Life. Sweetser, llmo, 

13.610 Triumphs of Invention and Discovery, J. II. 

Kvt'e, 12m, . 40 306 

13.611 Opportunities for Industry. E. T. Freedlev, 

12mo, * . 36 309 

13.612-3 Maga Excursion Papers. 12mo, 41 309 

13.614 The Forest Jungle, and Prairie. A. Elliott, 

12mo, 35 69 

13.615 _ West Virginia. J. R. Dodge, 12mo, 63 168 
L3,616-7 The Great Consummation, 2series. John Gum- 
ming, 12mo, 42 37 

13.618 Solitude of Christ. Austin Phelps, 26mo, 44 40 

13.619 U. S. Expedition to River Jordan and Dead 

Sea. W. F. Lynch. 8vo, 1849, 24 63 

13,620-5 Temperance Tales. Lucius Sargent, 6 vols. 
18mo, 

13.626 History of the French Revolution. M. A. Thiers, 

Vol. 2, 8vo, 

13.627 Hist, of Charles the Bold. J. F. Kirk, Vol. 3, 

8vo, 
13,628-33 The Rebellion Record. Frank Moore, 6 vols. 

8vo, 
13,634-11 EnglishiCvclopedia, Arts and Sciences. Chas. 

Kniyht.'s vols. 4to. 
X3,642 U. S. Blue Book, 1568, Pamp. 



4() 309 


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54 229 


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29 315 


76 189 



80 159 


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60 277 


40 263 


9 311 
-2.3 3.31 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board of School Committee, ? 
January 1, 1869. $ 

The Superintendent presented his Annual Report, which wa9 
read and accepted. 

WILLIAM LITTLE, Clerk. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
January 1, 1869. 

The Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
was read and accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

J. E. BENXETT, City Clerk. 



In Board of Common Council. 
January 1, 1869. 

In concurrence, the Annual Report of the Superintendent of 
Public Instruction was read, accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

H. M, GILLIS, Clerk. 



SCHOOL EEPOET. 



To the School Committee of the City of Manchester, 
Gentlemen : 

I submit to you my second annual report, of the Public Schools 
of this City. 

The appropriation for schools in 1868 was the same as for 1867 
viz : $38, 000 00. 

Many of the schools were discontinued at the close of the "Win- 
ter term, yet the expenses were the same as for the previous year. 

During the Winter term of the past year 69 teachers were em- 
ployed, the greatest number ever employed at any one time in the 
City. 

The number employed for the corresponding term of last year 
was 63. 

The average number of Teachers for the year 1868 was nearly 
the same as for 1867 as several new schools were established dur- 
ing the year. 

For the first half of 1867 the Middle and Primary School teach- 
ers were paid at the rate of $300, per annum, for the last half at 
the rate of $400. 

The salaries were continued at the same rate for the year 1868. 

Taking into account these facts, viz, that the salaries were not 
raised in 1867 till the middle of the year, and that so many teachers 
were employed the first term of 1868, the expenditures of the year 
are accounted for. 

The Treasurer's Report which is here presented will show in de- 
tail the expenditures of the year : 



196 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT IN ACCOUNT WITH H. R. CHAM- 
BERLIN, TREASURER. 

Amount of Funds. 



Balance from old account, 
Appropriation by city, 



$54 61 
38,000 00 



-$38,054 61 



EXPENDITURES. 



School District No. 2. 



TEACHING. 


W. W. Colburn, 


1,590 00 


C. Augusta Gile, 


390 00 


Mary E. Clough, 


430 00 


P. W. Parker, 


. - 770 00 


•Jacob Eastman, 


330 00 


Emma A. H. Brown, 


400 00 


Betsey A. Ambrose, 


400 00 


Martha B. Dinsmore, 


400 00 


Isaac L. Heath, 


1,160 00 


Lucretia E. Mauahan, 


400 00 


H. A. Slade, 


280 00 


R. B. Gove, 


400 00 


Thomas Corcoran. 


1,31125 


Mary Scholastica, 


140 00 


Alice McQuaid, 


227 50 


Julia A. Baker, 


390 00 


Mattie R. Kidder, 


400 00 


Sarah A. Greene, 


285 50 


Mary L. S eeper, 


406 50 


Nancy S. Bunton, 


400 00 


Mary J. Fife, 


400 00 


Lottie R. Adams, 


370 00 



197 



Nellie J. Sanderson, 


404 00 


Lizzie P. Gove, 


404 00 


Ellen B. Rowell, 


405 00 


Mary O'Brien, 


140 00 


Annie M. Bernard, 


140 00 


Mary Vincent, 


88 00 


C. Augusta Abbott. 


400 00 


Mary E. Ireland, 


270 00 


Emily J. Parker, . . 


407 00 


Georgianna Dow, 


408 50 


A. C. Flanders, 


406 50 


Addie E. Hutchinson, 


380 00 


Julia A. Clay, . 


380 00 


Carrie E. Reed, 


400 00 


Marian na Clough, 


390 00 


Cleora E. Bailey, 


142 00 


Mary A. Richardson, 


412 00 


Helen M. Morrill, 


400 50 


Mintie C. Edgerly, 


400 50 


Abbie E. Abbott 


408 75 


Emma A. McCoy, 


.380 00 


Mary Camillus. 


' 140 00 


Mary Liguori, 


140 00 


Mary Louis, 


100 00 


Sarah Clifford, 


140 00 


Mary Xavier, 


140 00 


Flora Campbell, 


145 00 


Helen M. Hills, 


400 00 


Annie Murphy, 


140 00 


Lucy Wheeler, 


140 00 


Georgia E. Smith, 


52 50 


Lina Custer, 


37 50 


Rebecca C. Hall, 


22 50 


Kate L. Porter, 


7 50 


Samuel W. Clark, 


636 00 


Fannie M. Smith, 


400 00 



198 



Mattie L. Jones, 
Mary A. Kelley, 
Josephine McConville, 
Hattie G. Flanders, 
Josephine M. Haines, 
Julia A. Hennessy, 
Adelaide B. George, 
Laura A. Montgomery, 
I. 8. Whitney, 
J. D. Jones, 



408 75 
30 00 
39 00 
67 50 

140 00 
97 50 

262 00 
90 00 

820 00 

144 00 



$23,167 25 



REPAIRS. 



Abbott & Kelly, 
Geo. II. Dudley, 
Daniels & Co., 
Haines & Wallace, 
Hartshorn & Pike, 
H. M. Bailey & Son, 
J. B. Varick & Co., 
William Wilder, 
H. T. Foss, ^ 
Neal & Holbrook, 
T. R. Hubbard, 
E. G. Haynes, 
H. T. Mo watt, 

E. Roper, 
G. B. Fogg, 
L. M. Greene, 
J G. Edgerly, 
Manchester Print Works, 

F. W. Parker, 
Thomas E. Cressey, 
Day & Roberts, 
Gage & Follansbee, 
True E. Dudley, 
Wm. H. Elliott, 



106 44 
336 10 
132 79 
144 19 
263 27 
115 62 
22 00 

32 03 
4 00 
9 12 

33 02 
66 75 

2 25 

6 00 

7 75 
24 00 
10 60 
33 78 

700 

8 75 
1 62 
6 73 
1 50 
125 



199 



A. H. Lowell, 
¥m. McPherson, 
E. A. Smith, 



50 00 
22 00 
41 30 



$1,469 86 



FUEL AND SAWING WOOD. 



H. D. Lord, 


157 62 


Gilman Clough, 


779 43 


Nehemiah Preston, . « 


5175 


Manchester Print "Works, 


32 30 


E. P. Johnson & Co., 


44 47 


Israel Webster, ' . 


30 00 


J. G. Edgerly, 


2 00 


Z. Harvey, 


27 75 


Moses Lull, . . 


15 00 


Michael Lane, 


2150 


J. L. Newton, 


3 00 


Concord Eailroad, freight, 


77 06 



$1,241 88 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



Henry A. Spooner, 


15 00 


Barton & Co., 


63 81 


D. F. Straw, . 


18 75 


G. F. Bosher & Co., 


38 60 


H. E. Newton & Co., 


94 50 


E. P. Dutton & Co., 


43 47 


David Libbey, 


29 45 


Charles A. Smith, 


4 50 


Wm. O. Haskell & Son, 


8 00 


H. H. Ladd & Co., 


15 00 


G W. Adams, 


1 82 


A. Ferren & Co., 


2 52 


I. S. Whitney, 


12 00 


Hoyt & Cox, 


2 50 



$349 92 



200 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



Wm. H. Fisk, 

A. Qnimby, 

Joseph L. Ross, 

H. C. Tilton, 

J. G. Edgerly, 

Tewksbury & Brother, 

Wm. O. Haskell & Son, 

I. S. Whitney, 

E. S. Ritchie, apparatus, 





186 73 




22 75 




40 45 




336 07 




155 




40 31 




10 00 




35 25 




80 12 



$753 23 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



John. B. Clarke, 
Campbell & Hanscom, 
C. F. Livingston, 
Charles O. Rogers, 



178 82 


64 62 


110 50 


3 90 



$357 84 



CARE OF FURNACES AND ROOMS. 



John Farrar, 
Nathaniel Corning, 
Thomas E. Cressey, 
T. P. Clough, 
M. W Oliver, 
Geo. W. Varnum, 
Thomas Howe, 
Joseph T. Snow, 
Edgar Clough, 
E. P. Cogswell, 2d, 





269 78 




77 00 




269 33 




91 57 




75 00 




484 95 




190 30 




22 92 




2100 




82 50 



$1,584 35 



S. & S. S. James, 
Hill & James, 



TEAMS. 



33 00 
20 00 



$53 00 



201 



INCIDENTALS. 



Julia Finnegau, cleaning, 

John Londigan, " 

Mrs. Vatter, " 

J. F. Wiley, cleaning clock, 

II. R. Chamberlin, Treas. salary, 

H. D. Lord, rent of shop, 

"Win. Little, clerk salary, 

Jeremiah Hayes, cleaning vaults. 

E. G. Richardson, tuning piano, 

J. E. Bennett, clerk of Dist. 

C. H. Hodgman, teaming, 
M. J. Kendall, " 
Manchester Post Office, 

Z. Harvey, cleaning vaults, 

H. D. Lord, posting warrants, 

J. G. Edgerly, cash paid, 

Abbie E. Abbott, paid for cleaning, 

D. F. Straw, repairing clock, 
Straw' & Lovejoy, " 
Hill & Co., expressage, 

T. S. Montgomery, cash paid, 
Michael Kerrigan, labor, 
John Lennon, " 



15 00 


45 00 


3 50 


50 00 


34 25 


35 00 


48 00 


4 25 


1OO0 


5 75 


8 24 


10 95 


1 50 


1 25 


4 15 


150 


1 25 


4 00 


40 


2 00 


1 00 


4 00 



256 24 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 1 

Sarah A. Preston, teaching, 

M. Theora Flanders, " 

J. D. Jones, " 

N. Preston, wood, 

S. & S. S. James, teams, 

Hill & James, " 

Mrs. G. W. Dustin, cleaning, 

Lee & Shepard, books, 

G. F. Bother & Co., chairs, 



143 00 


233 00 


31 75 


30 00 


10 00 


4 00 


3 50 


75 


2 75 



457 75 



202 



District No. 3. 
Edward F. James, teaching, 
J. D. Jones, " 

Nancy E. Howlett, " 
Katie L. Porter, " 

Martha W. Huhbard, " 
S. & S. S. James, teams, 
Gilman Clough, wood, 
E. P. Johnson & Co. " 
H. D. Lord sawing wood, 
Frank W. Mitchell, " 
Lee & Shepard hooks, 
Brewer & Tileston, charts, 
H. D. Lord, posting warrants, 
H. M. Bailey & Son, repairs, 
L. M, Greene, " 

Hartshorn & Pike, " 

Straw & Lovejoy, " 

G. F. Bosher & Co . Furniture, 

District No 4. 
"VV. W. Patterson, teaching, 
J. D. Jones, ** 

Etta M. George, " 

S. & S. S. James, teams, 
H. C. Tilton, books, 
Lee & Shepard, books, 
H. D. Lord, posting warrants, 
John P. Moore, wood and repairs, 



217 


00 


31 


75 


28 


00 


267 


00 


212 


00 


9 


00 


45 


88 


10 


50 


7 


50 


2 


50 


1 


00 


3 50 


1 


25 


2 70 


2 


00 


16 


38 


4 


00 


3 


50 


157 


00 


31 


75 


248 75 


12 50 




50 




75 


4 75 


35 


00 



46 



$491 00 



District No. 5. 



Eugene O. Locke, teaching, 


159 00 


J. D. Jones, " 


3175 


Mattie S. Miller, " 


125 00 


Ella M. Mitchell, " 


108 00 


S. & S. S. James, teams, 


10 00 



203 



Gilman dough, wood, 

H. D. Lord, sawing wood, 

Daniels & Co., repairs, 

Frank Eobie, " 

Lee & Shepard, books, 

H. D. Lord, posting warrants, 



24 56 


6 25 


3 55 


100 


50 


2 25 



$471 86 



District No. 6. 



George A. Little, teaching, 


157 00 


J. D. Jones, teaching, 


31 75 


Mary J. Reid, " . 


265 00 


S. & S. S. James, teams, 


10 00 


Hill & James, (i 


4 00 


Gilman Clough, wood, 


16 38 


James M. AVebster, cleaning, 


2 00 


" " repairs, 


1 75 


James AYiley, " 


7 50 


H. D. Lord, posting warrants 


2 50 


Lee & Shepard, books, . . . 


75 



$498 63 



District No. 7. 



Maria II. Hildreth, teaching, 


429 50 


Mary B. Lane, " 


332 50 


J. D. Jones, " 


31 75 


S. & S. S. James, teams, . • 


2 25 


Hill & James, teams, . 


8 00 


Gilman Clough, wood, 


28 50 


Joseph Marsh, wood, 


15 00 


H. D. Lord, sawing wood, 


7 50 


H. C. Tilton, books and statiouery 


2 10 


Lee & Shepard, books and stationery . 


1 50 


Peter O. AVoodman, repairs, 


5 72 


Geo. H. Dudley, «• 


8 75 


G. B. Fogg, " 


75 


Robert Hall, " 


4 63 



204 



Hartshorn & Pike, " 
Brewer & Tileston, charts, 
Geo. W. Adams, supplies, 



67 
3 50 

104 



-$883 66 



DISTRICT NO. 8. 



L. H. Button, teaching, 

J. D. Jones, " 

Anna S. Osgood, " 

Hill & James, teams, 

Paschal Preston, repairs, 

Daniels & Company, " 

H. D. Lord, posting warrants, 

J. H. Proctor, wood, 

Lee & Shepard, hooks, 

Willis H. Proctor, care of rooms, 



157 50 

31 75 

250 00 

13 75 

75 

108 

2 25 

36 00 

75 

2 50 



5496 33 



DISTRICT NO. 9 

Henry T. Rand, teaching, 

J. D. Jones, '• 

Lana S. George, " 

Hill & James, teams 

Stephen Haselton, wood, 

C. O. Huse, sawing wood, 

George W. George, repairs, 

Woodman & Hammett, books and charts 



DISTRICT NO 

Charles J. Darrah, teaching, 

I. S. Whitney, " 

Annette McDoel, " 

Hattie A. Mack, " 

Mary A. Parker, " 

Mary A. Stevens, " 

Sarah D. Lord, " 



10. 



157 00 

3175 

248 75 

13 00 

25 00 

4 00 

3 50 

1 50 



-$484 00 



196 00 
70 00 
140 50 
230 00 
210 50 
140 00 
402 50 



205 



Laura J. Hamblett, ',' 


244 00 


Lucia Cutler, " 


70 00 


Fannie C. Norris, " 


30 00 


Mattie S. Miller, " 


107 50 


Annette McDoel, 


154 00 


Mary A. Parker, 


120 00 


Hill & James, teams, 


4 00 


S.S.James & Co. " 


6 00 


Z. Harvey, care of rooms, 


123 50 


C. J. Darrah, " 


8 00 


H. C. Tilton, books and stationery, 


13 00 


Woodman & Hammett, '• 


20 40 


I. S. Whitney, music charts, 


10 00 


Haines & Wallace, repairs, 


10 92 


D. H. Young, " 


34 50 


Neal & Holbrook, " 


5 50 


Geo. H. Dudley, " 


6 62 


G. B. Fogg, 


60 


H.M.Bailey, &Son," 


4 07 


Gilman Clough, wood, 


136 56 


D. B. Eastman, " 


69 17 


Z. Harvey, sawing wood, 


21 50 


Haines & Wallace, " 


100 


II. D. Lord, posting warrants, 


100 


W. H. Fisk, supplies, 


4 91 


G. F. Bosher & Co., supplies, 


2 75 



$2,589 00 



DISTRICT NO. 11. 



L. H. Dutton, teaching, 


530 00 


I. S. Whitney, 


a 


10 00 


J. D. Jones, 


i( 


40 00 


Amos Wright, 


a 


170 75 


Fannie E. Porter, 


«« 


404 00 


llebecca Hall, 


a 


217 62 


Henry Whittcmore 


• 


5 00 



206 



S. & S. S. James, teams, 


7 50 




E. Stearns, sawing wood, 


15 70 




H. D. Lord, " 


187 




N. Preston, wood, 


63 00 




Z. Harvey, cleaning vault, 


150 




T. S. Montgomery, cash paid, 


9 42 




Geo. H. Dudley, repairs, 


10 62 




Daniels & Co., " 


1 59 




J. B. Varick & Co., " 


7 54 




H. M. Bailey & Son, " 


125 




Wm. McPherson, " 


12 00 




G. B. Fogg, 


75 




Hartshorn & Pike, " . 


34 




G. W. Adams, furniture and supplies 


1 50 




Wm. H. Fisk, " " 


9 42 


1,521 37 
38,042 63 






Balance to new account, 


• 


11 98 



$38,054 61 
H. K. CHAMBERLIN, 

Treasurer. 



Manchester, Dec. 7, 1868. 



SCHOOL YEAR. 



The school year is now divided into three terms, the first term be- 
ginning the first Monday of December, and continuing 14 weeks, 
the second beginning the last Monday of March, and continuing 
14 weeks, the third beginning the last Monday of August, and con- 
tinuing 12 weeks. 

The full term which is the last term of the year closes about the 
20th of November. 

The Winter term which commences the new year begins the 
first Monday of December. 

Thus the expenses of the month of December arc paid out of the 
next years appropriation. 

The fiscal year in all the other departments of the City, closes 
with the calendar year and the expenses of each department, — ex- 
cepting that of schools — from the first of January to the last of De- 
cember are paid from the appropriation of the current year. 

I see no reason for this arrangement with regard to the schools 
but on the contrary think the school year should close the last of 
December, and not allow bills to the amount of five or six thous- 
and dollars to be paid the next year. 

If this change is effected the fall term which has usually been 
12 weeks in length will be extended four or five weeks, closing 
the last Friday of December. 



The following list contains the names of those teachers who 
have served in the different schools of the city within the past 
year: 

HIGH SCHOOL. 



Principal— ¥m. "YV. Colburn ; 
Assistant — C. Augusta Gile; 
" Mary E. Clough. 



208 

NORTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — Frank \V. Parker, 2 terms ; 

' ' Jacob Eastman, JL term ; 

Assistant — Emma A. H. Brown ; 

" Betsey A. Ambrose ; 

" Martha B. Dinsinore. 

SOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — Isaac L. Heath ; 
Assistant — Lucretia E. Manalian; 

" Rebecca B. Gove; 

" Hannah A. Slade, 2 terms; 

" Lottie II. Adams, 1 term. 

PARK STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — Thomas Corcoran ; 
Assistant — Mary Scholastica, 1 term ; 
Alice G. McQuoid, 2 terms. 

EAST GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Jnlia A. Baker; 
Mattie R. Kidder. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

Principal — Samuel W. Clark;* 
Assistant — Fannie M. Smith. 

MIDDLE SCIIOCLS. 

No. 1, Sarah J. Green, 2 terms ; 
" Ellen B. Rowell, 1 term ; 
" 2. Mary L. Sleeper; 
" o. Nancy S. Bunton ; 
" 4. Mary J. Fife; 
" 5. Lottie It. Adams, two terms; 

''Scliool iu session only two terms. 



209 

ISTo. C. Augusta Abbott, one term; 
" G. Nellie J. Sanderson; 
" 7. Lizzie P. Gove; 
" 8. Ellen B. Howell, 2 terms; 
" Laura A. Montgomery, one term ; 
" 9, Mary O'Brien ;f 
" 10. Annie M. Bernard, f; 
"11. Mary Vincent, f ; 
" 12. C. Augusta Abbott, 2 terms; 
" Carrie E. Reed, 1 term; 
" 13. Hattie L. Jones. 

t PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. Mary E. Ireland, 2 terms; 
" Emma A. McCoy, 1 term; 

« 2. Emily J. Parker; 
" 3. Georgianna Dow; 
" 4. Anstrice G. Flanders; 
u 5. Addic L. Hutchinson ; 
« 6. Julia A. Clay; 
" 7. Carrie E. Reed, 2 terms; 
" Marianna Clough, 1 term; 

u 8. Marianna Clough, 2 terms; 
" Fannie M. Smith, 1 term; 
11 9 Cleora E. Bailey, 1 term; 
*' Adelaide B. George, 2 terms ; 
" 10. Mary A. Richardson; 
" 11. Helen M.Morrill; 
" 12. Mintie C. Edgerly; 
" 13. AbbieE. Abbott; 
" 14. Emma A. McCoy;* 
" 15. Mary Camillus, f; 
" 16. Mary Liguori; f 
u 17. Mary Louis; t 
"18. Sarah Clifford ; f 



210 

" 19. Mary Xavier; f 

" 20. Flora Campbell ; f 

" 21. Helen M. Hills; 

" 22 Annie Murphy, f 

" 23 Lucy 'Wheeler,f 

Ward Seven. — Grammar School. 

Principal — Charles J. Darrah, 1 term. 
" Annette McDoel, 2 terms. 

Assistant — Mary A. Parker, 2 " 

" Lucia A. Cutler, 1 term. 
East Primary, Sarah D. Lord. 
West Primary, Antoinette Stevens, l,term. 

" " Hattie A. Mack, 2 terms, 

South Primary, Laura J. Hamhlett, 2 terms. 
" " Mattie S. Miller, 1 term. 

Ward Eight. — Grammar School. 

Principal — Amos Wright. 1 term. 

" L. II, Dutton, 2 terms. 

North Primary, Fannie E. Porter. 
South Primary, Rebecca Hall. , ' 

Rural District. 

No 1 — Sai-ah A. Preston 1 term. 

" 1— M. Theora Flanders, 2 terms. 

" 3 — Edward F. James, 1 term. 

" 3 — Katie L. Porter, 2 terms. 

" 3 — Martha W. Hubbard — Assistant 2 terms. 

" 4— Win. W. Patterson, 1 term. 

" 4 — Etta M. George 2 terms. 

" 5 — Eugene O. Locke, 1 term. 

" 5— Mattie S. Miller, 1 term. 

" . —Ella M. Mitchell, 1 term. 

" 6 — George Little, 1 term. 



211 

No. — Mary S. Reid, 2 terms. 

" 7— Maria H. Hildreth, Principal. 
" — Mary B. Lane, Assistant. 

" 8— L. H. Dutton, 1 terra. 
" — Anna S. Osgood, 2 terms. 

" 8— Henry T. Rand, 1 term. 
" — Vilana S. George, 2 terms. 



MUSIC TEACHERS. 

Districts 2 and 10, 1. S. Whitney. 

No. 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 11, J. D. Jones. 

GRADUATES OF THE HIGH AND GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Since the year 1860, diplomas have been awarded to pupils who 
have completed the Course of Study at the High School. 

As so many are unable to complete the course at the High 
School — in fact, as such a large number never enter this school — it 
has been thought best to award diplomas to all who shall pass a 
successful examination in the Grammar School studies. 

Diplomas were awarded at the Grammar Schools at the close of 
the summer term. 

The following is a list of the diploma scholars at the various 
schools : 

North Grammar School. 



Annie II. Abbott, 
Ina E. Avery. 
Mary P. Blunt, 
Emma A. Blood, 
Emma F. Boody, 
J. Emma Boutelle, 

* School only 2 terms. 
| School only 1 term, 



Clara O Lewis, 
Lizzie H. McCrillis, 
Abbie E. Moore, 
Flora M. Proctor, 
Emma B. Quimby, 
Hattie Shaunon, 



Etta A. Frost. 
Clara A. Glidden 7 
Nettie Haynes, 
Minnie F. Hoyt, 
Lilla H. Jackson, 

George I. Aldrich, 
Robert A Annan, 
Malcolm L. Bradley, 
James A. Buncher, 
¥m. H. Cate, 
Arthur E. Clark, 
Henry C. Cross, 



212 

Mary S. Spofford, 
Emma F. Stowell, 
Martha E. Sutcliff, 
Elvira Watson 



L. W. Downs, 
Henry M. French, 
"Walter Newell, 
Bayard T. Perry, 
Edward E. Smith, 
Edward B. Woodbury. 



South Grammar School. 



Annie F. Baker, 
Josie A. Bosher, 
Mary F. Dana, 
Ida F. Drew. 
Nettie J. Palmer, 
Nellie M. Plummer, 



Josie S. Itumrill, 
Minnie F. Sanborn, 
Nellie F. Smith, 
Ella M. Straw, 
Rocilla M. Tuson. 



George C. Campbell, 
Charles C. Cochran, 
Frank Cutchins, 
Perry H. Dow, 
Leroy A. Hart, 
Eddie S. Heath, 

Park Street Grammar School. 



Charles A. Parker, 
Fred. C. Sanborn, 
Arthur E. Stearns, 
George M. True, 
Henry G. Wood. 



Walter J. Corcoran. 

At the close of the Fall Term, diplomas were awarded to 14 pu- 
pils at the High School, viz : 



FULL COURSE. 



Addie M. Chase, 
Marietta Howe. 



John M. Knowlos. 



213 



ENGLISH AND FRENCH. 



Emma A. Cross, Annie M. Varney, 

Ida J. Knowles, Emma S. Varney. 



ENGLISH. 



Jennie S. Baker, Joseph H. Batchelder, 

Addie C. Marshall, George E. Hall, 

Alma Porter, ¥m. A. Perry, 

George A. Stokes. 



ATTENDANCE AT THE SCHOOLS. 

A great effort has heen made in many of the schools, to secure a 
more regular attendance. 

Irregularity of attendance is a serious evil in many of our schools 
and constant effort should he made to correct it. 

Absence, tardiness, and dismissal are in too many instances un- 
necessary, and parents should cheerfully co-operate with teachers 
to lessen them. 

It has been altogether too common a practice to allow children to 
remain away from school to witness some event which could be of 
no benefit to them, while at the same time they were losing their 
recitations. 

Nothing need be said of the loss to any pupil which is occasioned 
by absence from recitation ; a loss not only to the scholar thus ab- 
sent, but also to the class of which he is a member, as the class 
must either wait till the delinquent one has gone over the lost 
ground, or the absentee loses much that is necessary for him to 
know before taking up new subjects. 

A man crawling through Elm st. or walking a tight rope ; a com- 
pany of soldiers headed by a fife and drum ; a horse race or a cir- 
cus, and many other similar occurrences, are regarded by many 
parents as of more importance than the education of their chil- 



214 

dren, and as a consequence their children are allowed to remain 
away from school whenever one of these sights is to be witnessed. 

At the close of the term if one of these pupils who has been ab- 
sent from school, to witness such exercises, is not the best scholar 
in the class, parents have the charity to attribute it all to the neg- 
ligence or partiality of the teacher. 

Let parents send their children to school regularly, even if there 
are some exhibitions upon the street which children fail to witness, 
and then there will not be so much complaint with regard to the 
poor success of pupils ; let less time be taken to prepare for a 
'party and more time for the preparation of a lesson in Geometry 
or Algebra, less time to frequent the many places of amusement* 
and more time to study the common branches, and then there will 
be a higher percentage of attendance at the schools, and less cause 
for complaint with regard to the backwardness of pupils. 

In this connection it may not be amiss to speak of measures 
adopted in some of the schools to secure what might be considered 
a high percentage of attendance but which really is not so. 

In some instances so much importance is attached to tardiness, 
that pupils who are a few minutes late prefer to return home and 
be absent rather than tardy. 

Another evil practice in the schools is to allow pupils to be 
present at roll call, and then be absent the remainder of the ses- 
sion, and yet be marked as present. 

By what process of mathematical calculation such scholars can 
be marked as present, I have not been able to learn, and should be 
pleased to be informed with regard to the operation. 

Another and the worst practice of all is this; If a scholar is ab- 
S3nt live consecutive days he is not regarded as a member of the 
school during the five or moi'e absent days, — although this is in di- 
rect violation of the school regulations, — as ten and not five is the 
number of clays specified. 

It has sometimes happened that when scholars have been absent 
three or four days, they have been sent home to remain the rest of 
the week, that the percentage of attendance might not be low. 

All of these practices should be discontinued and attendance 
should be regarded as of more importance than being present at 



215 

roll call, and the main object should be to see how many whole 
days pupils can be present rather than to see what high percentage 
can be shown in a report. 

All live teachers, knowing as they do the evil of absence as well 
as of tardiness, will make such exertions as will secure a regular 
attendance, and parents, knowing the annoyance to which teachers 
are subjected on account of these hindrances, should cheerfully 
assist in the matter. 

Punctuality is a habit which should be carefully cultivated in 
our schools yet we must not forget that there are circumstances at 
times which will prevent scholars from attending regularly. 

Encourage all pupils to attend whenever they can, and let the 
habit be acquired in the lowest grade. 

Several scholars have not been absent or tardy once during the 
past year, others have not during one term. 

It was intended to publish a list of their names in this report, 
and the teachers of the city were so informed, but as it has been 
impossible to obtain a correct list from all of the schools, it is not 
deemed advisable to publish any at this time. 

Several teachers have kept no record of tardiness, while in other 
schools records have been so kept, that an accurate report could 
not be made. 

This is to be regretted ; and I hope that for the coming year this 
subject will receive attention, so that the names of all not absent 
or tard} r for a year or for a term, may be published, constituting a 
Roll of Honor. 

In the last report, I stated that our higher grade schools were 
considerably smaller than the others, from the fact that so many 
pupils leave school at an earlier age. 

I have alluded to the same subject in this report, as I consider 
it a matter of great importance, and possibly something may be 
done whereby parents can be induced to send their children to 
school for a longer time. 

In too many instances the reasons are imaginary, which induce 
parents to withdraw their children from school at so early an age. 

By a little extra effort many children could be kept at school a 
few years longer. 



216 

I have made eareful inquiry with regard to the attendance, and 
have ascertained from the reports of teachers the number of pu- 
pils of different ages, and am now able to give the correct figures. 

In the month of January, 1868, there were 3100 pupils attending 
the different schools at one time. Of this number, 2,350, more 
than three-fourths of all the children in the schools of this city 
were under thirteen years of age. 

In this city there are nearly 5000 children between the ages of 5 
and 18, while but 15 annually graduate at the High School. 

There may be no remedy for this in a city like ours, but it seems 
that more ought to complete the Grammar School course, even if 
they never enter the High School. 

COURSE OF STUDY — GRADE OF SCHOOLS. 

The course of study has been revised, and although at present it 
may not be precisely what we need for the schools, it is working 
well, and the schools are accomplishing much more than they 
would without the prescribed course. 

Changes should be made from time to time as they are needed. 

One of the principal changes has been to introduce the study of 
Grammar and Arithmetic into the High School. 

It was found that there was not sufficient time allotted to these 
branches in the Grammar School; more particularly was this true 
with regard to Grammar. 

Accordingly scholars entering the High School have been obliged 
to leave the study of English Grammar before they were suffi- 
ciently familiar with it. 

Geography has been taken out of the Primary Schools, thus giv- ' 
ing the Primary teachers nmre time to attend to reading and spell- 
ing, branches which have been too much neglected, not because 
they could not be successfully taught, but because so much time 
was required for other branches ol less importance, especially to 
younger children. 

It is hoped that more time will be devoted to reading and spell- 
ing in the Primary and Middle schools, and if there is not time to 
attend to these branches sufficiently as the course is at p resent ar- 



217 

ranged, let more time be allotted ; in fact let it be understood that 
scholars should learn to read and spell before attempting to pro- 
nounce the names of rivers and mountains in Asia and Africa, or 
before attempting to learn the meaning of terms used in Written 
Arithmetic, or the rules for Analysis and Parsing. 

Heretofore Penmanship has been taught in no grade below the 
Grammar School, and as a consequence many have left our schools 
without ever having written a Capital letter. 

Penmanship is now taught in the higher Middle Schools, and I 
trust that soon this branch will be introduced into all Middle 
Schools, and it may be deemed advisable to have it taught even 
in lower grades. 

More time is now allowed for history, but these topics will be 
considered in another part of the report. 

We have in this city at the present time, four distinct grades of 
schools, viz: High, Grammar, Middle and Primary. 

The Intermediate School is not regarded as one in the regular 
grade, but is designed to afford special advantages to those pupils 
who cannot pursue a regular course in the High or Grammar 
Schools. 

The Middle and Primary grades are each divided into 1st and 2d, 
making four grades below the Grammar School. 

There are three classes in the 2d Primary Schools ; the time al- 
lowed for pupils in this grade is one year and a half; in the 1st 
Primary the same number of classes, and the same length of time) 
making three years in the Primary grade 

There are two classes in each Middle School; one year in each 
school, making two years in the Middle grade. 

The Grammar School course is four years, one year for each di- 
vision with two classes in each division, making eight classes in a 
Grammar School. 

In the High School there is a Classical course of four years and 
an English course of three years. 

Thus the time contemplated for a pupil entering the lowest Pri- 
mary and continuing his studies through the Classical course at 
the High School, is thirteen years. 

If scholars apply themselves, the course can be complete in less 



218 

time, while if they ave negligent they will drop back into other 
classes and not complete the course in the prescribed time. 

It has been the endeuvor to arrange the studies so as to render 
the coarse most convenient for the mass of pupils. We cannot 
afford to waste time In too many instances courses of instruc- 
tion are arranged for the rich, rather than the poor. 

The object of our common schools is to provide means of edu- 
cation for every child in the community, and schools can be so con- 
ducted that children who are unable to pursue their studies long 
enough to obtain a liberal education should have the privilege of 
attending to those branches Avhich will be most useful to them in 
the every day walks of life. 

Many things would be beneficial, but there is not time to attend 
to them and the labor necessary to be bestowed upon them will n'ot 
compensate for the time taken from other branches. 

There should be no unnecessary detention in attempting to have 
a child master what will not benefit him. 

In making these suggestions I would not be understood as join- 
ing with those who are continually asking that nothing but the so- 
called practical studies should be pursued in our schools, for 
there is no study — in my opinion — laid down in the course, which 
is not practical but as so many cannot complete the full course, 
there are some brandies that can better be omitted than others. 

After a careful consideration of the subject, having examined 
the courses of instruction and noticed the working of the different 
grades in many places, we are convinced that it is better for our 
schools to have two divisions of each of our lower grades, and I 
trust that before long there may be three divisions of Primary 
Schools. 

By multiplying grades the number of classes in each room will 
decrease; hence teachers will have more time to devote to each 
class and more attention can be given to each particular subject. 

I think this point is sufficiently clear to all who have examined 
the subject, and further comment is unuecessaiw. 

It will take sometime to bring our schools to the exact standard 
laid down for them, but they are gradually approaching it. 

In many localities the Middle and Primary schools are classed 



219 



according- to the grade recently adopted, while in other localities 
there are not enough scholars to allow this classification. 

In the Merrimack St. building, Franklin St. building and Spring 
St. building, this classification already exists, there being a 1st, 
and 2d Middle, and a 1st, and 2d Primary at each of the above named 
places. In the Intermediate building, Primary School Xo. 10, 
ranks as 1st Pirmary, and No. 9 as 2d. 

In the Old High School building Primary No. 2 ranks as 2d Pri- 
mary, and Primary No. 3, which has just been transferred from 
Bridge St., is the higher school of this grade, and in the same build- 
ing the school formerly known as Primary School No. 1 is now 
classed as a 2d Middle School. 

I hope that before the close of another year the Primary School 
at Towlesville together with the one in the old house on Concord 
St. will both be in a new building, and classified like the other 
Primary schools. 

A building can be erected sufficiently large to accommodate both 
of these schools and the Middle Schools, thus leaving the Blodgett 
St. and the Wilson Hill schools the only ones in the central part of 
the city which will not be graded and classified according to the 
plan adopted one year ago. 

CHANGES IN SCHOOLS. 

At the commencement of last winter term two divisions of a 
Grammar School were opened in the High School Building; at the 
commencement of the fall lerm another division was placed in the 
same building. 

Another grammar school division is needed in that locality to ac- 
commodate pupils of that grade. 

There are pupils enough in that vicinity for a full grammar 
school, and as soon as the rooms are provided such a school should 
be established. 

The Middle School, which for many years had been kept in the 
old house on Bridge St., was transferred to the Blodgett St. house 
last May, and the Primary School has just been transferred from 
the same building- to the Old High School building on Lowell St. 

Several Middle and Primary schools were discontinued at the 



220 

beginning of the spring term. At the beginning of the fall 
term Primary School No. 14, on Lowell St., was discontinued. 
During the fall term there was no school at the Intermediate. 

The crowded condition of the schools at Amoskeag rendered it 
necessary to open another school in that ward at the beginning of 
last spring term. 

The old school building has been used for that purpose for the 
past two terms. 

The house at Bakersville has been divided into two rooms, and 
two teachers are now permanently employed in that district. 



STUDIES PURSUED. 

Last year many of the studies were noticed separately and con- 
siderable space devoted to the consideration of each. 

I have already stated that Penmanship will hereafter be taught 
in the Middle Schools. Great improvement has been made in this 
branch within the past year, and this subject is now receiving the 
attention it deserves. 

It is hoped that Grammar School teachers will continue to man- 
ifest that interest in this department which has been shown during 
the past year, and also that in those schools into which it is to be 
introduced there will be an equal degree of interest. 

There is an objection to the method now in operation, viz: that 
too much time will be expended upon principles and elements, and 
not enough copy-books written in the course of the year. Let 
time enough be devoted to principles, but let more copy-books be 
used in the course of a year. I trust there will be no ground for 
this complaint during the coming year. 

With regard to spelling it was stated in the last report " That a 
thorough examination of the classes in the High and Grammar 
Schools would convince any one of the necessity of a more rigid 
drill in this branch." The deficiency in this respect is greater than 
I supposed at that time, and a careful examination of this subject 
shows that this study has been too much neglected. More atten- 



221 

tion is now given to it, and there is reason to believe that pupils 
will go from the lower grades better prepared in this branch — but 
judging from the past there is no danger that this study will be- 
come a "hobby " of many teachers. 

Geography has received during the past year its due share of at- 
tention and possibly more. I do not at all undervalue the impor- 
tance of this study, for I desire to have no pupil leave school with- 
out a good knowledge of this subject; yet in this age of hobbies 
there is danger that teachers in their zeal for any branch — espec- 
ially one which has been so poorly taught, in many instances as this 
has — should be induced to slight some branches in order to have 
classes appear well in a study formerly considered of no account. 

Teachers are discontinuing the practice of requiring pupils to 
commit to memory the names of rivers, and islands in some far off 
country, names which they may never again have occasion to hear 
and which arc pronounced only with difficulty, and instead of 
this, scholars are learning something of their own state and coun- 
ty and are taught that ideas are of more worth than words. 

It is deemed advisable to teach children, something of the posi- 
tion and production of New Hampshire — and Hillsboro County 
in particular — even if they are obliged to leave unlearned the 
names of some of the places of half civilized countries in Asia, 
and Africa, or if they are unable to tell the direction and length 
of the Murrumbidgee River. 

Map drawing is now successfully taught in the schools and good 
results have been obtained in this department during the past 
year. 

I think as our course of study is arranged, too much time is al- 
lowed for geography, and that we can have more geography 
taught in less time. 

Guyot's Intermediate Geography, which has been in use for the 
past year, has proved a good work, and teachers have obtained 
good results by using this method. 

As regards history, we need a primary work on this subject to be 
used in the lower division of the Grammar Schools. This branch 
requires more attention than it has received in former years, it 
has heen neglected, on the ground that pupils could read works of 



222 

history at home or after leaving school, hut I think it deserves a 
permanent place in the list of school studies. 

Many pupils will not have the time or the means to attend to 
reading works of history out of school, and others will not have 
that interest in the stud}' which comes from a course of instruc- 
tion while using the text-hook. 

There are many explanations needed and also many suggestions 
to he made which will interest the pupils, and a love for the 
study will in this Avay he acquired; the pupils will lay a good 
foundation and be induced to add to the knowledge which is ac- 
quired while pursuing the study in the schools. 
Written Arithmetic has always been well taught in our schools and 
at the present time the results here are as good as formerly. The 
only complaint that has existed in former years has been that there 
were too many formulas, too many difficult rules to be committed 
to memory, but the grounds for these complaints, I think, no long- 
er exist. 

It has sometimes been thought a good exercise to require child- 
dren to write numbers expressing decillions, undecillions, &c, 
but as they find but very few examples in the Arithmetics] involv- 
ing such numbers, it seems to be more profitable to spend the time 
in adding and subtracting numbers which can be expressed with 
by far less figures. In Mental Arithmetic formulas are not as 
much used as formerly, and the results are better. 

In schools where long, wordy explanations of the examples are 
not required where pupils are not compelled to commit to memo- 
ry a long list of words whose meaning to them is quite obscure, 
in schools where so many unintelligible terms are not used, but 
where pupils instead of being compelled to fix their minds upon 
the wording of the examples, are taught to concentrate their ener- 
gies upon arithmetical calculations there are the best results. 

Mental Arithmetic is now taught with good success in most of 
our lower- grade schools, and in many of them mathematical cal- 
culations are performed with an accuracy creditable to older 
pupils. 

Walton's Tables have been of great service in many schools and 
the benefit of this kind of drill is readily seen in many classes. 



223 

The Rules in Arithmetic should be clearly understood and the 
examples should be solved in a manner to be understood by all, 
but let the explanations be concise and the pupil's memory not 
burdened with terms to such an extent as to lose sight of the ob- 
ject for which he is striving. 

I think our teachers could succeed better with mental arithmetic 
if thej' could use a different text book, but it is better to keep a 
poor book in the schools than to run the risk of a change. 

I trust the same good results that have been obtained in the study 
of arithmetic during the past may still be noticed in the future. 

English Grammar is now taught in the High School and in the 
higher divisions of the Grammar School. There is more interest 
manifested in this study than formerly, and it is to be hoped that 
this interest will not abate. 

Scholars should be taught to express their thoughts in writing 
as soon as they are able to write, and thus grammar can be studied 
long before the text-book is used without obliging the child to com- 
mit to memory the rules of syntax. 

A course ot instruction in music has been adopted for the dif- 
ferent grades of schools, and the result in tliis department will 
compare favorably with the others, showing the benefit of system 
in this branch as well as in the others. 

It is a question to be considered whether or not drawing shall 
be taught in any of our schools. It is advocated by many, and in 
cities where it is taught it works w x ell. 

A smaller text-book on Physiology, I think, would be desirbale, 
as there is not time to complete the one now in use, and it is diffi- 
cult to decide what portions of it to omit. 

EXAMINATIONS, PROMOTIONS, EXHIBITIONS. 

During the past year there have been no stated times set apart for 
so-called examinations ; no occasion for exhibiting certain classes 
which had been drilled for weeks upon some particular subjects. 

I have examined the different classes at the various schools, a 



: 224 

number of times, but it has been done without any previous ar- 
rangement with the teachers as to the time or method. 

At the close of the summer term, a time was set apart for each 
school to receive visitors, and in most of the schools there was 
nothing- but the regular exercises. 

No special preparation was made for these visitations ; the schools 
were seen at their every day work. 

These days were set apart because we desired to have our 
schools visited more, and many parents would not make these 
visits unless such times were appointed. 

This should be different; parents should be induced to visit 
schools during term time and witness the regular exercises. 

So few visits are made to some schools, that the pupils cannot 
do themselves justice when visitors are present. I stated in the 
last report that all citizens should understand that the schools 
were at all times open to the public, and I emphatically repeat it 
at this time, and urge upon all the importance of visiting schools 
at any time without any previous notice. 

Let it be an every day occurrence, and the scholars becoming ac- 
customed to it, will feel composed and will do much better than 
if they are seen only on special days. 

The complaint is made that when schools are visited teachers 
suspend the regular order of exercises, and in many instances no 
recitations are heard, but instead of these there are some general 
exercises which I think are altogether too general. 

Each school is supposed to have a regular order of exercises, 
and this order should be adhered to unless there is some good rea- 
son to depart from it. 

If persons desire to visit a school to hear a particular recitation, 
they will ascertain at what hour that recitation occurs and govern 
themselves accordingly. 

If teachers have a particular class which they keep for exhibi- 
tion, a certain time should be allowed for this class, and the time 
stated upon the programme of exercises for the school. 

If a committee man wishes to hear any particular class, lie will 
state the fact to the teacher, and if he docs not make any such re- 



225 

quest the fair inference is that he wishes to witness the regular 

programme. 

People from other places will often visit our schools and will he 
anxious to hear a recitation in some particular department, and 
the same may be true with regard to our own citizens. In such 
cases teachers should accommodate their visitors, but as a general 
thing visitors Avill be better pleased to hear the regular recitations, 
and if a class is reciting at the time persons enter a school room 
the recitation should proceed as soon as possible without any 
apology or excuse on the part of a teacher. Scholars must not ex- 
pect that every time there arc visitors in school something extra- 
ordinary will occur. 

Members of the School Committee and all others upon inquiry 
at the Superintendent's office can ascertain at what hour any les- 
son will be heard, as the programme of exercises for each school 
should be there in accordance with the following regulation 
adopted by the School Committee, viz: ''Teachers shall send to 
the Superintendent as early as the second Monday of each term 
the order of exercise-; in their respective schools." Another regu- 
lation states that " The Superintendent shall receive and classify 
at the beginning of each term the order of exercises of each school 
in the city." I dwell at some length upon this point, because ob- 
jections are often urged against visiting schools at other times than 
the regular appointed days. It should not at all interfere with the 
exercises, and teachers and scholars should be taught to believe 
this. 

Several times during the past year there have been written ex- 
aminations in the higher divisions of the Grammar Schools. It is 
intended to. continue them in the High and Grammar Schools the 
coming year. 

At the close of the summer term the candidates for the High 
School were examined in the various branches studied in the 
Grammar Schools. 

The examination was in writing, continuing through the whole 
of one day. 

Between sixty and seventy were examined; about fifty were ad- 
mitted upon the first examination, while others were allowed a 
second trial. 



226 

It being the first year that scholars had been examined in this 
manner, the examination was not so thorough and rigid as I hope 
it may be in the future. Now teachers and pupils expect it and a 
high percentage of correct answers should be required. 

Some were admitted who should have remained at the Gram- 
mar Schools, but I hope this will be no precedent for another 
year. If we admitted pupils to the High School last year who 
were not fully qualified, let it be no reason for admitting others 
next summer unless they come fairly up to the requirements. 

A great many of the candidates, however, showed themselves 
familiar with the different studies, many of them answering cor- 
rectly upwards of 95 per cent, of the questions proposed at the 
written examination. In addition to this there had been several 
such examinations during the summer term, and from all these cir- 
cumstances I felt assured that the class would compare favorably 
with any class that ever entered the Manchester High School. It 
is a class that is able to perform a great amount of labor, and it is 
hoped that the High School teachers will see to it that they are 
busily engaged during their connection with the school. 

Regular promotions were made in most of the other schools at 
the close of the summer term. 

Classes have been promoted at different times in the year when- 
ever they were found qualified, and sometimes changes have been 
made to equalize the number of pupils at the different schools. 

I would renew the suggestion made last year, that regular pro- 
motions be made twice a year. 

In February last about forty candidates for teachers were exam- 
ined. 

It was stated last year that the last week of the summer term 
might be devoted to exhibitions of the different schools, with the 
understanding that they were not to be regarded as examinations, 
but such exercises would be had as teachers might think best 
Several of the schools had these exhibitions, and I am sure the 
preparation for them did not interfere with the regular exercises 
of the term. For instance, the exercises at the South Grammar 
■ School exhibition would have been creditable to any school, and 



227 

were considered superior to anything of the kind witnessed here 
for years ; yet the first class in this school — those" who mainly par- 
ticipated in the exercises — at the examination for admission to the 
High School proved themselves familiar with all the studies which 
they had pursued, and their thoroughness in the various branches 
showed that nothing had been neglected in order to gain time to 
prepare for the exhibition. 

While exhibitions can be conducted in this manner; while the 
preparation for them does not occupy the time which should be de- 
voted to the regular studies there can be no objection to them. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Last September an appropriation was made for evening schools. 
An evening school was taught at Amoskeag during the fall term 
by Mr. Dutton, Master of the Grammar School in that ward. An- 
other one was opened in the Intermediate building and for a num- 
ber of weeks instruction was given by some of our public school 
teachers. About one hundred and fifty persons attended the 
school in the Intermediate building. 

At present one division of the school is in the Old High School 
building under the charge of Mr. Fertl. Gagnon; the other is in 
the City Hall building under the charge of Mr. E. D. Hadlcy, as- 
sisted by Miss J. C. Walker. No doubt can be entertained of the 
need of these schools and a larger appropriation will be needed to 
sustain more of them. 



TRUANCY. 

Attention was called to this evil in the last report and the sub- 
ject has been laid before the City Council, who alone have the .pow- 
er to appoint Truant Officers, but no definite action has yet been 
taken with regard to it. I hope the School Board will hi}' this 
matter before the Council again and show the importance of an ef- 
ficient truant law. 

AVe have in this city a great many boys who should attend 



228 



school, but they are wasting their time in the streets and saloons 
and the law should reach them and compel them to attend school. 



SCHOOL BUILDINGS, 

Some of the buildings have been repaired during* the past year 
while others remain in the same condition as formerly. 

The Park St. House has been thoroughly repaired and furnished 
with new and comfortable seats and desks and the building is now 
in good condition. 

The lower rooms in the Spring St. House have been refurnished 
and are now comfortable, the rooms are better lighted than form- 
erly and are more convenient in many respects. 

The rooms in the North Grammar school need new furniture in 
order to have them correspond with the rooms on the lower floor. 
Two rooms in the lower part of the Franklin St. building, two 
in the Intermediate building, one at Wilson Hill, two in the Old 
High school building and one at Amoskeag, have been furnish- 
ed with new seats and desks during the past year. 

The furniture in several other rooms will need to be changed 
during the coming year ; it will add to the beauty of the rooms 
and will render some rooms comfortable for the children which 
rooms are now very uncomfortable indeed. 

The old house at Golf's Falls has been repaired as much as it 
could endure in its dilapidated condition. The members of the 
City Government next year will undoubtedly see the necessity of 
providing a more suitable building in this district. 

The house at Bakersvillc has been arranged for two schools and 
now well accommodates the scholars in that vicinity. 

In Piscataquog more school room is needed, as the schools in the 
upper house are always crowded, notwithstanding so many pupils 
are sent to the Franklin St. schools ; in Amoskeag another build- 
iu<>- is needed to provide accommodations for the school now 
taught in the old building. 

The house at Hallsville is not large enough and is not conveni- 
ently arranged for the number of pupils who attend; the house at 



229 

Massabeslc, needs to be enlarged and improved in many respects ; 
some slight repairs will be needed upon the house in District No. 
9 ; new furniture should be placed in the house at No. 6, while in 
District No. 1, the house has been repaired as many times as is 
practicable. 

The northeastern portion of District No. 2, is not very well fur- 
nished with school buildings. 

The old house on Bridge St. is now unoccupied, primary child- 
ren in that section being obliged to attend school on Blodgett St., 
Concord St. or in the Old High School building. The house at 
Towlesville, is not suitable for a school, while the old houses on 
Concord St., have for yeai's been regarded as unfit for that pur- 
pose. 

Thus it will readily be seen that in that section of the city, schol- 
ars belonging to Middle and Primary Schools are not provided 
with suitable school rooms. If any arrangement can be made so 
that these schools can all be placed in one building somewhere on 
Bridge St., near Ash or Maple, it will accommodate that whole 
section. A building for two Primary and two Middle schools 
would accommodate all the scholars of those grades in that part 
of the city, or if preferable two smaller buildings can he erected. 

I have already stated that room is needed in that section to ac- 
commodate a Grammar School and it is hoped the Primary. Mid- 
dle and Grammar Schools will all be provided for the coming year. 

A new steam heating apparatus has been placed in the High 
School building. It has not been in use long enough for us to know 
what success may attend it, but from present appearances it bids 
fair to excel other methods of heating school buildings. The ap- 
paratus was furnished by Mr. J. Q. A. Sargent of this city. 

There are two eight feet boilers, thirty-six inches in diameter 
one in each section of the basement. They are so arranged that 
in the fall and spring when not much fire is needed, one boiler 
only is used; in the winter time or whenever it becomes necessary 
both can be used. Both boilers are substantially inclosed in brick, 
and the whole, including the array of pipes, is surrounded with 
a wire enclosure. This heating apparatus is designed for low 
pressure, being constructed so as to develop the largest quantity 



230 

of heat with the smallest quantity of fuel. The whole building is 
heated by indirect radiation, the pipes arc laid in coils in the base- 
ment, and the hot air from the coils filled with steam from the 
boilers, passes into the several rooms through flues. In the rooms 
nothing is seen of the apparatus but the registers which open into 
the several apartments By this method no space is occupied by 
pipes in the different rooms, each room thereby presenting a much 
better appearance 

The boilers are fitted with improved steam and water guages, 
and guage cocks and safety valves, rendering it impossible for 
any accident to occur. They are self regulating and are both sup- 
plied with one pump, and are so arranged as to require but a 
small quantity of water, as the condensation returns immediately 
to the boiler. There are in the basement fourteen coils, corres- 
ponding to the same number of registers. The registers open into 
the main rooms, the recitation rooms, the rooms containing the 
chemical and philosophical apparatus, and the entries, so that the 
whole building is thoroughly warmed. The whole amount of 
pipe used is thirty-eight hundred feet. The simplicity of the ar- 
rangement is such that any person can manage it. 

If this method proves as successful as we anticipate, other build- 
ings should immediately be heated in the same manner, especially 
the Spring St. building, which has never been heated properly. 
The health of pupils in the North Grammar School is too much ex- 
posed, and too much sickness is caused annually to allow the 
present arrangement for heating and ventilation to continue. 

The names of the different buildings are given and also the num- 
ber of pupils that can be accommodated at each. 

High School will accommodate 

Spring St. " " 

Franklin St. " " 

Park St, " " 

Merrimack St. " " 

Intermediate " " 

Old High School " " 

Blodgett St. " " 



300 


pupils. 


381 


a 


384 


a 


375 


ti 


192 


u 


192 


a 


192 


u 


96 


a 



75 


a 


75 


a 


30 


it 


96 


a 


192 


a 


90 


(( 


25 


a 


70 


a 


30 


a 


40 


a 


40 


it 


60 


tt 


25 


a 


40 


it 


3,105 pupils. 



231 

Wilson Hill mil accommodate 96 pupils. 

Bridge St. " " 

Concord St. " " 

Towlesville " " 

Amoskeag " ei 

Piscataquog, (north) " " 

(south) " " 

Stark District " " 

Bakersville " " 

Goffs Falls " " 

Harvey's District " " 

Webster's Mills, " " 

llallsville " " 

Massabesic " - tl 

Mosquito Pond " " 



NORMAL SCHOOL AND TEACHERS' INSTITUTES. 

The question of a Normal School has been agitated considerably 
in this State within the past lew years, but as yet the Legislature 
has done nothing towards establishing one. The subject is still 
under discussion, and will be brought before the Legislature at its 
next session. 

In many cities, Training schools have been established, which 
have been quite succesful. Reference was made to this subject 
last year and the suggestion made that a Normal Department 
might be established in this city in connection with the High 
School. I think the suggestion was a practical one, and the sub- 
ject of a Training school in this city is one that needs the consid- 
eration of the Board. 

At the last session of the Legislature an appropriation was 
made for Teachers' Institutes. 

The State Superintendent has held Institutes in several of the 
counties and will hold one in Hillsboro County some time in the 
spring. In whatever part of the county it may be held I hope the 



232 

Board will do all that it can to assist the movement, and that Man- 
chester teachers will manifest such an interest as will reflect credit 
upon the educational system of this city. 

The schools have been suspended a number of times within the 
past year for the purpose of allowing- teachers to attend Teachers' 
Associations. Objections are urged against this practice,, but I 
think much is gained by these meetings and that our schools are 
made better by them. 

Live teachers will improve every opportunity of acquiring new 
methods of teaching and of improving on the old ones ; and fre- 
quent interchange of views between teachers of different sections 
will create an interest and zeal in the labor and the beneficial effect 
of such gatherings will be felt upon the schools. No teacher can 
say that he can learn nothing from others or that he can teach well 
enough already. 

The teacher that can teach so well that no improvement can be 
made, has taught long enough and should give place to one of a 
progressive spirit, one who is determined to keep abreast of the 
times. Some Yankee has said that "A man is not as good as his 
father unless he is better," and so a teacher who is not ahead of 
former times is lagging and has not caught the spirit of the age. 

In December last, many teachers of this city attended the State 
Association at Concord. 

In January the Hillsboro County Association, was organized in 
this city; lectures were given by Mr. Walton upon Arithmetic, 
Mr. Bowler on Penmanship and Mrs. Smith on Geography. 

The exercises were interesting and profitable, and our teachers 
derived much benefit from them. 

A meeting of the Association was held in Bedford, last May, 
which was attended by most of the teachers from this city. 

Meeting have frequently been held at the Committee Room dur- 
ing the year which meetings have been well attended by the 
teachers. 

The various branches taught in the schools have been discussed 
at these meetings, questions of interest to all teachers have been 
considered and the exercises generally have shown that the teach- 
ers of this city are enthusiastic in their labors. 



233 

I would recommend that during - the coming year the Board ob- 
tain the services of competent instructors in the various depart- 
ments and that our teachers have the opportunity of attending 
lectures occasionally upon the several branches. It will be the 
means of creatine - an interest and an enthusiasm in our schools. 



CONDITION OF THE SCHOOLS. 

My report was nearly written before I was aware that, the sub- 
committees would not report the different schools in detail. Hence 
I cannot speak of them as fully as I should, as the report would 
be too much extended. I shall speak of them by classes. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

"We have in this school competent and experienced instructors, 
and the members of the school possess ability sufficient to render 
it a superior school. Yet our High School has never maintained 
that high rank which its importance demands, and too often our 
citizens have spoken disparagingly of this school, and pointed to 
the Grammar and lower grade schools with feelings of pride. 
The real difficulty, it seems, has been a want of interesl : while 
there has been nothing which has deserved special criticism, there 
has not been that enterprise in the school which calls for special 
praise; it has lacked positiveness, vitality. In the Language of a 
former report ''In this school there should be no mediocrity, no 
such standard as that of respectable scholarship or ordinary de- 
portment. Pre-eminence, and that" only, should be the character- 
istic of the school" 

Several reasons beyond the control of teachers have operated 
against this school in the past. Pupils have been admitted to the 
school who were not thoroughly qualified and after admission 
have been allowed to be absent much of the time and still retain 
their connection with their class and receive diplomas at the end 
of the course the same as those who have labored faithfully all the 
time. 



234 

Graduating' from our High School has not meant what it should 
in a city where there are so many who might make excellent 
scholars. 

Let more caution be exercised with regard to admitting pupils 
and after they are admitted let them pursue the course marked 
out, and if it is necessary that they should lose much time while 
members of the school, let them drop back into other classes and 
not claim the same privilege as those who came fairly up to the re- 
quirement. 

These matters are entirely under the control of the Board; we 
have all been to blame in this matter, and now we should one and 
all endeavor to set the matter right, and when the Committee and 
Superintendent have done their duty, then let teachers infuse that 
spirit of enthusiasm into the school which it has lacked, and the 
lack of which has been the cause of such criticisms in the past. 

Such a course as this will make our High School what it should 
be, and the graduates of the institution will take some pride in 
it, and more parents will then desire that their children should en- 
joy its privileges. 

The more rigid the discipline at the High School, the more that 
is required of pupils in that school, the more eagerly will pupils 
in the Grammar Schools strive, and the more anxious will Gram- 
mar School teachers be to send to the High School those well qual- 

ified. 

And Grammar School teachers will demand — if they must send 

to the High School such pupils — that scholars from the lower 
grades shall be better prepared, and the result of making the High 
School more efficient will be to increase the efficiency of every 
grade in the city. We can raise the standard of the High School 
and it should be done. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

This school was not in session during the fall term owing to the 
limited number of scholars. It was not an efficient school during 
the spring term. During the winter term it was in better condi- 
tion. It is now opened again and cannot but be successful under 



235 

the present principal. The principal of the Intermediate school 
has as much salary as the principal of any Grammar School in this 
city, and I trust that the Board will consider the object for which 
this school was established, and not undertake to deprive so many 
pupils of the benefit of an English education. 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

A new principal was elected to the North Grammar School at 
the beginning of the fall term. He had had considerable experi- 
ence in teaching, and Ins examination showed that he was thorough 
in the branches required to be taught. He has not yet been in 
charge of the school long enough for us to speak of the results of 
his labors, and we must for the present regard any lack ot efficiency 
in this school, as due to a change of teachers, and trust that as the 
present priucipal becomes more familiar with the methods of in- 
struction here, that the school will take a higher stand. 

Col. Parker had been connected with the school for a lung time, 
and was so popular with the scholars that it would be strange if 
any new teacher should give satisfaction for the first term. 

The assistants in this school have labored faithfully, and their 
respective divisions have always appeared well, and they have ac- 
complished much. 

If this building was as comfortable as the Franklin St. house, 
we might expect better results. 

The South Grammar School continues to rank among the very 
best. Indeed, were I disposed to find fault I should hardly know 
what to criticize. The discipline of the school is as good as w <• 
could ask. The instruction is of a high order; a feeling of activity 
pervades the school, and the scholars well understand the branches 
which are taught. 

One thing tends to the efficiency of the school, and that is the or- 
der on the stairs, in the entries, and in fact in and about the build- 
ing, before and after school and at recess time. 

This is a matter which is too often overlooked by teachers, al- 
though it is of great importance, and has much to do with the di- 



236 

scipline of a school. Teachers should prevent disorder in any part 
of the school building- no matter whether the school is in session 
or not. 

I have no doubt as to the success of this school while it remains 
tinder the management of the present teachers. 

The Park St. Grammar School continues under the charge of the 
same principal with the same success as formerly. 

The Grammar Scnool at Piscataquog is doing well under the 
charge of its present principal. It is a school requiring a good 
deal of labor to manage, but the teacher at the head of it is suc- 
ceeding well. 

The Grammar School at Amoskeag during the past two terms I 
think, has made the greatest improvement of any school in the 
city, and although it is not yet a first-class school it is due to the 
fact that it was in such a condition when Mr. Dutton took charge 
of it, rather than from any lack of ability or inclination on his part. 

The East Grammar School which was organized the past year is 
in a flourishing condition, although the frequent change of teachers 
in the higher division has operated unfavorably. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

These schools have always been regarded as among our very 
best, and at the present time I think they sustain their former rep- 
utation. 

There has been considerable complaint with regard to the school 
at Wilson's Hill, but with that exception this grade of schools has 
been satisfactory. 

PMMAKY SCHOOLS. 

During the first term of the year there were twenty-three schools 
of this grade in the Central District, three in Ward 7 and one in 
Ward 8. At the present time there are nineteen in the whole 
city, including those at Piscataquog and Amoskeag. 

A new teacher was elected at the Piscataquog West Primary at 
the beginning of the spring term. 



237 

At the close of the summer term the teacher of the Piscataquog 
South Primary School who had taught this school in an acceptable 
manner for a number of years, resigned to assume duties else- 
where. She was succeeded by a teacher who had been remarkably 
successful in another district, and thus far iu the new position has 
given good satisfaction. 

The new Primary School at Amoskeag does not rank as well as 
the other Primary School, in the same ward— which is one of the 
best — and probably never will in its present quarters. 

A new teacher was elected to one of the Spring St. Primaries at 
the beginning of the spring term 

Owing to changes made in the old High School building these 
schools do not maintain a high rank. 

The instruction in our Primary schools is good and this grade of 
school is now receiving more attention than formerly. In those 
schools where much oral instruction lias been given the progress 
has been most rapid. I do not wish to see any of the schools neg- 
lected, but I think that the Primary require considerable atten- 
tion from the members of the Board, 

I cannot too strongly urge the importance of securing the best 
of teachers for Primary schools. It is a mistaken idea thai any 
one can teach a school of this grade. The highest talent is needed 
for this grade of schools; it is much easier to obtain a good Gram- 
mar Schoolteacher than one well fitted to teach a Primary school. 

The following extract from the report of a town in Massachu- 
setts, I consider so well timed that I insert it : 

"It is no more important that the High School should bein good 
condition than that the Primary Schools should be. In them is 
formed the child's first impression of school lite and study. The 
bias the tone of the first term here may characterize the whole of 
the child's future. 

Correct enunciation, promptness, quiet and cheerful obedience, 
dexterity of hand, even the proper carriage of the person, must 
iu three cases out of four be learned in the Primary if in any 
school. Let the reader consider whether the best qualities of a 
teacher are not required in such schools, aud whether such quali- 
ties do not deserve to be well paid. 



238 

Several years ago the accomplished and able lady now at the 
head of the Boston Training School, was induced to leave Oswego 
and take an assistant's place in a Boston Grammar School. After 
filling her new place awhile, very much to the satisfaction of her 
employers, she said to the superintendent, ' Sir, I cannot stay in 
Boston unless I am promoted.' Not understanding whither she 
could expect to he promoted from the good place she already had 
he asked what she desired. ' Why, Sir,' said she, ' I prepared 
myself with great labor, to teach, and am fitted for something 
better than a Grammar School. I want to be promoted to some- 
thing of more consequence — to a Primary School.' 

And she got her promotion. Her school soon became the admi- 
ration of all who knew it, and it was soon felt that she must teach 
teachers in the Training School. 

Let it not be supposed that the older grades of school are less 
but that the Primary schools are more important, in the estimation 
of the present committee, than the popular voice proclaims." 

RURAL SCHOOLS 

With the exception of the teachers at Hallsville, no school in 
the rural districts has the same teacher as last winter. 

Last year I spoke of the importance of continuing the same 
teachers in these schools for as long a time as possible. 

The Hallsville school is the most prosperous of any of the ru- 
ral schools and no doubt will continue to be so as long as the pres- 
ent principal has charge of it. 

While we cannot expect to secure such good teachers in all the 
suburban schools, we can have better results in many of them by 
employing permanent teachers in these districts. 

Since the division of the Bakersville school, both divisions there 
have accomplished much. 

A new principal has just been elected to the Bakersville school, 
the former principal having been transferred to the Intermediate 
School. 

At Goffs Falls there is a new teacher. All the other suburban 
schools have the same teachers as last term. 



SCHOOL STATISTICS FOR 1868. 

1. Whole No. different pupils enrolled during the year, 4,371 

2. Average No. pupils belonging to the schools, 2,654 

3. Average daily attendance, 2,428 

4. Average No. teachers employed during year 1868, 63 

5. " " " " " " 1867, 65 

6. No. of visits by members of School Board, 399 

7. No. visits by Superintendent, 1,115 

8. No. visits by citizens and others, 5,269 

9. No diplomas conferred at High School, 1 t 

10. No. diplomas conferred at Grammar Schools, 57 

11. Salary of Principal of High School, $1,800 00 

12. Salary of 1st Assistant at High School, 600 00 

13. Salary of 2nd Assistant at High School, 500 00 

14. Salary of Principal of Grammar Schools, 1,300 00 

15. Salary of Assistants of Grammar Schools, 400 00 

16. Salary of Middle and Primary School teachers, 400 00 

17. No. of weeks in school year, 40 

18. No. of schools, 45 

19. No of teachers, 59 

20. School appropriation for past year, $88,000 00 

21. Whole No. scats in all the schools in (he city, 3,105 

A great deal of difficulty is experienced in obtaining correct re- 
ports and in furnishing reliable statistics. The same complaint is 
made in other places and school reports show that there is a lack 
of uniformity in keeping school records. 

All of our schools are furnished with the same kind of registers 
and blanks which are to be filled out and returned to the Board. 

From these returns we obtain statistics with regard to the atten- 
dance at the different schools and many other items which should 
be included in a school report. Each teacher should pay special at- 
tention to this matter and see that all blanks in the l'egisters are 
properly tilled so that there will be a uniformity in the reports. 



210 

The records of a school should be kept in such a manner that if 
there is a change of teachers during the year, the annual report 
can be made by the last teacher without any difficulty, but it some- 
times happens that a new teacher is unable to make a correct report 
from the records of the previous one. 

Teachers may have a better method of making returns than the 
one required by the Committee but they should use the method 
adopted for the sake of uniformity. 

The average number of scholars belonging to a school is an item 
to be reported monthly by eacli teacher, and the same should be in 
every annual report. Tn the printed regulations directions are 
given for finding this, but frequently it is incorrectly reported, and 
so much difficulty was experienced last year in obtaining this item, 
that it could not be given for the year 1807. 

The returns of several of the schools for the past year, are in- 
complete, as new teachers have been unable to find the records of 
previous terms. Reports are to be made to the State Superinten- 
dent, and it is desirable that they be correct. I tiust that there 
will hereafter be a uniformity in the reports. 



CONCLUSION. 

Thus I have attempted to give a report of the schools of this 
city for the past year. We contemplate with satisfaction the his- 
tory of the past, yet we must not rest satisfied with what has been 
done. 

Every age has its duties, and we owe it to those who shall follow 
us, that this school system of which we are so justly proud, shall 
be improved by having been under our care. AVe did not origi- 
nate the system; it was bequeathed to us, and we should strive to 
improve it so that others may have the benefit of our experience. 
'it is the grand feature of the system that it provides for .In educa- 
tion of every child in the community; that the property of all 
shall be applied for the education of all. 



241 

Said Daniel Webster, " For the purpose of public instruction, 
we hold every man subject to taxation, in proportion to his prop- 
erty, and we look not to the question whether he himself, have or 
have not children to be benefitted by the education for which he 
pays. It is every poor man's undoubted birthright, it is the great 
blessing which this constitution has secured to him, it is his solace 
in life, and it may well be his consolation in death, that his country 
stands pledged, by the faith which it has plighted to all its citizens, 
to protect his children from ignorance, barbarism and vice." 

Our schools are for the benefit of all sects and all parties, and 
every child in the community is entitled to the blessings of free 
schools. The poorest and the richest must have in them the same 
privileges. 

There are imperfections in our school system, and what institu- 
tion is free from them? When we consider the high aim, the 
purposes of our schools, avc cannot too highly estimate their im- 
portance. "Who can picture the splendor of that state in which 
the people are all educated, or the shame and degradation in that 
community where but a small proportion of the people are edu- 
cated? The three thousand children now in our schools will soon 
occupy positions of trust and honor, and thus the character of the 
schools of our city to-day, affects the future welfare of our country. 

Let us then for the coming year labor more earnestly, and spare 
no effort to improve the public schools of this city. 

JOSEPH G. EDGEKLY, 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Manchester, N. II., Dec. 8th, 18G8. 



44:2 



Table showing the attendance at the various Schools foh 
the past year, together with the number op visitors. 





6 
y. 


SI 


" CD 


g> ~ 


'-~T 




SCHOOLS. 




E 3 - 


< 


^CJ 


-7 


•-.2 

i>3 




[58 


90 


85 


17 


25 


448 


i( rammar School 


224 


165 


161 


is 


42 


•420 


South Grammar School .... 


260 


168 


163 


7 


42 


575 


Park Street Grammar School 


156 


100 


90 


10 


19 


75 


East Grammar School 


150 


ICO 


i •_; 


21 


40 


227 


* Intermediate School 


100 


43 


40 


9 


14 


43 


Piscatasi ; ( rrammar School . 


113 


69 


. 01 


3 


24 


83 


Amoskeag Grammar School .... 


03 


42 


39 


3 


2D 


91 




73 


32 


07 


5 


38 


84 


No. 2 


64 


36 


38 


10 


23 


152 


" " No. 3 


71 


42 


40 


12 


23 


98 


" " No. 4 


83 


37 


35 


9 


16 


78 


" " No. 5 


CI 


34 


.•:.■; 


11 


34 


125 


" " No. o 


81 


40 


37 


11 


19 


52 


No. 7 


71 


38 


30 


8 


IS 


93 


No. 8 


63 


26 


22 


4 


22 


66 


f " '• No. 9 


(2 


55 


51 





5 


IS 


t li " No. 10 


53 


41 


38 







10 


t " " No. 11 


45 


45 


43 









" " No. 12 


70 


38 


36 


9 


23 


135 


" ■' No. 13 


44 


30 


27 


1 


20 


S3 


Primary SchoolNo. 1 


70 


27 


24 


11 


38 


P>7 


•■ ' " No. 2 


66 


Ml 


29 




23 


S3 


No. 3 


55 


23 


2d 


*2 


29 


55 


" " No. 4 


70 


34 


32 


6 


13 


15 


No. 5 


91 


37 


33 


14 


32 


144 


" No. 


57 


30 


29 


11 


25 


135 


No. 7 


96 


45 


41 


9 


41 


si 


No. 8 


70 


42 


:;;; 


8 


25 


04 


No. 9 


72 


30 


27 


13 


-'0 


41 


" ,: No. 10 


75 


43 


is 


15 


10 


113 


" " No. 11 


89 


40 


34 


18 


21 


110 




69 


37 


30 


17 


20 


33 


No. 13 


07 


30 


33 




21 


159 


* " " No. 14 


107 


40 


40 


"y 


24 


130 


t " " No. 15 


.v. 


55 


52 




5 




t " " No. 16 


55 


53 


51 




5 




t " " No. 17 


30 


36 


29 




6 




t " " No. 18 


41 


41 


39 




6 




t " " No. 19 


54 


47 


15 


5 


11 


50 


t " " No. 20 


54 


51 


49 




11 




" " No. 21 ... 


89 


37 


.-,3 


8 


35 


iii 


t " " No. 22 ..... 


50 


4'.) 


47 




5 




t " " No. 23 


51 


49 


47 




5 




Piscatasquog East Primary School . 


119 


51 


45 


'5 


21 


56 


Piscatasquog West Primary School 


74 


43 


37 


y 


24 


12 


Piscatasquog South Primary School . 


70 


37 


33 


4 


15 


58 


A.uioskeag North Primary School . 


63 


12 


39 


3 


2D 


91 


* Amoskeag South Primary School . 


4(1 


33 


28 


3 


9 


50 


School in District No. 1 ." . 


37 


25 


22 


1 


11 


20 




80 


59 


40 


24 


17 


70 


" " No. 4 


211 


12 


11 





13 


50 


" " No. 5 


IS 


12 


9 


5 


15 


00 


" " No. 


25 


19 


17 


5 


12 


70 


" " No. 7 


96 


00 


52 


4 


10 


90 


" " No. 8 


65 


40. 


34 


4 


12 


51 




45 


25 


20 


3 


14 


55 


Total 1 


1371 


2654 


2428 


399 


1115 


5209 



* In .session two terms. 



t In session one term. 



ORGANIZATION OF TIIE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE 

CITY OF MANCHESTER, 
FOR 18G8. 

MEMBERS OF TIIE BOARD. 



Ward 1.— Henry T. Mowatt, 
Ward 2.— Marshall P. Hall, 
Ward 3. — Moody Currier, 
Ward 4. — George W. Weeks, 



A\ \Ki> o. — William Little, 
Ward 6. — Daniel C.Gould, Jr, 
Ward 7. — .lames P. Walker, 
Ward 8. — T. S. Montgomery. 



Moody Currier, Chairman. 

William Little, Clerk. 

Joseph G. Edgerly, Superintendent. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 

Finance, Accounts and Claims. — Messrs. Currier, Montgomery 

Mowatt, and Gould. 
Repairs, Furniture and Supplies. — Messrs. Little, Hall, and 

Mowatt. 
Text-Books and Apparatus. — Messrs Walker, Weeks and Currier. 
Printing and Stationery. — Messrs. Gould. Montgomery, and Hall. 
Fuel and Heating. — Messrs. Little, Weeks, and Walker. 
Examination of Teachers — Messrs. Currier, Little,. and Hall. 

The Superintendent acting with all Committees excepting that 
on Finance. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

Messrs, Currier, Walker, and Montgomery. — High School. 

Mr. Mowatt — School in Ward 1. 

Mr. Hale — School in Ward 2, and Districts 3 and 4. 

Mr. Corrier — Schools in old High-School building andTowlesville. 



244 

Mr. Weeks — Schools in Merrimack-street building, and in Inter- 
mediate building. 

Mr. Little — Schools on Park street, Union, corner of Merrimack, 
and Districts 6 and 8. 

Mr. Gould — Schools on Wilson Hill, Concord steeet, and Districts 
5, 7, and 9. 

Mr. Walker — Schools in Ward 7, and on Union street, corner of 
Laurel. 

Mr. Montgomery — Schools in Ward 8, Blodgett street, Union, 
corner of Bridge, and District 1. 

Messrs. Weeks, Gould, and Walker, and (he Superintendent 
— on Music. 



ORGANIZATION OFJ 1869. 

JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 
i Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

Office, No. 5 City Hall. 
Office Hours from 8 to 9 a. m., school days. 

DANIEL CLARK, 

Chairman, Board of Education. 
MARSHALL P. HALL, 

Clerk, Board of Education. 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Ward 1.— Henry T. Mowatt, I Ward 5,— William Little, 
Ward 2.— Marshall P. Hall, Ward 6.— Elbridge G. Hadley, 

Ward 3. — Daniel Clark, Ward 7. — James Dean, 

Ward 4. — Samuel Upton, Ward 8. — T. S. Montgomery. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 

Finance, Accounts and Claims, — Messrs. Clark, Mowatt, Little 
and Dean. 

Repairs, Furniture and Supplies. — Messrs. Edgerlv, Dean and 
Hall. 



245 

Text— Boohs and Apparatus, — Upton, Edgerly and Clark. 

Printing and Stationery, — Messrs. Hall, Montgomery and 
Edgerly. 

Fuel and Heating, — Messrs. Montgomery, Edgerly, Hadley and 
Mowatfc. 

Examination of Teachers, — Messrs. Little, Upton, Edgerly 
and Hadley. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

Messrs. Clark, Upton and Dean, — Schools in High School 
Building, Schools on Concord street, and Suburban Schools 
Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 9. 

Messrs. Little and Hadley. — Schools in Intermediate Building 
and in Old High School Building. 

Messrs. Mowatt and Upton, — Schools on Spring street. 

Messrs. Hall and Little, — Schools on Franklin Btreei. 

Messrs. Hall and Clark, — Schools on Park street. 

Messrs. Dean and Hadley, — Schoois in Piscataquog, and Subur- 
ban Schools Xos. 3, 4 and 5. 

Messrs. Montgomery and Mowatt, — Schools at Amoskeag, on 
Blodgett street, and Suburban School No. 1. 

Messrs. Upton and Montgomery, — Schools on Merrimack street, 
at Wilson Hill, and at Towlesville. 

Messrs. Hadley and Hall, — Evening Schools. 

Messes. Clark and Dean, — on Music. 



INDEX 



Appropriations, 
Address, Mayor's Inaugural, . 
Address, Mayor's Valedictory, 
Abatement of Taxes, 

Balance Sheet of Treasurer, . 
Bridge, Araoskeag Falls, 
Granite, 

Commons, .... 

Cemetery, Tine Grove, . 

Report of Committee, 
Report of Treasurer, 

City Kail and Stores, 

Court House, .... 

County Tax, .... 

Debt, City, .... 

Discount on Taxes, . 

Dog Tax, .... 

Fire Department, . 

Steamer Amoskeag, 

Fire King, 

E. W. Harrington, 

N. S. Bean, 

Pennacook Hose Company, 

Hook and Ladder Company, 

Engineers, 

Miscellaneous, . 

Recapitulation^ 
Farm, City, .... 
Inventory, . 



447 



Government and Officers, 1867, 
Government and Officers, 18G8, 

Highways and Bridges, 
District No. 1, 

No. 2, 

No. 3, 

No. 4, 

No. 5, 

No. 6, 

No. 7, 

No. 8, 

No. 9, 

No. 10, 

No. 11, 

No. 12, 

No. 13, 
Highways, New, 
Hearse, New,. 

Incidental Expenses, 

Invoice of City Farm Property 

Interest, .... 

Land Sold from City Farm, 

Lighting Streets, 

Loan, Temporary, . 

Library, City, . 

Report of Trustees, 
Report of Librarian 
Report of Treasurer 
Donations, 
New Books, 

Liquor Agency, 

Liquor Agent, Report of, 

Militia, .... 

Officers, City, . 

Paupers off the Farm, . 
Police, .... 



11 



CI 
G2 
4G 
65 
66 
07 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 

7;; 

7! 
74 
L09 

93 
160 

107 

lis 
90 
108 
L02 
169 
172 
173 
176 
180 
109 
158 

108 

99 

53 

7S 



248 



Paving Streets, 
Printing- and Stationery, 
Property, City, 

Revenue Account, . 
Reserved Fund, . 
Reservoirs, .... 

Report of Finance Committee, 
Chief Engineer, . 
Overseers of Poor, 
Liquor Agent, 
Committee on Cemetery 
Committee on Library, 
Schools, . 
Repairs of Buildings, 
Repairs of School Houses, 

Sewers and Drains, 

Schools, 

School District No. 2, repairs, 

Debt and Interest, 

No. 3, 

No. 4, . 

No. 5, 

No. 6, . 

No. 7, . 

No. 8, . 

No. 10, . 

No. 11, . 
School Report, 
Sate Tax, .... 

Teams, City, .... 
Taxes Uncollected, 
Valuation, Taxes, &c., . 
Watering Streets, .