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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"



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:F^TJB!l-iIC IDOCTJJ^vdlElSrT 



^^jiji^^jKi, \^mi?> 




FOR THE YEAR 1870. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. : ^ ^^^ ^ 
PRINTED BY JOHN B. CI 



1871./ 



^t'!., ,- 



NEW HAiVlPSfliUr 
STATE LIBRARY 



TWENTY-KIFTH 



ANNUAL KEPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



JITY OF MANCHESTEE, 



FOR THE FISCAL VEAR ENDING 



E(JEMBER ;M, 1870, 



TfXiEIITEIi WITIt 



OrHER ANNUAL RErORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO TIIK AFFAUtg 
OF THE CITV. 







MANCHESTER, N. 11. : 
I'P.INTED J5Y JOHK B. CLARKE 
1871. 



N 
1676 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



Ix lioAKi) OK Common Council. 

AN OliDER aulliorizing the printing of the Twenty-Ul'th An- 
niuil Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of 
Manchester. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, That 
»be Joint Standing Committee on Finance be and. they are hereby 
Authorized to cause sixteen liundred copies of the Twenty-fifth 
Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of 
Manchester, including the Reports of the Overseers of the Poor, 
7:he Committee on City Farm, the Trustees, Librarian and Treas- 
ijjer of the City Library, the School Committee and the Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, the Committee on Cemeteries, the 
Library Ruilding Committee, the Committee on Lands and Build- 
ings, and Committee on School-House Repairs, to be printed for 
the use of the inhabitants of said city, and that the expense 
xfeereof l>e charged to tlie appi'oprintion for Printing and Sta- 
i)ionerT. 

Jan. 17. 1S71. Ix JJoard of Common Council. 
Read and passed. Wm. R. PATTElsr,PRE,siDENT. 

Jan. 17, 1871. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 
PiiMed in concurrence. .lAMES A. WESTOK, Mayor. 



GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS 

OK THK 

CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

1870. 



MAYOK. 

JAMES A. WESTON 



CITY CLERK. 

JOSEPH E. BEN'NETT. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1 — Daniel II. Maxfield, Ward o — Coruelius Healy, " 

Ward 2 — Henry A. Farringtoiu Ward G — George H. Hubbard, 

Ward 3 — Peter K. Chandler, Ward 7 — Samuel Brooks, 

Ward 4— Horace P. Watts, Ward S— William CI. Everett. 



president of common coxtncil. 
John P. Currier. 



clerk or common council. 
Klbriilge D. Hadley. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Waki) J. AVilliam Eursiel, Ward 5. John L. Kennedy, 

"William II. Maxwell, Lawrence Foley, 

John P. Currier. Thomas Willis. 

AVaed J, Henry W. Powell, Waiu) ti. Dustin L. Jenkins, 

Thomas R. Northrup, John W. Johnson, 

William B. Underhill. (ieorge E. Glines. 

AVaijd o. Simon F. Stanton, Ward 7. David O.Webster, 

iN^ehemiah S. Bean, John K. McQueston 

George II. Simmons. William H. Shepherd. 

AV^iJUJ 4. William E. Patten. Ward 8, Henry H. Fuller, 

Jacob B. Ilartwell, Harris J. Poor, 

Joseph B. Sawyer. Albert A. Woodward. 



MESSENGER. 

AVilliam Stevens. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEK. 

Finance. — Messrs. Johnson, liean and Patten; the Mayor and 
Alderman Brooks. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Farrington and ilaxfield; Messi'S. Max- 
Avell, Underhill and Ilartwell. 

Lands and Buihlings. — Aldermen Watts and Brooks; Messrs. 
Sawyer, Johnson and Shepherd. 

Public Instruction. — Aldermen Evei-ett and Fai-rington ; Messrs. 
McQueston, Powell and Willis. 

Streets. — Aldermen Chandler and Hubbard: Messrs. Bean, Stan- 
ton and Fuller. 

(Jiti/ Farm. — The Mayor and Alderman Watts: Messr*;. }.\<- 
Queston, Fuller and Jenkins. 

Seicers and Drains. — Aldermen Chandler and llealy: Messrs. 
Glines, Shepherd and Foley. 

Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Maxlield and Ilubl)ai'd; 
Messrs. Bursiel, Webster and Kennedy. 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Healy and Everett: xMessrs. Jen- 
kins, Simmons and Sawyer. 



5 

Claims. — xYldcrmen Brooks and MaxHcld: Messrs. Patten. 
Korthrup and Bursiel. 

House of Correction, — Aldermen Watts and Farrington; Messrs. 
Korthrup, Gliues and Poor. 

Military Affairs. — Aldermen Hubbard and Ilealy ; Messrs. 
Maxwell, Poor and AVebster. 

Citif Hall. — Aldermen Everett and Chandler; Messrs. Stanton. 
Woodwai-d and Powell. 

Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Farrington and Everett; Mcssr.s. 
Sawyer, Kennedy and Ilartwell. 



STANDING C'OMMITTEIiS IN liOAItD OF Al.DKIlMKN. 

Licenses. — Aldermen Healy and Brooks. 

Enrollment. — Aldermen Maxfield and Farrington. 

Bills in Second Beading. — Aldermen Hubbard and Watts. 

Market. — Aldermen Everett and Healy. 

Setting Trees. — Aldermen Chandler and Ilubljard. 

Marshal's Account. — Aldermen Maxfield and Chandler. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN I50A11D OK C03IM0N COUNCII. 

Election and Beturns. — Kennedy, AVebster and Xorthrup. 
Bills in Second Beading . — Patten, Simmons and Woodward. 
Enrollment. — ITnderhill, Ilartwell and Powell. 



ASSES.SOIIS. 



Moses O. Pearson, Timothy Sullivan, 

Horace 1*. Simpson, Isaac Whittemore, 

John F. Woodbury, Joseph N^. Prescott, 

Isaac D. Palmer, T. S. Montgomery. 



OYEUSEEnS OF THE POOI!. 



S, S. Moulton. Hugh Conroy, 

S. J. Young, John Morse, 

Js'ahum Baldwiu, Horatio Fradd, 

Moses E. Georgw, George H. Coll)y. 



6 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Henry C. Sanderson, Patrick A. Dcvine, 

Marshall P. Hall, Ephraim S. Peabody, 

Thomas Borden, James Dean, 

liamnel Upton, DeLafayette Robinson. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Joseph G. Edgerly. 



I50ARD OK ENGINEERS. 



Edwin P. Richardson, ChUf. 
Benjamin C. Kendall. Wilberforce Ireland, 

Elijah C'handler, Andrew C. Wallace. 



SOLICITOR. 

ifathan P. Hunt. O^ce— Patten's Buildiiij 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR. 

Henry R. Chamberlin. Office — City Hall Buildint 



DEPUTY COLLECTOR. 

Harrison 1). Lord. Union Build ini 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 

Hon. Daniel Clark, Samuel X. Bell, 

William P. Newell, Waterman Smith, 

Hon. Wm. C. Clarke, Hon. E. A. Straw, 

]'hinehn.s Adams, John P Currier, ex officio. 

Hon. James A. Weston, ex officio. 



LIBItARIAN. 

Charles H. Marshall. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



HON, JA.MES A. WESTON, 

MAYOR, 



THE CITY COUiNCIL OF IIANCHESTEK, 



DICLtVEUKD 



BEFORE THE TWO BRANCHES IN CONVENTIOl^ 



.lANUAllY ", 1871. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



An Oriler to Print the Mayor's Inaugural Address. 

Ordered, if the Board of Common Council concur, That the 
City Clerk be hereby authorized to cause to be printed, for the use 
cf the City Council, three hundred and fifty copies of the Address 
«f His Honor the Mayor, delivered this day l)efore a convention of 
the City Council. 

Ix lioAiti) OF Mayor and ALDifiOiKX, Jan. 3. 1871. 
Read and passed. 

J. E. BENNETT, City Clerk. 

Tx Board of Commox Couxcil, Jan. 3, 1871. 
Head and pa>si'd. 

ELBRIDGE (x. HADLEY, Clekk. 



ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Council: 

The events of another year have passed into history : 
their attending cares and responsibilities have given place 
to new purposes, their joys and sorrows have become a part 
of human experience, and the lessons suggested by them 
should give us wisdom for approaching duties. Notwith- 
standing the great fire staid for awhile the growth of our 
municipality, and the severe drouth threatened alarmingly, 
not only our personal comfort but to place its withering 
hand upon the chief sources of our industrial and financial 
prosperity, manifold blessings and the full measure of suc- 
cess in their countless pursuits have been bestowed upon 
the people, and may well awaken in our hearts a grateful 
response to the Giver of all our mercies. 

As we devote ourselves to the public service for the next 
municipal term, let us not fail to recognize the Supreme 
Ruler of the Universe as the source of all wisdom and 
power, and, relying upon His aid and guidance, let us 
cheerfully and hopefully, but earnestly, enter upon the dis- 
charge of our several duties, determined to manage the 
important trusts confided to us, for the greatest good of all 
our people. 

FINANCES. 

First, as of the greatest importance, I desire to ask your 



10 

attention to the financial condition of the city, as shown 
by the Treasurer's books : 

Statement of the City Debt Jan. 1, 1871. 
Amount of funded debt January 1, 1870, $401,900 00 
Decrease during the year, 8,800 00 

Amount of funded debt Jan. 1, 1871, 
Amount of temporary loan Jan. 1, 1870, 
Decrease during the year. 

Amount of temporary loan Jan. 1, 1871, 
Interest now due, estimated at 
Outstanding bills due Jan. 1, 1871, 

Total debt and interest January 1, 1871, 
Cash in the treasury Jan. 1, 1871, 
Notes due the city. 
Interest on same. 

Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1871, 
Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1870, 

Decrease of the debt during the year 1870, <|21 971 42 

The valuation, as returned by the Assessors for the past 
year, is $10,710,252, showing an increase of more than a 
half million of dollars over the valuation of 1869. The 
rate of taxation on -filOO was 2.48 in 1869 and 2 18 in 
1870. 

The total amount assessed by tax last year was 1238,- 
483.63. This sum was appropriated as follows : 

Por State tax .¥50,562 00 

" County tax 15^947 47 

" Municipal purposes .... 166,974 16 

$233,483 63 

I think it will be conceded by all that this important dc- 
l)artracnt of the government has always been managed with 
great prudence and careful foresight, as our present good 



28,001 00 
7,275 00 


S393,10(J 00 

$20,726 00 
9,000 00 

22,802 75 


36,.32l 02 

5,460 53 

307 92 


§445,628 75 
$42,089 47 






403,539 28 
425,510 70 



11 

coudition so well attests. The present indebtedness of the 
city is less than four per cent, on its valuation, and about 
three-fourths of this was occasioned by the late war. Since 
the re-establishment of peace, many valuable and costly 
improvements have been made. The Court-House, Library 
Building, and two School-Houses have been erected, capa- 
cious sewers constructed, new streets opened, a new steam 
fire-engine ])urchased, and other works of a permanent 
character accomplished. The expense of all these has 
been met by annual taxation, besides applying each year a 
handsome sum towards the extinction of the city debt. In 
view of such a record our citizens may well be gratified. 
. Bonds to the amount of !^8,800 became due the past 
year, and have been paid. Other bonds amounting to 
$6,000 mature the present year, for the payment of Avhich 
you will be called upon to make provision. 

Heretofore a large surplus has remained in the city 
treasury from the first of July, the commencement of the 
payment of tiic new tax list, till the following March or 
April, from which the city derives no advantage. I see no 
good reason for keeping these funds on deposit for so large 
a portion of the year, and I reconnnend that the floating 
debt, now only about $20,000, be extinguished as soon as 
practicable, by the use of money in the treasury not needed 
for other purposes. I recommend further that a sufficient 
sum be raised by taxation to meet the requirements of ev- 
ery department the present year, with a liberal sum to be 
applied to the further reduction of the city debt. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

There can be no duty more imperative, no trust more 
sacred, and no call which should suminon our attention 
more readily, than providing for the educational interests 
of the city. The public schools of Manchester have at- 



12 

tained a high position ; and I trust that wc shall endeavor 
not only to maintain their so well merited reputation, but 
shall be ready to respond to the increasing demands of the 
future. 

Although the school department is directly managed by 
a separate branch of the government, it will be your priv- 
ilege to furnish the means by which it is to be maintained ; 
and I heartily bespeak for it a liberal support. 

By a recent amendment to the city charter the Board ol 
School Committee, formerly consisting of one member 
from each ward, has been increased by the addition of the 
Mayor and President of the Common Council, the former 
being chairman ex officio of the Board. This wise provis- 
ion will form a connecting link between this and the other 
departments, thereby facilitating the transaction of busi- 
ness and securing a better system of accountability. 

The whole number of different children who have re- 
ceived instruction the past year is 3,200. The average 
number belonging to the schools the entire year was 2,167 ; 
the average daily attendance was 2,001, and the number 
in actual attendance at the close of the year was 2,337. 

The number of schools in the city, exclusive of three 
evening schools, is 46, being the same as reported one year 
ago. The number of teachers employed is Q5, being an 
increase of two over the previous number. The average 
cost per scholar for the year has been 120.21. 

The last annual appropriation for this department was 
as follows : 

Maintenance of schools .... ^42,000 00 

New school-houses 15,000 00 

School-house repairs 5,000 00 

Eveninc' schools 1,000 00 



Total $03,000 00 

A still larger sum will be required this year, to meet the 



13 

ordinary demands and complete the new school-houses al- 
ready commenced. 

SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

At Goffe's Falls a brick building of sufficient capacity to 
comfortably accommodate forty scholars has been erected 
upon a foundation that was laid the previous year, at a to- 
tal cost of 13,639.39. Another permanent brick structure, 
two stories in height, with slated roof, and containing four 
school-rooms, has been constructed on Main street, Piscata- 
quog, and is nearly ready for occupancy. A commodious 
lot for this house, an addition to the lot of the Franklin 
street grammar school (71 by 100 feet) and a new lot on 
the corner of Beech and Spruce streets for future use, have 
l)een purchased. The appropriation of last year is ade- 
quate to cover the cost of all these improvements. 

Contracts have been made for furnishing the materials 
for building a new grammar-school house on Lincoln street, 
and a portion of the l)rick has already been delivered upon 
the ground. It was the design of your predecessors to 
place this enterprise in a position to enable you to carry 
the work forward in the early part of the year, thus fur- 
nishing a better opportunity to season the walls and lum- 
ber, and secure the advantages arising from an early 
contract. 

I trust that no unnecessary delay will be permitted in 
carrying forward this inidertaking. 

CITY LTBRAUY. 

As an auxiliary to our other educational institutions, the 
City Library is prominent. Having its origin in the en- 
lightened liberality of the proprietors of the Manchester 
Athenaeum, fostered and sustained by substantial aid from 
the city treasury, and tlie generous contributions of many 



14 

citizens, it now has a catalogue embracing 14,930 volumes, 
selected with especial reference to the wants of this com- 
munity. 

It was expected one year ago that the library building 
would be fully completed and ready for occupancy last au- 
tumn, and an appropriation was made to secure this result. 
The work was placed under contract with the agreement 
that the building should be in readiness for use by the first 
of December last ; but unforeseen causes operated to re- 
tard the progress of the work, and it was decided to retain 
the old rooms till the coming spring. 

The total appropriations made in aid of this object amount 
to 125,000. An additional sum will be required for fur- 
nishing the rooms and fencing the lot. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

The police force, as now constituted, consists of City 
Marshal, Assistant Marshal, two day and ten night police- 
men. 

The City Marshal, who by the ordinances is made Cap- 
tain of the Watch, cannot be expected, in connection with 
his other duties, to devote that personal supervision over 
the night force that is essential to a well-regulated and 
efficient department. In case of a sudden emergency it is 
necessary that there sliould be a recognized head, clothed 
with ample authority. Our present force, feeling the need 
of such an officer, have usually chosen one of their own 
number as chief or captain of the watch. To guard against 
future contingencies, I am of the opinion that an officer 
should 1)0 appointed whose only duty should be to superin- 
tend the night force, seeing that every man is at his post ; 
that all reasonable security may be afforded to the lives 
and property of citizens. 

An amendment to the charter of the city, enacted at 



15 

the late session of tlie legislature of this state, provides 
that hereafter all police officers shall be chosen by the City 
Council in convention, instead of by the Board of Mayor 
and Aldermen as heretofore. The wisdom of this change, 
which virtually divides the responsibility connected with 
this department among thirty-two individuals, requiring all 
warrants to be signed by a majority of the whole City 
Council, may well be questioned. 

Your predecessors passed an order authorizing addition- 
al cells to be prepared in the City Hall building, to be used 
in connection with this department as a temporary place of 
confinement for prisoners. After the plans had been per- 
fected and a portion of the materials procured, the work 
was suspended by a proposition to purchase a lot in anoth- 
er locality for the purpose of building a separate police sta- 
tion thereon. Nothing has been accomplished, however, in 
this direction. 

The original plan was so arranged as to admit a conven- 
ient fire-proof room or vault over the cells, and to this 
subject I desire to call your especial attention. The Gen- 
eral Statutes very properly make the office of the City 
Clerk a general depository of the records and papers of 
every department of the city. These accumulations have 
already become so great as to crowd very important and 
valuable records from the single ordinary iron safe that is 
now provided, thus exposing them to destruction by fire. 
Their loss would be a serious misfortune, and I desire to 
urge upon you the great necessity of making such altera- 
tions in the City Hall building as will supply this great 
want, and at the same time furnish additional accommoda- 
tion for the police. 

The interest on the cost of a separate police station 
would in one or two years at most pay the expense of these 
proposed alterations. 



16 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

The department embracing the building and maintenance 
of highways and bridges is one of increasing importance 
and responsibility. The rapid expansion of the city in al- 
most every direction causes a demand annually for laying 
out and building new streets, and when once opened they 
must be kept in condition for public use. 

The allowance made yearly for repairs has not kept pace 
with tlie demand. Besides the care of all the back streets, 
there are now in District No. 2 twenty-eight and a half 
miles of roads, many of them poorly constructed at first, 
which require more or less attention. Another heavy drain, 
of recent origin, upon this fund, is the present practice of 
grading tlie sidewalks where the abutters are desirous of 
laying concrete pavements, while in most cities a separate 
appropriation is made for this ol)ject. Believing that our 
citizens demand l^ettcr roads, and arc willing to pay for 
them, 1 suggest a liberal increase in the allotment to this 
department. 

A lot of land, containing 24,000 square feet, and cost- 
ing f 1,537.50, has been purchased for the purpose prima- 
rily of securing the gravel upon it. This land is situated 
on the south side of Lowell street, and a little east of Ma- 
ple street. It will furnish some excellent material for 
streets, and could probably be disposed of for the first cost 
at least, after it has been relieved of the surplus earth. 
But I recommend that it be retained as a deposit for stone, 
Itrick, lumber, and other material used in this department; 
and that suitable sheds be erected this season, in which to 
store the sleds and other property unused in summer, and 
carts in winter. 

The authorities have laid out more than the usual num- 
ber of new streets the past year. In some instances this 



17 

course was ado{)ted in order tu secure the right of way -be- 
fore iniproveuieuts shouhl be made that would iucrease the 
laud damages, or defeat eutirely the establishmeut of av- 
enues Avhere tlie}^ are demanded for public convenience, as 
w^ell as to maintain tliat order and regularity so desirable 
in their location. 

The new streets completed last year are as follows : Cen- 
ter "street, in Ward Seven; sections of Russell, Prospect, 
Orange, Pearl, Harrison, Walnut, Ash, Cedar and Auburn 
streets. 

An expenditure of about >i^2,700 was made in Ward 
Eight, for rebuilding the bank wall and raising the high- 
way by the "eddy," and j)gid for by special transfer. This 
improvement was made necessary in consequence of the 
action of the water in time of unusual freshets. 

A permanent lattice Ijridge has l)een constructed across 
the Cohas brook, on the road leading to the Island Pond 
house, instead of the stringer bridge which had become 
decayed and unsafe. The road has also been raised and 
widened at this point, and is now above high water mark. 
The whole expense incurred is f 951.88. 

The easterly end of Amoskeag Falls bridge has been 
covered, rc-planked, and otherwise improved, and the whole 
structure neatly whitewashed. Materials for re-planking 
the l)alance of the l)ridge luivc been contracted for, and 
will ])e needed for use as early as practicable. 

Granite bridge will require repairing, and perhaps re- 
planking, tlie flooring having Ijccome defective. The pres- 
ent covering is of oak, four and a half inches thick, and 
has been used less than three years. Some new method 
Ijetter calculated to withstand the great wear is demanded, 
and I suggest that it would be true economy to pave a por- 
tion of the In'idge, at least, this year, with wood pavements. 

Early last year a joint arrangement was entered into be- 
tween the Amoskeag ^Manufacturing Company, the Concord 









$12 


,280 


54 


82, 


693 


34 








• 4, 


,793 


60 








4, 


793 


GU 















.^12, 


,280 


-A 



18 

Railroad, and the City Council, by which Canal street has 
been paved with stone from the north side of Pleasant 
street to the south end of the freight depot. The clayey 
nature of the soil made it necessary to remove a large 
amount of earth from the street, and replace it with loose 
sand or gravel, to aid the pavements to withstand the ac- 
tion of frost, thereby adding heavily to the expense of the 
work. 

Tlie whole cost of this iinprovemont was 

Apportioned as follows: — 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Company 

Concord Railroad 

City of Manchester 

The work was performed under the direction of the city 
officers, and the other parties have promptly responded in 
the above sums, as their proportion of the expense. 

A six-inch water pipe was laid through Hanover and 
Market streets, from Fine street to Franklin street, for 
supplying water with which to sprinkle the streets. This 
has proved entirely successful, and of great value, as with- 
out it we should have been deprived of the means of wet- 
ting the main avenues of trade, through the long and 
severe drought of the past season. The whole cost of work 
and necessary fixtures was $1,583.10. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

In order to perfect a thorough system of sewerage for 
the thickly settled portion of the city, an annual appropri- 
ation, liberal in amount, will be required for many years to 
come. It is gratifying that for some time past the work 
has progressed under a systematic plan, which when com- 
pleted will furnish adequate drainage for the streets and 
the abuttors. 



19 

111 1868 the new main sewer tlu'ough Elm street was ex- 
tended from Central street to Merrimack street. The work 
was suspended at that point in consequence of more press- 
ing demands in the eastern section of the city. That 
want having" ))een supplied, I recommend the extension of 
the Elm-street sewer the present season as far as the con- 
dition of the finances will permit. 

During the past year the main brick sewer in Union 
street (two by three feet) was extended 146 feet ; a brick 
sewer two feet in diameter was laid from Union street 
through Amherst street 900 feet, and extended in the same 
street with an eighteen-inch cement pipe 500 feet. There 
have also been laid in various other streets 3,488 feet of 
twelve-inch, pipe 1,583 feet of nine-inch pipe, and 321 feet 
of six-inch pipe, making a total of 6,938 feet, or about one 
and one-third miles of sewerage. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The great injury to the city by the fire of the 8th July 
last, by which many valuable buildings were destroyed, de- 
priving some of our most enterprising and worthy citizens 
of a large amount of property, rendering nearly two hun- 
dred families homeless, interrupting business, and throw- 
ing many out of employment, calls loudly upon us to see 
that all needed facilities are provided to prevent the recur- 
rence of a similar disaster. It is appalling to contemplate 
what must have been the result, had we not been favored 
with rain immediately after the l)ursting out of the flames, 
or had the fire occurred in a locality less favored in respect 
to a supply of water. The firemen performed their duties 
with alacrity, and worked with that indomitable will and 
persistence which have ever characterized them, and are 
entitled to our gratitude for their services on this as well 
as on other occasions. 



20 

Within a few weeks ten members of" the Hose Company 
liave been transferred to Engine No. 4, and a new company 
organized, making the present department to consist of 
four engine companies, one liose company, and one hook 
and ladder company, all furnished with superior apparatus. 
1 believe as a whole the department was never in better 
condition. But, in common with a large majority of our 
citizens, the firemen are impressed with the absolute ne- 
cessity of i)roviding against future disaster by the construc- 
tion of adequate 

WATEi: WORKS, 

This subject was submitted to the inhabitants at the late 
nmnicipal election, and by a decided vote the people de- 
clared that they desired that mmetliincj should Ije done in 
the matter. 

Unfortunately a difference of opinion exists among those 
who have interested themselves upon this subject ; first, as 
to the best source of supply ; and second, as to the best 
means to be adopted to secure the management and com- 
pletion of the enterprise. I say that this is unfortunate, 
for in an undertaking of such magnitude it is of the high- 
est importance that there should be unanimity and cooper- 
ation on the part of the people. 

I will not stop here to enlarge \\\)Q\\ the great blessings 
of an unlimited supply of water, nor more than advert to 
what has been ])roved a fact in other cities, that the works 
judiciously constructed would in a very few years become 
self-sustaining, and would require no direct aid from the 
city treasury ; but will submit for your consideration a 
proposition, as the second step (one having already been 
taken by the citizens themselves), designed mainly to se- 
cure union and harmony in whatever course may be adopt- 
ed. I suggest that a Commission composed of persons 



21 

from al)rou(l,of large practical experience in similar works, 
men of acknowledged character and capacity, in whose 
judgment the community would place the utmost confi- 
dence — whose duty it should be to consider the various 
propositions that have been suggested, hear all the parties 
who desire to be heard, and report as early in the season 
as practicable which of all the routes preposed, all things 
considered, is in their estimation the one best adapted to 
our wants. 

Should an opinion be obtained from such a source and 
under such circumstances, I am sure that a second stfep 
will have been taken in this great work, and that all other 
difficulties will vanish as the enterprise pi'ogresscs. 

COMMONS. 

The wisdom of our predecessors in awarding lil)eral ap- 
propriations by which the public commons are being greatly 
improved, thus contrilniting to the health, comfort, and 
enjoyment of our citizens, meets with universal ap})rol)a- 
tion. Merrimack Square is now half enclosed with a beau- 
tiful and substantial iron fence, which can be completed in 
two more seasons, with the sum usually set apart for that 
purpose. A border wall was commenced the past season 
on the shore of the pond in this square, and extended more 
than half the distance around it. 

The bank wall at the outlet of the pond on Hanover 
Square has been rebuilt, new wooden fences erected on 
portions of this and other commons, and the usual amount 
of concrete walk put down. With the continuance of the 
improvements now in progress, these commons will soon 
command attention and admiration. 

CEMETERIES. 

In the management of the public cemeteries no event 
has occurred to distinguish the past from former years. 



22 

The Valley will again claim some pecuniary assistance, 
that the grounds may be kept in such condition as will sat- 
isfy the demands and tastes of an enlightened community. 
The receipts from the sale of lots in the Pine Grove cem- 
etery are for the present sufficient for its support, 

A fence was built around the cemetery at Amoskeag, and 
an order passed for a similar enclosure at Goffe's Falls, 
which will be carried into effect early in the spring. 

MILITARY. 

The demand upon the treasury in aid of the military 
companies within our city is very moderate. The charac- 
ter of the members composing these companies commands 
our respect, and many of them are entitled to our gratitude 
for their heroic efforts for the preservation of the Union. 

One year ago it was my privilege to allude, in this con- 
nection, to the subject of a 

soldiers' monument. 

Although the City Council made an appropriation of 
•t'1,000 to defray the expense of any action that might be 
taken, I regret to say that the recommendation, although 
some progress was made, has not been carried into effect ; 
consequently no part of this sum has been expended. 1 
desire to again submit the matter for your consideration, 
with the suggestion that the City Library building, now 
nearly completed, furnishes a very appropriate place for a 
suitahle testimonial to those brave men, who sacrificed their 
lives that the Constitution might be maintained and the 
Union be preserved. 

Another and a very appropriate manner of transmitting 
to posterity onr gratitude to those gallant and patriotic men, 
is to erect on some one of our public squares an enduring 
monument of a suitable design, to be used in connection 
with a fountain in anticipation of the introduction of water. 



23 

With these suggestions, and the full assurance that your 
action will 1)0 such as to reflect honor upon our municipal- 
it}' and do justice to the memory of our citizen soldiery, I 
leave the matter in your hands. 

CITY FARM. 

The whole number of paupers at the almshouse during 
the past year was 32. The average number was eight and 
one-third, being a slight increase over the previous year. 

The general management of the farm has been contin- 
ued from year to year without material change except that 
the policy of reducing the number of acres has been adopt- 
ed and acted upon. 

There were sold iu 18G8 7 lots, auiouutiug to . 1^3,159 4() 

" 1S70 10 '• •• . . 6,550 40 

Making a total of $9,709 8G 

This sum has been diminished by expenditures 

for l)uilding the necessary streets . . .S609 34 
For fencing squares reserved for public use . 2:il 90 

.f831 24 



Leaving the net amount for 20 3-4 acres sold . $8,878 62 

1 trust it will be your pleasure to continue the same poli- 
cy in this respect until the farm is reduced to a proper size 
for economical management. 

CONCLUSION. 

I have thus, gentlemen of the city council, endeavored 
to lay before you in a plain, practical manner, the present 
condition and wants of the various departments of the 
city, together with such recommendations as seemed judi- 
cious and necessary to protect and foster all the material 
interests of this community. 

It is our privilege to assume these offices of trust and 



24 

responsibility, at an interesting period in theliistory of the 
city, and at an era of its greatest prosperity. It is for us 
to provide for the various demands which its rapid growth 
will require, liberally yet judiciously. Let us avoid every 
species of extravagance, and all expenditures of money for 
doubtful or untried projects : ever keeping in view the bur- 
dens of taxation which bear so heavily upon the people. 
Let us enter upon these duties with purity of motive and 
singleness of purpose, and with a determination to be faith- 
ful to every demand; frankly and openly meeting every 
question, irrespective of party lines or personal preference. 

In assuming the responsibilities of this honorable posi- 
tion for a third time, it will be my earnest endeavor to per- 
form its duties faithfully and impartially, at all times. Let 
me cherish the hope that our action may always be harmo- 
nious, and that a spirit of cordial cooperation may pervade 
all our councils. May we engage in this important work 
unitedly and zealously, with the sole aim of proving our- 
selves worthy of the confidence reposed in us, and faithful 
servants of tlie people. 



GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS 

OK THE 

CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

18 71. 



MAYOR. 

JAMES A. WESTON 



CITY CLERK. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT. 



ALDERMEX. 



Ward 1 — George W. Thiiyer, Ward 5 — Daniel Connor, 

Ward 2 — Henry Lewis, Ward (5 — John Hosley, 

AVard 3 — William Elanders, Ward 7 — Wm. N. Chaniberlin, 

Ward 4 — James S. Cheney, Ward S — William G. Everett. 



PRESIDENT COMMON COUNCIL. 

William E. Patten. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elbridse D. Hadlev. 



26 



COMMON ( OUXCIL. 



Waki) 1— Israel W. Dickey, Ward 5— Lawrence Foley, 
Oscar M. Titus, John L. Kennedy, 

Sylvanus A. Putnam. Austin O^Malley. 

n'ARD 2— Henry W. Powell, Wakd 6— Jacob J. Abbott, 
Dana D. Towns, Edwin Kennedy, 

John C. Smith. Jeremiah Hodge. 

Wakd .",— Xehemiah S. Bean, Ward 7— William M. Shepherd, 
(ieorge R. Simmons, James C. Russell, 

Henry C. Reynolds. Benjamin K. Parker. 

Wahd 4— AVllliam R. Patten. Wakd S— Harris J. Poor, 

Jacob B. Hartwell. Albert A. Woodward. 

Joseph B. Sawyer. Silas A. Felton. 



CITY MESSENGEK. 

William Stevens. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finaiifi.— The Mayor and Alderman Thayer; Mes.srs. Bean. 
Reynolds and E. Kennedy, 

^lccou/t<.s.— Aldermen Lewis and Everett; Messrs. Hartwell. 
Felton and Simmons. 

Lands and Buildings.— Aldermen Flanders and Connor; Messrs. 
Sawyer, Shepherd and Poor. 

Public Instruction.— Aldermen Everett and Cheney; Messr.?. 
Powell, Smith and Reynolds. 

Streets.— Aldermen Hosley and Chamberlin; Messrs. Bean. 
Felton and Abbott. 

City Farm.— The Mayor and Alderman Hosley; Messrs. Russell, 
Dickey and Woodward. 

Setvers and Drai7is.— Aldermen Cheney and Chamberlin ; Messrs. 
Shepherd, Foley and Russell. 

Commons and Cemeteries.— Aldermen Everett and Hosley; 
Messrs. J. L, Kennedy, Towns and Putnam. 

Fire Dejmrtment.- Aldermen Chamberlin and Cheney; Messrs. 
Simmons, Sawyer and Dickey. 

CZai>ns.— Aldermen Thayer and LcAvis; Messrs. Reynolds. 
I lodge and Powell. 



27 

House of Correction. — Aldernieu Connor and Flanders; Messrs. 
Poor, Titus and O'Malley. 

Military Afairs. — Aldermen Chani))erlin and Thayer; Messrs. 
Putnam, Smith and Towns. 

Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Flanders and Everett: Messrs. 
Woodward. J. L. Kennedy and Parker. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN 150 AKD OF MAYOIt AND ALDERMEN. 

Enrollment. — Aldermen Everett and Tliajer. 

Bills in Second Heading. — Aldermen Lewis and Clianibevlin. 

Licenses. — Aldermen Flanders and Ilosley. 

MarshaVs Accounts. — Aldermen Ilosley and Connor. 

Setting Trees. — Aldermen Connor and Cheney. 

Market. — Aldermen Cheney and Everett. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Electiona and lieturns. — ^AI;)bott, Parker and Foley. 

JJills in Second Heading. — E. Kennedy, Titus and Simmons. 

Enrollment.— HodrrQ. Sawyer and Ilartwell. 



ASSESSORS. 



Moses O. Pearson, Maurice F. Slieehan, 

Horace P. Simpson, Elbridge G. Ilaynes, 

William P. :N'ewell, Horatio Fradd, 

George W. Pinkerton, Joseph Melvin. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Samuel S. Moultou, Patrick Sheehan. 

Sayward J. Young, John Morse, 

Jeremiah Stickney, Isaac Lewis, 

Moses E. George, George H. Colby. 



28 

SCHOOL tOM3IITTKE. 

Henry C. Saiulerson, Patrick A. Deviiu', 

Marshall P. Hall. William P. Merrill, 

Thomas Borden. James Dean, 

Samiiol N. Bell, DeLafavette B()])inson. 



SUPElilKTENDEKT OF PUBLK INSTRUCTION. 

Josej)]! (''. Edij^erly. 



CITY SOLICITOIt. 
Xatlinn 1'. limit. O^Vr— Patten's Buildiu!. 



TltKASURKK AND COLLECTOR. 

Henry H. Chamberlin. Ofiire—Ciiy Hall. 



DEPUTY COLLECTOR. 

Harrison I). Lord. Office — I'nion lUiildin^-. 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LI15RARY. 

Hon. Daniel Clark, Samuel N. Bell, 

William P. Newell. Waterman Smitli, 

Hon. Wm. C. Clarke. Hon. E. A. Straw. 

Phinehas Adams, Wm. K. Patten, ex officio, 

Hon. James A. Weston, ex offifio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Charles H. Marshall. 



29 

POLICK DEPARTMENT. 

.Tufiticc. 

Samiu'l Upton. Office — Merchants' Exchauge. 

Assistant Justice. 

Klijali M. Topim: Of/?cc— Patten's Unildhi-. 

(Jity Marshal. 

William B. Tatteu. Offiet'— City Hall. 

Assistan t Marshal. 

John D. Howard. 

Niijht Watchmen. 

Thomas L. Quimby, William II. Xewhall, 

Patrick Doyle, John C. Colburn, 

James Dufiy, David Thayer, 

William T-Fogg, Hugh Eamsay, 

Ilezekiah II. Xoyes. 

Daji Police. 

Horatio W. Longa. Henry Bennett. 

Constables. 

William 15. Patten, Daniel K. White, 

John D. Howard, Harrison D. Lord. 

Police Officers. 

William J'.. Patten, William H. Kewhall, 

John D. Howard, John C. Colburn, 

Thomas L. Quimby, David Thayer, 

Patrick Doyle. Hugh Ramsay. 

James Dufty. Henry Bennett, 

William T. Fogg, Horatio W. Longa, 
Hezekiah H. Xoyes. 



30 

Special Police. 



John Cassid}-, 
"William Stevens, 
Henr}' "\V. Powell, 
George ^\. Butterfield. 
Albert F. Quiniby, 
Andrew J. Dickey, 



Leonard Shelters. 
Elbridge G. "Woodman, 
Charles Canfield. 
Hollis C. Ilunton, 
Jonathan Y. McQueston. 
ZSTathaniel Baker. 2d. 



William R. Forsaith. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 



Ward 1. James M. House. 
" 2, John D. PoAvell. 
'• 3, John ]Sr. Bruce. 
" 4. Horace Pettee, 



Ward 5, John L. Kennedy, 
'• 6, Henry T. Mowatt, 
'■ 7, Chauncy C. Favor, 
'• 8. William H. Xewhall. 



Ward 1, 

u 9 



Clerks. 

Charles H. Osgood, Ward o, John W. Harrington. 
Benjamin F. Hartford. " 6, Henry B. Fairbanks, 
John H. Andrews, - 7, Luther E. Wallace, - 



4, William F. Holmes. 



8. George H. Gerry. 



Selectmen. 



Ward 1, Silas C. Clatur, 
Levi L. Aldrich, 
Clarence M. Edgei'ly. 

Ward 2, Leonard Shelters, 

Stillman P. Cannon, 
James P. Carpenter. 

Ward 3, Benj. L, Hartshorn. 
Thacher M. Conant. 
Eussell White. 

^'ard 4. Henry French, 

Gustavus M. Sanborn. 
Henry B. Sawyer. 



Ward ;■). Timothy Connor, 
William Riordou, 
Michael McDonough. 

"Ward G, Ira P. Fellows, 

Harrison D. Lord, 
Isaac W. Hammond. 

Ward 7, Dalton J. Warren. 
Carrol Kiddle, 
George P. Shattuck. 

Ward 8, George S. Chandler. 
Milo W. Harvey, 
Daniel Farmer. 



ACCOUNT 



HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN 

CITY TREASUEEK, 



DECEMBER 31, 1869, TO DECEMBER 31, 1S70. 



32 



JJr. City of 3Ianchcster in account icith Jlcary 11. (Jhainbcrlin, 



To Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1870, 
Paupers oft" the Farm, 
( 'ity Farm, .... 
City Teams, .... 
Iliijjhwav District No. 1, 
Dist. No. 2. i?7,615.17; Dist. Xo. 8, $519.97 
■• :?, 474.20; " " 9, 370.34 

- 4, 228.(32: - •' 10, 905.05 

•• 5. 388.83; - " 11. 3,151.20 

" (>, 259.93; •■ " 12,' 319.G3 

•• 7, 504.20; ■■ '• 13, 304.76 

Xew lliuliwavs,. 

Granite Bridge, $717.S7; Am. Falls Bridge, .^1,010.7 
Sewers and Drains, $7900.78; Reservoirs, S654.03, 
Commons, iJ3,lG3.70; Pine Grove Cem., $775,10, 

Fire Department, 

Citv Police, $13,283.48; Citv Officers, $7,911.83. 
Lighting Streets, $4,023.00;' Militia, $383.33, 

Printing and Stationery, 

fncidontal Expenses, , 

City Hall, $1,321.5J ; City Library. $2,34s.08. 

Land sold from Farm. 

Paving Streets, $14,297.67; Watering Streets, $2,392.7 

Ab"t. of Taxes, $482.96; Dis. on Taxes, $4,953.9(3, 

State Tax, $50,5()2.00; Count v Tax, $15,947.47. 

Interest, $1772.94; Coupons," $22,134.(J0, 

Tern. Loan, $28,275.00; City Debt, $9,500.00, 

Court-House, $108.17; Dog Tax, $22.00, 

Reps, of Buildings, $2,08(3.35; Insurance, $1,141.25, 

Iron Fence, Merrimack Square. 

Police Station, $4U5.50; \' alley Cem., $300.00, 

Xew School-Houses, 

School Department, 

Evening Schools, 

School-House Lots, . . ' . 

Hi'idgo across Cohas Brook, 

Library Building, $1727.99; S. V. R. Koad, $25,noO.O( 

Cement Pipe, IL'uiover Square, .... 



Casii in llic Trcasui-v, Jan. 1. 1^71, 



$27,169 46 


3,855 


50 


2.811 


30 


3.821 


20 


72 


87 


8.135 


14 


844 


54 


L133 


67 


3,540 


03 


579 


5(3 


808 


9(5 


(),963 


81 


3. 2.334 GO 


S,.554 81 


3,938 


8!; 


7,072 


40 


21.195 


31 


4,40(3 


93 


2,583 


12 


5,315 


14 


s,6(59 


()2 


23(3 


25 


8,1(3,090 45 


5,43(3 


92 


0(3,509 47 


23,90() 


94 


37,775 


10 


130 07 


:{.227 


GO 


5,57<3 


34 


705 


50 


13,547 


31 


40,838 


86 


762 


50 


2.375 


00 


951 


38 


\ 20,727 


90 


10 


00 


370,214 


51 


36,321 


02 



406..^ 



CUy Treasurer (one ijcar endinij December ol, 1870.) 'C'r.. 



By Cash in the Treasiuy, i$27^398 61 

Unsold Bonds January 1, 1870, .... 30,800 00 

Taxes 1865, $21.70; Taxes 18G('), .'t?:508.;32, . .'JSO 11 

" 18(57, 475.97; " 18G8, 1.631.85, . 2,110 82 

'• 1869, 25,460.39; ^' 1870, 197,667.94, . 223,128 33 

J)oo- Tax 1867, i?3.00; Doi? Tax 1868, .$11.00, 14 00 

•• '' •' 1869, 113.00: " " 1870, 108.00. 281 00 

Temporfu-y l^oan, 21,000 00 

Savings Bank Tax 26,029 22 

Kailroad Tax 14,939 36 

IT. S. Bounty 1,445 49 

Literary Fund 1,015 00 

City Hall Buildin;^, .'i?2,090.29; City Farm, .^^2,019.87. 4.110 IB 

Police Court, .«4,242.78; City Scales, $256.46, . 4,499 24 

Pau^Ders from other toAvns, 344 46 

Pine Grove Cemetery, 548 10 

County of Hillsborough. 1,700 52 

Interest on Taxes, ' 1,058 83 

City Teams, .f2,.389.50; Oyerdrafts, .1r58.25, . 2,447 75 

License of Exhibitions and Shows. . . . ~uO 00 

Amoskeag ManT'g Co , Paying, , . . 2,693 3-5 

Concord Railroad,' . . ' . . . . 4,793 60 

Concord Railroad, Brick. .... 12 60 

Land sold from Farm, .".,721 9.:'> 

Dog- Licenses, .s;501. 21; Sewer Licenses, .s752.35, 1,05.3 56 

15oard refunded at Reform School, . . . 21 12 

Rent of Tenements, $108.00; Water Rent, .1?32.00, 140 00 
Interest on Bonds, .$109.75; Cost N'on-R. Taxes. .^26.00. 135 75 

Luml)er, $20.14; Rent of Hearse, .i?lOO.OO, . 120 14 

Ladders, .$7.00; Work by Man,. f3..-)0, . . 10 50 

Sundry Persons for Brick 4.38 90 

Liquor Sold, .'?200. 00; Diyidend on Insurance, .ir7.50, 207 -50 

Drawing wood, .f21.80; Rams and l^ead Pipe, iR33.85, -55 65 

Ward Room Lot, ij^l.OO; Water Tanks, S75.00, . 79 Oi« 

License to sell, $50.00; Old Hose, $l().0O, . 6() 00 

Coal, $24; Stone and Loam, .1r6.00, . . . .30 00 
Old School-house Golle's Falls, .f. 50.00; Polic(>, 

Duty, SKj.OO a\ 00 

Liberty ])ole, .i?2a.OO; Refunded liy Wm. Pjowers. .^^40.00. 60 00 

Warren llaryey. Land on Hanoyer St., . . 240 IS 

(Jrass from Commons and ('(Uirt-House Yai'd. . 71 00 



.1r.383,687 68 
Lnpaid Bills t)utla\\i'(l. .... 4510 

Unpaid JJills Jan. 1, 1.S71 22,802 75 



.1?406,535 
llEXRY R. CIIAMBERLIX, City TiaoAsuiiEi;. 
^raiuche.stfr. December 31, 1870. 



fij^a:n^ce committee\s report. 



The undersigned, Joint Standing Connnittee on Finance, certily 
that we have examined the within account of Henry R- Cliani- 
berlin, City Treasurer, and find the same correctly cast and pro])- 
erly vouched. 

During tlie year ending December '.M, 1870, there lias been re- 
ceived in the treasury, including the balance on hand January 1. 
1870, the sum of three hundred eighty-three thousand six hundred 
eighty-seven dollars and sixtj'-eight cents (383,687.68), and there 
has been paid from the treasury, during the same time, the sum of 
three hundred forty-seven thousand three hundred sixt3'-six dol- 
lars sixty-six cents (347,306.06), leaving in the treasury January 
1, 1871, thirty-six thousand three hundred twenty-one dollars and 
two cents (S36.321.02). 

JOHN AV. JOJIXSOX. 

X. S. BE AX, 

WM. E. PATTEX. 

JAMES A. WESTOX. 
Joint StanduKj Committee on Finance. 

Jan. lu, 1871. In Roahd of Commox Council. 
Read, accepted and ordered to lie printed. 

E. D. HADLEY. Clerk. 

Jan. 18, 1871. Ix Boakd of Mayoii and Aldermen. 
In concurrence, accepted and ordered to be printed. 

J. E. BEXXETT. City Cleuk. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT 



To taxes, 1870, collected 


. $192,598 


38 




Dog tax . 


• '168 


00 




Abated . 


115 


50 




Discounted 
1869, collected 


4,953 

. $25,169 


96 
99 


$197,835 84 


Dog tax . 


113 


00 




Abated . 


290 


40 


$25,573 39 


1868, collected 


$1,562 


70 


Dog tax . 


11 


00 




Abated . 


72 


15 


$1,645 85 


1867, collected 


$471 06 


Dog tax . 


o 
■J 


00 




Abated . 


4 


91 


$478 97 
$308 32 


1866, collected 






1865 " 






21 79 




$225,864 16 


Savings Bank tax 
Railroad " 


• 




$26,029 22 
14,939 36 


Interest on taxes 


. 




1,058 83 


Costs on non-resident taxe 


s 




20 00 



36 

To Soldiers' Bounties refunded !.y Gen. Gov'nt $1,345 49 

Literary Fund 1,015 00 

Temporary Loan 21,000 00 

Land sold from city farm .... 3,721 98 
Police costs and fines .... 4,242 78 

Concord Railroad on account j^f 

paving Canal street .... 4,793 60 
Amoskeag Manufacturing- Co. on 

account of paving Canal street 
City Farm for produce and labor 
J. W. Moore for stock of liquors 
Pine Grove Cemetery for lots and wood 
Tenements on Vine "street for rent 
North scales for fees . . |42 62 

South scales for fees . . 213 84 



2,693 


35 


2,019 


87 


200 


00 


548 


10 


108 


00 


.*256 


46 


570 


00 


240 


18 


50 


00 


301 


21 


100 


00 


109 


75 


1,688 


00 


402 


29 



Shows and exhibitions for license 

Warren Harvey for lot cor. Han- 
over and Hall sts., 1st payment 

License to sell ..... 

Dog licenses ..... 

Rent of hearse ..... 

Accrued interest on bonds sold . 

Rent of City Hall stores . 

Rent of City Hall and Police Court Room 

Sewer licenses . . . . . ^ . 752 35 

Water rent :!2 00 

Hillsljorough County for l)oard of 

inmates at Reform School . . . 1,645 32 

Hillsborough County for board of 

inmates at N. H. Asylum ... 3S 20 

Other towns for support of paupers . . 344 46 

llillsborough County for support of paupers 17 00 

Wm. Bowers for board of wife at Asylum . 40 00 

Ap[)i'Oj)riation for schools for hauling wood 21 80 



37 



To Clougli & Foster for hauling wood 
Work by city teams . 
L. H. Sleeper, rent No. 6, Ward 

Room lot to April 1, 1870 
Grass on Commons and Court-House 
Old water rams and lead pipe sold 
Old water tanks and liberty pole 
Old school-house at Goffc's Falls sold 
Old hose sold .... 
Old plank sold .... 
Brick sold .... 

J. S. BachcUer for coal 
Stone, loam and work 
Moulton Knowles for plank 
N. E. Fair for police duty 
Old ladders sold 
Insurance dividend . 
Over-draft for printing and stationery 

" " paving 

" " lire department . 

" " insurance 

" " city farm 

" " paupers off city farm 
City stock sold 





. $242 00 




2,147 50 




4 00 


lot 


71 00 




33 85 




95 00 




50 00 




16 00 




8 t)7 




451 50 




24 00 


. 


9 50 




11 47 




1(3 00 




7 00 




7 50 




2 00 




10 00 




5 00 




32 50 




8 75 




21 12 




30,800 00 


< 


i<356,088 87 



APPROPRIATIONS. 


Paupers oft" Farm 


$2,106 10 


City Farm .... 


2,528 62 


City Teams 


3,647 50 


Highway District No. 1 


250 00 


No. 2 . 


7,367 30 


No. 3 . 


500 00 



38 



Bj Highway Distric 


t No. 4 


*100 00 




No. 5 


350 00 




No. 6 


300 00 




No. 7 


500 00 




No. 8 


500 00 




No. 9 


300 00 




No. 10 


806 00 




No. 11 


3,150 00 




No. 12 


250 00 




No. 13 


225 00 


New Highways 


. 


7,500 00 


Paving Streets 


. 


13,486 95 


Watering Streets 




2,408 85 


Granite Bridge 


. 


600 00 


Amoskeag Falls 


Bridge 


1,508 67 


Sewers and Drains 


7,409 82 


Reservoirs . 




1,500 00 


Commons . 


. 


3,090 00 


Pine Grove Cemetery . 


548 10 


Valley '• 


. 


300 00 


State Tax . 


, 


50,562 00 


County Tax 


. 


15,947 47 


Soldiers' Monument 


1,000 00 


Fire Department 


. 


7,552 00 


City Police . 


. 


14,242 78 


Lighting Streets 


, 


4,000 00 


Printing and Stationery 


2,602 00 


Incidental Expenses . 


5,000 00 


City Hall . 


• 


2,090 29 


('ity Library 




2,500 00 


Militia 


. 


400 00 


Land sold from F 


arm . 


3,721 93 


Repairs of School-houses 


5,000 00 


Insurance . 


. 


1,040 00 


Interest 


. 


25,109 75 



89 



By Temporary Loan . . $21,000 00 

Repairs of Buildings . . 2,100 00 

Reduction of Debt . . 10,000 00 

Salaries of Officers . . 8,000 00 

Library Building . . 7,780 77 

Discount on Taxes . . 0,500 00 

Iron Fence, Merrimack Square, 5,000 00 

Bri'dge across Cohas Brook . 984 71 

Suncook Valley Railroad . 25,000 00 

Dog Tax, 1870 ... 168 00 

New School-houses and lots, 15,050 00 

Schools .... -14,014 20 

Evening Schools . . . 1,000 00 



$345,598 81 
Balance to Reserved Fund . 10,490 06 



1356,088 87 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 

By Balance from Old Account . 1642 88 

Appropriation . . . 1,500 00 

Hillsborough County for sup|)ort 

of inmates at Reform School, 1,645 32 

Hillsborough County for support 

of inmates at Insane Asylum, 38 20 

Hillsborough County for sup- 
port of paupers . . 17 00 



40 

By Town of Franklin, for snpport 

of paupers . . . .f41 49 

Town of "Warner for snpport of 

paupers .... 26 50 

Town of AVestnioreland for su})- 

port of paupers . . 21 7") 

Town of Bow for support of 

paupers .... 02 50 

Town of Lisbon for support of 

paupers .... 144 54 

City of Dover for support of 

paupers .... 47 68 

Wm. Bowers for support of wife 

at Insane Asylum . . 40 00 

I'L M. Johnson for support of 

inmate at Reform School . 21 12 



■14.268 98 



EXPENDITURES. 

To N. H. Asylum, for support of 

inmates .... .|195 34 

Town of Goffstown, for support 

of pauper . . . 11 62 

Tow^n of Jaffrey, for care of Pat- 
rick McLaughlin . . 45 98 

Hillsl)orougli County, for board 

of Reuben P. Webster . 99 71 

Hillsborough County, for board 

of inmates at Insane Asylum, 170 47 

Reform School for support of 

inmates .... 1,770 82 

G. F. Bosher & Co., for bedding, 10 50 

Healy & Sweeney, for groceries, 2 50 

11. C. Merrill, " . 8 00 



41 



To Sawyer Bros. & Co., groceries 
G. W. Adams & Son, 
Will. M. Hayes, 
II. Fradd & Co., 
Kidder & Chandler, 
Wm. F. Sleeper, ct Co., 
II. B. rutnam, 
J. C. Fifield, 
Fifield & Walker 
Moody & Co., 
Woodbridge Cressey 
Patrick Haley, for wood 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., " 
Wm. C. Richardson " 
G. F. Robertson, " 
Daniel Wheeler, " 
Win. Foster, " 

B. F. Locke, 
D. B. Eastman, " 
F. G. Hughes, " 

C. H. Foss, 
H. G. Connor, for medicine 
Josiah Crosby, attendance of D 

Barnard 
Joseph King, care of D. Barnard 
C. H. Crosby, 
C. H. Barnard, '' 
John Morse, " 

L. H. Colburn, " 
Martha Dearborn, for board of 

W. S. Dearborn 
Caroline Cilley, for board o 

Jonathan Cilley 
F. A. Colby, for board of child 

ren of J. M. Dickev . 



m 00 

127 22 
0(3 00 
46 57 

00 
80 96 
17 27 
11 40 

4 00 



17 


56 


2 


83 


2 


00 


116 


57 


4 


75 


9 


75 


12 


50 


41 


25 


7 


50 




50 


4 


00 


6 


00 


12 


41 


62 


50 


16 


00 


80 


50 


142 


00 


4 


00 


'^ 


00 


96 


00 


86 


00 


/* rr 


00 



42 



To Byron H. Richardson, for board 
and care of M. and M. E 
Northey 

B. F. Bascom, for board of I. I 

Stearns 
0. D. Abbott, medical attendance 

on S. L, French . 
City Farm, for moving S. L 

French 
Joseph Cross, for raih'oad ticket 

for S. L. French 
Thomas Wheat, medicine 
Leonard French, medical attend 

ance on Mrs. Ash 
J. L. O'Brien, for rent of tene 

ment .... 

D. C. Hall, for rent of tenement, 
S. S. Weston, for digging grave 

for Wm. Brown . 

Fogg & James, for team to Re- 
form School 

Fogg & James, for coach at bur- 
ial of A. Pelton . 

Fogg & James, for coacli at bur- 
ial of J. Ferry . 

Wm. Shepherd, coach at burial 
of J. B. Wiggin . 

.T. C. Whitten, board of James 
Wyman . . . . 

E. C. Miller, laying out body of 
A. Pelton .... 

Ellison Towns, care of A. Pelton 
P. A. Devine, for burial of J. 
Baxter's child 

C. S. Fisher, for l)urial of J. B. 
Wiggin . . . . 



^SO 


97 


8 


00 


?9 


50 


5 


50 


2 


90 


12 


00 



18 00 



5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 


5 


00 


() 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


4 


50 


20 


50 



4:] 



To C. S. Fisher, lor burial of .J. 

Whitchouso . . . ^17 00 

C. S. Fisher, burial of J. Ferry, 18 00 

C. S. Fisher, burial of A. Fcltou, l-\ 00 

C. S. Fisher, for coffin, etc., for 

M. E. Northey ... 23 95 

M. E. George, for cash paid for 

searching records , . lii 10 

M. E. George, for expense to 

Dover, in case S. L. French, ■') 00 

M. E. George, for cash paid to 

Josiah Perry ... 00 

Nahuni Baldwin, cash paid out, <> 00 

S. S. Moulton, for aid to >S. L. 

French .... 1 50 

James Mitchell, Jr., for boots, 8 35 

Geo. W. Weeks, " . 2 00 

Sarah A. Perry for case of J. 

Perry, .... 8 00 

C. F. Livingston, for printing 

notices, ... 3 25 



i^3,855 50 
Balance to New Account, . 413 48 



CITY FARM. 




By Balance from Old Account 


•^(;20 95 


Appropriation 


500 00 


County of Hillsboro' for sup- 




port of Paupers 


21 00 


Labor and produce sold 


1,990 12 


Overdraft refunded 


8 75 



.1;4268 98 



$3,140 82 



44 




EXPENDITURES. 




To Joseph Cross, Supt., Salary . 


'f'oOO 00 


Chas. G. Sherer, for labor 


281 50 


S. W. Page, 


73 88 


Geo. W. Clark, 


157 66 


lleubcir Morgan, •' 


4 00 


Parker M. Stevens, " 


7 00 


Patrick Broderick, " 


1 80 


Michael Hanly, " 


3 38 


John Thompson, " 


17 00 


Wm. C. Shannon, 


6 75 


David Sweat, " 


3 75 


Lizzie P-. Uptoir, house vs^ork . 


3 00 


Mary E. Clark, 


52 67 


Joseph Marsh, pasturing 


29 00 


Daniels & Co., for tools, seed, 




superphosphate, &c. 


147 !»4 


Straw & Lovejoy, rep. clock 


2 12 


D. P. Hadley, " " 


2 25 


H. G. Connor, for medicine. 


3 03 


K. M. Miller, for fish and 




meat .... 


7 43 


Geo. E. Cox, fish . 


91 


J. L. Fogg, beef 


24 9(3 


" " " labor 


71 94 


Hall, Watts ct Co., grain and 




plaster 


221 53 


H.& H.R.Pettee,gr'n and lime 


200 66 


William Boyd, for Meat 


8 26 


G. W. Adams tt Son, for 




groceries 


98 33 


Geo. W. Gardner & Co., for 




groceries 


103 61 


Spencer Bros., groceries 


55 54 



45 



To Johnson & Stevens, groceries 
Kidder & Chandler, '•' 
Cyrus Dunn, 

B. C. Flanders, " 

H. C. Merrill, 
Piper tt Shepard, for dry 

goods 
J. R, Weston, for dry goods 
Geo. S. Holmes, " " 
M. E. Higgins, '^ " 
Waite Brothers, " " 
Wm. B. Johnson &: Son, for 

dry goods 
H. S, Whitney, rep. ])umps 
James Hall, for tools, itc. at 

auction .... 
Brighani tt Pratt, for crackers 
S. G. Hoyt, rep. shoes 
Fred. C. Dow, shoes 
Geo. W. Thayer, shoes 
J. Stickney, for leather 

E. Branch, rep. harness 
Folsom & Son, for clothing . 
Chandler, Williams & Co. for 

clothing 
William T. Fogg, for swine . 
H. M. Bailey, tin ware 

T. R. Hubbard, shingles 

F. B. Eaton, for ])a])er, pens, 

and ink 
.las. J. Gregory, for seeds 
Josci)h Cate, for book 
D. A. Simons, for crockery . 
Charles Bunton, for black- 

smitliintr 



$QQ 


84 


6 


20 


130 


57 


T) 


50 


1 


63 


10 


58 


7 


72 


4 


25 


■> 


98 


oO 


86 


s 


75 
50 


17 


45 


'.) 


00 


8 


15 


10 


75 


28 


50 


47 


1<3 



10 50 

10 75 

30 00 

9 64 

2 00 



3 10 

7 42 

3 75 

10 75 



li 06 



46 

y. C. Forsaitli, cider mill 
A. ^V. Sanborn, rep. wagon 
Messrs. Reed S:. Sons, leg- 
irons .... 
Pike & Heald, rep. stoves 
Wiggin & Goodwin, ladders, 
C. S. Fisher, burying body of 
Frank Hall " . " . 

Clough & Foster, lumber 

Balance to New Account, 



160 


00 


6 


25 


7 


25 


8 


10 


2 


70 


i) 


00 


18 


84 



^2,811 30 
329 52 



$3,140 82 



CITY TEAMS. 

By Balance from Old Account 
Appropriation 
Highway District No. 2, for 

work 
New Highways 
Paving streets 
Watering streets • . 
Commons 
Sewers and Drains 
Lincoln-street school-house, for 

work 
City Treasurer, 
Fire Department (transferred) 



1931 50 
500 00 

1,113 50 

411 25 

108 75 

418 50 

49 50 

12 00 

33 50 
50 

1,000 00 



$4,579 00 



47 



EXPENDITURES. 



To James Dclaney, for horse . 1500 00 
Daniels & Co., for pails, brush, 

combs, nails, chains, <fec. 
H. T. Richards, for hay . 
A. Whitney, 
J. P. Bailey, 
J. G. Carr, 
G. W. Dearborn " 
Earl Dickey, hay and straw 
R. T. Dustin, for hay 
Jacob Bennett, " 

D. W. Atwood, " 
Clark Wilson, 
J. H. Maynard, " 
Francis Morton, '' 

E. V. Johnson & Co., for hay 
R. Anderson, " 
C. P. Bryant, " 
C. C. Crane, 

James A. Weston, " 

J. W. Longa, " 

McNiel Clough, " 

John P. Moore, " 

Daniel Boyce, " 

J. Q. Perry, 

Adam Dickey, for straw . 
C. H. Watts, 
H. M. Chadwick, oats . 
Hall, Watts & Co., for grain and 

meal .... 882 30 

H. ct H. R, Pettee, for grain 

and meal .... 3 85 

H. & H. R. Pettee, for cement 3 80 

Kidder &: Chandler, for salt . 2 64 



13 


83 


38 


85 


25 


98 


40 


84 


39 


50 


217 


45 


60 


99 


21 


00 


18 


15 


15 


14 


55 


45 


73 


18 


38 


09 


15 


09 


74 


72 


25 


13 


15 


99 


16 


42 


13 


83 


32 


24 


136 


81 


9 


63 


17 


44 


8 


10 


7 


36 


18 


75 



48 



To Cyrus Dunn, for lard 

Edwin Branch, for blanket 
Edwin Branch, for harness and 

repairs 
F. E. Morey, repairing cart 
Abbott & Reynolds, repairing 

cart and sleds . 
J. L. Kennedy, painting cart 
D. Hopkins, repairing cart 
Benj. Currier, for cart wheels 
BenJ. Currier, repairing cart 
Ceo. W. Buss, cart boxes 
Charles E. Moulton, repairing 
cart . . . . . 
(4age & Abbott, repairing cart, 
Ceorge W. Merriani, shoeing 
horses . . . . 
Charles Bunton, repairing carts, 
John F. Woodbury, & Co., shoe- 
ing 

R. W. Flanders & Co., for shoe- 
ing and repairing cart 
Fellows & Co., shoeing . 
Z. Foster Cam[»bcll,'anedicines, 
.S. S, Carr, medicines 
RobertWood, examining horses, 
F. C. Young, clipping horse , 
Ilartshorn & Fikc, for stove and 
pipe, Manchester st. stable, 
Manchester Gas Light Co., for 
gas for Manchester St. stable, 
John B. Yarick, for combs, 

In'ushes, etc., 
B. Frank Fogg, for repairing 
pipe 



%Q 76 
f) 00 

60 29 
2 75 



4 


50 


8 


45 


4 


50 


25 


00 


16 


05 


8 


25 


6 


88 


6 


80 


6 


27 


7 


Cjo 



96 o3 



104 


45 


5 


00 


27 


82 




90 


15 


00 


4 


50 


19 


75 


14 


16 


o 
'J 


42 


6 


23 



49 



To H. M. Bailey, lor brooms, brush 
es, &G. . . . . 
D. S. Ames, repairing harness 
Gco.H. Dudley, making trough 
Frederick Kimball, use of cart 
J. B. Saunders, repairing har 

ness .... 
Prank H. Currier, teamster 
B. E. Crawford, 
Albert F. Quimby, " 
Georse W. Butterfield," 



Balance to New Account 





02 


15 


92 


3 


75 


23 


00 


8 


75 


6 


00 


8 


00 


413 


00 


420 


00 



$3,821 20 
757 80 



$4,579 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 

By Balance from Old Account $8 76 

Appropriation .... 250 00 



1258 76 



P^XPENDITURER. 



To R. W. Dustin, Sup't, 1869 
P. Kimball, for labor 
G. W. Dustin " 
Samuel Hall, Sup't, 1870 

Balance to New Account 



$23 87 

14 50 

2 00 

32 50 

$72 87 
185 89 



1258 76 



60 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 

By Balance from Old Account . 836 21 

Appropriation . . . 5,600 00 

" Schools," for hauling wood . 21 80 

Clough & Foster, hauling wood, 242 00 

I. W. Smith, for work . . 3 50 

Reserved Fund (transferred),. 1,500 00 

87,403 51 



Overdrawn .... 


211 60 


EXPENDITURES. 




ro James Patten, Superintendent, 


8474 00 


Josiah Harvey, teamster . 


238 00 


Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster . 


65 00 


Albert F. Quimby, " 


72 50 


James Kearns, " 


475 75 


.Lewis Lafiot, " 


63 00 


Frank H. Currier, " 


"135 00 


William H. Straw, self and 




team .... 


9 00 


Warren Harvey, self and team. 


158 25 


Charles Colby, self and team . 


20 00 


City double team. No. 1, 


153 00 


a ii ii Q 
-'I 


164 25 


ii ii a Q 


213 75 


City single team, No. 1, 


329 50 


a ii a o 


241 00 


G. Flanders, use of cart 


7 00 


John Mahanna, for labor 


38 24 


N. Sleeper, " . 


1 50 


S. Sleeper, " . 


2 25 



87,615 1^ 



To James A. Stearns, 


labor 


$1 50 


Peter 0. Woodman. 


li 


1 00 


James Buckley, 


a 


14 25 


John Larkin, 


a 


174 50 


Edward Bresnalian, 


a 


147 24 


Patrick Finn, 


a 


201 24 


Michael Shea, 


a 


37 50 


Michael Lahey, 


a 


21 75 


Patrick McCabe, 


(( 


. 74 25 


William Griffin, 


;; 


79 12 


Patrick Mannahan, 


a 


85 12 


John Welch, 


a 


88 09 


John Fenof, 


a 


13 12 


Sylvester Donohoe, 


a 


217 87 


Thomas Carrigan, 


a 


89 49 


Michael Scanlan, 


a 


238 12 


Laurence McCarty, 


u 


119 62 


Thomas Moran, 


a 


88 37 


Patrick Cullen, 


a 


58 12 


Michael Hanly, 


u 


202 49 


James Victory, 


a 


129 30 


John Collins, 


a 


21 00 


Jerry Ragin, 


a 


34 87 


Peter Haggerty, 


a 


39 75 


Michael Ragin, 


a 


28 12 


Morris Horan, 


a 


4 50 


Terry Donnell, 


a 


40 12 


James Mahen, 


a 


3 75 


James Fitts, 


a 


55 50 


John Nolan, 


a 


27 00 


Daniel Mahanna, 


a 


9 75 


Thomas Fox, 


a 


93 37 


Patrick Broderick, 


a 


45 37 


Francis Cahill, 


a 


42 37 



52 



To John Myers, for labor 
Michael McGinnoii, "■ 
Matthew Owen, " 

William Maxwell, " 
Richard Horan, " 

John Daley, " 

Charles Donnelly, " 
J. 0. Hunt, 

Garret Murray, " 

Patrick Fox, " 

Michael Mullen, " 

Michael Stewart, " 

Peter Scanlan, " 

John F. Woodbury & Co., rep 

tools. 
Ceo. W. Merriani, making rods 

for crossings, 
R. W. Flanders & Co., repair 

ing tools 
Daniels & Co., for tools, nails 

<fcc. .... 
John B. Yarrick, for tools 
H. & H. R. Pettee, for cement, 
V. C. Hastings, for cement pipe, 
Hacket & Taylor, for concrete 
crossings . . . . 
E. L. Brown, for concrete cross- 
ings . . . . 
John C. Hoyt, for concrete cross- 
ings . . . . . 
O. Gay, for flagging 
Fellows <fc Co., for rep. tools 
Clark & Bodwell, for stone 
D. Flanders, for repairing tree 
Ijoxes . . . . 



$22 75 
6 75 
12 75 
27 75 
17 50 
62 62 
15 00 

42 00 
8 25 
8 25 

52 49 

8 25 

10 50 

43 10 



5 


60 


51 


00 


100 


68 


58 


06 


2 


75 


104 


53 


167 


62 


186 


75 


48 


50 


92 


80 


18 


50 


55 


00 



33 OQ 



53 



To D. Flanders, for repairing street 

crossings 
John L. Bradford, for repairing 

sidewalk .... 
Kidder & Chandler, for oil and 

lanterns .... 
W. W. Patterson, setting grades 

for sidewalk 
Geo. H. Allen, setting grades 

for sidewalk 
Pike & Heald, for pipe and sol- 
dering .... 
David Wells, for plank 
Charles E. Moulton, repairing 

canal bridge 
Charles E. Moulton, repairing 

crossings 
A. H. Lowell & Co., for cesspool 

covers .... 

Lamson & Harden, for stone 

chips .... 

Clough & Foster, for plank, 
Haines & Wallace, " 
J. Proctor Young, building wall 

on Hanover street 
Amos Spoiford, for stone 
H. K. Tilton 



$13 


50 


117 


58 





83 


14 


00 


8 


00 


12 


63 


37 


50 


1) 


75 


48 


07 


11 


10 


2 


00 


25 


00 


10 


82 


594 


95 


15 


00 


27 


50 



17,615 17 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 



By balance from Old Account . $00 38 

Appropriation . . . 450 00 

Reserved Fund (transferred"), 50 00 

1500 38 



54 

EXPENDITURES. 

To James F. Smith, Superintendent, 

1869 .... 148 12 
Edwin Kennedy, Superintendent, 

1870 . . . . 273 36 
B. F. Mitchell, for labor . 112 10 
Enos C. Howlett, " . . 23 25 
D. W. Reynolds " . . 1 50 
Granville Haselton " . . 7 50 
D. F. Miller " . . 1 50 
Clinton Dickey " . . 75 
Heirs of B. Mitchell, for gi-avel, 4 02 
J. k E. S. Harvey, " . 1 20 
Flanders & Locke, blacksmith 

work 90 



Balance to New Account 


$474 20 
26 18 


$500 38 




^ NO. 4. 


HIGHWAY DISTRICa 




By Balance from Old Account 


$194 57 




Appropriation 


100 00 


$294 57 


EXPENDITURES. 




To Ira W. Moore, Superintendent, 
1869 .... 


$20 75 




Rodney N. Whittemore, Super- 






intendent, 1870 


68 89 




Wm. S. Locke, building piers to 
bridge .... 


55 00 




Hoyt & Thompson, for lumber, 


18 36 





55 



To John P. Moore, for 


spikes 


$1 00 


John P. Moore, for labor 


7 25 


James Cheney, 


a 


17 50 


John Emerson, 


u 


8 25 


John Emerson, jr., 


u 


7 50 


R. P. Whitteraore 


u 


13 87 


Charles C. Moore, 


u 


3 00 


Charles Moore, 


li 


1 75 


James Corning, 


a 


1 75 


Isaac Whittemore, 


tt 


3 75 



Balance to New Account 



$228 62 
65 95 



$294 57 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 


By Balance from Old Account 


$64 80 


Appropriation .... 


$350 00 


EXPENDITURES. 


To Wm.W. Dickey, Superintendent 


, $82 00 


Sewell Boyce, for labor 


4 50 


Rodnia Nutt, " 




7 12 


E. S. Harvey, " 




25 37 


John Dickey, " 




35 50 


Simon B. Hill, 




13 25 


Samuel Knowles, " 




6 00 


Cleaves M. Harvey " 




17 12 


Oilman Harvey, " 




17 50 


James Emerson, " 




23 75 


William Crosby, " 




2 25 


Jonas Harvey, " 




29 25 


Israel M. Young, " 




1 50 



$414 80 



56 



To William Boyce, labor 
A. H. Hartshorn, " 
Edward Young, " 
James M. Young, gravel . 
TVm. P. Richardson, lumber 
Haines & Wallace, " 
Jonas & E. S. Harvey, " 

Balance to New Account . 



^1 


50 


14 


25 


o 
O 


00 


2 


25 


7 


92 


44 


84 


49 


96 


$388 


83 


26 


03 



$414 86 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 



By Balance from Old 


Account 


83 22 


Appropriation . 


EXPENDITURE 


8300 00 




5. 


To I. T. Webster, Superintendent . 


888 48 


James M. Dickey, 


for labor 


2 25 


Orrin R. Dickey, 




75 


Amos C. Webster, 




15 62 


Geo. Whittemore, 




1 30 


John Johnson, 




6 62 


David Perkins, 




75 


William Craig, 




5 75 


Henry C. Dickey, 




75 


James Wiley, 




3 75 


Amos Webster, 




1 25 


Ezekiel Foss, 




3 75 


James M. Webste 


', " 


33 79 


Samuel Bryant, 




14 25 


Frank E. Foss, 




17 25 



8303 22 



hi 

To J. D. Hall, for labor 
Gilman Cloiigh, " 
Clougli & Poster, for luml)er 

Balance to New xVccount 



89 75 

4 25 

49 42 



1259 93 
43 29 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 



$303 22 



By Balance from Old Account 


$26 58 


Appropriation 


500 00 


p:xpenditures. 


To Peter 0. Woodman, Supt. 


$65 50 


Horace Young, for labor 


27 12 


Robert Stevens, " 


2 00 


Isaac Hnse, " 


14 25 


James Howe, " 


67 46 


John B. Huse, " 


5 62 


Edward F. Jenkins, " 


5 49 


Mr. Lamb, " 


1 49 


Bernard McGinness, " 


30 62 


William B. Doty, " 


75 


Lawrence W. Morse, " 


65 05 


Joseph B. Pierce, " 


75 


Jewett B. Eastman, " 


■ 4 48 


City Farm, " 


6 50 


James Hall, " 


4 50 


Wm. Kendall, " 


1 12 


Nathan Sleeper, " 


37 


Daniel W. Reynolds, " 


37 


James M. Sawyer, " 


9 37 



$526 58 



58 



To John W. Brown, for labor 

John Hosley, " 
R. Y. Pillsfmry, 

Isaac Wheeler, " 

Levi Ladderbush, " 

Joseph Flowrey, " 

Lewis Rourke, " 

Lewis "Wheeler, " 

Michael Front, " 

Jeremiah L. Foffa:, " 

David B. Woodman, " 

Robert Barrett, " 

James P. Eaton, " 

John Grant, " 

Charles M. Piper, " 

James A. Stearns, " 

Thomas Teuhey. " 

James Chew, " 
Bodwell & Clark, for stone 

Geo. W. Merriam, for black 
smithins 



Balance to New Account 



-J-O 


ox 
15 


4 


50 


5 


25 


(3 


37 


6 


37 


8 


00 


5 


25 


12 


50 


23 


50 


10 


50 


10 


94 


o 
O 


00 


24: 


44 


24 


18 


1 


50 


17 


06 


10 


31 


12 


00 


1 


65 


$504 


20 


22 


38 



$526 58 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 



By Balance from Old Account 
Appropriation 
Reserved Fund (transferred), 



$51 


11 


450 


00 


50 


00 



— $551 11 



o9 





EXPENDITURES. 


To Jeremiah Garvin, S 


upt. 1869, 


132 00 


Luther S. Proctor, 


" 1870, 


102 10 


John P. Young, for labor 


39 75 


Joseph B. Young, 


a 


12 50 


WiUiara W. Whittemore, foi 




labor 




75 


George Young, for 


labor 


3 00 


John H. Proctor, 


a 


62 50 


Robert Stevens, 


;( 


45 25 


James P. Eaton, 


(( 


3 25 


Gilman Reed, 


a 


43 75 


Augustus Proctor, 


a 


34 25 


James Hall, 


a 


1 50 


Ephraim S. Young, 


a 


22 25 


William Mills, 


(.i 


7 50 


Lyman A. Proctor, 


a 


87 


Caleb Brown, 


a 


6 00 


Mr. Conway, 


ii. 


7 50 


Peter Parmer, 


a 


39 50 


Charles Offutt, 


u 


4 50 


Noah B. Reed, 


u 


6 75 


Phinehas Haselton, 


ii. 


1 50 


Walter Wright, 


a 


50 


Amos Spofford, 


a 


13 50 


Benjamin F. Page, 


u 


11 25 


James T. Haselton, 


a 


1 50 


John P. Young, Jr 


a 


3 00 


Joseph Campbell, 


a 


3 00 


Francis Arwell, 


i'. 


3 00 


Lewis Daniel, 


li 


3 00 


Clougli & Foster, k 


)v lumber. 


4 25 




$519 97 


Balance to New Account 


31 14 



-1551 11 



60 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 



By Balance from Old Account 
Appropriation 
Reserved Fund (transferred) 



EXPENDITURES. 

To William Boyce, Supt. 1869 
Albert N. Scott, Supt. 1870 
George W. George, for labor 
James Currier, " 

Charles T. Boyce, '• 

Nathaniel Corn in o- " 

John Hatch, " 

Samuel M. Worthley, " 
William Griffin, " 

Isaac H. Webster, " 

John G. Webster, " 

Elijah Goodale, " 

John Silver, " 

Stephen Haselton, " 

Benjamin W. Corning, " 

Israel Willey, " 
J. W. Currier, 

Frank Emery, " 

A. W. Corning, " 

E. W. Corning, " 

Benjamin M. Corning, " 

Albert G. Corning, " 

E. V. Corning, " 

Sidney Dunbar, " 

Dana Smith, " 

L. A. Dickev, " 



$93 34 

250 00 

50 00 



$44 00 

109 88 

18 25 

1 50 

3 00 

05 



50 
25 

O C,rj 

O O ( 

8 00 

9 75 
75 

3 00 
48 63 

4 50 
/o 
8 25 

5 25 
24 75 

75 
8 25 
4 50 
3 00 
7 50 
3 00 



$393 34 



Gl 



To Andrew Young, for gravel 
Cfough & Foster, for lumber 



Balance to New Account, 



80 


40 


12 


26 


$370 


34 


23 


00 



$393 34 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 



By Balance from 01( 


i Account 




. $132 80 


Appropriation 




800 00 


Stone and loam 


sold 


6 00 




EXPENDITURES. 


To John C. Head, 


Superintenden 


t 


1869 


. 


. $142 05 


Samuel Brown, Jr., Superintend 




ent, 1870 


. 


248 88 


S. S. Gale, for 


labor 




6 00 


A. Blake, 


a 




15 50 


Louis Bessell, 


'' 




1 12 


Julius Jointre, 


it 




26 62 


Peter Bedford, 


ii 




34 50 


Moses Bedford, 


a 




19 88 


Joseph Schofield 


a 




6 00 


Joseph Gagin, 


a. 




45 37 


Fradd <fe Co., 


i-i 




6 15 


Barr and Clapp, 


11 




5 16 


Nelson Pcraud, 


41 




14 25 


William Currier, 


u 




3 75 


James Dowd, 


'' 




30 00 


James Gibbins, 


a 




3 00 


John Herbroke, 


i; 




22 87 



$938 80 



62 



To Patrick Finn, for laljor 
Peter Scanlan, " 

William Maxwell, '• 
Clarke & Bodwell, for stone, 
M. D. Stokes, for paving blocks 
Wm. P. Riddle, for clay . 
John B. Varick, for spikes 
E. Mansur, for blacksmithing 
Haines & Wallace, for plank 
David H. Young, cement pipe . 
N. B. Tilton, mason work 

Balance to New Account . 



$7 88 



7 


88 


7 


88 


35 


00 


147 


33 




50 


5 


43 


10 


38 


26 


26 


21 


41 


4 


00 



^905 05 
33 75 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 



By Balance from Old Account 

Appropriation .... 
Reserved Fund (transferred) . 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Joseph Melvin, Sup't. 1869 
J. E. Stearns, Sup't. 1870 
Oilman R. Stevens, for labor 
William H. Newhall, " 
John Harwood, " 

John Horigan, " 

Franklin Fuller, '• 

James Linnen, " 

Elijah Stearns, " 

Francis Cahill, " 

Peter Monehan, " 

Thomas Moran, " 



141 68 

800 00 

2,350 00 



170 00 

110 69 

82 30 

1 50 

2 25 
25 50 
20 62 

32 48 
86 98 

7 87 

7 87 
7 87 



•$938 80 



1,191 68 



63 



To James Buckley, for labor 


$1 87 




Edward Stanton, '• 


84 00 




James Webber, " 


200 25 




Robert Lund, " 


39 75 




Thomas C. Stearns, " 


246 75 




H. H. Fuller, " 


85 50 




Alfred Soule, " 


18 75 




J. S. Monroe, " 


9 00 




Peter Benner, " 


21 00 




I. C. Flanders, laying wall a1 






Eddy 


61 88 




Asa Place, laying wall at Eddy 


208 46 




DeLafayette Robinson, layinf. 






wall at Eddy 


2 00 




Alfred Sayles, . 


50 37 




James Slater, . 


73 74 




John Harrington, 


6 00 




W. T. Sayles, . 


70 24 




Ezra Stearns, . 


37 00 




C. Bean 


75 




Hiram Stearns, 


3 75 




William Stearns, 


3 75 




Charles Fantom, 


2 25 




Oliver Gay, for use of derricl 






76 days 


152 00 




Clarke & Bodwell, for stone 


. 1,228 11 




Daniels & Co., chain for derricl 


: 4 48 




H. & H. R. Pettee, for cement 


8 50 




David Wells, for plank 


52 95 




J. F. Woodbury & Co., for iroi 


1 




work .... 


16 17 






13,151 20 




Balance to New Account . 


40 48 


^3.191 6S 



64 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 



By Balance from Old Account 


168 13 




Appropriation . 


250 


00 


$318 13 
1 60 


Overdrawn 






■ 


$319 63 


EXPENDITURES. 






To City Farm, for labor 


. $205 


13 




Jeremiah L. Fogg, , 


56 


00 




Noyes Farmer, 




3 


00 




Robert Stevens, 




28 


00 




Patrick Broderick, 




5 


25 




James Fitts, 






75 




Edward Bonner, 




5 


25 




Thomas Edwards, 




5 


25 




John Murray, . 




3 


00 




Michael Hanley, 




3 


00 





John P. Young, 



5 00 



$319 63 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 



By Balance from Old Account . $81 74 
Appropriation .... 200 00 
Reeerved Fund (transferred) . 25 00 



$306 74 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Lorenzo D. Scagel, Superinten- 
dent . . . . 
A. R. Phippen, for labor . 



$68 50 
7 50 



c 

To Peter Beniau, for labor 

Charles Williams, " 

William Campbell, •' 

Luther Campbell, •' 

Charles Campbell, " 

0. M. Wincgar, " 

Jonathan Kimball, " 
George W. Cate, 
Charles Colby, 

Joseph Caldwell, '■' 

Thomas Mackin, " 

George Bridney, " 

John Gamldc, " 

Nehemiah Preston, '' 

Leander Baker, '' 

Zuel Bernan, " 
Mrs. Yeatou; for gravel 

Balance to New Account 



•s3 


00 


10 


50 


G9 


75 


33 


75 


1 


50 


12 


36 


10 


25 


14 


50 


19 


75 


11 


25 


9 


75 


9 


75 


3 


75 


2 


50 


o 


00 


o 
O 


00 


4 


40 


$304 76 


1 


98 



8306 74 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 

By Appropriation . • 86,000 00 

Reserved Fund (transferred), 1,500 00 

8(,o00 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Balance from Old Account . $173 87 
Wm. H. Ayer, for land damage 

(Ashland street) . • 58 50 

Edward R. Young, land damage 

(Kennard road) . • 50 00 

5 



66 



To Benjamin SpofTortl,land damage 






(Lincoln street) 


$10 


00 


Enos D, Barney, land damage 






(Maple street) 


204 


00 


Ephraim Heald, land damage 






(High street) 


393 


50 


Abner G, Gutterson, land dam- 






age (High street) 


415 


20 


David Reed, land damage 






(High street) 


71 


30 


George H. Dorr, land damage 






(High street) 


191 


20 


Lane & Dorr, land damage (Ma- 






ple street) 


827 


75 


H. K. Slay ton, land damage 






(Maple street) . 


413 


87 


Henry G. Farrington, land dam- 






age (Clark street) 


200 


00 


David B. Adams, land damage 






(Ashland street) 


77 


28 


John Prince, land damage 






(Hanover street) 


er^ 


00 


D. A. Wilson, for brick work . 


6 


00 


X. P. Hunt, notifying landhold- 






ers . 


54 


16 


Fogg & James, for team 


2 


00 


James Patten, Superintendent, 


183 


00 


George W. Buttcrfield, teamster. 


81 


00 


Albert F. Quimby, " 


84 


00 


Josiah Harvey, " 


86 


50 


James Kearns, " 


29 


75 


Frank Currier, " 


9 


00 


City Double Team No. 1 


121 


50 


^' ^^ " No. 2 


126 


00 


^' " " No. 3 


120 


75 



67 



To City Single Team No. 1 
" No. 2 
David Adams, for self and team 
Patrick Broderick, for labor 

City Farm, " 

Morris Horan, " 

John Larkin, " 

0. H. Swift, " 

S. Donohoe, " 

J. Mali on ey. " 

Patrick McCabe, " 

M. Cronan, " 

Patrick Finn, " 

Jerry Ragin, " 

Timothy Quinn, " 

John Moran, " 

Thomas Moran, " 

William Connelly, " 

William Griffin, " 

William Straw, " 

Patrick Mannahan, " 

Edward Bresnahan, " 

Thomas Carrigan, " 

Michael Hanly, " 

James Victory, " 

Lawrence McCarty, " 

Thomas Fox, " 

Patrick Ciillen, " 

Michael Scanlan, " 

John Collins, " 

John Murray, " 

Peter Haggerty, " 

Michael Ragin, " 

Terry Donnell, " 

James Fitts, " 



131 00 

12 00 
140 00 

9 00 
93 00 

00 
139 87 

17 25 
46 87 

36 00 

13 12 
6 00 

14 50 
110 99 

5 62 
26 25 

118 12 

6 00 
26 25 

1 50 
120 11 
125 99 

86 25 

37 00 
22 87 
98 23 
46 50 

6 37 
41 25 

6 37 
10 50 
30 37 

3 00 

3 00 
61 13 



68 



To James Mahen, for 


labor 


a-1 50 


Columbus Wyman, 


a 


17 00 


Leaiider Miller, 


i.i 


3 00 


Peter Connor, 


a 


G 00 


Samuel Brown, jr.. 


a 


293 87 


Peter Bedford, 


• 


47 37 


James Dowd, 


;( 


3 75 


Julius Jointre, 


a 


27 00 


Moses Bedford, 


ti 


42 87 


Edward Wyman, 


a 


12 50 


Joseph Schofield, 


a 


40 62 


James Dearborn, 


a 


1 00 


Joseph Gaggin, 


a 


55 62 


John Hosley, 


a 


5 50 


John Holbrook, 


a 


11 00 


Peter 0. Woodman 


• 


4 75 


Nathan Sleeper, 


a 


3 00 


John Daley, 


a 


53 00 


Joseph Taylor, 


a 


8 25 


Garrett Murray, 


a 


39 38 


Francis Cahill, 


a 


25 12 


Michael Mullen, 


ii 


44 63 


John Fenof, 


a 


9 75 


Eli Perry, 


a 


10 50 


City Farm, 


a 


15 25 


Patrick Donough, 


a 


31 40 


Michael Stewart, 


a 


9 00 


James A. Stearns, 


a 


4 00 


John Scully, 


ii 


3 75 


Peter Connor, 


a 


10 88 


Robert McMann, 


a 


16 88 


John Nolan, 


a 


57 00 


Dennis Keefe, 


li 


27 38 


Peubcn Morgan, 


bC 


6 00 


William Griffin, 


a 


6 00 



GO 

To Charles Colby, for labor • *42 50 

Tatrick J^Icaglier, " • -J ^'^ 

Vs\ ^Y. Patterson, engineering, IT 00 

J. Edwin Stearns, " • ^"^ 00 

Geo. H. Allen, " • 103 00 

C. T. Brown, " • 10 00 
John F. Woodbury, sharpening 

tools . . • • 40 50 

Oliver Gay, for stone • • 1T2 00 

Z. B. Wright, blasting . • 64 50 

A. A. Bunton& Co.,forlnmber, 3 75 
Joseph B. Sawyer, making pro- 
files • • • • 
George W. Merriam, for iron 
work . • • • 

Lamson & Harden, stone post, 1 00 

.ii57,137 68 

Balance to New Account . 362 32 



•29 20 
40 45 



*7,500 00 



PAA^ING STREETS. 

By Balance from Old Account . $500 20 

" Appropriation . • • 3,000 00 

Overdraft refunded . • 10 00 

Reserved Fund (transferred) . 3,000 00 

Amoskeag Mfg. Co., on account 

of paving Canal street . 2,693 3t) 

Concord Railroad, on acct. of 

paving Canal street . 4,793 60 

Overdrawn . . . • 



113,997 15 
297 02 

$14,294 17 



70 

EXPENDITURES. 



To James Patten, Superintendent, 
Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster, 
Albert F. Quimby, " 

James Kearns " 

City Double Team No. 1 
" " No. 2 

" " " No. 3 

City Single Team No. 1 
Josiah Harvey, teamster 
J. Edwin Stearns, engineer 
George H. Allen, " . 
Daniel W. Garland, for paving- 
blocks . . . . 
Albert H. Huntress, for cobble 
stone . . . . . 
A. Garadard, for cobble stone . 
William W. Hubbard, for mauls, 
R. W. Flanders & Co., sharpen- 
ing tools 
Warren Harvey, self and team 
Patrick Finn, for paving 
Erastus Cutting, " 
Israel Shepherd, " 
John Collins, for labor 
Jerry Ragan, " 
Patrick McCabe, " 
Thomas Mo ran, " 
John Larkin, " 
Michael Scanlan, " 
John Crane, " 
C. H. Marden, 
Dana Rowe, " 
George G. Blake, " 



$63 00 
20 00 
20 50 
10 50 
30 00 
30 75 
18 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
6 00 

1,129 64 



11 


00 


12 


50 


5 


50 


14 


70 


125 


00 


46 


50 


42 


50 


21 


93 


9 


00 


9 


00 


24 


00 


26 


25 


27 


00 


9 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


7 


50 


30 


93 



71 



To George Noyes, for labor . 


811 


00 


William Maxwell, 


a 


38 


25 


Richard Horau, 


c; 


27 


00 


John Myers, 


a 


25 


00 


Jeremiah Coffee, 


a 


24 


00 


James Buckley, 


a 


17 


25 


Patrick Mannahan, 


u 


17 


25 


Terry Donnell, 


a 


24 


00 


Patrick Broderick, 


a 


16 


50 


Edward Bresnahan, 


a 


21 


00 


James Fitts, 


a 


24 


00 


Francis Cahill, 


ii, 


17 


25 


Michael McGinness, 


a 


18 


00 


Daniel Andrews, 


u 


15 


75 


John Nolan, 


4C 


1 


50 


George Carlton, 


a 


6 


18 


Matthew Owens, 


(( 


4 


50 


James Victory, 


a 


9 


00 

*2,017 13 



PAVING CANAL STREET NORTH OF CxRANITE STREET. 



To Police Station, for brick . 
W. W. Patterson, engineer 
Charles T. Brown, " 
George H. Allen, " 
John O'Brien, for cobble stone 
A. Garadard, " " 

H. J. Plummer, " " 

Luther S. Proctor, " " 
D, C. Hutchinson, for edge stone 
Oliver Gay, " " 

Oliver Gay, for flagging stone 
Gilman H. Kimball, for paving- 
blocks . . . . 



$32 


40 


16 


00 


26 


74 


108 


00 


52 


00 


6 


25 


108 


00 


128 


00 


228 


97 


31 


31 


162 


00 



1,302 68 



i'J. 



Daniel W. Garland, for paving- 
blocks .... $1,457 31 
Bodwell tt Clark, for cesspool 

covers . . . . 18 00 
Temple McQueston, for cement 

pipe 82 40 

V. C. Hastings, for cement pipe, 126 52 

H. & H. R. Pettee, for cement . 5 40 

Haines & Wallace, for stakes . 15 54 

Thomas R. Hubbard, " . 3 75 

John B. Yarick, for tools . 48 33 

Daniels & Co., for tools . . 2 40 
E. W. Flanders, for sharpening 

tools . . . . . 59 85 

City Double Team No. 1 . . 48 50 

" No. 2 . . 48 50 

William Preston, self and team, 42 50 

Warren Harvey, " " 296 25 

Charles Colby,' " " 42 00 

James Emerson, " " 262 50 

John Campbell, " " 238 00 

Samuel Brown, jr.," " 212 50 

David Adams, •• " 5o 00 

George W. Buttertield, teamster, 24 00 

Albert F. Quimby, " . 24 00 

James Patten, Supt. . . 108 00 

Israel Shepherd, for labor . 80 99 

Peter Scanlan, " . . 50 62 

Eli Perry, " . . 52 50 

Patrick Finn, " . . 123 00 

Edward Bresnahan. " . . 36 00 

Jerry Ragin, " . . 35 25 

James Victory, " . . 79 90 

Thomas Carrigan, " . . 36 00 

Richard Horan, " . . 96 75 



7B 



To Patrick Mannaliaii, labor 

John Myers, " 

William Maxwell, " 

Thomas Mannahan, '' 

MurtyMahoney " 

Almone Come, '* 

Francis C ah ill, " 

Jacob Minor, " 

Thomas Moran, " 

John Fagra, " 
John Willis, 

Cornelius Calaghan, " 

Thomas Gorman, " 

William Quigley, " 

Patrick McCabc, " 

John Larkin, " 

Thomas Train, " 

James Mahen, " 

Daniel Brosnahen, " 

William Frain, " 
John Fcnof, 

John Moran, " 

Terry Donnell, " 

Thomas Ptagin, " 

Frank liiggins, " 

William Greene, " 

John Cunningham, " 

George Carlton, " 

John Dolan, " 

Patrick Shannon, " 
Edward McLaughlin, " 

Terence McClusky, " 

John Kennedy, " 

John Haselton, " 

Michael Bolton, " 



$36 


00 


24 


00 


76 


87 


61 


50 


84 


00 


75 


75 


40 


50 


77 


00 


33 


00 



33 00 



26 



in 
25 



75 



6 75 
69 
54 
36 00 
25 50 

I 50 
63 00 
55 50 
48 00 

9 00 
76 50 
39 75 

6 00 
11 25 

6 00 
83 25 

3 75 

3 75 
86 25 
75 75 
55 50 

II 25 
22 12 



74 



ro Coni'l's Fitzpatrick, 


lal)0] 


•S47 25 


Thomas Cannon, . 




29 25 


David Guinney, 




32 25 


Michael Ferry, 




35 25 


Nathan Lovewell, 




39 75 


John Burke, 




9 00 


George Hosmer, 




3 75 


William Page, 




7 50 


Orlando Page, 




27 75 


John Hascey, 




31 50 


John Hoyt, 




9 75 


David Devine, 




28 87 


Joseph Gardner, 




21 37 


Thomas Edwards, 




16 50 


Charles Bruner, 




15 75 


John Kelley, 




7 50 


Francis Casey, 




6 75 


William Guraisay, 




7 50 


Alex. Gautier, 




7 50 


Frank River, 




7 50 


Patrick Murray, 




4 50 


John C. Hoyt, 




21 00 


Robert Barrett, 




1 50 


Richard Walsh, 




3 00 


A. H. Lowell, cesspool cov 


ers . 5 60 


Concord Railroad, 


freigl 


it on 


cobble stone 




115 00 



5,080 04 



PAVING CANAL STREET, SOUTH OF GRANITE STREET. 

To Police Station, for brick . . §9 00 
Daniel W. Garland, for paving- 
blocks . . . . 1,098 02 
M. S. Gay, for paving-blocks . 101 31 



75 



To Oliver Gay, for flagging stone . 

Oilman H. Kimball, for flagging 
stone . . . . . 

L. S. Proctor, for col)l)le stone, 

Concord Railroad, freight on 
stone . . . . . 

Elmon L. Brown, for concrete . 

J. L. Smith, for stakes 

H, & H. R. Pettee,for cement . 

Charles T. Brown, engineer 

George H. Allen, " 

R. W, Flanders & Co., for sharp- 
ening tools . . . . 

Warren Harvey, for teams 

James Emerson, for self and 
team . . . . . 

John Campbell,for self and team, 

Samnel Brown, jr., " " 

William Preston, " " 

D. C, Hutchinson, for curb stone, 

A. H. Lowell, for cesspool cover, 

Patrick Finn, for labor 

Richard Horan, " 

Peter Scanlan, " 

Ed'd McLaughlin, " 

William Maxwell, " 

George Carlton, '' 

Murty Mahoney, " 

Thomas Edwards, " 

John Hascey, " 

Terry Donnell, " 

William Page, " 

Michael Farry, " 

Frank River, " 

Charles Brunell, " 



8172 GO 



100 


80 


102 


00 


90 


00 


37 


46 




60 


2 


70 


24 


00 


57 


00 


35 


05 


222 


50 


148 


75 


135 


00 


148 


75 


127 


50 


33 


27 


7 


55 


111 


37 


51 


61 


101 


80 


48 


12 


103 


49 


10 


68 


41 


62 


8 


25 


43 


50 


32 


25 


41 


62 


37 


12 


40 


50 


26 


25 



76 



To Almoii Come, for labor 
Joseph Gardner, •' 
xUex. Gautier, " 
Jacob Mooney, '' 
Patrick Murry, " 
Thomas Ruiiy, " 
Eli Perry, " 

Alexander Perry, " 
John Kelly, 
James Victory, " 
John Fenof, 
William Gurasy, " 
Orlando Page, " 

David Devine, " 
John Kennedy, " 
Thomas Ryan, " 
Terence McClusky, for 
Nathan Lovewell, 
Cornelins Fitzpatrick, 
Thomas Cannon, 
Daniel Bresnahan, 
Michael Mulvcy, 
John Froley, 
Jerry Connor, 
John Dolan, 
George Hosmer, 
Patrick Shannon, 
John Moran, 
William Ganticr, 
John Willis, 
George Tnfts, 



lal)oi 



839 


75 


25 


12 


24 


00 


39 


37 


22 


87 


28 


12 


3 


00 


4 


50 


40 


50 


16 


87 


36 


75 


28 


12 


39 


00 


16 


87 


40 


50 


43 


87 


44 


00 


23 


62 


45 


00 


43 


50 


35 


62 


40 


49 


1 


50 


37 


50 


13 


50 


2 


25 


1 


50 


1 


50 


7 


50 


8 


25 


o 


50 




.s4 ^00 50 








$14,296 17 



3G 37 



WATERING STREETS. 

By Balance from Old Account . $15 52 

Appropriation . . . • 1,600 00 

Reserved Fund (transferred) . 700 00 

Old water tanks and rams sold . 108 85 



EXPENDITURES, 

To Palmer & Co., rep. rams . . $5 69 

John L. Kennedy, painting cart, 16 62 

Charles Bunton, repairing cart . 2 50 

J. W.Whittier, for piece of hose, 26 88 

John B. McCrillis, rep. cart . 25 00 
John Nolan, for labor on water 

pipe 

James Patten, Supt., for labor on 

water ])ipc .... 36 00 

William Griffin, for labor on 

water pipe . . • • 18 00 

Patrick Finn, labor on water 

pipe 

Jerry Ragin, for labor on water 

pipe . . . . • 

Timothy Quinn, for labor on 

water pipe . . ■ • 17 Ol 

Michael Haley for labor on water 

pipe ..... 
John Murray, for labor on water 

pipe 

Amasa Goddard, for labor on 

water i)ipe .... lo 7o 

John Fenof, for labor on water 

pipe . . . • . 



$2,42-1 37 



31 00 
3 00 



6 00 
9 75 



15 75 



To John Collins, for labor on water 

pipe 

Almon Come, for labor on water 

pipe ..... 
Michael Lamundy, for labor on 

water pipe .... 
Francis Cahill, for labor on water 

pipe 

Richard Horan, for labor on water 

pipe 

Peter Haggerty, for labor on 

water pipe .... 
John Coffey, labor on water pipe, 
Edward Bonner, labor on water 

pipe ..... 
James Buckley, for labor on 

water pipe .... 
Patrick Cullen, for labor on 

water pipe .... 
Patrick Cronan, for labor on 

water pipe .... 
John Kearns, for labor on water 

pipe 

Patrick Fox, labor on water pipe, 
Michael Ragin, for labor on 

water pipe .... 
Francis Shiatt, for labor on water 

pipe 

William Maxwell, for labor on 

water pipe .... 
David Collins, for labor on water 

pipe 

Michael McGinnis, for labor on 

water pipe .... 2 25 

John Myers, labor on water pipe, 9 00 



81 


50 


15 


75 


14 


25 


7 


50 


16 


12 


16 


12 


6 


00 


7 


50 


6 


00 


6 


00 


11 


25 


14 


25 


12 


75 


4 


50 


6 


00 


3 


00 


5 


25 



79 

To Garret IMurray, laljor on water 

pipe . . . 
Manchester Gas-Liglit Company 

for iron pipe 
H. N. Howe, repairing pipe 
Frank Currier, teamster . 
Warren Harvey, labor 
James Kearns, teamster . 
J. S. Bacheller, pumping water 

at Fair time 
Josiah Harvey, teamster . 
Single Team No. 1 . 
Double Team No. 3 . 
H. & H. R. Pettee, for cement 
Daniels & Co., for nails . 
A. H. Lowell & Co., for castings, 
Manchester Cement Pipe Works, 

Balance to New Account . 



$13 50 



4 


05 


23 


75 


(3 


00 


20 


00 


7 


00 


62 


00 


244 


00 


12 


00 


352 


50 


5 


50 


1 


41 


51 


90 


1,157 


95 



^2,392 78 
31 59 



|i2,424 37 



GRANITE BRIDGE. 



By Balance from Old Account . $218 49 

Appropriation, . , . 300 00 

Reserved Fund (transferred) .' 300 00 



$818 49 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Daniels &: Co., for nails and 

spikes, .... $14 10 

Haines & Wallace, for lumber . 260 34 

Merrill & Aldricli, for repairs . 28 50 

Daniel Flanders, " . 1 50 



80 



To Duttou AVoods, for repairs . 8344 07 
Charles E. Moulton, " . 69 36 



$717 87 
Balance to New Account . 100 62 



$818 49 



AMOSKEAG FALLS BRIDGE. 

By Balance from Old Account . $263 03 

Appropriation . . . 1,000 00 

Old plank sold ... 8 67 

Reserved Fund (transferred) . 500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Dutton Woods, for covering east 
end ..... 
Clough & Foster, for lumber 
Daniels & Co., for nails . 
Charles E. Moulton, for repairs 
Hartshorn it Pike, for can 
George W. Adams, oil, chimneys, 

kc, .... 
T. L. Quimljy, lighting 

Balance to New Account 



•n,771 70 



81,005 


45 






443 


50 

50 








00 






4 


00 






40 


28 






60 


00 






81,616 


73 




154 


97 










81,771 


70 



SFWERS AND DRAINS. 

By Balance from Old Account . 8472 31 

Appropriation . . . • 5,000 00 

Reserved Fund (transferred) . 1,600 00 



81 



By J3rick sold 
Plank sold 
Scwcr licenses 

Overdrawn 



U6 00 




11 47 




752 35 






-17,882 13 






18 65 




$7,900 78 



EXPENDITURES. 

To D. A. W^ilson, for l)uilding cess- 
pools 
William McPherson, buildin 

cesspools and drains . 
Temple McQueston, jtipe and 

laying 
V. C. Hastings, pipe and laying 
Natt & W. F. Head, brick 
T. R. Hubbard, stakes 
Charles Bunton, iron work 
James A, Eastman, extending 

Union street sewer 
Concord & Northern Railroad 

freight on bricks 
Merrill & Aldrich, making con 

ters .... 
George H. Allen, engineer 
Charles T. Brown, " 
iV. H. Lowell, for castings 
Warren Harvey (foreman) 
H. & 11. R. Pettee, cement 
Daniels & Co., nails 
Haines & Wallace, lumber 
Joseph L. Smith, " 
Oliver Gay, cesspool covers 
Police Station, for brick, 

6 



-12(3 00 



572 3G 



1,151 


44 


1,348 


11 


50 


50 


5 


64 




40 


1,440 


m 


7 


70 


10 


12 


08 


00 


o 


00 


268 


65 


137 


50 


56 


70 


1 


01 


27 


20 


6 


00 


42 


00 


217 


99 



82 



To George \V. Tliayer,i 


•ubber boots. 


.!il4 2r, 


James Patten, snpe 


rintendent. 


33 00 


Garrett MurraVj for lal)or 


87 99 


William Griffin, 


a 


125 99 


John Kelley, 


a 


11 25 


Thomas Edwards, 


c; 


21 75 


Patrick McDonougl 


, " . 


55 87 


David Collins, 


a 


9 00 


Patrick Fox, 


li 


74 25 


Timothy Quinn, 


a 


28 12 


Edward Bonner, 


u 


32 62 


Patrick Cronan, 


a 


45 37 


Eli Perry, 


a 


24 37 


John Daley, 


a 


29 25 


Peter Haggerty, 


a 


G2 02 


Thomas Fox, 


'• 


12 00 


John Kearns, 


a 


30 75 


John Fenof, 


a 


01 50 


John Nolan, 


'• 


84 00 


Amasa Goddard, 


a 


18 75 


Frank Shiatt, 


u 


25 12 


Michael Lamundy, 


a 


20 25 


Michael Baldwin, 


li. 


11 25 


John Murphy, 


a 


51 75 


Michael Reardon, 


a 


33 75 


John Manna, 


a 


12 75 


Elias Webber, 


a 


3 75 


John Pike, 


a 


49 50 


Almon Come, 


a 


34 50 


John Mahoney, 


a 


103 50 


Michael Shea, 


u 


42 75 


Thomas Carrigan, 


4( 


94 50 


Jei-ry Rag in. 


a 


7G 50 


Jfugh Murphy, 


ii 


9 00 


Peter Shiley, 


u 


32 25 



'o Zeb. Howard, for 


labor . 


U 50 


Patrick Craiglcy, 


a 


75 


Thomas Moraii, 


'• 


13 37 


Joseph Taylor, 


u 


43 50 


Lewis Raicho, 


a 


35 25 


Napoleon Charraii 


a ■ 


2 25 


William Maxwell, 


a 


7 50 


Michael Mullen, 


^' . 


44 25 


Charles McCarty, 


u 


12 75 


Robert Barrett, 


a 


21 00 


Thomas Bannon, 


a 


18 00 


James Fitts, 


a 


69 75 


Patrick j^Ieagher, 


^c 


15 75 


Thomas Moran, 


a 


12 00 


Charles Brunell, 


u 


35 62 


Morris Horan, 


a 


63 37 


Joseph Gardner, 


u 


17 25 


Peter Scanlan, 


a 


7 50 


Patrick Finn, 


a 


7 50 


Levi Woodman, 


a 


6 00 


Samuel Brown, jr., 


u 


52 00 


Joseph Gaggin, 


u 


32 25 


Peter Bedford, 


a 


28 50 


Julius Jointre, 


IL 


30 37 


James Dowd, 


a 


32 62 


Octavius Deget, 


u 


31 87 


Robert Greenhalgli 


5 


21 74 


James McCabe, 


a 


12 75 


Joseph Berham, 


a 


9 37 


Peter Jointre, 


i^ 


00 


Robert McMann, 


a 


27 00 


Michael Stewart, 


a 


9 00 


Peter Connor, 


a 


12 00 


James Mahen, 


a 


48 00 


Dennis Keefe, 


a 


27 75 



84 

To Ban- & Clapp, for laljor . . $0 55 
David H. Young, laying pipe, 120 80 
J. S. Kidder & Co., cement . 2 70 
Charles E. Moulton, making cen- 
ters .... 1 85 
Josiah Harvey, teamster . 8 00 
City Double Team No. 8 . 12 00 





Balance from 
Appropriation 


Old 




89 
81,500 




^y 


RESERVOIRS 

Account 


16 

00 



expp:nditures. 

To D. A. Wilson, for laying brick . 84 00 

Aljbott & Reynolds, for wrench, o 90 

William H. Kennedy, for care of 

reservoirs ... 37 50 

James Eastman, for cleaning out 

and repairing ... 70 00 

Daniels «fc Co., for nails and 

bolts .... 4 lo 

Charles Bunton, for gate handle 

and repairs . . . 4 00 

Charles E. Moulton, for gate 

covers . . . . ol 40 

Temple McQueston, laying pipe 

from Merrimack Square . 278 40 

H. & H. R. Pettee, for cement, 18 50 

Haines & Wallace, for lumber, 5 20 

John L. Bradford, for carpenter 

work .... 5 G2 



87,900 78 



81,509 10 



85 

To 1). C. Hutchinson, stone work, $8 00 
Charles Canfield, care of reser- 
voirs .... 16 50 
Warren Harvey, for labor . 20 00 



s 




> ? 


^ w ^ 


^ 5= ? ^ 


5^ 1^ t— 1 


2 K, • 2. ,-^ 


o ^ '"' 


s 


o ^ e: 


I- »-- p-> ^ w 


4 |-| 
£ g ^ 


a? 

o 

CO 




?r o • '-so 

" S "^ O 00 


^ S" to 


Oi 




^ O O Ci 


30, tl 
I clos 
child 




P g: 


p ao o' o ?? 


5 M' ^ 


to 


"^ c 


— 00 


DO 


~ o 


d *^ s ^ 


S o g 


O 


o ^ 


^ S g ?;• 


o , 

c ci 5 
1 2 of 


o 
p 

to 

DC 

o 


5 ^ 
■^ o 


5 1 2 g 
c 2 '^ "^ 
ST 5- S' '^ 
cr 2 i^ o 
o - 2- ^ 


o" &j ^' 




^ ::; 


. L_ t-- '"' '^ 


Pj O '-' 




^ o 

c 

O 1—) 

c ^ 

£ t3 


.^ ^ M 2 

■■^ b' s §• 


O — O 




' P 


_. p O f-; 

Q o - p 

B !^ €& J» 


- o c 






^ ^ ^ 




^ 2 


HT^ o' ^ 


5 o ^ 






^ ►pi CO o 


j» 1— tr^ 








t^ ;r o 




p ^ 


Q €P» S ^ 


lows : 
care, 
—etc. 




B « 

^ o 

o c 








Balance to New Account . 855 13 

$1,509 1(J 



84 



To BaiT & Clapp, for labor . . ^0 55 

David H. Young, laying pipe, 120 80 

J. S. Kidder & Co., cement . 2 70 
Charles E. Moulton, making cen- 



II. & H. R. Pettee, for cement, 13 50 

Haines & Wallace, for lumber, 5 20 
John L. Bradford, for carpenter 

work .... 5 G2 



85 



To 1>. C. Plutchinsoii 


, stone work. 


•$8 00 


Charles Canfield 


care of reser 




voirs 


. 


16 50 


Warren Harvey, 


for labor 


20 00 


William Griffin', 


li 


13 50 


James Fitts, 


a 


11 25 


Garrett Mnrray, 


u 


10 50 


Levi Woodman, 


;; 


11 25 


John Nolan, 


u 


11 25 


Michael Mullen, 


a 


11 25 


Patrick Donough 


i.i 


6 75 


Patrick Connor, 


a 


5 25 


JMorris Horan, 


a 


12 75 


Joseph Gardner, 


a 


11 25 


Charles Branncn, 


it. 


9 75 


Joseph Taylor, 


a 


5 25 


Thomas Mur})hy, 


i'. 


10 50 


David Gibbons, 


a 


8 00 


- Peter Haggerty, 


(,'. 


15 


John Mahanna, 


i.i 


-1 50 


Patrick Fox, 


(.', 


7 50 


Robert Greenhal" 


•h, " 


38 


Samuel Brown, jr 


•1 


50 


Joseph Gaggen, 


44 


38 


Peter Bedford, 


44 


38 


Julius Jointre, 


44 


38 


James Dowd, 


44 


38 


Octavius Deget, 


44 


38 


John F. Woodbui 


y ct; Co., l)lack 




smith work. 


• 


2 85 




1654 03 


Balance to New Account 


855 13 



$1,509 16 



86 

(COMMONS. 

By Jjalanec from Old Account . >fello 76 

Appropriation . . . 2,500 00 

City Farm, for grass (1869) . 70 00 
John H. Maynard, for liljerty 

pole .... -20 00 

Reserved Fund (transferred) . 500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Charles T. Jjrown, engineering, 

Merrimack Square . . ^19 87 

Geo. II. Allen, engineering, Mer- 
rimack Square . . . 75 50 

Josiah Hosford, lor pointing wall 

on Merrimack Square . . 38 70 

M. S. Gay, coping stone on Mer- 
rimack Square . . . 182 00 

H. &. H. R. Pettee, for cement 

on Merrimack Square . . 709 25 

Bod well & Clark, stone for Mer- 
rimack Square . . . 15 75 

0. Gay, for coping stone for Mer- 

rimack Square . . . 104 40 

1. C. Flanders, for laying stone 

on Merrimack Square . . oO 93 

Eli Badger, for laying stone on 

Merrimack Square . . 29 25 

Parker M. Stevens, for laying- 
stone on Merrimack Square, 2 00 

Napoleon Badger, for laying 

stone on Merrimack Square, 19 50 

John H. Farnum, for laying 

stone on Merrimack Square, 1 38 



•^3,205 7() 



87 

To Michael Dcvinc, for laying .stone 

on Merrimack S(][nare . 
Horace Quiniliy, for laying stone 

on Merrimack Sqnare . 
Lamsoii & Mardcn, for stone for 

]\Iorrimack Squatc 
John C. Hoyt, concreting on 

i\Icrrimack Square 
Elmon L. Brown, concreting on 

^lerrimack Square 
Elmon L. Brown, concreting on 

Concord Square . 
John C. Hoyt, concreting on 

Concord Square . 
Daniels <fe Co., for nails . 
T, P. Heath, lor hauling lumber, 
William W. Hubbard, for posts, 
William Kimball, for whitewash- 
ing fences .... 
David Wells, for lumber . 
Haines & Wallace, for lumber . 
John F. Woodbury & Co., for 

ironwork .... 32 75 

Daniel Flanders, resetting and 

repairing fence . 
Joseph L. Smith, for lumber 
jianiel W. Garland, paving on 

Concord Square . . 
James Patten, Supt. 
Warren Harvey, foreman . 
John Nolan, for labor 
Sylvester Donohoe, for labor 
James Victory, '* 

Michael Hanley, " 

William Griffin, '• 



■19 


38 


13 


00 





00 


137 


70 


324 


02 


2G0 


60 


241 


65 


C) 


18 


1 


00 


15 


00 


GO 


00 


03 


50 


44 


19 



123 


38 


.-) 


20 


76 


26 


12 


00 


15 


00 


o 


75 


9 


00 


6 


00 


9 


00 


9 


75 



To Michael Scanlan, for 
Thomas Fox, 
Lawrence McCarty, 
H. M. Bailey, 
John Cunningham, 
Michael Mullen, 
Matthew Owen, 
Terence Donnell, 
Edward Bresnahan, 
Charles Brunell, 
Francis Caliill, 
Patrick Broderick, 
Murty Mahoney, 
Patrick Mannahan. 
Peter Cannon, 
James Fitts, 
Patrick McCal)e, 
John Larkin, 
John Murray, 
Thomas Moran, 
Eobert McMan, 
Dennis Keefe, 
John Daley, 
Morris Koran, 
Jerry Ragan, 
Patrick Connor, 
Patrick Donough, 
Dominie Gibbins, 

^ James Mahen, 
John Mahanna, 

2^ Patrick Fox, 
Garret Murray, 
Thomas Shea, 
Thomas Cannon, 
George Carlton, 



labor 



fO 00 


5 


25 


8 


25 




25 


2 


25 




75 






3 


00 


9 


to 


7 


50 


G 


75 


4 


80 


8 


00 


G 


75 


o 
•J 


00 


18 


50 




00 


4 


50 


24 


87 



5 25 
8 00 



o 


(O 




00 


15 


00 


O 


25 


9 


00 


12 


00 


7 


50 


25 


87 


4 


50 


35 


24 


IG 


50 


11 


25 


15 


00 


9 


00 



80 



To Josiah Harvey, teamster 




810 00 


George W. Butterfiiekl, teamster, 


G 50 


A. F. Quimby, teamster . 




8 00 


Lewis Laflot, " 




9 00 


City Double Team, No. 1 . 




9 75 


" " " No. 2 




12 00 


" " " No. 8 . 




3 75 


City Single Team, No. 1 . 




12 00 


" " " No. 2 . 




12 00 


George W. Merriam, for 


iron 




work .... 


. 


1 00 


Charles E. Moultoii, for repairing 




fence .... 




4 75 


John L. Bradford, building 


fence 




on Hanover S(|uare 




52 88 



Balance to New Account 



•33,163 70 
42 06 



.33,205 76 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



By Balance from Old Account 
Schools, for wood 
Lots sold ..... 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Joseph B. Sawyer, salary . 

'• " ])lans, survey- 

ing, &c. .... 
John B. Yarick, for pump 
Joseph L. Smith, for lumber 
Daniels & Co., for scythes 
Abbott & Kelley, for painting . 
John G. Coult, for trees 



$515 82 

98 10 

450 00 



$25 00 

91) 42 
9 75 

14 31 
3 55 

1 08 
80 50 



$1,063 92 



iO 



To Kadniiel Haselton, for lal)or . mM 05 



Alljert B. Chase, 



:277 50 



$775 16 
Balance to New Account . . .$288 7(3 



•SI, 063 92 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

By Appropriation .... ij^goO 00 

To Josei)li B. Sawyer, Treasurer . i^p^QQ qq, 

L1CHTL\G STREETS. 

By Balance from Old Account . ,^21 98 

Appropriation .... o^oqo 00 
Reserved Fund (transferred) . 'sOO 00 

Overdrawn . . «'«21 93 

,1 67 



$4,023 60 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Manchester Gas-Light Co., for 

g^« • • • . ' . $2,294 75 
Manchester Gas-Light Co., for 

lighting lamps . . . i^oiq (,o 
Manchester Gas-Light Co., for 

repairing lanterns 25 87 

Manchester Gas-Light Co., f^r 

new lamp posts . . . 423 92 
Manchester Gas-Light Co., for 

burners . . . . 119 25 



91 



To Abbott <t Kcllcy, for repairing 
lanterns . 

J. J. Abbott, for repairing lan- 
terns ..... 

Hartshorn ct Pike, for repairing 
lanterns .... 

Pike <fe Heald, for repairing lan- 
terns ..... 

Charles E. Adams, for lanterns, 

H. H. Noyes, for lighting lamps. 
Ward T . . . . 

Barr k Clapp, for oil, chimneys 
and wicks .... 



825 05 



10 75 




2t; 70 




7 14 




10 12 




:]0 00 




22 m 






$4,023 CO 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



^y Balance from Old Ace<)nnt 


5^1,445 Oo 


Appropriation . . . ' .. 


7,500 00 


Overdraft refunded . 


5 00 


Old ladders sold 


7 00 


Old hose sold . 


10 00 


Coal sold .... 


24 00 


EXPENDITURES. 





.<5=8,997 93 



To Transferred to Account of City 
Teams .... 



•11,000 00 



AMOSKEAO COMPANY NO. ONE. 



To salaries of members . 

George W. Butterfield, monthly 
allowance .... 



03 17 



92 

To Manchester Gas-Light Co., for 

gas $37 32 

Edwin Branch, for liorse }jlank- 

cts . . . . , 13 25 

H. M. Bailey, for lantern . . 1 (37 

I). S, Ames, repairing harnesses, 76 G7 
J. ^y. Whittier, for repairing 

^^osG 35 <32 

Amoskeag Ax Co.,for axes . 4 00 

Albert Allen, for coal . . 5 OO 
Amoskeag M'f'g Co., for repairs 

and waste .... 445 20 
Pike & Heald, for re]<airs of lan- 
tern ..... 05 
Lewis Raich, for labor . . 67 
Alex Lupin, for sawing wood . 2 00 
H. C. Fisher, for wood , . 2 00 
G. H. Kimball, " . . jg 40 
E. E. Smith, '- . 42 87 
John Flemming, sawing wood . 4 63 
A. D. Colby, . . ^ . c 00 
A. H. Paige, engraving plate . 3 00 
John Larkin, for sawing wood . 8 13 
George E. Wilson & Co., for oil, 40 
Daniels & Co., hose and couj)- 

li"g etc 9 .55 



81,315 00 



FIRE KING COMPANY NO. TWO. 

To salaries of members . . . 8579 00 

Albert F. Quimby, monthly al- 
lowance .... 60 00 

P. C. Young, for clipping horse, 4 50 

Manchester Gas-Light Co., for 

gas 46 35 



OQ 



James Chambers, for wood 

Caleb C. Stowell, 

H. C. Fisher, 

Daniels & Co., for rotten stone, 
oil, baskets &c. . 

Edwin Branch, for blankets 

Hartshorn & Pike, for basin and 
pan . . . . • 

Hoyt&Cox, for repairing chairs 

J. Stickney, for chamois skin . 
t^]. P. Johnson & Co., for coal . 

Albert Allen, 

H. C. Fisher, for wood 

Oilman H. Kimball " 

E. E. Smith, 

J. W. Whittier, for repairing 
hose . . . • • 
Amoskeag M'f'g Co., for waste . 
George E. Wilson & Co., for 
oil, (fcc. .... 
Pike & Heald, repairing stoves, 
Wm. G. Hoyt, repairing chairs, 
Lewis Raiche, for sawing Avood, 
Alex. Lupin, " '' • 

John Flemming, '^ " • 

John Larkin, " " • 



92 25 



E. W. HARRINGTON COMPANY NO. THREE. 



To salaries of members 

Haines & Wallace, for team 
Haines & Wallace, for wood 
H. C. Fisher, 
G. H. Kimball, 
Albert Allen, coal . 



•1571 75 
75 00 

8 00 
2 00 

9 50 
5 00 



94 



To J. W. Whitticr. re|tairing hose, 
IL Fradd ct Co., sponge, soap, 
ttc., . . . . . 
Wm. F. Scott, carting hose 
John B. Yarick, liardware 
Pike & Heald, repairing stoves, 
Manchester Gas-Light Co., gas, 



|2o G2 



1 


8a 


2 


00 


T 


40 


4 


6d 


14 


33 



$728 08 



N. S. BEAN COMPANY NO. P^OUR. 



To salaries of members 

Manchester Gas-Light Co., for 

gas . 
Hartshorn tt Fike, for oil-can 

&c., .... 
John B. Yarick, bar, shovel 

stone, tfcc, 
H. M. Bailey, grate 
Randall Page, painting 
Albert Allen, coal 
H. C. Fisher, wood 
Gilman H. Kimball, wood 
E. E. Smith, 

Alex Lupin, sawing wood 
John Flemming, " 
John Lark in " 

Daniels & Co., spirits, duster, &c. 
L. T. Randall, job team . 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 

waste and repairs 
J. W. Whittier, hose 
Geo. E. Wilson ct Co., pail 
Pike & Heald, stovo repairs 



$223 36 



4 26 



3 


29 


2 


50 


30 


00 


50 


25 


o 


00 


16 


10 


12 


88 


2 


00 


1 


62 


4 


06 


14 


15 


1 


00 


20 


23 


904 


00 




60 


1 


45 



95 



T(t J. 15. Saunders, rci)airs of har- 
ness .... 
H. C. Merrill, su])})lies . ' . 



$12 50 
6 58 



*i;^i(; 5f; 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. ONE. 



8 00 



To salaries of members . . •'!'l,0o2 87 

T. P. Heath, for haulhig hose 

carriage 
Manchester Gas-Light Co., for 

gas .... 
Daniels & Co., for oil 
Amoskeag Ax Co., for axes 
Wrn. P. Scott, for carting 
Albert Allen, for coal 
Amoskeag M'f \g.Co., repairs and 

waste .... 
J. W. Whittier, repairing hose 
Oilman H. Kimball, wood 
Geo. E. Wilson, pail, oil, A-c, 
Alex Lupin, sawing wood 






39 


1 


25 


13 


51 


1 


00 


15 


00 


12 


50 


32 


68 


12 


05 


2 


35 


1 


50 



151,140 05 



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. ONE. 



To salaries of meml)ers . 

Manchester Gas-Light Co., for 

Henry Moulton S: Co., ladders . 

G. T. Stevens, ladders 

Josiah Gates <k Sons, ladder 
straps .... 

A. W. Sanborn, repairing car- 
riage . . . . . 

Daniels & Co., rope, etc. . 



$908 86 

14 08 

20 60 
4 80 

15 00 

4 00 

7 40 



96 



To Joel Daniels, painting ladders . 
Fogg & James, for team . 
Henry French, repairing ladders 
Gilman H. Kimball, for wood . 
Alex Lupin, sawing wood 



84 


50 


1 


50 


7 


65 


12 


05 


1 


50 



$1,001 94 



engineers' salaries to march 1, 1S70. 

Edwin P. Richardson, Chief En- 

gineei" .... 8 33 

Benjamin C. Kendall, Clerk . 8 33 

Elijah Chandler, Assistant . 4 IG 

Wilberforce Ireland, " . 4 16 

Andrew C. Wallace, " . 4 16 

miscellaneous. 

To Daniels & Co., for tools and nails, 87 98 
8. .S. Moulton, for work on coal 

box ..... 7 50 
^I. V. B. Richardson, lettering 

supply wagon ... 4 00 

Henry French, for repairs . 2 00 

George W. Cheney, horse to fire, 2 00 
C. F. Livingston, for printing 

regulations . . . . 21 50 

Henry A. Hall, repairs . 6 00 

Patrick Healey, wood . . 2 75 

Hezekiah H. Noyes, repairs . 14 00 
Edwin P. Richardson, examining 

buildings . . . . 21 00 
Edwin P. Richardson, expense to 

Worcester, Cambridge, &c., 6 45 
Benjamin C. Kendall, expense to 

Worcester, Cambridge, &c., 6 45 



829 14 



D7 



To Ameskcag Maimfaoturiiig Co., 
for waste .... 
J. V. Sullivan, paper 
Kidder & Cliaudlcr, siij)plics 
J. W. Whitticr, repairing hose, 
Peter Ilaggerty, lal)or 
George Varnura, " 
D. W. Morse, 
Hill & Co., expressage 
Marshall Jenkins, carting 
Maxim McGovern, watching fire, 
J. W. Abbott, carting 

A. A. Weston, 

Palmer & Co., pipes, cocks and 
labor .... 

Dennis Murphy, labor 

B. E. Crawford, carting hose 
Cowan Brothers, refreshments. 
Dr. McDerby, doctoring horses, 
Plumer tfe Chandler, oil suit 
Henry A. Hall, hose 

Albert Allen, coal 



• 83 


00 


2 


45 


1 


50 


.) 


50 


2 


00 


2 


00 




40 




40 


1 


15 


2 


00 


1 


75 


1 


75 


34 


35 


4 


00 




50 


10 


50 


i) 


00 


4 


50 


234 


00 


234 


00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

By Balance from Old Account . -11,139 3(3 
Appropriation . . , 10,000 00 

Costs and fines . . . 4,242 78 



m-^9 38 



•!!8,072 40 
Balance to New Account . 925 53 

$8,997 93 



115,382 14 



98 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Samuel Upton, Police Justice, 

salary .... $1,000 00 

Samuel Upton, rent of office . 52 50 

Elijah M. Topliff, Associate Jus- 
tice ..... 

William B. Patten, Marshal, sal- 
ary 

William B. Patten, Marshal, wit- 
ness fees paid 

William B. Patten, use of team, 

Kben Carr, Assistant Marshal, 
salary .... 

Eben Carr, for use of horse and 
wagon .... 

Jilben Carr, cash for feeding pris- 
oners .... 



49 


00 


800 


00 


209 


71 


11 


00 


G50 


00 


237 


50 


59 


17 



$3,068 88 



NIGHT WATCHMEN. 



To John D. Howard 


-^$528 00 


Thomas L. Quimljy . 


730 00 


Patrick Doyle . 


730 00 


James Duffy 


730 00 


William T. Fogg 


722 00 


Hugh Ramsay . 


716 00 


John C. Colburn 


706 00 


David Thayer . 


706 00 


Hezekiah H. Noyes . 


730 00 


William H. Newhall 


730 00 


Henry Bennett 


31 00 


Horatio W. Longa . 


36 50 


William D. Perkins . 


32 00 


Lucien B. Richards . 


60 50 



99 



To John Cassidy . 
Ezra D. Cilley . 
Albert F. Quimby 
William Stevens 
Hollis C. Hunton 
Samuel Clark . 
Andrew J. Dickey 
Leonard Shelters 
Benjamin W, Robinson 

B. B. Aldrich . 
Uriah A. Carswell 
Henry W, Powell 
Stephen C. Arasden 
Justus N. Tuck 
Erastus Cutting- 
Timothy Connors 

C. Walker 
Cyrus Sanborn 
A. Jenkins 
W. Forsaith . 
Thomas Howe . 
Russell 0. Burleigh 
Charles Canlield 
Albert H. Merrill 
Page S. Griffin 
John Marshall . 
E. W. Abbott . 
Moses 0. Pearson 
Christopher C. Colby 
Joel Daniels 
L. M. Valcour . 
Charles H. Patten 
T. J. Sanborn . 
W. P. Hazen . 
W. P. Farrino-ton 



,^80 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


12 


00 


15 


00 


6 


00 


17 


00 


11 


00 


2 


00 


9 


00 


2 


00 


17 


00 


5 


00 


7 


00 


71 


00 


8 


00 


G 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


8 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


8 


00 


4 


00 



100 



To J. E. Rand 
J. H. Keyes 
M. Batclielder . 
A. B. Smitli . 
James E. Bailey 
Gustavus M. Sanborn 



$4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 



87,563 00 



DAY POLICE 



To Horatio W. Longa 
Henry Bennett 
John D. Eloward 
Hugh Conroy . 
Albert F. Quimljy 
James Duffy 
Hezekiah H. Xoyes 
Thomas L. Quimby 
James E. Clough 
Patrick Doyle . 
William T. Fogg 
William H. Xewhall 
Hugh Ramsay . 
John C. Colburn 
David Thayer . 
Samuel Clark . 
Charles H, Fatten 
B. B. Aldrich . 
Lucien B. Richards 
Timothy O'Connor 
W. P. Hazen . 
John Sanborn . 
Elbridge G. AVoodman 
Leonard Shelters 
T. J. Sanborn . 
Stephen C. Amsden 



$718 


00 


500 


00 


22G 


50 


1 


00 


5 


00 


30 


50 


17 


00 


20 


00 


5 


00 


26 


00 


20 


00 


17 


00 


22 


50 


27 


50 


22 


00 


16 


00 


10 


00 


11 


00 


4 


00 


9 


50 


8 


00 


o 
o 


00 


4 


00 


12 


00 


8 


00 



6 00 



101 



To Justus N. Tuck 


$d 00 


Erastus Cutting 


2 00 


Hollis C. fluntou 


7 00 


Hugh Conroy . 


2 00 


Williaui D. Perkins . 


G 00 


P. Connors 


2 00 


A. Jenkins 


11 00 


^Y. P. Farrington . 


8 00 


J. E. Rand 


8 00 


J. H. Keyes 


8 00 


M. Batchelder . 


8 00 


Gustavus M. Sanborn 


G 00 


J. C. Cram . . , . 


8 00 


Henry W. Powell . 


G 00 


C. Walker 


8 00 


Cyrus Sanl)orn 


8 00 


William Rourke 


1 50 


Russell 0. Burleigh 


8.; 00 


John Cassidy 


^ 00 


Andrew J. Dickey 


G 00 


All)ert H. Merrill . 


8 00 


Page S. Griffin 


G 00 


John Marshall 


4 00 


Moses 0. Pearson 


8 00 


Cristopher C. Colby 


G 00 


Joel Daniels . . . . 


8 00 


B. W. Robinson 


8 00 


Uriah A. Carswell 


5 00 


L. M. Valcour 


G 00 


Charles Canlield 


8 00 


Stephen M. Bennett 


8 00 


David Alden 


8 00 


George W. Nichols . . 


8 00 


J. P. Nelson . . . . 


8 00 


James E. Clough 


8 00 



102 



To Simon Dodge 


88 00 


Levi Andrews 


8 00 


Adam Dickey 


8 00 


Ephraim G. Hastings 


4 00 


J. Catlin Smith 


2 00 


Orrin D. Carpenter 


8 00 


James W. Preston 


7 00 


Ezra D. Cilley 


8 00 


Henry Colby . 


2 00 


G. W. Chandler, Detective 


83 00 



$=2,07G 00- 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 



To F. B. Eaton, mucilage and twine 


$4 21 


John B. Clarke, printing 


51 05 


C. F. Livingston, " 


1 25 


William H. Fisk, " 


17 09 


William G. Everett, stationery. 


13 50 


John Y. Sullivan, " 


40 


A. W. Brown, pitchwood 


5 00 


James Collins, " 


1 50 


John G, Colt, wood 


15 05 


M. N. Garland, wood 


8 25 


C. E. Dudley, 


22 83 


John G. Dodge, " 


7 98 


J. T. Garland, wood 


8 63 


James W. McCannis,sawing wood 


, 1 75 


John Mclntire, " " 


4 82 


George Britner, " " 


4 00 


E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 


12 53 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., " 


217 89 


Lorenzo Chase, carrying in coal 


2 50 


Bridget Riley, washing rooms. 


7 30 


Margaret Clancy, " " 


2 00 


Hannah Murphy, " " 


4 90 



10^ 



To Margaret Ilalcy, washing rooms 
John Connors, cleaning lobby, 
William Connor, " " 

G. F. Boshcr, for comforters 
Wm. G. Hoyt, repairing chairs 
Merrill & Aldrich, " 
Straw & Lovejoy , repairing clock 
Gilman B. Fogg, keys 
B. Frank Fogg, repairing pipe 
Hartshorn & Pike, repairing 
stove, . . . . 

Pike & Heald, for stove and re- 
pairing 
William Stevens, setting glass . 
Charles Bnnton, repairing lob])y, 
William Parker, pails 
Dr. Fitzpatrick, for medical at 

tendance on prisoners 
Albert Brigham, crackers 
Daniels & Co., oil, locks, ttc. 
William C. Chase, burying nui 

sance 
William Campl)ell, burying dogs 
Patrick Finn, burying dog 
Hezekiah H. Noyes, killing dogs 
JohnL. Kennedy, painting signs 
R. C. Hall, posting notices 
S. S. James, for teams 
H. D. Corliss, for meals for offi- 
cers at Fair time 



Balance to New Account 



m 30 



1 


50 


1 


50 


4 


00 


•i 


50 




00 


^, 1 


25 


9 


97 


4 


25 



50 



30 


57 


6 


00 


, o 


00 




94 


5 


00 





50 


9 


64 


- 

1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


50 


2 


50 


9 


00 


2 


85 


23 


50 



26 40 $575 60 



L3,283 48 
2,098 66 



115,882 14 



104 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



By Balance from Old Account . 81,139 36 
Appropriation .... 5,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Henry N. Howe, for repairinf^ 

pump on Hanover street . 818 G7 

D. L. Stevens, serving writ . 4 34 

Isaac W. Smith, for contesting; 

election of Mayor . . 80 51 

Isaac W. Smitli, for revising 

Ordinances . . . 150 00 

M. Y. B. Richardson, for letter- 
ing scales .... tj 50 

John G. Lane, damage to person 
and team Ity defect in higli- 
way 500 00 

Charles F. Horr, damage by dis- 
continuing part of old Falls 
road ..... 

Manchester Post-Oflice, for pos- 
tage 

Joseph E. Bennett, for making- 
Annual Report 

Joseph E. Bennett, team to noti- 
fy land owners . 

Joseph E. Bennett, paid register 
of deeds .... 

Joseph E. Bennett, paid express, 

Caleb Gage, damage to garden, 

Jonathan Woodman, for damage 

to crop . . . . 12 00 



330 


60 


•27 


08 


125 


00 


o 

•J 


50 


1 


41 


4 


69 


5 


00 



86,139 36 



lo; 



To Joseph B. Sawyer, for survey 

for water works . . . §133 00 

Ann Donovan, washing No. 5 
Ward room 

Joanna Rourkc, gratnity . 

D. W. Fling, witness fees in case 
of Mrs. Moulton 

Clark &: Hnse, connsel in Goffs- 
town road case . 

Andrew J. Mayhew, for rent of 
]\Ierrimack Hall . 

Daniel Wheeler, wood for No. 4 
Ward room 

Jnlia Finnegan, for washing No. 
.5 Ward room 

C. A. Snlloway, for taking depo- 
sitions .... 

IJ. S. ct Canada Express Co., 
for express on ordinances . 

L. A. Proctor, for trees . 

S. S. James, for teams for Mes- 
senger .... 

S. S. James, for Legislative 
Committee .... 

Leonard French, returns of hirths 
and deaths . . . • 

William W. Brown, returns of 
births and deaths 

William Kimball, whitewashing 
tree boxes .... 

Elvin P. Corning, cleaning vaults, 

J. Q. A. Sargent, Avork on water 

pip^ 

ITackett & Taylor, for concrete 

Avest of Merrimack Square . 



O 


oO 


100 


00 


13 


84 


O.T 


00 


24 


00 


o 
■ ) 


00 


2 


50 


4 


^)i) 


2 


20 


111 


00 


[> 


00 





00 


13 


75 


12 


50 


47 


25 


12 


00 


47 


44 


290 


60 



106 

To A. G. Fairl)aiiks, refreshments 

for fii'cmen .... ^1{\ 41 

Geo. II. Dudley, repairs at pest- 
house . . . • 

Hill <fc Co., express . 

Horace Gordon, for watcrinf^ 
trough .... 

Josiah Hosford, pointing wall at 
the Center cemetery , 

Daniels & Co., nails for tree 
l)Oxes, &c. .... 

Daniels & Co., fuse for salutes . 

E. L. Brown, concreting in front 
of No. 6 Ward room . 

Mrs. Salter, gratuity 

Chas. E. Moulton, making tree 
boxes ..... 

J. H. Andrews, serving notice 
on Samuel Andrews . 

Haines & Wallace, lumber for 
tree boxes .... 

James A. Morse, meals for team- 
sters at Fair time 

Lamson & Marden, edge stone 

and landmarks . . . 33 37 

Pike & Heald, for pumjj and 
dippers .... 

John S. Webber, 

Charles E. Moulton, work on 
pump ..... 
■ E. W. Harrington, laying side- 
walk Market street 

Kidder & Chandler, for powder 
for salute .... 



11 


63 


2 


70 


22 


00 


20 


50 


1 


03 


4 


00 


16 


53 


17 


00 


20 


63 


o 


00 


18 


00 


10 


00 



20 


38 


7 


00 


13 


88 


25 


00 


44 


00 



107 

To Wm. G. Everett, for team on 

committees . . • • |3 00 

Waitc Brothers, flannel for cart- 

ridges . • • • V) I -. 

Cyrus W. Wallace, for gravel lot, 1,537 50 
Concord Railroad, freight on 

sprinkler . . • • -- ( 

William Shepherd, for coach . - 00 

Charles G. Sherer, care of small 

pox patients . • • ^'^'^ -'^ 
James A. Weston, use of team 
(1870) .... 
Pike & Heald, rep. water i)ipe . 
Jasper P. George, postage 
Chas. Bunton, rep. water pipe . 
G. S. Chandler, fitting up No. 8 

Ward room 
National Bank Reporter . 
James B. Gove, copying non- 
resident taxes 
J. E. Clough, 'cleaning vault 
Dana W. King, recording deeds, 
S. S. James & Co., teams at 

Fair time . . • • 'o 15 

David Wells, lumber for ceme- 
tery fence, Ward 8 . . 21 00 
H. J. Poor, for nails, for ceme- 
tery fence. Ward 8 . . 10 00 
Frank F. Dearborn, lumber for 

cemetery fence. Ward 8 . 141 36 
W. H. Newhall, making ceme- 
tery fence. Ward 8 . . 41 00 
John B. McCrillis, iron work for 

tree boxes .... 8 00 

Joseph B. Sawyer, engineering, 46 00 



100 


00 


O 


42 




83 


4 


00 


5 


00 


1 


50 


8 


00 


10 


00 


7 


01 



108 



To Haines & Wallace, luml)er for 

cemetery fence . 
Geo. W. Merriani, iron work for 

tree boxes .... 
James A. Weston, 100 copies of 

map of Manchester 
Edward Wyman, for damage to 

well . . . . . 



1 50 

.500 00 

32 00 

WALL AT WEST END OF HANOVER SQUARE. 



I. C. Flanders . 

Horace Quimby, 

John H. Farnham 

Eli Badger 

Napoleon Badger 

Patrick Fox 

Michael Devine 

Bodwell & Clark, for stone 



Balance to New Account 



24 38 
17 88 
17 88 
16 50 

10 00 

11 38 
5 25 

132 36 

$5,315 14 
824 22 



86,139 36 



CITY HALL AND STORES. 



By Balance from Old Account 
Rent of Police Court Roouj 
Rent of City Hall . 
Rent of fjtores 



EXPENDITURES. 



To James Collins, for })itchwood 
Geo. W. Clark, " . 



81,580 46 

151 18 

251 11 

1,688 00 



84 12 
3 00 



83,670 75 



109 

To A. W. Brown, i)itc]nvood . . .f2 00 

David Thayer, " . . 1 00 

John G. Coult, wood . . 10 91 

John Mclntirc, for sawing- wood, 2 60 

T. D. Chase, for wood . . G 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., for coal . lOG ol 
E. P. Johnson & Co., " . 16 28 

Lorenzo Chase, for carrying in 

fnel 2 00 

Henry J. Willey, for carrying in 

fuel . . . . . 50 

T. Ramsay Cochran, for wood . 7 88 

John Sullivan, for sawing wood, 1 25 

Matthew Owens, " " 1 75 

Michael Harrington, " '' 1 54 

Merrill & Aid rich, for repai ring- 
chairs &c. . * . . . 24 50 
John Q. A. Sargent, for repair- 
ing gas pipe and shade . 14 40 
M. G. Hoyt, for repairing chairs, 3 50 
David Libby, for brooms . . 10 
Charles A. Smith, for duster and 

pitcher .... 4 22 

Daniels <fc Co., for oil, nails, 

punch, tacks etc. 
diaries Williams, for magnet . 
National Bank Reporter for 1869 
^lanchester Gas-Liglit Co., for 
gas ..... 
Gideon Flanders, for ice, 1870 . 
^' 1869 . 
Bridget Riley, for washing- 
Mary Donohoe, " 
Mary E. Mason, " 
Margaret Haley, " . 



11 


91 


o 


40 


1 


51 


493 


01 


5 


90 


5 


85 


37 


25 


5 


00 


10 


10 


1 


80 



110 



To Hannah Murphy, washing . 2 10 

Geo. H. Dudley, for repairs . 3 00 

N. S. Clark, for tape . . 40 

John P. Brock, for repairing 

stove ..... G 00 

Hartshorn & Pike, for repairing 

stove ..... 1 30 

Pike & Heald, for repairing stove, 29 13 

Chas. Bunton, for repairing city 

clock &c 16 50 

Neal & Holbrook, for repairing 

roof ..... 3 00 

True Dudley, for repairing draw- 
ers .... . 75 

Alfred G. Fairbanks, for repair- 
ing chairs .... 3 75 

Natt & Wra. F. Head, for brick, 84 00 

Concord Railroad, for freight on 

brick 7 00 

Dickey, Carpenter tfe Co., for re- 
pairing sidewalk . . . 46 37 

Dickey, Carpenter & Co., for re- 
pairing chimney ... 8 50 

P. I. Boyd, for making awning 16 00 

Abbott &Kelley, for setting glass, 4 50 

John L. Kennedy, for setting 

glass 8 21 

John L. Kennedy, for painting 

signs ..... 54 75 

Barton & Co., carpet for school 

committee room . . . 93 65 

Johnson & Stevens, for pails . 1 05 

C. E. Clark, for gas burners . 7 50 

J. Peabody, for fans . . 1 00 



Ill 

To Thomas P. Clough, lor cleaning- 
carpets .... -§1 25 
J. J. Abbott, for setting glass . 8 00 
J. E. Clough, for cleaning vault, 20 00 
William Parker, for sprinkler . 1 00 
S. F. Murry & Co., for copper- 
as, fly-paper, ttc. . . 5 90 
Zelotes L. Place, moving settees 2 50 
William Stevens, " " . 3 75 
'G. W. Adams & Son, matches . 1 85 
*Straw & Lovejoy, clock for 

treasurer . . . . 35 00 

Straw & Lovejoy, rep. clocks . 28 20 

" '" reporting time 16 00 



$1,321 54 , 
Balance to New Account . 2,349 21 



•13,(370 75 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

By Balance from Old Account . $99 21 

Appropriation .... 2,000 00 

Reserved Fund (transferred) . 600 00 

Overdraft refunded ... 2 00 



$2,701 21 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Wm. E. Moore, for printing . $36 75 

John B. Clarke, printing Ordi- 
nances .... 354 36 

John B. Clarke, printing Annu- 
al Reports .... 704 52 

John B. Clarke, printing Mayor's 

Valedictory ... 43 45 



112 



To John B. Clarke, printing . 
R. J. P. Goodwin, stationery 

B. F. Bennett & Co., surveyors 
and weighers' and other blanL 
books .... 

McFarland & Jenks, advertising 

non-resident taxes 
H. W. Herrick, cuts for Re 

port .... 

C. A. Alvord, ])rintiiig cuts fo 
Report 

C. F. Livingston, printing May 

or's Address, check-lists, &c 
H. R. Chamberlin, stationery 
A. Quiniliy, " 

Campbell & Hanscom 
Win. G. Everett, blanks and 

blank books 
Henry A. Gage, printing . 
John Y. Sullivan, stationery 
Geo. W. Quimby, jr., " 
Wm. H. Fisk, for binding Ordi 

nances . . . , 

Wni. H. Fisk, blank books 
F. B. Eaton, ink and pens 
Daniel S. Holt, advertising Ordi 

nances ... 

Manchester Post-Office. for post 

age stamps . 
Silas R. Sleeper, for stationery 
John J). PoAvell, " 

Balance to New Account . 



m9 08 
1 50 



119 


50 


20 


25 


83 


85 


38 


50 


133 


1-j 


1 


72 


11 


07 


152 


08 


22 


00 


29 


00 


5 


87 




24 


397 


4G 


150 


55 


4 


87 



(3 25 



o 


00 


4 


00 


1 


00 


^2,583 


12 


118 


09 



82,701 21 



118 
BRIDGE ACROSS COHAS BROOK, 

NEAR CLOUGH's MILLS. 



By Appropriation 



•1974 71 



EXPENDITURE 


s. 


To Cloiigli cfe Foster, for lumber 


. $185 37 


I. T, Webster, Superintendent, 


300 77 


Moses Tracy, for labor 


75 41 


John S. Webster, " 


37 50 


Frank E. Foss, 


27 87 


Ezekiel Foss, " 


17 62 


James M. Webster, '' 


64 16 


Amos C. Webster, " 


43 11 


Ebenezer C. Webster, labor. 


3 00 


Oilman Clougli, " 


30 87 


John Dickey, " 


11 37 


Daniel H. Dickey, 


4 75 


Lyman A. Dickey, " 


7 37 


Charles Emerson, " 


3 25 


George B. Emerson, " 


3 50 


James Emerson, " 


6 00 


James Wiley, '' 


12 62 


John B. Varick, spikes 


4 35 


Daniels & Co., spikes and nails. 


20 68 


Dutton Woods, building bridge. 


92 31 




$951 38 


Balance to New Account 


23 33 



•S974 71 



114 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 

By Balance from Old Account . UO 98 
Appropriation . . . 2,000 00 

Reserved Fund (transferred) . 100 00 



^2M0 o«s 



EXPENDITURES. 



STABLES ON MANCHESTER STREET. 



To Samuel M. Xutt, for mason work, 
David H. Nutt, '• " 

D. A. AYilson, 
Neal tc IIoll)rook, lumber and 
work . . . , 

Daniels Sc Co., nails 
Haines & Wallace, lumlier 
Daniel Flanders, carpenter work 
H. & II. R. Pettee, cement, 
Oharles E. Moulton, labor 
A. H. Lowell, gutters 
Temple McQueston, cement i)ipe 
J. L. Kennedy, painting . 
J. Q. A. Sargent, gas piping 
Wm. Kimball, whitewashing 
Wm. Griffin, labor, 
Thomas Garrigan, labor . 
Patrick Burke, 
Timothv Connor " 



>^i4 ;3y 
1-4 52 

() 00 

^>72 03 

4 00 
11 95 
50 00 

5 50 
14 44 
11 00 

9 25 
28 51 
20 58 

4 00 

2 25 

3 00 
1 50 



81,173 76 



115 

PKST-HOUSE. 

To Charles G. yiierer, for work 
John V. Sullivan, paper hang- 
ings 



$30 80 
•') 51 



$35 81 



ENGINE-HOUSE AND STABLES, VINE STREET. 



To Haines & Wallace, for lunihcr . 
W. W. Hnbbard, 
John L. Bradford, carpenter 
work . . . . . 
Ncal tt Holbrook, carpenter work, 
T. R. Hnbbard, doors and win- 
dows .... 
Daniels & Co., hardware . 
Lamson & Marden, stone-work, 
Wni. H. Kennedy, " 

C. R. CoUey, painting- 
Joel Daniels, " . 
B. Frank Fogg, gas piping- 
James Eastman, mason work 
H. tt H. R. Pettee, cement 
Palmer & Co., gas piping 
Hackett & Taylor, concreting 

Ijasement . 
William McPherson, cement pipe 
Pike & Heald, tin and labor 
Charles E. Monlton, labor 
James Patten, " 

Patrick Finn, " . 

James Ivearns, " 

John Larkin, '• 

John Collins, " 

Patrick McCabe, " . 



$235 03 
28 00 

183 40 
25 31 

3 25 

90 53 

7 75 

3 00 

10 00 
13 00 

5 30 

2 75 

2 75 
27 50 

151 68 

11 25 
23 15 
13 00 

3 00 
3 50 



iO 

50 
50 
50 



IIG 



To Peter Haggerty, for labor . 


$1 50 




' 


William Griffin, " . 


3 00 






Lawrence McCarty " . 


1 50 






H. N. Howe, pump-work . 


13 54 






C. Sanborn, stone-work . 


1 75 


8876 


78 






82,080 


35 


Balance to New Account . 




54 


63 




82,140 


98 



COURT-HOUSE. 



By Balance from Old Account 
Appropriation 
Grass sold .... 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Josiah Hosford, pointing stone 
work ..... 

H. & H. R. Pettee, lime . 

Neal & Holbrook, repairing win- 
dows ..... 

Hartshorn & Pike, repairing 
pipes ..... 

John B. Yarick, dnster 

B. Frank Fogg, putting up foot 
rods ..... 

Wm. McPherson, putting in well, 

Hoyt & Cox, repairing chairs . 

Daniels & Co., Avrench, nails, &c. 

J. Q. A. Sargent, piping . 

Manchester Gas-Light Co., gas . 



Balance to New Account . 



835 50 

500 00 

1 00 



822 50 

1 45 

2 50 



6 


50 


3 


00 


19 


86 


22 


00 


2 


00 


4 


21 


7 


05 


17 


10 


8108 17 


428 


33 



8536 50 



8536 50 



117 



IRON FENCE ON MERRIMACK SQUARE. 



By Balance from Old Account . 11,532 62 
Appropriation .... 5,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Geo. H. Allen, engineer . . $14 50 
D. C. Hutchinson, stone base . 1,247 78 
Erastus Cutting, drilling . . 12 25 
A. H. Lowell & Co., fence cast- 
ings 4,240 81 

John L. Kennedy, painting . 61 00 



.16,532 62 



$5,576 34 
Balance to New Account . . 956 28 



MILITIA. 



By Balance from Old Account . |131 52 
Appropriation .... 400 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Manchester War Veterans, to 

April 17, 1870 ... $33 

Clark Guards, to Apr. 17, 1870, 100 00 

Amoskeag Veterans, to April 17, 

1870 100 00 

Head Guards, to Oct. 17, 1870, 150 00 



oo 



$383 33 
Balance to New Account . . 148 19 



;,532 62 



$531 52 



$531 52 



118 



POLICE STATION. 



By Haines & Wallace, for brick . •ii'loS 51 

.Sewers and drains, '' . 217 99 

Paving, '• . 41 40 

Concord Railroad, " . 12 60 



f:XPENDITURES. 






To Jos. B. Sawyer, for plan of cells, 


*i^7 


50 


Jesse Gault, l)rick . 


318 


00 


Concord Railroad, for freight on 






I) ricks .... 


53 


00 


Charles Colby, hauling bricks . 


27 


00 


INSURANCE. 






By Balance from Old Account 


8174 


25 


Appropriation .... 


1,000 


00 


E. P. Richardson, insurance div- 






idend .... 


7 


50 


Overdraft refunded . 


32 


50 



$405 50 



8405 50 



81.214 25 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Equitable Insurance Co. . . 835 00 

Company of North America . 15 00 

Phenix Insurance Co. . . 95 25 

^Etna Insurance Co. . . 268 00 

National Insurance Co. . . 30 00 

Home Ins. Co., New York . 30 00 

Manhattan Insurance Co. . 18 75 



110 



T(3 Howard Fire Insurance Co. 


$39 75 


N. E. JMorrill .... 


m 25 


E. P. Richardson 


200 00 


Springfield Firo Insurance Co. 


45 50 


Isaac W. Hniitli, 


104 25 


n. r. Cilley .... 


<;o 00 


Xew Hampshire Fire Insurance 




Co.^ 


12tJ 00 


George A. French . 


■M 50 




11,141 25 


Balance to New Account . 


78 00 







•■^1,214 25 



SALARY OF OFFICERS. 



By Balance from Old Account . $419 51 

Approi>riation .... 8,000 00 

6^8,419 51 

EXPENDITURES. 

To James A. Weston, Mayor . . $1,000 00 
Joseph E. Bennett, City Clerk . 1,000 00 
Henry R. Chambcrlin, Treasurer 

and Collector . . . 1,483 33 
Elbridge D. Hadley, Clerk of 

Common Council . . 100 00 

James 0. Adams, Clerk pro tem 

of Common Council 

David Thayer, Messenger 

William Stevens, " 

C. A. Sulloway, Solicitor, 1809 

$4,348 33 



58 


33 


G 


67 


000 


00 


100 


00 



120 



HEALTH OFFICERS. 



To George A. Crosby, 1869 . 
Eben Carr, " 

William B. Patten, " 

Ebenezer H. Davis, 1870 . 
William B. Patten, " 
Eben Carr, " 

Oscar D. Abbott, Pliysician 

ASSESSORS. 

To Moses 0. Pearson 
Horace P. Simpson 
John F. Woodbury 
Isaac D. Palmer 
Timothy Snllivan 
Isaac Whittemore 
Joseph X. Prescott 
Joseph E. Bennett, for writing 



m 00 
25 00 
25 00 

^25 00 
25 00 
25 00 



•$143 


00 


161 


00 


260 


00 


133 


00 


131 


00 


183 


00 


121 


00 


210 


00 



175 00 



$75 00 
50 00 



81,342 00 



OVERSEERS OF POOR. 



To Samuel S. Moulton . 


$25 00 


Sayward J. Young . 


25 00 


Xahum Baldwin 


25 00 


Moses E. George, Clerk . 


75 00 


Hugh Conroy . 


25 00 


John Morse 


25 00 


Horatio Fradd . 


25 00 


George H. Colby 


25 00 



$250 00 



121 



SCHOOL BOARD, 

To Joseph G. Edgcrly, Supt. . 81,500 00 

COMMITTEE. 



To Henry C. Sanderson 
Marshall P. Hall, Clerk 
Thomas Borden 
Samuel Upton . 
Patrick A. Devine . 
Ephraim S, Peabody 
James Dean 
DeLafayette Robinson 



To John P. Currier 
Timothy W. Challis 
Henry C. Tilton, 18' 
Cleorge Holbrook 
Elbridge G. Haynes 
C. C. Favor .' 
William H. Newhall 



810 00 
35 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 



MODERATORS. 


$3 00 


. 


3 00 


38 and 1869 


6 00 


, 


3 00 


. 


3 00 




3 00 


. 


3 00 



81.605 00 



824 00 



CLERKS 



To James M. House 
John D. Powell 
George W. Quimly, 
L. B. Bodwell . 
Jasper P. George 
Silas R. Sleeper 
Luther E. Wallace 
George H. Gerry 



85 


00 


5 


00 


2 


50 


5 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 



837 50 



122 



SELECTMEN. 



To .S. C. Clatur 

.Sylvauus B. Putnam 
Edward L. Carpenter 
]\[, A, Hunkins 
Elbridge G. Woodman 
Joseph Simonds 
Thacher M. Conant . 
B. L. Hartshorn 
Henry French 
Moses Eastman 
John V. Sullivan 
Ira P. Fellows 
Harrison D. Lord 
James W. Lathe 
Hosea E. Sturtevant 
D. J. Warren . 
Carrol Riddle . 
James Richardson 
Milo W. Harvey 
George S. ChaiuUer . 
Damon Y. Stearns, 1869 



Balance to New Account . 



■¥o 


00 


o 


00 


•J 


00 


■ ) 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 





00 


5 


00 





00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


r 

o 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 



•S105 00 

.$7,906 88 
512 68 

$8,419 51 



CITY LIBRARY. 



By Balance from Old Account 
Appropriation . 



8183 80 
2.500 00 
$,2,683 80 



123 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Appropriation, for books . 

S. N. Bell, for rent . 
" " cash for freight . 

Charles II. Marshall, Librarian . 
" " cash })aid 

Charles A. Smith, duster . 

Manchester Gas-Light Co., foi 
gas . ... 

Henry A. Gage, printing . 

Chas. F. Livingston, printin 
catalogues . 

William E. ^loore, printing 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 

William Parker, grate 

John Q. A. Sargent, gas burners 

Pike ct Heald, repairing stove 

James A. Weston, for map of 
Manchester 

^Etna Lisurance Co., for insur- 
ance ..... 

Phoenix Insurance Co., for insur- 
ance ..... 

William II. Fisk. for Ijinding . 



it?l,000 00 

'2r^0 00 

7 00 

(300 00 

3 00 



05 94 
3 00 

78 00 
■2 00 

1-2 00 
1 40 
1 45 
8 00 



Balance to New Account 



00 
32 50 

25 00 

220 48 

a2,348 08 



82,(383 30 



LIBRARY BUILDING. 



By Balance from Old Account . $696 07 
Appropriation .... 7,780 77 



88,476 84 





124 






EXPENDITURE 


5. 


To Daniels & Co., for oil, lampblack 


(fee. . 


. 


$27 58 


John J. Bennett 


, for cleaning 


brickwork . 




62 00 


A. H. Lowell, castings 


7 80 


Josiah Hosford, pointing stone 




work . 


. 


25 00 


Moses D. Stokes, 


steps 


G80 72 


Lamson & Mardei 


1, stone work 


3 00 


Oilman H. Kimball, edge stone 




and posts . 


. 


184 62 


John F. Woodbui 


y & Co., foi 


• 


iron work . 




8 05 


E. L. Brown, for concrete work 


148 15 


H. & H. R. Pettee 


, cask cement 


2 70 


David H. Yonng, 


drain pipe 


51 40 


Haines & Wallace 


, lumber 


32 02 


John L. Bradford, building fence 


2tj 89 


John B. Clarke, advertising 


8 13 


Peter Haggertj, labor 


1 50 


Dennis Gibbons 


ii 




9 00 


Patrick Connor, 


'' 




12 00 


Joseph Taylor 


iC 




3 00 


John Mahoney 


if. 




9 00 


Patrick Donough 


ii 




7 50 


Warren Harvey 


" 




5 00 


James Pitts, 


l( 




3 00 


Garret ^lurray 


li 




3 00 


Charles Brennan 


11, 




2 62 


Joseph Gardner 


ii 




2 62 


Michael Mullen 


ii 




3 00 


Morris Horan 


" 




3 00 


John Nolan 


u 




3 00 



125 



To Tatrick Fox, for labor . . $1 50 

Pike tt Heald, furnaces . . 228 97 

E. Roper, running cornice . 87 22 

John J. Bennett, for brick and 

work . . . , . 75 50 



$1,727 99 
Balance to New Account . .' 6,748 85 

$8,470 84 



SUNCOOK VALLEY RAILROAD. 

By Balance from Old Account . $25,000 00 

To casli $25,000 00 



CEMENT PIPE FROM HANOVER SQUARE. 

By Balance from Old xVccount . . $154 77 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Alanson Walker, for stone . 810 00 
Balance to Reserved Fund . 144 77 

S154 77 



STATE TAX. 

By Appropriation .... $50,562 00 

To State Treasurer's receipt . . $50,562 00 



COUNTY TAX. 



By xVppropriation .... $15,947 47 

To County Treasurer's receipt . $15,947 47 



126 



INTP]REST. 




JJy Balance from Old Account . 81,442 99 




Appropriation 


. 25,000 00 




Accrued interest on l)ond^ 


109 75 






=5^26,552 


74 


EXPENDITURES. 




To Cyrus Hazcn . 


$54 00 




Estate of Ira B. Osgood 


15 00 




Estate of X. Hunt . 


420 00 




William F. Harvey . 


16 22 




Rebecca W. Smith . 


69 00 




S. E. Burnham 


12 00 




Caroline B. Peterson 


8 08 




Henry Kelley . 


12 00 




D. Hunt . 


68 51 




Amoskeag National Bank 


77 50 




Manchester National BanL 


: . 77 50 




S. J. ct M. K. Wilson 


22 50 




Harrison. D. Lord 


6 60 




James A. Weston 


20 00 




John M. Harvey 


50 25 




Alonzo F. Carr 


60 40 




William P. Merrill . 


42 00 




X. B. Hall 


12 18 




Alvin Pratt 


6 00 




Rlioda Flanders 


30 00 




Mary P. Harris 


240 00 




Solomon Whitehousc 


30 00 




Jolm Ordway . 


1 67 




Merrimack River Savings ; 


Bank, 39 03 




William McDonald . 


264 00 




Amos S. Tallant 


57 00 





127 



To John C. Colburn 
Samuel S. Moultoii . 
Coupons on bonds 

Balance to New Account 



825 50 

80 00 

22,184 00 

123,906 94 

2,645 80 



^26,552 74 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 



By amount of loan, Jan. 1, 1870 
C\yrus K. Ilazen 
William McDonald . 
Manchester National Bank 
Amoskeag " " . 

M. K. & Sarah J. Wilson 
Charles E. Moulton . 

EXPENDITURES 



To William F. Harvey . 
Cyrus K. Hazen 
Caroline B. Peterson 
D. Hunt . 
Alonzo F. Carr 
Alvin Pratt 
John Ordway . 
Moody K. Wilson 
Sarah J. Wilson 
Amoskeag National Bank 
Manchester " " 

William McDonald . 



!!!28,001 00 

1,000 00 

8,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

1,500 00 

500 00 

•>549,001 00 



8700 00 

800 00 

500 00 

25 00 

1,000 00 

200 00 

5,000 00 

700 00 

800 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

8,000 00 



128 



To Samuel S. Moulton 
John C. Colburn 



Amount of loan, Jan. 1, 1871 



1500 00 

50 00 

828,275 00 

20,726 00 



$49,001 00 



REDUCTION OF DEBT. 

By Balance from Old Account . 82,800 00 

Appropriation .... 10,000 00 



812,800 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Merrimack River Savings Bank, 
balance on Hallsville scliooL- 
house .... 8700 00 
Loan of April 1, 1865 . . 8,800 00 



Balance to Xew Account 



89,500 00 
3,300 00 



•812,800 00 



LAND SOLD FROM FARM. 



By Balance from Old Account 
B. F. Farnum . 
J. R. Hanson . 
Mrs. Laura Boutelle 
Benj. W. Robinson 
Charles H. Robinson 
Henry M. Preston 
A. A. Bunton 
D. P. Beattie 
Waterman Smith 



8662 


■10 


276 


81 


320 


25 


365 


43 


117 


07 


127 


96 


101 


25 


65 


93 


65 


93 


1,901 


62 



129 



To Thomas W. Lane . . . |126 56 
Daniel H. Maxfield ... 126 56 
Hazen Davis . . . 126 56 



!|4,384 33 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Jos. B. iSawyer, running- lines 

and setting bounds , . |i3 00 

City Farm, for building streets . 20G 00 

Jerry L. Fogg, building streets . 27 25 



$236 25 
Balance to New Account . . 4,148 08 



•*4,384 33 



DOG TAX 1870. 
By amount collected . . . 1168 00 



EXPExNDITURES. 



To Isaac Huse, for damage to sheep, $22 00 
Balance to New Account . . 146 00 



$168 00 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

By Balance from Old Account . $30 02 
Appropriation .... 5,500 00 

$5,530 02 

9 



130 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Sundry persons . . . -$4,953 9G 

Balance to New Account . . 566 06 



$5,500 02 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

By Balance from Old Account 

Lut of 1867. 
To William K. Roby,paid in Brigliton, 

List of 1868. 



To E. S. I'ealjody, for maintainin 

watering-trough , 
Chas. F. Wliittemore, paid in 

Massachusetts 
Mitchell Leduc, minor 
Louis Desilitts, " 
John K. Cross, died before coUec 

tion .... 
^I. M. Bartlett,didnot own stock 
Eastman & Putney, had no cow 
Wm. H. Humphrey, could not 

pay .... 
^ D. A. Messer, had no carriage, 
Caleb W. Haselton, insane, 
William Whittle 



J|4,081 82 



U 91 



3 00 



b 


15 


O 


15 


■J 


15 


1-) 


15 


(i 


30 
95 


25 


2U 


1 


47 


1 


m 


21 


00 



m 15 



131 

List of 1869. 

To E. y. Peabody, for maintaining 

trough 
A. J. Young, for maintainin 

trough 
Littlefield k Hayes, overtaxed 
John H. Wales, " 

John D. Riddle, " 

Louise M. Prinec, " 

E. W. Harrington, no dog 
Geo. W. Morrison, '' 
Michael J. McDonald, no dog 
William E. Greeley, " 
C. Porter, '• 

Frank D. Hanson, " 

T. I). O'Connor, 
Charles W. Barker, 
Oliver B. Elliott, 
John B. Larkin, " 

D.W. Garland, paid in Hooksett 
H. S. Batchelder, '• 
Loaini Searle, overtaxed . 
John Ferguson, " 
J. P. Brock, 

Henry W. Herrick, overtaxed 
Clarissa H. Carr, taxed wrong, 
Edwin L. Hill, did not own 

house 
Thomas Moran, over 70 
William Carr, " 

Patrick Keher, " 
Joseph Wainwright, minor 
Fred Gagnon, " 

Charles W. Clougli, '' 



m 00 



o 


00 


12 


40 


3 


9G 


2 


48 


2 


48 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


o 


72 


3 


72 


4 


96 


3 


72 


49 


60 


9 


92 


1 


74 


44 


64 


3 


72 


o 


72 


3 


72 



6 i. 



o i-I 



132 

To Levi Snow, minor . . . $3 72 

Daniel Hill, "... 3 72 

William H. Wyman, minor . 3 72 

Benjamin Emerson, " . 3 72 

William M. Junkins, died before 

collection .... 3 72 

John K. Cross, died before col- 
lection .... 

Caleb W. Haselton, insane 

John Conley, poor . 

William Plnmb, name wrong 

Sherbnrn D. Smith, did not own 
bank stock .... 

Chas. F. Whittemore, paid in 
Massachusetts 

Henry W. Hazen, paid in Deer- 
field 

Amos I. Pollard, paid in Hook- 
sett 3 72 

Roswell G. Eaton, paid in San- 

bornton . . . . 3 72 

Robert McQaeston,paid in Litch- 
field 3 72 

William French, paid in Pitts- 
field 

Albert Young, })aid in Nashua . 

O. J. Poor, " Raymond, 

R. W. Flandei'S, paid in London- 
derry . . • . 

George Atwell, paid in Canaan, 

Benjamin Stewart, paid in Au- 
burn ..... 

Loami Searle, paid in Hooksett, 

Henry R, Demary, paid in Bos- 
ton . / . . . 3 72 



3 


72 


5 


71 


3 


72 


3 


72 


4 


96 


3 


72 


3 


72 



3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


o 
o 


72 


o 
o 


72 


o 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 



To Carlos F. Humphrey, lost a 
arm .... 
Edson G. Stark, no horse 
Lot No. -lO Park street taxe 

twice .... 
Godfrey Mason, taxed twice 
Rodnia Nutt, jr., not here 
Cyrus K. Foss, overtaxed 
Ann M. Long, taxed twice, 



m 72 

2 48 

60 
5 71 

3 72 

1 24 

2 48 



$290 40 



Lid of 1870. 

To Silas Mclntire, over 70 
Thomas Reynolds, " 
John Marsh, " 

Edward Stanton, " 
Henry M. Kellogg, minor 
Edward Bishop, " 

Charles Turner, 
John F. Moore, " 

Frederick Quinn, " 
Edward C. Paul, 
Gilman B. Fogg, no dog, 
John M. Chandler, " 
John P. Rowell, " 
George Smith, '' 

Joseph Goodwin, " 
Daniel Haley, " 

Lyman W. Colby, paid in Dun- 
barton .... 
Charles R. Foss, paid in Ca ndia 
D. 0. Danforth, " Amherst, 
John Danforth, 

Edward Fortier, nearly blind, . 
Addison P. Sawyer, taxed twice. 



$b 



3 27 

3 27 
3 27 
3 27 
3 37 
3 27 
3 27 
3 27 



1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 




2 


O 1 


Q 


27 


3 


27 


3 


27 


o 


21 



134 

To Frank Erigham, taxed twice . -1^3 27 
Lyman Colby, Avrong name . 3 27 
Amos E. Hurley, " " . 3 27 
Caleb W. Haselton, insane . 4 80 
Ghas. P. Griffin, died before col- 
lection .... 3 27 
S. N. Rol)ic, died before collec- 
tion ..... 3 27 
Amos .Spoffbrd, cow died . . 87 
John t^mitli, lost an arm . . 3 27 
Nancy F. Goodwin, maintaining 

watering trough ... 3 00 
William Campbell, maintaining 

watering trough . . . 6 00 

William Whittle, no horse, . 1 09 
" " interest money 

did not have ... 21 80 

8115 50 

1482 96^ 

Balance to New Account . . 3,548 8G 

84.031 82 



NEW SCHOOL-HOUSES AND LOTS. 

By balance from Old Accoiuit . -f 8,888 88 

Appropriation .... 15,000 00 
Cash for old lioiisc at (Joff'e's 

Falls oO 00 



■■$18,888 >\S 



EXPENDITURES. 
rxOFFE's FALLS HOUSE. 

To John B. Clarke, for advertising, 
Ceo. H. Allen, engineer . 
J. Edwin Stearns, " 
W. W. Patterson, " 
Natt Head, for erecting building, 
Geo. H. Dudley, for work 
Thomas P. Clongh, for cleaning, 
Joseph W. Ross, for ink wells . 
Joseph L. Ross, for furniture 
Joseph G. Edgcrly, for cash jjaid 

for freight &c. 
John L. Kennedy, for ])ainting, 
AVm. McPlierson, for iinishing 

black-boards 
John P. Moore, grading &c. 
John B, Yarick, for hooks, cord 

&c. ..... 



MAIN STREET HOUSE. 

To Campbell & Hanscom, for adver- 
tising .... .|1 00 
J. L. Smith, for lumber . . 11 56 



■to 


25 


14 


50 


14 


00 


4 


00 


2,700 


00 


15 


62 


2 


55 


5 


60 


195 


50 


5 


05 


5 


75 


8 


50 


42 


00 




11 




*8,025 48 



136 



To^Natt Head, on account of con- 
struction . . . . 
Temple McQneston, for well and 
drain . . . . . 
E. Cutting, stone work 
Haines & Wallace, lumber 
Joseph L. Ross, furniture 
Concord Railroad, freight on fur- 
niture . . . . 
Amoskeag M'f'g Co., for lot 



$5,500 00 



24 


33 


52 


37 


GO 


96 


306 


50 


15 


40 


1,000 


00 



$7,035 12 



LINCOLN STRP:ET HOUSE. 



"o Oilman H. Kimball, on account 

of foundation 
Gilman H. Kimball, for setting 

underpinning- 
John B. Clarke, advertising 
Haines & Wallace, lumber 
George W. Stevens, architect 
Hartshorn & Pike, pump 
John J. Bennett, work 
C. H. Hodgman, hauling brick 
J. L. Smith, lumber 
H. & H. R. Pettee, lime and ce 

ment .... 
Charles E. Moulton, building 

sheds 
James Patten, gratling lot 
John Fenof, " " 

James Fitts " " 

Michael Scanlan, " " 

William Griffin, " " 

John Daley, " " 



$2,582 40 

156 74 

4 50 
129 09 
200 00 

11 50 

5 06 
180 00 

8 00 

11 00 

42 50 
24 00 

6 37 
6 37 
6 37 
6 37 

9 37 



To John Mahonoy, grading lot 
John Larkin, " 

Lawrence McCarty, grading lot, 

Edward Bresnahan, " " 
Thomas Moran, 

Patrick Mannahan, " " 

Thomas Carrigan, " " 

" Frank Currier, " 
James Kerrin, 

Geo. W. Butterfiield, " 

Albert F. Quimby, '• " 
Josiah Harvey, 

Single Team No. 1, " 

Double Team No. 1, " 



FRANKLIN STREET HOUSE. 

To Amoskeag M'f'g Co., for land . 

SPRUCE STREET LOT. 

To Amoskeag M'f'g Co., for land . 
Balance to New Account 



$9 37 



4 


50 


4 


50 


4 


50 


4 


50 


4 


50 


4 


50 


T 


50 


8 


75 


2 


00 


3 


00 


G 


00 


8 


50 


8 


50 


o 
O 


00 


4 


50 





00 



$3,486 76 



$1,775 00 



$600 00 

$15,922 31 

2,966 57 

$18,888 88 



138 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

SPECIAL APrROPRlATION. 



By Appropriation 



EXPENDITURES 



To transferred to Appropriation foi 

Schools 
Al)l)ott & Kellcy, for ])ainting 
John L. Kennedy, "^ 

John L. Kelley, "• 

Joel Daniels, " 

L. A. Proctor, setting trees 
Daniels & Co., hardware . 
Geo. W. Merriam, iron work 
George H. Dudley, joiner work, 
John H. Maynard, raising up 

house 
A. A. Bunton & Co., lumi)cr 
Joseph L. Smith, '' 

Haines Sc Wallace, " 

Thomas R. Hubhard, 
Hartshorn & Pike, "repairing 

stoves . . . . 

Pike ct Heald, repairing stoves, 
Thomas P. Clough, for cleaning 

house . . . . 

Marshall J.f^Kendrick, teaming, 
William Kimljall, wliitewashing 

fences . . . . 

E. Cutting, setting edge stone , 
E. Catting, building vault 
Kidder & Chandler,' hardware . 



#2,014 20 

64 4G 

243 74 

14 67 

r, 45 

22 60 

78 17 

2 50 

650 67 

10 00 
163 27 

27 00 
292 44 

in 01 

89 81 
34 91 



3 00 

2 25 

16 42 

25 00 

11 25 

1 6n 



$5,000 00 



■245 


12 


7 


25 


4 


00 



139 



To Dickey, Carpenter & Co., laying 

sidewalk .... HH 05 
Amos Spofford, for digging well 50 00 

Fogg ct James, team . . 1 50 

John B. Varick, hardware . 1 62 

Will. McPliersoii, wliitewasliing 

Bakersville house . . 2o 00 

Wui. McTlierson, digging well 

at Anioskeag house 
Xeal tt Holbrook, joiner work 
Columbus Wyman, stone work 
Samuel Brown, jr., grading about 

house on Center street . 101 49 

•Levi M. Green, for painting 
blackboards 
Wm. 0. Haskell & Son . 
E. G. Hayiies, repairing plaster- 
ing ..... 
E. L. Brown, repairing concrete, 
Augustus Proctor, painting shed, 
John H. Proctor, grading lot . 
John S. Furber, pump 
American Tablet Co., for Ijlack- 
board . . . . ■ 
John Q. A. Sargent, piping 
Joseph L. Ross, furniture 



Balance to New Account 



() 


00 




<s 


00 




27 


00 




o 
■J 


50 




8 


80 




110 


00 




9 


50 




54 


70 




22 


45 




161 


88 




$4,833 


23 




160 


It 


§5,000 00 



110 



SCHOOLS. 



By Balance from Old Account . 814 22 
Appropriation .... 42,000 00 
Repairs of School-houses (trans- 
ferred) .... 2,014 20 



,S44,028 42 



EXPENDITURES. 
REPAIRS. 

To Brown & Fellows, for gate irons, 
John L. Kennedy, painting and 

glazing 
John Q. A. Sargent, repairing 

furnace .... 
Samuel Brown, grading yard 
George H. Dudley, joiner work, 
Wm. McPherson, mason work . 
James A. Eastman, " " 
E. G. Haynes, " " . 

M. J. Kendrick, jol> team . 
C. Aldrich, .* . 
C. H. Hodgman, jol) team 
David Libby, repairing chairs, 
Neal & Holbrook, carpenter 

work 25 8:J 

E. P. Cogswell, 2d, carpenter 

work ..... 
W. H, Elliott, repairing clocks, 
Straw & Lovejoy, " " . 

B. P. Martin, pump ... 
H. M. Bailey, for stove-pipe and 

register .... 
Thomas R. Hubbard, for lumber, 



81 


50 


97 


79 


12 


35 


20 


00 


aoo 


25 


18 


00 


4 


75 


25 


20 


1 


25 


18 


00 




75 


2 


95 



52 


44 


5 


75 


9 


25 


G 


00 


10 
45 


77 
00 



141 



To Daniels & Co., hardware . . $27 64 

Joliii B. McCrillis, bands for tree 

boxes ..... G 00 

Jewett B. Eastman, work . . 3 00 

American Tablet Co., for black- 
boards .... 78 00 

A. H. Lowell & Co., castings for 

seats ..... 96 25 

Charles C. Campbell, re{)airing- 

Stark House ... 7 10 

Levi M. Green, j)ainting black- 
boards .... 2 50 

Abbott & Kelley, painting . 16 67 

Joseph L. Ross, seats and desks, 1,100 00 

Hartshorn & Pike, repairing 

stoves .... 12 28 

Joseph W. Ross, ink wells . 70 00 

Concord Railroad, freight on 

furniture .... 18 50 

Leonard Stratton ... 88 

C C. Cox, glazing, &c. . . 5 10 

Gilraan B. Fogg, keys and re- 
pairing locks . . . 22 64 

Barton & Co., carpet . . 56 18 



.$2,244 07 



FUEL AND SAWING AVOOD. 



To J. JL Proctor, for wood 
B. L. Hartshorn, 
H. E. Ryder, . 
Daniel B. Eastman, 
Kiml)all & Hall, 
Tiios. R. Hubbard, 



$60 00 

5 00 

33 75 

14 00 

187 29 

4 00 



142 



To H. Ricliards, for wood 

Pine (jrove Cemetery, wood 
Oilman Clongli, " 

B. F. Locke, 

Simo4i U. Hill, " 

George W. George, " 

J. Preston, " 

Neliemiali Preston, " 

L. B. Bod well & Co., coal 
E. P. Johnson & Co. 
Highway District No. 2, haul 

ing wood 
Charles E. W. Clough, liauling 

wood .... 
J. ^Y. Abbott, hauling w^ood 
John Mclntirc, for sawing wood 
Chadburne George, " " 
Edmund Burke, '' " 

Thomas E. Clough, " " 
Eben Carr, 

William C. Chase, " " 
E. Stearns, " " 

Charles Aldrich, " " 

P. Connor, " " 

J. G. Edgerly, " " 

L. H. Button, " " 

Moses Lull, " 

John Flemming, " " 

Thomas Corcoran, " " 
Leonard Stratton, '' " 
Michael Lane, " " 

G. W. Clark, pitchwood . 



$38 25 
98 10 
90 00 

27 00 
13 12 
15 00 

28 00 
21 00 

3,152 91 
243 84 

21 80 





00 


3 


00 


56 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


87 


9 


00 


G 


00 


10 


76 


T 


50 


€> 


00 


4 


00 


o 


50 


{) 


50 


1 


50 


12 


00 


o 
O 


87 


2 


50 




00 



$4,193 06 



143 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES, 

To W. W. Cdlbnni, for luiiicrals 

Barton & Co., carpet 

Hoyt ct Cox, cliairs . 

A. 0. Parker, "... 

Charles A. Smith, duster 

Will. 11. Elliott, clocks 

Joseph W. Ttoss, ink wells 

J. L. Hamniett, erasers, blocks, 
etc., ..... 

Scott & Jewell, pails 

John S. Hayes, chair cushion . 

David Libby, l)rooms 

Joseph L. Ross, desks and seats, 

Daniels & Co., hardware . 

Vance & Goodwin, pail 

Leonard Stratton, tongs, brush, 
&c., ..... 

John B. Yarick, hardware 

C. E. Clough, carting furniture, 

G. F. Bosher, chairs 

Pike & Heald, dusters, dippers, 

<fec., 18 30 

H. C. Tilton, black-board Inrush- 
es .... . 

Hartshorn & Pike, dippers, <tc., 

Straw & Lovejoy, clocks . 

Wm. Parker, brushes and dip- 
pers ..... 

David Urch, baskets 

Nichols & flail, paper 
Geo. W. Adams & Son, pail 



fii^lO 


00 


10 


o8 


o 


50 


31 


00 


2 


10 


(> 


50 





58 


54 


50 


4 


32 


1 


25 


2G 




38 


50 


Cjij 


8(3 




25 


1 


10 


11 


GT 


5 


00 


13 


50 



179 


00 


IG 


88 


48 


00 


15 


15 


7 


50 


o 
O 


GO 




35 



$584 41 



144 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



To Brewer and Tileston, charts, 
cards, <fcc., . . . . 

A. W. AVilliams & Co., . 
Thompson, Bigelow and Brown, 

geographies 
Manchester Post Office, postage, 
M. P. Hall, stamps and envel- 
opes . . . . . 

B. F. Bennett & Co., blank rec- 
ords .... 

John S. Hayes, paper 

J. L. Hammett, charts, pencils 

<fec., .... 
Nichols & Hall 
F. B. Eaton, paper . 
I. S. Whitney, charts 
Wm. G. Everett, blank books 
W. A. Wilde & Co., 
Wood worth, Ainsworth Sc Co 
Wm. Henshaw, maps 
John V. Sullivan, books . 
H. M. Cable . 
William H. Fisk 
Antiquarian Bookstore, books 

for indigent children . 
J. G.Edgerly . 
Alfred Quimby, books for indi 

irent cliildren 



^83 16 
2 66 

50 34 
13 77 

5 72 



260 


00 


5 


75 


14 


58 


41 


41 


94 


05 


41 


75 


15 


00 


15 


53 


15 


00 


12 


00 


9 


02 


1 


25 


54 


12 


32 


30 


8 


00 


88 


€0 



$864 01 



145 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



To Wm. E. Moore 


$86 25 


Wm. H. Fisk . 


89 75 


Campbell ct Ilausconi 


57 35 


Chas. F. Livingston . 


164 80 


John B. Clarke 


245 80 



$643 05 



CARE OP ROOMS. 



To Etta M. George 
Addie M. Chase 
Mary J. Reid . 
Clara X. Brown 
Kate AV. Osgood 
Mary A. Richardson 
Abbie E. Abbott 
Emily J. Parker 
Georgianna Dow 
Annette McDocl 
Sarah J. Greene 
Eugene 0. Locke 
J. G. Edgerly . 
Alice G. Lord . 
Alpha Messer . 
Lana S. George 
Isaac L. Heath 
Nellie J. Sanderson 
William E. Buck 
Hattie L. Jones 
Thomas B. Conant 
Maria H. Hildreth 
Georgianna Patterson 
Andrew Farry . 
John F. Chase . 
10 



112 


50 


18 


00 


12 


50 


11 


00 


o 
■J 


00 


1 


50 


10 


50 


9 


50 


15 


00 


10 


50 


6 


50 


8 


00 


1 


50 


8 


50 


42 


00 


8 


00 


6 


00 


10 


50 


6 


00 


10 


50 


4 


00 


32 


20 


10 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 



140 



To Xellie F. Cheney 
Charles C. Campbell 
John Farrar 
L. H. Button . 
Charles B. Dexter . 
Volnev W. Fairbanks 
E. P. Cogswell, 2d. . 
Thomas P. Cloiigh . 
Leonard Stratton 
Charles Aldrich 
Thomas Corcoran 
Emma F. Benn 



w 


00 




G 


50 




4 


00 




132 


00 




114 


00 




216 


00 




311 


00 




8 


75 




151 


50 




482 


70 




82 


00 




2 


50 




. 


m 


78t) 05 



INCIDENTALS 

To Cheney & Co., for express 
Moses Lull, cleaning vault 
S. S. James & Co., teams . 
Fogg ct James, '• 

J. G. Edgerly, cash paid . 
L S. Whitney, rent of pianos 
J. M. Sanborn, •' 
Hill & Co., express . 
3Ianchester Gas-Light Co., fo 

rgas . 
J. W. Abbott, for teaming 
John C. Mclntire, for cleaning 

privies . 

J. H. Johnson, moving pianos 
L. H. Button, for washing house, 
Thomas P. Clough, for work on 

yards . . . . • 
Mary J. Reid, for washing 
Alice Benvon " 



87 00 

1 00 
48 00 

106 00 

9 75 

134 {j6 

50 00 

6 15 

22 98 

7 25 

50 00 
10 05 
25 80 

10 44 

2 50 
5 00 



14' 



To J. C. Nichols, for team 




-^3 50 


E. P. Cogswell, 2d, . 


. 


<S8 


E. G, Richardson, for 


tun in u- 




piano . 




1 50 



$503 36 



teachers' salaries. 



William W. Colburn 


$1,800 00 


C. Augusta Gilo 


800 00 


Mary E. Clough 


450 00 


Emma J. Ela . 


367 50 


William E. Buck . 


1,440 00 


Mary F. Cutler 


270 00 


Martha B. Dinsmore 


378 75 


Fannie E. Porter 


435 00 


Isaac L. Heath 


1,500 00 


Lucretia E. Mannahan 


500 00 


Lottie R. Adams 


435 00 


Carry E. Reid . 


435 00 


L. H. Button . 


1,147 50 


B. F. Dame . 


210 00 


Kate L. Porter 


435 00 


Julia A. Baker 


435 00 


Clara E. Davis 


350 00 


Daniel A. Clifford . 


. 1,170 00 


Emma A. Cross 


245 00 


L. D. Henry . 


660 00 


Mary A. Parker 


120 00 


Alpha Messer . 


860 00 


Weld C. Scates 


192 50 


Eugene 0. Locke 


258 50 


Sarah J. Greene 


412 50 


JMary E. L-eland 


435 00 


Mary L, Sleeper 


435 00 


Annette McDoel 


435 00 



148 



Eliza J. Young 






moO 00 


Nancy S. Bunton 






485 00 


Hattie G. Flanders 






367 50 


C. Augusta Abbott 






435 00 


Harry C. Hadley 






210 00 


Lizzie P. Gove 






435 00 


Georgianna Dow 






435 00 


Emily J. Parker 






435 00 


Abbie E. Abbott 






435 00 


Addie Hutchinson 






198 75 


Mary J. Fife . 






435 00 


Helen M. Morrill 






442 50 


Mintie C. Edgerly 






363 75 


Marianna Clougli 






225 00 


Adelaide B. George 




255 00 


Mary A. Richardson 




435 00 


Sarah D. Lord 




435 00 


Hattie A. Mack 




392 50 


Kate W. Osgood 




210 00 


Rebecca Hall . 




420 00 


Clara N. Bro^yn 




360 00 


Mary J, Re id . 




410 00 


Maria H. Hildreth . 




500 20 


Mary B. Lane . 




350 00 


Martha W. Hubbard 




392 50 


Addie M. Chase 




421 25 


Etta M. George 




404 12 


Emma F. Soule 




111 87 


Addie A. Marshall . 




256 88 


Alice G. Lord . 




335 00 


Mary E. Page . 




135 00 


I. S.' Whitney . 




. 1,040 00 


J. D. Jones 




690 -00 


Laura A, Montgomery 




411 25 


Isabella G. Mack 






155 00 



U9 



To Clara E. Davis 


^1 50 


Charles R. Treat . 


10 00 


Emma F. Bean 


1^5 00 


Mary A. Buzzell 


141 00 


Mary A. Barnes 


150 00 


Gertrude W. Borden 


127 50 


Nellie J. Sanderson . 


ai5 00 


Georgianna Patterson 


280 00 


Lana S. George 


300 00 


Hattie L. Jones 


255 00 


Lizzie M. Tolles 


15 00 


George H. Allen 


2 00 


EUen^B. Rowell 


1G8 75 


Anstrice G. Flanders 


1G8 75 


Henry Wight . 


5 00 


Susie A. Page . 


G 00 


Nellie Pearson 


10 50 


Ella Saulsbury 


12 00 


Henry W. Hazen 


30 00 


John F. Chase 


198 00 


Nellie F. Cheney 


135 00 


Mat tie S. Miller 


400 00 


jMartha N. Mason 


279 50 



Balance to New Account 



i^33,19G 82 

844,019 83 
8 59 

$44,028 42 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



By Appropriation 



$1,000 00 



150 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Elbridge I). Hadley, for teach- 
ing .... 
J. B. Prion, for teaching . 
John F. Chase, " 
Henry Wight, " 

D. A. Clifford, 
L. H. Button, " 

Eugene 0. Locke, " 
Thomas F. Butler, for rent of 

room .... 
Frank Hiland, for teaching 
Susie A. Page, " 

Charles F. Morrill, " 
Daniel Clark, for rent of room 
Henry C. Merrill, for oil &c. 
Lewis Perry, for sawing wood 
Charles A. Smith, for lamps etc. 
Cyrus Dunn, for oil . 
Johnson & Stevens, for oil 
Hall & Kimball, for wood, 
Moses Lull, for sawing wood 
Bridget Riley, for washing 
Haines & Wallace, for lumber 
Geo. H. Dudley, for joiner work 
J. G. Edgcrly," 
Campbell and Hanscom, fo 

printing . , , . 
C. F. Livingston, for printing 
J. B. Clarke, 

Balance to New Account . 



$12 50 
90 00 
54 00 
78 00 

123 00 
67 50 
92 00 

10 56 
9 00 



8 


00 


18 


00 


32 


61 


17 


94 


1 


25 


15 


30 


2 


03 


•1 


25 


9 


55 


1 


50 




75 


16 


26 


16 


50 




50 


o 
O 


75 


2 


50 


15 


25 


$^762 


50 


237 


50 




— Sl.OOO 00 



151 

OUTSTANDING TAXES. 

List of 18G7. 

Amount Jan. 1, 1870 . . . 87,569 25 

Amount collected and abated . 478 97 



Amount Jan. 1, 1871 . • • 'it5T,090 28 

List of 1808. 

Amount Jan. 1, 1870 . . . -$8,169 01 

Amount collected and abated . 1,645 85 

Amount Jan. 1, 1871 . . • ^6,523 70 

List of 1809. 

Amount Jan. 1, 1870 . . . 130,229 49 

Amount collected and abated . 25,573 39 



Amount Jan. 1, 1871 . • • $10,050 10 

List of 1870. 

Amount committed . . -$234,047 03 

Amount collected . -1192,700 48 

Amount discounted . 4,953 90 

Amount abated . 115 50 

197,835 94 

Amount Jan. 1,1871 . . . • $30,21109 

Total Outstanding Taxes, Jan. 1, 

1871 $00,481 83 



152 



Vall'atiox, Taxes. &c 



Yeae. 



1838 

1839 

1840 

1841 

1842 

1843 

1844 

1845 

1S4G 

1847 

1848 

1849 

1850 

1851 

1852 

1853 

1854 

1855 

1850 

1857 

1858 

1859 

18G0 

1861 

1862 

1863 

18G4 

18G5 

186G 

18G7 

1868 

1869 

1870 



Valuation. 



So55.270 
G04.9G3 
946.200 
1,229.054 
1,430.524 
1,598.826 
1,873.286 
2,544.780 
3,187.726 
4.488.550 
4,664.957 
5,500.049 
5.832.080 
6,906.462 
6,795.682 
6.995.528 
8,237.617 
8,833.248 
9,244.062 
9,983.862 
10,259.080 
9,8.53.310 
9,644.937 
9,343.254 
8,891.250 
9,597.786 
9,517.512 
9,478.368 
10,050.020 
10,101.556 
9,929.072 
10,205.303 
10,710.2^ 



Taxes. 



S2.235,49 
3,029,84 
3.986.56 
9,503,74 
12,952.44 
13,764,-32 
13,584,72 
19,246.27 
22,005,95 
24,953,54 
39,712,53 
44,979,92 
48,974,23 
51,798.47 
54,379,45 
61,545,81 
62,022,44 
71,952,09 
114.214,08 
84,862,98 
78,210,85 
81,368,01 
86,804,87 
99,104,96 
84,827,45 
96,233,86 
142,815,98 
209,696,20 
245,567,19 
207,457,39 
208,783,07 
254,022,43 
234,047.63 



Ko. Polls. 

244 

427 
772 
892 

1,053 

1,053 

1,053 

1,."')61 

1,808 

2.056 

2,688 

2,518 

2,820 

2.910 

2,745 

2,907 

2,814 

3,725 

3,760 

3,695 
3,695 
3,495 
3,651 
3,974 
3,071 
2,995 
3,168 
3.176 
4.114 
4,170 
4,583 
4,709 
4,959 



153 



CITY DEBT. 



Date of Notes. 


To whom payable. 


When pajablo. 


Principal. 


July 1,1847 


City Bonds. 


July 1,1872 


S20,000 00 


Feb. 28 


1852 


Kehomiah Hunt. 


Feb. 26, 1872 


3,800 00 


July 1 


1854 


City Bonds. 


July 1, 1874 


20,000 00 


Jan. 1 


1856 


a .. 


Jan. 1, 1880 


10,000 00 


July 1 


1857 




July 1, 1877 


22,500 00 


July 9 


1858 


Kehemiali Hunt. 


July 9, 1878 


2,400 00 


July 22 


1858 


u 


July 22, 1878 


1,100 00 


Jan. 1 


18(51 


City Bonds. 


Jan. 1, 1871 


6.000 00 


July 1 


18G2 


t.' u 


July 1, 1882 


22,500 00 


Jan. 1 


1863 


u u 


Jan. 1, 1888 


35,000 00 


Oct. 31 


1863 


u a 


I^Tov. 1, 1893 


70,000 00 


April 1 


18G4 


.1. ii 


April 1, 1884 


70,000 00 


July 1 


1864 


a u 


July 1, 1894 


50,000 00 


April 1 


18G5 


i: u 


April 1, 1885 


10,000 00 


Auo-. 1 


1869 


Iw u 


Feb. 1, 1872 


1,500 00 


Au^. 1 


18G9 


C. i. 


Feb. 1,1873 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


ii t. 


Feb. 1, 1874 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


U kl 


Feb. 1, 1875 


1,.500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


IW 


Feb. 1,1876 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


18G9 


u 


Feb. 1,1877 


1,500 01) 


Aug. 1 


1869 


;. 1.. 


Feb. 1, 1878 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


.; 


Feb. 1, 1879 


10,000 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


i. 


Feb. 1, 1880 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


i. 


Feb. 1, 1881 


10,000 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


U I. 


Feb. 1.1882 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


i. u 


Feb. jl, 1883 


5,000 00 


Augr. 1 


1869 


I. u 


Feb. 'l, 1884 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


i. u 


Feb. 1, 1885 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


U 1.. 


Fel). 1, 1886 


' 5,000 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


i.L U 


Feb. 1, 1887 


3,500 00 



Amouut of Funded Debt, Jan 1, 1871 . 8393,100 00 

Temporary Loan, Jan. 1, 1871 . 20,72(5 00 

$413,826 00 
Interest due Jan. 1, 1871 *. . 9,000 00 

Outstanding Bills, Jan. 1, 1871, 22,802 75 



Total Debt and Interest 



$445,628 75 



154 



Cash in the Treasury, Jan 1, 

1871 

Notes due the city 
Interest on the same . 



Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1871 



$36,321 02 

5,460 53 

307 92 



- $42,089 47 
1403,539 28 



Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1870 . $425,510 70 
Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1871 . 403,539 28 



Decrease of debt during* the year . $21,971 42 

Note. From the net indebtedness should be deducted about $50,000.00 for out_ 
standing taxes that may be regarded good. 



CITY PROPERTY. 

City Library Building .... 

Iron Fence on Commons, 
City Hall and lot, at cost 
City Farm and permanent improvements 
Stock, tools, furniture and provisions at city 
farm ...... 

Engines, hose and apparatus 

New engine-house and stable on Vine street 

Reservoirs, at cost .... 

Hearses, houses, tomb, new cemetery, at cost 

Court-House lot, at cost 

Court-House, ..... 

Common sewers, at cost .... 

Safe, furniture and gas fixtures at City Hall 
Street lanterns, posts, pipes and frames 
Water works ..... 

Horses, carts, plows and tools 



$18,700 00 

8,500 00 

35,815 00 

17,980 00 

4,924 25 

28,108 00 

15,900 00 

10,000 00 

4,900 00 

9,500 00 

41,000 00 

56,000 00 

2,500 00 

1,970 00 

3,500 00 

3,000 00 



155 



Engine-house and ward-room on Manchester 
street ....••• 
Ward room and lot on Park street 
Engine-house and lot in AVard Seven 
Water-pii)e, wagon and apparatus for watering 
streets ...•••• 
Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad 
Gravel lot, Lowell street . . . . 
" " Hanover street .... 
" " Ward Seven (one-half acre) 
" Bakersville (1 acre) . 



!i^3,000 00 

600 00 

1,000 00 

2,000 00 

60,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,000 00 

50 00 

100 00 

321,547 25 



SCHOOL PROPERTY. 



Blodgett street school-house and lot. 
Movable furniture, maps, charts, etc 
Bridge street house and lot . 
Old High school-house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
New High school-house 
Movable furniture, books, maps 

charts and apparatus 
Concord street house and lot 
Towlesville house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Wilson Hill house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Merrimack St. house and lot . 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Manchester St. house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Park St. house and lot . 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 



.!!3,000 00 
150 00 

6,000 00 

200 00 

15,000 00 

2,000 00 

800 00 

30 00 

3,300 00 

125 00 
15,000 00 

350 00 
8,000 00 

300 00 
8,000 00 

400 00 



13,150 00 
500 00 

6,200 00 



47,000 00 
1,000 00 

830 00 

3,425 00 

15,350 00 

8,300 00 

8,400 00 



156 



Franklin St. house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring St. house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Stark House and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot, Bakersville 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot at Goffe's Falls 
Movable fwrniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Harvey's 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Webster Mills 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Hallsville house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Massabesic house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Mosquito Pond house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Center St. house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Bridge St. lot . . . 
Lincoln St. lot . 
South house and lot, Piscataquog 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Amoskeag house and lot 
Movable furniture maps, etc. 
Main St. house 



Total Property 



. 117,700 


00 




400 


00 


18,100 00 


. 14,000 


00 




400 


00 


14,400 00 


200 


00 




25 


00 


235 00 


. ^2,800 


00 




75 


00 


2,875 00 


. 3,600 


00 


f 


100 


00 


3,700 00 


. 2,500 


00 




50 


00 


2,o50 00 


500 


00 




50 


00 


550 00 


. 2,300 


00 




75 


00 


2,375 00 


. 1,400 


00 




40 


00 


1,440 00 


. 1,000 


00 




50 


00 


1,050 00 


. 4,700 


00 




125 


00 


4,825 00 
2,300 00 
6,000 00 


. 2,800 


00 




60 


00 


2,860 00 


. 3,700 


00 




125 


00 


3,825 00 




81 
•^1 


7,000 00 




68,240 00 
21,547 25 


. 


80,787 25 



REPORT (W OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City 
of 3Ianchester. 

Ill compliance with the ordinances of said city, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewitli present their annual report. 

Tlie whole nnm])cr of families which have received more 
or less assistance during the past year is twenty-six, con- 
sisting of ninety-five persons, of which number twenty fam- 
ilies and seventy-five persons have a settlement in this city, 
and the remaining six families and twenty persons in oth- 
er towns in the State. Seven of the above number have 
died, four belonging to this city, and three to other towns 
in the State. 

The whole number of persons at the almshouse during 
the year is thirty-two ; average number for the year, eight 
and one-third. There have been five deaths at the alms- 
house, one belonging to this city, and four to the County of 
Hillsborough. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JAMES A. WESTON, Chairman ex officio. 

S. S. MOULTON, 

S. J. YOUNG, 

NAHUM BALDWIN, 

M. E. GEORGE, 

HUGH CONROY, 

JOHN MORSE, 

HORATIO PJIADD, 

G. H. COLBY, 

Overseers of the Poor 



158 



I)iventory and appraisal of Personal Property at the City 
Farm^ December 23, 1870, hy the Joint Standing Commit- 
tee on City Farm. 



2 pairs working oxen 

8 milch cows 

2 two-year-old heifers 

2 bulls 

1 calf 

1 horse 

1 l)oar 
10 pigs 

2 shotes 

3 breeding sows . 
1 fatting sow 

24 bushels wheat 
50 bushels corn 

25 bushels oats 
8 bushels beans . 

110 bushels potatoes 

8 bushels beets . 
80' bushels carrots 
175 pounds pop corn 
15 bushels turnips 
10 dozen cabbages 
21 tons No. 1 hay 
13 tons No. 2 hay 

3 tons No. 3 hay 

8 tons corn fodder 
2 1-2 tons straw . 
10 barrels cider 
4 1-2 barrels soap 

1-3 barrel salted cucumbers 
47 barrels apples . 



159 



7 1-2 barrels salt pork 
112 pounds salt beef 

50 poimds fresh pork 

40 pounds fresh beef 
117 pounds cheese . 

77 bushels barley . 

92 pounds butter . 
146 pounds lard 
J 38 pounds sugar . 
Salt lish and mackerel 
112 pounds dried apple 

34 pounds tobacco 

Molasses barrel 

21 gallons molasses 

Preserved tomatoes and ketchup 

44 gallons boiled cider 
3 gallons apple sauce 

15 doz. candles 

60 pounds nails 

31 pounds drills and 12 wedges 

1 meat saw 

2 ox carts . 
6 ox sleds . 

hay cart . 
hay wagon 
horse hay fork 
one-horse tip cart 

2 single wagons . 
1 single sleigh 
1 single sled 

3 harnesses 
1 lead harness 
Curry combs and brushes 
Bridle, halter and blankets 
1 drag rake 



$187 


50 


12 


32 


6 


72 


4 


40 


20 


00 


96 


25 


36 


80 


26 


28 


16 


56 


7 


50 


11 


20 


20 


40 


1 


00 


10 


50 


o 


00 


22 


00 


o 


00 


9 


50 


O 


00 


6 


50 


2 


00 


100 


00 


60 


00 


20 


00 


75 


00 


20 


00 


100 


00 


75 


00 


12 


00 


15 


00 


30 


00 


o 
O 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 



160 



<S hand rakes 




11 hay forks 


4 sickles 


2 grain cradles 


20 scythes . 


10 scythe snaths . 


1 cross-cut saw . 


1 string hells 


1 stone digger 


7 ox-yokes an dhows 


8 plows 


1 corn sheller 


25 fowls 


2-1 meal bags 


4 bushels salt 


7 baskets 


2 buffalo robes 


2 stone drags 


2 cultivators 


'i scalding tubs . 


1 rope and block 


Scales and steelyards 


1 winnowing mill 


2 hay cutters 


1 hay knife 




25 tie-chains 




2 grindstones 




1 wheelbarrow 




1 horse rake 




1 trowel 




1 chest tools 




3 wood saws 




1 shaving horse 




1 vise and saw set 


7 axes 





IGl 



5 ladders . 

8 shovels and spades . 

6 manure forks . 
3 barrows . 

2 bog hoes 
1 bush hook 

1 set measures . 

2 gravel scrapers 
Balls and chains . 
2 set fetters 

2 pairs handcuffs 

11 cider barrels . 

9 cook and other stoves 

12 tables 
2 clocks 

2 rocking chairs . 
40 common chairs 

5 looking-glasses 
23 window curtains 

9 boxes 

5 stone pots 
20 earthcrn pots . 
11 water pails 

7 wash tubs 

5 butter tubs 

Milk cans and measures 
7 milk pails 
60 milk pans 

6 sugar buckets . 
1 churn 

1 cream pot 

1 pie cupboard . 

1 cheese press . 

2 cheese safes 

1 pair cheese tongs 
11 



$D 00 


8 00 


5 00 


12 00 


2 00 


1 00 


1 00 


7 00 


17 00 


7 00 


3 00 


11 00 


45 00 


15 00 


5 00 


2 00 


12 00 


3 50 


5 00 


1 00 


5 00 


2 00 


2 20 


3 00 


75 


2 00 


1 40 


8 00 


1 50 


3 00 


75 


2 00 


2 50 



162 



3 cheese hoops . 
1 cheese tub and basket 
1 curd cutter 

9 cheese cloths and strainer; 
Coffee and tea-pots 
Tin ware 

12 flat irons . 
Mixing trough 
Salt mortar and coffee-mill 
Castor, pepper boxes and salt dishes 

13 chambers and bed-pan 
Shovels and tongs 
Knives, forki^' and spoons 

4 lightstands 

1 dinner-bell 
Rolling-pin and cake board 

2 clothes horses . 
Wash boards and benches 
School and other books 
1 tape measure . 

12 roller towels . 
■30 common towels 

12 table cloths and 1 table cover 
20 bedsteads and cords 
16 feather beds and bedding 

Thread and needles 
Floor brushes and brooms 
Clothes lines and pins . 

13 baking pans 

5 butcher and carving knives 

3 trays or waiters 
8 jugs 

12 candlesticks 

4 flails, cops and pin . 

6 muzzle baskets 



163 



Window glass 
10 pounds dried pumpkin 
14 bushels ashes 

1 clothes wringer 

1 cider mill 

1 seed sower 

2 gauging rods 
1 washing machine 
Peed and mixing boxes 
8 hoes 

6 stone hammers 
4 iron bars . 
4 picks 
6 large chains 

3 stake chains, 1 spread and 2 

chains 
1 kerosene oil can 

1 FLAG OP OUR COUNTRY 

Watering pot and oil can 

4 bushels corn meal 

2 bushels rye meal 
Candle moulds, sieves and knife-tray 
Coffee-boiler 

Chopping-knife and skimmers 
2 lanterns and 3 lamps 
Dress-table and bureau 
Reel, swifts and spinning-wheel 

2 chests of drawers and 2 trunks 
Dining set and crockery ware 

3 1-3 barrels vinegar 

2 pounds of hops 
16 pounds of tea . 

3 pounds of sage 
Medicines . 
2 garden rakes . 



whiffletree 



$1 00 



1 


00 


2 


80 


7 


00 


55 


00 


6 


50 


1 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


4 


00 


15 


00 


4 


50 




75 


2 


00 


1 


00 


4 


00 


2 


25 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


1 


75 


5 


00 


20 


00 


40 


00 




50 


16 


00 


1 


00 


2 


50 


1 


00 



1G4 



13 00 

20 00 

1 25 

6 00 

3 00 



2 stub scythes 

1 mowing-machine 
1 meat-bench 
60 diy casks 

3 cart spires 
Pine himber 
Oak lumber 
1 cask lime 
6 wrenches 

3 clothes-baskets 
Cant-hook . 
52 pounds bar soap 

1 3-4 barrels flour 

2 pounds coffee . 
1 suction pump . 

1 beetle and 5 wedges 
New clothing- on hand 
New boots on hand 

21 yards cotton cloth 
6 skeins yarn 
6 pounds gunpowder 

14 pounds sole leather 



$4,924 25 

Citi/ of Manchester in account with City Poor Farm, Dr. 

To Stock on hand Dec. 24, 1869, . $5,845 53 
Expenditures the current year . 2,811 30 
Inerest on farm . . . 1,000 00 

19.656 83 



30 


00 


8 


00 


1 


60 


O 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 


4 


68 


15 


75 




m 


5 


00 


2 


00 


19 


00 


24 


00 


O 


15 


1 


80 


1 


50 


4 


00 



165 

Contra. ^^• 



By Stock on hand Dec. 23, 1870 . $1,92-4 25 
KStock and produce sold from 

farm 2,019 87 

Clothing for paupers . -^ <39 55 

Clothing for prisoners . . 22 6i) 

435 5-7 weeks' board of prisoners 
and 266 weeks' board of pau- 
pers, at an average cost per 
week of 13.73 . . • 2,620 51 



.^$9,65(3 8^- 



Average number of paupers for 1870 . . '> 

Average number of paupers for 1869 . . b 1-4 

Average number of prisoners for 1870 . . 8 1-3 

Average number of prisoners for 1869 . . 5 o-5 

JAMES A. WESTON, 
H. P. WATTS, 
JOHN K. McQUESTON, 
HENRY H. FULLER, 
D. L. JENKINS. 

J. S. Committee on City Farm, 



ANNUAL KEPOKT 

OF THE 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON LANDS AND 
BUILDINGS. 



The Mayor and the Joint Standuig Committee on Lands 
and buildings, having been charged hj your Honorable 
Boards with the execution of various important orders, beg 
leave to submit the following Report : 

By an order of the City Councils adopted May 3d, your 
Committee were directed to erect a school-house at Goffe's 
Falls, in accordance with the plans adopted for the same 
last year. Your committee found the foundation of the 
house already completed, and the underpinning set. This 
was done and had been paid for under the order of the city 
councils of last year. The contract for completing the 
house and the necessary out-buildings was awarded to 
Messrs. Natt Head & Co., who proceeded to the execution 
of the work, and on the 14th of Sept. the building was ac- 
cepted by us and turned over to the school department. 
That section of the city now has a convenient and attract- 
ive house. It is substantially a copy of the house in the 
Harvey district, which has heretofore been declared, by 
competent authority, one of the finest buildings to be found 
in any rural district in the State. The cost of the work 
done on this house the present year has been 13,025,43. 



16H 

Under the order of June Ttli, authorizing the purchase 
of several school-house lots, and the erection of a brick 
school-house on Main street, in Piscataquog, your commit- 
tee have bought of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company 
the following described lots : 

A lot on the west side of Main street, in Piscataquog, 
containing 24,900 square feet. 

An addition to the lot on whicli the Franklin street 
house stands, containing 7,100 square feet. 

A lot on the northeast corner of Maple and Spruce 
streets, containing 15,000 square feet. 

The total cost of these lots is $3,375.00. 

Plans were prepared and a contract entered into with 
Messrs. N. Head & Co., for the erection of a brick school- 
house, two stories in height and containing accommodations 
for four schools, on the Main street lot. It was understood 
that only two rooms would be needed at present for the ac- 
commodation of the scliools, and therefore the contract con- 
templated the finishing of but two rooms. The house is 
now rapidly approaching completion. It is a plain brick 
l)uilding, 36 by 50 feet, with two additions or wings for en- 
tries, itc, each 12 by 2-1 feet. It has a cellar extending 
under the whole house, and a slated roof. The payments 
thus far made on this house amount to 16,035.12, and the 
total cost of the house and outbuilding, together with that 
of grading and fencing the lot, will probably amount to 
about 110,000. 

The same order authorized your committee to exchange 
the school-house lot at the north-west corner of Concord 
and Beech streets for a lot at the corner of Amherst and 
Maple streets. This exchange has not been made for the 
reason that no party has been found ready to indemnify 
the city for the expense to be- incurred in grading and oth- 
erwise improving the Amherst-street lot, in order to make 
it as valuable to the city as the Concord-street lot now is. 



169 



Under your order to cause a police station or lock-up to 
be constructed in the City Hall building, your committee 
proceeded to purchase bricks and make other arrangements 
for the work, but by a subsequent order vre were directed 
to delay further action in the premises, and to select a lot 
of land for such a station near, but not on Elm street, and 
report at a future meeting of the City Councils the terms 
upon which the same could be purchased. Your committee 
thereupon selected the lot upon which the American House 
on Manchester street formerly stood, and reported the 
terms on which it could then have been purchased, and 
there, so far as your committee is concerned, the matter 

rests. 

Still your committee believe that it is entirely practicable 
to so alter the City Hall building as to make a police sta- 
tion which shall be at once convenient for the officers and 
liealthful to the prisoners, and to construct a fire-proof 
room for the city archives and secure greatly increased and 
beautified accommodations for the various city officers ; and 
that all this can l)e done for a fraction of the cost of a new 
building for the police department alone. 

By an order adopted July 18, your committee were au- 
thorized to contract for materials for the Lincoln-street 
school-house. We have therefore contracted with Jesse 
Gault, Esq., of Hooksett, for brick, and with Messrs. 
Haines & Wallace for lumber, to be delivered in season^ to 
allow of commencing the work of erecting the building 
when the season for such work shall arrive in the spring. 

JAMES A. WESTON, 
HORACE P. WATTS, 
SAMUEL BROOKS, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER. 

Cotrwiittee. 



REPORT OF C0M3IITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 

To the City Councils : 
The Committee on Cemeteries respectfully submit their 

annual report. 

During the year now closing it has, as heretofore, been 
the aim of your committee to keep the two cemeteries 
committed to our care in as good order as the meams at our 
disposal have permitted. Mr. Wm. C. Chase has, under the 
immediate direction of His Honor Mayor Weston, been 
employed constantly in The Valley ; and Mr. A. B. Chase, 
with assistance from Mr. K. Haselton, most of the time in 
Pine Grove, under the supervision of Mr. J. B. Sawyer. 
Their duties have been faithfully performed. 

Nothing requiring special notice in this report has oc- 
curred in either cemetery. 

By the report of our treasurer, which we transmit, the 
Honorable Councils will be reminded that hereafter an an- 
nual appropriation from the city treasury will be required 
for The Valley. 

The Pine Grove will, it is expected, be self-sustaining. 

S. N. BELL, 
NATHAN PARKER, 
J. F. JAMES, 
W. D. BUCK, 
WATERMAN SMITH, 
D. H. MAXFIELD, 
GEO. H. HUBBARD, 
WILLIAM BURSIEL, 

D. 0. WEBSTER, 
J. L. KENNEDY, 

E. W. HARRINGTON, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 

Committee on Cemeteries. 
Manchester, Dec. 31, 1870. 



172 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

To tJie Committee on Cemeteries : 

The Treasurer makes the following annual report of the 
receipts and expenditures of The Valley and Pine Grove 
Cemeteries : 

THE VALLEY. 

The Receipts for the past year have been as follows : 

1300 00 

207 00 

20 00 

1 50 

43 50 

IS . 145 25 



Appropriation 

Lots sold 

Hay sold 

Leaves sold 

C. S. Fisher, torn)) rent 

W. C. Chase, work done for sundry perso 



The Expenditures have been : 
Balance overdraAvn last year 
C. F. Livingston, for printing 
Wm. H. Fisk, for binding record 

book 
"Wm. Howe, for labor 
Dennis Donnelly, " 
A. B. Chase " 

Wm. C. Chase " 
" " money paid out 

Joseph B. Sawyer, treasurer 1869 

Balance, cash on hand 





1717 25 


170 59 


^ 


10 50 




1 75 




14 00 




12 00 




6 00 




488 00 




37 66 




10 00 






$656 50 





$60 75 



PINE GROVE. 

All the moneys of this cemetery pass through the city 



173 



treasury, and the items of expenditure will consequently 
appear in detail in the accounts of the City Treasurer. 

Cash in city treasury Jan. 1, 1870, . . ISIS 82 

Cash in hands of your Treasurer . . . 151 67 



The Expenditures have been : — 
To J. B. Sawyer, for services as 
treasurer for 1868 
J. B. Saw3'er, for surveying &g. 
" " horse hire 

" '• plan of grounds 

for Supt. of burials 
K. Haselton, for chopping wood, 
" " labor 

A. B. Chase, for labor 

" " teaming . 

J. G. Colt, for trees and shrubs, 
J. B. Varrick, for grindstone and 
fixtures .... 
Abbott and Kelley, for painting, 
Daniels & Co., for tools .' 
J. L. Smith & Co., for lumber 
and stakes .... 
J. B. Sawyer, blank book 



-$670 49 



Cash received for 21 8-10 cords wood 

sold ...'.. 98 10 

Cash received for tree sold . . 50 

" " lots " . . 677 55 



$776 15 
•11,446 64 



$25 


00 


49 


67 


9 


50 


40 


00 


21 


80 


242 


25 


255 


00 


22 


50 


80 


50 


9 


75 


1 


08 


3 


55 


14 


31 




25 



$775 16 



Balance, cash on hand . $671 48 



174 

Of this sum .|288.76 is in the city treasury, and $382.72 
is in the hands of your Treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 

Treasurer. 
Manchester. Dec. 31, 1870. 

I certify that I have examined the foregoing account of 
J. B. Sawyer, Treasurer of tjie Committee on The Valley 
and Pine Grove Cemeteries, and I find the same correctly 
cast and properly vouched. 

Joseph E. Bennett, 

City Cleric and Auditor. 
Manchester, Jan. 2, 1871. 



REPORT 



COMMITTEE ON SCHOOL-HOUSE HEPAIRS. 



To the City Councils of Manchester : 

The committee appointed on the third day of May last 
with authority to take charge of the general repairs and 
improvements of school buildings and grounds, submit the 
following report : 

An appropriation of $5,000 was made for repairs of 
school buildings, but your committee found that the school 
committee had expended $2,014.20 previous to the first of 
May for repairs of school buildings. This was done in ac- 
cordance with an understanding between the members of 
the School Board and other city officers to the effect that 
the School Committee had charge of such repairs. The 
repaii's made by the School Committee were such as were 
needed, and for which the Finance Committee upon the 
recommendation of the School Committee had made provis- 
ion. Your committee therefore recommended to the City 



176 

Council that a transfer of ^2,014.20 be made from the ac- 
count of Repairs of School Buildings to that of Schools, 
which was accoi'dingly done, leaving the sum of $2,985.80 
to be expended by ourselves. 

The Grammar school-house in Ward 7 has been re- 
painted, a new fence built in front of the house, and the 
yard graded. A new room has been fitted up in the lower 
house in the same ward. 

A well has been dug in the yard of the brick school- 
house in Ward 8, and a pump placed there; the yard 
around the same house has been enlarged, and a new fence 
built on the front side of it. 

A new out-house has been built at the Intermediate 
school building, and the out-houses at the old High school 
building have been repaired. 

A new fence has been built on the back side of the Spring 
street building, and inside blinds put upon eight windows 
in the building. 

A well has been dug at the school-house in Harvey's Dis- 
trict, and some repairs made upon that building, and also 
upon some of the other buildings in the rural districts. 

The yard around the school-house in Youngsville in Mas- 
sabesic district has been considerably enlarged. 

John H. Proctor, who resides near the last named school- 
house, generously offered to give to the city over an acre 
of land ; his liberal offer was accepted, and your committee 
have received from Mr. Proctor a deed of the same, and 
have enclosed the area thus received. A well has also 
been dug in the yard, and the school as Avell as persons 
living in the neighborhood have for the past three mouths 
been supplied from it. 

Minor repairs have been made at several of the school 
buildings, of which your committee cannot speak in det-ail. 
The repairs made by the School Committee will be found 



177 

noticed ill the report of the iSupcnnteiident of Schools. 
The items of the above named expenditures will be found 
in the forthcoming- Annual Report of the city for 1870. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JAMES A. WESTON, 
H. P. WATTS, 
SAMUEL BROOKS, 
JOHN W. JOHNSON, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 
WILLIAM M. SHEPARD, 
JOSEPH rj. EDGERLY, 

Committee. 
Manchester, Dec. liO, 1870. 

12 



SEVK^JTEENTH ANNUAL I!EP01!T 



TEUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Council of the Citij of Manchester : 

The Trustees in making their Seventeenth Annual Re- 
port of the condition and affairs of the Library respectfully 
submit, that no unusual circumstance has occurred in the 
administration of its affairs ; while the interest felt in its 
continued prosperity is clearly shown by the continued and 
increasing use made by all classes of the community of the 
volumes contained on its shelves. 

A comparison of the number and character of the vol- 
umes taken from the library during the past year with 
that for a series of years preceding, shows that there has 
been a steady increase both in the number of persons 
making use of the library and of the volumes in circula- 
tion. It is at the same time gratifying to note that the use 
of works of standard merit is likewise constantly increas- 
ing, as the contents of the library become more generally 
known. 

The trustees regret that tlie practice of marking in the 
])Ooks, by those using the library, although diminished 
since attention was called to that subject in the last report, 



180 

lias not wholly ceased. It is not, however, supposed that 
this is done generally with any intention wantonly to injure 
the books but rather from thoughtlessness, and the trustees 
are of the opinion that the impropriety of thus defacing 
the books needs only to bo fully brought to the attention 
of our citizens to cause it to cease entirely. 

Losses of books to a small extent have occurred from 
time to time by the volumes Ijecoming too much worn for 
further use, and in a few instances it has been impossible 
to secure the return of the books taken out by the persons 
using the library. It has been deemed proper to replace 
as far as possible all such deficient volumes in cases where 
they had become worn out, or where there seemed to be no 
prospect of recovery, in order that the works represented 
on the catalogue as having been in the library should be 
in fact found on the shelves as fully as practicable. 

The number of volumes thus replaced has been two hun- 
dred and fifty-eight. A small number of inconsiderable 
value it has been found impossible to replace at present, 
but they can no doubt be ol)tained at some subsequent 
time. In the purchase of new books, the trustees have, as 
heretofore, endeavored to make a proportional increase in 
all the different departments of learning, and to make the 
library as perfect in that respect as the means at their com- 
mand would admit. 

The rooms now occupied for the library have for some 
time been considered inadequate for its proper care and 
preservation. The new library building erected by the 
city being nearly completed, it has not been deemed expe- 
dient to make any changes in the arrangements of the 
library, but to leave that matter to be done, if required, 
when the library shall have beqn removed to the new and 
commodious rooms in the library building. 

It was expected that this building would have been fin- 
ished ready for occupancy before the end of the present 



181 

year, arrangements and contracts having ])ecn made to that 
effect. 

By reason of the extensive fire in Jnly last, and from 
other causes, it has l)een found by the committee having 
charge of the construction of the library building imprac- 
ticable to have the work comi)leted as early as was origin- 
ally anticipated ; but there seems now no doubt that the 
building will be ready for the reception of the library early 
in the ensuing spring, when the lil)rary may at once be 
removed. 

The report of the librarian shows that at the time of the 
last report, there were in tlie library fourteen thousand one 
hundred and twenty-four volumes. That there have been 
added tlic past year eight hundred and six books and 
pamphlets, making the total number of books and pam- 
phlets now in tbe library, fourteen thousand nine hundred 
and thirty. 

Of the additions, one lunidrcd and forty-nine pamphlets 
and two hundred and three books have been presented. 
Three liundred forty-nine have been purchased, and one 
hundred five volumes of periodicals have been bound. 

Sixty different periodicals have been regularly received 
for use at the library rooms. Whenever the volumes have 
been completed, they have been bound and placed on the 
slielves for general circulation. 

The library has been open for the delivery of books two 
hundred fifty-two days, exclusive of the time when the li- 
brary is necessarily closed for the annual examination. 

During tiiis period there have been taken out upwards of 
thirty thousand volumes, all of which have been duly ac- 
counted for at the end of the year, with the exception of 
ten volumes, which have not yet been returned. These 
will undoubtedly ])e returned soon after the re-opening of 
the library. 

The treasurer's report shows that there has been ex- 



182 

peuded for l)Ooks, including the replacing of those worn 
out, the sum of eight hundred nineteen dollars fourteen 
cents ; for periodicals, the sum of two hundred sixteen dol- 
lars twenty-four cents, and that there is on hand unex- 
pended, the sum of six hundred ninety-two dollars twenty- 
five cents. It also presents a summary of the expenses 
incident to the care of the library, amounting to thirteen 
hundred forty-eight dollars eight cents. 

The appropriation made the past year for the support of 
the library has been sufficient to defray the expenses of its 
organization, leaving unexpended a balance sufficient to 
meet the necessary expenditures until another appropria- 
tion shall be made. 

Under ordinary circumstances a like amount would be 
sufficient for the succeeding year, Init as considerable ex- 
pense must necessarily be incurred in procuring furniture 
and in the removal of the library to the library building, 
an additional amount will be required to defray the ex- 
penses incident to such removal, and to place the library 
on a permanent basis and to provide the fixtures and furni- 
ture necessary for the accommodation of the public. 

A proper and reasonable expenditure in this respect is 
required to enable the trustees to protect the property in 
their charge, and to carry out the original design of the 
City Council in i)romoting its estal)lishment. 

In board of Trustees, Dec. 31, 1870. 
Read and approved. 

JAMES A. WESTON, Mayor. 
Wm. C. Clarke, Clerk. 



183 



TREASURER\^ REPORT. 

lo the Board of Trmtee^ of the City Llhrar>i : 

The Treasurer of the Board makes the following report 
of the receipts and expenditures by the Board of the funds 
received ])y thcni on account of the City Library. 



1870. 

Jan. 1. To balance as per last 

report . . • *"-- ^"^^ 

Jail -^4 cash of Lil)rarian . - T5 

Sept. 5. " " • -^ 00 

Get 12. '' of Citv Treasurer 200 00 

.>! - " . 100 00 

Dec. 20.' - •• • ''^O 0'^ 



Dii 



1870. 

Jan. 10. By i.aid N. E. News Co. "^IT 07 

21 24 

" •' . 10 10 

H. B. Dawson . •'> 00 

N. E. News Co. 11 05 

Temple Prime . 2 00 

A.. Chandler . ■'> 75 

N. E. News Co. 28 00 

W. S. West . 8 00 

Dawson Bros. . 23 61 

N. E. News Co. 47 94 

Dawson Bros. . 20 40 

N. E. News Co. 35 39 

N. E. News Co. 27 25 

Lee & Shepard - 53 24 

Lee & Shepard . 220 82 



^1,727 03 
Cr. 



Feb. 


7. 


Mar. 


1 . 




30. 


Apr. 


4. 




9. 




22. 


May 


11. 




18. 


June 


2. 




G. 




27. 


July 


5. 


Aug. 


8. 




13. 




23. 



184 



Aug. 23. 


by pa; 


i R. Hills . 


13 75 


Sept. 5. 




N. E. News Co. 


13 07 


26. 




Lee & Shepard 


15G 48 


Oct. 3. 




N. E. News Co. 


22 18 


12. 




N. E. News Co. 


156 48 


29. 




Lee & Shepard 


'i6 89 


31. 




N. E. News Co. . 


21 55 


Nov. 10. 




C. B. Poor 


4 00 


28. 




B. Chase . 


5 00 


Dec. 5. 




N. E. NcwsCo. . 


25 90 


31. 


Bal 


ance . 


692 25 



'11,727 63 

The expenditures for incidental expenses of the Library, 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1870, the items of which ap- 
pear at large in the Annual Report of the city, are as fol- 
lows : 

Librarian's salary 

Rent 

Licidentals . 

Gas 

Catalogue 

Fuel 

Lisurance 

Bindinsf 







'TPUOO 

250 


00 








34 


16 








95 


94 








78 


00 








12 


00 








57 


50 




220 


48 












$1,348 08 



185 



RECAPITULATION. 

Appropriation . . . . ' •|2,<)8-» ->0 

Paid Trustees lor purchase of books, -|5l,000 00 
Paid incidental expenses . . 1,348 08 

Balance .... ooo -J- 

$2,088 -SO 

Respcctl'ullv submitted. 

y. N. BELL, 
Treasurer of the Trustees of the City Lihrari/. 

Dec, 1870. We have examined the above report and 
find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JAMES A. WESTON, 
WM. P. NEWELL, 

Committee of Accounts for the Citi/ Lihranj. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the Trustees of the City Library, and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

City Auditor. 



186 

LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

The following is a report of the practical workings of the 
Library for the year 1870, also of its present condition, and 
is respectfully submitted. 

By rej)ort of last year there were in the library fourteen 
thousand one hundred and twenty-four volumes. Durino- 
the year the accessions have l»ecn eight hundred and six» 
including iiamphlets, making the total number at present 
fourteen thousand nine hundred and thirty volumes. The 
additions are more than for any year since 1804, and nearly 
double those of last year. Of this increase, one hundred 
and five volumes are periodicals, which have been regularly 
received, and are now bound and placed on the shelves'; 
three hundred and fifty-two are donations,— of which one 
hundred and forty-nine are pamphlets,— and three Imndred 
and forty-nine were by purchase. A list of the donations, 
■with names of tlie donors, is appended to this report. 

In the last report mention was made of those volumes 
withdraw^n from circulation by reason of being too much 
worn for use, of which there are, including those lost, four 
hundred and eleven. Two hundred and ]iinety-one of 
these now stand on shelves assigned them. Forty-four 
have been laid aside since the last report. During the 
year, effort has l)een made to replace as many of these vol- 
umes as possible, resulting in the purchase of two hundred 
and fifty-eight, leaving one hundred and fifty-three which 
cannot probably be obtained. 

The number of periodicals regularly received the past 
year, for use at the library, is sixty. Since November 1st 
four others have been added to the list, viz : " The Builder'* 



187 

and '■ TliG Alpine Journal," publislicd in London ; and 
"The Technologist" and " Van Nostrand's Engineering 
Magazine," published in New York. The " Hours at 
Home " and " Putnam's Magazine" have been merged in 
one, and now published under the name of " Scribner's 
Monthly." For three years past the " Lake Village 
Times" has been regularly received, being sent by the pub- 
lishers, Messrs. Stanton and Haynes. Since last May Mr. 
J. M. Sanborn has furnished the library with the " Western 
Home Journal," a weekly published in Lawrence, Kansas. 
The lil)rary has Ijeen opened for delivery of books two 
hundred and fifty-two days. The number of volumes 
loaned during the time is nearly thirty thousand. Largest 
number delivered in any one day was two hundred and 
twenty-one, on Friday, April 8. Only six are luiac- 
counted for. These cannot be considered as lost, but owing 
to delinquencies on the part of borrowers, they have not, 
as yet, been returned. By the last report ten were miss- 
ing ; eight of these have been returned, and the other two 
arc juvenile, and can be readily replaced. 

The practice of defacing books by pen and pencil marks 
has not yet ceased, but think the inclination less than in 
some years past. Li order that this be wholly done away 
with, more assistance will be required, so that every book 
can be examined before being placed on the shelves. If 
this duty was faithfully attended to it would be easy to de- 
tect any one practicing this evil. It may not, however, be 
thought best to adopt this plan at present. 

The whole number of guarantees received to date is seven 
thousand one hundred and twenty-two. Number received 
during the year is four hundred and seventy-three. Eigh- 
teen persons have deposited money for use of books. 

The amount of money received for fines, on hand Jan. 1, 
1870, was twenty-one dollars and thirty-four cents. During 



188 

tlic year there has l)eeu received fortj-one dollars and 
forty-nine cents. Have {)aid for stationery, postage, ex- 
press charges, and other incidentals, in all, twenty-one dol- 
lars and fifty-eight cents, leaving a balance of forty-one 
dollars and twenty-five cents. 

C. H. MARSHALL, 

Lihrariayi. 
December 81, 1870. 



189 



DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY IN 1870. 

Bv Hon. A. F. Stevens, Nashua. 

Annual Report Board of Regents, Smithsonian Insti- 
tution. 1868. 8vo. 
Reply of Joint Committee on Ordnanec Department. 
1869. 8vo. 
By Hon. A. H. CraCxIN, Lebanon. 

Commercial Relations of the United States. 1863-68. 

7 vols. 8vo. 

Report on Commerce and Navigation. 1867-68. 2 vols. 

8 vo. 

Executive Documents. 1868-69. 6 vols. 8vo. 
By Hon. J. W. Patterson, Hanover. 

Set of Executive Documents. 1868. 36 vols. 8vo. 

Set of Executive Documents. 1868. 40 vols. 8vo. 

Miscellaneous Reports— Paris Exposition. 1867. 6 
pamphlets. 
By Hon. John Lynch, Portland, Me. 

Water Power of the State of Maine. 1870. 8vo. 
By Prof. Benj. Peirce, Washington. 

Report of Superintendent Coast Survey. 1867. -Ito. 
By Gen. 0. 0. Howard, Washington. 

Report on Schools for Freedmen. 1869. Pamphlet. 
By J. W. Alvord, Washington. 

Report on Schools for Freedmen. 1869. Pamphlet. 

Letter on Condition of Freedmen. 1870. Pamphlet. 
By G. P. Randall, Chicago, III. 

Hand-book of Designs on Architecture. 1868. Pamph. 
By Hon. Jacob F. James, Manchester. 

Report of Hillsborough County Commissioners. 1869. 
, Pamphlet. 
By Joseph E. Bennett, Manchester (in behalf of City). 
New Hampshire Provincial Papers. 1623-1822. Bou- 
ton. 1869. 3 vols. 8vo. 



190 

Public Laws United States. 1857-5S. 2 vols. 8vo. 

Acts and Resolutions of 37tli Congress. 3 vols. 8vo. 

Ordinances of City of Lynn, Mass. 1865. 8vo. 

Charter and Ordinances of City of Manchester. 1870 
8vo. 

Laws of New Hampshire. 1826-28-37. 3 vols. 8vo. 

Acts of U. S. Congress. 7 vols. 8vo. 

Collection of Pamphlets on miscellaneous subjects. 88 
pamphlets. 
By Joseph B. Sawyer, Manchester. 

Report on Water Supply for City of Manchester. 1869. 
2 pamphlets. 
By A. H. Daniels, Manchester. 

Executive Documents. 1867. 8vo. 

Report Secretary of Connecticut Board of Agriculture 
1869. 8vo. 

Treatise on Dyeing and Calico Printing. Xew York 
1846. 8vo. 
By Charles H. Brown, Manchester. 

Proceedings of the R. W. Grand Lodge of the United 
States, L 0. 0. F. 1867-70. 4 pamphlets. 
By Charles F. Livlngston, Manchester. 

Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire F 
& A. M. 1869. Pamphlet. 
By George W. Hancock, Manchester. 

Anatomy and Physiology of the Horse. Dadd. 1857. 
8vo. 
By Wm. E. Moore, Manchester. 

Memorial of the Class of '49, Dartmouth College. 1869. 
8vo. 
By Arthur G. Fitz, Manchester. 

Catalogus Collegii Dartmuthensis. 1867. Pamphlet. 
By WiLLL\M Lees, Manchester. 

Hungary and Kossuth. Tefft. 1857. 12mo. 



191 

Sketches of Bunker Hill Battle and Mouumeut. 1840. 

18mo. 
Bryant <fe Stratton's Book-keeping. 18G4. 8vo. 
By Patrick McDonough, Manchester. 

Collection of Pamphlets on State Affairs. 12 pamphs. 
By Mrs. H. C. Sanderson, Manchester. 

Catalogue of the Manchester Athenaeum. 1815. Pamph. 
By U. S. Congress, Washington. 

Set of Executive Documents, 40th Congress. 47 vols. 
8vo. 
By Smithsonian Institution, Washington. 

Annual Reports Board of Pvegents. 18G4-G5. 2 vols. 

8vo. 
Contributions to Knowledge. Vol. 16. 18(39. 4to. 
Miscellaneous Collections. Vols. 8-9. 18G9. 8vo. 
By Commissioner of Patents, Washington. 

Report of the Commissioner. 18G7. 4 vols. 8vo. 
By the Combiissioners, Columbus, Ohio. 

Report on Reform Schools in Ohio. 1863. Pamphlet. 
By the Publishers. 

Scriptural Question Books, o vols. 24 mo. 

Reply in case of Gen. FitzJohn Porter, Baltimore. 

1863. Pamphlet. 
Catalogue of Scientific Books. Van Nostrand. New 

York. 1870. Pamphlet. 
Philosophical Magazine, Jan. 1863. London. Pamph. 
Journal of Horticulture, Pel)., 1867. Boston. Pamph. 
By Executive Committees. 

Report of Young Men's Association, Buffalo, N. Y. 

1869. Pamphlet. 
Report of Young Men's Institute, Hartford, Conn. 
1869. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Public Library, Boston. 
Annual Report. 1869. Pamphlet. 
Annual Report. 1869-70. Pamphlet. 



192 

Bulletins Public Library. 1870. 4 pamphlets. 
By Boston Society of Natural History, Boston. 

Annual Reports. 1865-69. 5 pamphlets. 
By Boston Athen^um, Boston. 

Catalogue of Books. 1827. 8vo. 

Lists of Books of Athenaeum. 13 pamphlets. 

By-Laws and Rules of Athenasum. 2 pamphlets. 
By Trustees Public Library, New Bedford, Mass. 

Catalogue of. Books. 1858. 8vo. 

Supplement to Catalogue. 1869. 8vo. 

Annual Reports. 1853-69. 15 pamphlets. 
By Trustees Peabody Institute, Peal)ody, Mass. 

Annual Report. 1869. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Holton Library, Brighton, Mass. 

Annual Report. 1869. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Public Library, Brookline, Mass. 

Catalogue of Books. 1865. 8vo. 

Annual Reports. 1868-69. 2 pamphlets. 
By Directors Public Library, Lowell, Mass. 

Catalogue of Books. 1861. 8vo. 

Supplement to Catalogue. 1870. Pamphlet. 

Annual Report. 1869. Pamphlet. 
By Directors Public Library, Newburyport, Mass. 

xVnnual Reports. 1857-69. 13 pamphlets. 
By Directors op Public Library, Springfield, Mass. 

Annual Report. 1869-70. Pamphlets. 

Annual Report of Sciiool Committee, Springfield. 1868. 
Pamphlet. 
By Directors op Public Library, Worcester, Mass. 

Annual Report. 1869. Pamphlet. 
By Directors op Mercantile Library, New York. 

Constitution and By-Laws. 1870. Pamphlet. 

Supplement to Catalogue. 1869. 8vo. 

Annual Report. 1869. Pamphlet. 



193 

By Directors of Mechanics' Institute, Cincinnati, 0. 

Annual Report. 1869. Pamphlet. 
By Directors of M. L. Association, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Annual Report. 1869. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees of Library Association, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Annual Report. 1869. Pamphlet. 
By Y. M. Institute, Hartford, Conn. 

Annual Report, 1869-70. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees of Public Library, Manchester. 

Supplement to Catalogue. 1869. Pamphlet. 
By N. H. State Library, Concord. 

Journals of the Legislature. 1827-28. 2 vols. 8vo. 
By Secretary of State, Concord. 

N. H. Provincial Papers. 1869. 3 vols. 8vo. 

General Statutes of New Hampshire. 1869. 8vo. 

Laws Passed June Session, 1870. 8vo. 

Report of Board of Education. 1869-70. Pamphlet. 
13 



194 



ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR 

1870. 

Gen. !N"<>. Xo. Shelf- 

14,125 Our Boys and Girls. 18G0. 8vo. ... 45 167 

14,12(3 Our Young Folks. Vol. 5. 1869. 8vo. . 47 166 
14,127 Student mid Schoolmate. Yols. 23-24. 1!)()9. 

8vo 54 1C4 

14,128-9 Littell's Living Age. Yols. 102-.3, 3-4, 1869. 

8vo 72 165 

14.130 Putnam's Magazine. Yol. 4, 2, 1869. 8vo. 65 174 

14.131 Atlantic Monthly. Yol. 24, 2, 1869. 8vo. . 48. 186 

14.132 Harper's Monthly Magazine. Yol. 39, 2, 

1869. 8vo 50 153 

14.133 Eclectic Magazine. Yol. 10, 2, 1869. Svo. 57 183 

14.134 The Galaxy. Yol. 8, 2, 1869. Svo. . . 62 176 

14.135 Chambers's Journal. 1808. Svo. . . . 35 253 

14.136 Hours at Home. Yol. 9, 2, 1SG9. Svo. . 51 185 

14.137 Arthur's Home Magazine. Yol. 34,, 2, 1869 . 44 193 

14.138 Peterson's Magazine. Yol. 56, 2, 1809. 8vo. 38 194 

14.139 Godey's Lady's Book. Yol. 79, 2, 1869. Svo. 73 173 

14.140 Leslie's Magazine. Yol. 25, 2, 1869. 4to. . 34 161 

14.141 Cornhill Magazine. Yol. 20, 2, 1869. Svo. . 20 85 

14.142 Temple Bar. Yol. 27, 2, 1869. Svo. . . 50 197 

14.143 Blackwood's Magazine. Yol. lOG, 2, 1869. . 52 175 

14.144 Leisure Hour. 1809. Svo 52 171 

14.145 Every Saturday. Yol. 8, 2, 1869. Svo. . 75 172 

14.146 Westminster Review. Yol. 92, 2, 1869. . 50 172 

14.147 London Quarterly Review. Yol. 127, 2, 1809. 63 172 

14.148 Xorth British Review. Yol. 50,2, 1869. Svo. 48 173 

14.149 Edinburgh Review. Yol. 130, 2, 1869. Svo. 62 173 

14.150 London Lancet 1869. Svo. ... 40 171 

14.151 Merchants' Magazine. Yol. 61, 2, 1869. Svo. 66 175 

14.152 Horticulturist. Yol. 24, 1869. Svo. . , 49 204 
M,153 American Journal of Science and Arts. 

Yol. 98, 2, 1869. Svo 48 176 

14,154 K. E. Historical and Genealogical Register. 

Yol. 23, 1869. . . .^ . . . 30 265 

14,15.5-0 National Quarterly Review. Yol. 17, 2, 1868. .57 19 



195 

14.157 North American Review. Vol. lOs. 2, 180'.). 

8vo '^1 1^^ 

14.158 Annual Reports Board of Regents, Smithso- 

nian Institution. 1868. 8vo. . . . 54 33() 
14.150 Report Committee of Ordnance De])artment. 

18G8. 8vo 53 368 

14.160 Annual Report Trustees Public Library, Bos- 
ton. 1869. Pamph 1-45 351 

14.161-2 Report on Water Supply for Manchester. 

186!). Pamph -M3 351 

14.163 Report on Preedmen, etc. 1869. Pamph. . 13-47 351 

14.164 Popular Science Review. Vol. 8, 1869. . 42 164 

14.165 Scientific American. Vol. 21, 2, 1869. 4to. 26 J 
14,166, Harper's Weekly. Vol. 13, 1869. 4to. . 17 G 
14,167-9 Provincial Papers— Records of Province X. 

H. 3 vols 43 242 

14,170 Anatomy and Physiology of the Horse. 

Dadd. 1857. 8vo 42 222 

14,171-7 Commercial Relations of United States. 

1863-69. 7 vols. 8vo 20 365 

14,178-80 Report of Commissioner on Commerce and 

Kavigatiouof the U.S. 1867-'68. 3 vols. 18 364 
14,182-4 Diplomatic Correspondence of the United 

States. 1868. 4 vols. 8vo. ... 21 364 
14 185-7 Report Secretary of the Interior. 1867- 6«. 

3 vols 25 364 

14,188-91 Report Secretary of War. 1867-68. 3 vols. 28 364 
14,192-3 Report Secretary of Navy. 1867-68. 2 vols. 

8vo 32 364 

14194-5 Report Postmaster General. l867-'68. 2 vols. 

Svo 34 364 

14.196 Commercial Relations of United States. 1868. 

Svo 27 365 

14.197 Report Commissioner on Agriculture. 1868. 

Svo 35 355 

14.198 Report Board of Regents Smithsonian Insti- 

tution. 1868. Svo 55 336 

14 199 Report Superintendent of Coast Survey. 1866. 

4to 31 322 

14,200-3 Reports Department of Agriculture, 1866- 

'69. 4 vol. Svo 55 206 

14,204-7 Report Commissioner of Patents. 1867. 4vols. 

8vo 32 366 



19G 

U,L>08-9 Laws of United States. 1857- 08. 2 vols. . 40 324 
14,210-12 Acts and Eesolutions of Congress. 1862-3. 

3 vols. 8vo 37 

14.213 Eevised Ordinances City of Lynn, Mass. 

1865. 8vo. . . . . . . 79 265 

14.214 Memorial of tlie Class of 1849. Dartmouth 

CoIIe<i;e. 1870. 8vo 25 .307 

14.215 Report on Water Supply for City of Provi- 

dence, R. I. 1868. Pamph. . . . 10-31 351 
14,210 Report on Water Supply for City of Chelsea, 

Mass. 1868. Pamph 11-31 351 

14.217 Specifications for Sewerage of Piedmont Dis- 

trict, city of Worcester, Mass. 1869. 

Painph 12-31 351 

14.218 Report Prof J. A. Kassett on Monitor Gas 

Works, Salem, Mass. 18G7. Pamph. . 13-31 351 

14.219 Description of Wrought -Iron Cement- 

Wired Water-Pipe Manchester. 18G9. . 

i^amph I4_;jl 351 

14.220 Rules and Regulations Trustees of Peahody 

Institute, Peabody, Mass. 1869. Pamph. 5-32 351 

14.221 Claims, Description and Testimonials of 

Steam Fire-Proof Safe. Boston. 1868, 

Pamph (3_32 351 

14.222 Report on Puljlic Schools City of Worcester, 

Mass. 1868. PamjDh 1-61 351 

14.223 Report School Committee City of Chelsea, 

Mass. 1868. Pamph 2-61 351 

14,224-5 Report on Public Schools, City of Concord, 

1866-69. Pamph 3_61 351 

14.226 Congressional Directory, 2d Sess. 40th Cong. 

Poore. 1868. Pamph 2-62 351 

14.227 Opinions on the Robins' Wood-Preserving 

Process. Boston. 1868. Pamph. . . 1-63 351 

14.228 Description, Opinions, etc., American Gas- 

Light Co. Boston 1868. Pamph. . . 2-63 351 

14.229 Advantages of Stafford Pavement. Boston, 

1869. Pamph 3_63 351 

14.230 Mode of Construction Nicolson Wooden Pave- 

ment. Boston. 1869. Pamph . . . 4-63 351 

14.231 Report of State Treasurer. 1868. Pamph.. 1-64 351 



197 

14,2;32 llepoi-t Directors Concord 1>. IJ. Corporation. 

18G8. Pamph '-J-'it ^i-')! 

14,2:3.') Annual Keport City of Coiu-onl. ISGT. 

Pamph •>-'>4 ■'>'>\ 

14.234 Revised Ordinanc'cs City of Macon, Mo. 

18()7. Pamph 4-04 :][>1 

14,2;5a Annual Report City of Path. INIc. ISliS. 

Pamph. •''-•>4 ool 

14.23(5 Municipal Register, City of Batli. Me. 

Pamph '>-()() :VA 

14.2:!7 Annual Reports (Jity of luicklaud. Me. 1807. 

Pamph 'i'-<>4 :i'A 

14.2;jS Inaugural Address of Nathaniel B. Shurtlelf. 

Mayor, Boston. 18()8. Pamph. . . 1-<m 'i.')! 
14,239-41 Inaugural Address of Chas. Saunders, Mayor. 

Cambridge, Mass. 1807. Pampli. . . 2-0.-) :!,31 

13.243 Annual Report City of Taunton. Mass. Ls08. 

Pamph 0-(i.-) .351 

14.244 Municipal Register City of Springlield. Mass. 

1808. Pamph 7-i)."> 3r»l 

14,24.5 Annual Report City of Portsmouth. ISdl). 

Pamph ''^-'•'j ''"'l- 

14.246 Annual Reports City of Lynn, Mass. ISOS. 

Pamph 1-<J'> 2.31 

14.247 Annual Reports City of "^Vorcester, Mass. 

1800. Pamph 2-00 3.")1 

14.248 Annual Report City of Lewiston, Me. 180'.l. 

Pamph "'-60 351 

14.249 Annual Report City of Dover. 1808. Pamph. 4-66 351 

14.250 Annual Rei)orts City of Biddeford, Me. 1808. 

Pamph i">-6<> '>51 

14.251 Annual Reports Town of Keene. 1808. 

Pamph 6-06 351 

14.252 Annual Report City of Salem, Mass. 1S07. 

Pamph '^-60 351 

14.253 Letter of X. G. Ordway to Ceo. G. Fogg. 

1809. Pamph. . .... 5-0;) 351 

14.254 Catalogue of Tilden Ladies' vSeminary, Leb- 

anon. 1869. Pamph 1-07 351 

14,255 Journal of Proceedings R. AV. Grand Lodge, 

I. O. O. F. of :Nrew Ilamp. 1809. Pamph. 2-07 351 



198 

14.2;j6 Report Adjutant-General of New Ilanipshire. 

18()8. Pampb !J-2'J 30 1 

14.2.")7 Reports Trustees, Treasurer, etc.. of X. II. 

Asylum for the Insane. 186'J. Paniph. . 10-29 351 
14.2.JS Report Trustees K. H. College of Agriculture 

and Mechanic Arts. 1869. Pamph. . 11-29 351 

I4,25y Report of State Treasurer, 1869. Pamph. . 12-29 351 
U.2G0 Report Trustees X. H. College of Agriculture 

and Mechanics Arts. 18(39. Pamph. . 13-29 351 
14.2(il Report of the Insurance Commissioners. 

1869. Pamph 14-29 351 

14.262 Reports of Warden and Inspector of State 

Prison. 1869. Pamph. \ . . . 15-29 351 
14-2f)3 Report Hillsborough County Commissioners. 

1868. Pamph 16-29 351 

14.264 Annual Report City of Manchester. 1869. 

Pamph. 3-51 351 

14.205 Supplement to Catalogue of City Library, 

Lowell, Mass. 1869. Pamph. ". . "'. 3-35 351 
14.2(56-81 Annual Report Trustees Hoi ton Lilirary. 

Brighton, Mass. 1869. Pamph. . . 18-27 351 

14.267 .Vnnual Report Y. M. Mercantile Library As- 

sociation, Pittsbvu-gh,Penn. 1869, Pamph. 19-27 351 

14.268 Annual Report Directors City Library. Low- 

ell, Mass. 1869. Pamph 20-27 351 

14.269 Annual Report Directors Public Library, 

Xewburyport, Mass. 1867-69. 13 Pamphs. 2-54 351 

14.282 Annual Report Trustees Public Library, Xew 

Bedford. 1869. Pamph 19-55 351 

14.283 Villa Eden: or Country-House on the Rhine. 

Auerbach. Part 3." 1869. 8vo. 
14,284-5 Reports Board of Regents Smithsonian Insti- 
tution. 1864-65. 8vo. .... 

14.286 Supplement to Catalogue of X. Y. Mercantile 

Library. 1869. 8vo 

14.287 Report Postmaster-General. 1867. 8vo. 
14,288-9 Diplomatic Correspondence of United States. 

1868. 20. 8vo 37 364 

14,290-1 Report Secretary of Interior. 1867. 2 vols. 

8vo 39 3C4 

14,292-3 Report Secretary of AViir. 18(i7. _■ vol. Svo. 41 S64 



39 133 


5() 


336 


23 


313 


36 


364 



199 

14.294 lloport Secretary of Navy. 18()7. 8 vo. . 43 3G4 

14,2'J.j Kcport Board of Ee.sjjents, Smithsonian Insti- 
tution. 1868. Svo <»0 330 

14,290 Charter and Revised Ordinances City of Man- 
chester. 1870. 8vo 80 2Gi 

14.207 A Battle of tlie Jiooks. " Gail Hamilton." 

1870. 12mo 71 10.5 

14,2!)8 Hedged In. Phelps. 187(i. Vmio. . . . 72 10.; 

14,291) An Old Fashioned Girl. Alcott. 1870. 12mo. 73 105 

14.300 Hospital Sketches: and Camp and Fire-side 

Stories. Alcott. 1870. 12mo. . . 74 105 

14.301 Society and Solitude. Emerson. 1870. I2m(). ' 84 190 

14.302 Lectures on Application of Chemistry and 

Geology to Agriculture. Johnston. 12mo. 4;) 228 
14.3(1.) \\^oodward's National Architect, AVoodward 

& Thompson. 1809. 4to. ... 32 C 

14,:')04-7 Reports ]5oard of Regents Smithsonian In- 
stitution. 1862-65. 4 vols. 8vo. . . 63 :j3f5 
14;j0S lieport Superintendent Coast Survev. 1859. 

4to • . . ' . . 18 42 

14,309-14 The Congressional Globe. 2d Session, 40th 

Congress. 1867-68. 6 vols. 4to. . . 14 341 
14,315-20 The Congressional Globe. 2d Session 40th 

Cong. 1867-68. 6 vols. 4to. . . . 25 341 
14,321-23 The Congressional Globe. 2d Session 39tli 

Cong. 1866-67. 3 vols. 4to. . . . 31 341 
14,324-29 The Congressional Globe. 2d Session 40th 

Cong. 1807-08. vols. 4to ... 34 341 
14,330-32 The Congressional Globe. 3d Session 40th 

Cong. 1868-69. 3 vols. 4to. ... 40 341 
14,333 The Congressional Globe. 1st Session 41st 

Cong. 1869. 4to 43 341 

14.334 Annual Report Y. M. Association, Bullalo, 

X. Y. 1869. Pamph 14-21 351 

14.335 Catalogue of Manchester Athenteum. 1845. 

Pamph 12-40 351 

14.336 Report Hillsborough County Commissioners. 

1809. Pamph 4-43 351 

Report on Public Schools, St. Louis, Mo. 

1809. Pamph 

14,338 Political Document. Letter to the President. 

Carey. 1809. Pamph 6-67 35 



200 

14,33!i Xew Ilanipslurc in tlu- Reliellion. Otis. 

1870. 8vo ,34 2o4 

14.340-1 Diplomatic Correspoiuleiife of U.S. 1.S07-08. 

2 vols. 8vo. 3.") 374 

14.342-3 Report Secretary of ^Var. 18(j7-G8. -1 vols. 

8vo 37 374 

14.344 Report Secretary of Interior. 18(J7-(')8. 8vo. 3H 374 

14.345 Reports Secretar}- of JSTavy and Postmaster- 

General, 1867-G8. 8vo 4U 374 

14,341'. Report Secretary of Treasm-y. 1867-G8. 8vo. 41 374 
14,347 Report Comptroller of Currency and Commis- 
sioner Internal Revenue. 1867-68, 8vo. 42 374 
14,.348 Miscellaneous Documents. 1867-68. Svo. . 43 374 

14.341) Trial of Henry Wirz. Svo 44 374 

14,35(1 Miscellaneous Documents. 1867-68. 8vo. . 45 374 
14,351-54 Report Commissioner of Patents. 18G7-(>S. 

4 vols. Svo 2(i 375 

14.35.")-8l' Miscellaneous Documents. 2d Session 40tli 

Cong. 1867-68, 28 vols. Svo. . . 41; ;]74 

14.383-5 Report Commissioner of Patents. 186G. ;; 

vols. 8v(j. . . .... 23 375 

14.386 Report Superintendent of U. S. Coast Survey. 

1866. 4to ". 

14.387 The Soprano. "Miss Kingsford.'' 186!). l2mo. 
14,,388 Stepping Heavemvard. Prentiss. 1869. l2mo. 

14.389 Under Tu-o Flags. " Ouida." 1869. l2mo. 

14.390 Vashti. Evans. 1869. 12mo. 

14.391 Down the Rhine. ••Optic."' 1869. li'mo. . 
14,302 Andes and the Amazon. Orton. 1869. l2mo. 
14,393 Woman Who Dared. Sargent. 16mo. 
14,304 On the Wing. Bustead. 1869. 16mo. 

14.395 Pre-Adamite Earth. Harris. 1860. 12mo. 

14.396 Meet for Heaven. 1860. 16mo. . 

14.307 Life in Heaven. 1868. 16mo. 

14.308 Heaven Our Home. 1869. 16mo. 
14.300 Fruits and Fruit-Trees of America, Down- 
ing. 1860. Svo 

14,400 Sketches of Creation. AVinchell. 1870. 12mo. 
14,401-2 History of Rome, Mommsen, 2 vols. 1870. 

Svo 60 207 

14,403-4 Life of Mary Russell Mitfcrd. 2 vols, 1870. 

12mo 41 305 



4 


372 


60 


134 


61 


134 


71 


107 


~)h 


107 


73 


179 


58 


77 


72 


106 


18 


178 


6 


29 


36 


36 


37 


36 


38 


36 


51 


203 


44 


228 



201 

14,40,-) Catalo-ue of Public T.iliraiy. Xew Bedford. 

ISUisH. 18G8. 8vo 24 313 

14.4()(; Supplement to Catalogue of Public Liljrary, 

New Bedford. 1869. 8vo. . . • -•"> 313 
14,4o7 Proceedings on occasion of Laying Corner- 
stone Library Edilice, New Bedford, Mass. 

185G. Pampii l-^'^ 351 

14,408-'Jt» Annual Eeports Trustees Public Library, New 

Bedford, Mass. 1853-'68. 13 vols. Pampli. 18-55 351 
14.4-_'l P,y-Laws of Washington Lodge, No. 01, F. 

and A. M.. of Manchester. 1870. Paniph. 7-32 351 
14,422 Constitution and By-Laws Ilillsboro' Lodge. 

No. 2, I. O. O. F. of Manchester. 187U. 

Pamph '-^'^5 320 

14.423-5 Report Connnissioners of Patents. 18C7. 

3 vols. 8VO •'" 3<J'J 

14.42('> Report on Conmieree and Navigation. 1808. 

8vo -il ''05 

14 4'>7-<j Laws of New Hampshire. 1827- 28-';>7. 3 vols. 

8vo 23:".24 

14-430-1 .Tournals N. 11. Legislature. 1844-'48. 2 vols. 

8vo 'j" ^•' 

14,432-38 Acts of L. S. Congress. 1S04- 08- 10-'l2- 

'13-31-43. 7 vols. 8vo 43 

14.430 American Naturalist. Yol. 3. 1809. 8vo. 04 187 

14.440 Student and Intellectual Observer. Vol. 4, 

2. 1801). 8vo 4'' 1^'^ 

14.441 .Journal of Franklin Institute. 3d series. 

Vol. 58. 2. 1869. 8vo 53 163 

14.442 Littell's Living Age. Vol. 104, 1, 1870. 8vo. 74 105 

14.443 Sixpenny Magazine. Vol. 14, 2, 1807. 8vo. 41 100 
14444 Cincinnati Lancet and Observer. Vol. 21, 

1860. 8vo 20 141 

14^445_G National Maga/lne. 2 vols. 1807. 8vo. . 18 141 

14.447 Townsend^s Parisian Costumes. Vol. 17. 

1800. 4to 21 C 

14.448 Historical Magazine. Vol. 0,2, 1809. 8vo. . 50 244 
14,440 Artizan. Vol. 27, 1869. 4to. ... 14 301 
14 450 Practical Mechanics' Journal. Vol. 5, 1809-70. 14 323 
14,451-2 Mechanics' Magazine. Vol. 91-2, 1860. 4to. 40 192 
14,453 Art Journal. Vol. 8, 1800. 4to. . . 14 A 



202 



14,4o4-G Journal of X. II. Legislature. 3 vols m^ 

18G8-9. 8vo. . . ' '' 43 2a 

14.457 Eose Mather. Holmes. Ism. 12nio. " ' 68 107 

4,4oS Hitherto. Whitney. 1869. 12mo. . jlfoT 

14.4o9 Through Night to Light. Spielhagen. 1S7(). 
12 mo. . 



o7 134 



o9 7 
30 27 



14,460 Among My Books. Lowell. l87(). J2mo. . 78 18^^ 

H-101 Hours at Home. Vol. 10, ], 1870. 8vo. . 52 185 

14.402 Temple Bar. Vol. 28, 1, 1870. 8vo. . ^ ^■ 

14.403 Man in Genesis and Geology. Thompson 

1870. 12mo. . . ; - .,,^ 
14,464 Our New AVay P.oun.l the World, ('ottin' 

18G9. 12mo 

14.405-(; Smithsonian Miscellaneous Col'leetimis Vols' 

8-9. 1869. 8vo 

lL4(i7 Smithsonian Contributions to Knowl'ed-e' 

Vol. 16,1869. 4to '^ ' -,,. .,.,^ 

14,468 Constitutional View of Late Win- Between the 

states. Vol. 2. Stephens. 1870. 8yo. . 52 '^.54 
14,409-.O Life of Daniel Webster. Curtis. 2yols 

1«^0. 8yo ■ ..g .5^,. 

14,471 Moods. Alcott. 1864. 12mo. . . " 75 105 

14,4/2 Children of the Abbey. Roche. 1869. 12mo 51 13(> 

14.473 Lothair. Disraeli. i870. 12mo. . 50 136, 

14.474 Seat of Empire. Coffin. 1870. 12mo ' 60 77 
14,470 Ecce Femina. AVhite. 1870. 12mo. . 44 309 
11,4.6 Ecce Ccelum. 1870. 12mo. . ,^ ona 
Y.'t'o Through By Daylight. " Optic.- 1870. 16mo 55 180 
14,4/8 Lightning Express. "Optic." 1870. 16mo 

14.479 On Time. "Optic." 1870. 16mo. . ' 57 igO 

14.480 Switch Ofl\ -Optic.-' 1870. 16mo. . ' .58 180 

14.481 Breal^Up. "Optic." 1870. 16mo. . . .59180 
14,482-0 Figures and Descriptions of Canadian Organ- 
ic Remains. 4 vols. 1869. Svo. . " . 29 2-^3 

14,486-8 Geological Survey of Canada. 3 vols. 1863- 

'65. 8vo .y^ ^.-..^ 

14.489 Harper's Magazine. Vol. 40, 1, 1870. Syo. ' ,51 5^53 

14.490 Good Words. 1869. 8yo. . . 05 iQ.y 

14.491 Once a Week. Vol. 4, 2, 1869. 8yo. .* " .51 174 

14.492 North British Review. Vol. 51, 2, 1869 . 49 17^ 

14.493 Chambers's Journal. 1869. 8vo. ... 36 25S 



203 

14 404 Aiiieri(--au Lit«'rarv GazeUe. Vol. 7, 18G(J. 

Svo. . . ■ --^ ^^^ 

]4.4'Jo Niek-Nax. Vol. 15. 18(i'.»-7o. Svo. . . 24 81 
14,4!Hl-7 Report on Conunerre and Xavi^ation. 2 vols. 

ISG'J. 8vo. ^- -^'^S 

14.4!)S Paris Universal Exposition. Report ol' U. S. 

Commissioner. 18G7. Svo. . . . -jO 315 
14,4ini Proceedings Grand Lodge of Xew Hampshire, 

F. & A. M. 1857-64 47 205 

14.500 Catalogue of Pulilic Library, Lowell, Mass. 

1801. 8vo 26 310 

I4.0U1 Annual Report Trustees Peabody Institute, 

Peabody, Mass. 1809. Pamph. . . 12-;>'3 351 

:4.5o2-:; Bulletins Public Library, City of ]5(Jston. 

1870. Pamph 18-40 351 

14.504 Annual Report Directors Mechanics' Listi- 

lute. Cincimiati, Ohio. 1809. Pamph. . 1-00 351 

14.505 Letter of J. AV. Alvord, relating to the Freed- 

men. 1870. Pamph. .... 12-47 351 

14,500 Iland-Book of Architectural Designs. Ran- 
dall. Chicago. Pamph. . . • 4-07 351 
14.507 Annual Report Trustees Pul)lic Library, 

Worcester, Mass. 1800. Pamph. . .21-27 351 
14.508-10 Scripture Question Books. 18mo. . . 40 300 

14.511 Little Spaniard. Mannering. 1809. IGmo. 03 179 

14.512 Salt Water Dick. Mannering. 1809. lOmo. 04 179 

14.513 Freaks of Fortune. "Optic." 1808. 16mo. 58 179 

14.514 Breaking Away. "Optic." 1870. ICmo. . 59 179 

14.515 Seek and Find. "Optic." 1870. lOmo. . 01 180 
14,510 Make or Break. " Optic." 1870. lOmo. . 02 180 

14.517 Down the River. "Optic." 1870. lOmo, . 63 180 

14.518 Characteristics of AVomen. Jameson. 1870. 

lOmo 79 189 

14.519 Report Board of Regents Smitlisonian Insti- 

tution. 18G8. 8vo Gl 330 

14.520 Report on Commerce and Navigation, 18(i7-8. 

8vo 44 305 

14.521 Report Secretary -of AA'ar in Europe. 1855- 

"50. 4to. . 27 342 

14 522 Commercial Relations of United States. 1807. 

8vo. ........ 34 3G5 



204 

14,523 Eeport Secretary Board of A-ricultui-e of 

Connecticut. 1868-9. 8vo. ... 22 309 

U.,r24: Treatise on Dyeing and Calico Printing-. Xew 

York. 1846. 8vo. . . . ' . . 03 004 

14.52.3 Union Democrat. Vols. 1.5-18, 18(iG-'G9. Man- 
chester. Folio 24 F 

14.526 Mirror and Farmer. Vols. ir.-is. lS()5-"t;7. 

Manchester. Folio 35 F 

14.527 Boston Weekly Journal . "\'ols. 34-;!5. 1807-68. 

Folio 19 I 

14.528 ^s'ew York Weekly Trilnnic \'ols. 25-27. 

1866-'67. Folio. 27 I 

14.529 Xew York Weekly Tribune. A'ols. l'7-29. 

1868-'69. Folio." .....' i>8 I 

14.530 Xew Weekly Herald. l867-"68. Folio. . 39 I 

14.531 Mirror and Farmer. Vols. 19-20. l8G8-"69, 

Manchester. Folio }>(-, y 

14,5.32 Daily Mirror and American. Yol. 36. 2. 1869. 

Manchester. Folio 22 II 

14.533 Manchester Daily Union. Vol. 7. 2. 1869. 

Uolio. ....... l"' T 

14.534 Catalogue of Boston Athenieum. 1857, 8vo. 27 316 
14.535-39 Lists of Books added to Boston Athenannn. 

1863-68. 5 pamphs l_5(j 351 

14,.540 B^'-Laws of Boston Atheuteum. 1865. Pamph, 16-59 351 
14,541 Eules of Library and Beading-Room, Boston 

Athea.Mium. 1857. Pamph. . . 17-.30 3.51 

14.542-9 Lists of Books added to Boston Atheuicum. 

1868-70. 8 pamph 1,S_59 3.51 

14,550 Annual Eeport Board of Directors, Mercan- 
tile Library Association. X. Y. 1869. 

I'^n^P'i 1-39 351 

14,.jol Supplement to Catalogue Public Library, 

Manchester. 1869. Pamph. . . \' ,s-41 351 

14.552 Annual Eeport Mercantile Library Company. 

Philadelphia. 1861. 8vo. ' . . . 21 18 

14.553 Eeport on Schools for Freedmen. 1«70. 

^'-'^'"Pl' 2-47 351 

14,o.j4 Annual Eeport Trustees Public Lil)rary. Bos- 
ton. 1869-70. Pamph. . . " , . -j-i.j 351 
14,555 Charges against Gen. O. O. Howard. Is70. 

P'^"^P^' 7-20 351 



205 

ijijG Report School Committee of City of Spring- 

tield, Mass. 186S. Pampli. . . . G-01 351 
,557 Annual Report Library Association. Spring- 
Held. Mass. 18(38-9.' Pampli. . . . 2-30 351 
,558 Annual Report Trustees Public Library, 

Brookline, Mass. 1865. Pamph. . . :j-39 351 
,55!) Annual Report Trustees Public Library, 

Rrookline, Mass, 1869. Pamph. . . 4-39 351 
,560 Catalogue of Public Library. Brookline, ^lass. 

1865. 8vo. 20 313 

Hermann and Dorothea. Goethe. 1870. KJmo. G7 !)(j 
Gold Elsie. Marlitt. 1869. 12mo. . . 37 108 
Old Mam'selle's Secret. Marlitt. 18G9. 12mo. 38 108 
Put Yourself in His Place. Reade. ls70. 

12mo 39 108 

Recreations of a Countrj- Parson. (1st and 

2d series.) Boyd. 1869. 12mo. 2 vols. 36 138 
Sanctum Sanctorum. Tilton. 1870. 12mo. 38 138 
Cometh up as a Flower. 1870. 8vo. . . 43 133 
Xot Wisely, but Too Well. 1870. 8vo. . 44 133 
Red as a Rose is She. 1870. 8vo. . . 45 133 

A Brave Lady. Craik. 1870. 8vo. . . 51133 
From the Oak to the Olive. Howe. 1868. 

12mo 12 70 

Up and Down the London Streets. Lemon. 

1867. 8vo 

The Insect World. Figuier. 1869. 8vo. . 
Critical Dictionary of English Literature and 

British and American Authors. .'Lllibone. 

Vol. 2. 1870. 8vo 

Iliad of Homer. Bryant. 2 vols. 1870. 4to. 
History of European Morals. Lecky. 2 vols. 

1870. 8v() 53 243 

Ilistor}- of Civilization Irom Fall of Roman 

Empire to French Revolution. Guizot. 

4 vols. 12mo 64 267 

Romance of Spanish History. Abbott. 1869. 

l2mo 36 269 

Chips from a German Work-Shoj). Muller. 

2 vols. 1870. 12mo 85 188 

14,587 The Bulls and the Jonathans. Paulding, 

1867. 12mo 80 189 



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206 



14.588 A Book of Vagaries. Paulding. 1868. 12mo. 

14.589 Literature of the Age of Elizabeth. Whipple. 

1869. 12mo. 

14.590 Historical View of American Ke volution. 

Greene. 1869. 12nio 

11,5'Jl Essa^^s on Political Economy. Greeley. 1870. 
12mo 

14.592 Sybaris and other Homes. Hale. 18C',). 12mo. 

14.593 Out of the Past. Goodvin. 1870. l2mo. . 

14.591 Principles of Phj'sics: or, Natural Philosophy. 

Silliman. 1870. 8vo 54 200 

14,595 Wonders of the Deep. De Vere. 1870. . 60 229 
14.596-7 Half-Hours with Best Letter-^Vriters. Knight . 

(1st and 2d series).) 1868. 12mo. . . 29 288 

14.598 Keminiscences of Mendelsohn. Polko. 1869. 

12mo 

14.599 Life of .J. J. Audubon. 1809. 12mo. . 
14,000 Elements of Character. Chandler. 1866. 

lOmo 

14.601 Secret of Swedenborg. James. 1869. 8vo. 

11.602 Bible Animals. Wood. 1870. 8vo. . 
14,60.") Discovery of the Great West. Parkman. 

1870. 8vo 

14.604 Ten Years in Wall street. Fowler. 1870. 8vo. 

14.605 Innocents Abroad. "Twain." 1870. 8vo. . 

14.600 Across America and Asia. Pumpelly. 1870. 

8mo 42 76 

14.607-8 Cyclopedia of Biblical, Theological and Ec- 
clesiastical Literature. McClintock and 
Strong. Vols. 2, 3. 1870. 8vo. ... 21 21 

14,609-11 Annual Cyclopedia. 1807-69. '^'ols. 7-9. 

8vo 27 25:5 

14,612 Hermann and Dorothea. Goethe. 1870. ISmo. 

14,61.j Queen of the Air. Kuskin. 1869. lOnio. . 

14.614 Vagabonds and other Poems. Trowbridge. 

1869. 16mo 

14.615 Pacific Railroad Open. Benler. 1861. 18mo. 
14,910 Peg Wofiington, and other stories. Reade. 

1869. 12mo 

14.617 German Tales. Auerbach. 1869. 12nio. . 

14.618 Black Forest Village Stories. Auerbach. 

. 1869. 12mo 48 108 



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207 



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l2mo 

12ino 
1870 



14,61!*-"20 Passages froin American Note-Books, llaw- 

thorue. 2 vols. 1868. 12ino. . 
14.02 1-2 Passages from English iSTote-Books. 
thorue. 2 vols. 1870. 12mo. . 
Fair Harvard. 18(59. 12mo. . 
Wild Huntress. Reid. 1870. 12mo. 
Story of a Bad Boy. Aldrich. 1870. 
B. O. W. C. DeMille. 1870. 12mo. 
Cabin on the Prairie. Pearson. 1870. 
Planting the Wilderness. MeCabe. 

IGnio 

Wild Life Under the Equator. DuChaillu 

I86it. 12mo 

Lost in Jungle. DuChaillu. 1870. 12mo. 
Sunset Land. Todd. 1,S70. l2nio. 
Little Barefoot. Auerbaeh. 1807. 12mo. 
Joseph in the snow. Auerbaeh. 18G8. 12mo 
Wonder-Book for Boys and Girls. Ilaw 
thorne. 1869. ISmo. 
I4,63u Spirit of Seventy-Six. 1809. 
14:.<)3r) Homestead on the Hillside. 

r2mo. ; . . . 
l4:,Co7 Lost Daughter. Lee Ilentz. 
14r,G38 Widow's Son. Southworth. 
14,039 Fair Play. Southworth. 1868. 12mo. 
14.640 Prince of Darkness. Southworth. 1809, 
12mo. ....... 

14.041 Fallen Pride. Southworth. 1868. 12mo. , 

14.042 Changed Brides. Southworth. 1869. 12ino 

14.643 Bride's Fate. Southworth. 1869. l2mo. . 

14.644 Haunted Homestead. Southworth. 12mo. 

14.645 Ruby's Husband. '^Harland." 1869. 12mo 
14,(!4(; Phemie's Temptation. "Harland." 1809. 

14.647 Blindpits. 1869. 12mo. 

14.648 Hammer and Anvil. Spielhagen. 1870. 12mo 
14,049 Problematical Characters. Spielhagen. 1870 

12mo 

1-4,650 David Elginbrod. MacDonald. 1870. 12mo 

14.651 Madame De Stael. Botts. 1869. 12mo. 

14.652 FelixHolt, the Radical. "Eliot." 1869. 12mo 

14.653 Hester Strong's Life Work. Southworth 

1870. 12mo 



18mo. 
Holmes. 

1857. 
1807. 



1870. 



l2mo. 
l2mo. 



39 138 

41 138 
43 138 
35 104 
30 104 
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39 09 

40 69 

01 77 

62 77 
66 77 

49 108 

50 108 

78 157 

79 109 

09 107 
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28 135 

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30 135 



208 

U,(5o4 Only a Gii-1. Von Hillern. 1870. 12in(). . 

14.655 Countess Gisela. Marlitt. 1869. I2m(). 

11.656 To-Day. Kimball. 1870. 12mo. 

14.657 Seven Curses of London. Greenwood. 1869. 

12mo 

14.658 Queen Hortense. '• Muhlbaeli." 1870. 8vo. 

14.659 Man Who Laughs. Hugo. 1870. 8vo. 

14.660 Steven Lawrence, Yeoman. . Edwards, Svo. 

14.661 Phineas Finn. Trollope. 1869. Svo. 

14.662 Vicar of Bullhampton. Trollope. 1870. 8vo. 

14.663 Moonstone. Collins. 1870. Svo. 

14.664 Dallas Galbraith. Davis. 1868. Svo. 

14.665 Miss Van Kortland. 1870. Svo. . 

14.666 Minister's Wife. Oliphant. 1869. Svo. 

14.667 That Boy of Norcott's. Lever. 1869. Svo. 

14.668 Alaska. Dall. 1870. Svo 

14.669 Harper's Monthly Magazine. A'ol. 1. 2. 1850. 

Svo. ........ 

14.670 Edinburgh Review. Vol. 131, 1, 1S70. 8vo. 

14.671 Westminster Review. Vol. 93, 1, 1870. Svo. 

14.672 Galaxy. Vol. 9, 1, 1870. Svo. 

14.673 Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine. "\'ol. 107, 

2, 1870. Svo 53 175 

14.674 Once-a-Week. Vol. 5, (new series) 1. 1870. 

Svo 

14.675 LittelFs Living Age. Vol. 105, 2, 1870. Svo. 

14.676 Cornhill Magazine. Vol. 21, 1, 1870. Svo. . 
14,777 Atlantic Monthly. Vol. 25, 1, 1870. Svo. . 

14.678 Eclectic Magazine. Vol. 63, 1. 1870. Svo. . 

14.679 Putnam's Magazine. Vol. 5, 1, 1870. Svo. . 

14.680 Temple Bar. Vol. 29, 2, 1870. Svo. . • . 

14.681 Heraldic Journal. Vol. 4, 1868. Svo. . 

14.682 Proceedings Academy of Natural Sciences of 

Philadelphia. 1869. Svo .... 

14.683 American Journal of Science and Arts. Sil- 

liman. Vol. 99, 1, 1870. Svo. . 

14.684 Journal of the Franklin Institute. Vol. 89, 

1, 1870. Svo 

14.685 Merchants' Magazine and Commercial Re- 

view. Vol. 62, 1, 1870. Svo. . 

14.686 Xorth American Review. Vol. 110, 1, 1870. 

8vo 



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14,687 Peterson's Magazine. Vol. 57,1, 1870. 8vo. 
1-4,688 Arthur's Home Magazine. Vol. 35, 1, 1870, 

14.689 Godey's Lady's Book. Vol. 80, 1, 1870. 8vo 

14.690 Leslie's Magazine. Vol. 26, 1, 1870. 4to. 
14,691-2 London Punch. Vols. 57-8, 1869-70. 4to. 
14,693 Manchester Daily Union. Vols. 7-8, 1, 1870 

Folio 

14,094 Daily Mirror and American. Vol. 37, 1, 1870 

Folio 

14,965-G Journals of X. H. Legislature. 1827-28 

vols. Svo 

14,097 Our Father\s House. March. 1870. 

14.698 Subjection of Women. Mill. 1870. 

14.699 Rose Mather. Holmes. 1870. l2mo. 

14.700 India. Southworth. 1856. 12mo. 
14,701-2 German Popular Tales. Grimm. 2 

1863. 12mo 

14.703 American Boys' Book of Sports and Games 

18G3. 12mo 

14.704 Proceedings, etc., in case of Gen. Fitz Jolm 

Porter. 1863. Svo 

14,705-6 Zenobia. Ware. 2 vols, 1855. 12mo. 
14,707-8 Zenobia. Ware. 2 vols. 18G9. 12mo. 

14.709 My Ten-Rod Farm. Gilman. 1869. 12mo 

14.710 Alec Forbes of Howglen. MacDonald. 1807 

8vo 

14.711 Guild Court. MacDonald. 1868. 8vo. 

14.712 Susan Fielding. Edwards. 1870. 8vo. 
14,713-14 Scottish Chiefs. Porter. 2 vols. 1840. 

14.715 Apropos of Women and Theatres. Logan 

1869. 12mo 

14.716 Dora and her Papa. Meteyard. 1870. 12mo 

14.717 John and the Demijohn. Wright. 1870 

16mo 

14.718 A New Flower for Children. Child. 1865 

16mo 

14.719 The Veil Lifted. 1869. 16mo. . 

14.720 Seaboard Parish. MacDonald. 1869. 12mo 

14.721 Hypatia. Kingsley. 1870. l2mo. 

14.722 Margret Howth. 1862. 16mo. . 

14.723 After Dark. Collins. 16mo. 





30 19 


Svo 


27 35 


12mo 


47 309 


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70 107 


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26 148 



39 194 
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79 157 

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32 135 
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210 

14:,724 Patience Strong's Outings. Whitney, 1870. 

12mo. . . . ^ 49 13(5 

14.725 The Missing Link. 1860. IGmo. . . . 47 40 

14.726 Archie Lovell. Edwards. 1869. 8vo. . 67 84 

14.727 Wuthering Heights and Agnes Grey. Bronte. 

1869. 12mo 77 157 

14,728-30 DivineComedy of Dante. Longfellow. 3 vols. 

1870. 4to '' . . . 59 91 

14.731 History of American Socialism. Noyes. 1870. 

8vo 55 243 

14.732 Rambles about Portsmoutli. Brewster. 2d se- 

ries. 1870. 8vo 31 238 

14,733-4 History of the Jews. Adams. 2 vols. 1812. 

l2mo 53 270 

14.735 Memoir of Mary L.Ware. Hall. 1868. 12mo. 27 298 

14.736 Letters of Mrs. John Adams. 1840. 12mo. 28 298 

14.737 Five Acres Too Much. Roosevelt. 1869. 

12mo 48 258 

14.738 iS'aturalists' Guide. Maynard. 1870. 12mo. 26 215 

14.739 Popular Geology. Miller. 1870. 12mo. . 27 215 

14.740 Essays. Miller. 1869. 12mo. ... 87 188 

14.741 Tales and Sketches. Miller. 1869. 12mo. . 44 138 

14.742 Inquiry into the Influence of Anthracite Fires 

on Health. Derby. 1868. IGmo. . . 64 207 

14.743 Lost Cause Regained. Pollard. 1868. 12mo. 29 2,56 

14.744 Masonic Biography and Dictionary. Row. 

1869, 12mo 21 310 

14.745 He that Overcometh, Boardman. 18C9. 12mo. 31 34 

14.746 Manual of the Evidences of Christianity, 

Bulfinch. 1869, 12mo 32 34 

14.747 Studies in the Evidences of Christianity. 

Bulfinch. 1869. 12mo 

14.748 Doctrine of the Resurrection. Bush. 1845, 
14,749-50 Lectures on the Sacred Poetry of the He- 
brews. South. 2 vols. 1787. 8vo. . 

14.751 Dictionary of Religions and Religious Denom- 

inations. Adams. 1817. 8vo. . 

14.752 Immanuel: or Life of Christ. Eddy, 1868. 

8vo 

14.753 Crown of Wild Olive. Ruskin. 12mo. 

14.754 Poems. Rossetti. 1870. 12mo. . 



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14.755 London Quarterly Review. Vol. 128, 1, 1870. 

14.756 Peg Woffington. Ileade. 1868. l2mo. 

14.757 Memoranda for Civil and Mechanical Engin- 

eering. Molesworth. 1868. IGmo. . 

14.758 Railroad Engineers' Companion for the Field. 

Griswold. 1870. 16mo 

14.759 Engineers', Contractors' and Surveyors' Table- 

Book. Scribner. 1867. IGmo. 

14.760 Railroad and Civil Engineers' Companion. 

Byone. 1868. 16mo 

14.761 Engineers' Remembrancer. Campin. 1863. 

IGmo 

14.762 Architect's Guide. 1869. 16mo. . 

14.763 Waterworks. Hughes. 1870. 16mo. . 

14.764 Manufacture of Bricks and Tiles. Dobson. 

1868. 16mo 

14.765 Rules and Tables relating to ilensuration. 

Engineering, etc. Rankine, 1866. . 
14,760 Diamonds and Precious Stones. Emanuel. . 
1867. l2mo 

14.767 Ilandy-Book of Meteorology. Buchan. 1868. 

12mo. 

14.768 Treatise on Meteorology. Morris. 1866. 

14.769 Treatise on Gas and Ventilation. Perkins. 

1869. 12nio 

14.770 Mineralogy Simplified. Erni. 1867. . 

14.771 Treatise on Quartz and Opal. Trail. 1867. . 

14.772 Manual of Rural Architecture. Jacques, 1869. 

16mo. ........ 

14.773 Treatise on Erection of Dwelling Houses. 

Brooks. 1808. 16mo 

14.774 American Cottage Builder. Bullock. 1869. 

8vo 

14.775 Treatise on Mining, Surveying, and Engin- 

eering. Hoskold. 1863. 8vo. . 

14.776 Treatise on Surveying, Levelling, etc. Mer- 

rett. 1863. 8vo 

14.777 On Ventilation. Edwards. 1868. 8vo. 

14.778 Treatise on Meteorology. Loomis. 1868. 

8vo. ........ 41 314 



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212 

14.779 Tlie Jiaromctcr, Tlicrmometer, Hygrometer 

uiul Atmospheric Appciiranees at Sea and 
Laud as aids in Foretelling Weather. Jen- 
kins. 18GS). 8vo 37 311 

14,780-1 Mamial oi' Toi)ography. 2 vols. KntholTer. 

1870 20 IJ 

14,781 Builders' and Contractors' Tables. Ijaxton. 

4to 24 221 

14,78:5 Progressive Drawing-Book. 185:3. 4to. . 25 221 

14.784 On use of Barometer on Surveys. William- 

son. 1868. 4to 48 201 

14.785 Tables on Meteorology and Ilypsometry. 

180!). 4to 49 201 

14.780 Cottage, Lodge and Villa Architecture. Auds- 

ley. 4to 33 C 

14.787 Suburban and llural Architecture. Black- 

burn. 4to 31 C 

14.788 Chapel and Churcli Architecture. Bowles 4to. 35 C 
14,781) Histoire des Barometre et Manometres An- 

eroides. Laurant. 18G7. 8vo. . . 39 301 

14.790 Keport Superintendent U. S. Coast Survey. 

1867. 4to 32 322 

14.791 The Londonderry Celebration. Exercises on 

the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary. 

Mack. 1870. 8vo 42 245 

14.792 Mystery of Edwin Drood. Dickens. 1870. 

8vo 08 84 

14.793 The Dodge Club. De Millc. 18G9. 8vo. . 02 133 
14J94-0 Works of Mrs. Amelia Opio. 3vols. 1811. 

8vo 25 121 

11.797 How He Won Her. Southworth. 1869. 12mo. 34 113 

14.798 The Missing Bride. Southworth. 1855. 12mo. 30 113 

14.799 The Discarded Daughter. Southworth. 1852. 

12mo 36 113 

14.800 The Fatal Marriage. Southworth. 1803. 

12mo 37 113 

14.801 Vivia. Southworth. 1857. 12mo. . . 38 113 

14.802 The llolienstcins. Spielhagen. 1870. 12mo. 07 134 
14,80:5 Little Maid of Oxbow. Mannering. 1871. . 05 179 

14.804 Organ-Grinder. Leslie. 1802. IGmo. . 80 158 

14.805 Young Patriot. 1862. lOmo. ... 81 158 



213 

14,800 Rag Ticker. Leslie. 186:^j. Hiino. . . «2 l-W 
l-i'807-18 Hans (Jhristiau Andersen Library. I'J vol.s. 

1800. lOnio ^^'' l*^'^ 

14.819 Guide-Board t-j Health, Peace, and Compe- 

tence. Hall. 1870. 8vo '^^ '■''■> 

14.820 Science of Thought. Everett. 1870. 12nio. oO 27 
14821-2 Friends in Council. Helps. 2 vols. 18G'J. 

' -, T .88 188 

l2nio 

14 823 Nationality: or, Law Jielating to Suljjccts 

and Aliens. Cockburn. 18G'J. 8vo. . 41 •> 

14 824 Scientific Results of a Journey in IJruzil. 

Agassiz. 1870. 8vo 43 7b 

14 8'^J History of Gloucester, Mass. Babson. 1800. 

' j,^,^^-' 43 245 

14 82G Rebellion Record. Vol.11. Moore. 8vo. . 40 203 
148^^7 Lost Daughter. Lee Hentz. 1870. 12mO. . 37 Ho 
14828-9 Modern Women. 2 vols. 1870. '^ Optic.'' 8/ 189 
14,830 Bear and Forbear. "Optic." 1871. 12mo. 00 180 

14'83I-2 Geology of Kew. Jersey. Cook. 2 vols. 1808. 

8vo '^^f] 

14,833 Arcadian Geology. Dawson. 1808. 8vo. . 2o 211 
14834 Annual Report Hartford (Conn.) Y. M. In- 
stitute. 1870. Pamphlet . . • -^^-^ -'^'^ 
14 835 Constitution and By-Laws Mercantile Library 

Association, New York. 1870. Pamphlet. 8-32 351 
14 830 List of Periodicals received at Public Library, 

Boston. 1870. Pamphlet. . . • 20-40 351 

14.837 Class List of Poetry, the Drama, etc., in Pub- 

lic Library, Boston. Pamph. . . • ^-^'^ "-^1 

14.838 Annuiilof Boston Society of Natural History. 

1808-9. Pamph • ^-^'^■* ''''^ 

14 839-43 Condition and Doings Boston Society of Nat- 
ural History. 1805-09. Pamph. . . :5-00 3..1 

14.844 Catalogue of American and Foreign Scientific 

Books. VanNostrand. 1870. Pamph.. 0-07 351 

14.845 London Philosophical Magazine, Jan. 1803. 

' -t. 1 . 0-03 351 

Pamph , 

14 840 American Journal of Horticulture. Feb., 

1807. Pamph • '-*>■' -'"^ 

14,847 Report Board of Commissioners of Ohio 

Reform Schools. 1863. Pamph. . . 8-f;3 351 



214 

14,848-50 Proceedings of the K. W. Grand Lodge of 

United States, I. O. O. F. 1867-69. s'phs. l-i 354 

14,8.51 Catalogus Seuatus Academici Collegii Dart- 

muthensis. 1867. Pamph. . ° . ^ j_qy 35^ 

14.852 Over Yonder. Marlitt. 1869. 8vo. . .' 66 133 

14.853 Edinburgh and its ^Neighborhood. 16mo. " 9 79 

14.854 Hungary and Kossuth. Teffl. 1852. 12mo! 31 988 

14.855 Water-Power of Maine. Wells. 1869. 8vo. '>5 2'>4 

14.856 History of Old Chester. Chase. 1869. 8vo. 44 245 
14,857-76 Eetrospect of Practical Medicine and Surgery. 

Braithwaite. 20 vols. 1860-69. 8vo! . 28 214 

14.877 Report on Musical Instruments. Stevens. 

(Paris Universal Exposition, 1867.) 1869. 

P^mi^h ] ^_^Q 3. J 

14.878 Report on Silk and Silk Manufactures. Cou- 

din. (Paris Universal Exposition. 1867.) 

1868. Pampli \ -_^q .^.^ 

14.879 Report on the Fine Arts. Leslie. (Paris 

Universal Exposition, 1867.) 1808. Pamph. 6-40 351 

14.880 Report on Preparation of Food ; Manufacture 

of Pressed Coal, etc. (Paris Universal 
Exposition, 1867.) 1868. Pamphs. . . 7-40 351 

14.881 Report on Buildings and Building Materials. 

(Paris Universal Exposition, 1867. 1869 

M..0 ^P^"^P'^ \' 8-40 351 

-14,882 Report on Mining and Preparation of Ores 
(Paris Universal Exposition, 1867). 1870. 

14.883 Typee. Melville. 1846. 12mo. ... 26 122 

14.884 The Betrothed and Talisman. Scott. 1850. 

l^"»o .' 28 126 

14,88a Alice. Buhver. 1853. l2mo. , . . 32 137 

14.886 Tales and Novels. Edgeworth. 1860. 12mo.' 28 143 

14.887 Young Yagers. Reid. 1865. 16mo. . . 66 156 

14.888 Gulliver's Travels, etc. Swift. 1850. 12mo. 67 156 

14.889 Life of Jack Downing. Smith. 1834. 12mo. 68 156 

14.890 Four Years in the Saddle. Gilmor. 1866. 

]2mo. ... rn 1-c. 

14.891 Beechnut. Abbott. 1850. 18mo. . . 76 170 

14.892 Xellie and her Friends. Franklin. 1861. 

16mo. . 



77 170 



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14.893 Harpers' Monthly Magazine. Vol. 27, 2, 1863. 

14.894 Proceedings of tlie K. W. Grand Lodge of the 

United States, I. O. O. F. 1870. Pampli. 

14.895 Sketches of Bunker Hill Battle and Monument. 

1843. 18mo 

14.896 Keports of Board of Education and Superin- 

tendent of Public Instruction of Xev.' 
Hampshire. 1809-70. Pamphlet. . 

14.897 Laws of jSfew Hampshire, June session, 1870. 

8vo 

14.898 General Statutes of Xew Hampshire. 1867. 

8vo 

14.899 Does Protection Protect? Grosvenor. 1871. 

8vo 50 16 

14.900 Pear Culture for Profit. Quinn. 1869. 16nio. 61 229 

14.901 History of Xew France. Charlevoix. 1870. 

Yol. 4. 4to 

14,902-5 Report of Commissioner of Patents. 18G7. 

4 vols. 8vo. 

14,906-8 Provincial Papers, Documents and Ptccords of 

Province of New Hampshire. 1G23-1722. 

3 vols. Bouton. 1869. 8vo. . 
14.909 Counting House Book-keeping. Bryant, Strat- 

ton and Packard. 1864. 8vo. . 
14,910-13 Cincinnati Lancet and Observer. 1858-64. 4 

vols. 8vo 

14,914 American Monthly. 1865. 2s[ew York. 8vo. 
14,915-16 Cincinnati Medical Observer. 1856-57. 2 

vols. 8vo 

14.917 Cincinnati Lancet and Observer. 1861. 8vo. 

14.918 Map of the City of Manchester, X. H. 1870. 

"Weston 

14.919 Constitutionand By-laws of Mechanics' Lodge, 

No. 13, I. O. b. F. Manchester. 1870. 

24mo 27 320 

14.920 Constitution and By-Laws of Wildey Lodge, 

No. 45, I. O. 6. F. Manchester. 1870. 

24mo 28 320 

14.921 Constitution and By-Laws of Wonolanset En- 

campment, No. 2, I. O. O. F. Man- 
chester. 1870. 24mo 29 320 



25 241 


40 336 


46 242 


52 203 


24 141 


28 141 


29 141 


31 141 



21G 
it 

14.922 Man and Wife. Collins. 1870. 8vo. . 

14.923 Courtesies of Wedded Life. Leslie. 18G9 

12mo. 

14.924 Juliette. Leslie. 18G9. 12mo. . 

14.925 Berkele}', the Banker. Martincau 

24rao. 

14.926 Settlers in Canada. Marryat. 1856. 12mo 

14.927 Gabriel Vane. Loud. 1856. 12mo. 

14.928 Life of Oliver Cromwell. Southcy 

18mo 

14.929 Foot-Prints of the Creator. Miller 

12mo 

14.930 Single-Entry Book-keeping. Marsh. 8vo 



18i 



1852 



1856 



C9 84 

2G 145 

27 145 

21 130 
70 156 
26 128 

36 300 

28 215 
53 203 



SCHOOL REPORT , 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In BoaUd of School Committee,) 

December 31, 1870. | 

The Superintenden presented his Annual Report, which was 
read and accepted. 

Mr. Upton, Special Committee to prepare the Annual Eeport, 
presented the accompanying, which was adopted by tlae Board, 
and, together witli the Report of the Superintendent, ordered to 
be presented to tlie City Council. 

M. P. HALL, Clevk. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 7 
Jan. 2, 1870. j 

Read, accepted and ordered to be printed in tlie Annual Reports. 

J. E. BEIsTKETT, City Clerk. 



In Board of Cojimon Council, > 
Jan. 2, 1870. ]" 

Read, accepted and ordered to be ])rinted in tlie Annual Reports. 
In concurrence. 

E. D. HADLEY, Clerk. 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1870. 



JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Office, No. 5 City Hall. 
Office hours from 8 to 9 A. M., school days. 

JAMES DEAN, 

Chairman Board of Education. 

MARSHALL P. HALL, 

Clerk Board of Education. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

— Henry C. Sanderson. 
—Marshall P. Hall. 
— Thomas Borden. 
— Samuel Upton. 
— Patrick A. Devine. 
— Ephraim S. Peabody. 
— James Dean. 
— DeLafayette Robinson. 

Regular meetings of the Board alternate Friday even 
ings, at 7 1-2 o'clock. 



Ward 


1. 


Ward 


o 


Ward 


3. 


Ward 


4. 


Ward 5. 


Ward 


6. 


Ward 


7. 


Ward 


8.- 



220 
STANDING COMailTTEES OF THE BOARD. 

Finance, Accounts and Claims. — Messrs. Dean, Peabodj, 
Sanderson and Robinson. 

Fuel and Heating. — Messrs. Robinson, Peabody, Edger- 
ly and Devine. 

Text-books and Apparatus. — Messrs. Upton, Edgerly and 
Dean. 

Repairs, Fwniture and Supplies. — Messrs. Edgerly, De- 
vine and Hall. 

Printing and Stationery. — Messrs. Sanderson, Borden 
and Edgerly. 

Exaynination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hall, Borden, Upton 
and Edgerly. 

Truancy. — Messrs. Hall, Devine and Edgerly. 

Employment of Children in 3Ianifacturing Fstahlishments. 
Messrs. Peabody, Dean and Edgerly. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

Messrs. Upton, Dean and Borden, — High school. 
Messrs. Sanderson and Dean, — Schools on Spring street. 
Messrs. Hall and Borden, — Schools on Franklin street. 
Messrs. Borden and Robinson, — East Grammar school. 
Messrs. Upton and Devine,— Schools on Merrimack street, 

and Suburban schools Nos. 6 and 8. 
Messrs. Devine and Peabody, — Schools at Towlesville, on 

Bridge street, and Suburban schools Nos. 4, 5 and 8. 
Messrs. Peabody and Upton, — Schools in Intermediate 

building, at Wilson Hill, and Hallsville. 
Messrs. Dean and Hall, — Schools in Piscataquog, and Ba- 

kersville. 
Messrs. Robinson and Sanderson, — Schools at Amoskeag, 

on Blodgett street, and Suburban school No. 1. 
Messrs. Sanderson and Hall, — Evening schools. 
Messrs. Upton and Robinson, — Music. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATIOiN. 



To the City Council of the City of Manchester : 

The School Committee for the year 1870 submit the fol- 
lowing report. 

The amount of money received for the support of schools 
during the year has been as follows : 

Balance on hand . . . 'ii^l4 22 
Appropriation .... 42,000 00 



$42,014 22 



The expenditures have been as follows : 
For Teaching- 
Care of rooms 
Fuel 

Books and stationery 
Printing and advertising 
Furniture and supplies 
Repairs . 
Incidentals 

Leaving an unexpended balance 
of '^ 



196 82 
1,789 Qb 
4,193 06 
864 01 
643 95 
584 41 
230 37 
503 36 



■142,005 63 
18 59 



In addition to the appropriation for the support of 
schools the sum of $5,000 was appropriated for repairs of 
school buildings. Early in the year the rooms of the 
North Grammar school were re-seated and various repairs 
made at several of the school-houses, the expenses for which 



222 

amounted to $2,014.22, and we expected this expenditure 
to be charged to this appropriation. It was charged and 
paid from the school fund, and to correct the error a like 
sum was transferred from the appropriation for repairs. 
Adding this sum of $2,014.22 to the amount properly- 
charged to school fund, $42,005.85, and it gives the total 
of $44,019.85 — the expenditure of the school department 
as given in the financial report of the city. 

It has been the practice, heretofore, to purchase some- 
time in the summer a year's supply of coal, and as the 
larger portion of it would he consumed in the year follow- 
ing, to leave the bill to be paid from that year's appropria- 
tion. Last year the committee, deeming a change in this 
practice desirable, purchased the usual quantity of coal and 
paid for that portion of it consumed within the year, leav- 
ing the balance to be paid from tlie appropriation for this 
year. This balance we have paid and have purchased and 
paid for a year's supply in addition. This change will 
enable the committee hereafter to take advantage of the 
market and buy at lowest cost prices, and relieve them 
from approving and paying so large a bill contracted by 
their predecessors. 

The amount paid this year for fuel purchased last year 
is $1,711.42. Deducting this, the total expenditure for 
schools during the year would be $40,294.21. 

Forty-seven schools have been supported during the year, 
requiring the services of sixty-five teachers, as follows : 
Four .in the High school, two in the Intermediate, fifteen in 
the Grammar, twelve in the Middle, twenty-one in the 
Frimaiy, and eleven in the Suburban. Two evening 
schools have also been kept during the season for them, 
requiring four teachers; and a school for the accommoda- 
tion of children discharged from employment in the mills, 
requiring one teacher, has been in operation about two 



223 

months. Two teachers of music have also been employed 
through the year. 

The salaries of teachers vary from 8300 to |1,800. 
Female teachers receiving for the first term of service at 
the rate of $300 per annum, and for the rest of the year at 
the rate of $350. For the second year $375, for the third 
year $400, and after that $450. The Grammar masters re- 
ceive $1,500 each, and the principal of the High school 
$1,800. These salaries are lower than those paid in most 
other cities. Worcester pays its female teachers $500 to 
$1,200, its Grammar masters, $1,800, and the principal of 
its High school, $2,300. Lawrence pays its female teachers 
$500, and its male teachers from $2,250 to $3,000. Lowell 
pays its female teachers $500, and its male teachers from 
$1,700 to $2,200. Even the small city of Dover pays the 
principal of its High school $2,000. We have raised the 
salaries of the female teachers fifty dollars per annum, and 
made no increase in the salaries of the male teachers. The 
services rendered are a full equivalent for the pay. No city 
is more exacting and no one has been more fortunate in the 
results. As a general rule the teachers love their profes- 
sion and devote themselves to their work. By earnest, well- 
directed efforts, thorough instruction and constant study of 
the best methods they have raised our schools to a high 
standard of excellence, and secured to themselves an envi- 
able reputation. Such teachers we ought to keep. They 
are worth as much to us as to any one. But too often their 
success is our loss.. Better positions are offered them and 
we lose them. Every change demonstrates the propriety 
and the wisdom of increased compensation, of paying for 
a good article the market value. A change, even if it be 
of one good teacher to another as good, is detrimental to 
the progress of the school. This fact is apparent in a 
comparison of the South Grammar school with the North. 
The former is orderly, systematic and thorough, working 



224 

harmoniously in its several departments, and attaining the 
highest results in its studies. It has been visited during 
the year by the State Superintendent, and others connected 
with educational interests, and their opinion is ours, that 
it is one of the best schools of its grade to he found any- 
where^ and one of which this city may well be proud. We 
believe very much of its success is due to the fact that it 
has had comparatively few changes in its corps of teachers. 
Its principal has been there five years, one of his assistants 
has been there eight years and another four years. 

The North Grammar school has equally good material in 
its scholars. Its teachers are, and have been, equally com- 
petent, but the school has not made equal progress. The 
instruction has not been as systematic and complete, nor 
have the scholars advanced as far in their studies or mas- 
tered as thoroughly the subjects they have studied. More 
time must be given them, or a lower standard of scholar- 
ship accepted. This school has had, within three years, 
three principals; three assistants in its second division, 
and now wants another ; four in its third division, and five 
in its fourth. Amid such changes it has done well to be 
where it now is. Permanency in its corps of teachers can 
alone place it Avhere it should be, and this can be secured 
only by the payment of such salaries as shall induce good 
teachers to remain v» ith us. It should be remembered that 
the clergyman, physician and lawyer can follow their pro- 
fession through life, but the teacher soon reaches the age 
which, in popular estimation, disqualifies him for the labors 
of the school-room. He may spend there the best years of 
his life, and then leave with an experience that is of no 
practical use to him in any other calling, and if his com- 
pensation has not been such as to enable him to save some- 
thing, his future is not such as to encourage others to fol- 
low liis footsteps. 

We are fortunate in having so many competent teachers 



225 



remain with us so long. Local considerations have ^e- 
vented their acceptance of better positions elsewhere. Wc 
have made their necessity our opportunity, but is it right to 
ask them to labor for less than their services are woi-th . 
We do not advocate extravagance, but we believe the labor- 
er is worthy of his hire, and that, in this city at least, no 
good teacher has ever been overpaid. 

For the number of scholars attending school, and tor the 
statistical information required by the statute to be lur- 
nished by us, we refer you to the tables accompanying the 
report of the Superintendent. In addition to the lacts 
there presented, the law requires us to report the number 
of children bet^-een the ages of four and fourteen uot at- 
tending school, and the number of persons between the 
ages of fourteen and twenty-one who cannot read and write. 
We have no means of obtaining this information, and can 
form no opinion of the number included in the two classes 
except as facts incidentally coming to our knowledge may 
enable us. For instance, we know that from five to eight 
hundred children under fifteen years of age are employed 
in the manufacturing establishments of this city, many ot 
whom have never attended school. We meet almost every 
day a large number of boys, blacking boots and selling 
papers upon the street, who should be in the school-room, 
and too frequently persons fifteen or sixteen years of age 
are found who can neither read or write. Generally pa- 
rents res^ard it a duty and a pleasure to send their children 
to school, but many, especially of foreign birth, care noth- 
ing for educational privileges, and allow their children to 
grow up in ignorance, or, worse, educate them in those 
schools of vice, the street and the saloons of the city. We 
have tried to remedy these evils by the enforcement of the 
laws against the employment of children in manufacturing 
establishments and against truancy, and though our efforts 
in this direction have been attended with good results. 



226 

they have fallen far short of the desired end. The change 
made by the last Legislature in the law respecting tlie em- 
ployment of minors in manufacturing corporations is as 
efficient as any law can be, and, aided by the cheerful 
cooperation of agent and overseers, this evil may be cor- 
rected. But the truant law is inadequate to accomplish its 
purpose. It makes truancy a synonym of idleness and va- 
grancy, and has no provision for that class of children who, 
through the thoughtless indifference or criminal neglect of 
parents, are kept from schoo for the sake of their labor. 
The State compels the raising of a revenue for the support 
of schools. The principle that justifies it in the exercise 
of this authority would justify it also in compelling attend- 
ance in those schools of all within certain ages ; and, in our 
judgment, any law on the subject of truancy that fails to 
recognize this principle, and to enforce it, is fatally defect- 
ive. If the iiumber of children in the city between four 
and fourteen years of age who do not attend school, and 
the number of persons over fourteen who cannot read and 
write were known, there would be less hesitancy in strin- 
gent legislation and more efficiency in the enforcement of 
the law as it now is, or hereafter may be, and we would 
suggest the propriety of making it the duty of the asses- 
sors to take this census in connection with their annual 
canvags of the city. 

One year ago a new school-house was built at Goffe's 
Falls. This year one has been erected in Ward Seven, and 
the early completion of tlie Grammar school house on Lin- 
coln street, is demanded. Grammar school scholars are 
now accommodated in Middle schools, crowding those 
schools with scholars and the teachers with classes ; and a 
large number of Grammar scholars are in the school at 
Hallsville. The removal of the East Grammar School to 
Lincoln street would enable the Committee to transfer these 
scholars to that school, thus securing to them better advan- 



221 

tages, relieving those schools of their surplus numbers, 
and saving to the city the expense of one teacher, now cm- 
ployed in the Hallsville school. It would also enable the 
Committee to establish new schools in the old High school 
building for the accommodation of the scholars now crowd- 
ing the rooms of the North Grammar school building, and 
furnish better accommodations for the school now located 
in the old house on the corner of Bridge and Union streets, 
a house vacated three years ago as unfit for school purposes, 
and used again with its increasing unfitness simply because 
no l)etter room could be had. 

This house can hardly be completed before other new 
ones will demand attention. One is now needed in District 
No. 1, and another in district No. G. Additional school 
room is needed in Ward 8. Two years ago a Primary 
school was established in the old house in that ward. It 
was then supposed the city owned the building, but it has 
since appeared that it is the property of the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company. The school remains there and 
probably no action will be taken by the Company to remove 
it, but the location is bad and the room unsuitable. A new 
house should be erected or such additions made to the brick 
house as shall accommodate this school. 

A new house with accommodations for two schools is 
needed in place of the old house now occu})icd on the cor- 
ner of Lowell and Jane streets, and the rapidly increasing 
population of the city will require the early building of a 
new house in the vicinity of Harrison and Union streets, 
and another in the vicinity of Spruce and Beech streets. 

We have been gratified with the practical workings of 
the Training school. Thirteen young ladies have been ad- 
mitted to it, seven of whom are now engaged as regular 
teachers. The advantages of this school are manifest. It 
offers encouragement to the best female talent of the city 
by preparing them for the duties of the school-room. In 



228 

case of the temporary absence of a teacher, it furnishes a 
substitute who is familiar with the system of teaching, and 
it tends to create a corps of instructors who have the at- 
tachments of home to induce them to excel in their pro- 
fession, and to remain permanently with us. Some of the 
best primary schools of the city are under the charge of 
those who have been in this department, and their success 
is due in no small degree to the experience there had. 
Necessity demands some place for the instruction of teach- 
ers, and in the absence of a Normal school we believe such 
advantages as the Training school affords indispensable. 

Vocal music has been taught in the schools for several 
years, with increasing interest and success. It has now 
become so well established as one of the regular branches 
of study, that we have required an examination in the ele- 
ments of music of those who have applied for positions as 
teachers, and of the scholars desiring promotion into high- 
er grades of schools, and we have also placed it in the 
course of study to be completed in the Grammar schools. 
The satisfactory progress made in this department the past 
year is due to the efficient labors of the Music teachers, 
Messrs. Whitney and Jones, and to the cheerful coopera- 
tion with them of the regular teachers of the sohools. 
Pianos have been placed in several of the schools. The 
High school, the North Grammar and South Grammar 
schools own their instruments. The East Grammar, Inter- 
mediate, 'Squog Grammar, 'Skeag Grammar, Bakersville, 
and Hallsville schools are supplied by hiring from terra to 
term. 

Experience has shown that an instrument once placed in 
a school-room becomes a fixture there. It is of great as- 
sistance in singing, in gymnastic exercises, and in securing 
order and system in the school-room. It is an incentive to 
musical genius ; creates musical taste, and develops musi- 
cal talent. In each school some scholar is found who can 



229 

play upon it, and others are prompted to learn. Parents 
believe it worth the money it costs, and whenever the 
city fails to procure one, they hire, and pay for it by con- 
tribution. It may be accepted as a settled fact that the 
schools now supplied with instruments will hereafter have 
them. How shall they be supplied ? Clearly not by the 
contributions of the scholars or parents. One school is as 
much entitled to the free use of an instrument as another. 
The city must supply them. Shall it be by hiring or buy- 
ing ? We believe it cheaper and better every way to pur- 
chase, and we recommend that such an appropriation be 
made as shall enable the committee to purchase an instru- 
ment f )r each school now supplied by hiring. 

We would take this occasion to call the favorable atten- 
tion of our citizens to the High School. It is too valuable 
iin institution to have its privileges limited. There should 
ha at least three hundred scholars there. We feel confi- 
dent more would be there were its advantages known and 
rappreciated. Previous committees have spoken of the 
school in terms of praise. They have not given more than 
it deserved. We have had some knowledge of similar 
.schools elsewhere and we know of none where the higher 
branches are more intelligently taught, where discipline is 
jnore thoroughly maintained, or where teachers and schol- 
ars are more worthy of commendation. We are glad to 
see a growing interest in its favor. Scholars from different 
sections of the city are seeking admission to it. The num- 
ber in the school has increased during the year, and, com- 
pared with former years, more of those who have been ad- 
mitted remain. 

The course of study in this school should be enlarged, 
and more time required before graduation. It needs a sci- 
entific department, in which young men and women having 
completed the regular course of study as now reqmred 
might be prepared to enter into some useful employment. 



230 

Linear drawing, surveying, engineering- and mechanics 
should be more thoroughly taught. This would require ad- 
ditional apparatus and the services of another teacher, but 
we think it would add to the practical advantages of the 
school, and more than compensate for the increased expen- 
diture. 

By an amendment to the City Charter passed at the last 
session of the legislature, the Mayor of the city and the 
President of the Common Council become members of the 
School Board, and have all the powers and privileges to 
which other members are entitled. This change brings the 
school department into more direct communication with the 
other branches of the government, and will lead, ^ i.- trust, 
to a better appreciation of its wants and to greater liberality 
in its support. 

In them your children are educated ; upon them r':'st the 
hopes of the future ; tlieir improvement is an occasion of 
joy, and their prosperity a prophecy of good. Strengthen 
them by the liberality of your appropriation, and encom-age 
them by the frequency of your visits. There is no place in 
the city into which an intelligent stranger can be taken with 
so much of interest to himself as into the school-room, and 
the citizen who is often there will find less to criticise and 
more to praise. 

SAMUEL UPTON, for the Committee. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



aentlcmcn of the School Committee : 

I submit to you my fourth annual report of the schools 

of this city. 
The first subject to which I desire to call attention is 

that of 

SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

In some sections of the city there are more pupils than 
can be properly accommodated in the school buildings of 
their respective divisions, while in the school buildings of 
other localities there are a sufficient number of seats to ac- 
commodate more than are enrolled in the schools of those 

sections. 

As pupils cannot be easily transferred from schools in 
one section to those in a distant part of the city, some of 
the schools are necessarily crowded. 

Some of the schools in the Spring street building have 
been unusually large during the past term, and there will 
be a lack of accommodations in that section until the East 
Grammar school is removed from the old High school 
building. This building is needed to accommodate pupils 
now attending school upon Spring street and Blodgett 

street. 

The lower grade schools in these sections are now well 
filled, and many children employed in the mills will pro 
psrly belong to some of these schools when discharged. 



232 

The East Grammar school can accommodate no more? 
so that Middle schools sending pupils to this school will be 
obliged to retain their pupils next year. 

If the East Grammar school could be placed in a differ- 
ent building from that which it now occupies the old High 
school building could be used for schools of a lower grade, 
thereby relieving the schools on Spring street and Blodgett 
street, and also providing room for children now employed 
in the mills. 

The section of tho city proper lying east of Elm 
street, and north of Amherst street, is not well provided 
with buildings for schools ot lower grades. 

There are two rooms in the house on Blodgett street, 
and two in the lower story of the new High school build- 
ing, which can be used for such schools. 

A Primary school is also kept in the house at the corner 
of Jane and Lowell streets, and one in the house at the 
corner of Bridge and Union streets. 

Neither of the wooden houses opposite the High school 
building has been occupied during the past year. 

The other sections of the city proper are well provided 
with rooms for schools of lower grades, and the Lincoln 
street house will furnish ample accommodations for pupils 
belonging to Grammar schools. 

Tlie old house at Amoskeag has been repaired during the 
year, and the school-room considerably enlarged. 

The house in Piscataquog will be ready for use some time 
in January, thus providing room sufficient for all the chil- 
dren in that ward. 

A new house has been erected at Goffe's Falls the past 
year, displacing the uncomfortable one which has been used 
in that district for so many years. 

A new building is needed in the Stark district to take 
the place of the one in that district now used for school 
purposes. 



233 

REPAIRS OP SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

This matter was placed in charge of the Committee on 
Lands and Buildings, together with the Mayor and Super- 
intendent of Schools. 

A report has heen made by that committee so that it is 
unnecessary to make any statement in relation to the re- 
pairs made by them. 

Some repairs were made by the school committee previ- 
ous to the appointment of the Committee on Repairs of 
School Buildings. 

The four rooms of the North Gramniar school were fur- 
nished with single desks, the old house at Amoskeag was 
repaired, and various repairs were made at several of the 
school buildings in the city proper and in the rural dis- 
tricts. 

In November a transfer of $2,014.20 was made from the 
appropriation on Repairs of School -Houses to that of 
Schools, to meet the expenditures incurred by the School 
Board for repairs. 



SCHOOL STATISTICS FOR 1870. 

1. Whole number different pupils enrolled during 

the year 3,200 

2. Average number pupils belonging to the schools, 2,159 

3. Average daily attendance .... 1,987 

4. Number of visits]by members of School Board, 495 

5. Number of visits by Superintendent . . 1,185 

6. Number of visits by citizens and others . . 4,394 

7. Number of diplomas conferred at High school, 19 

8. Number of diplomas conferred at Grammar 

schools ....... 33 

9. Salary of Principal of High school . . $1,800 

IG 



234 

10. Salary of First Assistant of High school 

11. Salary of Second Assistant of High school . 600 

12. Salary of Principal of Grammar schools . 1,500 

13. Salary of Assistants of Grammar schools . 450 

14. Salary of Middle and Primary school teachers, 450 

15. Number of weeks in school year . . ,. 40 

16. Number of schools ..... 45 

17. Number of teachers ..... 61 

18. School appropriation for past year . . 42,000 

Note. The First Assistant at the South Grammar school receives $500. 



NAMES OF TEACHERS. 

The following list contains the names of those teachers 
who have served in tlie different schools of the city within 
the past year : 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Principal— W. W. Colburn. 

Assistant — C. Augusta Gile; 
i " Mary E. Clough ; 

r " Emma J. Ela. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

Principal — Daniel A. Clifford. 
Assistant — Emma A. Cross. 

Miss Mary A. Buzzel served as substitute in the school 
a portion of the fall term, and the remainder of the term 
in the North Grammar school. 

NORTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — William E. Buck. 
Assistant — Martha B. Dinsmore ; 



235 

Assistant — Fannie E. Porter ; 

" Mary F. Cutler, 2 terms ; 

" Anstrice G. Flanders, 1 term. 

SOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — Isaac L. Heath. 
Assistant — Lucretia E. Manahan ; 

" Lottie E.. Adams ; 

" Carrie E. Reid. 

EAST GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — L. H. Dutton. 
Assistant — Julia A. Baker ; 

" Kate L. Porter ; 

" Clara E. Davis. 

PISCATAQUOG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — L. D. Henry, 2 terms ; 

" Harry C. Hadley, 1 term. 

Assistant — Mary A. Parker, 1 term ; 

" Kate W. Osgood, 1 term ; 

" Isabella G. Mack, 1 terra. 

AMOSKEAG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Alpha Messer. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodgett street, Sarah J. Green. 
" 2, Beech street, Mary E. Ireland. 
" 3, " " Mary L. Sleeper. 

'' 4, Wilson Hill, Annette McDoel. 
" 5, Merrimack street, Eliza I. Young. 
" 6, " " Nancy S. Bunion. 



236 

No. 7, Franklin street, Hattie G. Flanders. 
« 8, " " C. Augusta Abbott. 

" 9, Spring street, Mattie S. Miller. 
" 10, " " Lizzie P. Gove. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodgett street, Ellen B. Rowell, 1 term ; 
Emma F. Soule, 1 term ; 
Emma F. Bean, 1 term. 
No. 2, Spring street, Emma F. Bean. * 
" 3, Bridge street, Georgianna Dow. 
" 4, Towlesville, Emily J. Parker. 
" 6, Wilson Hill, Abbie E. Abbott. 
No. 7, Merrimack street, Mary A. Barnes, 1 term ; 

Addie L. Hutchinson, 2 terms. 
" 8, " '' Mary J. Fife. 

" 9, Manchester street, Helen M. Morrill. 
" 10, " " Mintie C. Edgerly. 

*' 11, Franklin street, Martha N. Mason, 2 terms ; 
Addie A. Marshall, 1 term. 
No. 12, Franklin street, Marianna Clough, 2 terms ; 

Martha W. Hubbard, 1 term. 
No. 13, Spring street, Adelaide B. George, 2 terms ; 
Gertrude W. Borden, 1 term. 
No. 14, Spring street, Mary A. Richardson. 
" 15, Piscataquog, Sarah D. Lord. 
" 16, " Hattie A. Mack. 

" 17, " Alice G. Lord, 2 terms ; 

Kate W. Osgood, 1 term. 
No. 18, Amoskeag, Rebecca Hall. 
" 19, " Laura A. Montgomery. 

" 20, Piscataquog, Clara N. Brown. 
" 21, " Mary C. Page. * 

* In session only one term. 



237 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Stark District. 

W. C. Scates, 1 term ; 

Nellie I. Sanderson, 2 terms. 
No. 3, Bakers ville. 

Principal — Eugene 0. Lock, 1 term ; 

" Georgianna Patterson, 1 term ; 

" Addie M. Chase, 1 term. 

Assistant — Martha W. Hubbard, 2 terms ; 
" Addie A. Marshall, 1 term. 

No. 4, Goffe's Falls. 

John F. Chase, 1 term ; 

Lana S. George, 2 terms. 
No. 5, Harvey District. 

Hattie L. Jones, 2 terms ; 

Nellie F. Cheney, 1 term. 
No. 6, Webster's Mills. 

Mary J. Reid. 
No. 7, Hallsville. 

Princiiml — Maria H. Hildreth. 

Assistant — Mary B. Lane. 
No. 8, Massabesic. 

Addie M. Chase, 2 terms ; 

Georgianna Patterson, 1 term. 
No. 9, Mosquito Pond. 

Etta M. George. 

MUSIC TEACHERS. 

Central District, 
I. S. Whitney. 

Amoskeag, Piscataquog, and Suburban Schools, 
J. D. Jones. 



238 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 



E. D. Hadley, 
John F. Chase, 
Henry Wight, 
Daniel A. Clifford, 
Charles F. Morrill, 



John B. Prion, 
Eugene 0. Locke, 
L. H. Dutton, 
Frank Hiland, 
Susie A. Page. 



GRADUATES OP THE HIGH AND GRAMMAR 
SCHOOLS. 

The following is a list of the diploma scholars at the 
various schools : 

NORTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



Nellie E. Brown, 
Ella F. Clement, 
Ida F. Gee, 
Clara I. Kenniston, 
Nellie B. Kibby, 
Helen G. Kimball, 
Emma H. Plumer, 



IdaW. Stowell, 
Nellie A. Wilson, 
Fred S. Bean, 
Everett C. Colburn, 
Prank Davis, 
George H. Durant, 
Charles S. Stevens. 



SOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



Ella Brock, 
Etta J. Carley, 
Addie Caswell, 
Imogene Caswell, 
Jennie Graham, 



Kate F. Graham, 
Nellie Senter, 
Frank H. Challis, 
Fred James, 
Eddie Brooks. 



EAST GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



Minnie C. Abbott, 
Carrie A. Cook, 



George C. Bunton, 
Willie C. Clarke, 



239 

Rose E. Heald, Allen E. Ilerrick, 

Gertrude F. Smith, James W. Hill, 

Samuel A. Page. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Full Course, cojnprising Latin, French and English. 

Mattie J. Boyd, Hattie S. Tozer, 

Maria F. Kidder, Mattie E. Clough, 

Lizzie S. Campbell, Nellie M. Whitney, 

Emma H. Perley, Louis C. Merrill, 

Hattie E. Child, W. Byron Stearns. 

French and English Course. 

May E. Brooks, Ella F. Smith, 

A. Matilda Russell, Cora F. Nichols, 

Celia M. Chase, Annabelle Tubbs, 

Sarah Tubbs. 

College Class. 

Joseph S. Haines, Charles H. Pettee. 

The class at the High school received their diplomas Fri- 
day, December 23d, at the High school-room. 

Hereafter classes will graduate at the close of the sum- 
mer term, a time more appropriate for such exercises. 

Order of Exercises at the Exhibition of Manchester 
High School, Friday, Dec. 23, 1870. 

1. Singing, .... By the School. 

2. Salutatory, .... Mattie J. Boyd. 

3. Recitation, ^'-Legend of Brcgenz,'' May E. Brooks. 
■1. Essay, ^^ After the night, the morning 

BreaJceth;' . . . Ella F. Smith. 



240 



5. Declamation, "TAc Destiny of 

America^'' .... 

6. Recitation, " Old Simon Bole,^^ 

7. Song, '•'-Rocked in the Cradle of 

the Deeip^'' 

8. Essay, '■'-My Spectacles^'' 

9. Recitation, .... 

10. Essay, '•'•The Advantages of a 

High School Education^ 

11. Duet, '■'-Les Dames de Seville,'' 

12. Essay, '■'-Social Astronomy," . 

13. Recitation, "iVo^Am^ to Wear." 

14. Essay, " Climh, hut heights are 

cold," .... 

15. Music, "Xe Dernier Sourire" 
IG. Recitation, .... 

17. Essay, " The wall must wear the 

iveather stain hefore it grows 
the ivy" 

18. Chronicles, . 

19. Music, ^'-Ronde de Nait" 

20. Classics, 

21. Music, '-'-Fantaisic Russe" 

22. Poem, ''King of the Winds," 

23. Valedictory, 



Louis C. Merrill. 
Cora F. Nichols. 

Hattie H. Wilbur. 

Sarah Tubbs. 

A. Matilda Russell. 

W. Bjroii Stearns. 
Cora F. Nichols and 
Maria F. Kidder. 
Hattie E. Child. 
Emma H. Perley. 

Annabelle Tubbs. 
Viola J. Palmer. 
Mattie Clouch. 



24. Ode, 



Celia M. Chase. 

Nellie M. Whitney. 

Mary Spofford. 

Hattie E. Tozer. 

EmmaH. Perley. 

Lizzie S. Campbell. 

Maria F. Kidder. 
Words by Mattie Clough, 
Music arranged by Emma H. Perley. 



As the suu is slowly sinking, 

And the day glides from our sight; 

O, Our Father, grant thy blessing, 

To our classmates here to-night. 

Grant thy mercy, 

Grant thy favor, — 

May we nobly choo«'^ be right. 



241 
II. 

If, while sailing on life's ocean, 

Dangers all around us lie, 
May we, O our Heavenly Father, 
Feel that thou art ever nigh; 
Make us hopeful, • 
Make us trustful, 
And in thee alone rely. 

III. 

Then whene'er our journey's ended, 

Safely on the other shore, 
We '11 proclaim our Father's triumphs. 
Sing his mercies o'er and o'er; 
We will thank him, 
We will bless him. 
And will praise him evermore . 

25. Presentation of Diplomas. 

The exercises at the High School Exhibition were of a 
hio-h order, and our citizens may well congratulate them- 
sefyes that such classes can be graduated from that school. 

At this time I deem it appropriate to make some sugges" 
ions connected with the subject of awarding diplomas 
the various schools. _ . 

There is a desire on the part of many of our citizens 
that their children shall complete the course of study m 
our schools and graduate with the class to which they have 
belonged so manv terms. Many feel a pride in saying tha 
their children have been memhers of the High school, and 
a still greater pride in saying that they are graduates. A 
^reat many of those who do not intend that their childre n 
shall enter the High school, are anxious to have them grad- 
uate at the Grammar schools. 

In former reports, allusion has been made to the la c 
that such a large number have left school before reaching 
the higher divisions of the Grammar schools. Within the 



242 

past two years there lias been a marked change in this re- 
spect, and now in the lower divisions of the Grammar 
schools there are many pupils desirous of completing the 
course and receiving diplomas. It is well to hold out some 
inducement to the p^ipils in order that more may avail 
themselves of the benefits of a full course. We should be 
careful not to make the diploma the main object ; but what 
is often regarded by pupils as irksome in the school can be 
better done by them if there is something placed before 
them for which they can strive. 

1 have spoken heretofore unfavorably of the prize system, 
as the rewards are limited to a few, but a diploma can be 
secured by all who will spend the time and make the 
exertion. 

Pupils look forward with hope to the day when they shall 
graduate, and the thought of that day stimulates them and 
lightens their labors. They cannot always understand the 
importance of all the studies they are pursuing, and are 
often impatient under the restraint of school life, and if wo 
can encourage more of them to remain by any such in- 
ducements it is our duty to do it. 

I have spoken sometimes disparagingly of exhibitions as 
they frequently have been conducted. Too often the time 
which should have been devoted to the regular studies of 
the school has been occupied in preparing for such exer- 
cises. Not so much time has been spent in preparing for 
exhibitions at our schools for the past few years as formerly, 
and in another respect there has been an improvement' 
and that is in the character of the exercises. 

This objection has been urged regarding exhibitions, viz : 
only a few of the best pupils are allowed to participate in 
the exercises, totally debarring from the exercises many 
worthy pupils who have labored faithfully during the whole 
course. At the recent exhibition of the High school a part 
was assigned to each pupil of the graduating class, so that 



243 



there was no ground of complaint that the exhibition was 
only for the best scholars. This policy of selecting a few 
choice pupils for such occasions discourages many who are 
really worthy, and deters others in the lower classes from 
completing the course. If it is understood that the schools 
are for all children, and not for the most brilliant ones, we 
shall have a larger number of graduates each year, a class 
of pupils that need the discipline of the schools, and by 
whom the community will he benefited. 

Although the exercises upon public days may not be 
quite as entertaining as tliough only the best are selected, 
yet our schools will better serve the interests of commu- 
nity, by sending into the world a class of pupils better able 
to iDear the burdens of life than many of those who are re- 
markably brilliant at school upon exhibition day, but are 
never heard of in after life. The display made upon such 
occasions and the expense attending such displays have 
been noticed by many, and are regarded as objections. I 
know it is an important era in the lives of the scholars 
and teachers. Scholars and parents are extremely anxious 
that everything should be done better than it has been 
done formerly. But we must bear in mind that great sac- 
rifices are made by many parents in order that their chil- 
dren may remain the full time in the schools, and many are 
not able to hear the expense attending such a display. The 
complaint is often made that the expenses attending the 
graduation of some classes are more than the cost of books 
for a full course of four years. Many parents feel that 
they cannot afford this, and they have a right to complain 
when extravagance in dress compels them to withdraw their 
children from school. 

These things have a tendency to deter people of mod- 
erate means from allowing their children to complete the 
course, and thus we shall lose the very pupils we ought to 
retain. If the custom is adopted of making such displays, 
no parent will consent to have a child participate in such 



244 

exercises, unless that child is dressed as well as the others, 
although the expense cannot be afforded. 

I know we cannot prescribe the dress that shall be worn 
on such occasions, nor can we prevent any expense to which 
parents may subject themselves, but we can convey the im- 
pression that all Avill have the same privilege in our schools 
and be honored at graduation not for extravagance in dress 
but for real merit. If parents understand that this is 
the feeling of school authorities it will tend to create a 
right public sentiment upon this subject and the matter of 
display will not be regarded as of the first importance. It 
may be said that there has not been any such display or ex- 
travagance in our city as to call for any such criticisms on 
the part of any one. Whatever may have been the facts 
with regard to these things, there certainly has been much 
criticism, and there also has been much complaint, and un- 
der these circumstances I have called attention to what are 
regarded by many as evils. Some parents have said that 
they were entirely opposed to these things, but contrary to 
their own better judgment they have acquiesced, not wish- 
ing to appear obstinate. They have borne the expenses at- 
tending the graduating exercises, but there will be many 
who cannot afford it, and it will be likely to lead to serious 
difficulty in the future. 

Near the close of the year it was decided to give diplo- 
mas to those pupils in the High school who should be ex- 
amined in music. There was an examination in this 
branch Wednesday, Oct. 26th, at the lecture room of the 
High school, and also one on Wednesday Dec, 6th, at the 
same place. This branch has not been considered in the 
examination of candidates for the High school until the 
past year, and consequently no members of the school — ex- 
cepting those just admitted — had been examined in that 
branch. 

Of this subject I sliall have occasion to speak in another 
part of the report. 



246 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



One liundrcd and sixteen pupils in the various schools 
have not been absent or tardy during the past year. At the 
close of the year certificates were awarded to these pupils. 

During the past year there has been a great effort made 
at many of the schools to secure a more punctual attend- 
ance. There has been a decided improvement in this re- 
spect from term to term, and the percentage of attendance 
at many of the schools during the term just closed has been 
higher than during any previous term. There were over five 
hundred children in the schools not absent or tardy once dur- 
ing the last term of the year. The following list contains the 
names of those not absent or tardy during the year 1870 : 

High School.— Josie A. Bosher, Rosa E. Heald, Maria 
F. Kidder, Gertrude F. Smith, Sarah F. Stevens, Hattie 
H. Wilbur, Abbie D. Wilson, Luther C. Baldwin, Fred S. 
Bean, Perry H. Dow, Charles R. Dustin, Allen E. Herrick, 
James W. Hill, Harry H. Ladd, Samuel A. Page, Frank 
W. Patten, Henry L. Webb. 

North Grammar.— Sarah J. Kidder, Annie M. Nowell, 
Annie M. Wilson, Ida J. Stanton, Ella A. Brown, Annie 
E. Furlong, Effie M. Annis, Emma L. Stokes, Annie E. 
Kidder, Emma Little, Willis C. Patten. (Miss Annie M. 
Wilson has not been absent or tardy once during the last 
four years.) 

South Grammar.— Metta J. Lord, Ida J. Bartlett, Annie 
Parker, Addie Stevens, Annie C. Caswell, Cora Bond, 
Lizzie M. Dodge, Hattie I. Andrews, George E. Tewks- 
bury, George F. Canis, Joseph Knowlton, Howard Holt, 
Arthur Heath, Willie Stark, John Sanborn, AVillie C. Mer- 
rill, Eddie F. Eastman, Walter B. Mitchell, Frank Bond, 
Willie H. Sullivan. 



246 

East Grammar. — Ella Kimball, Josie Brigham, Allie 
Hubbard, Josie M. Wilson, Annie Butman, Mary Watts, 
Vesta M. Tuck, Waldron Chase, Fred J. Kennard, Willie S; 
Moody, Frank Sutcliff, Herbert Thayer, Ed. S. Kimball. 

Amoskeag Grammar. — Eva J. Norton, Emma C. Fuller, 
Elva J. Norton, Clara Harwood, Nettie Newhall. 

Middle, No. 4, Wilson Hill.— Lillian E. Cutler, Walter 
Roper, William G. Roper, William H. Rowe. 

Middle, No. 5, Merrimack street. — Herman B. Neal. 

• Middle, Mo. 6, Merrimack street. — Lillie C. Hardy, 
Carrie B. Brigham. 

Middle, No. 7, Franklin street. — Lizzie M. Chase. 

Middle, No. 8, Franklin street. — Bertha A. Graves, Ash- 
ton Willand. 

Middle, No. 9, Spring street. — Charles H. Philbrick, 
Hattie D. Cooley, Nellie J. Clough, Emma C. Marston. 

Middle, No. 10, Spring street. — Ellen G. Kenney. 

Primary, No. 4, Towlesville. — Jennie E. Morgan, Willie 
F. Chamberlain. 

Primary, No. G, Wilson Hill. — Jennie Noyes, William 
.Stone. 

Primary, No. 7, Merrimack street. — Clara Alden, Willie 
Hunkins. 

Primary, No. 8, Merrimack street. — Willie Hardy, Frank 
Hunkins, Aldah C. Whitney. 



247 

Primary, No. 10, Manchester street. — Fannie E. Sand- 
oorn, Andrew Farley. 

Primary, No. 12, Franklin street.— Alice Pluramer. 

Primary, No. 13, Spring street.— George Dodge. 

Frimary, No. 14, Spring street.— George W. Lindley, 
Charles H. Gage. 

Primary, No. 16, Piscataquog, Center street. — Noill 
Caouettc, Mary Caouette. 

Primary, No. 17, Piscataquog, River Road. — Walter F. 
Prince, Eddie Sanszourie, Mena Wermers, Carrie M. Stev- 
ens, Nellie A. Hastings. 

Primary, No. 18, Amoskeag, lower house. — Andrew S. 
Fantome, De LafayetteRobinson, Fannie E. Newhall. 

Primary, No. 19, Amoskeag upper house. — Dora Brock, 
Maria Stearns, Minnie Stearns, Nettie Woodward. 

Primary, No. 20, Piscataquog, Rivet Road.— Louis 
Prince. 

Webster Mills, No. 6.— Hattie L. Webster, Sidney A. 
Webster. 

Hallsville.— Mattie M. Hayes, Sarah M. Yance. 

Mosquito Pond. — Lillian C. George. — 116. 



248 
EVENING SCHOOLS. 

An appropriation of $1,000 was made for these schools 
for the year 1870. 

Last winter two schools were kept in the old buildings 
on the corner of Concord and Beech streets, and one in the 
old building on the corner of Bridge and Union streets. 
The attendance at these schobls was 150. 

In October a school was opened in Merchants' Exchange, 
and placed in charge of Eugene 0. Locke, assisted by- 
Henry Wight. Mr. Locke left the city early in December 
and was succeeded by Charles F. Morrill. This school has 
numbered 75, most of whom have attended very constantly. 

Another school was opened in October in the old High 
school building. This school was taught for a few weeks 
by L. H. Button, Principal of the East Grammar school, 
until he left the city, since which time it has been under 
the charge of Daniel A. Clifford, Principal of the Interme- 
diate school. 

When these schools were first opened children thirteen 
and fourteen years of age were admitted to them, but re- 
cently none under fifteen have been admitted. 

There are in the city many young persons who would 
like to attend evening schools and review their English 
studies, but heretofore there has been difficulty in obtain- 
ing suitable rooms for evening schools. 

This subject, I think, deserves the attention of those in- 
terested in the education of all classes. The benefits de- 
rived from attending an evening school will, in some meas- 
ure, compensate for the lack of advantages on the part of 
many in their early days. 

It would be a good plan to arrange two rooms in some 
building so that they could be used for such a purpose. 
Two rooms in the old High School building, or in some 
other school building might be fitted up for that purpose 



249 



])y putting in gas and making some changes in the seats 
and desks. It would be an arrangement that would amply 
repay the expenditure. 



EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN IN MANUFACTUR- 
ING ESTABLISHMENTS. 

In 18-i8 the first law, as far as I have been able to learn, 
was enacted in New Hampshire upon this subject. It was 
as follows : 

Section 1. Xo child under the age of fifteen years shall be 
employed to labor in any nianutacturing establishment unless such 
child shall have attended some academy, high school or public or 
private day school, where instruction is given by a teacher compe- 
tent to instruct in the branches usually taught in district schools, 
at least twelve weeks during the year next preceding the time 
when such child shall be so employed. 

Sec. 2. Xo child under the age of twelve years shall l^e 
employed as aforesaid unless such child shall have attended some 
academy or school aforesaid at least six months during the year 
next preceding the time when said child shall be so employed: 
provided, however, that in case such child, when not prevented by 
sickness, shall have attended the district school in the district 
where such child had its residence during the whole time such 
school was kept in the district during the said year such child may 
be employed as aforesaid, in the same manner as if the child had 
attended an academy or school as aforesaid for the full term of six 
months. 

Sec. 3. The owner, agent or superintendent of any manufac- 
turing establishment who shall employ any child to labor in such 
estabUshment, unless a certificate is lodged with the agent or clerk 
thereof, signed by the teacher under whose charge such instruction 
Avas received, or by the prudential committee of the district ui 
which such child attended school as aforesaid, certifying that said 
child has attended school as provided by the first and second sec- 
tions of this chapter, shall forfeit ^and pay the sum of fifty dollars 
for each oftence, to be recovered by indictment to the use of the 
complainant, 
17 



250 

This law, I think, remained in force without any change 
until tiie revision of the Statutes in 1867, when the law 
was arranged as follows : 

LAWS OF NEW IIAMPSIIIKE. 

[General Statutes', Chapter LXXXIII, Sects. 11, 12, and 13.] 

Secton 11. No child under fifteen years of age shall be em- 
ployed in any manufacturing establishment unless he has attended 
some public school or private day school, where instruction was 
given by a teacher comi^eteut to instruct in the branches taught 
in common schools, at least twelve weeks during the year pre- 
ceding. 

Sec. 12. INo child under the age of twelve years shall be em- 
ployed, as aforesaid, unless he has attended school, as aforesaid, at 
least six months during the year preceding, or has attended the 
school of the district in Avhich he dwelt the, whole time it was kept 
during such year. 

Sec. 13. The owner, agent or superintendent of any manufac- 
turing estal)lishment who shall emi^loy such child without requir- 
ing a certificate, signed by the teacher of such school or prudential 
committee of the district in which it was kept, that such child lias 
attended school as aforesaid, shall be fined fifty dollars. 

In 1869 the following act was passed : 

AS ACT IN RELATION TO TIIE ATTENDANCE ON THE PUBLIC 

SCHOOLS. 

Be it enacted hy the Senate and House of Iie2Jresentatives in General 
Court convened: 

That the school committee of every town in which au}^ manufac- 
turing corporation is located shall have power to enforce the provis- 
ions of the General Statutes, chapter eighty-three, relating to the 
employment of children by manufacturing corporations, under the 
ages of twelve and fifteen years respectively, and their attendance 
m\ the public schools; and all necessary expense arising from pros- 
ecutions instituted by the school committee in enforcing the pi'ovis- 
ions of the existing law with reference to the employment of chil- 
dren by manufacturing corporations shall be audited, and i^aid for 
out of the town treasurv. 



251 

■ At the last session of tlie legislature the following law 
was enacted : 

The owner, agent or superintendent of any manufacturing es- 
tablishment, or any person connected therewitli, who sliall employ 
iu such establishment any child under the age of fifteen years, 
without having a certificate signed by the majority of the school 
connnittee of the town or city in which the child resides, or by 
such person or persons as they may designate for that purpose, that 
such child has attended school as required by sections eleven and 
twelve of chapter eighty-three of the General Statutes, shall be 
fined not exceeding twenty dollars for each ofience. 

On the 12th of Septemhcr last the Superintendent was 
authorized to give certificates to children desiring employ- 
ment in the mills in accordance with the act passed at the 
last session of the legislature. 

Septemher 23d the following vote was passed, at a regu- 
lar meeting of the School Committee : 

Besolved, That the Superintendent be instructed to confer with 
those persons employing children in the mills, and request them 
not to employ any after this date without the proper certificates, 
and that he make some arrangement in relation to those now in 
their employ, and report to the Board, as soon as practicable, his 
action in the premises. 

Septemher 27th I issued a circular to the overseers, in- 
forming them of your action and requesting them to send 
to my office all children in their employment, so that I 
could ascertain for what number it would be necessary to 
provide school accommodations whenever they should be 
discharged from the mills. It was also desirable to know 
to what grade of schools they would belong and in what 
sections of the city schools should be provided for these 
children. 

I received assurances from the overseers that none should 
be employed after the first of October without the proper 



9A9 



certificates, and with regard to those already at worli that 
they should be discharged as soon as others could be found 
to supply their places, and in return I assured them that 
ample time would be allowed them in order that they might 
make arrangements for other children. 

Tliis arrangement was made because it was not practica- 
ble for the overseers at that time to discharge many from 
their rooms, and if they had been discharged at that time 
there would not have been accommodations sufficient for 
them in the schools then established. 

The overseers readily consented to this request, and by 
their assistance I was enabled to ascertain somewhat accu- 
rately the number of children employed, their residences, 
and something with regard to their attainments, so that 
as many of them have since come from the mills there has 
not been been much difficulty in assigning them to the 
proper schools. 

Of course it was impossible to find each child employed, 
and from some who came to me I was not able to ascertain 
all the facts desired, but sufficient information Avas obtained 
to furnish a field of operations. 

Four hundred and two children, at that time employed 
in the mills, presented themselves at my office, of which 
number ninety-nine had attended school as the law of the 
State required ; the remaining three hundred and three 
were allowed to remain until some arrangement could be 
made for their discharge. Fourteen of those children re- 
sided in Ward 8, sixty-one in Ward 7, one hundred and 
ten in the city proper north of Amherst street, two hund- 
red and twelve south of Amherst street, and the remain- 
ing five outside of the city proper. 

This number included only those actually at work in the 
mills whose names and residences could be correctly ascer- 
tained ; others were discharged and afterwards attended 
schools while others probably did not present themselves 
at my office. 



253 

Allow mc at this time to sa}' that I had the hearty co- 
operation of agents and overseers in this work. 

I entered upon the performance of the duties you had 
seen fit to impose upon me with some misgivings, fearing 
that there might be some opposition on the part of some of 
those connected with the mills, but on the contrary they 
rendered me valuable assistance in ascertaining the facts 
with regard to these children. 

I addressed a letter to each agent in the city, asking his 
views on the subject, and received the following replies : 

Man'CIIESTer, .IST. II., October 14, 1870. 
Joseph G. Edgerly: 

Dear Sh\ — In response to your letter of yesterday, I Avould say 
that the law in relation to the employment of children ,in manufac- 
turing establishments I think is a good one. 

C'hildren under 15 years of age ought to attend school a portion 
of the year, and I will render you such assistance as I can in your 
eftbrts to secure their attendance. 

There are but few children employed on this corporation, and my 
orders to the overseers are to see that all liave the proper certiti- 
cate. Respectfully yours, 

Wm. L. Killey, 

Agent Laiujclon M'f':j Company. 

Makchesteu, Oct. m, 1870. 
J. G. Edgerly: 

Bear Sh\ — In answer to your note of the 13th, in which you 
wish me to state my views on the subject in relation to schools for 
children now in the mills, I will briefly state, I think it a good and 
worthy object; that you have my sympathies and co-operalion. I 
have given ordei's to my overseers to see that the laws relative to 
employing minors be strictly observed. 

In order that your system be successfully carried out there should 
be unanimity, among all those who employ minors, in regard to the 
laws. Yours respectfully, 

A. P. 0LZEISIDA31, 

Agent Hoaienj Mamtfactor;/. 



254 

Manchester, October 15, 1870. 
J. G. Edgeely: 

Bear Sir, — I am much pleased with the present arrangements 
hi regard to pubhc instruction, and the requirements of the law. 

I have given orders to all my overseers not to employ any chil- 
dren under 15 years of age, except they have a legal school cer- 
tificate, signed hy you. Yours respectful!}', 

John" Brugger, 

Agent Hosiery Manufactory. 

Manchester, UST. II., October 12. 1870. 
Joseph G. Edgerly: 

Dear Sir, — In regard to the statute regulating the employment 
of children in the mills, I would say, that it meets my hearty ap- 
])roval. 

Herewith please find cojiy of an order issued this day to each 
overseer in the employment of the Stark Mills. 

Yours very truly, 

PiiiNEHAS Adams, 

Agent Stark Mills. 

Office of Stark Miles, 
Manchester, X. H., October 12, 1870. 
To Overseer of Stark Mills: 

The laws of the State of ^ew Hampshire provide tliat no child 
under twelve years of age shall ha employed in any manufacturing 
establishment, unless he has attended some school at least six 
months during the year preceding. And also that no child under 
fifteen years of age shall be thus employed, unless he has attended 
some school at least twelve weeks during the year preceding; and 
it makes the individual emi^lojing any such child, without a certifi- 
cate from the proper officer that lie has attended school as required 
])y law, SUBJECT to a fine not exceeding twenty dollars 
for each offence. 

Every overseer in the Stark Mills, employing any person for the 
corporation, must pay strict attention to this requirement of the 
law, or they will render themselves personally liable lor its viola- 
tion. 

The proper certifying officer in this city is the Superintendent of 
Schools, and you must have his certificate, as above, before setting 
at work any person under fifteen years of age; and in case any 
child is sent out of your room in consequence of not having attended 
school as required by law, you will leave their name and residence 
at the office. 

1^0 child to be employed under the age of twelve years. 

P. Adams, Agent. 



255 

Manchester, N. II., October 1, 1870. 
J. G. Edgekly: 

Dear Su% — In reply to your inquiry as to my views of the State 
law requiring children under lifteen years of age, who are employed 
in manufacturing astahlishments, to attend school a certain portion 
of the year, I have to say, that I think the law to be one absolutely 
needed, and believe it should be strictly enforced. I believe it to 
be the duty of the State to see that all its children receive a good 
common s(rhool education. 

I do not think any dithcultles will be found, in this city, in en- 
forcing the law. Tours very truly, 

E. A. Stkaw, 

Agent Amoskeag My'g (Jo. 

At that time Mr. Straw issued an order similar to the cue 
of Mr. Adams. 

Manchester, X. II., Octo]>cr 19, 1870.. 
,Josp:rH G. EuGerly: 

j)(,ar Sb\—1 have received your note of the 13th inst., in rela- 
tion to children employed upon this corporation, and their attend- 
ance at school. 

When I received your circular of September l!7, setting forth the 
action of the School Committee, I was pleased that you had adopted 
this plan. The matter has been long neglected. 

I have given my subordinates instructions to comply strictly with 
the requirements of the Superintendent of Public; Instruction in 
regard to children employed. 

I shall give you my support in the matter. 

Waterman S^iitii, 

Agent Manchester Print Worls. 

The following order was issued by Mr. Smith a few weeks 

later : 

Manchester Print A\ orks, 
Manchester, N". II., I^ov. 18, 1870. 
To Overseer, Manchester Print Works: 

^'iV^_You are hereby notified that the above law* is now ui force, 
and you are required to discharge at once all those who have not fur- 
nished certificates according to law, and not employ any unless they 
{urnish the certificate required. You will also be held personally 
responsible for a strict compliance with this notice. 

Waterman Smith, Agent. 

" A copy of the State law was sent to cacli Overseer. 



256 

Manchester, J^. II., Oct. 21, 1870. 
J. G. Edgeely: 

Dear Sir, — Your favor ol' the 13th iiist, is received, and in reply 
would say, I think the law is a just and good one ; and I have given 
orders to my overseers not to employ children under fifteen years 
of age Avithout a certificate from you. 

Yours truly, 

W. B. Webster, 

• Agent J^amaske 3IilU. 

These letters and orders are of value to us, and indicate 
that the agents of this city have an interest in the educa- 
tional welfare of the State. 

As was stated in the last annual report there are ques- 
tions of importance connected with this subject which it is 
our duty carefully to consider. 

The subject involves the whole question of compulsory 
attendance at school, a question which, more than any 
other educational question at the present time, interests 
the civilized world. 

Prussia is teaching the whole world the value of public 
schools and the importance of educating each child in the 
State. 

Our system of public instruction, excellent as it is, is 
deficient in this respect, that it does not make provision for 
the poorest and those wlio have not a just appreciation of 
the value of an education, or rather, I might say, that it 
does not compel them to accept the provisions which have 
been made. 

It is urged l;>y many that the schools of New England 
reach only the children of the better class, — those whose 
parents will see to it that their children are educated 
whether there -is a good system o^ public schools or not ; 
that it leaves uncared for and without sufficient attention a 
large class that cannot avail themselves of its benefit or 
will not, unless stimulated to it by others. 



-J.bi 



We boast much — and we have reason for so doing — of 
our schools, but we are allowing hundreds in every State 
in the Union to grow up without attending school, fitting 
themselves, not to become useful citizens, but deadweights 
upon community. It was well said by Chancellor Kent : 
" The parent who sends his son into the world uneducated 
defrauds the community of a lawful citizen and bequeaths 
to it a nuisance." 

There are, in all large places, Primary schools, where 
children pass from the freedom of home-life to the res- 
traint and discipline of the school, where they are taught 
to recognize authority, where they first learn those lessons 
so essential to their progress in after life. There are Gram- 
mar schools, where the greater portion of pupils are fitted 
for the active duties of life and some for higlier institutions 
of learning. There are High schools, where young men 
are prepared for the best colleges of the land. All these 
grades of schools are found in our cities. These schools 
are supported by taxes levied upon all citizens ; schools 
that are free to all, and yet the census of 1860 showed that 
in Nevr England, the boasted land of intelligence, there 
were upwards of 30,000 persons over twenty years of age 
unable to read and write. It may be said that the greater 
portion of these were foreigners who came to our shores 
at an age when they could not receive the benefits of our 
schools, and consequently in speaking of our schools we 
ought not to draw any inferences from these statistics. If 
this is true it only proves to us that the state should make 
extraordinary eftbrts to educate the children of those peo- 
ple, and that unless special effort is made by school author- 
ities in their behalf they will be neglected, as people who 
have not received the benefits of the schools themselves 
will not be likely to retain their children in school for a great 
length of time unless urged to do so. 

In this connection it may be gratifying to know [that in 



258 



18G0 the number of people in New Hampshire over twenty 
years of age unable to read and write Avas less, according 
to the number of inhabitants, than in any other State in 
the Union, it being less than two and one-half per cent, of 
the entire population, but from present indications another 
census will exhibit statistics less favorable for us. 

The Commissioner of Education has recently issued a 
circular showing the number of persons over twenty years 
of age in the different states of the Union unable to read 
and write at the time of taking the census in 1860. The 
percentage is given in each state as follows : 



1. New Hampshire 












2.46 


2. Maine 












2.92 


3. Connecticut . 












3.29 


4. Wisconsin 












4.52 


5. Michigan 












4.99 


6. A^ermont 












5.09 


7. Minnesota 












5.67 


8. Pennsylvania 












5.68 


9. Ohio . 












5.74 


10. New York . 












5.81 


11. Kansas 












5.88 


12. Oregon 












5.95 


13. Rhode Island 












6.07 


14. Iowa 












6.26 


15. Massachusetts 












6.55 


IG, New Jersey . 












6.58 


IT. Illinois 












7.37 


18. California . 












7.56 


19. Indiana 












10.41 


20. Missouri 












19.76 


21. Maryland . 












22.10 


22. Delaware 












. 25.30 


23. Kentucky 












. 31.61 



L!51t 

24. Texas 35.73 

25. Tennessee 38.09 

26. Arkansas 39.42 

27. Virginia 41.74 

28. Nortli Carolina 47.34 

29. Florida 52.53 

30. Georgia 52.65 

31. Louisiana ....... 53.25 

32. Alabama 54.61 

33. South Carolina 60.67 

34. Mississippi ....... 60.85 

Although New Hampshire stands better in the list than 
the other states, it does not present such a favorable record 
as it ought, and it will be lower in the scale, unless the 
truant law and the law regarding the employment of chil- 
dren in the mills are more strictly enforced than they have 
Ijeen. 

The common school system of this country is founded 
upon the idea that the state should provide for the educa- 
tion of every child irrespective of color, condition or na- 
tionality. Truant laws have been enacted in many of the 
states authorizing certain persons to compel children to at- 
tend school. Laws have been enacted by many states for- 
bidding manufacturing establishments from employing chil- 
dren under certain ages, unless such children attend school 
a certain portion of the year. And yet in our large cities, 
and also in many smaller towns, a great many children may 
be found not attending any school, the law in many 
instances being practically disregarded. 

It is not my province to inquire why this state of things 
exists in Manchester ; why there have been so many chil- 
dren employed in the mills contrary to the law of the state, 
or why so many have been allowed to idle away their time 
in the streets or in haunts of vice. 



260 

The question for us now to consider is not why has it 
been so in the past, but should this state of tilings continue ? 
The fact stares us in the face that over three hundred chil- 
dren under fifteen years of age have this year been em- 
ployed in the mills of this city, who ought according to the 
laws of New Hampshire to have been in school. Many of 
them have lived in this city for years and have not attended 
school a single day. Many of these children know very 
little of the subjects taught in our lowest Primary schools, 
are unable to tell their ages, or to spell their own names. 
Aud yet the parents of many of these children are ex- 
tremely anxious that their children should remain in the 
mills ; in fact some of them have told me that their chil- 
dren should remain there until they were discharged, and 
then they should endeavor to obtain situations for them 
elsewhere, not intending to place them in school. 

I have witnessed these things within a few months, and 
know the importunities and vexations to which overseers 
are subjected, but the law of the state leaves the employer 
no discretion in this matter. The law distinctly states that 
all employers shall obtain certificates from some one au- 
thorized by the School Committee to give them, before set- 
ting at work any children under fifteen. 

I need not say anything of the class of citizens our city 
will be likely to have if these things are suffered to con- 
tinue. Besides those employed in the mills, there are 
many — a great many — who at times are working else- 
where, at other times not at work at all, but spending their 
time in the streets and in haunts of vice, infinitely worse 
for themselves and for the city than though they were em- 
ployed in the factories. 

I am satisfied that there have been at least eight hun- 
dred children in this city between the ages of five and fif- 
teen whose names have not been upon the registers of any 
public or private school in this city during the past year. 



261 

I bring the matter before you at this time to ask that if 
in this age — (in this country) and particularly in this sec- 
tion of the country that boasts so much of the common 
school system, and lays so much stress upon the impor- 
tance of educating the masses — there is not a great defi- 
ciency in a system of public instruction when one-sixth of 
tlie children of school ages are not enrolled in any school. 

It may be that there will be an effort on the part of 
many to evade the law by engaging in some other employ- 
ment, so that the truant ordinance can be evaded and a 
few dollars put into the pockets of parents. 

In Boston there is an ordinance requiring boot-blacks and 
news-v('uders to have a license, and one of the conditions 
of the license is that each child so licensed shall attend 
school a portion of the year. 

If many in this city endeavor to avoid going to school 
would it not be well to ask the City Council to pass an 
ordinance similar to the one in Boston ? 

There is another subject in this connection to be con- 
sidered, viz. : If the law is strictly enforced it must be 
somewhat severe in individual cases. 

There are some children at work in the mills who have 
no father or mother, and who, if discharged from the 
mills, would be at the mercy of the world ; others belong 
to families that are dependent for support on the wages of 
these children, and it will add to their privations if the 
children are denied the means of support. 

The law makes no distinction with regard to the circum- 
stances of children or parents, but I submit to you if it is 
Just to compel such children to leave the mills unless there 
is some provision made for their support. 

Of what use is it to endeavor to educate a child if he 
has not the means to sustain life while attending school ? 

One writer has said that " People perishing of hunger 
need bread first and teachino; afterwards." 



262 

Gen. Oliver, in speaking upon this point, says tliat, 
" Men and children in rags need clothing more than spell- 
ing-books. Meet them at the point where they need assist- 
ance and then they can be instructed. It would l)e uphill 
work to try to fill the empty minds of such poor starve- 
lings, whose thoughts, if forced into school and placed 
before a black-board would dwell with hankering earnest- 
ness upon bread and milk and porridge, to the utter neglect 
of alphabetical or arithmetical symbols." 

Timothy Titcomb says, " If you would do good to the 
soul of a starving child you must first put food into his 
mouth and clothes upon his back." 

Ought not such children to be assisted, at the public 
expense, during the few months they are at school ? It is 
cheaper for the city to feed and clothe them while they are 
at school than to allow them to grow up in ignorance. 

The child of to-day is to be the citizen of the future, 
and shall his voice and vote be on the side of right ? 

The common school will exert an influence upon him in 
this respect. If the child is at school to-day he will bring 
more into the coffers of the state when he arrives at man- 
hood, and will then repay the state for the expenditure 
in his behalf. 

It is the duty of the state to supervise these matters. 
The welfare of each child is its own welfare. 

The child of the foreigner and of the " native born " 
need the same encouragement, the same assistance. If 
any have come to us from foreign soil they need our help, 
for they are to be with us and of us. The old Latin poet 
has said : 

•' Tliey change the sky, but not the soul, 
Who pass beyond the sea." 

If some are allowed to remain in the mills, on ac- 
count of poverty, there will be difficulty immediately as to 



263 

who shall be discharged and who shall remain, and the 
only course to pursue is to execute the law impartially. 

The obligation of an employer ceases when he discharges 
the child. It is not his duty to see that the child attends 
school or that he is cared for while attending ; these are 
matters that devolve upon others. If children are sent 
from the mills to attend school, and do )iot attend, the 
fault is not with overseers but with the officers of the city, 
whose duty it is to provide schools for all children in the 
city, or with the truant officers, whose duty as defined in 
the City Ordinances is : " To look after all such cliildreii 
between the ages of six and sixteen years who do not reg- 
ularly attend school, and after absentees and truants there- 
from, and to report their names to the Superintendent of 
Schools, and upon the request of the Superintendent to 
make complaint of such persons to the Police Court and 
cause such complaint to be prosecuted, and the penalty or 
punishment enforced." 

There is another class of children to be considered, viz. : 
those whose parents compel them to labor when the 
parents can support them and keep them at school. Too 
often the greed or the laziness or the )jad habits of parents 
drive young children to work, while their earnings are re- 
ceived and squandered by the parents. The money which 
a child earns in the mills should be used to purchase the 
comforts of life, and not to provide whiskey for a drunken 
father or mother. There may be cases where it will not 
be necessary for children to labor in the mills, provided 
the parents do not waste their money upon that which 
" makes them poor indeed." 

These practical questions will arise in the enforcement 
of the law and I call attention to them at this time in 
order that some preparation may be made to meet them. 

It is evident, as was stated in the last report, that these 

children, varying from nine to fourteen years of age, with 

ut little education, ought not to be placed in schools with 



264 

cliildreii five and six years of age, but that separate schools 
should be established for them, or at least for the oldest of 
them. These schools should l)e in session the entire year, 
so that children need lose no time but might be able to 
return to the mills, if necessary, as soon as they had been 
twelve weeks from their employment. In these schools 
could be taught reading, writing, and such branches as arc 
most needed, "without requiring the pupils to pursue a regu- 
lar course of study. 

Such schools have been in successful operation, in 
other places, and in some places certain schools arc in 
session during vacations to accommodate not only those 
who are discharged from the mills to attend school but 
others whose parents cannot send them into the country 
and do not wish them to run in the streets during a long- 
vacation. 

Those discharged from the mills need not attend one of 
these special schools, but if more convenient might attend 
some of the regular graded schools for which they might 
be qualified. The names and residences of those dis- 
charged will be known, so that the children can l)e found 
by the truant officers and sent to school if they are not 
disposed to do so as soon as they are discharged. But 
there is not much to fear in regard to their remaining 
away from school for a long time if it is understood that 
they cannot be re-employed till they have been in school 
twelve weeks. 

Tluis I have at some length expressed my views upon 
this subject, and have given such statistics as I could gather. 

It is a subject to which I have given much thought ; one 
which, more than any other, interests me at the present 
time ; a subject which, as I view it, affects not only a few 
children now employed in the mills, but the city and state 
at large. I speak the more earnestly of it because to me, 
more than to any one else, the citizens are looking to sec if 
the provisions of the law are faithfully carried out. 



265 

It has been well said that "if testimony and experience 
prove anything they prove that a healthy, vigorous and in- 
dustrious population is the most valuable treasure a country 
can possess, and that it is a most wise policy to keep that 
population in a happy condition of willing and cheerful in- 
dustry." 

Said a Prussian school officer, "I promised God that 1 
would look upon every Prussian peasant child as a being 
who would complain of me before God, if I did not provide 
for him the best education as a man and a christian which 
it was possible for me to provide." 

I regard it as the cliief duty of those intrusted with the 
care of the schools of any place, to make special provision 
for the poor and unfortunate children of that place ; those 
whose parents liave not the means or inclination to give 
their children an education; those children who, having 
been deprived of parents, are left with no one specially te 
assist them in obtaining an education. The orphan should 
be placed upon a level with the favored child of wealth, so 
that each may start evenly in the race. It is our duty to 
care for such, and as for myself I shall endeavor, while I 
have the supervision of the educational interests of this 
city, to see that they are not neglected, even if the appro- 
priation for schools is o))liged to be increased ten, twenty, 
or even one hundred per cent. 



TRUANCY. 



I have spoken of this subject in connection with the fore- 
going, but some report needs to be made of the working of 
the law for the past year. 

The City Marshal, Assistant Marshal, the two Day Police, 
and one of the Night Police, were appointed Truant Officers 
last January. 

There has not been much difficulty in keeping pupils at 
18 



266 

school after they have once been regularly enrolled as mem- 
bers thereof. There have been those, however, who have not 
presented themselves at the schools, and when they have 
been found out of school it has been difficult to determine 
Avhether or not they had any regular occupation. 

Over one hundred children have been brought in by the 
officers, but only nine of these have been brought before the 
Police Court. Of this number seven have been sentenced 
to the Reform School, and the other two allowed to attend 
school in the city. 

In this connection, it is Init just to state, that Rev. Mr. 
Clark, the City Missionary, has rendered valuable assistance, 
during the year, in securing the attendance of a large num- 
ber of children at school. He has brought into the schools 
over forty children, who otherwise would not have attended 
school ; and has been instrumental in keeping others at 
school, for which labor he is entitled to the thanks of the 
school department, and all friends of education in our city. 

The Truant ordinance needs revising so that officers 
shall have more authority, and there should be a special 
school established for truants, as the most of those arrested 
are from ten to sixteen years of age, and the same difficul- 
ty exists with regard to classifying them as has been men- 
tioned in connection with those discharged from the mills. 
There should be a truancy police, whose whole duty, at 
certain seasons of the year, should be to arrest children 
roaming our streets. The amount of good they coidd do 
would more thati compensate for the extra expense. As it 
now is the arresting of truants is only a secondary matter 
with truant officers, their main business being that usually 
devolving upon police officers where no truant laws exist, 
and consequently they cannot be expected to look up ab- 
sentees from school like those officers specially appointed 
for that purpose. 



267 

I do not suppose that iu this land the people are prepared 
for such stringent laws regarding compulsory education as 
exist in some of the European countries, but all must see 
the need of a general truancy law to prevent children with 
no lawful employment from spending their time in the 
streets. 

Every citizen in community is taxed to support the schools 
of that community. This is just, but if the state takes a 
person's money to support schools has not that citizen a just 
right to demand that each child shall receive the benefits 
of the schools for which he pays his money ? 

The state, as a protection to itself, should compel every 
child to attend some public or private school, so that no one 
could become a voter without being able to read and write. 



TRAINING SCHOOLS. 

Since the establishment of this department one year ago 
last October, sixteen young ladies have been admitted to 
these schools, eight to the Middle school and eight to the 
Primary school. Of this number three have been elected 
to permanent positions in Grammar schools, one in a Middle 
school, and four in Primary schools, while four others have 
been teaching the entire portion of the past term in place 
of teachers granted leave of absence. 

At one time during the past year six teachers were 
absent on account of sickness, and their places were sup- 
plied by young ladies from these two schools. 

It often happens that there are sudden calls for teachers, 
vacancies sometimes occurring without any previous notice. 
In such cases, if a training school is in successful operation, 
a teacher can at any time be selected, one who is familiar 
with the system of schools in this city. 

All are aware how difficult it is for a new teacher to 



268 

understand the needs of a school, but if there are those in 
the training department who are intending to teach, one 
can be selected some days or weeks before the change 
occurs, and can tlius obtain much information before the 
other teacher leaves the school, which will cause much less 
disarrangement to any school than to select a teacher unac- 
quainted with the system, however successful such a teacher 
may have been elsewhere. 

It would be much better if the two training schools could 
be in one building, where all the young ladies fitting for 
teachers could have the ])enefit of any suggestions that 
might, from time to time, be made by members of the 
School Board, the Superintendent, or others. I would 
recommend that when the old High School building is at 
your disposal — after the removal of the East Grammar 
school — tliat building be used for this purpose, one teacher 
having charge of the two upper rooms, and one of the two 
lower. With this arrangement from four to eight young 
ladies might be preparing for teaching in our city. They 
could pursue the same plan tliat has been pursued here for 
the past year, and in addition to that some of them could 
be away from that school at times, visiting other schools. 

Besides, many of the graduates of our High school have 
not attended to English branches for several years, and 
need an opportunity to review them. At least twice a 
week there might be an exercise in some l)ranch of study 
for them, thereby enabling them to review their studies 
while they were learning to discipline a school and witness- 
ing the methods of instruction in the several schools. 

The building named seems to be well arranged for such 
a purpose, as the two upper rooms are connected, as are 
also the two lower ones, and pupils belonging to one room 
oftentimes are obliged to pass from one room to the other 
in entering or leaving their respective school-rooms. 

It may be deemed best, however, to use some Grammar 



269 

school building- for tins purpose, where those intending to 
teach can have the advantage of the three grades of schools, 
viz : Primary, Middle and Grammar. 

The main object should be to bring all the sub-teachers 
into the same building. With some building set apart for 
this purpose, and with the plan proposed, no doul)t need l)o 
entertained of the success of the school. 

A teacher of experience — the best the city can afford — 
ought always to be in charge of each school. 

An objection is sometimes urged against Training schools 
that the interests of the children belonging to such schools 
suffer in consequence of the arrangement of the schools, 
viz : l)y having so many different teachers in one room. 
The testimony of all who have watched the progress of 
these schools in other places is that the pupils in such 
schools make as good progress as those of other schools, 
and oftentimes better. 

In our cit}^ during the })ast year, no Primary or Middle 
schools have sent pupils to the higher grades better quali- 
fied than the pupils from these schools ; if we judge of the 
schools from the pupils promoted, it would bo a good reason 
for establishing several Training schools in our city. The 
results sought to be accomplished by these schools are well 
set forth in the report of the Superintendent of Schools in 
New Haven, viz : 

1. To secure thoroiKjIi iastrKctkin for the cJdldren of the suhoul. 
A principal of experience, whose capability is undoubted, is placed 
iu charge of each school, whose first duty is to see that the chil- 
dren receive the best of instruction. The leading purpose of the 
young teachers placed under her direction is to become acquainted 
at once with the best methods of teaching and governing a school _ 
The entire time of the principal is devoted to a supervision of the 
instruction and discipline of the classes throughout the building. 
If any defect or weakness is detected, immediate attention is given 
to it and a coi'rective applied. It is obvious, therefore, that the 
desire of the principal to secure success for the school, and tlie 



270 

lioi)e of future employment on the part of the teachers, depending 
on .1 development of capability here, conspire to insure the best 
efforts of all parties employed. Unfaithfulness, want of interest 
in the duties required, or incapacity to perform them, would be 
deemed sufficient cause for immediate removal of any teacher. 
None but those who are earnestly devoted to the work, and have 
all needful qualifications, both mental and physical, are desired to 
assume the duties of the position. Past experience leaves no 
doubtful testimony of Avhat can be accomplished for the improve- 
ment of the children. 

2. A second object is, to put the inexperienced teacher in pos- 
session of all the best methods of teaching and governing children 
in the shortest time possible. For this purpose- the principal, who 
has spent years in gathering her own experience and made full 
records of valuable results reached by others, observes how the 
beginner instructs her classes and secures order, in the room placed 
under her care. She corrects errors, advises how to overcome 
difficulties, as they occur, suggests improved methods, expresses 
approbation and encouragement of successful efforts, at just that 
period where failure begins, and ends in sad disappointment to 
multitudes who take upon themselves the responsible duties of the 
teacher without the friendly aid of a judicious adviser. It is not 
easy for any one unacquainted with the trials and difficulties that 
beset the teacher to appreciate the difference between the rapid 
preparation thus made to meet the requirements of the vocation, 
and the difficult position in which the individual is compelled to 
struggle alone, without experience, groping in the dark, trying 
fruitless experiments, with no one to advise or sympathize, with- 
out standard Or guide to determine whether any right progress is 
made, or how near an approach is alread}- made to a disastrous 
termination of an attempt to perform duties requiring skill and ex- 
perience of the highest order. 

Since the opening of the Fair street school, Jan. 1867, tliirty-two 
young ladies, having passed through a period of preparation for 
teaching in the training schools, have received appointments to 
positions in the public schools of this city. Nearly all of them re- 
ceived previous instruction in the public schools, and a large jjro- 
portion had been members of the High school. Of the Avhole 
nimiber not one can be regarded as having made a failure, while 
some are taking rank with the best teachers in our schools, receiv- 
ing honorable promotion and largely increased compensation. 
There are now nearly twenty in a course of preparation to fill va- 



271 

caucies that may heivafter occur. Of this number, nini; were grad- 
uates of the High school class of 1870. 

Who can tell how many of these young teachers would not have 
made a total failure, if they had been placed in schools without 
preparation; and how many children by fifties would have sufiei'ed 
at least temporary disaster ! 

3. A third object is, to give courses of lessons on various sub- 
jects, and instruct the teachers how to teach them. However well 
our pupils may be taught in the various branches of school studies, 
they are not prepared to teach others without special instruction 
on principles and methods. During a portion of the past year, the 
teachers of the two schools met once or twice a week and received 
special instruction from the princii^als. 

Mr. Johnson gave a full course of lessons, with practice, in pen- 
manship, illustrating with blackboard exercises the principles and 
analysis of letters, accompanie<l with [^articular directions for 
teaching. 

Miss Walker gave a minute and elaborate course of instruction 
in drawing, accompanied with methods of teaching. She also gave 
the young ladies much practice in j^honics, or spelling by sound, 
which will be particularly valuable in securing distinct articulation. 

Many familiar lectures were given by the principals and super- 
intendent on the general duties and qualifications of teachers. 
Critical essays were written and read by the teachers; and class 
exercises with the pupils of the training schools, in various studies 
were given in turn by the teachers to exhibit their methods and 
style of teaching. Members of the High school senior class unit- 
ed in these exercises, in preparation for active services in teaching. 
At the opening of the Summer term all the members of the class 
with one exception, which gi-aduated in April, received appoint- 
ments to the training schools and are perfoi-ming their duties very 
satisfoctorily. 



TEACHERS' MEETINGS. 

Ill the last report allusion was made to an organization 
of the teachers of this city. 

This association held regular meetings during the winter 
term, and the first part of the spring term, after which 



272 

time it seemed to lose its vitality, for what reason I am 
unable to state, as the last meetings held were as fully 
attended and the exercises as interesting and profitable as 
the earlier ones. 

Most of the teachers of the city attended these meet- 
ings, though of course there are in this place, as in all 
©thers, teachers who think their work is done when the 
school is closed for the night. Of this class of teachers 1 
have nothing to say, as their interest in their duties is 
evinced by their attendance at these meetings as well as in 
other ways. 

At the meetings of the Association the exercises were as 
follows : 

January 24. Mr. Button read an Essay on the subject of 
" Discipline," followed by a discussion by tlie gentlemen 
of the Association, on the same subject. 

January 31. Discussion by the gentlemen of the Asso- 
ciation. Question : "Are the results of a four years' course 
in our Grammar schools what we have a right to expect? " 

February 14. Essay on Spelling, by Miss Porter, of the 
the East Grammar school, and Miss Miller ; Essay on 
Reading, Mr. Clifford. 

February 28. Discussion upon the merits of the Gram- 
mar used in the schools. 

March 9. A class exercise in Mental Arithmetic, con- 
ducted by Mr. Henry. 

March 21. Paper by Mr. Messer, sul)ject : "Relations of 
Teacher and Scholar;" paper by Mr. Locke, subject: 
" The best time for commencing the studies of the pre- 
scribed course, and the order in which they should be 
taken up." Mr. Dutton made some suggestions upon the 
method of teaching history. 

May 9. A talk upon Natural History, by Mr. Colburn ; 
paper by Miss Morrill, subject : " Object Teaching." 

May 23. Continuation of the subject of Natural History, 



ti7y 

by Mr. Colbuni : paper by Mrs. Fife, subject : " Oral In- 
struction." 

At the beginning- of the fall term the committee appointed 
a series of meetings to be held on alternate Monday even- 
ings, and subjects were assigned to teachers for the vari- 
ous meetings. Some of the teacliers at these meetings 
read papers, while others with their classes gave illustra- 
tions of the method of teaching tlie different branches. 

There have been the following exercises : 

Writing, Mr. Dutton, class ; Reading Cliarts, Miss Mor- 
rill, class ; Arithmetical Cliarts, Miss Porter, of the North 
Grammar school, class ; Object Lesson, Miss Porter, of the 
East Grammar school, class ; Governmental Instructor, 
Mr. Buck, essay : Geography, Miss Dinsmore, class ; 
Reading, Mr. Heath, essay ; Physical Geography, ^Ir. Col- 
burn, essay. 

In addition to these meetings during the week of the 
Teachers' Institute for this county the State Superinten- 
dent and members of the Institute spent one forenoon in 
visiting the schools of this city for the purpose of witness- 
ing class exercises. 

The exercises in the Pranklin-street building were as 
follows : 

Reading, Mr. Heath ; Writing, Miss Manahan ; Written 
Arithmetic, Miss Adams ; Mental Arithmetic, Miss Rcid ; 
Music, Mr. Whitney, classes in the Primary schools. 

The importance of such meetings has been noticed so 
much in previous reports that it may seem superfluous to 
dwell upon the subject at this time, but there are so many 
who seem to carry the impression that nothing can be 
learned from any such meetings, or by discussion with other 
teachers, that the subject must continually be noticed in 
order that all may feel an interest in the subject. 



274 



STUDIES PURSUED. 

The course of study has not been matci-ially changed 
since the adoption of the general course in 1868. Govern- 
mental Instructor has been taken from the High school 
course and placed in the list of Grammar school studies. 
This is a subject that has not in our schools received suffi- 
cient attention. A great portion of the people receive in 
the schools what information they ever obtain upon this 
subject, and it is not right that our schools should send 
pupils into the world to assume the duties of citizens with- 
out some knowledge of national, state or municipal govern- 
ment. 

Townsend's Civil Government has recently been adopted 
as a text-book on this subject. There is need of a work 
upon the constitution and government of our own state, so 
that the pupils in our common schools may be able to 
understand more of the government of the state in which 
they live. 

Tiie study of Natural History has been introduced into 
the High school within the past year, Hooker's Natural 
History having been adopted as a text-book upon that sub- 
ject. This subject is now receiving, in many places, more 
attention than formerly, and there is no doubt that the 
study of it in our schools will be attended with pleasure 
and profit. 

There should be in the High school a more extended 
course in English literature, a subject that has not received 
the attention its importance demands. 

Some work like Be Vere's Studies in English, or Sivin- 
ton's Rambles among Words might be adopted for use in the 
schools, which would be of great benefit to the pupils in 
bringing to their notice the elements of which our language 
is composed, and leading them to pursue the study to a 
greater extent. 



What is needed is more thoi-ough study of tlio English 
language, its composition, the derivation and real meaning 
of many of its words and phrases. After a class has stud- 
ied Latin for several terms the members of it can profitably 
spend some time upon the English language, and by that 
means make clear to their minds some of those snbjects 
which they learned, hut could not understand in the Gram- 
mar schools. 

In this connection it may be well to suggest that several 
of the studies pursued in the Grammar schools might be 
reviewed at some time in the High school course. 

Fu{)ils enter the High school at an age when they cannot 
fully understand the suly'ects to which they have given their 
attention in the Grammar schools Many things must at 
that time be memorized merely, the explanations being de- 
ferred till later. After they have purg.ned the Grammar 
school studies several terms a few months review of the 
Grammar school studies would be of great benefit to them. 
Let one term of the last year in the High school be de- 
voted to a review of geography, history, grammar and arith- 
metic, and I hesitate not to say it would be one of the most 
profitable terms in the school. 

Declamation and composition need more attention both 
in the Grammar and High schools. 1 think it would create 
an interest in these exercises if two or three times a term a 
half day should be set apart for tliese exercises; pupils 
would then regard these branches as important, and more 
preparation would be made for them. This plan would, 
in a great measure, relieve these exercises of their irk- 
someness. 

It is gratifying to be able to state that the results in spell- 
ing are excellent, compared with tliose of former years. 
The spelling-book is not neglected, yet teachers now leel 
the need of having pupils spell other words than tliose found 
in the spelling book. The words misspelled by pupils are 



276 

not always those long words found in the spellers, but the 
common words used in daily conversation ; and in order to 
secure good results it is necessary that they frequently be 
called upon to spell these words, and those occurring in the 
lessons of the day. Whether the recitation be in geography 
or arithmetic, many words will be found that will not be cor- 
rectly spelled unless the attention of pupils has been called 
to them ; words too that are used daily by teachers and pu- 
pils. If the lesson is in arithmetic, ask a class to spell 
such words as division, denomination, decimal, midtiple etc. ; 
if in grammar, such words as 7iominative, participle, preposi- 
tion etc., and unless a class has been drilled outside of the 
spelling-book there will be more failures than any one would 
naturally suppose. There is need of constant drill in this 
branch, and in no other way can good results be secured ; 
there must be a constant use of the spelling-book, and con- 
stant practice upon words found in the lessons of the day, 
and upon words used in every-day life. 

Pupils in Primary schools need much practice in calling 
words at sight. Ability to do this is a very great assistance 
in reading ; phonic spelling greatly assists in this respect, 
and this method of spelling needs to lie taught as tlic pu- 
pils are learning to spell by letter. 

Throughout the year there has been considerable interest 
in the subject of reading ; there has been a decided im- 
provement in pronunciation and enunciation, subjects that 
require constant attention. Primary schools should make 
these matters of especial importance, even if they arc 
obliged to leave to the other schools some of the other 
branches. 

The practice of requiring pupils to pronounce at sight 
difficult words from the spelling-book and other text-books 
is of great benefit to them in reading. We all know that 
hesitation in reading is oftentimes due to the fact that a pu- 
pil cannot pronounce words at sight, whereas if he has been 



277 

accustomed to phonic spelling as well as to pronounce dif- 
licult words at sight, reading would be greatly improved. 
It is not sufficient for a reading exercise that the members 
of a class each rise and read a paragraph, that a few mis- 
takes are noticed and the class dismissed for the day. Pu- 
pils in the Primary and Middle schools should have that 
practice in reading that will enable them to read fluently 
from a book or a newspaper at home. With regard to this 
subject in the higher grades, not enough is read, Init there 
is some excuse for this in the fact that so much attention is 
paid to articulation and kindred subjects, which should 
have received more attention in the lower grades. 

A class in a Grammar school ought not to be kept for 
days practicing upon a single paragraph or upon a single 
page. This was once thought to be a good plan, but such 
is not now the case. 

All the reading which many classes have had in a whole 
term could be contained in the columns of a daily news- 
paper, and then there would be space enough in the paper 
to advertise the wares of half the traders on Elm street. Is 
it not true that some of the reading books which pupils 
have used for several years contain pieces that the pupils 
jiever have read, and of which they know as little as they 
do of the Hebrew language 't 

Classes in the higher grades should read several pages 
in a day, not only from the reading book, but from other 
books, from the Governmental Instructor and the History, 
so that the pupils may be familiar with different styles of 
reading. Many of the important facts in history could be 
fixed in the minds of the pupils better by reading the pages 
containing these facts two or three times, than by terms of 
dry study. 

Is it not true that the whole matter which some classes 
in the higher divisions of a Grammar school have read in 
a whole term of twelve weeks would not amount to twenty 



278 

pages of an ordinary sized reading book ? Certainly a 
class needs practice in articulation and pronunciation, but 
it can have that practice, and in addition to that some classes 
can read many times twenty pages in a term. It may 
not all be from the reading book, but may be from some 
book, paper, or magazine, hi some schools extracts are 
frequently read from papers by members of the classes. 
The practice should begin in the lower grades and continue 
through the various grades. 

"Walton's Primary and Intellectual Arithmetics are now 
used in nearly all the schools in the city. Walton and 
Cogswell's Charts are used in all schools where mental 
arithmetic is taught, and the constant use of these charts 
has done much to give the pupils a readiness in the use of 
numbers tiiat enables j.them to solve practical questions 
rapidly. 

Much has been said of grammar in former reports, and 
it has been thought that pupils might learn to speak and 
write correctly before they learn the technical rules of the 
text-books. 

Pupils need practice in various grades so that they may 
not have that difficulty so common in the schools of giving 
expression to their ideas. This study ought not to be de- 
layed till pupils have formed so many bad habits in the use 
of language ; what the pupils need is such knowledge of 
their own language as will enable them to give correct ex- 
pression to their ideas, and also to read and understand 
works of interest. In conversation and in recitation they 
should be taught to speak correctly, the words they use be- 
ing well understood. Daily practice in writing sentences 
and in correcting errors will aid them. Pupils are accus- 
tomed to expressions that are incorrect, and it is the prov- 
ince of the schools to make the corrections ; but if in the 
schools the same expressions are used in recitations which 
they are accustomed to hear outside of the school-room, 



279 

they cannot Ije expected to improve in their use of lan- 
guage. If these errors are noticed and corrected, tlie pu- 
pil will know what it means to speak and write correctly. 

Let the corrections be made, even if it is left for other 
grades to give the reasons for so doing. At the close of 
an exercise, errors that have been noticed can be corrected, 
and thus pupils can be taught to detect errors and correct 
them daily and hourly. 

We talk of errors in regard to the use of language which 
children learn at home and in the street, but they also use 
other incorrect expressions in the schools, and oftentimes 
such expressions are not corrected. 

Many errors in pronunciation as well as violations of 
grammatical rules are heard in the recitations, and too 
often is this the case if the recitation is in grammar. How 
often in conversation do they violate the very rules they 
have been reciting and repeat the same errors they have 
been correcting. 

These errors should be carefully noticed in all the grades 
of schools. Something can be done to remedy these faults 
by teaching pupils to express their thoughts upon paper as 
soon as they can write. 

Is it not true that some pupils who have studied gram- 
mar for years are unable to write an ordinary Imsiness 
letter or to give a description of some place which they 
have seen ? Wo must endeavor to put into practice the 
lessons that pupils learn, and thus make grammar a prac- 
tical study. 

As the course of study is now arranged, two years are 
allowed for geography in the Middle schools and two years 
in the Grammar schools, with one or two terms for a re- 
view of the subject in the first division of the Grammar 
school. It seems to me that geography and history might 
be studied together more than they have been, and at the 



280 

same time allow all the time necessary for finishing the 
two geographies now used in the schools. 

Campbell's History was put into the schools last spring, 
since which time it has been used in the third divisions of 
the Grammar schools as a reading book, in accordance 
with the suggestions made upon the subject of reading. 
The progress made in this branch with this arrangement 
has been as good as in classes where pupils have been 
obliged to commit to memory the language of the book ; 
in fact, I do not know of any that have made more com- 
mendable progress in any of the studies, or have used 
their time to better advantage than those classes that 
have used their history as a reading book for the past two 
terms. 

The pupils applying for admission to the High school, 
last summer, were examined in Governmental Instructor 
and Music in addition to the studies formerly required of 
them. 

Mention has already been made of the suljject of music, 
but I desire to call your attention more particularly to the 
subject. This branch of study is now systematically taught 
in all of our schools, and pupils in the various schools are 
examined in it the same as in other studies. 

It seems to be the opinion, or the opinion is gaining 
ground, that all of the children — with here and there an 
exception — can be taught to sing if they commence at an 
early age. Scholars in many of our Primary schools can 
read music in two parts quite readily, and. can explain the 
characters used in the singing book as readily as they can 
the punctuation marks or abbreviations. In the last an- 
nual report of the Cleveland schools the Superintendent 
said, " If this system of instruction be continued for a few 
years there will be few regular attendants at school of 
from ten to fifteen years of age who will not readily sing. 



281 

at sight, any ordinary piece of music. The influence 
which such an accomplishment will have upon the amuse- 
ments of the fireside, and our life as a people, cannot 
easily be estimated." 

Many of the teachers now in the schools of this and 
other cities never had the benefit of instruction in music 
while they attended school, and of course cannot feel so 
well prepared to give instruction in this branch as they 
can in other departments, yet many teachers who have 
never learned to sing give good instruction in the rudi- 
ments of music. 

It makes a vast difference whether a teacher gives in- 
struction in this branch merely as a pastime, when nothing 
else can be found to do, or takes up the subject and makes 
it a regular branch of study, in which there shall be the 
same method of instruction as in spelling or arithmetic. 
When the pupils now in the Primary schools shall have 
passed through the different grades of the school, receiving 
in each grade regular, systematic instruction in music, 
but very few will be graduated at the High school not as 
competent to teach this as any branch. It will not then 
be regarded as such a difficult task, and in fact it is not at 
the present time considered to be such a difficult task, as 
it was a few years ago. 

The state owes it to every child to give him a fair 
knowledge of all the branches taught in the schools, and 
the extract copied from the Cleveland report shows the 
importance attached to it elsewhere. 

Let us not regard it as one of the special subjects to be 
taught in the schools, but consider it a part of the regular 
course of study, not compel children to attend special 
schools of instruction in order to learn the rudiments of 
music, but place it where it belongs within the reach of 
every child in the land, viz. : in the list of studies for the 

common schools. 
19 



282 

By far the greater portion of children receive all tlieir 
education in the common schools, as they have not the 
means to attend any other place of instruction, not even a 
singing school. Many others, with the means, have not 
the inclination, and thus unless music is taught in the com- 
mon schools only a very small portion of the community 
will understand anything of this subject, and therefore 
should it be placed where every child can have instruction 
in this branch. To the objection that may be urged, that if 
this is taught in schools other branches will be neglected, I 
reply that experience has proved to me that in those 
schools where regular, systematic instruction is given in 
this branch, pupils are as proficient in other departments as 
in those schools where this subject is neglected. 

I would not urge the importance of this branch, or of 
giving undue prominence to it, on the ground that otlier 
studies will be better learned by studying thoroughly this 
subject, but it is a fact that in our city schools arithmetic, 
geography and other branches are better understood where 
thorough drill is given in music. 

The written examinations in the higher classes show a 
marked progress in penmanship. In many of the lower 
grades writing is taught successfully, the main objection be- 
ing that in some instances pupils acquire bad habits in re- 
gard to the position of the body, and also in holding pen- 
cils, it causing some trouble in the higher classes as attempts 
are made to remedy these faults. 

As has been repeatedly stated in reports, so many 
children leave the schools before reaching the division 
where they naturally receive instruction in this department, 
it is well to commence writing at an early age, so that all 
can have some instruction in this branch. It seems to be 
a sensible idea that a child can profitably attend to this 
branch as soon as he can hold a pen or a pencil properly. 

Too much importance, however, cannot be attached to 



283 

the proper position of the body, and the correct method of 
holding the pen or the pencil. 

The results in a copy-book are not always such good in- 
dications of progress in this branch as copies of notes, bills 
and letters, or the written examinations in the several 
branches. 

In all exercises in writing pupils should be taught that 
the rules and principles of the copy-book should be applied. 
Children in the Primary schools can be taught to write 
upon the slate, great care being taken to see that they sit 
in a proper position, and hold their pencils properly, so that 
when they use pen and ink they will have that control of 
their muscles which will be of much advantage to them. 

Drawing has been taught in many of the schools during 
the past year. In many schools where it has received at- 
tention good results have been experienced, but I do not 
think it can be introduced into all the schools immediately, 
but it will come gradually into all as teachers feel the need 
of it, and think that they can teach it. 

In the schools where drawing has been taught there have 
been better results in writing. I have no doubt that in all 
the schools it will aid in teaching penmanship. An ease in 
handling the pencil is gained from the drawing lesson 
which will prove beneficial to tlie children who are learning 
to write. 



PHYSICAL EXERCISES. 

The regulations of the schools require that in each school 
some time be devoted each day to these exercises. 

Much has been said in school reports, from all sections of 
the country, of the benefits arising from gymnastic exercises 
in schools. No one can be convinced of their importance 
by reading what may be said in any report concerning 
them. If teachers arc not disposed to practice them in 



284 

school much, they can conduct them in such a manner as 
to excite the ridicule of pupils and defeat the object aimed 
at in the exercises ; and -with such teachers it is not well to 
require the practice. 

I am thoroughly convinced, not only from what I have 
read upon the subject, but from my observation and experi- 
ence in the school-room, that the importance of these ex- 
ercise is underrated by many teachers and parents. As 
this subject has reference to the healtli of pupils, I defer 
further remarks upon it until the subject of the health of 
children is specially considered. 



VENTILATION. 

I desire to call attention to this subject in order that 
members of the School Board and members of Building 
Committees may investigate the subject. 

There is no doubt that the progress of many schools is 
hindered on account of poor ventilation, yet as many of 
our school buildings are constructed there is no method of 
ventilation except to open the windows. 

In many of the rooms the pupils sit with their backs to 
the windows, and oftentimes the windows are closed until 
the children become listless on account of impure air in 
the rooms, wlien the windows arc opened and the cold air 
blows upon their necks, which often leads to injurious 
results. 

The regulations of the schools require teachers to ob- 
serve these matters, as will be seen by the following, viz. : 

[School Regulations, Chapter III.] 

" Teachers must, at all seasons of the year, make the 
ventilation and temperature of their school-rooms an essen- 
tial object of attention. The air in the room must be suf- 
ficiently changed at every recess, and at the close of every 
session. Pupils shall in no case be allowed to sit in a 
draught of air. Every school-room must he supplied with a 



285 

therynometer, which will he furnished upon the application 
of any teacher to tlie Superintendent. The thermometer 
should he placed so as to indicate, as nearly as possihle, 
the average temperature of the rooms." 

Windows at the backs of children ought not to be opened 
in cold weather ; if there is no other method of ventilating, 
the pupils can be allowed a few minutes' recess each hour, 
and at these times the windows can be opened so as to 
change the air in the rooms. 

In many rooms windows opening into the halls can be 
arranged over the doors, thus allowing air from the halls 
to pass into the rooms, and the cold air coming into the 
faces of the children would not subject them to so much 
danger. 

Too often the air in a school-room is allowed to become 
impure, when the temperature is too low, under the mis- 
taken idea that cold air is always pure, and that unless the 
room is too warm there is no trouble. 

As several school buildings will be erected (in this 
city) within a few years, this subject ought to be kept 
prominently before the minds of those authorized to erect 
such buildings. It is better to have less ornamental ])uild- 
ings and have those well ventilated ; better to provide for 
the health and comfort of the children intrusted to our 
care, than to make any attempt at display in the erection 
of buildings. 

I do not propose to attribute all the poor health of 
children in the schools to poor ventilation, but no doubt it 
has its effect. 

While speaking in relation to the health of children in 
the schools, allow me to quote from a report made by 
members of the Providence school committee upon this 
subject. 

'* The special Committee to whom was referred certain parts of 
a late Keport, made by the Superintendent of Public Schools, beg 



286 

leave to say, that in their judgment, Health, in its relation to Edu- 
cation, is among the most important subjects that can engage the 
attention of parents, teachers, and the friends of the young. A 
sound body for the abode of a sound mind is of vital consequence; 
and a careful regard or a careless neglect of this fact will affect the 
individual and the State for good or for evil. The intellectual 
nature is of too much consequence to itself to overlook or under- 
value its connection with physical life ; and is of too much impor- 
tance to the State to authorize a disregard of the laws that govern 
them both. The State cannot afford to lose the services of a supe- 
rior intellect for the want of well compacted muscles and sinews 
to do its promptings; nor, for a similar reason, can society spare 
an ornament to its social fobric. 

" That the young, and especially females, are less vigorous now 
than in former years, is a fact generally acknowledged. That this 
depreciation of vigor is still going on is also a painful, as it is an 
alarming, truth. Wh}'' it is so will be well for parents and the 
guardians of youth to inquire. Our public school system has 
sometimes been severely criticised as tending to undermine the 
health of jnipils in the schools. As a general answer, it may be 
said, without fear of successful contradiction, that facts do not 
justify the criticism or imputation. It is true, enfeebled health is 
to be sometimes found in connection with school life, but the 
schools, as a rule, are not responsible for the infirmities and 
diseases complained of. A careful examination of the subject will 
show that the ill health from which pupils suffer originates, usu- 
ally, outside of the school-room. The sources from which it is 
dex'ived will be found in false home habits; in the changed modes 
of living; in an abuse of the organs of digestiou; in the loss of 
rest consequent upon keeping unseasonable hours; in the styles of 
dress which fashion, with relentless law, enforces; in the excite- 
ments of sensation literature ; and in a frequent violation of phys- 
iological laws. 

" We have referred to the keeping of late hours as one of the 
causes that increase debility among the young. To this reference 
we would add a word. Sleej) is as essential to the health of the 
body as it is to mental equanimity. Yet, no demand of nature is 
more frequently disregarded than the one requiring in this form for 
children,'uniform and undisturbed seasons of quiet. The entire 
period of infancy is often made the season for sacrificing a sound 
nervous organism on the altar of maternal vanity. A visitor calls, 
and the slumbers of the cradle must be l)roken to exhibit some 



287 

remarkable quality that daily delights the discerning eyes of a 
fond mother ; and even in its waking hours, Avhen it should be left 
as much as possible to itself, the helpless victim is constantly 
excited by efforts to extort from it a bewitching smile or " the cun- 
ningest little laugh." 

•'As life unfolds, the child of ten or twelve years — we speak now 
of girls — is stimulated with ideas in advance of its age. To the 
studies of the school is added music, dancing and evening parties. 
To music, as a home study and recreation, we raise no objection. 
Were this the only addition to school studies, no harm would fol- 
low. But the accomplishment of dancing as generally acquired, 
uo less'than evening parties, involves late hours, insufficient cloth- 
ing, especially in winter, and a large amount of intense excite- 
ment. It is unnecessary to argue the point that a child of tender 
years who leaves a heated hall or a private circle, at ten or eleven 
o'clock at night, all aglow with jihysical exercise, will not be in 
good preparation for study on the following day ; and if dull reci- 
tations, heavy eyes and drooping spirits shall constitute the day's 
expei'ience, as doubtless it will, succeeded in time by failing health, 
no one need feel surprised. The effect Avill partake of the nature 
of the cause. It is to this and to other domestic irregularities, 
that the Committee wish to call the attention of parents who com- 
plain that their children are overworked in the school-room. 
Before such complaints are reiterated, let the necessary home pre- 
cautions for the preservation of health be preserved ; and, above 
all, let mothers see to it that their children under fourteen years 
of age habitually retire to rest at an early hour. 

" With regard to sensational reading as a demoralizer of mental, 
moral and physical health, we believe there is but one opinion 
among all educators and other persons of observation. It is a nui- 
sance that an intelligent public opinion should abate. We are not 
to be understood as opposed to all light reading. We believe that 
reading of this kind, of a cheerful character, is salutary to health 
of mind and body while used in moderation. To a girl weary of 
Mathematics or Philosophy, nothing can be more refreshing than 
" Lady of the Lake," " Kenilworth," " Ivanhoe," " The Task," 
" The Sketch Book," Miss Muhlbach's works, and similar writings, 
unless it be the sensible, spirited conversation of agreeable, culti- 
vated people. But exciting fiction, like many of the translations 
of sensational French novels, and not a little of English and Amer- 
ican, is pernicious in the highest degree. One of the most expe- 
rienced teachers in our country, and the head of a principal nor- 



288 

mal institution, in reply to an inquiry on this topic, writes : ' The 
light reading now so common among children, I regard as one of 
the greatest curses of the times, intellectually and morally. Much 
of this kind of reading is positively immoral in its tendency, and 
much of the better sort tends to dissipate the mental energies, and 
to create a distaste for honest school work and for really valuable 
reading.' Another says that the positive effects of such reading 
'are almost all bad; but the negative effects in preventing our 
children from reading history, &c., &c., are absolutely appalling. 
Light, trashy Ijooks should all be eliminated from our libraries and 
burned up. These infest our houses like the frogs of Egypt, and 
I find it very ditftcult to induce a child to read a sober history.' A 
third writes that ' the excess of light reading, so much indulged 
in, which unduly excites the imagination and inflames the appe- 
tites of pupils of twelve years of age and upwards, is productive 
of much ill health, and often of habits which destroy the health, 
and l)ring premature death. The life of many a young soul is 
blasted forever before the parent is aware of it, by this excess.' 
Many more testimonies like the foregoing might be added, but 
enough has been said, we think, to ensure from parents the watch- 
ful supervision of the reading of their children. 

"But besides reading of the i^ernicious character here mentioned, 
dress should also be held responsible for a share of the evil now 
charged upon our system of instruction. In this, not less than in 
allowing other habits already spoken of, mothers are faulty to a 
degree that many would be reluctant to confess. Yet the fact is 
undeniable, that hundreds of mothers send their young children 
to school in winter in a manner wholly unsuited to the season. 
We have seen girls of eight and ten years of age in the school- 
room on a winter day, wearing low-necked dresses with short 
sleeves, and trembling with cold ; and when subsequently we have 
been informed of the prevalence of croup and lung fever, we have 
felt that it would be blasphemy to pronounce the mortality that 
followed an ' inscrutable Providence.' 

" In a Mortality Keport for October, 1869, made by Dr. Edwin 
M. Snow, the City Kegistrar of Providence, he speaks on this sub- 
ject in the following words: — 

' Children are killed by the manner in which they are dressed 
and by the food that is given them, as much as by any other causes. 
Infants of the most tender age, in our changeable and rough cli- 
mate, are left with bare arms and legs and with low-necked dresses. 
The mothers, in the same dress, would shiver and suffer with the 



289 

cold, and would expect a lit of sickness as the result of their cul- 
pable carelessness. And yet the mothers could endure such treat- 
ment Avith far less danger to health and life than their tender 
infants. 

' A moment's reflection will indicate the eftects of this mode of 
dressing, or want of dressing, on the child. The moment the cold 
air strikes the bare arms and legs of the child, the blood is driven 
from these extremities to the internal and more vital organs of the 
body. The result is congestion, to a greater or less extent, of 
these organs. In warm weather the etfect will be congestion of 
the bowels, causing diarrhrta, dysentery, or cholera infantum. We 
think this mode of dressing must be reckoned as one of the most 
prominent causes of summer complaints, so called. In colder 
weather congestion and inflammation of the lungs, congestion and 
inflammation of the brain, convulsions, &c., will result. At all 
seasons, congestion, more or less, is caused, the definite eftects 
depending upon the constitution of the child, the weather, and 
various other circumstances. 

' It is painful, extremely so, to one who reflects upon the subject, 
to see children thus decked like victims for sacrifice, to gratify the 
insane pride of foolish mothers. Our most earnest advice to all 
mothers is to dress the legs and arms of their children warmly, at 
all events. It would be infinitely less dangerous to life and health 
to leave their bodies uncovered than to leave their ai'ms and legs 
bare as is the common custom.' 

" These several points are abundantly and sadly illustrated in 
the history of individual life, and demand a consideration they 
have not heretofore received. Particularly should parents and 
guardians feel their responsibilities in this matter. Let parental 
duty be faithfully discharged in the home, and seldom or never 
will there be cause to complain of our public school system as un- 
dermining health. Those who know most of the workings of that 
system know full well that it is not unreasonable lessons and the 
hard driving of pupils which cause ijremature decay of health. 
They know, too, that if the studies pursued and the lessons re- 
quired were all that injuriously atVect pupils, medical treatment 
for our school population would seldom be required. 

" But without attempting to eliminate this subject under each 
appropriate head, it may be asked, what may be done in the school- 
room to promote the health, and impart physical vigor to pupils? 
The answers are plain and bi'ief. 

1. Secure to each room perfect ventilation at whatever pecuni- 
ary cost. On this almost everything depends.* Where ventila- 

* It may be stated without fear of contradiction, that there is no one subject of 
greater sanitary and therapeutic importance tlian tlie subject of ventilation. The 
injury wliich the human system receives trom miasmatic poisons on the free air, 
wlietlier blown over marshes or collections of organic matter, is insignificant in 



290 

tion is imperfect, the noxious gases act as a sort of poison. The 
lungs are filled with that which cannot serve the purposes o 
breathing; the blood, returning from its circulation, is not purified 
by its contact with impure air in the lungs, and consequently is 
obliged to renew its circulation in a partially impure condition. 
This causes languor and other unpleasant sensations in various 
parts of the body, especially in the head, which regularly receives 
a large proportion of the circulating fluid. The pupil, if of sensi- 
tive organization, may be troubled with nausea, dizziness or head- 
ache, and compelled to lose the benefit of the school. Any one 
who has visited the Thayer Street Grammar school in the middle 
of a forenoon or afternoon session in the winter, and has perceived 
how closely the purity of the air within approximates to the 
atmosphere without, will appreciate this plea for Avhat is so little 
considered in the construction of public halls and of sleeping 
apartments, where much of the disease attributed to other caused 
is engendered. At each inspiration and expiration of the lungs 
about twenty cubic inches of air passes through this organ, or not 
far from three hundred and sixty cubic feet in twenty-four hours. 
According to the best authorities, the least quantity which should 
be allowed for dwelling houses, shops and schools, should be eight 
hundred feet to each person, in order to supply a sufficient amount 
of oxygen. This requirement applies with even more force to 
sleeping apartments at night than to school-rooms, where the fre- 
quent opening of doors and the occasional opening of windows, 
during the session, may partially supply the needed element of 
oxygen. 

To thorough ventilation should be added such an arrangement 
of the seats in the school-room as will secure pupils from the dis- 
comfort of sitting fuc'mg the light, or of suffering the dazzle of 
cross lights. Light in this way, especially when unduly strong, 
strains the optic nerve. This affects the brain— the brain affects 
the stomach which sympathizes with it— and the whole affects 
injuriously the entire nervous system. Let the light, in due pro- 
portion, always strike upon the pupil's desk from the left, so that 
the hand in writing may never be in the shade ; and, for the 
blackboard, let a moist sponge be used to . absorb the dry chalk 
dust, which, when removed with a dry brush, fills the room with 
impalpable particles, injurious to sensitive lungs. 

comparisnn with lliat wliicli links iti huniaii liahitatioiis, wliether in gcriDS of disease 
or ill tlio \viilo!<|)i-e:iil |in).srriinoii ami suauriii'i wlii'-h result tVoiu breatliiii"; an atmos- 
phere iiieapable of duly suppoi-tiiig the vital fuiicliuns.— />/•. Slater, in Sanittii-t/ 
lieport. 



291 

" And here we would call the attention of teachers to a matter 
of great importance, which is often undesignedly overlooked in the 
school-room. We refer to Myobia, or near-sightedness in chil- 
dren, which, without constant care on the part of teachers, may 
become an aggravated evil. This defect in the visual organs 
should not for a moment be forgotten in the daily assignment of 
lessons, and the pupil suffering from it should be put upon shorter 
and less exhaustive tasks than another whose vision is perfect. 

''2. Let physical exercise be made a part of the daily routine 
of the school. Light gymnastics may be practiced twice each day, 
with great advantage. This exercise should not be spasmodic, as 
has sometimes been the case, but regular through each successive 
term during the entire school years. When the various motions 
of the body are directed by music, as they should be in all possible 
cases, a double benefit is achieved ; the muscular powers are well 
developed, and the mind enjoys a pleasant and healthful recrea- 
tion. 

" The brief outline here presented indicates the views of the 
committee on this momentous subject.* They have used all the 
In-evity that the nature of the topic assigned them will allow. 
They have done so from a conviction that they would thus most 
readily gain the eye and interest of those for whom their words 
are designed. They are anxious to witness a hearty co-operation 
of the Home and the School in the work of physical and intellec- 
tual development. They desire, in all that pertains to the social 
life of the young, that the Home may be what it should be, that 
the School may become what it ought to be— the nursery of gene- 
rations of strong, healthy and thoroughly cultured bodies and 
minds." 

I have occupied considerable space with the quotation, 
but the subject is such an important one that I desire to 
keep it prominently in view. 

* While this report was passiiij; thnmgh tho press a translation of an able and 
interesting paper by Dr. K. Vin'lww, of JJcrliu, rnissia, on ••School-Room Dis- 
eases " was placed in the hands of tlie comnuttee. Jt, shows that tlic subject of this 
report is attracting careful attention in Kuroiie. Ur. Vs. r>aper treats of eye diseases, 
congestion of the cerebral circulation, spinal diseases, diseases of tlie_ respiratory 
organs, organs of digestion, contagious diseases, wounds and otiier injuries, &e. So 
far as the topics treated and the facts stated have a bearing upon the views presented 
by the couiuiittec they hnd them unqualitiedly sustained. 



292 



DISCIPLINE. 

Not much has ever l)een said in our school reports con- 
cerning corporal punishment and kindred subjects. The 
general idea has been this : that the discipline of a school 
should be intrusted to the teacher, and the teacher held 
strictly responsible for it, and in case any privilege should 
be abused, there should be change of teachers. 

No one would attempt to justify frequent and indiscrim- 
inate use of the rod, but it is best to leave the matter in 
the hands of the teachers, rather than to dictate to them 
the particular method in which they should govern their 
soliools. If a teacher cannot be allowed to exercise his 
judgment as to when and hnv he shall punish, he is not the 
proper person to have charge of a school, and another 
should be found to whom this power could be intrusted. 

It has been repeatedly stated that teachers are not suffi- 
ciently thoughtful with regard to the order in the entries, 
on the stairways, in the yards, at recess time, before and 
after school. Much mischief has its origin at recess, and 
while pupils arc congregated in the rooms before scliool 
opens. Tlie efficiency of a school depends very much upon 
the notice taken of these matters ; more so than teachers 
are apt^to think. 

When the city hall bell rings, all school buildings are 
opened for the admission of pupils; and when they enter 
the school-rooms tliey should take their seats and pursue their 
studies the same as in school hours, instead of spending the 
time boisterously about the building, or performing gym- 
nastic feats among the desks and chairs of the school- 
rooms. 

Base ball is regarded as a fine game, but the school- 
room is hardly the place for practicing it, nor should pro- 
miscuous dancing be allowed in the halls, while jumping, 



293 

leaping and wrestling can better be done out of doors 
than npon the stairs, while passing from the school. 
Boys should not undertake foot races while passing into the 
school or out of it. Where attention is paid to these mat- 
ters there will be better discipline in the school-room. 



CONDITION OF THE SCHOOLS. 

There has been no change of teachers in the High school 
during the year. At the North Grammar school there 
have boon but two changes during the year, an unusually 
small number for that school. No change has occurred at 
the S )Lith Grammar school or at the Amoskeag Grammar 
school 

Mr. Dutton, Principal of the East Grammar school, re- 
signed near the close of the year and was succeeded by 
Mr. B. F. Dame, being the only change in that school. 

A new Principal was elected to the Piscataquog Gram- 
mar school at the beginning of the fall term. There has 
been a change of assistants in this school each term during 
the year. No change has occurred at the Intermediate 
school, excepting that the assistant was granted leave of 
absence for the greater portion of the fall term. The ten 
Middle schools have retained the same teachers throughout 
the entire year. There have been more frequent changes 
in the Primary schools, although several of them have re- 
tained the same teachers for the year. 

During the fall term a new Primary school was establish- 
ed in the upper story of the Spring street building, and 
another one in the lower building at Piscataquog. These 
schools were for the accommodation of children discharged 
from the mills. 

There has been no change of teachers in the Suburban 
schools at Hallsville, Webster's Mills, or Mosquito Pond. 



294 

In regard to the progress made at the several schools I 
have made report from time to time, and deem it unnecessary 
to speak of that at this time. 



GENERAL MATTERS. 

I desire to renew several suggestions, made in the last 
report, among which are the taking of a school census, 
and the naming of the school buildings. 

The law of the state requires that the School Committee 
of each place shall report each year the number of children 
in that place, between the ages of four and fourteen, that 
have not attended school, and the number of persons over 
twenty-one years of age not able to read and write. 
Such a report cannot be made by the School Committee 
of this city, unless there is some plan adopted for taking 
the school census. 

The revision of the course of study in our High school, 
in order to meet the wants of the community better, is a 
subject that will soon demand attention. 

The trades, mercantile life, and similar pursuits absorb 
the greater portion of the boys who leave our schools, and 
we must arrange for them a course of study which shall 
fit them for these various pursuits. 

It should be the chief aim of the schools to prepare the 
pupils in them for the active duties of life in the different 
spheres of practical affairs. 

The Avants of the many must be regarded, and the com- 
mon school must furnish to the w^orld pupils well trained 
in those things which will be of service to the pupils them- 
selves, and will benefit the community at large. 

In speaking of these matters I would not be understood 
as urging that any study now in the High school course be 
taken from it, or that anything should be done whereby 



295 

any boy can bn prevented from obtaining aclassical educa- 
tion as good as he now receives there, but I would urge 
that mechanical drawing, and sucli studies as our young 
men need to prepare them for the varied pursuits in which 
our community is engaged, be added to the studies already 
pursued in the school. 

Thus I have endeavored to make such suggestions re- 
garding the common schools of this city as to me seemed 
appropriate. 

In reviewing the work of our schools, for the past year, 
I think we can safely say that much improvement has 
been made, but this is only an incentive to renewed exer- 
tion. 

The common school system of our country is undergoing 
a severe test, and it is for those who are realizing the 
benefits that this system has conferred upon them in the 
past to assist in raising the standard of common school 
education, in order that the public schools may meet the 
wants of a growing Republic. The common school should 
have the sympathy of every citizen, the support of every 
lover of our civil institutions. To these schools must we 
look for that which is to make the men and women of our 
land an honor to the age in which they live. 

If anything needs correcting, let it be done Avith a firm 
belief that, back of all the tumult and discord that tend 
to impair the school system, there is in the hearts of the 
American people a faith in that school system which has 
contributed so much to the wealth and glory of the nation. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH G. EPGERLY, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 
Manchester, N. H., Dec. 31, 1870. 



296 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS 
THE PAST YEAR. 



Schools. 


Whole number be- 
longing. 


t-i 
taOC 

£ — 

DO 






Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 






66 
94 
100 
103 
104 
56 
36 
42 
41 
26 
22 
30 
34 
46 
.34 


95 
44 
125 
135 
130 
68 
35 
29 
36 
39 
23 
57 
33 
37 
42 
51 
33 
43 
3 
33 
47 

29 
41 
22 
47 
34 
43 
32 
39 
41 
77 
41 
31 
42 
33 
50 
14 
13 
63 
15 
13 
13 
30 
28 
17 


161 
138 
225 
238 
2.^4 
124 
71 
61 
77 
65 
45 
87 
67 
83 
76 
90 
70 
80 
37 
62 
88 

66 
96 
66 

110 
71 
80 
65 
97 
80 

158 
99 
69 
75 
66 

125 
34 
32 

117 
31 
32 
29 
72 
56 
38 


113 
49 
154 
161 
179 
80 
41 
35 
44 
38 
26 
38 
40 
36 
38 
46 
43 
33 
20 
30 
41 

33 
45 
41 
50 
34 
38 
35 
45 
37 
57 
44 
35 
37 
35 
40 
21 
24 
59 
18 
18 
21 
52 
35 
20 


106 




46 




148 




1.57 


East Grammar school 

Piscataquog Grammar ssliool • . . 


172 
68 
38 




31 


" " No. '1 


40 


1' " No. 3 


35 


" No. 4 


24 


11 11 No. 5 


37 


" " No. C 


38 




34 


11 " No 8 


37 


• 1 " Xo. 9 


39 
37 
37 
34 
29 
41 

37 
55 
44 
63 
37 
37 
33 
58 
39 


43 


11 •• Jso. 10 


41 




28 


" " No. 2 


19 


1' No. 3 


25 


11 1' No. 4 


38 






11 1- No. () 


32 


11 " No 7 


41 


11 " No 8 


39 


" No. 9 

11 1' No. 10 


44 
32 


11 " No. 11 


34 


" No. 13 

11 11 No. 14 


33 
4i) 
31 


11 11 No 15 . 


81 
58 
38 
33 
33 
75 
20 
19 
54 
16 
19 
16 
42 
28 
21 


51 


11 11 No IG . . 


40 


'• 11 No. 17 


32 


1. 1' No. 18 


30 


• 1 " No. 19 


31 


11 '1 jso "0 . 


33 


11 1' No. 21 


19 




21 


• 1 11 No. 3 


52 


. 11 11 No 4 


16 


" No. 5 

11 11 No. G 


16 
21 » 


11 11 No. 7 


47 


• 1 11 No 8 . 


30 


11 11 No 9 


18 






Total 








2159 


1987 







The whole number rcrortcd from each school, if added together, would be more 
than the whole number in all the schools, as some scholars are reported Irom two dif- 
ferent schools. The whole number of different pupils attending all the schools last 
year was, as near as can be ascertained, 3,200. 

* Discontinued. 



QUESTIONS SUBMITTED TO CANDIDATES FOR 
ADMISSION TO THE HIGH SCHOOL AT THE 
ANNUAL EXAMINATION, JUNE 20 AND 22, 

1870. 

ARITHMETIC. 

1. Two persons are (500 miles apart and traveling toward each 

other; one travels 78 miles, the other twice as far; how far 
apart are tliey? 

2. A piece of gronnd, ecjntaining iunr acres, is S rods wide; how 

long is it? 
.'5. How many ways of expressing division? Illustrate, 
■i. Gife the table of square measure. 
5. If 6 horses can plow 22 acres in 10 days, how many horses will 

it take to plow 33 acres in 9 days? 
(J. Add 8 tenths, 6 hundredths, 433 thousandths, and llG mi!- 

lionths. 

7. Divide 72 hundredths by 3G thousandths. 

8. If the divisor be three-fifths and the (|uotent one and onc-lialf 

what is the dividend? 

9. A pile of wood is 15 feet long, 10 feet high, and 8 ieet wide 

what is t worth at $7.75 joer cord? 

10. What part of one-half an acre is a piece of laud 121 feet long, 

and 36 feet wide? 

11. A room is IS feet 8 inches long, and 10 feet G inches wide; one 

kind of carjieting three-fourths of a yard wide, can be ob- 
tained lor .^2.00 per yard; another kind a j-ard wide, can be 
obtained for f 1,75 per yard; which kind is the more expen- 
sive, and how much more will it cost to carpet the room 
with this kind, than with the other? 

12. AVhat is the interest of .'«64.25. from Octol)er 10, 1809, till the 

present time? 

13. A man bought a lot (»f land for .^1,200; he paid ^125 for fen- 

cing it, .f 3,500 for buildingra house, and iS;75 for some shade 
20 



298 

trees; he afterwards sold the house and lot for S5,390; what 
per cent, did he gain, and for how much should he have 
sold it to have gained twelve and one-half per cent? 

14. A man bought 6000 bushels of wheat at ii?1.60 a bushel; he 

sold 10 per cent, of it at 3 per cent. loss, 50 per cent, of it 
at 10 per cent, gain, and the remainder at 5 per cent, gain; 
what was gained by the transaction V 

15. What principal will amount to .$110 in 1 year, H months, at 

six per cent.? 
U. What is the cube root of 117019? 
17. What is the square root of .001704? 

GEAMMAE. 

1. Give the plural of mouse, sheep, statesman, child, goose, lady. 

sijoonful, sister-in-law, woman, and brother. 

2. Give the feminine of lion, hero, liear, king, male, husband. 

and master. 
.'3. What is a particii)le? Write a sentence containing a parti- 
ciple. 

4. Give the principal parts of do, go, say, eat, fall, cast, bind. let. 

pay, put. slide, rise, grow, wear, steal, speak, and think. 

5. (a) Make a list of novns in the following extract, naming the 

cases of the first three; (b) a list of pronouns, and decline 
the first tico\ (c) a list of adjectives, and compare the first 
two; (d) a list of adverbs; (e) a list of the prepositions: 
" I 3"icld to nobody in the world in reverence and respect 
to the immortal memory of AVashington. His life and his 
principles were the guiding star of my life; to that star I 
look up for inspiration and advice, during the vicissitudes of 
n:iy stormy life. Hence I drew that devotion to my country 
and to the cause of national freedom, which you, gentlemen. 
:iud millions of your fellow-citizens, and your national gov- 
ernment, are so kind as to honor by unexamjiled distinc- 
■ ^ ' tion." 
i). 'Write a sentence containing a noun in the objective case; one 
containing an adjective in the superlative degree; one con- 
taining a personal pronoun in the nominative case; one con- 
taining a relative pronoun in the objective case. 

7. What is conjugation? 

8. What is declension? 

'.). What is the object of the verb gave, in the sentence, " Where 
is the knife I gave you?" 



299 

10. AVhat is a regular verb? Give example. 

11. What is an irregular verb? Give example. 

13. Parse each verb in the following sentence, viz.: ''He has for- 
gotten much that he once knew." 

13. Correct the following sentences where corrections are needed: 

(a) He built a new cottage house, (b) Ihaintgot no book, 
(c) You darsen't do it. (d) Charles and i have took them 
things, (e) May him audi go home, (f) When he raised 
up to go he seen the books fell on the floor, (g) Who had 
I ought to give this to ? (h) Let that remain a secret 
between you and I. (i) Tell them boys to go quickly. 

14. Write a description of the Manchester Post Office. 

GEOGEAPIIY. 

1. Define horizon. 

2. What and where are the tropics? 

3. Describe the Amazon river. 

4. What is foreign commerce? Domestic commerce? 

5. What are some of the imports of the United States? 
(i. What are the principal tributaries of the Mississippi? 

7. Locate and describe a city in each of the New England States, 

8. State what and inhere are the following, viz. : Biscay, Sicily , 

Borneo, Mozambique, Panama, Danube, Cuba, Gibraltar, 
Alps, and Nile. 

9. How does the surface of the New England States compare 

with that of the States bordering on the Gulf of Mexico? 

10. What are some of the leading commercial cities of this coun- 

try? 

11. Define a river basin; a system of rivers; a water-shed. 

12. What is a zone? What is the entire breadth in degrees of the 

Torrid zone? Of each Temperate zone? 

13. Describe the Hudson river. 

14. Name some river on whicli are located several manufacturing 

cities. Name some of the cities on its banks. 
1.5. What are some of the largest places of New England? 
IG. Which of the New England States extends farthest north? 

17. Give the boundaries of New England. 

18. Through what waters would you pass in going by sea fx*om 

New York to Boston? 



300 

HISTORY. 

1 . \V"ho was the first President, and who composed his Cabinet? 

2. In wliat States were battles fought during the late rebellion? 
;». From whom did Columbus receive aid to make his discoveries? 
4. Who were the Hessians? 

.5. Give an account of Perry's victory on Lake Erie. 

(). How long was Harrison President? How long was Lincoln? 

7. 'When and how was negro slavery introduced into this country? 

8. Xame some pei'sons who made voyages of discovery to this 

country? 

9. Xame the Presidents in order, Avith the length of time each 

served. 

10. What can you say of Aaron Burr? 

11. What can you say of the Hartford Convention? 

12. What were some of the prominent events of Jackson's admin- 

istration? What of Van Buren's? 

13. What were some of the battles of the Mexican war? 

1-1. What was the Fugitive Slave Act, and when was it passed? 
15. What were some of the leading events of Pierce's administra- 
tion? 
. 16. Name four of the prominent Confederate generals in the re- 
bellion. aS'ame four Union generals. 

17. What can you say of the Fenian organization? 

18. Give an account of Sherman's march to the sea. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

1. What is the ditlereuce betwen an oi'ganie and an inorganic 

body? 

2. Define fibre; muscle; tissue. 

;>. How many bones in the human body? Xame them. 

4. Describe the heart. 

5. Give the names of the permanent teeth. 

(). Into how many parts arc the teetli divided? 

7. AVhat is the treatment of wounds caused by the l:)ite of raljid 

animals? 

8. Why should a school-room and all public rooms and sleeping- 

rooms be well ventilated? 

9. Describe the bronchia. 
10. Describe the trachea. 



301 

MUSIC. 

1. Upon which hue of the start" do vou commence the scale of 

2. What is the signature for the key of GV AV D? 

3. How many steps has the scale? How many large steps? How 

many small steps? In what order must these steps be placed 
to form the scale? 

4. What do the following letters signify, viz.: p, pp, f, rt', mf? 

5. What characters denote silence? 
G. Describe the staff. 

7. Xame the notes. 

8. What do you understand by the key of C? 

0. What is meant by transposition of the scale? 
10, Wliat is meant hy double measure? 

GOYEENMEKTAL IIs^STRUCTOR. 

1. How may a bill l)ecome a law, notwitlistanding the veto of the 

President? 

2. How many Senators has Kew Hampsliire in Congress? How 

many Ecpresentatives ? 

3. Which State has the largest number of Senators? \N'hic]i the 

largest numl:)er of Representatives? 

4. How is the President elected? 

5. How are United States Senators chosen? 

G. How are Representatives to Congress chosen? 

7. Of how^ many members does the Kew Hampshire Senate con- 
sist? Who is President of that body at the present time? 

8 What officers compose the Cabinet of the President? 

1). Who appoints the Judges of the Supreme Court of the United 
States, and for how long a time do they hold their office? 
How many Judges compose the Court? 

10. Who performs the duties of Vice-President on the death of 

that officer? 

11. What is the pay of members of Congress? 

12. What is the salary of the President? Vice-President? 

13. When does the Legislature of ISTew Hampshire assemble? 

14. How many members of the Legislature are there from this 

city? 

15. Of how many members does the Governor's Council in this 

State consist? 



COURSE OF STUDY 

IN THE 

MANCHESTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



SECOND PRIMARY. 

TIIIKD CLASS. 

Kfudincj and Sp(llin(j.- — Elenieiitan' sounds; names uf letters, 
learned from cards and tablets; words and sounds I'epeated after 
the teacher; commence Ilillard's First Reader. 

Arithmetic. — Commence counting; develoij the idea of numbers 
to ten by the use of objects; count to fifty on the numeral frame. 

Oral lessons on form, color, etc., illustrated by objects in the 
school-room. 

Hillard^s Cltarts. — No. 1, names and sounds of letters; No. 3, to 
l>e spelled by letters and sounds. 

Singing and iihysical exercises each half day in all Primary 
.schools. 

Repeating verses and maxims in all Primary schools. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Heading and SpelliiKj. — Ilillard's First Reader completed; "Wor- 
cester's Primary Speller, to twentieth page; printing small letters 
so as to form monosyllables. 

Arithmetic. — Counting to one hundred, with the use of the nu- 
meral frame; counting by twos to fifty. 

Oral lessons on form, size, color, and on plants and animals. 

Boston Primary School Tablets. — No. 5, the pupils to name and 
]ioint out the lines and plane figures; No. 19, entire; No, 20 to X. 

Hillard''s Charts. — No. 1, analyze the forms of capital letters, 
and tell what lines compose each; No. 4, syllables spelled by 
sounds; No. 3, words spelled by sounds and by letters. Calling 
words at sight. 



304 

FIRST CLASS. 

ReacliiKj and SpeUlmj. — IlillanVs Second Eeacler: Primary Speller 
to Ibrty-tiftli page; spelling words from reading lessons by sounds; 
questions on the meaning of pieces read; printing words on slates: 
exercises in drawing on slates, to secure right method of holding 
pencil, etc. 

Arithmetic. — Miscellaneous exercises in adding small numbers: 
counting by twos to one hundred. 

Oral lessons on objects, with their parts, qualities and uses. 

Boston Primary School Tablets. — ISTo. 24, to L; Kos. 17 and 18, 
names of punctuation marks learned; review of those prescribed 
for second class. 

ITillard's Charts. — Xo. 2, entire; Xos. A. and T). 



FIRST PRIMARY. 

TIIIItD CLASS. 

lieaOiiiii ami SpelUmj. — Second Reader completed and reviewed: 
words from reading lessons spelled by letters and sounds; Primary 
Speller, to sixty-first page : printing capitals and small letters on 
the slate. 

Arithmetic. — Exercises in adding and subtracting small num- 
bers; counting by threes, fours, etc., to one hundred and back, in 
all classes ot this grade, and also in Middle schools; the idea of 
multiplication developed by the use of the numeral frame. 

Oral instructions upon common objects. 

Boston Primary School Tablets. — Xos. I'j and 20 reviewed en- 
tire, with exercises in writing Roman and Arabic figures on the 
slate and board; No. 5 reviewed in conne<'tion with Xo. 0, with ex- 
ercises in drawing on the slate. 

JTillanVs Charts. — -Xos. o. and G. 

SKCOXD CLASS. 

Peadiny and Spelling. — Third Reader; Primary Speller, from the 
sixty-eigth to the seventy-ninth page; frequent exercises in calling 
w^ords at sight from cards and charts, and afterwards spelling the 
same; words from reading lessons printed ujion the slate. 

Arithmetic. — Addition, subtraction and multiplcation taught 
orally; miscellaneous questions under each rule: Primary Arith- 
metic commenced. 



305 

Geography. — X;unos of the counties in tlie state, with .some oral 
instruction in regard to our own city, etc. 

Oral lessons on parts, form and color, illustrated by conunon o!)- 
jects; on plants and animals — those with which children are fa- 
miliar. 

Penmanship. — Writing a few capitals and small letters. 

Boston Primary School Tablets. — Review of Kos, 17, 18, 19 and 
20; use of punctuation marks commenced; Ko. 7, drawing, and 
oral lessons on the objects. 

JIillar(Vs Charts. — Kos. 7 and S. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Meaduuj and SpidUng. — Third Header; Primary Speller com- 
pleted and reviewed, omitting page sixty-first to sixty-seventh, in- 
clusive, and eighty-seventh, eighty-eighth and eighty-ninth pages; 
questions on punctuation, use of capitals, and marks indicating the 
pronunciation; commence abreviations; words irom reading and 
spelling lessons spelled by sounds and by letters. 

Pemnanship. — Writing capitals and small letters, also words from 
reading and spelling lessons; letters copied froni Payson and Dun- 
ton's Charts. 

Arithmetic. — Primary Arithmetic to lifty-seventh page; miscel- 
laneous exercises in addition, subtraction, multiplication and divi- 
sion; tables of multiplication and division to 10 X 10, and 100 -f- 10. 
on slates and blackboards. 

Geography . — Exercises from maps and the board. 

Oral lessons on objects, trades, occupations, etc. 

Boston Primary School Tablets. — ]M^o. 18, uses and definitions of 
points and marks used and apjilied in reading lessons; Xos. 7andS. 

ITillarcVs Charts. — Frequent drills on IS'os. 2 and 5. 



SECON'D MIDDLE. 

SECOND CLASS. 



Beading and Spelling. — Tliird Header completed; Compreliensive 
Speller, to tifty-fourth page, with special attention to sounds of let- 
ters; in reading and spelling, careful attention given to enuncia- 
tion, pronunciation, illustrations and definitions, with particular 



806 

cure that the words of the detinitions arc not more difHeiiU to un- 
derstand than the words defined. 

Penmanshi}). — Writing upon slates; letters coi)ied from Payson 
and Dunton's Charts. 

Dro?ci«g.— Drawing on slates; review of tablets Xos. 5 and 6; 
attention given to lines and angles; different kinds of each; mean- 
ing of straight, ohllque, citrvcO, etc., as applied to lines, and rir/ht, 
obtuse, etc., as applied to angles, thoroughl}' understood. 

Arithmetic— Trimnvy Arithmetic completed; Walton's Tables in 
all classes in the Middle and Grammar schools; exercises in com- 
l)inations of numbers in Middle and Grammar schools; multiplica- 
tion and division tables thoroughly studied; 12 X 12, and 144-^12 
frequently placed on the slate and boai'd; notation to 1000. 

Geography. — Primary Geography to twenty-ninth page, with 
considerable oral instruction; map drawing; general geography 
taught by use of globes ; geography of Xew Hampshire and Hills- 
l)orough county, l)y use of maps. 

KIKST CLASS. 

Heading and Spelling. — Fourth Reader; Comprehensive Speller, 
irom fifty-fourth to sixty-second page ; words spelled generally from 
reading lessons. 

Writing and Drawing. — Continued. 

Arithmetic. — Occasional exercises in notation and numeration; 
Intellectual Arithmetic to the thirty-ninth page ; frequent exercises 
in combination of numbers, so varied as to combine accuracy with 
rapidity. These exercises continued through the Middle and 
Grammar schools. 

Geography . — Primary Geography continued to the sixtj-first 
page; map-drawing, as in the second class. 

History. — Oral instruction. 



FIRST MIDDLE. 



SECOND CLASS. 



Reading and Spelling. — Fourth Reader; Comprehensive Speller, 
from ninety-first to one hundred and second page. 

Arithmetic. — Written Arithmetic; oral instruction; notation to 
1,000,000; Intellectual Arithmetic to sixty-first page. 



307 

(reograpki/. — Primary (.leo^irraphy completed and reviewed; map- 
drawing continued. 

Penmanship. — Payson, Dunton & Scribner's series of writing 
books commenced; careful attention given to position of body, etc. 

History. — Historical sketches; discovery of America; war of the 
Revolution, etc. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Heading and Spelling. — Fourth Reader; Comprehensive Spellei', 
from one hundred and second to one hundred and tenth page, with 
review of whole book, excepting what is included between the 
sixty-second and ninety-first pages; review of punctuation marks; 
the use of capitals and abbreviations; words in reading lessons de- 
fined; pupils to repeat in their own language the subject of the 
reading lessons. 

Arithmetic. — Written Arithmetic continued through division; 
Intellectual Arithmetic, to seventy-fourth page. 

Penmanship. — Writing continued. 

History. — Oral instruction, continued; historical sketches; Co- 
lumbus, King Philip, and others. 

Geography. — Intermediate Geography, to nineteenth page, and 
from fifty-second page — United States, to fifty-seventh page — N'a- 
ture of !New England; map-drawing continued. 

Hillard^s Charts. — Ko. 2, used in Middle schools. 

Walton & CogsweWs Arithmetical Charts used in all classes 
where Mental Arithmetic is taught. 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

FOURTH DIVISION. 

Beading. — Intermediate Reader. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller, to one hundred and thirtieth 
page. 

Arithmetic. — Practical Arithmetic, to one hundred and sixteenth 
page; Intellectual Arithmetic, to one hundred and eighth page. 

Geography. — Intermediate, from fifty-seventh to eighty-fifth page. 

History. — Oral instruction. 

Penmanship. — -Book No. 2, of Payson, Dunton and Scribner's 

series. 

Grammar. — False Syntax corrected; oral exercises. 



308 

THIRD DIVISION. 

lleudimj. — Intermediate Header. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller, from sixty-second to ninety- 
first page; oral and written exercises. 

Arithmetic . — Practical Arithmetic, to one hundred and ninety- 
fifth page ; Intellectual Arithmetic, to one hundred and thirty-ninth 
page. 

Geography. — From nineteenth to fifty-second page. 

History. — Oral instruction ; Campbell's History used as a read- 
ing book through the American Revolution. 

Penmanship. — Book 'No. ',i. 

Grammor. — Same as in fourth division. 

SECOXD DIVISIOX. 

Eeadinv:. — Fifth Reader. 

Spelling. — Miscellaneous exercises; words from reading book 
and speller. 

Arithmetic. — Practical Arithmetic, to two hundred and fifty-ninth 
page; Intellectual Arithmetic completed. 

History. — Campbell's History completed. 

G^ra9?i)na)-.— Text-book connnenced; exercises in writing. 

Penmanship. 

FIRST DIVISIOX. 

Beading. — Fifth Reader. 

Spelling. — Miscellaneous. 

Arithmetic. — Practical Arithmetic completed . 

Geography. — Reviewed . 

History. — Seavey's. 

Physiology. — Cutter's. 

Grammar. — Continued, with analysis and parsing. 

Pemnanship. 

Declamations and Compositions throughout the course. 



LIST OF TEXT-BOOKS USED IX'^ THE PRIMAEY, MIDDLE AND 
GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Ilillard's series of reading books with charts. 
Worcester's Primary and Comprehensive Spellers. 
Walton's Primary and Intellectual Arithmetics. 



309 

Robinson's Practical Arithmetic. 

Quaclvenbos's Grammars. 

Seavey's History. 

Campbell's History, 

Guyot's Intermediate and Elementary Geographies. 

Cutter's Physiology. 

Hohman's Practical Course in Singing, parts i, ii, iii, and iv. 

Payson, Dunton and Scribner's Writing Books. 

Bartholomew's Drawing Books and Cards. 

The coui-se of study for the High Scliool is not published at this 
time as changes are soon to be made in it. 



MUSIC. 

SECOXD PKIMAEY. 

1. Pupils to sing by rote all the exercises and songs of the first 
fifteen pages of Hohman's Practical Course in singing, Part 1. In 
schools where these books are not used, such other songs and exer- 
cises as are dictated by the teacher of music. 

2. Sing the scale ascending and descending by numbers, letters 
and syllables. 

3. Musical notation, taught from the lilack-board — the pupils to 
copy the notes and other cliaractors upon their slates to the follow- 
ing extent : 

(a) Kotes, short and long. 

(b) Measures, Bar and Doul)le Bar. 

(c) Rests, short and long. 

• ((Z) The Staff Degrees, Lines and Spaces. 

(e) The G Clef. 

(f) The significations of tlie following letters, viz : j).,pp, f,ff\ 
mf; also the repeat. 

4. Music Charts for daily exercise. 

f). Other songs and exercises at the discretion of the teacher. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

1. Continuation of songs through Hohman's, Part 1st, by rote ; 
also the following additional characters in musical notation : 
(a) Eighth and sixteenth notes ; half and quarter rests. 
(6) Dotted notes, 
(c) Sharps, flats, naturals and the hold. 



310 

3. Double, triple, quadruple and sextuple time, including accen- 
tuation and manner of beating the same. 

4. Music Charts for daily exercise; miscellaneous exercises and 
songs at the discretion of teachers. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

IXCLUDI^TG FIRST AISTD SECOND. 

1. Sing exercises and songs in Ilohman's Practical Course, i)art 
2, by NOTE. 

2. Describe by its intervals the major diatonic scale. 

3. Describe double, triple, quadruple and sextui:)le time. 

4. "Write at dictation, whole, quarter and eighth notes, and their 
corresponding rests. 

.5. Write the staff and G clef in its proper jDlace upon the staff, 
6. Write at dictation upon the staif Avith the G clef, the notes 
representing the following sounds, viz : j/, a. 6, 



«, f?, e,/, g, «, &, c, (7, e, /, (J. 

7. Music Charts for daily exercise. 

8. Sing at sight simple melodies in the key of C, and G and P 
major. 

9. Write the scales of C, G and P major upon the staft" with the G 
clef, and their proper signatures ; also name the pitch of the sounds 
composing these scales in their order. 

10. Explain the use of sharps, flats and naturals. 

GRAMMAE SCHOOLS. 

1. Write, at dictation, exercises upon the slate and blackboard. 

2. Transpose the scale into all keys. 

3. Read simple tunes by syllables, at sight, in one, two and three 
parts. 

4. Sing different numbers of the scale at dictation. 

.5. Mark time correctly in double, trijile, quadruple and sextuple 
time. 

6. Music Charts for daily exercise. 

7. Songs and exercises selected b}' teachers. 

Pupils in the higher division should be familiar with the princi- 
ples laid down in Parts 3 and 4 of Hohman's Practical Course. 



Pv IT L E S 

OF THK 

S C H C) O L C^ O M M I T T E E 

AND 

REaULATIONS 

OF THE 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



CHAPTER I. 

RULES FOR THE COMMITTEE. 

Section 1. The Mayor of the city shall preside at the 
meetings of the Board. 

Sec. 2. At each meeting the chairman shall cause the 
proceedings of the last meeting to be read, and business 
taken up in the following order : 

1st. Petitions, applications and notices. 

2d. Reports from the Superintendent. 

3d. Reports of standing committees. 

4th. Reports of select committees. 

.5th. Unfinished business. 

Oth. New and miscellaneous business. 

Sec. 3. At the beginning of the year the chairman shall 
appoint the following committees, subject to the approval of 
the Board : 

1st. Finance, accounts and claims. 

2d. Repairs, furniture and supplies. 

3d. Text-books and apparatus. 

4th. Printing and stationery. 

5th. Fuel and lieatins;. 



312 

6th. Examination of teachers. 

7th. Truancy. 

8tli. Employment of children in manufacturing estab- 
lishments. 

9th. Sub-committees for the various schools. 

Sec. 4. The School Committee shall meet in their room 
in the City Hall on the evening of the first Tuesday in 
each year. 

Sec. 5. The regular meetings of the Board shall be held 
on the first Friday evenings of each month, and special meet- 
ings at the call of the Chairman, at his discretion, or when- 
ever requested by two meml^ers of the Board in writing. 

Sec. 6. A majority of the existing members of the 
Board shall be requisite to constitute a quorum, except for 
the purpose of adjourning ; a majority of the whole Com- 
mittee, voting in the affirmative, shall be necessary to give 
validity to any vote or act of the Board. 

Sec. 7. The election of teachers for the year shall be 
made on such day or days in the month of February or 
March as the Board shall specially assign for that purpose. 
All teachers shall l)c subject to removal at any time l>y the 
Board. 

Sec. 8. All applications for schools shall be made in 
the applicant's own hand-writing, and shall state the age, 
experience in teaching, and the residence of the applicant, 
together with references as to moral character. 

Sec. 9. The salaries of all the teachers shall be fixed 
by the Board at the time of the election, but may be in- 
creased or decreased at any time at the discretion of the 
Board. 

Sec. 10. The annual report to the city, and the prepara- 
tion of the report required by the State, shall be made by a 
special committee chosen by the Board. Each sub-com- 
mittee shall make a report of the condition of their schools 
at the close of the year. 



813 

Sec. 11. The length of the school year, the date of the 
commencement, and the duration of each term, and the 
length of vacations, shall be fixed by special vote of the 
Committee. 

Sec. 12. The Secretary shall have charge of the rec- 
ords of the Board, and of all papers directed by them to 
be kept on file. He shall keep a fair and full record of all 
the proceedings of the Board. He shall give notice in 
writing, to every member of the Board, of all its regular 
and special meetings, and in case of the absence from the 
city of tlie Chairman, he shall have power to call special 
meetings of tlie Board in the sanic manner as the Chair- 
man. 



CHAPTER II. 

DUTIES OF COMMITTEES. 

Section 1, The committee on finance, accounts and 
claims, shall, in the month of January or February, make 
an estimate of the expenses for the year and report to the 
Board. They shall examine and audit all accounts against 
the school department ; all propositions for change of sala- 
ries shall be referred to the committee and they shall report 
to the Board for final action upon the subject. 

Sec. 2. The committee on employment of children in 
manufacturing establishments and the committee on truan- 
cy shall use their efforts to secure the enforcement of the 
laws relating to these subjects, and shall report their ac- 
tion to the Board and make such recommendations as they 
deem expedient. 

Sec. 3. The sub-committees shall examine the classes 
in the respective schools, and visit them at discretion with- 
out previous notice to the teachers. Tliey shall, conjointlr 
21 



314 

with the Superintendent, give their advice to the teachers 
Gil any emergency, and take cognizance of any difficulty 
which may occur between instructors and pupils, or parents 
of pupils, or between tlie instructors themselves, relative 
to the government or instruction of the school. An appeal, 
however, to the whole Board is not hereby precluded to any 
citizen, pupil or instructor. 

Each sub-committee shall make a report of the condition 
of their schools at the close of the year. 

Sec. 4. Although the various interests of so many 
schools require the division of the Board into sub-commit- 
tees, yet each member shall consider it his duty to watch 
over the literary and moral improvement of all the schools, 
to afford his personal assistance in their regular visitations 
and examinations, and to visit them at other times accord- 
ing to his ability. 

CHAPTER III. 

JIULES FOR THE SUPERINTENDENT. 

Section 1. The Superintendent shall devote himself en- 
tirely to the duties of his office. He shall study the public 
school system, and keep himself acquainted with the pro- 
gress of instruction and discipline in other places, in order 
to prescribe the most appropriate means for the advance- 
ment of the public schools of the city ; and shall take es- 
pecial care that all the orders and regulations of the School 
Committee are carried into full effiict. 

Sec. 2. He shall, under the direction and control of the 
School Committee, as far as practicable, have the care and 
supervision of all the public schools ; he shall visit each 
school as often as his other duties will reasonal)ly permit, 
and carefully examine into its progress and condition ; he 
shall pay particular attention to the classification of the 



oi.) 

scholars, and shall equalize, as far as may be, the attend- 
ance upon the different schools. 

Sec. 3. He shall advise with the teachers in reference 
to the course of instruction and discipline in their respect- 
ive schools, see that the prescribed studies are carefully 
pursued, and that no books are used except such as are 
adopted by this Board. He shall have power to appoint 
stated or occasional meetings of all the teachers in the em- 
ployment of the Board, for the purpose of iustructingthem 
in respect to their duties, and for mutual consultation in 
all matters connected with the prosperity of the schools; 
and all orders issued by him shall bo binding upon all 
teachers unless revoked by the Board. 

He shall investigate all cases of discipline or difficulty 
reported to him by the teachers or by the parent or guar- 
dian of a scholar, and shall take such action in the matter 
as he, in connection with the sub-committee, may deem ex- 
pedient. He shall exert his personal influence to secure as 
general and regular attendance as possible, endeavor to 
raise the character of every scholar, and keep himself ac- 
quainted with the general progress of each school, and, as 
far as practicable, of each scholar. 

Sec. 4. He shall be a member of all standing commit- 
tees except Finance. He shall receive from the teachers 
of the several schools their monthly reports, and shall 
classify and present them to the Board at its next meeting ; 
and shall also receive and classify, at the beginning of each 
term, the order of exercises of each school in the city. He 
shall annually prepare a written report for publication, in 
which report he shall give such information relating to the 
condition of the schools, and present such plans for their 
improvement, as he may have to communicate. 

Sec. 5. He shall furnish to the order of teachers all 
necessary blanks, registers, blank-books, and text-books. 
He shall use his influence to secure tlie observance of the 



316 

law concerning the employment of children in manufac- 
turing establishments, and shall carefully inquire and as- 
certain the names of all scholars of non-resident parents 
and guardians, and report the same to the Board. He 
shall have authority to cause all such ordinary repairs to 
be made as are immediately needed, either for the school- 
houses, furniture, or heating apparatus. 

Sec. 6. He shall have the direction and control of the 
transfer of scholars from one school to another of the same 
rank, and all certificates of transfer shall be signed by him. 
Upon every application for a transfer he shall carefully in- 
vestigate the reasons therefor, and shall especially regard 
the numbers in the schools and the residence of the schol- 
ar. In doubtful or difficult cases he shall consult the ap- 
propriate sub-committees, or refer the case to the Board. 

Sec. 7. He shall aid in the examination of teachers, 
and conduct all public and private examinations of schools 
appointed by the Committee. He shall examine, or cause 
to be examined, the most advanced classes in the different 
schools, or so many of them as may be candidates for the 
next higher grade of schools, in such manner as shall be 
prescribed by the Board, and make a selection of such as 
are prepared for promotion, and cause the proper transfers 
to be made, provided such candidates and transfers shall 
receive the sanction of the respective sub-committees. 

Sec. 8. He shall take cognizance of all cases of truancy 
or non-attendance upon school which may be reported to 
him by teachers, or which may otherwise come to his 
knowledge, and shall, in every instance, strive to reform 
the child. In case his efforts are unsuccessful, he shall re- 
port the name of any habitual truant or absentee to the 
officer whose duty it is to make complaint in such cases. 
He shall also report to the School Committee every case of 
delinquency, tardiness, or violation of any of the rules, on 
the part of teachers. 



317 

Sec. 9. Pic shall have his office in the School Commit- 
tee room, ill the City Hall, shall keep regular office hours, 
and shall be in his office one hour each day before either 
the morning or afternoon session of the schools. In case of 
temporary absence from the city, or of sickness, he shall 
notify the Chairman of the Board, and make such arrange- 
ments for his office business as he may think proper. 



CHAPTER IV. 

RULES FOR TEACHERS AND PUPILS. 

Section 1. Teachers must be in their respective school- 
rooms at least lifteen minutes before the time for opening 
their schools, for the purpose of admitting the scholars 
and preserving order. 

School-rooms are not to be opened for the admission of 
pupils until the arrival of the teacher, unless some provision 
has otherwise been made satisfactory to the Superintendent 
or sub-committee. 

When pupils enter their respective rooms before the time 
for opening school, they shall take their seats the same as 
during school hours. No ])laying must he cdloivccl in the 
school-buildings. 

When pupils are filing in and out at the opening and 
closing of the school, and at recesses, the teachers are 
expected to give their personal attention to the preservation 
of order in the halls, and on the stairs, ayid not rely upon 
the aid of monitors. 

At each recess every pupil shall pass out in an orderly 
manner, unless permission is obtained to remain in the 
school-room ; pupils remaining in the school-room during 
recess shall not be allowed to communicate with each other 
or to run about the room. 



318 

Pupils shall not be allowed in the entries at recess, but 
shall remain in the yards or the basement until the bell is 
struck, when they shall pass into the school-rooms in an or- 
derly manner ; they shall not, however, be required to 
remain out when tlie exposure would be injurious to 
health. 

Sec. '2. The morning exercises of all the scliools shall 
commence with the reading- of the Scriptures, followed by 
the Lord's Prayer. 

Sec. 3. In all schools above the Primary grade, each 
session shall l)e of three hours' continuance ; in the Prima- 
ry schools the afternoon session shall be two hours ; all 
schools shall be dismissed at the appointed time, and the 
pupils shall at once leave the premises in an orderly man- 
ner, unless detained by the teacher or permission is grant- 
ed them to remain. 

Sec. 4. Teachers shall not be engaged in any employ- 
ment not connected with their duties during school hours, 
but must faithfully devote themselves to the interest of their 
scholars ; they shall give their pupils constant employment, 
and endeavor by judicious and diversified modes to render 
the schools })leasant as well as profitable ; they shall use all 
suitable means to promote good morals and manners among 
their pupils ; they shall maintain firm, prudent, and vigi- 
lant discipline, and shall as far as practicaljle govern by 
mild and persuasive measures. 

Sec. 5. Foi- violent opposition to authority in any par- 
ticular instance, or for the repetition of any offense, the 
teacher may exclude a child from school for the time be- 
ing, for the purpose of reflection and consultation ; and 
shall forthwith give information of the measure to the pa- 
rent or guardian, and apply to the Superintendent or sub- 
committee for advice and direction. Any child under this 
censure, who shall express sincere regret for the offense, as 
openly and explicitly as the nature of the case may seem 



319 

to the teacher to rc(iuirc, and sliall manifest full {)roof of 
amendment, sliall he re-instated in the privileges of the 
school. 

.Sec. G. When the example of a scholar is very injuri- 
ous, and in all cases where reformation appears to he hope- 
less, and the scholar manifests an hahitnal neglect of stud- 
ies, the teacher shall report such scholar to the ►'School 
Committee for expulsion, through the Superintendent or 
snh-committee. 

Sec. 7. No book or tract designed to advocate the ten- 
ets of any particular sect or party shall be permitted in 
any of the schools, nor shall any sectarian or }iartisan in- 
struction be given by any teacher in tlie same. 

Sec. 8. Teachers in the public schools shall iiot lie al- 
lowed to keep private schools of any description, or attend 
to the instrnction of any private pupils before 6 o'clock, R, 
M., except on Saturdays, or be engaged in any avccatiojis 
incompatible with their school duties. 

Teachers may be allowed one half^day each term to visit 
other schools, to observe modes of discipline and instruc- 
tion, permission to make such visits Ijcing obtained from 
the Superintendent. Visiting other schools without per- 
mission will be regarded as a resignation on the part of 
any teacher. No advertisement shall be read or distributed 
in any of the public schools, nor shall any public entertain- 
ment be announced in any school without special permis- 
sion. 

No books shall be studied in the schools other tlian those 
authorized by the School Committee ; and all teachers are 
required to follow the principles and modes of instruction 
laid down in the text-books used. 

Sec. 9. No person not having a legal lesidence in th-e 
City of Mancli esler shall be admitkd lo Ihe ] ublic schools, 
except by special vote of the School Committee. 

Sec. 10. Pupils shall attend such schools as they may 



320 

be assigned by tbo Committee or Superintendent. No pu- 
pil sball be allowed to study out of school during school 
hours, or leave school for the purpose of taking music or 
other lessons, or take less than the required immber of 
studies without permission from the Board. 

Sec. 11. When application for admission to any school 
is made to a teacher by a pupil, the teacher shall, in every 
doubtful case, after ascertaining the residence of the ap- 
plicant, refer him directly to the Superintendent. 

With the consent of the Superintendent or sub-committee, 
teachers may suspend the connection of pupils with their 
schools, when not provided with the necessary books and 
slates, or when they come to school otherwise than in a 
neat and clean condition. No scholar shall be permitted 
to attend any school in the city who has not been duly vac- 
cinated ; nor shall any scholar affected with any contagious 
disease, or residing in a family with any such disease, be 
permitted to attend until he has produced a certificate from 
some regular physician, stating that there is no danger to 
be apprehended from the same. 

Sec. 12. It shall be the duty of teachers to exercise 
a general care and inspection over their pupils as well out 
of school as within, and they shall require them to go di- 
rectly to and from school. They shall also exercise suit- 
able vigilance with regard to the school-buildings by them 
respectively occupied, and the appurtenances of the same, 
including fences, trees and yards, that they may sustain no 
unnecessary injury from the pupils by cutting, disfiguring, 
or otlier improper usage, and every teacher shall be re- 
quired to ascertain, if possible, by whom the injury was 
done. 

Sec. 13. The teachers of the several schools shall also 
prescribe such rules for the use of the yards and out-build- 
ings connected with the school-houses as shall insure their 
being kept in a neat and proper condition, and shall ex- 



321 

amine them as often as may be necessary for such purpose, 
and they will be held responsible for any want of neatness 
or cleanliness about their premises. Any pupil who shall 
cut, or otherwise injure, any public school-house, or injure 
any fences, trees, or out-buildings belonging to the school- 
grounds, or shall write any profane or obscene language, or 
make any obscene pictures or characters on any public 
school premises, shall be liable to suspension or expulsion. 

It shall be the duty of the Principals of the High school, 
of the Intermediate and Grammar schools, to see that all 
the regulations respecting the school rooms, in their re- 
spective buildings, are enforced, and that order be main- 
tained in and around the school buildings. 

Sec. 14. Whenever any scholar is absent from school, 
the teacher shall immediately ascertain the reason ; and if 
such absence be continued, and is not occasioned by sick- 
ness, or other sufficient cause, he shall report such al)sence 
to the Superintendent, or the Committee for enforcing the 
truant law. 

Sec. 15. Teachers must, at all seasons of the year, 
make the ventilation and temperature of their school-rooms 
an essential object of attention. The air in the room must 
be sufficiently changed at every recess, and at the close of 
every session. Pupils shall in no case be allowed to sit in 
a draught of air. 

Every school-room must he supplied with a thermometer, 
which will be furnished upon the application of any teacher 
to the Superintendent. The thermometer should be placed 
so as to indicate, as nearly as possible, the average temper- 
ature of the rooms. 

Sec. 16. All the pupils shall have a recess of teyi min- 
utes in each half-day, for recreation and exercise in the 
open air, under the direction of the teachers. Teachers 
may, however, forbid certain pupils from having their re- 
cess with the school, allowing them sufficient time bv them- 



Qi>9 



selves. Any special arrangement with regard to recesses 
may be made by the Superintendent and sub-committees o£ 
the various schools. 

Sec. 17. It shall be the duty of the teachers of the- 
several public schools to see that their respective rooms are 
kept properly swept and cleaned. Unless other provision 
is made, the teacher shall appoint some suitable person to 
build fires and take care of the school-house, whose compen- 
sation shall be fixed by the School Committee. 

Sec. 18. All the teachers shall be required to keep 
registers, furnished at the public expense, in which they 
shall record the names, residences, ages and attendance of 
their pupils, and sucli other particulars as shall give a cor- 
rect idea of the state of the school. These registers shall 
be returned to the Superintendent at the close of each 
term, unless otherwise directed ; and all blanks in these 
registers shall be filled out each term, in order that teach- 
ers may be legally entitled to receive their pay. 

Teachers shall not receive from the treasurer any pay for 
their services without presenting to him a certificate irom 
the Superintendent, stating that they have complied with 
these requirements. All work upon class-books and re- 
ports, except the making out of the daily records, shall be 
made out of school hours. 

Sec. 19. The teachers of the several schools shall send 
their reports to the Superintendent on the first day in each 
month, which reports shall show the whole number and the 
average number of males and females in the respective 
schools, together with the average daily attendance, and the 
percentage of daily attendance for the month ending on the 
preceding Friday, or such part thereof as has not been em- 
braced in a prior report. 

The average daily attendance is obtained by dividing the 
aggregate number of marks of presence of all the scholars 
bv the inimber of half-days in the time specified : and 



823 

i 

each scholar shall be considered a member of the school 
during any temporary absence in the term, unless such ab- 
sence be more than five consecutive days. 

The average number belonging to the school is obtained 
by dividing the aggregate number of marks of absence of 
all the scholars belonging to the school by the number of 
half-days in the time specified, and adding the result to the 
average daily attendance. Teachers shall send to the Su- 
perintendent, as early as the second ]\[onday of each term, 
the order of exorcises in their respective schools, and shall 
keep a copy of the same in some conspicuous part of the 
school-room. 

Teachers shall also be required to fill out all blanks fur- 
nished them by the direction of the Board, or by the Super- 
intendent ; and these blanks shall be returned at the time 
mentioned in the request. 

Sec. 20. The following holidays shall be granted to the 
schools : every Saturday, Fourth of July, Fast-Day, Thanks- 
giving, Christmas, and 22d February. No other day shall 
by allowed except by special permission of the Board. 

Sec. 21. Any teacher desiring to be absent from school 
shall make the desire known to the Superintendent or sub- 
committee, who alone are authorized to fill such temporary 
vacancy ; and no bill for services performed without their 
consent shall be approved. The absence of any teacher for 
one week or more, shall cause a corresponding deduction 
from the salary of said teacher, and for a less period the 
teacher shall pay the substitute provided by the Superin- 
tendent or sub-committee. 

If any teacher is absent or tardy without being excused 
by the Superintendent or sub-committee, or dismisses school 
before the end of the term, without such i)ermission, it will 
be considered hy them as a resignation on the part of such 
teacher. 

Sec. 22, Teachers shall attend all meetings appointed 



324 

* 

by the Board, or by the Chairman of the Boaad, or by the 
Superintendent, and any absence from such meetings by 
any teacher who has been duly notified shall be regarded 
the same as absence from school during school hours. 

Any sub-committee may call together the teachers in his 
sub-division at such time and place as he may designate, 
and each teacher in J the sub-division shall be required to 

attend. 

Sec. 23. Teachers shall have a copy of these regulations 
at all times at their respective school-rooms, and shall, from 
time to time, read to their respective schools so much 
thereof as will give the pupils a correct understanding of 
the rules by which the schools are to be governed. 

"The school committee may prescribe suitable rules and 
regulations for the management, studies, classification and 
discipline of the schools, whenever they deem the same 
necessary ; and the same lacing recorded by the town clerk, 
and a copy thereof given to the teachers and read in the 
schools, shall be binding upon scholars and teachers." — 
N. H. General Statutes, Chapter 81, Sec. 10. 



CHAPTER V. 

RULES FOR GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Section 1. Pupils shall attend, the schools for which 
they are fitted, in their respective divisions as heretofore 
defined by the school committee, except when otherwise 
directed by the Board. 

Sec. 2. Principals shall examine the pupils under the 
care of their assistants as often as they can consistently 
with proper attention to those whom they have immediately 
in charge. 

Sec. 3. Singing, physical exercises, and vocal gymnas- 
tics, shall form a part of the exercises of each day. 

Sec. 4. In the relation existing between the instructors 
in the Grammar schools, and also in the High school, the 



325 

Principals shall hold priority ; and their directions shall be 
followed by the other instructors, in the business of the 
schools. 

Sec. 5. The morning session of the school shall be 
from 9 to 12 throughout the year. Afternoon session 
from 1st Monday in November to the 1st Monday in Feb- 
ruary, from 1 1-2 to 4 1-2, and from the 1st Monday in Feb- 
ruary to the 1st Monday in November from 2 to 5, unless 
special permission is given to change them. 

Sec. 6. Candidates for admission to the High school 
must give evidence of a fair moral character, and be able 
to pass a rigid examination in the studies of the Grammar 
schools before the Committee or the Superintendent. Ev- 
ery sc'.iolar completing the prescribed course of study in 
the High or Grammar schools shall be entitled to a diploma 
from the Board, provided the attendance, deportment and 
scholarship be satisfactory. 



CHAPTER VI. 

SCHOOL GRADES AND COURSE OF STUDY. 

Section 1. Tlie schools of this city shall be classed as 
follows : — Ungraded, Partially Graded, 1st and 2d Primary, 
1st and 2d Middle, Intermediate, Grammar, and High 
schools ; children five years of age may be admitted to the 
schools of this city. 

Sec. 2. Ungraded schools shall be maintained in such 
districts as have not a sufficient number of scholars to al- 
low the establishment of the several grades. Partially 
Graded schools may exist in such localities as cannot be 
accommodated by the Graded schools. The studies shall 
be such as the pupils are qualified to pursue, and are author- 
ized by the laws of the State. The text-books shall be tlie 
same as are prescribed for the Graded schools. 



326 

Sec. o. The Intermediate school is not regarded as one 
in the regular grade, but is designed to afford special ad- 
vantages to such pupils as shall attend school for less than 
two terms in the year, or such as, from mental or physical 
inability, cannot maintain a fair position in the Grammar 
or High school, or are not easily managed in a Middle or 
Primary school. No pupil shall be admitted to this school 
who can profitably attend the graded schools. 

The studies pursued shall correspond, as nearly as pos- 
sible, with those in the Grammar grade, though it is not 
required that they be taken up in the same order, nor that 
every pupil attend to every branch. 

Sec. 4. The course of study in the other schools shall 
be such as the Board may from time to time determine. 



CHAPTER VII. 

TRAINING DEPARTMENT. 

Section 1. For the purpose of furnishing the schools in 
Manchester with experienced and qualified teachers, the 
committee may from time to time elect such applicants as 
upon examination they may judge suitable to become 
teachers, and place them in any of the schools of this city ; 
such persons elected shall be styled sub-teachers, and shall 
serve in such schools as the School Committee or Superin- 
tendent may determine, under the guidance and direction 
of the principals thereof, upon such terms and conditions 
as may be deemed best for the interests of the schools 
and in such way and manner as may fit them to become to 
teachers. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



S C H O O L D E P A R T M E N" T 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1871. 



HON. JAMES A. WESTON, 3Ia>/ar, 

EX OFFICIO CHAIRMAN. 



WILLIAM R. PATTEN, 

PRESIDENT OP THE COMMON COUNC IL, EX OFFICIO. 



JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Office— :^o. 5 City Hall; residence, N"o. 68 Beech St.; office 
hours, from 8 to 9 a. m., school days. 



MEMBERS OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Ward 1— Henry C. Sanderson, Ward 5— Patrick A. Deviuc 

Ward 2-Marshall P. Hall, Ward 6— William P. Merrill. 

Ward 3— Thomas Borden, Ward 7— James Dean, 

Ward 4— Samuel N. Bell, Ward 8-DeLafayette Kobinson 



'-10,< 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 

Finance, Accounts and Claims. — The Mayor, Messrs. Dean, San- 
derson, Kobinson and Patten. 

Fuel and Heating. — Messrs. Robinson, Edgerly, and Merrill. 

Text-Books and A2)2Xiratus. — Messrs. Dean, Edgerly, Bell, and 
Patten. 

Hepairs., Furniture, and Sui^plies. — Messrs. Edgerly, Devine, and 
Hall. 

Printiny and Stationery. — Messrs. Sanderson, Borden, and Edg- 
erly. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Borden, Hall, Merrill, and 
Edgerly. 

Truancy. — Messrs. Devine, Edgerl}-, and Hall. 

Emxjloyment of Children in Manufacturing Establisliments. — 
Messrs. Bell, Dean, Edgerly, and the Mayor. 



SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Dean, Borden, and Bell. 

Schools on Spring and Blodgett streets. — Mr. Sanderson, 

Schools on Franklin street. — Mr. Hall. 

East Grammar School. — Mr. Borden. 

Schools on Merrimack street. — Mr. Patten. 

Schools in Intermediate Building and Suburban School Xo. o. — 

Mr. Devine. 
Schools at Towlesville, Wilson Hill, and Bridge street.— Mr. Bell. 
Schools at Amoskeag, and Suburban School Xo. 1. — Mr. Robinson. 
Schools in Piscataquog.— Mr. Dean, 
Surburban Schools Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.— Mr. Merrill, 
Evening Schools, — Messrs. Sanderson and Hall. 
Music, — Messrs, Robinson and Devine. 



NAMES AND LOCATION OF SCHOOLS. 

1. High School, Beech street, 

2. Intermediate School, Manchester street. 

3. Xorth Gi'ammar School, Spring street. 

4. South " " Franklin street. 

5. East " " Lowell street. 

(5. Piscataquog Grammar School, Centre street 



329 



8. 


Middle 


9. 


'' 


10. 


.L 


11. 


" 


12. 


U 


13. 


'' 


14. 


ii 


15. 


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17. 


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18. 


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10. 


a 


20. 


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Amoskcag Grammar School, Amoskcaif. 
Middle Scliool 'No. 1, Blodgett street. 
" 2, Beech street. 
" 3, Beech street, 
" 4, Wilson Hill. 
" 5, Merrimack street. 
"■ 6, Merrimack street. 
'' 7, Franklin street. 
'' 8, Franklin street. 
"■ 9, Spring street. 
'' 10, Spring street. 
'' 1, Blodgett street. 

2, Spring street. 
" 3, Bridge street. 
•' 4, Towlesville. 
" 6, Wilson Hill. 
•' 7, Merrimack street. 
" 8, Merrimack street. 
"• 9, Manchester street. 
^' 10, Manchester street. 
'' 11, Franklin street. 
'' 12, Franklin street. 
" 13, Spring street. 
•' 14, SiJring street. 
'• 15, Piscataquog, Main street. 
•' 16, Piscataquog, Main street. 
•' 17, Piscataquog, River road. 
'' 18, Amoskeag, South. 
'•• 19, Amoskeag, !North. 
'' 20, Piscataquog, River road. 
'' 21, Piscataquog, Centre street. 
'' 1, Stiirk District. 

3, Bakersville, 
" 4, Gofte's Falls. 
'^ 5, Harvey District. 
" 6, Webster's Mills. 
*' 7, Hallsville. 
'' 8, Massabesic. 
"• 9, Mosquito Pond. 



22 



331 



REPORT OF CITY REGISTRAR. 



Office of City Registrar, Feb. 16,1871. 
To the City Councils of Manchester: 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to present herewith the 
Report of the deaths in the city of Manchester for the year 
1870. 

The whole number of deaths, males . . . 223 
" " " females . • .289 



Total . 


. 


. 503 


The deat 


is in each month 


were as follows : 




January 


. 44 


July . 


. 59 


February 


. 22 


August . 


. 50 


March 


. 41 


September 


. 52 


April 


. 28 


October 


. 42 


May . 


. 39 


November 


. 36 


June . 


. 36 


December 


. 54 




210 




293 


The birth 


places of those who died were as folio 


ws: 


Born in th( 


J United States 




. 362 


a 


Ireland 




. 65 


a 


Canada 




. 46 


a 


England 




•,;, 10 


a 


Scotland 




2 


a 


Germany 




2 




Unknown 




. 16 



503 
For a particular statement of the causes of death, I refer 
you to the accompanying table. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph E. Bennett, Registrar. 






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ANALYSIS (JF AYATEK TAKEN FKOM STEVENS' 
POND, AUGUST 9, 1870. 



130ST0N, St'pteinbor 7, 1870. 
Joseph B. Saavyek, 

Civil Engineer, Jlanchiatcr, JV. II. 
Sir, — The sample of water in a sealed glass demijolm, marked 
"Stevens Pond," and received from you, has been analyzed with 
the following results : 

It is clear, transparent, and free from unusual color, odor, or taste. 
It does not decompose after standing in a warm place for ten days, 
and is free from animal matter. This water contain: 

In one U. S. gallon. In 100,000 parts 

Vegetable organic matter, 1.10 1.83 

Mineral matter 1.17 1.95 

2.27 grains. 3.78 parts. 

Its degree of hardness, on Dr. Clark's scale, is 88-100; and its 
action on lead pipe is barely percei^tible, less than usual. 

This water is uncommonly pure, and suitable for general distri- 
bution in a large city, being very much purer than that derived 
from wells in inhabited districts, and above the average of pond 
water. Respectfully, 

S, Daxa Hayes, 

State^ Asswjer, Ilassachuseits. 



i25 



/ 



INDEX 



Analysis of Water from Stevens' Pond . . . . 


. 334 


Appropriations 


. 37 


Additions to City Library 


. 194 


Address, Mayor's Inaugural 


. 9 


Abatement of Taxes 


. 130 


Amoskeag Falls Bridge • 


. 80 


Balance sheet of Treasurer 


. 32 


Bridge, Amoskeag Falls 


. 80 


Bridge, Granite 


. 79 


Bridge across Cohas Brook 


. 113 


City Farm 


. 43 


Appraisal of property at .... 


. 158 


City Property 


. 154 


Teams 


. 40 


Library 


122 


Hall and Stores 


. 108 


Debt 


. 153 


Keduction of 


. 128 


Cement Pipe from Hanover Square . . • . 


. 125 


Commons ......... 


. 86 


Cemeteries, Keport of Committee on . . 


171 


Report of Treasurer .... 


. 172 


Cemetery, Pine Grove 


. 89, 172 


Valley 


. 90, 17 


Court-IIouse 


. IIG 


County Tax 


. 125 


Committees, standing 


. G 



336 



Donations to City Library 

Debt, City 

Discount on Taxes 

Debt, City, Eeduction of . 

Day Police 

Dog Tax, 1870 . . . . 

Finance Committee. Keport of . 
Fii-e Department 

Steamer Amoskeag . 
Fire King 
E. W. Harrington 
K, S. Bean . 
Pennacook Hose Company 
Hook and Ladder Company 
Engineers .... 
Miscellaneous 

Farm, City 

Inventory 



Government and Ofticers, 1870 . 

1871 . 

Granite Bridu^e .... 



Highways and Bridges 
District IN'o. 1 . 

Xo. -2 . 

No. 3 . 

Xo. 4 . 

Xo. o . 

Xo. . 

Xo. 7 . 

Xo. 8 . 

Xo. 9 . 

Xo. 10^. 

Xo. ll\ 

Xo. 12 . 

Xo. 13 . 
Highways, Xew . 



Incidental Ex^^enses . 
Invoice of City Farm Property 



337 



Insuraiiec .... 


. 








. 118 


Inaugural Address of Mayor 










'.) 


Irou Fence on Merrimack Squa 


re 








. 117 


Interest .... 










. 120 


Land sold from City Farm 










. 128 


Lighting Streets 










. 90 


Loan, Temporar}- 










. 127 


Library Building 










. 123 


Ijibrary, City 










. 122 


Eeport of Trustees 










. 179 


Librarian 










. ISO 


Treasurer 










. 183 


Donations 










. 189 


jSTew Books . 










. 193 


Militia . •. 










. 117 


]Mortuary Tal)lc 










. 332,333 


Night Watch . . . . 










29, 98 


New School-houses and lots 










. 135 


Officers, City . 










. 25 


Overseers of Poor, Report of . 










. 157 


Paupers off Farm 










. 39 


Police Department 










29, 97 


Police Station . . . . 










. 118 


Pine Grove Cemetery 










. 89, 172 


Payment of City Debt 










. 151 


Paving Streets . . . . 










. ()9 


Paving Canal Street . 










. 71 


Printing and Stationery 










. Ill 


Property, City . . . . 










. 1G8 


Property, School 










. 109 


Pieduction of Cit}^ Debt 










. 128 


Revenue Account 










. 35 


Reservoirs . . . . 










. 84 


Repairs of Buildings . 










. 114 


Repairs of School-houses . 










138,140, 175 


Report of Finance Committee . 










. 34 


Overseers of Poor 










. 157 



539 



licpoii of Committee on Cemeteries 

City Registrar 

Joint Standing Com. on Lands and Buildings 
Trustees of Library .... 
Committee on Repairs of School-liouses 
School Committee .... 
Superintendent of Public Instruction 



Salaries of Officers 

Sewers and Drains 

Suncook Yalley Railroad . 

School Expenses 

School-houses and Repairs 

School-houses and Lots 

School-house at Goife's Falls 

Schools, Evening 

School Report .... 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 

State Tax 



Teachers, names of 
Treasurer's Balance Sheet 
Teams, City 
Taxes, uncollected 
Temporary Loan 



Valuation, Taxes, etc. 
Vallev Cemetery 



Report of 



172 
331 
168 
179 
175 
217 
231 



. 119 

. 80 
. 125 
. 140 
138, 140 
. 135 
. 167 
. 149 



217 
231 
125 

272 



40 
157 
127 



152. 172 
. 90 



Waterius: Streets 



77 



«23 



e 



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