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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

PUBLIC DOCUMENT. 



_fx.^ 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



CITY OF MANCHESTER 



THE YEAR 1871. 




MANCHESTER: 
CAMl'BET.T. & HANSCOM, PRINTERS. is8!i KLM STREET 

18 7 2. 



-.\: 



%.. 



TWENTY-SIXTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF MANCHESTEll 



FOR THE riSCAL YEAIl EXDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1871, 



TOGETIIEU WITH 



OTIIliU ANXUAL KEPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO TiIK AFFAIRS OF 

THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. 
CAMl'ISKLL & IIAXSCOM, nUNTERS, 839 ELM STREET. 

18 7 2. 






CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



Ix BoAi:i> OF Common Counxil. 

AN OBDER authorizing the printing of the Twenty-Sixth Annual Re- 
port of tlie Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordekei), If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, That the Joint 
Standing Committee on Finance be and they are hereby authorized to pro- 
cure for the use of the inhabitants of said city, the printing of eighteen hun- 
dred copies of the Twenty-Sixth Annual Report of the Receipts and Ex- 
penditures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports of the Over- 
seers of the Poor, the Committee on City Farm, the Trustees, Librarian 
and Treasurer of the City Library, the School Committee and the Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction, the Committee on Cemeteries, the Com- 
mittee on Lands and Buildings, the Committee on School House Repairs, 
and the Board of Engineers of the Fire Department ; and that the expense 
thereof be charged to the appropriation for Printing and Stationery. 

January 22, 1872. Ix Boakd of Common Counxil. 
Passed. EDWIN KENNEDY, President. 

January 22, 1872. Ix Boaud of Mayor and Aldekmex. 
Passed in concurrence. P. C. CHENEY, Mayor. 

A true copy. 

Attest : JOSEPH E. BENNETT, City Cleuk. 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESS 



OF THE 



s^. JAMES A. WESTON, 

U A Y 11 , 



THE CITY COUNCILS OF MANCHESTER, 

DKIJVERED Cr.FORE THE TWO BRANCHES IX COXVE>fTIOW, 
JAXt'.VRY 2, 1872. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



An order to print the Valedictory of Ex-Mayor IVe-itoii and the I/sanyural of Mayor 

Cheney. 



Ordi:iu:d, If the Board of ^layor and Aldermen concur, that the City 
Clerk is hereby authorized to procure the printing of tliree hundred copies 
each of tlie Valedictory of Hon. James A. AVestou, aud the Inaugural 
Address of Hon. Person C. Clieuey, this day delivered before the several 
branches of the City Government, for the use of the City Councils. 

Jaxx-ary 2, 1872. 
In Board of Common Council, read a first time, and under a suspension 
of the rales read a second time and passed. 

THOS. W. LANE, Clerl: 

Januaky 2, 1872. 
In Board of IMayor and Aldermen. 
Read and passed in concurrence. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, C% Clerk, 



^OiLEDICTOEY MESSAGE. 



Gentlbmex of the City Councils : 

Assembled, as we are, to perform our last official acts 
of the municipal term now a,l>out to close, it is titting 
that a record of some of the more important doings of 
the year should be made, both in justice to ourselves, 
and for the information of those who are to succeed us. 
But first of all let us acknowledge the goodness of that 
Great Being xAio has bestowed upon us individually and 
collectively so many blessings, and who has, to such a 
degree vouclisafed to this municipality exemption from 
the dire calamities which have so fearfully afflicted 
other cities and states. And as "we entered upon our 
duties by invoking the aid and assistance of tliat Being 
who by His omnii)otent ])Ower has created the Universe, 
and who in his inhnite goodness has protected and pre- 
served all that the Universe contains, may w^e again 
recognize our dependence, and return to Him the Iiom- 
age of sincere and grateful hearts. 

One of our numl)er, who commenced the year full of 
hope and happiness, has been removed hence, in the 
midst of his usefulness, and ])efore his official duties had 
frdrly oi)ened upon him. The circumstances attending 
this sad event drew us in sympathy toward him, and we 
cannot fail to hold in faithful remembrance the name 
•of Alderman Flanders. 



/ ' 



FINANCES. 

Ill tlio brief review of wluit has been accouiplished 
during' tlie year, I desire first to invite your attention to 
the present, and to some extent to the prospective con- 
dition of the iinances of the city. Since the close of 
the late war to the present time there has been little 
change in the amount of our indebtedness. Many 
works of Ji i)ermanent character have been, and are still 
being carried forward, and all expenditures thus far 
have been met without any increase of our liabilities. 
But this condition of our hnances will continue no 
longer. 

The Legislatures of 1870 and 1871 made provisions 
for the partial reimbursement of cities and tov/ns, by 
the State, for war exi)enditures ; and the accounts are 
so far adjusted that a settlement can be had in a few 
days. The amount due the city of Manchester is not 
less than $125,000, and is payable in six per cent, bonds 
of the State, bearing interest from the first day of Jan- 
uary, 1872. This will reduce the indebtedness of the 
city about one-third, aiul to less than three per cent, on 
the assessed valuation. 

On the other hand the nominal indebtedness of the 
city is to be increased by the construction of vrater- 
works ; ])ut the Water Loan cannot strictly be consid- 
ered a debt, for the reason that the works them- 
selves represent a productive, and as I believe, ulti- 
mately a self-sustaining property, and should never be- 
come a burden upon the tax-payers. 

The following is an exhibit of the condition of the 
treasury on the first da\' of January, 1872 : 

Amount of fuiulcd debt Jan'y 1, 1871, $393,103 OQ 
Decrease during tlie year, . . . 6,000 00 

Amount of funded debt January 1, 1872, $387,100 00 

Am't of temporary loan Jan y 1, 1871, $20,726 00 
Increase during the year, . . . 1,444: 00 
Am't of temporary loan Jan'y 1, 1872, . $22,170 00 



Interest now due, estimated at, .... 9,000 00 

Outstandhio- bills due Jan'y 1, 1872, . . . 20,53158 



Total debt and interest Jan'y 1, 1872, . . . $438,80158 
Casli in the Treasury Jan'y 1, 1872, . $3,751 29 

Notes due the city, . . . . ■ . 4,270 40 
Interest on the same (^estimated), . . 450 00 

$8,471 69 



Net indebtedness Jan'y 1, 1872, .... $430,329 89 
Net indebtedness Jan'y 1, 1871, .... 403,539 28 



Increase of the debt during the year, . . . $26,790 61 

This increase of the liabilities of the city, is owing iu 
l)art to the constrnction of ne^v school houses, bills for 
which to the anionnt of $30,o9G.9G, having been charged 
to the accounts of 1871. 

Other large expenditures have been made, and some 
of them of a very unusual character, as follows : 

Aid furnished the City of Chicago, $15,000 ; paid on 
account of sewers and drains, $9,932.95 ; new highways, 
$12,()17.60 ; highway district No. 2, $9,251.48 ; Granite 
bridge, $1,542.10 ; Amoskeag Falls bridge, $2,919.34 ; 
commons, including iron fence, $7,455.66 ; Court House, 
$1,092.(>8 ; city bonds, $6,000 ; library buildings, $10,- 
971.24 ; tower and bell on No. 3 engine house, $1,330.67 ; 
and $1,723.06 advanced on account of the water works. 
The amount of taxes uncollected is $36,876.57. When 
the annual report of the Finance Committee shall be 
made, furnishing tlie details of the receix^ts and expen- 
ditures, the exhibit Avill be quite satisfactory. The rate 
of taxation has been less and the expenditures greater 
than during any year since the close of the war. 

SCHOOL HOUSES, 

During the year the Main Street school house has 
been comj)leted, by grading and fencing the grounds, 



cementing- the basement, and doing such otlier work as 
will render this honse one of the most convenient, com- 
fortable and substantial within the city. 

The committee who were authorized to purchase a lot 
and erect n school house in suburban District jS^o. 1, af- 
ter procuring an eligible site of one acre of Mr. John 
Oami)bell, aiul contracting for the foundation, found the 
sum appropriated too small to cany out the plan which 
they had adopted ; and as the season had so far advanced 
they did not deem it expedient to advertise a second 
time for i)roposals. The foundation is mostly laid and 
in condition to receive the superstructure early the com- 
ing season. 

A nevv^ furnace has l)een supplied to the Eraiddiu 
Street school house, concrete has been laid about this 
and other houses, several of them have bten ])ainted, 
and all have been kept in good condition. I believe, as 
a whole, the school buildings were never in l)etter re- 
pair than at the present time. 

The foundation of the Lincoln Street School House 
was completed in 1870, and a portion of the materials 
for its construction i)urchased and delivered ui)on the 
ground, so as to enable the v.ork to go forward early 
the succeeding season. Your committee, who were au- 
thorized to construct this house upon a, plan i)reviously 
adopted, taking advantage of this circumstance, and af- 
ter advertising for i)roposals, awarded the contract to 
Alpheus Gay, Esq., which v^as signed on the 24tli day 
of March. Work was commenced forthv.ith, and the 
Avails raised in the early summer months. The other 
work was x)uslied forward vigorously, and the building 
will be ready for occupancy the coming week. This struc- 
ture is built of bricks, with hollow and pilastered walls, 
ornamented with bricks, stones, and a variety of win- 
dows, bracketed cornice. Mansard roof and cupola. 

It is 71 X ()1, with Y.ings on the North and South 
sides 1(> X 31, and on the East and West sides 3 x 24, 



and is two stories, ^sitli a. basenicut and roof story, of 
the following- heights : basement story, 8 feet elear ; 1st 
story, 13 feet ; 2d story, 15 feet ; roof story, 15 feet. 

The l)asenient story is divided throngli the center 
both ways by 1'2-ineh brick walls, niaking fonr rooms 28 
X oo, and tvro rooms in the North and South Avings 15 x 
28. All of these rooms have a cement iluor, lathed and 
X^lastered ceiling, and vviiite washed brick walls, and are 
well lighted, heated and ventilated, and connected by 
do(n's, so that they can be used separately or together. 

There are eight school rooms, all separated by an 8- 
inch brick wall, and deafened floors, except in one in- 
stance the i)artition Itetween two rooms is omitted for 
the present, thus furnishing a hall that may be used un- 
til such time as the space will be refjuired for schools. 
When this time arrives, tlie large hall in the roof may 
lie linished. 

The main entrances are in the Xorth and KSoatli 
Aviugs, and consist of a liight of massive buttressed 
stone steps, heavy bracketed a-wiung, and a brick por- 
tico, giving an outside shelter of 150 s<piare feet to each 
entrance. 

The cupola, is 13 feet sijuare, and has an ornamental 
roof and cornice, and is surmounted Vv^ith a heavy 8-feet 
vane, contains a line-toned bell VvX'ighing 140G pouiuls, 
and a lirst-class tower clock. 

The building is warmed by four furnaces in the base- 
ment. Single seats and desks of the most approA^ed 
pattern have been proAided, and accomodations secured 
for four hundred pupils. 

It is estiniated by the architect that the sum of 814,- 
400.00 AA'ill be required to meet the bills uoav contracted, 
comx)lete the building, grade the grounds and inclose 
the lot with a suitable fence, so that the Avhole cost of' 
the structure, including improvements on the lot, Avill 
not exceed $45,000.00 

I take ideasure hi ackuoAvledging the valuable and 



10 

faithful services of G AV. Stevens, Esq., the areliiteet, 
to whose skill and g'ood judgment we are greatly in- 
debted for one of the finest and most substantial school 
houses in the State. 

CITY LIBRARY BUILDING. 

The City Library building was completed and passed 
into the hands of the Trustees in the month of July, 
and is now occupied in accordance with the original de- 
sign. The total cost of the building to the present time 
is $29,222.39, and I believe it is now complete in every 
particular excei)t a portion of the fencing around the 
lot. By the terms of the will of the late Oliver Dean 
the sum of $5,000.00 lias been generously donated to the 
Trustees and their successors in ofnce, w^ith the con- 
dition that the income sliall be apijlied to the purchase 
of books. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

The rapid expansion of the city limits in every di- 
rection, has called unusual attention to laying out, 
building and repairing highways ; and I trust our 
successors vrill not consider it trespassing upon their 
X)rovince, when I say that I fear our people do not yet 
appreciate the importance of locating streets early, be- 
fore buildings are placed upon the route, and of making" 
them hroad and regular, so as to conform to the general 
l>lan of the city. When cities about us are expending" 
thousands upon thousands, and even millions, to extend 
and widen their thoroughfares, which a nominal sum 
would have accomplished if attended to earlj-, we should 
take warning. When a new street is projected, the re- 
sults of the next hundred years, should be kept con- 
stantly^ in view. 

No year in the history of the city, have there been so 
many. streets laid out as during the past season, and in 



11 

Jill iiLstaiices Yvitli direct reference to what we expect 
tliey may become many years lieiice. Elm Street has 
been located North to land of the State Keform School, 
and South, to Baker Street, secnring- a thoronglifare one 
hundred feet in width, more than three miles in length 
and perfectly straight, with the exception of a slight an- 
gle at Lowell Street. Many other new and important 
streets have been laid out which I will not stop to enu- 
merate. This action of the Board of Mayor and Alder- 
men has made it necessary to apply a lavger amount of 
money for this department than was appropriated in the 
commencement of the year, the deticiency being made 
up by transfers from a reserved fund set apart for such 
contingencies. 

The great increase of the number of miles of roads 
to be kei)t in repair, and the extensive use of concrete 
pavements by our citizens for sidewalks, wliich have 
been graded at the expense of the city, have dravvu 
heavily ui)on the appro})riation for re])airs in District 
]^o. 2. The expenditures have increased from four or 
live thousand dollars, a fevv' years ago, to more tlian nine 
thousand dollars for the year about to close. 

One of the piers of the Amoskeag Falls Bridge which 
had become defective and dangerous from the action 
of logs and ice in the river, has been thoroughly re- 
X)aired. 

Both this bridge and the Granite Bridge have been 
replanked, and put in such condition as to require little 
or no repairs the coming year. The customary amount 
of paving has been done, by laying a section on Gran- 
ite Street in Ward 7, on Elm Street, from Central to 
Depot Streets, and on Manchester Street from Elm to 
the back street. 

In ansv/er to a very large and respectable petition, 
the Board of ]Mayor and Aldermen ordered a renumljer- 
ing of the streets. It is believed that this Vv^ork has 
been accomplished in so thorough a manner as to avoid 



12 

the recurreiK'e of another change. Plans of each street 
have l)eeii juepared and tiled ^vith tlie City Cleric for 
safe keeping-. 

SEWERS AND DRAIN'S. 

The freqnent flooding of Ehn Street during a heavy 
and sudden fall of rain, and the necessity of a sewer of 
greater depth than the old one, has long Iseen held as a 
sufhcient reason for laying an additiona.l sewer of such 
capacity and depth as to remedy the faults of the one 
constructed twenty-four years ago. 

This work has been undertaken and a sewer 3 ft. 8 in. 
by 2 ft. in. has been built from 3ierrimack Street to 
Amherst vStreet, a distance of 8!)") feet, and requiring 
145,000 of brick in its construction. The work was 
carefully examined by men passing through the sewer 
after its completion. Ko defect of any kind could l)e 
discovered, and there can be no doubt that it v.iil answer 
the requirements of the city without rei)airs as long as 
this municipality shall exist. 

The cost of the extension of this sewer will not he so 
great as that already constructed, as tlie size will dimin- 
ish as the work proceeds northv;ard. A branch ceinent 
sev.er has been extended up ^Manchester Street from 
Elm Street, 153 feet in length and 15 by22 inches inside 
diameters, and laid of suthcient depth to accommodate 
the basements of the new buildings iu that locality. 
Many other sewers ha^e been constructed in various 
parts of the city, all of wliichare carefully laid down on 
a plan kept for the purpose. The total expenditure 
cliargeable to the department is Jj'O 951,60. 

C03IM0XS. 

The new fence conmienced last year has been com- 
pleted around Tremont Stpiare, aiul a concrete vralk has 
been laid from the IS^ortlnvest to tlie Southeast corner. 



13 

Two v.nlks have also been laid the entive length of Con- 
cord Square, and the wall around the reservoir has been 
repaired, and granite coping j)laced upon the same so as 
to raise it to a proi)er heiglit to correspond with other 
improvements ah-eady made. The proximity of tliis 
])ond to the new walks rendering it somewhat dangerous 
to pedestrians passing that way, an iron railing has 
been ordered to be erected, but is not yet put up. 

The iron fence around jMerrimack Square has been 
completed on the North and South sides, and both of 
the corners on Chestnut Street have been turned. Three 
gates have been purchased, and two of them set up, the 
remaining one being intended for the East side where 
only the fence is not yet constructed. The bank wall 
around the pond has been completed, and the Scpiare 
otherwise nuich improved by tilling up the low and moist 
portions with surplus earth. Edge stones have been 
placed the entire length on the Merrimack Street side 
in anticipation of a concrete vv^alk the coming Springs 
when the new tilling shall have settled. 

A large sum of money has been expended within the 
last three years in improvements upon this connnon, 
and I believe it has received the approl)ation of our fel- 
low citizens. A comparatively small outlay will finish 
the Vx ork now in progress, and when completed we can 
safely boast of the best inclosed, and otherwise one of 
the most beautiful public squares of its size in the 
Union. 

I trust I may be pardoned for referring to a subject 
which has received some attention, and which I have 
refrained from making the occasion of a special conmiu- 
nication only by reason of the attention required by 
other momentous (luestions. While f>ur people never 
tire of the commendations bestoAved upon the donors of 
all our i)ublic scpiares, for their wisdom and liberality, 
no adequate pro\ ision is being made for the future ; and 
while all the more i)rosperous and growing cities, espe- 



14 

cially in the West, are establishing' extensive public 
parks, where the people can retire from the noise and 
bustle of busy streets, for pleasure or recreation, we are 
inactive. I greatly fear that posterity will deplore the 
want of wiser and more far-seeing action in this regard 
on the i)art of this eminently busy and practical people. 

I v.'ill venture the suggestion that such a park as 
would do honor to the city should contain not less than 
two hundred acres, and it matters little how wild, un- 
cultivated and valueless the spot may be, provided only 
that it contains such natural advantages as will facili- 
tate the desired improvements. 

There are several locations about the city well adap- 
ted by nature for this j)urpose, that at the present time 
could l)e ol)tained at reasonable x)rices. 

The enterx)rise need not be burdensome to the city, 
as after the first outlay for the land, the improvements 
may be gradual and more or less extensive according to 
circumstances. Such a retreat would eventually become 
the great attraction of Manchester, and its establish- 
ment would do imperishable honor to the City Council 
that makes the necessary provision for its accomplish- 
ment. 

WATER-WORKS. 

Probably no subject has ever come before the peoi)le 
and City Councils of so much importance as the intro- 
duction of water; and no (piestion has ever received 
more careful attention. The discussion both in i)ublic 
and private, has extended over quite a number of years, 
and has been earnest and sometimes acrimonious ; but 
it is gratifying that generally the views and opinions 
expressed have been candid, and characterized by a sin- 
cere wish that such i)lan should be adopted as would be 
conducive to the best interests of the municipality. For- 
tunately some of the most difficult and embarrassing 
questions are now settled, and history will accord to 



15 

this City Council the honor of organizing and establish- 
ing the enterprise on a basis ensuring the successful 
construction of the works. It is probable that within 
the next twelve months we shall arrive at the result so 
earnestly desired, and enjoy the blessing '^f a bountiful 
supply of water. 

It may not be unprofitable to review more in detail 
the proceedings during the year relative to this matter. 
In my last inaugural address it was recommended that 
the services of experienced and disinterested parties be 
obtained for the purpose of giving careful attention to 
the sulrject, but having more particular reference to the 
source of supply, and of furnishing to the City Councils 
the result of such investigation for their information 
and guidance. 

Accordingly on the 7tli of February following, an 
order was i^assed by which a joint special committee, 
of which the Mayor was chairman, was instructed in 
substance to carry out my suggestions in this re- 
si)ect. After careful inquiries this committee secured 
the services of the Hon. William J. McAlpine, one 
of the most celebrated hydraulic engineers in the 
country, who has laid before you his views and recom- 
mendations, both in a i^ublic lecture, and by a 
written report which has been printed for general 
circulation. 

The general desire of our citizens, so far as could 
be ascertained, being in favor of the construction, 
ownership and management of the works by the city, 
the committee before referred to, made a report on 
the sixth day of June, to the City Councils, in which 
they recommended that the State Legislature, then 
about to assemble, be applied to for such legislation 
as would be necessary to enable the city to assume 
the control and direction of the euterxmse. 

The same committee, being charged with this duty, 
procured the passage of "An act to enable the City 



IG 

of Mnncliester to construct v/ater works," T\iiicli was 
approved on tlie 30tli day of the same month. Im- 
jnediately foUowing (July 11th), I thought it proper 
to make a special communication to the City Coun- 
cils in which this subject was reviewed at some 
length, and in which the passage of "An ordinance 
in relation to water works," a draft of which ac- 
companied the communicjition, was recommended. 

The proposed ordinance was printed, and received 
a very careful examination, being freely and fully 
discussed in both boards, and after some moditica- 
tion was passed on the lirst day of August by a yea 
and nay vote, without a single dissenting voice. 

On the same evening the Water Commissioners,. 
l)rovided for in the enalding act and ordinance, were 
elected, and on the seventh day of August they met 
and perfected their organization.* 

I have been thus particular in reviewing the ac- 
tion of the City Councils relating to this subject in 
consequence of its imi)ortance, and because in after 
years it will be regarded as a prominent event in 
the history of the city. 

A statement of the action of the Water Commis- 
sioners, tliough more ])roperly coming from the 
board, may not be out of place here. 

A resolution was passed by the City Councils, in- 
structing the Commissioners "to examine and care- 
fully consider the Holly system of water works, so 
called, for the purpose of determining whether such 
system is not the most suitable one to be adopted 

* The lirst board ot Water Commissioners was constituted as foliows: 
E. A. Straw, E. AY. Harrington, Wm. P. Newell, Aretas Blood, Alpheus 
Gay, A. C. Wallace, and James A. Weston, Mayor, ex officio. The board 
organized by the choice of E. i\.. Straw, President, and S. N. Bell, Clerk. 
The expiration of the term of service of each, was then determined by 
lot in the following order :—Wm. P. Newell, Straw, Blood, Gay, Wallace, 
Harrington. On the IDtli of Sept. Wm. P. Newell was re-elected for a 
full term of six years from th. lirst Tuesday of January, 1872. 



17 

for the contemplated water supply for the city.''' 
"That they likewise be instructed to examine an 3^ 
other system of water works to Vvhicli their attention 
may be called, in order that the best, most econom- 
ical, and advantageous mode of supplying the city 
with water may be adopted." 

In i)ursuance of these instructions most of the 
board visited Ogdensburg, Montreal, Norwich, Wor- 
cester, and other i)laces where works upon different 
idans were in operation. While at i>rorwich they 
made the acquaintance of Col. J. T. Fanning, who 
had charge of constructing the works at that place, 
and who was temporarily employed to make such 
surveys as were necessary to determine whether a 
sufficient quantity of water could be collected and 
stored at Chase's meadow, and in the old Burnham 
mill pond, — an arrangement similar to that adopted, 
and in successful oi)eration at Norwich. The result 
of the surveys was such, that in the opinion of the 
engineer it would not be i^rudent to exi)end the 
amount required to carry out this fjlan, as the suj)- 
ply would not i)robably be sufficient for any considera- 
ble number of years, and to supplement the works, 
would require a large outlay. 

Attention was then directed to the stream leading 
from Sawyer's Pond in Hooksett, which is thought 
to be the most available source from which a satis- 
factory quantity of water can be obtained by gravi- 
tation. Some xn^eliminary estimates were made of 
the cost of introducing water from this source, as 
compared with similar estimates on the Massabesic 
Pond route. 

These estimates not being sufficiently in detail to 
warrant a decision by the Watei* Commissioners, fur- 
ther and more accurate estimates were ordered 011 



18 

the last two named routes, and are now in i)rogress. 
In a week or two the result will be known. 

The Commissioners obtained i)ermission of the 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Company to use tempora- 
rily the water from their reservoir through certain 
pil)es for fire purposes only, and on the ninth day of 
October it w^as voted to lay a water-pipe, eight 
inches in diameter, through liortions of Pine, Pearl 
and Merrimack Streets. This route was subsequent- 
ly modified by changing a i)ortioii of the route from 
Pine to Chestnut Street. 

Manufacturers of the various kinds of water-pipe, 
§'ates, and hydrants, w^ere at once invited to hand 
in proposals for the worli. The contract for fur- 
nishing the pipe was awarded to the American Gas 
and Water-pipe Company, of Jersey City, at $1.15 
per linear foot, which includes trenching and back- 
filling, setting the gates, gate boxes and hydrants. 

The contract for furnishing the gates was award- 
<ed to the Ludlow Yalve Manufacturing Company of 
'Troy, X. Y., for 811.80 each. 

.In o satisfactory pattern of hydrant being present- 
ed, a contract was subsequently made with the Bos- 
ton Machine Company, to furnish the number re- 
quired for $15.00 each. The contractors began and 
prosecuted the work of manufacture and laying the 
pipe with the intention and expectation of complet- 
ing the whole amount this season. When about 
1,300 feet had been laid, the extreme cold w^eather, 
coming on much sooner than usual, put a stop to 
further progress. 

Fifteen hydrants have been set on the line of 
the pipe laid, and in a iev>- days the water will be 
let on and will be furnished in case of fire in 
ample quantities at the intersection of streets. 

While it is a matter of regi'et that the whole 
line of ])ipe as contemplated, could not have been 



ID 

Itiid this Fall, it is gratifying to know that the por- 
tion of the eity the least protected, and where the 
hazard has been considered the greatest, will soon 
be furnished with ample facilities for the extinguish- 
ment of tires. 

It is impossible to furnish a statement of the 
expenditures on account of this department at this 
time, as the water-i)ipe was warranted, and has not 
been accepted, and no settlement made with the 
contractors. The amount already i)aid is $1,723.00. 

The Finance Committee has prepared "Water 
Loan" bonds of the city to the amount of $400,000, 
as provided in the ordinance, dated January 1st, 
1872, which will soon be ready for delivery. It 
will thus be seen that we have fairly entered upon 
this great and important undertaking, and its suc- 
cessful completion is placed beyond a doubt, and 
I cannot forbear in this connection to congratulate 
the people of Manchester upon the very happy 
pros})ect in relation to this all-engrossing subject 
of Vt'ater supply. 

COXCLUSIOX. 

Gentlemen of the City Council : 

Our official connection is about to cease. The 
■manner we have discharged our duty is sul)mitted 
to our constituents ; the events of the year, Avith 
whatever has been accomplished, must become a i)art 
of the history of the city. We hope to receive 
the approval of our fellow citizens, and that pos- 
terity may find our plans to have been projected 
upon sound i^rinciples, our labors faithfully iJer- 
formed, and that something has been done to ad- 
vance and strengthen the gTeat interests entrusted 
to our keeping. T embrace this opportunity to ten- 
4er my thanks to all the members of the City 



20 

Government for their faithful co-operation in the 
discharge of our official duties and for the courtesy 
which I have universally received at their hands ; 
and I desire especially to express to the i^eople of 
Manchester my sincere and heartfelt gratitude for 
the confidence they have given me. I Avould it were 
in my i)ower to make knovrn in more fitting terms 
my appreciation and return a l)etter recompense for 
the favors they have bestowed upon me. With the 
humble prayer that the fullest of life's blessings 
may attend you and them, and bidding those God- 
speed who are about to assume the responsibilities 
of office, we surrender the several departments of 
our municipal government. 



GOVEENMENT AND OFFICERS 

OF THE 

CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

1871. 



MAYOR. 

JAMES A. WESTON 



CITY CLERK. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1 — George W. Thayer, Ward 5 — ■Daniel Connor, 

Ward 2 — Henry Lewis, Ward 6 — John Hosley, 

"VV '^ i *William Flanders, Ward 7 — Wm. N. Chamberlin, 

^^^ IfPeterK. Chandler, Ward 8— William G. Everett. 
Ward 4 — James S. Clieney, 



PRESIDENT COMMON COUNCIL. 

William R. Patten. 

''Died Feln-uarv 7, 1871. fElected March U, 1871. 



22 

CLERK OF COMilOX COUNCIL. 

Elbridire D. Hadlev. 



C031M0X COUNCIL. 



Ward 1— Israel W. Dickey, 
Oscar M. Titus, 
Sylvanus B. Putnam. 

Ward 2 — Henry W. Powell, 
Dana D. Towne, 
John C. Smith. 

Ward 3 — Xehemiah S. Bean, 
George R. Simmons, 
Henry C. Reynolds. 

Ward 4— William R. Patten, 
Jacob B. Hartwell, 
Joseph B. Sawyer. 



Ward 5 — Lawrence Foley,- 
John L. Kennedy.. 
Austin O'Malley, 
Ward 6 — Jacob J. Abbott, 
Edwin Kennedy, 
Jeremiah Hodge. 
Wai;d 7 — William M. Shepherd, 
James C. Russell, 
Benjamin K. Parker. 
Ward 8 — Harris J. Poor, 

Albert A. Woodward- 
Silas A.- Felton.- 



CITY MESSENGER. 

William Stevens. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — Messrs. Bean, Reynolds andE. Kennedy; the Mayoi- 
and Alderman Thayer. 

Accoitnts. — Aldermen Lewis and Everett ; Messrs. Hartwell, 
Felton and Simmons. 

Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Chandler and Connor; 
Messrs. Sawyer, Shepherd and Poor. 

Public Instruction. — Aldermen Everett and Cheney; Messrs. 
Powell, Smith and Reynolds. 

Streets. — Aldermen Hosley and Chamberlin ; Messrs. Bean, Fel- 
ton and Abbott. 

City Farm. — Tlie Mayor and Alderman Hosley ; Messrs. Rus 
selJ, Dickey and Woodward. 



23 

Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Clieney and Cliamberlin ; 
Messrs. Shepherd, Foley and Russell. 

Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Everett and Ilosley ; 
Messrs. J. L. Kennedy, Towne and Putnam. 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Chamberlin and Cheney ; Messrs. 
Simmons, SaAvyer and Dickey. 

Claims. — Aldermen Thayer and Lewis ; Messrs. Ileynolds, 
Hodge and Powell. 

House of Correction. — Aldermen Connor and Chandler ; Messrs. 
Poor, Titus and O'Malley. 

Military Affairs. — Aldermen Chamberlin and Thayer ; Messrs. 
Putnam, Smith and Towne. 

Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Chandler and Everett ; Messrs. 
WoodAvard, J. L. Kennedy and Parker. 



STANDING C05OIITTEES IN IJOAED OF JIAYOK AND ALDKUMEN. 

Enrollment. — Aldermen Everett and Thayer. 

Bills in Second Reading. — Aldermen Lewis and Chamberlin. 

lAcenses. — Aldermen Chandler and Hosley. 

Mar shaX s Accounts. — Aldermen Ilosley and Connor. 

Setting Trees. — Aldermen Connor and Cheney. 

Market. — Aldermen Chenev and Everett. 



STANDING COJIMITTEES IN BOARD OF COM.AION COUNCIL. 

Elections and Returns. — Abbott, Parker and Foley. 

Bills in Second Heading. — E. Kennedy, Titus and Simmons. 

Enrollment. — Hodge, Sawyer and Hartwell. 



ASSESSORS. 

Moses O. Pearson, Maurice F. Sheehan, 

Horace P. Simpson, Ellnidge G. Haynes, 

*William P. Newell, Horatio Fradd, 

fJohn F. Woodlnny, George W. Pinkerton, 

Jo&'cph Melvin. 

* Resigned. t Elected to fdl vacancy. 



24 

ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Josepli E. Bennett, Isaac Whittemore. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Samviel S. Moulton, Patrick Sheelian 

Saywarcl J. Young, *John Morse, 

Jeremiah Stickney, fH. W. Savory, 

Moses E. George, Isaac Lewis, 

George H. Colby. 



SGIIOOI. COMMITTEE. 



James A. Weston, ex officio. Wm. R. Patten, ex officio. 

Henry C. Sanderson, Patrick A. Devine, 

Marshall P. Hall, William P. Merrill, 

Thomas Borden, James Dean, 

Samuel N. Bell, DeLafayette Robinson. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Joseph G. Edgerly. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Nathan P. Hunt. Office — Patten's Building. 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR. 

Henry R. Chamberlin. Office — City Hall. 



DEPUTY COLLECTOR. 

Harrison D. Lord. Office — Union Building. 

* Died Sept. 15, 18T1. t Elected to fill vacancy. 



'Zi) 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIRARY. 

Hon. Daniel Clark, Hon. Samuel N. Bell, 

William P. Newell, Waterman Smith, 

Hon. Wm. C. Clarke, Hon. E. A. Straw, 

Phinelias Adams, Wm. R. Patten, ex officio, 

Hon. James A. Weston, ex officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Charles H. Marshall. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Justice. 
Samuel Uiiton. Office — Merchants' Exchange. 

Assistant Justice. 
Elijah M. ToplifF. O^ce— Patten's Building. 

City Marshal. 
William B. Patten. Office— Qiiy Hall. 

Assistant 3Iarshal. 
John D. HoAvard. 

Night 'Watchmen. 

Thomas L. Quimby, William H. Newhall, 

Patrick Doyle, John C. Colburn, 

James Duffy, David Thayer, 

William T. Fogg, Hugh Ramsay, 

Hezekiah H. Noyes, John F. Cassidy, 

Wm. R. Forsaith. 

Day Police. 
Horatio W. Longa, Henry Bennett. 





26 




Constables. 


William B. Patten, 




John D. Howard, 






Anson Merrill. 




Police Officers. 


William B. Patten, 




John D. Howard, 




Thomas L. Quimby, 




Patrick Doyle, 




James Duffy, 




William T. Fogg, 





Daniel K. White, 
Harrison D. Lord. 



William H. Newhall, 
John C. Colburn, 
David Thayer, 
Hugh Ramsay, 
Henry Bennett, 
Horatio W. Longa, 
Hezekiah H. Noyes. 



Special Police. 



John Cassidy, 
William Stevens, 
Heniy W, Powell, 
George W. Butterfield, 
Albert F. Quimby, 
Andrew J. Dickey, 



Leonard Shelters, 
Elbridge G. Woodman, 
Charles Canfield, 
Hollis C. Hunton, 
Jonathan Y. McQueston.. 
Nathaniel Baker, 2d, 



William R. Forsaith. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 

OF THE 

HON. PERSON C. CHENEY 

MAYOR, 

TO THE 

CITY COL^CILS OF MA:N CHESTER, 

DELIVF-RED BE1<-0RE THE TWO BRANCHES IX^ COXVENTIOX,- 
JAXUARY 2, 1872. 



ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

The aiinual return of tlie organization of our City 
Goveriunent l:>riug's with it changes and new responsi- 
bilities. I appear before yon, in o])edience to flie wishes 
of my fellow citizens to assume the duties of mayor. It 
is not without some hesitation that I enter upon the dis- 
charge of these duties ; but, sincerely believing in an 
overruling Providence, and trusting implicity in his di- 
vine assistance, and ivu owing, too, that I am to be sur- 
rounded by men wise in counsel and of large ex- 
Ijerience, who are interested with me in the successful 
administration of our municipal aftairs, I shall proceed 
briefly and contidentlj^ to make such suggestions and 
reconnnendations as seem to me advisable ; it being un- 
derstood that they are made upon such information as I 
am able to obtain through the several departments to 
which I may allude. 

We have, during the year just closed, witnessed in 
different parts of the country, some of the most terrible 
disasters which have ever been the lot of any i^eople. 
Hundreds of our fellow beings have fallen victims to 
the devouring element of fire. We have seen whole 
cities, in this way, suddenly swept out of existence ; 
l)estilence has visited others, and others still have been 
subject to dissension and riot. It has been our good 
fortune to escape these direful calamities. We have 
looked with wonder and admiration upon the grand and 



30 

•snM'ime si)ectacle of the heart of the nations of hotli con- 
tinents, as touched with sympathy and pity. The noble 
and generous response to the calls from Chicago and 
Peshtigo have been as from a divine source. I need not 
say that we, as a city, have shared in this response. Our 
hearts felt the inspiration of the moment, and our tears 
were mingled with the tears of our suffering fellow 
countrymen ; and, what is better, we manifested the 
sincerity of our feelings in the aid we made haste to 
render. It is a i)]easant thought that, while we have 
contributed to alleviate the distress of others, the more 
noble purpose has been served of keeping alive iritliiu 
ourselves the higher and better feelings of our nature. 
Who will say that our city will not be all the more 
l)rosperous for having, in the hour of need, placed her- 
self on record as the friend of humanity ? Her success 
to-day is all the most sanguine could desire. New 
branches of industry are being introduced in every di- 
rection, and we may justly feel a pride in our rai)id 
growth. Let it be our aim to meet the demands that 
may be made upon us, in a comprehensive and liberal 
view, and in such a manner that the future interests of 
the cit}" will best be subserved. 

In calling your attention to the matter of finance, it 
is not, perhaps, necessary for me to suggest that in our 
expenditures that policy is best v/hich ultimately makes 
the best return, even though its principal benefit may 
not be apparent during our administration. Wliile I 
would recommend much thought and great caution in 
your appropriations I would not have you forget that it 
is of the utmost imi^ortance that we keep x^ace with the 
increasing demands which are ever attendant upon a 
prosi)erous and growing city. I submit the statement 
of the treasurer, which is as follows : 



oi 

STATiaiKNT OF TIIK CITY DEBT, JANUAliY 1, 1872. 

Amount fiuuled debt, Jan. 1, 1871, . $393,100 00 
Decrease duvino- the year, . . . C,000 00 



Amount funded January 1, 1872, . . . $387,100 00 
Am't of temporary loan Jan. 1, 1871, . 20,726 00 
Increase during tlie year, . . . 1,444 00 



Amount of temporary loan Jan. 1, 1872, . . $22,170 00 

Interest now due estimated at .... 9,000 00 

Outstanding bills due January 1, 1872, . . . 20,531 58 



Total interest and debt due January, 1871, . $438,801 58 

Cash in tlie treasury January 1, 1872, . $3,751 29 
Notes due the city, .... 4,270 40 

Interest on the same, .... 450 00 

• $8,471 G9 



Net indebtedness January 1, 1872, . . . 430,329 89 

1, 1871, .... 403,539 28 



Increase during tlie year, ..... $26,790 61 

Our present valuation, as sliown by tlie last return, is 
$11,365,162 00, wliicli is an increase of $654,010 00 over 
that of tlie previons year. 

The whole sum raised last year was $236,639. 74, of 
which Yv-as paid — 

\ 

Por State tax, $50,502 00 

For County tax, 15,947 47 

Leaving for municipal purposes, . . 170,130 27 

$236,639 74 

The rate of taxation for 1871 was $2.08 on $100, while 
in 1870 it was $2.18. 

It is a gratifying fact to learn that we are to have re- 
funded hy the State something lilvc one-third of the debt 



incurred by tlie war, and that, too, at a most opportune 
time. I understand this amount to he about $125,000, 
and to be paid in State bonds, which are soon to be is- 
sued. Our State tax will be very much less this year 
than for the past few years, as a less sum was aiyproiyria- 
tecl to diminish tlie State debt. This new source of reve- 
nue from the State bonds, and the decrease in the State 
tax, will obviate the necessity of a special appropria- 
tion to meet that part of the funded debt Avhich falls 
due during the year, and which is one bond of $20,000 
on twenty-live years' time, bearing date of July 1, 1847, 
becoming due the first of next July ; one bond of $1,500, 
on three years' time, dated August 1, 1809, becoming 
due August 1 ; one note to Xehemiah Hunt, on twenty 
years' time, of $3,000, given February 26, 1852, matur- 
ing the 2Gth of the next month. The four hundred 
thousand dollars in bonds, issued for the construction 
of the Water Works, are nearly ready to put into the 
market. With the State bonds, which we shall have, to 
make use of, it is hoped that these can be disposed of 
at par, as may be required. 

SCHOOLvS. 

That the government and institutions of our country 
may meet with uninterrui)ted lu'osi^erity, there is noth- 
ing of more A'ital imi)ortance than the education of our 
children and the success of our i)ublic schools. I would, 
in addition to what has been done in former years, urge 
upon you the imi)ortance of liberal and generous action 
toward the means of education. Our school-rooms 
should be well-lighted, airy, warm, and attractive in 
every way, that the children may consider it a delight 
to be present, and crave the knowledge which is of so 
nuich importance to the future well-being of our repub- 
lic. I would especially urge upon parents the impor- 
tance of visting the schools themselves, and the neces- 



sity of constant attendance on the i)art of their chil- 
dren. As to their exact condition I wouhl refer you to 
the full report of our Superintendent of Public In- 
struction. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

Your ap])ropriation for nev/ school houses last year 
was $20,000. This sum was all expended upon the Lin- 
coln-Street school house, and the further sum of $11,- 
388.88 has been expended ui)on this building- during' the 
year, while the upper rooms are yet uniinished, and the 
fences, walks, and shade trees are unprovided for. 

The City Councils voted last spring to build a new 
house in the Stark District, at an exi)ense of $3,000. 
The foundation only is laid. There are also two rooms 
in the new house at Piscataquog which are yet untui- 
ished. A sum adequate to complete these several build- 
mgs, you will need to provide for. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Our new City Library building is now comi)leted, and 
was first occupied last September. It is a building of 
great architectural beauty and built in the most thorough 
and substantial manner, reflecting alike credit to the city 
and the noble i)urpose for w^hich it was erected. It is 
well understood that we are indebted to the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company for the lot on which this build- 
ing stands. The exi)ense of the structure, about twenty- 
nine thousand dollars, has all been defrayed by past ap- 
propriations. 

By the Avill of the late Hon. Oliver Dean, M. D., 
$5,000 are donated, the interest of Avhich is to be an- 
nually expended in the purchase of iiew books. This 
liberal gift is received by us all with much i)leasure ; and 
the remembrance of one of our earliest business men 
will ever be cherished with gratitude. 
3 



34 

There is connected ^vitli the library a spacious and 
magnificent reading room, very inviting- in its ai)pear- 
ance ; and, I am happy to learn, it is atibrding valuable 
information to a large class of our citizens, who make 
it a place of frequent resort. Four hundred and sev- 
enty-eight new volmnes have been added to the library 
during the year, making 15,408 in all. 

I'OLICE DEPAETMEXT. 

We doubtless all agree as to the necessity an<l imi)©!-- 
tance of having the Police Department in as perfect 
and efRcient a condition as x>ossible. AVe cannot hope 
to maintain good order and quiet Avithout scrutinizing 
with great care this i)art of our municipal regulations. 
You are aware that Ave have no one clothed with the 
proper authority to superintend i)ersonally the night 
force of our police, it being impossible for our city mar- 
shal to be on duty both day and night. The importance 
of delegating full poAATT to some energetic and prudent 
man, Avhose sole duty it shall be to look after this par- 
ticular branch, Avill readily suggest itself to your minds. 
I notice in the city marshal's room a plan, di-awn in 
1857, for an addition to the City Hall building, by AA'hich 
greater security and convenince may lie had in the 
transaction of city business, and a more respectable 
place provided for our unfortunate fellow beings who 
find temporary lodgment there. This subject has been 
referred to and discussed at A^arious times ever since ; 
other plans haA^e been drawn, and orders passed to rem- 
edy this shameful CAil ; but I understand it to be in 
precisely the same condition it AA^as in fifteen years ago. 

A x)ersonal examination by you of Avhat is known as 
"our lobby" aaiII, I dou1)t not, result in some immediate 
action by Avhich this great wrong Avill be made right, 
and one painful topic be disposed of in A\Titing an in- 
augural address. 



o.> 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Oiiv Fire Department is all we could reasonably liope 
for or desire ; prompt and efficient upon all occasions, 
working together with the most perfect good feeling, 
and each striving to do his whole duty. We have been 
remarkjibly fa^'ored by the absence of fires of any con- 
siderable magnitude during the past year ; but our ex- 
perience and observation teach us that we cannot be too 
Avatchful or do too much to control the fiery element. 

Other cities, no larger than ours, are using with suc- 
cess the Electric Fire Alarm Telegraph, and I would 
suggest that you take measures to inquire into the i)rac- 
ticability of its adoption here at an early day. It can 
be introduced here partially, so that its effect may be 
demonstrated, at an expense of about six thousand dol- 
lars ; while the necessary apparatus for the v/hole city 
would involve an additional expense of about foi'U* thou- 
sand dollars more, which could be added at any time 
when it was thought expedient. 

WATER WOEK^^. 

I 

The Board of Water Commissioners are making such 
progress as they can in introducing a supply of v/ater, 
and a full reiiort from them will soon be made. Per- 
mission has been obtained from the Amoskeag Manu- 
facturing Company to temporarily tap the main pipe 
leading to their reservoir, at the corner of Brook and 
Chestnut streets, with an eight-inch pipe ; and contracts 
made for laying seven thousand feet, with the necessary 
hydrants. Already about four thousand feet of this 
pipe, with fifteen hydrants attached, have been laid, 
running south, and diverging east and Vvcst to the most 
important points. The contractors require that some 
little time should elapse after the pipe is laid, before 
filling it with water, so that the cement may become 
hard and the pipe durable. It is the intention that this 



3G 

work shall be a i)art of the permanent supply when the 
water works are comi)leted. An engineer has been se- 
cured, and immediate measures will be taken to deter- 
mine the most feasible source of introduction. It gives 
me great pleasure to find in the Board a disposition to 
look at this matter in a fair and imi)artial manner, and 
that no decision will be arrived at until after the fullest 
investigation. In the meantime, let us congratulate 
ourselves that we are to have an abundant sui)i)ly of 
fresh water, and that, too, it is believed, in a way that 
will be nearly or quite self-sustaining, and not exorbi- 
tant in price to those who may use it. 

HIGHWAYS, BRIDGES, SEWERS, AND DRAI:N'S, 

Are all matters of great importance, to which much 
time and attention should be given. As I become more 
familiar with their condition and wants, I shall doubt- 
less desire to communicate with you thereon His Hon- 
or, Mayor Weston, has, in his valedictory, made a de- 
tailed statement on these several subjects, to which I 
iiiost respectfully refer you for further information. 

COMMONS. 

'Our commons have been very much improved and 
beautified during the last few years, and they now re- 
flect great credit upon our City Government. A small 
amount of money expended annually for still further 
improvements cannot fail to bring good returns, as these 
commons are conducive to the health, happiness, and 
pleasure of a large class of our citizens. 

The iron fence around Merrimack Square is completed, 
excepting the east side. The effect is surprisingly beau- 
tiful, and you will undoubtedly decide to complete the 
work during the coming year. 



6i 



CEMETERIES. 



All appropriation of $300 Avas made last year to tlie 
Yalley Cemetery, by wliicli its attractiveness and beau- 
ty may be continued. I am not advised that this ceme- 
tery or the Pine Grove Vv' ill require aid aside from its le- 
gitimate receipts. 

MILITARY, AND SOLDIERS' MOXUMBNT. 

We have now, in the city, five military companies, all 
of which, vv'e hope, will continue to exist and be kept in 
a high state of efficiency. All needful encouragement 
to this end should be given them. We should not too 
soon forget the imiiortance nor underrate the value of 
our citizen soldiery. To them v/e are indebted for all 
that we are or can ever hope to be. Bravely did thej^ 
come to the rescue in the hoiu' of peril, and freely give 
their lives that we might enjoy the blessings of to-day. 
In our prosperity, we must not forget these great sacrifices, 
and wo shall be wanting in justice and tender recollec- 
tion if we fail to place the names of our heroic dead up- 
on some conspicuous tablet erected to their memory. 
I hope you will give this matter your serious consider- 
ation in making your appropriations. 

CITY FARM. 

It will be remembered that during the jeav 1870, there 
were sold from the City Farm tvv^enty and three-fourths 
acres of land, the whole sales amounting to $8,878. (>2. 
During this last year no sales of land have been made. 
I am advised that there is much more that might be 
disposed of with advantage to the citj'. There are yet 
belonging to the farm about one hundred acres, this 
side of the Mammoth Eoad. It will doubtless be good 
policy to sell from these lands, as may be rerpiired for 
house-lots. 



0>) 

111 tills connection I Troiild suggest tliat some five or 
six acres be reserved v/itli a view of establisliing a city 
hospital, as, ^vitb. our increasing poi)ulation, tlie found- 
ing of sncb an institution cannot be much longer de- 
ferred. I am informed that much encouragement to 
this object would be received from our large corpora- 
tions, as well as from various private sources. It is a 
matter well worthy of your consideration, and will, I 
doubt not, receive that attention it requires. 

The general management of the farm and the alms- 
house, I hear spoken of only in praise. 

CONCLUSION. 

{Tiutlemen oj tlie City CounciJ.s : 

I have endeavored to be as brief and comprehensive 
as possible in the suggestions I have made to you. aim- 
ing to call you attention at this time to some of the 
more important matters which I deem necessary for you 
to consider. My purpose will be, with you, to inves- 
tigate fully, act cautiously, and execute with dispatch, 
any business that we may decide to do, not forget- 
ting the imjiortance of rigid economy, and, also, the 
fact that we are a growing city, increasing in valuation 
over one-half liiillion dollars yearly; and while this is 
likely to continue we must, as far as prudent and prac- 
ticable, anticipate the wants of our iieople. That we 
may be successful in the administration of our afl'airs, 
and that the blessings of Heaven may attend all of our 
undertakings, is my bumble prayer. 



M A I^ H E S T E E 

CITY GOVERNMENT, 
18 7 2. 



MAYOIJ. 

PERSON C. CI-IET^^E^' 



CITY CLEItK. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT. 



ATJ)KiniKX. 



Wakd 1 — George W. Thayer. Wakd 5 — La-wrence Foley. 

Ward 2 — Henry Lewis. Ward 6 — Ephraini S. Harvey. 

Ward 3 — Nehemiah S. ]3eaii. Ward 7 — Win. N. Chamberliii. 

Ward 4— Horace Pettee. Ward 8— Albert A. Woodv.'ard. 



TRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL, 

Edwin Keiniedy. 



CLERK Ol'^ COMMON COUNCIL. 

Thomas AV. Lane. 



40 



3IEMBERS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Ward 1 — Israel W. Dickey, Ward 5 — John L. Kennedy, 
Oscar M. Titus, Austin O'Malley, 

Levi L. Aldrich. Patrick Harrington. 

Ward 2— Dana D. To^-ne, Ward 6— Jacob J. Abbott, 
John C. Smith, Edwin Kennedy, 

Leonard Shelteis. Jeremiah Hodge. 

Ward 3 — Henry C. Reynolds, Ward 7 — James C. Russell, 

Charles A. Smith, Benjamin K. Parker, 

John L. Kelly. Augustus G. Stevens. 

Ward 4— Cliarles R. Colley, Ward 8— Silas A. Felton, 
Jason Weston, John Field, 

Joseph L. Smith. Frank D. Hanscom. 



^lESSENGER. 

William Stevens. 

JOINT STANDING COM.AIITTEES. 

Finance. — Messrs. Reynolds, Hodge, C. A. Smith ; tlie 3Iayor 
and Alderman Thayer. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Lewis and Pcttee ; Messrs. Felton, Shel- 
ters, and Weston. 

Lands and JBuildmgs. — Aldermen Thajer and Harvey ; Messrs. 
Abbott, Russell and J. L. Kennedy. 

I^ublic Instruction. — Aldermen Pettee and Woodward ; Messrs. 
J. C. Smith, Aldrich and Kelly. 

Streets. — Aldermen Chamberlin and Bean ; Messrs. Felton, 
Abbott and Titus. 

City Farm. — The Mayor, Alderman Foley ; ^lessrs. Dickey, 
Stevens and Hanscom. 

Se^cers and Drains. — Aldermen Pettee and Harvey ; ^Messrs. 
Russell, Field and Harrington. 

Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Vv'oodward and Lewis ; 
Messrs. J. L. Kennedy, Towne and Abbott. 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Beau and Chamberlin ; Messrs. 
Dickey, Colley and Parker. 



41" 

Olainis. — Alderinon Tlmyer and Lewis ; Messrs. Koynolds 
Hodge and J. L. Smith. 

House of Correction. — Aldenneu Harvey and Foley ; Messrs. 
Titns, O'Malley and Field. 

M'ditary Affairs. — Aldermen Cliamberlin and Lewis ; Messrs. 
J. C. Smith, Towne and Kelly. 

Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Bean and Pettee ; Messrs. Wes'- 
ton, Hanscom and J. L. Smith. 



STAXDIXG COJI.AHTTEES IN BO.VRD OV IIWOU AND ALDEUJIKN. 

Enrollment. — Aldermen Thayer and Woodward. 
Jiills in Second Heading. — Aldermen Lewis and Cliamherlin. 
Licenses. — Aldermen Bean and Harvey. 

Marshal's Accounts and Police Department. — Aldermen Pet- 
tee and Lewis. 

Setting Trees. — Aldermen Pettee and Foley. 
Market. — Aldermen Bean and Thayer. 



STANDING COHnilTTEES IN BOAKD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Election Iletur)is. — Messrs. Parker, Colley and Stevens. 
Bills in Second liecfding. — Messrs. Kelly, Shelters and Al- 
drich. 

Enrollment. — Messrs. Hodge, Stevens and C. A. Smith. 



ASSESSORS. 

Moses O. Pearson, Thomas Hovre, 

Horace P. Simpson, Elbridge G. Llaynes, 

Gilman Riddle, Horatio Fradd, 

Gcorire W. Pinkerton, Daniel Farmer. 



OVEKSEEP.S OF THE POOR 



Samuel S. Moulton, Daniel Connor, 

Sayward J. Young, Jeremiah Abbott, 



42 



Jeremiah Stickney Allen N. Clapp, 

Moses E. Geovixe, Georw S. Chandler. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Hon. P. C. Cheney, ex-officio, Patrick A. Devine, 

Henry C. Sanderson, Daniel Gould, Jr. 

Marshall P. Hall, James Dean, 

Daniel Clark, DeLafayette Hobinson, 

tSamuel U})ton, Edwin Kennedy, cx-officio. 



SUPEKINTENDEXT OF ITDLIC INSTRUCTIOX. 

Josei>}i G. Edgerly. 



CITY SOI.ICITOK. 

Nathan P. Hunt. Office— V'^ii^n^ Building. 



TnEASUKER AND COELECTOIJ. 

Henry II. Chamberlin. Office — City Hall. 



DEiTTV COEEECTOn. 

Harrison D. Lord. Office — Union Building. 



THUSTEES CITY EIEIJAItY. 

Hon. Daniel Clark, Hon. Samuel N. Bell. 

William P. Newell, Waterman Smith, 

Hon. Wm. C. Clarke, Hon. E. A. Straw, 

Phinehas Adams, E. Kennedy, ex officio, 

Hon. Person C. Cheney, ex officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 



Cliarles 11. Marshall. 



POLICE DEPAKTJIENT. 

Justice. 
Samuel Upton. Office — Merchants' Exchange. 

Assistant Justice. 
Elijah M. Toplift: 6>^'?e— Patten's Building. 

City Marshal. 
William B. Patten. Office— City Hall. 

Assistant Marshal. 
John D. Howard. 

Captain of the IVatch. 
Thomas L. Quimby. 

JSTir/h t Watch men. 

Thomas L. Quimby. William H. B. ISTesvhall. 

Patrick Doyle. Lucieii B. Richards. 

David Thayer. James Dufly. 

John C. Colburn. Hezekiah II. Noyes. 

John F. Cassidy. Jahn W. Webster. 

Thomas R. Northrup. Orrin D. Carpenter. 

Day Police. 
Horatio W. Longa. Henry Bennett. 



44 



Police Officers. 



William B. Patten. 
John D. HoAvard. 
Thomas L. Quimby. 
Patrick Doyle. 
David Thayer. 
John C. Colburn. 
John F. Cassidy. 
Thomas R. Northrup. 



William II. B. NewhalL 
Lucien B. Ilichards. 
James Duffy. 
Hezekiah H. Noyes. 
John W. Webster. 
Orrin D. Carpenter. 
Horatio W. Longa. 
Henrv Bennett. 



Cojistables. 

William B. Patten. John D. Howard. 

Harrison D. Lord. 



WAED OFFICERS. 

3Ioderators. 



Wakd 1 — James M. House. 
» 2— John D. Powell. 
'^ 3— John P. NeAvell. 
" 4 — Horace Pettee. 



Ward 5 — George Fox. 
" 6 — Isaac D. Palmer. 
" 7 — Chauncy C. Favor. 
" 8— Wm.H.B.Newhall. 



Ward Clerks. 



Ward 1 — Charles H. Osgood. 
" 2— Benj. F. Hartford. 
" 3— Henry S. Clark. 

4— William F. Holmes. 



Ward 5 — John W. Harrington. 
" 6 — Henry B. Fairbanks. 
" 7— Luther E. Wallace. 
" 8— Charles M. Stevens. 



Selectmoi. 



Ward 1 , Silas C. Clatur, 

Clarence M. Edgerly, 
Horace C. Page. 

Ward 2, Stilman P. Cannon, 
James P. Cai"penter, 
John H. Rano. 



Ward 5, Michael McDonough, 
William Howe, 
Patrick Cullerty. 

Ward 6, Isaac W. Hammond, 
John B. Huse, 
Groves Brown, 



45 

Ward 3, Russell White, Ward 7, William G. Dunham, 

Charles A. Pierce, Melzer E. Beard, 

James Sutclifte. John T. Dyson. 

Ward 4, Gustavus M. Sanborn, Ward 8, George H. Colby, 
Jasper P. George, Thomas P. Frost, 

Jolm G. Lane. Madison Gerry. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



William B. Patten, John D. Howard, 

Ebenezer II. Davis. 



CITY lUIYSICIAN. 

Oscar D. Abbott. 



CIIIElj' ENGINEEi: OE EIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Benjamin C. Kendall. 

Assista)it Engineers. 

Wilberforce Ireland, Albion II. Lowell, 

A^ndrew C. Wallace, William T. Evans. 



A C C O U N T 

O F 

ITENllY 11. CHAMBERLIN 

C I T Y T R E A S U 11 E 11 , 

F R O .M 

DECEMBER 31, 1870, TO DECEMBER 31, 1871. 



48 



Dr. 



City of Mandiesier in account v:it]i 



To Unpaid Bills, Jan. 1, 1872, 
Paupers ofl" the Farm, 
City Farm, 
City Teams, 
HigliAvay District No. 1, 



3ist 


. No. 2, 


(( 


" ^> 


(< 


" 4, 


li 


" 5, 



§9,251.48; Dist. No. 8, $538.02 



484.84; 
255. GO; 
298.22; 
383.40; 
G55.0G ; 



9, 342.9G 

10, 1,129.00 

11, 589. 4G 

12, 241. 8G 

13, 190.74 



34, 



New Highways, 

Granite Bridge, $1,542.10; Am. Falls Bridge, .$2,919. 
Sewers and Drains, §9,932.95; Reservoirs, §274.G2, 
Commons, $3, 26G.1G; Land sold from Farm, §2.50, 
Valley Cemetery, §300.00; Pine Grove Cemetery, §801. GG, 

Fire Department, 

City Police, §14,0G7.70; City Officers, §8,251. CG, 
Lighting Streets, §3,G38.17; Militia, §500.00, , 

Printing and Stationery, 

Incidental Expenses, 

City Hall Bnildiug, §1,393.42; City Library, §3,132.9G, 

Paving Streets, §3,913. G9; Watering Streets, §825.29, 

Abatement of Taxes, §1,215.G3; Dis. on Taxes, §4,882.0G, 

State Tax, §50,562 00 ; County Tax, §15,947.47, 

Interest, §2,775.G2; Coupons, §23,388.00, 

Tern. Loan, §52,25G.OO ; City Debt, §6,000.00, . 

Court House, §1,092.68; Insurance, §1,405.50, . 

Iron Fence, Merrimack Square, 

Repairs of Buildings, §671.16; Liquor Agency, §224. 

New School Houses, 

School Department, 

Repairs of School Houses — Special Appropriation, 

Evening Schools, 

Bridge across Cohas Brook, .... 
Library Building, §10,971.24; Waterworks, §1,723.0." 
Chicago Relief Fund, §15,000; Dog Tax, §16.00, 
New Engine House, 



80, 



§22,802 

3,589 

4,203 

6,435 

225 

9,789 

827 

1,384 

887 

625 

845 

12,617 

4,461 

10,207 

3,268 

1,101 

9,122 

22,319 

4,138 

2,013 

5,743 

4,526 

4,738 

6,097 

66,509 

26,163 

58,256 

2,498 

4,189 

895 

30,396 

41,750 

3,362 

725 

23 

12,694 

15,016 

1,330 



41 

75 
92 
69 
50 
80 
60 
G8 
26 
80 
GO 
44 
57 
GG 
66 
81 
36 
17 
28 
70 
38 
98 
69 
47 
G2 
00 
18 
50 
96 
9G 
26 
99 
60 
33 
30 
00 
67 



Cash in the Treasury January 1, 1872, 



§405,788 
3,751 



§409,539 59 



4«J 



City Trritsitrcr {o)ie i/rar ouHnij vith Dec. ISTI.J 



t'r. 



15y Cash in the Treasuiy Jim. 1, 1871, 

Taxes 1 SCO— 040.18. Taxes 18G7— $304.08, 



18G0— 2,577.94, 

1S71— i;n»,.54'j.i; 



City Farm, $2,50G 
Citv Scales, 248. 5i 



18(;8— 5 17. '.to. 
'• 1S70— 25,147.54 

DouTax 

Temporary Loan. 

Savings Banlv Tax, 

Kail Koad Tax, 

Literary Fund, 

In.surance Tax, 

City Hall and Stores, .$2,015.50, 

Police Conrt, 4,105.82, 

Panpers from other Towns, .... 

Pine Grove Cemetery, ...... 

County of Hillsborougli, 

Interest on Taxes, ...... 

•City Teams, .$2,388.50. Overdrafts, .$55.70, 

License of Exhibitions and Sliows, 

Laud sold from Farm, ..... 

Dog Licenses, $183.08. Sewer Licenses, .$501.50, 

Cost Non-Resident Taxes, 

Am. ManTg. Co. — School House Lot, 

John Lee, — Old School House Building, . 

Wm. M. Rolfe, — Balance of Xote, 

G. F. Bosher, — 1 pr. Horses, .... 

Luther Campbell. — Cai't, Harness and Hay, 

Board Refunded ^ . 

L'nknown person, ....... 

R. White. —Labor, 

Edward Wyman. — Stone, ..... 
G. W. Stevens, — from Lincoln St. S. IL, . 
Kidder & Cluxndler, — Table, . . . . 
Lumber, .$62.75. Rent of Ward Room. $%.m. . 
Rent of Tenements, ...... 

Old Scliool House, 

Labor, $13.59. Briclv, .$18.00 

Horse Collar., $S. 00. Water Rent, $20(i. 00,. 
Rent of Hearse 



Unpaid Bills. Outlawed, 
Unpaid Bills, .Tan. 1. 1872, 





$3G,321 02 




344 2(5 




3,005 84 




224,(;0(> 71 




381 00 




54,. 500 00 




28,1.58 IC 




10.034 18 




0(!0 00 




423 3S 


.43, 


4,G11 93 


3, 


4,3.54 35 




77 60 




1,250 GO 




1,001 92 




1,277 74 




2,444 20 




645 00 




1,580 '27 




775 48 




27 00 




540 00 




121 50' 




145 50 




260 00 




54 25 




,>/ 7;» 

31 00 




34 00 




2:! 00 




6 00 




2 00 
71 75 

108 0(t 






68 50 




31 50 




214 00 




75 00 




.$388,712 86 




205 15 




. 20,531 58 



$400,530 59 
HENRY IL CHAMBERL]US% C% Treasurer. 
Manchester, JannaiT 1, 187^.'. 

9 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S KEFOKT. 



The uiuler>i,niKd. Joint SlaiuUug Coiniiiittoe on Eiiiaiice, certify tliat 
we have exaiuiiuHl tlie within account of Ileniy 11. Chaniberliii, City 
Treastiver. and lind the same correctly cast and properh' vouched. 

During the year 1871 there has been received into the Treasury, includ- 
ing the balance on hand January 1, 1871, the sum of three hundred eighty- 
eight thousand seven hundred twelve dollars and eighty-six cents, and 
there has l)een paid out during the same time, the sum of three hundred 
eighty-four thousand nine hundred sixty-one dollars fifty-seven cents, 
leaving in the Treastiry Januarv 1 . 187:.'. three thousand seven Iiundrcd 
liftj--onc tlollars twenty-nine cents. 

X. S. r.EAX. 
(r. W. TlIAYEi;, 
II. C. PvEYNOLDS, 
EDWIX KEXXEDY, 
JAMES A. WESTOX, 
Jiiiuf. Stauduirj (Jomriiittpc on Flimvcf. 



REYENIIE ACCOUNT. 



Taxes 1871, collected 
Dog tax 
A})ated 
Discounted 

1870, collected 
Dog" tax 
Abated 

18(11), collected 
Dog tax 
Abated 

1868, collected 
Dog tax 
Abated 

18()7, collected 
Dog tax 
Al»ated 

18()(), collected 



$194,178 49 

214 00 

488 02 

4.882 CO 

$24.(349 19 
133 00 
498 35 

$2,383 91 

19 00 

194 03 

$499 00 

13 00 
18 90 

$289 35 
2 00 

14 73 



$199,763 17 



$25,2^0 64 



12,590 94 



$530 m 



$300 08 
40 18 



$228,517 81 



O'J 



Oasli oil iiaiui Jan. ], isTO . 

Savings Bank tax 

Eail Eoatl tax 

Interest on taxes 

Cost on non-resident taxes 

Literary Fnnd 

Insuranee Tax 

Tep.iporary Loan 

Land sold from farm . 

Police costs and tines 

City Farm for produce sold and labor 

Pine Grove Cemetery for lots and wood 

Rent of tenements on Vine street 

South scales for fees . 

Shov.s and exhibitions for licenses 

Dog licenses 

Eent of hearse (3-4 of year) 

•Overdrafts 

Rent of stores ... 

Rent of City Hall 

•Licenses to enter connnon sewers 

Water rent 

Oounty of Hillsboro' for board of inmates 

iit Reform Scliool 

County of Hillsboro' for support of paupers 

at City Farm 

Town of Warner for su.pport of Mrs. Wiggin 
Tovvu of Dow for support of Mrs. Bond . 
Town of Merrimack for board of Mary 

Shedd at Reform School 
Reform School for])oard of Elisabeth 
C. B. Seavey for aid refunded . 
Geo. AVyman " " 

Amoskeag Mf 'g Co. for school house 
John Lee for old scliool houses . 
^Nm. M. Rolfe balance for Potter Place 



. $30, 321 


02 


. 28,158 


10 


. 19,034 


18 


. . 1,277 


74 


27 


00 


900 00 


423 


38 


54,500 00 


1,589 


27 


4,105 


82 


2,590 


43 


)od . 1,250 00 


108 00 


248 


53 


045 


00 


183 


98 


75 


00 


55 


79 


1,813 


50 


202 


00 


591 


50 


20(> 


00 



1.824 0' 



rlohnson 



lot 



5 

39 

33 

20 

7 

24 

540 

190 

145 



2.) 
35 
00 

25 
00 
73 
00 
00 
00 
50 



')0 



Olio pair roan liorses sold . 

Luther Oaiiipbcll for hay 

Liitlier (^ain])bo]l for cart and liarness 

Enssell White tor Labor 

T.^nknown i)er.son for conscience money 

l^]dward Wynian for stone, 

(1. W. Stevens for brick sokl 

Kidder & Chandler for table 

Sundry persons for okl phmk 

AV ¥. Sleeper & Co for rent of Ward roon 

lot 

Brick sold 

Two horse collars sold 
Highway Dist. Xo. 2, for city team work 
Lincoln street school house " 
Watering streets " 

Amoskeag Falls Bridge " 

Paving streets " 

Commons " 

Sewers and drains " 

New highways " 



47 



iVI 



$200 00 
24 25 
30 00 
50 
00 
00 
00 
00 
75 

1) 00 

18 00 

8 00 

1,074 00 

13 00 

18 00 

4 50 

120 00 

122 50 

231 50 

7111) 00 



1871 
1870 
1800 
1868 
1867 







^388,712 


86 


> TAXES. 








. $36,918 


57 






. 10,931 


15 






8,059 


16 






5,992 


8() 






6,784 


20 










S68,685 


94 







$457,398 80 



54 



APPEOPEIATIONS, 

INCLUDING BALANCES FROM LAST YEAR, 



I3y Paupei 


•s off 


Farm 


5 


• 


CityF 


arm, 


. 


. 


. 


City Teams 




. 


. 


Highw 


ay District No. 


1 


( ( 






No. 


2 


a 






No. 


o 


a 






No. 


4 


■it 






No. 


5 


a 






No. 





41 






No. 




a 






No. 


8 


a 






No. 


i) 


(i 






No. 


10 


4( 






No. 


11 


'(( 






No. 


12 


(i 






No. 


13 



New liig'iiways 
Watering streets . 
Paving' streets 
Granite Bridge 
Amoskeag- Falls Bridge 
Oolias Bridge 
Commons 
lleservoirs 
Sewers and Drains 
Pine Clrove Cemetery 
Valley Cemetery . 
+State tax 
County tax 
Fire department . 
Police department 
Lighting streets 
Printing and stationery 



$3,873 48 

4,529 1)5 

(J,4G8 55 

335 89 

9,929 50 

52() 18 

315 95 

431 03 

395 29 

072 38 

581 14 

373 00 

1,133 75 

740 48 

250 00 

201 98 

12,030 22 

881 59 

3,950 52 

1,501 02 

3,005 72 

23 33 

3,332 0(» 

2,355 13 

10,018 50 

1,538 70 

300 00 

50,502 00 

15,947 47 

12,132 78 

14,314 91 

4,500 00 

2,121 59 



i)i) 



\\\ IiifidtMital expi'uscs 
City Han 
City Library . 
3liiitia . 

Land sold from farm 
IJepairs of scliool lionsc 
Insurance 
Interest ... 
Tem]>orarv loan 
Ivepairs of bnildiniis 
Keduction of debt . 
Salaries of officers . 
Library l)uildin,ii- 
Discount on taxes . 
Iron fence on ]Merriuuicl 
Dog tax, 1871 
IS'ew scliool houses and 
Schools . 
Evening schools 
Li([Uor agency 
Chicago relief 
Court House . 
Abatement of taxes 
Soldiers' Monument 



S(1U 

ots 



ire 



$8,824 22 
4,30(1 71 
r,,P.3r) 22 
548 11) 
5,737 35 
4,1(W> 77 
1,405 50 

25,045 80 

74,22() 00 
1,054 (13 
0,300 00 
8,507 ()8 

11,048 85 

5,570 0(5 

4,950 28 

214 00 

23,01)(; 57 

4;M>37 51) 

1,237 50 

(mO 1M) 

15,000 00 
1,102 75 
3,548 8(5 
1,000 00 



Hal a nee 



$428,758 27 
28,040 53 



$457,31)8 80 



m 



AITKOPEIATIOXS AXD EXrEXDlTUKES. 



rALPKRS OFF FARM. 

By Balance from old account . $4i:> 48 
Appropriation .... 1,500 00 
Hillsl)oi"ongli County, for sui)- 
l>ort of iinnatcs at Eefonu 

Scliool l,.Si>4 07 

Town of AVarnci' for sui)iK)rt 

of 3Irs. Wig'gin ... 5 ,'^5 

Town of Bow for support of 

Mrs. Bond .... :]\) 00 
Town of Merrimack for suj^iiort 
of :vrary Sliedd at Reform 
School :V/> 25 

Beform v^cliool for l>oai'<l of 

Elisabetli Johnson, refunded '2(5 00 

C. B. vSeavy, for aid refunded . 7 7-> 

Geo. AVvman for aid refunded 24 00 



EXI'ENDITUKES. 

To Wm. ('. Bichardson for wood 
Wm. Foster, " 

L. B. Bod well c^^ Co., 

B. F. Locke e^^ Co., 

Ba trick Healey, " 

H. E. Stevens «S: Co., for g-roceries 

C. C. Frost & Co. - " 
H. Fradd & Co., 

Geo. Vr. Adams <!<: Son " 

Wm. M. Jlayes 
Sawyer B>rothers " 

W. F. Sleeper *S: Co. 



$78 


12 


25 


00 


85 


c37 


2 


50 


») 


•>— 


20 


00 


51 


01 


(\{i 


81 


5() 


88 


1() 


00 


10 


28 


104 


\r> 



$;].87;i 4(i^ 



$10 00 


S7 


00 


5 


;^5 


57 


43 


(;o 


00 


r}2 


00 


or. 


00 



i)/ 



To A. Mallard & Sou 

.lolm J. Hayes 

Jolui llaiTiii.i;tou " 

Kidder & Cliandler 

('iirrier Urotliers " 

A. P. Clolby for Itoardiiijj;- Mrs. 
Dickey and cliildieu 

]\[artha Dearborn for l)oardiiii;' 
W. S. Dearborn . 

Mrs. ( '. E. ]\1 oulton, for care of 
31rs. Tovviis .... 

F. (t. Wynian foi- hoardin,!;" t*>a- 
rali Wynian and family 

Arvilla Ivichardson, nursing- 
Mrs. Wynian 

]VIary Carr, for nursing ]Mrs. 
Davis ..... 

Isaac Lewis, care of Mrs. Davis 

('ain])l)ell «1^: Hunt, for medi- 
cine ..... 4 oo 

Eeform School for board of 

Inmates from Mancliester . 2, 18,") 07 

N. H. In. Asylum, for b'd and 

care of (). Hunt . . 124 .S2 

N. H. Fn. Asylum, for b'd and 

care of Jas. Eastman . . 10 1!0 

X. H.In. Asylum, for b'd an<l 

care of Patrick Hamilton . loO 'A 

Fairbanks «!<: Downs, for 

stove for Mrs. Da\ is . .2 25 

(ieo. W. Thayer, for shoes . ."> 50 

^ntchell, Gove *S: Co. for shoes 1 15 

Closes E. George, for cash ])d 
for stationery and search- 
ing records . . . 12 

W. H. ISTewhall, for digging- 
grave for Hazen Davis . 2 00 



24 


00 


i; 


00 


s 


00 


4 


00 



58 



To V. S. Fisher, for burial of 

Hazeu Davis . . . $1,3 00 
Town of Dorchester, iiursiuii' 

and bmial of Dains Page . 134 08 
Fogg ♦Is: James, for team . 1 00 

Benjamin Stevens, for board 

of Eichard Dame . . 4 00 



3,oSi) 41 
Balance to new account . 284 05 



CITY FABM. 



By Balance from old account , Bo'.lS 27 
Ai>})ropriation . . . 500 00 
Besei'v-ed Fund . . . 1,000 00 
County of Hillsboro' for sup- 
port of i)aupers ... 77 25 
Overdraft, refunded . . 18 00 
Produce sold and labor . . 2,590 43 



EXPENDITURES. 

To paid Josei)h Cross, supt. salary $500 00 

Spencer Bros, for groceries 

C.eo. AV. Adams & Co. " 

Kidder & Chandler 

Cyrus Dunn & Co., for flour 
an<l groceries 

Cyrus Dunn, for Hour and 
groceries 

A. Mallard cK: Son, for gro- 
ceries ..... 

frardner «!!t Co., for groceries 






90 


37 


01 


()<) 


05 


37 


07 


29 


01 


93 


97 

58 



$3,873, 40 



$4,529 95 



130 


72 


70 


GO 


17 


50 


108 


27 


'284 


75 


li) 


00 


10 


50 


27 


00 



59 



T'o paid Henry ('. :vrevrill, for 

groceries . . . $58 23 
H. & H. E. Pettee for 

grain and meal . . H>H 78 
H. & H. E. Eettee, for 

lii)ie .... 20 

J. S. Kidder & Co. ft)r 

grain and grinding 
Frencli & Gay, for grain 
Hall, Watts & Co. ^ do. 
J. Abbott, do. . 
J. L. Fogg, do. 
James P. Eaton for 

thresbiiig grain . 
L. S. Proctor, do. . 
*' " " for Imll 

J. L. Fogg, for meat . (52 03 
John H. Farmer, for i>r. 

of oxen. . . .240 00 
John N. True, for pr. of 

steers . . . .105 00 
Charles W. Eovtcl], for 

pr. of oxen . . . l\)~) 00 
Commons, for grass, (two 

years) .... 
J. [^. Holt, for use of ])oar 
JMr. Cass, for meat . 
Wm. Poyd, " " 
H. M. Miller, for hsh 
Geo. E. Vox, " " 
JSToyes Farmer, for goods 

at auction 
J. E. Weston, for cloth . 
Waite Brothers, do. 

Piper & Shepherd, do. 
Eossiter cK: Gray, do. 1.3 lO 



00 


00 


2 


00 


13 


04 


4 08 


4 


42 





05 


11 


8() 


20 


44 


11 


84 



87 10 


10 00 


;3 10 


1 50 


r> 20 



(JO 



To ])ai(l Lane & Dorr, for dotli- 

iug" and crockery . 
Folsoiii & Son, for elotli- 

ing- 
G. S. Holmes, for thread, 

&c. .... 

Fred. C. Dow, for shoes . 
J. M, Robinson, do. 
Shnlf & Kindjall, for 

boots . . . . 10 30 
S. G. Hoyt, repairing 

slioes . . . . .") 44 

A. F. reiTV, for medicine 31 97 
Brigham & Piatt, for 

crackers ... S 2rt 

Pike & Heald, for rep. 

stoves and dishes, 

brooms, &c. . 
D. P. Hadley, for repair- 
ing ch)ck 
f]vans & Pussell, for lum- 
ber 

Paschal j^reston, for sav*- 

ing. .... 
John P. ^IcCrillis, for 

shingles 
John B. ]McCrillis, for 

repairing wagon . 
A. Qniud^y, for paper 

hangings 
John L. Kelly, for i)aint- 

ing and hanging ])aper 
Swift & Gutterson, for 

carpenter work 
D. & D. Gregg, for sash 
Jer. Hodge, formouhlings 



21 


03 


1 


25' 




53 


it 
• > 


00 


118 


20 


() 


00 


<) 


<S0 


7() 


34 


."),") 


.')« 


5 


.SO 


'> 


<)5. 



'(51 



To paid Edwin Braiicli, for re]>air- 

iiig' liariu'sscs 

M. Eead and Sons, for 

irons , . . . 

Asa Libl)y, for manure . 

C. Bunt on, Idacksmltli- 

ing . . . . 

J. H. Wales, mason ^vork 

iST. E. Cole, horse hire 

O. S. Fisher, for burial of 

A. Eol)erts . 
Daniels & Co., for hard- 
ware, seeds, phosphate 
&c. . . . • 

Clis. G. Slierer for labor . 
Eeuben Morgan, for labor 
Hiram C. Kenney, for " 
Wm. B. Brainard 
Gilman AVorthen " 

Michael Burke " 

William stills 
LeAvis Smith " 

Francis O'Cahill 
S. S. ^>lson 
Alice McKean " 

Mary E. Brainard 
Sarah Wetherbee 
Lizzie Ui)ton " 

Balance to new account 



$1L> r>o 



11 00 


18 00 


74 5(5 


4 00 


20 00 



15 00 



325 


70 


109 


00 


142 


50 


128 


35 


52 


40 


18 00 


17 


50 


■ 2() 


00 


24 


27 


12 


00 


10 


25 


14 50 


18 


34 


42 


00 


45 


50 



$4,203 75 

320 20 $4,529 95 



1757 SO 


500 00 


,()00 00 


200 00 


24 25 


30 00 


S 00 



(;2 



CITY TEAMS. 

By balance from old account 

Aj)[)ro])riation .... 
Fire Departineut transferred . 
Casli for pair horses (roan) 
Luther Cain])bell, for hay 
Luther ('ani})l)ell, cart and 

Harness .... 

G. Flaiulers, for horse collars . 
Highway district Xo. 2, for 

vvork of teams . . . 1,074 00 
Lincoln street school house, for 

work of teams 
AVatering' streets 
Amoskeag Falls liridge, for 

work of teams 
Paving streets, work of teams 
Connnons, Y>'ork of teams 
Sewers and drains, w'k of teams 
Xew highways, work of teams 
Iteserved fund .... 



EXPENDITUItES. 

To i>aid (ieo. W. l^utterlield team- 
ster .... 

A. F. Quind)y, teamster . 

Frank H. Currier, " 

Winthrop Small 

-L C. Wliittemore, for use 
of cart .... 

(ieo. W. Merriam, shoeing 

Vx. ^y. Flanders, 

cl. F. A\^)odbury, & Co. (h>. 



1:3 


00 


l.S 


00 


4 


50 


12() 


00 


122 


50 


231 


50 


790 


00 


1!00 00 



$341 


00 


'Mr) 


00 


4 00 


312 


00 


12 


00 


21 


IH) 


14 


74 


108 


08 



$0,408 55. 



To paid A. B. Webster repjiiriiii;- 

fart .... $5 40 

A. W. Sanborn, cart and 
repairs .... 

C. E. Moiilton, iei»airin,ij;' 

J. B. McCrillis. cart and 
repairs .... 

J. L>. & H. 11. Abbott, re- 
pairing- cart . 

Emerson »!<: Porter, for pr. 
horses .... 

Kussell White expense to 
Bost(n) to exam, liorses 

B. C. Kenchill, (h). 
Albert F. Quiniby do. 
Concord raili'oad, freii>]it 

on horses from Boston 
]\Iancliester ( las Liglit Co. 
for g'us .... 
(j. F. Bosher, for selling- 
horses .... 
.r. (t. Tag-oart, for hay . 
Edward Langdell " 
J. G. Carr " . 

J. X. Currier 
J. P. Bailey. " . 

8imon MuUins " 

Rnfns Calef " . 

Horace F. llichards " 
E. P. Johnson & Co. " 
B. Tnttle '* . 

B. S. Brown " 

H.B. Fetch " . 

E. L. Brown " 

Eaton & Wliittemore" 
i'hilp Major " . k; 25 

^'- I^oyd " . IS ,-)(; 



42,S 


70 

75 


400 


41 


•> 


05 


1,07.-) 


Ot) 


<) 


(M) 


ir> 


00 


{} 


50 





m 


i;j 


(m 


l>5 


25 


172 


00 


2!) 


25 


.")() 


!)7 


:M) 


0() 


18 


(;o 


(11 


05 


.'>-■> 


01 


19 


45 


229 


01 




4;; 


Ot7 

21) 


77 


14 


(;2 


18 


()2 



04 



To paid C. McC^niey 
A. Sejivey 
Daniel H. Paikoi 
J. Crombio 
G. N. (ioodwiii 
Clark Wilson 
A. Whitney 
G. A. Eastman 
I). 1). Hill 
J. O. Clark 
J. A. Poor 
J. E. Emerson 
James S. Lord 
J, L. Foog- 
L. W. Merrill 
Benjamin Hall 
Isaac W. Hammond, for 

straw 
I. M. Yonng, 
Joseph Poor 
J. T. Nesmith 
J. Abbott, for 
Hall, Watts & Co." " 
French & Gay 
H. & H. E. Pettee " 
J. S. Kidder & Co. " 
G.W. Gardner & Co. 
Kidder «S: Chandler 
City Farm, for carrots 
J. 8. Monlton, for ladder 
H. M. Bailey . 
Edwin Branch, for liar 

nesses and repairs 
D. S. Ames do. 

F. IST. McLaren, for re 

l)airs of harnesses . 
8. S. Carr, for alcohol 



do. 



iiram 



. $35 


82 


>>») 


08 


20 00 


14 


93 


28 


40 


. . 20 08 


47 


25 


40 


15 


m 


19 


. 388 50 


5 


05 


15 


51 





85 


52 


15 


19 


28 


18 


27 


4 


14 


15 


12 


.) 


0() 


37 


90 


. 213 


87 


. 283 


28 


148 


70 


194 


79 


. • 57 


10 


() 


15 


27 


00 


18 00 


s 5 


52 


1 


02 


. 155 


40 


. 157 


30 


51 


83 




75 



<;5 

To paid Daniels & Co., for lialters, 

whips, oil, «!s:c. . . $25 87 
M. C. Derl)y, for pi'ofe«- 

sioual services . . 77 00 
Tebbetts Brothers, for 

medicines . . . 3 83 

Locke & Demick, for salt, 

brooms, &c. . . . 4 00 

T. E. Hubbard, for feed 

box .... 6 50 

G. B. Fogg-, for keys . 50 

H. IST. Howe, for repairing 

l)ump . . . . o 00 

J. B. Yarick . . . 14 14 
0. E. Oolley, for painting 

cart .' . . . 1 CO 

Z. Foster Campbell, for 

medicine 

B. F. Fogg, for piping . G 55 

Pike & Heald, for stoves 

and repairing pumps . 8 50 

Henrv C. Merrill . . 25 



A Oi 



$0,435 02 
Balance to new account 32 03 



HIGHWAY DISTEICT No. 1. 

By Balance from old account . $185 80 
Ai)propriation * . . 150 00 



$(3,408 55 



$335 80 



GG 



EXPEXDITURES. 



'To paid Samuel Hall, supt. . 
Cyrus ^Ya^lle^, for labor 
Peter Kimball, for labor 
James O. Clark, for labor 
C. AV. Eowell, for labor . 
George Clark, for labor . 
Joliu Camx)bell, for labor 
X. Preston, for labor 
Burke Stark, for labor . 
James Hall, for labor 



William Campbell, for 



gravel 



Balance to uovi account 



80G 04 
18 75 

G 00 
21 25 
24 00 

9 25 
2G 00 

7 25 

8 25 
4 50 
4 40 



8225 GO 
110 20 



HIGHWAY DISTEICT Xo. 2. 



By Approiu'iation. 
Reserved fund, 
Received for labor, 



87000 00 

2900 00 

29 50 



8335 89 



89,929 50 



EXPEXDITUEES. 

To Balance from old account, 
James Patten, supt. 
Russell White, " 
Luther Cami)bell, for lal)or 
Loami Searls, for labor . 
Geo. W. Buttertield, teamster 
A. F. Quimby. 
W. Small, ' !' 

Josiah Harvey, " 

James Kearns. " 



. 8211 


GG 


. 354 00 


ooo 


00 


. 124 00 


142 


00 


• 115 


50 


. 119 


50 


. 112 


00 


42 


00 


. 389 


54 



(5^ 



To A. AV. Quiiiiby, 
Lewis Laflott, 
A. Wells, for team . 
John Campbell, for teaii 
City double team ~Xo. 



single " 

Micliael Seaiilai], for 1; 
S. Donolioe, 
M. Haiidley, 
John Feimotf, 
Vrilliam Griffin, 
Peter Scanlan, 
Micliael tSliea, 
David Devine, 
Patrick Maiiabaii, 
Edward Alierii, 
J. M. Langhlin, 
Patrick Broderick, 
Timotliy Connors 
Jobn Daley, 
John Mabouey, 
William Maxwell 
Thomas Calaghan, 
John Larkin, 
Edward Bonner, 
John Nolan, 
Edward Bresnahan, 
Timothy Sullivan, 
Thomas Fox, 
M. Ilanrihan 
Patrick Finn 
Jervy Began 
Eicliard Horan 
Eugene Sullivan 



ibor 



. $119 


25 


(u 


87 


. li)2 


50 


. 208 


00 


. 173 


25 


. 17!) 


25 


. 178 


50 


. 307 


00 


. 22G 


00 


. 107 


99 


. 112 


V2 


. ■ 5(j 


(12 


. 283 


75 


. 154 




. 112 


87 


74 


02 


30 


12 


. 120 


84 


21 


37 


42 


00 


il 


87 


40 


12 


i < 


25 


0>) 


75 


. 124 


74 


02 


()2 


. 233 


12 


70 


25 


01 


49 


. 122 


99 


71 


25 


. 110 


02 


19 


12 


. 275 


25 


71 


99 


97 


49 


13 


87 



08 



To Lawrence ]McCarty 
Patrick Spain 
P. Dupier 
Amos Goddard 
M. Hurley 
Micliael Kelly 
Micliael Eeg-au 
Thomas Maliouey 
Wm. Froin 
Patrick WLalaii 
Bartliolomew ^Moriarty 
3Iurty ]Malioiiey 
AV. 11. Burke 
Daniel Daley 
Wm. Conway 
Thomas ^loran 
Michael Mullen 
Thomas Edwards 
John Kennedy 
Peter Madden 
Moses Lull 
James Victory 
James Silk 
Thomas Carrigan 
James Pitts 
Patrick Hag'gert> 
Garret IMurray 
John Mahoney 
J. H. Masters 
Hugh Murphy 
Wm. Muri)hy 
T. Bermier 
J. Letendre 
John Slattery 
E. P. Johnson & Go. 
Wm. Leonard 
P. Leonard 



. $51 


00 


MG 00 




75 


34 


50 


41 


02 


10 


50 


oo 


50 


27 


00- 


2.5 


(;2 


:v.) 


00 


7 


00 


50 


74 


15 


37 


48 


7.5 


(>5 


37 


. 107 


24 


19 


87 


1 


50 


24 


37 


9 


75 


21 


00 


19 


12 


25 


12 


70 


87 


4 


50 


4 


12' 


r-- 


7'> 


i t 


I ~i 


88 


87 


20 


25 


15 


00 


19 


12 


13 


87 


o 


t; 


»> 


<J) 


10 


50 


2 


50 


7 


87 


1.3 


12 



69 



To Jolui \\'elcli 
Mitchell Pockett 
Jei'iT Cliampdelaiie " 

jMic'liad Kelly 
Ftit. Coinior " 

Fogii," & Janics, for lior.se hire 
Kidder & Cliaii<ller, for powder 
Daniels & Co., for tools 
J. F. Yv'oodbury & (Jo., for 

blaeksniitliiug' 
T>. H. Young", for drain pipe 
(1. E. Monlton, for repairing 

tree boxes, street crossings 

and canal bridge . 
H. W. Herri ck, for graAcl 
Jolm B. Varick, for tools 
G. W. Merriain, for black 

smithing 
Pike & Heald 
Charles Bunton, for I)lack 

smithing 
John B. McCi'illis, for hoop: 

for tree boxes 
Lamson & Marden, for stone 

chips .... 
D. Folsom, do. 

G. H. Allen, civil engineer 
Stearns & Allen, civil engineer 
L. L. Flanders 
C. W. Mead, laying concrete 

crossings 
Hackett & Taylor do. . 
J. M. ISTutt, blasting 
Y. C. Hastings, pipe 
Haines & Wallace, plank 
A. D. Gooden, labor on Park st 



$1-3 


vS7 


15 


37 


10 


87 


4 50 


3 


00 


10 


75 


So 


02 


173 


1)7 




95 


1 


24 



5 25 

105 20 

112 8() 
1 55 

57 15 

3() 00 






00 


37 


00 


17 


50 


4G 


75 


5 


00 


590 07 


422 


75 


1() 


17 


150 


G2 


34 


87 


30 00 



70 



To Xaiicy F. Goodeu, blasting on 

Ptu-k street . . . . 100 00 

Clias. Colby, team . . . o(S 25 

13. W. Garland & Co., flagging- ;j2 00 



Balance to new account 



$9,4g;;> 14 

. 4G(> ?>{] 



highv;ay disteict xo. 3. 

By Balance from old account . $2(j 18 
Appropriation .... 500 00 



i^lK920 50 



852G IK 



B X ['EXDIT URE S 



To B. F. Mitchell Wiipt. 

" " for gravel 

E. Kennedy for labor 
W, H. Locke 
E. Y. G. Smith 
Fred. McKitten 
Alfred Perry 
James F. Smith 
E. K. Haselton 
G. Haselton 
John Campbell 
George Parrot 
Wm.Clongh 
Dennis McCarty 
Michael Fox 
Kadmiel Haselton 
Abraham Loiselle 
Louis Giere 



203 47 


17 08 


17 50 


57 50 


7 50 


15 (52 


(; 00 


7 50 


k; 50 


24 10 


73 00 


-') 75 


4 50 


(•> 00 


(> 00 


1 50 


('» 00 


00 



71 



To Julian Giere " . . $2 02 

Jolm r>. A^ai-ick, 2 (J. S. shovels 2 70 



Balance to new account 



$484 84 
41 34 



S52() 18 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT Xo. 4. 



By Balance from old account 
Appropriation . 



SG5 05 
250 00 



$315 1)5 



EXPENDITURES, 



To E. X. Wliittemorc S 


upt. . 




$102 11 


Uerry Mills for labor . 




14 02 


John P. Moore ' 






22 75 


Clinton Moore ' 






1 50 


John Emerson ' 






75 


Frank Moore ' 






7 50 


William May 






3 CO 


Jonathan Aiken ' 






10 50 


E. P. AVhittemorc ' 






37 25 


Byron Moore ' 






(; 00 


Isaac Whittemore ' 






9 00 


James Cheney ' 






9 50 


C. C. Whittemore ' 






3 00 


Charles Moore ' 






5 02 


John Calef 






14 25 


David Webster ' 






2 25 




$225 00 


Balance to new account 






90 35 



$315 95 



HIGHWAY HISTIIICT Ko. 5. 



By balance from old account, . $2(5 03 
Appropriation, . . . 400 00 

W. V. Dickey, for old plank . 5 00 



$431 03 



EXPENDITURE S . 



To 0. N. Harvey, Superintendent 
AVilliani W. Dickey, for labor 
John Dickey, 
E. S. Harvey, 
Jonas Harvey, 
Alplionzo Boyce, 
Ransom Flanders, 
Jolni B. Ellenwood, 
James M. Young, 
James Emerson, 
Josiali Harvc} , 
Oilman Harvey, 
AVm. P. Merriil, 
Israel Young, 
Samuel E. Knov/les, 
Daniel Connor, 
Andrew J. Young, 
Jolni B. Yarick, i>ick 
J & E. S. Plarvey, for gravel 
Edward E. Young, for gravel 



Balance to new account, 



831 


75 


12 


75 


11) 


38 




88 


m 


38 


4 


25 


4 


25 


1 


50 


12 


00 


21 


75 


24 


25 


35 


09 




50 


23 


42 


.1 


50 


8 00 


'> 


25 


1 


(12 




70 





00 


298 


22 


132 


SI 



$431 03 



HIGHWAY DISTEICT Xo. (5. 



By balance from old accoimt, 
Ai)proi)riatioii, 
E. C. Webster, for old plank 



S4:j 


2t) 


;>50 


00 


'> 


00 



$305 20 



EXPEXDITUKE 8 . 



To Daniel H. Dickey, Supt. 
I. T. Webster, for labor 
James Wiley, " 

William Craig, 
eTames M. Webster, " 
John Jolmson, " 

David Dickey, 2d, " 
David Dickey, " 

Samuel Bryant, " 

ISTabum Webster, " 
A. J. Peaslee, 
George Whittemore ' ' 
William Perkins, " 
E. Fletcher, 
0. 0. Wortlien, 
G. B. Emerson, 
John Lai'kin, " 



Balance to new account, 



. $208 


()5 




75 


24 


00 


18 


50 




50 


(> 


00 


21 


25 


14 


00 


13 


50 


15 


00 


3 


00 




75 


1 


50 


k) 


25 


14 


25 


1 


00 


1 


50 


jT, o O O 


40 


11 


89 



$395 29 



HIGHWAY DISTPilCT Xo. 7. 



By balance from old account, 
Appropriation, 
Eeserved Fund, 



. $22 


38 


. 550 


00 


. 100 


00 



$072 38 



74 



EXPEND 


ITURES 




To Isaac Hiise, Snpt. . 


, ^ 


$198 90 


Peter 0. AVoodiiiau, for labor 


10 75 


Bernard McGiniiess, 


(( 


. 29 03 


James Howe, 


il 


(; 75 


I^. Sleeper, 


( ( 


. 1 50 


James P. Eatou, 


i i 


. ;'» 00 


Philip Farmer, 


(( 


(•> 00 


William Brown, 


li 


10 50 


J. B. Pierce, 


(( 


14 00 


Eobert Stevens, 


(( 


75 


J. A. Stearns, 


i I 


7 00 


D. W. Eeynolds, 


i i 


75 


Israel Webster, 


(( 


29 03 


Jolin W. Webster, 


li 


7 50 


McGregor Hall, 


a 


8 ()3 


Mr. Osgood, 


a 


1 50 


Xatlian Johnson, 


i I 


58 38 


H. H. Yonng-, 


a 


00 05 


William Doty, 


11 


25 88 


E. L. Jenkins, 


a 


02 01 


William Kauffer, 


i I 


1(> 13 


James Dearl)orn, 


i i 


8 25 


Eobert Barrett, 


li 


7 50 


Jos"ei)h Marsh, 


(( 


5 03 


Henry Goodhne, 


(( 


75 


James Blaisdell, 


(( 


5 00 


Mr. Kendall, 


u 


3, 00 


Joseph Garland, 


(( 


9 75 


Joseph Garland, for gravel 


2 40 


A. S. Laml), for stone 


, 


5 00 


J. II. Proctor, for stone . 


9 00 


Olongli & Foster, for In 


mber 


. 20 94 




$055 00 


Balance to new acconnt, 


• 


17 32 



$072 38 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT Xo. 8. 



By Balance from old {vccoiiut 
Appropriation . 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Luther S. Proctor, Supt. . 

Jolni r. Yoiuig" for labor 

liobcrt Stevens " 

N. B. Bead 

JolniA. Haselton 

(Jilmau Heed " 

J. H. Proctor 

Peter Farnier " 

Amos Latucli " 

Lyman A. Proctor " 

■ B^. F. Page 

Mr. Glidden 

AVilliain Mills 

E. S. Yomig 

Frank Wlnttcmore " 

J. J. Adams 

Amos Spofiord " 

J. P. Yonng, jr. " 

BandallJ. Piilsbnry 

James P. Eaton 

Alfred AVright 

Zadoc B. Wright 

J. M Oromhie' 

Cox & Cass 



Balance to new account . 



. 831 


14 


. 550 


00 


. 8177 


75 


21 


75 


58 


75 


8 


00 


8 


25 


31) 


75 




00 


9 


40 


31 


50 


8 


25 


35 


25 


2 


50 


21 


37 


1 


50 




25 


11 


75 


12 


00 


7 


50 


o 


00 


11 


75 


9 


00 


9 


00 


11 


25 


1 


50 


$538 


02 


43 


12 



$581 14 



5?581 14 



7G 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 9. 

By ])a]3iiice from old aceoiuit, . $323 00 
Apin'opriatiou, .. . . 250 00 



$373 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



To Albert X. Scott, Supt. 
Joliu Silver, for labor 
William GrifiiD, 
Alplioiizo Boyce, 
Ladd Boyce, 
William Boyce, 
G. W. George, 
David Swett, 
Stephen Heseltou, 
Xatli'l Ooruiug, 
Elijah Goo dale, 

0. E. Clark, 
B. W. Corning- 
John D. Emery 
E. V, Corning, 

1. II. AVebstcH', 
Sidney Dunbar, 
J. M. Corning, 
Ezekiel Foss, 
A. W. Corning, 
James Currier, ' 
Eugene Dunbar, 
J. G. Webster, for gravel 
Clougli & Foster, for lumber 



Balance to nevv account. 



$18 754 



.) 1^;) 



14 


25 


8 


37 


f) 


00 





00 


13 


50 


15 


00 


3 


00 


7 


50 


4^ 


00 


o 


00 


35 


50 


o 




13 


00 




00 


1) 00 


1 


50 


i) 


50 


19 


50 


1 


50 


4 50 


8 


59 


48 


59 



$342 90 

30 84 



$373 00 



HIGHWAY DISTEICT No. 10. 



By Balance from old accomit 
Appropriation 
Beserved fund 



800 00 

mo 00 



$1,1 



oo <<> 



EXrEXDlTURES. 

To Samuel Brown jr. Siipt. . 
W. r. AVortldey for labor 
S. S. Gale 
Maxwell 01i\ei' 
Peter Bumblebee " 

Simon Aboir " 

Hiittee IMartin 
Jose])li (4aji,gin " 

Frank III vers " 

K. Fnuld & Co., oil 
Jacqne ]Mannel " 

Thomas Tower " 

Frank Olivev 
James Dowd " 

AVm. Leonard " 

Bobert YwiiTen " 

Haines & Wallace . 
Bodwell & Clark, stone . 
John B. Yarick for picks 
H. Head, blacksmith work 
B. L. Fellows, gravel 
J. S. Kidder & Co., lime . 



I>alance to new acconnt 



$414 27 
3 00 
G 25 

72 87 

19 r>o 



8 


25 


• 8 


25 


90 


;>8 


02 


47 


1 


40 


;35 


02 


9 00 


12 


75 


45 


00 


.1 


50 


() 


88 


119 


70 


108 


00 




00 





05 


IS 


80 


11 


00 


$1,129 


00 


4 


75 



$1,133 75 



HIGHWAY DISTEIOT Xo. 11. 



By Balance from last year 
Approimatioii . 



$40 48 
700 00 



$740 48 



EXPEyDITUEES. 



To Ezra B. Stearns, Supt. 
Jolin E. Stearns, for labor 
L. S. Hartshorn 

Elijah Stearns " 
H. J. Poor 

Thomas C. Stearns " 

Geo. Andrews " 

Wm. Stearns " 

Gilman R. Stevens " 

Charles Fantom " 

John Hoi'i'igan " 

AVm. K. Cochran " 

John Harwood " 
Thomas C. Erost 

Amos II. (jeny " 

Ariosto Stearns " 
Josei)h Melvin 
W. H. Newhall 
John Fields 
Geo. H. Colby 

James Webber " 

Allen Partridge " 
Davi<l Wells, for plank 



Balance to new account 



. $177 


00 


4 


50 


4 50 


22 


50 


o 
O 


00 


. 20 02 


. 10 


50 


o 


37 


. 14 45 


4 


87 


o 
O 


00 


3 


00 


. 47 


88 


. 78 


75 


. 19 00 


8 


75 


. 30 


00 


1 


75 


G 00 


4 


50 


. 50 


25 




00 


. 53 


87 


$589 46 


. 151 


02 



$740 48 



79 



HIGHWAY DISTEICT Ko. 12. 

By Appropriation . . . $250 00 

EXrEXDITUEES. 

To Balance from old account 
City Farm for la1)or 
Eobert Stevens " 
William Mills 
Geo. W. Jenkins " 
Alonzo Page " 

J. L. Fogg- 
Bernard McGinness for lalior 
Joseph Welcome " 

Lawrence McCarty " 

M. Healy 

William 0. Shannon " 

David Wool ford 
William Maxwell 
Eeuben Moman " 



U 50 


. 115 


50 


IS 


50 


(5 


00 


17 


87 


15 


87 


14 


02 


8 


25 


8 


25 


8 


25 


8 


25 





00 


4 50 


5 


00 


'> 


00 



1243 sr, 

Balance to new account . (>4 



$250 00 



80 



HIGHWAY DISTEICT No. 13. 



By Balance from old account 
Appropriation 



$1 1)8 
200 00 



$201 98. 



EXPEXDITURES, 



To Wm. Campbell, Supt. . 
Lorenzo D. Scagel for labor 
Wm. Shore 
J. Long- 
Thomas E(hA'ard,s " 
John Canada " 
John Caldwell 
J. Colby 
F. Kimball 



Balance to new account 



$94 


25 


48 


02 


1 00 


() 00 


13 


87 


14 


25 




25 


t) 


00 


1 


50 



$190 74 
11 24 



$201 98. 



SUMMARY OF EXPEXHITUEBS FOE EEEAIES 
OF HIGHWAYS BY DISTEICTS. 



District 


Xo. 


1 

3 








$225 (19 

9,251 48 

484 84 






4 
5 
() 








255 00 
298 22 
383 40 






7 . 








055 00 
538 02 



81 



Distiict No. 9 

" 10 

" 11 

" " 12 

" 13 



$342 1)6 

1,129 00 

589 46 

241 86 

190 74 









By 


NEW HIGHW 

Balance from old account 
Appropriation 
Eeserved fund 
Overdraft (refunded) 


AYS. 

. $362 62 

. 7,500 00 

. 4,750 00 

23 60 



$14,58(> 3^ 



$12,636 22 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Stephen Saunders, land dam- 
age (High street) . 
S. Saunders do. Maple st. . 
0. O'Shannessey do. do. 
Jason Weston, do. do. 
Albert Little, do. do. 
G. B. Brown, do, do. 
John Lee, do. do. . 
E. Faulkner, do. High st 
Mahala Gould, do. do. 
John Kennard, do do. 
D. & D. B. Wilson, do. do 
John L. Kelly and N. S. Clark 

do. Hanover st. . 
Timothy Sullivan, do. do. 
Geo. W. Hunkings, do. do. 
Hamilton Melendy, do. do. 
Wm. B. Johnson, do. do. 
Harrington «& Straw, do. do 
6 



$1 00 

169 06 

90 00 

343 00 

79 20' 

300 OO' 

743 11 

136 50 

13 97 

26 00 

11 50 

16 25 

11 38 
15 71 

10 84 
32 50 

48 75 



82 



To LI ILill, Exr. do. Jiassabe.sic st 
Natli'l Perkins, do. Central st 
G. &. E. K. Haselton, do. Elm 

street 

Duncan Kein, do. do, 
Henry C. Dickey, do. do. 
M. Moran, do. Belmont st. 
A. S. Lamb, do. do. 
Edson Hill and estate of S 

James, do. jManchester st 
-John 'Dealy, do. do. 
Oatharine Kerrin, do. do. 
First Baptist Society, do. do 
Harrington & Johnson, do. do 
"Timothy D. O'Connor, do. do 
D. C. Gonld, do. Ashland st 
Geo. W. Berry, do. do. 
J. 8. Holt, do. do. . 
Benj. Si)oftbrd, do. Chester st 
\V. O. & E. G. Donnelly do 
W. O. & E. G. Donnelly, do 

Lincoln st. . 
IJussell White, Suj)t. 
D. \y. lleynolds, for labor 
Fogg' & James, for horse hire 
Stearns & Allen, engineerin.i 
Geo. H. Allen ^ " 

,B. L. Flanders 
0. H. Gordon, 
Joseph L. Smith for stakes 
City Farm for labor 
Charles Tebbetts for labor 
Janies Tebbetts 
Levi ^Yoodmau " 

Kidder & Chandler for powder 
James Kcarns for labor , 
A. AY. Qniraby " . 



$17r> 75 
400 00 

200 00 

1,100 00 

700 00 

100 00 

50 00 

32 50 

24 38 
r>2 50 
05 00 
81 25 
If) 25 

;112 G4 

19 20 

222 30 

1 00 

1 00 

3,0 50 

219 00 

40 00 

2 00 
244 25 

8(; 75 

14 50 

12 00 

(I 00 

347 12 

12 37 

4 12 

7 87 

25 39 
81 43 
7() 50 



To Geo. AV.ButteriuMd, labor . 
A. F. Qiiiiiiby " . 

Wintlirop Small 
Luther Caiiiplx'U " . 
Joseph A. Haines for gravel 
Loaini Searles fov labor . 
City Double Team Xo. 1 



" SiugU; 



Michael Seaulaii for labor 

S. Donohoe " 
Michael Haudley 
John Feunoff 
WiUiaui Griitiu 

Teter Seauhiu " 

Patrick Couuor " 
Michael Shea 

AlmuH Cashing " 

David Devine " 
Patrick Mauahau 

John McLaughlin " 

Timothy Connor " 
John Dealey 

John Mahouey " 

William Maxwell " 

Thomas Carrigan " 

Thomas Calaghan " 

John Larkin " 

Edward Bonner " 

John ISTolan " 

John Devine " 

Edward Bresnahaii " 
Timothy Sullivan 

Thomas Fox " 



$i2:\ oO 
U4 00 
112 50 

m 50 

L>00 00 
1G2 50 
177 00 
1()'2 00 
151) 00 

m 00 

102 50 

102 50 

(;i 49 

:>:> 40 

14 25 
07 50 

141 00 

:u 50 

19 50 

15 75 
28 00 

20 99 
128 74 

15 75 
15 00 
25 S7 
25 87 
45 05 

9 00 

15 00 

150 12 

53 02 

:i() 25 

(> 00 

87 00 

115 49 

02 30 



84 



To Patrick Finn for 
Jerry Regau 
Eicliard Horan 
Lawrence McCarty 
Patrick Spaiue 
Amos Goddard 

A. Wells 
John Oampljell 
Micliael Healey 
William McQuirie 
Michael Kegan 
Thomas Mahoney 
Thomas St. Louis 
Patrick Whalan 
Murty Mahoney 
W. H. Brooks 
Ijouis Laflott 
Daniel Dealey 
William Conway 
Thomas Moran 
Jerry Connor 

B. Moriarty 
Michael Mullins 
James Silk 
James Victory 
J. H. Masters 
T. Bernier 
Patrick Leonard 
Eugene Sullivan 
Lewis Kichards 
Frank Currier 
John Slattery 
Moses Prox 
Peter Bosher 
Patrick Broderick 
John Welch 
Cornelius Crane 



lahor 





. S54 00 




35 38 




47 25 




15 75 




14 25 




99 38 




. 131 25 




. 131 25 




99 00 




25 12 




15 75 




09 75 




7 50 




13 50 




55 49 




34 87 




92 99 




56 24 




()3 74 




36 00 




3 00 




39 00 




23 99 




22 50 




23 25 




19 50 




18 75 




15 75 




43 50 




7 50 




16 62 




49 12 




m 00 




14 25 




8 25 




43 87 




2 25 



85 



To T. J. Goodsoll for labor . 
Louis CIiaiKlelane " . 
I. 0. Fkmdei's " . 

Charles Tiper " . 

Patrick Lee " . 

Jolin Regan " . 

Joseph Stone " . 

Peter ]Mad(len " . 

S. Eaton Emory " . 

Geo. Stearns " . 

Dudley Noyes " . 

Eli Perry " . 

George Newrey " . 

Peter Haggerty " . 

Clark & Bodwell for stone 
Horace (j)uiniby for labor 
John Regan " . 

Patrick Eox " . 

John Frenchman " . 

M. D. Stokes for use of derric 
Edward Ahern for labor . 
Joseph Welcome " . 

Michael Ilaurihan " . 
Moses Lull " . 

Bernard McGinness " . 
Jerry Mahanna " . 

Charles Bunton, blacksmithin 
Pike & Heald, repairing ]>um] 
Patrick Connor for labor . 
Haines & Wallace for 1 urn be 
William Froin for labor . 
Thomas Caiaglian " . 
Thomas Connor " . 

Wm. G. Everett for horse Inr 
Join I B. Varick, 
John Hosley for stone x)Osts 
('. Younu' for labor 



$(5 


75 


04 


49 


79 


25 


45 


50 


4 


50 


31) 


12 


21 


00 


34 


25 


4 50 


O 


00 


22 


50 


5 


25 


5 


25 




25 


. 430 08 


13 


13 


17 


25 


5 


00 


9 


79 


k 27 


00 


90 


87 


47 


99 


29 


75 


48 


37 


69 


87 


49 


50 


g 4(» 


45 


1> 


75 




75 


r 4 


50 


22 


12 


15 


37 


o 


00 


e 4 


50 




25 


7 


50 


15 


00 



S(> 

To John P. YouDg" for labor 
Joliii H. rroctor " . 

Z. B. Wriolit " . 



BahuK'e to ik^w account 





sio 


50 








.'>5 


50 






• 


110 


05 






ill: 


!,(>i7 


()0 




. 


18 


02 










i!^12, 


,030 


')'> 



W ATEEIXG STIIE I:TS. 

By balance from old account . $31 59 
A|)[)ropiiation . . . 700 00 

Reserved Fund . . . 150 00 



EXPENDITIKES. 

To I^. Frank Fogg" for repairing i)ii)e $'2 ()5 
J. W. Whittier 
J. H. Witberell 
J. (^). A. Sargent 
John L. Kennedy for i)ainting 

cart 

A. W. Sanborn for repairing 

cart 

Luther Campbell for team and 

teamster .... 
Anioskeag Steamer . 
Bennaeook Hose Company 
(1. W. Buttertiekl, teamster . 
A. F. Quimby, teamster . 
\V. Small, teamster 
City Teams .... 
II. N. Howe for repairing jtipe 
A'. i\ Hastings for pii>e . 



13 


70 


») 


00 


.'57 


08 


12 


4] 


17 


30 


500 


00 


2<S 


00 


10 


25 


4 00 


(> 


00 


• > 


00 


IS 00 


4 


50 


;k) 


50 



$881 5i) 



ST 



To William Shore for work on cart §'i 50 
J. Campbell for team -'>,"> 00 



lialaiice to new account . 



1825 29 
5(; 30 



$881 51) 



rAYlNCi STREETS. 

By balance front old account . $300 52 

.Vi)propriation .... 3,500 00 
IJeserved fund .... 150 00 



$3,950 52 



KXPENDITUEES. 

To llussell WIiiti% Sui)t. 

J. S. Kidder & Co., for cement 
L. W. Prince for cobble stone 
1). W. Garland & Co. for blocks 

and flagging- stone 
Stearns & Allen, engineers 
R. W. Flanders & Co., re])air 

ing tooi(^*' ... 
J. L. Smith for stakes 
Jeremiah Connor for labor 
Hackett & Taylor for concrete 
(I. W. jintterfield, teamster 
A. F. Quimby " 

W. Small 

Frank Currier " 

Patrick Finn for ]>aving . 
Wm. Maxwell " . 

Ivichard Horan for labor 
Patrick Spain " . 

Luther Cam i:)bell " . 



$03 00 
13 75 



2,08(5 70 

4(5 75 

20 50 
2 00 

10 00 
28 72 
10 00 
18 00 
1J5 50 

21 00 
11(5 25 
111 37 

48 75 
3(5 00 
24 00 



To John Campbell for labor. 

A. Wells 
T. Mills 

E. Bonuer " 
Amos Goddai'd '• 
L. Ohapdelane " 
Micliael Prox 

Ben Bressot " 

Joseph Welcome " 

J. Lupin " 

William Froin " 

David Devine " 

Francis O'Oaliill 
Micliael Eegan ' ' 

F. Perry 

Thomas Calaghan " 

B. McGinness 

George Newrey ' ' 

Thomas Froin " 

Jerry Eegan " 

Jerry Mahanna " 

T. j'. Goodsell 

Levi Woodman " 

Peter Bosher " 

J. M. Dickey 

Peter Sea nlan " 

E. McLaughlin 

Terrence Gillis " 

Joseph Oota 

Eli Perry 

T. Mahoney 

■€. Clough 

•J. A. B. Emerson 

€ity Teams 

Joseph Gaggiu " 

Samuel Brown, -)r. " 

Jclm C. Head 



$120 


25 


71 


25 


14 


(32 




00 


18 


75 


21 


37 


20 (52 


(5 


00 


19 


87 


11 


62 


28 


87 


r- 
1 


12 


11 


(J2 


15 


75 


1) 




IG 


87 


21 




13 


12 


16 


87 


25 


37 


o8 


25 




50 


21 


37 


') 


00 


15 


75 


. 102 


(;2 





87 


35 


00 


35 


62 


13 


12 


IS 


00 


17 


50 


27 


50 


. 123 


00 


VJ 


50 


. 103 


74 


12 


50 



To 







89 




Miix^\'ell Oliver 


for 


labor . 


$15 00 


Frank Eivcrs 






19 i;5 


Jacob Mayiiard 






IS 75 


James Dowd 






15 00 


Josepli Labell 






4 50 


Cliarles Barrou 






7 50 



Balance to new account 



$3,913 (59 

3(» 83 



$3,950 52 



LIGHTING STREETS. 
By Appropriation . . . $4,500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Balance from old account 

Mancliester Gas-Light Company 

for gas 

do. for lighting lamps 
do. for lamp posts 
Colley & Kelly, for repairing 
lanterns .... 
Fogg & James, for team 
H. M. Bailey, for repairing lan- 
terns 

II. H. Koycs, for lighting 

lami)S in AVard 7 . 
J. J. Abbott, for rep. lanterns 
Pike & Heald, do. 
Pike & Heald, for lanterns 
J. L. Kelly, for rep. lanterns . 
A. H. Lowell, for lamp posts 
Wm. G. Everett, for team 



$1 07 

2,103 78 
972 45 

39 00 

44 50 
1 00 

1 25 

25 00 
7 00 
94 99 
48 00 
18 75 
205 00 



4> O 



'ZO 



m 



To liaiT & (Happ, for kcH'oseiie 

and lamp ('liimneys . . $10 50 
Vance & (Toodvviii, do. . 4 10 



l^alance to new ae<'onnt 






5B4,500 00 



GRANITE BEIIXJE. 



]>y Ikdanee from old aec'ount . 1100 (>'2 

Apj)roprial:ion . . . 1.500 00 



$1,(100 (12 



EXPEXDITURES. 

To j>aid Haines & Wallace, plank 
Clougli & Foster 
Daniels & Co., spikes 
John B. Yarick " 
(Charles E. ]Monlton, repairs 
Walter Xeal 

(4eorg"e Holbrc^ok " 

Lntlier Campl)ell 
Loami ^^earles " 

William (\)nway 
Timothy Connoi' 
Louis Laflott 
Edward I^onner 
William (Iriflin 
.lolni Larkin 
l^dward Aliern 
(Jeovge Bloss 
Patrick Mannalian 



- $797 


83 


488 


71 


48 


08 


23 


89 


20 


25 


20 


00 


70 


44 


4 


00 


8 


00 


4 


50 


1 


50 


4 


50 


7 


00 


7 


00 


7 


00 


• > 


00 


<> 


00 




50 



91 



To Lewis Cliapdelaiic 






t^ 00 


William Froiii 






1 75 


.lerry Maluiiiiia 






3 00 


AV. H. Brooks 






1 50 


Michael Healey 






1 50 


Thomas ('aiTlg-au 






I 50 


Barth. Moriarty 






1 75 


Murty Mahoiiy 






1 50 


Jolin Foinioft' 






?> 50 


' 


$1,542 10 


Bahniee to new aceoiiut 


58 52 












$1,000 ()2 



AMOSKEACI FALLS BKIIXIE. 



By Balance fi'om old account . $154 5)7 

Appropriation . . . 2,000 00 

Eesei'ved Fund . . . HOO 00 

Old ])lank sold . . . 50 75 



$:;,005 72 



EXPENDITUKIOS. 

l^o paid Kimball & Buntou for 
stone and work . . , $1 



(lough & Foster, plank . 
S. B. Chandler, laying plank . 
0. E. Moulton, Avork 
J. B. Varick, nails . 
Currier Bros, for oil & chimneys 
G. W. Adams & Son for oil & 
chimneys . . . . 
(i. W. Butterlield for work 



,4SS 


(;5 


,0(;i) 


17 


105 


75 


15 


47 




30 


24 


00 


11 


50 


o 


00 



92 



To A. F. Qiiiinby for labor 

City Teams 

Warren Harvey " 

J. J. Abbott for painting- 
T. L. Q nimby for ligliting- 
J. B. Jones for selling old i)lank 



SI 00 

4 50 
40 oO 

1 50 
00 CO 

5 CO 



Balance to new account . 



$2,919 34 
86 38 



S3,005 72 



BEIDGE ACEOSS COHAS BEOOK. 
By balance from old account . . $23 33 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Clougli & Foster for plank 
John G. Webster . 



5 00. 



SEWEES AND DEAIX?. 

By Appropriation . . . $0,000 00 

Eeserved Fund . . . 3,400 00 

Fees for entering, . . 50 1 50 

Cash for brick, labor & plank 27 00 



$10,018 50 



EXPENDITUBES. 



To Balance from old account 
Geo. H. Allen for plan . 
Geo. H. Allen for engineering 

services . . . . 

S. L. Flanders 
Stearns & Allen for engineer'g 

services . . . . 

A. H. Lowell for castings 
Haines & Wallace for lumber 
David Wells for lumber . 

D. H. & S. M. iS^utt, masonry 
Temple McQueston for i^ipe 

and laying .... 
Wm. McPlierson for pipe and 

laying . . . . . 
V. 0. Hastings for pipe nnd 

laying . . . . . 
C.^V. Mead for brick 
Estate of Wm. Ricliardson for 

brick 

John J. Bennett for brick 
J. L. Smith for lumber . 
Plumer & Chandler, rubber 

suits 

Geo. W. Thayer, rubber boots 

O. Gay, cess-pool covers . 

H. & H. E. rettee for cement 

E. P. Johnson & Co. for plaidv 
Lamson& Harden, stone work 
Rogers & Niles, nails and tools 
Kidder & Chandler for oil 
John B. Varick for nails . 
Russell White, Supt. 
John Daley for work . 
Daniel Daley " . 



$18 


Vu) 


2G 


00 


33 


00 


00 


91 


75 


110 


95 


109 


23 


41 


00 


2,880 


21 



1,347 48 



350 94 



315 


00 


28 


00 


o 


00 


91 


olj 


34 


23 


14 


75 


51 00 


42 


00 


52 


30 


81 


00 


1 


00 


44 


44 


9 


00 


o 


44 



72 00 

12 75 



94 



To 



William Griffin for 


labor . 


. $m 87 


Loaiiii Searles 


a 


50 00 


MicLael Hcaly 


(( 


1 50 


Michael Shea 


( ( 


27 00 


3Iichael Scaulaii 


(( 


32 25 


Tiiiiothy Coinioi' 


a 


57 SO 


David Devine 


1 1 


74 08 


Patrick Fiuii 


a 


i)8 00 


Patrick Manna hai i 


i. 


47 25 


John Mahoney 


i i 


30 75 


John ]N^olan 


a 


2i) 02 


David H. Yonni>,' 


(( 


1 08 


Edwar<l Bonner 


i i 


100 50 


John McLanghliii 


i I 


18 00 


Ahnns Cashing- 


a 


17 00 


C. H. Hodgeman 


ii 


8 50 


Thomas Fox 


a 


24 75 


Louis Laflott 


i I 


57 75 


Thomas Oalaghan 


li 


()0 75 


Wm. Conway 


i: 


09 00 


Moses Prox 


I i 


30 00 


John Kennedy 


i I 


7() 00 


3Iichael Kelley 


i I 


42 00 


Luther Campbell 


n 


134 00 


Moses Lull 


i ( 


23 25 


Patrick Whalau 


(( 


44 ()2 


Lawrence McCarty 


(( 


103 50 


Patrick Spaine 


(( 


73 50 


Michael Handl\ 


(( 


24 75 


Jerry Eegan 


a 


109 24 


Thomas Froin 


i i 


27 75 


William Froin 


(( 


79 37 


William Leonard 


n 


18 75 


Michael Hanrahan 


i i 


49 50 


J. Welcome 


11 


21 75 


J. Letendre 


a 


75 


Jerrv Mahanna 


It 


71 12 



95 



To Syl\ ester Donolioe loi 
i leni ju'd MeG i i n u'ss 
Edwai'd Aherii 
Michael Fitzgerald 
Jaeol) Puffer 
Joseph Lupine 
A. Pereault 
Moses Bresset 
James Hayes 
Mieliael Regan 
Murty i\Iahoney 
Thomas Moran 
Ed. Bresnahan 
T. 15ernier 
Mitchell Pockett 
James Silk 
Patrick Leonard 
Eugene Sldli^•an 
Jolui Welch 
I'ichard Horan 
Peter ^Scanlan 
William Maxwell 
Joseph Cota 
John Regan 
i'haries E. Moulton 
A. Wells 
Amos (loddard 
^niliani Dinin 
Thomas Carrigan 
(leorge Bloss 
Francis O. Cahill 
John Butler 
William Ayers 
John Sullivan 
Michael MuUin 
P. Connor 
Thomas St. Louis 



•hd 


or 


!^33) 75 


. 


14 25 






42 75 






8 25 






1 50 






15 75 




» 


9 75 






12 75 






f) 00 






21 7() 






m 37 






40 12 






10 50 






58 r2 






45 37 






58 12 






49 87 






10 50 






19 50 






04 12 






{>2 50 






70 00 






7 12 






2 25 






10 25 






12 50 






42 00 






13 50 






40 (>9 






28 50 






34 50 






24 50 






75 
24 00 
30 00 
37 12 
23 25 



96 



ro TeiTuuce (iillis for 


labor 


. 847 25 


Hugh Kelley 


(; 


11 25 


James Freeman 


;( 


75 


Joseph Matthews 


(( 


10 50 


Bartholomew Moriarty 


50 00 


Joseph Webber 


(( 


5 25 


Oil ver Ch apdelaii e 


(( 


30 00 


A. Perkins 


(( 


38 87 


J. H. Campbell 


11 


30 00 


l\ Wright 


a 


8 25 


Peter Haggerty 


a 


31 12 


Levi H. Sleeper 


li 


4 50 


Jerry Ohamplin 


a 


20 25 


rJames Lynch 


li 


3 75 


Joseph Daley 


(C 


10 50 


Louis Ohapclelane 


u 


37 12 


J. H. Masters 


11 


45 37 


Joseph Hill 


(( 


14 25 


Michael Healey 


(( 


38 25 


James Lyiui 


(( 


10 50 


James Victory 


(( 


20 25 


John Jethro 


(( 


18 00 


Antoine Lovejoy 


(( 


27 25 


Thomas Foley 


(( 


19 50 


NeilMcGuire 


c 


3 00 


Eobert McGnire 


li 


4 50 


William McGuire 


il 


33 75 


Coleman Devine 


(( 


18 00 


Dennis Dacey 


(( 


18 00 


William H. Brooks 


(( 


32 02 


O. Mathews 


(( 


13 50 


J. A. Ehodes 


(( 


3 00 


Timothy Snllivan 


(( 


40 12 


John I^arkin 


(( 


31 50 


James Kearns 


(( 


44 00 


A. W. Q nimby 


i I 


30 75 


John Fennoif 


u 


38 25 



0' 



'To John Slatteiy labor . 

Cx. W. I>utterlield, teamster 
W. Small " . 

A. F. (^) nimby " . 

City Teams 



Balance to new aceoiiiit 



$2; 5 25 




20 00 




2;) 00 




20 00 




. 2;n 50 




$9,051 ()0 




()() DO 




810,018 


50 



EESEEVOIES. 



By balanee from old account . §885 13 

Appropriation . . . 1,500 00 



$0 «^ c t 10 
2,-><S,) J, J 



EXPENDITURES. 

'To William Kennedy, care of res. 
Amoskeag' Man'f'g Co., for 
bagging .... 

A. B. Webster, for iron Y\'ork . 
Geo. Holbrook, for repairs 
"Fire King," for pumping 
Charles Bunton, for iron work 
H. H. Noyes, for work 
James Eastman, for work, 1870 
C. E. Moulton, for work . 
Haines & Wallace, for lumber 
J. L. Smith, " " . 

Loami Searles, for labor 
Wm. Griffin 
Ed. Bonner 
X/Ouis Laflott " 

7 



$143 50 



1) 00 


2 


00 


19 


32 





20 


1 


70 




00 


11 


50 



'J 


00 


30 40 


12 


00 


12 


00 





50 





50 







00 



08 



To ratrick Miiinialian, labor 
Almiis Ouslnug" " 

John Feniioff " 



Balance to new account 



$3 50 


3 


50 


7 


00 


$274 


02 


2,110 


51 



$2,385 la 



PINE (mOYE. 

By Balance from old account , $288 7(J 
deceived for lots &c., sold . 1,250 00 

EXPEXDITUEES. 



$1,538 7(5. 



To Kadmiel Haselton foi labor 
A. B. Chase " " 

J. G. Colt for trees 
Daniels & Co. for tools . 
Pike i& Heald, repairing pump 
T. McQueston, putting in well 
I). Folsom, stone for well 
H. N. Howe for i)ump . 
J. J. Abbott for i)ainting 
Evans «& Eussell for lumber 
William C. Chase for labor 



Balance to new account . 



1252 

324 

54 



ii 
25 



75 
00 

07 
50 
50 
00 

27 00 
9 18 

() 2(; 

20 05 

$801 GO 
737 10 



$1,538 70 



99 



VALLEY OEMETEEY. 



By Appropriation . . . S300 00 

To Treasurer of Committee . $300 00 



COMMONS. 



By Balance from old account . $42 00 

Appropriation . . . 2,500 00 

Eeserved Fund ... 700 00 

City Farm for grass . . 90 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Geo. H. Allen, civil engineer . $1G 25 
Stearns & Allen " . 29 50 

Hackett & Taylor for concrete 

walks . . . . . 1,035 00 
Daniels & Co. for nails . . 4 68 

H. & H. E. Pettee, cement . 8 05 

Proctor & Haselton for shade 

trees 12 00* 

Geo. H. Dudley for making- 
tree boxes .... 
A. B. Webster for iron work 
Warren Harvey sand for walks 
John L. Bradford for building 
fence ..... 
W. W. Hubbard for posts 
David Wells for lumber 
C. E. Moulton for work 
Bodwell & Clark for stone . 
Joel Page for trimming trees 



8 


05 


1 


75 


98 


57 


168 02 


47 


75 


63 


54 


3 00 


7 


00 


9 


25 



J, 332 06 



100 



To Ebcii KnoAvlton, vvliite v/asli- 

iug fence . . . . 

Jolin L. Kennedy for painting 

fence . 
Oliver Gay for stone 
I. 0. Flanders for stoue work 
W. H. Xewhall for work 
Lanison&Marden, stone cliii)s 
Timothy Connor for labor 
Jolin Daley " 

Frank Currier " 

James Kearns " 

J. M. Dickey 
S. Donohoe " 

Jolm Fennoff " 

Thomas Fox 
Michael Scanlaii " 

Daniel Daley 
John Mahoney " 

A. W. Quimby 
Ed. Bresnahan " 

John Campbell 
Lntlier Campbell " 

Loami Searles " 

John Larkin " 

William Griffin 
Patrick Mannahan " 
AV. H. Brooks 
AVilliam Conway " 

Almus Cushing" " 

Thomas Carrigan " 

Murty Mahoney 
AVilliam Froin " 

Louis Lafiott " 

Bartholomew Moriarty " 
City Teams 



$40 00 



112 


04 


84(3 


54 


k lOG 


32 


19 


50 


s 1 


00 


23 


02 


23 


02 


1 


75 


38 


43 


10 


50 


30 




44 50 


31 


50 


30 


37 


84 31 


78 


18 


4 


50 


4 


12 


11 


25 


() 


00 


o 


00 


10 50 


1 


75 


1 


75 


1 


50 


4 50 


5 


25 




50 


9 00 


1 


75 


1 


50 


1 


Tr>; 


122 


50 



101 



To Haines & Wallace for Iiiiiiber $25 8G 
J. L. Smith for liiiiiber . 7 02 



Balance to new account 



83,2C)G 10 

05 90 $.3,332 00 



IEO]S" FENCE ON MEREIMAOK SQUARE. 



By balance from old account . $950 28 

Appropriation .... 4,000 00 



$-l,95() 28 



EXPENDITUllE.S. 

To George E. Dickey for ]»lan of 
Gate .... 

Stearns & Allen, civi] engi 
neers .... 

D. W. & T. Garland fov stone 
base .... 

A. H. Lowell for gates . 
" " for fence 

Balance to new account 



15 00 


14 00 


. 975 00 


. 030 00 


. 2,555 50 


$4,189 50 


. 700 78 



$4,950 28 



MILITIA. 

By Balance from old account 
Ai)propriation . 



$148 19 
400 00 



$548 19 



102 




EXPENDITURES. 




To Maucliester War Veterans 


$100 00 


Battery, section B. . 


100 00 


Head Guards .... 


100 00 


Amoskeag Veterans 


100 00 




$400 00 


Balance to new account . 


148 19 







$548 19 



EEPAIES OF BUILDINGS. 

By Balance from old account . $54 (53 
Appropriation .... 1,000 00 



$1,054 63 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Geo. Holbrook, repairs of en- 
gine house .... 

Walter Keal, repairs of city 
stables 

AValter Neal, repairs of Ward G 
Ward room .... 

Dickey, Carpenter & Co., re- 
pairs of city stables 

John C. Young, roofing engine 
house 

Bike & Heald, pump and rep'rs 

John B. Varick, nails 

0. E. Colley, painting at en- 
gine house .... 

0. E. Moulton, repairing stalls 

Colley & Kelly, painting 

Daniels & Co., nails 



$153 06 


217 35 


54 61 


62 85 


79 02 


7 72 


30 


19 01 


30 35 


3 05 


4 02 



103 

To Geo. A. Baker &Co. light, rods $30 00 

J. J. Abbott, glazino- . . 4 50 

J. L. Smith, himber . . 5 32 



$671 IG 
Balance to new account . . 383 47 



$1,054 ()3 



LIBRAEY BUILDING. 

By Balance from old account 8(>,74<S 85 

Appropriation .... 4,000 00 
Eeserved fund . . . . 300 00 



$11,048 85 



EXPENDITUKES. 

To W. W. Hubbard ... $33 08 
Daniels & Co., for hardware, 

glass, &e. .... 03G 03 

J. A. Stevens, for painting . 23 98 

Alpheus Gay, building contract 7,138 95 

Alpheus Gaj', for extra work . 772 70 

Piper & Shepherd, for cloth . 8 IG 

Horace Willey, for grading . GG 50 

Hackett & Taylor for concrete 212 43 

Pike & Heald, for stoves . 45 GG 

J. W. Johnson, chairs . . 3G0 85 
J. Q. A. Sargent for gas pipe 

and fixtures .... 207 C5 
J. J. Bennett for cleaning brick 

walls 74 50 

W. S. James, frescoing rooms 1,350 00 



104 



To J. S. Kidder & Co., ceineiit . $24 45 
Jerry Plodge, for luiiiljer . . 15 70 



$10,971 24 
77 {>1 
Balance to new {iccoiuit, $11,048 85- 



DISCOUJS^T OX TAXES. 

By Balance from old account . $57(5 00 
Appropriation . , . 5,000 00 

$5,570 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To paid smidi-y persons . .84,882 00 

Balance to nev/ account . (>94 00 

$5,570 00 



AID TO OHICAGO SUFFERERS. 
By Appropriation . . . $15,000 00 

EXPEXDITURES. 

To paid Relief Committee . . $15,000 00 



COURT HOUSE. 

By Balance from old account . $428 33 

Incidental cx[)enses transfer- 
red to lit n\) rooms for Wa- 
ter Commissioners . . 704 42 

$1,292,75 



105 



EXPENDITURES. 



To ])ai(I J. Q. A. Sargent for lix- 
tiires and pipe 
Walter Neal, repairing closets 
Pike & Heald, stoves and re}). 
Ebenez(^r Hadley for trees 
John P. Brock, water cistern . 
David Tliayer, brooms 
Kenben Morgan, setting trees 
George Holbrook, fitting np 

rooms for Water Com'rs 
Fj. Ivoper for plastering . 
Am. Man. Co. for doors . 
Daniels «& Co., mortise latch . 
Fairbanks & Downs, gal. ])ipe 
G. B. Fogg, keys 
J. L. Kennedy, painting . 
kSnllivan Brothers, stoves 



Balance to new account 



$;>05 


00 


22 


5<s 


101) 


23 


27 


00 


<> 


95 


4 


(10 


1 


50 


274 


70 


77 


12 


29 


15 


2 


50 


-37 


80 


<> 


35 


90 


42 


103 


7<s 


81,092 


OS 


200 07 





$1,292 75 



CITY LIBEARY. 

By Balance from old account . $335 22 

Appropriation . . . .'1000 00 



JjPO, OOi) — -J 



EXPENDITURES. 

To C. H. Marshall, cash paid . 83 97 

C. H. Marshall salary as Lib'n 79!) 97 

W. H. Fisk, print'gand l)ind'g 31(; 59 

C. F. Livingston, catalogues, . 150 25 

Wm. Parker, boxes, . . . 4 19 



lOG 



To E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
A. Ferren & Co., clotli . 
S. N. Bell, rent of room 
S. X. Bell, IncidentaLs 
Cutter, Tower & Co., press and 

die .... 

Man. Gas Light Co. for gas 
^Etna Ins. Co. . 
J. J. Abbott for setting glas: 
E. E. Coburn for i)eriodicals 
J. V. Sullivan 
John A. Caverly, carting books 
Gil. B. Fogg, plated numbers 
J. B. Clarke, printing 
Geo. Holbrook, lum. and work 
P. C. Cheney & Co., carpet 
Pike & Heald, grate and work 
G. ^V. Adams & Son, matches 
Straw & Lovejoy, clock . 
Trustees, annual appropriation 
J. Leavitt, steps and ladders 
Currier Brothers for matches 
Julia Martin for washing 
C. A. Smith, spittoons, duster 
Stearns & Farmer, brooms 
David Urch, waste baskets 
A. A. Adams, for labor, 
J. Q. A.Sargent, for gas fittings 
Daniels & Co., for shovel and 
castors .... 



$302 


G5 


22 


44 


151 05 


5 


33 


7 


00 


117 


27 



32 50 
1 00 

3 75 
1 05 

40 00 

5 95 

15 45 

12 95 

9 9G 

4 71 
(38 

35 00 
1,000 00 

7 07 
45 

8 50 
14 00 

1 ()0 

3 00 

1 50 

50 99 

1 55 



Balance to new account 



5,132 97 

202 25 



5,335 22 



107 
PEINTING AXD STxiTIOII^EEY. 



By Balance from old account 


$118 09 


Appropriation 


2,000 00 


Overdraft (refunded) 


3 50 




$2,121 50 


EXPEXDITURES. 




To William G. Everett, for l)ooks 




and stationery 


$55 25 


Doane & Greenougli, for books 


20 00 


AVm. E. Moore, for printing* . 


08 25 


Thomas Howe, for stationery . 


1 0(5 


F. B. Eaton, .... 


7 27 


Campbell & Hanscom, printing- 


222 32 


Wm. H. risk, for blank books 




and paper .... 


115 08 


John B. Clarke, for printing . 


1,385 G4 


Jolin A. S. Jacobs, for pens, . 


1 50 


H. K. Cbamberlin, for paper . 


77 


S. r. Murry & Co., for ink. 


1 13 


Manchester P. 0., for stamps 


30 00 


B. r. Hartford, for stationery 


1 75 


C. F. Livingston, for printing 


89 87 


Tewksbury Brothers, for i)aper 


12 07 


McFarland & Jenks, printing 


18 00 


John T. Sullivan, for stationery 


2 72 


$2,013 28 


Balance to new account . 


108 31 


— 


$2,121 59 



108 



FIEE DEPARTMENT. 



By Balance from old accoiiut 


. $925 53 


Appropriation . 


. 9,500 00 


Overdraft, refunded . 


7 25 


Eeserved Fund 


. 1,700 00 




$12,132 78 



EXPENDITURES. — AMOSKEAG STEAMER NO. 1. 

To G. W. Bntterfield, teamster . 

E. P. Johnson & Co., for coal . 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., for coal . 

Pike & Heald, for pipe, &c. 

Manchester Gas-liglit Co. 

E. Bresnalian, putting in fuel 

Randall Page, numbering hats 

Geo. P. Worthley, for wood . 

D. S. Ames, for rei)airing har- 
nesses 

Wm. Foster, for wood 

T. R. Hubbard, do. 

H. M. Bailey, for rep. stove . 

Haines & "Wallace, for wood . 

B. F. Fogg, for gas tixtures . 

Daniels & Co., for hardware . 

J. W. Whittier, hose and repairs 

Locke & Demick, for matches 

J. B. Varick, for hose, and 

couplings, &c. ... 20 92 

Kidder & Chandler, for oil, 

matches, &c. ... 5 20 

A. H. Weston, for overalls . 25 50 

Wm. H. Straw, teamster . 14 00 

O. E. Kimball, salary . . 50 00 

Geo. E. Simmons, " . . 45 00 

Horace Nichols " . . 90 00 



8(>0 00 


77 


G3 


45 


3G 


7 


03 


32 


52 


7 


70 


o 


50 


1 


00 


24 (10 


12 


GO 


9 


00 


10 08 


28 


03 


r» 


(14 


8 


i)5 


IGO 


5G 




55 



101) 



To 



S. C. Lowell for ,s{ 


Uary 


860 00 


James E. Oarr 


;( 


45 00 


G. AY. Biittertteld 


(( 


35 00 


Erastus Oiittiny 


(; 


35 00 


John Dodge 


(( 


35 00 


A. D. Scoville 


(( 


17 50 


0. W. Steveus 


a 


35 00 


H. H. Gliiies 


a 


17 50 


C. M. 3Iorsc 


a 


35 00 


H. E. Philbrick 


i i 


17 50 


John D. Linns 


a 


35 00 


J. E. Wilson 


a 


17 50 


S. E. Fnrlong 


a 


17 50 


J. L. Avery 


a 


17 50 


PrintiDg . 


• 


10 00 



$1,184 97 



EIRE KING CO. NO. 2. 

To A. F. Q nimby, teamster 

Amoskeag- Man'f g Co., repairs 
Wm. Foster, for wood 
E. r. Johnson & Co., for coal 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., for coal 
Pike & Heald, for matches, 

stove fnrnitnre, &c. 
T. E. Hnbbard, for Avood 
Haines & Walhice, for Avood . 
Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 

D. S. Ames, for rep. harnesses 
Edwin Branch, for blankets . 
Daniels & Co. 
J. W. Whittier, hose 
H. M. Bailey, zinc, etc. . 
A. H. AVeston, overalls . 

E. Bresnahan, pntting in fuel 



$G0 00 


25 


00 


12 


GO 


81 


88 


45 


37 


14 


54 


9 


00 


28 


87 


53 


04 


9 10 


48 00 


11 


79- 


128 


07 


2 


75 


25 


CO 


7 


7i) 



110 



To J. r. Fersou, pay roll, July 1 
Hazen Davis, " " 

A. M. Keiinistoii, " " 

D. W. Morse, 
S. W. Nelson, 
0. A. Swain, 
W. E. Demeiy 

A. F. Qiiimby, 

B. T. Eust, 
W. D. Terkins, 
Alfred Hall 
W. H. Nelson, 

C. F. Hall, 

J. J. Gleason, 

Printing .... 

Pay Eoll, December 30 . 



$25 00 
22 50 
22 50 
45 00 
30 00 
17 50 
17 50 
17 50 
17 50 
17 50 
17 50 
17 50 
17 50 
17 50 
5 00 

307 50 



$1,178 81 



E. W. Haeringtox Co. No. 3. 



To paid E. P. Johnson & Co., fuel 
William Foster, for fuel 
Haines & Wallace, " 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., " 
Haines & Wallace, haul, mach 
Beuj. Laduc, sawing wood 
H. Fradd & Co., soap, brooms 
D. J. Warren, work 
H. H. Noyes, 
Pike & Heald, stove and pipe 
Am. Man. Co., for repairs 
J. W. -^Vliittier for hose . 
John B. Yarick, oil and stone 
Pay roll to February 
John Patterson, payroll, Julyl 
H. Fradd 
D. J. Warren 



$33 80 

21 00 

G 00 

41 35 

75 00 

3 00 

3 24 

3 00 

S 97 

17 90 

282 02 

14G 07 

15 75 

17 50 

25 00 

27 50 

17 50 



Ill 



To 



To 



H. Crandjill, pay-roll, July 1 
William Doraii " " . 

1). O. Webster " " . 

H. E. Sturtevant " " . 

B. K. Parker " " . 

George ^Veaver " " . 

John Dinsmore, " " . 

M. Wlielpley " " . 

Joseph Scotield " " . 

J. E. Young " " . 

F. Heath " " . 

Printing " " . 

Pay Eoll to December 30 
Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
Lamson & Marden, for steps 
and nnderjiinning for porch 
B. F. Fogg, for piping 
Wm. Blake & Co., foi^bell 
Concord E. E., freight on bell 
Wm. H. M} ers, plan of belfrey 
I^. B. Tilton, for mason work 
W. Ireland, for building belfrey 
J. J. Abbott, for painting 
Wm. H. Fisk, paper hangings 



N. S. BEA^J^ CO. NO. 4 

W. Small, teamster 

E. P. Johnson & Co., for fuel . 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., for fuel . 

Z. Foster Campbell . 

AYm. Foster, for Vvood 

H. M. Bailey, for rep. stove . 

T. E. Hubbard, for wood 

Amoskeag Man'f'g Co., repairs 

A. F. Allen, for hats 

J. W. C. Pickering, 13 jackets 



$17 50 
95 00 
25 00 
17 
17 
17 



50 
50 
50 



19 58 
17 50 



« 


V5 


8 


75 


5 


00 


322 


50 


14 


49 


15 


78 


9 


15 


402 


5() 


2 


64 


15 


00 


28 


50 


829 


75 


43 07 


12 


87 


$56 


25 


77 


63 


45 


37 


1 


00 


12 


60 


1 


25 


9 00 


31 


70 


76 


50 


130 00 



$2,093 41 



112 



To Haines & Wallace, for -wood . 
Mancliester Gas-liglit Co., gnu 
Ed. Bresualiaii, putting in coal 

D. S. Ames, for rep. harnesses 
B. r. Fogg, for gas tlxtures . 

E. N. McLaren, for harnesses 
and repairs .... 

Daniels & Co., ladder, falls, &c. 
G. E. Wilson & Co., for salt, 

matches, &c. 
E. Branch, for collars 
J. W. Whittier, for repairs 
B. C. Kendall, time-book 
Fairbanks & Downs, stove &c. 
J. V. Sullivan, paper hangings 
A. B. Webster, iron work 

A. H. Weston, overalls 
John B. Yarick, hardware 
Pike & Heald, stove, zinc, &c. 
Wm. €t. Hoyt for chairs . 
George E. Wo; thley for wood . 

B. B. Hope, Eoreman, salary 
Henry Moore, salary 

G. h! Dodge " . . 

W. H. Yickery " . . 

J. S. Bacheller " 

A. D. Colby " . . 

B. W. Kobinson " . . 
G.W.Wilson " . . 
G. W. Lincoln " . . 

0. B. Elliott " . • 
J. H. Bacheller " 

W. Small 

J. C. Butterfield " . . 

J. W. Preston " . . 

S. H. Bacheller " . . 

1. Emerson " 



$28 


80 


39 


03 


7 


70 


r- 
< 


42 


13 


88 


101 


90 


14 


57 


5 


05 


14 00 


1 


50 




80 


59 


m 


o 
o 


09 


1 00 


10 50 


31 


59 


3>0 00 


22 


50 


4 00 


50 00 


7 


50 


43 


33 


45 


00 


90 00 


00 


CO 


17 


50 


35 


00 


35 


00 


35 


00 


24 


92 


35 


00 


29 


17 


29 


17 


29 


17 



5 83 



1 1 ;•, 



To J. ]J. Coliiii, ,s;il;ir\ 
F. E. Jiidkiiis 
V. Vk Lin colli 
ri'iuliiiii" 



1 7 "Mi 




1 1 ')V 

14 5S 




10 00 




^iAr>* 


4r> 



HOOK AND LADDER CO. NO. ONE. 

Po .Viiioskeag Axe Co., for axe 
Aiuoskeag 3[f' g- Co., hooks 
E. I>raiH'Ii for l)Uniket 
'Manchester Gas Light Co. 

for gas .... 
Stearns & Farmer for i)ails 
C. F. Livingston, printing 
E. Bresnahan, cutting Avood 
Daniels & Co. for Iiardware 
Geo. liolbrook for vrork . 
John B. Yarick, whii) c^'c. 
l)i'adley & Fisher for chairs 
Pike cK: Heald, reiiairing stove 
AVm. Foster for v.ood 
Stark Mills for leather cloth 
A. H. AVeston for overalls 
Members for extra services 
Joel Daniels for i)aintiiig 
Joel Daniels for salary 
Geo. E. Glines 
C. H. Bradford 
G. H. Dudley 
C. Cantield ' " . 

H. P. Young 

E. T. Hardy 
M. L. Hunkins 

C. E. Clough 

F. A. Senfer 

D. H. Young 
8 



.^1 


50 


1) 


31 


12 


50 


ai 


50 


1 


1() 


3 


50 


5 


70 


4 


07 


() 


00 


4 


03 


S 


75 


1 


70 


12 


00 


21 


41 


. 1G3 


00 


7 


50 


1) 


00 


50 


00 


15 


00 


45 


00 


:55 


00 


45 


00 


35 


00 


20 


42 


17 


50 


35 


00 


37 


00 


35 


00 



114 



To H. L. Drew 
J. L. Bradford 
J. N. Chase 
T. H. Pike 
E. G. Holmes 
P. W. Hamiaford 
L. Flint 
Geo. Bacon 
G. L. Leacli 
M. Y. B. Eichardson, 
C. A. Clougli 
J. Jewell 
L. Jenkins 
P. S. Hubbard 
J. F. 8eward 
H. CosgToves 
S. 0. Hubbard 
AVm. CaiT 
James Kearns 

C. E. Duntley 
L. Kobinson 
\Ym. Tebbetts 
J. Harding- 

L. Stone 

A. F. Blancliard 

A. J. Kendall 

E. Kemp 

D. M. K. Philips 

F. 0. Stearns 
A. J. Chick 

S. L. Hubl)ard 
Printing 



835 00 
35 00 
35 00 
37 00 
35 00 
17 50 
37 00 
35 OO 
37 00 
20 42 
35 00 
37 00 
35 OO 
31 1<S 
20 42 
29 18 
17 50 
35 00 
35 00 
17 50 
17 50 
17 50 
5 84 
11 G8 
11 08 
11 08 
2 92 
5 84 
2 92 
2 92 
5 84 
10 00 



$1,427 07 



115 



PE>"^NACOOK HOSE COMPANY. 



To Aiiioskeag M'f'g Co. for re[)air 
Will. Foster for wood 
James G. Knight for work 
Henry C. Merrill for oil, &c. 
Manchester Gas-light Co., ga 
Wm. H. Straw for team 
T. P. Heath for team 
Pike & Heald for lead pi[)e 
Ed. Bresnahan, putting in fuel 
Daniels & Co. . 
J. B. Saunders, patching hose 
J. 'N. Bruce, painting 
J. W. Whittier, repairs . 
J. B. Yarick, wrench 
S. S. James & Co., teams 

A. W. Sanborn, repairing car 
riages .... 

J. E. Merrill, for salary . 

B. B. Aldrich 

D. H. Maxtield 
Albert Maxfleld 

C. E. Colley 
J. G. Knights 
Benj. Spofford 
A. H. Merrill 
Thomas W. Lane " 
T. P. Heath 

E. O. Burleigh 
H. M. Perkins 
H. W. Fisher 
H. S. Brown 
W. E. Porter 
G. W. Holmes 
W. S. McLoud 
Geo. F. Calef 



$3 00 

12 CO 
i) 00 
2 1)8 
9 21 
9 75 
8 00 
5 77 
5 70 
20 
<) 00 

50 00 
2 00 
1 17 

25 50 

31 10 
50 00 
45 00 
45 00> 
85 00 
35 00 
35 OO 



35 

17 



00 
50 



35 00 
17 50 
35 00 
35 00 
35 00 
35 00 
35 00 
35 00 
23 34 
23 34 



IIG 



To G. B. Xoyes 
W. L. Bleuiiis 
(1. IL Porter 

A, J. Cobnrii 
O. C. Monblo 
Oliarles Manly 
Printing' . 



salary 



$11 


()() 






35 


00 






2(1 


25 






2('y. 


>5 






17 


50 






11 


m 






10 00 











$1 OTC) 


OS 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

To 0. F. Livingston, printing fire 

regulations $10 50 
B. Frank Fogg, bnrners and 

repairs 23 33 

E. P. Eichardson, inspecting 

stoves, &c 25 50 

(1. Lincoln, Avatching fires . 2 00 

J. Emerson, trucking hose . 2 00 

George Holln'ook for worlc . 25 00 

J. W. Whittier, hose and rep" is 4()2 30 

Daniels & Co. for tools . - IG 06 

(3. W. Leach, trucking . . 1 50 

Sanuiel 0. Forsaith, repjiirs . 3 07 

John B. Clarke, printing . 4 40 

Campbeli & Hanscom, printing 7 20 

0. H. Hodgman, trucking . 3> 00 

(lilnian B. Fogg, keys . . 4 25 

T. Pv. Hubbard, lumber . . (> 50 

E. P. Johnson & Co. for coal . 225 50 

Thomas IS^orchon for work . 2 25 



117 



engineers' salaries. 



E. r. Eichaiason 


1 S70 . 


^s(; 27 




li. C. Kendall 


a 


()0 42 




Elijah Chandler 


a 


:y.} .5s 




W. Ireland 


i I 


31) r).s 




A. C. Wallace 


ii 


3 ns 




B. 0. Kendall 


1871 . 


. 100 00 




B. C. Kendall, e 


xi)ense out of 






town 


, 


1) 2.~) 




B. 0. Kendall, h 


tationeiy 


1 2,5 




Elijah Chandler, 


. 


50 00 




AVilberforce Trel 


and 


75 00 




A. C. AVallaoe 


. 


50 00 




Win. T. Evans 


• 


50 00 


$1,432 10 
1,G00 00 


T(?anis transfervt 


d 





IlECAriTULATIOX. 



Anioskeag- Company 


:>^ro. 


1 


$1,184 97 


Eire King " 




») 


1,178 81 


E. W. Harrington Co. 




.) 


2,()03 41 


]^. S. Bean 




4 


1,4,-9 4') 


Hook cS: Ladder 




1 


1,427 G7 


Pennacook Hose " 




1 


1,07() 98 


Miscellaneous 






1,432 19 


Teams . 






1,C00 00 




$12,0,53 48 


Balance to new account 




71) 30 








$12,1,32 78 



118 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

By balance from old account . $1,909 09 

Appropriation ... . 8,000 00 

Eeceived from costs and fines . 4,405 82 



$14,314 91 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Wni. B. Patten, City Marshal, 

salary .... $800 00 
do., cash paid for witness fees 187 82 
do. for officers . . . 10 00 
do. for irons and buttons . 11 80 
John D. Howard, Asst. Mar- 
shal, salary . . . 053 00 
<lo. for use of team . . . 289 00 
do. x)aid for i)roYisions . . 50 10 
do. paid for burying nuisances 8 25 
Samuel Upton, Justice, salary 1,000 00 
<lo. for rent of office . . 50 00 
do, for blanks ... 48 50 
E. M. Topliff, Asst. Justice . 50 00 
Eben Carr for use of team . 7 00 
T. L. Quimby, night vratch, . 730 00 
Patrick Doyle ' " . .728 00 
James Dutiy " . . 722 00 
William T. Fogg '^ . . 722 00 
H. Ptamsey " " . . 598 00 
David Thayer " . . 730 00 
John C. Colburn " . . 730 00 
John F. Cassidy '• . . 730 00 
H. H. Noyes ' " . . 730 00 
W. H. B. Newhall '' . . 730 00 
flenry Bennett " . . 29 00 
H. W. Longa •' . . 7 50 
Orrin D. Carpenter " . . 55 00 



119 

To D. T. Biirleigli, iiigbt watch 
Will. Stevens " " 

Geo. H. Goodhue 
0. H. Patten 
Samuel Chirk 
Wni. E. Forsaith 
Luciaii B. Eichards " 
fl. W. Powell 

A. J. Dickey 

Leonard Shelters " " 

Timothy Connor " " 

Groves Brown " " 

Charles Canfield 

B. B. Aldrich 
Wm. D. Perkins 

C. C. Frost 
Eben 0. James 

Thomas Howe " " 

A. H. Merrill 

C. A. Walker 

James E. Bailey 

J. Dickinson " " 

Stephen M. Bennett " 

H. Fradd 

John D. Edgerly 

Joel Daniels 

W. H. Straw 

Joseph Mclntire " " 

Frank D. Hanscom " 

S.C. Amsden 

Benj. W. Eol>inson " " 

W. Eaton 

Hollis 0. Hunton 

L. D. Sleeper 

A. Hi))bard 

John xV. Barker 

Page S. Griffin 

A. Crosby 



$19 00 


20 00 


22 00 


18 00 


IT 00 


392 00 


402 00 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


00 


()(> 00 


5 00 


10 00 


1 CO 


4 00 


4 00 


2 00 


4 00 


3 CO 


4 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


4 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


29 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


70 00 


4 00 


10 00 


70 00 


2 00 


10 00 



120 

To lioratio \V. I.oiiga day watcli 
Henry Bennett 
Tlionias L. Qniniby " 
Pcitrick Doyle 

James Dnfty " " 

William T. Foo-o- 
Hugh Ramsay 
])jivid Tliayer 
Joliu C. Coil)um 
John F. Cassidy 
He/.ekiali H. Noyes '• 
Vv^m. H. B. Xewball " 
Jolni 13. Edo-erly 
Jolui I). IloYvai'd 
William D. Perkins " 
Andre v/ J. Dickey 
Orrin D. Carpenter " " 
Adam Dickey 
Nathaniel Baker 2d " 
S. L. Mitchell 
Ezra D. Cilley 
William Pv. Forsaith " 
Lncien B, Pichards " '* 
Saiiuiel Clark 
A. H. Merrill 

'J'imothy Connor " " 

C. C. Frost 

William Stevens " " 

]']! bridge ( I.AVoodman " " 
Wm. X. Chamberlin " 
E. P. Johnson & Co. for fnel , 
J.. }\. Bodwell & Co. 
Charles P. Foss 
Charles E. Dudley 
William 11. Fisk, printing po- 
lice blanks .... 
William (4. Everett, stationery 



§724 00 


700 00 


IS 00 


43 00 


20 00 


2 00 


4 00 


12 00 


14 00 


10 00 


15 00 


G 00 


2 00 


22 00 


I 00 


4 00 


:^ 00 


1 50 


5 00 


2 00 


1 00 


4 00 


S 00 


2 00 


;; 00 


2 00 


:\ 00 


2 00 


;j 00 


2 00 


;3s m 


24S 72 


V.) 00 


15 (X) 


14 50 


<; 25 



121 



Jolm i>. Clarke, print in.!;' . 
Pike c^ Jlciild, repairing stoves 

C. C. Chase . . . 
E. (J. Hayiies, reptiii'iiii>' lobby 
r>. F. Fog-g, repairing gas pipe 

and bni'nei'S . 
1). A. Simons for bedding 
J. 1). iiean 

dnlia A. Martin for washing 
]5ridget Kiley 
Hannah PTarringt(»n " 
.lolni I)Urton, earrying in fuel 
William Stevens, earrying in 

fuel and sawing wood «S:c. 
Brigham & Pratt for crackers . 
William Starr 
William Parker foi' pails 
True E. Dudley rep. watch-room 
(leo. Holbrook " " 

J. J. Abbott, setting glass 
J. L. Kennedy " 

Daniels & Co. for glass, oil &c 
A. H. Merrill for use of team 
(Tilman P. Eogg for keys 
S. S. James & Oo. for teams 
J. Mclntire, burying nuisances 
Wm. C. Chase '' 
'V'uno. Sullivan " 
Wm. Kennedy " 
.J. Campbell 

.1. C. Whitton, cleaning watch- 
room ..... 
William G. Westover for tul) . 

D. Evans & Co. for buttons 
Bradley & Fisher, ottice chairs 

Jialance to new account . 



i^l23 00 

20 24 
5 00 

1) r,o 
i;5 00 

(> 25 

7 r>o 

5 00 

12 1>0 

7 (r) 

1 00 

72 75 

!) 00 

(I ;>7 
so 

2 50 
M 00 

;•> 00 

1 00 

8 74 
8 00 

5 85 
-'54 50 

2 50 

00 
2 00 
.3 00 

1 50 

1 ;;5 

75 
15 00 

21 00 



$14,0()7 70 
247 21 



$14,314 01 



122 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



By Balance from old account . S824 22 
Appropriation .... 8,000 00 



$8,824 22 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Western Union Telegraph Co., 
for telegTapbing time from 
Cambridge . . . . $10 00 
P. A. Devine .... 2 25 

Fogg & James for teams . ^fi) 00 

H. s"] Whitney . . . . 22 25 
John Campbell for damage to 

ox, by defect in highway . 25 00 
Lowell S. Hartshorn, damage to 

team by defect of highway . 12 09 
Edward I vers, injury to daugh- 
ter l)y defect in highway 
Geo. Y. Sawyer, professional 
serv. in suit of Mrs. Moulton 
Electa Moulton for injury by 
icy streets .... 
J. B. McCrillis, tree-box irons 
T. Corcoran, wash, ward-room 
A. L. Trembly for vaccination 
J. Q. A. Sargent, repairing wa- 
ter pipe .... 25 7 
Sampson, Davenport &Co.,for 

six City Directories 
Dana W. King, recording deeds 
E. J. P. Goodwin, returns of 

births and deaths 
L. B. How, do. 
W. W. Brov/n, do. . 
Leonard French, do. 



25 


00 


70 00 


252 


52 


21 


00 


11 


00 


240 00 



9 


CO 


4 


17 


1 


75 


6 00 


.4 


25 


9 


50 



$19 


20 


o 


12 


125 


00 


o 


75 


»> 


00 



123 



To R. J. P. Goodwin, care of pris. 

J. E. Bennett, cash pd express 
" " Annual Eeport 

W. B. Patten, expense to Con- 
cord with J. Eastman . 

W. B. Patten, small pox case 

^. P. Hunt for cash paid out 

in suits against the city . 35 54 

Pilce & Heald, w orli on water- 
ing trough .... 10 78 

John Ferguson, small pox case 30 00 

C. G. Sherer, care of small pox 
patients .... 114 44 

J. D. Howard, team in small 

pox cases .... 29 00 

David Woolford, care of small 
pox patients .... 

Mrs. S. W. Young, do. 

C. S. Fisher for burial of small 
pox patients 

George E. Hersey, vaccination 

O. D. Abbott, 

E. v. Corning, cleaning vault 

L. A. Proctor, 

J. E. Clough, 

Andrew J. Mayhew, use of 

hall for ward meeting . . 12 00 

Geo. H. Allen for giving grades 
for side w^alks . . . 51 50 

Stearns & Allen, do. do. . 5() 75 

Stearns & Allen, engineering 
at Gofts Falls Cemetery . 23 75 

Stearns & Allen, running out 
lots . . . . . (3 25 

Stearns & Allen, numbering 

streets 32 75 



309 01 


30 00 


23 00 


()0 00 


91 50 


10 00 


8 00 


14 00 



120 00 


00 


1 37 


.00 00 


5 00 



124 



^'o ]VIaiieliester (ias-liglit Co., gas 

at Ward Eooin . . . $0 00 

J. E. Stearns, surveying for wa- 
ter works .... 

^laucliester l\)st of!ice, stamps 

Saiiuiel Dwinnels, witness fees 

Wni. J. McAlpine, expert on wa- 
ter-v>'ork s . . . . 

T. E. Hul)l)ar(l, grade stakes . 

J. B.Jones for selling old school 

lionse ..... 5 00 

Mr. Page, lnail)er for cemetery 

fence at Goft's Falls . '. 00 22 

J. L*. Bradford rep. fence, Golf's 

Falls cemetery ... 01 85 

Crombie «S: Wliittemore sliade 

trees . . . . . 82 77 

E. I). Hadley for making cop- 
ies in mattei" of soldiers' 
bounties .... 

diaries Offutt for damage to 
Crops ..... 

1st X. H. Battery for Itb of 
July salute .... 

J. E. Lang for copying tax list 

E. H. Davis, services in small 

pox cases .... .'>0 00 

James A. Weston for cash paid 
fare and expense to Lowell 
and other places to examine 
water works .... 21 03 

Haines & Wallace, lundjer for 

tree boxes .... 03 30 

G. Parker for painting Ceme- 
tery fence, AVard 8 . . 83 22 

Daniels & Co., nails for Ceme- 
tery fence at Gotts Falls . 7 51 



13 55 


25 00 


30 00 


00 



125 



To Muncliestev WmIcm' ri[)e Co. for 

piijo for jHiiuMluot on VAui st. $2o^ '20 
J, KeniRHly, labor laying' pipe 
T. Brrnier 

J. Slattory ' " " 

Lewis Laiiott 



Eugene Sullivan " " 

Lawrence McCarty " " 

Win. Conway " " 

Thomas Moian 

Timothy Sullivan 

r. Leonard 

John Welch 

Murty Mahoney 

James Silk 

J. Dailey 

Michael Shea 

Patrick Whalan 

Michael Healey 

Jerry Chaniplaine " " 

Amos Goddard 

Charles E. Palmer for danuiges 
to team .... 

Sampson, Davenport & Co., 
nundjering houses 

D. W. Garland c^^ Co., for edge 
stone for side Avalk North side 
of Merrimack S([uai'e . 

T. A. Lane for Avork on water 
pipe ..... 

Geo. Holbrook for jiiaking wa- 
tering trough 

James Curtis for rent of barn . 

Lamson & Marden for stone 
land-marks .... 

Colley & Kelly for painting- 
guide boards 



1 50 
;] 00 
;5 00 

;> 00 
:> 00 
r> 00 
;5 00 
:> 00 
r> 00 
r, 00 
;j 00 

3 00 

r> 00 
r> 00 

1 50 

;5 00 

3 00 
:\ 00 
3 00 

25 00 

130 00 



410 


10 


I 


70 


3,5 


00 


40 


00 


18 


00 


18 00 



126 



To G, A. Barker for bank note de- 
tector 

Nancy J. Clement for damage 
to premises by lowering' Lau- 
rel street .... 

C. M. Hubbard, team for small 
pox patient .... 

J. N. Bruce for x)ainting Nos. 
for doors .... 

James A. AVeston for use of 
team, 1871 .... 

H. M. Bailey for work on v/a- 
ter pipe .... 

Stearns & Allen for making- 
plans for street numbers 

Union Teleg'pli Co., dispatches 

S. C. Forsaitli for damage to 
premises by overtlow from 
common sewer 

Henry B. Fairl)anks for team 
to notify jurors 

Ira P. Fellows for team to i)0st 
check-lists. . 

David Wells for lumber for 
guide-posts . 

Hill & Co., expressage on money 

H. C. Merrill . . . "^ 

Brown & Lincoln for rei)airing 
No. 8 ward room . 

Geo. S. Chandler do. 

J. B. Sawyer, civil engineer 

S. S. James & Co. for teams 

Pike & Heald for work on ac- 
queduct .... 



$1 50 

625 00 

5 00 

318 45 

100 00 

88 

55 75 
21 15 

125 00 
(J 00 

3 00 

12 50 

1 00 

2 00 

4 00 
2 00 

38 00 
21 00 

G 25 



127 



PAVING GUTTERS AT IIALLSVILLE. 



Joseph B riercc, 


cobble stones 


$202 00 


Willimii Doty 


for 


lal)or 


00 


James Currier 






3(> 00 


Henry Goodluie 






1 50 


Patrick Finn 






11) 50 


Wni. ]\^ax^\ell 






35 75 


Petei' Scaiilaii 






2() 25 


ratrick Coinior 






1() 50 


Jerry Eegan 






17 50 


Thomas Calaglu 


m 




8 25 


Jerry Mahaiiiui 






25 12 


Mnrty Mahoiiy 






(> 00 


Michael Healey 






19 87 


vSteariis & Allen 


, en 


gineers 


11 50 



$5,743 70 
Court House acc't transferred 704 42 



Balance to new account 



$0,508 12 
2,31G 10 



CITY HALL AND STORES. 

By Balance from old account . $2,349 21 

Rent of stores . . . . 1,813 50 
Rent of hall .... 202 00 
Table sold .... 2 00 



$8,824 22 



$4,300 71 



EXPENDITURES. 



To B. F. Fogg, work on gas pipe . $27 10 
3I;inchester Gas-light Co., gas 508 29 



128 



To AVni. Stevens, washing- and pnt- 
ting doAvn carpets, &c. 
Walter Xeal for rei)airs of roof 
Cliarles A. Smitli, dnsters and 
pitehers .... 

Barton & Co., niattingfor clerk's 
room ..... 
rairl)anks <!<: Downs for stove 
4ind pipe .... 
Geo.W. Adams & Son, matcLes 
J. L. Kennedy, setting glass . 
James Collins for pitcli wood . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
E. P. Johnson & Co. " 
('has. E Dudley for wood 
J. M. Young for pitchwood 
John Mclntire, sav*'ing Avood . 
H. I). Lord, sawing wood 
Bridget Biley for washing and 

cleaning- 
Gideon Elanders for ice . 
Eobert Gilchrist for cu]) . 
Daniels «!<: Co., i)unch, brushes 

carpet sweeper, «S:c., 
J. S. Holt for soap . 
Geo. II. Dudley for repairs 
Henry French for repairs 
George S. Holmes . 
Charles Williams 
Samuel C. Forsaith for work on 
clock ..... 
A. O. Parker for PJ chairs 
Pike & Heald, repairing stoves 
and pii)e .... 
Thomas P. Clough, cleaning- 
carpet 

J. J. Abbott, setting glass 



$4;.J 80 
9 (50 

12 1)7 

;",9 20 

20 24 

1 25 
.■) 00 
(5 50 

120 72 

15 77 

10 07 

5 00 

8 00 

2 00 

:')2 15 

5 98 

30 

18 on 
1 64 
7 00 

51 99 

9 00 
5 00 

21 4;$ 
7 20 

75 4(; 

1 25 
9 45 



129 

To C. C. Frost & Co., matclies . 
StraAV & Lovejoy for repairing 

clocks 

Currier Brothers for btisket and 

matclies .... 

J. Q. A. Sargent for litting gas 

l)ipe ..... 
Giliuan B. Fogg for keys &c. . 
Hill & Co., express on die 
Gilnian Eeed for sand 
Yim. G. Everett for pens 
J. Ambler for 2 stamps and 

dies 

George Holbrook for repairs . 
J. E. Cloiigli, cleaning vault . 
A. G. Fairbanks for cliairs 
Dicke}^, Carpenter & Co. for 

v\'liitewasliing and repairs . 89 50 
E. A. Lawrence for trucking . 
H. E. Stevens for sal-soda &c . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co. for coal . 
William C. Eogers . 
J. C. Young for repairiug roof 
Daniels & Co. for cords for 

clock 

Barton & Co., laying carpets . 
H. C. Hunton, setting glass . 
Bridget Eiley for washing and 

cleaning .... 

A. G. Fairbanks for brooms 
G. B. Fogg for keys . . 14 Fi 

9 



i<l 


7G 


u\ 


00 


1 


90 


•> 

r > 


00 


10 


■12 


1 


90 


7 


50 


1 


25 


21 


55 


27 


80 


10 00 


12 


50 





<r) 


4 


95 


22 


7r> 


1 


58 


Jl 


7(J 


12 


21 


5 


25 




00 





50 


o 


KO 



130 



To Josepli Tuck, (.'leairnig carpet . $4 .■)() 
John Mooar, repairing clock . 4 00 



^1,303 42 
lleservcd fund, trausfeiTcd . 2,700 00 



Balance to new a,ccouiit 



$4,093 42 
. 273 20 



$4,3fU; 71 



OFFIOEES' SAliAEIES. 

By Balance from old account . .i=r>07 OS 
Appropriation .... SJJOO 00 



SS.507 <iS 



EXPEXDITT KWS. 

To James A. Weston, Mayor ..^f 1,000 00 

J. E. Bennett, City Clerk . 1,000 00 

II. 11. Cbambei'liii,'' Treasurer . 400 00 

Collector . 1,000 Oi) 

Katlian 1\ Iluur, Solicitor . 100 00 

K. 1). Hadley, ClerkofCoun.il 01 0() 

AVr.\. Steveus, IMessenger . 000 00 

A.ssessor.s. 

M. O. rearsou., assessing taxes 141 00 

*' " abating '^ 4') 00 

«' '• veg. cbeck-lisls 20 00 

H. r. Simpson, assessing taxes 1 77 CO 

" " abating " 30 CO 

" " reg. cbeck-lists 20 00 

J. i'\ W^oodbury, ass'iig taxes 210 00 

" *' abating " 3f; 00 

'' '^ re-i". elieck-lists 20 CO 



i;n 



To '1, \\\ riiikcrtoii, ass"ii,o' t:ix<\s i^lsij 00 

abating- " 1H) 00 

reg. chedv-lists 20 00 

M. E. Slieehaii, assessing taxes TrS 00 

abating " 1<S 00 

reg. clieck-lists t>0 00 

K, G. liaynes, assessing taxes 90 00 

abating " :\0 00 

veg. elieck-lists L>0 00 

Jos. ^lelvin, assessing taxes 78 00 

a1)ating " 18 00 

reg. clieek-lists 20 00 

Horatio Fradd, assessing- taxes 75 00 

al)ating " 21 00 

reg. eiieelv-lists 20 00 

•Josepli E. i>ennett, asst. ass'or 210 00 

Isaae Wliitteniove, " M-tOO 

To .bnnes A. Weston . . . $10 00 

William E. Tatten . . . 10 00 

IL Cl. Sanderson . . . 10 00 

Marshall P. Hall . . . 10 00 

Tlionias Borden . . . 10 00 

Samuel X. Bell . . . 10 00 

Patrick A. Hevine . . . 10 00 

William P. Men-ill . . • . JO 00 

James Dean . . . . 10 00 

DeL. Kobinson . . . 10 00 

Joseph G. Edgerh', Secretary . 25 00 
" " Snpter'ent 

Public Instruction . . 1,500 00 

(h'l'fsum^ of the Poor. 

To Samuel S. Moulton . . . $25 00 

•'^ay^vard J. Young . . . 25 00 



132 



To »rereiiiiali 8tickiiey . 




$25 00 


Moses E. George 




25 00 


Clerk 




50 00 


.Joliu Morse 




17 71 


H. W. Savory . 




7 29 


Patriek vSlieelian 




25 00 


Isaac Lewis 




25 00 


(leorge H. Colby 




25 00 


HraUh Officers. 




1\) William B. Tatteii . 


^$25 00 


Jolin D. Howard 


25 00 


Ebeiiezer H. Davis . 


25 00 


Oscar D. Al)l)ott, City l'b.\ siciau 


50 00 


yfoderatoi's. 




To (ieorgeFoxfov 1870 


$r> 00 


.lobn X. Bruce " 


;; 00 


1871 


;5 00 


Jaiu(\s M. House 


;5 00 


Jobu 1). Powell 


3 00 


Horace Pettee 


.'i 00 


Jobn L. Kennedy 


3 00 


Cbanncy C. Fa^or . 


3 00 


Wni. H. B. Newliall . 


3 00 


Ward Clerks. 




To George Fox 1870 


$5 00 


Cbas. H. Osgood " 




5 00 


B. F. Hartford '• 




5 00 


J. H. Andrews " 




5 00 


Wm. F. Holmes " 




5 00 


J. W. Harrington " 




5 00 


H. B. Fairbanks '' 




5 00 


L. E. Wallace " 




5 00 


G. H. Gerry 




2 50 


C. 31. Stevens 




2 50 



i;r> 



'Vo 



Tiiiiotby Coimor, 
Tliomas Willis 
Tliomas Howe 
I L. A. Gage 
Levi L. Aldricli 

0. M. Edgerly 
vSilas C. Clatiir 
Ijeoiiard Shelters 
>'^. P. Cauuon 

J. P. Cari)enter 
Russell White 
'r. M. Conant 
Beiij. L. Hartshorn 
Henry French 
H. B. Savrj^er 
G. M. Sanborn 
M. McDonongh 
'I^'imothy Connor 
Flarrison D. Lord 
ira P. Fellows 

1. W. Hammond 
Dal ton J. Warren 
(.Carroll Piddle 
Geo. Shattuck 
Geo. S. Chandler 
Daniel Farmer 
Milo W. Harve^ 



Selectmen. 
1870 



$5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


T) 


00 


5 


00 


1*- 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


J 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 




00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


."> 


00 


T) 


00 


~) 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 



i^alance to new aeeount 



$8,251 ()«; 
25G 02 



$8,.~>07 (is 



i;)4 



LxiNl) SOLD FROM FARM. 



By Balaiiee from old accoiuit $4,148 08 

Hectnvcd on notes . . . 1,580 27 



exi'enditi:ke8. 

To George H. Allen, engineer . $2 50 
Balanee to new aeeonnt . . 5.734 85 



1X8LRAX0E. 



'fiJ,iOi •)->■ 



$5, 731 



By B>al;niee tVoiu old account 
Appropriation . 
Overdraft refunded . 
Reserved Fund , 



. *73 00 




. 1,100 00 




7 50 




. 225 00 






$1,405 5(V 



exp?:nditukp:s. 



To 



Oeorge A. 4'reneh . 


!i^l5 00 


.Etna Insurance Co. 


255 75 


X. H. Insurance Co. 


200 00 


l*li«nix Insurance Co. 


no 25 


E. P. Richardson 


30(; 25 


Isaac AV. Snutli 


140 75 


X. E. Morrill . 


30 25 


Home Insurance Co. 


105 00 


X'^ational Insurance Co. . 


30 00 


Howard Insurance Co. 


()9 75 


(\ M. Edgerly . 


37 50 



$1,105 5U 



1:55 



INTEEEST. 

r>y Bnliint'e iVoiiMjld aecount 5§2,()4r) 80' 

Appropiiatiou . . 23,000 00 

r>nliuicc Cvverdrawu . . 517 82 



$2G,lb;i 62 



exi'J':nditi 


LTJEH. 




K. B. Hall 


. $13 08 




Estate ofN. Hunt . 


. 420 00 




lilioda Elauders 


33 83 




John M. Harvey 


78 07 




Sally E. Burnliaiii . 


12 00 




Keheeca Vi. Sniith . 


120 50 




Cyrus Hazeii . 


(50 00 




Ira V). Os!i,()od . 


45 00 




Louis A. Lee . 


24 00 




William P. Merrill . 


42 00 




Georg-e H. Lawrence 


. 200 20 




First Is'^atioiial Bank 


04 00 




City National Bank 


42 00 




Anioskeag- National BanL 


: . 208 00 


• 


Manchester National Bai 


dv . 220 00 




Anna S. Tallant 


41 80 




S. Whiteliouse 


32 50 




John V. Golbnrn 


2G 25 




Henry Kelly 


10 35 




C. E. Monlton . 


30 85 




Milton McCoy . 


. 270 48 




Betsey Brown . 


71 50 




H. D. Lord 


4 32 




Daniel Hunt . 


OG 99 




Mary P. Harris 


. • . 217 00 




Jesse Gibson . 


. 183 25 




E. P. Parkhurst 


. 155 75 




Coupons . 


. 23,388 00 


^2G,1G3. m 



13G 



TEMPOEAEY LOAK, 



By Am't outstaiid'g Jan. 1, 1871 
Mancliester National Bank 

Amoskeag " " 

City " " 

First " " 
Alvin I'ratt . 
Louisa Wilson 



$20,72G 00 

18,000 00 

10,000 00 

4,000 00 

8,000 00 

8,000 00 

500 00 



■ $75,220 



EXPEJfDITUKES. 



To Sally E. Burnliaiii 
G. H. Lawrence 
Wm. P. Merrill 
Daniel Hunt 
H. D. Lord 
Mary P. Harris 
Mancliester National B 
Amoskeag " 

First 
Gity 

N. B. Hall 
Ira B. Osgood 
Eebecca W. Smith 
Ehoda Flanders 
Anna S. Tallant 
S. Whitelionse 
John C. Colburn 
Henry Kelley 
C. E/Moulton 
Milton McCoy 
Betsey Brown 
John M. Harvey 
Jesse Gi])son . 



ank 



$200 00 
500 00 
700 00 

LlOO 00 
110 00 

4,000 00 
L3,000 00 
11,000 00 

8,000 00 

4,000 00 
200 00 
500 00 

1,000 00 
500 00 
050 00 
500 00 
375 00 
200 00 
500 00 

1,000 00 
200 00 

1,275 00 
800 00 



13: 



To E. P. Parkluirst . . . $74() 00 
Error in account of 1803 . <S00 00 



$53,050 00 
Outstand'g loan Dec. 31, 1871 22,170 00 

§75,220 00 



IWYMEXT OF CITY DEBT. 

l>y balance from oIjI account . $3,300 00 
Appropriation . . . 0,000 00 

5ii'0,300 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Bonds of January 1, 1801 . $0,000 00 
Balance to new account 3,300 00 

$0,300 00 



LIQUOR AGENCY. 
By balance ironi old accoinit . $()50 90 

EXrENDITl/IlES. 

To A. F. Laiiton for li(iuors . $72 27 
John W. Moore for litiuors and 

fixtures .... 148 28 

U. S. and Canada express . 4 25 



$224 80 
Balance to new account . . 420 19 



$050 99 



138 



\^'^ATER WOIIKS. 

'I'o Joliii B. Clarke for printing- . .^3 25 
James A. We.stou paid bilis of 

Coiniiiissiouers to ]Montrea], 

Xorwicli and otlier places . *iS5 <S7 

Stearns & Allen, engineering . 234 00 

Josepli 1>. Sawyer, engin'ing . 54!) 05 
(lilnian E. Riddle for labor and 

team 05 00 

S. S. James & Co. for teams . 4 00 

Lndlow Yahe Co. for gates . 35S 40 
Concord Eail Road Co., freiglit 

on hydrants and gates . . 29 90 
Thomas A. ].ane for labor on 

gates . . . . . 3 00 

J. T. Fanning for services . i5r> 00 

" " for expenses ])aid 34 50 



$1,723 {){> 



SCHOOL HOUSE IIEP.VIES. 

By Balance from old acconnt . .¥l(>(> 77 
Appropriation .... 4,000 00 



EXPPINDITIKES. 



$4.1(>(; 



To L*roctor & Haselton for shade 

trees .t)<s7 00 

Amos Spolford for blasting- 
stone in school house yar<l . 10 00 
W C. Hastings for water pipe 35 55 
Man. Cement water pi])e Co., 
Avater ])ipe . ' . . . 220 50 



131) 



'() i*at. Finn for labor kiyiiii^' pipe 
Jeny Eegan " " 

Sylvester Douolioe " " 
Jolm Xolaii 
AMlliaiii Griffin 
Thomas Fox " " 

.lohn Daley 

Timotliy Connor " " 

Michael Shea 
VaI. I'.onner 

David Devine " " 

John McLanghlin " " 
\>"ni. McPherson for putting in 

vrells . • . 
A. A. Bunton «& Co., hinihcr 
•J. L. Smith 

Kvans & linssell " 

J. Hodge 

Clough & Foster for Inndier 
tfaines & Wallace 
Pasclial Preston " 

Thomas P. Clongh for work 
William H. B. Newhall " 
John P>. Yarick for hardware 
Daniels & Co., " 

(ieo. H. Dudley, joiner work 
John S. Furber for pumps 
Hackett & Taylor for concrete 

walks .... 
C. W. Mead & Co., concrete 

walks 
J. J. Al)bott for painting 
J. L. Kennedy 
FI. & H. R. Pettee for lime 
Pike&Heald, stoves, pumps &< 
James Emerson for work on 

Xo 5 yard . . . . 



$8 


75 


y 


50 


T 


50 


" 


50 


■" 


50 


— 


50 


"7 


50 


- 


50 


■~ 


50 


H 


25 


(> 


75 


7 


50 


LSI 


05 


i 


24 


1 


00 


M) 


()0 


1L> 


45 


LM) 


25 


i;5(; 


24 


•> 


57 


1 


25 


»> 


00 


•> 


88 


29 


9(> 



10 50 



ir^V} 25 



152 


50 


107 


85 


278 


5() 


»> 


75 


15(5 


08 



19 42 



140 



J. L. Eo.ss for furniture . 
J. Q. A. Siivgent for furnace 
L. A. AVar«l for job teaming' 
S, S. Jaines »S: Co. for teams 
American Talsiet Co. for blacl 

boards .... 
Colley «&: Kelly for painting 
Jolm 1). Emery for repairini 

^o. 9 .... 
M. J. Kendrick for job team 
C. G. Clement for work . 
Concord Eail Eoad for freight 
(^rrin Carlton for jol> team 
Henry AV. Eovre, joiner work 
Temple McQueston for drain 

pipe 

(xran\ille Haselton for work 
•fames F. Smith for work 
J. Q. A. Sargent for piping- 
old High School House 
E. G. Haynes, plastering do 
A. Hartshorn, digging well 
Dickey, Car})enter & Co. foi 

mason work 
Jolni L. Kelly for paiiitiug 



iJalance to new jiccount 



$80 70 
345 02 

3 55 
(; (10 

:wj 80 

191 40 

9 57 

2 00 

31 12 

1 41 

2 00 
i5 81 

18 52 

8 00 

30 00 

97 30 

80 00 
28 00 

17 00 

2 42 

$3,758 41 
408 3<) 



$4,100 77 



41 



NEW SCHOOL HOUSES AND LOTS 

By balance iVoiit old account . $2,l)(t(> r>7 

Cash for lot coi'. Concord and 

Beach streets . . . .MO 00 

do. for l>rh'k do. do. . 00 

do. for houses do. do. . liH) 00 

do. for stonci .... '211 01) 
Appropriation .... 20,000 00 
Balance overdrawn i)rovided 

for by te!n]>orary loan . (),()71 .'>!) 

$;30,;5uo im; 

EXPENDITURES. — SCHOOL HOUSE TX STARK DISTRlC'i". 

To Wni. E. Moore for printing . $2 oO 
Stearns & Allen, engineers . 9 00 

$1\ 'A) 

MAIN STREET SCHOOL IIOi:SI<:. 

Am. Tablet Co., black-boards . $15 00 
J. B. Savv'yer, superintending 

construction 
John L. Kennedy for painting 
J. Tennant, i)ickets and rails 
Saui'l Brov, n, grading, &c. 
G. H. Dudley, joiner work 
Temple McQueston for well . 
Haines & Wallace for hnnber 
Natt Head, })alance on contract 2,224 40 
J. B. ^"arick for hardware 
M. L. Hunkinsfor rooling 
David Wool ford for A\'ork 
L. B. Bodwell & Co. for wood 
(t. Spokesheld, extra niasom-y 
.1. W. Ai)bott f<u' job team 
O. (Jay, stone for vnult, etc. 



2L") 


45 


71 
00! ? 


90 


t i> 

89 


07 


50 


125 


94 


40 


09 


224 


40 


1 


75 


17 


()0 


27 


00 


1<S 00 


143 


75 


>; 


50 


SI 


s7 



142 



A. A. liuutoii cK: Co., iuniber . 
Strav/ «& Lovejoy for clocks 
Mead, Mason & Co. for Imild- 

iiigoiit-lionses 
IMke & Hcald for sto\'es . 
(leo. Holbrook, joiner Avork 
I'', ('nttina' foT Avork 



^1 80 




13 00 




;>5G 78 




72 87 




91) 02 




4 00 






U,'2H\ 5)2 



LINCOLX STIIEET SCHOOL HOI^SE. 

'Vn ,5esse Gault for l)i'ick . .14,500 00 
Al})lieiis Gay, on contract . 10,000 00 
Haines & Wallace for Imnbei' 
G. W. Stevens, architect, on ac. 
G. A. Baker & Co., light, rods 
rike & Heald, ])mn]>, pipe, c^c. 
Wni. IMake & Co. for bell 
Dunlap & Baker, tower clock . 
H. Willey, grading, on acconnt 
Con. andiS^ortli. II. E., freight 
James Patten for labor . 
Patrick Finn 
John Larkin " 

Tlunnas Carrigan " 
James Fitts " 

John Fennoll" " 

Patrick Mannahau " 
James Cnrran " 



Josiah Harvey 
W. Small 
Citv Teams 



5,310 21) 

250 00 

135 00 

181) 47 

031 50 

(132 OS 

400 00 

(> SO 

() 00 

3, 00 

3 00 

;] 00 

3 00 
3 00 

3 00 

;; 50 

4 00 
2 00 

13 00 



-$20,10S 54 



$30,30(; ISO 



14a 



ev]':n]N(j schools. 

!»y iinlaiiee tVoiu ohl nct'oiml . $237 50 
A])i)i'0])rii!tio)i . . . !,000 CO 



$1,237 50 



Exrp:Ni)iTriiEs. 

'I'o paid L. B. lUnhw]] & Co., wood 
M. J. KeiHlriek, job team 
11. C. Hill, postino- bills . 
Cliarlcs Willir.ms, stove . 
d. B. Jones, ejiaivs 
II. C. Merrill, oil, cvc. 
Pike & Ileald, stm/es 
Diekey, CarpeiitiM- <S: Co., re 

pairs of re Oil) 
Charles F. Morriii, leaeluii*'- 
Ca3ii|)l>ell & Haiiseoii), adv'i.> 
.b)lin I>. Clark{%- pri]itii)<2," 
lielle G. Daniels, lea!'lii)i<^' 
Henry Wi.oht 
Marry 0. Hadley 
Dan'l Clark and otlun's for ren 
dcdm ]\lclntire, sav.inj;' wood 
J. W. Abbott for Job teams 
Susie C. Page for teaeliiui>- 
1). (I. Broekway " . 

\l. H. Parkinson " . 

Lney A. Putnam " 
J. fJ. Edgerly for .'ash jiaid 
John A, Barker, care of roon 
D. A. tniltbrd for teaching 
Charles A. Smith for himps and 
chimneys 



Balance to new aiu-ount 



$20 07 
1 00 
1 00 
7 00 
() 00 
() 32 
55 i 



7 


50 


0(1 


00 


o 


00 


1() 




20 


Of) 


108 


00 


() 


00 


U 


57 


1 


it) 
00 


K) 


00 


Ol 


00 


130 


00 


12 


50 


•> 


50 


14 


00 


78 


00 



m 



$725 00 
511 90 



$1,237 50 



144 



SCHOOLS. 

By Balance from old account . $8 59 

Dog tax 029 00 

Appropriation .... 43,000 00 



$43,037 59 



EXPENDITl RES — RErAIES. 

'Po Pike & Heald . 

Amoskeag Mfg. Co. rep. fence 

Jolin (}. A. Sargent 

G. B. Fogg forkey.s, lock.s, &c 

V. ^y. Fairbanks . 

Joel Daniels . 

W. P. Stratton 

\V. II. B. Newhall . 

Geo. W. Merriani 

Daniels & Co. . 

D. B. Eastman-. 

Alonzo Wicom 

Cbas. E. Clongh 

AVm. McPlierson 

Joseph W. Eoss, ink wells 

A. B. Webster repaiving fence 

John L. Kennedy . 

A. A. Bnnton, & Co. 

T. K. Hubbard 

H. M. Bailey . 

George H. Dudley . 

American Tab. Co., blackboard 

Daniels & Co. . 

J. J. Abbott . 

Concord railroad, freight 

Charles Williams, rep. stoves 

J. B. ^^arick, luird Avnre . 



$155 


71 


15 


75 


(58 


51 


15 


55 


20 


75 


4 


48 


8 


50 


1 


00 


1 


49 


8 


90 


4 


25 


-1 


25 


1 


00 


1 


75 


15 


75 


8 


00 


28 


58 


3 


42 


4 


91 


32 


20 


81 




29 


25 


11 


07 


3 


35 




34 


5 


25 


»> 


50 



i4r) 



^Fo H. H. Noye.*. . 
J. L. Koss 
Sullivan Brothers 



$21 


14 


35 


84 


40 


1)4 



!<()4r) so 



FTEL 



To W. S. Locke . 
Peter Kimball 
T. E. Iliibbawl 
1). B. Eastman 
E. P. Johnson & (^o 
.1. I). Emery 
Daniel Riley 
J. L. Smith 
I.. B. Bodwell cK: Co. 
tUeaves X. Harvey 
Horace Eichards 
John P. Moore 
John K. McQn(\'.toi 
1>. L. Hartshorn 
John Mclntire 
Willie Eio-by . 
iEall & Kimball 
William C. Chase 
.V. Wicom 
K. Stearns 
( 'lough & Foster 
Israel Webster 
John H. Proctor 
Levi Woodman 
George H. Oolb> 
Henry L. Hill . 
Uavid H. Young 
C. E. Foss 



$74 00 

4 50 
81 00 

203 00 

102 00 

15 25 

15 50 

1,542 08 

37 50 

13 25 
50 00 
71 75 

7 50 
12 00 

5 00 
137 88 

2 00 
75 

3 00 
255 44 

43 45 
35 00 

14 CO 
63 CO 

1 50 

135 50 

5 25 



10 



$2,040 SI 



146 



FrE>'ITUIlE AND SUPPLTPZS. 



To 



Pike & Heal<l . . . . 


$212 31 


W. H. Elliott . 


21 75 


DiiA'id Libl)y 


20 ();3 


F. B. Eaton . 


28 42 


B. F. Bennett & Co. 


100 50 


Straw & Love joy 


20 50 


Concord Eail Eoad . 


25 


J. L. Haniniett 


41 ()0 


J. L. Ross . . . . 


00 


W. A. Wilde cS: Co. . 


22 00 


William Parker jr. . 


4 02 


Charles Williams 


37 (>0 


Daniels & Co. . 


54 U) 


Currier Brothers 


4 81 


Hill & Co. ... 


1 25 


Wni. F. Kohie . 


22 00 


Nichols & Hall 


13 ()8 


John B. Yarick 


28 05 


Barton & Co . 


3 50 


Fairbanks «^' Downs 


(52 



$663 00 



H(10KS AND STATIONERY. 



I'o John Y. Sullivan 

Manchester Post Ofltice . 

F. B. Eaton 

Nichols & Hall . 

Thonii)son, Bio-elow & Brown 

Tewksbury Brothers 

Antiquarian Bookstore . 

Alfred Quiniby 

Brewer, Tileston & Co. . 

Doane & Green ough 

J. G. Edfferlv . 



.158 


t t 


(> 


20 


34 


20 


o 


60 


:{ 


57 


60 


42 


47 


02 


21 


;»3 





oo 


.32 


00 


4 


m 



147 



To William V. MqvviW 
Alpha Mcsser . 
Will. H. Fisk . 
John L. Sliorey 
J. L. Haiiniiett 



PRINTING AND 

To Wni. i^]. Moore 
H. F. Morse . 
C F. Liviiigston 
Thomas Ohubbuck 
John B. Clarke 
Campbell & Haiiseom 



$1 ;J5 

1 85 
20 57 
20 00 
15 'M> 



IDVERTISING 




S70 


75 






00 




. 171 


75 




28 


75 




287 


03 




17 


00 



$340 34 



$340 34 



CARK OF ROOMS 



To Charles B. Uexter 
B. F. Dame 
Leonard Stratlon 
Y. W. Fairbanks 
Charles Aldrich 
Charles Fnller 
Shepherd Miller 
Geo. I. Aldrich 
Mary E. Page 
Daniel A. Cliftbrd 
, J. Q. A. Sargent 
H. B. Thayer . 
Wm. E. Buck . 
Isaac L. Heath 
Alpha Messer 
Annette McDoel 
Thomas P. Clough 
Abbie E. Abbott 
Clara IST. Brown 



$20 00 

119 35 

227 00 

915 40 

80 00 

30 00 

18 00 

30 00 

2 10 



127 

18 

8 



00 
75 
25 
3 00 
7 50 
4G 00 
21 25 
48 00 
10 50 
10 50 



148 



To I^elUc M. Pearson 
' Mary A. Waite 
Timothy Siillivau 
George W. Dustin 
diaries F. Morrill 
Joliu A. Barker 
Henry L. Hill 
Emma F. Eeaii 
Georgia nil a D o w 
Ella F. Salisbury 
Emily J. Parker 
Etta M. George 
Alice G. Lord 
Lizzie M. Tolles 
Georgianna Patterson 
Lana S. George 
Hattie L. Jones 
Mary J. Eeed 
Maria H. Hildreth 
Addle M. Chase 



$G 50 
7 50- 

1 00 

2 00 

;j2 00 
;j3 00 

2 50 

4 50 

19 00 

4 00 

(J 50 

12 50 

10 50 

() 00 



17 

9 

11 



50 
00 
75 



12 50 
33 50 
23 25 



$1,997 i;o 



INCIDENTALS. 



To M. P. Hall 

Imri S. Whitney 

DeL. Eobinson 

J. H. Johnson . 

M. J. Kendrick 

MaryJ.-Reid . 

Fogg & James . 

U. S. & Canada Express 

Manchester Gas-Light Co 

J. C. Is^ichols . 

Geo. B. KSmith . 

Hill & Co. 

J. G. Edgerlv . 



*.S 80 

59 25 

18 00 

7 13 

5 25 

2 50 

()0 50 

2 20 
1() 80 

4 50 

3 50 
3 25 

2<; 20 



110 



L. Stratton for pails, &c. 

Manchester Post Office 

Eicliard A . Lawren ce 

Xellie M. Pearson for cleaninij; 

D. A. Clifford, rent of piano 

S. S. James & Co. for teams 

(Jeorge W. George for cleaning' 

Addic M. Chase 

V. W. Fairl)anks 

John B. A'ariek 

G. A. Gaskell . 

H. P. Morse . 

Wm. W. Colhnrn 

James H. Johnson 

Moses Lnll 

A. Wicom 

8. P. Mnrry & Co. 

P>aiT & Chii)p . 

J. W. Abbott . 



^17 

s 



1)5 



1 00 
10 00 
:'A 50 



4 

(> 

5 

1 

1 

10 
J. 



00 
50 
70 
(>0 
50 
45 
GO 
7 40 

1 00 

2 00 

3 35 

1 55 

2 50 



$34G 05 



TEACHERS SALAEIES. 



1\) 



William W. Colburn 


$1,800 00 


C. Angusta Gile 


. 580 00 


Hattie E. ChiUl 


22 50 


Emma J. Ela . 


. 393 13 


Mattie J. Boyd 


82 50 


J). A. Clifford . 


. 1,417 50 


Mary A. Bnzzell 


. 350 00 


William E. Buck . 


. 1,500 00 


Anstrice G. Planderj 


^ . . 450 CO 


Pannie E. Porter 


450 00 


Sarah J. Greene 


. 438 75 


Isaac L. Heatli 


. 1,500 00 


Lucretia E. Manahai 


I . . 475 00 



150 



To Eniiiia H. Perley 
Martlia W. Tiubbard 
Ella F. Salisbury 
Emma F. Bean 
Mary E. Page . 
Mary E. Clongli 
Beiijamhi E. Dame 
Mary A. liicliardson 
Lizzie S. Campbell 
Lucy A. Putnam 
Gertrude W. Borden 
Hattie S. Tozer 
Celia M. Oliase 
George H. Allen 
Betsey B. vSliepiierd 
Lottie R. Adams 
Carrie E. Eeid . 
Mary J. Reid . 
Kate L. Porter 
Julia A. Baker 
Clara E. DavivS 
Harry 0. Hadley 
Isabella G. Mack 
Alpha Messer . 
]^ellie J. Sanderson 
Mary E. Ireland 
Mary L. Sleeper 
Annette McDoel 
Eliza J. Young 
^ancy S. Bunton 
Hattie G. Flanders 
0. Augusta Abbott 
Ma.ttie S. Miller 
Lizzie P. Gove 
Ellen B. Rowell 
Georgianna Dow 
Emily J. Parker 



S119 


75 


420 


21 


157 


50 


398 


75 


'2G7 


50 


450 00 


,500 00 


78 


75 


110 00 


?>7 


50 


271 


25 


195 00 


72 


50 


>) 


50 


r- 
i 


50 


414 00 


449 


00 


400 00 


32(; 


25 


4G0 00 


293 


43 


414 00 


350 00 


45G 


25 


427 


50 


41 G 


25 


450 00 


405 


00 


375 


01 


500 00 


393 


13 


450 


00 


450 00 


450 00 


450 00 


427 


50 


243 00 



151 



Al>l)ie E. Abbott 
Addio L. Hutcliiuson 
Mary J. Fife . 
Helen I\L Morrill 
IMartba M. Mason 
Emma A. Cross 
Sarali T). Lord 
llattie A. Mack 
Alice G. Lord . 
Kebecca C. Hall 
Laura A. Montgomery 
Clara N. Brown 
Lizzie M. Tolles 
(J eorgianna Patterson 
Addie A. Marsball 
Laiia vS. George 
Hattie L. Jones 
:\[aria H. Hildretli 
Mary I). Lane . 
Addie M. Chase 
Etta M. George 
3Iary A. Barnes 
Nellie M. Pearson 
Itebecca George 
Mary A. Waite 
tUiarles F. Morrill 
Allen A. Bennett 
^Ontie C. Edgerly 
3Lirtlia J. Boyd ' 
Belle 11. Daniels 
Xellie M. Whitne\' 
Hemy AViglit 
Imri !S. Whitney 
Jerry D. Jones 
George A. Emerson 
E. A. Daniels . 



8450 


00 


450 


00 


i50 


01) 


450 


00 


400 


00 


;550 


25 


450 


00 


430 


25 


308 


13 


420 


25 


390 


00 


370 


20 


82 


50 


tim 


00 


355 


00 


244 00 


230 00 


500 


00 


350 


00 


430 


50 


3,80 00 


;j50 


00 


171 


00 


15 


00 


270 


00 


38 


75 


272 


00 


11)1 


25 


30 00 


')>> 


50 


00 


CO 


15 00 


032 


50 


701 


25 


75 


00 


50 00 



152 



To Samuel T. Page 

Daniel G. BrockMay 



]ialance to new accoiiiit 



$G5 00 
10 CO 



ABATEMENT OE TAXES. 

I>y Itahuicc from old account . 

EXPENDITURES. 

List of 1807. 

To layman W. (Triffiii, poor . 
Tlionias Lee, minor . 
Darnett H. Cheney, dead 

List of 1808 

Anson Merrill, jxl. in riymontli 
layman W. Griiiin, poor . 
Thomas Lee, minor, 
Charles Holbrook, minor 
Michael Stanton, out of city 
J^arnett H. Cheney, dead 

List of 1809. 

(lilman H. Kimball, over-tax 
Wm. B. Dana, dead 
Barnett IT. Cheney, dead 
Thomas Lee, minor 
Jonas S. Everett, do. 
Clinton Holcomb, do. 
l*atrick Dowd, disabled soldier 
Jerome B. Titus, not liere 
Patrick W. Brown, do. 



■ $33,831 84 

141,354 84 

2,282 75 

$43,037 59 



$3,548 m; 



$4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


1 3 


15 


3 


15 


3 


15 




15 


3 


15 


3 


15 


24 


19 


3 


72 


o 


72 


3 


72 


. 


72 


• ) 


72 


r .'> 


72 


o 


72 




7^ 



153 

To Daii'l C, (Jeori>e, pd. in Bedford 
Elhridg-e Wasoii, " Cliester 
Anson Merrill " Plymoutli 
Win. B. Freneh " Hennlkev 
.lames Enssell " Hopkinton 
Eob't Gonnini»-, in State Prison 
D. C. Whitteniore & Co., taxed 
wrong ..... 
S. B. Hadley, not here . 
ratriek Hannan, over seventy 
Daniel 8wett, 
Lyman W. Griffin, poor . 
Sarah M. Perry, poor 
Joseph Yervail, maimed . 
Horaee H Yonng, overtaxed . 
Geo. S. Chandler, no cow 
Stiekney & Prime, poor . 
G. E. Riddle, no l)ank stock . 
Jacob Peavey .... 

List of J 870. 

Barnett H. Cheney, dead 
Michael McManaman, do. 
George Hall, do. 

C. F. Clarke & Co. taxed v. rong 21 80 

Obediah Jackson, overtaxed . 13 OH 

Patrick H. (^'Brien " . 21 80 

Gilman H. Kimball " . 10 80 

Patrick Dowd, disabled soldier 4 30 

Eob't Gnnning, in State Prison 3 27 

John Harwood, taxed twice . 3 27 

AV. P. Clark, jjd. in Allenstown 3 27 

I. W. Heath, " Cantevbniy 3 27 

Daniel Call " Canada . 3 27 

C. J. Darrah " Bedford . 3 27 

Jon'a Smith " Cioffstown 3 27 

H. Dewhurst " Exeter . :] 27 



m 


72 


•> 


72 


3 


72 


;} 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


2<) 


7(; 


o 


72 


.') 


72 


3 


72 


.> 


72 


4 


90 


3 


72 


25 


00 




50 


12 


40 


12 


40 


17 


80 



3 27 

3 27 



154 



To Win. B. Fiviifli " Heuniker $:\ 27 

AV. H. Eiiieivsou " i^ostoii . ."> 27 

A. J. Sanborn " Springiield ,*> 27 

F. AV. Batclielder, do. Pelhani ;; 27 
C. 8. Green " Bow . ;5 27 

G. W. riutts " Londond'y ;'> 27 
J. D. Pjitterson " " . ."> 27 
H. D. Simons " N^ashiia . 112 27 



o .: ( 



F. Putnam " Hooksett . 
I. W. Pennoek " Goff8tov>-n 4 27 
J. B. Smith " Hillsboro' .", 27 
J. Gerrisli " Pittstield . o 27 

G. P. Amsden " Lynn . ,3 27 
Ephraim Plumpton, in Auburn ;> 27 
William Blancbard lost by Hre ;U 01 
Jonas Everett, minor . . ;> 27 
James Fairfield " . . . 3 27 
Ephraim Hill " . . . 3 27 
Willie"Georo'e " . . . 3 27 
Edward Tirrill " . . . 3 27 
Bovv'ers Freneh " . . . 3 27 
John J. Hayes " . . . r, 27 
William Di^'nam " . . . ."> 27 
Cummings S. Annis, over 70 . ;> 27 
William Uignam " 
Simon Specht " 
C. E. Kuig-ht, out of eity 
John Lewis, taxed twice . 3 2' 



:i 21 

;; 27 



o - < 



Joseph Stark, " " . 

William C. Shannon, no eow . ()! 

J. A. Knowles, no horse . . 1 S)<) 

Daniel Haley, no dog . . 1 00 

James W. Bavrett " . . 1 00 

Benj. G. Brooks " • . 1 00 

Israel M. Young " . . I 00 

Michael Hurley " . . 1 00 

Eben Foss ' " . . 1 00 






To C. M. Hubbard, no doi;- 
M. J. McDonald " . 

D. C. ^YIlittenio^e, no horse 
John Dickey 2d, no dog- . 
Patrick Ilannan, ])0()r 
Cliristopher Mullen, i)oor 
Daniel Wheeler, " 

Jeremiah Sheehan, sick . 
Joseph Yervail, maimed 
Benj. Cole, 
Samuel B. Adams, . 
John Young-, keeping- water 

trough, 
William Vincent, did not ov^] 
James H. Tresilliau " 
John Larkin, '' 

William C. Clarke 
Peter Scanlan, not here . 
Eben Ferren, over taxed 
John W. Brown " 
Abbie ^V. Johnson, over taxed 



ill 00 


1 00 


:5 27 


1 00 


3 27 


:^ 27 


11 1)1) 


3 27 


3 27 


.". 97 



') 


00 


5 


40 


23 


08 


17 


44 


4 


3(5 




27 


30 


52 



19 02 



List of 1S71. 

Gilniai> Iii<hlle, oxev taxed . 10 40 
Catherine Murry, " " . 4 lO 
J. A. V. Smith, " " . 10 (;4 
A. IL Westo]!, " '• . 20 80 
Patrick Murry, " " . 2 08 
Daniel Farmer, " " . 187 20 
Frank C. Morrill, " " . (5 24 
Simon Dodge, " '• . 1(5 (;4 
Larkin Sargent, " " . 24 
Daniel Call, paid in Canada . 3. 12 
Wm. B. Clark, " " Allenstown 3 12 
Alphonzo Crosby, paid in Albi- 
on, Me. .... 3> 12 



15G 

Po E. Jobert, paid in ClieLsea. 

Dennis W. Ham, paid in AVolf- 

horougb, .... 
Wm. G. Frencli, paid in Titts- 

tield 

X. I). Merrill, paid in Gotts- 

town ..... 
Stephen Downs, paid in Xe^\'- 

bnryport, .... 
George Lord, p'd in Francest'n 
Harrison Head, pd in Hooksett 
J. W. ^taekey, pd inLondon'iy 
Jos. Whipple, " Weave 
Danforth Eowe " Laconia . 
Jefferson Smith, insane . 
Henry Sloane, taxed twiee 
John Ferguson " 

(Jhanes Haines " 

Frank Taggart 
(Uiarles C. Clarke, poor 
James Cleworth " 
P. A. O Connor 
V/illiam C. Chase, no dog- 
Fred. Boardman, " 
John M. Chandler, 
Wm. W. Brown, 
Daniel Fogg " 
J. B. Ellenwood 
J. Y. McQueston, 
Levi M. Green 
Joseph Garland " 
Godfrey Messier " 
James Martin 
Thomas Kelley " 
Heirs of S. F. Manahan, no dog 
]^>art. Doyle, no hog 
E. T. Hardy, no horse 



$3 


12 


o 


12 




12 


o 

t) 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


o 


12 


3 


12 




12 


o 


12 


it 


12 


3 


12 


o 
'f 


12 


»> 
t) 


12 


• > 

-> 


12 


• > 


12 




12 




12 


1 


00 


1 


00 


j 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


I 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 




21 


1 


25- 



15' 



To riis. A. Pierce, no liorst 
J. C. Lyford 
S. P. Eiske, no eaiiiage 
Estate of J. (J. Cilley, no liorse 

or carria<;e . 
(leorge f^. Pai'ker, minor 
Anson Davis " 

A. P>rown 

\V. Sanborn " 

^I. Harrington " 

L. E. P>ra gg 
.1. Shaekford 
Cx. G. Dickey 
C. Gerrisli 

J. P>eanian " 

J. Sutter 
Erank Clark 
<). L. Messier 
James Wildev, o\ er 70 
•}. Lyons 
Will. Kimball 
]]. Bresnaban " 
A. C. Wiggin, away 
J>. Bnbier, ])lin(l 
Wm. A. Hackctt, overtax 
Xancy E. (ioodwin for keeping 
vrateving troviiib . 



^1 


04 


1 


GO 


.3 


12 


.') 


54 


•> 


12 


.'> 


12 




12 


o 


12 




12 


• > 


12 


o 


12 


•> 

r> 


12 


3 


12 




12 


o 
»> 


12 


•> 


12 


• > 


12 


o 


12 


f) 


12 


«> 

'J 


12 


»> 


12 




12 


r > 


12 


f ) 


12 



;j 00 



Balance to new accoinit 



$1,215 03 
. 2,333 23 



$3,548 .SO 



158 



STATE TAX. 



By Ai)propiiatiou . . . $50,r)()2 00 

'iV) paid State Treasurer .... $50,502 00 



COUNTY TAX. 



By Appropriation . . . $15,1)47 47 

To ])ai(l County Treasurer .... $15,947 47 



151) 



^^VLlTATION, Taxes, «Jcc. 



YI':.VH. Valuation. 


Taxes. 


Xo. Polls. 


Poll Tax. 


i8;w 


.fi5o5,270 


.'$2,235 49 


244 


$1 60 


18o!» 


















(!04,i)fi:! 


;!,029 84 


427 


2 14 


1840 


















'.)4(!,200 


3,980 51! 


772 


2 20 


1841 


















1.221), 054 


9,503 74 


892 


3 49 


1841.' 


















1,430,524 


12,952 44 


1.053 


2 70 


1S4;'. 


















1,.598,82() 


13.704 32 


1,053 


2 60 


1841 


















1,873.280 


13,.584 72 


1,053 


2 2,5 


184.-, 


















2,544,780 


19,240 27 


1,501 


2 30 


]84(; 


















3,187,72(J 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


1847 


















4.488,550 


24,953 54 


2,050 


1 6.S 


1848 


















4.004,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 5s 


184i» 


















5,500,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


1850 


















5.832.080 


48,974 23 


2.820 


2 37 


1851 


















0,900,402 


51,798 47 


2.910 


2 25 


1852 


















0,795,682 


54,379 45 


2;7;15 


1 92 


185;! 


















0,995,528 


(;i.545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


1854 


















8.237,017 


(;2.022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


1855 


















8^833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


1850 


















9.244,002 


114,214 08 


3,760 


2 90 


1857 


















9^983,802 


84,802 98 


3,095 


2 04 


1S58 


















10^259,080 


7S,210 85 


:'.,095 


1 8."> 


is,-,;.t 


















9,853,310 


81.308 01 


3,495 


1 92 


18G0 


















9.044,937 


8(;.,S04 87 


3,051 


2 IC. 


18G1 


















9.343,254 


99.104 90 


3,974 


2 40 


18('.2 


















8,891,2.50 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


I8t):! 


















9.597,780 


90,233 80 


2,995 


2 40 


18G4 


















9,517.512 


142,815 98 


3,108 


3 50 


18G5 


















9.478,308 


209,090 20 


3,170 


5 18 


180(; 


















10,050,020 


245,. 50 7 19 


4,114 


5 50 


J 807 


















10.101,550 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 01 


LSGM 


















9.929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


i.s(i;» 


















10,205,303 


2.54,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


1870 


















10,710,252 


234,047 (;3 


4,959 


3 27 


1871 


















11,305,102 


230,039 74 


5,404 


3 ]2 





IGO 



City Debt. 



Date of Xotes 



To whom payable. 



When payable. 



Piincipal. 



•Ally 




1S47 


City Bonds. 


July 


1 


IS 72 


$20,000 Oi) 


Feb. 


2 s 


18.52 


Neliemiah Hunt. 


Feb. 


28 


, 1872 


3, GOO 00 


July 




185-t 


City Bonds. 


July 




1874 


20,000 00 


.Jan. 




185G 


il a 


Jan. 




1880 


10.000 00 


.lulv 




1857 


li " 


July 




1877 


22,500 00 


JiilV 




1858 


Neliemiah Hunt. 


July 




1878 


2,400 00 


.FnlV 


22 


185S 


Neheniiali Hunt. 


July 


22 


1878 


1,100 .00 


.luly 




18G2 


City Bonds. 


Jufy 




1882 


22.500 00 


.Fan. 




18()3 


" " 


.Jan. 




, 1888 


35.000 0(t 


Oct. 


31 ' 


18G3 


4i a 


Nov. 




1893 


70,000 00 


.\in-il 




ISG^ 


U 4i 


April 




1884 


70,000 00 


Jiilv 




18G-t 


u u 


July 




1894 


50,000 00 


April 




18.-)5 


u (i 


April 




1885 


10,000 00 


Aua. 




18G9 


11 (( 


Aug. 




1872 


1,500 00 


Aui;. 




18G9 


<i il 


Aug. 




1873 


1,500 00 


"vim-. 




186!) 


C. i. 


Aug. 




1874 


1.500 00 


Au-r. 




18 GO 


i; 1. 


Aug. 




1875 


1,500 00 


AUO-. 




LSGO 


i; a 


Aug. 




1876 


1,500 00 


Aug-. 




18Gi) 


u a 


Aug. 




1877 


1,500 00 


Auj,^ 




1SG9 


li a 


Aug. 




1878 


1,500 00 


Aujf. 




18G!) 


li a 


Aug. 




1879 


10,000 00 


Auii-. 




18G!) 


a a 


Aug. 




1880 


1,500 00 


Au:;. 




18(1!) 




Ang. 




1881 


10,000 00 


An if. 




18G!) 


a t; 


Aug. 




1882 


1,500 00 


Xivj;. 




18G!) 


" " 


Aug. 




1883 


5,000 00 


Auu-. 




18G9 


" '• 


Aug. 




1884 


1,500 00 


Aujr. 




1869 


a a 


Aug. 




1885 


1,500 08 


Au«-. 




18G9 


a i: 


Aug. 




188G 


5,000 00 


Auir. 




18G9 


a a 


Aug. 




1887 


3,500 00 



Amount of funded debt January 1, 1871, . 

Decrease during the year. 

Amount of funded debt January 1, 1872, . 

Amoxuit of temporary loan Jaiuiary 1, 1871, 

I ucrease during the year, 

Amount of temporary loan January 1, 1872, 

luterest now due, estimated at 

Outstanding bills due January 1, 1872, 

'I'otal debt and interest January 1, 1872, . 
( -ash in tlie Treasury January i, 1872, 
N'otes due the city ..... 
Interest on the same (estimated), . 



Net indebtedness January 1, 1872, 
N'et indebtedness January 1, 1871. 

Increase of debt during the A'car. 



$393,100 CO 
6,000 00 

$20,726 00 
1.444 00 



S387 100 00 



$3,751 29 

4,270 40 

450 00 



$22,170 00 

9,000 00 

20,531 58 

$438,801 58 



$8,471 09 

$430,329 89 
403,539 28 

$26,790 Gl 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER, 



FOE THE YEAE 1S71. 



11 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



Jax. 1, 1872, Ix BoAUD OK Mayor and Aldeumex. 
Read and accepted, and ordered to be printed. 

J. E. BENNETT, CUn Cleric. 



11 E P O 11 T 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTJMENT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1S71. 



B. C. KENDiVLL, 



Chief Engineek. 



Engineer's Office, Jan. 1, 1S72. 

To His Honor the Mayor and tlic Board of Aldermen : 

Gentlemen : — Herewith I liave tlie honor to subniit 
to your Honorable Board tlie Annual Report of the Fire 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1871. I 
have g'i^'en in detail an account of the apparatus be- 
longing to the Department, the name and style of the 
several companies, together with the number of men, 
and a list of fires during the year. I also give in detail 
the amount in the hands of each company at a fair val- 
uation. 

amoskeag engine company no. 1, 

LOCATED ON VINE STltKKT. 

1 first-class rotary steam fire engine . . $3,000 00 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage . . . 150 00 

200 feet rubber hose, good \ . . . 300 00 

75 feet linen hose " . . . . 45 00 

COO feet leather hose " .... 750 00 

500 feet " " ordinarv . . . . 500 00 



1G4 



70 feet suiall rubber 




14 woolen jackets 


14 pairs overalls . 


14 fire hats . 


3 stoves and pipe 


1 force-pump 


1 pair blankets and hoods 


1 iron pan . 


13 life ropes and straps 


2 axes .... 


2 iron bars . 


1 pair pole straps 


1 vise and bench 


1 coal hod, shovel, wrench 


5 oil and fluid cans 


2 blunderbusses . 


2 brass i)ipes 


1 branch piece with gate 


1 jack-screw 


5 lanterns . 


hall and house furniture 


1 pail, tackle and fall 


7 hose patches 


1 sink .... 




(3 badges 




26 keys .... 




3 tons of hard coal 




3 tons of cannel coal 




2 cords of hard wood 




1 cord of pine 




1 clock 




1 si)ray nozzle 




1 reducing ijiece . 




1 map of city 




1 feather duster . 




1 pair of harnesses 





and h 



annner 



S14 OO 


112 00 


20 00 


03 00 


40 00 


30 00 


8 00 


8 00 


12 00 


3 00 


2 oa 


5 00 


5 00 


4 00 


7 00 


24 00 


24 00 


15 00 


5 00 


20 00 


30 00 


00 


2 00. 


3 00 


5) 00 


3 oa 


33 00 


03 oa 


17 00 


(J oa 


7 oa 


25 00 


8 00 


7 00 


3 00 


50 oa 



105 



1 whip 



1 large slide ureiicb . 



Total uiiioiuit 



$2 50 
2 50 



$5,443 00 



FIRE KING EXGINB CO. XO. 2, 

LOCATED OX VIXE STREET. 



500 
800 
50 
10 
10 
14 
14 
14 
5 

o 
O 

•o 

1 
1 
1 

14 
1 

1 
G 

o 
O 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

9 



first-class double plunger engine, 




$3,000 00 


two-wlieeled liose carriage 




200 00 


feet leather liose, nearly new . 






025 00 


feet " " ordinary 






SOO 00 


feet small rubber hose 






10 00 


belts and spanners 






10 00 


life ropes and straps 






10 00 


pairs hats 






(>] 00 


woolen jackets 






70 00 


pairs overalls . 






20 00 


torches .... 






15 00 


lanterns .... 






15 00 


blunderbusses 






24 00 


branch piece 






5 00 


branch i)iece y^ith gate 






15 00 


spray nozzle 






25 00 


chairs .... 






;}0 00 


reducing piece 






8 00 


iron pan 






3 00 


badges .... 






00 


stoves and pipe 






50 00 


jack screw 






5 00 


pair liarnesses . 






45 00 


pair blankets and hoods . 






8 00 


vise and bench 






5 00 


wreiich, hammer, bar and coal 


hod 




4 00 


shovels .... 






2 00 


axes 






3 00 


tin cans 






3. eO 



IGO 



1 clock 


S8 00 


1 force i>iiiup ...... 


25 00 


1 whip ....... 


2 25 


1 large coal sliovel 


1 00 


1 sink ........ 


3 00 


2 fly covers 


5 00 


3 tons hard coal ..... 


33 00 


3 tons cannel coal .... 


()3 00 


2 cords liard wood .... 


17 00 


1 1-2 cords pine Avood 


9 00 


1 map of city ..... 


7 00 


1 pair blankets and hoods . 


20 00 


1 feather duster 


3 00 


1 iron kettle 


2 50 



Total 



85,317 75 



E. W. nARMNGTON ENGINE CO. NO. 3, 



LOCATED AT TISCATAQUOG. 



1 second-class engine 


. 82,500 00 


1 two-wheeled hose carriage 


200 00 


200 feet rubber hose, good . 


300 00 


1000 feet leather hose, good . 


1,250 00 


300 feet leather hose, ordinary 


300 00 


18 feet small rubber hose 


3 00 


12 pairs overalls ..... 


18 00 


12 woolen jackets .... 


1)0 00 


12 tire hats 


54 00 


14 belts and spanners .... 


20 00 


4 torches 


8 00 


1 pair harnesses ..... 


35 00 


1 pair blankets ...... 


(1 00 


3 trumpets 


(> 00 


1 bench and vise .... 


5 00 


2 stoves and pipe . . . 


30 00 


1 branch-piece with gate . 


15 00 



107 



1 jack screw 


() settees 


() office cliairs . 


() small chairs 


1 coal hod . 


1 tackle and fall 


1 chandelier 


1 iron pan . 


1 table 


4 tons hard coal . 


4 tons cannel coal 


3 cords hard wood 


i- cord pine wood 


2 blunderl)nsses 


1 coal shovel 


1 force pump 


1 iron bar, oil can and 


1 lantern . 


1 set pole straps 


12 keys 


gallons oil 


1 gallon sperm oil 


1 large sponge . 


2 pipes 


1 map of city . 


1 step ladder 


2 axes 


1 8 hose patches . 


10 life ropes and straps 


1 wrench and hammer 


2 lanterns . 


1 water pot 


old couplings , 


1 10 gallon can . 


10 lbs. waste 


2 small oil cans . 



sin 



§5 CO'- 


20 00 


10 00 


4 00 


1 00 


8 00 


10 00 


5 00 


o 00 


44 00 


84 00 


25 50 


3 00 


24 00 


1 00 


25 00 


00 


4 00 


5 00 


2 00 


9 00 


2 50 


1 00 


15 00 


7 00. 


2 00; 


3 00 


4 00 


12 00 


2 00 


G 00 


1 00 


8 00 


2 00 


2 00 


1 00 



$5,215 OO 



108 



]S\ S. BEAN ENGINE CO. NO. 4. 



LOCATED OX VINE STIJEET. 



1 second-class double plunder engine 




$4,200 00 


1 two-wlieeled Iiose carriag-e 


150 00 


1 force pump 






30 00 


1 sink 






3 00 


2 stoves and pipe 






100 00 


1 oil can and shovel . 






1 50 


2 blankets and hoods 






25 00 


3 tons hard coal 






33 00 


3 tons cannel coal 






(53 00 


2 cords hard wood 






17 00 


1 cord soft wood 






(» 00 


2 j)luiiderbusses 






29 00 


2 axes .... 






(} 00 


1 bench and vise 






. , 13 00 


4 pole strai)s 






10 00 


1 leather bucket 






10 00 


1 lot gas fixtures 






30 00 


1 lot lead pipe for pump 






15 00 


810 ft. leather hose, new 






. 1,023 00 


2 dust brushes and pan 






2 00 


10 office chairs 






40 00 


4 oil cans .... 






1 00 


1 pail, l>room and wash basin 






4 00 


14 keys .... 






4 00 


50 feet small rubber hose 






8 00 


14 fire hats .... 






03 00 


14 v»'Oolen jackets 






120 00 


14 pairs overalls .... 






3o 00 


10 belts and spanners . 






25 00 


1 step ladder .... 






2 00 


() life straps .... 






7 50 


1 whip ..... 






2 25 


1 pair of harnesses 






100 00 


1 pair of halters 






4 00 



i(;o 



2 feather (lu.sters 

1 cloek 

2 cui)boai'(ls 

I Diap of city 
1 basket 
1 iron l»ar 
1 coal hod . 
1 pair lialters 

Total 



$4 50 


8 50 


12 00 


7 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


4 00 


$0,210 75 



PEXXACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1, 

LOCATKD OX VINE STREKT. 



1 4 wheeled hose carriage 


1 4 wheeled hose carriage 


GOO feet leather hose, 


new 


L,000 feet leather hose. 


good 


450 feet leather hose. 


ordinj 


10 woolen jackets 


. 


24 s})anners and hell 


s 


1 signal lantern 




4 torches . 




4 axes 




1 shovel . 




3 oil cans . 




37 chairs 




1 table 




1 miiTor . 




1 chandelier 




3 trnnipets 




1 blunderbnss . 




1 jack screw 




28 hose patches . 




4 lanterns 




1 sink 




1 copper pump . 





ny 



S800 00 


200 00 


750 00 


1,000 00 


400 00 


40 00 


25 00 


12 00 


8 00 


() 00 


1 00 


2 00 


48 00 


5 00 


8 00 


8 00 


() 00 


12 00 


1 00 


5 00 


10 00 


3 00 


3 00 



170 



8 pairs overalls 










$15 oa 


30 badges . 








45 oa 


12 holsters . 








4 00 


1 liainmer . 








1 00 


1 slide wrencli . 








1 00 


2 stoves and pipe 






* • • 


20 00 


2 settees . 








t\ 00 


2 cords liard wood 








IT 00 


10 life ropes, 1 map of city 




19 00 


Total 


$3,477 00 


HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO.l, 


LOCATED OX VIXK STI 


lElCT. 


1 truck with hooks and ladders 


, 81,100 00 


500 feet old ladders 






1 00 


1 signal lantern . 










10 00 


4 torches 










8 00 


1 trumpet . 










1 00 


4 large hooks 










35 OO 


3 small hooks 










5 00 


30 oflSce chairs 










45 00= 


1 table 










14 00' 


2 stoves and pipe 










25 00' 


1 jack screw 










2 00 


4 axes 










7 00 


1 shovel and iron bar 










2 00 


8 hay forks 










14 00 


2 buckets . 










3 00- 


1 rope 










15 00 


45 badges 










30 OO 


1 sink . 










3 00 


copper puni]) . 










3 00 


12 pairs overalls . 










24 00 


30 woolen jackets . 










220 00 



171 



2 cords liard ^\ oo<l 
1 ma|) of city 

Total . 



ENGINEER S DErARTMENT. 



1 supply wagon 
1 lot of old hose and couplings 
5 maps of city . . ■ . 
1 piece suction liose 

Total .... 



yi7 00 


7 00 


$1,591 00 


$225 00 


75 00 


30 00 


12 00 



$342 00 



RECAriTULATION 



Ainoskeag Engine Conipan} 


' No. 1 




$5,443 m 


Fire King ''' 


No. 2 




5,317 75 


E. W. Harrington 


No. 3 




5,215 00 


N. kS. Bean Engine " 


No. 4 




0,21G 75 


Pennacook Hose " 


No. 1 




3,477 00 


Hook and Ladder " 


No. 1 




1,591 00 


Engineer's department . 


• 




342 00 


Total amount of property 


in departm 


ent 


829,002 50 



NAMES AND EESIDENCE OF MEMBBES OF THE 
FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

ENGINEERS. 

B. C. Kendall, chief, cor. Central and Maple Streets. 

Wilberforce Ireland, clerk, cor. Prospect and Union. 

A. C. Wallace, Main street, Piscataquog. 

Elijah Chandler, 15 Machine Shop Block. 

W. T. Evans,, cor. Merrimack and Maple streets. 



172 

AMOSKBAG ENGIXE CO. NO. 1. 

<). E. Kendall, Ibreiiiaii, Harrison .street. 

(I. E. Simmons, assistant, 14 Pearl street. 

Horace Mcliols, engineer, 27 Machine Shop Block. 

Samuel 0. Lowell, assistant, 5 Machine Shop Block. 

James E. Carr, clerk, 71 Amherst street. 

G. W. Bntterheld, driver. Engine House, Tine street. 

Erastus Cutting, 105 Hanover street. 

0. W. Stevens, 3G Pearl streeet. 

C. M. Morse, 30 Lowell street. 

J. D. Linus, 5 Machine Shop Block. 

S. E. Furlong, 32 Machine Shop Block. 

J. E. Wilson, 53 Machine Shop Block. 

John Dodge, 121 Amoskeag Corporation. 

J. L. Avery, 222 Chestnut street. 

FIEB KING EXT^IXE CO. ^'0. 2. 

,L F. Pherson, loreman, 25 Machine Shop Block. 
K. Davis, assistant foreman, G4 Stark Corporation. 

A. M. Kenistoii, clerk and treas., 10 Bridge street. 
I). W. Morse, engineer, 4 Parsons 1)1 ock, Ehn street. 

S. ^y. E'elson, assis't engineer, 20 Machine Shop block. 

0. A. Swain, 4 Burgess block. 

J. J. Gleason, 10 Machine Shop block. 

B. T. Eust, Central, cor. Maple street. 

A. f! Quimby, driver. Engine house. Vine street. 

V/. H. Nelson, Amherst, cor. Maple street. 

<i F. Hall, 212 Chestnut street. 

J. W. Batchelder, lOG Pine street. 

0. O. i^arnard, 47 Amherst street. 

George AV. Cheney, 40 Amoskeag Corporation. 

E. w. iiARRiiN^GTO^" e:^sgixe CO. y^o. 3. 

John Patterson, foreman, Main street. 
Horatio Fradd, assis't foreman, Dover street. 
D. J. Warren, cor. Main an.d Granite street. 



B. K. Parker, Main stieet. 

Wiii. Doraii, engineer, Main street. 

H. Crandall, driver, Mast road. 

H. E. Stnrtevant, Amlier.st road. 

J. E. Yonng, Main street. 

J. Dinsmore, Granite street. 

William A. Babcock, New Doiiglas street. 

Thomas Yonng, Main street. 

Joseph Scholield. " " 

N. S. BEAX ENGINE CO. XO. 4. 

S. B. Hope, foreman, 10(3 Lowell street. 

G. H. Dodge, assis't foreman, 35 Machine Shop block. 

J. S. Batchelder, engineer, 151 Pine street. 

A. D. Colby, assis't engineer, 41 Machine Shop block. 
W. H. Yickery, clerk, 24 Concord street. 

W. Small, driver. Engine House, Yine street. 

G. W. "Wilson, Nashua street. 

G. W. Lincoln, 34 Laurel street. 

O. B. Elliott, 53 Stark Corporation. 

S. H. Batchelder, 8 Macinne Shop Block. 

J. W. Preston, 39 Machine Shop block. 

J. C. Butterlield, 35 Amoskeag Corporation. 

F. E. Judkins, 42 Machine Shop jlock. 

F. B. Lincoln, 34 Laurel street. 

PENXACOOK HOSE CO. NO. 1. 

J. E. Merrill, foreman, 45 Orange street. 

B. B. Aldrich, assis't foreman, 90 Central street. 

D. H. Maxheld, clerk and treas., 17 Stark Cor. 
Albert Maxfield, steward, 14 Amoskeag " 
Charles E. Colley, 152 Manchester street. 
Benjamin Spofibrd, 242 Hanover street. 
James G. Knight, 110 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Thomas ^Y. Lane, 19 Blodgett street.' 

E. O. Burleigh, 90 Amoskeag Corporation. 



174 

D. M. Perkins, Hill «ic James' block, Maucliester street. 

H. W. Fisher, 51 Macliine Shop block. 

Heuiy S. Brown, 14 Amoskeag Cor., Bridge street. 

W. E. Porter, Lowell st., JauesYille. 

W. L. Blemiis, 42 Hanover street. 

G. ^y. Holmes, 147 Merrimack street. 

G. H. Porter, 10 Amoskeag Corporation. 

A. J. Cobiirn, Amherst street, Towlesville. 

Charles Manly, Pearl street. 

G. B. l^oyes, 149 Merrimack street. 

HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

J, Daniels, foreman. Ash street. 

G. E. Glines, assistant, Orange street. 

C. H, Bradford, clerk, 58 Bridge street. 

0. Cantield, steward, 18 Amoskeag Corporation. 

G. E. Dudley, treasurer, cor. Beach and Laurel streets. 

. Kearns, driver, Concord street. 
H. P. Young, 113 Pine street. 

C. E. Clougii, 72 Bridge street. 

F. A. Sent'er, 39 Pine street. 

D. H. Young, 72 Bridge street. 
H. L. Drew, 89 Hanover street. 
J. L. Bradford, 58 Bridge street. 
J. ]^. Chase, Bridge street. 

E. H. Pike, 8 Lincoln block, Elm street. 
E. A. G. Holmes, 122 Manchester street. 
L. Flint, Bridge, cor. Maple. 

George Bacon, Museum Building. 

G. L. Leach, Merrimack street. 

C. A. Clough, 1 Print Works Corporation. 

J. Jev/ell, 52 Orange street. 

L Jenkins, Manchester street. 

W. Carr, 59 Pine street. 

L. Eobinson, Pine street. 

C. E. Duntley, Concord slreet. 

^Y. Tebbetts, IMuseum Building. 

L. Stone, 14 Laurel street. 



i.J 



A. ¥. Blaucliard, Orauge street. 

A. J. Eaiidall, 7 Cliestinit street, Kno^vles block. 

D. M. K. riiillips, cor. Central and Maple street. 

F. E. Stearns, Orange street. 

A. J. Chick, 7 Chestnut street. 

By the following record, it Avill be seen that the tire 
department has been called out twenty-eight times the 
past year. Although the department has been called 
out more times than for several years past, the loss by 
fire has ])een very light, not exceeding forty-eight thou- 
sand dollars, including the Central llailroad bridge, the 
loss of which was put at $L>5,000. The above facts 
speak well for the etiiciency of the department, it being 
.second to none of its size and means. 

LLST OF FIRES FOR THE YEAR 1871. 

Jan. 22, slight lire on Spruce street. 

" 25, cor. Orange and Tine street ; loss 84,000 00 

Feb. 10, slight tire on Manchester street. 

" 15, J. 8. Kidder & Co., engine room. 

" 20, alarm Manchester Corporation. 

Mar. 1, alarm. 

" 17, slight tire in Kiddle's building. 
April 11, hre near Stearns' hotel ; loss $.300 00. 

May 30, tire at Johnson & Co's; loss $1,500 00. 
June 2, alarm North end Elm street. 

" 3, tire in wood shed, Orange street. 
(), Eailroad Bridge ; loss, $25,000 CO. 

" 19, lire cor. Pearl and Chestnut st. ; $2,500 00. 
July 1, lire cor. Elm aud Park st., loss $3,000 00. 

'• 8, alarm. 

" 21, tire at Lowell's Foundry; loss $5,0C0 00. 
Aug. 5, alarm, cor. Andierst and Elm street. 

.. " 20, fire on Concord street ; loss $500 CO. 

" 24, nlai'm, cor. Manchester and Chestnut st. 



176 

Aug. 30, alarm, cor. of Elm and Amlierst st. 
Sept. (>, fire at Meclianics' Eow. 
Oct. 1, alarm on Park street. 

" 7, alarm. 

" 2i>, lire Wilson road ; loss $4,000 00. 

Nov. L>, fire at Mechanics' Eow ; loss $1,500 00. 

" 4, slig'lit lire on Washington street. 

" 7, alarm. 

" 15, alarm on Manchester street. 

Total loss for the year, $47,300 00 

The working apparatus of the department is in the best 
condition, steamers 2, 3, and 4 having heen thoronghly 
overhauled and repaired. 

There have been added to the department during the 
year (500 feet of new hose, and about the same amount 
condennied as unlit for service. The amount of hose 
((),0r)9 ft.) is fre(iuently insufficient to meet the demand. 
There should l)e added to it 3,000 feet the coming 
season. 

TJie attention of the City Council having been called 
in previous reports to the scarcity of water in certain 
sections of our city, and the entire destitution in others, 
for lire purjjoses, and having lu'esented in my judg- 
ment the remedy for the evils complained of, it would 
seem unnecessary for me to make any suggestion. 

The advantage of having instant information of the 
locality of a lire can easily be appreciated, even by 
those having no experience in the matter. The impor- 
tance of the Fire Alarm Telegraph cannot be too highly 
appreciated, and no city wishing an efficient Fire De- 
partment should be Avithout it. It effects a great saving 
in preventing false alarms ; and on the principle that 
prevention is better than cure, 1 would recommend its 
adoption by our city. 

I would recommend that the repairs on buildings oc- 
cupied by the Fire Dei)artment be placed in the hands 



of the ijoard of Engineers, together with the repairs on 
reservoirs, as they woiihl l)e better and more seasonably 
done. 

In eonehision, I would respectfully tender my thanks 
to the City Government and its Committee on Fire 
Department for their promptness in supplying the 
wants of the department ; also to the officers and mem- 
bers of the department generally, for their hearty eo- 
oi)eration in discharging the duties of the department, 
and thereby meeting the reasonable expection of their 
fellow-citi/ens. 

B. C. KENDALL, 

CMcf Eiujineer, 



llErOllT OF OYEllSEEES OF THE POOH. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Comma)! Camicil of the City 
of 3Tanehestcr : 

In coinpliaiiee witli the ordinances of said city, tlic 
Overseers of the Poor lierewitli present tlieir Annual 
Eeport : 

The whole number of families wliich liave received 
more or less assistance during the past year is seven- 
teen, consisting of forty-seven persoiis, of which num- 
ber, fifteen fomilies and thirty-six persons liave a set- 
tlement in this city, and the remaining two families and 
eleven persons in other towns in the State. 

The whole number of i)ersons at the alm;-;-house dur- 
ing the 3'ear is twenty-tive ; average number for the 
year, five and one-fourth. There have been one death 
and two births. Papers have been made out as the law 
requires for one hundred and thirty-tv/o persons to l)e 
assisted by the County of Hillsliorough. 

All of which is res[)ectfully submitted. 

JAMES A. WESTON, 

Chalrr.ian ex-offido. 
S. S. MOULTON, 
S. J. YOUNG, 
JEEEMIAH STIOKNEY, 
M. E. GEOEGE, 
PATEICK SHEEHAN, 
H. W. SAYOEY, 
ISAAC LEWIS, 
G. H. COLBY, 

Overseers of tlic Poor. ' 



180 



Iiiventonj and aiypraiml of Personal Froi)crty at the City 
Farm, Deeemljer 2o, 1S71, hy the Joint /Standing Com- 
mittee on City Farm. 



2 pairs working- oxen 

1 pail* 3 years old steer 

8 milcli cows 

1 yearling heifer . 

1 imll . " . 

Icalf . 

1 horse 
1) pigs . 

2 shotes 
2 breeding- sows . 

.35 bushels barley . 

28 bushels wheat . 
170 bushels corn 

39 bushels ears sweet corn 

13 bushels oats 

7h bushels beans . 
200 bushels potatoes 

85 bushels beets . 
115 bushels carrots 
IGG pounds pop corn 
230 bushels turnii)s 
G dozen cabbages 

IG tons No. 1 hay . 

9 tons No. 2 hay . 

1^ tons No. 3 hay . 

2 tons corn fodder 

1|- tons straw 

30 gallons cider . 

4 barrels soap 

1 barrel salted cucumbers 
21 barrels apples . 

1 bag red top seed 
9| barrels salt pork 



$300 00 

125 00 

280 00 

15 00 

30 00 

10 00 

100 00 

72 00 

30 00 

55 00 

35 00 

50 00 

170 00 

75 00 

7 80 
22 50 

120 50 
42 50 
57 50 

8 30 
115 00 

3 00 

500 00 

252 00 

27 00 

3>0 00 

22 50 

8 00 

20 00 

5 00 

8 75 

7 00 

105 75 



181 



PtO pounds salt beef 

18 pounds fresh pork . 
1.15 pounds cheese 

o8 i)ounds butter 
1204 ](Ounds lard 
L*0.'> pounds sugar . 
Salt lish and mackerel . 

70 pounds dried apple . 
2 pounds tobacco 

Molasses barrel and faucet 

28 gallons molasses 
4 quarts preserved tomatoc- 

20 gallons boiled cider . 

7 dozen candles . 
55 pounds nails 

38 pounds drills and 38 wed; 

1 meat saw . 

2 ox carts 

ox sleds 

1 hay cart . 
1 hay wagon 

1 horse hay fork . 

1 one-horse tip-cart 

2 single wagons . 
1 single sleigh 

1 single sled 

3 harnesses . 
1 lead harness 

Curry combs and brushes 
Bridle, halter and blankets 

1 drag rake 

8 hand rakes 
11 hay forks . 

4 sickles 

2 grain cradles . 
20 scythes 
10 scythe snaths . 



s and 



es 



ketchup 



$2 40 


1 14 


19 90 


12 1() 


24 48 


24 30 


13 00 


7 00 


1 30 


1 50 


14 00 


1 00 


20 00 


2 10 


2 75 


8 00 


2 00 


85 00 


00 00 


18 00 


75 00 


20 00 


75 00 


70 00 


10 00 


15 00 


30 00 


3 00 


2 00 


00 


1 00 


2 00 


5 00 


1 00 


3 50 


7 50 



3 00 



18L> 



1 cross-cut saw . 

1 string' Udells 

1 stone digger 

7 ox-yokes mihI 1)ows 

<S j)lows 

1 corn slielier 
40 fov/ls 

25 meal bags , 

2 l)ags salt . 
7 baskets 

2 butlaio robes 
2 stone drags 

2 cultivators 

3 scalding tubs . 
1 rope ainl block . 
vScales and steelyards 

1 winnowing mill 

2 bay cutters 

1 hay knife . 
25 tie-chains . 

2 grindstones 
1 wheelbarrov; 

1 horse rake 

2 mason's trowels ' 
1 chest tools 

3 wood saws 

1 shaving horse . 
1 vise and saw set 
7 axes . 

1 ai)[»le picker 
5 ladders 

10 shovels and spades 

manure forks . 
3 harrows 

2 bog hoes . 

1 bush hook 

1 set measures 



U 00 


1 00 


24 00 


30 00 


75 00 


2 00 


20 00 


5 00 


4 50 


2 00 


20 00 


8 00 


4 00 


1 00 


3 00 


12 00 


8 00 


G 00 


2 00 


f) 00 


7 00 


10 00 


25 00 


1 00 


17 00 


3 00 


1 00 


3 00 


5 00 


50 


5 00 


10 00 


5 00 


12 00 


1 50 


1 00 


1 00 



i8a 



*2 gmvcl sera pel's 

Balls and cliahis 

tj set fetters 

'2 pairs liaiidciitts 
1- cider Itavrels 

If cook a;iHl other sto\ 
12 tables 

2 clocks 

2 rocking chairs . 
.3() coiiinioii cliairs 

T) looking glasses 
]!) ^vilulo^v curtains 

boxes 

() stone pots 
21 earthen pots 
.10 water pails 

4 wash tnbs 

5 l)ntter tubs 

Milk pans and nieasur 
7 inilk ])ails 
40 milk ])ans 
() sugar buckets . 

1 churn 

1 cream i)ot 

1 pie cupboard . 

1 cheese press 

2 cheese safes 

1 pair cheese tongs 

cheese hooi)s . 

1 cheese tul) and bask 
1 curd <'utter 

10 cheese clotlis and s 
('Ottee and tea-pots 
Tin ware 
12 flat irons . 
Mixing trough 
8alt mortar and coffee 



es 



rani 



rs 



mill 



m> 


00 


IT 


00 


10 00 


o 


00 


10 00 


45 


00 


15 


00 


5 


00 


») 


00 


12 


00 


f'5 


50 


5 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


—1 


00 


o 


00 


•> 


0(^ 


') 


7f> 
00 


>) 


m 


() 


00 


1 


50 


3 


00 




75 


o 


00 


2 


50 


5 


00 




50 


2 


00 


»') 


00 


1 


00 


o 
f ) 


00 


O 


00 


(; 


00 




00 


') 


00 


1 


00 



i84 



Castor, pepper 1)(>xe.s and salt dishes 
17 ciiaiiibers and bed-pan 
Shovels and tongs 
Knives, forks and spoons 

4 light-stands 

1 dinner-bell 
Eolling-pin and cake l)oard 

2 elotlies horses . 
AVash boards and benches 
School and other Ijooks 
1 tape measure . 

11 roller towels 
31 common towels 

12 table cloths and 1 table cover 
20 bedsteads and cords 
17 feather beds and bedding 

Thread and needles 
Floor brushes and ln'ooms 
Clothes lines and pins 
15 baking pans 

5 butcher and carving knives 
4 trays and waiters 
8 jugs .... 

12 candlesticks 

4 flails, cops and i>in . 

(> nuizzle baskets 

i; barrel crackers 

Window Glass 
15 ])Ounds dried i)umpkin 
20 bushels ashes . 

1 clothes wringer 

1 cider mill 

1 seed sower 

2 gauging rods . 
1 washing machine 
feed aiul mixing boxes 

11 hoes 



$1 


00 


5 


00 


') 


00 


10 


00 


'> 


00 




25 


1 


00 


2 


00 




00 


5 


00 




50 


2 


00 


3 


00 


12 


00 


15 


00 


200 00 


2 


00 


o 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


25 


'> 


00 


1 


50 


2 


00 


1 


50 


2 


25 


1 


00 


1 


50 


5 


00 


7 


00 


50 


00 


(> 


50 


1 


00 




50 


5 


00 


i 


00 



185 



5 stone haiuiners 

4 iron bars 
3 picks 
7 lar^e cliains 
3 stake, 1 spread and 2 wliittletr 

1 kerosene oil can 

1 FLAG OF OUR COUNTRY 

Watering- pot and oil can 

5 bags corn meal 
3 bushels rye meal 
Candle momds, sieves and knife 
Cott'ee boiler , • 
Cliopping-knife and skimmers 
3 lanterns and 3 lamps 
Dress-table and bureau 
Reel, svv^ifts and si)inning-wlieel 

2 chests of drawers and 2 trunk 
Dining set and crockery ware 
8 barrels vinegar 

1 pound of hoi)s . 
19 pounds of tea . 

3 pounds of sage 
Medicines . 

2 garden rakes . 

1 hand-sled . 

2 stub scythes 

2 mowing nuichiues 

1 meat bench 
00 dry casks . 

3 cart spires 
Pine lumber 
Oak lumber 

2 casks lime 
(5 wrenches . 

3 clothes-baskets 
1 cant-hook 

28 pounds bar soap 



eel 



tra;\ 



iins 



80 00 


5 00 


4 00 


15 00 


4 50 


75 


2 00 


1 00 


00 


;{ 00 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


4 00 


4 00 


1 75 


5 00 


20 00 


00 00 


25 


19 00 


1 00 


2 50 


1 00 


5 00 


3 00 


90 00 


1 25 


00 


3 00 


20 00 


18 00 


1 10 


3 00 


1 50 


1 00 


3 08 



J8(; 



H barrels Hour . . . . 

r> pounds coffee . . . . 

1 suction pump . . . . 

1 beetle and 5 wedges 

New clotli and clotliing on liand 

Boots on band , . . . 

5 skeins yarn . . . . 

5 pounds gunpowder . 
14 i)ounds sole leatber . 



$1'J 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


21 


00 


10 


00 


1 


00 


1 


25 


4 00 


$4,820 


23 



Cit)/ of ManclicHtcr in account with Citij Poor Farm. Dii 



To Stock on band Dec. 24, 1870 . 
Expenditures tbe current year 
Interest on farm 



$4,924 25 
4,203 75 
1,000 00 

$10,128 00 



Contra. 

By Stock on band Dec. 23, 1871 
Stock and produce sold from 

farm .... 
Clotliing for})au])ers 
Clotliing for i>risoners 
373 4-7 weeks' l)oar(l of prison- 
ers, and 272 5-7 Aveeks' b'd of 
paupers, at an a\erage cost 
per week of $4.03 . 



Ck. 



. $4,820 23 


. 2,500 43 


00 81) 


40 34 



2,004 11 



$10,128 CO 



187 

Average number of X)ani>er8 in 1870 . . 5 

Average number of i)aui)ers iu 1S71 . . 5 1-4 

Average luuiiber of prisoners iu 1870 . . 8 l-;; 

Average number of prisoners in 1871 . , 7 1-0 

JxVMES A. WESTON, 
,)Oim HOSLEY, 
JxVMES 0. EUSSELL, 
ISRAEL W. Dlt^KEY, 
A. A. WOODWAEI), 

J. fS. Committee ou C'ltji luoi)}. 



R E P 11 T 



COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES 



To the City Couitcils: 

The Committee on Cemeteries respeetfully submit 
their Ainuial Eeport : 

During the jjiist year Mr. William C. Chase has heen 
employed in the Valley, and Mr. A. B. Chase, Avith as- 
sistance from Mr. liazelton, in Pine Grove. The for- 
mer has, as heretofore, been under the direction of His 
Honor Mayor Weston, and the latter under that of Mr. 
J. B. Sawyer. 

The growth of the city in })uildings and population in 
the immediate vicinity of the Valley begins to be felt 
by those having charge of this ground as a serious and 
growing inconvenience, and your conunittee think that 
a high and close fence will become necessary around the 
whole lot. One or two sides should be fenced in this 
manner the coming season. For this purpose an ap- 
in'opriation will be recpured from the city treasury. 

The Pine Grove continues, as heretofore, to imjvrove 
in appearance. Several costly monuments liaAc been 
erected by owners of lots, and many lots have been 
tastefully planted with trees and flowers. 



This grouiul also requives a now and iiernianent fence, 
and it is expected that the means at the disposal of your 
committee will enable them to begin the work during 
the coming year. 

We tvansinit the report of ouv Treasurer. 

JOHN HOSLEY, 
WM. G. EVERETT, 
JOHN L. KENNEDY, 
DANA D. TOWNE, 
S. B. PUTNAM, 
E. W. HARRINGTON, 
WATERMAN SMITH, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
WM. I). BUCK, 
NATHAN PARKER, 
S. N. BELL, 
JACOB E. JAMES, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 

Committee on Cemeteries, 

Manchester, January 1, 1872. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Committee on Cemeteries : 

Your Treasurer respectfully submits his Annual Report 
of the receipts and expenditures of the Valley and Pine 
Grove Cemeteries : 



THE VALLEY, 



The receipts have been — 

Balance from previous year . . . . SOO 75 

C. S. Fisher, tomb rent '-^^ ^0 

Fractional lots sold '^'^ 00 



191 



I 'ity Treasury, appi'oin'iatioii 
Win. C Chase, work doiie for sundry ovvuers 
of lots ....... 

Wni. C. Chase, hay 

" " runners of old hearse 

J. B. Jones, two old hearses .... 



S548 00 



The payments liave ))een — 
W. C. lliase, 274 days labor 
J. P. (xodfrey & Co., roofing 

liearse houses .... 
W. (). Chase, casli j>aid out 
J. P>. Sawyer, treas. to .Vpril, 1871 



Leaving a balance against the Cemetery of 

riXE GEOVE. 

Cash in City Treasury, Jan. 1, 1871 $288 70 



Cash in hands of Aour Treasurer 



381 



Cash received for (;:> 1-2 lots sold $1,179 38 
" interest ... 3 45 



" " 2 cords pine ]iml)s 
" "24 bushels cider apple 
1870 .... 
Cash received for arass 1870 



4 00 

3 00 

4 00 



$300 00 



145 00 


20 00 


5 00 


17 25 



$(121 50 



13 00 




50 77 




10 00 






>i;(t»)7 77 







$0 27 



$071 48. 



$1,193 83 



$1,805 31 



192 

Tlie expcnditiu'es luive been — 
A. B. Chase, 101^ days labor . $287 25 

"10^ days work of 

liorse 

A. B. Chase, money i)d. for labor 
Kadmiel Hazelton, IGS^ days " 
J. G. Colt, 54 trees . 
Daniels & Co., tools . 
Pike & Heald, repairing pump . 
Temple McQuestou, cement well 

31 feet 

D. Folsom, stone for top of well 
H. ]Sr. Howe, pump 30 feet . 
J. J. Abbott, painting- 
W. C. Chase, breaking roads and 

labor 

W. C. Chase, fixtures and nails . 
Evans & Eussell, 170 stakes 
A. B. Chase, stone. 



24 


75 


9 00 


252 


75 


54 00 


2 


G7 


2 


50 


77 


50 


25 


00 


27 00 


9 


18 


19 


00 


1 


05 





2G 


o 
O 


74 



$801 G(; 



Balance, cash on hand . $1,0G3 G5 

Of this sum, $737.10 is in the City Treasury, and 
$320.55 is in the hands of your Treasurer. 

JOSEPH B. SA^VYER, 

TreuHnrer. 
Manchester, Dec. 30, 1871. 

I certify that I have examined the foregoing accounts 
of J. B. Sawyer, Treasurer of the Committee on the 
Valley and Pine Grove Cemeteries, and I find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

City Auditor. 
Manchester, Jan. 1, 1872. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



EIGHTEEKTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Council of {he Ciiif of Manelivster : 

The Trustees of tlie City Library Iserewilli i)resciit 
their Eighteenth Annual Eeport of the affairs and con- 
dition of the Library. 

They are gratilied to he able to announce that the 
conduct of its atfairs has ijresented no unusual circum- 
stance calculated to impair its efficiency, or to weaken 
the esteem in whicli it is lield by the inhabitants of the 
city. 

The number of volumes taken out during the year has 
been greater than in the year preceding, notwithstaiul- 
ing the fact that the Library ^yas necessarily closed for 
a much longer i)eriod than usual, in consequence of its 
removal from the rooms formerly occupied in Patten's 
Building to the ucav building erected for the Library on 
Franklin Street. 

During the latter part of July the Board v.as notilied 
by the Mayor that the Library Building v»'as ready for 
occupancy, and that the Library might be removed 
thither as soon as proper arrangements could be made. 
Preparations were at once commenced for such removal, 
and to arrange the library in the Library lUiilding. This 
work, under the charge of the Librarian, proceeded with 
13 



190 

such dispatch that the Library v/as opened to the pub 
lie before the tirst day of kSeptember. « 

It was not deemed expedient by the City Council that 
any formal ox)ening' should take place at the Library 
Building", and as soon as the arrangements had been 
completed, it was opened for general use without fur- 
ther ceremony. 

On account of the expected removal of the Library, 
the Trustees did not think it x)roper to purchase largely 
of nevf books until such removal had taken place, and 
in consequence of this determination, nearly the whole 
of the approx)riation for the purchase of books remains 
on hand to be expended during the coming year. 

On this account the additions to the Library are 
less than nsual, but will be more than compensated in 
the purchases that may be made during the ensuing 
year. 

The losses of books by long use and from accidental 
causes have been ({uite small, and the places of those 
supposed to he lost have been replaced by duplicates in 
order that the books appearing on the catalogue might 
so far as x)racticable be found on the shelves. 

In some instances it has happened that volumes sup- 
loosed to have been lost have been returned after the 
lapse of quite a number of years, but it is not believed 
that the library suffers any detriment from this soiu'ce, 
although in some cases, it has the effect to give dupli- 
cate copies of books, of which under ordinary circum- 
stances, a single copy Avould be sufficient. 

It has been the custom since the puldication of the 
general catalogue in 1SG3, at the end of each year, to 
print a limited number of copies of a suijplementary cat- 
alogue, containing the additions made during the year. 
The edition of some of these annual supplements has 
been exhausted and comi)lete series of them, even for 
use in the library rooms cannot nov/ be had. It is there- 
fore worthy of consideration whether some provision 



197 

should not 1)0 made for compiling together such an- 
nual supplements as have been issued since 1803 into a, 
catalogue, containing in one volume, all the additions 
made since that date. For this i)urpose, the Board rec- 
comend that an addition he made to the usual appropri- 
ation sufhcient to enable the trustees to have this v/ork 
commenced at an early day. 

The report of the Librarian shows that, at the time of 
the last annual examination, there vrere in the Library, 
fourteen tliousand nine hundred and thirty volumes ; 
that there have been added during the year, four iiun- 
dred and seventy-eight ; making the total luimb.er of 
books and i)amphlets now in the Library, fifteen thou 
sand four hundred and eight. 

Of the additions, one hundred and eighty-one books, 
and one Inmdred and three pamphlets, have been pre- 
sented, one hundre«l purchased, and ninety-four volumes 
of periodicals bound. 

kSixty-six different periodicals have been regularly re- 
ceived for use at the Library, and v/henever the ciuTcnt 
A'olumes have become complete they have been bound 
and placed on the shelves for general circulation. 

The Library has been open for the delivery of books 
two hundred and sixty-live days, and the circulation has 
amounted to thirty-two thousand six hundred and sev- 
enty-live volumes. In addition to those taken away, 
there have been a large number used and consulted at 
the Library rooms, of which no account has becii kept. 

()f the large numl)er of volumes taken out during 
the year, the Librarian states tlie gratifying and cred- 
itable fact that only one has not been returned or ac- 
counted for at the end of the year. 

The Treasurer's Report shov»'s that there has been 
expended for books and i)eriodicals the sum of four hun- 
dred and seventy-live dollars and fourteen cents, and 
that there is an unexpended balance of the approi)ria- 



198 

tioii for tliat piiri)Ose, of twelve binidrcd and seveuteeu 
dollars and eleven cents. 

Tlie purchases of books now in contemidation by the 
Trustees will reduce this amount in a short time, and 
still leave a sufficient sum for tlie purchase of such ncAV 
works as there may be i)ublished from time to time un- 
til the appropriation for the next year shall be available. 

The same report shows that the incidental expendi- 
tues, including the expense of rem oval to the new build- 
ing', have been twenty-one hundred, thirty-two dollars 
and ninety-seven cents. 

As no extraordinary expenditures are anticipated for 
the next year, it seems probable that an appropriation 
equal to that of last year v»'ill be sufficient to meet all 
the demands that will be required for the expenses inci- 
dent to tiie management of the iil)rary for the succeed- 
ing year. 

In Board of Trustees, Dec. 30, 1871. 
Read and ap])roved. 

JAMES A. WESTON, 
Mayor, and Prcsiilent ex-officio. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, CkrJc pro Urn. 



TREASUEER'S REPORT. 
To the Board of Trustees of the Cit}j Lihrary: 

. Tlie Treasurer of the Board makes the follov.ing report 
of the receipts and expenditures by tlie Board of the 
funds received l)y them on account of the City Library. 

1871. 
Jan. 2. To balance as per last report 
To appropriation for 1871 . 
1871. 
Jan. 7. By])'d N.E. News Co., books and 
l^eriodicals . 
14. William Little, ])Ooks, 



$rm 


25 


1,000 00 


$70 


45 


3 


00 



1 50 


1) 50 


2 00 


() 00 


30 04 


40 45 


4 00 


18 98 



11)1) 

N. E. News Co., peidodicals SK) 05 

Sampson, Davenport & Co., 

books ..... 
H. A. IJrown & Co., books 
Temi)le rrinie, i)erio(licals 
Sampson, Davenport & Co., 
books ..... 
N. E. News Co., books and 

periodicals 
N. E. News Co., books and 

periodicals 
Boston Soc. of Nat. History, 

l)eriodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co. books and 

periodicals .... 28 22 

N. E. News Co., V)()()ks and 

l)eriodicals . 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee & Itiley, books 
S. Walker & Co., books 
S. Walker & Co., books 
N. E. News Co., books ami 

periodicals. 
N. E. News Co., i)eriodicals 
S. Walker & Co., books 
N. E. News Co., i)eriodicals 
McFarland & Jenks, books 
A. J. Nay, books 
S. Walker & Co., books 

By balance 

Appropriation for 1871 nndrawn 



Tlie expenditures for the incidental expenses of tbe 
Library, for the year ending Dec. 31, 1871, the items of 



Feb. 


(».^ 




1). 




15. 


Mar. 


»> 




<> 




0. 


April 


L2. 


May 


8. 


June 


5. 


July 


o 


Aug. 


7. 


>Sepl. 


4. 




1). 


] 


L3. 


Oct. 


3. 




9. 


Nov. 


G. 


Dec: 


27. 



24 


90 


20 


24 


12 


87 


8 


00 


'> 


00 


1 


00 


121 


GO 


17 


()8 


2 


00 


\:\ 


()G 


() 


00 


4 00 


»> 


00 


217 


11 


1,000 CO 


$1,092 


25 



200 



Avliicli a[)i)ear at length in the Annual Eeport of the City, 
are as follows : 

Librarian's salary . 

Kent . . . 

Incidentals and movina 

Gas 

Catalogue 

Fuel 

insurance 

Bind inc. . 



Balance 





$799 97 




151 05 




294 93 




117 27 




148 00 




302 65 




32 50 




280 GO 




$2,132 97 


• 


202 25 



$2,335 22 



EECAPITULATION. 



Appropriation 
Paid Trustees 

Incidentals 
Balance . 



$1,000 00 
2,132 97 



$3,335 22 



$3,335 22 



Respectfull y submitted. 

S. N. BELL, 

Treasun'r af the Trustees of Citij Librar;/. 

Dec. 29, 1871. We have examined the above report 
and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JAMES A. WESTOX, 
WM. P. XEWELL, 

Committee of ^[ccounts of (Jitij Lihrari/. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of 
receipts and, expenditures embraced in the foregoing 
report of the Trustees of the Cit^ Library, and find tlie 
same correctly cast and proi)erly vouched. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

City Auditor. 



201 
LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trmtees : 

The following is a report of the practical workings 
of the Library for the year 1871, and is respectfully sub- 
mitted. 

During- the year the additions to the Library have 
been somewhat less than for several years past. The 
circulation has been about the average for the past ten 
years. Since removing to the new building the interest 
manifested has increased, showing a daily average in 
the delivery of books of twenty-one over that of the 
tirst six months of the year. Many cards have been 
presented for renewal which had not been used for sev- 
eral years. 

There are at i)resent in the Library six hundred and 
thirty-nine pamphlets, tifteen maps, and fourteen 
thousand seven hundred and tifty-four bound volimies, 
making the total number tifteen thousand four hundred 
and eight. The increase for the year is four hundred 
and seventy-eight, of which ninety-four are volumes of 
periodicals, two hundred and eighty-foiu' are donations, 
— one hundred and three being i)amphlets — and one 
hundred have been purchased. A list of the donations 
is appended to this report. 

There are now three hundred and thirty-six volumes 
laid aside, being too much vrorn for use. Two lumdred 
and forty-eight of these, and sixty-one others, have 
been replaced since January 1, 1870, and are now found 
on the shelves, leaving one hundred and sixty-one vol- 
umes Avhich are nearly all out of ])rint. The nundier 
of books withdrawn from circulation <luring the year is 
forty-six ; nund)er replaced, sixty-four. 

Of the i)eriodicals regularly received there are sixty- 
six. Seven of these are donations, four being v>'eeklies, 



202 

and tliree moiitlilies. The "Practical Meclianic's Jour- 
nal" and "Student and Intellectual Observer," both 
English publications, have been discontinued. 

The Library has been opened to the public two hun- 
dred and sixty-five days. The number of volumes 
loaned, exclusive of those used in the building, is thirty- 
two thousand six hundred and seventy-Uve, an average 
■of one hundred and thirty-eight per day. For the last 
two months the daily average has been one hundred and 
forty-seven. In 1<SG0 the circulation was larger than 
for any other year, being forty-one thousand four hun- 
dred and seventy-two. The time occupied in moving 
and in regulating at the new building made it necessary 
that the Library should be closed for a longer season than 
usual ; had it not been for this, the number of books 
loaned Avould have been nearly tive thousand more than 
for the year previous. Although but a short time has 
elapsed since our removal, yet it is enough to indicate a 
large increase of interest in the Library for the coming- 
year. It has been necessary in several cases to exclude 
from the rooms persons for disorderly conduct. It is 
hoped that these instances will not often occur. 

The largest number of books delivered in any one 
day Avas three hundred and seventy-live, on the day of 
opening at the new building, nearly one hundred more 
than for any other day of which there is record, since 
the Library was organized. One only is unaccoi-inted 
for. 

The whole number of guarantees received to date is 
seven thousand six hundred and tliirty-seven ; number 
received during the year, five hundred and fifteen, and 
since August, two hundred and seventy, an average of 
three per day. Thirteen persons have borrowed books 
on deposit. 

A new set of day-books were prepared during the 
summer, and first used on re-opening in August. Num- 
ber of names novv' on the books, two thousand onehnn- 



20-3 

tired and forty-six, of wliicli nearly live hundred were 
added dnrinf;^ the last four niontlis. The nnmher of 
cards regularly used is nearly nine hundred. 

Tlie rules of the Library requiring tines for delin- 
quencies have not been always enforced in years past. 
It is necessary that they should l)e, and for a i>ortion 
of the year I have attended to this duty in nearly all 
cases where books have been detained. The amount of 
fines on hand January 1, 1871, was forty-one dollars and 
twenty-five cents. The amount received during- the 
year is seventy dollars and forty-five cents. Amount 
paid for stationery, i)Ostage, express charges and other 
incidentals, twenty-three dollars and eighty cents, leav- 
ing a balance on hand of eighty-seven dollars and nine- 
ty cents. 

0. n. MAE.SHALL, 

lAbrarian. 



204 



DONATIONS TO THE LIBEAEY IN 1871. 

By Hox. J. W. Patterson, Hanover. 

Report of Outrages in the Southern States. 1871. 8vo. 
Statistics on Commerce and Navigation. 1870. 8vo. 
Monthly Reports of Department of Agriculture. 1869-'71. 
2 vols. 8vo. 
By Hon. A. H. Cragin, Lebanon. 

Reports on Observation Eclipse of the Sun, Aug., 1869. 4to. 
Reports of Secretaries of tlie Treasury, War and Navy De- 

l)artments. 1870. 8vo. 
Report on the Finances. 1870. Svo. 

Report of Commissioners of General Land Office. 1868. 8vo. 
By Hon. S. N. Bell, Manchester. 

Report of Commissioner of Agriculture. 1869. 8vo. 
Congressional Director}', 1st Session 42d Congress. Poore. 

1871. Pauiphlet. 
Battle of Bunker Hill : an Historical Poem. Emmons. 1839. 
16mo. 
By Hox. James A. Weston, Manchester, (in behalf of City.) 

Re])orts of Cases in the Su})reme Judicial Court of New 
Hampshire. Vols. 1-47, (excepting vols. 7,9, 10, 22 and 32) 
1810— '67. 8vo. 42 vols. 
By Hon. Moody Currier, Manchester. 

The Banker's Magazine. Vols. 6-15. 1851-62. 8vo. 11 vols. 
By Hon. ILck.aian Foster, Manchester. 

The Banker's Magazine. Vol. 5. 1850. 8vo. 
By Gardner Brewer, Esq., Boston. 

Speeches, Addresses and Letters on Industrial and Financial 
Questions. Kelley. 1871. 8vo. 
By EzEKiKE GooDAViN, Esq., Lake City, ]Minn. 

History of Old Township of Dunstable, Mass. Fox. 1846. 
12 mo. 
By R. C. Mack, Esq., Londonderry. 

A rei)ly to a criticism in the North American Review. Aj^ril, 
1809— On Salem Witchcraft. Upham. 1869. 8vo. 
By JosEi'ii E. Bennett, Esq., Manchester. 

Inaugural Address of Hon. James A. Weston, Mayor. 1871. 

Pamph. 
Annual Reports of City of Manchester. 1870. Pamph. 
By CiiAS. H. Bkoavn, Esq., ^Manchester. 

Journal of Proceedings of R. W. Grand Lodge, I. O. O. F. of 

New Hampshire. 1869. Pam])h. 
Journal of Proceedings of R. Vi. Grand Lodge, I. O. O. F. of 
New Hampshire. 1870. Pamph. 



205 

By Joel T.vvi.ok, Esq., Manchester. 

Journal of Proeeedintrs of K. W. Grand Encampment, I. O. 
O. F. of New nain'i.sliire. 18GD-1870. 2 Panipli. 
By A. A. Haksco.ai, Es(j., Mancliester. 

History of tlie Insurrection in Massachusetts. 1786. 8vo. 

IJebates on tlie Formation of the Constitution of Me. 1819. 8vo 

IlistoricaLand Political Memoir of N. W. Coast of North Amer- 
ica. 1840. 8vo. 
By J. B. Sawyek, Esq., Manchester. 

Report of Buildinoj Committee of Town House. 1842. Pamph. 
By C. F. LivixGSTON, Esq., Manchester. 

Proceedings of the M. W. Grand Lodge, F. and A. M. of New 

Hampshire. 1868-1869-1870. 3 Paniphs. 
By A. H. Daniels, Es(j., Manchester. 

Prison Life and lieflections. Thompson. 1848. 12mo. 

Psalms and Hymns. 1753. 12mo. 

On Baptism. l6mo. 

Holy Spirit Resisted. Kimball. 1850. 16mo. 

Congregational Manual. Le Bosquet. 1841. 16nio. 

A View on Slavery. Jay. 1839. 12mo. 

Educational Systems of Puritans and Jesuites compared. 
Porter. 1851, 16mo. 

Old Humphrey's Observations. 1842. 16mo. 

History of the Jews. 1843. 16mo. 

Reformation in Europe. 16mo. 

Glimjises of Spain. Wallis. 1849. 12mo. 

Dark Scenes of History. James. 1850. 12mo. 

Memoir of Mrs. E. B.Dwight. 1840. 12mo. 

Princi])Ies of Pliysiology. Combe. 1843. 16mo. 

Manual of Phonography. Langley. 1857. 12mo. 

lleport U. S. Christian Commission. 1863. 8vo. 

Report on the Eiglith Census. 1860. 8vo. 

Municipal Register of City of Manchester. 1865. IGmo. 

Charter and Ordinances of City of Manchester. 1859. 8vo. 

Geography Made Easy. Morse. 1804. 16mo. 
By Syi.v'esteu C. Gould, Esq., Manchester. 

Congressional Directorv, 3d session 41st Consxress. Poore. 
1870. Pamphlet. 

Proceedings at the Dedication of Masonic Tem])le, Manches- 
ter, Dec. 1870. Pamphlet. 
By Mrs. M. J. F. Mooke, Milford. 

The Divine Nature. Moore. 1824. 8vo. 
By Mrs. A. C. "VYicbstek, Manchester. 

Annual Report of the City of Manchester. 1850. Pamphlet. 
By Mrs. L. Palmer, Manchester. 

The Yankee Enterprise ; a collection of stories. 1855. 12mo. 



20() 

]^y U. S. CoxGUKSs, Washington. 

Set of Executive Doc's, 3d session 40lh Congress. 1868-69. 
8vo. 27 vol. 

U. S. Coast Survey. 1867. 4to. 

Reports on Condition of Banks in the U. S. 1858-60-61. 
8vo. 3vo]. 
By Smitiisoniax Institution, Washington. 

Sniiths'n (Contributions to Knowledge. Vol. 17. 1871. 4to. 

Science for the People. Twining, London. 1870. 8vo. 
By TiiK Commissioners, W^ashington. 

Report of Commissioners of Agriculture. 1869. 8vo. 
By James A. Weston, Governor of N. H. 

American State Papers — Military Affairs. Vols. 3-7. 1828 
'38. 4to. 5 vols. 

American State Papers — Naval Affairs. Vols. 2-4. 1824- 
'36. 4to. 3 vols. 

American State Papers — Public Lands. Vols. 4-8. 1823- 
'37. 4to. 5 vols. 

American State Papers — Foreign Relations. Vols. 5-6. 1789- 
1859. 4to. 2 vols. 

American State Papers — Finances. Vols. 4-5. 1822-23. 
4to. 2 vols. 

Laws of the State. 1830. 8vo. 

Revised Statutes of the State. 1842. 8vo. 

Compiled Statutes of the State. 1853. 8vo. 

Laws of the State. 1826-29. 8vo. 4 vols. 

Laws of the State. 1841-47. 8 vo. 2 vols. 

Laws of the State. 1850-52. 8vo. 2 vols. 

Laws of the State. 1859-66. 8vo. 5 vols. 

Laws of the State. 1869-70. 8vo. 2 vols. 
By Trustees Public Library', Boston. 

Annual Re] )ort of the Trustees. 1870-71. Pamphlet. 

Bulletin of the Public Library. April, 1871. Pamphlet. 

Bulletin of the Public Library. July, 1871. Pamphlet. 

Bulletin of the Public Library. Oct., 1871. Pamphlet. 

Book list of Public Library. "^1871. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Public Library, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annual Re] )ort of the Trustees. 1870-71. Pamphlets. 

Catalogue of the Public Library. 1871. 8vo. 
By Trustees Public Library, Fall River, Mass. 

Annual Reports of the Trustees. 1861-67. 10 Pamjthlets. 
l^y Trustees Public Library, New ]5edford, Mass. 

Annual Re])ort of the Trustees. 1870. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Public Library, Taunton, Mass. 

Amuial Reports of the Trustees. 1869-70. 2 Pamphlets. 
By Trustees Public Library, Waltham, Mass. 

Annual Report of the Trustees. 1870. Pamphlet. 



207 

IJy Tiu'.sTKKs Prr.i.K" Lihijauv, Charlestowii, Mass. 

Annual Report of tlie Trustees. 1870. Painplilet. 
By Tkusteks PiiiLic Liuhakv, Wateitown, Mass. 

Annual Report of the Trustees. 1870. Pamphlet. 
Ry Trustees Pibmc Libkakv, Maneliester. 

Annual Report of the Trustees. 1870. Pamphlet. 

Supplement to Catalo<j;:ue of Public Library. 1870. Pani})h. 
By Tki STEES Pubek; Libkaky, Ilingham, Mass. 

Address at Dedication of the Public Library. 18G0. Pami)h, 
By DiiiECTORs Public Libuarv, Worcester, Mass. 

Annual Reports of the Directoi's. 1867-70. 4 Pamphlets. 

Catalogue of the Public Library. 1870. 12mo. 
By Directors Atiiex.eum, Providence, R. I. 

Annual Report of tl>e Directors. 1870-'71. Pamphlet. 
By Directors Public Library, St. Louis, Mo. 

Annual Report of the Directors. 1869-1870. Panqih. 
By Directors Public Library, Lowell, Mass 

Annual Report of the Directors. 1870. Pamph. 
By Directors Merc axtile Library, New York. 

Annual Report of the Association. 1870-'71. Pamph. 

Accession List. 1870. Pam])h. 

Annual Report of Anniversary Celebration. 1870. Pam])h. 
By Executive Cojoiittee Y. M. Institute, Hartford, Conn. 

Annual Report of the Committee. [1870-'7l. Pam])h. 
By The City Council, Lowell, ]\ras.s. 

Map of the City of Lowell. 1868. 
By The School CoJiMirrEE, Manchester. 

Annual Report of the Schools. 1870. Pamph. 
By The Board of Directors, San Francisco. 

Rei)ort Odd Fellovs's' Mutual Aid Association. 1870. Pamph. 
By The Order, Manchester. 

Constitutions of the Grand Lodge,Subordinate Ledges, and Re- 
becca Degree Lodges, L O. O. F. of N. H. 1871. Pamph. 

Bv-LaAvs of Kashoonon Encampment No. 1,1.0. O. F. of N. 
H. 1844. Pamph. 
By The Author. 

Readv Calculations u})on Business Transactions. Jones. 18oo. 
24nio. 

Sermon on the Second Death. Dods, Taunton. 1832. Pam- 
l)hlet. 
By Unitarian Association, Boston. 

Army Tracts. 1865. 12mo. 



208 

By The Pubusukk.s. 

C.ataloofue of Books and Pamphlets. Boston. Pamphlet. 

National Sabbath School Teacher. Pamphlet. 

Little Folks. 1871. Pami)hlet. 

Lesson Paper for Scholars. 1871. Pamphlet. 

Rules of Military Institute, Reed's Ferry. Pamphlet. 

Gen. Howard in Connection with Fi'eedmen's Bureau. 1871. 

Advertising Sheet of Ohio Valley ; Historical series. 1871. 

Pamphlet. 
The Bureau; a magazine devoted to Commerce, Manufac 

tures, etc. 1871. Pamphlet. 
The Book-Buyer ; a summary of American and Foreign Lit- 
erature. 1871. Pam})h. 
Route, liesources, etc., of Northern Pacific R. R. 2 Pamphs. 
Monthly Bulletins of Publications. 1871. Pamph. 
List of Publications. 1871. Pamph. 
An Article on attendance ot Theological Seminaries. 1871. 

Pamphlet. 
Life Lisurance Illustrated, 1871. Pamphlet. 
An Ordinance in relation to the AVater Supply. Manchester, 

1871. Pamphlet. 
Report on the Water Su])plv of Manchester. McAlpine, 

1871. Pamphlet. 
Harpers' Trade List. 1871. Pamphlet. 
Catalogue of Publications. 1869. Pamphlet. 
List of Publications. 1869. Pamphlets. 
Charter of Northern Pacific Railroad. 2 Pamphlets. 
Catalogue of Publications. Bristol, England. 1871. 2 Pam 

phlets. 
Proceedings National Ship Canal Convention, Chicago. 1863. 

Pamphlets. 
Bankers' Almanac. 1857. Pamphlet. 
American Whig Review. June 18o7. Pamphlet. 
The Railroad Guide. 1871. Pamphlet. 
New Hamjxshire Register. 1869-71. 3 vols. 
New Hami)shire Register. 1807, 1850, 1867. 3 vols. 



a n 



J l\^ 



CITY OF MANOHESTEE. 



IX BOAKD OF MaYOII AND Al-DERMEX. > 
Jaxuaky 1, 1872. 5 

The Keporls of the School Committee and Superintendent of Public In- 
struction were accepted and ordered to be printed in the Annual Reports, 

J. E. BENNETT, City Clerk. 



Ix Board of Commox Couxcil. 
Jaxuauy 1, 1872. 

In concurrence, the Reports of the School Committee and Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction Avere accepted and ordered to l)e printed. 

T. W. LANE, Clerk. 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1871. 



HOX. JAMES A. WESTON, Mayor, 

ex-officio Chairman.. 

WM. E. PATTEN, 

President of tlie Common Council, cx-officio. 

JOSEPH G. EDGEELY, 

SuPT. OF Public Insteuctiok, 

and Secretary of the Boards 



MEMBEES OF BOAED OF EDUCATION 

Ward 1. — Henry C. Sanderson. 
Ward 2.— Marshall P. Hall. 
Ward 3. — Thomas Borden. 
Ward 4.— Samuel N. Bell. 
Ward 5. — Patrick A. Devine. 
Ward 6.— Wm. P. Merrill. 
Ward 7. — James Dean. 
Ward 8. — DeLafayette Eobiuson. 



212 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOAED. 

Finance, AcGouuts, and Claims. — The Mayor, Messrs. 
Dean, Sandeisoii, Robiusoii, and Patten. 

Fuel and Ileailnfj. — Messrw. Eobinson, Edgerly, and 
Merrill. 

Text-boolis and A^rpamtus. — Messrs. Dean, Edgerly, 
Bell, and Patten. 

Bc])airs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Edgerly, 
Devine, and Hall. 

Printing and Stationery. — Messrs. Sanderson, Borden, 
and Edgerly. 

Examination of Fcacliers. — Messrs. Borden, Hall, Mer- 
rill, and Edgerly. 

Truancy. — Messrs. Devine, Edgerly, and Hall. 

Fmployment of Cldldren in Manufacturing Fsiahlisli- 
meMs. — Messrs. Bell, Dean, Edgerly, and the Mayor. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Dean, Borden, and Bell. 

Schools on Si)ring and Blodgett streets. — Mr. Sander- 
son. 

Schools on Franklin street. — Mr. Hall. 

East Grammar School. — Mr. Borden. 

Schools on Merrimack street. — Mr. Patten. 

Schools in Intermediate Building and Suhurban School 
I'To. 3.— Mr. Devine. 

Schools at ToYv'lesville, Wilson Hill, and Bridge street. — 
Mr. Bell. 

Schools at Amoskeag and Suburban School No. 1. — Mr. 
Eobinson. 

Schools in Piscataquog. — Mr. Dean. 

Suburban Schools Nos. 4, 5, 0, 7, 8, 0.— Mr. Merrill. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Sanderson and Hall. 

Music. — Messrs. Eobinson and Devine. 



llEPOIiT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Citij CouucUs of the City of MmiclieMer : 

The Board of School Committee for the year 1871 
respectfully make report. For a particular account of 
the condition of our schools and a discussion of educa- 
tional matters in detail, v/e refer to the Eeport of the 
Sui)erintendent of Public Instruction. We desire to re- 
fer here, briefly, to matters in which this Committee 
and your Honorable Boards are mutually interested and 
responsible. 

THE isEAV ORGAXIZATIOX. 

Upon the organization of this Board in January last, 
His Honor the Mayor assumed the new duties of "Chair- 
man of the Board of Education," imposed upon hioi by 
the Act of Legislature passed in June, 1870. The Pres- 
ident of the Common Council, also made a member ex- 
officio, by the same law, has acted with the Board, Al- 
ter the exijerience of the year, we are glad to note the 
favorable working of this plan. It gives to this Board 
an increased working force, a presiding officer invested 
with the dignity pertaining to the highest office in the 
city, and intelligent representatives in both branches of 
the City Couacil. The change is an important one. 
The intimate relation which the Mayor must hereafter 
sustain to the educational interests of the city, will lend 
a new significance to the annual canvas for the Mayor- 
alty. We may expect beneficial results from this ar- 



214 

raugement iu siicli measure ouly as the men elected to 

) o 
of educatiou. 



the office shall be intelligent and liberal in their views 



EXPENDITURES. 

The resources of this department for the year 1871, 
as shown by the books of the City Clerk, have been as 
follows : 
Balance from last year . . $8 59 
" dog tax for 18G7, 

'G8, '69 029 00 

Appropriation . . . .43,000 00 
Overdraft, refunded ... 9 94 

$43, 037 59 

This amount is accounted for as follows : 

For Teaching . . . .$33,831 84 

Fuel 2,940 84 

Care of rooms . . . 1,997 00 

Eepairs 045 80 

Furniture and supplies . . 003 09 
Printing and Advertising . 589 28 
Books and stationery . . 340 34 
Incidentals .... 340 05 
Balance on hand . . . 2,282 75 

$43,037 59 



Tliere are outstanding Dills to the amount of about 
$500, leaving a net balance of about $1,700. This sur- 
X>Ius is occasioned in })art by the resignation of Mr. 
Whitney, teacher of jriusic, and the emi)loyment of one 
teacher in this branch for the last term, instead of two. 
Mr. Jones, who has had the whole charge of music since 
the resignation of Mr. Whitney, has been unable, on 
account of illness, to attend to his duties for a portion 



215 

*of the time, 80 that only $1,195.75 lias been paid for 
teaching in this department, against $1,000, which it 
was estimated wonld l)e required. 

The sum of $1,000 was also api)roi)riated for Evening- 
Schools. About $700 of this has been expended. The 
balance would have been i)rolitably absorbed had con- 
templated jdans for the increased usefulness of these 
schools been carried out, reference to which will be 
made in another i>lace. 

TEACHERS AND SALARIES. 

There have been few changes the present year in the 
corps of regular teachers. We have reluctantly accepted 
the resignation of three of the best. We have made some 
well deserved promotions. The whole number of regu- 
lar teachers employed, is sixty-one, in forty-live schools : 
but during some portions of tiie i)ast year, several of 
the schools have been so large as to require additional 
teachers. No new schools have been opened. Eleven 
ladies have entered the training school and remained 
the time required by the Committee, without compensa- 
tion. Five of these have been elected as regular teach- 
ers. The others are available to till future vacancies, 
or to serve as substitutes in regular schools. Of the 
whole number of female teachers employed, more than 
four-iifths are in schools belov/ the grammar grade. The 
tender age of most of the iJupils under their charge, 
.and the methods of instruction employed recpiire i)ecu- 
liar iitness in the teacher. We have been fortunate as 
a rule, in our selections for these places. These teach- 
ers form a working force whose labors are invaluable. 
The i)atience, skill, judgment, ingenuity and ceaseless 
care required for the successful management of these 
schools, is little known to the public, and less apprecia- 
ted. They are paid salaries ranging from $300 to $450 
per aniuim. Xo increase has been made this year. 



21G 

Wc have fortunately retained tlie services of the ac- 
complished teachers in our higher grades, notwithstand- 
ing the inducements held out to many of them by com- 
mittees from other cities. The salaries paid female 
teachers in these grades, are S450 and $500 in Grammar 
schools, and $350 to $800 in the High School, and the 
city receives a full e(piivalent. 

The salaries paid to the male teachers remain the 
same as last year. Though relatively high we cannot 
expect to secure for less, such teachers for these posi- 
tions as their importance demands. The years Vv'hich 
our chihlren spend under the charge of the masters in 
our Grammar and High schools are far more imi)ortant 
than any other in the whole course of instruction. They 
are years peculiarly formative in their influence upon 
the mind and habit of the scholar. It is not for the 
routine of text-book instruction — that is satisfactorily 
done by females — nor yet for discipline, alone, that men 
are employed at liberal salaries, but for ;i higher and 
nobler work upon the character of their i)ui)ils. We 
trust to them mainly, in their capacity as masters and 
directors of large schools for the development not only 
of a thorough scholarship, but of a courteous, upright 
and honest manhood in the youth of our schools. 
Nothing short of this is worthy of a man, and the true 
man only can accomplish it. The public will eventu- 
ally apply this test, and salaries will be determined, not 
so nuieh by rates paid in other tov\'ns, as by the more 
correct estimate of the value of services actually ren- 
dered. 

TEXT BOOKS AND STUDIES. 

The Committee have required no change in text books 
the present year. There are i^alpable defects, however, 
in some of those now in use. Better ones have not 
been presented. When these shall be found, they should 



217 

be jit once introduced, and every intelligent citizen will 
cheerfully i>ear the expense which needed chnnges in- 
volve. 

The course of .study nov/ pursued we regard as on the 
whole an admirable one, well suited for the fortunate 
pupils who can finish it and pass to liigher institutions^ 
of learning. This is Avell attested by the fact that 
graduates of our High School have been uniformly no- 
ticed as well litted for the colleges w^hich they have en- 
tered. While this full course should not be abridged, 
but rather made more comprehensive, some modihca- 
tion of it would i^robably be better suited to the wants 
of a large number of children who annually i)ass from 
the lower schools into the work of life. The end with 
them is not a complete education, but to gain that which 
they will most need in after life, at w^hatever point they 
may abandon the school. Every child should be re- 
garded as a candidate for the highest instruction our 
schools can give ; but v/hile the fact is before us that 
eighty-live per cent, of the scholars in our Grammar 
schools never enter the High School, it is plainly our 
duty to give in these schools the best possible advant- 
ages to those whose school days must so soon end. 

Our attention has been directed to the English course 
in the High School, with a view to render it more prac- 
tical. This may i^robably be done, taking care not to 
overdo the worlv. In the demand for technical instruc- 
tion now so popular, it may be forgotten tliat the work of 
the common school is general and not special instruc- 
tion. This should come, as well as a choice of calling, 
in later life, with maturer i)owers, and reaches its best 
results when based upon the thorough general training^ 
contemplated by our system. This subject may well 
engage the early attention of the incoming School 
Board. 

A request was presented to this Board in Sei>tember 
by the Eev. Mr. Chevalier, of the French Catholic 



218 

•Church, to have the children of his people taught the 
French language in our schools. We do not un- 
derstand that French children do not acquire English 
readily in our schools, or that, like tlie Irish Catholics, 
the French people demand separate schools. On the 
contrary, large nunil)ers of their children are in our 
schools, pursuing the same studies, and making equal 
progress with others. It is asked that French teachers 
be employed, and instruction given in two languages. 
This we have deemed it inexpedient to do, at in'esent. 
It would require additional teachers and entail a large 
expense. If French is introduced, why not German 
for the children of that nationality? Moreover, if our 
schools are thus made to peri)etuate foreign tongues 
among us, then our own children must be taught all of 
them. There are grave objections to the plan on the 
score of expense and inconvenience, and on the broader 
ground that a plurality of languages has always proved 
a serious drawback on the i)rosperity of communities 
where it existed. We like to contemplate the day when 
we shall be a homogeneous people, with a common 
language, and we regard our connnon schools as the 
most efficient means to that end. 



EVEXIXG SCHOOLS. 

Two evening schools were opened in October, and 
have been continued since with more than ordinary 
success. Beside the large number who have had little 
or no i)revious instruction, we have found an older class 
of scholars, some of them former pupils in our day 
schools, but now engaged in the various trades. xV^)- 
preciating the value of an education, they seek to com- 
pensate in this way for early disadvantages, by the 
study of practical branches helpful to them in their 
chosen occupations. There are many others of tliis 
deserving class in our citv. For their benefit it lias 



219 

been proposed to introduce tlie study of drawing. It 
is needless to argue the value of drawing- and design to 
all the industrial pursuits, and indirectly to all classes. 
In Massacbusetts the law requires such instruction in 
all large towns. The city of Worcester is this winter 
giving free drawing lessons to two hundred and fifty 
persons, representing thirty dift'erent trades. Expendi- 
ture in this direction will surely be reiinl)ursed to a 
manufactnring city, in elevated tastes, imi)roA'ed work- 
manship, and increased value of its products. 



SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

We congratulate your Boards upon the completion of 
the Lincoln Street house. It is probably better adapted 
for the nse of schools than any other house in the city. 
Architecturally it surx3asses all our public buildings, 
and is in every respect alike creditable to the skill of 
the architect and to the i)ublic spirit of our city. AVitli 
a proi)er distribution of scholars in the various schools 
there will now be no pressing need of accommodations in 
the city proper. Should the i^resent rapid growth of 
the city continue, however, new houses for lower grade 
schools will soon be required on one or more of the lots 
which, through the wise action of your predecessors, 
are now owned by the city. A new house, or an addi- 
tion to the old one, must soon be ])uilt in .Vmoskeag. 
One of the schools in tliat ward is nov/ kept by sufferance 
in an unsuitable l)uilding not owned by the city. 

We have remaining in the su])urban districts a few^ 
specimens of the old time school house, well realizing 
the figure of Whittier's verse, as 

"Ragged beggars, sunning," — 

interesting as relics, but unfit for schools. 

This is especially true of the house in District Ko. 1. 
We understand that the foundation for a ne^Y building 



liiis lately been put in ; and Tve rejoice that tbe ancient 
structure must soon disappear, notwitlistanding tbe rev- 
erential regard wiiicb bas preserved it so long. Otber 
information, as to tbe condition of buildings, and 
repairs made upon tbem, will be communicated to you 
by otber committees. 

TRUANCY AND AI'.J^ENTI<:EISM. 

It is a sorrowful tbougbt tbat notwitbstanding tbe 
large expenditure of money and labor devoted to our 
scbools, so many of tbose Avbo most need tbem fail to 
reap tbeir advantages. Our scbools are attractive, ef- 
ficient, and free. And yet a large class of our citizens 
reject tbem altogetber, withdrawing from tbem nearly a 
thousand children, to be placed in scbools which may 
answer tbe letter of the lav>-, but which, in our belief, 
cannot realize the great and beneficent results of our 
common school system, to society or to the child. 

From four hundred to tive hundred cbildren are at 
work in tbe mills or elsewhere, receiving a modicum of 
instruction, as they are reached by the law. 

Information in regard to tbe working of tbis law will 
be communicated by tbe Superintendent. We have had 
in our own schools, all told, thirty-five hundred schol- 
ars. Deducting all we have named from the estimated 
total number of persons of school aga in tbe city, we 
have remaining from two hundred to five hundred who 
by no chance or pretext can have received a syllable of 
instruction from our schools tbe past year. These, 
though not all truants in tbe strict sense of tbe term, 
have been proper subjects for tbe work of tbe truant 
officer, and sbould bave been Isrougbt in. Some attempts 
bavc been made to do this, but we are compelled to say 
tbat tbe wbole result is a lamentable failure, and we 
regard the excuses which have been made for the non- 
enforcement of the law in this regard as paltry in the 



221 

extreme. The task is not ;ui impossible one. We 
commend to tlie attention of our truant otiicers tlie 
following- extract from the report of the Superintendent 
of Schools in St. Paul, Minn. He says : 

"I have reason to belie\e that through the public 
schools and the private schools, all the cMldrcn of 
tlie city are in attendance upon a course of education. With 
the concurrence of the chief of police and his force, tru- 
ancy is scarcely known. In no part of the city, neitlicr 
in the town, nor the streets, nor at the deimts, nor in the suh- 
irrhs, will cMldren he found diirinf/ school hours. I take 
pride in calling attention to the fact, and have invoked 
the assistance of the police, on the assumi^tion that a 
vagrant child is as much under their supervision as a 
vagrant man, and I am ha[)py to know that tliey are in 
full sympathy with me." 

AVhy not in Manchester ? 

The Legislature of ISTew^ Hampshire passed in June 
last, a general act comj)elling attendance at school. 
This differs from i)revious enactments mainbr in making 
the parent, and not the child, liable for its violation. 
Our experience convinces us that this is riglit. We arc 
constantly meeting with cases of great injustice to chil- 
dren from the cupidity of parents or their indifference 
to the right of the child to a common education. To 
carry out the provisions of this law v/ithout hardship, 
it may be necessary to provide, in cases of extreme pov- 
erty, for the support of the child while in the school. The 
State should require, also, that private schools be open 
to the inspection of public school authorities. The State 
insists upon education as a means to the great end 
above all others, of intelligent and loyal citizenship. 
If private schools be established with a course of in- 
struction subversive of this end, then compulsory law 
<lefeats itself. Bovs vrill soon become A'oters, and in 



the war with Ignorance v/e must not recruit our ranks 
from the enemy's camj). 

We recommend the employment of one officer only 
for the enforcement of all laws against truancy and ab- 
senteeism. We believe tliat such an officer, if in sym- 
pathy with the friends of popular education, and x)ro- 
ceeding- to his work in the spirit of justice and human- 
ity, might accomplish more than has yet been done for 
the removal of these great e^ils and their attendant 
vices. 

We earnestly hoije that provision will be made by the 
new City Councils for an annual census of the children 
of school age in the city. This enumeration is neces- 
sary as the datum upon which to base all educational 
operations. 

As we close the year, we have no words of boasting 
for our schools. They are excellent, but far short of our 
ideal. Precisely v\diat they most need, we do not at- 
temi)t to determine. We believe that every American 
school should teach, first of all, the English rudiments, 
a knowledge of our country and its government, and a 
Avholesome regard for constituted authority. Let every 
child secure these. We may then add all the possibili- 
ties of learning and culture, until our Common Schools 
shall be suited to the wants of all classes, as they are 
now indisi)ensable to the life of the State. 

"The riclies of the t'oinmoinvealtli 

Are free, strong minds, and hearts of liealth ; 

And more to her tlian gold or grain, 

The cunning liand and cultured brain." 

M. P. HALL, 

For the Committee. 
December 29, 1871. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S IlEPOllT. 



Gentlemen of the Sehool Committee : 

The expenditures of the Scliool Department ^vill be 
given in detail in another part of the City Eeport, but 
it seems ai)propriate at this time to call special atten- 
tion to the subject. 

All the expenses of the School Department for the 
past year have been paid from the api)roi)riation of the 
year, leaving an unexpended balance of 82,000. 

Formerly bills vrere left unpaid each year, and in this 
manner difficulties arose in the management of the 
financial affairs of the School Department, as some 
Boards were obliged to pay bills contracted the previ- 
ous year, thus compelling them to leave unpaid other 
bills. 

Previous to 18G9 the school year closed in Kovember, 
and at that time all bills against the School Depart- 
ment that could not be paid were allowed to remain 
unsettled until the next year, in addition to the cur- 
rent exi)enses for the month of December. 

By this arrangement it sometimes happened that on 
the first of January, when the members of the School 
Board organized, they found unpaid bills to the amount 
of 80,000, which should have been settled the previous 
year, and no one can fail to see that much difficidty 
would ])e experienced on that account. 

ISTow the school year closes the last of December and 
each board can settle its own bills, discontinuing the 



224 

schools when the appropriation is exhausted, unless the 
City Council makes a larger ai)propriation. 

Duriuo" the past year special care has been taken to 
have bills ijresented and approved, so that novv', instead 
of leaving unpaid bills for the committee of 1872 to set- 
tle, there is a balance in the treasury, and there has 
been fuel purchased for most of the schools suiScient to 
last till April next. 

ATTENDANCE AT SCHOOLS. 

The percentage of attendance at many of our schools 
during the si)ring term was quite low, more so tlian at 
any time since 1 have been connected with the schools. 

Measles, whoox)ing-cough, and scarlet fever attacked 
the schools and decreased the attendance very much. 
For many weeks not more than one-half the pux)iis were 
present in some of the schools, and in many cases not 
more than one-fourth. Schools registering forty pupils 
did not have more than twelve or fifteen in attendance 
for many v^^eks, and it ])eing the term preceding the 
long vacation, many did not return after their recovery. 

Thus the average daily attendance for the term and 
for the year has been greatly reduced on account of the 
causes named. 

Those pupils who have not been absent or tardy for 
three terms in succession have been presented with tes- 
timonials. 

The following list contains the names of those pupils 
not absent or tardy for a whole year, or three successive 
terms : 

UIGII SCHOOL. 

Josie A. Bosher, F. Gregg Forsaith, 

Fred. C. Sanborn, George G. Tewksbury, 

Edward Ingliam, Frank A. McQueston, 



225 



rred. H. Lewis, 
Luther C. Baldwin, 
Fraucena Fogg, 
Eose E. Heald, 
Charlie C. Hayes, 
Fred. H. Emerson, 
Etta J. Caiiey, 



George F. Cauis, 
Frank E. Putney, 
.John M. Dana, 
Fred. A. Kennard, 
Nellie S. Moody, 
Ida J. Bartlett. 



ifORTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Nellie E. Philbrick, Mary E. Sylvester, 

Carrie I. Stevens, Emma B. Tozer, 

Wm. O. Cressey, Carrie E. Leavitt, 

Eugene G. Flanders, Nellie E. Marston, 

Ida L. Fitz, Henry T. Stevens, 

Arthur G. Bassett, Annie F. Bartlett, 

Charles H. Butman, Jennie E. Hackett, 

Willis C. Patten, Annie E. Kidder, 

Susie F. Annis, Annie M. Nowell, 

Carrie F. Bartlett, Lottie A. Summers. 



SOUTH GRAilMAR SCHOOL. 



Geo. C. Prime, 
Ida I. Brigham, 
Fred. W. Cheney, 
Jason A. Philips, 
Sarah E. Nutting, 
Anna F. Fairbanks, 
Etta M. Watson, 
Tilton F. Fifteld, 
Mary E. Batchelder, 
Estella J. Stevens, 
John F. Pattee, 
Georgia A. McCoy, 
Ida E. Hackett, 
Frank Colby, 
15 



Authur C. Heath, 
Frank S. Sleeper, 
Lizzie M. Dodge, 
Nettie E. Dow, 
Manora Manter, 
Ella J. Neal, 
Lilla H. Powers, 
Edwin T. Jones, 
Albert E. Sweatt, 
Annie C. Caswell, 
Frank T. Dickey, 
Fred. W. McAllister, 
Walter J. Sleeper, 
Albert A. Colby, 



22G 



Ola-ra Biirleigii, Josie E. Plumer, 

Herman C. Graupner, Eva F. Tiison, 

obn M. Kendall, Bertha A. Graves, 

Eda A. Hackett, Annie H. Eowe, 

Mary Eowell, Henry W. Hunton, 

Cora F. Bond, Charles H. Sisco, 

Frank W. Bond, Ashton H. Willand. 

EAST GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Willie I. Smith, Julia Eand, 

Kobert P. Herrick, Walter Eoper, 

Eddie S. Kimball, Mattie W. Jewell, 

Arthur G. Everett, Carrie A. IS^utter, 

Frank Lull, Mary A. Watts. 

PISCATAQUOG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Michael Dowd. 

7i.M0SKEAG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Emma M. Fuller, Nettie G. iS^ewhall, 

Elva Co Norton, Susie E. Xewhall, 

Clara I. Harwood. 

NO. 1, MIDDLE SCHOOL, DLODGETT STREET 

Hattie Abbott, Frank Parker. 

JfO. 2, MIDDLE SCHOOL, BEECH STREET. 

Walter Abbott. 

NO. .3, MIDDLE SCHOOL, BEECH STREET. 

Frank E. Heald, Elmer J. Taylor, 

Phebe J. Coburn. 



Qo- 



NO. 5, MIDDLE SCHOOL, MERRIMACK STREET. 

Charles W. Babbitt, AVillie L. Hardy, 

Franklin P. Himkins, Wni. McDonald, 

J. Willie Eowley. 

NO. G, MIDDLE SCHOOL, MERRIMACK STREET. 

Myron L. Stickney, Geo. Freddie Soule, 

Sarali F. Coomes, Carrie W. Stevens. 

NO. 7, MIDDLE SCHOOL, FRANKLIN STREET. 

Jolin G. Dolber, Georgia AV. Downs, 

Lizzie M. Cliase, Lula I. Hanson, 

Mary A. Fracker, Georgia A. Farrington. 

NO. 8, MIDDLE SCHOOL, FRANKLIN STREET. 

Elmer E. Sawjer, Maggie D. IMartin, 

Hattie E. Campbell, Ida D. Goss, 

John T. Cleworth, Addie Baker, 

Alice Heap, Lizzie B. Butler, 

Charles E. Palmer, Sarah J. Butler, 

NO. 9, MIDDLE SCHOOL, SPRING STREET. 

Charles Gage. 

NO. 10, MIDDLE SCHOOL, SPRING STREET. 

Albert Collins, Walter K. Sanborn, 

Mary H. Searle. 

NO. 6, PRIMARY SCHOOL, WILSON HILL. 

William Stone. 



228 



NO. 8, PEi:»,rAiiY SCHOOL, merrimack street. 

Etta Bartlett, Harry Dow, 

Willie Hiiiikins. 



KO. 10, PRIMARY SCHOOL, MANCHESTER STREET. 

George M. Cloiigii, diaries E. Morrison, 

Nettie A. Dimond. 

NO. 12, PRIMARY SCHOOL, FRANKLIN STREET. 

Harry Dolber. 

NO. 11, PRIMARY SCHOOL, SPRING STREET. 

Charles Marston. 

NO. IG, PRIMARY SCHOOL, MAIN ST., PISCATAQUOG. 

Mary Caouette. 

NO. 17, PRIMARY SCHOOL, RH^R ROAD, PISCATAQUOG. 

Nattie Noyes, Caroline Cronshaw. 

NO. 19, PRIMARY SCHOOL, AMOSKEAG. 

Maria Stevens, Maria Stearns, 

Belle Stevens, Georgie L. Stearns, 

DeLaFayette Eobinson, Jr. 

NO. 21, PRIMARY SCHOOL, CENTRE ST., PISCATAQUOG. 

' Mary Jontras. 

BiilvERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Carrie Brigham, Perla Mears, 

Lizzie Burns. 



220 

NO. C, SUBURBAN SCHOOL, WEBSTER'S MILLS. 

Eosabell R. Tracy, Frank H. Colby, 

Hattic L. Webster, John B. Emerson, 

Sidney A. Webster. 

HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Emma E. Adams, Artliiir M. Colburn. 

Testimonials have been i)resented at the close of each 
term to those punctual in attendance. There are va- 
rious objections to this method of rewarding- pupils ; 
but generally, teachers have liked the plan, and it may 
be well to continue it for one teriii more and then adopt 
some other plan of rewarding them for punctuality. 

SCHOOL HOUSES AND SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Suticient care has not always been exercised in re- 
gard to securing suitable lots for school houses, and the 
result is that in what is now the thickly settled part of 
the city, buildings are erected so near the school build- 
ings that the work of the schools is frequently dis- 
turbed. 

The new building in Piscataquog was completed early 
in the year, since which time two Primaiy schools have 
been kei^t in it. 

The lot upon which the house stands, contains some- 
thing more than half an acre of land, making a fine 
play ground for the children. 

Joseph B. vSaAvyer, by Vv-honi the following description 
of the building has been furnished, was the architect of 
this building, and it was erected under his immediate 
.sui)ervision : 



230 

The IjuiUling is two stories in lieiglit, built of brick, with a 
slated roof. 

The main building is 3G by 50 feet and contains two school- 
rooms on each lloor, 21^ by 34 feet. 

The entries and stairways are placed in wings projecting from 
the opposite sides of the main building. Connected with each 
school-room are two clothes rooms 5 by 9^- feet, and each school- 
room has direct communication with both entries. 

By this arrangement, the entries, stairways, and basement rooms 
on one side of the house can be used exclusively by the girls; the 
other by the boys. 

The basement is divided by a brick wall into two equal play- 
rooms ; the entrances to the outbuildings are from the basement. 

The basement is 8 feet in height, the first story 12 feet, and the 
second story 14 feet. 

Each school-room is lighted by five large windows, three at the 
back of the room and one on either side. There are inside blinds 
upon each window. 

The rooms are ventilated by four large fines in the chimney 
stack. 

The walls of the building are hollow or vaulted, the plastering 
being set upon lathing furred off from the walls, by which ar- 
rangement warmth and dryness are secured. Each room is fur- 
nished Avith 45 single desks and seats from the raanufoctory of 
Joseph L. Ross, of Boston. 

Two of the rooms have not been completed, but when finished 
will provide suitable accommodations for all the scholars in that 
section of the city. 

The building is admirably arranged for four Primary schools, 
and when completed the cost of the house and lot will be about 
$12,000. 

For the past four years an effort lias been made to 
have a Grammar School Building' in the east i)art of the 
city, to accommodate the East Grammar School. 

This school was organized in December, 18G7, in the 
High School building ; at that time two divisions cor- 
responding^ in grade to the third and fourth divisions of 
the other Grammar schools, were established, one being- 



231 

composed of i)ui)ils trjinsferred from the Xortli «iik1 
South Grammar schools, and the other of pupils pro- 
moted from the varioKS Middle schools, for whom there 
was not room in the other Grammar schools. 

At the beginning- of the fall term of 18G8, another di- 
vision was established in the same building ; in 1869 
the three divisions Avere transferred to the old High 
School building, and another division formed composed 
of pupils transferred from the other Grammar schools, 
thus making it a full Grammar school, a Master at that 
time being placed in charge of it. 

AVhen the school is transferred to the new building on 
Lincoln Street, two other divisions will be needed to ac- 
commodate all who wish to attend. 

DESCRIPTION OF THE LINCOLN ST. BUILDING. 

The lot upon which the building stands is 220 feet 
square, bounded on the north by Merrimack street, on 
the south by Laurel street, on the east by Lincoln 
street, and on the vvest by a back street twenty feet 
wide. 

The following description of the building has been 
furnished by George W. Stevens, the architect, the sub- 
stance of which has already been i)ublished in the daily 
l)ai>ers of this city : 

The building is in tlie Anglo-Frencli style of architecture, 
built of bricks, with hollow and jailastered walls, ornamented Avith 
bricks, stones, and a variety of windows, bracketed cornice. Man- 
sard roof and cupola. 

It is 71 X 61, Avitli wings on the north and south sides 16 x 31, 
and on the east and west sides 3 x 24, and is two stories Avith a 
basement and roof story of the following heights : Basement sto 
ry, eight feet clear ; 1 st story, 1 3 feet ; 2d story, 1 5 feet ; roof 
story, 15 feet. 

The basement story is diA'ided through the centre both Avays 
by 12-inch brick walls, making four rooms 28 x 33, and two rooms 



orio 



ill the north and south wings la x 28. All the basement rooms 
have a cement floor, lathed and plastered ceiling, and whitewash- 
ed brick walls, and are high, well lighted, heated and ventilated, 
and connected by doors, so that they can be used separately or 
together, and are accessible by the stairways on tlie north and 
south wdngs ; and the two west rooms by a door and stone steps, 
with the corridor leading to the temporary wooden building on the 
west line of lot and back street. 

In the north and south wings are the stairways leading from the 
basement to the hall. All of the main rooms are separated by an 
8 inch brick wall and deafened floors, thus preventing one school 
while in session from disturbing the others, and rendering the 
building essentially fire -proof. 

The main entrances are in the north and south wings, and con- 
sist of a flight of massive buttressed stone steps, heavy, bracketed 
awning, and a brick portico, giving an outside shelter of 150 
square feet to each entrance. 

The first story contains four school rooms 28|^ x 29 feet ; two 
teachers' rooms 8|- x 15 feet ; and two clothes rooms for the pu- 
pils 20 X 4 feet. The second story contains two school rooms 28-J 
X 29 feet, and a hall 29 x 47 feet ; teachers' rooms and clothes 
rooms the same as on the first floor. 

It is the intention to divide tlie hall into two school rooms, thus 
making four school rooms upon the second floor 

The entrance for the boys is on Merrimack street ; for the girls 
on Laurel street. 

The root story which is not yet completed, is GO feet wide and 
GG feet long, and when finished, will make an excellent place for 
school exhibitions and for gatherings of various kinds. 

All the school rooms are furnished with single seats and desks 
fi'om the manufactory of William O. Haskell & Son of Boston, 
the hall being furnished with settees from the same establishment. 
Each room v\-ill accommodate forty-five pupils, and the hall as now 
:irranged, will seat five hundred persons. 

There is a bell in each of the seven school rooms and also a 
gong in the basement and one on the outside of the buildiiig, all 
of which are rung from the master's room. 

A speaking tube also connects each room with the master's room. 

The bells, gongs aiul speaking tubes were furnished by Seth 
Fuller of Boston. 



There are gas pipes in cacli of tlie rooms, iu tlie entriet!, and in 
ilie basement ; the hall is ah'eady sn])plie(l with two Ibur-liglit 
chandeliers. 

The cupola, 13 feet square, has an ornamental roof and cornice, 
and is surmounted Avitli a heavy 8-feet vane. 

The bell is from Blake's bell foundry, Boston, and weighs 1,43G 
pounds. 

The clock, which is one of Howard's best 8-day striking tower 
clocks, was turnished by Dunlap & Baker. 

The building is heated by four Golden Eagle Furnaces, furnish- 
ed by Pike & Ileald. 

The foundation was put iu by Oilman II. Kimball, who fur- 
nished material for the same. 

The contract for building the house was awarded to Alpheus 
Gay in March last, and the Avork has been done under the general 
suj^ervision of the architect. 

The gas piping has been done by John Q. A. Sargent ; the 
black-boards Avere jjainted by the American Tablet Co. ; the ce 
raent floor in the basement Avas laid by John Bennett. 

It is earnestly hoped that the large hall Avill be completed the 
coming year, a fence built around the lot, shade trees set out, and 
concrete Avalks laid. When fully completed, it Avill be the linest 
Pchool building in the Slate, reflecting great credit ui)on the archi- 
tect and the liberality of the city. 

The rooms are all Avell lighted, heated and Aentilated, the build 
ing being arranged generally for the comfort and convenience of 
the pupils, considerations Avhich do not always Aveigli Avith those 
having the charge of erecting school houses. 

The building Avill be ready for occupancy at the beginning of 
next term. 

The old house at ToAvlesA'ille and the one on the cor- 
ner of Bridge and Union streets ought not to be used 
longer for school piu'poses, but the schools now iu those 
houses ought to be transferred to other buildings. Two 
of the schools could be transferred to the High School 
building and the other, together with the two Middle 
schools now in the High School building could be placed 
in the building on Loaa^cH street noAV occupied by the 
East Grammar School. 



234 



During n, i)art of the year some of the schools in the 
Spring' street bnihling are crowded, but the transfer of 
the East Grammar School will i)rovide accommodation 
for some of the children now attending the Spring 
street schools. 

A new" building is to be erected in the Stark District 
to take the place of the old one nov/ in use. When this 
change is made all of the school ])uildings belonging to 
the city and used by the city for schools, will be in 
good condition. 

The following list will show what school accommo- 



dations there are in the city 



High School building, G rooms, will accomodate 



Spring street 


(( 


8 


Franklin street 


kC 


8 


Lincoln street 


;< 


8 


Lowell street 


(( 


4 


Intermediate 


(( 


4 


Wilson Hill 


( ■ 




Blodgett street 


(( 


O 


Merrimack street ' ' 


4 


Main street 


"Sq' 


g-4 


Centre street 


(( (( 


4 


Eiver Eoad 


u .( 




Amoskeag 




2 


Bakersville 




2 


Hallsville 




1 


Goft's Falls 




1 


Harvey Dist. 




1 


Webster's Mills 




1 


Massabesic 




1 


Mosquito Pond 




1 


Stark Dist, 




1 



room 



rupils, 

300 

*3C0 

360 

3C0 

100 

180 

90 

90 

180 

*180 

180 

90 

90 

75 

GO 

40 

40 

30 

40 

40 

40 



* Two rooms not yet completed. 



2,985 



235 

111 most of the building's forty-five is given its the 
number to be accommodated, although more seats can 
be placed in some of the rooms. 

During the past year 3,200 different pupils have been 
registered in all the schools, but as they are not all in 
attendance at the same time, that number can be ac- 
commodated. 

The city owns a lot on Bridge street between Ash and 
Maple streets, and one on the corner of Beech and Ce- 
dar streets ; the lot at Towlesville ought to be ex- 
changed for one farther east and north, and the one on 
the corner of Bridge and Union streets for one farther 
north. 

As houses are built up on the north of Elm street, a lot 
will be needed somewhere near Clark's Ledge. 

It is well to be provided with lots at an early day, not 
waiting till buildings are erected in the most eligible 
places, and then be obliged to ])urchase lots near other 
buildings, at the same time paying high prices for the 
lots. 

In some of the rural districts more land ought to be 
liurchased and the lots graded and fenced. 

The school at Massabesic is quite large, and soon two 
schools will be needed in that district. 



SCHOOL STATISTICS FOR 1870. 

1. Whole number different pupils enrolled dur- 

ing the year 3,200 

2. Average number pupils belonging to the 

schools 2,080 

3. Average daily attendance .... 1,911 

4. Number of visits by members of School 

Board 190 

5. Number of visits by Superintendent . . 1,244 



23G 

<>. JSTumber of visits by citizens and others . 3,6G4 

7. Number of diplomas conferred at the High 

School 9 

8. JSTumber of diplomas conferred at Grammar 

schools 45 

9. Salary of Principal of High school . . $1,800 

10. Salary of First Assistant of High school . 800 

11. Salary of Second Assistant of High school COO 

12. Salary of Principal of Grammar schools . 1, 500 

13. Salary of Assistants of Grammar schools . 450 

14. Salary of Middle and Primary school teach- 

ers 450 

15. IvTumber of weeks in school year . . 40 

IG. Number of schools 45 

17. Number of teachers* Gl 

18 School approi^riation for past year . . $43,000 



NAMES or TEACHERS. 

The following list contains the names of those teach- 
ers wlio have served in the different schools of the city 
Avithin the past year : 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Principal — W. W. Colburn. 
Assistant — C. Augusta Gile ; 2 terms. 
Mary E. Olough ; 2 terms. 
Emma J. Ela. 
" Mary A. Barnes ; 1 term. 

" Martha J. Boyd ; 1 term. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

Principal— Daniel A. Clifford. 
Assistant — Mary A. Buzzel. 

*Exti\i teafhers liavc sometimes beeu cmiiloycd iu some of tlie schools iu additioa 
to this number. 



237 

NORTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — William E. Buck. 

" Anstrice G. Flanders. 

" Fannie E. Porter. 

" Sarah J. Greene. 

SOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — Isaac L. Heath. 
Assistant — Lucretia E. ]Manahan. 
Lottie E. Adams. 
" Carrie E. Eeid. 

EAST GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — Benj. F. Dame. 
Assistant — Julia A. Baker. 

Kate L. Porter. 

Clara E. IJavis. 

Miss Porter and Miss Davis resigned during- the fall 
term. Miss Annette McDoel Tvas transferred from Xo. 
4 Middle School to succeed Miss Porter, and Miss Liz- 
zie S. Campbell was elected to succeed Miss Davis, 

PISCATAQUOG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — Harry C. Hadle\ ; 2 teims. 
" Allen A. Bennett ; 1 term. 

Assistant — Isabella G. Mack. 

AMOSKEAG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Alpha Messer ; 2 terms. 
Cliarlos F. Morrill ; 1 term. 



238 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

Ko. 1, Blodgett street, JSTellie I. Sanderson. 
' 2, Beech street, Mary E. Ireland. 
'3, " " Mary L. Sleeper. 

' 4, Wilson Hill, Annette McDoel, 2 terms. 
' " " " Emma H. Ferley, 1 term. , 

' 5, Merrimack street, Eliza I. Yonng. 
'0, " " ISTancy S. Bunton. 

' 7, Franklin street, Hattie G. Flanders. 
* 8, " " C. Augusta Abbott. 

' 9, Spring Street, Mattie S. Miller. 
'10, " " Lizzie P. Gove. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

JS^o. 1, Blodgett street, Ellen B. Eowell. 
" 2, Bridge street, Emma F. Bean. 
*' 3, Bridge street, Georgianna Dow. 
" 4, Towlesville, Emily J. Parker, 2 terms. 
Ella F. Salisbury, 1 term. 
" G, Wilson Hill, Abbie E. Abbott. 
" 7, Merrimack street, Addie L. Hutchinson. 
"8, " " Mary J. Fife. 

" 0, Manchester street, Helen M. Morrill. 
"10, " " Mintie C. Edgerly, 1 term. 

" " Mary A. Barnes, 2 terms. 

" 11, Franklin street, Martha ]^. Mason. 
"12, " " Martha W. Hubbard. 

" 13, Spring street, Emma A. Cross. 
*' 14, Spring street, Gertrude W. Borden. 
" 15, Piscataquog, Sarah D. Lord. 
" IG, " Hattie A. Mack. 

"17, " Alice G. Lord. 

" 18, Amoskeag, Eebecca 0. Hall. 
"19, " Laura A. Montgomery. 

" 20, Piscataquog, Clara N. Brown. 
"21, " Mary 0. Page, 2 terms. 

" Hattie S. Tozer, 1 term. 



239 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

JSTo. 1, stark District, Lizzie M. Tollcs, 1 term. 

" " iSTellie M. Pearson, 2 terms. 

No. 3, Bakersville, Principal, Addie M. Chase. 

" Assistant, Addie A. Marshall. 

1^0. 4, Gotfe's Falls, Lana S. George, 1 term. 
" Mary A. Waite, 2 terms. 
No. 5, Harvey District, Hattie L. Jones, 2 terms. 
" " Lana S. George, 1 term. 

No. G, AVebster's Mills, Mary J. Eeid. 
No. 7, Hallsville, Principal, Maria H. Hildreth. 

" Assistant, Mary B. Lane. 

No. 8, Massabesic, Georgianna Patterson. 
No. 9, Mosquito Pond, Etta M. George. 

MUSIC TEACHERS. 

Central District, 

I. S. Whitney. 
Amoskeag, Piscataqnog, and Suburban Schools, 

J. D. Jones. 
During the fall term, Mr. Jones had charge of the 
music in all the schools of the city. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

E.'_H. Parkinson, Charles F. Morrill, 

Daniel G. Brockway, Henry Wight, 

Daniel A. Clifford, Lucy A. Putnam, 

Belle E. Daniels. 



GEx\DUATES OF THE HIGH AND GEAMMAE 
SCHOOLS. 

The following is a list of the diploma scholars at the 
various schools : 



240 



XOTITII GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Thomas B. Conant. 



Edward X. Fogg'. 
Frank G. Forsaitli 
Harry H. Ladd. 
Frank H. Eowe. 
Frank F. Smith. 
James W. Wilson. 
Minnie A. Camphell. 



Lillian B. Dorr. 
IdaF. Elliott. 
Annie M. Gay. 
Emma J. Henry. 
Emma E. Roby. 
Hattie A. Sanderson. 
Mary E. Thayer. 
Abbie D. Wilson. 



SOUTH GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



Nathan P. Batchelder. 
George F. Canis. 
Irvin E. Casv> ell. 
Fred W. Cheney. 
Oliver N. Flanders. 
Frank A. McQueston. 
Frank E. Pntney. 
George E. Tewksbnry. 
Ida J. Bartlett. 

Addie F. 



Ella H. Dana. 
Maggie A. Fullerton. 
Emma G. Hastings. 
Ida E. Monlton. 
Sarah E. Kntting. 
Josie H. Eichardson. 
Flora M. Senter. 
Josie E. Eollins. 
Amoretta J. Sweatt. 
Stevens. 



EAST GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



Fred. J. Kennard. 
Willie S. Moody. 
Wm, E. Marden. 
Emma G. Jewell. 
Belle J. Kennard. 



Emma !Monlton. 
Snsie C. Cook. 
Yesta Tnck. 
John M. Dana. 
Dayton F. Moore, 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



George I. Aldrich. 
James A. Bnncher. 
Charles E. Cochran. 
Perry H. Dow. 

Katie E. 



Charles A. Parker. 
Willard B. Parker. 
Frank J. Perkins. 
Arthnr E. Stearns. 
Joy. 



241 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

La.st winter one evening- school vv^as kept in the old 
High School bnilding, and another in Merchants Ex- 
change. These schools closed in March. 

In October a school was opened in tlie old High School 
building, and another in the Police Court Eooni. The 
one that was opened in the Police Court Eoom has been 
transferred to the old High School building. About 
seventy pupils attend these schools and are making- 
good progress. 



EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDPtEN IN THE MILLS. 

The law upon this subject has received careful at- 
tention during the past year, overseers generally hav- 
ing regarded it and required certificates of all children 
applying for v/ork. Within the year over 400 certifi- 
cates were given by me. 

I have visited the mills frequently and ani satisfied 
that there are many overseers who have not employed 
a child under fifteen during the past year Avithout such 
child had a certificate signed by me. 

There are some overseers, however, who pay but little 
attention to the matter, and it is a question for consid- 
eration whether or not some measures shall be taken to 
bring suits against some of them at an early day. 



TRUANCY. 



Not so favorable a report can be made upon this sub- 
ject as we might wish. Although a very stringent law 
was passed at the last session of the Legislature, which 
is intended to compel the attendance at school, of all 
16 



242 

cliildren between the ages of eight and fonrteen, it is 
doubtful if public sentiment is right for the rigid en- 
forcement of the law. I have no doubt tliat such a law 
is needed and must be enforced as a safeguard to the 
republic ; but i)eoi)le must be made to see the evil effects 
of non-attendance at school before they will be anxious 
for the enforcement of such a stringent law. 

The lav/ to which reference has been made is as fol- 
lows : 

Be it enacted l)y the Senate and House of Representatives m 
General Court convened : 

Section 1. Every parent, guardian, master, or other person hav 
ing the custody, control, or charge of any child between the age 
of eight and fourteen years residing in any school district in which 
a public school is annually taught for the period of twelve weeks 
or more, within two miles by the nearest traveled road from his 
residence, shall cause such child to attend such public school for 
twelve weeks at least in every year from and after the first day of 
September next, six weeks at least of which attendance shall be 
consecutive, unless such child shall be excused from such attend- 
ance by the school committee of the town, or the board of educa- 
tion, or the superintending school committee of such district, upon 
its being shown to their satisfaction that the physical or mental 
condition of such ch.ild was such as to prevent his attendance at 
school for the period required, or that such child was instructed in 
a private school or at home for at least twelve weeks duiing such 
year in the branches of cdacation required to be taught in the 
public schools, or, having acquired those branches, in other more 
advanced studies. 

Sec. 2. The school committee of every town and the board of 
education or superintending committee of every district shall cause 
to be posted in three of the most jjublic places in each school dis- 
trict mider their supervision, or to be published in some ncAvspaper 
printed in town three weeks successively, in the month of August 
annually, a notice of the provisions of this act, partieidarly calling-^ 
the attention of parents, guardians, masters and others tliereto. 
The necessary expense of posting such notice or making ^:uch pub- 



243 

licatiou sliall l>e paid l>y the town oi- district wliose comniittee in- 
curs the same. 

Sec. 3. Any parent, guardian, master, or otlier person -violating- 
tlie provisions of tlie first section of tliis act sliall forfeit and jiay 
tlie sum of ten dolhirs for the lirst otience, and the sum of twenty 
dollars for the second and every subsequent otfence, to be recover- 
ed in an action of debt in tlie name of the district v.'ithin wliose 
limits the penalty was incurred, by the school committee, board of 
education oi* superintending school committee having the supervis- 
ion of the schools in such district, in any court of competent jn 
risdiction. All penalties recovered shall be paid to the district 
and added to the school money thereof. 

Sec. 4. School committees, boards of education, and superiii- 
tending school committees, respectively, shall sue for all jjenalties 
incurred under the provisions of the preceding sections ; and any 
school committee, board of education, or superintending school 
committee, u])on whom a written notice has been served by any 
tax-payer, stating by Avhom, when and how any such penalty has 
been incurred, who shall neglect for ten days after the service of 
such notice u})on them to institute a suit for the recovery thereof, 
unless such penalty shall sooner be paid without a suit, or unless, 
upon investigation during that time, they shall be satisfied that no 
penalty has actually been incurred, shall forfeit and pay the sum of 
twenty dollars for each neglect, to be recovered by the selectmen of 
the town or the mayor and aldermen of the city in an action of 
debt, in the name of the town or city, in any court of competent 
jurisdiction ; such jjenalty, Avheu recovered, to be paid to the dis 
trict in which the oiiginal penalty was incurred, and added to tlie 
school money thereof. 

Sec. 5. This act shall take effect u[)on its passage. 

Approved July 14, 1871. 

As has been said, unless special effort is made to car- 
ry into effect the provisions of the law, it will remain a 
dead letter upon the statute books. 

If the people of this city and State are satisfied to 
have so many children grow up in oiu- midst without at- 
tending- school, T supi)Ose we must subinit ; but v/e 
should endeavor to create a right public sentiment in 
favor of the enforcement of a truant law. 



244 

In nothing connected with our educational system 
are we so behind as in the matter of compulsory education. 

Scores of children are in our midst who do not attend 
any school. 

A special truant officer is needed, whose whole duty 
— at least during certain portions of the year — should 
be to look after children who neglect to attend, and 
compel their attendance at school. As was said in the 
last Aimual Eeport the regular police have their du- 
ties to perform, and there is needed some one whose 
s])eckd duty it is to become acquainted with these chil- 
dren, ascertain their residences, and insist upon their 
attendance. 



HIGH PEESSUEE. 

At the present time there is mucli excitement upon 
the subject of over-working the pupils in schools, and 
in various jdaces eftbrts are being made to lessen the 
liumber of weeks in a school year, as well as the number 
•of school hours in a day, many contending that schools 
should not be in session over 30 weeks each year and 
only 4 hours each day. 

There has been so much said upon this subject that I 
have deemed it of sufficient importance to call your at- 
tention to it at this time. The greater portion of i)u- 
pils in this city do not attend school much after they 
reach the age of 12, and i^revious to that time many 
are away from school considerably, hence if we lessen 
the number of school houns many children, and es- 
l^ecially those v/ho most need the instruction, will be 
deprived of the means of acquiring the rudiments of a 
common school education. 

We must arrange our schools for the many and not 
for the few, and I think that those who are so urgent 
for the reduction of school hours, take into account only 



245 

the condition of those chiUlren who are phiced in school 
at the age of tive, being- able to attend school regularly 
through the various grades, not considering the great 
number who do not attend school on an average of 
more than 12 weeks a year from the time they enter the 
schools until they are finally ^^ ithdrawn to enter upon 
the active duties of life. 

A few statistics upon this subject will indicate more 
clearly the condition of the schools in this respect. 

At the beginning of the winter term, Jan. 3, 1870, 
less than two years ago, there v/ere in the three princi- 
pal Grammar schools of this city, 507 pupils ; at the 
present time only 250 of that number are in the Gram- 
mar schools, and less than 50 are in the High school, 
showing that, of the pu])ils two years ago registered in 
the Grammar schools, only about one-half at i)resent at- 
tend school ; and it has been stated in the report of the 
committee that eighty-five i)er cent, of the scholars in 
the Grammar schools never enter the High school. 

These facts clearly indicate that the larger portion of 
children do not attend school long enough to complete 
the Grammar school course. 

With regard to those that do remain in school pursu- 
ing the course of study prescribed for graded schools, 
think it will be found upon examination that the 
course is so arranged as not to require too much study. 

The course of study in our schools is arranged as fol- 
lows, viz : Three years in the Primary, two years in the 
Middle, four years in the Grammar, and four years in 
the High school. 

The course is so arranged that a child of ordinary ca- 
pacity can comi)lete the studies prescribed for any grade, 
in less time than is allotted to those studies by the i)ro- 
gramme. 

For instance, Vvc allow tive years for the study of 
written arithmetic, and it would seem that a short exer- 
cise in this studv each dav during three vears of the 



24(> 

Grammar school course, ongbt to be sufficient ; and the 
same is true of geography and other branches usually 
taught in common schools. 

With a course of study so arranged there ought to be 
time enough to devote to drawing and music, studies 
more recently introduced, without obliging the chihh'eii 
to labor so much as to impair their health. 

Many jjlaces have adopted the plan of a two hoiu's' 
session in the afternoon ; but the course of study re- 
mains the same, the pupils still being required to per- 
form the same amount of labor Jis when the afternoon 
session was three hours. 

It is generally conceded that it is not so much the 
number of hours spent in study, as it is the close con- 
linement to study and the conUnued strain upon the fac- 
ulties, that breaks down so many children. 

In Primary schools there should be a recess at the 
end of each hour. 

That is the most successful school, especially of a 
lovv^er grade, where there is a diversity of employment. 
In primary schools, exercises should not be continued 
over twenty minutes, thirty minutes being sufficient in 
the intermediate grade, and forty-five minutes enough 
for any grade. 

In previous re})orts, this subject has been discussed 
at length, considerable space having been devoted in 
the reports of 18G7 and 1870 to this special topic, quota- 
tions having been made in those reports from those who 
had given careful attention to the su])ject. 

In too many instaaces it is not so much the difficult 
lesson in school as late hours and the atmosphere of 
brilliantly lighted and crowded rooms that occasion 
nervous i)rostration. 

With wholesome food, i)ure aii', early hours, and reg- 
ular habits, children will not be so likely to break down 
in their studies, as at the present time with the habits 
of many of them. Many of these cliildren, with regard 



247 

to whom complaint is made, were injured before attend- 
ing school. By far too many of these weak, puny, 
sickly children in the schools, were in that condition 
before they ever attended school, having- been urged 
forward by doting parents who rejoiced in the preco- 
ciousness of their children. 

Sometimes when the suggestion is made to such i^a- 
rents as complain of the severe tasks in the school, 
that their children might fall back into another class, 
they reply that they cannot think of that, preferring to 
have them remain where they think they are over- 
worked. 

Again, it is not the amount of work required, or 
achieved by scholars that injures, out the pressure and 
un healthful excitement under which it is performed. 

Before i)arents comidain that the studies of the school 
^re undermining the constitution of their children, it 
^vould be well to ascertain how many, and what books 
they are reading, in addition to the books used in 
school. 

The reading of nuiny of the books in the libraries, 
tends to impair the health of the children, and progress 
in their studies cannot be expected while attention is 
given to such reading. 

One writer pointedly says : 

" Tliis class of writings is t6 be condt-iimed, not only on account 
of their ininioral tendency, but also because they have a most per- 
nicious influence in counteracting mental discipline. It is utterly 
impossible for a pupil, while at school, to form habits of patient 
thouglit and accurate analysis, and learn to trace out with nice dis- 
crimination the most important relations of scientific truths, so 
long as they spend hours of each day in poring o^'cr the exciting- 
stories of modern fiction. This reprehensible practice is also one 
of the most prolific causes of the ill health complained of Ijy the 
young. Tliere is no mental exercise -so exhausting to the brain, 
none that so impairs the intellect and deadens the finer sensibili- 
ties of our moral nature, as the habitual reading of the high 
wrought and thviHing pictures of lunnan lolly, that now form the 



248 

staple of much of our popular literature. There can l^e no ques- 
tion but that very many of the yourtg now attending school, who 
are sacrificing their hours of healthful repose to this kind of infat- 
uation, are fast undermining their health, and will, sooner or later, 
reap the bitter fruits of their folly." 

Another says : "Wlien the plainest laws of bealtli are 
violated, when, for example, oliildren are crannned Avitli 
mince pie, colored candies, or doughnuts, between 
meals and before retiring, it is hardly fair that the in- 
evitable result should be charged to the overtasking of 
the teacher. 

After the earnest studies of school, and in addition 
to all the gymnastics there introduced, let children be 
encouraged to v/alk and ride, work and play, run and 
romx) ; let them row boats, jump rope, trundle hoop, 
twang the bow, pitch quoits, try for ten strikes, play at 
ball, base, cricket, or crocpiet, or with shuttlecock and 
battledoor, and then we shall hear far less of the evil of 
overtasking the brain. I have no fear of stimulatinir 
healthy children, of suitable age, to excessive study 
during school hours, provided they are I'elieved by pro^)- 
er intervals for gymnastics and music." 

The study and discii)line at West Point will not il- 
lustrate exactly the point under discussion, as the stu- 
dents there are much older than those in the public 
schools, but it will very v.ell illustrate one important 
point, viz : that study will not iujure a student so much 
as irregularity in many habits. 

Says one writer : 

"The coiu'se of the Military Academy is probably the most se- 
vere of any similar one in the world." 

"Notwithstanding the severity of the studies and exacting rigor 
of the recitations, and the rivalry of the students, tlie health of the 
cadets is uncommonly good. It is a rare thing for a cadet to break 
down from over-study. This is due, not primarily to tlie tact that 
all candidates admitted must possess a sound constitution, but 
more to the excellent hygienic rules of the academy. 



^ 249 

In no other literary institution witliia my knowledge are the 
rules of health so rigidly observed ; in no other are the require- 
ments for study so severe and unrelenting, especially in the higher 
mathematics. One of the cadets, who is among the Ijcst scholais 
of his class, said to me, ' Before I came under this rigid regime I 
could scarcely bear a tithe of the application I have here safely 
practiced.' There are regular hours for study, recreation, exer- 
cise, sleep and meals. The food is ample, but the diet plain. No 
restaurant is tolerated on the premises, to suggest or facilitate the 
noxious practice of eating betv/een meals, or at late hours in the 
evening. Xo tempting "saloon" disturbs the stomach with pastry, 
cakes, or confectionery. The regixlar and frequent military drills,, 
the gymnasium, and the equitation hall, invite or exact abundant 
and most invigorating exercise." 

Ill the last St. Louis Report there is the followiiig-, 
to most of v/hich I can assent, viz : 

"•The IIic.vLTiiFULNESs OF Study. — Much lias been written by 
sensational paragraphists in late years regarding the supposed in- 
jurious effects of the modern school system on the physical devel- 
opment of children. Most of the facts and arguments adduced to 
prove the unhealthfulness of study are purely chimerical. It may 
be true that an occasional Ijoy or girl breaks down from over men- 
tal work unbalanced by proper physical exercise and diet. But it 
is likely that ten times as many die from attacks of diseases which 
would liave been easily resisted by boys and girls whose individu- 
ality had been more developed through judicious application to 
study. 

The immense disproportion between highly civilized nations 
and barbarous ones in respect to mortality among children is well 
known. Tlie increase in the average length of human life that 
has gone on remarkably during the past century in all civilized 
countries is not to be referred to the growing infrequency of war, 
but rather to the more general diffusion of mental culture a,nd the 
consequent ability to take care of the body. That the modern 
school system — as well as many of the habits of civilized life, e. g. 
tea and coffee drinking, lengthening of day into the night, novel 
reading, <fcc. — that all these tend to produce a more nervous, high 
ly-organized race of people is true ; but it does not follow, as some 



250 

suppose, tliat anythiiio- is really lost jjhysically. This can easily 
1)8 proved by comparing tlie amount of j^hysical endurance of — 
•or the amount of actual physical "vvork accom2)lished by — the man 
belonging to the new type of American physique with that of the 
more stolid and less nervous man. The experience of the army 
places this question beyond doubt. In Florida and in Mexico as 
well as in tlie late civil war, those volunteers who had been most 
developed nervously — including even those made so by dissipated 
life in the cities — were found capable of most endurance in an ac- 
tual campaign. 

Great pains have been taken in late years to ascertain the rela- 
tive rates of mortality of difierent classes of ])cople — in fact the 
life-assurance companies have reduced the results to tables as relia- 
h\e as the multiplication table. The average life of college grad- 
uates, for instance, is nearly twenty per cent, longer than the gen- 
eral average of the society in which they live, counting only those 
who arrive at 20 years of age. The same advantage is found in 
favor of the professions which demand a life of hard study from 
those who enter them. 

The fact that the civilized man withstands acute diseases far bet- 
ter than the savage, and that the nervous, intellectual man has far 
greater immunity from such diseases than the grossly developed 
physical man, bears on this i)oint. The physician notes that the 
influence of the mind x:pon the body is far greater in the former 
than in the lattei'. Mental discipline constantly increases this pow- 
er of the will over the body and it has been remarked that men 
possessed with great purposes have a surprising power to ward oif 
disease and death until the achievement of their plans. 

The regular systematic employment furnislied the ])upil by his 
school-tasks affords protection against a multitude of ailments that 
attack youth avIio grow up in indolence. It is as normal for man 
to exercise his brain as for aninaals to exercise their limbs ; it is the 
supreme function belonging to liuman nature, and it would be 
strange indeed were this unhealthy." 

Delicate, iiervouvs cliildren no doubt sutler, but not 
entirely from the eftects of study. Cliildren are allowed 
to enter scLool too young, and thus oftentimes acquire 
ji dislike for scliool books, the fretting being more inju- 
rious to tliem than the labor imposed by the teachers. 



251 

There are certain duties required of teacliers and oth- 
ers, having charge of schools, the faithful performance 
of which would render the condition of the children in 
the schools more comfortable. 

AYe pay too little attention to the subject of ventila- 
tion, and in fact we have never made the subject of suf- 
ficient importance either in the construction of school 
buildings or in the management of them afterward. 

Building committees erect school houses, providing 
no means of ventilation except the doors and windows, 
and too often these are opened in such a manner as to 
allow the cold air to come directly upon the necks of 
children, something which ought never to be done. 

The State Superintendent in the last Eeport says up 
on the subject something that should be read by all who 
have anything to do with the erection of school l)uild- 
ings. 

The extract to which reference is made, is as follows : 

"Iso fiict is iiiore evident, even to common observation, than 
tliat pure aii* is indispensable to liealth, and yet there are but few 
school houses in New Hampshire in which pure air can be breathed 
for three hours during a winter's da}'. 

We may give our children the hard fare at ]\ome vrhich were 
the common rations of other days ; we may provide for tliem tlie 
hard benches and uncomfortable arrangements of old fashioned 
school houses, if we will give them also the fresh air there provided 
by loose windows and spacious open fire places. But we cannot 
without guilt, shut them up for six hours each day in a small, 
tight room, warmed by a box stove. Such an atmos})liere poisons 
the blood, drains the vitality, and lays the foundation of a hundred 
forms of sickness and suffering. Witliout })ure air the circulation 
of the blood, instead of a current of life, becomes a current of 
death, diffusing itself through a million of channels into every part 
of the system. Would ])arents buy a solution of arsenic at the 
druggist's, and inject it into the veins of their children? Tliis 
would prove no more fatal than to inhale the poison of bad air 
which tliey are compc'lled to breath in most of our school houses. 



day after day and Aveek after Aveek. The only difference is, one is 
rapid and tlie other a slow process of poisoning. 

When the school-room is first opened, the air is comparatively 
pure, but in a short time the fifty pairs of lungs have consumed 
nearly all the oxygen, and the vicious compound that remains stu- 
pefies the intellect, and by slow degrees saps the very life blood. 
This is not all theorj^, but the simple truth, and it is of fearful im- 
port to our children. My object is sinijily to call attention to this 
important matter." 

It lias already beeu intimated that i)upils are kept 
too long at one recitation, tliat the work of the last ten 
minutes of the recitation is more injnrions than that 
done in the former twenty-five minutes. 

While the members of a class are bright and active 
before the exercise has become wearisome, the pupils 
are not injured, but when they become tired, listless 
and uneasy, the energies are taxed too much. 

Sometimes Vv e err materially in judgment in assign- 
ing lessons that the pui)ils caimot possibly learn. 

We must take into account many things in the as- 
signment of lessons, as for instance : — the number of 
recitations the pupil has besides the one under consid- 
eration, the age of the i)upils, the season of the year, 
etc., etc. 

At certain seasons of the year, pupils can perform a 
greater amount of work than at other times. In one 
of the hot sultry days in sunmier, a class cannot be ex- 
pected to commit to memory as long lessons as in the 
bright clear days in October, yet, frequently, lessons of 
a certain length are assigned merely because the i^encil 
marks are there and we know by those marks that a form- 
er class learned just so much. 

It might be well sometimes when a child is repri- 
manded for having a poor lesson and obliged to remain 
after school to learn it after having done his very best, I 
say, it might be well to see if the teacher could learn the 
same lesson and be able to recite it. 



Not always is llio difficulty with the pupil or the text- 
book, but frequently the questions are asked in such a 
stupid uiaiiuer, that not even a good scholar can make 
a recitation. 

Let teachers first learn how to conduct a recitation, 
how to ask questions so as to draw from the pupils 
whatever has been learned of the lesson under consid- 
eration, before condemning them for fjiilures in the re- 
citation. 

Sometimes pui^ils have been i)ermitted, and some- 
times required to study at recess, although the regula- 
tions strictly forbid it. 

Ko child should be kept in school during the whole 
session of the half day, but should be encouraged to ex- 
ercise in the open air, even compelled to do so in pleas- 
ant weather, and when the weather is such as toi)rcvent 
out-door exercise, the time of recess could be spent in 
physical exercise in doors. 

Teachers should see to it, that the i>uinls have suffi- 
cient exercise if they remain in the rooms at recess, 
which does not mean that they spend the time running 
about the halls, defacing the furniture and tearing 
down maps, the injury done to which, in some schools, 
is considerable in the course of a year. 

It will be proper to attribute to the schools and to the 
school system, the cause of poor health among the chil- 
dren when they are properly cared for at home and at 
school. 

This discussion in various sections of the land, con- 
cerning the health of children in schools, will be benefi- 
cial, for it will call the attention of the i)eople gener- 
erally to the subject, inquiries will be made and the 
difficulty ascertained. 

Anything that will tend to give us a better arranged 
course of study for the schools, better constructed 
buildings for schools, will be beneficial and my main ob- 



254 

ject in devoting so iiiucli space to tliis subject, is to cre- 
ate an interest in it. 

We may liave tlie best arranged course of study pos- 
sible, but unless v.e regard the laws of health at home, 
and at school, the pupils will come from the schools 
with constitutions unable to bear slight burdens. 



EXAMINATIONS— MAEKING SYSTEM, Etc. 

During the i)ast year many of the schools have ad- 
opted the x)lan of having written examinations at the 
close of the month, or at least twice each term, giving* 
each i)upil an examination in the studies of the month 
or half term. The plan is regarded as an excellent one 
l)y those w ho have adopted it, the effect upon the schools 
being good. 

The plan of marking each recitation has been aban- 
doned in most of the schools, and iu but few schools do 
w^e notice the practice of requiring each pupil to make 
a report at the close of the day stating how many times 
he has whispered, liov/ many mistakes he has made in 
the lessons of the day, how many times he has looked 
around during the day, etc. etc. 

That these methods are not entirely abandoned is 
because we become so strongly attached to a system 
that frequently we are unable to see its injurious effects, 
but there is no doubt that the marking system will 
gradually be discontinued as better results are seen in 
schools v»diere it is not used. 

In a school of forty pupils tlier^ is no need of asking 
l)upils to report at all. The teacher should be able to 
tell what pupils are absent or tardy, and whether or 
not there has been disturbance enough in the school to 
warrant him in reprimanding any one. 

It does not strenjythen our conlidence in a teachei' or 



L'oa 

a school if, at the close of a session pupils are asked 
how many times they have Avhispeved during- the half- 
day, and several other questions of similar import. 

Many teachers would be unwilling- to make the tacit 
admission that their pupils had heen out of order dur- 
ing- the day and tliey Itad not noticed it, even preferring- 
that the rules of the school should be disobeyed than 
that they should be under the necessity of asking- if 
some one does not think he deserves a pnnishment. 

It is the honest, well-disposed pupils who now and 
then disobey that report themselves and sutt'er the dis- 
grace, not those who willfully and deliberately disobey^ 

We must deal witli children as they are and not as 
we mUjlit irUfli tliem to he. 

Those children v>-ho can violate the rules of school for 
six hours a day, without being noticed, will not regard 
it as a great sin to deny the same at the close of the 
session. 

There may be a few who will report their disobedi- 
ence, but their nund)er is not large. 

AVe read of such in some of the story books, but we 
tind only a small number in our schools. 

The remarks npon this subject thus far have been with 
reference particularly to dex)ortment, but tlie same will 
apply equally to recitations. 

Classes frequently recite, and at the close of the reci- 
tations the names of the pupils are called, to ascertain 
\Am have had good lessons, the i)upils being allowed to 
make their own rei)orts. 

Sometimes they are marked on a scale from 1 to 10,, 
and in that case if pupils are asked to report them- 
selves, some of them who have confidence in their own 
abilities, report themselves as perfect, and the teacher re- 
ceives the report and credits them accordingly, although 
those pupils may not have answered a single question, but 
they feel assured that they could have done so had the 
questions been asked them ; others not feeling tliat degree 



256 

of assunince report one failure and desire to be marked 
two, Avliile sometimes tliose Avho desire to be liouest 
tliiuk they deserve six or seven, altlioiigli they may have 
as good a knowledge of the lesson as any one in the 
class. 

It is the business of the teacher to ascertain how 
much the pui)ils know of the subject under considera- 
tion, in order to know what course to i)ursue in the reci- 
tation. 

It is not really necessary that each pupil shall be 
asked a certain question, nor that every question in the 
lesson shall be asked, for there are some lessons that do 
not require much study or explanation, but there are 
certain topics upon which the pupils are deficient, and 
there is where the Avork should be. In a recitation, it 
is important to know where the inipils are deficient, 
and this being known, those topics can be explained 
and the pupils can receive the benefit of the investiga- 
tions of the teacher. 

Any one can ask questions and mark each pupil, but 
every one is not able to tell what pupils need the most 
assistance, or what points need the most exi^lanation. 

A recitation then cannot be properly conducted, if at 
the close of a recitation, each impil is to receive a cer- 
tain mark for the questions answered, or if each pupil is 
to be marked by the teacher as soon as he or she has 
answered a question. In no way can justice be done, 
but by conducting a recitation in such a. manner as to 
impart the greatest amount of information to the pu- 
pils, and at the same time to draw from them what in- 
formation they possess in regard to it ; at the close of 
the month, there can be an examination of the various 
classes upon the studies of the month and the per cent, 
noted, which will give some idea of the attainments of 

the classes. 

The method of conducting recitations has been con- 
sidered in the discussion relating to overwork in the 



schools, and in aiiotlior part of the report it has been 
said that we cannot dotennine a pni)il's fitness for pro- 
motion by a single examination, and jnst here is ^onnd 
the value of these written examinations : some of the 
good scholars may fail in one examination for admis- 
sion to the High School, but if a pupil well understands 
the studies he has pursued, he will not be likely to make 
a failure at the end of every month in the year. 

Instead of making one examination a test of admis- 
sion to the High School let the examinations of the last 
two years in the Grannnar- school be considered, and 
there cannot be much doubt as to the fitness of a child 
to enter a higher grade. Again it becomes more evident 
each term that a great deficiency in our schools — we 
might almost say the greatest deficiency— is in the poAv- 
er of pupils to express themselves in relation to the sim- 
plest matters. 

It is all very well to spend time in analyzing and 
parsing, to study carefully the rules of syntax ; these 
things should not be neglected, but it must be borne iu 
mind that many pupils who can analyze the different 
sentences in Paradise Lost and the ^Seasons, giving rules 
and exceptions, are unable to construct a simple sen- 
tence correctly. 

The fault is not that they have been taught too much 
but that they have lost sight of the grand aim of the 
study, viz : to learn to sjjeak and write the English Ian* 
guage correctly. 

Frequent written examinations will correct this evil in 
a great measure, and will also induce pupils to continue 
the practice of expressing themselves in writing. These 
examination papers too, will sometimes satisfy fault- 
finding parents who imagine — naturally enough — that 
their children are as good scholars as the children ot 
their neighbors, who have been promoted. 

Let it not be understood that a child who can pass a 
good written examination iu some branches is for that 
17 



258 

reason as good a scholar as can be desired, as there will 
be danger that we shall press this matter so much that 
these examinations will be regarded as ends rather than 
means, bnt I think that anything which tends to get rid 
of the old marking system, and at the same time gives 
pupils the practice in writing can not fail to be beuefl- 
cial. 

The written examinations for admission to the High 
School show the need of this practice in the Grammar 
School. 

The answers given at each of the examinations for 
the past four years have been kept at this office, and I 
had selected some of those given at the examination 
last summer, intending to publish them in this report, 
but as many of the answers are so ridiculous I have not 
thought it best to make them public. 

I know it Avill l)e ditficult to satisfy many parents 
that their children are not qualified for promotion, as 
they will not examine the papers, but simply insist 
that their children are as good scholars as the children 
of their neighbors. 

The parents of some of the pupils who have answer- 
ed questions in such a manner, have sometimes felt ag- 
grieved and have spoken of the Committee and Super- 
intendent in anything but comi)limentary terms; but 
if there can be ten sets of questions and answers for 
the last year in the Grammar school, it will make a 
l^lainer case. 

Sometimes too, pupils giving such answers at a writ- 
ten examination, have been those who, during their 
Grammar school course, have managed to keep with 
their classes and sometimes to obtain high marks at a 
recitation, but they did not study for the i)uri)ose of 
acquiring information, but merely to learn a lesson to 
recite. 

At the next examination for admission to the High 
school, it may be well to print some of the questions 



25!) 

uiid answers for the benefit of parents disposed to find 
fault because their cliikh-en are not admitted to the 
Hiiih seliool. 



vSCHOOLl-^ AND STUDIED. 

By referen<'e to the list of teachers, it will readily be 
s<?en what changes have occurred during the year in the 
corps of teachers. 

It is proper, however, to call attention to the fact that 
there has been no change at the North (lr:unniar school 
during the entire year ; something that could not be 
.said of the school for any previous year for a longtime. 

At the close of the sununer term, Mr, 1. S. Wh.tney, 
who had taught vocal music in the schools for eleven 
years, resigned his position, and Mr. J. 1). Jones, who 
for five years had taught music in tlie suburban 
.schools, and for some years in the schools of Amoskeag 
and Piscataquog, was elected to take charges of the 
singing in all tlu' schools. Both of these gentlemen 
had taught in an acceptable manner, and it was gener- 
ally conceded that the inipils in the various schools Avere 
nuiking good progress in tliis branch. Mr. Jones has 
been in poor health most of the time since he has taken 
charge of the music in all the schools, and consequent- 
ly we cannot speak of the results of his la]>ors during 
the past term. 

It seems to be the general impression in most places 
that a general Superintendent of this departnumt is 
needed, who shall aid the regular teachers in their work, 
meeting the teachers of the various grades frequently 
to arrange a course of instruction, visiting the schools 
from time to time, but requiring the chief v/ork in the 
school-room to be done bv the regular teachers. 



200 

There is a decided o'ojection as our schools are^ 
arranged, to the i)lan of having- special teachers in the 
various departments, as the work can be better done by 
the regular teachers, but as regards such branches as 
music and drawing, bianches that have not been luu'su- 
ed as regular studies, many teachers have not qualified 
themselves to teach them ; but because some teachers 
are not able to teach them now, it is no more a reason 
why the branches should not be required, than it Avould 
l)e to discontinue reading, spelling and arithmetic in 
the schools, because some of our teachers cannot teach 
such branches well, and no one will attempt to deny 
that some of these branches are very i)oorly taught in, 
some schools. 

In order to assist those teachers v*ho do not feel 
thoroughly competent to instruct in the branch of vocal 
music, for instance, if it is to be taught, it will be necesr^ 
sary to employ a special teacher for a while, not to re- 
lieve the regular teachers of any of their responsibilities. 
in the matter, but to assist them in this department. 

Some of our schools have had the benefit of instruc- 
tion in this branch for a number of years, and as the 
pupils leave the schools, they ought to be able to take- 
charge of this department the same as any other. 

I stated in the last report, that T thought singing 
should be one of the regular branches of study in the- 
schools, and later observations have convinced me that 
it can be taught in all the schools to advantage. 

I think those who have considered the subject, are of 
the opinion, that at no distant day. teachers will have 
no more difficulty than with the other studies. 

We are past the time of saying that it is a special 
gift, and only a few can learn ; this is shown to be- 
wrong in any of the primary schools where but few 
children can be found who can not and do not learn to. 
sinff. 



2G1 

All studies might as well be called special studies ; 
there are children who study the spelling book for years 
and then are unable to write a page without misspell- 
ing some of the common words in the English lan- 
guage ; others study arithmetic for years without being 
able to repeat the multiplication table correctly, while 
»others study etymology and syntax, for months, and it 
may be years, learn to parse and analyze and tlien some 
of their sentences would be good specimens to place in 
ithe grammar under the head of false syntax. 

Yet no one thinks of discontinuing these studies in 
the schools, or of excusing such scholars from these 
■exercises. 

It Avill be necessary for a while, to enJi)loy a special 
teacher of drawing to aid the other teachers in this 
branch. 

B}^ this method, uniformity of instruction can Ite se- 
cured at the outset, and tliis branch of study can be 
made valuable in all grades of schools. 

With regard to this study, there is in diflx^rent sec- 
tions of the country, a growing feeling in favor of its in- 
troduction into all schools. 

Some years ago Horace ]Mann said: "1 believe a 
child will learn to draw and write sooner and with more 
care than he v.ill learn writing alone." 

This has i)roved to be the case in some of our scliools 
within the past year. Instead of having five vrriting 
lessons, in some instances there have been three writ- 
ing and tv/o drav»'ing lessons a week, and the results in 
penmanship have been as good as formerly v.ith tlic five 
writing lessons a Aveek. 

We do not expect to make finished artists of the i)u- 
pils, but we can give them such training in this depart- 
ment as will be of use to them in the various mechanical 
pursuits in whicli they Vvill engage ; we do not regard 
this as an ornamental branch, but one of the most use- 



2()2 

fill, especially in a eity like this, Avliere the majority of 
the boys instead of entering the professions learn some 
mechanical trade. 

When vre considei' that in a city like ours most of the 
chihb'en nov/ in our ])ul)lic schools will be required to- 
earn their living l)y njanual lal.or, Ave should endeavor 
to provide them v.ith the instruction best suited to their 
v/ants in after life. 

The complaint is frerpiently made in various sections, 
of the country, that [foreign workmen occupy the best 
places in our vrorkshops and factories, audit is said that 
every branch of cmr manufactming interests is sutfering 
from the lack of such training as the schools ought to 
give. 

This being the case there is an imperative need of 
idacing in our common schools those branches the studji 
of which Viill eualde tlie American child to compete 
Avith those from foreign soil. 

One Avriter in speaking u})ou this ]K)int says that 
American boys are growing too })roud to learn a trade,, 
and attri])utes this to the fjict that our system of in- 
struction has ignored an industrial life. 

The sa.me v.riter says : 

''The only legitimate result af our educational system will be 
the ])roductiou of lawyers and doctors, oi", at the least, clerks and 
school teaL'hers. In consequence of this defect, children receive 
the impression that education has no bearing upon mechanics ; that 
a trade is oidy manual drudg^ery. The result is, that our boys se- 
lect the most eftemiiuite employments in ])refercnce 1o manly me- 
chanical worlc. 

When our educational SAstem provides our youth with some in- 
telli<font preparation for the jirosecution of iiulustrial labor, tlie 
trades will be iilied by a more cultivated class of young men, and 
our Ijoys will blush to be found selling ])in:s and needles; but thev 
will Udt be ashaiticd to be seen usino; the hammer and chisel." 



263 

Many who have regarded this a ii.seless study, are 
now eager to have it taught regularly in the schools. 

Tlie time wasted by pupils in committing to memory 
rules and dehnitious in some branches, if devoted to 
this study, would give the pupils a good idea of this 
subject. 

In connection with the subject of studies in oiu* 
schools, it may not be inappropriate to speak of text- 
books and changes in the same. 

Tliere is an impression in some sections, that School 
Boards are ever eager for changes in l.ooks, and not- 
withstanding there may be no changes, the charge is 
made just the same. 

There are but few jdaces Avhere changes in text-books 
have been less frequent than in this city. 

In 1809, there was a change in Mental Arithmetics, 
the cost of exchange being twenty-two cents, and the 
same year. Primary Geographies were exchanged even. 
In 1S(>8, a vote was passed, requiring a change of spell- 
ing books, the cost of exchange being ten cents. 

Sometimes in order to test a book some schools have 
been allowed to use a nevv- book ; and again, where sev- 
eral editions of the same book are in use, arrangements 
have been made to have a uniformity in the schools, 
l)ut it has generally been a saving to the pupils. 

The only general changes made by the School Board 
during the past four years in grades below the High 
School, involving any expense to the pupils, have been 
the Speller and Mental Aritiunetic, at an expense of 
thirty-two cents. 

Kobinson's Practical Arithmetic v^as introduced in 
1805 ; Hilliard's Headers, Guyot's Intermediate Geog- 
raphy and Seavey's History in 1807. Weld & Quack- 
enbos' Grammar was introduced into the Grammar 
School in 1803. l)ut as Qmickenbos' Grammar was the 
text book used in the High School, the latter named 
l)Ook is now used in both grades. 



204 

In fiict, as has been stated, the text books that were 
in nse January 1, 18()8, are now used, with the excep- 
tion of the rriinary Geography. Mental Arithmetic and 
Speller. 

Some changes have been made in text-books in the 
High school, but the number of scholars in the classes, 
is quite small and generally new books introduced 
there have been piKchased by the pupils at much less 
than the regular cost. 

In fact while some pupils have been obliged to make 
an "" exchange, paying the difference between the old 
and ^new book, it has cost on the average less for 
books than if no change had been made, as in many in- 
stances the old book had become worn out, and a new 
one was obtained at a reduced price. 

Allusion has just been made to the fact that some 
classes have been allowed to use other than the regu- 
larly adopted books, in order to test them, and this 
practice has led to confusion whenever pupils froui 
these schools have removed to other parts of the city 
and been obliged to obtain other books. 

There has been considerable discussion during the 
past year in relation to a change of Grammars and 
Geographies, but it has been thought best to retain 
those text-books now in use, even though they are not 
the best that can be found upon those subjects, choos- 
ing to use a book not regarded by all the teachers as 
the best rather than to excite any comuiotion by com- 
l)elling children to purchase new ones. 

It was stated in the report of 1S()8 that it was better 
to keep a poor book in school tlian to run the risk of a 
change. It think I stated the case strongly at that 
time, but it is best to be satislied before luakiug a 
change. 

Oue important point to be considered in connection 
with the course of study is the time to be allotted to 



205 

each branck and th(^ .special attention ijaid to eacL 
braucli. 

This might properly have been considered in tlic dis- 
cussion upon high 2)ressure, but it will not be amiss to 
consider it now. 

We alt very well understand that all studies are not 
alilcc important, some requiring more attention than 
others. 

Many children wiio are to leave school at an early 
age — and this will be the case in spite of all we can 
do — must give more attention to some studies than to 
others ; but a regular cast-iron graded system makes no 
allowance for such pupils, but sends them into the Vv'orld 
without a knowledge of the studies most needed. 

Certainly there must be a system, a regular course of 
study, but good judgment is needed here as elsewhere, 
and no teacher should be cramped or compelled to work 
in a certain fixed way, but after the plan of study is 
made, each ought to be allowed such freedom of action 
as will suit the individual case. All teachers Vv ill not 
use just the same method of instruction, nor is it nec- 
essary, provided satisfactory results are obtained. 

Our course of study is so arranged that pupils can 
advance faster than the classes if they show themselves 
worthy of it, being promoted v»dienever they show them- 
selves i)roperly qualified, while others remain in one 
grade longer than the prescribed time in order to ob- 
tain a better knowledge of the studies of that grade. 

It must ])e borne in mind, that there v/ill be in all 
schools, a number of pui)ils who v/ill not be able to 
master the studies pursued in those grades and cannot 
pass the required examination. 

Must these pupils be kept in one school for many 
years in order that they may be able to obtain a certain 
])er cent, in their examination in some studies, or should 
they be allowed to enter higher grades and o])tain a cer- 



tain nmonnt of information in other studies? Grade 
the classes as v/e may, some A^ill obtain ii clear knowl- 
edge of the branches they study, others will understand 
them partially, while some will not thoroughly under- 
stand any of the studies pursued, whether a longer or a 
shorter time is spent upon them. 

8uch is the i)ractical working of the system, no mat- 
ter what theory may he held concerning promotions, or 
how numy regulations may be made, stating that no 
one can \n) promoted who is unable to pass a prescribed 
examination. 

The test of admission should not be so rigid as to ex- 
clude those who have labored patiently and conscien- 
tiously for many years in the lower grades, nor on the 
other hand, so lax as to encourage indolence in those 
who need something to stimulate them in their studies. 

Great care needs to be exercised in this matter. 
Those who have ever had occasion to examine pupiLs 
for promotion know well what ditticulties lie in the way. 

The main object should not be to see what percent- 
age impils can obtain at an examination, but that they 
obtain a clear knowledge of the studies pursued. But 
examinations are of use in this respect, as I have en- 
deavored to shovv" in a previous part of the report. 

All methods of instruction are faulty that prevent pu- 
pils from receiving the instruction necessary to become 
good citizens. 

Pupils ditfer in ability and disposition, and often- 
times one is more deserving of praise for partially per- 
forming a task than another who performs the whole 
task. 

To meet all the ordinary expenses of the schools, and 
to establish new schools the coming year will require an 
increased ai)i)ropriation, but I am satisfied that the cit- 
izens of Manchester will <rrant vdiatever is needed for 



207 



CONCLUSION. 

tlie support of siu'h schools as tlio School Board desiro 
to uiaintaiii. 

Ill the iiiaiiagcniciit of our ctlncatioiial interests each 
one should be governed by the highest motives, earn- 
estly desiring- the best results. I have endeavored to 
make such suggestions as I deemed best for the educa- 
tional interests of our city, and I close with the wish 
that our schools may be such that the richest and 
poorest shall be l)ene1ited by them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH G. EDGEELY, 

Superintendent of PuhVtc Instruction. 

MANCiiBrtTEii, December 29th, 1871. 



208 



TABLE SIIOAVING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE DIFFERENT 
SCHOOLS THE PAST YEAR. 



s^inooLs. 


Whole number be- 
long-iiig. 


s 

So 


a 
•5 6 

II 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Total 






101 
147 
122 
111 
47 
U4 
37 
2t> 
44 
32 
22 
33 
52 
3!) 
38 
44 
47 
35 
12 
27 

30 
3(i 
2'.t 
51 
34 
4<i 
37 
5(> 
30 
78 
44 
42 
32 
21 
(53 
8G 
23 
48 
15 
15 
14 
:55 
24 
18 


179 
227 
220 
217 
132 
124 

e8 

(i8 
87 

es 

51 

6(j 
93 

m 

79 
83 
84 
59 
53 
52 
G7 
73 
78 
(14 

108 
C7 
89 
74 

104 
tJS 

140 
90 
85 
00 
54 

115 

171 
37 

101 
39 
34 
29 
76 
53 
40 


122 
153 
158 
178 
52 
61 
35 
39 
42 
38 
30 
30 
40 
43 
38 
35 
51 
35 
16 
28 
24 

37 
36 
41 
35 
39 
36 
40 
27 
38 
38 
.35 
37 
32 
40 
43 
15 
50 

25 
20 
4li 
34 

22 


116 


North Grammar School 

South Grammar School 


HO 
!)S 
10^ 
85 
(-0 
31 
42 
43 
30 
20 


149 
156 
160 




50 


riscataquoK Grammar School 

Amo.skeag: Grammar School 

Middle School No. 1 


5'! 
33 

3(i 


No. ti 


33 


'• '• No. a 


35 


" <"• No. 4 


28 


• i " No .') . 


33 


">• '• No. i; 

'■ No. 7 


41 
44 
41 
39 


42 
39 


'• " No. S 

'• '• >Jo iJ . 


3« 

3;> 


" '• No. 10 


37 
21 
41 
25 
42 
43 
42 


45 




31 


•' No. i 

•' '• No. ;! 


14 
21 


" '• No. 4 

'" '• No. <l 


29 


■'* " No. 7 




^' " No. S 

''• " No ... 


34 


«' •' No 10 


43 

37 

is 

38 
('8 
52 
43 

28 

3;; 

.V2 
85 
14 
53 


.30 


'= " No. n 


34 


'• " No Ti 


3;{ 


No.i:! 

" No. 11 


3.5 
25 


" No. 15 

No. l»i 

" " No. 17 


35 
3(5 


" " I?o. IS 


31 


No. 1!1 

•' No. 20 

No. 21 


29 
31 

40 

u 


" " No .'5 


45 


'• '• No. 4 

No. 5 

'S Xo (i . 


24 
19 
15 
41 
29 


21 
21 
17 


So. 7 


43 


^- •• No. 8 


.30 


No !t . . . 


19 








Total 








2,080 


1,911 







The whole number reported from eacli school, if added together, would be more 
than tlie whole number in all the schools, as some scholars are reported from two 
different schools. The whole nimiber of different pupils atteudiug all the schools last 
rear was, as near as can be ascertained, 3.200. 



QUESTIONS SUBMITTED TO CANDIDATES FOR AD- 
MISSION TO THE HIGH SCHOOL AT THE ANNUAL 
EXAMINATION IN; 1,87, L, 



AJUTHMKTIO. 

1. A man haying $.12-aii}l 4-.50, gave one boy $2 and 61-80, to 

another one fourth of the reinamder; how much had he left? 

2. If 10 nien in 15; days of 8 liours each earn $480, hoAV many 

men in 10 days of 12 hours each can earn $720? 

3. Express in figures tjight billions three thousand and nine. 

4. Add one and oue-hall'-^two and one-fourth — live-sixtlis — four 

thirds and one-fifteenth. 

5. What cost 12,450Jjricks at $8.25 per thousand I; 

6. A square lot of- land contains 1 A. 9 sq. I'ods : Avhat are the 

dimensions ? 

7. A tree 100 feet high, stands 60 feet from a pole 20 feet high;_ 

what is the distance from the top of the tree to the top of 
the pole ? 

8 When gold is at 25,pcr cent. ])remium over p'aper money, 
Avliat is the value of a paper dollar ? 

9. A man sold six horses for $1/50, each ; on one of them lie lost 10 
])er cent., on another he lost 20 percent., on another he lost, 
25 per cent. ; on one of them he gained 10 per cent., on an- 
other he gained 20 per cent., and on anotlier lie gained 25 
per cent.,; what did; he gain or lose by the Avhole transac- 
tion ? 

10. What cost 3-T., 9 cwt., S.qrs., 13 lbs., 9 oz. ot sugar at $13.- 

25 per cwt.?; 

11. What will it. cost; to plaster a room 18 ft., 6 in. long, 10 ff., 

high, and 15 ft.,.4. in..'\Yi<Ic', at 5^2 cents a square yard? 



270 

12. Wluit is the interest of $42.75 tW 5 mos., 10 days, at 7 1 2 

per cent.? 

13. A\ hat is a decimal fi-action? 

14. Give tlie rule for the mnltiplication of decimals. 

15. Divide .0012 hy 40. ; .012 by .003. : 10 by .005. ; l.G ])y .16.: 

.18 by 18. 

IG. A piece of land is 50 rods long and 24 rods wide ; what is it 
worth at $37.75 per acre. 

17. What is discount? 

18. From a piece of land containing one acre there were three lots 

sold ; the first was 5 1-2 rods long and 3 rods 5 1-2 feet 
wide : the second contained two thirds as mnch as the first, 
and the third Avas 18 rods long and 2 1-2 rods wide ; how 
much remained unsold ? 

1 9. A pile of wood is 25 ft. 4 in. long, 8 ft. 6 in. high, and 4 ft. 

wide ; what is the Avood worth at $S 75 per cord? 

(iKAAniAi;. 

1. Hovv' many and what tenses has each of the modes? 

2. Name and define the parts of si)eech in tlie English language. 

3. Give a synopsis of tlie verb </o. 

4. (a) Make a list of nouns in the following extract, naming the 

case of the first foiu'; (b) a list of the Axrbs; (c) a list of 
the jironouns, declining the iii'st tv.o ; (d) a list of the 
])repositions: (e) a list of the adverbs; (f) a list of the 
adjectives: 

I have but one request to ask, at my dcpartiu'e from this world ; it is 
tlie charity of its silence. Let no man write my epitai3h; for as no one 
Avho knows my motives dares now vindicate them, let not prejudice or 
ignorance asperse them. Let them and me respose in obscurity and 
peace, and my tomb remain uninscribed.nntil other times, and other men, 
(;an do justice to ni)' character. When my country shall take her place 
among tlie nations of the earth, — then, and not till then, let my epi- 
taph be written I 

5. Write a sentence containing a verb in the perfect tense ; a 

sentence containing a relati\e pronoun in the objective 
case; a sentence containing tin adjective in the comparative' 
dcOTce. 



271 

6 Correct the following where corrections are needed : lie 
give me a book ; It was him Avhich done it ; Whom do you 
see ? Them books are hern ; The roar of the cannon and 
musketry were fearful ; I seen Charles lying them books on 
the table. 

7. Give the plural form of valley ; child; rJece; spoonful; lily; 

fife ; life ; who ; 1 ; city. 

8. What is a defective verb ? Write a sentence containing one. 

9. What are the properties of nouns and pronouns? 

10. Parse the italicised words in the following sentences : 

1. He Avas sick six months. 

2. I gave the boy a hook. 

3. By fairy hands their knell is rung, 
Jiy forms unseen their dirge is sung. 

4. Will you lend me yonv 2)encil ? 

GEOGIIAl'lIY. 

1. Define latitude, longitude, tlie equator, poles and tropics. 

2. Name the New England States and bound two of them. 

3. What and where are the following ? Pekiii ; Madagascar ; 

Danube; Suez; Ilayti; Marmora; Dublin ; Yucatan; Ori- 
noco; Bengal; Niagara ; Gibralter ; Pamlico. 

4 Name three rivers in the United States ; three in Europe ; 
three in Asia ; three in Africa. 

o. Name six rivers that fiow into the Atlantic Ocean. 

0. What are the natural divisions of water? Name and locate 
one of each. 

7. What is a water-shed ? 

8. Through what lakes, rivers and gulfs do the waters of Lake 

Michigan pass in reaching the ocean ? 

9. What are the ten largest cities of tlie United States? 

10. Sketch a map of the United States. 

11. What are the chief exports of the United States? What are 

the chief imports ? 

1 2. How many States in the United States ? 

13. Name the territories of the United States. 



272 

14. Upon what does tlie climate of a country depend? 
] 5. Name the seas in and around Asia. 

HISTORY. 

1. What was the first permanent settlement in Xortli America? 

2. When and where was the first settlement in Virginia? 

;3. What etTect ui)on America liad the English revolution of 

1688? 
4. In what battle Avas General Wolf mortally wounded? When 

was it fought? What other distingui-shed general Tvas. 

mortally wounded in the same battle ? 
o. What causes led to the war of the ReTolution ? 

6. Give an account of the attack on Fort Moultrie in 1776. 

7. What was the Boston Port Bill ? 

8. What were the boundaries of the United States at the close' 

of the Revolution? 

9. What territory has since been acquired? Is'ame the date of 

each acquisition. 

10. Give some account of the Missouri Compromise. 

11. What measures of John Adamg' atlministration excited dis- 

satisfaction? 

12. Name three of the victories obtained by General Scott in the 

Mexican Wai-. 

13. Name the first and the last State admitted to the Union since 

the original thirteen. 

14. Name the Presidents who Avere elected from Virginia. What 

other states have given Presidents to the Union? 

15. V/hat Presidents have been elected by the House of Repre- 

sentatives ? 
1 6 How may it happen th.at a person may be elected President of 
the United States by the people, without receiving a major- 
ity of the votes? 

17. What was the object of the Fugitive Slave Law? In whose 

administration was it enacted? 

18. What important events in the history of the United States- 

have occurred since tiie last Presi«lential election? 



273 



SU'SK'. 

L Whul are notes? 

2. What is the scale ? 

3. Of wliat does tlie staff consist? 

4. Wliat is tlic use of figures avrano-efl like the folluv.'ing, viz : 

2 3 4 „(,. ? 
044, CLL. . 

.'), Wliat is the difference in pitch l»et\veen two tones culled? 

G. Wliat are bars ? 

7. What is a tie ? 

8. What is the key of one shar})? 
[). ANHiat is a hold ? 

10. Vfliat are the syllahles of tlie chromatic scale? 

riivsioi.OGV. 

1. Name the circulatory organs, and describe the functions of 

each. 

2. How would you stop the bleeding of a severed artery ? 

3. Give the anatomy of the teeth. 

4. Desci-ibe the sali\'ary glands. 

5. How many bones in the trunk 1 Name them. 

6. W^liat is the difference between inspired and expired air? 

7. Why are we insensible to the vitiation of the air of the room 

in Avhich we are seated ? 

8. What is the temperature of the liuman body? 

9. How is the surplus lieat of the body removed ? 
10. Describe the eye. 

GOVKKNMKNT. 

1. When was the Federal C'onstitution ado])ted? 

2. How many members of Congress has ^New Hampshire ? 

Name them. 

3. What is a Constitution ? 

4. How does legislative power differ from executive ? 

5. What is meant by impeachment ? 

18 



274 

(I. What is the distiiictiou bet^veell a majority and i)luvality? 

7. What is asserted in the preamble of the constitution? 

8. What are the duties of the Secretary of War ? 

n. How nuxny electoral votes can each statp cast for President? 
10. Wlio is the presiding officer in the United States Senate, and 
how is he chosen? Who in the House of Representatives, 
and liow is he chosen? 



COURSE OF STUDY 



IN THE 



MANCHESTEE PUBLIC SCHOOES. 



SECOND PRIMARY. 

TIIIUD CLASS. 

Reading and Spelling. — Elementary sounds ; names of letters, 
learned from cards and tablets ; words and sounds repeated after 
the teacher ; commence Hillard's First Reader. 

Arithmetic. — Commence counting ; develop the idea of num- 
bers to ten by the use of objects ; count to fifty on the numeral 
frame. 

Oral lessons on form, color, etc., illustrated by objects in the 
school room. 

Hillard's Charts. — No. 1, names and sounds of letters ; No. 3, 
to be sj^elled by letters and sounds. 

Singing and physical exercises each half day in all Primary 
schools. 

Repeating verses and maxims in all Primary schools. 

SKCOND CLASS. 

Tteading and Spelling. — Hillard's First Reader completed ; 
Worcester's Primary Speller, to twentieth page ; printing small 
letters so as to form monosyllables. 

Arithmetic. — Counting to one hundred, with the use of the nu- 
meral frame ; counting by twos to fifty. 

Oral lessons on form, size, color, and on animals and plants. 

Boston Primary School Tablets. — No. 5, the pupils to name 



27(5 

and point out the lines uiul plane fignres ; No. 19, entire ; No. 20 
to X. 

IliHwcVs Charts. — Xo. 1, analyze the forms of capital letters* 
and tell what lines coin])ose each ; No. 4, syllables spelled by 
sounds ; No. 3, words spelled by sounds and by letters. Calling 
words at sight. 

FIKST CLASS. 

Reading and Spelling. — Ilillard's Second Reader ; Primary 
Speller to forty-fifth iiage ; spelling words from reading lessons 
by sounds ; questions on the meaning of pieces read ; printing 
words on slates ; exercises in drawing on slates, to secure right 
method of holding pencil, etc. 

Arithmetic. — ^Miscellaneous exercises in adding small numbers ; 
counting by twos to one hundred. 

Oral lessons on objects, with their parts, qualities and uses. 

.Boston Friniary School Tablets. — No. 24, to L; Nos. 17 and 
18, names of punctuation marks learned: review of those pre 
scribed for second class. 

Ilillard's Charts. — No. 2, entire ; Nos. 4 and 5. 



FIIiST PllIMAliY. 

TillKD CLASS. 

Heading and Spelling. — Second Reader completed and re- 
viewed ; words from reading lessons spelled by letters and sounds ; 
Primary Speller, to sixty-first page ; printing capitals and small 
letters on the slate. 

Arithmetic. — Exercises in adding and subtracting small num- 
bers ; counting by threes, fours, etc., to one hundred and back, in 
all classes of this grade, and also in Middle schools ; the idea of 
multiplication developed by the use of the numeral frame. 

Oral instruction upon common objects. 

lioston Friinar]f School Tablets. — Nos. 19 and 20 reviewed en 
tirG, with exercises in writing Roman and Arabic figures on the 
slate and board ; No. 5 reviewed in connection with No. 6, with 
exercises in drawing on the slate. 

Ilillard's Charts. — Nos. 5 and 6. 



277 



SICCOXO CLASS. 

lieadiiKj and fSpelllnf/. — Third Header ; Primary Speller, from 
the sixty-eighth to the seventy-ninth page ; frequent exercises in 
calling words at sight from cards and charts, and afterwards spel- 
ling the same ; words fi-om reading lessons printed upon the slate. 

A7'ithmetic. — Addition, subtraction, and nmltiplication taught 
orally ; miscellaneous questions under each rule ; Prinaary Arith- 
metic commenced. 

Geography. — Names of the counties in the state, with some oral 
instruction in regard to our own city, etc. 

Oral lessons on parts, form and color, illustrated by common ob- 
jects ; on plants and animals — those with which children are fa- 
miliar. 

Penmansldp. — Writing a fcAV capitals and small letters. 

Boston Primary School Tablets. — Iteview of Nos. 17, I'S, 19 
and 20; use of punctuation marks commenced; ISTo. 7, drawing, 
and oral lessons on the objects. 

Ilillard's Charts. — Nos. 7 and 8. 

FIUST CLASS. 

Heading and Spelling. — Tliird Header; Piinuuy Speller com- 
pleted and ]-eviewed, omitting page sixty-iirst to sixty-seventh, in- 
clusive, and eighty-seventh, eighty-eighth and eighty-ninth pages ; 
questions on punctuation, use of cajiitals, and marks indicating the 
pronunciation; commence abreviations ; words froin reading and 
spellhig lessons spelled ])y sounds and by letters. 

Penmeinship. — Writing capitals and small letters, also words 
from reading and spelling lessons; letters copied from Payson and 
Dunton's Charts. 

Arithmetic. — Primary Arithmetic to iift^-- seventh j^age; miscel- 
laneous exercises in addition, substraction, nudti})lication and di- 
vision; tables of multiplication and division to 10 times 10, and 
100 divided by 10, on slates and blackboards. 

Geography. — Exercises from maps and the board. 

Oral lessons on objects, trades, occupations, etc. 

'Boston Primary School Tablets. — No. 18, uses and definitions 
of points and marks used and applied in reading lessons ; Nos. 7 
and 8. 



278 

Ilillard's Charts. — Frequent drills on Nos. 2 and 6. 

JBartholoiiieio s Drawing Cards and Charts, used in all Prima- 
ry schools. 



SECOND MIDDLE. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Heading and Spelling. — Third Reader completed ; Comprehen- 
sive Speller, to fifty-fourth page, with special attention to sounds 
of letters ; in reading and spellling, careful attention given to enun 
elation, pronunciation, illustrations and definitions, with particular 
care that the words of the definitions are not more difficult to un 
derstand than the words defined. 

Penmansliip. — Writing upon slates ; letters copied from Payson 
and Dunton's Charts. 

Drawing. — Bartholomew's Cards No. 2 ; review of tablets Nos. 
5 and G ; attention given to lines and angles; difierent Vinds of 
each ; meaning of straigJit, oblique, curved, etc., as applied to lines, 
and right, obtuse, etc., as applied to angles, thoroughly understood. 

Arithmetic. — Pjimary Arithmetic completed ; Walton's Tables 
in all classes in the Middle and Grammar schools; exercises in 
combinations of numbers in Middle and Grammar schools ; multi- 
plication and division tables thoroughly studied ; 12 times 12, and 
144 divided by 12, frequently placed on the slate and board ; nota- 
tion to 1000. 

Geography. — Primary Geography to 29th page, with consider 
able oral instruction ; map drawing ; general geograj^hy tauglit by 
use of globes ; geography of New Hampshire and Hillsborough 
county, by use of maps. 

FIUST CT.ASS. 

Heading and t^pelling. — Foiuth Header ; Conip]"ehensive Spel- 
ler, from fifty-fourth to sixty-second page ; words spelled generally 
from reading lessons. 

Writing and Drawing. — Continued. 

Arithmetic. — Occasional exercises in notation and numeration ; 
Intellectual Arithmetic to the thirty-ninth page; frequent exercis- 



279 

es in combination of numbers, so varied as to combine accuracy 
with rapidity. These exercises continued through tlie Middle and 
Grammar schools. 

GeograpJiy. — Primary Geography continued to the sixty-first 
page; maj) drawing, as in the second class. 

History. — Oral Instruction. 



FIRST MIDDLE. 



SECOXn CLASS. 



lieading caul S2)eU'i)tg. — Fourth Reader ; Comjnx'hensive Spel- 
ler, from ninety-first to one hundred and second page. 

Arithmetic. — Written Arithmetic ; oral instruction ; notation to 
1,000,000 ; Intellectual Arithmetic to sixty-first page. 

Geography. — Primary Geography coiupleted and reviewed ; 
map-drawing continued. 

I*enmcmship. — Payson, Dunton & Sciibner's series of writing 
books commenced : careful attention given to position of body, 
etc. 

Drawing. — Bartholomew's Drawing Ijook Xo. 1. 

History. — Historical sketches : discovery of America : war of 
the Revolution, etc. 

IIRST CLASS. 

Heading and /Sj^elling. — Fourth Reader; Comprehensive Spel- 
ler, from one hundred and second to one hundred and tenth })age, 
Avith review of Avholc book, excei)ting Avhat is included between 
the sixty-second and ninety-first pages; review of punctuation 
marks ; the use of capitals and abbreviations ; words in reading 
lessons defined ; pupils to repeat in their own language the sub 
ject of the reading lessons. 

Arithmetic. — Written Arithmetic continued tbrough division; 
Intellectual Arithmetic to seventy-fourth page. 

Penmanship. — Writing and Drawing continued. 

History. — Oral instruction, continued ; histoiical sketches ; 
Columbus, King Piiilip, and others. 



280 

Geoiji-apliy. — InUTinediatc Gcograpliy, to nluetecnth page, au<I 
from fifty-second pfige — United States, to fifty seventh page — 
Nature of New England ; map-drawing continued. 

IIlllar(Vs Charts. — No. 2, used in Middle Schools. 

Walto)is Tables and Walton & CogsxceUs Arithmetical 
Charts used in all classcss where Mental Arithmetic is taught. 



GRAMMAll SCHOOL. 



FOURTH DIVISION. 



Heading. — Intei-niediate Reader. 

Spelling. — Compreh.cnsive S])eller, to one hundrecl thirtieth 
page. 

^irlthrnetlc. — Practical Arithmetic, to one hundred and sixteenth 
page ; Intellectual Arithmetic to ninety-seventh page. 

Geogritphy. — Tntcrmcdiate, from fifty seventh to eighty fifth 
page. 

JIlstorg.—Ovd\ instruction. 

I*enrnansJilp. — Book No. 2 of rnys(»i!, Duiiton cfc Scribncr's 
scries. Drawing Book No. 2. 

Grammar — False Syntax corrected , oi-al exercises. 

■rniiin i>ivision. 

Heading. — Intermetiiate Header. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller, from sixt}- second to ninety - 
first page ; oral and written exercises. 

Arithmetic. — Practical Arithmetic, to (>n(> hundred and ninety- 
fiftli page ; Intellectual Arithmetic, to one hmulred aiul tM'cntieth 
])age. 

Geograp)/i)j. — From nineteenth to fifty -second page. 

History. — Oral instruction ; Campbell's History used as a read- 
ing book through the American Ilevoluti^u. 

Penmanship. — l]ook No. 3. 

Dravnng. — I>ook No. o. 

Grammar. — Same oj-". in fourth di\isio7i. 



281 



SK('OXI) DIVISIOX. 

Reading. — Fii\h llcadei". 

Spelling. — 3Iiseellaneou:s exercises ; words iVcin reading book 
and speller. 

Arithmetic. — Practical Arithmetic to two lumdred and fifty 
ninth page; Intellectual Arithmetic to one hundred and thirtieth 
])ao-e. 

History. — Campbell's History completed. 

Grammar. — Text book commenced ; exercises in writing. 

I^e7imanshlp. 

FIKST DIVISION. 

Reading. — Fifth Header. 

^^pellmg. — Miscellaneous. 

ArltJwietic. — Practical and Intellectual completed, 

(xeography. — Reviewed. 

History. — Seavey's. 

Physiology. — Cutter's. 

Grammar. — Contimied, with analysis and parsing. 

l^enmanship). 

^Book-Keep in g. 

Civil Government. 

Declamations and Compositions throughout the course. 



LIST 01-' TKXX-BOOKS ISEI) IN THE I'lUJIAHY, MIDHLE, AXI) OKAM.MAK. 
^ SCHOOLS. 

Hillard's series of reading books, with charts. 

Worcester's Primary and Comprehensive Speller. 

Walton's Primary and Intellectual Arithmetics. 

Robinson's Practical Arithmetic. 

Quackenbos' Grammars. 

Seavey's History. 

Campbell's History. 

Guyot's Intermediate and Elementary Geographies. 

Cutter's Physiology. 

Ilohman's Practical Course in Singing, parts i, ii, iii, and iv. 

Payson, Dunton tfc Scribner's Writing Books. 

Bartholomew's Drawing Books, Cards, and Charts. 



282 



HIGH SCHOOL 



CLASSICAL COURSE OF FOUR YEARS. 

FIRST YEAK. FIKST TEIIM. 

Algebra; English Grammar; Physical Geography. 

SECOND TEI{]M. 

Algebra ; Natural History ; English Composition. 

TIIIKD TEKM. 

Geometry ; Ancient History ; Latin Lessons; Reading and Spell- 
ing each term during the first year. 

SECOND YEAR. FIKST TERM. 

Geometry ; Ancient and Modern History ; Latin Lessons. 

SECOND TERM. 

Trigonometry ; Cai'sar ; Xatural Pliiloso})hy. 

THIRD TERM. 

Botany; Xatural Philosophy ; Cresar. 

THIRD YEAR. FIRST TERSI. 

Cifsar and Virgil : Rhetoric ; Astronomy. 

SECOND TERJi. 

Geology ; Yirgil ; English Literature. 

THIRD TERM. 

Virgil ; English Literature. 

FOURTH YEAR. FIRST TER31. 

Virgil and Cicero ; Chemistry. 

SECOND TERJI. 

Cicero ; Mental Philoso})hy ; Geography and History reviewed 

THIRD TERM. 

Odes of Horace ; Political Economy ; Arithmetic. 



283 



ENGLISH COURSE OF THREE YEARS. 

FIKST YEAR. FIRST TERM. 

Algebra ; English Grammar ; Physical Geography. 

SECOND TERM. 

Algebra ; English Grammar ; Natural History. 

THIRD TERM. 

Geometry ; Ancient History ; Botany. 

SECOND YEAR. FIRST TERM. 

Geometry ; Ancient and Modern History ; Rhetoric. 

SECOND TERM. 

Trigonometry ; Natural Philosophy ; English Literature. 

THIRD TERM. 

Natural Philosophy ; English Literature. 

THIRD YEAR. FIRST TERM. 

Astronomy ; Chemistry. 

SECOND TERM. 

Geology ; Mental Philosophy ; Geography and History review 
ed. 

THIRD ter:m. 

Political Economy ; Grammar ; Arithmetic. 

Pupils preparing for college to pursue such a Classical Course 
as will meet the requirements of the colleges they propose to cn^ 
ter. 

Classes in French will be formed for those who desire to pursue 
the study. 

Declamations and Compositions at regular intervals throughout 
the course. 

Vocal Music throuohout the course. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



SCHOOL D E P A irj^ M E N T . 



OliGANIZATION FOE 1872. 



HOIST. PERSON C. CHENEY, Mayor, 

ex-officio ClIAIEMAif. 

EDWIN KENNEDY, 

President of tlie Coiiiiuon Council, cx-officio. 

JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

SupT. OF Public Ixstkuctiox. 

Office — No. 5 City Hall ; office lionrs from S to 9 a. m., 
school days. 



MEMBERS OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Ward 1. — Henry C. Sanderson. 
Ward 2.— 3Iarsliall P. Hall. 
Ward 3.— Daniel Clark. 
Ward 4. — Samuel Upton. 
Ward 5. — Patrick A. Devine. 
Ward 0. — Daniel C. Gould, jr. 
Ward 7. — James Dean. 
Ward 8. — DeLafayette Robinson. 



285 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOAED. 

Finance, Accounts, and Clahns. — Messrs. Clark, Ueaii, 
Saudeisoii, Eobinsoii, Jiud Kennedy. 

llejMiirs, Furniture, and Sujjplicfi. — Messrs. Edg'erl}', 
Kennedy, Devine, and Sanderson. 

Text-doohi and Apparatus. — Messrs. Upton, Clark, 
Hall, and Edgerly. 

Fuel and Hcatin/f. — Messrs. Robinson, Upton, Clark, 
and Edgerly. 

Examination ofTeacJters. — Messrs. Hall, Could, Upton, 
and Edgerly. 

Printinff and /Stationer)/. — Messrs. Devine, Robinson, 
Dean, and Edgerly. 

Truanci}. — Messrs. Sanderson, Robinson, Devine, and 
Edgerly. 

FmpJoymcnt of Children in Manufaeturina Fstahlish- 
■ments. — Messrs. Dean, Gould, Hall, and Edgerly. 



SUB-COMMITTEES. 

Schools in High School Building — Messrs. Clark, Up- 
ton and Dean. 

Schools on Spring Street — Messrs. Sanderson, and 
Gould. 

Schools on Franklin Street. — Messrs. Hall, and Upton. 
Schools in Old High School Building and Suburban 

Schools Nos. 1 and 7 — Messrs. Clark and Devine. 
Schools on Lincoln Street and Merrimack St. — Messrs. 

Upton and Hall. 

Schools in Intermediate Building and Suburban School 
No. f>. — Messrs. Devine and Sanderson. 



28G 

Scliools at Wilson Hill and 8ubnrl)an Schools Nos. 4, 5, 

6, 8, and 9 — Messrs. Gould and Clark. 
Schools in Piscataquog. — Messrs. Dean and Kobinson. 
Schools in Amoskeag and on Blodgett Street — Messrs. 

Robinson and Dean. 
Evening Schools. — Messrs. Sanderson and Hall. 
Music — Messrs. Gould and Upton. 



SCHOOLS AND TEACHEES, 
January, 1872. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Beech Street. — Principal, W. W. Colburn. 

Assistants, C. Augusta Gile,. 
Mary E. Clough, 
Emma J. Ela. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

Manchester St.— Principal, Daniel A. Clifford, 

Assistants, Mary A. Buzzell, 

Martha J. Boyd. 

SPRING STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal, William E. Buck. 

Assistants, Anstrice G. Flanders, 
Sarah J. Greene, 
Lizzie S. Campbell. 

FRANKLIN STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal, Isaac L. Heath. 

Assistants, Lucretia E. Manahan, 
Lottie E, Adams, 
Carrie E. Eeid. 



287 



JjIncoln street grammar school 

Principal, Berijiiinin F. Dame. 
Assistaots, Julia A. Baker, 
Mary J. Fife, 

Annette McDoel, 
Eliza I. Yonng', 
Mattie S. Miller. 

PISCATAQUOG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Centre 8t. — Principal, Allen A. Bennet. 
Assistant, Isabella G. Mack. 



l^o. 



1 

2 

3 

4 


7 

8 

9 

10 



1^0. 1 

'> 

-J 

o 
O 

4 
(5 

7 

8 

9 

11 

12 



AMOSKEAG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal, Charles F. Morrill. 

?»iIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

Blodg'ett Street. — I^ellie I. Sandersonv 
Lowell Street. — Isabelle E. Daniels. 
Lowell Street. — Mary L. Sleeper. 
Wilson Hill. — Emma H. Perley. 
Merrimack Street. — ISTancy S. Bnnton. 
Franklin Street. — Hattie G. Flanders. 
Franklin Street. — 0. Aiio'usta Abbott. 
Spring Street, — Hattie S. Tozer. 
Spring' Street. — Lizzie P. Gove. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

Blodgett S.treet.~Ellen B. Eovv'ell. 
Lowell Street. — Emma F. Bean. 
Beech Street. — Georgianna Dow. 
Beech Street.— ^lary E. Ireland. 
Wilson Hill.— Abbie E. Abbott, 
Merrimack Street. — Addie L. Hntchinson. 
Merrimack Street. — Mintie C. Edgerly. 
Manchester Street.— Helen M Morrill. 
Franklin Street. — Martha 1>^. Mason. 
Franklin Street. — Martha W. Hubbard. 



288 

" 13, Spring Sti'oet. — Euiiiui A. Cross. 

" 14, Spring Street. — Gertrude W. Borden. 

" 15. ISTortb Main Street. — Sarah D. Lord. 

" , IG, North Main Street.— Hattie A. Mack. 

" 17, South Main Street. — Alice G. Lord. 

" 18, Amoskeag — Eebecca C. Hall. 

" 19, Amoskeag. — Laura A. Montgomery. 

" 20, South Main Street.— Clara I^. Brown. 

" 21, Centre Street.— Ella F. Salisbury. 

SUBUECAX SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Stark District. — George A. Emerson. 

" 3, Bakersville. — Principal, Addie M. Chase. 

Assistant, Addie A. Marsliall. 
No. 4, Goffe's Ealls.- Hadley F. Higgins. 

" 5, Harvey District. — Lana vS. George. 

" (J, WebstersMills.— Mary J. Eeid." 

" 7, Hallsville.— Principal, Maria H. Hildretli. 
Assistant, Mary B. Lane. 
No. 8, Massabesic. — Samuel T. Page. 

" 0, Mosquito Pond.— Etta M. George. 

MUSIC TEACHER, 

.T. J. KinVhall. 



289 



CITY PEOPEETY. 



City Library Building 

Iron Fence on Commons 

City Hall and Lot, at cost . 

City Farm and jjermanent improvements 

Stock, tools, furniture, and provisions at 

city farm 

Engines, hose, and apparatus 

IS'ew engine house and stable on Vine 

street 

Eeservoirs, at cost .... 
Hearses, houses, tomb, new cemetery, at 

cost 

Court House Lot, at cost 

Court House 

Common Sewers, at cost 

Safe, funaiture, and gas fixtures at City 

Hall 

Street lanterns, posts, pipes, and frames 

Water-Works 

Horses, carts, plows, and tools . 
Engine House and ward room on Manches 

ter street 

Ward Eoom and lot on Park street . 
Engine House and lot in Ward Seven 
Water-Pipe, wagon, and apparatus for 

watering streets .... 
xStock in Suncook Valley Eailroad 
Gravel lot, Lowell street 
" " Hanover street . 
'* " Ward Seven ( one-half acre ) 
** " Bakersville (one acre) 



19 



$29,000 00 
12,500 00 
35,815 00 
17,980 00 

4,826 23 
28,108 00 

15,900 00 
10,000 00 

4,900 00 

9,500 00 

41,000 00 

62,000 00 

2,500 00 
2,000 00 
3,500 00 
8,000 00 

3,000 00 

600 00 

2,300 00 

2,000 00 

50,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,000 00 

50 00 

100 00 

$343,079 23 



290 



SCHOOL PEOPEETY. 



Blodgett street school house 

and lot $3,000 00 

Movable furniture, niai)s, charts, 

etc _. 150 00 

Bridge street liouse and lot 

Old High school house and lot . 6,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. . 200 00 

New High School House . . 45,000 00 
Movable furniture, books, maps, 

charts and apparatus . . 2,000 00 

Towlesville house and lot . 

Wilson Hill house and lot . 3,300 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. . 125 00 

Merrimack street house and lot 15,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. . 350 00 

Manchester street house and lot 8,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc, . 300 00 

Park street house and lot . . 8,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. . 400 00 

Fra,ukliu street house and lot . 18,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. . 400 00 

Si>ring street house and lot . 14,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. . 400 00 

Stark house and lot . . . 200 00 

Movable furniture, maps etc. . 35 00 



$3,150 00 
500 00 



0,200 00 



47,000 00 
800 00 



3,425 00 

15,350 00 

8,300 00 

8,400 00 

18,400 CO 

14,400 00 

235 00 



2\)l 



House and lot, Bakersville 
Movable fiiriiiture, maps, etc. 

House and lot at Gotfe's Falls 
Movable fiiriiiture, maps, etc. 

House and lot uear Harvey's 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

House and lot near Webster' 

Mills . . . . 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

Hallsville house and lot . 
Moval)le furniture, ma[)s, etc. 

Massabesic bouse and lot . 
Movable furniture, mai)S, etc. 

Mosquito Pond house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

Center street house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

Bridge street lot 

Lincoln street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

South house and lot, 'Squog- 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

Amoskeag house and lot . 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

Main street house and lot 
Movable furniture, maps, etc. 



;;,ooo 00 

75 00 



;j,()00 00 

100 00 


2,500 00 

50 00 



500 00 
50 00 



r>,075 00 



r,,700 00 



2,550 00 



550 00 



2,375 00 



1,440 00 
1,000 00 
50 00 

1,050 00 

5,000 00 
125 00 

5,125 00 

2,300 00 



2,300 00 
75 00 


1,400 00 

40 00 



30,000 00 
400 00 

2,800 00 
00 00 

3,700 00 
125 00 

10,000 00 
100 00 



36,400 00 



2,860 00 



3,825 00 



10,100 00 



292 

Am't School House Property $201,110 00 

Am't City Property . . .343,070 23 



Total l»i'operty . . . $544,189 23 



DOG TAX, 1871. 

By amoiiiit collected .... $214 00 

To x)aid DeL. Robinson, for injury to 

sheep $10 00 

To balance to new account . . . 198 00 

$214 00 



293 



EEPOET OF CITY EEGISTEAE. 

Office of City Eegistrar, Feb. 10, 1872. 

To the City CoiuwUs of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — I have the liouor to present here with 
the Eei)ort of the deaths and in the city of Manchester 
for the year 1871. 

The whole number of deaths, males . . . 285 

females . . 279 



Total . 


. 


. 


. 504 


The deaths in each 


month 


were as follows : 




January 


. 41 


July . . 


. 69 


February 


. 35 


August 


. 04 


March . 


, 40 


September 


. 50 


April 


. 47 


October 


. 40 


May 


. 04 


November . 


. 34 


June 


. 50 


December . 


. 24 




283 




282 


"the birth-places of those v 


iho died were as 


follows : 


Born in the United States 


* . . . 


. 443 


Ireland 




. . . > 


. 58 


Canada 




. 


. 47 


England 




. 


9 


Scotland 




. 


. 4 


Prussia 




• ^ 


1 


N^ova Scotia 


♦ » 


1 


ISTew Brunswick 


• 


1 



504 

For a particular statement of the causes of death, I 
refer you to the accompanying table. 

Eespectfully submitted, 
Joseph p]. Bennett, Eegistrar. 



294 









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INDEX 



Appropriations 








54 


Address, Mayor's Inaugural 








. 29 


Address, Mayor's Valedictory 




.• 




5 


Abatement of Taxes .... 








152 


Amoskeag Falls Bridge 








91 


Balance Sheet of Treasurer . 








48 


Bridge, Amoskeag Falls 








91 


Bridge, Granite 








90 


Bridge across Colias Brook 








92 


Chicago Sufterers, Aid to . 








104 


City Farm 








58 


Appraisal of property at 








180 


City Property 








289 


Teams 








62 


Library ..... 








105 


Hall and Stores .... 








127 


Debt 








160 


Reduction of ... 








137 


Commons ...... 








99 


Cemeteries, Report of Committee on 








189 


Report of Treasurer . 








190 


Cemetery, Pine Grove . . . . 






98, 191 


Valley . . 






99, 190 


Coui't House ..... 






. 104 


County Tax 






. 158 


Committees, Standing .... 








40 



298 



Donations to City Libi 


•ary 












. 204 


Debt, City . 












. 160 


Discount on Taxes 












. 104 


Debt, City, Reduction of 












. 137 


Day Police . 












120-25 


Dog Tax, 1871 . 












. 292 


Donations to Library . 












. 204 


Finance Committee, Report of 










. 50 


Fire Dei)artment 










. 108 


Steamer Amoskeao; 










163, 108 


Fii'e King 










. 165, 109 


E. W. Harrington 










. 166,110 


K S. Bean . 










168, 111 


Pennacook Hose Comimny . 










169, 115 


Hook and Ladder Company 










170, 113 


Engineers ... 










171, 117 


Miscellaneous 










. 116 


Farm, City .... 










58 


Inventory . 










. 180 


Government and Officers, 1871 










. 21 


1872, 










. 39 


Granite Bridge . 












. 90 


Highways and Bridges 




District No. 1 


65 


No. 2 












. 66 


No, 3 














. 70 


No. 4 














71 


No. .5 














. 72 


No. G 














. 73 


No. 7 














. 73 


No. 8 














. 75 


No. 9 














. 76 


No. 10 














. 77 


No. 11 














. 78 


No. 12 














. 79 


No. 13 














. -80 


Highways, New . 














81 



290 



Incidental Expenses 

Invoice of City Farm Property 

Insurance , . , . 

Inaugural Address of Mayor 

Iron fence on Merrimack Square 

Interest 



Liquor agency 
Land sold from City Farm 
Lio'liting streets . 
Loan, temporary . 
Library building . 
Library, City 

Report of Trustees 
Librarian 
Treasurer 

Donations 
Lincoln street school house 

Militia .... 

Mortuary table 

Main street school house 

Night AVatch 

New school houses and lots 



Officers, city 

Overseers of tlie Poor, repor 

Paupers off Farm . 
Police department 
Pine Grove Cemetery . 
Payment of city debt . 
Paving streets 
Printing and stationery 
Property, city 
Property, school . 

Ileduction of city debt . 
Revenue account . 
Reservoirs . 
Repairs of buildings 



ot 



122 
180 
134 
29 
101 
135 

137 
134 
89 
136 
103 
105 
195 
201 
198 
204 
142 

101 
>94,295 
141 

>5, 118 
141 

39 
179 

56 
118 

98 
137 

87 
107 
289 
290 

137 
51 
97 

102 



300 



Repairs of school houses 


138, 144 


Report of Finance Committee . . 


. 50 


Overseers of Poor .... 


. 179 


Chief Engineer 


. 163 


Committee on Cemeteries 


. 189 


City Registrar 


. 293 


Trustees of Library .... 


. 193 


School Committee .... 


. 207 


Superintendent of Public Instruction . 


. 223 


Salaries of Officers 


. 130 


Sewers and Drains ...... 


. 92 


School Expenses ....... 


. 144 


School houses and Repairs ..... 


138-144 


School-houses and Lots 


. 141 


Schools, Evening . . ' . 


. 143 


School Report ....... 


. 207 


Superintendent of Public Instruction, Report of . 


. 223 


State Tax 


. 158 


Schools ........ 


. 144 


Teachers, names of ..... . 


. 236 


Treasurer's Balance Sheet 


. 48 


Teams, City 


. 62 


Taxes, uncollected . . . . ' . 


. 53 


Temporary Loan 


. 136 


Valuation, Taxes, etc. 


. 159 


Valley Cemetery 


. 99 


Water Works 


. 138 


Watering Streets 


. 86 



Erratum.— Page 147, read $589.28 instead of $340.34, for 
printing and advertising. 






/ 



\