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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"



trr^ 



piTBLic doctjmp:nt, 



Ann^ual Keports 




CITY OF MANCHESTER 



■YEj^IR. 1S7S 



il'/iiaC. 



NEW iiA;; 
STATE LiBRARX 



TWENTY-SEVENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



CITY OF MANCHESTER 



FOB THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1879, 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPOKTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 
AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H., 

JOHN B . CLARKE, P K I N T K R , 

1873. 



CITY OF MANCHESTEE. 



In Board of Common Council. 
AN ORDEE authorizing the printing of the Twentj^-seveuth 

Annual Eeport of tlie Receipts and Expenditures of tlie City of 

Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they are hereby, 
authorized to procure for the use of the inhabitants of said city, 
the printing of eighteen hundred copies of the Twenty-seventh 
Annual Eeport of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of 
Manchester, including the Eei^orts of the Overseers of the Poor, 
the Committee on City Farm, the Trustees, Librarian, and Treas- 
urer of the City Lilirary, the School Committee and the Sujierin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, the Committee on Cemeteries, the 
Board of Engineers of the Fire Department, and the Special Au- 
ditor; and that the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for Printing and Stationery. 

January G, 1873. In Board of Common Council. 
Passed. EDWIN" KENi^TEDY, President. 

January 6, 1873. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 
Passed in concurrence. P. C. CHEXEY, Mayor. 

A true copy. Attest : 

JOSEPH E. BENXETT, City Clerk. 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESS 



HON. PERSON C. CHENEY, 



1VIA.YOR, 



CITY COUNCILS OF MANCHESTEE, 



DELIVERED BEFORE THE TWO BRANCHES IN CONVENTIOlSi , 
JANUARY fi, 1873. 



N 
Z6ZQ1 

)b7^ 



VALEDICTORY ADDEESS. 



Gentlemen op the City Councils: 

Our official term being about to close, I deem it advisable 
to conform to the custom which seems to have become 
established, and to call to your notice, briefly, in retiring, 
some of the more important matters vs^hich you have had 
under consideration, and your action thereon. The impor- 
tance of this will be the more obvious as we recur to the 
unusual expenditures which it has been the province of this 
administration to assume. You clearly indicated at an 
early day that you desired to pursue a liberal policy in all 
matters of public interest and improvement, and your sub- 
sequent action, enlarged as it may seem upon review, is 
only in accordance with the just demands of a thriving 
community. 

The matter of finance has received the careful attention 
of the Finance Committee, and their recommendations and 
suggestions have been duly considered. At the commence- 
ment of the year the matter of auditing the accounts of the 
City Clerk and Treasurer was before the Convention. The 
fact that these accounts had never been audited except by 
the Finance Committee (who could hardly be expected to 
do it in detail), was deemed a sufficient reason for employ- 
ing an auditor to carefully review and audit these accounts. 
This was done, and the accounts were thus examined and 
audited from the beginning of the term of service of the 
present Treasurer in the year 1851 up to the year 1871. 



6 

The result has indeed been gratifying, as the report of tlie 
auditor will show, for in no instance has an error been 
found. The greatest accuracy appears in every transaction 
through the whole twenty years, although the expenditures 
have been constantly increasing, so that from 157,660 in 
1851 they reached 1382,985 in 1871. This result is the 
best comment that can be made upon the manner in which 
the duties of these two offices are performed. I need not 
say you cannot over-estimate the value of such faithfulness 
and efficiency. 

The increased duties of the Treasurer during the past 
year rendered it necessary for him to decline the appoint- 
ment of Collector. The Collector \s salary is one thousand 
dollars, while the Treasurer's was only four hundred dol- 
lars. I am happy to say the latter has been increased to 
one thousand dollars. 

The annual exhibit, as appears by the statement of the 
Treasurer, is as follows : 

Amount funded January 1, 1872 $387,100 00 

Decrease during the year 95 qoO 00 

Amount funded debt January 1, 1873 ;^362 100 00 

Amount temporary loan January 1, 1872. . S22,170 00 
Decrease during the year 19 871 43 

Amount temporary loan January 1, 1873 2 298 57 

Amount of interest due 7 qqq qq 

Outstanding bills 1 t'i o 1 «« 

Indebtedness to water loan 40 455 51 

total indebtedness January 1, 1873 $458 978 94 

Cash in the treasury January 1, 1873 $57,426 39 

;N"otes due the city j^'q^q ^3 

Interest on same 475 qq 

S62,541 52 

Net indebtedness January 1, 1873, exclusive of water 
^^^'^^ $396,437 42 



Ket indebtedness January 1, 1872 430,329 89 



Decrease during the year $33,892 47 

State Bonds in treasury January 1, 1873 123,800 00 

There is in addition to these assets : 

Uncollected taxes of 1872 to the amount of $31,350 51 

" « 1871 " " 11,310 60 

" " 1870 " " 8,873 48 

" " 1869 " " 7,221 35 

" " 1868 " " 5,538 20 

" '■ 1867 " " 6,397 01 



Making in all $70,690 65 

Of this sum, it is safe to say that one-half of it will be 
collected. There is yet uncalled for, and which the city 
owes, of land damage awards, to the amount of about 

$6,000. 

STATEMENT OF WATER-WORKS ACCOUNT. 

Water bonds issued January 1, 1872 $400,000 00 

Interest received on same 7,407 73 

$407,407 73 

By Mayor's draft, 1871 1,723 06 

" " 1872 245,870 66 

By discount on sale of bonds 9,047 50 

By coupons paid * 8,81 1 00 

By bonds unsold and in the treasury 101,500 00 

By cash in City Treasury 40,455 51 

$407,407 73 

I ought, perhaps, to allude to the increase in the per- 
centage of taxation for the past year. The expenditures 
upon the Lincoln-street school-house in 1871 were $11,398 
in excess of the provision made for it. It was also esti- 
mated by the architect that a further sum of $12,000 would 
be necessary to complete the building ; so that an appro- 
priation of $23,398 was made for this purpese. This item 
alone increased the rate twenty cents. 



There was found to be due to various parties for land 
damage awards on account of streets, $12,737, and as the 
custom had been to pay these awards upon demand, it was 
deemed advisable to provide for the payment of the entire 
sum, and this increased the rate ten cents more. These 
two items, with the changes made by the Legislature of 
1871 in relation to the tax upon ratable polls, which was 
equivalent to a reduction in our valuation of about three 
hundred thousand dollars, or an increase of five cents in 
the rate per cent., will, I trust, satisfactorily explain why 
the rate is so much larger than last year. It will be 
remembered that the rate per cent, was $2.08 last year, 
while this year it was $2.24. I should state in this connec- 
tion that only about one-half the appropriation for land 
damage awards was called for during the year, and as our 
appropriation for the reduction of the city debt was largely 
overdrawn in consequence of the payment of the funded 
debt which had matured during the year, it was thought 
better to make transfers from this and other unexpended 
appropriations, than to provide by temporary loan. We 
have received from the State as a partial reimbursement for 
war expenditures, one hundred and twenty-five thousand 
and eight hundred dollars in State bonds, bearing interest 
at six per cent., aaid dated January 1st, 1872. That too 
many of them should not be thr6wn upon the market at 
once, towns and cities receiving them were requested not 
to dispose of any below their par value within the year. 
This request has been observed by us, although we were in 
no way bound to do so. Only two sales have been made 
during the year, one of them amounting to twenty-three 
hundred dollars, and being in payment for an iron bridge 
across the canal on Granite street to replace the wooden 
bridge which had become impaired by long usage. The 
balance of these are in the hands of the Treasurer, as 
appears by his statement. The large expenditures not con- 



9 

sidered in making up our appropriations in the spring, and 
which have been paid, are $7,000 upon the City Hall build- 
ing, $1,400 on Valley Cemetery for a bank wall, $1,700 to 
satisfy an execution in favor of the county against the city 
for fines collected by the Police Court prior to 1867, and 
the overdraft of paving of $3,400, and of the reduction of 
the city debt $12,598, making $26,098 in all. 

The expenditures up"on the water-works are kept in a 
separate account, and, as yet, exceed the estimate by some 
$15,000 only, which excess is in the item of land damages. 
Water bonds to the amount of $258,500 were sold at ninety- 
six and one-half cents on the dollar, while forty thousand 
were sold at higher rates, leaving $101,500 yet to be dis- 
posed of. The wisdom of issuing these bonds at six per 
cent, interest instead of seven is apparent, when we con- 
sider that to make the interest equal to seven per cent, the 
bonds must be sold at a fraction less than eighty-nine cents. 
Selling, as we have, at 96 1-2 and more saves the city about 
$22,000 on the sales already made. 

SCHOOLS. 

The detailed report, which is annually made by the 
School Committee and Superintendent, will render it un- 
necessary for me to say anything, except alluding to the 
general prosperity of our schools. Nothing has occurred 
to retard their progress, while on the contrary, circum- 
stances have contributed to their further advancement. 
The number of pupils is largely in excess of what it was 
one year ago — the increase being about six hundred. It 
will be remembered that for the last ten years the Superin- 
tendent has urged upon the City Councils the necessity of 
appointing a Truant Officer, whose special duty should be 
to compel the attendance of Truants at our Public Schools. 
It has been your privilege to carry into effect these recom- 



10 

mendations, and to witness very gratifying results there- 
from. This great increase of pupils is largely attributable 
to the appointment of this officer, and the efficient manner 
in which he has performed his duties. I think there can 
be no doubt of the wisdom of continuing this office. 

SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

I am informed by the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion that our school-houses are in a better condition than 
ever before. 

In District No. 1, a new brick house, with slated roof, 
large enough for the wants of the district, has been built 
at an expense of 13,405.04, including tlie furnitures. The 
new High-School-house has been repainted and varnished 
throughout at an expense of -$584.05. The Lincoln-street 
school-house has been completed, the grounds enclosed, and 
shade trees set out, in accordance with the original design. 

The Main-street house has also been finished, giving two 
additional rooms and involving an expense of 12,806.34. 
A change has been made in the Spring-street house, so that 
the upper part of it is more accessible, and the grounds, 
which were exceedingly bad in wet weather, and worse in 
dry, on account of the sand and dust, have been covered 
with concrete. The outlay for these two items is i791.69. 
An order passed the City Councils to put in the furniture 
for a new grammar-school-building foundation, corner of 
T?ridge and Ash streets, substantially like that of the Lin- 
coln-street house. This was in progress when interrupted 
by the severe weather, and was abandoned for the season, 
only $709.61 having been expended. It will be for our 
successors to determine whether it will be advisable to do 
any more toward this building the present year than to 
complete the foundation and set the underpinning, the con- 
tract for which has been accorded. 



11 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

The expenditures upon new highways and bridges the 
past year have been $9,712.45, exckisive of the new iron 
bridge across the canal on Granite street, which, it is esti- 
mated, will cost, when completed, 13,000, of which sum 
$2,300 have been paid. The new streets built are as fol- 
lows : Salmon street, from Elm to Amoskeag Falls Bridge ; 
Pennacook, from Union to Pine ; High street, from Maple 
to Nashua ; Maple, from Lowell to Concord; Lincoln, from 
Manchester to Merrimack ; Beech street, from Park across 
Cemetery Brook ; Belmont, from Massabesic to a point 
south of the Portsmouth Railroad, and Ferry street, from 
Main to River street. The stonework has all been done for 
the extension of Elm street south, and it was the intention 
of the Committee on Streets to complete the earthwork, 
but other matters more pressing prevented. The new 
streets laid out during the year are, Webster street, from 
the River Road to Elm ; Auburn, from Elm to Canal ; Ce- 
dar street, from Canal to Elm ; Franklin, from Granite to 
Auburn ; Belmont, from a point south of Massabesic to 
Merrimack ; Beacon, from Merrimack to Spruce ; Amherst, 
from Hall to a point 120 rods east ; and River street, from 
Granite to North Weare Railroad. There have been no 
land damages to be paid in the laying out of these streets, 
with two exceptions, viz : one amounting to $900 on Web- 
ster street, which has been paid, and that on Belmont, 
which is only this evening determined, amounting to 
$694.14. And I may take this occasion to acknowledge 
the obligations of the city to the Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company for its generosity in donating, as it has, its lands 
for our streets, and to recognize the high character of all 
its business transactions pertaining to this municipality. 
The sidewalk on Amherst street, from Pine to Beech street, 
has been widened two feet, and for the greater part newly 



12 

laid with concrete. That our highways have been in worse 
condition than usual is true, but it was impossible that this 
could be otherwise with the unprecedented rains and 
washes which have been continuous through the season. 
This, in connection with the laying of the water-pipes in 
all of our principal streets, is why our citizens have been 
called upon to submit to this inconvenience, which they 
have so patiently borne. The expenditure in Highway 
District No. 2 has been $11,069.93. It has been the cus- 
tom, and I think it a wise one, where parties desired to put 
in concrete sidewalks, for the city to do the grading. This 
liberality on the part of the city seems to be appreciated, 
as is manifest from the large number of new concrete walks 
which have been laid. This expense of grading during the 
year amounts to $2,183. 50, all of which was charged to the 
appropriation for this district. Unusual amounts have been 
expended for paving, the whole sum reaching |!8,165.65. 
Ten hundred and forty-nine yards were laid in Elm street, 
making the connection with Granite ; four hundred in Man- 
chester ; five hundred and sixty in Hanover ; and four hun- 
dred and ten in Granite street. There were used in con- 
nection with tliis work, 473 feet of flagging stone. The 
low price at which the paving blocks were contracted for, 
and the bad condition of the streets paved, were the rea- 
sons why the committee felt justified in so much exceeding 
the appropriation. 

SEWEES AND DRAINS. 

In consequence of the almost incessant rains, there was 
)io favorable time for extending the large brick sewer on 
Ehn street, but our facilities for drainage have been greatly 
improved by the laying of 5,320 feet of 12 inch pipe, 511 
feet of 15 inch, and 1,412 of 9 inch, making over seven 
thousand feet in all, laid in different parts of the city. The 
whole amount expended is $7,716.55. 



13 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Very soon after the organization of the present city gov- 
ernment, large and respectable petitions were received ask- 
ing for the construction of a Fire Alarm Telegraph. These 
petitions were acted upon promptly, and after considerable 
discussion and close investigation, a committee was author- 
ized to contract for such an Alarm. An appropriation of 
f 11, 500 was made for this purpose. This appropriation 
was based upon a proposition made by Messrs, Gamewell & 
Co., to put in twenty-two (22) signal boxes and three bell 
strikers for this sum. The contract, as made, was for this 
number of boxes and strikers, with the addition of five 
engineers' gongs, for the sum of $10,000. It was after- 
wards decided to add seven more boxes, which was done at 
an expense of -1^1,575. 

I deem the introduction of this system of great impor- 
tance, as it adds greatly to our facilities for extinguishing 
fires. Additional strikers are yet necessary in order that 
the alarm may be more general. A frame work is being 
erected near the corner of Prospect and Elm streets, where 
it is proposed to put the Engine-house bell, and to attach 
another striker to it, the order for which is already given. 
Should this not prove sufficient, an additional one, put upon 
the bell of the Baptist Church, at the corner of Amherst 
and Union streets, cannot fail to accomplish the purpose, 
and this can be done at a small expense. 

WATER WORKS. 

One of the most important public enterprises that our 
city ever engaged in is that of introducing water for the 
supply of any and all who desire it. With the full report 
of the Water Commissioners, and that of the engineer, 
which are just submitted to you, any extended remarks at 



14 



this time are not called for. I desire onlv to assure you 
that I have the most perfect confidence in the success of 
the undertaking. I have no hesitation in saying that I 
think the source of the supply is the right one, and that 
we are getting a greater return for our money than we 
should from either of the other places surveyed. At the 
pumpmg station we get 45 feet head, which is equal to a 
500-horse-power privilege, or one that would be ample for 
a mill of 40,000 spindles. It will readily be seen that with 
this great power the water can be elevated to the reservoir 
at a small expense, and with the purchases that have been 
made by the commissioners there can be no question of the 
abundance of the supply for any future use. I am aware 
that fears have been expressed by many as to the strength 
and durability of the pipe, and it is proper that I should 
state in this connection that the contract for the furnishing 
and laying of the pipes was awarded to Mr. George H. Nor- 
man, of Newport, R. L, who is said to be amply^ responsi- 
ble. The contractor was required to give bonds to the city 
in the sum of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars for 
the maintenance of the whole of the works in perfect order, 
as against any neglects or defects of material or workman- 
ship, for the space of three years after the works have been 
completed to the satisfaction of the commissioners. 

This bond was duly executed, and is signed by two respon- 
sible sureties, so that it may safely be said that this is no 
hazardous experiment, but a matter in which the interests 
of the city are fully protected, for it is conceded by all that 
before the expiration of three years the pipes will be amply 
tested. The distribution pipes are mostly laid' and con- 
nected with the reservoir of the Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company, so that we have for present use, for fire purposes, 
118 hydrants. The supply main is all laid, and all but 
some 1,500 feet of the force main, and it may reasonably 
be expected that the works will be completed by the close 
of the year. 



15 

POLICE STATION. 

The old Lobby, which has so long been a disgrace to the 
city, and so often the theme of valedictories and inaugnrals, 
is no longer used as a prison-pen, and we have as a substi- 
tute, in a new and convenient locality, ten large and well- 
ventilated cells, where forty prisoners can be comfortably 
taken care of. A plan was submitted to the City Councils 
by Mr. A. G. Stevens, for a change in the City Hall Build- 
ing whereby better police accommodations could he obtained, 
and this plan meeting with the unqualified approval of both 
branches, provisions were at once made for carrying it into 
effect. I need not describe the plan, as you are already 
familiar with it. Suffice it to say that this department is 
now as complete as any other in the comfort and conven- 
ience of its rooms. Brick fire-proof vaults, four feet by 
twelve, have been put in for the use of the Treasurer and 
Clerk. This was regarded as a necessity, as most of the 
books and papers belonging to the city were in no way pro- 
tected from fire, and their loss would have been a misfortune 
without remedy. 

CITY HOSPITAL. 

The action of the City Government in adopting a resolu- 
tion to set apart a lot of land for a city hospital, and in 
appointing a committee to procure plans for buildings, as 
recommended by the committee to whom the subject was 
referred, is eminently wise and humane. A city, healthy 
and populous as ours, ought not longer to neglect to make 
provisions for the poor and homeless among us, who, falling 
sick or meeting with accidents, are left, too often, destitute 
of suitable means and place for their relief and cure. A 
Christian city must not forget this charge upon it, and my 
hope is that at an early day such a hospital may be erected. 



16 

and provision made therein for such conveniences and care 
as shall make us sure that Manchester is not unmindful of 
its needy sick, and that we are discharging the duty cast 
upon all among whom the poor and unfortunate dwell. 

soldiers' monument. 

A beginning has been made in the raising of a fund for 
the building of such a monument. The appropriation here- 
tofore made, though not large, has been put at interest, and 
I hope it may be increased from other sources. 

I venture to suggest that further appropriations be made 
by the city, from time to time, until this fund shall be large 
enough to erect a monument which shall be worthy of our 
city and of tlie brave men and brave deeds it will honor. 
In^the hurry and care of life let us not forget the devotion 
of those who have given their lives for our lives. They 
went from us and for us, and have not come back ; and we 
see their faces no more. But we shall not forget them. 
The nation will not ; nor our State ; nor our city ; nor any 
of us. 

And while we have built up to them in our hearts monu- 
ments of love and honor more enduring than stone or mar- 
ble, and cherish their memories at every fireside, it is fit 
that, as a city, we remember to do what homage we may to 
the priceless services and heroic sacrifices of the patriot 
dead who shed their blood to bring us out of war's tribula- 
tions into the blessings of union, liberty, and peace. 

CONCLUSION. 

G-entlemen of the City Councils : With this brief summary 
our official duties terminate. To say that the anxieties and 
care pertaining to the office which I have had the honor 
to hold, have been materially lessened by your kindness 



17 

and sympathy, which I have been conscious of receiving at 
all times, is only saying what I feel to be true, and for this 
I give you my warmest thanks. It is our hope that the 
affairs of the city have been so administered during the 
year of our service, that those who come after us and as- 
sume the cares which we are so soon to put off may find 
them no heavier because of us. And for the future, whether 
our duties be here or elsewhere, I trust it will be our en- 
deavor to do them cheerfully and faithfully, remembering 
always all men as brethren, and Him who is the Father of 
us all. 

City Report— 2 



M A N C H E S T E R 



CITY GOYERNMENT, 

1872. 



MAYOR. 



i^Ei^son^ G. CHEisrEY. 



CITY CLERK. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1 — George W. Thayer. 
Ward 2 — Henry Lewis. 

Ward 3 — Nehemiah S. Bean. 
Ward 4 — Horace Pettee. 

Ward 5 — Lawrence Foley. 

Ward 6 — Ephraim S. Harvey. 
Ward 7 — Wm. N. Chamberlin. 

Ward 8 — Albert A. Woodward. 



20 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Edwin Kennedy. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

* Thomas W. Lane, 
t Sylvanus B. Putman. 



MEMBERS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Ward 1. 

Israel W. Dickey, 
Oscar M. Titus, 
Levi L. Aldrich. 

Ward 2. 

Dana D. Towne, 
John C. Smith, 
Leonard Shelters. 

Ward 3. 

Henry C. Reynolds, 
Charles A. Smith, 
John L. Kelly. 

Ward 4. 

Charles R. Colley, 
Jason Weston, 
Joseph L. Smith. 



Ward 5. 

John L. Kennedy, 
Austin O'Malley, 
Patrick Harrington. 

Ward>6. 

Jacob J. Abbott, 
Edwin Kennedy, 
Jeremiah Hodge. 

Ward 7. 

James C. Russell, 
Benjamin K. Parker, 
Augustus G. Stevens. 

Ward 8. 

Silas A. Felton, 

John Field, 

Frank D. Hanscom. 



MESSENGER. 

William Stevens. 



* Resigned May, 21. t Elected to fiU vacancy. 



21 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — Messrs. Reynolds, Hodge, C. A. Smith ; the 
Mayor and Alderman Thayer. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Lewis and Pettee ; Messrs. Felton, 
Shelters, and Weston. 

Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Thayer and Harvey ; 
Messrs. Abbott, Russell and J. L. Kennedy. 

Puhlic Instruction. — Aldermen Pettee and Woodward ; 
Messrs. J. C. Smith, Aldrich and Kelly. 

Streets. — Aldermen Ciiamberlin and Bean ; Messrs. Fel- 
ton, Abbott and Titus. 

City Farm. — The Mayor, Alderman Foley ; Messrs. 
Dickey, Stevens and Hanscom. 

Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Pettee and Harvey ; 
Messrs. Russell, Field and Harrington. 

Commo7is and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Woodward and 
Lewis ; Messrs. J. L. Kennedy, Towne and Abbott. 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Bean and Chamberlin ; 
Messrs. Dickey, Colley and Parker 

Claims. — Aldermen Thayer and Lewis; Messrs. 'Rey- 
nolds, Hodge and J. L. Smith. 

House of Correction. — Aldermen HarVey and Foley ; 
Messrs. Titus, O'Malley and Field. 

Military Affairs. — xVldermen Chamberlin and Lewis ; 
Messrs. J. C. Smith, Towne and Kelly. 

Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Bean and Pettee ; Messrs. 
Weston, Hanscom and J. L. Smith. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

Enrollment. — Aldermen Thayer and Woodu-nrd. * 

Bills in Second Beading. — Aldermen Lev.is and Cham- 
berlin. 

Licenses. — Aldermen Bean and Harvey. 

Marshal's Accounts and Police Department. — Aldermen 
Pettee and Lewis. 

Setting Trees. — Aldermen*Pettee and Foley. 

Market. — Aldermen Bean and Thayer. 



22 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Election Returns. — Messrs. Parker, CoUey and Stevens. 
Bills in Second Reading. — Messrs. Kelly, Shelters and 
Aldrich. 
Enrollme7it. — Messrs. Hodge, Stevens and C. A. Smith. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



HON. CHARLES H. BAETLETT, 



1MA.YOK, 



CITY COUNCILS OF MANCHESTEK, 



DELIVERED BEFORE THE TWO BRANCHES IN CONVENTION, 
JANUARY 6, 1873. 



INAUGURAL ADDllESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

The uniform practice of my predecessors has doubtless 
led you to expect that I should conform to the custom 
which they have established, and address you briefly, at the 
threshold of the public duties we are about to assume, upon 
some of the subjects which must necessarily fall under your 
consideration during the term of office upon which you 
have now entered. It has also doubtless occurred to you, 
that in so doing, I labor under an embarrassment peculiar 
to one who approaches a field of labor in which he has had 
no previous experience. 

First of all, gentlemen, we may well congratulate our- 
selves that we assume the administration of the affairs of 
the city at a time when every department of the city gov- 
ernment is in so satisfactory a condition ; when public order 
is undisturbed ; public health unmenaced by pestilence or 
epidemic ; when thrift and activity pervade every branch 
of our varied industries, and labor and capital harmoni- 
ously co-operate in every enterprise in which our people are 
engaged. 

And not only is the present full of satisfaction and en- 
couragement, but the future is equally full of hope and 
promise, and it now becomes our duty, as it should ever be 
our pleasure, to exert our utmost endeavor to secure, as far 
as upon us depends, the full realization of all reasonable 
expectations which our people may entertain of the growth 



26 

and prosperity of the first city, ia wealth, population and 
business importance within the limits of our State. 

We must not forget that this great aggregation of wealth 
and population which now comprises this young and vigor- 
ous municipality is but the work of a few brief years ; tliat 
our expansion in solid, substantial business industries was 
never more marked and rapid, and that we have every rea- 
sonable expectation that this condition of affairs will con- 
tinue for an indefinite period. 

One of the marked tendencies of the population of our 
State, at present, is to aggregate in cities and villages for 
the prosecution of those pursuits which are supposed to 
yield a larger and more remunerative return than agricul- 
ture, and if we would avail ourselves of the oj^portunity 
thus afforded to increase our population and wealth, by at- 
tracting thither this migratory class of our rural popula- 
tion which is slowly but surely drifting away from the agri- 
cultural districts, we must strive, by the excellence of our 
public institutions, and by the variety, extent and activity 
of our industries, to present attractions for business and 
residence which shall accomplish this object. 

This consideration should induce us to approach the ad- 
ministration of the affairs of the city, neither in a spirit of 
inconsiderate extravagance on the one hand, nor of unwise 
parsimony on the other, but with a generous and ardent 
purpose not only to meet the pressing demands of the hour, 
but to provide for the future, and initiate those improve- 
ments which shall aid in augmenting our wealth and popu- 
lation for years to come. 

Our geographical position, railroad facilities and me- 
chanical power, justify the hope that a city of double and 
treble our present numbers shall flourish and thrive within 
our borders, and to place the realization of this hope be- 
yond all peradventure requires only the unwavering faith 
and unyielding resolve of our present population. 



27 

Passing now from this general outlook, I will invite your 
attentiori to a brief consideration of some of the subjects 
which will engage your early attention. 

I have been furnished by the City Treasurer with an ex- 
hibit of the financial condition of the city at the beginning 
of the fiscal year, which is as follows : 

Amount funded debt Jan. 1, 1872 $387,100 00 

Decrease during the j'ear 25,000 00 

Amount funded debt Jan. 1, 1873 $362,100 00 

Amount temporary loan Jan. 1, 1873 $22,170 00 

Decrease during the year 19,871 43 

Amount temporary loan Jan. 1, 1873 $2,298 57 

Interest due 7,000 00 

Outstanding bills Jan. 1, 1873 47,124 86 

Indebtedness to Water Works 40,455 51 

.$458,978 64 

Cash in treasury Jan. 1, 1873 '. $57,426 39 

Notes due the city 4,640 13 

Interest ou same 475 00 

$62,541 52 

]Sret indebtedness Jan. 1, 1873 $390,437 42 

Ket indebtedness Jan. 1, 1872 430,329 88 

Decrease during the year 33,892 47 

It will be seen by the foregoing exhibit that about nine 
per cent, of the net indebtedness of the city has been ex- 
tinguished the past year, and a similar annual reduction 
would cancel the debt in about eleven years. 

I am not of those who contemplate with any degree of 
satisfaction a condition of perpetual indebtedness ; neither 
do I believe in the wisdom or justice of transmitting our 
pecuniary obligations to be liquidated by posterity. His- 
tory repeats itself. Our ancestors had their extraordinary 
emergencies involving the incurring of I'arge public obliga- 
tions. We have had ours, and our posterity will have 
theirs, and let us not shackle their hands and incapacitate 



28 

them for the emergencies which will devolve upon them, by 
handing down a burdensome debt which we incurred and 
ought to pay. 

Only $1,500 of the funded debt matures the present 
year, but we have, in the items of $2,208.57 as the present 
temporary loan and $40,455.51 due the Water Works ac- 
count, an aggregate, including the maturing funded debt, 
of $44,254.08 to the reduction of Avliich we can apply any 
surplus of revenue over expenditures whifth the treasurer 
may have on hand.' I trust it will not be less than that 
which was applied the past year. 

Water bonds to the amount of $268,500 have been ne- 
gotiated at an average price of a fraction above 96 1-2 per 
cent. The balance of the whole issue, amounting to $101,- 
509, are now on hand, and we shall be obliged to negotiate 
them to meet the expenditures upon the Water Works the 
coming season, unless the continuance of the stringency in 
the money market shall render it expedient to meet the 
current expenses of this department by a sale of the State 
Bonds held by the city, amounting to $123,000, and with- 
hold the Water Bonds till they can be placed upon a more 
favorable market. 

WATER WORKS. 

As the construction and operation of the Water Works 
was placed in the hands of a Board of Water Commission- 
ers, who have exclusive control over the subject, I am not 
aware that you will be called upon to act the present year 
in regard to it, except it be to make an additional ^.ppro- 
priation for the completion of the works. 

The work has thus far proceeded upon the basis of an 
appropriation of $400,000, which was made upon estimates 
of cost which did not embrace the whole of the compact 
part of the city, and to extend the works to all points where 



29 

a demand exists for them, will involve an appropriation of 
an additional hundred thousand dollars, or in that vicinity 
according to the estimates embraced in the report of the 
Engineer, Colonel Fanning, to the Water Commissioners, 
and which will be laid before you, and the commissioners 
request that you will place at their command the sum of 
1550,000, in all to enable them to construct the works in 
the most substantial manner and extend them throughout 
the compact part of the city. They suggest that this addi- 
tional appropriation be met by a transfer of the State Bonds, 
now in the hands of the Treasurer, amounting to about 
$123,000, and that the balance be supplied from the. receipts 
of the water rents, so that the Water Bonds of the city, now 
amounting to $400,000, may not be increased. I see no 
better way for providing for an additional appropriation 
than that suggested by the Commissioners. And upon this 
point of an additional appropriation, I see no alternative 
before us but to place in the hands of the Commissioners 
whatever may be necessary to complete the enterprise upon 
which we have entered, and for the complete success of 
which, I know of no better guaranty that we can possibly 
have, than we now have in the character of the men who 
have been intrusted with it. 

Land to the amount of 2488 5-8 acres has been purchased 
at a cost of about $30,000. Fifteen and a half miles of 
pipe have been laid ; 135 hydrants set ; about $285,000 ex- 
pended, and the completion of the works during the year 
is anticipated. The engineer and commissioners express 
perfect confidence in the pipe which has been used and in 
the complete and satisfactory success of the enterprise. 

OUR SCHOOLS, 

At no period in the history of the city has our school 
system been more perfect or efficient than we find it to-day. 



30 

The ability and efficiency of tlie Board of Education, who 
are charged with the immediate care and supervision of 
this important subject, and the wise and generous action of 
your predecessors in placing ample funds at their disposal 
for the prosecution of this noble purpose, share in the 
credit of accomplishing this good work. 

The report of the School Board, whicli will soon be laid 
before you, will advise you in detail as to their wants for 
the present year. 

The rapid increase of our population makes radical and 
imperative demands for more school room, more teachers, 
and larger appropriations, and there is no one subject upon 
which our people are more thoroughly united, than in ap- 
propriating all necessary funds for this purpose. 

That people which pour their wealth with a lavish hand 
into the channels of popular education and intelligence, 
can never grow poor. It is something more than bread cast 
upon the waters, returning after many days ; it is the golden 
seed which is sown upon a soil that shall yield a fruitage more 
than golden, for there is no wealth which can compare in 
value to a people, with that wealth of popular virtue and 
intelligence, which mainly spring from our educational 
system. 

An appropriation of -fSjOOO was made the past year for 
the purpose of putting in the foundation for a new school 
house at tlie corner of Ash and Bridge streets, but the work 
was not completed, and the unexpended balance of the ap- 
propriation has been transferred to other accounts. 

This appropriation you will be asked to renew, and per- 
haps to carry forward tlie work towards completion. The 
old High School house on Lowell street is capable of mod- 
ifications which, without great expense, will add much to 
its capacity and convenience, and its accessibility to so nu- 
merous a portion of our people renders it desirable that its 
utmost capacity should be secured. 



31- 

Other improvements in other directions may be required, 
with the details of which I need not detain you. 

THE CITY LIBRARY. 

This institution, which reflects so much credit upon the 
city, and answers a popular want which can in no other 
way be -so fully satisfied, now contains 17,063 volumes, — 
being an increase of 1,655 over the previous year. 

There has been expended during the past year for the 
purchase of books and periodicals, the sum of $1117.96. 
Upwards of flOOO remain in the treasury. 

During the year the legacy of Dr. Dean, of the sum of 
$5000 in trust, for the benefit of this institution, has been 
paid over to the trustees by his executors, and the amount 
has been invested in the Water Bonds of the city. The 
interest of this sum, amounting to upwards of $300 per 
annum, will be applied to the purchase of new books. 

During the past year, also, the library has received a 
further donation of great value and usefulness from the 
Hon. Gardner Brewer, of Boston, consisting of a catalogue 
of 683 valuable works, which are to be known as the 
"Brewer Donation," 

The Trustees of the Library have already fittingly ac- 
knowledged this generous act, but I cannot permit this op- 
portunity to pass without giving expression to the deep 
sense of gratitude which is universally felt by our people 
towards this esteemed citizen of our neighboring Common- 
wealth, for this most acceptable and munificent donation, 
and I cannot refrain from here repeating the hope, ex- 
pressed by the trustees in their report, that the example 
set by these donors may be followed by many of our own 
citizens, whose liberal means enable them to add to the 
wealth which is here being treasured for the common ben- 
efit of our people. 



'A2 

FIRE DEPARTBIENT. 

The fire alarm telegraph, which has been in operation 
for the past few months, will, when fully perfected, supply 
a want which has long been felt by this department. Ad- 
ditional strikers are needed to make the alarm effective in 
all parts of the city, one of which is already in process of 
construction in the northerly part of the city. Still an- 
other is required in the northeast section. 

These additional means of alarm, with new boxes at 
certain points not now sufficiently covered, will render this 
system of alarm a great convenience. 

If the steam fire engines were distributed in different 
sections of the city, instead of all being grouped together 
as at present on Vine street, it is believed by those having 
charge of this department that promptness in reaching the 
scene of the fire in many cases would be facilitated. The 
readiness with which a steamer could be brought to play 
upon a fire would be still further greatly promoted, if the 
boilers could be kept constantly supplied with hot water. 
This could be easily done in cold weather if the engine 
houses were heated by steam, instead of being warmed by 
stoves as at present, for which purpose twenty-four tons of 
coal and fifteen cords of wood are annually consumed. 
The use of steam for this purpose would be much more 
economical, independent of supplying the steamers with 
hot water, a consideration that is not fully estimated until 
we consider how critical and important are the few mo- 
ments succeeding the breaking out of a fire, in determin- 
ing its destructive character and the ability of the depart- 
ment to control it. 

There is also a great deficiency in the supply of hose, 
which would become painfully manifest in case any consid- 
erable conflagration should occur, and the introduction of 
water into the city for fire purposes renders it desirable 



33 

that a liberal supply of hose should be distributed in vari- 
ous sections of the city for immediate aj)ijlication to the 
hydrants, whenever occasion may require. At leaet three 
thousand additional feet of hose arc required to put the 
department upon a footing to meet any emergency that 
may arise. 

If we would escape the devastating conflagrations that 
have smitten our sister cities, inflicting so much of per- 
sonal suffering and distress, and laying so much of their 
accumulated wealth in ashes, we must leave no precaution- 
ary measures neglected which may tend to avert these dire- 
ful calamities which are becoming so common in this coun- 
try. Such exemption can only be secured by a careful at- 
tention to those sources of danger from which they spring. 

Sundry vain efforts have heretofore been made to protect 
the city, by the passage of appropriate ordinances, from the 
dangers to which we are constantly exposed by reason of 
defective chimneys and faultily-constructed buildings. 

Conflagrations will go where combustible material, in- 
securely protected, invites them. They may not come to- 
day nor to-morrow, but they will have their day. 

I hope that aniong my first official acts will be the ap- 
proval of an ordinance designed and calculated to dimin- 
ish the unnecessary exposures to which we are now sub- 
jected. 

It is unnecessary for me to speak of the personnel of our 
Fire Department. No city can surpass it, and we cannot 
improve upon it. 

POLICE DEPAETMENT. 

During the past year, as appears by a statement for 
which I am indebted to the courtesy of the City Marshal, 
there have been made 771 arrests. Of these 501 paid the 
fines imposed ; 97 were sent to the House of Correction ; 

City Report— 3 



34 

85 were sent to jail ; 12 to the House of Reformation ; 77 
bound over ; 7 discharged, and two appealed. The amount 
received in fines and costs is $5,715.08. The police force 
consists of seventeen persons. 

COMMONS. 

The iron fence around Merrimack square, which was 
commenced in 1869 has now been completed. When this 
work was entered upon, it was with the purpose of making 
a limited appropriation annually for the improvement and 
ornamentation of our public squares, until all of them 
should be suitably beautified and adorned. I hope the or- 
iginal plan will be acted upon and that you will prosecute 
the work which has been so satisfactorily commenced. 

CEMETERIES. 

During the past year the construction of a new fence 
around the Valley Cemetery was commenced, and the work 
is now in an unfinished condition, and for the continuance 
of which an appropriation will be asked for. It was found 
absolutely necessary to re-fence a portion of the grounds to 
protect the graves from continual desecration in the sum- 
mer season, by the variety of animals that arc permitted to 
run at large in that locality. I do not propose to submit 
any arguments or to make further suggestions upon this 
point. I know that any appropriation which may be re- 
quired for the proper care and preservation of the resting 
place of our dead, needs no advocate before the City Coun- 
cils of Manchester. The receipts for the sale of lots, I 
doubt not, will meet all the expenditures which it may be 
necessary to make on the Pine Grove Cemetery for many 
years to come. 

There are, in these cemeteries, several hundred graves 
of friendless persons which are unmarked by the name of 



35 

the forgotten tenants. Many of these it is now impossible 
to identify, but there are a large number of whom a record 
has been kept, and which can now be rescued froui obliv- 
ion. You may not think it doing too much for the poor 
and friendless who come among us to find employment but 
find, instead, a grave, to authorize the committee having 
these grounds in charge to mark the spot by some cheap 
tablet sufficiently for its future identification. I am in- 
formed that it frequently occurs that some of these bodies 
are sought for by absent relatives for removal to their 
former homes, but cannot be found. 

HIGHWAYS AND STREETS. 

The construction and repair of streets and highways-, 1 
apprehend, may call for an appropriation somewhat in -ex- 
cess of previous years. New streets are being continually 
constructed to meet the wants of our growing population, 
thus annually adding to the cost and labor of street repairs, 
while the unusual amount of rain-fall the past season has 
damaged them to an extent that will require much labor 
and expense to restore them to their former condition. 
The laying of the pipe for the water works through the 
principal streets has also tended to render them less jjcr- 
fect and add to the usual expense of repairs. The city has 
also adopted the practice of preparing the sidewalks for 
those who desire to lay concrete walks, and this work, at 
certain seasons of the year, diverts a considerable portion 
of the force employed upon the streets from their usual 
work. You will doubtless take into consideration all these 
especial and unusual circumstances in providing an appro- 
priation for this department, and I trust that, as soon as 
the season will permit, the Superintendent of Streets and 
all others having this subject in charge will proceed with 
the requisite force to put all our streets and highways in 



36 

that high state of repair which the large amount of travel 
to which they are all subjected demands, and which the 
traveling public has a right to require. 

The sad havoc which the immense rain-fall the past sea- 
son has made with our streets and highways, forces upon 
our consideration the inquiry whether a wise economy does 
not require that our streets should be constructed of more 
permanent and indestructible material than sand and 
gravel. The original cost of construction would, of course, 
be greater, but it is open to inquiry whether this increased 
cost of construction is not fully compensated by the dim- 
inution of the repair account. 

Few things are more attractive to the public eye, and 
few add more to popular enjoyment and convenience than 
hard, smooth streets. None of us, I am sure, has ever 
wafked or ridden over a macadamized road without a feel- 
ing of regret that the same cannot be found at home. I 
am not prepared, at this time, to present such facts as 
would be necessary to base any action upon in this direc- 
tion, but I cannot refrain from inviting your earnest con- 
sideration to tliis subject, and I indulge the hope that you 
will institute an inquiry upon the subject which will reach 
an early solution of the problem whether there may not be 
in this direction an escape from the bad streets and heavy 
repair account with which we have to deal. 

It has long seemed to me that there ought to be con- 
nected with this department a competent engineer, whose 
office should be more permanent in its character than is 
that of Superintendent of Streets, so that the improve- 
ments upon our streets may be carried forward from year to 
year with reference to some fixed system and plan, without 
which we can never expect to attain to that uniformity of 
grades and economy in expenditures which is so desirable. 



37 

soldiers' monument. 

The sum of one thousand dollars was appropriated some 
time since, for the erection of a soldiers' monument, but 
no steps have, as yet, been taken, so far as I am aware, to 
accomplish this object. This appropriation has been in- 
vested, so that it may be used with its accumulation in ac- 
complishment of the object intended, when other appropria- 
tions shall have been added to render the project attain- 
able. 

■ We are now nearing the close of the eightli year since 
the termination of the struggle in which these heroes fell, 
and yet no commemorative work of our hands bears wit- 
ness to the great debt we owe them and the profound re- 
spect and reverence in which we hold their memories. 

Monumental piles and commemorative statues are noth- 
ing to them. They have passed beyond the reach of any 
expression of our deep gratitude or any plaudits of human 
lips, but can we, who daily reap the harvest of which their 
blood was the precious germ, — can we who rejoice in a 
prosperity to which but for their sacrifices we must ever 
have remained strangers, can we afford to exhibit a want 
of appreciation which of all things else we ought to give 
expression to with alacrity and zeal ? Ungrateful we are 
not ; neglectful let us no longer seem. 

CITY HALL IMPROVEMENTS. 

The alterations which are in progress in the City Hall 
building will, when completed, add materially to the con- 
venience of all departments of the City Government, by 
which it is occupied, as well as increase the security of the 
city records from destruction by conflagration. Among the 
most marked improvements, at this point, will be the con- 
struction of a new lobby to supersede the old one which 



88 

defied so long tlie maledictions of my predecessors and the 
execrations of the multitude, the demise of which I record 
with sincere satisfaction. 

These impiovements have long been needed, and I con- 
gratulate you upon the prospect for their early completion. 

It may be worthy of your consideration whether this lo- 
cation is likely to remain indefinitely a desirable site for 
the City Hall building ; whether it may not soon possess 
greater value for business purposes ; and if so, whether it 
is expedient to seek elsewhere a more desirable site and 
hold it for future contingencies. 

CITY FARM. 

The City Farm, the past year, has furnished 496 weeks' 
board of paupers and 415 weeks' board of prisoners, at an 
average cost of '^2.62 1-2 per week. The average number 
of i)aupers has been 9 1-2, and of prisoners, 8. It is un- 
derstood that the Superintendent, Mr. Cross, declines fur- 
ther service at the farm, and that it will soon be necessary 
to supply a successor. I recommend the sale of so much 
of the farm as may not be needed for agricultural purposes 
connected with the support of the criminals and paupers 
maintained there. I do not deem it profitable for the citj 
to engage in agriculture beyond this want, neither do I 
deem it desirable for it to remain a landed proprietor be- 
yond what is required for public uses. 

PEST HOUSE. 

My attention has been called, by the City Physician and 
others, to the necessity of a larger and more coinmodious 
pest-house. The ancient and diminutive structure now 
used for the purpose, you will be satisfied at sight, is en- 
tirely inadequate and unsuitable for this purpose. "While 



39 

considering the extent of our population and our exposure 
to contagious diseases which prevail about us, we have thus 
far remained singularly free and exempt from them, yet it 
is painfully manifest that we are liable to be visited by a 
contagious malady at any time which would require isola- 
tion from the city and for which emergency we have now 
no adequate provision. The location of our present pest- 
house, so far as I am aware, is as favorable as any that can 
be selected, and tiie character of the building which will be 
required, I do not suppose, would call for a large appropria- 
tion. But it seems to bs the universal judgment of all who 
have been led to investigate the subject that prompt and 
decisive action is called for. 

CITY HOSPITAL. 

Another subject, which, to some extent, has been consid- 
ered by the City Councils and the public, will be pressed 
upon your consideration, and I trust will be your pleasure 
and good fortune to matui-e measures which will secure at 
no distant day the establishment of a city hospital, the 
imperative want and necessity for which is keenly felt and 
universally conceded. Not only is it demanded for the 
poor, Avho are the pecuniary charge of the city and county, 
for whom there is no other adequate provision, but particu- 
larly and mainly for that large and ever increasing class of 
our population, the homeless. The poor are not always 
homeless, but who can be poorer than the homeless sick ? 
Poor, it may not be, in worldly riches, but poor— they alone 
know how poor — in that which the heart most craves, and 
in that which life and future health must depend,— the care 
and accommodations which the sick demand ; poor in that 
which their money cannot buy and which is not attainable 
except through the aid of an institution of this character. 



40 

Not only is this large class of our population homeless in 
the true sense of that term, but they necessarily occupy 
apartments which can afford no conveniences for the sick, 
and are so compact that the sick and well are alike a mutual 
annoyance to each other. This class would scorn to be 
classed with paupers and almstakers, but would cheerfully 
pay for the facilities their situation demands, but which 
they cannot now obtain. 

Facilities could here be provided for all cases of acciden- 
tal injury which are constantly occuring among a population 
engaged so extensively in mechanical pursuits, and for all 
cases requiring surgical treatment which cannot be so 
advantageously treated at any private residence, and in this 
particular it would be equally beneficial to all classes. I 
cannot, upon this occasion, more than generally allude to 
the subject and to a few of the more prominent considera- 
tions connected with it. Other opportunities must be 
sought for its more ample discussion. 

I do not understand that it is contemplated that the city 
should alone assume the burden of the erection of such a 
hospital as is contemplated, nor that the whole structure be 
pressed to an early completion ; but that the action and 
donations of the city should constitute a nucleus around 
which the co-operative efforts of our corporations and 
benevolent citizens could center until the object is attained. 
The city could well donate a site on which it could be 
erected, as it is the proprietor of grounds well adapted to 
this purpose, and it perhaps would not be doing too much 
if it should undertake the construction of a portion of the 
building for use until the needed assistance can be otherwise 
obtained to carry forward the enterprise. 

I do not find, however, any authority of law which will 
allow the City Councils to appropriate any public funds or 
other property of the city for this purpose. Neither the 
General Statutes nor the City Charter contain any provision 



41 

which, in my judgment, confers the necessary power, and I 
shouhi not advise the incuring of any pecuniary obligations 
in this direction on the part of the city until the requisite 
authority is obtained from the Legislature. Much may be 
done in the meantime, however, by gathering the necessary 
information in regard to the operation of similar institu- 
tions elsewhere, and. by enlisting the co-operation of those 
upon whom the institution must mainly depend for its 
endowment. 

CONCLUSION. 

I have thus, gentlemen, made such suggestions with 
reference to some of the subjects which will engage our 
attention, as have occurred to me in the brief period I 
have had to consider them. Experience and fuller infor- 
mation may modify the views here expressed, and if so, I 
shall not hesitate to embrace the better reason and discard 
a first impression. 

Our fellow-citizens expect and have a right to expect at 
our hands, the best government it is in our power to give 
them. In this direction I can only promise you my hearty 
co-operation and utmost endeavor. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOYEENMENT, 

1873. 



MAYOR. 



CHARLES H. BARTLETT. 



CITY CLERK. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1. — Israel W. Dickey. 

Ward 2. — Jonathan B. Moore. 
Ward 3. — Nehemiah S. J^ean. 
Ward 4. — Horace Pettee. 
Ward 5. — John Sweeney. 

Ward 6. — Ephraini S. Harvey. 
Ward 7— Luther E. Wallace. 

Ward 8 — Albert A. Woodward. 



44 

PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Chas. A. Smith. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Sylvanus B. Putman. 



MEMBERS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Ward 1. 

Levi L. Aldrich, 
Sam C. Lowell, 
James L. Sweet. 

Ward 2. 

^ 

Leonard Shelters, 
John W. Dickey, 
Frank Pushee. 

Ward 3. 

Charles A. Smith, 
Rufus H. Pike, 
Robert G. Annan. 

Ward 4. 

Charles R. Colley, 
Joseph L. Smith, 
Jason Weston.- 



Ward 5. 

John L. Kennedy, 
Patrick Cullity, 
John F. Cahill. 

Ward 6. 

Henry B. Fairbanks, 
Amory Cobb, 
Charles K. Tucker. 

Ward 7. 

William G. Dunham, 
Isaac W. Darrah, 
Isaac R. Dewey. 

Ward 8. 

Silas A. Felton, 
Frank D. Hanscom, 
John Field. 



MESSENGER. 

William Stevens. 



'45 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — Messrs. J. L. Smith, Pike and Dunham ; the 
Mayor and Alderman Bean. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Pettee and Harvey; Messrs. Felton, 
Shelters and Weston. 

Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Harvey and Dickey ; 
Messrs. Kennedy, Colley and Annan. 

Puhlic Instruction. — Aldermen Pettee and Woodward ; 
Messrs. Aldricli, Fairbanks and Darrah. 

Streets. — Aldermen Bean and Moore ; Messrs. Felton, 
Pike and Kennedy. 

City Farm.— The Mayor, Alderman Dickey ; Messrs. 
Hanscom, Cullity and Sweet. 

Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Pettee and Sweeney ; 
Messrs. Field, Annan and Fairbanks. 

Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Woodward and 
Moore ; Messrs. Kennedy, Tucker and Darrah. 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Bean and Wallace ; Messrs. 
Colley, Lowell and Cobb. 

Claims. — Aldermen Moore and Pettee ; Messrs. J. L. 
Smith, Dewey and Dickey. 

House of Correction. — Aldermen Sweeney and Harvey; 
Messrs. Field, Fairbanks and Cahill. 

Military Affairs. — Aldermen Wallace and Sweeney; 
Messrs. Aldrich, Hanscom and Pushee. 

Ligldiyig Streets. — Aldermen Dickey and Bean ; Messrs. 
Weston, Hanscom and J. L. Smith. 



STAMDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

Enrollment. — Aldermen Woodward and Wallace. 
Bills in Second Beading:— Aldermen Bean and Moore. 
Licenses. — Aldermen Dickey and Harvey. 
Marshal's Accounts and Police Department. — Aldermen 
Pettee and Sweeney. 

Setting I^/^es.— Aldermen Dickey and Harvey. 
Market. — Aldermen Moore and Wallace. 



40- 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OP COMMON COUNCIL. 

Election Returns. — Messrs. CoUey, Annan and Pusbee. 
Bills in Second Readmg. — Messrs. Shelters, Aldrich and 
Felton. 

Enrollment. — Messrs. Shelters, Felton and Dunham. 



ASSESSORS. 



Moses 0. Pearson, Thomas Howe, 

Horace P. Simpson, Isaac D. Palmer, 

Nicholas Nichols, Horatio Fradd, 

George W. Pinkerton, Daniel Farmer. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Samuel S. Moulton, John Horan, 

Sayward J. Young, Jeremiah Abbott, 

Jeremiah Stickney, Allen N. Clapp, 

Moses E. George, George S. Chandler. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Cbas. H. Bartlett, ex-officio, Chas. A. Smith, ex-officio, 

Henry E. Burnham, Frank J. Murray, 

Marshall P. Hall, Frank G. Clark, 

Daniel Clark, George P. Rockwell, 

Nathan P. Hunt, George H. Colby. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Joseph G. Edgerly. 



47 

CITY TREASURER. 

Henry R. Cliamberlin. Office— City Hall. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Win. G. Everett. Office— City Hall. 



DEPUTY COLLECTORS. 



Harrison D. Lord. Office — Union Building. 
Daniel K. White. (9^cc— Riddle's Building. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

John H. Andrews. Office — Plumer's Block. 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY. 



Hon. Daniel Clark, Hon. E. A. Straw, 

Hon. Wm. P. Newell, Hon. Isaac W. Smith, 
Hon. Saml. N. Bell, Col. Waterman Smith, 

Hon. Phinehas Adams, Charles A. Smith, ex-officio, 
Hon. Charles H. Bartlett, ex-officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Charles H. Marshall. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Justice. 
Samuel Upton. Office — (^^ity Hall. 



48 

Assistant Justice. 

Elijah M. Topliff. 

Citit/ Marshal. 

Gilmaii H. Kimball. 

Assistant Marshal. 

Daniel R. Prescott. 

Captain of the Watch. 

Thomas L. Quimby. 

Day Police. 

Horatio W. Longa. John D. Howard. 

Night Watchmen. 

John C. Colburn, Patrick Doyle. 

John P. Cassidy, James Duffy, 

William H. B. Newhall, Hiram Stearns, 

Hezekiah H. Noyes. George L. Stearns, 

Edward Bonner, James Bucklin, 

John W. Webster. 

Constables. 

Oilman H. Kimball, Daniel R. Prescott, 

Thomas S. Montgomery, Henry Bennett, 

Harrison D. Lord, Daniel K. White. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Gilman H. Kimball, Daniel R. Prescott, 

Oscar D. Abbott. 



49 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Oscar D. Abbott. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Benjamin C. Kendall. 

ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Wilberforce Ireland, Albion H. Lowell, 

Andrew C. Wallace, Freeman Higgins. 



CITY AUDITOR. 

Joseph E. Bennett. 



WARD OFFICERS. 
Moderators. 



Ward 1 — Charles Canfield. 

Ward 2— John D. Powell. . 
Ward 3— John P. Newell. 

Ward 4 — Moulton Knowles. 

Ward 5 — Daniel F. Healey. 

Ward 6 — George H. Dudley. 

Ward 7 — Chauncey C. Favor. 
Ward 8 — Hiram Stearns. 

Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1— Charles H. Osgood. 

Ward 2 — Herman F. Straw. 

Ward 3— Henry S. Clark. 

Ward 4 — Samuel S. Piper, 

city Keport— 4 



50 



Ward 5— Patrick J. O'Neil. 

Ward G — Daniel R. Prescott. 

Ward 7 — George F. Perry. 

Ward 8— Charles M. Stevens. 

Selectmen. 



Ward 1. 

Horace C. Page, 
Franklin W. McKinley, 
Willis P. Fogg. 

Ward 2. 

Edwin H. Hobbs, 
John H. Rano, 
John Marshall. 

Ward 3. 

Charles li. Pierce, 
James Sutcliffe, 
Henry F. Morse. 

Ward 4. 

Gustavns M. Sanborn, 
Jasper P. George, 
Augustus Wagner. 



Ward 5. 

Daniel Connor, 
Michael Gillis, 
George Fox. 

Ward 6. 

John B. Huse, 
Groves Brown, 
Henry A. Gage. 

Ward 7. 

Melzar E. Beard, 
John T. Dyson, 
Guy B. Dunham. 

Ward 8. 

George H. Coll\y, 
Madison Gerry, 
Thomas P. Frost. 



ACCOUNT 



F 



HENRY R. (JHAMBERLIN, 

CITY TREASURER, 



FROM 



DEOEMBEE 31, 1871, TO DEOEMBEE 31, ]872. 



52 



Ih-. 



H. B. Chamherlin in account with the City 



S781.15, 



To Cash on baud, Jan. 1st, 1872, 
State Bonds and Cash, . 
Water Bonds, 
Temporary Loan. . 
Savings Bank Tax, 
Eailroad Tax, . 
Literary Fund, 
Insurance Tax, 

City Hall and Stores, $2,464.80; City Farm, S2,864.60, 
Police Court, $5,715.08; City Scales, $288.42, 
Paupers from other Towns, ..... 

Pine Grove Cemetery 

County of Hillsborough, 

City Teams, $1,692.80; Overdrafts, $309.64, . 
License of Exhibitions and Shows, 
Land sold from Farm, .... 
Dog Licenses, $312.88; Sewer Licenses, 

Cost Non-Resident Taxes, 

Lumber, §10. 16; Rent of Hearse, $100.00 . 

Interest on State Bonds, 

Board of inmates at »State Reform School, 

Grass from Commons, $90.00; Int. on Taxes. $1,231.19 

Rent of Tenements, S104.75; Water Rent, $103.50, 

Taxes, 1867, S387.19: Taxes, 1868. $454.66, . 

Taxes, 1869, S837-81; Taxes, 1870, $2,057.67, 

Taxes, 1871, $25,607.97; Taxes, 1872, $227,603.79, 

Dog Tax, ^68, $5; '69, $5; '70, $22; '71, $118; '72, $344, 

Mary E. Myer's Land, Hanover Street, 

J. G. Edgerly, Tuition and Books, 

J. L. Kelly, School-houso Lot, 

Rent of Ward Room, ... 

Use of Cart, $40.75; Loam, $101.00, 

Old School bovise, Dist. No. 1, 

Stone and Brick, §56.25; Gas, 

Second-hand Windows, 

Damage by Dogs, 

Repairing Paving, 

One Horse, 

Work done by Cit}' Laborers, 

Taxes, 1866, 

Interest on Water Bonds, 



>.76, 



$3,751 

125,861 

400,000 

53,398 

30,576 

17,lL^0 

1,120 

423 

5,329 

6,003 

100 

1,218 

2,234 

2,002 

673 

1,885 

1,094 

24 

110 

3,774 

92 

1,321 

208 

841 

2,895 

253,211 

494 

915 

148 

269 

18 

141 

45 

59 

9 

11 

26 

100 

9 

14 

7,407 



29 

12 
00 
57 
76 
77 
00 
38 
40 
50 
74 
79 
27 
44 
00 
32 
03 
00 
16 
00 
85 
19 
25 
85 
48 
76 
00 
33 
30 
19 
00 
75 
00 
01 
00 
00 
75 
00 
63 
59 
73 



Unpaid Bills, Jan. 1, 1873, . 

L^npuid Bills of Water Works, Jan. 1, 1873, 



.*;924,942 20 
29,726 65 
17:398 21 



$972,067 06 



53 



of Manchester {ending December 31, 1872). 



CV. 



By Unpaid Bills January 1, 1872, 

Paupers ofF the Farm, .... 

City Farm, S4,805.68; City Teams, .f 4,182; . 

Highway Dist. No, 1, 

Dist. No. 2, $11,009.93; Dist. No. 8, $382.91, 

" " 3, G8U.8G; " " 9, 294.57, 

" 4, 190.38; " " 10, 75(5.11, 

" 5, 474.0(3; " "11, 929.83, 

" " 6, 281.71; " "12, 371.17, 

" " 7, 7G1.56; " " 13, 288.41, 

New Hio;liways, 

Granite Bridge; $142.07; Am. Falls Bridge, $887.00, 

Sewers and Drains, $7,710.55; reserA^oirs, $319.06, 

Commons, $1,241.80; Soldiers' Monument, $1000.00,* 

Valley Cemetery, 

Pine Grove Cemetery, 

Fire Department, ...... 

City Police, $16,022.82; City Officers, $8,890.33, 

Li!j"hting Streets, $4,543.31; Militia, $470.83, 

Printing and Stationer}^ 

Iron Bridge, 

Incidental Expenses, 

City Hall, $8,853.42: City Library, $2,856.42, 

Paving Streets, iif8,165.(35; Watering Streets, S749.50, 

Ab't. of Taxes, $1,437.23; Dis. on Taxes, $5,522.10, 

State Tax, $25,281.00; County Tax, $15,947.47, 

Interest, $2,759.25; Coupons, $32,622.00 

TemjDorary Loan, , 

Reduction of City Debt, 

Court House, $92.29; Insurance, $1,508 

Iron Fence, Merrimack Square, 



Eeps. of Buildings, $804,32; Liquor A^ 

New School Houses, 

Repairs of School Houses, 

Evening Schools, . 

School Department, 

Library Building, . 

Water Works, 

Fire Alarm Telegraph, . 

Land Damage, 

Discount on Water Bonds, 



Cash of Water Works, Jan. 1, 1873, 
Cash in City Treasury Jan. 1, 1873, 
State Bonds unsold, Jan. 1, 1873, 
Water Bonds unsold, Jan. 1, 1873, 



HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, 

Manchester, Jan. 1, 1873. 



18, . 
cy, .116.70 



^20,531 

8,632 

8,988 

165 

11,452 

975 

946 

1,403 

652 

1,049 

14,288 

1,029 

8,035 

2,241 

1,7()S 

905 

12,259 

24,913 

5.014 

2,056 

2,320 

8,536 

11,709 

8,915 

6,959 

41 ,228 

35,381 

73,270 

25,000 

1,6(J0 

3,241 

821 

24,779 

5,384 

1,132 

47,920 

70 

245,870 

12,042 

1,857 

9,047 



58 
46 
02 
90 
84 
43 
49 
89 
88 
97 
45 
07 
61 
80 
00 
62 
07 
15 
14 
31 
69 
22 
84 
15 
33 
47 
25 
00 
00 
47 
91 
02 
93 
40 
59 
03 
87 
66 
24 
42 
50 



$689,340 

40,455 

16,970 

123,800 

101,500 



67 
51 

88 
00 
00 



$972,067 06 
City Tkeasurer. 



54 



Total amount of expenditures for the year 
1872 as per preceding page of Treasurer's 
Account, ....... 

From which deduct the amount of 
the following, which is charged 
to several appropriations, and 
not drawn from the Treasur}^ : 

City Teams, 

City Farm, 

Overdrafts, 

Paupers from other Towns, 

County of Hillsborough, 

Board of Inmates at Reform School 

Stone and Brick, 

Gas, .... 

Repairing Paving, 

Work of hired men, . 

Temporary Loan, 

Unpaid Bills, Jan. 1, 1873, . 



Actual Payments, 1872, 



$689,340 67 



. 11,692 80 




215 


53 




309 


64 




100 


74 




. 2,234 


27 




1, 92 


85 




56 


25 




2 


76 




26 


75 




9 


63 




. 19,871 


43 




. 47,124 


86 


71,737 51 








$617,603 16 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S EEPORT. 



The undersigned, Joint Standing Committee on Finance, 
certify that we have examined tlie within account of Henry 
R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer, and find the same correctly 
cast and properly vouched. 

During the year 1872 there has been received, including 
the balance on hand January 1, 1872, the sum of nine 
hundred twenty-four thousand nine hundred forty-two dol- 
lars and twenty cents, and there has been paid out during 
the same time, the sum of six hundred forty-two thousand 
two hundred fifteen dollars and eighty -one cents, leaving in 
the treasury January 1, 1873, the sum of fifty-seven thou- 
sand four hundred twenty-six dollars and thirty-nine cents 
in cash, and one hundred twenty-three thousand eight hun- 
dred dollars in State Bonds, and one hundred one thou- 
sand five hundred dollars in City Water Bonds. 

H. C. REYNOLDS, 
J. HODGE, 
CHAS. A. SMITH, 
G. W. THAYER, 
P. C. CHENEY, 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance. 



BEPORT 



SPECIAL AUDITOR TO EXAMIXE THE ACCOUNTS OF 
CITY CLERK ANT) CITY TREASURER, 

DECEMBER 31, 1872. 



Manchester, N. H., Dec. 31, 1872. 
To THE Finance Committee, City op Manchester, N. H, 

G-entlemen : Having completed the examination of the 
city accomits, connected with tlie offices of City Cleric and 
Treasurer, I beg leave to submit the follovs^ing report : 

Appreciating the importance of the duties which your 
confidence imposed upon me, I have endeavored to make a 
thorough and impartial examination. I began as far Ijack 
as the year 1851, when the present City Treasurer, H. R. 
Chamberlin, Esq., first assumed the duties of his office. 

It em])races a period of twenty years, from a time when 
the revenues and expenditures of the city were small, com- 
pared with the present. 

I have, however, met with no little embarrassment in not 
being able to procure all the records necessary to accom- 
plish the purpose ; the early records which should exhibit 
the source and disposition of the revenues of the City Clerk's 
office, could not be found. The Treasurer's receipts, filed 
with the City Clerk, and the orders of the Treasurer, from 
May 1, 1851, to February 1, 1852, I was unable to find. 

The present receptacle for the city archives is so unsuited 
to the purpose for which it is used, I deem it but just to the 



68 

officers in cliarge, to report, that it seems impossible to 
keep them in a desirable condition for a read}' reference, — 
from being lost, or for preserving the records of their pre- 
decessors in office. Draft book number two was so strongly 
impregnated with chlorine, as to render it extremely diffi- 
cult to examine, and among the promiscuous mass of papers, 
was found certain canceled coupons to the city bonds, that 
have never been destroyed by the proper authority. 

The accounts of the City Clerk are so intimately connected 
with the Treasurer's, I found it necessary to compare them 
to feel assured of accuracy, and that both these officers 
liad faithfully discharged their obligations to the city. 

Until within a few years it has been the custom to trans- 
fer the revenues of the City Clerk's office directly to the 
Treasurer, and to retain his receipt as the only record of 
tlie transaction, — nothing retained to trace the source of the 
same ; but a comparison with the Treasurer's books, when 
subsequent transfers were made, and a record kept, gives 
sufficient evidence that a faithful and correct account was 
rendered, with one exception. 

It appears that when F. H. Lyford — a former City Clerk, 
— closed his connection with the city, there was received by 
him, from various sources, the sum of five hundred and five 
dollars and thirty-seven cents, ($505.37), that of this 
amount he had transfered to the Treasurer, one hundred 
and eighty-four dollars and twenty-three cents, (-$184.23), 
leaving a balance due the city of three hundred and twenty- 
one dollars and fourteen cents, ($321.14), which is shown 
more in detail in my previous report to your board. While 
the late Joseph Knowlton filled the office of City Clerk, a 
record was kept of all moneys received and transferred by 
him, which appears to be correctly accounted for. While 
the present City Clerk, Joseph E. Bennett, Esq., has filled 
the office, a more complete and reliable record has been 
kept, showing from whom and for what purpose all moneys 



59 

have been received, and that the same have been promptly 
and correctly transferred to the Treasurer. 

In the examination of the City Treasurer's accounts, 
which embrace the revenues and expenditures of the city 
for more than twenty years, I have given my closest atten- 
tion, but fail in finding a single error. In 1851, wlicn he 
first assumed the treasurcrship, the expenditures of the city 
were fifty-seven thousand six hundred and sixty dollars, 
($57,660); in 1871 they amounted to four hundred and five 
thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight dollars, (!$405,- 
788), showing an annual average increase of seventeen 
thousand four hundred and six dollars, ($17,406), and an 
aggregate amount paid out during the twenty years, of four 
million fiive hundred and seven thousand one hundred and 
eleven dollars, ($4,507,111). 

Besides doing the ordinary business of his office, dur- 
ing the late war State aid was paid every month by 
him, to over six hundred individuals, bounties to nearly 
all of our soldiers, besides liquidating the coupons of the 
city bonds as ^hey matured. 

Considering that this extraordinary service was rendered 
without additional assistance to himself or expense to the 
city, I deem it but justice due a courteous and worthy officer, 
as well as to those whose implicit confidence has secured 
him the responsible position for more than twenty years, to 
repeat, that his accounts are correctly and artistically kept, 
and to make acknowledgment for his ever-ready willing- 
ness to aid your Auditor, 

For the confidence you have shown in appointing me to 
the office I hold, and for your aid and advice, accept my 
warmest thanks. 

I am, gentlemen, your obedient servant, 

JOHN. P. LORD, Auditor. 



EEPOKT or COMMITTEE ON CEMETEEIES. 



To the City Councils : 

The Special Committee on Cemeteries present their an- 
nual report of receipts and disbursements, with a brief state- 
ment of their proceedings during the year, and a few sug- 
gestions for the convenience of their successors. 

Though there are several cemeteries in which our citizens 
are interested, and over which a continued municipal care 
should be exercised, the extent of our authority, in the ca- 
pacity of a committee, seems to be limited to " The Valley " 
and " Pine Grove." The other burial grounds are either 
local in their character and objects of neighborhood regard, 
though in part under the supervision of the councils, or are 
private lots over which the city has no authority. They are 
designated by their location or by the names of citizens who 
reside in their vicinity. The cemeteries at Amoskeag, Pis- 
cataquog, Goffe's Falls, and Manchester Center, are known 
by their location ; that near Harvey's Mills is called the 
Merrill Cemetery, and that on the Derry Road in the East 
part of the city, formerly known as the " Huse Yard," is now 
called " Stowell's," in consequence of their proximity to the 
residences of former citizens of these names. In addition 
to these is the Catholic Cemetery just beyond the city lim- 
its, which is held in sacred regard by that religious denom- 
ination. At the north part of the city is a small yard in 
which the people of that section have been accustomed to 
bury their dead, and which has never received attention from 



62 



the city authorities. The old "Ray" Cemetery, on the. 
River Road near the Amoskeag Falls, is falling into neglect 
as the remembrance of those who lie buried there is oblit- 
erated by the passing years. Not far from this locality is 
the family burial ground wliere the Hero of Bennington 
and a few relatives are sleeping. That the memory of the 
early dead many not wholly pass away, we may note the 
fact that more than a century ago there was a burial ground 
on the old Weston farm, which has recently Ijeen designa- 
ted as the Forest Cemetery, as it has grown a forest of trees 
since its last grave was opened. It was undoubtedly the 
earliest burial place in a section of country embracing what 
is now Manchester, Londonderry, Chester and Auburn. It 
would seem that a proper respect for the dead would lead 
our citizens to save this old ground from the desecration 
to which the utilitarian spirit of the age would subject it. 
When the old Christian Brook Cemetery was required as 
the seat of new mechanical enterprises, the relics were 
religiously gathered, removed to a prominent section of the 
Valley, and the spot marked by the old slates originally 
erected to their memory. May a kindred spirit be mani- 
fested in regard to that early burial place whose memorial 
stones are annually disappearing. 



THE VALLEY. 



Until quite recently the income from the sale of lots, with 
a sm.all appropriation from the City Treasury, has afforded 
a revenue sufficient to meet the current expenses of the 
grounds and to warrant annual improvements. Now that 
the number of lots sold is very limited, and the revenue 
has greatly decreased, it has become necessary to make 
larger demands upon the city, or neglect all improvements 
and allow the fences to decay, the terraces to crumble and 
slide into the paths, the avenues to fill with leaves or orow 



63 

over with grass, and fowls and swine to revel amid the 
decorations we have placed on the graves of our departed 
friends. 

The committee have commenced a system of general im- 
provements which will require liberal annual appropriations 
for a series of years. They have removed many of the 
large pines which seriously interfered with the growth of 
flow^ers and ornamental shrubbery beneath their branches, 
and threatened injury to valuable monuments and costly 
structures whenever strong winds swept through the val- 
ley. They have graded down natural elevations and laid 
out new and valuable lots, for which there is a ready de- 
mand. They have laid many feet of large water pipe down 
the declivities, to conduct the excess of water to the stream 
below, without overflowing the burial lots or washing away 
the sandy embankments ; they have raised the grade of low 
sections to avoid the collection of bodies of water, even 
though of temporary duration ; and more tlian all, they 
have commenced a solid cement wall on the northern line, 
extending from the north-westerly corner nearly to the 
gateway at the Chestnut-street entrance. The expense of 
the improvements, as well as the receipts from all sources, 
will be seen in the financial statement in this report. 

The sub-committee embraced in their plan the continua- 
tion of the wall easterly to Pine street, and eventually, 
down the Pine-street line to the southern bank of the 
stream. They also contemplated the construction of an 
iron fence to surmount this solid base, and from year to 
year to extend ^operations until the grounds shall be sub- 
stantially enclosed. They have also discussed permanent 
and important improvements which would render it neces- 
sary to close the entrance on Auburn street at the foot of 
Chestnut, and to make the main entrance from Pine street. 
In this case the massive granite pillars, cap-stone and or- 
namental work could be removed and established on tlie 



64 

eastern side. The close ])roximitj of the northern section 
of the grounds to the dense population that has recently 
located there, renders this course advisable, and will soon 
make it an imperative requirement. 

To do this, it would become necessary to construct a 
drive way down the southern embankment to the carriage 
road that now winds along at the base of the hills. A par- 
tial survey shows that it can be done without great expense. 
There are other improvements whicli have been projected, 
but not executed the present season, such as the removal 
of the poplars whicli are becoming troublesome, and the 
substitution of maples and elms ; the laying of more ex- 
tensive water courses, and the construction of fountains in 
different parts of the valley. But these will require time 
and money, and may not be all realized until our city is 
more liberal and more able to meet the expense. 

That " The Valley " may be maintained in a respectable 
condition, with only a few improvements annually, it will 
be necessary that regular appropriations be made, or own- 
ers of lots will be called on by the love they bear their de- 
ceased friends, to organize an association, and contribute 
generously to accomplish the object. 

But they should never be permitted to make it a private 
undertaking. They have purchased their lots with the im- 
plied understanding that the cemetery shall be protected, 
made serviceable, and properly adorned at the public ex- 
pense. At least it is a duty which the city owes the pro- 
prietors of lots, who do much to make them attractive, and 
who contribute their proportion to meet all municipal ex- 
penses. 



65 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY 

Is steadily gaining in embellishments and attractiveness, 
and in the favor of the people. The income from the sale 
of lots is already considerable, and will be likely to increase 
in the futnre. The fence around the grounds having be- 
come old and dilapidated, the attention of your committee 
was early called to its renewal. After mature considera- 
tion, it was decided to begin a permanent fence, and to 
build it of iron. A contract was accordingly made with 
A. H. Lowell for 576 feet of fence of a suitable pattern, 
and with Mr. G. H. Kimball for the necessary stonework. 
The stonework is already set. The ironwork is mostly 
cast, and will be in place before the opening of spring. 
This amount of fence will reach about one-third of the 
distance on the River Road. It should be extended from 
year to year, as the means at the disposal of the committee 
may warrant. 

The subject of putting permanent head-marks to the 
graves on the public ground, has received some considera- 
tion from your committee. A sample of a cast-iron head- 
mark was procured from Mr. Lowell, together with the 
terms on which he would make them, bat owing to the 
fact that our means were likely to be exhausted on the 
fence, nothing further has been done in this direction. 
Experience has proved that very few of these graves are 
ever marked in any permanent manner by the friends of 
the deceased to whom the duty primarily belongs, and if 
they are to be identified at all after the lapse of a few 
months, they must be marked at the public expense. It is 
a question whether it would not be a wise use of the money 
it would cost to place some inexpensive but durable mon- 
uments on these graves. 

Mr. Wm. C. Chase has been employed in the Valley, 
and Mr. Granville Heselton, at Pine Grove. Both have 

City Report— 5 



66 

discliargecl their duties to the acceptance of the committee 

and tlie satisfaction of the public. 
Respectfully submitted, 

A. A. WOODWARD, 
HENRY LEWIS, 
JOHN L. KENNEDY, 
JACOB J. ABBOTT, 
HOLMES R. PETTEE, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 
A. H. DANIELS, 
J. F. JAMES, 
N. PARKER, 
JAMES 0. ADAMS, 

Cominittee on Cemeteries. 
Mancliester, Jan. 4, 1873. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Comiaittee on Cemeteries : 

The Treasurer respectfully submits the following as his 
annual report : 

THE VALLEY. 

1872. Dr. 

May 30, To cash of C. S. Fisher, Supt. of Burials, 

tomb rent, $51 25 

Ang. 12, To cash of Jesse Eastman for lot No. 

756, 90 00 

Oct. 25, To cash of A. G. Fairbanks, for lot No. 

188, 90 00 

Dec. 20, To cash of Rebecca J. Parker, for lot 

No. 775, 112 50 

Balance overdrawn, .... 134 59 

$478 34 



67 



1872. 

Jan. 1, By Balance from preceding year, . 

Feb. 9, Cash paid J. L. Smith & Co., hmiber, 
Daniels & Co., for tools, . 
A. H. Lowell, repairing gate post, 
Wm. C. Chase, for labor, . 
Temple McQueston, for cement pipe, 
John B. Clarke, advertising, 



June 


8, 


Aug. 


27, 


Dec. 


24, 


Dec. 


27, 



Cr. 


$6 27 


13 30 


7 52 


2 00 


430 75 


12 50 


6 00 



$478 34 



The foregoing statement shows only those financial trans- 
actions which have come under the cognizance of your 
treasurer. The payments have been made on bills ap- 
proved by Mr. J. 0. Adams, the Chairman of the Sub- 
Committee having charge of the grounds. 

I am informed by the City Clerk that, in addition to the 
foregoing, the sum of $1,708 has been appropriated by the 
City Councils and expended under the direction of the sub- 
committee, the payments having been made directly from 
the city treasury. The items will probably appear in de- 
tail in the finance report. 

The following bills are outstanding : 



H. & H. R. Pettee, .... 


. $2 60 


W. C. Chase, 


. 244 00 


A. H. Lowell, 


4 13 


Mr. Howe, 


. 41 00 


J. B. Sawyer, treasurer 1871, 


. 10 00 




8301 73 


PINE GROVE. 




1872. 


Dr. . 


Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1872, 


. $1,063 65 


received for fifty-three lots sold 


895 40 



68 



interest, ....... 

of A. B. Chase, for grass, 1871, 

of W. C. Chase, for 6652 ft. pine logs, . 

of Granville Heselton, 8 cords pine limbs, 

" grass, 1872, . 

" apples, 1872, 
" " old fence posts. 



1872. 
Paid A. B. Chase, 21 days' work, 

Granville Heselton, 191 days' work, . 
" " 18 days for horse, 

Kadmiel Heselton, 115 1-2 days' work, 
S. B. Kidder, surveying logs, 
J. G. Colt, 50 trees, . 
Daniels & Co., tools, . 
J. B. Yarick, wheelbarrow, 
E. Cutting, labor on well, 
Evans & Russell, chestnut stakes, 
John B. Clarke, advertising, 
Taylor & Clark, 14 yards concrete, 
Warren Harvey, grading, . 
G. H. Kimball, stonework for iron fence, 
Fogg & James, livery teams, 
J. L. Smith & Co., chestnut stakes, . 
Balance, cash on hand, 



$2 00 


3 


00 


69 


84 


16 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


12,055 89 


Cr 




. $31 


50 


. 286 


50 


27 


00 


. 174 


25 


1 


00 


41 


67 


2 


83 


5 


50 


5 


12 


3 


00 


4 


50 


10 


50 


. 100 


75 


. 182 


00 


25 


00 


4 


50 


1,150 


27 



1,055 89 



Of this balance tlie sum of 81,050.27 is in the city treas- 
ury, and $100.00 is in my hands. 

JOSEPH B. SAWYER, Treasurer. 
Manchester, Dec. 30, 1872. 



69 

City Auditor's Office, Jan. 4, 1873. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the preceding ac- 
counts of Joseph B. Sawyer, Treasurer, and find them cor- 
rectly cast and the payments properly vouched for 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

Gity Auditor. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



Engineer's Office, December, 1872. 
To His Honor the Mayor, and City Councils of 3fanehester : 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with the provisions of the 
ordinances of the city, I herewith submit the Annual Re- 
port of the Fire Department for the year ending Dec. 31, 
1872. 

Inventory of the property belonging to the Fire Depart- 
ment and the estimated value thereof: 

AMOSKEAG ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1, 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 first-class rotary steam fire engine, 
1 two-wheeled hose carriage, new, 
150 feet three-inch rubber hose, 
800 feet leather hose, good, 
300 feet leather hose, ordinary, 
50 feet small rubber hose, 
14 woolen jackets, . 
14 pairs overalls, 
14 firemen's hats, . 
3 stoves and pipes, 
I force-pump, 
1 pair blankets and hoods, 



$2,000 00 

250 00 

150 00 

064 00 

300 00 

14 00 

120 00 

20 00 

63 00 

40 00 

20 00 

8 00 



72 



1 iron pan, . 
13 life-ropes and straps, . 

2 axes, .... 

1 pair straps, 

2 iron bars, . 
vise and bench, . 
coal-hod, shovel, wrench and hammei 

5 oil and fluid cans, 

3 blunderbusses, . 

2 brass pipes, 
1 branch-piece with gate, 

1 jack-screw, 5 lanterns, 
hall and house furniture, 

7 hose patches, 
sink, pail, tackle and fall, 

6 badges, 
26 keys, .... 

4 tons hard coal, . 

3 tons cannel coal, 

2 cords hard wood, 
1 cord soft wood, . 
1 clock, 

1 spray nozzle and reducing piece, 
1 map of city, 
1 feather duster, . 
1 pair of harnesses, 
1 whip, 
1 large slide wrench, 

100 feet manilki rope, 

1 hydrant connection, . 

2 hydrant wrenches. 

Total amount, 



5 00 
12 00 



3 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


34 


00 


24 


00 


15 


00 


25 


00 


65 


00 


o 
O 


00 


15 


00 


9 


00 


3 


00 


44 


00 


90 


00 


18 


00 


7 


50 


7 


00 


33 


00 


7 


00 


2 


50 


40 


00 


2 


00 


2 


50 


10 


00 


10 


00 


1 


00 


14,551 50 



FIRE KING ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2, 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 first-class double plunger engine, 






$3,000 00 


1 two-wheeled hose carriage, . 




200 00 


700 feet of leather hose, nearly new, 




875 00 


600 feet of leather hose, ordinary, 




600 00 


50 feet small rubber hose. 






10 00 


10 belts and spanners. 






10 00 


10 life ropes and straps, . 






10 00 


14 fire hats, .... 






63 00 


14 woolen jackets, . 






80 00 


14 pairs overalls .... 






25 00 


5 torches, 3 lanterns, 






30 00 


2 blunderbusses, . 






24 00 


1 branch-piece, .... 






5 00 


1 branch-piece with gate. 






15 00 


1 spray nozzle, 






25 00 


14 chains, .... 






30 00 


1 reducing piece, 1 iron pan, . 






11 00 


6 badges, .... 






6 00 


3 stoves and pipes. 






50 00 


1 jack-screw. 






5 00 


1 pair of harnesses. 






30 00 


1 vise, bench, wrench, &c., . 






10 00 


2 shovels, 2 axes, . 






5 00 


3 tin cans, .... 






3 00 


1 clock, .... 






8 00 


1 force-pump, 






15 00 


1 whip and coal-shovel, . 






2 25 


1 sink, ..... 






5 00 


4 tons hard coal, . 






44 00 


3 tons cannel coal. 






90 00 


2 cords of hard wood, . 






18 00 



74 



1 cord of pine wood, 
1 map of city, 

blankets and hoods 

towels, 
1 feather duster, 
1 iron kettle, 
1 pair pole straps, 
1 whiffletree, 

1 hydrant connection, 

2 hydrant wrenches, 
1 strainer for pump. 

Total amount, 



6 


00 


7 


00 


25 


00 


1 


50 


o 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


4 


00 


10 


00 


1 


00 


4 


00 



^5,272 75 



E. W. HARRINGTON ENGINE COMPANY NO. o. 



LOCATED AT PISCATAQUOG. 



1 second-class engine, 

1 two-wheeled hose carriag( 


^5 


• 




. $3,000 00 
200 00 


200 feet rubber hose. 






100 00 


1000 feet leather hose. 








. 1,250 00 


300 feet leather hose. 








. , 200 00 


18 feet small rubber hose, 








9 00 


12 pairs overalls, 
12 woolen jackets. 








18 00 
80 00 


12 fire hats. 








54 00 


14 belts and. spanners, . 
4 torches, 








20 00 

8 00 


1 pair harnesses, 
1 pair blankets, 








35 00 
6 00 


3 trumpets, 

1 bench and vise. 








6 00 
8 00 


2 stoves and pipe, 

1 branch with gate, . 


, 






50 00 
15 00 


1 jack screw, 








5 00 



75 



6 settees, 










•$20 00 


6 office chairs. 










10 00 


6 small chairs. 










4 00 


1 tackle and fall. 










8 00 


1 chandelier. 










10 00 


1 coal hod, 1 iron pan 










6 00 


1 table, 










5 00 


4 tons hard coal, 










44 00 


2 tons cannel coal, 










60 00 


3 cords hard wood, . 










27 00 


2 cord pine wood, 










3 00 


2 blunderbusses, 










24 00 


1 coal shovel. 










1 00 


1 force pump. 










25 00 


1 iron bar, oil can, an 


i sinL 


'■^ 






7 00 


1 lantern. 










4 00 


1 set pole straps. 










5 00 


28 keys, . , . 










4 00 


1 gallon sperm oil, 










2 50 


1 large sponge, . 










1 00 


2 pipes. 










15 00 


1 map of the city, 










7 00 


1 step ladder, 










2 00 


2 axes. 










3 00 


18 hose patches, . 










5 00 


10 life ropes and straps, 








12 00 


1 wrench and hammer, 








2 00 


2 lanterns. 








6 00 


1 water pot. 








1 00 


1 lot of coupling. 








8 00 


1 ten gallon can. 








2 00 


2 oil cans, 








1 00 


1 hydrant connection, 








8 00 


2 hydrant wrenches, 


. 








2 00 



76 



towels, 
75 feet mauilla rope, 

Total amount, 



m 00 

9 00 



,420 hO 



N. S. BEAN ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 



LOCATED OX VINE STREET. 



1 second-class double-ijhinger engine, 
1 two-wheeled hose carriage, new, 
900 feet leather hose, 
1 force pump, 

1 sink, 

2 stoves and pipe, 

1 oil can and shovel, 

2 blankets and hoods 
4 tons hard coal, 

3 tons cannel coal, 
2 cords hard wood, 

1 cord soft wood, 

2 blunderbusses, 
2 axes, 

1 bench and vise, 

2 pairs pole straps, 
1 leather bucket, 
1 lot gas fixtures, 

1 lot lead pipe for pump, 

2 dust brushes and pan, 
16 office chairs, 

4 oil cans, 
1 pail, broom, and wash basin, 

14 keys, 

50 feet small rubber hose, 

14 fire hats. 



14,000 


00 


250 


00 


1,125 


00 


30 


00 


5 


00 


100 


00 


1 


50 


20 


00 


44 


00 


90 


00 


18 


00 


6 


00 


30 


00 


6 


00 


13 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


30 


00 


15 


00 


2 


00 


40 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


8 


00 


63 


00 



i I 



14 woolen jackets, 








1115 00 


14 pairs overalls. 








30 00 


10 belts and spanners, . 








25 00 


1 step ladder, 








2 00 


6 life straps, 








7 00 


1 whip. 








2 25 


1 pair harnesses. 








90 00 


1 pair halters, . 








4 00 


2 feather dusters, 








4 00 


1 clock, 








8 00 


2 cupboards, 








12 00 


1 map of city, . 








7 00 


1 basket, 1 coal hod, 1 iron 


bar. 






4 00 


1 pair halters, . 








4 00 


2 lanterns, 








5 00 


1 hydrant connection, 








8 00 


1 strainer for pump, . 








4 00 


2 hydrant wrenches, . 








2 00 


Total amount, .... 


. 16,230 75 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STBEET. 



1 four-wheeled hose carriage, 






$800 00 


1-1 






200 00 


800 ft. leather hose. 






1,000 00 


800 " " " . . 






800 00 


450 " " " . . . 






350 00 


20 woolen jackets. 






130 00 


24 spanners and belts. 






25 00 


1 signal lantern, 






12 00 


4 torches, 






8 00 


4 axes, .... 






6 00 



78 



1 shovel, . 
3 oil cans, . 
37 chairs, . 
1 table, 
1 mirror, . 
1 chandelier, 
3 trumpets, 

3 blunderbusses, 
1 jackscrew, 

28 hose patches, 

4 lanterns, 
1 sink, 
1 copper pump and pipe, 

20 pairs overalls, 
30 badges, . 
12 holsters, 
1 hammer, 

1 steel wrench, . 

2 stoves and pipe, 
2 settees, . 
2 cords hard wood, 
1 map of city, 

10 life ropes, 
20 fire hats, 

4 hydrant wrenches, 

1 cupboard, 

Total amount. 



$1 


00 


2 


00 


48 


00 


5 


00 


8 


00 


8 


00 


6 


00 


45 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


16 


00 


5 


00 


12 


00 


39 


00 


45 


00 


4 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


15 


00 


6 


00 


18 


00 


7 


00 


12 


00 


112 


00 


4 


00 


12 


00 



;,749 50 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 truck, with hooks and ladders, 
200 feet old ladders, 
1 signal lantern. 



$1,300 00 

200 00 

10 00 



79 



4 torches, . 








88 00 


1 trumpet, 
4 large hooks. 








1 00 
30 00 


3 small hooks, . 








5 00 


30 office chairs, . 








45 00 


1 table. 








14 00 


2 stoves and pipe, 








25 00 


1 lifting jack, . 
4 axes, 








2 00 
7 00 


shovel and iron bar. 








2 00 


8 hay forks, 
2 buckets, . 








14 00 
8 00 


1 rope, 
45 badges, . 








15 00 
45 00 


1 sink. 








5 00 


1 copper pump and pipe, 
30 pairs overalls. 








12 00 

60 00 


30 woolen jackets, 
2 cords hard wood. 








200 00 
18 00 


1 map of city, . 
1 shovel, . 








7 00 
1 25 


1 manure fork, . 








1 50 


4 lanterns. 








10 00 


Total amount, .... 


. 82,051 75 



goff's falls hose company. 



1 two-wheeled hose carriage, 
600 feet leather hose. 



z axes. 



6 spanner belts, 
12 spanners. 



8150 00 

400 00 

6 00 

8 00 

8 00 



80 



1 blunderbuss, . 
1 drag rope, 

Total amount, 



ii)12 00 
3 00 

1587 00 



AMOSKEAG HOSE COMPANY. 



1 two- wheeled hose carriage, 
800 feet hose, 
1 blunderbuss, , 

Total amount, 



1200 


00 


600 


00 


12 


00 



1812 00 



ENGINEERS DEPARTMENT. 



1 supply wagon, 
1 lot of old hose and couplings, 
5 maps of city, . 
1 piece suction hose, 
5 badges, . 
1 table, 

1 stove and pipe, 
1 coal hod and shovel 
2 ton coal, 

5 woolen jackets, 
oil cloth, 

6 chairs, . 



$200 00 
30 00 
30 00 
12 00 
21 50 
18 00 
20 00 
1 50 
5 50 
55 00 
28 00 
10 00 



Total amount. 



$431 50 



81 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



29 alarm boxes throughout the city, B bell 
strikers, 3 large aud 5 small electro-me- 
chanical gongs, one automatic at the cen- 
tral office in City Hall, central office re- 
peater, 178 cups Hill's battery, three gal- 
vanometers, 15 miles of wire connecting 
all at the office in City Hall, at cost, . 
1691-2 pounds No. 9 galv. wire, 
250 feet wire, . 

55 glass insulators, 
5 call and zinc and connection, 
180 zincs, Hill's battery, 
180 hangers, Hill's battery, 

1 battery syringe, 

2 pairs of flyers, . 
2 hand vises, 
1 waterpot, 2 pails, 
1 scrub-brush and duster, 
1 sink, .... 
1 strap, .... 

brackets, broom and file, . 
150 pounds blue vitriol, . 

Total amount. 



$12,042 


24 


19 


50 


15 


00 


5 


77 


3 


75 


108 


00 


36 


00 


4 


50 


3 


50 


9 


00 


1 


87 


1 


00 


12 


00 




50 


rr 
1 


00 


19 


50 


112,289 13 



RECAPITULATION. 



Amoskeag Engine Company No. 1, 
Fire King " " No. 2, 

E. W. Harrington " No. 3, 
N. S. Bean " No. 4, 

Pennacook Hose " No. 1, 



H,461 50 
5,372 75 
5,420 50 
6,259 75 
3,769 00 



city Eeport— 6 



82 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co 
Goff's Falls Hose, . 
Amoskeag " 
Fire Alarm Telegraph, 
Engineer's Department, . 

Total amount, 



mpany No. 1, . 2,051 75 
586 00 
812 00 
. 12,289 13 
431 50 



141,453 88 



NAMES AND RESIDENCES OF MEMBERS OF THE 
FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

ENGINEERS. 

B. C. Kendall, chief engineer. No. 311 Central Street. 
Wilbertbrce Ireland, clerk, cor. Prospect and Union Streets. 
A. C. Wallace, Main Street, Piscataquog. 

W. T. Evans, cor. Merrimack and Maple Streets. 
A. H. Lowell, Park Street, 

AMOSKEAG ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1, 

Orren E. Kimball, foreman, No. 9 Harrison Street. 
George R. Simmons, assistant foreman, No. 1 Pennacook St. 
Horace Nichols, engineer, No. 27 machine shop block. 
Sam C. Lowell, assistant engineer. No. 5 machine shop 

block. 
James R. Carr, clerk. No. 14 Orange Street. 
G. W. Butterfield, driver, engine house, Vine Street. 
Erastus Cutting, hoseman, No. 175 Hanover Street. 

C. M. Morse, hoseman. No. 548 Chestnut Street. 
John D. Linus, hoseman. No. 5 machine shop block. 
John E. Wilson, hoseman. No. 53 machine shop block. 
John L. Avery, hoseman, No. 518 Chestnut Street. 



83 

George W. Vickery, hosemaii, No. 60 Orange Street. 
Frank E. Stevens, hoseman, No. 24 Brook Street. 
John L. Underbill, hoseman. No. 14 Laurel Street. 

FIRE laNG ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

J. F. Pherson, foreman, No. 25 machine shop block. 
H. Davis, assistant foreman. No. 64 Stark Corporation. 

A. M. Kenniston, clerk and treasurer, No. 14 Bridge Street. 
D. W. Morse, engineer. No. 1419 Elm Street. 

S. W. Nelson, assistant engineer, 26 machine shop block. 
J. J. Gleason, hoseman. No. 16 machine shop block. 
C. A. Swain, hoseman, No. 4 Burgess' block. 

B. T. Rust, hoseman, corner Maple and Central Streets. 

C. F. Hall, hoseman, No. 510 Chestnut Street. 
J. W. Batchelder, hoseman. No. 840 Pine Street. 

C. 0. Barnard, hoseman, No. 7 Amoskeag Corporation. 
G. W. Cheney, hoseman. No. 67 Amoskeag .Corporation. 

F. W. McKinley, hoseman. No. 14 Amoskeag Corporation. 

A. Merrill, driver, engine house. Vine Street. 

E. W. HARRINGTON ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. 

John Patterson, foreman, Main Street. 
Horatio Fradd, assistant foreman, Dover Street. 

D. J. Warren, hoseman, Barr & Ciapp's block, Main Street. 
Horace Crandall, hoseman, Mast Road. 

William Doran, hoseman, Douglas Street. 
H. E. Sturtevant, hoseman, Granite Street. 

B. K. Parker, hoseman. Main Street. 
George Weaver, hoseman, River Street. 
John R. Young, hoseman, Dover Street. 
Thomas Young, hoseman, Dover Street. 
Jack Schofield, hoseman. Main Street. 

John T. G. Dinsmore, hoseman, Granite Street. 



84 

N. S. BEAN ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 

G. F. Podge, foreman, No. 35 machine shop block. 

G. W. Wilson, assistant foreman, Nashua Street. 

W. H. Vickery, clerk, No. 19 machine shop block. 

J. S. Bacheller, engineer, cor. Amherst and Beech Streets. 

A. D. Colby, assistant engineer. No. 44 machine shop block. 

A. Roby, driver, engine house Vine Street. 

0. B. Elliott, hoseman, No. 53 Stark Corporation. 
J. W. Preston, hoseman. No. 39 machine shop block. 
S. H. Batchelder, hoseman, No. 8 machine shop block. 

F. E. Judkins, hoseman. No. 57 machine shop block. 

B. S. Stewart, hoseman, No. 80 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Charles Howe, hoseman. No. 99 Amoskeag Corporation. 
J. H. Bacheller, hoseman, Central block. Elm Street. 
P. W. Hanaford, hoseman. No. 256 Lowell Street. 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

H. W. Fisher, foreman, No. 51 machine shop block. 

H. S. Brown, assistant foreman. No. 14 L. & W. P. Blocks. 

D. II. Max field, clerk and treasurer. No. 17 Stark Corp. 

Albert Maxfield, steward, No. 14 Amoskeag Corporation. 

J. E. Merrill, No. 83 Orange Street. 

J. G. Knight, No. 409 Pine Street. 

T. W. Lane, No. 31 Blodgett Street. 

B. B. Aldrich, No. 156 Central Street. 
W. L. Blenus, No. 153 Hanover Street. 

G. H. Porter, No. 108 Merrimack Street. 
A. J. Coburn, No. 395 Amherst Street. 

C. Manley, No. 27 Orange Street. 

A. G. Sanborn, No. 11 Globe block. 

B. A. Durgin, No. 153 Hanover Street. 
M. W. Ford, No. 61 Amherst Street. 
W. R. Sawyer, No. 7 Pearl Avenue. 



85 



G. A. Stevens, No. 1,302 Elm Street. 

E. S. Whitney, No. 91 Orange Street. 

E. C. Jones, No. 8 Pearl Avenue. 

D. W. Ham, No. 71 Amoskeag Corporation. 



NUMBERS AND LOCATIONS OF ALARM BOXES 
AND KEYS. 

No. 3 — Blood's Shop, Elm Street. Keys at E. P. John- 
son & Co.'s Office, and Samuel Colby's residence, cor. Elm 
and Young Streets. 

No. 4 — Cor. Spruce and Elm Streets. Keys at Stearns' 
Hotel, and Campbell's Drug Store. 

No. 5 — City Hall. Keys at City Marshal's Office, and 
Littlefield's Drug Store. 

No. 6 — Engine House, Vine Street. Keys at Engine 
House, Vine Street. 

No. 7 — City Hotel. Keys at City Hotel, and A. F. Per- 
ry's Drug Store. 

No. 8 — Elm Street, foot of Orange Street. Keys at Grif- 
fin & Jones' Grocery, and C. C. Perry's Variety Store. 

No. 12 — Blood's Shop. Keys private. 

No. 13 — Cor. Brook and Chestnut Streets. Keys at res- 
idences of W. Jencks and Lewis Simons. 

No. 14 — Cor. Prospect and Union Streets. Keys at res- 
idences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15 — Cor. Pearl and Chestnut Streets. Keys at res- 
idences of Chas. Palmer and T. S. Montgomery. 

No. 16 — Cor. Lowell and Union Streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Rev. John O'Brien and R. Hassara. 

No. 17 — Cor. Amherst and Beech Streets. Keys at res- 
idences of J. S. Bacheller and H. P. Watts. 



86 

No. 21 — Cor. MeiTimack and Pine Streets. Keys at A. 
Mallard & Son's Grocery, and residence of J. A. Emerson, 

No. 23 — Cor. Central and Beech Streets. Keys at res- 
idejices of Maj. J. Stevens and G. F. Lincoln. 

No. 24 — Cor. Massabesic and Park Streets. Keys at 
residences of R. W. Flanders and Ira Emery. 

No. 25 — Cor. Hanover and Ashland Streets. Keys at 
residences of Dea. Daniel C. Gould and Horace Gordon. 

No, 26 — Cor. Bridge and Russell Streets. Keys at res- 
idences of E. V. Dillingham and William E. Porter. 

No. 31 — Amoskeag Village. Keys at residence of Capt. 
J. M. Varnum, and Cheney & Co.'s Paper Mill. 

No. 32 — Langdon Mills, cor. Canal and Brook Streets. 
Keys at Martin's Paper Mill, and at Langdon Mills Watch 

Room, 

No. 34 — Mechanics' Row. Keys at Watch Room and W. 

W. Hubbard's Office. 

No. 35— Stark Mills. Keys at Stark Mills Watch Room. 

No. 41 — Amoskeag Mills. Keys at Amoskeag Mills 
Watch Room. 

No. 42 — Manchester Mills. Keys at Manchester Mills 
Watch Room. 

No. 43 — Namaske Mills. Keys at Namaske Mills Watch 
Room. 

No. 51— S. C. Forsaith's Shop. Keys at S. C. Forsaith's 
Office, and Freight Depot. 

No. 52 — Barr's Brick Block, 'Sqiiog. Keys at Barr & 
Clapp's Store, and Merrimack House. 

No. 53 — Wallace's Brewery. Keys at Wallace's Brew- 
ery Office, and I. R. Dewey's Store. 

No. 61 — Cor. Elm and ETancock Streets, Bakersville. 
Keys at J. C. Howe's residence, and M. O'Neil's Saloon, 

No. 62 — Massabesic Street, Hallsville, Keys at residen- 
ces of Charles Chase and A. W. Bartlett. 

Also, keys will be in the hands of all the regular police. 



87 
INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY HOLDERS AND OTHERS. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearest alarm box, keys to 
wliich are always in the hands of the i)olicc and responsible 
persons in the vicinity of the boxes. 

2. Key holders upon the discovery or positive iuforma- 
tion of a fire, will unlock the box, pull the hook down once 
as far as they can (firndy without jerking) and then let go. 
Shut the door and remove the key. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to re- 
main by the box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in 
the box, pull again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to the 
next nearest box and give the alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never touch 
the box except to give an alarm of fire. Be sure that the 
box is locked before leavmg it. Give an alarm for no cause 
other than an actual fire. Do not give an alarm for a chim- 
ney. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your resi- 
dence or place of business where the keys are kept, return 
the key to the same officer. 

(3. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to 
inform themselves of the location of the alarm boxes near 
their property ; also the places where the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be soiuided upon the fire-bells thus: For 
box 5 five strokes, 1-1-1-1-1, with short intervals, and re- 
peating. For box 82, three strokes, 1-1-1, with a ])ause, 
then two strokes, 1-1, a pause, and repeating. Alarms for 
other numbers are given in a like manner; the inunbers 
of each box given four times for an alarm. 

One stroke of the alarm dismisses all companies remain- 
ing at the Engine Houses. Two strokes dismisses the whole 
Department. 



NEW APPARATUS. 

The expenses of the Department have been much larger 
than usual during the year because of the introduction of 
the Fire Alarm Telegraph, the purchase of a new hook and 
ladder truck, two new hose carriages, and a supply of hose 
amounting to 1,600 feet, and also because of the increase of 
the salaries of the firemen. Early in the spring, the new 
hook and ladder truck which was ordered for the Excelsior 
Hook and Ladder Company was completed. The members 
of the company having the new carriage in charge are 
much pleased with it. It supplies a demand in this branch 
of the service, as it is far superior to the old one in every 
respect. 

One of the new hose carriages, with 600 feet of new hose 
has been placed in charge of the hose company at Goff 's 
Falls. The apparatus is to be operated in connection with 
a force pump at Derry Mills. The other hose carriage, with 
800 feet of hose, has been placed at Amoskeag Village. 
This apparatus is to be operated in connection with a force 
pump at Cheney & Co.'s Paper Mills. Tlie most of the 
hose now in use is in good condition, and in ordinary 
cases will meet the present demands of the department. 
In case, however, of a very large fire, or in case of a fire 
at considerable distance from a reservoir or hydrant, a 
greater supply of pipe would be al)solutely necessary. I 
would, therefore, recommend the immediate purchase of 
2,000 feet of pipe to meet all emergencies. 

WATER SUPPLY. 

During the year, the pipes for the water-works which are 
to be introduced, have been laid in many of the streets of 
the city, and water has been temporarily conducted into the 
pipes from the Amoskeag Company's reservoir at Janesville. 



• 89 

In most quarters there is a much better supply of water for 
fire purposes than ever before. The eastern portion of the 
city, however, is not properly protected by a sufficient supply 
of water, for the reason that the pipes for the water-works 
do uot extend above Beech Street. 1 would therefore recom- 
mend that a pipe be laid as soon as possil)le from Beech 
Street through Lowell Street to Wilson Street, one from 
Beech Street through Hanover Street to Wilson Street, and 
one from Beech Street through Bridge Street to Nashua 
Street. 

FIRES. 

The losses by fire during the year were, fortunately, 
unusally small. The firemen were called out eighteen 
times only. There were twelve false alarms, and the ser- 
vices of the firemen were needed only six times. The 
entire losses by fire amount in the aggregate to 114,000. 
There was insurance on the property destroyed, to the 
amount of f 8,000. The actual losses of our citizens by fire 
were, therefore, only $6,000. The principal fire was in 
September, at Sweeney's block, corner of Central and 
Cliestnut Streets ; this loss was about 18,000. 

THE FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

In February last, a committee was appointed by the City 
Council to make an examination of the two systems of Fire 
Alarm Telegraph in operation in the country. The com- 
mittee consisted of His Honor the Mayor, Alderman Bean, 
Councilman Colley and the Chief Engineer of the Fire De- 
partment. The committee first made an examination of 
the system of Game well & Co., in operation at Taunton, 
Masiv In March, the committee proceeded to Cleveland, 
Ohio, and made an examination of the Letonia system, in 
operation in that city. Several representatives of the Le- 



90 

toiiia system had previously given an exhibition of tlieir 
apparatus in this city. In April, J. W. Stover, the Gen- 
eral Sui)erinteudent of Gamevvell & Co., Moses G. Farmer, 
the electrician of the company, and James M. Gardner, one 
of the members of the firm, visited this city and made a 
full exhibition and explanation of their system at the City 
Hall before the committee and a large number of our prom- 
inent citizens. The exhibition was highly satisfactory to 
the committee, and they were unanimousl}'^ of the opinion 
that the system of Gamewell & Co, was greatly superior 
to the Letonia system. On the recommendation of the 
committee, the City Council adopted the system of Game- 
well & Co., and the committee were instructed to make a 
contract with the proprietors of the system for its immedi- 
ate introduction into this city. The contract was made, 
and the work was finished ready for operation on the 6th 
of September. 

Gamewell & Co.'s system has been in operation for sev- 
eral years in many of the largest cities in the Union, and 
has given the most unqualified satisfaction to all classes. 
The firemen in those places where the system has been in- 
troduced, are particularly pleased with its results. The ex- 
act location of a fire is known instantly to every fireman 
who hears the alarm bells, whereas, under the old system, 
there was much confusion and uncertainty as to the place 
of a fire. In case a fire broke out at a distance from the 
bells which were usually rung, much valuable time was lost 
before the messenger could give a general alarm, and his 
message was often misundei-stood as it was passed from one 
to another, so that the firemen and engines were sent in a 
direction opposite to that where the fire was located. 

In those cities where the fire alarm telegraph has been 
introduced, there is much less noise and confusion at fires 
than formerly. In ordinary cases, few except the firemen 
are now present. Those whose special business it is to put 



91 

out the fire, have ample room to work, whereas, in former 
times, they were greatly disturbed by the crowds of people 
who surrounded them and stood in their way. 

The system has been in operation in this city only about 
four mouths, liut its merits and advantages have been com- 
pletely demonstrated to the satisfaction of our citizens. 
The firemen, now that they have become familiar with the 
signals and the working of the system, regard it as of great 
advantage to them in the performance of their duties. As 
our citizens become better acquainted with the details of 
the system, there will be fewer mistakes in the giving of 
alarms. This city has the advantage of the latest improve- 
ments of Gamewell & Co., and the system introduced here 
is prol)ably equal to any in the world. 

At the first introduction of the system here, some mis- 
takes on the part of thoFC who had the management of the 
apparatus were inevitable. With more experience, a bet- 
ter acquaintance with the signals, and greater care on the 
])art of those wlio give an alarm at the boxes, most errors 
will doubtless be avoided. 

It has been found that there is not a sufficient number 
of bell strikers to give an alarm to all portions of the city. 
An additional striker has accordingly been ordered for the 
northern section of the city. I would recommend that a 
striker be placed on the new Grammar School House to 
be erected on the corner of Ash and Bridge streets. 

It has also been found that more alarm boxes are needed. 
I would recommend that an alarm box be placed near the 
Lincoln Street School House, one near the jNfonchester 
House, one at the corner of Manchester and Chestnut 
streets, one on Elm street near the Riding Park, and one 
on Stark Building, on Elm street. 



92 

ENGINE HOUSES. 

As the city has been grcatlj extended in all directions 
within a few years, it has become necessary that the steam 
fire engines and other fire apparatus should be located at 
various points. It is plain to all that a fire breaking out at 
the north or at the south end of the city could be reached 
with much more readiness by an engine located near those 
points, than by the engines which are all located on Vine 
street, except the E. W. Harrington, No. 3, which is located 
at Piscataquog. I would suggest that arrangements should 
be made for the erection of a suitable engine-house at the 
north part of the city, and also for one near the southern 
limits of the thickly settled portion of the city. 

REPAIRS. 

All of the steam fire engines are in excellent condition 
except the Amoskeag No. 1. This engine, which has been 
in oporation nearly fourteen years, was tlie first one which 
was built by the Amoskeag Company, and was the pioneer 
of those splendid machines which are known in nearly all 
of the great cities of the United States, as unequalled for 
efficiency and durability. This engine requires a new boiler 
and some otlier repairs. With these repairs, the engines 
will do excellent service for a long time to come. I would 
recommend that the engine-house on Vine street be heated 
by steam. This can be accomplished at half the presentf, 
expense of heating it by stoves. If steam were introduced 
into the building, the water in the boilers could be kept at 
a boiling point, and steam could be got up witliout delay. 
This saving of time, in the case of fire, is oftentimes of much 
account. 



98 
firemen's relief association. 

In the early portion of the past year, an association for 
mutual relief was formed by the firemen of the city, and 
eighty-seven out of the one hundred and four firemen have 
become members. The sum of one dollar is required as a 
fee for membership. With fees for membership, and the 
generous contributions of some of the public-spirited citi- 
zens of .the city, and also by the proceeds of a levee which 
was given in aid of the object, at Smyth's Hall, the society 
have a fund of about i475. The sum of $1 per week is 
paid to sick or disabled members for the term of ten weeks, 
and, in case of death, the sum of -150 is paid to the family 
of the deceased. The sum of $125 has already been paid 
out to disabled firemen, one of whom was injured at the 
Central street fire in September, and in the case of a mem- 
ber who died recently, his family received the benefit pro- 
vided in such cases. 

The association tends to strengthen the sympathies and 
friendships which should always be maintained among the 
firemen. The Board of Engineers, in behalf of the mem- 
bers of the association, retu)-n their thanks to those citizens 
who have aided them, and would comnjend the association 
to the favorable consideration of all of our citizens. 

CONCLUSION. 

With the extensive improvements which have been in- 
troduced during the year past, Manchester now has as fine 
an equipment in her fire department, as has any city of 
its size in the country. Her firemen are a united body of 
men, and are composed of some of the most intelligent cit- 
izens in the city. It is certain that no body of firemen in 
the Union are better skilled in the use of fire apparatus, or 
excel them in their gentlemanly deportment. The City 



94 

Council, in raising the salaries of the firemen, performed a 
just and honorable act, and one which gives great satisfac- 
tion to the members of the department. In behalf of the 
firemen, permit me, gentlemen, to thank you for granting 
their petition on this subject. 

In conclusion, I desire to thank His Honor the Mayor, 
the members of the City Council, and its Committee on the 
Fire Department, for their readiness in supplying the wants 
of the departmemt. I would also extend my thanks to my 
assistants, and to the firemen of the city generally, for the 
activity tliey liave manifested in the discharge of their du- 
ties, and their zeal in promoting the interests of tlie de- 
partment. 

B. C. KENDALL, Chief Engineer. 



NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OE THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith submit their 
Nineteenth Annual Report of the condition of the Library. 

As stated in the last report, the Library was removed to 
the Library Building on Franklin Street, in September, 
1871, and was opened for the use of the public as soon as 
the preliminary arrangements could be completed. 

The present year is therefore the first complete year in 
which the operations of the Library have been conducted 
in a building especially fitted for its use, and the results 
developed during the year give strong evidence of the 
wisdom of the City Councils in making this provision for 
its increase, preservation and permanence. 

It affords pleasure to the Hoard to be able to report that 
by the occupation of the Library Building, not only is more 
ample security afforded to the large and valuable property 
intrusted to their care against destruction by fire, but also, 
by the greater promptness and efficiency with which the du- 
ties of the librarian can be performed, the facility with 
which the resources of the Library can be made available is 
increased, and the convenience of the public promoted. 



96 

The beneficial effect upon the Library of the completion 
of the building, is shown in the increased number of vol- 
umes presented, as well as by the greater number of persons 
who use the Library as a place of consultation of those 
volumes that, by the regulations, are not permitted to be 
taken from the Library Build hig, and as a place of resort 
for purposes of reading and study. 

Early in March the Board received from Hon. Gardner 
Brewer, of Boston, Mass., the following letter : 

'^ Boston, March 12, 1872. 
" To the Trustees of the Manchester City Library : 

" Gentlemen : I send you herewith a catalogue of books, 
mostly novels and poems, which, with your approval, I pro- 
pose presenting to the Manchester City Library. 

" Will you please examine this catalogue and erase with 
pencil all such works as appear to you to have an immoral 
effect or pernicious tendency, or for any reason are undesir- 
able to have, and if there are any works of which you ad- 
vise having more than one copy, please mark against them 
the number wanted. I intend having these books very 
strongly bound, with morocco backs and cloth sides, like a 
sample I will send you within a few days. 
" Respectfully yours, 

" GARDNER BREWER." 

And at a meeting of the Board held on the fifteenth of 
March, 1872, the following resolutions offered by Hon. 
Daniel Clark, was unanimously adopted : 

Resolved^ That the Trustees accept with pleasure the offer of a 
donation of valuable books by the Hon. Gardner Brewer, that the 
thanks of the Board be presented to him therefoi", and that they be 
placed, when received, upon the shelves of the Library and known 
as the "Brewer Donation." 

Resolved, That tlie Secretary of the Board transmit to Mr. 
Brewer a copy of the record of the proceedings of this meeting. 



97 

The volumes indicated in the letter of Mr. Brewer were 
received in July, and after being properly numbered and 
entered by the Librarian on his books were placed upon the 
shelves. 

The number of volumes received was six hundred eighty- 
three, and being handsomely and uniformly bound and 
placed in an alcove by themselves, will form an important 
and valuable addition to the Library. 

It is believed that the example thus set may be hereafter 
followed by some of our public-spirited citizens, whose 
means may permit them to make similar donations. 

By the will of the late Oliver Dean, a bequest of five 
tliousand dollars was made to the Trustees of the City 
Library of Manchester, N. H., in trust to apply the income 
of the same to tlie increase of the Library. 

On the twelfth of July last, the Board were notified by 
the executors of the will of Dr. Dean, that they would be 
ready on the twenty-fourth of July to pay the legacy to the 
Trustees for the purpose named in the will, and at a meet- 
ing of the Board, Hon. P. C. Cheney, Mayor of the city, 
was authorized to receive the same and execute on behalf 
of the Board the necessary receipts or vouchers therefor. 

On the day named the sum of five thousand dollars was 
so received, and was invested by the Mayor in the bonds of 
the City of Manchester, issued for the construction of the 
water-works, at the same rate at which they were sold to 
other parties, such bonds amounting at par to -$5,100, and 
leaving a balance of twenty-five dollars in cash, which, 
with the bonds, were deposited with the City Treasurer, 
subject to the order of the Board. The income of this fund, 
amounting to upward of three hundred dollars per year, 
will be appropriated to the purchase of books, and the Board 
recomrdend that such purchases be placed by themselves 
and known as the " Dean Donation." 

The heating apparatus used in the Library consists of the 
two hot-air furnaces that had formerly been in use in the 

City Report— (j 



court-house, and which were taken from thence when the 
steam-heating was introduced into that building. 

The experience of the last winter seemed to indicate 
that these furnaces were insufficient in capacity to properly 
warm the Library in the coldest weather, and that the con- 
sumption of fuel was disproportioned to the useful result 
obtained, a large part of the heat being apparently wasted 
in the basement, and comparatively but little effect pro- 
duced in the Library-room. 

Changes have since been made in the arrangement of the 
furnaces that it is hoped will in a great measure remedy the 
difficulty heretofore experienced. 

The Hon. William C. Clarke, the Secretary of the Board, 
who had been one of the Trustees of the Library from the 
commencement of its operations, died in April last. The 
late Judge Clarke had always manifested a deep interest in 
the welfare and succes of the Library, and by his decease 
the Library lias suffered the loss of one of its earliest friends 
and most earnest supporters. 

The vacancy tlius occasioned was filled by the election 
of Hon. Isaac W. Smith. 

A supplemental catalogue of the additions made to the 
Library during the year 1871 was prepared, and a limited 
number of copies printed for use at the Library, and a list 
of the l)ooks contained in the Brewer Donation was also 
prepared and printed for similar use. 

A resolution was adopted by the City Council in March 
last, authorizing " The Trustees to revise and publish such 
a number of catalogues in one volume containing the full 
contents of the Library to January 1, 1872, and sell at such 
price as they may determine, and procure assistance if 
needed in such revision and publication, the expense of the 
same to be provided for in the Library appropriation for 
1872." 



99 

This resolution was not brought to the attention of the 
Board seasonably, so that they could give the City Councils 
the necessary information as to the cost of such revision 
and publication, before the annual appropriations were 
made, and on that account no appropriation was made for 
the purpose of carrying out the object of the resolution, 
and the Trustees did not feel authorized to incur any 
expense on that account until after an appropriation had 
been made. 

The catalogue of all tlie l)ooks in the Library, from No, 
1 to No. 8,762 inclusive, (being nearly to January 1, 1863), 
was published in that year, and since that time annual sup- 
plements have been prepared and published, some of which 
are out of print. 

There are a considerable numlier of copies of the cata- 
logue of 1863 on hand, and the Board would recommend 
that instead of revising and publishing a catalogue of all 
the books to the present date in one volume, as proposed in 
the resolution, a revision be made in one volume of the 
catalogues that have been made since 1863, the expense 
of which would be much less than that of the wliole number 
of volumes in the Library. 

Such a catalogue pi-epared in form like that issued in 
1863, would contain the titles of books from No. 8,763 to 
17,068 inclusive, and as they are usually repeated under 
several heads, would make an aggregate of al)Out twenty-five 
thousand titles, and contain about two hundred pages. 

An edition of one thousand copies is estimated to cost 
about seven hundred fifty dollars for the printing, in addition 
to the sum that might be required for the revision and 
preparation of copy for the printer. 

No accurate estimate can be formed by the Board of the 
cost of the revision and copy for the printer, for the reason 
that the catalogues heretofore published have been prej)ared 
gratuitously, and the Board have grave doubts whether the 



100 

preparation of this catalogue could be procured on these 
terms. If this suggestion in reference to the preparation 
of a catalogue should be approved by the City Councils, it 
will require an appropriation to meet the expense in addi- 
tion to the appropriation required for the ordinary expenses 
of the Library. 

The rejwrt of the Librarian shows that the circulation is 
greater than it was the preceding year, the number of 
volumes taken out being thirty-five thousand one hundred, 
while the whole number of days the Library has been open 
for the delivery of books was two hundred seventy-two. 
Of this number there have been but eight that are unac- 
counted for at the end of the year. His account shows 
that at the time of the last report, there were in the Library 
fifteen thousand four hundred and eight volumes. There 
have been added during the year one thousand six lumdred 
and fifty-four, making a total of books and pamphlets now 
in the Library, of seventeen thousand and sixty-three. Six 
hundred eighty-three of these were presented by Hon. 
Gardner Brewer, and are known as the Brewer Donation, and 
one hundred forty-six volumes of books and two hundred 
eight pamphlets, have been presented by other individuals, 
a list of whom, with the titles of the works presented, 
accompanies the report of the Librarian. To them the 
Trustees, on behalf of the city, tender their thanks. ' 

Five hundred thirty-two have been purchased, at a cost 
of nine hundred sixteen dollars and eighty-seven cents, and 
sixty-five periodicals have been taken during the year at a 
cost of two hundred one dollars and nine cents, which, when 
the volumes have been completed, have been bound and 
placed upon the shelves for use. 

The Treasurer's report shows that there have been 
expended for books and periodicals, the sum of eleven hun- 
dred seventeen dollars ninety-six cents, and that there is 
an unexpended balance of ten Imndred ninety-nine dollars 



101 

fifteen cents applicable for the purchase of books and peri- 
odicals. In addition to this sum there will be available, on 
the first day of January, for the same purpose, the income 
of the Dean legacy to that date. 

The expenses paid for the ordinary and incidental char- 
ges of the Library, as paid by the City Treasurer, have 
been eighteen hundred fifty-six dollars forty-two cents. 
The items of these expenditures are stated at length in the 
annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city, 
and a summary of the same is appended to the report of the 
Treasurer of the Board. 

Unless it should be thought advisable to make an addi- 
tional appropriation for the preparation and publication of 
a catalogue, as suggested in this report, the Board are 
aware of no unusual expense requiring any considerable 
increase above the appropriation of the past year that will 
be likely to arise. 

In Board of Trustees, January 3, 1873. 

Read and approved, and ordered to be presented to City 
Council. 

P. C. CHENEY, 
Mayor ^ and President ex-officio. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, Clerk pro tem. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The Treasurer of the Board makes the following report 
of the receipts and expenditures by the Board of the funds 
received by them on account of the City Library: 

1872. 

Jan. 2. To balance as per last account . $1,217 11 

To appropriation for 1872 .. . 1,000 00 

To cash for books lost ... 4 00 

12,221 11 



102 



1872. 
Jan. 8. By p'd N. E, Xews Co., books and 
periodicals 
11. S. A. Walker & Co., books . 

27. M. A. Buck, books 

Feb. 7. N. E. News Co., books and 

periodicals 
Mar. 4. N. E. News Co., books and 

periodicals 
April 8. N. E. News Co., books and 

periodicals 
May 25. Lee & Shepard, books . 

May 6. N. E. News Co., books and 

periodicals 
June 10. N. E. News Co., books and 

periodicals 
3. Boston Soc. of Nat. History, 

periodicals 
3. Boston Soc. of Nat. History, 

periodicals 
10. Lee & Sbepard, books . 

19. Lee & Shepard, books . 

July 3. Lee & Shepard, books . 

8. N. E. News Co., books and 

periodicals 
Aug. 5. Lee & Shepard, books 

5. Lee & Shepard, books 

5. Lee & Shepard, books 

19. Lee & Shepard, books . 

5. N. E. News Co., periodicals . 

Sept. 11. S. N. Bell, books . 

11. Sanford & Evarts, maps . 

11. Sampson, Davenport & Co., 

books .... 
10. M. A. Buck, books 



121 


72 


4 


00 


27 


75 


123 


12 


48 


05 


57 


25 


77 


43 


37 


65 


24 


59 


4 


00 


4 


00 


5 


92 


24 


77 


19 


55 


20 


21 


198 


63 


36 


01 


104 


81 


79 


53 


15 


55 


5 


50 


2 


00 


4 


00 


20 


00 



AufT. 


31. 


Sept. 


7. 


Oct. 


8. 




8. 


Nov. 


6. 




10. 




5. 


Dec. 


10. 



• 103 

Lee & Shepard, books 

N. E. News Co., books and 

periodicals 
Lee & Shepard, books 
N. E. News Co., books and 

periodicals 
H. B. Dawson, periodicals 
N. E. News Co., books and 

periodicals 
Lee & Shepard, books 
N. E. News Co., books and 

periodicals 



17 21 



By Balance 



21 


93 


11 

3 


25 


1 

21 


99 


5 

r1 


00 


d 

36 


18 


10 

r1 


50 


17 


86 


$1,117 


96 


. 1,103 


15 



^2,221 11 



The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the Li- 
brary for the year ending Dec. 31, 1872, the items of which 
appear at length in the Annual Report of the City, are as 
follows : 



Librarian's salary . 


. $800 00 


Incidentals .... 


153 08 


Gas 


217 05 


Printing Catalogue . 


104 00 


Printing .... 


66 00 


Fuel 


194' 91 


Binding ..... 


321 38 




$1,856 42 


Balance .... 


95 83 



,952 25 



104 



For Books 1916 87 

Periodicals . . . . 201 09 



$1,117 96 



RECAPITULATION. 

Appropriation $2,952 25 

Paid Trustees .... |1,000 00 

Incidentals .... 1,856 42 

Balance 95 83 

$2,952 25 

Respectfully submitted. 

S. N. BELL, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 

We have examined the above report and find the same 
correctly cast and properl}^ vouched. 

WM. P. NEWELL, 
P. C. CHENEY, 

Committee of Accounts of City Library. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the Trustees of the City Library, and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

City Auditor. 



105 
LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

The following is a report of the practical workings of the 
Library for the year 1872, also of its present condition, and 
is respectfully submitted. 

During the past year 'the .additions to the Library have 
been larger than for any year since its organization. This 
is owing principally to the valuable donation from Mr. Gard- 
ner Brewer, containing six hundred and eighty-three vol- 
umes. A much larger number, however, has been pur- 
chased than in years past. The average circulation of 
books remains substantially the same. 

The total number of volumes now belonging to the Libra- 
ry is seventeen thousand and sixty-three. Included in this 
number are eight hundred and forty-seven pamphlets and 
sixteen maps; those remaining being bound volumes. 

The increase has been, including the ' Brewer Donation,' 
one thousand six hundred and fifty-five . Of these eighty- 
six are volumes of periodicals which have been bound and 
placed on the shelves, one thousand and thirty-seven are 
donations — two hundred and eight being pamphlets — and 
five hundred and thirty-two have been purchased. A list 
of the donations is appended to this report. 

Ninety volumes have been withdrawn from circulation 
during the year. Of this number, thirty-six have been re- 
placed for the year. It is advisable that these places 
on the shelves, rendered vacant by volumes too much worn 
for use, be filled as far as it is possible to do so. Sixty-five 
periodicals have been regularly received. 

The Library has been opened to the public two hundred 
and seventy-two days. The number of volumes loaned, ex- 
clusive of those used in the building, is thirty-five thousand 
and one hundred ; an average per day of one hundred and 



106 

thirty-six. Largest number delivered in any one day, two 
hundred and ninety-five, on Friday, April 8th. 

At the last report one book was missing. This was soon 
after returned, showing that of the thirty-two thousand vol- 
umes bound, not one was lost. The number unaccounted 
for at present is three. These will, undoubtedly, be re- 
turned within a few weeks after the Library is reopened. 
Nearly four thousand new covers have been used the past 
year. 

The whole number of guarantees received is eight thous- 
and one hundred and sixty-three. Number received since 
the last report five hundred and twenty-six ; an average of 
forty-eight per month. Two hundred and fifty-two old ac- 
counts have been renewed, making seven hundred and sev- 
enty-sight names added to our books. Fourteen persons 
have borrowed books on deposit. Number of cards in con- 
stant use, nine hundred. 

The amount received for fines and on hand January 1, 
1S12, was eighty -seven dollars and ninety cents. Amount 
received during the year, eighty dollars and eighty-nine 
cents. Amount paid for stationery, postage, express charg- 
es and other incidentals, sixty-three dollars and ten cents ; 
leaving a balance on hand of one hundred and five dollars 

and sixty-nine cents. 

CHAS. H. MARSHALL, 

Librarian. 



107 

DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY IN 1872. 

By Hon. James W. Patterson, Hanover. 

Montlily Report of the Department of Agriculture. 

1870. 8vo. 

Ninth Census of the United States. 1870. 4to. 

Report on Commerce and Navigation. 1870-71. 8vo. 

Report of Superintendent U. S. Coast Survey. 1868. 
4to. 

Report of Joint Select Committee on Condition of Af- 
fairs in the late Insurrectionary States. 1872. 8vo. 

Report Commissioners of Education on Public Schools 
in the District of Columbia. 1870. 8vo. 

Report Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion. 1870. 8vo. 

Report Superintendent U. S. Coast Survey. 1868. 4to. 

Statistics of Mines and Mining west of the Rocky Moun- 
tains. 1872. 8vo. 

Agriculture of the United States. 1860. 4to. 

Population of the United States. 1860. 4to. 

Statistics of the United States (including mortality, 
property, etc.) 1860. 4to. 

Manufactures of the United States. 1860. 4to. 

Congressional Globe, 1st session, 42d Congress. 2 vols. 

1871. 4to. 

By Hon. Aaron H. Cragin, Lebanon. 

Foreign Relations of the United States. 2 vols. 1870-71. 

8vo". 
Report Secretary of the Interior. 2 vols. 1870-71. 

8vo. 
Report Secretary of the Interior. 2 vols. 1871-72. 

8vo. 
Report Secretary of War. 2 vols. 1870-71. 8vo. 
Report Secretary of War. 2 vols. 1871-72. 8vo. 
Report Secretary of the Navy. 1870-71. 8vo. 



108 

Report Secretary of the Navy. 1871-72. 8vo. 

Commercial Relations of the United States. 1869-'70. 
8vo. 

Report Commissioners General Land Office. 1869. 8vo. 

Report Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion. 1870. 8vo. 

Ninth Census of the United States. 1870. 4to. 

Ninth Census of the United States. 1870. 4to. 

Report Commissioner of Agriculture on Diseases of 
Cattle. 1871. 4to. 

Report Commissioners of Agriculture on Diseases of 
Cattle. 1871. 4to. 

Report Superintendent of the United States Coast Sur- 
vey. 1868. 4to. 

Report Superintendent of the United States Coast Sur- 
vey. 1868. 4to. 

Report on Commerce and Navigation of the United 
States. 1871. 8vo. 

Report Commissioners of Agriculture. 1871. 8vo. 

Report Commissioners of General Land Office. 2 vols. 
1870-71. 8vo. 

Report Secretary of the Interior. 1872. 8vo. 

Report Roard of Indian Commissioners. 1871. 8vo. 

Report of Explorations and Surveys in Nevada and Ar- 
izona. 1872. 4to. 

Congressional Globe, 2d Session, 42d Congress. 1872. 
7 vols. 4to. 
By Hon. S. N. Bell, Manchester. 

Report Commissioners of Agriculture on Diseases of 
Cattle. 1872. 4to. 

Congressional Directory, 2d Session 41st Congress, 
1872. Pamphlet. 

Report on Commercial Relations of the United States. 
1869. 8vo. 



109 

Congressional Globe, 3d Session, 41st Congress. 3 vols. 
1870-71. 4to. 

Congressional Globe, 1st Session, 42d Congress. 2 vols. 
1870-71. 4to. 

Report Commissioners of Patents. 4 vols. 1868. 8vo. 

Ninth Census of the United States. 1870. 4to. 

Report Commissioner of Patents. 2 vols. 1854. 8vo. 

Report Commissioner of Patents. 4 vols. 1867. 8vo. 

Speeches made in Congress 2d Session, 42d Congress. 
1872. 5 Pamphlets. 

Catalogue of Officers and Students of the School of 
Mines, Columbia College, N. Y. 1871-72. Pamph. 

Report Superintendent U. S. Coast Survey. 1868. 4to. 

Report on Commerce and Navigation of the United 
States. 1870-71. 8vo. 

Report of a Reconnoissance made on the Yoken river. 
1869. Pamphlet. 

List of Officers and Members of the U. S. Centennial 
Commission. 1872, Pamphlet. 

Report of the U. S. Comptroller of Currency. 1869. 
8 vo. 

Report on Condition of Affairs in the late Insurrection- 
ary States. 13 vols. 1872. 8vo. 
By Hon. James A. Weston, Manchester. 

Atlas of Strafford County, N. H. 1871. 4to. 
By Gardner Brewer, Esq., Boston. 

The Brewer Donation ; being a collection of the most 
popular English and German authors, comprising Fic- 
tion, History, Essays and Poetry. 683 vols. 16mo. 
By William D. Kelly, Esq., Philadelphia. 

Speeches and Addresses on Industrial and Financial 
Questions. 1872. 8vo. 
By Thomas Richmond, Esq., Chicago. 

God dealing with Slavery. 1870. 12mo. 



no 

By William Q. Riddle, Esq., New York. 

Proceedings of the Anniversary Celebration of the New 
England Society in New York City. 1871. Pamph. 
By C. L. Flint, Esq., Boston, 

Reports of the Mass. Board of Agriculture. 6 vols. 
1866-71. 8vo. 
By Little, Brown & Co., Boston. 

The Divinity of Christ. Lindore. 1872. 12mo. 
By Chas. H. Brown, Esq., Manchester. 

Proceedings of the R. W. Grand Lodge of the United 
States, i. 0. 0. P. 1871. Pamphlet. 
By Chas. F. Livingston. Manchester. 

Proceedings of the R. W. Grand Lodge of New Hamp- 
shire, I. 0. 0. P. 1871. Pamphlet. 
Proceedings of the R. W. Grand Encampment of New 

Hampshire. L 0. 0. F. 1871. Pamphlet. 
Proceedings of the M. W. Grand Lodge of New Hamp- 
shire, A. F. and A. M. 1865-68. 4 Pamphlets. 
Proceedings of the M. W. Grand Lodge of New Hamp- 
shire, A. F. and A. M. 1871. Pamphlet. 
Proceedings of the New Hampshire Printers' Associa- 
tion. 1868-7D. 3 Pamphs. 
Transactions of the N. H. State Agricultural Society. 
8 vols. 1850-59. 8vo. 
By James 0. Adams, Esq., Manchester. 

Report of the N. H. Board of Agriculture. 1871. 8vo. 
By S. C. Gould, Manchester. 

Catalogue of the Class of '46, Dart. College. 1863. 8vo. 
By A. W. Smith, Esq., Manchester. 

Sermons on the Sabbath and Law. Andrews. 1870. 

16mo. 
Life Incidents in connection with the Great Advent 

Movement, 1840-44. White. 1868. 16mo. 
Autobiography of Elder Joseph Bates. 1868. 16mo. 



Ill 

By John C. Chase, Esq., Manchester. 

Annual Catalogue of the Mass. Institute of Technology. 
1865-71. 7 Pamphs. 
By U. S. Congress. 

Executive Documents, 1st, 2d and 3d Session, 41st Con- 
gress, 1809-7 0-71. 75 vols. 
By N. H. Legislature. 

Journals of the Legislature. 1871. 8vo. 

Reports to the Senate and House, June Session. 1871. 
8vo. 17 Pamphs. 

Message of Gov. Onslow Stearns, June Session, 1870. 
By N. H. State Library. 

Laws of New Hampshire, June Session, '41, and June 
and Nov. Session, '42. 8vo. 

Laws of New Hampshire, June Session, '71. 8vo. 
By Trustees Public Library, Boston, Mass. 

Report of the Trustees. 1872. Pamph. 

Bulletins, Nos. 20 and 21, January and March, 1872. 
2 Pamphlets. 
By Trustees Public Library, Charlestown, Mass. 
Report of the Trustees. 1871. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Public Library, New Bedford, Mass. 

Report of the Trustees, 1871. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Public Library, Leicester, Mass. 

Report of the Trustees. 1869, Pamphlet, 
By Trustees Public Library, Watertown, Mass. 

Report of the Trustees. 1871-72. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Public Library, Taunton, Mass. 

Report of the Trustees. 1871, Pamphlet, 
By Trustees Public Library, Springfield, Mass. 

Report of the Trustees. 1871, Pamphlet. 

Catalogue of the Library. 1871. 8vo. 
By Trustees Public Library, Reading. Mass, 

Report of the Trustees, 1871-72. Pamphlet, 



112 

By Trustees Public Library, Nashua, N. H. 

Report of the Trustees. 1870-71. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Public Library, Manchester, N. H. 

Report of the Trustees, 1869-71. 2 Pamphlets. 

Catalogue of the Library. 1856. 8vo. 

Supplement to Catalogue. 1872. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Peabody Institute, Georgetown, Mass. 

Report of the Trustees. 1871. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. 

Report of the Trustees. 1870-71. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Public Library, Walpole, N. H. 

Catalogue of the Library. 1869. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Library Association, East Boston. 

Catalogue of the Association. 1863. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Public School Library, St. Louis, Mo. 

Report of the Trustees. 1870. Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Howard University, Washington. 

Catalogue of the Officers and Students. 1870-71. 
Pamphlet. 
By Trustees Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Annual Register of the University. 1871-72. Pamph. 
By Directors Public Library, Newburyport, Mass. 

Report of the Directors. 1870-71. 2 pamphlets. 
By Directors Public Library, Worcester, Mass. 

Report of the Directors. 1871. Pamphlet. 
By Directors Mercantile Library, New York. 

Report of the Directors. 1871-72. Pamphlet. 

Supplement to Catalogue of the Library. 1872. 8vo. 
By Directors House of Refuge, Cincinnati, 0. 

Report of the Directors. 1871. Pamphlet. 
By the Commissioners. 

Report Hillsboro' County Commissioners. 1868-71. 
8vo. 



113 

Report Hillsboro' County Commissioners. 1871. Pamph. 
Report Water Commissioners of Woburn, Mass. 1872. 
Pamphlet. 
By THE Board. 

Report Board of Education of New Hampshire. 1870. 

Pamphlet. 
Reports Board of Education of Connecticut. 1866-72. 
7 vols. 8vo. 
By THE Order. 

By-Laws of Union Lodge, No. 32, I. 0. 0. F. of New 

Hampshire. 1871. 32mo. 
By-Laws of Trinity Commandery, No. 1, of Knights 
Templar of New Hampshire. 1861. 16mo. 
By THE Authors. 

Life of William A. Canfield, (in the army) 1869. 

Pamph. 
Anti-Oppression Hymns. Kelley. 1858. Pamph. 
International Copyright question considered. Carey. 

1872. Pamph. 
Sketch of Benj. Franklin's Autobiography. Green. 

1872. Pamph. 
Report Boston Dispensatory. Green. 1872. Pamph. 
Brazen Age ; a poem. Morse. 1862. Pamph. 
Liberty Union Songs. Masquerier. 1866. Pamph. 
Diversion and Nomenclature of the Earth. Masquerier. 
1847. Pamph. 
By the Publishers. 

Stumbling Blocks. Hamilton. 12mo. 

Country Living and Country Thinking. Hamilton. 

12mo. 
Gala-Days. Hamilton. 12mo. 
Harper's Magazine, Vol. 7, 1853, 2 copies. 8vo. 
Peterson's Magazine, 5 vols. 1854-60. 8vo. 
Godey's Magazine, Yol. 46. 1853. 8vo. 

City Report— 8 



114 

Catalogue of books published by D. G. Francis. New 

York. 1S72. Pamph. 
Woodward's Architecture. 1872. Pamph. 
Year-book Unitarian Congregational Church, Boston. 

1872. Pamph. 
Report on Trial of Sewing ]\rachines,at Maryland Inst., 

Baltimore. 1871. Pampli. 
Sermon by Rev. Geo. H. Hepworth. 1867. Pamph. 
The Doctor of Alcautarc ; an opera. Pamph. 
Business Directory of Billerica, Mass. 1869. Pamph. 
Almanac for the use of Navigators. 1870. Pamph. 
Sermon on the Second Death. Dods. 1832. Pamph. 
Monthly Journal ; American Unitarian Association, 

Boston. 1869. Pamph. 
American Educational Monthly, Boston. Jan., 1868. 

Paraph. 
DeBow's Review. March, 1857. Washington. Pamph. 
Address on Political Corruption, New York. 1871. 

Pamph. 
Argument on Railroad Facilities, Boston. 1869. Pam. 
History of Democracy in the U. S. Nos. 1-4. 1852. 

4 Pamphlets. 
Overland Monthly. Sept., 1869. Pamphlet. 
Lectures on Science and Art. Lardner. 1845. 8vo. 
Cobden Club Essays. 2nd series. London. 1871. 8vo. 
Publications of the Cobden Club. London. 1871. 

2 Pamphlets. 
Reports of city of Manchester. 1871. Pamphlet. 
Reports of the town of Wobnrn, Mass. 1871-72. Pam. 
Reports of the town of Walpole, N. H. 1871-72. Pam. 
By Estate of William D. Buck, M. D., Manchester. 

A collection of Pamphlets on Medical Subjects. 76 

Pamphlets. 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council of the City of 
Manchester : 

In compliance with the ordinance of said City, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their Annual Report. 

The whole number of families which have received more 
or less assistance during the past year, is twenty-two, con- 
sisting of sixty-seven persons, of which number nineteen 
families and sixty persons have a settlement in this city, 
and the remaining three families and seven persons in 
other towns in the State. There has been one death. 

The whole number of persons at the Almshouse during 
the year is thirty-eight ; average immber for the year, nine 
and one-half. There has been one death and two births. 

We do not think it wise or just to have the House of 
Correction connected with the Almshouse. 

And we wish to bring to your notice, the satisfactory 
manner in which Mr. Cross, our Superintendent, and his 
wife, have discharged their responsible and arduous duties 
for past years, and we should regard the city as peculiarly 
fortunate if their services could be secured for the future. 



116 

We have made out the papers as the law requires, for 
seventy-nine persons to be assisted by the County of Hills- 
borough. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

P. C. CHENEY, 

Chairman ex-officio. 
M. E. GEORGE, 

Clerk. 
S. S. MOULTON, 
S. J. YOUNG, 
JEREMIAH STICKNEY, 
DANIEL CONNOR, 
JEREMIAH ABBOTT, 
A. N. CLAPP, 
GEORGE S. CHANDLER, 
Overseers of the Poor. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF J. S. COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



City of Manchester in account with City Farm. Dr. 

To Stock on hand Dec. 23, ISl'l . . . |4,826 23 

Expenditures for 1872 .... 4,805 68 

Interest on Farm 1,000 00 



$10,631 91 
Contra. Cb. 

By Stock on hand Dec. 28, 1872 . .15,571 01 
Produce sold and labor . . 2,864 60 
Clothhig for paupers . . 94 52 

Clothing for prisoners . . 40 44 

496 weeks' board of paupers 
and 415 weeks' board of pris- 
oners, at an average cost per 
week of $2,261 ^ ^ 2,061 34 

$10,631 91 

Average number of paupers in 1871 . . 5 1-4 

Average number of paupers in 1872 . . 9 1-2 

Average number of prisoners in 1871 . . 7 1-2 

Average number of prisoners in 1872 . . 8 

P. C. CHENEY, 
LAWRENCE FOLEY, 
ISRAEL W. DICKEY, 
AUGUSTUS G. STEVENS, 

J. S. Committee on City Farw. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



MANCHESTER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1872. 



HON. PERSON C. CHENEY, Mayor, 

ex-officio Chairman. 

EDWIN KENNEDY, 

President of the Common Council, ex-officio. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Ward 1. — Henry C. Sanderson. 
Ward 2.— Marshall P. Hall. 
Ward 3.— Daniel Clark. 
Ward 4. — Samuel Upton. 
Ward 5. — Patrick A. Devine. 
Ward 6.— Daniel C. Gould. 
Ward 7. — James Dean. 
Ward 8. — DeLafayette Robinson, 

JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

SuPT. OF Public Instruction, 

, and Secretary of the Board. 



122 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 

Finance, Accounts, and Claims. — Messrs. Clark, Dean, 
Sanderson, Robinson and Kennedy. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Edgerly, 
Kennedy, Devine and Sanderson. 

Text-hooks and Apparatus. — Messrs. Upton, Clark, Hall, 
and Edgerly. 

Fuel and Heating. — Messrs. Robinson, Upton, Clark, and 
Edgerly. 

Fxamination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hall, Gould, Upton, 
and Edgerly. 

Printing and Stationery. — Messrs. Devine, Robinson, 
Dean, and Edgerly. 

Truancy. — Messrs. Sanderson, Robinson, Devine, and 
Edgerly. 

Employment of Children in Manufacturing Establish- 
ments. — Messrs. Dean, Gould, Hall, and Edgerly. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

Schools in High School Building. — Messrs. Clark, Upton, 

and Dean. 
Schools on Spring Street. — Messrs. Sanderson and Gould. 
Schools on Franklin Street. — Messrs. Hall and Upton. 
Schools in Old High School Building and Suburban Schools 

in Nos. 1 and 7. — Messrs. Clark and Devine. 
Schools on Lincoln Street and Merrimack Street. — Messrs. 

Upton and Hall. 
Schools in Intermediate Building and Suburban School No. 

3. — Messrs. Devine and Sanderson. 
Schools on Wilson Hill and Suburban Schools Nos. 4, 5, 6, 

8, and 9. — Messrs. Gould and Clark. 
Schools in Piscataquog. — Messrs. Dean and Robinson. 
Schools in Amoskeag and on Blodgett Street. — Messrs. 

Robinson and Dean. 
Evening Schools. — Messrs. Sanderson and Hall. 
Music. — Messrs. Gould and Upton. 



REPORT OP SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 
The School Committee submit the following report for 

the year 1872. 

The funds for the year, under the administration of the 

Committee, have been as follows ; 



Unexpended balance of 1871 


$2,282 75 


Appropriation of 1872 


45,000 00 


Dog tax, 1867 . 


2 00 


" 1868 . 


13 00 


1869 . 


19 00 


1870 . 


245 00 


1871 . 


198 00 


Overdraft (repaid) 


37 00 


Tuition from out of town . 


122 00 


Sale of books 


26 30 




"ffilT 01^ 0^ 




((Pt: I ,c''±(J \)0 


Of this sum there has been expe 


nded : 


For Teachers' salaries 


$35,223 39 


Fuel . . . .• 


. 4,185 04 


Care of rooms 


. 2,274 50 


Furniture and Supplies 


. 2,722 79 


Printing and Advertising 


502 61 


Books and Stationery 


838 46 


Incidentals 


. 2,164 97 




$47,911 76 


Balance 


. 33 29 




$47,945 05 



124 

This expenditure, however, of $47,911.76, must not, all 
of it, be " set down " to tlie expense of the Schools in 1872. 

There was an unexpended balance of $2,282.75 of the 
appropriation of 1871. Against this balance there were 
outstanding bills of 1871, to the estimated amount of 
$500.00 which have been paid during the past year, leaving 
the actual balance of $1,782.75 unexpended. 

This sum of $1,782.75 the City Councils of 1871 author- 
ized the School Committee to lay out in the purchase of 
pianos for the schools, and they expended for that purpose, 
for instruments now in the schools, the sum of $1,728.75. 
Deducting this sum from the balance of $1,782.75, it will be 
seen that only the sum of $54.00 was available, and used 
for the current expenses of 1872, or, in other words, de- 
ducting the $500.00 paid for outstanding bills of 1871, 
and the amount paid for jjianos of $1,728.75, by vote of 
the Council of 1871, there remains from all sources, to be 
applied to the expenses of the schools, for 1872, the sum 
of $45,683.51. Again, this sum should be further dimin- 
ished to show the correct expenditure of 1872. The supply 
of fuel purcliased in 1871, was exhausted during the winter 
term, and for the remainder of the season was purchased 
in small quantities and at varying prices. 

The Committee thought this poor economy, especially as 
to coal ; and during the last summer purchased a large 
supply, probably sufficient to carry the schools quite through 
the winter, and to the warm weather of 1873. 

They estimate that there is now on hand at least $1,000 
worth of coal, which will be used in 1873, the value of 
which should fairly be deducted from the expenses of 1872. 

If this deduction be made, the amount expended for 
1872, will be $44,683.51. 

This shows the actual expenses of the schools for 1872 
to have been $316.49 less than the sum of $45,000.00, 
which was appropriated. 



125 

Again, when the esthnate was made for the schools for 
1872, there was nothing reckoned for the expenses of a 
truant officer. But that officer has been paid, out of the 
school money, the sum of 1592.00, by so much increasing 
the expenses of the schools. 

More teachers have been employed the past year than 
heretofore, and the salaries of three or four have been 
slightly increased. The whole sum paid the teachers has 
been $35,223.38, against $33,831. 84 paid in 1871. 

But if we divide the sum thus paid in each year respect- 
ively, by the average number of scholars in each year, to 
wit : by 2278 in 1872, and by 2080 in 1871, we shall find 
the sum paid the teachers for each pupil, was $16.26 in 
1871, and $15.46 in 1872. 

This is said not to disparage the acts of the Committee 
of 1871, but simply to show that while there has been an 
increase in the amount paid the teachers, it has not exceeded 
the increase of scholars. 

The increase in the amount paid for fuel, includes a sup- 
ply of coal for eighteen months, instead of twelve as here- 
tofore stated. 

The sum charged to " Furniture and Supplies " includes 
$1,728.75 for pianos, and the sum charged to Incidentals, 
includes the sum of $492.00 paid the Truant Officer, and 
incidental repairs. , 

The expenses of this year have also been increased over 
the last, by the employment of a Music Teacher nearly the 
whole of the year, at a yearly expense of $1,650.00, instead 
of $1,195.75, paid last year for services during a part of 
the year. 

There have been taught in the city the past year, forty- 
five schools. 

The *nallest number of teachers at any time has been 
sixty-one ; the largest, sixty-eight ; the average, sixty-four, 
and the whole number of different ones, eighty ; ten males, 
and seventy females. 



126 

The whole number of scholars has been 3,500 ; the av- 
erage number 2,278 ; showing that 1,200 and more are 
daily out of the schools. 

The increase of scholars in the schools under our imme- 
diate supervision has been 200. 

The schools for the past year have generally been good, 
and with some exceptions, satisfactory to the Committee. 

Most of them have advanced — some have made little or 
no progress, but, it is believed, none have retrograded. 

This difference has been owing, sometimes, to the mate- 
rial of the schools, sometimes to a change of teachers, 
sometimes to the aptness of the teacher to teach, and some- 
times from a combination of causes. 

Thus, in District No. 1, the scholars have been few and 
generally backward, the parents uninterested, the house 
poor, and too often the teachers so too. 

One cause seemed to retroact on the other, and com- 
bined, they have prevented almost entirely the progress of 
that school. 

A new house has been built the past season, and thus a 
larger attendance secured, and the Committee hope for 
better results in the future. 

Should they not be attained, it will become a serious 
question whether a school should be maintained the year 
round in a district where parents and scholars both manifest 
so little interest in the means of education. 

The school at Goff's Falls, on the other hand, which, 
some few years ago, was poor in material and results, since 
the erection of a new house, and, especially, during the 
past year, has made a progress that has been very gratify- 
ing to the Committee, and this progress has been equally 
owing to a combination of causes. 

There have been more scholars, more intere^ among 
them, more interest among the parents, a new house, a 
good and successful teacher, and more attention generally 
to the advancement of the school. 



127 

Other instances might be mentioned where schools have 
been retarded by a combination of causes, but these two 
may suffice for illustration. 

While, however, the different schools in the city have 
made different degrees of progress, and while that differ- 
ence has in part arisen from the difference in the aptness 
or litness of the teachers for their position, the Committee 
desire to say, that the teachers generally have labored 
earnestly and faithfully, and generally have striven to attain 
good results, though they have not always attained success. 

During the year there have been several changes among 
the teachers. 

Miss Gile, so long and so successfully an assistant at the 
High School, was offered larger pay at Newton, Mass., and 
after some hesitation concluded to accept it, adding another 
to the instances where those who would pay for it have 
secured the best talent and largest experience. 

Mr. Heath, the faithful and successful master of the 
South Grammar School, has resigned his situation, to enter 
the profession of the law, and some of the ladies have, 
while " wielding the birch," been hit by " Cupid's arrow/' 
and have left school-keeping for house-keeping. 

Against this there is no law, regulation or practice, 
though the Committee sometimes wish the " little god " 
would have more regard to the interests of the schools in 
his selections. 

A new music master has been engaged the past year, 
Mr. J. J. Kimball, a fine singer, and an experienced teacher. 
His 'salary is •Sl,500.00 per annum, and the expense of 
teams to the out-lying districts, this year, 8150.00, making 
a cost of 81,650.00. 

He has devoted himself to his work with industry and 
zeal, and the results are already manifest, not only in more 
interest among the schools in singing, but also, in many 
cases, in better reading and speaking, in purity, sweetness, 



128 

and clearness of tone, and fulness and distinctness of enun- 
ciation. 

So many, however, are the schools that he is obliged 
to visit, that it takes him nearly or quite two weeks to visit 
them all, and consequently he cannot see any one of them 
oftener than once in that time. Thus he is obliged to rely 
very much upon the teachers of the schools to aid him in 
the practice of his lessons by the scholars. To enable him 
to do this more efficiently, he has met and instructed them, 
and they have generally aided him in his work ; especially, 
in those schools where the teachers are singers, and can 
lead their pupils by example — by voice and ear, as well as 
by chart or book. 

You may tell a child, many and many a time, to make 
such and such a sound, to sing do or re or fa or mi, and 
yet he will not do it half so quickly or easily as he will 
when some one leads, and his little voice glides in sweet 
harmony into and with the notes which fall upon his ear. 

This consideration makes it all the more necessary that 
those proposing to teach should learn to sing, and that 
those who select teachers, should make a knowledge of 
music one of the requirements. • 

Musical instruments, particularly a piano, are found to be 
great helps in schools. They not only aid in music, but in 
manners and discipline. 

When used in schools to regulate the movements of the 
scholars, they are productive of order, regularity and pre- 
cision. The boy who learns to keep step and come to 
time at school is more likely to do so in life. Stuffing 'with 
ideas, rules and formulas is but partial education. It is 
cramming instead of forming. 

By a vote of the City Council of 1871, the Committee 
was authorized to purchase pianos with the unexpended 
balance of that year, and they therefore purchased six, and 
one parlor-organ, at an expense of $1,728.75, as above 
stated, and they deem the purpose of the expenditure wise. 



129 

In schools graded and organized like those of Manches- 
ter, there is great need of uniformity, not only in the course 
of study but also in the progress made in those studies, so 
that, not only the scholars shall be equally well fitted in 
different schools for promotion to one of a higher grade, 
as from the Grammar into the High School, but also, so 
that a child, removed from a Primary, Middle, or division of 
a Grammar school, into a corresponding school or division 
in another part of the city, shall fall into a place similar to 
the one he left, and be able to go right on without either 
waiting or falling behind. 

To this end, the committee have revised the course of 
study for the Grammar schools, and have presented to each 
teacher the work to be done each term, so that each shall 
go as far as the other in any given division, or given cor- 
responding class. 

In this work, they have invited the co-operation and aid 
of the teachers, and they believe with good prospects of 
ultimately remedying an existing evil. 

The framers of the constitution of New Hampsnire, in 
1792, declared their conviction, that " Knowledge and learn- 
ing, generally diffused through a community, were essential to 
the preservation of a free government,^'' — and that instrument 
declares it to be the duty of the legislators and magistrates, 
in all future periods of the government, to cherish the interests 
of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries and public 
schools. 

Following this declaration of the necessity of education 
to the continued existence of a free government, the Legis- 
lature early, and from time to time, passed laws requiring 
the several towns and places in the State to build school- 
houses and maintain public schools. But they neglected 
to add any provision requiring the parent or guardian to 
send the children to the school. The tax must be laid and 
collected, the house built, and the teacher provided, but 

City Report— 9 



130 

the parent might do as he was minded about sending his 
children to be educated. 

Education was declared necessary to the existence of a 
free government such as ours, but there was a delicacy, not 
to say a strange neglect, in requiring parents to educate 
their children up to that necessity, and it was not until 
1871, that the Legislature adopted any positive provision, 
requiring children, under a penalty, to be sent to school. 

By the act of that year, " every parent, guardian, master, 
or other person having the custody, control, or charge of 
any child between the ages of eight and fourteen," is re- 
quired to send that child to a public school for a period of 
twelve weeks at least, if there he a school of that length in 
the district, and he lives within two miles of it by the near- 
est travelled road, unless the child be excused from such at- 
tendance by the school committee of the toivn, or Board of Ed- 
ucation, or the Superintending School Committee of such dis- 
trict," upon its being shown to their satisfaction, that the 
physical or mental condition of such child was such as to 
prevent his attendance at school for the period required, or 
that such child was instructed in a private school or at 
home, for at least twelve weeks during such year, in the 
branches of education required to be taught in the public 
schools, or, having acquired those branches, in other more 
advanced studies. 

This the parent, guardian, master, <fec., must do under a 
penalty, and this penalty he is liable to, unless for sickness, 
or because the child has been instructed in a private school, 
or at home, in the branches required, the School Board may 
excuse the child from such attendance. 

It will be observed that by this statute, there is hut one 
excuse for a failure to instruct a child somewhere, that is, 
the mental or physical condition of the child being such as 
to prevent his attendance, and he can be excused from re- 
ceiving that instruction at the public school, only by show- 



131 

ing to the satisfaction of the school authorities, that he has 
been instructed in a private school or at home, as required. 

In the same direction, and to the same end, to wit, bring- 
ing the children into the schools, is the ordinance of the 
city against truancy. 

It provides that "any child between six and sixteen years, 
having no regular and lawful occupation, and of sufficient 
health, neglecting to attend some proper school, or remain- 
ing absent, or playing truant therefrom, shall, upon con- 
viction thereof, be fined a sura not exceeding ten dollars, 
nor less than one dollar ; and in default of payment there- 
of, be committed to the Reform School till the same be 
paid, or he is otherwise discharged ; or instead of such fine, 
he may be sentenced to the Reform School for a term not 
exceeding one year. 

The statute punishes the parent, guardian, master, &c., 
the ordinance the child, for not conforming to its require- 
ments in regard to the child's attending school, yet the 
statistics of the public schools in this city for 1872, show 
the lamentable and astonishing fact, that nearly one-third of 
the whole number of ehildreyi in those schools is daily absent 
therefrom. 

The whole number of scholars reported, is in round 

numbers, ........ 3500 

The daily average number is . . . . . 2278 



The daily absentees are 1222 

It will not do, however, to suppose that so large a num- 
ber of those who belong to the several schools, daily absent 
themselves therefrom, because, if so, the percentage of at- 
tendance would not be over 60 to 65, while it will run as 
high as 90 per cent, for the term, and in some over 99. 



132 

The conclusion then is, and must be, that there is a large 
irregular, floating, careless, perhaps uncared-for class of 
children, who go to school for a day, or a week, get reg- 
istered, and are counted, then play truant, stay at hojne, or 
wander abroad in idleness, vice, mischief or crime. 

These are they to whom the statute and ordinance above 
recited should be made to apply. These are they who be- 
come the worst citizens, and endanger a free government, 
and these are they for whom an effort should be made to 
bring them into the schools. 

In view of these facts, the committee earnestly request 
that the present truant officer may be continued. His ser- 
vices have been very salutary. 

Not only has he returned two hundred truants to the 
public schools, exclusive of those children returned to other 
schools while he has been employed, but during that time, 
the average daily attendance has been larger, and the com- 
mittee feel that his restraining hand may have tended to 
make it so. 

It is certainly as useful and beneficial to society and good 
order to follow the wayward child and restore him to the 
school, as it is when he is older and becomes a drunkard, 
vagabond, brawler, or a thief, to pick him up by the way- 
side, to arrest him in a fight, commit him to the loljby, to 
fine him in the court, or commit him to prison. 

The city ordinance requires tlie Mayor and Aldermen to 
appoint in the month of January, annually, three or more 
persons, whose duty it shall be to look after children be- 
tween the ages of six and sixteen who do not regularly at- 
tend school. 

To answer the requirements of this ordinance the past 
year, three persons were appointed, but only one assigned 
to duty. That one, the truant boys soon came to know 
perfectly, and they kept out of his sight, as much as possi- 
ble, by dodging and hiding, and as he could be in but 



133 

one place at one time, though he was diligent, active and 
faithful, there can be no doubt many truants escaped him. 

This suggests the consideration, why the other two ap- 
pointees, in the discharge of their duties as police officers, 
might not also be required to assist in picking up truants, 
and those neglecting to attend school, and compelling them 
to do so. 

Indeed, while one man may give his exclusive attention 
to the matter, and be always ready to answer the call of 
the teachers in bringing in absentees, and be paid for such 
service, as his sole business, why should not the whole 
police force, be authorized and required to aid in the work 
of securing the attendance of these children in the schools ? 

In such case, officers in their daily rounds could pick 
up those who might, by artful dodging, escape the eye of 
the especial truant officer. 

The past year, that officer has been paid out of the school 
funds ; but no estimate was made for such payment, in 
determining the amount to be appropriated for the schools 
of 1872, and it has unexpectedly taken $492.00 out of the 
fund, and increased the school expenses by just so mucli* 
Fortunately there were funds sufficient, or the schools 
would have fallen behind. 

The committee are not aware that it makes any very 
particular difference, out of what fund he is paid, as the 
payment in either case comes out of the city, yet as the 
truant officer should always be a police officer, and as he is 
appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen, it would seem more 
natural that he should be considered one of the police, and 
paid accordingly. 

If to be paid from the school appropriation, the amount 
should be increased accordingly, and his appointment should 
be made contingent upon the action of the Board. 

Again, the consideration of the relation of the num- 
ber of scholars daily attending our schools, to the whole 



134 

number who have been in the schools during the year, 
makes apparent the necessity of more school room, if we 
would have ample accommodations for all, who should at- 
tend school. 

There have been in the school, during the past year, 
3,500 scholars. The average number has been 2,278, or 
1,222 less than the whole number. Yet with this number, 
so much below what it should be, most of the school houses 
in the city proper have been crowded, and many of the 
rooms overrun ; so that new seats have had to be squeezed 
into inconvenient places, and two teachers employed in the 
same room. 

Within the past year 500 French children have been 
taught in the schools. 

If any one for a moment supposes such children are to 
be neglected, let him consider the consequences of such a 
number grown up in ignorance and vice. They cannot 
become the good and useful citizens they should ; and, in 
many instances they will become depraved, idle vagabonds, 
criminals, destructive of the peace and order of society 
and good government. 

Manchester, by its whirling wheels, its humming spin- 
dles, its clattering hammers, and its busy activities, holds 
out the hopes of employment to thousands, who must labor, 
beg or starve. Many such come here to find a market for 
their labor, a place for something to do. They bring their 
children with them, and it adds to their contentment and 
their prosperity, if, while they labor for their bread, their 
children ean be educated in the schools. 

It is not too much to say, that the public schools are the 
most important public interest of the city. They go deeper, 
wider, and further — they reach the tender relation of parent 
and child, and secure intelligence, thought, and more or 
less culture in the progressing generation ; and thus they 
give stability to the fabric of society. They influence labor, 



135 

open the store-houses of nature, and fit men and women to 
appropriate her treasures. 

Would any one learn how fast this interest is increasing, 
let him consider. Three years ago, the city took the first 
steps in building the Lincoln-street Grammar school house. 

There arc in it now eight schools, of three hundred and 
more children, so well organized and taught that it is safe 
to say, no eight schools can be found in any one building 
in New Hampshire which excel them ; and still we need 
more room. 

The contemplated house on the corner of Ash and Bridge 
Streets should be finished as soon as the other interests of 
the city will permit ; the coming year if possible, the next 
at farthest. 

There is now, at the Spring-street school, a class ready 
for the Grammar scliool, with no place to go. They are 
through with their Middle-school studies, and fitted to be 
advanced. They should not be retained where they are. 
It would dampen their ardor and cool their zeal, while oth- 
ers push for their room. They must go on, and must be 
placed, with a new teacher, either in the attic of the Spring 
street house, which is now occupied, or sent into a room in 
the old High-school building on Lowell Street. 

This last building is one of the most useful and conven- 
iently-located school houses in the city. Li it are kept, 
from time to time, such schools as can find no other con- 
venient locations. 

In this house are now taught the evening schools, which 
are large, and in successful operation, a Primary school 
attended almost solely by French children, and a Middle 
school. It cannot well be dispensed with, but it might be 
made much more convenient and useful by an alteration of 
the arrangement of its rooms, and in tlie heating appara- 
tus. The committee recommend that this be done, and 
will be prepared with a plan and estimates before the 
appropriations for another year are made. 



136 

There are several other topics which might be well in- 
cluded in this report, but its present length forbids. 

The report of the Superintendent, more in detail, is 
herewith submitted, and to that the committee invite atten- 
tion for further information. All of which is respectfully 
submitted, in the hope and faith that the same care and 
liberality which has made our schools a blessing to thou- 
sands, and a pride to the city, will still watch over and 
provide for them so long as children shall be born, and 
require an education. 

Manchester, Jan. 3, 1873. 

P. C. CHENEY, 
H. C. SANDERSON, 
M. P. HALL, 
DAN'L CLARK, 
SAMUEL UPTON, 
JAMES DEAN, 
School Committee of Manchester. 



SUPERINTENDEIST'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the School Committee : 

I submit to you my Sixth Annual Report of the schools 
of this city, being the eighteenth report of the Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction. 

I have no comparison to make between our schools and 
those in other places. Others must judge of the efficiency 
of our school system, and whether or not the progress made 
is commensurate with the expenditure involved. Such a 
report as this should contain a statement of the condition 
of the schools, and suggestions in relation to methods of 
instruction and management. 

The expenditures in detail will be given in the report 
prepared by the City Clerk. In my last report I stated that 
there was a balance remaining in the treasury belonging to 
the school department. The expense of the musical in- 
struments, the salary paid the Truant Officer, and some 
other items, will account for the small sum remaining at 
the present time. 



SCHOOL STATISTICS FOR 1872. 

1. Whole number different pupils enrolled dur- 

ing the year ...... 3,500 

2. Average number pupils belonging to the 

schools 2,2T8 



138 

3. Average daily attendance .... 2,110 

4. Number of visits by members of School 

Board 876 

5. Number of visits by Superintendent . . 1,172 

6. Number of visits by citizens and others . 3,613 

7. Number of diplomas conferred at the High 

School 27 

8. Number of diplomas conferred at Grammar 

schools ....... 54 

9. Salary of Principal of High School . . 2,000 

10. Salary of First Assistant in the High School 800 

11. Salary of Second Assistant in the High 

School 600 

12. Salary of Principal of Grammar schools . 1,500 

13. Salary of Assistants in Grammar schools . ' 450 

14. Salary of Principal of Training School . 600 

15. Salary of Middle and Primary school teach- 

ers ....... 450 

16. Number of weeks in school year ... 40 

17. Number of schools ..... 45 

18. Number of teachers, (average number for 

the year) ...... 64 

19. School appropriation for past year . . $45,000 



The whole number of schools maintained in the Central 
district during the year has been twenty-seven ; one High 
school with four teachers, the Intermediate school with two 
teachers constantly employed, and an additional teacher a 
portion of the term ; the Training school with one teacher 
and a varying number of sub-teachers ; the Spring-street 
Grammar school with four permanent teachers, and an ad- 
ditional teacher for the Fall term ; the Franklin-Street 
Grammar school with four teachers ; the Lincoln-street 



139 

Grammar school with six teachers during the Winter and 
Spring terms, and nine for the Fall term ; eight Middle 
schools with one teacher each, and thirteen Primary schools 
each with one teacher. During a portion of the year, some 
of the Middle and Primary schools have been so large as 
to require additional teachers. 

In Piscataquog there has been one Grammar school with 
two teachers permanently employed, and an extra assist- 
ant a part of the Spring and Fall terms. There have been 
five Primary schools in this ward, with one teacher each. 

In Amoskeag, the Grammar school and two Primary 
schools have each had the services of one teacher. 

Two of the suburban schools, those at Hallsville and 
Bakersville, have employed two teachers each, the other 
six suburban schools one each. 

One teacher of vocal music has been employed who has 
given instruction in each of the schools once in two weeks. 

SCHOOL HOUSES AND SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Six rooms in the Lincoln-street building were ready for 
occupancy at the beginning of the year. During the sum- 
mer vacation the two remaining rooms, together with the 
large hall in the upper story, were completed, so that for 
the past term the eight rooms have been occupied. The 
work upon the new buildings, and most of the repairs have 
been done under the direction of the Committee on Lands 
and Buildings, 

The upper story of the Main-street building was com- 
pleted during the summer vacation. The house in the 
Stark District was ready for use the first of the present 
month. The completion of these buildings furnished eight 
additional rooms in the Central District, two in Piscata- 
quog, 'while the one in the Stark District took the place of 
the old house there. 



140 

There is but one unoccupied room in the Central Dis- 
trict, that being in the building on the corner of Lowell 
and Chestnut streets. This room will be needed should the 
number of pupils in the Blodgett-street schools and in some 
of the rooms on Spring street be as large as in previous 
terms. No account is made of the Bridge-street building, 
as it is not regarded, at present, as suitable for schools. 

There are two unoccupied rooms in Piscataquog, one on 
Centre street, and one on Main street. 

Some of the lots have been enlarged, and new lots pur- 
chased during the year. 

The completion of the Lincoln-street building, and its 
occupancy, required several changes to be made in the 
schools in various parts of the city. The four divisions of 
the East Grammar school were transferred from the Lowell- 
street building to the new building, together with a suffi- 
cient number of pupils from the Merrimack-street build- 
ing to form a fifth division. The pupils composing this 
fifth division had l)een in the Training school on Merrimack 
street previous to this change, on account of lack of room 
in the Grammar schools. Pupils were promoted from the 
Middle schools on Merrimack street and Beech street, to 
form the sixth division, and tlie six divisions thus organ- 
ized occupied all the rooms at that time completed. 

At the beginning of the Fall term, pupils were trans- 
ferred from the schools on Merrimack street, the Middle 
school at Wilson Hill, and the higher Primary school on 
Beech street, to form two Middle schools. These Middle 
schools constitute the seventh and eighth divisions of the 
Lincoln-street school, so that the school, as now organized, 
consists of one division corresponding to the first division of 
a Grammar school, one second division, two third divisions, 
two fourth divisions, and two Middle schools, one of each 
grade. 



141 

At the beginning of the year Middle schools Nos. 2 and 
3, which had been in the High School building, together 
with one of the Primary schools from the Bridge-street 
house, were transferred to the Lowell-street building ; the 
other Primary school on Bridge street, and the Towlesville 
Primary school were transferred to the High School build- 
ing. 

At the beginning of the Fall term the two Middle schools 
on Lowell street were united, and a new Primary school 
opened in that building. This school has been reported as 
a part of No. 2 Primary. The other room on Lowell street 
has been unoccupied, being as has been stated, the only 
unoccupied room in the city proper. 

Primary No. 10 was discontinued at the beginning of 
the Winter term, the pupils transferred to Merrimack street 
and Franklin street, as at that time none of the Primary 
schools were crowded. In the Spring it became necessary 
to re-open No 10 Primary, since which time all the lower 
grade schools located south of Manchester street have been 
filled. At times there have been more than could be seated 
comfortably. A clothes room in the Franklin-street build- 
ing has been used for a school room during a part of the 
Fall term. 

It will be necessary during the coming year to organize 
two or more divisions of a Grammar school, either in the 
High School building, or the Lowell-street building, these 
schools to serve as a beginning for the school which will 
occupy the Ash-street building when completed. At the 
present time there are thirty pupils in the Spring street 
building qualified for promotion to the Grammar school, for 
whom there is no place in either of the three Grammar 
schools. 



142 
NAMES OF TEACHERS. 

The following list contains the names of those teachers 
who have served in the different schools of the city within 
the past year : 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Principal— W. W. Colburn. 
Assistant — C. Augusta Gile ; 2 terms. 

" Mary E. Clough. 

" Emma J. Ela. 

" Maria F. Kidder ; 1 term. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL — MANCHESTER STREET. 

Principal — Daniel A. Clifford. 
Assistant — Mary A. Buzzell ; 2 terms. ' 

" Martha J. Boyd ; 1 term. 

" Abbie S. McClintock ; 1 term. 

TRAINING SCHOOL — MERRIMACK STREET. 

Principal — Nancy S. Bunton. 

SPRING-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — William E. Buck. 
Assistant — Anstrice G. Flanders. 

" Sarah J. Greene. 

" Lizzie S. Campbell. 

" Mary A. Buzzell ; 1 term. 

FRANKLIN-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — Isaac L. Heath. 
Assistant — Lucretia E. Manahan. 

" Lottie R. Adams. 

" Carrie E. Reid. 



143 

LINCOLN-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



Principal — Benjamin P. Dame. 
Assistant — Julia A. Baker. 

Mary J. Pife. 

Annette McDoel. 

Eliza I. Young. 

Mattie S. Miller. 

Isabelle R. Daniels ; 1 term. 

Anna J. Dana : 1 term. 

Lizzie H. Patterson ; 1 term. 

PISCATAQUOG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Centre St. — Principal, Allen A. Bennett. 

Assistant, Isabella G. Mack ; 2 terms. 
" Martha J. Boyd ; 2 terms. 

" Rocilla M. Tuson ; 1 term. 

AMOSKEAG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal— Charles P. Morrill. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodgett Street.— Nellie I. Sanderson. 

" 2, Lowell Street. — Isabelle R. Daniels ; 2 terms. 

This school was discontinued at tlie beginning of the fall 
term. 
No. 3, Lowell Street. — Mary L. Sleeper. 

" 4, Wilson Hill. — Emma H. Perley. 

" 7, Franklin Street. — Hattie G. Flanders. 

" 8, Franklin Street. — C. Augusta Abbott. 

" 9, Spring Street. — Hattie S. Tozer. 

" 10, Spring Street. — Lizzie P. Gove. 



144 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodgett street.— Ellen B. Rowell. 
" 2, Lowell Street. — Emma F. Beaiie. 
An assistant was employed in this school nearly all of 
the fall term. 

No. 3, Beech Street. — Georgianna Dow ; 2 terms. 

" Kate E. Joy ; , . , 

•^ '1 term. 



" Anna 0. Heath ; 

" 4, Beech Street. — Mary E. Ireland. 
" 6, Wilson Hill.— Abbie E. Abbott. 
" 7, Merrimack Street. — Addie L. Hutchinson. 
" 8, Merrimack Street. — Mintie C. Edgerly. 
" 9, Manchester Street. — Helen M. Morrill. 
" 10, Manchester Street. — Nellie Pearson ; 2 terms. 
This school was not in session during the winter term, 
and is reported for the year as part of No. 9 Primary. 

No. 11, Franklin Street. — Martha N. Mason. 
" 12, Franklin Street.— Martha W. Hubbard. 
" 13, Spring Street. — Emma A. Cross. 
" 14, Spring Street. — Gertrude W. Borden. 
" 15, North Main Street.— Sarah D. Lord. 
" 16, North Main Street. — Hattie A. Mack ; 1 term. 

" " Celia M. Chase ; 2 terms. 

" 17, South Main Street. — Alice G. Lord. 
" 18, Amoskeag. — Rebecca C. Hall ; 2 terms. 

" Nellie E. Tappan ; 1 term. 

" 19, Amoskeag. — Laura A. Montgomery ; 2 terms. 

" Fannie M. Kelley ; 1 term. 

" 20, South Main Street. — Clara N. Brown. 
" 21, North Main Street.— Ella F. Salisbury. 



145 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Stark District.— George A. Emerson ; 1 term. 
" " Julia D. Marston; 1 term. 

« " Nellie M. Gate ; 1 term. 

" 3, Bakersville.— Principal, Adclie M. Ghase. 

Assistant, Addie A. Marshall. 
" 4, Goffe's Falls.— Hadley P. Higgins ; 1 term. 
" " Georgie A. Nute ; 2 terms. 

" 5, Harvey District. — Lana S. George ; 1 term. 

" " Nellie M. Whitney ; 2 terms. 

" 6, Webster's Mills.— Mary J. Reid. 
" 7, Hallsville. — Principal, Maria J. Hildreth. 

Assistant, Mary B. Lane. 
'' 8, Massabesic. — Samuel T. Page ; 1 term. 
" Marianna Waite ; 2 terms, 

" 9, Mosquito Pond. — Etta M. George. 

MUSIC TEACHER. 

J. J. Kimball. 



GRADUATES OF THE HIGH AND GRAMMAR 

SCHOOLS. 

At the close of the Summer term, diplomas were awarded 
to twenty-seven pupils of the High school, and fifty-four in 
the Grammar schools, who had completed the course pre- 
scribed for those schools. 

The following list* contains the names of the different 
scholars : 

City Report— 10 



146 

HIGH SCHOOL. 



Full Course, coinprising French, Latin and Eiiglish. 



Annie H. Abbott, 
Josephine A. Bosher, 
Mary F. Dana, 
Nettie A. Haines, 
Mary Ada Lear, 
Lizzie M. McCrillis, 



Emma B. Quinby, 
Mary Spofford, 
Rocilla M. Tuson, 
William H. M. Gate, 
Fred C. Sanborn. 



French and English. 



Francena Fogg, 
Ella F. Harrington, 
Minnie F. Hoyt, 
S. Izetta Locke, 



Nellie M. Plummer, 
Florence M. Proctor, 
Estella N. Howlett, 
Arthur E. Clarke. 



English Course. 



Elvira S. Prior, 
Frank D. Burleigh, 
Fred S. Bean, 



Walter Newell, 
Samuel A. Page, 
Monroe Tubbs. 



■College Course. 
Henry M. French, John Foster. 



SPEING-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



Fred 0. Barton, 
Charles H. Butman, 
Charles A. Lane, 
Herbert M. Moody, 
Willis C. Patten, 
James H. Tebbetts, 



Fannie M. Bassett, 
Lilla 0. Cressy, 
Carrier A. Farnum, 
Ida L. Fitz, 
Jessie B. Farmer, 
S. Josie Kidder, 



147 



Lulu Ames, 

L. Etta Ankarloo, 

Susie F. Annis, 



Etta M'Laren, 
Annie M. Nowell, 
Ella F. Sanborn. 



FRANKLIN-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



Arthur C. Heath, 
Howard C. Holt, 
Joseph A. C. Knowlton, 
J. Albert Phillips, 
Edgar A. McQueston, 
Frank H. Colby, 
Carrie M. Gilmore, 

Annie A. 



Carrie A. Frost, 
Lizzie S. Nichols, 
Etta M. Young, 
Nellie E. Lovejoj, 
Georgie A. McCoy, 
Cora F. Bond, 
Mary E. Eastman, 
Parker. 



LINCOLN-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



Frank S. Sutcliffe, 
Arthur W. Chase, 
Arthur G. Everett, 
George B. True, 
Robert P. Herrick, 
George L. Tewksbury, 
Charles C. Bosher, 
Willie I. Smith, ' 

Olive A. 



Henrj' Soule, 
Annie L. Thompson. 
Emma W. Mitchell, 
Mattio W. Jewell, 
Mary L. Heath, 
Mattie M. Hayes, 
Sadie E. Parrett, 
Clara G. Fogg, 
Rowe. 



BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Emma J. Mears, Mary M. Mitchell. 

HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Wilbur J. Huse, Ella E. Johnson. 



148 
ATTENDANCE AT SCHOOL. 

There has been a marked improvement as regards the 
attendance at many of the schools, cases of absence and 
tardiness being much less frequent than formerly. No con- 
tagious disease has appeared in the schools, to diminish, in 
any great measure, the attendance ; circuses and other shows 
have not had that attraction for the pupils as in former 
years, and in many of the schools, there has been a com- 
mendable effort on tlie part of the pupils to make the per 
cent, of attendance as high as possible. 

There may have been instances where pupils have been 
in school, when, on account of their health, they should have 
remained at home. Sometimes there is danger of so much 
being said to the children in relation to punctuality as to 
lead the more ambitious to suppose that they must not, 
under any circumstances, be away from school ; but the 
health of a child ought not to be endangered in this respect. 
Teachers need have no fear of urging the scholars too much, 
when circuses and things of that kind threaten to interfere 
with the regular business of the school, but there will be 
occasions when some ought not to be in school, even if the* 
testimonials for punctuality are thereby lost. 

Pupils should be taught early that it is of great import- 
ance for them to be at school constantly, not simply because 
being a few minutes late will retard the progress of the 
school, but to impress upon them in youth the lesson 
of promptness. Children should pay strict regard to this, 
even if they are obliged to deny themselves some enjoy- 
ment. 

The following list contains the names of those not absent 
or tardy for three successive terms. Testimonials were 
presented to these pupils, as has been done for the past few 
years. Something was said in the last report of the object- 
ions to giving these testimonials, but many have thought it 



149 



a good plan, and it has been continued. Still, I trust that 
it may not be a permanent arrangement, as it will bave the 
effect of inducing some to attend the schools at the risk of 
their health, while many that should be in school will care 
nothing either for punctuality or testimonials. 



LIST OF PUPILS NOT ABSENT OR TARDY FOR 
THREE SUCCESSIVE TERMS. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 



Ida J. Bartlett, 
C. R. Dustin, 
John M. Dana, 
Fred H. Emerson, 
Arthur C. Heath, 
Robert P. Herrick, 
J. Edward Ingham, 
Willis C. Patten, 
George E. Tewksbury, 



Etta J. Carley, 
Charles C. Hayes, 
Rose E. Heald, 
Allan E. Herrick, 
James W. Hill, 
John M. Johnson, 
Frank W. Patten, 
D. Arthur Taggart, 
James W. Wilson. 



SPEING-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



Ai S. Annis, 
William A. Butterfield, 
Irving L. Campbell, 
Arthur E. Jacobs, 
Alden E. Johnson, 
Charles A. Lane, 
George A. Marshall, 
Dana Perkins, 
Aimer J. Taylor, 
Clarence E. Temple, 
Attie F. Annis, 



Martha D. Brown, 
Lilla M. Chase, 
Edna M. Dow, 
Albertine M. Farnham, 
Susie A. Gage, 
Emma C. Gee, 
Anne E. Kidder, 
Una R. Knight, 
Luetta F. Perkins, 
Sarah A. Severance, 
Alma A. Smith, 



Ida M. Annis, 
Theresa Benton, 
Ella A. Brown, 



150 



Ella G. Sylvester, 
JMary E. Sylvester, 
Hattie J. Wilson, 



Ella M. Woodard. 



FRANKLIN-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 



Willie Bartlett, 
Arthur E. Dodge, 
Tilton Fifield, 
Herman Graupner, 
Lafayette B. Holt, 
George H. Holbrook, 
Edwin F. Jones, 
John M. Kendall, 
Charles F. Kent, 
Joseph A. C. Knowlton 
Fred W. McAlister, 
Eddie A. McQueston, 
Walter B. Mitchell, 
Edwin C. Page, 
John F. Fattee, 
Arthur M. Prime, 
Elmer E. Sawyer, 
Walter J. Sleeper, 
Elmer W. Stearns, 
Willis A. Young, 

Mary 0. 



Ashton H. Willard, 
Nina D. Annis, 
Gertrude H. Brooks, 
Ahbie Brown, 
Clara L. Burleigh, 
Martha E. Dickinson, 
Mattie A. Doe, 
Mary E. Eastman, 
Isabel Fifield, 

, Lizzie M. Fradd, 
Lizzie M. Moore, 
Sarah C. Morrison, 
Ella J. Neal, 
Annie A. Parker, 
Emma Patterson, 
Florence M. Patterson, 
AUie M. Plnmer. 
Ida L. Plnmer, 
Estella J. Stevens, 
Minnie H. Soule, 

Tewksbury. 



lincoln-stree:t grammar school. 



Waldron Chase, 
Willie H. CoUey, 
Harry Dow, 
Charles H. Ferren, 
Frank E. Heald, 



Lizzie W. Boyd, 
Carrie Brigham, 
Nettie Cass, 
Lillian E. Cutler, 
Lilly Dodge, 



151 



J. Frank Hill, 
Frank Hunkins, 
Willie P. Hunkins, 
Ed. L. Kimball, 
Edward Knowlton, 
Frank Lull, 
Willie McDonald, 
Herman B. Neal, 
Walter Roper, 
Willie H. Rowe, 
Walter S. Rust, 
Albert Stark, 
Frank Sutcliffe, 
Ella F. Bailey, 
Effie A. Bolles, 



Ida J. Emery, 
Annie Felch, 
Amanda G-ould, 
Emily S. Hall, 
Mattie S. Hayes, 
Effie Hunkins, 
Mary A. Johnson, 
Flora M. Junkins, 
Hattie D. Mason, 
Fannie Roper, 
Josie A. Stark, 
Annie L. Thompson, 
Etta Vance, 
Sadie M. Vance, 
Nellie A. Young. 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

George H. Allen, Helen M. Elliot, 

Jennie A. Hunkins. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Oscar Kebbon, George A. Willey. 

PISCATAQUOG GRAMMAR. 

Emma Darrah, Nellie Hastings, 

Jennie Matz. 



AMOSKEAG GRAMMAR. 



Byron Pettingill, 
Emma M. Fuller, 
Clara I. Harwood, 



Maria Stearns, 
Maria Stevens, 
Belle Stevens. 



152 

NO. 1 MIDDLE. 

John Proctor, Charles RoUins. 

NO. 3 MIDDLE. 

Fred A. Montgomery, Ida B. Cheney, 

Carrie M. Lovering. 

NO. 4 MIDDLE. 

Lottie E. Cutter, Eliza A. Wheeler. 

NO. 7 MIDDLE. 

John G. Dolber. 

NO. 8 MIDDLE. 

Edwin A. Caswell, Mary E. Chase, 

Norman H. Colby, Fannie L. Sanborn, 

Walter H. French, Emma T. Wallace, 

Charles E. Palmer, Isetta E. Walsh. 

NO. 9 MIDDLE. 

Blanche F. Dodge. 

NO. 10 MIDDLE. 

Frank E. Dodge, Charles H. Gage, 

Frank L. Downs, S. Arthur Hall, 

Willie F. Hart, George F. Higgins, 

Fred C. Myrick, Olive J. Stevens. 

NO. 1 PRIMAEY. 

Inez G. Lane. 



153 

NO. 4 PRIMARY, 

Abby M. True. 

NO. 8 PRIMARY. 

Walter Hurley, Cora W. Holmes, 

Eddie Perkins^, Marion Page, 

Grace Parker. 

NO. 11 PRIMARY. 

Willie Willand, Annie Porter. 

NO. 12 PRIMARY. 

George Burleigh, Henry Dolber. 

NO. 14 PRIMARY. 

Napoleon Lombard. 

NO. 16 PRIMARY. 

Mattie Dowd. 

NO. 17 PRIMARY. 

John P. Brown. Alzina Raymond, 

Gillis Stark, Rosanna Raymond, 

Nettie Tilton. 

NO. 20 PRIMARY. 

Freddie Stark, Amedi Thibeault, 

Edmund Raymond. 

NO. 21 PRIMARY. 

Sarah Harvey. 



164 

BAKERSVILLE. 

Willie O'Neil, Nora C. Gilford, 

Isabelle Burns. 

HALLS VILLE. 

Arthur M. Colburn, Emma E. Adams, 

Wilbur J. Huse, Hattie L. Johnson. 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

These schools are becoming more important and more 
beneficial each year. Many people are leaving the rural 
districts of the State mainly on account of the superior 
educational advantages which their children may derive in 
the larger places. There are also many pushing into the 
cities for the purpose of learning trades, of engaging in 
business pursuits, of becoming connected with the various 
occupations of the cities. Many of them are young men 
who have not enjoyed good opportunities for schooling in 
the rural districts, but in a city where evening schools are 
maintained, they will be able, in some degree, to make 
themselves familiar with some of the common branches, 
and for this class it is a good investment to maintain such 
schools. These schools are becoming as much a part of the 
educational system of the land, as the school commonly 
known as the Grammar school. In many cities there is 
no school for which an appropriation can be more readily 
secured. 

In the erection and arrangement of school buildings, 
provision should be made for these schools, some of the 
rooms so arranged that they can be used for this purpose. 
In this city a much larger attendance could be secured in 
the evening schools if there were suitable school rooms 



155 

which would be easy of access to the young men and wo- 
men employed in the various manufacturing establishments 
of the place. Most of the school rooms that have been used 
for these schools contain desk and chairs too small for 
those desirous of attending; consequently M^e have been 
obliged to provide extra tables and chairs for such rooms. 
In this manner we are unable to accommodate but few com- 
pared with the number that might attend if the rooms were 
properly arranged. 

I have no doubt that in some places rooms will be ar- 
ranged especially for evening schools, it may be buildings 
erected for that special purpose, so that young persons in 
our large places may have an opportunity of acquiring a 
knowledge of the branches taught in the common schools 
of the State. 

In 1854 the first public evening school was established 
in this city, and was in successful operation through the 
winter. No such school was again maintained till the Fall 
of 1868, when one was opened in the Intermediate school 
building. This school consisted of about one hundred and 
fifty, over half of them being children from ten to fourteen 
years of age. 

At the time the school was organized, the Intermediate 
school was not in session, but as soon as that school was 
re-opened, the evening school was transferred to the Police 
Court Room. This was not a suitable place, as the room 
was likely to be used some evenings each week for gather- 
ings of various kinds, consequently the attendance was quite 
irregular. The next year the old houses on the corner of 
Beech and Concord streets, and the one on Bridge street, 
were used, and the attendance was quite large at first, but 
it decreased as winter came on, owing to the fact that 
many lived so far from the schools that they could not con- 
veniently attend after a long days' work. 

The next year one division was organized in a room in 
Merchants' Exchange, and another in the Lowell-street 



156 

building. These schools were very well attended. For the 
past two years the evening schools have been kept in the 
Lowell-street building, but, as has been stated, there is diffi- 
culty in having an evening school in a room where day 
scholars of ten years of age attend. This Fall over two 
hundred scholars have enrolled themselves in these schools, 
but as the accommodations have not been sufficient, the at- 
tendance has gradually diminished. 

It is to be hoped that this subject will receive the atten- 
tion of the School Committee and the City Council at an 
early day, and that measures will be taken to provide ac- 
commodation for a class of people in our midst, who have 
not had that training which the children in all of our large 
places are now receiving. 

1 trust that an evening drawing school will be opened 
next year, as there are many young men in Manchester to 
whom such a school would be of great advantage. 



EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN IN MANUFACTURING 
ESTABLISHMENTS. 

Four hundred and twenty-one children under fifteen 
years of age, have received certificates entitling them to 
work in the mill. This subject needs constant attention, 
and if the school authorities attend to it carefully each year, 
but few will find employment unless they can produce cer- 
tificates of their attendance at school ; but should there be 
a relaxation of efforts in this respect, many will be employed 
who ought to be in school. 

Some overseers will not employ a child without a certifi- 
cate from the proper officers, and such overseers will dis- 
charge all children at the time named in the certificate, but 
there are others not so particular, either in regard to em- 



157 

ploying or discharging them until their attention is called 
to the subject. On this account there will be an urgent 
necessity for constant watchfulness on the part of the 
School Board. 

For the past two years, certificates have been given by 
the Superintendent, in accordance with the law passed in 
1870. Cliildren wishing to obtain employment in the mills 
procure a certificate from the teachers of the schools where 
they have attended. 

The following is the form of the certificate given l^y a 
teacher : 

TEACPIER'S CERTIFICATE. 

Manchester, N. H., 



This is to Certify that aged years 

months, residing at I^o. Street, has attended a Day 

School on Street, taught by me weelvS within the year 

preceding the date hereof. 

attendance as follows: 

weeks in Jan., 18 weelcs in July, 18 

weeks in Feb., 18 weeks in Aug., 18 

weeks in Mar., 18 weeks in Sept., 18 

weeks in Apr., 18 weeks in Oct., 18 

weeks in May, 18 weeks in IS'ov., 18 

weeks in June, 18 weeks in Dec, 18 

Teacher. 

This certificate is presented to the Superintendent, who 
places it on file, giving the child one for the overseer, of 
which the following is a copy : 

SCHOOL CERTIFICATE. 

Manchester, K. H., 

This Certifies that aged years, months, 

residing at No. Street, has attended school in this 

city three months within the year next precedii^g the date hereof, 
and he may be employed in any manufacturing establishment, 

until 18 

Supt. of Pub, Instruction. 



158 

On the back of this certificate is printed the law of the 
State, in relation to the employment of children in manu- 
facturing establishments. 

The certificates given by the teachers are of no use to the 
overseers, but are placed on file in the office of the Superin- 
tendent, in order that it may be known who are entitled to 
work. In the case of children coming into the city, some- 
times I have sent to the city from which they have moved, 
to ascertain in relation to their attendance at school ; some, 
times I have been obliged to rely upon the testimony of the 
children, or their parents. 

The law requires those employing children to have a cer- 
tificate from the School Board, for every child employed, 
and if there are children in the mills of whom the over- 
seers have not required certificates, it is plain that such 
overseers have not complied with the provisions of the law. 
If people are disposed to state the case falsely, either in. 
regard to the age of children, or the time at school, the 
School Committee and not the overseers must decide upon 
the merits of the case. 

As it is managed in this city, it would not be difficult at 
any time to ascertain whether children were employed con- 
trary to law, as each child should have a teacher's certifi- 
cate filed in this office. 

Generally, when I have found children in the mills who 
had no legal right there, and have called the attention of the 
overseers to the fact, they have been promptly discharged. 

As has been stated, this subject is of such vast import- 
ance as to require constant attention, for if some overseers 
are disposed to carry out, in good faith, the provisions of 
the law, but little can be accomplished if the children dis- 
charged from one mill find employment the next day in 
another establishment. Complaint is sometimes made that 
this is done, and on this account I would urge the neces- 
sity of attending strictly to the enforcement of the law. 



159 
TRUANCY. 

No subject has been disciiSvsed more fully in school re- 
ports of former years, none having been regarded as of 
more vital importance to the welfare of the city. At fre- 
quent times, ordinances have been enacted by the City 
Council, and resolutions passed by the School Board, in re- 
lation to it. During all this time, although much was 
done to arrest the evil, there were a great many children 
not enrolled in any scliool. It became evident to the com- 
munity that a special truant officer was needed. 

Early in the year, the School Committee passed the fol- 
lowing vote, viz : 

Hesolved. — That in the opinion of this Board, truancy from the 
public schools in this city is a very great evil, entailing ignorance 
and vice upon the community, and that they, therefore, recom- 
mend to the City Council the appointment of some suitable person 
to act as Truant Officer, to bring children, unnecessarily absenting 
themselves, into the schools. 

This resolution was presented to the City Council, and 
the Superintendent appeared before the Mayor and Alder- 
men, to urge the appointment of some one to serve as 
special officer for this purpose. After some deliberation, 
they decided to detail some one of the police force for that 
purpose. 

Mr. David Thayer, one of the regular police force, was 
detailed to act in that capacity for three weeks ; at the end 
of that time he was instructed to continue his labors till 
the close of the term. 

At the beginning of the Spring term he was detailed for 
that term, and in September was appointed to act perma- 
nently, under the provisions of the following ordinance : 



160 

AN ORDINANCE IN AMENDMENT OF CHAPTER 19 OP THE REVISED 

ORDINANCES. 

Be it ordained, hy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Coun- 
cil of the City of Manchester in City Council assembled, as 
folloivs : 

Section 1. The mayor and aldermen shall, annually, in 
the month of January, appoint three or more truant officers, 
one of whom shall be detailed for duty under the supervis- 
ion and direction of the board of school committee, and 
shall receive for his services the sum of sixty dollars monthly 
while actually employed, and shall hold his office until a 
successor is appointed and qualified in his stead, unless 
sooner removed by said board. 

Sec. 2. The mayor and aldermen shall fill any vacancy 
caused by resignation or otherwise, and may at any time 
appoint additional truant officers. 

Sec. 3. All ordinances and parts of ordinances conflict- 
ing with this are hereby repealed. 

Passed August 20, 1872. 

Mr. Thayer accordingly has served as truant officer since 
the first of February last, and the value of his services can 
hardly be estimated. He has proved himself a faithful and 
efficient officer, has endeavored to act as 2i friend and adviser 
rather than a terror to the children. 

The exact number of children brought into school 
through his efforts cannot be stated, as many have been 
found in the streets and at home who have been induced 
by a very little effort to attend some school, but their names 
have not been reported, as they could hardly be classed as 
truants. 

Some have been taken into the public schools, and some 
into the other schools in the city. It is safe to state that 
at least two hundred children have attended some public 
school, none of whom would have been enrolled in any 
school had it not been for the efforts of the officers. In 
many localities of the city, where, formerly, boys congre- 



161 

gated, much to the auuoyaiice of well-disposed persons, 
such boys canuot now be found. 

Frequently families moving into the city have neglected 
to send their children to school for some weeks, sometimes 
for months ; such children have been induced to attend 
school, while others enrolled in the schools have been com- 
pelled to attend more regularly. 

There has been an erroneous idea in the minds of many 
people in relation to the duties of a truant oflicer, some 
thinking it his duty to arrest and lock up every child found 
in the streets during school hours. It should be the duty 
of the officer to ascertain the whereabouts of children 
absenting themselves from school, to ascertain their resi- 
dences, and many facts having a bearing upon the case. 
Children found in the streets must be treated as other 
children ; oftentimes the parents can be interested in the 
matter and much accomplished without any serious disturb- 
ance. It is well for the officer to have an understanding 
with the parents in relation to the attendance of their child- 
ren at school, for in this way many can be kept in school 
without much labor, whereas, if the parent is offijnded on 
account of the action of the officer, oftentimes the object is 
defeated. 

There are some children, liowever, who cannot be dealt 
with in this way, and these can be reached only by the 
strong arm of the law. 

Many of those found by the officer have been taken to 
school and have attended constantly, others have been 
taken to this office where they have promised to attend 
regularly, some have been brought before the police court, 
but dismissed, as they promised to attend school, while a few 
have been sentenced to the Reform School. 

The working of the law for the past year must be grati- 
fying to all interested in the education of youth in this 
place, and we may confidently expect that with a vigorous 

City Report— U 



162 

effort for the coming year many more will be brought within 
the influence of our schools, and the benefits of the schools 
extended to all classes. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

In the summer of 1868 a course of study was adopted for 
the various grades of schools, which course has been pur- 
sued since that time. During the past year it has been 
revised to some extent, but it needs a more thorough revis- 
ion. As arranged four years ago a course was marked out 
to be pursued for the year, but it was not specified what 
branches should be studied each term, consequently different 
schools of the same grade were pursuing different studies 
at the same time, and scholars changing their residences 
and entering schools in other parts of the city did not 
always find classes suited to their advancement. 

This difficulty should be remedied as far as possible, 
although in a city like this where the population is chang- 
ing, and the school room in many sections is limited, it is 
impossible to arrange the schools in such a manner as to 
have all the schools of the same grade working on the same 
plan. The studies of each of the three terms in the year 
and the limits in each study can be assigned, so that, 
as far as practicable, all schools of the same grade may 
pursue the same course for the term. So many studies are 
now required in the school that it is impossible to devote 
sufficient time to each branch for a daily recitation, and 
one important thing to be considered is the relative amount 
of time to be devoted to each study. 

There is time enough in the years allotted to the Pri- 
mary, Middle and Grammar schools for pupils to pursue all 
the studies a sufficient length of time, provided there is a 



163 

proper distribution of the time, but* it is evident that in 
schools where Arithmetic, Reading, Spelling, Geography, 
Penmansliip, Music, Drawing, and History are taught, there 
is not time enough each day for a recitation in each. 
A part of the studies can be pursued one term, and the 
remainder the next term, or some studies a part of one 
term and the others the remainder of the term, or there 
can be an alternation from day to day. 

The important fact must be borne in mind that there is 
not time enough in one day for a recitation in each branch. 
An hour each day must be devoted to opening exercises 
and recesses ; where there are only two classes in a room, 
an hour and a half is required for reading and spelling, an 
hour for written arithmetic, and an liour for mental arith- 
metic. This arrangement gives only a half hour to each 
recitation, and in a Grammar school, where there are from 
fifteen to twenty pupils in a class, that amount of time is 
needed. A half hour is needed each day for penmanship, 
and there is only left one hour for geography, history, lan- 
guage, music, drawing, composition, declamation and similar 
exercises. 

The objection is sometimes urged that in case a study is 
discontinued for a time the pupils lose the knowledge of 
the subject they have gained, so that when the subject is 
resumed it is like commencing a new subject. If this is true 
— of which there is some doubt — some of the branches can 
be pursued as regular studies, while others can be studied 
in such a manner as to keep the subject fresh in the minds 
of the pupils. 

The time in school should not be so occupied with recita- 
tions as to leave the children but little time for study. The 
question is frequently asked, " How much should pupils 
study out of school?" I answer, but little as regards their 
regular school exercises. Many of them have work to do at 
home, which occupies a portion of their time, and if they 



1G4 

have leisure at home^it can be spent profitably in -reading 
and studying some book other than those used as text books 
in the school. 

By miscellaneous reading, I do not mean the reading of 
those works of fiction, too many of which are found in the 
hands of pupils, some of the works, too, being taken from 
public libraries, some from Sabbatli School libraries. There 
are works having an intimate connection with the studies 
of the school, historical or scientilic works that can be read 
with a benefit to tliose pursuing studies of the higher grades, 
and for the younger classes, works similar to the Child's 
Book of Nature^ which has been used for the past term with 
such good success in some of the Middle and Grammar 
schools. For children in the Primary school, books like 
the Nursery can be used to advantage. 

The books that a child reads out of school have a great 
influence upon his progress in school, and is a subject to 
which teachers will do well to give heed. 

If, bowever, the time in the schools is so occupied with 
recitations, and the lessons arranged are of such character 
as to require several hours of study at home, the result is 
bad. 

The great portion of school work should be done in the 
school room, although as pupils enter the higher grades 
more work can be done outside. There will be, in every 
school, those who are nnable to perform as much work as 
others, and such ones must study more or less out of school, 
but to prescribe a course of study to complete which will 
require a great amount of study at home, is decidedly 
wrong. 

The school room is a workshop, and there is not much 
danger of overworking the pupils if the amount of time 
given to recitation, the temperature of the rooms, and kin- 
dred subjects are sufficiently considered. 

Let the pupils be trained to do their work rapidly and 
thoroughly in the school room, thereby forming habits of 



• 165 

such a character as to give them strength to perform their 
work well in after life. There is a great deal said in re- 
gard to overworking pupils in the school room, and the con- 
sequent injury to the health of many, but it is the manner 
in which the time is spent out of school that breaks down 
many children. The health of the pnpils is the first thing 
to be considered, and every thing should be done to assist a 
child in this respect, no matter whether he stands at the 
head or the foot of the class. 

In arranging a course of study, we must consider the 
fact, to which allusion has already been made, that some 
pupils can do a great deal more than others, and the work 
should be so arranged that the class as a whole can perform 
it. If there are those who can do more, they will be able to 
secure extra promotions, besides haviiig more time for gen- 
eral reading. In the promotion of scholars, we take into 
account simply the progress made in the text books used in 
the schools, not the amount of information acquired in 
other ways. Whether or not we can make a change in this 
respect, remains to be seen. 

The same difificulty in regard to the distribution of time 
has been experienced in other places. At a meeting of the 
School Superintendents of New England, a committee was 
appointed to consider the subject of a general revision of 
the course of study, and the time to be given to each 
branch. This committee will soon be ready to report, and 
it is hoped that the report may assist us in prescribing a 
course of study for our schools. 

We may be able to fix the number of hours that should 
be given to each study, for a term. 

In preparing a new course of study, considerable thought 
should be given to the study of Languages ; oral lessons 
in this department should be given in all grades, from the 
Primary to the High school. 

This plan opens the the way for the discussion of the rel- 
ative merits of text-book instruction, and oral instruction. 



166 

Although much can be done by oral instruction, still the 
judicious use of text books must not be condemned. If 
there were no more than twenty pupils placed in charge of 
one teacher, and the attendance should be regular, the 
teaching might be oral, but as the attendance fiequently is 
so irregular, and the number of pupils under the charge of 
one teacher must be upwards of forty, and sometimes nearly 
fifty, teachers cannot have the time for oral teaching that 
they ought. One thing, however, is clear, that in a school 
where teachers do not rely entirely on text books, but teach 
the subject independently of all books, the best results are 
attained. 

Reading and spelling should bo the prominent studies in 
Primary schools ; at least three fifths of the working hours 
each week should be allotted to these branches. The in- 
troduction of the Nursery into these schools has proved of 
great advantage in teaching the pupils to read pieces at 
sight, and at the same time the pupils have been much in- 
terested in many of the pieces. 

The Child's Book of Nature has been used as a reading 
book in some of the Middle and lower divisions of the 
Grammar schools, during the past term, the use of the 
same having been attended with good results. The pupils 
have had the benefit of the reading exercise, and much in- 
formation has been acquired. 

Pupils ought to read a great deal in other books than the 
regularly-prescribed text book ; selections from magazines 
or daily pa])ers should be made. It is thought by many 
teachers that a class ought not to be asked to read a piece 
that has not been studied. I cannot agree with those views, 
for I think the object of teaching reading in our schools is 
to give the pupils such a familiarity with the language that 
words can be called at sight, and the proper words employed 
even though the position of the words is changed. 

The object to be secured in. teaching arithmetic is not 
merely to enable pupils to solve a few problems in a book 



167 

readily, but to perform accurately such examples as they will 
find in every-day life. 

So with reading ; it is not the province of the schools to 
enable scholars to read a few selections from the reader, 
but to read intelligibly such selections from books or papers 
as they may be asked to read. Of course to do this there 
must be a vast amount of practice in the schools. There 
should be elocutionary drill daily, faults in pronunciation, 
and articulation should be noticed, not only in the reading 
lesson, but in all recitations. It is of little use to require 
pupils to practice upon the vowel and consonant sounds 
during a reading lesson, and allow the same elements to be 
used so carelessly in other recitations. Much of the time 
in the reading exercise is occupied in the endeavor to cor- 
rect the bad habits formed in other recitations. The clear 
enunciation taught in connection with the reading lesson 
should be applied in other exercises. 

The pieces read should not be beyond the comprehension 
of the pupils nor should they be allowed to spell so many 
of the words in the reading lesson. Many of the blunders 
made in reading are because so many of the words are 
obliged to be spelled while the children are reading. 

It is is not well to notice too many errors in the reading, 
as the pupils are liable to be confused with so many cor- 
rections. Some deficiencies can be made more prominent 
in some recitation, and the attention of the child called 
especially to them. ' 

I have had occasion in former re{)orts to speak of the 
good results in spelling. For the past year the plan adopt- 
ed a few years since has been practiced. This plan is to 
require the pupils to spell words from the various text books 
in use, and many words found outside of the books, words 
which the pupils ai^e liable to use in daily conversation. 

As spelling was formerly taught, there were many pupils 
who could spell the long words found in the speller, such 



168 

as hieroglyphics, hypochondria^ adscititious , rnonocotyledonous^ 
words that they would seldom meet after leaving school, 
while they would misspell words like ivhich, those, many, 
city, primer, and others wliich are used. Many of the 
teachers in the Primary and Middle schools require con- 
stant practice upon some of the common words that are 
used daily, and it would be well if all teachers in these 
grades would adopt such a course, using care to select the 
most common words. 

At the examination of candidates for admission to the 
High school last summer, a list of one hundred words was 
submitted to the applicants, and especial pains were taken 
to select only those words which are in daily use. The list 
will be found in connection with the questions for examina- 
tion of pupils for admission to the High school. 

The suggestions made in connection with the subject of 
reading as far as they relate to articulation, apply with 
equal force to spelling. Much can be done in this way to 
correct many of the faults in pronunciation. The pronun- 
ciation of long words found in the speller is a good exer- 
cise for articulation, even if tlie words are not spelled. 

In relation to penmanship, I think it could be taught with 
profit in many of the lower-grade schools. Some object to 
this, assigning as a reason, that if pupils commence to 
write at an early age they will acquire bad habits, as re- 
gards position of body, method of holding pen, etc. There 
may be some force in the objection, and while we cannot 
be too particular in regard to these matters, we must bear 
in mind that nearly all pupils will in some way iSarn to 
make tlie letters of our alphabet, and will use the pen and 
pencil a great deal. It is therefore a question to be con- 
sidered, whether it is not better to connnence the work in 
our schools earlier than we have done, and thus endeavor 
to start the young pupils in a correct manner. The fre- 
quent written examinations that occur in most of our 



169 

schools, give an opportunity for the pupils to write a great 
deal outside of the copy-])ook, and it is an excellent prac- 
tice. The directions given in regard to teaching this branch 
should be thoroughly studied by teachers of all grades. 

As the studies are arranged, it is proposed that pupils 
shall be taught to count quite early in the course, being 
taught in the Primary schools to add and subtract small 
numbers ; but the text book is not to be used in this grade. 
Pupils can perform the operations in mental arithmetic 
with ease and rapidity, and they should not be troubled to 
learn the rules and definitions until later in the course. 
The object in studying arithmetic is to become familiar with 
the use of numbers, and not to repeat long formulas 
which are of no benefit whatever in mathematical calcula- 
tions. These can be learned later in the course as a mental 
discipline. 

Practical arithmetic might be taught earlier in the course, 
and taken in connection with the study of mental arithme- 
tic. The subjects ought to be studied at the same time. It 
is a wrong idea to pursue the study of mental arithmetic 
for several j'ears before commencing what we technically 
term written arithmetic. When scholars are learning the 
division and multiplication tables in the mental arithmetic, 
they can be taught to numerate, add, subtract, multiply 
and divide, and when they are pursuing the subject of frac- 
tions, they vsliould be accustomed to cipher a great deal. 

Sometimes, however, the time is not profitably spent in 
ciphering after the principle is well understood. It might 
be better in arrangijig a course of study, simply to say 
arithmetic, giving the topics to be pursued in each grade 
witbout specifying whether it is Written or Mental Arith- 
metic. We need not have two different rectations in arith- 
metic in the Grammar schools, but the two studies hereto- 
fore known as Mental and Written Arithmetic can be taken 
at once. There are examples in tlie Practical Arithmetic 



170 

which ought to be performed mentally, and there are ex- 
amples in the Intellectual which need the use of the slate 
and blackboard. 

Geograpliy has been studied in the two grades of Middle 
schools, and the two lower divisions of the Grammar school. 
It has been reviewed in the first division of the Grammar 
school. The text-book has been used in all these grades. 
This has given too much time to this study, and the text- 
book has been used too much. 

I am confident that we should have better results if not 
more than half as much time were allowed for this study, 
and the text-book used less. We ought not to teach less 
of the subject, but we should do it in less time. Much of 
the time heretofore allotted to this study could be devoted 
to Language ; nd Penmanship. 

History might be taught orally in the lower divisions, 
the study continued in the next divisions, not with the in- 
tention of requiring the pupils to commit to memory ver- 
batim the words of the book, but that the book may be used 
as a reading book, and the topic of the lessons made fa- 
miliar by conversation and illustrations, the regular text- 
book being studied in the higher divisions of the Grammar 
schools. 

Drawing has been taught as in previous years. There is 
yet no uniform system pursued in our schools, but in the 
schools where it has been pursued upon a regular plan, the 
results have been satisfactory. 

At the begining of the year a new teacher of vocal mu- 
sic was elected, who lias visited each school in the city 
once in two weeks. So much has been said in late re- 
ports in relation to this branch that little needs to be said 
at this time. It is as much a recognized branch of study 
as any in the curriculum, and is so regarded in most of the 
schools. 



171 

The regular teachers, under the direction of the music 
teachers, are carrying into effect the plan proposed by the 
Board. We must constantly bear in mind that this subject 
is not taught in the schools for the benefit of the few, in 
order that some who arc gifted in this direction can be- 
come extraordinary singers, but it is for the benefit of the 
mass of pupils enrolled in the schools. 

Langvuige is the study that requires the most attention in 
the revision of the course, because heretofore nothing has 
been said in regard to it, and hence there has been no uni- 
form system in regard to the method of instruction. For 
a long time it has been deemed important that there should 
be a systematic course of teaching in this department ; that 
pains should be taken with the pupils early in the course 
to teach them the correct use of the language. 

There is no doubt of the good results to be obtained from 
following the plan adopted, provided teachers do not require 
too many definitions and rules, or attempt to teach too 
much of the science. Pupils in the Primary and Middle 
schools can he taught to construct sentences, and to correct 
some of the common errors in the use of language, but all 
abstract definitions and scientific explanations must be 
avoided until late in the course. The only objection to 
calling the study Grammar instead of Language is that 
we would fall into the old way of teaching the definitions 
of nouns and verbs and the rules of Syntax before any 
attention is paid to the use of language. 

It has been stated in former reports, and it can be repeated 
with emphasis that pupils can learn the different parts of 
speech so that they can be distinguished readily, can 
repeat the rules of syntax with the exceptions, and still 
not be able to write a page correctly. There are others who 
have not studied grammar who write the English language 
quite well, because they have been accustomed to the correct 
use of it. 



172 

The only way that a pupil can learn to speak and write 
correctly is'to commence early ; the errors noticed in the 
school room should be corrected. We speak of errors that 
have their origin at home and in the street, but in many of 
the recitations pupils are allowed to violate many of the 
plainest rules of syntax. 

A course of study must not be so rigid as to repress in- 
dividuality, nor must it be so elastic as to allow pupils the 
opportunity of passing through the various grades with only 
a superficial knowledge of the subject. The semi-annual 
promotions give an opportunity to the deserving ones of 
gaining time by receiving double promotions, while those 
who, on account of sickness or other causes are unable to 
keep with their classes, will not lose so much as though the 
promotions were but once a year. 

Sometimes a pupil will be sufficiently well versed in all 
branches but one to deserve promotion, and it is a question 
whether that pupil shall be compelled to remain behind 
another six months merely to study that one branch. 

These and other practical questions must be considered, 
and we must not lose sight of the fact that it is more im- 
portant to educate the mass of children in the city, than it 
is to have what is called a splendid system of schools with 
what passes for a remarkably good course of study. 

At the present time wiien so much is required of the 
children in the schools, physical culture must receive a 
prominent place in the course. A certain amount of time 
should be devoted daily to physical exercises ; they should 
form as much a part of the exercises at school as reading 
and spelling. Other things can be neglected ; the health of 
the children mast not he neglected. 



173 
TEXT BOOKS AND APPARATUS. 

No change has been made in text books, except the in- 
troduction of Mason's Music Readers into schools where 
pupils were to purchase new books. Those classes having 
the other books will retain them, so that no expense will 
be involved in the change. 

In consequence of opening the school in the Lincoln- 
Street building, the schools in Piscataquog, and the one in 
the Stark District, it has been necessary to purchase an un- 
usual supply of maps, charts and text books for the use of 
the schools, so that the expenditure for supplies, books and 
stationery, and some items charged to incidentals, has been 
much larger than usual. 

The schools are well supplied with reference books, maps 
and charts. Much can be accomplished by these instru- 
ments where efficient teachers are found who can make 
good use of them. Let schools be well supplied with globes, 
maps, charts, dictionaries and reference books generally, 
and the increased interest manifested will amply compen- 
sate for the expense. 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Since the organization of this school, three years ago 
last October, forty-two young ladies have entered the school 
to prepare themselves for the duties of teachers. Of this 
number thirty have been selected to teach, of whom twenty- 
four are now in the service, and there are others at present 
in the school that can be selected to fill vacancies as they 
occur. 

The objects and the plan of the school have been men- 
tioned before, so it is needless to speak of them now. The 



174 

results have been good, some excellent teachers havhigbeen 
selected for the various grades of school. The school has 
been conducted without any special regulations, and in fact 
there is not much need of them. 

At a meeting of the Board, November 23, it was voted 
to consolidate the two departments of the Training school, 
and place both in the Merrimack-Street building, the new 
arrangement to go into effect at the beginning of next term. 
For the past year the school on Merrimack Street has had 
an unvisually large number of pupils, so that in fact the 
Training school has served not only as a school for training 
teachers, but also as a place to accommodate the many 
pupils who could not be accommodated elsewhere. 

Training schools are now regarded as a part of the 
school system of our large cities. With us it is not an ex- 
periment, but after three years' trial its success has been 
such as to warrant its continuance. The only objection that 
has ever been urged against such schools has been that the 
children would suffer by being under the charge of so many 
different teachers. This has never operated against the 
school in this city, and the same report reaches us from 
other places. 

In fact this school overcomes one difficulty tliat is met 
in all systems of graded schools. There will be in every 
school pupils who need more less assistance, which assist- 
ance cannot be rendered during the time of recitation, and 
teachers in regular graded schools cannot find time to ren- 
der such assistance ; consequently in the best schools some 
pupils lag behind on that very account. 

The young ladies in this school can give individual at- 
tention to such pupils, and in this way the school can accom- 
plish more than other schools of the same grade. Changes 
can be made in the management of the school, suggestions 
made from time to time, as the needs of the pupils require. 
Care must be taken that this school maintain as high a rank 



175 

as any in the city ; otherwise people sending children there 
will complain, and that justly, that their children are obliged 
to attend an experimental school where persons are trained 
for teaching, at the expense of the pupils attending that 
school. 

It should not only be as good as other schools, but for 
reasons before specified it should be better. Th ^ r( gilar 
teachers, not being confined so closely to hearing recitations, 
as teachers of the other schools, can have opportunity to 
watch more carefully the progress of individual pupils, and 
can render efficient aid to many of them. 

Some have been admitted who had not completed the full 
course at the High school, but it will be well to limit the 
number of those entering the Training school to graduates 
of the High school, or to those who have received an edu- 
cation elsewhere equivalent to that received by those who 
graduate from the High school in this city. 



TEACHERS' MEETINGS. 

The teachers have been called together several times by 
the superintendent, Mr. Kimball has met them frequently 
for the purpose of giving them directions regarding the 
subject of vocal music, and there has been an association 
formed by the teachers, which has had a few meetings. 

In a city where there are sixty-five teachers, two-thirds of 
whom are teaching in the city proper, there ought to be a 
sufficient degree of professional interest to sustain such an 
organization without anything being done by the school 
board concerning it. There are many subjects connected 
with the management of the schools that can be discussed 
at these meetings with profit to all the teachers. 



176 

Such meetings need not be formal in their character, but 
of such a nature as to allow all to express their opinions 
freely, make such inquiries as are thought proper, and offer 
such suggestions as may be deemed best. It should be en- 
tirely voluntary on the part of the teachers, the interest in 
the work being sufficient to sustain the organization. 

There are times when it will be of advantage for the 
school committee to call meetings of the teachers in order 
to lay before them certain plans, which can as well be done 
in a meeting of sixty teachers as with each separately. 
The school committee have authority to call together the 
teachers at such times as may be deemed advisable, but the 
interests of the schools will be better subserved if these 
meetings are held without any compulsion. 



GENERAL MATTERS. 

The number of children in Manchester who ought to 
receive the benefits of its schools cannot be ascertained, as 
there is no provision for a school census. The subject has 
been discussed frequently, but nothing has been done to aid 
in obtaining a correct census. 

Five years ago there were no French pupils in our schools, 
or indeed the number of such was so small that it was hardly 
noticeable. The past term over five hundred have been 
registered in the various schools. Many of them have 
made commendable progress and are rapidly acquiring a 
knowledge of our language. The great obstacle to their 
advancement is irregularity of attendance. 

The citizens of this place, in common with those of every 
part of the land, are willing and anxious to do whatever 
can be done to provide the means of a good education to 
all in our midst, irrespective of nationality or sect, and I 



177 

know of nothing in our system of schools to which objection 
can be made in relation to our treatment of foreigMi children. 

It has always been regarded as one of the chief attrac- 
tions of the American common school that the children of 
all nationalities could be educated together, all classes could 
alike share its benefits. No institution is so far-reaching 
in its tendencies, so universally broad in its aim, as this. 
It is emphatically for all classes, sects and nationalities. 
The assaults that have been made upon it in many parts of 
the land have not weakened the faith of its supporters in 
the prevailing benefits of the system. 

I speak of it in connection with the subject of the foreign 
element in our schools to show that no prejudice operates 
against any class in the schools. 

In conclusion I can say, as was said in the report of the 
school committee of last year, '^ I have no words of boast- 
ing for our schools." Other cities may have better schools, 
better results may be attained elsewhere. Of this others 
must judge. I have spoken of the work done by the schools 
the past year. The record of the year is finished. 

New schools have been organized, new methods of in- 
struction adopted, we have attempted to do what we could 
to secure for the children of this city a good common school 
education. 

The work for the coming year certainly can be no lighter 
than it has been during the year now closing, but I have no 
doubt that liberal appropriations, and a corresponding in- 
terest on the part of those having charge of the funds, will 
secure good results. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

Superintendent. 

Manchester, December 31, 1872. 

City Report— 12 



178 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE DIFFERENT SCHOOLS 
THE PAST YEAR. 



SCHOOLS. 


Whole number be-, 
longing. 


u 

M 

2 bb 

s s 

al 

> 

< 


i 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


> 

< 




82 
89 
108 
193 
114 
61 
60 
27 
28 
34 
47 
49 
59 
65 
50 
39 
32 
117 
21 
43 
50 
61 
73 
90 
63 
65 
55 
45 
66 
54 
39 
17 
30 
28 
44 
10 
37 
21 
25 
19 
40 
29 
21 


121 

151 
140 
232 
51 
66 
64 
29 
32 
30 
46 
45 
63 
50 
29 
52 
47 
96 
26 
39 
38 
60 
63 
91 
51 
57 
70 
60 
51 
58 
36 
36 
20 
28 
45 
12 
34 
24 
17 
16 
30 
34 
17 


203 

240 

248 

425 

165 

127 

124 

56 

60 

64 

93 

94 

122 

115 

79 

91 

79 

213 

47 

82 

88 

121 

136 

181 

114 

122 

125 

105 

116 

112 

75 

53 

50 

56 

89 

22 

71 

45 

42 

35 

70 

63 

38 


129 
166 
159 
278 
61 
74 
61 
35 
38 
26 
42 
31 
50 
49 
31 
40 
36 
50 
35 
42 
40 
41 
40 
84 
44 
45 
39 
31 
39 
36 
34 
31 
26 
42 
45 
13 
40 
29 
24 
23 
42 
35 
20 


121 




161 




157 




270 




48 




69 




5T 




33 




35 


1' << No 2 


25 


<' " No 3 


37 


u " No 4 


26 




46 


• i << No 8 


48 


u '1 No 9.. 


31 


" No. 10 

Primary School No. 1... 

.i No 2 


37 
33 
44 


11 >» No 3 


31 


'i li No 4 


38 


11 a No 6 


37 


li " No 7 


39 


i. " No 8 


38 


ii " No 9 


73 


i< 11 No 11 


39 


li i< No 12 


41 




35 




29 


a "1 No 15 


35 


i< <' No 16 


33 


<i " No 17 


31 


<i «' No 18 


25 


<i ii No 19 


25 


" '< No 20 


38 




41 




11 


u " No 3 


38 




27 


<i " No 5 


22 


« " No 6 


20 


11 << No 7 


38 


« 11 No 8 : 


31 


" " No. 9 


17 










2,278 


2,110 







The whole number reported from each school, if added together would be more 
than the whole number in all the schools, as some scholars are .•jff ^f^ ,^';°°^ ^\7° ^„' 
more different schools. The whole number of different pupils attending all the 
schools last year was, as near as can be ascertained, 3,500. 



SERVICES 



DEDICATION OF THE LINCOLN -STEEET SCHOOL HOUSE, 
JANUARY 23, 1872. 



This building, a description of which was given in tlie 
last Annual School Report, was formally dedicated on the 
23d of January last. The exercises were held in the room 
at that time used for a hall, as the large hall in the upper 
story was not then completed. The room was completely 
filled, there being many present from abroad. 

Hon. P. C. Cheney, Mayor of the city, presided. Prayer 
was offered by Rev. William J. Tucker. Gov. Weston, 
who as Mayor in 1871 was Chairman of the Building Com- 
mittee, delivered the keys to Mayor Cheney. 

ADDRESS OF GOVERNOR WESTON. 

^'Mr. Mayor: 

" As the chairman of the committee to whom the con- 
struction of the Lincoln-street school-house was entrusted, 
the pleasing duty is courteously accorded to me to submit to 
you, the chief executive officer of the city, the result of 
our labors, and to surrender this structure, through you, to 
the purposes of a Grammar school. 

" The lot upon which the building stands was procured 
in 1869, and a contract was made for laying the foundation 



180 

that season, which was completed the following year. In 
1870, by order of the City Councils, the principal materi- 
als used in the construction of the house were purchased, 
and on the 24th day of January, 1871, an order was passed 
by the City Councils instructing the Committee on Lands 
and ]?uildings, with the Mayor, " to erect a school-house 
on the lot on Lincoln street, agreeably to the plans adopted 
by a former committee." 

" After advertising for proposals, the committee awarded 
the principal contract to Alpheus Gay, Esq., which was 
signed on the 24th day of March. The architect, G. W. 
Stevens, and myself, were then appointed a sub-committee 
to superintend the details of the work, and it is but justice 
to say that this labor has devolved mainly upon the archi- 
tect, to whom the committee desire to express their obliga- 
tions, and to whom the community is indebted for the arch- 
itectural taste and beauty displayed in this, structure. 

" Aside from the work of the principal contractor, mate- 
rials have been furnished by the following parties : G. H. 
Kimball, foundation ; H. Willey, grading ; Jesse Gault, 
brick ; Haines & Wallace, lumber ; Pike & Heald, furnaces ; 
American Tablet Company, blackboards ; Dunlap & Baker, 
tower clock, and William Blake, bell. It affords the com- 
mittee great pleasure to say tliat, with slight exceptions, 
the contracts have been faithfully and satisfactorily per- 
formed. 

" A particular description having been laid before the 
citizens on other occasions, it is not deemed necessary to 
repeat it here, further than to remark that it has been the 
design of the committee to erect a substantial, commodious 
and thoroughly-constructed building, and one which may 
be pointed to with pride rather than regret. How far they 
have been successful is for others to determine. 

" And now, sir, as I transfer to you these keys, it is with 
the conviction that you and your associates of the School 



181 

Board will guard well the portals of this new temple of 
learning ; that the keys may truly become the keys of 
knowledge, and never be turned against the honest inquirer 
after learning, but will ever exclude all contaminating in- 
fluences and disturbing elements. As a seat of learning, 
may good scholarship and honest endeavors be ever found 
within its walls, and may the inculcations that proceed 
from the teachers emanate from virtuous impulses, be well 
received, and crowned with success." 

MAYOR Cheney's remarks. 

Mayor Cheney, on receiving the keys, spoke as follows : 

" In behalf of the City Government I accept these keys 
from your hands, and congratulate you upon the successful 
termination of the labors of your committee. The super- 
vision of the erection of a building like this is no easy 
task, and the best compensation you can receive for what- 
ever care and anxiety you may have experienced on this 
account is the assurance that your efforts are fully appreci- 
ated and will not be forgotten." 

Addressing Judge Upton, chairman of the Sub-Commit- 
tee for that school, he said : 

" You are about to receive under your guardianship this 
beautiful structure. My connection with you in an official 
capacity renders it proper that the formality of transferring 
to you the keys should be prefaced by a few remarks. 
Hardly two years have passed since the construction of this 
building was conceived. And yet we are here to-day to 
solemnly dedicate it to the great cause of education, — the 
foundation of all that pertains to our future usefulness, 
advancement and success in life. Our highest and noblest 
aspirations arise from intellectual and moral culture, nursed 
and stimulated by our glorious system of free education. 



182 

It is not too much to say that our existence as a nation 
depends upon the successful operation of our free schools, 
and we can but see and realize the increasing prosperity of 
those towns and cities whose aim is a hio-h deo;ree of excel- 
lence in the training of the young. To no one thing are 
we so much indebted for the increase of our population and 
wealth for the past few years, as to the inducements which 
our city offers for public instruction. The education of 
their children is the first thought of every true parent^ and 
they naturally seek for a home in that place which offers 
the best facilities for the accomplishment of this purpose. 
The generous and munificent expenditures constantly being 
made by our fast-growing city, for the comfort, happiness 
and safety of her children, in the erection of edifices like 
this, capacious, elegant, and admirably arranged, must be 
a new incentive to both teacher and pupil to urge them 
forward in the path of duty and arouse the just apprecia- 
tion and gratitude of us all. May the house which we this 
day dedicate secure for itself an enviable reputation, and 
add another noble monument to the intelligence of our 
people. And now, sir, into your hands I commit these keys, 
feeling that they are intrusted to experience, ability, and 
zeal in the cause of education." 

jUDCxE Upton's remarks. 

Judge Upton on receiving the keys responded as follows : 
" Mr. Mayor : 

" In receiving from you the keys of this building, permit 
me to express the gratification I feel, in common with the 
other members of the School Board, for this convenient and 
substantial structure ; and you will also allow me to con- 
gratulate you that one of the first of your official acts 
should be so intimately connected with the educational in- 
terests of our city. 



183 

" And I congratulate you, fellow citizens, that tliis build- 
ing, so adapted to its purposes and so beautiful in its appear- 
ance, has been provided for the education of your children. 
These accommodations were imperatively needed. During 
the past six years our city has been growing rapidly, and 
large demands have been made for school purposes, and 
large demands are still upon us. We have, in that time, 
enlarged the school house at Youngsville, built a new one 
in No. 5, and another in No. 4. We have furnished one 
room in the lower house in 'Squog, thoroughly repaired 
the Grammar school building in that ward, and erected a 
new house, with accommodations for four schools ; while, in 
the limits of the city proper, we have re-seated the rooms 
of the North Grammar school, repaired and re-seated the 
rooms in the old High school building, built the High 
school building, and now we have built this Grammar 
school building, with six rooms furnished and already occu- 
pied by two hundred and sixty scholars. I hardly see how 
these scholars have been provided for heretofore. Three 
of the four schools vacated in the old High school building, 
by the removal of that school to these rooms, are already 
occupied by other schools. 

" The North-Grammar-school building has three hundred 
and twenty-five scholars in its several rooms, and others 
constantly seeking admission. The South-Grammar-school 
building has in its several rooms three hundred and sixty 
scholars. The rooms in the new High-school building. 
Intermediate and Blodgett Street are all occu[>ied, and we 
can but feel as we take possession of these rooms that, 
however enviable may be the reputation of this city for what 
she has done and is doing for the cause of education, she 
has not furnished school accommodations in advance of the 
demand. 

" It may not be improper at this time and on this occasion 
to consider for a moment the demands now pressing upon 
us, and to be supplied in the immediate future. 



184 

" The foundations for a new house are now laid in the 
Stark District. A new house is wanted in the Webster 
District. More land should be secured in connection with 
the school Iniilding at Hallsville and Bakersville, and the 
Grammar-school building at 'Squog. A new house or 
addition to the old one is wanted at 'Skeag. The large 
and rapidly-increasing population in the north-east section 
of the city requires the erection of a building for primary- 
schools in the vicinity of Harrison and Beech Streets. In 
all that territory lying north of Lowell Street and east of 
Chestnut Street there is no school building. 

" What I have said of the north-east section is true of the 
south-east also, and provision should be made for a primary 
school building in the vicinity of Park and Beech Streets. 
The school has been removed from the old building at 
Towlesville and a new building is demanded in that vicinity. 
And if another year shall continue the growth of the past 
on north Elm Street, some accommodations will be required 
there. Already the middle schools in the north part of the 
city contain advanced scholars seeking admission to a Gram- 
mar school. And if the foundation for a Grammar school 
building on the corner of Bridge and Ash Street should be 
put in this year, it can hardly be completed before a full 
school shall be ready to occupy it. 

" The first step toward the organization of this school was 
taken in the fall of 1867. The records of the school com- 
mittee show that on tlie first day of November, 1867, a peti- 
tion was received from I. W. Smith and others, asking for 
the establishment of a new Grammar school in the east part 
of the city. 

" On the twenty-ninth of that month, the special commit- 
tee to whom this petition was referred, reported in favor of 
establishing two divisions of a Grammar school in the new 
High school building ; and at the commencement of the 
winter term, the third and fourth divisions of this school 



185 

were opened ; one in the room belonging to and now occu- 
pied l)y the High school, and the otlier in one of the rooms 
in the lower story of that building. 

" They continued to occupy tliese rooms till tlie spring of 
1869, when the other two divisions were established, and 
the school removed to the old High school building on 
Lowell Street. 

" The first action for the erection of this building for the 
accommodation of that school, was the passage of the fol- 
lowing resolutions by the School Board, March 12, 1869 : 

" ' Resolved, That the interests of our schools demand the 
erection of two school buildings, each having accommodation 
for a Grammar school ; one to be located south of Merri- 
mack Street and east of Beech Street : the other north of 
Lowell Street, and east of Beech Street.' 

" This resolution was presented to the City Government, 
and steps were at once taken to secure this lot, and another 
on the corner of Bridge and Ash Streets. 

" Plans and specifications for this building were obtained, 
and the contract for the foundation made. Almost three 
years have passed, and to-day we meet to dedicate the 
building to the cause of learning. 

" It is, I think, the most convenient and the most attrac- 
tive of any of our school buildings. 

" I doubt not many of you have found yourselves involun- 
tarily comparing this house and its conveniences with the 
school-house of your early days ; and you recognize and 
appreciate the improvements, and yet the improvements 
you see have hardly kept pace with those of the school 
itself, in its order and discipline, in its methods of instruc- 
tion, and in the branches of study tauglit. 

'• It seems to me that the life of a scholar in one of our 
schools must be a pleasant life. The building itself gratifies 
his sense of the beautiful, by its form and finish. The 
school-room is neat, comfortable, and pleasant, with its 



18(3 

sunny windows and appropriate furniture, and the dry, 
hard studies of arithmetic and grammar are relieved by the 
more attractive ones of music and drawing. 

" But the pleasure of the scliolar does not end with the 
close of school days. It accompanies him through life. 
As we remember the scenes of our youth, and most vividly 
the school-house and its surroundings, so will these scholars 
take with them through all the years of their future the 
scenes of their school life, and every pleasant memory shall 
become to them ' a thing of beauty and a joy forever.' 

" Some one has said that ' the pleasantest things in life 
are pleasant thoughts, and the greatest art in life is to have 
as many as possible.' And so we may congratulate our- 
selves that in the progress we have made in our school 
architecture and methods of study, we have been contribut- 
ing to the greatest art in life, and furnishing the occasion 
for pleasant thoughts to cheer, strengthen, and purify the 
future life of each scholar. 

" And we have not yet reached the end in the march of 
improvement. We trust that another year will see these 
grounds graded, a fence erected, and trees and shrubbery 
planted. We would that the hand that beautifies and adorns 
might enter these rooms and break the sharp angle of their 
corners by placing there some work of art, and hang upon 
their walls paintings, chromos or engravings. The school- 
room is the home of the child six waking hours, two hundred 
days each year, and why should it not be made as pleasant 
and as attractive as the sitting-room of the father's house ? 

" During the last year, by the unanimous vote of the City 
Government, the School Board was authorized to purchase 
a musical instrument for each of the Grammar schools of 
the city, and I trust tliat the time is not far in the future 
when, actuated by the same generous spirit, the city will pro- 
vide whatever is necessary to beautify and adorn the school- 
room, and also to furnish each scholar the books necessary 



187 

to enable him to pursue any of the studies required in the 
school. Then we can with truth claim that education is 
free, and that by our munificence, taste and forethought, the 
pathway of learning is made beautiful and lovely, and open 
to all. 

" But I have alre.idy trespassed upon your time, and will 
not longer detain you from those more competent to address 
you. It remains only for me to deliver these keys to the 
master of this school." 

Addressing Mr. Dame, Principal of the school, he said : 

" In committing these keys to you, allow me to congratu- 
late you on the success you have already achieved. Your 
past efforts encourage us to expect much in the future. The 
committee anticipate that you and your able corps of assist- 
ants will make this school the equal of any in its grade. 
You will teach spelling, reading, writing, drawing, arithme- 
tic, geography aad grammar, and you will aim in each 
department of study to show good results. You will remem- 
ber, too, that by the constitution of this State, you are 
required to teacli piety, religion and morality. This does 
not require the inculcation of sectarian sentiments, but it 
does require that by precept and example you should impress 
upon your scholars a love for truth, justice and purity. 
This is a Christian country. Our schools are the outgrowth 
of our Clu'istian civilization. These scholars are the chil- 
dren of Christian parents. Teach them as a Christian, a 
Christian's faith. The prosperity of our people, the devel- 
opment of our institutions, and the perpetuity of our coun- 
try, depend upon the Christian education of our children^ 
We then commit to you great trusts, and in the performance 
of your duty we extend to you our sympathy and pledge to 
you our counsel and our aid." 

Mr. Dame, accepting the keys from the School Committee, 
made a very appropriate speech, thanking the committee for 



188 

the support rendered him, and pledging his fidelity, and 
that of those associated with him in the work assigned 
tliem . 

J. G. Edgerly, Esq., the city Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, delivered a somewhat extended address, cover- 
ing the history of school buildings in the city, and discussed 
at length the American common school system. 

Marshall P. Hall, Esq., of the school committee, followed 
in brief and valuable remarks regarding the influence of 
common school education. 

Rev. Dr. C. W. Wallace followed with a short speech. 
He thought that, inasmuch as the people had taxed them- 
selves heavily for schools, the children should be compelled, 
if necessary, to avail themselves of their benefits. He also 
said that the influence of a noble-minded man as a teacher 
is of much more importance than his mere knowledge of 
the branches to be taught. He would have first-class 
teachers, and, after fixing a salary for scholastic qualifica- 
tions, would add as much more for true manhood. 

Joseph W. Simonds, Esq., State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, was next introduced. He complimented the 
people of Manchester for the interest which they had always 
taken in education, and for the excellence of the schools 
which they had maintained. 

James 0. Adams, Esq., the next speaker, contrasted the 
splendid school edifices in many of the cities and towns of 
the State with the small and uncomfortable houses of former 
years. He contended that there had been a great improve- 
ment in the method of teaching, and that we have better 
scholars than formerly. 

Ex-Gov. Smyth, the next speaker, referred to the interest 
he had always felt in the public schools of the city, and 
humorously remarked that he regarded the pupils as his 
children. He alluded to a part of a loan which the First 
National Bank (of which he is cashier) had recently taken 



189 

from the city of Petersburg, Va. He said the loan was 
contracted to pay for erecting several splendid school-house 
buildings at Petersburg, and for other improvements in the 
city. 

The ex-Governor visited Petersburg, and he said that 
when he saw the fine school buildings there, and became 
aware of the interest which the citizens of that fine city 
were taking in education, he had not the least doubt of 
their financial reliability. The speaker contended that the 
interest which the people of Manchester have always cher- 
ished in the public schools, is the best evidence of the 
stability and future prosperity of the city. 

Joseph Kidder, Esq., was the last speaker. He said he 
always rejoiced in the improvements which are being made 
in our public schools. He spoke of the importance of 
physical education, and suggested that it would be well to 
found an industrial school in the city where some of the 
branches of education now taught can be practically 
applied. He contended that one important branch of edu- 
cation is sadly neglected in our present school system, viz : 
the art of getting a living. All our pupils in the schools 
cannot be teachers or professors in colleges. The great 
majority must till the soil, or engage in the mechanical 
arts, and hence their education must be such that they can 
engage in these callings to the best advantage. 

The exercises of the hour were made the more interesting; 
by exercises in vocal and piano-forte music. A large num- 
ber of the young ladies connected with the school sung 
selections under the directions of Mr. Kimball, teacher of 
vocal music. Mr. F. W. Batchelder officiated with great 
taste at the piano. 

The exercises were closed with the doxology, sung to the 
tune of Old Hundred. 



QUESTIONS SUBMITTED TO CANDIDATES FOR 
ADMISSION TO THE HIGH SCHOOL AT THE 
ANNUAL EXAMINATION. 



AEITHMETIC. 



1. At what rate per cent, must $100 be loaned to gain ."$1.75 in 

2 years and 4 months ? 

2. In how long time will it take $160 to gain 35 cents at 5iper ct. 

3. A cellar is to be dug 50 ft. 4 in. long, 28 ft. 3 in. wide, and 6 ft. 

6 in. deep ; what will it cost to dig it at 5 cents per cubic 
foot? 

4. A pile of wood is 56 ft. 6 in. long, 10 ft. 4 in. high, and 5 ft. 

wide ; what is the wood worth at $7.75 per cord ? 

5. What is ^^otation ? 

6. What is Numeration V 

7. How many days will it take a man to travel 194 miles, 92^ rods, 

if he travels 18 miles, 4 furlongs, 10 rods in 1 day. 

8. Add four hundred and twelve — seven hundredths — eight — four 

thousand and three thousandths — ten hundredths. 

9. Bought sugar at 12^ cents and sold it at 15 cents a pound ; what 

was gained per cent ? 

10. What will a lot of land 25\ rods long and 10 ft. wide cost at 122 

cents per square foot ? 

11. What will it cost to fence the lot at 4^, cents per linear foot ? 

12. Divide .8 by 4 ; .08 by .04 ; 80 by .004 ; .0008 by 4. ; 80 by .4; 

800 by .004. 

13. Reduce 20 rods, 1 yard, 2 feet, 6 inches to the decimal of a mile. 

14. How do you divide decimal fractions ? 

15. A. bought a piece of land 30 rods square, at $50 per acre, and 

B. bought 2 pieces of land each 15 rods square at $50 per 
acre ; what did each pay for the land ? 



192 

16. A ton of ice was bought for §50, and sold at 3 cents a pound ; 

what was gained or lost per cent ? 

17. What is meant by rate per cent V 

18. Find the sum, the difference, then the product of .SJ and 15i. 

19. Add .3-5, 7-8,7-15 and 6 5-8 ; from the sum subtract 5 3-4; mul- 

tiply the remainder by 3-8 of 12 3-4 aad divide the product 
by .3 3-4. 

20. How many square feet on the surface of a board I yd. long and 

3 yd, wide ? 

21. Two persons start from the same place and travel ten hours, 

one due north, at the rate of 8 miles an hour, the other due 
west, at the rate of 6 miles an hour ; at the end of 10 hours 
each travels 4 of an hour directly towards each other ; how 
far apart are they at the end of that time ? 

GEAMMAE. 

1. What is English Grammar ? 

2. What is language ? 

3. What is a numeral adjective ? 

4. Correct the following sentences where corrections are necessary. 

(1) Charles, he was at school, but the rest they was all at 
home. 

(2) It will not rain to-morrow, I do not think. 

(3) Whom shall we send ? 

(4) Who was sent with you to do the work ? 

(5) I know no one who I could speak to. 

(6) Let's you and I go. 

(7) I see him last week laying on the ground. 

(8) He was setting there when his brother done that. 

(9) He give me them books. 

(10) One added to four makes five. 

(11) He invited me and she to come. 

(12) Time and tide waits for no man. 

5. He did it himself. Parse himself. 

6. Let us stop. Parse the words in italics. 

7. Parse each word in the following sentence: 

Wheat is worth two dollars a bushel. 

8. Write a sentence containing a collective noun ; one containing 

a personal pronoun ; one containing a verb in the pluperfect 
tense; one containing an adjective in the comparative de- 
gree : one containing an abstract noun. 



193 

9. Give the opposite gender of each of the following nonns, viz : 
witch, widow, earl, step-son, duke, niece, lion, emperor, gen- 
tleman, madam, czar. 

10. Write a brief description of the Merrimac Eiver. 

11. Give the principal parts of go, do, see, bid, tread, storm, hear, 

light, fight, arise, stay, shine, swear, let, draw. 

12. How many cases have nouns ? Define each. 

13. ISTame the different kinds of pronouns. 

14. Decline I, who, city. 

15. What is a syllable? 

16. Give the plural of the following words, viz : five, commander- 

in-chief, who, roof, sofx, loaf, enemy. 

17. Parse the italicized words in the following sentences : they 

fought like brave men. Go, tame the wild torrent, or stem 
with a straw, the proud surges that sweep o'er the strand, 
that confines them. 

18. And when, from the long distance of a hundred years, they 

shall look back upon us, they shall know, at least, that we 
possessed affections, which, running backward, and warming 
with gratitude for what our ancestors have done for our 
happiness, run forward, also, to our posterity, and meet them 
with cordial salutation, ere yt^t they have arrived on the 
shore of being. 
a. Make a list of the nouns in the above extract, naming the 
case of the first three ; b. a list of the pronouns, naming the 
kind of each ; c. a list of the adverbs ; d. a list of the con- 
junctions stating what the first three connect. 

19. Mention and define the different parts of speech. 

20. Give a synopsis of the verb do in the active voice. 

21. What is mood ? 

22. Where should the article a be used ? 

23. Where should the article an be used ? 

24. Compare little, near, many, useful, few, bad, late, old, round? 

handsome, square, hostile, great. 

HISTORY. 

TOPICS. 

1. Christopher Columbus. 

2. Settlement of 'New Hampshire. 

3. Pequot War. 

City Report— 13 



194 

4. Causes of the Revolutionary War. 

5. Declaration of Independence. 

6. Battle of Trenton. 

7. Madison's Administration. 

8. King Philip's War. 

9. Surrender of Cornwallis. 

10. Abraham Lincoln, 

11. Buchanan's Administration. 

12. French and Indian War. 

13. Settlement of Jamestown. 

14. A naval engagement in the War of 1812. 
1.5. Fort Sumpter. 

16. The engagement between the Monitor and the Merrimack. 

17. Sherman's " March to the Sea." 

18. Surrender of Lee. 

19. Settlement of Plymouth. 

20. Xames of the Presidents of the United States, in order. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

1. ISTame the tributaries of the Merrimac. 

2. Name the largest five places in New Hampshire. 

3. Name the largest ten cities in the U. S. 

4. Name the inland states in this country. 

.5. To what cities of the U. S. would you send for a cargo of cot- 
ton '? of grain ? of pork ? 

6. Through wdiat waters would you pass in sailing from Montreal 

to New York ? 

7. What and where are the following? Andes; Huron; Oregon; 

Little Rock ; Baltic ; Alps ; Nile ; Ganges ; Alleghany ; 
Albemarle; Corsica; Suez. 

8. What is a plain ? a valley V a spring ? a cape ? 

9. Give the latitude and longitude of Manchester. 

10. How many degrees from the equator to the tropics ? 

11. What is the diiference between a state and a territory ? 

12. Into what three parts may the surface of the United States be 

divided, and how is each drained ? 

13. Name and locate the capital of Maine; of New York; of 

Switzerland ; of Russia. 

14. What bodies of water surround the British Isles ? 

15. Name the countries of Africa. 



195 



16. Bound N^ew Hampshire, and tell what is meant by giving the 
boundaries of a state. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

1. Describe the spinal column. 

2. Describe the skull. 

3. ]Srame the five tenses; describe each. 

4. Describe the heart and trace the circulation of blood. 

5. By what are the bones bound together ? 

6. What can you say of the effect of exercise upon the muscles ? 

7. Describe the larynx. 

8. What can you say in regard to the preparation of food for sick 

persons ? 

SPELLING. 



1. Cupboard. 


27. 


Reservoir. 


2. Cheese. 


28. 


Measles. 


3. Breeze. 


29. 


Caterpillar. 


4. Siege. 


30. 


Lettuce. 


5. Please. 


31. 


Mortise. 


6. Dozen. 


32. 


Separate. 


7. Finally. 


33. 


Twelfth. 


8. Daily. 


34. 


Thirtieth. 


9. Furnace. 


35. 


Avoirdupois, 


.10. Celebrate. 


36. 


Biscuit. 


11. Leopard. 


37. 


Cinnamon. 


12. Leper. 


38. 


Alpaca. 


13. Pepper. 


39. 


Carriage. 


14. Denominator. 


40. 


Porridge. 


15. Benefit. 


41. 


People. 


16. Aqueduct. 


42. 


Steeple. 


17. Cemetery. 


43. 


Belfry. 


18. Alcohol. 


44. 


Nominative. 


19. Portrait. 


45. 


Participle. 


20. Jewel. 


46. 


Crayon. 


21. Fuel. 


47. 


Captain. 


22. Dial. 


48. 


Colonel. 


23. Shepherd. 


49. 


Hanover. 


24. Dismiss. 


50. 


Myrtle. 


26. Business. 


51. 


Merrimac. 


26. Sewer. 


52. 


Lieutenant. 



196 



53. Primer. 

54. Saleratus. 

55. Freight. 

56. Sieve. 

57. Committee. 

58. Soprano. 

59. Treble. 

60. Ninth. 

61. JSTeeessary. 

62. Bilious. 

63. BiHion. 

64. Auctioneer. 
66. Chandelier. 

66. February. 

67. Lil)rary. 

68. Catarrh. 

69. Secretary. 

70. Chimney. 

71. Bodies. 

72. Canal. 

73. Crystal. 

74. Dimension, 

75. Burglar, 

76. Calico. 



77. Muslin. 

78. Insurance. 

79. Candidate. 

80. Until. 

81. Police. 

82. Isthmus. 

83. Brakeman. 

84. Engine. 

85. Cushion: 

86. Hemisphere. 

87. Factory. 

88. Kecitation. 

89. Machine. 

90. Neuter. 

91. Pewter. 

92. Barren. 

93. Spire. 

94. Brier. 

95. Liai". 

96. Scythe. 

97. Feminine. 

98. Masculine. 

99. Medicine. 
100. Physician. 



COURSE OF STUDY 



MANCHESTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



SECOND PEIMARY. 

THIRD CLASS. 



Beading and B2:)elling. — Elementary sounds; names of letters, 
learned from cards and tablets; words and somids repeated after 
the teacher; commence Hillard's Eirst Reader. Words should not 
be spelled by the pupils while reading; special attention given to 
enunciation. Pupils in this grade should be taught to hold books 
and turn leaves properly. Hillard's Charts: No. 1, names and 
sounds of letters; No. 3, to be spelled by letters and sounds. 

Drawing. — Bartholomew's Drawing Charts : Careful attention 
given to position of the bodj^, method of holding pencil, etc. 

Language. — Correct common errors in the use of language, such 
errors as the pupils are likely to hear and imitate. Pupils to ex- 
press their thoughts in proper language, and to give their answers 
in complete sentences. 

Numbers. — Commence counting; develop the idea of numbers 
to ten by the vise of objects; count to fifty on the numeral frame; 
Roman numerals to X. 

Music. — Practice five note exercises softly, paying particular at- 
tention to the right formation of tones. Gain the attention of the 
pupils by singing some easy melody for them to imitate, at the 
same time requiring a proper singing position. Avoid all noisy 
singing. Teach the scale with scale names, pitch names and syl- 
lables; also the division of time into short equal portions. Culti- 
vate the ear and eye to the same, with exercises on the board. 



198 

Oral Instruction. — Form, color, etc , illustrated by objects in the 
school-room ; morals and manners. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Heading and Spelling. — Hillard's First Reader completed; "Wor- 
cester's Primary Speller, to twentieth page; printing or writing 
small letters so as to form monosyllables. The words in the speller 
should be spelled by letters and sound before they are given to the 
pupils to be learned. Require full, clear tones, distinct enuncia- 
tion, and correct accent. Hillard's Charts: !N'o. 1, analyze the 
forms of capital letters, and tell what lines compose each; Ko. 4, 
syllables spelled by sounds; l^o. 3, words spelled by sounds and by 
letters. Calling words at sight. 

Language., Music and Drawing. — (Jbserve 23revious directions. 

Arithmetic. — Counting to one hundred, with the use of the nu- 
meral frame, and counting by twos to fifty, daily exercise ; Arabic 
figures from 1 to 100, read at sight; Roman numerals to L. 

Oral Instruction. — Form, size, color, animals and plants. 

Boston Primary School Tablets. — 'No. o, the jjupils to name and 
point out the lines and jilaiie figures. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Beading and Spelling. — Hillard's Second Reader; Primary Spell- 
er to forty-fifth page; spelling words from reading lessons by 
sounds; questions on the meaning of pieces read; daily drill on the 
sounds of vowels and consonants. The meaning of words in the 
lessons to be given chiefly by their use in short sentences, and their 
use to be made plain by conversation with the children in regard to 
them. Spell tlie names of the days of the week, months of the 
year, and many other familiar words; Hillard's Charts, No. 2 en- 
tire; -N'os. 4 and 5. 

Language. — Pupils to state in their own language the substance 
of the reading lesson, using correct exj^ressions in their statements. 
Repeat sentences read by teachers. 

Music and Drawing. — Observe previous directions. 

Writing. — The forms of the small letters to be taught from charts 
and black-board. Words occurring in the reading lesson written 
on the slate. Pupils should be provided with long pencils and 
taught to hold them as they would pens. 



199 

Arithmetic. — Daily exercises in adding and subtracting small 
numbers; Roman numbers to C; counting by twos to one hun- 
dred and back. 

Oral Instruction. — Objects with their parts, qualities, and uses. 

Boston Primary School Tablets. — Nos. 17 and 18, names of punc- 
tuation marks learned ; review of those prescribed for second class . 

Singing and physical exercises at least twice each half day in all 
Primary schools. 

Repeating verses and maxims in all Primary schools. 

Note. — 'No exercise in this grade should be more than fifteen 
minutes long; and for many exercises five or ten minutes are suffi- 
cient. 

Pupils not employed in recitation should be occupied with slate 
exercises, at the black-board, or in such other manner as the inge- 
nuity of the teacher may devise. 

No pupil should be allowed to sit still with nothing to do; vari- 
ety and short exercises are needed. 



FIRST PRIMARY 



THIRD CLASS. 



Reading and Spelling. — Second Reader completed and re\iewed, 
with miscellaneous words ft-om reading lessons spelled by letters 
and sounds; Primary Speller, to sixty-first page, and spelUng of 
miscellaneous words. Explain the meaning of nenj words in each 
lesson before the lesson is read; reading from magazines and pa- 
pers; Hillard's Charts, ISTos. 5 and 6. 

Language. — Correct errors in the use of language; fonn sentences 
of the words defined in the Reader; require the pupil to give a 
brief description of some familiar object. 

Arithmetic. — Daily exercises in adding and subtracting small 
numbers; counting by threes, fours, etc., to one hundred and back, 
in all classes of this grade ; the idea of multiplication and division 
developed by the use of the numeral frame and otherwise ; review 
of Roman and Arabic figures, with exercises in writing the same 
on the slate and board. 

Oral Instruction. — Common objects illustrated by pictures and 
otherwise. 



200 

Boston Primary School Tablets.— 'No. 5 reviewed in connection 
with No. 6, with exercises in drawing on the slate. 

Drawing. — Bartholomew's Drawing Charts and Cards. 

Writing. — Capitals and small letters written with pencil on slates 
and paper; group letters according to shnilarity of form; form 
words of letters named by the teacher, and also write words occur- 
ring in the reading and spelling lessons; special attention given to 
position and method of holding pencil. 

Music. — Continue the practice of five-note exercises. Introduce 
the staff, also the G cleff with the five notes written on the staff. 
Sing scale names 1 2 3 — 1 2 3 4 — 1 2 3 4 5; repeat with pitch names 
and syllables. Great care should be taken in giving the vowel 
sounds. Practice from chart, in connection with exercises on the 
board. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Beading and Spelling. — Third Reader; Primary SjDeller, from 
the sixty-eighth to the seventy-ninth page ; frequent exercises in 
calling words at sight from cards and charts, and afterwards spell- 
ing the same; pupils should be able to point and explain title page, 
table of contents, leaves, pages, margin, frontispiece, etc. Hill- 
ard's Charts Nos. 7 and 8. 

Arithmetic. — Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division 
taught orally^ miscellaneous questions under each rule. Allow no 
counting of fingers. Arabic and Roman notation continued ; num- 
bers written on slate, paper and black-board ; add columns of tens 
and units on slate and black-board, no result to exceed fifty. 

Oral Instruction. — Parts, form and color, illustrated by common 
objects; plants and animals, those with which the children are 
familiar; names of the counties in the state; some facts in relation 
to our own city, etc. 

Language, Iliisic, Writing and Drawing. — Observe previous 
directions. 

Boston Frimary School Tablets. — Review of 'Nos. 17 and 18, use 
of punctuation marks commenced; !N"o. 7, drawing, and oral lessons 
on the objects. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Beading and Spelling .—Third Reader; Primary Speller completed 
and reviewed, omitting pages sixty-first to sixty-seventh, inclusive, 
and eighty-seventh, eighty-eighth, and eigty-ninth pages; questions 



201 

on pronunciation; commence abbreviations; words from reading 
and spelling lessons spelled by sounds and by letters. Miscella- 
neous reading, as in second class. The meaning of what is read 
should be made plain by the use of definitions and illustrations. 
Daily exercises in spelling miscellaneous words, especially those 
occurring in the various lessons. Special attention given to flu- 
ency of utterance, distinct articulation, and correct pronunciation. 

Hillard's Charts; Frequent drills on ISTos. 2 and 5. 

Music, Writing and Drawing. — Observe previous directions. 

Oral Instruction. — Objects, trades and occupations; globes and 
maps used to illustrate. 

Language. — Write sentences dictated by the teacher. Pupils to 
correct errors they have noticed. Give synonyms of words occur- 
ring in the reading lessons. Observe previous directions. 

Arithmetic. — ^Primary Arithmetic to fifty-seventh page. Miscel- 
laneous exercises in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and 
division; tables of multiplication and division to 10 times 10, and 
100 divided by 10, on slates and black-boards. Walton's Tables and 
Charts; Roman and Arabic notation continued to 500; adding and 
subtracting numbers of four figures, no figure in the subtrahend to 
exceed the corresponding figure in the minuend. 

The use of the text-hook in Arithmetic is allowed in this grade, yet 
most of the instruction should he oral, the hook merely serving as a 
guide to the teacher so that there may he uniformity in. the different 
schools. 

Note. — In localities where it is practicable, there will be three 
grades of Primary schools. In such schools the lowest grade will 
take the course jDrescribed for the second and third classes of the 
lowest Primary schools; the next higher grade that prescribed for 
the first class of the Second Primary, and the third class of the 
Firs't Primary, and the higher grade that prescribed for the first 
and second classes of the First Primary. 



20-2 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL, SIXTH DIVISION, 



SECOND MIDDLE SCHOOL. 
FALL TERM— SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Beading. — Fourth Reader. 

Spelling. — Words selected from reading lessons. 

Arithmetic — Intellectual to fiftieth page; Walton's Tables and 
Charts; addition and subtraction of numbers containing five fig- 
ures ; multiplication of numbers containing four figures in the mul- 
tiplicand and one in the multiplier; division of numbers one period 
in the dividend, one figure in the divisor; frequent exercises in 
combination of numbers so varied as to combine accuracy with ra- 
pidity. 

Drawing. — Book J^To. 1. 

Writing. — Book No. 1. 

Oral Instruction. — Place and direction; location of some of the 
principal countries of this world, and some of the products of those 
countries; continue the course arranged for previous grades. 

Music. — Introduce the different marks of expression, mp, p, pp, 
mf,f, flf, cres. -==: dim. ::==-; also dotted half and quarter notes, and 
rests, and all the difierent signs of music. Commence the transpo- 
sition of the scale. Practice all the difierent kinds of measure, 
double, triple, quadruple, and sextuple measure, with correct accent. 
Write numbers on the board and require pupils to copy in notes. 

Language. — Correct errors in the use of language. Write sen- 
tences containing words in the reading lessons. Pupils copy 
sentences read by the teacher, also sentences written on the black- 
board by the teachei*. Use of capitals, punctuation marks and 
abbreviations continued. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Beading. — Third Reader. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller to sixty-second page, with 
special attention to sound of letters; in reading and spelling careful 



203 

attention given to enunciation, pronunciation and meaning of 
words. 

Writing. — Book No. 1, and writing on slates. 

Drawing. — Book i^o. 1; review of tablets I^os. 5 and 6; attention 
given to lines and angles; different kinds of each; meaning of 
straight, oblique, curved, etc., as api^lied to lines, and right, obtusei 
etc., applied to angles, thoroughly understood. 

Arithmetic. — Primary completed; "Walton's Tables and Charts. 

Exercises in combination of numbers; multiplication and division 
tables thoroughly studied; 12 multiplied by 12, and 144 divided by 
12, frequently placed on the slate and board; notation to 1,000; 
addition and subtraction of numbers containing four figures; multi- 
plication of numbers, one period in the multiplicand and one figure 
in the multiplier. 

Music and Language. — Observe previous directions. 

Oral Instruction. — Review of all topics prescribed for Primary 
Schools; historical sketches; the facts of geography made attractive 
by simple illustrations ; natural divisions of land and water ; prod- 
ucts and staple commodities of several states; location and direc- 
tion of some of the most prominent objects, and principal places 
in the city and vicinity ; avoid teaching too many facts at one time. 



Wli^TEK TERM— TWELVE WEEK8. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Beading. — Fourth Reader. 

Spelling. — Miscellaneous words selected; daily exercise. 

Writing, Drawing, Music, Language and Oral Listruction. — Ob- 
serve previous directions. 

Arithmetic. — Intellectual to thirty-third page; Walton's Charts 
and Tables, daily exercise. Observe previous directions. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Reading. — Third Reader. 

SijeHw//.— Comprehensive Speller to forty-sixth page. 

Arithmetic. — Primary completed; Walton's Charts and Tables. 
Observe previous directions. 

Music, Writing, Drawing, Language and Oral Listruction. — Ob- 
serve previous directions. 



204 
SPEmG TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading. — Fourth Reader. 

Spelling. — Miscellaneous words selected; daily exercise. 

Arithmetic. — Intellectual, to fiftieth page; Walton's Charts and 
Tables. Observe previous directions. 

Writing, Drawing, Music, Language and Oral Instruction. — Ob- 
serve previous directions. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Reading. — Third Reader; Hillard's Charts No. 2. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller, from forty-sixth to sixty-sec- 
ond page; miscellaneous spelling. 

, Arithmetic. — Intellectual, to thirty- third page; Walton's Charts 
and Tables. Observe previous directions. 

Language, Drawing, Writing, Music and Oral Listruction. — Ob- 
serve previous directions. 



FIFTH DIVISION, 



FIRST MIDDLE SCHOOL. 



FALL TERM— SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading and Spelling. — Intermediate Reader and Child's Book of 
Nature, Part 2; words for spelling selected from reading lessons 
and from other text-books used in the school; review of punctuation 
marks; the use of capitals and abbreviations; attention given to 
meaning of words in the reading lesson; pupils to repeat in their 
own language the subject of the reading lesson. 



205 

Ainthmetic. — Practical, to eighty-sixth page, omitting pages 
sixty-four, sixty-five and sixty-six; Walton's Charts and Tables. 
Putnam Drill Cards, N"o, 1. 

Writing. — Book No. 2. 

Drawing. — Book IsTo. 2. 

Music. — Continue short exercises with reviews. Practice indi- 
vidual reading of notes, from Second Music Keader. Commence 
simple exercises in two jmrts, introduce fiat seven, and sharp four. 
Teach the scale by intervals. 

Geography . — Central and Western States, and Terrritories. 

Oral Instruction. — The National Flag, Coat of Arms, etc.; histor- 
ical sketches, discovery of America, War of the Kevolution, etc, ; 
selections from some work upon history read to the pupils. 

Language. — Name nouns and pronouns in the reading lessons; 
correct false syntax. Teach the meaning of the tenns., sentence 
statement, questions, and command. Pupils find statements, ques- 
tions, and commands in their text-books. Teach pupils to observe 
that statements and commands begin with a capital, and end with 
a period, and that a question begins with a capital, and ends with 
a question-mark. Write statements, questions, and commands, 
and change them from one form to another; make several state- 
ments about the same thing, connecting them with the word and. 
Teach that a comma is used in such statements to show that a 
word or words have been omitted. Write lists of such words on the 
board, and require pupils to use them in statements, questions, and 
commands, orally and in writing. Pupils should have a clear un- 
derstanding of the meaning of the words used. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Beading. — Fovirth Eeader and Child's Book of Nature, Part 1. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive SjDeller, from ninety-fir^ t to one hund- 
red and tenth page. 

Arithmetic. — Intellectual to seventy-seventh page; Walton's Ta- 
bles and Charts; Putnam Drill Cards, No. 1; addition and sub- 
traction continued, numbers containing five figures; multiplication 
and division of numbers of four figures in the multiplicand and 
dividend, and two in the multiplier and divisor. 

Drawing. — Book No. 2. 

Writing. — Book No. 2; careful attention paid to position of body, 
method of holding pen, etc. 



206 

Language. — Correct errors in the use of language. Write sen- 
tences containing words in the different text books used in this 
class, and also sentences containing miscellaneous words selected 
by the pupils. 

Music. — Observe previous directions. 

Oral Instruction. — Historical sketches the same as in first class; 
Columbus, King Philip, and others. 

Geography. — New England and Middle Atlantic States. 



WHITER TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Beading and Spelling. — Intermediate Reader and Child's Book 
of Nature, Part 2; miscellaneous spelling. 

Arithmetic. — Practical to forty-second page; Walton's Charts 
and Tables; Putnam Drill Cards, No. 1, daily exercise. Observe 
previous directions. 

Drawing. — Book No. 2. 

Writing. — Book No. 2. 

History, Language and Music. — Observe previous directions. 

Geography. — Middle Atlantic and Southeastern States. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Beading. — Fourth Reader and Child's Book of Nature, Part 1. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller, from ninety-first to one hun- 
dred and tenth page. 

Arithmetic. Intellectual, to seventy-seventh page; Walton's 
Tables and Charts; Putnam Dx-ill Cards, No. 1. Observe previous 
directions. 

History., Music and Language. — Observe previous directions. 

Writing. — Book No. 2. 

Drawing. — Book No. 2. 

Geography. — New England States. 



207 
SUMMEE TEEM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Beading and Spelling. — Intermediate Eeader and Child's Book of 
Nature, Part 2; miscellaneous spelling. 

Geography . — Central States and Territories. 

Arithmetic. — Pi'actical, to eighty-sixth page; Walton's Tables 
and Charts; Putnam Drill Cards, Ko. 1. Observe previous direc- 
tions. 

History, Language and Music. — Observe previous directions. 

Writing. — Book No. 2. 

Drawing. — Book No. 2. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Beading and Spelling. — Fourth Eeader and Child's Book of Na- 
ture, Part 1; miscellaneous spelling, daily exercise; Hillard's Chart^ 
No. 2. 

Geography . — Middle Atlantic and Southeastern States. 

Arithmetic. — Walton's Charts and Tables, daily exercise; Put- 
nam Drill Cards, No. 1. Observe previous directions. 

Writing. — Book No. 2, careful attention paid to position of body, 
method of holding pen, etc. 

Drawing. — Book No. 2. 

History, Music and Language. — Observe previous directions. 



FOURTH DIVISION. 



FALL TEEM— SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Beading and Spelling. — Intermediate Eeader, with miscellaneous 
exercises in spelling. 

Arithmetic. — Practical, to one hundred and sixteenth page, and 
review; Putnam Drill Cards No. 1; Walton's Tables and Charts. 



208 

Geography . — Intermediate, from seventieth to eighty-fifth page. 

Writing. — Book No. 3. 

Draiving. — Book 'No. 3. 

History. — Oral instruction. 

Jfitsic— Practice from Chart No. 2 to page 26, in connection with 
Music Eeader 2d Book. Practice the triads of the scale in varied 
forms; introduce chromatic scale ; continue two part songs. 

Language. — Pupils to name the action-words in the reading les- 
sons, afterwards writing sentences containing these action-words. 
Teach the proper method of writing abbreviations and contrac- 
tions with the use of the period and apostrophe in such cases. 
Write a list of abbreviations and contractions on the board, and 
require pupils to use them in sentences. Dictate sentences con- 
taining abbreviations and contractions ; similar exercises in teach- 
ing the use of quotation marks. Pupils to find abbreviations, con- 
tractions, and quotation marks in reading lessons. Correct false 
syntax. Teach the use of the article. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Beading. — Intermediate Reader, and Child's Book of Nature, 
Part 3. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller, to one hundred and thirty- 
third page. 

Arithmetic. — Intellectual, to one hundred and twentieth page and 
thoroughly reviewed; Practical Arithmetic taught orally; Putnam 
Drill Cards No. 2; Walton's Charts and Tables. 

History. — Oral instruction. 

Geography. — Intermediate to nineteenth page, and from fifty- 
second to fifty-seventh page. 

Drawing, Writing and Music. — Observe previous directions. 

Language. — Name nouns and pronowns, giving person and num- 
ber; write sentences containing parts of speech learned; correct 
false syntax; teach the difierence between common and proper 
names; write lists of common and proper names, afterwards using 
the same names in sentences; write sentences containing different 
kinds of nouns and pronouns, also sentences containing names of 
the days of the week, months of the year, and the seasons; write 
sentences from dictation ; correct sentences written incorrectly on 
the board; special attention given to orthography, use of capitals 
and punctuation. 



209 
WIN"TEK TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading. — Intermediate Reader. 

Spelling. — Oral and written; daily exercise. 

Arithmetic. — Practical, to one hundred and sixteenth page ; Put- 
nam Drill Cards No. 2; Walton's Charts and Tables. 

Geography. — Intermediate, from fifty-seventh to seventieth page. 

History, Language, Drawing, Writing and Music — Observe pre- 
vious directions. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Reading. — Intermediate Reader and Child's Book of Nature, 
Part 3. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller to one hundred and thirteenth 
page. 

Arithmetic. — Intellectual, to one hundred and eighth page ; Put- 
nam Drill Cards No. 2; Walton's Charts and Tables. 

Language, Music, History, Writing and Drawing. — Observe pre- 
vious dii'cctions. 

Geography. — Intermediate, to nineteenth page, and from fifty- 
second to fifty-seventh page. 



SPRING TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading and Spelling. — Intermediate Reader; miscellaneous 
spelling, oral and written. 

Geography. — Intermediate from seventieth to eighty-fifth page. 

Arithmetic. — Putnam Drill Cards No. 2; Walton's Charts and 
Tables. 

Language, Music, History, Writing and Drawing. — Observe pre- 
vious directions. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Reading and Spelling. — Intermediate Reader and Child's Book 
of Nature, Part 3; miscellaneous spelling. 

City Report— 14 



210 

Arithmetic. — Intellectual, to one hundred and twentieth page, 
and Ihoroughl}' reviewed; Practical, to one hundred and sixth 
page; Putnam Drill Cards Ko. 2; Walton's Charts and Tables. 

Geography.— Intermediate from fifty-seventh to seventieth page. 

Drawing, History, Language, Music and Writing. — Observe pre- 
vious directions. 



THIRD DIVISION. 



FALL TEEM— SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FIEST CLASS. 

Eeadinw and Spelling.— Franklin Fifth Reader; miscellaneous 
spelling, oral and written. 

Arithmetic. — Intellectual, to one hundred and twentieth page; 
Practical, to two hundred and sixteenth page, omitting articles 224 
to 230, inclusive; Putnam Drill Cards Xos. 3 and 4. 

Drawing. — Book ISTo. 4. 

Writing. — Book j^o. 4. 

Music. — Teach the minor scale in A relative, to C major, and 
the minor triads. Continue reading three-part songs. 

Geography. — Intermediate, from forty-first to fifty-second page. 

History. — Campbell's used as a reading book, completed. 

Language. — Pupils should now be taught the classes and prop- 
erties of the diflerent parts of speech learned, also the use of ad- 
verbs; change sentences from one form to another; write im- 
promptu compositions upon familiar subjects; observe previous di- 
rections. 

SECOND CLASS, 

Reading and Spelling. — Franklin Fifth Reader; miscellaneous 
spelling, oral and written. 

Arithmetic. — Practical, to one hundred and seventy-fifth page; 
Putnam Dl-ill Cards No. 3. 

Drawing, Language, Music and Writing. — Observe previous 
directions. 



211 

Geography. — Intermediate, from viineteeuth to foi'ty-first page. 

History. — Campbell's, used as a reading book, to seventy-fit'th 
page. 

Language. — I^ame nouns, pronouns, verbs and adjectives in the 
reading lessons; write sentences containing the parts of speech 
learned; pupils now to be taught that the subject and predicate are 
the essential parts of a sentence; write sentences containing sim- 
ple subject and predicate; copy passages read by the teacher; copy 
passages from the reading lessons, using different words to express 
the same meaning. Pupils begin letter writing; give special at- 
tention to the different parts of the letter, including, first, super- 
scription, that is, place, date and address; second, body, that is, 
sentences, lines and paragraphs; third, subscription, that is, re- 
gards and signature; fourth, proper manner of folding; fiftli, ad- 
dress on envelope; sixth, place of stamp, etc. 



WINTER TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading. — Franklin Fifth Reader. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller, from sixty-second to ninety- 
first page, and review of the whole book. 

Arithmetic. — Intellectual, to one hundred and twentieth page 
and reviewed; Practical, to one hundred ninety-fifth page and 
reviewed; Putnam Drill Cards Xo. 3; \Yalton's Charts and Tables. 

Geography. — Intermediate, from forty-first to fifty-second page. 

Drawing, Language, Music and Writing. — Observe previous di- 
rections. 

History. — CampbelPs, used as a reading book, to one hundred 
thirty-seventh page. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Reading and SpeUing.— Franklin Fifth Reader; miscellaneous 
spelling. 

Arithmetic. — Practical, to one hundred and fifty-eighth page; 
Putnam Drill Cards No. 3; Walton^s Charts and Tables. 

Drawing. Language, Music and Writing. — Observe previous di- 
rections. 



212 

Geography. — Keview. 

History. — Campbell's, to seventy-fifth page. 



SPRING TEEM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading and Spelling. — Franklin Eifth Reader; miscellaneous 
spelling. 

Arithmetic. — Practical, to two hundred and twelfth page, omit- 
ting articles 224 to 230, inclusive; Putnam Drill Cards Nos. 3 and 
4; Walton's Charts and Tables. 

Geography. — Review. 

History. — Cami)bell's, completed. 

Drawing, Language, Music and Writing. — Observe previous di- 
rections. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Reading. — Eranklin Eifth Reader. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller, from sixty-second to ninety- 
first page, and reviewed. 

Geography. — Intermediate, from nineteenth to forty-first page. 

Arithmetic. — Practical, to one hundred and seventy-fifth page; 
Intellectual, to ninetieth page; Putnam Drill Cards No. 3; Wal- 
ton's Charts and Tables. 

Drawing, Language, Music and Writing. Observe previous di- 
rections. 

History. — Campbell's to one hundred thirty-seventh page. 



SECOND DIVISION. 



FALL TERM— SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading and Spelling. — Fifth Reader, miscellaneous spelling. 
Arithmetic. — Practical, reviewed; Putnam Drill Cards, Nos. 1, 
2, 3 and 4, 



213 

Language. — Pupils should now be taught that all the words in 
our language can be divided into nine classes, called parts of speech ; 
name the difierent parts of speech in the reading lessons, and write 
sentences containing them; teach the meaning of the words, idea, 
thought, word, phrase, clause, sentence, etc.; And examples of each 
of the above-named temns in the reading lessons; frequent exer- 
cises in writing compositions; letter writing continued; avoid long 
and tedious formulas for parsing ; text-book commenced. 

Music. — Pupils should be able to read notes at sight in nine 
different keys ; judicious vocal exercises should be practiced daily, 
solfeggios, etc. 

History. — Campbell's, to one hundred and sixty-ninth page and 
reviewed. 

Geography. — Keview of United States. 

Drawing and Writing. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Beading. — Franklin Fifth Eeader. 

Spelling. — Review of Comprehensive Speller. 

Geograjihy. — Review of South America and Africa. 

Arithmetic. — Practical, from two hundred and twenty-seventh 
to two hundred and fifty-ninth page; Putnam Drill Cards No. 4; 
Walton's Charts and Tables. 

Drawing, Language, Music and Writing. — Observe previous di- 
rections. 

History. — Campbell's to eighty-seventh page. 



WINTER TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading and Spelling. — Fifth Reader; miscellaneous spelling. 

Geography. — Intermediate, review of Europe and Asia. 

Arithmetic. — Intellectual, from one hundred twentieth page, 
completed. Putnam Drill Cards, Nos. 2 and 3. 

History. — Campbell's, to one hundred sixty-ninth page. 

Drawing, Language, Music and Writing. Observe previous 
directions. 



214 



SECOND CLASS. 

Reading. — Franklin Fifth Reader. 

Spelling. — Comprehensive Speller reviewed. 

Arithmetic. — Practical, from two hundred twenty-seventh, to two 
hundred fifty-ninth page; Putnam Drill Cards, JSTo. 4; Walton's 
Charts and Tables. 

Geography. — Review of South America and Africa. 

Drawing, Language, Music and Writing. — Observe previous 
directions. 

History. — Campbell's to seventy-fifth page. 



SPRING TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading and Spelling. — Fifth Reader; miscellaneous spelling. 

Arithmetic. — Practical, reviewed ; Putnam Drill Cards, Nos. 1 
2, 3 and 4. 

Music and Drawing. — Observe previous directions. 

Geography. — Review of United States. 

History. — Campbell's, reviewed. 

Language.— Text-book commenced. Observe previous direc- 
tions. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Reading and Spelling. — Fifth Reader; miscellaneous spelling. 

History. — Campbeirs, to one hundred and forty-sixth page. 

Arithmetic— Intellectual, from one hundred and twentieth page 
completed; Putnam Drill Cards, ]S'o. 4. 

Geography. — Review of Europe and Asia. 

Drawing, Language, Music and Writing. — Observe previous 
directions. 



215 
FIRST DIVISION. 



FALL TERM— SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

Reading. — Fifth Reader. 

History. — Campbell's, completed and reviewed. 

Arithmetic. — Practical, completed. 

Language. — Text l)ook continued ; pupils will write different 
kinds of letters, such as business letters, familiar letters of intro- 
duction and friendship, notes of invitation, acceptances and re- 
gret ; abstracts of lessons in history, geography, and other branch- 
es ; selections of poetry in the Reader changed to prose. Attention 
given to writing promissory notes, bills of goods, etc. Observe 
directions for preceding grades. 

Drawing, Writing and Spelling. 

Music. — Singing at sight constitutes the chief study of the class, 
paying especial attention to the correct method of producing tone. 
Pupils should understand all the signs and characters used in 
musical composition, and be able to comprehend, and read at sight 
any ordinary music. 



WINTER TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

Reading. — Fifth Reader. 

Geography. — Intermediate, reviewed. 

Physiology. 

Writing and Spelling. 

Arithmetic. — Putnam Drill Cards ; Walton's Tables and Charts. 

Language. — Observe previous directions. 

Drawing, 

Music. 



SPRING TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

Reading — Fifth Reader. 

Civil Government. 

.Writing, Spelling, Drawing and Music. 



216 

Arithmetic. — Reviewed. 

Language. — Write abstracts of lessons of the day, of descrip- 
tions, stories, etc., read by the teacher; compositions upon topics 
suggested by events of the day. 

Scholars promoted to the first division at the beginning of the 
Winter Term, to pursue such a course for two terms as shall be 
determined hereafter. 

Declamations in each grade of the Grammar school. 

Teachers in each grade should observe the directions given for 
previous grades. 

Ungraded and partially graded schools will follow the course as 
closely as practicable, having as few classes in the school as pos- 
sible. The tendency in the schools in the rural districts is to 
increase the number of classes, thereby impairing the efficiency of 
the schools. 



PROGRAMME OF STUDIES. 

The progi'arame includes nine classes, the work of each class 
covering a period of one year. 

The number of hours per week allotted to each study or exercise 
is indicated by the figure annexed ; the whole number of school 
hours per week being twenty -five in Primary schools and thirty 
in other grades. 

THIRD PRIMARY. 







Hours. 


Hours. 


Reading, 




. 9 1-2 


Oral Instruction, . . 2 1-2 


Spelling, 




. 2 1-2 


Music, . . . .11-2 


Printing (first 


hah" of the] 


Physical Exercises, . 1 1-2 


' year), . 




1 

'.0!l_9 


Drawing, . . .1 


Writing, (last 


half of the. { " "'" 


Opening Exercises and 


year), . 




J 


Recesses, . . 4 






SECOND 


PRIMARY. 


Reading, 




. 8 


Music, . . . .11-2 


Spelling, 




. 2 1-2 


Physical Exercises, . . 1 1-4 


Writing, 




. 2 


Drawing, .... 1 


Arithmetic, . 




. 2 1-2 


Opening Exercises and Re- 


Oral Instruction, . 


. 2 1-4 


cesses, . . .4 



217 



FIRST PRIMARY. 





Hours. 




Hours. 


Reading, 


. 8 


Music, . . . . 


11-2 


Spelling, 


. 2 1-2 


Physical Exercises, . 


11-4 


Writing, 


. 2 


Drawing, . . . . 


1 


Arithmetic, . 


. 2 1-2 


Opening Exercises and Re- 




Oral Instruction, . 


. 2 1-4 


cesses, 


4 



SECOND MIDDLE. 



Reading, . 


. 8 


Spelling, . 


. 3 


"Writing, . 


. 2 


Arithmetic, 


. 4 


Oral Instruction, 


. 2 


Music, 


. 1 



1-2 



1-2 



Physical Exercises, . 1 
Drawing, . . .1 
Language, . . .2 
Opening Exercises and Re- 
cesses, ... 5 



FIRST MIDDLE. 



Reading, . 


. 


. 7 1-2 


Physical Exercises, 




1 


Spelling, . 


. 


. 21-2 


Drawing, 




1 


Writing, . 


. 


. 2 1-2 


Language, 


, 


2 


Arithmetic, 


. 


. 5 


Opening Exercises 


and 




Oral Instruction, 


. 2 


Recesses, 


, 


5 


Music, 


• 


. 1 1-2 










GRAMMAR 


SCHOOL— 


FOURTH DIVISION. 






Reading, . 


, , 


. 6 


Drawing, 


. 


1 


Spelling, . 


. 


. 2 1-2 


Language, 


. 


3 


Writing, . 




. 2 1-2 


Geography, . 


. 


1 


Arithmetic, 




. 4 1-2 


Declamations, 


. 


1 


Oral Instruction, 


. 1 


Opening Exercises 


and 




Music, 




. 1 1-2 


Recesses, 


, 


5 


Physical Exercises, . 


. 1 









THIRD DIVISION. 



Reading, . 

Spelling, . 
Writing, . 
Arithmetic, 



5 


Language, 


. 3 


1 1-2 

2 

4 


Geography, . 

History, 

Declamations, 


. 4 
. 1 
. 1 



218 





Hours. 






Hours. 


Music, 


. 1 1-2 


Opening Exercises 


and 




Physical Exercises, 


. 1 


Recesses, . 




5 


Drawing, . 


. 1 










SECOND DIVISION, 






Eeading, . 


. 5 


Drawing, 




1 


Spelling, . 


, 1 


Language, 




4 


Writing, . 


. 1 


History, 


, 


3 1-2 


Arithmetic. 


, 4 


Declamations, 




1 


Oral Instruction, 


. 2 


Opening Exercises 


and 




Music, 


. 1 1-2 


Recesses, 


, 


5 


Physical Exercises, 


, 1 










FIRST DIVISION", 






Reading, . 


. 4 


History, 




3 


Spelling, . 


, 1 


Civil Government, 


. 


3-4 


Writing and Bookkee 


ping, 1 


Geography, , 


. 


3-4 


Arithmetic, 


, 4 


Physiology, . 




3-4 


Oral Instruction, 


3-4 


Declamations and Com- 




Music, 


, 1 1-2 


positions, 




1 1-2 


Physical Exercises, 


. 1 


Opening Exercises 


and 




Drawing, . 


. 1 


Recesses, 




5 


Language, 


, 4 









LIST OF TEXT-BOOKS USED IN THE PRIMARY, MIDDLE, AND 
GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 



Hilliard's series of Reading-books with Charts. 

Worcester's Primary and Comprehensive Speller. 

Walton's Primary and Intellectual Arithmetics. 

Robinson's Practical Arithmetic. 

Quackeabos' Grammars. 

Seavey's History. 

Campbell's Histoiy. 

Guyot's Intermediate and Elementary Geographies. 

Cutter's Physiology. 

Mason's Music Readers. 

Payson, Dunton and Scribner's Writing Books. 

Bartholomew's Drawing Books, Cards, and Charts. 



HIGH SCHOOL 



CLASSICAL COURSE OF FOUR YEARS. 



FIRST YEAR— FIRST TERM. 

Algebra; English Grammar; Physical Geography; Reading and 
Spelling. 

SECOND TERM. 

Algebra; Natural History; English Composition; Reading and 
Spelling. 

THIRD TERM. 

Geometry; Ancient History ; Latin Lessons. 

SECOND YEAR— FIRST TERM. 

Geometry; Ancient and Modern History ; Latin Lessons. 

SECOND TERM. 

Trigonometry; Cjesar; Natural Philosophy. 

THIRD TERM. 

Botany ; Natural Philosophy ; Csesar. 

THIRD YEAR — FIRST TERM. 

Csesar and Virgil; Astronomy. 



220 

SECOND TEEM. 

Geology; Virgil; English Literature. 

THIKD TERM. 

Virgil; English Literature ; Geography; Spelling. 

FOUKTH YEAR — FIRST TERM. 

Virgil and Cicero ;, Chemistry ; Arithmetic; Beading. 

SECOND TERM. 

Cicero; Mental Philosophy ; U. S. History reviewed. 

THIRD TERM. 

Odes of Horace ; Political Economy ; English Grammar. 



e:n'glish course of theee years. 

FIRST YEAR — FIRST TERM. 

Algebra ; English Grammar ; Physical Geography ; Reading and 
Spelling. 

SECOND TERM. 

Algebra ; English Grammar ; N'atural History ; Reading and 
Spelling. 

THIRD TERM. 

Geometry ; Ancient History ; Botany. 

SECOND YEAR — FIRST TERM. 

Geometry ; Ancient and Modern History ; Rhetoric. 

SECOND TERM. 

Trigonometry ; Natural Philosophy ; English Literatiire. 



221 

THIRD TERM. 

Natural Philosophy; English Literature. 

THIRD YEAR — FIRST TERM. 

Astronomy; Chemistry; Arithmetic; Reading. 

SECOND TERM. 

Geology; Mental Philosophy ; U. S. History reviewed. 

THIRD TERM. 

Political Economy ; English Grammar; Geography; Spelling. 

Pupils preparing for college to pursue such a Classical Course as 
will meet the requirements of the colleges they propose to enter. 
Classes in French and Drawing will be formed for those who desire 
to pursue these branches. 

Declamations and Compositions at regular intervals throughout 
the course. 

Vocal Music throughout the course. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



OIIGANIZATION FOR 1878. 



(CARLES H. BARTLETT, Mayor, 

ex-officio Chairman. 

CHARLES A. SMITH, 

President of the Common Council, ex-officio. 



MEMBERS OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Ward 1. — Henry E. Burnham. 
Ward 2.— Marshall P. Hall, Clerk. 
Ward 3.— Daniel Clark. 
Ward 4.— Nathan P. Hunt. . 
Ward 5. — Frank J. Murray. 
Ward 6.— Frank G. Clark, 
Ward 7. — George P. Rockwell. 
Ward 8.— George H. Colby. 

JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Office— ^0. 5 City Hall ; Office Hours from 8 to 9 a. m., 
school days. * 



224 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOAED. 

Finance^ Accounts^ and Claims. — Messrs. Daniel Clark. 
Smith, Hall, and the Mayor. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Edgerly, 
Colby, Smith and Hunt. 

Text-Books and Apjjaratus. — Messrs. Hall, Edgerly, F. G. 
Clark and Burnham. 

Fuel and Heating. — The Mayor, Messrs. Colby, Daniel 
Clark and Edgerly. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Burnham, Murray, 
Hunt and Edgerly. 

Truancy. — Messrs. F. G. Clark, Murray, Hall and Edgerly. 

Employmeyit of Children in Manufacturiyig Establish- 
ments. — Messrs. Hunt, Daniel Clark, Rockwell and Edgerly. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Hall, Murray and Smith. 

Music. — Messrs. Daniel Clark and Rockwell. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

Schools in High School Building, at Wilson Hill, and Sub- 
urban Schools Nos. 7 and 8. — Messrs. Daniel Clark, Hall 
and Hunt. 

Schools on Spring Street. — Messrs. Burnham and Daniel 
Clark. 

Schools on Franklin Street. — Messrs. Hall and Rockwell. 

Schools on Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Hunt and Hall. 

Schools on Lowell Street, in Intermediate Building, and 
Bakersville. — Messrs. Murray and Daniel Clark. 

Training School. — Messrs. F. G. Clark and Daniel Clark. 

Suburban Schools Nos. 4, 5, 6 and 9. — Messrs. F. G. Clark 
and Murray. 

Schools in Piscataquog. — Messrs. Rockwell and Colby. 

Schools in Amoskeag, on Blodgett Street, and Suburban 
School No. 1. — -Messrs Colby and Burnham. 



225 
SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS. 

January^ 1873. 

HIGH SCHOOL — BEECH STREET. 

Principal, W. W. Colhui-n. 
Assistants, Mary E. Clough, 

Lucrctia E. Manalian, 

Emma J. Ela. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL — MANCHESTER STREET. 

Principal, Alfred S Hall. 
Assistant, Abbie S. McClintock. 

TRAINING SCHOOL — MERRIMACK STREET. 

Principal Higher Department, Nancy S. Bunton. 

Assistant, Mintie C. Edgerly. 
Principal Primary Department, Martha N. Mason, 

Assistant, Anna 0. Heath. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL — SPRING STREET. 

Principal, William E. Buck. 
Assistants, Mary A. Buzzel, 

Anstrice G. Flanders, 

Sarah J. Greene, 

Lizzie S. Campbell. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL — FRANKLIN STREET. 

Principal, Daniel A. Clifford. 
Assistants, Mary F. Dana, 

Lottie R. Adams, 

Carrie E. Raid. 

City Report— 15 



226 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL LINCOLN STREET. 

Principal, Benjamin F. Dame. 
Assistants, Lizzie H. Patterson, 

Julia A. Baker, 

Mary J. Fife, 

Annette McDoel, 

Eliza I. Young, 

Isabella R. Daniels, 

Anna J. Dana, 

Rocilla M. Tuson. 

PISCATAQUOG GRAMMAR SCHOOL — CENTER STREET. 

Principal, Allen A. Bennet. 
Assistants, Martha J. Boyd, 
Addie M. Lear. 

AMOSKEAG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal, Charles F. Morrill. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodgett Street. — Nellie I. Sanderson. 
3, Lowell Street. — Mary L. Sleeper. 

7, Franklin Street. — Hattie G. Flanders. 

8, Franklin Street. — C. Augusta Abbott. 

9, Spring Street. — Hattie S. Tozer. 
10, Spring Street. — Lizzie P. Gove. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodgett Street.— Ellen B. Rowell. 
" 2, Lowell Street. — Enama F. Bean. 



No. 



o 

4 
5 
6 
7 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 



227 

Beech Street, — Georgianna Dow, 
Beech Street. — Mary E. Ireland, 
Lowell Street. — Annie M. Oifut, 
Wilson Hill.— Al)bie E. Abbott. 
Wilson Hill. — Emma H. Perley. 
Manchester Street. — Helen M. Morrill. 
Manchester Street. — Mellie Pearson. 
Franklin Street. — E. Jennie Campbell. 
Franklin Street. — Martha W. Hubbard. 
Spring Street. — Emma A. Cross. 
Spring Street. — Gertrude W. Borden. 
North Main Street. — Sarah D. Lord. 
North Main Street. — Celia M, Chase, 
South Main Street. — Alice G, Lord, 
Amoskeag, — Kate E, Joy, 
Amoskeag, — Nellie E. Tappan, 
South Main Street, — Clara N, Brown. 
North Main Street, — Ella P. Salisbury, 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 



No. 1, Stark District.— Nellie M. Cato. 

" 3, Bakersville. — Principal, Addie M. Chase, 

Assistant, Addie A. Marshall, 
No. 4, Goffe's Falls. — Georgie A, Nute. 

" 5, Harvey District. — Sylvester Brown. 

" 6, Webster's Mills.— Mary J. Reid. 

" 7, Hallsville. — Principal, Maria H. Hildreth^ 
Assistant, Mary B. Lane. 
No. 8, Massabesic. — Marianna Waite. 

" 9, Mosquito Pond. — Etta M. George.. 

MUSIC TEACHER.. 

J. J. Kimball. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



EXPENDITURES IN DETAIL. 



YEAR ENDING DEC. 31, 1872. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



To cash on hand January 1, 


1872, . 




$3,751 


29 


State Bonds sold, 


. 


, 


2,000 


00 


Cash of State on acc't of 


soldiers' bounties. 


61 


12 


Water Bonds sold. 


. 




288,452 


50 


Temporary Loan, 


. 


. 


53,398 


57 


Taxes, 1872, collected. 


221,603 


47 






Dog tax. 


. 344 


00 






Abated, 


.■ 478 


22 






Discounted, 


. 5,522 


10 

i 


227,947 


79 






' 


Taxes, 1871, collected, 


25,425 


13 






Dog tax. 


. 118 


00 






Abated, 


. 182 


84 


25,725 


97 


Taxes, 1870, collected. 


. 1,936 


98 


Dog tax. 


22 


00 






Abated, 


. 120 


69 


2,079 


67 


Taxes, 1869, collected, 


. 617 


20 


Dog tax, 


5 


00 






Abated, 


. 220 


61 


842 


ki 


Taxes, 1868, collected. 


. 246 


53 


o± 


Dog tax. 


. . 5 


00 






Abated, 


. 208 


13 


zl^Q 


CKCK 



232 



Taxes, 1867, collected, . . 159 44 
abated, . . 227 75 



Taxes, 1866, collected. 

Costs oil nou-resideut taxes, 

Interest on taxes. 

Savings l)ank tax, 

Railroad tax. 

Insurance tax, . 

Literary Fund, . 

Police Court costs and fines. 

Land sold from farm. 

School-house lot, corner Wilson and Lowell 

Streets, 1st payment, . 
Lot corner Hanover and Belmont Streets, 1st 

payment, 
Stark (old) school-house, . 
Interest on State Bonds, 
County of Hillsboro' for board of inmates at 

Reform School, 
Town of Merrimack for board of inmates at 

Reform School, 
Town of Hillsboro' for board of inmates at 

Reform School, 
J. Wallace for board of inmates at Reform 

School, 
Town of Alexandria for support of Nellie M 

Pickering, 
Town of Hooksett for support of Mrs. Mary 

George, 

City Farm for grass on commons for 1871, 
Produce and labor from City Farm, 
Interest on Water Bonds, . 
Lots, &c., sold in Pine-Grove Cemetery, 
True E. Dudley for stone, . 



387 19 

14 59 

24 00 

1,231 19 

30,576 76 

17,120 77 

423 38 

1,120 00 

5,715 08 

1,885 32 

269 19 



915 


33 


45 


00 


3,774 


00 


2,234 


27 


70 


86 


6 


00 



42 85 

17 20 

6 68 

90 00 

2,864 60 

7,407 73 

1,218 79 

30 25 



233 



J. McCaulley for discount on load of hay. 


1 00 


Rent of tenements, .... 


104 75 


" City Hall, . 




350 00 


" Stores, 




2,114 80 


" Hearse, 




100 00 


" No. 6 Wardroom, 




18 00 


" Water, .... 




103 50 


License to shows. 




673 00 


" to enter sewers. 




781 15 


" to keep dogs, 




312 88 


Water Works for repairing paving. 




26 75 


Highway Dist. No. 2 for work of city teams 


1,209 05 


Paving streets, for work of city teams, 


389 00 


New Highways, " " 


42 75 


Commons, '" " 


22 00 


Lincoln-St. School-house, "• 


30 00 


Samuel Brown, jr. for loam sold. 


101 00 


Horse sold, 


100 00 


Work of laborers, 


9 63 


Fees for weighing, .... 


288 42 


Republican Club for gas. 


2 76 


Cyrus Dunn for old plank. 


8 00 


L. Searles for posts, .... 


2 16 


J. Campbell for use of cart, 


20 50 


Bailey & Delany, " 


20 25 


Pupils from other towns for tuition, . 


122 00 


J- G. Edgerly for old books sold, 


26 30 


M. Prout for damage to sheep done by dog 


11 00 


Old windows sold from City Hall, 


9 00 


J. J. Bennett for brick, 




26 00 


< 


B689,236 06 



234 
PAUPERS OFF FARM. 

By Balance from last year, . . $284 07 
Appropriations, . . . 1,500 00 

County of Hillsboro' for board 

of inmates of Reform School, 2,234 27 
Town of Merrimack for board of 

inmates of Reform School, . 70 86 

Town of Hillsborough for board 

of inmates of Reform School, 6 00 

J. Wallace for board at Reform 

School, .... 92 85 

Town of Alexandria for aid to 

Nellie M. Pickering, . . 17 20 

Town of Hooksett, aid to Mrs. 

Mary George, . . . 6 68 



Amount, .... 


4,211 93 


Transferred to reserved fund, 


500 00 


EXPENDITURES. 


Paid for dry goods. 


13 25 


for medicines, 


15 13 


for provisions. 


318 26 


for fuel. 


204 42 


for boots and shoes, 


17 78 


for teams. 


10 50 


for printing, . 


9 50 


for burial of F. B. Kimball, 


28 00 


for board of inmates of Ref'm 




School, .... 


2,551 14 


for board of family of J. M 




Dickey, .... 


32 00 



Cr. 



,711 93 



Dr. 



235 



Paid for W. S. Dearborn, 

for James Wymaii, 

for aid to C. Haselton, . 

Unity for supp't of Ella Vin- 
cent and family, 
To expense of bringing said family 

to Manchester, 
expense of carrying Nellie M. 

Pickering to Alexandria, 
bills for nursing, provisions, and 

fuel for Mrs. John Davis, 
expense of moving Tim Quinn's 

family, 
expense of moving Rich'd Dame 

from Nashua, 
bill paid A. Story & Co. for aid 

to Roswell Towns, 
bill paid John K. Richardson for 

board of Alfred Craig, . 
bill paid for searching records of 

other towns, 

Amount, ..... 
To balance to new account, . *■ . 



$16 00 


11 


00 


16 


00 


20 


57 


21 


50 


17 


20 


254 


13 


2 


00 


8 


75 


48 


50 


16 


00 


10 


83 


3,632 


46 


79 


47 



!,711 93 



CITY FARM. 



By Balance from last year, . 


8326 20 


Appropriation, 


800 00 


Reserved fund. 


1,200 00 


Hillsborough County for board 




of paupers, .... 


140 69 


Receipts for labor and produce. 


2,723 91 



Cr. 



i,190- 80 



280 




EXPENDITURES 


?. 


To Superintendent's salary, . 


1500 00 


" "• by spec- 




ial vote of City Council, . 


100 00 


Paid laborers. 


977 84 


for housework, 


156 50 


for groceries and provisions. 


540 00 


for grain and meal, 


584 97 


for hardware and tools, 


127 54 


for stoves and repairing, 


103 59 


for 4 pairs oxen, . 


730 00 


for 5 cows, . 


169 00 


for 2 bulls, . . . . 


80 00 


for lime and cement, 


5 60 


for plaster, . 


15 00 


for repairing lead pipe, . 


1 75 


for boots and shoes. 


52 15 


for phosphates and seeds, 


119 45 


for tobacco, . 


14 19 


for dry goods. 


32 06 


for meat, 


100 89 


for clothing, . 


54 87 


for wheat, . . . 


18 00 


for team work. 


10 00 


for fish, 


6 68 


for crackers. 


8 50 


for blacksmithing. 


113 73 


for leveler and breaker, 


25 00 


for filing saws, 


3 70 


for potatoes, . 


22 87 


for lumber, . 


22 42 


for plow. 


5 00 


for crockery. 


17 45 


for medicine, 


1 20 



Dr. 



237 



Paid for mirrors, .... 


$1 


67 




for pasturing. 


18 


00 




for making and repairing cart. 


m 


06 




Amount, .... 


4,805 


68 




To Balance to new account, . 


385 


12 


$5,190 80 


CITY TEAMS. 






Or. 


By Balance from last year, 


132 


63 




Appropriation, . . . . 


1,000 


00 




Transferred from appropriation for 








Fire Department, . 


1,600 


00 




Received for horse sold, 


100 


00 




Discount on load of hay. 


1 


00 




Received of Highway Dist. No. 2, 








work of teams. 


1,209 


00 




" Paving streets, work 








of teams, 


389 


00 




" New highways, work 








of teams, 


42 


75 




" Commons, work of 








teams. 


22 


00 




" Lincoln-Street School 








house, 


30 


00 


$4,426 38 








EXPENDITURES. 








To paid teamsters, . . . i 


Bl,220 


50 




for grain, . . . . 


830 


65 




for hay, . . . . 


1,285 


13 




for straw, . . . . 


67 


62 





238 



To paid for shoeing, 


$188 


94 




for harnesses and repairs. 


110 


36 




for carts and repairs, 


303 


75 




for medicine and doctors 








bills. 


75 


37 




for disinfectants, 


8 


32 




for gas, . . . . 


9 


00 




for team. 


2 


50 




for repairing pump and stalls 


3 


91 




for oil, salt, pails, brooms, &c. 


, 46 


29 




Amount, 


$4,182 


34 




Balance to new account. 


244 


04 


14,426 38 









HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 1. 

Bj Balance from last year, . . $110 20 
Appropriation, .... 200 00 



$310 20 



EXPENDITURES. 



To paid Superintendent, . . . $10 50 
for labor, .... 155 40 



Amount, .... $165 90 
Balance to new account, . 144 30 



$310 20 



239 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 2. 



By Balance from old account, . . $466 36 
Appropriation, . . . 10,000 00 

Transferred from reserved fund, 600 00 



Received for labor. 


9 


63 


" posts, 


2 


16 


" use of carts, . 


40 


75 

(161 1 1 1 Q qo 






qpiX^XJLO V\J 


EXPENDITURES. 






To paid Russell White, as Superin- 






tendent, . 


8786 


00 


Russell White, use of horse 






and wagon (1871), . 


132 


00 


do. (1872), . 


132 


00 


teamsters, . . . . 


998 


10 


city teams. 


1,209 


00 


other teams, 


933 


50 


laborers, . . . . 


5,407 


95 


for rubber coats and oil suits, 


26 


00 


for oil, powder and fuse. 


17 


30 


for concrete crossings, 


977 


07 


for repairing bridges, 


60 


67 


for blacksmith work. 


. 182 


01 


for lumber. 


1 


25 


for tools, . . . . 


137 


21 


for grade stakes and pipe. 


36 


62 


for cement and masonry, 


33 


25 * 



Amount, 

Balance to new account. 



$11,069 93 
48 97 



$11,118 90 



240 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 3. 



Bj Balance from last year, . 


141 34 


Appropriation, . *. 


600 00 


Transferred from reserved fund 


50 00 


EXPENDITURE 


s. 


Paid B. F. Mitchell, as Supt., 


$50 00 


D. F. Miller, 


133 00 


laborers, 


237 28 


for teams, . . . . 


229 50 


for plank. 


9 49 


for gravel. 


20 84 


for sharpening pick, 


75 


Amount, 


1680 86 


Balance to new account. 


10 48 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 4. 



By Balance from old account, 
Appropriation, 



160 35 
250 00 



EXPENDITURES. 




R. N. Whittemore, Supt., 


114 00 


C. C. Webster 


4 00 


for teams, . . . . 


75 50 


for clay, 


8 00 


laborers, 


88 88 


Amount, 


190 38 


Balance to new account, . 


119 97 



$691 34 



$691 34 

Cr. 

$310 35 

Dr. 



$810 85 



2M 



HIGHWAY DLSTRICT No. 5. 



By Balance from last year, 


. $132 81 


Appropriation, 


. 800 00 


Reserved fund transferred. 


. 50 00 


EXPENDiTURES. 


Paid S. B. Hill, 


. $71 25 


for labor and teams, . 


. 382 57 


for scraper. 


. 10 00 


for steel bar, 


2 25 


for hoe, .... 


1 00 


for nails, .... 


59 


for gravel, .... 


3 50 


for lumber, 


2 90 

« 


Amount, .... 


. 474 06 


Balance to new account, . 


7 75 







Cr. 



$482 81 



Dr. 



$482 81 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 6. 



Cr. 



By Balance from old account, . 


$11 


89 




Appropriation, 


400 


00 


$411 89 
Dr. 


EXPENDITURES. 

Paid D. H. Dickey, salary as Supt., . 
laborers, . . . . . 


146 
125 


00 
00 • 


for team work, . . . . 


108 


71 




for gravel, 


2 


00 




Amount, . . . . . 


281 


71 




Balance to new account, 

city Report— 16 


130 


18 


$411 89 



242 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 7. 



By Balance from last year, 


$17 32 


Appropriation , . . . 


600 00 


Reserved fund transferred, . 


150 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




Paid Isaac Huse, Superintendent, 


119 00 


P. 0. Woodman, " 


58 50 


for labor and team work, 


563 79 


for lumber, . . . . 


96 


for tools, . . . . . 


12 39 


for repairing tools, 


10 42 


paving gutter at Hallsville, 


96 50 


Amount, . . . . . 


761 56 


Balance lo new account, . 


5 76 







Cr. 



1767 32 



Dr. 



$767 32 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 8. 



By Balance from last year. 

Appropriation, . . . . 


143 12 
550 00 


EXPENDITURES. 

Paid L. S. Proctor, Superintendent, . 
Wm. Parsley, " 

laborers, 

for team work, . . . . 


$8 00 

58 00 

204 33 

90 25 



Cr. 



$593 12 



Dr. 



243 



Paid for scraper and pick, 


111 50 




for repairing tools, 


2 13 




for lumber and railing, 


8 70 




Amount, ..... 


382 91 




Balance to new account, . 


210 21 


$593 12 


HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 9. 








Cr. 


By Balance from last year, 


$30 04 




Appropriation, .... 


350 00 


1380 04 


EXPENDITURES. 








Dr. 


Paid A. N. Scott, Superintendent, 


130 00 




A. W. Corning, " 


33 00 




laborers, ..... 


117 00 




for teams, 


46 00 




for plank, 


68 57 




Amount, ..... 


294 57 




Balance to new account, . 


85 47 


1380 04 


HIGHWAY DISTRICT 


No. 10. 


Cr. 


By Balance from last year. 


$4 75 




Appropriation, 


1,000 00 


$1,004 75 



244 



EXPENDITUREF 


i. 


aid Samuel Brown, Jr., Supt,, 


887 50 


laborers, . . . . 


302 22 


for team work. 


244 16 


for building fence, 


27 00 


for tools, 


19 45 


for nails, oil and pails, 


4 07 


for powder and fuse. 


1 27 


for plank. 


4 59 


for clay. 


47 25 


for repairing bridge, 


6 50 


for sharpening tools. 


12 16 


Amount, 


. 1756 11 


Balance to new account, 


248 64 







Dr. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 11. 



By Balance from last year, 
Appropriation, . 



,1151 02 
800 00 





EXPENDITURES. 




Paid Ezra B. Stearns, 


Supt., . 


$72 00 


Joseph Melvin, 


a 


200 00 


laborers. 


. 


452 24 


for team work, 


• . • 


155 99 


for plank, 


. 


46 38 


for blacksmith v, 


^ork, 


3 22 


Amount, 


1929 83 


Balance to new account, 


21 19 



1,004 75 

Cr. 

$951 02 
Dr. 



$951 02 



245 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 12. 



Cr. 



By Balance from last 


year, . 


16 64 




Appropriation, . 


. 


250 00 




Reserved fund, 


. 


125 00 


$381 64 




EXPENDITURES. 










Dr. 


Paid laborers, 


. 


1262 35 




for team work, 


. 


101 32 




for paving, . 


• • • 


7 50 




Amount, 


1371 17 




Balance to new account, 


10 47 










$381 64 


HIGHWAY DISTRICT 


No. 13. 










Cr. 


By Balance from last 


year, . 


$11 24 




Appropriation, 


. 


aoO 00 




Reserved fund. 


. 


100 00 


$311 24 


II 


EXPENDITURES. 










Dr. 


Paid Wm. Campbell, Supt., . 


$7 50 




Eben Carr, 


a 


53 00 




laborers, 


. 


178 16 




for team work, 


• 


49 75 




Amount, 


$288 41 




Balance to new accbunt, . 


22 83 











$311 24 



246 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



By Balance from last year, 
Appropriation, 

Received for stone and loam sold, 
" lot, corner of Han- 

over and Belmont 
Sts., 1st payment, . 



Cr. 



118 62 

9,500 00 

131 26 



915 33 
$10,565 20 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Samuel Brown, Jr., Supt. 
laborers, 
for team work, 
for blasting on Pennacook St. 
for building bank wall on Ma 
pie St., . 
" culvert on Beech 

St., 
Civil Engineer, 
for building culvert on Elm St 
for teams from stable, . 
for drain pipe, 
for land taken for Webster St. 
for sharpening tools, 
for land taken for widening 

Concord St., 
for widening Concord St., 
Luther Campbell for grading 

Belmont St., 
for lot of land on Belmont St. 

Amount, . . ... 
Transferred to reserved fund 
Balance to new account, 



Dr. 



178 00 

2,212 28 

1,733 28 

79 85 

1,365 06 

1,074 00 

248 00 

275 00 

21 50 

84 00 

930 00 

1 75 

36 66 
342 39 



56 


25 




1,194 


08 




$9,732 


10 




500 


00 




333 


10 






110,565 


20 



247 
AWARDS FOR LANDS TAKEN FOR HIGHWAYS. 

Due January 1, 1872. Cr. 

By appropriation, ...... 812,737 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for land for widening Manches- 
ter Street, 

Paid for land for widening Hanover 
Street, .... 

Paid for land for north extension of 
Elm Street, 

Paid for land for south extension of 
Elm Street, 

Paid for land for Valley Street, 
" " Spruce " 

u u High *' 

" " Beech 

" " Central " 

" " Pearl " 

" " Cypress " 

" " Bridge " 

" " Jewett " 

" " Porter " 

River Road, north, 
Belmont Street, . 



Dr. 






Transferred to reserved fund, . 
Balance to new account, 



124 38 

40 63 

1,200 00 

35 00 

1,687 00 

158 00 

15 00 

20 00 

361 34 

1,249 56 

22 00 

468 00 

239 00 

462 00 

300 86 

131 00 

6,413 77 

6,000 00 

323 23 



,737 00 



248 



PAVING STREETS. 

By Balance from last year, . . §36 83 
Appropriation, .... 4,500 00 
Reserved fund (transferred,) . 3,612 07 
Received of Water Works for re- 
pairing paving, . . . 26 75 



Cr. 



EXPENDITURES. 


Paid Russell White, Superintendent 


, $162 00 


Samuel Brown, jr., '" 


40 00 


laborers, .... 


3,618 59 


for teams. 


645 20 


for paving blocks, . 


3,297 50 


, for cobble stone, . 


19 91 


for flagging stone. 


189 80 


for grade stakes, . 


20 24 


for repairing tools, 


69 16 


for engineering, 


103 25 




8,165 65 


Balance to new account, 


10 00 


WATERING STI 


tEETS. 


By Balance from last year, 


$56 30 


Appropriation, 


800 00 



$8,175 65 



Dr. 



,175 65 



Cr. 



356 80 



249 






EXPENDITURES. 






id Mark E. Harvey for self and 






team, ..... 


1720 


00 


for repairing water cart, 


29 


60 




749 


50 


Reserved fund (transferred,) . 


100 


00 


Balance to new account, . 


6 


80 









Cr. 



1856 30 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



By Balance from last year, 
Appropriation, 



14 
4,500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 




id for gas, . . . . 


12,402 09 


for lighting lamps, 


1,195 01 


for lanterns and lamps, 


240 15 


for repairs of lanterns, . 


241 69 


for lamp-posts. 


437 00 


for oil, matches and chimneys. 


22 02 


for can, faucet and trimmer, . 


5 35 




4,543 31 


Transferred to reserved fund. 


800 00 


Balance to new account. 


16 83 



Cr. 



^5,300 14 



Dr. 



,350 14 



250 








GRANITE BRIDGE. 




Cr. 


By Balance from last year, 
Appropriation, 


$58 
200 


52 
00 


$258 52 
Dr. 


EXPENDITURES. 






Paid for carpenter -work repairs, . 
for tinning, .... 
for painting. 


$42 

96 

2 


40 

81 
86 






142 


07 




Balance to new account. 


116 


45 


$258 52 


AMOSKEAG FALLS 


BRIDGE. 


Cr. 


By Balance from last year. 
Appropriation, 


$86 
1,200 


38 
00 


$1,286 38 








EXPENDITURES. 






Dr. 


Paid for stonework, building pier, 
balance of account, 
for repairs, .... 
for can, oil and chimneys, 
for lighting. 


$799 

1 

26 

60 


30 
25 
45 
00 






887 


00 




Balance to new account. 


399 


38 


$1,^86 38 



251 



IRON BRIDGE— GRANITE STREET. 



Or. 



By State Bonds, 

Balance overdrawn, . 



12,300 00 
20 69 



12,320 69 



EXPENDITURES. 



Dr. 



Paid Curry & Parker for iron super- 
structure, .... $2,300 00 
for freight on same, . . 20 69 

$i2,320 69 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Or. 



By Balance from last year, 


•166 90 


Receipts for entering drains. 


781 15 


Appropriation, .... 


10,000 00 




ffiin SIS 05 




'iPX\J jO^O \JO 


EXPENDITURES. 




Dr. 


Paid Superintendent, 


$14 00 


for livery teams. 


7 00 


for engineer, . 


3 75 


for cesspool covers, (stone). 


24 00 


for tools, 


36 35 


for rubber boots. 


39 00 


for freight on pipe, . 


42 00 


for team work, 


64 50 


for lumber, 


84 47 


for cesspool covers, (castings) 


126 59 


for cement, 


179 15 



2 It. :> 



Paid for brick, .... 


$249 18 




for pipe and laying, • . 


3,585 95 




for labor, .... 


3,260 61 




Amount, .... 


7,716 55 




Reserved fund transferred. 


2,800 00 




Balance to new account, 


331 50 






f-m Q/iQ nf; 




T 


4.^v^,w^w x^^ 


COMMONS. 




Or. 


By Balance from last year. 


165 90 




Appropriation, .... 


1,500 00 




Overdraft, .... 


9 40 


$1,575 30 






EXPENDITURES. 




Dr. 


Paid for laborers, .... 


$304 99 




for repairing fence. 


106 81 




for whitewashing fence, . 


40 00 




for team work, 


70 75 




for trees, .... 


24 50 




for engineer, .... 


19 50 




for concrete for Merrimack 






Square, .... 


675 25 




Amount, .... 


1,241 80 




Balance to new account. 


333 50 


11,575 30 



253 
PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



By Balance from last year, 
received for lots, 
logs, wood, grass, apples, posts, 
and interest. 



To Expenditures, (see page 68), 
Balance to new account, 



Or. 



1737 


10 






1,121 


95 






96 


84 










11,955 


80 












Dr 




$905 


62 






1,050 


27 










11,955 


89 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



Cr. 



By Appropriation, .... 


1800 00 




Reserved Fund, 


1,408 00 


81,708 00 






EXPENDITURES. 




Dr. 


Paid for plans for wall, and Superin- 






tendent's services, 


850 00 




for wall, ..... 


1,472 00 




for excavation, 


186 00 


81,708 00 







RESERVOIRS. 

Cr. 
By Balance from last year, .... 82,080 51 



254 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for iron work, . . . $40 79 

for masoniy, . . " . . 11 25 
for work on reservoir corner of 

Bridge and Ashland Streets, 33 00 

for repairs of covers, . . 52 02 

for work on reservoir in Ward 7, 29 00 

for overflow of land, . . 35 00 

for care of reservoirs, . . 100 00 

for pumping out reservoirs, . 18 00 



319 06 
Balance to new account, . 1,761 45 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

By Balance from last year, . . $79 30 
Appropriation, . . . 15,000 00 

E. P. Johnson, overdraft, . 4 25 



Dr. 



$2,080 51 



Cr. 



EXPENDITURES. 




" AMOSKEAG " NO. 


ONE. 


Paid pay roll, .... 


$720 00 


for fuel, . . • 


222 40 


for teamster. 


60 OD 


for gas, .... 


33 93 


for hydr't connect'n & gauge, 


29 16 


for manilla rope, . 


6 71 



$15,083 55 



Dr. 



255 



Paid for oil and matches, 

for rotten stone, soap, 



112 85 



and 



spirits, . . . . 


7 05 


for door bolts and labor, 


6 62 


for tin pipe and chain, . 


6 23 


for repairing force-pump. 


4 75 


for lanterns, pipe, and repair- 




ing stoves, 


16 45 


for jackets, . . . . 


29 24 


for pole strap. 


2 75 


for duster, . . . . 


3 00 


for chairs, . . . ' . 


31 50 


" FIRE KING " NO. 


TWO. 


Paid pay roll. 


8720 00 


for fuel, 


234 25 


for teamster, 


60 00 


for gas. 


68 07 


for repairs on machine, . 


816 92 


for shovel, 


1 00 


for waste. 


8 00 


for oil and matches, 


10 97 


for rotten stone and spirits, 


1 86 


for door bolts and labor, 


6 62 


for lanterns, pipe, and repair 




ing stoves. 


13 18 


for repairing gas pipe, . 


2 46 


for tool box, 


1 30 


for jackets, . 


39 59 


for repairing harness, . 


1 80 


for towel crash, 


2 67 



,192 64 



.,988 69 



256 

'' E. W. HARRINGTON " NO. THREE. 



Paid pay roll. 


. 


1717 50 


for fuel 




53 46 


for team, 




75 00 


for gas, 




8 22 


for hydrant connections 


and 




strainer, . 




17 16 


for gauge. 




15 00 


for lock. 




2 63 


for duster and chamois 


skin. 


3 75 


for keys. 




11 68 


for sieve. 




50 


for leather, . 




1 00 


for crash for towels, 




2 00 


for oil and matches. 




5 55 


for pail. 




30 


for spirits, 




85 


for stove and pipe. 




33 75 


• 

" N. S. BEAN 


" NO. 


FOUR. 


Paid pay roll, 




$520 00 


for fuel. 




214 82 


for teamster, 




60 00 


for gas. 




52 98 


for hydrant connections 


and 




strainers, 




31 75 


for gauge and labor. 




26 75 


for waste, 




4 50 


for door bolts and labor, 




6 63 


for oil and matches, 




5 75 


for gas pipe and burners 


J 


5 91 


for repairing force pump, 




3 62 



$948 35 



257 



Paid for i)ole straps, 


15 75 


for gas fixtures and repairs, . 


2 80 


for soap, spirits, and rotten 




stone, .... 


5 49 


for two lanterns, . 


5 00 


for stove pipe and labor. 


49 14 


for rope and broom, 


6 90 



.,007 79 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER CO. NO. ONE. 



id pay roll, .... 


$1,383 00 


for fuel, .... 


34 60 


for gas, .... 


32 03 


for two axes. 


3 25 


for lumber, .... 


2 27 


for gas bracket, 


1 45 


for new carriage, less exchange 




of -f 150, .... 


550 00 


for ladders, .... 


107 90 


for painting ladders, 


55 97 


for jackets, .... 


113 40 


for making jackets & overalls, 


16 50 


for bridle and straps, 


9 68 


for duster, shovel, fork, and 




hooks, .... 


7 59 


for waste, .... 


1 50 


for 4 lanterns. 


14 00 


for 12 pieces forging & labor. 


4 90 


G. E. Glines' exp. to Boston, 


6 00 


for repairing harnesses, 


23 30 


for hats, .... 


156 00 


for matches. 


55 



$2,523 89 



City Report— 17 



258 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. ONE. 



Paid pay roll, 


. 1945 00 


for fuel, 


34 60 


for teams, 


16 50 


for gas, 


12 36 


for pipe and cleaning stove, 


8 50 


for jackets, . 


200 98 


for hats, 


101 00 


for work and material for cup 




board. 


15 77 


for hose dressing, . 


41 50 


for repairing hose, 


26 34 


for matches, oil and spirits, 


5 98 


for waste. 


4 25 


for express bills, . 


50 



,413 28 



GOFF S FALLS HOSE COMPANY. 



Paid for hose carriage, . 


. 1250 00 


for spanners, 


10 64 


for hose. 


16 63 


for axes and rope. 


8 27 


for freight, . 


3 40 



$288 94 



AMOSKEAG HOSE COMPANY. 



Paid for hose. 



1827 55 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Paid for spanners and wrenches for 

hydrants, . . . . $23 37 
for bagging, .... 9 00 



259 



aid for cementing cistern, . 


S7 00 


for hose, . . . . 


1,243 78 


for rubber pipe. 


33 25 


for watching at fires, 


6 00 


for engineers' jackets, . 


47 24 


for repairing pipe and pump, 


1 25 


for teamsters. 


24 00 


for repairing gas pipe and dooi 




bells, 


1 95 


fo]- pipe and lining to stove, . 


24 01 


for wood, . . . . 


1 00 


for stuffing furniture, 


2 00 


for 'engraving badges. 


21 00 


for oil, spirits and rope. 


9 60 


for livery teams, . 


3 50 


for hose dressing, 


141 38 


for express bills, 


3 99 


for printing regulations 2 years 


5, 49 60 


bill-heads &, cards, 


47 25 


for salary of engineers, 1872, 


337 50 


" of clerk. 


25 00 


for labor and shavings, . 


5 25 



^2,067 92 



RECAPITULATION. 



Amoskeag No. 1, 
Fire King No. 2, 
E. W. Harrington No. 
N. S. Bean No. 4, 
Excelsior No. 1, . 
Pennacook Hose No. 1, 
Golf's Falls Hose Co., 
Amoskeag Hose Co., 
Miscellaneous, 



$1,192 64 

1,988 69 

948 35 

1,007 79 

2,523 89 

1,413 28 

288 94 

827 55 

2,067 92 



12,259 07 



260 

Transferred to account of city- 
teams, . . 1,600 00 
reserve fund, . 1,000 00 
Balance to new account, . 224 48 



$15,083 55 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Cr. 
By Apj)ropriation, . . 111,500 00 

Reserved fund, ... 542 24 

$12,042 24 



EXPENDITURES. 



Dr. 



Paid for system of Fire Alarm as 

per contract, . . $11,620 25 

for painting room (central sta- 



tion,), .... 


30 87 


for furniture for room, . 


33 08 


for zincs, hangers, and bell 




strikers, .... 


151 83 


for engineering, 


2 00 


for chemicals. 


53 93 


B. C. Kendall, labor and cash 




paid, 


50 28 


B. C. Kendall, care of battery 




to Dec. 31, 1872, 


loo 00 

$12,042 24 


IRON FENCE. 


Cr. 


By Balance from last year. 


$766 78 


Appropriation, .... 


3,000 00 

$3,766 78 



261 





EXPENDITURES. 




id A. H. Lowell for 


fence, 


(iron 




castings), . 


. 


. 


.^2,139 56 


A.. H. Lowell for lock and key, 


1 95 


for grade stakes, 


. 




2 25 


for stone base, 


. 


. 


1,085 15 


engineering, . 


• 


• 


13 00 


Amount, 


3,241 91 


Balance, 


* 


" 


524 87 







Br. 



13,766 78 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Cr. 



By Balance from last year, 


1247 


81 


Appropriation, .... 


10,000 


00 


Overdraft refunded, . 


.1 


25 


Receipts for costs and fines. 


5,715 


08 


Reserved fund, 


100 


00 

*l(^ OfiJ. 1 J. 






t]P±v>,VUT: J.4: 


EXPENDITURES. 






Paid marshal's salary, . 


-$875 


00 


assistant marshal's salary, 


712 


50 


justice's salar^', 


1,000 


00 


assistant justice's salary, 


64 


00 


rent of justice's office, 


50 


00 


for witness fees, messages, &c., 


189 


00 


salary of captain of watch. 


845 


25 


salary of night watch. 


8,825 


16 


salary of day watch. 


2,139 


90 


for teams, .... 


373 


75 



262 

Paid for fuel, 

for books and stationery, 

for bedding, . 

for provisions for prisoners and 
travelers, 

for washing, . 

for 2 marshal's l)adges, . 

for 15 watchmen's badges, 

for burying nuisances and kill- 
ing dogs, . 

for repairing stoves, 

for care of lobby, . 

for oil, matches and pails, 

for painting, gas-fitting and re- 
pairing lock, 

for physician's services and 
medicine, . 

for police buttons, . 

Amount, 

Balance to new account. 



^384 


6Q 


134 


80 


77 


50 


69 


16 


66 


25 


16 


00 


60 


00 


33 


25 


42 


07 



30 70 
15 50 

6 60 

6 77 
5 00 



•$16,022 82 
41 32 



$16,064 14 



CITY HALL. 




By Balance from last year, . 


$273 29 


Receipts for rent, 


2,393 80 


" for old windows, 


9 00 


" for brick, . 


26 00 


" for gas. 


2 76 


Reserved fund transferred. 


7,121 63 



Cr. 



•$9,827 48 



26; 



EXPENDITURES. 




Paid for gas, .... 


$595 11 


for fuel, 


255 40 


for washing, .... 


. 36 05 


for awning, .... 


22 55 


for shovel, brooms and pails, . 


11 56 


for bell-rope and rep'ng clocks. 


33 51 


for keys and repairing locks, . 


10 48 


for oil, matches, tub, &c.. 


12 70 


for mats and brushes, 


2 35 


for sand and ice, 


9 08 


for repairing settees. 


52 20 


for repairing roof, . 


24 97 


for door spring, 


2 25 


for repairing stoves, 


4 97 


for painting, and setting glass. 


36 75 


for repairing engineer's room, . 


5 50 


for fitting up collector's office. 


35 25 


for whitewashing, . 


6 00 


for gas burners for council room. 


15 41 


for water-tank, sink and chairs, 


21 30 



Di 



Carried forward, 



,193 42 



REMODELING CITY HALL BUILDING. 



Paid for iron doors for safes, . 


175 00 


for lime and cement. 


329 90 


for brick-masonry, . 


969 75 


for wire netting, in treasurer's 




office, 


206 55 


for windows and doors, . 


147 92 


for freight, .... 


96 30 


for job team, .... 


129 75 



264 



Paid for stone work, 


11,002 12 


for iron work, .... 


673 31 


for lumber, .... 


87 44 


for carpenter work, . 


1,232 57 


for painting and paper hanging, 


365 50 


for stoves and furnaces, . 


752 00 


for gas pipe and fixtures. 


487 33 


for drain pipe. 


31 50 


for cell doors, .... 


260 00 


for hardware, .... 


95 71 


for carpeting, .... 


137 35 


for corrugated iron, for arches. 


. 430 00 


for architect's services, . 


150 00 


Amount, . . . . 


7,660 00 


Brought forward, . 


1,193 42 




8,853 42 


Balance to new account. 


974 06 


^ 





,827 48 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



By Balance from last year. 
Appropriation, 



.$2,316 10 
8,000 00 



Cr. 



$10,316 10 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for gas in ward room, . . $ 30 
for guide boards, ... 18 75 
for making annual report, . 125 00 
Martin Early for injury to per- 
son by defect in highway, . 250 00 



Dr. 



265 



Paid Catherine Brannan for injury 
to person by defect in high- 
way, 1100 00 

L. B. Bodwell injury to person 
by defect in highway . . 200 00 

Winnefred Harrington injury 
to person by defect in high- 
way, 100 00 

D. Kerwin for damages to 

sleigh by defect in highway, 5 80 
J. P. Hubbard & Co. damages 
to sleigh by defect in high- 
way, 45 00 

J. M. Platts injury to son by 

defect in highway, . . 50 00 

M. T. Burbank damage to car- 
riage by defect in highway, . 10 00 

C. C. Chase damage to horse 

by defect in highway, . 12G 00 

Horace Morse damage to wag- 
on by defect in highway, . 5 00 

E. A, Thayer damage to team 

by defect in highway, . . 5 00 

W. I. Gilbert damage to car- 
riage by defect in highway, . 30 00 

A. H. Lowell damage by over- 
flow of sewer, . . . 50 00 

J. M. Dickey damage to well 
by overflow of sewer, . 50 00 

Daniel Connor damage to well 
by overflow of sewer, . 75 00 

D. C. Gould damage to land by 
overflow of sewer, . . 50 00 

Mrs. McKenzie for bedding 
burned on account of small 
pox, 50 00 



266 



Paid H. B. Gould damage to lot by 

grading Central Street, . $20 00 

Mrs. Nancy C. Batchelder dam- 
age to lot by grading Central 
Street, .... 

Mrs. N. G. Thompson damage 
to lot by paving gutter, 

N. Duford damage to lot by 
flowing, .... 

for rent of Merrimack Hall for 
ward room, 

for expense of Co. Commis- 
sioners discontinuing roads, 

for copying non-resident tax 
list, ..... 

for damage to sheep by dogs, . 

for express, .... 

for job team, 

for medical care of small-pox 
patients, .... 

for provisions for small-pox 
patients, .... 

for nursing and care of small- 
pox patients, 

for plowing and fencing garden 

, at pest house, 

for repairing carriage for pest 
house, .... 

for repairing pest house, 

for team to pest house, . 

for .posting health notices, 

for vaccination, 

for expense numbering streets, 

for establishing grades of side- 
walks, . . . . 128 50 



50 


00 


20 


00 


12 


00 


96 


64 


5 


75 


25 


00 


3 


45 


3 


50 


163 


84 


118 


71 


519 


62 


15 


00 


29 


25 


16 


10 


13 


50 


2 


50 


91 


00 


660 


11 



267 



Paid for running lines on Union 




Street, .... 


$29 50 


for running lines on city lands, 


46 50 


for water-bond certificates, 


400 00 


for stone at entrance of Mer- 




rimack Square, . 


39 00 


for making bier, 


2 00 


for teams, for committees. 


230 80 


for searching town records at 




Bedford, .... 


8 00 


for sealing weights. 


1 00 


for shade trees. 


27 50 


for trimming shade trees, 


512 75 


for making and repairing tree 




^boxes, .... 


701 39 


for iron work, for railing, on 




Hanover Street, 


28 00 


for pumping out cellar forH. C. 




Dickey, .... 


14 00 


for moving and fitting up No. 6 




Ward room, 


119 05 


for washing and repairing No. 




5 Ward room, . 


36 85 


for water pipes, 


31 07 


for fitting up room for Art 




Association, 


127 67 


for running a line near A. 




Branch's, .... 


2 50 


for recording deeds. 


3 93 


for auditing accounts of City 




Clerk and Treasurer, . 


• 581 00 


for repairs at Fire Alarm Tel- 




egraph office, 


55 08 


for repairs of privy vaults. 


8 26 


for repairs of plank sidewalk, 


1 75 



mi 



Paid for cleaning vaults, . . $4B 00 
for grading near Valley, . 20 00 

for grade stakes and posts, . 8 50 

for repairing stamp, . . 1 00 

Smith & Clark, counsel fees, . 74 00 

for selling city lots, . . 37 51 

for dockets and briefs, . . 13 91 

for repairing wagon damaged 

by defect in highway, . 34 80 

for physician's return of births 

and deaths, , . , 13 00 

for iron doors for Water Com- 
missioner's room, . . 35 57 
for carrying insane person to 

asylum, .... 6 00 

for serving notices of road- 
hearing, .... 1 50 
for expense of firemen to Bos- 
ton fire, .... 10 04 
for witness fees, Moulton vs. 

Manchester, ... 1 37 

for telegraphing Cambridge 

time, .... 10 70 

for stone monument, . . 1 50 

for costs and fines to Hillsbo- 
rough County, . . . 1,775 90 



Amount, .... 8,536 22 

Reserved fund transferred, . 1,500 00 

Balance to new account, . 279 88 



,316 10 



269 




CITY LIBRARY. 


By Balance from last year, . 


1202 25 


Appropriation, .... 


2,750 00 


EXPENDITURES 


)• 


Paid appropriation for books, . 


11,000 00 


Librarian's salary, . 


799 00 


" assistant. 


15 00 


for washing and work, . 


2 50 


for binding. 


368 61 


for printing, . 


170 00 


for gas, .... 


215 25 


for fuel, .... 


194 91 


for scraper, shovel, hod an( 




sprinkler, . 


3 65 


for wrench and brooms, . 


3 00 


for repairs and gas-fixtures, 


23 57 


for mucilage, . 


2 25 


for coloring statuary, 


2 00 


for furniture, . 


16 18 


for manilla paper, . 


40 50 


Amount, 


. 2,856 31 


Balance to new account. 


95 94 







Cr. 



,952 25 



Dr. 



^2,952 25 



OFFICERS' SALARIES. 



By Balance from last year, 
Appropriation, 



$256 02 
9,000 00 



Cr. 



,256 02 





270 






EXPENDITURE!" 


5. 


Paid salary 


of Mayor, . 


•n,ooo 00 


ii. 


City Clerk, . 


1,000 00 


a 


Treasurer and Col- 
lector, (Henry R 






Chamberlin), 


1,166 67 


a 


Collector, ( W. G. 






Everett), 


583 33 


a 


Supt. Public Instr'n, 


1,650 00 


u 


Messenger, 


600 00 


;( 


Clerk of Com. Coun- 






cil, (T. W. Lane) 


47 22 


a 


Clerk of Com. Coun 






cil,(S. B. Putnam) 


61 11 


a 


Solicitor, six months 


> 




(J. H. Andrews) 


50 00 


a 


Solicitor, twelve mo 






(N. P. Hunt) 


100 00 


a 


Health Officer, 


75 00 


a 


Physician, 


50 00 


li 


Overseers of poor, . 


250 00 


a 


Assessors, 


1,958 00 


(( 


Board of S. Com., 


115 00 


(( 


Ward Moderators, 


24 00 


a 


" Clerks, . 


40 00 


11 


" Selectmen, 
unt. 


120 00 


Amo 


8,890 33 


Transferred to reserved fund, 


300 00 


Balance to new account, 


65 69 



Dr. 



),256 02 



271 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Or. 
By Balance from last year, . . |)108 31 
Appropriation, . . . 2,000 00 

12,108 31 



Dr. 



EXPENDITURES. 






for printing annual report 


for 






1871, . 


. 


1608 


00 


" for Assessors, 




251 


88 


for Collector's 


of- 






fice, 


. 


69 


75 


" for Clerk's office. 


91 


00 


" for Mayor's office, 


66 


50 


" for Health officers. 


25 


25 


for advertising, 




595 


89 


for postage, . 




31 


49 


for stationery and books 


for 






Clerk's office, 


. 


119 


80 


for stationery and books 


for 






Treasurer's office, 


. 


47 


97 


for stationery and books 


for 






Collector's office, 




69 


66 


for stationery and books 


for 






Assessors' office, 


. 


73 


87 


for stationery and books 


for 






Marshal's office, 


• 


5 


22 



Amount, .... 2,056 31 
Balance to new account, . 52 00 



5,108 31 



272 
INSURANCE. 

By Appropriation, . . , -$1,500 00 

Reserved fund, . . . 50 00 



EXPENDITURES. 




Paid Foster & Clough, agents, for 




premiums, .... 


1497 05 


B. P. Cillej, agent, for premi- 




ums, ..... 


69 75 


N.^E. Morrill, agent, for pre- 




miums, .... 


55 00 


I. W. Smith, agent, for pre- 




miums, .... 


164 88 


Geo. A. French, agent, for pre- 




miums, .... 


117 50 


E. P. Richardson, agent, for 




premiums, .... 


356 50 


C. ]\[. Edgerly, agent, for pre- 




miums, .... 


112 50 


N. H. Ins. Co., . 


135 00 


Amount, .... 


1,508 18 


Balance to new account, . 


41 82 


REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 


By Balance from last year, 


$383 47 


Appropriation, 


1,000 00 



Cr. 



.,550 00 



Dr. 



81,550 00 



Cr. 



$1,383 47 



273 



EXPENDITURES. 



Dr. 



Paid for repairs on Vine-Street en- 
gine-house, as follows, viz : 
for lumber, .... 
for carpenter work, 
for sink and air chamber, 
for roofing, .... 
for mason work, 
for painting, 
for repairs of No. 2 ward room, 

carpenter work, 
for repairs of No. 6 ward room, 

foundation, 
for repairs of No. 6 ward room, 

carpenter work, . 
for repairs of No. 6 ward room, 

mason work, 
for repairs of No. 6 ward room, 

painting, .... 
for repairs of No. 6 ward room, 

shutters. .... 
for repairs of No. 4 ward room, 

carpenter work, . 
for repairs of No. 5 ward room, 

painting, .... 
for repairs of library building, 

cement work, 
for repairing water and gas 

pipe at court house. 

Amount, .... 

Reserved fund transferred, . 

Balance to new account, . 

City Report— 18 



$23 


26 


186 


17 


35 


41 


20 


40 


47 


87 


67 


34 


34 


22 


48 


87 


73 


60 


10 


00 


22 


19 


11 


00 


146 


62 


39 


12 


4 


80 


26 


47 


1804 


32 


500 


00 


79 


15 



,383 47 



274 
COURT HOUSE. 
By Balance from last year, 



Cr. 

ilOO 07 



EXPENDITURES. 




Paid for pails, cluster, &c., 


12 68 


for repairing pump, 


22 45 


for setting trees, 


1 50 


for stove pipe, 


24 74 


for setting glass and painting, 


11 42 


for zinc and labor, . 


3 50 


for drain pipe. 


16 00 


for gas, 


10 00 


Amount, .... 


92 29 


Balance to new account. 


7 78 





Dr. 



-1100 07 



LIBRARY BUILDING. 



' Balance from last year. 


$77 


61 


Overdraft refunded, . 


156 


74 


EXPENDITURES. 






id Alpheus Gay for lumber and 






work, 


$70 


87 


Balance to new account. 


163 


48 



Cr. 



$234 35 



Dr. 



$234 35 



k 



275 

STATE TAX. 

Cr. 
By Appropriation, . . . $25,281 00 

Dr. 
Paid State Treasurer, . . . 125,281 00 



COUNTY TAX. 

Cr. 

By Appropriation, . . . $15,947 47 

Dr. 

Paid County Treasurer, . . . $15,947 47 



MILITIA. 






Cr. 


By Balance from last year. 


$48 


19 




Appropriation, .... 


400 


00 




Reserved fund. 


22 


64 


$470 83 


EXPENDITURES. 












Dr. 


Paid Sheridan Guards to April 17, 








1872, 


$20 


83 




Amoskeag Veteran Association 








to April 17, 1872, 


100 


00 




Head Guards to Apr. 17, 1872, 


50 


00 




Clark Guards " " 


100 


00 




Manchester War Veterans to 








April 17, 1872, . 


100 


00 




Section B, 1st N. H. Battery, to 








April 17, 1872, . 


100 


00 


<ffii7n «3 



276 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

By Balance from last year, 

EXPENDITURES. 

1867. 
Paid David Nutt, no money, 

John L. Kelly, no money, 
Thomas Flaherty, poor, 
James Y. Furlong, " 
Sarah M. Perry, " 
Elbridge Reed, " 

Ira Ballon, " 

Bradley Rose, " 

John Barr, " 

John W. Bridge, " 
Thomas Hackett, " 
John Whidden, " 
Robert E. Williams, " 
Sylvester C. Fitch, " 
William Bolsover, dead 
Robert C. Harris, " 
Wm. M. Junkins, " 
Sol. H. Dutton, 
Thomas Baxter, " 
Augustine Pelton, " 
Jonathan Moore, " 
Joseph Currier, " 
Wm. B. Dana, " 

Joseph Birney, " 

Nathaniel Corning, " 
Joseph T. Donohoe, " 
Chas. A. Knights, " 
Henry P. Lane, " 
Wm. E. Robinson, " 





$4 61 


y^ 


7 68 




4 91 




4 n 




4 73 




4 91 




4 91 




4 91 




1 00 




4 91 




4 91 




4 91 




. ■ 4 91 




4 91 




4 91 




4 76 




4 91 




4 91 




4 91 




4 91 




4 91 




4 91 




4 91 




2 04 




4 91 




4 91 




4 91 




4 91 




4 91 



Cr. 
!|2,333 23 



Dr. 



277 



Paid Patrick Kelley, dead, . 
John Tehan, " 

George Aldrich, not lialjle, 
Orrin B. Cowan, disabled sol- 
dier, ..... 

Harvey Hill, disabled soldier, 
Frank K. Tucker, " " 

Wilson & Kimball, gone, 
Benj. H. Piper, did not own, 
John S. Kidder, " " 
Ed. M. Tillotson, minor, 
Frank Swett, paid in Haver- 
hill, ...... 

Wm. Whelpley, paid in Iowa, 
F. W. Batchelder, paid in Pel- 
ham, ..... 

Warren Blackmer, paid in 
Lowell, . . . . 

Nathn'l A. Gladden, paid in 
Lowell, .... 

Rufus Calef, paid in Washing- 
ton, ..... 

George W. Boyce, paid in Lon- 
donderry, . . . . 

Amount carried forward, 



$4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


16 


04 


1 


40 




47 


4 


91 


4 


61 


4 


76 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 


4 


91 



mi 75 



1868. 
Paid Ira Ballou, poor, . 

James Y. Furlong, poor, 

Wm. C. Shannon, " 

Martin Earley, " 

Sarah M. Perry, '• 

McConnell Austin, " 

Elbridge Reed, " 



$s 


15 


3 


55 


3 


99 


3 


15 


3 


86 


3 


15 


3 


15 



278 



'aid Thomas Hackett, poor, 


$3 15 


John Whidden, " 


3 15 


Sylvester C. Fitch, " 


8 15 


William Bolsover, dead, 


3 15 


John M. Crystal, dead, 


3 15 


Robert C. Harris, " 


3 02 


Patrick Roby, " 


3 15 


Thos. Jones, " 


3 15 


Wm. M. Junkins, " 


3 15 


David Sumner, " 


3 15 


Jona. Moore, " 


3 15 


Joseph Currier, " 


3 15 


Wm. B. Dana, " 


3 15 


Joseph T. Donohoe, dead, 


3 15 


John Tehan, 


3 15 


Valentine Connelly, " 


3 15 


F. A. Wasley, not here, 


3 15 


H. Hurtz & Co., run away. 


63 00 


H. Hurtz, run away. 


3 15 


John O'Neil, gone to Ireland 


3 15 


Michael Larkin, blind, . 


3 15 


Michael Regan, maimed. 


3 15 


Wm. A. Canfield, maimed. 


3 15 


Harvey Hill, disabled, , 


3 02 


Frank K. Tucker, disabled, . 


3 15 


Joseph Bry^on, minor. 


3 15 


Wm. M. Hayes, " 


3 15 


George Aldrich, not liable. 


3 15 


Joliu A. Adams, but one dog, 


1 00 


Vinal Stevens, paid in New- 




bury, .... 


3 15 


Chas. A. Aiken, paid in Haver 




hill, Mass., 


4 21 


Oilman D. Moore, paid in Bed 




ford, .... 


3 15 



7 


35 


3 


15 


o 

o 


15 


3 


15 



279 



Paid John Willand, paid in Lowell, |3 15 

Horace Townsend, paid in 
Bedford, .... 5 25 

Charles Townsend, paid in 
Bedford, .... 

Joseph Rushlow, paid in Low- 
ell, 

Warren Blackmer, paid in 
Lowell, .... 

David A. Page, paid in Golfs- 
town, ..... 

Amount carried forward, . $208 13 



1869. 
Paid David A. Page, paid in Goffs- 
town, ..... 
F. C. Morrill, paid in Boscawen, 
Frank B. Eaton, paid in Port- 
land, ..... 
Peter Trainer, paid in Concord, 
Wm. H. Everett, paid in Han- 
over, ..... 
C. R. Foss, paid in Candia, 
Orville C. Gordon, paid in N, 
Hampton, .... 
H. C. Swain, paid in Andover, 
Chas. H. Marshall, paid in Bed- 
ford, ..... 
Horace Townsend, paid in Bed- 
ford, ..... 
F. W. Batchelder, paid in Pel- 
ham, ..... 
Joseph Rushlow, paid in Low- 
ell, 



13 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


72 




72 


3 


72 


3 


72 


3 


7.2 


3 


72 


7 


44 


3 


72 


3 


72 



280 



Paid Nathan McCoy, paid in Weare, |3 72 


Sylvester C. Gould, paid in 




Weare, .... 


3 72 


Benj. Paucost, not here, . 


3 72 


Elbridge Reed, maimed. 


3 72 


Ira Bryant, *•' 


3 72 


Walter H. Thwing, maimed, . 


2 24 


Wm. A. Canfield,' 


3 72 


Frank K. Tucker, 


3 72 


Ignace Anger, poor, 


3 72 


Martin Barley, " 


3 72 


McConnell Austin, poor. 


3 72 


Frank W. Elliott, " 


3 72 


John 0. Langley, " 


3 72 


John Barr, " 


1 00 


Jona. feargent, " 


3 72 


Patrick Kelley, " 


3 72 


Lewis Adams, " 


3 72 


Orrin B. Cowan, " 


3 72 


John Whidden, '- 


3 72 


Sylvester C. Fitch, " 


3 72 


William Bolsover, dead, 


3 72 


Patrick Roby, " 


3 72 


Thomas Jones, " 


3 72 


Wm. M. Junkins, " 


3 72 


Wm. McPherson, 2d, dead. 


3 72 


William Bursiel, " 


3 72 


Chas. M. Gordon, " 


3 72 


Patrick Hamilton, " 


10 17 


Horace M. Gillis, dead, . 


3 72 


David Sumner, dead. 


3 72 


Augustus Pelton, dead, . 


3 72 


Valentine Connelly, dead. 


3 72 


Joseph Currier, dead, 


' 3 72 


Thomas C. Tresillian, dead, 


3 72 



281 



Paid Edward Metcalf, blind, . 
William George, sick, 
James Fogg, over 70, 
Andrew Farrell, no dog, 
Wm. White, overtaxed, 
Wm. C. Shannon, no cow, 
John O'Neil, gone to Ireland 
George H. Brown, twice, 
Joseph Everett, twice, . 
John Burke, in State Prison, 
George W. Yarnuni, wrons 

name, 
Pat'k Haley, twice, 
Timothy Clark, 
Zebulon N. Doe, 

Amount carried forward, 



72 
72 
72 
00 
48 
61 
3 72 
3 72 
3 72 
3 72 



3 72 

2 23 

3 72 
3 72 



1220 61 



1870. 
Paid Clias. A. Barnard, paid in Mas- 
sachusetts, . . . . 
A. H. Stebbens, paid in Massa- 
chusetts, . . . . 
Sam'l P. Oram, paid in Weare, 
David H. Bean, paid in Au- 
burn, . . . . 
Albert F. Richards, paid in 

Goffstown, . 
John Morrison, dead, 
Owen Murray, " 
Patrick Roby, " 
Patrick Hamilton, dead, 
Martin Earley, '' . 

David Sumner, " 

Augustine Pelton, " 



^3 27 

3 27 
3 27 

3 27 



4 


27 


4 


46 


3 


27 


4 


27 


3 


27 


O 


27 


o 
O 


27 



282 



Paid Jona. Sargent, poor, 


13 27 


Joseph Anger, poor, 


4 14 


Sarah M. Perry, poor, . 


4 36 


McConnell Austin, " 


3 27 


Barnard Williams, " 


3 27 


Lewis Adams, " 


4 36 


Sylvester C. Fitch, '^ 


3 27 


Heirs of Dorcas Hartshorn, no 




dogs, 


3 00 


Edward Metcalf, blind, . 


3 27 


William George, sick. 


3 27 


Jas. S. Bacheller, did not own. 


7 63 


Wm. Little, no interest money. 


21 80 


James M. Clough, did not own, 


3 81 


Frank W. Elliott, disabled, . 


3 27 


John O'Neil, gone to Ireland, 


3 27 


Gilman H. Kimball, for water- 




ing trough, 


3 00 


Amount carried forward, 


8120 69 


1871. 




Paid Daniel G. Brockway, paid in 




Vermont, .... 


83 12 


John Broderick, paid in Clin- 




ton, Mass., 


3 12 


Harrison Rowe, paid in Hook- 




sett, 


3 12 


Wm. H. Myers, paid in Wash- 




ington, .... 


3 12 


David H. Bean, paid in Auburn, 


3 12 


Benj. Stevens, paid in Pem- 




broke, .... 


3 12 


Chas. P. Shepherd, paid in Dun- 




barton, .... 


3 12 



283 



Paid Sam'l P. Cram, paid in Weare, 


$3 12 


F. W. Batchelder, paid in 


Pel- 




ham, .... 




3 12 


John W. Baldwin, paid in 


Gil- 




ford, .... 


, 


3 12 


Stephen Tlioraas, paid in 


Law- 




rence. 




3 12 


James S. Washburn, pai 


d in 




Derrj, 




3 12 


Stephen Austin, paid in 


Bed- 




ford. 




3 12 


Gilbert Briggs, jr., paid in 


Wil- 




mot, .... 




3 12 


Henry Rowell, paid in N 


.Y., 


3 12 


Greenleaf Cummings, paid in 




Haverhill, . 




3 12 


Wm. Davidson, minor, . 




3 12 


Geo.' A. Stokes, " 




3 12 


Paul Now, " 




3 12 


Charles C. Griffin, dead. 




9 29 


Wm. P. Smith, 




3 12 


David Sumner, " 




3 12 


Dorsit P. Beattie, " 




3 12 


Patrick Robie, " 




3 12 


Patrick Hamilton. " 




3 12 


Jona. Sargent, poor, 




3 12 


Walter L. Biennis, poor, 




3 12 


Patrick Kelley, poor, 




3 12 


Joseph Anger, poor. 




4 12 


Sarah M. Perry, poor, 




4 16 


McConnell Austin," 




3 12 


Lewis Adams, " 




3 12 


Orrin B. Cowan, " 




3 12 


Sylvester C. Fitch, poor, 




3 12 


Frank N. Poor, overtaxed, 




6 24 



284 



Paid Blodgett & Young, overtaxed, $20 80 
David F. Brown, no dog, . 1 00 

Heirs of Dorcas Hartshorn, no 

dog, 1 00 

* John L. Hayes, no sluts, . 4 00 

Napoleon Dufrain, no horse, . 1 67 

John L. Allen, no horse, . 1 25 

Benj. Robie, no stock in trade, 2 08 

James M. Clough, did not own, 2 46 

Pierce Powers, lame, 
Edward Metcalf, blind, . 
Michael Larkin, " 
Elbridge Reed, maimed, 
William George, sick, 
Frank W. Elliott, disabled, 
John Young, watering trough, 
Charles Clark, watering trough, 
Gilman H. Kimball, watering 

trough, .... 
1-2 lot land on Central Street 

taxed wrong. 

Amount carried forward, . 182 84 



3 12 
3 12 
3 12 
3 12 
3 .12 
3 12 
3 00 
3 00 



3 00 
33 



1872. 
Paid Durrill B. Ayer, no dog, 

William Ansell, " 

Jeremiah Abbott, " 

Patrick Bohan, " 

Alden Caswell, " 
Geo. B. Chandler, " 

E. T. Hardy, " 

John L. Hayes, " 

Benjamin Laduc, "■ 

Frank Murray, " 



11 


00 


1 


00 


o 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 



285 



id Fred L. Lang, no d 


^g, 


11 00 


James Stockdale, " 




1 00 


Terence Sweeny, ' 




2 00 


Daniel E. Sullivan, ' 




1 00 


E. M. Tubbs, 




1 00 


J. H. Dowd, 




1 00 


Martha Young, " 




2 00 


George W. Adams, ' 




1 00 


Thomas Barry, ' 




1 00 


Warren Green, ' 




1 00 


Louis Brooks, ' 




2 00 


James Patten, ' 




1 00 


Oscar B. Davis, " 




1 00 


Jos. B. Cilley, 


i 


1 00 


Edward O'Brien, 




1 00 


D. 0. Parker, 




1 00 


Frank P. Fifield, 




1 00 


Albert 0. Dunn, ' 




1 00 


Allen N. George, ' 




1 00 


Joseph B. Spofford, n 


linor. 


2 24 


Daniel Ligalls, 


a 


2 24 


Frank Woodbury, 


a 


2 24 


Milo B. Wilson, 


a 


2 24 


Frank Harris, 


a 


. . 2 24 


Gustav Weisnar, 


a 


2 24 


Fred L. Lang, 


u 


2 24 


Daniel Plumer, 


it 


2 24 


Charles Lang, 


a 


2 24 


Peter McEvoy, 


a 


2 24 


Hamilton L. Perley, 


a 


2 24 


Elbridge Farmer, 


a 


2 24 


Frank Johnson, 


a 


2 24 


Joseph White, 


a 


2 24 


Wm. B. Orrill, 


(.i 


2 24 


Frank Folsom, 


u 


2 24 



286 



id Cornelius Sullivan, 


minor. 


$2 24 


Robert Arasden, 




2 24 


George Whittemore, 




2 2i 


Chas. Gilbert, 




2 24 


James Farley, 




2 24 


Richard Powers, 




2 24 


Samuel Bowers, 




2 24 


Patrick Glynn, 




2 24 


James L. Stearns, 




2 24 


Chas. F. Woithen, 




2 24 


Paul Now, 




2 24 


James Shackford, 




2 24 


Joseph Gagnon, 




2 24 


George Bigelow, 




2 24 


Richard Loring, 




2 24 


Michael Kearns, 




2 24 


John A. Barker, disabled sol 




dier, . 




2 24 


Wm. H. Emery, disabled soldie 


r, 2 24 


James W. Lathe, 




2 24 


Frank W. Elliot, 




2 24 


Lyman H. Lamprey, 




2 24 


John S. Woodman, 




2 24 


Orrin B. Cowan, 




2 24 


Charles Boro, poor, 




2 24 


Joseph Anger, '■'■ 




2 24 


Aaron George, " 




2 24 


Pierce Powers, lame 


? 


2 24 


Silas N. Robie, " 




2 24 


Warren Wyman, " 




2 24 


Wilbur Hodgman, dead, 


2 24 


William Bolsover, 


a 


2 24 


William P. Smith, 


i.i 


2 24 


George Abbott, 


a 


2 24 


Dorset P. Beattie, 


a 


2 24 



287 



Paid Joel L. Elliott, dead, . 

Jonathan Sargent, " . 

John Griffin, " . 

Edward A. Durgin, maimed, 

Edward Wyman, paid in Hook- 
sett, ... 

Lester R. Bragg, paid in Moul 
tonboro, ... 

Daniel Hill, paid in London 
derrj, .... 

Harrison Rowe. paid in Hook 
sett, .... 

Jason W. Bean, paid in Dan 
bury, .... 

N. C. Fitts, paid in Candia, 

Charles A. Adams, paid in New 
Boston, 

Alden C. Watson, paid in 
Auburn, 

Jacob Luf kin, paid in Auburn, 

Charles Bsty, paid in Auburn, 

Franklin Hardy, paid in Derry, 

Warrfen Morrill, paid in Con- 
cord, . . . . . 

John Gorman, paid in Law- 
rence, . . . . 

Josiah Randall, paid in Tyngs- 
boro, . . . . . 

Wm. H. Emerson, paid in Bos- 
ton, . . . . . 

Alonzo Elliott, paid in Alton, . 

John Parker, paid in Andover, 

Horace N. Howe, paid in Sut- 
ton, . . . . . 

Francis Vallaly, paid in New 
Market, . . . . 



2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 



2 24 



2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


9 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 



Paid Fred Clay, paid in Deny, 


12 24 


Stephen Downs, paid in New- 




burjport, .... 


2 24 


Geo. Curry, paid in Canada, . 


2 24 


Walter Chandler, Columbia, . 


2 24 


Charles H. Berry, paid in Alex- 




andria, 


2 24 


Gilbert Briggs, paid in Wil- 




mot, ..... 


2 24 


Daniel B. Emery, paid in Som- 




ers worth, .... 


2 24 


Thomas Dame, paid in Gilford, 


2 24 


Adolphus D. Morrow, paid in 




Alexandria, 


2 24 


H. W. Hurlburt, paid in Ha- 




verhill, .... 


2 24 


Aaron C. Elliott, paid in Dun- 




barton, .... 


2 24 


Frank E. Mason, paid in Hill, 


2 24 


Edward Leavitt,paid in Auburn, 


2 24 


Abraham Twist, paid in Am- 




herst, ..... 


2 24 


Charles C. Tinkham, paid in 




Grafton, .... 


2 24 


C. C. Dearborn, paid in Concord, 


2 24 


John Orrill, paid in Boston, 


2 24 


John L. O'Brien, taxed twice. 


2 24 


James O'Brien, '' " 


2 24 


Hiram Morrison, " " 


2 24 


Michael Earley, 


. 2 24 


I. D. Palmer, " " 


2 24 


David Burbank, " " 


2 24 


John H. Parker, " " 


2 24 


John N. Baker, " " 


2 24 


Wm. H. Morrill, " " 


2 24 



289 



Paid John B. Varick, no carriage, . 


82 


24 




Charles Chase, no bank stock, 


2 


24 




Charles J. Anderson, not here, 


2 


24 




Charles M. Bailey, 


2 


24 




Zena Regnon, " 


2 


24 




Michael McDonald, overtaxed. 


8 


96 




Daniel W. Merrill, " 


5 


15 




James Hall, " 


6 


72 




Edward McDerby, " 


14 


00 




Jane M. Sargent, " 


13 


44 




D. A. Messer, " 


4 


00 




Dennis Gleason, " 


5 


60 




Wm. H. Wright, 


11 


80 




Nancy A. Lord, taxed wrong. 


27 


40 




Oliver B. Gay, no horse, 


1 


50 




Heirs of J. Pressey, no cow, . 




45 




J. M. Robinson & Son, no stock 








in trade, .... 


81 


56 




Mary G. Gale, bank stock. 


67 


20 




James Lane, no horse and car- 








riage, .... 


4 


48 




A, D. Gooden, watering trough, 


3 


00 




John Young, " 


3 


00 




G. H.Kimball, 


3 


00 




Amount, .... 


$478 


20 




" brought forward, 1867, 


227 


75 




1868, 


208 


13 




" 1869, 


220 


61 




" " 1870, 


120 


69 




1871, 


182 


84 




Total amount, 


1,438 


22 




Balance to new account, . 


895 


01 








— $2,383 


28 



City Keport— 13 



290 

DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

Cr. 
By Balance from last year, . . 1694 00 
Appropriation, . . . 5,000 00 

15,694 00 

expenditures. 

Dr. 
Paid sundry persons, . . . 85,522 10 
Balance to new account, . 171 90 

$5,694 90 



LIQUOR AGENCY. 

Cr. 
By Balance from old account, . . . 8426 19 

expenditures. 

Dr. 
Paid for liquors, . . . . -§16 TO 
Balance to new account, . 409 49 

8426 19 



INTEREST. 

Cr. 
By Appropriation, . . . 26,000 00 

Coupons on State Bonds, . . 3.774 00 

-129,774 00 



291 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid Balance from last year, . 

Interest on Temporary Loan, 
" Funded debt, 

Amount, 

Reserved fund traiisfcrrod, 
Balance to new account. 



$517 82 

2,759 25 

24,311 00 

27,688 07 

1,82(> 00 

359 93 



Dr. 



^29,774 00 



WATER WORKS. 



Cr. 



By proceeds of bonds sold, 
Interest on same, 



8289,452 50 
. 7,407 73 



-1296,860 23 



EXPKNDITURES/ 



Dr. 



Paid balance from last year, . . $1,723 06 

Mayor's drafts this year, 245,870 66 

Coupons paid, . . . 8,811 00 

Balance to new account, . 40,455 51 



$296,860 23 

There are now in the City Treasury $101,500.00 Water Bonds unsold. 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 

By Amount outstanding Jan. 1st, 

1872, .... $22,170 00 
Sundry loans, for 1872, . 53,398 57 



Cr. 



$75,568 57 



For details of expenditures see Water Commissioners' Report. 



292 

expenditures. 

Dr. 
Paid loans during the year, . 173,270 00 

To outstanding loan Dec. 31, '72, 2,298 57 

175,568 57 



PAYMENT OF FUNDED DEBT. 

Cr. 
By Balance from last year, . . $7,300 00 
Appropriation, . . . 5,100 00 

Old School District, No. 5, bal- 
ance of account, ... 1 75 
Reserved fund, (transferred) . 12,598 25 

125,000 00 

expenditures. 

Dr. 
Paid Loan of Feb. 28, 1852, . . $3,600 00 
" July 1, 1847, . . 20,000 00 
On account of loan of August 
1, 1869, .... 1,400 00 

$25,000 00 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

Or. 
By Balance from last year, . . $408 36 
Appropriation, . . . 5,000 00 

$5,408 36 



293 



EXPENDITURES, 












Dr. 


id for carpenter and joiner work 


$1,109 18 




for lumber, . 


370 


82 




for doors and windows, 


55 


43 




for gas-piping and fixtures, 


227 


71 




for repairing pumps and steam 








works, 


25 


83 




for hardware, 


104 


74 




for black-boards, . 


137 


10 




for painting and glazing. 


1,424 


82 




for whitewashing and plaster 








ing, .... 


186 


97 




for concreting yards, 


634 


97 




for stoves and furnaces, 


774 


37 




for setting trees, . 


40 


52 




for grading yard Massabesic 








House, 


62 


50 




for building vault. 


90 


12 




for freight and job teams. 


8 


03 




for repairing iron fence. 


15 


76 




for locks and keys, 


15 


83 




for labor. 


99 


50 




Amount, 


5,384 


40 




Balance to new account. 


23 


96 


15,408 36 


' 







LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL-HOUSE. 



By Appropriation, 
Reserved fund. 



^23,398 47 
381 23 



Or. 



,779 70 



294 




EXPENDITURES. 




Paid new school house and lots, bal- 




ance overdrawn last year, . 


$6,671 39 


G. W. Stevens, bal. acct., 


430 00 


" for cash paid 




for sundries. 


33 73 


Alpheus Gay, for erection of 




building, bal. acct., 


5,860 81 


for sanding fence, 


75 00 


for running cornice, 


GO 00 


for painting numbers, . 


34 90 


A. H. French, for finishing 




upper story. 


1,300 00 


A. H. French, for building coal- 




bins, &c., .... 


107 89 


A. H. French, for building 




book-case, .... 


59 56 


for cementing basement, 


200 00 


for stone posts and thresholds. 


370 25 


for furnaces and pumps, 


1,850 86 


for bells and speaking tubes, . 


285 58 


for l)lack-boards, . 


268 30 


bal. acct. for brick, 


419 54 


for grading lot. 


506 11 


for furniture. 


612 66 


for building fence. 


1,116 85 


for outside windows. 


242 80 


for hardware, 


23 94 


for iron posts. 


50 20 


for gas-pipe and fixtures, 


226 17 


for fuel & care while building. 


274 86 


for keys, .... 


12 88 


for drain pipe, 


24 40 


for job team, 


15 90 



Dr. 



295 



Paid for trees, 

for building masonry (vault), 

for clocks, .... 

for concrete walks, 

for ink wells, 

for roofing over walk, . 



833 


66 






41 


46 






52 


63 






430 


32 






29 


05 






58 


00 








$23,7^ 


"9 


70 



By Appropriation 



NEW SCHOOL-HOUSES AND LOTS. 

Cr. 

. ■ . . . 113,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



STARK SCHOOL-HOUSE. 



Paid for lot, .... 


1150 00 


for foundation. 


285 19 


for engineer, 


4 50 


for well. 


28 00 


for construction of house. 


2,714 25 


for painting. 


7 50 


for ink wells, 


7 00 


for furniture, 


204 10 


for livery team. 


4 50 



Amount carried forward, . $3,405 04 



Dr. 



HALLSVILLE SCHOOL-HOUSE. 

Paid for addition to lot, . . - $311 00 



Dr. 



296 

MAIN STREET SCHOOL-HOUSE. 



Paid for carpenter work, 
for painting, . 
for masonry, 
for lumber, 
for hardware, 
for furnaces and pipes, 
for black-boards, . 
for concreting basement 
for furniture, 
for grading lot, 
for trees, 
for gutters, . 



■Amount carried forward, . 12,806 34 



$527 86 

303 76 

156 02 

213 16 

88 32 

894 06 

81 30 

111 25 

383 36 

8 25 

34 00 

5 00 



Dr. 



ASH STREET SCHOOL-HOUSE. 

Paid for grading lot, . . . 188 52 
for lumber for batters, . . 41 08 
for setting batters, . . 18 16 
for well and pump, . . 33 85 
on account of foundation, . 378 00 
on account of architect's ser- 
vices, 150 00 

Amount carried forward, . $709 61 



Dr. 



BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL-HOUSE. 

Paid for addition to lot, . . $439 63 



Dr. 



297 

RECAPITULATION. 

Stark School-House, 
Hallsville Scliool-House lot, . 
Bakersville School-House lot. 
Main Street School-House, 
Ash Street School-House, 

Amount, .... 

Reserved fund transferred, . 

Balance to new account, . 



^3,405 04 

311 00 

439 63 

2,806 34 

709 61 

7,671 62 

5,100 00 

228 38 



113,000 00 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



By Balance from last year. 
Appropriation, 



1511 90 
1,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 


Paid for instruction. 


. 


1726 60 


for printing;, . 




37 75 


for care of rooms. 


. 


94 00 


for fuel, 


. 


180 50 


for lighting rooms. 


. 


48 30 


for furniture. 


. 


23 40 


for repairs, . 


. 


11 25 


for books, 


. 


4 29 


for job team. 


» 


3 50 


for posting notices. 


• 


3 00 


Amount, 


. 1,132 59 


Balance to new 


account, 


379 31 



Cr. 



.,511 90 



Dr. 



11,511 90 



298 



SCHOOLS. 

By Balance from last year, . . |2,292 69 

Appropriation, . . . 45,000 00 

Dog tax, 477 00 

Fogg & James, (overdraft re- 
funded) .... 37 00 
Cash for old books sold, . . 26 30 
Tuition, 122 00 



Cr. 



$47,954 99 



EXPENDITURES. 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



Dr. 



Paid for cleaning houses, 




$54 58 


for job teams. 




70 27 


for shellacking blinds. 




56 95 


for gas. 




42 50 


for carpeting. 




12 28 


for blackboards, 




81 55 


for livery teams, . 




251 00 


for repairing well, 




7 00 


for postage, . 




14 22 


for glazing, . 




9 56 


for masonry at Intermediate 




house. 


. 


29 50 


" at Amoskeag 


house, 


21 00 


for tuning pianos, . 




7 50 


for stone. 


. 


2 50 


for express, . 


. 


16 45 


for salary of Truant Officer, . 


492 00 


for carting wood, . 


. 


24 00 


for pencils, . 


. 


6 00 


for coal hooks, 


, 


4 13 



299 



Paid for cleaning vaults, 
for diplomas, 

for rent of musical instrum'ts 
for shade trees, 
for rep. Lowell St. House, 
for piping Si)ring St. House, 
for lumber, 
for grading lots, 
for rep. pumps, stoves, <&c., 
for chemicals, 
for rep. locks and keys, 
for repairing roof, 
for rent of Smyth's Rail, 
for pails, pipe, dippers, &c., 
for wire cloth, 
for banking house at Bakers 

ville, .... 
for freight, 

for cleaning and rep. stoves, 
for rep. plastering, 
for putting up hooks, 
for hardware, 
for pitch pipes, 
S. Upton, exp. to Marlboro, 
G. B. Dunham for work, 
J. G. Edgerly for cash paid out 
J. L. Kennedy for painting, 
CoUey & Kelly " 
Geo. Hoi brook for carpentei 

work, 
Geo. H. Dudley for carpentei 

work, 
Joel Daniels for painting. 



^48 


50 


57 


Gd 


13 


00 


4 


50 


10 


86 


55 


86 


31 


88 


64 


36 


114 


40 


1 


91 


32 


84 


5 


81 


10 


00 


19 


35 


24 


11 


7 


50 


14 


77 


163 


28 


21 


50 


6 


00 


3 


88 


9 


75 


5 


00 


9 


00 


32 


73 


52 


51 


47 


44 



11 40 

72 50 
2 69 



Amount carried forward. 



2,164 97 



300 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



Dr. 



Paid for black-boards and erasers, 
for pails, baskets, brooms, dust 

ers, &c., 
for thermometers, . 
for pianos, . 
for organ, 
for pointers, . 
for 20 copies manual of com 

merce, 
for ink, pens, books and cray 

ons, .... 
for table and mirror, 
for chemicals, 
for settees and chairs, . 
for pencils and drawing paper 
for mats and carpets, . 
for clock, 
for book-case, 

for maps and numeral frames 
for 5 camps U. S., 
for 2 master's desks, 
for music charts, . 
for ink wells, ... 

Amount, 

Amount bro't forward, (Con 

Ex.) 
Teachers' salaries. 
Care of rooms, . 
Printing and advertising. 



$39 00 

219 03 

14 82 
1,617 25 

90 00 
12 00 

15 00 



79 


69 


20 


00 


2 


40 


147 


75 


49 


44 


51 


08 


5 


50 


20 


00 


94 


43 


35 


00 


120 


00 


80 


00 


10 


40 



2,722 79 



2,164 97 
35,231 66 

2,274 50 
502 61 



301 



Books and stationery. 
Fuel, . 



838 46 

4,185 04 



Amount, .... 47,920 04 
Balance to new account, . 34 96 



•147,954 99 



SOLDIERS' MONUMENT. 






Or. 


By Balance from old account, 


$1,000 00 




Dr. 


Paid investment in State Bonds, Jan, 




1st, 1873, .... 


11,000 00 



LAND SOLD FROM FARM. 

By Balance from old account, . $5,734 85 
Receipts on notes and for land 
sold, 1,885 32 



Outstanding taxes for 1872, 


$31,347 77 


1871, 


11,416 10 


1870, 


8,851 48 


1869, 


7,216 35 


1868, 


5,533 20 


1867, 


6,397 01 



Cr. 



',620 17 



,761 91 



302 
Valuation, Taxes, &c. 



YEAR. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1838 . . 


$555,270 


$2,235 49 


244 


$1 66 


$300 


1839 . . 


604,963 


3,029 84 


427 


2 14 


300 


1840 . . 


946,201) 


3,986 56 


772 


2 20 


300 


1841 . . 


1,229,054 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


300 


1842 . . 


1,430,524 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


300 


1843 . . 


1,598,826 


13.764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


300 


1844 . . 


1,873,286 


13,584 72 


1,053 


2 25 


300 


1845 . . 


2,544,780 


19,246 27 


1,561 


2 30 


300 


184(3 . . 


3,187,726 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


3o0 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


18a0 . . 


5,832.080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


0,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 08 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


2+0 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


•2 10 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644.937 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343.254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,89i;250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


' 240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 .. . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


5,911 


2 24 


100 



303 
City Debt. 



Date of Notes. 


To whom payable. 


When 


payable. 


Principal. 


July 




1854 


City Bonds. 


July 




1874 


20,000 00 


Jan. 




, 1856 


" " ! Jau. 




1880 


10,000 00 


July 




1857 


July 




1877 


22,500 00 


Julv 




1858 


I^ehemiah Hunt. July 




1878 


2,400 00 


July 


22 


1858 


! July 


22 


1878 


1,100 00 


July 




1862 


City Bonds. | July 




1882 


22,500 00 


Jan. 




18G3 


"' '' i Jan. 




1888 


35,000 00 


Oct. 


?)1 


18G3 


Nov. 




1893 


70,000 00 


A])ri] 




1864 


u .l 


A])i'il 




1884 


70,000 00 


July 




18(54 


ii. .. 


July 




1894 


50,000 00 


A]:)!'!! 




18(i5 


u 


April 




1885 


10,000 00 


Aug. 




18(;9 


U (.'. 


Aug. 




1872 


100 00 


Aua;. 




18G9 


U ;i 


Aug. 




1873 


1,500 00 


Aug . 




1869 


li (. 


Aug. 




1874 


1,500 00 


Aug. 




1869 


i. i. 


Aug. 




1875 


1,500 00 


Aug. 




1869 


(.. u 


Aug. 




1876 


1,500 00 


Aug. 




1869 ' " " 


Aug. 




1877 


1,500 00 


Aug. 




1869 


Aug. 




1878 


1,500 00 


Aug. 




1869 " 


Aug. 




1879 


10,000 00 


Aug. 




1869 i " 


Aug. 




1880 


1,500 00 


Aug. 




1869 i " 


Aug. 




1881 


10,000 00 


Aug. 




1869 1 " " 


Aug. 




1882 


1,500 00 


Aug. 




1869 


(. u 


Aug. 




1883 


5,000 00 


Aug. 




1869 


!.<. C. 


Aug. 




1884 


1,500 00 


Aug. 




1869' 


u it 


Aug. 




1885 


1,500 00 


Aug . 




1869 ! " " 


Aug. 




1886 


5,000 00 


Aug. 




1869 j " 


Aug. 




1887 


3,500 00 


Jan. 




1872 Water Bonds. 


Jan. 




1887 


100,000 00 


Jan. 




1872 1 '^ - Jan. 




1892 


100,0(J0 00 


Jau . 




1872 


Jan. 




1897 


100,000 00 


Jan. 




1872 

1 


Jan . 




1902 


100,000 00 



304 



Amount of funded debt Jan. 1, 

1872, . . . . 
Paid during the year, 

Increase during the year, 
(water loan) 



$387,100 00 
25,000 00 

362,100 00 
400,000 00 



Amountof funded debt, Jan. 1,1873, . . $762,100 00 
Amount of temporary loan Jan. 

1," 1872, .... 22,170 00 

Decrease during the year, . 19,871 00 

Amount of temporary loan Jan. 1, 1873, . 2,298 57 

Interest now due, (estimated) . . . 7,000 00 

Outstanding bills Jan. 1, 1873, . . . 47,124 86 

" " for land damage, . . 6,000 00 

Total indebtedness Jan. 1, '73, . . . 824,523 43 



Cash in the Treasury Jan. 

1873, 
Notes due the city, 
Interest on the same. 
Water bonds unsold. 
State bonds on hand. 

Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1873, 
« " Jan. 1, 1872, 



57,426 39 

7,640 13 

475 00 

101,500 00 

123,800 00 



287,842 52 

536,680 91 
430,329 89 



Increase of indebtedness during the year, . 106,351 02 

Attest, JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

City Auditor. 

Note.— The decrease of net indebtedness during the year, 
exclusive of water-works expenses, is $33,892.47.— See page 7. 



eS05 

CITY PROPERTY. 

City Library Building, . . . 

Iron Fence on Commons, 

City Hall and Lot, .... 

City Farm and permanent improvements, 

Stock, tools, furniture, and provisions at City 
Farm, ..... 

Engines, hose and apparatus, 

Engine house and stable, Vine St., 

Reservoirs, ..... 

Hearse, houses, tombs, and new cemetery. 

Court House and lot. 

Common sewers, .... 

Safes, furniture and fixtures at City Hall, 

Street lanterns, posts and pipes. 

Water Works, 

Horses, carts, plows and tools for streets. 

Ward room and lot, Manchester Street, 

Ward room and lot. Park Street, 

Engine house and lot. Ward Seven, 

Water pipe, wagon and apparatus for water 
ing streets, 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad, 

Gravel lot, Lowell Street, . 
" Belmont Street, 

" Ward 7, (one-half acre) 

•' Bakersville, (one acre) 

Fire Alarm Telegraph, 



$20,000 00 
15,700 00 
45,000 00 
17,980 00 

5,571 01 
41,453 88 
15,900 00 
10,000 00 

4,900 00 
50,500 00 
65,000 00 

3,000 00 

2,500 00 
250,000 00 

3,000 00 

3,000 00 
600 00 

2,300 00 

2,000 00 

50,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,200 00 

50 00 

100 00 

12,000 00 



City Report— 20 



,254 89 



306 
SCHOOL PROPERTY. 

Blodgett-street school-house and lot, -^3,000 00 

Movable funiiture, maps, charts, etc., loO 00 
Bridge-street house and lot, . 

Old High school-house and lot, . 6,500 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 200 00 

New High school-house, . . 45,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, charts, 

books and apparatus, . . 2,000 00 

Wilson-Hill house and lot, . . 3,300 00 

Moval)le furniture, maps, etc., . 125 00 

Merrimack-street house and lot, . 15,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 350 00 

Manchester-street house and lot, . 8,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 300 00 

Park-street house and lot, . . 8,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 400 00 

Franklin-street house and lot, . 18,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 400 00 

Spring-street house and lot, . . 14,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 400 00 

Stark house and lot, . . . 3,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 200 00 

Bakersville house and lot. . . 3,400 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 75 00 

Goff's Falls house and lot, . . 3,600 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 100 00 

House and lot near Harvey's, . 2,500 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., , 50 00 

House and lot near Clough's mill, . 500 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 50 00 

Hallsville house and lot, . . 3,400 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 75 00 

Massabesic house and lot, . . 1,400 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 40 00 



13,150 00 
500 00 

6,700 00 



47,000 00 
3,425 00 

15,350 00 
8,300 00 
8,400 00 

18,400 00 

14,400 00 
3,200 00 
3,475 00 
3,700 00 
2,550 00 
550 00 
3,475 00 
1,440 00 



307 



Mosquito Pond house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc.. 
Center-street house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc.. 
Ash-street lot, 
Lincoln-street house and lot, . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc.. 
South house and lot, 'Squog, . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Amoskeag house and lot. 

Movable furniture, maps, etc.. 
Main-street house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc.. 

Amount of School Property, 
"• City Property, 

Total Property, . 



. 1,000 


00 






50 


00 


1,050 


00 


. 5,000 


00 






125 


00 


5,125 


00 






3,000 


00 


. 50,000 


00 






400 


00 


50,400 


00 


. 2,800 


00 






60 


00 


2,860 


00 


. 3,700 


00 






125 


00 


3,825 


00 


. 12,000 


00 






100 


00 


12,100 


00 






222,375 


00 




$ 


632,254 


89 




854,629 


89 



NAMES OF OFFICEES AND MEMBEES OF EXCELSIOE HOOK 
AND LADDEE COMPANY NO. 1, FOE 1873. 



The following list having been omitted from its proper place, 
is inserted here. 



OFFICERS, 

James M. Jewell, Foreman. 

A. L. Robertson, Assistant Foreman. 

N. Southard, Clerk. 

Joel Daniels, Treasurer. 

C. Can field, /Steward. 

MEMBERS. 



Geo. E. Glines, 
H. P. Young, 
P. A. Senter, 
J. N. Chase, 
T. H. Pike, 
E. A. G. Holmes, 
Geo. H. Dudley, 
L. Flint, 
Geo. Bacon, 
G. L. Leach, 
C. A. Clough, 
C. E. Duntley, 
E. W. Polsom, 



D. M. K. Phillips, 
L. E. Pike, 

J. F. Sargent, 
Chas. Harvey, 
S. Worthen, 
J. S. Dennett, 
W. 0. Davidson, 
H. H. Cole, 
A. A. Haselton, 
Wm. L. Leavitt, 
Martin "Win gate, 

E. Wason. 



INDEX 



Abatement of Taxes 
Alarm Telegraph 

Boxes and keys 
Amoskeag Falls Bridge 

Engine Co. 'No. 1 

Hose Co. 
Apparatus, Fire 

School 
Ash-Street School-house 
Attendance at School 
Awards for land taken for highways 
Auditor, Special Report of 

Bakersville School-house 
Bridge, Granite 

Granite-Street Iron 

Amoskeag Falls . 
Buildings, Repairs of 
Library . 

City Government, 1872 . 
1873 . 

Library 

Hall Improvements 

Hall .... 

Farm 

Teams, 

Treasurer's Accounts 
Cemeteries 
Commons 
County Tax 
Course of Study 
Contingent Expenses, (Schools) 

Debt, City . . . . 
City, payment of . 

Expenditures in detail 

Examination of candidates for schools 



. 276 . 

81, 82, 89, 260 
. 85 
. 250 

71,81,82,254 
80, 82, 258 
. 88 
. 173 
. 296 
148, 178 
. 247 
. 57 

. 297 

. 250 

. 251 

. 250 

. 272 

. 274 

. 19 
. 43 

31, 95, 269 

37, 263 

. 262 

115, 235 

. 237 

. 61 

34, 253 

34, 252 

. 275 

162, 197 

. 298 

7,303 
. 292 

. 229 
. 191 



310 



Employment of children in the mills 
E. W. HaiTiugton Engine Co, No. 3 
Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 
Engineer's Department 

Report, . 
Engine Houses, 
Evening Schools 

Farm, City 

Finances 

Fire Alarm Telegraph 

Fence, Iron 

Fire Department, 

King 
Fires, 1872 

Firemen's Relief Association 
Furniture and Supplies, (Schools) 

GofF's Falls Hose Co. 
Government, City, 1872 

187.3 _ 
Graduates of High and Grammar schools 
Granite Bridge 

Street Iron Bridge 

Hallsville School-house . 
Highway District No. 1 . 

No. 2 . 

No. 3 . 

No. 4 . 

No. 5 . 

No. 6 . 

No. 7 . 

No. 8 . 

No. 9 . 

No. 10 . 

No. 11 . 

No. 12 . 

No. 13 . 
Highways and Bridges 
New . 

Awards for lands taken for 
Hospital, City . 

Iron Fence around Merrimack Square 

Inaugural Address of Hon. Chas. H. Bartlett 

Iron Bridge, Granite Street 

Incidental Expenses 

Insurance 

Interest 

Land sold from farm 
Damage awards 



; 156 

74, 81, 83, 256 

78, 82, 257, 308 

80, 258 

. 71 

. 92 

. 154, 297 

38, 2?o 

5 27 

81,' 82, [9 260 

. 260 

13, 32, 2.54 

73, 81, 83, 255 

. 89 

. 73 

. 300 

79, 82, 258 

19 

43 

145 

250 

250 

295 
238 
239 
240 
240 
241 
241 
242 
242 
243 
243 
244 
245 
245 

11,35 
246 
247 

15,39 

260 

23 

251 

264 

272 
290 

301 
247 



311 



Library, City . 

Building 

Donations to 
Librarian's Eeport . 
Lincoln-Street School-house 
Liquor Agency 
Loan, Temporary 

Monument, Soldiers' 

M^i"t-!Srect School-house 

Militia .... 

Miscellaneous Expenses of Fire Department 

Names of Teachers 

New School-houses and Lots 

Night Watch . 

N. S. Bean Engine Co. No. 4 

Officers, City . 
Outstanding Taxes . 
Overseers oi i-'oor, Eeport of 

Payment of City Debt . 
Paving Streets. . . . 
Paupers ol! Farm . 
Pennacook Hose Company No. 1 
Pest House .... 
Pine Grove .... 
Police Department . 
Station . . 
Printing and Advertising (Schools) 

Stationery 
Propertv, School 
City 

Repairs of School-houses 

Buildings 

City Hall 
Reservoirs 
Revenue Accovnit . 
Report, Order to print 27th Annual 
of Finance Committee 

Special Auditor 

Committee on Cemeteries 
City Farm 

Chief Engineer 

Trustees of City Library 

Librarian 

Overseers of Poor 

School Committee 

Supt. of Public Instruction 

Salaries of Officers .... 
Teachers 



81, 84 



31, 95, 269 
. 274 
. 1(7 
. 105 
179, 93 
. 290 
. 291 

. 301 

. 297 

. 275 

. 258 

. 142 

. 295 

. 48 
76, 81, 84, 256 

43, 269 
301 
115 

292 

248 

234 

,258 

38 

253 

33, 261 

15 
300 
271 
306 
3b5 

292 

272 

263 

253 

231 

2 

55 

57 

61 

117 

71 

95 

105 

115 

123 

137 

262 
300 



312 



Schools 
School Report . 

Department , 
High . 

Houses and Lots 
House, Stark 

Lincoln Street 
Ash Street 
Bakersville 
Hallsville 
Main Street 
Evening 

Superintendent's Report of 
Studies, Programme of 

Course of . 
Sewers and Drains . 
Soldiers' Monument 
Streets, Lighting 
Watering 
Paving 
State Tax 

Taxes, Abatement of 

Discount on 

Summary of 

Outstanding 
Temporary Loan 
Telegraph, Pire Alarm 
Teams, City . 

Valuation, Taxes, «fec. 

Valley 

Valedictory of Hon. P. C 

Water Works . 
Watering Streets 



Cheney 



9, 29, 225, 298 
. 123 

121, 223 

219 

10, 139, 295 

. 297 

. 293 

. 296 

296, 297 
. 297 

296, 297 

154, 297 
. 137 
. 216 
, 162 
. 251 
16, 37, 301 
. 249 
. 248 
. 248 
. 275 



. 276 

. 290 

. 302 

. 301 

. 291 
82, 89, 260 

. 237 



81, 



. 302 
62, 66, 253 
3 

7, 28, 291 
. 248