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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



ANNUAL REPORTS 




THE YEA R 1800 




M ANC J I ESTER: 
P R I N T K I ) BY J () ir N B . C L A 15 K E 

18 7 0. 



NEW HAMP, . . 
STATE LIBRARY 



TWENTY-FOURTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF MANCHESTER 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR EXDIXG 



DECEMBER 31, 18G9, 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TD THE AFFAIRS 
OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. : 
PRINTED BY JOHN 13. CLARKE. 

1870. 



1669 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



Ix Board of Common Council. 

AX ORDER authorizing the printing of the Twenty-fourth An- 
nual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of 
Manchester. ' 

Ordered, (if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur,) That 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance be and they are hereby 
authorized to cause sixteen hundred copies of the Twenty-fourth 
Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of 
Manchester, including the Reports of the Chief Engineer of the 
Eire Department, the Overseers of the Poor, the Committee on 
City Farm, the Trustees, Librarian and Treasurer of the City Li- 
brary, the School Committee and the Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, the City Liquor Agent, the Committee on Cemeteries, 
the Library Building Committee, and the Building Committee and 
Committee on School-House Repairs, to be printed for the use of 
the inhabitants of said city, and that the expense thereof be 
charged to the appropriation for Printing and Stationery. 

Jan. 11, 1870. Ix Board of Commox Council. 
Passed. J. P. CURRIER, President. 

Jan. 11, 1870. Ix Board ok Mayor and Aldermen. 
Passed in concurrence. JAMES A. \VESTOX, Mayor. 

A true record. 

Attest: JOSEPH E. BEXXETT, City Clekiv. 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESS 



HON. ISAAC W. SMITH, 

MAYOE, 



CITY COUNCIL OF MANCHESTER 



DELIVERED 

BEFORE THE TWO BRANCHES IN CONVENTION, 
JANUARY 3, 1870. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AX ORDER to print the Mayor's Valedictory Address. 

Ordered (if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur), That 
three hundred copies of the Valedictory Address of Hon. Isaac 
W. Smith, delivered hefore a convention of the City Council this 
day, he printed for the use of the City Government, and that he 
be requested to furnish a copy to be printed in the annual reports. 

Jan. 3, 1870. In Common Council. 
Read and passed. E. D. HADLEV, Clerk. 

Jan. 3, 1870. In Board or Mayor and Aldermen. 
Passed in concurrence. 

JOSEPH E. BEXXETT, City Clerk. 



VALEDICTORY MESSAGE. 



Gentlemen of the City Council : 

We have now readied the close of another municipal 
year, and are about to surrender up the trusts imposed 
upon us by our fellow citizens one year ago. Let me invite 
your attention, for a few moments, to a brief review of our 
official acts, that are so soon to become matters of history. 
This, it is proper we should do, no less that our acts may 
be placed upon record in justice to ourselves, than for the 
information of our successors. If our labors shall stand 
the scrutiny of time, it is no more than our right that the 
record thereof should be preserved ; or, if the contrary 
prove to be the fact, we will be no less slow to have them 
reviewed by our constituents, confident that our intentions 
have been right, whatever errors of judgment we may have 
committed. 

FINANCES. 

The indebtedness of the city, January 1, 1869, as stated 
in my inaugural message, was as follows : 



Funded debt . 

Temporary loan . 

Estimated interest to Jan. 1, 1869 

Outstanding bills . 

Debt of late School District ]STo. 2 



Total debt and interest 



$351,900.00 

37,301.00 
10,000.00 
15,156.00 
17,200.00 
742.70 

$432,299.78 



Cash in treasury 

l)ue on Barrett place and for City Farm 

lots sold 

Estimated interest on same . 

Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 18G9 . 



$42,794.85 

. 2,450.49 
47.00 
$45,292.34 



1387,007.44 



(Which is $1,800 more than appears in the statement of 
city debt on pages 131 and 182 of the City Reports for 
1868, where the interest on the city debt to Jan. 1, 1869, 
is estimated at $9,000 instead of $10,000, as stated above.) 
The indebtedness of the city January 1, 1870, was as 
follows : 



Funded debt 

Bonds issued in 18G9 in aid of the Suncook Valley 
R. R., authorized by the City Council of 1868 

Temporary loan 

Note against late School District No. 7 
Balance due Suncook Valley R. R. 
Estimated interest to Jan. 1, 1870 
Outstanding bills Jan. 1, 1870 

Total debt and interest 
Cash in the treasury Jan. 1, 1870 . . 827,398.51 

Bonds unsold (aid of S. V. R. R.) Jan. 1, 

1870 36,800.00 

Notes due on Barrett place and on City 

Farm lots sold 1,961.81 

Estimated interest on same to Jan. 1, 1870 . 142.14 



Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1870 
" " " Jan. 1, 1869 



Increase 



8351,900.00 

50,000.00 
2S,001.00 

742.70 

25,000.00 

9,000.00 

27,169.46 

8491,813.16 



$66,302.46 

425,510.70 
386,007.44 

839,503.26 



The loan in aid of the Suncook Valley Railroad is an ex- 
traordinary expenditure, and is not fairly chargeable to the 
expenditures of this year. 



The unpaid school hills of 1868, as furnished me by the Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction, amounted to . . §0,243.06 
The unexpended school appropriation of 1868 

was §11.98 

The unexpended evening school appropriation 

of 1808 was 99.81 

The unexpended school-house repair appropri- 
ation of 1868 was $280.21, less §200 abated 
and paid back to School District Xo. 8, 
previous to Jan. 5, 1809 .... 80.21 

§192.03 

Total deficiency of school hills for 1808 . . . §6,051.03 
There is due upon the tax-list for 1869 §35,860.61 

There was due one year ago upon the list 

for 1868 27,789.51 



Difference §8,071.07 

The aggregate of these three items, viz., S. V. R. R. 

loan §50,000.00 

Unpaid school bills of 1868 paid this year . . . 6,051.03 

Difference in uncollected tax-lists .... 8,701.07 



Is $64,122.10 

From which deduct the apparent increase of L869, ;i^ 

found above 39,503.26 



.Leaves $24,618.84 

As the real decrease in the indebtedness of the city, the 
comparison being made upon the same basis for the two 
years. 

None of the appropriations arc overdrawn, while many 
of them have large balances unexpended. There are no 
outstanding bills due against the city to any considerable 
amount. Efforts have been made to have every claim 
against the city presented. Notices to that effect have 
been advertised in the daily papers. The claims have been 
presented as fully as it ever will be practicable to be done 
at any given date. For the first time in many years, the 
accounts in the School department have been adjusted and 
paid to the end of the year. 



It will be noticed that there is due the Suncook Railroad 
a balance of 825,000 of the sum appropriated in aid of that 
road in 1868, to meet which, bonds of the city have been 
issued and are in the hands of the City Treasurer. Of the 
sum paid the Road, $13,200 was from sale of bonds, and 
$11,800 in cash advanced from the treasury in anticipation 
of the sale of bonds. If this had not been done, the cash 
in the treasury Jan. 1,. 1870, would have been $10,598.51, 
instead of $27,398.51, as before stated. There will be due 
a balance of $1,200, or thereabouts, for the iron fence upon 
Merrimack square, when it is completed, and the unex- 
pended balance of the appropriation is more than sufficient 
to meet it. When the contract for finishing the exterior of 
the Library building is completed there will be due about 
$1,000. The unexpended balance of that appropriation 
will be nearly or quite sufficient to meet this amount. 
These balances for the fence and the Library building 
could not be adjusted for the reason that the contracts had 
not been completed, but the contractors were paid for the 
work so far as finished up to the time the accounts were 
closed. 

CITY LIBRARY BUILDING. 

The erection of a Public Library building was com- 
menced in the spring, and the exterior of the building- 
has been nearly or quite completed. It is in the " Ameri- 
canized Gothic" style of architecture, one story and a 
basement in height. Its extreme dimensions are ninety 
by forty-nine feet, with a wing on either side twelve feet 
square, for the librarian's room and side entrance, and 
a tower fourteen feet square and fifty-eight feet high, for 
the principal entrance at the southwest corner. It is 
located upon a lot on Franklin street, generously donated 
to the city by the Amoskcag Manufacturing Company. 
The entire building is spacious, well lighted and ventilated, 



9 

and has all the appointments necessary for a well regu- 
lated modern library, and will contain one hundred thou- 
sand volumes. 

An appropriation was made in 1868 of . . 85,000 

There was raised this year by tax . . . 7,500 

And transferred from reserved fund . . . 4,500 



Total appropriation ..... $17,000 

The unexpended balance of the appropriation is $975.06, 
which, as before stated, will be sufficient, or nearly so, to 
complete the exterior of the building. If the necessary 
funds are supplied, the building can easily be finished 
another year, when the city will have a library room sub- 
stantially fire-proof, easy of access, and an ornament to 
the city. 

When the appropriation of $7,500, by tax, was made 
last April, it was expected that no further call would be 
made upon the city treasury for that purpose, encourage- 
ment having been given that donations by one or more 
gentlemen residing in Massachusetts and interested in the 
mills in this city might be expected. I have still reason 
to believe that at least $5,000 dollars will be placed at the 
disposal of the city at an early day. In order to meet the 
expense incurred above the appropriation, it became neces- 
sary for the City Council to make the transfer from reserved 
fund of $4,500, — a result which Avas not anticipated when 
the appropriation was made in the spring, and which will 
account, to that extent, for the increase in the net indebted- 
ness of -the city the past year. 

SCHOOL -HOUSES. 

During the year the old High school -house has been 
refitted for the accommodation of the East Grammar 
school. Steam heating apparatus has been placed in the 



10 

Spring-street school-house. Concrete walks have been 
laid about many of the school yards, and the buildings 
generally have been put in thorough repair. Two gram- 
mar school lots have been purchased, of an acre each in 
size, upon one of which preparations for putting in the 
foundation for a school-house are in a forward state. The 
lot at Goffe's Falls has been enlarged to over an acre, and 
the foundation for a new house, to be built of brick, has 
been put in. The house in Massabesic district has been 
enlarged and thoroughly repaired. It is believed that the 
school-houses of the city were never in better repair. The 
erection of a grammar school-house upon Lincoln street 
was commenced to meet the present and increasing wants 
of the city. There are now in what recently was school 
district No. 2, three full grammar schools, all of them full, 
and some of them more than full, in all the divisions 
except the first division of the Spring-street house. The 
first division in all will be more than full at the commence- 
ment of next term, when promotions will be made. There 
is at the Wilson Hill school-house a grammar class of 
scholars which cannot be accommodated any where in a 
grammar school for want of seats. There is also a large 
class of scholars in the direction of Hallsville who find no 
convenient grammar school within reach. I hope I shall 
not be considered as trespassing upon the province of our 
successors, if I suggest that it is desirable to complete the 
Lincoln-street house ready for occupation in 1871, at which 
time tbere will be scholars enough for two divisions more, 
which cannot otherwise be accommodated anywhere. 

RESERVOIRS. 

The reservoir upon Tremont square has been rebuilt, the 
walls being laid with stone and covered with chestnut 
timber and planking. Three new reservoirs have been 
built on Myrtle street, — one near Pine street, one between 



11 

Union and Beech streets, and one at the corner of Maple 
street, — each supplied from an aqueduct laid from the 
small reservoir of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, 
by private enterprise. A ten-inch cement pipe has been 
laid from Merrimack square to Park street, through East 
Elm back street, with reservoirs upon Central and Park 
streets, thus affording facilities for extinguishing fires to a 
section of the city heretofore destitute of the same. This 
pipe can be extended south whenever desired. A reser- 
voir has also been built at the corner of Hall and Amherst 
streets. 

NEW HIGHWAYS. 

There have been laid out, during the year, the following 
new highways or streets : 

Maple street from Amherst street north to Concord street ; 
Porter street from its intersection with the highway leading 
from the meeting-house at the Centre to Bakcrsvillc, nor- 
therly to the Young or Ferry road ; Lincoln street from 
Amherst street near its intersection with Deny street, south 
to Park street, parallel with Maple street ; a street from the 
Smyth road, so called, near Christian brook, to the Mam- 
moth road, to avoid the hill over which the county com- 
missioners laid out the Smyth road ; a street between Val- 
ley and Young streets, and from Willow street westerly to 
Elm street ; a street from Elm street to Union street, north 
of the Riding Park ; the extension of Clarke street east to 
Union street, from the northerly terminus of Elm street ; 
a street from the westerly end of Douglas street in Ward 
7, northerly, parallel with the North Weare Railroad, to a 
point nearly opposite the premises of Josiali Hosford ; Co- 
burn street extended north from Amherst street to Concord 
street ; Russell street from Myrtle street south to Bridge 
street, the southern portion over Water street ; an avenue 
for foot passengers, in what is generally known as " Meth- 



12 

odist Court," extending one hundred feet west from Elm 
street. As soon as the library building shall be completed 
this avenue will be extended by the Amoskeag Manufac- 
turing Company to Franklin street, thus rendering the li- 
brary easily ascessible. The portion laid out by the city 
has been graded, and a concrete walk laid the entire 
length. 

There have been built, tills year, the following new high- 
ways laid out during the year : 

The street from the Smyth road near Christian brook 
to the Mammoth road ; the street between Valley and 
Young streets ; the extension of Porter street to the Ferry 
road ; Methodist Court Avenue. 

And the following streets laid out in 1868 and years 
previous : 

The street from the McQueston place on the River road 
in Ward 7, to Bedford line : Ash street from Lowell street 
north three hundred feet, and from Orange to Myrtle 
street ; Pine street from Prospect to Harrison street ; Har- 
rison street from Chestnut to Pine street; Beech street 
from Pearl to Myrtle street ; Orange street from Walnut to 
Ash street ; Pearl street from Beech to Ash street. 

The extension of Union street north, and the graveling 
of Nashua street, have been nearly completed. 

PAVING. 

A contract was made early in the season for 2,600 yards 
of stone block paving at one dollar per yard, which is con- 
siderably less than the price paid of late years. There is 
still due from the contractor 441.8 yards, which he engages 
to deliver early the coining spring. The balance of 2158.2 
yards has been delivered and laid down, 363.7 yards in 
Granite street, Ward 7, 464.2 yards in Elm street, south 
end, 1037.3 in Elm street, north end, 5 yards in Spring- 
street school yard, and 288 yards in Hanover street. I 



13 

was disappointed at the failure of the contractor to deliver 
the full quantity contracted for, and repeatedly urged him. 
to furnish the stone more rapidly. But, notwithstanding 
his failure to do so, there has been laid, this year, fifty per 
cent, more of paving than in any previous year, so far as 
my information extends, and at less than the cost of such 
work of late years. 

SEWERS. 

It was found, early in the year, that there was a great 
demand for additional sewerage, and the city council ap- 
propriated $8,000 for that purpose. " Slade's Plan " for 
the drainage of the city provides for four main sewers run- 
ning south, one on Elm street, one on Union street, and 
two east of Union street, these last three extending south 
to Cedar street, and there entering a main sewer draining 
into the Elm-street sewer. This system of sewerage! is the 
only one that can be carried out with any uniformity. The 
importance of constructing our sewers upon sonic system, 
that each successive- administration may take up and carry 
forward the work as left by its predecessor, cannot be ques- 
tioned. We have endeavored, this year, to conform to the 
system known as " Slade's Plan." In no other way could 
sewerage facilities be afforded to the section of the city 
east of Union street. A careful estimate was therefore 
made for a main sewer from Hanover street to Cedar 
street, with an outlet through a temporary sewer south 
from Cedar street to the Cemetery brook. The expense 
was estimated at $11,000. This estimate was laid before 
the City Council, and an additional sum of $7,000 was ap- 
propriated, making the sum of $15,000 in the whole, raised 
by taxation this year for sewerage, which is probably two 
and one-half times the amount appropriated for that pur- 
pose in any previous year. 

An eighteen-inch cement, temporary sewer was laid from 



14 

the Cemetery brook to Cedar street ; from Cedar street to 
Central street, a brick sewer, three feet and eight inches in 
height, and from Central street to a point near the outlet 
of the brook flowing through Hanover square, a three-foot 
brick sewer, the lower part double, with man-holes and 
cesspools complete, in the most thorough manner. It will 
probably last as long as the city shall stand, and will never 
need repairs. No separate account was kept of its cost, but 
it was constructed within the estimate. The grade or depth 
is such that it can be extended north as far as the settled 
limits of the city extend, and thus afford sewerage facilities 
to all that section of the city. And the sewers west of 
Union street will thus be relieved of any drainage east of 
that street. 

The other sewers constructed this year are as follows : 
A twelve-inch cement sewer from Union street, in the 
back street between Park and Central streets, east a dis- 
tance of one thousand two hundred feet, to Maple street; 
and another of the same size and distance from Union to 
Maple street, in the back street between Central and 
Laurel streets ; a nine-inch cement sewer extended east 
from Maple street four hundred feet, in the back street be- 
tween Hanover and Manchester streets ; a nine-inch cement 
sewer extended north two hundred feet on Pine street, 
from Concord street ; a twelve-inch cement sewer extended 
north three hundred and twenty feet on Elm street, from 
Orange to Myrtle ; in Church street, and in the back street 
between Lowell and Washington streets, a nine-inch cement 
fewer, three hundred feet north and east from Lowell 
street ; in Church street, a nine-inch cement sewer, one 
hundred feet north from Washington street; in the back 
street west of Chestnut, between Park and Spruce streets, 
a nine-inch cement sewer, one hundred and sixty-two feet ; 
between Central and Laurel, on Pine and Union, a nine- 
inch cement sewer, four hundred and fifty feet ; from Elm 



15 

street west through Central street, and thence north 
through Elm west back street, a. twelve-inch cement sewer, 
four hundred feet, to Merrimack street; from rear of 
Smyth's Block, a nine-inch cement sewer, north to Wells' 
Block, seventy-five feet. 

In Ward Seven, the plank sewer in Main street, from 
Granite street to the Piscataquog river, has been replaced 
by a two-foot brick sewer a distance of eleven hundred 
feet, one-half of the expense from the North Weare Rail- 
road to the river, amounting to 8349.93, being defrayed by 
the railroad. A twelve-inch cement sewer extends west 
and north eleven hundred and thirty-eight feet, from this 
sewer, through Clinton and Summer streets, to the reser- 
voir on Douglas street ; and a nine-inch cement sewer from 
Clinton street north, two hundred and fifty feet, in Dover 
street. Over forty cesspools have also been constructed. 

COMMONS. 

Last year concrete walks were laid across the upper por- 
tion of Concord square, and with such satisfaction to the 
public that this year walks of the same material were laid 
across Tremont, Hanover and Merrimack squares, to the 
great convenience of people who travel across the same. 
The commons have also been otherwise improved. The 
amount of concrete walk laid upon the commons, around 
the school-houses, and for street crossings, is over three 
thousand square yards. 

The several commons were donated to the city by the 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, one of the conditions 
of the deeds being that the city should, within a time 
limited, surround the same with substantial fences of iron. 
The times fixed within which this should be done expired 
some years ago, as to each of the four commons above 
named, although the Amoskeag Company has never sought 



16 

to take advantage of the neglect of the city to comply with 
this condition. 

Last year my predecessor recommended an appropriation 
sufficient to place an iron fence upon the west side of Mer- 
rimack square. No appropriation, however, was made. I 
renewed the recommendation in my inaugural message, 
and the City Council appropriated the sum of $'4,000 for 
that purpose, entrusting the charge of the work to the 
Mayor and committee on commons. The committee thus 
appointed examined a large number of drawings of differ- 
ent styles of fences, conferred with many persons of expe- 
rience in such matters, and visited the city of Concord to 
examine the different patterns of fences erected in that 
place. After full deliberation, the committee, with but a 
single dissenting voice, selected the style of fence that 
surrounds the State-House at Concord, with some few 
modifications, and contracted with A. H. Lowell & Co., of 
this city, to construct the same, the contract for the stone 
work being taken by Mr. E. Cutting. 

When the result of the committee's selection of style or 
pattern of fence was made known, considerable dissatis- 
faction was expressed. The committee, however, saw no 
reason to reconsider their action, and proceeded with the 
work, content to wait the judgment of the public, confident 
it would be satisfied with the selection when the work 
should be completed. The stone-work was finished before 
the ground was frozen, and fully complies with the terms 
of the contract. The fence has nearly all been set, the 
whole work being done at an expense considerably within 
the appropriation. 

The style of fence and manner in which the work has 
been done meet with universal approbation. The fence is 
strong, substantial, ornamental and in good proportion, 
and when completed around the common will render the 
place beautiful and attractive. I trust the work thus com- 



17 

mcnced will be continued by succeeding administrations, 
till all the commons are adorned in like manner. 

WATER FROM HANOVER SQUARE. 

The iron pipe laid down several }'ears since, to conduct 
water from Hanover square to Elm street, having become 
obstructed by rust, it was found necessary to relay the 
same, in order to secure the continuance of a supply of 
pure water from that source. There being a scarcity of 
good water upon Elm street and vicinity, the supply from 
Hanover square had come to be looked upon as indis- 
pensable. An appropriation of 83,000 was made for that 
purpose. A stone reservoir, forty by eight feet, was con- 
structed on Hanover square, and the water is conducted 
thence to the City Hall in a four-inch sheet-iron pipe, with 
an interior and exterior coating of cement; thence through 
a two-inch similar pipe to Brown's Block, Elm 
south end. 

The pipe from the City Hall to Smyth's Block was not 
relaid, it being in better condition than the rest. A two- 
inch cement-lined pipe was laid from Smyth's Block to 
Woodbury's shop, Elm street, north end, a distance of live 
hundred feet, thus affording a supply of water for that end 
of the city. There is an unexpended balance of the appro- 
priation remaining of 81oi».7T. 

WATER FROM THE MASSABESIC. 

Many of my predecessors have called the attention of 
the city government, from time to time, to the necessity of 
procuring a supply of pure water from the Massabesic. In 
my inaugural message I called your attention to the sub- 
ject, and suggested, upon information that had been com- 
municated to me, that that desirable result might be 
secured by the city's subscribing for a portion of the capital 
stock of the City Aqueduct Company. 
2 



18 

After it became known that tlie company did not find 
sufficient encouragement to undertake the enterprise, I 
recommended, in a special message to you on the 7th of 
September last, the appointment of a commission to exam- 
ine and report " the most feasible plan for introducing wa- 
ter into the city." The commission subsequently reported 
that the sense of the voters be taken at the December elec- 
tion upon the expediency of the city's contracting with the 
Aqueduct Company to construct works for bringing water 
from the Massabesic into the city upon a guaranty by the 
city to the company of seven per cent, annual dividends. 
The proposition failed to meet the approval of the voters, 
and it remains for our successors to devise some other plan 
for accomplishing a result so desirable and so necessary, 
and which will at the same time meet the approval of the 
people. 

I do not think our citizens are generally aware how des- 
titute our city is, in time of drought, of water for extin- 
guishing fires. There is a scarcity of reservoirs in some 
sections of the city, and during the severe drought of last 
summer, for nearly six weeks, no water flowed over the dam 
at the outlet on Hanover square, whence all our reservoirs 
derive their supply of water. It is not difficult to predict 
what must be the result of a conflagration at such a time. 
Can it be that we need the experience of Portland before 
we shall be wise ? 

. CITY TEAMS. 

There have been purchased during the year a pair of 
horses weighing 3000 pounds, at an expense of $1,000, for 
use with the fire steamers, and a heavy single horse at an 
expense of $350, to take the place of the one used for 
many years in the service of the city. The city teams now 
consist of eight horses, three pairs and two single horses. 
Two pairs are set apart for the use of the Fire Department 



19 

when required to draw the steamers to the place of fire, 
each pair being always in the stable for that purpose on 
alternate days, and when off duty in the fire department 
at work upon the streets. With the present number of 
horses, the work of the city can be done withotit hiring 
others. The teams, taken collectively, are valuable, and 
well adapted to the purposes for which they are used. Ad- 
ditional stable accommodations being required, and it being 
impossible to purchase the land for that purpose south of 
the present engine-house and stable, except at exorbitant 
prices, the restriction upon the ward-room lot on Manches- 
ter street was released to the city for the sum of $500, in 
pursuance of authority from the city council. The build- 
ing on the lot has been moved forward in line with the 
other buildings on either side, and a building is now being 
erected upon the southerly portion of the lot, with accom- 
modations for keeping five horses therein, whenever it shall 
be needed for so many, and with room for storing the carts, 
sleds and other city property when not in use. By this 
arrangement ample accommodation will lie furnished for 
the city teams for many years to come. 

CONCLUSION. 

Such is the record, gentlemen of the City Council, of 
the more important acts of the city government for the 
year 1869. More money has been raised, and more money 
expended, and more work performed, than in any previous 
year. But we have been constantly reminded that this city 
is rapidly growing in wealth and population, and increasing 
with rapid strides in all its business interests, — while its 
wants and necessities increase in corresponding proportion. 
Our appropriations and expenditures have been made with 
a view to our future as well as our present wants, which in 
the end is true economy. I feel that I am warranted in 
the assertion that the improvements made during this year 



20 

by the city were never of a more permanent character, and 
never more thoroughly made, nor the money ever more 
economically expended. We cheerfully submit our record 
to the approval of our constituents, and wait with confi- 
dence the- impartial judgment that will be pronounced upon 
it with the lapse of time. 

With this clay end our official labors and responsibilities. 
I have striven to redeem my pledge made to you when we 
took upon ourselves the oath of office, that whatever of 
ability or strength I possessed should be devoted to the 
faithful discharge of my official duties. Whatever of suc- 
cess has attended this administration has been in a large 
measure owing to your kind cooperation and to your coun- 
sel and experience. 

You have been prompt in your attendance upon the meet- 
ings of the government, and faithful in performing the 
work assigned you upon the different committees. I bear 
cheerful testimony to the fidelity which you have one and 
all shown in your unrequited labors, — unrequited, except 
so far as you have the approval of your own consciences 
and the approbation of your constituents. 

I would also gratefully acknowledge the courtesy and 
kindness which you have individually and collectively 
manifested towards me. It will be among the most pleas- 
ant of my recollections in after years, that nothing has oc- 
curred to disturb in any degree the harmony of the rela- 
tions which have existed between us. 

I cannot take my official leave of you without closing this 
valedictory as I commenced my inaugural message One year 
ago. Let us acknowledge our profound gratitude to God 
that, during the year now about to close, peace and good 
order have been maintained in our limits ; that pestilence 
has not desolated our homes, nor conflagration laid waste 
our dwellings ; that prosperity has smiled upon our efforts, 



21 

and success attended the various individual and corporate 
enterprises of our beloved city. And let us humbly invoice 
His continuance of these blessings during the year upon 
which we are about to enter. 

ISAAC W. SMITH. 



GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS 

OF THE 

CITY OF MANCHESTER, 
I860. 



MAYOR. 

ISAAC W. SMITH, 



CITY CLERK. 

JOSEPH E. BENXETT. 



ALDERMEN". 



Ward 1— Daniel II. Maxfield, Ward 5— Daniel Connor, 

Ward 2— Henry A. Farrington, Ward 6— George II. Hubbard, 

Ward 3 — William P. Newell, Ward 7 — Chauncey C. Favor, 

Ward 4 — Horace B. Putnam, Ward 8 — George II. Gerry. 



PRESIDENT COMMON COIM 11.. 

Peter K. Chandler. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL". 

Horace M. Gillis* 
Elbridge D. Hadleyf. 

* Died July 7, 1SG9. 

+ Elected in place of Horace M. Gillis, deceased, July 19, 1.SC9. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



Ward 1, William Bursiel, 

WiUiam II. Maxwell, 
John P. Currier. 

"Ward 2, Henry Lewis, 

Thomas E. Northrup, 
"William B. Underbill. 

Ward 3, Peter K. Chandler, 
Reed P. Silver, 
Sim >n F. Stanton. 

WARD 4, Arthur M. Eastman, 
Benj. W. Robinson, 
Jonathan B. Moore. 



Ward 5, Cornelius Healey, 
Patrick Devine *, 
J{>lm L. Kennedy f, 
John McKeon. 

Ward 6, Dustin L. Jenkins, 
John W. Johnson, 
George E. Glines. 

Ward 7, Samuel Brooks, 

David O. Webster, 
John K. McQueston. 

Ward 8, A. A. Partridge, 
Hiram Steams, 
William G. Everett. 



MESSENGER. 

David Tbayer. 



JOINT STANDING CON3IITTEES. 

Finance. — Messrs. Silver, Brooks and Johnson; the Mayor and 
Alderman Newell. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Farrington and Maxlield; Messrs. Max- 
well, Underbill and Currier. 

Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Putnam and Newell; Messrs. 
Brooks, Robinson and Johnson. 

Public Instruction. — Aldermen Gerry and Farrington; Mi 
McQueston, Everett and Jenkins. 

Streets. — Aldermen Newell and Putnam; Messrs. Lewis, Silver 
and Stanton. 

( ity Farm. — The Mayor and Alderman Favor; Messrs. Steams. 
Partridge and Moore. 

Seicers and Drains. — Aldermen Newell and Connor; Messrs. 
Robinson, Eastman and Bursiel. 

Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Maxfield and Gerry; 
Messrs. Partridge, Webster and Moore. 



♦Resigned. 

t In place of Patrick Devine, resigned. 



Fire Department..^ Aldermen Gerry and Hubbard; Messrs. 
Brooks, Glines and McKeon. 

Claims. — Aldermen Putnam and Hubbard; Messrs. Eastman, 
JSTorthrup and Currier. 

House of Correction. — Aldermen Connor and Farrington; Messrs. 
Moore, Kennedy and Lewis. 

Military Affairs. — Aldermen Hubbard and Favor; Messrs. Heal}', 
Glines and Maxwell. 

City Hall Buildings. — Aldermen Hubbard and Maxfield; Messrs. 
Underbill, Lewis and Stanton. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IX BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Licenses. — Aldermen Favor and Connor. 

Enrollment. — Aldermen Maxfield and Farrington. 

Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Farrington and Gerry. 

Bills in Siant:! Beading. — Aldermen Putnam and Maxfield. 

Market. — Aldermen Connor and Gerry. 

S< tting Trees. — Aldermen Newell and Putnam. 

Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Favor and Connor. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON' COUNCIL. 

Elections and Returns. — Messrs. Everett, Northrup and Under- 
bill. 
Bills in Second Beading. — Messrs. Currier, Webster and (dines 
Enrollment. — Messrs. Eastman, McQueston and Stearns. 



ASSKSSOIiS. 

George W. Thayer, Timothy Sullivan, 

Horace P. Simpson, Isaac Whiitemore, 

J. G. Cilley *, . Joseph X. Prescott, 

John F. Woodbury f, Allen Partridge, 

Isaac D. Palmer. 



COMMITTEE ON ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

George W. Thayer, Isaac D. Palmer, 

John F. Woodbury. 

* Re? igned. 

t Elected March, 18C9, in place of J. G. Cilley, resigned. 



26 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



S. S. Moulton, John Sweeney, 

S. J. Young, II. TV. Savory, 

STahum Baldwin, Horatio Fradd, 

Moses E. George, John Field. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Henry T. Mowatt, William Little, 

Marshall P. Hall, Elbridge D. Hadley, 

Daniel Clark, James Dean, 

Samuel Upton, T. S. Montgomery. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Joseph Gr. Edgerly. 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



Edwin P. Richardson, Chief. 
Benjamin C. Kendall, Wilberforce Ireland, 

Andrew C. "Wallace, George Holbrook, 

Elijah Chandler. 



SOLICITOR. 
Cyrus A. Sulloway. Office — Union Building. 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR. 

Henry R. Chamberlin. Office — City Hall Building. 



DEPUTY COLLECTOR. 

Harrison D. Lord. Office — City Hall Building. 



27 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY. 

Hon. Daniel Clark, Waterman Smith, 

William P. Newell, Hon. E. A. Straw, 

Hon. Wm. C. Clarke, Peter K. Chandler, 

Phinehas Adams, Hon. Isaac W. Smith, 

Samuel X. Bell. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Charles II. Marshall. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 

Ward 1, John P. Currier, Ward 5, William Little, 
" 2, Timothy W. Challis, " 6, Holmes R. Pettee, 

" 3, Henry C. Tilton, " 7, Andrew C. Wallace. 

" 4, George Holbrook, " 8, George H. Colby. 

( 'It rl's. 

Ward 1, James M. House, Ward .*>. James Ha; - 
" 2, Leonard Shelters, " 6, Charles L. Bailey, 

" 3, Richard J. P. Goodwin, " 7, Luther E. WaUace, 
" 4, Jasper P. George, " 8. Charles W. Farmer. 

Selectmen. 

Ward 1, Wm. McPherson, Ward 5, William Riordan, 
Edward Garner, John Burke, 

Edward L. Carpenter. George Fox. 

Ward 2, John W. Dickey, Ward G, Ezra Kimball, 

Elbridge G. Woodman, James W. Lathe, 

* Joseph Simonds. Thomas C. Cheney. 

Ward 3, Thorndike P. Heath, Ward 7, Geo. ('. Baker, 
Nathaniel Morrill, Joseph Freschl, 

George W. Vickery. Hosea E. Sturtevant. 

Ward 4, Henry French, , Ward 8, Parker F. Emerson, 

Roswell II. Hassam, Damon Y. Stearns, 

Moses Eastman. James Richardson. 



CITY UNDERTAKERS. 

Charles S. Fisher, Patrick A. Devine. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Justice. 

Samuel Upton. Office — Merchants' Exchange. 

Assistant Justice. 
Elijah M. Topliff. Office— Patten's Building. 

City Marshal. 
William B. Patten. Office— City Hall. 
Assistan t Ma rsh < > K 
Eben Carr. Office— City Hall. 
Night Watch. 



John D. Howard, 
Lucien B. Richards, 
Patrick Doyle, 
Hugh Ramsey, 
W. II. B. Newhall, 



Horatio W. Longa, 



William B. Patten, 
Eben Carr, 
John D. Howard, 
Thomas L. Quimby, 
Albert P. Quimby, 
Hezekiah II. Noyes, 
Lucien B. Richards, 
H. D. Lord, 



Thomas L. Quimby, 
Win. I). Perkins, 
James Duffy, 
William T. Fogg, 
Hezekiah II. Xoyes. 

Day Police. 

Henry Bennett. 

Constabh ■<. 

Patrick Doyle, 
Henry Bennett, 
Horatio W. Longa, 
James Duffy, 
William T. Fogg, 
William II. B. Kewhall, 
IlD*'h Ramsey, 
Wm. 1). Perkins. 



29 



William B. Patten, 
John D. Howard, 
Albert F. Quiniby, 
Henry Bennett, 
.James Dully, 
William H. B. Newhall, 

L. B. 



Police Officers. 

Eben Carr, 
Thomas L. Quimby, 
Patrick Doyle, 
Horatio W. Longa, 
William T. Fogg, 
Hezekiah H. Nbyes, 
Richards. 



Special Folia . 



James Patten, 
George W. Butterfleld, 
Henry B. Moulton, 
John W. Dickey, 
Benjamin Sleeper, 
Elbridge G. Woodman, 
John T. Chase, 
Charles L. Richardson, 
John D. Edgerly, 
William P. Gage, 
Jonathan Y. McQueston, 
Stephen Palmer, 

Sylvanus B. Putnam, 
Austin Jenkins, 

John C. Smith, 

C. C Colby, 

C. R.Colley, 

Joseph Melvin, 

James E. Bailey, 

John Smith, 

Hugh Conroy, 

George F. Judkins, 

Andrew J. Dickey, 

Henry W. Powell, 

Leonard shelters, 

George W. Nichols, 

Hollis C. Hunton, 

Albert H. Merrill, 

Benjamin W. Robinson, 

William D. Perkins, 

Edward Garner, 



Charles II. Ilurlburt. 
William X. Chamberlin, 
Ephraim G. Hastings, 
Charles Canfield, 
Henry Colby, 
George H. Colby, 
Uriah A. Carswell, 
W. Haselton, 
George W. McConnell, 
David Thayer, 
Nathaniel Baker, 2d, 
Horatio Fra hi. 
John ( '. Head, 

John. E.' Stearns, 

Josiah Stevens, 

Andrew J. Mahew, 

Page s. Griffin, 

Eras! us Cutting, 

Joseph L. Smith, 

John F. Woodbury, 

Guy W. Latham, 

Franklin Goss, 

John Sanborn, 

Thomas C. Cheney, 

E. B. Edwards, 

Israel Doble, 

Joseph Marsh, 

Henry J. Young, 

Ira P. Fellows, 

Chase T. Hackett, 

Alexander AI. Cornin<r, 



Joel Daniels, 
Nathaniel C. Barker, 
Orrin I). Carpenter, 
Charles M. Stevens, 
Reuben S. Harlow, 
John Sanborn, 
Edward P. Cogswell, 2d, 
John Hosley, 
Geo. S. Holmes, 
B. B. Aldrich, 
T. P. Heath, 
P. W. Follansbee, 
Albert Dinsmore, 
Charles Clough, 
Jacob S. York, 
Frederick L. Drown, 
"William Short, 



Eben Carr, 



30 

Levi H. Sleeper, 
Harrison D. Lord, 
Alonzo Avery, 
Milo W. Harvey, 
Henry J. W. Yarnum, 
Charles G. Sherer, 
Joseph Cross, 
J'ere. Connor, 
L. B. Richards, 
Wra. C. Chase, 
Wm. A. Babcock, 
Patrick McDonough, 
Kadmiel Haselton, 
Russell O. Burleigh. 
Justus X. Tuck, 
John Moore, 
Samuel Clark. 

Truant Officers. 

Henry Bennett, 



H. "W. Longa. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

William B. Patten, Eben Carr, 

George A. Crosby. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



HON. JAMES A. WESTON, 

MAYOR, 



CITY COUNCIL OF MANCHESTER, 



DELIYERED 



BEFORE THE TWO BRANCHES IN CONVENTION, 
JANUARY 4, 1870. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



An Order to Print the Mayor's Inaugural Add] 

Ordered, If the Board of Common Council concur, That the 
City Clerk be here 1 *}' authorized to cause to be printed for the use 
of the City Council, three hundred copies of the Address of His 
Honor the Mayor, delivered this day before a convention of the 
City Council. 

Ix Eoard of Mayor and Aldermen, Jan. 4, 1870. 
Readtind passed. 

J. E. BEXXETT. City Cleek. 

In Board of Comseon CorxciL, Jan. k 1870. 
Read and passed. 

ELBEIDGE D. IIADLEY. Clerk. 



ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Council: 

With a profound sense of ray obligations to the people 
of my native city, who have honored me a second time with 
the highest office within their gift, and with a full appre- 
ciation of the arduous and responsible duties of the posi- 
tion, I have in your presence assumed the trusts imposed 
upon me. You too have been sworn to the faithful dis- 
charge of duties of great moment, and upon us rests the 
responsibility of administering the affairs of our city for 
the year 1870. 

By the blessing of a kind Providence, we have assem- 
bled under most favorable circumstances, and as a comniu 
nity have great cause for thankfulness. The past year has 
been truly prosperous. Our growth has been unusual, and 
the freedom from pestilence and all public* calamities very 
remarkable : and it becomes us to render thanks to the 
great Giver of all things, for preservation from the many- 
trials to which we are ever exposed, and the merciful care 
with which we have been so truly blessed. 

We enter to-day upon the twenty-fourth year of the cor- 
porate existence of our municipality, and are reminded by 
our unprecedented thrift, that our best services will be re- 
quired to provide for the ever increasing demands of an 
expanding city, and to guard and foster all its interests. 

Wc are, by far, the wealthiest and most populous city in 
the state, and it behooves us to contemplate the future with 
broad and liberal views, if we would continue to increase 
3 



84 

and to maintain our important and influential position, 
which the central location of Manchester and the existing 
and proposed means of intercommunication so preeminently 
justify. In reviewing the present condition and wants of 
our city, I desire first to call your attention to the subject 
of our 

FINANCES. 

The good management of this department of the gov- 
ernment is of the greatest importance, affecting as it does 
our welfare and prosperity in every substantial particular. 
The magnitude of the trust may be readily comprehended 
when we consider that we are, as public agents, invested 
not only with the power to determine the necessity for the 
expenditure of money, but also clothed with authority to 
levy taxes for the payment of such expenditure upon our 
fellow-citizens, — a payment which in one sense is involun- 
tary on their part, and which places the sole accountability 
for the propriety of such expenditure upon the constituted 
agents of the city. In the exercise of this power, let us 
remember our personal and official responsibility. 

The city treasurer has kindly furnished the following 
exhibit of the present financial condition of our city affairs : 

Amount of funded debt January 1, 1869, . . . 8351,900.00 
Increase during the year in aid of the S. V. K. R., . 50,000.00 

Amount of funded debt January 1, 1870, 
Amount of temporary loan Jan. 1, 1870, 
Deduct for decrease during the year, . 

Amount of temporary loan January 1, 1870, 
Interest now due, estimated at 
Balance due Suncook Valley Railroad, . 
Outstanding bills due January 1, 1870, . 
Note against late School District No. 7, 

Total debt and interest January 1, 1870, . . . 8491,813.16 





8401,900.00 


837,301 




9,300 




. , 


828,001.00 


. 


9,000.00 


. 


25,000.00 


. 


27,169.46 


• 


742.70 



35 

Cash in treasury January 1, 1870, . . $27,398.51 

Notes due the city, 1,961.81 

Interest on same, 142.14 

Bonds unsold, 36,800.00 



•S66.302.46 
Net indebtedness January 1, 1870, .... $425,510.70 

The valuation as returned by the assessors for the past 
year is §10, 205, 302, showing an increase of §276,230 over 
the valuation of 1868. The amount assessed by tax last 
year was §254,022.43. Rate of taxation on §100, §2.48. 
The amount paid for state and county tax last year was 
§64,737.53. 

To provide for all our current expenditures, including 
permanent improvements, and to meet the demands of the 
general government, our taxes are burdensome, but are 
submitted to with unexampled patience. Let us therefore 
resolve to relieve our fellow-citizens, so far as we can, of 
this great burden, by administering the affairs of the city 
with the most rigid economy in all our business trans- 
actions. But in our earnest endeavors to prevent unwar- 
rantable extravagance in large matters, we must not be 
drawn into the common error of penuriousness in small 
things. A just discrimination between parsimony and 
frugality, as well as between extravagance and liberality, 
should never be lost sight of in managing the affairs of a 
municipality like ours. One of the largest appropriations 
that we are annually called upon to make is for the main- 
tenance of the public 

SCHOOLS. 

I cordially commend to you this great interest, upon 
which your best deliberations will be required. "While it 
belongs to another board, chosen by the people for this 
purpose, to regulate the details of our schools, and make 



36 

the contracts for instruction, it is for you to make the 
needful appropriations for their maintenance, and also to 
provide suitable buildings for their accommodation. The 
expense .of our schools is indeed great, but I am sure there 
is no burden more cheerfully borne, nor is there any money 
more advantageously expended, or that yields a richer re- 
turn. Upon the education of the masses rest the per- 
manency and stability of our free institutions. 

The whole number of scholars attending school the past 
year was 3500. The average number occupying seats was 
2200. The actual number attending the last term was 
2610 ; average number 2190. 

SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

A recent change in our school district system transferred 
the erection and management of the school-houses to the 
City Council, which assumed full control of this department 
last year, for the first time. This important trust was 
placed in the hands of a special committee, composed in 
part of members of the city government, and in part of 
citizens at large. Under the authority conferred upon 
them, the committee purchased one acre of land in the 
former district No. 4, for a school-house lot, and placed 
thereon a foundation and underpinning for a brick building, 
similar in size and style to the one erected in district No. 5. 
The amount appropriated for this purpose was 82,500, of 
which there now remains in the treasury, unexpended, the 
sum of $1,867.54. An additional appropriation will be 
needed to carry out the designs of the committee. 

Two other large lots have been purchased of the Amos- 
keag Manufacturing Company, one of which, located on 
the north side of Bridge street and on the west side of 
Maple street, embraces a whole square. The other, situated 
west of Lincoln street and s6uth of Merrimack street, 



with Laurel street on the south and a twenty-feet passage- 
way on the west, contains 40,000 square feet. 

The committee propose the erection of a grammar 
school building upon the last named lot, and for that pur- 
pose have adopted a plan for a structure estimated to cost 
830,000, and have made contracts for some portion of the 
work. From information derived from the report of the 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, it may be stated that 
the present number of seats in our school buildings em- 
braced in highway district No. 2, is 2391, while the number 
of scholars actually attending school in the same territory 
during the last term was 1849, and the average number 
only 15S3. It was stated, too, by the retiring school com- 
mittee, in a preamble relative to the Park street Grammar 
school, that " there are vacant seats in the other grammar 
schools, and in the schools of lower grade on Franklin and 
Merrimack streets." However disagreeable it may be to 
seek retrenchment in this department of city affairs, I feel 
compelled by the facts here stated, and in consideration of 
other important reasons, to ask you to seriously consider 
whether the cause of education would be impaired by the 
postponement of this work until our finances arc in a more 
satisfactory condition, or until the accommodations sought 
are more urgently demanded than is apparent at the pres- 
ent time. Should a further investigation demonstrate that 
the views here expressed are not well founded, I can assure 
you of my hearty cooperation in the consummation of this 
or any other measure having for its object the real elevation 
and intellectual development of the pupils of our common 

Schools. 

For many reasons it seems desirable that there should 
be a more intimate connection between the city council 
and the school committee ; and for this purpose the retir- 
ing mayor recommended, one year ago, that our charter be 
so amended that the mayor should be a member ex officio 



of this board. In this proposed change I heartily concur, 
and would advise to go farther, and constitute the Presi- 
dent of the Common Council a member of the school com- 
mittee also. Each branch of the city council would then 
have a representative in the school department, and the 
interests of that department would be represented by two 
members in the city council. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

An institution possessing so many facilities for intellect- 
ual improvement as the City Library will never cease to 
have large claims upon our generosity and fostering care. 
From its foundation to the present time, the appropriations 
by the city council have been liberal, and in my judgment 
the money has been well bestowed. Its management is 
confided to a board of trustees, in whose good judgment 
and competency for the position we all entertain the full- 
est confidence ; and can rest assured that the funds set 
apart in aid of this object will be judiciously and econom- 
ically expended. 

A new library building has been erected on Franklin 
street the past year, and finished on the outside only. The 
structure is an ornament to our city, creditable to the taste 
and public spirit of the people, and a noble monument to 
their foresight and liberality. The amount of the appro- 
priations for this object was 812,500, and the expenditure 
to 'the present time is about $17,000. This is all paid but 
about |1,000, — a transfer of $4,500 from the reserved 
fund having been made for this purpose. 

Donations to the amount of several thousand dollars have 
been secured, but are not available at the present time ; 
consequently, in any further outlay upon the building, it 
will be necessary to rely upon our own resources for the 
means, in the first instance. In accordance with a previ- 



89 

ous understanding, the lot upon which the building stands 
has been conveyed to the city, free of expense, by the 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Company. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

All citizens feel a deep interest in the Police Department, 
upon which, in a very large degree, the safety and good 
order of the community depend. To arrest criminals, re- 
cover stolen property, and bring offenders to justice, is only 
a small part of the duty of a good and efficient officer. 
His great care should be to prevent crime by" the preserva- 
tion of peace, and to protect property by constant vigilance. 

It is creditable to this department, that during the last 
year our city has been exempt from scenes of tumult and 
disturbance, and that peace and good order have prevailed 
throughout the community. Our present permanent force 
is composed of fourteen members, consisting of marshal, 
assistant marshal, two day police, captain of the watch, 
and nine night watchmen. 

I desire to again call the attention of the city council to 
the condition of the "lobby," so faithfully described by my 
predecessor in his annual message, and renew the recom- 
mendations contained in my inaugural address of January 
7th, 1868, in relation thereto. The necessity for better 
accommodations is indeed urgent, and I trust you will give 
the matter your serious consideration. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

The department embracing the construction and repairs 
of highways and bridges requires unceasing attention, and 
is burdened with peculiar responsibilities.. It is equalled by 
no other in its constantly increasing demands upon those 
in authority, claiming each year a larger appropriation of 
the public funds for its maintenance. The rapid growth of 
the city, and consequent extension of its limits, are partic- 



40 

ularly noticeable in the demand for new streets and side- 
walks to accommodate the large number of houses being 
erected in every direction. Those proposing to add to our 
taxable property by thus improving their estates should be 
encouraged by the prompt construction of all necessary 
streets, — not merely "turnpiked," but brought to a proper 
and established grade. Most of our thoroughfares are over 
a material of such nature that a very small outlay is suffi- 
cient to do this, if attended to at the proper time. When 
once accomplished, a good foundation is secured for the 
construction t>f a street of any desired character, and the 
abuttors are furnished with the means of arranging their 
buildings and fences so as to secure - uniformity in the 
grades of sidewalks. The want of an established grade, 
which is so clearly apparent in many places in the city, par- 
ticularly on the sidewalks, would thus be avoided without 
material expense. 

Still, it is evident that great improvements in this respect 
have been effected within the last three years, by the intro- 
duction and extensive use of concrete pavements ; and I 
trust it will be your pleasure to render all reasonable facil- 
ities, the present year, to those undertaking a work of so 
much public convenience. 

My attention has been called to the condition of our 
bridges across the Merrimack river. Two years ago, Gran- 
ite bridge was' replanked and otherwise so thoroughly re- 
paired that it was thought no further outlay would be 
required for several years to pome ; but a settling at the 
easterly end caused an examination, the past season, which 
reve*aled a mass of decayed timber in the most vital part 
of the structure. To make the necessary repairs at this 
point, an expenditure of several hundred dollars will be 
required. The foot-walks on the sides of the bridge, being 
wholly exposed to the weather, are also much deteriorated, 
demanding constant attention to keep them in a condition 



41 

to bear with safety the weight of so large a number of per- 
sons as are liable to congregate upon them. 

It has been thought by some that it would be, economy 
to cover this bridge, to assist in its preservation, and ren- 
der its use more convenient and agreeable. Also, to re- 
move the centre partition, which divides it into two tracks, 
and causes nearly all the travel to come upon a few planks. 
I have called the attention of a practical bridge-builder to 
this subject, and am assured that the proposed change can 
be made without seriously affecting the strength of the 
structure, and with little inconvenience to public travel. 
To decide whether the true interest of our city demands 
an appropriation for this purpose will require your careful 
attention. 

The Amoskeag Falls bridge was covered at the time of 
its construction, with the exception of the easterly end 
over the railroad track. The planking of this portion of 
the bridge was so arranged that the water was carried from 
it to the covered part of the structure, seriously affecting 
its durability. Two years ago, the decayed timber at this 
point was removed, and otber defects repaired, yet the 
cause still remains. For this and other reasons not neces- 
sary to discuss here, I hope you will take immediate meas- 
ures to extend the covering over the whole structure. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

More progress has been made during the past season in 
providing our city with suitable sewerage, than in any pre- 
vious year. Brick sewers have been constructed in Union 
street, from Cedar street to the outlet of the pond in Han- 
over square, a distance of 195(f feet ; and also in Main 
street, in Ward 7, a distance of about 1100 feet, extending 
from Piscataquog river to Granite street. In addition to 
these, a large amount of cement sewers has been laid, in 
various parts of the city. 



42 

Although I am not aware that a large appropriation will 
be demanded the present year, many applications will un- 
doubtedly be made for increased sewerage facilities, which 
will involve the exercise of the most careful discrimination 
in deciding upon the locality where the necessity is greatest. 

The money expended in this department makes but lit- 
tle show, but there is no place where a reasonable amount 
can be more profitably used from year to year, than in per- 
fecting a thorough system of drainage, in the' thickly settled 
portion of the city. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Of our Fire Department the entire community speak only 
in terms of praise. Its reputation for prompt, fearless 
and resolute action in the performance of every duty ex- 
tends beyond our borders, and our admiration is challenged 
by the uniform good conduct and efficiency of its mem- 
bers. The harmony and mutual good feeling that exist 
among the several organizations contribute much to its 
success. 

The estimated value of property damaged or destroyed 
by fire last year was $28,676, on which there was §27,576 
insurance. The department has been called out for duty 
sixteen times. 

The proposition which was submitted to the people at 
our last municipal election, relative to the introduction of 
water from the Massabesic Pond, having been rejected by a 
large majority, it is not likely that an immediate supply can 
be depended upon from that source, for the extinguishment 
of fires. I would therefore recommend the establishment 
of reservoirs in every available location, where their neces- 
sity will justify the expense. 

A new reservoir was constructed last year at the inter- 
section of Hall and Amherst streets, and the one on Tre- 
mont square much enlarged and improved. 



43 

A water pipe was laid from the pond in Merrimack 
square through the back street east of Elm street, supply- 
ing reservoirs in Central and Park streets. Three other 
reservoirs have also been established on Myrtle street, in 
connection with a private aqueduct. 

COMMONS. 

No city has been more highly favored by the establish- 
ment of public commons than ours, and it remains for us 
to make them attractive, and thus contribute to the health, 
comfort and enjoyment of our citizens. 

Great improvements have recently been made upon them, 
by laying concrete pavements on the most frequented walks. 
This plan meets with such general favor, that the propriety 
of its continuance is not questioned. 

A substantial and appropriate iron fence is now nearly 
completed on the western border of Merrimack square, 
which is an honor to the 'city, and creditable to the taste 
and good judgment of the committee having the same in 
charge. It is doubtful whether a fence combining more 
desirable elements for a like position can be found any- 
where. I would advise that the work be continued as fast 
as the condition of our finances will admit. 

Let me also suggest that some attention shonld be paid 
to the common known as The Park, which has heretofore 
been entirely neglected, save by the erection of a common 
board fence around the grounds. The walks should at least 
be laid out and graded, as a basis for further improvements. 

CEMETERIES. 

All enlightened communities desire pleasant and attract- 
ive grounds for the burial of the dead. The resting places 
of those we love, consecrated and made sacred to thousands 
by the holiest affections, should receive our watchful care. 



44 

Let us ornament and beautify these localities around which 
gather so many tender recollections. 

A small appropriation will be necessary in aid of the 
Valley ; but at present the Pine Grove Cemetery is self- 
mstaining, the proceeds from the sale of lots being sufficient 
.o cover the expense of any improvements yet undertaken. 

MILITARY. 

The military force within our city has been gradually 
reduced from nine companies two years ago to four at the 
present time. Their demands upon the treasury are mod- 
erate, only being for sufficient assistance to defray the ex- 
pense of rent of their armories. Many of the members 
composing these companies served honorably in the late 
war, and are entitled to our gratitude and esteem. I have 
no doubt you will cheerfully extend to them such aid and* 
encouragement as may be just and reasonable. In this 
connection permit me to call your attention to the subject 
of a 

soldiers' monument. 

The Legislature of our state enacted a law by which 
" any city or town, at any legal meeting holden for the 
purpose, may raise and appropriate so much money as they 
deem necessary, to be expended in procuring and erecting 
a monument to perpetuate the memory of such soldiers be- 
longing thereto as may have sacrificed their lives in the 
service of their country." 

Nearly five years have now elapsed since the din of war 
and clash of arms were last heard in our land, and the 
bitterness which characterized those long years of bloody 
strife is happily fast passing away. Our gallant soldiers 
have returned to the paths of peace, while a great army of 
slain, having sealed their devotion with their lives, return 
not. " Their bones lie mingled with the soil of every 



45 

battle-field, and there the}' will remain forever." Yet we 
can point to no enduring monument erected by a grateful 
people, that shall transmit to posterity the devotion and 
sacrifice of our fellow-citizens who went forth to victory 
and to death, in defence of the Union and the Constitution. 
With full confidence that your action will be such as 
shall reflect credit upon an appreciating people,, and the 
cause it is proposed to comnjemorate, I commit the subject 
to your hands. 

CITY FARM. 

The whole number of paupers at the almshouse during 
the past year was twenty-nine. The average number was 
six and a quarter. 

In consequenee of a change in the laws of the state 
relative to pauper settlements, whereby towns and cities 
are relieved from furnishing aid to most of the poor, many 
towns have disposed of their farms, and made arrange- 
ments with the county officers for the support of such per- 
sons as may be chargeable to them. While it would not 
perhaps be wise in us to adopt this course, I cannot too 
strongly urge upon you that it is our true policy to culti- 
vate a less number number of acres. I think it will not 
be denied that the cost of working the farm, with a fair 
allowance to cover depreciation, is greater than the value 
of the crops it produces. Why, then, should we continue 
this expensive policy longer ? 

Two years ago the City Council caused the westerly por- 
tion of the farm to be divided into lots, which were put 
into the market at prices fixed by a committee, duly 
authorized for that purpose. Under this arrangement 
seven lots were disposed of that year, but I am not aware 
of any sales being made since. I trust that this subject 
will receive your early attention, and that you will take the 
necessary steps to dispose of such portions of this property 



46 

as is unnecessary for the purposes for which it was de- 
signed. You will thus be increasing our taxable property, 
and rendering more attractive a portion of our city now 
necessarily too much neglected. 

CONCLUSION. 

Gentlemen of the City Council : I have thus, more at 
length than may have appeared necessary, endeavored to 
bring to your attention the various branches of municipal 
business which, in the faithful performance of your duties, 
will claim your best and most careful deliberations. 

It is a source of unaffected pleasure that I am to be 
associated with so many gentlemen in both branches of the 
city council who have already had experience in the man- 
agement of our city affairs. From each of you I solicit 
counsel and advice, or any suggestions that will be of ser- 
vice in the discharge of my official duties ; and I feel 
assured that in my efforts to promote the material interests 
of our municipality, your hearty cooperation and support 
will never be wanting. 

On my part, I assure you, nothing in my power shall be 
left undone to make your labors easy, and render ouu offi- 
cial intercourse harmonious, pleasant and agreeable. 

Let us then be united in all our endeavors for the high- 
est prosperity of our beloved city, and may all our public 
acts be performed under the blessing and guidance of that 
Great Being who is the source of all wisdom and all 
strength. 



GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS 

OF THE 

CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

1870. 



MAYOR. 

JAMES A. WESTON, 



CITY CLERK. 

JOSEPH E. BEXXETT. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1 — Daniel H. Maxfield, Ward 5 — dornelius Healy, 

Ward 2 — Henry A. Farrington, Ward 6 — George H. Hubbard, 

Ward 3 — Peter K. Chandler, Ward 7 — Samuel Brooks, 

Ward 4— Horace P. Watts, Ward 8— William G. Everett. 



PRESIDENT of common council. 
John P. Currier. 



clerk of common council. 
Elbridge D. Hadley. 



48 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Ward 1, William Bursiel, Ward 5, John L. Kennedy, 

William H. Maxwell, Lawrence Foley, 

John P. Currier. Thomas Willis. 

Ward 2, Henry W. Powell, Ward 6, Dustin L. Jenkins, 

Thomas R. Northrup, John W. Johnson, 

William B. Unclerhill. George E. Glines. 

Ward 3, Simon F. Stanton, Ward 7, David O. Webster, 

Nehemiah S. Bean, John K. McQueston, 

George R. Simmons. William H. shepherd. 

Ward 4, William R. Patten, Ward 8, Henry H. Fuller, 

Joseph B. Sawyer, Harris J. Poor, 

Jacob B. Hart well. Albert A. Woodward. 



MESSENGER. 

William Stevens. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — Messrs. Johnson, Bean and Patten; the Mayor and 
Alderman Brooks. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Farrington and Maxfield; Messrs. Max- 
well, Underhill and Hartwell. 

Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Watts and Brooks; Messrs. 
Sawyer, Johnson and Shepherd. 

Public Instruction. — Aldermen Everett and Farrington; Messrs. 
McQueston, Powell and Willis. 

Streets. — Aldermen Chandler and Hubbard; Messrs. Bean, Stan- 
ton and Fuller. 

City Farm. — The Mayor and Alderman Watts; Messrs. Mc- 
Queston, Fuller and Jenkins. 

Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Chandler and Healy; Messrs. 
Glines, Shepherd and Foley. 

Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Maxfield and Hubbard; 
Messrs. Bursiel, Webster and Kennedy. 

Fire Department, — Aldermen Healy and Everett; Messrs. Jen- 
kins, Simmons and Sawyer. 

Claims. — Aldermen Brooks and Maxfield; Messrs. Patten, North- 
rup and Bursiel. 



49 

House of Correction. — Aldermen. "Watts and Farrington; Messrs. 
Northrup, Wines and Poor. 

Military Affairs. — Aldermen Hubbard and Healy; Messrs. Max- 
well, Poor and Webster. 

City Hall. — Aldermen Everett and Chandler; Messrs. Stanton, 
Woodward and Powell. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Licenses. — Aldermen Healy and Brooks. 

Enrollment. — Aldermen Maxfield and Farrington. 

Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Farrington and Everett. 

Bills in Second Beading. — Aldermen Hubbard and Watts. 

Market. — Aldermen Everett and Healy. 

Setting Trees. — Aldermen Chandler and Hubbard. 

Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Maxfield and Chandler. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elections and Returns. — Kennedy, Webster and Northrup. 
Bills in Second Beading. — Patten, Simmons and Woodward. 
Enrollment. — Underbill, Hartwell and Powell. 



ASSESSORS. 



Moses O. Pearson, Timothy Sullivan, 

Horace P. Simpson, Lssac Whittemore, 

John F. Woodbury, Joseph X. Prescott, 

Isaac D. Palmer, T. S. Montgomery. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

S. S. Moulton, Hugh Conroy, 

S. J. Young, • John Morse, 

Nahum Baldwin, Horatio Fradd, 

Moses E. George, George H. Colby. 

4 



50 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Henry C. Sanderson, Patrick A. Devine, 

Marshall P. Hall, Ephraim S. Peabody, 

Thomas Borden, James Dean, 

Samuel Upton, DeLafayette Robinson. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION, 

Joseph G. Edgerly. 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



Edwin P. Richardson, Chief. 
Benjamin C. Kendall, Wilberforce Ireland, 

Elijah Chandler, Andrew C. Wallace. 



SOLICITOR. 

Cyrus A. Sulloway. Office — Union Building 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR. 

Henry R. Chamberlin. Office — City Hall Building. 



DEPUTY COLLECTOR. 

Harrison D. Lord. City Hall Building." 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 

Hon. Daniel Clark, Samuel !N\ Bell, 

William P. Newell, Waterman Smith, 

Hon. Wm. C. Clarke, Hon. E. A. Straw, 

Phinehas Adams, John P. Currier, 

Hon. James A. Weston. 



51 

LIBRARIAN. 

Charles H. Marshall. 



WARD OFFICERS. 



Moderators. 



Ward 1, J. P. Carrier, 
" 2, Timothy W. Challis, 
" 3, John X. Bruce, 
" 4, George Holbrook, 



Ward 5, John Smith, 
" 0. Elbridge G. Haynes, 
" 7, Chauncy C. Favor, 
" 8, Daniel Farmer. 



Clerks. 



Ward 1, James M. House, 
" 2, John D. Powell, 
" 3, Richard J. P. Goodwin, 
" 4, Jasper P. George, 



Ward •">, William Hayes, 
" 6, Silas R. Sleeper, 
" 7, Luther E. Wallace, 
" 8, George H. Gerry. 



S( lectmen. 



Ward 1, Edward L. Carpenter, 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, 
Silas C. Clatur. 

Ward 2, Elbridge G. Woodman, 
Joseph Simonds, 
Moses A. Hunkins. 

Ward 3, Benj. L. Hartshorn, 
Thatcher M. Conant, 
Henry A. Gage. 

Ward 4, Henry French, 
Moses Eastman, 
John V. Sullivan. 



Ward •">. George Fox, 

Timothy O'Connor, 

Thomas Willis. 

Ward 6, James W. Lathe, 
Ira P. Fellows, 
Harrison D. Lord. 

Ward 7, Hosea E. Sturtevant, 
Carroll Riddle, 
Halt on J. Warren. 

Ward 8, James Richardson, 
Geo. S. Chandler, 
Milo W. Harvey. 



CITY UNDERTAKERS. 

Charles S. Fisher, Patrick A. Devine. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Oscar D. Abbott. 



52 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Justice. 
Samuel Upton. Office — Merchants' Exchange. 

Assistant Justice. 

Elijah M. Topliff. Office— Patten's Building. 

City Marshal. 

William B. Patten. Officer- City Hall. 

Assistant Marshal. 
Eben Carr. Office— City Hall. 



John D. Howard, 
Thomas L. Quimby 
Patrick Doyle, 
James Duffy, 
William T. Fogg. 



Henry Bennett, 



William B. Patten, 
Eben Carr, 



Night Watchmen. 

Hezekiah H. Noyes, 
William H. B. Newhall, 
John C. Colbum, 
David Thayer, 
Hugh Ramsay. 

Day Police. 

Horatio W. Longa. 

Truant Officers. 

Henry Bennett, 
Horatio W. Longa, 
Hezekiah H. Xoyes. 
Constables. 



William B. Patten, Eben Carr. 

Police Officers. 



William B. Patten, 
Eben Carr, 
John D. Howard, 
Thomas L. Quimby, 
Patrick Doyle, 
James Duffy, 
William T. Fogg, 



Hezekiah H. Xoyes, 
William H. B. Newhall, 
John C. Colburn, 
David Thayer, 
Hugh Ramsay, 
Henry Bennett, 
Horatio W. Longa. 



53 



Special Police. 



Henry B. Moulton, 
.John W. Dickey, 
Benjamin Sleeper, 
Elbridge G. Woodman. 
Horace P. Simpson, 
Justus N". Tuck, 
Albert H. Merrill, 
Joel Daniels, 
Orin D. Carpenter, 
Levi Andrews, 
Andrew J. Dickey, 
Henry W. Powell, 
Leonard Shelters, 
William P. Gage, 
Jonathan Y. McQueston, 
Henry Colby, 
Benjamin W. Robinson, 
Erastus Cutting, 
Thorndike P. Heath, 
George W. Nichols, 
Page S. Griffin, 
Bradley B. Aldrich, 
Uriah A. Carswell, 
John D. E .Igerly, 
William Stevens, 
Christopher C. Colby, 
Samuel Clark, 



John Catlin Smith, 
Andrew J. Mayhew, 
Charles Canfield, 
Hollis C. Hunton, 
Austin Jenkins, 
John Sanborn, 
Charles L. Richardson, 
Nathaniel Baker, 2d, 
John T. Chase, 
James Patten, 
George W. Butterfield, 
Albert E. Quimby, 
Josiah Stevens, 
William N. Chamberlin, 
James E. Bail<\ . 
Joseph Melvin, 
Joseph Cross, 
Hugh Conroy, 
Russel O. Burleigh, 
John Smith, 
Thomas Howe, 
Harrison D. Lord, 
Horatio Fradd, 
Timothy O'Connor, 
Milo W. Harvey, 
John E. Stearns, 
Ira C. Hardy. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

William B. Patten, George A. Crosby, 

Eben Can-. 



ACCOUNT 



HENRY R. CHAMBERLIX, 

CITY TREASURER, 



DECEMBER 31, 1808, TO DECEMBER 31, 18G9. 



56 



Dr. City of Manchester in account with Henry B. Chamfa rlin f 




■; * 


510.96; 


4, 


136.06; 


5, 


335.14; 


6, 


285.34; 


7, 


673.42; 



To Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1869, 
Paupers off the Farm, 
Citv Farm, .... 
City Teams, 

Highway District No. 1, . 
Dist. No. 2, §5,171.29; Dist No. 8, $424.94 

" 9, 287.40 
" 10, 783.94 
" 11, 1,047.45 
" 12, 249.87 
" 13, 301.24 

New Highways, 

Granite Bridge, $29.60; Am. Falls Bridge, $128.88, 
Sewers and Drains, $16,555.67; Reservoirs, §1,646.18, 
Commons, §1,705.98; Pine Grove Cem. $787.15, 

Fire Department, 

City Police, $12,402.68; City Officers, 8,180.60, 

Lighting Streets, 

Printing and Stationery, 

Incidental Expenses, 

City Hall Building, §1,106.19 ; City Library, §2,316.70, 
Land sold from Farm, §342.40; Militia, $450.64, . 
Paving Streets, §4,499.80; Watering Streets, $594.48, 
Ab't on Taxes. $1,182.92; Dis. on Taxes, $5,468.85, 
State Tax. $50,562.00; County Tax, $14,175.53, 
Interest, S2.S72.Ol; Coupons, §20,685.00. . 
Tern. Loan, §16,650.00; City Debt, §17,200.00, 
Court House, §2,549.61 ; Rep. of Buildings, §1,659.02, 
Liquor Agency, §511.08; Do^ Tax, §70.60, 
Insurance, $1,025.75; Library Building, §16,523.16, 



Slo.loO 

2,1)72 

4,104 

4,761 

330 

5.596 

798 

940 

1,382 

535 

974 

4,832 

158' 

18,201 

2,4!)3 

6,054 

20,583 

3,263 

1,999 

.-.,74o 

3.422 

793 

5,094 

6,651 

64,737 

23,557 

33,850 

4,208 

581 

17,.-)4S 



Pipe, Hanover Square, §3,059.33; S.V.R.R. §25,000.00, 28,059 



Iron Fence, Merrimack Square, 

School Department, . 

New School-Houses, . 

New School-House, Goffe's Falls, 

Repairs of School-Houses, 

School-House Lots, . 

Evening School, 



2,467 

55.172 

974 

613 

453 

3,900 
209 



08 
59 
34 
09 

(12 

2:; 
36 

(HI 
.V.) 

2] 

00 
84 
48 
85 
13 
(17 
28 
69 
34 

(Ml 

89 
04 
28 

77 
53 
01 

00 
63 

OS 

in 
33 

38 

.v.i 

(IS 

96 
27 
00 
45 



City Bonds unsold, 

("ash in the Treasury, Jan. 1, 1870, 



$353>178 31 

36,800 00 
27,398 51 



§417,376 82 



57 
City Treasurer (one year ending December 31, 1869). Cr. 



By Cash in the Treasury Jan. 1, 1869, . . . . $42,794 85 

Taxes 1862, $16.90; Taxes 1864, $30.78, . 47 68 

" I860, 122.35; " 1866, 273.61, . . 395 96 

" 1867, 1,300.59; " 1868, 19,395.93, . . 20,696 52 

Taxes collected, 1869, 217,611) 94 

Dog Tax 1867, 89.00; Dog Tax 1868, 890.00, . . 99 00 

Dog Tax 1869, 182 00 

Temporary Loan, $7,350.00; City Bonds, £50,000.00, 57,350 00 

Savings Bank Tax, 18,472 38 

Railroad Tax, L2,740 92 

U. S. Bounty, 12.222 20 

Literary Fund, 874 20 

City Hall Building, §1,979.00; City Farm, 82.5S3.45, 4,562 45 

Police Court, $3,352.47;. City Scales, $334.65, . . 3,687 12 

Paupers from other towns, 269 50 

Pine Grove Cemetery, 794 35 

County of Hillsborough, 1,2! 

Interest on Taxes, 653 88 

City Teams, $1,250.50; Overdraft, $17.40, . . 1,267 90 

Exhibitions and Shows, 640 00 

Dog Licenses, $512.00; Sewer Licenses, 8767.01, . 1,279 01 
Liquor Agency. $715.42; cost Non-res. Taxes, 828.00, 743 42 

National Bank Tax in other towns, . . . 125 7'.) 
Land sold from Farm, ...... 

Board of Inmates Reform School, .... $84 00 

Tenements Vine street, 108 00 

J. Patten, Cart, 860.00; II. D. Lord. Carpet, $8.00 . 68 00 

No. 4 Ward Room, $2.00; Old Pipe, $214.00, . . 216 00 

Rent of Hearse, 8100.00; O. Barton, Brick, $22.00, L22 00 

Taylor & Hackett, damage to Geo. I. Copp, . . Km 00 

Work on Sewers, 4 50 

Bedford, for New Highway, 12 56 

Hay on acct. of Teams, 81-00 ; Rent of Ct. Room, 85.00, 6 0,0 

Harness, Brick etc., 847.00; use of Cart, $15.00, . 62 00 

Fence, Merrimack Square, .§10.00; Tree sold, $6.26, 16 26 

Concord Railroad, Sewers and Cesspools, . . 340 93 

Library Building, $219.23; Sewers, $181.80, . . 40103 

License to sell, $50.00; Gravel, $203.85, . . . 253 85 

I. Riddle, for Old Conductor, . . . . . 4 50 

Undrawn in School Department last year, . 11 98 

8390,207 36 

Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1870, .... 27,169 46 



8117,376 82 
HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, City Treasurer. 
Manchester, January 1, 1870. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



The undersigned, Joint Standing Committee on Finance, certify 
that we have examined the foregoing account of Henry B. Cham- 
berlin, City Treasurer, and find the same correctly cast and prop- 
erly vouched. 

During the year ending December 31, 1869, there has been re- 
ceived in the treasury, including the balance on band January 1, 
1869, the sum of three hundred ninety thousand two hundred seven 
dollars and thirty-six cents (390,207.36), and there has been paid 
from the treasiuy during the same time, the sum of three hundred 
twenty-six thousand eight dollars and eighty-five cents (326,008.- 
85), leaving in the treasury January 1, 1870, twenty-seven thousand 
three hundred ninety-eight dollars and fifty-one cents (27,398.51) 
in cash, and thirty-six thousand eight hundred dollars in unsold 

City Bonds. 

B. P. SILYEB, 

ISAAC W. SMITH, 

WM. P. NEWELL, 

SAMUEL BKOOKS, 

J. W. JOHXSOX. 

Joint Standing < 'ommittee on Finance. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



To taxes, 1869, collected 


$211,792 39 




Dog tax . 


164 00 




Abated 


367 70 




Discounted 


5,468 85 






- 


8217,792 94 


1868, collected . 


$19,045 33 




Dog tax . 


88 00 




Abated 


352 60 








$19,485 93 


1867, collected 


$1,232 39 


Dog tax . 


2 00 




Abated 


75 20 


$1,309 59 


1866, collected . 


$205 15 


Abated 


68 46 


$273 61 


1865, collected . 


37 00 


Abated 


85 35 


$122 35 






186-4, collected 


• 


$30 78 


1862 " 


• 


16 90 




$239,032 10 


Savings Bank tax 


• 


$18,472 38 


Railroad " 


> . . 


12,740 92 


Interest on taxes 


• • 


653 88 


Costs on non-resident taxes 


, # 


28 00 



60 

To Tax on Stocks in Banks at Nashua . . $84 14 
" " " Francestown . 41 65 

Temporary Loan 7,350 00 

Soldiers' Bounties refunded Jjy Gen. Gov'mt 1,222 20 

Literary Fund 874 20 

Rent of City Hall stores .... 1,688 00 

Rent of City Hall . . . . . 250 00 

Rent of Police Court Room ... 46 00 

Old carpet 8 00 

County of Hillsborough for sup- 
port of inmates at Asylum . SI 80 93 

County of Hillsborough for sup- 
port of inmates at Ref. School 1,076 04 

County of Hillsborough for sup- 
port of County paupers 5 00 

New Boston for support of Jehon- 

net family . . . . 2 50 

Washington for support of Mrs. 

Barrett 6 88 

Hopkinton for support of Ellen S. 
Kendall ..... 

Weare for support of Moses L. Lull 

Newport for support of Mrs. Haven 

City of Concord .... 

Town of Hillsborough for support 

of C. W. Connor at Ref. School 26 00 

S. S. Moulton for support of Sarah 

F. Bunton at Reform School . 23 00 

S. S. Moulton support of John Wal- 
lace at Reform School . . 9 00 

S. S. Moulton for support of paupers 4 50 

Portsmouth for support of Mrs. 

Wallace 24 00 

Nellie George for support of Mary 

George at Reform School . . 35 13 



18 


62 


3 


55 


15 


98 


32 


34 



61 



To E. S. Pearson for support of son at 

Reform School . . . . $26 00 
Margaret McLane for support of 

son at Reform School . 26 00 



Hillsborough County for fuel and gas at court- 
house ....... 

E. M. Kellogg, liquor agent, for liquors sold 



81,615 47 

28 55 
715 42 



City Farm for labor . . . 8579 38 

milk . . .812 23 

beef . . .382 16 

oxen . . .205 00 

hay . . .172 18 

fencing lots . . 221 90 

pasturing . . 168 40 

field products, <fec. . 436 70 

support of county 

paupers . . 105 50 



82,583 45 



City Teams, work in district No. 2 8541 25 
on new highways 419 75 
commons . 32 00 
repairs on school- 
houses . 22 00 
paving streets 153 00 
sewers and drains 61 50 
reservoirs . 3 00 
C. M. Stevens 

for hay . 1 00 
repairing build- 
ings . . 18 00 
John Camp- 
bell for cart 60 00 



62 



To City Teams, Luther Campbell, liar- 
harness . . 815 00 
Luther Campbell, use 

of cart . . . 15 00 



Police costs and fines 

Old pipe sold from water works 

Hackett and Taylor for obstructing 

Licenses to enter, sewers 

Otis Barton for brick . 

Concord railroad for building sewer 

Reservoirs for brick 

Incidental expenses for brick for 

scales .... 
Repairs of buildings for brick 
Charles Wells for building sewer 
J. F. James for work on sewers 



Old fence, wood, and liberty-pole 
Sewers and drains, for brick from • 

Library Building . . . 8100 00 
Commons, for loam from Library 

Building ..... 
Court House, for loam from Library 

Building ..... 
Repairs of school-houses, for loam 

from Library Building 
Cement pipe on Hanover street, for 

stone ..... 

Rent of tenements on Vine street 
Sales from Pine Grove Cemetery 
Cash for dog licenses 

lots from City Farm 
use of No. 4 Ward Room 



g street . 


. 8767 


01 


. 22 


00 


• 349 


93 


. 60 


60 


. 20 


20 


. 101 


00 


. 10 


00 


4 


50 



81,341 50 

$3,352 47 
214 10 
100 00 



81,335 24 
32 26 



15 13 




62 50 




17 50 




24 00 






8219 23 
108 00 




. . 


794 35 


. . 


512 00 


, , 


586 06 


f # 


2 00 



68 



To Cash for rent of hearse .... $100 00 

weighing ..... 834 65 

license to sell .... 50 00 

licenses to shows and circuses . 640 00 

from Treasurer of School Committee . 11 98 

of M. Hurley for gravel ... 7 50 
A. H. Lowell for gravel . $15 53 
S. C. Forsaith " . 180 82 
Bedford, one-half expense 

of selling highway . 12 56 208 91 

for city stock sold . . . • 13,200 00 

old brick and old pipe from City Hall 10 50 

• H. & H. R. Pettee, overdraft . . IT 40 

$310,612 51 



Transfers from sundry appropriations to 



sundry appropriations 



$3,696 T3 
$314,309 24 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



By Paupers off farm . 


. 


$3,602 85 


City Farm . 


. 


3,799 20 


City Teams . 




5,153 90 


Highway District No. 


1 


330 00 


No. 


2 


5,207 50 


No. 


3 


500 00 


No. 


4 


250 00 


No. 


5 


400 00 


No. 


6 


250 00 


No. 


7. 


700 00 


No. 


8 


450 00 


No. 


. 9 


250 00 


No. 


10 


800 00 



64 



To Highway District No. 11 

No. 12 
No. 13 
New Highways 
Granite Bridge 
Amoskeag Falls Bridge 
Sewers and Drains 
Reservoirs 
Commons 

Pine Grove Cemetery 
Fire Department . 
City Police . 
Lighting Streets . 
Printing and Stationery 
Incidental Expenses 
City Hall Building 
City Library . 
Militia 

Land sold from Farm 
Paving Streets 
Watering Streets . 
Schools 
New school-house at Goffe' 

Falls 
Repairs of school-houses 
Insurance 
State Tax . 
County Tax . 
Interest 

Temporary Loan • 
Court-House 
Liquor Agency 
Repairs of Buildings 
Dog Tax, 1867 
City Debt, Payment 



81,050 00 

250 00 

325 00 

4,658 91 

200 00 

300 00 

16,335 24 

1,200 00 

1,602 26 

794 35 

10,000 00 

13,352 47 

2,600 00 

1,800 00 

3,400 00 

2.652 50 
2,500 00 

400 00 

586 06 

5,000 00 

630 00 

46,219 48 

2,500 00 

8,596 73 

1,200 00 

50,562 00 

14,175 53 

25,000 00 

7,350 00 

1.653 00. 
715 42 

1,700 00 

7 00 

20,000 00 



65 

To Evening Schools . . . $200 00 

City Officers .... 8,500 00 

City Library Building . . 12,319 33 

Discount on Taxes . . 5,140 00 

Iron Fence, Merrimack square, 4,000 00 

New School-houses and Lots 6,000 00 

Cement Pipe on Hanover St., 3,214 10 
Repairs of old High School 

house .... 550 00 



8310,942 83 

Balance to Reserved Fund . 3,366 41 



8314,309 24 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 

By Appropriation .... $2,000 00 

Hillsborough county, for board 

of inmates at Reform School, 1 ,076 04 

Hillsborough county, for board 

of inmates at Insane Asylum, 180 93 

Hillsborough county, for support 

of paupers .... 5 00 

Sundry persons, for board of in- 
mates at Reform School . 110 00 

Other towns for support of pau- 
pers 243 50 



83,615 47 



EXPENDITURES. 



To E. B. Fellows, for wood . . $4 25 

Lane & Dorr, for wood . . 10 00 

5 



66- 

To William C. Richardson, wood . 
Parker Butterfield, " 

G. F. Robertson. " 

Daniel Wheeler, " 

William Foster. " 

J. C. Fi field, " . 

L. W. Hall, " . 

S. B. Bod well & Co., " . 

• D. B. Eastman, " 

Foster & Co., " . 

Hillsborough county, for board 

of Reuben P. Webster . 
Martha Dearborn, for board of 

W. S. Dearborn . 
A. P. Colby, /or board of Mrs. 

Dickey and children . 

Caroline Wyman, for board of 

Sarah J. Wyman and family, 

Mary E. Wyman, for board of 

A. Wyman .... 

Miss Emerson, for nursing Mrs. 

Haven .... 

John Prince, burying child of 

Mrs. Welch 
P. A. Devine, burying ., . 
" " coffin and burying 

J. Baxter . 
C. S. Fisher, coffin and burying 

Wm. Brown 
" " coffin and burying 

J. Davis 
" " coffin and burying 

Mrs. Griffin . 
Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., provisions 
Geo. W. Adams & Son, « . 



*23 


00 


10 


00 


3 


37 


9 


00 


4 


25 


1 


05 


2 


37 


57 


87 


30 


00 


3 


00 


39 


61 


96 


00 


96 


00 


93 


00 


IT 


50 


6 


00 


2 


50 


19 


00 


16 


50 


10 


09 


IT 


50 


16 


25 


115 


78 


67 


29 



67 



To H. B. Putnam, for provisions, 
Baker & Fradd, " . 

Fradd & Co., " . 

Frost & Higgins, " 

Geo. W. Gardner & Co., " 
Patrick He'aly, " 

Jeremiah Hayes, " 

Wm. M. Hayes, " 

A. M. Eastman, " 

Healy & Sweeney, " 

City Clerk of Dover, for search- 
ing records 
H. Fradd, for cash paid Abner 
Collins .... 
N. H. Asylum, for board of 

Emma V. Haselton 
N. H. Asylum, for board of 

Hattie A. Vincent 
N. H. Asylum, for board of 

Reuben P. Webster 
N. II. Asylum, for board of 

Bridget Scully 
Town of Hillsborough, for aid to 

Mrs. Elizabeth Haines 
Town of Goffstown, for aid to 

Wm. Brown 
A. G. Fairbanks, expense taking- 
Bridget Scully to Asylum . 
A. G. Fairbanks, expense taking 
R. P. Webster from Asylum 
Fogg & James, for team to Pem- 
broke ..... 
H. W. Savory, for team to east 
part of the city . 



$1 


00 


29 


72 


78 


73 


3 


00 


10 


00 


4 


00 


32 


00 


64 


00 


9 


54 


9 


90 


1 


38 


3 


00 


157 


26 


4.3 


47 


35 


:'m 


71 


61 


10 


00 


4 


76 


8 


00 


7 


00 


3 


50 


2 


75 



68 



To S. S. James & Co., for team to 

Farm $1 00 

Town of Hooksett, for aid to Geo. 

Stearns's family ... 77 09 

Reform School, for board of in- 
mates 1,455 57 

Manchester Gas-Light Company, 

for coke .... 6 00 

Abner F. Collins, for nursing 

John Davis ... 21 00 

S. F.. Murry & Co., medicine 

for Mrs. Hayes . . . 2 28 

Leonard French, medical attend- 
ence on Mrs. Haven . 

E. M. Kellogg, medicine for 
Mrs. Haven 

Connor & Pearson, medical pre- 
scriptions . . 

C. F. Livingston, for printing 
notices .... 

S. S. Monlton, expenses to 
Hooksett and Pembroke 

S. S. Moulton, expenses to Con- 
cord 

S. S. Moulton, aid to Mrs. 
Haven .... 

S. S. Moulton, aid to Mrs. Ja- 
quith ..... 



Balance to New Account 



7 00 






2 62 






21 47 






2 75 






4 75 






4 10 






2 10 






1 75 


83,615 




82,972 59 
642 88 


47 



69 



CITY FARM. 



By Balance from Old Account 


. $941 84 


Appropriation . 


. 


500 00 


Amount rec'd for labor 


. 


579 38 


milk 


. 


312 23 


beef 


. 


382 16 


oxen 


. , 


205 00 


hay 


. 


172 18 


fencii 


lg lots 


221 90 


pasturing 


168 40 


field 


products 


436 70 


Amount rec'd for su 


pport o 


f 


County paupers . 


• 


105 50 


Transferred from Reser 


ved Func 

3NDITURE 


I 700 00 


EXP] 


• 

3. 


To Joseph Cross, Sup't, salary 


$500 00 


Maria Wilkinson, for ho 


usework 


10 00 


Lizzie Upton, 


a 


25 50 


Emma A. Cross, 


a 


28 50 


Alice Thomas 


a 


28 75 


Charles G. Sherer, for labor, 


268 08 


Geo. W. Gardner & Co. 


a 


6 00 


Edward Simmons, 


a 


7 50 


George Stevens, 


a 


25 00 


Reuben Morgan, 


a 


103 50 


Herbert J. Marsh, 


a 


87 01 


John Sargent, 


a 


52 00 


Jerry Sullivan, 


a 


28 50 


Hiram Mclntire, 


a 


1 50 


Timothy O'Brien, 


u 


3 00 


William Smith, 


it 


19 00 


James McGlome, 


a 


51 76 



•34,725 29 



70 



To Manly Crommett, for labor 


811 50 


Freeman Wilson, for meat 


4 20 


Joseph Garland, " . 


19 18 


Charles W. Rowell, " . 


53 00 


Jerry L. Fogg " . 


169 00 


Cook & Miller " . 


4 12 


Johnson & Stevens, for groceries 


\ 87 99 


Horace B. Putnam, " 


70 41 


Geo. W. Adams & Son, " 


1 20 


Cyrus Dunn, " 


152 73 


H. C. Merrill, 


81 70 


Locke & Demick, " 


48 70 


C. C. Frost & Co., 


41 65 


Kidder & Chandler " • . 


24 38 


John Sullivan, for tablecloths 


3 00 


A. G. Fairbanks, doctoring hog 


; 2 00 


Joseph Cate, doctoring cattle 


3 00 


A. F. Perry, medicine 


13 50 


B. B. Weeks & Co., medicine 


2 19 


0. D. Abbott, surgical operatioi 


6 


upon Mrs. Roberts 


40 00 


Moses C. Clark, for heifer 


56 00 


Abram Doloff, for heifer . 


40 00 


Wm. F. Plead, yoke of oxen 


240 00 


Mrs. Jane Addison, one Jersej 


r 


bull .... 


100 00 


S. S. Nelson, pasturing cattle 


63 00 


John H. Proctor, " " 


3 00 


H. & H. R. Pettee, grain . 


283 52 


J. Abbott, grain 


131 72 


Uall, Watts & Co., grain anc 




plaster . 


119 72 


J. E. Bennett, five barrels pota- 




toes .... 


5 00 



71 



To J. A. Weston, potatoes 
L. W. Morse, " 

F. C. Lougee, " 
Abel Wilder, seed corn 
James J. H. Gregory, seeds 
Haines & Wallace, barley 
Brighani & Pratt, one barrel 

crackers .... 

Charles Bimton, blacksmith work 

Waite Brothers, dry goods 

Barton & Co., " 

J. R. Weston, " 

Chandler & Williams, elothing. 

Brown & Potter, paper hangings, 

Joel Daniels, hanging paper 

John Bixbec, filing saws . 

City of Manchester, taxes for 
1868 

Fogg & James, team to farm . 

C. D. Dunbar, wheelbarrow 

A. W. Sanborn, repairing and 

painting wagon . . . 13 50 

Benj. Currier, repairing wagon 

and plow .... 5 40 

Amoskeag Ax Company, new 
steeling axes 

J. S. Holt, one barrel # of soap . 

Daniels & Co., tools and hard- 
ware ..... 

A. Fox, 200 chestnut posts 

S* G. Hoyt, repairing shoes 

G. W. Thayer, boots and shoes, 
T. L. Haaangs, " " . 
T. T. Abbot, washing-machine . 



814 00 


12 


50 


3 


00 


3 


35 


11 


73 


6 


25 


5 


00 


114 


02 


32 


75 


18 


G4 


25 


13 


28 


87 


3 


19 


5 


08 


2 


GO 


147 


30 


1 


50 


12 


00 



3 


20 


5 


00 


99 


57 


52 


00 


6 


25 


20 


25 


23 


15 


7 


00 



72 



To H. C. Tilton, writing-book . $0 35 

H. B. Burgess, two buffalo robes 25 00 

J. H. Wales, whitewashing . 3 50 

Clough & Foster, sawing lumber 79 26 

R. M. Rollins, hay-fork . 25 00 

E. S. Dickerman, furniture . 18 35 

Moses C. Clark, heifer . 20 00 

J. L. Smith, lumber . 1 50 

Edwin Branch, repairing harness 6 63 

Edwin Branch, harness, . . 25 00 

H. M. Bailey, tin ware . . 24 51 



84,034 34 


Balance to New Account . 


690 95 


CITY TEAMS. 




Balance from Old Account 


$551 09 


Appropriation .... 


800 00 


Transferred from Reserved Fund 


1500 00 


" " Fire Department, 


1500 00 


Work on Highways . 


541 25 


New Highways . 


419 75 


Commons . 


32 00 


Repairs of School-houses, 


22 00 


Paving Streets 


153 00 


Sewers and Drains 


61 50 


Reservoirs . . * . 


3 00 


Repairs of Buildings . 


18 00 


CM. Stevens, for hay, 


1 00 


John Campbell, for cart, 


60 00 


Luther Campbell, for 




harness . 


15 00 


Luther Campbell, use 




of cart . 


15 00 



1,725 29 



$5692 59 



73 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Geo. S. Butters, for horse . 




8350 00 


Emerson & Porter, pair horses . 


1000 00 


E. P. Richardson, expense to 




Boston jto purchase horses 


3 00 


D. W. Fling, expense to Lowell 




to purchase horse . 


5 00 


M. C. Derby for doctoring horse 


39 50 


Z. Foster Campbell, for medi- 




cine, etc. .... 


14 11 


Horace Richards, for hay . 


194 67 


E. Follansbee, " . 


12 00 


\T. F. Skinner, " . 


10 92 


Gershom Harvell, for straw 


8 84 


P. Walsh, " 


9 18 


Samuel Chandler, for hay . 


33 65 


A. J. Young, " 




6 84 


G. Blaisdell, " . 




13 12 


Daniel George, " 




12 11 


John Hosley, " 




208 73 


E. S. Harvey, " 




9 72 


H. C. Fuller, " 




24 61 


S. D. Smith, " . 




7 96 


J. P. Gage, " 




15 36 


Rufus Calef, for straw 




8 95 


H. T. Richards, for hay 




17 10 


D. D. Dickey, " 




25 72 


William M. Kelley, " 




19 81 


J. P. Bailey, " 




14 54 


A. Whitney, " 




18 83 


E. P. Johnson & Co/for hay . 


6 92 


Warren Harvey, for hauling hay 




from John Hosley's, 


17 72 


T. P. Heath, for hauling hay 




from John Hosley's 




13 50 



74 



To H. M. Bailey, for use of wagon 
H. & H. R. Pettee, for grain 
Hall, Watts & Co., for grain 
Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 
James Patten, " 

Albert F. Quimby, " 

Josiah Harvey, " 

Daniels & Co., for cart 
Daniels & Co., for combs, 

cards, forks, brushes, etc. 
Geo. Hunt, use of cart 
Geo. Hunt, use of stable . 
Robert Wood, veterinary ser 

vices .... 
Greeley & son, for blankets and 

repairing harnesses 
J. C. Clark, cushions for carts 
Edwin Branch, one pair liar 

nesses .... 
Edwin Branch, repairing har 

nesses . 
James Boyd & Sons, one pair 

collars . . . 
Hill <fc Co., express on collars 
Fogg & James, boarding horse 
P. C. Young, clipping horse 
J. B. Saunders, one pair blankets 
E. L. Brown, sled 
E. L. Brown, repairs 
Gilman B. Fogg, repairing lock 
Charles Clough, carrots . * 
John F. Woodbury & Co., shoe 

ing 
G. W. Merriam, shoeing . 



8 3 


66 


236 


78f 


424 


92 


514 


40 


231 


50 


301 


50 


12 


00 


258 


00 


15 


92 


7 


50 


1 


50 



10 00 

18 55 
9 00 

90 00 

8 02 



18 


50 


1 


00 


15 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


60 


00 


15 


00 


1 


00 


9 


00 


96 


33 


10 


15 



$15 00 


7 


60 


66 


70 


30 


00 



75 , 

To R. TV. Flanders, for shoeing and 
repairs ..... 
S. S. Moulton, repairing carts . 
F. P. Hutchinson, blacksmith 
work ..... 
Geo. W. Cheney, boarding horse 
Concord Railroad, for freight on 

horses 26 40 

Brown & Felknvs, blacksmith 
work . . ... 

Palmer & Co., repairing pump 
Cyrus Dunn, salt 
Kidder & Chandler for oil, salt, 
&c. ..... 

F. N. McLaren, repairing har- 
nesses .... 

Locke & Demick, oil, salt, 
brooms, &c. 
Hartshorn & Pike, dipper, oil 
can, &c. . ... 



Balance to New Account 



12 44 




5 00 




72 




34 26 




39 52 




11 46 




2 32 




$4,761 09 




931 50 






85;692 59 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 

By Balance from Old Account . $8 78 

Appropriation .... 250 00 

Reserved Fund ... 80 00 



8338 78 



EXPENDITURES. 



To N. Preston, Superintendent . $43 00 
R. C. Dustin, " . 201 65 



76 



To Geo. W. Dustin, for labor 
Peter Kimball, ' 

John Campbell, " 

John Merrill, " 

James 0. Clark, ' 
Luther Campbell, ' 
Benjamin Pockett, " 
Joseph Lawrence, ' 
Geo. Clark, for stone chips 



Balance to New Account 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 

By Appropriation .... 5,000 00 
Cash of M. Hurley, for gravel . 7 50 

Reserved Fund ... 200 00 



r 


$35 49 




5 63 




• 3 25 




12 00 




8 00 




10 00 




3 00 




3 00 


s 


5 00 

• 


• 


$330 02 




8 76 



50 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Charles Canfield, Superindent . $378 
James Patten, Superintendent . 82 
James A. Weston, for engineer- 
ing 109 00 

James Patten, teamster . . 47 50 

Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster . 66 50 

Albert F. Quimby, teamster . 40 00 

Josiah Harvey, " . . 24 00 

James Kerrin, " . . 462 44 

Warren Harvey, for self and team 201 75 

James Emerson, for self and team 35 00 

Geo. Hunt, use of cart . . 33 50 
Amoskeag Ax Co., new steeling 

axes 2 00 



$338 78 



$5,207 50 



77 



To Charles Clough, opening cess- 
pools 

John B. Varick, lead pipe 

John B. Varick, shovels and picks 

Daniels & Co., tools and nails 

Hill & James, team . 

Fogg & James, team 

Plumer & Chandler, rubber coat 

S. S. Moulton, repairing street 
crossings 

Michael Gillis, setting posts 

City Team No. 1 
No. 2 

No. 3 .. . 
Single 

S. C. Harrington, labor 

Chas. Bunton, blacksmith work 

George W. Cheney, team . 

Dickey, Carpenter & Co., repair 
ing paving on Hanover street 

S. S. James & Co., team . 

E. T. James, team 

Kidder & Chandler, powder, oil 
and pails 

Haines & Wallace, plank . 

Clough & Foster, plank 

Moses D. Stokes, flagging stone 

Stark Mills, for damage to pump 
and snow-plow 

Johnson & Stevens, oil 

Fellows & Co., blacksmithing, 
(done ifl 1867) . 

E. L. Brown, blacksmithing 

E. A. Smith, hauling sand 

Hill & Fling, team . 



$7 25 
29 75 
44 81 
93 90 
5 00 
12 25 
10 00 



53 03 

4 00 

99 75 

118 50 

15 00 

308 00 

5 

13 



62 
74 

50 



2 00 

1 00 

2 50 

6 24 

18 00 
39 36 
05 20 

13 00 
4 50 

4 00 
10 00 

5 60 
4 00 



78 



To Timothy Quinn, labor 


11 50 


Patrick Finn, labor 


. 


150 50 


Edward Prindable, 


labor . 


19 50 


Edward Bresnalian, 


n 


233 23 


Sylvester Donohoe, 


a 


150 37 


Thomas Fox, 


u 


78 74 


Peter Scanlan, 


a 


80 24 


J. 0. Hunt, 


a 


22 50 


John Larkin, 


a 


214 61 


Patrick McLaughlii 


L," . . 


5 50 


Nathl. Corning, 


ii 


24 25 


Patrick Lahey, 


u 


9 00 


Daniel Mahanna, 


a 


127 70 


Patrick Shea, 


« 


8 62 


John Carrigan, 


u 


41 62 


Peter Lahey, 


a 


12 00 


Daniel Harrington, 


u 


21 00 


Edward Garnet, 


cc 


12 00 


Edward Simmons, 


a 


21 00 


Zeb. Caouette, 


c< 


19 87 


Patrick Nervin, 


a 


28 74 


Patrick McCabe, 


a 


48 75 


James Yictory, 


a 


42 00 


Jerry Ragin, 


a 


23 00 


Patrick Broderick, 


a 


26 75 


Francis 0. C ah ill, 


a 


51 75 


James Hayes, 


a 


28 50 


J. C. Jackman, 


a 


11 25 


Thomas Griffin, 


U <t 


2 25 


Michael Lahey, 


a 


25 37 


Henry Gerar, 


a 


18 00 


Fred. Baslio, 


a 


24 00 


John Rider, 


« 


18 00 


Benjamin Stevens, 


a 


43 75 


Thomas Navin, 


M 


4 50 



79 



To John Kerrin, " 

Patrick Mouehan, " 

George Page, " 

Thomas Cavanagh, " 

John Finnegan, " 

Patrick Doherty, " 

John P. Wilson, " 

Charles Colby, " 

Michael Shea, " 

Michael Scanlan, " 

Henry C. Merrill, lanterns and 
wicking . 

Taylor & Hackett, concrete side- 
walks and crossings 

Hartshorn & Pike, scoop . 

Brown & Fellows, blacksmith 
work .... 

P. 0. Woodman, putting up rail- 
ing on Park street . 

Erastus Cutting, setting curb- 
stone . . . 

Geo.W. Merriam, repairing tools 

J. L. Smith & Co., lumber for 
street crossings 

Byron Stearns, labor 

George Lane, " . , 

Isaac Hammond, labor 

David H. Young, work on cross 
ings . 

J. B. Sawyer, setting grades for 
sidewalks 



Balance to New Account 



$23 25 
88 87 

8 75 
10 50 
18 00 

6 75 
35 50 
20 00 
12 00 
93 74, 

3 10 



529 


48 


1 


00 


13 


54 


56 


76 


4 50 


i- G7 


02 


7 


98 


12 


r- - 

10 


6 


00 


4 


00 


1 


00 


16 


00 


$5,171 


29 


36 


21 



;,207 50 



80 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 


By Balance from Old Account 


$11 31 


Appropriation .... 
Reserved Fund .... 


•100 00 
100 00 


EXPENDITURES. 


To E. C. Howlett, Superintendent 
James F. Smith, " 


827 50 
71 75 


William S. Locke, for labor 


5 37 


tt « u gravQl t 


4 08 


0. N. Mitchell, labor 


1 12 


Kadmiel Haselton, labor 




3 00 


A. C. Stearns, " 




4 50 


Sidney A. Farrar, " 




96 


D. F. Miller, " 




68 74 


C. M. Baker, " 




3 75 


Duncan Kane, " 




13 12 


George Abbott, " 




6 00 


John Campbell, " 




31 25 


E. Kennedy, " 




Q8 00 


Rufus Calef, " 
Peter 0. Woodman," 




2 00 
2 62 


John Mclntire, " 




9 00 


C. N. Harvey, " 




19 50 


A. C. Ordway, " 




4 50 


R. W. Flanders 




1 82 


E. P. Johnson & Co. 




2 50 


John B. Varrick & Co., foi 


■ nails 


; 60 


B. F. Mitchell, labor . 




114 12 


" " " gravel 




14 88 


Jonas and E. S. Harvey, £ 
Ezra A. Mitchell, gravel . 


jjrave] 


1 08 
1 20 



$511 34 



81 



To James A. Weston, running line 
of Calef road 
H. D. Lord, running line of Calef 
road ..... 



Balance to New Account . 



816 00 

12 00 

8510 96 
38 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 

By Balance from Old Account 
Appropriation. 

EXPENDITURES 

To Ira W. Moore, Superintendent 
R. P. Whittemore, labor 
John Calef, " 

John Emerson, " 

John Emerson, jr., " 
John P. Moore, " 

Henry H. White " 

Nathaniel Moore " 

Charles C. Moore " 
Jonas and E. S. Harvey, lumber 
Haines & Wallace 
John B. Varick & Co., spikes 

Balance to New Account , 



8100 63 


250 


00 


842 


75 


8 


75 


3 


00 


7 


50 


7 


50 


9 


00 


3 


50 


1 


50 


2 


25 


47 


46 


21 


75 


1 


10 



8156 06 
194 57 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 



By Appropriation .... 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Wm. W. Dickey, Superintendent 
John Dickey, for labor 
6 



850 00 
22 50 



8511 34 



8350 63 



8350 63 



8400 00 



82 



To Cleaves M. Harvey, labor 
Simon B. Hill, " 

Eben Clark, " 

James Emerson, " 

Jonas Harvey, " 

John Young, " 

William Crosbie, " 
James M. Young, " 
James E. Young, " 
Oilman Harvey, " 

Anson Hartshorn, " 
E. S. Harvey, " 

E. S. Harvey, gravel 
Edward R. Young, gravel 
Haines & Wallace, lumber 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 
use of derrick 



$23 


75 


9 


75 


9 


50 


21 


86 


20 


25 


3 


00 


10 


50 


5 


00 


27 


75 


6 


75 


4 


50 


33 


48 


5 


00 


7 


50 


71 


05 



3 00 



5 14 

64 86 



$400 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 



By Balance from Old Account 


$38 56 


Appropriation . 


250 00 


EXPENDITURES. 


To H. C. Dickey, Superintendent 


$18 12 


I. T. Webster, " 


86 94 


Gilman Clough, for plank . 


14 24 


Clough & Foster, " . 


6 40 


John B. Varick & Co., spikes . 


1 10 


Amos C. Webster, for labor 


14 87 


Peter O. Woodman, " 


1 00 


John Hosley, " 


17 50 



$288 56 



83 



To John Larkin, for labor 


SI 50 


J. M. Webster, " 


40 43 


John Dickey, " 


4 50 


Munroe Leavitt, " 


1 50 


David Dickey, " 


5 25 


James Wiley, " 


9 75 


James M. Dickey, " 


2 25 


Daniel H. Dickey, " 


9 00 


George Whittemore, labor 


4 12 


George Emerson, " 


1 50 


James W. Hills, ; ' 


4 12 


Samuel Bryant, " 


4 75 


William Craig, " 


8 25 


John Johnson, " 


9 00 


Orrin R. Dickey, " 


3 00 


Frank Foss, " 


5 00 


J. Stark Webster, " ' 


8 25 


Nahum Webster, " 


3 00 




$285 34 


Balance to New Account . 


3 22 



8288 56 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 



By Appropriation .... 


$500 00 


Reserved Fund .... 


200 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




To Peter O. Woodman, Sup't . 


8163 52 


Peter O. Woodman, for ten stone 




posts ..... 


10 00 


Peter W. Follensbee, ten stone 




posts ..... 


22 00 



$700 00 



84 



To James A. Weston, surveying Can 
dia road 
Daniels & Co., scraper 
Daniels & Co., bolts . 
E. Morrill, for labor 
George Lane, " . 
M. Goodale, " . 

Robert Stevens, " . 
Orlando Young, " . 
James A. Stearns, labor 
Byron Stearns, " 

Solomon Toby, " 

James P. Eaton, " 
Charles Colburn, " 
-James Hall, " 

J. L. Fogg, 
Isaac Huse, u 

Michael Front, " 

Michael Kelley, " 

Bernard McGinnis, " 
W. W. Whittemore, " 
William Doty, " 

Edward F. Jenkins, " 
L. W. Morse, 
Joseph Currier, " 

Robert Barrett, " 

Walter Kauffer, " 
George Young, " 

R. J. Fillsbury, " 

Walker Emerson, " 
Daniel Croning, " 

James Howe, " 

I. W. Hammond, " 
Charles Lamb, " 

Lester Stearns, " 



S42 00 



17 


00 


7 


01 


2 


25 




75 


1 


12 


4 


81 


1 


69 




75 


1 


12 


6 


69 


5 


00 




75 




37 


53 


87 


57 


33 


16 


25 


16 


87 


30 


25 


2 


00 


5 


25 


16 


50 


32 


25 


8 


25 


19 


44 


1 


50 


5 


25 


26 


00 


3 


75 


13 


50 


15 


62 


1 


00 




50 



87 



85 



To Charles Trask, for labor . 
John Campbell, " 

Ignatius T. Webster, " 
Daniel W. Garland, " 
George W. Merriam, blacksmith 
work ..... 
Clough & Foster, lumber . 



83 00 





00 




75 


3 


00 


4 


70 


34 


89 


8 67 3 


42 


26 


58 



8700 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 



By Balance from Old Account 
Appropriation . 



826 05 
450 00 



$476 05 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Jeremiah Garvin, Sup't 
Robert Stevens, for labor 

George Young, " 

I. W. Hammond, " 

Gilman Reed, " 

Paschal Preston, " 

James P. Eaton, " 

John H. Proctor, " 

J. S. Stocdale, " 

John W. Proctor, " 

Lyman Proctor, " 

Ephraim Young, " 

R. Pillsbury, " 

Zadoc Wright, " 

City Farm, lumber, . 



859 30 

44 12 
61 62 
10 50 

45 46 
1 50 

94 75 

30 50 

8 00 

6 00 

7 37 
19 00 

1 50 

2 00 

3 70 



86 



To L. S. Proctor, labor ... 812 62 
C. H. Wilkins, building culvert 17 00 



Balance to New Account 



$124 94 
51 11 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 



$476 05 



By Balance from Old 


Accoun 


t 


. $130 74 


Appropriation . 


EXPENDITURE 


250 00 




s. 


To "William Boyce, Superintendent 


. $132 74 


Stephen Haselton, 


labor . 


10 50 


John Silver, 


a 




11 00 


G. L. Boyce, 


u 




11 25 


A. Thomas, 


u 




9 00 


D. G. Perley, 


a 




12 50 


E. Foss, 


u 




6 00 


Elijah Goodale, 


a 




3 00 


E. Corning, 


a 




4 50 


N. Corning, 


a 


v 


6 00 


A. Boyce, 


a 




2 25 


William Griffin, 


a 




2 25 


G. W. George, 


u 




13 50 


C. D. Dunbar, 


a 




9 50 


B. W. Corning, 


u 




28 50 


A. N. Scott, 


a 




4 50 


Isaac H. Webster, 


u 




2 80 


Orlando Page, 


u 




3 00 


S. D. Smith, 


u 




1 75 


I. Corning, 


a 




3 75 


J. Hatch, 


a 




3 75 


H. Thomas, 


u 




1 50 



74 



87 



To I. L. T. Boyce, labor 

Edward R. Young, gravel . 

Balance to New Account . 



11 50 
2 36 



8287 40 
893 34 



8380 74 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 



By Balance from Old 


Account 




. 8116 74 


Appropriation . 


EXPENDITURE 


800 00 




s. 


To J. C. Head, Supei 


intendent 


. 8532 23 


H. H. Noyes, for labor 


1 00 


James Collins, 


« 




12 32 


H. H. Taylor, 


t u 




37 


J. C. Osgood, 


a 




7 50 


Z. Coleman, 


a 




8 62 


Barr & Clapp, 


a 




42 79 


William Currier, 


u 




75 


Augustus Wyman, 


a 




10 50 


Columbus Wyman 


a 

• 




2 00 


John Stearns, 


a 




10 '50 


John Collins, 


a 




6 75 


A. Blake, 


u 




28 50 


Peter Geddes, 


ii 




12 75 


Peter Bedford, 


a . 




13 12 


H. S. Sweeney, 


a 




11 02 


E. McLaughlin, 


a 




7 50 


James Gibbons 


a 




3 00 


Wm. P. Riddle, clay 




3 00 


E. Mansur, sharpening too 


Is . 


3 83 


S. S. Moulton, repairing bridge . 


1 87 


Daniels & Co., nails . 




2 40 



8916 74 



88 



To Haines & Wallace, plank for 
bridge .... 
Geo. Dudely, repairing bridge 
Henry Plummer, stone 

Balance to New Account 

HIGHWAY DISTRK 

By Balance from Old Account 
Appropriation . 
Reserved Fund . 



EXPENDITURES 

To Joseph Melvin, Superintendent 
W. H. B. Newhall, for work 
Thomas C. Stearns " 

John E. Stearns " 

Gilman R. Stevens " 

Rodney Hardy, jr., " 

Nicholas Parker, " 

John Horrigan, " 

Michael Mara, " 

Timothy Horrigan, " 

Gustavus Parker, " 

Elijah Stearns, " 

James Webber, " 

t Geo. S. Chandler, " 

John B. Yarick & Co., nails 
David Wells, for posts and rail 

ing .... 
David Wells, plank for bridges 

Balance to New Account . 



$49 


52 


9 


00 


2 


50 


$783 


94 


132 


80 


]T NO. 11. 


$39 13 


700 


00 


350 


00 


s. 

. $315 


00 


28 


50 


. * 80 


Go 


11 


83 


266 


31 


's 


75 

75 


3 


00 


3 


00 


4 


50 


22 


00 


4 


38 


29 


25 


3 


00 


2 


75 


14 


33 


248 


45 


$1047 45 


41 


68 



$916 74 



$1089 13 



$1089 13 



89 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 



By Balance from Old Account 


$68 00 


Appropriation .... 


250 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




To City Farm for labor . 


1199 37 


J.L.Fogg, "... 


36 00 


Joseph Gate, "... 


10 00 


William Mills, "... 


4 50 



1249 87 
68 13 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 

By Balance from Old Account 

Appropriation .... 
Reserved Fund . . 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Wm. Campbell, Superintendent 
Luther Campbell, for labor 
Lorenzo Scagel, 
George Clark, 
George Tufts, 
Joseph Carrigan, 
James Beede 
N. Preston 
Lewis Paravoy 
John Marsh 
Joseph Welcome 
Frank P. Pockett 
O. M. Winegar 



$57 


98 


250 


00 


75 


00 


$114 00 


12 


50 


35 


99 


1 


50 


56 


00 


22 


50 


7 


50 


3 


25 


13 


50 


14 


25 


14 


25 


4 


40 


1 


50 



$301 24 
81 74 



$318 00 



$318 00 



$382 98 



2 98 



90 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 

By Appropriation .... 84,000 00 

Reserved Fund . . . 450 00 

Cash received for gravel . . 196 35 
Town of Bedford, one half cost of 

selling road . . . 12 56 



$4,658 91 
Overdrawn 173 57 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Neal & Holbrook, work on fences 

north side Hanover street . $69 02 

James A. Weston, engineering, 25 50 

Mary P. Harris, removing door- 
steps 9 37 

J. H. Stevens, surveying River 

road . . . ... 2 00 

John D. Riddle, land damage 

(Lincoln street) ... 38 40 

Horace Pettee, land damage 

(Lincoln street) ... 100 00 

A. F. Hall and others, land dam- 
age (Lincoln street) . . 600 00 

Wm. H. Plumer, land damage 

(Lincoln street) ... 456 30 

Heirs of L. V. Bell, land damage 

(Lincoln street) ... 79 70 

Henry Clough, land damage 

(Kennard road) . . . 75 00 

John Kennard, land damage 

(Kennard road) . . . 25 00 



$4,832 48 



91 

To Joseph H. Coburn, land damage 

(Kennard road) . . . $65 00 

Samuel C. Harrington, land dam- 
age (Kennard road) . . 25 00 

John K. McQaeston, land dam- 
age (River road) . . 72 25 

Lucinda McQueston, land dam- 
age (River road) 

Geo. F. Bosher & Co., selling 
River road .... 

Geo. F. Bosher & Co., selling 
Kennard road 

J. T. & D. W. Garland, making 
Kennard road 

Horace Holbrook, making Mc- 
Queston road 

Geo. Porter, making Porter road 
" " laying culvert 

A. H. Lowell & Co., grates for 
Dean avenue 

Taylor & Hackett, concreting 
Dean avenue 

E. G. Haynes, repairing side- 
walk, Hanover street . 

Fogg & James, team to notify 
land owners 

J. E. Bennett, team to notify land 
owners .... 

Fogg & James, team for commit- 
tee 

S. S. James & Co., team for com- 
mittee .... 

Joseph B. Sawyer, engineering, 

J. L. Smith & Co., stakes 

James Patten, Superintendent . 



100 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


390 


00 


142 


00 


40 


00 


40 


00 


21 


75 


67 


80 


7 


87 


5 


00 


3 


50 


8 


00 


2 


00 


30 


00 


4 


00 


51 


00 



92 



To Geo. W. Butterfield 


teamster 


$Q<5 50 


A. F. Quimby, 


u 


TO 00 


Benj. Stevens, 


a 


158 36 


James Kerrin, teamster 


38 50 


Warren Harvey and team 


210 00 


Josiah Harvey, teamster . 


106 00 


City Team No. 1 


• 


111 75 


No. 2 


. 


105 00 


No. 3 ■ 


. 


136 50 


Single 


. 


80 00 


Ed. Bresnalian, for labor . 


60 75 


Edward Prindable, 


t< 


3 00 


Henry Gear, 


(( 


12 00 


Fred. Basho, 


<< 


12 00 


Michael Shea, 


a 


6 00 


John Finnegan, 


a 


3 00 


John Kerrin, 


u 


30 00 


Jerry Ragin, 


a 


12 00 


Peter Scanlan, 


a 


32 75 


Thomas Fox, 


u 


6 00 


Nathaniel Corning 


a 


11 00 


Joseph Carrigan, 


a 


47 62 


Thomas Carrigan, 


a 


38 50 


James Victory, 


a 


38 25 


John McCarty, 


u 


13 50 


Patrick Kelley, 


a 


6 00 


Francis 0. Cahill, 


a 


29 25 


Thomas Brennan, 


a 


1 50 


Daniel Harrington, 


a 


10 50 


James Hayes, 


a 


26 25 


John Larkin, 


a 


121 37 


J. C. Jackman, 


a 


9 00 


, Eben Knowlton, 


a 


33 00 


Patrick Finn, 


a 


52 50 


Michael Scanlan, 


a 


10 25 



93 



To Sylvester Donohoe, labor . 
Patrick Broderick, " 
Patrick Monehan, " 
John P. Wilson, " 

Timothy Sullivan, " 
Daniel Mahanna, " 

Thomas Doherty, " 
William Cook, " 

Patrick McCabe, " 

Thomas Moran, " 

Michael Handley, " 
Morris Horan, " 

Wm. C. Chase, making new road 

near Jail 
H. B. Putnam, use of team on 

committees 
Geo. H. Hubbard, use of team 

on committees 
Kidder & Chandler, powder 



12 
91 87 
93 37 
35 87 
32 37 
19 50 
8 25 
13 50 
45 37 
30 00 
13 50 
27 00 

30 00 

4 00 

6 50 

70 



*4.?-32 43 



PAYING STREETS. 



By Appropriation . 



. $5,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To James Patten, Superintendent . 
Charles Canfield, . . 
James A.Weston, setting grades, 
Moses D. Stokes, paving blocks, 
" " flagging stone, 

James P. Eaton, cobble stone . 
I. A. B. Emerson, cobble stone . 
Henry Clough, cobble stone 
Albert H. Huntress, cobble stone, 



$15 00 

3 00 

86 50 

2,130 16 

18 00 

25 00 

7 50 

7 50 

5 50 



94 



To City Farm, cobble stone 

Haines & Wallace, grade stakes 
T. R. Hubbard, " " 

J. L. Smith, " " 

Warren Harvey, earth 
Hezekiah H. Noyes, keeping 

lights .... 
E. Cutting, paving . 
Warren Harvey, self and team 
E. Mansur, sharpening tools 
John C. Head, Superintendent 
Henry J. Plummer, cobble stone 
David Worthley, " " 

Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 
Josiah Harvey, " 

A. F. Quimby, " 

James Kerrin, " 

John P. Wilson, " 

Benjamin Stevens, " 

City Team No. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3 

Single 
Patrick Finn, for 
Timothy Quinn, 
Michael Shea, 
Michael Scanlan, 
Barr & Clapp, 
William Horton, 
Edward Sweeney, 
John Stearns, 
John Collins, 
William Leonard, 
Ja;nes Victory, 
Patrick Mannahan 



labor 



$31 50 

4 05 

26 14 

2 00 

20 50 

3 00 
860 78 

27 50 

5 35 
118 50 

47 50 
31 00 
27 00 

36 00 
25 00 
18 37 
49 42 
43 74 
40 50 

37 50 
54 00 

21 00 
15 75 

6 75 
31 75 
13 50 

22 50 
9 75 

62 
24 00 

5 25 

6 00 
8 48 

31 87 



95 



To Timothy Sullivan, 


labor 




$1 75 


Joseph Carrigan, 


<< 




19 50 


Eben Knowlton, 


« 




36 37 


Michael Lamundy, 


a 




22 75 


Peter Ferris, 


a 




4 50 


John Larkin, 


a 




54 50 


Sylvester Donohoe 


a 




45 00 


Daniel Mahanna, 


<< 




10 08 


Thomas Fox, 


u 




3 75 


Patrick Nevin, 


a 




3 75 


Peter Scanlan, 


a 




12 50 


J 0. Hunt, 


a 




3 00 


John Carrigan, 


a 




3 75 


Thomas Brenner, 


a 




2 62 


Peter Lahey, 


a 




3 75 


Daniel Harrington. 


a 




3 75 


E. Garnet, 


a 




3 75 


Patrick McCabe, 


a 




23 25 


Thomas Milliet, 


a 




3 75 


John Kerrin, 


u 




15 00 


Levi Woodman, 


u 




3 75 


John Campbell, self and team 


25 00 


Luther Campbell, self and team 


i 10 00 


Henry Gerar, for labor 


4 50 


Fred Basho, 


« 


4 50 


Edw'd McLaughlin 


a 


15 00 


Thomas Carrigan, 


a 


29 50 


Thomas Callaghan, 


a 


6 00 


Joseph Colby, self and team 


10 00 


Patrick Broderick, 


labor . 


43 12 


Thomas Doherty, 


a 


3 00 


E. L. Brown, sharp 


ening tools . 


13 63 


Thomas Moran, 


labor . 


6 25 


James Hayes, 


a 


4 50 


Jerry Ragin, 


a 




28 00 



96 



To Francis 0. Caliill, labor . 
Patrick Man nab an, " 
Timothy Shea, " 



$1 50 
4 50 
2 25 



Balance to New Account 


84,499 80 
500 20 






GRANITE BRIDGE. 

By Balance from Old Account . $ 48 09 
Appropriation .... 200 00 


EXPENDITURE 

To Haines & Wallace, plank . 
Daniels & Co., spikes 
R. W. Flanders, making rods 
Merrill & Aldricb, carpenter worl 
S. S. Moulton, " " . 


3. 

$6 '85 

87 

11 00 

: 6 80 

4 08 


Balance to New Account . 


$29 60 
218 49 






AMOSKEAG FALLS 

By Balance from Old Account 
Appropriation . 


BRIDGE. 

891 91 
300 00 



$5,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Cbarles A. Smith, for lamp . $1 25 
George W. Adams & Son, oil and 

chimneys . . . . 29 26 

R. W. Flanders, for making rods 7 00 

George Hunt, job team . . 1 00 



97 



To S. S. Moulton, making repairs 
Daniels & Co., nails . 
T. R. Hubbard, plank 
Haines & Wallace, plank . 
T. L. Quimby, lighting bridge 

Balance to New Account . 



m oo 




52 


1 


53 


25 


32 


60 


00 


$128 


88 


263 


03 



$391 91 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



By Balance from Old Account 


8782 74 


Appropriation .... 


15,000 00 


Fees received for entering drains 


767 01 


Cash for bricks sold . 


22 00 


Concord Railroad, for building 




sewer ..... 


349 93 


Reservoirs, for bricks 


60 60 


Incidental Expenses, for bricks 




for hay scales 


20 20 


Repairs of Buildings, for bricks . 


101 00 


Cash received for work on pri- 




vate sewers 


14 50 


EXPENDITURES. 




To James Patten, Superintendent . 


$303 00 


Temple McQueston, laying pipe 


1,342 78 


William McPherson, " " . 


1,297 06 


D. H. Nutt, mason work . 


311 55 


S. M. Nutt, " « 


289 00 


L. J. Hoag, " " 


277 00 


D. A. Wilson, " « . 


258 00 


Nathan B. Tilton, mason work . 

7 


219 00 



817,117 98 



98 



To James M. McPherson, mason 
work .... 

Charles Cheney, mason work 
David H. Young, " 

Natt & Wm, F. Head, brick 
H. & H. R. Pettee, cement 
J. S. Kidder & Co., " . 
Leonard Bnrsiel, sand 
A. H. Lowell, for cesspool covers 

man-hole frames, &c. . 
Frost & Kimball, man-hole frame 
H. D. Corliss, lunch . 
Geo. W. Merriam, repairing, tools 
M. D. Stokes, cesspool covers 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 

for iron work 
Library Building, brick 
Samson &■ Marden, work on cess 

pool covers . 
James A. Weston, engineering 
T. R. Hubbard, lumber 
J. L. Smith, & Co., stakes 
S. S. Moulton, making patterns 
John C. Head, Superintendent 
Fred. C. Dow, rubber boots 
Geo. W. Thayer, " " . 
Haines & Wallace, pla-nk . 
Joseph Dunlap, " 

Daniels & Co., nails . 
John B. Varick & Co., nails 
E. Mansur, blacksmith work 
Patrick Finn, for labor 
John Carrigan, " 
Patrick Cullen, " 
Thomas Brunner, " 



838 OO 

8 00 

13 00 

3,240 

1,607 

5 



71 

00 
95 



3 



260 1? 
21 32 

5 00 
55 91 
72 00 

108 80 
100 10 

2 25 

249 50 

9 52 

6 00 
16 ° 

357 
9 



35 
00 



14 00 
5 38 

25 76 

7 59 

75 

10 30 
78 42 
12 00 

11 25 
10 50 



99 



To Patrick Laliey, for 


abor . 


$10 50 


Daniel Harrington, 


a 


47 37 


John Millict, 


a 


20 62 


Zeb. Caouctte, 


a 


3 75 


Michael Driscoll, 


a 


5 25 


Henry Gerar, 


a 


5 25 


Fred Basho, 


a 


5 25 


Patrick Mannahan, 


u 


105 74 


Ed. Bresnahan, 


it 


5 25 


Michael Harrington 


a 


21 75 


Michael Shea, 


it 


184 30 


John P. Wilson, 


a 


60 25 


Jerry Ragin, 


u 


140 42 


Patrick Kelley, 


a 


10 50 


James Fitts, 


a 


19 50 


Thomas Cavanagh, 


a 


5 25 


John Connor, 


a 


30 00 


Patrick Doherty, 


a 


25 50 


Joseph Carrigan, 


a 


85 50 


Francis Carrigan, 


u 


10 50 


Patrick Navin, 


a 


75 24 


Patrick McCahe, 


a 


95 79 


Michael Hanley, 


a 


95 12 


William Griffin, 


a 


183 04 


James Victory, 


it 


118 12 


Thomas Carrigan, 


a 


129 80 


Thomas Moran, 


a 


133 29 


Sylvester Donohoe, 


a 


17 62 


Patrick Broderick, 


u 


19 87 


Michael Foley, 


a 


3 50 


Patrick Early, 


u 


89 99 


Andrew Britton, 


a 


116 42 


Timothy Shea, 


a 


77 29 


Thomas Doherty, 


a 


118 50 


Timothy Connor, 


(< 


100 99 



100 



To Nathaniel Corning, 


labor „ 


828 00 


Artenaas Perkins, 


u 


8 25 


Robert McMann, 


a 


115 24 


Barr & Clapp, 


u 


96 64 


John Stearns, 


a 


73 87 


William Leonard, 


u 


82 87 


Peter Geddes, 


a 


76 87 


Peter Bedford, 


a. 


73 12 


Joseph Condry, 


u 


26 87 


James Coffin, 


a 


3 75 


James Follensbee, 


a 


15 00 


M. G. Moore, 


a 


51 37 


John Collins, 


a 


29 25 


Peter Bordo, 


a 


67 12 


Francis 0. Cahill, 


u 


138 00 


Michael Lanumdy, 


a 


124 77 


P. M. Stevens, 


u 


106 24 


John Kerrin, 


a 


131 30 


Peter Scanlan, 


a 


10 50 


James Hayes, 


a 


35 62 


Isador Grondin, 


a 


6 00 


John Savage, 


a 


97 87 


Patrick Haggert, 


u 


90 37 


John Dealey, 


a 


115 12 


Levi H. Sleeper, 


a 


26 25 


Matthew Owens, 


a 


114 00 


John McCumber, 


a 


2 25 


Mark Ready, 


a 


42 00 


William Connell, 


a 


9 00 


John Ahern, 


a 


41 25 


Frank Hibbard, 


a 


5 25 


Charles Drake, 


a 


19 12 


Edward Hall, 


a 


12 00 


Geo. W. Butterfield, 


teamster . 


13 00 


A. F. Quimby, 


u 


8 00 



101 



To Josiah Harvey, teamster 
City team No. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3 
Patrick Whalan, for labor 
Patrick Moore, 
Patrick Conway, 
John Moran, 
Bernard Donnelly, 
Michael Larkin, 
Timothy Sullivan, 
Eben Knowlton, 
Frank Hibbard, 
Timothy P. Shea, 
George Miner, 
Lawrence McCarty 
George F. Baiker, 
William Comnell, 
John Higgins, 
Patrick S-paine, 
Michael Lahey, 
John Larkin, 
Edward Donnelley, 
Levi Woodman, 
Timothy Quinn, 
Cornelius Shea, 
Benjamin Stevens, 
Joseph George, 
A. Blake, 
Harry Perkins, 
H. H. Noyes, 
E. Cutting, 
James Eastman, 
Edward Wyman, 
James Dowd, 



. $2 00 
19 50 
12 00 
30 00 

101 50 

120 00 

108 50 
83 50 
46 92 
53 12 
48 30 
10 12 
7 50 

116 19 
6 00 

106 12 
19 12 
37 50 
16 50 
41 62 

103 05 
12 25 
19 12 
18 37 
55 12 

7 
11 



zt> 



12 
80 
87 
72 37 
75 37 
13 87 
2 00 
88 18 
50 62 
33 12 



102 



To S. S. Gale, for labor 
Henry S. Sweeney, " 

William Webster, " 

Almon Come, " 

John Welch, " 

John Fletcher, " 

James Harod, " 

Patrick Manning, " 

Owen Kenney, " 

John Savage, " 

Joseph Welcome, " 

Peter Deresher, " 

Peter Gatley, " 

Peter Ferris, " 

Patrick Burke, " 

Patrick Britton, " 

John McCarty, " 

Warren Harvey, " 

James O'Brien, " 



$5 12 
9 00 

1 50 
54 74 

75 

22 12 

23 50 

2 00 
31 50 

13 50 
20 62 

6 00 
6 00 

18 75 
9 00 

16 50 

14 (32 
32"50 
54 14 





616,555 67 






Balance to New Account . 


562 


31 










— $17 


,117 


98 


RESERVOIRS. 








By Balance from Old Account 


$45.") 


34 






Reserved Fund 


200 


00 






Appropriation . 


. 1,000 


00 
&1 


r\rkr\ 


54 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Chas. Canfield, Superintendent . 6*3 00 

" " care of reservoirs, Go 00 

James Patten, Superintendent . 12 00 



103 



To Temple McQneston 


, 'Cemerj 


t pipe 8172 00 


Lamson & Marden, 


stone chips 


1 50 


James A. Weston, < 


3ngineering 


7 50 


William McPherson 


, mason wor] 


l 3 00 


John Kearrin, 


abor . 


17 25 


John Dealey, 


a 




3 00 


Edward Bresnahan 


a 




4 50 


John Larkin, 


a 




4 50 


Sylvester Donohoe 


a 




4 50 


Daniel Mahanna, 


a 




4 00 


Charles Drake, 


a 




7 50 


Patrick Kevin, 


a 




• 17 00 


Joseph Welcome, 


u 




7 50 


John P. Wilson, 


a 




15 00 


Peter Scanlan, 


a 




5 38 


Patrick Britton, 


a 




7 50 


J. 0. Hunt, 


a 




5 62 


Warren Harvey, 


a 




3 GO 


William 'Griffin, 


a 




15 75 


Lawrence McCarty, 


it 




3 00 


Michael Lahey, 


a 




21 00 


Peter Ferris, 


a 




7 50 


Benjamin Stevens, 


<< 




10 50 


Owen Kennedy, 


a 




3 00 


Pelix Russell, 


a 




8 25 


Matthew -Owen, 


a 




3 00 


Joseph Bodroe, 


a 




8 25 


Timothy Qui 1111, 


li 




3 00 


John Rider, 


a 




3 00 


Thomas Doherty, 


a 




3 00 


Thomas Miller, 


a 




6 75 


John McCarty, 


a 




7 50 


Patrick Mannahan, 


a 




3 50 


Michael Lamundy, 


a 




3 00 


Michael Shea, 


a 




8 75 



104 



To Timothy Sullivan, labor 




$3 50 


Jerry Ragin, 


a 




6 50 


Nathaniel Corning, 


a 




3 50 


Patrick Earley, 


« 




3 50 


James Victory, 


a 




1 50 


Patrick Cullen, 


a 




6 00 


Patrick McCabe, 


u 




3 50 


John Connor, 


u 




7 50 


Thomas Carrigan, 


it 




3 50 


Michael Driscoll, 


u 




7 50 


Andrew Britton, 


a 




8 75 


Michael Handley, 


u 




3 50 


Thomas Moran, 


a 




3 50 


Robert McMann, 


u 




3 50 


Francis 0. Cahill, 


u 




6 50 


Timothy Shea, 


a 




7 50 


A. F. Quimby, teamster 




2 00 


City Team No. 


. 




3 00 


A. H. Lowell, man-hole covers . 


117 18 


Geo. W. Merriam, 


blacksmith 




work . 


. 


7 00 


David H. Nutt, mason work 


20 31 


David H. Young, " 


u 


1 00 


Moses D. Stokes, stone covering 


10 00 


R. W. Flanders, blacksmith work 


2 00 


Joseph Dunlap, lumber 


11 64 


H. Forsaith & Co. 


, wrench for 




reservoir on My 


i*tle street . 


7 50 


Alanson Walker, stone work on 




Tremont Square 


reservoir . 


245 36 


Daniels & Co., nails 


and bolts . 


19 55 


Manchester Water 


Pipe Works. 




pipe (Myrtle str 


eet) . 


54 12 


Sewers and Drains, 


for bricks . 


60 60 


S. S. Moulton, repaii 


*ing cot 


T ers . 


47 26 



105 

To Neal & Holbrook, carpenter work, 

E. P. Richardson, work on res- 
ervoirs on Tremont Square . 

Steamer Fire King, work on res- 
ervoir on Tremont Square . 

Steamer Amoskeag, work on res- 
ervoir on Elm street . 

J. C. Young, tarring reservoir 
on Tremont square 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 
for cover .... 

H. & H. R. Pettee, cement 

D. J. Warren, work on reservoir 
at Squog .... 

Clough & Foster, lumber . 



$45 


53 


12 


00 


136 


32 


5 


00 


820 


TO 


10 


88 


4-4 


00 


6 


97 


189 


51 





81,646 18 




Balance to New Account . 


9 16 


81,655 34 






COMMONS. 




By Balance from Old Account 


1299 48 




Appropriation .... 


1,500 00 




Cash for old fence, wood and lib- 






erty pole .... 


32 26 


Sri 821 7J 



EXPENDITURES. 

To James A. Weston, engineering . $68 00 

Warren Harvey, earth for rilling, 44 50 
T. R. Hubbard, grade stakes and 

posts $18 03 

City Library Building, loam . . 15 13 
Haines & Wallace, lumber for 

fence 20 68 



106 



To James Patten, Superintendent 
Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 
Albert F. Quimby, " 

James Kerrin, " 

City Team No. 1 

No. 2 

Single 
H. & H. R. Pettee, cement 
S. S. Moulton, repairing fences 
Daniels & Co., nails and seed 
Hackett & Taylor, concrete, Tre 
mont Square 



Hackett & Taylor, concrete 

over Square 
Hackett & Taylor, concrete 

rimack Square . 
E. P. Coggswell, for labor 

Thomas Carrigan, " 

James Victory, " 

John Rider, " 

Patrick Kelley " 

Thomas Navin, " 

Benjamin Stevens, " 

Edward Prindable, " 

Patrick Finn, " 

Thomas Miller, " 

Richard Long, " 

Jerry Ragin, " 

John P. Wilson, " 

Richard Horan, " 

Zeb. Caouette, . " 
E. Garnet, 

Thomas Fox, ' " 

James Fitts, " 

Peter Scanlan, " 



Han 



, Mei 



827 00 

10 00 

6 00 

5 25 

15 00 

9 00 

8 00 

9 20 
56 88 
12 91 

377 45 

314 59 

400 00 



10 


84 


12 


37 


11 


25 


5 


25 


11 


25 


10 


50 


5 


37 


14 


25 


16 


75 


5 


25 


9 


75 


2 


25 


4 


50 


1 


50 


8 


25 


9 


00 


2 


25 


3 


75 


7 


12 



107 



To James Emerson, 


self and team 


$20 00 


George Hunt 


. 






88 


Sylvester Donohoe, labor 






75 


Patrick McCabe, 


n 




4 


37 


Patrick Mannahan, " 






75 


Henry Gerar, 


a 






75 


John Larkin, 


a 




3 


50 


William Kimball, 


whitewashing 






fences 


• * 




75 


00 




$1,705 


98 


Balance to New Account . 


% 


125 


76 










si 831 74 




[ETERY 


VI ,00 JL 1 -± 


PINE 


GROVE 


CE\ 




By Balance from Old 


Account 


. 


$508 62 


Receipts for Sales 


• 


• 


794 


35 

A1 3H9 07 



EXPENDITURES 

To John H. Maynard, for building 
house .... 
Albert B. Chase, for labor . 
Kadmiel Haselton, " 
Samuel B. Fellows, " . 
Benjamin F. Mitchell, gravel and 

labor .... 
Charles Moore, labor 
J. L. Smith & Co., lumber 
Hartshorn & Pike, repairing well 
Abbott & Kelley, painting . 
Fogg & James, teams 

Balance to New Account . 



$387 


00 


18 


50 


258 


00 


52 
1 


50 


28 


16 


, 


00 


11 


12 


, 4 


00 


o 


37 


19 50 


787 


15 


. . 515 


82 



$1,302 97 



108 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

By Appropriation $10,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Transferred to Reserved Fund . $1,000 00 
Transferred to Account of City 

Teams .... 1,500 00 



$2,500 00 



AMOSKEAG COMPANY NO. ONE. 

To salaries of members . . . $147 00 

Manchester Gas-Light Company, 

for gas ... . 34 30 

Gilman H. Kimball, wood . . 23 62 

Kimball & Hall, " . 12 00 

H. M. Bailey, pipe for cistern . 55 

H. M. Bailey, setting up stoves . 2 50 

H. M. Bailey, lanterns, stove- 
pipe, <fec 16 68 

Temple McQueston, putting in 
cistern .... 

John Larkin, sawing wood 

Edward Bresnahan, sawing wood, 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 
repairs .... 

Locke & Demick, brooms and 
matches .... 

John B. Saunders, making breech- 
ing 

Daniels & Co., for oil, rotten 
stone, &c. .... 

Concord Railroad, freight on coal, 

S. F. Munroe, coal . 

Palmer & Co., repairing pump . 



13 


25 


4 


48 


r 




00 


110 


30 


5 


24 


20 


00 


4 


93 


12 


47 


30 


97 


1 


75 



109 



To Kimball Brothers, oil 
A. H. Weston, jackets 
A. H. Weston, repairing jackets 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . 
Hartshorn & Pike, zinc 



811 63 


T9 


20 


> 3 


50 


54 


60 


o 


17 



8891 14 



FIRE KING COMPANY NO. TWO. 



To salaries of members . 

Manchester Gas-Light Company 

for gas 
Gilman H. Kimball, wood . 
Kimball & Hall, " . 

H. Richards, " . 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
S. F. Munroe, coal . 
Concord Railroad, freight on coal 
John Larkin, sawing wood 
Lane & Dorr, wood . 
Daniels & Co., for oil, hose, &c. 
S. H. Piper & Son, crash . 
John B. Clarke, printing tags 
Palmer & Co., repairing pump 
Kimball Brothers, oil 
George E. Wilson & Co., matches 

and soap 
H. M. Bailey, stove, pipe, &c. 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 

repairs 
A. H. Weston, jackets 
A. H. Weston, repairing jackets 
Gilman B. Fogg, making keys 
Hoyt & Cox, chairs . 



6147 00 

33 92 

23 63 
12 00 

4 25 

54 60 

30 97 

12 48 

6 98 

6 00 

24 91 
3 32 
1 50 
1 25 

11 63 



5 
24 



so 
77 



171 83 

10 88 

4 50 

6 75 

31 50 



$920 52 



110 



E. W. HARRINGTON COMPANY NO. THREE. 



To salary of members . 

Manchester Gas-Light Company, 

for gas 
Gilman H. Kimball, wood . 
Kimball & Hall, " . 

Haines & Wallace, " . 
Haines & Wallace, lumber 
Haines & Wallace, hauling ma 

chine (1 year) 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . 
S. F. Munroe, coal . 
Concord Railroad, freight on coal 
John Patterson, cash paid for 

sawing wood 
A. D. Hatch, carting hose . 
John B. Yarick & Co., oil, pad 

lock, &c. . 
Baker & Fradd, broom and pan 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 

repairs 
Kimball Brothers, oil 
II. H. Fradd & Co. . 
Hartshorn & Pike, zinc 



1457 00 



20 


00 


10 


50 


12 


00 


4 


00 


5 


50 


75 


00 


88 


46 



37 50 
10 00 



2 00 
2 75 



14 
1 



63 
05 



5 00 

11 63 

4 35 

1 96 



BEAN COMPANY NO. FOUR. 

818 



To J. S. Batchelder, Engineer 
A. D. Colby, Foreman 
James Patten, care of engine 
A. F. Quimby, " " 

Manchester Gas-Light Co., gas 
Gilman H. Kimball, wood 
Kimball & Hall, " 



i o 
18 75 
10 40 
21 03 
15 62 
13 66 
8 25 



Ill 



To Lane & Dorr, wood 
S. F. Munroe, coal 
Concord Railroad, freight on coal 
John Larkin, sawing wood 
Amoskeag Man'f'g Co., repairs 
Kimball Brothers, oil 
Daniels & Co., hose, oil, &c. 
Geo. E. Wilson, matches . 
H. M. Bailey, repairs of stove 
A. H. Weston, jackets 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
G. B. Fogg, repairing locks 
Hoyt & Co., chairs . 
Hartshorn & Pike, polish, brush 

and dust-pan 
R. Gilchrist, duster . 



o. ONE. 



PENNAC00K HOSE N 

To salaries of members 

Gilman H. Kimball, wood 
Kimball & Hall, " 

Amoskeag Man'f'g Co., repairs 
Manchester Gas-Light Co., gas 
John Larkin, sawing wood 
T. P. Heath, hauling hose car 

riage .... 
Daniels & Co., oil 
John B. Clarke, printing . 
Win. D. Perkins, carting hose 
Kimball Brothers, oil 



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. ONE. 

To salaries of members . . $707 00 

Manchester Gas-Light Co., gas . 15 74 



$6 00 

30 97 

12 47 

5 50 

14 00 
11 62 
24 35 

3 65 

33 

19 80 

54 60 

1 25 

15 00 

2 38 

IT - 



vU 92 

13 65 

6 00 

38 88 

6 96 

3 48 

10 00 
1 38 



12 


00 


o 
O 


00 


11 


62 



6310 03 



8941 89 



112 



To Grilinan H. Kimball, wood 


$13 65 


Kimball & Hall, " 


6 00 


John Larkin, sawing wood 


5 26 


C. F. Livingston, printing notices 


3 25 


Daniels & Co., oil . * . 


1 75 


H. M. Bailey, globe for lantern, &c. 


1 20 


Hartshorn & Pike, cleaning stove- 




pipe 


1 00 


MISCELLANEOUS. 




To Temple McQueston, putting in 




cistern .... 


$13 25 


C. F. Livingston, printing Engi- 




neers' notices 


16 50 


H. A. Gage, printing Engineers' 




reports .... 


30 00 


E. P. Richardson, examining 




stoves .... 


•42 00 


S. S. Moulton, making ladder and 




repairs .... 


7 00 


Gregg & Dodge, putting up lan- 




tern 


22 51 


George W. Cheney, team . 


6 00 


T. R. Hubbard, blinds for engine- 




house .... 


9 00 


J. W. Whittier, 522 feet hose . 


861 30 


J. W. Whittier, repairing hose 




and couplings . . . 


48 44 


S. P. Heath, teaming 


3 25 


S. S. James & Co., team . 


2 50 


Geo.E. Wilson & Co., matches . 


1 20 


Daniels & Co., nails . 


36 


C. E. Clough, hauling coal 


10 50 



$755 85 



113 



To Plumer & Chandler, rubber coat 
Fogg & James, team 
A. W. Sanborn <fc Co., supply 
wagon .... 



SALARY OF ENGINEERS. 

Edwin P. Richardson, Chief En- 
gineer .... 
Benjamin C. Kendall, Clerk 
Elijah Chandler, Assistant Clerk 
Wilberforce Ireland, " " . 
George Holbrook, " " . 
Andrew C. Wallace, " " . 



810 00 


1 50 


227 00 



$50 00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 



$1,312 31 



S200 00 



RECAPITULATION. 



By Appropriation 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Amoskeag Company No. 1 
Fire King " No. 2 

E. W. Harrington, No. 3 
N. S. Bean, No. 4 

Pennacook Hose Company No. 1 
Hook and Ladder " No. 1 
Miscellaneous .... 
Estimated expense of teams 

Transferred to Reserved Fund . 

Balance to New Account 
8 



$10,000 00 



$894 14 

920 52 

719 33 

310 03 

941 89 

755 85 

1,512 31 

1,500 00 

S7,554 07 

1,000 00 

18,554 07 

1,445 93 



$10,000 00 



124 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



By Appropriation . 


. 


. 


810,000 00 


Amount received from costs an 


d 


fines .... 


. 3,352 47 




fijio oco \1 




Q±0}00-t T: ( 


EXPENDITURES. 


To Samuel Upton, salary for 1869 


) 


Police Justice 


. $1,000 00 


Rent of office . 


50 00 


Wm. B. Patten, City Marshal 


y 


salary 


800 00 


Wm. B. Patten, costs paid 


174 91 


Eben Carr, Assistant Marshal 




salary 


650 00 


Eben Carr, use of team 


193 00 


Eben Carr, paid for feeding pris 




oners .... 


90 51 


Wg 


Id Watchn 


en. 


John D. Howard 




$730 00 


Thomas L. Quimby 






730 00 


Albert F. Quimby 






191 00 


Lucien B. Richards 






466 00 


Patrick Doyle . 






724 00 


Horatio W. Longa 






280 00 


Henry Bennett 






202 00 


James Duffy 






726 00 


William T. Fogg 






730 00 


Hezekiah H. Noyes . 






730 00 


Wm. H. B. Newhall . 






730 00 


Hugh Ramsay . 






544 00 


William D. Perkins 






542 00 


Andrew J. Dickey 






3 50 


Henry W. Powell . 






1 50 



115 



To H. C. Hunton . 






$5 00 


Joel Daniels 






5 50 


Edward Garner 






3 50 


Guy Latham 






1 50 


Page S. Griffin 






5 50 


David Thayer . 






10 00 


Bradley B. Aldrich 






7 50 


Justus N. Tuck 






6 00 


Nathaniel Barker 






6 00 


Albert H. 'Merrill 






2 00 


Orin D. Carpenter 






4 00 


Austin Jenkins 






2 00 


Leonard Shelters 






2 00 


Erastus Cutting 






2 00 


Day Police 




John D. Howard 


44 50 


T. L. Quiinby . 




33 50 


Albert F. Quimby 




84 00 


Lucien B. Richards . 




25 50 


Patrick Doyle . 




30 50 


Henry Bennett . 




554 00 


Horatio W. Longa 




470 00 


James Duffy 




34 50 


William D. Perkins . 




35 50 


William T. Fogg 




24 50 


Thorndike P. Heath 




2 00 


James E. Bailey 




2 00 


Albert H. Merrill 




12 00 


Hugh Ramsay . 




29 00 


Henry W. Powell 




11 00 


Hezekiah H. Noyes . 




17 00 


William H. B. NewhaJl . 




22 00 


David Thayer . 




2 00 


A. B. Smith 






8 00 



116 



To John T. Chase 
Samuel Clark . 
John F. Woodbury 
Hugh Conroy . 
Andrew J. Dickey 
Edward Garner 
Hollis C. Hunton 
Joel Daniels 
Guy Latham 
Geo. W. Nichols 
Page S. Griffin 
Bradley B. Aldrich 
Elbridge G. Woodman 
Nathaniel Barker 
Leonard Shelters 
E. Cutting 

William N. Chamberlm 
Justus N. Tuck 
John Sanborn . 
Or in D. Carpenter 
Austin Jenkins 
Benjamin W. Robinson 
Christopher C. Colby 
John Catlin Smith . 
Geo. W. Cheney, for team 
Fogg & James, team 
Wm. D. Perkins, team to Candia 
S. S. James & Co., team 
H. D. Lord, sawing wood 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
E. P. Johnson & Co., " 
A. B. Corliss, wood . 
J. H. Proctor, wood . 
D. B. Eastman, " . 
J. G. Coult, « . 



n 


00 


6 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


12 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


o 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


o 
o 


00 


O 


00 


o 

O 


00 


3 


00 


2' 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


8 


00 


8 


00 


1 


00 


8 


00 


8 


00 


1 


50 


17 


50 


3 


50 


1 


00 


2 


50 


31 


46 


122 


03 


28 


33 


14 


62 


10 


32 


25 


50 



117 



To James Russell, sawing and put- 
ting in wood . . . $1 25 

Daniel Riley, sawing and putting 

in wood .... 2 00 

Moses Lumber, sawing and put- 
ting in wood 

David Thayer, carrying in coal 

Moses Lull, " " 

Lorenzo Chase, " " 

Thomas Burke, sawing wood 

James Collins, pitch-wood . 

D. IL & S. M. Nutt, repairing 
watch-room and lobby . 

Mary Russell, washing- 
David Thayer, " 

Bridget Reiley, " 

David Thayer, setting glass 

R. C. Hill, posting notices 

Daniels & Co., oil 

Taylor & Kilpatrick, ticking for 
lobby .... 

J. D. Bean, bedding . 

D. B. Durgin, making mattresses, 

H. M. Bailey, repairing stoves . 

John B. Clarke, printing blanks, 

H. H. Noycs, killing and burying 
dogs ..... 

"Win. H. Fisk, stationery . 

H. C. Tilton, " 

B. F. Bennett, blank book . 
Hartshorn <fe Pike, repairing 

stoves . . . . 11 50 

Benjamin Hutchinson, burying 

nuisances .... 4 00 

C. R. Colley, setting glass . . 2 50 



1 


50 


1 


30 


1 


50 


1 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 


23 


50 


1 


50 


2 


01 


o 


25 


4 


00 


2 


50 


3 


80 


o 


74 


4 


00 


1 


25 


19 


17 


94 


55 


5 


00 


6 


95 




75 


11 


00 



118 

To A. B. Burnham, services as De- 
tective at Fair . . . 823 30 
J. L. Kennedy, papering Mar- 

i slial's office 
B. Frank Fogg, piping lobby 

Balance to New Account . 





4 


83 








2 


35 






812 


.402 


G8 






949 


79 










§13 


,352 


47 



LIGHTING STREETS. 

By Balance from Old Account . 8685 62 
Appropriation .... 2,500 00 
Reserved Fund .... 100 00 

$3,2S5 62 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Manchester Gas-Light Co., for 

gas 81,946 42 

Manchester Gas-Light Co., for 

. lighting . . . . 628 37 

Manchester Gas-Light Co., for re- 
pairing lanterns . . . 18 50 

Manchester Gas-Light Co., new 

lamp-posts . . . . 585 70 

John L. Kennedy, lettering lan- 
terns 4 00 

Hartshorn & Pike, repairing lan- 
terns 21 07 

Brown & Potter, repairing lan- 
terns . . . . . 4 95 " 

Abbott & Kelley, repairing lan- 
terns ..... 12 75 



119 



To Ban- & Clapp, oil and chimneys, $15 93 
H. H. Noyes, light oil lamps . 30 00 



83263 69 
Balance to New Account . . 21 93 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

By Balance from Old Account . $298 55 
Appropriation .... 1,500 00 
Reserved Fund . . . . 300 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To John B. Clarke, printing Suncook 
Valley Railroad Bonds 

JolmJ3. Clarke, printing check- 
lists ..... 

John B. Clarke, printing and ad- 
vertising •. 

C. F. Livingston, printing and 
advertising .... 

Henry A. Gage, printing Annual 
Reports .... 

Campbell & Hanscom, printing 
and advertising . 

John W. Moore, printing . 

John W. Moore & Co., printing, 

John V. Sullivan, mucilage 

Alfred Quimby, stationery 

Henry C. Tilton, " 

McFarland & Jenks, advertising 
non-resident taxes 

Win. H. Fisk, blank books and 
stationery .... 



$121 


45 


100 


00 


471 


68 


172 


25 


591 


00 


222 


64 


3 


50 


3 


50 


1 


05 


30 


93 


26 


06 


21 


75 


102 


04 



13,285 62 



82,098 55 



120 



To Wm. G. Everett, blank books for 






police ..... 


$14 m 




L. S. Learned, blank tax-books . 


59 50 




C. W. Farmer, stationery . 


75 




Jasper P. George, " 


69 




Leonard Shelters " 


9T 




B. F. Bennett, blank books and 






stationery .... 


50 10 






$1,999 34 




Balance to New Account . 


99 21 


$2,098 55 







INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

By Balance from Old Account . $3,584 36 

Appropriation .... 3,300 00 
Amount received of Hackett & 

Taylor, obstructing street . 100 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To P. TV. Follensbee, for raising No. 

6 ward-room . . . 35 00 

F. R. French, damage to wagon 

by defect in road . . 4 00 

Western Telegraph Company, re- 
porting time, 1868 and 1869, 20 80 

A. TV. Sanborn & Co., painting 

and repairing hearse . . 81 20 

A. TV. Sanborn & Co., making 

runners for hearse . . 52 30 

Gregg & Dodge, work on water- 
pipe 12 3T 

John Lythgoe, fitting up Ward 5 

ward-room .... 3 00 



,984 36 



121 



To Follensbee & Cross, for work on 

water-works and stable . $1 25 

County Commissioners, expense 

discontinuing old Falls road, 91 29 

Hartshorn & Pike, paper-folders, 2 16 

Wm. C. Richardson, wood for 

ward-rooms . . . 8 50 

A. J. Mayhew, rent of Merri- 
mack Hall for ward-room 

Manchester Post Office, postage, 

E. C. Bryant, right of way across 

his land .... 

B. B. Hill, stamp . 

C. A. Sulloway, costs in Electa 

Lane's case .... 

C. A. Sulloway, extra pay as so- 
licitor ..... 

Dana W. King, searching records 
and making copies 

National Bank Reporter . 

Woodbridge Odlin, for serving 
notice .... 

Cheney & Co., express on pack-' 
ages ..... 

H. P. Watts, sewer license re- 
funded .... 

Joseph E. Bennett, making An- 
nual Report 

Geo. W. Thayer, team to east 
part of town 

Mrs. Electa Moulton, damage to 
person .... 

A. M. Chapin, surveying Maple 
street ..... 



48 


00 


22 


00 


6 


m 


12 


00 


19 


69 


101 


10 


9 


58 


1 


50 


1 


00 


7 


90 


15 


00 


125 


00 


o 
O 


00 


702 


50 


4 


00 



122 

To G. A. Rarasdell, for searching 
records .... 

S. S. Moulton, fitting up ward- 
room ..... 

S. S. Moulton, work on tree- 
boxes ..... 

S. S. Moulton, work on water- 
works ...... 

Horace Gordon, making watering 
trough .... 

P. K. Chandler, expense to Cam- 
bridge, on Court-House 

I. W. Smith, expense to Boston, 

I. W. Smith, expense to Wor- 
cester ..... 

Reed P. Silver, expense to Wor- 
cester .... 

Wm. P. Newell, expense to Wor- 
cester .... 

A. D. Stark, photograph of Court 
House .... 

Elisabeth Dearborn, damage to 
person by defect in highway, 

Geo. A. Martin, damage to prem- 
ises by overflow of sewer 

C. 0. Colby, injury to daughter 
by slipping on icy street 

J. G. King, injury to awning by 
fire from steamer 

Wm. G. Hanson, injury to awning 
by fire from steamer . 

John Aigin, damage to crops by 
Union street sewer 

Fogg & James, damage to car- 
riage by defect in highway . 



$5 


20 


3 


00 


76 


63 


26 


75 


19 


15 


5 


50 


6 


50 


8 


60 


6 


10 


8 


60 


o 
O 


00 


25 


00 


56 


G5 


110 


00 


5 


00 


4 


50 


20 


00 


50 


00 



00 



123 



To Wm. Hayes, damage to person by- 
slippery sidewalk . . $300 00 

Geo. W. Varnum, cleaning ward- 
room .... 

Leonard French, returns of 

births and deaths . . 11 25 

L. B. Howe, returns of births 

and deaths .... 4 50 

W. W. Brown, returns of births 

and deaths ... 9 00 

Geo.W. Manter, returns of births 

and deaths .... 2 75 

Manchester Gas-Light Co., gas 

at No. 4 ward-room . . 20 52 

J. G. Coult, trees on Elm street, 116 00 

H. C. Tilton, books for indigent 

children .... 9 70 

Alfred Q'uimby, books for indi- 
gent children 

Tewksbury & Brother, books for 
indigent children 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood for 
No. 4 ward-room 

G. A. Ramsdell, writ 

Daniels & Co., nails for tree boxes, 

Daniels & Co., two wheelbarrows, 

Charles Canfield, expense to Low- 
ell for horse ... 5 10 

J. R. Hubbard, lumber for tree 

boxes 64 47 

T.R. Hubbard, lumber for troughs 41 06 

Geo. Hunt, carting lumber for 

tree boxes .... 2 13 



7 


80 


21 


12 


2 


25 


2 


00 


17 


70 


13 


50 



124 

Expenses Incident to the President's Visit. 
To H. B. Putnam, expense to 

Boston on committee . $6 00 

Steamer Fire King, sprin- 
kling streets . . 20 40 

Win, D. Perkins, hauling 
hose . . . . 9 00 

Pennacook Hose Co., ser- 
vices watering streets . 

J. C. Nichols, horses 

F. Kimball, horse . 

Amoskeag Fire Engine 
Co., watering streets 

Wm. Shepherd, teams 

S. S. James & Co., teams, 29 00 

Hubbard &Webster,horse, 2 00 

Luther Campbell, water- 
ing streets . . . 14 00 

Timo. Clark, hoisting flags, 6 00 

$197 40 



52 


80 


9 


00 


2 


00 


31 


20 


10 


00 



H. B. Putnam, use of team on 

committee .... 2 50 

J. L. Smith, lumber for tree boxes, 6 78 

J. H. Andrews, serving notice 

upon Samuel Andrews . 3 00 

Fogg & James, team to notify 

juror 2 00 

Palmer & Co., repairing water- 
ing trough .... 75 

Wm. Kimball, whitewashing tree 

boxes ..... 44 68 

Geo. Y. Sawyer, services as coun- 
sel in case of Electa Lane . 115 00 

S. N. Bell, services as counsel in 

case of Electa Lane . . 20 00 



125 

To Kidder & Chandler, powder for 

salute .... $35 50 

Waite Brothers, flannel for car- 
tridges .... 5 25 

First X. II. Battery, firing salutes 20 00 

Hartshorn & Pike, work on wa- 
tering troughs . 2 65 

Daniels & Co., bolts and nails 
for watering troughs . 

Cheney & Co., magnet 

Margaret M. Haynes, on account 
of costs paid by B. C. Haynes, 

David Thayer, expense to Dracut 
to notify landholder 

Thomas Carrigan, labor on hay 
scales .... 

Wm. Griffin, labor on hay scales 

Patrick Finn, " " " . 

Ed. Prindable, " " " . 

Chas. Bunton , iron work on trough, 

H. N. How, work on trough 

James H. Tresillian, damage to 
wife by falling on sidewalk . 

John Q. A. Sargent, work on wa- 
tering troughs 

H. &, H. R. Pettee, cement for 
scales. .... 

Gilman B. Fogg, sealing scales . 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 

iron for troughs ... 6 13 

Wm. McPherson, masonry for 

scales . . . . 23 66 

C. R. Colley, painting tree boxes, 14 22 

Town of Greenfield, State aid . 19 00 



8 


95 


1 


26 


349 


00 


2 


25 


3 


50 


3 


50 


4 


37 


3 


00 


6 


49 




75 


112 


50 


3 


64 


17 


10 


3 


50 



126 



To Fairbanks & Brown, exchange on 
scales ..... 

Geo. W. Merriam, iron work on 
tree boxes .... 

City Aqueduct Company, survey 
of water-works . 

City Aqueduct Company, pub- 
lishing report 

Fogg & James, horse hire 

Fogg & James, water rent re- 
funded .... 

"Win. B. Johnson, water rent re- 
funded .... 

Geo. H. Dudley, fitting up No. 3 
ward-room . . 

Wm. Shepherd, dinner to Legis- 
lative committee 

Samuel T. Foster, making up 
records of City Council 

H. M. Bailey .... 

J. N. Bruce, lettering mile-stones 

N. W. Gove, copying non-resi- 
dent tax-list ... 8 00 

Geo. I. Copp, damage to person 
by obstruction in the street, 

Dana W. King, recording deed, 

Joanna Rourke, gratuity . 

B. P. Cilley, releasing restriction 
on ward-room lot in Ward 
No. 4 

Haines & Wallace, lumber for 
scales ..... 

John B. McCrillis,iron hoops for 
tree boxes .... 



125 


00 


$8 


50 


150 


00 


678 


35 


16 


00 


12 


50 


4 75 


11 


00 


22 


00 


25 


00 


2 


40 


22 


00 



150 


00 


1 


95 


50 


00 


500 


00 


40 


GQ 


36 


00 



127 



To Isaac W. Smith, use of team for 

1869 .... 
Isaac W. Smith, casli paid for city 
Henry French, work on scales 
I. S. Holt, damage to pipe 
Ann Donnovan, cleaning ward 

room .... 
James E. Clough, cleaning vault 
Lamson & Marden, mile-stones 
Randall Page, lettering scales 
William Riordan, fitting up No 

5 ward-room 
J. F. James, perambulating town 

lines .... 
Hartshorn & Pike, work on watei 

rams .... 
J. E. Bennett, cash paid express 
Sewers and Drains, brick for 

scales .... 
J. W. Whittier, hose for water 

tank .... 
E. D. Haclley, enrolling Revised 

Ordinances . 



$92 75 
12 42 

3 32 
15 00 

2 50 

42 00 

14 00 

4 50 

4 50 

GO 00 

75 
1 75 

20 20 

9 00 

25 00 

15,745 00 
Transferred to Account of Mili- 
tia 100 00 

Balance to New Account . . 1,139 3(3 



86,984 36 



CITY HALL AND STORES. 

By Balance from Old Account . $1,034 15 
Appropriation .... 650 00 
Rents 2,002 50 



$3,686 65 



128 



EXPENDITURES. 

To J. Q. A. Sargent, gas fixtures 

and work .... 
H. M. Bailey, gas shades . 
Charles A. Smith, water cistern, 
Manchester Gas-Light Company, 

for gas 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
John H. Proctor, wood 
John G. Coult, " 

John Collins, pitch-wood . 
Wm. C. Shannon, sawing and 

carrying in wood 
David Thayer, carrying in coal 
Daniel Reiley, sawing wood 
John Mclntire, " " 
John Hayes, carrying wood and 

coal .... 
Daniels & Co., oil, shovels and 

varnish 
P. J. Boyd, canvas for awning 
Brown & Potter, setting glass 
Abbott & Kelley, " " 
David Thayer, " " 

David Thayer, repairing door 
David Thayer, washing 
Bridget Reily, " 
Timothy Clark, cleaning . 
David Libby, brooms 
Gilman B. Fogg, making and re 

pairing keys 
John B. Varick & Co., rope, lock 

and varnish 



$15 09 
2 29 
7 75 

455 61 
26 00 
65 90 
14 50 
13 25 
2 00 

2 50 
4 00 

1 50 

2 00 

1 25 

9 10 

16 92 

60 

2 75 
4 50 
2 95 
2 81 

11 75 
1 00 

7 25 

8 35 

9 97 



129 



To S. M. Bennett, repairing plaster- 
ing 

Barton & Co., oilcloth for clerk's 

office . 
Stephen Smith & Co., desk for 
School Committee's room . 
David H. Young, whitewashing 
School Committee's room . 
Merrill & Aldrich, repairs . 
Hall & Swift, laying floor in attic, 
Taylor & Hackett, laying con- 
crete walk .... 
Cheney & Co., 1 Daniels' battery, 
S. C. Forsaith & Co., work on 

city clock . 
Hiram Forsaith, grates 
S. F. Murry, fly-paper 
Johnson & Stevens, pail 
Hoyt <fe Cox, office chair 
Hartshorn & Pike, setting up 

stoves. . 
Geo. H. Dudley, snow-scraper . 

Transferred to Reserved Fund 
Balance to New Account 



9 



$1 


75 


19 


95 


80 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


13 


96 


127 


00 


4 


75 


60 


81 


136 


50 




60 




35 


1 


55 


2 


68 


1 


00 


82,100 


19 


1,000 


00 


580 


46 



83,686 65 



130 



CITY OFFICERS. 



By Balance from Old Account . $100 11 
Appropriation .... '8,500 00 



41 


66 


100 


00 


925 


00 


400 


00 


8 


06 


593 


55 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Isaac W. Smith, Mayor . . 81,000 00 
Joseph E. Bennett, City Clerk . 1,000 00 
H. M. Gillis, Clerk of Common 

Council .... 50 00 

E. D. Hadley, Clerk of Common 

Council .... 
C. A. Sulloway, Solicitor . 
H. R. Chamberlin, Collector of 

Taxes ..... 
H. R. Chamberlin, Treasurer 
H. D. Lord, Messenger 
David Thayer, " 
Stephen Palmer, Health Officer, 

1868 25 00 

Wm. B. Patten, Health Officer, 

1867 and 1868 ... 50 00 

E.H.Davis, Health Officer, 1868, 25 00 

School Board. 
To Joseph G. Edgerly, Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction 
H. T. Mo watt . 
Marshall P. Hall, Clerk . 
Daniel Clark 
Samuel Upton . 
William Little . 
E. D. Hadley . 
James Dean 
T. S. Montgomery 



. fl,350 


00 


10 


00 


45 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00. 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 



88,600 11 



131 



Assessors. 




To Geo. W. Thayer 


$273 00 


Horace P. Simpson . 


163 50 


John F. Woodbury . 


244 50 


Isaac D. Palmer 


163 50 


Timothy Sullivan 


165 00 


Isaac Whittemore, . 


196 00 


Joseph N. Prescott . 


160 50 


Allen Partridge 


148 00 


J. E. Bennett, Assistant . 


204 00 


Overseers of the 


Poor. 


To S. S. Moulton, Clerk . 


$15 00 


Sayward J. Young . 


25 00 


Nahum Baldwin, 18G8 and 1869 


50 00 


Moses E. George 


25 00 


John Sweeney . 


25 00 


Hiram W. Savory 


25 00 


Horatio Fradd . 


20 00 


John Field . 


20 20 


To E. M. Kellogg, Liquor Agent 


$300 00 


R. J. P. Goodwin, City Physician 


, 14 00 


Oscar D. Abbott, " " 


33 33 


Moderators. 




To George H. Colby, 1808 and 1869 


, $6 00 


John P. Currier 


3 00 


Timothy W. Challis . 


3 00 


George Holbrook 


3 00 


William Little . 


3 00 


Holmes R. Pettee 


3 00 


A. C. Wallace, 1868 and 1869 


6 00 



132 



Ward 


Clerks. 


To James M. House ... 85 00 


Leonard Shelters 






5 00 


R. J. P. Goodwin 






5 00 


Jasper P. George 






5 00 


James Hayes . 






5 00 


Silas R. Sleeper 






5 00 


. E. Wallace . 






5 00 


Charles W. Farmer 






5 00 


Selectmen. 


To William McPlierson ... $5 00 


Edward L. Carpenter 




5 00 


Edward Garner 




5 00 


Joseph Simonds 






5 00 


E. G. Woodman 






5 00 


John W. Dickey 






5 00 


George W. Vickery 






5 00 


N. E. Morrill . 






5 00 


Henry French . 






5 00 


Moses Eastman . 






5 00 


Roswell H. Hassam 






5 00 


George Fox 






5 00 


John Burke 






5 00 


William Riordon 






5 00 


Thomas C. Cheney . 






5 00 


Ezra Kimball . 






5 00 


James W. Lathe 






5 00 


George C. Baker 






5 00 


Hosea E. Sturtevant . 






5 00 


Joseph Freschl . 






5 00 



Balance to New Account 



$8,180 60 
419 51 



5,600 11 



133 



By Appropriation 



CITY LIBRARY. 



EXPENDITURES. 



To C. H. Marshall, Librarian, salary, $600 00 

C. H. Marshall, cash paid out . 6 24 

S. N. Bell, rent . . . . 250 00 

S. N. Bell, cash paid ... 116 
Manchester Gas-Light Company, 

for gas . . . . 115 42 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . 71 50 

Trustees of Library . . . 1,000 00 
Rice, Kendall & Co., floor mat- 

ting 81 78 

George W. Merriam, iron work . 1 25 
J. W.- Moore & Co., advertising, 1 00 
C. F. Livingston, printing cata- 
logue 84 00 

H. A. Gage, printing catalogue . 22 50 

Samuel H. Seudder, Memoirs . 4 00 

Wm. H. Pisk, printing . . 64 66 

L. S. Learned, blank books . 5 69 

./Etna Insurance Company . . 32 50 

Phoenix Insurance Company . 25 00 

$2,316 70 

Balance to New Account . . 183 30 



12,500 00 



$2,500 00 



134 



COURT-HOUSE. 



Balance from Old Account 


$931 56 




Appropriation .... 


1,500 00 




Hillsborough County, for wood 






and gas .... 


28 55 




Reserved Fund 


125 00 


82,585 11 


EXPENDITURES. 







To Lamson & Harden, drilling for 
fence ..... 
Geo. H. Dudley, repairing win- 
dows ..... 

E. G. Haynes, work on furnaces 
Abbott & Kelley, setting glass . 
Abbott & Kelley, painting fence, 
H. H. Ladd, clocks and thermom- 
eters 

H. D. Lord, filling tank . 

F. P. Hutchinson, iron work 

J. Q. A. Sargent, repairing pipe 
J. Q. A. Sargent, steam heating 

apparatus . 
F. B. Balch, trees . 
Warren Harvey, earth to till yard 
E. P. Cogswell, grading yard 
E. Garnett, " " 

Patrick Broderick, " " 

City Library Building, for loam 
L. A. Proctor, setting trees 
Julia Finnegan, washing . 
John B. Varick & Co., window 

cords and springs 
Daniels & Co, nails . 



$13 00 

3 00 
3 00 

5 00 
71 22 

16 55 

2 25 

6 25 
50 

1,800 00 
90 00 
11 50 
19 86 

3 00 
3 75 

62 50 
6 00 
5 00 

3 95 

2 38 



135 

To Neal & Holbrook, building fence, 

and repairs 
G. B. Fogg, keys and tags 
Hartshorn & Pike, repairing fur 

naces .... 
Geo. W. Merriam, iron work 
Hoyt & Cox, repairing chairs 
Dickey, Carpenter & Co., ce 

menting basement floor 
Charles A. Smith, pitcher and 

tumbler 
Patrick Finn, sawing wood 
A. B. Corliss, wood . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
Manchester Gas-Light Co., gas 

Balance to New Account 



$124 95 
19 95 

19 54 
2 37 

2 00 

189 73 

1 12 

3 00 

14 87 

15 47 

4 00 

20 90 

2,549 61 

35 50 



$2,585 11 



INTEREST. 



By Appropriation 



EXPEND 



To Coupons . 
Mary P. Harris 
David Austin . 
Merrimack River Savings 
Amoskeag Savings Bank 
City Savings Bank 
Manchester Savings Bank 
Sally E. Burnham 
Mary L. Wilkins and S 

Chandler 
Caroline B. Peterson 



TURES. 



125,000 00 



Banl 



W 



$20,685 00 

240 00 

60 00 

21 50 

21 50 

21 50 

22 93 
15 00 

70 00 
90 00 



:6b 



To Ira B. Osgood . 


$30 00 




Cyrus Hazen 


50 


50 




John M. Harvey 


12 


00 




A. F. Carr 


182 


75 




Cyrus Sargent, . 


472 


00 




Estate of Nehemiah Hunt 


318 


00 




Alvin Pratt . 


45 


75 




Eebecca W. Smith . 


90 


00 




H. D. Lord . 


6 


60 




Sayward J. Young . 


60 


51 




Jesse Gibson . 


325 


74 




Jul m C. Col burn 


94 


50 




J. E. Bennett . 


3 


67 




Rose Ann Lane 


5 


56 




Calvin Vickery 


138 


00 




Solomon Whitehouse 


30 


00 




John Ordway 


300 


00 




"William P. Merrill . 


42 


00 




Rhoda Flanders 


30 


00 




William F. Harvey . 


42 


00 




S. S. Moulton . 


30 


00 






823,551 01 




Balance to New Account 


1,442 


99 








ss-^i 000 


00 






<£>.— yjUuU 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 

By amount of loan January 1, 1869, $'37,301 00 
* Amount of loan for 1869 . . 7,350 00 



844,651 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Cyrus Sargent . 
Sally E. Burnham 
Alvin Pratt 
Sayward J. Young 



83,000 00 

50 00 

1,300 00 

1,200 00 



187 



To Jesse Gibson . 
John C. Colburn 
Joseph E. Bennett 
Rose Ann Lane 
Calvin Yickery 
Alonzo F. Carr 
Cyrus Hazen 
Sophia W. Chandler 
Mary L. Wilkins 



82,600 00 

100 00 

1,000 00 

100 00 

2,300 00 

2,500 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 



$6,650 00 
Amount of Temporary Loan Jan- 
uary 1, 1870 . . . 28,001 00 



811,651 00 



WATERING STREETS. 

. 8500 00 



By Appropriation .... 
Reserved Fund 

EXPENDITURES. 

To A.W. Sanborn, painting carriage, 
Gregg & Dodge, repairs of rams 
and tanks .... 
Abbott & Kelley, painting tanks, 
S. S. Moulton, work on tanks . 
Palmer & Co., work on rams 
Hartshorn & Pike, work on rams 
H. N. Howe, " " . 

B. Frank Fogg, work on tank . 
J. Q. A. Sargent, repairing pipe 

on Spring street . 
Luther Campbell,watering streets 

Balance to New Account 



110 00 



831 25 



8010 00 



6.-) 


78 


25 


60 


8 


00 


19 


12 


o 


80 


o 
o 


00 


9 


44 


19 


49 


410 


00 


8591 48 


15 


62 



8610 00 



138 
LIQUOR AGENCY. 



By Balance from Old Account 


$246 65 






Cash for liquors sold 


765 34 


$1,011 


99 








EXPENDITURES. 








To E. M. Kellogg, cash paid for li- 
cense ..... 


825 00 






E. M. Kellogg, cash paid for 

liquors .... 

Albert F. Lauten, cash paid for 


10 57 






liquors .... 


475 51 








$511 08 




Balance to New Account 


500 91 


$1,011 


99 








INSURANCE. 








By Appropriation .... 


• 


$1,200 


00 


EXPENDITURES. 









To Ins. Co. of N. America, Geo. A. 

French, agt., on Bakersville 

school-house . . . $15 00 
Eq. Fire and Mar. Ins. Co., Geo. 

A. French, agt., City Hall . 35 00 

Home Ins. Co., Geo. A. French, 

agt., High School house and 

furniture .... 80 00 

Home Ins. Co., Geo. A. French, 

agt., Amoskeag Falls bridge 37 50 

Phoenix Ins. Co., L. B. Clough, 

agt., Court-House . . 30 00 



139 

To Phoenix Ins. Co., L. B. Clough, 

agt., Spring st. school-house, 815 75 

Phoenix Ins. Co., L. B. Clough, 
agt., Franklin street school- 
house 23 25 

Phoenix Ins. Co., L. B. Clough, 

agt., brick engine-house . 11 25 

Phoenix Ins. Co., L. B. Clough, 

agt., engine-house stable . 15 00 

National Ins. Co., L. B. Clough, 

agt., High School house . 30 00 

./Etna Ins. Co., Herman Foster, 
agt., Manchester st. engine- 
house . . . • . 5 25 

./Etna Ins. Co., Herman Foster, 
agt., High School house and 
furniture .... 30 00 

./Etna Ins. Co., Herman Foster, 
agt., Franklin street school- 
house .... 23 25 

iEtna Ins. Co., Herman Foster, 

agt., Spring st. school-house 15 75 

iEtna Ins. Co., Herman Foster, 

agt., brick engine-house . 22 50 

./Etna Ins. Co., Herman Foster, 

agt., Amoskeag Falls bridge, 37 50 

./Etna Ins. Co., Herman Foster, 

agt., City Hall . . . 73 00 

jEtna Ins. Co., Herman Foster, 

agt., Almshouse barn . 28 00 

./Etna Ins. Co., Herman Foster, 

agt., Almshouse . . 15 75 

Quincy Mut. Fire Ins. Co., E. P. 
Richardson, agent, Court- 
House .... 11 25 



61') 


00 


15 


00 


20 


00 


15 


00 



140 

To Merchants' and Farmers' Mut. 
Fire Ins. Co.,E. P. Richard- 
son, agt., Court-House 

Niagara Ins. Co., E. P. Richard- 
son, agt., High School house, 

Niagara Ins. Co., E. P. Richard- 
son, agt., two-story school- 
house, Ward 7 . 

Security Ins. Co., E. P. Richard- 
son, agt., High School house 

North American Ins. Co., E. P. 
Richardson, agent, Interme- 
diate School house .. . 25 00 

North American Ins. Co., E. P. 
Richardson, agent, No. 3 en- 
gine-house .... 21 00 

Republic Ins. Co.,E. P. Richard- 
son, agt., engine-house, Vine 
street .... 26 50 

Bay State Ins. Co.,E. P. Richard- 
son, agent, Merrimack street 
school-house . . . 18 75 

Bay State Ins. Co.,E. P. Richard- 
son, agt., new hearse . . 15 00 

Niagara Ins. Co., E. P. Richard- 
son, agent, South Squog 
school-house . . . 12 00 

Howard Ins. Co., B. P. Cilley, 
agt., Merrimack street school- 
house .... 18 75 

Howard Ins. Co., B. P. Cilley, 

agt., old High School house 7 50 

Howard Ins. Co., B. P. Cilley, 

agt., Spring st. school-house 7 50 



141 

To Howard Ins. Co., B. P. Cilley, 
agent, Wilson Hill school- 
house .... $6 00 

Howard Ins. Co., B. P. Cilley, 

agt.j Granite bridge \ . SO 00 

Shoe and Leather Dealers' Ins. 
Co.,B.P. Cilley, agt., Gran- 
ite bridge .... 30 00 

Springfield Fire and Marine Ins. 
Co., I. W. Smith, agt., High 
School house ... 30 00 

Springfield Fire and Marine Ins. 
Co., I. W. Smith, agent, old 
High School house . . 20 00 

Springfield Fire and Marine Ins. 
Co., I. W. Smith, agt., Blodg- 
ett street school-house . 11 25 

Springfield Fire and Marine Ins. 
Co., I. W. Smith, agt., fur- 
niture in Merrimack st. and 
Intermediate school-houses . 8 00 

Springfield Fire and Marine Ins. 
Co., I. W. Smith, agt., ward- 
room, engine-house, engine 
and supplies, Ward 7 . . 21 00 

Springfield Fire and Marine Ins. 
Co., I. W. Smith, agt., City 
Hall 35 00 

Yonkers and New York Fire Ins. 
Co., I. W. Smith, agt., steam 
fire engines and fire appara- 
tus 26 50 

Manhattan Ins. Co., E. T. Ste- 
vens, agt., Park st. school- 
house . . . . 18 75 



142 

To City Fire Ins. Co., Hartford, N. 
E. Morrill, agt., Park street 
school-bouse . . . $25 00 
City Fire Ins. Co., Hartford, N. 
E. Morrill, agent, old High 
School house . . . 11 25 

Peoples' Fire Ins. Co., E. M. 

Topliff, agt., Court-House . 31 00 



$1,025 75 
Balance to New Account . . 174 25 

81,200 00 



LAND SOLD FROM FARM. 

By Balance from Old Account . $418 74 

Cash of Sarah H. Bradley, bal. 



for lot .... 


358 50 




Chas. Canfield, second payment 






for lot .... 


103 11 




D. P. Beattie, second payment 






for lot .... 


62 25 




A. A. Bnnton, second pay men 




• 


for lot .... 


62 20 


$1,004 80 






EXPENDITURES. 






To Lamson & Marden, land-marks . 


$4 00 




Gity Farm, for building Bridge 






street ..... 


100 50 




City Farm, for fencing lots 


221 90 




Robert Stevens, building Bridge 






street ..... 


16 00 






$342 40 




Balance to New Account 


662 40 


$1,004 80 



143 



MILITIA. 



By Balance from Old Account . $82 16 
Appropriation .... 400 00 
Transferred from Incidental Ex- 
penses . . . . 100 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Sheridan Guards, bal. to Jan- 
uary 1,1869 ... . 835 16 
Clark Guards, to April 17, 1869, 50 00 

Head Guards, to April 17, 1869, 50 00 

Amoskeag Veterans, to April 

17, 1869 .... 50 00 

Abbott & Kelley, paint- 
ing armory . . $100 00 
B. F. Fogg, piping ar- 
mory . . . 20 02 
Henry French, repair- 
ing armory . . 129 98 
Dickey, Carpenter & Co. 15 48 265 48 



8450 64 
Balance to New Account . . 131 52 



EEPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 

By Appropriation .... $500 00 
Transferred from Reserved Fund, 1,200 00 



$582 16 



$582 16 



$1,700 00 



144 



EXPENDITURES. 

To T. R. Hubbard, for blinds on 

Vine street engine-house . $15 00 

Temple McQueston, cistern at 

engine-house, Vine street . 13 12 

S. S. Moulton, repairing engine- 
house, Vine street . 13 88 

E. Cutting, stone work, engine- 
house, Vine street . 2 30 

Dickey, Carpenter & Co., mason 

work, engine-house, Vine St. 93 TO 

John C. Young, repairing roof, 

engine-house, Vine street . 372 96 

Daniels & Co., hails and butts, 

engine-house, Vine street . 9 00 

Palmer & Co., piping, engine- 
house, Vine street . 9 75 

Neal &, Holbrook, carpenter work, 

engine-house, Vine street . 48 06 

Wm. H. Fisk, paper-hangings, 

engine-house, Vine street . 22 46 

Hartshorn, conductor, engine- 
house, Vine street . . 4 42 

T. B. Brown, hanging paper, en- 
gine-house, Vine street . 4 50 

Abbott & Kelley, setting glass, 

engine-house, Vine street . 2 85 

Charles R. Colley, painting en- 
gine-house, Vine street . 263 74 

Richardson & Co., painting No. 

3 engine-house . . . 181 45 

Haines & Wallace, lumber at No. 

3 engine-house . . . 64 08 

Merrill & Aldrich, repairing No. 

3 engine-house . . . 38 75 



145 



To D. J. Warren, repairing No. 3 

engine-house . . . $11 50 

H. & H. R. Pettee, lime and ce- 
ment, Manchester street en- 
gine-house . . . . 26 25 

City Farm, stone for Manchester 

street engine-house . . 7 50 

Oilman B. Fogg, key, Manches- 
ter street engine house . 1 00 

P. W. Follensbee, moving Man- 
chester street engine-house . 94 00 

James Patten, work on Manches- 
ter street engine-house . 36 00 

Michael Shea, work on Manches- 
ter street engine-house . 24 75 

Wm. Griffin, work on Manches- 
ter street engine-house . 10 50 

Ed. Bresnahan, work on Man- 
chester street engine-house . 2o 25 

Benj. Stevens, work on Manches- 
ter street engine-house . 7 50 

James Victory, work on Man- 
chester street engine-house . 9 00 

Sylvester Donohoe, work on Man- 
chester street engine-house . 7 50 

Patrick Finn, work on Manches- 
ter street engine-house . 24 75 

John P. Wilson, work on Man- 
chester street engine-house . 7 50 

Josiah Harvey, work on Man- 
chester street engine-house . 24 00 

City Team, No. 3, work on.' Man- 
chester street engine-house . 18 00 

David II. Nutt, brick-work on 

Manchester St. engine-house, 22 00 

10 



146 

To Samuel M. Nutt, brick- work on 

Manchester St. engine-house, $22 00 

D. A. Wilson, brick-work on Man- 
chester street engine-house . 21 00 

Sewers and Drains, bricks for 

Manchester St. engine-house, 101 00 



$1,659 02 
Balance to New Account . . 40 98 



DOG TAX. 



By Balance from list of 1867, Jan. 

1,1869 .... $200 00 
Amount collected during the year 7 00 

Balance from list of 1868, Jan. 

1, 1869 . . . . 114 00 
Amount collected during the 

year 88 00 

Amount collected on list of 1869, 166 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Gilman H. Kimball, sheep killed, $10 60 
O. M. Winegar, sheep killed and 

damaged . . . . 60 00 



$70 60 
Balance to New Account . . 504 40 



LIBRARY BUILDING. 

By Balance from Old Account . $5,000 00 
Appropriation .... 7,500 00 



$1,700 00 



$575 00 



$575 00 



147 



By Transferred from Reserved Fund, $4,500 00 
Sewers and Drains, for bricks . 100 00 
Sundry Appropriations . . 119 1 



817,219 23 



EXPENDITURES. 

For Grading and Excavating 
To Reed P. Silver, foreman . 
Louis Gear 



Martin Spane . 
Artemas Perkins 
John McCarty . 
Michael Howett 
Michael Carrigan 
Daniel Harrington 
Henry Matthews 
Thomas Moran . 
Thomas Horan . 
William Griffin 
Thomas Fox 
Robert Murray . 
Thomas Shea . 
Patrick McCabe 
Patrick Kelley . 
Moses D. Stokes 
Thomas Carrigan 



J. L. Smith, lumber for targets 
S. S. Moulton, setting targets 

and making patterns . 
Daniels & Co., nails and lead 
M. D. Stokes, foundation . 
Wm. H. Fisk, frame and mount 

ing elevation 
N. & Wm. F. Head, brick 
Wm. McPherson, putting well 
D. C. Hutchinson, cutting tablet, 



72 87 
6 25 
40 12 
88 62 
37 87 
6 37 
19 12 
87 12 
3 00. 

30 74 
1 50 

24 00 

31 50 
16 50 
13 50 



1 

1 
141 

9 



50 
50 
37 



21 26 

38 00 
16 92 

3,528 22 



5 
8,327 



62 
10 
5 16 
75 00 



148 



To A. H. Lowell, castings 

Alpheus Gay, erecting building . 
Hartshorn & Pike, tinning roof 

to tower .... 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

iron work .... 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

galvanized mouldings . 



1353 04 


8,000 


00 


80 


37 


7 


78 


532 


99 



Balance to New Account 



,523 16 
69G 07 



817,219 23 



CEMENT PIPE ON HANOVER STREET. 
By Appropriation . . ' . $3,000 00 

" Cash for old pipe sold . . 214 10 



EXPENDITURES. 

To James A. Weston, engineering, 



James Patten, Su'p't, excav 
Daniel W. Fling 
J. C. Jack man . 
Patrick McCabe 
Michael Lahey . 
Patrick Erode rick 
Stephen Spane . 
Jerry Ragin 
Dennis Shea 
Thomas Ryan . 
Patrick Kelley . 
Cornelius Cronan 
Nathaniel Corning . 
Michael Handley 
Charles Spalding 
John Connor 
Thomas Fox 



ation, 



839 


50 


52 


50 


25 


00 


4 


50 


25 


50 


33 


25 


G 


00 


18 


00 


22 


12 


21 


00 


8 


25 


14 


25 


11 


25 


6 


25 


18 


00 


6 


00 


G 


00 


4 


50 



80,214 10 



149 



To Thomas Griffin 
Artemas Perkins 
John McCarty . 
Dennis Harrington 
Charles Colby . 
B. C. Hastings . 
Patrick Lee 
Michael Shea . 
Patrick Navin . 
Daniel Harrington 
John P. Wilson 
William Griffin 
Thomas Moran . 
Patrick Earley . 
James Luther . 
Thomas Brannon 
Michael Kelley . 

Shepherd 

James Hayes . 
James Victory . 
Patrick Collety . 
Thomas Carrigan 
Patrick Monehan 
Thomas Miller . 
Joseph Carrigan 
Malachi Bohan . 
Moses Lumber . 
Patrick Finn . 
Richard Long . 
Henry Gcrar 
Fred Basho 
Joseph Rermey 
Win. Fitzgerald 
Riehard Horan . 
Thomas Navin . 



<JP<J 


00 


Q 


00 


4 


50 


16 


50 


7 


50 


4 


75 


7 


50 


5 


25 


5 


25 


5 


25 




00 


7 


00 


5 


25 


3 


50 


10 


50 


31 


50 


7 


50 




88 


12 


00 


5 


25 


7 


50 


Q1 
OX 


50 


Q 




00 


16 


50 


4 


50 


16 


12 


1 


50 


37 


62 


28 


50 


19 


50 


19 


50 


12 


00 


12 


75 


26 


25 


97 


7.) 



150 

To Cornelius Crane 

James Buckley .... 
M. D. Stokes, man-bole cover . 
J. Q. A. Sargent, putting in pipe 
and gauges .... 
Hartshorn & Pike, cementing 
pipes ..... 
Manchester Wrought-Iron and 
Cement Water Pipe Co., for 
pipe ..... 
Charles Bunton, iron work 
S. S. Moulton, making boxes 
E. Cutting, laying reservoirs 
H. & H. R. Pettee, cement 
Dickey, Carpenter & Co., build- 
ing well .... 

A. II. Lowell, castings for covers, 
D. II. Young, brick-work . 

B. F. Fogg, fitting pipe 

W. W. Hubbard, turning plug . 
City Library Building, stone 



•15 


00 


15 


75 


10 


00 


52 


97 


4 


50 


,741 


46 


1 


50 


5 


00 


410 


67 


G 


I 


13 


GS 


13 


39 


o 


oo 


c 


17 




50 


24 


00- 



$3,059 3a 
Balance to New Account . . 159 77 



83,214 00 



IRON FENCE ON MERRIMACK SQUARE. 
By Appropriation 84,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To J. A. Weston, engineering . $"40 50 

Isaac W. Smith, expense to Con- 
cord 12 95 

J. L. Smith, for lumber for tar- 
gets 4 55 



151 



To Erastus Cutting, for stone base . 81309 38 
A. JJ. Lowell, & Co., for iron 

fence 1100 00 



$2467 ■ ■ 
Balance to New Account . . 1532 <J2 

84,000 00 



DIS< OUNT ON TAX! - 

By Balance from Old Account . $358 87 
Appropriation . 
ll< : ^w<:d Fund . . , . 640 00 

15 - -: 

EXPENDITUR] 

To allowed discount to sundry tax- 

yers ... 5 85 

Balance to New Account . . 30 02 

- H 



PAYMENT OF CITY DEBT. 
! Appropriation 

EX] IBS. 

To debt for Sigh School ii 

Amoskeag Sa^ ings Bunk . 14300 00 

Manche - ings Bank . . 4300 00 

City Savings Bank . . . 4300 00 

Merrimack River .Savings Bank, 4300 00 



$17,200 00 
Balance to New Account . . 2,800 "' 

— $20,000 00 



152 



SUXCOOK VALLEY RAILROAD. 
By Appropriation «$50,€S0Q 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Suncook Valley Railroad . $25,000 00 
Balance to New Account . 25,000 00 

850,000 00 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 
By Balance from Old Account . 

EXPENDITURES. 



<5,214 7-4 



List of Sdiool-House Taxes in Old District No. 8. 



To Bell, Joseph . 






$0 45 


Clough, Harrison M. 




2 77 


Collins, Margaret 






1 62 


Crombie, James M. . 






4 01 


Day, Patrick O. 






2 39* 


Dickey, David . 






2 48 


Farmer, Peter . 






11 16 


Farrington, Isaac J. 






6$ 


First National Bank 






1 80 


Fogg, William T. 






99 


Grimshaw, Evan H. 






1 49 


Garvin, Jeremiah 






3 47 


Goodrich, Ira . 






5 81 


Hall, Daniel 






90 


Hall, Samuel . 






GS 


Hammond, Isaac W. 






3 83 


Haselton, John A. 






2 13 


Haselton, James T. 






2 03 


Huse, Isaac 






81 


Jones Jeremiah B. 






36 



106 



To Jackson, Obadiah 


$0 81 


Jones, Sylvester 


32 


Johnson, Nathan 


09 


Elliott, John S. 


1 80 


Lougee, Frederick C. 


3 47 


Mills, William C. . 


4 64 


Maynard John H. 


36 


Noyes Hiram D. 


2 1(3 


Offutt, Charles . 


1 08 


Offutt, Edward P. . 


14 31 


Phikerton, George W. 


32 


Preston, Paschal 


4 70 


Preston, Henry M. . 


2 05 


Proctor, John II. . . . 


7 34 


Proctor, Augustus 


1 13 


Proctor, Lyman A. . 


1 80 


Proctor, Thomas W. . 


1 89 


Proctor, Luther S. 


21 92 


Parshley, William 


4 68 


Porter, George . 


32 


Prouty, Thomas S. . 


3 38 


Pillsbury, Randall J. 


3 15 


Reed, Gilman . 


5 30 


Peed, Noah B. . . '. 


3 87 


Bobbins, John . 


68 


Stockdale, James 


3 92 


Stevens, Frederick . . 


68 


Smith, William 


1 98 


Spofford, Amos 


2 39 


Stevens, Horace 


1 10 


Stearns, Thomas K. . 


1 04 


Sawtelle, Franklin, heirs of 


2 43 


Tobie, Solomon 


81 


Wilson, Mary . 


5 13 


Wilson, Freeman 


QS 



154 



To Wilson, Eugene F. . 
Wood, Jonathan 
Wright, Zacloc B. 
Wright, Alfred . 
Whittemore, Aaron F. 
Whittemore, William W. 
Young, John C. 
Young, John P. 
Young, Ephraira S. 
Young, Joseph B. 
Young, George . 
Haselton, Kadraiel 
Clark, John, heirs of 
Deny National Bank 
Eastman, Charles H . 
Moor, Cyrus 
Jones, Levi 
George Young . 



11 08 

2 97 

68 

68 

1 62 

1 62 

45 

7 52 

1 85 

2 07 
6 44 

68 

2 25 

2 21 

1 35 

13 50 

23 

54 





List of 1865. 




Horace P. Willey 


. 


$9 58 


Benjamin L. Winn 


. 


70 55 


Jacob Peavey, 70 


List of 1866. 


5 22 






Jacob Peavey, 70 


. . . 


$5 84 


Ignace Anges . 


. 


5 84 


Patrick McLaughlin, 70 . 


6 38 


Thomas P. Pierce 


. 


50 40 



List of 1867. 

George B. Clement, minor . $4 91 

Philip Reiley .... 4 91 

Parker French .... 4 91 



8209 37 



$85 30 



$68 46 



155 



To Galen Eastman 


U 91 


Moses Wadleigh 


4 91 


John V. Gooden 


3 00 


Patrick McLaughlin . 


4 91 


Albert J. Shattuck . 


4 91 


Ignace Anges . 


4 91 


Oliver IT. Abbott 


4 91 


Murty Mahoney, 70 . 


4 91 


Marvin Win gate 


4 91 


Leonard Sanborn 


4 91 


Alexander Cooper 


4 76 


William Boynton, 70 


4 61 


Michael Sullivan 


4 91 


James P. Carpenter . 


4 91 


Harvey Goodwin . . . 


2 00 


List of 1868 




Austin G. Fuller 


$3 15 


Solon Densmoore 


3 15 


G. D. Young . 


3 15 


Patrick Broderick, 70 


3 15 


Franklin McKinley . 


3 15 


Reuben Howett 


3 15 


William Riordon 


1 00 


Albert George . 


2 00 


William Q. Young, . 


3 02 


Alonzo Wells . 


3 15 


E. Parker French 


3 15 


John Hatch . 


10 21 


John Peacock . 


3 15 


B. F. Martin . 


26 25 


E. S. Peabody . 


21 00 


Alexander Young 


Q 1 K 


Samuel Blood . 


3 15 



$$83 21 



156 



To S. N. Bell . 


$1 38 


John Hartwell . 


3 15 


Martin Spane . 


3 15 


Frank Pitts . 


3 15 


Nathaniel Herrick . 


1 00 


Geo. W. Darrah ... 


•3 15 


Samuel A. Folch 


3 15 


Frank P. Carpenter . 


6 30 


Wm. II. Gate . 


3 15 


John Cavanagh 


3 15 


Henry C. Dickey 


3 15 


Charles W. Stevens, minor 


3 15 


Charles L. Harmon . 


3 15 


F. J. Drake . 


3 15 


William Campbell 


3 00 


Elbridge Wason 


3 15 


Charles Johnson 


5 25 


Orrin Carlton . 


3 15 


I. P. Fellows 


1 00 


F. L. Wallace . 


3 15 


J. E. Marble . 


1 00 


Dudle}' Lougee 


3 15 


Albert Shattuck 


3 15 


Wm. D. For son 


3 15 


Daniel Murphy 


1 00 


Thomas Regney, minor 


3 15 


Ignace Anges . 


4 15 


George C. Hoyt, minor 


3 15 


Edward Kennedy 


3 15 


Jesse M. Coburn 


3 15 


John P. Cram . 


3 15 


Lyman Colby 


3 15 


Harrison G. Kimball 


3 15 


B. F. Martin .... 


10 50 


Albert A. Buxton 


3 15 



157 



To Patrick A. McLaughlin, 70 


$3 15 


Jesse F. Williams 


3 15 


Nathan Wilkins, minor 


3 15 


Thomas Moulton 


3 15 


Curtis T. Moulton . 


3 15 


John L. Foster 


3 15 


D. Savory 


3 15 


Murty Mahoney, 70 . 


3 15 


Dennis Sullivan 


3 15 


Franklin Parker 


3 04 


Edward E. Parker 


3 04 


Charles Parker 


3 04 


Charles Philips 


3 15 


John Adams, minor . 


3 15 


Charles M. Bailey, minor . 


3 15 


John B. Bailey 


3 15 


Michael Markey, 70 . 


3 15 


Plummer Page . 


3 15 


Joseph Vervail 


3 15 


N. A. Wright . 


3 15 


Charles W. Wingate 


3 15 


William Watts, minor 


3 15 


John A. Stevens, minor 


3 15 


Lewis E. Phelps 


3 15 


Henry W. Moore 


3 15 


Horace Tobie 


3 15 


R. C. French 


3 15 


John C. French 


3 15 


Charles Fletcher, minor 


3 15 


Charles Butterfly 


3 02 


Thomas Cavanagh, 70 


3 15 


Charles W. Clough, minor 


3 15 


David Burbank 


3 15 


John V. Gooden 


3 00 


Freeman N. Thurbur 


3 15 



158 



John Carter . 
Ira Bryant . 

William H. Blackburn 
Arthur M. Eastman . 
Charles Yeterlin 
George Young . 
Charles Adams 

List of 1869 

Joseph Goodwin, jr. . 

George Savery . 

Ephraim Hill, minor 

George B. N. Dow, minor 

George McAlister, minor 

Michael Larkin 

Joseph F. Gilman, minor 

Byron B. Tobie, minor 

Charles Chase . 

Isaac W. Smith 

J. M. Sanborn . 

Almira Williams 

Mary Kelliher . 

William Whittle 

John Haggerty, minor 

Cook & Miller . 

Wm. J. Holmes 

Cheric Gervais, minor 

Joseph Gervais, minor 

Ralph H. Sargent, minor 

John S. Elliott . 

Byron Richardson 

Daniel Goold, 70 

William B. Emerson, minor 

Patrick Rossiter 

John Sheehan, minor 



m 


00 


o 


15 


18 


90 


6 


30 




15 


3 


93 


o 
o 


15 


81 00 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


21 


80 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


73 


1 


00 


o 


48 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


16 


12 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


o 
i) 


72 


O 


72 



8362 68 



159 



To John Kerrin 
Alonzo Clark 
John Dan forth . 
Alston W. Cheney 
James Livsey . 
John Roby 
Donald Macoy . 
Joshua T. Taylor 
Samuel Upton . 
Estate of J. L. Davis 
Charles C. Frost 
John B. Varick 
Ed. L. Houlton 
Lewis W. Barrows 
James Bowker . 
Patrick Earley 
Hamilton Melendy 
Charles M. Stevens 
Alfred A. Colby 
Thomas P. Frost 
Daniel Logue . 
John Baker 
Jacob Miller 
Jonas Page 
John Johnson . 
Edward McLaughlin 
A. J. Rowe 
Robert H, Wilson 
Charles A. Swain 
Wm. B. Clark . 
William Walker 
George P. Amsden 
William Dignam, 70 
George W. Darrah . 
Ferdinand PfefTerkoon 



$3 72 


39 


68 


3 


72 


3 


72 


O 

o 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


24 


80 




80 


3 


48 


2 


48 


1 


73 


2 


48 


1 


24 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


6 


20 


6 


20 


3 


72 



3 72 
3 72 
3 72 



160 



To Frederick A. Mitchell, 70 
Harvey Goodwin 
Obadiah Jackson 
Frank F. Downs 
Win. E. Eastman 
John H. Cooper, minor 
John F. Adams 
Edward Bresnahan, TO 
Albert J. Elliott 
Daniel McCarty 
Dnstiri L. Jenkins 
George Griswold 
Clinton W. Stanley . 
Geo. H. Hubbard 
Sarah P. Pulsifer 
William S. Jones 
George Parker 
George Taft 
William II . Martin . 
Amos Balch 
Daniel Sanborn 



$3 72 

3 72 

4 22 
3 72 



i 
3 


44 

72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


4 


96 


4 


96 


2 


48 


4 


96 


4 


96 


3 


72 


3 


72 


16 


12 




75 


12 


40 


12 


40 



8373 85 



Balance to New Account . 



$1,182 92 
4,031 82 



$5,214 74 



161 

SCHOOL-HOUSE AT GOFFE'S FALLS. 
By Appropriation $2,500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 






To James A. Weston, locating house, 


$27 50 




E. Cutting, " " . 


6 00 




E. Cutting, foundation 


477 75 




John P. Moore, land 


100 00 




E. P. Johnson, lumber for tar- 






gets ..... 


2 71 






$613 96 




Balance to New Account . 


$1,886 04 


$2,500 00 



NEW SCHOOL -HOUSES AND LOTS. 

By Balance from School District 

Debt $826 92 

Appropriation .... 6,000 00 



$6,826 92 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

lot on Lincoln street . . $1,600 00 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

lot on Bridge street . . 2,300 00 
John B. Clarke, advertising for 

proposals . . . 6 75 

Geo. W. Stevens, plans . . 150 00 
Wm. McPherson, well . . 48 00 

J. L. Smith, lumber for targets . 21 33 

S. S. Moulton, setting targets . 22 50 

11 



162 

To G. H. Kimball, on account of 

foundation stone . . . $723 00 
Fogg & James, team ... 2 50 



$4,874 08 
Balance to New Account . . 1,952 84 



SCHOOLS. 



By Balance from Old Account of 

evening schools . . . $'99 84 

Reserved Fund, for evening 

schools . . . . 200 00 

Balance from Old Account of re- 
pairs ...... 280 21. 

Appropriation for repairs . . 8,500 00 

Appropriation for schools . . 40,000 00 

Appropriation for bills outstand- 
ing Jan. 1, 1869 . . . 4,707 50 

Reserved Fund, for bills out- 
standing Jan. 1, 1869 . . 1,300 00 

Reserved Fund, for schools and 

repairs . . . . 200 00 

Reserved Fund, for repairs on 

High school-house . . 650 00 



$6,826 92 



$55,837 55 



EXPENDITURES.* 

To Teachers' salaries . . * . . $34,979 87 



Repairs of school houses . 
Care of rooms and furnaces 
Fuel and sawing wood 
Furniture and supplies 

* For details, see report of School Committee. 



10,382 70 
1,862 85 
3,770 46 
2,505 25 



163 



To Books and stationery 

Printing and advertising . 

Horse hire 

Incidentals 



Balance to New Account 



$1,253 


80 






523 


56 






223 


00 






333 


82 






$55,835 31 




2 


24 








$00 


,837 


55 



OUTSTANDING TAXES. 

List of 1859, J. L. Kelley, Collector, 
List of 1861, H. R. Chamberlin, 

Collector ..... 



£8,245 76 
4,493 43 



List of 1862. 
Amount Jan. 1, 1869 
Amount collected . 

Amount Jan. 1, 1870 

List of 1863 . 
List of 1864. 
Amount Jan. 1, 1869 
Amount collected . 

Amount Jan. 1, 1870 

List of 1865. 
Amount Jan. 1, 1869 
Amount collected and abated 

Amount Jan. 1, 1870' . 

List of 1866. 

Amount Jan. 1, 1869 .. 

Amount collected and abated 

Amount Jan. 1, 1870 



$2,448 08 
16 90 



• 


2,431 18 


• 


2,722 58 


4,178 72 




30 78 




• 


4,147 94 


4,289 37 




122 35 




• 


4,167 02 


8,269 83 




273 61 





8,096 22 



164 



List of 1867. 

Amount Jan. 1, 1869 . . . $8,878 84 

Amount collected and abated . . 1,309 59 

Amount Jan. 1, 1870 ..... 

List of 1868. 

Amount Jan. 1, 1869 . . . 27,655 54 

Amount collected and abated . . 19,485 93 



Amount Jan. 1, 1870 ..... 

List of 1869. 

Amount committed •. . . 254,022 43 
Amount collected .$211,956 39 
Amount discounted . 5,468 85 
Amount abated . . 367 70 

217,792 94 



Amount Jan. 1, 1870 

Total Outstanding Taxes, Jan. 1, 
1870 



$7,569 25 



8,169 61 



36,229 49 



,272 48 



By Balance from Old Account 
Appropriation . 
Fire Department, transferred 
City Hall Building, " 
Revenue Account 



RESERVED FUND. 

$10,640 54 



2,454 97 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
3,366 41 



$18,461 92 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Transferred to Evening Schools, $200 00 

Transferred to Repairs of Old 

High School-House . . 550 00 

Transferred to Repairs of Build- 
ings 1,200 00 



165 



To Transferred to City Teams 


81,500 00 


City Farm . 


TOO 00 


District No. 1 


80 00 


No. 2 


200 00 


No. 3 


100 00 


No. 7 


200 00 


No. 11 


350 00 


No. 13 


75 00 


Discount on Taxes, 040 00 


Watering Streets 


130 00 


New Highways 


450 00 


Reservoirs . 


200 00 


Lighting Streets 


100 00 


Printing and Sta 




tionery . 


300 00 


Library Building 


4,500 00 


Schools 


1,500 00 


Court-House 


125 00 




813,100 00 


Balance to New Account . 


. 5,361 92 



$18,461 92 



166 



Valuation, Taxes, &c. 



Year. 



1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1842 
1843 
1844 
1845 
184G 
1847 
1848 
1849 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 



Valuation. 



$555,270 
604,963 
946.200 
1,229,054 
1,430,524 
1,598,826 
1,873,280 
2,544,780 
3,187,726 
4,488,550 
4,664.1157 
5,500,049 
5,832,080 
6,906,462 
6,795,682 
6,995,528 
s.^:j7,617 
8,833,248 
9,244,062 
9,983,862 

10,259,080 
9,853,310 
9,644,937 
9,343,254 
8,891,250 
9,597,786 
9,517,512 
9,478,368 

10,050,020 

10,101,556 
9,929,072 

10,205,302 



Taxes. 



£2,235.49 
3,029.84 
3,986.56 
9,563.74 

12,952.44 

13,764.32 

13,584.72 

19,24(1.27 

22,005.95 

24,953.54 

39,712.53 

44,979.92 

48,974.23 

51,798.47 

:. 1,379.45 

6 1,54 :..si 

62,022.44 

71,952.09 

114,214.08 

84,862.98 

78,210.85 

81,368.01 

86,804.87 

99,104.96 

84,827.45 

96,233.86 

142,815.98 

209,691',. 20 

245,567.19 

207,457.31) 

208,783.07 

254,022.43 



No. Polls. 


Poll Tax. 


244 


81.66 


427 


2.14 


772 


2.20 


892 


3.49 


1,053 


2.76 


1,053 


» 2.60 


1,053 


2.25 


1,561 


2.30 


1,808 


2.10 


2,056 


1.68 


2,688 


2.58 


2,518 


2.47 


2,820 


2.37 


2.910 


2.25 


2,745 


1.02 


2.1)07 


1.S2 


2,814 


1.80 


• 3,725 


1.94 


3,760 


2.96 


3,095 


2.04 


3,695 


1.S3 


3,495 


1.92 


3,651 


2.16 


3,974 


2.40 


3,071 


2.21 


2,995 


2.40 


3,168 


3.50 


3,176 


5. IS 


4,114 


5.50 


4,170 


4.61 


4,583 


•2.xr> 


4,709 


3.72 



167 



CITY DEBT. 



Date of Notes. 


To whom payable. 


When payable. 


Principal. 


July 


1 


1847 


City Bonds. 


July 1. 1872 


• 1 ?20.noo 00 


Feb. 


28 


1852 


^Tehemiah Hunt. 


Feb. 28 


. 1872 


3,600 Oil 


July 


1 


1854 


City Bonds. 


July 1 


is?! 


20 0(H) 01! 


Jan. 


1 


1856 


u u 


Jan. 1 


1880 


n i.i h io 00 


July 


1 


1857 


u u 


July 1 


1877 


22,500 00 


July 


9 


L858 


Nehemiah Hunt. 


July 9 


1878 


2,400 00 


July 


22 


L858 


u .. 


July 22 


1878 


1,100 00 


Jan. 


"I 


1861 


City Bonds. 


Jan". 1 


1871 


6,000 00 


July 


1 


1862 


u u 


July 1 


1882 


22,500 00 


Jan . 


1 


1863 


u u 


Jan. 1, 


1888 


35,000 00 


Oct. 


31 


1863 


u ■ u 


Nov. 1 


1893 


70,000 00 


April 


1 


1864 


a u 


April 1 


1884 


70.000 00 


July 


1 


1864 


u u 


July 1, 


1894 


50,000 00 


April 


1 


1865 


a a 


April 1 


1870 


8,800 00 


April 


1 


1865 


a a 


April 1 


1885 


lo.ooo 00 


Aug. 


1, 


1869 


cc (i 


Feb. l 


1872 


1. .-<:<) 00 


Aug. 


1 


1869 


a it 


Feb. 1 


[873 


1,500 00 


Aug. 


1 


1869 


u u 


Feb. l 


1874 


1,500 no 


Aug. 


1. 


1S6!) 


u a 


Feb. 1 


is::, 


1,500 00 


Aug. 


1, 


ISC!) 


cc a 


Fch. 1 


1876 


1,500 00 


Aug. 


1 


1809 


u a 


Fell. 1 


1S77 


1,500 00 


Aug. 


1 


L869 


a a 


Feb. 1 


1878 


1,500 00 


Aug. 


1 


L869 


u a 


Fel). 1 


1879 


10,000 00 


Aug. 


1 


1869 


a u 


Feb. 1 


1 SSI 1 


*l..Min Till 


Aug. 


1 


1869 


u a 


Feb. 1 


1881 


10,000 00 


Aug. 


1 


1869 


u u 


Feb. 1 


1882 


1,500 00 


Aug. 


1 


1869 


a cc 


Feb. 1 


1883 


5,000 <io 


Aug. 


1 


1869 


a a 


Feb. 1 


1SS| 


1,500 00 


Aug. 


1 


1869 


a u 


Feb. 1 


L885 


1,500 08 


Aug. 


1 


1869 


a a 


Fel). 1 


1886 


5,000 00 


Aug. 


1 


1869 


a a 


Feb. 1 


1887 


3,500 00 



Amount of Funded Debt, Jan. 1., 1870 

Temporary Loan, Jan. 1, 1870 

Interest due, Jan. 1, 1870 . 



8401,900 00 

28,001 00 



$129,901 00 
9,000 00 



$138,901 00 



168 



Balance due S. V. R. R. . 

Outstanding Bills, Jan. 1, 1870 . 
Note against late school district No. 7 



Cash in the Treasury, Jan. 1, 

1870 

Notes due the city . 
Interest on the same 
Bonds unsold, Jan. 1, 1870 

Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1870 



827,398 51 

1,961 81 

142 14 

36,800 00 



125,000 00 

27,169 46 

742 70 

8491,813 16 



$66,302 46 
$425,510 70 



CITY PROPERTY. 

City Library Building $17,000 00 

Iron Fence on Commons .... 3,000 00 

City Hall and lot, at cost . . . . • 35,815 00 

City Farm at cost, and permanent improvements, 17,980 00 
Stock, tools, furniture and provisions at city 

farm ....... 5,545 53 

Engines, hose and apparatus .... 28,108 00 

New engine-house and stable on Vine St. . 15,900 00 

Reservoirs, at cost ...... 9,700 00 

Hearses, houses, tomb, new cemetery, at cost, 4,900 00 

Court- House lot, at cost 9,500 00 

Court-House 41,000 00 

Common sewers, at cost 50,000 00 

Safe, furniture and gas fixtures at City Hall, . 2,500 00 

Street lanterns/posts, pipes and frames . . 1,570 00 

Water works 3,500 00 



169 



Horses, carts, plows and tools 

Engine-house and ward-room on Manchester St 

Ward room and lot on Park St. 

Engine-house and lot in ward seven 

Water wagon and apparatus for watering streets, 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad . 



SCHOOL PROPERTY. 



Blodgett street school-house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, charts, etc. 
Bridge St. house and lot 
Old High school-house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. . 
New High school-house . 
Movable furniture, books, maps 

charts and apparatus 
Concord St. house and lot 
Towlesville house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. . 
Wilson Hill house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Merrimack St. house and lot . 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Manchester St. house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Park St. house and lot . 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Franklin St. house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring St. house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot suburban district 

No. 1 . 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 



$3,000 00 
150 00 

6,000 00 
200 00 

45,000 oa 

2,000 00 

800 00 

30 00 

3,300 00 

125 00 

15,000 00 

350 00 

8,000 00 

300 00 

8,000 00 

400 00 

16,000 00 

400 00 

13,000 00 

400 00 

200 00 
35 00 



$3,000 00 

2,500 00 

600 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

50,000 00 



$3,150 00 
500 00 

6,200 00 



47,000 00 
1,000 00 

830 00 

3,425 00 

15,350 00 

8,300 00 

8,400 00 

16,400 00 

13,400 00 

235 00 



170 



House and lot, Bakersville 
Movable furniture, maps, -etc. 
House and lot at Goffe's Falls 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Harvey's . 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Webster Mills 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Hallsvillc house and lot . 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Massabesic house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Mosquito Pond house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
North house and lot, Piscataquog 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Bridge St. lot 
Lincoln St. lot 

South house and lot, Piscataquog 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Amoskeag house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 



$2,800 00 

75 00 2,875 00 
750 00 
50 00 800 00 
2,500 00 

50 00 2,550 00 
500 00 

50 00 550 00 
2,300 00 

75 00 2,375 00 
1,200 00 

40 00 1,240 00 
1,000 00 

• 50 00 1,050 00 
4,500 00 

125 00 4,625 00 
2,300 00 
2,500 00 
2,800 00 

60 00 . 2,860 00 
3,500 00 
125 00 3,625 00 



$458,658 53 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT, 



FOR THE YEAR 1869. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER 



Jan. 3, 1870, In Board of Common Council. 
Head and accepted, and ordered to be printed in the Annual 
Reports. 

E. D. IIADLEY, 

Clerk. 

Jan. 3, 1870, In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 
Bead, accepted, and ordered to be printed in the Annual Re- 
ports. 

JOSEPH E. BEXXETT, 

City Cleric. 



REPORT 



OP THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1869, 

MANCHESTER, X. H. 
E.P.RICHARDSON . . Chief. Engineer. 



Engineer's Office, Jan. 1, 1870. 
To his Honor the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen : 

Gentlemen, — Agreeably to custom and in accordance to 
the requirements of the city ordinances, I herewith submit 
my annual report, embodying all matters relating to the 
Fire Department. 

In giving an account of property on hand belonging to 
the Department I have omitted some articles which have 
previously entered into the account, from the fact that such 
articles represented a value which does not really exist. I 
am not sure that I should not make a discount even, on the 
full amount returned, of at least ten per cent, for wear and 
tear and depreciation. I think such a discount should be 
made annually in order to represent the fair value of mate- 
rial and apparatus in the Department. I give in detail the 
amount in the hands of each company, at cost, or there- 
abouts, commencing with 



174 



AM0SKEAG ENGINE COMPANY NO. 

LOCATED OX VINE STREET. 

1 first class rotary steam fire-engine 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage 
300 feet rubber hose, (good) 
150 feet linen " " 
600 feet leather " " 
500 feet leather " (ordinary) 

70 feet small rubber hose 
14 woolen jackets t 
14 pairs overalls . 

2 stoves and pipe 
1 force-pump 

1 pair blankets and hoods 
1 iron pan . 

1 wash basin 
7 life ropes . 

2 axes 

2 iron bars . 
1 vise and bench 
1 coal hod . 
1 shovel 
1 slide wrench 

1 hammer . 
5 oil and fluid cans 

2 blunderbusses . 
2 brass pipes 
1 branch-piece with gate 
1 jack-screw 
5 lanterns . 
hall and house furniture 
1 pail .... 
1 tackle and fall 
1-4 box soap 



1, 



$3,000 


00 


250 


00 


437 


00 


87 


00 


577 


00 


600 


00 


14 


00 


112 


00 


23 


00 


33 


00 


12 


00 


11 


00 


8 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


o 
O 


00 


o 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


7 


00 


24 


00 


24 


00 


15 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 


30 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 



175 



7 hose patches 

1 stove and pipe in hall 

1 sink 
6 badges 

26 keys 
4 tons hard coal . 

2 1-2 tons cannel coal 
1 1-2 cords hard wood 
1 cord soft wood 
1 clock 
1 spray nozzle 
1 reducing piece . 
1 pair harnesses . . 

Total Amount for Engine No. 1 



82 00 
7 00 
3 00 
9- 00 

3 00 
52 00 
38 00 
11 00 

4 00 

7 00 
25 00 

8 00 
50 00 



$5,533 00 



FIRE KING ENGINE CO. NO. 2, 



LOCATED OX VISE STREET. 



1 first-class double plunger engine 






$3,000 00 


1 two-wheeled hose carriage 




250 00 


100 feet rubber hose 






248 00 


400 feet leather hose, nearly new 






660 00 


850 " " " ordinary, 






850 00 


50 feet rubber hosp, 1 inch . 






10 00 


10 belts and spanners . 








10 00 


4 life ropes . 








2 00 


14 fire hats . 








14 00 


14 woolen jackets . 








84 00 


14 pairs overalls . 








23 00 


5 torches 








18 00 


3 lanterns .... 








15 00 


2 blunderbusses . 








24 00 


1 branch-piece 








5 00 


1 branch-piece with gate 








15 00 



176 



1 spray nozzle 
14 chairs 
1 reducing piece 
1 iron pan . 
6 badges 

3 stoves and pipe 
1 jack-screw 
1 pair harnesses , 
1 pair blankets and hoods 
1 vise and bench 
1 slide wrench • 
1 hammer 
1 iron bar 

1 coal hod 

2 shovels 

2 axes 

3 pails 

3 tin cans 
1 clock 
1 force pump 
1 large coal shovel 
1 sink 

1 water sprinkler 

2 fly covers . 

4 tons hard coal 
2 1-2 tons cannel coal 

2 cords hard wood 
1 cord pine wood 



Total Amount for Engine Co. No. 2 



177 



E. W. HARRINGTON ENGINE COMPANY NO. 

LOCATED AT PISCATAQUOG. 

1 second class single U tank engine 
1 two-wheel hose carriage 
275 feet rubber hose (good) . 
900 feet leather hose (nearly new) 
300 feet leather hose (ordinary) 
18 feet small rubber hose 
12 pairs overalls . 
14 belts and spanners 

12 woolen jackets . 
4 torches 
1 pair harnesses . 
1 pair blankets . 
3 trumpets . 

1 bench and vise . 

2 stoves and pipe 
1 branch-piece with gate 
1 jack screw 
6 settees 

13 office chairs 
6 small chairs 
1 coal hod . 
1 tackle and fall . 

3 wash basins 
1 chandelier 
1 iron pan . 

1 table 

2 tons hard coal . 
2 1-2 tons cannel coal 
2 cords hard wood 
1-2 cord soft wood 
2 blunderbusses . 
1 coal shovel 

12 



$2,650 00 


250 


00 


365 


00 


1,187 


00 


300 


00 


O 
O 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


105 


00 


8 


00 


40 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


22 


00 


15 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 


17 


00 


4 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00. 


26 


00 


38 


00 


14 


00 


2 


00 


24 00 


1 


00 



178 



1 iron bar .... 
1 oil can . 

1 sink .... 

1 force pump 

Total for Engine Co. No. 3 



81 00 


o 


00 


3 


00 


26 


00 



$5,213 00 



N. S. BEAN ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4, 

LOCATED OX YENS STREET. 

1 second class double plunger engine . 
1 two-wheel hose carriage 
I 1 force pump 
1 sink . 
1 stove and pipe . 

1 oil can and shovel 

2 blankets and hoods . 
2 tons hard coal . 
2 1-2 tons cannel coal . 
2 cords hard wood 
1-2 cord soft wood 
2 blunderbusses 
2 axes 

1 vise . 

2 pole straps 
1 leather bucket 
1 lot gas pipe and fixtures 

1 lot of lead pipe for force pump 
506 feet new hose . 

2 dust brushes and pan 

6 office chairs 

1 wash basin 

2 small oil cans 
1 pail and broom 

7 keys 



14,250 


00 


200 


00 


30 


00 


3 


00 


62 


00 


1 


00 


27 


00 


26 


00 


38 


00 


14 


00 


2 


00 


29 


00 


7 


00 


8 


00 


4 


00 


10 


00 


35 


00 


10 


00 


834 


00 


2 


00 


15 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


4 


00 



179 



50 feet rubber hose . 
1 gallon can ..... 

Total amount for Engine Co. No. 4 . 



$8 00 
1 00 



15,622 00 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1, 



LOCATED OX VINE STREET. 



1 four-wheel hose 


carriage 






800 00 


1 four-wheel hose carriage, spare 




200 00 


500 feet leather hose, new 




800 00 


1000 feet leather hose, good . 


. 


1250 00 


550 feet leather hose, ordinary 




650 00 


10 hoseman's jackets, woolen 




46 00 


1 hoseman's jacket, rubber . 




3 00 


24 spanners and 8 belts 






25 00 


1 signal lantern . 






12 00 


4 torches 










8 00 


2 axes . 










3 00 


1 shovel 










1 00 


3 oil cans . 










2 00 


25 chairs 










36 00 


12 chairs 










12 00 


1 table 










5 00 


1 mirror 










8 00 


1 chandelier 










8 00 


3 trumpets . 










9 00 


1 blunderbuss 










12 00 


1 jack screw 










1 00 


28 hose patches 










7 00 


4 lanterns . 










16 00 


1 sink 










3 00 


1 copper pump 










3 00 
*17 00 


8 pair overalls 










30 badges 










45 00 


12 holsters . 










4 00 


1 hammer . 










1 00 



180 



1 slide wrench .... 

2 stoves and pipe 

2 settees ..... 
2 cords hard wood 

Total amount for Hose Co. No. 1 



$1 00 

20 00 

6 00 

14 00 



$4,028 00. 



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 truck, with hooks and ladders 
500 feet old ladders 
1 signal lantern 
4 torches 
1 trumpet . 
4 large hooks 

3 small hooks 
80 office chairs 

1 table 

2 stoves 
1 jack-screw 

4 axes 
1 shovel 

1 iron bar . 

2 hay forks . 
2 buckets 
1 rope 

45 badges 

1 iron sink . 

1 copper pump 
12 pair overalls 
12 jackets 

1 broom and waste 

1 cortl hard wood 



Total amount for Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1. 



11,100 


00 


125 


00 


10 


00 


8 


00 


1 


00 


85 


00 


5 


00 


45 


00 


14 


00 


25 


00 


2 


00 


7 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


20 


00 


30 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


35 


00 


57 


00 


1 


00 


7 


00 


$1,541 00 



181 



engineer's department. 

1 two-wheel hose carriage, spare 
1 tape measure .... 
1 piece suction hose, ordinary 
1 lot old hose and couplings 
1 supply wagon .... 



150 


00 


1 


00 


15 


00 


125 


00 


227 


00 



$508 00 



RECAPITULATION. 

Amoskcag Engine Co. No. 1 . 
Fire King " " No. 2 . 
E. W. Harrington Engine Co. No. 3 
N. S. Bean " " No. 4 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 
Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 . 
Engineer's Department . 

Total amount of property in De- 
partment .... 



55,533 00 
5,613 00 

5,263 00 
5,622 00 
4,028 00 
1,541 00 
508 00 



08 00 



NAMES AND RESIDENCES OF MEMBERS OF THE 
FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



ENGINEERS. 

E. P. Richardson, Chief, No. 172 Manchester street. 
B. C. Kendall, 1st Assistant and Clerk, corner of Maple 

and Central streets. 
Elijah Chandler, 2d Assistant, 15 Machine Shop Block. 
Wwreland, 3d Ass't, corner of Amherst and Pine streets. 
George Holbrook, 4th Assistant, 84 Merrimack street. 
A. C.Wallace, 5th Assistant, Granite street, Piscataquog. 



182 



AM0SKEAG ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

Orrin E. Kimball, Foreman, 60 Bridge street. 

Geo. R. Simmons, Assistant Foreman, 14 Pearl street. 

Horace Nichols, Engineer, 27 Machine Shop Blocks. 

S. C. Lowell, Fireman, 5 Machine Shop Blocks. 

J. R. Carr, Clerk, 3 Machine Shop Blocks. 

Geo. Butterfield, Driver, Engine-house, Vine street. 

E. Cutting, 105 Hanover street. 

P. C. Lane, 15 Central street. 

H. H. Glines, 5 Machine Shop Blocks. 

A. R. Wells, 139 Elm street. 

C. W. Stevens, 36 Pearl street. 

John Dodge, 121 Amoskeag Corporation. 

A. D. Scovell, corner of Pine and Concord streets. 

FIRE KING ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

J. F. Ferson, Foreman, 25 Machine Shop Blocks. 
W. D. Perkins, Assistant Foreman, 35 Orange street. 
H. Davis, Foreman of Hose, 64 Stark Corporation. 

D. W. Morse, Engineer, 67 Amherst street. 
Frank Truell, Fireman, 56 Machine Shop Blocks. 

A. M. Kenniston, Clerk, 10 Bridge street. 

B. T. Rust, Central, near Beech street. 

A. F. Quirnby, Driver, Engine-house, Vine street. 

G. H. Piper, 46 Concord street. 

S. W. Nelson, 26 Machine Shop Blocks. 

J. G. George, 4 Stark Corporation. 

"W. E. Demary, 95 Central street. 

A. Hall, 45 Machine Shop Blocks. 

C. A. Swain, Burgess' Block, Pearl street- 



183 



E. W. HARRINGTON ENGINE COMPANY NO. 6. 

John Patterson, Foreman, corner of Granite and Main 

streets. 
H. Fradd, Assistant Foreman, 26 Pleasant street. 
J. M. Wallace, Engineer, Granite street. 
M. Whelpley, Fireman, Walnut street. 
George Weaver, Steward, Main street. 
H. Crandall, Driver, Mast Road. 
William Dorans, Summer street. 
J. Densmore, Granite street. 

B. K. Parker, Main street. 

D. J. Warren, Pleasant street. 
D. 0. Webster, Merrimack House. 
H. E. Sturtevant, Bedford road. 

N. S. BEAN ENGINE COMPANY NO. FOUR. 

James S. Bacheler, Engineer, 151 Pine street. 
A. D. Colby, Fireman, 44 Machine Shop Blocks. 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

Albert Maxfield, Foreman, 14 Amoskeag Corporation. 
A. H. Merrill, Assistant Foreman, 148 Manchester street. 
Thos. W. Lane, Clerk, 19 Blodgett street. 
Joseph E. Merrill, Steward, 45 Orange street. 
David Thayer, corner Bridge and Walnut streets. 
J. G. Knight, Kimball Block, Elm street. 

C. R. Colley, 152 Manchester street. 
J. D. Howard, 107 Lowell street. 
Benjamin Spofford, 242 Hanover street. 
Samuel B. Hope, 106 Lowell street. 

Ira W. Pennock, 54 Manchester Corporation. 
Benjamin W. Robinson, 187 Hanover street. 

D. H. Maxfield, 17 Stark Corporation. 



184 

T. P. Heath, corner Hall and Central streets. 
R. 0. Burleigh, 96 Amoskeag Corporation. 
J. C. Colburn, 80 Orange street. 

D. M. Perkins, 73 Amoskeag Corporation. 
W. H. Vickery, 24 Smyth's Block. 
Henry W. Fisher, 51 Machine Shop Blocks. 
Henry French, 3 Bartlett's Block. 

H. S. Brown, 14 Land and Water Power Block. 
William E. Porter, 13 Nashua street. 
Oliver B. Elliott, 53 Stark Corporation. 

E. A. Thayer, corner of Bridge and Walnut streets. 
George W. Holmes, 174 Merrimack street. 
George H. Dodge, 8 Pine street. 

A. M. Caswell, 5 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Isaiah Emerson, Kimball's Block, Elm street. 
William C. McCloud. 
David A Messer, Kimball's Block. 

HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, NO. 1. 

E. F. Hardy, Foreman, corner Bridge and Maple streets. 
G. E. Riddle, Assistant Foreman, 263 Chestnut street. 
C. H. Bradford, Clerk, 45 Bridge street. 

G. H. Dudley, Treasurer, corner Laurel and Beech sts. 

H. P. Young, Steward, 115 Pine street. 

J. Remes, Teamster, 12 Concord street. 

C. Canfield, 18 Amoskeag Corporation. 

M. Knowles, 97 Union street. 

M. L. Hunkins, 52 Orange street. 

C. E. Clough, corner Maple and Pearl streets. 

F. A. Senter, 39 Pine street. 

D. II. Young, 72 Bridge street. 
H. L. Drew, 89 Hanover street. 
J. L. Bradford, 45 Bridge street. 

J. N. Chase, Bridge street near Summer street. 
, J. Daniels, 161 Merrimack street. 



185 

H. Pike, 1 Lincoln Block, Elm street. 

G. E. Glines, 57 Pine street. 

George Merrick, 4 Lincoln Block, Elm street. 

E. A. G. Holmes, 122 Manchester street. 

P. W. Hannaford, 118 Lowell street. 

L. Flint, 118 Lowell street. 

G. Bacon, Pine street. 

R. D. Bagley, Amoskeag Corporation. 

G. L. Leach, 45 Amherst street. 

M.V. B. Richardson, 1 Pearl street Block. 



SUMMARY. 

The effective force of the Department consists of 
1 Chief and 5 Assistant Engineers 
Engine Co. No. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3 

No. 4 
Hose Co. No. 1 
Hook and Ladder Co. No. 

Total . 



6 men. 
14 
14 
12 

2 

30 
25 

103 men. 



The apparatus consists of — 

1 first-class steamer, rotary, No. 1, Amoskeag. 

1 first-class steamer, double-plunger, No. 2, Fire King. 

1 second-class steamer, U tank, No. 3,E. W. Harrington. 

1 second-class steamer, double-plunger, No. 4, N. S. Bean. 

1 four-wheel hose carriage, No. 1, Pennacook. 

1 four-wheel hose carriage, (spare) No. 1, Pennacook. 

4 two-wheel hose carriages, with steamers Nos. 1, 2, 3 

and 4. 
1 two-wheel hose carriage (spare). 
1 supply wagon, No. 1. 



186 

1 hook and ladder truck, No. 1. with hooks and ladders 

complete. 
500 feet old ladders, and large and small fire-hooks, 

extra. 
675 feet rubber hose, good. 
3,906 feet leather hose, new, or nearly so. 
1,300 feet leather hose, ordinary. 

150 feet linen hose. * 

6,031, total number of feet of hose. 

By the following record it will be seen that the loss by 
fire during the past year has been considerably in excess 
of the year preceding. There have been sixteen fires and 
alarms, as follows : 

Jan. 29. Alarm. Loss. Insurance. 

31. Fire at Print Works Dry- 
House .... $200 00 
April 17. Alarm. 

Aug. 5. Fire, Hall's Block, Pine st., 110 00 $110 00 
9. Alarm. 
18. Alarm. 

29. Fire at Brugger's Mill . 15,000 00 15,000 00 
Sept. 17. Fire at Spruce street . 4,500 00 4,500 00 

30. Fire, Lowell st., Wheeler's 

house .... 
Oct. 2. Alarm. 

6. Fire in Amoskeag yard 
9. Fire at Washington st. 
26. Alarm. 
Dec. 17. Fire at G. W. Gardner's 
store, Merrimack street, 

21. Fire at Bag Mill ' . 

22. Mechanics' Row 

Total . . . $28,676 00 $27,576 00 



1,800 00 


1,200 


00 


4,000 00 


4,000 


00 


slight 






366 00 


366 


00 


2,200 00 


2,200 


00 


700 00 


£00 


00 



187 

During tho past year all the apparatus lias been put in 
the best working order, and I believe I may say the De- 
partment has never been so well equipped in all ways as it 
is at present. I believe that with an addition perhaps of 
one thousand feet of new hose eacli year, there will be no 
great need of expenditures for repairs for several years. 
The houses have all been thoroughly repaired and painted. 
There is still need of a further outlay on the Vine street 
building. I would recommend that the basement story of 
this building be finished off by cementing the floor and 
putting in new windows, and also to heat "the building with 
steam. 

Your board have, during the past year, presented for 
your consideration an addition to the City Ordinances, 
in view to render property more secure against fire. I 
believe there is nothing in either recommendation that 
can be considered objectionable, while I am sure their 
adoption would add a great deal to the security of our city 
against lire. 

In regard to water, I have only to renew the recommen- 
dation of my predecessor. His report showed the im- 
portance of an expenditure for additional supply at the 
north, cast and south parts of the city. I would most re- 
spectfully call your attention to these sections, and ask 
that an appropriation be made to furnish a better supply 
in such localities. 

In conclusion, I desire to return my most sincere thanks 
to each and every member of the Fire Department, for the 
prompt and efficient manner in which they have sustained, 
me in the faithful discharge of duty, and for their uniform 
courtesy and friendliness to each other on all occasions. 
And I trust that the same spirit that has characterized 
them in the past may continue in the future. 
Respectfully submitted. 

E. P. RICHARDSON, 

Chief Engineer . 



188 



CONDITION OF CISTERNS AND RESERVOIRS, MANCHESTER, N. H., 
JUNE 21, 1SC9. 











o 




X 




No. 


Location. 


o 
- s 

"7 ^ 


_ C 

7*. - 

— "5 





SI 
'5 

o 


Feed Gates. 










c3 
CO 


O 








Ft In. Ft. In. 


Ft.In. 






1 


Elm street, at City Hall 


8 2 5 2 


6 


1 


Cor. Hanover and 














Chestnut streets. 


2 


Elm St., near Smyth's Bl'k, j g 
Gate. Mercantile Block 


5 

5 2 


5 10 

6 10 


17 


2 


Concord Square. 


3 


1 


3 


None 


1 




4 Cor. Chestnut and Hanover sts. . 


1 4 


2 6 


None 


1 


Feeds No. 1. 


5 


Mitchell's, Manchester St., j 7V 
Knowles, Merrimack street 


8 
8 4 


4 

5 8 


10 
3 


2 




6 










Worthless. 


7 


Pine st., between Manchester and 










Hanover and Pine 




Merrimack streets 


4 10 
8 13 


5 11 
9 


8 
8 


1 
1 


streets. 


8 


June. Hanover and Pine sts 




9 


Gate, June. Hanover & Pine sts.. 


5 6 


2 6 


5 


1 


Feeds No. 6. 


10 


June. Pine and Central sts., i V 


6 1 
6 


6 11 

6 9 


7 


2 




11 


( N 
June. Elm and Myrtle sts , i V 


3 5 
3 2 


7 
7 8 


None 


2 




12 


Lowell street, at school-house. . . 


8 2 


5 7 


4 


1 




13 


Lowell street, near Nashua St.... 


7 5 


5 1 


None 


1 




14 




1 10 


7 


None 


1 




15 


June. Chestnut and Amherst sts. 


2 10 


3 8 


None 


1 


Gate. 


16 




5 8 


5 8 


3 


1 




17 j Bridge street, head of Birch, ^' 


6 
6 


5 10 

6 8 


1 3 
1 4 


2 




is June. Chestnut and Orange sis.. 


6 5 


4 5 


1 8 


1 






5 3 


3 3 None 


1 




20 Steam Mill. Janesville 


Level 


•J 6 


None 


Good 






5 7' 


6 1 


None 


1 




June. Walnut and Amherst sts . 


8 3 


2 5 


None 


1 




23 .rune. Chestnut and Harrison sts. 


2 3 


7 6 


3 


1 




24 


Post Office, Hanover street 






None 


1 


Gate feeds Nos. 1&5. 


25 


Bakersville 


14 6 


4 8 


None 


1 




£6 


'Squog, Granite St., north Baker 
















6 4 


6 2 


1 8 


1 




27 Squog, corner Walnut street ... . 1 S 


7 


None 


1 




28 


Squog, north Steam Mill, Squog 














Good 


None 






29 




5 


None 


1 




30 


Squog, Am. n'th Bow. place, ■ V .7, 


7 4 
7 4 


X me 

None 


2 




31 


Amoskeag, Penstock, north Bat. 
Mill 




Good 




Good 




32 


Central st. .junc. Elm, back St.. . 








4 






Merrimack Square. 


33 


Park St.. June. Elm back st 








4 






" " 


34 


Amherst st.,junc Hall st 








2 




6 




35 


.Myrtle st., junc. Maple 








4 






Co.'s Reservoir. 


3fi 


Myrtle st., junc. Walnut 








4 






II u 


37 


Myrtle street, junc. Pine 








4 






" 



REPORT OF CITY LIQUOR AGENT. 



To the Honorable Board of Mayor and Aldermen : 

The undersigned, City Liquor Agent, reports the follow- 
ing as the business of the agency for 1869, and its present 
condition. 



Stock on hand Jan. 1, 1869 . 


$300 58 




Purchased since, as per bills . 


475 51 


8776 09 


Stock on hand in bulk, (see papei 




No. 1) . . . . . 


8227 33 




Bottled liquors, (see paper No. 2) . 


52 27 




Demijohns, jugs, kegs, &c, (see pa- 






per No. 3) . 


32 2-1 


$311 84 




liquors sold 


Deduct from whole amount cost of 


$464 25 


Current expenses, viz. — 






Freight 


87 56 




Half expenses of agent to Boston 


1 61 




Corks ..... 


1 40 




U. S. tax .... 


25 00 




Salary of Agent 


300 00 


$335 57 






Whole amount of expense 


$799 82 


Cash received for sales . 


. . . 


8074 02 


Expenses over receipts . 


$125 80 


E. 


M. KELLOGG, 




City Liquor 


Agent. 



190 

We certify that we have examined the foregoing report 
and accounts and stock in trade, and found the above ac- 
count correct. 

Geo. H. Hubbard, 
Danl. H. Maxfield, 
Committee to settle with Liquor Agent. 



No. 1. 

LIQUORS ON HAND 13 BULK, JAN. 1, 1870. 





Gals. 


Qts. 


Pts. 


Gills. 




Holland gin, 


at $4.75 




2 


1 




$2 97 


Malaga wine, 


2.45 


1 


1 


. 


i 


3 10* 


Cherry brandy, 


7.00 




2 






3 50 


Native grape wine 


, 1.90 




3 


1 


3 


1 84 


Elderberry wine, 


1.60 


. . 


3 


1 


2 


1 50* 


Port wine, 


3.50 




1 




. 


88* 


Madeira wine, 


5.50 


1 




1 


3 


6 70* 


Brown Sh. wine, 


3.50 


2 


2 


1 


2 


9 41* 


Bay rum, 


6.23 


1 


1 




21 


7 54 


Cherry rum. 


2.60 




1 


. 


21 


I 87 


Cal. Port wine, 


4.00 


. . 


. 


. 


25 


34 


Brandy, 


9.77 


4 


2 


1 


. 


45 18 


Alcohol, 


2.00 


19 


2 


. 


. 


39 00 


Whisky, 


1.80 


23 


2 




. 


42 30 


Medford rum, 


1.75 


33 


2 


' . 




58 63 


American gin, 


2.25 




3 


. 


1 


1 75 


*7h per cent. com. 


on, 21.59 










1 61 


1 per ct. analyz. oi 


l, 21.59 










21 




$227 33 



NO. 2. 

BOTTLED LIQUORS OK HAND JAN". 1, 1870. 

3 Geneva Cordial at 81.00 per bottle . . $3 00 

7 Holland gin, (old rye) .67 . . . . 4 69 

1 " " " 1.00 .... 1 00 

1 " « 1.00 1 00 

1 « " 1.25 1 25 

2 Bourbon whisky, 1.00 2 00 



191 



1 Bourbon whisky, $1.00 . 

2 « « .50 
1 " " .67 
1 Scotch " 1.00 
1 Copper distilled whisky, 1.00 
1 Cognac brandy, 1.50 
1 Cherry " .33 . 
1 Blackberry brandy, 1.25 
7 Hock wine, 1.00 . 

6 Claret wine, .67 . 
1 Grape wine, .67 . 
1 Sparkling Catawba wine, .67 

7 Catawba wine, .67 

18 Blackberry wine, 4s. . 
1 Pale Sherry wine, 1.00 
4 London porter, qts., 32£ 
1 " " pt., 23 



NO. 3. 
DEMIJOHNS, JUGS. &c 
7 faucets, at &0.25 ..... 
7 two-gallon jugs, .62 
1 three-gallon jug, .80 
6 three-gallon demijohns, 1.00 



§1 00 



1 one-gallon " 


.75 


^ it (i 


.50 


3 five-gallon kegs, .90 


. 


6 kegs, packing, .15 


• 


1 sign 


• 



1 


00 




67 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


50 




33 


1 


25 


7 


00 


4 


02 




67 




67 


4 


69 


12 


00 


1 


00 


1 


30 




23 



$52 27 



81 75 


4 34 


80 


6 00 


75 


50 


2 70 


90 


14 50 



52 24 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City 
of Manchester. 

In compliance with the ordinances of said city, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their annual report. 

The whole number of families which have received more 
or less assistance during the past year is twenty-five, con- 
sisting of one hundred and four persons, of which number 
twenty-two families and ninety-four persons have a settle- 
ment in this city, and the remaining three families and ten 
persons in other towns in the state. Five of the above 
number have died, four belonging to this city, and one to 
the city of Concord. 

The whole number of persons at the almshouse during 
the year is twenty-nine ; average number for the year, six 
and one quarter. There has been but one death at the 
almshouse during the year. 

It is our belief that the comfort and wants of the pau- 
pers have been carefully considered by the superintendent 
and matron. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

ISAAC W. SMITH, Mayor, Chairman ex officio. 

S. S. MOULTON, 

H. W. SAVORY, 

JOHN SWEENEY, 

S. J. YOUNG, 

H. FRADD, 

NAHUM BALDWIN, 

MOSES E. GEORGE, 

JOHN FIELD, 

Overseers of the Poor. 
13 



194 



Inventory and appraisal of Personal Property at 
Farm, December 24, 1869, by the Joint Standing 
tee on City Farm. 

3 pairs working oxen 
9 milch cows 

3 yearling heifers 
1 bull and 1 Lull calf 
1 horse 
G shotes 
1 breeding sow 

4 bushels wheat 
150 bushels corn 
120 bushels oats 

18 bushels beans 
230 bushels potatoes 
7 bushels beets . 

80 bushels carrots 
821 pounds pop corn 

30 bushels turnips 

24 doz. cabbages . 

18 tons No. 1 hay . 

11 tons No. 2 hay . 

4 tons No. 3 hay . 

5 tons corn fodder 
3 tons straw 
1 1-4 barrels cider 

5 barrels soap 
1-2 barrel salted cucumbers 
7 barrels apples . 

6 barrels salt pork 
30 pounds salt beef 
72 pounds fresh pork 

215 pounds fresh beef 
134 pounds cheese . 



the City 
Commit- 



195 



30 bushels barley 


45 00 


144 pounds butter ..... 


57 60 


121 pounds lard ..... 


26 62 


222 pounds sugar ..... 


32 19 


Salt fish and mackerel .... 


6 25 


52 pounds dried apple .... 


10 00 


72 pounds tobacco ..... 


43 20 


Molasses barrel and faucet . 


2 00 


2 gallons molasses .... 


1 20 


6 gallons preserved tomatoes 


1 50 


3 gallons boiled cider .... 


3 00 


4 gallons apple sauce and barrel . 


5 50 


5 1-2 doz. (8 lbs.) candles . 


1 37 


90 pounds nails ..... 


4 95 


10 pounds drills and wedges . 


3 00 


1 meat saw ...... 


2 50 


2 ox carts ...... 


• 175 00 


5 ox sleds and 1 new sled nearly finished 


60 00 


1 hay cart ...... 


25 00 


1 hay wagon ..... 


80 00 


1 horse hay fork ..... 


25 00 


1 one-horse tip cart .... 


110 00 


2 single wagons ..... 


100 00 


1 single sleigh ..... 


12 00 


3 harnesses ...... 


40 00 


1 lead harness ...... 


4 00 


Curry combs and brushes 


2 00 


Bridle, halter and blankets . 


10 00 


1 drag rake ....... 


1 50 


8 hand rakes ..... 


2 00 


11 hay forks 


6 00 


4 sickles ....... 


1 00 


2 grain cradles 


4 00 


20 scythes 


7 50 


10 scythe snaths 


3 00 



106 



1 cross-cut saw . 
1 string bells 
1 stone digger 
7 ox-jokes and bows 
9 plows 

1 corn sheller 
22 fowls 

20 meal bags 

2 bushels salt 
4 baskets 

2 buffalo robes 

1 drag 

2 cultivators 

3 scalding tubs 

1 rope and block . 
Scales and steelyards 
\ winnowing mill 
1 hay cutter 

1 hay knife . 
25 tie-chains . 

2 grindstones 

1 wheelbarrow 

2 horse rakes 

2 trowels 

1 chest tools 

3 wood saws 

1 shaving horse . 
1 vise and saw set 

7 axes 

4 ladders 

9 shovels and spades 

8 manure forks' . 
3 barrows . 

3 bog hoes . 
1 bush hook 



197 



1 set measures 








1 00 


2 gravel scrapers . 








8 00 


Balls and chains. 








17 00 


2 set fetters 








7 00 


2 pairs handcuffs . 








3 00 


10 meat barrels 








5 00 


10 cider barrels 








G 00 


9 cook and other stoves 








45 00 


12 tables 








15 00 


2 clocks 








5 00 


2 rocking chairs . 








2 00 


40 common chairs 








15 00 


5 looking-glasses . 








3 50 


20 window curtains 








5 00 


9 boxes 








1 00 


3 stone pots 








3 00 


20 earthen pots 








2 25 


11 water pails 








2 20 


7 wash tubs 








3 00 


6 butter tubs 








1 00 


Milk cans and measures 








2 50 


8 milk pails 








2 00 


60 milk pans 








8 00 


6 sugar buckets . 








1 50 


1 churn . 








3 50 


1 cream pot 








1 00 


1 pie cupboard 








2 00 


1 cheese press 








3 00 


2 cheese safes 








5 00 


1 pair cheese tongs 








50 


3 cheese hoops 








2 00 


1 cheese tub and basket 








3 50 


1 curd cutter 








1 25 


4 cheese cloths and strainer 






2 00 


Coffee- and-teapots 








2 00 



198 



Tin ware 

12 flat irons . 
Mixing trough 
Salt mortar and coffee-mill . 
Castor, pepper boxes and salt dishes 

13 chambers and bed-pan 
Shovels and tongs 
Knives, forks and spoons 
4 lightstands 

1 dinner-bell 
llolling-pin and cake board 

2 clothes horses . 
Wash boards and benches 
School and other books 
1 tape measure 

10 roller towels 
33 common towels 

12 table cloths and 1 table cover 
20 bedsteads and cords . 
16 feather beds and bedding 

Thread and needles 
Floor brushes and brooms 
Clothes lines and pins . 

13 baking pans 
6 butcher and carving knives 

3 tea trays or waiters . 
8 jugs. 

12 candlesticks 

4 flails, cops and pin . 
4 muzzle baskets . 
Window glass 

10 pounds dried pumpkin 
6 bushels ashes . 
1 meat chest 
1 clothes wringer 



8 


00 


3 


00 


2 


50 


1 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


12 


00 


o 


00 




25 


1 


00 


2 


09 


2 


00 


2 


50 




75 


4 


00 


4 


00 


10 


00 


15 


00 


165 


00 




50 


2 


00 


2 


00 


4 


25 


1 


00 




75 


3 


00 


1 


50 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


20 


1 


00 



199 



1 washing machine .... 


86 00 


Feed and mixing boxes 


5 00 


8 hoes . . . . . . 


5 00 


5 stone hammers .... 


12 00 


2 iron bars ...... 


3 00 


3 picks ...... 


3 00 


6 large chains ..... 


15 00 


3 stake chains, 1 spread and 1 whiffletree 


i 


chain . . f . . . 


4 00 


1 kerosene oil can .... 


1 00 


1 FLAG OF OUR COUNTRY . 


2 00 


Watering pot and oil can ' . 


2 00 


4 bushels corn meal .... 


4 80 


2 bushels rye meal .... 


3 00 


Candle moulds, sieves and knife-tray . 


1 00 


Coffee-boiler ..... 


2 00 


Chopping-knife and skimmers 


1 00 


2 lanterns and 3 lamps 


4 00 


Dress-table and bureau 


4 00 


Reel, swifts and spinning-wheel . 


1 75 


2 chests of drawers and 2 trunks 


5 00 


Dining set and crockery ware . . - . 


20 00 


5j barrels vinegar .... 


74 00 


2 pounds of hops .... 


50 


8 pounds of tea ..... 


9 00 


3 pounds of sage .... 


1 00 


Medicines ....... 


2 50 


2 garden rakes ...... 


1 50 


2 stub scythes ...... 


3 50 


1 mowing-machine . 


80 00 


1 meat-bench ...... 


1 25 


GO dry casks ...... 


6 00 


3 cart spires ...... 


3 00 


Pine lumber and shingles . 


30 00 


Oak lumber ...... 


40 00 



200 



6 wrenches 








m oo 


3 clothes-baskets 








1 50 


Cant-hook . 








1 00 


28 pounds bar soap 








3 20 


1 1-4 barrels flour 








11 00 


50 pounds sausages 








10 00 


53 pounds rough tallow 








3 70 


3 pounds coffee . 








1 00 


1 suction pump . 








5 00 


1 beetle and 5 wedges 








2 25 


New clothing on hand 








19 75 


New boots on hand 








4 75 


38 yards cotton cloth 








7 65 


4 skeins yarn 








60 


8 pounds gunpowder . 








2 00 



fto,84o 53 
City of Manchester in account with City Poor Farm, Dr. 



To Stock on hand Dec. 24, JL868, 
Expenditures the current year, 
Interest on farm, 

Contra. 



$5,582 85 
4,302 45 
1,000 00 



810,885 30 
Cb. 



By Stock on hand Dec. 24, 1869, $5,845 53 
Stock and produce sold from farm, 2,599 20 
Clothing for paupers, . . 95 63 

Clothing for prisoners, . . 26 40 
295 4-7 weeks' board of prisoners 
and 625 weeks' board of pau- 
pers, at an average cost per 
week of $2.51|| . . 2,318 54 



$10,885 30 



201 

Average number of paupers for 1869, . . 6 1-1 

Average number of paupers for 1868, . . 11 1-2 

Average number of prisoners for 1869, . . 5 5-8 

Average number of prisoners for 1868, . . 4 1-16 

ISAAC W. SMITH, 
C. C. FAVOR, 
HIRAM STEARNS, 
A. A. PATRIDGE, 
JONATHAN B. MOORE. 

J, iS, Committee on Oily Farm. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES 



To the City Council : 

The Committee on Cemeteries respectfully submit their 
annual report. 

THE VALLEY. 

This cemetery has for many years been self-sustaining, 
the income from the sale of lots, and other sources, having 
been sufficient to meet all expenses. But the ground suit- 
able for interments has now all been lotted and sold, or 
otherwise occupied. There is yet much room in the valley 
for tombs, but only a small number of such structures are 
built in each year, and the sale of such lots is conse- 
quently slow. It is, therefore, probable that The Valley will 
hereafter require a small annual appropriation from the 
city treasury. The small amount of money belonging to 
this cemetery has confined the operations of your commit- 
tee almost exclusively to the usual care of the grounds. 
Not much has been done to the structures, such as fences, 
bridges and buildings. Some repairs of these will be nec- 
essary the coming year, and we would suggest an appropri- 
ation of three hundred dollars for that purpose and for the 
ordinary care of the grounds. 



20-4 



PINE GROVE. 



These grounds are rapidly assuming the appearance of a 
well kept cemetery. The fact that there are few or no lots 
to be obtained in The Valley has turned the public atten- 
tion to this cemetery. Forty-eight lots have been sold the 
past year, making the whole number now sold about one 
hundred and seventy. The owners of several lots have 
surrounded them with handsome stone-work, and a large 
number have been improved with plants and shubbery. 

It will be seen that, aside from the ordinary care, the 
principal outlay of your committee has been for the erection 
of a building containing a tool-house, and a shelter for per- 
sons and carriages visiting the grounds. This is a con- 
venience for which a necessity has long been felt, and 
being built in a neat and tasteful manner, it contributes 
something to the embellishment of the grounds. 

It is presumed that no appropriation for this cemetery 
will be necessary the coming year. 

DANIEL H. MAXFIELD, 
GEORGE H. GERRY, 

D. 0. WEBSTER, 
J. B. MOORE, 

E. W. HARRINGTON, 
NATHAN PARKER, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
S. N. BELL, 

* W. D. BUCK, 
J. F. JAMES, 
WATERMAN SMITH, 

Committee on Cemeteries. 
Manchester, Dec. 31, 1869. 



205 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

To the Committee on Cemeteries : 
The Treasurer submits the following Report : 

THE VALLEY. 

The Income of the year has been derived from the fol- 
lowing sources : — 
Lots sold ...... 

Hay sold ...... 

Interest ....... 

C . S. Fisher, tomb rent .... 

W. C. Chase, for work done for individuals 

" " for damage to grounds 
Balance, overdrawn .... 



. $258 


41 


25 


00 


14 


04 


42 


75 


111 


35 


3 


00 


76 


59 



The Expenditures have been 
Balance from Old Account 
John Rider, for labor 
Albert B. Chase, " 
E. P. Cogswell, " 
Nathl. Corning, '" 
Wm. C. Chase, " 

" " work of horse 

" " money paid out 

J. B. Sawyer, services as treasurer for 1868 



PINE GROVE. 



<531 14 



861 46 



11 


00 


2 


00 


7 


00 


4 


00 


417 


50 


2 


00 


10 


18 


10 


00 



5531 14 



The moneys of this cemetery pass through the city treas- 
ury, and the items of expenditure will therefore appear in 
the report of the Finance Committee. 



206 



Cash in City Treasury Jan. 1, 1869, 



as per last report 
Cash in hands of your Treasurer 


. $508 62 
155 25 


$663 87 
789 13 


Cash received during the year 


for 48 lots sold, 






apples " . 
interest 


2 00 
2 64 




$1,457 64 


The payments have been : — 
For breaking paths 




$8 00 




Labor .... 




355 16 




Horse hire 




19 50 




Repairing pump 
Stakes, and painting 
Building tool-house 




'4 00 
13 49 

387 00 


$787 15 







Balance, cash on hand 

Of this sum $515.82 is in the City Treasury, 
and $154.67 is in the hands of your Treasurer. 
Bills approved but not presented for payment . 



$670 49 



$124 42 

$546 07 



Cash in hand above all liabilities . 
Respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 

Treasurer. 
Manchester, Dec. 31, 1869. 

We have examined the foregoing Report of the Treasurer 
of the Committee on Cemeteries, and find the same correct, 
and supported by the proper vouchers. 
Manchester, N. H., Jan. 1, 1870. 

James A. Weston, 
S. N. Bell, 

Sub- Committee. 



207 

I have examined the foregoing accounts of the Treasurer 
of the Committee on Cemeteries, and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and the payments properly avouched for. 

Joseph E. Bennett, 

City Auditor. 
Jan. 1, 1870. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BUILDING COMMITTEE AND COMMITTEE ON 
SCHOOL -HOUSE REPAIRS. 



To the City Council of Manchester : 

The committee appointed by virtue of an order of the 
City Council passed May 4, 1860, with authority to purchase 
additional school-house lots, to put in the foundation for a 
new grammar school-house, to erect a house at Goffc's 
Falls, and to take charge of the general repairs and im- 
provements of school buildings and grounds, submit the 
following Report: 

They purchased of the Amoskeag Company two large 
and eligible lots of land for school-house sites, one on the 
north side of Bridge street, between Maple and Ash streets, 
261 1-2 feet by 220, at a cost of $2,300.00 ; and another 
between Merrimack and Laurel streets, fronting on Lincoln 
street, 200 feet square, at a cost of $1,600.00. 

A plan has been adopted for a grammar school-house on 
the Lincoln street lot, and a contract made for putting in 
the foundation. The committee also contracted for the 
dimension stone for the entire building. The material for 
the foundation has been drawn, but owing to the pressure 
on stone workmen in the autumn, the work was not exe- 
cuted according to expectation. The amount of the appro- 
14 



210 

priation expended for plan, material, and for sinking a well, 
is 8971.58. Propositions have been received for furnishing 
the brick, but no contract for them has been made. The 
work may be resumed in the spring if the requisite appro- 
priation shall be made. 

The school-house lot at Goffe's Falls has been enlarged to 
an acre and a tenth, and a foundation been put in for a 
house similar to that in the Harvey district. The sum of 
$613.96 of the $2,500 appropriated, has been expended. 

The house in the Massabesic district has been enlarged 
and repaired, and the wood-shed rebuilt. The grammar 
school-house in "Ward 7 has been new roofed and otherwise 
improved. Sargent's steam-heating apparatus has been put 
into the North Grammar school-house, wood-sheds have 
been rebuilt, ami other repairs made. The old High 
school-house has been refitted for the East Grammar 
school, and has been otherwise much improved. Concrete 
walks have been laid in various localities, and many other 
essential improvements have been made in school buildings, 
all of which are more particularly given in the report of the 
Superintendent of Schools. 

The items of the foregoing expenditures will be found in 
the forthcoming Annual Report of the city for 1869. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 
Manchester, Jan. 3, 1870. 

ISAAC W. SMITH, 
JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 
IUNIEL CLARK, 
WM. P. NEWELL, 
JOHN W. JOHNSON, 
SAMUEL P. JACKSON, 
JAMES 0. ADAMS, 

Committee. 



REPORT 



COMMITTEE ON LIBKAEY BUILDING. 



To the City Council of Manchester : 

Gentlemen: — The committee appointed to take charge of 
the erection of a Public Library building upon the lot on 
Franklin street, donated to the city for the purpose by the 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, herewith submit the 
following Report : 

Your Committee employed George W. Stevens, Esq., of 
this city, as architect. From a variety of plans submitted 
by him, your committee unanimously agreed upon one 
which is substantially the same with that approved by the 
committee of 1868. They take pleasure in commending 
the faithful manner in which he has attended to the duties 
assigned him, as well as in attesting to his qualifications for 
such a position. 

The building is constructed in the " Americanized Gothic" 
style of architecture, one story and a basement in height. 
Its extreme dimensions are ninety by forty-nine feet, with a 
wing on either side twelve feet square, "for the librarian's 
room and side entrance, and a tower fourteen feet square 
and fifty-eight feet high, for the principal entrance, stair- 
ways, etc., at the southwest corner. 

The basement story is nine feet high in the clear, and 



212 

extends under the entire building. It is Well lighted and 
ventilated, lias spacious entrances, and can, with all parts 
of the buildings be entirely under the control of the 
librarian. 

The first floor is eighty -six by forty-four feet in the clear, 
with wings on either side, for librarian's office and side en- 
trance, and a tower vestibule at ffie southwest corner, for 
stairways to the basement and west-end gallery or reading 
room. 

The main floor is divided longitudinally into three parts, 
by long columns supporting the roof. The nave is twenty- 
three feet, and the transept eleven feet wide. 

The roof is supported on twelve columns^ from which 
spring, either way, ornamental Gothic arches. 

The nave is to be the general reception or waiting 
room, and the transept will be for books, separated by an 
ornamental rail or fence. 

The entire building is spacious, well lighted and ventil- 
ated, and has all the appointments necessary for a well 
regulated modern library, with capacity large enough for 
one hundred thousand volumes. 

Your committee decided to finish only the outside of the 
building this year. There was appropriated by the city 

In 18G8 85,000 00 

April, 1869 7,500 00 

Dec, 1869 .. . 4,500 00 



Total . . . . .. . 817,000 00 

At the time the appropriation was made in April last, 
your committee were encouraged to believe that at least 
five thousand dollars would be contributed by one of the 
citizens of Massachusetts, largely interested an the mills in 
this place, which would have been sufficient to finish the 
exterior of the building. Your committee are informed 



213 

that this sum will probably be put at the disposal of the 
city at an early day, and will be available for finishing the 
interior of the building. 

In order to enable your committee to meet the expense 
incurred in finishing the exterior of the building, the City 
Council, on the 28th inst., made a transfer from Reserved 
Fund of four thousand five hundred dollars. The com- 
mittee have thus been enabled to pay all bills incurred up 
to this time, and there remains in the city treasury unex- 
pended, a balance of nine hundred and seventy-five dollars 
and six cents, which will be nearly sufficient to meet the 
expense necessary to be incurred hereafter in completing 
the exterior of the building. 

Should the necessary funds be supplied next year, the 
interior of the edifice can be easily finished, when the city 
will have a building substantially fire-proof, well adapted 
for the purpose of a public library, easy of access, and an 
ornament to the city. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Manchester, Dec. 31, 1869. 

ISAAC W. SMITH, 
FREDERIC SMYTH, 
S. N. BELL, 
E. A. STRAW, 
R. P. SILVER, 
WM. P. NEWELL, 
P. K. CHANDLER. 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY 



The Trustees of the City Library respectfully submit' 
their Sixteenth Annual Report of the condition of the 
Library. 

So far as the administration of the ordinary affairs of 
the library is concerned there has occurred no event to 
distinguish the past year from former years. 

The resort to the library-room for reading and borrow- 
ing books has been steadily increasing, and is a gratifying 
indication of the favor in which the library is held, and 
the value it has acquired in the estimation of our citizens. 

The books, when taken out, are generally returned in 
good order, with the exception that the practice of mark- 
ing upon them with pen and pencil seems to be on the in- 
crease- and, in some instances, more serious mutilations 
have been observed. This, without doubt, generally occurs 
from thoughtlessness, rather than any intention to commit 
either wanton or malicious injury; and while it is to be 
regretted that any should so far forget themselves as to 
mar or mutilate the property of the library, the trustees 
have a firm belief that the good judgment and moral 
sense of the community is sufficient to repress any such 
practice whenever their attention is called to the subject. 



216 

The number of volumes not returned at the annual ex- 
amination is quite small, and generally the losses from this 
source are of works of comparatively insignificant value, 
and easily replaced whenever, from the lapse of time, it 
is decided that the books have been lost and there ceases 
to be a reasonable expectation of their return. 

The trustees, in the purchase of books, have adhered to 
the principle which has hitherto guided them, of keeping 
the library supplied, so far as the means at their com- 
mand would enable them to do, with the current literature 
and fresh reading of the day, without, at the same time, 
expending so much in that mode as to deprive themselves 
of the ability to make constant additions of a more perma- 
nent value. 

The increase in the number of volumes in the library? 
as well as in the number of persons availing themselves of 
its privileges, admonishes the trustees that larger and more 
commodious apartments for the use of the library are im- 
peratively demanded, and they are gratified to know that 
since their last report important progress has been made in 
the erection of an elegant and fire-proof building for the 
occupation of the library. Early in the year, an eligible 
lot was secured, through the liberality of the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company, and a building is being erected , 
which, although not yet completed, is so far advanced that 
there seems no reasonable doubt that it may be ready for 
occupation for the library before the end of the next year. 

The report of the librarian shows that, at the date of the 
report of the last year the library contained thirteen thou- 
sand six hundred and sixty-one volumes, that during the 
year there have been added four hundred sixty-three vol- 
umes, — of this number one hundred and forty-eight have 
been purchased, two hundred and one have been presented, 
and one hundred and fourteen volumes of periodicals have 



217 

been bound, — making the total number of volumes now in the 
library, fourteen thousand one hundred and -twenty-four. 

Forty-eight periodicals have been regularly taken and 
placed on the files, and they have been bound and placed 
on the shelves as fast as the volumes have been completed. 

The library has been open for delivery of books two 
hundred sixty days. 

The total circulation, exclusive of books and periodicals 
taken to be used at the library room, has been thirty-two 
thousand four hundred seventy-five, and of this number 
only ten are unaccounted for at the close of the year. 

The number of guarantees taken since the library went 
into operation has been six thousand six hundred forty- 
nine, of which four hundred fifty-three have been added 
the past year. 

The amount received for fines, on account of books de- 
tained beyond the time permitted by the regulations, in- 
cluding the balance on hand January 1, 18G9, has been 
forty-five dollars nine cents, twenty-three dollars seventy- 
five cents of which has been expended by the librarian in 
payment of express charges, postage, stationery and other 
minor expenses, leaving in his hands a balance of twenty- 
one dollars thirty-four cents. 

The trustees, in behalf of the city, tender their thanks 
to those persons who have presented books and pamphlets 
to the library. A list of such donations, with the names 
of the donors, is appended to this report. 

A catalogue of the books, pamphlets and periodicals 
added to the library, arranged in the order of their recep- 
tion, is also appended. 

• The treasurer's report shows the expenditure for books 
and periodicals, and a brief summary of the incidental ex- 
penses incurred in the management of the library. 

The appropriation made at the commencement of the 
year has been sufficient to defray the expenses, and an ap- 



218 

propriation of a similar amount for the coming year will 
be sufficient, unless some unusual expense shall be incurred 
in the removal and re-arrangement of the books in the 
library building, whenever it may be completed. 

An appropriation may be required to supply the neces- 
sary fixtures and furniture for the proper accommodation 
of the library, in the new building, unless the appropriation 
for completing the building should also include the expense 
of furnishing it. 

The liberality of the City Council in providing the 
means and commencing the construction of the building 
for the library leads the trustees to entertain no doubt 
that it will speedily be completed, and will be an orna- 
ment, as well as a credit, to the city, and at the same time 
furnish to the trustees the means of better preserving and 
protecting the valuable property committed to their charge. 

In board of Trustees, Jan. 1, 1870. 
Read and approved. 

ISAAC W. SMITH, 

Mayor, and President ex officio. 
Joseph E. Bennett, Secretary pro tern. 



219 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 
The Treasurer of the Board makes the following report of 
the receipts and expenditures by the Board of the funds 
received by them on account of the City Library. 



1869. 








Dr. 


Jan. 5. 


To balance as per last 








report 


. $320 


26- 




Feb. 8. 


cash of Librarian 


1 


00 




July 21. 


" City Treasurer 100 


00 




Dec. 26. 


a a 


900 


00 


$1,321 26 








1869. 








Cr. 


Jan. 4. 


By paid N". E. News Co. 


816 


32 




12. 


A. Williams & Co. 


9 


22 




Feb. 5. 


N. E. News Co. . 


20 


29 




Mar. 1. 


A. Williams <fc Co. 


.1 


04 




4. 


A. Williams & Co. 


2 


20 




4. 


Wiggin & Lunt 


3 


00 




5. 


N. Y. Lyceum of Nat 










History 


2 


00 




8. 


N. E. News Co. . 


13 


24 




Apr. 1. 


A. Williams & Co. 




30 




5. 


N. E. News Co. . 








5. 


A. Williams & Co. 


2 


10 




5. 


S. H. Scudder 


4 


00 




May 8. 


N. E. News Co. . 


24 


27 




13. 


N. E. News Co. . 


41 


04 




20. 


Lee & Shepard 


6 


50 




June 1. 


N. E. News Co. . 


38 


42 




July 5. 


N. E. News Co. . 


13 


10 




21. 


W. H. Fisk . 


116 


01 




21. 


W. H. Fisk . 


o 
O 


00 





220 



Aug. 9. By paid N. E. News Co 

Sept. 6. N. E. News Co. 

Oct. 4. N. E. News Co. 
11. S. H. Scudder 
18. Temple Prime 
29. C. H. Marshall 

Nov. 8. N. E. News Co. 
26. H. B. Dawson 

Dec. 6. N. E. News Co. 
8. Lee & Shepard 
8. C. H. Marshall 
Balance 



$43 63 



71 


67 


15 


32 


4 


00 


2 


00 


29 


60 


18 


63 


5 


00 


68 


89 


4 


75 


2 


50 


$722 


88 



$1,321 26 



The expenditures for incidental expenses of the Library 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1869, the items of which 
appear at large in the Annual Report of the city, are as 
follows : 



Librarian's salary . 


. $600 00 


Rent ...... 


250 00 


Incidentals .... 


88 24 


Gas ..... 


115 42 


Catalogue .... 


84 00 


Fuel 


71 50 


Insurance . 


57 50 


Printing . 


22 50 


Binding .... 


27 54 



,316 70 



221 



RECAPITULATION. 



Appropriation $2,500 00 

Paid Trustees .... $1,000 00 

Paid incidental expenses . . 1,316 70 

Balance 183 30 



Respectfully submitted. 



$2,500 00 



S. N. BELL, 
Treasurer of the Trustees of the City Library. 

Dec. 31, 1869. We have examined the above report 
and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

WM, P. NEWELL, 
ISAAC. W. SMITH, 

Committee of Accounts of the City Library. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the Trustees of the City Library, and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

Dec. 31, 1869. City Auditor. 



222 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

The following is a report of the practical workings of 
the Library for the year 1869, also of its present condition, 
and is respectfully submitted. 

According to the report of last year there were in the 
library thirteen thousand, six hundred and sixty-one vol- 
umes. At the present time, the whole number, including 
pamphlets and maps, is fourteen thousand, one hundred 
and twenty-four volumes. Of these, thirteen are maps, 
seven hundred and fifty are pamphlets, and thirteen thou- 
sand three hundred and sixty-one are bound volumes. In- 
cluded in the sum total are those too much worn for circu- 
lation, and now laid aside, numbering two hundred and 
eleven, an average of thirteen annually since the organiza- 
tion of the library. Of those worn out there have been 
replaced twenty-five. The w r hole number lost since the 
library was first opened is one hundred and fifty-four, an 
average of nine per year. These are of that class for 
which there is the greatest demand, and should be re- 
placed as far as practicable. 

The increase for the year is four hundred and sixty-three 
volumes and pamphlets. Of these, one hundred and forty- 
eight were by purchase ; two hundred and one were pre- 
sented, of which one hundred and forty-one are pamphlets, 
— a list of them, with names of the donors, being appended 
to this report, — and one hundred and fourteen are volumes 
of periodicals bound and placed on the shelves. The num- 
ber of periodicals for use at the library is fifty-eight. It 
was thought best to discontinue two magazines, the "Lon- 
don Society" and "Sixpenny Magazine," early in the year, 
and others were taken in their places. 

The library has been opened for the delivery of books 



223 

two hundred and sixty days. The number of volumes 
loaned during this time, for circulation, is thirty-two thou- 
sand, four hundred and seventy-five, an average of one 
hundred and twenty-five per day. The largest number de- 
livered in any one day was two hundred and nineteen, April 
19. Largest number delivered in any one month was three 
thousand five hundred and seventy-four, in March. Usually 
a greater number are loaned during this month than any 
other in the year. Ten only are unaccounted for. These 
are not considered as lost, and will undoubtedly be re- 
turned. A partial account has been kept of readers in the 
room ; the number is not far from one hundred and fifty 
per week. 

The books are generally well cared for, although some 
are defaced by pen and pencil marks. If these were all 
thoroughly erased, the inclination would be much less to 
continue the practice. This cannot be easily done without 
more labor than could be consistently given, and perform- 
ance of the other duties beside. There are three or four 
instances of persons losing books, but their value was at 
once refunded. One or two instances of catalogues being 
taken from the library tables are noted. Only a small num- 
ber can be kept at the desk, often not as many as are really 
needed, as the inclination to take them seems to be greater 
when a large number is in use. Two books have been found 
that were lost before the commencement of the year, one 
of them having been missing eight years. 

The whole number of guarantees taken to date is six 
thousand six hundred and forty-nine. Four hundred and 
fifty-three were received during the year ; an average of 
forty-one per month. Six persons have deposited money 
for the use of books. 

The amount of money received for fines on hand Janu- 
ary 1, 1869, was three dollars and eight cents. During the 
year there has been received for fines forty-two dollars and 



224 

one cent. Paid express charges, stationery, postage, and 
other minor incidentals, in all twenty-three dollars and 
seventy-five cents ; leaving a balance of twenty-one dollars 
and thirty-four cents. 

It may be of interest to the Board to notice a few statis- 
tics relative to the workings of the library for the past ten 
years. 

Whole number of additions, seven thousand and six 
hundred volumes and pamphlets ; average per year, seven 
hundred and sixty. Whole number of books loaned for 
circulation, three hundred and sixty-two thousand and 
four hundred ; average per year, thirty-six thousand two 
hundred and forty ; average per day, one hundred and 
thirty. Smallest number loaned in one year, thirty thou- 
sand, in 1861 ; average per day, one hundred and nineteen. 
Largest number loaned, forty-one thousand four hundred 
and seventy-five, in 1866 ; average per day, one hundred 
and forty-six. Increase in delivery of books the last five 
years over five years preceding, two thousand. Whole 
number of guarantees taken, four thousand two hundred 
and seventy-four ; average per year, four hundred and 
twenty-seven. Smallest number received in one year, two 
hundred and ninety-six, in 1860. Largest number re- 
ceived, five hundred and fifteen, in 1867. Increase of 
guarantees the last five years over five years preceding, 
six hundred. 

C. H. MARSHALL, 
Librarian. 

December 31, 1869. 



225 



DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY IN 1869. 

By Hon. J. W. Patterson, Washington. 

Diplomatic Correspondence. 2 vols. 1868. 8vo. 
By Hon. A. H. Cragin, Washington. 

Report of Secretary of War. 2 vols. 1867. 8vo. 
Report of Secretary of the Navy. 1867. 8vo. 
Report of Secretary of the Interior. 2 vols. 1867. 

8vo. 
Report of Paymaster-General. 1867. 8vo. 
Diplomatic Correspondence. 2 vols. 1867. 8vo. 
By Prof. Benjamin Peirce, Washington. 

U. S. Coast Survey. 1866. 4to. 
By J. W. Alvord, Esq., Washington. 

Semi-Annual Reports on Schools for Freedmen. 1868- 
69. '3 pamphlets. 
By Prof. C. H. Hitchcock, Hanover. 

First Annual Report upon Geology and Mineralogy of 
New Hampshire. 1869. Pamphlet. 
By John J. Bell, Esq., Exeter. 

Proceedings of the M. W. Grand Lodge of New Hamp- 
shire. 1868. Pamphlet. 
By Hon. Daniel Clark, Manchester. 

Report of Superintendent of Freedmen. 1864. Pam- 
phlet. 
By Hon. Charles Hudson, Lexington, Mass. 
History of Lexington, Mass. 1868. 8vo. 
By Hon. Jacob F. James, Manchester. 

Report of Hillsborough County Commissioners. 1868. 
Pamphlet. 
By Hon. Joseph B. Clark, Manchester. 

Charge of Hon. Henry A. Bellows to Grand Jury, May 
Term, 1868. Pamphlet. 

15 



226 

By Joseph E. Bennett, Esq., Manchester. 

Catalogue of Officers and Students of Dartmouth Col- 
ledge. 1866-67. Pamphlet. 

Concord R. R. Corporation vs. George Clough. Argu- 
ment of John II. George. 1869. Pamphlet. 

Annual Reports of Schools in Concord. 1868. Pamph. 

Annual Reports of Dover. 1867. Pamphlet. 

Annual Reports o? Concord. 1867. Pamphlet. 

Annual Reports of Bangor, Me. 1867. Pamphlet. 

Annual Reports of New Bedford, Mass. 1868. Pamph. 

Annual Reports of Worcester, Mass. 1867. Pamph. 

Annual Reports of New Haven, Conn. 1867. Pamph. 

Annual Reports of Hartford, Conn. 1867. Pamphlet. 

Report of N. H. Missionary Society. 1862-64. Pamph. 

Public Laws of U. S. 1861. 8vo. 
By Dr. Leonard French, Manchester. 

Memorial of the Class of '43, Dartmouth College. 
1869. 8vo. 
By Rev. T. P. Sawin, Manchester. 

Annual Report of City Missionary Society, Manchester. 

1868. Pamphlet. 

By J. W. Meader, Esq., Manchester. 

The Merrimack River : its Source and its Tributaries. 

1869. 8vo. 

By James 0. Adams, Esq., Manchester. 

Memorial of the Class of '43, Dartmouth College. 
1869. 8vo. 
By C. F. Livingston, Esq., Manchester. 

Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire, 

1789 to 1856. 2 vols. 8vo. 
Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire, 
. 1863 to 1868. 8vo. 
By M. P. Hall, Esq., Manchester. 

Message and Reports to the General Assembly and to 
the Governor of Ohio. 1860. 2 vols. 8vo. 



227 

School Laws of Ohio. 1862. 8vo. 
By S. C. Gould, Esq., Manchester. 

The Farmer's Monthly Visitor. Yol. 12. 1852. 8vo. 
By P. J. O'Neil, Esq., Manchester. 

Lives of Eminent Christians of Various Denominations. 
1852. 8vo. 
By Mrs. A. A. Hanscom, Manchester. 

History of the Consumptive's Home, Boston. 12mo. 
By Mrs. H. C. Sanderson, Manchester. 

The Guardian. 1754. 12mo. 
By N. H. State Library. 

Journals of the Senate and House, from 1826. 19 
vols. 8vo. 
By the Board. 

Report of Ohio Board of Agriculture. 1859. 8vo. 
By Trustees Boston Public Library. 

Index to Catalogue of Public Library. 1859. 8vo. 

A Memorial of Joshua Bates, Esq. 1865. 8vo. 

Presentation of a Bust and Portrait of Joshua Bates, 
Esq., to Public Library. 1866. 8vo. 

An Ordinance in relation to the Public Library. 1869. 
Pamphlet. 

Circular of the Patrons of Bowditch Library on occa- 
sion of the Presentation to Public Library. 1858. 
Pamphlet. 

Annual Reports of Public Library from 1852. 13 
pamphlets. 

Finding Lists of Public Library. 5 pamphlets. 

Bulletins of Public Library. 11 pamphlets. 
By Trustees Astor Library, N. Y. 

Annual Report of 1868. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Lowell Public Library. 

Annual Report of 1868. Pamphlet. 
By Weston (Mass.) Town Library. 

Annual Report of 1868. 



228 

By Brookline (Mass.) Town Library. 

Annual Report of 1868. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Holton Library, Brighton, Mass. 

Annual Report of 18G8. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Taunton (Mass.) Public Library. 

Annual Report of 1868. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Peabooy (Mass.) Institute. 

Annual Reports, from 1859. 8 pamphs. 
By Trustees Worcester Public Library. 

Annual Report of 1868. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Manchester Public Library. 
Animal Reports, 1863 to 1868. 6 pamphs. 
Catalogue and Supplements of Public Library, 1863- 
68. 7 pamphs. 
By Directors Providence (R. I.) Athenaeum. 

Annual Report of 1868-69. Pamphlet. 
By Directors Y. M. Mercantile Association, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 
Annual Report of 1868. Pamphlet. 
By Directors Odd Fellows' Library Association, San 
Francisco, Cal. 
Annual Report of 1868. Pamphlet. 
By Librarian Winchester (Mass.) Town Library. 

By-Laws and Catalogue of Town Library, 1868. Pamph. 
By Commissioners of Patents. 

Report on Patents. (Agriculture.) 1859-61. 2 vols. 
8vo. 
By Commissioners Hillsborough County. 

Report of the Commissioners. 1868. Pamphlet. 
By Committee Y. M. Association, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Report of Executive Committee of 1868. Pamphlet. 
Hon. Daniel Clark has presented the Library a copy of 
the " Resolution for the Abolition of Slavery," with the 
original signatures of the signers, nicely framed. 



229 

Mr. V. W. Fairbanks has presented the Library a case of 
birds, stuffed and mounted, comprising seventeen va- 
rieties. In order that it may not be injured by dust, it 
should be inclosed within a glass case. 

Mr. S. C. Gould has at different times presented the Li- 
brary with copies of rare newspapers published in Man- 
chester, and other specimens of printing. These, when 
bound, will make quite an interesting volume. 



230 



ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY FROM JANUARY 
TO DECEMBER, 1869. 

Gen. No. No. Shelf. 

13,659 Goethe and Schiller. "L. Muhlbnch." (Mrs. C. Mnndt.) 8vo. . . 47 84 
13,6:0 Prince Eugene and his Times. "L.Muhlbach." (Mrs. C. Mundt.) 

8vo 48 84 

13,661 Palace and Cottage. "Oliver Optic." (W.T.Adams.) 12mo. . 72 179 

13,062 Annual Report of Trustees Boston Public Library, 1868. Pamph. 17-44 351 

13.663 Proceedings of M. W. Grand Lodge of New Hampshire. 1868. 

Pamph 3-30 351 

13.664 Report of Superintendent of Freedmen, 1864. Pamph. . . . 4-30 351 

13.665 Frank Leslie's Magazine. Vol. 23, 2, 1868 32 161 

13.666 Godey's Lady's Magazine. Vol. 77, 2, 1868 71 173 

13.667 Peterson's Magazine. Vol. 54, 2, 1868 36 194 

13.668 Arthur's Home Magazine. Vol. 32, 2, 1868. . . • . . . 42 193 

13.669 Our Young Folks. Vol. 4, 1868 , . . 46 166 

13.670 Student and Schoolmate. Vols. 21, 22, 1868 53 164 

13.671 The Galaxy. Vol. 6, 2, 1868 60 176 

13.672 Harper's Monthly Magazine. Vol. 37, 2, 18G8 48 153 

13.673 Atlantic Monthly. Vol. 22, 2, 1868 46 186 

13.674 Putnam's Magazine. Vol. 2, 2, 1868 63 174 

13.675 Eclectic Magazine. Vol. 7, 2, 1868 , . 55 183 

13.676 Littell's Living Age. Vol. 98, 3, 1868 68 1G5 

13.677 London Society. Vol. 14, 2, 1866 04 175 

13.678 Temple Bar. Vol. 23, 2, 1868 46 197 

13.679 Cornhill Magazine. Vol. 17, 1, 1868 17 85 

13.680 Journal of Franklin Institute. Vol. 85, 1, 1868 . . . . 50 163 
13,081 Westminster Review. Vol. 89, 1, 1868 47 172 

13.682 London Quarterly Review. Vol. 124, 1, 1868 60 172 

13.683 North British Review. Vol. 48, 1, 1868 46 173 

13.684 Edinburgh Review. Vol. 127, 1, 1868 59 173 

13.685 Heraldic Journal. Vol. 3, 1808 79 184 

13.686 Mechanics' Magazine. Vol. 19, 1, 1868 46 192 

13.687 London Lancet. 1868 39 171 

13,688-9 American Journal of Science and Arts. B. Silliman. A'ols. 45-6, 

2 vols. 1858 45 176 

13.690 Littell's Living Age. Vol. 99, 3, 1868 69 165 

13.691 North American Review. Vol. 107, 2, 1868 49 177 

13,092 N. E. Historical and Genealogical Register. Vol. 22, 1808 . . 29 265 

13,693 Chamber's Journal. 1867 34 253 

13,094- Sixpenny Magazine. Vol. 3, 1808 44 166 

13,095 History of the Consumptive's Home, Boston, 1868, 12mo. . . 45 40 

13.696 Our Boys and Girls, 1868 ... 44 167 

13.697 Nick Nax. Vol. 12, 1807-8 22 81 

13.698 Frank Leslie's Magazine. Vol. 22, 1, 1868 31 161 

13,099 (Executive Documents.) Report Secretary of War, 1807 . . 41367 

13,700-1 (Executive Documents.) Reports Secretary of Navy, 1867. 2 vols. 42 307 
13,702-3 (Executive Documents.) Reports Secretary of the Interior. 2 vols. 

1867 44 367 

13,704 (Executive Documents.) Report of Postmaster-General, 1867 . 46 307 



281 

13,705-G (Executive Documents.) Diplomatic Correspondence. 2 vols. 1SG7, 47 3C7 

13.707 Merchants Magazine. Vol. 59, 2, 1S68 25 84 

13.708 Popular Science Review. Vol. 7, 1868 41164 

13.709 Proceedings of Academy Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, 1867 . 29 353 

13.710 The Horticulturist. Vol. 23, 1868 48 204 

13.711 Historical Magazine. Vol. 3, 1SG8 47 244 

.13,712-13 London Artizau. Vols. 25-6, 1867-8 12 301 

13,714 Proceedings of Grand Lodge of Masons of Mew Hampshire, 

1863-68. 8vo 48 205 

13,715-16 Annual Reports Trustees Lowell Public Library. 1867-0.-;. Pamp. 4,27 351 

13.717 Annual Report Trustees New Bedford Public Library, 1868-9. 

Pamph 6-27 351. 

13.718 Catalogue Officers and Students of Dartmouth College, 1S6G-7 

Pamp6 1-18 351 

13.719 (Concord R. R. Corp. vs. George Clough.) Argument of John H. 

George. 1869. Pamph 2-18 351 

13,820 Annual Reports of Concord. 1868. Pamph 3-18 351 

13.721 Annual Reports of Dover. 1867. Pamph 4-18 351 

13.722 Annual Reports of Concord. 1867. Pamph 5-18 351 

13.723 Annual Reports of Nashua. 1867-8. Pamph 6-18 351 

13.724 Annual Reports of Bangor, Me. 1867-8. Pamph 7-18 351 

13,72.5 Annual Reports of New Bedford. 1867. Pajnph 8-18 351 

13,726 Annual Reports of New Haven, Conn. 1867-8. Pamph. . . 9-18 351 

14,7-7 Annual Reports of Hartford, Conn. 1866-7. Pamph, . . . 1-19 351 

13.728 Annual Reports of Worcester, Mass. 1*67. Paraph. . . . 2-19 351 

13.729 Public Laws of U.S. 1861. 8vo 41 324 

13,730-31 Annual Reports N.H. Missionary Society. 1862-64. Pamph. . 1-20 351 

13.732 Countess of Rudolstadt. "Geo. Sand." (Madame Dudevant.) 8vo. 31 133 

13.733 Harper's Weekly. Vol. 12, 1868 12 G 

13.734 Scientific American. Vol.19, 1868 24 J 

13,734 Manchester Daily Union. 1867-68. 4 vols 7 J 

13,739-42 Daily Mirror and American. 1867-08. 4 vols 17 H 

13.743 History of Lexington, Mass. Chas. Hudson. 1868. 8vo . , 41212 

13.744 Annual Report Y. M. Mercantile Library Association, Pittsburgh, 

Pa. 1868. Pamph 7-27 351 

13.745 Letter of X. G. Ordway to N. H. Republican State Committee. 

1869. Pamph • 2-31 351 

13.746 Charge of Hon. Henry A. Bellows to Grand Jury, Hillsborough 

County, May Term, 1868. Pamph 15-22 351 

13.747 Watson's Catalogue of Fruit Trees, etc. 1869. Pamph. . . . 3-31351 

13.748 Miner's Patent Lamp. 1860. Pamph 3-20 351 

13,749-50 Catalogues of Private Libraries. 8vo 34 324 

33.751 Manual of Civil Engineering. W. J. Ranking. 12mo . . . 61257 

13.752 Annual Reports Weston, Mass. 1868-9. Pamph 10-21 351 

13.753 Annual Report Y. M. Mercantile Library Association, Cincin- 

nati, O. 1868. Pamph 27-8 351 

13.754 Annual Reports Brookline, Mass. 1868. Pamph 1-33 351 

1-3,755 Annual Report Manchester City Mission. 1868. Pamph. . . 4-20 351 

13.756 Catalogue S. S. Library, Hanover street Society, Manchester. 

Pamph 3-32 351 

13.757 List of Newpapers published in U. S. 24mo 43 360 

13.758 Photographic Journal. Vol. 12, 1868 • 23 323 

13.759 Westminster Review. Vol. 90, 2, 1868 48 172 

13,760-61 Blackwood's Magazine. Vols. 103-104, 1808 49 175 



232 



13,762 
13,763 
13,764-6 
13,767 
13,768 
13,769 
13,770 
13,771-72 
13,773 
13,774 
^3,775 
13,776 
13,777 
13,778 
13,779 

13,780 
13,781 

13,782 

13,783 
13,784 
13,785 
13,786 
13,787 
13,788 
13,789 
13,790 

13,791 

13.792 

13,793 

1?,794 

13,795 

13,796 

13,797 

13,79 

13,79 

13,80 

13,8 
13,802 

13 803 

13,804-5 

13,806-7 

13,808 

13,809 

13,810 

13,811 

13,812 

13,813 

13,814-15 



Cotton Supply Reporter. 1864-5 

Townsend's Parisian Costumes. 1868 .... 
London Punch. Yols. 53-55, 1867-8 .... 

Once-a-Week. Vol. 2, 2, 186S 

Journal of Franklin Institute. Vol. 86, 2, 1S68 
Publisher's Circular. (London.) Vol. 31, 1868 . 
Harper's Monthly Magazine. Vol. 36, 1, 1868 . 
Student and Intellectual Observer. Vols. 1-2, 1867-8 
American Naturalist. Vol. 2, 1868 .... 

Leisure Hour. 1868 

Mechanics' Magazine. Vol. 20, 2, 1868 

Art Journal (London). Vol 7, 1868 .... 

Illustrated Catalogue of Universal Exhibition. (Paris). 1867, 4to, 

Annual Report Trustees Astor Library, New York, 1868. Pamph, 

Annua! Report Trustees Holton Library, Brighton, Mass., 1868 

Pamph 

Annual Report Y. M. Association of Buffalo, N. Y. 1868. Pamph 
Annual Report Hillsboro' County Commissioners. 1868. Paaiph 
Annual Report Directors, Worcester, (Mass.,) Public Library 

1868. Pamph 

The General ; or, Twelve Nights in the Hunters' Camp. 12 mo. 
Adventures in the Wilderness. Rev. Wm. H. H. Murray. 12mo 
Rifle and Hound in Ceylon. S. W. Baker. 12mo. 
Gold Hunters in Europe. W. H. Thomes. 12mo. 
" Josh Billings " on Ice, and other Things. 12mo. 
Man with the Broken Ear. Edmond About. 12mo. 
Gloverson and his Silent Partners. Ralph Keeler. 12iuo. 
Tricotrin: or, Story of a Waif and Stray. "Ouida," (MissL.de 

la Rame.) 12mo. 

Villa on the Rhine. Berthold Auerbach. Vol.1. 12mo. 
The Gates Ajar. Miss E. S. Phelps. 12mo. 
Men, Women and Ghosts. Miss E. S. Phelps. 12mo. . 
Ingham Papers. E. E. Hale. 12 mo. .... 

The Gates Wide Open. George Wood. 12 mo. 

Edelweiss. Berthold Auerbach. 16mo 

'""•o Lite-Paths. " L. Muhlbach." (Mrs. C. Mundt.) 12mo. 
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Auerbach 

The Factory Girl. Miss M. E. Braddon. 8vo. 
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8vo 




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233 

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13.824 Essays on the Greek Christian Poets. Mrs. E. B. Browning. 16mo. 52 109 

13.825 Digest of Reports of U. S. Courts. Vol. 4. 81110 24 3 

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13.827 Ethelyn's Mistake. Mary J. Holmes. 12mo 67 107 

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13.829 The Amazon. F. Dinyelstedt. 12mo 46 136 

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13,81 Annual Report Trustees Taunton Public Library. 1868. Pamph. 13-27 351 

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234 



13.874 The Merrimack River ; its Source and its Tributaries. J. W. Hea- 

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13.876 Memorial of the Class of '43, Dartmouth College. 1869. 8vo . 24 303 

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2. 8vo 38 133 

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13.894 American Journal of Science and Arts. B. Silliman. Vol. 47, 1, 

1869 47 176 

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13.902 Lives of Eminent Christians of Various Denominations. John 

Frost. 8vo 26 272 

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Pamph 14-40 351 

J3.918 Villa on the Rhine. Berthold Auerbach. Vol. 2. 12nio . . 56 134 

13.919 Church of the Catacombs. W. Wiseman. 12mo . . . . 59 134 

13.920 Gardening for Profit. Peter Henderson. 12mo . . . . 56 229 

13.921 Practical Floriculture. Peter Henderson. 12mo .... 57 229 

13.922 Memorial of the class of '43, Dartmouth College. 1869. 8vo . . 25 303 
13,923-5 History of Architect ore. James Fergarson. 3 vols. Svo . . 15 212 
13, 926 Rjport of Ohio Board of Agriculture. 1859. 8vo . . . . 16 369 
13,927-8 Reports Commissioners of Patents. 1859-61. 8vo . . . . 17 369 
13,929-30 Reports to theGeneral Assembly an 1 Governor of Ohio. 1860. Svo. 

2 vols 19 369 

13,931 Ohio School Laws. 1862. Svo 21 369 



235 



13,932 

13,933 
13,934 
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13,983 
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13,985 



4to 



12mo 
l'2nio 



Ancient Pictorial History of the World. 
Life of Washington. J. Sparks. 8vo . 
Life of J. C. Fremont. 12mo 
Life of Chas. Sumner. 12mo 



Frost. 



(M 



vo 



P. Trim- 



ire, 
Paraph 
89-1856. 



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ble. 4to 

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Annual Report upon Geology and Mineralogy of New Hampsh 

Annual Report Hartford Young Men's Institute 

Proceedings M. W. Grand Lodge of New Hampshire, 

Vols. 1-2 

Report Superintendent U. S. Coast Survey. 1866 

Good Words. 1808 

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Daily News. Vol. 1, 1, 1869 

Daily Mirror and American. Vol. 35, 1, 1869 

Manchester Daily Union. Vol. 6, 1, 1869 . 

Manchester Daily Union. Vol. 2, 1, 1865 . 

Harper's Monthly Magazine. Vol. 7, 2, 1853 

Sartain's Union Magazine. Vol. 4. 1849 . 

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rs. J 



46 202 


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13,9SC Poetical Works of Tlios. Hood. 12mo 64 96 

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13.992 English Grammar. G. Brown. 13mo. 1845 44 360 

13.993 Rhetorical Reader. E. Porter. 12mo. 1839 45 360 

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13.995 Book of Cookery. Sarah J. Hale. 12mo 61 207 

13.996 Philosophy of Health. L. B. Coles. ]2mo 62 207 

13.997 Homoeopathic Domestic Medicine. J. Laurie. 1846. 12mo . . 63 207 

13.998 Gleason's Pictorial. Vol. 1, 1851 IK 

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14,0f2 Manual of Qualitative Chemical Analysis. Eliot and Storer . . 58 2-9 

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14.004 Dictionary of Manufactures, Mining, etc. Geo. Dodd. 12mo. . 62 257 

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14.012 Slide-Valve aud Link Motion. W. S. Auchincloss. 8vo. . . 32 314 
14,613 Glide in Construction of Machine Gearing. T. M. Joynson. 8vo. 33 314 

14.014 Investigations of Formulas for Strength of parts in Steam Ma- 

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14.015 The Plane-Table in Topographical Engineering . . . . 35 314 

14.016 Manual of Topographical Drawing. R.S.Smith. 8vo . . . 36 314 

14.017 Account of Iron Railway Bridge across the Mississippi river at 

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14.027 Report on Schools of Freedmen. 1869. Pamph. . . . 1-47 351 

14.028 Once-a-Week. 1899. Vol. 1 50 174 

14.029 Historical Magazine. Vol. 5. 1, 1869 49 244 

14.030 Punch (London). Vol. 56, 1, 1863 26 82 

14,031-43 Journals of Senate aud House, New Hampshire. 19 vols. 1828- 

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14.050 Memoirs Long Island Historical Society. Vol. 3. 1869. 8vo. . 44 251 

14.051 Index to Catalogue Boston Public Library. 1868. 8vo. . . 20 313 

14.052 Memorial of Joshua Bates, Esq., Boston. 1865. 8vo. ... 26 303 



237 

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14,054-5 Pamphlets relating to Boston Public Library. 2 pamph. . .16-22 351 

14.056 Journal of Franklin Institute. Vol. 57, 1. 1809. . ... . 52 163 

14.057 Edinburgh Review. Vol. 128, 2. -:86S 60 173 

14.058 Magazine of Horticulture. Vol. 34. 1868 52 187 

14.059 National Quarterly Review. Vol. 18, 1. 1869 58 196 

14.060 American Woman's Home. C. E. Beecher and H. B. Stowe. 8vo. 84 188 

14.061 Report on Filtration of River Waters. James P. Kirkwod. 4to . 31 C 

14.062 Annual Report Directors Providence (R. I.) Athenasum. 1868-9. 

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14,102-124 Annual Reports of Manchester. 1847-1869. Pamph. . . . 1-48 351 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER 



In Board of School Committee, 7 
December 29, 1869. ) 

The Superintendent presented his Annual Report, which was 
read and accepted. 

M. P. HALL, Clerk. 



Dec. 31, 1869. 
Mr. Clark, Special Committee appointed to prepare the Annual 
Report, presented the accompanying, which was adopted by the 
Board and ordered to be presented to the City Council. 

M. P. HALL, Clerk. 



In Board of Common Council, ) 
January 3, 1870. j 
The Annual Reports of the School Committee and Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction were read and accepted, and ordered to 
be printed in the Annual Reports. 

E. D. HADLEY, Clerk. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 7 
Jan. 3, 1870. J 

In concurrence read, accepted and ordered to be printed. 

J. E. BENNETT, City Clerk. 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1869. 



JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

Superintendent op Public Instruction. 

Office, No. 5 City Hall. 
Office hours from 8 to 9 a. m., school days. 

DANIEL CLARK, 

Chairman Board of Education. 

MARSHALL P. HALL, 

Clerk Board of Education. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

-Henry T. Mowatt. 
-Marshall P. Hall. 
-Daniel Clark. 
-Samuel Upton. 
-William Little. 
-Elbridge D. Hadley, 
-James Dean. 
-T. S. Montgomery. 

Regular Meetings of the Board, Friday evenings, 7 1-2 
o'clock. Approval of Bills, last Friday of each month. 
1G 



Ward 1. 


Ward 2. 


Ward 3. 


Ward 4. 


Ward 5. 


Ward 6. 


Ward 7. 


Ward 8. 



242 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOAKD. 

Finance, Accounts and Claims. — Messrs. Clark, Mowatt, 
Little and Dean. 

Repairs, Furniture and Supplies. — Messrs. Edgerly, Dean 
and Hall. 

Text-Books and Apparatus.— Messrs. Upton, Edgerly and 
Clark. 

Printing and Stationery. — Messrs. Hall, Montgomery and 
Edgerly. 

Fuel and Keating. — Messrs. Montgomery, Edgerly, Had- 
ley and Mowatt. 

Examination of Teachers. — -Messrs. Little, Upton, Edg- 
erly and Hadley. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

Messrs. Clark, Upton and Dean, — Schools in High school 
building, schools on Concord street, and suburban schools 
Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 9. 

Messrs. Little and Hadley, — Schools in Intermediate build- 
ing and in old High school building. 

Messrs. Mowatt and Upton, — Schools on Spring street. 

Messrs. Hall and Little, — Schools on Franklin street. 

Messrs. Hall and Clark, — Schools on Park street. 

Messrs. Dean and Hadley, — Schools in Piscataquog, and 
suburban Schools Nos. 3, 4 and 5. 

Messrs. Montgomery and Mowatt, — Schools at Amoskeag, 
on Blodgett street, and suburban school No. 1. 

Messrs. Upton and Montgomery, — Schools on Merrimack 
street, at Wilson Hill, and Tovvlesville. 

Messrs. Hadley and Hall, — Evening schools. 

Messrs. Clark and Dean, — on Music. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



To the City Council of the City of Manchester : 

The School Gommittee for the year 1869 respectfully 
make report that there have been taught in the city, dur- 
ing the past year, forty-six different day schools, to wit : 
one High ; six Grammar ; ten Middle ; twenty Primary ; 
one Intermediate ; and eight ungraded, suburban schools. 
The whole number of scholars attending these schools lias 
been 3500 ; the average attendance, 2100 ; and they have 
been taught by seventy-eight different teachers, — ten males, 
and sixty-eight females. The actual number of teachers 
required to teach these schools, at the same time, was 
sixty-three ; but more have been employed, not at the same 
time, but at different times during the year, on account of 
the changes which have taken place. 

The wages of these teachers have varied, among the 
males from eight hundred dollars to eighteen hundred, and 
among the females from three hundred and fifty dollars to 
eight hundred. Only one teacher, the principal of the High 
school, has received eighteen hundred, and only two, the 
principal of the South Grammar and of the North Gram- 
mar, for part of the time, have received fifteen hundred 
dollars ; while three have received eleven, twelve, and thir- 
teen hundred dollars respectively. Other males have re- 
eived from eight to nine hundred dollars. 

One female teacher has received eight hundred part of 
the year, another five hundred all the year ; another five, 



244 

and another four hundred and fifty, each, part of the year. 
Most of the other females have received four hundred dollars 
each ; new teachers three hundred and fifty or seventy- 
live dollars, according to their experience. 

In addition to the above teachers, two music teachers 
have been employed, one at the rate of nine hundred, and 
the other at five hundred and fifty dollars, according to the 
service performed. 

Three evening schools have also been taught, at which 
two hundred children have attended who could not attend 
the day schools. These last schools, with one or more day 
schools, have been of "various tribes and kindred." Some 
of the children are unable to read or speak a word of the 
English language, making the employment of a French 
teacher indispensable. 

The whole expense of maintaining and carrying on these 
schools, aside from repairs of school-houses, has been $39,- 
201.86. Of this amount of $39,201.86, there have been 
paid 

For Teaching .... $31,543 62 

Fuel 2,691 78 

Furniture and supplies . 1,757 29 
Janitors and care of school- 
houses . . . . 1,595 11 
Books and stationery . . 794 82 
Various other necessary pur- 
poses .... 819 24 

The city council appropriated $40,000.00 for schools for 
the year 1869, aside from repairs of school-houses, and de- 
ficiences. It will thus be seen that the schools have been 
supported inside the appropriation, leaving a balance of 
$798.14 not expended directly upon the schools. It must 
not, however, be supposed this balance is now in the treas- 
ury, or that it will be carried forward to another year. The 



245 

committee understand it has all been expended, and in this 
way :— 

In addition to the $40,000.00 appropriated for schools, 
the city council also appropriated $4,707.50 to pay the defi- 
ciency of the year 1868, arising mainly from the change of 
the close of the school year from November 30 to Decem- 
ber 31, to make it correspond with the close of the fiscal 
year, thus lengthening the school year of 18G8 one month. 
This amount of deficiency was ascertained and fixed by the 
treasurer's books, as they then stood, taking the bills which 
had already been paid. But it "turned out" that not all 
the bills for 1868 had at that time been presented and paid ; 
and that other bills for 1868 were outstanding, to the fur- 
ther amount of $ 1,536 .01, which had to be provided for; 
and thus was absorbed the balance of 1798.14, and more 
from other sources.* The fact, however, remains, that 
the schools of the year 1869, including the evening schools, 
have been conducted within the sum of 840,000.00 appro- 
priated, not including repairs of school-houses. 

For repairs of school-houses the sum of $8,500.00 was 
appropriated, to be expended by another committee. This 
lias been done. During the year some of the bouses have 
been enlarged, some furnished with new heating apparatus 
and new seated and furnished, and others repaired and im- 
proved. They are generally in a good condition. 

The old High school-house on Lowell street ban been 
" fitted up" and used for the East Grammar school, which 
has been made a full grammar school, of four divisions. 

A foundation has been put in for a new house at Goffe's 
Falls, and materials purchased and work commenced for a 
new grammar school-house on the new lot purchased by 
the city on Lincoln street. 

More school room, however, is still needed in certain 

* Since the above was written an appropriation has been made to cover the defi- 
ciency. 



246 

parts of the city. In ward seven the houses are very much 
crowded, and are too few. The present houses are over- 
run, and children are increasing in this ward very fast, 
from immigration of foreign families, and other causes. 

In one of the schools four-fifths of the scholars are of 
Celtic descent. They are generally anxious to learn, and 
it becomes a matter of great importance, not only to the 
children and the parents, but to the community, that they 
should be provided with the means of education, — fitted 
to acquire a livelihood in some of the various useful occupa- 
tions, raised in the social scale, and made honest and wor- 
thy citizens. Thus only can be counteracted the dangers 
of a large foreign population, and thus only can be secured 
the highest advantages which their strong muscles can 
confer. 

The committee take great pleasure in bearing witness 
to the general excellence and faithfulness of the teachers 
that have been employed. Many of them can scarcely be 
excelled, in their several stations, for scholarship, dig- 
nity of deportment, purity of character, or skill and tact in 
teaching. Some have succeeded better than others, but 
all have been faithful. Some changes have been necessary, 
yet the committee feel that all have tried to d^> their best. 

One teacher has died during the year. She was success- 
ful in her vocation, an estimable young lady, a daughter of 
one of our citizens, educated amongst us. She promised 
usefulness here, but has been removed by " angel hands/' 
and we here pay to her the tribute due to acknowledged 
worth. 

The wages paid to these teachers, the committee have 
not regarded as too high. It is of great importance to the 
schools that the teachers should be, to a good degree, per- 
manent. Yet we are constantly having our best teachers 
picked away by those who are willing to pay more than we 
do, or perhaps can, for their services, and so we are left 



247 

to fill vacancies made by the selection of those whom we 
should be glad to keep. 

We cannot long boast of superior schools, if they are 
allowed thus to be culled and drained. Good schools can- 
not exist without good teachers, and the best teachers are 
the cheapest. They can only be retained by adequate 
wages. Oftentimes, with an indifferent teacher, the school 
makes no progress, and the money expended is worse than 
thrown away. There are teachers in our schools who 
should be retained at any reasonable price, and but very 
few that it is desirable to change. But these changes will 
occur, do the best we may ; and vacancies have to be filled. 
The question will often come suddenly and sharply, "Who 
shall take that place ?" And, upon looking round, there is 
not to be found readily just the person desired. To supply 
this want the committee have, during the year, established 
a training-school for teachers — not a distinct localily or 
school-house for that purpose, but a plan which should se- 
cure that object. They have provided for the selection of 
young ladies, who purpose to devote themselves to teach- 
ing and who are willing thus to be employed, and have 
placed them, without compensation, in some of the schools 
with old and experienced teachers, to acquire experience, 
and master, to some extent, the art of teaching, before re- 
ceiving pay, or permanent employment. Several excellent 
teachers have been secured in this way. Young ladies 
have made application to be admitted into these schools 
to be trained. Most of them have shown the necessary 
requisites for teachers, and several have been selected and 
placed in charge of schools, with good promise of success. 

While the committee have thus endeavored to secure 
good teachers, they have also turned their attention to se- 
curing the attendance of children in the schools. 

The whole number of scholars in the schools the past 
year has been, in round numbers, 3,500. The average 



248 

attendance has been, 2,100. There has then been an aver- 
age absence of 1,400 1 — to say nothing of those not attend- 
ing the schools at all. 

How could the children be brought into the schools ? 
was the question for the committee. Those parents who 
appreciate the value of an education will see that their 
children attend the schools, but there are many parents 
who do not appreciate the value of an education, who suf- 
fer their children to roam the streets, or spend their time 
in worse haunts ; others, who compel them to labor in 
the mills, from morn to night, day after day, to earn money 
enough to supoprt their parents, sometimes in idleness and 
vice. And thus it is, that those who most need the use of 
the public schools, because they cannot attain to private in- 
struction, are deprived of their benefits. 

The aim of the law in raising money for public instruc- 
tion is, that the citizen may be educated ; and if an edu- 
cated citizen is better than an ignorant one, it becomes for 
the interest of every citizen that every other citizen should 
be educated. If the law takes the money of the citizen 
for schooling, it should see to it that the fund is well ap- 
plied, and at least an equal share of it to those who most 
need it. 

Guided by these views the committee opened three even- 
ing schools, so that children employed by day might learn 
at night. Two hundred children have attended these 
schools, many of them manifesting great eagerness to 
learn. They have also gone into the street, and, by the 
aid of the truant ordinance, have restored some seventy- 
five children to the schools. 

At the commencement of the year it was ascertained 
that many children were employed in the mills who had 
not attended school the length of time required by the 
laws of the State. The attention of the agents of the cor- 
porations, and those in charge, was called to it, and their 



249 

assistance requested in securing to such children the re- 
quisite schooling. They readily granted it, and thus one 
hundred children were transferred from the mills to the 
schools. 

The statistics of the schools show the gratifying fact, 
that at the close of the schools for the year, five hundred 
more scholars were in the schools than at the commence- 
ment. There were three hundred more the second term 
than at the first, and two hundred more the third than at 
the second. 

Many more remain to be brought in. At least a thousand 
more scholars, with our population, should be in the 
schools. They must be placed there by every effectual 
means ; by keeping the schools efficient and attractive, 
by making the children there happy and contented, so that 
they may allure others in, by hunting up the wandering, 
reclaiming the erring and the truant, and by bringing home 
to the parent a knowledge of what is done, and what can 
be done, for the child in these schools. 

The committee have recently, with considerable reluc- 
tance, discontinued the Park .Street Grammar school, not 
because the school was entirely unnecessary, nor because 
it had not made a very fair progress during the year, nor 
because its teachers were not faithful, capable, efficient, and 
successful ; they were all of these. But because the school 
did not work in entire harmony with the other schools ; 
because both parents and children, in many cases, insisted 
that they, the children, should go to that school, and no 
other, no matter in what part of the city they resided ; and 
chiefly because the number of scholars in that school of the 
grade of grammar scholars was far too small to warrant 
its continuance under its present organization as a gram- 
mar school. It had scholars enough for some organization, 
but what precisely should be done, the committee thought 
could be better told at the commencement of the next year. 



250 

The committee have no hesitation in saying that ample 
provision should be made, and no doubt will be made, for 
all of those scholars who desire to attend the public schools, 
in the locality and grade to which they belong. 

Most of the schools of the city have done exceedingly 
well for the past year. They have made good progress, 
their standard has been high, and their methods improved 
and excellent. Both teachers and scholars have labored 
with the committee to make them [daces of the best in- 
struction and greatest improvement — a grace and orna- 
ment to our city. 

But while speaking thus favorably of most of the schools, 
the committee feel that the High school is deserving of 
especial notice, and that it will be regarded as no disparage- 
ment to any other school that it is so mentioned. Perhaps 
it deserves a particular notice the more, because that here- 
tofore it has not always been what it was desirable it 
should be. But during this past year it has made fine 
progress. There has been among its pupils a marked de- 
sire to excel, and a thoroughness of scholarship, a propri- 
ety of conduct, an elevation of aim and attainment, and 
about the whole school, such evidence of progress and 
such an atmosphere of culture, as made it delightful both 
to visit and to teach. 

It graduated this year twenty-two pupils. It should 
graduate more, many more, and it is to lie hoped that the 
time will soon come when its annual classes shall number 
scores, and even hundreds. There is reason to believe 
there are those among us who would maintain our schools 
upon the low level of the bare requirements of the law, 
and would have taught therein only such studies as are 
specifically required by statute. But the committee have 
no sympathy with such views. They would maintain such 
schools, and have taught therein such studies, as should best 



251 

fit the children for the great duties of life, and make them, 
in the highest sense, noble citizens. 

The public school is the only place of learning that most 
children can attend. Not one in fifty certainly, perhaps 
not one in a hundred ever, has the advantages of an acad- 
emy, or higher private school. Now why should forty-nine, 
perhaps ninety-nine, children be pushed into life with bare 
reading, spelling, writing, English grammar, arithmetic, 
and the elements of geography and history, and those im- 
perfectly taught, while the fiftieth child, by the accident of 
birth, or circumstance, or fortune, has opened to him far 
more of the treasures of learning? Why ■should he be in- 
structed and delighted in all the beauties and wonders of 
physiology and natural history, of philosophy and astron- 
omy, of botany and chemistry, or why should he be trained 
and strengthened, up the paths of the more exact sciences, 
while the other forty-nine are made, more or less of them, 
to feel that the riches and glories of such, and all further 
studies, are beyond their reach. Nay, rather, why should 
not the way of public instruction be a broad and a long 
one, wherein all may go free, up to the broad heights of 
learning, thus made happier and better, because more intel- 
ligent beings? 

Does the rich man complain that his property is thus 
taken to educate the poor man's child ? Let him remem- 
ber that society is thus made better for his enjoyment, the 
world more fit to live in, and security given to the wealth 
he hoards and enjoys ; for that the stability of the govern- 
ment which gives him protection rests upon the intelli- 
gence and virtue of the people. 

Let us then cherish our schools. If they are not, they 
should be, our pride, and objects of liberal appropriation 
and tender solicitude and care. No part of the public ser- 
vice involves greater responsibilities, unites such delicate 
duties and trusts, or reaches farther in its consequences. 



252 

They are admirable in plan, they are wide and free in 
scope, they are thorough in instruction, and they are cor- 
rective and parental in discipline. They take the child at 
the primary, through the middle and grammar, and grad- 
uate him at the High, an institution the committee feel 
warranted in saying, not excelled by many academies in 
the state. 

The report of the Superintendent to the Committee is 
herewith transmitted, for further information upon the state 
of the schools. 

DANIEL CLARK, for the Committee. 

Dec. 31, 1869. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the School Committee : 

In conformity with your regulations, I submit to you the 
following report of the schools of this city for the year 
.1869. 

It has been the custom in former years for the School 
Committee to choose a treasurer, who has made an annual 
report of the expenses of the year. During the past year 
the bills of the school department have been approved by 
the Committee on Accounts for the city government, and 
have been paid in connection with the bills of the other de- 
partments of the city. 

Tlie school year now closes the last of December, a 
month later than formerly, consequently an extra appropri- 
ation was made this year to cover the entire expenses of 
the schools from December 1st, 1868, to January 1st, 1870. 
The expenditures for schools from January 1st, 1869, to 
January 1st, 1870, are regarded as the expenditures for 
the school year, and the amount paid for the latter part of 
1868 as the deficiency of that year. 

The items of expense are given in detail in the following 
tables : 

DEFICIENCY OF 1868. 

TEACHING. 

Wm. W. Colburn .... $180 00 
C. Augusta Gile .... 60 00 

Mary E. Clough .... 50 00 



25-1 



L. H. Dutton 






8100 00 


Katie L. Porter 






40 00 


Jacob Eastman 






110 00 


Emma A. H. Brown 






40 00 


Martha B. Dinsmore 






40 00 


B. E. Ambrose 






40 00 


Isaac L. Heath 






150 00 


Lucretia E. Manahan 






40 00 


Lottie R. Adams . 






40 00 


Rebecca B. Gove . 






40 00 


Hannah A. Slade . 






40 00 


Julia A. Baker 






40 00 


Mattie R. Kidder . 






40 00 


Thomas Corcoran 






130 00 


Alice G. McQuaid . 






85 00 


Annette McDoel 






50 00 


Mary A. Parker 






40 00 


1). A. Clifford 






75 00 


Sarah J. Greene . 






40 00 


Mary E. Ireland 






40 00 


Mary L. Sleeper 






40 00 


Hattie L. Jones 






40 00 


Mary J. Fife 






40 00 


Nancy S. Bimton . 






40 00 


Carrie E. Reed 






40 00 


C. Augusta Abbott 






40 00 


Nellie J. Sanderson 






40 00 


Lizzie P. Gove 






40 00 


Ellen B. Rowell . 






40 00 


Helen M. Hills . 






40 00 


Georgianna Dow . 






40 00 


Emily J. Parker . 






40 00 


Anstrice G. Flanders 






40 00 


Abbie E. Abbott . 






40 00 


Addie L. Hutchinson 






40 00 



1^00 



Julia A. Clay- 






$40 00 


Helen M. Morrill . 






40 00 


Mintie C. Edgerly . 






40 00 


Fannie M. Smith . 






40 00 


Marianna Clough . 






40 00 


Adelaide B. George 






40 00 


Mary A. Richardson 






40 00 


Mattie S. Miller . 






35 00 


Hattie A. Mack . 






35 00 


Sarah D. Lord 






40 00 


Rebecca Hall 






37 50 


Fannie E. Porter . 






40 00 


M. Thcora Flanders 






35 00 


Frances N. Plumcr 






35 00 


Martha W. Hubbard 






35 00 


L. D. Henry . 






75 00 


Ella M. Mitchell . 






35 00 


Mary J. Reid 






40 00 


Maria II. Hildreth . 






40 00 


Mary Ij. Lane 






35 00 


Anna S. Osgood 






35 00 


Lana S. George 






37 50 


I. S. Whitney 






90 00 


J. D. Jones . 






48 00 


REPAIRS. 




J. L. Smith 836 82 


Daniels & Co 






49 99 


George W. George 






9 00 


J. B. Varick . 






2 09 


J. C. Young . 






21 20 


H. D. Lord . 






21 00 


Haines cfc Wallace . 






35 28 


Abbott & Kelley . 






10 19 


George H. Dudley . 






116 47 



83,068 00 



256 



G.B.Fogg . 
J. L. Kennedy 
Charles A. Holt . 
Thomas R. Hubbard 
J. Q. A. ►Sargent . 
W. W. Baker 



FUEL AN 



Abner Hoyt . 
E. P. Johnson & Co 
J. Webster . 
J. L. Smith . 
Concord R. R, 
Thomas J. Downing 
Eben Can- 
Frank Mitchell 
Charles Gilford 
.Michael Lane 
Elijah Stearns 
John Bashaw 
J. G. Leach . 
William Doty 
J. L. Newton 
Rodney Whittemor 
Horace Willey 
Dana Rowe . 
Haines <fc Wallace 
N. Preston . 
Gilman Clough 
J. II. Proctor 



D DR 



.VWIN 



$6 32 

52 43 

5 85 

62 00 

20 85 
18 56 



WOOD. 

$278 


53 


585 


34 


10 


00 


7 


50 


24 


72 


4 


00 


2 


00 




50 


1 


50 


7 


50 


11 


00 


17 


50 


8 


50 


20 


00 


5 


00 


10 


75 


29 


00 


3 


35 


2 


00 


11 


Q6 


28 


33 


10 


00 



$468 05 



$1,078 68 



257 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



S. F. Muny . 






■SO 85 


Woodman & Hammet 






3 83 


C. W. Rowell 






55 


G. W. Adams 






3 75 


David Libby . 






24 75 


H. E. Newton 






8 00 


David Urch . 






9 00 


Charles Williams . 






295 47 


H. M. Bailey 






21 53 


Hartshorn & Pike . 






136 07 


J. W. Ross . 






16 80 


A. H. Lowell 






172 00 


Charles A. Smith . 






3 25 


Gage & Follansbee 






2 40 


L. H. Dutton 






8 25 


Thomas Corcoran . 






14 25 


Charles Hoclgman . 






7 75 


Otis Barton . 






1 00 


G. F. Bosher . 






4 00 


CARE OP ROOB 


IS. 


Robert Corning 


3 00 


Warren Wyman . 






40 00 


E. P. Cogswell 






67 27 


Geo. W. Varnnm . 






48 25 


Thomas E. Cressy 






42 22 


Thomas Howe 






24 00 


John Farrar . 






24 00 


W. Campbell 






5 00 


M. T. Flanders . 






1 00 



$733 50 



$254 74 



17 



258 



BOOKS 


AND 


STATIONERY. 


Brewer & Tileston . 




152 72 


H. C. Tilton . 






96 10 


Wilde, Bowler & Co 






1 80 


Lee & Shepard 






31 80 


A. Quirnby 






22 18 


Wm. H. Fisk 






91 56 


I. S. Whitney 






76 15 


Tewksbury <fc Brother 






18 2-1 


PRINTING AND ADVERTTS 


ING. 


John B. Clarke .... 


138 88 


C. F. Livingston .... 


30 25 


INCIDENTALS. 




Hill & James, teams 


142 00 


Fogg & James, "... 


23 50 


S. S. James & Co., teams 


23 50 


E. T. James, teams 


10 00 


J. W. Abbott, teaming . 


35 


Hill & Co., express 


50 


John P. Ankarloo, cleaning di- 




plomas ..... 


1 05 


Manchester Post Office . 


7 36 


H. R. Chamberlin, salary 


50 00 


T. S. Montgomery, cash paid , 


6 65 


J. S. Hayes, labor .... 


7 00 


W. F. Brown, filling diplomas 


3 50 


T. P. Heath, teaming 




• 


2 00 



$393 55 



869 13 



$177 41 



259 



Teaching 
Repairs . 

Fuel and sawing wood 
Furniture and supplies 
Care of rooms ■ 
Books and stationery 
Printing and advertising 
Incidentals . 



TOTAL DEFICIENCY FOR 1868. 

13,068 00 
468 05 



1,078 68 
733 50 
254 74 
303 55 
69 13 
177 41 



EXPENDITURES FOR 1869. 



TEACHING. 



Wm. W. Colburn . 
C. Augusta Gilo 
Mary E. Clough . 
E. D. Hadley 
Jacob Eastman 
Emma A. H. Brown 
Martha B. Dinsmore 
Betsy A. Ambrose 
Katie L. Chapin 
I. L. Heath . 
Lucretia E. Manahan 
Lottie R. Adams . 
Rebecca B. Gove . 
Hannah A. Slade . 
Julia A. Baker 
Mattie R. Kidder . 
.Thomas Corcoran . 
Alice G. McQuaid 
Annette McDoel . 
Mary A. Parker 



$1,800 00 
750 00 
500 00 
209 50 
137 50 
268 75 
400 00 
30 00 
176 75 
1,430 00 
475 00 
400 00 
100 00 
100 00 
400 00 
240 00 
00 
25 
00 



1,2: 



369 
425 
400 00 



1,243 06 



260 



D. A. Clifford 






. $750 00 


L. H. Button 






. 1,280 00 


Katie L. Porter 






400 00 


J. S. Hayes . 






37 50 


Mary F. Cutler 






208 75 


Win. E. Buck 






803 00 


Nancy S. Bunton . 






400 00 


Carrie E. Reed 






400 00 


Hattie G. Flanders 






218 75 


Nellie J. Sanderson 






400 00 


Lizzie P. Gove 






400 00 


Sarah J. Green 






400 00 


Mary L. Sleeper 






400 00 


Mary E. Ireland . 






400 00 


Mary J. Fife 






400 00 


C. Augusta Abbott 






310 00 


Hattie L. Jones 






100 00 


Fannie L. Burnham 






140 00 


E. 0. Locke . 






15 00 


Ellen B. Rowell . 






344 00 


Helen M. Hills . 






100 00 


Georgianna Dow . 






400 00 


Emily J. Parker 






400 00 


Anstrice G. Flanders 






100 00 


M. Theora Flanders 






143 75 


Abbie E. Abbott . 






400 00 


Addie L. Hutchinson 






380 00 


Julia A. Clay 






400 00 


Helen M. Morrill . 






400 00 


Mintie C. Edgerly . 






340 00 


Fannie M. Smith . 






350 00 


Marianna Clough . 






400 00 


Adelaide B. George 






400 00 


Mary A. Richardson 






400 00 


Sarah D. Lord 






392 00 



261 



Hattie A. Mack 






. $368 75 


Mattie S. Miller . 






368 75 


Rebecca Hall 






373 75 


Fannie E. Porter . 






400 00 


Laura A. Montgomery 






196 87 


Clara N. Brown 






201 25 


Emma F. Soule 






218 75 


Frances N. Plummer 






350 00 


Martha W. Hubbard 






368 75 


Mary A. Doty 






122 50 


Mary F. Currier . 






87 50 


Ella M. Mitchell . 






87 50 


Nellie F. Cheney . 






201 25 


Mary J. Reid 






350 00 


Maria H. Hildreth 






475 00 


Mary B. Lane 






350 00 


Addie M. Chase . 






208 75 


Anna S. Osgood 






87 50 


Lana S. George 






343 75 


Eva A. Baker 






15 00 


Addie C. Marshall 






75 00 


Emma A. Cross 






137 50 


Emma J. Ela 






140 00 


Alice G. Lord 






52 5 9 


Martha N. Mason . 






37 50 


I. S. Whitney 






900 00 


J. D. Jones . 






539 50 


Chas. R. Treat 






50 00 


L. D. Henry . 






787 50 




OQ1 C|q (?0 


<JO IjO-tO U — 


FUEL AND SAWING WOOD. 


Abner Hoyt v $508 05 


E. P. Johnson & Co. . . . 909 90 


Israel Webster 






85 00 



262 



Concord Railroad 
Horace Willey 
Dana Rowe . 
Elijah Stearns 
John Bosh aw 
Haines <fe Wallace 
Thos. Howe . 
J. G. Leach . 
Wm. Dotey . 
Geo. W. Varnum 
Nehemiah Preston 
Rodney Whittemoi 
Chas. E. Clough 
T. R. Hubbard 
Geo. W. George 
Gil man Clough 
John P. Moore 
L. B. Bodwell 
J. H. Proctor 
Chas. Russell 
Thos. E. Cressey 
Cleaves N. Harvey 
Jonas Harvey 
John Fleming 
John Mclntyre 
J. G. Edgerly 
Herbert F. Thayer 
H. A. Mclntyre 
Matthew Forsaith 
E. D. Hadley 
John Wason, 2d 
Isaiah Emerson 
Moody B. Jones 



$'50 


06 


58 


10 


6 


70 


17 


.25 


38 


00 


2 


00 


1 


50 


4 


25 


20 


00 


1 


00 


80 


34 


21 


50 


26 


25 


19 


60 


10 


50 


84 


17 


47 


80 


874 


44 


20 


00 


19 


00 


12 


02 


5 


oo 


168 


50 


10 


00 


24 


25 


4 


50 


4 


50 


3 


00 


26 


00 


9 


25 


30 


60 


9 


75 


29 


00 

<3 



•$3,691 78 



263 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 




S. F. Murry .... 84 95 




J. L. Hammett 






M 70 




George W. Adams 






67 




Daniel Libby 






36 35 




Otis Barton 






177 54 




T. P. Heath 






2 50 




David Urcli 






15 00 




Hartshorn & Pike 






470 53 




J. W. Ross 






16 80 




Samuel Bickford . 






15 00 




Wm. H. Elliott . 






33 00 




Daniels & Co. 






198 48 




Gil man B. Fogg . 






18 98 




J. L. Ross 






496 62 




Concord R. R. 






2 52 




Chas. E. Clough, . 






7 50 




Straw and Lovejoy 






13 00 




John B. Varick 






43 89 




J. W. Abbott 






5 00 




J. G. Edgerly 






25 




Hoyt & Cox 






9 50 




L. W. Eastman 






2 16 




Vance & Goodwin 






2 60 




G. F. Bosher 






83 75 




81,757 


29 


BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 




Brewer & Tileston . . . $92 70 




H. C. Tilton . . 114 40 




A. Quimby . 






79 25 




Lee & Shepard 






12 00 




Wm. H. Fisk 






152 11 




I. S. Whitney 






30 00 




John V, Sullivan 






2 05 





264 



J. F. Dodge 


$20 00 


J. L. Ilammett 


185 25 


"Wool worth, Ainsworth & Co. 


6 48 


Thompson, Bigelow <fc Brown 


42 60 


Edward Gim 


4 50 


Wm. G. Everett . 


9 25 


Manchester Post Office . 


4 92 


Wm. Henshaw 


7 50 


Antq. Bookstore 


9 00 


Tewksbury & Bro. 


22 81 


CARE OF ROOMS. 


Warren Wyman . 


$49 75 


E. P. Coggswell, 2d 


169 98 


Geo. W. Varnum . 


262 75 


Thos. E. Cressey . 


135 78 


Thos. Howe 


81 00 


John Farrar 


198 00 


Charles Aldrich . 


166 00 


Prank Rowe . . 


64 10 


Sundry persons at different scho 


ols 424 15 


G. W. Dustin 


5 00 


Chas. D. Fuller . 


18 00 


Leonard Stratton . 


16 00 


John S. Hayes 


4 60 


PRINTING AND AD 


VERTISING. 


J. W. Moore 


5 00 


J. B. Clarke 


155 15 


C. F. Livingston . 


66 00 


Campbell & Han scorn . 


60 13 


Thos. Chubbuck 


28 75 


H. W. Herrick . 


25 00 


H. A. Gage 


108 00 



$794 82 



$1,595 11 



$448 03 



265 



INCIDENTALS. 






Hill & Co., expressage . 


9 


80 


Manchester P. 0., postage 


3 


00 


G. W. Varnum, labor . 


14 


50 " 


Thos. E. Cressey, labor 


15 


97 


S. S. James & Co., teams 


15 


00 


Thos. Howe, labor 


3 


00 


Cheney & Co., express . 


1 


95 


Fogg & James, teams . 


104 


00 


Angeline Dustin, washing school-room 3 


00 


I. S. Whitney .... 


41 


65 


J. G. Edgerly, cash paid 


33 


50 


Gas-Light Co., .... 


3 


04 


Samuel Upton, cash paid 


14 


00 


Horace Willey, cleaning out privies 


100 


00 


Isaac Huse, cleaning out privies . 


3 


50 


Chas. E. Clough, teaming 




60 


H. M. Bailey .... 




50 


H. F. Morse, filling out diplomas . 


4 


20 

$371 *>1 


TOTAL EXPENDITURES FOR SCHOOLS IN 


(JPO 1 X — L 

1869. 


Teaching .... 


$31,543 


62 


Fuel and sawing wood . 


2,691 


78 


Furniture and supplies . 


1,757 


29 


Books and stationery . 


794 


82 


Care of rooms 


1,595 


11 


Printing and advertising 


448 


03 


Incidental .... 


371 


21 

$39,201 86 



266 



REPAIRS 



J. L. Smith 

Daniels & Co. 

Haines & Wallace 

Abbott & Kelly 

E. P. Cogswell 

T. R. Hubbard 

Thos. T. Howe 

G. H. Dudley 

J. L. Kennedy 

N. Preston . 

E. G. Haines 

Hartshorn & Pike 

E. P. Hutchinson 

Joel Daniels 

W. 0. Haskell & Son 

Warren Harvey 

John G. Coult 

Dickey & Carpenter 

J. A. Sargent 

J. B. Varick 

J. L. Ross 

Paid for city teams and 

Hackett & Taylor 

Concord R. R. 

S. S. Moulton 

Chas. A. Clough 

J. C. Young 

G. W. Varnum 

Palmer & Co. 

A. H. Lowell 

Wm. McPherson 

Gas-Light Co. 

Wm. Cogswell 

T. P. Clough 



labor 



rs 



8107 


49 


89 


37 


628 


25 


471 


39 


104 


29 


219 


26 


2 


50 


1,538 


98 


538. 


77 


4 


25 


24 


25 


78 


79 


4 


00 


11 


50 


24 


00 


42 


25 


45 


00 


400 


33 


2,802 


76 


3 


12 


27 


25 


175 


40 


668 


93 


5 


08 


23 


99 


12 


00 


10 


91 


5 


00 


5 


50 


44 


75 


293 


21 


13 


20 


22 


00 


32 


12 



267 



Columbus Wyman 
Neal & Holbrook 
Clough & Foster 
E. Cutting . 
M. J. Kendriek 
D. B. Eastman 
T. S. Montgomery 
S. H. Button 
H. M. Bailey 
Geo. W. Merriam 
J. H. Proctor 
Leonard Stratton 
M. D. Stokes 
J. B. Kendriek 
H. H. Noyes 
Paschal Preston 
William Boyce 
Joseph L. Ross 
Joseph W. Ross 
Concord Railroad 
M. J. Kendriek 
Neal & Holbrook 
Joel Daniels 



87 


00 


319 


58 


44 


55 


25 


50 


10 


25 


1 


25 


8 


50 


9 


20 


14 


14 


6 


75 


6 


00 




60 


5 


00 


20 


00 


44 


10 


358 


82 


35 


75 


412 


00 


17 


05 


6 


48 


3 


25 


17 


74 


61 


25 



$9,914 65 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Johnson <fo Stevens, oil 
Kidder & Chandler, oil 
E. D. Hadley, teaching 
J. B. Prion, teaching . 
E. O. Locke, teaching 
Brown & Tileston, books and stationery 
John B. Clarke, printing and adver- 
tising ...... 



$5 05 
2 20 
141 00 
99 00 
36 00 
25 04 

6 40 



268 



J. C. Walker, teaching 

Ferd Gagnon, teaching 

G. W. Yarnuni, care of rooms . 

Cbristana Yatter, cleaning . 

Cheney & Co., books and expressage 

Mary A. Doty, teaching 

H. C. Tilton, books 

Arthur M. Eastman, oil 



. $28 


50 


. 60 


00 


. 13 


00 


. 6 


00 


. 37 


24 


. 3 


75 


. 3 


15 


. 9 


41 



6175 74 



SUMMARY OP EXPENDITURES. 

Deficiency of 1868 . . . $6,243 06 

Expended for schools in 1869 . 39,201 86 

Repairs of school-houses . . 9,914 65 

Evening schools .... 475 74 



$'55,835 31 



SCHOOL YEAR. 

In the last Annual Report attention was called to the 
difficulty experienced in closing the school year in Novem- 
ber, while the fiscal year in all other departments have 
closed with the calendar year. Tbis difficulty has been 
remedied : provision has been made for the deficiency 
which had been constantly increasing, and the School Com- 
mittee of 1870 will have no unpaid bills of the preceding 
year. 

As the school year is now arranged, there are three 
terms, the first commencing the first Monday of January 
and continuing twelve weeks, the second beginning the sec- 
ond Monday of April and continuing twelve weeks, the 
third beginning the last Monday of August and continu- 
ing sixteen weeks. 

If it is found that the fall term is too long, the old ar- 



269 

rangement can be again adopted, the expenses of the first 
four weeks of the winter term being paid from the appro- 
priation of the current year, but in that case there will be 
a liability that some bills will be left to be paid the next 
year, and another deficiency may arise. 

SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

At the beginning of the spring term, the three divisions 
of the East Grammar school were transferred from the new 
to the old High school building, and the school was made 
a full grammar school. 

One of the Primary schools, which for one term had been 
kept in the old High school building, was transferred to 
its old quarters at the corner of Bridge and Union streets. 
The other Avas discontinued, and the Middle school was 
placed in the new High school building. 

The Middle school formerly kept in one of the old houses 
on Concord street was transferred at the same time to the 
High school building, and the Primary school in the other 
building on Concord street was discontinued at the begin- 
ning of the fall term. 

The unoccupied room in the lower house in Piscataquog 
was fitted up during the spring term, and a school has been 
in session there for two terms. Several new schools should 
be opened the coining year, as many are now excessively 
crowded, and some of them in locations where there will 
be difficulty in obtaining school rooms. There is an imper- 
ative need of more school room in Piscataquog, as all the 
schools in that section are filled, and families are constantly 
moving into that ward. There are one hundred more pu- 
pils in the Piscataquog schools than there were a year ago, 
and but one more school than then. In estimating the ex- 
penses for 1870, at least two more schools must be consid- 
ered in that ward. 



270 

The schools at Amoskeag are so crowded that it will be 
necessary to open another school in that ward soon. 

The Spring street Primaries hare been unusually full for 
the past term, and probably there will be more pupils in 
those schools during the next year, and an estimate should 
be made for another school in that vicinity, although no 
school-room can be obtained till the East Grammar is trans- 
ferred to the new house. 

The Wilson Hill and Merrimack street schools during 
some portions of the year have had more scholars than 
they could well accommodate. A class has been detained 
at the Wilson Hill Middle school as there were no accom- 
modations at the Grammar schools for its members. To 
relieve these schools, there should be another school es- 
tablished in that section. Hence, for the coming year we 
shall need at least four middle and primary schools more 
than we have at present, without regard to the two prima- 
ries now suspended. 

The school at Massabesic is quite large, too large for any 
suburban school, and before long arrangements should be 
made for dividing it. 

There is but one school in the old building on Bridge 
street, and neither of the wooden buildings on Concord 
street is occupied, but as these houses are not in the sec- 
tion of the city where the schools are too large, nothing 
will be gained by using them. 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS, EEPAIRS, ETC. 

Considerable has been done in the way of repairs upon 
school buildings during the past year. An appropriation 
of 88,500.00 was made by the city government, which, in 
addition to a portion of the school fund, has been expended 
upon the school buildings. 

The upper house at Piscataquog has been somewhat re- 
modeled. A new roof has been placed upon it, the lower 



271 

rooms have been refurnished, coal stores have been put 
into the various rooms, the basement has been arranged so 
as to contain the fuel, and many other changes have been 
made. 

A new steam heating apparatus has been put into the 
Spring street building, new sheds have been built, and the 
seats in the grammar school rooms have been arranged so 
that the pupils in all the rooms face the south, instead of 
half facing east, and half west, as formerly. The heating 
apparatus is the same as that used in the High school, ex- 
cepting that the pipes are in the rooms instead of having 
the coils in the basement. 

A new fence has been built on the back side of the Frank- 
lin street house. The house at Wilson Hill has been re- 
painted, the furniture in one of the rooms has been changed, 
a new fence has been built upon the south side, a concrete 
walk laid on the south side, and many improvements made 
upon the building and about the yards. 

Concrete walks have been laid in front of the Blodgett 
street house, and also on the west and south sides of the 
Merrimack street building. 

The house at Massabesic has been enlarged, the house at 
Mosquito pond has been repainted, and a fence built around 
the yard. 

At Amoskeag and Bakersville the out-building- have 
been enlarged. Other repairs have been made at several 
of the houses, so that, for the coming year, not so much of 
an appropriation will be needed for repairs as during the 
past year. What repairs are needed should be specified so 
that the City Council may determine with regard to them. 

One thing is especially needed at every school-house, and 
that is a well of good water, so that pupils will not lie 
obliged to trouble people living in the vicinity. 



272 



NAMES OF TEACHERS. 

The following list contains the names of those teachers 
who have served in the different schools of the city within 
the past year : — 

1. HIGH SCHOOL, BEECH STREET. 

Principal — William W. Colburn. 
Assistant — C. Augusta Gile ; 

" Mary E. Clough ; 

" Emma J. Ela, 1 term. 

2. INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL, MANCHESTER STREET. 

Principal — L. H. Dutton, 1 term; 

" Wm. E. Buck, 2 terms. 

Assistant — Kate L. Porter, 1 term ; 

" Emma A. Cross, 1 term. 

3. NORTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL, SPRING STREET. 

Principal — Jacob Eastman, 1 term ; 

" John A. Hayes, 2 terms. 

Assistant — Martha B. Dinsmore ; 

" Emma A. H. Brown, 2 terms ; 

" Mary F. Cutler, 2 terms ; 

" Fannie E. Porter, 1 term ; 

" Katie L. Chapin, 1 term ; 

" Betsy A. Ambrose, 1 term. 

4. SOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL, FRANKLIN STREET. 

Principal — Isaac L. Heath. 
Assistant — Lucretia E. Manahan ; 

" Lottie R. Adams ; 

" Rebecca B. Gove, 1 term; 

" Katie L. Chapin, 1 term. 

" Carrie E. Reid, 1 term. 



273 

5. EAST GRAMMAR SCHOOL, LOWELL STREET. 

Principal — L. H. Dutton, 2 terras. 
Assistant — Julia A. Baker ; 

" Hannah A. Slade, 1 term ; 

" Kate L. Porter, 2 terms ; 

" Mattie R. Kidder, 2 terms ; 

" Fannie Burnham, 1 term. 

6. PARK STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL, PARK STREET. 

Principal — Thomas Corcoran. 
Assistant — Alice G. McQuaid. 

7. PISCATAQUOG GRAMMAR SCHOOL, PISCATAQUOG. 

Principal — Annette McDocl, 1 term; 

" L. D. Henry, 2 terms. 

. Assistant — Mary A. Parker. 

8. AMOSKEAG GRAMMAR SCHOOL, AMOSKEAG. 

D. A. Clifford. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

9. No. 1, Blodgett street, Sarah J. Green. 

10. " 2, Beech street, Mary E. Ireland. 

11. " 3, " " Mary L. Sleeper. 

12. " 4, Wilson Hill, Annette McDoel, 2 terms ; 

Hattie L. Jones, 1 term. 

13. No. 5, Merrimack street, Mary J. Fife. 

14. " 6, " " .Nancy S. Bunton. 

15. " 7, Franklin street, Carrie E. Reid, 2 terms; 

Hattie G. Flanders, 1 term. 

16. No. 8, Franklin street, C. Augusta Abbott. 

17. " 9, Spring street, Nellie J. Sanderson. 

18. " 10, " " Lizzie P. Gove. 

18 



274 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

19. No. 1, Blodgett street, Ellen B. Rowell. 

20. " 2, Lowell street, Helen M. Hills. Discontinued 

at close of winter term. 

21. No. 3, Bridge street, Georgianna Dow. 

22. No. 4, Towlesville, Emily J. Parker. 

23. No. 5, Concord street, Anstrice G. Flanders, 1 term ; 

M. Theora Flanders, 1 term. 
Discontinued at close of summer term. 

24. No. 6, Wilson Hill, Abbie E. Abbott. 

25. " 7, Merrimack street, Addie L. Hntchinson. 

26. " 8, " " Julia A. Clay. 

27. " 9, Manchester street, Helen M. Morrill. 

28. « 10, " " Mintie C. Edgerly. 

29. " 11, Franklin street, Fannie M. Smith. 

30. " 12, " " Marianna Clough. 

31. " 13, Spring street, Adelaide B. George. 

32. " 14, " " Mary A. Richardson. 
83. " 15, Squog, Sarah D. Lord. 

34. " 16, " Hattie A. Mack. 

35. " 17, " Mattie S. Miller. 

36. " 18, Skeag, Rebecca Hall. 

37. " 19, " Fannie E. Porter, 2 terms ; 

Laura A. Montgomery, 1 term. 

38. No. 20, Squog, Clara N. Brown. In session spring 

and fall terms. 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

39. No. 1, Stark District. 

M. Theora Flanders, 1 term ; 
Emma F. Soule, 2 terms. 

40. No. 3, Bakersville. 
Principal — Frances N. Plumer. 
Assistant — Martha W. Hubbard. 



275 

41. No. 4. • 

L. D. Henry, 1 term ; 
Mary A. Doty, 1 term ; 
Mary F. Currier, 1 term. 

42. No. 5. 

Ella M. Mitchell, 1 term ; 
Laura A. Montgomery, 1 term ; 
Nellie F. Cheney, 1 term. 

43. No. 6. 

Mary J. Reid. 

44. No. 7, Hallsville. 
Principal — Maria H. Hildreth. 
Assistant — Mary B. Lane. 

45. No. 8, Massabesic. 

Addie M. Chase, 2 terms ; 
Anna S. Osgood, 1 term. 

46. No. 9, Mosquito Pond. 

Vilana S. George. 

MUSIC TEACHERS. 

Central District, 

I. S. Whitney. 
Amoskeag, Piscataquog, and Suburban Schools, 

J. D. Jones. 



GRADUATES OF THE HIGH AND GRAMMAR 
SCHOOLS. 

The following is a list of the diploma scholars at the 
various schools : 

SOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Walter H. Baker, Lillie F. Mitchell, 

Mace Moulton, Nellie P. Walker, 

Henry L. Webb, Mary E. Truesdale, 



276 

Luther C. Baldwin, Elvira S. Prior, 

John H. Smith, Ella M. Patterson, 

George D. Towne, • Ida A. Howe, 
Bennie P. Cheney, Emma J. Gage, 

Nellie E. Tappan, Jennie F. Bailey, 

Delia C. Hutchinson, Georgie Fisher. 

EAST GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Philip X. Branch, Eva A. Lougee, 

David F. Clark, Medora Weeks, 

Frank B. Robinson, Emma M. White, 

Thomas W. Robinson, Jennie A. Pierce. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Full Course. 
Mary A. Buzzell, Isabella G. Mack, 

Mary F. Conner, Jennie S. Young, 

Isabeile R. Daniels, Charles H. Kimball. 

Latin and English. 
Mary F. Barnes. 

French and English. 
Martha A. Conner, Delana B. Harrington. 

Anna J. Dana, Addie L. James, 

Bertha L. Dean, Thomas D. Luce, 

Augusta £. Downs, Charles S. Young. 

English Course. 

Ellen C. Fairbanks, Charles F. Haynes, 

Kittie Gibson, Henry S. Page, 

Nettie M. Gooden, Edwin 0. Pearson, 

Edward M. Slay ton. 



277 

College Class. 

Samuel G. Fulton, Boston Medical College. 

Charles S. Frost, Bates College. 

H. Martin Kellogg, Dartmouth College. 



ROLL OF HONOR. 

Efforts have been made to secure a more punctual atten- 
dance than formerly. In many of the schools the percent- 
age of attendance has been very good. 

The following list contains the names of those pupils who 
have not been absent or tardy during the past year : 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Isabelle R. Daniels, Mary A. Smith, 

Francena Fogg, Thomas D. Luce, 

Charles II. Pettee. 

NORTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Lillian B. Dorr, Louisa R. Quint, 

Hattie A. Sanderson, Carrie L. Randlett, 

Emma E. Roby, Belle F. Sargent, 

Laura W. Ames, Anna M. "Wilson, 

Annie M. No well, Annie E. Furlong. 

SOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Etta Carley, Anna Parker, 

Ella Dana, Arthur Heath, 

Leonard Brown, Frank E. AYebster, 

Fred James, Clara L. Burleigh, 

George Tewksbury, Hattie J. Andrews, 

Eddie Harrington, Josie R. Plummer. 

FISCATAQUOG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Amelia F. Elliott, Mary L. Watson. 



278 



AMOSKEAG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Emma M. Fuller, Hattie J. Robinson, 

Eva J. Norton, Nettie I. Stevens, 

Angie M. Richardson, t Anna E. Woodward, 

Clara I. Harwood. 

NO. FOUR MIDDLE SCHOOL. 

Walter Roper. 

NO. EIGHT MIDDLE SCHOOL. 

Anna E. Caswell. 

NO. SIX PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

Ernest Jodoin, Willie Roper, 

Estelle Crawford. 

NO. SEVEN PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

Ernest Graupner, Willie Hunkins. 

NO. EIGHT PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

Frank Hunkins. 

NO. SEVENTEEN PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

Mary Tirrell, Carrie Stevens, 

Carrie Wermers. 

NO. NINETEEN PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

Nettie Woodward. 

NO. SIX SUBURBAN SCHOOL. 

Hattie L. Webster, Sidney A. Webster. 



SCHOOL STATISTICS FOR 1869. 

1. Whole number different pupils enrolled during 

the year 3,500 

2. Average number pupils belonging to the schools, 2,259 



279 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 



Average daily attendance 
Number of visits by members of School Board 
Number of visits by Superintendent 
Number of visits by citizens and others . 
Number of diplomas conferred at High school 
Number of diplomas conferred at Gramma 
schools ...... 

Salary of Principal of High school 
Salary of First Assistant of High school 
Salary of Second Assistant of High school 
Salary of Principal of Grammar schools 
Salary of Assistants of Grammar schools* 
Salary of Middle and Primary school teachers 
Number of weeks in school year . 
Number of schools .... 

Number of teachers .... 

School appropriation for past year . 



1,969 

711 

1,092 

5,317 

22 

29 

$1,800 

800 

500 

1,500 

. 400 

400 

40 

46 

63 

$40,000 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Last year attention was called to this subject, and it was 
suggested that provision be made to sustain more of these 
schools this year. No special appropriation was made for 
this purpose, but the city government authorized the 
opening of the schools in the fall. The buildings at the 
corner of Concord and Beech streets have been used for 
this purpose, also the unoccupied room at the corner of 
Bridge and Union streets. 

Over two hundred pupils have attended these schools, 
and many more would have attended had there been ac- 
commodations sufficient. Each evening the different rooms 
have been filled by those who, having labored through the 



* The First Assistant at the South Grammar school receives $500; the First Assis- 
tant at the North Grammar school, $450. 



280 

day, have pursued their studies in the evening with com- 
mendable zeal. 

The great obstacle to success is the want of room. If 
school-rooms enough could be obtained for this purpose, a 
great many more would attend, thus giving to many the 
opportunity of acquiring the rudiments of an English edu- 
cation, many of whom have never enjoyed these advan- 
tages. After a hard day's labor it is no small small desire 
for improvement that induces any one to bend over books 
an hour and a half in the evening. 

It may be urged in objection to these schools, that 
parents will withdraw their children from day schools and 
put them to daily toil in some remunerative occupation, 
with the hope of supplying the defects of their education 
through night instruction. 

Overtasking a child by thirteen hours of daily physical 
and mental labor is a great wrong which should not be per- 
mitted. The practice exerts a bad influence, because it 
subjects children at a premature age to wearisome and ex- 
haustive labor and the influence of night exposure. Edu- 
cation is of value to all, but if it is acquired at the expense 
of health, the cost is too great. It would be wise, therefore, 
to limit the age of admission to these schools at fifteen, 
and then we should have a large number of pupils in the 
evening schools. 

EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN IN MANUFACTURING ESTABLISMENTS. 

Immediately connected with the foregoing subject is that 
of employing children under fifteen in the mills. The law 
of the state is clear upon that point, as will be seen by the 
following, viz.: 

LAWS OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 
[General Statutes, Chapter lxxxiii, Sects. 11, 12, and 13.1 

Section 11. No child under fifteen years of age shall be em- 
ployed in any manufacturing establishment, unless he has attended 



281 

some public school or private day school, where instruction was 
given by a teacher competent to instruct in the branches taught in 
common schools, at least twelve weeks during the j-ear preceding. 

Sec. 12. ISTo child under the age of twelve years shall be em- 
ployed, as aforesaid, unless he has attended school, as aforesaid, at 
least six months during the year preceding, or has attended the 
school of the district in which he dwelt the whole time it was kept 
during such year. 

Sec. 13. The owner, agent or superintendent of any manufac- 
turing establishment who shall employ such child without requiring 
a certificate, signed by the teacher of such school or prudential 
committee of the district in which it was kept, that such child has 
attended school as aforesaid, shall be fined fifty dollars. 

[Law passed June Session, 1869, Chapter xxxvin.] 

AN ACT IK RELATION TO THE ATTENDANCE ON THE PUBLIC 

SCHOOLS. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 

Court convened : 

Section 1. That the school committee of every town in which 
any manufacturing corporation is located shall have power to en- 
force the provisions of the General Statutes, chapter eighty-three, 
relating to the employment of children, by manufacturing corpora- 
tions, under the ages of twelve and fifteen years respectively, and 
their attendance on the public schools ; and all necessary expense 
arising from prosecutions instituted by the .school committee in 
enforcing the provisions of the existing law with reference to the 
employment of children by manufacturing corporations shall be 
audited, and paid for out of the town treasury. 

No attention having been paid to the subject for a nmn- 
ber of years, many children were employed in the various 
manufacturing establishments who had not attended school 
for a long time, some of them even for two or three years. 
In October I consulted with the agents of the different 
mills in regard to the subject. They readily consented to 
require the certificates from all who applied for work, and 
to send out as soon as possible those who were already at 
work. 



282 

More than one hundred children have been discharged 
daring the past three months, who otherwise would have 
been retained in the mills. The agents and overseers have 
cooperated in the work, and there is no reason why each 
child in this city cannot receive the rudiments of a good 
English education. In many rooms it would not be prac- 
ticable to discharge all those who have no legal right to be 
employed, hence arrangements were made with the over- 
seers to discharge a part at a time, and receive back into 
the mills only those who should bring certificates. 

There are some questions connected with the subject 
which it will be well to consider now, otherwise difficulty 
may arise in the future. There will be, for the present at 
least, difficulty in placing the children in the graded 
schools ; their age and size seem to forbid that they be 
placed with children so much younger and smaller. It will 
not be as well for the pupils who attend regularly, i^ cer- 
tainly cannot be as beneficial for those children from the 
mills who attend but a few months a year, as they will be 
unable to attend long enough to enter a graded school and 
take the course prescribed for such schools. 

As they cannot be in school but a short time, we must 
arrange so that they can pursue those studies which will be 
of the greatest benefit to them, and not compel them to com- 
pete in all branches with pupils who are pursuing a regular 
course, and who expect to finish the course of study pre- 
scribed for Primary, Middle, Grammar, and High schools. 

The Factory school, as it is called, at Fall River, and the 
Half-Time school, at Indian Orchard Village, Springfield, 
are regarded as quite successful. With regard to these 
schools the following extracts, from the report of Gen. H. 
K. Oliver,* will show with what success they have met. 

k ' My first official visit to this city was in the latter part of the 
year 1867, soon after my appointment to this specialty, and at a 

*■ Ojn. Oliver w.w appointe 1 to enforce the law in the State of Massachusetts. 



283 

time when the outgoing and incoming city government had a social 
re-union. Invited to be present, I took the opportunity of speak- 
ing upon the condition of its factory population, as it then appeared 
to me, with my experience of that at Lowell and Lawrence. I 
spoke with an entire plainness, and without offence, withholding 
nothing of what appeared to me to be the uncomfortable and dis- 
creditable certainties of the operative life of their city, and spe- 
cially of the condition of the children. The superintendent of 
their public schools, M. "W. Tewksbury, Esq., was present and made 
known a plan which he had originated, and which he hoped Avould 
be encouraged and sustained by both the municipal and manufac- 
turing authorities, having reference to improving the very low 
educational condition of the child-operatives. This plan, when 
matured, received both the desired encouragement and support, 
and resulted in the permanent establishment of a school exclusively 
devoted to the children of the mills, and in which, turn by turn, 
every three months, a detail of one-quarter part of tbese children 
is systematically made by the superintendents of the several lac- 
tories, according to the following form: — 

Names of Children sent from Mill to Factory School, 

for Term cornmencinij 180 . 



Names. 


Age. 


Residence. 






» 



, Agent. 

Received Teaclu r. 

" With this list the children are sent under charge of a school 
official to a school-house specially set apart for the purpose. Here 
they are placed under instruction given by a master and three as- 
sistants, after having been classed as well as circumstances will 
admit. They are taught to read, to write, to spell ordinary words, 
to draw upon the blackboard, arithmetic, geography, and singing 
by ear, with simple indoor exercises in gymnastics. Morals and 
manners, in which they had probably before received very little if 
any instruction, are sedulously inculcated. It is both surprising 
and gratifying to see what beneficial changes are wrought, both 
upon the outer and inner being of these poor younglings, in the 
brief time of their schooling. Some of them become ' little Olivers 



284 

ashing for more,'' and are found at the close of their three months 
desiring to continue under teaching, and some wise parents have 
yielded to their wish and kept them at the school; others return 
to the work with cleaner habits of body and mind, more respectful 
and gentle in demeanor, a proper pride in some degree awakened, 
and a consciousness that they have at length started upon the way 
to improvement. 

" Leaving school they each receive two certificates, on stiff card- 
board paper, signed by the superintendent of schools. They are 
as follows: — 

'Pupil's Certificate. 

This certifies that has attended school three 

months according to law during the year 1868. 

M. W. Tewksbuby, Supt. of Public Schools. 

Directions: — The duplicate card is to be given to the Overseer 
of the room in which the child is employed, and this certificate 
carried by the pupil to be shown when called for. If the card be- 
comes worn and defaced, by carrying both it and the duplicate to 
the teacher, new cards will be given in exchange.' 

'Overseer's Coupon. 

This certifies that has attended school three 

months during the year 1868, in accordance with the provisions of 
the law. 

M. W. Tewksbuby, Supt. of Public Schools. 

Directions: — This card is to be taken by the Overseer when 
the child is employed and retained during the whole time he is at 
work. 

No child under fifteen years of age will have a right to be 
employed unless he can present such a certificate to the Overseer. 
When the child leaves his employment in one establishment to 
enter school or obtain work elsewhere, this card is to be given 
him.' 

'• One of these is given to the overseer of the room wherein they 
again enter upon work, and the other is retained by themselves to 
be shown when called for. If he leaves one mill to work in 
another, he must carry and exhibit both. They may now be law- 
fully employed for the next consecutive nine months, at the end of 
which time they take their two certificates, return to school, give 
them up to the teacher, commence a new course of instruction, 
and at the end of three months more receive new certificates, 
varying in color and date, and again return to their several mills. 



285 

The operatives of Fall Elver being by families, mainly, and a per- 
manently settled class of residents, secures, measurably, the same 
children at school in any one quarter who attended a year previ- 
ously. I have made three visits to this city, in the last two of 
which I spent the entire school day with these children, deeply in- 
terested in the etfort, and grateful to all who had contributed to 
the inauguration of so encouraging an experiment. On my last 
visit I had an interview of upwards of two hours with several of 
the gentlemen at the haad of the manufacturing establishments, 
comparing opinions upon the intent and operation of the law, and 
its influence in individual cases, and in the aggregate. Its intent 
met full approval, its operation in some individual cases, it was 
shown, would bear severely where the family of the child or child- 
ren was very poor, but these would be the exceptions, and the aid 
of the city or factory might be extended during the three months 
of schooling. 

"It was suggested that if any cases should occur where a child 
was found of the age of twelve or thirteen years who, having at- 
tended school up to that age, had obtained the usual education 
common to children of that age, such child might be exempted 
from the operation of the law, and if it fell a desire for furl 
education it could take advantage of the evening schools, there be- 
ing two constituting a part of the system of the city, and well 
filled. 

"A supervisory power by the Slate was considered advisable, 
that uniformity might be secured all over its territory, and the law 
be made of like force and results everywhere. Most hearty and 
encouraging pledges of supporting the new enterprise were given, 
and every facility promised in aiding its details in the several fac- 
tories. A like feeling was manifested by the school committee, a 
meeting of which I subsequently attended, and I left Fall River 
with a feeling that valuable and permanent good for this cla>s of 
our children had been secured there, and with gratitude to all par- 
ties who had aided so good a cause. 

"The record of attendance from the date of the opening of the 
school (April 1st, 1868,) to the end of the year, was as follows: — 

dumber of boys registered .... 343 

girls registered .... 283 

Total G26 



286 

Number who have attended three months, received certificates: 

Boys 328 

Girls 268 

Total 596 

Removed from town or otherwise accounted 

for . i 30 

626 
Per cent of attendance, 87. 
Number of French Canadian pupils, about 100. 

" A large number of those taken from the mills, who lived at 
very great distance from the school, or who, having received al- 
ready education enough to enter classes in other schools without 
disturbing the work of such classes, were allowed to do so. At 
least 800 factory children out of some 1,000 in the city are known 
to have attended school, while perhaps 100 escaped through cun- 
ning or oversight. 

" The superintendent of schools in this city deserves the special 
praise of originating, and, in the face of many peculiar difficulties, 
of successfully organizing and putting into operation this novel 
element in our school system. It needed the wisdom of the ser- 
pent and the harmlessness of the dove, to move between needy 
parents and children, heads of factories, and heads of the school 
department of the city, and without offence to anj r , to secure a 
united co-operation in an experiment never before attempted in 
Massachusetts. Persuaded that earnest effort in a good cause 
would not fail, and recognizing the call of duty in a field hitherto 
unsown, and therefore barren of harvest, he entered thereon, 
plowed and planted, and the crop has shot up with excellent prom- 
ise of abundant return of fruit. The success of the enterprise has 
made friends of the early doubters, and now its permanent contin- 
uance and success will be looked for and expected by all the good 
people of the State. I know of no similar school in Massachu- 
setts, and cannot but express my great gratification at its creation, 
and my earnest hope for its stability. To secure that, the encour- 
agement and aid of the city and of its manufacturers are all that 
are needed, and if these be permanent we may hope to satiate, in 
some degree, this craving hunger of the heart. 

" In my report of 1868, I spoke of the educational condition of 
the operative children of this city in no language of praise. My 



expressions were said to have been energetic. I have only to say 
that I spoke as the plain verities I saw impelled me, and am only 
too thankful now to he able to exchange the speech of reproach 
for the pleasanter phra.se of commendation. As a public officer, I 
ought to withhold neither' the one or the other, when either are 
called for. It is matter not unworthy of note that while calling 
public attention to the educational interests of the Commonwealth, 
and commenting upon the status of high schools, grammar and 
primary schools, and giving statistics of instruction and attend- 
ance therein, this class of the children of the state seem to have 
been wholly unnoticed by both state and town. 

'•Yet something has been achieved if it be only the throwing 
some glimmers of light upon spots where the darkness was deemed 
to be the most murky, and the unstopping of ears that seemed to 
be the most deaf, all over the state, and we have good hope that 
we can apply remedies where the disease was thought to be least 
remediable, and where the acknowledged evils of the foreign 
method of factory life threatened to become a heritage of our own. 

"There is also another bright spot, as will be seen in the foil »w- 
ing letter from the superintendent of public schools in Springfield: 

'Springfield, January 21, 1869. 
Gen. H. K. Oliver : 

Mn Diar Sir, — Yours asking about our 'half-time school' at 
the Indian Orchard village, came to hand this morning. The ne- 
cessity for the school is found in the practical difficulty, almost utter 
impossibility, of getting the children out of the mills and into the 
day schools as the law requires. Bui of these difficulties I need 
not speak to you. For the opportunity of trying the experiment 
we are greatly indebted to Edward Atkinson, Esq., Treasurer of 
the Indian Orchard Mills Company, and to Charles J.Goodwin, 
Esq., Agent of the Company. The details of the school are simply 
these: The children leave the mills at noon, and instead of return- 
ing at a quarter before one o'clock, they go into the school-room at 
one, have three hours of school, and then return to their work. 
Thirty operatives are thus taken from the mills, and that the plea 
of poverty may be taken out of the mouths of the parents, they are 
paid for full lime. If they are not at school, they are not paid, and 
the attendance is better at that school than at any other in the city. 
"Would not a fine for absence have a good effect generally ? 

The services of an experienced teacher were secured, and the 
work moves on finely. 

The school has not been long enough in operation for us to 
speak of results, but it certainly promises well. 

I shall be happy to show it to you whenever you can visit us. 

Yours truly, 
E. A. Hubbard.' 



288 

" The following letter from the Agent of the Indian Orchard 
Mill to his Treasurer, gives the methods of the half-time school 
established there : — 

'Indian Orchard Mills, 
Indian Orchard, Feb. 4, 18G9. 
Edward Atkinson, Esq., Treasurer. 

Dear Sir, — The number of children attending half-time school 
is thirty, aged from nine to fourteen. 

Number of boys 9 

Girls ...... 21 

Hours school per week . . 15 
Hours work per week . . 4S£ 

The scholars leave work at twelve o'clock, school commencing 
at one o'clock, and closing at four, with fifteen minutes recess each 
session, thus giving them one half hour for play before school and 
fifteen minutes during school hours. Number of school weeks in 
year, forty. The parents of the children attending school are much 
pleased with the arrangement. I have not had a case of truancy 
reported to me ; this shows that the children like and appreciate 
the system. The school has been keeping seven weeks. I cannot 
as yet compare the earnings on job work ; but I find that where 
the children were before losing from one to four days per month, 
they are now working full time during the hours assigned to labor ; 
the school hours being a real rest to them. I am watching the 
working of this school with interest, and while I do not wish to 
arrive at a conclusion hastily, I fully believe that the half-time sys- 
tem is practicable, and wherever adopted, the manufacturer as well 
as operator will derive a benefit from it. Yours truly, 

C. J. Goodwin, Agent.'' 

" A movement has also been made towards the establishment of 
a similar school in Salem. The difficulties encountered in school- 
ing factory children are well stated by the Superintendent of 
Schools in Lowell. He sa} _ s : — 

'The children in this city who work in the mills are coming 
from the mill to the schools at all times in the year, that they may 
attend school the length of time the law requires and then return 
to their work again ; much inconvenience is thus caused to the 
schools, and these scholars themselves suffer many disadvantages ; 
they do not usually find classes of the same degree of advance- 
ment with themselves, and must enter a class either above or below 
their present attainments ; besides, the course of study prescribed 
for the regular classes in our schools is not calculated to be of the 
most practical benefit to those who can attend school but a few 
months in each year. The subject of establishing a school espec- 
ially for such scholars has been before the committee and referred 
to a sub-committee for investigation.'* 

* A half-time school could be without difficulty established in Lowell anddogrer^ 
good. H. K. O. 



289 

" "With the examples of these two schools before us, one an inter- 
change of pupils every three months, the other a half-time school, 
the children attending each afternoon, excepting during school 
holidays, and working in the mills during their unschool time, the 
question, -which is the better method, naturally arises. Under the 
three months system of the state law, the children receive thirty 
hours' instruction per week for thirteen weeks, equivalent to three 
hundred and ninety hours per year. Under the half-time system, 
the children are at school, say ten hours per week, averaging long 
and short days, for fifty-two w r eeks, less vacations, say forty weeks 
of the whole year, equivalent to four hundred hours per year. 
Both the experiments are new here, and results cannot j r et be 
given. My own impression is that the half-time system will be 
found to be the better, and had I the order of work and school to 
arrange, it would be this : school-work, or brain- work, first; mill- 
work, or body-work, next ; then sleep ; then in the same order the 
next day, — a clear head after repose for school, then the bodily ex- 
ercise of labor, then sound sleep, and this order will help to keep a 
' sound mind in a sound body.' " 

There are, at the least calculation, 500 children, under 
15 years of age, constantly employed in the mills of this 
city, and it is a question of no small moment as to how 
they shall receive their schooling ; it is a question affect- 
ing not only them, but the interests and' welfare of the 
community. One thing is certain, and that is, more 
school room will be needed to accommodate them, and 
every pains should be taken to provide suitable accommo- 
dations for them, and I have no doubt the agents of the 
mills will co-operate in any measure to secure the desired 
result. 

TRUANCY. 

Attention was called to this evil in the reports of 1867 
and 1868, and the attention of the city government was 
directed to it, but no definite action was taken with regard 
to the matter until last spring, when the following ordi- 
nance was enacted. 

19 



290 

CITY OF MANCHESTER. 

In the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine. 

AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO TRUANT OFFICERS AND HABIT- 
UAL TRUANTS. 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council of 

the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. Any child between the age of six and sixteen years, 
having no regular and lawful occupation, and of sufficient health, 
neglecting to attend some preper school, or remaining absent or 
playing truant therefrom, shall upon conviction thereof be fined a 
sum not exceeding ten dollars nor less than one dollar, and in de- 
fault of payment thereof be committed to the Reform School till 
the same be paid, or he is otherwise discharged ; or instead of such 
fine he may be sentenced to said Reform School for a term not ex- 
ceeding one year. 

Sec. 2. There shall be appointed by the Mayor and Alderman, 
upon the passage of this ordinance, and every year thereafter in 
the month of January, three or more persons whose duty it shall 
be to look after all such children between the ages of six and six- 
teen years who do not regularly attend school, and after absentees 
and truants therefrom, and to report their names to the Superin- 
tendent of Schools, and upon the request of the Superintendent to 
make complaint of such persons to the Police Court and cause such 
complaint to be prosecuted, and the penalty or punishment en. 
forced. 

Sec. 3. The persons so appointed shall receive such conrpensa- 
tion for their services as may be determined by the City Council, 
and all fines and fees paid under the provisions of this ordinance 
shall be paid by the City Marshal to the City Treasury. 

Sec. 4, Chapter 20, of the Revised Ordinances is hereby repealed. 

April 20, 1869. In Board of Common Council, passed to be or- 
dained. 

P. K. CHANDLER, President. 

April 20, 1869. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, passed in 
concurrence to be ordained. 

ISAAC. W. SMITH, Mayor. 

A true copy. Attest, — 

Joseph E. Bennett, City Clerk. 

Officers were immediately appointed and many children 
have been kept in the schools who would otherwise have 



291 

been in the streets. One of the very first arrests made by 
the officer was an American boy fifteen years of age, who did 
not know the alphabet ; and yet that boy had always lived 
in this city where the common school was free to all, but 
he could not be induced to attend school till an officer 
clothed with authority took him and compelled his attend- 
ance at a primary school where the ages of the children 
ranged from five to seven. If people are compelled annually 
to pay their money for the support of schools, why have they 
not the right to demand that each child in the community 
shall receive the benefit of the schools for which their money 
is paid ? There are many children in this, as in .all cities, 
who will not attend schoohunless they are compelled to do so, 
and society as a protection to itself should see to it that in- 
stead of growing up in ignorance and vice they should be 
taught that which will be of value to them in the future. 

Mayor Smith, in his inaugural message, truly said, — " It 
is cheaper as well as better to educate a child, and thus 
prevent his going astray, than to support him in confine- 
ment and attempt to reform him later in life." 

Over fifty children, between the ages of eight and sixteen 
years, have been brought in by the truant officers, most of 
whom have been sent to the different schools, only a very 
few having been taken before the police court. 

This subject demands the attention of every citizen in- 
terested in the welfare of the community. 

TRAINING SCHOOLS. 

The subject of a Normal school has been agitated in this 
state for a number of years, and will undoubtedly continue 
to be discussed until one is established. In many places 
Training schools have been established, where those intend- 
ing to teach are prepared for the work. The plan adopted 
is to select graduates of the High school of the place, and 
sometimes others, and place them in some regular schools, 



292 

under the direction of experienced teachers. The young 
ladies thus selected will instruct and govern under the 
guidance of the regular teacher, being advised as circum- 
stances may require. The time spent in these schools va- 
ries in different places, some requiring three months, others 
six, and still others a whole year. 

Allusion was made to this subject in the reports of 1867 
and 1868, and the subject was discussed among the mem- 
bers of the Board, but no action was taken till last May, 
when at a meeting of the Committee, Judge Upton intro- 
duced the following resolution : 

Piesolved, That it is expedient to institute some system 
for training teachers for the public schools of this city. 

The question was informally discussed at several subse- 
quent meetings, and in September the same gentleman in- 
troduced the following, which was adopted as one of the 
regulations of the School Board : 

" For the purpose of furnishing the schools in Manches- 
ter with experienced and qualified teachers, the committee 
may from time to time elect such graduates of the High 
school in this city as they may judge suitable upon exam- 
ination and as may desire to become teachers, and employ 
them as substitutes, when required, or as assistants in any 
of the schools, under the guidance and direction of the 
principals thereof, upon such terms and conditions as they 
may judge for the interests of the schools, and in such way 
and manner as may fit them to become teachers thereof." 

The Primary schools on Manchester street and the Mid- 
dle schools on Merrimack street, were selected as the 
schools in which the candidates should be placed. Three 
young ladies were selected for the primary and three for 
the middle department, during the fall term. 

The young ladies selected for the primary department 
have been employed most of the time as substitutes in 
other schools as temporary vacancies have occurred, the va- 



293 

cancies in this department having been frequent during the 
past term. 

We have no training schools as jet, for grammar school 
teachers, as there is more difficulty in obtaining good teach- 
ers for the lower grades than for this grade, but if appli- 
cants are numerous, some of them can be placed in gram- 
mar schools. No time has yet been fixed during which the 
candidates shall remain in the schools, but I would recom- 
mend six months as the time. It seems to me that it can- 
not need much argument to prove the utility of these 
schools. In all the professions, study in some special branch 
is required before one. can enter upon the duties of that 
profession. The importance of professional schools for the 
education of teachers is fully recognized by the leading ed- 
ucators of the country. 

The difficulty in this, as in other places, in securing good 
teachers — especially for the primary schools — is that young- 
ladies are selected to take charge of schools who are 
obliged to learn how at the expense of the children in the 
school. Proficiency is acquired only by systematic study 
and training. Experienced labor is not always skilled labor. 
In very few callings in life would persons dare ask for po- 
sitions without some special qualification for the place. 
Why select persons to take charge of the immortal minds 
in the school-room unless they have fitted themselves for 
the noble task ? This is as reasonable as to demand that 
one shall be examined with regard to his qualifications for 
the law or for medicine. 

While pupils are under our charge during the short pe- 
riod allotted them for school, they should have the best in- 
struction from those of the readiest tact, widest experi- 
ence and noblest influence. We should implant in them 
noble aspirations, and the task can better be performed by 
those who bring to their work an energy, a zeal and a 
training for the duty. A teacher may for years perform 



294 

the ordinary duties of the school-room in such a manner 
as to avoid removal, and still be entirely ignorant of the 
real duties of the teacher, knowing little of the right meth- 
od of imparting elementary instruction. We will not al- 
low an inexperienced person to repair a watch or mend a 
pair of boots for us, and certainly inexperienced persons 
should not be permitted to take charge of our schools. If 
we recognize the truth of these statements, we naturally 
inquire " Where shall we obtain the best teachers ?" 

As we have seen that no one. in the many other depart- 
ments of life can hope for success without careful prepara- 
tion, we must expect the same of those intending to teach. 
If the young ladies who annually graduate from the High 
school, those whom we judge to be well adapted to the 
business of teaching, can have the preparation in the 
schools taught by the best of our teachers, we may reason- 
able expect that we shall have a more efficient corps of 
teachers in our public schools. They will assume the 
charge of schools having not only some knowledge of teach- 
ing, but the best of all qualifications, actual experience in 
the duties of the school-room, where defects have been 
pointed out and corrected. It will have the effect of bring- 
ing the graduates of our own schools into the corps of 
teachers, and thus induce many to take the full course at 
the High school. The preference should be given to the 
young ladies who have been educated in this city. This 
has been done in the past, as is shown by the number of 
teachers employed who have come from our High school. 
Of the fifty-four female teachers in the schools last term, 
forty were residents of this place, or had attended the Man- 
chester High school. There is ability in our own schools 
inferior to none. There are pupils in these schools who 
will make successful teachers, and the training school will 
prepare many of them for the duties of the school-room, 



295 

so that we may have in our own city a corps of teachers 
equal to the graduates of a Normal school. 

teachers' meetings. 

Intimately connected with the subject of preparation for 
the duties of teaching before one enters upon those duties, 
is that'of making an annual growth after such labor has 
commenced. 

The tendency of the teacher's life is to fall into routine, 
and to proceed term after term repeating the same lessons 
in the same way, and especially is this true in the limited 
course of study prescribed for a graded school. Among 
the chief means for encouraging educational growth are 
meetings of teachers, not so much from real information 
obtained there, as from the enthusiasm awakened and the 
zeal kindled by meeting those engaged in the same pursuit, 
and coming in contact with many others who have experi- 
enced difficulties similar to their own. Teachers with but 
little experience can learn of those who have been longer 
in the work. The best methods of teaching can be illus- 
trated, and a general interchange of opinions upon topics 
connected with the duties of the school-room can but result 
in good to those who attend. A session with fifty others 
engaged in the same business leads many a teacher, who 
before had thought there was nothing to learn, to think 
that there are many good methods witli which he is not 
familiar. 

The School Committee of Manchester have ever afforded 
to teachers every opportunity to attend state and county 
meetings when held within reasonable distance of this place. 
The objection is often urged that if schools are dismissed 
for this purpose, many teachers will not attend, but will 
devote the time to something else. I cannot concur with 
this, for if any teacher paid by the city neglects to attend, 
the remedy is not to refuse to close the schools that teach- 



296 

crs who desire may attend, but to have a corps of teachers 
that will attend. We have in this city teachers of both 
classes, and the incoming board can consider their cases. 
If a teacher cannot spend time to discuss educational ques- 
tions, to attend educational meetings, to make careful pre- 
paration out of school for the labors of the school-room, 
another should be found whose time is not so much occu- 
pied, and who is not content to teach as well to-day as he 
taught yesterday. 

I am convinced that county and state associations, al- 
though beneficial to our teachers, cannot be of such service 
as a city organization, as then questions of local importance 
can be considered by those immediately interested. The 
teachers of this place have organized such an association, 
although as yet but little has been done by it, but it can be 
made of great service if the teachers themselves are dis- 
posed to interest themselves in the matter. 

STUDIES PURSUED. 

The course of study adopted last year has proved quite 
satisfactory, and good results have been accomplished in 
our schools by following the plan proposed in that course. 
It is a question demanding our consideration whether the 
Grammar school course shall not be extended, so that 
pupils leaving those schools shall be better fitted for the 
business of life* 

I would not have anything done to reduce the number in 
the High school ; but there are many who complete the 
Grammar school course, who never enter the High school, 
and others who enter the High school and remain but a 
very short time. Of the sixty-five pupils examined and 
admitted to the High school a year ago last summer, less 
than thirty-five are in the school to-day ; but it is more 
than probable that if they had been required to remain 



297 

one year longer in the Grammar school before being ad- 
mitted to theliigh school, nearly every one -would have .re- 
s mained. If a vast majority of the children cannot enter 
the High school, it is important that some of the High 
school studies should be brought to the Grammar school. 

Guyot's Elementary and Intermediate Geographies are 
now used in all the schools, and are giving general satis- 
faction. The results in this branch compare favorably 
with those of any other, and the progress made in the 
study during the two years Guyot's books have been in 
use has been much more rapid than before. 

Walton's Primary and Intellectual Arithmetics have 
taken the place of Robinson's. In the study of mental 
arithmetic, much can be done without ^a text-book. The 
study of arithmetic should be so conducted that the pupils 
will become ready reckoners, even if they fail to commit to 
memory a certain number of rules. After pupils have 
commenced the study of written arithmetic, mental arith- 
metic may lie used as an aid, the same principles being 
studied at the same time. 

If there is any fault in teaching arithmetic, it is because 
pupils are required to commit to memory certain rules, 
when they need the practice upon the examples. They 
talk too much about carrying one for every ten, or whether 
they borrow one from the minuend, or add one to the sub- 
trahend, when the time could be more profitably employed 
upon the common operations of arithmetic, making use of 
small numbers and comparatively easy examples, thus be- 
coming familiar with principles which are to be used in the 
every day walks of life. It is well enough for the disci- 
pline of the mind to dwell somewhat upon these points, 
but the child needs in the school the practice which will 
enable him to solve the problems of life. It has often 
been stated, that if our pupils were marked for superiority 



298 

in any branch, it was in mathematics, and the same is 
true now. 

With regard to History, I desire to repeat what has been . 
stated in former reports. A Primary History is needed for 
the third divisions of the Grammar schools. History 
should be used more in many classes, especially as a read- 
ing book. There is a deficiency in this branch which is 
quite apparent at the examination of candidates for teach- 
ers. This study is neglected, upon the ground that pupils 
will read history at some other time ; but very many never 
acquire much knowledge of this branch, excepting what is 
learned in school. If it is important that the youth of our 
land should be familiar with the events of American his- 
tory, it must receive more attention in the common schools. 

Bartholomew's series of Drawing Books and Cards have 
been introduced into some of the schools. This branch of 
study in many places is receiving more attention than 
formerly, and is regarded with favor. It has received but 
little attention heretofore in our schools, although many 
urge its importance. The Grammar schools, and some of 
the Middle and Primary schools, have been using the sys- 
tem for two months past with good success, and there is no 
doubt it should be introduced into all the schools and 
made a regular branch of study. 

Spelling, during the past year, has received more atten- 
tion than formerly, but still there is need of drill in this 
branch. The interest now awakened in this branch is 
commendable, and the subject is receiving the attention 
that should have been bestowed upon it in former years. 

Many teachers have taken unusual pains with their 
Reading classes, — a very gratifying fact, as this branch has 
been too much neglected in former years. I would recom- 
mend that the use of the Sixth Reader be discontinued in 
the Grammar schools ; that the Fifth Reader be used in the 
first division, and the Intermediate in the third. 



299 

In November the teachers employed Prof. Treat to give 
a course of lessons in Elocution, and the committee after- 
ward engaged him for a longer time. There can be no 
doubt that with the interest manifested in this branch by 
the teachers, good results will be obtained. A copy of 
Munroe's Manual has been furnished each teacher, and 
with the aid of this work and the exorcises of Prof. Treat 
the teachers are well prepared in this department. 

Payson, Dunton & Scribner's Writing Books have been 
used in our schools for a number of years. The prac- 
tice of teaching writing as a simultaneous class exercise, 
conducted by counting, was not begun till about three years 
ago. Mr. Burnett, Teacher of Penmanship, was sent to 
this city last winter by Messrs. Woolworth and Ainsworth, 
the publishers of the books. He remained here one week, 
visiting nearly every division where penmanship was taught, 
making suggestions to the teachers, and drilling many of 
the classes, and his instruction was of great service both to 
teachers and pupils. We were convinced that he was a 
gentleman who thoroughly understood the method of teach- 
ing this branch, and we hope that his services will be se- 
cured again next year. 

The system that is used in our schools is a good one, and 
the teachers are closely following the requirements of the 
system. The writing of the pupils in the schools is rapidly 
improving, as is clearly shown from the written examina- 
tions in many of the schools. 

Vocal Music has been taught in some of the schools for 
the past ten years. Lessons have been given by instruc- 
tors employed for that purpose in every school for the past 
three years, and now it is a regular exercise, the same as 
arithmetic and geography. 

There no longer remains a doubt of the utility of this 
branch in our common schools. Although many teachers 
are unaccustomed to it, and cannot give their classes the 



800 

drill in this branch that they can in some of the others, 
the course of study adopted last year meets the difficulty 
in a great measure, and teachers by carefully observing the 
methods of instruction of the music teachers, and follow- 
ing their suggestions, can easily give their classes the in- 
struction required in this department of study. Whatever 
misgivings there may have been with regard to the subject 
in former years, I think the committee are satisfied that 
it is a branch of instruction which ought not to be neg- 
lected. The majority of children in our midst receive no 
instruction in singing unless they receive it in the common 
school, and we cannot afford to deprive them of its benefit. 

Oar great difficulty in years past has been with Gram- 
mar. Time enough has been devoted to committing to 
memory the rules, but sufficient attention has not been 
given to the use of our language. We were taught that 
" Grammar teaches us to speak and write the language 
correctly," but the use that many pupils make of the lan- 
guage does not prove that to be correct. It is too common 
an idea that if a pupil can repeat the rules in the book, give 
the number of the rules and the many exceptions, he is 
a good scholar, even if he violate the rules of grammar 
every time he analyzes a sentence. 

What we need is less of abstraction and more of thought, 
and a vocabulary so that we may construct sentences that 
shall convey the meaning of what we intend to say. The 
time allotted for school-days is too short to spend upon per- 
plexities and technicalities which will not affect the speech 
of the pupils in our schools. How vague and unsatisfactory 
the ideas which our pupils gain from such terms as the fol- 
lowing, which they perhaps can repeat with fluency : Aux- 
iliary, antecedent, correlative, coordinate, proposition, pas- 
sive, impersonal, infinitive, logical, synopsis, etc. Much of 
the time devoted to this study might be profitably employed 
in practical exercises in composition and conversation, in 



301 

learning to " speak and write the language correctly." 
More oral instruction should he given, and the pupil should 
continue the study longer in the High school. Our pupils 
must he taught that it is important to acquire a good use of 
language, and that success in business does not depend 
entirely upon mathematical knowledge, as oftentimes young 
men fail of desirable positions on account of the misuse of 
their mother tongue. 

The practical exercises, in learning the correct use of 
our language, should commence in the lower grades, in 
connection with the recitations, and continue through the 
course. The pupil should not neglect this subject till he is 
about to leave school, and then think he has mastered it 
because he can repeat the following rule : " A noun or 
noun used for explanation or emphasis, by being predicated 
of another, or put in apposition with another, must be 
in the same case." The fault is not with the teachers, as 
they follow the course marked out, but the system is wrong 
and should be corrected. 

CONDITION OP THE SCHOOLS. 

An extra assistant has been employed in the High school 
for one term ; with this exception, there has been no 
change of teachers during the year. A great many changes 
have occurred in the North Grammar school, and in fact 
this seems to be an unfortunate school in this regard. 
Within the past two years there have been twelve different 
teachers in that school, and there is but one teacher re- 
maining who was connected with the school the first of this 
year. These circumstances have tended greatly to retard 
the progress of the school, but as long as other places can 
offer much larger salaries, we must expect to lose our best 
teachers, and to have our schools suffer in consequence. 
At the beginning of the year, Mr. Eastman, the principal 
of the school, resigned, and for the remainder of the winter 



302 

term the school was under the charge of Mr. E. D. Hartley, 
a member of the school committee. John S. Hayes, prin- 
cipal of a grammar school in Medford, Mass., was then se- 
lected. Mr. Hayes was a gentleman of considerable expe- 
dience, an enthusiastic and faithful teacher. He secured 
the affection of his pupils, and the esteem of the parents. 
The committee and superintendent felt that he was the man 
for the position. The school was rapidly progressing un- 
der his direction, and promised to be one of the best gram- 
mar schools to be found. In November, however, the 
schooL committee of Newton, Mass., offered him a larger 
salary, and he left us. The North Grammar school has 
had many good teachers, has many times been disarranged 
by changes, but I think it can be safely said that it never 
had a more efficient teacher, nor that it ever sustained a 
greater loss. At a meeting of the committee, when his 
resignation was accepted, the following resolution was 
unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That in accepting the resignation of Mr. J. S. 
Hayes, as teacher of the North Grammar school in this 
city, we tender him the assurance of our kindest regards 
and best wishes. Though his residence with us has been 
short, yet it has been sufficiently long to show his ability, 
faithfulness and tact as a teacher, and to occasion deep re- 
gret in parting with him. 

Wm. E. Buck, who had been principal of the Interme- 
diate school for two terms, was then elected principal, and 
his success heretofore warrants the belief that he will suc- 
ceed well in his new position. Early in the year, Miss 
Ambrose, teacher in the third division, resigned, and Miss 
Dinsmore was transferred from the fourth division to fill 
the vacancy, which position she now occupies. Miss Dins- 
more presented her resignation last May, but the commit- 
tee urged her to remain, and she was induced to withdraw 
the resignation. Miss Kate L. Chapin was elected to the 



303 

fourth division, but was transferred to the corresponding 
division of the South Grammar school the next term. Miss 
Emma A. XL Brown, who for a number of years had been 
one of the most efficient teachers in the city, received last 
September an offer of 81,000 per year in Dayton, and left 
early in the fall term. Miss Mary F. Cutler was selected 
assistant, and had charge of the fourth division during the 
spring term. Upon the resignation of Miss Brown she 
was placed in charge of the second division. Miss Fannie 
E. Porter, who had been one of our most successful primary 
school teachers, was then elected to the fourth division. 

With all these changes and under such circumstances, it 
is remarkable that any school should have maintained a 
respectable position, but the North Grammar school, in 
spite of difficulties, occupies to-day a rank which is credit- 
able to our school system. The members of the first class 
in this school were as well qualified for admission to the 
High school la^t summer as the pupils who entered from 
the other schools, but the whole class preferred to remain 
another year in the Grammar school ; and, what is re- 
markable, their parents did not ask that their children 
should be promoted, but were willing that they should re- 
main another year in the Grammar school in order to have 
a good opportunity to review their studies. Oftentimes 
parents are too anxious to have their children sent to a 
higher grade even if it is injurious to the children. The 
anxiety is not always that the child shall be thorough in 
his studies, but that he shall be in a higher grade of school. 
Better allow the child two or three years more time in the 
schools, and then he will go out into the world as soon as 
the world needs him, and with a better preparation for its 
duties. 

But one division of the South Grammar school has ex- 
perienced any change of teachers within the past year. 
Miss Gove, of the fourth division, resigned at the close of 



304 

the winter* term, and was succeeded by Miss Cliapin, trans- 
ferred from the North school, who in turn was succeeded 
by Miss Reid, transferred from Middle school No. 7. This 
school is still in a very prosperous condition, and shows 
what can be accomplished by retaining the same teachers 
permanently. 

The East Grammar was made a full grammar school at 
the beginning of the spring term. Mr. L. H. Button, who 
had been successful in several other schools, was elected 
principal, and in his new position has fully sustained his 
former reputation. Miss Kate L. Porter was elected to the 
second division at the beginning of the spring term. The 
third division is taught by Miss Baker, who has had charge 
of it since the organization of the school two years ago ; 
this division still continues one of the best in the city, both 
as regards the instruction and the discipline. Miss Kidder 
remained in the fourth division till the close of the summer 
term, when she resigned and was succeeded by Miss Fan- 
nie Burnham. 

The grade of this school is not equal to that of the other 
grammar schools, and some explanation may be necessary 
with regard to it. 

This school was established two years ago in order to re- 
lieve the other grammar schools, and it was not graded as 
well as the others were, nor was it possible to do so, conse- 
quently pupils in this school are not so far advanced as 
those in corresponding divisions of the two other schools. 
The class now in the first division should, with a very few 
exceptions, remain in the school two years, and there should 
be very few changes in the other divisions during that time 
unless the pressure from the lower schools demands it ; and 
in that case pupils should not be crowded in any of their 
studies. If these suggestions are carried out we may ex- 
pect a first-class school here. 

It will often happen that in order to equalize the number 



305 

of pupils in the schools classes will be sent forward before 
they have completed the course prescribed for that grade, 
but they need not be required to take the studies of the 
next higher grade until they can profitably do it ; and if 
there is not sufficient room in the higher grades to accom- 
modate those who deserve promotion, the studies of the 
higher grade can be pursued in the lower grade schools. 
It is utterly impossible to keep the schools graded to the 
exact point laid down in the course of study, but it should 
be followed as far as practicable. 

The East Grammar school can never become a superior 
school if the pupils now in the various divisions do not re- 
main longer than the time prescribed, because they entered 
before they were fully up to the requirements. If the pu- 
pils now in the first division can remain in this school until 
they arc qualified for the High school, the East Grammar 
school will in every respect be equal to the other grammar 
schools; but if pupils are hurried to the High school 
poorly prepared, and others .from the lower divisions, no 
better prepared, are allowed to fill their places and pursue 
the studies of the higher division, the school must neces- 
sarily occupy a low rank. The members of the first class, 
with very few exceptions, instead of entering the High 
school last summer should have remained another year 
in the grammar school, and then they could have entered 
with honor and done credit both to the school from which 
they came and the one to which they went. The number 
of pupils sent from a school is not always the safest crite- 
rion by which to judge of its merits, nor can we decide it 
by knowing the ground passed over; but rather let us judge 
from the work the pupils can do after the promotion. 

No change has been made in the Park street Grammar 

school, or Amoskeag Grammar school, during the year. 

The Amoskeag school was closed, however, a month sooner 

than was anticipated, on account of the transfer of Mr, 

20 



306 

Clifford to the Intermediate school. Mr. Alpha Messer has 
lust been elected to the Amoskeag school. 

Miss Annette McDoel was principal of the Piscataquog 
Grammar school during the winter term ; since then it has 
been taught by Mr. L. D. Henry, who during the winter 
taught the school at Goffe's Falls. Both Miss McDoel and 
Mr. Henry have labored successfully in this school, and the 
pupils under their charge have made commendable prog- 
ress. Miss Alice G. Lord has been employed as an extra 
assistant a part of the fall term, as the school was so large 
and so poorly graded that two teachers could not do justice 
to all the pupils attending. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

During the winter term Mr. Dutton was principal of the 
school, assisted by Miss Kate L. Porter ; both were elected 
to the East Grammar school at the beginning of the spring- 
term. The school was never in a more prosperous condition 
than when taught by Mr. Dutton. Mr. Buck had charge of 
the school for the remainder of the year, or until near the 
close of the fall term. Miss Emma A. Cross, a graduate 
of the High school, has been the assistant for the past 
term ; during the spring term there was no assistant 
teacher. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

There are ten schools of this grade in the city ; during 
the past year there have been but few changes in them. At 
the beginning of the spring term Miss McDoel was trans- 
ferred from the Piscataquog Grammar school to the "Wilson 
Hill Middle school, since which time the latter named 
school has made very good progress. 

At the beginning of the fall term Miss Hattie G. Flan- 
ders was elected to Middle school No. 7, to fdl the vacancy 
occasioned by the transfer of Miss Rcid to the South Gram- 



307 

mar school. The remaining eight schools of this grade 
have had no change of teachers during the year. 

Our middle schools have been highly commended in for- 
mer reports, and at present they maintain their former 
high reputation. It is a question worthy of consideration 
whether there should be a separate grade for these schools, 
or allow the middle schools as now graded to become a 
part of the grammar schools. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

But few changes have occurred in this grade of schools 
within the year. 

Primary school No. 2, which had been kept in the old 
High school building, was discontinued at the close of the 
winter term, and the same disposition was made of Pri- 
mary school No. 5, Concord street, at the close of the 
summer term. 

Miss Smith, of No. 11 Primary, resigned during the fall 
term, and Miss Addie M. Marshall, from the Training 
school, taught the school for the remainder of the term. 

Miss Clara N. Brown has taught the new school in Pis- 
cataquog which was opened last May. 

Miss Laura A. Montgomery was elected to Amoskeag 
Primary No. 19, to take the place of Miss Porter, trans- 
ferred to the North Grammar school. 

In the other fifteen Primary schools there have been no 
changes during the year. 

The importance of Primary schools has been considered 
in former reports, and it may seem useless to refer to the 
subject at this time, yet there is danger that we shall un- 
dervalue the importance of these schools and confine' our 
attention too much to the schools of higher grade. When 
we consider what a large number of children never attend 
a school after leaving the Middle schools, we cannot over. 



308 

estimate the value of our lowest grade schools. The great- 
est care should be exercised in selecting teachers for these 
schools, and the supervision of these schools should be the 
chief duty of those who are appointed to supervise the 
schools of any city. The primary school forms the basis 
of our educational system ; the work must be well done 
here in order to fit the child for labor in the higher grades. 
Teachers with patience, tact and nice discernment of char- 
acter are needed in these schools. The old notion that any 
one could teach a primary school has been abandoned. 
The school committee of this city have shown their appre- 
ciation of the teachers in this grade and of the labor re- 
quired, by making their salaries the same as those of assist- 
ants in grammar schools. In the language of another, " If 
inexperienced, unprepared teachers are to be employed, by 
all means let them be inflicted on some other grade, and 
not be intrusted with the noblest and most responsible 
work of the primary school, until they have gained experi- 
ence at the expense of some less sensitive and fragile class 
of intellects." 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

Miss Theora Flanders taught the school in District No. 1 
for the winter term, and then took charge of the Concord 
street Primary school. She was obliged to leave the last 
named school on account of ill health, and died during the 
fall. Miss Flanders was a recent graduate of our High 
school, a good scholar, a successful teacher, and an estima- 
ble young lady. 

Miss Emma F. Soule has taught the school in District 
No..l for the past two terms. 

The schools at Hallsville, Bakersville, Webster's Mills 
and Mosquito Pond have had no change of teachers for 
the year. 

Mr. L. D. Henry taught the school at Goffe's Falls dur- 



309 

ing the winter term, in a very acceptable manner. Miss 
Mary A. Doty was elected for the spring term, and Miss 
Mary T. Currier for the fall term. 

The school in the Harvey District was taught in the 
winter by Miss Ella M. Mitchell, in the spring by Miss 
Nellie M. Cheney, and Miss Laura A. Montgomery, and in 
the fall by Miss Cheney. This school, as well as many 
others, has suffered much in terms past from a frequent 
change of teachers, and in fact this is a matter of no small 
importance, but one which has been too much overlooked. 

Miss Addie M. Chase was elected to the Massabesic 
school at the beginning of the spring term, and although 
this is one of the largest as well as one of the most diffi- 
cult schools in Manchester, she has managed it remarkably 
well. 

Before dismissing the subject of suburban schools I wish 
to urge the importance of securing permanent teachers in 
these schools. If permanent teachers are needed any- 
where they are needed in these schools, as the pupils are 
of various ages and qualifications and need some one who 
knows their needs better than a person who comes to re- 
main with them but a few months. No one can fail to see 
that it is quite disastrous to the interests of such a school, 
as well as to any school, to have a young, inexperienced 
teacher placed in charge of it and retained but one or two 
terms and then replaced by another of no experience who 
is obliged to learn something of teaching at the expense of 
the children in the district. The same ideas have been 
advanced in the remarks made concerning Training schools, 
but I wish to press the matter more strongly than ever. 

During the past seven terms there have been six different 
teachers employed at Goffe's Falls, and the same is true of 
the school in the Harvey District. 

If it is urged that teachers living in the city are unwill- 
ing to remain in these schools, but are constantly endeav- 



310 

oring to obtain situations in graded schools, the reply will 
be, that there are teachers in other places who would be 
willing to remain in these schools for a longer time, and 
such ones should be obtained and paid a salary sufficient 
to retain them. 

We owe it to the people of these districts, who are taxed 
for the support of the schools, and who have no voice in 
the selection of teachers, to supply them with as good 
teachers as we furnish to the graded schools ; we owe it to 
the children in these schools, who are to become citizens, 
and who deserve the same at our hands as children resid- 
ing in more thickly settled portions of the place. 

GENERAL MATTERS. 

In 1865 the superintendent recommended that some 
plan should be adopted for taking a school census, in order 
to ascertain the number of children of the city entitled to 
school privileges. This is an important question and 
some action is necessary with regard to it. 

The naming of the schools is a matter to which I desire 
to direct your attention. For a great many years there 
were but two principal grammar schools in the place, 
called respectively North and South Grammar. When the 
new school was established it was called the East Gram- 
mar ; should another school lie organized in the eastern 
section of the city it must be called the Northeastern, to 
indicate its locality. Would it not be well for the Board of 
Education to give to the principal schools the names of 
individuals, as is the case in most other cities ? Such 
names as Stark and Blodgett might be especially appro- 
priate in this place, and many others will suggest them- 
selves if the idea is favorably received. 

Nothing has been said in this report with regard to ex- 
hibitions and examinations, as the faults in these respects 
have been corrected. 



311 

I sec no reason for changing the views expressed two 
years ago in respect to prizes, marking and ranking. We 
have no better schools in our midst than some of those 
where not the least attention is paid to marking and rank- 
ing. There is not so much irregularity of attendance in 
many of the schools as formerly, but this subject needs 
constant attention in order to remedy the evils resulting 
from it. 

It is sometimes urged as an objection to our school sys- 
tem and our methods of instruction, that they are better 
suited for those children who are to maintain themselves 
by professional pursuits than for those who will engage in 
mechanical employment; that the time now spent upon 
many of the studies in the higher grades are suited only 
to the rich and not to those who are to earn their liveli- 
hood for themselves. If there are these objections, let all 
grounds for them be removed and our schools be made - 
mon schools in every particular. 

It has been suggested in this report that the Grammar 
school course should be revised in such a wa} r as to allow 
those who are unable to pursue the full course an opportu- 
nity to become familiar with some subjects that are now 
only studied during the last part of the High School 
course. We should endeavor to persuade as many as pos- 
sible to complete the full course. Pupils arc withdrawn 
from school oftentimes when it is not necessary, when one 
or two years more in the schools would prove of gnat ben- 
efit to them. Education tends to equalize conditions and 
destroy the barriers that separate classes. 

We would not hold up before the youth in our schools 
such incentives as are too often placed before them ; we 
would not stimulate the boy by telling him that he shall 
be the occupant of the White House, or the girl by telling 
her that she shall be raised above the hfced of exertion, 
and lead a life of frivolity and ease. Let uk say to all the 



312 

children in the schools, that it is " better to be right than 
to be president ;" that they are training themselves for the 
responsibilities of life ; that they must learn in our schools 
to be good citizens ; and thus shall we elevate the standard 
of opinion, and promote the general happiness. 

One thing charged against teachers in some places can- 
not be said of the teachers in our city, that they take occa- 
sion to express their political or religious preferences in 
the schools. Parents differ in their political persuasions 
and in religious sentiments, and however earnest teachers 
may be in their convictions, they have scrupulously re- 
frained from anything that could wound the feelings of any 
one. The rule forbidding any sectarian or partisan instruc- 
tion in the schools is faithfully observed. If it has not 
been observed, the attention of the committee or superin- 
tendent has not been called to it. 

The health of pupils is a subject demanding our atten- 
tion ; the proper ventilation of the school-rooms is a mat- 
ter to which each teacher should give personal attention. 
Much of the weariness in many rooms may be attributed to 
the vitiated air of the room, which is not renewed often 
enough by the methods of ventilation employed in many 
houses. The necessity arises of opening some of the doors 
or the windows, and great caution should be exercised that 
pupils are not subjected, to a current of air by so doing. 
Much of the complaint of exhaustion, headache and high 
pressure would not be heard if our school-rooms were 
properly ventilated. 

The play ground at many of the school buildings is not 
sufficient for the pupils, and consequently they cannot have 
the exercise needed at recess without going into the streets, 
a thing which should not be allowed under any circum- 
stances. In many of the schools, teachers are careful to 
train their pupils to sit and stand in such a manner as to 
promote health and give them vigor for study. Physical 



313 

exercises have been introduced into most of the schools, 
and should be into, every school. Those who have been 
entrusted with building school-houses have not always suf- 
ficiently regarded the subjects of ventilation and light, sub- 
iects which should be considered in the erection of every 
school-house. Many influences arc at work, both at home 
and in the street, which tend to impair the health of the 
child, but this does not relieve the teacher from any re- 
sponsibility. In this connection, it may not be out of place 
to direct attention to some of the dangers to which chil- 
dren in all of our schools are exposed. The following ex- 
tract, from the able superintendent of schools in Provi- 
dence, shows what thought is bestowed upon these mat- 
ters in other places. I quote at length from his report of 
May 1868. 

"It will be but of little avail that we erect costly buildings, 
adorned with all that beauty and art can supply, and furnished by 
a liberal hand with all the means by which schools can be advanced 
to the highest standard of excellence, if the very fountains of 
knowledge are to be polluted. 

"It is a notorious fact that the press is teeming witli productions 
of the most dangerous character. The writings of the worst infi- 
dels and atheists that ever disgraced humanity are now being pub- 
lished and sent forth in the most attractive and seductive forms. 
Pocket editions of these works are now furnished to clubs and 
club-rooms in almost every section of the country. 

"And very many of the popular tales and novels of the present 
clay have, either directly or indirectly, a decided immoral tendency. 
The writers seem to aim to keep on the border line of decency, so 
as to be beyond the reach of the law, while, at the same time, they 
scatter with an unsparing hand their insidious poison. 

"This class of writings is to be condemned, not only on account 
of their immoral tendency, but also because they have a most de- 
cided and pernicious influence in count eracting mental discipline. 
It is utterly impossible for a pupil, while at school, to form habits 
of patient thought and accurate analysis, and to learn to trace out 
with nice discrimination the most important relations of scientific 
truths, so long as they spend hours of each clay in poring over the 



814 

exciting stories of modern fiction. This reprehensible practice is 
also one of the most prolific causes of the ill health complained of 
by the young. There is no mental exercise so exhausting to the 
brain, none that so impairs the intellect and deadens the finer sen- 
sibilities of our moral nature, as the habitual reading of the high 
wrought and thrilling pictures of human folly that now form the 
staple of much of our popular literature. There can be no ques- 
tion but that very many of the young now attending school, who 
are sacrificing their hours of healthful repose to this kind of infat- 
uation, are fast undermining their health, and will, sooner or later, 
reap the bitter fruits of their folly. This subject is deserving of 
more serious attention from the friends of education than it has 
ever yet received. 

u There are other dangers still more serious and alarming. The 
temptations that assail our youth are being multiplied in every pos- 
sible way, and are assuming the most seductive forms, so that it 
may now be truly said without poetic fiction — 

i Facilis Descensus Averno? 

It is a lamentable truth that some of the vilest prints and pic- 
tures that the most depraved imaginations ever conceived, are 
stealthily but widely disseminated in many parts of our city. It is 
also true, and most deeply to be deplored, that there are miscre- 
ants in human form who prowl about our school-houses and lurk at 
the corners of our streets, to entrap and to decoy the innocent vic- 
tims on their way to and from school; and if through their wiles 
and stratagems an unsuspecting youth falls, there are those who 
gloat over her shame with a kind of fiendish glee, and, like the 
Harpies of old, seem to delight in loathsome garbage; while the 
unprincipled villains whose brows should bear the brand of infamy 
forever, are suffered to go at large, unscathed. 

These things ought not so to be. The time has come when some 
organized and vigorous effort should be made to ferret out the 
wickedness that lurks in secret places — to bring to the light of day 
the hidden things of darkness, and to hold up to indignant scorn 
every one who dares to destroy the peace of households, or in the 
slightest degree to endanger the purity of any of our schools. 
These must be preserved, at whatever cost or whatever sacrifice. 
Every possible safeguard and shield should be thrown around them. 
They must be preserved, not only as fountains of knowledge, but 
also as fountains of purity and virtue, ^o laws can be too strin- 
gent, no vigilance too great. Every parent and every friend of hu- 



315 

inanity should feel his responsibility to aid, to the full extent of his 
power, in a work so vital to the highest welfare and security of the 
young. 

"Teachers may, and most of them do, exercise the most careful 
supervision over their pupils, not only when under their special 
charge, but when going to and from school; yet, after all. very 
much depends on the strictness of parental discipline. If children 
are allowed to frequent the streets, and to spend their evenings 
from home, unattended, and to expose themselves to temptations 
that beset them on every side, the sad consequences must rest 
mainly on their parents. 

"There should, however, be a cordial and vigorous co-operation 
of all, till every haunt of vice is broken up, and every fiend in hu- 
man form is consigned to his merited doom. 

"In any and every moral reform, the civil authorities are but the 
exponents of the public will, and can accomplish nothing more 
than what an intelligent and united public sentiment imperatively 
demand. 

"Let the pulpit, the press and every fireside utter the same 
voice, — that of a determined and fixed purpose to eradicate ev iy 
species of iniquity. 

"But, while we are to be vigilant and unremitting in exposing 
vice in every form, we should, with the most sedulous care, gu ird 
against crushing an innocent one on mere suspicion, or unfounded 
rumor. 

The public mind is now so sensitive, that if an evil disposed per- 
son but utter a suspicion, or an inuendo, prejudicial to the charac- 
ter of an individual, there are ten thousand ears ready to catch the 
faintest whisper, and ten thousand tongues eager to speed it on its 
work of ruin. Nothing is too absurd for credulous gossipers to re- 
peat, who are ever on tiptoe gaping after something new. No 
other vouchers of its truth are required but that 'somebody says 
so.' And this malicious and irresponsible somebody, who is ever 
hurling his poisoned arrows in the dark, when pursued vanishes 
like an 'Ignis Fatuus' into the very bogs from which he orig- 
i nated. 

"It is also but too true that many who are noted for their Chris- 
tian benevolence and philanthropy, and who would shudder at the 
thought of being considered uncharitable or unjust, yet thought- 
lessly lend themselves to aid in giving currency to reports that are 
sadly blighting to character, without any other evidence of their 
truth than that ' somebody has said so.' 



316 

"What individual, or what school, or what household, can be safe 
from such covert attacks. The purest and the most exalted char- 
acter that ever shed its heavenly radiance on human nature may 
receive a stain from the foul breath of suspicion. And many an 
innocent one may be crushed to the very dust by unscrupulous 
defamers. 

"Truth is heaven-born and rejoices in the light. It should never 
be covered up nor hidden from public view; and falsehood, hypoc- 
risy and vice of every hue should be stripped of their gaudy trap- 
pings, and exposed in all their naked deformity." 

The above quotation is as applicable to Manchester as to 
Providence or any other city, and parents and teachers 
should cooperate and use every means to protect the men- 
tal, physical and moral condition of the youth of our city. 

Let there be no conflict as to the rights of teachers, par- 
ents and pupils, but let all labor for the good of the rising 
generation. Let no time be wasted in discussing the ques- 
tion as to when the teacher's authority begins and when it 
ceases, but let there be a mutual understanding among 
teachers and parents, and many evils will be avoided. 
The teacher will receive the support and sympathy of all 
who desire that our schools may prove a blessing to the 
community. 

CONCLUSION. 

Gentlemen of the School Committee: 

I have endeavored to make a fair report of the schools 
of Manchester for the past year. I have pointed out some 
of their deficiencies and have made such recommendations 
as I thought to be needed for their improvement. 

I think we may safely say that the past year has been 
one in which much has been accomplished by our schools. 

The members of the committee have spared no pains to 
improve the schools ; they have freely given their time for 
the benefit of the schools intrusted to them. 



3.17 

The teachers have exhibited a commendable zeal in their 
work and I doubt if anywhere a corps of teachers can be 
found that more cheerfully aid the Superintendent in his 
task. Many of them make teaching the business of their 
lives; they entertain a just estimate of its responsibilities 
and they exert themselves to keep pace with the ever ad- 
vancing standard of education ; they have a just apprecia- 
tion of what their position demands. 

The city government made the appropriation asked for, 
and have done their part in every respect. 

Our schools are the hope and the glory of the commu- 
nity ; they mould the mind and quicken the intelligence. 
They must be liberally supported and skillfully managed. 
The education of the youth is a duty we owe to ourselves 
as well as to them. To them will soon be confided the 
property, the institutions — civil, educational and reli- 
gious — of this country. In our schools the rich and poor 
meet 'together ; they occupy the same scats, pursue the 
same studies, receive the same instruction. 

We have the experience of the past to guide us. Those 
who have placed us in charge of the schools of this city 
expect that there shall be improvement each year ; and 
with the interest manifested by parents and citizens gen- 
erally, and the means at our disposal, we can make our 
public schools in the future, as they have been in the past, 
the pride of our noble city. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Manchester, N. H., Dec. 23, 1869. 



318 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS 
FOR THE PAST YEAR, TOGETHER WITH THE NUMBER OF 

VISITORS. 



Schools. 



8 £ 



p 2 



High school 

Intermediate school 

North Grammar school 

South Grammar school 

East Grammar Bchool 

Park-street Grammar school. 
Piscataquog Grammar school 
Amoskeag Grammar school. 

Middle school No. 1 

No. 2 

" " No. 3 

" " No. 4 

" " No. 5 

" " No. 6 

" " No. 7 

No. 8 

" " No. 9 

" " No. 10 

Primary school No. 1 

" " No. 2 

" No. 3 

No. 4 

" " No. 5 

" " No. 6 

" No. 7 

" No. 8 

" " No. 9 

« " No. 10 

" No. 11 

" " No. 12 

" " No. 13 

" No. 14 

" " No. 15 

No. 16 

" " No. 17 

" " No. 18 

" " No. 19 

" " No. 20 

Suburban school No. 1 

No. 3 

No. 4 

" " No. 5 

" " No. 6: 

" " No. 7 

" •• No. 8 

" •• No. 9 

Total 



156 
107 
250 
259 
250 
153 
116 
72 
63 
100 
54 
60 
83 
71 
101 
86 
110 
73 
60 
44 
61 
74 
41 
66 
82 
65 
105 
52 
105 
87 
98 
85 
124 
72 
73 
58 
60 
53 
33 
106 
37 
27 
26 
97 
61 
30 



103 
98 

1.-,.; 

167 

150 
82 
75 
46 
26 
38 
34 
39 
40 
1! 
47 
37 
41 
35 
32 
36 
35 
35 
26 
34 
38 
35 
43 
32 
44 
45 
40 
39 
50 

37 

34 

33 

37 

38 

18 

62 

18 

19 

21 

60 

36 

21 



92 
30 
lis 
162 
145 
78 
70 
42 
24 
32 
30 
31 
37 
40 
41 
35 
40 
34 
28 
hi 
33 
33 
23 
30 
36 
31 
38 
30 
36 
33 
36 
33 
45 
28 
30 
22 
32 
33 
17 
49 
17 
14 
19 
52 
32 
17 



5 

4 

8 

15 

13 

23 

18 

14 

11 

21 

20 

22 

24 

14 

3 

9 

7 

4 

13 

9 

9 

8 

14 

12 

7 



40 

34 

42 

40 

35 

19 

26 

22 

37 

40 

17 

24 

32 

34 

21 

29 

19 

16 

25 

10 

30 

19 

10 

21 

33 

21 

19 

21 

37 

20 

31 

30 

30 

31 

18 

19 

21 

10 

11 

18 

12 

12 

13 

16 

14 

1.'! 



2,259 1,969 711 1,092 5,317 



The whole number reported from each school, if added together, would be more 
than the whole number in all the schools, as some scholars are reported from two dif- 
ferent schools. The whole number of different pupils attending all the schools last 
year was, as near as can be ascertained, 3,500. 



QUESTIONS SUBMITTED TO CANDIDATES FOR 
ADMISSION TO THE HIGH SCHOOL, AT THE 
ANNUAL EXAMINATION, JUNE 24, 1869. 



ARITHMETIC. 

1. What is the value of a pile of wood 85 ft. long, 10 ft. G in. . 

high, and 6 ft. 4 in. wide, at $6.75 a cord? 

2. Add lh, I, 4-5, 2h and |. 

3. Divide .000018 by 12; .00114 by 16; 120 by .00; 42 by .07: 72 

by .018. 

4. What is a multiple? 

5. What is a compound number? Give example. 
0. Reduce 8 rods to the decimal of a mile. 

7. From $ of 8 miles take f of 5 furlongs. 

8. Divide 11 gals., 3 qts., 1 pt. of milk among- 5 persons. How 

much will each receive? 

9. What is ratio? ' 

10. What is a prime number? 

11. 51G-(-4 thousand+2 millions 4- 2756=:? 

12. A man has \ of Ins property in railroad stock, 20 percent, of 

the remainder in bank stock, h of the remainder in a ship, 
and 813,500 in real estate. How much is he worth? What 
principles does this problem illustrate? 

13. A man sold 4 horses at $240 each; on two of them he lost 20 

per cent., and on the other 2 gained 20 per cent.; what was 
gained or lost by the whole transaction? 

14. What is the width of a common on which stands a flag-stall' 

120 feet high, from the top of which to one side of the 
common is 150 feet, and the other 200 feet? If the width 
of the common is f of the length, how many acres does it 
contain? 

15. What is the interest of 8116.80 from Jan. 18th, 18G7, to July 

27th, 1869, at b\ per cent.? 

16. In what time will $50, on interest at 8 per cent., amount to 

$61.50? 



820 

17. If 18 men can perform a piece of work in 7 days, how long 

will it take 6 men and 4 boys to perform the same, each boy 
doing | as much as a man? 

18. For how much must a note be given at a bank to-morrow, 

payable Nov. 1st, to obtain §400? 

GKAMMAE. 

1. Not many generations ago, where you now sit, circled with 
all that exalts and embellishes civilized life, the rank thistle nodded 
in the wind, and the wild fox dug his hole unscared. Here lived 
and loved another race of beings. Beneath the same sun that 
rolls over your heads, the Indian hunter pursued the panting deer; 
gazing on the same moon that smiles for you, the Indian lover 
wooed his dusky mate. 

a, Make a list of the nouns in the above extract, — naming the 
cases of the first four; 6, a list of the pronouns:, naming the kind of 
each; c, a list of the verbs, naming the subjects of the last two; rf, 
a list of the adjectives, comparing the first two; e, a list of the ad- 
verbs, — a list of the prepositions, and state what the first two gov- 
ern; /, a list of the conjunctions. 

2. By what may a noun be modified? 

3. What is conjugation? 

4. "What verbs are followed by two objectives? 

5. Correct the following sentences: Charles told his father how 
that he see the man which had went home before he done the work. 
I have wrote to the man what made them boots as fitted so nice 
for my brother, and spoke to him for two pair for myself; but I ex- 
pect he did not receive the order. 

6. What are the principal parts of forego? of be? of know? of 
use? of climb? of see? of cut? 

8. Parse the italicized words in the following sentences: Those 
whom we elected have served. "Where is the book I bought for you 
last iccck? 

8. Compare good; bad; happy; far; long; round; miserable. 

9. Conjugate the verb GO in the indicative mode. 

10. How are names pluralized that have the titles Dr., Mr., or 
Miss? Give examples. 

11. "Write a sentence containing a relative pronoun in the object- 
ive case; one containing an adjective in the superlative degree. 

12. When is the si<rn TO of the infinitive omitted? 



321 



GEOGKAPHY. 

1. Name the counties of New Hampshire. 

2. Give the boundaries of Manchester. 

3. Name some of the seas in and about Europe. 

4. Through what^ water would you pass in sailing from Boston 
to Calcutta? 

5. Name six of the largest cities of the United States. 

6. Describe the Connecticut river. 

7. Name some of the rivers of Asia; of Africa; of Europe. 

8. Define a peninsula, and mention three. 

9. What is meant by the climate of a country? 

10. By what is the climate of a country affected? 

11. What can you say of the Mackenzie river? 

12. Name and locate some noted volcanoes. 

13. What can you say of Switzerland? 

14. Name some mountain ranges of Europe. 

15. What waters wash the coast of the British Isles? 

10. Where are commercial towns usually situated? Why? 

17. Where are manufacturing towns usually situated? Why? 

18. A ship sails from Boston to Canton; what can it carry, and 

what can it bring back, that will find a sale in each place? 

19. Why is New York the largest city on the Atlantic Coast? 
What city is growing the most rapidly of any place in the 

West, and why is it outstripping Cincinnati, and the other 
older cities in that section? 

20. What are the leading imports of the Atlantic cities in the 

United States? 
Why should it be so? 

HISTORY. 

1. What was the character of the first settlers of Pennsylvania? 

2. Describe the engagement on Lake Erie in the war of 1812. 

3. Name some of the battles of the Mexican war. 

4. How many Presidents have there been? 

5. How many Senators does New Hampshire send to Con- 

gress? How many Representatives? 

6. How many Senators does New York send? How many Rep- 

resentatives? 

7. Give some account of the Pequod war. 

8. Give some account of the Boston Massacre. 

21 



322 

9. How many voyages did Columbus make to America, and 
what discoveries did he make at each voyage? 

10. Who were the Puritans, and what caused them to emigrate 

to the New World? 

11. Give some account of Patrick Henry. 

12. How long was Harrison President? Who succeeded him? 

13. Who were the Hessians? 

14. Mention some of the prominent naval officers who were en- 

gaged in the war of 1812. 

15. What was the Missouri Compromise, and when was it re- 

pealed? 

16. What do you regard as one of the most important events in 

the history of this country? Why do you so regard it? 

17. Name the four military men whom you think to have accom- 

plished the most for our country, and give some facts with 
regard to them; wherein they have been more successful 
than other military men? 

18. Name the four men, not military men, who you think have 

accomplished the most for our country, and state in what 
their merit consists. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

1. Describe the bones. 

2. Describe the chest. 

3. Describe the stomach. 

4. What is respiration? 

5. Give some incidents illustrating the effects of impure air. 

6. Describe the larynx. 

7. Of what is the nervous system composed? 

8. Name the senses, and give a brief description of each. 
0. What can you say of the distribution of the blood. 

10. What is necessary when large blood vessels are wounded or 
cut? 



COURSE OF STUDY 



MANCHESTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



SECOND PRIMARY. 



THIRD CLASS. 



"Reading and Spelling. — Elementary sounds; names of letter*, 
learned from cards and tablets; words and sounds repeated after 
the teacher; commence Hillard's First Reader. 

Arithmetic. — Commence counting; develop the idea of numbers to 
ten by the use of objects; count to fifty on the numeral frame. 

Oral lessons on form, color, etc., illustrated by objects in the 
school-room. 

Hillard's Charts. — No. 1, names and sounds of letters; Xo. 3, to 
be spelled by letters and sounds. 

Singing and physical exercises each half day in all Primary 
schools. 

Repeating verses and maxims in all Primary schools. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Heading and Spelling. — Hillard's First Reader completed; "Wor- 
cester's Primary Speller, to twentieth page ; printing small letters 
so as to form monosyllables. 

Arithmetic. — Counting to one hundred, with the use of the 
numeral frame; counting by twos to fifty. 

Oral lessons on form, size, color, and on plants and animals. 

Boston Primary School Tablets. — Xo. 5, the pupils to name and 
point out the lines and plane figures; No. 19, entire; No. 20, to X. 

HillanVs Charts. — Xo. 1, anah/ze the forms of capital letters, 



324 

and tell what lines compose each; No. 4, syllables spelled by 
sounds ; No. 3, words spelled by sounds and by letters. Calling 
words at sight. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Beading and Spelling. — Hillard's Second Header; Primary Speller 
to forty-fifth page ; spelling words from reading lessons by sounds ; 
questions on the meaning of pieces read; printing words on slates; 
exercises in drawing on slates, to secure right method of holding 
pencil, etc. 

Arithmetic. — Miscellaneous exercises in adding small numbers; 
counting by twos to one hundred. 

Oral lessons on objects, with their parts, qualities and uses. 

Boston Brimary School Tablets. — No. 24, to L; Nos. 17 and IS, 
names of punctuation marks learned; review of those prescribed 
for second class. 

Hillard's Charts. — No. 2, entire ; Nos. 4 and 5. 



FIKST PRIMARY. 



THIRD CLASS. 



Beading and Spelling. — Second Reader completed and reviewed; 
words from reading lessons spelled by letters and sounds; Primary 
Speller, to sixty-first page; printing capitals and small letters on 
the slate. 

Arithmetic. — Exercises in adding and subtracting small num- 
bers; counting by threes, fours, etc., to one hundred and back, in 
all classes of this grade, and also in Middle schools; the idea of 
multiplication developed by the use of the numeral frame. 

Oral instructions upon common objects. 

Boston Brimary School Tablets. — Nos. 19 and 20 reviewed en- 
tire, with exercises in writing Roman and Arabic figures on the 
slate and board ; No. 5 reviewed in connection with No. 6, with 
exercises in drawing on the slate. 

Hillard''s Charts. — Nos. 5 and 6. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Beading and Spelling. — Third Reader; Primary Speller, from the 
sixty-eighth to the seventy-ninth page; frequent exercises in call- 
ing words at sight from cards and charts, and afterwards spelling 
the same; words from reading lessons printed upon the slate. 



325 

Arithmetic. — Addition, subtraction and multiplication taught 
orally; miscellaneous questions under each rule; Primary Arith- 
metic commenced. 

Geography. — Names of the counties in the state, with some oral 
instruction in regard to our own city, etc. 

Oral lessons on parts, form and color, illustrated by common 
objects; on plants and animals — those with which children are 
familiar. 

Penmanship. — Writing a few capitals and small letters. 

Boston Primary School Tablets. — Review of Nos. 17, 18, 19 and 
20; use of punctuation marks commenced; No. 7, drawing, and 
oral lessons on the objects. 

Millard's Charts. — Nos. 7 and 8. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading and Spelling. — Third Reader; Primary Speller com- 
pleted and reviewed, omitting page sixty-first to sixty-seventh, in- 
clusive, and eighty-seventh, eighth-eighth and eighty-ninth pages; 
questions on punctuation, use of capitals, and marks indicating the 
pronunciation; commence abreviations; words from reading and 
spelling lessons spelled by sounds and by letters. 

Penmanship. — Writing capitals and small letters, also words from 
reading and spelling lessons; letters copied from Payson and Dun- 
ton's Charts. 

Arithmetic. — Primary Arithmetic to fifty-seventh page; miscel- 
laneous exercises in addition, subtraction, multiplication and divis- 
ion ; tables of multiplication and division to 10 X 10, and 100 -j- 10, 
on slates and blackboards. 

Geography. — Exercises from maps and the board. 

Oral lessons on objects, trades, occupations, etc. 

Boston Primary School Tablets. — No 18, uses and definitions of 
points and marks used and applied in reading lessons; Nos. 7 and 8. 

HillarcVs Charts. — Frequent drills on Nos. 2 and 5. 



SECOND MIDDLE. 



SECOND CLASS. 



Beading and Spelling. — Third Reader completed; Comprehensive 
Speller, to fifty-fourth page, with special attention to sounds of let- 
ters; in reading and spelling, careful attention given to cuuncia- 



326 

tion, pronunciation, illustrations and definitions, with particular 
care that the words of the definitions are not more difficult to 
understand than the words defined. 

Penmanship. — Writing upon slates ; letters copied from Payson 
and Dunton's Charts. 

Drawing. — Drawing on slates; review of tablets Xos. 5 and 6; 
attention given to lines and angles: different kinds of each; mean- 
ing of straight, oblique, curved, etc., as applied to lines, and right, 
obtuse, etc., as applied to angles, thoroughly understood. 

Arithmetic. — Primary Arithmetic completed; Walton's Tables in 
all classes in the Middle and Grammar schools; exercises in com- 
binations of numbers in Middle and Grammar schools; multiplica- 
tion and division tables thoroughly studied; 12 X 12, and 141 -f- 12, 
frequently placed on the slate and board; notation to 1000. 

Geography. — Primary Geography to twenty-ninth page, with 
considerable oral instruction; map drawing; general, geography 
taught by use of globes: geography of New Hampshire anil Hills- 
borough county, by use of maps. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading and Spelling.— Fourth Reader; Comprehensive Speller, 
from fifty-fourth to sixty-second page; words spelled generally from 
reading lessons. 

Writing and Drawing. — Continued. 

Arithmetic- — Occasional exercises in notation and numeration; 
Intellectual Arithmetic to the thirty-ninth page ; frequent exercises 
in combination of numbers, so varied as to combine accuracy with 
rapidity. These exercises continued through the Middle and 
Grammar schools. 

Geography. — Primary Geography continued to the sixty-first 
page ; map-drawing, as in the second class. 

History. — Oral instruction. 



FIRST MIDDLE. 



SECOXD CLASS. 



Reading and Spelling. — Fourth Reader; Comprehensive Speller, 
from ninety-first to one hundred and second page. 

Arithmetic. — Written Arithmetic; oral instruction; notation to 
1,009,000; Intellectual Arithmetic to sixt}^-first page. 



327 

Geography. — Primary Geography completed and reviewed; map- 
drawing continued. 

Penmanship. — Parson, Dunton & Scribner's series of writing 
books commenced; careful attention given to position of body, etc. 

History. — Historical sketches; discovery of America; war of the 
^Revolution, etc. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Beading and Spelling. — Fourth Header; Comprehensive Speller, 
from one hundred and second to one hundred and tenth page, with 
review of whole book, excepting what is included between the sixty- 
second and ninety-first pages; review of punctuation marks; the 
use of capitals and abbreviations; words in reading lessons de- 
fined; pupils to repeat in their own language the subject of the 
reading lessons. 

Arithmetic. — Written Arithmetic continued through division; 
Intellectual Arithmetic, to seventy-fourth page. 

Penmanship. — Writing continued. 

History. — Oral instruction, continued; historical sketches; Co- 
lumbus, King Philip, and others. 

Geography. — Intermediate Geography, to nineteenth page, and 
from fifty-second page — United Stales, to fifty-seventh page — 
Nature of New England; map-drawing continued. 

_Hillard"s Charts. — No. 2, used in Middle Schools. 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

FOURTH DIVISIOX. 

Beading. — Intermediate Reader. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller, to one hundred and thirtieth 
page. 

Arithmetic. — Practical Arithmetic, to one hundred and sixteenth 
page ; Intellectual Arithmetic, to one hundred and eighth page. 

Geography. — Intermediate, from fifty-seventh to eighty-fifth page. 

History. — Oral instruction. 

Penmanship.— Book No. 2, of Payson, Dunton and Scribner's 
series. 

Grammar. — False Syntax corrected; oral exercises. 



328 

THIRD DIVISION. 

Beading. — Intermediate Reader. 

'Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller, from sixty-second to ninety- 
first page; oral and written exercises. 

Arithmetic. — Practical Arithmetic, to one hundred and ninety- 
fifth page ; Intellectual Arithmetic, to one hundred and thirty- 
ninth page. 

Geography. — From nineteenth to fifty-second page. 

History. — Oral instruction; text-hook last term. 

Penmanship. — Book Ho. 3. 

Grammar. — Same as in fourth division. 

SECOND DIVISION. 

Heading. — Fifth Reader. 

Sjpi lling. — Miscellaneous exercises; words from reading hook and 
speller. 

Arithmetic. — Practical Arithmetic, to two hundred and fifty- 
ninth page; Intellectual Arithmetic completed. 

History. — Through the American Revolution. 

(i ran u nar — Text-hook commenced; exercises in writing. 

l'i nmanship. 

FIRST DIVISION. 

Bending. — Fifth Reader. 

Spelling. — Miscellaneous. 

Arithmetic. — Practical Arithmetic completed. 

6r< ography. — Reviewed. 

History. — Completed and reviewed. 

Physiology. — Cutter's. 

Grammar. — Continued, with analysis and parsing. 

P( nmanship. 

Declamations and Compositions throughout the course. 



LIST OF TEXT-BOOKS USED IN THE PRIMARY, MIDDLE AND 
GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Hillard's series of reading books with charts. 
Worcester's Primary and Comprehensive Spellers. 
Walton's Primary and Intellectual Arithmetics. 
Robinson's Practical Arithmetic. 



329 

Quackenbos's Grammars. 

Goodrich's History (Seavey's). 

Guyot's Intermediate and Elementary Geographies. 

Cutter's Physiology. 

Hohman's Practical Course in Singing, parts I, II, in, and IT. 

Payson, Dunton and Scribner's Writing Books. 

Bartholomew's Drawing Books and Cards. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 
CLASSICAL COUESE OF FOUR YEARS. 

FIRST YEAR. — FIRST TERM. 

Arithmetic; Grammar, Quackenbos's with Analysis and parsing; 
Governmental Instructor, ShurtlefTs; Physical Geography com- 
menced, Warren's. 

SECOND TERM. 

Algebra commenced, Robinson's; English Composition, Quack- 
enbos's; Physical Geogi'aphy completed; Book-Keeping, Hanaford 
& Pay son's. 

THIRD TERM. 

Algebra completed; Ancient History, with Ancient Geography; 
Latin Lessons commenced. 

SECOND YEAR. — FIRST TERM. 

Latin Lessons; Geometry; Modern History. 

SECOND TERM. 

Latin Lessons completed; Caesar commenced; Geometry com- 
pleted; Natural Philosophy commenced, Wells's. 

THIRD TERM. 

Caesar; Trigonometry; Natural Philosophy completed; Greek 
Lessons, Crosby's. 

THIRD YEAR. — FIRST TERM. 

Caesar, Hanson's; Rhetoric, Quackenbos's; Astronomy; Greek 
Lessons. 

SECOND TERM. 

Virgil commenced, Freize's; Geology, Loomis's; French Gram- 
mar; Natural History; Anabasis, Crosby's or Boise's. 



330 

THIRD TERM. 

Virgil continued; Botany, Wood's; French Grammar; Tele- 
niaque or Le Grand Pere; Anabasis. 

FOURTH YEAR. — FIRST TERM. 

Virgil completed; Corinne; English Literature, Collier's; An- 
abasis; Lessons once a week in Zoology. 

SECOND TERM. 

Cicero, Hanson's; Chemistry, Youman's; Homer, Owen's; De- 
Fivas' Classic French Reader; weekly lessons in English Litera- 
ture. 

THIRD TERM. 

Odes of Horace; Chemistry completed; Racine or L'Allemagne; 
Arithmetic; Mental Philosophy; Grammar reviewed; Anabasis 
and Homer reviewed. 

Boys preparing for college will give such attention to the com- 
position of Latin and Greek as will meet the recpiirements of the 
college they propose to enter. 

Declamations and Compositions at regular intervals throughout 
the course. 

Vocal Music throughout the course. 

Pupils not wishing to study French and the Classics can pursue 
the following 

EXGLISH COURSE. 

FIRST TEAR. — FIRST TERM. 

Arithmetic; Grammar; Analysis and parsing; Governmental 
Instructor; Physical Geography commenced. 

SECOND TERM. 

Algebra commenced; English Composition; Physical" Geogra- 
phy completed; Book-Keeping. 

THIRD TERM. 

xUgebra completed; Ancient Histoi'y, with Ancient Geography; 
Botany. 

SECOND YEAR. — FIRST TERM. 

Geometry; Modern History; Rhetoric. 



331 

SECOND TERM. 

Geometry; Natural Philosophy, Natural History; Chemistry. 

THIRD TERM. 

Trigonometry; Natural Philosophy; Chemistry. 

THIRD YEAR. — FIRST TERM. 

Astronomy; English Literature; weekly lessons in Zoology. 

SECOND TEEM. 

Mental Philosophy; Geology; weekly lessons in English Liter- 
ature. 

THIRD TERM. 

Arithmetic; Grammar reviewed. 

Exercises in Elocution and Music the same as in the classical 
course. 

Ungraded and partially graded schools will, as far as practicable, 
follow the course adopted for the other schools. 



MUSIC. 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

1. Pupils to sing by rote all the exercises and. songs of the first 
fifteen pages of Hohman's Practical Course in singing, Part 1. In 
schools where these books are not used, such other songs and ex- 
ercises as are dictated by the teacher of music. 

2. Sing the scale ascending and descending by numbers, letters 
and syllables. 

3. Musical notation, taught from the black-board — the pupils to 
copy the notes and other characters upon their slates to the follow- 
ing extent: 

(a) Notes, short and long. 

(b) Measures, Bar and Double Bar. 

(c) Rests, short and long. 

(d) The Staff Degrees, Lines and Spaces. 

(e) The G Clef. 

(/) The significations of the following letters, viz: p, pp, /. jj' 
ynf\ also the repeat. 



332 

4. Music Charts for daily exercise. 

5. Other songs and exercises at the discretion of the teacher. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

1. Continuation of songs through Hohman's, Part 1st, by rote; 
also the following additional characters in musical notation : 
(a) Eighth and sixteenth notes ; half and quarter rests. 
(6) Dotted notes, 
(c) Sharps, flats, naturals and the hold. 

3. Double, triple, quadruple and sextuple time, including accen- 
tuation and manner of beating the same. 

4. Music Charts for daily exercise ; miscellaneous exercises and 
songs at the discretion of teachers. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

INCLUDING FIRST AND SECOND. 

1. Sing exercises and songs in Hohman's Practical Course, Part 
2, by note. 

2. Describe by its intervals the major diatonic scale. 

3. Describe double, triple, quadruple and sextuple time. 

4. Write at dictation, whole, quarter and eighth notes, and their 
corresponding rests. 

5. Write the staff and G clef in its proper place upon the staff. 

6. Write at dictation upon the staff with the G clef, the notes 
representing the following sounds, viz : </, a, b, 



c, d, e, f, g, a, b, c, d, e, /, g. 

7. Music Charts for daily exercise. 

8. Sing at sight simple melodies in the key of C, and G and F 
major. 

9. Write the scales of C, G and F major upon the staff with the G 
clef, and their proper signatures; also name the pitch of the sounds 
composing these scales in their order. 

10. Explain the use of sharps, flats and naturals. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

1. Write, at dictation, exercises upon the slate and blackboard. 

2. Transpose the scale into all keys. 

3. Read simple tunes by syllables, at sight, in one, two and three 
parts. 



333 

4. Sing different numbers of the scale at dictation. 

5. Mark time correctly in double, triple, quadruple and sextuple 
time. 

6. Music Charts for daily exercise. 

7. Songs and exercises selected by teachers. 

Pupils in the higher division should be familiar with the princi- 
ples laid down in Parts 3 and 4 of Hohman's Practical Course. 



CITY OF .MANCHESTER. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1870. 



JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Office — No. 5, City Hall; office hours, from 8 to a. m., school 
days. 



JAMES DEAX, 

CHAIRMAN OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



MAESHALL P. HALL, 

CLERK OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Ward 1— Henry C. Sanderson, Ward 5— Patrick A. Devine, 
Ward 2— Marshall P. Hall, Ward 6— Ephraim S. Peabody, 
Ward 3— Thomas Borden, WARD 7 — James Dean, 

Ward 4 — Samuel Upton, Ward 8 — De Lafayette Robinson. 

Regular meetings of the Board alternate Friday evenings at 7£ 
o'clock. 



336 



STANDING COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD. 

Finance, Accounts and Claims. — Messrs. Dean, Peabody, Sander- 
son, Robinson. 

Fuel and Heating. — Messrs. Robinson, Peabody, Edgerly, Devine. 

Text-books and Apparatus. — Messrs. Upton, Edgerly, and Dean. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Edgerly, Devine and 
Hall. 

Printing and Stationery. — Messrs. Sanderson, Borden and Edg- 
erly. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hall, Borden, Upton, and 
Edgerly. 

Truancy. — Messrs. Hall, Devine, and Edgerly. 

Employment of Children in Manufacturing Establishments. — 
Messrs. Peabody, Dean, and Edgerly. 



SUB-COMMITTEES. 

Messrs. Upton, Dean, and Borden, — Higb School. 

Messrs. Sanderson and Dean, — Schools on Spring street. 

Messrs. Hall and Borden, — Schools on Franklin street. 

Messrs. Borden and Robinson, — East Grammar School. 

Messrs. Upton and Devine, — Schools on Merrimack street, and 

Suburban Schools Nos. 6 and 8. 
Messrs. Devine and Peabody, — Schools at Towlesville, on Bridge 

street, and Suburban Schools Nos. 4, 5 and 9. 
Messrs. Peabody and Upton, — Schools in Intermediate Building, 

at Wilson Hill, and Hallsville. 
Messrs. Dean and Hall, — Schools in Piscataquog and Bakersville. 
Messrs. Robinson and Sanderson, — Schools at Amoskeag, on 

Blodgett street, and Suburban School No. 1. 
Messrs. Sanderson and Hall, — Evening Schools. 
Messrs. Upton and Robinson, — Music. 



NAMES AND LOCATION OF SCHOOLS. 

1. High School, Beech street. 

2. Intermediate School, Manchester street. 

3. North Grammar School, Spring street. 

4. South " " Franklin street. 

5. East " " Lowell street. 



337 



6. 


Park street Grr 


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8. 


Amoskeag 


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9. 


Middle School No. 1, 


10. 


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School, Park street. Discontinued. 

" Piscataquog. 

" Amoskeag. 
Blodgett street. 
Beach street. 
Beach street. 
Wilson Hill. 
Merrimack street. 
Merrimack street. 
Franklin street. 
Franklin street. 
Spring street. 
Spring street. 
Blodgett street. 
Lowell street. Discontinued. 
Bridge street. 
Towlesville. 

Concord street. Discontinued. 
Wilson Kill. 
Merrimack street. 
Merrimack sired. 
Manchester street. 
Manchester street. 
Franklin street. 
Franklin street. 
Spring street. 
Spring street. 
Piscataquog upper house. 
Piscataquog upper house. 
Piscataquog lower house. 
Amoskeag South. 
Amoskeag North. 
Piscataquog lower house. 
Stark District. 
Bakersville. 
GonVs Falls. 
Harvey's District. 
Webster's Mills. 
Hallsville. 
Massabesic. 
Mosquito Pond. 



22 



INDEX. 



Appropriations G3 

Additions to City Library 230 

Address, Mayor's Inaugural 33 

Mayor's Valedictory 5 

Abatement of Taxes 152 

Balance sheet of Treasurer 56 

Bridge, Amoskeag Falls 96 

Bridge, Granite 06 

City Farm CO 

Appraisal of property at 104 

City Property 168 

Teams ' 72 

Library 133 

Hall and Stores 127 

Debt 167 

Payment of 151 

City Liquor Agency 138 

Agent, Report of 180 

Cement Pipe on Hanover street 148 

Condition of Cisterns and Reservoirs 188 

Commons 105 

Cemeteries, Report of Committee on 203 

Report of Treasurer 205 

Cemetery, Pine Grove 107 and 204 

Court House 134 

County Tax 64 

Committees, standing 24 

Donations to Cit}- Library 225 

Debt, City 167 



340 



Debt, City, payment of 
Day Police . 



108 and 
1C9 and 
110 and 

110 and 

111 and 
111 and 
113 and 



151 
115 

58- 
108 
174 
175 
177 
178 
179 
180 
181 
112 
1S1 
181 
171 
185 
188 

G9 
194 

23 

47 

75 
No. 2 70 



Finance Committee, Report of 
Fire Department 

Steamer Amoskeag . 
Fire King 
E. W. Harrington 
N. S. Bean . 
Pennacook Hose Company 
Hook and Ladder Company 
Engineers .... 
Miscellaneous 
Recapitulation . 
Karnes of Firemen 
Report of Chief Engineer 
Summary .... 
Condition of Cisterns and Reser 
Farm, City .... 
Inventory . 



Government and Officers, 1869 
1870 

Highways and Bridges. 
District No. 1 . 



113 and 



No. 3 
No. 4 
No. 5 
No. 6 
No. 7 
No. 8 
No. 9 
No. 10 
No. 11 
No. 12 
No. 13 
Highways, New . 



Incidental Expenses . 
Invoice of City Farm Property 
Insurance .... 



80 
81 

81 
82 
83 
85 
80 
87 
88 
89 
89 
90 

120 
194 
138 



341 



Inaugural Address of Mayor . 
Iron Fence on Merrimack Square 
Interest ..... 



Land sold from City Farm 

Lighting Streets 

Loan, Temporary 

Library Building 

Librar}^ City .... 

Report of Trustees 
Librarian 
Treasurer 

Donations 

New Books . 

Report of Library Building 
Liquor Agency .... 
Liquor Agent, Report of . 



Militia 



Night Watch 



Committee 



Officers, City 

Overseers of Poor, Report of 

Paupers off Farm . 
Police Department 
Pine Grove Cemetery . 
Payment of City Debt 
Paving Streets 
Printing and Stationery 
Property, City 
Property, School . 

Revenue Account 

Reserved Fund 

Reservoirs .... 

Repairs of Buildings . 

Repairs of School-houses 

Report of Finance Committee 
Chief Engineer . 
Overseers of Poor 
Committee on Cemeteries 



. 33 

. 150 
. 135 

. 142 
. US 
. 136 
146 and 211 
. 133 
. 216 
222 
. 219 
. 225 
. 230 
. 211 
. 138 
. 189 

. 143 

52 and 114 

. 130 

. 193 

. 65 

. 28, 1 14 
. 107.2H4 
. 151 
. 93 
. 119 
. 168 
. 109 

. 59 
. 164 

. 102,188 
. 143 

. 162,209 
. 58 
. 171 
. 193 
. 203 



342 

Report of Trustees of Library . 216 

Committee on Library Building .... 211 

Liquor Ageut 189 

Committee on Repairs of School-houses . . . 209 

School Committee 243 

Superintendent of Public Instruction . . . 253 

Sewers and Drains 97 

Suncook Valley Railroad 152 

School Expenses 162 

School-houses and Repairs 209, 266 

School-house at Goffe's Falls 161 

School Report 243 

Superintendent of Public Instruction, Report of 253 

State Tax :. 64 

Teachers, names of 272 

Treasurer's Balance Sheet 56 

Teams, City 72 

Taxes, uncollected 163 

Temporary Loan 136 

Valuation, Taxes, etc 166 

Valedictory Address, Mayor's 5 

Watering Streets 137